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INTERNATIONAL 



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PublishedWith The New York Times and The Washington Post 


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PARIS, TUESDAY* DECEMBER 17, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 188: 



•^>?W orr y Expressed 


^t)ver Ver, Kamos 

BySeth Mydans •. 

Afcw York Times Service ' . 

y--- MANILA ■— President Ferdi- 
'-’inland R Marcos said Monday he 
■'vas preparedto file charges if neo 
^! : .ssary against senior -militar y afB- 
: v - .'.^Vers to belp resolve a factional dis- 
aJs? ^ wute that he said was dividing the 
j^^^-'Jliflippine armed forces. 

■j •« “We have never admitted this,” 
■ : ' V.-^dr.-Marcos said in an interview, 

1 ■ ■« •-. 


es Split in Military Mine Kills 


; of General Ver and 
of General Ramos, they 
Ci.^ne all sitting on their hanncbcs. 

. . .^^fhey are watching each other.” 

“ , : '=!*"' General Fabian G Ver is the 
' - ^>nned forces chief of staff. He was 
•’• Reinstated on Dec. 3, the day after 
-cij^Ne was acquitted on charges of in- 
- • • /olvenjem in the 1983 assassina- 

u of the opposition leader Beat-, 
•j'^jno S. Aquino Jr. 

General Fidel C. Ramos, Gener- 
fj .1 Vet's deputy, served in iris place 
injuring his year’s leave after bang 
icr. i m plicated in the Aquino assassina- 
r *W,:v Toil During that year. General Ra> 
; Z nos became the focus for hopes for 
r r J »Oeform. He hinted that he ..would- ' 
.. onsider resigning his commission 
" ..t- *_£? General Ver were reinstated. 

“I called the two generals,” Mr.- 
■ --‘^darcos said, “and told them, ’I 
•.V-i^vant you to can all these people 
• nd tell <h*i*i ltn« Hm got tO 

p*. ’ , *J_ 

i.-I; .f fi ~ (Continued on Page 6, CoL 5) 



Ferdinand E. Marcos 


Corazoa C Aqtrino 


AqoinoIUajSeek 

Trial of Marcos 

% Seth Mydans 

New York Tunes Service 

MANILA — The opposition 
candidate for president, Corazoa 
C. Aquino, said Sunday that if she 
was elected Feb. 7 she would prob- 
ably put President Ferdinand R 
Marcos on trial for the murder of 

her friwthafl/t 

“Iwfllfile charges against him,” 
she said. She modified her state- 
ment later to say: “Maybe I w£Q be 
one of many. Maybe it doesn't even 
have to be me.” 

Da an interview at her home after 
a rally to launch her election cam- 
paign, Mrs. Aquino said she did 
not have a specific program erf gov- 
ernment and Thar “the only thing I 
can really offer the Filipino people 
is my sincerity." 

She said she had told supporters 
who urged her to ran, "What on 
earth do I know about being presi- 
dent?” 

Taking part in the interview were 
AH Rosenthal, executive editor 
of The New York Times, and War- 
ren Hoge, the paper's foreign edi- 
tor. 

Mrs. Aquino, who says she is not 
a poHtidaa and became a candi- 
date reluctantly, appeared uncer- 
tain about some of the key issues 
involved in foe election. 

“Til have to admit to you, Tm 

(Continued on Frige 6, CoL 6) 


6 in South 
Africa 

Army Threatens 
Zimbabwe After 
Border Blast 


Fi ; 


Lange Says 
France Could 
Hold Agents 

United Press IntenuaUmol 

* WELLINGTON, New Zealand 
In a surprising reversal. Prime 

- , . .^JEnisler David Lange said Mon- 
w ^ay that two French secret agmts 
“* nprisoned for manslaughter in the 
3NAL HHiTfimbing of the Rainbow Warrior 
. . -• r(rB ^ f right be sent home before their 
<rui - miences are finished if France 
nomised to keep them in juisoa. 
c:, ^' : Mr. Lange, linked -flhe return, of 
. I- agents to New’ Zealand's de- 

- '...« :^,Tiandfor$16miIlkmmconmeosa- 

oa from France for the sinking of 
tJ x Greenpeace ship in Auckland 
harbor on July 10. France sabo- 
^iged the ecology group’s vessel to 
it from taking part in a protest 
*4 a French nudear test 
£* Mr. Lange said Monday he 
^ould never negotiate “a release to 
tataeedom” for the agents. He had 
aeviously declared that the two 
^'Senls would serve their 10-year 
t«3iiences in New Zealand. 

France admitted sending the 

- j^ents, Captain Dommique Prieur, 

and Mqcr Alain Mafart, 33, to 
.atow up the boat A Greenpeace 
hotographer was killed. 

^ Mr. Lange said that if his nation 
-oiqreed to send the agents to 
prance, he “would want to know 
£r tat there are guarantees that they 
tfre going to be imprisoned.” 

5 'f 3 Asked if their return would be 

^ rought up at the compensation 
iUcs in New York, which are 
■called, Mr. Lange said: “After 
Rf hat I said now 1 have no doubt 
a 'tga iat it will be.” 

• He said it was “totally unrealis- 
rf to talk about releasing the 
^nts “anywhere in the near fu- 

-^■^Lmiger term, 1 don’t know vriiat 
^ight happen there, but it would be 
gay kmg term,” be continued. 
'And I want to teD you that this 
government is not prepared to ne- 
**sriate a release to freedom of 
(Uose two people under any tir- 
ades.” 


U.S. Budget Cuts: Squeeze lor GAO 


By George Lardner Jr. 

Washington Pan Service 

WASHINGTON —Hie Gen- 
eral Accounting Office, which 
will have the final word on SI 1 .7 
hill ion in cuts suddenly demand- 
ed by the new act to balance the 
budget, will have just five days, 
including a weekend, to deliver 
its verdict to the pre^dent. 

“We’D just have to drop other 
work, but the problem isn’t going 
to be finding enough bodies,” the 
GAQ’s general counsel, Harry R. 
Van Cfeve; said last wedc “It’s 
gmng to be fine 
pie with the required : 

Under the sew legislation, al- 
ready being challenged in court, 
the Office of Management and 
Budget and the Congressional 
Budget Office would do the ini- 
tial work of calculating program- 
by-program spending reductions 


for mula 


under .a 

spelled out in die MIL 
Their report, as one congres- 
sional s ummar y pits it, “would 
contain all of the information 
needed to prepare the presiden- 
tial order” for the president’s sig- 


Reagan gambles that Ms visit 
to Capitol HU! w£D salvage tax 
reform. Page 3. 

nature “and,, in essence, would 
constitute a draft enter.” 

The draft is to be seat to the 
GAO on Jan. 15, and, the head of 
that agency. Comptroller Geper- 
al Chules A-’Bowsher, would be 
requited to liave it reviewed. 

Under the law, the president is 
obligated to rniptemant cuts set 
out in Mr. Bowsher’s report 
GAO offiraalc said they were 
ruefully envisi oning such head- 
lines as “Comptroller General 
Cuts School Lunches.” 


Such critics of the law as Alan 
B. Morrison, head of the Public 
Citizen Litigation 'Group, main- 
tain that the GAO is simply 
meant to give a quick Messing to 
the cuts md cast “an attempted 
constitutional gloss” over the 
procedure. 

“They’ve never done a tiring 
with the budget,” be said. “Now 

they have three working days to 
review an extraordinarily com- 
plicated report with people who 
have no expertise in the field.” 

Under a 1976 Supreme Court 
riweiri/wij appointed ontdele $x~ 
erasing "pgrufMPtat authority . 
pursuant to die laws of the Unit- 
ed States” must be appointed by 
the president. While the GAO is 
generally coosidcxed a congres- 
sional watchdog an the pdbEc 
purse, the comptroller general, 
unfike the director of the Con- 
gressional Budget Office, is a 
presidential appciatec- 


By Andrew Torchia 

The Associated Press 

JOHANNESBURG — Six 
whiles were killed and five were 
figured seriously when their truck 
bit a land mine near the border 
with Zimbabwe, an army spokes- 
man said. Defense Minister Mag- 
nus Malan, threatgraH Zimbabwe 
on Monday with retaliation. 

The African National Congress 
claimed responsibility for the inci- 
dent, which took place late Sunday. 

Tom Scbina, spokesman for the 
outlawed guerrilla organization in 
Lusaka, Zambia, said that the ex- 
plosion and other recent attaelrg 
claimed by the group represented 
an intensification of the armed 
struggle against white-minority 
rule m South Africa. 

General Malan ThrMiwnwl South 
African military retaliation across 
the border if Zimbabwe did not 
crack down on what South Africa 
has described as guerrilla infiltra- 
tion from its northern neighbor. 

Zimbabwe has denied that the 
rebels operate from its territory 
and has accused South Africa of 
massing troops on its border. 

{An army spokesman, said the 
urine that exploded Sunday was 
planted at the time as those 
that exploded last month. The New 
York Times reported from Johan- 
nesburg. Soldiers have found and 
defused four other land mines in 
the area and have maintained dail y 

patrols along the border with Zim- 
babwe.] 

The -two famili es involved in the 
land urine explosion were of Afri- 
kaner descent. 

Mr. Sebina denied that the guer- 
rittas were based in Zimbabwe. He 
said the mines were planted by 
guerrillas units “based in and oper- 
ating within South Africa.” 

The South African Press Associ- 
ation quoted General Malan as 
saying Monday. “South Africa wiD . 
nottolerate such actions and I must 
warn that this could lead to a situa- 
tion similar to that of SWAFO in 
Angola.” 

Sooth African forces have re- 
peatedly invaded Angola to attack 
guerrillas of the South-West Africa 
People’s Organization. SWAPO 

(Co ntinue d on Page 6, CoL 4) 


Europe Balks at Accepting Lead Economic Role 


1 1 


■*> 


By Paul Lewis 

New York Times Service 

PARIS — Once again. Western Europe is 
being urged to serve as locomotive” for the 
world's economy. Bui its governments, seared 
by the problems that followed Europe's last 
time in the global leade rs hip role, are balking. 

The pressure, cooring from diverse quarters, 
is intense; The Reagan administration, the In- 
ternational Monetary Fund, the Orgamzatioa 
for Economic Cooperation and Development 
and many poHcy-makers and academic econo- 
mists are urging European nations to step up 
economic growth by lowering taxes and increas- 
ing government spending. 

“Europe is not doing enough to fill the growth 
gap left by the U.R,” said Professor Richard 
Portes, who directs the Center for Economic 
Research in London. 

Without greater vigor in Europe, it is feared, 
the slowdown from 19WS rapid growth rate in 
the United Stales will leave the whole Weston 
economy growing at a dangerously slow rate in 

coming years. That would make it harder for the 

United Stales to cut its trade deficit and resist 


protectionism. Sluggish growth in Europe also 
would hurt Third Wodd exports and increase 
the risk of a new debt crisis, and it would push 
Europe's already high unemployment rate even 
higher. 

So far, however. West Germany and Britain, 
the two countries best positioned to help the 
world economy grow faster, axe refuting any 
sig nificant relaxation of their present tight eco- 
nomic policies. The two countries argue that 
greater stimulation would sacrifice the progress 
they have made in curbing mfintinn and gettin g 
public spending under control 

In October, the European Community’s Ex- 
ecutive Commission urged economically stron- 
ger members such as West Germanyand Britain 
to adopt more expansionary pafioes, including 
broad tax cuts and increased government 
spending. Otherwise, the commission warned, 
growth in Europe would be stuck at about 23 
percent a year fra: the rest of the decade; with no 
significant fall in the JECs 1 1 -percent jobless 
rate. 

“A disorderly adjustment process in. the U.S. 
and a worsening ot the developing countries’ 


debt problems would make the outlook even 
more gloomy,” the couamstion added. 

The consensus among economic forecasters is 
that the U.S. economy will slow from an unsus- 
tainable 6.8-percent rate of growth last year to 
around 3 percent this year and next. As a result, 
growth in the industrial wodd as a whole win 
fall from 4.9 percent in 1984 to 3 percent this 
year and in 1986. West Earope’s contribution 
w31 be unchanged at about 23 percent in each 
of these three years. 

But the IMF, the OECD and many private 
economists believe that a 3-percent growth for 
the Western industrialized countries is the nrixu- 
mum [needed to enaMcThiid Wodd countries to 
pay interest and principal on their debts, the 
United States to slowly correct its trade deficit 
and Europe to avoid a further rise in unengjloy- 
menL 

Further wwipUflUing matters is the agree- 
ment to devalue the dollar that was announced 
in September in New Yoric by the United States, 
Japan, West Germany, Britain and France. A 
lower dollar would hop make American goods 
(Continued on Plage 17, CoL 1) 



Jumper Takes Rescuer With Him 

A Boston fireman, Walter McGinn, tried to hold William 
Dolan as he threatened to jump from an elevated highway. 
Bat as Mr. McGinn gpt a grip, Mr. Dolan plunged, taking the 
fireman with him. They landinti in a net held by nine firemen 
30 feet below. Mr. Dolan, 28, was unhurt, bat Mr. McGinn, 
35, and four firemen holding the net were slightly figured. 



From Gander, a Message to Crash Victims 9 Families 

By Christopher S. Wren 

New York Tima Service 



Tin flt M P QWt 

the American flag to 
of Phfladdphia after the 
for the crash victims. 


GANDER, Newfoundland — 
The chiving snow had abated but a 
bitter wind rattled the flags Dying 
at half-staff when Gander’s towns- 
people turned out to mourn the 256 
Americans killed m last week’s air 
disaster. 

The Newfo undlander s, bundled 
against the arid, ovofiDed Sl Mar- 
tin's Anglican Procathedral, where 
the ecumenical service was held 
Sunday. When no more could fit in, 
they spilled down die street to Sl 
J oseph's Roman Catholic Church 
to fo&ow on a closed-circuit televi- 
sion set. 

They never knew the soldiers 
from the 101st Airborne Division 
who had filed sleepy-eyed before 
dawn Thursday into the transit 
lounge of Gander. International 
AitporL 

There the soldiers bought home- 
coming gifts, sang impromptu 
-Christmas carols, -and phoned 
loved ones before embariring on the 
final leg of a flight back from ax 
months of peaceiEeepmg duty with 
the 11-natron force in the Smai 
Peninsula. 

The town woke to the explosion 
that lit up the woods beyond the 
nmway when the DC-8 jethuer. 
cratiied after takeoff, JaHmg all 248 
soldiers and the eight crew mem-- 
bers aboard. Investigators have yet 


to determine what caused, the 
crash, Canada’s worst domestic 
a viation disaster. 

The victims, who had been lying 
in a temporary morgue inside an 
airport hangar, were flown to Do- 
ver, Delaware, starting Monday. 
The thousand or more Gander 
townspeople at the service Sunday 


who titrated the access of television 
crews and photographers. “We are 
feeling for all those people across 
the United States wno. lost their 
sons and daughters.” 

Captain Stephen French, of the 
Salvation Army, led townspeople 
m read^responsiveNfnHn Psalm 
46, which refers to God as “our 


“In Newfoundland, it's one way 
of a community working through a 
grieving process,” the deputy may- 
or, Sandra Kelly, said in an inter- 
view earlier. “People always expect 
that when something happens, ev- 
erybody hangs together here. The 
phone just kept ringing and people 
were asking, 'Are yon going to do 


Hie town woke to ike explosion that lit up the woods beyond the 
nmway when the DC-8 jetliner crashed after takeoff, killing all 248 
soldiers and the eight crew members aboard. 


cause because they wantedto let the 
gra vin g American familie s at Fart 
Campbell, Kentucky, and else- 
where know that they cared. 

. The hour-long manorial service 
in the snug, white clapboard church 
sounded not one false note in its 
outpouring of affection and sym- 
pathy for what the Andean rectOT, 
the Reverend James Red, called 
the town’s “extended farnfly” in the 
United States. 

Though dignitaries like New- 
foundland’s lieutenant governor, 
Anthony B. Pfiddon, and the U.S. 
ambassador, Thomas Niles, arrived 
to take part, the gesture belonged 
to the town. 

“Tbi* is not a media event; this is 
a memorial service” said Douglas 
B. Sheppard, the mayor of Gander r 


refuge and strength, a very present 
beta in trouble.” 

They listened as the Reverend 
Frank Curtis, the pastor of the 
United Church, read verses from 
Sl PauFs first letter to foe Corin- 
thians about the Resurrection. At 
the end, foe Newfoundlanders sang 
the “Battle Hymn at the Republic.” 

The Reverend Edward Bromley, 
foe town’s Catholic priest, said m 
his homily that foe disaster had 
made Gander reflect on its own 
fragility. He asked that the town 
remember “our brothers and sisters 
in the United States” who lost 
loved ones in foe crash. 

The memorial service was con- 
ceived by foe six local churches in 
Gander, a town rf 12^)00 that grew 
up around the airport here. 


this? People would have been very 
upset if we hadn’t done it” 

Gander experienced two lesser 
crashes in 1946 and 1967, though 
this tinK it was harder to help, Miss 
Kelly said, became than were no 
-survivors to care for. 

Copies of a videotape of Sun- 
day’s service will be sent to Fort 
Campbell for distribution to fam- 
Sies who want to know more about 
this faraway corner of North 
America where their loved ones 
died. 

■ Reagan Plays Tribute 

David Hoffman of The Washing- 
ton Post reported from Ton Camp- 
bell: 

President Ronald Reagan paid 
tribute Monday to the soldiers who 


Shultz 

Meets 

Kadar 


Um SL Sees Chance 
Of Wider Contact 
With East Bloc 

By Bernard Gwen zm an 

New York Times Service 

BUDAPEST — Secretary of 
Slate George P. Shultz said Mon- 
day that East- West relations were 
now at “a very important moment” 
that could lead to a strengthening 
of ties between foe United States 
and the Communist states of East 
Europe. 

Following a meeting with Janos 
Kadar, the Hungarian leader. Mr. 
Shultz said that if Soviet -American 
relations continued to make pro- 
gress, “in foe normal course of 
events.” he would expect to see 
more trade and cultural exchanges 
with Soviet bloc nations. 

Mr. Shultz, for foe first time on 
his three-nation trip to East Eu- 
rope. noted foe possibility for wid- 
er and more productive ties if meet- 
ings between President Ronald 
Reagan and Mikhail S. Gorbachev, 
foe Soviet leader, produced con- 
crete results. 

A senior aide to Mr. Shultz said 
that Mr. Kadar and other Hungar- 
ian leaders stressed foe role that an 
easing in Soviet-American rela- 
tions would play in foe ability of 
East Europeans to move more flex- 
ibly in international affairs. 

In sharp contrast to his talks 
Sunday in Bucharest with Presi- 
dent Nkolae Ceausescu. in which 
Mr. Shultz expressed U.S. concern 
about human rights in Ro mania 
and warned that Romania was in 
danger of losing its most-favored- 
nation trade status. Mr. Shultz 
praised the leadership of Mr. Ka- 
dar. 

He said that he was sympathetic 
to Hungary's request that its most- 
favored-nation status be awarded 
on a longer term baas than foe 
current annual extension. Hungar- 
ian officials complained, Mr. 
Shultz said, that under current U.S. 
law they could only be certain of 
retaining foe preferential tariffs on 
a yearly basis. 

This makes it difficult for Hun- 
garian exporters and U.S. import- 
ers to engage in long-term planning 
because they cannot be certain that 
the tariffs will not be increased. 

Mr. Shultz said that he assured 
his hosts that there was no danger 
of foe United States revoking Hun- 
gary’s trade preference. 

In contrast, there are three bills 
pending in congress to strip Roma- 
nia of most-favored-nation status 
because of purported arrests and 
persecution of some Christian 
sects. 

Mr. Ceausescu and Mr. Shultz 
agreed Sunday to set up machinery 
under which Ugh officials in Wash- 
ington and Bucharest would deal 
directly with charges that human 
rights were being violated in Roma- 
nia, a senior U.S. official said. 

Mr. Ceausescu, according to a 
U.S. official, denied there had been 
persecution of Christians. He as- 
serted that the Romanian Ortho- 
dox Church was foe savior of Ro- 
mania during the long years of 
Turkish occupation and that Ro- 
mania was a “Christian country.” 

He also criticized foe United 
States far failing to provide Roma- 
nia with high- technology products 
even though Romania is regarded 
by the United States as indepen- 
dent of foe Soviet Union in foreign 
policy. 

Romanian exports to the United 
Stales reached SI billion last year 
while U.5. exports to Romania 
were only about $200 million. This 
gave Romania a huge trade surplus. 


died in foe crash and offered solace 
to their families. 

“In life they were our heroes, in 
death our loved ones, our dar- 
lings,” he said. 

“I know that there are no words 
that can make your pain less, or 
makeyour sorrow less painful; how 
I wish that were," Mr. Reagan 
told members of 13S families and 
several hundred soldiers who gath- 
ered in a hanger ai Fon Campbell 

“But df one thing we can be sure: 
as a poet said of other young sol- 
diers m another war, they will never 
grow old, they will always be 
young,” Mr. Reagan sakL “And we 
know one thing with every bit at 
our thinking — they are now in the 
arms of God.” 

Then the president and Nancy 
Reagan personally comforted every 
family member. Moving slowly 
through the hanger. Mr. Reagan 
greeting them aQ with both arms 
outstretched, storing tributes to the 
fallen soldiers. His wife embraced 
family members. 

The scene brought lean to sol- 
diers of foe 101st Airborne Divi- 
sion who had returned to the Unit- 
ed States foe week before. 

Investigators found foe DC-8 
suddenly veered sod lost speed 
before it crashed. Page 4. 


INSIDE 

■ Angola indicated at a ruling 

party congress that it would not 
slacken Soviet ties. Page L 

■ Fearing a ‘raid’ on the state's 

water, Utah has taken over a 
federal project. Page 3. 

■ An opponent of Chancellor 
Helmut Kohl began his cam- 
paign in West Germany.Page 4. 

■ South Korean leaders will 

pursue talks with North Korea 
m the new year. Page 5. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ Economists said the United 
States would probably have 
slightly higher economic 
growth next year. Page 11. 

■ IVfidcou Coqu, the pipeline 

company, is foe target of a SL6- 

bOlion takeover bid. Page 11. 

tomorrow 

Despite confuaon about a US. 


- — ■■ ■■ — >iii mu iggc 

program is moving ahead with tt 

momtotum that will be Hard to 
stop. The first of three articles 
appears tomorrow. 


5 


-tt:- 







Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRmDNE, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17,1985 


**R 



UNIVERSITY 

DEGREE 


W0BDKS • MASIBK • DQCTORME 
tar WvK A c uil w i*; tf» Qp .lr nw i 


Send detailed resume 
for free evaluation. 


PACIFIC WESTERN UNVBSITY 


000 N. Sepulveda Bivd.. 
Las Angeles, Californio 
90W9, Dept. 23. U4LA. 


Angola Congress Indicates Soviet Ties Remain Firm W ORLD B RIEF S 

^ CP z : i . n_ o* ' -jm 


The flavour 
of an island 
in a single 
malt 



SCOTCH WHISKY 


mmmm 


By James Brooke 

New York Timet Service 

LUANDA Angola — If the 

statements heard at a party con- 
gress last week are any indication, 
Angola is not about to lessen its ties 
to the Soviet Union or ease out 
30,000 Cuban troops helping to 
figh t a 10-year bum war against 
an tj-Conranmiat guerrillas. 

Hie congress, me second held by 
the ruling Manrist-Leoutist Popu- 
lar Movement for the liberation, of 
Angola since independence bom 
Portugal a decade ago, rang with 
speeches of bravura and defiance 
of the West 

President Jbs6 Eduardo dos San- 
tos warmly praised Havana and 

Moscow, and linked the United 
States to Sooth Africa, his main 
external enemy. 

“Warlike circles of the United 

States of America persist in encour- 
aging racist South Afdca to contin- 
ue an aggressive and d**t*hfliring 
policy against neighboring coun- 
tries,'* he said at the dosing sesszon. 

He vowed that Angola would 
never again be “colonized or sub- 
jected to any form of domination.” 

Angola has become the focus of 
an important foreign policy deci- 
sion for the Reagan administration. 
After a decad e of nomnvbtament 
in the Angolan dvO war, Washing- 
ton is considering pnmdiiig open 
or covert aid to the anti-govern- 
ment farces of Jonas Savimbi, 
which control a large part of south- 
ern Angola. 

Mr. Savimbi is openly supported 
by South Africa, whose apartheid 
regime is anmhamn to much of 
blade Africa. 

Washington has kng been trying 
to negotiate a comprehensive peace 
agreement in southern Africa in 
which Cubans would leave Angola 
in exchange for a South African 
departure bom South-West Africa. 
Pretoria rules that taritory, also 


Hie U.S. threat of aid 
to the rebels seems 
only to have made the 
government ding 
more to Cohan troops 
helping to fight die 
bush war. 



p ressed skepticism last week that 
the regional peace talks would lead 
anywhere. 

*The At 


U ganda Accord to Be Signed Today 


Angolans see negotiations 
as a stalling operation to stave oft 
aid for UNITA,” a Western diplo- 
mat said. 

An African diplomat said: 
“With the people elected to the new 
central committee, the Americans 

should expect a tougher stand.** 

■ Hemimin Escbroo, general di- 
rector of the state oil company, 
Sonangd, said, “How is it possible 
that U.S. companies can have im- 
portant investments in Angola, and 
their government is ready to fi- 
nance terrorists ready to destroy 
those US. assets?” 

Although die United States does 
not have diplomatic relations with 
Angola, U.S. companies in cooper- 
ation with the stale oil company 
produce about 70 parent of Ango- 
la’s oiL Last year, the United States 
bought about half the country’s oO 
production. 


NAIROBI (AP) — The _ 

las have completed work on a 

Tuesday, Kenya’s president announced Monday mgtt- 
President Daniel arap Moi, who has medi a t ed off-and-on talks. be- . 
tween the two rides since August, was flanked by leaden of the risaJ 
delegations as he made the announcement outside his office. 

MnMri early last week said the treaty would be signed Friday, only to/ 
have his plans Unrated by disputes between Uganda's m2itmy govern-. 

and the National Resistance Army. But Monday night's anaoaacc. 
mem differed from the previous are in that h was made m the presence # 
Uganda’s bead of state, General Tito Okdlo, and the guerrilla cornzmmd-' 
or, Yoweri Museveni. : ; ' 


Offer for UPI Might Be Withdrawn 


WASHINGTON (WP) — A Mexican newspaper publisher, Mario 
Vazquez Rana, has threatened to withdraw his offer of $41 million for , 
United Press International unless a federal bankruptcy jadge^noi«a>: 

twplimm.nl 1 ‘ * ‘ 

Ant 

Bason . . 

would do “incalculable damage to UPL” Mr. Vazquez and a _ 
financier, Joe Rosso, agreed last month to purchase UPL The news 
agency filed in April for protection under Chapter 11 of the Federal- 
Bankruptcy Coda 


ited Press International unless a lateral oanKrupicyjnagMppio^si' 

teSe^irai^ tdd Judge Georgs F. ' 
ion that the court’s failure to approve the pre&mnary agreement! 


Jos6 Eduardo dos Santos 


known as Namibia, in of 

the United Nations. 

Reagan administration officials 
have said disbursement of aid to 
the rebels win be delayed until ear- 
ly next year, in hopes that the 
threat of aid wiB force Luanda to 
set a timetable for getting the Cu- 
bans to leave. 

But the congress speeches indi- 
cated the thww so far at 
has o nly marifttlw. An gnlim yi wra- 
meat chug more to the Cubans. 

Some diplomats and others said 
they believed that Mr. Savimbfs 
National Union for the Total Inde- 
pendence of Angola, which is 
known by its Portuguese acronym, 
UNITA, has become so strong that 


the ruling party would be toppled if 
h were not for the Cubans. 

The weeklang party congress, 
the first in five yearn, elected a new 
central committee, which wiU serve 
until 1990. It is dominated by army 
commandos. 

Mr. Dos Santos, reading from a 
report prepared by the outgoing 
central committee, said: 

*The Soviet Union with its mate- 
rial, moral, political and diplomatic 
support continues to be the do? 
pendable rear guard of all people 
who struggle for freedom and inde- 
pendence. Cuba’s soos have irrigat- 
ed our sacred soil with tbeir Wood 
and have supported, shoulder-to- 
shoulder with their Angolan broth- 


ers, the defense of the conquest of 
the revolution against external ag- 
gressions.” 

He also said: “The racist state of 
South Africa- has become the faith- 
ful gmml|iwi of the strategic inter- 
ests of the U.S. in somhori Africa." 

In July (he Angolans, angered by 
tite repeal of US. legislation pre- 
venting aid to Mr. Savimbi, sus- 
pended negotiations with Sooth 
Africa tb»t US. officials have bro- 
kered to- three years. 

In November, the talks resumed. 
The i*b‘rf U.S. negotiator, 

A. Crocker, assistant secretary of 
state for African affairs, is expected 
to come to Luanda within a month. 

But diplomats in Luanda ex- 


■ C on servati ve s Plan Stand 

Conservatives plan to make aid 
for Angolan rebels their primary 
foreign policy objective next year, 
according to spokesmen for conser- 
vative lobbying g r oup s, Hie New 
York Times reported Sunday from 
Washington. 

A conservative strategist said: 
“Next year this will be the litmus 
test of the seriousness of the Rea- 

gun nHmnl itiiryfifw 1 ^ q qtiifih I iii ^ni 

to the cause of freedom filters.” 

Howard Phillips, rhairmnn of 
the Conservative Caucus, said: 
“The real issue is whether we will 
permit the Soviet Union to replace 
Sooth Africa, as the dominant pow- 
er in the region. It’s a fundamental 
issue, and this is the of 

truth.” 

He added: “No politician will 
receive conservative support for the 
presidency in 1988 who’s not right 
on thin issue” 


EC Minis ters Meet on Treaty Revisions 


BRUSSELS (Reuters) — European Commu nity fo reign ministers met 
Monday to tty to complete work on an agreement reache d at an EC ■ 
summi t meeting in Luxembourg two weeks ago on revamping rbegronp’j . 

1957 founding treaty. , r ... “ 

But despite an appeal from industrial leaders for rapid g np lemcataunc ' 
of the accord, there appeared little hope of the deal being ready for 
si gning in the near future. ' L . 

Diplomats said that member countries still were divided over many 
;<ni« and that it could take several months before governments signed ,■ • 
the revised treaty, which then has to go before n ation a l parliaments for > -.i 
ratification. Ministers are wrangling mainly over a proposed' minor 
increase in the powers of the European Pa rl iam ent 


B elgium Arrests Bombing Suspects 


BRUSSELS (Reuters) —The al- 


ieged leader of a group of Belgian 
Carette, 


The Sun also sets. 


gngrriTIjn, Pierre Canute, was ar- 
rested Monday with three other 
suspects in the southern city of Na- 
mur, the justice ministry said. A 
statement by Justice Minister Jean 
Gol said aU four were armed but 
did not resist arrest- 
Mr. Carette is suspected of lead- 
ing the extreme leftist Fighting 
Communist Calls, which have car- 
ried out 27 bomb attacks in the last' >■ 


14 months on North Atlantic Trear ; s ' / ?• : ; 
ty Organization, United States and? : ‘ :^« 


ryOrgaj 

Be lgian 

Tnes 


.establishment targets. 

' statement said the others ar- - 
rested were two men, Didier Che- 
volec and Bertrand Sassoye, and a 
woman, Pascale Vandqgeerde. It 
said some of the four were carrying 
forged identity pliers. 





Pierre Carette 


Tf ail you want on your holiday is 
Xsunshine, you're too easily satisfied. 

You’re also fortunate, because the 
world is full of places, some nice and 
some quite nasty, that can give you 
what you seek. 

But what will you do when you've 
had enough sun? 

And what wiH you do when it sets? 

A holiday should be a pleasure at any hour 
you favour, under the sun or the stars, in your 
choice of landscape, whether you’re active or 
sedentary, culture-minded or hedonistic. 

if you agree with us, and want your holiday to 
satisfy aB of your senses and sensibilities, read on' 
about Spain. 

The mountains or the shore? 

Spain has plenty of both. 

Our mountains, among the highest in Europe, 
offer some of the world’s best and least crowded 
skiing. There’s great climbing, too, and every other 
mountain sport in season. 

As for the shore, take your choice of beaches 
from nearly 6,000 Km. of coastline. 

Have a great Spanish holiday at sky level or at 
sea level. 

It’s up (or down) to you. 

What if you sunburn easily? 

Spend part of each day indoors. 

In shops, for instance, selling choice leather, 
lace, porcelains, antiques and an. 

Or come indoors to see things money 
can’t buy. In the great museums of 



Speaking of rooms... 

Spain offers every kind of accommodation, 
from simple country inns to world-dass deluxe 
hotels. 

1 Some of. our mc»t modem hotels are in - 


somepf our mo^t andestTimldirigs. Many- castles..-' ; - 
; :and othof historiclahdniarks have been ■ 


Ex-Reagan Adviser Acquitted oi Fraud 

NEW YORK (AP) — Thomas C. Reed, a former adviser to President 
Ronald Reagan, was acquitted Monday of charges that he used 
information to make a 5427,000 profit m stock options, tint fabricated 
documents to cover op his actions. ■ 

Mr. Reed, 51, became a special . national security assistant to Mr. 
Reagan in 1982. He resigned in 1983 amid mounting criticism of his 
options trading. 

The fedoal court jury in Manhattan acquitted Mr. Reed of one want 
each of securities fraud, wire fraud and ohstructicsi of justice. Conviction 
would have carried a maximum sentence of five years in prison on ~ \ 

count : .. - 


regional wines keep them perfect company. 

By the time you’ve savored the last of your 
Spanish brandy, you will have had a late night. And 
the fun is only starting. 


. converted with ingenuity and elegance 
, featuring art and furnishings of their periods. 
Interestingly, even pur newest and most 
fashionable resort hotels use traditional Spanish 
architectural themes and decor, so you never , 
have that modem sense of deja vu found in the 
usual “international” reson. 

. We have heard that one young woman, .. 
asked where she went chi j- 
hei holiday, replied . 


For the Record 



Epjoy our longest, latest uights. 

At Spanish fiestas, the party seldom stops until 
sunrise. 

And at many, not until two or three sunrises 
have passed. ‘ 

No matter who) you come to Spain, you will 
find a fiesta somewhere. There are literally 
hundreds throughout the year. Some are simple 
Saints* days in little village squares. But these are 
often wonderful for their intimacy, the welcome 
given to strangers and their sense of natural, 
unplanned gaiety. 

Others are spectacles, elaborately staged and 
wardrobed. See processionals, mock battles, floral 
decoration competitions, wine harvests or solemnly 
impressive holy days. Or watch the breaking of wDd 
horses or the showing of exquisitely trained horses. 
Or see the running of the bulls at the St. Fermin 
fiesta in Pamplona, made famous by Hemingway. 



French rir controllers plan a one-day strike Friday at the start of the 
Christmas holiday period to back a claim for better pensions. (Reuters) 
MBoran DfBas, 74, a fonaer heir apparent to Tito and now thebest- 
known Yugoslav dissident, was reported in a hospital Monday after’ 
suffering a heart attack and lung edema. His wife said be was out of- 
immediate danger. • (AP)- 

The Umtod States wffl continue economic aid to Ghana despite a strain 
on relations caused in November when a former CIA employee inGhtma ; 
pleaded guilty to giving a Ghanaian the names of CIA contacts in Ghana, 
the State Department said Monday. (UP*) 

The 'Senate confirmed Margaret M. Heckler as UJS. ambassador to. 
Irdand op Monday. Mrs. Heckler, eased out as secretary of tbe Healtft 


by Yaicfc vote. (UPfy 

has suspended death se nt ences imposed for drug and oil; ; 
i during the government off Maor General Mohammed Buhari.' 
wbue the cases are renewed by a judicial trib unal, Lagos radio reported/ 
Monday. General Buhari was deposed in August 



A U.S.Jury in Orlando, Florida, convicted two persons and 
hit others Monday of conspiring to ship 1,140 TJ J. anti-tank n 
Iran. Those convicted are Paul Cutter, 47, and Charies St Oaire,-52.-- 

Sentencing is scheduled for Jan. 21. . (AP) 

."IBe U.S. Supreme Court cleared die way Monday far an accused Nazi 
criminal, John Denganjuk, 65, to be extradited to Israel. He is alleged to 
have helped kill 900,000 Jews at a death camp in Trebtinka, Poland. (AP) 


Spain are displayed troves of priceless treasures. 

Or stroll in the shade of castles and palaces, 
mosques and alcazars. 

Spain has thousands of ways to tempt you in, 
out of the sun. 


What happens after sunset? 

You understand a people when you underhand 
how they eat. 

Not just the cuisine, but where, how, when and 
with whom it is enjoyed. 

We start with “tapas”, snacks in amazing 
variety, eaten at stand-up bars at eight or nine 
in the evening. That’s the time to meet us and 
make new friends, in the hours before dinner starts 
at ten or eleven at night. 

Then you can maintain the informal note 
or go to dress-up places serving haute cuisine 
as splendid as any in Europe. As for us, we love 
seafood simply prepared, and even hundreds of 
miles inland you’ll find it fresh daily. Our regional 
dishes are so varied that you might think they come 
from many countries and cultures. And our 



This long ad is far too short 

If you’re interested in visiting Spain, there’s 
much more you’ll want to know. 

Sudi as details on your personal interests. 
Where you can golf or charter a boat, or hunt for 
game, for example. Or how to follow the route 
of Don Quixote. Or where the Paradores, our 
national tourist inns, are located. 

We have booklets and brochures oh practically 
everything. 

Visit your nearest Spanish National Tourist 
Office or mail the coupon below to tell us what 
you’re interred in. 

Whatever it is, you'll find it in Spain, where 
there’s everything under the sun. r V 


■ INPROTUR (S.G.T.) 
1 Marfa de .Molina, 50 


Visiting 

New York City? 

Gramercy 
Park Hotel 


Distinguished 500 room 
hotel with excellent 
Restaurant, Cocktail Lounge, 
Room Service and Piano Ban 
Overlooking Gramercy Park 
with newly decorated, 
comfortable rooms. ■ 


Singles $85-95 
Doubles $90-100. 
Suites $115-175 
Group rates and attractive 
monthly rates available. 
Call Geo. Mgn Tom O’Brien 
(212)475-4320 

• Tdo66$-755 . 

Cable GRAMPARK 
2 1st St. and Lexington Ave. 
New Yjtk, N Y, USA 10010 


Every fiesta is a party, and you’re invited to 
them all. 

What’s to do at night between fiestas? 

I:' night dubs, casinos, ballet, opera, jazz, folk 
music, discos, rock music and flamenco dancers 
don’t interest you, there really isn’t very much! 

Perhaps people- watching at an outdoor cafe 


• • .1 

I 2S006 Madrid. Spain ; i 

| Please tefl : me where I can find everything • | 
I under the son.. • ' I 

Name 

Address - 

City 

Country 

Iam interested in: 


Reagan Signs DiB 
On China Accord 


Reuters 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Ragan signed a bffl Mon- 
day to put into effect an accord pa ; 
peaceful nuclear cooperation thai , r 
the United States and Gbmaagreed!> ^ 
to last summer. 


Mr. Reagan said in a statement 
that; the agreement would have “a 
significant, positive effect” on itU- \ 
tious between the two. cbustixs 
and would lead to a rr mthining 
d ta l ogne cm important tat-.' 
ergy and nonproliferatirai matters. 
It is also espected to roean bSSoas 
of ddlais in contracts for Amen-.' 
can companies. - 


v-Mioiiui iicgoiiaion c 

a confrontation witfa 

^WhiteH<S&SS 

woold scuttle the pact. Thej 
ment, vdnch was signed tact h 
limited to a general butlmeTt 
peaceful of nudear et 


while sipping a rare sherry might catdi your 



Chilled 

TIO PEPE 


The natural aperitif. 


J 
( 


I 


imagiuation. Or you could just go to your 
and read a book. 


1 ; 

i 

l Spain. Everything under the suh; I 

ft. — ai—-— 




i 




























INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17, 1985 


Page 3 


- . ; ■* i a- 


By William E. Gcist 

Sew York Tima Soria 


NEW YORK— If s Chnstmas 
in tte city. OzQdrai gaze 
: T ■ ^.'afidMved mtOBtnre windows. the 


or a N. Y, 'Santa*: Pert Noses 9 Eye Lifts , Less Flab 

busy *easfflifOT New “Cosmetic smeary u becoming .women, alihongb New York when he was growing up, it “I came to see Dr J; 
" substantial comma- so common amane some of rims*. women tenH m rtmrhae* ums wnwi itv> -,n „r a^IL, .w* u .bj « ’ ■ 


FINLANDIA 


" * i. the air, Santas ring bells on street 

•'■i ^fcomeri and Dr. Elliot Jacobs’s 
^office becomes as busy as Santa’s 
bwn workshop. 

r YV i»Li He's checking his fist Left see, 

l mGeo$gs wants a moer nose, Jose- 
^T' 1 . V™ 3 asks for a firmer chest and 

*_ ■ - :.C '.- 'Manra wants an eye lift . 

Dr. Jacobs, plastic surgeon, has 
; •'ihefea hard ai work in recent days. 
, > ■ jwfonnmg all manner of aug- 
i^^tnentatiooB, re rtn eti o ns, imptenta- 
. ’^j^dons, corrections and nips and 
r : - r ^ Stocks cm scalps, foreheads, noses, 
■vi :yes, ears, dims, throats, breasts, 
>jjeQks, hips, thighs and calves, 
i There is no rest for the weary, 

rw-.h Doctors take an oath. Dr. Jacobs’s 

4l * yiKsuetionlh^ 

removes fat from abdomens, hips 
V^rv^jd thighs with a plastic hose — 
-s ■:? r-V^dn a way that seems almost ab- 
"^snnfly basic — whirs nearly inces- 
• santly during the holiday season, 

r cr ^ fitting liter jars with fat. 


This is the busy season for New 
, York* s rather substantial comma- 
mty of fdastic surgeons serving the 
d^atiter substantial cosmetic 
surgery needs — and providing 
the qjmlent with a relief valve for 
<fisp<*ablei»eacDfc 

People want to look thedrbesl 
for holiday parties,” Dr. Jacobs 
said between operations in his of- 
fice. 

“A lot of the pfltientq are »1»> 
going an cruises or tops Sooth,” 
• be said. “And before this rush has 
a_ c h an c e to calm down, we’ll be 
Mt with students on Christmas 
vacations ccming in for their nose 
jobs.” 

Some patients have cosmetic 
surgery dose to fight holiday de- 
pression, and Others want to beat 
the deadline for deducting the sor- 
goy from their 1985 income-tax 
returns 

' Cosmetic surgeons on Park Av- 
enue get emergency calls at this 
time of year. Dr. Jacobs said that 
patients call up on weekends and 
m the TmHrito of the night, desper- 
ate to make appointments right 
away so that they will look good in 
time for some party, ball or gala. 


“Cosmetic sugary is becoming 
so comma among some of these 
people,” be said, “that they treatit 
fike a trip (o the hairdresser.** 
Somepeopk stop by on the way 
to foe airport for a few hundred 
dollars worth of Collagen dots, 


.women, although New York 
women tend to purchase some- 
what smaller modds than those in 
other parts of the country. 

He said his patients sometimes 
scurry in waving pictures of mod- 
els they have tom out of rnaga- 


Teople want to look their best for holiday 
parties, and before this rush has a chance 
to calm down, well he hit with students 
on Christmas vacations coming in for . 
their nose jobs.’ 

—Dr. EBiot Jacobs, plastic surgeon 


which remove wrinkles in amazter 
of hoars. Others spend $3,500 for 
noses, up to $7400 for suction 
hpeetonnes and $2400 to $5,000 
for breast surgery. 

Dr. Jacobs constantly answers 
the caO for cleavage. 

“Women need it for their holi- 
day ball gowns,” he said, noting 
'that there is a tread to larger 
breasts among the redeagnexs of 


zincs, saying, This is the nose I 
want.” Sometimes they want the, 
whole face. Some bring in pages 
torn from Playboy magazine 
showing breasts they would Eke. 

“Bo Derek breasts andhfichad 
Jackson noses have been very 
popular” he said. He is proud to 
say there is no single, readily iden- 
tifiable Jacobs nose. 

In his neighborhood, he said, 


when he was growing up, it 
s e eme d like all of the teen-agers 
had either the “Diamond nose” or 
the “Goldman nose," named after 
. the doctors who performed thou- 
sands of them, all variations of the 
scooped nose with the upturned 
tip. 

His desk drawers are crammed 
with all sons of silicone and in- 
flatable implants, which he is de- 
lighted to pull out and demon- 
strate. 

“Look at this,” he said, whip- 
ping out a sOJcone chin implant 
and sticking it on his dim “It' 
comes with a dimple tool” (No 
extra charge.) 

In the watting room, with its 
walls of mirrors, patients said they 
overheard the most fascinating 
discussions. There was the woman . . 
whose buttocks Eft went askew, 
forcing her to stand for the last 
three months, even through din- 
oerparties. 

T became iU when I tried on 
swimming soils," said a patient, 
“but 1 decided to buy one anyway, 
wear it to the doctor’s office and 
have him get rid of everything bad 
that shows.” 


“1 came to see Dr. Jacobs for 
the holiday season,” said Sharon 
Poniello, a patient who has had 
Collagen shots. “I have important 
business parties, and the man I’m 
trying to get to many me is com- 
ing in from Paris. 

“I kept buying new Christmas 
party dresses and taking them 
bock I had my hair done and that 
didn't work. I finally realized that 
these two little lines Tram my nose 
to my mouth were making me 
look drawn, tired and haggard." 

“Having had them, people tell 
me I look happier now," said the 
32-year-old woman. “One of ray 
friends said I was vain to do this, 
but now I think that she is a very, 
very sloppy person." 

An Upper East Side woman 
said that she has had a nose job 
and facelift “among other things” 
bnt that lately her friends have 
told ter that “maybe I am too too 
conventional-looking.” 

T wouldn’t mind a little char- 
acter pot bade in my face,” she 
added. “What do you think?” 



FINLANDIA ON ICE 


Jtah, Fearing 'Raid’ on Its Water, Takes Over U.S. Project 




^ingSr 


By Robert Lindsey 

New York Tima Service 

SALT LAKE CITY — Utah res- 
pite voted overwhelmingly last 
jnth to spend $335 million to 
to finish a federally planned sys- 
□ of dams and canals on the. 
dorado River after being warned 
it if they did not California 
luld someday “raid" Utah’s wa- 
resonzees. 

’Governor WiDiaxn J. Jankknv of 
utb Dakota recently brought a 
it. before theUA Supreme Court 



bucket, and then we’ve got it,” said want to control onr own destiny. If 
Paul P ^ p n tm» w i »g«icti>nt Hir^oi/y we can’t control the water in the 
of the Division of Water Resources state of Sooth Dakota, we'll esso- 
in Utah, where a proposal by Den- dally find ourselves a colony of the 
ver en trepr eneurs to divert water rest of the country.” 
from the Colorado River to San On Nov. 5. more than 72 percent 

Diego, almost 1,000 miles 0400 of the voters in a 12-county area in 
kilometers) away, is regarded with and around Salt Lake City ap- 
mnr-h apprehension. proved taxing themselves $335 ntil- 

A cornerstone of Western water non over the next 50 years to corn- 
law is the “use it or lose it” prino- plete a major segment of a 
ole: if die owners rtf water rights reclamation system known as the 


Arizona » much apprehension. proved taxing themseh 

A cornerstone of Western water lion over the next 50 y 
law is the “use it or lose it” princi- plete a major seg: 
pie: if die owners rtf water rights reclamation system b 
tion projects to one in which states fail to exercise them for a “benefi- Central Utah Project. 


iit bcforetheU4. Supreme Court are increasingly having to shoulder dal” use. the rights can be taken 
iking to establish me principle the cost of such projects. away. 

at upstream states on the Missou- There is a new emphasis on wa- Mr. Janklow filed his lawsuit af- 
River have a right to take water ter conservation, and water is being ter states downriver persuaded a 


Voters were warned that if they 
did not agree, Congress would lafl 
the project and in time California 
would take much of the water aHo- 


. >m the river and sell h before the regarded as a commodity to be lower court to block plans by a cated to Utah under a 1922 inter- 


’cr flows downstream into Ne- bought and sold like other natural 
asks, Iowa, Kansas and Missour resources. 

Northern states, fearful that 
Ttetwodevdopmmtsarcsymp- larger and more politically power- 
ms of a new phase in the battle fnl states sooth of them might take 


South Dakota water agency to sdl state cor 
water to a proposed coal shiny Colorado 
pipeline system. “There’ 


ate compact that apportioned 
aiorado River water. 

“There’s a fairly broad percep- 


“We’re not saying we see water tion, mistaken or otherwise, to 
as a commodity as Saudia Arabia many people in the state, that Cali- 

v- _ n «s m n.i . >v ■- - — V— - « « W— 


er Western water that is taking the water if they do nothing, are sees its oQ,* said W. Robert Nen- fomia is stealing oar water,” Mr. 
Vape as the nation passes from an positing to protect their resources, fdd, the state’s secretary of water Summers said. 

i of huge federal water redama- The idea is, let’s get it in onr and natural reso u rces, “but we The slates’ efforts to secure more 


^fcagan Appeak A Tax Reform Gamble 


/y-fv .r;r.. r 


control over water within their 
boundaries is occurring at a time of 
rapid ehany in federal policies and 
regional attitudes regarding the de- 
velopment of water resources in the 
West. 

On Nov. 15, the first segment of 
the $34 billion Central Arizona 
Project was opened, bringing water 
from the Colorado River to the 
growing city of Phoenix and divert- 
ing water formeriy allocated to 
Southern California. 

Many officials say they believe 
the Central Arizona Project is the 
last rtf the big federal water recla- 
mation projects that have trans- 
formed the region in the past centu- 
ry- 

“Federal water policy is moving 
very rapidly toward cost sharing by 
the states and pricing water at mar- 
ket rates,” Governor Bruce Babbitt 
of Arizona said. Tt’s going to be a 
very tortured transition, but it’s un- 
der way.” 








mm 






JGAILLIERS 


l.RUli IV . ) A iOm’AJNH-GKN: 


r -' % Gary Kiott 

Nrw York Tirana Service 

^WASHINGTON — Congrcssio- 
I leaders looked to a trip by Pres- 
- : an Ronald Reagan to Capitol 
. 11 on Monday as the last chance 
salvage his tax ovohanl pco- 
: ^un- 

.There were indications that 
:-mocratic support for tax~rcvi-~ 
n legislation was slipping and 
t Republican support was still 
1 of the votes needed for passage 
he House of Representatives, 
-loose Democrats said die fate 
/he lax revision effort would not 
^ known until after Monday after- 
” m, when Mr. Reagan made an 
’ raordinaiy trip to a House office ■ 
' kfing across the street from the 
ritol to mpeal to Rqpubhcans 
-■ dud closed doors for support for 
'at he has called the tqp I^isla- 
priority of his second term, 
mom over the weekend by the 
: iie House to round np Repubfi- 
•Z support apparently failed to 
over the rnmimnni of 50 Re- 
ilican votes that House Demo- 
;is say are necessary to ensure 
■ ;jse passage of the bH 
» senior White House official 
” I Sunday night that Mr. Reagan, 
asuiy ctffioals, and other ad- 
'■ T dstration officials had made 
ly calls to Republican members 
' ■ wghout the weekend and said 


that a total of about 35 Republican 
votes had been lined up. 

The aide added that the presi- 
dent would attempt to secure more 
votes at his meeting Monday when 
he would essentially “reiterate his 
desire that there be an opportunity 
to secure tax reform” and that the . 
o pp o rtun ity would be lost if the 
House bill were not passed. 

But the aide said that the 35 
Republican votes the president had 
already, secured might be enough to 
winpassage of the Ml if Democrats 
held their ranks and offered con- 
cession s on procedural rules that 
would allow two Republican 
amendments to be offered to the 
Ways and Means Comnrittee'shilL 
According to the official, the 
change in the rules could be critical 
to winning further Republican sup- 
port, even with the president's visit 
to Capitol HflL 

Representative Dan Rostenkcrw- 
slri, the Illinois Democrat who 
heads the committee, said that Mr. 
Reagan’s private meeting with Re- 
publicans would produce enough 
votes to ensure passage of the bill 
this week before Congress adjourns 
for the year. 

But some Republican leaders, 
questioning whether Mr. Reagan’s 
personal appeal would be enough 
to change Republican minds, sard 
they would continue to defy the 


White House and vote against the 

l egislation 

“I don't plan to change my posi- 
tion.” said Representative Dick 
Queney of Wyoming, foe third- 
ranking Republican leader. In a 
television interview, he said that 
Mr. Reagan “may well have same 
success at peeling off some Repub- 
lican- supporters*- at the Monday 
but he could not predict 
whether Mr. Reagan would suc- 
ceed in getting 50 votes. 

Tt could be posable, but h is 
going to be very difficult to get foe 
50," Re pr e sen t a tive Trent Lott of 
Mississippi, the Republican whip, 
said in another interview. 

But Democratic leaders held fast 
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Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17, 1985 


** 


Cherokees , Altering Another Tradition, Elect Woman Chief 


By Robert Rrinhold 

New York Times Serdce 

TAHLEQUAH, Oklahoma — A woman who 
began life 40 years ago as the daughter of a full- 
blooded Cherokee father and a white mother has 
been installed as the fim woman to be chief of a 
major American Indian tribe. 

She is W3ma P. ManlriDer, and die was sworn in 
as principal chief of the Cherokees in a brief 
ceremony Saturday before the 15-member tribal 
council. The Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma is die 
second-largest Indian tribe in the United States 
after the Navajo. 

Afterward, she promised to continue the tribe’s 
economic development efforts and declared that 
resentment of hex amo ng some tradition-minded 
Cherokees had abated. Her people, she said, "are 
worried about jobs and education, not whether the 
tribe is ran by a woman or not." 

The ceremony, which took plan: in the plush 

council chambers, was without Indian ritual. Chief 


ManldHer wore a fimnle blade suit and carried a 
Bible. 

According to die National Tribal Chairmen's 
Association, there are at least 29 women who lead 
Indian tribes. But none has ever before led a tribe 
as large as this one. 

The Cherokee Natron has 67,000 registered 
members, most of them living in 14 counties in 
northeastern Oklahoma. A separate smaller Cher- 
okee tribe remains in North Carotin*. 

Chief ManlriDer was automatically elevated 
from deputy principal chief when Ross O. Swim- 
mer, the tribe’s principal chief for 10 years, re- 
signed to become assistant secretary of the interior 
for Indian affairs. He was sworn in Friday in 
Washington and wiD head the Bureau of Indian 

ATfairi 

Mr. Swimmer, a Republican, has pushed to 
make Indians less dependent on the federal gov- 
ernment. 

Although Oiief Mankier is a liberal Democrat 
who has taken part in Indian protests, she said rixe 


planned to "Stay on the same path." She will save 
the remaining 18 months of Mr. Swimmer’s four- 
year term. 

Under the leadership of Mr. Swimmer, a lawyer 
and banker, the tribe opened numerous businesses, 
including a motel ami restaurant, greenhouse, a 
cattle and poultry ranch and an. electronics manu- 
facturing concern. Assets have grown to $23 mQ- 
lioiL 

Tribal headquarters are in a modem complex 
here in Tahlequah, the Cherokees’ original Okla- 
homa. capital. The tribal government's principal 
function is to administer 520 mfllinn in anniml 
federal and state assistance for health, housing and 
education programs far Indian^ 

Despite large philosophical differences with her, 
Mr. Swimmer chose Miss ManlriDer as his running 
mate in 1963. 

She was born in the tiny community of Rocky 
Mountain, Oklahoma, but her family moved to 
San Francisco when she was 11. Indian protests 


there reawakened her interest in her ethnic roots. 

She divorced her husband, an Ecuadoran, in 
1974 and moved back to Oklahoma, using her 


to help the tribe. 

She lives simply in a small wooden home, with 
three dogs and many books on philosophy and 
on Mankiller Flats in Rocky Moun- 
tain. 

She said Satur day that one of her major tasks 
would be to find new sources of income to replace 
funds lost to cuts in the federal budget At a news 
conference, she said she would like to attract 
“responsible businesses’ with “good environmen- 
tal records.” 

However, just as Mr. Swimmer did, she said she 
would not resort to bingo games, as some other 
tribes have. 

“I ready don’t think bingo will provide a stable 
econom y for our tribe,” she said. “I would rather 
do'things that would last a long time:" 



W ilma p. Mankiller, principal chief of the 


H« Amort rim 

Cherokees. 


DC-8 Veered, Lost Speed Before Crash at Gander 


The Associated Pros 


GANDER, Newfoundland — 
Canadian investigators said Mon- 
day that the chartered DC-8 that 
carried 248 U.S. soldiers and eight 
crew members to their deaths last 
week reached an adequate speed 
before takeoff, then suddenly 
veered right and lost speed steadily 
until it crashed. 


Peter Boag, investigator for the 
Canadian Aviation Safety Board, 
said that analysis of the plane’s 
flight data recorder showed that 
the four-engine Arrow Air aircraft 


reached a peak speed of 190 miles 
(305 kil ‘ ‘ 


per hour (305 kilometers per hour) 
during the one minute and 40 sec- 
onds that elapsed, bom the time it 


U.S. Ruling on Breath Test 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The Su- 
preme Court with two dissenting 
votes, refused Monday to give mo- 
torists the right to talk to a lawyer 
before deciding whether to take a 
breath test for alcohol content in 
(he blood. 


' was positioned on the runway 
ready to take off. 

[Ken Johnson, the investigation 
coordinator and director of the 
safety board, said that sabotage 
and fuel contamination had been 
ruled out, Reuters reported. He 
also reiterated that the plane’s toad 
“was within the limits prescribed 
for the airplane." 

[“What we expect is a painstak- 
ing, long tedious kind of investiga- 
tion," Mr. Johnson said. “It’ll take 
us some time before it is over, sev- 
eral months."] 

Mr. Boag said the flight data 
recorder provided some details of 
what happened daring takeoff, but 
did not explain why the plane 
crashed. 

“It wQl help us in determining 
die cause, but certainly at this stage 
it doesn't tell us the cause." he said. 

“It's a very difficult in\ 
tion, because of the catastropi 
destruction of the aircraft, because 
there are no survivors," Mr. Boag 
said 

He said he had not {tinned down 
at what point during the brief flight 
the jet began slowing down 'and 


changing direction about 20 de- 
grees to the right of its norma] path. 
He also said he was not yet sure 
what peak altitude the plane 
achieved 

Meanwhile, the first 20 coffins 
carrying the remains of the 
soldiers were flown Monday to Do- 


treaty, has suspended use of the 
carrier pending the outcome of the 
investijptian. 

■ Boston Incident Investigated 
UJS. inspectors began an investi- 
gation Monday to learn why parts 
fell off a British Airways 747 and 


va- Air Force Base m Delaware for S tS*** 4 * “TSSSPS? 


autopsies. . 

The servicemen were members of 
the 101st Airborne, bound for Fort 
Campbell, Kentucky, and h om e af- 
ter peacekeeping duties in the £*na? 
Peninsula. 

Mr. Boag said the post mortems 
would hdp establish exactly how, 
and perhaps why, the plane 
crashed 

Mr. Boag said he was optimistic 
that the safety board could deter- 
mine the reasons foe the crash after 
considering a report he will prepare 
*nH testimony at public Ivwiny in 
Gander early next year. 

Miami-based Arrow has said it 
follows all U.S. regulations, but of- 
ficials of the SSnni peacekeeping 
force, which polices the withdrawal 
of Egyptian and Israeli troops un- 
der the two nations’ 1979 peace 


jet landed Sunday at Boston’s air- 
port, The Associated Press report- 
ed 

No one was injured and Flight 
215 from London, with 254 passen- 
gers and a crew of 17, landed safely 
Sunday at Logan International 
Airport 

Two sections of the left wing 
flaps imped off, and one fell into 
Massachusetts Bay. The second hit 
(be roof of a house and then fefl 
onto a parked car. 

The flaps are extended during 
takeoff arid landing to give the air- 
craft added lift 

When the jet was inspected at the 
airport, authorities also found that 
an engine tail cone was missing, 
accqrding to Nick Lamberti, 
spokesman for the Massachusetts 
Port Authority, which operates the 
airport 


GANDER 


INTERNATIONAL 



Kohl’s Opponent Opens Campaign 

Johannes Rau Promises Fairer Society in WestGermany 


Broken Due shows path of 
DC-8. It crashed less than a 
mile after end of runway. 


British Airways officials said 
Monday in London that they were 
conducting their own investigation 
of the incident but would not make 
extra checks of its 747 fleet 


Cypriot Leaders Are Pessimistic About Reunification Talks 


By Henry Kamm 

New York Tunes Serdce 


NICOSIA — President Spyros 
Denktash, the 


Kyprianou and Ranf 
leaders of the Greek and Turkish 
parts of Cyprus, have expressed 
deep pessimism about the rinnw* 


Wn Leaves Jordan for Syria 

Reuters 

AMMAN — Foreign Minister 
Wu Xueqian of China left Monday 
for Syria after a three-day visit to 
Jordan during which he met with 
King Hussein and praised his Mid- 
dle East peace efforts. Mr. Wu also 
met with Khalil al-Wazir, a dose 
aide of Yasser Arafat chairman of 
the Palestine Liberation Organiza- 
tion. 


of reaching an agreement to reunite 
the divided island. 

They spoke in the face of an 
optimistic declaration Dec. 10 by 
the secretary-general of the United 
Nations, Javier F fer ez de Cutitor, 
who is seeking to bring them to the 
negotiating table. Their last meet- 
ing collapsed in January. 

Reporting to the Security Coun- 
cil on separate discussions since 
then with Mr. Kyprianou and Mr. 
Denktash, Mr. P6rcz de CuHtor 
said, “I expressed the conviction 
that the outstanding differences be- 
tween the two tides were not insur- 
mountable and that they should 
therefore be amenable to an early 
solution." 


But Mr. Denktash, in an inter- 
view Thursday in the office that he 


occupies as president of the self- 
proclaimed T urkish Republic of 
Northern Cyprus, said he had 
warned the secretary-general 
against optimism. 

“As long as Mr. Papandreou has 
the strings in ins hands, I see no 
chance," the Turkish. Cypriot lead- 
er said. 

Asked if he bdieved that Prime 
Minister Andreas Papandreou of 
Greece controlled Mr. Kyprianou’s 
negotiating conduct he said, “Of 
course he does." 

Mr. Kyprianou, whose position 
was strengthened in parliamentary 
el e cti on s Dec. 8, met with r epor te rs 
Wednesday in the presidential pal- 
ace on the Greek part of the island. 
He said he did not believe that 
either Mr. Denktash or the Turkish 


government was working for a rea- 
sonable solution. 

Diplomats masted (hat the two 
leaders’ real views were not as irreo- 
ondlable as their public state- 
ments. A well -placed diplomat in 
touch with both sides said the sec- 
retary-generaFs optimism was not 
unjustified despite deep differences 
on three key issues. . 

One of these issues is when the 
Turkish troops that occupied the 
northern third of the island in. 1974 
should withdraw. Mr. Kyprianou 
and Mr. Papandreou insist that no 
transitional government for a re- 
united Cyprus can be formed until 
all the occupation forces, now esti- 
mated at 18,000, have left. 

Mr. Denktash main tains that 
Turkish troops should leave gradu- 
ally. after the nation is reunited. 



Reuters 

AHLEN, West Germany — Jo- 
hannes Rau. the Social Democratic 
Party candidate, began bis cam- 
paign Monday to remove Cbancel- 
■ lor Helmut Kohl from power with a 
pledge to create a fairer society. 

Speaking at a party raOy to open 
his challenge for the chancellorship 
in January 1987, Mr. Ran, 54. 
pledged .measures to tackle unem- 
ployment and said he would be 
open to dialogue and compromise 
with all sections of society. 

Mr. Ran also pledged immediate 
action to try to reduce nuclear arms 
in . Europe, but he also declared a 
firm commitment to the North At- 
lantic Treaty Organization. 

“I am ready and I want to be the 
chancellor erf all men and women," 
be said at a gathering of Social 
Democratic Party officials. He 
urged moderate voters to desert the 
governing center-right coalition. 

In a bid to revase the party’s 
steady decline in opinion polls, Mr. 
Rau warned voters if the 
Christian Democratic Union, Mr. 
KohTs party, were returned to 
power h would pursue a far mere 
rightist course than at present 
He said Mr. KohTs party would 
about a divided society of 
and poor. 

A poll published Monday in the 
mass-chculatioai daily Btld said 45 
percent of voters p referred Mr. 
Kohl as chancellor while 44 percent 
backed Mr. Ran. It was the first 
tmig Mr. Kohl has edged almad this 
year. 



Johannes Ban 


The survey said 45 percent sup- 
ported the Christian Democr a tic 
Union, known as the CDU. Anoth- 
er 15 percent backed their centrist 
coalition partners, the Free Demo- 
cratic Party, while Social Demo- 
cratic Party support dropped to 42 
percent, down 1-5 percent in four 
weeks. 


Mr. Rau said at the rally in Ah- 
len, a small town near tiro north- 
western dry of Dortmund, that he 
was still convinced he could attract 
lorit 

CDU has lost the win for 


compromise and moderation," be 
said. “I see in this the political 
obligation and chance to offer a 
new home to those who can no 
longer fed at home with the Chris- 
tian Democrats." 

Mr. Rau said he would introduce 
an income tax levy on people earn- 
ing more than 60,000 Deutsche 
marks ($23,840) a year to finance 
job creation projects. He also 
pledged to cut the standard work- 
ing week in industry in order to 
create more jobs. 

Mr. Rau, who is premier of the 
state of North Rhine-WestphaHa, 
made a bid for the female vote by 
saying women suffered from big 
disadvantages, and undertook to 
support than in the job market ~ 

He promised to enforce tighter 
pollution restrictions on industry 
and tax the use of en vir o nm e n tally 
harmful herbicides. 

In a dear attempt to soothe the 
fears of moderate voters suspicious 
of the growing power of the left 
wing of the Soda! Democratic Par- 
ty, he said he would not fed bound 
by party resolutions. 

The party has adopted a policy 
opposing deployment of U5. mis- 
sies in West Germany, but Mr. 
Rau said only that he would try to 
“negotiate away" both American 
and Soviet missies. 

“As chancellor 1 would immedi- 
ately launch an initiative in our 
allian ce and towards the Soviet 


Union in order to break through 
the vicious circle of rearmament in 
Europe," Mr. Ran said. 


Iraqi and Soviet Leaders 



Rauf Denktash 


• Neuters . . leaders discussed the Gulf conflict 

MOSCOW -^President Saddam and the Middle East “from the 
Hussein of Iraq, on his first visit to' standpoint of the need to remove 
Moscow for seven years, discussed the ca u ses" behind them. 


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On the second issue, Mr. Ky- 
priairoa seeks the right of return for. 
all Greek Cypriots who were driven 
from their lands by Turkish occu- 
pation. “If thatishis po&ty, there is 
no hope At all," the Turkish leader 
said. 

A third major difference con- 
cerns international guarantees for a 
reunited Cyprus. Although Mr. 
Kyprianou was noncommittal on 
that issue Wednesday, Mr. Papan- 
dreou has said that Athens would 
not accept Ankara as a guarantor. 

Of a possible formula that would 


the Gulf war and the Middle East 
conflict on Monday with MBthail 
S. Gorbachev, the Soviet leader, 
andPresideai Andrei A. Gromyko. 

The o ffic i al Tass new agency 
mid that Mr. Hussein covered the 
topics in Kremlin talks after arriv- 
ing on a previously unannounced 
working visi. . . 

Arab diplomats said he appeared 
to be seeking & major Sovia. com- 
mitment an arms -supplies to hdp 


In a banquet speech Mr. Gromy- 
ko set out the Soviet Union's neu- 
trality in the Gulf conflict, which 
he described as unnecessary and 
mindless, Tass said. 

He alhided to Iran’s insistence 
on Mr. Hasson’s overthrow as the 


only way to end the war and reiter- 
ated the Soviet position that such 


Iraq break the stalemate in its war 
with] 


Iran, which is now in its sixth 

y^- • . 

-Moscow has taken an men-. 
h a nded position an the war, but 


aims woe a foolish way of settling 
political quarrels. 

Diplomats said that Mr. Hussein 
was Kkdy to press the Kremlin to 
act to baft arms shipments to Iran 
from Syria, a dose Soviet ally bat 
an adversary aflraq. 

Tass said that Mr. 



Anibal Cameo Silva* 


Hussein and 


SECOND HAND, 

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Ufa posable formula that would wu ™ war, out w — — — ■ — - - — ----- — - 

not include Turkey, Mr. Denktash supples Iraq with the minority of 
said, “We don’t even look at it" hs weapons. 


[said, 

Explaining Mr. Ftoez de Cud- 


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tor’s optimism, a well-placed diplo- 
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an agreement. Turkey's occupation 
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United States and West European 
natrons, and its ec onom ic plight 
makes better relations withiis i 
a presang need. ’ 


Tass said that Mr. Hussein had a 


ing conflict in the regjoo and called 
for an mti»rnari«n«l conference to 


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KSMSSMt Government 


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gon, the formulation implies a sub- 
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Reporting on the talks with Mr. 
Gromyko, Tass said that the two 


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question. 

They also stressed “the urgent 
need to overcome as soon as possi- 
ble differences in the Palestine re- 
sistance movement and to restore 
the unity of die Palestine Libera- 
tion Organization." 

Moscow has continued to sup- 


Reutgrs 


LISBON — A good showing by 
the Social Democratic Party in Ic>- 


center-right government, winch has 

port Yasstt Arafat's Ietoiersllip of 
toe PLO against Syrian-backed With most results > 


factions opposed to hun, 

Mr. Hnssefii's trip comes at a 
tune of increased Soviet dipl omatic 
activity in the Middle East direct- 
ed at regaming a voice for Moscow 
in efforts to bring about an overall 
peace settlement in toe region. 

Tins has induded increased con- 
tacts with Israel, with which Mos- 
cow broke relations in 1967, and 
the opening of diplomatic ties with 
thrGulf states of Oman and the 
United Arab Emirates. 


Monday, the SooaJ Democrats had 
won control of almost half the 
country’s 305 municipalities, hh.-.. 
eluding those in the three biggest v . 
aces, Lisbon. Oporto and Coim- 
bra. 


It was a first test of popularity 
for the r~ 


Mr. Gorbachev and senior Sow- '-avaco ouva, a 46 -year-otd 
et officials have denied that rest©- economist, also congratulated his 
ration of relations wthisrad was pany on todr alliance witommo^ 
nnmineiit, iron Socialists in parts nf chrm gfy 


ttro govonment of Prime Mrms- 
tff Anibal Cavaco Siva, who came 
to power in October on a ptotfoon 
of efficiency, confidence and eerf 
nonne growth for Weston Eu- 
rope’s poorest country. 

Mr. Cavaco Silva, a 46-year-old 


aimed at . 

ahgDCdCompnjnist 

the area. 

*1116 government has rdSed oh 


m amove, 
the Soviei- 
siK^dCED 


Diplomats said that Moscow re- 
cently had been seeking to reassure 
toe Syrian leader, Hafez al-Asaad, 
that its moves toward moderate 

Arab nates and Israel aimed at ** 

bringing about an international , “PPwt of the Social 

peace coideremxiirvolvmg the So- JJJSjP 11 * program 

viet Union did not jeopardize todr ana may now be a 

dose tics. “continue to do so. 

D^kama m Baghttod said the ^ 

unexpected visit to the Soviet 


.. . - ,, _ Soviet 

Union, Mr. Hossem’s first to a 
nou-Aiab coimtiy mice the Gulf 
war started, probabhr wan HnV«v| ^ 
Scniet arms supplies. The Soviet 
Uxuaa and' France are Iraq's 
siq^ersof we^oos. 


JWEATB NOTTCX 


RICHARDWIEUS RU TUUGE 
Borri in Tuka, jv. 

1922, <Scd in lexis ' Nov’ 23, 1985 
Ftirietal tovim at: ftre Ladmise 
J985,«vJ«Sas- 
mires (Icm-K-Cbei) Dec. 22, 1983. 

wfllrest artrO 9 heau.ro- 


sl P a Isbdr laws, which make’ it 
impossible to warbrs to ' 
oe dismissed, and to gratoiaSy *d) 
off nati onali zed initestries. -Bodi 
SEa* highly impqptto. / 

The local doctkm resuhs wai : 




Jan. 26 . 


! m preridential Hects^' 



’VredssoriaSedPrtgg 

r President E&b 


' <» Mbridiy lor anoffi- 
u) Poland, the o£Ea&2th 
agency PAP reported; : 


£rr::: 


? 

...I 




F q aag MjUfcfac BB 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17, 1985 


PageS 


Big Turnout, Africa’s Bumper Crop Could Threaten Farm Prices 

"lahnMark 


T., 


Post-Accord 

bsamVote 




i. Untied Press Intemanonal 

1GUWAHATI, India - Bailot- 
Ln Assam an Monday drew the 
/jest turnout in the history of 
northeastern state, and there 
ipearcd to be none of the ethnic 
_ )lenoe that left nearly 4,000 peo- 
e dead during the last polls two 
' ;ars ago, officials said. 

Voters formed long lines at poD- 
, VNg booths throughout the state, 
l>! the (V^ eluding areas dominated byBen- 
~-^%li-speaking Moslem immigrants 
^Nho were the main targets of the 
>83 violence. 

“Assam is witnessing for the first 
[|me a heavy turnout,” aiH the 
kief election officer, P.C. Mishra. 

py« r> He estimated that about SO per- 

* * of the state’s 9.8 million regjs- 

~ _ >rcd voters cast their ballots be- 
; ^ire the deadline Monday evening. 

’ . ^ -t -esultswereexpectedbylateTlies- 

^ay. 

■ 'J 'i: v< The election follows an accord 

' ^vacbed Aug. 15 between Prime 
' f,qis ter Rajiv Gandhi and Assaxn- 
^--..se protesters. The Assamese 
■?.*. .greed to end a six-year campaign 
- if strikes and demonstrations to 
s ' i nun for a government promise to 
^-.>xpel two million immigrants, 
: -. O'. iostly Modems, who have settled 
s Assam since 1971. 

■ About 200,000 other immi grants 
ir. ^ r ho entered between 1966 and 
v t; £.971 mil lose the right to vote. 

' ; ; The high turnout appeared to 

• fc. inflect widespread support for the 

■r\ssam Gona Pa ri&had, a party 
• ^ Vmed by Assamese students. A 
T .T^T.^udent boycott of the 1983 elec- 

■ rl , ^ r on had helped keep the turnout to 

3 percent and bad provoked a 
. ,?: msacre of Bengali immigrants 
. ho defied the boycott 

I ■ Analysts say the Assam Gana 
. - arishad poses a serious threat to 

V;:^ Gandhi’s Congress (I) Party, 

. ' - ’ !'- l 'hich has ruled Assam for 32 <rf the 
* . : ' -MSt 38 years. The election wiD de- 
' ide 124 state assembly seats and 
~~-4 seats for the national Pariia- 
intent 

Two months ago Mr. Gandhi's 
“realty lost power to the moderate 
’ . ■ ikh party, A kali Dal, in elections 

‘ . _ j._ t Pnnjab. 

.. .• V - Political analysts predicted that 
- '-Tiling would be divided mainly 
r "Jong ethnic lines, with most of the 
jters among the state’s 8J million. 

. ‘lindus choosing the Assam Gana 
"'"a rishad. and the voters among As- 
un’s 5 million Moslems divided 
^tween Congress (I) and the newly 
V’rmed United Minorities FronL 
Moslem leaders have con- 
..ihe.Augost accord, pomt- 
oul ihat it does hot" specify 
i'the expelled immigrants will 
o when they leave Assam. Bangla- 
esh already has said it will not 
ike them back. 


By Blaine Harden 

‘ (Yog/nngion Rost Ser»iM - 

NAIROBI — African countries 
plagued by drought have under- 
gone a “spectacular 7 ’ transforma- 
tion in die. past year as good rains 
have produced record harvests 
across ranch of the continent, ac- 
cording to a statement released 
here Monday by the brad of the 
United Nations Food and Agricul- 
ture Organization. 

However, the agency’s direcior- 
general, Edouard ‘saraima warned 
that the bumper crop, combined 
with expected deliveries of millions 
of tons more of outside relief food, 
could flood grain markets in Africa 
and sharply reduce prices paid to 
fanners. 

Mr. Saouma has appealed to do- 
nor countries to hdp prop up prices 
by buying some of Africa's record 
grain surpluses and giving it to oth- 
er needy African countries. 

A senior economist for the FAO 
said Monday that the United 
States, which accounts for more 
than half of the relief food pledged 
for Africa next year, has shewn 
little interest in giving financial aid 
to redistribute the food Africa pro- 
duces. 


“While donors have generously Africa’s 3.01 annual population 
supplied Tood and emergency rid,” growth rate. Africa still will need to 
Mr. Saouma said, “they have been . import about 62 million tons of 
rather less interest edin ‘providing food next year, 3.4 million of which 

wfll need to come in food assis- 
tance, the FAO said. 

■ 6 Critical Countries 
The following synopses by the 
FAO of the food situation in the 
remaining six critical countries was 
reported by United Press Interna- 
tiona] from Nairobi: 

• Ethiopia (population 40 mil- 
lion): The government’s relief and 
Rehabilitation Commission esti- 
mates that 5.8 million people wiD 
be in need of food aid next year 
including 1.7 million in the north- 
ern provinces of Tigre and Eritrea 
and 2.1 million in the central Shoa 
and Wallo provinces. 

Good rains hare provided a 
“reasonable" harvest of 5.8 million 
tons of grains but, because of war 
and the inability to get seeds to 
Tigre and Eritrea, the rains went to 
waste in those two provinces. 

The FAO estimated needs to be 
900.000 tons. Pledges for 1986 
amount to only 300,000 tons. 

• Sudan (18 million): The coun- 
try experienced a record harvest of 
4.6 million tons of grain up from 


agricultural inputs. Fm pha-ds still 
remains os feeding the person, not 
on recovery. We have to build a 
bridge from emergency to sus- 
tains development. Without reha- 
bilitation assistance, Africa risks 
becoming irreversibly dependent 
on food aid." 

Of the 21 countries in sub-Saha- 
ran Africa that were on the FAQ’s 
“danger list" last year, only six re- 
main for next year: Ethiopia. Su- 
dan, Angola, Botswana, Mozam- 
bique and Cape Verde. 

Six. West African countries that 
were affected last year by drought 
produced a record 6.7 milli on met- 
ric ions of grain this year, 50 per- 
cent more than last year, the FAO 
said- They are Burkina Faso, Chad, 
Mali, Mauritania, Niger and Sene- 
gal 

Tins year's harvest reversed a 
disturbing four-year trend in Afri- 
ca in which growth in the conti- 
nent’s population had outstripped 
.growth in food production. 

According to the FAO, food and 
agricultural production increased 4 
percent this year. weQ ahead of 


1-5 million tons last year and al- 
most double the lost five year's av- 
erage of 2.6 million tons. 

Despite the bumper crop, how- 
ever, nearly a milli on people in 
Kordofon and Darfur provinces in 
the west still face a serious starva- 
tion threat. There was no rain in the 
Iwo areas. 

Emergency relief aid require- 
ments for next year are 400.000 
ions, down from fast year's 1 .4 mil- 
lion tons. 

• Angola (7 million): About 
million people still face starvation 
next year, according to the FAO. 
Wax continues to cripple farm pro- 
duction and food import require- 
ments are estimated to be about 
360,000 tons, about the same as the 
previous year. 

• Botswana (840,000): Drought 
continues in Botswana with Lois 
year’s harvest a mere 20.000 tons, 
or about 10 percent, of the coun- 
try’s annual consumption require- 
ment. The FAO estimated that 60 
percent of the population will be in 
need of food aid next year. 

Food aid requirements for next 
year are estimated at 180,000 tons, 
or 5,000 tons less than last year. So 
far oily 41,000 tons of food has 


been pledged for the coming year. 

• Mozambique ( 10 million): The 
situation remains critical, with 2.6 
million people facing a serious star- 
vation threat. Civil war has brought 
farm production to a virtual stand- 
still Only 100,000 tons of grain 
were harvested locally, leaving a 
food aid requirement of half a mil- 
lion tons. 

• ape Verde (320.000): The 
tiny island nation produced only 
2,100 tons of gram, or less than 5 
percent of its requirement. Virtu- 
ally no rain has fallen this year an d 
the entire population is in need of 
food assistance. Food import re- 
quirements for next year are esti- 
mated at 70,000 tons, up from 
65,000 tons hist year. 


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Seoul Officials to Pursue Talks With North in ’86 



^1 


By Clyde Haberrnan ; 

New York Times Service 
SEOUL — After more than a 
year of unusually steady and even 
amicable negotiations. South Kore- 
an officials say that no substantive 
progress has been made with No^th 
Korea on possible two-way trade 
and large-scale exchanges of fam- 
ilies separated by war. 

Despite the pessimistic assess- 
ment, however, officials say that' 
they are not disappointed and that 
they will pursue talkie with the 
North into 1986. 

“We did not anticipate that any 
rapid progress would be made.” 
said South Korea's foreign minis- 
ter, Lee Won Kyung. 

“It will take a very, very long 
time," he said. “But this is the best 
way to keep North Korea under 
control and to ease tensions of the 
Korean peninsula." 

Since late 1984 the two Koreas 
have had more contact, on a wider 
range of issues, than at any point 
since they signed an armistice end- 
ing the Korean War in 1953. They 
have discussed possible economic 
cooperation, family reunions, joint 
sports ventures and discussions be- 
tween lawmakers. 

The mere fact that the countries 
are able to talk civilly borders on 
remarkable, given the vituperation 
that has dommated the relationship 
over the years. ' 

They can even point to a few 
small successes. Most conspicuous 
were the border crossings that 50 
Koreans from each side made in 
September for brief visits with rela- 
tives not seen since the early 1950s. 



Lee Won Kyung 


But building on such achieve- 
ments has proved difficult, as was 
demonstrated this month when the 
two Korean Red Cross societies 
met in Seoul to talk of ways to 
expand the recent family contacts 
to benefit an estimated 10 milli on 
separated relatives. 

Although the negotiators offered 
proposals that occasionally over- 
lapped, they agreed only to meet 
again, in the North Korean capital 
of Pyongyang in February. 

Mr. Lee and other South Korean 
leaders have sought to dampen re- 
ports that a face-to-face meeting is 
being arranged between their presi- 


dent. Chun Doo Hwan, and the 
North Korean leader. Kim 11 Sung. 

A senior member of North Ko- 
rea’s Workers Parly. Ho Dam, is 
believed to have visited Seoul in 
September to discuss such a top- 
level encounter. Recent accounts 
from Seoul and Tokyo suggested 
that South Korea's intelligence 
chief. Chang Se Dong, traveled to 
Pyongyang on a similar mission. 

South Korean officials and well- 
placed foreign diplomats have 
tended to avoid direct comment on 
these reports of high-level ex- 
changes. But they insist that no 
summit meeting has been set, and a 
Western diplomat said he thinks 
that both sides have "backed off" 
from the idea as being premature. 

Although reading North Korean 
intentions is difficult, many South 
Koreans say they believe that 
Pyongyang — diplomatically iso- 
lated and economically pressed — 
wants only to give an appearance of 
improved relations in the hope of 
eventually sparking contact with 
the United States. Japan and West- 
ern Europe. 

Others are not so sure, however, 
that the North’s motives are insin- 
cere. (hie person familiar with the 
Red Cross talks said he had detect- 
ed a genuine desire by the Pyong- 
yang negotiators to reach an agree- 
ment that would permit family 
exchanges. 

Still the more prevalent view in 
Seoul is that North Korea’s “smfle 
diplomacy" is a tactic to camou- 
flage the fact that it has built up its 
forces along the highly fortified 
Korean dennHiarized zone. 


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South Korea's concern is not so 
much a full-scale invasion as the 
prospect of small military encoun- 
ters at the border and perhaps ter- 
rorist acts deep into southern terri- 
tory. 

According to senior officials. 
South Korea wiB become increas- 
ingly vulnerable to attacks as it 
draws closer to the 1988 Olympic 
Games, which will be held in Seoul. 


Nuclear Industry 
Assailed in U.K. 

Reuters 

LONDON — British legislators 
have compiled a highly critical re- 
port of Britain’s nuclear industry 
and its handlin g of dangerous ra- 
dioactive waste. The Tunes of Lon- 
don reported Monday. 

The report, now in its draft stage, 
expressed deep concern at the risks 
of reprocessing spent nuclear fuel 
the dumping of nuclear waste at sea 
and the industry’s lack of public 
accountability, The Times said. 

The d ocumen t said that Britain's 
nuclear industry is “virtually light 
years" behind those in other coun- 
tries in dealing with the safe dispos- 
al of waste, placing far too much 
reliance on research talcing place 
abroad, the newspaper reported. 


“Mit einem neuen Superlativ 
wartet Canon jetzt auf: Der 
groBte Hersteller von 
Spiegelreflexkameras pra- 
sentiert die Canon MC, 
apostr ophiert als ‘kleinste 
Autofokus Kamera der Welt’. 

‘Color Foto’ in Germany wrote this about die 
latest compact to come out of Canon 



Canon/VlC 















Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17, 1985 


Israelis Suggest Syria 
Can Keep Missiles if They 
Pose No Threat to Planes 


By William Gaibome 

Washington Post Service 

. JERUSALEM — Israeli leaders 
sought Monday to play down Syr- 
ia’s deployment of surface-to-air 
missile batteries dose to the Leba- 
nese border, suggesting that Syria 
could keep the SAM-2 weapons 
where they were as long as it did 
not use them against Israeli recon- 
naissance aircraft. 

. Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin 
said there was no compelling politi- 
cal or military objective at present 
that would justify Israel attacking 
the medium-range surface-to-air 
niissiles on Syrian soiL 

• “Without an aggressive attack” 
by Syria, he said in a speech, “there 
is no meaning in pressing for an 
initiative of war.” 

He said that the introduction of 
sophisticated weaponry into the 
Middle East had precluded “easy 
and pointless wars,” and stressed 
that Israeli military preparedness 
should be geared to swift reaction 
to aggression. 

Senior Israeli officials confirmed 


earlier that Israel had conveyed 
through U.S. diplomatic channels a 
warning to Syria to remove smaller 
SAM-6 and SAM-8 weapons that 
had been deployed in Lebanon's 
Bekaa Valley on the Beirui-Damas- 
cus Highway. 

Mr. Rabin's remarks wine con- 
siderably more guarded than warn- 
ings issued Sunday by officials of 
the Israeli military cammand, who 
spoke of an “extremely dangerous 
situation” and drew a parallel be- 
tween the Syrian missile deploy- 
ment three weeks ago and a similar 
move in the spring of 1981 

At that time, Israeli warplanes 
attacked Syrian missile batteries 
along the Lebanese border. Those 
al lacks preceded the June 6, 1982, 
Israeli invasion of Lebanon. 

The Israeli Army command an- 
nounced Sunday that the Syrians 
had moved three concentrations of 
SAM-2 weapons dose to the Leba- 
nese border, thereby curtailing the 
Israeli Air Force's ability to con- 
duct high-altitude reconnaissance 


THE BREAKFAST TIME TOAST 

At 9am each day the board members of James 
Bur rough may be found making their toast 

That's the time when they sample and 'nose' the 
previous day's distillation of Beefeater London Dry. 

They like their toast to be dear, brilliant and subtly 
balanced. With a dry softness that doesn’t overwhelm 
the palate. 

Only then is it allowed to leave the distillery 
bearing the proud name of Beefeater. 

J Sj Invariably it meets the required high 

■4 standard. 

■P Which is undoubtedly what prompts 
them to raise their glasses to the memory 
S; of their founder Mr. James Burrough. 

A man who, just like them, was 
VS inordinately fussy about his dry toast 



6 Afrikaners Marcos Acknowledges Split in 


- ' . -r-y. 


Killed by 
Mine Near 
Zimbabwe 



ThjtQn 




(Continued bom Page 1) 
conducts raids into South-West Af- 
rica, also known as Namibia, in a 
campaign to end. South African 
role of the territory in defiance of 
the United Nations. 

■General Maian interrupted a va- 
cation to fly to the scene of the 
explosion, where the news agency 
feu hn reported him as saying, “It is dear 
Yitzhak Rabin that the ANC is going out of its 

way with this sort of action to farce 
flights over most of the Bekaa Val- a co . afUct . between South Africa 


ley and northern Lebanon. 

The Israelis contended that the 


and its neighbors.” 

Foreign Minister RJF. Botha 


area protected by an “umbrdla” of said the government was Urgently 
Soviet-supplied SAM-2 missiles approaching” Zimbabwean au- 
was where pro-Syrian Palestinian “ ormes m connection with the 
guerrilla groups were most active. explosion, with an aim of 

Military sources said that the ' eroovm 8 the threat of violence.” 
purpose of Sunday’s warning was . P 6 explosion caused what was 
to signal Damascus that white fare- believed to be the largest white ca- 


di might tolerate the presence of the soalty toD in a angle incident ance 
missiles, which are all in Syrian a 041 bomb killed 19 persons and 
territory, it would not tolerate their ' S> ure £ B ^ oot 200 ' m Pretorii * ‘ m 
use ag a in st Israeli reconnaissance , 

aircraft fly ing over Lebanon. According to unofficial lists, the 

The suggestion was that the over- deaths brought to 1,000 the number 
flights would continue, although killed m n ? ore 1S . “““to of 
Israeli military sources refused to against apartheid, the gov- 

mnfirm this eminent’s system of legalized race- 

Abba Eban, chairman of the separation. . 

Foreign Affairs and Defense Com- **&**?/ headquarters m Pre- 
nrittee in the Knesset, Israel’s par- locUL ' *** A 6 * 811 ca P^ 

liament, said Monday that there said m a statement Monday the 
would be no justification for Israel casualties were members of two 
attacking the missile bases now famines and that four of those 
“We have to pat up with the fact kflled were children under the age 
that other people have sovereign “ JJ- ^ otber mo were 
territory in which they can do what Tbe press association said the 
they like,” he said on state radio, «P»osion occurred three kfloine- 
“and one cannot possibly have any ters (two miles) from the border 


influence on what sovereign conn- “«*“ !«««*», « 

tries do in their territory" mining and farming town. It said 

Mr. Eban added, “Tm sure Syria sedand mines Tolled one peron 
would love to be able u tell us uymed seven, including five 
where to put our miagflws in such a solc “ers, m the same area last 

way so as not to have any influence rn ^“ L . 

on Syrian territory " News of the deaths spread across 

Hesrid he saw no evidence that ** 

Syria was seeking a military con- Vow an Afrikaner holiday marir- 
frontation with Israel “8 ^edrfeat of a large Zulu tribal 

_ n .. . 0 . force by outnumbered mute pio- 

■ Reaction m Syria neocs at Blood River in Natal mov- 


and 30 kOometers from Messina, a 


ing the defeat of a large Zum tribal 
force by outnumbered white pio- 
neers at Blood River in Natal prov- 


The government-controlled ince cm Dec. 16, 1838. 


press in Damascus said Monday 
that Syria would not be intimidated 
by what it said were renewed mili- 


l New Incursion Reported 

South African forces have a gain 


THE GIN OF ENGLAND 


tary threats from Israel, Reuters advanced deep inside Angolan ter- 
reported. ritory, a special correspondent for 

The comments followed a state- die Mozambican news agency AIM 
ment Sunday by the Israeli Army r e P or tod Monday from Ongiva, 
chief. General Moshe Levy, that near the Angolan-Namibian oor- 
Syria had moved SAM-2 weapons de r, Age ncc France-Pressereport- 
to its border, posing a threat to °d frota Maputo, Mozambique. 
Israeli flights over Lebanon. The report quoted Captain Jose 

He said the missiles were moved an Angolan officer, as say- 

in after Israeli reconnaissance ^ Ongiva that the South Afn- 
planes shot down two Syrian MiGs 0111 ®dvance had taken place since 
on Nov. 19. Thursday. 


(Continued from Page 1) 
Otherwise, Fm going to kick out 
everybody and put in new men.’ ” 
The president said he told his 
generals be was concerned about 
some “lapses in intelligence and 
discipline.” 

Taking pan in the interview, 
which was conducted at Malacan- 
ang Palace, were the executive edi- 
tor of The New York Times, AM, 
Rosenthal and the foreign editor, 
Warren Hoge 

The United States had pressured 
Mir. Marcos not to reinstate Gener- 
al Ver and now is pressing for his 
early removal saying the return of 
a man who is seen as symbolizing 
political patronage in the armed 
forces would set back efforts for 
reform. 

Mr. Marcos has hinted that the 
reinstatement of General Ver is 
temporary, but has declined to say 
definitely that he would be re- 
moved. 

Asked if General Ver would re- 
tain his post through elections 
scheduled for Feb. 7. Mr. Marcos 
declined to be specific, saying; "I 
doubt it I would like to settle this 
problem as soon as possible, and 
when I say as soon as possible, it 
may happen next week. It may hap- 
pen the week after that.” 

He implied that General Ver 
would stay on as a consultant even 
if he were removed from his com- 
mand. 

Mr. Marcos’s disclosure of a rift 
between the support os oF General 
Ver and General Ramos was the 
first confirmation of factional trou- 
bles wi thin the Philippine militar y 
Hints of the problem "have beat 
disclosed to outsiders, but Mr. 
Marcos is the first official to say it 
is hampering the military’s perfor- 
mance of its mission. 

“The whole armed forces is 
slowed down by facti onalism, ” he 
said. 

Mr. Marcos announced earlier a 
top-to- bottom reorganization of 
the military, but some officers have 
dismissed this as a ploy to deflect 
U.S. criticism of General Vers re- 
instatement and of the state of dis- 
cipline, t raining and performance 
of the mflitaiy. 

The day after General Ver’s rein- 
statement, Mr. Marcos said, the 
two generals and some of their sup- 
porters confronted each other in 
the president's office, where be had 
called them to “put your hair 
down.” 

T told than I don't intend to 
scandalize the armed forces,” he 
said, “but Tm going to file charges 
against anybody who doesn’t fol- 
low orders.” 

“Wen, they have coded down,” 
the president added. “1 told them 
the facts of life. There is no rival- 
ry.” He quoted the two generals as 
saying that both of them would 
probably resign together.- 


Mr. Marcos said that the Ameri- 
can pressure not to reinstate Gen- 
.eral Ver had caused a backlash 
among his military supporters and 
their rivals, both of whom be said 
had begun to “hold bade” in the 
performance of their duties, wait- 
ing for a resolution of the situation. 

Asked if this was harming the 
battle against the' Communist in- 
surgency in the country, Mr. Mar- 
. cos said: “Oh. they would fight. 
But they wouldn't follow the initia- 
tive.” 

He said that General Ver had 
asked only to be reinstated after his 


acquittal so that he could recover 
his honor and good name, and of- 
fered to resign the same day. 

“I said, 'No. you’ve got some 
problems to settle, because of 
course there was a confrontation 
on policies-' ” 

On other subjects, Mr. Marcos 


• Western worries about ad- 
vances in guerrilla activities are ex- 
aggerated, probably because for- 
eign analysts are not familiar 
enough with the situation. 

• Despite official assurances to 
the contrary, some Americans have 


become actively involved hr jgjjje:'-, 
porting the p^tical oppotdm i 
headed by Coraifon C. Aqumo, Mfc 
Aquino's widow. After snggestiigt--' 
that the U.S) Central Int^g^S. 
Agency might be among these peST' 
pie, he said, he had recoved ad^. 
ances that there would be no &«m. 
dal support for anyone. 

• Reacting to a statement, ' 
Mrs. Aquino that she probxfara! 
would put him on trial for ber&a* ' 
band's murder if she. wins fbe.pfccff. 
tion, Mr. Marcos raid, “I rc&K '• 
she has nerve, but this is a litfletife' 
much.” • 


If She Is Elected, Aquino Asserts, 
Marcos May Be Tried for Murder 


(Coatamed from Page I) 

getting so many crash courses at 
this point in my life,” she said. 

.attended^ by^an^-stimated 20.CKX) 
supporters, Mrs. Aquino made her 
first public campaign pledge; 

“If you decl ine president I will 
not live in Malacanang.” the presi- 
dential palace, she said. “1 will hold 
office there but I will live in my 
own bouse, and I will give the pal- 
ace to the people.” 

At one point during the inter- 
view she sad she could remember 
only one of the two key issues on 
which her backers and those of her 
running mate, Salvador H. Laurel 
have not yet readied agreement 

She said one issue was the two 
large U.S. military bases here. She 
said she favored the removal of the 
bases but that this would depend 
on other issues, which she declined 
to name, after the' bases agreement 
expires in 1991. 

She seemed to be uncertain of 
the implications of her threat to put 
Mr. Marcos on trial if he loses the 
election, and modified her position 
in the course of the interview. 

After a previous report that she 
might want to put him on trial the 
president responded that such a 
course might mean war between his 
followers and hers. ■ • 

“So what will I say, ‘Mr. Marcos, 
you can go ahead and run and even 
if you win FH be so kind?’ ” she 
raid when asked to darify her posi- 
tion^ “I cannot ray that. I thmb he 
Wifl be gjrren due process of law. He 
will be given justice which was de- 
nied my husband. Can’t we leave it 

at that? You reaHy want Marcos to 
shoot me, don’t you?” ; 

Hwhmh»ndRmignnS Afptinii 

Jr, -a. popular Opposition leader, 
was assassinated m l 983 as he re- 
turned to Manila after three years 
of self-imposed exile in the United 
States. 


one of them military men, were 
acquitted Dec 2. of the murder ii a 
trial she called a sham. She has said 
repeatedly that she holds Mr. Mar- 
cos responsible for the murder of 
her husband. 

Mrs. Aquino said not being a 
politician and not having clear 
ideas of government give her an 
advantage in facing Mr. Marcos. 

“He has never met anybody like 
me,” she said. “I mean he knew my 
husband because my husband was 
a politician. I am not a politician, 
so he never knows, or at least I 
think he doesn't know everything 
Tm going to da” 

Like many Filipinos, Mrs. 
Aquino acknowledged Mr. Mar- 
cos’s brilliance as a politician, and 
cited his ability to stay in power for 
20' years while keeping the moder- 
ate opposition fragmented. 

Asked about the specifics of her 
program, now that she is the leader 
of the opposition, she said, “we 

have thf. minim run pr ogram nf gov- 
ernment,” but that two aspects of it 
remain in contention, one of which 
is the issue of the bases; 

Asked the second issue, she said; 
“I forget now. I just remember the 


pose him say, she answered, *'Na£ 
anymore.” 

“You don’t have to be so nenoar- 
because, my goodness, we arejtt 
underdogs," she said. 

■ U.S. Accused of Interfc&eHfcJ 

A senior Philippine cabinet dbb» 
is ter accused the United States 
Monday of interfering in Rufina 
pine politics and said Washington 


— ri — ' , rr v 7 ' jw . 

February’s presidential riectioi»; 
Reuters reposted from Manila: - 

Labor Minister Bias F. Opleaaid' 
the U.S. Congress had “any Burnt! 
ber of resolutions that practto8j£ 
fo rmal™ and legitimize ihnt 
vention. These are all 
highly visible si g ns of mterveutioi# 
in our politics. . . . TTtlp. 

“I think there is no mistaking ifag 

fact that American authorities^ 
working visibly or otherwise;- 
pressing their support for the Corai 
zon Aquino-Salvador Laurel tfr&sf 
et,” Mr. Ople said. . . - ■$ ; 


Police in 


Twenty-six defendants,. all but! I 


She defended her vagueness on 
Issues, saying: “Look, Marcos 
promised so many thin g * He had 
such a beautiful prog ram . And yet 
kx>k at what happened to this 
country.” 

! Asked for her analysis of the 
New People’s Army, tne military 
wing of the Communist- Party, that 
has been a growing concern here 
and in Washington, she first re- 
ferred ber questioners to a . Jesuit 
priest who works with shim dwell- 
ers. 

■ “I asked him one night to come 
here and brief me on communism 
and how we go about fighting it 
and aH that,” she said. 

Asked whether she believed the 
United Stales was supporting Mr. 
Marcos, as many Filipinos who op- 


Break Up Protest Camp! 

WACKERSDORF, 'west.Ga&£ 
many — Riot police and units ' 
the paramilitary frontier gwirij| 
broke up a camp of anti-nudeaf^ 
protesters Monday near tfrej.- 
Czechoslovak border and briefly- 
rounded op about 800 demonstiad 
tors. 

Witnesses said there were sad-- - 
fles as 2,000 police formed a hunmr 
chain around the camp on^ 
climbed over log barricades 
ded with nails to surround thepra^' 
testers. Protesters were arrested? 
and set free a short time later. Thejr : ■■ 
could later face charges of obstruct' 
tion. The demonstrators had 
fused to leave the area, the planned^ 
site of West Gcnnany's first nacie^ - 
ar reprocesang plant. 


li itiTH WHKTvtTsfSm 











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iter-' 1 





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After four days of violent rainstorms, 
jungle heat and fierce roads, two 
Toyota Ceiica Turbos plunged across 
the finish line to a thrilling one-two 
victory in the 1985 ivory Coast Rally. 
For Toyota, it was a repeat of their 
dual triumph in the Safari Rally earlier 
in the year, as champion drivers 
J. Kankkunen and B. Waldegaard 


dominated the race. Neither had 
serious problems with their cars, 
though only 8 of 50 starters 
finished. 

Once again, these superbly strong, 
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pionship quality and technological 
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3 


TOYOTA 





Page 8 


licralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



tribune 


hUMied *3di n» Nn* YoA Timet and Tbe Wmbmptoa PM 


Terror Denounced at Last 


The United Nations has just concluded a 
decade-long effort to condemn terrorism- Why 
was it so herd to speak out clearly against 
hijacking airliners, bombing buses and mur- 
dering civilians? Because a leading perpetrator 
of these crimes, the Palestine Liberation Orga- 
nization, is a potent force in the General As- 
sembly. It wrapped them in the doak of a 
struggle for setf-determination agains t Israel 
and, by extension, the United States 
, What broke the FLO’S intimidation of its 
customary protectors, the Communist-pl us- 
Third World majority? The PLO is widely 
recognized now as a principal actor in inter- 
national terrorism. Its role in hijacking the 
AchiHe Lauro was merely its most conspicuous 
recent embarrassment — so much of one, in 
fact, that Yasser Arafat was subsequently 

compelled to condemn acts against innocent 
and defenseless people, unless — his cynical 
exception — they ore Israelis. 

As terrorism has increased, moreover, so has 
the number of nations victimized by it. So long 
as Israelis were the main target, many other 
nations bought the PLO's argument that the 
“underlying cause” of terrorism is Israeli op- 
pression. But how to explain such deeds as the 
kidnapping of four Soviets, and the murder of 
one, by crazies in Beirut? It turned out that the 
PLO was popularizing not so much the Pales- 
tinian cause as the terrorist example, teaching 


its methods to those with other purposes, ex- 
tending its reach and hurt, in an awful sense 
s ec ularizin g and democratizing tL 

Thus was created a constituency ready to 
say, with no ifs, ands or buts, that terrorism is 
bad. Cuba tried to muddy the issue by working 
in a condemnation of “slate terrorism" — 
Assemhiy-esc for Israel and the United States. 
The Bri tish and the Americans, furthering a 
rampalg n to get other nations to deepen their 
commitment against terrorism, replied that 
there was no shortage of legal instruments 
condemning questionable acts committed by 
states, but that what was needed was an instru- 
ment to counter terrorism committed by 
groups and individuals, a phenomenon other- 
wise hard to pin down by law. In committee; 
Cuba's proposition got one vote: Cuba’s. 

On Dec. 9 the whole Assembly condemned 
“as criminal all acts, methods and practices of 
terrorism wherever and by whomever commit- 
ted." The adoption, said a UN document, 
“was followed by applause from the represen- 
tatives." It was earned. Secretary-General Ja- 
vier Pferez de Coaiar said ibis was how the UN 
system was supposed to work: nations uniting 
in solidarity on universal problems. 

It is a long way from word to deed, but 
saying the right ward is important and finally, 
on terrorism, the United Nations has said it 
— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Uganda’s Slide Continues 


Uganda is disintegrating. Civil order in the 
one-time pearl of Africa has broken down. A 
rebel army is dosing in on Kampala, where 
iood supplies have been cut off, education has 
been halted and private armies stalk the 
streets. Colonialism, tribalism and the legacy 
of Idi Amin are taking a cumulative toU 
How could a once prosperous society fall so 
far? The answer has to begin with Mil Lon 
Apollo Obote, who led Uganda to indepen- 
dence and twice served as president, from 1962 
to 1971 and from 1980 to 1985. Despite his 
generally competent economic management, 
he permanently alienated the largest tribal 
group, the Baganda. by sending troops against 
them in 1966. His second term began with a 
rigged election and was stained by the wide- 
spread trilling of dviHans by an undisciplined 


army. This year that army finally ousted him 
The years between Mr. Obote's regimes be- 
longed mostly to the monstrous Idi Amin, who 
turned mast murder into a policy. Under Mr. 
Obote and Mr. Amin, probably one of every 20 
Ugandans were lolled — more than half a 
million. In recent months what passes for 
power has been held by a military council 
combining collaborators of and rebels against 
Mr. Amin and Mr. Obote. But the main rebel 
leader, Yoweri Museveni, has continued to 
fight, and Us National Resistance Army is 
now dosing in on Kampala. Kenya, a neighbor 
with historic ties, deserves credit for Hying to 
broker a political settlement But it seems too 
much to expect that Uganda’s nightmare can 
quickly end even if the fighting stops. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


A Good Man for Refugees 


Few jobs are harder, or more heartbreaking, 
than that of United Nations High Commis- 
sioner for Ref ogees. The incumbent is steward 
of the hapless millions dislocated by invasions, 
civil ware and rebellions. As the High Com- 
mission’s operations and budget have grown, 
so has the importance of the job. That is why 
the scramble among five nations to name the 
successor to Pool Hartling was so unseemly. 

The Netherlands, Sweden, Norway and 
Egypt all pul forward senior diplomats, none 
with outstanding qualifications for the job. 
Fortunately Switzerland, which is not a UN 
member, put forward Jean-Pierre Hocke, oper- 
ations director of the Swiss-based Internation- 
al Committee of the Red Cross. His credentials 
were dearly the strongest His choice by Secre- 
tary-General Javier P6rez de Cudllar bodes 
well for the commisrion work in 80 countries 
— and should build support among major 
donors for its SSOO-nnQion operating budget 

It lakes strong leadership to keep the special 


agencies from the bogs of politics and p&tronr 
age- Most of their work is in poorer countries 
but most of their funds come from Western 
democracies. To its dame, the Soviet Union 
refuses voluntary contributions to UN agen- 
cies, claiming speciously that capitalism bears 
all responsibility for Third World distress. 
Even so, the Soviet bloc eagerly promotes its 
causes and job-seekers in those agencies. 

Not unreasonably, the major donors are 
masting on minimum standards of compe- 
tence and fairness at United Nations agencies. 
UNESCO failed that test, resisting reform 
even after the United States withdrew. Now 
Britain, too, is quitting. One salutary result is a 
fresh appreciation of sound leadership. The 
Red Cros bas an exemplary record in provid- 
ing disaster relief and of impartially defending 
the rights of war prisoners. Hie Office of the 
High Commissioner stands to benefit from 
Mr. Hooke’s firm administrative band. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


Until the Present Boss Leaves 

In deciding to implement its threatened 
withdrawal from UNESCO, the British gov- 
ernment very sensibly declined to take at their 
face value the pseudo- reforms agreed to in 
Sofia by the organization with the sole object 
or avoiding loss of further members. In the 
light of past experience there are no grounds 
for believing that the “politicization" and mal- 
administration of UNESCO can be eliminated 
while its present director-general remains in 
office. This was no doubt the main consider- 
ation that influenced the British decision, and 
it will probably serve as a guide to other 
governments that are considering withdrawal 
— New Zurcher Zeitung (Zurich). 

An Unfinished Christmas Gift 

In 1952 I was one or many college students 
who professed their growing alienation from 
organized religion. Although I was raised in a 
churchgoing family and still considered myself 
a Christian, I shared some of my fellow stu- 
dents’ skepticism about the ability of the 
church to challenge social injustice in Ameri- 


can society. At the time I was dating a minis- 
terial student named Martin Luther King Jr. 
He surprised me by saying that he also had 
some doubts about the relevance of the church. 
However, he insisted, “To really cany out the 
precepts of Jesus would be the most revolu- 
tionary and dangerous thing in the world." 
Every Christmas season I remember those 
words as if they were spoken yesterday. That, 
for me, is the spirit of Christmas. 

The unfinished Christian revolution is' a 
challenge of burning urgency for people of 
good will everywhere. As my husband said in 
his final published statement: “Jesus of Naza- 
reth wrote no books, he owned no property to 
endow him with influence. He had no friends 
in the courts of the powezfnL But be (hanged 
the course of mankind with only the pom and 
despised . . . Naive and unsophisticated 
though we may be, the poor and despised at 
the 20th century will revolutionize this era. We 
will fight for human justice, brotherhood, se- 
cure peace and abundance for all When we 
have won these in the spirit of unshakable 
nonviolence, then in luminous splendor the 
Christian era will truly begin.” 

— Syndicated columnist Coretta Scott King. 


FROM OUR DEC 17 PAGES, 75 AIND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: f A Million Men Would Rise Up* 

WASHINGTON — If war were imminent, the 
excitement could hardly be greater than that 
which has followed the report of Jacob M, 
Dickinson, Secretary of War, on U.S. military 
unpreparedness. The “peace" party in Con- 
gress. led by Mr. Tawney, chairman of the 
Committee on House Appropriations, accuses 
the Secretary of War. Representatives from 
Pacific const stares, manufacturers of arma- 
ments and some newspapers of a conspiracy to 
frighten the country, so as to secure large 
appropriations. The altitude of the “peace" 
party was expressed by a member of Congress: 
“It is folly to talk about 100,000 men bang 
landed on our shores. A millio n men would 
rise up to drive out the invaders, and if we do 
not have ammunition we will use stones.” 


1935: In Defense of Birdi Control 
NEW YORK — What is regarded as one of 
the strongest defenses of birth control ever 
advanced in this country has been issued by 13 
Protestant and Jewish clergymen in response 
to a sermon in which Cardinal Hayes assailed 
a proposal to issue birth control information 
only to families dealing such knowledge. The 
Cardinal disclosed that he was speaking not 
only as a Roman prelate but as an American, 
which caused the clerical critics to point out: 
“For one religious group to attempt to exercise 

authority over other groups, whether that au- 
thority be legal social or ethical is undemo- 
cratic and out of place in America-" Of greater 
importance is that those replying to the Cardi- 
nal take issue with his theory that birth control 
is either immoral or economically unwise. 


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JOHN HA Y WHITNEY, Chairma n 19S8-19B2 
KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M. FOISIE 
WALTER WELLS 
SAMUEL ABT 
ROBERT K. McCABE 
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Eieamw Editor RENEBONDY Deputy PubUlher 

Editor ALAEN LECOUR AaoStriePMsker 

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TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17, 1985 



Conditions far Talks to Save South Africa 


L ONDON — What we see in South Africa is 
/ nothing less than the dangerous breakup of 
a political system that has endured, in one form 
or another, for more than three centuries. At the 
heart of the crisis lies the problem of how to 
arrange a rapid transition from a political system 
entrmchmg exclusive white rule to enfranchise- 
ment of the blade majority in such a way as to 
avoid economic and social chaos. In a word, the 
problem is how to avoid revolutionary collapse. 

Tiying to deal with this situation, by simply 
reforming the apartheid laws would be oke plas- 
tering over the surface of a structure that has 
already crumbled at its foundations. . 

President P.W. Botha ami. the ruling establish- 
ment see the. full implications of tins historic 
crisis. It is precisely because they know that the 
phasing out of apartheid laws inevitably entails 
the end of white political dominance — and 
predudes the re-establishment of white control 
by other meant — that their commitment to 
reform appears clumsy and inconsistent, and 
that they choose to rely so heavily on the use of 
force to contain the forces of the opposition. 

Those who call for Mr. Botha's resignation in 
the belief that it could help to speed political 
change fail to see the difficulties that would 
confront any white leader in the present crisis. 
There is no leader with higher sfamHtng among 
Af rikan ers or with greater experience of political 
maneuvering. None of the contenders who might 
succeed him can claim better qualifications for 
steering the country through its present crisis. If 
P.W. Botha cannot succeed, no one an. 

But President Botha is in a dilemma 
Every move he ma kes in flnnnimra'ng intended 
changes away from apartheid (let alone imple- 
menting them) feeds a right-wing backlash. Re- 
cent results in five by-elections, despite the ruling 
party’s victory in four of them, stow that there - 
has been a significant swing to the extremists. 

The government is in no real risk of being 
swept from office. But it has not yet begun to 
implement any of the bard decisions, it has 
merely pointed the way toward change — and 
even so, the white electorate shows signs of 
taking fright- And Mr. Botha would find it diffi- 
cult to move forward if his base among Afrika- 
ners were seen to be crumbling. 

However, the longer he delays and the greater 
the force be employs, the more likely he makes an 
increase in violence from the increasingly mili- 
tant black opposition. This increase m black 
violence in turn feeds the white backlash and 
may increase the tendency by white militants to 
resort to illegal violence; mid it increases reliance 
on the use of force by the state. 

There is a third dimension to Mr. Botha's 


By Colin Legnm 


dilemma Many Sooth Africans believe that the 
reason why Afrikaners are starring to turn away 
from Ml Botha is that they are losing faith in his 
ability to cany out iris informs. Afrikaners axe 
more apprehensive about their future than at any 
time in their history, and they desperately need 
reassurance. All many can see is that ever since 
Mr. Botha embarked on his cautious policy of 
refonnsrlfce country has become increasingly 
less governable and Mack violence has increased 

Mr. Botha’s critics argue that he should ignore 
the rids of backlash and move boldly forward to 
avert .violent collapse. WTH he listen to this ad- 
vice? The signs at present are not encouraging. 

He continues to think he has manipulative 
options. He believes that by making such conces- 
sions as introducing black leaders uto his presi- 


The country is not beyond 
hope. Whites and blacks now 
recognise a common stake 
hi avoiding a complete 
economic breakdown and a 
racial conflagration. 


A Mitral <vmnn 1 he can divide the black opposi- 
tion while demonstrating his wffimgness to begin 
the process of power-sharing. He continues to 


pin his faith on substantial reforms in the lower 
tiers of government to give blacks a greater say in 
mnna^ringi their affairs in urban areas. 

But none of this is likely to work. The political 
realty is that he has two choices: to move toward 
even greater dictatorial and forceful measures 
against black violence, or to bain serious negoti- 
ations with representative black leaders. 

His own view is that both are necessary. But h 
is unclear which of the two win predominate. 

There is little doubt that he has enough force at 
his disposal to resist black opposition and vio- 
lence for several years. But if be takes this hard 
line he cannot engage influential black leaders in 
negotiations about a post-apartheid political sys- 
tem. AH be will succeed in doing is to bring the 
country nearer to revolutionary change, while 
completing the alienation of Western govern- 
ments. Hie has already lost Western publics. 

His other choice — entering into serious nego- 
tiations — requires that he agree to precondi- 


tions essential to the credibility of representative 
black leaders. Are such trams available? 

S™>nHings among influential black leaders 
suggest that they are anxious to negotiate rather 
than fight, and that they may be ready to start 
negotiations on the following terms: 

• Repeal of the four crucial laws underpin- 
ning apartheid: the Group Areas Act, which 
defines where people may live according to their 
race; the Population Registration Act, winch 
dafines people by race and tribe; the Separate 
Ameni ties Act, much enforces racial discrimina- 
tion in public services; the various urban areas 
acts that control where blacks live and work. 

• Lifting of the bans on the African National 
Congress and the Pan-Africanist Congress, 

• Unconditional release from prison of Nd- 
san Mandela and all other black leaders regarded 
as political detainees; and return from «De of 
Oliver Tambo and other political leadffs. 

The only hope of preventing South Africa 
from sliding further into violence and economic 
disaster is for both sides to be brought to the 
ne go tiatin g table. The most pressing need there- 
fore is to work toward getting agreement on an 
agenda that will start the negotiating process. 

External factors can play a crucial role. It is in 
the Western interest to break the cycle of vio- 
lence repression and to facilitate negotiation 
on the kind of South Africa in which all its 
communities will fed secure and at peace. 

E xternal pressures in the form of sanctions, 
along with internal pressures, undoubtedly 
played a major part in compelling the govern- 
ment to accept the need to abandon apartheid in 
principle. But if external pressures are to be 
positively effective they should now be geared to 
persuading both sides to agree to terms for nego- 
tiating thar future in a democratic South Africa. 

If the new Commonwealth commissi on — 
eminent figures from Australia, Barbados, Brit- 
ain, C-m niida, India, Nigeria and Tanzania — is to 

produce results, it should have as its primary task 

the diplomatic one of getting President Botha to 
accept an agenda acceptable to the most repre- 
sentative brack leaders. Perhaps only such a 
tenig n outride initiative can persuade him to set 
South Africa on a new course. 

The situation is desperately serious and will 
continue to deteriorate rapidly unless negotia- 
tions can be started. But the country is not 
beyoodhope. Both whites and blades now recog- 
nize tlmir common stake in avoiding a complete 
economic breakdown and a racial conflagration. 


The writer, a syndicated columnist and veteran 
commentator on African affairs, returned recently 
from a monthlong tour of South Africa. 


A Radical 


An Italian 
System, 
Disguised 


Mg buktf 


By Michael Barone 

This is the first of two articles. 


VETASHINGTON —The United 
W Stales does not need a parlia- 
mentary system, as columnists and 
former presidential aides so often 
claim. It doesn't need one because it 
already has one. But the system isnot 
modeled on the country that critics of 
the American system would like. 

The parliamentary system most 
critics have in mind is the British one, 
where the party in power selects the 
prime minister and has an automatic 
legislative majority for whatever it 
proposes; its budget is adopted with- 
in days, and temporarily unpopular 
measures can always be passed. 

Quite a contrast, it is said, with. 
America’s separate executive and leg- 
islative brandies, with its yearlong 
wrangles over the budget, with its 
presidents often opposed by obdu- 
rate majorities in Congress. 

But m practice America already 
has a parliamentary system. Not the 
British one — the Italian one. 

Italian politics is often put down as 
unstable — changing cab i ne ts, divid- 
ed responsibility, splinter parties. 
Ministries that confer responsibility 
for various issues are rotated In Italy 
among feuding politicians so as to 
assemble a majority in Parliament. 

Functional responsibility — not 
necessarily the title, but the real ded- 
sion-mahng power — gets passed 
around in America as well, to those 
strong enough to grab it Witness the 
recent jostling over the Gramm-Rnd- 
man and tax reform legislation. 



In a parliamentary system, execu- 
tive departments are headed by legis- 
lators, while in the United States 
those are supposed to be separate 
jobs. But in the past few years an 
executive officer, David Stockman, 
as director of the Office of Manage- 
ment and Budget, had such control 
over the legislative process that begot 
a House notmtoally controlled by the 
other party to pass a Ml with his 
penciled notations written in the 
margins; and Les Aspin, n ominally a 
congressman from Wisconsin, effec- 
tively made an executive branch deci- 
sion to bufld a certain number of MX 
missiles with a certain basing mode. 

It is a tradition in Itaiy to bemoan 
the instability of the government and 
the weakness of the parijamentary 
system. Yet Italy enjoys buoyant eco- 
nomic growth and cultural vitality, 
anrf even, has a government that has 
lasted three years in office. 


America’s system has produoed de- 
cisions on important issues and has 
adopted ptiBctes — Social Security 
cuts and a gas tax, for instance — 
that were considered politically im- 
possible. Yoa may or may not consid- 
er these policies desirable, but you 
have to admit that the UJS. pariia- 


mentary system gets w 

How tins works is not apparent 
when you regard the system with the 
usual labels attached. But it becomes 
dear when you consider -who, in ef- 
fect, has assumed the function of 
prime minister, who makes policy on 
the central issue of the day. 

Sometimes there are interregnums, 
times when no one makes paficy ef- 
fectively, That was true during much 
of the Carter presidency. 

, But once 1980 we have seen four 
functioning parliamentary govern-, 
meats in five years — fewer than the 
Italian postwar average, but more 


A Flawed Alliance to Be Grateful For 


B OSTON — It was a moment of 
drama that slipped into melo- 
drama. On the Oslo stage, the world 
stage, one American doctor and erne 
Soviet, Bernard Lown and Yevgeni 
Chazov, stood defending their new 
Nobel Peace Prize on Dec. 9. In 
front of them, journalists were 
questioning the choice of an organi- 
zation that had Herltowl to take a 
stand on Soviet human rights ques- 
tions. Suddenly, freakishly, a Soviet 
ftftittftrftrtiwn slumped over in his 
chair, in cardiac arrest 
La an instant the two heads of 
In ternatio nal Physicians for the 
Prevention of Nuclear War were 
once again a pair of cardiologists. 
Laurel wreaths put aside, jackets 
off, the personal physician to the 
Kremlin and the American who in- 
vented the defibrillator took buns 
with the i m p romp tu team that got 
Lev Novikov’s heart beating agam. 

If such a scene had been written 

into a film, the director would have 
struck it out The symbolism was 
too pat, too easy in its emotional 
pufl. Indeed, a Russian expatriate 
at the press conference is said to 
have suggested that the heart attack 
itself was staged- But h was, rather, 
medicine as metaphor. East and 
West saving a human Hfe. The 
“code,” as they caO such an emer- 
gency team effort, taking instant 
priority over politics. 

Later Dr. Lown read it as a kind 
of sign that justified the group's 
decision to focus solely on the larg- 
est public health issue of all time: 
the threat of nuclear war. He said of 
the rescue, “It is the same with the 
threat of nuclear war. You treat it 
first and ask questions later.” The 
basic human tight is survivaL 


By Ellen Goodman 


Five years ago the doctors' group 
was founded with that notion, u 


physicians could bridge differences 
of culture and language and nation- 
ality to fin a cure for smallpox, 
Ttheir 


that makes for strange bedfellows. 
IL is just as easy fra: an “apolitical” 
idealist to believe that his cause is 
SO nnmpnniiw that it ft i m m ig h e*. afl 
others. The habit of sacrifiring a 


then maybe they could use 
special role to carve a path through, 
around, over East- West politics and 
speak as physicians about the 

threat for which Acre is no com 
Today they have 135,000 members 
in 41 countries who consktar them- 
selves doctors first. 

But it isn’t always as simple as it 
sounds. In the brief daylight hours ' 
in Oslo, a 12 -ycar-dd letter bad 
cast a moral shadow over Dr. Char : 
zov. In 1973 he had signed a letter 
denouncing nnn thw Nobel winner, 
the disorient physicist Andrei Sa- 
kharov. Ironically, Mr. Sakharov’s 
first steps into dissent were taken 
when be opposed Soviet nuclear 
testing in .toe atmosphere. 

The letter was a reminder of the 
disequilibrium in any joint venture 
with the Soviets. The Soviet ade of 
a “citizens’ movement” is always 
quasi-offid&L Than is private life 
but no private rector in the Soviet 
Union, rally those with stale ap- 
proval and those who dissent 

But the question is whether the 
shadow of politics will darken the 
doctors’ efforts and taint die peace 
prize. Can one “do business” only 
with those whose histories are pria- 
tine? Can we work together for one 
goal tiptoeing around fundamental 
differences in values, without be- 


can be addictive and destructive. 

But at . the imw, more than 

one union Of idealists has been 
srifintired by demands for purity, 
leaving the field to their, enemies. 
■ Even the enemies of peace. 

This time the Nobel committee 
(fid not find a flawless set of brows 
to crown. They, rarely do. Few 
peace pores are awarded without 
c on t ro versy. Even selfless Mother 
Teresa was regarded by some as a 
mnsemauka to the status quo. If 
every would-be international group 
for every endeavor — to save 
whales or. avrad- war -—demanded 
of its SqrieLmembers that they first 
disavow then" gov ernmen ts there 
would be nosuch group. - 

There who would disqualify the 
physicians cm (be basis of one cause 
and one'ktter should at least read 
another teats. Andrei Sakharov 
wrote in 1980: ‘Despite all that has 
happened, I fed that the questions 


mining 

What 


ts can wc mute 

for what ends? Ills not just politics 


are so dudal they must be given 
absolute priority, even in the most 
difficult caCTmsamcea." . - 
What these doctors have made is 
an imperfect alliance; but an affi-’ , 
ance mat is successful They have ; 
found a. angular, respected voice to ’ 
describe and prescribe. It is harder 
and messier and much more ethi- 
cally complex to try to save a world 
than to save a single patient But it 
isn’t just Lev Novakov who -Should 
begratefulthat they are on die ease. 


that Congress obediently passed. ' 
Stockman ministry fell after publica- 
tion of an article in which he gave 
credence to arguments against the 
policies be had just installed. 

Mr. Stockman was followed by a 
ministry effectively headed by Sena- 
tor Howard Baker, Republican of 
Tennessee, with Senator Robert 
Dole, Republican of Kansas, as min- 
ister of finance and Senator Pete Do- 
rhenid. Republican of New Mexioo. 
as minister of the budget. Together 
■ they wrote and passed the budget and 
tax bills of 1982. These established a 
status quo on budget and macroeco- 
nomic issues that has been largely 
maintained, through wildly varying 
economic times, era- since. The Bak- 
er ministry fdl after the 1982 elec- 
tions, when Republican losses in the 
Home persuaded Mr. Baker that the 
ministry no longer commanded a 

congressional majority. 

The third ministry was a grand 
coalition government, a combination 
between readers of two ordinarily 
hostile parties, of the sort West Ger- 
many had between 1967 and 1969 
and Britain got in 1916 and 1931. The 
coalition was formed in December 
1982 when Howard Baker walked 
across the Capital to Tip (yNeflTs 
office and agreed with him to support 
a roads-and-gas-tax bflL 
' Grand coalitions are used in Enro- 
pean parliamentary systems to pa*$ 
.measures that nwihw party alone 
could support politically; and so 
here. The coalition passed within 


political impossibility. A few months 
Later, following the promptings of a 
bipartisan commission that was in 
dose touch with coalition leaders 
O’Neill and Baker, Congress adopted 
previously unthinkable Social Securi- 
ty benefit cuts and tax increases. 

. Then the grand coahtion hunkered 
down and awaited the prosperity of 
1984, which returned it to office in 
the November dections. President 
Reagan, Tip O’Neill’s House Demo 
cats and the Senate Republicans 

were swept back to office in the most 

successful incumbent year in nearly 
200 years of American elections. 

The big political news of 1985 has 
been the breakup of the grand coali- 
tion. Ronald' Reagan broke it up last 
May. The questioa now is whether he 
can take its place.. 

. The Wadmpon Post 


Crusade, 


Misnamed 


7 V.’ 


than Italy has hpri during [he same 
period. Three of them were largely 
suocessfuL The mettle of the fourth is 
being lested-now: Can it command 
majorities an the major issues before 
Congress, and produce results that 
can be sustained over a long haul? 

The first prime minister was David 
Stockman. As the incoming director 
of the OMB in 1981 he had an effec- 
tive monopoly on info rmation about 
how the federal budget at that time 
worked, a monopoly that enabled 
him to determine the sfre and shape 


By Anthony Lewis 

B oston — Look up the Wi 

“conservative" in the dictionary, 
and you find such adjectives as “cuv. 
tious," “moderate," “prudent.” Now* 
think what today’s self-styled coasaZ 
vatives want to do with A m e ri cas 
foreign policy. You will understands 
bow an old political tradition has 
been transformed into something, 
radical and strange- 

The intellectual right that kVa 

down the line these days is gang bo £ 
for adventurism in foreign policy, u 
wants to fight on the beaches of An- 
gola and in the bills of Cambodia - l- 
not because the United States bap 
vital national interests there but ter; 
ea n s e ideology commands it Ameri- 
ca must fight communism wherever & 
appears in the Third World. -■ 

The scope of this new globalism 

was made dear the other day by Rep- 
resentative Jack Kemp, the conserva- 
tive standard-bearer from Buffalo; 
New York. He suggested overthrow- 
tog not only Angola's government 
but Mozambique’s as wdL 
American conservatism used to 
stand for caution to foreign affairs, 
for restraint. It was opposed to inter- 
national crusades, even a g ai ns t an 
ideology as uncongenial as comma- 
ni-tm it was worried about over- 
straining U.S. resources. It wanted 
to pursue limited goals abroad, by 
strictly constitutional means. 

Those were the views of Senator 
Robert Taft of Ohio — Mr. Conser- 
vative, as he was called to the 1950s. 

He even opposed the North Atlantic 
treaty to 1949 because he thought it 
committed the United Slates to un- 
foreseeable military obligations. As a 
strict constitutionalist he opposed 
fighting an undeclared war to Korea. 

Now we are in the age of the neo- 
conservatives, who want America to 
intervene everywhere. They do not 
care about constitutional or other 
niceties. Old-fashioned ideas — the 
tradition of respect for established 
gover nmen ts, the ingrained Ameri- 
can dislike of covert methods, the j 
obligation of presidents to respect the 
will of Congress — should not be 
allowed to get to the way of a crusade: 

The contrast between those two 
kinds of “conservatism" is brilliantly 
drawn by Christopher Layne to the 
winter issue of Foreign Policy. Hie 
Kills the old school “real conserva- 
tives" and says it is time for a reassra- 
tion of their cautious, realistic views. 

The neoconservatives, Mr. Layne 
says, believe that “the primary threat 
to the United States is ideologicaL” A 
failure of UJS. “resolve” anywhere 
will produce “a worldwide stampede 
to the Soviet camp.” Accordingly, 
neoconservatives argue that the Unit- 
ed States must try to roll back Com- 
munis: or Marxist ideology wherever 
it appears, at whatever pace. 

Mr. Layne points out a historical . 
irony: Hie crusade philosophy has# 7 
taken hold on the righl at a lime when 
the United Slates manifestly cannot 
afford unlimited foreign crusades. 
When Taft worried about the limits 
on American resources, the limits 
were not visible. Today they are. to 
enormous budget deficits and to a 
new states as a debtor nation. 

“The essence cf a conservative pd- 
tey,” Mr. Layne concludes, “is to pre- 
serve national strength, husband re- 
sources and expend than wisely” 

The American diplomat and schol- 
ar who has pre-eminently stood for 
realistic goals is George Kerman. By 
chance he has an essay to the current 
issue of Foreign Affairs s umming up 
his lifelong view that America must 
limit its commitments abroad to the 
essential and the achievable. 

“Americans must overcome their 
tendency toward generalization," Ik $ 
writes, “and learn to examine each 
case on its merit The best measure of 
these merits is not the attractiveness 
of certain general semantic symbols 
but the effect of the given situation 
on the tangible «mt demonstrable in- 
terests of tee United States.” 

That is study the way to begin 
analyzing any proposed crusade 
ab road: to terms of hard American 
interests. Are American lives or prop- 
erty threatened? Is there a threat to 
regional stability? What will the cost 
of intervention be, to dollars and 
damage to other American intaestS? 
What end do we foresee? 

Interventions and plots a gainst es- 
tablished governments used to go 
against the American grain; those 
were thought to be Soviet- tactics. I • 
Nowadays when politicians talk 
sually erf overthrowing governments 
for ideological reasons, hardly an 
eyebrow is raised. Such tactics are 
still wrong as a mattw of American 
values, but they also fafi the tine 
conservative test of interest 

The New York Times. 




! C; 

i i'ii< 


i ■ . 

ft*. 


^ x 

I 




i 


N 


LETTER 


Ss 


I am compelled to write to you 
about the use of the word "dissident” 
tn relation to East Europe. In Slavic 
languages the terms for “dissident” 
do not connote merely dissent bnt 
imply that those who are thus labeled 
are traitras. This so-called traitorous 
aspect spills over into everything *hat 
has any connection with them what 
they say cannot be listened to be- 
cause it is somehow traitorous. They 
tmMna be taken seriously. 

We should not continue to use a 
«nn with a connotation in Eastern 
“rope that irdoes not have to West- 
era Europe. The problem arises in 
particular when West and East Earo- 
P®aosmeet and the two rides attach 

meanings to the same word. 
fteNaooaal Peace Council prates 
h^pcak of people belonging to tode- 

Pendent organizations — of “todfr 
Pendents* for short For the sake of 

“dependent « 
cast Europe, it is worthwhile making 
U»e effort to change our usagpT^ 


SHEILA OAKES. 



a 4 : 






/ INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17, 1985 

ARTS / LEISURE 


^ Ilia 


The Quiet Intensify of Jim Hall 


r -*a»* FrankfuU “Das RheiiigoldV* Fasoit and Fafoer figures, with business-suited singers. 


GielerirBerghaus 'Ring’ on Target 
With an Eye-Catching f Rheingold 9 

By Andrew dark (he overt political connotations through these startling stage pic* 

tt* RANKFTJRT t ike with which the “Ring” has been so tures is the force of human sdf- 


’“vSj* By Andrew dark 

T 3 » RANKFTJRT — Like most 
r German conductors and opera 
directors, Michael Giekn wanted 
to put his stamp cm Wagner’s 
i “Ring,” and with the new Frank- 
""/-i: fmtproduction of “Das Rbrin- 
goki it looks as if his plan is well 
’• : on target The production is a vin- 
'^3 dication of what Giden has done in 
U his aghi yean as director of the 
Frankfurt Opera, which under his 
■ ptiAanee has emhelKcheri fr* **pn- 
tation as one of the most progres- 
: --r szveopenoompamesm WestGer- 
many. 

the new Frankfurt “Ring” is 

• z the East German producer fcai 
- -*■ Berghaus, one of a group of avant- 
— z. garde stage directors with wham 
Gidat, 58, is associated. Together 

- ~ "ttey have helped to realize Ins po- 

Scy of questioning traditional ap- 
proaches to the standard operatic 

- ^.repertory and experimenting with 

.new teomques in mraac theater. 

“Das RheanzokT is to be joined 
• by “Die Walkflre” in May, The 
final two parts of the cycle, “Sfeg- 

: ; -fried” ana “GAtterdBrntnenm^” 

. .wQl follow next season, c nlmrrtaf- 
W ~ingwththree complete "Rin^cy- 
- . _cles in 1987. That will be Gtden’s 
_■ ^parting shot: After 10 years at 
. Frankfurt he will move to Baden- 
Baden to become chief conductor 
- of the Southwest German Radio 
' Orchestra. The Frankfurt city gov- 
J_ennnem has chosen the Israeli con- 
■ ductor Gary Bertini as his succes- 
"_V.jor. 

.’1-3! The ™*i» surprise in "Das 
" Rheingdd" is that Berghaus avrads 


DOONfiSBURY 


m> ZONKBZ. NCW THAT 

YOU HEGRKH.Z THOUGHT 

cfium He mm SB /&£ 
m£* TDFWUPFBROUR 
FAFBN&LfARJYAT 
m&N.A 


the overt political connotations 
with which the “Ring” has been so 
heavily laden in recent years. In 
interviews before the opening there 
was modi talk of a psychoanalyti- 
cal concept, for which the “Ring” 
no doubt is rich hunting ground. 
Whether this works as a practical 
approach in the theater will be- 
come apparent only as the Frank- 
furt cycle develops into its later 


On its own, “Das RhemgoM” 
provides an absorbing evening, 
though at times H succumbs to the 
avant-garde chchA and suffers from 
overfall in its profusion of «ta«- 
Bui with Giden’s superb ehirida- 
tion of the score and a cast of 
uneven quality, the production 
combines humor, a well-argued 
analysis of Imman behavior and — 
at its most immediate level — some 
eyecatching imagery. 

The Rhine maidens are halfway 
between statuettes and 

mermaids, suspended against a 
blade backdrop that allows them to 
sway and circle. The gods — also 
depicted in white neo-dassical garb 
— dump around stage on plinths, 
but are forced to feomo down tar 
earth when Froa, the goddess of 
youth, is abducted. The inhabitants 
of Nibelheim are identically 
masked as surrealist dwarfs, while 
Fasoit and Father are represented 
as two giant mobile terracotta fig- 
ures fronted by expressionless sing- 
ers in dark suits. Valhalla is a huge 
open-ended ring of concrete, tilled 
to one side and decorated with a 
map of the universe. 

The thread Berghaus- 



h 3 ! 

fetfl 


centeredness personified by the 
gods. Preoccupied with Logo's 
guide to the Nibelheim gold, they 
fail to notice Freda’s abduction. 
Flushed with self -congratulation at 
the return of their privileges after 
Freda’s return, they callously ignore 
the giants' fight over the gold. Heirs 
to the splendor of property for 
which they have not paid, they are 
deaf to the Rhine mai/fens * pleas 
far the return of the plundered 
treasure. From (me angle the pro- 
duction is a devastating critique of 
greed and social disharmony; from 
another, it is a manifesto for the 
egalitarian society. 

The principal musical value Hfs 
in Giden’s authoritative and fluent 
reading of the score, which shuns 
its histrionic qualities in favor of 
light textures, selective bursts of 
energy and a coherent pointing of 
the drama. Orchestra and cast have 
clearly been meticulously pre- 
pared; the voices of the Rnine 
maidens are well-blended, <md co- 
ordination between stage and {tit is 


-■ Judging by. the cast for “Rhein- 
gold,” which . combines the ex- 
tremes of youth and experience, the 
most wuwnumding characters in 
this “Ring” may turn out to be the 
least expected. The best voices and 
characterizations of the evening are 
those of Adalbert Waller as Alber- 
fch, Manfred Schenk as Fasoit, 
Barry Mora as Danner and Heinz 
Zednik as Logu The company will 
have to find a more experienced 
Wotan fox “Die WaDcftre/’ In most 
respects, however, the prospects for 
die development of tins cycle are 
good. 


By Michael Zwerin 

Intentarim a l Herald Tribute 

P I ARI5 — Playing with the leg- 
endary Jimmy Gtuffrc trio and 
on such legendary recordings as 
“The Bridge” with Sonny RriQins 
and “Undimarreat" with Bill Ev- 
ans has placed Jim HaR up there in 
the pantheon dosebtiund such leg- 
ends as Charlie Christian and 
Django Reinhardt. Paul Desmond 
called him “the favorite guitarist of 
many people who agree on little 
else in music.” 

Hall recently performed m duo 
with the French pianist Michel Pe- 
, tracriani at the Tbifitrc de la Vjfle. 
They had never played together be- 
fore. Several critics said Hall 
lacked assurance, but it is difficult 
to assimilate his nT*Tuaiai ( quiet in- 
tensity, which is not heard often in 
Europe. 

. “I discover something every time 
Iplay,” he said affix the concert 
“Tonight 1 discovered I could play 
anything at all with Michel Petruc- 
riam and it would work. I guess, in 
general, 1 add a softer dimension. 

“You know, I bought a bouse in 
the country two hours north of 
. New York. I had to get out I was 
drained. The city was getting too 
crazy. Maybe I’ve changed too. In 
your 20s you need to be fed that 
energy, but in your 50s if it isn’t 
happening inside you it’s too late 
anyway. Make any sense?” 

After five years in music schools 
in Columbus, Ohio, and Cleveland, 
he saw that most of the students 
were “just going to school to stay in 
school and never in Efe get out of 
school. They seemed to need that 
protection — it's like prison with 
retirement” 

The prospect scared him. He left 
fra Los Angeles, where he was 
hired by Chico Hamilton. The 
band started to spend so much time 
in New York that be decided to 
move there. 

Jimmy Ginffre had recorded a 
clarinet piece accompanied only by 
the sound of his foot tapping, and 
tins gave him an idea fra a trio with 
three independent voices (includ- 
ing Bobby Brookmeyer’s valve 
trombone) and no rhythm section. 
It was seminal hometown funk, 
what one critic described as “mo- 
nastic Wues.” 

Meanwhile, Sonny Rollins, who 
had retired, was nonetheless prac- 
ticing several nights a week. When 
he hired Hall to be part of Us 
comeback band, ft was “Eke a 
blessing from the pope. Until that 
point I wasn't really convinced that 




“I discover something every time I play. 


1 was pan of the essence of what 
was goiag on in jazz in New York. 
So when Sonny called me it was the 
final blessing. 

“Sonny’s imagination is so over- 
powering, I stood up there unable 
to believe my ears and when it was 

Z mnj to play I thought, ‘Now 
t?r ” In the middle of what he 
describes as “a veiy heavy d rinkin g 
period," Hall was impressed by the 
“outrageous” things & clear-headed 
Rollins could play. 

“I used to think I had to drink to 
play,” Hall said, “but I'd get so 
drunk I couldn’t play at all” He. 
joined Alcoholics Anonymous and 
was “afraid to walk past saloons for 
awhile.” 

He cloistered hmmrif in the stu- 
dios jls a member of the orchestra 
on Merv Griffin’s television show, 
began to teach, and recorded in 
duos with Bill Evans, Brookmeyer 
and, later, Ron Carter. He played 
with Paul Desmond. Ben Webster 
and Coleman Hawkins. He record- 
ed solo albums. His accumulated 
body of soft-dimensional work 
made him a hero to rock-guitar 


heroes. “I began to hear people say 
that more and more," he said. “It’s 
nice. I try to learn from those guys 
too. It’s not as much being a guitar 
player as being a musician. 

“That’s the way I think about 
Miles Davis. I always find myself 
defending Miles. He’s just so smart 
and gifted and courageous. His cur- 
rent band sounds like Bartok with a 
backbeaL As I get older I’ve been 
getting more courage to try new 
things. A lot of people take less 
risks as ih^ get older but Picasso 
and Stravinsky didn’t do that I 
want to go out like they did.” 

Getting older mayVe bem on his 
mind fra a reason: After the con- 
cert, Hall joined Fetrucdani and 
others fra a late darner at a nearby 
brasserie. Petxuoaani h«<i arranged 
fra a cake to celebrate Hall's 55th 
birthday, which would arrive in 20 
minutes — midnight. Hearing peo- 
ple whispering words like “gflteau,” 
Hall guessed what was up, and 
slipped out of the restaurant. “He’s 
going to Ms hotel,” his agent said. 
“He’s so shy. He said he couldn't 
handle it” 


West German Clinic Kitsch Outsoaps r DaIlm’ 


By Richard Williams 

Reuters 

B ONN — A-West German soap 
opera called “Schwaizwaldk- 
finik” (Blade Forest Clinic), round- ' 
ly lambasted as visual kitsch by the 
critks, has established itself as a 
runaway TV success in seven 
weeks. 

Ratings show more than 20 mil- 
lion fans are hooked on the tale of 
doctors and nnrses in a sanatorium 
dtiep in southern Germany. In its 
first week of transmission, 
“Schwarzwaldklimk” broke ah au- 
dience records in West Germany, 
attracting 24.6 million viewers. 


pacts of Ms womanizing, however, 
are kept off the n c r een. 

West German television's p ub- 
licly owned second channel, ZDF, 
which shows “SchwarzwaldkKnik,” 
has commissioned 11 45-minme 
episodes fra next year to follow the 
original 25. 

The influential news magazine 
Der Spiegel dubbed the scries “Op- 
eration Kitsch.” Spiegel said 
“Schwaizwaldklimk” was “an un- 
restrained lapse bade to the 1950s, 
when kitsch and sentimentality 
... Ted a conservatism oonfused 
by anything new ” It charged that 
the show was a throwback to the 


way of lire — that were popular 
during the Nazi era. 

Despite such criticism, ZDF, ap- 
pears to have started a trend. This 
month its main rival, the ARD, 
began screening “Lindesstrasse” 
(Linden Street). Sched u led to ran 
for 52 weeks, it depicts Hfe in a 
suburban street in Cologne. It is 
billed as West Germany’s answer 
to Britain's long-running “Corona- 
tion Street.” ^ 

The mass-circulation daily BQd, 
however, recommended “Schwarz- 
waldkhmk'* and said of “Linden- 
strasse": “The whole thing reeks of 
the studio and the typewriter. 
. . . The only people who’ll get 



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TRAVELLERS REASSURED 'WATER 
IN BOMBA Y SAFE TO DRINK ' 


Based on his long and intimate acquaintance with 
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“Of all the things that people drink in Bombay, 
water has never figured prominently. 

Most prefer Tonic in Bombay, Mar- QH 
tini in Bombay or .Orange in Bombay. 

Indeed, anything that one would 
usually mix in Bombay. 

But. let me assure you, there y r 
is no need to stay clear .1 

of the water. 

Those^ ^ rumours 

Gins are well and -jB 

truly ill-founded. ” gr BjWvirjfftjl ' U 


jeandinh van 

7ruectelaPaix 



Milano - Via Pietro Vcrri. 3 
Parigi - 10. Rue de la Paix 
Lugano - Rjva Vela. 12 




Nonstop From Paris lo Atlanta. 
OnTo 1U0U.& A.Ckies. ^ 


From New York to Texas, from service from the New York and Boston 

Florida to California, Delta flies you gateways to cities across the U.S. A. 

just about anywhere in the US. A. You can also fly Delta nonstop 
Catch Delta s nonstop from Paris from London to Adanta, from Frank' 
to Atlanta, where you can make easy fort to Atlanta and from Frankfurt to 
Delta-to-Delta connections to 100 Dallas/FtWDrtL 

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Delta also has frequent daily Delta in Paris at 1-335-4080. 


Or call Delta in London on (01) 
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Delta Ticket Offices are at 24 
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and Friedensstrasse 7, 6000 
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, _ . ‘ Schedules, are subject to 

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25 years ago, 

Merrill Lynch began 

serving London. 

T 

i- 

r" 

Today we 

serve the wide worki 

•X , • ... , T" " ' fi ' 

December marks the completion of 25 years instruments, foreign exchange and interna- 
of Merrill Lynchs presence in London. tional equities. Our European-based 

It’s a presence that reaches far beyond investment banking teams specialise in ■" £ 
Britain. Our clients require access to all cross-border transactions. And our 

the world’s major financial and investment research is global in scope, 
markets, and we have built up a major world- Merrill Lynch has made a major commit^ ; 
wide organisation to serve those needs. ment to serving clients throughout Europe, 

In Europe and the Middle East alone, we the Middle East and the rest of the world. ■ p 
have 26 private client offices and five insti- Our organisation provides a unique range h 
tutional offices. We provide private banking of services to meet your needs in an increase l 
facilities in London and Geneva. ingly complex world financial market. | : 

We are active in all major trading A global market we know as well as our ; ^ 

markets: in debt securities, money market own neighbourhood. 








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[TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17, 1985 






] 


Ifcralb^^Sribunc. 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 


Dow Jones Surges 1 7.89 
Sets Record. Page 12 




Page 11 


FUTUMS AMD OPTIONS 

Bond-Futures Trade Suffers 
Feething Pangs in Japan 

By YOSHIKO MORI 

Reuters 

T OKY O — J span's two-monthold bond-futures market is 
far from being as. efficient me chanism for bondh ol ders 
to mhunmc interest-rate risks. But traders are stfll 
hopeful that, with time and greater volume, the market 
kriH come into its own. 

-With an average daily turnover of about 500 bfiHon yen ($L5 
Qlion), the market is not large enoug h for us to hedge our 
jiormotus bank debenture inventories,” one chief bond dealer at 
i long-lean credit bank said. 

But it is too soon to worry, according to a bond trader at one 
J.S. bank. "All successful futures markets tend to start off at a 
low pace and mature as time 


At 500 billion yen, 
daily volume 
is too small to 
hire many hedgers. 


pcs on," this trader said. 

The futures market, inaugu- 
ated Oct 19 to help holders 
if cash bonds reduce rides by 
oddng in interest rates with 
utures contracts, is still in its 
ofaucy, an official of the To- 

:yo Stock Exchange noted. 

Further growth requires 

nore liquidity and voiume to attract hedgers, he said. The market 
ihould be good for smaller investors who can easily participate 
jecaose margin requirements are low and prices arc set freely, he 

But individuals have nearly halted trading contracts, leaving 
he market to professionals, one bond mawng gr said. 

Individual investors who bad been speculating with long pot- 
ions suffered heavy losses when the ca*h bond market suddenly 
rose-dived on Oct. 25, the bond manage said. 

T HE BANK of Japan nearly strangled the market when it 
guided yen intoest rates sharply higher in order to help 
boost the yen’s value against the dollar. 

The lack of adequate volume also inhibits spreads — the 
raiding of both purchase and sale contracts for deliveries in 
Efferent months. "Spreads cannot be successfully exercised 
mless the contracts have daily volume of at least 300 bOlioix yen,” 
i bold manager of a major securities house taid. 

Daily volume has been heavy on the current month bat 
minimal on other months. Recent average volume on current 
March has been around 800 bflfion yen, while nearby June has 
seat less than 10 billion and distant March nxL 
Institutional investors tend to adhere to a similar outlook for 
fen interest rates, causing a lopsided market, one HanW said. 
CVithoot diversity to create enough volume and liquidity for more 
xjntracts, hedgers and spreaders will not be lared into the 
narket, he added. 

But dealers are optimistic that the situation will improve as 
jarticqMtnts begin to understand the workings of the market. 

k “Hedgers’ participation is inhibited by inexperience and lack 
information,” said a band manager at one commercial bank, 
ut it is encouraging that they have already seized about a 10- 
it share of the total trading volume.” 

In addition, day traders, those who trade and settle positions 
lyithin a tingle day, are already overwhelmingly active in the 
maricet, dealers said. These traders generally arbitrage between 
bond prices in the cash market ami contracts in the futures 

Day traders would also place spreads if there were enough 
olnme on more contracts, dealers said. 

Corporations, . which have been watching the market with 
merest, may become participants depend in g on its development, 
lealers said. 

A spokesman for Toyota Motes’ Carp, said: "We have been on 
he sidelines to see how the market progresses.” So far, Toyota 
ias been mwinming rides through other he said, 

i - aw Bank dealers noted that the futures market provides opportu- 
LUl (Continued on Page 15, CoL 1) 


Currency Rates 


in 


I ■ DlM. 

2S4U cot! 10475* 

MKbfe) SIM 7U575 J6JKS 

wHWI ZS2M 1435 

ndonOi) 


Dec. 16 

FJF. ILL WAr. U. LF. " Yn 

34J4* B.145* &S»* UCM* UOJSy 

644S5 Ufl • IAMB 24J75 ISM - 

HU* UftBx KTfiJ • 4JM* 11f47* 1346 • 


3$ 


ua 1439 11.1015 iau» 449 74J0S UB75 291 JS 

hM U24L2S 147170 4*225 22131 40545 31451 B1&J4 1401 

• YorttfcJ 0491a 251 74745 UU4B US5 5133 2.U 20Z.W 

m Mils 114*75 14575 4419 x UI4 HI975* UM HA.* 

kyo 2UM 29434 KL40 2421 IIJ9* 7140 7*5.13- *437 

rtc* 2.114* 1M 41735' 27JS5* 01224* 74385* 45144* 1404* 

XU *4 *92 OJB44 11911 *7471 14M49 2470 447157 UQS 17444* 

ii®a 14HS4 075711 274SO U9273 NA 24923 5S9B42 229M HA 

«"lwj In London and Zurf etc firings In other European cantm. Now York mtosate PM. 

Coamerdal franc (t>) Amounts needed to buy one pound Ic) Amounts needed to buy one 
Uorl-I Units of 100 txl Units of 1MO (y> Units of ItLOOO NJ3. : not auatB/t; AL4_ not tnrslloOle. 

Totmr mi P ound: WJtoAO 


| r^lfcer Dollar Yi 

Itmm* p « r IL&4 
mi OlSo 
14443 

jrtr.iOUi. 17.71 
'AHa.fr. 51 JO 

■H BIB. 940540 
■ S U94 
i ynoa 12013 
^mfaknws 9.144 
k n*.Moed 1355 


>rlc 

lCte 


ear n er par Uil 
Fin. markka 54845 
Greek drac. 15030 
Hone KonaS 7J045 
12.1455 
1,13440 
rMl 08157 


KowoW (floor A2907 
Mntay.rtn*. 24395 


Cnrraaer par U5i 
Max. pom 44440 
744 
1743 
15940 
Saw* rind 34504 
SfM-S 2.1203 

SkAfr.icad 24144 
S. Kor. won 891.11 


r UJJ 
SoatotroMa 07M2 
S*an.POMlta 15430 
SwatL krona 7302 
TdOMt 3948 
Thai*** 34473 
THrkMttra 54545 
UAEdfrlWn 24727 


: 1-1744 Irish C 

I.* SOOM do Benotua t Brussels); Banco Commando)* ttaOono (MUon); Banooo No- 
d» Part* (Part *1; Bank at Tokyo (Tokyo): IMF (SDR): BA It (t tar, rival, tBrham); 
**** (nMe). other data from Reuters andAP. 


fatacstRates 


Ure« 

Donor 

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its 

5MMW 

Franc* 

Franc 

Dec. 13/16 

ECU BOR 

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Mr4 

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cm: Maroon Guaranty (dollar, DM. SF. Pound. FF): Uords Bank (ECU): Reuters 
W. Rates onpneaMo to I n terbank deposits of SI million minimum (or eouhnUont). 

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Ihdlar P e p M ri to 

Dee 16 

l-M 
l-M 

3 months 7* *8 

4 m0M2M 799 -4 

1 YOOr 8-HMi 

Source: Reuters. 


VARbMyNarlMMs 

Dec 16 

MerrtH LyncB RocMv Asatla 
SadovBveraoe YMd: 7J1 

Tul eiu la latoras* Rafar laMoj 745 
Source: Merrill lynch. T ol era t e 


Gold 


Dee 16 



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Now York 

— 

32110 

+ M0 


Luxembaun. Paris and London official Hit- 
tags,- Nano Kona and Zurich opmiAw and 
dosing prices: New York Comex cummt 
amrocL AUprkmm UJS-Speraunct. 
Source: R e ut e rs. 


Takeover 
Of Midcon 
Is Sou^it 

2 Energy Firms 
Bid $2.6 BUBon 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Wagher Sc 
Brown and Freeport-McMoRan 
Inc. announced Monday that they 
bad jointly launched a S2.6-b3Eoa 
attenq>t to acquire Midcon Cotp. 

The partnership is making a 
tender csEfcr of S6Z.S0 per tiiare in 
cash for Midcon’s shares outstand- 
ing. It also seeks to purchase all 
Midcon’s KW-pcrecm subordinat- 
ed convertible debentures due 2009 
for $1,488.10 cash for each 31,000 
face amount. 

Wagner A: Brown and Freqxst, 
winch joined as WB Partners to 
pursue Midcon, propose that the 
tender offer be followed by a merg- 
er in which remaining Midcon 
stock would be exchanged for cash. 

The partners already own 4.4 
percent of Midcan shares. 

Midcon shares dosed Monday at 
$63,375 on (he New York Stoc k 
Exchange, up SI .625. 

A spokesman at Midcan's head- 
quarters in Lombard, Illinois, said 
the oO and gas pipeline company 
was studying the nnsoiiriicd bid. 

Midcon completed the acquisi- 
tion last week of United Energy 
Resources lira. The transaction, 
valued at 51.14 billion, was widely 
viewed as a move to shield Midcon 
from hostile pursuers. 

Wagner & Brown, based in Mid- 
land, Texas, is an oil and gas con- 
cern. Freeport, based in New Or- 
leans, is also in the energy bntiness. 

The transaction is to be financed 
with a bask loan and the sale of 
securities. 

Dread Burnham Lambert Inc. 
will luiufk die securiti es portion of 
the fimmemfl. The New York in- 
vestment house, which specializes 
in high-risk securities' feuwring 
known as junk bonds, has said it 
would be.able to place the securi- 
ties before Dec. 31. 

Restrictions by the Federal Re- 
serve Board on the use of junk 
band financing take effect next 
year. 


The Return of the U.S. Gold Coin 

Dealers Predict Success 
If It Is Marketed Wisely 


By Nancy L Ross 

. Washington Post Ser/kc 

WASHINGTON —A new gold coin, tbe Amer- 
ican Eagle, has the potential to attract U.S. inves- 
tors away from foreign coins if it is properly 
marketed, coin dealers are predicting. 

Tbe first U.S. gold coin for general circulation in 
53 years was approved Dec. 2 by the House of 
Representatives, after the Senate had passed a 
simitar bill Nov. 14. President Ronald Reagan, 
who banned imports of the South African gold 
Krugerrand and asked (he Treasury last Septem- 
bd to design acorn to replace it, is expecud to sign 
ihc legislation. 

Tbe four coins, with face values of $5, $10, $25 
and $50 and containing one-toilh of a troy ounce 
to one troy ounce of gold, are scheduled to go cm 
sale OcL 1, 1986. 

Since the sa le of gold bullion in the United 
States was reauthorized a little more than a decade 
ago, the government has issued a number of com- 
memorative medallions and coQectors' coins. 
Same, such as the gold and silver coins sold in 
conjunction with the 1984 Olympic Games, were 
very successful. About $72 ndmon in Olympic 
coins were sold, yielding $130 milli on in profits to 
the Treasury because the coins were minted with 
reserve gold valued at $42 an ounce. 

Other governmental attempts to sell gold to 
collectors have been less than successful. Between 

1980 and 1985, only 1.7 million ounces of gold 
medallions commemor ati ng such Americans as 
Louis Armstrong and Frank Lloyd Wright were 
sold, well short of the maximum projected mintage 
nf 5 miTKnw mmreo Th* nwInIKrmg utere tnarkmrA 

directly by die government and required a buyer to 
dete rmine the price by telephone, send a postal 
money order ami wait months for delivery. 

The legislation passed by the U.S. House speci- 
fies that the marketing of die Eagle be very differ- 
ent Coins will be available directly from the Trea- 
smy, but also from banks, bullion dealers, coin 
shops and other outlets. Wholesalers will be given 
discounts. 

Making the coins readily available to customers 
is essential, said George Panda, manag er of the 
predous-metala division of Deak-Perrera Interna- 
tional in New York. 

Mr. Parda predicted that tbe Eagle easily could 
capture 50 percent of the market within a year. 
Three million to four milHoa ounces of gold corns 
and medallions are sold annually in toe United 
States, according to tbe House subcommittee on 
coinage. 

The c oins will be legal tender, worth their face 
value if offered for payment. However, they can- 
not be bought for their face value. The price of a 
$50 gold piece will be equal to the market price of 
an ounce of gold pins a small premium; a $5 coin 
will cost one- tenth as modi. 

Tbe price of the coins win be competitive at 
about a 3-percent pre m ium with the fruidian 



Back of proposed new com. 



Front of 1908-1033 coin. 



Baek of 1908-1933 coin. 

HaMriitMh 9 

Maple Leaf, which now accounts far about 70 
percent of gold coin sales in the United States, and 
the Krugpmnd, as well as the Mexican Onza and a 
few other foreign coins. The legislation sets the 
price for the coins at the cost of newly tinned UK 
(Continued oa Page 17, CoL 4) 


U.S. Economists 
Forecast Slump 
After ’86 Upturn 


Compiled try Our Staff from Dispatches 

WASHINGTON - UK busi- 
ness economists said Monday that 
the United States probably would 
have slightly higher economic 
growth next year but that a reces- 
sion loomed as a growing possibili- 
ty for 1987. 

Meanwhile, the Federal Reserve 
Board reported that the UK fac- 
tory- utilization rate rose slightly in 
November following two months 
of decline. Tbe Fed reported that 
UK factories, mines and utilities 
operated at 80.1 percent of capaci- 
ty in November, up from 79.9 per- 
cent in October. 

Tbe 0-2-percem increase fol- 
lowed a 0.5-percent decline in Oc- 
tober and a 03-percent drop in 
September. 

On the outlook, the National As- 
sociation of Business Economists 
said its latest poD of 300 of its 
members found that 83 percent be- 
lieved that the country would be in 
a recession by tbe end of 1987. 

The economists also expressed 
little confidence in the legislation 
signed last week by President Ron- 
ald Reagan requiring a balanced 
federal budget by 1991. 

Fifty-nine percent of those sur- 
veyed said they did not believe the 
balanced-budget bill was an effec- 
tive way to reduce scaring federal 
budget deficits, objecting in pan to 
the automatic nature of the cuts. 

The problem, as tbe economists 
see it, is that federal budget cuts 
would reduce the stimulus needed 
to drive (he economy forward and 
that the alternative, raising taxes, 
also would retard economic 
growth. 

“There is no question that our 
members think that 1987 is the 
most likely year for a recession.’' 
said Kathleen Cooper, president of 
the association, which represents 
companies’ staff economists. 
Among the forecasts contained in 
tbe latest survey: 

• The economy, as measured by 
the gross national product, will 
grow 23 percent in 1986. This 
would be an imp rov e ment over tbe 


expected 2.5-porent rate of growth 
this year, but still far below the 6.8- 
it expansion in 1984. Tbe 
i administration has forecast 
4-percent growth next year. Tbe 
GNP is a measure of the total value 
of a nation’s goods and services. 

• Inflation will remain in check, 
with consumer prices rising 4 per- 
cent next year, up only slightly 
from the expected 3 .5 -percent in- 
crease this year. 

• Despite the slightly improved 
growth rate, unemployment will re- 
main stuck where it is' now, averag- 
ing 7 2 percent in 1986, the same as 
1985, tbe economists said. 

■ Interest rates, as measured by 
the prime rate, will end next year 
right where they are now, at 9.5 
percent The prime is used as a 
basis in calculating rates for banks' ■ 
most creditworthy corporate cus- 
tomers. 

As for when the next recession 
will begin, 46 percent of the econo- 
mists surveyed said it would begin 
in 1987, while 37 said it would start 
sometime in 1986. 

Separately Monday, the Com- 
merce Department said that manu- 
facturing corporations' after-tax 
profits fdl to 3.7 cents per dollar of 
sales in tbe third quarter, down 03 
cents from the preceding quarter 
and 0.7 cents from the like quarter 
last year. {AP, Reuters) 


Carbide Rejects GAF Bid, 
Announces Stock Buyback 


By Jonathan P. Hicks 

New York Times Serdce 

NEW YORK — Union Carbide 
>„ calling a $68-a-sh«re bid by 


Coip. “grossly 
and unfair, said that its I 
rejected that offer and authorized a 
program to repurchase 35 percent 
of its stock for a package of cash 
and notes that it valued at $85 a 
share. 

Warren M. Anderson, Carbide’s 

chairman, said the ginp f chemical 

company would, as a further defen- 
sive maneuver, repurchase an addi- 
tional 35 percent of its shares if 
GAFs holdings of Carbide exceed- 
ed 30 percent. GAP owns 10 per- 
cent of Carbide’s stock. 

[GAF said late Monday that it 
had challenged the Carbide ex- 
change offer in a federal court suit, 
Reuters reported from New York. 
According to GAF, tbe offer is Hie- . 
' because it was made solely to 
lock GAFs takeover offer and to 
perpetuate Carbide management.] 

In an interview Sunday night, 
Mr. Anderson called the GAF off er 
“a boot-strap, junk-bond, bnst-up 
deaL” He said that under the repur- 
chase program, each shareholder 
could exchange a share of GAF 
stock for $20 in cash and $65 in 
“intermediate and long-term 
notes.” Carbide said its investment 
banker, Morgan Stanley & Gx, val- 
ued tire stock repurchases at $2 
billion each. 

Mr. Anderson also said that Car- 
bide’s board had decided against 


malting a bid to acquire GAF, the 
so-called “Pac Man" strategy some 
on Wall Street bad expected. Such 
a bid, be said, would “not make 
sense oconomicaDy for the compa- 
ny or our shareholders-" 

He added that GAF had violated 
UK securities laws and that Taw- 
suits will be executed.” 

Samud J. Heyman, GAFs chair- 
man, oouM not he reached for com- 
ment However, a spokesman for 
GAF said Sunday night that the 
company was “shocked and sur- 
prised" by Carbide’s action, bat 
insisted that GAF was “committed 
to press forward with our offer to 
successful con elusion-” 

Carbide said that GAF would 
not be excluded from the initial 
repurchase program. However, 
sources dose to the situation said 
that the second repurchase, if it is 
undertaken, would exclude shares 
held by GAP. . 

“This kind of throws the ball 
back in GAFs court,” said • 

J. Krug, an analyst with 
Lynch & Co. T don’t think the 
game is over yet. Right now, it 
would be fodum to accept the Hey- 
man offer. He’D have to do some- 
thing new, depending on where the 
stock goes in toe next couple days.” 

Union Carbide stock rose 75 
cats a share on the New York 
Stock Exchange Monday, to 
$70.50. GAF, winch had risen 
$335 on Friday, fdl $4 a share, to 
561. 


U.K. Industrial Production 
Declined 0.3% in October 


Meets Closed 

nanriat markets were dosed Monday in South Africa for a holiday. 


Reuters 

LONDON — Britain’s industri- 
al production fdl a provisional 03 
percent in October after Septem- 
ber’s rise was revised to 1.7 percent 
from a reported 13 percent, the 
government said Monday. 

The Central Statistical Office 
said its index for industrial output 
was set at a seasonally adjusted 
108.8 in October, up 5.4 p erc ent 
from a year earlier. In Sep temb er, 
the year-to-year rise was 5.6 per- 
cent. 

Manufacturing output rose 03 
percent in October after a gain of 
03 peremt in September, tbe agen- 
cy said. The index for manufactur- 
ing output rose to 104.0 from 1033 
in September. The year-to-year rise 
in October was 3.4 percent and 13 
percent m September, 

Government sources said the de- 
efine in tbe production index was 
largely due to declining oil produc- 
tion. This was partly offset by in- 
creased output of beer and sugar. 
Motor vchide output fdl, however. 

TheCSO said that output figures 
for the first two quarters were en- 
couraging and the sluggish growth 
since then could be attributed to 
erratic dements and to the provi- 
sional nature of tbe figures. 


Government sources said that 
the 1984-85 coal-miners’ strike was 
no longer affecting the monthly fig- 
ures. 

Over the three months to Octo- 
ber, output of food, drink, tobacco, 
textile and dothing increased by 2 
percent while chemicals fdl by 1 
percent 


U.S. Steel, 
Korean Firm 
To Cooperate 

The Associated Press 

PITTSBURGH — UK Steel 
Coro, announced Monday that it 
would form a joint venture with 
Pohang Iron & Steel Co. of Sooth 
Korea to own, operate and mod- 
ernize UK Steel’s plant in Pitts- 
burg, California. 

Tbe San Fnmdsco-area plant 
will market Tiigh-qnaBty sted and 
tin productions throughout the 
western United States," the compa- 
nies said. 

They said the joint venture 
would invest more than $300 mil- 
lion in the next four years at the 
plant to modernize and expand op- 
erations for producing cold-raDed 
sheets, gatvanmed impiate 
and tin-free sted. 

The Pittsburg plant now em- 
ploys about 1,100 workers and the 
companies said the venture was ex- 
pected “to assure existing employ- 
ment well into tbe next ccntary.” 

Tbe agreement also provides for 
UK Sted to sopply hot-rolled sted 
coils for finishing by the joint-ven- 
lill from UK Steel's plant 


tore mill 

near Provo, Utah, “as 
til almost 1990.” 

Rumors had circulated for 
months that UK Sted was negoti- 
ating with Pohang, considered one 
of the world's lowest-cost sted pro- 
ducers, to import semifinished sted 
for processing at UK Sted nriTls in 
the United States. 

UK Sled’s chairman, David M. 
Roderick, bad said several times 
that UK Steel was negotiating with 
the South Koreans, but also with 
other potential foreign suppliers 
about a variety of projects. 

The United Steelworkers of 
America waged a vigorous cam- 
paign against UK Steel’s plan in 
1982 to buy semifinished steel from 
British Sind Crap, fra finishing at 
UK Sted’s Fairless Works on the 
Delaware River near Philadelphia. 

Mr. Roderick called the move 
into a joint venture “a necessary 
stepT 


U.K. Vows Not to Interfere 
In Westland Rescue Plans 


By Bob Hagexty 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — The British gov- 
ernment, seeking to resolve a 
squabble between ministers, said 
Monday that it would not interfere 
in competing proposals to rescue 
Westland PLC, Britain’s only mak- 
er of heticoplers. 

Die statement leaves the way 
open for Westland shareholders to 
decide which proposal to accept 
Westland’s board last Friday ap- 
proved an agreement, by Fiat SpA 
of Italy and the Sikorsky helicopter 
unit of United Technokigics Crap, 
of the United States to acquire 29.9 
percent of Westland for about £30 
million ($43 million) as part of a 
badly needed injection of capital. 

Sikorsky and Fiat would have an 
option to acquire another 10 per- 
cent of Westuud, the British com- 
pany ooufinned Monday. 

But Britain’s defease minister, 
Michael Headline, opposes that 1 


rescue plan and has lined up a com- 
peting proposal from an all-Euro- 
pean group composed of Aerospa- 
tiale of France, Agnsta SpA of 

Italy, Messcrschmirt-BBIkow- 
Blohm GmbH of West Germany, 
British Aerospace PLC and Gener- 
al Electric Co. of Britain, which is 
unrelated to the UK company of 
the same name. 

Westland’s board has rejected 
the European group’s rescue, but 


the companies involved plan to 
present their proposal to Westland 
shareholders, said David Home, a 
managing director of LloycFs Mer- 
chant Bmk, which is advising the 
European group. 

Monday’s government statement 
was read in Parliament by Leon 
Brittan, the trade and industry sec- 
retary, who has dashed with Mr. 
Hesdtme on the issue. The state- 
ment was a rebuff to Mr. Hesdtine, 
who said during the weekend that 
be feared the Skorsky-Fiat rescue 
would leave Westland as a mere 
“metal basher." 

A spokesman for Prime Minister 
Margaret Thatcher said Monday 
that she had opposed government 
intervention in the matter. 

Westland has promised to an- 
nounce details of the Skorsky-Fiat 
rescue Thursday. 

Financial sources said both tides 
are offering to pay about £30 mil- 
lion fra 293 percent of Westland. 

The affair has created consider- 
able bitterness. Westland’s chair- 
man, Sir John Cockney, argued 
during the weekend that General 
Electric had joined the European 
group late last week only as a 
means of causing to the defease 
fflinistiy, its biggest customer. Sir 
John described GECs managing 
director. Lord Weinstock. as “a 
poodle snapping at tbe heels’' of 
Mr. Hesdtine. 


U.S. Relaxing 
Some Controls 
On Ouna Trade 

The Assodaitd Press 

WASHINGTON — Com- 
merce Secretary Malcolm Bal- 
drige announced Monday that 
Washington will relax trade re- 
strictions on a variety of items 
bound for export to China. 

Mr. Baldnge, calling the 
move “a major step oh rad in 
trade with China," said the re- 
laxation of controls would 
speed the processing of export 
applications for as much as 75 
percent of the goods shipped to 
China by U.S. exporters. 

Tbe secretary said that the 
licensing changes, which he said 
would be formally announced 
later by the Reagan administra- 
tion, would expmid to 27 from 7 
the categories of products that 
now can go to China without 
special review. 

Items eligible for the speed- 
ed-up processing, he said, 
would include computers, ma- 
chine tools, semiconductors, ro- 
botics and electronic instru- 
ments. 

He said it had not yet been 
determined what the action 
would mean in terms of addi- 
tional trade with China. Two- 
way trade with China amount- 
ed to roughly 56 billion this 
year, according to Commerce 
Department figures. 


ARGENTINE 

REPUBLIC 

EXTERNAL U.S. S BONOS 

AND 

BONOS NOMINAT1VOS 

THE WESTON 
GROUP 

Enquiries to: 
CH-1003 LAUSANNE 
2 Rue de la Pan. 
Telex: 25869. 

Tel^ 021/20 17 41. 



five Star Service an the World’s futures markets. Boor 
ond d ea ram members of major U.K. and U.S. Exchanges. 

— Call us toll free on any of our telephone numbers. 
_ Free Market Letter. 

— Free Chart Service for accounts of $20,000 or more. 

— Over 60 years of experience and reliability. 

BAILEY SHATK1N LIMITED 

World Trad* Camtiw, t/ rt aroationot Horn*, 

Si. Katharim'iway, London El 9QN. 

Tat.: (441) 401 3225. Tbe; 886583. fax: 481 4389. 
Garmcary: 0130.6464 Holland: 06.022^000 

Switzerland: 04605.0123 From: 19.05.908311 




Statement of 
Income 

(tor The period April 1. VS05 
to September 30. 1985) 
m Millions of Yen 


1,735.665 

Cost of sales 

1550^13 

Income before taxes and minority 

interests 

7fi156 


42,276 


33^927 

Net income per share . . 

11.28 (in Yen) 


Growth of Consolidated Net Sales 

IE nartn aw*m Karen 31 via B«p4 301 _ 



Balance Sheet 

Assets 

Cash and time deposits 31 7,998 

Notes and accounts receivable, 

trade 711,950 

Inventories 590369 

Other current assets 395,430 

Property, plant and equipment 71 6580 

Other assets 494,013 

Tbtal assets. 33263M 


19S3 1984 1884 1985 1985 
Sep*. Mar. Sept Iter. Sept 

(SeulemDer 30. 1985) in Millions of Yen 

Liabilities and Shareholders 3 Equity 

Bank loans and current portion ot 

long-term debl 713.691 

Notes and accounls payable, trade 595343 

Olher current liabilities 574,931 

Long-term liabilities 661,718 

Minority interest 1 15.962 

Shareholders' equity 564.695 

Tbtal liabilities and 

shareholders’ equity 3326340 


TOSHIBA 


TOSHIBA CORPORATION 




B 


.12 








Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 


Dow Jones Averages 


Open Mgb Low Last C» 

Irtflu* 1S38JD 1570X7 1S2U0 1X0.10 + 17X9 

Trims 723.90 731.16 716X6 723X1 + DJO 

Util 149.16 17129 1*7X9 171X1 + 221 

Comp 415.11 04X5 410X9 61941 + £50 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bonds 

UWJIIaj 

industrial] 


NYSE Diaries 


NYSE Index 


Wig* Law dot* ckVt 
Composite 122X9 UM 121X0 +107 

Industrials 140X1 13870 139X0 +1X7 

Tnmsn. ll&ss 11334 116.13 +046 

utilities 4159 41X4 62X3 +048 

FI nones 1324S 13144 132 25 +1X3 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


Dec. 13 394X32 479X91 

Dee. 12 334X45 711785 

Dec.ll 493X43 734X79 

Dec. 10 67f«5 

Dec. 9 _ 291X02 01X93 

•Included In the sole* flow res 


Va.OH PM. VVm , 000 

ptot.6pxa.wi mmm 

Pree coaseSdaM dose WJO4J0- 


Tables include Hm nafiofiwMe price* 
UP to the dosing on Wall Street and 
do not reflect Jcte trates elsewhere. 

f'ta The Associated Press 


Monday 

WSI 

■^1 
H ' 

( 

losing 


AMEX Diaries 


Aawaneed 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Tefal issues 
Mm* Highs 
New Law* 
Vgtwne up 
V olume dawn 


CtoM Pto*. 

SH ffl- 

3 Sf 

59 54 

13 14 

5X84.120 
£372.1* 


Standard & Poor's index 


HW Lew Clese anw 
Industrial! 237X0 23U2 225X5 +2X9 

Troup. 193X4 191X2 192X5 + 849 

Utilities 92* 91X2 91X5 + 076 

Finance 36X1 25X6 2SX7 +030 

Composite 2I3JB 289.91 *282 +2X8 


NASDAQ index 


CmmM 

industrials 

Plnanae 

insurance 

UfiUttas 

Banks 

Tramp. 


323.16 +1.17 VU» 

329X3 +1.K 321.12 2SU6 
ftiq +1X4 414X3 £0X4 
WN +1X9 *77X6 27287 
+0X6 29461 3J-10 
flfS +229 Dili 22371 
296J0-0JI »«2 2»J» 


AMEX Sales 


4P44.voiume 
Prev.4 PAL volume 
Prav. cant, volume 


11617X00 
1771 MOO 
17710X00 


AMEX Most Actives 


WIcKO* 

BAT in 

wonoB 

AM Inti 

TIE 

HmeGn 

DomeP 

Lionel 

ABOCO 

WDMtt 

KeyPh 

Ultmte 

CtilMA » 

NVTimes 

EchaBa 


HM LOW Last 

Sts S s , 

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Jto 23% 24% 

2» 2ft » 

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am 

ID W» 

lift 

Tat 2]ta 231V 

M m Wl 

U 12*9 W» 


AMEX Stock Index 


MW Vow ° ott 

HUB 244X9 34SJ9 +0X0 


High LOW Stock 


SIl Cion 

DIV. VM. PE HBlHWlLaw QuOt.OrtB 


7.18 

92 


2X7 

11.3 


212 

105 




1* 

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5X 


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xo 

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JS21 

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74% 
179* 

9492 29% 
441 39 
1086 33%. 
397 37 
35 B 8% 
25% 


Dow Index Soars Past 1,550 


United Press fiucntadonaf 

NEW YORK — Hie Dow Jones industrial 
average crashed through the 1,550 mark Mon- 
day as investors anticipated further interest-rate 
■wiinfs in the seventh' heaviest trading in his- 
tory. 

The Dow Jones industrial, transportation 
and utilities averages set records as did the 
broader market indexes. 

“The market’s on a rod,” «md Monte Gordon 
of Dreyfus Corp. 

Purchases related to expiring December 
stock-index futures and options contracts and 
to so-called year-end window-dressing also fu- 
eled the buying. 

After racking up a 23.97-point gain Friday, 
the popular Dow industrial mdex climbed an- 
other 17.89 points to dose at 1,553.10, surpass- 
ing its previous all-time high of 1,535.21. 

Jjtte profit-taking dragged the Dow down 
from a mid- afternoon height of more than 28 
points. Tbe Dow closed above 1,500 for the first 
time last Wednesday. 

Bouyed by continued optimism about inter- 
est rates, the Dow utility average rose 231 to 
171.01, breaking through its former record of 
168.91 set July 12. The Dow transportation 
index exceeded a high set Friday, driving ahead 
0.70 to 722.61. 

Among the broader market indicators, the 
New York Stock Exchange climbed 1.07 to 
121.90, its fourth new record in as many ses- 
sions. Standard & Poor’s 500-stock index rose 
2.08 to 212.02, its sixth new high in six days. The 
price of an average share jumped 33 cents. 

Advancing issues outpaced declines 1,018- 
700 among me 2,081 issues traded. 


Big Board volume amounted to 176 million 
shares compared with 177.9 milli on shares trad- 
ed Friday. 

Composite volume of NYSE-Usted issues on 
all US. exchanges and over tbe counter totaled 
210.5 mOfion shares, compared with 215.9 nut- 
lion shares traded Friday. 

Prices advanced on the view that subdued 
inflation and sluggish economic activity will 
allow the Federal Reserve to let interest rates 
faH 

The Fed’s pohcy-making arm is meeting early 

this wedc in Washington to discuss the economy 
and monetary policy. Analysts said Federal 
Open Market Committee members may reach a 
decision on whether or not to cut the discount 
rate. 

“There is a heady sense of expectation that 
tbe Fed may lower the rare before the end of the 
year,” Mr. Gordon said. 

Trading connected to the options and futures 
markets also sparred the market higher, partici- 
pants said. Baying by traders whose strategies 
involved bring short stocks and who wanted to 
cover their short positions gave prices a boost, 
they said. 

December contracts in both the stock-index 
futures and options markets expire Friday, as 
do individual options contracts. Because of this, 
the market could experience some added vola- 
tility, said Alfred Goldman of A.G. Edwards in 
SL Louis. 

Purchases by money managers who do not 
want to show large cadi positions in tbeir port- 
folios at the end of the year also aided the 
market's advance, traders said. 


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U 

1X8 

11 

JO 

11 

1X0*18.1 

78 

17 

M 

Id 

J4 

29 


77ft— I* 
136ft +Zft 
73% +Ift 


ft 

90 +1% 
40ft + ft 


37 36% 

15% 15 

S 17% 
14ft 
19% 
7% 

s 

X 

W -0% 

ss 

??ft 




» r 3 


29ft 13ft 











































































































Page 13 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17, 1985 


T 


TotM* toawfe me naHmivkie prices 
jip to Hwdoslnsr on waH Street 
and do not reflect tala tr o de floRw ture. 


w* 

31 
47 
50V. 

ss 

Id M‘ Of) 

d UMtti 

im 

ST 
BPb 
1M 
SB 
174 


pf. 440 1ZA 
PfMI 120 
pf ASA 123 


3 


13% u 
39 37 37 

41 40 41 

41 41 41 

a « « 

ZT% 21 27 

K® 

74% 74% 

74 73 

71 71 

72 70 
2* m 

17* 17% 


63 33 Ou*Ot 1.40 28 15 812 60 59% SM— 4 

1054 VI ChraOpf 756 9.1 M0CW05 1IM 105 +1 

35 174 QuokSO JOo 35 19 <73 33K> 33 TSh 

HM 5 Quantx 19 IMS 64 54 i + Ml 

344 27 QuHlar 150 13 11 4*2 3Hk 30W< SM— 4 

am ISM QkRaH 34a 8 20 M0 32% 31 31% +1% 


WA 5b RBIWt JM|J 734 5% A + Vta 

63% 34% RCA 1JB4 15 3214309 99% SPA 59% — b 


inn a% 

13% v* 

sm m 

19 11 

47 34 

11 6 % 
65% 47% 
17% 11% 
34 21% 

24 1SU. 
24 15% 

31% 21 
36 23 

39 20 

20% 9% 
13% 10% 


RoKnE I JOB A 
Rollins M 35 
5«wwn 

gooer 84 19 
Rarer 1.13 II 
Rowan .13 \J 
RoyiD live u 
Roy tut* 

ftuUMS 58 14 

RuuBr 

RusTep J6 14 
RvonH 150 45 
Ryders M U 
Rvtana 56 14 
Rvmrf 

Rvirwr pi 1,17 M 


IM 17% 
14 13% 

2% 3 
16b 15% 
36 35% 

TVk 61k 
61% 60% 
17% 17% 
34% 33% 
35% 34% 
231k 32% 
27 36% 

17 35% 

28% 27% 
18% 17% 
12% 12% 


10'A 4 "1 
14 4 % 

3% 

16% 4 % 
35% 4 % 
4 % — % 
61% 4 % 
17% 4 % 
34% 4 % 
35 4 b 

22% 4 % 
28% 4 % 
37 41'i 

27% — % 
18% 4 % 
12% 4% 


liMoMtl 

HIBtlLO* Modi 


51 31% 50BMLI 

17-i 1J SmiU 


ss. cme 

SI». YU. PE MtaHiahLaw owscn-et 


.48 15 14 714 U% 50b Mb — 
48 17 21 W 13 12% 12% 4 


2 2% 16% Srtiron 1 Ofl 55 18 167 30% 30% — 


39% 30% Svtjrnd 140 7J 
16% UP. SvmsCp 


8 33% 331k WO — 
75 13% 11% 19b — 


44% 33% Srnlert 1.20 2.1 17 KU 45b 44 44b — 
4$b Svaeo 44 1JJ 20 201 46 45% 45% 4 


77% 41 

60 + % 


NYSE Ffiglis-Lows 


ut 


: ’gRHGN & COLONIAL 
;,RESB?VE ASSET FUND 

H9CE5 AT KM2JJ5: 
It tULDOUARCASH $1064 

.- ' *«JKUW?e4CY CASH $11 £3 
DOLLAR BOW3S $1203 

MULTlCUBOCr BONDS $1294 
-'T 5TB1MG ASSET £1122 

FQRBGN&COIONM. 

? MANWEM04T {JSBE1J IM1H) 

: MUCASIBl STOET^T>BJSy0KEY^l 
"• 4 0SO351 ra£t 4192063 

r Onm FAC FUNDS, SS 

J : MBNAnON4£ft»*>SUSr 


. the latest information on 
\ _ Voe-Holhein International uv 

’ 1 Gty-Qock International no 
itae cafl collect 31-20627762. 


> sstoisscddrig above average 
'■ _ital gains in global stock 
■ iotis can simply write us a 
, • ' S and the weekly 
; .NESTORS ALERT newsletter 
' : be sent free and without 
gation. . ■ 


•' .• ii Commerce Securities bv 

- 'W Trade Center 
. _ /'tnsfcyfcmn 857 
i " • j XX Amsterdam, 
t'.’NetbartaiuJs 
14507 fiiBj nl 


tamr/MUL 
Malania AorW/n 

2S232S3T 1 

Malania 08/65 
Men Han *4 
Man Han 97 
ManHawowy) 
Mar MU(0 
Mar Mid 94 
Mar Mm n 
Mar MldN 
Mcorp 97 Wittily] 
MaflanBkW 
Midland M Ptip 
MMaadBkParaNw 
Mhflmd Intel 
MAnmdLnm 
MktomiMfl 
MM lend Inter 
MOaul Pin 97(QMJ 
Mitsui FkiM 
MunCnBfHfN 
MaBkOenn 
Nabv>tcop> 

NdtBk dStbOM 

NbfcDttrofftf 

Rot Conan BXOTW 

NotWulPnplAI 

MatWMParvtm 

iwwadRari 

Hat M FlnOS 

HotHMiPera ta 

Mol VMM 94 

No! West Fin 92 

Nat west Fin Pare 

MaUeOyM 

NawZaetaodV 

Hz Steal DsvVt 

MonflcMVl 

emm 

OtiM 

cabvs/et 

OttahenMUiwfi 

Pfr«lll9UV4 

P»e97 

Pic Banian H/n 
QaaemlcmKiMOK 
Renta 91 
RtoM 

Rep Bk DeOatV/ 

Ren tty Of 

Rap My 10 

RottnchJIdimti 

RbciS 

NtatPant 

Rtanaam 

SoHomo 9W3 

SaraaomPtailWM 

SBfwrinl Flnji . 

Scrnidf FlaApiVS. 

ficondl Fta DacVS 

SoatlmdMR 
SacPodflc97 
$k Pacific 93 

mam 

5M 98/93 

SHimm 

Sie latVI 

SocGmfWVS 

5KG«nMarf4 

SecGanNavM 

Sac Gan <7 

Sncbfl 

Stmta ms 

Miftm 

SaahiKMMvt 

Spoiaia/n 

SnotnVf 

Spaitakarnaffl 
Stand Owl M 
Siam Chart VI 
Stood Otari Mmaldi 
stand Chart Part* 
Sumitomo TP12/V4 
5UM»aiMa*«nn 
SwodonW 
svndan 90/85 
3WMtot>92«tlMMvl 
Sweden mm 


Non Dollar 


iB 
IR 

50 15 
Rt 1,94 U 
14* U 

140 3.1 

141 18 
JO 13 

150 75 
IJB 10.7 


28 
23% 
43b 
20 
18% 
25% 
34 
10 % 
64% 
23b 
58% 
% I 53 
1% I 9b 
% 


137 

35 90 4M9 
33 25 3*6 
A3 14 zm 
31 30 1858 
11136 7188 
28 12 311 
IS 16 531 

33 9 3543 

18 9 127 

19 8 44 

34 11 216 

11 13 639 
28 II no 
0.9 309 

45 40 

31 10 38 

53 M 112 
11 IS 36» 
4.1 685 

17 21 S3 
19 18 130 
1J 43 147V 
2.7 13 <67 

08 13 sn 
to* 
99 

IS 


A 6 683 
8 15 S3 
1* 12 WlB 
20 12 285 

732 
194 
4fl 
1J7 


39b UAL 
28% UAL Pt 
10% UCCEL 
2M UDCn 

20 UGI 

21 UGI nl 

8% UHCSK 
10b URS 
25b USPG 
28% U5G 5 
51 lISGpl 
19% UniFrst 
48 Unllvr 
Mb UnlNV 
33b UComp 
34 UnCarb 

4% UnlonC 
15% UnEtoc 
36b UnElot 
31% UnElpt 
46% UnElpt 
29 UnElnUl 
57% UEIptL 
21% UnElPf 
16% UnEI Pi 
23% UnElpt 
57% UEInfH 
17% UnEepn 
39% UnPoc 
*0 UnPcpf 
SO unrylpt 

3% UntIDr 


EULABANK 

Extract from Audited Consolidated Accounts 
for the eleventh year ended 30th September 1985 


Profit before Taxation 

Profit after Ttoation 

Share Capital and Reserves 

Subordinated Loans 

Deposits 

Cash at Banks, etc 

Deposits Placed 

Loans and Advances 

Tbtal Assets 


1985 

£ 

8,937,399 

4,927,067 

42^)43,804 

25,000,000 

814^33,329 

170,629,058 

92,695,469 

608,142,109 

894,765,579 


1984 

£ 

8,749,891 

4^54349 

38,016,737 

28,112,450 

831,616^31 

164^75^)64 

34^631^31 

697^733^60 

921,198^02 


All of these securities having been sold this announcement appears as a matter of record only. 


2,000,000 Shares 


O GWG Corporation 


Common Stock 

($.01 par value) 


- ^ 


Databank is an international merchant bank based in the City of 
London; its shareholders are fading European and Latin American, 
banks. The bank specialises in arranging and participating in loans 
to major borrowers throughout Latin America. 


Enrope Algenuene Bank Nededand NV; Banca Nazionato del liavoro; Banco 

Central SA; Banque anraelles Lambert SA; Banque Nationals da Pans SA; 
Barclays Bank PLC; Bayensdie Hypoft^ert-und Wecfase^-Bank AG; 
Deutsdi-Sfldamedkaniache Bank AG; Di ea dner Bank AG; Gstene icfai sctie 
Ltoderbank AG; Union Bank of Switzedand. 

Latin America Banca Serim SNC; Banco de Colombia; Banco de la Nad^n; 
Banco de la Naddn Argentina; Banco de la BepdbKca Oriental del Uruguay; 
Banco del Estado; Banco del Estado de Chile; Banco del Piduncha CA; 
Banco do &asi2 SA; Banco Industrial de Venezoela CA: Banco Merc antil de 
SSo Paulo SA. 

The above extract is an abiidged version of the group’s ioll accounts which 
will be filed wife the Registrar of Companies and on which the company's 
fi nd ifnre gave an nnqnalifie d report 

Copies of fee Annual Report and Accounts may be obtained from the 
Seaetary. 


Bear, Stearns & Go. Inc. 
Dillon, Read & Go. Inc. 
Goldman, Sachs & Go. 
Kidder, Peabody & Go. 

Incorporated 


Lazard Freres & Go. 

. The First Boston Corporation 

Donaldson, Lufkin & Jenrette 

SeeorltlcB Corporttkft 

Hambrecht & Qmst 

buorporeted 

Merrill Lynch Gapifal Markets 


Alex. Brown & Sons 

Ineorpontted 

Drexel Burnham Lambert 

Iiuotporeted 

E.F. Hutton & Company Inc. 
Montgomery Securities 


EULABANK 

'P«rHik-T.ftrtiiaii«4«TlpBHi Bank Fiwritnrf 

TbL -01 


Morgan Stanley & Go. PaineWebber Prudendal-Bache Robertson, Golman & Stephens 

Xececrponiicd Incorporated Securities 

L. F* Rothschild, Cnterberg, Towbin Salomon Brothers Inc 

Shearson Lehman Brothers Inc. Smith Barney, Harris Gpham & Go. 

Incorporated 



Wertbeim & Go^ Inc. 


Allen & Gompany i 

Incorporated 

A. 6. Edwards & Sons, Inc. 


Oppenheimer & Go., Inc. 

Thomson McKinnon Securities Inc. 

December, 1985 


Dean Witter Reynolds Inc. 
Arnhold and S. Bleichroeder, Inc. 


itter Reynolds Inc. Stephens Inc. 

[eichroeder, Inc. Bntcher & Singer Inc. 

Moseley, Hallgarten, Estabrook & Weeden Inc. 

Rothschild Inc 
Tucker, Anthony & R. L. Day, Inc. 


sue***. 





























































I i.v > M ixr.M » (»KM ■! = ■ * i«™ ■» > i< i M»U'I aw f) X) 'J 


Mondays 

M SE 

Closing 


tombs include th# nationwide price* 
up to the dosing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


17 Month 
HMlUn Stack 


Dtv.YH.PE WCbHtahLow QuaLOtar 


US. Rriim's 


(Continued from Page 13) 


aw 19!* UnBmd Mb 2 13 g 3^ i« 


IB* 10to UBrdpt SB 18* IS* IS* 

34* ?9Vb UCbTVs .W 2 St MS K* 34* 35* +'£ 

26* 13 1 * U Ilium 132 BJ 5 161 ££ £* + tfc 

JO* 24 UllhiPt W M ‘ H* inu, wit - 

20 14* Ulllupr 230 11X Mte life IM l8VS 



Company Results 


UDlotn 

USLIFE 

CIsHbRJ 

UtoPL 

UtPLpf 

UtPLpf 

UtPLpf 

UtPLpf 

UtlllCo 

S pr 
pf 


38 *-* 

io* + * 


gguenun and profits or war* In ml lltoni, ore In teal 

cumncfet unless olMnttie Mlcatea. 


Jap tu West Polnt'Pepperell 

III Ooor. 1986 19SS 

Foil Photo Film 

Vnr 198S 1984 Revenue 341 J 3174 

Revenue 748X80. 644216 Net Inc- 

Pnoflti 46.120. 56X36. Por Share — 1-33 »■« 

Per Shore-, T7S.97 152X6 


United Stales 


Con Cigna 

3M ouor. Xm 

Revenue 1XJIL 

Net inc — »■£ 

Per Shore — 0X8 

1st HoH 19S6 

Revenue M20 

Net Inc 5X4 

Per Share — 132 


Wilson Foods 
W Ooor. 1984 1*S5 


Revenue 3702 4(02 

Net Inc {0)243 013 

per Share — 002 

a: tos#. 


1 V 1 

53* 

25* VF Carp 1X8 

24 

13 

1930 

54 

51* 

53 +1 

14* 




142 2006 

13 

% 

12* 

75* 

15* Valor pf 

3X4 

MX 


31 

MW 

34to 






128 

2to 


2to— * 


IV* VanDm 

1X0 

14 

8 

545 

29* 

29 

5* 

2* Varoa 




120 

4* 

4* 

4* 

15* 

4* Varcopf 




1 

14* 

14* 

14* 



X6 

9 

24 

1582 

29* 

28* 28* — * 


9* vans 

XO 

2X 

40 

195 

14Vi 

14* 

14*— * 








10* 






17 

214 

11 

10* + * 



IXOolOX 


28 








14 

371 

12* 

12Vt 

12* + * 



XB 

X 

23 

3881 

59* 

S3 

SB*-* 


39to VoEPpf 5X0 11X 


20lh 45* 

45*— 1* 


59 VoEPpf 732 10.1 


2402 76* 

73 

74* +1 


44 VoEF pf 8X4 )0L4 


rate as 

US 




830 

93 



92* 



74* VoEPpf 935 10.1 


9864)2 WVt 

95 

94to +2to 



7.72 103 


30z7S 

3* 

75 


55 VoEP Pf 7X0 KL3 



49*— to 





17 

159 

20* 

2Vvj 

29to— to 





25 

» 

70 

49* 

69*— * 

90to 

A4to VulenM 

2X0 

3.1 

14 

50 

90* 

90* 

90* 

1 


Longview Fibre 
4th Quar. IMS 19W 

Revenue 1224 1205 

Net Inc 10S 454 

Per Share D.9S 041 

Year 1983 1994 

Revenue 459.1 4810 

Net Inc 224 222 

Per Share 2JE 2X0 


Worthington ind. 

2nd Ooor. 1994 1985 

Revenue 180.1 i«,i 

Net Inc 920 840 

Per Share 033 031 


let Half 1984 INS 

Revenue 1542 ms 

Net Inc 17X 172 

Per Share 043 042 


Per share norite n uta t ed for 

J-far-2 sptll fa Oct. 


31to 26 
2 5* 1414 
10 * 6 
3298 16% 
30V. 21* 
25* 17* 
40to 30* 
■a sov. 
54 41V. 

32* 17* 
34* 19* 
48 33* 

23* 17* 
28* 21 
52* 38* 


VV1C0R 142 
wockht XO 
wai nee 
WIMrt 5 .14 
Walami XQ 
wkHRsglXB 
WalCSv JO 
Walt Jim 140 
WaltJpl 140 
WariKO J8 
WmCm 
WomrL IJ4 
WoshGs 144 

WltlNol 186 

WasNpf 150 


73 9 3 

14 78 

221 

4 30 5719 
1J 19 1594 
550 

13 18 97 

13 8 824 
IV 3 

19 IS 517 
3919 
3J 14 5*83 
75 9 484 
42 8 104 

55 1 


30* 30* 
25* 24* 
4* 4* 
32* 31* 

g££* 

40* 40* 
42* 41* 

30* 29* 
35* 38* 
48* 47 
22 * 21 * 
24 2S* 

47* 47* 


30Vj — to 
25W + Vfe 
4*— * 
32* + * 
28to + 16 
23* + to 
40* + U 
42* + Ml 
54 + * 

30 + * 

35* + * 
47* — Vl> 
22 + * 
24 + * 

47* +1 




Via The Associated Pros 


Season 

Season 

ftcifi- 

High . 

Low 

Open High Low Close Ora. ' 


JPI 


60* 37* Xerox 100 5.1 20 3317 M SB* 59*— * 

56* 40* Xerox Pf sxs ; ao 4io 5* 5* + K 

29 20* XTRA .64 10 13 5> 22* 22* 22*— to 


30* 24* ZaleCp 152 45 13 104 29% 29* 27to— to 
TT 7* Zapata .12 15 44 3866 7* «* 6to— 1 
65* 32* Zovrex X> J 19 445 66* 64* 44*.+ * 

25 16* ZentthE 0" SLS 3HS 2U? ± T *. 

21* 15* Zeros SHI? *5£ 23S S* + * 

41 to 24* Zumln 152 15 14 290 38* 37* 38to— * 



Metals 



Livestock 


Coiimiwifdes 



Comfnctffities 


Cash Prices 






Dec. 16 


Hied 

Law 

Close 

BM Ask 

Ctlto 

SUGAR 

French francs per piefric ten 
Mar 1X12 1X00 1X08 

1X10 

+ 9 

MOV 

1X38 

1X24 

TX3S 

1X37 

+ 12 


1X90 


1X80 

1X88 


Oct 

1X29 

1X29 

1X20 

1XX 


Dec 

1X45 

1X45 

1X45 

1355 

+ 21 

Mar 

1X05 

1X99 

1X91 

1X10 

+ 22 


Dec. 16 

Oom Prevtous 
Mon Law lid JUt IH Ask 

SUGAR 

SterBng per metric ton 
Mar 14450 14150 14450 14550 14550 16550 
May 14950 147.40 140JB 14950 14950 14940 
Aim 17550 17150 17450 17550 17350 17450 
Oct 17B5D 17750 17850 17140 17750 17850 
Volume: 1549 late of 50 lam. 


SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
U.S5 per aaec* 


High ■ Law Settle 

Dee N.T. N.T. 316s; 

Feb 319.40 319X0 321 JO 

Mar NLT. N.T. 32350 

Volume: 40 lata otlOOm. 


EH. vet.: 1.158 lots of 50 Iona. Prev. actual 
sain: 1504 lots. Open Interest: 30X40 
COCOA 

Frndi francs per IN kg 


Dec 

Mar 


1XW 

1JW) 

1X15 

1X19 

+5 
+ 3 

May 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1320 

1X40 

Unch. 

Jlv 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1X30 


Unen. 

Sen 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1,940 

— 

Unch. 

Dec 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1.940 

— 

Unch. 

Mar 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1X30 

“ 

Unch. 


Est. voL: 2 lots of 10 Ians. Prev. actual sales: 
33 loll Open Interest : 406 
COFFEE 

French francs per IN kg 
Jan 2550 2375 2531 2540 -1-75 

Mar 2X20 2530 2514 2520 + 100 

May N.T. N.T. 2570 — +105 

JlV 2590 2590 2-51 D 2570 + 84 

Sea 3400 2500 2500 — + 120 

Nov 2537 2537 2517 — + 120 

Jan N.T. M.Y. 2520 — + 120 

Est. voi.: 250 kits of 5 tone Prev. actual 
sales: 54 lots. Open Interest: 388 
Source.' Bourse do Commerce. 


COCOA 

Sterling per metric toe 
DOC 1587 1564 1584 1585 1583 1591 

Mar 1535 1.726 1529 1530 1529 1530 

MP9 1547 1540 1544 1547 1541 1543 

Jly 1540 1554 1558 1540 1X55 1558 

Sea 1573 1576 1570 1577 1570 1571 

Dk 1575 1575 1573 1500 1570 1573 

Mar I59S 1595 1585 159S 1565 1590 

Volume: UNO lots of 10 tons. 


KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Matania cents per kite 

dose pw 

Bid Ask Bid 

Jan 18050 lfliJO 181 in 

Feb 180JO 181 JO 181 Jn 

Mar 181 JO 1B2J0 16280 

API 18480 18580 18*50 

MOV 184JSS 187J10 18450 

Jun 18650 109 JO 189 i» 

Volume; 0 lots. 



Dee. 16 
■ Year 

Commodity aad unit 

Men 

Ago 

Coffee 4 Santob lb 

138 

1X4 

Prlnldatfi 64/30 38 to, yd _ 

in 

<L7I 

Steel MUets (Pitt.), ton 

473X0 

<71X0 

Iron 2Fdnr.Ptiila« ton __ 

nut 

MUM 

Steal scrap No 1 Itw Pin. _ 

n« 

CFO 


18-19 

nos 

Zinc. E. St L. Baals, lb 

49-73 

43-44 

4JM3 

US 

Palladium, oz — - 

90-92 

134-141 

Silver N.Y.n 

Sam co: AP. 

5X3 

6X45 


COFFEE 

SterBae per metric fm 
Jan 2570 2.120 25SD 2557 

Mar 2528 2.165 2520 25» 

May 2575 2525 2574 2575 

Jly 2535 2575 2X25 2535 

Sep 2.445 X33S 2445 2X00 

MOV 2500 2385 2X95 2JD0 

Jan M.T. N.T. 2520 2540 

Volume: 14548 kits of 5 tans. 


2591 2095 
2147 2.148 
2199 2500 
2540 2544 
2290 2294 
2530 2535 
2525 2575 


SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Singapore cents per Idle 
dose 

Bid Aik 

RSS I Jan— 155.0? 155.50 

RSSIFeb- 15540 15550 

RSS 2 Jan— 19650 151 JO 

RSS 3 Jan_ 148J0 149JD 

RSS 4 Jan— 14450 14650 

RSS 5 Jan— 139 JD 141 JO 


CATTLE (CME) 

40 44.17 66X0 

3$ 3? ££ S| 

4455 5625 Jun 6150 41J» 

45.40 5520 AuO 6050 4tt^ 

4040 57 JD Ocf 59.13 5920 

SS 59 JO D&^W-IO 60.10 

E»L Sales 163*4 Prev. Sates 12J37 
PrevToav Openlnt. 66474 off 491 
FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 

4425 4435 

tub <M Mar <67S ttH 

71 JM 4040 Apr 4430 4620 

7600 40.10 MOV 4475 6405 

mm 45.10 Aug 4505 4665 

EH. Soles 1JSD Prev. Sato UQ4 
Prw. Day Open Int. 10342 off 44 
HOGS (CME) 

3Mtoo lbs.- cents per Bx : 

aw Dec 4935 4937 

5647 38.10 FEb ETJ0 «TJ5 

47J5 34.12 Apr 43.4B 4272 

S 39JS3 JW 44J5 4580 

49JH- 4045 JUt 45.10 4528 

S* 4035 AUO 4*25 44^ 

41.10 3887 Oct 40a 40JD 

49 JO 3837 D*C *175 4 37 

4X73 *0-40 Feb 4VJ0 *1-50 


6530 4530 — 1J0 

61J9 6128 — 1JB 


4032 40X5 — 135 

4050 6032 —tan 
5920 5920 —92 
5*55 9155 -~A2 

5920 5925 —.15 


45.15 4532 —120 
45X5 4642 —133 
6330 4535 —.97 

4435 6630 — A0 

6550 4520 — JO 


Previous 
BM Ask 

15525 15530 
15535 15650 

15020 15U0 

148JD 149JS 
14420 14650 

13920 141 JO 


EH. Soles 4X45 Prw.Sato 130 
Prev. Dav Open inL 25294 off 139 
PORK BELLIES (CME) 

38200 lbs.- cents perb. 

7630 kS Feb 6730 6820 

75xo Si5 mS am om 

7540 57J1S Mav 47.15 47.15 

7420 5730 Jut 4675 4675 

73.15 5528 Aug. 4427 _ 44X7 

Est. Safes 1092 Prev. Sales 4224 
Prev. Day Open inf. >304 op 179 


4835 4920 
4693 4735 

4220 4222 

4450 4472 
4420 44J2 
4320 4332 
MIS 483B 
41.17 41.17 
41X7 41X7 


S&PIOQ 
hidex Options 


GASOIL 

U3. dollars per metric tea 

Jaa 24525 24020 34425 244J0 24120 24120 

Feb 24075 23420 2383S 23&J0 23620 236J0 


KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
Malaysian rtoggns per E teas 


86X2 6732 —35 

6530 6655 —.15 

4535 4626 —JO 
65X5 4627 — 25 

6735 43X5 —122 


■PrevtausN 


Aik 

871 




COFFEE C(NYCSCE) 

37200 lbe^ cents per lb. 

21320 12935 Dec 19820 28330 19601 20220 +9 JO 

19&M 138JD Mar 201.96 20136 30136 201.96 4600 

199X0 13120 Mar 205X0 285X8 205X0 205X0 +620 


Industrials 


iiii 




Stock Indexes 


Currency Options 


Financial 


London Metals 


DM Iiitures 
Options 


IK GtrmtBiMari lXOXinorts. arts per axrt 


Dbcesnl Prav. 

Oiler Bid Yield YleM 


Dec. 16 

Strike cas+seHie PutvSetite 

Price Mar Jun Sep Mar Jon 5a> 

38 2J1 226 — 838 031 044 

39 138 230 248 8X5 023 695 

48 891 12 7.10 OH Ut 133 

41 659 1.16 1X1 1X3 130 120 

a Ut US U1 US 233 22 

43 - 034 - - 323 - 


Hoonte Ml 724 722 734 7.12 

Fmeato HO 72* 722 739 739 

Wear MU 725 723 734 7X7 

Prev. 

BM Oiler YMd YWd 
38-rr. bond 104 S/32 1047/32 9X5 933 


spat 79320 79X00 73720 73821 

Forward 01720 01X00 74120 74220 

COPPER CATHODES CtUgk Grade) 

Sterltoe per metric tea 
Spat 98500 98530 979 JO 98030 

Forward 10D3J0 100420 99930 ION 

COPPER CATHODES (Standard) 

Start teg per metric tea 
SPOt 98020 90320 97020 97220 

Forward 99320 99420 90920 99020 

LEAD 

Sterling per metric tea 
Spot 27520 77720 27020 27120 

Forward 20320 20330 27820 27130 

NICKEL 

Sterling per metric tan 
Spat 30BSJN 309520 294020 299020 

Forward 311020 311520 294520 297020 

SILVER 


PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 
Option X Strike 
Undortvtoa Price Cads— Last 
Doc Jn Mar Dec Jan Mi 
12JN British (taands-cents per aatt. 

B Pound 125 1J5 r t 

14439 140 • r 530 

1409 145 S US 290 

14439 150 S 025 1X0 

SOON Ganodkm DeBamceats par oaK. 
CDollr 70 err 

7136 71 a 076 r 

7136 72 8 r 0X7 

3136 73 s r 018 


0X0 2X0 

2JB 5.10 


D Marie 82 

39X1 34 

39X1. 35 

39X1 34 

39X1 30 

39X1 39 

39X1 40 

39X1 41 

nsxN French Fn 

F Franc 130 


SP COMP. INDEX (CME) 
points and cents ____ 

210.90 1753V Dec 21090 213JB 

213X0 182J0 Mar 213X0 21&J0 

228.15 18X90 Jun 21535 210X8 

21720 1872a S«p 217X0 220.10 

EH.SatoKMJXl Prev. SoteslOXTV 
Prev. Dav Open lot. 86573 up 1X22 
VALUE LINE(KCBT) 
points and cants 

21725 188X0 Dec 214X0 714X5 

218X0 19050 Mar 21820 2 20 30 

220X0 - 197X0- JUn 22030 22070 

226X0 200X5 Sep 

22420 226X0 Dec. L , 

EH. Salas Pro*. Salas 832 7 

Prev. Day Open Int. 17X73 up 1323 
NYSE COMP. INDEX (9IYFE) 
potato and cents 

12135 10130 Dec 121X5 12335 

72X40 10530 Mar 12125 12525 

124X0 10698 Jun 126X0 12640 

12523 108.10 SOP.. 127.10 127.10 

Bn. Salas 15342 Prev. Sates uxro 
Prev. Dav Open int. 12X82 UP 404 
MAJOR MKT INDEX (CBT) 

"SSST'SIS B 

293’* 270* Jan 293Va OTV5 

294* 271 Mar 295* 33S* 

Est. Sales Prev.Sglas 450 

Prev. Day Open Int. 1.933 up 4 


71025 71235 
21X05 215.15 
21530 717X5 
71730 71935 


21X75 71430 
717X5 717.95 
21030 23035 
22335 
22630 


171X5 12230 
122X9 174X0 
12630 12535 
12600 127.10 


271* 297 
292VY 290* 
294* 799W 


r 483 
r 3X4 
133 2X5 

039 UB 
0X6 0X7 

8JB 0J3 


s U2 ass 

0 0.11 &5J 

• 0X2 1X8 


Commodity Indexes 


Source: Sataman Brothers, 


Estimated total rel 3823 
cells: Frt vH. 4X41 eon InL 27JN 
Peti : FrLveL 842 open InL I7XN 
Source: CME. 


Memo Lvetk Dreaearr hhn: 13483 
Ctiansv for ttM Oar: +0J4 
Average ytsU: BJ4 « 

Source: Merrill Lmch. 


Spot 40JJ10 407J» 40530 407X0 

Forward 417JM 418X0 417X0 419X0 

TIN (Standard) 

Starting per metric ten 
Spat Swa Sum. — — 

Forward Susa. Sum. — — 

ZINC 

StwRag par metric ton 

Spot 474X0 479X0 45630 440X0 

Source: AP. 


■cut GUIDE ID OUNGWEll 


_ L15 e 3X0 

Yea-Moth* al a coat p 

■ r 436 

s r 380 

s r 2X0 

> 1X8 1X7 

8 e.« aw 

■ 0.17 039 


1 t in 

s 0X4 r 

■ 032 r 


dose 

MDOdV* 934X0 f 

Reuters 1391 JW 

D_J. Futures ________ 12830 

Com. Research Bureau- 231.10 

Moody 's : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1931. 
d- preliminary; f- final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. 18, 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1974. 


Prrvuus 
931 JO f 
1.775X0 

12733 

230.10 



r 139 
0X4 1.11 

r &33 


8 r 035 
■ 031 1X5 


ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) 


Dec. 16,1985 


Net aesat volee (notations ora ihppOM by the Fuads KHtd wttk Ike axaepHee of tome eaotM batad m tea* prica. 

The marginal itonbota IrK&cata freaueocy at quatatfoM gappGed:(tfJ-rttally; (w) -weekly; M- M m e aHN yj (rj-ragotarty; (TJ-lrragutorty. 


iN'tTH'M-rn i" i -nii 


•( dlCS Money Markn Fund— I 

-Id ICS Money Market Fwnd_ 

-tdl CSMMWy Markal Fd Yen_ YT00O9X0 

■I d ) Enerole-VoW 5F 14735 

-4dl u«ee— _ — SP 851X0 

■Id) Euraao-vaiar SP lvun 

•tdl Pacific -Volar SP 16335 

DREXEL BURNHAM LAMBERT INC 
Winthester Home, 77 London Wall 
LONDON EO »1 9209797) 

■iw) FHHburv Graup Ltd S 13073 

■tm) WMdieHer Divenined- s 2l.90» 

-(ml Winchester Financial Lid. S 9X6 

-(mi winchester Frontier t 10838 

■lw) Winchester Hotdlnpi FF 1 07.44 

t 12J6 

- * 52X7 

S 18W.11 



6MM JapmteM Yeo-HOM* at a cent per 4 

/Yen 52 *84 t. ■ 

rotate* VOL 7JM call at 

Total «at vaL UU Pat at 

r— Not badad. a— Na option offered. 

Lott k pramhim (purdiaM prica). 

Source: AP. 


IS ££ 


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Sribunci 


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il . * * . 


USINESS ROUNDUP 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17, X985 

CURRENCY MARKETS 


Page 15 


jPhyssen Stahl Quadruples Profit 


1 « > By Warren Gccler 

International Herald Tribune 

)UISBUR&> West Germany 
: i% ffisen Stabl AG, Europe's largest 
• *>#atc steelmaker, said Monday 
i it more than quadrupled group ' 
profit to 383 tbSBwbl Deutsche 
is ($152 million} for the year 
. n 93 million DM a year earlier. 

.^letnz Kriwet, Thyssen Stahl’s 
" ' n rpan, said that despite the 
ing jump in profit, the profit-to- 
s relationship az the company 
fell short of what he considers a 
v able profit margin of 5 percent. 
' ;-ii sales of 10.4 billion DM, op 
n 9 2 bfllioo a year earlier, 
fssea’s Stahl's profit margin was 
i . percent. 

*.--4r. Kriwet said the group's 
'■ ing performance in the year 
ed in September was due pri- 
ily to robust foreign demand 
both crude sled and con thru- 
cast semifinished sted prod' . 

Crude-steel production rose 5 
~ cent to about 11.1 mDlion mel- 
tons (112 million short tons). 


The current year, however, 
promises lower profit mainly be- 
cause of faffing exports, Mr. Kriwet 
said. * 

Thyssen executives said that 
Thyssni’s competitiveness abroad 
is likely to be eroded this year not 
only by a weaker doBar but also by 

Electronic Data Seeks 
Ventures With Logics 

International Herald Tribute 

LONDON -s- Electronic Data 
Systems Corp., a unit of General 
Motors Corp., said Monday that it 
had approached Lomca PLC of 
Britain about “possible business 
combinations of the two firms." 

Logtca, a troubled British com- 
puter-software and office-automa- 
tion company, had a loss of £53 
million (S7.6 million} on sales of 
£80.6 million in the year ended 
June 30. EDS, acquired by GM in 
1984. is a major information-ser- 
vices company. 


price-undercutting from South 
American and South Korean com- 
petitors. Competition within the 
domestic market is also expected to 
cause heavy price pressure: As a 
resuIt,.Mr. Knwet said, be expects 
both prices and sales this year to 
drop by 3 percent to 5 percent 

He said that foreign competitors, 
including numerous beneficiaries 
of state subsidies, have made in- 
roAds into the important U.S. auto 
industry market for semifinished 
steel, m which Thyssen has played 
a dominant role as a foreign suppli- 
er for several years. 

In the two years that Thyssen 
Staid has existed as an independent 
unit of the diversified Thyssen AG 
group, the company has been able 
to allocate 194 million DM to re- 
serves, chiefly the result of capaci- 
ty-cutting measures that have 
yielded two years of growing prof- 
its after heavy losses. For the cur- 
rent year, Thyssen Stahl plans to 
invest 676 nuDion DM, down from 
767 million in 1984-85. 


VW Forecasts Higher Sales , 
Earnings for Current Year 

■ _Retaers 

WOLFSBURG. West Germany — Volkswagen AG, West Germa- 
ny’s biggest car and truck group, said Monday that it expects to report 
higher sales and profits for this year, and sees good prospects for 
earnings in 1986. 

In an interim report, VW said it ejects world group sales to rise 15 
percent from last year’s 45.7 billion Deutsche marks (about $18 
bilfioq at current rates), topping 50 billion for the first time. Parent 
sales also are expected to increase 15 percent from 33.8 billion DM in 
1984, it smd. 

The automaker gave no specific profit forecast but said h expected 
worldwide after- tax profit to be above last year’s 238 million DM. The 
company reported nine-month world net of 424 million DM, and 
analysts said they expect fuD-year profit to be near 600 million DM. 

The tepon gave no indication of 1985 dividend, which analysts 


VW has become the market leader in Western Europe this year for 
the first time, helped by sustained demand for its second-generation 
Golf hatchback. 

VW said it expects world group vehicle production to rise 12 
percent, to 2.4 million units this year, and deliveries to customers to 
rise 13 percent, to 242 million, a level last reached in 1980. 


r'mwn Businesses to Be Sold company notes 

o Goldsmith, James River Dutch chemicals group Akzo IS 


The Associated Press 

. {: >UCHMOND, Virginia — 

; i'les River Corp. would acquire 
vviority ownership of the paper 
*2 in ess of Crown Zellerbach 
— ■ •' “-p. and the British financier, Sir 
ics Goldsmith, would retain 
... trol of Crown’s forest-products 
Ji J. cardboard operations in a 
fje-way transaction announced 
d - ^pday. 

ieve Garnett, a James River 
kesman. said the psper-manu- 
rnring giant would spend about 
0 mini on worth of its own stock 
V ier a complicated formula to ob- 
; 'j the stock in San Francisco- 
.'ed Crown Zellerbach. 

'ir James, who owns just over 50 
' sent of Crown Zeilerbach’s 27 
(ion shares outstanding, would 

lapan Market 

- -• : A 

. H ; (Cominned from Page 11) 

\ - :es for ramimiring not only port- 
o risks but also fixed bank lend- 

rates and interest rates on 

i .neas ie-scale time deposits. 

trt the market will have to ma- 

- _ to handle a large amount of 
~ ’/.-ads before it will be diversified 
L . ugh for all hedging needs, the 

- : k dealers said. 

\ healthy growth of the futures 
' £• ket could eventually lead to to- 
- : lecontrol of interest rates,’ -the ■■ 
yo Stock Exchange official 


retain controlling interest in three 
subsidiaries of Crown Zellerbach 
that would be spun off into sepa- 
rate companies, Mr. Garnett said. 

Sir James would acquire at least 
a 78-percent ownership of the three 
new companies — Crown’s forest- 
products and cardboard operations 
and a smaller office-products unit 
— with any balance owned by 
Crown shareholders. He also would 
receive about $90 million in cash, 
Mr, Garnett said. 

Crown shareholders would be 
able to tender their stock either to 
James River or to Sir James. But 
for the transaction to come off, 
James River must be tendered at 
least 90 percent of the Crown 
shares not already owned by Sir 
James, Mr. Garnett said. 

“Neither the James River ex- 
change offer nor the Crown ex- 
change offer will be consummated 

imlwre both are rywi<awimnilp«t * the 

companies said. 

A “definitive agreement” has 
been signed and unanimously ap- 
proved by the boards of directors 
of both Crown Zellerbach and 
James River, the companies said. 

Mr. Garnett said James River 
has animal sales of $25 billion, and 
with the addition of the rem a i n ing 
portion of Grown Zellerbach would 
have annual sales of about $43 
billion. Crown Zellerbach has an- 
nual sales of about $3.1 bfltioo- 

Sir James is operating through a 
subsidiary of his General Oriental 
Securities Ltd. Partnership. 


Akzo Cheuoe BV, a unit of the 
Dutch chemicals group Akzo NV, 
said it considered an S8.8-mHlion 
antitrust fine imposed by the exec- 
utive Commission of the European 
Community as u n w ar r an ted, and 
was considering an appeal to the 
European Court of Justice. 

Bid, the French state-controlled 
computer group, said it would offer 
a one-for-three rights issue to 
shareholders at par of 30 francs 
($3.89) per share. . 

Casio Computer Ca will make a 
one-for-10 bonus stock issue on 
April 30 for shareholders registered 
as of March 20. 

Deutsche Texaco AG expects 
profit to improve this year, with 
better results from the chemical di- 
vision, the company magazine said. 

Fujitsu EspaBa SA, a computer 
sales subsidiary of Fujitsu Lul, has 
signed an agreement to merge in 
April with Secotnsa, a data-pro- 


cessing-equipment producing affil- 
iate of Compadia Telefonica Na- 
tional de Espafia SA. a Fujitsu 


Guardian Royal Exchange Assure 
ance PLC said it had acquired a 
6.65-pexcent bolding in the ordi- 
nary shares of Plessey Co., which 
last week rejected a £1.18-bilHon 
(31.75-billioa) hid from General 
Electric Co. of Britain. 

Hitachi Ltd. said it would start 
production of videotape recorders 
in Anaheim, Calif ornia, next June. 

Imperial Chemical Industries 
PLCs proposed joint venture in 
vinyl chloride and polyvinyl chlo- 
ride with a unit of Eniriniw SpA of 
Italy will not be referred to the 
Monopolies and Mergers Commis- 
sion, the British Department of 
Trade and Industry announced. 

Knimtei IM p lans to buOd hy- 
draulic shovels and other heavy 
.equipment at a plant in New Cas- 


THE EUROMARKETS 


New Issues Dry Up Ahead of Christmas Break 


By Christopher Pizzey 

Reuters 

LONDON — Most secondary- 
market areas of the Eurobond mar- 
ket ended virtually unchanged 
Monday compared with Friday’s 
closing levels. Most operators were 
not witting to open fresh positions 
ahead of the Christmas break, deal- 
ers said. 

New-issj e-activity alio dried op^. 
with only one new bond issue being 
launched, 250 nriUioa Deutsche 


marks of capped floating- rale notes 
for the Union Bank of Finland. 

The 10-year note pays V4 point 
over the three-month London in- 
terbank offered rate, with a maxi- 
mum coupon of 8 percent. The lead 
manager was Deoische Bank AG. 

One doDar-straght trader said 
that he expected activity on both 
the p rjipary and sqpg fldary markets 
to re main very thm this week, with 
dealers more concerned over squar- 


Dollar Turns Lower in U.S. Trading 


Compiled br Our Staff From Ditpctcka 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
edged lower in dull U.S. trading 
Monday after dosing generally 
higher in Europe. 

Dealers said that year-end cor- 
porate demand had buoyed the 
currency in the earlier European 
session, but that UJ5. traders bid it 
lower cm renewed speculation of an 
imminent cut in the Federal Re- 
serve's benchmark discount rate. 

“The holiday season has hit the 
market," one dealer said. “There 
was a tittle bit of commercial de- 
mand but the big players don't 
want to get involved right now.” 

In New York, the dollar fell to 
2.5100 Deutsche marks from 
2.5230 ai Friday's dose; to 202.10 
yen from 202.75: to 7.6765 French 


francs from 7.7175 and to 2.1000 
Swiss francs from 2.1080. 

The British pound strengthened 
to $1.4430 from $1.4360. 

In earlier trading in Europe, the 
pound advanced in London to 
close at SI .4380, up from $1.4365 
on Friday. Dealers said the British 
currency was supported by high 
domestic interest rates. 

In Europe, dealers said the mar- 
kets still were concerned about oil 
prices and their consequent impact 
on the pound, but the British cur- 
rency steadied in line with a rela- 
tively stable crude oil market. 

Dealers said interest in U.S. eco- 
nomic statistics bad dwindled. 
They said the market’s feeling was 
that however good the indicators 
might be. central bank intervention 


by the five leading industrial na- 
tions would prevail the do&ir from 
rising above 2.55 DM. 

Dealers said many market par- 
ticipants had already taken posi- 
tions on a cut in the VS. discount 
rate, which is believed to be inevita- 
ble if not imminent. 

In other European markets 
Monday, the dollar wa*. fixed in 
Frankfurt at 2.5224 DM, up from 
2.5172 DM at the Friday fixing. 

In Zurich, the dollar closed at 
2.1168 Swiss francs, up from 1)06 
on Friday. 

The US. currency was fixed at 
7.7115 French francs in Paris, up 
from 7.696 francs on Friday. 

In Milan, the dollar finned to 
1.72025 lire from Friday’s fix of 
1,717.50 lire. [UPl, Reuters) 


tie, England, the company said. 

Nissan Motor Co. will have to 
reduce its forecast of results for the 
year ending March 31 if the yen 
remains at present high levels, ac- 
cording to Yu taka Kume, the com- 
pany presi dent. 

Pttstus Flugzeugwerke AG, the 
Swiss aircraft maker, said it won a 
contract worth 300 million Swiss 
francs ($1413 million) to supply 69 
PC-9 training aircraft to the Aus- 
tralian Air Force. 

Saab-Samk AB said Swedish 
aviation authorities had lifted an 
order grounding all Saab SF-34Q 
commuter planes that was issued 
Dec. 11 after an incident of in- 
flight engine failure. 

Toyota Motor Corp. will begin 
negotiations this week on the estab- 
lishment of a joint-venture assem- 
bly plant in Taiwan to produce 
60,000 subcompact cars a year, a 
Taiwan government official said. 


ing their positions ahead of the 
holiday rather than with actively 
making markets. 

He added that prices Monday 
tended to edge ahead slightly in 
places, with the market stilfunder- 
pinned by the prospects of a dis- 
count-rate reduction in the United 
Slates. “There are some issues 
which are Vi or V4 point firmer, but 
you’ve got to look pretty hard to 
find them," he said. 


Royal Oak 
Perpetuel Calendar 














Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17 > 1985 


llWwith 

Hfrniaw start 


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AMEX 


dosing 


15% fit, CMI CP 
3U. % CMXCo 

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14W 9 CoMNJ i; 

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1B% 11% Cameo M 25 a 

3 ivt Campnl ^ 

17 Vt I3V. CMareb a l.» 
23% 16% CdnOec M 
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11 714 714 714 + % 

100 lift 11 1IW— 'A 

12 Bft Bft Bft — V* 

H 15% 15 IS%-% 


Ta.lles include Itifi nationwide prices 
up t# the dosing an Wall Street 
end do not reflect late trades etsewtiere. 

I til The Associated Press 


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J*a AM I HI *1 

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69 ATT l ! d SJ2D 60 __ 

7% AcmeU .33 IS J3 

Adlan 15 

I'* Acton 
L .\Actnw1 

l»'i AdriHJ 7 

22'. AOPuil .«» A 18 

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30 AflIPbs a0 1.1 24 

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14 

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S lSSSS* 5 K S ’8 iR .w .Sts 

4ft AmCoo 13 


AConfrl 1-000 1.7 15 
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4‘T AFruC A *5 

4". AFrucB 

JSJ AHIIhM 9 

Cl Alsroal 6 

ll^f AAltoSA X 17 66 
13' j AMicB 52 38 65 
T AMEW 

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i;ii APrnc 54b 15 70 
t'i AinRllY 4 

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$1. AnwlH 105 

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lift Arundl 15 

6i z Asmrg JO 25 55 
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, 7'-. Aslrol Pi 150 I3A 
ft AtlsCM 
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.72 75 18 
105 


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15 1 60*4 60ft 60% 

924 54 'V 52Va 53ft — W 

«5 16300* 5ft 5ft 
44 29200* 5ft 4% 5% + % 

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66 57 13ft 13% 13ft 

65 15 13% 13% 13% 

J99 5 71 * 5% 5ft 

19 29 4 3% 3ft 

16 11 50% 50% 50ft— % 

18 ft ft % 

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(Gm tinned on Page 17) :. 

Australian Exchanges • 
Agree to Merger in ’87 • 

4 genre France-Presse ” 

SYDNEY — Australia’s six stock exchanges 
have agreed to merge into a single market to be 
known as the Australian Stock Exchange. * 

The six exchanges would retain their separate 
trading floors in Sydney. Melbourne, Perdu 
Hobart, Adelaide and Brisbane under an agree- 
ment reached at a weekend meeting here of their 
joint boards, Ron Coppel executive directorof 
the Australian Associated Stock Exchange^* 
said Sunday. 

The merged body would start operations by 
April 1, 1987, sutgecl to a 75-percent vote in 
favor at each stock exchange. 

All the assets of the existing exchanges would 
be pooled on a national basis. 

The agreement would end years of often- 
bitter rivalry, particularly between the Sydney 
and Melbourne exchanges, which together ac- 
count for more than 90 percent of all turnover 
on the Australian equity markets. 

The new exchange would be the world's sixth 
largest, and the largest in the Southern Hemi- 
sphere. 










'N 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17, 1985 


Page r 


lurope Balks at 'Locomotive’ Role 


(Conttwrerf fang Page 1) 

. are borapedtis*^ and let the Unt- 

■ Slaves reduce its trade deficit 
thout reaeatiflg behind protcc- 

. nisi twricre. 

it wooid also would make Eu- 
:.&s goods more expensive to 
oericsn consumers. 

But to support the yea against 
; dtfc a key goal of the agree- 
' al, the Bank ot Japan has had to 
. so its domestic interest rates, a 
ire that threatens to depress 
iwthTJOrtyear unless the govan- 
nt takes offsetting stimulative 
ion. But sane economists find 
rail's xdnetance understandable, 
aase H already has a huge gov- 

unent debt. 

Meanwhile, European govem- 
nts also find that their ability to 
nulale growth through lowerm- 
ost rates is Hunted % fear that 
4 migbJl depress their currencies 
dust the dollar a g ain 
?or its part, the Reagan adminis- 
donispublidyui^mgWestGer- 
ny. in particular, to do more to 
nulate us economy. Last month 
. assistant Treasury secretary, 
vid C Molford, tcM Congress 
d West Germany was fading to 
a up to the September agreement 
refusing to cut taxes more tins 
n to stimulate growth and raise 
; vaine of the Deutsche mark. 
Proponents of faster European 
. name growth contend that the 
;hfy restrictive economic policies 

■ lowed by all European govern- 


ments since the J 979-80 a3-price 
diode have made their economies 
overly dependent on exports for 
growth and vulne rable to a U.SL 
slowdown and a fall in the dollar. 

According to Professor Lesta 
Thurow of the Massachusetts Insti- 
tntfi of Technology, “One-third of 
European growth can he traced to 
Amocan recovery and the strong 
dollar, both of whsdv are starting to 
disappear." 

The intrinsic weakness of the Eu- 
ropean econ o mies is revealed by 
their low growth of domestic de- 
mand, winch excludes the effect of 
foreign trade. 

Waite domestic demand is grow- 
ing at just under 4 percent in the 
United States this year and by 3 
percent in the industrial world as a 
whole, it is bumping along at less 
than 2 percent in Europe. West 
German domestic demand is ex- 
pected to grow only 1 2 percent this 
year. 

As the OECD recently pointed 
out, a dados in the American ap- 
petite for imports, and more com- 
petitive American exports, would 

mean that "F nr t y w AmtMm ite- 

maud growth would need to be 
faster merely to prevent a growth 
slowdown from its present rate." 

Another argument is that a small 

coordinated expansion by several 
countries is likely to prove more 
potent and leas risky than a big 
push by just one. . 

In 1978, Western nations at- 


tempted the. same kind of cootdir 
nated arakaa being urged today. 

At that year’s Weston economic 
snmmfc meeting in Bonn, Japan 
and West Germany agreed to act as 
locomotives f or the world economy 
by simultaneously adopting stimu- 
latory measures equal to 1 percent 
of their total output Smaller con- 
tributions were promised fay Brit- 
ain, France, Italy and CanadA- 

The governments in Britain, 
West Gennany and Japan now re- 
gard that experiment as an unquali- 
fied disaster that pushed the indus- 
trial worid back into - inflation, 
recession and higher unanpkiy- 
ment 

But some policy-makers and 
economists think such an effort 
would fare much better new. They 
argue that Europe’s earlier attempt 
to play the locomotive was derailed 
by the Iranian revotafion and the 

oQ-price rise, which forced up 
wand inflation, compelling govern- 
ments everywhere to stamp on die 
brakes. 

In particular, argues Stephen 
Morris, a former economic adviser 
to the OECD now at the Institute 
for International Economics in 
Washington, oil prices are now fall- 
ing, inflation is lower and unem- 
ployment higher, Europe’s external 
payments are stronger and the dol- 
lar is overvalued, rather than un- 
dervalued, as it was under Presi- 
dent Jimmy Carter. 


Japan lets 6 Foreign Firms 
Open Securities Branches 

Renters - 

TOKYO — Japan will allow six foreign securities firms to open 
branches in this country beginning next year, a Finance Ministry 
official said Monday. 

The six are DB Capital Market (Aria) Ltd, EF. Hutton & Co„ 
Schroder Securities (Japan) Co, Cazenove & Co.. Paine Webber Inc. 
and HoaroGovett Far East Ltd, the spokesman said 

A f ormal announcement is expected later this week, he added 

Deotsebe Bw* AG of West Germany said earlier that it would 
reduce Us stake in DB Capital Market to SO percent to conform with 
Japan’s securities and exchange law, which prevents banks here from 
having both c omm e rcial banking and securities operations. 

■ The rmni$tiy spokesman said that HoareGovett Ltd of Britain has 
reduced its share in Hoare Govett Far East to 50 percent for the same 
reason. 

The spokesman said, however, that Merchants National Bank & 
Trust Co. of Indianapolis would not have to reduce its 100-percent 
share in Schroder Securities because it does not have a banking 
branch in Japan. 


Thailand Will Post Daily Price lor Its Tin 


Return of the U.S. Gold Coin 


(CoHtteBedfroa Page 11) 
gold phis a small charge for mmi- 


To be successful, die Eagle will 
have to have liquidity tmH continu- 
ity, said Jeffrey Christian erf J. 
Aral’s commodity research group, 
who expressed caution about the 
coin’s chances. 

"It must be the same every year, 
nnt Blt*! * wfakh 

changes face periodically, said 
Richard Latribrochi, special-service 


yrMu pagw of the precious-metals di- 
vision of American National Bank 
of New York. Continuity is neces- 
sary to have the coin regarded as 
legal tender and not a collectors 
item, dealers said 
The design of the 550 one-ounce 
coin is specified by law. It will 
feature a design “symbolic of Kber- 
ty" on the front and a family of 
eagles on the back. The designs of 
the other coins will be set by the 
secretary of the Treasury. 


By Vichoon Arnom 

Renters 

BANGKOK — Thailand is to 
begin Tuesday posting a daily tin 
pace, whkh initially will be dm 
equivalent of 21 Malaysian ringgit 
per kilogram (53.93 per pound), a 
government official said Monday. 

Shravong Changkasiri, an offi- 
cial of the Mineral Resources De- 
partment, also said the government 
nad p romulgate d tariff measures 
Monday to hap Thai m ines remain 
competitive if an expected sharp 
decline in world tin prices occurs. 

Department officials said it was 
hoped that the posting of daily ref- 
erence prices would help revive 


trading in tin, w hich was suspend- 
ed OcL 24 on the exchanges in 
London and Kuala Lumpur, Ma- 
laysia. 

Analysts and traders these have 
said they expea prices to fall at the 
resmnption of trading. The Inter- 
national Tin Councd, whose an- 
nouncement that it lacked money 
for price-support operations pro- 
voked the suspension, is negotiat- 
ing with creditors for an agreement 
that would allow trading to resume. 

The Dui officials said the posted 
price would also act as a bench- 
mark for royalty calculations. 

Thailand which like Malaysia is 
a leading tin producer, previously 


France’s State Financial Group Plans 
To Take Share in Channel Project 

bond portfolio, is interested in loan 
finance and would “take an impor- 
tant pan in the subscription of 
bonds issued by the winner" he 
said. 


Rouen 


PARIS — Caisse des Depflts el 
Consignations. France's state-con- 
trolled financial group, said Mon- 
day that it plans to take an impor- 
tant stake in the project to be 
chosen to provide a fixed link 
across the Channel. 

A Caisse spokesman, Philippe 
Puyan, said that the group does not 
plan to participate in the capital of 
whichever of the four proposed 
links is eventually chosen by Brit- 
ain and Ranee. "We have no im- 
mediate plans to take a stake in the 
form of shares," be said. 

The group, which has a large 


The governments of France and 
Britain are expected to decide in 
January on one of four proposals 
for a fixed link across the Channel. 
The proposals include roads, rail 
lines, bridges and tunnels. 

The Caisse. which collects de- 
posits from state savings banks, 
had a 1984 balance shea of 1,15 
trillion French francs ($149 bil- 
lion). 


traded most of its tin through the 
London Metal Exchange but used 
the Koala Lumpur price as a refer- 
ence for royalty calculation. 

Tim minerals department offi- 
cial, Mr. Sivavong. said Industry 
Minister Chirayu Israngkun Na 
Ayuthaya bad signed into law a 
cabinet decision made last month 
to cut Thailand’s high export royal- 
ty on tin and related taxes. 

industry sources said the cuts in 
export royalty would allow Thai 
mines, burdened by high produc- 
tion costs, to survive if world prices 
fall to around 20 to 22 ringgit from 
over 29, the rate last quoted on the 
Koala Lumpur market. That rate 
was equivalent to London Metal 
Exchange rates when trading was 
halted. 

Thailand Smelting & Refining 
Co, which smelts most of Thai- 
land's tin concentrate and exports 
all its tin metal said over the week- 
end that actual traded prices of 
Thai tin could vary from that being 
fixed by the government. 

The company, a unit of Royal 
Dutch/SheD Group, said it hod in- 
vited buyers of the metal to sum 
making daily bids for the quantities 
of tin and prices they wish to pay. 

The company said it expected 
foreign-bid volumes would be low 
in die early stages and that more tin 
concentrate would be offered than 
the market can absorb. Industry 
sources said most mines wish to 
reduce stocks of concentrate to 
ease their cash-flow problems. 


Monday 

arc 


Prices 


NASDAQ prices cm of 
3 pjn. New York ftme. 

Via The Associated Press 


(Low HOC* 


Dtv.YM. ms Him LOW 3 PM. Ortm 


H 11 ADC 71 

. 

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21k APhvG 
16% AM Sec ' 
8, AMSffO 
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17 Am rani 


2* 


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21 1477 





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262 

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91 

28ft 

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270 

lift 

1114 

374 

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140 

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39% 

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36* 

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167 

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714 

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BsftlFC A59 tj 
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BrwTam 

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% % 
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2614 25ft 
15ft 15 
20ft 19ft 
32 JTft 
(ft Oft 


2104 
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3114 +2M 
506— ft 
30 — ft 
11 -ft 

*4 + ft 

15ft+ ft 
2*14 + ft 
15ft + ft 
2006 + ft 

32 + ft 

004 + ft 



9ft 404 C COR 04 

1014 3ft CP Rhb 558 

12ft Oft CML 

2144 14 CPI 25e 2 473 

MS 4ft CPT 1329 

721* 6 CSP 67 

6ft 2ft CACI 144 

26ft 17ft CbrvSC 33a 4.1 486 

1214 70* CalMIC 199 

6 » OrtSh/O It 

41* 1ft Co I Ion P 60 

15ft Bft Srtny 

'% 

19ft 1214 CrVnlD 

5 314 CaraerC 

14ft 6ft drank 

lift 6ft Gorton t 
2ift Vi* emovso 

1616 5ft Cancers 

35ft 25ft CntrBc 1 JO 5.1 
2714 I Contcor 

60 3S04 CcnSc 216 U 

2314 T2V6 CBshSs Jt 3L3 
3114 10ft CPdBks 34 13 
4ft 1ft Carmlk 
33ft 8ft Cetus 
6ft 3ft CIwpEn 
37ft 15ft ChormS 20 3 

21ft 12 OlfcPnt 
11 606 OiftTdl 

3T16 180b 5iLwn 
1014 4ft Chan 

is oft aw 

14ft 8ft _ 

31 22 OilPacs 

10ft 6ft Otronr 
2Sft 1206 OtfOwt A0 1J 
440b 25ft dittos .12a ; 

34ft 1006 dollar 
12ft 5 a price 

714 m circon 

23ft IfiftCtzSGO 
37 94ft CteFId 
4714 270* CIZUIA 
42ft 2714 CtxUlB 
14ft 54* OtvFod 
33ft 30ft CtvNCp 
2804 22ft CtarkJ 
1914 1306 Cteord. 

211k 161ft ClavtBt 220 112 

2916 5ft CWltfllS 

1914 130k Coast? 

2604 906 Cot* Lb 

49ft 26ft COCOBII 56a 1.1 

IB 14 Coour 

304 Itm Canonic 

26ft 13 Cidwnrt 
7ft 904 Co totoR 

16ft 1QV. Coltoen 

504 304 Collins 

3614 270* ColLJAC 1J0 If 

72*4 1514 Caima 

21ft 15ft CoJoNt 24 5A 

141k 51k Camar a 

:2 d 

33ft Cmeric* 120 SO 
44ft 26ft CmctU 1A4 20 

13 Oft CmlSh OS 4.9 

38ft 2tft enwrri 1A0 4J 

4ft ft ComAM 
3006 16ft Camlnd 
1706 0 ComSvS 

34 14ft CmpGds 
25ft 14ft QnpCrs 
414 206 Consul 
15ft 5ft CCTC 
32ft 16ft CmoAa _ 

13ft 706 CmoDt JO 3 

Bft 3ft CptEal 
15ft 6ft CmatH 
91k 6ft Cmaltti 
Oft 5ft CmoLR .11 13 

6ft 2 CmptM 
10(4 6ft CmaPd * 

22ft «0k CmTlks 
1114 3ft Cmputn 
8 11k Cptctt 

lift 6 Csmshf 
n* 6 Concptl _ 

27 190* CnCaa 2A0 T70 

18ft 10ft CCapR JL68 145 
26ft 110* CCowS 2.16 175 
Bft Mi CoaRjf 
54ft 3206 CnsPap 1A0 U 

5ft 3ft ConxPd JOS 2J 

6ft 1ft Consul _ 

4504 29ft CirtlBc 2M> 45 
1014 814 C1IHH8 

8 4 CtLosr 

12V. 4ft Convst 
2114 lift Cenvrse 
5ft ft CaprBk) 

61k 2ft CaarLsr 
2214 14ft Coors B A0 2D 
1614 5ft Copyist 
946 6 Cor com 

3M6 2^6 Corests 1J4 3.9 
5 1ft Conus 
7ft 31k COsmo 
1614 10V. CrttBrl 
180* 10ft Cronos 
2946 20ft CrOSTr 
1404 9 CWlflt 

34ft 15ft Crumps 
28ft 18ft CuUnFr 
2814 15ft Culums 
27 18ft CVcare 


7ft 7 
5ft 4ft 
12V* Uli 
21(6 28ft 
6ft 6ft 


.14 


4414 44 
45 4fl* 
lift lift 

38ft 31ft 
1004 1014 
2314 22 
20ft 1814 
306 3ft 
Mb Mk 
33 32 

9ft 00* 
704 70k 
14ft 14ft 
7ft 7ft 
8ft 706 

r a 

22«. 2114 
Mk 5ft 
lft Hi 
lift lift 
01k 7ft 

IH6 TOO* 

T ’«* 

57V6 son 

3ft 30k 
2ft 2ft 
<50* 4514 
10ft IB 
4M 4ft 

!%5ft 

H * 

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15(4 14ft 
7(4 7 

lift lift 

TB "35 

4ft 41k 
14ft 1306 

19 180k 
23ft 23 
1404 14(4 
21ft 2004 
21(4 21(4 
2D 19% 

20 19ft 


ii*±S 

5ft— 14 

'St-' 

31(4— 14 
2104 + ft 
906 + ft 
am + ft 
12ft— ft 

+ vs 


42 


45 + ft 

lift + 14 

"ft+'ft 

18V6 ft 

23 +06 

20 +18* 
314— ft 
M6 

1-a 

14ft— ft 
7ft + ft 
0 + ft 
2ft + ft 

21ft"+ ft 

M 

Sft + ft 
14ft + ft 
lift 
014 

6ft + ft 
5214 +114 
3ft + ft 
2ft— ft 
4506 + ft 
10ft + ft 
4ft 

12ft „ 

14 + ft 

lft— ft 


IS + ft 
7 —ft 

4ft— ft 

Ml* 

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9114— ft 
20 +ft 
20 + ft 


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HtehLQP sura 


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1306 

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24 

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39M 

2ft 

6ft 

lift 

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15(6 

3706 


2714 

20% 

27 

13 

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13ft 

15ft 

7ft 

3404 


10 DBA 
3ft DO I 
646 DEP 
406 DSC 
30ft DatsySv 
22(4 DaissF 
4ft DmnBlo 
83 DortGP 
13 Dato-ds 
004 DtatO 
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2ft Dtasft 
4ft Datum 
4ft Dawson 
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9ft DadsD 
3 Oft DatdtiA 


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32 10 


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10 Dfcean 
3ft DJcmad 
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23 Dfcnax 
1714 DkGnl 
25ft DmnB 
12ft DftllH 
17ft DaytDB 


91 

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242 

5 

136 

499 

673 

330 

90 

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36 

182 

12S9 

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3SS 

414 

4692 

106 

176 

354 


1614 1514 15ft 
A 9ft 204 
13 120* 1241 

7ft 7ft 7ft 
30ft 9906 290* 
310* Sift 31ft 
Oft Oft 0ft 
115ft 715ft 115ft 
21ft 21 21ft 
12 110k 110' 

7 *64 7 

27ft** 


s % 


TOW. Drndr 
lift DravGr 
Mft DunfcDs 
9ft Durfran 
914 DorFJIs 
3ft Dynsoi 
T7ft DvntdiC 


30 3 

152 3L7 
20O 1A 
M 43 
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34 tO 
34 4.1 
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96 

U 

131 

14 

490 

110 

434 

06 

154 

49 

2*5 


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26 23ft 
1104 II 
34*6 2*1* 

ft £ 

SE SE 

2D 19ft 
37* 37V6 

22ft 27ft 
3614 3SM 
140* 1406 
79 1» 

10ft TO 
13 no* 
2286 2214 
248* 24 
13(6 Oft 
1206 1206 
<ft 606 
3414 34 


Sft +0k 

23 


36 

1406 


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1714 714 

I* “a 

4014 2S1* 
1204 7ft 
U 128k 
lift 68k 
12% 6ft 
17ft 1*K 

lift 4ft 

28(6 9ft 
■20% SM 
79ft 79% 
15(4 2ft 
130* 6ft 
1406 7 

MH 504 
7ft 2ft 
*% 506 
177k 6ft 
32ft 15(6 
2206 704 

17ft 806 

2114 10 
3014 <06 
004 5ft 
35 23Va 
1104 Sft 
271k ITOk 
161k 7ft 


ECITOI 

EIP 

Eogm 

EconLli 

EIClUc 

EIPOS 

Elan 

Eftlto 

Eldons 


Eldon 
EteNud 
ElcRnt 
Oct Mis 
EiranEI 
ErnpAIr 


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41 40 

T&lS 

lift 10% 
Oft fft 
1706 170k 
IU 70k 
1714 1614 
20% 19% 
TOM Uft 
206 2 
1% J 
TOO* W% 
T7% 12 


7ft— ft 

6ft + ft 

4006 + — 
7ft + ft 
1S% + ft 
11% +1 
0ft + ft 
1706+ 14 
• + 0k 

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w+; 

206— ft 


7(4 

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... 7ft 

3406 24 
2016 ltft 
13 13 

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71k 

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10ft 10% 
19% 190* 
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9ft 

70ft 

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7114 

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45ft 

41ft 

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30ft 

45(4 

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16ft 

22ft 

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190k 

17ft 

•ft 

21 

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34% 

23(6 

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lift 

714 


,40b 1J 
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504 FDP 
Sft FMI 
1% FamRsst ’ 

10ft FbbiF 

41% RrnG ITS 25 

, ssast“ 

2TV RrtCTS* 132 4.1 
36ft FHlhTs 1AO 25 
21ft Plopl* . JO 1A 
IK RHrtt A0 4.1 
3ft PlWJlca 30 55 
< 0 * FInamx 

no natoen 

21ft FATOBk V.U 10 
25ft FlAFbi JO 23 
16% FIATVlS 3* 31 
11% FtColF 
200* FCororC U0 54 
Mk F*Cont TJOalSJ 
11 FEaae 
9 PFCCHS 
14ft PPFtM 
U PIFaCP 
11% FIPnMS 
21ft FtRBk M 
28% FJirN 1J0 
30% FMdB 1JS 
25ft FMtOns 1A0 
26 FRBGa 1J0 
19% FttNElo Jta 
1806 FSacC 1.TO 
19% fTms . 

37% fWJBC 1J4 

lift fSSi 

1514 RaFdl 
27* FtoNFI 
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uft Ftorecb 
3 FMnrh 
12(6 FUtwA S3 A 
13% FLJnnB JJ7 J 
26 For Am 36 23 
13% Foraatp U0 70 

Forms 
6 Fenxn ft J 
3* FOstar .to 2* 

16% Framnt AO 28 
486 Fudrek 
IK f=UlrHB 33 U 




PA 7ft 
10ft 10(6 
lft 1% 
lift lift 


19% 19 19 + ft 

3% M 886— V. 
15ft 15 15% 

32% 32% 32% 

63ft 63 63 —ft 

41% 400* 41% + % 
15 14ft 14ft— 06 
306 3% 3% + ft 
•ft 706 Sft 
TOft T7* 18ft 
360* 36ft 3606 + % 
35 75 35 —ft 

34% 34% 34ft + % 
19% 19% 1914— ft 
22ft 22, 2914 + % 

6ft 


28 


M 


19% 19% 

23% 2314 
22% 2214 
16ft M% 

3Sft 22% 

34(6 33* 

4206 42% 

54ft 54 
39 38% 

45% 45 
W. 29% 

23 228* 

26% 20* 

‘ *** ifc+lt 


190*— % 
23% + ft 
22% + ft 
Mft 

23V. + ft 
34 + % 

42% + 1k 
54ft— 0* 
39 + % 

45% + % 
27V. — ft 
23 + % 

26% 




30* 

15 H 

i7* n% 
42(4 41% 
W* 10% 
15* 15% 
7ft 6ft 
21 20 % 
21 20 % 
33ft 3314 
TOft 14% 

T* 

'4 ml K 

18% 17* 


Uft + ft 

17* + ft 

TOft — ft 

21 + % 
20% 

33% + ft 
14%— ft 
Sft + ft 
lft— ft 
11% 

3ft— % 
78% + % 


n* 3 on 33 3 3 3 —% 

1614 9% GaJBao 1M 15% 14% 1406— ft 

lift 4% GamaB .10 19 472 506 Sft 5% + 14 

7SV. 33V. G«ftii 1075 7* 68% 60ft— % 

18ft 5 Genets 2520 Wft 9ft 10ft + ft 

7% 1% Ganas 519 Sft 1ft lft— % 


Mondays 



.. TftbUs TOctade Hie n p H oiiwW prtew 
1. MPtoHw Ckosfnfl on Wall Street 
«d do not reflect Jot* trades elsewhere. 


■*1 not 


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Dtv. YW.PE TfltaHMiLPW amOiW 


(Owtimaed from Pago 16) 

6 20ft 20% 
134 9ft 9% 
15 lft IN 
169 5ft 5 
15 It 14 

I » W 
19 3% 3ft 
247 IK 12 
9 23ft 23% 
156 IK 13ft 
710 Uk I 
ZU 11* lift 
121 TOft 17ft 
46 4ft 4% 
13 1ft 1ft 
261 24ft 24M 
68 3ft 30k 
29 Mk 614 


35 ID IB 

■We 1.1 19 

Iw. _ 

A U It 
E - — . Jl* 24 U 16 

Eftntnia A U I 

. A * “ i 

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> .10 u 11 


28% 

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3ft 

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lft 

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'Sk-EE 

ift 

24ft 

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kft + ft 


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J6 74 ® 


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85 5% 5ft 
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48 7ft 7% 714— ft 
53 13% ISO* 15% 

32 9ft 9ft fft— ft 
50 20% 19* 20% + % 
II ft TO ft 

2fl4 Uft lift +lft 
13 Uft 67ft to -ft 

58 5% Sft 5ft— ft 

14* Uft 14% + * 
lft 1% 1ft + ft 
3 , 260 *42 +1 
1% lft lft 
40ft 39ft 40 + % 

13ft Uft Uft + % 

a 7% 7* + % 
3* 4 + ft 

5* 5 Slk— ft 
21ft 2D* 21ft , 
17% 17ft 17ft— ft 


37 

43 


54 

90 
210 
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363 

91 
SB 
795 


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5 % % 

1 3* 3* 


12 Mon It. 

HWl LOW Start 


DW. YW. PE WtaHW»Low aortOlke 


13% 606 TetUS 

34ft SOM TolEdpf 
62% 51ft Tel Ed p4 
906 296 Tortet 

1604 B% TotlPte 
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29ft 23% TMPtpl 
14 806 TmsLx 

19% lfflfc.TmBToc 
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B TrlSM 
666 Triad) 
3% TrIHma 
30* Trlde* 
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23% in* TurnBn 
3 TO* 22 Tumrc 
ID 7* TmEqn 
3% lft Tylrwts 


11% 

13ft 

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34 

2J8 IDA 
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14 

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120 5.1 9 
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42 42 

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1% m + h 

27% 27%— ft 
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16% 16% + lk 
15% 15» + % 
10 TO 
13 13 

4 416 + ft 

k. • 6 — ft 

lS% &.= » 

23% 2336— ft 

b% m + % 
2 2 — * 


1 

u ~i 

3ft * UNA 

31 .* _% It 


3* 3 

22% 8% gurnle 

Uft 9% Union _ 

15% lift Unkppf 35 S2 
114k 0% Unbnar UTOIBA 
23ft 14% UAIrPd 3*b 2A 
26 16% UnCosFS 30 2.1 

216 1% UFaodA .10 7J 
2 114 l! FoodB 

MK lift UUted 
22* 12* USAGwt ■ 

Oft 5% UnltoiV 
21 TOft UnWjrt 
TOft TftUwCm 
88k «ft UnfvRs 
21ft 15ft UftfvRir 
15% im UnvPal 


13 


172 7A 7 
15 
IS 

JO 37144 


1203 33% 
1« 12 
37 14ft 
3M 10% 
34x32* 
7 23* 

65 m 
26 1% 
67 12ft 
27 17% 
44 5% 

3 21% 
42 10ft 
235 <06 

116 21% 
40 lift 


22V> ZJ% + 4k 

im Ti* 

14ft TOft— % 
10ft Wft 
22ft 32% + ft 
23ft 23%— ft 
Ift lft— * 
lft lft — ft 
12* 1»— % 
16ft 17% + ft 
5% Sft — ft 
23% 23ft + % 
W 10ft- ft 
6ft 6ft 
19* 21* + * 
UK lift— % 


10ft 

20* 

30 

25ft 

6ft 

* 

13* 

6% 

10% 

9 

9% 

12* 

21 

•ft 


JO 


1J 17 
2.1 13 


9* VST 3Se 95 
13% VaUvRS 1-40 U 11 
17* Val9N-£ 

15ft VtAmC 
3ft VtRsh 
* Varna 
•ft Vernlt 
K Variola 
4* Wrterti 
306 Vfcon 

MftwIC 
714 VapiOX 
IS VHICCP 
5 VvauBt 


3D IJ 35 


JOb 13 10 
A0 46 10 
J0D 10 12 


147 10 
4 20% 
16 29* 
154 19ft 

no i% 
66 * 
102 10* 
59 40k 
14 5 

61 5 
B 9% 

2 m 

2 20 * 
107 6ft 


9% 10 +ft 

20ft »ft— ft 

2906 29% — % 

IK 18% 

10% 10% - ft 
4ft 41h—* 
4* 4* 

4% 4ft— ft 
9 9 - ft 

BU Bft— ft 

20% 20* + * 

6% 6% 


W 


7* 

706 

29% 

lft 

TO* 

uo 

20% 

ID* 

Sft 

IK 

914 

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6* WlkEni 


16 


7 
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1JB 19J 
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76* WShPit 36 

15 WRITS 1.28 70 H 
60* WatscA X XI 72 
3% Wltitrd 
K WWdpf 262i 
6ft weblnvn 
ft WBblnwi 
% 


15 fc WonaB 


46 

159 


4% 4* 

6* 6ft 


606 — ft 


7677 22* 22ft 22ft— Ok 
234 ft * * 

95 1406 U* 14ft- % 
61 124*03 04* *2 
42 18% 10* TOft + % 
TO 6* 6ft 6ft ^ 
552 3% 2ft 20*— ft 

137 fi% B* 8% — % 

.8 l \ \=A 


UMontt 

HtafcLPW 


av.YW.PE IfaHlae Lon Ouol.One 


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4 

41ft 

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21ft 

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35 

31* 

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6* 

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24% 

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70k Wadstn 152 145 
7% Wedtcft 
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7 WMtfTb JtM 
806 waken 
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35 WTaxpf AM 1L1 
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n* wvEfli 
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3 Wlckas 
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% 

4ft 

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3 3 

fft 9%— ft 
11* lift 
5% 5ft + ft 
9ft 9* + ft 

«* ,L „ 

1— ft 





10* lift + ^ 


11 


26ft 

Wicks | 

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3ft WlOEA 
18ft WMttln 224912.1 
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UftWkWaar 32 23 
206 WtedaE . 

12* WWdapfJJO 127 
9 wertfia J5S 
16* Wrulfir JB .1 



18* + ft 


806 5* YardcCa 


It W A 


6ft Mk— % 

1 


M 3ft ZJmer jffl 


115 S* 5ft 5* + K 



MEW HiCHS 59 


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MEW LOWS TO 

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IT 

Potorom 
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SCESTOPf 
Tetetlex 
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Dtv. Y6t 18Bi Wc* Low 1 PJ4 Orte 







25% 

25ft 

»% 

1 8ft 




80 

6* 

6* 

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34* 

16 GUkGS 

34 

IJ 

448 

19ft 

19% 

29* 

20ft 













IK 

1SH 

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26% 

75* 

26% +% 



2 

AS 


17ft 

16% 




23 

733 

19ft 

19 


TO 





9H 

fft 

mk 

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5ft Graft's 



74 

14(6 

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7* 

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2572 

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6* 

AM + ft 

26ft 

13ft OWSav 

Mr IJ 


20 

% 

26 

12* 

7* GtSoFd 



123 

7* 

7ft— * 

20* 

10% Grech 



2S4 

20ft 

lfft 

19*— % 

W 

12% Guittrd 

Me 3 

21 

14 

“ft 

14 

ITO 

% GMBdc 

15D0C 

516 

* 

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r~ 




H 



J 


15* HBO 

30 

IJ 

5557 

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18 

19% +lft 

n% 

7 HCC 


3 




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140 

16ft 


16* 

7ft 

3<4 Hadca 



22 

6% 


C% + % 

3% 

2 Hudson 



697 

7* 

TVb 

2% 

1TO 

13% HomOlt 

30 

1.2 

7kx 

17* 

TRh 

TO* . 

30% 

36ft HrtfNl 

177 

A3 

433 

36% 

IS 

36*- ft 

lflft 


30 




B*— ft 

16 


.141 

300 


2ft 


4ft 

1% Wttiln 
1* Hllhdvn 



78 

90S 

lft 

4* 

3* 

3*— ft 

25* 

lift HChcAl 

u 

J 

456 

19* 

TO 

TOft + ft 

24ft 

15% HchoBs 

JM 

A 

40 

20% 

20 

2D 

« 




451 

4 

3% 

3%— % 

15 Helix 



42 

(TO 

19* 




32023 





34% 

■ fdTWZ; i-J 


61 


24 


13% 

■ 1 



51 

12 

lift 

lift 

12 




528 

7 

4% 

6% — ft 

32* 

13* HP1FA2 



79 

32* 

37% 

32%—* 

10ft 




3610 

lft 

1 

1 —ft 

28ft 



23 

80 

29% 

28% 

28V> 

1 6% 





4% 



Bft 




138 

21% 

lift 

31% + ft 

29% 

20 HunIJB 

30 e J 

32 

29ft 

28% 

29 

Uft 

814 Hfltoln 



30 

12* 

12 

12*- ft 

27% 

17 HntoBS 

M 

3.1 

133 

27% 

27 


31% 

15ft Hybrttc 



1380 

32 

31 

32 +1 . 

14% 




623 

17 

16% 

Uft + % 

» 

5% HytefcM 



14 

• 

7% 

8 

| 







1 

10% 

7* ILC 



24 

9% 

K 

K- ft 

35* 

17ft IMS I 

30 

j4 

401 

33* 

33* 

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15% 

7* ISC 



1517 

15* 

15 

15% + % 

7* 

3* last 



582 

■ 

7% 

8 + ft 

U* 




991 

Uft 

11% 

11% —lft 

7% 




39 

5* 

TO 

5*— % 

53 


1A0 

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11 

51 

«% 

51 


2114 infaRsc 


116 

26% 

26% 

28% — ft 





46 

17 

16ft 


83ft 




JT7 

23% 

2366 

23ft— ft 





1023 

Sft 

S% 

5%— % 


Bft InWDv 



104 

16% 

16 

16 





6* 

5% 

5% 

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23ft 

10% ISSCO 



119 

17% 

Uft 

17% 

32ft 




4505 

31% 

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31 + % 

TO 




m 

4% 

4* 


3* 




30 

1% 

1% 

1% 





36 

11% 

11% 

11% 

16ft 


30 

1A 

m 

U 

Uft 

14 + ft 

37(4 



5576 

38 

37 

37% + % 

10% 

5ft 1 airman 



493 

Bft 

7* 

8 + ft 

22% 

ID* intmec 



381 

13% 

IJ 

13% 

13ft 

514 Intrmtr 



45 

Bft 


8 + ft 


a mtenn 



238 


ID* 

11 . 


7% iGarne 



53 

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8ft— ft 

17* 

7* IntLses 



149 

T7ft 

17ft 

17% + ft 

12 

Sft inMobU 
* IRIS 



316 

8ft 

8* 

Bft— * 

3V6 



1443 

l* 

lft 

1* + ft 

Uft 




1282 

12% 

11% 

12% + ft 

13% 




298 

13* 

12* 

13% + * 

1014 

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1014 

10ft 

MM 

10* + ft 

r~ 







1 

15% 


.14 

IA 

125 

11* 

lift 

Uft— ft 

8% 

J* Joctawt 



28 

6% 

Aft 

Aft 


28 Jock Lie 



164 

43ft 

41ft 

43ft +1VS 

25% 

15ft JamWlr 



116 

24% 

24 

24% 

B% 




71 

5 

£ 

4* + ft 

24ft 


.14 

3 

3499 

23* 

23ft + * 

7% 

3* Jonichi 

t 


347 

6 

5* 

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ID* 

6% Jospftsn 



65 

Bft 

Bft 

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23ft 




47 

23ft 

23ft 

23ft + % 

20ft 

IK Jwtln 

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64 

18ft 

lift 

(•ft + * 





K 



1 





925 

22% 

22 

22% + (6 


414 KVPtte 



25 

8% 

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Bft + % 




19 

200 

23% 

23% 

23%— ft 





520 

IK 

IS* 

15ft— ft 


9% Kasler 

351 


531 

11% 

11 

lift + ft 




91 

H* 

11 

lift + ft 



1J0 

Z6 

1956 

69 

6/ft 

«K +tft 


31% KyCnU 

1J0 

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99 

Bft 

54 

55 +lft 





33 

6* 

6% 

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4% KeyTm 



315 

10* 

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1% Klmbrk 



36 

3 

2 





J 

979 

20 





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3 

110 

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8% 




J6 

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449 

15 

U* 

14*— ft 

29ft 

Bft Kuleke 

.121 

374 

12* 

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12ft— ft 





. 



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227 

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6* 

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519 

23ft 

23% 

23% — % 





215 

14 

13ft 

13% — % 





66 

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30% 

20ft + ft 


33% LaZBy 

1A0 

2J 

38 

53% 

53 

53% 



.16 

A 

242 

25* 

24* 



II Loldtte 

JO 

1.1 

278 

18% 

17% 

18 — % 



JO 

53 

5 

Uft 

14 

T4ft 



32 

4.1 

293 

18 

17ft 




1200 £0 

59 

60% 

60 

58% + % 




IJ 

82 

28% 

Z7ft 


7* 

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1557 

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l WEJ 7I 


8«4 Leinar 



99 

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340X5 

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716 

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If l' ■ ^ ** 

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25 

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20 

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IA0 

r'l 

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30% 

29ft 

38% + ft 





2D91 

24% 

23% 

23% — ft 


19 Lvnden 



25 

22% 

22% 

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19* 

6 LVDhPI 



436 


19 


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1 


TO* *06 
lift 714 
9% 406 
714 3ft 
23% 15 
32% 17% 
17% 9ft 
28 21* 
9% 7* 

14% 7ft 
1614 .7ft 
24% ink 
7214 31ft 
1906 13* 

9 2% 

IK 6* 
37% 21ft 
26ft 8* 
6* 1* 
34* 24% 
3406 13% 
15% 8% 
20k 

31k 

38* 30% 
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11% 6 
9 4 

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30% 13 
41% 32 

g*f?% 

41% 25* 

22ft 12ft 

21(6 11 % 
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27* l?ft 
5ft 2ft 
14 31% 

5% I* 
27* 17ft 
TO* 714 
IK 606 
21* TO 
13 6ft 
39ft 27ft 
Sft 16% 
W14 K 
17% 9* 
37% 96ft 
2014 lift 
22ft 14* 
7* 

18% 1W> 

26% lift 


MBI 
MO 
Ml W 
MPSI5 

sm 

MOTSd 

Manltw 

MfrsNs 

Marcus 

Mnut 

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Mridrts 

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Matn5 

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MeFcsi 


MadCre 


ManlrC 

MercBc 

McreBk 

Mtrses 

MrdBcs 

JSS^ S 

Mlcom 

MterO 

MIcrMk 

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MlcrTC 

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MdPcA 

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AMWAir 
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MlnSoT 

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MaMCB 

Madina l 

Mataeir 

Mom 

Mama 

MonAni 

Mcnont 

MonuC 

MorFkt 

Morrsn 

Mace lay 

MMOb 

Mylans 


228 13 

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JO 3A 
1J4 30 
30 16 

1J0 23 

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JB 15 
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1J0 46 

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64 

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115 

253 

272 

380 

329 

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190 
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279 
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893 

1 

2708 

415 

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115 

297 

199 

27 

97 

1124 

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8ft 814 fft + M 
11 10* II 

f* « ** 

4* 4ft 4ft— 14 
24 23% 2206 

32* 320* 32W 
11% 11 II 
27V, 27% 27ft 
B* 8ft 8% + ft 
11% lift 11* 
u io* n 
23ft 23 Bft 
42% 41ft C + * 
ltft 19* 1914— % 
4* 4ft 4ft + ft 
8% 8 8 + * 
3604 35ft 3S06 + H 

*85 

4* <ft Mk 
35* 3Sft »% 

11* II* 110* 

9% 9 »% + % 

4* 4* 4* + % 

1* 15* 15%-% 

20* 2Bft 30ft- * 

41ft 41 41 — Ik 

72ft 71ft 71%—% 
IK 15% 15% 

Sb m 2K + * 

221k 2» +% 

3* 3 3% + Ik 

7% 7 7% + % 

- e 

7* tO! TO + % 
2ft K 2ft 
43* 43ft 4£k- ft 
8* 8* 8ft — ft 
24* 24 2Mk 
4* 4ft 41k— * 
42% <2 42% + % 

lift 11* II* 

22 *104 f 
It lflft 10* + * 
38 »% + * 

28* a 28* + 06 

17ft 17 17 

15* tSft IS)?— % 
35% 34* 36*—* 
17ft 1TO 17* 

20ft 19* 20 

i Rtlt 


16 % 

17ft 17* + % 


9 

Mk 

11 * 


2 ft NCACP 
2* HMS 
514 NOPCDS 


14 


3* 2ft 2ft—* 
4ft 4% Mk 
11 IK 11 + % 


12 Month 
HMUw Stock 


Dhr. Hd lOOt HtahLOte 3 PAL OHM 


220* Uft 
5006 37 
3M4 12% 
17% n. 
36 12 

70* 4ft 
506 2 

7 I* 
I k 
11U 40h 

914 414 

42 21 

12ft TO 
34 22 ft 

Sft 1*06 
36 21* 

18% 9ft 
3QV. TO 
Uft 1% 
4% % 

14% 706 

21ft 15 
5206 28% 
570* XU. 
■ Sft 
906 5 
tflk TO 
2014 15* 
36* IK 
34* lift 

Oft 4006 
7 4% 

*06 4* 

19ft IK 

iev> 606 
13% 6* 


NwkSOC 
NlwkSs 
Mourai 
NBiunS 
ME Bus 
NHtnpB 
NJMrt 

MwldBk 


NBnTex 6 U m 
MIICTV 235 43 112 
NtCptrs 30 2 r« 

NOon 64 24 387 
NHHCs 34 1.9 36 

Nt Lurid 48 

NMIem 894 

NKr»la 92 

NMBlT .151 so 


US 
4537 
25 
X 
2 
47 
20 
431 
158 
1607 
340 

A0 26 1027 
49 3 J X 
A4 3 1562 
621 A 307 
306 
74 
437 

M2 XI 75 
JO 11 251 

220 86 70 

1J8 IJ 101 
593 
142 

51 11 56 

10 
144 


Nwppn 
NtCal a 
Nike 8 


12 17 
60 21 
1.12b 37 

St i 


27ft 

23% 

22% 

Bft 

5 StofBIO 

30 

23 

49ft 

48* 

49ft + * 

31% 

21 Sftmdv 

1J8 

3A 

25% 

18ft 

25* 

17ft 

as* + % 
18 + ft 

23% 

27% 

20ft itonhMi U0 

45 

18ft 

IT* 

>7%— * 

41ft 

31% 56051 BS 


15 





3ft StateG 


3ft 

3 

3 — Ji 

7ft 

4ft Stoteer 






taw 

lift StewStv 



Aft 

6ft 


25 

19ft Sftrtnl 


XI 

7 

Aft 

7 + ft 

8ft 

Sft SttfeJ 



5* 


5ft + ft 

25 

K Stratus 



24% 

23* 


42ft 

29ft StrwCIs 


IJ 

41 

40 

41 + ft 

24ft 

15% Straws 

232 


8* 


K— % 

1171ft 113* Suborn 

15 

38% 

X1m 

2QW— % 

85ft 

42ft SubrB 

1.92 

23 

31% 

31ft 

31% + % 

4% 

MTTm- ' '.I, n’’l 



35* 

35* 

3Sft + % 

‘ft 

"i" W * : — |T" |M 

.10 

IJ 

19ft 

IK 

19ft + ft 

■ ris 







>J "* ' '^1 




17ft 

12ft— ft 

W% 

7% SuoShv 



1 

* 

1 

4* 

3 Suprtex 




Mentftr 

NrakBx 


MA1I IP 

Nests* 

NwMG 

NwNLf 

N test PS 

NoraH 

NudPh 

Numrax 

Nvmrcs 

NutrtP 

NuMeds 


14% Uft 14ft 
18% 18% 18* + % 
50% 491k 5D% + ft 
52% 51* Sift— % 
6* 4 I 
7* 7ft 70* — ft 
IK TOft IK + ft 
IK IM TO* 

25* 25ft 25ft 
24ft 2406 24* + % 
63ft 6204 62* 

4ft 6% Mk + % 
5ft Sft Sft— VU 
IM 18 TO — % 
9* 9% 9% 

Bft 7* 7ft— % 


r“ — : o -i 


1* Oceoner 



236 

7ft 

1* 

.?. +* 









46% 

33% OsilGP 

1J8 

25 

148 

43% 

47% 

43% +1 

73% 

43M OWbCP 

2JB 

42 

193 

7QM 

» 

7D — % 

38 

41% 

20% OldKnts LlC 
2XM OURP9 34 

2.9 

XI 

X 

i£* 

37% 

35ft 

£* + ' 
31*— M 


19* OtdSptC 260 128 

58 

22 




53 

L7 

63 

JIM 

31% 

31M 





393 

10% 

9M 

10 + % 

19% 




427 

14M 

14 

Uft 

4K 

22% Octic B 



830 

28% 

26% 

27% -1. 

Sft 

5M OrtUt 



*80 

7ft 

6* 

7. +% 

a 

4% OrfoQP 



190 

6% 

4 




30 

1A 




34* + % 


27% oitrrp 

134 

82 

44 

34* 

34 





23 

10% 

10% 

10% + 16 



Jf 

15 

163 

18% 

TO 

'‘ft-* 

4* 

% OXDGD 


283 

* 


■ 




P 



1 



M3 

S 


34 


33*— M 

53% 


MOC 

2S0 

45% 

r-7l 

45M- % 

■T 




970 

11% 

ii 


11% PoeTol 

JO 

52 

« 

15% 


15M 

17% 

10M PoeoPfi 

449 

TO 

•■.I 

17* + % 



.13 

15 

14 

K 

M 

M 



AO 

5L1 


12 

11% 

11% . 





9M 


6% 

6% + % 



1 


24 

U* 

14* 

IK 


1% Poyctu 



ii 


20% 

2K+ * 

17ft 




169 

rtr 

12M 

73% + M 

& 


Jt 

.9 

318 


6% 


2K PenoEn 

220 

65 

5 


32M 

§% +2% 

TIM 

30* Pentors 

58 

28 

200 


31% 





3267 



f “ M 

30M 

23ft Petrtte 

1.12 

42 

IM 


26% 

«-* 





iL 

:h 

BM 


7M PSFS 

.15# 1A 


10* 

IK + ft 

20% 

14% PhllGi 

sex 

25 


20ft 

20% 






■‘r 


rt 

33% 




941 


32 



ifi 

22 

62 

26% 

?7M +.(k 


29M PlonHI 

23 

1009 

> -*'i 

r- 1 .1 1 

^r* 



.12 


55 







110 

LC 


n% 

34% 

UM PicyMg 



1483 



21* t? 

27* 




257 



2K + * 


T% Powoil 



190 

| L 


1% 

mi-.j 

9% Powrtcl 



40 

r 8 


12% — % 


5M PwCenv 

.12 


26 

93 


13 

30% 

13% 

30% + ft 

im 

7% 

i vset 



358* 

1689 

’2% 

11% 

6 

11% + * 
6M 

14% 

7% PrtcOn* 


533 

8% 

/* 

• + % 

71% 

37ft PfleeCu 



1135 

■ 1 

71% 

12 + % 





65 


13 

13 — ft 





225 

■Vl 


4 


21* ProdCs 

.12 

2 

272 


*7 

47% + % 



120 10J 

M 


1^1 


21* 

13* Previn 



236 


Kj 

21* 

29 

UM Purl Bn 

AQ 

IA 



IM 

» 

| 



Q 



1 





248 

9* 

9% 

966— % 


3% Quadra 



163 

5* 

BM 

8(6 — ft 

13% 

9 QuakCs 

JB 

32 

55 

1346 

12% 

26* 

12% 

26 

12M— ft 
25* + * 
4* + ft 


3* QuesiM 



1434 

4ft 

4M 


K Quixote 



22 

TOM 

TO 

18 —M 

16% 

8 Quotrn 



16280 

12 


11* 





R 



1 


rviTv 

Jle 

.1 

75 

4* 

6* 

6% 



52 

3J 

589 

19% 


19 — ft 


kf 



691 

15% 

14% 

15 + * 





626 

H 

IK 

11M + % 





» 

7% 

7% 

7% 





114 

3* 

3* 

3%— ft 


23% Raters 

U» 

32 

439 

34.. 

J3M 

33* +* 



24 

IJ 

20 

18% 

IBM 

IBM + % 


lft RedICr 



83 

1% 

1* 

1*— ft 





44 

21* 

21* 

31% 





41 

IK 

TOM 

IK + ft 

K 


54 

22 

74 

37% 

33% 

33%— % 





102 

11% 

11 

11 — ft 

7% 

4* RbcvEI 

20 

29 

1507 

A* 

AM 

6* + % 


rasa 

.12 






131k 



218 

5M 

5% 

Sft- ft 


7M RnAufo 

.16 

IJ 

125 

9M 


11% 

^ ' J 







Wr r 'j 

11% RestrSv 



69 

20 

19* 

19* + * 

■J' '*• 


.15# IJ 

51 

9% 

8* 

9 + % 


34a 



3796 



51% 

P • ! f ■ /J ■ , * 

IA0 

27 

S3 

51 

50% 

51 + % 



22 

U 

49 

18ft 

17* 

IBM + M 


3* Rfbttm s 



257 

7% 

7% 

7M + ft 

22* 

12* RIChEls 



210 

2W6 

21% 

21M + % 



JO 


106 



17* 

35% 

21% RoodSv 

L10 

11 

826 

35% 

35 

35M 



26 


35 

W 

14 

14 + % 





7774 

9% 

9% 

9M— ft 



54 

21 

2SM 

24M 

25M +1.. 

lift 


1 


22 

9 

BM 

•Vs— % 





453 

3ft 

2% 

3M + ft 





151 

11* 

11M 

UM— ft 

24% 

12 RvonFs 



57 

23% 

21% 

21% — % 


U 8ft SAY Ind 
15* IK setsy 
23ft 13 SEt 
1106 506 SFE 
■a 16. 5RI 
25* 6ft Safecds 
«C% 30% Saftaj 
15% 9% SafHItl 

221k 7% St Jade 
82* 47* 51 Paul 
6* 2ft Sal Cot 
» 4ft SanBar 
«% 5ftSchri5v 
31ft 16ft SavnFs 
21 12ft SBXPSi 
1004 6% SconOp 

18% 10ft SconTr 
14*. 8* Scherer 
28ft 14(4 SchhnA 

T& St&SSf 6 

200* 6 ScJfex 

fft 3% Sec Go! 
K 4ft Season 
4ft lft sacTao 
TO 1% 5EEQ 
26% 16 Sdbrt 
9* Sft Sereloi 
9% <16 sensor 
IM u SvcMer 
25ft 17ft Swmtis 
27 13* Setvteo 

TO 4ft SvcFrci 
KV, 12* SavOak 
27* 24* ShrMed 
41* 29*4 Shwmt 
24 12* SlwfbVS 

Uft t Shewn 
31* 22ft Shoneys 
IS* 10 ShonSas 
10% 3ft SDlcen 
17ft fft Silicons 
28ft 11% SJUcVaJ 
34ft 12 Slllauc 
1106 K 5111 k 
17% 12* Slmpln 
15* lOft Staplns 
IK 9ft Slaters 
12* 8% Skipper 
4 1* SmHtiL 

54 3414 Soetefv 

3646 II* SaCtvSv 
10ft 6ft SeHaCA 
21* lift SollwA 
31% 19ft 5onocPs 
22* 14% SenrFd 
6ft 306 SOHD5P 
33 20% ~ 

2M 16ft 
M 5* 

2* 31* 

19W 10% 

2M 10* 

K 5* 

1606 13ft 
13 3ft 


31 

4 J§ 

•10r 1A 99 
60 45 401 
20b J 730 
168 33 506 

159 

3J0 37 IB72 
103 
182 
55 
53 
465 
419 
263 
102 
11 
402 
115 

6117 
338 


•TO 23 

J8a2J 
A4 2.1 


906 9% fft 
1514 IS IS —ft 
2206 22ft 22* + ft 
716 6% 7 —ft 

17* 17* 17*— ft 
26* 2506 34ft + ft 
46 45ft 45%— % 
11% 10* 11% 

27ft Z7% 22ft 
82 II 82 +1 
5ft 5H Sft 
6* 61k 6ft 
6% 6% 6% 

31ft 31 31ft + ft 
21ft 21 21 

Wft re id% + % 

19ft IK 19 +1 

14* TO* 14* 

2Sft TO 28% 

4* 8* 406 + Ok 
7 6% 6ft— % 

7% 7% 7% + % 
4* 414 4% 

7% 7 TO 
1* 1* 1* 

3 306 2* 


JO 

19 

46 

20M 

20 

20M 





43 

7* 

7% 

7* 

+ 

* 

25 

S 

4231 

9ft 

fft 

9* 



28 

A 

1254 

13* 

13* 

13* 

+ 

% 

JO 

1 

35 

$ 

23% 

21 

23 

23% 

23 

23% 





33 

4* 

4% 

4% 



.16 

J 


19ft 

181k 

19 

+ 

ft 

43 

IA 


35ft 

34% 

35ft 

+ 

* 

LB4 

4A 

231 

41% 

41* 

«Wk 

— 

ft 

.16 

J 

404 

25ft 

23% 

24% 

+1 



155 

9% 

8* 

9 

»- 

ft 

.15 

S 

653 

2V* 

28ft 

29ft 

+ 

ft 


JO U 

JB J 
1J4 3 A 



13 12% 13 . .. 

5* 4* 5% + ft 
14* TOft 14% + ft 
16ft 16 lfft + ft 
221k 22ft 22ft 
51k ,5ft 5ft + ft 
16* 16 16 — Ik 

lift 11% 11% 

17% lift 1606— % 
TOU 9* 906— % 
204 2* 2* + ft 

54 53% 53% 

36 2S% 25*— % 

Iff* 9* 10* + * 
17* TO* 17ft + 06 
30% 30% 300 m 
17 lift TSft - ft 
4ft 4* 4ft 
21% 20* 2114 + % 
W 15% 19 + ft 

Ml TO TO 
32* 31ft 
TOft WK 
35 24% 

8% 8 
17 lift 
9% 9 


32* +1% 
fflk + % 
21ft— ft 

17 +% 

91k— ft 


UMenfli 
mould* stock 


SMB m 

D*v. YW MB, Mom 


Lew 3 PAL dike 


01 

Sii 

14 


112 

*? 

57 

817 

U 


9% Sft 

32% 31% 
US'* 1SV. 
26% 26% 
40'* 40U 
4* Aft 
Aft SO. 
15% IS 
21 13 

8% 8 
24% 24% 
410. 41% 
24ft 24 
134 144ft 
>7 83. 


3fc 2% 2^1 
10ft fft 


9% + * 
32ft + * 
15ft 

2606 + % 
40ft 

4(4 + ft 
5*— ft 
15ft + % 
23 

Sft + ft 

24% — ft 

41% 

2 (ft + ft 
156 + ft 

+1% 


U 

14* 


26% 


Bft SvtnbT 
4 Svntadi 
5* 2ft Syntrex 
14% 8ft 5vicans 70 
I SvAiec 
A Svstln 
Svslnto 
5vstml JB 


1106 606 
27% 15% 


197 

IU 

Ift 

IM— ll 

54 

11% 

II 

11 — % 

27 

BU 

8% 

■U— % 

62 

1% 

3M 

3* + * 

140 

IK 

H1U 

IOVj — * 

325 

7 

6* 

6*— * 


5% 

14 

5 

131, 

5 -U 
TOM 

9M 

1 

9% + U 

43 

7*6 

7% 

7T6 + M 


10% 10 10 
26ft 26ft 26ft- % 


| 



““ 

T 



1 






115 

12 

11% 

UM + ft 






4 

26U 




7M 



71 

3ft 


3(6 


28* 

12* Tandem 



4797 

23% 



1 

M 




1013 

4ft 

4 

4 — ft 


IS 

5* TcCom 



11 

15 

14% 

11 + u 


22 

9 Telco 



208 

TOM 

13% 

13M 




1 


93 

38U 

37(1 

38 <m + % 






837 

8* 

Ift 



27 


22 

12 

424 

25M 




27M 




594 

22ft 

SIM 



4% 




1683 

3U 

3* 

3% 


30 

BM Tetabs 



525 

*% 

9% 

9Vj + % 


23 

9% Yebtons 

Jl 


323 

21% 

31 

21 

. 

10% 


1 


50 

3% 








59 



6ft + ft 


13ft 

6% Thrmd s 



19 

IK. 

11% 

1IU— % 


an 

16% ThrdN s 

M 

24 

34 

26M 


36% 


Uft 

5* Thortec 



192 

8* 

7* 

Sft 


20ft 




•48 

7 

6% 

7 






224 

3M 

3% 

K— lft 


15ft 

9M T me Fib 



W 

“IT 

\ 

’b?+ *? 



IM TottSvs 



38 

38M 

77% 

27% + % 


17% 

10 TrefcAu 



378 

14M 

I1M 

13% +2% 



6U Triads y 




10* 



1 

30% 

20 TnnJo 

A0 

IS 

4 

26% 

26% 

2kU 


c 




U 



_ 1 

I 

27* 

18 USLlCs 

JO 

u 

57 

27(6 

27ft 

27* + % 

s 

24% 

13* UTL 



13 

16M 


UM 


11 

5 Uttrw 

26e 

J 

3S4 

Eft 

Bft 

K— % 


23M 

IK Lfnomn 


1497 

15 

14% 

15 + 'i 


14% 

7* Unlil 



140 

u% 

Uft 



29M 

16M UnPtntr 

1291 


24 

21% 

37% 

28% + M 


63% 

24% UnTScs 

’j* 

I5r 

m 

61% 

6UM 

60M— 1 


26% 

11* 

12ft liACmt 

3 

X 

294 

63 

25% 


%A 

! 

29* 

21M UBCol 

128 

208 

30% 

29% 

30ft + M 

• 

II 




86 

»% 

6* 

6*- ft 


22% 



J 

81 

TO* 

IK 

18* + ft 




1J4M8J 

124 

9 

BM 

8% 

■ 

'ft 

9% UPrrad 
3* US Ant 



13 

70 

% 

w 

% 



23* USBcp 

120 

14 

6S9 

39 

2K 

29 - ft 


51* 

1% US Cap 


123 

3* 

J* 

3% + ft 


6 

22* 

2M US Dean 
• USHCl 

25 

2J 

71 

2909 

3* 

T9* 

2(6 

19 

2% 

19* + * 




.12 


4U 

<ft 

4U 




AOe 11 

791 

19% 


19% +1 


42% 

25% USTrs 

*4* 

2J 

237 

43M 


43M + % 


25% 

17(6 U Stahl 

24 

12 

256 

24 

23% 

23% + ft 


25ft 

IK UnTetev 



24 

24* 

J4 

24ft— ft 


48% 

33* UVoBs 

1A4 

15 

33 

47% 

46* 

47ft- ft 


23M 

14% Um/Fm 



726 

24M 

23M 

24ft +1 

, 

2Dft 

10 UrtvHir 



2902 

15* 

(5% 


■ 

TO 

7M UFSB6. 

.0 It 

A 

>3 

15% 

TOU 


T1 

6% 

3% Uscaf 

34 

5J 

692 

5% 



| 




V 



fl 

- 

9* 

5% VLI 



193 

6 

5% 

S%— % 


(6% 

7% VLSI 



680 

ISM 

15 

15% — % 

•• 

11* 

3* VMX 



820 

4* 

4ft 

4* + % 


11* 

7* VSE 

17e 14 

5 

10M 

him 

10M 


20% 

6 Valid La 



1070 

9M 


9M + (6 


22* 

8M ValFSL 



505 

3TU 

19M 

31 +1M 


42% 

23* VOINII 

122 

13 

2422 

39% 

39 



38M 

IK VoILn 

A0 

IA 

142 

28 

2/M 

28 + M 

. 

19* 

11% VmOus 

AD 

20 

89 

19* 

IV* 

IK 


IK 




58 

6M 

6 

6% 

— 

Aft 




499 

516 




% 



4 

476 

20* 

30ft 

20% + ft 



33a 32 

137 

7* 

7* 

7ft— ft 

C 

UM 




141 

16% 


16 + % 

21% 

IK Vlratw 



46 

51 



12* 





7* 

** 

1 

32 

14% vottlnl 



309 

20% 

19M 

20% + % 

r 

| 



W 




i 

25% 

17* WO 40 

124 

45 

187 

53% 


5Ti + % 


17% 

ID WaibCs 

22 

1.9 

31 

17% 


17% + ft 







9* 




25% 

19 WdiE 

1J4 

7 A 

153 

24% 


23% — % 


30ft 

Uft WFSLs 


20 

287 

36* 

29% 

30M + ft 


17% 

10* WMSB 



722 


« 



9% 

A Wove* 



47 

7* 

7* + ft 





32 

145 

■ r . J 

TOft 

]2ft . 


T9VI 

8* w«Fn 



39 

1 B 

16% 

17% + * 


17% 

5% WstFSL 



842 


16ft 

17ft 


IK 

S% WM1CTC 



61 

m /i 

8M 



r 

6% WtTlAS 



161 


17ft 

17* + ft 







20M 


• 

17M 

6* WerwCs 



171 

■ i . J 

11% 

13 + ft 


38* 

24% wettrn 

34 

26 

150 


37ft 

37%— ft 





1946 

4ft 


4* 


TOft 

3 widcom 



176 

3* 

3% 

3U— ft 


fl& 



U 

1447 

53 

SIM 

51% 

i 






Uft 



19 




4 

19 

TOM 

IBM 








5% 





m 


104! 

5* 

5% 

5* 


24% 

rJf.'i'TiB 

JO 


B5 

14% 

14M 

Uft- % 


19% 

ipf'i'rry 

r.-M 


22 

13ft 

17% 



23* 

14% worthas 

M 


371 

22M 

23ft 

5Z*i + * 


9* 


.(to 


133 

8% 

RU 

EU 


30* 

20% Wvmon 

JO 


123 

22% 

22 

22% 


| 




L 





6* 

1* Xebec 



582 

2 

T>*6 

Ilk 

f, 

U% 




1270 


8% 

9% + * 

v 

17% 

10%-Xktoe 



1848 

14* 


Uft + * 


1 S/M 


■P | 

■L 


■^1 


P 


38* 

15 YtowFi 

-54 

is 

397 

28* 

38M 

28* 





z 



I 



30ft 6 Zen Lb » .101 A 372 

14 low Zleotar ABa 3A I 

46% 31 ZJonUt lJi 3J 32 
5% 1* ZIlM 19 

B'fc 1% Zlvod 25 

15% Aft Zondvn JBI A 244 


25% 25% 25ft + ft 

lift 131k Uft 
46 45ft 46 
3% 2ft 2* 

Aft 6 6 — % 

12% 121k 12ft 


Sate* Route* ora unofficial. Yearly htohs and taws ret tea 

the prawtaueJI week! Pkio me currant week, but not ttw latest 

(radano dev.lMhar« • Mil or irtoci. AvWeni omowiMno lo 2S 

Ptrctnl or mare has been oaltL the year's hWTOow ranoo and 

dividend are shown lor the new stock only. Unices otherwise 

noted, rates of dividends are annual dbbvrskmenb based an 

me latest deaent ten. 

a— rtvldend also oxtrafs)7l 

b — annual retool dividend Pkn stock dlvUend/l 

c— ItouWaimo dhrldendTI 

Ckl— coHetL/l 

d— now yeerw to*4l 

a —dividend dM*rad or paid In preceding 12 montnui 

o — dlvMsnd In Canadian luiK&suMia to 15% non-residence 

Ml 

—dividend doctored otter spIU-up or stack dividend, 
—dividend ooM this veer, emittod. deferred, or no onion 
token oitoten dividend mevtlno. 
k— dhddsM dectarod or paid imi roar, on accumulative 
Issue teHh dlvldemta In arrears. 

n— new tasueinlhauas S3 weeks. The htoiFKrerenoebeoita 

wlin me start of TradMo. 

nd — n#*l day delivery. 

P/E— Prtcs-kar nln ei ratio. 

—dividend dechtred or add in orecedlno 12 months. oUb 
stock dividend. 

— stock salti. Dividend beams with dote of spill, 
ill— Softs. 

— dividend paid In stock hi procedlno 12 months, estimated 
eaft votuk on ox-dMdend or ex-dbtrflwtion data. 

«— oawvoarlr hloh. 

— trading hama 

vl — In bankniotcv or rocalvoraitto or belna raaroanlzea urn 

(tor the Bankniatcv Aa. or seeurtttes aewmed by such com- 

ponies. 

wd — when (flstrlbutod. 
wi— when Issued, 
ww—wllh w a i t on to . 

— an-rtvidend or ak-iioiit% 
xdts— n-dMrmiHm. 

nv—wlituut warranto. 

— ex-dtofetand and sodas m lull, 
via— yield. 

—solas in fun. 




0 


.'•3 














Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17, 1985 


IS 16 IT IS 19 


PEANUTS 

THAT WAS A HARP 
TE5T„H0W'P YOU 
EVER SET AN ‘■A* 7 


BOOKS 


I PASS TESTS THE 


OLD-FASHIONED WAY 


1 21 I | i M i 


1 25 1 26 127 


1 38 I 1 39 




YOU RE WEIRD, 
MARC IE ! j 


in n Mm 


|S0 I I 1 I I S3 


BLONDIE 

tS THIS U JSGAgg i|| I Ijl 1 


SOftRY. IT MUST BE 
TOTALLY WATERPROOF, 


WHY IS THAT SO I THE J 
IMPORTANT, WAY 

COW\7n 41 JULIUS 
-vv M > TIPS AT 


OUR BAGS USUALLY 
r W!hC7 UP IN THE ^ 
SWIMM1N0 POOL 7T 


157^ ISO 


Tif-t* i o l 

R ESO RTS | 


ACROSS 
1 Tableland 
SN.H.'s stale 
flower 

10 Pop 

13 King toppers 

14 Sports area 

15 Artist Charles 
Gibson 

16 Temporary 
prexy 

19 Khartoum is 
its capital 

20 Explode 

21 Scratch 
producer 

24 Soft drink 

25 “Bonjour, mon 

28 Babylonian 
deity 

30 Ouit working 

34 Forbid 

35 Inclines 

37 Periods of time 

38 Veep's 
possible role 

42 Cultivate 

43 Discover 

44 Bom 

45 Cheap: Slang 

48 Secular 

49 Eternally, to 
Poe 

50 Juice drinks 

52 Hebrew month 


54 Homed 

58 Ernie of 
baseball fame 

62 Ford or Carter 

65 Regrets 

66 Giant grass 

67 Kind of spirit 

68 Quarter of four 

69 Clergyman's 
dickey 

70 Alliance 
acronym 

DOWN 

1 Charts 

2 Tannish 

3 Pip 

4 Very: Mus. 

5 Boy 

6 Anger 

7 Lease 
preceder 

8 Poker 
payments 

9 Paris, to Helen 

10 Information 

11 Dill of the 
Bible 

12 Title Christie 
held 

15 Made a 

charitable gift 

17 Clinic figure 

18 Took a cab 

22 Bluff 

23 Sound of doubt 
or disdain 


25 Ln the rear, at 
sea 

26 Parrot 

27 Opening 
monologue, for . 
short 

29 Showery 
month 

31 Good-night girl 

32 Rajah's mate 

33 Chemical 
compound 

36 Bristles 

39 Preserves in 
memory: Var. 

40 Earth 

41 Nightmares 

46 fixe 

47 Holy 

(brat) 

51 Partitions 

53 Burdened 

54 Hairdo for a 
soul brother 

55 Part of speech 

56 What Daphne 
became 

57 Colorless; 
monotonous 

59 Soviet river 

60 Emulate Mme. 
Defarge 

61 Town in 
Normandy 

63 Letter from 
Athens 

64 Gel 


S^III 


BEETLE BALLE 


X HAVE A FEeuM£THE 
RECRUIT! H© OFFICE JS 



ANDY CAPP 

( |W5l|BS8 SS5 !i 

OM Or N«n AMftea SfKdwni 


WHO IS SHE. ANDY 
- THE eiNQBW&ttaED 
. LASS HOLME WITH F* , 


rrisAuauRNj 
»- JACK. < 
AUBURN!} 


SORRV.ANCV.t 
MVAUS 1 AKE ) 


|T> 5 AjgUIN WHEN 
t THIPrRE FRYING *■ 


POLAND UNDER BLACK LIGHT 

By Janusz Andaman. Translated by Nina 
Taylor and Andrew Short 131 pages. 
Readers International, 8 Strathray Gar- 
dens, London NW3 4A Y. 

Reviewed by Walter Goodman 
<4W/HEN did ^ happen? Could it have 

W been in this country? When?" It hap- 
pened in Polan d in December 1981. when, as 
Janusz Andennan describes the unpoation of 
martial law. the police, party and anny made 
war on the Polish people. What that meant is 
the ihffnf of “Poland Under Black Light," his 
book of grim and gritty vignettes from a 
crushed society. 

Andaman is a 35-year-old writer who has 
beat getting, into trouble over his work since 
his stu d en t days in Krakow. He was impris- 
■oned after the declaration of martial law. He 
now lives in Warsaw. Tins novel, his first to 
appear in P«gii<h, is published by Readers 
International, a London house specializing in 
books hflinwl in their country of origin. 

r other dissident writers in the Soviet 
bloc, Andaman resorts to a land of surrealism 
to capture the realities of life for someone like 
himself, or the writer who moves like a shadow 
tfrmaigh these pages, people who will not, can- 
not play by the official rules. He speaks for 
those who nave been declared dangers to the 


Sohrfioo to Previous Puzzle 


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30033 000303 
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□0003 0H3D3300E3 
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□□□33 333 3333 


state: “They were made prisoners before being- • 
told that war bad broken ouL Prisoners werr£ 
taken first in this war. and war was declared* 
afterwards." 

The prose is nol elegant; it has the peundmgr 
cadences of delirium, obsessive and ominous.’ 
Yet these intensely private visions of prisons,- 
hospitals, streets where it is always b i lter ^ 
or scorching hot. carry powerful political reso- 
nance. There are spies everywhere: “This con- 
versation is being monitored" is a refrain. . 

Many of the episodes are the stuff of night-, 
mare. A prisoner is summoned from his ceD by ; 
a secret policeman, who turns out to be his 
father. A taxi driver enters a police station, 
demanding to know what happened fo his- * 
passenger, who has never emerged from the 
building; the meter continues to run like a. 
memory of freedom. ! T? 

Everyone in these pages is a prisoner or a . . ■ 
guard, and the guards, of course, are prisoners,' 
too. Just as the political detainees endlessly _ 
circle their prison yards, so outside. Poles gq; 
about their daily rounds under the eves of. 
omnipresent police, who are walking tightly 1 
regulated circles of their own. 1 

Andaman is not given to subtlety, and now 
and then be resorts to standard descriptions: 
“The militiamen prowl the neighborhood, leer 
insolently into faces, check papers, rummage 1 
through handbags." But at his more imagina - 1 
live, he finds an ordinary item, like a drinking 
mug in a prison, to symbolize the servitude of 
his country: “The mug stands on the window- 
sill, its pale whiteness blurred against the 
shroud over the grating; the mug is covered all 
over in designs and tattoos; it has been re- 
trieved from numerous mouths, and the date . 
stamp tells that it has been thirty-one years in f) 
service. The sides are lined with lettering, na- r 
ked women, dates, article and paragraph num- 
bers that have broken the successive owners." 

Censors not only silence; they also force 1 
feed. Hie writer who is forbidden to write 
listens to the one station he can get on the- 
radio. A children's song comes out at him; 

Through aO our landsofair. 

Our land demands your loyalty. 

You are her own true heir. ’ * 

There is no sunlight in these pages, except 
perhaps in the existence of the book itself and 
its testimony to the author's defiance. 

Waits- Goodman is on the staff of The New 
York Times. 


WIZARD of ID 


CHESS 


iVw York Times, edited by Eugene Matesha. 

DENNIS THE MENACE 


VOC-TOP- 


v Tve&mi > 


£0P5MOHN6- 

wseimw . 

L RTIBBTC A 



it£ 

,Jl£T 


BUT IF IT'LL MAKE YOU FEEL 

BETTER, Hi ASK NEXT, > 

r — r*TlME I SE E HIM f J 

( WHEN WILL ' | 

L that be*? v . 


TONIGHT t HE'S PICKING ME UP \ 
AT MY APARTMENT AT SEVEN ! 1 
SHALL I CALL YOU AFTER HE / 

— r BRINGS ME HOME 

/7 V SS ^ A. ( OR CAN YOU 

ul WArr UMT,L Vd 
JpAPFOINTMEWT 
l NEXT WEEK‘S 


By Robert Byrne 

TN the game betwen the Pasa- 
1 den a grandmaster Larry 
Christiansen and the Beverly 
Hills international master 
Kamran Shiran, the advance 
with 4 . . . P-K5 is dubious, 
although this pawn is in no real 
danger of going lost After 5 N- 
Q2, B-B4, it would be wrong to 
play 6 Q-B2, B-N3; 7 N/2xP?, 
NxN; 8 NxN, P-Q4; 9 PxP, B- 
NSch; 10 B-Q2, BxBch; 11 
KxB, QxP, which gives Blade a 
dear advantage. 

The real trouble was that af- 
ter 6 P-K3, P-KN3; 7 B-K2, P- 
JCR4; 8 P-B31, Black was 
farced to abandon his grip in 
the center with 8 . . . PxP; 9 
BxP and let White proceed to a 
powerful build-up with II P- 
K4. 

After 12 N-N3, Shirazi could 
not well play 12 ... 0-0 and 
permit a strong pin with 13 B- 
N5. But after 12 . .. N-KN5; 
13 N-Q5, what side was he sup- 
posed to castle on? 

While 15 . . . NxN; 16 
BPxN eliminated a strong 
white piece, it also opened the 
QB Se for White to use for' 
attack. Now, 16 . . . 0-0?; 17 
P-R3, N-R3; 18 Q-Q2. K-R2; 
19 NxPwould have been awful 
for Blade. So Shirazi went over 


the blade position disheveled. 
Thus, 19 . . . P-K5; 20 NxP, 
BxPch; 21 K-Rl, P-KB3; 22 
. BxP! is very strong for White. 

Shirazfs 18 . . . PxRP did 
not distract Christiansen from 
his plan of opening lines 
the king with 19 P-K 6 ! 
A result ofl9 . . . PxN? 
could have been the crashing 

20 BxN. BxPch; 21 K-Rl. PxB; 
22 QxKNPL R-R5; 23 Q-B5, 
Q-K2; 24 BxNP. 

On 19 . . . B-N4; 20 BxN!, 
BxR; 21 QxB, Shirazi could not 
intercept the attack by 

21 . . . Q-B3? because of 22 
Q-NScb, K-Bl. 23 R-KB1. His 
attempt to find safety with 
21 ... 0-0 - LnridenUiy leav- 
ing two white pieces en prise - 
encountered 22 Q-K21, threat- 
ening a fork with 23 P-K7. 

After 22 . . . Q-K2; 23 
PxPdi; 26 K-Rl, R-KB1. Shir- 
az i was temporarily ahead in 
material and stood to achieve a 
good position were White to 
rush about recovering the ex- 
change. Moreover, he had set a 
lethal little trap 21 R-KB1?, 
QxB! wins outright for Black 

Against 27 . . . B-B3, 
Christiansen could have played 
28 R-KBt, K-N2, 29 R-B5, R- 
KR1; 30 Q-N4, R-R3; 31 P- 
KR4, R-N3; 32 P-R5, R-R3; 33 
BxNP, which ends all resis- 
tance. 

With 27 . . . BxP; 28 
BxNP, B-B3, Shirazi hoped to 
make a counterthreat of his 
passed QNP, but Christian- 
sen's 29 R-R4! was annihilat- 
ing. Thus, 29 . . . P-N7;30Q- 



DfUTMHaCN'llMTC If’B.D 

Fashftoa after 28. - • H-BS 


N 6 ch, K-Rl; 31 R-R4ch, 
R-R2; 32BxBch forces mate, 
no matter how Black recap- 
tures. ^ 

Or was there a last reprieve.' 
Chris tan sen suggested that 
maybe, after 29 . . . BxB; R : 
KN4, White might not be able 
to crack 30 . . . P-N7!; 31 
RxBch, QxR, 32 QxQcb, K.- 
R2; 33 P-R4ch, K-N3: 34 Q- 
K4ch, K-R3; 35 BxR. RxB; 36 
K-N2, P-R5! 

Instead. Shirazi staggered 
through 30 . . . QxB; 3! 
QxBch, K-Rl; 32 PxQ, and 
then gave up. 

OJLD MDUlM DEFENSE 


* 5 * a m 

™ S& IS 

w » Ml Ml) 

ss sa 

® WTO 

wara a ma> imh. 
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\xl£s 


] 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TR1BUTVE, TUESDAY, DECEMBER 17, 1985 


Page 19 


SPORTS 




occerDraw 




1 H ■ to be in Mcraterrcy. .We lore the 

' ' r -^paCOCfl-Y— England ana summer, and the changes’* in alti- 
r --> sent to die hot and low aide “don’t bother ns one Ht”P»U 
. ? icm aty of 


gaay . . . * adding that West Ger- 
many “wffi need a lot of hick to 
survive in this one.” 


tnde “don’t bother ns one bit,” Pal- 
lares said. 

“I believe that all the teams that 
will have to [day in Monterrey are 
going to hare greater difficulty in 
winning the cop,” Robson said. 

“However, in terms of teams, 1 am 
-u , v . _ . .. . . . glad to get Monterrey anyway bc- 

i % G«many probably ism the cause Group E would hare been 
. '-vilest piriimiiiaiy group, that ■ extremely difficult" 

^.Mexico is m the easiest and Chariton said the Fn P i;«h team • rv™™ r . . . , . 

rahcBS tor m rwad. Pokpd is a and Hungary. Games also wffl be 

very strong team. I do not know, I 


y v^cd after the draw 
. r ' ^' mined which teams 

*.e in the 1986 soccer Wedi! 
'but most other teams ap- 
. >:•. sd satisfied with their luck. 

*«' e draw also deter mined that 


This was the draw: 

• Group A, based in Puebla, has 
Italy, Bulgaria, Argentina and 
Sooth Korea. Games in this group 
also will be played at Mexico City. 

• Group B, based in Mexico 
City, has Mexico, Belgium, Para- 
guay and Iraq. Games also wS be 
played at Toluca. 


Bulgaria in Mexico City’s gjt- 
’ "Vv. Vztcc Stadium cn May 31 in 
. > nst rtf 36 first-round games 
''*:s'hikd in nine Mexican cTr?i»q 
' -i^nterrey, 588 mQes (952 kflo- 

‘ r Trs) north of the capital, is low^ 

; ‘^ 'id hotter than (he eight other The PoHsfa news 
.‘■’'•-'.'Si.i Most of the 24 national er in the week 
: - . ..fs had hoped to avoid it. 

* TtuaUy all the nations* 
iv.Htives were at the draw, 

” - : jvdffloo studio and watched by 

. - ■- ^ .-A i vnu». i- 


just.do not know. It is going to be 
very tough and very difficult/* ‘ 
Krajewslri said his team is “going 
to hare an extremely hard tune.” 

SencyPAPearii- 
described Mon- 
terrey as “the hell of Mexico.” 

To the West G erman «w.h 
Franz Beckenbauer, whose team 


iara, has 
North- 


• Group D, in 
Brazil, Spun, Algeria 
rm Ireland. 

• Group E, based in Qnezetaro, 
has West Germany, Uruguay, Scot- 
land and Denmark. Games also 
will be played at NezahnalcoyoU. 

— * sees smemsksks ssg^ , »- 


■"^.jod the world. 

,-hxk Poland’s Waldennar Kra- 
and England’s former star- 
^id-delegate, Bobby Chariton, 


England. 

England’s was the last name to 
be pulled in the draw. 

The first two teams from each 


of teams we will have to compete 
against 1” 

Tt win be tough, very, very 
_ tough to compete otwwn jff some of 

-« .the English coach Bobby Rob- the strongest teams rnSotnh Amer- group and the four best third-place 
.. -.-T eonqjtained to reporters and Europe,” Beckenbauer ™l advance beyond the first 

T — *' — ’ said after the draw put Uruguay, “A which has each group play- 

Scotlaod and Denmark in Group 
E, headed by West Germany. 

Asked what the toughest twwm 
will be, Beckenbauer said. “Uro- 


_ ' td upset, Jesus Manuel Pat- 
id ncT^^^and w^w^ah the 

." -was about 

'araguay would have just loved 


in^a round-robin. 


SCOREBOARD 


Football 


Basketball 


L Standings 


AMERICAN CONHREHCE 


NBA Standings 


Eoakmd 

W L 
M 4 

T Pet. pf 

0 .714 307 

PA 

237 

s 

10 4 

0 

J14 370 

393 

. -v Ute 

18 5 

0 

.447 356 

254 


4 11 

0 

■247 284 

370 

o 

2 12 

0 

JJ3 280 

353 

A iinid 

- CMtroi 
• 7 

• 

.533 277 

257 

. -i«tl 
j.lnii 

7 8 

• 

AO 418 

401 

7 8 

8 

.447 349 

327 

to 

3 10 

0 

J33 268 

378 

' Rohtan- 

WHt 

11- * 

0 

J33 338 

302 

r 

10 5 

8 

447 333 

305 

i 

0 1 

8 

.533 X25 

276 

■no 

• 7 

0 

-533 433 

387 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 

Atlantic DMtlM 

W L Pet 


CB 


■ a - 

PQCwe iiCfSvT 

WnMeeton 
. PhitadetoMa 
Ni» York 

Milwaukee 

Detroit 

Atlanta 

Clevaland 

Oitcocro 

fruflana 


20 4 

14 11 
12 11 
12 12 
1 17 

Central Dtvtatae 
18 10 
14 12 
12 13 
11 13 
* 1* 
7 T7 


jm — 
.560 6ft 
322 7V, 

NO I 

jtn n 

A43 — 
SX 3 
M 4ft 
ASS 5 
J21 9 

.292 9 



WESTERN CONFERENCE 
MMme e f DtvWen 


ef ending champion I Laly 
would seem to have its toughest 
opposition in Argentina, another 
former champion, in Group A. 

The draw was held under tight 
security in one of the large studios 
of the private narintMi television 
network Televisa in the San Angel 
neighborhood of southern Mexico 
City. 

It had been scheduled for the 
ornate Fine Arts Palace downtown, 
but was changed at the last urinate 
following a series of protests by 
Mexican intellectuals, who com- 
plained that a sports- related event 
would “‘contaminate" the budding 
traditionally used for opera, ballet 
and other arts performances. 

The original location, the audito- 
rium of the National Medical Cen- 
ter, could not be used because of 
the destruction wrought by the 
Sept 19 earthquake that tritinH at 
least 7,000 people and damagud or 
destroyed about 3,000 buddings. 



Raiders Win Tide 
In West as Defense 
Stymies Seahawks 


Confuted by Ovr Staff From Dapatdm 

LOS ANGELES — The Los An- 
geles Raiders clinched the Ameri- 
can Conference Western Division 
title Sunday, and Seattle's long- 
shot bid for a playoff berth aided 
as the Raiders beat the Seahawks, 
13-3, at the Los Angeles Coliseum. 

Seattle, needing a victory and a 
Joss by the Raiders next week to 
keep its playoff chances alive, was 
stymied all afternoon by the Raid- 
ers' defense. The Seahawks' slim 
hopes finally were dashed with 6 
minutes 9 seconds to play when 
Marcus Allen scored the game's 
only touchdown from seven yards 

OUL 

Allen’s run, set up by a 49-yard 
Wilson 


8“?.*““ ry EDanL The 36 points lopped 

Williams, gave him 106 yards rush- jUir ious SpomivEr 
mg for the game. It was his eighth M entire game twTseas^ 


to DoJtie 


threw four touchdown posses and 
Eric Dickerson ran for 124 yards 
and two scores as Los Angeles' 
long-slumbering offense roared to 

life with a division tide-clinching 
romp over Sl Louis. 

The victory gave the Rams an 
insurmountable two-game edge 
over the defending Super Bowl 
Champion San Francisco 49ers in 
the NFC West, and their first divi- 
sion championship since 1979. 

They broke open the gome open 
with a 36-point first half, as Dick- 
erson rushed for 109 yards and 
scored on runs of 1 and 2 yards and 
Brock threw touchdown passes of 
13 yards to Ron Brown. 47 yards to 
Tony Hunter, and 43 yardsioHen- 


BmMt*— UN 


iTtOMAL CONFERENCE 


MT 341 382 
488 371 273 
400 270 294 
400 249 275 
-333 282 387 


433 419 181 
467 317 318 
467 312 322 
447 290 329 
.133 277 428 

79 334 241 
400 388 247 
-333 284 38S 
-200 264 442 


CMM 
14 I 
7 a 

7 8 

7 8 

Boy 2 U 

Wtaf 

— tanis 11 4 

' jn&KD 9 4 i 

'leans S 18 

s n i 

- -TCftert division into) 

Khsd wikKard olayoff berth) 
• - SATURDAY'S RESULTS 
no 19. taw York Jets 4 
'■-w 14, Kanms aty a 

SUNDAYS RESULTS 
‘ urwin BufWb24 
kiatai 27. Cincinnati 24 
1 0W24. Detroit 21 

- -toad 28. Houston 21 
wnlls 31, Tampa Bay 21 

- la 14. Minnesota 13 

- 1 2L taw York Giants 21 

. _• 'rmiclseD 31, taw Orleans 19 
leso 20. PNtodetphla 14 
"0®»c« Rum 44, St. Louis 14 
nodes Holders 13, Seattle 3 


Homtari 

17 

8 

MB 



Darner 

14 

9 

A4D 

7 

Utah 

IS 

11 

577 

2ft 

San Antonio 

14 

12 

J38 

3ft 

Dallas 

12 

11 

sn 

4 

Socnaitonta 

8 

17 

JttO 

9 

Pacific Dtvtdan 



LA. Latere 

20 

3 

MV 



Portland 

15 

» 

S3 i 

7 

Seattle 

11 

15 

A23 

TOft 

GoMon Stole 

U 

18 

J67 

12ft 

LA. Clipper* 

8 

17 

-320 

13 

Phoonlx - - 

-7 

17 . 

292 

13ft 


Earnest Jackson, a ru n ni ng back for the PbllarieipiBa Eagles, found that he uneyqiectedly 
had some dose friends during Sunday’s game in San Diego. The Chargers won, 20-14. 


straight 100 -yard rushing game. 

A brawl with 3:54 remaining re- 
sulted in three players being eject- 
ed: Jeff Barnes and Rod Martin of 
the Raiders and Bryan Millard of 
the Seahawks. 

The Raiders took a 6-3 lead in a 
hard-fought but error-plagued first 
half in which 10 penalties were as- 
sessed Seattle was hit with 4 for 31 
yards, Los Angeles 6 for 45 yards. 

Fittingly, the half ended with a 

flurry of flags that began with 16 
seconds left and the Raiders on the 
Seahawks’ five-yard line. Before it 
was over, Chris Bahr, the Raiders' 
place-kicker, would have to kick 
three field goals totaling 81 yards 
just to get 3 points. 

After driving from their 47, tire 
Raiders had to try a Grid goal after 
an incomplete pass to Watinnu 

Bahr first locked a 22-yarder, but 
Andy Parker was called for trip- 
ping, the lock was nullified and the 
ball was moved 10 yards bade. 

Bahr then made good on a 32- 
yard kick, but the defense was 
called for encroachment before the 

3 i, a re-kick was ordered and the 
was moved to the 10-yard hue. 
Bohr's 27-yard kick was good 
mice again, and this time it gave the 
Raiders a 6-3 lead. 

Ranis 46, Canfimta 14: In Ana- 
heim, California, Dieter Brock 


Dickerson earned just twice in 
the second half. 

Brock, in danger or losing his 
starting job two weeks ago follow- 
ing a 29-3 loss to New Orleans, 
completed eight of 13 throws for 
147 yards and the three scores in 
tire first half. 

Chargers 20, Eagles 14: In Son 
Diego, reserve quarterback Mark 
Herrmann, subbing for the injured 
Dan Fouis, threw a 23-yard pass to 
Charlie Joiner for the go-ahead 
touchdown against Philadelphia. 

Corner back Danny Walters 
slopped the Eagles’ final drive with 
a second interception of the quar- 
terback Ron Jaworski with 3:09 left 
to play in the fourth quarter. He 
returned the interception 30 yards 
and a 15-yard personal foul penalty 
gave the Chargers the ball at the 
Philadelphia 31 They then ran out 
the clock. 

Fouls left the game with a 
braised left knee after being hit 
following a 46-yard pass to Wes 
Chandler that put the ball on the 
Eagles’ 1 1-yard line with three min- 
utes gone in tire third period. 

Two plays later, Spencer took 
the handoff from Herrmann and 
scored from six yards out for tire 
Chargers’ first touchdown. (NYT. 
AJ>) 


NFL Playoff Picture Grows Clearer — But Then, Again, Not 


o Mane at Miami 


* fege All-Star Team 


T98S AH-Amortc 
FIRST TEAM 


z. *end— WIN!* Smith, Miami (Florida], 
) V tumor. 

" rwnNtm— nmMcO— >TaiH ta —i.S- 
; DavM wnitana, Illinois 4-3, 


SUNDAY'S RESULTS 
CMCOW 31 38 21 28— MM 

■Wton 24 24 38 27— W9 

BIM 13-24 M 34, McHoiB 11-17 S-7 27.- Wool- 
ri doe 9-22 8-1024. Green 7-14 M17. RqQoaBta; 
Chicago 49 (Green 14), Boston 54 (PartMi 151. 
AMbte: CMca»2S iwomrMee.Geniin.MBcy 
4). Barton 29 (Mow VI. 

Sacramento 17 17 *9 29— S3 

MBWOMme 14 28 81 34—140 

Cummlnes 10-15 1-1 21, ReyrwHJs MHli; 
Theus 7-15 4-4 UL Drew 8-14 O0 16. Rebaaodi: 
Sacramento 38 (Tyler, Tharp* 5), Milwaukee 
58 (LMW8I- AccMtt SocxamanfoK (OMenl- 
Ino. Draw 4i, Milwaukee 34 (Prasrny 8). 
Detroit 28 30 34 33—419 

LA. Later* 41 *3 41 27—132 

Worthy 13-15 VI 25, EJateami 58 Ml 19; 
Lana 8-11 (HI 16. Thomas 3-1 12-12 14. Re- 
beaetfs: Defied 54 (Mahani Ml. Los AnaMos 
57 [Rnmhls 11). Aratafa: Detroit 28 CThoma* 
11). Las Angelas 29 (d Johnson 15). 

Seattle 22 28 38 2S— IBS 

Golden state 23 31 31 25-112 

Short 14-224427, CorroU H7 0924; Chom- 
bars 11-19 44 & Wood M3 4-s 22. Rebeaada: 
Seattle 35 (SHunalll.Gettan Slate 47 (CarreH 
8). Assists: Seattle 361 Hendereon tOLGmden 
Stole 21 (Floyd 4). 


Selected Coflege Scores 


— Jim Dambrowsid, VlrotaHa, 4-S, 
^4er; Brtaa JaxwtoKrWaat VlnilnlciiMk 
nlor. 

: m— Jefl BreoeLSoumern Calhomla. 

tomor; John Rtewtre, Temple. 6-5. 
Trior. 

'sr— Pet. Anderson, Georgia. 6-& 244. 

Rfboek — Chuck long, Iowa. 44. 213, 

‘ Mo bocks — Bo Jackson, Auburn, 4-1, 
: Lontnio White. Mtahtam Stain. 5 
• Mohamora. 

-i klcfcer — John Loo, UCLA, 5-11, 187, 


Barton Colloaa 84. Holy Cn» 57 
MIDWEST 
Purdue 71 Toledo 56 


Hockey 


NHL Standings 


WALES CONFERENCE 


Patrick Division 
W L T Ptl 


GF GA 


ten — Tony CaslUas, Oklahoma *-L 
-Hor; Tkn Green. Syracuse, 6-2, 344. 
■ Hommo n d e hi, Micfltean. i^ft. 
. Nr; Ladle 0*Neal, Oklahoma State, 4- 
1 Whir. 

ncters— Brian Baewarth, OMahama. 
* Mpfcoaiom; MJdnel Brook*. LSU.4-1, 
lor i Jotsmv Holland. Tom* aam. 4-2. 
•.hn Lnry station. Iowa. 6-1. 227. se- 

l — Thomas Everort, Bavtar, 54, 177. 
<T »»M Fulcher. Arizona State. 53ft, 
or; Mam Moom Oklahoma State. 4a 
lor. 


PhUadetaMa 
Waehlneton 
NY Irtanders 
MY Ranaen 
Plttsburah 
How Jersey 

Quebec 

Barton 
Montreal 
Buffalo 


93 


12 14 1 

Adam Division 
17 II 3 

M -10 4 

15 11 3 

14 14 3 

14 13 0 


44 143 
39 IN 84 
30 109 111 
29 109 104 
28 119 113 
25 104 120 


34 120 94 

34 115 IDS 
33 130 109 
30 IN) 100 
a in no 


By Barry WUner 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — They were cele- 
brating in Southern Calif ontia and 
in the BigD. In the ffig Apple, they 
woe scratching their heads and try- 
ing to figure ont where they stand. 

In Glevdand, they were in — 
maybe. In Chicago, they had been 
in for weeks. And in Miami, one 
team was about to take the upper 
hand while the other fell into the 
whirlpool that is the National 
Football League wild-card race. 

The Los Angeles Rams and 
Raiders clinched their divisions' ti- 
tles Sunday, as did tire Dallas Cow- 
boys. The New York Giants and 
Jets will secure playoff spots with 
victories next weekend, but could 
get in despile losing. Cleveland, 
which plays the Jets next Sunday, 
would win the AFC Central with a 
victory, but could win tire division 
with a loss. 

The Bears, who are 14-1 and own 
the NFC Central crown, have 
clinched the hotnefidd advantage 
throughout tire NFC postseason 
parade. On Saturday, they beat the 
Jets, who trail the Dolphins and 
New England Patriots by a half- 
game in the AFC East 
Monday night’s game 
those teams in Miami. 

Starting with the least complex 
situations, the Rams, Raiders, 
Cowboys and Bears get byes into 
tire second round of the playoffs. 
The NFC wild-card team will be 
other tire Giants, the San Francis- 
co 49ers or the Washington Red- 
skins. 

“One down, one to go,” said tire 
running back George Rogers after 


V* r \ •: vj 


FfyingHigh 
At Lake Placid 

Franz Nenttandtner, 19, 
reified from sixth place 
with this second jump of 
87.5 meters to beat fel- 
low Austrian Ernst Vet- 
tori, 224.1 points to 
223.8, and win Sunday's 
World Cnp competition 
at Lake madid, New 
York. Neutlandtner, 
who has been competing 
in Worid Cup jumping 
for otdy two seasons, 
now trails only Primoz 
Ulaga of Yugoslavia in 
the overall standings. 


vH'- to* • 

. t-.^ . . •• ■ ' . . . 

■■■ ■ i-„i •• 

t..:\ •• ■ 

'. u-j . ■ • 

*■1" 







his Redskins stayed in contention 
by rallying Sunday to beat the Cin- 
cinnati Beagals. “Just getting inter- 
esting.’’ 

Actually, it is not that simple. 
Even if the Redskins beat St. Louis 
next Saturday, they will fail to 
make tire playoffs if the Giants 
beat Pittsburgh earlier that day and 


the defodisg Super Bowl champi- 
on 49ers beat IMlas on Sunday. 

The Giants can sneak in the back 
door after having the front en- 
trance blocked Sunday by Ed (Too 
Tall) Jones and Jim JeffcoaL Jones 
tipped a pass by the Giants' quar- 
terback PhD Simms right to Jeff- 
coat, who ran 65 yards for a touch- 


down that spurred Dallas to its 
NFC East- d inching triumph. 

“This feels great. Nobody 
thought we would win the divi- 
sion,’' said the Cowboys’ coach, 
Tom Landry. Tin a little suiprised 
myself to see us East champions. 
This is an amaring team.” 

Anyone who can figure out the 


AFC playoff possibilities without a 
calculator, oraja board, caysial ball 
and list of NFL tie-breaking proce- 
dures would be just as amazing. 
For instance, (hoe were 16 wild- 
card and Eastern Division title pos- 
sibilities going intn iha gnrrw be- 
tween the Patriots and Dolphins. 

But fire, the easy stuff. The 


Raidas’ staunch defense eliminat- 
ed Seattle from the playoffs Sun- 
day and rftnehed the AFC West If 
they win their last game, against tire 
Rams, the Raiders have the home- 
field edge for tire entire AFC play- 
offs. 

Meanwhile, New England would 
win the AFC East with a victory 
Monday night. Bui if the Dolphins 
win, it would leave everything un- 
solved until Week 16. 

The Dolphins take tire division 
crown with victories over New En- 
gland and Buffalo. The Jets would 
if Miami beats tire Patriots and 
loses to the Bills, whDe the Jets beat 
Cleveland. If the Jets beat the 
Browns, they have at least a wild- 
card berth. 

If you’re still with us, try this. 
Fra Denver to qualify, one of the 
East teams must finish 10-6 while 
tire Broncos beat Seattle on Friday 
night to go 1 1-5. If aD four wind up 
11-5, provided Miami beats New 
En gland, tire Jets win tire East and 
tire Broncos will be out on average 
net point differential in the confer- 
ence, the fourth tie breaker. 

Unless, of course, tire Broncos 
rout tire Seahawks so badly that 
they make up a significant deficit in 
the point differential. 

Cleveland has a strong interest in 
Saturday’s Gianis-Steelers contest 
because a Pittsburgh loss gives tire 
AFC Central to the Browns. If the 
Steders win and Cindnnati beats 
New England on Sunday, the 
Browns must beat tire Jets or the 
Bengals would win the division 
thanks to a belter record in games. 

Any questions? If so, call tire 
NFL commissioner, Pete Rozelie. 


r— Berry Hrttan. Colorado. 6-1 19S, 

CMcodo 

10 

15 

4 

24 

ore. 

MJnneiato 

8 

14 

7 

23 

HKONO TIAM 

Toronto 

8 

17 

5 

21 

Ofltero 

Detroit 

7 

18 

4 

18 

' and — Keith Jackson. Oklahoma. 


SniYlha Dtvtrtaa 


: tttatwrs — Law Barnes. Oroaon; 

Edmonton 

23 

5 

4 

50 

■ Stammer. San Dteoo State. 

Calgary 

17 

9 

3 

37 

■ — John Ckty, iMssour) ; Dauo Wll- 

Winnipeg 

10 

IB 

4 

24 

ABM. 

Vancouver 

18 

79 

3 

23 

h l. janft Dutes, Ptarkta Stole; Don 
Inn*, 

Lai Angelos 7 

19 

4 

18 

■' — BO Lewd, HuhrtteM. 


SUNDAY? RESULTS 

.■Bock — vianv Testowanta. Miami 

Quebec 




8 


CAMPBELL CONFERENCE] 

NorrU Division 

5L Louta 13 12 4 38 104 IK 

120 139 
110 118 
115 135 
95 158 

173 125 
130 100 
109 147 
117 139 
101 152 


SPORTS BRIEFS Celtics Give 

Snow Chief Sees Way to Ridh Victory Jones No. 300 


a. 

*»*«*•— RaMa Dupont soutnam 
*'• N a n o lm n McGoNom, Now. 

■ Utter— John Dttttrktt. Bolt State. 


ii* 


®n — Jerome Brown. Miami (RorV 
11 Rufll Barton Calhse; Jim Show, 
Mwk Walon. UCLA. 

Khan — Cornelius Bennett, Ata- 
. tovta Murphy. Oklahoma; John Of- 
MeBem MleMoen; Michael ZorxBch, 
Jta. 

— Brad Codtnai, Miatiaanj Alloa 
Maaa; Chits WWte, Tomassaa. 
yj — Utah Simon, Air Fora. 


Transition 


BASeBALL 


1 IN— Named Carta AMomo manna 
; HKMibepRHnoHonof Jlmmv John 

* Wtustai Mlm Mwitntlm 

BASKETBALL 

.Hand B tetetao fl A wod ot h m 
:LAND— Actfwatad Keffb Lae, for 
*>WNl Emin Wiutkw, award. 

FOOTBALL 

• tar (goal F u e U t nB u ai— 

ANTS— Aettuated Dan Kasaelback. 
I ant lm Rouaon, runMna Back, 
to* Havnas, camarbate, and Jefl 
. quarttrBoch, Rie Intuml reserve 


INGLEWOOD, California (LAT) — Snow Chief, newly outfitted with 
blinkers beside his eyes, ran away Sunday from a field of nine other 2- 
year-olds to win the $1,172,000 Hollywood Futurity, taming what was 
supposed be a highly contentious race into a rout by scoring a six and 
one-half length victory over Electric Blue. 

Electric Blue, running only his third race after winning over maidens 
and in allowance company, tost ground by not going through a tight spot 
along the rail and seemed to be more interested in the crowd than the 
finish line. 

“Maybe” the trainer Nefl Diysdale “ought to slap a pair of blinkers an 
my horse, too,” said Electric Bbe’s jockey, Eddie Demoussaye. “Maybe 
they’ll malm him ran straight-” Mel State, who trains Snow Chief, put 
blinkers on ins edit for the first tune in a workout Thursday. 

Zfi! Austrians Finish 1-2 in Bobsled Races 

CORTINA D'AMPEZZO, Italy (AF) — The Austrian entry steered by 
Walter DeBe Kart won the four-man Worid Cop bobsled competition, 
finish mg with an aggregate time df 3 nhnntes and 19 seconds after fonr 
heats Saturday andSunday. Second was an Austrian sled steered by Peter 
Kienast, in 3:48.40. 

Great Britain, led by Nick Phipps, was third in 3:48.49. Phipps had 
teamed with compatriot Alan Cearns earlier in tbe .wedcend to win the 
two-man title. 

.... After the weektaad’s faces, Kienastled the individnal standings with 35 

lor ml sms moaal: vaneowvar (onMooo) pdiits, foflowcd by DcDe Kart with 29 and Phq^s with 28. Man Roy of 
’“’ ,J the United States was in fourth with 26. 


i i— a 

ButhMa >4 3-4 

Ramsey (3), Rvtt 4 (13), SrtUno (8) l Sown 
C4).PStosfnV (II). Shota oa mol: Quebec (on 
Bonan) 798-24; Buffalo (on Matarehak) 
11-14.12-37. 

St. LOUIS 8 1 2-3 

NOWJAMW I T M 

Pasfciwskl (9). Mullon (15), RamaM (5)/ 
Andersen <4), Breton (9). Shota oa ooat: SL 
Louta (an Rosrti) 7-179— 2S; nm Jerem (on 
Mtamrtey) W-tt-7— 36. 

Ptttibarati 1 5 

H.Y. Ranters 1 1- t-J 

Ltaastiom (6). Letnletix (19), Ruskowiikl 
(11), Slmaaon 2 (5); Ruataotainan (7). 0> 
barm m.SBrtta an flood: Pittsburgh (on VOn- 
biosbrauck) )B»-»-a»; N.v.itaw4r»(onMfr 
loch#) U-11-17-40. 

8 1 2-4 
2 I 2-5 

SununonM (8). Huddv a (4). Hunter (7), 
Cottay (12); sundttram (7). Lam (4). Lantti- 


IMutf Prat Iniemakmat 

BOSTON — The Boston Celtics 
gave K.C Jones his 300th victory 
as an NBA coach Sunday. 

“It was one of the most amaang 
comebacks I’ve seen in a while, 
Jones said after his team outscored 
the Chicago Bulls, 15-1, in the last 
five nrinntes for a 109-104 victory. 

Larry Bird scored 6 of hisgame- 


NRA FOCUS 


.vote (i3).FonM (18): Eliott fY»r tilP 

[Wl. Shot* oa moU Toronto (on U1C UCWIU 


T2-M4— 33; Edmonton (on Braduor) 10-17- 
73 — 40 . 

Toronto 1 2 8 0-3 

0 2 1 

Le am on 15), 

(4),ArnW2(W. 

Bowhonl) MW-0— 34; wuwipoo (on Wroo- 
flrt) 17-1 1-150— 45L 

Detroit 

CMOOflO 

Savant 3 (19J. Dupont (2), Brown 
WUson (4J ! Y S f wio n (4L Duauav (9). jahrv 
dm (l), oumtolek (157. Shota on aoal: Do- 
traman Banwn™*) 73*5-37; aileaoo (on 
Staton) 11-9-14— M. 


high 34 poinis in the rally and the 
BoDs went 0-for-7 as me Cdtics 
forced them to take some tough 
shots. 

•They rose to another level and, 
xameap' 
said one of the 
Qnfnrin Dailey. 

Wifi Qiicago ahead, 103*94, 
Danny A m gr, sank an off-balance 
20-foot shot, then stole the baB and 
fed Kiri for a layup. 

Johnson, who returned after 
missing one game with a 
■tended thumb on his left 
made a 12-foot jumper and 
followed with a layup to cut 



David Shub, 26, an assistant to bis father, Don, tire coach of the Miami 
Dolphins, is bang considered as coach of the Phifaririphia Faglftfl, a team 

(AP) 


with 50 
ides in front, 
104-103, that Bird nude four free 
throws and Ainge one to ensure 
victory. 



PLAYOFFS! 


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9 


M 






Page 20 


ART BUCHWALD 


Thanks for the Memories 




W ASHINGTON — Hie hit 
number of last week's Kenne- 
dy Center Honors show was a rons- 
mg tribute to Bob Hope. American 
veterans from past wars came on 
stage; identified where they had 
seen Hope entertain, sainted and 
said, “Thanks for the memories.” 

It is almost impossible to have 
served in any U. S. conflict once 
Pearl Harbor 
without having 
seen Bob Hope. 

My memory 
goes back to 
1944. I was Sta- 
tioned on a piece 
of coral in the 
Marshall Islands 
with 3,000 ma- 
rines, soldiers 

and Seabees _ . .. 

(which, for those Bodiwald 

of you too young to remember, was 
the nam e coined from the initials 
for construction battalions). We 
were in charge of guarding empty 
sea lanes for a war lhat had passed 
us by. We lived in tents, played 
volleyball, produced homemade 
raisin whisky and made souvenirs 
of Japanese flags, which we sold to 
sailors on navy ships anchored in 
the lagoon. 

The important thing to re mem- 
ber is that our tent had no floor. 
This made it quite muddy during 
the rainy season, which made our 
toes go squish, squish in the night 
□ 

With the rainy season approach- 
ing we decided to take action and 
get ourselves a wooden floor. The 
question was how to do it Cooper 
said the Seabees had plywood 
stashed away on the western ride of 
the island. Brinkerhoff said the 
army always left their truck keys in 
the ignition. Far hart reported be 
could “borrow” all the tools we 
needed from the air force armory, 
lire rest of us became part of a 
commando group whose mission 
was to capture the plywood with- 
out the Seabees being any the wis- 
er. 

The operation was a success and 
by dawn the wood was stashed in 
our tent The next step was to get 
the floor built before the Seabees 
discovered the theft. 

First we leveled the ground and 
laid out the foundation with two- 
by-fours (also stolen). This took us 
the better part of the morning. We 
whistled while we worked until 
Schulman rushed in and yelled. 


“Bob Heme is on the island with his 
P Half i 


show! 
their tools 


started to change 
clothes. “Hey, guys, we have to get 
the floor done,* I said. 

“They say he brought Eve show- 
girls" Schulman said. 

□ 

The other half dropped their 

tnrjs 

“Hold it,” I said. “If we don’t get 
this floor laid' the navy MPs will 
End the wood and well not only 
lose it but be chopping rocks in the 
brig." 

Carroll said, “We’ve been de- 
prived of everything that ts good 
about America. Don't make us give 
up Bob Hope too.” 

I told them, “This is a gift from 
heaven. We can install the whole 
thing while Hope is pafonn in g. 
Please, gays, you can see Bob Hope 
and showgirls any day of the week. 
But how often can yon get a brand- 
new plywood floor?” 

Cooper said, “I’m going to the 
show.” 

□ 

Farhart nodded, “My mnthaf 
would never forgive me If I didn’t 
go.” 

Brinkerhoff said, “We owe it to 
all the people who have made the 
USO what it ts today.” 

1 didn’t want to do it bat I had no 
choice. Somebody had to beat 
some sense into them. I stood in 
front ofthe tent, raised my fists and 
said. “Anyone who wants to go to 
the Bob Hope show has to tight me 
first” 


Cooper shrugged his shoulders 
and hit me in the nwnach. While I 
was on one knee B rinkerhoff got 
me in the jaw. Schulman sent a 
roundhouse to the ribs, and Far- 
hart tried to see which eye he could 
close first Then Cooper started to 
play soccer with my groin. 


In one way or another they all 
made their point and there was 


nothing for me to do but fetid up 
“buddies” 


my lent and follow my 
to the show. 


We came back three hours later, 
our morale soaring and our faith in 
American women restored. It only 
took us nntfl midnig ht to lay the 
floor. It was a day I win always 
remember. So, Bob, even though 
my gran still hurts, thanks for the 
m emori es 


The Fil 



By Alan M. Kriegsman 

Washington Port Saviee 

N EW YORK— Mikhail Bar- 
yshnikov lounges in a desk 
chair, dressed in a polo shirt, 
jeans and boots. The dothes suit 
the setting, a large cluttered rocsn 
in a warehouse on lower Broad- 
way. It is his office — the office of 
the artistic director of the Ameri- 
can Ballet Theatre. Posters, pho- 
tographs, a Cocteau drawing of 
Stravinsky adorn the walk 
Baryshnikov was talking about 
iris new movie, “White Nights.” 
“I had reservations from the start 
about the stray hue, which I don't 
find very convincing,” he said. 
“But what do I know about it?” 

In fact, the film draws an obvi- 
ous parallel with Baryshnikov’s 
story. He plays a Soviet ballet 
dancer who defected to the West 
some years before. When his To- 
kyo-bound plane makes a crash 
landing in Siberia, he is held by 
the KGB and introduced to Ray- 
mond Greenwood (Gregory 
Hines ), an American tap dancer 
who defected to Russia in protest 
over the Vietnam War. It’s a cliff- 
hanger as the two attempt to flee. 

Most reviews of “White 
Nights” so far, lukewarm or cool- 
er on the movie itself, rave about 
Baryshnikov. Still, ranting the 
pictnre was a personal ordeal. 
There had been grumbling in the 
dance wold that he was giving up 
the ballet stage and putting aside 
his responsibilities as ABT direc- 
tor to malm the movie. 

“I grew up a lot on this film,” 
said Baryshnikov, 37. “It’s 
opened my eyes in many respects 
to my past and to my future. This 
was not for me a trial balloon, h 
was not something to see if I can 
be a movie star. It was an escape 
from reality, from difficulties m 
my Hfe.” 

A longtime cigarette addict, he 
quit smrtiring last February alte- 
ra lot of hard moments in my Hfe. 
One ni g ht, I got scared. It was a 
night of depression. I frit terrible, 
I looked terrible. I said to myself, 
‘Why arc you giving yourself this 
self -punishment? Yon don't pun- 
ish yourself enough all the time 
with everything eke, why do yon 


need this extra? Tone, after aQ, is 
punishing us. So I stopped.” 

Baryshnikov - acknowledged 
that, though “I thought it would 
be much worse,” shooting the film 
did recall painful moments from 
his career with Leningrad's Kirov 
RaTlrt anri his defection to the 
West in 1974. 

“But the truth is, I have passed 


through th&l period of my Hfe," 
he a dded . 


, “Toe weight of ray life 
now is here; in this country. I've 
put roots down here, my con- 
sciousness has changed. I think in 
a different way. My Ufe is here. 
My daughter is here.” 

Baryshnikov’s dEUE^ier, Sura, 
whose mother is the actress Jessi- 
ca Lange, will be 5 in March. 

He shuffled through papas 
and produced a photo of Shura, 
blond, clutching a teddy bear and 
leaning against her faxhex. Does 
he see Shura, who lives with her 
mother, as often as he'd Hke7 

“No,” he said. *Td hke to see 
her all.the time.” Then he bright- 
ened. “Right now Fm seeing a lot 
of her, every week. They are here 
now” — t -Brig* and twr compan- 
ion, the actor and playwright Sam 
Shepard. 

Baryshnikov had mixed feel- 
ings about his performance in 
“White Nights.” “But you have to 

ytart by imrifr ^tanfling that 1 am a 

skeptic to begin with — not just 
about my acting in this movie, but 
about theater, ballet, about every- 
thing. There have been very few 
times in my Ufe that Fve been 


.- : vr- 


*tet*Oorc*A/Tl» Vtahretortat 

“I respect this industry very, very much.” 


rittken by what Tm tilting , that 
It 1 1 


I’ve felt I gave a truly powerful 
performance. For a lot of people 
it may have been terrific. But in 
20 years on the stage I think I did 
maybe 10 or 15 good perfor- 
mances.” 

He ambivalent feelings 

about moviemaking. 

“One thing about this film ii 
that it made me want to do anoth- 
er film. I know now, from doing 
this one, what I can do, -and I 
know that I can do iL And work- 
ing with these people, with all the 
hardships involved and the can- 
plicated relationships, I respect 
ririt industry very, very much " 

After his first movie appear- 
ance, in 1977*5 “The Turning 


Point," Baryshnikov had numer- 
ous film offers, he said. “Thank 
God I didn’t do them,” he added, 
without elaborating. But if he 
malrwa annthgr film, *Td Iflte to 

have a director say to me, T want 
you to do a film without dance — 
you’re right for the part.’ ” 

One of the most compcflmg 
scenes m “White Nights” has him 

dancing an impassioned, spectac- 
ular solo on the Kirov stage as he 
reflects on his c a re er before his 
flight The tianeft borrows motifs 
from Russian folk dance. The mu- 
sic is “The Horses,” written and 
song by Vladimir Vsotsky, a Sovi- 
et dtsrident who died in 1980. 


sot of underground, Ms records, 
and tapes were in every house; 
people sang his songs in the 
schools, the army, the factories, 
farms, and the government, too. 
He wrote songs about all sides of 
Russian life, bat because they had 
political overtones he never got 
any official recognition. On the 
other hand, he was a shrewd man, 
and he was never sent to a prison. 
I knew him very wdL He was a 
tragic figure, a very good man, 
bat full of pain, for Ins met ds, for 
himself, for his country. I suggest- 
ed his music for (his scene, and I 
choreographed iL" 


“He was known as the Russian 
bard,” Baryshnikov said. “He was 
mare popular in Russia than Pres- 
ley is here Even though it was 


Baryshnikov said Jerzy Skoti- 
mowski’s portrayal of the film’s 
debonair bat sinister KGB colo- 
nel corresponded to the real 
KGB. “They’re very much like 


rhar They’re very wdl educated, 
they know the Western world, 
■’ fve aS finished a university 
many have spent time in dip- 
lomatic jobs. Some of them ■ — the 
stupid ones —are truly confused, 
and believe they’re actually doing 
good for their eotmtiy. Some are 
cynical, and do it fra the power, 
the cares, the security. And there 
are some who just love it.” 

Baryshnikov’s favorite soene in 
the film was when Hines bet him 
1 1 rubles that he could not do 11 
pirouettes in a row (most dancers 
arc hap py to reach half that num- 
ber) anti he whips them off as if he 
could manag e two dozen without 
blinking. 

“In ad days I used to do 15, 
16," he said, “and I did 13 or 14 in 
rehearsal I thought it would be 
nice to do 15 far the picture, but 
in the end it didn’t look very con- 
vincing." 

Usually, though, be makes a 
habit of self-deprecation, forever 
ratting down Ms idiosyncratic 
En g lish , his fluent piano playing, 
his ballets (all box-office bonan- 
zas) and, not infrequently, his 

dancing. 

Looking bade at the ground he 

has covered — 10 years with the 
Kirov, medals at Varna and Mos- 
cow, an epoch-making decade of 
Haneyng in the West, a two-year 
stmt with Balanchine’s New York 
Gty Ballet, five years as director 
of ABT, touring with his small 
Baryshnikov .inH Company sum- 
mer troupe, producing three bal- 
lets, publishing the book “Barysh- 
nikov at Work” in 1976, and 
making television specials. “The 
Turning Pant” and now “White 
Nights” — it is apparent that be is 
approaching another crossroads. 

He has said repeatedly that Ms 
dancing days are numbered. He is 
s till recuperating from last Au- 
gust’s knee surgery. But not long 
after he described the kind of 
movie he would like to make next, 
the conversation took a sudden 
U-turn: 

“Maybe 1 won’t do any more 
films. Maybe FU just start to 
dance a gam. You have to pay a 
certain price to be a dancer. It’s 
not fike an actor, who does a job, 
goes to Hawaii to rest and wails 
for bis agent to call him. But 1 
have to dance. 1 must dance, as 
long as I'm still intrigued by live 
theater, by the terrific viriti of it 
There’s nothing Kke that, not even 
the movies. 1-enfri said, ‘Movies 
are the first art of the new genera- 
tion.' But live performance cm the 
stage is not replaceable, not ever, 
not by anything.” 


in a goal during overtime to 
der to victory as 10 teams tad 
tusks in the 1985 Wodd Befog, 
Polo championship in Megra 
Nepal. The toornamtaH inchKJtdj 
celebrity-laden team from the jt*. 
der Cartier, induding the ffoto 
Beatles drummer, Riogo Starry 
wife, the actress Barbara Bach; 
Cartier’s president, Afafa hfo 
The sport bears some resendfo^ 
to the game played with ponies, 
the field is snorter because fo- 
phants can’t gaBop. The pfcnt* g 
tied into the saddle and the died 

his mallet depends on the hogfe" 

his mount. Elephant polo was j£$ 
vived in 1982 by Jtm Edmn&$ 
Hampshire, England, chainnarof 
the Tiger Tops resort in Megbgtf 
and James Mandaik of Had&». 
too. Scotland. 

□ 




t 


A tuba time can be a thing ^ 
beauty, lovers of the isstmom 

insist, and 300 tuba players oca. 

pah-ing at once can draw a ana 

even in New York. Thousands ^ 

shoppers and sightseers yauu& 

Rockefeller Plaza to watch the®. 

uual Tuba Christmas const, 'n 

event conceived in 1974 and cm. 

ducted by Harvey Phfflps, pnrfo- 
sor of music and tuba missioom- a i/' 
Indiana University. 




Sylvester Stallone, 39 v -of 
“Rocky” “Rambo” fame, h* 
married Brigitte Nielsen, 22, fog. 
foot-tall (1.83-meter) Danish mod- 
el and actress he has Bved with for 
some mouths. The ceremony was u 
the mansion of “Rocky’s” co-pro. 
docer, Irwin Winkler, in Beverty 
Hills, Calif ornia. Nielsen — a do- 
covery of Dmo de Laurentis, vt ijo 
cast her in the title ntie of “Red 
Sonja,” with Arnold S dmaafo 
ger — sent a fan letter and photofa 
Stallone at about the time of ft 
divorce from his first wife, Sarin, 
earlier this year. He was impressed, 
and shortly thereafter she moved 
into hts home in Cafiforou. J&4 
plays the wife of SiaBane’s Rb>-.._ 
opponent in “Rocky IV.” . . .tSi - 
ringer Junes Taylor, whose this ia- 
dude “Fire and Rain,” has manni 
the actress Kathryn Walker at the 
Ca thedral of Sl John the Divine is 
New York. Walker ap pe are d on 
Broadway in “Private Lives” in 
1983 and has had several tdevirion 
roles. Taylor’s first wife was the 
singer Cariy Sumo. 


u 


$ 


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. US $165,000. For fur- 


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her e dfanwttioe tot Bag Barnett, To- 
rortto Canada 416461^109 or write 

44 Glorias St W„ Ste. 4406. Toronto^ 

Ortf. M4Y 1KL Could be cSxusted, in 
Switzerland d u rin g Xmae hoSdaja, 
pKHitas, etc. 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


MOIIGMS. Beautiful Provencal rik. 

luxunoudy decorated. Superb recap' 

hai with outhonbe bme red fea- 

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Oymrown*, u sure v aqiuatu uwku. 

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RACE OPPORTUNITY. Exceptional 4 

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Ce ti fomw. Sold by the ownar. Su perb 
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FMOOjOOO. Tel 93 63*11 / 99 <3 

99 65 after 7 pm 


COTE D'AZUR. ST. JEAN Gap Fvttt. 


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ITALY 


SABAUDIA-30MNJTE5 frtw. Ro™. 
EUR, 120 iqm. uAy an the no. 7 


Roma. 


MONACO 


nUNOPAUTY 

OF MONACO 

UMGUE KBSMN STYIE VUA 
Far sale, dose to the famous 

JAIDM ExamouE 
Far further dekdi platan canted 

AGHX 

26 bis Bd Prinamo Chaiotta 
MC 99000 Mama 
Tet 93 50 66 00 Telex <79417 MC 


PARS* SUBURBS 


NEAR MBS 

On gotf of ». Norn b Breteehe 


tgagHrege^horea 


39 39 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


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FOR SALE 


PARIS A SUBURBS 


EXCEPTIONAL 
ON QUA! Of Bi 
FAONG HE ST UJUB 
fWtiboure, Sting, <fining,4 bedroom, 3 
betifa, office, modi room, 1600 join, 
fantastic view ovrr Pam. high 


teouciLhi w 

prrea. Vto, Guarticn every day toon* 
Sctturday afternoon and Sundays: 16 
Qua i dta Gdaa ft n, 75004 Preie 


20MMU1B mOMPABS 

STGSMAM Bi LAYE 

ON BME OF FOREST 
Nnre god 4 American SdmaL Very 
beautiful Bp ote, 300 aqjy t y i n g rrre . 
kl 000 aqA lend bncMdpaol 


d°ssy|K)0K}A ml jma 


rerv readereed area, 

reoenr Mdns, In vpiL .BAtt 


raoms. double reception, 3 


Scar 


Yd. 42953 




REAL ESTATE 

FOR SALE 

REAL ESTATE 

FOR SALE 

PARIS ft SUBURBS 

PARIS A SUBURBS 

FAISANDBUE 

MBS I6TH 

1 OJ iQ-nL, e twwy raaora, o 
t^dfooni^ 5 brthrootrtj. 3 rocro 
room. F6WOOO. M zV 42 26 86 

- ExronoNALvmr 
. FRONT DE SEINE 

30lh floor, double Bvfag + 

3 bedoom^ near, 
SANTAN3EA 47 04 75 60 

MARAIS 150 SOM. 

lift natatory di— ter huBteg 

Booufful reception, 2 bedrooma, 

• 2 bote FWOT^a 

EMBASSY 45 63 16 40 

FOCH 

Very beautiful bukSng, upper floor. 
|iwioc»430 qA, 4 reception, 3/4 

OPT1M 45 62 03 03. 


AVBUEFOCH 

Modem hfafa dot b uUnft 

Salon t drag room 

3 bedroom, paianc, mmTi roam 
BC» 77 89 Z9 



REAL ESTATE 
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PARIS R SUBURBS 


mm . anteat far. 

rooce, ndf. rooms. 
01.45 


i 2268 55. 


16IH NORIK 110 


beths. 


TS; 


7* floor. 


SPAIN 


pnoe-l 


I Ban 281 


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te US. $9.80 or local 

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breioad e Bxo .1 5 nde» from i 
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627900 OMIOMa 


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bvxk yu xmd v fl ng tonvattaadne 

portnr in ttretiup re atesUdiad aom. 

pony with projects 4/or ad wtiea a i 

JDdS wdl QS ium dI, 

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Herdd Tribune, 92521 
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am. 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPIE 

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SRIRDUND 

[ SWITZERLAND 

fureiaraa con buy STUDIOS/ APART- 

MB^T5 / CHALETS, IAKX GB4P/A - 

MONTKEUXrein three vrorld famous 
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JURA 4 radon ofGSTAAD. From 
5P110^Ca T&oogaa 60K ot 6WX 
attarao. . . 

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52 Mretitrifcait, CH-12Q2 GBBfA. 
Tet 022/34f540l Tefcat 22030 

a ' ■ 

REAL ESTATE 

TO RENT/SHARE 



GREAT BRITAIN 

LONDON. For the bed famafced floh 
and homer. Cons# the Sparinfare 
PHSpr. Kay end Le»k Tat South d 
Pert 352 Sill, North of Part 722 
5135. Tdex 27846 8K1DC a 

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8 Aro. 2a Mttdna 

75008 Area 

YOUR REAL STATE 
. AGBIT IN PARIS 
4552-7899 

. . AT HOME W PANS 

PARIS PROMO 
amfli— mrai flair oasau 
4563 2560 









L 1 ' : T-| , -'iF'i'-an’foM 


PARE AREA UNFURNISHED 

8ft ALMA 

Very high dot, iMm reirealm 
+ 2 bedroom, 2 bote, .132 iqav, 
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F16fl0tt Tet S 63 68 38. ■ 

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h & 3 3&.nK SS 1 * 

KAMI, 2 OOPVp IWU T UuQOi 

D. FEAU 42 94 20 00 

' 1-' 

AW GEORGE V 

LuauHorafa^ HOOOl 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENI7SHARE 


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16TH VK70R HUGO. PSed<Morre, 

jagh dog i bri bin g, tm dl tf ixto *■ 

heated dord ei uaiond o + tem 

Befaranon. P290Q. TaL 45 00 29 51 


71H 

273 

61 0096 


90 suil grrenl floor, 

a. riSjAo not Tat 45 


MSI EXECUTIVE HO B — 1MB- 

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PLUS 

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Ate Moore 42h»976. home 48912419 


PAHS APARTMENT WANIBj b)> 2 
mam r iBhh American prafeadondk 
JreTini June. Tab day 45 48 83 91 


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buinaB re nreia nw . Tuubit Ger- 
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mg petition. CtJ Prea 4$ 74 50 84. 


EMPLOYMENT 


general positions 

AVAILABLE 


TAX PREPMBL American low firm 

soda assrianend panon far prepre 

ration of US 4 French income ton 
return. Ttib 45 63 91 23 Frek 


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GOVERNESS/ HOUSEKEEPER -Amer- 

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seefa femetio far eora of 2 bv«*le 
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Maiimjcn7 yean experience 
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Contod i hi 

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URGBmY reeb far 
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■^JJpjrhe GloW Niewspa 

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•• •••' •••••• ■■■■ • 

■ i J.S ? WEATUR DATA Aff^AR ON PAGE 18 



INTERNATIONAL 




ribunc 


^io. 31,983 


51/85 


Published With Hie New York Times and The Washington Post 

k*: ~ PARIS, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 18, 1985 ’ 


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ESTABLISHED 1887 


m 


vs. 


By Leslie H, Gclb the Strategic] 

- Nary^rk Timet Strike the' proposed 

^ Washington — Mora than known. 

Zl and a half years after President Despite thi 

^nald Reagan broached the idea turn, key U.S. 
^ ik^trMrtvhssfid detenu* hiaau 


the Strategic Defense Initiative, as ' _ The first dear-cut result of the 


the' proposed syttem is formally program seems to be that the wodd 
known. of the Anri-Ballistic Missile Treaty 

Despite die gathering momeo- of 1972, a world essentially without 
turn, key U.S. officials say the pro- defenses against missile attack, will 
■ never be the same. 

, . . ' ” . The conditions of that wodd. 

Weapons ill Space with the United States and the So- 
_ * J. " viet Union each limited toone nris- 

. The Program, the Debate sfle defense ate, are being eroded 

— — ■— — ■■ bty the new technology and treaty 

First of three .articles loopholes. Both sides are exploiting 

Z ' ■ 77. treaty ambiguities, although each 

jgram has not reached the point ctf says it believes the other is more 


N <f^nistratKM opens and antics _ 

. re remain uncertain about the .- ■ Weapons in Space • 
‘isequeaces of such a defense for * £ 

v.-. s dear strategy and aims control. . The Program, the Debate 

almost all in the fiflwermneat 

^ *: gong along, whfrttte program First of three articles 

'-i s^d. as & resoh,' it has moved far-^.T — * 7 — 

V, 7 rd significantly in the postfix jgram has not reached the point erf 
’ ^/'joths. _ . Jf Tioictum-Thcy say they are wait- 

-c t ,5 The prevailing view noW-i^iJjat it- mgfor the oppor tuni ty to get the 
bccotpS ba rt fe |m#9iSraer to president to measures 

'‘it.j ’Oi back T^evQ frino fi^D .S. ofiS- that will take it even further before 
Ifajils and- '^^^laOTS^teovdedge he leaves office in 1989, so his suc- 
there% confusion about cessor will be more or less com- 
. pmpos^Ajd consequences of polled to forge ahead. 


"pd Long, Steep Decline 


: ■ ^ 'mths. • / • _ ... ^ -noirtum-They say they are wait- guilty of this. ' 

- ! r t^Ibe preyafltngyie» noy jfclfat. it. mfrfor the opportunity to get the The result is the devdopment of 

becMiC Qan^mjMjft^rjo president to authorize measures anti-tactical ballistic missSTanfr 
^.mbackT^gjKSBjAoffi- that will take it even further before satellite weapons andknmiadais. 

• ■ and telat^s^acfaiovdedge he leaves office in 1989, so his sue- All of these improve antTbaffistic 

there confusion about cessor wffl be more or less com- mitriv candnliiies, the very dung 

• pmpos^ajd consequences of peDed to foige ahead. tbe trea^wastoiied to sevoriy 

• \v; Kmxt 

The summit meeting between 

;pd Long, Steep Decline 

C7 y J. progress in this respect. And, for all 

> i^ir T1 ' J* m 1 /* Th TW the apparent agreement at the «*> 

7 as rredietedtor Dollar 

■a--.,'; over how to proceed. 

b» a L Bv Hobart Rowen nabons to deflate the dollar by m- Several inportant officials ac- 

^ . WaddngmPtetStrrice tHvaum smoe Swumber on for- knowledge that TLS. goals are still 

-■^WASHINGTON — A min i^diets, and the re- suspended somewhere betweea Mr. 

:= Sr UA S^VncfBUlddawof 

-shaded tor a sustained, dramatic Amoicaii people from missile 

" treating a recessum in the 801 . "Fps 11 attadr and the more proximate 

: - X'mied States and causing severe f*? 118 <I Sf e 1 5 k ** y ^ **“ ^J 011 prospects for improving deterrence 

'■ '"-' •oblaiB dsewhere to Ae worid, ^iD. be too httle and too 0 r protecting missile retaliatory 

l:, :; ; S hoe Tuesday by an an- forces. Officials also admowiedge 

- -^oritative eamonrist at tbc Insti- that a struggle u i beginning over 

- - 7,te for International Economics. ' °J . _ cruas how to measure the dtunate cost- 

: might be useful tn forcing attempts effectiveness of space-based de- 

’ The econ o mist, Stephen Mams, to devise new mechanisms to guide f eases. 

- i ls-edicted in rrepotl tiiat the dot- the international economy, be said. In particular, they point to a 

Among othttdumges, he called for fight bSmSefense 





Reagan’s Appeal 
Gains New Vote 
On Tax Package 


By Jim Luther if subs 

The Associated Press made b 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. As a 
House of Representatives, rcvers- CSBS J 
ing a stunning setback it dealt Pres- wsend 
idem Ronald Reagan last week, re- 10 vet0 


if substantial changes were not 
made by the Senate. 

As a condition for the Republi- 
cans' support, Mr. Reagan agreed 
lo send Congress a letter promising 
to veto any tax measure that did 


sponded to a personal plea from not contain certain dements, 
the president Tuesday and agreed The Republicans also wanted a 
to consider his tax-reform initia- promise from the Democrats that a 
rive. vote would be permitted on the 

The House voted 258-168 to ap- House floor on a resolution saying 
prove a procedural resolution to **“» restrictions on business tax 

allow House consideration of the — — ~7~ 

bill, the first step toward final ap- Congress moved to approve the 
provaL third emergency stopgap spend- 

Mr. Reagan considers tax reform ing MD m three months. Page 3. 

Lhe top item on his legislative agen- — 

da. preferences would not go into ef- 

Last week, only 14 House Re- feet until the beginning of 1987. 
publicans gave their assent in a Mr. Reagan's aides said he had 
similar procedural vote. This time, picked up 50 Republican votes, 
70 Republicans in the House joined enough to pass the tax bill before 


188 Democrats in siding with the Congress adjourns this week if 
president. Fifty-eight Democrats Democratic lawmakers remain sol- 
and 1 10 Republicans voted to let idly behind ibe president. 


tax overhaul die. 

The measure still faced more 


Lobbyists opposed to the bill 
worked feverishly all week to weak- 


rj. -imitative economist at the. Insti- 
- ",te for International Economics.' 

■ The economist, Stephen Mams, 


late.” He arid a hard l a nd i ng now forces. Officials also acknowledge 
seemed “more or less inevitable. ” that a struggle is beginning over 
The prospect of a dollar crisis how to measure the liT timat^ cos t- 
nrigbt be useful in Totting attempts effectiveness of space-based de- 


Monming the Victims of Canadian Crash 

President Ronald Reagan comforts the wife of a soldier killed in the crash of a DC-8 in 
Newfoundland ata service in Fort Campbell, Kentucky. Investigators are focusing attention on the 
possibility that a reversal of power in one engine caused the crash, in winch 256 people died. Page 3. 


votes Tuesday, including a Repub- en Democratic support, 
lican amendment to the bill and a Among the items Mr. Reagan 
final vote mi whether to pass the said he would insist on in anv tax 
bill itself and sotd it to the Senate, bill be signed, according to Repub- 
lic lopsided vote Tuesday indi- lican legislators, were a top individ- 
cated the bill might pass in the ual income tax rate no higher than 


House, but it did not guarantee it 
The House speaker, Thomas P. 
O’Neill Jr„ a Massachusetts Demo- 
crat, said in pleading for the tall: 


35 percent, a 52,000 personal ex- 
emption for all taxpayers, a maxi- 
mum capital grins lax rale no high- 
er than the current 20 percent and a 


“The American people have lost delay in the date at which tax p ref- 
confidence in the fairness and the erences would be eliminated. 


= .bfewd laKfetfr" Hf forecast that with the dollar, the yen, and the and his ridesOTone side and Paul a 1 m "rw 1 1 rv POi • i 

SSSKSasaaftSi Angry Shultz Tells Belgrade Official 

.. ; 450 bfflion m the value of their and West Germany’s Bundesbank. ™ 


integrity of our tax laws.” 

“In my 33 years in Congress,” he 


The Democrats* bill would place 
lhe top rate, now 50 percent, at 38 


added, “we have never come this percent; place the personal exerap- 


.. ; 450 billion m the value of then- and West Germany’s Bundesbank, 
collar investments, now wrath In Mr. Mairis's scenario, the dol- 

/txmt 5920 btUion. lar would phmge.in the next three 

jtisa A former director of research for years by 42 percent from the levels 
c Organization fra Economic Co- prevailing before Sept. 22, and by 
"‘"deration and Development in Par- 33 percent front early December. 


tV&Mr. Morns said that the difficol- The result would be a doubling of 
— ^s he foresees “need not happen” the rate of inflation and would lead 


and west Germany's Bundesbank, nth* in ^ent cong ressional testi- 
In Mr. Mams’s scenario, the dol- moiiy, Mr. Wdnberpr leveled a 
lar would plunge in the next three broadadeaarinst Mr. Nitze’s insis- 
years by 42 percent from the levels tentx thri defenses ahiinaidy be 
prevailing before SepL 22, and by judged in wnw of their cost and 
33 percent from early December, effectiveness against offenses. 


dose" to reform. 

The minority leader, Robert H. 


nan, now 51.080, at 51,500 for tax- 
payers who itemize their deduc- 


Given Mr. Reagan’s opposition 


Mr. Shultz changed the tone of Mr. Shultz’s remarks, which 
what had been a placid news con- came as he ended a visit to three 


..correct economic tx 
• ‘ ‘ Wd in lhe United 
'^d Western Europe. 
< He cited with app 
: ^.Mnpts by five leaai 


rfiaesarefiti- to higher interest rates and a severe 
States, Japan recession in the United States, Mr. 


ri the ai- 
indnstrial 


M^xis told reporters. fusetooontanplaten^otiatingre- daylhAt the hhacfanv of ti»e Adnlle ship, murdering it American, tor- 'Ui fighter planes later forced however, Mr. Mima aooss the street from the ChpitoL 

Z^*?*?™* S5SSS3£3S5tf?E eJesSsssto* ZOKZZZSL'SZZ 


to cranjaramse on SDI, of^aals state GerawP.Shnltz. pounding a « 
who work forhimcm^ge ma kind tab]c m ^ ^ -y^oslavii’s 
erf muted shadow-boxing. Most re- foreign pnbKdyOTTucs- '] 


By John M. G oshho Mr. Shultz changed the tone of 
Washington Pmi Semee what had been a pbdd news con- 

BELGRADE — Secrediy of fcrence filled lat^dy with refer- 
ate George P.Shnltz. pounding a Yugoslav- American 

Me in anger, told Yugoslavia’s friradship.by inteqeomg; 
reran minister pnbHdv cat Tues- '*TT* bgackmg of the Italian 


•11 • „ Michd of Einois, reminded fellow tions and 52,000 for those who do 

UTO IVlIllTlff Republicans of how many times nor. set a top capital gains lax rate 

O thqr had cranplained that they were at 22 percent, and end tax prefer- 

Mr. Shultz’s remarks, which not being allowed to ddrate an is- cnees six months before rate reduc- 


^Bm£^ti£ ap*sr5 . -T^one of those tim^espe- 
to nSS^tituriSfiSSM aiDywhen ^president ap- 

SerMr.AbbasTSpe^S 
hijacking last Octobw; unlrative afii^ he sad. 

SSfighter planes later forced _ However, Mr. Mk±ri has raid he 


c. tions would go into effect 

“This is one of those times, espe- Mr. Reagan appeared to have 
illy when our president has ap- switched the final few votes ata50- 
nkd” for a chance to keep the tax minute meeting with 160 Republi- 
iliative alive, he said. can lawmakers in a hearing room 

However, Mr. Michd has aid he across the street from the GapitoL 


(ContimedonPagelS.CoLI) ICoriuiti on PageS, CoL I) 


Jganda Signs 
^eace Pad 
i^ilh Rebels 

By Blaine Harden 

Washington Post Service 

' ."NAIROBI — After nearly four 
= -.onths of fighting in Uganda and 

- V-'gotiatmg in Kenya, the Ugandan 

rii tiny government signed a peace 
.V'roemmt here Tuesday with the 
' W National Resistance Army, 
^jwing the guerrilla groiqi equal 
. wer in running the country. 

_ — -The agreement caDs for an im- 
__^-sdifllc cease-fire and disarming 
co m batants in the civil war that 
oke out after a coup in July top- 
_xl the government of President 
riutou Qbotd. 

■ ~ 'It also calls fra the prosecution 

- all Ugandans guilty of past hu- 
’Ojytn lights violations, the release of 
^ - political prisoners and an even- 

u return to dvilian. rule. 

In the which preripitat- 

the near collapse of the Ugan- 
i tt ^a economy and plunged much of 
i 11 matiooinlo anarchy, the 10,000- 
— ^jb National Reaaance Army 
soundly defeated iU-disci- 
ned government troops in a se- 
i of battles and had taken oon- 
of a third of the country, 
^csda/s agreement testifies to the 
Ads' military strength. 


Laura cruise ship resulted in a ter- “rrag and noidmg a wnote Duncn an Egyptian jeiimer carrying me 
n^rict iniiptw that was “not justi- °* ot bcr Americans, is not justified four actual hijackers and Mr. Ab- 
toLby any canse thst J knowirf” by., any cause that I know of. bas inland in Italy. But. while the 
Mr.Shnhz’souibui^oraiiredal There's no oonnectioa with any Italian authorities arrested and 


ground it would damage the econo- mained adamantly apposed to Mr. 
my of has district, a position taken Reagan's position. 


by many erf las colleagues. 


The treasury secretary, James A. 


: •'■-•w.V' ,• 

+■ + • i 

< 5 











a j rant' news conference after the ca ““- 


minister, Raif Dizdarevic, said that roo nd i n g his 
Yugoslavia distinguished between ^ to a rising 
terrorism and “the struggle against ^ toe intern! 
colo nialism, aggression and must step up tc 
racism.” He «dd#yi' “when speak- deal With it uru 
ing of temaisn, rate must also view and deCninvely, 
die causes that lead to it.” ^ hide f 

Mr. Dizdarevic also said that toatkmaramn 
Yugoslavia regarded the Palestine . H® to® 1 .®™ 


Pounding his fist on the table, he 


charged the hijackers, they permit- 
ted Mr. Abbas, who had an Iraqi 


His Democratic counterpart, Jim Raker 3d, said Mr. Reagan had 
Wright of Texas, the majority lead- called Mr. O’Neill on Monday 


said in a firing voice: “It’s wrong, diplomatic passport, to leave Italy cr, also opposed the measure, night to say that he had pledges of 


and the international community aboard a Yugoslav airliner, 
must step up to tins proWemand Yugoslavia subsequently rtgect- 

’Wgftj'j! ed a u!s!requot^r his anest and 
and defimnvely. There must be no eawdWo! r i llld allowed him to 

Wh ° 1,0 - -pubHdzed.departure 

He then turned to Mr. Dizdare- “?R 


which would si g nific antly increase least 50 Republican votes. 


taxes on the oil industry. 

■ Reagan Visits Capitol H3I 

Earlier, Band £ Rosenbaum of 
The New York Tones reported: 

The turnaround came after Mr. 


At the start of the day. according 
to Republican leaders, there were 
38 such pledges. 

Democrats supported Mr. Rea- 
gan by a 3-to-l margin, and Mr. 
O’Neill said Monday of his party. 


L^^fSSionas^S the United States eleeuxi not to Ira "I brejw that weTl hold pretty 

feel the same way” Mcmday night and m^lean ex- niudt the^porition weNc_had . 


gitnnate representative of the Pal- 
estinian people” and said that his 
government had. nothing farther to 
say about its refusal to arrest Mo- 


HKYugMtav'icpMltatbU <“*» “ relations- moritany pmoMl wcl <o Re- 

government had condemned the Nfr- Shultz’s outburst also con- publican lawmakers. 

A chin* Lauro piracy. But he trusted to Us s e emin gly subdued Administration officials and Re- 

1 ! «■ I sttitnHp Hrlipf in flw» J mliMi 1v LI! i j 1. ' J i i i 


Republican leaders said the let- 
ter from the president outlining 
those conditions and promising to 


aav X LO 1UU4U iu fliiuat I *r * Tl*irT« W k ■ — - qiju — — , | |T nifV aw~ ■ ■■ ■ — 

hammed Abbas, the alleged mas- insisted that “the acts of individnal attitude earlier in the day when be publican leaders later said he had 3 ^ 


lermind of the hijacking in which Palestimans should 
an elderly American, Leon K li n g h - fused with the policy 
offer, was murdered. He added, “Obvit 

Immediately after his comment, agree rat this matter.' 


Palestinians should not be con- said that Mr. Abbas, following his won enough votes to assure] 
fused with the policy of the PLO.” departure from Yugoslavia, had of the tax legislation in the 
He added, “Obviously, we dis- been “welcomed" mlraq and that Lawmakers said Mr. 
agree on this matter ” (Crnitmnrd oa Page 7, CoL 1 ) • promised he would veto the 


m enough votes to assure passage *«“ ““ 10 ^ vote 

the tax legislation in the Hoax. swllcilcs - 

Lawmakers said Mr. Reagan Most Republicans continued to 


Reputed Mafia Leader 
Gunned Down in N. Y. 


By Robert D. McFadden 

New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK— Paul C. Castek 
lano, the reputed leader of the laxg- 


away, leaving behind a grisly tab- 
leau. ‘ 

The slaying was viewed by high- 
ranking law enforcement officials 


Yoweri Museveni, left, and Tito OkeCo m a king peace. 

ported the government after the four months by fight i n g, looting 
coup. and random murder. 

• An “observer monitor force” is 

Toe Na t iona l Resistance Army to come to Uganda to supervise the 
was guaranteed equal power in jmpletnen lation of the ag reement. 

fwmmanrlmfl fhd rvumhV c arnwd >n. _ ■ i 


The countries mentioned as con- 
tributing to dm force were Kenya, 


jj,«s military strength. commanding the country’s armed 7 ^ countries mentioned as con- 

rhe National Resistance Army f °^' ^ DCW ^ y ^ »bt rting to the force were Kenya, 

A have seven seats on the 20- 3.700 cur rent a rmy Tanzania, Britain and Canada, 

'mbo- Military Council, and the ?£' . ^ ccrr '~ firoD i $5 Presideni Daniel arap Mai of 

■rent government wffl have ei^it Natumal R e s i y n ee Amtyand ,400 Kenya, who chaired the lengthy 
is, including the chairmanshi p. 01621 from each erf the other three negotiations, hailed the 

"4 Bhemfla leader. Yoweri Muse- agreement in a fo rm al ri gm nz cere- 


est and most powerful American as the ami of a straggle for control 
crime organization, and an under- °f the Gambmo faction of org 2 - 
worid associate have been shot to nnxd crime in New York. Mr. Cas- 
dealh bv three assassins on a busy tellano reputedly led that faction, 
street on Manhattan’s East Side. “3l «rald fee the beginning of a 
As Mr. Castdlano and Iris asso- ®ob war,” said Edward Mc- 

date, Thomas BDotti, stepped out D<»aid, the head of the Organized 
trf a H mousing on 46th Street near Crime Strike Force of the U5. Jus- 
Third Avenue shortly before 5:30 tice Department m eastern New 
P.M. Monday, the police said, the York state, 
three men approached, drew send- Other law enforcement officials 
automatic weapons from under said that the death of the reputed 
their trenchcoats and opened fire. No. 2 leader of the Gambmo 



promised he would veto the tax bill oppose the president 

U.S. Congress Approves 
$6.3-BiIUon Arms Bonus 


By George G Wilson 

Washington Post Service 


Critics of what one called the 
“$6- billion honey pot" said the 


WASHINGTON — House and Pentagon would not be bound by 


Senate conferees have bolstered the 
Reagan administration's effort to 


the conference report language. 
They predicted the Defense De- 


save its rearmament progra m by partment would try use the money 
agreeing to a S6u3-biUion dividend to take the sting out of the bai- 
rn military funds that could offset anced -budget law, which requires 
the automatic cuts envisioned by an end to federal defeats by 1991. 


the new balanced-budget law. 

The action came as the confer- 
ence committee gave final approval 
Monday to a compromise $2825- 


Rsprescniative Les AuCoin, a 
Democrat of Oregon, said Monday 
that the moratorium on anti-satel- 
lite tests outweighed what House 


Pm! G Castellano billion defense budget in addition conferees lost on funding levels. 


' is, including the chairmanshi p, 
-i .gnemfla leader, Yoweri Muse- 
li, was wamari vice chairman of 
■coontiL 

’ (he other five seats will go to 
. tiler guerrilla factions that sup- 


Under the agreement, all aimed 
troops are to withdraw immediate- 
ly from Kampala, a city that has 
been heavily damaged in the past 


agreement in a formal signing cere- 
mony as the “dawning of a new era 
of peace in Uganda.” 

He said it offered the country a 

(Contained on Page 7, CoL 5), 


Mr/ Castellano and Mr. Bilot ti group, Aniell 
were each shot about six times in Have set the s 
the head and upper body and fell lano’s slaying. 


leader of the Gambmo United States, since the death of his 
Aniello DeUacroce, may brother-in-law, Carlo Gambmo, in 
: the stage for Mr. Castel-- 1 976. He acquired the leadership in 


DeUacroce died a bloodless contest with Mr. Della- ply these funds to the budget 


to the 565-billion bonus. * 

The dividend is left over from year, 1 
prior appropriations. The House of balar 
Representatives had wanted to ap- get-c 
plv these funds to the budget fra bring 


dead beside tijeopendoras of tbeir Dec. 2at the age of 71. He had been croce, who accepted the secondary the 1986 fiscal year, which be»m ThcSenat 
black Lincoln hroonsme. under treatment for cancer. position in the group, law enforce- Oct. 1, but the Senate prevailed in its effort to 


said, the gunmen fled on foot and headed the Gambino group, the 
jumped into a waiting car chat sped largest criminal organization in the 


Mr. Castellano was said to have mem officials say. 

aded the Gambino group, the Federal prosecutors and agents 

rgest criminal organization in the (Continued on Page 7, CoL 1) 


oreign Demand for Babies Spurs Kidnappings in El Salvador 


By Marlise Simons 

New York Timet Service 

AN SALVADOR — A stranger snatched a baby 


“We plan to it harder to adopt,” said Carmen According to David Keane Leavitt, an adoption 
Partiti on* , the deputy interior minister. “We are not lawyer in Beveriy Hals, California, there is no U.S. 


against adoption. It can do a lot of 


After the shooting, witnesses Mr. Castellano was said to have mem officials say. malting it an addition to the tornl. 

lid, the gnnmen fled on foot and headed the Gambino group, the Federal prosecutors and agents The overall figure, including 
raped into a waiting car that sped largest criminal organization in the f Combined on Hue 7, CoL 1) funds fra nuclear warheads and 

; ; * military construction contained m 

separate legislation, comes to just 

rs Kidnappings in El Salvador 

X X O dent Ronald Reagan had sought to 

keep his defense program at last 

According to David Keane Leavitt, an adoption gun had ordered them to hand over their toddlers. One year’s level plus increases fra infla- 
pryer in Beveriy Hills, California, there is no U.S. sister ran off screaming and the man fled, they said. non. 


“Those are redeemable next 
year,” he said, predicting that the 
balanced-budget bill and the bud- 
get-cutting mood in Congress will 
bring the totals back down. 

The Senate also gained ground in 
its effort to clear the way for the 
resumption of nerve-gas produc- 
tion, banned for 16 years. 


’ na woman’s arms lie other day. She had just come going on js terrible. We don’t want children used for 

“**• If- so ,o ft. United wh ? 
shJX m^iurehed toward her. the demand for adoption appears greatest and parents 


.. amg the street, a man lurched toward her. 

:_Tk woman screamed, but iheJtidnapper got away. 
■ officials at a family court, who told the story, said 


the demand for adoption appears greatest ana parents 
are willing to pay the highest legal fees. Several hun- 
dred babies also arc sent to Canada and Europe evexy 


ye whiiethere are reputable lawyers mvpivedin adop- 


lawyer in Beveriy Hills, California, mere is no U.S. aster ran off screaming and the man fled, they said. non. 
xL But what’s federal law that requires those who want to adopt to , , , The House of Representatives 

dren used for ascertain the. legality of lhe placement. The lax bureaucracy of B Salvador, its civil war and had voted to limit the Pentagon to 

... vast poverty have made the counay one of the mam $292 Wffion fra fiscal 1986, while 

However, if . anyone, whether art agent or adopting Juairkets fra foreign adoptions in this hemisphere. The the Senate had approved S302 bil- 
paimt, knowingly accepts a child under fraudulent D.S. consulate in San Salvador reports that it handles lion. 

a rcuuBtances, by falsifying the immigration docu- ntrae visas for adopted children than any other post During the intense bargaining 
merits or tying to the imm igration authorities, that except in South Korea and Colombia. The flow has behind closed doors, participants 
would violate United States immigration laws. almost doubled since 1982 and is expected to reach said, the House’s major victory was 


about 400 this year. 


* entd non wore, omera nave uunsu u uuv a whuvc uusi- 

uSSw officials said, was part of what the ness, foreign diploma and Salvadoran officials said, 
sr of justice, Julio Samayoa, recently called the Th ey sai d a numb erof la wyers had tiimr 

Kind alanni^Suie to children in 0 own Erromirement n«wm*s that mdmied j^aby 

scouts who persuaded destitute mothers to gpe up 
«hfa.h h« hnrfiteA n.«nr omhafts and tfieir babies, caretakers who ran makeshift nurseries 


^ r to ban additional testing of anti- 

ti'ot work, others haVe turned if into a lucrative bust- The police and other officials dedinedto provide y th-issu-of aHootion also reflects the custons of .weapons unless Moscow 

n^c fiwnni rimlomais and Salvadoran officials said, details about die same the kidnappings m El ‘ « issue oi adopnon also reiieos me customs oi bRaks |B 3 ^^,^ ^ such 


1 1 j(ister of justice, Julio Samayca, recently called the 
jtjrmdalous and alarming” trade to children in El 
W -ador. 

dontinn. which has benefited many orphans and 


-doption. winch has benefited many 
ndooed children to the troubled Sal 1 


ran sod- and people who arranged fra false documents. 


,/ now has begun to haunt the country. By The hundreds of adoptions here annually yield, by 

. wm, the huge foreign demand for children has led estimates, more than SI nriHion ay ear, largely in 
•' only to profiteering and fraud but also to falsifies- exorbitant agent and lawyer fees. 

. of documents and kidnappings. While baby procurement has existed hoe for several 

' he government has ordered an investigation and years, kidnappings reportedly have increased in recait 
it intends to tighten the rules. months and caused widespread alarm. 


details about the scope' of toe kidnappings in El „ breaks its moratorium on such 

Salvador. “The idea is to avoid panic.” said an official Jalva<1 raan society. tests. 

of a state welfare agency. “I know of at least 10 cases “More than 70 percent of mothers here are not The Senate’s big victory was to 
this year, only in the capital," married," a diplomat said. “Men take the values of raise toe amount of money avaii- 

„ , „ , parenthood liehthr. It's common to have children with able to the Pentagon. 

J? .SSlSSiSStt! SJlTfJS morathan one woman bnt «**“ ^ amaai ° rvm The conference report wfll in- 

do^s_pora rMi^tbrahoods. In Zarannl, a man pttote not look after them.” struct the Pentaaon touse most of 


housing complex on ahillade north of toe dty, women , ^ 

talked angrih^about ihelMk of polke protection and Speaking of the many unwanted pregnancies, a we w J Dtrnon to miiiiary 

said theywere keeping their chihheu indoors. supervisor at a maternity hospital said that “poor ®J e< ? ed i? ^ 

saw L«y wscxwpuis mwuiuiu^ wom® and even prostitutes often don’t use birth ^ 54 KRion, during fiscal 

Two sistos, who said they were too nervous to give control,” and there still is a strong taboo about 1986. The usual practice is 10 sub- 
iheir nama^ re-enacted for a , visi tor how a man with a abortion, nht a supplmental budget requesL 


able to the Pentagon. 

The conference report will in- 
struct the Pentagon to use most of 
the $65 bOKon to finance mfiiiary 


1986. The usual practice is to sub- 
mit a supplemental budget request. 


INSIDE 

■ South African and Zimbab- 

wean military officials dis- 
cussed security foQowinga land 
mine attack. Page L 

■ Ethiopia is trying to develop 
its rural regions through mass 
relocations of fanners. Page 1 

■ Syria threatened to deal Isra- 
el a “painful How” if it attacks 
anti-aircraft missies on Syria’s 
border with Lebanon. Page 2. 

■ EC foreign ministers ap- 

proved changes to toe Treaty of 
Rome. Page 7. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ Deutsche Bank AG said it 

would offer 3.4 million shares 
in Daimler-Benz. Page 15. 

■ The European Community 

ac cused the United States of 
erecting a wide range of barriers 
to free trade. Pagets. 






/ 


Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 18, 1985 



Page 3 






EVTEHlVATIOjVAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER IS, 1985 


$ 


AMERICAN TOPICS 


Uneag/Proeperity 
At CM’S Saturn Site 

Tot Sale" agns have 

2P ***7*8**® “ 

^iOV TWnesree, : cojrm 

l,100 r siiice General Motors an- 
notmced five months ago. Out 
ic ff . £ the Sattirasubcompactautamo- 
bfle plant woaW bebtrih thereat 
a cofl rfSJJ billkm — the big*. 
gestnuJustrialmvesanentby 
American boamess at a sh ^ 
time and place m history. Tjtvf 
values . are footing sky-high. 
Out-of-town speculators were so 
numerous for a while that they 
had to wear arm band* to keep 
from trying to sell to each othra, 
the Los Angdes Times : 

Officials of the town. 


% 

.jyv 

•«r4s fei 




about 30 miles (48 IcQometen) 
. a p r -V? south of Nashvflk, and. ofsur- 
roundingMaicy County art rao 
x5? mg to prepare a comprehensive 
growth plan to prevent Spring 
Hill from taking on the “honky- 
* ^s - toa ^ M * ook Of strip; 

"• -^' v that have sprouted in other 
boom towns. 

The plant wiH hire 6,000 work- 
ers and is expected to generate at 
least 10^000 addmonaTjobs. Un- 
der an agreement with the Unit- 
;,«d Auto Workers, half the Rant's 
T-1 w i jA eonwH beTmkm manbens, 
Jargdy from the North. 

ButBobby Williams, pastor of 
the local Church of .Christ, told 
his congregation not to worry: A 
fanner readout who had been a 
UAW member had reassured 
him f< lhat many of the people 
who wantlo come downhere are 
traiupknfed Southazurs who’ll 
want to: come bade down here. 
And .some of them - are Ghris- 
riang ".; '. 


Short Takes - 

Tffratyyeara nt, die Nation- 
81 Araocialiba erf Diaper Services 
had- .200- member companies 
renting- doth diapers; now it is 
down to HO. Disposable dimers 
have cornered- 70 percent or the 
S3-5 . bfflkjn-a-year diaper mar- 
ket Bat doth (Uen are making 
their way back. ’They’re softer 
on the skin,” said Anus Agnew, 
mother of Christopher, 2, “and 
the disposable ones aren’t biode- 
gradable.” Indeed, The New 
York Times says the plastic Hner 
of a disposable diaper takes 250 
r; r ^ yeais to decompose. 

Thennroamed spacecraft Pio- 
\fj neer 6, lannched 20 years ago 
Monday, was built to last six 


tel* 

hab^ 


hat 



ROBOT ON THE BEAT — PM Nolan, a New Yoric 
poficeman, lost tus nightstick to a pint-sized Omnirobot 
2000 from Daily Planet, a specialty outer-space store. 


months, but it is still working. 
Following the approx im ate orbit 
erf the Earth, bat on the other 
side of the sun, it continues to 
send data about solar phenome- 
na. Nobody listens; in functions 
have long since beat usurped by 
newer instruments- But in a sen- 
timental gesture, the National 
Aeronautics and Space Adminis- 
tration planned to tune in the dd. 
workhorse for a few nmmies this 
week. 

The day tint Bo Jackson, a 
black, athkxe at Auburn Univer- 
sity at Montgomery, Alabama, 
won the Heisman Trophy as the 
best college football player of the 
year, U.W. demon, a federal 
district judge in la- 

beled Auburn the most segrega- 
tionist campus in the state and 
gave Governor George C Wal- 
lace until nxkJ-Febniary to devise 
a plan to remove remnants of 
segregation from Alabama uni- 
versities. Except for things like 
the “presence of black athletes,” 


Judge demon wrote earlier tins 
month, “Auburn’s racial atti- 
tudes have <*»»nawt little 
the ’50s.” 

Mayor Bob PoweS of Monroe, 
Louisiana, and Police Chief Wit- 
he Buffington gave a diri«niM« 
present to the entire city: Park- 
ing meters will spend the holiday 
season covered with bags tied 
with ribbons. 

President Ronald Reagan, 
speaking in Seattle the other day, 
got off another of his one-liners; 
Tluae are still some drohards,” 
he said, “Who refuse to acknowl- 
edge that the chany* we’ve 
made have hwt anything to do 
with America’s dramatic prog- 
ress in these last few years. They 
sort of remind me of the fellow 
wbo was asked which was worse, 
ignorance or apathy, and he said, 
T don’t know, and I don’t care.’ ” 

. — Compiled by 
ARTHUR HIGBEE 


DC-8 Crash Inquiry Focuses 
On Power Reversal in Engine 



By Richard Widrin 

N ew Jerk Tima Semite 
NEW YORK — Investigators 
are focusing increasing attention 

on the possibility that thftirragh nf a 

chartered «irinier in Newfound- 
land last week was caused by a 
reversal of power in one of its en- 
gines. 

This would be consistent with 
the sadden veering and speed loss 
that Ganadtaw official* said the 
plane had experienced just before it 
to the ground. Bat other 
causes of the crash last 
ty are being investigated. 
Canadian investigators aid that 
the Arrow Air DC-8 had readied a 
speed sufficient for a proper take- 
off before it decelerated and 
crashed. 

According to officials dose to 
the inquiry, an examination of the 
wreckage showed that the right 
outboard engine’s thrust revexser, 
wirich hdps to skw a plane on 
landing, was in the deployed posi- 
tion- The reversers cm the jet’s three 
other engines were properly 
stowed, the officials said 

- The plane's nose took an abrupt 
20-degree turn to the right and the 
plaocYspeed dropped rapidly from 
the peak figure of 190 miles per 
hour (305 kilometers per hour). The 
heading and speed figures were ob- 
tained by the Canadian authorities 
from the dau recorder retrieved 
from the plane. 

The sources cautioned against 
drawing premature conclusions 
from the discovery of the deployed 
thrust revenka-. They noted that the 
impact of a crash had deployed the 
mechanism in previous modems. 
They said the damaged parts would 
have to be examined carefully to 

wfi^thw ilv» A^ lu ynw); 

took place before car after the crash. 

The Arrow Air jetliner faltered 
on takeoff from Gander, New- 
foundland, sminliwt into a 
rocky WTTwU last Thursday. AO 
236 people on boiid were kuled. 

Other possible reasons for the 
disaster that are being 
mriiwfe conv entional M pm fut- 
ure; icing of die heavily loaded 
plane’s wings, which had not been 
de-iced in me twinrinw g refueling 
stop at Gander; intrusion into the 

ai ref renin nf sn me nurinnim Oth- 
er than a thrust reverscr, Jess- 
ihan-aptimnm flying techniques by 
the crew. 

Some safety experts suggested 
that several of these factors aright 
have come into play. 

Ken Johnson, director of the Ca- 
nadian Aviation Safety Board, was 




H.S. Congress, Stuck on Budget, Moves Delta Pilots 

Are Safest, 
Paper Says 



By David Espo 

The Associated Pro* 


/ 7 WASHINGTON — The U.S. 
'“ingress, straggling through a 
~ ' r TCket of year-end legislation, ap- 
1 oved Tuesday yet another short- 

- - - : -m spending bffl needed to keep 

my federal agencies in operation 
d prevent disruption of govem- 
^ ^ent seraices. 

'Truly the system has broken 
■- '"‘--■wn.” said the Reagan adnrinis- 
•r-ition’s budget director, James G 
: filler 3d He spoke after the 
: - 3usc of Representatives passed 
third emergency stopgap spend- 
bill since late September, and 

- second in less than a week, and 

it to the -Senate. 

Bat lawmakers said there was 
-‘r®ty of blame to go around. Pri- 
• jely, they faulted administration. 
-- idals for failing to push for pas- 
te of a long-term. S37(Tb£rtion 
siding ML The Ml, which in- 
ded a large rise in defense 
finding, was defeated overwhelm- 
' -Jy late Monday in the House. 

Ibe long-running drama over 
:.v spading Ml resumed while the 
. jz use voted 238-168 to revive tax- 
.. .. xhaul kgjdaikm, winch Prea- 
„ - - U Rtmsld Reagan bas called the 
' item on his second- term do- 

- , Stic agenda. 

Pith Congress already well be- 
id its ori^nal adjournment tar- 

- legisiators expressed fnistra- 
- i over the length of the session. 

ould any of yon tike to be with 
r families?" asked the House 
^--''Mblican whip, Trent Lott of 




The new target date for adjourn- 
ment appeared to be Wednesday or 
Thursday. Members of the two 
houses hope by then to have ap- 
proved a 552-bffiioa farm ML a 
«wTipaninn measure to bail out the 
Farm Credit System, and a mea- 
sure to cat federal spending by as 
ranch as $80 billion over three 
years. 

The spending Ml that was de- 
feated Monday would have provid- 
ed funding for the rest of fiscal 
1986 for the departments of De- 
fense, Agriculture. Transportation, 
the Interior and Treasury, as well 
as the General Services Adminis- 
tration, the Office of Personnel 
Management, the White House and 
a few other agencies that had not 
received their regular appropria- 
tions for the year. The fiscal year 
began Oct 1. 

The legislation was needed be- 
cause Congress has passed only six 
of the 13 regular appro pri ations 
bills. 

Despite the lapse in spending au- 
thority for many agencies, officials 
ordered no immediate shutdown of 
services. 

The chief White House spokes- 
man, Larry Speakes, said that if no 
interim bill were passed by 
Wednesday, nonessential federal 
workers would be told not to report 
to work. 

House members, meanwhile, 
said several factors ware responsi- 
ble for the rejection of the long- 
term spending Ml by a 235M70 
vote: Liberal Democrats were an- 
gry over a large increase in military 
spending in a time of fiscal auster- 


ity, Republicans were concerned 
about a provision that coold lead to 
a congressional pay raise in 1987; 
and admmistratkiQ officials, preoc- 
cupied with the tax fight, had not 
-indicated a firm position on the 
measure to Republican lawmakers. 

The ad ministr ation “had it right 
on the one-yard line and they fum- 
bled,” said Representative Silvio O. 
Conte of Massachusetts, the top 
Republican on the House Appro- 
priations Committee. Republicans 
voted 119-35 against the ML 

Other irritants in the huge bill 
included a provision to cm off fed- 
eral highway aid to states that did 
not raise the legal drinking age to 
21. That affected Vermont, Wis- 
consin and T jwiciima- the vote in 
those three delegations combined 
was 13-3 against die measure. 

*Tm going to recommend that 
we adjust these things,” said Repre- 
sentative Jamie L. Whitten, Demo- 
crat of Mississippi, chairman of the 
House Appropriations Committee. 

In another matter, the House ap- 
proved legislation p erm ittin g tne 
former White House chief of staff, 
Hamilton Jordan, to seek reim- 
bursement of 566^53 in legal fees 
incurred during a 1979 investiga- 
tion of allegations that be pos- 
sessed cocaine. Mr. Jordan was 
cleared of wrongdoing in the case. 

The Senate spent the room ing 
Tuesday deba ting a variety of pres- 
idential appointments, con firmi ng 
former Senator Janies L. Buckley, a 
New York Republican, as a federal 
judge by an 84-1 1 vote, and Anno 
Graham by voice vote to the Con- 
sumer Product Safety Commisshm. 


The Associated Pros 
DALLAS — Pilots for Conti- 
nental Airlines are cited for violat- 
ing federal regulations more than 
those at any other airime, and Del- 
ta Air Lines’ pilots have the lowest 
citation rate; the Dallas Times Her- 
ald reported Tuesday . 

The newspaper said that based 
on comparisons of 1,132 federal 
pilot citations issued since 1980 

and the n nml ^ of flight* of tfrii 
major mime, pilots at Continental, 
Midway and American ranked 
first, second and third for the high- 
est rate erf violations. 

Pilots at TWA, USAir, Frontier 
and Pan American also were died 
more often than the average of the 
17 airimes used for comp arisen, the 
newspaper said. Delta was fol- 
lowed by Ozark and Republic in 
the lowest citation rate, and those 

airlinws emphariye the im portance 

of fed sal safety regulations more 
than the others, said John Gah- 

S ult, president of the Aviation 
fety Institute. 

Officials at the airimes whose 
pilots were cited most blame a lack 
of uniformity in the way violations 
are reported to and investigated by 
the Federal Aviation Administra- 
tion. 

According to the newspaper, d- 
tatioiis were i ssued to the 17 air- 
lines it studied at an average rate of 
one every 31,956 flights. 

At Delta, pilots averaged one ci- 
tation every 57,490 flights, while 
Continental averaged one citation 
.every 15,600 flights. 


prof 

reposed Ban on Space Tests Assailed 

I n New York Times Serriex 


WASHINGTON — The White 
3$e and the Defense Depart- 
u have sharply criticized a 
ding congressional proposal to 
fur ther testing of anti -satellite 
pons, saying a ban would said 
wrtmg signal to Moscow. 
-Pentagon spokesman charged 
iday that the proposed ban 
M give the Soviet-Union “tife- 
e&th veto power over a vital 
■ defense program.’* 
e said the ban would undercat 
I control negotiations, 


. - »al security and waste about 
; snilhofl already spent to launch 


two satellites that were intended to 
serve as targets for tests of the anti- 
satellite weapon. 

The proposed ban on such tests 
was approved late Friday by House 
and Senate negotiators as part of a 
catchall spending Mi for fiscal 
1986. House-Senate conferees for- 
to it on Monday, 
chief White House spokes- 
man, Larry Speakes, said the ' ad- 
ministration- had not accepted the 
language imposing the ban. Bat ad- 
ministration officials stopped shot 
of saying that President Ronald 
Reagan would veto the spending 
bilL 



pippipii 

. ■ ' ; *’ r i V . 

* '• 

i colon 

AUBERCY 

Cher 40 years 
of traditional 
perfection 


FINLANDIA V 



FINLANDIA ON ICE 


quoted by Reuters as saying that 
sabotage and fuel contamination 
had both been ruled out as causes. 

Thrust reversers are clamshell- 
shaped devices that are extended 
outward from the rear of a jet en- 
gine when a plane touches down an 
landing. They bdp slow down a 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

plane by turning the jet exhaust 
sharply forward so that it exerts 
force in the opposite direction from 
that used to propel a plane for- 
ward. 

To activate the rever ser s on a 
DC-8, a pilot must first pull back 
the throttle for a particular ef i gnw 
and then pull back another throt- 
tle-hke lever attached to the revere' 
er. It was not immediately dear to 
investigators how a reverscr could 
be deployed by accident in the air. 

When the plane’s sharp veering 
was first disclosed by officials in- 
vestigating the crash, an immediate 
theory pox forth by aviation experts 
was tint engine power had been 
lost on the right side. But at (he 

speed the plane was known to have 
attained before it was suddenly 
slowed, the crew normally should 
have been able to continue flying 
safely with just three of its four 
engines operating properly. 

But what if both right engines 
had failed? 

The issue became increasingly 
clouded as industry officials dis- 
closed thj>t examination showed 
that all four tigfrwt appeared to 
have been producing high power at 
the time of impact. That determi- 
nation can be made visually, ac- 
cording to experts. 

An en gin e that was producing 
high power will shred compr essor 
and turbine Wad«e as the plane 
crashes. The process is brown as 
“com cobbing” because the com- 
presses' and turbine dixs to which 
the blades were attached are remi- 
niscent of a cob from which the 
kernels have been detached. 

Some experts continued to sug- 
that failure to de-ice the jet- 
at Gander might have contrib- 


uted to the crash, while others 
masted that the snowfall while the 
plane was on the ground would not 
have signi fi cantly affected its take- 
off. 

Icing of a wing can dangerously 
increase weight and can dimmish a 
wing’s lifting ability by distorting 
the aerodynamic Dow erf air over its 
surface. 

Suspicions of a power loss in one 
of the engines were reinforced tty 

reports £r«n industry officials that 

the right inboard engine of the Ar- 
row Air plane had been having re- 
cent problems. One source quoted 
Federal Aviation Administration 
officials as saying that die *»ngm* 
had been using excessive amounts 
ofofl. 

StiS, lOSS Of a *tmgtg mgr mp 
should not, by itself, have precipi- 
tated a crash. The plane had at- 
tained a speed that was sufficient 
for continued acceleration and safe 
flight with only three engines oper- 
ating. 

The type of engine involved, the 
Pratt A Whitney JT3D, was a dif- 
ferent model from the one that 
malfunctioned in different ways, 
figuring in two fatal accidents last 
CTimner in Manchester, Fn gtwnd, 
and MBwaukee, Wisconsin. 


Colombian Rebels Kill 
Civilian, 2 Policemen 

United Press International 

BOGOTA — Leftist rebels have 
attacked a town popular with tour- 
ists, killing two policemen and a 
civilian. The authorities said that 
other guerrillas hijacked two planes 
and used them to drop propaganda 
leaflets. 

A miliiary source said the rebels 
battled the police Monday in the 
plaza of San Agustin, 250 miles 
(400 kilometers) southwest of Bo- 
gota. In to the three 

deaths, seven civilians were wound- 
ed, the source said. Military offi- 
cials said other guerrillas hijacked 
two light planes Sunday and used 
them to drop leaflets before freeing 
the pilots and releasing the planes. 


Congress Backs Micronesum Self-Rule 


New York Tbna Service 

WASHINGTON -—After nearly 
16 years of complicated negotia- 
tions, Congress has approved legis- 
lation that would end U.S. steward- 
ship of the Mkronesian glan ds in 
the Pacific Ocean. 

A Compact of Free Association 
recognizes the islands’ right to self- 
government, bm at the same time 
retains vital UJS. military interests 
in the area. 

President Ronald Reagan is ex- 


pected to sign the co mp act into law 
this week, probably Friday, at a 
ceremony attended by representa- 
tives of the Federated States of Mi- 
cronesia and the Republic of the 
Marshall Islands 
Although the legislation is not as 
comprehensive as leaders of the is- 
lands had sought, key members of 
Congress and administration offi- 
cials said they were hopeful the 
it would be enaazsed by 
islands’ governments. 


& ■ 



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in IB oral geld, 
wanr-mnont. 
with extra- Gat 
quartz mownwiL 
Instant time-zone change, til 


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PARIS 10, place Vendomc 1. bd de la Madeleine 
70, fg Saint-Honore Palais des Congres. Porte Maillot 
CANNES: 1 9, La Croisette 



Shrine of Shah Rukn-e-Aiam, Multan— 11th century A.D. 


On Pakistan International, you’ll find that 
behind the environment of peace and tranquillity 
is a culture influenced by the sage and scholarly. 



- • \i,* ; xV*. 

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9 







Page 4 


Heralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



Sri bunt 


PtabUshed With The New York Tinn sad The Wwiifegtioa Port 


Time to Shift Into Gear 


The prices of raw materials —rubber, cop- 
per, sugar — are in a worldwide nosedive. It is 
the 1970s in reverse. OPEC can't hold the line 
against dec lining oil prices. The international 
cartel that guarded the price of tin collapsed in 
a flurry of uncollectible IOUs in October. It is 
hard not to cackle over chickens coming home 
to roost, but commodity deflation is a mixed 
blessing. The gains for the industrialized im- 
porters are mirrored by the losses of exporters, 
many of them very poor and deeply in debt to 
Western banks. Decency and self-interest re- 
quire something better than gloating. 

An array of raw materials that cost $100 in 
1 980 now costs only 574 JO. Even after adjust- 
ing for the distortions created by a strong 
dollar, the purchasing power of most commod- 
ity exporters has plummeted. According to 
The Economist, the decline in one year saved 
the industrialized economies $65 billion. Part 
of that is at the expense of wealthy oil produc- 
ers, but oil prices have fallen less than those of 
most metals and farm products. The big losers 
include Bolivia, Ghana and the Philippines. 

One direct consequence is a shorter fuse 
on the debt bomb. Interest rates have declined 
by a third in the last three years, but declining 
commodity prices have offset the debtors' 
gain. Some debtors, including Peru, Chile, Ivo- 
ry Coast and Morocco, owe more of their 
export earnings for debt service than in 1982. 
Their living standards are declining. Worse, 
they must reduce imports of capital equip- 
ment, losing the growth route out of debt. 

If low commodity prices are the problem, 
why not just raise than? In theory both pro- 
ducers and consumers could benefit from 
“buffer stock" agreements that soak up com- 


modity surpluses when prices are low and that 
relieve shortages when prices are high. Hie 
Carter administration was inclined to cooper- 
ate in their creation. Even market-oriented 
Reaganites have quietly blessed a buffer stock 
agreement in coffee. But it is rarely possible to 
satisfy both buyers and sellers for very long; 
these agreements usually fall apart 

Treasury Secretary James Baker suggests 
that the quickest remedy is to reopen the loan 
windows of Western banks. That makes sense 
for debtors like Brazil and Argentina, winch 
could use (be extra capital productively. But 
loading more debt onto overburdened econo- 
mies is a palliative at best More effective relief 
requires more demand for Thud World com- 
modities, and lower interest rates. 

The Federal Reserve could serve those ob- 
jectives by tiberalizmg credit. But relying only 
on U.S. monetary poGcy would risk re-igniting 
inflation. The more prudent path would be for 
the advanced nations to coordinate economic 
policies. America’s contribution would have to 
be to reduce its budget deficit markedly, easing 
the U.S. government’s demand for private cap- 
ital and letting interest rates falL Japan and 
Western Europe would have to reduce taxes or 

increaM government sp ending , a rimnlBring im- 
ports of raw materials from the Third World. 

The industrial countries agreed in principle 
to this division of responsibility last fall, but 
their good intentions have not been translated 
into policy. That is understandable; the Japa- 
nese Diet is as reluctant to increase sp ending 
as the U.S. Congress has been to reduce h. But 
with half the world’s economy idling in neu- 
tral the inaction by all is indefensible. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Company Not to Keep 


The Reagan a dminis tration's Central Amer- 
ican counterterrorism bill repackages a dubi- 
ous idea derived from a flawed premise. It 
would earmark $54 million Tor hardware and 
training for police in El Salvador, Guatemala, 
Honduras, Panama and Costa Rica. The hope 
is to turn bad cops into good cops under the 
tutelage of Uncle Sam. Undeniably, Central 
America's police, underpaid and often over- 
zealous, could benefit from better training. 
Most of the money would be spent in El 
Salvador, where the police face a resurgence of 
urban terrorism. But it is naive to assume that 
training alone can “professionalize” police in 
societies in which civilian authority is feeble, 
as in El Salvador, or nonexistent, as in Guate- 
mala. The risk of involving the United Stales 
with police forces capable of torture or other 
atrocities far outweighs any benefit 
The risk is real In* Uruguay in the 1970s, 
U.S.-trained policemen tortured leftist sus- 
pects, and guerrillas executed a U.S. adviser 
accused of complicity. In El Salvador last 
June, a U.S.-trained military police team used 
excessive force to end a hospital strike. The 


attackers killed a patient and four police 
guards whom they failed to recognize. 

No U JL training can overcome a failure of 
local authorities to control the police. “Dis- 
appearances" and torture were common dur- 
ing the Argentine military’s dirty war against 
terrorism, but police behavior improved dra- 
matically when an elected president took over 
in 1983. No special training was required. By 
contrast, S Salvador’s weO-meaning but weak 
government deals as a supplicant with security 
forces it only nominally controls. It is not 

police manuals that need changing SO nrnrh as 

attitudes — as happened when President Rea- 
gan finally made dear that if death-squad 
killing s did not cease, U.S. aid would. 

In 1974, after the ugly business in Uruguay, 
Congress barred further aid for training for- 
eign police. Already circumvented in El Salva- 
dor, tiie restriction was lifted this year. Now, in 
the name of combating terrorism, the adminis- 
tration wants to revive police t raining in a 
whole region. Unless it can make a better case 
for the operation. Congress ought to demnr. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


A Hard Choice for Zimbabwe 

The deaths of six white South Africans, four 
of than children, near- the Republic’s border 
with Zimbabwe comes after a succession of 
less horrible bomb incidents in that area. Al- 
though the Zimbabwean government denies 
that it is offering sanctuary to African Nation- 
al Congress gueirdlas, it seems to be tolerating 
their presence. If the government does not 
really wish to act as a land of host to ANC 
guerillas it had better quickly get rid of them 
if it can. The South Africans are notoriously 
impatient in these matters and it may not even 
need one more incident of this sort for them to 
go into Zimbabwe in a spirit of retribution. 

— The Daily Telegraph ( London J. 

Babies, 'Dallas’ and Democracy 

Does population — its levels, its direction — 
influence cultural potency? Of course it does. 
Population ... influences power, economics 
and politics, and these factors dearly interlink 
with culture and values. Weak nations tend to 
emulate strong ones. Wealthy nations export 
goods and services that indirectly transmit 
values and culture. Why do American movies 
and television programs dominate the global 
market? Why don’t Dutch movies and televi- 
sion programs dominate the global market? 
There is an economy of scale in many aspects 
of culture just as then: is in military weaponry. 

Nations populous and wealthy enough to 
build aircraft carriers can amortize the cost of 
a multitude of situation comedies, high-budget 
movies and traveling art exhibits. These prod- 
ucts, already profitable or near break-even in a 


large domestic market, can be sold overseas at 
relatively Low incremental cost. And when 
“Dallas" is on every week in Algeria, on bal- 
ance the West (believe it or not) benefits. 

Democratic values are contagious. They 
have spread remarkably in the last two centu- 
ries. The democratic infection needs camera. 
Who are the carriers? In recent centuries the 
United States, France, Britain and others. If 
these camera are weakened in the relative 
scheme of things — by diminished demo- 
graphic strength and its outward ripples — is it 
possible that the spread of democratic values 
may be slowed? Or stopped? Or reversed? 

— Excerpted by The Washington Past 
from a paper presented by Ben J. Wattenberg 
and Karl Zaumeister at an American 
Enterprise Institute seminar this month. 

A Peaceful Night for a Change 

If someone has been gouging yon on the 
head with a hammer for 30 years, do you miss 
it when it stops? After a week of watching 
British television, I didn’t yearn at all far the 
shriek and the frenzy of American television. 

British television isn’t always grabbing you 
by the collar and shouting “Wadi me, watch 
me, watch me." It doesn’t overflow with pro- 
mos harangues and clamorous importun- 
mgs. Often, indeed, it defies you to stay tuned. 

The BBC has lost dignity and viewers, but it 
minds its manners. An announcer said, “This 
is as far as we come on BBC-1" and wished all 
us viewers “a very peaceful night” He didn’t 
insist that we tune in again in the morning. 
From his lone of voice, he didn’t care if we did. 

— Tom Shales in The Washington Post. 


FROM OUR DEC 18 PACES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: For a Neutral Panama Canal 
PARIS — It is curious dial at the very moment 
when President Taft is proposing an inter- 
national conference to bring about a limitation 
of armament be should favor the fortification 
of the Panama Canal which will render a vast 
increase of America's armament Friends of 
peace should demand not the fortification of 
the canal but the declaration of its neutrality 
under the guarantee ol all the Powers. Such a 
declaration would place the canal zone outride 
the range of a posable war. Neutralization 
under the guarantee of the United States, 
France, Great Britain, Italy, Germany. Russia, 
Austria, China and Japan would be a more 
efficacious protection of its existence than any 
fortifications military genius could devise. 


1935: Japan Stokes Chinese Anger 
TIENTSIN — A new wave of Chinese nation- 
alism is growing out of the increase of anti- 
Japanese sentiment. Chiang Kai-shek’s prom- 
ise to the nation that “ China will not yield an 
inch to any power seeking to destroy her liber- 
ty" and parades of students and laborers pro-' 
testing Japanese influence are manif es tations 
of the opposition. Observers do not see any 
indication that the North Qiina situation win 
become calmer in the near future. It is believed 
that Japanese penetration will continue until 
they have control of the five North China 
provinces and their 95,000^)00 inhabitants. 
Meanwhile, a bomb was hurled [on Dec. 17] at 
the residence of General Tada, common der-in- 
chief of the Japanese faces in North China 


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© 1985, International Herald Tribune. AB rights reserved. 



WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 18, 1985 


A Plague That Washington Encouraged 


N EW YORK —The conviction of five Ar- 
gentine mili tary commanders for waging a 
“dirty war 71 against their own people is an en- 
couraging precedent for democracy in Latin 
America. Bin democrats elsewhere in the hemi- 
sphere, especially in Central America, who have 
endured similar reigns oftenor still find hopes of 
human rights trials elusive. Not the least ot then- 
burdens is the legacy of Reagan policy. 

The Argentine death squads bequeathed tbdr 
modus operandi to the death squads of Central 
America. The wave of state violence that began 
in Argentina in 1976, killing at least 9,000 people 
before it ran its course, struck El Salvador and 
Guatemala in 1979 and after. The cars without 

liw»nw pla ten the Iririnfi p prn gg the a«a.«mari nn 

of church leaders, the torture and the disappear- 
ances — all were methods tried first in Argentina 
and later borrowed by the Central Americans. 

Arraigning senior offietra who oversaw this 
Central American terrorism would go a long way 
toward establishing democracy in the 
From the start there has been plentiful i 
that the violence in Central Am 

itina— has been largdy directed from the 
st levels of government. The problem is that 
many of the prime suspects have enjoyed the 
blessings oT the Reagan admujistraticn. 

In February 1981 Secretary of State Alexander 

Haig called for resumption of U-S. aid to Argen- 
tina at the grounds th w T Argentina ha d made 
“dramatic, dramatic improvements’’ in hnwmn 
rights. Jeane Kirkpatrick, then the chief U.S. 
delegate to the United Nations, hdd friendly 
meetings with a host of Argentine officers. Gen- 
eral Roberto Eduardo Viola, who was sentenced 


By Jefferson Morley 

last week to 17 years in prison, was warmly 
welcomed at the White House in March 1981- 

General Viola’s counterparts in Central Amer- 
ica received amilar approbation in the first half 
of President Reagan’s first term. In 1 982, Reagan 
administration offfrialg described Roberto tFAu- 
btrisson, the right-wing leader said to have dose 
ties to the Salvadoran death squads, as a “fine 
young democrat” who could not be called an 
extremist The administration allowed Argentine 
army advisers to train anti-Sandanist insurgents 
in kidnapping, assassination and torture. In De- 
cember 1982 President Reagan, himself down- 
played the death squad rampages in Guatemala. 

None of tins softness on terrorism has been 
lost on democrats in Central America, and it 


surely 


._ them pause. If President Reagan 
mem criticism of the Guatemalan gen- 


— as in 



erais as a “bum rap" three years ago, how could 
he possibly believe that a formal indictment of 
th o se yniw generals would be justified today? 

In some cases the attitude in Washington may 
even enHnnyr Cen tral American moderates. A 
Central American who publicly calls for prosecu- 
tion of mili tary officos involved in death squads 
knows that he may be their next victim in any 
case, but in diff ere n ce from the United States 
main*; it all the more prudent to keep sOenL 

The assistant secretary of stale for mtcr-Amcr- 
icah affairs, Efiiou Abrams, bos told foreign 
reporters that the administration will support 
Central Americans whether they “decide to nave 
a 100-percent amnesty” for officers involved in 
ri g h ts abuses a “decide to try everyone." The 
trouble is, as Mr. Abrams has admi tted on other 
occasions, dim Central American leaders have 
not been able even to discipline their military 
subordinates, much less put them on trial. 

A congressional resolution, supported by the 
adnnmstratioa, could clarify the UJS. position. It 
could haO Argentina for its impartial and un- 
flinching approach toils own tnaL The resolu- 
tion should also sta ff- that any 1,3 *™ American 
go ver nm ent that followed the Argentine example 
would enjoy the support of the people of the 
United States and, if desired, the assistance of 
the U.S. government. That would underline the 
U.S. position that democracy consists not just of 
elections but also of tbe rule of law. 


The writer is associate editor 
He contributed this conmmt to 


of The New Republic 
The New York Times. 


Don’t Ask Where the United States Really Stands 


W ASHINGTON — Usually 
there are two uses for bargain- 
ing chips: bargain with them or save 

themTihe Reagan adminis tration 
has been trying to establish a thud: to 
extract money from Congress for pol- 
icies that Congress opposes. 

This is not the only reason fa the 
current disaffection between the 
White House and Capitol Hill just a 
year after President Reagan's trium- 
phant re-election. But broken prom- 
ises have contributed substantially to 
the strained relations between the 
legislators and the executive. 

Tbe two most flagrant cases con- 
cern missiles Nicaragua. 

When Congress balked at the re- 
quest far 100 MX missiles, the presi- 
dent appointed a commission under 
Brent Scowooft, a former national 
security adviser, to study the issue. 
When tire commission recommended 
a compromise, a deal was made 
Funds were appropriated fa 50 mis- 
siles phis spares. In return, the ad- 
ministration agreed to gp ahead with 
Midgetman, a mobile single-warhead 
missile that would escape the prob- 
lem of MX vulnerability. 

But now the administration has 
changed the policy and has offered 
the Russians a ban on all mobile 
missiles It is highly unKkdy that 


A President 
In Trouble 
As Premier 

By Michael Barone 

This is the second of two articles. 

W ASHINGTON — Ranald Rea- 
gan was not forced to break op 
America's governing coalition last 
May. It was dragging along just fine, 
wonting to produce a budget with a 
deficit a good deal smaller than what 
Mr. Reagan proposed. Just abort ev- 
ery practicing politician believes that 
the deficit is too high, that it is pro- 
ducing a trade de&al and an overval- 
ued dollar that are costing Americans 
jobs and producing high interest 
rates. So Tip O’Neill and Bob Dole 
set to w<xt to produce budget resolu- 
tions fa cats in domestic and mili- 
tary spen ding and a freeze on Social 
Security. The president signed on. 

Thai crunch! Mr. Reagan reversed 
position. Hie wanted to keep his cam- 
paign promise (extorted by Demo- 
crats) not to cut Social Security; he 
did not want to oommit to any cats in 
the Pentagon's budget; he wanted' to 
keep blaming the deficit cm domestic 
spending by Congress. Most of all, he 
(fid not want a tax increase. 

Suddenly be was acting like a 
prime minis ter taming a recalcitrant 
Chamber of Deputies rather than as a 
president above the fray. 

The president in Italy is a ceremo- 
nial figure, a kind of constitutional 
monarch who functions politically as 
no more than a referee. Modi of tbe 
time Ronald Reagan seems to have 
functioned in just this way. But on 
the lag central issue he evidently 
sensed that the grand coalition's un- 
derlying policy was to raise taxes. So 
he decided to derail the coalition and 
take on tbe prem iership himself. 

The rest of the political year has 
conssied of efforts by other politi- 
cians to assemble different governing 
coalitions, and the foiling of those 


turn is whether he can 
majority fa his own policies. 

In the process the focus of politics 
has shifted wildly from the budget 
resolution to tax reform to trade re- 
strictions to the Gramm-Rodman- 
Hollings bill p ur port in g to require an 
automatic balancing of the budget, 
and back to tax reform again. 

The attentive reader will sense that 
all of these are the same thing in 
different guise, Proteus bobbing up 
first in one part of the ocean and then 
in another. If you can't cut the budget 
deficit, try to cut the trade deficit, or 
put through a tax bill that wlQ end up 
raising revenue, or enact an automat- 
ic budget-balancing me chanism. 

Mr. Reagan has bod mixed success 
on these measures. He managed to 
neutralize tbe Democrats’ initiative 
on trade. But in embracing the 

dative, and in embracing so'fukc- 
wannly the tax lull crafted by Dan 
Rostenkowski in response to an ini- 
tiative that was technically his own, 
Mr, Reagan may have set an unsus- 
tainable course. He may retrieve suc- 


By Flora Lewis 


Moscow would accept, but the offer 
puts the whole basis of the Washing- 
ton compromise in question. Further, 
the Defense Department has daw- 
dled in drawing up specifications fa 
Midgetman, so the designers can't 
work on it The promise has not been 
explicitly withdrawn, but that cer- 
tainly seems to be the intention. 

The unavowed reason is apparent- 
ly that Midgetman, which would not 
need to be defended with anti-missile 
missiles, could undermine the argu- 
ment advanced fa “star wars.” If 
yOU insist on AefmAmfr big miaaili^ 
then you need more big missiles to 
defend, not little ones instead. 

In a similar pattern, Congress was 
persuaded to appropriate funds 
openly for the Nicaraguan “contras" 
with a promise that the United States 
would negotiate with the Samfinist 
government to seek a political settle- 
ment. But the negotiations have been 
stalled — not formally broken off, 
just not continued. Now Secretary of 
Stale George Shultz says the United 
States will not negotiate unless Nica- 
ragua first makes an agreement with 
the rebels mediated by the church. 

Something approaching this turn- 
around seems to be developing with 


as well The ban on aid for 
the UNITA forces of Janas Savimbi, 
the South African-backed rebel was 
lifted with the argument that It would 
put pressure on the Angolan govern- 
ment to accept a deal in which it 
would expel Cuban troops in return 
fa South African withdrawal from 
, Namibia. Now Mr. Sa- 
• isbe- 


• ing called “freedom fighters/ 

It addles the mind to tty to figure 
out why any American a d m i m stra- 
tion would want to take over from 
South Africa the cost and serious 

through South African-controlled 
Namibia anyway, and the United 
States would share South Africa's op- 
probrium in the rest of Africa. 

A dminist ration experts are well 
aware that Mr. Savimbi cannot tri- 
umph in Angola. He is essentially 
limited to his tribal base, and if he is 


the Luanda regime, the Cubans, wit 
Soviet backing, would reinforce the 
government This is a no-win war. 

AH three of these cases not only 
reflect a backing down from policies 
developed frith difficult and delicate 



cess this week, but be seems to have 
staked out positions that are unlikely 
to rally a steady parliamentary ma- 
jority fa the next three years. 

Begin with trade and, protection- 
ism, whidi for a moment were elevat- 
ed to the rank of nnmber one issue. 
The Democrats seized control of an 
important ministry and tried to make 
it me rmtnr of political attention. 

Heavyweights in Congress had 
come up with a punitive trade bill last 
summer. In the fall Mr. Reagan took 
over the' issue. Tr 
James Baker got the 


was that they could not come up with 
an alternative that could pass the 
Democratic House. And the House 
Republicans are not the president's 
natural allies on this issue (or on most 
others); they are a beleaguered and 
resentful minority, out ctf the loop on 
most issues while other Republicans 
all over town are running things. 

So they jumped with glee at the 
chance to beat something, even if it 
meant beating not Tip O’Neil] but 


cuts axe easily imagined: a continued 
slowdown of mOitazy spending; some 
cuts in domestic spending, too, but 
not a lot; a tax increase. 

Mr. Reagan can survive con tinuing 
controversy over the budget pretty 
weD. He and, as 1984 shows, tbe vot- 
ers are willing to endure the admitted 
evfl effects of the deficits in prefer- 
ence to many alternatives. 

Moreover, Mr. Reagan's lack of 
thesortof lanrhnarkacoQn mlBihwim f 

ffldt AtWMMaB — * — * j ■ _ 


Ronald Reagan: They voted against that American historians and jour- 
him on tax reform. The fact was that nalists have come to expect of 


at 


the chance to beat 
something, evenif it 


was 


it to lower the value of the 
became cheaper, im- 
ports more expensive. Die problem » 
not solved but it is eased. Mr. Baker, 
who knows he is Mr. Reagan's man, 
holds the Trade Ministry now. 

Tax reform began last spring also 
as a Reagan initiative, managed by 
Mr. Baker. Mr. Reagan’s top priority, 


House Republicans and House Dem- 
ocrats could allow the tax bill to die 
without any harm to themselves. The 
one hurt would be Ronald Reagan, 
who would have missed his chance to 
get a tax program and forge a coali- 
tion to Help him an other matters. 

Mr. Reagan chose, knowingly or 
not, to risk losing tax reform and to 
embrace Gramm-Rudman. The latter 
decision could be disastrous. 

Originally the Senate version ol 
Gramm-Rudman looked good to Mr. 


suc- 


cessful presidents is not fatal He 
writ to produce conditions, not p« 
laws or sign treaties: facts an the 
ground, not pieces of paper. 

But what he has done, by letting 
tax reform become so precarious ana 
by embracing Gramm-Rudman, is to 
make it much more difficult fa him 
to sustain this fourth parliamentary 
government of his presidential term. 

The Washington Post 


compromise within the U.S. govern- 
ment They also provoke the question 
of what U.S. policy is now. 

But the answer offered From many 
parts of Washington is just another 
question: Whose policy are you talk- 
ing about? In each case there are 
some people in the administration 
who want to stick with tbe derisions 
made, who want to pursue negotia- 
tions, and there are some people who 
don't who will use any excuse a ploy 
available to break away from the 
search for agreements. The two sides 
manag e to give the appearance of an 
adminis tration position by agreeing 
on short-tom tactics — to help tbe 
Nicaraguan contras, fa example — 
while they are really in conflict on tbe 
longer-term goals of the operations- 

So nobody knows where the Unit- 
ed States really stands on these im- 
portant issues, and no announcement 
can be considered definitive. The bat- 
tle of the Potomac goes on and on. 

There has been a ffnny of congres- 
sional attempts to take foreign policy 
initiatives in the last few years due to 
this vacuum and indecision. But Coo- 
gress is just not equipped to take the 
lead. It can support or oppose, and 
grumble when it feds it has been 
tricked. That is what is happening. 

The New York Tones. 


Less Money 
Will Mean 
Less Power 

By Philip Geyelin 

TV TASHINCtTON — T he budget-' 
W balaiKan$ process is going to 
force an agonizing reappraisal of pri- 
orities for U.S. domestic programs 
and national security. Nobody can 
tell what tbe domestic repdreusskns 
will be, but implications for fopaga 
policy are somewhat eiurer to foraee: 

Just as some retrenchment a in 
store for a whole range erf domestic 
programs, so there wifi inevitaMy ie - 
less money availabtefor defense - 
there is a difference: The effect of & 
former will reinforce RaufldRra- 
gan’s domestic d o ct ri ne. The effect'd: - 
the latter on his grand designs for 

national security will be exactiyithe 

opposite: It wul undermine, raise 
doubts, weaken his hand. r ;~V, 
Because appearances wrigh heavi- 
ly in the exercise of US. power stad 
influence around the wood, the ad- • 
verse impression convej 
al way by the Giamm-i 
lation wul matter almost as ; 
hs nuts-and-bolts effect on rideufe 
Already administration officials "are 
readying the couster-argameirt'thit 
the United States can somehow suf- 
fer through Gramm-Rudman with- 
out an agonizing reappraisal of for- 
eign policy ends and means. i- 

But unless you really believe that ' 
Congress will wipe out several: datum 
domestic programs in order tamed 
the deficit target of $144 bSBon for 
the next fiscal year, or that Pce&deot 
Reagan wiU (fo a 280-dqme trim ad- 
tax increases, Gramm-Rudman rie- . 
quires that something be trimmed 
from almost every one erf the~3^20 
separate “accounts" in the defease 
budget over the next three years.- 
If that is the way it toms but, 
whether we are talking about ihe tienr . 
from NATO headquarteain Rrassds 
or tbe view from the Krendin,. hfr. 
Reagan's bright picture of an Artieii- 
ca “back andstanding tafl” will inev- 
itably give way to a afferent percep- 
tion. America may claim to bebara, 
talking ing and standing tall, but it _ _ 
will be seen to be standing, or wrig- 
gling, in a fiscal stnutjadceL - .. T 

Mikhail Gorbachev may have 
sounded primitive in the ignorance . 
about America that he is su pposed to 
have displayed at the Geneva sum- 
mit, but he is study not deaf to the 
debate that raged over Gramro-Rad- 
man, and still less are the West Euro- 
peans. Phrases Eke “march of folly," 

“the aQiest tiring if it weren’t so tn£ 
ic”ot “an art of desperation” cannot 
have gone unnoticed. Nor can the 
verdict of Senator Pal MoynOum: 
“Gramm-Rodman is a suicide pact 
We axe entoiiig into an agreemrat 
with the administration to dismantle 
the defenses of the United States." 

Some of those are partisan words. 

But while the issue was stiQ in doubt, 
tbe official spokesman fa Mr. Rea- 
gan’s Pentagon said that passage of e 
Gramm-Rudman would “send a mes- f. 
sage of comfort to the Soviet Union." 

Asked about it after the president 
had signed the biR Secretary of De- 
fense Caspar Weinberger straggled 
manfully to put the best face on this 
“message of comfort” He conceded 
that a major cutback in military 
pending could be read by the Soviets 
as “a lack of wiH” He did not exactly 
go oat of his way to minimize the 
potential damage to U.S. security. 

But Mr. Weinberger is gambling 
that his losses in (he current fiscal 

be 


to no more than zero percent 
real growth) can be recouped m later 
years. As fa the way the Soviets will 
read the US. wdl to defend U.5. 
interests, his answer is that the Unit- 
ed States can point to five years of 
steady i mp rov e ment in its defenses. £ 

Maybe. But not even its staunchest j 
backers would call Gramm-Rodman ■ 
a show of strength. On the contrary, 
it was defended as the oily alterna- 
tive to budgetary madness that was 
driving the United Slates to . ever 
more murdoous deficits. 

That is not the way a superpower 
with a daim to a hading roe or the 
world’s stage is ejected .to. talk 
about its fiscal affrriraltK perhaps in 
this sense that the budg et 
ment win make the heaviest demands 
on foreign policy. Wbat wiU be re- 
quired of the administration is a rec- 
ognition that national solvency isan 
dement in national se curit y. 

That means i wngnhing Bm fti on 
American power. It means knompg 
that big talk can backfire 2 the im- 
pressirat gets around that the United*- - 
States is unable to put its money 
where its month is in. Afghanistan, in 
Angola, in Nicaragua — . or in -an 
arms buildup that u supposed ® be 
a pi iff to bargtuniiig .from 
strength on arms cottioL , 

Washington Pari Writers Group. : - 


domestic spending cuts 
seemed to impose no pressure for 
a tax increase. But then Tip O’Neil] 
advanced Ms dam to the Budget 
Ministry. He attarirari Gramm-Rud- 
man as sett-protection for Senate Re- 
publicans, smce.it required no cuts 
before the!986 elections in winch 22 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

Not 'Generous Ransom 1 



increase would be smugged in by 
legislators eager to cut the defied 
(and 10 hand oat goodies to constitu- 
encies without paying for them). By 
making Ms insistence an revenue 
neutrality utterly dear from die- be- 
ginning, Mr. Reagan has prevented 
any proposal from coming forward 
which raises taxes much. 

Then he failed to advance the Ros- 
lenkowski tax bill when it emerged 
from the Ways and Means Commit 
tee. Hoe he seems to have had bad’ 
advice from bis WMte House chief of 
staff, Donald Regan, who derailed, a . 
quick endorsement of the Rosten- 
kowski MB on the grounds that it 
would irri t a t e House Republicans' 
and prevent them from coming for- 
ward' mth thar own^ ^alternative. 


The editorial “Hold Marcos to His 
Hedge” (Dec. 14) accuses the Phflip- 
pmes of having “squeezed generous' 
•ransom in successive leases.” But the 
sums pledged by Presidents Carter 
, , ^ and Reagan -—$500 mjHiou and $900 

_ everyone rise faded to antici- million over five years— fa UA use 

iSf Q,Nc ^ kad ^S 5 ^ ^aportani bases are icsignifi- 
thaigo^ ab^evtay House Dem- cant compared to what the uTcon- 

ocrat behind the Democratic alter- 1 

native. The .Democrats’ version of 
Gramm-Rudman would have locked 
into effect wdl before -the 1986 elec- 
tion and" put huge pressure on Mr. 

Reagan by imposing deep cuts in 
defen se unless he compromised on 
taxes or domestic spending. 

Now the Senate Republicans and 
the Home Democrats tove split the 

Gramm-iiiidmmfaJoiTO. m£ 1£ Come to Pretoria and See 
Scn^lUpubU^fonXr 


el and Egypt, where there are no such 
ILS. military facilities. Fa lesser fa- 
m Turkey and Greece, Con- 
grcss has liberallyprovided $644 not 
non and $450 mflfion yearly. 

pacifico a. Castro, 

Acting Foreign Minister^ 
Manila 


But: if an: 
dear abbot the 


should have been 
RqpubScans, it 


Gramm-Rudman has created new 
problems that might revive the grand 
coalition, winch is still smarting from 
its defeat. Its solutions to the disloca- 
tion^ caused by mandatory budget 


South African blacks 
even' to attend US. 
dons" ("Get on the Side of Certain 
Gtange m South Africa," Dec 6.) Ob- 
viously not by attending sudTfuno- 
hons, which are in fact attended by 


more black community takbtis than 
those of any other rfipfoma&t mis- 
sion. Nor does he seat to' have the 
foggiest notion of whatprograibs (he 
U.S. government has mplacefoMfea- 
tify with “what, after afl, are’ Ameri- 
can values: democracy. 'law,':frcc. 
trade unions, respect Jfor'hmsxil 
tights, educatkm without tEscrmsa- - 
non.” These are -the hazards 
ing on authors' in as prestigious* 

E ublication as Foreign AffofrSftO-. 
awe done thar homeworit.\ 

.; HERMAN Wi NICKEL; . . 

UB. Ambassada to’SputtrAfrfca. V 

Nine Flights for the Dead 

The U.S.mfljtgry can ar rangg Tf«uc' ■ 
flights to lake d»d 5oltficrs- j|3aie 
from Newfoundland bait can’rfttrfg 
even one Ci4l to bring five trqpw 
bade from tire Middle East. Thia&s, 

'now -ittfusc ^hefrtirenwg regri^^ 

funs- begins. How about a switch: Lef&r ' 
air force Ily the troops 'mxrand/ffbd 
jpt the jnnfisteis take the duaars»‘ : : ;. 

V- DAN L. TRaIJS; ^ 

• - Iisbat ^ 















The new German Air-Line. 
The Audi 200 Turbo. 



j 

Audi presents an interesting ? j jt 
example of what amounts V . 

to an aerodynamic tour de t =, jf«’ 
force - using ultra-modem t 

weight-saving techniques. 

For greater economy yet 
making no compromises as 
regards safety. Attributes • 
such as those that character- 
ize modem aircraft con- 
struction are part and parcel 
of the advanced Audi con- 
cept And thus of a new gen- % 
eration of automobiles. 

As typified by the Audi 200 
Turbo. An exclusive saloon 
with a list of advantages 
to its name which make it a 
convincing alternative in the 
up-market range. 



Wwspfung dutch Techrat 











** 


CVTERNATIOIVAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 18, 1985 


Page? 


S EC Ministers 







Hi 


■cn 






Of Rome 

By Steven J. Dryden 

International Herald Tribune 


^ BRUSSELS — European Com-' 
“‘•Cry, uuaity foreign nuoistm fcanally 
■ f4r , ippnyred cm Taesdxy changes in . 
“ kjie ECs founding treaty mad£ ear-" 
-ier this month. 




J l£. Italy and Denmark maintained 
c 'u, -heir reservations on revisions m 
■■ffche 1957 treaty, Ibdr objections 
-bf-ir "ire the two major obstacles -to the 

,‘‘4 jnanimous agreement required for 
: ^adoption of the changes is the 
treaty of Rome. 

A spofceanan for the Nether- 
r .. r ands, which takes over the ECs 
^ rotating presidency next month, 
\ r ,. ‘ aid his government hopes to se- 
''^cpnrB the agreement of Italy . and 
~*i. , _ Denmark by the end of January, 
'-•f The Dutch spokesman said the 
foreign ministers who met to re- 
solve remaining differences made 
only minor alterations in the agree- 
ment, which was readied Dec. 3 in 
jjLoxembourg. The ministers ap- 
- proved a preamble and texts setting 
out the treaty revisions. 

Among the revisions approved in 
Luxembourg were an increased nse 
of majority voting to replace the 
need for unanimity, greater foreign 
policy cooperation and a modest 
increase in the powers of the Euro- 
pean Parliament. • 

Italy wants more substantial 
powers for the parliament, while 
the Danish government has been 
bound by the objections of its own 
l egislature to any change m the 
Treaty of Rome. 

A spokesman for GiuKo An- 
dreotti, (he Italian foreign minister, 
said that the foreign ministers ap- 
proved two alterations in the Lux- 
embourg package that might meet 
his counttVs objections. One of the 
changes would strengthen the “di- 
rect dialogue" between the Europe- 
an Parliament and the EC Council, 
the community’s chief decision- 
making body, the spokesman said. 

The other alteration riariffog the 
ability of the EC to increase coop- 
eration on monetary pahey without 
ratting an intergove rnmental con- 
ference such as the one held by the 
community this fall, the spokesmah 
said. 

Italy’s final position, on the 
changes, the spokesman said, 
would depend on the opinions de- 
livered next month by the Italian 
Parliament and the E ur opean Par- 
liament. The European Parliamen t 
has said that the Luxembourg 
agreement gave it insufficient pow- 
ers. 

The position of Denmark Is nrare 
delicate because of the objections 
of its legislature to any treaty 
changes, EC officials saidl Several 
diplomats said they believed the 
Danish government, in effect, 
would have to challenge the legisla- 
ture to decide whether to stay in or 
leave the community. 



Britain Unveils Plan to Revamp Welfare Syste: 


Thr Associated Pros “The aim will be to achieve a 

LONDON — Britain’s Corner- modem social security system di- 
vative government tmveQed details reeling help where that help is 
cm Monday of a plan to modernize' needed ."Mr. Fowler told the 
the country’s soda! welfare 


„stem 

and make it more economical. 

The opposition said the pro- 
posed changes woald him the poor. 

Calling the plan the most signifi- 
cant reform of the socialist-in- 
spired welfare system since it began 
40 years ago, the social services 
secretary, Norman Fowler, said the 
changes would cut costs and help 
those most in need Most of the 
changes would not go into effect 
until 1988. 


next general election,” Mr. 
Meacher said, “it will be a central 
reason why this government is 
swept from power." 

House of Commons in announcing Tire government is trying now to 

““ 1 halve the huge cost of the pension 
Bui Michael Meacher. a spokes- plan, which it says would rise from 
man for the opposition Labor Par- £200 million ($288 million) at pie- 
ty, said the government was “tar- sent to £25.5 billion by the year 


geting cuts on the very 
He contended that 1,7; 
more people would lose from the 
changes than would gain, while an- 
other critic estimated that as many 
as four million would be worse off . 

“When this is put to the British 
people, as it now must be, at the 


2033 unless changes are made. 

The government proposes to 
substantially reduce benefits from 
the supplementary state pension 
plans, while encouraging individ- 
uals to buy private pens on plans. 
Widows’ pensions would be cut in 
half. 


Spending on housing benefits 
would be reduced by abouL £450 
million but 200,000 low-income 
working families with children 
would receive a new family credit 
Disabled people with low in- 
comes also would benefit from spe- 
cial premiums, Mr. Fowler said. 

The government would abolish 
the automatic maternity grant to 
every mother, replacing it with a 
bigger grant to mothers from low- 
income families only. 

People on welfare would have to 
pay at least 20 percent of their 


property taxes, instead of having 
them paid by the government 

Sir Terence Beckett director 
general of the Confederation of 
British Indus Lrv, said the reform 
package “show's sensible thinking 
from a government which has wise- 
ly listened to advice." 

Norman Willis, general secretary 
of the Trade Union Congress, an 
umbrella group, said of the reform 
package, “Instead of addressing it- 
self to the issue of present and 
future social needs it has em- 
barked on a cost-cutting exercise.” 


Comecon Plans a Technology Drive 


SPACE VISIT — The Naval Observatory in Washing- 
ton photographed Halley’s comet seeming to pass the 
star Gamma Pisces. The comet was 759 minion mOes 
from Earth, traveling at 70,000 mph. But the 3.7 magni- 
tude star was really seven million times farther away. 


Shultz, in Yugoslavia, Assails 
Hijacking of Achille Lauro 

(Continued from Page 1) 

the Iraqi authorities have rebuffed 
UJ>. requests for his arrest 

Despite that situation, Mr. 

Shultz said in an airborne briefing 
between Budapest and Belgrade, 
the United States did not plan to 
take any action against President 
Saddam Hussein's Iraqi govern- 
ment. He specifically rejected the 
idea of putting Iraq' bade on the 
U.S. list of countries officially re- 
garded as aiding terrorism. 

Iraq was removed from the ter- 
rorism list three yean ago. Since 
then, Washington, which has tilted 
toward Iraq in its Gulf war against 
Iran and which has sought Iraqi 
support for efforts to rejuvenate 
the Middle East peace process, has 
insisted that Iraq had stopped aid- 
ing and harboring terrorist groups. 

Belgrade front Budapest, Mr. 

Shultz said: 

“We certainly have raised this 
issue with the Iraqis. 1 think It’s a- 
real problem. With respect to Yu- 
goslavia, he passed through here. 


With respect to Iraq, he seems to' 
have been welcomed there. That’s 
different, and it constitutes much 
more of a problem." 

When asked what action the 
United States plans, Mr. Shultz 
said: “We’re not in a position to go 
and do something about it. We’re 
not going to take some kind of f 
military action or something. We 
protest We make our views known 
about it” 

He then was asked whether Iraq 
would be put back on the terrorism 
list as its apparent harboring of Mr. 
Abbas appears to faD squa 
within the criteria specified by 
Congress for putting a conn try in 
that category. The U.S. govern- 
ment has offered a 5250,000 reward 
for Mr. Abbas’s capture. 

“We don’t have any plan to do 
that,” Mr. Shultz said. “These peo- 
ple like Abbas move around' from 
one country to another. We’re not 
going to put every country he goes 
to on the terrorist list” 


Rouen 

. MOSCOW — Sowts-bkw prime 
ministers met Tuesday to put the 
finishing touches to a plan for de- 
veloping the new technology need- 
ed to modernize the Communist 
economies. 

The 15-year program drown up 
by die Comecon cooaanrio group- 
ing is seen by Western experts as a 

reflection of the importance that 

the Soviet leader, Mikhail S. Gor- 
bachev, attaches to dosing the 
East-West “technology gap.” 

The prime mmmers’ meeting 
was called six months ahead of the 
next scheduled Comecon session, 
suggesting that the Kremlin was 
impatient over delays in devising 
the plan. 

Some Western diplomats say 
that soch a plan is vital if the Soviet 
Union is to match US. efforts in 
developing a space-based missile 
defense. 

The meeting, chaired by Nikolai 
L Ryzhkov of the Soviet Union, 
was attended by the heads of gov- 
ernment of Czechoslovakia, East 
Germany, Bulgaria, Hungary, Ro- 
mania, Poland and Mongolia as 
well as deputy prime ministers 
from Vietnam ana Cuba. 

1 In a speech summarized by the 
Tass news agency, Mr. Ryzhkov 
made it dear that there had been 
problems in drawing up (he pro- 
'--‘’-’obvious that it. 


Diplomats said the delays 
stemmed from longstanding differ- 
ences among Comecon members 
over the extent to which they 
should coordinate tbdr economies. 

The Kremlin has sought greater 
coordination within Comecon, 
long devoted purdy to trading, re- 
quiring member countries to spe- 
cialize in certain fields it nd tailor 


their industrial plans to the needs 
of all members and to the Soviet 
Union in particular. 

Moscow has used Eastern Eu- 
rope's heavy dependence on Soviet 
oil as a lever to bring about closer 
alignment of industrial plan* in- 
vestment in Soviet energy indus- 
tries and a higher quality of exports 
to the Soviet Union. 


Uganda Peace Pact Is Signed 


has not been simple work, taHng 
the ap p ropriate and complex deci- 
sions,” he said. 


(Continued from Page I) 
chance of “transcending (he trap- 
pings of tribalism, regionalism and 
religious differences" that had 
spawned “wanton” violence in the 
country for decades. 

In the past 15 years, the infra- 
structure of Uganda has crumbled 
as foreign investors have aban- 
doned what was once one of the 
most developed countries in East 
Africa. 

Lieutenant General Tito Okello, 
71, the bead of the Ugandan mili- 
tary government, said he was confi- 
dent that the accord would bring 
“stability, prosperity, national uni- 
ty and democracy” to Uganda. 

Mr. Museveni, who led 3 guerril- 
la war for nearly four years against 
Mr. Obote’s government before 
taking on General Okdlo's forces, 
vowed to abide by the provisions of 
the agreement. But he said that h 
would “have no purpose" until 
government soldiers who had com- 
mitted atrocities against civ ilian* 
were punished. 


Human rights groups have esti- 
mated that more that a half million 
Ugandans have disappeared during 
the past 15 years. 

The National Resistance Army 
greeted the peace agreement Tues- 
day by releasing 39 hostages bran a 
Uganda Airlines flight hijacked on 
Nov. 10. 

Delegate of Red Cross 
Shot to Death in Angola 

Reuters 

GENEVA — A Swiss delegate of 
the International Committee of the 
Red Cross was shot to death Mon- 
day night on a beach near Lobito in 
Angola, the Red Cross said Tues- 
day. 

Marc Blaser, 21. had gone to 
Angola in October os a radio oper- 
ator on his first mission Tor the 
humanitarian organization. The 
Red Cross said an inquiry had been 
opened to determine the circum- 
stances of the attack. 



Telephone (0212) 882-1 • Telex 8514713 








Gandhi’s Party Is Trailing in Assam 


Lbeied Press haentaaonal 

GUWAHATI, India — The rui- 
ng party of Prime Minister Rajiv 
Sandhi appeared Tuesday to be 
leaded for a solid electoral defeat 
o the racially torn stale of Assam. 
Early returns from Monday’s 
" 1 voting showed Mr. Gao- 
l's Congress (I) Party Tunning 
1 fit a three-way race despite 
(is four-day campaign swing 
trough the state last week. 
Election officials in Gvwahati, 
state capital said that with 
Ion half the vote counted for 
4 state assembly seats, the 
Garni Pariahad, or Assam 
:*s Front, was leading in 38 
Mercies, and Congress (I) led 

-# 2 a; - 

Minority parties, such as the 
« and the tribal and un- 
it parties, woe leading in 22 
tuatries. 

Officiate said . that no trend had 
_ Lin the 14 contested nation- 
Paritament seats, 
ff the Congress (I) Party loses 
! of tber state assembly races, it 
Id he the second major defeat 
the prime minister's party tins 
On Sept 25, his ruling party 


was swept aside in a landslide in 
the northern state of Punjab by the 
SOth Akali Dal party. 

The election in Assam was the 
first since February 1983, when 
voting led to violence among the 
stale’s volatile mixture of Hindus, 
Moslems and tribal groups. About 
4,000 people were killed in the vio- 
lence. 

The recent campaign centered on 
a single issue: Mr. Gandhi’s agree- 
ment with the majority Hindus on 
Aug. 15 to expel more than two 
million Moslem immigrants who 
have entered Assam from Bangla- 
desh since 1971. The accord also 
calls for Moslems who entered As- 
sam from 1966 to 1971 to be disen- 
franchised for 10 years. 

Many oT Assam’s 8.5 nullion 
Hindus, who are represented by the 
newly formed Assam Gana Pan- 
shad political party, praised the ac- 
cord. 

The state's 5 nullion Moslems, 
who were the main target of the 
■1983 violence, opposed the pact, 
saying it skirted the issue of where 
they would go when they left As- 
sam. Bangladesh has said it will not 
take them back. 


As expected, Monday's voting 
was divided mainly along rarial 
lines- Assam Gana Parishad at- 
tracted most of the Hindu votes 
while Congress (I) and the United 
Minorities Front captured the 
votes of Moslems and other minor- 
ities. 

About 80 percent of Assam’s 9i 
million voters cast ballots Monday. 


11 Killed in Explosion 
Of Gas Tank in Colorado 

The Associated Press 

■ GLENWOOD SPRINGS. Colo- 
rado — Firefighters searched the 
smoldering rubble of a two-story 
gas company Tuesday for a missing 
person after a propane tank explo- 
sion and fire that killed 11 persons 
and injured 13. 

Twenty-seven employees of the 
Rocky Mountain Natural Gas Co. 
in this west-central Colorado town 
were believed to be in the building 
when the explosion occurred Mon- 
day morning. Two persons escaped 
injury. 


dime Figure 
inihN.Y. 


id that they believed that John 
°tti, who had been a mqjor leader 
i the Ddlacxoce group, would now 
y to take control of the entire 
- uambino group. Mr. Gotti is 
waiting trial in federal district 
ddrt in Brooklyn on charges of 
-arcotics trafficking and racketeer- 

Federal officials who monitor 

crime said the death of 

r. Ddlacroce apparently cleared 

- way fer younger leaders to con- 

Casidlano segment for 
muL-pf the group, which had 
,® d am a g ed ly two major feder- 
indictmeuts since last spring. 

Mr, Castellano, 73, who lived on 
Heir bland, had been on trial 
th mw other defendants in fed- 
diaria court in Manhatt an 
^ Sqaeosber on charges of op- 
^tiqgaear-theft ring and consptr- 
to commit murders and other 

to law enforcement 
, the.Gambino organiza- 
ir involved in gambling, loan 
5 labor racketeering, dn^g 
j and other illegal activi- 

in the stales of New York, 

'id* an<L Pennsylvania and the 
•• of Atlantic City, New Jersey, 
iLasYegas. 


New York’s 5 Mafia Groups 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — For more than three decades, five major orga- 
nized-crime syndicates in the New York area, collectively called the 
Mafia or La Cosa Nostra, have beat known to law enforcement 
officials. 

The leaders of the five groups were indicted this year for being 
members of a “commission” that federal prosecutors say governs the 
groups' participation in such illegal activities as narcotics trafficking, 
loan sharking, gambling, labor racketeering, automobile theft, truck 
hijacking and extortion. 

Paul Castellano, who was shot to death Monday, was reputed to be 
the bead of the largest of the five groups, the Gambino group. 

According to a 1983 estimate by the New York Police Department, 
the Gambino group has 250 full members and 550 associates. The 
police report termed it “the largest, most influential criminal organi- 
zation in New York City.” 

Mr. Castellano was a cousin and brother-in-law of Carlo Gambino, 
who headed the group that bears his name from 1957 tmtil his death of 
natural causes in 1976. 

All five crime groups are headed by successors to the founders. 
Only one of the founders, Joseph Bonanno, is still alive. Mr. Bonanno, 
now 80, bas been inactive on the New York scene since the mid-1950s. 

The Bonanno group is currently beaded by Philip Rastelli, 67, of 
Brooklyn, according to the federal racketeering indictment trader 
which Mr. Castellano. Mr. Rastelli and other alleged Mafia leaders 
were put on trial 

A third group, named after Joseph A. Colombo, has as its acting 
head Gennaro Langdla, also known as Geny Lang, according to 
federal authorities. Mr. Langdla. 46, lives in Brooklyn. He is another 
of the defendants in the ongoing federal racketeering trial in Manhat- 
tan. Mr, Colombo died in 1978, 

A fourth New York organized-crime group identified by the au- 
thorities is named for Thomas Luchese. Its present leader is Anthony 
CoraHo, who is 72 and lives in South Oyster Bay Cove, New York 

The fifth group is named for Vito Genovese, who died in 1969 while 
serving a 15-year seatence on narcotics charges. The group's present 
leader, according to the federal indictment, is Anthony Salerno, 73. of 
Rhinebecfc, New York. 




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t 







Space-Based Defense Research Progresses: The Vision vs. the 


* (Comintied from Page 1) 

36me m the hope that this will loll off prospects 
Tor an arms control process that they say barms 
U.S. interests. Some State Department officials 

S ant to use the SDI as a bargaming chip for cuts 
Soviet offensive forces. 

L The parties within the administration and 
Congress to these various disputes — over the 
goals of defending people or weapons, stan- 
dards forjudging prospects and arms control — 
have reached a land of equilibrium. Neither side 
prevails. The result is that the established policy 
and the programs chug right along, more slowly 
than if there were unity, but forward nonethe- 
less. Even some Soviet officials wonder aloud 
whether the march toward space defenses can be 


Progress and Problems: The New Exotic Arms 


i The single most compelling reason for this is 
[die force of Mr. Reagan's commitment and 
[vision of transforming nuclear strategy from 
deterrence based on the threat of retaliation to 
jdeace based on effective defense. AdminLstra- 
juon skeptics say they dare not question this 
vision. Legislators raise plenty of questions, but 
thy they think it necessary for reasons of pru- 
rience and politics to approve funds to keep the 
initiative going. 

1 These also is the cloudiness of the critics’ 
position. The critics say they favor only re- 


pat it is doing only research. The critics say 
anises are unaffordable, unworkable and bad, 
lit that case is difficult to make conclusively 
ore more research is dene. 

Businesses Are Lured 
ve Contracts 

And there is the allure of exotic technologies. 


lity now. Businesses and research institutions 
being drawn into the space-research orbit by 
ucrative contracts. European allies who express 
bdarm about arms control and the undermining 
bf alliance strategy are tantalized by the re- 


. But there also are countervailing pressures. In 
particular. Congress and the adnrinia t mrinn wQl 
be wrestling with increased efforts to cut mili- 
tary spending generally . 

Nonetheless, the consensus is that a continu- 
ing and probably extensive research effort is 
virtually inevitable. This is particularly true as 
long as the Soviet Union also seems bent on 
some sort of space- or land-based missile de- 
fense, although the precise nature of what that is 
remains unclear. 

Representative Les Aspin, a Wisconsin Dem- 
ocrat who is chairman of the House Armed 
Services Committee, said the “commitment to 
SDI has grown substantially, even though its 
feasibility and good sense have been no better 
demonstrated today than they were when the 
president first spoke of the idea.” 

“There’s the feeling that there's no really big 
decision to make now because it’s just a research 
program,” he said. 

“Given all the factors,” he said, “we have no 
real other choice than to do this, which means 
keeping the program gang bat at a slower 
pace." 

In the process, Mr. Aspin said, “the real 
danger is that we will end up destroying the idea 
of deterrence without achieving the perfect 
world of defense." , . _ . 

B h 1983, when Mr. Reagan began his 
te attacked the traditional theory of 
by retaliation as immoral and unreh- 
oal was grand, to make nuclear weap- 
tent and obsolete." 

y several U.S. officials now acknowledge that 
a went too far too fast. Even if Mr. Reagan's 
[vision comes to pass, it might be 20 years or 
more away. In the meantime, the United States 
[would haw to rely on offensive forces and 
deterrence through retaliation. So, officials say, 
they began to tone down their public statements 
jjomewhat, to “enhancing deterrence.” Along 
the way. the goals were left in some confusion, 
j On May 30. according to the officials, Mr. 

B issued National Security Decision Di- 
172. It states bluntly: “UJS. policy sup- 
e basic principles that our existing meth- 
detenence and NATO’s strategy of 
response remain fuDy valid, and must be 
tpported as long as there is no more 
e alternative for preventing war.” 

] on this, the Reagan administration 
ed a special report in June. At one point, 
m accord with the directive, it proclaimed that 
[“successful SDI research and development of 
defense options would not lead to abandonment 
pf deterrence but rather to an enhancement of 
deterrence and an evolution in the weapons of 
(teterrence through the contribution of defen- 
sive systems." 

I But the original goal also found its way into 
the report: “The purpose of the defensive op- 
tions we seek is clear — to find a means to 
destroy attacking ballistic missiles before they 
jan reach any of their potential targets.” The 
emphasis, the report said, is on “eliminating the 
general threat posed by ballistic missiles.” 

T The report added that the “goal of our re- 
search is not, and cannot be, simply to protect 
bur retaliatory forces from attack.” 



Space-Based Lasers; In theory, 
these would combine chemicals in the 
manner of rocket engines to fire beams of 
concentrated laser energy through space. 
Lately, they have lost luster because of 
fears about the vulnerability of space-based 
objects. 


Ground-Based L ase r s ; These 

devices, especially free-electron lasers, 
would bounce beams off orbiting "battle 
mirrors" toward enemy missiles. Such 
systems, which are cheaper because heavy 
lasers need not be lifted into space, are 
viewed as less vulnerable to attack. 


X-Ray Lasers: Powered by nuclear 
bombs, these would fire beams of X-rays at 
targets before consuming themselves In 
fireballs. Small and light, they could be 
"popped up" into space as needed. But 
problems in their testing have cooled 
enthusiasm. 


Space Sensors: These "eyes" would 
be critical for coordinating battles and 
knowing which missiles and warheads had 
slipped through the defensive shield. An 
emerging hurdle is seen as quick tfgestfon 
of sensor data and its relay to military 
commanders. 



Ra&glHlS: These devices, based in 
space, would use electromagnetic fields to 
accelerate and launch "smart" projectiles 
to home in on enemy boosters. The small 
projectiles are envisioned as something 
similar to those recently tested in American 
antisatellite weapon. 


Ground-Based Interceptors; 

Using conventional rocket technology, 
these would be used to destroy enemy 
warheads during final phase of their flight, 
just before they hit targets. Such 
interceptors are often viewed as ideal for 
defending fields of American piissfles. 


Countermeasures: An enemy could 
try to outwit a shield by attacking it or by 
complicating its job. Chaff dropped from 
missiles could confuse suace-based radars 
and sensors. Decoys could complicate 
targeting. Missiles and warheads with 
minor-like coatings could reflect laser 


beams. Most challenging of all, an 
exploding nuclear warhead, set off 
accidentally by defender or intentionally by 
enemy, would send out electromagnetic 
pulses that would wreak havoc in electrical 
systems in space and on earth. 


Dkmiepbf Jn Ludn/Thn f4n> York Tam 


Choice of Defending 
Missile Silos or People 

i Tucked away inside this huger debate is a 
jnore immediate question, namely whether ini- 
tial SDI deployments should be used to defend 
^nissfle sflos and other militaiy targets or wfaeth- 

r they should defend people. 

US- officials are at pains to deny that they 


have any intent of taming Mr. Reagan's virion 
away from defending people toward defending 
weapons. Many of them say they think this 
would knock the bottom out of public support 
for the effort But some legislators, like Mr. 
Aspin and Senator Albert Gore Jr., a Tennessee 
Democrat, maintain that protecting militaiy 
taigas is the real goaL 

Talking of the Em stages of deployment, 
Fred G fide, undersecretary of defense for po- 
licy, said, “The first impact bf ballistic missile 
defense of the new technology rather than the 
traditional defense will be to make it more 
difficult for the aggressor to destroy all missile 
silos and command and control centers.” 

Die publicly expressed concerns and the logic 
of UJS. policy have tended to go more in the 
direction of defending militaiy targets from the 
beginning. When Mr. Reagan spoke of “the 
window of vulnerability” in his first years in 
office, that is what he meant — that U.S. mis- 
siles and command centers were vulnerable and 
needed to be defended. Ibis problem has never 
been solved, although two years ago a Reagan 
commission on strategic forces said that the 
problem never existed in the first place. 

Nevertheless, many top U.S. officials call this 
their No. 1 strategic worry, and say missile 
defense is the only answer. 

They reason that the best way to solve this 
problem is to gat Moscow to get rid of its large 
land-based missies, but the Russians will not go 
along. 

A second possible solution is to deploy mo- 
bile missiles, which would be less vulnerable. 
But Washington has proposed banning these 
because Moscow would have an advantage, be- 
ing able to deploy them anywhere in the Soviet 
Union. 

A third possible solution is greater reliance on 
submarine-launched mi ssi es. Bat there is no 
telling how long submarines can remain invul- 
nerable. 

That leaves Washington, according to this 
reasoning, with its fourth and last option: de- 
fending us missile sites. 

A senior US. arms control adviser said in an 
interview that “without SDI we have real prob- 
lems sustaining deterrence.” 

lb the absence of further offensive agree- 
ments, this adviser and others contended that 
laying the basis for population defense could 
ultimately force each side into offensive build- 
ups. 

Even as the debate over protecting people or 
weapons continues, a new and equally porten- 
tous one is brewing over jig g in g progress on 
research. Mr. Reagan's May directive says, 
“Within the SDI research program, we will 
judge defenses to be dearabfe only if they are 
survivable and cost-effective at the margin.” 

Whether the system wQ] be able to survive, an 
attack is a question that will not be answered for 


some time. In the meantime, SDI progress was 
to be determined by whether research would 
show that it would be cheaper at the margin — 
that is, after all the basics are paid for — to add 
a unit of defense or an offensive warhead. 

The notion here is that if adding offenses 
would be less expensive, defenses would make 
no sense. Mr. Nitze, the State Department's 
senior ammrontrol adviser, first used this crite- 
rion a year ago as a key test of the system’s ■ 
prospective cost-effectiveness. * 

But on Oct 31, before the Senate Foreign 
Relations Committee, Mr. Weinberger was 
asked about this idea. 

He responded: “Web, I have to say, senator, 
that I really do not know what cost-effective at 
the margins me an s. It is one of those nice 
phrases that rolls around easily off the tongue 
and people nod rather approvingly because it 
soands rather profound. 

“I have the greatest admiration for Ambassa- 
dor Nitze, but I do not know specifically what 
he has in mind with that. If he means is it less 
expensive to build strategic defenses than con- 
tinually to engage in trying to add offensive 
systems, I would say the syllogism proves hsdL 
It is dearly less expensive because the defense 
can, in effect, ultimately, if it is as effective as we 
hope it is, make it quite apparent that farther 
offensive systems are not useful." 

Richard N. Pole, assistant secretary of de- 
fense for international security policy, sought to 
explain this farther in an interview by saying 
that Mr. Weinberger “just did not want cost- 
effectiveness to be die sole criterion, and that he 
wanted to make people see the difficulties in 
interpretation of cost-effectiveness.” 

Mr. Gore said: “Any decision to discard tins 
criterion would strip the program and the con- 
cept of its last shred of intellectual legitimacy. It 
would only stinmlatc a race to deploy offensive 
countermeasures. This was the realization that 
ted us to the ABM treaty in the first place. If 
they do this, they’re saying, 1)3100 logic, damn 
reasoned debate, full speed ahead P " 

How to Switch Strategy 
From Offense to Defense 

As these problems are resolved, Washington 
also will have to tackle the question that has 
given official planners the most trouble: name- 
ly, how to make the transition from a world 
dominated by offensive nuclear forces to one 
dominated (9 defenses. 

For four decades, deterrence has rested on the 
idea that no matter which side struck first and 
no matter how vigorous the blow, the other 
could and would retaliate with a devastating 

blow. Thus, both would know there could be no 
meaningful victory, and neither would strike 
first Washington contends that deterrence 


based an the threat of mutual annihilation is 
immoral. Further, it insists that technologies in 
(he making will allow Moscow to make first 
strikes that could be successful 

The t ransi tion period, in which Washington 
envisages a combination of offenses and de- . 
fenses, amid last 10. 20 or 30 years. In the 
opinion of many, like Mr. Aspin, this period 
“wonld.be far vmore dangerous and imstahle 
than anything we’ve lived tbroagh so far." ; 

The nightmare some imagine is' that, for the 
fiat time, nuclear war might be made thinkable, 
and miKtaiy planners would be able to calculate 
nuclear victory as follows: a first strike that 
knocks out mare than 90 percent of the victim's 
offensive nuclear fences, phis defenses good 
enough to bihut most of what remained for a 
retaliatory blow. 

Mr. Iklc and Mr. Perlc say defenses will make 
nuclear war less thinkable^ not more so. “From 
the moment deployment of defenses begins,” 
Mr. Perte said, “you’ve complicated Soviet cal- 
culations needed for a first strike. Because of the 
defenses, Moscow could notcotmtcm being able 
to destroy enough of the retaliatory forces to 
make a mat strike worthwhile.” 

But from a wide range of U.S. militaiy and 
civilian planners, it appears that, ss one of them 
pat it, “We have not began to think about, let 
alone explain to others, exactly what combina- 
tions of offenses and defenses would aid up 
making the balance more or less kaMe." 

Besides, the general riewamang these experts 
is that the transition from offenses to defenses 
could not be made safety without. Russian coop- 
eration. . , 

Persuading Moscow 
To Accept SDI Flan 

Washington’s public position on g et tin g Sovi- 
et cooperation is upbeat. Mr Tj fide said agree- 
ment “won't crane soon,” bat added: “In the 
long term, it is far more plausible that the 
Soviets will agree with us on the new strategic 
order that eliminates destruction of the 
Soviet Union if nuclear war were to break oat" 

To bring Moscow along, Mr. Reagan has 
offered to share SDI technology, although in 
private conversations, few in the Reagan adrnin- 
Btration say this would be plausible. 

Mr. Reagan also, has ordered that all SDI 
programs be conducted in accordance with a 
“strict interpretation” of the Anti-Baifistic Mis- 
sile Treaty. Eves (rides bf the program concede 
that tins stricture has been followed, with the 
arguable exception of rate or two planned tests. 
The SDI testing program has been bmiled to 
Kibcompomeats, as distiiiguisliedfromanti-bal- 
lisric nrissOe components or systems themselves. 

Dus stricture has been followed despite 
Washington's assertion thaithe treaty aerially 


allows development and testing of components 
and fall systons of the new technologies. 

Many arms experts dispute this intapreta- 


a research arm of Congress. “The inherent &»■ 
tations of language and the rapid pace of tech- 
nology,” the report said, “make it impossible to 


tion, among them Gerard G Smith, the chief develop dear, unambiguous and objective stsn- 
r u^mtiat nr of thg treaty But the matter r emains dflrdS by which tO measure all possible research 

moot as long as the White House continues to programs" covered by the treaty. 


say it will not avail itself of the supposed legal One of m 

rights ' element of 


ramples the report rites is one 
space-based defense system 


By all accounts, be got nowhere. Moscow’s craft. Calling the dement an adjunct ora sub- 
position r emains that it will agree to cuts in component, the report says, “depends less on 
strategic nuclear forces only if Washington objective determinations of capability titan, on 
agrees to restrict SDI to laboratory research. bow rate defines those toms.” 

As far as Mr. Smith is concerned, these posi- The report also notes Moscow's deployment 


tioris will continue to block a treaty. A sizable of a radar at Abalakovo, in Siberia. U.S. offi- 
number of U-S. officials agree with him. “The dais say the i n stallation is a ballistic-misak 
alternatives are dean arms control or a shot at early warning radar and say it violates the treaty 
developing defenses,” Mr. Smith said. “As long stipulation that such radars can be situated only 
as the president sticks to his position, we will on the peripheries of the two nations, 
have no anna treaty." The treaty permits space- tracking radars to 

Even if Moscow were to show interest in be placed anywhere, and does not define the two 
negotiating a transition from offense to defense, kinds of radars. Moscow insists the Abalakovo 
it is far from dear that the Reagan adnrinistra- radar is for space tracking and thus is not a 
tion is in a position to lay out now to do so. treaty violation. There is no disputing the fact 
As Mr. Dele said: “It’s hard to talk to (be that the deployment of such radios in nnmbea 
Soviets about something we ourselves haven't in both countries would clearly defeat tbepur- 
thooght through completely. We could discuss pose of the treaty. 

the tranatioo only in the broadest teens.” Also, because the treaty only Kmhx defenses 

He added that the negotiations would be so against strategic, or long-range, nrissika, Mos- 
“unmensely complex" that “it might be prudent cow has moved sharply to develop ballistic mis- 
to steer this through tacit arrangements" rather sOe systems for use against medmm-range nri»*« 
than through a signed treaty. tiles, sometimes known as anti-tactkal systems 

The betting inside and outside the Reagan Washington now is talking about developing its 
administration is that Moscow’s most likely own weapons against medium-range mistil es. - 
response to SDI development will continue to The report also points to “the great overlap" 
be threats of more missile deployments. That between anti-salelhie te chnolo gie s «md anti-M- 
view was bolstered inadvertently in a letter Mr. listic missile technologies. Moscow has a rudt-, 
Weinberger sent to Mr. Reagan just before the mentaiy anti-satellite weapon, and Washington. 


summit meeting. 


is testing a more advanced one. Moscow has, 


In it. Mr. Weinberger wrote that if Moscow proposed a ban and Washnaton has 'nected; 
were to deploy defenses, “even a probable tern- the idea. 

tonal defease,” such a development “would “The great loophole in the ABM Treaty,” Me. 
require us to increase the number of our often- Smith said, “is not whether it paButsttesdevd-- 


or its negotiating stance, that defeases should anti-tactical ballistic missile sysuansand radm, 
make it easier to -reduce offensive forces. anti-ballistic missile defenses wiD emerge any-; 

1 . a m 1 1 way. As I understand, the admniixrratinn iur 

March Of 1 ecimoloffy tends to do just this." UJ5. officials (buy that , 

. . . this is their purpose, bm acknowledge thzt &stf /- 

Krn riing A rmfi Control SSSSSne ***** ™ these axeis -^ taloowbas v . 

With the arms talks stalemated, one-sided Aimd all the compteritiei andcoenteraiffi' 
derati ons by both nations and the march of meats, one point is clean In tlu absence of new . 
technology »e movmg to aode theold order of agreements to dose gray areas iridd treaties 


the Anti-Ballistic MissBe Treaty, the world in and to ban or limit the development of new 
wiuch the superpowers agreed to maintain twSwfiingi f ^ anti-ballistic misme capabtGiies 
peace through the threat of mutual a nnihilat i o n will increase significantly on both sides in the 
rather than through defenses. J 

That was a major conduaon of a recent . . 

report by the OffireofTechnology Assessment, 'TOMORROW.- The rift among SDtraeardtm, 


Anti-Foreigner Sentiment Boosts Swiss Rightists, but Shift Is Seen as Temporary 


g. By Lisa Schlein 

S International Herald Tribune 

g vIEVA — Despite unexpected victories by 
•htist parlies in parliamentary elections in 
a and Lausanne this fall, political observ- 
ool believe Switzerland is moving very far 
right. 

S ad they interpret the vote as part of the 
swing of Swiss political sentiment over 
two decades. 

£ In the overwhelmingly successful campaig ns 
cf both the Vigilance Party in Geneva and the 
Rational Action Party in Lausanne, foreign 

S dents of all kinds — refugees, foreign work- 
in tenia tional civil servants and executives 
with multinational companies — were blamed 
fw the severe housing shortage in the two cities. 
Campaign posters and literature proclaimed 
ijiat the Swis were “fed up with too many false 
refugees, too many foreigners and too much 
crime." These issues were linked with “not 
egough bousing, security or social welfare.” 
fWdJ-off foreigners were accused of driving 
up* rents and real-estate values. Political refu- 


gees and foreign workers were accused of taking 
housing away from pensioners and low-income 
students and workers. The charges resulted in 
overwhelming victories for the two parties. 

Bui, in a typical comment among political 


on the left as well as the right were 


* “The electorate wanted to si g nal its discon- 
tent with too many foreigners and too much 
business speculation in Geneva,” be said. “In 


1970, inflation, then at 4 percent, produced a 
decline in real income, and voters showed their 
unhappiness by rallying around the Schwarzen- 
bach initiative. 


But, m a typical comment among political business speculation in Geneva,” be said. “In 
analysts, David Handley, a framer professor of Switzerland, it happens rather often that votes 
political science at the University of Geneva, are cast to demonstrate a certain point of view, 
said that voting fra Vigilance and National Then the next time, the logic of the votes cast is 
Action was the public s way of saying that it was different." 


oduced a Vigilance and National. Action victories by 
wed their cracking down cm people seeking aiyhrm 
iwarzen- Nearly a ruQHonfcaagners live in Switzerland 

and more than 23,000 requests for political 


frustrated by governmental! 
housing problem. 


uity to solve the 


Hans Tschani, a political writer, agreed, $ay- 


Evecy time you find a situation like the 

JePeSrlaSm or S in r “ Squeezed!* too large a percentage of 


housing crisis in Geneva or a decline in real ? “J ^ « 

income” Mr. Handley said, “the Swiss elector- they lose their sense of individual 

ate is susceptible to behaving like this. People , 

who ana on the frin g e of p olit ics under stand this Recent figures from the Bureau of Statistics 

and jump in and profit from the situation.” the can ton of Geneva show that, as of last 

A similar viewpoint was expressed by Ray- ^ unc ’ average monthly rents for a five-room 
round Gennann, director of the Institute for apartment in a new building were 2,055 Swiss 
Advanced Studies in Public Administration in francs (about $975). From January through S«- 
Lausanne. He said he regarded the growing * eni ^ cr this year, 1,735 persoas applied for 
number of refugees in Switzerland as having ^artreents to the Geneva Housing Bureau, a 


This initiative, drawn up by the leader (rf the asylum are pending. In this country at fi.5 mil. 
National Action Party, James SdiwaBWibach, lion in h a bi ta n ts, many Swiss say that “the boat 
who said foreign waiters were eating into the ^ foil." 

livelihoods of Swiss citizens, sought to restrict In mid-November, when Geneva elected its 
migrant laborers from entering the country, seven-member Executive Governing Council, 
Although every political party opposed tire ini- many observers viewed the vote as a major test 
native as discnnunatoiy and economically un- of Vigilance’s emerging strength. In an effort to 
sound, it drew a substantial vote. The final offset this, federal authorities expeBed 59 fair- 
count was 564,000, or 46 percent in favor and cans and ordered 12 Turks and about 70 Chh- 
653,000, or 54 percent, against. eans to leave. 

The government got the message. Federal • a I»oS«sor of political 

authorities tightened requirements for work per- *w«at Umvemny of Lausanne, suggpsts 
mits» restricted thtnamberof seasonal waters f^^^hhoaties were trying to keep Gc- 


tetes against a rightist takedver : of tite fxmuji 
co mmen ta to rs say. Rivalry among .the thied 
mam ling u istic regions — Oc pnahj Frerwh'*™ 
Italian — is regarded hero as precluding tbe ficrt 
of nationalistic fervor ihm cw be exploited, isl 
more ethnically hnmn yngra it nrinntnac. _ r. 

In Switzerland, local issues are almost always- 
more important than ngttftnal tv eu p; littie &Gt. 
mogeneity masts in national parties, which 
weak federations of cantonal or state parties. Sit 
nat i ona l elections, candlfa fas tend, to nm cD- 
eantonal, not federal, issues. - • -/jV; 

Neither Vigilance near National Action: b» 

Stmn9 Aatinnal . t «■.*- — ^ 



rsttonly in-the canton of Geneva, where eve) 
tmid inhabitant is a fordgner/has been irptm 
tince 1964 and is COnsirler wd an arrajiiwl psHlt 


lumber of this year, 1,735 persoas 
apartments to the Geneva Housin' 


galv anbad yntwrs ip faww Vj gilntw *. nn d Nfl- figure that does not include those who Signed up 

tional Action. .with private housing agenries. 


lied for 
ireau, a 


allowed to enter the country and barred family establishment in powa-. since 1964 and is considered an accepred 

members from aroranpanying migrant workers. . “f “~P" acs j 00 * . tough stance ““ political landscap e, Despite 


TTteSdhwaraenhach initiative^ “almost waxnn- fSSS 


plished what it set out to do withouthai 
legally accept e d, because of tbc actions 
the authorities,” Mr. Handley said. 


against Vigilance winning a seat in 
live Council,” he said. 


rmeasure 
ie Execu- 


In the end, the Vigilance for -the- 

executive council seat, Arnold Schlaepf er, k»t. 


But it’s not correct to equate rightist politics There is a precedent in Switzerland for the Now, in actions reminiscent of that era,.Swiss In afidd of 12 he 

h VAnrtnhrtlw 1 rrn timaiil ** Vi# wramawf n/tfino nrntrel onrmr tmrli iwnlf and laHr Afliniirmit Tn f twlar ol nm4inr»i«ni Imura ■vwmi«~«f ■! - n 


reals and real-estate values. Political refu- with xenophobic sentiment," he warned, noting protest over high ranis and lack of housing. In federal authorities have responded to the recent ; ■ ^ strodijra^^ 


ie political peaks, it is expec te d , to remafei^ 
nongove rnmental puny. t\ t..‘‘ ■ ' 

JSvrn less is expected' of .National Actiw' - 
whK* begaa hithc canton of 2ura* ia l9^m: 
Jfrcngih still lies there and in thecahton officii, 
both large population centos is the Germah'- - 
spauring part of Switzerland: ' ■ ; r ' : 









INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 18, 1985 

ARTS /LEISURE 


Page 9 


Shaffer’s 'Yonadab 9 Should Have Stayed a Footnote 



By Sheridan Morlcy 

International Hcmid Tribane 


production of The Cherry Or- 1982). An 80-mmuie new-moraliry di booing on still another it is the 
chard.” As is wtfl enough known tale of the New Yak streets, it story of a man in midlife crisis who 


L ONDON— It win not come as from his work with toe Shared Ex- takes the form of blackout sketches leaves his family and ends up in 

/news to admiral of P«er perience company, Alfreds sets written in a kind of staccato poetry, prison as a killer. fable for our tone. I have yet to see 

Shaffer that his plays across toe character and tort hot no precise 1°“ Fatter cartoons printed m What makes Mamet — along a belter play about toe anlionuty 

past 20 years —from “Royal Hunt moves: Different audiences on dif- Wood and arid. On one levd it is a with Sam Shepard — the most ex- of the contemporary urban jungle, 

of toe Sun" through “Equus" and ferem nights are i»M" to find ac- digest of all those Charles Bronson citing writer to come out of Ameri- nora writer with a better command 

■ ■ ■ ii ton in totally different areas of the anti-mugger movies filtered ca in the last 20 years is his abibly of the instantly dramauc. Mamet 

THE LONDON STAGE stage during toe pyn«, and through a literate typewriter; on to work on oil those levels snmilta- writes his plays the way war pho- 

- — ; — r: — . . — - — whSe in the past some Shared Ex- anotheritisa debate about precon- neously and at the last to give a tographers shoot battles. 


bleak conversation piece interrupt- 
ed by sodden bursts of violence toe 
coherence and power of a classic 
fable for oar tone. I have yet to see 
a better play about toe irrationality 




verson of “Twlefio. 


to? te* tornOmr “Strangs" to perience players have found this a 
tonal Theare s OCw stage) kn company is in such peak coudi- 

“ *“« principally ** few 

COTCOMd twm hones, one of ^ NaIiQnaI ^ 


Lyubimov Stages; a Bitter 'Fidelio 


By Andrew Park 


The most blatant example of this after toe 
final chorus, winch should bring the opera to an end 


inteflectnals in exile. In the intervening period the w bosequkk getaway with Leonore farther diminishes 
founder of Moscow’s Taganka Theater has won prizes toe hero ine’s sig nific ance. Tbc other prisoners, joined 
‘for his drama productions in London, stirred contro- aowby Kzarro, are shnnte d bade behind ban, and 
versy over a succession of opera stagings in Italy and Rocco assumes toe busy’s mantle. 

a t-H-' v -- — - Ute f Oitkft rio nf tke rmani ^aan MivwiAnad Ku the 


idiom h« God in him and OTiwt everything from “Duchess of 
recognize rt and the other of whom Malfi" to The Real Inspector 
ham'tWit can. Hound") that it has no tremble with 

InTbnadab the two arc half- a characteristically mteflfeent and . 
hrotbas, Amnon and Absalom, brisk exploration of the text, 
though thm stardom is admittedly m^Cheny Orchard" isnatoer 

usurped by the title figure, a valedictory tragedy nor bleak 
TOjfeunst gossip who has aS of Sa- farce; When Fus (Hugh Lloyd) is 
hen sobsessicms with his social and kf t lodced up to die intoe house at 
vbsbc snpenoss hot, alas, not any toe md of Act 4 it is not some 
of even his talent except when it symbolic passing of toe old guard 
comes to chatting up the audience, but merely another accident m a 
to abmdramg Mozart and Sa- bouse that has always been full of 


had a much-publicized row with cultural nffirdnU in The twisting of the opera has been sanctioned by the ? en .l a i. r 00 *. Samuel and a them. An immensely strong female 
Bologna. His latest venture — a new production of conductor, Dermis Rnssefl Davies, who has added a justifiably mm or foo tnote therein, troupe (Sheila Hancock, Eleanor 
Beethoven’s “RdeBo” at the WOntembezg State The- short passage of instrumental music to accompany snaner and ms director, rtter Hail, firon, Sdma Cadd], Julie Legrand) 
ater in Stuttgart — marks the start of an extended visit Lyubimov's coda. Given the routine and undifferam- iraveavmupnoneMtluarlcwefor does most of the night's work. 


by Lyubimov to the German-speaking theater world ated orchestral playing eaxher in toe 
this season, and next season he isschetiuled to begin a production very pearly succeeds in c 


series of opera productions in southern France. 

. Wherever Lyubimov goes, bis work provokes heated 


moving andix 
The singing 


g earlier in the performance, toe 
y mcceeds in denying all thin is 
in toe opera. 

nrradftnal 


ritual pageantry. But instead of a though Edward Pethabridge as a 
Viennese opera converted into a wonderfully Gayev 

mnnkr mystery, what we get here and McKeikxt as the triumphant 
ss fctue mare than the nonmusical peasant purchaser of toe orchard 


■ wunevu i^Tuumiuv kdo, ma wui& uiuvgiLCb ucucu , - — : o — o — — — - ■ * — r „. rf ; nn n # “T 0jr -»T, nn j .u, h mn - ■ r , F 

discussion- “ndelio" is no exception. Lyubimov seizes fr a the Act 1 garnet. As Rocoo, Matthias HODc pve performances torn are dnup 


the theme of injustice and turns it into an indictment c o n firm ed bi* sta ndin g as one of the most pr omising 
of authoritarian regimes. At first sight his desire to >' oan §G OT ^ basses. Wolfgang Probsfs ringing tore 
arouse the audience’s awareness of moral issues fi^ve Hzarro a strong profile. Robert Sc hnnk, looking 
be reinierpretation of a great work appears and sounding less involved, was an off-form 
and the production conveys a sense erf the Florestan. 

1 drabness and o ppression faring prisoners Ine most committed performance was the Leonore 

nee. of JeanmneAltmeyer, in wbose voice the music always 


unrelieved drabness and oppression facing prisoners 
nf conscience. 


TKw tlw waiAimg ntnwapiiw i nf Huttutfng t snnriAi sounded beautiful and noble. Her tender, full-bodied metiuc 
cot. with its mesh fencma and seazchKshts. is inten- tone was sustained in all the most taxing passages of cy to r 


mg leomicofar L/rcai ocoa i. rminden of how muA Nft- 

Bchmd a gauzei amain that is tjonal will lose if the company is 
often left mercifully dosed, mmor ^owed to disband, 
biblical functionaries cavort 
ground in vaguely choreographic n 

f^irwi while in boat erf it Alan Steven Berkoff is back at toe 
Rate* as the all-seeixig narrator of Donmar Warehouse with a double 
the title tries with increasing urgen- bill of bis new play, “Harry's 
cy to retain our interest for thro: Christmas," and his old redial of 


touts in a story that the Book of Poe's The TaMNe Hemt." Tins 

iditoria^Sd^^Sait^ licberwonld^beeneveaSSI^edatedifit Samuel toA rednoed .to a few 

had nor h~n Trrr * nnoKna n»o> fromT^ th* paragraphs. The tale of Tamar and a decade, and Berkoff brmgs it 


■«fred hy the appearance tuPbrarm's hffnrhtrwgi at tV “ DS difficult rcac, and her handling or Abscneu- 
ade doom of the andxtoriuin, and by the mOitary Ircba!" would have been even better appredated if it 
unifonns, recalling intimidating East-bloc border- ^ not been for a jingling noise from nuder toe s tage 
[guards. — the drains of the prisoners' chorus awaiting its 

> Bat instead of hi ghlighting the timriaac ny-ywy. in entry. It served as a further illustration of the rose n si - 
Beethoven’s music and nndedimng the w^^sideal- tivffir some stage directors show toward music. 
km, Lyubimov uses it as a peg on which to hang a further performances Dec 19, 25, Hand Jan. 19. 

personal diatribe, thrusting al (he audience his bitter- . , , 

ness and diriTtnamnniAi t over the state of human Andrew Clark is a Journalist and music critic based in 

f reedoms Switzerland. 


how she was raped by her half- back to the stage with all toe Vic- 
brotoer is of wme interest as a torian relish of Emlyn Williams set- 
prelude to the war of succession by ting off cm a Dickens tour. About 
toe rival sons of David, and if (as in “Harry’s Christinas" I am not so 


“Eqims") Staffer had been able to sore: A mawkish, unusnaDy senti- 
crane up with some altogether on- mental piece about a man left to die 



Wenders’s r Tokyo Ga A Cold Movie 


expec ted and *»"*ring explanation 
of an apparouiy familiar happen- 
ing, toe retdfing might have b^i 
ofsmne imerest as welL 
Predsdy because he is so deeply 
□□involved in the proceedings, fan 


alone with his greeting cards be- 
cause nobody lores him, it is played 
as a study in obsessive loochncss to 
contrast with the campy villainy of 
ThD-Tale Heart.” But Berkoff's 
audiences, especially since his sup 


an out-of-work priest required to cess as a Hollywood heavy in “Bev- 
bfflies and getting dance steps there’s fun or fedma in h. This Elm mak e s e ns e of events he can neither erly Hills Cop," are a fanatically 

■ a . nwrn ° * .* r « a .1 ° Val* fiAe/VMKvd V/w«a4nk , Irtual mrtk an/4 nwTl till » i AHt tA raa 


By Mark Hunter billies and getting dance steps there’s fu 

F ' lARIS — Vim Wenders calls "Sb 1 - ^ unspoken question is: . has both. 

Tokyo-Ga" a “film journal," as Where do Oxu’s emotionally 
if to underscore that h is not a charged, subtle stories (“Voyage to 
documentary. The film recounts Tokyo" is excerpted throughout Two re 
Wenders's research into toe life and the film) fit m? thechano 


Happy Christmas With all of our hearts 

Capture Her Heart This Christmas With A Rare Gem 
Or A 'Petit Bijou' From Our Boutioue Collection 
From The Most Fabulous Collect ion Of Jeuels In The World 


documentary. The film recounts Tokyo" is excerpted throughout Two recent French films afford 
Wenders research into toe Hfe and the film) fit in? the chance to watch toe wide range 

work of the late Japanese director The score by toe art-rock group of actor Michel Boujenah, fear 

, ■ Dick Tracy, which suggests a week tnred m toe ftench entry for toe 

MOVIE MARQUEE of watching gangster and sd-fi ^ 

1 movies cm the Late show, hek>s kero Hon n n es et un Couffln (Three 

Yasuhiro Ozn and his cOnfranta- the film interesting. But for all the Men and a Bassinet), and in an 
don with a city of which, be says in heat of its imagery and the wannto ada p tation by toe director John 
the narration, T had already an of Qzu's presence among those who BerT > r of *e novel by Dcrotoie 
jmage” formed by Qzu’e films. .. knew him, this is a cold movie. Letessie^ T* Yoyage 4 PaimpoT 
Wenders's movie is not a cultural Nowhere is it more so than when CH* Voyage to Pamqx^. 
pOTtrait flattering to the Japanese. Ozn’s fonm camExaman, weeping In the latter Boqenah is Jofl, a 
They emerge as obsessive; whether ^ he recalls bis late master, begs factory worker and mili ta n t union- 

with the nerve-wraddng pachinko Wenders to go and has to ask ^ persuades Maryvonne 

game, taking photographs, putting three times. (Mynam Boyer) to marry hnn after 

a perfect finishing touch on a wax n she discovers she is pregnant Up to 

sandwich or dressing up life rocka- this point the film has had a dark, 

■ ■ “Chore” was originally directed depressing tone; with Boujenah’ 8 

nAAvrcnimv by Luigi Comencimfar Italian tele- entrance it becomes a weddng- 

UUUl’IliolJtlli virion, but it stands up well to a class comedy of manners. 

theater setting. It is beautifully Boyer’s is toe more difficult role. 

HJiffTPOiDU photographed, suffused by a gold- We have to accept her as toe hoo- 

kB3AN t MM& HMTOOLOR. en undertone that well evokes the ine of her own fantasies as well as a 

WHtyzONK 50Q&D1PI noaalgiw inherent in its theme determined, disappointed realist. 

I IfSMEtiOUR. UEfiRMCDLr (adapted from the children’s novel Jofl has fantasies and disappoint- 

: OLPROOM&! L£6 ^ fV ^9^. by Fdmondo de Amiris) about meats cf bis own; be is a good man 

* schoolboys from pro-Wadd War I wfaowonldliketobebeitec Adroll 

E Trieste who meet again <m the Aus- cast of supporting play ers — espo- 

■ trian bunt as soldiers. dally Jean-Fran$ou Garrean as a 

S« — ll Cxxnenrim remarked in an essay .woman-crazy journalist w^Kwe pri- 

1L Wy*l >jhr called “The Annoyance of Maksug maty nrfataanon is wtto htmsrif — 


halt nor control, Yonadab is totally loyal mob and will torn out to see 
unable to command- -the interest him read the Riot Act if necessary, 
that alone could move toe play What he does is oddly irrelevant to 
along. Bates achieves a finely the style of over-the-top theatrical 
hjtchy irritetifln (Trt mf, ainn^ " he flamboyance that he has brought 
exhorts Amnon at toe aid of one back to the world of solo actor- 


characteristically turgid scene, 
“there are other people to be stoned 
in tins city besides yon") but tins 
alone cannot stop the evening*! fast 


a perfect finishing toach on a wax 
sandwich or dressing up like rocka- 

DOONESBURY 

HMDOYOU ZSfi&k 

Km™*? £IS£m£ 

I rrsmw* t2£2£%. 

■ oufmomi 


nbther. 

WUN&BR 

laxe 

SOCKS. 


HBEt! 

ms 

you! 


‘Cuore’ ’’ that fie has breomi k^ps toe wny turmng at a good 
known as “the director of dxfl- pace, though the ending falls short 
dren.” Here, as in numerous previ- of a rractoition. It worid not wotic 
mis films, the schoolboys’ world is at all if Bcqenah did nt oonv mce 

map. 

For exanqde, theriam scramdid, Boujenah’s waddling run in 
Frann (Gianhica GaOc), falls m -r^Hammes et unCouffin,” the 
lov e w, tt , rc d h ^ S ut^ surprise hil by Coflcen Seiran, tdli 
teacher (Grahaiiadeao) and turns ^ toal “Midid, toe King of the 
mto the class angeL Whoi he re- *« »>,- 


tience, Jofl is capable of a viotent 
snap. 

Boujenah’s waddling run in 
“Trois Hommes et un Couffin,” the 



MIKE, PO YOU 
OFCOUKSE HAVE ANY ttJEA 
WSME,Z! HOUMANYW 
umtSmth ftooHeFHAve 
THETttCK Be&OKMGTO 


mw UK ango. wnou uc ro- Bqq^" acoordfflg to toe 

vats to r^eDxm tqxni her rqrfac^ wend <mto baby. 

HeisoMofthreebacSorswitom 
angrnsh that drive Fr^to vuv mridentified baby on their hands h 
imee, tondm| torn shamed and turns out to be the offspring of Ms 
shavoi-headed in a refarnratoy. wfae-pnot roommate(Andr4 

Y'St ^ e °f-^ er . W ^ Dc^soiberX whose loves are with- 

and toe otirer beys, now grown, oalnmnbaor d ept h.By toeendof 

also takes place m.that same golden the film, after drakW off a gang 

that has drawnthepilot inroa 
2“ — ffiJS*- beroin smuggling & and 
We findFrmti <» the battlefield, a kan ^ withSs buddies to care 
convicted timrf paroled into die for Sthing outride himself, Mi- 
army^vriwse heotoianns one of his a lot straighten 

old schoolmates. (Nather recog- . . . ■ . “TT . . 

nizes the otha, though Comendm Scrrau is a fenmnst, winch may 

smacks os with theeme.) Franti is rantmpKtteteoajginlo 
killed on a night patrol, Ms face the pattans and possibilities <rf 
oddlv luminous, clean beneath the 8C**da rota. 


ouesnoN* 


Aior? 

\ 


rvEGormo 
onm mikes 

ONHOLPNGHT 
NOW. f 

J&S*? 


oddly luminous, dean beneath the 
blood. This hi not the gray face cf 
fear — Tm frightened" are his last 
words before the attack — nor the 
shock Comendm wants, but death 
on a postcard. 

Another break in tone is wel- 
come, when the schoolboys watch a 

propaganda Shn in which a peas- 
ant boy cola ‘than Shirley Temple 
saves Italian forces tram their ene- 
mies and loses his leg in the bar- 
gain. Comendm cuts to the faces of 

the weeping audience members, 
and darned if the offscreen audi- 
ence isn’t wet-eyed over this 
kitschy spectacle, too. Comendm 
has madg kids out of us, and kids 
will believe almost anything if 


WORLDWIDE 

entertainment 


One awaits ha next film eagerly. 


management 


alone caimot stop the evening's fast Briefly to the Royal Court from 
becoming either a parody or a re- Newcastle has come the first Brit- 
mn cf all ife previous ish production of David Mamet’s 

about God and man in aS the other “Eitaon#’ (first seen in Chicago in 

Shaffer plays. Wendy Morgan — 

iMT«iy« a final moment of femi- 

nist revenge, Leigh Lawson and 

Anthony Head are wdl-cositrasted . . . , . c r 

as toe half-brothers, and Patrick ■ 

Stewart would doubtless be a fine 
king if Shaffer had written the part 
is any coherent detafl. 

□ 

On toe National’s Cottesloe 
stage, toe Ian McKellen acting 
company is making its final ap- 
pearance at toe end of an alt-too- 
short year in Mike Alfreds’* new 

UJL to Continue 
library Project 

The Associated Pros 

L ONDON — The British Li- 
/ brary, designed to be the most 
modem national Ebrary in the 
world, will have 180 mfles (290 ki- 
lometers) of shrives toe about 25 
milifon bodes when its second 
stage is completed in 1993, the arts 
minister. Richard Luce, said Mat- 
day night in announcing govern- 
ment approval of the addition. 

The ±96-mDlion (SI 37-miHion) 
first stage of the new library, con- 
taining reading rooms, an exhibi- 
tion center and storage, is being 
bruit next to the St. Pan eras rafl 
statkm and is scheduled to be com- 
pleted by 1989. Lace said the sec- 
ond stage would cost £61 million. 

The entire project is not expected 
to be finished until after the year 
2000. 

The British library was separat- 
ed from tiie British Museum in 
1971 but many of its books remain . . « 

at toe museum. The new building is inTTlg 

designed to provide better storage mont 

and conservation for the books that 

long ago overflowed from toe mu- OOG > 

seam into a score of buildings vwir 

across London. ycui 


draft 

Unmistakably 


s* Bcompton Road Knicktsbridgl London SWi Telephone oi '-nj v.n Telea:uw. 
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18-12-85 


B 3 Z H 

I 

: J 

1 

i* 







CONTAINER INVESTMENT • CONTAINER INVESTMENT • CONTAINER 


Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY,. DECEMBER 18, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 



Dow Jones Averages 


Opes mail low Last Chs. 

Indus issue tssui ismjs ismjq— uo 
Trans RUI 72B52 71301 719 -?7— 374 
Util 1T1JB 174.14 17035 173.14 + 115 
Comp S2SJ9 41199 41747— 1.74 


NYSE Diaries 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bonds 
U HI Mbs 
I ndustrials 




NYSE index 


High Low Closa OhK 
Cornwall* 12250 121.17 121.17—073 

liWwlrtab 13956 13072 13072—1.11 

Transp. 11572 11542 1 1562— 1.11 

U Ilium ‘4277 62JB tOM +043 

Ftntmc* 13247 13177 13141—097 


Odd- Lot Trading in N.Y. 


Bav Sales -ShYl 

Dec. 1* 390443 710*44 UM 

hell.,,, 390732 679,9*1 4413 

Dee.12 _ 214^45 71070$ 4622 

DOC. 11 495,045 734779 4.999 

Doc. 10 ■ ■■ 220401 474965 4345 

•Included in the rales Roura* 


Tuesday s 

MSE 

dosing 


AMEX Diaries 



NASDAOJrtdex 


amex Most Actives 


Hiatt Low Last aw 



Cawipdsljp 

induotriato 

Fi nones 

insurance 

Utilities 

Banks 

Trans* 


Week 
i art* Ago 
5 — 1,91 3174* 
I — • 273 321-41 
3-lJ* 41557 
( +049 37675 
| +003 2*3.14 
S — 050 33*J4 
3 — 3.12 22878 



1SSBUN 


17AOUM 

Prw CMHlMMid droe 

27^519.941 


BAT m l 
Wlrtes 1 
WanaB 

□oeneP 

TIE 

woigin 

CtilMAS 

CUiCdo 

HnwCrv 

DotuPd 
am mu 
Mavt»“ 
AL-trCo 

Wicks fdA 
HovOT 


4’o «*» 

y.S 44- 

22'* 19V, 
fim 2* 

A- 51« 
10W 

20 * 19}- 
14- j IA 
Mil 24- 
!4*e 14 s * 

Ft 59* 
73 k 231*1 
30A. 29*» 

MV; 30 
¥% V* 


5* 

m. —5% 
7k — to 

si* - n 

HW. V* 
30 + 4* 

■ *4^% + 4* 
im* - I* 

Sh 

zr*« -h 

30 — 1* 

30 ~ 54 

3W 


Standard & Poor's index 


AMEX Sales 


Tables Include the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing sa Wall Street and 
do not reflect kite trades elsewhere.. 

Via the Associated Press 


industrials 
Tramp. . 
Utilities 
Finance 
Commas . 


High LM Close ClTgo 
23447 m73 23343-143 
19275 18977 19028 —247 
9259 91.95 9277 +082 
2554 2550 2564—073 
21045 21051 21045 — 177 


4 PM. volume 
Prev. 4 PM. volume 
Pr*v. eons, whims 


13440400 

13620000 

13420400 



25*0 
2452 
104 
184 
50 m 
57 199* 
99 224* 
321 1744 
4655 294* 
284 
37 


NYSE Slides in Profit-Taking 


35'A 
S2VJ 
2416 
Th 
44W 
17V, 

1*6 
27 
644 
4499 
40 
13to 
12to - 
26* Aminos 
2244 Alcan 


3J0 

66 

275 

96 

267 

41 

160 

16 

66 

15 

64 

16 

2.90 

47 

260 

120 

360 

56 

1175 

126 

260 

106 

261 e 

87 

160 

36 

.92 

36 

266 

96 

166 

15 

68 

16 

160 

2 9 


2944 29 
546 54* 
1902 59V. 58V. 
7W Z744 27 
3427 2446 241* 
7842 55 534* 

821 298* 291* 
4532 351* 341* 

Mbit 


United Press huematHmal 

NEW YORK —The New York stock market 
broke its w innin g streak and succumbed to 
selling Tuesday, suffering its sharpest loss in 
two weeks. Trading was heavy. 

The Dow Jones industrial average fell on 
profit-taking early in the session but recouped 
losses and moved into phis territory by early 
afternoon. For a while, the btae-dupmdex held 
the high ground but in the end it backed down 
and finished with a loss of 8.60 to 1,54450. 

Broader market indexes receded from the 
record highs they set Monday. The New York 
Stock Exchange index fell 0.73 to 121.17 and 
Standard & Poor’s 500-stock index lost 1.37 to 
'210.65. The price of an average share dropped 
22 cents. 

Declines outpaced advances by a 5-3 ratio. 
Volume totaled 155.23 million shares, down 
from 176.03 million shares traded Monday: 

“The market is very vulnerable to profit- 
taking at this point,*’ said Trude T -nrinvr of 
Evans & Co. “When there is selling, everyone 
starts getting nervous.” 

She said that selling probably would continue 
early Wednesday and would intensify if the 
market does not manage to rally from the lower 
levels. 

Eugene Perom Jr, technical analyst at Bate- 
man Eichler, Hill Richards in Los Angeles said 
that after a 200-point advance, the market 
would likely become more moody and erratic. 

Mr. Perom said that investors would become 
more interested in such economic and monetary 


events as whether corporate earnings actually 
revive in the first quarter of 1986 and whether 
the Federal Reserve cuts the discount rate.- 

The Commerce Department reported U.S. 
housing starts fell \22 percent in November. 
The government also said the US. current ac- 
count deficit amounted to S30.5 billion in the 
third quarter. 

On the trading floor, AT&T was the most 
active NYSE-listed issue, adding K to 24%. 

Union Carbide followed, rising % to 70%. 
Carbide set up so-called “golden parachutes*' 
for 42 of its executives if a hostile takeover of 
thecompany is successful GAF Corp. fell 2VS to 
5816. The company, involved in a hostile take- 
over attempt of Union Carbide, filed suit in 
New York to Mock Carbide's S85-a-share slock 
swap offer. 

Texaco was third most active issue, dropping 
! to 27%. Pennzoil dropped 1% to 64%. 

Helping to send the Dow utilities index to an 
all-time Ugh, the second such record in two 
days. Commonwealth Edison rose U to 30 in 
volume of nearly 2 million shares. Pacific Gas & 
Electric added % to 20, Philadelphia Electric 
edged up % to 17%, Consolidated Edison added 
% to 28% - 

Among actively traded blue chips, IBM rose 
% to 152%, Exxon eased % to 53%, General 
Electric fell 1% to 71%, Sears lost % to 40 and 
U.S. Steel dropped % to 25%. 

High- technology issues were among the day’s 
biggest losers. Cray Research lost 4% to 64%, 
Texas Instruments fell 3% to 103%. 




370b 56 

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26 

31 

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11 

17 



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166 

46 

10 

160 

37 

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31 

168 

66 


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360 

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28 18 
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38U. 27 
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284* 16V* 


AtCvEi 258 U 
AttRldl 400 4J 
AtIRccf 280 16 
AtkoCp 

Aupot JO 16 
AufoOt 68 1.1 
Avalon n OSs 12 
AVEMC 60 16 
Avery 68 !.» 

AVTWl SO 1.4 


I 294* 29 29V. + Vh 

! 431* 43 431* — to 

152 151V* 152 +44 

I 13V* 13 131*— I* 

1 24V* 251* 2544—11* 
i 594* 5844 594* 

41* 24* 41* 

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HtatlLOw Stock DM. m PE HfaHfahUra qutf.OiW 






.121 


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WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 18, 1985 


INT»MI10IUL MANAGES 


Bringing Creative Hunkers 
Out of the Corporate Closet 


By SHERRY BUCHANAN . 

Intawttumal WctaM Tribune 

P ARIS — Creative is in. - Deductive reasoning is ant, 
according to the latest fad. To be competitive, companies 
need creative Thinkers to come op with new product 
or new ways to use old products. But, by definition, 
bureaucratic organizations tend to stomp out the creative think- 
ers. The corporate dile mm a is' bow to Institutionalize a higher 
level of creativity. 

“We need to bring the creative out of the closet,” says John 
Katzenbach, director of McKinsey A Co., the New Yoric-based 
management consulting firm 

But bringing the creatives out of the doset may often mean that 
management has to accept a 


higher degree of fail ore. 

“One of the problems with 
the products of a creative' 
thinker is that 99 out of 100 
are useless,” says Eeke Ver- 
shuur, a firm believer in ere- , 
alive thinking and a senior re- 
search engineer with Shell 
Laboratory in Amsterdam, an 


Hie environment 
in a company 


Ae irnnsnul 


operating company of Shell Research BV and Shell's largest 
research laboratory. “But, if you don’t allow creative thinking, 
yon never get that 1 -per cent success rate.” 

To bring more creativity into the corporate world, companies 
are willing to do just about anything. Many large companies such 
as General Electric Co. of the United States, International 
Business Machines Corp., American Telephone & Telegraph Co. 
and Royal Dutch/ Shell Group, are sending their managers to 
creativity consultants. Some companies just send a few already- 
creative types who will then join smart idea teams. Others send 
everybody from senior-level managers to Hue managers and 
researchers. 

Creativity consultants are selling corporate believers a wide 
variety of creativity-enhancing tools ranging from old brain- 
storming sessions to word association games and analng aa, as 
well as techniques based on the consultants’ own experience. 


T HE TECHNIQUES are supposed to help yon lode at an 
old problem from anew angle so that, if all goes well, you 
will come up with a creative solution. The international 
scientific c ommuni ty is still divided as to what extent creativity is 
a skin that can be taught. 

“Creative drinking is making a connection in the mmd that is 
not logical,” says Jason Smelling, director of Synectics LtcL, the 
British subsidiary of Synectics Inc.. “The censor inside us is 
always reinforced in company meetings. Most new ideas by 
definition appear unworkable, so people fed they can only put 
forward highly defensible ideas.” 

Synectics, in Cambridge, Massachus etts, started 25 years ago 
organizing brainstorming sessions for companies. It now teaches 
m echanisms that help people listen to new without rejecting 

them out of hand. With two-day sessions costing $10,000 and up, 
Synectics reports an annua] revenue increase of 20 percent over 
last year. 

Companies who believe in creativity training have plenty of 
success stories to teEL In 1982, after & Synecocs-led creativity 
session. Etonic Shoe Co., a subsidiary of Colgate-Palmolive Co., 
came up with a new tennis shoe that is as comfortable as being 
barefoot During that session, an executive said he wished he 
could play tennis barefoot Synectics argues that, in a regular 
company meeting, the barefoot idea would have been rejected 

immediately as being “dumb.” 

“As soon as you are in a creative session, you can say anything 
you want, even if people laugh at you,” says Jacobus Steenbaker, 
training manager at Cyananrid BV, die Dutch subsidiary of the 
UiL chemical manufacturer. 

After a two-day creative session last week at Cyananrid in 
Rotterdam, a task force of five chemists, five senior managers and 
five line managers came up with six new ways to develop a 
propylene-based product. The problem facing the task force was 
(Continued on Page 14, CoL 5) 


| Currency Rates 


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contract. Ait prices m us. Seer ounce. 
Source: Reuters. 


Hcralh^^eribunc. 


BUSINESS / FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 10 


** 


Page IX 



The U.S. 
On Trade 

Publishes a list 
Of 23 r Obstacles’ 


The Asaackaed Pnat 

BRUSSELS — The European 
Community, seeking to counter 
UJS. criticism of iu trade practices, 
accused the United States on Tues- 
day of erecting a wide range of 
barriers to free trade. 

Hie Common Market’s execu- 
tive branch published a Gsi of 23 
examples of what it called direct 
and indirect US. barriers to Euro- 
pean goods and services. 

The list includes a program an- 


nounced by the Reagan admnris- 
st Ma\ 


nation last May to give away up to 
52-bflEon worth of farm products 
to help U.S. exporters recapture 
for«n markets. 

EC nffidak said their attack on 
the United States was an attempt to 
'prevent the admi^T^ t mrinp 

from "perpetnating the false im- 
press] cm that only foreign nations 
traded unfairly.” 

Three months ago the Reagan 
administration launched a new 
trade pdxw armed at eliminating 
foreign trade restrictions and subsi- 
dies. And, in October, it stepped up 
the campaign by beginning legal 
action against what it called exces- 
sive EC export subsidies on wheat 

“World opinion coold be led to 
believe that the United States was 
the only [country] to respect the 
rales of the game of world trade," 
said Willy de Qereq, the ECs com- 

m i man ner for mwnil affaire 

“The notion of fair trade must be 
applied in the same way on both 
sides of die Atlantic,” he said in a 
written statement 

Among the EC complaints is a 
charge that Eu rop e an exports are 
restricted by UB. import quotas on 
a variety of farm products, includ- 
ing peanuts, sugar and syrups and 
certain daily products. 

Still another com plain t relates to 

an outright vklai^^die ^§79 
subsidies code of the General 
Agreement on Tariffs and Trade. 
GATT is a 90-nation accord that 
sets out fair-trade rales and proce- 
dures for settling disputes. 

The other complaints include a 
U.S. failure to accelerate tariff cuts 
on vitamin B-12 as requested by a 
GATT panel, customs barriers to 
imports of European steel tubes 
. ana pipes, and UJL restrictions on 
imports of firearms and munitions. 

Mr. de Qercq said his list was 
not exhaustive but was an indica- 
tion that the United States was as 
guilty as Europe in ma in ta in ing ob- 
stacles to free trade. 


Shiseido: Putting on a New Face 

Cosmetic Finn 


Tries Markets 
Outside Japan 


By Susan Chira 

New York Tuna Sonia 

TOKYO ■— Every so often. 
Victor Harris, the president of 
Max Factor’s Japanese subsid- 
iary, is pressed by his U.S. super- 
visors to attack the weaknesses 
of the Japanese cosmetics giant, 
Shfedda But he says: Tve spent 
a career examining their weak- 
nesses, and you’re not going to 
find any major ones." 

Mr. Harris, whose company is 
a leading foreign cosmetics con- 
cern in Japan, gryes Shiseido top 
grades in marketing, production, 
quality and management, all of 
which have helped to push the 
company to ihe'top here. Last 
year, Shiseido had sales of $1-5 
trillion. 



And now Shiseido, the third- 
largest cosmetics company in the 
wood, after Avon and L’Orfcal of 
France, has begun a more ag- 
gressive drive to sell its products 
outride Asia. 

Shisei do has been mailing its 
fine in the United Stales for 20 
years. But in the early 1970s, 
when h tried to make its prod- 
ucts in the United States using 
subcontractors, it was not happy 
with the raw materials used or 
the perfo rman ce of employees. 
In the late 1970s, it tried again 
unsuccessfully. 

The latest effort, though, Shi- 
seido says, is resulting in brisk 
sales in the United States, which 
it earimatea at $63 mOlioa annu- 
ally. 


iho Non York Tir 

A saleswoman for Shiseido attends to a customer at one 
of the Tokyo outlets of the big cosmetics company. 


Shiseido's renewed efforts 
abroad come at a time of slower 
growth and increased competi- 
tion at home. The company re- 
corded lower growth rates than 
many of its Japanese and foreign 
rivals last year, as it had in 1981 
and 1 982. The only recent year in 
which its growth exceeded that 
of the industry as a whole was 
1983. 

Shiseido is selling to a market 
that analysts describe as mature. 
And while its domestic leader- 
> remains secure, Shiseido has 
fed the top share of depart- 
ment-store sales to a much smaH- 
er U.S. competitor, Clinique. 


In the fiscal year ended Nov. 
30, 1984. Shiseido earned 562.4 
million- Its sales grew 1.7 percent 
from 1983, below the 3.7-percent 
average growth of the industry as 
calculated by the Shukan Shogyo 
trade magazine, which polls 400 
companies selling cosmetics in 
Japan, but higher than the 1.4- 
pezeent worldwide rate. 

Shiwirin has not mainiaineri 
its lead for about 30 years, how- 
ever, by remaining complacent. 
The company spends about 6 
percent of its sales on advertising 
— a figure considered low for 


(Condoned on Page 14, CoL 0 


BA Posts 6.3% Rise in Pretax Profit 


Japan Air Loses 
Route Monopoly 


Untied Press International 

TOKYO — The Japanese 
cabinet ruled Tuesday that Ja- 
pan Air Lines must give up its 
1 5-year-old monopoly on inter- 
national passenger flights, 
opening the way for the coun- 
try's domestic carriers to apply 
for overseas routes. 

The cabinet abolished a 1970 
“aviation constitution” that 
regulated a strict divirion of 
markets among Japan's three 
major airlines. It was designed 
to promote the growth and de- 
velopment of the nation's avia- 
tion industry. 

Under that law, the 34.5-per- 
cent government-owned JAL 
was assigned international 
routes and domestic flights con- 
necting laige dues, while Toa 
Domestic Airways and All Nip- 
pon Airways were allowed to 
provide other domestic service. 


By Bob Hagerty 

International Hertaa Tribune 

LONDON — British Airways 
PLC said Tnesday that pretax prof- 
it rose 6 J percent in the six months 
ended Sept- 30, largely reflecting 
lower interest costs. 

BA's results are being closely 
watched as the government pre- 
pares' to sell the airline to private 
investors. The sale, long delayed by 
the need to settle litigation, is tentar 
lively scheduled for next s umm er 
and is expected to value the airline 
at around £1 biHian ($1 .44 bflKon). 

BA said its pretax profit in- 
creased-to £20rnriffion uom-£189 
minion a year earlier. Net profit 
rose 7 parent to £200 millian from 
£187 wrilKon- the airline pays little 
tax because it is still daiming tax 
relief from huge losses recorded 
several years ago. 

Lord King of Wartnaby, chair- 
man, said the results represented 
“good progress” after the “excep- 
tionally good” performance m the 
year ended last March 31. 

But profit before interest and 
taxation, or operating profit, fell IS 
percent to £222 nriDioa in the latest 
six months from £260 nriDioa a 
year earlier, even though revenue 
grew 11 percent to £1.74 biDian 
from £1.57 bQfiao. 

Two airline accidents during the 
six months cat operating profit by 
at least £9 million, BA raid. One 
accident in August at Manchester, 
England, in which 55 passengers 
were killed, caused the loss of a 
Boeing 737, Another accident 
forced the airline to withdraw from 
service a TriStar jet during the peak 
summer travel period. 

BA also cited the loss ot 
able routes to Jeddah and Dl 
in Saudi Arabia. Those routes were 
transferred to British Caledonian 
Airways as part of a government 
restructuring of the Botish airline 
business last year. In return, BA 
won new routes to South America. 

The new routes “are performing 
weD and prospects are encourag- 


ParUamentary Panel Asserts Sale 
Of British Telecom Was Under-Priced 


Reuters 

LONDON — A parliamentary committee asserted Tuesday that 
the British government under-pneed the shares of the national tde- 
communi cations company when it was sold into private hands. 

The Committee of Public Accounts, which monitors public spend- 
ing, said the sale of British Telecommunications PLC m November 
1984 could have raised more money for the taxpayers. 

The sale of the government’s 503-percent stake in British Telecom 
raised £3^ billion, or $4.6 billion at the exchange rate then in farce. 

But the commi ttee said: “It can be argued with hindsight that the 
price was over-cautious and that a modest increase of four or five 
pence in the offer price of £1 JO would have brought in a higher 
return." 

It said the Treasury and the Department of Trade and Industry 
should review the sale in light of the plans by P rim e Minister 
Margaret Thatcher’s Conservative gov ernmen t to transf er other gov- 
ernment holdings to the private sector. These indude British Airways 
PLC and British Gas Corp. 

As soon as trading began in British Telec ommunicat ions shares in 
December 1984, then- pnee soared, and a spok e s man for the opposi- 
tion Labor Party, Alan Williams, accused me government of “crimi- 
nal incompetence" in pricing the issue. 

“The government has today presided over the biggest giveaway in 
British commercial history,” the Labor spokesman said at the time. 


ing. but they have yet to contribute 
profits,” BA said. 

The drop in operating profit also 
reflected currency-translation 
losses and higher fuel costs. For the 
year ending March 31, fuel costs 
will show an increase of 10 percent, 
according to the estimate of Colin 
Marshall, chief executive. 


BA complained that regulatory 
or rriected 


agencies bad delayed or rcji 
some of its applications to increase 
fares. 

Interest costs declined to £29 
million from £48 nriDion as BA 
reduced its drill to £464 million 
from £647 million last March 31 
and more than £1 bflKon in 1983. 
The decline reflects both 
meats and the decline of the 
in winch much of BA’s debt is de- 
nominated. 

BA's net worth stood at £499 


million f up from £297 milHnn 
year before. 

BA also said it was confident 
that h could settle by next spring a 
class-action lawsuit arising from 
the 1982 collapse of Laker Airways 
Ltd The suit, filed in a U.S. district 
court, alleged that BA and others 
conspired to fix prices for certain 
categories of air travel between 
Britain and the United States. 


Lost July, BA and several other 
defendants settled another suit by 
agreeing to pay a total of $48 mil- 
lion to the liquidator of Laker and 
others. That suit charged that the 
defendants fixed prices in an effort 
to drive Laker out of business. 


For the year ended March 31, 
BA recorded an extraordinary loss 
of £33 nnDkm to cover the estimat- 
ed amount of cash it will pay unde 
the settlements. 


U.S. Current Account Deficit Widened in Quarter 


By Stuart Auerbach 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The United 
Stales slipped deeper into drill to 
foreign creditors as the current ac- 
count deficit — the broadest mea- 
sure of the nation's trade and fi- 
nancial transactions with the rest of 
the world — grew to 53CL5baffion in 
the third quarter, the Commerce 


is was the second-largest 
quarterly deficit, just SO bDhon 
behind the record set during the 
fourth quarter of last year, and an 
increase of $2J billion from the 
second-quarter mark. 

On the basis of new information, 
the government said that the trade 
picture was slightly better in the 
second quarter than it appeared 
when the trade figures were re- 
leased m September. The second- 
quarter deficit was revised down 
from $31 J bflKon to $27.7 bflKon. 

The third-quarter current ac- 
count figures — which measures 
merchandise trade, sales of services 
*nd overseas investment — mam , 
tamed the United States as a debtor 
nation for the first time since 
World War L The slide to debtor 
stains was forecast after the first 
quarter, but received confirmation, 
in September when the third-quar- 
ter figures were released. 

Commerce Secretary Malcolm 
Baldtjge blamed the increased defi- 
cit increase on “the widening mer- 
chandise trade deficit,” which rose 
$4.6*hilliQn, to a record $33.1 bfl- 
Mon. This swamped improvements , 


in tbe service sector that were due 
largely to the weakening of the dol- 
lar. 

Net service receipts jumped by 
34 percent, to $6.7 billion, as in- 
come on UJ. direct investment 
overseas increased $1.6 billion, to 
$1(12 bflUon. This was dne to in- 
creases in the value of foreign cur- 
rencies and the weaker dollars, 
which enhanced income on over- 
seas investments when it was con- 
verted to doflars. 

At the same time, income from 
foreign ownership of investments 
in the United States declined by 
$400 niflHnn, to S2.4 billion. This 
was due hugely to falling interest 
rates. 

The balance of payments deficit 
was a record $107.4 bflKon last year 


and in 1983 it was $46 bflKon. The 
deficit totals $822 bflKon for the 
first three quarters of this year. 

■ Housing Starts Tumble 
The Commerce Department also 
reported Tuesday that housing 
construction plummeted 12 2 per- 
cent in November, the steepest de- 
cline in six months. The Associated 


Analysts have been puzzled by 
the weakness in housing activity, 
given the fact that mortgage rates 
have now fallen to their lowest lev- 
els in six years. 


from Washington. 


The department said that the de- 
cline left construction at an annual 
rale of 1.55 million units in Novem- 


ber, the lowest pace since April 
‘ . decline 


1983. The month- to-month 
was the sharpest since a 13-percent 
drop in March. Housing starts had 
risen 9 percent in October follow- 
ing a 7.1-percent September de- 
cline. 


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\ irai i 


Deutsche R ank 


To Sell 10% of 
Daimler’s Stock 


By Warren Gecler 

International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — Deutsche 
Bank AG, in an eariia-lhan-ex- 
pected move that win raise 3.81 
billion Deutsche marks ($1.5 bil- 
lionX said Tuesday it would offer 
3.4 niiTKnn shares in Daimler-Benz 
AG through an mteraational bank 
consortium. 

The shares, which amount to 10 
. percent of the West German auto- 
maker’s equity and are to be ac- 
quired through Deutsche Bank’s 
recent agreement to buy the Flick 
group, wifl be offered at 1,120 DM 
each, or a 100.5- DM discount from 


from late last week and derided to 
move the offering forward to take 
advantage of demand." 

Daimler's shares have been 
among the best poforming West 
German blue chip issues this year, 
soaring from lows around 550 DM 
to records of around 1,260 DM in 
recent weeks. Spurring demand for 
Daimler shares have been major 
diversification moves this year by 
tbe automaker into high-technol- 
ogy. including a pending acquisi- 
tion of a majority stake in AEG 
AG. the electronics conglomerate. 


and the purchase of a majority 
tnei 


Tuesday’s closing price of Daimler 
Of 1^205f 


50 cn the Frankfurt Stock 
Exchange, down from 1,252 DM 
Monday. Deutsche Bank's shores, 
meanwhile, rose to 801 DM Tues- 
day from 800 DM Monday. 

Deutsche Bank declined to say 
which banks had been invited to 
act as co-managers of tbe offer, but 
industry sources said the consor- 
tium partners wifl be primarily 
West German and Swiss banks. 
Dresdner Bank AG and Commerz- 
bank AG, West Germany^ second 
and third largest commercial banks 
after Deutsche, and Westdeutscbe 
Landesbank Girozentrale, the larg- 
est state-owned bank, will be senior 
co-managers, sources at the banks 
said. 

Deutsche Bank’s announcement 
took the market by surprise, as the 
bank had said several weeks ago 
that the Daimler stake would be 
offered to the public about six to 
eight weeks into the coming year. 
Deutsche Bank owns an estimated 
28.5 percent stake in Daimler, but 
has said it has no intention of wid- 
ening that stake through its Flick 
takeover. 

A Deutsche Bank spokesman 
said the subscription period for the 
Daimler shares opened Tuesday 
and will run through Jan. 3, if nec- 
essary. He said the bank regarded a 
placement beginning this week as 
“optimal timing." 

“There’s no doubt Deutsche was 
planning to do this in January," 
said Robert Boon of the London- 
based investment firm of PhflKps & 
Drew, “but Deutsche saw the snarp 
price rise across the [stock] market 


bolding in Dornier GmbH, tne na- 
tion's second-largest aerospace 
group, after Messerscbmitu-Bbl- 
kow-Blohm GmbH. 

“We don't think the price Deut- 
sche is asking is unsatisfactory- al- 
though it is cot at oll-iime'high 
levels,” Mr. Be ton said, echoing the 
.(Continued on Page 14, CoL 6) 


Crude Prices Fall 
In Hectic Trade 


Agcnce Fnmce-Preue 

LONDON — Oil prices 
turned sharply lower Tuesday 
on reports that Venezuela 
would abandon a price plan ap- 
proved by the Organization of 
Petroleum Exporting Countries 
and that Mexico would cut its 
own prices to conform to those 
on the spot market. 

The price for January deliv- 


Nigeria makes forecast on 
OPEC ofl output Page 14. 


ery of the most widely traded 
European crude. North Sea 
Brent, fdl in hectic trading to 
$25.45 a barrel from £26.30 on 
Monday while February con- 
tracts fell more than $1, to 
$24.50 a barrel from $25 JO. 

Traders said the rumored 
price moves upset an already 
skittish market. Tbe influential 
UJ. review. Petroleum Intelli- 
gence Weekly, reported that 
OPEC production has risen to 
18 million barrels a day from 
17.8 million in mid-November. 



lU 






rut;: ir 

/•v rne\CH 
> SUIlSfi-'iP 


BI-WEEKLY LETTER OP RARE NEWS AND PROSPECTIVE PUBLISHED BY 




600 5 
900 5 


PLEASE RETURN SUBSCRIPTION FORM WITH PAYMENT 

1. AIR MAIL 

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To receive the text of one or more Topics, wl back and remain in tne. 

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NAME FIRST NAME 

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by □ Cheque □ Visa Card number 

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7S0Q8 PARIS - Tol. 42J5B9J0 - Telex: DIFCOM 641 654 F 
Subscriptions start as soon as payment is recevakf. 




' 7 -.' ■■ 


I 








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. JUuten 

BRUSSELS — European Community mini* - 
lots have failed io agree on a common stand on 
attempts to solve the international tin aim, a 
British spokesman said Tuesday. 

British officials had hoped to persuade the 
other EC nations to agree to discuss shari ng the 
liabilities of tin; International Tin Council, 

; winch is scheduled to meet Wednesday in Lon- 
don. But France and West Germany Mocked 
agreement, saying each country should act on 
its own in the talks, the spokesman said. 

Tin trading has come almost to a standstill 
since late October when the 1TC, which groups 
22 producer and consumer nations, ran out of 
rponey to support the world tin price. Most EC 
countries, which form the largest bloc within 
the ITC, do not accept legal liability for the 
organization's debts. 


FIRST 


In August 1985, Research Services 
Ltd. released a study of the reading 
habits of international financial 
managers in Europe/ The study 
showed conclusively that more read 
Institutional Investor than any other 
magazine. ..including: 

• The Economist 

• Euromoney 

• Business Week 

• Fortune 

• Time 

• Newsweek 

• Der Spiegel 

• Le Nouvel Economiste 

In fact, in virtually every category- 
fromjob responsibility of financial 
manager to industry to geographic 
location, the story remained the 
same: Institutional Investor ranked 
first 

And if worldwide leadership is not 
reason enough to advertise in 
Institutional Investor, here is another: 
thanks to strengthening international 
currencies, coupled with a new rate 
structure, an advertising schedule in 
1986 will cost international 
marketers significantly less than it 
did in 1985. 

Put first things first Contact your 
Institutional Investor account 
executive today. Or, contact 
Christine Cavolina, European 
Advertising Director, in London at 
(01) 379-7511. In New York, contact 
Denise C. Coleman, V.R & 
International Advertising Director at 
(212) 303-3388. 


■Co-sporaorad by Business Week, The Economist, 
Euramoney, The Financial Tunes. Institutional Investor 
in te rnational and The WEH Street Joumai/Euiope. 


Floating-Rate Notes 


Dollar 


* vufyv.. Yyl 


EP DECLARES 60 -CENT 

DISTRIBUTION 


Enserch Exploration Partners, Ltd., on 
December 6, 1985, declared a quarterly 
cash distribution of 60 cents per unit, pay- 
able January 3, 1986, to unitholders 
of record December 16, 1985. Enserch 
Exploration Partners* Ltd. <NYSE-EP), a 
Texas limited partnership, conducts sub- 
stantially all the domestic oil and gas 
operations of ENSERCH Corporation 
(NYSE-ENS). 

For additional information, please write to 
Benjamin A Brown, Vice President, Financial 
Relations, Dept. M,_ ENSERCH Center, Box 
999, Dallas, Texas 75221. 


EXPLORATION 

PAFTTNERS, LTD. 








































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Page 13 


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»v 31ft Totten 180 zt 
64 34ft Taxb-pf “” m 34 
lift 6V Tl»«* 371 


104 


W 16 

10 

24 22 
13 
U 


4Sft 44V 44V— )ft 

. 25* 34* 35ft + * 
177 Ik 1 8ft 
42 20V 28 20 

MS 31* X* m-ib| 

3 1MV 1« 19B +W* 
jw 19 uw M* + ft 

22 2m 20* 20*6-* 

176 9W6 99* 89*— W 
1« SM9 41V 39 37 -8* 

17 26 17ft 17 77 — V 

~ 074 a* 57ft 5 }*— * 

79 3ft 2V 3ft + V 
471299* 276*276*— * 
4H 17* Mb 14*—* I 
653 5BV ST* 58ft— ft 
1110 44V 43* 44 — V 


36V 14ft T retort 6 
19* -lift ToroCo 
5 1 Tosco 

loft 5ft Taw* 

7* JV Towle at 
41V 2SV ToyRU* 

2fiv 16 Truer i 
15ft 13 Tiumln 
23 9V TWA 
u imTWApf 
K4 is* Tranuri 
22* 18ft Treninc 

14 lift TARltY 

71ft 15* TmCdani,T2 _ 

57V. 44 Tranaco 68*138 SI 
66* S3 Trneepl 387 68 
SSft soft TitkcbI 4J3 U ' 

2(* IB* Tran Ex 2J6 IZ4 
U* J* Traneen 
97 65 ft TrGPaf Ut «j 

47ft 29ft T 

43V atv* T _ _ 

25ft 12V TwUwtA ' ' 30 27V 22*4 22V 

as 2 * m “SsiwSft-fc 

2S* It* I**dpf 1.40 98 3 19* 17* 17*— V 

49* Uft Trawler 284 4J 11 *726 47* 44 V 47ft - * 

gft SOftTrovef 4.16 78 113 S4 55* Si + V 

3“ X44611J IV 29V 39 39ft 

2 TrtCnn* 2J0M ll 26* 26V 26V — ft 

I ^?^c s ?^2i M J «»»»-* 
’* ,J 19 


125 158 209 15* 14* IS 

1 JO 41 17 2193 36* 36* 35 — * 

128 HU 65 2 21* 21* + ft 

180 78 t] V II 12* B* 

' 35 IS* 15ft iSft— ft 

668 S2* 52 S3 — * 
33 Mft 64 64 — T 

560 55ft aft 54ft— ft 

654 19ft 16* 19 + * 

I 238 Bft 8 8 - * 

2530z 06V 96 96 — V 

3 at* 2 e* am 

7 67 14ft 14 Mft + ft 

rronwy 180 38 13 433 46ft 46* 46ft + ft 

Trmrid JS VI 16 6482 40* 39* (0 


7* 5ft Trten 
17* 12ft Trtnty 
35ft MV TrilElM 
44* 33* Tuc»EP 

IT* 9* Tultex 
Vf. It TwinDa 
g* 31* TyraLb 

17* 13* Triers 


OTS 1! 

JOb 3 ^ 




. — -20 

180 67 « 
7J 16 
48 IS 
1-7 14 
17 13 


18 

560 
19 3* 

121 S* 
IK 14 


S3* 35ft — V 
a* 36ft- V 
3V 3* 

6ft 6ft— V 
\&L 15*—* 


a 

80 

JO 


25ft 24* 25* + * 
723 45ft 44lk 44ft + ft 
06 18* 18 18*— ft 

It 15ft 18* IS* + V 
165 47* 46V *7V— V. 
m 15* 14V 14*—* 


7J B mk 38* 39V— V 


u 


JOb 25 12 
ZOO 18191 

JU 1019 
IJ 23 
Z 1 7 1 


MV. 33 ThmBet 1J6 3 J 19 
» 15* Thom In Jjb X4 11 

is* MV TtxnMM JO 28 M 


25* 18* Thrifty 
34 13* TWwtr 

18* 5M Tlaefln 


Zt 16 

48 


180 


32 31V 22 4- V 

187 183 103* — 3* 

5* 4U _£*— * 

79456 MM T3V BV— ft 
IS 31* 31V 31V— V 

9 3004 51* 49* 50V— V 
US JM 54ft— ft 

66 11V n 11*— V 

17 27V 27ft 77ft 
1*4 22ft Jlft 33 
449 40* 39 39V— V 

MO 20V Wt 30 +V 
M 14V 14 X — ft 
531 25* 24* 25 — * 
374 13* 13* 13V + V 
90* 7* 7* 7ft— V 


23V UK . ___ _ 

59 38 TlmaM US V U 

°9V « ““ 

5S JSffiSf fS8n 

21V 15V Toktoni J8 27 11 
23* 16* Tot Ed* iSJollJ 6 
as ToiEd pf 3J2 128 
XV as* TctEDpt 3JS 12J 
28V 23* To! Ed of 3J7 1X4 
33* 29 TtUEdpf 438 128 
20* Uft ToiEd Pf 236 1Z1 
18* 15* ToiEd pT 221 J1A 
33 10 Tonkoa .10 A 6 

61V K TdeJRoi 8b J IS 


1J If 12S0 64* 43* 44 — * 


IISkHihires 

Via The Associated Press 


‘ton Season 

oh Law 

Open Htoh Law 

Dec. 17 

Close Qa 

Grains ! 


■ "-‘ r «Sl8hninlnftnt m- donors per buttgu 

3V, 279ft Dec i«ft XOft 1«V 246* — 8BV 

■fiTS 4* 287 Mar 144ft 147 142ft 146* -81V 

2 204 Mar 126ft 136ft 222V 133ft - 

TcClC2* 143 Jid 293ft 294 290 293 

J 247 Sep 290V 293 290* 293V 4-J0V 

tv 29a Dec iaa kjjv ioi* ubv +jnv 

Safa Prev. Salts 1384 
v. Day Open Int 30753 eHUt 

Ibu mSuraum- dollars per twihel 

. J 214* Dec 1ST 251V 249ft ISO —.00ft 

234ft Mar 251 151* 247V 250ft — 80V 

IV 231 MOV 256 256ft 254 254V —80V 

-i 133 Jul 255 2S7V> 254ft XISV +J00V 

> 224V SOP 237 241 236 IMS* +84 

ift 230V Dec 227 230 226 229ft +83* 

-„J» 231ft Mar 233 225V 232ft 235ft +JO* 

:.-:2feop«i^mSPSrW 

- ‘beams ccen _ 


.-4 430 

485V 

.-• -'-r 489 

487 

• r '470ft 

456 

• in 470 

. . „ 587 

£* 219* 

-*• !ctoyOoon lnt72648ofl99 
:~r."AGAN RMALICmr 
1 per ton 


Jan 539ft 5L3J J35 SJ6 —81 

Mar 541 544ft 535*. 5J7ft —80ft 

Mdv iH 555 546V 5J8V — 80V 

Jul 5J8 581 557ft 554V —81V 

AUB 553ft 558 551 532ft 

Sao 5J2 540 531 536V +8CU 

MOV 531 530 530* 534V +86 

Jon 540 547ft 540 545ft +JBft 

MOT 356 +8Sft 

Prav. Salat 31495. 


L40 DOC 14200 14170 U1J» 14240 

12781 Jon 141 JO 14450 14270 14280 

13080 Mar 14X20 14530 14120 14440 

DUI . May 14580 14780 14+90 14530 

13480 Jul 14680 14180 14650 147.70 

1355) Aug 14780 MOJO 14650 14750 

USB Sep 14430 145SD 14480 14550 

13500 Oct 14278 

13680 DK 14180 14480 14180 14480 

D680 JOR 14230 14350 14230 14330 


+30 

+50 

+80 

+.W 

+1JD 

+250 

+080 

4280 


33 

2230 


- - “Day Open inf. 4X1 
.-SEAN OIL (ctm 
. iKw-doflnry perICO 

> i mi ok 

:-t7 WL32 Jon 

- - I 1890 Mar 

. -• 3 WJ5 May 

| 17J6 Jul 

- .-.ril 19JB A4>e 

...« 1955 Sea 

r:--0. 1951 Oct 

. .-0 J9J0- Dec 

• - --0 • 19J0 Jon 

Prev. Sates MJ77 
-: - DavOpwtltt. 49414 up 1803 



Livestock 


JLE(CME) 

- ibL- ants per lb. 

5 5580 Dk 

_ -5 . 5433 M 

- -J 3330 Apr 
..,4 . sus Mm 
• -rl. 3330. AM 
.^1 5750 Ocf 

.) _S9.U Dec 


6475 
6020 
60.10 
6050 
5V JO 
5860 
6050 


6550 

61JS 

6155 

6130 

6027 

S93S 

6050 


to§ 

fkn 

6085 


-—Sir S 444 Sates 14748 

.Day Open InL 6U47 up 573 

:,- *2E" CATTLE tCMEl 

-'.Sbv-nnisperlb. 

6050 Jan 6480 66.10 6475 

6083 Mar 6425 4447 45J» 

...J 6086 Apr 65.15 6685 6480 

-•■V 60.10 May 64X 6585 64.10 

-V 65.18 Aug 633S 6485 6325 

'■U« 1505 PreTsatej IJ6S 

.Toy Open InL 10033 uplll 

;^s8m 

3413 Apr 4Z2S 4240 

2M5 '{“P 6480 4490 

4ȣ JU 4402 4580 

«3S Ana 4X95 4480 

• X87 Oct 40J5 4057 

- »37 Dec 41.17 41.17 

• 6040 Feb 4187 41X7 

.5* W8S n-ev.5atos SJV 

• *oyOpnlnt 23825 off 69 
U BELLIES (CME) 

^Mrcmbperib. 

. §35 Feb 6780 6785 66J0 

KJK Mar 6650 6680 6545 
* . MW 6650 6683 65.75 

. ' CTJ0 Jul 65BB 6480 6430 

’ S350 Aup 6X30 6122 6205 

••* 3185 Pruv. Sales 5J24 
°v Open lot 9866 up 62 


6465 

6OJ0 

6032 

6070 

59J5 

5850 

oolos 


6435 

6447 

6422 

6485 

65J7 


+.15 
— SO 
+30 


+-S 

+57 



6650 —182 
6585 

6475 —1.10 
6412 —55 

6352 —153 


Food 


J C(MYCSCE) 

1»5S Dec 21080 21080 30380 20170 

; W49J Mar 20796 207.96 30796 20796 

T318B May 21180 31180 21188 21180 

■ Jut 71380 21586 21580 21380 

- }»JS Sep 219.16 217.14 219.14 219.14 

IM80 Dec 32387 22387 22387 22387 

J425D Mar . 22+00 

» - M ov =“-SD M6J0 23680 22630 

• * Jr 5 * 4 Prev. Sales |JB6 
brOPMInL U980 off B6 
WORLD n WYCSCEl 

Ut Mar 


555 

650 


315 

653 


350 

656 


+15 

-HUM 

+680 

S8 

as 

+600 




Currency Options 




Dot 17 


Pets— Loot 


•80 

38S 


0.13 


034 

r 


035 


280 

495 


0X2 

185 

183 

285 


0X5 

Off 


Wl^LPHIA EXCHANGE 
ViiNe 

• Price Coin— Lari 

400 Mer Dee Jan Mar 

™ tanDKMlB ner oatt. 

WO 1 r r 

us s r 985 

140 ■ 4.15 550 

• MS MS 6 255 

1» B 055 155 

• J* * r US 

taira Doitan-cents per wWT. 

ZI 5 r r 

72 S r 0X3 

71 8 r r 

. . 74 % r 087 

,* Berman MfliHe-c w h per natt. 

35 5 r 312 

34 3 r 4.17 

37 % r 116 

ner 2x0 
37 1 182 US 

40 9 033 187 

. ... 41 9 087 083 

BB RnkoIHii of a can! per anil 
, H O 3 r 330 1 19 r 

w*m« Yea-lOOtM of a cent per imiL 

42 9 r 780 s r r 

43 s r 682 err 

« • r SJO s r r 

4S s r 651 * r r 

V » r r 9 081 084 

47 a r 283 * r r 

« s 0J1 IN & M3 093 

50 s 0.17 083 1 r r 

_ S3 ■ r Z15 e r r 

• FrmKs-ceati per unit. 

33 3 9 1665 9 9 

40 9 S 780 S £ 

44 9 r 482 1 r 

V 9 r 280 B r 

47 s OK 1-77 s 0.19 

. V 1.15 B50 r b r 

-■OL 79K Caflapee hrt. 

BL 4877 PUT open let. 

MM-9-Nd epllan offered 
T*nn (o u rriwe e artes). 


0.13 

080 

t 

t 


Season Season 


High 

LOW 


Oaen 

High 

LOW 

Ctaaa 

Ota. 

7.15 

158 

May 

6X8 

6X7 

6X4 

6X4 

—89 

+90 

& 

Jul 

627 

628 

63B 

4J9 

—.11 


Son 


601 

+90 



700 

402 

Oct 

702 

707 

607 


—07 

705 

+25 





J Y4l 


7X8 

ESI. Sotos 

+61 

Mar 7X2 7X5 

Prev.Sates HU02 

7X5 

7X5 

—08 


Prev. Day Open lnt.lO!X14 up 1512 
COCOA (MYCSCE1 


10 manic tonrS^ertM 


H— 

I960 

I960 


May 

Jul 

Sap 

Mar 


2240 

2290 

2301 

2325 

2353 


2250 

2297 

2313 

2339 

2355 


2215 

2165 

2290 


2226 

2271 


17780 
16250 
157 80 
IMP - 
12380 
11180 
16155 


EsL Sates Prev.Sdes 1877 
Prey. Day Open I to. 17J75 up 138 
ORANGE JUICE (NYCE) 

15000 UxL-oonts per lb. 

10080 11150 Jan 13490 12275 1167S 13155 — 3JD 

11250 Mor 13250 13U5 12185 TZU5 —390 

11195 MOV 13080 13130 12230 12X55 — +85 

111X0 Jul 13080 133X0 123X0 12+25 — +15 

11180 Sen 13600 13600 12480 1ZL25 -400 

11U0 Nov 12(80 —400 

11200 Jan ■ 13455 —480 

11130 Mar 12+75 —175 

E+tSotefl 4800 PnrftSales 2167 12475 ~* J5 

Prev. Day Open Int. 11912 up 5(9 


1 Metals 1 

COPPER (GOMEX) 
250001b*- cents per lb. 






8+25 

5850 

□ec 

640J 

6+11 

6355 


—JO 

8420 

5825 

Jan 

6+11 

6+11 

6+11 

6U1 

—05 



Feb 





—05 

nun 

5900 

Mar 

6422 

6405 

64.U 


-90 


6000 

Mm 

64XS 

45.11 

66X1 


—00 


6006 

Jto 

6&U 

650) 

6421 




6090 

sea 

6525 

+SXC 

65. U 



6105 

D«C 

45JC 

6520 

6521 


—35 

-» 

'•Si? *%tr 



i 

.-.6530 


6700 

tax 

May 






6+20 

63 05 

& 






6+60 

6128 




6+10 

—35 

Est.Sales 


r 




Prev. Day Open Ito. 81349 uol 




ALUMINUM (OOMEX) 
40X00 ihe^ cents per lb. 






70X0 

23 

Dec 




5105 

—200 

7+50 

Jan 




5100 

—225 



Feb 






73X0 

4298 

Mar 

57X0 

S305 

5? flu 

CTiK 




May 

5115 

ssxa 

5115 



61X5 

4 +50 

Jul 

5400 

5400 

5+25 



52.10 

5220 

£§ 

Sea 

Dec 




5395 

5495 

—230 

—208 



Jan 




5505 

— 200 

5305 

49 M) 

Mar 

May 




5590 

=8 

ss 


JUl 




5700 


51 20 

Sen 




5705 

—230 

Piw. Day Open Ynt. 1J32 oUB 





SILVER (CDMEX) 






5000. tray od- cents per troy a* 





12300 

5700 

Dee 

5840 



5772 

—113 

12150 

5742 

Jan 

58+0 

5B60 

5790 

— 134 

6190 

5800 

Feb 




5KL4 

— 13X 

1W30 

57&D 

Mar 

6012 


SB 

5872 


10480 

58+0 

May 

6090 

6100 

5949 

*450 


Jul 

41BX 

4132 


4022 

—130 

9400 

Sen 

6210 

6232 


6100 

—1+0 

7990 

6130 

Doc 

6380 

6380 

jtfna 

S2Z1 

—14 0 

7B90 


Jen 




6360 

— 14X 

7700 

6250 

Mar 

6450 

6450 

6332 

634X 

—142 

7520 

64+0 

MOV 




6411 

—1+9 


6500 

Jut 

66+0 

6660 



—15.1 

7290 

6492 

Sen 

6730 
a lei 12 

6730 

6610 

—154 

EsL Soles 20000 Pray. 3 





Prev. Day Open Ito. 85035 up 1.109 




PLATINUM (NYME) 











35200 

33000 

Dec 31200 

33108 

33200 331X0 

—220 


257X0 



33620 



—200 

35200 

329X0 

Feb 





—300 

362JD 

364X8 


340X0 

34100 

33+00 

336X0 

—150 

36620 

27300 

Jul 

343X0 

343J0 

339X0 

33990 

-3.10 
— iio 

36900 


Oct 

34700 

34700 

3000 

34160 

37100 

34700 



—110 

EsL Sales 3X37 Prev.Sates 3006 
Prev. Da/Onon int 16094 off 466 




PALLADIUM (NYME) 






14130 

8925 

Dec 

93X0 

93X0 

9150 

9305 

—110 

127 JO 

9000 


US 

9600 

9450 

*425 

-AJC 


91 JD 

Jun 

97 00 

9605 

9605 

—1X0 

T 15 t)G 

9400 

Sen 




9700 

—1X0 

11A4Q 

9+25 





9825 


Est. Sates 

•rev. Sales 

784 



Prev. Day Oaen lift. +544 up 88 





GOLD (COME3U 







m wwotr douarfipee tniyaz. 
409 JO 301.50 DK filJD 

32200 

320X0 

PCI 

-20 



Jan 




E-Hl 

—X 

485X0 


Feb 



m . to 

32190 

—100 

49+00 

314JB 


328X0 

32900 

32720 

—1.10 

43520 

33L50 

Jun 


TW ® 

r^r-l 

—120 

428X0 


S3 1 

33550 

0600 


—100 

39520 

3310) 

14000 34100 



— UQ 



Dec 

34420 

345.10 


e r 'll 

—120 

MM 


Feb 



34708 

—1XO 

388X0 

34600 

Apr 




35190 

-L88 

3*6X0 


Jun 





—1.99 

38300 

35+00 


161X0 

IA1JD 361X0 


—200 
— Z10 

36700 

36300 

Oct 




!'9M 

EsL Sates 18008 Prev. Sales 37064 
Prev. Dav Open lrtt.132202 off 463 




Financial 1 1 


US T. BILLS IIMND 


SI million- Pts of IflOKt. 
9111 BS27 Doc 

9298 

9303 

9250 

9308 

—02 

9132 

B+60 

Mar 

9128 

9334 

S3 

9132 

+04 

9121 

H701 

Jun 

9308 

9307 

9304 

+06 

92.96 

8808 

See 

92M 

9302 

9256 

9300 

+08 

92X7 

8905 

Dec 

92X7 

9224 

92X6 

9222 

+09 

9204 

0928 

Mar 

9207 

9244 

9237 

92X5 

+.11 

9111 

9050 

Jun 

92.11 

9119 

9111 

92.19 

+.12 

9107 

9003 

Sea 

9194 

91X4 

91X4 

91X5 

+.» 


M YR, TREASURYICBTT 

nao800Prift-e*&aitfsor 


wi ptf 
ra-S 93-18 
92-16 73-21 
71-26 71-20 
70-29 9M0 
W-3 706 


73-2 

73-7 

90-Z7 

TOG 


93-15 

93-19 

91-22 

SDZ7 

903 


85-17 

84-10 

83-13 

8HZ 

81-31 

81-20 

01-8 

00-20 

00-15 

77-11 

N4 


8 524 
84-20 
8X23 
S3 

03-10 

81-27 

01-15 

01-3 

BO-24 

00-10 

005 


93-25 75-13 Dec 

93-1 75-14 Mar 

71-4 76-30 Jun 

903 BO-7 Sep 

07-15 BO-3 Dec ... 

ESI. Sales Prev. Sales WJM 

Prev. Day Open llrt. 7IA76 UP 902 

US TREASURY BONDS CCBTJ 
(8 pct-SinUHOpIs & 32ndsaf 100 pet 1 
058 578 Dec 85-34 806 

04-3 57-2 Mar 84-14 84-31 

83-4 56-29 Jun 83-17 B4-? 

02-9 54-29 S6P B2-23 83-15 

01-19 56-25 Dec 82 82-34 

01-2 56-27 Mar 81-30 B2-4 

00-13 43-13 Jim 81-13 81-18 

79-J1 634 Sep 81-5 81-5 

77- 19 62-34 Dec 80-16 00-34 

78- 25 47 Mor 77-11 80-13 

70-17 64-35 Jun 00-10 »-10 

Est.Safa piw.SaieslMJOO 

Prey. Day OpanlntJlMTl uo6»2 
MUNICIPAL BONDS (CBT) 

90-36 7027 

91-3 KM Mnr 9V14 71-30 91-12 91-17 

19-29 77 Jim 90-26 90-29 »2S 90-2S 

38-3 77-10 SB 1M IH !M »■! 

EsL Sales PTBv.Sotes UflS 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 11847 up 43 
CERT. DEPOSIT UMM) 

72J5 92X8 72J4 

9267 8654 Mar 9Z47 923V 7267 

9Z50 860 Jun 

7U9 87J4 SOP 

9 US 88J4 Dec 

9025 BUD MOT 

E3t.SaK3 101 Prey. Soles 514 
Prev. Dav Oaen int. 1 J7* up 121 
EURODOLLARS (IMM) 


9222 
VMS 
YUS 
91 Jt 
VMM 

ten 

EsLSates EM. Prtv.EMS 3M54 
Prev.DayOpenlnL157JM up 73s 


7257 

7232 

TUB 

9174 


+24 

+23 

+21 

+20 

+30 


-m 

+u 

+25 

+*7 

+2 

■wo 

+11 

+14 

+15 

+m 

+113 


+3 

18 


+J0 

a- 

+:!? 

+.n 


fill 0 Mor 

9702 

93-19 

9232 

9237 

+04 

8623 


92.19 

y77* 

92.19 

9228 

+J» 

8708 

S6P 

9103 


9103 

9201 

+.W 

■708 

DOC 

91X8 

dijj 

91X6 

9123 

+.11 




91X2 

9106 

71X3 

+.11 

8804 


91J59 

91.13 

9109 

91.15 

+.11 

8909 

5CP 

9805 

J?05 

9803 

1008 

+.11 


Mali 


Lew 


open Utah Low One On. 


BRITISH POUND (IMM) 
seer pound-} potto eouoUSUeei 
1X866 UMBO Mar 1X245 1X20 S 1X200 1X215 

1 X755 1J9Q5 Jun 1X105 1X158 1X060 IX06S 

1X300 13785 Sep 13920 13920 13920 13973 

J+55D 1-1590 Dec UB00 13900 13998 13893 

Efll.Sates 5-244 Prev. Sate* &481 
Prey. Day Open Int T> r K4 up 32 
CANADIAN DOLLAR (IMM> 

S per dir- 1 petot aauals 500001 
3504 6981 Mar 3144 3149 3133 3134 

33 M 3070 Jun 3Q3 3125 3116 3116 

3300 .TWO Sep 

3568 3087 Dec 3095 301 

Mar 

EM-Sales W48 Prev. Sales U48 
Prev. Day Open Int. 10301 up 560 
FRENCH FRANC (IMM) 

SPOT franc- 1 paint eauati *200001 

.10*5 Mor 33880 

.12130 Jun .13000 .13080 .13888 .12140 +1SD 

4 


38 


—IN 

—300 

—180 


—17 

—19 

—19 

—If 


JBW X8T7 


XI22 


».S0te»*' 1 Prev. Sate* 

Prev. Day Open Int. 195 UP 2 

GERMAN MARK (IMM) 

5 per mark- 1 point eauaK 500001 
MM J040 Mar X012 XOH 

-«S2 3X15 Jun X045 X«S9 

-4132 3762 Sep 

J156 3300 Dec 

EsL Sales 16J7B Prev. Sales 28X97 
Prev. Day Open lot 60847 apU57 
JAPANESE YEN (IMM) 

1 Per yen- 1 oalto epuals SOOOBOOl 
004996 004035 Mar 004957 00(967 0B49SS 004*6 
00910 00(220 Jun 0M97O 08(983 084978 00071 

JB5005 004590 Sep 00093 00(993 004985 00(986 

004909 00(150 Dec • 005082 

Es). Sates 7.9S2 Prev. So US MJT2 

Prev. Day OneilnL 35X77 off LI 07 

SWISS FRANC (IMM) 

3 per tronc-1 potto BQMOlS SOPOT 
XBSS 0835 MOT 0fl X818 

X923 X190 Jun XBX5 X8S4 

X930 X790 Sec XS75 XH75 

J9D5 X015 Dec X92S X925 

Est. Sates 14331 Prev.satee 14-Mi 
Prev. Day Open Ito. 34990 up 1027 


+3 

+3 

+3 

+3 


X826 XB29 —27 




industrials 


LUMBER (CME) 

130000 bd. ft.-sper 1000 bd. ft 
1S70O 13XM Jan 15250 1S2JQ 15050 15060 —ZOO 

19S0O 13930 Mar 157 JO 15700 1SJ0 155X0 — XI D 

174X0 1+130 May ltOJO T6OB0 75900 159.10 —2J0 

18100 149 JO Jul 16+50 16+50 16260 76200 — L90 

17600 15290 Sep 1<JJ» 14500 16+20 10*20 —1.10 

1*730 156J0 Nov 16420 16430 16+7D 16500 

17100 16600 Jan 16000 — U0 

EsL Sates 1307 Prey. Sale* 1303 
Prev. Day Open Int. 4X63 uol30 
COTTON 2 (NYCE) 

50000 camt* per Bv 
7635 5BJ7 Mar 41X0 6105 61.12 

7000 5890 May 6005 6135 6095 

7H0S 5820 Jul 59-82 5805 5800 

6SJ8 5000 Od 5035 5000 5635 

5925 48X0 Dec 4800 4890 4ZS5 

6635 4900 Mar 

S2J5 


61X7 —01 

6122 +34 

5839 +09 

30.75 +05 


4705 

40X5 


+s 


Esf. Soles SS PrevSahn 4050 
Prev- Dav Open Ito. 32371 0*1271 
NBATUM QtLCNYME) 

4a ®f H ' e 67Sr er jSl 7800 7840 7600 77.14 — Z15 
9ai5 7000 M 7450 74X0 75J9 73J9 -200 

*505 6a*0 Mar 7130 7130 7834 7004 —200 

BUG 647$ APT 64B0 UJO 6501 6531 —200 

7490 63X0 MOV 63X0 *130 6300 6308 —200 

7529 63J0 Jun 63X0 43X0 62J0 62J0 —200 

7400 6508 Jur 4150 6158 6200 62J0 — 20B 

7+15 6+90 AUB 6100 6300 6)35 4125 — 20B 

7220 4305 Sep 4100 —200 

Feb _ 7530 

EsL Soles Prev. Sales 1X536 

Prev. Day Open Ito. 33X00 up 950 
CRUDE OtLCNYME) 

UQO bbL- dal tars Per btot- 
31.17 240B Jan 3490 

30X3 2+25 Fob 2520 

2906 7+13 Mar 2+78 

29.45 2193 Apr 2187 

2435 2305 May 2835 

2706 2336 Jun 

27J3 2L50 Jul 

2703 2300 Auo 

2700 23.18 Sep 

2633 2100 OcJ 

2600 2200 _Dec _ 

e«. Sates Prev. Sales H9P0 

Prev. Day Open Ito. 64JS4 off 1X67 



Stock indexes 


SP COMP. INDEX (CME) 

potnteandeen* 

3T305 77570 Dec 313X0 21300 21000 21118 —105 

21480 18200 Mar 214M 21400 213J5 ZI170 —145 

228.15 18190 Jun 21700 21890 31535 21505 — U0 

22110 18700 Sep 72100 22100 2T7X0 217X0 —175 

Erf. Sates Prev. Sale* WM81 

Prev. Day Oaen (At A2M up 2x87 
VALUE UNE fKCBT) 

03 tSS Dec 21508 21500 21Z50 21200 —IN 

30 190J0 Mor 218J0 ZI195 215X0 21400 —195 

23000 19700 Jun 22105 22120 21858 21830 —205 

E 20005 Sep 221X0 — 2.15 

23480 Dec 23418 —260 

es Prev. Sal as 8318 

Prev.Dov Open int 18546 up 573 
NYSE COMRINOBX (NYFE) 
poftrts and cents 

12125 10100 D*C 12200 12278 12155 121X0 —30 

W 10450 Mar 13+40 13+75 T21» 1ZL25 -05 

10 10490 Jun 12405 11405 13+55 134X0 —35 

127.10 10600 Sep 127X0 127X0 0690 12595 — <35 

EsL Sates 20049 Prev.Sates 17J42 
Prev. Dav Open Inf. 13X35 up + 53 
MAJOR MKT INDEX (CBT) 
pottos and eights 

377* 349* Dec 296V 2T7ft 274* 295* — 44 

299ft 270V Jan 390 299 295ft 296* —1* 

300V 271 MOT 300* 3009k 297* 270* —ft ■ 

EsL Sale* Prev.Sates 390 

Prev. Day Open InL 1095 up 4) 


Commodity indexes 


MoodV'S- 

Rsuiers. 


D_J. Futures. 


dose Previous 

937.10 f 934^0 f 

NA 1791 JX) 

12807 12820 

Com. Researcti Bureau. MA. 237.70 

Moody'S : bos* 100 : Dec. 31, 1731. 
p . preliminary; 1 - final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. 18. 1931. 

Dow Janes : base 100 : Dec 3), 1774. 


Survey finds Confidence 
Among U.S. Consumers 

United Pros International 

NEW YORK — US. consumes* are sHgbtiy 
more confident about current and future busi- 
ness conditions than they were carter in the 
year, but they continue to express concern 
about the job outlook, the Conference Board 
reported Tuesday. 

The business-research organizations Con- 
sumer Confidence Index, based on 1969-1970’s 
100, advanced to 92.1 in November, up more 
than 2 points over October. The index has been 
running near current levels for more than a. 
year, the organization said. 

More than 30 percent of the 5,000 U.S. fam- 
ilies surveyed complained that jobs are “hard to 
get," compared with less than 20 percent who 
said jobs are “plentiful,*’ the organization said. 


59* 39ft UAL 100 20 3171 $2 50ft SI —1ft 

36* mh jJALpf 200 81 2112 301k 27ft 27ft-2* 

2* m uccel _ ii to UK. is* is*- «, 

30 22* UDCn 400 170 I +67 22W22ft23* + ft 

24ft 20 UGI 204 9X 12 146 21ft 21 21ft— ft 

25*21 UGI Pf 235110 40Qz 2S » » +« 

11 ft tv. uwcrm q m ft n, 

14 18ft USB XD 30 IS 117 13ft 12* 13ft + ft 

41ft 25V USFG 200 SJ 3*40 40* 39* 40 — * 

S W* USG* 1X0 34 I 1132 SO 4*«7ft + ft 

if* >2* utoFrer a u u 49 unt im u* + * 

13ta 84ft UtoNV 400*11 U TTOmftUSvSlSft+ft 
«t 33ft UCamp 1X4 19 M 1940 42* w toft— ft 


71* 34 UnCartl 3x0 «J 
0ft 4M UntertC 
21* 15* UnEteC 104 87 
32* 26ft UnElpf 3J0 110 
38 28* UnEl P< +08 100 

40 31* UnElpf +S3 11 J 

41ft X UnElpf +56 110 
40* 46ft UnEl pf 6X0 183 
34* 79 UnElpfM+80 TZ2 
2>V 21* UnElpf 206 1D0 
28* 16* UnElpf 2.13 UX 
36* 22* UnElpf 272 181 
69 £4 UnElpf 7X4 T06 

72 57* UEIpfH 800 110 

7* 17ft UnExpn XI* Z3 


71ft 70* 71 + ft 

11* 7ft 7ft 7ft 
1179 21* 31 21ft + ft 
JOCz 32 31 31V. + ft 

2081 37 37 17 — * 

220T39 39 X —I 

70z 41* 4>ft 41ft + * 
680z63 60* U +1H 

16 33 32V 32*— ft 

92 09* 27ft 27ft 

17 20* 20 30* + ft 

4 27 27 27 + ft 

7001 70 68* 70 +1* 

14$0z 72* 70 73ft «* 

53 39ft UnPac ’ 1JB" 3J 13 <S 521-5 SH? 57* — ft 


B 21ft ZHk 21ft- 
58ft 55* 55ft— 3ft 
44* 43* 43*— 1* 
173 9ft 8ft 7ft + It 

157 18ft 17ft 17ft— ft 
'48 23ft 211k 21ft— ft 
» 29ft 26* 29 — ft 
28 27* 29ft 29ft + ft 
MS X 30 + ft 
13 33* 33* 33* + ft 
06 19ft 19ft 17ft— Ik 
1 17 19 19 + ft 

XO 28* 27 27 —1ft 

12x 57* 57* 57ft + ft 


115ft 90 UnPcpf 70S AX 
74 50 Unnrlpf 800 110 

5* 2* Unit Dr 
25* 10V UnBmd M J 11 
18* 10* UBrdpf 
35ft 19* UCbTVs .10 0 56 

26ft 13V UIDun 202 88 5 
3m 26 Ullluto 307 130 


163 114* 113* 113V —1ft 
1630i 71* 71* 71*— ft 
165 3* 3ft 3ft— ft 

42 25* 25* 25* + ft 

34 Ifft 18* 19ft + ft 

145 34 35V 35V— ft 

96 36ft 26ft 26V— V 

11 29ft 39ft 37* + ft 


1 12 Mean , 

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Dta.Vie.PE HtoHJNiLew 

Com 

Ouot.Chye 

12 mam v. 

1 HtohLsw Slack Dik. no. PE lOteHtahLaw 

0666 

Quot.ope 

20 

14>k Lllllupr 

200 11.9 





71k 

30* WolkJn 06 

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71 UJerBs 

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16* WebbD 2D 

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site 

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2161 

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19* 

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1.9 14 

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375 

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35 WstPtP £28 

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102 +9 







10* WstetTB t(M 

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31 

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31* UTchal 

225 60 


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B'h 

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1015 

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1ft 

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1.97 80 

10 

1486 

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73ft 

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363 

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lift UnLeaf 

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53 

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7 

8548 

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32* UsLlFE 

1.13 30 

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260 184 


4 -37V, 

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11 12 

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28ft 

23* UIPLof 

200 185 


30 

31* 

77* 

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34 

74ft weyrre uo 

4.1 » 2343 

X* Jt* 31V- <0 


19 UtPLpf 

234 HU 


70 

23ft 

77* 

27* + ft 

44* 

371» Wevrot 2J0 

6X 

3*5 

43ft 

43 

43*— ft 



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210 

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23* 

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91 

163 



69*— * 


19ft UlllCoBf 2X4 100 


5 

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31ft mncopf+12 110 


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116 

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32* Viacom 

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39* VaEPpf 500 180 


I00Z46 

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774* Alicfpl 8.90 ion 

70Z 89 

89 

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59 VaEPpI 702 90 


53501 78 

IVS 

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18* WIMrt s 

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71ft woterns 

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24k Zurnln I0£ 


43) 


to 

to — * 


Commodities 

Dtc 17 

ciom 

_ HM Lew Bid ANc aree 


Mar 

1X04 

1080 

1090 

1092 

— 18 

May 

1X34 

)X1I 

1X18 




1X81 

1X72 

1X75 




N.T. 

N.T. 

1215 



Dec 

N.T. 

1290 

N.T. 

1236 




1290 

1295 

1X19 


ESI. 

vaL: 6to lots of H tan*. 



ia tea: 1212 tots. Open Interest: 30024 


COCOA 





Fresrti franca per no ks 



Dec 

1093 

1095 

10M 



Mor 

1220 

1,920 

1.915 



faoy 

K.T. 

N.T. 

1230 



& 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1240 


+ 18 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1250 




tec 

N.T. 

N.T. 

+950 



tear 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1.960 




vaL: 31 lots of 10 tons. Prev. 

actual 


*ate«: 3 late. Open Merest :405 
COFFEE 

Franck franc* per in ke 
Jan 3X10 3X00 2X00 

1560 


2020 

2065 


JlY N.T. N.T. 2X40 

S*P 2035 2015 2035 

MOV N.T. N.T. UV 

J an f+T. N.T. 2040 

Ext. veL; 3*9 tel* of 5 tens. Prev. actual 
sates: 257 lot*. Open Interest: 314 
Source: Bourn du Commerce. 


+ 155 
+ 145 
+ 130 
+ 1X 
+ 130 
+ 120 
+ 120 


Comfnoiikies 

Dec.) 7 

SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
U00 pertoec* 


N.T.' 


Fete-. 

' N.T. 

Volume: 41 tots of 100 a. 
KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 


NT. 331.18 


Sente 

31838 
321 JO 


ceetttarMo 

Previnae 

BM 

Ask 

DM 

Aak 

_ -VH1S0 

_ muo 

10LSO 

10120 

18020 

10050 

18120 

18120 

_ 18120 

10220 

18120 

18220 

_ 18+00 

18520 

18+00 

18500 

_ 18+00 

18720 

10600 

18700 

_ 18820 

18920 

18050 

10920 


Feb 
Mar 
APl . 

May 

Jun. 

Volume: Olofv 
SINGAPORE RUBBER 
-kite 


Bid 


London 

Cjommocfities 


flee. 17 

ciew Fleeted* 
su6Aji Htek Lew lid Ask iia Ask 

Stented ear metric ten 
Mar 16708 16200 16230 142X8 164JB 16130 
May 170X0 16600 16600 166X8 16808 16900 
AM 174X8 171x0 178X8 171X0 T7+0G 17500 
OC I 17700 17800 17500 175X8 17838 178X8 

Volume: ZOO lot* toss tone. 

COCOA 

Sterttee per metric tee 
Dec 1083 1X85 1000 UBS 1X84 1X05 

Mor 1.731 1028 1044 1045 1039 1030 

MOT 1065 1044 1058 1060 1046 1047 

Jly 1079 1041 1074 1075 105* 1068 

See 1092 1075 10*9 1090 1070 1077 

Dec 1093 I0B8 1090 1095 1073 10*0 

MOT M.T. N.T. 1000 1010 1005 1099 

Volume : 2023 tofs of 10 tone. 

COFFEE 

stert te e per metelc ten 
Jon 2X45 2JH Z375 20*5 20» 2057 

Mor 2J0D 2048 2X30 2*35 2320 2028 

Mat ZM8 2X00 2X77 2X80 2074 2375 

Jly 2J93 2X68 2J28 2030 2X25 2X35 

S4P 2X64 2515 2J70 2J80 2X65 2X80 

NOV 2000 2080 2X05 2X20 2X95 2J00 

JOB 2X50 2X50 3X15 3000 ZJ20 2J5Q 

Volume: 17,W teisol Store. 

GASOIL 

UJ. dBBers per metric tee 

23800 23200 236X0 23605 26+25 364J0 
23300 22625 22900 229 J0 Ltey j 23850 
22305 31705 31850 31900 22808 97*74 
moo 28700 20700 20705 21658 21*05 
■re 28200 19850 19000 19850 20600 206J0 
re 20200 19850 19550 19658 20X00 -wyi 
IV 20400 19+75 19+75 1960D 20100 20400 
IM 38200 19600 19000 19700 mere 30+00 
M N.T. N.T. 19100 20100 »»N 2OB0S 
Volume: 7072 lots pf TOO lore 

CR UDE OI L (BRENT) 

ULMter* per barrel 

0aa 2335 2500 2500 3508 2810 2608 
Feb 2+SD 24X0 2+21 2+75 2500 24X0 
2-1- N.T. 5300 24X8 24X0 2500 
JLT. N.T. 23X0 2+20 2+10 3+88 
. S-I- N-I- Jz * , + 00 2400 24X0 

Jun N.T. N.T. 2208 2400 »« 2+50 
Volume: AH lots of 1000 barrel* 

Sources: Reuters ant! London PetnHeum Ex- 

(oasoH crude oai. 


Mar 



RSSIFeb- 

RSS2Jan_ 

RSSSJan— 


15558 

15550 

15X50 

14950 


15500 
1585D 

. . 34808 

RSS4JOB- M+50 _ 

R55 5 Jon 139 JO 141 JO 

KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
M—oTsteortaao nsjer Often* 


15400 

15500 

15QJ0 

14856 


15550 
151 JO 
149 JO 


139 JO 141 JO 


Previous 
»M Ask 


Feb, 

Mer 

API. 


Vohmie: I loft of 25 ten* 
Sparer: Afuter* 


510 

no 


Dtc. 17 



Otter 

BM 

YtaM 

YleM 

Bernik MO 

701 

701 

706 

706 

AaNWlkkni 

703 

7jn 

70S 

7J» 

lAmwbM 

70S 

701 

721 

724 

Prev. 


Bte 

ONer 

YteU 

YkM 

38+r. head 

185 +732 

NS 8732 

90S 

9X5 


Source: Sotoman Brathen. 


Ctenpe tertke aey: +8XS 
Avene* yield: 864 * 
Sourer: MtrrU Lradk 


{ Dividends 


fllr. 17 

Per Ami Pay Ret 


40 IMS 


ft Fum. ind. 

INCREASED 
Brunswick Coro 
Burnnpten Northern 

CrownAmerta, Inc 

Fifth Third Bancorp 

First Valiev Con 

Lilly (Ell) 

Manvfoc. Hanover 
Ostftpsh Track CPA 

oshkMh Truck et-u 

One Bancorp 
Reenenvr Tele. 

RTE Corp 

Shared Medical Sv* 

wameu Paper Etuis 

OMITTED 

CommonwooRh Realty Trust 
SPECIAL 

Countrywd MUM inv . 06 12-31 12-31 

STOCK 

Godfrey CD _ 10ft 2-1 MJ 

VAzuiau Pcxwr JMRlB _ 10% Ite 12 36 

Wteconstn Sttirn G . 5ft +1 12-31 

STOCK SPLITS 
Bnjnwwtck Cere— 2+ar-l 
Mono rai Avalon — Wor-2 


O 

08 

2-14 

1-17 

Q 

XO 

+1 

y. 

□ 0 7te 

1-72 

u 

Q 

45 

1-15 

TJ-31 

O 

00 

1-15 

17-31 

O 

AS 

.VA 


O 

01 

1-25 


S 08k 

2-14 


S 

10 

2-14 

1-15 

a 

.15 

Ml 


Q 

A* 

2-3 


0 

15 

1-3) 

17-31 

Q 

15 

1-15 

12-31 

Q 

.111 

-6 

12-76 


AbttlbFPrlee Inc 
Andorwn Gretnwd 
Belt Atlantic 
ClUcorp 
Culp toe 

srssssfss ^ 

Fair Lints Inc 
Firestone T& r 
F irst Boston 
General Oeteme Cp 
Oeneral Mills 
Godfrey Co 
Helnlcfce tratru 


USUAL 


Haiti Properties 
Kray IK 

ft BD Bancorp 

Neva An Albert, cl- A 
OUeearGo 
Public See Colorado 
Security Capital Cp 
S nyder OU f ort n m s 
ThampsonlWed.Ce 
Tras Joist Core 
vetnant Industries 
Vara Inc 
WteMlekfSInc 
WlBconetn Sttm G 



■Mtoi m m on th ly: a-eearierly; s-semt- 


Source: l/PL 



Dtc. 17 


Strike 

Price 

MOT 

Qdb-Settte 

Jee See 

Mar 

Pute-Sattta 
JOB 5*9 

to 

051 

7SO 


no. 

(US 

0M 

39 

125 

121 

248 

+40 

071 

0.95 

« 

a* 

1X8 

Z10 

039 

1.17 

10) 

41 

057 

+16 

1X1 

1J» 

1X6 

IJ0 

a 

031 

802 

101 

112 

20* 

2J7 

43 


056 



239 

— 


Estimated total VBL +442 
CA: Msn.wiL 8450 opeeteL 77064 
Poll : Mon. ml 1055 ope* taL 18272 
Jounce; CME. 


Commodity and Unit 

Cot tea 4 Santo* in 

Prlnlcloln 64/30 38 ft, vd _ 

Steel bilWts iPin.t.ion 

Iren J Fitev Philo, ton 

Steel sunn No 1 hvy Pitt. . 
Lead Soot. «> ______ 

Coooer elect, to 

Tin (Straits), lb . 


Zinc. E. SI. U Bast* ID . 

Palladium, a: 

Silver N.T. at 

Source: AP. 


CCS 

□ 

Drc 17 

'tern- 

Toe 

Aoa 

108 

1X4 

802 

058 

47X88 

47X08 

213J8 

1)108 

73-34 

81-62 

18-19 

21-23 

68-71 

63-47 

NJL 

53953 

eJ3 

841 

98-92 

116-MI 

5035 

4X8 




Dtr. 17 

Close Prevtoas 

Bid Ask BM Aik 

ALUMINUM 
Sterlinu per metric ton 
Sml 770X0 771X0 79308 79300 

Forward 7660a 79700 91700 R1B0O 
COPPER CATHODES IMloh Grade) 

Stnilno per melrie tan 
Spot 97500 97550 98508 98550 

Forward 99500 msjo loom 1084 

COPPER CATHODES (Standard} 

Sir nine per metric ion 
SPOI 95700 96000 90000 *0100 

Forward 97700 98000 99300 99608 

LEAD 

5terilno per metric mi 
SPDl 774X0 275X0 37500 77700 

Forward 28200 38258 283.00 283J0 
NICKEL 

Sterling per metric tea 


Snot 

Forward 

SILVER 


307500 308800 308500 309500 
310000 311(100 311000 311500 


£ual 

Forward 
TIN (Stoi 


40300 40+00 40500 40700 
41501 41600 41700 41800 

) 


S Wrung per metric loti 
Soot SUSP SUSP.’ — — 

Forward Susp. Susp. — ■ ■*- 

ZINC 

Sterttee per metric nn 

Spot 47000 47300 47600 479.80 

Source: AP. 


I jg ^.1 


Dec. 17 


fttae Dec Joe Fen Mar 

no XL. * — — 

iw r% n ml - 

* 2F6 

NS Till 22+ 23V; sv, 

IN 14M lift 19 20+ 

IK IIKi 11 Ufa Ufa 

209 6fa ffa Ufa II* 

* 7fa 6 7% (fa 

7K> ft n Hi 6 

715 - 217163* fly 

- 137162* Jft 

TeWcoBntanr Clci 
lent aa imm kAtnsa 
TMM Wtere 3B132& 
Total Pat oees bn. UB7A63 


Dk Jaa Ftk Mer 

L lf» VH - 

- 1/14 * — 

1/16 1/16 I'M aa 
T7M * 77M * 

1711 4716 IVM 1* 
1/M Ik IH IS 
* 1ft J* Jfa 
1VU3* 5* 5k 
4h 6* Jta 7* 

- fk 10L Wk 

- Ufa - lift 


HMB2PZ7 Low 22451 
Source: cboe . 


ooocz&sm-iji 


ADVERTISEMENT 


INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) Dec. 17 , 1985 

Not asset value eetonttens are supplied tty tee Funds fisted wttfa ttw exception of some quotes based an kune pried. 

Themaratenl lymbeta Indicate freqnrncv el nootaltons wp*lted:(d)-ddnv; (w> -weekly; (b) -bLmaattily; ID-reautarty; ill -Irrrwrtarly. 


AL MAL MANAGEMENT 

•lw) AJ-Mot Trust. SJI % 197X1 

BANK JULIUS BAER SCO. Ltd. 

• (di Baareond SF 92115 

-tn\ coetmr sf 132300 

-i d ) EouRxw America S12S50OO 

-fdl Edtobapr Euroae SF150 

-{d> Equlbapr Padflc — SF 122500 

-1 d ) Grobor SF 109200 

XdlStecfcbar SF 174+00 


S 131X6 
* 1826 


BNP INTERFUNDS 

-1 W ) Interbond Fund 

-4wj intercurrency US*. 
-(w) Itoorcurroacy DM. 


-Iwl Intenourrencv Sterltfta— ( 

-(w) Jnterequlty Padflc Otter S 

Xw> Intoroa u fty N. Amer. Otter _ s 



BRITAMHULPOB 271, SL Hetter. 
-(w) Brit. Dollar l 

31 

£ 

■(d 

-(d . 

CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 
’ CEtafM inti Fund. 


I Bril* Monao-Curr 
Brit, lotu Monopportf J 
Brit. InttcManoaJtortf J 
Bril. Am. Inc. (■ Fd UdJ 
Brlt.Gold Fund — J 
BrttManaaCuTTrecv— J 
Brit. Japan Dir Psrt. FdJ 
BrHJunwv Gilt Fund_J 
Britworid LM* FimdZI 
Brit world Teehn. Fund. 



Crri COR P IliVESTMEMT MNK|LK} 


POB 1373 unembeure ToL 477.91 


1 gttnvaste. 


{ d 5 attmtost UauWWv- 

CREDIT SUISSE (ISSUE I 


Ad 

(d. 

-(d) Bond Valor D-mark . 


-<d 

-Id 

-(d 

-Id 

-(d 

r* 

r 


Action Steam J 
I Band valor 9wf. 


ECU 1017 JO 
5171758 

^F 50708 

SF 18+65 

DM 106-70 


Bond valor US-oollar — _ s U1X6 
Bond valor tSlorita— . tt8O0O 

Band Voter Yen Yen 1828+00 

Csswoft Voter Sw»—^_ SF 
Convert Valor US-DOLLAR . 5 12BJ0 
CtoWtor ■ SF 69600 

C5 Fortes- Bondi SF 7600 

CS Farm- inn SF 12*25 

C5 Money Market Fund. S11P80O 

C5 Money Matkft Fund- DM 106400 
~ - ‘ 8105200 


.d. 

-(d) 

-I dies Money Market Fund 

d 1 CS Money Market Fd Yen_ yi 8046600 

-<d) Enerote-VQtar SF 14125 

-(dlUnec SF 86ZD0 

id) Europo-Votor SF 19+75 

+ d) Poettic -voter SF I6ZSS 

DC EXE L BURNHAM LAMBERT INC 
Winchester Hpuw> 77 London wail 
LONDON EC2 (619209797) 

^w) Finsbury Groua LW t 13073 

-fin) WlatewNerDiverafftod S 21.90* 

Win) Wtadtomr FteancM Lid. s 9x6 

-Irn) Winchester Frontier 0 

^W) Yfindietiw HohEran. 


-tar) worldwide Securities . 

.< wi WorUwfcte Spackd 

DIT INVESTMENT PPM 
-+( d J Concsntra 
-HdMtol ' 


FF 107X6 
. S 1Z56 

- 5 5207 

- S 1090.11 


DM 

DM 


35.99 
W 05 


Dwm ft Horol WS Lter d Doorat, Brussels 
.(ml D&H commodHv Pool — , 536123 — 

-im) Currency * GoU Foci S 16630 

- mJ Winch. Life Fut. Pool SS6Z32*** 

-im) Trans Wbrid Fut Pool *87958 — 

EBC TRUST COXJER3EY) LTD. 

1-3 Sdtta SLSL HWlerrt534^S3Jl 
TRADED CURRENCY FUND. 

SCdllnc.: Bid.. — 5 IZ)7*Offtr S11.1IB* 

9t d icon.: BM S 1Z31 Otter S12XB7 

INTERNATIONAL INCOME FUND 
-fd) Short Term ’A' (Assum)— - s ijiu 

-101 Sheri Tsrtn'A' (Dtstr) » 10097 

-I d 1 Short Tomi 5' (AecumJ — S 13027 
-I d) Short TttlM'B’f PfNr)— t 80699 

DM- Deutsche Mark; 

P/V *10 nsi »or unit* N A - N 

Redemet- Price- Ex-Caunon; 


Am) Lone Term s 25J1 

FAC mcmt. ltd. inv. advisers 
1. Laurence Poutov Hill, EC+ in -623X660 

FAC Anew S 1306 

.... FAC European— _ — s 1688 

Jvr) FAC Ortetoui S 3253 

FIDELITY POB 470, Hamilton Bermuda 

xm) FAA HotdJna* s 79X5 

J-l s 79X5 

S 1133 
S 1103 
S 13874 
S 25X6 
* — 

* 3308 
S 1600 
S1SU6 
S HU3 
S 4806 


d ) Fidelity 

a 1 FldtHtv Australia Fund . 
d ) FWeflly Discovery Fund. 
a ) Fidel tty D|r. SvreTrrem 
a ) Fldebfy For East Fte 
d Fidelity tori. Fund 


d) Fidelity Orient Fund 

di Fidelity Frontier Fund 

a ) PidoHty PoeJtic Fund 

d I Fidelity Sad. Orowth F<L — 
d i Fidelity World Fund . 

FORBES PO BJ87 GRAND CAY66AN 


\ 9^ 

S 7J1 

5 ts 

S 45201 
£ 13+60 

... S 18309 

London: 01-491 4238. Geneva :4h2235S530 
OLOBAJL ASSET MANAGE ME NT COUP. 
PB 119. St Peter Peri, Guernsey, 048V2S715 


•Iwl 1 

-lw) GoM Appreciation. 

-(ml stratevtc Tracfino 

GEFIMOR FUNDS. 

Am) East Investment Fun 
Aw) Scottish World Fund- 
(w) State 5L Affleric 


FuturGAM&A. 

GAM Arbttraee 1nc_ 
GAMerica Inc- 


GAM Australia Inc. 
GAMBoolan Inc — 
GAM ErmJtope 


S 12831 
S 14+29 
S 15707 
. S 9814 

s r.:_ 

S 17X3 
SF 12478 
S 10005 
S 15873 

... = S 125.18 

_w) GAM North America Inc. — - S 117.14 
.(w) GAM N. America Unit Trust- 1U75p 

w) GAM Padflc Inc S 141X2 

GAM Pen* A Cher, work)*— WX8p 


Hone Km toe. 

w) GAM Internottonol Inc. 
w» gam Jaaan Inc. 


wl GAMrinl. 


GAM Start & Inti Unit 1 
I GAM worldwide tne. 


~\m) GAM TVCftB SA aOS* A — 
vr) GSAM Interest Inc U&Ord. 

GSAM Interest IncUJ 

_ . GSAM Interest Inc 

w) GSAM Interest Inc . 

,w> G&AM Interest Inc. DM 10005 

(w) GSAM interest me e 10800 


iffl 

Inc — S 036 
— ISUS-p 

S 19603 

s nut 

S 1BV56 
S 97X3 
SF 9937 
Yon 9089 


G.T. MANAGEMENT (UK) Ltd. 

-(d)BorrvPdcFdJJd. S 1106 

r> G.T. Applied science S 1406 

d ) G.T. Asean H.K. GwttkFd S 1101 

d) C.T. Atte Fund . ■ - - S 4 39 

dl G.T. Ausirana Fund S 25.12- 

d ) &T. Europe Futte — s 140s 


(Wl G.T, Gura. Small Co* Fund. 

*r ) G.T. Deitar Fund 

d I GlT. Bond Fund 

dj GvT.GMxd TidiiMV I _ 
d i G.T. Honshu Pathflrteer_ 
d) &Y. investment Fund. 


w )GJ. Jam Small GcFund^. S 

r>GvT.- 


1605 

12031 

U23 

3105 

2Z15 

J0J5 

27X1 

11503 


. _ Tetfwoloov Fund S 

_d) G.T. South China Fute ... j_ 

HILL SAMUEL INVEST. MOMT. IHTU SJL 
Jersey, PA Box 63, TN SS36 76029 
Berne PA Bex 2631 Tel 4131 22(051 

Croesbovr (Far East) SF 1131 

C 2 F (Btoanced) ML. 5-2 

Euraeeon Equity Fuad DM 1200 

Into). Bond Fund S 7809 

int-CurrwicvUJ. S 2608 

ITF FdjTectmteev) s .1509 

O'SeasFd (N, AMERICA) _S 31X8- 
DINE FLEMING. POB 78 GPO H* KB 

J.P CurrencvABond s 16X2 

XP Hono Kami Trvst___ * SB 
J.F Peetflc income Trail — v 2731 

J.F Japan Trust-- Y 4895 

. JJ= JO pan T e c hn ol og y Y 28376 

I r | JjF Pacific SecZlAcc) J 731 

LLOYDS BANK IKTU POB «A Geneva ill 

-Hw) Lloyds Irtri Dolter S 18738 

+l»l Lloyds Inn Europe SF 130-0 


Ad 

ft 

-id 

d 

d. 

JAR 


-+lw) Lloyds itoi Growth 

Uevds mn income — _ 
LlOVdS Inri N. AmBrloo_ 

Ltova* inn Pactftc 

. .. UoyxtsintX Smaller Cos 
NIMARB8N 
-id 

OB U F+EJ( C UMTTE 5“ 

■J»| Multtcurrancv . 

-iwl Donor Medi um Term. 


£ 


Palter Lo ng rtmu 

Pound Slernnod 
Ooortche Man . J 
Dutch Flortn _J 
Swts# n i M 


ORANGE NASSAU GROUP 
PB 85 578. The Hoove 107BJ 469(70 
■RR Bevwr Beteooimren++ 


t F 17870 
F 32100 
. S 1113 
SF 133X0 
. S 1501 

_» 100.14 
_* 11802 
_S 1D1J 

— * 1Z79 
— 1107 
_* 1232 

— S 1309 
_£ 1001 
1005 
10X1 
10- 1ft 


•1 Sff 


.SF 


Atsmmmmmtm 

PARISBAS-GROUP 


S 3205 


Cortona international . 

ECUPAR. 

OBLI-DM- 


OBLIGE5TION— 
OB LI -DOLLAR— 

OBU-YEN 

OBLI-GULOEN- 

PARDIL-FUND. 


_ 5 10232 
ECU TWCL28 
DM1240J0 

. SP W30 

S 115700 


FL 1062.72 
S 95X2 
— S 12.14 
S 13609 
_ 5 10.91 
% ULI7 


PARED ROPE G ROWTH 

PARINTEH FUND 

PARINTER BONO FUND — 

PAR US Tree* Bond -CL O'. 

ROYAL B. CANADA.POB 26+GUERNSEY 
-Hw) RBC Cteiadten Fund Ltd., s 1202- 
FOrEastBPodOc Fd_ S 1251 

Inri Capital Fd- * 

tori Income Fd. s 1139- 

MarkCurrency Fd S 2702 

North Amer. Fd. * 1804 

”D INTL FUND 146-1-214770) 

. 1 * 6J5 otter S 608 

-tw)Acc:B»d S 4X8 Offer 5 700 

SVENS KA INTERNATIONAL LTD. 

17 Devonshire ScjxrteorKi 1 )77-8048 

Ar \ SHB Band Fund . t 2524 

-(wl SHB Inti Growth Fund S 2BX8 

SWISS BANK COR P. (ISSUE PRICES) 

•' Amortcn-Valor 5F 527 Jo 

D-Mork Bond Selection _ DM 12155 

. Dollar Bond Selection S 14209 

A d ) Florin Bond Selection FL ’ 

, d 1 ltoervaior. ■ . . SF 

d) Jaoan Portfolio. 



Ad)i 
Hdll 
-id) i 


9075 


d ) starting Bond Soioctton — 

d 1 5wfn Fareten Bond Sef 

-4 01 Swbsvtoor NewSertes 

A di Untecrwii Bane SotccL — 

A a i Universal Fund 

-(d) Yen Bond Select ion— 

UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND 

■CD UJL STL 



d Aim U0.SIL SF 3835 

d Bond-tnvest SF 6875 

d fftncoSwttsSh. SF 18500 

A3 Jooan- Invest SF 96600 

-id Sant South Afr. S»L SF 2S7XQ 

-id a tod I Stock price) SF 22500 

UNION INVESTMENT Frank! art 


Hdl Unlreata. 
-(diuntfondk 


-Id) UnlroR. 
-id) UniZins. 


Other Funds 

Adteondi Investments Fund. 

Atolvtsf ML. 

Aided Ltd - - - 

Aouita international Fund 

Arab Finance t.f 

Artfruft 

Trustcor inti Fa IaEifj 

BondseMx-lme Pr. ... 

CMtedoOFMeri yiBi e Fd 

CcBrttai Present. Fa mn. 

Citadel Fund — 

Ctevetend Dttrtore Fd 

Columbia Securities.. 
COMETS. 


DM 4808 
DM 30X0 
DM 86X0 
OM 10815 


Convert. Fa mn A Certs. 
Convert Fa Inri S Certs. 
Dai wo japan Fund- ■ — 

DJEML. 


lw 

lw. 

A d ) PoPur-Baer bund Fd - 
-( d ) D-wrk-Beor Bond Fd 



DM108800 


ld)D. WUter WM Wide Ivt Tst._ S 11X3 

< r ■ Drakkor invMLFuod N.V s 12304 

(d 1 Drevtu* America Fund—. S 1107 

(dIDrrvtusFunainri. S 4202 

(w) Dreyfus interaontinenl— . — S 16.92 
lw) Trtr EWtmJfahment Tru»1__ S 104 


Ecu 

11007703 

- S 905X5 

. S H. 

5F 20+90 

- S 739 
SF 6722 

. S 3701 

Frank t-Trusi Interzins— . DM 41.9) 

Georee v INV. bond F jiijm 

._ Gaverafr+Soc. Funo*. S 9l.n 

IW) Houssmonn HUB* N.V S 14+52 

■ Hastia Fundi — 1 10701 

Horizon Fund S 136623 


(d) Eurooe ooihwtions- 

Iwl First Eoole Fund 

( r ) Fifty Stars Ud 

(W) Fixed Income Trans 

(wl FonselDk issue Pr 

(wl Farextund 

lw) Fornwlo Selection Fa. 


Fonditoiio- 


IBEJl Hold too* Ltd. 

ila-iGB_- 

ILA-tGS. 


Interfuna SA— 
tntertnarket Fund. 


SF 121 28 

S 902 

S 18X9 

S 2000 

. _ S 29226 

intermtnlna Mut. Fa Cl/B' _ i 15129 

Inri 5ecwrlrtes Fund S 1407 

Investa DWS DM 6200 

Invest Atlantia uet S 10x3 

1 to I fortune Inn Fund SA S 19.95 

Japan Selection Fund S usxo 

Japan PocJflc Fund . S mxv 

JeHOrPtn* itoLLid sioeaazs 

KJelnworl Bensun Inri Fd . — S 3423 
Ktelnwert Ben* Jon. Fd- * 8891 


KW 901400 
S 1109 
_ 8150009 
S 19892 
S 137000 
S 8127 
S 19128 
S 2227 
10+97200 
* 11X5 
S 974930 
S 3733* 

. _ . 85796X3 

Iwl Novotoc investment Fund— . f 182X6 

Iwl NAM.F I 17208 

(m)NSPF.I.T 8 101.99 

10) Poctttc Horizon Invt. Fd $ 1225.99 

' PANCURRI InC. S 2253 


(w) Karoo Grawtti Trust. 

I d ) Letcom Fund- 
(w) Leverets Cap l 

(a ) LkzutBoer. 

lw) Luxfund — 

Cm) Maanatund N.V. 

( a ) Mealotanum SeL Fa 

I r ) Meteors 

tw) NAAT 

( d ) Nlkko Growth Poduse 

(w) Ntopon Fund 

(ml NOSTEC Portfolio. 


. r ) Ported 5w, R Eat Genrvo. 
( r ) P er mo l Vawe N.V 
(r) Pletedes. 


Iwl PSeo Fund N.V.. 
(W) PSGO Inn. N.v.. 


(w) Putnam Era infaSaTr. 

(d) Putnam Inti Fund 

I r J Prt-Teeh. 


(wl Quantum Fund N.v.. 

(dl Rente Fund 

Id) Rent invest. 


&F139T0B 
. S 135309 

- tmsjs 

- S 133.90 
. S 105X4 

- * 904 

- S 7804 

- S 94000 

- 8629506 
LF 285808 


. , LF 105551 

(dl Reserve insured Deposits— S1125JD 

fw) Rudolf WWtt Fut FdLM 8130608 

fwl Snimiral PiwNmin — SF 12+2S 

I d ) SCi/Terti. SA Luxemboure- * 1202 

w) Seven Arrows Fund N.v. 5 92*28 

w ) State St. BOtlk Equity HdssNV— 5 10X1 

w) SlratBoy investment Fund s ss.il 

d I Syntax Lta lOcm A)' I ux» 

wi Techno Growth Fund SF 8700 

_a)Tmmton Australia FdLM 5 MO 

(d) Thornton HK 8 China s 1036 

d ) Thornton Jauon Fund Ltd a 1301 

d > Thornton Orient. Inc. Fd Ltd- S 1030 
(»»{ Tokyo Poe HoM. (5ea)— S 11420 


w i Tokyo Poc. Hula N.V. 
wl Timwacilie fum. 
w) Trans Europe Fund 
d | Turqvotee Fu ' 


S 157.19 
8 10528 

.wi Tweedy ^rowni av.CIwsA^ 8234401 

(w) TweedvArowm n.v.C katB s 1605,16 

(ml Tweedy3rowrte (UJO av 3101309 

(dl UN I CO Fund- DM 7+20 

(d) UNI Bond Fund 8119108 

l r) UNI Capitol Fund. , ... . S 124130 
(dl US Federal Securitas., .. * 1&46 
(d) US Treasury Income lund-___ s 
(w) vnndrr hilt A vmte j 17*9 

<d> World Fund SJL 8 1434 


ft 


B 


*FC. : 






Page 14 


U.K. Announces Plans to Tighten Bank Controls 



By Larry Thorson 

The Associated Presi 

LONDON — The British gov- 
ernment announced plans Tuesday 
for tighter control of banks in re- 
sponse to the collapse last year of 
Johnson Matthey Bankers Ltd. 

The proposed new legislation 
would strengthen the Bank of En- 
gland’s supervisory powers over 
larger banks like JMB. which have 
been operating largely on trust, un- 
der Lbe assumption dial they were 
acting honestly and competently. 

A white paper published by the 
chancellor of the Exchequer, Nigel 
Lawson, said that the JMB collapse 
revealed “serious weaknesses" in 
banking supervision. JMB was tak- 
en over the Bank of England last 


year after it collapsed under £248 
miTI i nn ($354 million) in bad debts. 

New legislation wiO be intro- 
duced “at the earliest possible op- 
portunity." it said. 

“London's pre-eminence as a 
world banking center is based on 
freedom and probity. We are deter- 
mined to preserve both," Mr. Law- 
son said in the publication, which 
outlined the government’s plans 
with the aim of provoking discus- 
sion while legislation is bang writ- 
ten. 

Brian Sedgemore, an opposition 
Labor Party legislator, clashed bit- 
terly with Mr. Lawson in the House 
of Commons over the issue: And 
the Labor Party's chief economics 
spokesman. Roy Hatimley. said 


that the proposals were “grossly 
inadequate" because they did not 
call for an independent supervisory 
body. 

In response to demand both 
from the public and from con- 
cerned market insiders, Prime Min- 
ister Margaret Thatcher's govern- 
ment has had to promise greater 
support to fraud-investigative 
agencies as well as new legislation 
to help control the City, London’s 
largely self-regulated financial dis- 
trict 

Mrs. Thatcher was asked Tues- 
day in the House of Commons to 
outline her plans to “clean up the 
City.” 

“No one is more anxious for 
those who are guilty of fraud to be 
brought to justice than this govern- 


ment 7 ’ she replied. Mrs. Thatcher 
said she had just received a report 
with 1 12 recommendations on the 
prosecution of financial frauds, 
and hoped to publish it in January. 

Mr. Lawson’s while paper reject- 
ed the option of setting up a sepa- 
rate bank-supervision body ac- 
countable to Parliament. Instead, 
the proposed legislation would in- 
crease the central hank’s superviso- 
ry staff and powers so that it can 
deal with the large, so-called “rec- 
ognized banks" as weD as smaller 
hanks. 

“Recognized banks have not in- 
variably operated in a manner con- 
sonant with the concept of high 
reputation and standing." the 
white paper said. 


U.S. Agency Is Battling Precious-Metal Frauds 


By Narhaniel C Nash 

,V«r York Tintn Service 

WASHINGTON — The phone 
rings. The smooth voice on the oth- 
er end addresses you by your first 
name and asks. “Are you interested 
in the best investment in the 
world?" The sales pilch has begun. 

The caller is touting silver or an- 
other precious metal that he or she 
predicts will soon rise in price, pro- 
ducing a kilting for those lucky in- 
vestors who can establish big posi- 
tions with a small downpayment. 
The trouble is, however, that they 
rarely do make a killing — or even 
hold onto their initial slake. 

The scene, described by Dennis 
M. O'Keefe, an enforcement offi- 
cial at the Commodity Futures 
Trading Commission, is pan of 
what federal courts have estab- 
lished as a growing fraud on the 
American public. 

“There is so little expertise 
around to prosecute this kind of 
fraud that it's become a license to 
print money." Mr. O'Keefe said. 
“Investors continue to love pre- 
cious metals and continue to fall 
for these scams." 

Over the last 18 months, since 
the commission began to crack 
down, federal and statejudges have 
granted orders closing more than 
20 precious-metal dealers. Almost 
all of these dealers were illegally 
offering the equivalent of a silver- 
futures contract that guaranteed 
investors that they could buy at a 
certain price over a specific period 
of time. 

And the CFTC, Mr. O'Keefe 
said, suspects similar practices by 
200 other dealers who have hun- 
dreds of offices throughout the 
country and attract about S300 mil- 
lion in investor funds each year. 

What has been judged illegal by 
the courts is that these investment 
products are unregistered futures 
contracts and that the firms selling 


them are engaging in fraudulent 
sales practices. 

For their part the dealers that 
were shut down have maintained 
that their investment products are 
not futures but cash contracts and 
that, therefore, they are not subject 
to regulation by the CFTC, which 
is the federal regulatory agency for 
the commodi ties and futures indus- 
tries. 

While the illegal sale of so-called 
off-exchange futures has the CFTC 
concerned, Mr. O'Keefe and state 
enforcers say they use these viola- 
tions to get at an even more trou- 
blesome practice — fraudulent 
soles tactics of these companies. 

On the phone, according to Mr. 
O'Keefe, salesmen promise that in- 
vestors' funds are protected be- 
cause the companies hedge their 
positions in the silver-futures mar- 
ket, that they segregate customers’ 
funds and that they have large - 
quantities of silver bullion stored in 
vaults in order to meet delivery 
demands. But little or none of what 
the salesmen say is true, Mr. 
O'Keefe said. 

That even extends to their 
names, it is said. “What they don’t 
tell you.” said Lawrence H. Fuchs, 
financial investigations director of 
the suite comptroller's office in 
Florida, “is that they are using false 
nam es, or that the principals of the 
company have criminal records 
and nave been the subject of previ- 
ous regulatory actions." 

Similar operations have been 
around for many years. Typically, 
however, their fraudulent practices 
are not discovered until metal 
prices have risen sharply and inves- 
tors find that they cannot collect 
their profits. By using the ban on 
off-exchange futures to shut down 
metals dealers, the regulators say 
they are able to stop the fraud 
much earlier, before the dealers can 
skip town. 


’®**®iillK"MiP******®*® C i 1 V" Ii 1 ' 'i 

m 

Unregistered commodi ly firms that have been the subject Of recera court 
ftcHons by ihe Commodity Futures Trading Commission. 

Date of 

n 

Firm 

Action Offices | 

First American Currency, Laguna Hills. CalH . 

Dec. 5 

i 

Trinity Metals Exchange, Kansas City, Mo. 

Nov. 27 

6 

Wellington Precious Metals, 

Fort Lauderdale, Fla. 

Nov. 25 

19 

Precious Metals International, 

Fort Lauderdaie.Fla. 

Nov. 12 

4 

First International Metals. Boca Raton, Fla. 

Nov. 12 

1 

Westbrook Funding Ltd.. North Miami Beach 

Sent. 25 

1 

Source Commodity Futures Tr.tdmQ Gomnussun 




The Iasi few yours of falling or 
fiat prices of precious metals have 
been ideal for these operations, 
said Jeffrey Rosen, a partner with 
the Washington law firm of Stop- 
pelman, Rosen, Eaton & De Mar- 
tino. “Investors haven't made any 
money," he said, “so these shops 
don't have to shut down." 

Si nce i ts inception in July 1984, 
the CFTC enforcement division’s 
federal-state liaison office, which 
works with state agencies to shut 
down fraudulent dealers, has fo- 
cused on Florida. But the 38-year- 
old Mr. O’Keefe, who heads the 
office, says most of the action is 
now centered in Southern Califor- 
nia, where as many as 150 compa- 
nies are operating. 

Dennis KJejna, the head of en- 
forcement at the commission and 
Mr. O'Keefe’s superior, said, “Of 
the 18 federal court actions we filed 
in fiscal year 1985, 11 involved aBe-' 
gations of off-exchange acti vity." 
In the last month, the CFTC has 
taken action against four firms, and 
four more actions are planned be- 
fore the end of the year. 

As Mr. O'Keefe tells it, such 
companies operate in a world of 
high-pressure telephone sales by 
“phone pros," or “yaks," using rd- 


The New York Times 

atively inexpensive wide-area tele- 
phone service, or WATS, lines to 
solicit business across the country. 

Names are taken from lists of 
would-be Investors who answer so- 
licitations for inves tmen t advice 
and information. The small compa- 
nies are often called “boflo’ rooms" 
or “bucket shops,” and customers 
are dubbed “mooches." 

The customers are offered silver 
investments that permit them to 
lock in a current price and close out 
their accounts after 90 or 120 days. 
If customers do not have a profit 
after the 120 days, they can roll 
over the contract for two yean or 
longer. What the customers are of- 
ten not told initially, however, is 
that rollover fees are exceptionally 
high — up to 10 percent a year of 
the total value of the contract. 
When investors do have a profit 
and want to cash in. Mr. O’Keefe 
said, they find it almost impossible 
to persuade the companies to close 
out their accounts. 

Enforcement officials say lucra- 
tive profits come from especially 
high commissions and the manage, 
meat fees that are often hidden to 
investors before they send their 
money in. 


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Promoting 

Corporate 

Creativity 

(Continued from Page 11) 
how to use propylene, a flammable 
gas. in a product so that it would 
not bum. 

Last year. Shell Laboratory set 
up an “opportunity search" team 
to create new product ideas. The 
team consists of four engineers and 
two lab technicians, all of whom 
attended creative thinking semi- 
nars led by the London-bared guru, 
Edward de Bono. 

Ben Quist, director oC the Shell 
team, credits creative thinking with 
the team's idea to use salt caverns 
to store water that will later be used 
for hydroelectric generation: The 
idea is still at the research stage. 
Traditionally water for hydropow- 
er is stored above ground in artifi- 
cial lakes. . 

But so far, even believers in the 
art of creative thinking have not 
found a reliable way to detect cre- 
ative thinkers in advance — bn the 
process-of hiring, for example. 

“What I was looking for at these 
creativity training sessions was for 
tools to find creative talents," says 
Mr. Vershuur of ShelL “We can 
easily assess a PhD in mechanical 
engineering, but there is no Ph.D in 
creative thinking," So far, Mr. Ver- 
shuur hasn't found a way. 

Zurich Bourse Volume Rises 

Rvuien 

ZURICH — Share and bond 
volume on the Zurich Stock Ex- 
change in November reached 45.2 
billion Swiss francs (£21.42 bil- 
Uonk a record for any month and 
ahead of the previous peak oT 413 
billion francs set in October, the 
Bourse commission said Tuesday. 
The figures compare with volume 
in November 1984 of 27.7 billion 
francs. 


Revren 

LAGOS — OPEC's share of the 
non-Communist world’s oil pro- 
duction should be 18 million to 20 
million barrels a day next year, 
according to Nigeria's oil minister. 
Tam David- West. 

Speaking on Nigerian television 
Monday night, Mr. David-West 
said the real figure would be deter- 
mined by a committee that was set 
up by the Organization of Petro- 
leum Exporting Countries at its 
meeting in Geneva earlier this 
month. 

Current crude-oil production in 
|he non -Communist world is esti- 
mated at 48.5 million barrels a day. 
The decision by the OPEC to de- 



Tam David- West 




production ceiling of lt> million 
barrels per dav. although the actual 

a US un.!9ii<u uv me wrtv IV uu- , * ■ m mdfnbprc 

fend its share of this output set P™! 16 011 JJ U iAL a t 18 

orices fluctuating undelv fast week bad iwentiy been estimated at 18 

million. 

The Nigerian minister said it was 
too early to get a clear picture of 


prices fluctuating widely last week 
before they recovered. 

Mr. David-West said what hap- 
pened was only panic and specula- 
tion after the OPEC ministerial 
meeting. 

Before lbe meeting, OPEC had 
been working to a self-imposed 


the oil price situation. He said that 
in a month or two Nigeria would be 
able to determine if there was a 
need to cut prices. 

Mr. David-Wesi *nd non-OPEC 


producers had three options - £ 
cut output volunianiv to _«■£. 
prices, to cooperate WI,h ,F ‘;V. ‘ 
to flood the market anu vause 
price crash. 

Apn«cTashwouldgre..t|>^il 

industrialized countries an* .^d to 
a collapse of some bank> in tn. m. 
nations, he said. 

He said secret and ir.lormal con- 
tacts had taken place between 
OPEC and non- OPEC racers 
in the past but it sectnco the time 
had now come for the two Ul 
have formal contacts. He gave no 
details. 

The Nigerian oil minister refused 
to say what OPEC would do ii 

producers outside OPEC ignored 
its call for cooperation to prop up 
prices. 

Two major non-OPEC produc- 
ers. Britain and Nor-vav. who^e 
North Sea Brent competes directly 
with Nigeria's highly priced Bonny 
Light, have consistently refused to 
cooperate with OPEC on pricing or 
production policy. 


Deutsche Bank Witt Offer Daimler Shares 


(Continued from Plage 11) 

sentiment of other analysts. Mr. 
Beton predicted a 31 -percent jump 
in Daimler's net profit this year to 
SO DM a share, from 61 DM in 
1984. Analysts predicted that 
Daimler will increase its dividend 
to at least 12 DM a share from last 
year’s 10.50 DM. 

Horst W. Elwenn, senior vice 
president of Hessiscbe Landes- 
bank-Girazenlral, said he expects 
the Daimler share placement to be 
“unquestionably successful" add- 
ing that “a placement in Germany 
wm in no way shake the stock mar- 
ket,” by drawing investor funds 
into Daimler and- out of other ma- 
jor West German stocks. He said 
most of the shares will be bought 
up by institutional investors in Eu- 


rope. Japan and the United States, 
but private investors, will have am- 
ple opportunity to buy as well. 

Mr. Elwenn said he was optimis- 
tic that Daimler’s share price still 
has considerable upward momen- 
tum. although a period of softer 
prices might set in for several weeks 
arier the Deutsche offering. 

Through its planned Daimler 
share sale and its planned 1.5-bil- 
lion- DM sale of a 26- percent stake 
in W.R. Grace & Co. to Grace's 
owners, announced earlier this 
month. Deutsche Bank will be able 
to finance the acquisition of the 
giant Rick industrial group. Deut- 
sche Bank said the Flick purchase 
would be for about 5 billion DM. 

The Flick acquisition will in- 


clude the 10-percent stake in Daim- 
ler. the 2o-percenl interest in 
Grace, in which Grace decided to 
exeeise its first option to buy it 
back, as well as the core industrial 
enterprises within Flick. TTioe core 4r 
enterprises are to be floated on 
West German stock exchanges in 
the spring under the name Fcld- 
muehle- Nobel AG. 

•‘What comes nexL the Feld- 
muehle-Nobel floatation, will 
probably be pure profit now that 
Deutsche has financed the acquisi- 
tion and covered a substantial part 
of other costs." said Mr. Beton of 
Phillips & Drew, “depending on 
the costs of floating Feldmuehle. 
we could see Deutsche nei at least I 
billion DM from the full Flick- 
transaction.' 


Shiseido Expands to New Markets Outside Asia 


■4- ' r 


(Continued from Page 11) 
Japanese companies but higher 
than U.S. companies with opera- 
tions here dial do not have national 
networks. And it is trying to spin 
growth by revamping its retail out- 
lets, developing new markets and 
diversifying its product lines, along 
with moving aggressively abroad. 

Unlike L'Oreal of France, Shi- 
seido’s sales are almost entirely do- 
mestic. Overseas sales accounted 
for 9 percent of total revenues last 
year. But Yostaio Ohno, Shiseido' s 
president, is trying to increase that 
with the focus on the United States. 

Shiseido products, under the 
brand names Moisture Mist and 
Shiseido Facial, are now shipped 
from Japan and distributed 
through UXKJ stores in the United 
States. But the company is hardly a 
household word m the United 
States. It declines to give exact fig. 
ures, but says its U.S. advertising 
budget is limited because it sells 
only through die 1,000 stores , said 
Iwao Hatton, a company spokes- . 
man. 

Mr. Ohno said that Shiseido now 
is moving cautiously, after going 
through “a lot or sod-searching." . 

Among the first dedsions made 


in the renewed overseas effort were 
to manufacture all products in Ja- 
pan flTid to concentrate on the high 
end of the market. Thus Shiseido is 
advertising in high-fashion maga- 
zines and is selling its products 
through prestigious department 
stores. 

Although Shiseido executives 
seem happy with current sales in 
the United States, analysts here be- 
lieve that they may have to push 
harder to increase that presence. 

Chiyoko Tada of Jaidine Flem- 
ing Securities, said, “I think they 
wiU have to spend a lot more on 
advertising. When you enter a new 
market, you have to make a name. I 
don't tbmk .they’ve done that yet" 

Shiseido may be placing particu- 
lar emphasis on its overseas sales 
because the Japanese market is 
growing so slowly. Bat Mr. Ohno 
said, “I still believe there is poten- 
tial" 

One of Mr. Ohno’s approaches is 
to develop a market in Japan for 
fragrances, which the Japanese 
have traditionally shunned. Mr. 
Harris, however, said Max Factor 
had spent a lot of money unsuc- 
cessfully uying to promote fra- 
grances in Japan. 




Market Share lor the Japanese . 1 

cosn»Uc and toflerry market. | 

Shiseido 

22.6% 

Kanebo 

12^ 

Kao 

6v8 

Pota 

5.8 

Kosei 

4.3 

Noevia 

3.1 

Menard . 

3.0 

Max Factor 

2JS 

Uon 

2.0 

Avon 

1.7 

AD others 

36.1 

Siaurv" Shuluin Sfiogyo, < Juponeeo 9 

irwaefOvrnML | 


NTT 

In the meantime, Shiseido is pro- 
posing that its more than 20.000 
retail outlets, which account for the 
vast majority of its sales but which 
have been underperforming lately, 
renovate at their own cost to con- 
centrate aa specific consumers and 
markets. 

“The retail shops are losing at- 
tractiveness to our customers,” Mr. 
Ohno said. 

One proposed type of store. 


called the Cosmetics House, will 
feature specialized skin -care and 
makeup products, include kitchen 
and interior-design products and 
emphasize personal service. Anoth- 
er type, called Your Shiseida, will 
aim at young married women and 
wilt include Shiseido food prod- 
ucts. The company's Y&Y shops 
will be geared to teen-agers and 
include apparel and accessories. 

The remodeling, which Miss 
Tada described as ambitious and 
imaginative, also allows Shiseido to 
distribute growing lines of non cos- 
metic items. Cosmetics accounted 
for 84 percent of sales last year and 
toiletries. 11 percent. 

In the last few years, Shiseido 
has opened health clubs, clothing: 
boutiques and several restaurant* 
with Food ranging from coffee- 
house fare to nouveUe cuisine. Last 
year, food products accounted for 5 
percent of Shiseido's sales. 

Mr. Harris believes Shiseido will 
profit from such new ventures, de- 
spite tougher competition at home. 
In times when sales are flat, Mr. 
Harris said, some U.S. companies 
pull back. But not Shiseido. “They 
just pile it on.’’ he said. "That’s why 
Shiseido is doing so welL" 


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INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 18, 1985 


Page 15 


BUSINESS ROUNDUP 


Texas Air Corp. Restates 

TWA 



Cotnpikd by Our Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK —Texas Air Corp. 

* ■ / as indicated that it is still interest- 

. . 7 ^'d in acquiring Trans World Air- 
, nes for S 22 a share in cash if 
' V’WA's merger ' agreement with 
" s ‘‘art C. Icahn, a New York finan- 
er. were terminated without K- 
. nlity to the airline. 

■ TWA disdosed Tuesday that it 
.. id received the offer in a letter 
-- ; 'ora Texas Air’s chairman, Frank 
' orenzo. It added that it will be 
ieeting with Mr. Icahn to discuss 
. ’/■•« status of their existing merger 
■.pasneai and the Texas Air offer. 
■■■■ Texas Air and TWA had earlier 
ached a tentative agreement to 
...... .ergs, but the accord foundered on 

r - jposukm from TWA’s unions. 
WA subsequently accepted a 
-"^gher offer from Mr. Icahn after 
: had won effective control of the 
rrier through open-market pur- 
; of its suck. 

5 The renewed overture comes 
nid persistent reports that Mr. 
/ . ahn is having trouble financing 
s takeover of TWA and may at- 
' mpt to reduce the cash portion of 
‘ s offer. 

• •; Mr. Icahn, who already owns SI 
■ -scent of TWA’s stock, has of- 
‘ red to buy the rest for $24 a share. 
■- ie offer consists of S19.50 a share 

cash and S4.50 a share in a new 
invertible preferred stock. 

In his letter to TWA, Mr. Lor- 
rzo said Texas Air supports the 
irreni merger agreement But he 
■ged TWA to consider other op- 


:anu 


lions if the agreement was signifi- 
cantly amended; 

“Texas Air is willing, upon the 
termination of (he Icahn merger 
agreement without liability to 
TWA Or payments to Icahn, to en- 
ter into a merger agreement with 
TWA on mutually satisfactory 
terms,’' Mr. Lorenzo stated in his 
letter to TWA’s board. 

“Based on its knowledge of 
TWA Texas Air bdieves that it 
will be able to obtain the financing 
necessary to consummate such a 
merger," Mr. Lorenzo said. 

He also indicated a willingness 
to negotiate with TWA’s unions in 
an effort to win cost savings com- 
parable to those sought by Mr. 
Icahn. 

TWA’s three principal unions 
vigorously opposed Mr. Lorenzo’s 
earlier bid for the airline because erf 
what they called Ids anti-union ac- 
tivities at Continental Airlines. 

After acquiring control of Conti- 
nental, Mr. Lorenzo took the earn- 
er into Chapter 1 1 bankruptcy pro- 
tection and abrogated its labor 
agreements. (JPI. Reuters) 

Toshiba, I^I Sign Accord 

A genre France- Presse 

TOKYO — Toshiba Con), of 
Japan announced Tuesday that it 
had signed an agreement with LSI 
Logic Corp. of the United Slates to 
cooperate in. marketing semicon- 
ductors in Japan. 


Thyssen Resumes 
Dividends With 
PayoutofSDM 

Reuters ■ 

DUISBURG, West Germa- 
ny — Thyssen AG, the diversi- 
fied steels, engineering and 
trading group* said Tuesday 
that it would resume paying a 
dividend this year after 3 two- 
hiatus caused by heavy 


Thyssen gave no specific net 
profit for the year coding Sept. 
30, but said it would pay S 
Deutsche marks (SI. 98) per' 50* 
DM share on the results. It last 
paid 2 DM for the year ending 
Sept. 30, 1982. Net profit for 
the 1983-84 year was 181 mil- 
lion DM, 


The dividend 
'be on higher caj; 


it will 
of about 
1316 billion DM following a 
nominal increase of 260 million 
DM earlier this year through a 
one-for-five rights issue. The 
new shares are entitled to full 
1984-85 dividend. 

Thyssen said all divisions op- 
erated profitably, while subsid- 
iaries made a good contribution 
to the overall result. 

The company said that third- 
sales rose 7 percent to 
,8 billion DM. Overall sales 
from capital goods and process- 
ing operations increased 6 per- 
cent last year to 10.4 billion 
DM, Thyssen said. 


& 


Vakasone Says No Decision 
Taken to End Car Quotas 


Reuters 

TOKYO — Japan has made no 
vision yet on whether to continue 
limitary restrictions on car ex- 
otcirts' to the United States, Prime 
mister Yasuhiro Nakasone has 
-id, according to government 
.nrces. 

. . -They said Tuesday that Mr. Na- 

- /.sane told Howard H. Baker Jr., 

- ~ e foriner majority leader of the 

S. Senate who was visiting Ja- 
^.n, that U5. newspaper reports 
. sc wrong in suggesting that Ja- 
. . I n would end the four-year-old 
" strain ts in March. 

.’However. Shoichiro Toyoda, 
~ sidenL of Toyota Motor Corp., 
-- d journalists Tuesday that he 
- old argue against any extension 


when the restrictions run out in 
March. 

Reports that the restraints would 
be ended arose from comments by 
Eji Toyoda, chairman of Toyota, 
last week in Lexington, Kentucky. 
He was there to announce the con- 
struction of an $800-million 
Toyota assembly plant. 

The current ceiling on Japanese 
shipments to the United States is 
2.3 million cars a year. The restric- 
tions began in 1981 after U.S. auto- 
makers said Japanese imports had 
priced them out of their home mar- 

Since then, several Japanese 
companies have announced plans 
to build assembly plants in the 
United States. 


HE EUROMARKETS 


IS. Debt Ratty Boosts Dottar-Stndght Sectoi 


By Chrisropher Pizzey 

Reuters 

-ONDON — The dollar- 
light sector of the Eurobond 
rices ended Tuesday on a firm 
e. with prices underpinned by 
continuing rally on the U.S. 
dit markets, dealers said. 

.'1 keep thinking that the bull 
rkst has ended . . .and then we 
another (economic) statistic 
'i says it hasn’t,” a trader at a 
' i. bank said. 

— 4e was referring to Tuesday’s 
that U.S. November housing 
-^yls dropped 12 J 2 percent, which 


prompted talk among some dealers 
that the Federal Reserve Board was 
about to cut its benchmark dis- 
count rate to 7 percent from the 
current 7% percent. 

Despite the continuing wide gap 
in yields between the United States 
and the Eurobond market — which 
has discouraged many borrowers 
from issuing doflar-straight bends 
— StatoQ issued a J1 25-million 
bond paying 9% percent over 10 
years, priced at 10014. 

The issue was lead-managed by 
Deutsche Bank Capital Markets, 
which quoted it at a discount of 


about 1 %, comfortably inside the 
total fees of 2 percent. 

Otherwise, new-issue activity 
was again concentrated on other 
currencies, with the yen again to 
the Forefront. 

Syntex USA Inc. issued a 20- 
billion-yen bond paying 6 %» per- 
cent over seven years and priced at 
101 . It was guaranteed by the par- 
ent company, Syntex Corp., and 
was lead-managed by LTCB Inter- 
national It ended on the market at 
a discount of about IK. compared 
with the total fees of 2 percent 


ong Decline 
jior Dollar 

. (Continued from Page 1) 
-joined bottom of the dollar de- 
—^ 5 , the yen would have risen to 
to the dollar, from 202. 10 Tues- 
i -’in Tokyo. The marie would be 
to the dollar, from 2-512 on 
^»day in Frankfurt 
% economist said that in 1985, 
United States is spending 45 

• ''em more for goods and ser- 
^ ;S than it is earning. No other 

nation has ever moved into 
as massively as that." 

..._y though foreigners have invest- 
. -“heavily in the United States, 
_ r,'Ti by high interest rales and a 

- ively strong recovery, Mr. 

• .Vis argued that “a Lime is 

.-■■d to come, as the dollar’s de- 
gathers momentum, when for- 
willingness to invest tbeir 
gs in the United States dries 
' -st« than the U.S. economy's 
; “ for Lbem.” 

H% .‘ : -‘t 2 n this happens, he said. 

- will m>t be enough capital to 
^Vce the budget deficit, “a 

; . .h will develop in U.S. finan- 
.v •’ larkeis, and the economy will 
aded for trouble.” 

' e result, as foreigners pull in- 
. rent out of the United States, 
7"': icesskm cuts the U.S. ability 
imported goods, would be a 
o the expansion of U.S. debt 
agn creditors by 1988. 

V ..«V under Mr. Morris’s scenar- 
- . ■ United States would regain 
*<iitor siams by 1993. Begin- 
.3 1990. the U.S. current ac- 

, - the broadest measure of 

performance, would once 
’how a surplus, 
other analysis have sug- 
■-'? that the dollar could contin- 
^ y tjov a gentle decline, ot “soft 
' ' 4 ." in which the crunch fore- 
^V’y Mr. Marris is avoided. 

■redid the decline in foreign 
*»' . unit will come gradually. 

T . ,; i be offset by reductions in 

'' ,,T Jga deficit. 

.. “x scenario looks totally im- 
de," Mr. Marris said. 
r xe basis at exchange rates at 

• ■. * of November, the softland- 

.V Id imply a U.S. intemation- 

poaiUpii in 1990 of SI uil- 
-^ !0 links, ihu SIOO billion 

.i-'orccast for the end of this 



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Petrofina Launches a Bid 
For Charterhouse Petroleum 


Compiled by Ow Suff From Dopacha 

LONDON — Petrofina SA*of 
Belgium, oae of the workl’s largest 
oil companies, launched a £145- 
million ($ 20 S-millioo) takeover hid 
on Tuesday for Charterhouse Pe- 
troleum PLC, a London-based ofl- 
inveslmcnt firm. 

Charterhouse management has 
recommended to its shareholders 
(hat the offer be accepted. Die Brit- 
ish firm has interests is several 
North Sea col fields. 

Petrofina has been working in 
Britain for nearly 60 years. Its Pe- 
trofina (UK) Ltd. has a refinery, a 
chain of service stations and shares 
in various North Sea oil conces- 
sions. 

The merger of Petiofina’s British 
exploration and production inter- 
ests with Charterhouse will be on 
die basis a f three new shares of no 
par value and £59 in ash far every 
295 Charterhouse ordinary shares. 

Petrofina already owns 1.7 mil- 
lion onlmary Cbuterhoure shares, 
or 1.25 percent of the totaL Full 
acceptance would involve the issue 
of as many as 136 million new 
Petrofina shares, or 73 percent of 
the enlarged share capital 

This does not take into account 
any further Charterhouse shares is- 
sued on die exercise of outstanding 
options. 

Separate proposals would be 
made to option holders to sub- 
scribe for ordinary Charterhouse 
shares on terms that reflected the 
terms of the offer. 


Petrofina said it would offer each 
Charterhouse shareholder the op- 
portunity (0 take either more cash 
or more new Petrofina shares. 

Application would be made for 
the new Petrofina shares 10 be ad- 
mitted 10 listing on the Brussels 
and Antwerp exchanges. 

Charterhouse shares surged 35 
pence Tuesday on the London 
Slock Exchange, to 101 pence, from 
Monday's dose of 66 pence each. 

In Brussels, Petrofina shares 
dosed Tuesday at 6,510 Belgian 
francs (S 126.55), down from 6,690 
francs at Monday's dose. 

In the first half ending in June, 
Charterhouse said pretax profit feD 
037 percent to £113 million from 
£15.4 million in the first 1984 half. 
Saks slipped 0.04 percent to £36.5 
million from £38,1 mini mi. 

Petrofina reported parent com- 
pany net profit rose 0.10 percent lo 
8.73 billion francs in the first half 
of 1985 from 7.91 billion francs in 
first half 1984. 

Charterhouse said it intended to 
pay a second interim dividend for 
the 1985 year of 0,75 pence net in 
lieu of a final dividend. 

Dividends for 1985 would there- 
fore total 135 pence net compared 
with 1.0 pence in 1984. The divi- 
dend will be paid 21 days after the 
Petrofina offer becomes uncondi- 
tional to shareholders. 

(Reiacrs, AFP ) 


Brokerage Fails 
In Singapore 

A genre France .Prase 

SINGAPORE — The Stock 
Exchange of Singapore said 
Tuesday that it bad taken over a 
brokerage firm, Associated 
Asian Securities, which had nm 
into trouble as a result of the 
sharp foil in stock market prices 
early this month. 

The stock exchange refused 
to give details of the takeover, 
the second incident of its kind 
in the exchange’s history. The 
Straits Tunes newspaper said 
the action took effect Dec. 6 . 

That was the day after trad- 
ing resumed on stock markets 
in Singapore and Kuala Lum- 
pur, Malaysia, following an un- 
precedented three-day suspen- 
sion of trading precipitated 
when Pan-Electric Industries 
Ltd. went into receivership. 
When the markets reopened, 
share prices fell 20 parent to 30 
percent across the board. 


Amoco Adopts Budget 
With Cuts From 1985 

Reuters 

CHICAGO — Amoco Corp. 
said Tuesday that its directors had 
approved a 1986 capital and explo- 
ration budget of S5 billion, 10 per- 
cent below the estimated 1985 
spending level. 

Amoco said that 80 percent of 
the budget was designated for 
worldwide exploration and produc- 
tion activities. 


Massey Nears Pact 
On Unit Spinr Off 

The Associated Press 

TORONTO — Massey- Fergu- 
son Ltd. says it has almost complet- 
ed an agreement with lenders to 
spin off 60 percent of its combine 
manufacturing and foundries divi- 
sion 

Most of Massey’s major lenders 
have agreed in principle either to 
extend the deadlines for repayment 
of Massey’s 5600 million in long- 
term debt or to convert some of the 
money they are owed into equitv in 
the company, a company spokes- 
man, Jack Nowling, said Monday. 

In addition, the company in- 
tends to consolidate all aspects of 
its combines operation at its Brant- 
ford, Ontario, plant. 


COMPANY NOTiS 


Aerospatiale, the French govern- 
ment-owned aerospace company, 
said Finnair had signed a contract 
to buy five ATR-72 commuter air- 
craft and has taken an option on 
three more. Value of the order was 
not disclosed. 

AT&T said it will start a digital 
daia-tran smission service between 
the United States and Japan, Cana- 
da. Britain. France and Italy on 
Jan. 27. 

Continental Illinois National 
Bank & Trust Ox of Chicago said 
that a special funding “safety net*' 
set up by banks to help it weather 
its liquidity crisis in 1984 has been 
disbanded, and that nearly $12 bil- 
lion in loans from the banks and 
the Federal Reserve System bad 
been repaid. 

Hongkong Land Co. said it has 
canceled a 23-biHioo-Hoog-Kong- 


doliar ($320.5-rai1fioD) standby 
credit facility and freed its major 
asset Exchange Square in central 
Hong Kong, from mortgage. The 
firm arranged for the facility in 
January 1984 in anticipation of to- 
la! debt rising to about 16 billion 
dollars between 1985 and 1987. 

Janfine Mathesoo Holdings Ltd. 
said it has sold a 62-unit luxury 
residential development in Hong 
Kong to Broad Yield Co. for 254 5 
million Hong Kong dollars ($32.6 
milhoa). Jardine said it also sold 93 
homesites in Hawaii for 343 mil- 
lion dollars. 

Keppd Shipyard, Singapore’s 
government-owned ship-repair fa- 
cility, said it wiQ reduce its service 
capacity from 450 ships a year cur- 
rently lo 210 by the end of 1986. 

MAN-Roland Druckmaschmen 
AG, a maker of printing machines. 


said net income in the year ended 
June 30 more than doubled from a 
year earlier, to 13-2 million Deut- 
sche marks (about $53 million I 
from 6.3 million. Sales rose 27 per- 
cent, to 1.06 billion DM, it said. 

Ptnffips Petroleum International 
Corp. said it and Pec ten Orient Co. 
had signed a contract with China 
for ofFshote oil exploration rights 
in the South China Sea. Terms of 
the accord were not disdosed. 

S uwn p iu g e M i , the en gin eering 
and main contracting unit of Italy's 
state energy conglomerate, ENI, 
said it had signed a letter of intent 
lo build a large fertilizer complex in 
India. It valued the contract at 
$350 millioc- 

Standard Chartered Bank PLC 
said il will move into a new 40- 
story headquarters building in 
Hong Kong in 1989. 


FINTER BANK ZURICH 

The Board of Directors of Finler Bank Zurich has 
apjtoi tiled, effective 1st January 1986, 

Mr. Otto Berther, 

General Manager and Executive Vice President 

Mr. Gianni MeregaHi, 

First Senior Vice President 
of Lugano and Chbsso Branch Offices. 


Midland BankTrust 
Corporation 
In the 

Channel Islands 


We offer a full range of banking 
antitrust services including. 
'Deposils (sterling and other currencies) 

* Loans (sterling and other currencies) 
“Execmorand Trustee 
"Personal Income Tax 
’Portfolio Investment Management 
“Company Management 
Offshore Gift and International Bond Funds 
For funber details comsct us it: 

M.dianii HjrJ, ‘frass Cnrpomijon : ( nji'. - ny\ ; l.tmm-j 
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MiCljsJ Tru-J ( or^ifjiHnwJfKi il imncJ 
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(<rc-u ,' (< t Rin,<s: 

Mergers of 

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IHT 



IF YOU KNEW THAT REPUBLIC SERVES CLIENTS IN OVER 80 COUNTRIES. YOU’D BE PHONING THEM TOO. 


Republic National Bank of New York. Traditional banking in an age of change. 

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Plants have fed theworld 
and cured its ills since life began. 

Now we’re destroying their principal hat 
at the rate of 50 acres every minute. 



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W e live on this planet by courtesy 
of the earth’s green cover Plants 
protect fragile soils from erosion, 
regulate the atmosphere, maintain 
water supplies for agriculture and 
prevent formation of deserts. Without 
p lants man could not survive. 

Yet, knowing this, we are destroying 
our own life-support system at such an 
alarming rate mat it has already become 
a rrisis - a crisis for ourselves and an 
even bigger one for our children. 

The figures alone should tell the stray 
- we destroy a tropical rain forest three 
times the size of Switzerland every year, 
within 25 years only fragments or the 
vast Malaysian ana Indonesian forests 
will remain. 




U>- * ~ 

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Photo: Courtesy of RJdund Evans Schultes 


Botanical Museum at Harvard University, has 
spent 13 years in the Amazon jungle collecting 
^Sna^plmtiefmydiajidl^BnAmd 

jnaking than available Ut Western medicine 
and science. ‘'The drugs of the future" he says, 
grow in the primeval jungfe? 

What we are destroying 
Much of the food, medicines and 
materials we use every day of our lives 
is derived from the wild species which 
grow in the tropics. Yet only a tiny 
fraction of the world’s flowering plants 
have been studied for possible use. 
Horrifyingly, some 25,000 of &D. 
flowering species are on the verge of 
extinction. 

Once the plants go, they are gone 
forever. Once the forests go only 
wastelands remain. 


^■;U 


Photo: Maifc-J. Ptodriu 
Catharantkusmseus. Many of the world’s 
children who have suffered from leukaemia are 
now alive due to the properties discovered in 
die rosy periwinkle, which originated in 
Madagascar where 90% of the forests are 
already destroyed 

Who is the villain? 

There is no villain - except ignorance 
and short-sightedness. The desperately 
poor people who live in the forests have 
to dear areas for crops and fuel, but 
they are doing this in such a way that 
they are destroying their very livelihood 
Add to this the way in which the 
heart is being ripped out of the forests 
to meet die demand for tropical 
timbers and we have a recipe for 
disaster. 


What can be done about it? jf 
The problem seems so vast that there is ' 
a tendency to shrug and say “What can 
I do?” But there is an answer. There is 
something that each and every one of 
us can do. 

The WWF Plant 
Conservation Programme 
The World Conservation Strategy, 
published in 1980, is a prog ramme for 
conserving the world's natural resources 
whilst managing them for human 
needs. A practical, international plant 


now well under way 


•' v 

chat V- 


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Photo: WWF/Hrjunglus 
Disease-resistant potatrux obtained by cross- 
breeding roild potatoes from the Andes with 
domestic varieties, ensure that Ireland will 
never again experience the blight disease which 

CJiptd out its entire crop, ieaping a rrdUion ■ . 

people to die of starvation. 


m 


The Vavilov Centres. Named after the Russian . 
scientist who identified them. These are the 
regions. in which our major crop plants wen . I 
first domesticated. Many of these regions 
contain wdd or semi-domesticated relatives of- 
commercial species which can he cross-bred tcith 
crop plants to increase yield and resistance to .. 
pests and diseases: 

You can become part of it A 
The WWF Plant Conservation " 
Programme is a plan for survival which 
you can help make a reality. Join the V: 
World Wildlife Fund now. We need 
your voice and your financial support 
Get in touch with your local WWF 
office for membership details, or send 
your contribution direct to the World 
Wildlife Fund atr WWF International," ' 
Membership Secretary, World Consec 
vation Centre, 1196 Gland, Switzerland. 

r £?l Save the plants 
that save us. y 

WWFfor world conservation “ 


Photo: (Foreati Bruoo Cofcmah/Boan C<*1« 

































* i 


INTERJVATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 18, 1985 


JUSNESS PEOPLE 


Page 17 





mt 


By Brenda Erdmann. ‘ * 


, -LONDON — - ITT Cotp.-has 

■ .-mod awoddwide martetmgor- 

; laiza&OD tax rU-tdeconummica-' 
’-ns products. . . 

■•."The new unit; to be called . HT 
' ’temariona! Marketmg Group,' 
! - B be based in Brussels and: win 
insoljdafe die current activities of 

■ ■ ITT Asia/ Padfic-Latm. Ameri- 

■ group, ITT Africa and the Mid- 

East and ITT Eastern Europe 

■ ^ralions. The group will report 
! ,'Daniel P.Weadock, ITT execu- 
Ae vice president and president of 
;jssel»-based ITT Europe Inc: 

i ‘Bernard 5. McFadden is respon- 
se for the management of the 
:[v group. He is an ITT vice presi- 

< >H and group executive, interna* 

,'oa! marketing. Mr. McFadden 

; : 1 continue toreport to Mr. Wea- 
'• X 

At the same tune, responsibility 
•i two ITT tdecomrnunicatiocs- 
■oufacturing operations is also 
'og reassigned, with ITT South 

< jfic. based in Sydney, and HTs 

■ ..-rest in Industria de Telecom- 
• nicadon SA in Mexico City, 

, v being monitored directly by 
^ . WeadocL 

’ Ar. Weadock said the formation 
''he gro up wa s a “logical progres- 
j” for rfT*s worldwide market- 
strategy. He said 80 percent of 
teleco mmunicatio ns and dec-, 
oics products sold by ITT in the 
a-Parilic and Latin America re-. 




Ford of Europe bas named .John 
AJVfl. Grant, above, as treasurer, 
sodw edm g Brace L. Blythe, 
who is taking upline m post of 
executive director, in charge of 
Mure business strategy for the 
company. Mir. Grant previously 
was assistant treasurer for Ford 
of Europe, a unit of the U.S. 
automaker, Ford Motor Co. 

gions come from its European 
mbnuf term in g nnir^ t with many of 
these companies involved in tech- 
nology transfer to the Third World. 
“We are now bringing ITT closer lo 
its customers," he said. 

Natjonaje-Naieriaoden NV, the 
Dutch insurance group, said that 
effective June I, its supervisory 
board has appointed JJ. van Rijn, 


currently a member of the execu- 
tive board, as a deputy chainnan of 
the executive board. He save 
jointly with O. Haitink. From the 
same date, the board intends to 
appoint H. Huizinga and GJ\ 
Jouckbcer as member* of the exec- 
utive board Both currently hold 
executive posts with Natiooalo-Ne- 
derbnden operations in Australia 
and Noah America, respectively. 
The company also mid that from 
June L a general management for 
the operations in the Netheriands 
win be instituted, consisting of Mr. 
Huizinga, r chairman, A.L. van 
Koert, vice chainnan, and G van 
Kekem, member. Mr. van Koert is 
currently a member of the execu- 
tive board of Amfas and Mr. van 
Kekem senior general manager of 

National e-Ned er Ian den General 

Insurance Co. 

Apple Computer loc. said hsAp- 
ple Computer International unit 
has opened an Asian regional office 
in Hong Kong. The office wiD have 
responsibility for Apple's business . 
throughout its Asian region and 
will be headed by Larry David, 
managing director of Apple's Asia 
operations. 

Snamprogetti tid. bas named 
Ennio Carbone managing director, 
succeeding Vittorio Giacomelli, 
who has . returned to group head- 
quarters in Milan Mr. Carbone 
was director of projects for Snam- 
progetti SpA, which is a member of 
the ENI group, before moving to 


Basingstoke, England, to head up 
the company’s British unit. 

Cable & Wireless PLC has 
named RJ. Olsen, and G.M.W. 
Owen to its board of of directors, 
effective Jan. 1. Mr. Olsen wiD be- 
come executive director responsi- 
ble for the Far East and ftrffic, 
succeeding BA Pemberton. Mr. 
Olsen win also retain his post as 
managing director of Hong Kong 
Telephone Co. Mr. .Pemberton, 
who currently holds the posts of 
chief operating officer and direc- 
tor, Far East and Pacific, will, from 
Jan. U sow only as chief operat- 
ing officer. Mr. Owen will become 
executive director responsible for 
business in the United Kingdom, 
while retaining his pon as manag- 
ing director of Mercury Communi- 
cations Ltd.. 


McCunecf Polaroid 
Is Resigning asGiief 

■ The Associated Press 
CAMBRIDGE, Massachusetts 
— ■ William J. McCune Jr„ chair- 
man of Polaroid Corp., said Tues- 
day that he would retire as chief 
executive Jan. L 
Mr. McCune said the company’s 
board has decud LM- Booth, 54, 
as Polaroid’s chief executive. Mr. 
Booth win remain president Mr. 
McCone, 70, has been chief execu- 
tive since 1980 and wiD continue as 

chairmen . 


Robert Anderson 


Resigning Arco 
Chairmanship 

Im Angela Times Service 

LOS ANGELES — Robert 
0. Anderson, who parlayed a 
small New Mexican oil refinery 
into the oil-industry giant At- 
lantic Richfield Co., will retire 
as Arco’s chairman Jan. 1. 

Lodwrick M. Cook, 57, who 
became president and chief ex- 
ecutive last June, wQI succeed 
the 68-year-old Mr. Anderson 
as chairman, the company said 
cm Monday. Robert E Wycoff, 
54, an Arco vice chairman, will 
take the president’s tide from 
Mr. Cook at the oil company. 

Mr. Anderson, who has a cat- 
tle ranch in New Mexico, has 
not been active in the day-to- 
day affairs of Arco for some 
time. He continued to play on 
important role in major corpo- 
rate decisions, however, includ- 
ing the recent reshaping of Ar- 
co’s key businesses. 

Mr. Anderson became Arco’s 
first chainnan in 1966, follow- 
ing the merger of Atlantic Re- 
fining Co. of Philadelphia with 
Richfield Oil of Los Angeles, 
and he is widely regarded as its 
founder. Under his leadership, 
the company’s size expanded 
dramatically, especially after 




Robert O. Anderson 

the 1 970 discovery of the largest 
oil field in North America at 
Prudhoe Bay mt Alaska’s North 
Slope. 

Mr. Anderson said Monday 
that he was retiring to “devote 
more lime to my various per- 
sonal and business interests." 

Mr. Cook, a petroleum engi- 
neer by training, started his ca- 
reer by laying oil pipeline. He is 
wdl known within the industry 
for supervising the construction 
of the Trans-Alaska pipeline. 


Rate Prospects Depress 
Dollar, Oil Cuts Hurt Pound 


Compiled br Ow Staff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
closed mixed in light UJ5. trading 
Tuesday after falling earlier in Eu- 
rope on prospects for lower U.S. 
interest rates. The British pound 
came under pressure because of a 
drop in oD prices. 

“There remains a feeling that the 
Federal Reserve Board will cut the 
discount rate by the end of the year, 
which keeps a cap on the upside 
potential for the dollar,** said Dan- 
iel Holland, vice president of Dis- 
count Corp. of New York. 

The discount rate, the Fed's 
charge on loans to member banks, 
is the rate from which all other U.S. 
interest rates are scaled upward. 

In New York, the dollar slipped 
to 2.5075 Deutsche marks from 
2L5100 at Monday’s close; to 201.85 
Japanese yen from 202.10, and to 
7.6723 French francs from 7.6765. 
But it rose to 2.1065 Swiss francs 
from 2.1000. 

The British pound, meanwhile, 
slipped against the dollar and con- 
tinental currencies as North Sea oil 
for January delivery fell about SI a 
barrel from Monday’s levels. 

The pound, which has been 
buoyed by North Sea ail revenues, 
fell in New York to SI.4355 from 
SI. 4430 on Monday. In London, it 
eased to St. 4373 from SI .4380 at 


Monday's dose and to 3.6095 DM 
from 3.6290. 

In earlier trading in Europe, the 
dollar fell to 2^ 110 DM in London 
from its previous finish there of 
2.5235. Deaiere said the U.S. cur- 
rency had fallen to a quoted low of 
under 2JiD DM before rebounding 
on corporate buying. 

The dollar also fell in London to 
201.85 yen from 202.65 on Monday 
and to 2.1015 Swiss francs from 
2.1120. 

Dealers said there was a great 
reluctance among operators to take 
new dollar positions because of un- 
certainty about being able to cover 
them in the current thin market. 

“If you lake a position, it's going 
to be difficult to get out of it; peo- 
ple are being very cautious," one 
London deala said. “People are 
generally quite happy with what 
they made for the year and things 
are unlikely to gel back into swing 
until the new year." 

In other European markets 
Tuesday, the doDar was fixed at 
mid afternoon in Frankfurt at 
15120 DM, down from 15224 at 
the Monday fixing; at 7.6920 
French francs in Pans, down from 
7.71 15, and at 1,714 JO lire in Mi- 
lan, down from 1,72015. In Zurich, 
the dollar closed 2.1030 Swiss 
francs, down from 11168. 

(Reuters. VP1, 1HT ) 


• Tuesday's 

n ore 


Prices 


NASDAQ prices os of 

. 3 pjn. New York time. 

Via The Associated Press 


xtm Sales in Mat 

Un. 5»°Ct Olv.YM. HU HM) UUPA qS 


S WW Conus *36 

7ft M* Cosmo 141 

l« l|to CncBrT .14 M 3S? 

, IV mi Sunos 17 

3MI m CrnsTr JO IS M4 

£ I MM * CmiM 28 

* | 34ft 15* Crumps 231 

an* 18% CuBnFr JM 44 78 

1 XV. IM Cubans J U lU 

27 1IM Cram 15 


IN lft 1% 

W M M 
14% 14 14 — to 

is* u% ibk + % 

23 22* 22* 

14% 14to MM 

21% am 21* + % 

21 Mi 21*21% — Mi 

am 20 2m + % 
sow m mi.— * 


I 12140081 Sates k, Nat 1 

KUiLaw Slack Oh. YU. VBOs Htoh Law 3 PJA are. 

11% 

6 Forum 

86b 

5 

5171 

UK 

11 

iito — % 


3to Faster 

.10 

24 

326 

4 

3% 

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16U Freml 

48 

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601 

23% 

39* 

23* 


4* Fudrck 



363 

7% 

6* 

6K— to 

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32 

15 

230 

18% 

18 

1TO— % 


SVt Ik, MhtllCT 
27M 17W Mlntfor 
m 7V. MCosk joia .1 
TO 6* MoMC B 
22 14 ModlAat 41 3.1 

U 4% Mobctr 
39% 27% Malax JO 

2SV. uu. Mama 45a 14 
TO 72k MonAnt 
TO 9*MonolM 
37V. 24% MonuC 140 40 
20V. I4M| MorFlO JJ1 
2m Ikft Morrsn 40 24 
7ft 2 Mom lay 
TO 12VV MotCIS JO 1 J 
24U. 11V] Mvlan t .10 4 


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38 

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35V. + Vi 

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IVK— K 
34. 

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441k 
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34 TO 
25K MU. 
41k 2k* 

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w 

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as 

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687 

49* 

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239. 



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364 

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41V. 




131 

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BK— Ik 


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JB 

25 

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31* — to 

42Vfe 

1.12b 13 

469 

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Wfc 

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8 

908 

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M 

J 

181 



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V 



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84 

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72f 

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521k 

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51*— to 



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88 

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810 27 

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2SU 25K 25W 
2CV 34K an + <A 
51 52% A2W- K 

n m- n— k 

SK 5W n + K 
TO 18 18 

w* m n* 

7K 7* 7K 


IK ocaawr 

H> Octtta* 

331* OollGp 1 JOB 

43 Vi OfttoCo 280 

am OldKntf 1.10 
33K OldRps J* 
TO OWS PfC 240 
15 OdoBoi S3 
3W OnUna 
TO OPftcC 
2 m ophcr 
la onxmc 
Sift omit 
41* orfaCp 
TO ommn 20 
27K DffrTP 225 

1 ownMs as 
1* oxaca 


206 

25 23 

48 270 
2 9 261 
21 133 

128 29 

U 187 
449 
178 
326 


aw 2 
111* m 

6* 439x 

69K 69K 
39 37Kj 

to an 

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31V. 30K 
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TO 141* 
27V. 26K 
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Mta TO 
34 V, 341* 
111* 17K 
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69K + Mi 
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351* 

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271* 

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6 

TO— 1* 
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BK 3K Jockool 440 

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25V. ISA JnnWlr ISO 

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34 Vi 14 Jortco .14 3 745 

TV. 3K JonldH I 257 
im JouKisn 75 

23V, 9K Juno I 149 

20K 13K Justin 40 22 43 


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19JA TO 
17K m 
im 6K 
69 43 

4146 31V* 
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11 6K 
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291* 81* 


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KV Phr 
Komonj 44 
Kcrchr 
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Kavdon 
Kamo 1J0 
KyCnU 180 
Kavax 
KeyTm 
KJmtark .. 
Kinder 86 
Kray JM 

Kroner J6 

Ktllcka .121 


111* IW* 101* — K 
6K 4 41* + M 

44 43 43 —1 

24K 3* 20* 

40S, 4k* 4V. 

231* 23 231*— 1* 

4«h 5K 6 +1* 

ilk 7K 7K— V* 

23K 231* 23'* 

IIW 17* 17* 


221* 22 221* 

8* Bt* 81*— 1* 
23K 23K 23* 

15* 15V* TO 
111k II 11 — U 
I1K 11V* UK + 1* 
TDK 69V* 70* +2 
55* SSV. 55* + * 
6V* 6K 6K 
10* 101* TO— I* 
2 2 2 
19* 19 19VH— K 

8* IK 01*— Ui 
15 14K TO— V* 

12* 121* 12* + Vh 


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365 

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73 

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14* 

13* 

131 

238 

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26* 

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251* + I* 

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TO + V* 
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441* + Vt 
24 + Ik 

24U + * 
471m 

241* — '* 
TO— U 
«•*— V* 
51m 


Tue sday^ 


Oosing 


Tables iactiHle Hie aattonwide prices 
«w to Hie dosing an Wall Street 
■Ml do net reflect Kite trades elsewhere. 


5* + K 

21 — M 

17V*— k 

!»-* 

8*+K 

33V* 

63 +1 , 
2K + K 
TO— V* 
IV* 

27K— V* 
121k— * 
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IK— M 

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241* + * 
8K— 1* 
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70 
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3X1 *2 
41 JO 129 


A 21 13 
84 14 M 

J0a 17 I 
06 20 11 

120 SO 


2 72* 72* 

1 10V* TO 
7 UK 18V* 
1 » » 
22 2DV* 20V* 

21 A* A 

152 1* IK 
11 20* 20 

3U 9* 9V* 
60 1* IK 

034 51* S 

2 14 M 

22 7Vt 7K 
4 Bt 3ft 
2 2JK 2314 

153 TO TO 

22S IK 1 
126 UK 11 , 
92 UK 181* 
13 lb M 
84 H* 11* 
130 24V* 24V* 
M 3K 3K 
II M M 


72*— 1* 
TO— 14 
18K- V* 
7* — I* 
26*— M 
5VS 
IK 

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IK 

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7VS + V* 
3* + ft 

231* — l* 
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1 — V* 
UK + V* 
UK 

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3<M 

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6K + *1 





29 

2% 

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23 

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52 


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546 

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IS 

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22% 

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49 

1% 

IK 

m 




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TK 

lto 

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12 

64 

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1 



56 

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172 

75 

7 

16 

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22* 

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18 

334 

17% 

9* 

12% 40! 



15 

89 

AK 

AK 

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JO 

18140 

U 

21% 

21 

21 -» 




74 

11% 

10% 

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9K 9* 
9K BK 

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1 K 
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TO V* 
13* 12V& 
10K 9* 

11* UK 
19* 19* 
UK 16* 
2K 21* 
5* 4* 
2K 216 
33V* 31M 
SK S 
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4 M 

m h 
im im 

23* 21% 
2* 2% 
14* 14* 
12* UK 

19 im 


TO + I* 
UK 
51* 

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BK— * 

3K— K 

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40 + 1* 

9W— * 
12K— K 
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15K— * 
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32K— * 
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480 38 18 
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37 7W 7* 7K + * 

2m 6V. 5* SK— * 

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158 1BK TO 1BK— * 
17 9* 9* 9* 

74 20% 20* 20* + * 
36 2* 2* 2* 

55 J* 2* 2* — to 
571 141* UK 13*— K 
55 23* 22* 23* . 

106 TO SK 5H— I* 
9 14* UK Ifift—K 
12 IK IK TK— * 

563240 MO 340 —2 
109 m .1 IK 

S I9* 391* 391* — * 
13* 13* TO + to 
143 Bto 7% 7* 

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UK 10* — K 
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4K 4K— 1* 
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0* TO— to 
8K » + * 
30* 21* + * 
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UK 9 QwakCi J8 U ID7 

32V* IS dunum 2596 

5K 2% Quasi M 114 

TO n. Qulxol* 73 

TO 8 QuOtm 23*3 


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34 795 
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11 453 
J 72x 

556 
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28 25 Vj 37 — to 
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111* 18 lit* 
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7to 71k 
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10ft TDto 
33 32V, 

II TO 
6% 6V, 
17% 16K 
5to 4% 
9% 9% 

in* 10% 
20% a 

9% 9 
27* 27% 
51 5QK 
19% UK 
7% 7to 
17* 17% 
35V, 34U 
13* U* 
9% 9% 
25to 25 
9 SK 
3 2* 

11% UK 
22V. 21* 


6to— to 
18%—% 
1TO— to 
UK 
7lu 

TO- to 
33% — K 
IS* + Ik 
IK— to 
21K— to 
1S%— to 
32* 

llPk— to 
Ato— * 
17 — to 
4%— to 

f=! 

ir + to 

19to+l 

7% 

IT* 

34* — to 
13* 

9to— to 
25to— to , 
9 + % ' 

2K- to 
UK 

21*— to 


1 V 1 


9* 

5to VLI 



483 

5* 

TO 

5%— to 

16* 

7to vur 



263 

15% 

15 

15*— ft 









11* 

7* VSE 

■17a U 

31 

10% 

10% 

10% 4 % 

20* 

8% VOIFSL 







22* 



281 

n* 

20ft 


42* 

27* VoINfl 

U2 

13 

1108 

40* 

39% 

40* + * 





11 




1VK 

llto Van Dus 

JO 

28 

35 

TO 

19* 

19* — ft 

Uto 

4* Vanzatl 



68 

A* 



AW 

2% Vanrrax 



354 


4% 


a* 

14* vicorp 

,12a 

J 

431 

20* 

30% 

30* — * 

13% 


72a 10 

5*4 

7% 

7* 


16% 






16 


21* 

13K Vlroiak 



21 

21 

30% 

71 + % 

17% 

5K VoCtawl 



410 

7to 

7 


22 




734 

20* 

50% 20% + * 


L_ 


16 

15* 

8% 

10* 

UK 

13 

UK 

Sto 

21 

1A_ 

26* 

Ah 

45* 

30to 

15to 

9% 

32% 

71k 

83* 

47* 

5* 

TO 

10 

4% 

«K 

5% 

31% 

15% 

21% 

12% 

10* 

Ato 

15* 

8% 

M* 

BK 

21% 

14* 

5% 

3* 

13% 

6to 

20* 

A 

9% 

3K 

8* 

4* 

4% 

1% 

7% 

IK 

2Ato 

16 

9H 

5% 

TO 

Ato 

UK 

11 

25% 

17% 

27 

13* 

7% 

4% 

Uto 

12ft 

37* 

34* 

41* 

2916 

25% 

13* 

14% 

8 

31* 

22% 

15K 

10 


s 1 




125 

9* 

8% 

9.. — % 



1057 

15* 

15 

15to + % 



38 

23% 

22% 

22% - * 

.Ur 

U 

VO 

Tto 

Aft 

7 — to 

JO 

u 

162 

17* 

17to 

1714— % 

70b J 

1006 

26* 

25ft 

26% 

140 

15 

mi 

46to 

45ft 

4A* + % 



179 

Uto 

10* 

10ft— ft 



4W 

22* 

21% 

21ft- * 

3J» 

17 

3183 

87 

81* 

81ft— to 



35 

5% 

Sto 

5to— % 



35 

6% 

6% 

6% 

.14 

A1 


6* 

6* 

a* 

JOd 

12.9 

S3 

31 

30% 

30%— to 

J4 

2.1 

128 

31% 

20ft 

20ft— % 



566 

10% 

Mto 

10% + % 



301 x 

IS* 

Uto 

uto 

72 

3.1 

363 

Iito 

ITO 

IS* + K 

JOb 

1J 

31 

28* 

28 

28 - to 



3 

4* 

4* 

4ft 



M 

6% 

Ato 

6% + to 



700 

7* 

7% 

7W— to 



122 

4 Vi 

«to 

*% + ft 



4001 

7* 

Aft 

Aft— * 



220 

2 

IK 

1*— to 



238 

3ft 

3* 

JK- to 

JO 

A0 

16 

20 

20 

a 



74 

7* 

7% 

716— % 

JS 

J 

2480 

9to 

9 

9% 

M 

J 

952 

13ft 

13* 

1S»+ % 

JM 

3.7 

467 

33 

23% 

22*— ft 

t 


32 

24 

23 ft 

23% + to 



49 

4* 

4b 


.16 

J 

54* 

19* 

19 

19 

AS 

1J 

1227 

35% 

3M 

3Sto + to 

1J4 

44 

135* 

41ft 

41% 

41ft 4* to 

.16 

A 

112 

25% 

74* 

25 + % 



143 

91k 

8* 

8W— * 

.1$ 

J 

773 

29* 

39% 

29* + to 



66 

T2ft 

12ft 

13*— % 


25K 17K 
IT* M 
13* AK 
25* 19 
3TO 16to 
17* 10* 
9* 6 
141* 10% 
19% BK 
17* TO 
TO J* 
18* TO 
23 15% 

17V, ft* 
38ft 24* 
A* TO 
1|to 3 
53 32 

IS* 7* 
UK 4to 
7* 3% 
24* 14* 
19* Uto 
22% Uto 
30% 20K 


4* IK Xebec 
13* 5* Wcw 
17* Iflto Xfdtx 


1JM 

45 

230 

24 

23K 

23b— % 

33 

17 

■ 

17to 

16* 

16* 



106 

9% 

9% 

9%— 14 

176 

7J 

191 

24% 

23* 

23ft 4 % 

JO 

10 

170 

30* 

29ft 

30*— % 



649 

17 

16* 

16*— to 



2a 

7* 

TK 

7ft— % 

JO 

U 

290 

12to 

12 

Hto 4 to 



58 

17V. 

16ft 

17 — * 



1307 

16ft 

15% 

16 — ft 



21 

8% 

8% 

8% 



75 

17* 

17ft 

17% 4 % 

JO 

20 

204 

30* 

20% 

20% 



563 

12% 

UK 

12* 4 to 

.98 

2J 

624 

37ft 


37 — 'A 



ZB6 

4* 

4* 

«* 4 % 



1400 

3% 

3b 

IS + to 

1J5 

13 

289 

51% 

50* 

50*— * 



924 

15* 

15* 

15% 4 % 



100 

TO 

TO 

5% 4 % 

JOI 


1075 

5* 

ft 

5%— % 

JO 

42 

97 

14* 

14 

14*— % 

JO 

49 

47 

13 

12* 

12U— * 

At 

1.9 

411 

23* 

22* 

J2K + to 

JO 

U 

752 

22* 

23U 

23* 


Uto 15 YlowFs M 1.9 33A 


30% 6 ZMUrs .101 J 1829 

14 10% Ztetfar Jla 35 36 

461* 31 23onlH 1J6 38 120 
5* 1* Z1M 3 

TO TO Zfvod » 

15to 6% Zandvn Mi A 004 


28 % 28 % am — 


2S% 24K 25% + to 
14 13* UK + to 

46 45% 46 

2 to aft 2 K 

6% 5ft TO— H 
17* 12% T2* ♦ 1* 










































Page 18 


7” 

2 

a 

4 

1 

5 

0 

7 

B 

8 

I 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 




15 





16 




17 




IB 






19 





20 







21 







BoB 

22 



23 

24 

1 

25 




26 

27 

28 



■ 

29 


30 

1 

31 


32 

33 

34 

35 




| 

36 




37 


1 

38 



39 




40 






1 

41 



«“ 



43 






44 




45 



46 


1 

47 



1 

48 






49 


50 

1 

51 


52 




53 

54 

55 




50 


57 



SB 

59 

50 

ei" 







52 

n 







64 




1 

05 





1 

00 




iF“ 




68 





69 






X 


PEANUTS 


ACROSS 


1 Clock stopper? 

5 Pointless 

10 Mining 
product 

14 •• Dream. 

Can'll?" 

15 Proboscises 

16 Arsenal stash 

17 Start of a 
quotation from 
Dryden 

20 Near graduate 

21 Lament 

22 Girl 

(Clara Bow) 

25 "Norma " 

26 Cynosure at a 
ball 

29 Eneroor 
febrero 

31 Thin pancake 

35 "It's a Sin to 

Tell " 

36 Spring month 
in Milano 

38 Cub Scout unit 

39 Cask 

40 Middle of the 
quotation 

41 Melancholy 

42 Dutch 
commune 

43 Leaning 

44 Machu Picchu 
land 

45 Passover feast 

47 Printeraps 
follower 

48 City near 
Leipzig 


49 Mrs.. in 
Madrid 
51 Group 
character 

53 Algeciras is 
one 

57 Preoccupy 

61 End of 
quotation 

64 Biblical weed 

65 Part of 
U.S.N.R. 

66 Satiate 

67 Singing 
brothers' 
name 

68 Trueheart's 
love 

69 Brain scans, 
for short 


DOWN 


1 Partner of 
starts 

2 Aspirin target 

3 City on the ’ 
Ome 

4 Qualify 

5 Harden 

6 de plume 

7 Cleo’s bosom 
buddy? 

8 Require 

9 Poly follower 

10 Bingo official 

11 Melville opus 

12 Asian river 

13 Prospector’s 
find 

18 Architect Mies 
van der 


12/ta/as 

19 Typewriter 
bar 

23FixupODa 

stake 

24 Consisting or 
three 

26 College in 
Lewiston, Me. 

27 Getaway from 

28 up 

(formed a queue) 

30 Seal 

32 A Ford 

33 Thirtieth-anni- 
versary gift 

34 Provide 

36 HirtandCapp 

37 Place to park 

40 Edible root 

44 “A to 

Lndia,” recent 
film 

46 Catches sight 
of 

48 Man of the road 

50“ You Glad 

You’re You?” 

52 In a wrathful 
way 

53 precedent 

54 A concern of a 
coed 

55 Farm fraction 

56 Nicholas or 
Ivan 

58 Perry’s penner 

59 Self-satisfied 

60 Concordes 

62 Cavaliers' 
campus 

63 Cul-de- 


€' New York Timet, edited by Eugene Maleska. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 



BOOKS 


PLEASURES OF THE BELLE EPO- 

QUE: Entertainment and Festivity 
in Tnnr-of-th e-Century France 

By Charies Rearick Illustrated. 240 pages. 
$29.95. 

Yale University Press, 302 Temple Street, 
New Haven, Com 06520. 


Reviewed by John Gross 

F EW golden ages feel golden at the time. 

and in the 30 years or so before 1914 no 
one in France seems to have gone around 
proc laimin g that the country was living 
through a Only in retrospect, after 

the dark divide of World War L did the phrase 
came into use as a label for the prewar period. 
Once applied, it stuck, and it suh sums up the 
popular notion of French life in that era as a 
constant round of cafe, cabarets, strolls along 
the boulevard, sophisticated pleasures. 
Historians have no trouble showing bow 

much of this is nonsense. Pre-1914 France was 
plagued by bitter political conflicts, festering 
social problems and harsh economic divisions. 
Yet if the idea of the belle epoque is an illusion, 
it has proved an extraordinarily potent one. 
The pleasures of the period need to be evoked 
as wdl as dissected, to be entered into sympa- 
thetically as well as set in their social context. 
Charies Rearick, who teaches history at the 
University of Massachusetts in Amherst, has 
by and large succeeded in doing so in this lively 
and original survey. 

Rearick begins with the 14th of July — not 
just any 14th of July, but the festivities that 
took place in 1880, the first of their kind. 
Successive French governments had steadfast- 
ly refused to treat the anniversary of the revo- 
lution as an occasion for public rejoicing. 
When they finally established h as the chief 
national holiday, it was a key symbol of the 
democratic secular culture that the Third Re- 
public was bent on promoting. 

While the celebrations of 1880, considered 
as a republican fSte, were a striking success, the 
holiday soon took on a less formal, more bois- 
terous coloration. If this was in large part a 
reversion to traditional ways, it also chimed in 
with a determined hedonism and a rejection of 
the work ethic, which Paul Lafargue (Karl 
Marx’s son-in-law) summed up in 1 883 as “the 
right to be lazy.” 

For most French families this remained a 
difficult right to enjoy, so it is among i 
groups that Rearick finds his mosL spark 


vein of material, above all in his discussion of 
•'bohemian gaiety and the new show business.’ 1 

The centerpiece of this section is an account ■ 
of the pioneering Montmartre cabaret Le Char** 
Noir (whose proprietor, Rodolphe Satis, 
dressed his waiters as members of the Acafc 
nue Fnnwjaise) and its many imitators. Tne . 
cabarets took advantage of a nourishing bote 
mi an culture that manifested itself in suds 
curious phenomena as “The kcoberems^V 
group that held Dada- like art shows (tmeefla- 
tor. whose entries included “sculptures' in 
bread crumb," was Tofllouse-Lamrec). 

Rearick also addresses himself to morefsa- 
eral themes, such as changing patterns of divide 
ing up time, and whether the comingofriEfr. 


could be considered “a ctmtiimaucm 
another form.” a festival of destruction. " “ ~ 


John Cross is on the staff of The New 
Times. 


BESTSELLERS £ 


Tbc New York Usks '■ 

Hia Um u hued on reporo from mere dan 2JJ00 bookstall 
ihmjgbuai tbe United Suits. Wtcksoa buRWtHROStilr 

consecutive. 



TVs 

Week 


FICTION 

Lm WrJb 
tie* «■(*> 

THE MAMMOTH HUNTERS, by Jan 

M Aud 


LAKE WOBEGON DAYS, by Garrison 
Keillor 


t 


m 


TEXAS, bv Janes A Michener 

CONTACT, bv Carl Seam 

SECRETS, by DmcfleSicd 

THE SECRETS OF HARRY BRIGHT. 


bv Joseph Wambi 
JALAP A 


GALAPAGOS, by Run Va nnegin 

WORLD'S FAIR, bv EJL. Doctwow 

THE ACCIDENTAL TOURIST, bv Anne 

Tvkr ' 

THE CAT 'WHO WALKS THROUGH 

WALLS, by Robert A Konkin 8 

WHATS BRED IN THE BONE, by Rob- 
cmra Davies 


9 I3 4 


THE VAMPIRE LESTAT. by Amte Riot II 
SKELETON CREW, by Stephen King .... 12 
THE OLD GRINGO, by Carlos Fueates — 
LONDON MATCH, by Lcn Doghion — 

NONFICTION 


YEAGER; An Autobiography, by nm* 

Yeager and Leo Janos : _ 

IACOCCA: AN AUTOBIOGRAPHY, by 

Lee laoocca with William Novak 

I NEVER PLAYED THE GAME, bv 

Howard Cosed with Peter Banvenue 

ELVIS AND ME. by PrueUbi Beauties 


Presley with Sandra Hannon 

DANCINC 


Solution to Previous Puzzle 


JG IN THE LIGHT, by Shirley 

MacLaine 

ON THE ROAD WITH CHARLES KUR- 

ALT. by Charies Knrati 

HOUSE, by Tracy Kidder 

ANSEL ADAMS, by Ansel Adams with 
' Street 


23 

-S9 

3 

13 

U 

10 


t- 

t - 


□ 

E 

a 

□ 

D 

E 

B 

□ 

Q 

E 

□ 

□ 

□ 

E 

□ 

□ 


I L 1 1 iLlAlC 


GO Cl EDO 


1 

□ 

□ 

□ 

1 

□ 

□ 


□ 

101 

□ 

□ 

Q 

□ 

IH 

□ 

□ 

□ 

□ 


9 ONLY ONE WOOF, by James Heniot _ 

10 SHOOT LOW. BOYS — THEY’RE R1 
DEV SHETLAND PONIES, by Lewis 
Grizzard 


il 


12 


FERRARO: My Story, by Geraldine A. 
Ferraro 


— 11 


13 


MADE IN AMERICA, by Peter Ueber- 
roth with Richard Levin and Amy Oman 
A LIGHT IN THE ATTIC, by Sbd Silver 
stein 


14 


14 CHARLES & DIANA, by Ralph G Mar- 

15 GODDESS, by Anthony S umm e rs ..... 


.12 


3 

7 

2 

US 


f' 

i . 


ADVICE. HOW-TO AND MISCELLANEOUS 


FIT FOR LIFE, by Haney Diamond and . 
Marilyn Diamond 


THE BE (HAPPY) ATTITUDES, by Rob 
ert Schuller 


JANE BRODY’S GOOD FOOD BOOK, 

by Jane E. Brody - _ ... 

THE FRUGAL GOURMET, bv Jeff 
Smith 


CALLANEnCS. by Callan Pinckney with 

SalBe Baum] _ 


n 

6 

2 

JS 

7 


BRIDGE 


i 


Unscmntbifl these low Jianbtos, 
one tenor to each square, to form 
tour ordbiary words. 


TAUID 



_u 


1 LEWNY 


n 


■ 

■: 


O N the diagramed deal 
North drove optimistical- 
ly to four hearts. The opening 
one-dub bid was strong and 
artificial, and two dubs was 
Stayman. 

, A spade was led to the ace, 
and East shifted to a dub, a 
normal play that proved to be 
a delicate error. South won 
with tbe ace and embarked an 
trumps by leading the jack. 
West took his ace on the sec- 
ond round and played a third 
round. 

South won iu dummy, 
ducked a spade to West and 
won the diamond shift with his 
ace. He cashed the dub king, 
ruffed a dub and returned to 
the dosed hand with a spade to 


the long. The position was now 
this: 



could have prevailed by lead--' 
ing diamonds at. an earlier 
stage, attacking South's vital; 
line of communication 


South bad now reached a 
classic position. He led his 
trump queen, forcing West to 
part with ' a diamond. The 
spade eight, now useless, was 
thrown from the dummy and 
East could not stand the pres- 
sure in minor suits. 

Notice that the defenders 


NORTH 

*S«32 

9X932 

4X43 

*106 

VEST iiiiiiii EAST 

9 1092 11111111 O Q J 8 7 £ 

4k. J 9 8 7 3. 
SOUTH (D) 

♦ X 6 5 
CQJ54 
0 AS 
4AKS1 




k Q 4 


f 


Em sod Vm ware vulnerable. 


The bkk&na: 

Soteb wen 

North 

Ebsl. 

I * 

Pan 

1 0 

P»Bi 

1N.T. 

Fan 

2* 

PMS&- 

29 

Pass 

4 ? ' 

Pa*,.^ 

Pass 

Wot 

Pass 

led On apede queen. 

.. 


I . 

i* 

i ^ 


IGRAVEA 



um 




1 

■ 

:• 

■ 

H 


WHOM TO CALL IF 

YOU'RE PLANNING TO 

&IVE A BANQUET 

■ FOR TOUR CAT. 


Now arrange the circled letters to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


^.■ M Tm- rnn 


Yesterday's 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Jumbles: ANKLE YODEL DEADLY EITHER 


Answer What a criminal who falls Into cement 
has to be— A HARDENED ONE 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


N1CH 
C F 


Algarve 

Amsterdam 

Athens 

Bttrcetana 

BCMrada 

Berlin 

Brands 

Bvctmresi 

Budapest 

Copeifflagea 

Casta Oal Sal 

Dublin 

Edinburgh 

Florence 

Frankfurt 

Geneva 

HOlfMli 

lltonbtri 

La* nirmn 
LMan 
London 
Madrid 
Milan 
Moscow 
Munich 
Nice 
0*1* 

Paris 

Prague 

RarkiovBi 

Rama 

Stockholm 

Strasbourg 

Venice 

Vienna 

Warsaw 

Zurich 

MIDDLE 


14 il 
10 SO 


16 il 
IB 64 


LOW 

: p 

1 43 
1 4 
i S* 

T 45 

r 45 
45 


ASIA 


II SI 
8 41 
11 S2 


■ M 


2 36 
IV 66 


Bangkok 

Belling 
Hons Kaos 
Manila 
New MM 
seout 

Shanghai 

Singapore 

Tatoel 

Takrn 


HIGH 
C F 
27 81 
2 37 
18 64 
21 U 
IV 66 


LOW 
C F 
14 57 
-7 IV 
7 45 
23 73 
14 57 


• 5 23 -13 
3 37 - 3 Z7 
31 88 23 73 
16 41 6 43 
V «8 0 33 


13 51 
II 52 


11 52 
10 50 


AFRICA 


6 43 


10 SO 
D 33 


-14 
13 
r! 7? 


ID SO 
11 53 


V 

V 
-7 

7 . 
16 il 


-5 73 


8 44 


16 61 
-5 23 


A Wert 

Cairo 

Cane Town 

CasaMascfl 

Harare 

loom 

Nairobi 

Tuan 


IV 60 4 J» 


3V 84 17 63 
IS 64 6 43 

84 K 17 63 
31 n 31 70 
27 61 12 54 
IB 64 V 46 


LATIN AMERICA 


46 


Bveave Alrti 34 93 IV 66 

Caracas 27 81 17 63 

Lima 26 75 16 61 

Mexico CUt 33 » 6 43 

Rio de Janeiro — — — — 


45 
34 
M 
B II 
5 41 
-2 28 


NORTH AMERICA 


10 50 
6 43 


10 50 
I 34 


6 

EAST 


63 3 37 


Ankara 
Bel nil 
De mates* 
Jerusalem 
Tel Av|v 

OCEANIA 

Auckland 
Sydney 


4 39 0 12 Cl 

— — — « na 

15 sv a 43 o 

13 55 v 44 r 

16 «1 13 as r 


25 77 16 61 *h 
3V 84 IV 66 lr 
cl -cloudv. iD-tognr; tr-IMr; n-halli 
sh- showers; sw-HWw; jl-starmy. 


Anchorage 

Atlanta 

Boston 

Chicago 

0*nv*r 

Detroit 

Honolulu 

Horn) on 

Los Anodes 

Miami 

M ln nonnofl* 

Montreal 

Nassau 

New York 

Son Francisco 

Seam# 

Torunlo 

washtagtoe 


o-overcml; pc-partly 


21 -5 
32 -1 
34 -4 
10 -16 

36 -7 

21 -12 
81 16 
54 6 

86 9 

75 14 
8 -8 

21 -7 
7V 20 

37 -I 

14 6 

45 2 

26 -7 
39 6 

dmdV; 


21 PC 
30 lr 

35 pc 
3 d 

» PC 
10 sw 
61 PC 
43 d 

48 fr 
57 PC 
-22 PC 
IV sw 
68 PC 
X fr 
43 la 

36 «0 
IV d 
43 PC 

i r-robii 


WEDNESDAY'S FORECAST — CHANNEL: SUflhHv dumpy. FRANKFURT! 

TemoJ— 6 <48 — 431- LONDON: Party cloudy *nm showers. Temp. 
g^fa^Jn^MADRIp; Fair. TempMO — -2 


fS'^'ijlfTioSlE; «^uiv! A T«na.^l5--- 1 8 *!^— lii.T'EL AVIV:' Not 
jiliuHift ZURICH* Gaudy. Temp. 7 — 3 145 — 381. BAHOKOK: Foosy. Temp. 

C0I “Si. HM» WcU. T.™. 17-11 (63 — S2I. MANILA! 
!Li, t™ 30 — 18 (86—641. SEOUL: Snow. Temp. *5 — -13 121— VI. 
SINGAPORE! Siormv. Terna. 2V — 24 184 — 751. TOKYO: Fair. T*mp. I— 9 
146-37). 


Wbrld Stock Markets 


Via Agence France- Presse Dec. 17 

Closing prices m local currtncia unless otherwise i n dicat ed 


As 



date 

Prev. 

ABN 

sn 

55450 

ACF Hal dlno 

273J0 

270 






I 1 ’ 1 

AhoW 

7*40 

7*20 

Amev 

r 

SMS 

A'Dam Rufatrar 

BJS 

8 JS 

Amro Bank 

10140 

100.10 

BVO 

351 

246 



ItiJ 







Fakker 

75 

73 


262J0 

357 


214.20 

214 


7840 

79.70 




Naardan 

■ hi 


«2 

IyI 

Ncdltayd 

199 JO 

201 


37SJO 

376 

Pakhoed 

8420 

M Vlyj 

Philips 



Robew 

■iLJ 

p IVyl 


rr.i 

pnrTl 


73.10 

7X30 


46J0 

4640 

Royal Dutch 

17X711 

17130 

Unilever 

38160 

386 

Von OnunwaaB 

31 JD 

3140 

VMF Stark 

3 XUD 

2S6J0 

VNU 

283 

779 JO 

AN P. CBS Gaol inttgx : Ml 38 
Prevloai : 2MJB 


Artwd 

Bekoerr 

Caduntll 

Cobtpa 

EBES 

OB-mna-BM 

COL 

Gavaerf 

Hoboken 


KretflettKPik 
Pet ref lira 
See Generate 

Safina 

Salvor 

Traction Elec 

UCB 

Unerg 

VI9III9 MOnfooM 


2730 2790 
1400 8400 

in 291 

4355 4420 
3130 3815 
SOOO 5020 
2570 2350 

5000 5030 

5720 5690 

2919 2940 
11500 11500 
6510 0690 

2240 2273 

■mi ray, 

4100 61M 

4735 4810 

5600 5SB 

2265 2310 

5700 5690 


Carrent Stack Index : 2*9731 
Prewow : 2BHJ7 


i buk hri 


AEG 

AlUanrVers 

Altana 

BASF 

Barer 

Bov Hvm Bank 
Bov Veremstaank 
BBC 

BMF-Bank 

BMW 

Commerzbank 

Cant Gum ml 

Dalmler-Banx 

Deaussa 

Deutsche Babcock 
Deutsche Bank 

Dmdner Bank 

O HH 

i iorp«n*i* 


236J90 236M 

1D401062V] 

438 437 

26VJ0 272J0 
WM 26V 

495 500 

500 498 
28* JO 29020 

408 493 

579 572 

3033* 30450 
UVJO 162 
122BVJ 1251 

430 <34 

208 213 

501 800 

37130 37S 

243 XH 

344 347 JO 






KtI 




Wr't- 






■ r t 





. .1 

K. . 


■ il 






^F.77 i 







r ’ 1 


BM. . > 1 



^■r -n 

1 | 






f.t r J 

1 i?T| 


W" 1 



■ Vi] 

* 1 



vm 



■riF-ir'JI 










■ ' ) 





n 

■ ’i 





mBL\ r . .1 


















Provisos 

PWA 

RWE 

Rhvlnmrfall 
Setter Ina 
SEL 
Simons 

Tftyssen 

VMM 

Velkswoa e n wrfc 
Wei la 


1280 TIB 
34f 349 
153 15430 

1V3 1» 
SOOS17JO 
633 660 
335 32450 




175 

zrazruo 

443 439-50 

733 743 


CMgwitat fBdojc : W6J8 
FrovtoPS ! UM7JS 


| WiimiTi..it i 

Bk East Asia 

34.10 

HUS 


2040 


China Llatit 

15 

USB 

Green Istoml 

745 

8 

Hang Sana Bank 

46J0 

il 


XU 

XU 


1150 


HK Electric 

840 

Me 

HK Realty A 

u 

1X10 

HK Hotels 

3445 

3173 

HK Lend 

645 

655 

hk Sumo Dank 

755 

745 

HK Telephone 

9.90 

9.96 

HK Yaumsfai 

1925 

1874 

HK Wharf 

740 

7Ai 

Hutch Whampoa 

26J0 


Hum 

064 

mn Cllv 

avv 



1340 

U20 

JsnaneSee 

1440 

U 


M) 

KUO 


W.W 

60 

w*«wd 

6J0 

640 

SHK Propi 

1X70 

nre 


117 

143 

Swire PodllcA 

X 

3040 


2JJ3S 


**v*» M*png 

ore 

ore 

Wing On Co 
wlnsor 

ire 

SM 

& 

World Inn 

160 

940 

Keeg Sene index : 
Previous : 172841 

173045 


[ tllhlfl l 



AECI 

Anglo American 
Anglo Am Gold 


Blwoor 

Buffets 

DeBoers 

Drtetanletn 

Elands 



AA Carp 
Alllad-LVDra 
Anglo Am Gold 
Assam ponds 
Asa DcXrlBs 
Burdovs 


Siw. *111* 


BaT. 

n e w born 

BICC 

BL 

Blue Orcte 
BOC Group 
Boots 

Bawoter Indus 
BP 

Brit Home St 
Brit Tetecwn 
BrltAeroipoco 
Be I loll 
BTR 

Burtnah 
Cable Wireless 
Cad Du nr Sctiw 
Charier Can* 

Commercial U 

Cons Gold 
Cevrtaulds 

S%S.e 

DivtiHers 

□rtefantein 

Flsons 

Freest 

Gen Accident 
GRN 

GbuaC 

Grand Met 

GRE 

Guinness 

GU5 

Nanion 

Hawker 

ICi 

Imperial Grew 
Jaouar 

Land Securities; 
Leoal General 
UavdsBank 

LMrlio 

Lucas 

Marks and Sp 
Metal Bax 
Midland Bank 
N6rt West Bank 
P mao 
Pllklnatan 
Pieseev 
Prudential 
Racrt Elect 
Randfonlebi 
Rank 
Reed inti 
Reuters 
Raroi Dutch s 

Soot chi 
Salnsbury 
Sears HokBnas 


sssw 

250 

144 

432 

635 

»l 


26 

553 

283 

2S2 

305 

536 

366 

189 

446 

203 


270 

580 

153 

295 

227 

447 

184 

225 

457 

4(1 

hh 

433 

S1**k 

146 

706 

250 

153/64 

363 

781 

282 

*30 

1*1 

435 

731 

252 


29* 

724 

459 

181 

435 

174 

510 

417 

647 

415 

305 

176 

767 

156 

STB 


677 

318 

«n 

5U 

745 

344 

US 


316 

42ft 

SU 

748 

341 



been 

tee*. 


. OS 

636 


■ 

88 

Sid Chorh-rvd 

434 

427 

Sun Alliance 

STS 

SZJ 





■ 278 

2W 


399 

407 

TJ. Group 

359 

370 

Trafalgar Hie 

333 

344 

TUP 

155 

157 


195 

195 

Unilever i 12 ivraara 19/xt 


244 



28S 


Woalwarth 

SOS 

511 

F.T. 38 Index : 109X58 


ha/ 1 1 . i. ~n.. 

[ Prevtaux : T376JS 

■ 


II »■ 1 




Ctaahotate 




HFjj.-I 


Eriaania 

■ • l' ii 

Farm Italia 


ipr-1 

| Fiat 

«n 

IrM 

Generali 

m. > ii 



rrm 

llatcemenlf 

m j 

llalgai 

- ■ i 

E • li 



■ 1 M 

Wt i * ’ l 1 



■i-I 

! NBA 

3546 

|ri 

1 OUvsttl 

2640 




reirli 

RAS 

■ r.-i, Ab- . : 11 

' Rtaascente 

990 

Lv 1 ! 

SIP 

3MM 


SME 

K3 

■Fll 

Snta 

m^A 




Stet 

3635 

3860, 

1 MIS Current Index ; lew 


Prevloai : 1887 

i 



II IMl 1 1 

Air Ltaulde 

623 

R 

Abriham AH. 

403 

BrV 

AvDosesuW 

■El 

B ylr. 

Bancalro 

■07 


DIC 

492 

HfTT 

BangralA 

1590 

u r 7 ' • 

Bauyguea 

879 


B5N-GD 

2535 

a 

Carretaur 

2895 

tvjT 

Charoeun 

737 

hj ' 

CteMed 

481 

464 

Oarty 

1850 


□uaiez 

880 





Euroaei 

1005 


GcnEaux 

835 


Hachefte 

13S) 


Lafarge Cap 

692 


Legrand 

2425 

P^'l 

Iwsleur 

711 


IThwd 

277S 

a 

Marten 

MS4 

■ Litl 

Mptro 

1642 


Merttn 

2599 

t;Lv> J 

Mlchelln 

1430 


MaetHemetiy 



Moulinex 

M 


OcsWentate 

714 


Pernod Rle 

m 

717 | 

Perrier 

Peugeot 

S9S 

<438 I 
474 1 

Printemm 

375 

■ li' 

Radtatadei 

317 


Resmite 

197S 


Roussel udaf 

1640 

1 f* t 


47* 

wm 

Skis Rustam 

1453 

rvL-;. 




Thomson CSF 

TO 

fcr 

Total 

279 281 JO | 

Agefl Index : ma. 
Prsvlogi ; HA 
CAC Index : 25M 
Prcvtoex:8SX8 





Mai Bunking 

0C8C 

OUB 

OUE - 
ShangrMa 
simeoarbv 
rporvLamf 
SYor* Press 
S Steamship 
SI Trading 
.UnlM Overseas 


Strait* Times tad 

PrevtaB : 6*U5 


index :6)k45 


AGA 

Alta Laval 


177 

263 


ahmComo 


Electrolux ' 
Ericsson 
Essette '• 
Handel sbankiti 
Pharmacia 
Saeb-Seania 
Sandy Be 
Skmiska 
3KF 

SwedlshMattti 

Votva 


TO 

190 

2H 


. MS 
510 
700 
125 


242 


A Hee roveeridea Index: HA. 


ACl 

ANZ 

BMP 

Bcral 

Bougainville 


272 270 
4J3 4J7 
A40 BJU 
118 112 
1A5 154 

t 8 

112 4.15 

LA 175 
-5J6 120 
1*3 156 

242 220 
ZN 293 
2.17 2X1 
1 2 
LSI 250 
M2 350 
440 448 
* UD 
2-16 2-T7 
270 245 
142 143 
110 120 
234 132 

211 106 

a ts 


Codiataa 
CRA 
CSR 
Dunlap 
Elder* in 
.ICI Australia 
Magellan 
MIM - 
Myer . 

Nat Aim Bank. 
News Carp 
N Broken Hill 
PoeeWon 
Old Coal Trvst- 
Santae ■ - 
Thomas Haven 
Western Mining 
Banking 




Atari 

AsahiChem 
AhN Glass 
BankofTakve 

Bridgestone 

Canon 

Casta 

ClMi, 

Dot Nippon Prtiu 
DatwaHauM 


402 

•27 


778 

S1V 

1200 

1820 


1310 

0M 


772 

523 

1210 

IBM 

409 

1290 


Detara Securities 
Fame 
Fail Bank 
Full Photo 
Fuillsu 
Htlochi 
Hitachi Cable 
Honda 

JmianAlrUnM 
Kallma 
Kanso) Power 
Kamxakl Steel 

Klrinsrewtry 

Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kyoara 
Matsu Elec inde 
Matsu Elec Works 
MHsubtsni Bank 
MltsuWeM Chem 
Mitsubishi Elec 
Mitsubishi Heavy 
MitaubWilCarp 
Mitsui and Co. 
MHsufeDsM 

Mitsumi 

NEC 

NGK Imitators ■ 
NUckaSec 
Nkman Kagaku 
Nippon Oil 
Nippon Steel 
Yueen 


Nomura See 

Olympus 

Pione er 

Ricoh 

Sharp 

Stdmaiu 

sninetsu Chemical 
Sony 

Sum Hama Bank 
Sumlleme Cbem 

Sumitomo Marine 

Sumitomo Metal 
Tolsei Carp 
Tblslia Marine 

TakcdaCbem 

TDK 

Tallin 

Tokko Marine 
Tokyo Elec. P ow er 
Teppan Printing 
Tornv Ind 
Toshiba 
Toyota 
Yamalchl Sec 





Man* 

Oertlk on-B 

Roche Baby 

Sandaz 

aeMndler 

Suizor 

Surveillance 

Swtavalr 

SBC 

S'*?** Reinsurance 
SwhsvnUtstsonk 

Union Bade 
Winterthur 
Zurich ins 


PnmomiMui 


GmatEm ooda vieuiP 


Dec. 17 1 


Sates StOCh 
2990 AMI Pree 
1213 Ack lands 
6753 AgnlCoE 
mas Agra Ind A 
32615 AH Energy 
3700 Alta Nat 
lUTAtaomoSt 
167631 Atco 1 1 
16212 bp Canada 
3142X Bank BC 
I3S453 Bank N 5 
Ivan Baton At 


WSoe Broterna 

67400 Br on ioleo 
3100 Brenda M 
55115 BCFP 
63575 BC Res 
12109 BC Phone 
£714 Brunette 
2700 Buda Can 
14933 CAE 
1I33CCLA 
8968 CO. B f 
28525 Cad Frv 
_ 9*0 Campeau t 
2S3WC Nor west 
3737 c r 
300 Cc 


High Law Cl ose Ota. 
9181k 1716 "l736 — V. 
Sink IBM 18W+ M 
S2W6 21 Mr 7116 + Ik 
sw m vw— v. 

SIT 1*4* 1616— W 
S1SV* 15W 15W 

50 8 S 
nivh ink im+w 
S31ta 3116 31M 

K*. 5Vk SVi— 16 
*15 1446 1446— 16 

*SW MVi 20M + Vk 
370 360 340 — S 

340 340 330 4-5 

SW ink Wk+ Ik 
88V> 84k 84k- 1% 

m*k ink n*b+ i6 
214 206 211 —3 

KMk 2646 864k- 16 
S13W 13 13W + Hi 

*30 2*V. 29Sk— U 

new law 16W— vk 
Slow 16W 16W+ Ik 
*16*fc 16 

51 5 
SU7 


55= £«• Trust 
200 CGE 

152825 Cl Bk Com 
283350 CTlne At 
24700 cure B 

3850 Coro 
7720Cekmnr 

, 200 Colon 175 p 

4272CentrtTr 

rossoammlex 

aavoacDtaABf 

^SS^A 

TO0OCOMHIR 

9500 Conran A 

3600Cramix 
38100 Czar Res 
21211 Dowi Dev 
408 Doon A 
2946 Denison An 
17300 Denison Q f 
OOODamucon 
TMODWumbAI 
2H00Dk5awi B 
msSDofasoo 
SW Donohue 
2310 Du Pont A 
217B0DylexA 
1706 eictbam X 
2150 Emc* 


JMBEaoltySur 
I FCAInn 


37831 L 

272 55 C Falcon C 
287133 Fknbrdg* 

166260 Fed I no A 

100 Fed Plan 
WeOFOtVFln 
2000GcndUA 
.9700 Geac Camp 
12050 Gibraltar. 
MOWGeWcprpf 
. lOOOGaoavear 
4397 Graff G 
10500 GL Forest 


. 5660 gT P odflc 
GnytMD 


2672BI — 

.8617 Hawker 

’^fiSKS, 

1*78 Halttnar i 
■2178 H BOY Co 
*6012 Imaccn 
SSOOlndal 
1200 1 noils 
lOtmo inland Gas 
26W99 Inti Thom 
.^IntgrPtae 

.SBVIpaco 
142J0 Jonrock . 
.646* Karr Add 
32223 Labatr 
3600 LOW Cem 
?»Lacano ‘ 
23SOLobtawGo 
24100 Lumenlcs 

.49B0MD5HA 
UoreMiSanHX 
,3579V Maritime | 


1614+ IA 
144k 144k+ Ik 
2646 264*— 4fc 

S H2+ w 

H J7W mv 
S42 42 42 

*n 7V 7V -WW 
*44 434k 43k, 

ni% ii% 11% 
nw }94k 19% • 
59% I? 1916 — U 
Jta% 10% 10% 
no 20 20 

S14Vk 14 14 — Vk 

*11% 11% -11%— V6 
rah 546 546+ Vt 

B46 5% 5%+ Vh 

sunk mb i*4k- % 
57% 7% 7% 

245 260 243 —2 
*17% 17 17 — % 

SO* 22% 224k— U. 
230 225 220 —2 

SSV6 5% 5Vk— % 
ttS 465 4*5 +M. 

55% 15Vk 154k — Ik 
*14% 14% 14Vk-i Vk 
«% 5% 5% 

*7% 7 Vk 742—16 

57% 71k 71k— % 
5274k 26Vk 27 
XM 17% 174k — 4% 
S2TO 274k 274k + Ik 
n4 151k 13%— Yt 
sm 7V* TVk— 4k 
822VY 22 22 + 16 

56% 6% 6%- Ik 

521% 21 Vk 214k+ 46 
5151 6 U 15% + % 
Sm TF46 20 +% 
SM 134k 1346+ % 
S26W 26% 26%- Vk 
511 10% 10% 

535 36% 34%+ Vh 

27% 7 7 — U 

sim m ns 
56% 6% 6V6 
537% 37% 37% 

OS .14% 144k— 1 
*17 16% 16% 

*36 39% 36 + U. 

52% 22% 

sn% re 12 — % 

EN% 23% 24%+ % 
12046 20 »%+% 

526 2546 26 + 2 

»» U% 27%+ VS 
*W% 191* 19% + % 
««% 1M6 1646+% 
*H 11% lt%- % 
* 9%+% 

gM 13% UVG-% 

m--T 

ni% -3«k 31 + % 

’a? 17%- % 
59% 9% 9%— % 
”3% 2» Z2 % — U 
*J2S 3® 1746+46 

S? 4 i*% 

ns 14% 15 .. 
51546 14% 14% — % 


3905 Mariana E 
21819 Mo Ison A t 
22030 Molten B 
8*00 Murohy 
1100 Nabisco L 
7943S7 Noronda 
64017 Nnrcan 
562743 NVOAltAt 
5130 Nawsco W 
19917 NnWHvA 
7742 0ak«nxxf 
12S00 Omnlbue a 
14048 OsiMnm A f 
2792S Pac W Alrki 
30550 Pamour 
26640 Par. P 
3300 Pembina 
520 Pine Point 


90S 305 3BS - 

120 19% 1944— % 

CTH t 3046 2946 + 16 
*23% 224k 22%— 1W 
*294* 2914 29% + 16 
S16% 15% 1646+ I 

S164k 15% WE+16, 
-H 646 6% 

*10 10 IB 

39 38 38 -1%. 

294 2SS 295 — 6 ” 
*84 34 34 

>1516 15 15 +Vta 

58% 8% 8%-U, 
03% 33 33%+%l 


r- 


OQuesiwgt 
MHO Royrock f 


7808 

8600 RactPaHi 
2355 RaedSt 1 &p 
53S7RaaeroA 

ltzbRanan 

too Rama eei 
13000 Sceptre 
ooascottsf 
mm Sears Can' 
35595 Shell GOU 
15132 Sherrttt 
45S25 staler B I 

si ssa-. 

4700 Steep R 
700 Tara 
M40T«*CorA 
39M4 Teck B f 
umiTM Can 
55675 Th om N A 
2722S9Tor Dm Bk 
llOttToniorBf 
373B Traders A f 
345DTrns *41 
CTO Trindy Res 
7003 TraMtftr UA 
eni7Trcan PL 


SBSDTrnanA 

aiSSIJX*' 

aw 



*16% 16% 1646 + 46* 
S20 19% 2B + * 

CM% 30% 23%— 46. . 
350 *60 345 

5716 6% 7 +46' 

515% 15 15 

547 4646 47 + % 

51246 13 1246 + 16 

sis i«» is + »v_ 

State 30 JO — 

450 435 v- +' 

520% 28V. 2846 
511% 1146 114k— % - 
5331* 22% 22%-i % 
n 74k 716+ 46 

*13 12% 13- + 46. 

*15% ISte I5b— % 
*2*4 k 25 25 — te 

323% 2QVk 23*— % 
190 1*5 185 — 5 

. 255 294 255 

*174* 17 W — 4k 
£7% 17% 17*- 46 
*18 1646 W4k-lte 

*29% 29bk 29%+ 16 
tazte 22 22V6— * 

KSte a«* 25% „ 

53346 33% 33%+% 
*27% 274k 2746+46 
511% lllk 11% 

352 250 250 —5 

S’k 27V, 27Vk— % 
Site 214* 21%-% 
HB *19 310 

*2H 6 21% 2246 
529% 29 2946 + » 

45 44 44 —1 

• law I4te+te 

512% 12% 12%_ W 
«% 84% 8% 

SO 410 410 —10 

MS 380 31S +15.-. 

11?* 1946 19* V* 
511* llte llftfUM... 

101 103 

- 57% 7 7 -i5w 

5746 6% 6%-%., 

2E347JS8 shoras — v.-- 


Cl 


4-, 


1 


"-K 


TSE 3N Index: 


Chat PrevW* 
24800 2XCn 



Dec 17 


,v 

•V 


High Low Ctose CPF 
534* 34% 34te- W 
Slfl* 14 I4H+F 
*W6 14*14% 


.ti. 


State 1646 4^46', 


:+% 


*11% 18% 

£8% re mb 

514 . .1326 U rr 
512% 11% J3-.+-* 
516% 1*. ta-T-S 
52466 34 Si’ * * 
«i tnkss*-' 4 
514% 14% 14* 
'*19% 19% 

53416 3M 

5234* JO* 

886% 3646 
ilEwe* • • • . , 




iMfinhWiimRc 


wnn; 


SHaSHWOEEANDfiaum 
DOQNE9MY r • 

IMUNREWL,:' / 



' 5 ’L s "h.. 






I 


























Riggins’ Glorious, and Outrageous, Career With Redskins Appears Over 


John Riggins 


By Ira Rosenfeld 

- The Associated Press . 

_■ Washington — A fter bulldozing past Na- 

Football League ladders for 14 y ears, it is 
Bray that John Riggins has played his last oimw 
tor the 

. _Rjttuis did not play m the 17-12 victory over 
PMadophia on Dec. 8 or in the 27-24 defeat of 
Q ncrnr a n last Sunday. The game against the 
Eagles was the first in four years inwhidi a healthy 
Riggins had not played. Afterward, he told the 
rimniDE backs* coach. Don Bmiir, “T ihintr r 
just spent the first day of the rest of my life.'* - 
Last Sunday in RFK Stadium he a cere- 
monial entrance with the startin g team ms 
cheered by fans and teammates, then ran back to 
the bench so George Rogers coaW start the game. 

Rogers, the former star of the New Orleans 
Saints who was acquired between seasons, rushed 
for 130 yards and scored a touchdown against the 

»t_ _ T1 1 i.," > '■ 


touchdown on & long ran in the dosing minutes of 
the game, keeping the Re&drifts in the running for 
sspotin theplayofli 

The coach, Joe Gsbba, had offered to Start 
Rigg in s, in die team's final home garrw as a 
gesture to the man who helped the Redskins win 
three straight NFC East Dnirioa titles, two con- 
ference titles and a Super Bond ch» n» p ff> n«h i p 
Riggins refused Gibbs' offer ami, after a season of 
bang alternated as the lone naming back with 
Rogers, appears to have been pushed aside. He is 
not expected to return to the Redskins nett sea- 
son. 

“It would take a miracle for John to come 
back," said one team official, who asked not to he 
identified. 

Ai 36, Riggins is the oldest running back in the 
league and the highest paid, earning more than 
$825,000. He will become a free agent after the 
season and Redskins officials have said privately 
there are no pbns to offer him a new contract 

To bring him back would just hurt the team 


ami continue to impede the progress of George," 
said another high-ranking team nfftrial who asked 
not to be identified. 

“The truth is no matter what John has done in 
the pari, this is a young man’s game." 

Riggins retorted last Thursday that “I ain’t 

hanging nothing op." Then he added, with a laugh, 

“Of course, I might be wearing a different adored 

unif am" next season. 

Whether or not he tries to play apnthw 
he already has shattered the myth that a running 
bark’s best years are before age 30. 

Since his 30th birthday in 1980, Riggins has run 
for more than 100 yards fa a pw. s Trimi*. wiih 
an NFL record six m arow during the playoffs. He 
has scored 71 touchdowns and rushed for more 
than 1,000 yards three times. 

“Don’t tcD me John is too old for thic game,** 
said the Redskins’ center Jeff Bostic. “It would not 
surprise me if he derided to play another year, 
another five yean, whatever he wants.** 

. Only the second player in NFL history to score 


100 touchdowns rushing, Riggins has eight this 
year and is 10 shy of Tim Brown’s record of 106. 
with 677 yards rushing this season, he moved past 
O J. Simpson into fourth place on the league’s all- 
time rushing list at 1 1352. 

“What separates John from the rest is his tre- 
mendous consistency,” said the Redskins' veteran 
tight end, Rick Walker. “You can give John the 
ball and he would eat up the dock, picking up 2, 3 
or 4 yards. Thai when you got inside the 10-yard 
line, you brew it was Riggp's time. Inside the 10 
with John was as good as gold.” 


legend.* said the linebacker Neal Olkewicz. 

An all- America at the University of Kansas, 
Riggins was the No. 1 draft choice of the New 
York Jets in 1971 and led them in receiving and 
rushing as a rookie. Before playing out his option 
with them, in 1975, he would run for more than 
3,800 yards and 31 touchdowns. 

He also led the Jets ami Redskins in outrageous 


acts, showing up one year with a Mohawk haircut, 
another with his toenails painted purple, and al- 
ways an a motorcycle. 

His nine-year career in Washington was inter- 
rupted for one season, 1980, which be sat out in a 
contract dispute. When the team faltered without 
him, the coach. Jack Pardee, was fired and Riggins 
returned in triumph. 

Although he was arrested for public dninkeness 
and was criticized for what some considered an 
in sulting remark tn Supreme Court Justice Sandra 
Day O’Connor — be apologized for both incidents 
— Riggins still can do no wrong in the eyes of his 
fans and teammates. 

“He keeps the game in perspective. If you 
watched John play and knew what be was like 
during ibe week you knew you didn't have to be a 
drill sergeant to play this game," Walker said. 

“If you are lucky, you meet a character like John 
once in a lifetime,” Bostic said. “When you do, you 
never forget him, never want to say goodbye.* 


immy Summer Aicaits World Cup Teams 


DNDON — So, putting that 
- ;■ aqnske behind it, the famOy of 
a has held its draw, mixed its 

'• | end is mating full jawwi 

•'"■ jd to a World Cup in Mexico 
. June 

ales? Lady- Lode has shaken a 
.daQ remarkably similar to a 
. (apiece of politics and favor 
-17 might have been arranged by 
. ■- niting International F edera tion 
r . 'ootbaH Associations (FIFA), 
n-rt Qt we saw, did we not, fate at 
-. ... k? We saw the customary m- 
"• hand an the draw, saw the 
-.innate separation of hostile na- 
-{ - ,s and cow neighbours. Well, 
:V- /glimpsed au rimr. We fketingly- 

' " • ROB HUGHES 

dted 5-year-old Luis Javier 
osoCanedo — whose grandfa- 
rile organizing connni tr 
^ pluck tho teams 9 oat 

';>aree goldfish bowls containing 

‘elected contestants. 

‘ -ur view was limited by the re- 
- 1 of television companies to be 
. ped off." They were asked to 
. . $2,400 for each spot of cam- 
-tary — a prelude to the 54,600 
jadi of the 52 games next sum- 
— and thpydiofie to rebut such 
rtioa, winch was in addition to 
. negotiated tderisun picture 
* is. 

■ ire earthquake is going to be the 
■ X for everything come sum- 
And television will be about as 
- ral as the projected audience of 
7 miDion will gat Indeed, TV 
. dy is the cup’s spiritual home. 
- -■n. from the black oomedy.of . 
years ago, when the “five" 
bad to be stopped and rerun 
use the pre-plotting went 
, yon would not imagine that 


vast numbers of people would tune 
to the drawing of lots would you? 

Wrong. FIFA budgeted for 1,000 
VIPs at the scene, and 100 million 
viewed from home. 

The auditorium of Mexico City’s 
central hospital, a medical show- 
piece, was to have been the ventre 
Tot the draw, but it fell with the 
homes of some 40,000 dozens i««f 
September. 

So the VIPs and the remaining 
co mme ntators, whose stationshaa 
paid the price were squeezed into a 
television studio. 

_ It was only natural that Tetevi- 
sia, the Mexican TV company, con- 
trol the shots. Televisa has busi- 
ness relationships with the FIFA 
hierarchy — grandfather Guil- 
lermo Cane d o is a partner of Emi- 
lio Ascraga, Tdevisia’s chief share- 
holder — it has a major stake in 
Aztec Stadium, it pays the World 
Cup organizing committee’s bills 
and it was because of Tdevisia’s 
connections that this Wodd Cup 
was swindled, out of torn, to Mexi- 
co once Colombia abandoned re- 
sponsibility for staging iL 
Soon, because of Televisia, and 
the demands of Europe for “five" 
World Cup thrills, many potential- 
ly fine matches will be grilled under 
a midday «m. 

The opening match, Italy versus 
Bulgaria, kicks off at noon and 
promises to be a stifling humdinger 
of a stalemate between two nations 
more given to caution than flam- 
boyance, but who will have to by to 
find their way through high alti- 
tude and low stamina. 

As the draw was completed Hun- 
gary met Mexico in a friendly 
ma t ch. Hungary, one of Europe’s 
more - confided "contenders, was 


beaten, 2-0, and the winger Gyorgy 
Bognar, after bring substituted for, 
said, “Never in my life have I felt so 
bad. I fdt as if I had 1000 needles in 
my fangs." 

Come summer, he will be expect- 
ed to step up the pace and learn to 
live with needles. Hungary does not 
have Lbe worn of draws — a non- 
South American group with 
France, the Soviet Union and Can- 
ada based in Leon and Irapuato. It 
does, however, have to lock off at 
noon against France on June 9. 

Noon kickoffs threaten to debili- 
tate the pg"arhf t but within horns 
of the draw yet another prize game, 
Brazil versus Spain, was moved un- 
der the mfaday sun. Not that Brazil 
is complaining. It is a 5-2 favorite. 
And Pile said “God has began to 
bdpBrazQ" when its group in Gua- 
dalajara was completed with Spain, 
Northern Ireland and Algeria. 

“It’s every player’s dream to tom 
out against Brazil and tuck one of 
their shirts away in the drawer," 
mM the mwling Irish center-for- 
ward, Billy Hamilton. 

Souvenir hunters do not usually 
pose many problems, but Ireland 
versus Spain — a repeat of the 1982 
match in Valencia, where Hamilton 
and company humiliated the Span- 
iards — is intriguing. 

Mexico’s own players, all except 
the Real Madrid goal scorer Hugo 
Sanchez, excused from chib duties 
for a whole year, have been blessed. 
Belgium, organized as ever, m&hr 
trouble the Mexicans, but neither 
Paraguay nor Iraq instill fear. 

The two groups everyone wanted 
to avoid were last out of the bowls. 
Franz Beckenbuer, whose style is to 
sound positive even when he is not, 
shudders al faring Denmark (the 
dark horse of the tournament)^ 


Uruguay (the South American 
champion) and Scotland (a better 
team with mountains to climb). 

“It win be tough, very tough. We 
need a lot of lock to survive this 
group,” Beckenbuer said. 

Survival of another sort, that of a 
quirky rirmntr, faces Poland, En- 
gland, Portugal and Morocco. They 
compete in tee north in Monterey, 
and Poland’s captain, Zbigniew 
Boniek, observed: “For us the 
venue will be a bigger problem than 
the teams against us." 

The English will be relieved be 
said thaL Somehow the suspicion 
lurks that England’s manager, 
Bobb Robson, knew Monterrey 
would be his fate: The animosity 
has built since a year ago when he 
chose to say that “Monterrey will 
be the short straw of the draw." He 
meant the low altitude and >be in- 
tense heal of the industrial city. 

Unfoigiveably, the Mexicans 
have thrown in Monterrey with its 
altitude of 538 meters (1,764 feet) a 
mere quarter that of the 11 other 
starinmw The problems indude 
whether to go ahead with high alti- 
tude training or to Instead get to 
Monuarey and try to adjust to the 
extreme brat 

The English had booked a stay in 
Colorado, but now may camp in 
the mountains ouuide Monterrey, 
living at 1,500 meters and. canting 
down to train. But shoald En gbmn 
or Poland win the group, in the 
second round they win have to 
move up quickly to 2300 metera or 
more. Should they come in second, 
the next round and possibly the 
quarterfinal would be in Monter- 
rey, giving them an advantage — 
until the semifinals, which definite- 
ly -wiD -be played- in thinner air.-'-' 


1 




Dolphins Kick Pats 
Out of AFC East Lead 



faUMMIPI 

Garin Veris (60), the Patriots’ defensive aid, knocked the 
ban away from tbe Dolphins’ Tony Nathan and recovered it 
during die second quarter of a rainy game in Miami The 
Dolphins won, 30-27, on a field god late in the contest 


By Bob Oates 

Los Angela Tima Service 

MIAMI — The Miami Dolphins 
slipped post tbe New England Pa- 
triots, 30-27, on Monday night and 
now only the lowly Buffalo Bills 
stand in their way of winning the 
chnxmaonship of the AFC East. 

A fumble late in the rainy game 
made it dose, but Dan Marino 
quarterbacked the Dolphins to a 
w inning field goal in the last four 
minutes aid the Patriots had lost 
an I8th straight at the Orange 
BowL 

“I still think we’ve got a great 
defense;” said the New England 
coach, Raymond Berry. “The 30 
points? That Quarterback — what’s 
his name? —had so methin g to do 
with it." 

Although the Dolphins missed a 
couple of chances to put their old 
division rivals away earlier, they 
led by 27-13 fa the fourth quarter, 
when the Patriots scored twice in 
six seconds to tie. 

PatikM^dose 1 witi^ a touchdown 
march. Then, on the kickoff, Rod 
McSwain knocked the ball away 
from Miami* S Joe Carter, a normal- 
ly reliable running back, and Ce- 
dric Jones carried it into the end 
zone. 

“We sure find ways to make it 
interesting," said Miami 's coach, 
Don Shota. 

But Marino kept his cool in the 
rain. With passes to tire wide re- 
covers Mark Duper and Marie 
Clayton and to the tight end Brace 
Hardy, he put the ball fa position 
for Fuad Revriz to kick ms third 
field goal, bom 47 yards. 


“Against tbe Patriot defense, you 
have to bite, scratch and claw for 
everything you get," said Shula. 

After the field goal the. drama 
continued when Eason brought the 
Patriots down the field again, but 
safety Glenn Blackwood ended 
their hopes with an interception. 

“Just fa time," said Marino. “I 
knew the game wasn't over when 
we had that 27-13 lead. They can 
really come up with the big plays. 
New England has a physical, ag- 
gressive defense.” 

It did not always look that way. 
The Patriots chose to cover Mari- 
no's receivers more often than they 

S lit a big rush on the quarterback, 
ut Manno fdt bothered even so. 
His problem was the New En- 
gland linebackers, particular! v An- 
dre Tippett. When the Dolphins 
were bounding toward what ap- 
peared to be a halftime lead of 24- 
7, or at least 20-7, Tippett sacked 
Marino for a second time and 
forced the fumble that cost a scor- 
ing chance at the New England 25. 

Eason's problem was fas coach- 
es, who turned conservative at 
some strange times. When the Dol- 
phins lost the ball to the Patriots on 
a fumble at the Miami 21 in the 
third quarter, they ran on seven 
consecutive plays before settling 
Tor a field goal. 

Afterward, Eason was still wor- 
rying about his last pass, intercept- 
ed by Blackwood. 

“I overthrew" the receiver Der- 
rick Ramsey, he said. “He was be- 
hind his man where he was 




rain was not a factor." 
Shula loved the rain, too. 


lOREBOARD 


Basketball 


Film 'Edith and Marcel 9 Raises Thoughts on Boxing 


ional Basketball Association Leaders 


• TAnwgh Me. H 

TBAMOFFEHn 

0 Pt 

23 SMI 

Ml 23 7990 

t 34 3045 

:-***" » 327* 

,.r 73 2915 

23 7633 

ad 27 3031 

. ■ 34 2(71 

U 3892 

W 2*57 

... ® a ana 

’ «W*> « 2629 

mmv 75 273* 

.; w» 24 2*33 

• Sft«!» 30 3040 

Ml at ai4 

v taSM » 2704 

i •nanta 25 2*70 

23 2440 

24 3522 

* 24 2702 

S 2392 

. [M 14 2254 

TEAM ORFEIue 

O Ha 

24 2371 

■ ' » 2*50 

.. Iton 73 2399 

24 2520 

S 2652 

a urn 
..i*. V 2571 

PMD 24 2501 


Sot Antonio 
Ctovokmd 
Aw Utah 
12X5 New Inn 
lift* Portland 
117.1 LA. Lnfcff-* 
117.1 GaMwi Slat* 
11*4 Dallas 
1U3 Denver 
1123 Houston 
11U Oilcan 
11V2 Sac i awwnl u 
118L7 Phoenix 
IW Detroit 
1094 LA. Clippers 


3A 

76 

75 

INDIVIDUAL 

Scarfno 


Selected College Scores 

283# 1093 EAST 

2*25 1094 NYU 74, Catholic U. 72 

1877 lift? SOUTH 

OTA 1114 Alabama 100. Florida 01. » 

3817 liu dernson 89. Baptist *3 
3581 1124 Jacksonville ». 64. Atnens St. 37 

3147 1124 Murray St. 7L Bowdna Oman A OT 

25V 1124 MIDWEST 

2043 11X7 CraMiton 92. Austin Peav M 

2862 1144 Drake 74. WUHam JevwHI «t 

3217 1144 Iowa St. 95, South Dakota 58 

3877 119.1 Katomamo M. Concorato. Mkh. 50 

2766 1U3 Marshall 72, E. Michigan 45 

3041 1174 Missouri 72, X Illinois 44 

2954 1184 N. NUdUoan 8L Mlmv-Duluth *1 

SOUTHWEST 
Louisiana St n, Lamar 57 
FT Pts Aw Tom-El Paso *9, Centenary *3 


Douhov. Utah 
English. Den. 
Wool ridge, aiL 
Wilkins. AIL 
Ololinwn, Hou. 
□avis. Phoo. 
Shatl, G4. 
Malone. Phil 
Bint Bos. 

Free, Clev. 


23 Z70 221 761 3X4 FAR WEST 

» 281 174 73* 294 Fresno M. 75. Mankato ». 57 

26 2*1 TOO 704 25.7 Fullerton St. 91, Seattle 39 

25 246 132 *27 25.1 N«v.-Reno 92. Santa Clara *1 

75 338 148 *2* 2X0 

22 313 104 53* 2 44 

22 215 101 534 20 Hnt*tpV 

24 IBS 70S 575 344 lAUVIVtl 

34 211 132 5*7 234 — 

21 175 la 49* 234 


Field seal Perc en tage 

FS PGA Pet 
Thorpe. Sac. 121 189 4« 

Worthy. LAL 280 3» 427 

Dawkins. NJ. 130 JOB 425 

Johnson. SA. 127 204 A23 

Nonce. Phoo. 189 318 4M 


Hockey 

NHL Standings 


Football 


AMERICAN COMF1 FENCE 


LOlmticor, Del. 
Williams, nj. 
Otaiuwan. Hou. 
Rutand, Wash. 


W L T PCI. PF PA 
II 4 0 .733 400 320 Johnson. LAL 

10 5 0 4*7 356 254 Tltomo#. DM. 

10 5 0 4*7 3a 3*7 Bagiev, Clev. 

4 11 o 40 28* 370 Cheek* PWL 

2 13 0 .133 300 353 


S OH Del Tot Aw New Jen 
26 98 23* 334 125 
25 99 21* 315 124 Quebec 
25 140 1*7 307 124 Boston 
a 7S 1*7 342 12.1 Montreal 


e N*. AW. CAJ 

21 384 115 
25 2*6 114 St LOUI* 
« 227 RS Chicago 
2A 219 9.1 Minnesota 

Toronto 


4X3 277 257 College TOD 20fl 
4*7 418 403 ° *■ EdmontW 

4*7 3*9 327 The tap TO leans In The Associated Pres* Coioarv 

433 2*8 378 college basketao B will ( fi rst ptace vo les , total Winnipeg 

potato, reconh. tasl week's raektegs): Vancouve 

J33 338 302 Record Pta Pvs Lot Ange 

4*7 353 305 I- North Carolina 1451 74 12*0 1 


-lATWHAL COMPERE MCE 
East 

> 10 5 0 4*7 

*** » « 0 400 

- •«» J & 0 400 

* 9 0 400 

A S 18 0 431 

Cemrat 

■ ■ 14 1 a 433 

w 7 8 o 4*7 

* 7 8 0 4*7 

7 8 0 4*7 

, 2 13 8 .133 

West 

It 4 8 J33 

w*« 9 * 0 400 

MM 5 W 0 481 

... 3 12 0 200 : 

Otatatan .HHOI 

to* -■ ■. ku, 


J33 338 3B2 

4*7 353 305 

433 325 27* 1 MkMaon (14) 

433 433 397 1 Duke (4) 

433 279 33* 4. Swoon* 

MCE 5. Georget o wn (11 

A Kansas 

4*7 311 302 7. Georgia Tech 

409 371 273 8. Oklahoma 

400 Z70 296 9. Loutstana -State 

400 249 273 1ft Memphis State 
431 2*2 387 11. 5L John's 

12. Nev.-Las Vmms 
433 419 181 IX Kentucky 
4*7 317 338 14. Alo^ B Irml nohom 
4*7 311 322 IX Illinois 
4*7 290 329 It. LooUvllle 
.133 277 420 17, Indiana 

1& Da Paul 

733 334 2*1 19. Notre Dame 
400 380 247 a. Virginia Tech 


94 1I9T 
B-0 114* 

44 1073 

64 980 

8-1 938 

4-1 9JJ 
04 775 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Pahidc Division 

W L T PH SFOA 
Philadelphia a 8 0 4* 143 93 

Washington 18 1 3 » VM M 

NY islanders IT 10 8 a 107 112 

ny Rangers u 11 1 » 109 dm- 

Pittsburgh 12 15 4 a 119 113 

New Jersey 12 1* l 23 106 HO 

Adams Dlvfsfan 

Quebec 17 n 2 3* 120 9* 

Boston 14 10 6 34 115 IK 

Montreal 15 11 4 34 134 TO 

Buffalo 14 14 2 a 110 100 

Hartford 14 13 1 29 115 114 

CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 
Norris Division 

St Lou 18 13 12 4 a 104 110 

Chicago 10 15 4 a 120 139 

Minnesota 8 14 7 a 11a 118 

Toronto 8 17 5 21 115 135 

Detroit 7 18 4 18 95 m 

Sente# DtvWea 

Edmonton 33 S 4 a 171 IS 

Coioarv T7 9 3 37 139 100 

Winnipeg 10 18 4 24 109 147 

Vancouver 10 -19 3 23 117 139 

Los Angeles 7 19 4 is Wl U2 

MONDAY’S RESULT 

Har tford 10 1 9-4 

Montreal 2 110-4 

Samuetasen (1). Evason (31. Babvch (7), 
Gov In (ldi; Kuivera (4}. Detain (171. Smith 
(9), Waiter 16). Shots or goal: Hartford (on 
Pflimev) TM-ll-J— 28; Montreal (an Liul) 9- 
11-94— 29. 


By Gcocgc Vccscy 

New Turk Timer Service 

NEW YORK — It had been * 
peat week for maidnips cm televi- 
sion. Army-Navy 00 Saturday. 
Kareem and Aksexn as wdl as 
Chris and Martina in one night 
and, a few nights earlier, tire Bears 
and the Dotphfas. And afew nights 
before that. “Edith and MarceL 

The main reasons far seeking out 
the fihn “Edith and Maxcei" were 
the music and tbe French language 
and tho love story of two of 
France’s most popular performers, 
Edith Piaf and Marcd Cerdan. 

But the movie also ilbstraied 
that boxing has contributed more 
drama to film than any other sport, 
and it raised questions about die 
future of boxing movies fa what is 
fast becoming the post-Muham- 
mad Ah ice age. 

Even those of us who believe 
professional boxing should be 
abolished can recall favorite films 
in which boxing is the backdrop. 
Classicists recall Marion Brando’s 
longshoreman who coulda been a 
comenduh in “On tbe 'Waterfront” 
or James Eari Jones’s defiant black 
champion in “The Great White 
Hope,” while today we have the 
nearly-cartoon-character. 


“Rocky," who says he keeps going 
because “I gotta — Tmafida." 

The bating action fa “Edith and 
Mated" is mostly an impressionis- 
tic finny of arms and legs, with 
much of the drama taking place fa 
other venues: Piaf cuts short her 
music-hall performance to listen to 
her lover’s bout on the radio; Ger- 
dau’s wife listens bravely to the 
fight and to the gossip in a crowded 
restaurant in Algiers. 

Perhaps the most touching mo- 
ment in the fit™ is when the boxer 
and the singer date for the first time 
— “two French people alone in 
New York,” says the worldly street 
sparrow, trying to make conversa- 
tion — and they both realize they 
are often frightened . 

The isolated courage of the per- 
former seems to be me of the rea- 
sons many people are drawn to 
boxing, perhaps even beyond the 
violence — and there have been 
times when entire nations clustered 
around squawking radio sets as a 
Mated Cerdan climbed into a ring. 

Boxing seems to have slipped far 
below (bat emotional level fa tbe 
United Stales. It is four years since 
AH fought for the last time, a shab- 
by drubbing by Trevor Babick fa a 
flunsy setting in the Bahamas. Box- 


ing has survived even that dreadful 
timewhen Aaron Pryor gave an 
ugly bearing to Alexis AjgueHo,. 
and Duk Koo Kim fell, dose to 
brain-dead, as thousands cheered. 

The “sweet science,” as pundits 
of a ampler age ailed it, scons 
grim and hung over, a perpetual 
rainy Monday. Holmes falls short 
of Rocky Manaano’s record for an 

The 'sweet science, 9 
as pandits of a 
simpler age called 
h, seems grim and 
hung over. 

undefeate d heavyweight c ha m p i on 
and lets loose a bitter tirade against 
the late champion. Gerry Cooney 
flexes a muscle and the promoters 
start lugging gold bullion to the 
doorstep of the white hope. 

One erf boxing's problans is that 
the scripted, and therefore totally 
honest, burlesque of professional 
wrestling has stolen its ad. Wres- 


and the buffoons that boxing, with 
its weave of hype and reality, once 
had. , 


Why wait — as many boxing 
fans and boxing writers seem to be 
doing — for Jade Dempsey and Joe 
Louis to come back when we al- 
ready have Hulk Hogan and Junk- 
yard Dog? The only thing boxing 
has to match Rowdy Roddy Piper 
is Dan King — and he’s a promot- 
er, far goodness’ sakes. 

Somewhere between the post-Ali 
ennui and the mounting evidence 
that boxing is harmful to health, 
business gfies on, and interesting 
people struggle to get ahead. 
Thomas Hauser, a writer with some 
excellent credentials, including the 
book “Missing," has recently writ- 
ten “The Black Lights." 

“Black Lights" — what a boxer 
sees when be is knocked out — is an 
inside look at Billy Costello's de- 
fease of his super-lightweight title, 
in one of those confusing alphabet- 
ized boxing associations, against 
Saoul Mamby on Nov. 3, 1984. 

Hauser was obviously given en- 
try that a working reporter could 
not get, and he made die most of it 
— particularly a tense showdown 
between King end Mike Jones, 
Costello’s manager, that is more 
gripping ihan anything in the ring. 

Half the book is spent delivering 


a thumbnail history of boxing, 
forcing Hauser to truncate closeups 
of Costello and his family. But the 
glimpses of Victor Valle and the 
sparring partners. Costello's spat 
with his siabkmate, Cooney, and 
the matchmaking intrigue are wdl 
worth the familiar parts. 

Al the end, there is nothing sug- 
gesting a future movie from Costel- 
lo's Kfe — and one is tempted to 
give thanks for that — but (here is 
hope he has purchased a secure 
future for his family, and that is the 
best rationale of all for boxing. 

Boxing endures with more than a 
few good people like Costello, and 
few people liken to a squawking 
radio to follow a Louis or an AL or 
a Cerdan anymore, yet “Edith and 
Marcel” reminds us that boxing 
has taught more about hope and 
desperation than any other sport. 

Craven the dangers of boxing, 
perhaps it is time to turn ihi* famil- 
iar setting over to the performing 
arts, to make it part of our national 
theater, providing jobs for actors of 
all sir e* and backgrounds and in- 
suring catharsis for the audience 
without the loss of blood and brain 
cells and Hfe itself (o the partici- 
pants. 


Skiing 


World Cop 


NHL Leaders 


Gretzky. £dm 

Uflikux. Pan 
Anderson. Edm 
NaHuad.Mll 
Kun-L Edm 
PraoA PM 


Had wfKKnrd ptoraTf berth) 
MONDAY'S RESULT 
at New Erawm 27 
Dae. 28 
at Seattle 

Dec. 21 
* Narastants 
•tar « 51. Lowta 
Dec. 23 
■'« New Orleans 
.ut Miami 
«o«Tiwt 
dl « New England 
-.4 W New York Jets 
tar at Taman Bov 
taifa at Minnesota 
«of Kansas atv 
at indianoooits 
I Sen Francisco 
DetB 

. « Betters at Las Angeles Rams 


J3J 284 38S The UPI toe-28 college basketball rnlhm caHey. Edta 
200 2W 442 Ufoeim vales and re c ord s , total petals, p stmtiw. Qua. 

, ^ ead last ween raaWnaiJ: K«rr. Pho 

berth) 1. Norm Carolina (3tl (7-81 573 1 Breton, utan 

LT 2. MkMgan (7) <M) 533 2 T . Murray, CU 

l Duke (2) IM) 464 3 Bomfi NY1 

4. Kansas IH1 421 4 ^ovord, CN 

5. Syracuse CM) *19 5 Fraser, CM 

A GeoreekMi (Ml 355 7 etwirt i , Hart 

7. Georgia TI0V l*-15 34* t cook*. Qua. 

8. Oklahoma [B-0) 230 9 Niche Lx. LA 

9. St. John's (8-1) 204 13 

ML Nevato-Un VeaaS (A-t) m IS 

11. (lie) Louisiana si. mu 1*3 12 

11. tile) MemaMs Stale (74) 1*3 IS Peetora, Wash 

tx mmols (*-2) 123 11 Fraeee.p«i 

u. Kentucky (5-11 95 I 

15. Atabomo-eirmlrwhom (B-ll 55 18 Sj**®"' 1 '**' 

15. Indktaa (5-11 » i* 

17. Louisville (5-2) *f 17 Motorchutoque . 

16. DePOut (M> 4* 20 Ul ™«Vh.Pha 

19. Notre Dome (4-lj 38 « vwwesbrwc*. 1 

20. Penaardlne 16-1) 24 x Romano, Pan 

WNes Rams (z-uannkedl Keans, Btn 


a a Pts 
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19 33 S3 
24 2* 58 
23 2* 49 
23 21 44 

21 23 44 
» 31 43 

18 24 42 
28 12 40 
IS 21 38 
1* 21 37 

19 17 35 
19 17 35 
14 22 36 
12 24 3* 

22 -13 35 
14 21 35 


COALTRNDINC 



MP 

CA 

SO Am 

Peetera, w»ah 

381 

12 

1 

139 

Fraeee. Ptili 

659 

36 

2 

£51 

Jenson, wash 

iaa 

47 

0 

2J4 

Saataert-Mtl 

430 

2D 

2 

17V 

□'Amour. Cte 

316 

15 

0 

285 

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us 

29 

2 

288 

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480 

23 

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vanUnbrauck. NYR 

1391 

70 

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3.12 

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973 

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3.14 


MEIK SLALOM 
(at MaftMiw dl CampLoH* Hatvl 

1. - Jonas Nilsson. Sweden, 1 minute 37 j 04 sec- 
onds. 

2. Baton KrtmL Yueaslnvta, 1:37.67. 

X Paul Prommett. Uec h tontaeta. 1:3648. 

4. I vo no EdalM, Italy, 1:3649. 

5. Hubert Strata, Austria. 1:3691. 

*- Robert Eriocbar, m*y, idun, 

7. Gflnttier Mactar. Austria. 1 J9 j04. 

8. Johan Waflner, Sweden, 1 J9.1S. 

9. Klaus l lettsgger, Austria, 1:3921. 

16 Robert Zeller, Austria, 1:39 JO. 

OVIRALL STANDI NOS 
1. Pohrr Mflfler, Switzerland, 70 at* 

2L Mare GtraRtoUL Lux. 68 
X Peter Wlmsberoer, Austria 65 
4. Karl Aiplaer. SwUnriand, 55 
X KrtaDl. 47 

6 (He) Rok Petrovk. Yuoastavlaond n UsMn, 
37 

V. Michael Matr. IhHv. 35 
9. Ingemar Steranark, Sweden, 35 


Transition 


BASEBALL 
American League 

Baltimore— S ent Lao Hernandez, out- 
Better, to New York to cemotoie earlier trade. 
CLEVELAND— Traded Rid) Thflmoean. 

pitcher. toMJhraukae tor Sent Reberteoftdh- 
er.Assfgoed Robert* to Maine, International 
League. 

MILWAUKEE— As s ig n ed Rich Thompson, 
pttdher, to Vancouver, Pacific Coast League. 

TEXAS Announced Itm Dickie Holes, 
pitcher, and Elite valentine, autnehtor. wffl 
became free agents, effective Friday. 
Nattoaal League 

HOUSTON — Traded Jerrv Mumphrty, out- 

fielder, ta CMcogo tor Billy Haicher.autflekt- 
#r, and a player 10 bo named tolar. 
BASKETBALL 

PHILADELPHIA— Activated Sedate 

ThraalL owua. waived Pwl Thonwean and 
Buieh Carter, guards, 

college 

ALLEOH BN Y— Hired Petar J- vans ns - 
foethall coach. 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

Sweden’s Nilsson Wins Special Slalom 

MADONNA DI CAMPIGLIO, Italy (AF) — Jonas Nilsson of Swe- 
den won his first World Cup ski race Tuesday, the men’s special slalom, 


BlancpaiN 


with the fastest first heat, 46.70 seconds, and the third-best time, 5034, fa 
the second ran down the icy Miramontj trade 

Bojan Krizaj of Yugoslavia, was seemd fa 1:3737 with Ltodhtenstafa's 
Paul Frommdt thud fa 1:38.48. Mark Girardeffi of Luxembourg, the 
overall Wodd Cup diampion, feU in the second beat and did not pick up 
any points. Ingemar Stenmark of Sweden, who won Sunday’s giant 
slalom, hit a gate and f dl fa the second heat. 

It also was announced that the two women’s giant slaloms tins weekend 
fa Hans, Austria, lad been canceled lor of lack of snow, and that the 
Austrian skier Christine Putz, who suffered serious head injuries last 
week at Yal tf Isere, France, remained in a coma but was improving. 

Polish Team Expels Twins Over Skis 

WARSAW, Poland (AF) — Dorota and Malgorzata Tlalka-Magore, 
tbe twins who are among the world's um women's slalom driers, nave 
b era expelled from (he Polish national ski team for contract violations, 
the official Polish news agency PAP reported. 

Tbe sisters, who mam ed French brothos and have been living in 
France, “arbitrarily prolonged their stay abroad and broke off all ties" 
wiih their Polish sari dub, the Lema Zakopane Sprats Club, PAP said. 

PAP said they also had exhibited a “blameworthy attitude" and 
violated “contracts between Polish sports authorities and foreign firms” 
by using a Afferent brand of sltis and bindings than allowed. 


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Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 18, 1985 


OBSERVER 


PEOPLE 


Gifts for the Cometose ' New ’ He mingwtiy Novel on Bi sexuality 'BwzU’ Gets Oscar Shm 

Bv Russell Baker r^lotemthisastomdangiAe. H=mm s «4^ y JAMoye; “BmlT wjucb won I ^bree ^ ^ 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — Please don't 
dunk me blast when 1 say the 
approach of Halley’s comet does 
not matre my pulse flatter. It is a 
simple case of disillusion. A few 
years ago I got terribly worked up 
about another comet and had my 
heart broken when it failed to show 
up. 

That comet was named Kohou- 
tek. Sure, Kohootek was out there 
somewhere. People with access to 
the Mount Wilson Observatory 
could even see it. But to os of the 
naked-eye set, Kohootek was a 
dud. 

My children were that young 
enough to be flabbergasted by my 
wisdom, or so I thought, and I had 
filled them with a great deal of 
wisdom about (his Kohootek, 
which we would soon see in glori- 
ous flashing color with our own 
naked eyes. 

Finally, growing impatient my- 
self — far the newspapers, after the 
excited frothings of their astrono- 
my experts, had fallen ominously 
sdent — I sighted h one twilight in 
the Maryland sky. I was driving an 
inte rmina ble turnpike with the 
family sealed in a sedan when I 
spotted a beautiful light hovering 
over faraway Baltimore. 

“There it is,” I cried. “Kohou- 
tek.” 

All the children responded at 
once in chorus: “That’s not a com- 
et That’s just Venus, the evening 
star.” I have bad no nse for comets 


The Boston Globe’s distin- 
guished nature disqnisitionist, 
M. R. Montgomery, says this atti- 
tude is appropriate, since Halley’s 
comet is merely a chunk of ice 
flying predictably eccentric orbits 
around the sun. 

1 died Montgomery last week to 
a person vary dear to me when die 
said I must be thrilled about the 
approach of Halley’s comet “Far 
from it” I said. “It is merely a piece 
of ice, and its arrival at this time is a 
rather dun mathematical znevita- 
hflty” 

This thraigh tires outburst pro- 
duced «gns of dismay in the young 
woman. Interpreting rh«m immedi- 
ately with absolute accuracy, I in- 
stantly added, “Nevertheless, I 
wish with all sty heart that I had 
btuoculare or a telescope so that I 


might observe this astamshmg pho- 
nanmon of heavenly refrigera- 
tion.” 

The retrieved an awkward situa- 
tion, for die sweet child, slavishly 
obeying die ennent avalanche of 
advertising advice an what to got 
d 8 d, hubby or gramps for Chnst- 
mas, had obviondy bought either a 
telescope or binoculars to help me 
enjoy Halley’s comet to its foflest. 

Ah weQ, I thought, it wQl be easy 
to burble happfly about either bin- 
oculars or telescope when the gifts 
are opened anoe with either one I 

can sit an the roof and stare at the 

craters of the moon while the rest 
of them are gbed by “Knot's Land- 
ing” to the TV set 
□ 

Two days later a young man who 
is very dose to me telephoned. T 

guess you’re really coaled about 

Halley’s comet, right?” he said. 

“Right, absolutely right” I said. 
The only reason 1 have insisted on 
living to my present advanced age 
is so I could ealeb Halley’s comet 
rtii* time around.” 

Wdl, perhaps the aid was giving 
nw fcanocolars *wt the boy a tele- 
scope. With a tekscope 1 could sit 
on the tool and see the rings of 
whichever planet it is that has the 
rings. I should know its name, I 
suppose, but life is too sheet to 
master both the solar system and 
the wines of Bordeaux, aid though 
I am uncertain which planet has the 
rings I know exactly which wine 
should be drunk while examining 
such planets through a telescope. 

A few min ntes later my wife ar- 
rived home carrying a telescope- 
shaped shopping bag. 

By bedtime my godmother « 
Aunt Dolly had both phoned to 
confirm their suspicions that die 
approach of Halley’s comet had me 
more excited than any phenome- 
non since the scene in “Heirs An- 
gels” in which Jean Harlow ap- 
peared in a bathrobe. 

After Christmas, op on the roof, 
I shall be wdl equ ip ped in case a 
similar scene is {Haying behind 
some uncurtained window in die 
neighborhood. So will a lot of other 
dads, husbands, grampses, godsons 
and favorite nephews, thanks to the 
late Halley. Science these days may 
be just (me piece of depressing 
news after another, but m almost 
every instance it also offers some 
small reward for mankind. 

New York Tima Srrtiet 


By Edwin McDowell 

Nrw York TimaSendee 

N EW YORK — An unpub- 
lished novel that Ernest 
Hemingway worked on over the 
course of 15 years will be pub- 
lished in May by Charles 
Scribner's Sms. “The Gaidai of 
Eden," deals with a young Ameri- 
can writa and bis wife of three 
weeks, both of wham are attract- 
ed to the same woman. 

The noveTs treatment of bisex- 
uality is a departure from the 
masculine themes popularly asso- 
ciated with Hemingway. “It 
shows a lot of the tenderness and 
vulnerability that was usually ob- 
scured by his public i m ag e," said 
Tom Jeote, who edited the manu- 
script. 

Tube t he m e also hel ps explain 
why the book is being published 
only now, 24years after Heming- 
way’s deatL^Tfa theme of bisex- 
uality is not as strange today as it 
was 25 years ago,” said Charles 
Scribner Jr., chairman of Qiaries 
Scribner’s Sms, which has pub- 
lished Hemingway since 1926. He 
said that several editors, himself 
included, “took a crack at editing 
the work,” but the publishing 
bouse was never satisfied with the 
results until now. 

Scribnert describes the bo ok , 
begun in 1946 and worked on at 
intervals until shortly before the 
author’s death in 1961, as Hem- 
ingway’s “last unpublished major 
work,” although a 1928 novel of 
300 handwritten pages exists 

among the Hemingway papers at 
(he John F. Kennedy Library in 
Dorchester, Massachusetts. Peter 
Griffin, a Hemingway biographer 
and one of the few people to have 
read that manuscript, said the 
Scribner daim was probably ac- 
curate because the earlier novel 
was incomplete and badly 
flawed. 

Professor Carlos Baker, in a 
biography of He mi ngway, de- 
scribed “The Garden of Edum” as 
“an experimental compound of 
past and present, fifled with as- 
tonishing ineptitudes based 
in part upon manories of his 

marriagre” »n WwHIgy Rirharrtywi 

and Pauline Pfeiffer. 

Baker noted that the opening 
locale, the seaport village of Le 
Grau-dn-Rai, France, at the foot 
of die RfaAne estuary, was where 
Hemingway spent his honey- 



moon with Pfeiffer in May 1927. 
Like Hemingway at that time, the 
hero, David Bonne, has been 
married only three weeks and is 
the author of a successful noveL 
His wife, Catherine, shares his 
hungers and his pleasures. Ac- 
cording to Baker, “Their nights 
were given to experiments with 
the transfer of sexual identities in 
which she assumed the name of 
Pete and he (be name of Cather- 
ine.” 

Baker, noting that the novel 
was partly used in the develop- 
ment of “Across the River and 
Into the Trees,” said that “it had 
none of the taut nervousness of 
Ernest’s best fiction, and was so 
repetitious that it seemed inter- 
minable." He noted that it ran to 
48 chapters and more than 
200,000 words. 

That repetition presumably 
has been pruned in the editing by 
J cnks. who woxked oo the novd 
’tor five months to reduce it to 30 
chapters and one-third its origi- 
nal length. “What is important,” 
J en Its said, “is that there’s noth- 
ing in the book that is not Hem- 
ingway. The book Is absolutely 
identical to the s tru ct u re — scene 
by scene, chapter by chapter, line 
byline." 

Scribner said Maty Honing-' 
way, the author's widow, brought 
the manuscript to the company 


more than 20 years ago. “I don’t 
think anybody could accuse us of 
rushing into pant with it, but 
when dealing' with a posthumous 
work by a worfd-dass author like 
Ernest Hemingway you have a 
responsibility to exercise great 
care,” he said. 

The Garden of Eden” will be 
the 10th posthumous Hemingway 
book. The others include “Ernest 
Hemingway: Selected Letters, 
1917-1961,” edited by Baker; “Is- 
lands in the Stream,” a novd 
about the dissolution of a paint- 
er’s family; and “A Moveable 
Feast,” sketches of Hemingway’s 
life a«d acquaintances in Paris. 

Earlier tins year, Scribner’s 
published “The Endless Sum- 
mer,” a sharply edited verson of 
Hemingway’s chronide of the 
Spanish bullfight season of 1959. 
Tnat book was on Tbe New York 
Times bestseller list for seven 
weeks. Griffin’s recently, pub- 
lished biography, “Along With 
Youth: Hem ing wa y, the Early 
Years” (Oxford University 
Press), contains five previously 
unpublished riant stories that 
Gnffin found among the Hem- 
ingway papers. And on Friday. 
Scabner’s win publish “Dateline: 
Toronto,” a volume of all 172 
dispatches Hemingway wrote for 
The Toronto Star in 1920-24. 


Pritir* gener ally praised the 
He mingway letters and “A Move- 
able Feast," but many thought it 
a mistake to issue “Islands in the 
Stream.” “We did get it in the 
neck quite a bit from ’amateur 
experts,’” Scribner said. But he 
said he was “overjoyed” whm the 
critic Edmond Wilson “said he 
thought it certainly should be 
published and that it included 
some of Hemingway's finest 

work. 

“He also said it was proper to 
explain dot Hemingway’s work 
had not been completed,” 
Scribner said. “We have also stat- 
ed that Hemingway’s work on 
this book was not in its final 
form. And having said that there 
is absolutely no harm and noth- 
ing wrong m our publishing the 
book with that disclaimer.” 

- Griffin agreed, “He made lots 

of indications on the manuscripts 
of things to be changed,” be said, 
i "and when he went bad he would 
often interject signs in his writing 
to indicate he didn’t like it. If 
someone really knows his stuff, 
he can tdl where Hemingway 
should be cut” 

Jeaks said he began with three 
Hemingway versions of ‘The 
Garden of Eden” — a 400-page 
version, one at 1 ,200 pages, and a 
copy of the 1 , 200 -page manu- 
script to which Hemingway had 
added about 300 pages. J enks 
said he read and compared tfagn 
all, but in the end worked from 
the longest one. 

“The' cutting I did involved 
taking out a subplot in a very 
rough draft that be had not inte- 
grated into the mam body of the 
novd. But within the unfinished 
manuscript was a complete and 
major work that is absolutely an- 
thentic to Hemingway's work as a 
whole.” 

Jenks said his first question, 
upon approaching the manu- 
script, was, “Is there a book here 
that should be published for 
readers?” He -was satisfied that 
the answer was yes, he said. 

“When you go into something 
Hire this," he mid, “you go totally 
under the law established by the 
writer — in this case, (he law of 
an ancient god. I’d Idee to think 
that if He min gway had lived he 
would have made the same sorts 
of derisions that ultimatel y I 
made.” 


••Brazil,” which won three 
awards from the Los Angeles Hm 
Critics Association even though it 
has not been commercially released 
in the United States, will be given a 
one-week U. S. run beginning Dec. 
25 to qualify it for the 1985 Acade- 
my Awards competition. Universal 
Pictures’ dn" 1 ™", Frank Price, 
said that “Brazil” would be re- 
leased in New York and Los Ange- 
les and that the studio would 
schedule private screenings for 
members of (be Academy of Mo- 
tion Picture Arts and Sciences. 
“Brazil," the subject of a long feud 
between its director, Terry Gilliam, 
and Sidney Shemberg, president of 
Universal's parent, MCA Inc., won 
tbe film critics' awards Saturday 
for best picture, best director and 
best screenplay. The critics also 
voted Gilliam best director, and 
(heir screenplay award went to Gil- 
liam, Tom Stoppard and Charles 
McKeown. “Brazil," an Orwdlian 
nightmare about a person who de- 
fies a depersonalized, bureaucratic 
system mid is crushed, stars Jona- 
than Pryce, with a cameo by Robert 
De Niro. . . . “The Color Purple" 
was named the best film of 1985 by 
the National Board of Review of 
Motion Pictures, and one of its 
stars, Whoopi Goldberg, was cbo- 
sen as best actress. Wiffiam Hurt 
and Rad Juba shared the best actor 
award for “Kiss of the Spider 
Woman.” Best supporting actors 
were Hans Maria Brandaner for 
“Out of Africa” and AqjeEca Has- 
too for “Prizzf s Honor." 

□ 

George Harrison is spending £2 
mfflion ($ 2 J 8 million) to build a 
mansi on in Australia, the Sun 
newspaper reported Tuesday in 
London. The former Beatie’s new 
home will be set in 6 acres (2.4 
hectares) of “tropical paradise” on 
Hamil ton Island in the Great Bar- 
rier Reef off Queensland, the daily 
said, adding that Harrison. 42. who 
now lives in a mansion at Henley- 
on-Thames, west of London, hopes 
to move in by August. . 

□ 

A Soviet enrigrt opened his eyes 
and started talkin g again after 
neady three weeks of a fake coma, 
but he may wish he hadn’t: French 
o fficials charged Vladimir Leontev 
with theft and concealment, court 
and police sources in Boulogne- 
sur-Mer said. Leaotev. 43. a resi- 
dent of France since 1978, refused 


to say where be got the 27gj 
French francs ($36,170) fonrita 
him after a road acridemNov.* 
in Britain, a court source ttbii 

o ■: r : 

Judy Came, returning to Bti&jg 
to appear in conn oa drag-pts^ 
son charges, was arrested i 
toms officials at Heathrow aapm* 
on new charges of bringfogcocsa* 
and cannabis into the county 4 
Scotland Yard spokeswoman 
the actress, 46, was arrested ^ 
arriving cm a flight from tire United 
States. Came is to appear in al^ 
don court on the new chargak^ •" 
day, the spokeswoman said. Ptyjgg 
said Came had flown to Britabfa ' 
a court appearance m herhufe. 
town, Northampton, where n, 


cocaine, cannabis and am phe t - 
amines. That court dale wiUhen- 
scheduled. Came, best known f w 
the 1960s television series “Lagfe- 
In,” had been in the Utated States 
promoting her autobiography 
“Laughing on the Ctatside, Qyt»: 

on the Inside.” 

□ 

Rita lachmaun has defaulted 
twice on initial payment of the jj? 
million Deutsche marks (tag 
$646,000) she bid Oct 21 fa a 
famous pair of stamps, Stem on. 
tine said Tuesday. The canc ^ 
blue and orange-red one-penny ' 
Mauritius stamps are still in the 
safe of a Hamburg auctioneer. 
Stem said it suspected that the 
German- bom Lachmatm, former 
wife of the late Revlon dad. 
Charles Ladanasa, bid for die 
stamps as a publicity stunt. Jhh 
T-aehmann told the magazine, "In 

the United States, big people don’t 
have to pay foca big deal at once.” 

□ 

Queen Elizabeth R has refused, 
10 block the use of Britain's royal; 
warrants on cigarette packs. An op-' - 
position politician. Erase Roberts, 
had asked the queen to review the 
policy last January after her sister. 


had what proved to be mmor fap’*- 
surgery. 

□ 

President Francois Mitterrand of 
France and Jack Lang, minister of 
culture, inaugurated the revamped 
National Museum of Modern An 
at the Pompidou Center on Tues- 
day. Part of the galley was re- 
opened last spring. 


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