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§f.S,; Hoi 

( V 1 , ' 

E Rosenbaum 

r <Jj!~Sww York Tune* Struct 

f •- ■i^’HINGTON — The US. 

of Representatives, after 
‘'%'S of fierce lobbying and defr- 
^■‘‘ditical maneuvering, has ap* 

- legislation that would make 
• :r v.{ <l JSt extensive changes in the 
income tax system in more 

V:' 9 years. 

- r ~c, Sough the measure differs in 
7 ' important respects from 
Ronald Reagan’s pro- 
=' t ; !, passage of the bill Tuesday 
•- V-jy theDemoCTaticrarntroIled 
was a significant victory for 

. esidenL 

- made revision of the tax code 
-.7^ i^est legislative priority of his 
- 77 fe -d term and staked the pres- 


OW PAGE 3 

■ Most Republicans who 
voted for tax revision fdt 
they had won something. 

■ Americans abroad could 
face a higher tax burden. 

■ The 1987 budget would 
hah' aid for farm research , 
and abolish the ICC: 


The crucial vote came on a mo- 
tion by Republican opponents to 
recommit the trill to the Ways and 
Means Committee, a parliamenta- 
ry way of killing the legislation. 
The recommittal motion was de- 
feated, 256-171, with 207. Demo- 
crats and 49 Republicans voting to 
keep the measure alive and 39 
Democrats and 132 Republicans 
voting io kill H. 


The bill was then approved by a 
voice vote. 

The sweeping measure now goes 
to.tbe Senate, where deprocedures 
and politics are even less tidy than, 
those in the House and where the 
outlook is uncertain. 

The prevailing view is that the 
Senate will approve some form of 
tax legislation next year but that it 
may bear little resemblance to the 
House version. In any case, the 
co ngr e ssional debate on taxes is 
likely to last all next year. 

“Obviously we’re very glad," 
said Treasury Secretary James A, 
Baker 3d. “We think the president's 
appeal was clearly effective, and 
we’re delighted to see the degree of 
Republican support” 

. As he concluded the debate. 
Representative Dan Rostcnkowski 
the chairman of the Ways and 


Rattle of the U,S. Titans’ Hastens 
Europe’s Technological Revolution 


’ -itv By J 0 ® 6 ?* 1 Ktdbett 

- •c l .. /wnaBMH Herald Tribune 

■ JWN — Carlo de Benedet ti 

•t* t-' ted more than two years ago in 

battle of die titans" and so he 
.7 ' s; cot surprised lohearthe bnHe- 
' . the combat zone: Bri tarn’s 
i J.' i i~^est compoter-manufactoring 
*■ no longer British. 

~V ,'~''be hew. leader, is International 


r *5: s its plant in Greenock, Scot- 


tfs chief strategic planner. “IBM 
wfll be there, and we think that our 
pact with AT&T means that we win 
also be one of the survivors.” 

Survival has become the watch- 
word as IBM and AT&T prowl 
Europe to find allies. 

Throughout Western Europe, 
IBM' dwarfs the competition. The 

crnnhwifH TRVTc mhadiar. 

res or operating companies in every 
major European country were 


are already that in Europe today.” 

As a participant in “the battle of 
the titans,” Olivetti um increasing- 
ly good company 
Philips, the Dutch electronics 
nmltmational, has begnn a joint 
ve n t ure with AT&T to make ad- 
vanced public telephone equip- 
ment And AT&T is budding a big 
senrioondnetor plant in Spain hi 
partnership with CSa. Tdef6nka 
National de Espafla. 

Even in France, where President 


r --'dr • 


Eo«>pe^NewA^)roadje6toCoiiopetiJiMi 


; _T : ' ii the fixe of American and Japanese competition, is Western 
: rape m an irreversible economic decline? Can it catch up technologi- 

’ ~Y?A/v European economies too rigid to change? Can Europe move 
~n a managerial to an entrepreneurial society? 

7 »» is the fourth in a series of articles, appearing from time to time, 

aing on these questions and some answers. 


^**3, expanded production of per- 
computers -i- the company 
t-jui not say exactly hoW many it. 
res — it became Britton’* big- 
electronics producer and lifted 
T^jaaeunaa of LBM-UK last year 

- -: £35 bdfon (abanr$3-j4 tvt&vn) 

. , - t t was nealfy fburtimes Mgbei’ 
■’’■■■■i the revenues pf ICL, Britain's 
, ^or hcxnegrown compnWMnak- 

-w'o Mr. de Benedetti this was 
rpty another skirmish between 
: " two American titans — IBM 

- ;.-j American Telephone & Tde- 
Vph Co.— fighting for control of 
. ' emerging global industry in 

' : ;^Mlta-based owmmumcfltionfi. 

— --ched off on unprecedented 
v' 'nd of takeovers in the dectron- 
industry and forced European 
VustriaHsts and politicians to 
jpt to technological revolution a 
’ade earikr than. they expected, 
rst ^Thcse titans don't just set tech- 
;al standards, they set strategic, 
adards,” says Jacques Dormant .. 
jotacuthe at Thomson, France’s 
: S»t electronics manufacturer. 

Mr. de Benedetti was one erf the 
- & to act on this insight* As chair- 
. n of Olivetti, now Europe's lead- 
V. supplier of office electronics, he 
' ed with AT&T in 1983, selling it 
••^Speroeat interest in his compa- 

joome Europeans were indignant 
‘^see Olivetti ally itself with an 
■f^atrican corporation in a strategic 
ijr , haology, Inti Mr. de Benedetti 
‘l fugged off the objections. 

needed the technology, I need - 
now, and F weal where 1 had to 
$Oo get it,” he says. In exchange, 
‘wttti provided AT&T with oul- 
sand sales skills in the European 
.^rket Instead of a capitulation, 
DA^- de Benedetti regarded the 
*'we as an opportunity For his 
npany to beccnne more uuerna- 
QaL 

Bis reaction is doctrine at OH- 
•ti, a tightly knit company based 
afiripe town of Ivrea, just 
(side Turin in Italy’s industrial- 
^ north. 

■■■*Tbe worldwide computer and 
Bra un itmtiirari/wi industry is go- 

- t toward the emergence of two, 
■'.V- ne or maybe four global alli- 
7 - .res," add Elserino Fid, Olivet- 


aboui 511 trillion last year, nearly 
10 times tngjher than those of the 
largest-seffiog European computer 
maker , France’s state-owned (and 
lavirirfy subsidized) BuIL 
. IBM’s dominant position is re- 
spected by Mr.-de Benedetti, who 
ma^&UfltroririBd Olivetti from^a 
creaky typewriter manufacturer 
into an electronics company with 
profits of $205 nrinion last year — 
and-globd-ambttions. 

■ *T don't want to say that we can 
beat IBM,” Mr. de Benedetti as- 
serted. "That would be stupid. Onr 

aim is to be seen in the marketplace 
as an alternative to IBM. I think we 


ed Olivetti and Philips for breaking 
European ranks and joining 
AT&T, die U.S. corporation is ne- 
gotiating an agreement with the 
state-owned Compagaic G£n6role 
d’EIbclricitfc v usually known as 
CGE. The proposed joint venture 
would be guaranteed at least 15 
percent of France’s state-con- 
trolled market in teleoommnnica- 
tiHfls equipment 
So far, AT&T has roped little 
profit from its push into Europe: 
only 1 percent of its 1984 revenues 
of $33 bdtion. It sriQ trails not only 
IBM but alto Digital Equipment 
Carp, in computer sales in Europe. 
But AT&T is planning to open a 
European headquarters,- a sure sign 
-Of flitfqt a>A»ajng ' temper of its cam- 


IBM is also stepping up its offen- 
sive. 

Among several new alliances in 
Italy, its most important is a joint 
venture to develop industrial auto- 
mation with Set, the mother com- 
pany for all the tdecomizuutica- 
(Coptinoed on Page 7, CoL 3) 



Means- Commit tee, which screened 
the bill, declared that many Ameri- 
cans fdt they were “bring cheated” 
- because people better ofT than they 
are were avdding taxes. 

“That's what this debate is aft 
about,” the Illinois Democrat said. 
“It’s potting fairness in the code." 

Most Republicans opposed the 
House bill on the ground that it 
would be disadvantageous to busi- 
ness and would harm the economy. 

Last week Republicans mounted 
a sneak attack against the proce- 
dural resolution, called “the rule,” 
that had to be passed before the bill 
itself could be considered. In a sur- 
prise to the While House and the 
Democratic leadership, the rule 
was rejected, with only 14 Republi- 
cans voting Tor it and 164 against it. 

As a result cf an intensive cam- 
paign by the Reagan administra- 
tion and an unusual visit to Capitol 
Hill by the president, a new rale, 
with only cosmetic changes, was 
approved Ttiesday by a vote of 258- 
168. 

Seventy Republicans voted for 
the rule this t i 'rr^s and no voted 
against it. As for Democrats, 188 
supported the rule and 58 voted 
against it 

In the view of nearly all political 
analysts, the concept of tax revision 
would have been blocked for the 
rest of the Reagan presidency with- 
out House approval of a bul this 
year. 

If enacted in a form anywhere 
close to the House bill, the legisla- 
tion would affect the tax liability of 
almost every household and busi- 
ness in America. 

It would sharply lower tax rates, 
limit many deductions and other 
tax preferences, apply a stiff mini- 
mum tax to wealthy people and 
profitable corporations, remove 
millions of poor people from the 
income tax rolls and shift part of 
the tax burden from individuals to 



The bfll follows the baric frame- 
work of the pnmosals that Mr. 
Reagan submitted to Congress last 
May, reducing tax rata, restricting 
tax preferences and raising neither 
more nor less revenue than the cur- 
rent tax system. 

But it would be more favorable 
to lower- and noddle-income tax- 
payers and less advantageous to the 
wealthy than the president's plan. 
Moreover, the House biO would 
retain deductions for State and lo- 
cal income, property andsdek tax - j 
es, which che president, wanted to 
end, and would let employer-paid 
fringe benefits, winch the president 
wanted to tax, remain tax-free. 

It would also nuke the top cor- 
porate tax rale 36 percent, com- 
pared with 46 percent now and 36 
percent proposed by the president. 

Over aO, the bin would reduce 
the taxes paid by individuals by an 
average of 9 percent and would 
raise corporate taxes more than 20 
percent. 

To garner the final few Republi- 
can votes he needed, the president 
pledged to veto any measure reach- 
tag his desk that (fid not meet sev- 
eral criteria: a up tax rate no high- 
er than 35 percent, a $2,000 
personal exemption, for all low- and 
middle-income taxpayers and their 
dependents, tax incentives for in- 
dustries that depend on heavy in- 
vestment in equipment and ma- 
chinery and a delay in the effective 
date of limits on business invest- 
ment incentives until rate reduc- 
tions are put into effect. 

None of those criteria are met in 
the House bHL 


By William J. Broad 

JNew York Tuna Senate 

NEW YORK — A deep rift has 
divided the leading scientists at 
work on President Ronald Rea- 
gan's anti-missile dufanse plan. 

Some of them charge that the 
program is being seriously threat- 
ened by exaggerated assertions, 
misleading tests and costly public 
relations razzle-dazzle, Others deny 

Weapons in Space 

The Program, the Debate 

■ ■ •• Secon d of thw articles . 

that those working on the huge re- 
search project have auty interest in 
showmanship or hyperbole. 

Critics outside the government 
have long said the anti-missile de- 
fense program, popularly known as 
“star ware,” is structured to pro- 
mote the illusion erf quick te chn ical 
gains, no matter how great or small 
its accomplishments. But the new 
criticism is notable because it 
comes from scientists at the fore- 
front of the president's program, 
who say their technical credibility 
is at stake. 

In the future, these federal scien- 
tists say, showy tests may increas- 
ingly take precedence overcautious 
and technically sound science, es- 
pecially as budget cuts force 
changes in the anti-missile defense 
program, which is formally known 
as the Strategic Defense Initiative. 

These scientists wain that the 
real danger is false public confi- 
dence in anti-missile technology 
that might be wholly inadequate to 
the ambitious task of protecting the 
nation from enemy warheads. 

In me case, dissident scientists 


Disney Picks France for Theme Park 


HANDS OFF — Workers begin the foar-monttt pro- 
cess of removing scaffolding from the Statue of Liberty 
(n New York Harbor. More work is to be done on the 
statue’s interior before a July centennial celebration. 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dupauha 

PARIS — Walt Disney Produc- 
tions signed Wednesday an agree- 
ment with the French government 
to set np a Enropean entertainment 
park in a suburb east of Paris. 

Prime Minister Laurent Fabius 
of France signed the accord with 
the president of the American com- 
pany, Michael D. Eisner. Tbe 
theme park will be sited in Mame- 
la-Vallfce, 12 miles (20 kilometers) 
east of the capital. 

France was competing for (he 
contract with Spain, which was 
hoping to set up the park on the 
Costa Blanca, between Barcelona 
and Alicante. 

“This contract represents for the 


region and for France tbe possibili- 
ty for considerable employment, 
economic development, tourism 
and also culture,” Mr. Fabius said 
at the signing ceremony at the Hd- 
td Matigoon in Paris, his working 
quarters. 

Talks an tbe ate for a new Dis- 
ney park had been under way for a 
year. 

The creation of the park near 
Paris is expected to bang about 
6,000 jobs over the five-year con- 
struction period, then 20,000 to 
25,000 jobs when it opens in 1991. 

Tbe park would be similar to 
Disneyworid in Florida and Dis- 
neyland in- California. It is to cover 
250 acres (100 hectares), but the 


Bonn Seeks Role 
In SDI for Firms, 
Rejects Funding 
By Government 


aMMf»un 

Representative Dan Rostenkowski, chai rman of the House 
Ways and Means Committee, toasts the tax biB written by 
his panel and passed by the House. He is flanked by 
Representatives Marty Russo, left, and Fortney Stark Jr. 

Showmanship and SDI: 
Rift Divides Researchers 


hove naked careers and jail sen- 
tences to publicize embarrassing 
top-secret details about widely 
touted programs, provoking both 
federal hunts for those who dis- 
closed the information and con- 
gressional investigations of the 
charges. 

*Tm very alarmed at (he degree 
of hype, promises and a failure to 
focus on what this national pro- 
gram really is — a research pro- 
gram with lots of unanswered ques- 
tions," said Dr. George H. MiGer, 
head of defense programs at the 
Lawrence Livermore National 
Laboratory in Livermore, Califor- 
nia. Tm afraid the public is losing 
-i ; ght of how difficult liisjob isT 

Dr. Roger L. Hagengtuber. di- 
rector of system studies at tbe San- 
dia National Laboratory in Albu- 
querque, New Mexico, asked, “Will 
the science be negatively affected 
by tbe fact that there's so much 
pressure for stunts and demonstra- 
tions? 

“Clearfy the answer is yes, espe- 
cially as t be dollars go down,” he 
said. “The need for progress in a 
program of this size is irreducible.” 

Defenders of the anti-missile 
plan, including its director, deny 
that (he program contains any hint 
of showmanship. But other key of- 
ficials say it has been structured 
with an eye to public relations. 

“Salesmanship is dearly a fac- 
tor,” said Lieutenant Colonel Mi- 
chael Havey, formerly a senior ana- 
lyst on anti-missile issues in the 
president's Office of Science and 
Technology Policy. “It has to be 
when you're dealing with people: 
Bui what’s important is that we're 
selling a quality product” 

He added, “It's not been any- 
thing but honorable men trying to 

(Continued on Page 4, CoL I) 


By William Drozdiak 

Washington Pmt Service 

BONN — West Germany decid- 
ed Wednesday to open negotia- 
tions with the United States on the 
participation of West German 
companies in President Ronald 
Reagan's research program into 
space-based missile defenses. 

The government spokesman. 
Friedhetm Ost, said that the West 
German cabinet had voted unani- 
mously to send Economics Minis- 
ter Martin Bunge man n to Wash- 
ington next month to seek 
conditions for the exchange of sci- 
entific research and technology be- 
tween the two allies. 

Chancellor Helmut Kohl's cen- 
ter-right coalition, while reiterating 
its political support for Mr. Rea- 
gan's Strategic Defense Initiative, 
also declared that it would not pur- 
sue any direct government role or 
provide any public funding for (he 
research effort. 

By stressing the business aspects 
and muting the security repercus- 
sions of SDI, Bonn clearly hoped to 
stifle a protracted feud between 
Mr. Kohl's Christian Democrats 
and their junior partner, the Free 
Democrats, over the wisdom of em- 
bracing the controversial project. 

The West German decision 
quickly provoked angiy criticism in 
Moscow. The Soviet news agency 
Tass charged that Bonn intended to 
use tbe “cosmic bridge” of SDI to 
“bypass existing bans and lay the 
path for nuclear aiming” of the 
West German Army. 

The Bonn government believes 
that a draft agreement can be 
reached by the end of March “if 
both sides are reasonable,” accord- 
ing to Horst Teltsdrik, Mr. Kohl's 
adviser on foreign and security af- 
fairs. 

Earlier this month, Britain be- 
came the first country' to sign an 
accord regulating the involvement 
of its companies in the program. 

A so-called memorandum of un- 


derstanding between London and 
Washington cites 18 areas in which 
British technology could plav a role 
in SDI research, but it makes no 
binding commitments. Britain was 
forced to drop an earlier demand 
for SI.5 billion in contract guaran- 
tees. 

Before Wednesday's decision, 
Mr. Kohl's government had hoped 
to examine the pact that London 
signed as a possible precedent. But 
Britain refused to disclose details 
of the pact, citing national security 
reasons. Diploma rs said Prime 
Minister Margaret Thatcher turned 
down a personal appeal by Mr. 
Kohl for a copy of the document. 

West German officials said that 
Bonn may follow London’s format 
and sign a similar Lind of memo- 
randum. On the other hand, an 
exchange of letters may prose suffi- 
cient, particularly as West Germa- 
ny wishes to emphasize business 
interests and 3void the security 
q ties lions that would involve the 
government, the officials said. 

Mr. Kohl and other Christian 
Democrats have advocated a 
staunch political endorsement of 
the program to demonstrate allied 
support for Mr. Reagan and to give 
him a stronger hand in the Geneva 
arms talks. 

But Foreign Minister Hans- Die- 
inch Genscher and other members 
of the Free Democrat Party have 
expressed fears that a dose Vole in 
SDJ could damage Bonn's relations 
with Eastern Europe. 

Mr. Genseher is known to be 
wary of tampering with the North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization po- 
licy of nuclear deterrence. 

■ France Attacks SDI 

Earlier. Michael Dobbs of The 
Washington Past reported from Par- 
is; 

France's Socialist government 
Mapped up its criticism of SO* 
Tuesday, predicting that it would 

. (Continued on Page 4, CoL 5) 


Filipinos Wondering: 
Will Election Be Held? 


ensemble, including hotels and 
parking lots, will be spread over 
3,950 acres. 

Ten million visitors are expected 
annually after the center opens. 
Initial investment by all partners is 
to total between 10 billion and 15 
billion francs (SI 35 and $2.02 bil- 
lion.) 

The French proposal appeared 
initially to be a long shot because of 
the favorable climate enjoyed by 
Spain. But the attraction of Marae- 
la-Vallee, a newly established busi- 
ness center, stemmed from Paris's 
central location on European tour- 
ist itineraries and its excellent 
transportation system. (AP, AFP) 


By Seth Mydans 

New York Tima Srrvuv 

MANILA — With the party 
tickets selected and tire candidates 
already beginning their campaigns, 
an overriding question remains un- 
resolved: WQ1 the Philippine presi- 
dential election scheduled for Feb- 
ruary be held at all? 

The Philippine Supreme Court 
finished two days of hearings 
Wednesday on 1 1 petitions asking 
it to declare the election unconsti- 
tutional and is expected to rule on 
them soon. 

It is generally accepted among 
both his supporters and opponents 
that President Ferdinand E Mar- 
cos controls the 13-member court, 
and the question, as it is being 
debated here, boils down to wheth- 
er the president now wonts to call 
off the vote. 

Contrary, perhaps, to Mr. Mar- 
cos's expectations; the president's 
fractious opponents have united 
behind a single strong candidate. 
Corazon C Aquino. 

In the first days of tbe campaign 
Mr. Marcos has drawn strikingly 
smaller and less enthusiastic 
crowds titan has Mrs. Aquino, who 
is tbe widow of his rival Benigno S. 
Aquino Jr., a former senator. 

The possibility that Mr. Marcos 
coukl lose an election appears to 
have increased. 

“He may want a breathing 
space," a source dose to Malacaft- 
ang Palace said Wednesday. “May- 
be events have been rushing ahead 
faster than be wanted." 

Though many lawyers and politi- 
cians in Manila say the election as 



Corazon C Aquino 

Mr. Marcos has structured it is pa- 
tently unconstitutional, arguments 
before the court have emphasized a 
plea that the vote be allowed to 
take place anyway. 

“If the court does not believe 
that it is constitutional, declare it 
so. but we beg you. do not stop the 
election, because of the imperative 
necessity of survival." argued Em- 
manuel PeLtez. a former vice presi- 
dent of the Philippines. 

in his most recent comment on 
the subject, on Tuesday, Mr. Mar- 
cos said: "I’m still hoping the court 

(Continued on Page 5, CoL I) 


v^tudy Suggests a Few Beers for Health 


-r v Philip M. Boffcy 311 brewers and the United Stales Brewers Association 

* \ ' New Ycri Tima Semite but fluffed by the medical school 

^ WASHINGTON -- Beer drinkers appear to be The study’s director, Dr. Alex Richman, a professor 

Ktantiafiy healthier then either nondrinkers or wine at Dalbousie Uarvenaty in Halifax, Now Scotia, teu- 
>J liquor drinkers, according to the hugest study yet boned that the results did not necessarily prove that 
aducted of health differences among people twio beer promoted health. 


ok different kinds of alcoholic beverages. 


But, he said, “There is no evidence that moderate. 


• ^The survey of more than 17,000 Canadians found 'drinking would interfere with a person's health. In 
£: 1 it people who drank beer regularly and in moderate f aci> our study suggests that drinking beer regularly 
cunts were healthier than people who drank oti«r an( j j n moderate amounts may actually be 
ohotic beverages. advantageous.” 

; Ae apparent good health of bej dntaM b the new study, extremely heavy beer drinkers, 

vtdtotonk^oi SSS^iliteSofbeaaw^ 
Ae of ta counted. The more rften ^ t ^ Stoss than expected, but those 

who drank 15 to 34 pints had 23 J peroeai less fflness 
MU. Those who drank baroneormOTetun»aday ^ drank 4 to 7 pints had 

V'd 25 percent less illness than expected. 

V The study, reported in the current issue of the 27.8 percent kss illness than expected. 

trnal Drag aim Alcohol Dependence, was. spon- Beer contains more nutrients than other alcohohc 


had 1 percent mare illness than expected, but those 
who draat l5 to 34 pints tmS22J mmu iqs ifag 
' than expected, and those who drank 4 to 7 pints had 


than expected, and those who drank 4 to 7 pints had 
27.8 percent less illness than expected. 

Beer contains more nutrients than other alcoholic- 


«red by the Brewers Association of Canada and by beverages, and it produces lower concentrations of 
Alcoholic Beverage Medical Research Foundation alcohol in the blood, and less functional impairment, 
£ the Johns Hopkins School erf Medicine in Balti- than higher strength alcoholic beverages, the study 
ijWe. The foundation is financed by both the Canadi- noted. 


INSIDE 

■ The arrest of four suspected 
terrorists in Belgium came as a 
relief to the police. Page 2. 

■ Dismay among Yugoslav re- 

publics has paralyzed the na- 
tion's leadership. Page 2. 

■ AIDS research in Africa 
shows the disease how poses a 
threat to newborns. Page 5. 

SCIENCE 

■ New ted»pes magnify, the 
world beyond the ability of con- 
ventional microscopes. Page 8. 

BlISINESS/FINANCE , 

■ Latin American, debtor na- 
tions proposed stops to ease the 
region's fiscal crisis. Page 15. 

■ Texaco won a court order 
barring .Pennaofl Co. from at- 
taching Texaco assets. Page 19. 


Assam Anti-Immigrant Group Defeats Gandhi Party 


By Steven R. Weisman 

New York Tima Service ‘ 

NEW DELHI — In a political 
setback for Prime Munster Rajiv 
Gandhi, the ruling Congress (I) 
Party was defeated in elections bdd 
in the troubled northeastern state 
of Assam, according to returns 
Wqdac^iay. 

. A newfy-foined regional party. 


grant agitation, was winning or 
leading in nearly hah the state’s 
districts. The party was expected to 
lead a coalition government with 
smaller parties. 

The Assam voting Monday ap- 
peared to be heavily polarized 
along religious lines berereen Hin- 
dus and Moslems. 

Assam is one of a growing num- 
ber of Indian states that have 
turned to a party Mgaareed around 


the sectarian or religious interests 
of the local majority. The new 
coup is known as Assam Gana 
rariihad, or Assam People’s Front. 

Earlier this year, the state of 
Punjab elected a party of Sikhs to 
form a government. Mr. Gandhi 
was said to be quietly pleased that 
the Stkft party would be responsi- 
ble for marniainmg order. 

Regional parties run the popu- 
lous southern states of Andhra Pra- 
desh and Tamil Nadu, and politi- 
cians say that the state of Jammu 
and Kashmir which is mostly Mos- 
lem, is likely to follow suit. 

While many political expats say 
the trend toward regional parties 
threatens national unity by aggra- 
vating coofiicts, others argue that it 
gives healthy expression to India’s 
diversity. 

The Assam results are hkely to 


pose a challenge for Mr. Gandhi, as 
he and state leaders try to put into 
effect an accord of Iasi August to 
wid local religious ethnic an - 
tagonisms. 

Thousands of people have been 
killed in a dispute in Assam over 
tbe role of Moslem immigrants 
from Bangladesh, formerly East 
Pakistan. The dispute has pro- 
duced some of the worst violence in 
India since independence in 1947. 

Assam agitation leadens had de- 
manded that millions of the al igns 
be deported or disenfranchised. 
With the Assam accord, Mr. Gan- 
dhi bowed to their demuds, agree- 
ing to remove immigrants from 
voter rolls and expel those who 
arrived after 1971, 

Many people fear violence if the 
accord is put into effect against the 
tmntigranu’ will, and if, for exam- 


ple. hundreds of thousands of 
Bangladeshi immigrants are forc- 
ibly expelled. The newly elected 
ami-immigrant leaders hove prom- 
ised to try to do tins. 

The polarization of the elector- 
ate — an ominous mend, in the 
view of many —was evident in the 
early returns. Lower-caste Hindus, 
who normally vote for tbe Congress 
(I) Party, voted this time for the 
new anti-immigrant Assam Peo- 
ple’s Front Almost all the immi- 
grants are Moslem. 

The Congress (I) Party also lost 
the vote of Moslems, who voted for 
another new party, the United Mi- 
norities Front, which had vowed to 
cancel the Assam accord. 

The United Minorities Front 
also got rotes from Morions who 
had lived in the state for a long 

(Continued oo frge S, CM. 7) 





Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1985 


Bombing Arrests Eased Strain on Police in Belgium ^ lur< ^ 1 WORL D BRIEFS 

Tm am awtA _ k - J "A/ff— - 4 


By Steven I. Dry den 

International Herald Tribune 


BRUSSELS — Belgian police, faced with, mounting 
criticism over their failure to stop a 14-month bomb- 
in g rampaign have had their first breakthrough with 
the arrests of four suspected leftist guerrillas. 

The four were said to be members of the Fighting 


Communist Cells, the group that has claimed respon- 
sibility for the campaign. Two people have died in 17 


ability for the campaign. Two people have died ux 17 
attacks by the group on North Atlantic Treaty Organi- 
zation targets, U.S. military contractors and Belgian 
business and government offices. 

Bur not all the concern among Belgians about 
security has been prompted by the law enforcement 
authorities' failure to stop the Fighting Communist 
Cells. 

In July, the government or Prime Minister Wilfried 
Martens almost collapsed following a parliamentary 
report that blamed the Interior Ministry for security 
lapses at the European Cup Soccer Final in Brussels in 


May. Thirty-nine people died at the game in clashes 
between English and Italian fans. 


between English and Italian fans. 

This fall the public was startled by the reappear- 
ance of a gang of supermarket robbers who methodi- 
cally shot down bystanders during boldups. The gang, 

which killed 17 people in attacks in September and 
November, has been linked to several other multiple 
slayings since 1981 

Police so far have made little apparent progress in 
finding the members of that gang, whose tactics have 
led some criminologists to speculate that they are acts 


d politically motivated terrorism. 
The incidents, along with the b 


The incidents, along with the bomb attacks and a 
rise in other crime, have left many Belgians fearful that 
their country’s reputation for tranquility is a thing of 
the past. 

“Belgium, which has the highest percentage of cops 
in the European Community, is today a kind of 
laboratory of failure in crime-stopping," a national 
magazine commented recently. 

ft was in this context that Justice Minister Jean Gol 
emphasized Tuesday that the capture of Pierre Car- 
die, a suspected leader of the Fighting Communist 
Cells, was “not the result of luck" but of good police 
investigatory work, 

Mr. Corecte. 33, a former printer and the son of a 
security services agent, was arrested Monday after- 
noon in a fast-food restaurant in the southern city of 
Namur along with three other suspected members of 


the group, which is known as theCCC after its French 
name. All four of the suspects arc Belgian. 

The authorities said that they found Mr. Curette by 
secretly following one of the suspects, Pascale Bande- 
geerde. after she was spotted by pob'ee earlier tn the 
day in the nearby dty of Charleroi. 

Mr. Candle has been linked by police to the Frendi 
leftist group Direct Action, as weD as to a June 1979 
bombing is southern Belgium that nearly hit a car 
carrying General Alexander M. Haig Jr„ then the 
NATO commander. 

Police who followed Miss Bandegeerde also were 
led to an apartment in Charleroi that they described as 
a hideout of the guerrilla group. They said they found 
papers in the apartment claiming responsibility for 
recent attacks, as well as plans for future bombings. 

Although Mr. Gol and other Belgian officials ex- 
pressed satisfaction with the arrest, they indicated that 
other members of the group were stiD at large. 

The Brussels newspaper Le Soir said further attacks 
were possible since tbe group is believed to possess a 
large amount of explosives that were stolen from a 
quarry south of Brussels last year. 

At the be ginning of their bombing campaign, the 
Fighting Communist Cells were cautious in their tac- 
tics, planting the explosives in the middle of the oighL 

But in recent weeks, the guerrillas have walked into 
downtown banks and business offices during working 
hours and left the time bombs along with leaflets 
wanting of the impending explosion. 

Beleaguered by almost weekly bombings by the 
group this fall, the government took the unusual step 
of mobilizing six companies of army commandos to 
assist tbe police. 

But criminology and terrorism experts say that 
fundamental changes are needed in the police force. 

Police and government officials admit that despite 
serious outbreaks of terrorism in neighboring coun- 
tries such as West Germany and Italy in tbe 1970s, 
Belgium failed to prepare its security forces to fight 
that kind of threat 

"Belgians could never believe something like this 
could happen here." said Christian Lepage, a Brussels 
police commissioner. “ We thought we knew 
everything.” 

Mr. Lepage placed part of the blame for police 
deficiencies on inadequate training and funds. Until 
1979, for example. local police forces were not re- 
quired to send recruits to a training school. Many of 
them, he said, learned as they worked from older 
officers. 



In Geneva, 
But Refuses 



To Say Why 


--4 

CypnisAiTests Armed Man ^ 

LARNACA. Cyprus (Reuters) — A man who tried to board aaaj^ 
withguflS and grenades bidden made wuie bottte to *» band W, 
was remanded in custody Wednesday for eight days by a Cyppa®^ 
Pobcesaid they were looting for two other men as posable 


Sami All Maroun Ns*. as mum u> owuy F5&I 
358, which was on a stopover Tuesday during a Zancn to Amnia fu,. 
They said he had a Jordanian passport and was beheved tobes 

Palestinian. . . 


Roden 

GENEVA — Terry Waite, tbe 
special envoy from the Church of 
England who is trying to secure tbe 
release of four American hostages 
held in Lebanon, arrived here 
Wednesday but refused to com- 
ment on the purpose of his visit. 

In response to inquiries, Mr. 
Waite said: “I don’t want to speak. 
Tm not here." 

Diplomatic sources said that Mr. 
Waile, 46. met informally with offi- 
cials of the International Red Cross 
during a brief stop in Geneva early 
this month and that he intended to 
follow up tbe talks. 

A Rea Cross spokeswoman said 
only that there were no formal 
plans for a meeting. 

Hold staff said that Mr. Waite, 
the lay representative of the Most 
Reverend Robert Ruurie. tbe arch- 
bishop of Canterbury, arrived from 
London. He was due to leave Fri- 


Palestioian. 


The police said the man had three hand grenades, twopistob, a &%£ 
and 91 rounds of amm unition concealed in Chianti bottles that had 
sawed off at the base and reseated. 


Protests Disrupt Spam’s Basque Region 


PAMPLONA. Spain (Reuters) — Several demo nstrators wore 
Wednesday in clashes with the police during widespread protests ^ 
northern Spain against the death of a Basque man arrested by 
paramilitary Civil Guard, police sources aj«L 
In Navarre province, where the man, Mikel Zaoalza, 32, was ■ 
protesters threw gasoline bombs at police, who fired rubber bage^ 1 
Several protesters were injured and a pouceman suffered bunts. Witness, 
es said a journalist was taken to a hospital after being beaten by polk* 
with riot sticks in San Sebastiin. 

Four perrons were detained in Bilbao, where demonstrators set fire u , 
barricades. A general strike brought the province of Giuptocoa to a 
standstill and slowed other Basque provinces. Mr. Zabalza’s body was 
found in the Bidassoa River 19 daw after he disappeared wftikia 
custody. 


day for Lebanon. 

Mr. Waite has been negotiating 
with the kidnappers in Beirut but 
has not identified them or any 
group to Much they may belong. 

He has said he would try to hold 
talks next with officials from Ku- 
wait, wfaiefa has jailed 17 Arab 
guerrillas on bombing charges, Ku- 
waiti officials have said they would 
oppose any deal to five the 17 in 
return for the Americans' release, 
and Mr. Waite was denied a Ku- 
waiti entry visa last week. 

The hostages are Terry A. An- 
derson, a correspondent of The As- 
sociated Press; tbe Reverend Law- 
rence Martin Jen co, a Roman 
Catholic priest; David P. Jacobsen, 
director of the American Universi- 
ty hospital in Beirut; and Thomas 
M. Sutherland, tbe university’s act- 
ing dean of agriculture. 

In Damascus, meanwhile, rival 
Lebanese militias started joint talks 
with Syrian leaders in a fresh at- 
tempt to break the stalemate over a 
plan to cod Lebanon's civil war. 

The talks followed separate 
meetings between Vice President 
Abdel Halim Kbaddam and repre- 
sentatives of the Christian Leba- 
nese Forces militia, the matnly- 
Drnze Progressive Socialist Party 
and the Shiite Amal militia 


Windows were shattered at this gas company bonding on 
Oct 8 when a car bomb exploded in Brussels. Tbe Fighting 
Communist Cells claimed responsibility for the attack. 


Disunity Among Yugoslav Republics 


TRAVELLERS REA SS U RED 1 WA TER 
IN BOMBA Y SAFE TO DRINK'. 


Paralyzes Leadership, Slows Economy 


By Henry Kamm 

New York Times Service 


cal force admits that its own appeal 
is waning, 


stepped at his choosing are a thing 
of the past. A nine-member coHeo- 


Based on his long and intimate acquaintance with 
Bombay our foreign correspondent writes: 

"Of all the things that people drink in Bombay, 
water has never figured prominently, ==■■ 

Most prefer Tonic in Bombay, Mar- 
tini in Bombay or Orange in Bombay. V~S 
Indeed, anything that one woulii 
usually mix in Bombay. 

But. let me assure you, there 
Is no need to stay dear | 


of the water. 

Those rumours 
which infer that 
water does not mix 
with this most 
distinctive of Im- 
ported London Dry i 
Gins are well and _ j 
truly ill-founded." 



BELGRADE — Three hundred 
households in Serbia canceled dec- 
ide service in November. With an 
80-percent rate of inflation this 
year and a 73-percent rise in the 
cost of living, the residents could 
no longer afford iL 
Throughout the country, when- 
ever a train crosses from one of the 
six constituent republics to the 
□ext, the engine has to be changed. 
While countries elsewhere in Eu- 
rope move toward integration, the 
Yugoslav republics ever more 
Strongly assert their rights within 
the same country. 


Y ugoslavia’s economic problems tive state presidency, comprising 
are severe and its political disorder one representative for each repub- 


is complex. Yugoslav officials, like tic and autonomous province plus 
foreign diplomats here, say they see the president of tbe Communist 


little chance of reversing ibe eco- Party Presidium, exercises the du- 
nomic decline or of restoring unity, ties of the head of state. 


Yugoslavia has a foreign debt of Elected for terms ranging from 


Seoul Tells U.S. Reporter to Leave 


SEOUL (AP) — Timothy Elder, a Tokyo-based correspondent fix Tbe 
Washington Tunes, left Souih Korea on Tuesday after bong dedamj 
persona non grata and adviawl by authorities to go quickly. >,. . 

A South Korean official said that Mr. Elder, 34, had been dedaad 
undesirable because of a siorv he wrote saying that President Chan Doo 
Hwan of South Korea and President Kim 11 Sung of North Korea met 
secretly on Nov. 9 in the demilitarized zone that divides the peninsula. 

Souih Korean officials in Seoul and Washington have vehemently 
denied the story, saying it was based on “rumors and speculation." The 
Washingto n Times is owned by members of the Unification Church, 
headed by tbe South Korean evangelist, the Reverend Sun Myung Moon. 


Kaunda Urges Effort on African Trade 


LUSAKA. Zambia — President 
Kenneth Kaimda of Zambia urged 
a group of IS black African states 
Wednesday to bury their differ- 
ences and work together for eco- 
nomic i m provement as officials 
from the countries met to review 
efforts to set up a free-trade zone. 

Opening a meeting of the Prefer- ^ 
curia! Trade Area, Mr. Kaunda 
said the members faced enormous 
problems in developing (bear econ- 
omies. He said tbe group, which 
aims to create a common market of 



up to 20 countries by 1992, was 
vital because the continent's black 


$20 billion. Since 1980, real wages, one to four years, the president, 
the measure of purchasing power, Radovan Vlajkovic; prime minis- 


have declined by nearly one-third, ter, MRka Pianino, and party chief , 
Most households in this nation of Vidoje Zarkovic, hold their posts in 


22-6 million people are significant- comparative anonymity until they 
ly worse off today than they were are relieved by others whose names 
five years ago. Unemployment are equally unf amiliar to the aver- 


five years ago. Unemployment are equally unfamiliar to the aver- 
stands at 1.2 million, or 13 percent age citizen. 


Ivory Coast 
Resumes Ties 


states had been economically de- 
pendent upon tbe industrialized 
world for too long. “There is an 
imperative need to consolidate our 
unity of purpose,” be said. 

Zambia, Zimbabwe, Burundi 
and Tanzania are represented at 
the two days of talks by their heads 
of state, while the other countries 
— Comoro Islands, Djibouti, Etbi- 


J2£i|t j 


strongly assert tneir rigors witmn 0 f the labor force. Real power resides in the repab- 

tne same counhy. “Economic stagnation has lies and provinces, whose legzsLa- 

Mean white, cite ruling Commit- reached tbe limits of social and cures tell their members of thoTed- 
nist Parly, known here as the political tolerance,” said Zivorad eral Assembly bow to vote. Laws 
League of Communists, announced Kovacevic, a member of tbe cabi- most be passed by “consensus,” 
in November that 75,000 members, net, the Federal Executive Council, meaning, m fact, u n a nim ity, 
most of them bine-collar workers. The republic that Tito founded Announcing the government's 


With Israel 


opia, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, 
Mauritius, Rwanda, Somalia, Swa- 


Mauritius, Rwanda, Somalia, Swa- 
ziland and Uganda — have sent 
senior ministers. 



Kenneth Kaunda 


The Associated Press 


League of Communists, announced 
in November that 75,000 members, 
most of them bine-collar workers, 
had turned in their parly cards last 
year. 

With its economy in crisis and 
the country in need of determined 
leadership, as even Yugoslav offi- 
cials concede, political disarray is 
paralyzing decision- making, and 
the party that allows no rival politi- 


Annotmcing the government's 


at tbe end of World War II and ted program for economic change at a 
with a firm hand until his death in news conference in November, Mr. 


1980 has become a quarreling, Kovacevic said, “1 am not sure that 
loose confederation of six effective- parliament and the public will fully 


ly autonomous republics and two 
nearly equally independent prov- 


i these measures." 

: program was produced tra- 


inees. Yugoslav officials and for- der pressure from tbe international 


eign diplomats said. 


Monetary Fund, creditor govera- 


The League of Communists, the meats and the 610 commercial 
only political party, has become banks to which Yugoslavia owes 


eight separate party organizations $20 billion. 


with equal representation in the Mr. Kovacevic seemed to be un- 


in tEb e ©igft Court of Justice (€nglanb) 

Chancery Dlvlson 


collective federal leadership. Tbe derst&ting the situation. Tbe sepa- 
coUective leadership cannot impose rate interests of Yugoslavia’s re- 


decisions on the Federal Assembly gions preclude the adoption of 


or on the constituoit republics. most of the program in its present 
Diplomacy and the military oon- form. 


tin ue firmly in the government’s Mr. Kovacevic, an economics 


INTHE MATTER of 

CENTAUR INTERNATIONAL INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED 

and 

IN THE MATTER of 

THE CONCORD REINSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED 

and 

IN THE MATTER of 

M ARB ARCH INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED 


hand. Bui few other powers are specialist who studied in the Unit- 


No. 006262 oft 985 


centralized. 

The far-reaefain 
Yugoslavia’s repui 


ed States, noted this when he said 
autonomy of that the ddfereo^ between Slove- 
cs and prov- ma, the most developed republic. 


GENEVA — Israel and the Ivo- 
ry Coast announced Wednesday 
that they were resuming diplomatic 
relations that were severed after the 
1973 Middle East war. 

The announcement was made af- 
ter a meeting in Geneva between 
F6Iix Honphoufit-Boigny, presi- 
dent of tbe Ivory Coast, and Prime 
Minister Shimon Peres of Israel 

Mr. Peres said be expected that 
relations also would be re-estab- 
lished soon with two other African 
countries, bat be declined to name 
than. 

A joint communiqu& read by the 
Israeli Foreign Ministry said that 
Mr. Peres expressed his support at 
die meeting “/or the policy of dia- 
logue and of peace of President 
Houpboutt-Boigny.” 

The Israeli prime minister, h 
said, “expressed his conviction that 


Guatemala’s New Leader Visits U.S. 


WASHINGTON (WPJ — Marco VinjrioCerezo, the president-elect of 
Guatemala, on a visit here, has proclaimed a position of “active neutral- 


icy” in Central America’s conflicts. 

Mr. Cerezo, who wtB become tbe first civilian president in Guatemala 
in 31 years, said his “active neutrality" would mem "a more aggressive 


presence in the affairs of Central America,” including a push for a 
Central American parliament as a forum for rational discussions. 


Central American parliament as a forum for regional discussions. 

Mr. Cerezo met for 20 minutes on Wednesday with Vice President 
Gouge Bush, who accepted an invitation to attend Mr. Cerezo" s inaugu- 
ration Jan. 14. 


For the Record 


The conviction of Jeffrey R. MacDonald, a former army doctor in the 
Green Berets who was found guilty of the 1970 murders of his wife and 


two daughters, was upheld Wednesday by a U.S. Appeals Court in 
Richmond, Virginia. He says a band of hippies Idled his family. (AP) 


that policy is applicable also within 
the context of ihe-MtdiSe East." 


No. 006281 Of 1985 


races was enshrined in the 1974 and Kosovo, the least cteraoped 
constitution, Tito's work, but did province, were greater than. those 


not become reality until his death, between the United States and Yu- 
Tbe legal bounds chat Tito over- goslavia. 


No. 006260 011985 


IN THE MATTER of 

SHASTA REINSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED 

and 

IN THE MATTER of 
THE COMPANIES ACT, 1985 


No. 006263 of 1985 


Nobel Peace Laureates 
Meet With Gorbachev 


3n t Supreme Court of J&crmuba 


IN THE MATTER Of 

CENTAUR INTERNATIONAL INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED 

and 

INTHE MATTER of 

THE CONCORD REINSURANCE COMPANY UMfTED 

and 

IN THE MATTER of 

MARBARCH INSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED 

and 

IN THE MATTER of 

SHASTA REINSURANCE COMPANY LIMITED 

and 

INTHE MATTER of 
THE COMPANIES ACT, 1981 


1985: No. 336 


1985: No. 334 


1985: No. 335 


1985: No. 333 


Reuters 

MOSCOW — The American 
and Soviet doctors who won this 
year’s Nobel Peace Prize met the 
Soviet leader. MtkbaQ S. Gorba- 
chev, on Wednesday and said they 
had urged him to extend a halt to 
nuclear testing. 

Dr. Yevgeni Chazov, a Soviet 
deputy health minister, and Dr. 
Bernard Lawn of Harvard, said 
they had talked for more than two 
hours with Mr. Gorbachev, mainly 
on the aims of their organization, 
the International Physicians for tbe 

Prevention of Nudear War. 

Speaking at a news conference, 
tbe two defended the group's goals. 
The award to tbe organization 
caused controversy in the West be- 
cause ol Dr. Chazov’s rede as a 
senior Soviet official and his signa- 


ture of a letter critical of the Soviet 
dissident Andrei D. Sakharov. 

Dr. Lown, a cardiologist, said 
that the two men had pressed Mr. 
Gorbachev to extend a suspension 
on nuclear testing doe to rod Jan. 
L Moscow declared tbe moratori- 
um in July. 

“The impression I received -was 
that the Soviet Union will ran. go on 
suspending testing forever, be 
said. 

Dr. Lown said that Mr. Gorba- 
chev told them a freeze could easily 
be verified and that Moscow was 
still hoping the United States 
would join it The United States 
has said ii will continue testing. 

Tbe Am e rican doctor said lie 
told Mr. Gorbachev', “Someone has 
to have the courage and statesman- 
ship'’ to hdp cod the arms race: 


the context of ute-Mtddte East." 

The two leaders will put the deci- 
sion to resume Tdattoos before 
their governments- for approval the 
communique said. 

In addition to white-ruled South 
Africa, the move would increase to 
seven (he number of African conn- 
tries that have formal relations with 
IsraeL The nation also has ties with 
Egypt, Malawi, Swaziland, Lesoto, 
Liberia, and Zaire. 

Israel also has “‘interest offices" 
in a number, of otter African coun- 
tries. the Foreign Ministry said. 


Richmond. Virginia. He says a hand at hippies Killed ms ranuiy. 

A former assistant secretary of the navy, George A. Sawyer, was cleared 
Tuesday Of chajges that he concealed his job interviews with a majoc 
military contractor. General Dynamics Corp-i during his final months ip 
the Pentagon. (Art 

Finance Minister Aooad AbM-MaguM of Sudan resisted Wednesday 
after the government failed to endorse a draft accord Ire had negotiated 
with the International Monetary Fund. ( Reuters i 

The Israeli Army dosed An-Nuah University at Nablus on Wednesday 
for the second consecutive day following weekend rallies on tbe West 
Bank campus in support of the Palestine Liberation Organization, an-' 
army spokeswoman said. (AP} 

President Saddam Hussein of Iraq returned to Baghdad on Tuesday 
.from a two-day visit to tbe Soviet Umon; diplomatic sources said he was. 
seeking more Soviet arms. (Reuters) 

Polish police detained on Wednesday two activists of the banned 
Solidarity trade muon, Henryk Wujec and Jacek Szymanderski, after 
searching their homes, opposition sources said (Reuters) 


Swedish Airline Bans 
Smoking on All Flights 


Correction 


The Associated Press 

STOCKHOLM — - The Swedish 
domestic airline Lrajeflyg will ban 
smoking on all its flights, wwirinp it 
tire first totally no-smoking airline 
in Eorope, offioals said. 


In a special report on diamonds published Dec. 10, an article on tfa< 
investment market overstated the decline since 1980 in (he asking pna 
for a one-carat D- Flawless diamond. The correct figure for the drop L 
84J percent. 


DOONESBURY 


would be no smoking on its flights 
beginning Jan. 20. It cited general 
health concerns and polls that 
show an overwhelming majority of 
passengers in favor of the measure. 
The airline transported 3,3 million 
passengers in tbe last fiscal year. 


U5TEN, 20NK, TH&REflSOH 
I CALLED ISTWT U&R£ 

. tm&cmoFmDeN 

j NEXTUEEKfiNDW&efXath 
- ay® HAVE A FAREWELL 
“ \a^w&MON. 


SINCE you CAN AFFORD & 

and i were 

HOPING VO(/p BEADLE ' 
TO FLY UP AND \XXN US 
FOR. THE FESTIVITIES! 


At Meetings of Scheme Creditors held in London on 4th December 1985, a .Scheme of 
Arrangement ("the Scheme") between the above named companies and their respective 
Scheme Creditors was approved by the required statutory majorities as to number and value . 


The Scheme is subject to the sanction of the Courts in England and Bermuda. The Scheme 
Companies will now petition those Courts (or such sanction. It is hoped that the hearings will 
take place on 20th January 1986 in England and on 31st January 1986 in Bermuda. If the 
Scheme is sanctioned by both Courts, it is hoped that it will become operative on or 
immediately after the latter date . 



Taiwan Flatus Collide; 2 Die 

The Associated Press 


TAIPEI — An F-5E jet Fighter 
allided with a T-CH-1 mujUry 


collided vritb a T-CH-1 nmjtaiy 
training, aircraft over central Tai- 
wan on 'Tuesday, lolling both air- 
men cm tbe trainer and seriously 
injuring tbe fighter pilot, the Unit- 
ed Daily News- reported Wednes- 
day; 


LMuumMt&rr, 

***** '~ rt ' "LOVELY 
TSKAB. 












LV 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1985 


Page 3 



• Stuart Auerbach . edon C^toIHni before he actual- 

vV v aubgftn MMer iy signed foe veto. 

-i^tfHINCTW Present lie bill, as approved by Cour 
s h? $«*> would have rolled bade tex- 

•V * & and clothing shipments from 

*e three toSsappBw-Tai- 
“ A,;hc Umted States. wan, Korea and Hong Koog-by 

' wevgr, ht delayed foe action as modi as 30 percent 

late. Tues day night to avoid. Tie growth o{ ladle sKpoimts 
' '.*^ on ™££ fflemoMS of tbe from aroe other major suppliers, all 

•*|e <rf uSSS- Adan countlies w*th the exception 

** Braz3 » ta« been limited 

. o ovohanl the lax system. pennanentiy to 1 peroenl a year. 
: “damaging effects” of. the Shoe imports wanM hme tyyn Kwy 
quota baPrirould soon be ited far eight years to 60 percent of 
. . y every American fo the form the US. tsarist, and juggage im- 

- .-her prices and shrinking eco- ports also would have faced restric- 
. > growth," Mr. Reagan said in lions, 
ft of his message that drealat- A White House official said the 


president delayed Ins veto because 
“it would just cloud foisgsup" to 


Textile, Shoe Imports 


deal with a trade Ml that had expanded in the Senate to include 
strong support in the Senate and the copper and shoe sectors in an 


, The measure started as a Ml to los Moore, executive vice president 
trap the textile industry but was of the American Textile Manu/ao- 
expanded in the Senate to include cures institute, vowed the legisla- 


Housein the midst of the tax de- attempt toswdJ the number of sup- 
bate. The presafem, who faced a porters. It passed both houses by 


midnight Tuesday deadl ine for his comfortable margins, but in neither 
signed it shortly before II case was the victory margin enough 
P.M. to override a veto. 

The l^tation had become foe The bin had bipartisan support, 
weapon for a bipartisan attack on centered largely in the textile and 


o overhaul the tax system, 
s “damaging effects” of. the 


the U-S- trade deficit, which is ex- 
ported to soar to a record $150 
billion this year. Imports were 
blamed for factory dosings and 


lottery Was Tool in Winning Tax Bill Converts 


- ■ By Dale Russakoff 

' t - £7 WesUagien Pan Service 
- , WASHINGTON — President 
' -'aid Reagan may have wanted 
Jk taxes when he invited Rep- 
native Steven Gunderson to 

^^tyyooog Republican coogrcss- 
; i from dairy country wanted to 
• -- •: cows. So they did. 

: " : y the time foe session was over, 
•• .r Vi men had what they wanted. 

Gunderson knew Mr. Reagan 
■ i.- f;dd sigB the farm bill sought by 
V. ‘niraL Wisconsin district; Mr. 
knew Mr. Gunderson 
~.-.-' T . nld help try to rescue sweeping 
. '^overhaul legislation in the 
v-l.ase. 

■'I told him my fanners needed a 
nee in agriculture," said Mr. 
n Ifd ttdeaon. 34, “and so I think it 
(Xily right to give the president 

- chance on tax reform. I think 

- watt’s a sensible way for adults to 

.j jod that's the way business was 
Sr e Tnoday-up and down the 
i - ‘ mbtican md Democratic aisles 
g/- j be House as Mr. Reagan and 
Democratic leaders picked 
5 foe votes needed to resuscitate a 
t ‘ hflT: that many members said 
%= jh/ywisbfldwouldgo away, 
j, . J ‘‘ n a surprise move only a week 


Many Republicans 
lined up behind the 
bill because the 
president finally 
had treated them as 
players in 
Washington 
politics* 



the copper and shoe sectors in an tive battle would continue. “We are 
attempt to swell the number of sup- aot going io go away,” he said, 
pottos. It pa ssed b oth house % Despite the bill’s strong support 
comfortable margins, but in neither in Congress — at one point more 
case was the victory margin enough than half die Senate and two-thirds 
to override a veto. of the House had lined up as oo- 

lite Ml bad bipartisan support, sponsors — a presidential veto was 
centered largely in the textile and never in doubt White House aides 
is ax- apparel-producing states of the opposed the bill in Congress, caB- 
$150 . Southeast and the Northeast, its ing it highly protectionist, 
were major opposition came from law- “It is my firm conviction that the 

and makers from farm states and ex- economic and human costs of such 
port-oriented states of the Pacific a bill run far loo high — costs in 
. Northwest, who felt their coostitu- foreign retaliation against U.S. ex- 
eats would suffer most from retali- ports, loss rtf American jobs, losses 
anon. - jo American businesses and dam- 

In anticipation of the veto. Car- age to tire world trading system on 

which our prosperity depends,” 

‘ Mr. Reagan aid in the draft veto 

l Converts 7*^ ** * ^ 

import-battered textile industry in 
week, Mr. Reagan promised that his draft message while ignoring 
Ms Council on Economic Policy the complaints of shoe and copper 
would investigate whether import makers. 

•quotas should be imposed on ma- According to the draft, be or- 
'dtine tools, a staple of Mr. Henry’s dered Commerce Secretary Mal- 


losses of manufacturing jobSu.Sup- port-oriented states of the Pacific 
porters of the measure said imports . Northwest, who felt their constitu- 


had eliminated 356J100 jobs in the ents would suffer most from reiali- 
U.S. textik, shoe and copper indus- anon. 

tries. In anticipation of the veto, Car- 


prospericy depends,” 
said in the draft veto 



wtf 


district 


colm Baldrige to investigate textile 


Generally, the Republicans who industry charges that imports are 
changed their mind nmf up surging into the United States in 
behind tax overhaul came from the amounts greater than allowed by 
Northeast and Middle West Few international agreements, 
converts emerged in areas depen- Mr. Moore of the textile institute 

dent on timber, oU or minin g a fl said tactile imports had doubted 
industries that are likely to pay sioce 1980 and now accounted for 


The president also directed 


Steven Gunderson 


cratic and Republican converts ap- And in response to a request Washington politics. 


to visit Capitol Hill on Monday Trade Representative Clayton K. 
and to acknowledge the oft-ignored Yeuaer to take a strong stand in 
House Republicans as players in negotiations that have just started 


for a new bnemationa] pact cover- 


pear to have heard contradictory from Representative Ran! B. Henry “Thai way, people can vote for a ing trade in textiles and apparel 
messages in the president's prom- of Michigan, another Republican bill they may not like and say: We called the Multi-Fiber Arrange- 
Lses. On Tuesday, each side needed who voted against the bill last won,” Mr. Vander Jagt said. meat 

the other, and almost nobody came — — ■ — — — — — 

away feeling empty-handed. 

«£ * £s& Reason’s ’87 Budget Would Halt Aid 

day because he said he believed Mr. O - O 

Ragan would veto the bill unless nr} jt n • jn f TT~h * 


w^dtaed consideration of the tax “I just don't bdiev 
ALl Gn Toesday, Mir. Gnnderson hear about this HD fre 
W .55 other rebels, indndipg such Mr. Fowler said. 

WpubBcan leaders such as Repre- Mr. Vander Jagt st 
dilative Jack F. Kemp of New for the legislation bet 
/ Tk. reversed themsdves and sup- pects the Senate to a 
rted the president- _ more Republican. A 

Few ctfihe Republican cot verts Democ rats said they did so because 
d they changed their opinion of they hope the Shmi* will mi H. 
j tax bill’s merits. Mr. Guilder- Some inming»r« ca 
J called it “awfuL” Representa- foe Reagan fold for i 
A Henry J. Hyitle of nhnois said might repel the p resit 
J “demised" it. Rwresentalive sentative SSvio O. Cor 
Jmy Vander Jagt of Michigan can of Massachusetts, I 
it “seriously flawed.” said he hopes the Sex 

tat mtKt said thcy fdt they had foe bill as a v ehicte n 
V'-iTin something; froni Mr. Ragan. ^ Ic d uce foe deficit 
it a little attention, a promise to He said Reagan mat 
, . ,,0 the bill unless the Senate ally emotional appeal 

t ■ trends it or, in cases Hke Mr. Gun- telephone last week, bt 

■sot’s, a special favor for a nothing u> do with his switch. 

; tase member or his district “He said if this w, 

: 'fever mind that Mr. Reagan around, be'd be an ind 
foably would have signed foe idem and he couldn't c 
-m WH anyway or that Mr. Gun- anyone in 1986," Mr. 

. ~ --son already had decided out of “in politics, you alwa 
.-■ally to Mr. Reagan to vole for window open. I said: ‘1 
- lax ML about it’ W Td ahea 

. . Never wind, also, that Demo- mv mind.” 


more taxes under the measure. . 45 percent of U3. retail sales. \ YYlD1*l/»OnC L 
Mr. Vander Jagt said many oth- Mr. Reagan said he would tight- xaJUKyJL IL-ill lo 1 
ers changed their postion because eo administrauve and enf o rc e ment 

they fell that they had won the procedures if the industry charges By Robert C Siner 
battle even before me war was over, proved true. imlmatUmal Herald rmw 

They had persuaded the president The president also directed WASHINGTON The tax re- 

to visit Capitol Hill on Monday Trade Representative Clayton K. fonn m ^ ^ House ^ 
and to artaiowtedge the oft-ignored Yewrer to take a strong stmjd m Reprcscnt^onTuesday would 
House Republicans as players m negotiations foot have just started jgnooo earned income 

Washingimi pohtics. for a nw mtematwna] pact cover- wclusioil for Americans living 

“That way, people can vote for a mg hade in texala and apparel abroad to j 7 5i000 ^ ^cci aU 
bill they may not like and say: We called the Multi-Fiber Arrange- uxpayers who use foe excision to 
won,” Mr. Vander Jagt said. menL ammmnm lax. 

— 1 If the tax bin is approved by the 

__ . _ __ Am* Senate and signed bv President 

’Budget Would Halt Aid tt&zfSiFSz 
ice. End Commerce Panel 225Mt5ft 


SALUTE TO DC-3 — The woridiorse of the air, the Douglas DC-3, is malting its 50th 
anniversary. The first test flight of the twin-engine transport, nicknamed “the gooney 
bird,** was over Santa Monica, California, on Dec. 17, 1935. From left, Donald W. 
Douglas Jr., board member of McDonnell Doogias Corp.; Arthur Raymond, one of the 
plane's designers; and Bailey Oswald, an aerodynamicist on the original plane. 

Bill Would Trim Exclusion, Subject 
Americans Abroad to Minimum Tax 


salary, allowances, interest, and To illustrate how the minimum 
dividend income to find “net tax- tax would work, consider a married 
able income.” He would subtract overseas taxpayer who earns 
from this a “threshold amount” of $120,000 in salary and allowances 
$40,000 (130,000 for a single tax- and has personal exemptions and 
payer) arid his personal exemptions deductions of $20,000. leaving 
and deductions, or take foe stan- S 100.000. 
dard deduction. The taxpayer , , fc _ 


Sk PViJT Reagan’s ’87 Budget Would Halt Aid 

day because he said he believed Mr. O - O burden for many Americans work- 

Rragan would veto the bill unless m w-y n i ri I /I TTk 1 ing overseas. 

fc^*Mssr5 To Farm Service, End Commerce Panel 

By Robert Peax 

Mr Rmom WHS Kiirffino Tor* Ti»» Sen*r cnunents pay for goods and ser- ers, and IS credited with making a “r 

' . , j,- & .. t WASHINGTON — President vices ranging from police protec- major contribution to productivity. 

I just don t beli eve a nything 1 Ronald Reagan’s draft budget for lion and day care to computers and It is part of a cooperative network “ininisratJOTs^padcage does not 
hear about this biD from now on, ^ i987 fiscal ^ 

Mr. Fovrier smd. the staff of the Social Security Ad- 

Mr. Vander Jagt said he voted ministration, abolish foe Interstate 
for the legislation because he ex- Commerce Commission and end 


would then take 25 percent of what i Jnder woold 

an<. Mi «i% rmH thimli^ninn subunct the $80,000 mcome exclu- 

f-w 

using the $75,000 exclusion and abOU ‘ S "* 5 °° 

pay whichever was greater. m U ’ S ’ mes - 

The minimum (ax could be re- If the new rules are enacted, the 
duced by applying CTedit for in- taxpayer would subtract the 
coroe taxes paid to a foreign gov- $40,000 threshold amount from foe 
erament. In many high-tax 5100,000. leaving 560.000. His 
countries, such as those in northern minimum tax would be 25 percent 
Europe, the foreign tax credit can of that, or SI 5,000. Using the 
substantially reduce or even totally $75,000 exclusion, he would find 
offset the U.S. taxes. The foreign his U.S. tax would be about $3,500. 


for the legislation because he ex- Commerce Commission and end pervasive federal programs, affect- 
pects the Senate to make the hill federal support for the agricul tural' mg virtually every UJS. county, 
more Republican. At least two Extension Service. While Mr. Reagan’s budget does 

Dcanocrats said fordid so because The commerce commissioxi, es- not seek to cut SodalSecurity 
they hope the Senate will loll h. tablisbed in 1887, is the oldest fed- benefits, it would propose trim- 


tion and day care to computes and It is part of a cooperative network . .. - - . 

mass mmsiL that mdudes 177 federal employees UXralBfor 

Revenue sharing and the Exten- and 16.000 state and county work- a&roa o. . 

sion Service are wro of the most era v Un T r P"*”? 1 , 

Tect- Federal budget officials said that abroad may exclude SSO.OQO of m- 
: ;r come earned abroad from U3. m- 

f- £ the serncewks worth presemn^ come taxes. The figure is due to rise 

«<** toJSS^forSeSLd^ 

1987 * 10 S90.000 in 1988 and 
$95,000 in 1989. The House bffl 


Some mutineers came bade to eral i^ulatory agency. The Exien- 
the Reagan fold for reasons that ^on Service gives technical and 
Bright repel the president. Repre- scientific advice to fanners, 
sentative SQvioO. Conte, RepuMi- Administration officials said 
can of Massachusetts, for example. Tuesday that the proposals were 
said he hopes the Senate will use ^ a $50-bfllkm narfrugr of 
the bin as a vehicle to raise taxes spending cuts and fee increases 


tax credit is not subject to the mini- 
mum tax. 


Bui he would have to pay foe great- 
er of toe two, or $]5,000. 


( artier 



He said Reagan made an unosu- $144 billion, foemaxinnim allowed 
ally emotional appeal to him by by a new law aimed at balancing 
telephone last week, but foal it had foe budget by 1991. 


Tuesday that foe proposals were monthly cash benefits io 37 mulion 
part of a $50- billion package of people, now has 78,950 employees, 
spending cuts and fee increases . Under foe president's proposal, 
needed' to bold the T987 deficit to foe-interstate Commerce Conhnb- 


ining 3,000 exapkiyeesfrom the So- • sSJS S 

cial Security Administration and foe counties, federal officials ^ k at ^ ^ 
through attrition, budget nffiriak said. nitdv 

Issrs.'sans: 


sion would go out of business in its terms, than any other society in the 
nemenniiil year. The agency was world.” he said. “A major reason is 


vim - 

The draft budget proposal was fnr 

criticized by Lee R. Kolmer, dean . 01 c ^ a consequence for 
of ihe conege of Africulnm u Ihoy »ho u«= ■!.. ^dos. 0 . .. te 

ss» , ss: tahm l 

We^pend less for food, in real T o find foe minimum tax an 

overseas taxpayer would total his 



The administration’s budget for 


“He aud if this wsnt turned 1987 , which begins next OcL 
around, be d be an ineffective pres- 1, will not become public until it is 
idem and he couldn't campaign for submitted to Congress in February, 
anyone in 1986,” Mr. Conte said. The decisions have been tentatively 


created to regulate the rates of rafl- thai agriculture in tins country has 

roads, which had been accused of adopted science and technology at ni.rt' p c* i,.. 
unfair, monopolistic practices. a very rapid rate. But new technd- Edllippme Ferry 31I1KS, 
Since 1935 foe commission has ogy doesn’t just gp from the re- Q RmuhimI 107 Micsreifr 
had authority to regulate trucking search laboratory to foe point of m***"*^ 


companies arid bus lines. 


my mind. 


Mr. Reagan’s 1987 budget also 
would save $760 million by dimi- 


In recent years, many econo- agent. The Extension Service is the 
mists have said such regulation in- transfer agent” 
hibited vigorous competition. Earlier, it was disclosed foal foe 


production without some transfer 7X* Associated Pros 

' pat- The Extension Service is the MANILA — A passenger ferry 
rnsfer agent” capsized and sank Wednesday off 

Earlier, it was disclosed foal foe the central island of Mindoro, and 


q E S 
D E E 


artiefi. 

A I l l I E P S 

I 1 I 

II III I I 


p s VsN 

1 1 s x 

E I E 


N. Y. Jewelers 
_ ace Tax Charges 

New Yort Times Service 

-4EW YORK — The president 
the controller of Van Geef A 
■ v ods Inc. have been indicted on 
•• u]ga of scheming to bdp cus- 
. acre evade city and state sales 
es On more than $4.6 million in 
. 'diy. 

•s- 

. Zlaude Arpels, 74, foe president 
i A1 Schwartz, 66, foe controDer, 


Mr. Conte, sporting a Reagan- nating the last quarterly payment 
'signature tie dasp, said his vote did of revenue-sharing funds autho- 
not signal new loyalty to foe While rized by current law. The money 


normally would be disbursed in the other industries. 


James C. Miller 3d, director of the draft budget calls for selling the 197 people were missing and feared 
Office of Management and Budget, Federal Housing Administration to drowned, foe Philippine News 
has been a leading proponent of “private bidders.” The agency is Agency reported, 
deregulation in transportation and basically a giant mortgage insur- Only three persons were rescued 


deregulation in transportation and basically a giant mortgage insur- Only three persons were rescued 
other industries. ance company that has provided after foe ferry Asuncion sank, foe 

Tbe Extension Service, founded in s uran ce for 51 million home buy- agency quoted the Philippine Coast 
in 1914, translates research into ers in its 50 years of existence. Guard as saying. 


Five years tbe/ve been m of- first week of October 1986 to Tbe Extension Service, founded in s uran ce for 51 million home buy 
nee. lheyve_ given me zuen. I’ve 39,000 counties, cities and towns. in 1914, translates research into ers in its 50 years of existence 

gotten nothing except this tie ; 

dasp.” he exclaimed, waving a ci- 

gar . 

^ But^ome Republicans said .t^y 'foull always be recognised by your taste in Scotch. 

home about. Representative FM'Jf '‘Jj- "W . r . 

George W. Gekas, Republican of . . vt * 

Pennsylvania, agreed to vote “yes” AHj "W'cjyfi •* 

after Treasury Secretary James A. KHT i fjp 'Ms 9 +•*'’ «Hkv‘ 

Baker 3d promised last week to smXL * jJT » ■ M' ' f *^**"‘" ' 

study his proposal to stagger foe Tw *y V / ^fiC - -«w 


THE 90TH AND 30TH OF DECEMBER 

.Cartier 

WILL BE OPENED IN PARIS AND MONTE-CARLO 
UNTIL 9 PM. 

MB : 13 RUE D£ LA ftMX - 12 AVENUE MONTAIGNE 23 RUE OU 
FAUBOURG SAINT-HONORt - 7 PLA« VENDOwiE - 23 PLACE 
VENDOiME- HOTEL GEORGE V: 31 AVENUE GEOBGE-V- HOTEL HILTON- 
18 AVBJUE DE SUFTHEN - MONTE-CARLO : PLACE DU CASINO. 




aded not gtrilty Monday in State fifing dates for income tax returns. 


preme Court in Manhattan to An aide to the coogressman said 
trees cri conspiracy, falsifying Mr. Gekas helped block tbe bin last 
tiness records and fading to col- week largely because it allowed for 
t sales taxes over a five-year peri- no consideration of his plan on 

filing dates. 


WTT 

P* 




Your Partner 

for Commercial Events 
in the German Democratic Republic 


lajor Points of U.S. Tax Bill 

. — " Lot Angela Timet Service 

WASHINGTON — Here are highlights of what the tax bill approved 
foe House of Representatives would provide: 
nrirridual tax rates: The many brackets with rates ranging from 1 1 
cent to 50 percent collapse into four brackets with rates ranging from 
percent to 38 percent 

- ’ersoeal exemption: Increase from the current $1,040 to $2,000 in 
6, but effectively limited to Si ,500 for taxpayers who itemize deduc- 

taodard deduction: Increase to $2^50 for single people and $4,800 for 
^ypfcs, compared to the current zero-bracket amounts of $2^90 and 
540. 

-'ufivitlnal tax breaks: Two-earner deduction repealed. Mortgage inter- 
on a first and second home still folly deductible, bet other interest 
I unions limited to $20,000 per family. Dividend exduaon — $100 far 
' .^es, $200 for couples — repealed. Most other deductions. indodin| 
state and local tax payments, retained. Minimum tax raised to 25 
^.cent. 

' j frtiranent: Personal contributions to tax-deferred 401(k) accounts 

- c (led to $7,000, and maximum contributions to individual retirement 
' Mints reduced by $1 for each $1 contributed to a 401(k) plan. 

1 Corporate tax rates Top rate reduced to 36 peroenl from 46 percent. 

tesiaess tax breaks: Investment tax credit repealed- Business write- 
W ‘i for capital costs reduced. Only 80 percent of business meals and 
' ■ wtahunem expenses deductible- Many specific preferences for indus- 
leduced. Mimm nin tax expanded and boosted to 25 percent 













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• Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HF.il ALP TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1985 


Selling of SDI: A Deep Rift Among Researchers 


(Continued bin Plage 1) 
find the best way to convince the 
public at large, and Congress in 
particular, that we have a viable 
program, both technically and po- 
litically” 

From ihc start, program officials 
have acknowledged the need to 
Stirring demonstrations. Dr. Ger- 
okl Yooas, the program's chief sci- 
entist, told a Georgetown Universi- 
ty symposium in September 1984 
that one of the plan’s biggest dial' 
lenges would be to build public and 
congressional support, as well as 
gaining the support of U.S. allies. 
The task, he said, called for “visible 
technology achievements.” 

In private. SDI officials have of- 
ten used acronyms evocative of 
salesmanship, especially in plan- 
ning for highly visible technology 
tests. The initial name for these was 
Beacon, for Bold Experiments to 
Advance Confidence. Later, the 
nam e for such a project became 
STAR, for Significant Technical 
Achievements and Research. 

Of the 1,000 or so contracts and 
projects in the SDI program, only 
about 10 reportedly have been se- 
lected for STAR roles. The criteria 
for their selection are whether a 
project is ™l™^ scientific gains 
and whether it can be evocative of 
technological advances. 

“Early on there was a series of 
Beacons that was rejected as being 
too showy,” said an official of a 
large aerospace firm, who added: 
“There is history to show that 
stunts are helpful, distasteful 
though they may be in some ways.” 

Examples are said to indude the 
bouncing of a laser beam off the 
space shuttle in June, the demob- 
turn of a stationary missile during a 
laser test in New Mexico in Sep- 
tember, and the destruction of a 
mock Soviet missile by a speeding 
projectile in November. 

According to past and present 


government officials, a STAR gets 
a lot of money and attention. In a 

of theprogram. Dr. Edward T-Ser^ 
a key promoter of the anti-missile 
plan and principal developer of the 
hydrogen bomb, told a London au- 
dience in June that major STAR 
prcgecu were expected to cost $500 
nrinkm to $2 bdlion each, and that 
several were anticipated in the next 
two or three years. 

The chief booster of such dem- 
onstrations is the director of the 
anti-missile plan, i iqitenant Gen- 
eral James A. Abrahamson of the 
air force, wbo has argued in speech- 
es and congressional testimony 
tha t breakthroughs are bong hmH> 
at an “incredible pace.” 


search stage. And I'm afraid the 
public is getting the opinion that 
it's closer than it really is." 

In November's Defense Week, a 
respected industry publication, re- 
searchers leveled an unusual blast 
of public criticism at what they 
viewed as oversetting. In an article 
titled “Expert Decries Harmful 
Hyperbole,’' Dr. Cornelius F. Coll 
3d, director of “star wars** system 
studies at the Livermore laborato- 
ry, charged that overstatements by 
Pentagon officials were imperiling 
the program. He also argued that 
estimates of the cost of an anti- 
missile defense we unrealistically 
low. 

“If s more important to tins lab 
that our technical credibility be 
‘Pl ained than it is that ‘star wars* 
becomes a reality," he added. 
“There's going to be life after ‘star 
wars.*" 


Scientists Level 
Blast of Criticism 

In October be told Congress that Oll 6 Mfitaohoil 
the New Mexico laser test “demon- I 

&£fiC*A£hc££ Captive Chicken 


Dr. Hageugrubersaid such sales- 
manship could imperil the design 
of experiments, especially those 
meant to test the destructive power 
of beam weapons. “There’s a desire 
to have very early demonstrations, 
to show lethality,” he *«id j adding 
such tests can be “contrived.” 

“U, for example, one was going 
to demonstrate the lethality of mi- 
crowaves, one could put a digital 
watch in the hoot of a microwave 
generator, blow the watch apart, 
and say microwaves kill watches.” 
hesaicL “For the lay public and 
Congress, that might be impres- 
sive.” 

“Bui,” he added, “it’s actually 
far removed from reality, and inter- 
feres in a way with more thoughtful 
experiments. These demonstra- 
tions have the potential to be what 
we call strap-down chicken tests, 
where you stinap the chicken down, 
blow it apart with a shotgun, and 
say shotguns kin chickens. But 


Abrahamson told a space technol- 
ogy conference in Colorado that 
the anti-xmsstte program bad re- 
cently succeeded in destroying a 
one- third-sized mockup of a Soviet 
SS-I8 missfle. 

Displaying a photograph of the 
splintered booster, he said the test 
demonstrated the anti-missile po- 
tential of the electromagnetic rail- 

gun, an exp erim ental kinetic ener- 
gy weapon that could be based in 
space. The audience, including 
hundreds of Pentagon officials, 
military industry executives and re- 
porters, broke into applause at the 
right of the crumpled booster. 

But in response to questions at a 
much smaller briefing later. Gener- 
al Abrahamson revealed that the 
damage had not been done by an 
electromagnetic raflgun but by a 
iuudened projectile fired from an 
air gun. The modern air gun was 
developed in France in the early 
18th century. 



he told the Philadelphia World Af- 
fairs Council that “surprising pro- 
gress” had been made that meant 
the United States could deploy a 
workable space shield ax least a 
decade sooner than expected. 

Such assertions, however, irritate 
scientists at the forefront of the 
anti-missile project, whose research 
has shown actual progress on put- 
ting into effect the president’s vi- 
sion of a “space shield.” 

“There are some things we can 
do,” said Dr. Miller of the liver- 
more laboratory, which employs 
8,000 workers and scientists. “We 
probably could bufld a strategic 
defense that would be 50-percent 
effective against the current Soviet 
threat, and that may be interesting. 
But we can't do what the president 
asked for. That's dearly in the re- 


High officials at several federal 
laboratories in California and New 
Mexico echoed the complaints of 
Dr. Coll and Dr. Miller, saying 
U.S. technical credibility was 
fhn aataned by sales pitches. 

‘There’s a real danger in this 
hype atmosphere for certain pro- 
grams tojpverpromise,” said Dr. 
Stephen D. Rockwood, director of 
“star wars" research at the Los Ala- 
mos National Laboratory in New 
Mexico, which employs 7,000 
workers. 

Dr. Hagengruber of the Sandia 
lab. which has 8,000 employees, 
said, “The more expensive a pro- 
gram is. and the more it gets to 
something as fundamsital as nu- 
clear weapons, the more impressive 
the merchandising efforts be- 
come.” 


Ural’s quite different from trying to ^ , T n 

kill a chicken in a dense forest CfltlCS 1USK Jail, 
while if • naming away from you.” 

Although Dr. HaattMcruber de- 
clined to cite t. 

outride the government 
pointed to the destruction of a mis- 
sile in New Mexico in September as 
more showmanship than science. 



The X-ray laser, 
right, powered by 
a nuclear bomb, 
corid in theory 
fire beams of radi- 
ation at enemy 
missies. Above, 
the underground 
test site in the Ne- 
vada desert 


Rocket 

engine 



Nuclear weapon (inside) 


racking 

telescope 


Dissidents in the Pentagon’s 
anti-missile program generally con- 
firm (heir criticism to policy trends. 
But in one case, however, ooncera- 


The stati ona r y motor casing in ing development of (he X-ray laser, 
the desert was meant to nrinne a researchers were so upset by what 
Soviet missile in flight, according they viewed as exa gg e ra tion and 
to Pentagon officials. Close-up hyperbole that they broke the secu- 
fflms and photos of the exploding ticylaws. 


missile were widely distributed and 


i X-ray laser device, powered 


“In every organization there are 
[>le who are more optimistic 
more pessimistic," he added. 
“Since we don’t impore stria cen- 
sorship, I'm sure there are some 
who think parts of the program 
won’t pay on in the way some other 
people have described them.” 

Dr. Y on a s , the program's chief 


a combination of the two, several 
future STAR projects are expected 
to revolve around laser tests on the 
space shuttle, according to scien- 
tists in government and industry. 
These are to demonstrate the abili- 
ty to find and trade moving targets, 
in rehearsal for pointing a weapon. 


shown repeatedly on television be- by a nuclear bomb, is meant to fire scientist, said he had fought a los- ShflDC of FlltUTC* 
fore the Geneva summit nwring . beams of radiation is space to de- ing battle to keep government offi- i 

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The weapon behind that test is 
known as Mimd, for Mid-Infrared 
Advanced Chemical Laser. It was 
built in the late 1970s by TRW Inc 
for the navy and was originally 
meant to investigate defense of 
U.S* ship* from enemy planes and 
missiles. Congress til fed that pro- 
gram. But the Mirad laser was later 
r es urr e ct ed by the Pentagon for le- 
thality tests, and in 1984 was as- 
sembled at the White Sands Missile 
Range in New Mexico, a top-se- 
cret, $300- million installatio n 


Mirad is “the free world’s high- nudear X-ray laser tests. In its 
est average-power laser,” according Nov. 8 issue, Samre magarin* a 


stroy enemy missiles. 

In April, Dr. Tefler alluded to X- 
ray laser breakthroughs in a speech 
at the University of California. 
Some time later, according to press 
he took the news to the 
rite House. Mr. Reagan later di- 
rected that an extra $100 rnttlion be 
channeled into the X-ray laser ef- 
fort. 

But anonymous rebels soon ob- 
jected to the purported advances, 
risking jail sentences to give jour- 
nalists top-secret details of 
r X-ray laser tests. 


to the Pentagon, although it looks 
more Hke a giant diesel engine. Its 
beam is fixed m< 1 cannot be direct- 
ed at moving targets. The laser’s 
drfirate mirrors, dozens in all, are 
fashioned so that beat is removed 
by the dzcnlatian of 9,000 gallons 
(34,000 tilers) of cold water. About 
370 people are needed to operate 
the laser rite.' 

In the test in September, the sec- 
raid stage of a Titan missile was put 
about half a mile from the laser. 
The casing, which carried no fuel, 
exploded after being irradiated by 
the Mirad beam for “several sec- 
onds,” Pentagon o fficials aid de- 
dimag to be more specific about 
the time. 

"This advance gives us greater 
confidence in- oar ability to focus 
the laser beam into a small spot at 
long range.” General Abrahamson 
told the Philadelphia World Affairs 
Council, hailing it as one of the 
program's “world-class break- 
throughs.” 

Critics outride (he government, 
however, note that in space an anti- 
missile laser would have to fire its 
beam thousands of miles. They add 
that fra decades big lasers have 
been used to bum holes in metal 
over short ranges. 

On another score, these critics 
say, the Mirad test was misleading. 
“The impression was that the laser 
blew it apart,” said John E. Pike, 
bead of space policy for the Feder- 
ation of American Scientists, a 
nonprofit group based in Washing- 
ton that is skeptical of the anti- 
missile plan. “But it was the gadget 
at the top, the cross bar that was 
ostensibly there Ira dynamic load- 
ing, with the cables pulling down, 
that caused it to fly to pieces. The 
test looked much more i mpr e ssi ve 
than it was.” 

Air Gun Splinters 
Missile Mock-Up 

In November, a different test 
was publicized when General 


respected scientific journal, report- 
ed that a key X-ray focusing de- 
ment h*d proved defective and had 
failed in an experiment at the Ne- 
vada nudear weapons test rite. 

In addhirm^ the journal said, a 
key monitoring device had been 
mucafibrated, rendering the results 

Of earlier tests nwnwtarn Further 

disclosures to the press revealed 
that the government intended to 
proceed with its next X-ray laser 
test although the dt qjg n flaw had 
not bew t criminate d 

On Dec. 6, 30 members of Con- 
gress sent a letter to Defease Secre- 
tary Caspar W. Weinberger urging 
him to postpone the test, which was 
to cost $30 milh' nn, until the prob- 
lems could be fixed. They also 
asked for an “immediate” briefing 
on the X-ray laser program, indud- 
ing the ex p e rim ental flaw. 

Federal officials have publidy 
co nfirm ed that there are unre- 
solved technical problems in the X- 
ray laser experiments, but they 
have characterized (hem as minor. 

With the X-ray laser and anti- 
missile tests in general, dissident 
scientists contend that serious re- 
search is threatened with distortion 
by the rush to impress the presi- 
daut. Congress and the American 
public with anti-missile feats. Gen- 
eral Abrahamson, the program di- 
rector, denies this. 

“We're trying to run an open 
program,” he said in an interview. 
“Within the limits of security oon- 
aderatious, we owe the nation pro- 
cedures that allow people to see 
what we’re doing, the real rate of 
progress, so they can make their 
own j ndgments." 


dak from using such acronyms as 
Beacon and STAR, saying they 
falsely implied a concern with 
sbowmansnip. He raid the anti- 
missile program did have a special 
category of “significant experi- 
ments to resolve key technical is- 
sues.” but be denied that any tests 
had been staged or their results 
exaggerated. 

“The Mirad experiments were 
worthwhile and provided impor- 
tant information,” he said. 

Despite such denials, federal sci- 
entists say showy demonstrations 
are normal in any area of ****** 
that requires a lot of public money. 
“Blame the whole American ap- 
proach to big science,” said Dr. 
Rockwood, of the Los Alamos lab- 
oratory. “Congress needs to see 
something. They aren’t knowledge- 
able enough to judge inventions 
without some sort of demonstra- 
tions.” 

In the anti-missile program. Dr. 
Rockwood sard, real experiments 
that resulted in breakthroughs 
would probably be kept secret, es- 
pecially if they heto promise for the 
penetration of an atony’s anii-nas- 
sfle shield. 

As for public relations stunts, he 
said the potential fra distorting the 
anti-missile agenda could be mini- 
mized if key scientists manag- 
ers adhered to its deeper goals. “If 
the programs are managed in that 
way,” he said, “then this oversell- 
ing will not lead to vast waste." 

Merchandising pressure may in- 
crease because of cuts in the SDI 
budget, according to some dissi- 
dent Scientists. Far fiscal 1986, 
Congress cm roughly SI bflhon 
from the Reagan administration's 
request of $3.7 billion. Larger arts 
loom, some congressional sources 
say, estimating the five-year anti- 
missile research program may get 
little nwre than half the $26 bubon 
originally sought. 

The problem, as some dissident 
scientists see it, is that visible “pro- 
gress” most be made no matter bow 
much money is cut. Otherwise, the 
programs’ size makes them even 
more vulnerable. “It happens ev- 
not just SDI," said Dr. 
iber of the Sandia lab. 
real science or stunts, or 


Originally such tests bad been 
grouped together under a Pentagon 
program tided Talon Gold, which 
was to have had a single space- 
based test aboard the space shuttle 
in 1988. But Pentagon officials 
killed that program and created a 
new one in which a series of point- 
ing tests on the shuttle are sched- 
uled for 1986, 1987 and 1988. 

“You don’t want to tie things 
together in an end-to-end system,” 
said Dr. Havey, formerly with die 
White House. “Too many things 
can go wrong. You need to demon- 
strate the components." 

At the Pentagon's request, these 
shuttle tests are to be publicized, 
according to offi ciate of the Na- 
tional Aeronautics and Space Ad- 
ministration. Such openness is a 
{weak with official Defense Depart- 
ment policy, which calls for mfli- 
tary shuttle missions and experi- 
ments to be classified as secret 

Paradoxically, the new openness 
means that routine launches of mil- 
itary c om m un ications satellites will 
be kept secret wUle tests of ad- 
vanced weapons wfll be displayed 
in public. Starting in 1986. than 
are to be two major shuttle-based 
experiments fra the - anti-missile 
program each year, according -to 

NASA officials. 

During one shuttle mimarm, laser 
beams fired through a window of 
the European-built Spacelab are to 
strike one or more large mirrors 
mounted in the shuttle's payload 
bay, and thee be reflected toward 


to the magazine. Aviation Wc 
and Space Technology. 

“Aside bom its technical objec- 
tives,” the magazine said, quoting 
authoritative Pentagon sources, 
“the mission is designed to show 
that the SDI project can produce 
significant results while building 
momentum to justify long-term 
continuation of the multiMIlion- 
dollar research effort." 

The dtewHwrttv in the anti-missile 
program say zeal gams are being 

de beams and free-dectron lasers, 
technical areas that have received 
httk publicity so far. They add that 


nn 

these projects have become STAX 
programs and win be given nxxe 
money and demonstrations. 

Scientists in government asd is. 
d us try say there is a push to arh 
Use the fruits of the anti-nasa* 
research before the 1988 presiden- 
tial election- Top federal efficiab 
deny this. But in May, Mr. Rea- 
gan's science adviser. 'Dr, Georg 
A. Keyworth II, told a meeting of 
military contractors that “unequiv- 
ocal proof” of the feasibility of 
anti-missile defense could be dem- 
onstrated by 1988 if the research 
was “properly streamlined." 

After the speech. Dr. Keyworth 
said he was not speakmgof demon- 
strations of nasale interception is 
space; which he called a gwnnw>j 
“If you put a big laser on a mam- 
tain top and destroy a steel sphere a 
meter in diameter on another 
moun taint op a couple of hundred 
miles away, you've demonstrated 
technological feasibility a heck o r * 
lot better than with space sunnl» 
lion." 

Dr. Keyworth. one of the most 
ardent supporters of the SDI plan 
in the Reagan a ri n an ktra tio u , re- 
cently announced he will resign his 
post at the end of the year. He has 
said he is satisfied with the direc- 
tion of the program. 

In the next few years increasing- 
ly showy laser demonstrations wfll 
probably be performed in the New 
Mexico desert, according to scien- 
tists in government and industry. - 
The Mirad laser, they say, is being 
equipped with a large bom direc- 
tor that wfll allow it to flre at mov- 
ing targets, like large missiles. 

Whether such exhibitions as 
pointing lasers out of the spaa 
shuttle and destroying missiles in 
the New Mexican desert will corf, 
stitute “unequivocal proof" of the 
feasibility of the “star wars" de- 
fense. as Dr. Keyworth put it, is an 
issue that will be debated not only 
by Congress and the U.S. public 
but also by the scientists at weak on 
the program. They say they are 
already worried by pressures to dis- 
tort science fra the sake of public 
relations. 

Asked what the public should 
expect from the program in the 
next two or three years, Dr. Hagm- 
gruber of Sandia replied: “1 expect 
they win not see the leaps and 
bounds in the technology . they 
would all like to see. Their patience 
will wear thin, and that wul~bcan 
added stimulus to stunts and dran- 
oos (rations." 

TOMORROW: The overall ' 
tary equation and the Soviet re- 
sponse. 


Bonn Seeks Share of U.S. Research on Space Defense 


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(Continued from Page I) 
lead to a new round in the nudear 
arms race and weaken the security 
of Western Eurc^je. 

The criticism was contained in a 
foil-page interview by the Paris 
newspaper Le Monde of Defense 
Minister Pan! Qufl&s on his ream 

fmrr i 1»llrq fn W auhttig fon. 

“SDI could upset the strategic 
concepts on which peree has rested 
since the last war,” said Mr. Qtril&s. 
He added that it also could lead to 
a further polarization of public 
opinion in Western Europe be- 
tween “those who take refuge in 
neutralism and pacifism*’ and 


“those who place their destiny in 
the hands of the 


Differences over SDI emerged in 
talks Ttiesday in Paris between 
President Frangois Mitterrand and 
Mr. KohL Earlier this year, the two 
leaders attempted to coordinate a 
common West European position 
cm the program, bat this effort now 
seems to have failed. • • 

[The two leaders announced 
plans Wednesday to increase mili- 
tary cooperation, but remained di- 
vided over .SDI, The Associated 
Press reported. . 

{After their Paris meeting, they 

tried to 

ing 


nouudng drat officers of their ar- 
mies would train together- Mr. 
Kohl said this was a “modest but 
significant sign of the vitality of 
relations.” 

[The French believe that any 
West German participation in SDI 
will be detrimental to Mr. Mitter- 
rand's Eureka proj era. Eureka calls 
for increased European coopera- 
tion to develop high technology to 
rocct U-S. and Japanese advances 
and is seen largely as a civilian 
pnqject But it could have military 


credible project, evea for the next 
half century,” Mr. Quflis said. 
“Science can malm progress, same- 
times very rapid progress, but it 
cannot work mirades.” • : 


Mistrial Declared 
For U.S. Governor 

The Associated PrvsM - 

NEW ORLEANS— The 
teering trial of Governor 


^ D clear that he was tamer- 01 Louisiana and foorco- 

toputthe best face ouincreas- suaded by the US. ar gumen ts in ^aidants ended Wednesday ft a 
mmtaxy cooperation by an- favor of SDL Mr. Quilts listed jmy reporting h- 

French objections to the progra m 's 
cost and technical feasibility. He 
said these doubts had been rein- 
forced by the skepticism of several 
leading US. scientists. 





FINLANDIA ON ICE 


self hopelessly deadlocked. 

U5. District Judge Manx! li- 
vandais said that the jury had told 
him there was no chance it could 
reach a verdict without reviewing 


“The most optimistic predictions amounts of testimony. 

i ftA# aIIm. " a Thf 1 11 trier crairi ilwtf 


do not allow us to consder tins a 


DEATH NOTICE 


THOMPSON 

ON DECEMBER 13th in London. 
Fhyflis, widow rf Cyril S (Tommy) 
beloved mother Nod and Christo- 
pher and Grandmother to Scott, 
Nicola and Alexander. Imement in 
family grave at Oaroa Montreal* 
Cemetiy December 20th at 1 1 am 


The judge said that jurors wens 
asking for loo much material arid 
that be had been presented with 'a 
motion for a mistrial. “I will gr.m 
that motion," he said. U.S: AutF 
ney John Volz had said he would 
retry Mr. Edwards if Iheitny fatted 
to reach a verdict. 


Seize the worid. 

The Intematkmal HerakiTHbune. 



We are glad to announce our marriage 

Heinz AJ. Kem Margit Kem 

nee Schuhmann 
December 18 , 1985, in Prankfurt-am-Main 

Bologna / Frankfurt-am-Kain 


















Page 5 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1985 


lesearch in Africa Shows AIDS 
few Posing a Risk to Newborns 



3y Lawrence K. Altman 
fjew York Tunes Service 
»ARJS — Researchers have 
nd more corroborating evidence 
it AIM is spreading in Africa to 
i point that it poses substantia] 
monewbom infants, and that it 
acts about as many women as 
primarily by heterosexual in- 


; evidence comes from studies 
a by Zambian, j American 
Canadian researchers involv- 
[smsfif groups of pregnant wom- 
'^ v ^erid newi>Ora infants, as well as 
^Viddualswith sexually transmii- 
diseasts and a variety of other 
tiical conditions, according to 
1 Subhash K. Hira of the Univer- 

Teaching Hospital in Lusaka, 

J Zambian capital. 

143 women who gave birth at 
Eiversity Teaching Hospital in re- 
'i months, 17, or 12 percent, had 
j bodies to the acquired immune 
fiamey syndrome virus, an indi- 
ion of prior infection. These 17 
ye birth to IS infants who had 
jbodies to the AIDS virus. None 
•■“f - .the babies bom to the other 126 
^ - ; _' 4 hers showed evidence of such 

■"■^edkm, Dr. Hira said in an inter- 

■ . ■*. 

W. 

- Because many people may be 
'-iV-riers of the AIDS virus without 

- - iU, and still others may 
: L -4 develop symptoms until years 

- ;,er blood tests show evidence of 
■ejection, it is not known how 
* a.iny of these women and infants 

develop AIDS. Additional 
' xs might be found later because 
^r-.'ants can acquire the AIDS virus 
-'"Jim nursing mothers who are in- 
^sed 

'-’i ^further studies are being done to 
v ■_> tennine bow many, if any, or the 
^ ' mothers and 15 babies had false 
^ -a results that could result from 



immunological factors that nor- 
mally change in pregnancy and the 
first few months of life, Dr. Hira 
said. 

One component of the studies 
concerned apparently healthy peo- 
pie. Of 100 who had annual physi- 
cal checkups, blood tests showed 
that 15 had evidence of the AIDS 
virus. Of these 15, two could have 
become infected' through blood 
transfusions, two were bisexuals 
and two had anal sexual rela- 

tions at least once. 

Other parts of the studies have 
shown that in Lusaka there is “al- 
most an epidemic of herpes zoster," 
or shingles. Dr. Hira said. Doctors 
throughout the world have noted 
that shingles is one of the opportu- 
nistic infections that strike AIDS 
patients with unusual frequency. 

Of the approximately 1,800 pa- 
tients examined over the last three 
and a half months in a clinic spe- 
cializing, in sexually transmitted 
diseases, 120 patients, or IS per- 
cent, have had shingles. This figure 
compares with 91. or one-half of 1 
percent, of the 3,310 patients treat- 
ed in the same clinic from 1979 to 
1982. 

Blood samples! taken from 53 of 
the most recent shingles cases 
showed that 25, or 47 percent, had 
evidence of infection by the AIDS 
virus. The AIDS blood test was not 
developed until last year, so a com- 
parative figure from 1979-82 is not 
available. 

The researchers found this evi- 
dence of infection with the AIDS 
virus among small groups of indi- 
viduals affected by various other 
conditions: 

• Forty-Eve of 63 people (71 
percent) who suffered from unex- 
plained swollen lymph nodes for 
more than two months. 


• Nine of 13 patients (69 per- 
cem)with Kaposi's sarcoma: 

•Three of four persons suffering 
from tuberculosis that had spread 
throughout their bodies. 

• Both of the two patients who 
had suffered from unexplained 
chrome diarrhea for more than two 
months. 

' • Both of the two persons with 
unexplained acute weight loss. 

But only one of 41 patients with 
leprosy, or less than 2 percent, had 
evidence of infection with the 
AIDS virus. These 41 people bad 
been in a leprosy hospital for more 
than three years. Because they had 
been isolated from society. Dr. 
Hira said, he interpreted these find- 
ings to mean that the AIDS virus 
was introduced into only 

recently. He also said that the tests 
could have falsely yielded negative 
results because erf leprosy’s immu- 
nology. 

Dr. Hira said that evidence of 
the AIDS virus was found in about 
the same proportion of men and 
women. 

The fact that none of 125 persons 
tested said they were bisexuals and 
only two said they had engaged in 
anal sex supported the thesis that 
AIDS in Africa is spread through 
vaginal sex. Dr. Hira said. Seven 
who had received transfusions 
could have contracted AIDS 
through contaminated blood. 

Some researchers theorize that 
the AIDS vims may spread more 
easily among heterosexuals in Afri- 
ca who have sores from syphilis 
and other sexually transmitted dis- 
eases. According to the theory, 
breaks in the slua from the sores 
allow the AIDS virus to enter the 
body more easily than through in- 
tact skin. Dr. Hira said that 51 of 
the 125 had had sexually transmit- 
ted infections in the past. 



Regional Group Defeats 
Gandhi’s Party in Assam 


Tha AooooMd Prat* 

Brian G. Chambers, (eft, and Kevin J. Barlow, right, in Kuala Lumpur, where Malaysia's 
Supreme Court rejected an appeal to commute their death sentences on drug charges. 

Malaysia Upholds AwtraHam* Death Sentence 


Ageoee France- Press* 

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia — The Malaysian 
Supreme Court rejected Wednesday an appeal by two 
Australians who were sentenced to death for traffick- 
ing in heroin. 

A three-man panel ruled that there was no miscar- 
riage of justice in August when the Penang high court 
convicted Brian G. Chambers, 28, a building contrac- 
tor from Sydney, and Kevin J. Barlow, 27, a British- 
born welder from Perth, on trafficking charges. 

The two men were arrested at Penang airport in 
November 1983 with 179 grams (about 4 ounces) of 
heroin in a suitcase. Each accused the other of putting 
the drugs in the bag. 

They would be the first Westerners to be hanged 
under 1983 amendments to the Malaysian Dangerous 
Drags Act, which made the death sentence mandatory 
for anyone possessing 15 or more grams of heroin or 
morphine, or 200 or more grams of marijuana or 
hadiigh 

In Canberra, the Foreign Affairs Department said 
that Foreign Minister W illiam Hayden would appeal 
to Malaysian authorities to commute the sentences to 


life imprisonment. In London, relatives of Mr. Barlow 
were petitioning the British government to seek 
clemency. 

"Yes. I think they are out to make an example of 
me." Mr. Barlow said in answer to journalists 1 ques- 
tions after the verdict was delivered. “Isn’t that what I 
was told by everyone these past two years?" 

Both men will make a final appeal to the Pardons 
Board in Penang stale, where they were arrested and 
convicted, their lawyers said. 

Thirty-three persons, most of them Malaysians, 
have been hanged for drug offenses since 1975. Four 
others, including a French secretary who was convict- 
ed before the mandatory death sentence was intro- 
duced. have bad death reduced to life Lenns. More 
than 50 others are cm death row pending appeals. 

The stiff penalties, perhaps the toughest in the 
world, are aimed at curbing the spreading addiction to 
heroin and other hard drugs among Malaysia’s 16 
million residents. The laws assume that people who 
are caught possessing more than the minimum amount 
of drugs intend to sell them. 


Filipinos Begin to Wonder Whether Election Will Be Held 


: (Continued from Page 1) 

U declare the law constitutional.’’ 
rx ".it he sounded less enthusiastic 
:: in before. 

- -His associates have also been 
-^reading the suggestion that the 
"-’■jctiaD might not lake place. 
-'■.:Teodoro F. Valencia, a newspa- 

‘ " c.r columnist who is dose to the 

- ; jsident, said recently of the elec- 
- : .-n preparations: “If it looks like a 
-'-dc, quacks like a dude and walks 
: r a dock, it is probably a horse, 
—oything but a duck.” 

-^:lhe issue under debate before 
: .i court is the failure of the presi- 
_ .oi to leave office to create the 
_;-ancy demanded by the oonstim- 


Mr. Marcos submitted a letter of 
resignation to the National Assem- 
bly on Nov. 1 1 with the stipulation 
that the resignation would take ef- 
fect only upon the assumption of 
office by the winner of the election. 

In tins way, he managed to re- 
main in office and employ the full 
powers of the presidency during 
the election campaign. 

His political opponents immedi- 
ately branded the maneuver uncon- 
stitutional, but they agreed to con- 
test the election anyway. 

The petitions before the court 
have been filed by opposition poli- 
ticians and groups such as the Phil- 
ippine National Bar Association 
and the Concerned Women of (he 


Philippines. They are said to want 
the constitutionality issue settled 
before the fact so that it can not be 
used to annul the results after the 
voting. 

Ten of court's 13 justices, all of 
whom have been appointed by Mr. 
Marcos, must rule against its' con- 
stitutionality for the election to be 
called off. If they do so, politicians 
here see various possible scenarios. 

One that has been mentioned in 
the court proceeding is the possibil- 
ity that an election could be re- 
placed by a national referendum on 
the continued tenure of Mr. Mar- 
cos. who will reach his 20th anni- 
versary in office this month. Such a 
referendum might be bdd to coin- 


cide with nationwide local elections 
set for May. 

Such a move would elimina te the 
direct challenge of Mrs. Aquino. 
The main issue in her campaign, 
however, is the removal of Mr. 
Marcos, and she could continue to 
campaig n against him in a referen- 
dum. 

Another possibility is tbai the 
presidential election would be 
called off but the vote for the vice 
president could proceed. This 
would pit Mr. Marcos’s running 
mate, Arturo M. Totentino, a for- 
mer foreign minister, against Salva- 
dor H. Laurel, a former senator. . 

A third scenario was suggested 
by Mr. Marcos last week when he 


said that if the court ruled against 
the election he would appeal but if 
be lost the appeal the vote would 
then take place only upon the expi- 
ration of his six-year term in 1987. 

But at least one opposition poli- 
tician, Homobono Adaza, is pre- 
dicting that the president might 
feel be needs to introduce some 
form of state of emergency to con- 
tain the reaction to such a move. 
Mr. Pelaez predicted in court hat 
frustration over any calling off of 
the election could plunge the coun- 
try into chaos. 

And in an editorial Wednesday, 
an independent newspaper, the in- 
quirer, said of the election. “Many 
Filipinos perceive it as the last 


chance of democracy to survive in 
this troubled country. Crushing 
people's high hopes now might lead 
to the inevitable slide toward non- 
democraiic options for change — a 
bloody civil war or revolution." 


Retail Sales in China 

Reuteri 

BEIJING — Retail sales in Chi- 
na this year will rise try 27 percent 
to about 426.34 billion yuan 
($133.2 billion) from 335.7 billion 
yuan in 1984. 

The agency said the increase is 
due to rising incomes and a large 
increase in the number of retail 
outlets, many not state-owned. 


(Continued from Page I) 
time, or who had come from other 
pans of India, and were thus not 
endangered by the accord. 

In the past! these Moslems also 
had tended to vote for the Congress 
(I) Party, but this time they defect- 
ed out of apparent solidarity with 
their co-religionists. 

The Congress (1) Party, which 
has ruled the slate for 3b of the last 
38 years, had thus been caught in 
the middle of two opposing camps, 
despite Mr. Gandhi's strenuous ef- 
forts. 

The prime minister campaigned 
several times in the state, promising 
to increase economic aid and as- 
serting that only his party could 
curb ethnic and religious hatreds. 
He warned against the prolifera- 
tion of regionally based parties. 

By all accounts, he wanted to win 
the election and was under some 
pressure from party members to 
produce a victory The party did 
better in several scattered by-elec- 
tions on Monday around the' coun- 
try. 

At stake in Assam were 126 
seals. Early returns showed the As- 
sam People's Front having won 26 
seals and leading in about 30 oth- 
ers. The Congress (I) Party had 
won only fO seats and was leading 
in fewer than 20 others. 

The Moslem-dominated United 
Minorities Front won three seats 
and was leading in about 10 others. 
Other votes went lo the Communist 
Party, various parties of indigenous 
uibespeople and the Congress (SI 
Party, a splinter of Mr. Gandhi's 
pany- 

Honda Union Vote 
In Ohio Is Delayed 

Sev York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The Na- 
tional Labor Relations Board has 
“indefinitely postponed" a union 
representation vote scheduled for 
Thursday at a Honda plant in Ohio 
after the United Automobile 
Workers formally charged the com- 
pany with an unfair labor practice. 

The complaint, filed Dec. 13 in 
Gevdand. accused Honda of ille- 
gally interrogating workers about 
their attitudes toward unions, al- 
lowing anti-union material to be 
distributed on company time and 
granting increased holiday and va- 
cation benefits to discourage union 
activity. 

Honda officials at the plant in 
Marysville, Ohio, have denied the 
charges. Singe Yoshida, executive 
vice president of Honda of Ameri- 
ca. said the union had “violated" 
the company’s “atmosphere of re- 
spect by using these manufactured 
charges to delay a vole." 


Fourteen national Parliament 
seats were also being contested, but 
these returns were still incomplete 
Wednesday. The .Assam election 
will not materially affect the Con- 
gress party's 80-percent majority of 
the 52? seats in Parliament 

The turnout hud been unusually 
high, reflecting an extraordinary 
amount of interest in the election 
— by some accounts, as high as 80 
percent of almost 10 million eligi- 
ble voters. 

During the last elections in As- 
sam. in 1983, thousands of people 
died as anti-immigrant forces 
staged a boycott and tried to dis- 
rupt the hallotiag. This time, tens 
of thousands of policemen and 
paramilitary troopers guarded the 
voting. 

■ Sri lanka, Tamils Plan Talks 

Sri u, exploring the possi- 
bility of talks in Colombo with the 
Tamil United Liberation Front, the 
main Tamil separatist pony, in- 
formed sources in the capital said 
Wednesday, according to Agcnce 
France-Pnsse. 

The Sri Lanka government sent a 
message by Indian intermediaries, 
and hopes that the Tamil party's 
leader. Appapillai Aminhalingam. 
and other party leaders now in self- 
exile in Madras. Indio, will come lo 
Colombo, the sources said. 

If the talks were to gel off the 
ground, the People's Liberation 
Organization of Tamil Eelam, one 
of the major militant groups, would 
be likely to join in, the sources 
added. 

However the Tamil United Lib- 
eration Front was. reluctant to 
make any commitment to attend 
such a meeting, preferring to meet 
government negotiators m India, 
sources dose to the party said. 

Authoritative sources here said 
that the government wanted assur- 
ances that the organization would 
not suddenly withdraw from the 
talks or abandon them as they did 
two years ago. 

In November, six Tamil separat- 
ist groups rejected a draft working 
paper, formulated by New Delhi, 
that proposed greater autonomy in 
Tamil areas. 


2d Strike at Hie Guardian 

TheAssaiaicJFrcu 

LONDON — The Guardian, 
one of Britain's 10 national morn- 
ing newspapers, failed to appear 
Wednesday for the second time in 
two weeks because of a wage dis- 
pute by production workers. 


WHAT WOULD LIFE BE Utf 
WITHOUT IT? 

WEEKEND 

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JANUARY 27, 1986 


JANUARY 28, 1986 


Chairman: Lee W. Huebner, Publisher, 

International Herald Tribune. 

KEYNOTE ADDRESS 
Antonio Ortiz Mena, President, 

Inter-American Development Bank, Washington D.C 
SNAPSHOT OF THE DEBT CRISIS, RESCHEDULING MOVES, 
ADJUSTMENT PROGRAMS 

Eduardo Wiesner Duran, Western Hemisphere Director, 
International Monetary Fund, Washington D.C 
LATIN AMERICAN INITIATIVES TO TACKLE 
THE DEBT PROBLEM 

Jesus Silva Herzog, finance Minister, Mexico. 

Femao Bracher, Governor, Central Bank, Brazil 
HOW THE INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL SYSTEM 
SHOULD ADAPT 

Michel Camdessus, Governor, Banque de France. 

Robin Leigh-Pemberton, Governor, Bank of England. 

HOW MULTINATIONALS HAVE MADE A SUCCESS OF 
OPERATING IN THE REGION 
CJ. van dear Klugt, Vice-Chairman, 

Philips Industries, Eindhoven. 

Peter Wallenberg, First Vice Chairman, 

Skandinaviska Enskdda Banker, Stockholm. 

REVIVING INDUSTRIES IN LATIN AMERICA 

The Honorable Edward Seaga, M.P., Prime Minister, Jamaica 

Francisco Swett, finance Minister, Ecuador. 

Amaldo Musich, Director, Ogarizad6n Techint, Buenos Aires. 


Chairman: Anthony Sampson, international writer, 

Editor of The Sampson Letter. 

NEW EFFORTS TO STIMULATE TRADE WITH THE AREA 
Claude Owysson, European Commissioner, Brussels. 

Felipe Jaromiflo, Chairman of the Contracting Parties 
to the GATT, Geneva 

THE NEED FOR A LONG-TERM SOLUTION TO THE DEBT 
PROBLEM AND FOR NEW CREDITS 
Enrique Iglesias, Foreign Minister, Uruguay. 

Manuel Ulloa Bias, fanner Prune Minister, Peru. 

THE COMMERCIAL BANKS' VIEW OF LATIN AMS1CA 
David Rockefeller, Chairman, International Advisory 
Committee, The Chase Manhattan Bank, New York. 

Willian Rhodes, Chairman, Restructuring Committee, 
Citibank, New Yoric 

Werner Blessing, Member of the Board of Managing 
Directors, Deutsche Bank, Frankfurt. 

PERSPECTIVES ON ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL DEVH.OPVBMT 

a) Central America: 

Garios Manuel CostiOo, former Vice President, Costa Rica. 

b) Andean Region; 

Manuel Azpurua Arreaza, finance Minister, Venezuela 
THE FUTURE: REVIVING GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT, 
Tbffi COMMON INTBRE5T 

Lord Harold Lever, former Chancellor, Duchy of Lancaster. 
ROUND TABLE D1SCUSSIONOF A CURRENT ISSUE 
Participation from several key speakers. 


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Page 6 


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1985 


Beralb 


INTERNATIONAL 


Pnbli»h«J With TV York Tin** and The WmhiagM Pont 


Sound Without Action 


Watch the Sky Above the Syrian Border 


When President Reagan returned from 
Geneva last month, we urged that he apply 
his amplified prestige to reducing his huge 
budget deficit, which has the singular char- 
acteristic of harming America and the rest of 
the world simultaneously. With strong lead- 
ership, significant progress could have been 
made in the current fiscal year. But all we see 
in last week’s balanced-budget legislation is 
a framework commitment to eliminate the 
deficit progressively by 1991, with no hard 
decisions about the immediate future. 

The budget-balancing law can be criti- 
cized on many grounds. It leaves the 1986 
deficit dangerously high- The forced spend- 
ing cuts it envisages have to fall equally and 
arbitrarily on military and on civilian pro- 
grams, some or which are exempted in ad- 
vance; this robs the government of the abili- 
ty to make discretionary spending choices in 
the light of changing circumstances. There is 
no reason why a deficit should shrink in 
regular, linear fashion over a six-year peri- 
od; an economy moves in cycles, not straight 
lines. America's elected representatives are 
saying they cannot trust themselves to use 
budgetary discretion responsibly. Lastly, the 
law may prove ineffective for the simple 
reason that a future Congress can scrap it 


Yet a presidential veto would not have 
made sense. The Gramm-Rudman formula 
is flawed, but it seems to be the best that 
could be achieved for now. At least it binds 
Congress and the president to make some 
attack on the deficit before next November’s 
elections. Fain decisions now to cat spend- 
ing on specific programs, or to raise taxes, or 
both, would have been better — the medi- 
cine tlmt the IMF, with American support, is 
urging on other debtor countries. Some in- 
crease in tax revenues is probably essential. 
With world oil prices Falling, this is an ideal 
time to raise taxes on gasoline and fuel oiL 
That might do no more than offset declining 
market prices, and it could be justified as 
simply transferring to the federal coffers 
part of the levy that OPEC has been impos- 
ing on the American consumer. 

If the law is strictly observed, the budget 
deficit might fall from 5 J percent of GNP in 
fiscal 1985 to 3.5 percent in 1987. That could 
pull interest rates down, improve American 
competitiveness, weaken protectionist pres- 
sure and give important relief to foreign 
debtors. But all the required tough action 
has yet to be devised. Gramm-Rudman is a 
vague promise to him over a new leaf. 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. 


A South African Scene 


The government of South Africa keeps 
warning that its opponents are Communists in 
Soviet hire, but it is the regime itself that is 
Sovietizing South Africa. Its restrictions on the 
media are among the most conspicuous and 
objectionable pieces of evidence of this trend. 

American audiences could see the policy in 
action last weekend by watching the television 
coverage in Mamelodl A black township out- 
side Pretoria, Mamdodi is not subject to the 
emergency- rule news curbs that the govern- 
ment imposed last October to keep the outside 
world {rom observing popular unrest and offi- 
cial repression. Nonetheless, pistol- wielding 
police hailed television coverage of the funeral 
of some blacks who had died in an earlier 
protest. In response, people in the crowd 
stoned the police, and in the ensuing gunfire a 
sound man was shot in the leg. “We cannot let 
anything bad about South Africa get out any- 
more." an officer explained. 

it is evidently not enough for the South 
Africans to try to censor the news by law and 


edict; they are doing it by harassment and 
outright intimidation as well. Bat Pretoria's 
effort to fence itself off from Western inspec- 
tion can only isolate it further from Western 
understanding By its restrictions, the apart- 
heid government increasingly makes itself* over 
in the Soviet image. Far from sparing itself the 
effects of bad publicity, it feeds apprehensions 
that behind a veil of censorship it is practicing 
a policy too terrible to withstand the light of 
day. Already low, the country’s credibility is 
bound to smk even lower if there is not aq 
adequate supply of independent witnesses. 

What occurred at Mamdodi reflects an ugly 
pattern in South Africa. A funeral for vic tims 
of the country's basic injustice was being held 
peacefully. Police tried to cut off the formally 
permitted media coverage. A disturbance 
erupted. The government, to justify censor- 
ship, keeps insisting that the media provoke 
trouble, but here it was plain that the police 
were the provocateurs. It was thuggery. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


A New Budget Game 


The House and Senate have been sparring 
all year over the defense budget. In that sense 
the House was foil owing form Tuesday night 
in rejecting, partly for its defense provisions, 
the proposed continuing resolution to fund for 
the rest of the fiscal year the agencies whose 
regular appropriations bills have not been 
passed. But this vote counts more. Hie reason 
is a multiplier effect in the new Gramm-Rud- 
man budget process. Gramm-Rudman has cre- 
ated a new game for everyone to learn, a game 
called “baselines." The process sets out declin- 
ing deficit targets for the next five years and 
provides for automatic spending cuts, half 
from defense and half from domestic pro- 
grams, if in any year the president and Con- 
gress fail to hit their target The question is: 
automatic cuts from what levels? The higher 
you lift your starting point or baseline in any 
year, the less your program has to fear from 
Gramm-Rudman and die stronger your posi- 
tion will be in a scramble to produce a budget 
by orthodox means as the deadline for auto- 
matic cuts approaches. Gramm-Rudman is to 
inflict its first cuts next spring. The starting 
point wil] be the continuing resolution. 

In its appropriations bill the House voted to 
hold the Pentagon to $292 billion in spending 


authority this fiscal year, the same as Last year, 
without allowance for inflation — and it (fid 
not exactly vote to appropriate even that. It 
found more than S6 billion in unused spending 
authority from prior years and told the ser- 
vices to use it this year. The Senate has called 
for S302 billion in spending authority, enough 
of an increase to cover the expected inflation 
rate and the amount contained in the congres- 
sional budget resolution, which the adminis- 
tration has now embraced. 

The conferees on the continuing resolution 
agreed to give the Pentagon $299 billion in 
spending authority and voted to make this 
authority all new. That w ay the Pentagon 
would have all its old appropriations in reserve 
for Gramm-Rudman. After Tuesday’s rqeo- 
tion, the matter now goes back to conference. 

By the standards of the first Reagan term, 
the Pentagon loses even if it wins. Spending 
will continue to rise this fiscal year as a result 
of past appropriations, but new appropria- 
tions — the feedstock for future spending — 
for the fust time in the Reagan administration 
will apparently not rise perceptibly, and under 
Gramm-Rudman could even falL The defense 
ride of the budget has hit an uncertain plateau. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


Hidden Riches, Hidden Woes 

The most popular film in the Philippines is 
“Hidden Riches," a documentary on the villas, 
apartment bouses, supermarkets and hotels in 
the United States owned by President Mateos, 
his wife Imekla and their friends. In the coun- 
tryside church workers feed the hungry’ at soup 
kitchens and then show the movie. 

Mr. Marcos has not traveled around his 
nation for years. The government and many 
diplomats have no idea about conditions in the 


provinces. Human rights violations are more 
widespread now than in the martial law era 
(1972-81). When one person in a family is 
assassi n ated, survivors join the C ommimist s. 

There is no doubt that the Marcos era is 
coming to a dose. The process could be 
stopped only by government reforms from 
withm. But President Marcos has hardly any 
choice. True reform would amount to sawing 
off the limb on which he sits. 

— Erhard Haubdd (Neue ZOrcher Zatung, 
Zurich), quoted in World Press Review. 


FROM OUR DEG 19 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Strong Naval Fleets Win Ware 

PARIS — The Washington Post says: "We 
could have forts at every seaport, but should 
Congress fail to provide for an adequate fleet 
in each ocean, an active force could still land 
between the forts. Once ashore it would be a 
serious matter to dislodge iL With a fleet in 
each ocean we could prevent it from blockad- 
ing or landing and would be saved a war.” [The 
Herald comments:] “The teachings of history 
corroborate the statement of our judicious 

contemporary. The Washington Post. In the 

war with Spain, an army of 165,000 Spaniards 
in Cuba bad to surrender to an American force 
of some 15.000 because the American navy 
controlled the sea. In the Transvaal war, if the 
Boers had been ten times as numerous as they 
were, they must finally have succumbed, be- 
cause Great Britain had command of the sea.” 


1935: Plan to Partition Ethiopia Fails 

PARIS — The Hoare- Laval plan [to cede more 
than half oT Ethiopia to Italy] was pushed 
nearer the brink of its grave at Geneva by 
Anthony Eden: British Minister for League erf 
Nations Affairs, who made it plain that Eng- 
land was no longer interested in the proposal 
which brought the downfall of Sir Samuel 
Hoare, Foreign Secretary, who resigned [on 
Dec. 18] in the face of bitter public opinion 
and a divided Cabinet. France's Prime Minis- 
ter Pierre Laval has now resigned the plan’s 
fate to the Council or the League, where there 
is no doubt as to the outcome. Meanwhile, 
Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin, with Sir Sam- 
ud out of the Cabinet, will ask for a vote of 
confidence from the House of Commons on a 
"full League policy" from which he swerved 
10 approve the ill-fated plan. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HA Y WHITNEY. Chairma n 19581982 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-ChtHrmcn 


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ROBERT K. McCABE Deputy Eduor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Dvrar* of Operation 

CARL GEW1RTZ Assxuue Eduor FRANCOIS DESMAISQNS Director af Circviatu*t 

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TTTASHINGTON —The alarm bells arering- 
YY ing again in the Middle East Since late 
last month Syria has deployed a number of 
Soviet surfaco-to-air missiles on rites from which 
th ey co aid be launched against Israeli air force 
reconnaissance flights over Lebanon. 


By Drew Middleton 

The Syrians teamed mnrfa from lb or defeat in 
the 1973 war and from their futile encounters 
with the Israeli army and air force during IsraeTs 


The Israelis cl aim that the deployments are a invas’on of Lebanon in 1982. The primary lesson 
“dangerous change" in the status quo, and they was that they could not hope to defeat Israel 
haw told the Syrian government so through the until the technological level of their forces ap- 
United States. The Syrians are sitting tight, up- proximated that of land, 
parady determined that theyare not about to be Thai level has risen steadily. The missiles to 

ordered around by Israel. There is stubbornness which Israeli scouting aircraft are now exposed 
and arrogance on both sides. are Russian-built SAM-2s, SAM-ds and SAM- 

The danger lies in the possibility that SAMs 8s. The SAM-6 has a range of about 35 miles (56 
will ‘be launched the next lime Israeli" aircraft kilometers) and is employed against aircraft at 
sweep along the frontier on one of their recon- high altitudes. The SAM-8 is designed to take cm 
naissarra missions. If the missiles hit, as they are low-flying attackers. The SAM-2 is the largest of 
likely to do, the Israelis will retaliate, probably the three, with a range of up to 35 miles. 
with air attacks on the nrissfle rites. All the evidence reaching Western intelligence 

There is then a real possibility of a renewal of sources is that these weapons are now manned 
the Arab-Israefi conflict that has tom the Middle entirely by Syrians instead erf the Soviet tedmi- 
East apart four times since the founding erf the ciaus who serviced them when they first arrived, 
state of Israel The tentative U.S. -supported There are also strong indications that theSyri- 

movements toward a peace settlement will be an command, control and communications sys- 
tossed on history’s ash heap. tern, which failed lamentably in 1973 and 1982, 

The tendency in U.S. mili tary codes is to has been revised and strengthened. The level of 
believe that Israel would have little difficulty technical expertise in the air force, which now 
defeating Syria. Ibis seems an exaggeration. Is- deploys about 500 combat aircraft, has also risen, 
rad can whip Syria, and, as long as Iraq is at war Much of the improvement in the air force and 
with Iran, any combination of Arab states. But it ibe army, according to an Israeli colonel is due 
will not be easy, and the cost will be high to “several thousand Soviet mffitaiy advisers 


who arc in practice responsible for preparing the 
Syrian army for war against Israel. 

Syria’s Defense Ministry did not rely entirely 
on the Russians, although they were vital m 
teaching Syrians how to use new tanks, aircraft 
and missiles. Technical training was expanded 
throughout the arm ed forces. Inducements woe 
offered to experienced t e ch ni cia n s to stay in 
nrnfnrm after their 30 months’ service. The f wok 
that would face Israel in any new conflict would 
be far more efficient and modern than those 
defe at ^ in the last two encounters. 

The Israeli air force, which has d om i n ated the 
rides in the last four wars, probably would suffer 
heavier losses from more modern Syrian fighters 
and raisriks, although it would prevail in the end- 

Isradi air force operations areal the heart of 
the growing crisis- Every week the air force flies 
several reconnaissance missions over Lebanon. 
The Israelis say that the Lebanese government in 
Beirut cannot control the anti-Israel guerrilla 
groups in that country. But of course the Israel 
aircraft do not confine their scrutiny to Lebanon. 

The planes, usually flying close to the Leba- 
non-Syria border, photograph nriliiaiy targets in 
Syria as wdL The Syrians know this and are 
anffawri Hence the movement of their missiles 
andthe mounting tensi on. The next Israeli re- 
connaissance flight will be a critical event in the 


history of the 


O 1985 Drew Middleton. 


That Serves 
A Purpose 

By Hobart Bowen 

W ASHINGTON —Now that the 
budget-balancing gimmickry 
has been enacted into law, the Demo- 
cratic Party must assess its responsi- 
bility for getting it through Congress. 

Twenty-two Senate Democrats 
voted for the infamous bill, exactly 
equal to the 22 who had the guts to 
call it a fakery. In the House, almost 
as many Democrats voted for it as 
against — 118 to 130. These Gramm- 
Rudman Democrats will have to live 
with their vote to dismember the old 
coalition of the left, labor, liberals 
and inner city interests. 

To be sore, some House Demo- 
crats succeeded in amending the orig- 
inal Senate bOl to exclude from its 
mlomitic bud get- cuttin g eight jpro- 
grams, including Medicaid and food 
stamps, that serve low-income fam- 
ilies and disabled veterans. And a few 
Democratic senators — including Pat 
Moymhan of New Ycric and Gary 
Hart of Colorado — bluntly tokl 
their colleagues that Gnumn-Rnd- 
man was bad medicine and a dnrlring 
of their responsibilities. 

But as a party the Democrats, in 
their new reliance on die political 
payoff of “fiscal integrity," were 
afraid to try to kfll Gramm-Rudman. 
Meanwhile, President Reagan’s 




- -y “i . I 




i err 


willingness to accept Gramm-Rud- growth rate. In such a ca 
man as his own lends credence to the . accelerate the downturn, 
charge : made by Senator Moymhan . . 
some weds ago that from the outset . 

dm president and his first budget r | 1 |*-S a DyJ 
director, David Stockman, planned -!■ HIP JJUIj 
the big tax cuts of 1981, along with 
the boostin military spendmg,lar dm TY7ASHINGTON — Supporters 
precise propose of creating the deficit YY of the so-caUcd Gramm-Rud- 

that would then allow the final as- man amendment claim that it merely 
sanlt on social programs. Senator Da- forces Congress to “do its job r ight." 
vid Durenberger, a Republican, re- They say that if Congress does its job 
fers to this as “ <fe*mrionwiiwM the — if Congress meets the mandatory 
financing of the public serviced . deficit-reduction targets — the prest- 

No one has yet explained why a dent will not need to intervene to 
balanced budget should be a national impose across-the-board cuts, 
goal The goal should be to balance But Congress did its job this year, 
the economy, which should be both It produced a budget that wooldhave 
compassionate and competitive. cut $55 billion from the deficit And 
Representative Pbfl Gramm, the President Reagan walked 
genius behind the revolution that rejected a Republican- 
takes budget derision-malting out of proposal to reform Sod: 
the hands of congressmen, is candid ana impose an oil-import 
about his goal: “The whole genius of Under Gramm- Rudma 
the American political system is im- will not just be strong me 
posing limits on the power of govern- hemlock, hi 1988, with a 


menu I think the American people The economic consequences of the 
want to control the growth and size Gramm-Rudman process are among 
and tbc expense of the government.” the major womes. According to Data 
Mr. Gramm has brushed aside dis- Resources Incorporated, unless the 
cussion of one basic weakness of Us Federal Reserve loosens the money 
scheme: its inadequate provisions for supply considerably, the fiscal drag 
dealing with recession. Since Herbert of deep, sudden budget reductions 
Hoover turned a recession into a de- under Gramm-Rudman will push the 
pression by trying to cut government unemployment rate sharply higher, 
spending as an antidote to bad times, to over 9 percent in 1987 before it 
no national administration of either retreats to around current levels, 
party has repeated that mistake. But Mr. Gramm senes notice that he 
Gramm-Rudman will require budget will be back next year trying to get 
cuts even if the economy is limping the eight exempted low-income and 
along, say, at just a 2-percent real veterans’ programs under Us budget- 
growth rate. In such a case, it woulff .cutting knife. '.He is on toe . way to 
accelerate the down turn- . ,'L' ..success in achieving Us pet goal,—' 


eliminating government services — 
unless the courts declare the whole 
business unconstitutional or a new 
Congress comes to its senses. 

The folly of the whole exercise of 
budget-balancing via a blind formula 
is matched only by the deception 
symbolized in 1981 by the Laffer sup- 
ply-side curve that was supposed to 
yidd greater tax revenues and ample 
national savings out of lower tax 
rates. What supply-tide economics 
produced was the giant deficit that 
curbed the flow of savings, sapped 
the Democratic Party’s resolve and 
now gives us Gramm-Rudman. 

TheWOshtngwn Past 


Can Donors 

GettheAct 

Together?* 

By Giles Merritt 

B RUSSELS —When four Reagan 
heavyweights turned up in Bn*, 
sds this month for talks with the EC 
Commission, there was something 
they forgot to mention. Missing from 
the agenda put forward by Secret*™ 
of State George Shultz, Conusercc 
Secretary Malcolm Baldrige, Agriak 
rare Secretary John Block and Trade 
Representative Clayton Yeutxer was 
an idea (hatched in Washington) ft>- 
cooperation between Americans 

Europeans oo development aid pn> 
jects so the Third World. 

The sad case of the U.S. propotal- 
that-never-was affords some interest- 
ing intights into the political pitfalls 
that surround the whole subject of 

aid. The straightforward aim was to 
stop U.S. and EC donors of ap- 
proaching $30 billion a year in devel- 
opment aid from topping over one 
another. Unfortunately, the proposal 
touches raw nerves on both sides of 
the Atlantic, and for that reason risks 
be in g buried by the bureaucrats. 

A new framework of six-monthly 
coordination meetings, say UJL ex- 
perts. could help disentangle the aid 
muddle created by competing nation- 
al and international agencies. At teas 
it could head off overlaps. The faa£" 
ine that has drawn world attention to 
Africa’s plight has also underfilled 
toe chaotic mess that the many sepa- 
rate relief efforts are oca ting. 

A few months ago, when the rains 
finally came to Sudan, they washed 
away vital railway installations. 
Three teams of engineers were rushed 
in quite independently by the United 
Stales, Britain and the Netherlands 
for a job that needed but one. They 
discovered each others’ existence 
only when they met on site. 

The proliferation of fact-finding 
and other missions from aid dooms is 
overstretching many Third Wodd 
governments* administrative re- 
sources. Botswana moved to hah 
them altogether after receiving 175 
non-essential missions in a tingle 
year. One of the poorest West Afn^ 
can states, Burkina Faso, has found 
itself swamped by more than 300 
such missioDS in a year. 

There is, too, a presting need to 
make the rich countries’ aid go fur- 
ther. The OECD’s Development As- 
sistance Committee says that fay 1990 
aid spending will have risen only S5 
billion to S35 billion a year because 
aid budgets are being increased by 2 
p e r ce n t a year as against a previous 


This Budget-Balancing Medicine Is Poison 


By Senator Gary Har t cut one dollar in defense roending the 
J j . government would need to cut at 

The twiter is a Democrat from Colorado, fest two dollars in Pentagon pro- 
grams. Because of the unique ziature 
excess of Slut trillion 3nd an avail- of defense contracting, one senator 
able pool of $500 bDHou from which --has estimated that Gramm-Rudman 


to cut, the amendment on Con- 
gress to cut $35 billion — if the eco- 
nomy is healthy. What h a p pens if we 
have a recession in 19877 Required 
budget cuts in 1988 could then 
amount to 5164 bflEon, meaning a 


President Reagan walked away. He 30-percent cut in nuclear- 


nai tigntmg forces Stales had managed to keep fairfy 
real jeopardy. dear of Africa and had left aid policy 

f Gramm-Ru dman lanatv in the hands of the nnst-cnln- 


Under Gramm-Rudman, budgets 
will not just be strong medicine, but 
hemlock. In 1988, with a budget in 


The effect on national defense is 
particularly severe. "The Congressio- 
nal Budget Office estimates that to 


A Grayness in the West at Year’s End 


P ARIS — Today’s debates on 
domestic as wdl as foreign pol- 
icies in the West tend to be instru- 
mental ones, about how best to do 
sdf -evidently desirable things. Ev- 
eryone is in favor of arms reduc- 
tions. better East-West relations, a 
stable international economy and 
reduced unemployment, inflation 
and debt The question is how to do 
iL The values of society itself, toe 
great social choices that have been 
made, are mostly uncon tested. 

It is fairly recent that this has 
been so. The Communist parties of 
Italy, Spain and France, the mast 
important radical challengers of es- 
tablished Western values in recent 


By W illiam Rfafff 

Die crusades today, though, are 
on the margins of society. Europe- 
an communism is a meat force. 
'Radical movements are largely dis- 
regarded, which explains why some 
resort to bombs to make their argu- 
ment The old causes are won — 
which, of course, is a good thing. 

Economic justice was the tingle 
greatest moral issue behind the po- 
litical dissent of late 19th and easi- 
er 20th century Europe and North 
America. By now the struggle over 
wealth’s distribution has been tem- 
pered in the Western democracies 


it is impassible for nations to Ike without a 

conviction of moral direction in national life. 


years, once possessed church-like 
intensity. They evoked commit- 
ments resembling that of religion. 
They were photographer's nega- 
tives, so to speak, of toe institution- 
alized and atrophied Latin Catholi- 
cism of toe late 19th and early 20th 
centuries. They, too, preached the 
message' of another world. 

Il is no coincidence that Militant 
Tendency, the ktft-wing faction in- 
tide the modem British Labor Par- 
ty, resembles nothing so much as an 
evangelical and revivalist sect in the 
English tradition of religious dis- 
sent. The theologically desiccated 
Anglican Church itself has increas- 
ingly taken up toe causes of secular 
reform, a phmomenon also evident 
in the Catholic Church. 

The more weakened or absent 
religion is in a society, the more 
people look for secular substitutes, 
attributing to movements of mate- 
rial reform toe power to transform 

human relationships. People think 

that a crusading movement of the 
left or sew right, or a revolutionary 
cause, will be able to solve not 
merely soda] distress but individual 
human grief and mystery as wdL 


by welfare programs and redistrib-' 
alive tax policies, at the same time 
that the ideals of communism have 
been EateDy compromised by the 
modem Sonet realities of famine, 
labor camps, secret police and intel- 
lectual obscurantism. 

Democratic socialism, in West- 
ern Europe, has run aground in the 
shoals of moderation. It finds itself 
with nothing dramatically different 
to propose from what- is already 
favOTea by the parties of the demo- 
cratic right. The Socialist Party in 
France came to power in' 1981 
promising to change people’s lives. 
It could not do so, and now itspins 
out hs final weeks of power in the 
shadow of the Greenpeace scandal 
making shamefaced doctoral and 
business deals to perpetuate its in- 
fluence beyond the party’s expected 
defeat m toe elections next March. 

The Communist Party is an emp- 
ty shell in Spain as well as in 
France. In Italy toe party has be- 
come an unconvincing imitation of 
democratic socialism. 

A comparable loss of moral dy- 
namism 'is developing in the United 
States, where President .Reagan 


came to power on a near-evangeli- 
cal wave of opinion that demanded 
not only nrihtazy strength for toe 
country, national pride, but moral 
elevation, national virtue. ^ TheJRea- 
gan program of individualism and 
economic liberalism has in practice 
produced an orgy of materialism 
and fraud; companies looted for 
executive gain or wrecked for the 
sake of fiscal manipulation; family 
farms mined; high nffiank indict- 
ed foe economic crimes. The Demo- 
cratic opposition, which had its 
‘ moral confidence broken by Viet- 
nam and the Iran hadwg B crisis, 
still searches for a deus ex machina 
— even in the compromised guise 
of Edward Kennedy.. . 

It is a bad time when Britain's 
TrotekyUes, wild men as. they may 
. be. seam the only ones truly deter- 
mined to change their static, class- 

crippled, society — the only ones 

except Margaret Thatcher, who has 

had her chance, and, like Mr. Rea- 
gan. has seen her principles mocked 
by financial swindlers in the heart 
of the conservative establishment. 

The Greats are toe ones in West 
Germany who care deeply — about 
tire wrong things, perhaps, but in 
stark contrast to toe moral grayuess 
of a society which, its vetoes con- 
ceded, remains grotesquely compla- 
-cent about those virtues. 

We approach the end of 1985 
with an ideological flatness in the 
West, great experiments exhausted, 
dissent marghrafced, debate dead- 
ened. The moraliratioo of polities 
has done great harm in modon 
history, producing movements 
closed to compromise or reason; 
but at the same time it is impossible 
for nations to live without a convic- 
tion of moral (Erection, of generos- 
ity and purpose in nariAnni 
“When there is no vision, the peo- 
ple perish,” the prophet warns. 
WdL one hopes that it does not 
come to that Nonetheless, in to- 
day's moral dimate toe wanting 
justifies a thought or two. 

.01985 WiOkmPfoff,. 


could result in a 25-percent redaction 
in total defense spending. Worse, toe 
Reagan administration has already 
declared its intention to protect nu- 
clear weapons from reductions. That 
leaves conventional fighting forces 
and readiness in real jeopardy. 

The havoc of Gramm-Rudman 
will not be limited to the Defense 
Department. It prevents Congress 
from establishing and meeting bud- 
get priorities such as education, train- 
ing, industrial modernization and 
other investments in the future. The 
purpose erf the budget should be to 
strengthen the economy and defense. 
Grarmn-Rudman may well result in 
the death of the very programs that 
enhance competitive capabilities. 

The president and Congress have 
now established a scheme that will 
lead 4o a new form of gBiw-gmancbi p 
within the federal government. We 
will see artificially high budgets de- 
signed to embarrass the president 
into exercising the veto or to apply 
across-the-board cuts. Some pro- 
grams may receive in flu red budget 

allocations so that the o riginall y 
desired level can be obtained despite 
a percentage reduction. 

Bui if toe goal is a competitive 
economy and investments in our fu- 
ture, then all budget cuts are not 
equaL This sham of a budget plan 
proposes to cut equal parts from fat 
ana lean, from special interest and 
nat i o nal interest, from competitive 
minds and protected constituencies. 

Gramm-Rudman arose in the ab- 
sence of a viable Democratic alter- 
native, but it has taught many Demo- 
crats a lasting lesson. Those outside 
the party should not count on the 
disarray of tins year to last into the 
next. The Republican Party may con- 
trol the rules and the process, bat if 
Gramm-Rudman is their vision they 
will not control the future. 

Los Angela Tones. 


aver age of 4 percent. The slowdown 
coincides with a deterioration in the 
position of many Third World coun- 
tries, particularly in Africa. 

By the year 2000, reckons the U.S. 
Agency lor International Develop- 
ment, the population of the 46 coun- 
tries of sub-Saharan Africa will have 
doubled in 20 years to l&O milli on. Of 
the present 400 nnUkmpeopie there, 
something like 180 miaioa in 34 or 
the countries suffer from such funda- 
mental shortages as a growing scarci- 
ty of firewood. Meanwhile, only 
about 10 percent of the African work 
force has a salaried job. More effi- 
cient agriculture remains the key to 
survival, and development aid rather 
than emergency food aid is needed to 
bring about the “green revolution” 
that will enable Africa to feed itself. 

UJ5. support fra- some sort of aid 
coordination mechanism reflects 
Washington’s realization that its ixE 
yolvemeni in Africa is doomed to 
increase. Until lately the United 
States had m a n aged to keen fairfv 


ars. But tins ■year's 
big f a mine raid' effort is already 
bringing a minor new American in- 
volvement in development aid. t ‘ 
Why was the idea for regular U.S.- 
EC contacts on Tbird Worm develop- 
ment policy not raised in Brussels 
on Dec. 13? Closer coordination has 
been urged this year by people at tin 
top of the World Bank, UNCTAD 
and the OECD, but the pr e s sur es 
against setting up even an informal 
co nnn Q n icalions mechanism prevaiL 
On the American aide, 
fears that a UJS.- EC forum on aid 
could somehow affect the 
trans-Atlantic farm trade ifiapntf ' 
over the subsidized cereals exports 
that both rides are threatening to 
unload onto the wodd nwrifu In 
Europe there is a view that U.S. de- 
velopment aid is much more politi- 
cized than the Community's, md 
tome are suspicions that Washington 
might one day wish to use an aid 
poBcy fo ram for su p erpo w er potties." 

The Community has some practi- 
cal doubts as wwl, having yet to 


new American in- 
fopment aid. i 
a for regular U.S.- 


between the national aid schemes of 
its member states. In recent years it 
has also tried to concert some of its 
Afirarn development aid projects, 
with those of Japan, bat it dropped 
the scheme as unworkable. 

Despite t h ese various otriecrions,. 
wwW probably con- 
clude that the countries ton* provide 
abort 90 percent of all Third Worid 
development assistance should get 
together to streamline their efforts. 

International Herald Tribune. 


LETTER TO THE EDITOR 

People and the Deserts *««*■ The key notions a 


Id response to the comment by 
Farouk El-Baz on deserts (Dec 3 and 
4), it needs to be em phariTwl that 
there is a difference between ancient 
geological deserts, shaped by climate 
and geok^y, and those partly caused 

by man in more recent tinra through 

inadequate « excessive use of natural 
resources. Drought reinforces this 
latter process, but desertification 
continues even without drought 

. People cannot be blamed for seek- 

mg food, energy and income, but 
those quests are the main causes of 
desertification. Several, agricultural 
sectors have yet to receive an ade- 
quate package of technologies. 

Much can be learned studying no- 
®sds and farmers in desert condi- 


^ notions are diversity 
[UMl flodUicjr of responses, and mo- ■ 
of population. An integrated 
approach is n e ed ed in agricultural- 
ptens. Economic development should 
be coordinated with conservation' 
of desertification control ] 
TTie need to leant to live wiih 
oesert and drought was emphasized. 

report by toe Economic 
L f™ nns swnfof Afnca. The selection ' 
of drou^t-resistant plant varieties.' 
“odd be continued. Water policy : 
sbouW be diversified, pbummg*-- ’ 
oe^ed for food production and it- ■, ^ 
An energy poEcy needs to be ' 
•jPjnMd- And an international; ■ * 
Centex should link all the parameters - 
“ “e desertification problem. - ' - =— 
GEORGES NOVIlCOFFi ‘ 
Tana, 





Page 7 


t^nM-Europe 
And Cassam: 
,^\ll Systems 
^ire on line 


EVTERISATIONAIi HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1985 


1 


& 

r-bs 


Fitchett 1 

tjatmadoaal Herald Tribune 

r ’^PARIS— ; As one of Europe's 


.-SSI 


corporations and 1 
„ J:hs biggea taxpayers, IBM- 
^■i^yropc might feel entitled to ask a 
r'^sstian of political and business 
^'^■^das: Why caa’i Common Mar- 
companies act more like IBM? •; 
- -^.jycan’l they loo eropbaroenjarv 
and ofgamze production on 



'Battle of ihe US. Titans 9 Hastens Technological Revolution 




Kaspar V. Cassam 


"xv ‘ ^Lln fact, some European compa- 
^ -3s are starting to do just that. 

true European company 
--^ ■ joiild operate in a very similar 
* 0\y to the European subsidiaries 
uVy^cmtgor UiL corporations,’* says 
^ i^-dbb Wilmot, until recently head 
Britain's major competitor 
’:i "The key difference would 

that the mcgor wealth creation 
jT;V shareholders and management 
the 'strategic decision-making 
L-r^i-d source of technology would 
--■^ly ia Europe.” 

-awfAdds David Cooksey, a venture 
.^^pitalist whose Advent company 
ij^?%Wed in London: “If you don't 
^ .^^nt in several countries at race, 
~ don’t achieve critical mass, you 
survive counterattacks by big 
i'^ts yS . and Japanese comped teas.” 


-. I'.'hdBM’s profitability in Europe 
e^A-an* from its ability to achieve 
~ .^jirfceting power seldom matched 
jJT /^a-i its competitors. “We treat West- 
Europe as me entity, so we get 
V^t-onomies of scale,” explains 

• . -j .jjpgj. V. faeggni , the oKai rwum of 

.‘T^M-Europe. “Our plant in Mool- 
^ .-■ iiier, France, makes all of our 
i^ T: ^Tgc computers for Europe, our 
in Greenock, Scotland, 
7 ^-fc skes all the personal computers.” 
*"~i!5'A fuD explanation of this ap- 
I 3 ; <nach comes from Jacques Mai- 
‘’■^airougs, Mr. Cassanfs predcccs- 
in a recent French bode, 
c%idanager International.” In 1958, 

■ ' the fledgling Common Mar- 
5 began to reduce tariff barrios 

“aiong European countries, IBM 
: -s^id eight factories in the six origi- 

- - y i^l member nations — France, 

; u^'est Germany, Italy, Belgium, the 

■ ^ Netherlands and Luxembourg. 

1 ^=S:k»t of the factories were making 
^4 :e full range of IBM products and 

!•:' rlrjoe of than were notably profit- 

- ~'i = The solution was to assign each 
■: • :cc‘.M product to a single factory. 

. ^lich manufactured it for the en- 

•==i«BC. 

• _ c ~. ; -“Dtscnsskras were difficult be- 

;> use factory and govenunent offi- 

• - -hIs in each country wanted their 

: M plant to make die most proCt- 

je products, but we succeeded in . 
; r . posing, a reorganization because 
-■ had a'European management* ' 
•; . -z book relates. 

is a dear how-to lesson about 

• ^Tma gmg in the Connnon Market, 
” r , ; c ~il it's harder to make Semens, 

J. jilips and Bud work together than 
; - M subadiaries,” it says. 

..... ^Functionalism has long charac- 
..-ized IBM-Europe. At the sky- 
~.l' japa outpost of La Defense, 
-^ar Pans, the books in Mr. Cas- 
.‘.',rafs office are all International 
.' T-iancss Machines publications. 
~ '.'1 desk is bare except for his ap- 
-- - ;T.imment calendar and a wooden 
; ... ptal calculator, invented in the 
r 7 . ' 7 th century by the French phUos- 

• 1 '. 7 bff PascaL 

- J 7^ This Rareness is part of his style. 
-'“T'/scribing his joint-venture poli- 

- -- 77 .S, in winch Mr. Cassani says 
•—^ 'TM is looking for obvious match- 

-••• ^ • with strong partners, he says; 

- -J.yy people have to explain mi a 
r ■ J * eet of paper why it’s a 

- - -* " m \od idea. Otherwise 1 won’t do it-” 
-- : '.Mr. Cassani, 58, is known to gov- 

- 'T'jmeat officials and corporate ex- 
^;nives throughout Western Eu- 
^..pe as “Kap.” A nickname 
■ -'pears to ease bis mission of con- 

- ^ang people that IBM is a good 

. - ropean ertizen- 


He has a bifocal view of industri- 
‘ al Europe, seeing it partly through 
. UiL eyes as an IBM senior vice 
president who frequently visits cor- 
porate headquarters in Armonk, 
New York, and putly as a Swiss- 
bam executive widely recognized 
for bis sensithnty to Europe’s cor- 
porate practices and problems. 

“The big debate 00 multination- 
als is over” in Europe, he insists. 
“In the mid-1970s, when a big, in- 
novative multinational was suc- 
cessful, it was the devil We don’t 
hear that any mor e." 

An aide adds: “Nobody kids 
themselves any longer that they 
Bright be able to re-create their 
world without IBM.” 

The world of IBM-Europe com- 
prises 83 countries, including many 
m the Middle East and Afnca, but 
its lucrative markets are concen- 
trated in Western Europe. The re- 
cession has not dented IBM-Eu- 
rope’s profits: nearly £2 billion last 
year of IBM’s total S6J8 billion, 
op from S5_S billion in 1983. 

IBM employs more than 90,000 
Europeans in 13 plants and 6 re- 
search centos in the EC and last 
year it bought nearly S2 billion 
worth of products from 37,000 Eu- 
ropean subcontractors. IBM is also 
one of the largest European tax- 
payers with a total bffl of SO btl- 
Hon last year in the EC. 

Mr. Cassanfs confidence that 
Europe accepts IBM is rooted in a 
conviction that “the syndrome of 
defeatism in Europe is gone.” 

In the last two years, many Euro- 
pean electronics turns, whose sales 
were aided by a strong dollar, have 
invested heavily in computer-inte- 
grated manufacturing facilities for 
microchips, he points out 

To make modem micro-elec- 
tronics, Mr. Cassani continues, 
companies must 
on electronic tools, 
ed des i gn not only saves millions of 
hours in planning products but also 
simplifies manufacturing: When 
IBM used computers to redesign an 
electric typewriter, it reduced the 
number of parts by two thirds and 
cut assembly time from a half day 
each to a half hour. 

IBM’s commercial success, both 
Mr. Maisonrouge and Mr. Cassam 
stress, is chiefly due to an emphasis 
on marketing. 

Generally m Europe, says a man- 
agement expert at Batidle Insti- 
tute, a Geneva-based c on sul t ancy 
group, “marketing and research de- 
partments tend to be kept apart, 
whereas in IBM and other U.S. 
companies there is constant inter- 
play, malting them more product- 
oriented.” 

like virtually everybody else in 
the top IBM echdons, Mr. Cassani 
— who has spent his entire career, 
34 years, with the company — 
came up through sales and market- 
ing. 

He expresses surprise that Euro- 
peans are not more enthusiastic 
about the potential of their com- 
puter industry. “The dala-prooess- 
mg industry in Europe is growing 
strongly, 20 percent last year, its 
highest rate since 1976,” he says. 
“The trend con tinned this year.” 

The prospect of an electronics 
revolution ignites Mr. Cassanfs 
normally cautious tone: “We’re go- 
ing into the information economy,” 
be insis ts, “as certain as mnen in 
church.” 


(Co afa ued from Page 1) 
lions activities of the sote-owned. 
conglomerate Istituto Recostm- 
zkmc Industrials. 

In West Gecmany, IBM is work- 
iog with the suue-nm Buodapost 
to develop a videotex system pro- 
viding inroonation on home tetevi- 
sion screens. In Britain, however, 
IBM was foSed in an agreement 
with British Telecom on a value- 
added network, or VAN, that 
would have provided computer- 
based services nationwide by 
phra w 

Charging that this combination 
of IBM and the denationalized 
phone company would have over- 
powered any competition, the Brit- 
ish govenunent vetoed the deaL 
Despite the setback, IBM las not 
given up its ambition of going be- 
yond suing such hardware as per- 
sonal computers. B n s bie s sm e n see 

IBM poritirHUDg itself to play a 
major role in helping develop Eu- 
rope's emerging computer-based 
communications systems. 

“IBM has chosen the smart way 
in, through VANs, and avoided try- 
ing to crash into the market for 
public network switching, which 
would fating them head to head 
with the PITs,” Mr. Darmon says, 
referring to the pubfic phone net- 
works generally ran by state-owned 
PTTs. 

In Asia too, both U.S. corpora- 
te. IBM 


nous are increasingly active. 

plans a VAN with Nippon Tele- 
graph & Telephone, Japan's former 
tdqdxme monopoly, which be- 
came a private company this year. 
AT&T has already teamed up in 
Japan with Ricoh to make small 
phone networks and belongs to a 
.joint venture, involving 16 Japa- 
nese companies led by Mitsui, to 
provide telecommunications ser- 
vices. AT&T also has two joint ven- 
tures in South Korea with Lucky 
Gold Star, one to make fiber-optic 
cables, the other to make semicon- 
ductors. 

This strategy of arriftnow; is a 
departure for IBM and AT&T, 
both of them longtime corporate 
kmere. 

The Chany- was triggered by 
U.S. court decisions — unrelated, 
but made coincidentally in 1982 — 
to break up AT&T’s phone monop- 
oly and drop antitrust action 
against IBM. The court decisions 
accel e rated the companies' move- 
ment into each other's business. 

Traditionally, IBM built ma- 
chines, AT&T carried messages. 
Today, both computers and tele- 
phones operate with the same 
parts: microchips and software 
programs of instructions. So AT&T 
now sells computers and IBM mar- 
kets communications networks to 
accompany hs computers. 


7 Prison Guards 
Held in Oklahoma 
As Convicts Riot 

Rotten 

McALESTER, Oklahoma — 
Heavily armed police surrounded 
Oklahoma’s maximum security 
prison Wednesday after seven 
guards were taken hostage by more 
than 70 inmates who rioted Tues- 
day night. 

Three other guards, stabbed and 
beaten in the protest over over- 
crowding and food, were released, 
and negotiators were trying to se- 
cure the release of the others. 

AH three were hospitalized in 
stable condition, a spokesman for 
the Oklahoma State Penitentiary 
said. In 1973, three guards were 
killed in a riot at the prison, located 
100 mQes (160 kOometers) east of 
Oklahoma Gty. 

The prisoners took control of 
two win^ of the building and com- 
municated their demands for better 
conditions by tdc^cning a local 
radio station and asking that four 
reporters be allowed m for a news 
conference Wednesday. 

Authorities were reluctant to al- 
low the meeting, fearing the report- 
ers might also be taken captive. 





The Associated Press 

- JN1TED NATIONS, New 
: ■'rk — The UN Security Council 
. ■ mimoasly adopted an unprece- 
r'.ued resolution on Wednesday 
idemmng terrorist abductions 
"'..I calling for the release of all 


' To preserve the show of solidari- 
1 there was no public debate on 
resolution, which stemmed 
- '.n a UJL initiative prompted by 
hijacking of the Italian cruise 
~ • ) Arirille Lauro in October. The 


hijackers arc accused of lotting an 
dderiy American passenger. 

Egypt, off whose coast the hi- 
jacking drama look place, joined in 
co-sponsoring the resolution, along 
with the United States. Britain, 
France. Australia, Denmark, Peru 
and Trinidad and Tobago. 

At the insistence of India and 
other Third World members of the 
15-nation council, some minor 
cfa mg ps were made in the text 
Tuesday at closed-door consulta- 


tions, according to participants at 
tbemeeting. 

The resolution “condemns un- 
equivocally all acts of hostage-tak- 
ing and abduction” and “calls for 
the immediate safe release of all 
hostages and abducted persons 
wherever and by whomever they 
are being hdd.” 

Western sources said UiL and 
Soviet delegates had been meeting 
privately for weeks on (he wording 
of thetexL 




Vous au 33 rue Francois If 
quelle coincidence! 


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AT&T and IBM are big 
to provide customers with 
huge, often global, networks feed- 
ing off computer power: But the 
costs of inventing, developing and 


require 
to recoup their invest- 


be so 
global 
meets. 

Europe cannot escape the stock 
wave. 

“Once they started merging 
phones and computers, evoybody 
else had to follow,” Thomson's Mr. 
Daemon says. 

Maria Bellisaiio, the head of 
Iiatid, a phoWHcnaking subsidiary 
of Italy's Stet, concurs. “When they 
moved, we had to,” she says simply. 
She acknowledged at a conference 
in London tfau *»nntb that her 
’s survival depended on 

stronger Trttwrtfirinmil 

ties in'theuext five years. 

This need for a broads- base is 
true even for the titans. AT&T, 
whose renowned research estab- 
lishment. Befl Labs, made posable 
the wwvfain computer by inventing 
the transistor in 1947, and IBM, the 
world's moa_profitaWe company 
with S6.5& bilhon in earnings last 
year, need help in developing the 
new id ecornim nucations 


"They are embarked on a series 
of mega-alliances,” says a U.S. spe- 
cialist at the Organization far Eco- 
nomic Cooperation and Deudop- 
ipwu, which groups the iwafag 

nO n-C ranm i n iH d imh^tripl pon a-rc 

“The political dhnenaon is that 
they need die European ventures to 
get a foothold in what is still largely 
government-controlled and mil re- 
main a highly political business in 
the Common Market.” 

So far, “the battle of the titans” 
has not been folly understood, ac- 
cording to numerous recent inter- 


views with bus i nessmen, analysts 
and political leaders. 

“Many Europeans still do not 
comprehend the fierceness and im- 
plications of the l»ltle and the fact 
that Europe is caught m the cross- 
fire,” Robb Wilmot, until recently 
head of Britain's ICL, told fellow 
.' electronics executives and govern- 
ment officials at a conference in 
Brussels last month. 

They were reviewing Esprit, a 
.^^Jd^csearoh progtm n tohdg 

institutions cooperate to close the 
technology gap with the United 
States and Japan in computers and 
tdecommumcations. The program 

is sponsored by the European 
Com m i s sion, the executive secre- 
tariat of the European Community. 

Business leaders at the meeting 
insisted that improved research co- 
operation was not enough, that Eu- 
ropean industrial chang es were ur- 
gent. 

Already, a wave erf takeover bids 

is starting to change Europe’s high- 

tech landscape. 

In Britain, General Electric Co. 
wants to absorb Plesscy to form an 
electronics company that would 
rank eighth in the world m telecom- 
mpjeatlffvj Fadi company 

has also been talking with Sweden’s 
Ericsson. Italy's two strongest tele- 
communications manufacturers, 
Italic! and Teletua, have just 
joined forces. 

In France, the government has 
merged the telecommunications 
work of two big. stale-owned elec- 
tronics companies into Thomson- 
Alcatel, under CGE Even West 
Germany's electronics giant, Sie- 
mens, is tatting about industrial 
cooperatkm with GTE Cbrpi die 

second -largest US, telecommuni- 
cations manufacturer behind 
AT&T’s Western Electric. 


A more original European re- 
sponse is a new company known as 
European Silicon Structures, re- 
ferred toas ES2 and coTounded by 
Mr. Wilcnot to make custom micro- 
chips, the basis for all computer 
reasoning. ES2 has tried to avoid 
having a national identity by 
spreading its activities and owner- 
ship through major European 
countries. 

An innovative high-technology 
company most have a Europe-wide 
approach from its start, says Jean 
Luc Grand-Oemetu, chief execu- 
tive officer of ES2. “Otherwise if 
the market for your product opens 

a U A and Japanese competitors 
move in and wipe you out” 
What also worries European- 
minded industrialists is that dere- 
gulatory pressures to open up mar- 
kets to international mu ip w itinr, 
coining mainly from the United 
States, wtD affect European mar- 
kets before European companies 

arc ready to compete. 

“This pressure on already fragile 
national suppliers is just the strate- 
gic gap our competitors have bees 
waiting for,” Mr. Wilmot feds. 
“Why dse do we have U-S. and 
Japanese computer, communica- 
tions and semiconductor facilities 
undo 1 construction all across Eu- 
rope?” 

The Europe-wide approach 
scans too slow to some established 
companies. Faced with the offen- 
sive of IBM and AT&T, some cor- 
porations have decided, like Philips 
and Olivetti, that they must jean 
one of than. 

“We M fallen far behind the 
United States and Japan in tech- 
nology development,” Philips’s 
chairman, Wisse Dekko-, acknowl- 
edges. “Any dogmatism about 
*keepmgit European 1 is rapidly dis- 


appearing in the search for benefi- 
dal r elationships " 

Philips, like Olivetti, chose to co- 
operaic with AT&T, partly because 
their technologies dovetail and 
partly because, m the words of an 
industry analyst, “AT&T has never 
been in Europe, so Europeans 
don't know it and it doesn't fright- 
en than as much.’’ 

The same cannot he said for 
IBM, which has been in Europe 
since before World War II and 
whose power intimidates Europe- 
ans. Indeed, says Kaspar V. Cas- 
sani, chairman of IBM-Eurqpe, 
“Our joint ventures in the United 
States and Japan are much bigger 
than the ones in Europe, but they 
attract less attention because they 
do not trigger European-style de- 
bates about their impact on the 
future of the society 

Mr. Cassani says nevertheless 
that he expects IBM to double its 
European telecommunications 
business dining the next five years. 

AT&T is developing its ap- 
proach more slowly, in part be- 
cause it is sometimes handicapped 
by its lack of foreign experience: 
(Industry folklore says that most 
members of the AT&T team that 
flew to Turin to work out the de- 
tails with Olivetti had never been to 
Europe before, not even on vaca- 
(uhl) 

AT&T’s management, mainly 
engineers, also has little of (he mar- 
keting experience acquired by 
IBM's managers, most of whom 
came up the executive ladder 
through sales. 

But AT&T's staying power 
makes it a formidable rival Al- 
ready AT&T has become the rally- 
ing point for European electronics 
companies* attempts to band to- 
on W mn '< w Iwjinieal Stan- 
for their equipment, making 


their computers and software inter- 
changeable but incompatible with 
IBM equipment. 

AT&T executives stress that they 
operate with widely compatible 
computer lan guage and equip- 
ment, based on an emerging techni- 
cal system developed under the 
auspices of the Geneva-based In- 
ternational Standards Organiza- 
tion and called Open Systems In- 
lemxuucTion, or OSI. 

European manufacturers feel 
OSI will provide some competitive 
protection against IBM equipment, 
which operates only with IBM’s 
system, known as Systems Network 
Architecture: or SNA. 

The degree of compatibility be- 
tween systems using these two'stan- 
dardsis a main issue in internation- 
al negotiations over technical 
specifications for phone systems of 

the future. 

Mr. Cassani says that IBM has 
helped develop OSI and is commit- 
ted to compatibility with it. but so 
far the company has not aban- 
doned its own system. 

Whatever the outcome of “the 
battle of the titans,” Europeans are 
increasingly aware that they cannot 
stay on ihe skWines. Some Europe- 
ans regard the U.S. companies' am- 
bitions as a challenge to the inde- 
pendence of Europe but others sec 
an opportunity their companies 
cannot refuse. 

As a Philips executive puts it 
rhetorically: “Would you rather 1 
imported UB. technology so Euro- 
pean companies can take part in a 
global business or would you rather 
just wait to fall fatally behind in a 
technological and industrial revo- 
lution?” 

(Next; The movie Gunners givs gob- 
oL) 


GERMAN QUALITY WINES 


The world's lightest wines 
from Moselle and Rhine 


German wines continue to grow 
in popularity. In just the last de- 
cade German wine exports have 
quadrupled. Approximately 400 
million bottles - around one 
third of the German harvest — 
find their way to connoisseurs 
throughout the world. 

The unique taste 

President Jefferson and Queen Vic- 
toria were neither the first nor the 
last famous people to enjoy from 
Rhine and Moselle wines. They dis- 
covered more than a hundred years 
ago that German wines are excep- 
tionally fresh and fruity. And above 
all - light and refreshing. 

Wines of distinction: 

German Kabinett wines 

Wine connoisseurs consider Ger- 
man Kabinett the epitome of light 
fresh, elegant wine. 

They are 

• among the lightest wines in the 
world 

• lower in alcohol 

e characterized by stimulating 
freshness and a subtle acidity 

• noted for their delicate fruitiness 
and light aromatic bouquet 

A unique range and 
variety of wines 

The Moselle and Rhine wines are fa- 
mous for their blend of refreshing 
acidity and delicate sweetness, but 
they are certainly not all sweet 
There is a wide selection of dry and 
semi-dry wines for those who prefer 
them. 

The "light" trend 

Wines for drinking with today’s cui- 
sine should be stimulating^ fresh 
and light. 

Following this world-wide trend, 
German Kabinett wines are very 
much in demand. Their lightness 
makes them the ideal complement 
to good food. 

They are perfect for the light busi- 
ness lunch or as an aperitif for par- 
ties and other social events. 


FRANKEN 




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Can you help us find the original of this 
portrait of James Gordon Bennett, Jr. by Henri 
Gervex, painted in 1903? As part of the 
preparations for the International Herald Tribune’s 
100th anniversary in 1987, we are researching our 
own history: looking for all documents, letters, 
files, etc. relating to the paper from its birth in 1887 
as the European edition of the New York Herald 
(often known as the "Paris Herald”). 

We invite anyone with knowledge of the 
history or current whereabouts of the above 
painting of the founder and first publisher of the 
European edition to contact 

Ruth Levy, 

International Herald Tribune 
181, Avenue Charies-de-Gaulle 
92521 NeuillyCedex. 

Tel.: 47.47.12.65. Telex: 613595. 


SCIENCE 


The Small World of Microscopes: Techniques Without Light 


By Walter Sullivan 

jVfw York Tima Strike 

Q Q ENTISTS are testing and us- 
J mg techniques that go far be- 
yond those of conventional optical 
or electron microscopes, enabling 
them to see the most intimate struc- 
tures of living and nonliving sys- 
tems. In ways never before possi- 
ble. scientists can magnify and 
examine the surfaces, internal 
structures, even the atomic compo- 
sitions of specimens, including liv- 
ing cells. 

While the original microscopes 
used light waves, these powerful 
new devices use a variety of tech- 
nologies, including beams of sound 
waves, X-rays, polarized electrons 
or the nuclei of various atoms. 

Although most of the advances 
depend on ill umina tion of speci- 
mens with high-energy particles, 
there is much excitement over ap- 
proaches that use viable light and 
therefore do not damage living 
specimens. Electron microscopes 
“fry” the subject with electron 
bombardment. 


One visible-light method, devel- 
oped by Alan Boyde at University 
College in London, produced the 
first three-dimensional pictures of 
highly magnified subjects: A series 
of sharply focused images is ob- 
tained at successive depths, then, as 
described in the journal Science, 
the images are slacked for a three- 
dimensional effect. 


At ComeU University, Michael 
S. Isaacson and colleagues have de- 
vised a way to produce images 
showing details far smaller than the 
wavelength of light used to scan the 
material. The trick is to produce an 
extremely narrow beam of light by 
p assing it through a hole whose 
diameter is only one-tenth to one- 
twentieth the light's wavelength. 

Most of the new approaches de- 
pend on illumination with radia- 
tion whose wavelengths are far 
shorter than those of visible Light. 
The invention of the electron mi- 



Top, graphite surface viewed by IBM microscope in Zu- 
rich; below, hemoglobin molecules from earthworm blood, 


BM. Umwuy of Oacogo fc*e»og»oph»k Tha N*~ To* row. (drowog) 

at various angles. Drawing shows scanning trans m ission 
electron microscope being built at University of Chicago. 


CHRISTMAS 

DREAM 


Gijhmerc and si Ik 
for ladies and men 


Alexandre Savin's 
collection 


Exc ; u s v i tv Cishrr.eri' I iou v. 1 . 


Cashmere House 


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angle 60. FaubouzgSt-Hooort 
« PARIS 8 p • 


croscope in 1932 made use erf two 
critical discoveries. One was that 
electrons moved through-space in a 
wavelike manner, their wave- 
lengths dependent on their energy; 
high-energy electrons have wave- 
lengths far shorter than those of 
light. The other discovery was that 
a magnetic field could focus elec- 
trons as a lens focuses light. 

In the t ransmissi on electron mi- 
croscope. the first type developed, 
a beam of electrons is fired through 
a thin slice of specimen, just as light 
passes through a specimen in a con- 
ventional microscope. 

Material in the specimen scatters 
the electrons, producing an image 
that can then be enlarged by the 
“lens” of a magnetic field, and re- 
corded. An image must be ob- 
tained, however, before the eleo- 
irons alter the specimen. The 
results are two-dimensional. 

The scanning electron micro- 
scope, which came into widespread 
use in the 1960s, creates a three- 
dimensional image, not from elec- 
trons fired through the specimen 


but from secondary electrons re- 
leased from the specimen's surface 
by the electron bombardment. 

A new approach, combining fea- 
tures of both types, is the scanning' 
transmission electron microscope. 
The most ambitious version is be- 
ing built at the University of Chica- 
go under the direction of Dr. Al- 
bert V. Crewe, a pioneer in 
microscope design. It is a refine- 
ment of a device he completed in 
1966 and subsequently upgraded; 
with it, he was first able to produce 
images showing individual atoms. 
The new version is designed to re- 
veal ch emic al properties as well as 
to distinguish objects only 0.6 ang- 
stroms apart; an angstrom equals 
one ten-hOHoath of a meter. Mag- 
nification by light microscopes is 
limited because wavdengths of vis- 
ible light are measured in tbou- 


asy mme tries, the sextupols must be 
fashioned to extreme precision 
from iron that has been melted in a 
vacuum to draw off impurities, and 
hammered in a special forge to 
eliminate large crystals. It is hoped 
that the microscope will be ready 
for testing next summer. 

Other new approaches are those 
using X-rays of relatively long 
wavelength to show very tiny struc- 
tures without destroying them. 
This technique was used in 19S3 to 
obtain the first X-ray image of a 
living oefl. The resolution was 75 
angstroms, almost enough to show 
individual molecules. 


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sands of angstroms. The wave- 
length of an electron accelerated to 
IOOjOOO volts is 0.04 angstroms. At- 
oms in a crystal are two to five 
angstroms wide. 

Tie most powerful suchexisting 
device is at the Lawrence Berkeley 
Laboratory of the University of 
California. Its resolution — defin- 


Eariy this year, Ralph Feder of 
IBM and his colleagues presented 
in Science a series of “flash" X-ray 
images showing living blood plate- 
lets reaching out with “pseudo- 
pods" that bound them to other 
platelets — the process that leads 
to blood coagulation. The speci- 
mens had been placed on top of X- 
ray sensitive material and exposed 
to a flash of X-rays, producing a 
shadow images on the- it-ray 1 sensi- 
tive material that was then viewed 


with a scanning electron micro- 
scope. 

The availability of high-intensity 
X-ray sources, such as the new Na- 
tional Synchrotron Light Source at 
Brookhaven National Laboratory, 
on Long Island, is making possible 
microscopy in which X-rays are fo- 
cused by devices called zoneplales. 
X-rays cannot be bent by ordinary 
mirrors or focused by lenses but 
they can be bent, or diffracted, to- 
ward a focal point by a grating or 
pattern of concentric, circular 
grooves. In this way Janos Kiiz and 
his colleagues at the State Universi- 
ty of New York at Stony Brook 
have mapped the calcium oon tent 
of human Anil tissue. 

A device called the scanning tun- 
neling microscope, in whose devel- 
opment IBM is playing a major 
role, looks at the bumps and valleys 
of surfaces down to the scale of 
individual atoms. A needlelike 
electrode scans across an electrical- 
ly charged specimen, and electrons 
mat escape, or tunnel, out of each 
Spot on the specimen ^an be used to 
bmp its surface atom by atom. This 


200,000-Voit 
Po wer S e emly 


mg the smallest scale at which it 
can observe — is 1.6 angstroms. 
The existing Chicago machine 
achieves 2.4- angstrom resolutiou. 
It can examine the atomic structure 
of such substances as the hemoglo- 
bin in earthworm blood. 


Study Stresses Smoking-Cardiac link 


The mill timilli on-do liar project 
to achieve 0.6-angstram resolution 
depends on high technology. A 
deep vacuum must be mamtirinri 
to prevent electrons from being 
scattered by molecules of air, and 
the electron beam must be kept 
within a narrow energy range to 
prevent the blur of multiple Images 
caused when electrons of different 
energies are bent to different de- 
grees by the magnetic lens. 

The greatest challenge is to com- 
pensate for the spherical aberration 
that has blocked progress toward 
greater magnifications. Such aber- 
ration occurs because electrons 
bent by the spherical configuration 
of a magnetic lens focus on a line, 
rather than a point. The distortion 
becomes increasingly serious at the 
very short wavelengths needed for 
great magnification. Dr. Crewe has 
devised a system of sextupol, or six- 
pole, magnets to correct for this 
effect. To be free of magnetic 


By Allan Paxachini 

Las A ngeks Times Service 

F ) EOPLE under age 55 who quit smoking revert to 
normal heart-attack risk mnch more quickly than 
scientists have previously thought, even in smokera 
who have other conditions that add to the risk, but 
switching to low-tar, low-nicotine cigarettes has no 
significant effect on health, according to two new 
studies. 

Researchers at the Boston University School of 
Public Health report that in people who quit before 
age 55 the risk of sudden major heart attack, winch is 
substantially elevated by .smoking, returns to normal 
within as little as two years. The researchers cautioned 
that the reversal was probably not that fast for all 
smokers, but they said the new evidence not only 
confirmed the ability of the body to rebound from the 
effects even, of decades of smoking but implied a faster 
response than many scientists thought possible. 

rot smokers who have developed high blood pres- 
sure or who have family histories of heart-attack 
susceptibility, quilting can bring about a significant 
damnation of the prospect erf having a sudden heart 
attack, according to the report in the New Rn g fo od 
Journal of Medirane. 

The study focused on men, but Lynn Rosenberg, 
who headed the Boston project, said the effect ap- 
peared to be just as pronounced in women. She saod 
that a small group of women was originally included in 


the project but that, though they showed the same 
reversal effect as men, the number of female subjects. - 
was loo small for statistical review as precise as that to . 
which male subjects were subjected. 

For smokers who cannot or wall not quit, a study at 
the University of Arizona Health Sciences Center in t 
Tucson finds that, especially among longtime smok- 
os. it does little or no good to change from conven- 
tional cigarettes to so-called low-yield ones. 

The research, published the journal Chest, said that 
though what tobacco company marketing depart- _ 
mails call “light” cigarettes produce less tax and < 
nicotine, longtime smokers probably have such exten- 
sive lung impairment that using the low-yield brands . 
would not unprove their health at alL Marketing / ' 
figures indica t e that low-tar, low-nicotine cigarettes, * 
whose development began in the early 1970s, now - 
account for significantly more than half the market - 

The Boston study examined the relationship of : 
smoking and heart attack risk in almost 5,000 men, aQ 
under 55, among patients at 78 hospitals in Massachu- 
setts, Rhode Island, Connecticut and New York. Men 
smoking at the time of the researdi were found to have j 
triple the risk of sudden catastrophic heart attack as 
the controls who had never smoked. Men who had ’ • 
betan off tobacco for at least one year had declined to • ‘ 
double the risk and for men who had abstained for 23 
months, the risk dropped to nearly the same level as "■ 
the men who had never smoked. 


IN BRIEF 


Comet Brightness Laid to Water Loss 


by scientists from the University of Rome and the Regina Elena Institute 
for Cancer Research in Rome. 


WASHINGTON (UPI) — As seen, from Earth, Halley’s comet has 
been surprisingly bright in recent weeks, and the first observations from 
space suggest that the cause is water boding off its icy nucleus faster than 
expected. 

Professor Paul Feldman of Johns Hopkins University, a member of a 
team of scientists operating an astronomy satellite called International 
Ultraviolet Explorer, said the comet was bang Tour tons of water a 
second when it was 170 million miles from the sun. He said satellite data 
showed the water loss rate to be three times neater than expected. 

In a related development, astronomers at the University of California 
at Santa Cruz and NASA's Ames Research Center, using the Lick 
Observatory’s 120-inch Shane telescope, reported that ice particles bad 
been detected around the comet. 


Synthetic THC Can Now Be Marketed 


NE W RO CHELLE, New York (NYT) — pie U. S. Food and Drop ‘ ■ 


* j ~ ■ . — . -v" v. 1 ’ *■ *■) — i nc u.o. rooo ana un 

Admuustranon has approved commercial production of synthetic THC 
me psycboactive ingredient in marijuana, to treat the nausea and vomit- - ; 
mg that often result from cancer chemotherapy. The drug was previously : 
available directly from the National Cancer Institute, according to the 1 
Medical Let t er on Drugs and Therapeutics. 


Temporary Pacemakers Pat in Pills 


ANN ARBOR, Michigan (AP) — A temporary pacemaker in a pfl] has 
stabilized heartbeats or unmoved medical diagnosis in 43 patients, 
according to University of Mutfgan researchers. 

The device paces the heart temporarily and helps doctors diagnose 
cardiac ailments without forcing patients to exercise to raise pulse rates,' 
said Professor Janice Jenkins of the university's Department erf Electrical 
Engineering and Computer Science. She said the device can also control 
rapid heartbeats. . 

The pacemaker, an electrode, is placed in a gelatin capsule attached to 
a thin, insulated line and is swallowed. The doctor lines the capsule up 
near the left atrium, where the electrode can be stimulated to stabilize the 
heartbeat or increase it temporarily for teats. 


technique, which can achieve a res- 
olution of about two angstroms. ; 
will enable researchers to study ; 
corrosion and other metal surface*, 
reactions on the smallest scale. 

The acoustic microscope, under 1 
development at Stanford Universi- i 
ty and elsewhere, offers special ad' ; 
vantages in that its images reflect - 
the mechanical qualities of the-, 
specimen: density, elasticity and 
viscosity. 

Another approach is the scan-; 
ning ion mi crop robe, developed by 
Riccardo Levi-Setti at the waiver* . 
sity of Chicago in conjunction with 
Hughes Research Laboratories. In- . 
stead of electrons, it fires a beam of ; 
ions, or atoms that have shed some 
of their electrons, at the specimen. 
The ions are usually those of the 
metal gallium This not only maps . 
elements of the specimen with a . 
resolution of- about 400 angstrom^ - 
6ut indicates which of thetr iso- - 
topes are present. . * 


i 1 


3 i 


Mi 


The drug, taken orally, is known generically as dronabinol and will be 
marketed under the trade name Marin61.lt is listed as a Schedule II ding, 
Vhemost controlled category of prescription drugs. It has proved effective 1 
01 cfaemo,her ^ y ' thou&h not for patients receiving ' J 

Side effects of THC include drowsiness and orthostatic hypotension, L ; 
also known as "dry mouth." Other possible effects, especially in older 
patients and those unused to marijuana, are digriweea, disorientation, 
agression, paranoia, hallucinations and manic psychosis, the Medical 


U.S., China Plan Project on El Nino 

• WASHINGTON /API - A U. S.-Thme*. 


^AaTDjTCTONifAIJ — A U. S.-Chinese prqjefl to investigate tl 
t Ph ffnonjei wn, which can disrupt weather arose 


t'Wicaj uceaiMilobai Atmos 

iSjIT Chinese and American scientists are sche 

Hemoglobin Found in Ancient Bones S? 

research cruises in the next four years. 

R NHIn rcntr i)uur« J . . 


WASHINGTON (NYT) — Fragments of hemoglobin have beat 
detected in the bonm of humans who died as much a$ 4,500 years ago, 
Kalian medical scientists report Using advanced immunological meth- 
ods, the researchers found traces of hanoglobin in- bones from early 
Roman times and the Bronze Age. 

The purpose was to trat the possibility of using traces of the blood 
substance in archaeological research and in studying the ancient history 
of diseases such as the trfood . disorder Jialassemia. - 

Though the ability to detea hemoglobin varies with time and probably 
the conditions to which the bones were exposed since burial, traces of 


. . i. 

. i> 


«r. 


to a report in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA 


Galilee Water Readies 37-Year Law 


pt&i * 


and villages in Galilee faced a shonageof 


said several settlements . * 









INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1985 


Page 9 


ADVERTISING SECTION 


ADVERTISING SECTION 


H 



25 Years After Independence 




■w 


y>vt« 


Donors React Favorably 
To Economic Recovery Program 


. j 


Scarcely a year after Colonel Maaouya Ould SicT Ahmed Taya came 

to power on December 12, 1984, Mauritania’s new mm of 
economic planners have challoiril up several early points toward 
positive reform. 

By their own admission, much remains to be done But a new 
Economic Recovery Program (ERP), covering the 1985-1988 
period, was adopted already last July, and Mauritania’s donors — 
both bilateral and multilateral — have demonstrated their favor- 
able reaction to it. 

A year ago, the economy was dearly on a downward spiral, 
burdened with desertification, drought, low world prices for iron 
ore, a buge debt-service bill of 2 billion ouguiya ($31 million) in 
1984 alone, a 2_8 billion ouguiya 1984 budget deficit and heavy 
shortfalls in the trade and current-account balances. 

While recognizing that some of the causes of the country's 
economic woes ate external and beyond Mauritania’s control, die 
ERP acknowledges that other causes — for example, bad manage- 
ment and ill-chosen investments — can be corrected with appro- 
priate policies executed at home. 

Investment is to be "moderated” — a clear reference to vast 
sums of iron-arc revenue sunk by earlier economic decision-makers 
into white-elephant schemes in the late 1960s and early 1970s. And 
priority will go to the productive sectors and to maintaining and 
rehabilitating existing projects rather than scarring up new ones. 
Fishing, agriculture and minqals come in for special attention. 

The World Bank has given Mauritania a significant vote of 
confidence Its concessionaiy-lending atm, the International De- 
velopment Assodarion(lDA) has this year granted $29-15 million 
in credits for three sectors: agriculture, industry and public 
enterprise. The largest component, $16.4 million, is to hdp 
Mauritania restructure and rationalize the loss-making public- 


/{fits 



sector companies by, - in the World Bank’s words, "reorganizing, 
privatizing and dosing down en te r pri ses. ” This $29-2 million 
project is a>- financed by France’s Caisse centrale de cooperation 
econoraique (CCCE) and Fonds <Tai dc ct de cooperation (FAC) 
and by the European Investment Bank and the European Develop- 
ment Fund 

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) also cune through 
with a one-year standby arrangement of $12£5 million, which 
expircs.on April 11, 1986- Mauritania has encountered no trouble 
in actually receiving the payments of this sum — a further 
indication that the IMF is satisfied with the country’s economic 
policies. 

Once the IMF facility was in place, the way was dear for the 
World Bank to assemble other donors and creditors in Paris to 
discuss Mauritania’s financial requirements. A sort of mini- 
consultarive group meeting on March 12 and 13 had listened as 
Mauritania’s Finance Minister, Mr. Anne- Amadou Babaly, out- 
lined the ERP and then, according to a World Bank communique, 
"stated their conviction that Mauritania could, over the 
term, overcome its present financial problems." Saudi Arabia alone 
pledged a direct grant of $30 million at that meeting, and donors 
agreed to reconvene for a full consultative group meeting by the 
end of the year. 

At the request of the Mauritanian government, the World Bank 
agreed to open a resident mission in Nouakchott in September. 
Conscious of the crippling effect of such a large debt-service 
burden. Western creditor governments convened a two-day Paris 
meeting on April 27 and agreed to reschedule 90 percent of 
payments of principal and interest due between December 31, 
1984, and March 31, 198 6: repayments will begin in 198 9. 

The largest <harr of ERP spending — 35 percent — is 
earmarked for the rural sector, and while some attention to 
infrastructure is envisaged, especially in the form of rehabilitation 
and maintenance of existing fad lines, the primary emphasis is on 
projects likely to create revenue quickly. Both field crops and 
livestock-raising arc to receive a boost. 

Water is the critical factor in Mauritania’s efforts to grow more 
of its food needs locally. Two-thirds of die conn try is Sahara, desert, 
and much of the remaining third is marginal Sahelian land very 
much dependent on good rains. Until 1985, Mauritania had had 
precious little rain. This year, more rain fell than in any of the 
previous 17 years, which helps tremendously in the short term, but 
very little over the long term. 

Agriculture is very much concentrated in the Chemama, a 
narrow fertile crescent in the south of die councry, along the 
Senegal River. It is seasonally inundated when the river overflows 
its banks. Cereal crops — mostly miller and sorghum — may have 


Developing the 
Iron and Steel Industry 


Mauritania comparatively 
^ large mineral resources in its 
subsoil and can therefore be 
considered a mining country. 
• • Top priority goes to developing 
this source of wealth and gradu- 
ally increasing its value-added 
•j factor. 

- Mauritania’s long-term goal 
is to set up a complete iron and 
steel complex. This first stage 

• of the processing of iron ore 
- would involve private manage- 
ment or ownership, a possibili- 
ty currently being studied by 
several Arab states. 

The aim of SAFA (Sod ere 
-^arabe du fer et de l’ader en 
Mauritanie) is to be an iron and 
wed processing center in West 
•" Africa. It has initiated conven- 
• tional iron and steel production 
in a country where the market 
,> ij is comparatively small. It start- 
le "'sd with electric furnaces and 
tow has a small one which 
produces consumer goods of 
jenerally high quality, such as 
ron rods and steel sections foe 
Mauritania and rhe West Afri- 
an sub-region. SAFA has laid 
he groundwork for an iron and 
Eeel complex which it intends 
3 develop, if only as a training 
=&ttac in iron and steel pcoduc- 
oo. 

SAFA is the first and only 
&tric steel organization in 
^est Africa. Senegal is the 
j-j rind pal market of the West 
! - *’ frican Economic Community 

- IAO). The CEAO is inrcr- 
■ ted in SAFA because of its 

oximiry and the vast trade 
usabilities. The market chere- 
te appears wide-open. There 
Ttain a few problems concem- 
J the range of SAFA’s prod- 
ts, but Mauritania is on die 
. id to solving them since it 
i begun with its own domes- 
needs. 

.The CEAO market is SA- 
natural export market. 



Mineral resources are mostlv located in the north. 


given its proximity and trading 
contacts, not to mention the 
fiscal advantages stemming 
from agree m ents concluded 
with the CEAO. These agree- 
ments, though they present cer- 
tain difficulties, give Maurita- 
nia certain advantages in the 
international market, provided 
they are carrricd out to the 
letter by the parries concerned. 
Mauritania is planning to break 
into this market in a big way. In 
the years ahead, it bopes to 
acquire a large share of this 
market, currently estimated at 
some 100,000 cons per year. 

The present unit, with a ca- 
pacity of 36JXX> tons per year, 
cart easily sell its surplus pro- . 
duction after satisfying the 
Mauritanian market. Maurita- 


nia and its fellow CEAO coun- 
tries need to reinforce the above 
agreements, which, though not 
easy to attain, were dr awn up 
for two reasons: to promote 
production ar the community 
level and to expand trade 
among the countries commit- 
ted to strengthening the eco- 
nomic links of this sub-region. 

Mauritania cooperates with 
the Algiers-based Union arabe 
du fee et de 1'ader in sharing 
with Arab countries its knowl- 
edge of resources and market 
factors. It stresses the need for 
balanced development of iron 
and steel in Arab countries. For 
technical assistance, Mauritania 
has dealt with the Tunisian 
company El Pouledh, one of the 
longest-established in the Ma- 


ghreb. The cooperation has 
been most fruitful 

The inccrnarioaal marker is 
comparatively right and Mauri- 
tania believes that iron and seed 
products arc still in fairly strong 
demand Ac the least, demand is 
starionary. Supply, however, is 
likely to develop. Indeed, iron 
and steel plants are to be found 
practically everywhere, and sev- 
eral Arab scares are finalizing 
projects for plants char will 
manufacture similar products. 
Since these products do nor 
compete with Mauritania on 
the same market, the country is 
not unduly disturbed by this 
development. 

Some say that consumption 
is stagnant, especially in the 
matter of iron rods. For some 
time now, no large projects ca- 
pable of altering the market 
have emerged. Mauritania is 
therefore witnessing a stable 
market, in terms of both supply 
and demand, and does not ex- 
pect any significant internation- 
al price fluctuation. 

The delicate subject of tech- 
nology transfer has been dis- 
cussed at every forum, includ- 
ing the United Nations. It is a 
problem for the recipient in 
thar he is expect e d to buy the 
most suitable technology for 
his particular technological en- 
vironment. Consequently, is 
long as the user is not the one 
to choose the appropriate tech- 
nology. the transfer cannot be 
made, since the choice will have 
been made by thesclkr. A pure- 
ly economic problem of depen- 
dency will thus arise. The inev- 
itable conclusion, therefore, is 
that as long as Mauritania, a 
developing country, .fails ro es- 
tablish the necessary institu- 
tional machinery to facilitate 
effective technological transfer, 
such transfer will never occur. 


Traditional Mauritania, symbolized by the open tent, is complemented by projects geared to fortify its economic viability. 


tripled in 1985, from 20,000 metric tons in 1984 to an estimated 
oOOOO metric tons this year. But to bring about stable production 
levels, the Senegal must be harnessed. Mauritania belongs, along 
with Mali and Senegal, to the Organisation pour la mise en valeur 
du fleuve Senegal (OMVS). which is now building two dams that 
will irrigate more than 400,000 hectares and will curb salt-water 
incursion, a serious problem in dry years, when the volume of 
water in the river is too low ro prevent salt water horn washing 
back from the Adamic and damaging crop land Completion is 
targeted for 1990. 


The focus now, though, is on small-scale irrigation. $8.2 million 
of rhe IDA credit this year will help finance pumping sets and 
other equipment necessary to irrigate 75 farm plots of 20 to 2' 
hectares each, under a $10.8 million scheme expected to increase 
cereal production by 10,000 metric cons a year and to benefir some 
2,900 farm families ar Kaedi and Gouraye. The Rome-base u 
International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) is co- 
financing. The French are co-financing 82 plots of similar sire at 
Boghe. If these schemes succeed, drought may never again take 
quite so high a toll on the Mauritanian economy. 

— Linda Van Buren 



SOCIETE ARABE DU FER 
ET DE L’ACIER EN 
MAURITANIE 

Arab Iron and Steel Company in Mauritania 
CAPITAL -450,000,000 UM 


HEAD OFFICES - NOUADHIBOU 

- ISLAMIC REPUBLIC OF MAURITANIA 

Directorate General 

Commercial Representation 

Tel: 23 89 

P.O.Box 1260 

25 35 and 25 36 SNIM network 

Tel: 51254 

P.O.Box 114 

Telex: 531 MTN 

Telex: 426 MTN 

NOUAKCHOTT 


The Soti6t6 Arabe du Fer et de I’Acier 
(SAFA), joint stockcompany was created 
by protocol of 14 March 1984 by: 

- SNIM-sem (Social* Nationale Indus- 
trie! leet Mnidre-Socteted'Economie 
Mixte Nouadhibou R.I.M.) 

-AR1MCO (Arab Mining Company - 
Amman, Jordan) 

- AISCO (Arab Iron and Steel Company 
-Bahrain) 

Each of these shareholders hold one- 
third ol the capital; 

Within the framework of this associa- 
tion the mining and steel company 
SNIM-sem In Nouadhibou has given way 
to the new company SAFA. 

The aim of SAFA from this main core 
(Nouadhibou Unit) is to take over 
development of the iron and steel and 
metallurgical operations in the Islamic 
Republic of Mauritania. 

NOUADHIBOU UNTT 1 

The mining and steel works Is at pres- 
ent in operation. 

a) Installations 

- One steel works dealing with 12,000 
ton/ year 



V • - 
Ahmedou o uldjiddou 
Director Genera/ of SAFA 

»5ton arc furnace 
» ingot casting 

36.000 ton/year mill for the production 
Of: 

• concrete reinforcing bars: 6mm to 
32mm diameter (smooth and milled) 



Head office and factory of SAFA Nouadhibou 


• marketable grindings 
-related installations 

b) Recycled raw materials: 

Local iron mostly coming from SNIM 
(rails, carriage wheels) 

c) Energy: 

supplied by the national water and 
electricity board (SONELEC) 

d) Personnel: 

The company employs ISO to 180 
agents according to the production 
programme. 

e) Marketing: 

Most of the production is intended for 
export. 

The products manufactured comply to 
international standards. They are 
approved by the Taxe de Cooperation 
R&gionale-T.C.R. (Regional Coopera- 
tion Tax) system within the framework 
of the Communaute Economique de 
I’Afrique de J'Ouesl - C.E AO (Vfest 
African Economic Community) 

1) Renovation: 

Alongside the exploitation ot the exist- 
ing unit, SAFA has undertaken the 
renovation of all the installations with a 
view to improving production condi- 
tions and a better cost and quality con- 
trol over production. 

DEVELOPMENT PLAN 

Within the framework of industrial 
development in the Islamic Republic of 
Mauritania , SAFA is cune ntiy carry ing out 
studies with a view ro the short term 
realisation of iron and steel and metallur- 
gical unttssuch as: 

- metallic structures (framework, pylons, 
etc...) 

-smelting (plating sheets, grinding 
equipment and other current parts) 
-drawing mill 
-etc... 


SAFA 


/ 



V 


7 


/ 


4 


i. 




r 





Page 10 


ADVERTISING SECTION 


IN l'EKNATIUNAL HERALD TRIBLNE, THtK&liAi, DECEMBER 19, 19»5 _ 

tw advertising section 



MAURITANIENNE 
D’ ASSISTANCE 
TECHNIQUES MARITIME 

MATEMA S.A. 

Boulevard Maritime 
P.O.Box 248 

Telephone: 23.37/22.l6.Telex: 417 MTN 
Nouadhibou -Islamic Republic of Mauritania 


DIRECTOR GENERAL: MR. 2EIN OULD MALLOUM 



Zein ould Maltoum 
Director Genera/ of MA TEMA 

ACTIVITIES 

1 . Assistance and advice to businesses and ship 
owners as regards all problems ( concemed 
with the purchase of vessels, equipment and 
maintenance and the supervision of new con- 
structions or repairs. 

2. Study of technical and/or economic projects 
concerning marine, port or river industries. 

3. Expertise in ships and marine installations. 

4. Surveying of marine and various accidents and 
damage. 

5. Representation of insurance companies, 
studies, surveyors and classification super- 
vision etc... foreign concerns having interests 
in Mauritania, or neighbouring countries. 

6. MATEMA actsas representative as regards the 
requirements for qualified experienced per- 
sonnel in positions concerning MATEMA's 
interests in Mauritania and/or anywhere else 
as the case may be. 

7. AGENT OF THE ITALIAN NAVAL REGISTER 
(R.I.N.A.) IN MAURITANIA. 


SJL—iijjJ ^ — di\ 1 — Lijr** 1 

ISLAMIC REPUBLIC OF MAURITANIA 




A bird's eye view of the Autonomous Port of Nouadhibou 

You are assured of the best quality service at the 
cheapest rates on the North-West Coast of Africa, 
with the following accoutrements: 

— a 600-meter quay at . . ‘ 6 meters 

— a 1 30-meter quay at 8 meters 

— a 90-meterquayat 7. meters 

— a 250-meter quay at 3 meters 

Water. Gas/Oil. Ice Supplies. 

All provisions and materials required for fishing. 

Ease of access at any tide. Day or Night, for all vessels 
up to a Draught of 24 feet. 

A specialized Company offering top quality services 
and Materials is responsible for the handling of 
merchandise. 

PAN. is the maritime port for you, situated half-way 
between the Canary Islands and Dakar, in the calmest 
of waters created by the natural harbor of Levrier Bay. 

A coastal radio station, telex and VHF lines ensure 
excellent communications between port, boats and 
owners. 

Tel. {3 linos); 21-34; 

22-70; 

22-35. 

Telex: 441 MTN. 

An imponant port lor fishing and commerce, the 
Autonomous Port of Nouadhibou will experience intense 
industrial and commercial activity in the coming years. 


Message Concerning the State of the Nation by His Excellency the Colonel Maaouya Ould 
Sid’Ahmed Taya, President of the Military Commission for National Safety, Head of State, 
Defiveied on the Occasioir the December 12 Holiday. 

Mr. Resident; Members of cuy situation. The long-term of tbc future for the Mauri ta- part of an integrated pallet: 2a- 

the Military Commission foe deposits reached 2.491 billion man economy. cion project. 

National Safety, Ministers, in lace June 1985 after a high of According to tbc xhostpessi- Operations in the industrial 

Ambassadors, Ladies and Gen- 1.701 billion at die end of 1984, misric forecasts, 606,700 tons of field consisted of; 

demen, representing a 46$ increase. As Esh of all spares can be talcs — a reorganization of the in- 

Twdve months ago, the die demand deposits, they annually from our ceri racial dus trial sector to better 

Military Commissioa for Na- mereasedfrom 5.9826 billion in wsurn, wirfwur any risk" of monitor tbc setting up and 

donal Safety conducted an in? December 1984 to 6.4324 bil- ovofishing. operation of companies; 

lemalresmKftuangop lion in June 1983 for a 7.5* Three hundred sixty five - asststance in the acaoon of 

have indicated the reasons and IF 0 "*- ships are ouiendy operating in new mdusmal urnts through 

finality of this essential action Development of the money our territorial waters. This in- increased help ro promoters; 
on SWWl occasions. supply remains within the lim- dudes 94 national ships with — prodding exis ting m dus- 

In December 1984 our coun- its compatible with the need to 62 freezer boats and 32 foe boats cries with the pzooxnon re- 


try was in a serious sttuanoa: 
lack of credibility on the inter- 
national level, the dilapidated 
State of (be economic and mon- 
etary system, institution of a 
system of power ridiculing the 
most elementary principles of 
liberties foe citizens, all devi- 
ations which interf e red with 
the options of the Military 
r oinmi<saon for National Safe- 
ty. Tilw chc Armed Faeces, ev- 
ery one of you bitterly resented 
the canosive effects of this po- 
licy. 

Dear fellow countrymen and 
women. 

The directions which must 
guide the government’s action 
woe laid out distinctly in the 
official statement issued by die 
Military Commission for Na- 
tional Safety December 13, 
1964: establishment of a strong 
and fait government and stabi- 
lization of an unbalanced and 
unsteady economy. This work 
reflects the challenges and 
threats which assail us as a 
nation, threats for which we 
almost mortgaged our future. 

From that time, governmen- 
tal action has, during the last 
year, been based on doe restruc- 
turing and credibility of the 
State, stabilization of the eco- 
nomic and monetary situation 
to create a solid base foe real 
economic and social p r o g r e ss . 
This has been an often disap- 
pointed, but tenacious hope of 
our people. 

1 will give you a concise 
account of gove rn ment activi- 
ties concerning this subject be- 
fore explaining the prospects of 
the Financial and Economic Re- 
covery Program for die next 
three years. 

Results 

a) Financial and economic situ- 
ation 

The initial government bud- 
get for the fiscal year 1985 in- 
cluding expenditures of 13-144 
billion ouguiya and revenues at 
13-137 billion was modified for 
two reasons: 

1. To move doscr to the 
goals of the Financial and Eco- 
nomic Recovery Program. 

2. To account for the impact 
of the national debt. 

However, during the first 
nine months of the year, the 
results obtained in execution of 
the Finance Act reveal both a 
stabilization of expenditure and 
an increase in revenue and 
funds as compared wich the 
previous year. 

Indeed, a slowdown in the 
budget consumption was re- 
corded. Tax payments rose 22* 
during the first ten months of 
1985 over the previous year. 

It should be reported that 
tbe bulk of our national debt 
contracted with other govern- 
ments was resch e duled, if not 
simply paid oft 

It is also comforting co re- 
port that the Treasury has been 
streamlined, through the regu- 
lar processing of the interior 
and exterior proceedings. 

A distinct impro v e m ent in 

government funds can also be 

noted. This improv em ent will 
bring the current budget deficit 
to dose to 403 million ouguiya 
45 against 1 billion at the end of 
1984. 

This situation results from 
an improvement in the action 
of the tax collection services, 
bur is also due to progress made 
by all the financial depart- 
ments. 

To further improve the fi- 
nancial and economic situation 
of the country, the Military 
Commission for National Safe- 
ty adopted tbe Financial and 
Economic Recovery Pro g ram 
during the session held Septem- 
ber to 8, 1985, which covets 
the 1985-1988 period 

1 will return co the antici pac- 
ed goals and performances of 
dus program. 

Government efforts aimed at 
reducing tbe imbalance in gov- 
ernment finances and foreign 
payments had a major effect on 
the development of rite mone- 


tary situation. Tbe tong-term 
deposits reached 2.491 billion 
in lace June 1985 after a high of 
1.701 billion at the end of 1984, 
representing a 4696 increase. As 
for the demand deposits, they 
increased from 5.9826 billion in 
December 1964 co 6.4324 bil- 
lion in June 1985 for a 7.5% 
growth. 

Development of chc money 
supply remains within the lim- 
its compatible with the need to 
retain the domestic and foreign 
value of the currency, and its 
structure seems satisfactory. 

The credit increase has been 
moderate, reflecting char of the 
money supply, as the ratal do- 
mestic credit rose from 19-762 
billion at the end of 1984 to 
20.026 billion at the end of 
September 1965 for an increase 
of only 1 3%. 

Net government debts de- 
creased by 160 million over the 
r e fere n ce period as compared 
wich the end of Decem- 
ber 1984. 

The eatings foe fisheries, in- 
dustry and energy economic 
sectors have increased. Howev- 
er, an insufficienr amount of 
credit was granted to the rural 
sector and small-fishing indus- 
try. Measures were taken to 
compensate for this , using the 
structures of the National De- 
velopment Fund. The resources 
of this Fund are more suitable 
than banks for action in 
two outlets. 

Starting in 1986, the Nation- 
al Development Fund should 
offer fanners an adequate agri- 
cultural asdic system to accom- 
pany the strategy for the sector 
see up by die government. This 
system will compensate for the 
low income of rural producers 
by providing them with "in- 
trants” and production facilities 


of the future for the Maurita- 
nian economy. 

According to the most pessi- 
mistic forecasts, 606,700 tons of 
fish of all spories can be talcs 
annually from our territorial 
waters, without any risk 'of 
overfishing. 

Three hundred sixty five 
. ships are currently operating in 
our territorial waters. This in- 
dudes 94 national ships with 
62 freezer boats and 32 ice boats 
unloading their entire catch at 
Nouadhibou. These statistics 
do not take into account ships 
chartered by certain national 
shipowners as part of an agrcc- ■ 
meat recently signed wich Por- 
tugal. 

The Mauritanian Fish Mar- 
keting Company (SMCP), 
which constitutes the main 
government operator in the 
fishery domain, expanded its 
field of operations by signing a 
contract with a Japanese firm, 
which agreed to buy 20 to 30% 
of its production. It is currently 
making every effort co pene- 
trate certain Arab and African 
markets. . 

As an indication, on Septem- 
ber 30, 1985, the SMCP paid 
734 million UM to the Trea- 
sury in export duties for bot- 
tom fish. Fear this category of 
fish, SMCP sales should exceed 
7.500 billion UM this year. 

Tbe small- fishing industry 
continues to attract the atten- 
tion of the administration due 
to its high job-creating capacity 
and the guarantees it offers in 
cams of supplying the interior 
market and ground industries. 

Small shipowners are cur- 
rently estimated to indude 624 
boars, operated by a workforce 
of 2j000 fishermen. Financing 
has or will be obtained to devel- 
op this sector from tbe Saudi 
Devdopment Fund, Denmark, 



Colonel Maaouya Ould Sid’Ahmed Taya. 


with long-term payment condi- 
tions. 

On the whole, the monetary 
and credit policy is starting to 
yield results, which proves the 
effectiveness of the instruments 
used. The monetary authorities 
will make sure they are rein- 
forced co contain tbe inflation- 
ist pressures and to regulate the 
overall demand so as co encour- 
age the adjustment process al- 
ready instituted in our external 
payments. 

The creation of a National 
Credit Board is in keeping with 
the general pattern of these 
new directions in monetary po- 
licy. I should add that this 
Board is already ope ra tio n al 
and is responsible for determin- 
ing chc main lines of the credit 
policy. 

Furthermore, an audit study 
of the banking system is under- 
way ac five banks and at the 
National Development Fund. 

This study will rover three 
essential aspects of bank man- 
agement-. 

1. Risks associated wich 
portfolios. 

2. Hie foreign debt level 

3. Profitability. 

The ratal deficir in external 
payments was limited to 1.574 
billion ouguiya following the 
Erst seven months erf 1985 as 
opposed to 3.434 billion during 
the same period of the previous 
year, despite chc auditing of the 
.transfer proceedings recorded 
by the BCM, which readied 21 
billion ouguiya in Decern- .. 
her 1984. 

Although significant im- 
provrxncDr in the overall bal- 
ance of payments was obtained, 
our position in relation to the 
international market remains 
fragile due co the continuing 
high level of imports. 

The continuing growth erf 
fishery exports should signifi- 
cantly contribute to a recovery 
in our balanoe-of-paymenc situ- 
ation. 

The extent of the available 
halfeuric resources means that 
the fishery industry is tbc sector 


the FAO, die FED and the 
FADES. 

In the mining sector, the 
reorganization of the SNIM 
and the SAMDST have been em- 
phasized this year so that 
SNIM will be able to confront 
the inccmarionai competition 
on the iron ore market, while 
the SAMIN can resume opera- 
tions of Akjoujt copper as soon 
as possible. 

During the first nine 
mooch* of the year, sales of iron 
ore readied 7,128^34 tons, rep- 
resenting a value of 
8^13,448^10 ouguiya. 

Negotiations are currently 
underway with the World 
Bank and the Kuwait Fund go 
settle the SNIM cash problems 
and to renovate the railway 
which transports the iron ore to 
the pore of Nouadhibou. 

A solution to the problem of 
the guarantee required to ob- 
tain financing is currently un- 
der consideration. - 

In the field of research, our 
national territory is currently 
coveted by five mineral-pro- 
specting permits valid for phos- 
phate, iron, copper ami hydro- 
carbons. A mining author- 
ization has been issued to the 
SNIM for radioactive sub- 
stances, Ic covers the northern 
■ section of the Docsale Rgeibatt. 
The ORMG has a permanent 
authorization for all ter ri tories 
nor award by ocher prospect- 
ing permits. As you know, 
these prospecting operations 
■' have already yielded the discov- 
ery of a major phosphace depos- 
it in BofaL The fcasfomty study 
for this project is under consid- 
eration for the near future, fol- 
lowing the creation of a. consor- 
tium, including the interest 
parties, primarily the SAMIA, 
andARMICO. 

An cweasrrc survey will be 
• conducted for the two iron.de- 
- posies In the TASIAT where 
-the reserves are estimated ac 
dose co 4 billion tons with an 
- . average icon content of 32% for 
, the Lebthemuye deposit alone 
These deposits may bemincdas 


part of an integrated palletiza- 
tion project. 

Operations in tbe industrial 
field consisted of; 

— a reorganization of the in- 
dustrial sector co better 
monitor the setting up and 
operation of companies; 

— assistance in the acation of 
new industrial units through 
increased help to promoters; 

— providing existing indus- 
tries with the protection re- 
quired for relaunching oper- 
ations, while calting into 
consideration our member- 
ship in regional and interna- 
tional organizations. 
Operation of the industrial 

firms in the parapublk sector 
was satisfactory: this is the case 
erf the SAMIA, which includes 
. a plaster plant with a produc- 
tion capacity of 100,000 tons. 

The SAFA now manages the 
Nouadhibou electrical seed- 
works, which has been opera- 
tional for several months due to 
a drop in the electrical energy 
costs. 

In the hydroelectric and en- 
ergy fields, 1965 was significant 
for die launching of such major 
projects as the CEAO program, 
which includes 364 water holes 
with 200 drilling rigs and chc 
Saudi program which provides 
32 water supplies via source 
points. In addition to these two 
programs, the work on the sec- 
ond conduit linking Nouak- 
chott and idrni will sour in the 
very near future and financing 
has been obtained for the 
’Nouadhibou water supply pro- 
ject. The goal of all these pro- 
jects is to significandy increase 
the coverage of water require- 
ments in rural and urban areas: 

As foe energy, SONELECs 
future looks promising, given 
the call for bids in die near 
future for the. large Nouakchott 
electrical power plant, attain- 
ment of financing for a reha- 
bilitation program and connec- 
tion of the Point Central 
installations to the SONELEC 
network. These will ensure the 
country’s electrical energy re- 
quirements. 

Furthermore; tbc icarr-op of 
the Manacalf hydroelectric 
power plant will bring electric 
p o w er to chc right bank of the 
Senegal River, guaranteeing 
the multisector devdopment of 
this area, and will provide a 
reliable power supply to the 
dty of Nouakchott. I should 
emphasise at this poinc that our 
country has taken a firm option 
•for 15% of the output of this 
power plant. 

Concerning hydrocarbons, 
we . have concluded two agree- 
ments with Algeria, securing 
the stable operation of the pe- 
troleum refinery and providing 
for the construction of a barrel- 
ling center in Nouakchott to 
ensure the butane gas supply to 
the country. 

The SMCPP has been suc- 
cessful in providing a regular . 
supply of petroleum products 
to the country. The SMCPP 
imports, which accounted for 
'approximately 138£00 tons/M, 
dropped 12.5% from the previ- 
ous year. 

In the equipment sector, we 
can report: 

— the completion of the Port 
de 1’ Amide work scheduled 
for 1986; 

— work and studies have been 
carried out for the constroc- 

. tion or repair of road sec- 
tions for the purpose of de- 
veloping the country’s 
network <rf roads and to free 
remaining- isolated regions; 

. — completion- of the 'work' on 
the Nouakchott -airport 
automatic center financed by 
the FED; 

— FAC financing obtained lor 
conducting studies concern- 
ing the new Nouakchott air- 
port project and adaptation 
of die runways for 747-type 
aircraft; 

—partial completion of tbe 
program foe 581 iow<osr 
. housing units financed by 
die government of Kuwait; 

— scan of tbe final phase of the 
Saudi program for 469 hous- 

. - ing units and completion of 
36 plots with improved sani- 
. .ration. 

Finally, X would like to re- 
port the- recovery in the finan- 
cial position of the Nouakchott 
Maritime Institution. 

■For a complete transcript of text, 
please contact tin Presidency, m 


THE AUTONOMOUS PORT 
OF NOUADHIBOU 

PORT AUTONOME DE 
NOUADHIBOU 

""pan - 


Gaye Sidatti. Director Genera/ 
of the Autonomous Port of Nouadhibou 

The activities of PAN have increased considerably since 
the installation of NPP, and in particular, since the 
implementation of the decision taken in 1982 to make it 
obligatory to unload the hauls of fish (deep water fish; 
realised in the Mauritanian ZEE. The figures speak for 
themselves. 

1982 393,71 6 tons handled 

1983 822,939 tons handled 

1 984 840,000 tons handled 

1985 954,996 tons handled 

The major increase in movements in the port was not 
realised without creating a certain amount of difficulties, 
while at the same time it can be seen that the figures tor 
1 985 already correspond to those forecast fr: ;■ ie end of 
the third phase of the PAN development project although 
the second phase should only have been commenced at 
the end of 1985. 


The Port Headquarters in Nouadhibou, 
a now development commenced in 
November 1985. 


BANQUE CENTRALE DE 
MAURITANIE 


Nouakchott 
B.P.:623 623 
Telex: RIMBANK- 72 


- 

■ ^ ‘ UH=* 

l*l‘l» i_IJ 


Tel: 52206 ■ 


Governor Mr. Dieng Boubou Rartxa 
Deputy-Governor Me Mohamed Ould Nany 

The Banque Centrale de Mauritanie was created by 
legal decree number 73.1 18 of May 30, 1973. It took 
the place of the Banque Centrale des feats de I'Afri- 
que de rOuest, to which the Islamic Republic of 
Mauritania belonged, alongside other African states 
and the French Repubfic. 

The Banque Centrale de Mauritanie has, in terms 
of the statutes that govern its working, ail the classic 
functions of a Central Bank (issuing currency, estab- 
lishing credit norms, distributing and controlling cre- 
dits, undertaking economic studies, realizing financial 
operations on behalf of the State) as welt as other 
specific functions linked to the circumstances of its 
creation and to the particular importance which it is 
accorded by government authority. 

The Banque Centrale de Mauritanie is thus 
ctosety associated with the efforts of the government 
its credit policy is characterized by dynamism, a 
low discount rate (4.5 percent), the attribution of 
meeffum-term credits for periods of up to eight years, 
and, generally, by the encouragement of all industrial, 
mining, agricultural and social housing projects. 

Under the impulse of the Banque Centrale de 
Mauntanie, the banking system has been consider- 
ably developed. Several banks have thus been 
created: 

-The Banque Arabo-Libyo-Mauritarvlertne (BALM) 
(Arab-Libyan- Mauritanian Bank) with a capital of 
140 million ouguiya; 

- The Banque Arabe Africa! ne en Mauritania (BAAM) 
(Arab African Bank in Mauritania), with Kuwaiti 

partictoatton,withacaiMt^crf300mfflkmc^Uya^ 
-The Banque Internationale pour la, Mauritanie 
(BIMA) (International Bank of Mauritania) with a 
capital of 1 50 milSon ouguiya; 

-The Soctete Maurttanienne.de Banque (SMB) 
(Mauritanian Banking Society) with a capital of 1 QQ 
million ouguiya; 

In addition, a development bank and a development ' 
fond have been created: 

- The Banque Mauritanienne pour la Developpemem 

rLIli2^!^ rce * BMDC ) (Mauritanian Bank for 
development and Commerce) with a capital of 80 
rraffion ouguiya; 

N ? lo nal D ® v ek>PPemem (FNDJ 










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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 19, 19S5 


Page 11 


ADVERTISING SECTION 


ADVERTISING SECTION 



Mohamed ould Mokhtar 
Director General of SMCP 

Interview with 
Mohamed 0 Mokhtar 
Director General of the SMCP 

The SMCP has had several substantial secondary effects 
on the Mauritanian economy, in particular as regards the 
balance of payments, due to a considerable and 
guaranteed gain in foreign currency and also on the 
national treasury by way of tax receipts due to 
immediate, cash payments; the SMCP has achieved its 
basic aim, which is to say, marketing Mauritanian fish, 
subject to Mauritanian law in force which obliges 
unloading. 

F.M.: Initially, one was aware of a certain refusal among 
the shipowners and commercial operators in your sphere 
as regards the SMCP, what is the current situation? 
M.0.M.: For several months now, I have felt, a very 
great willingness and a sincere wish to cooperate on the 
part of Mauritanian shipowners, because, what I am 
interested in is Mauritanian shipowners who produce 
fish, who fish and sell me the produce to market, and in 
this much we have begun to understand each other so 
that I no longer have any problems in this area. 

For the last quartet of a century since Mauritania has 
gained independence/ people in this sector have become 
accustomed to a certain complacency due to the fact that 
the public authorities in Mauritania, in my opinion, have 
not always given this sector the importance which it 
merits and over the last few years the national 
adminis tration has taken a real interest in the sector, 


having taken note that this was perhaps the sector of the 
future. People have become used to working alone and 
on an individual basis and consequently they present 
themselves in an anarchical way as persons isolated in the . 
face of their foreign partners who are in a position of 
strength. Over a period of time, the SMCP has been 
accepted by the masses and this is the reality on which 
everyone is counting. 

FjM Y ou are confronted with fierce competition on the 
international market within the field of marketing. 
M.0.M Yes, our geographical zone is interesting by its 
richness in cephalopods which mainly go to japan and 
from this point of view we are in strong competition with 
our Moroccan brothers and our Spanish friends who have 
comparable species given the geographical proximity. 
However, I feel that there is room for everyone and I do 
not feel that there is any particularly harsh or hindering 
competition, because you are aware that the protein 
problem is real and that the world is in need of protein 
and as such, of fish. In the year 2000, certain 
geographical zones in the world are threatened by 
famine, if this is not already with us and we can therefore 
say that we will market our products with ease and while 
I am sure that our Spanish friends and our Moroccan 
brothers will do likewise, there is perhaps, on this 
occasion, harsh competition among our clients. 

F.M.: It is the reverse therefore? 

M.0.M.: I feel that it is quite the reverse. In any event I 
have not been aware of any problem in that area. We 
have ho difficulty in disposing of our fish and we have 
sold enormous quantities in the months of September, 
August and October and we continue to do so, in spite of 
the fact that cer tain geographical regions such as the 
Arab world and certain African zones have not been 
sufficiently investigated, because the SMCP is still in its 
early stages, and we are thinking of setting up a more 
all-encompassing strategy for breaking into markets, 
initially the Arab and African markets. It was a problem 
of ignorance and lack of communication or marketing, 
thence, the opportunity presented to us today by the 
International Herald Tribune in this supplement on 
Mauritania, is pushing us forward in the direction in 
which we wish to progress. 

F.M.: Prices have almost doubled this year in a 
favourable trend for Mauritania; do you think this 
increase will continue or that there will be a stabilisation 
in prices? 





S.M.C.R 

THE SOCIETE MAURITANIENNE DE 
COMMERCIALISATION DE POISSONS 

The Mauritanian Fish Marketing Company 

E STABLISHED in June 1984, the SMCP has made it possible to consolidate in a significant 
manner the New Fishing Policy; to be more specific, it has achieved the main objectives for 
which it was created. It only began operations in August 1984, without its own capital, but 
thanks to credit to the tune of 60 million granted by the Banque Centrale de Mauritanie. The 
SMCP accounts show a loss of 60 million for 1984 and a provisional gain of 100 milli on for the first 
quarter of 1985. 



The Increase in marketable production by the SMCP 
remains linked to the growth of the national fleet in 
freezer and cold storage vessels. 

The SMCP has likewise increased its partnerships, 
concluding an agreement over the last few weeks with the 
Japanese Group C. ITOH which committed itself to 
purchase 20 to 30% of the production on a regular basis. 

In -the very near future, the SMCP should make an 
effort to penetrate several large markets such as those in 
Africa, (in particular, Nigeria and the Ivory Coast) and 
those in the Arab world. 


The positive action of this company on the 

Mauritanian economy is evident: 

— centralised submission of tenders to purchasers from 
abroad; 

— increases on the sales prices of products to foreign 
countries; 

— campaign against fraud by improved supervision and 
control of the activities of vessels; 

— incentives upon unloading by speedy and guaranteed 


settlement of products unloaded at rates equivalent to 
international rates: 

— Elimination of intermediaries, both as regards the 
intervention of Spanish banks and in relation to 
marketing. 

The result is, in- particular in 19S5, a substantial 
growth in quantities unloaded and, consequently, a 
considerable reflection on the Balance of Payments and 
an increase in the collection of taxes on fishing rights by 
the Treasury. 

On 30 September 1985, the SMCP paid 734 million 
UM to customs by way of duty on the ex pen of deep 
water fish. 

The turnover of the company for this category of 
product must this year exceed 100 million dollars, which 
is to say, 7,500 million UM, a figure such has never 
before been achieved. . 

Fathi Mahouachi 


Interview with the Minister of Fishing and Marine Economy 

MrTaki0Sidi 

Reminder of the importance of marine fishing for the national economy 


In spite of the constant decrease in real terms of the Gross 
National Product (0.6% per annum) during the last five 
years, the marine fishing sector has seen, during the same 
period, its own importance grow, going from 6.5% in 
1982 to 9.3% of the G.N.P. in 1984. This is an indication 
of the dominant position of this growing sector in the 
economy of our country. 

The exports in marine produce, a direct consequence 
of the implementation of the new Fishing Policy, has 
increased substantially further to the decision taken in 
1982 by the government making it obligatory to unload 
all demersal species at Nouadhibou, and also the creation 
of the SMCP in 1984. Thus, filing which in 1984 
accounted for more than 43% of the total exports, during 
this year should amount to almost 50%, which is to say in 
the region of $ 180 million (13 thousand million UM). 
The table below shows the division of the four (4) major 
categories of fish exported in 1984 in millions of UM and 
on a percentage basis. 

Million UM % 


Pdagic species and related ,: w 

products 4.792V -> - 4St 
Cephalopods 3.147 30 

Deep water fish L235 12 

Others 1.425 13 


The contribution of the fishing sector to the national 
budget is considerable. In 1984 it amounted to 1.559 
million UM which breaks down to 1.099 million in duty 
and tax on exports (20% of the total customs receipts as 
against 16.3% in 1983 and 14.8% in 1984) and 460 
million in the sales of fishing licences to shipowners from 
abroad. 

It should be noted that the tendency is towards an 
increase in 1985 when, for the first time the budgetary 
objectives laid down by the government (2,000 million 
UM) will be realised 100% and may perhaps be exceeded. 

These figures show the emergence and the relative 
success of a complex economic sector, largely confronted 
by considerable and varying restrictions, not least of 
which is stiff international competition. In order to 
appreciate this trend better, it should be recalled that the 
contribution of the fishing sector in 1978 amounted to 
only 4.7 million UM. 


For a coast of 700 km, an exclusive economic zone of 
200 i marine miles and a continental plateau of 36,000 
km 2 , it has been estimated that the following quantities 
can be used on an annual basis without risk of 
over-exploitation: 

# pelagic species 440,000 tons 

# deep water fish 100,000 tons 

# cephalopods 42,000 tons 

# tuna fish 10,000 tons 

# white fish 10,000 tons 

# langoustine 700 tons 

# deep water shrimps . 4,000 tons 

This estimate, which in no way can be classified as 
“pessimistic” is based upon that of the FAO and 
therefore remains controversial in the absence of a 
scientific evaluation of all our waters. Concerning this 
evaluation, we have called upon the cooperation of 
certain allied countries and, in particular, France who 
kindly replied to our request by returning its module in 
July within the framework of an agreement which 
provides for two annual evaluation campaigns for which 
Tranced responsible. Contacts have also been made with 
Canada and the United States. A meeting, under the 
guardianship of the FAO was held from 16 to 27 
September 1985 in Naoudhibou concerning evaluation of 
the resources. The Centre National de Recherches 
Oceanograpbiques et des Peches (The National Oceanic 
and Fishing Research Centre) likewise benefits from the 
technical cooperation of the Soviet Union. 

Fishing Efforts 

As regards the year 1984, the fishing effort was split as 
follows for quantities declared: 

# pelagic species 210,000 tons 

# deep water fish 58,000 tons 

It should be noted that as far as pelagic species are 
concerned, the fishing effort was limited to 7 Vi months 
as opposed to 12, which explains the low level of the 
figure indicated. This was due to the delay in the 
conclusion of the contract between MAUSOV and LA 
SOVRYBFLOT. 

Furthermore, given the poor marine surveillance to 
the south of Cape Timiris and oq the open sea, the 




It is true, in the space of a year prices have 
almost doubled for certain spedes such as the 
cephalopods. During the same period last year the price 
was US$ 2,500 per ton while in the last few months we 
have sold at US$ 3,800 per ton. I fed that from here to 
the end of the year prices will stabilise at around US$ 
3,500 for this spedes which is very popular on the 
international market. 

FJM.: On the production side you have mentioned that 
certain potential markets have not been investigated, 
which indicates that you have provided for a production 
policy; will the production itself be suffident? ‘ 
M.0.M.: I feel that there are not enough dependable 
studies, as far as 1 know, which allow us to calculate what 
our exact potential is, however, it is currently estimated, 
without exaggeration, at 80,000 ton per annum as regards 
so called deep water fish. At the present time we produce 
approximately 60,000 ton per annum. We therefore feel 
that we can reasonably meet the demands of all those 
interested. 


F.M.: What about the infrastructure in Nouadhibou? 
M.0.M.: As regards the infrastructure, it is the SMCP 
who markets the produce; there are the fleets which 
bring in the fish, who call in and, when they berth, their 
boats are seen to by the SMCP and the fish becomes the 
property of the SMCP and is stored as its responsibility: 
there are land units which have been created over the last 
few years thanks to the readiness of the Mauritanian 
authorities in supporting the new fishing policy which is 
fundamentally based on the notion of unloading. 
Therefore there are suffident land units, either 
refrigerated warehouses or factories, in order to make 
storage, handling and marketing of the fish possible 
without any problems. 

To conclude, I would mention that we need the 
assistance of all our brothers and our friends and there 
are still many projects to be realised; thus the assistance 
of Arab funding and a certain number of sources of 
financing from allied countries would be extremely 
precious to us. 


Taki ould Sidi 

Minister of Fishing and Marine Economy. 

industrial fleet very often worked within the 3 mile 
boundary and could have carried out high value 
commercial transhipments of produce on the open seas. 
This situation makes it very difficult to give a fair 
evaluation of the real fishing effort in the waters under 
national jurisdiction. Successive drops in hauls over 
recent years would indicate that at least as far as some 
species are concerned, it would seem that an equilibrium 
has been reached. It has been noted however, during the 
June to September period, a return in certain species of 
high commercial value such as the octopus. 

Training 

In this field there are real and urgent needs, in 
particular as regards the training of senior staff on board 
vessels, technicians and research workers. 

The total staff of registered Mauritanian marines 
amounts to 4,239. Those who have had proper training 
have been issued with marine record cards (2,438 
marines); 400 others hold industrial fishing cards and 
1,400 hold non-industrial fishing cards. 1,592 are simply 
taken on. 

Marine refresher courses are held at the Centre 
Professionnelle Maritime de Nouadhibou (Professional 
Marine Training Centre in Nouadhibou). Financing for 
the extension of this centre has just been confirmed by 
the European Development Fund. 

As regards training on the whole, two projects have 
been drawn up with the assistance of the FAO, and these 
should be operational in the near future. 

For higher training, this could be looked after in the 
future by the Instirut Superieure d'Etudes des Sciences 
Halieutiques de Nouadhibou (The Nouadhibou Higher 
Institute of Fishery Studies) financed by the CEAO 
which is currently being constructed. 

Action by the Department in 1985 

1985 has for the most pan been a year of observation, 
identification and evaluation of the restrictions which 
inhibit the harmonious development of the sector. This 
period of reflection has made it possible, within the 
framework of the general economic recovery, to define a 
coherent action programme and to integrate this 
programme into the overall development strategy citing 
clear, calculated objectives. It is in this direction that the 
tasks entrusted to the central and regional departments of 
the Ministry are orientated. 

10 November 1985 
Fathi Mahouachi NOUAKCHOTT 



Unloading the SMCP product (usine en mer . . .). 


Stocking up in an SMCP shop. 


Inside an SMCP warehouse at - 30°C. 


and . . . landing frozen fish bound for export 



M.C 



Soctete d’Etat au Capital de 500 millions d’ouguiyas 
Nouadhibou - Avenue Median 
Telephone: 22.81, 23.50 - Telex: 420 MTN B.P.: 259 NDB 


fl 




& 



Page 12 


ADVERTISING SECTION 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1985 

ADVERTISING SECTION 





The Port of 


Nouadhibou 


The development potential of 
Nouadhibou as a fishing port is 
considerable. The Port Miners- 
tier de Cansado and the oiling 
jetty Des Mouettes are just five 
kilometers north of Cap Blanc 
(Ras Nouadhibou), tucked into 
die Bay of Levricr, but south of - 
Potntc de Cansado and opposite 
the small village of Gucra, on 
the Atlantic side of the penin- 
sula. The town and port of 
Nouadhibou are 15 kilometers 
inside the Bay of Levricr, in the 
subsidiary bay of Csuisado. 
Only the Banc de la Gazelle 
immediately north of the 


Pointc dc Cansado is a hazard. 
Ships stay three kilometers off- 
shore until almost due east of 
Nouadhibou- 


port on the West African coast 
Its fish prices arc very conpeti- 


This large fishing port, lo- 
cated in some of rhe best 
stocked fishing waters m the 
world, can accept ships up to 
feet draught at any stare of the 
ride, day or nighr. There arc 
over 800 meters of quays 
dredged to mote than six me- 
ters "alongside.” Even the larg- 
est Ru ssi an and Japanese fish 
processing ships can berth at 
Nouadhibou, still die cheapest 


There is a wharf at Nouak- 
chott which has a Capacity of 
aSO.000 tons (in 1982, 325.442 
rons of goods were unloaded, 
04,330 tons of which were ce- 
ment) and there arc plans to 
develop a deep-water pore. 
Nouadhibou remains Maurita- 
nia's only major port; the com- 
missioning of Friendship Port 
in 1987 will increase its impor- 
tance both to Mauritania and to 
nearby West African counrries. 


Traditional Fishing in Mauritania 


Traditional, non-industrial Fish- 
ing plays a major role in the 
economic life of Mauritania. It 
! offers a strong job creation po- 
tential. the guarantee of a con- 
tinued onshore supply and a 
domestic market. To ensure the 
development of this type of 
fishing, certain projects have 
been undertaken with rhe help 
of friendly councries and orga- 
| nizarions. 

Japan was the first foreign 
country to help traditional fish- 
ing in Mauricania. It provided 
first-class technical assistance 
and two donations totaling 350 
million ouguiya (£2.67 million) 
between 1980 and 1983, fishing 
tackle (canoes, motors and 
equipment), two 2-ton cold 
storage rooms, a 2-ron-per-day 
production factory, and refrig- 
erator and isothermic vans. Fol- 
lowing a recent visit by the 
Japanese Agency for Coopera- 
tion, a request was made ro the 
Japanese Government to con- 
tinue giving technical and fi- 
nancial assistance. 

A £700,000 donation by the 
Saudi Fund is helping Maurita- 
nia finance rhe following pro- 
jects: 

— the building and equipping 
of a construction and repair 
workshop for traditional 
fishing purposes ar Nouak- 
chott. 


rhe purchase of two all- 
weather vehicles for chc su- 
pervisory fishing staff, 
the purchase of 34 fully 
equipped canoes, 
chc recruiting of an expert in 
the organization of coopera- 
tives, a project which, with 
the technical assistance of 
chc UNDP, w ill facilitate 
the construction of 10 
launches. 30 polyester ca- 
noes and 20 to 30 isothermic 
crates for preserving fish for 
the retail market. 


towns in the South and East of 
Mauritania with cold-storage 
appliances and increase their 
food self-sufficiency by ensur- 
ing a regular supply of fish. 

The Food and Agriculture 
Organization of die United Na- 
tions (FAO) is providing 
$247,000 to improve traditional 
fish processing methods. This 
project has been in operation 
since October 1985. 

The European Development 
Bind is financing rwo projects: 
the encouragement and guaran- 



undertake the study of the sec- 
ond. 

Furthermore, a 7 million 
CFA francs finance package was 
recently obtained for the desali- 
nation of sea water. 

The FAO has agreed to con- 
tribute $72i£00 toward financ- 
ing an on-thesjob training pro- 
gram for fishermen. The 
agreement took effecr in late 
September 1985. 

As to the plan to create a 
non-industrial fishing port ar 
the Baie du Repos at Nouadhi- 
bou, two surveys arc in pro- 
gress, one to be financed by 
FAG die ocher by the Indepen-' 
dent Port of Nouadhibou. 
Once finished, these two stud- 
ies will be forwarded to Fades, 
which has agreed in principle to 
undertake the project. Equip- 
ment needs in Mauritania arc 
currently estimated ar 624 boats 
manned by roughly 2000 fisher- 


A 12,000 ton-per-year industry. 


Denmark is providing 500 
million ouguiya toward the fi- 
nancing of a cold-storage chain. 
The financial arrangements arc 
currently being negotiated. 
This project, managed by 
SPPAM, will provide the main 


tee of sea fishing, and the sup- 
ply of drinking water to the 
Imraguen villages through the 
desalination of sea water by a 
solar process. The first project 
should begin very soon, and a 
committee has been selected to 


The mission of the SPPAM 
is to promote traditional fish- 
ing. It was ser up on August 2, 
1983, by Mauricania (35%), co- 
operative and pre-cooperative 
fishing units (10%) and Mauri- 
tania n businessmen (55%). Its 
investment program, carried 
out in 1984 at a cost of 28 


million, covers » 30-ton process- 
ing plane intended to complex 


SOMIS 


Soci&g Mauritanienne des 
Industries du Sucre 


SOCl£lE DtCONOMIE MJXTE AU 


CAPITAL DE 300 MILLIONS D 'OUGUIYA 


Sl£GE SOCIAL NOUAKCHOTT -R.l.M 


B.P. 671 T61. 527-22-517-30 
Telex 861 MTN 
Compte BMDC 998 et 822 


^SU\ ActLflJ Lobjjjll iS' ^ 1 $ 

oL^csl c*U i — 5 

i "jjSjt T— j 

Ljlflji j ill 

o\Y TT c-J3U 
0 • vi» • ^ A*\ 1 

.<_> ATT j ^ A A uL-i-l 


•• vjRFj S.O.M.I.S. was created by a decision from the Council of 
; f Ministers on 2 September 1984. 
yy.-I'S# A mixed investment company composed of the State 
H as the largest shareholder, with the company Sonimex and 

several private companies, S.O.M.I.S. inherited the situa- 
KBpa tion of the ex-SOSUM A, the former Society Mauritanienne 

de sucre (Mauritanian sugar company) which cost 
lB3S Mauritania approximately 2 thousand million ‘ouguiya’ 
■ \ IJB (main currency) and which at the outset had assembly line 
, ; - • v ' |2JE faults and the factory was closed in 1976; it reopened in 1980 

X ' *' •*’ ' with Algerian collaboration who extended a credit of 10 

^ dollars to Mauritania. 

On 2 September 1984, Mauritania decided to re- 
'=• -^Ml establish it as the Societe des Industries du Sucre (Com- 
Abdoui Thiam pany of Sugar Industries) (a service company), in fact the 

Director General of SOMIS monopoly of sugar sales belonging to SONIMEX. SOMIS 

carries out the conglomeration process for SONIMEX who supplies it with the raw material 
(crystaiised sugar) and removes the conglomerated sugar. 

SOMIS has problems of a technical nature due to inexperience with the production 
equipment which was not a prototype and which stood for a long period without operating, 
subjected to bad weather, sea winds, rust, etc . . . Nevertheless substantial progress has been 
made in this area and little by little, SOMIS is becoming fully experienced in the operation of this 
production equipment and is hopeful of overcoming all these difficulties over the next few years. 

The task before SOMIS is to supply the home market with sugar and its capacity has been 
established with this goal in mind. It like-wise hopes to be able to effect a horizontal integration in 
sugar production, from the cultivation of the cane up to production of the sugar in pieces. At the 
present time and on the insistence of SONIMEX, SOMIS in agreement with the State is looking 
towards the purchase of a cubing assembly line which should produce 50 ton per day and which 
would commence probably at the beginning of 1987 if all the contracts can be signed during the 
course of 1985. SOMIS production was decidedin accordance with SONIMEX; in the year1985 it 
would produce 21 ,000 ton . in 1 986. it would produce 30,000 ton. The factory capacity is 35,000 ton 
which only covers the needs of the home market 

The production price fluctuated between 15 and 17 ‘ouguiya’ per kilo (1.50 FF to 1.70 FF). 


1 






; V 


Abdoul Thiam 
Director General of SOMiS 




menc Nouakchott's already-ex- 
isting cold-storage facilities, a 
10- ran ice factory at Nouak- 
chott -and a 2- to 10-ton inland 
isothermic room. 

Investing in a cold-storage 
complex at Nouakchott, 
planned between 1984 and 
1987, will provide a freezing 
capacity of 20 tons per day, 800 
to 2500 ton storage capacity, 
the production of 40 tons of ice 
per day and a motor repair 
workshop. 

SPPAM hopes to increase its 
storage and freezing capacity 
later on and set up a cold- 
storage chain inland. It has real- 
ized a turnover of 121,213,809 
ouguiya. Activities have so far 
been limited to the importing 
and sale of fishing equipment 
and motors. It should be noted 
- that Italy has shown some in- 
terest in cooperating with 
SPPAM. This cooperation 
might in the near future cake 
the form of financial assistance 
and aid in fishing equipment 
and appliances. 

Traditional-style fishing will 
produce an estimated 12,000 
tons per year, half of which will 
go to the domestic market (es- 
sentially chc South and South- 
east of the country). Another 
6,000 tons will either be landed 
fresh ac Nouadhibou and pro- 
cessed at the factories, particu- 
larly SOFRIMA and COMA- 
COPP; or exported cp the 
Canary Islands and Senegal ■ 


u 

- ■ t 




j- . ‘.ce \ M>ru>Hi(j»r 

►V i 1 Ew-c* 

' V> •• - 


'•■j; f 1 

Jv-kter’,. 


.r /. /.v 


.V .V..I It ft 







Loading a boat at Nouadhibou. 


MAURITANIA STATISTICS 


Capital: Nouakchott. 

Average Temperature: January: 21“ C; July: 2#>C. 
Geography: Mauritania is in the Maghreb ("West'’ in Ara- 
bic). Northwest Africa is more precise. Mauritania is a member 
of the 16-nation ECOWAS (the Economic Community of 
West African Scares); the Arab League; tbeOMVS (Organize 
non for the Development of the Senqgal River Valley) and the 
CEAO (the economic grouping of seven Frendi-speaJang 
countries). 

Area: One million square kilometers (328,000 square miles). 
Population: Roughly Ui million as of November 1985. 
Population growth rare: 1.6% at May 1985. 

By Ain Major airports ar Nouadhibou, Nouakchott and 
Zoucrate plus 30 small aerodromes. 

Ports: At Naoudhibou, chc fishing prat and the peat minera- 
lier, the latter has a capacity of over *0 million tons per year. 
Main Resources: Iron ores and fishing. 

History: Three quartets of the Mauritanian people are Moors 
(or Maures) of mixed Arab and Berber stock. They speak the 
Hassiniyya dialect of Arabic The Bidan Moors are light- 
skinned and the Harattin are black. 

Religion: Islamic, Maickicc sea. 

Currency: Ouguiya (average 1984 exchange rare 63.803 
ouguiya •=■ l dollar). 


S. 


SOCIETE MAURITANIENNE DE 
COMMERCIALISATION DES 
PRODUITS PETROUERS 


Mauritanian Company for Marketing 
Oil Products 


Avenue GAMAL ABDEL NASSER 
P.O.Box 679 -Tel. 52651 and 52661 
Tbc 849 MTN -NOUAKCHOTT 

Capital: 120,000,000 UM 
CA. (84): 4,127,329,270.48 UM 



State company created by decree No. 80.1 71 ol 
21 July 1 980 whose purpose is: 

• to import, store, distribute and market oil 
products; 

• to exploit, either alone or in association with 
other corporate or natural bodies, storage or 
distribution warehouses tor oil products; 

• to construct and manage units tor storing oil 
products; 

• to manage under its own name the shares 

whose ownership has been transferred to itby 

toe State such shares corresponding to the 

State’s participation in economic import 
7 activities concerning toe storage and 
- distribution of oil related products; 

• to participate in all industrial, financial, 
commercial, mobile or fixed operations which 
may be related to one or other of toe 
aforementioned aims; 

this participation may take toe form of the . • 
creation of of subsidiaries, subscription to or 

• purchase of holdings, company rights, or :. 
otherwise; 


toe SMCPP shall supply the country with oil \ 
products toroughoutthe national territory, wHh 

58 points of sale and 4 aviation depots; 

. the SMCPP shall import and maricstbutarte gas 
at preferential prices reflecting toe economic ‘ 
.policy and the reconstitution of traditional - 
sources of energy (charcoal) defined over the 
^lastfew years by the State of Mauritania.' 








Page 13 


"\ 

N 


ENTER3VATIQNAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1985 


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ADVERTISING SECTION 


ADVERTISING SECTION 


Fishing Industry 



A professional polyglot -who 
previously produced Maurita- 
nia's national plan — the Hon- 
orable Tald Ould Sidi — is now 
the minister in charge of fish- 
ing. The position of Mini sere ck 
la Pecbe cr de 1’Economie Man- 
rime has become a very impor- . 
one one in Mauritania: fish 
revenues in 1985 are expected 
to exceed record iron ore sales 
(Guelb and Kedja tonnages to- 
ed over 10 million tons). 

Mauritania has done an 
about-face in the past several 
years. In 1977 foreign boats 
paid only $3-5 million in fees on 
a fish harvest worth over half a 
billion. The loopholes are being 
dosed one by one, and all the 
big fishing countries have 
formed joint ventures with the 
Mauritanian government 
through the umbrella fish orga- 
nization, SMCP. In particular, 
the Samip agre em ent with Iraq 
is on the point of becoming 
operational, that of Mausov 
with Russia is new and opera- 
tional, and thar of Comacop 
with South Korea specializes in 


tuna. Almap deals with Algeria, 
MSP with Scandinavia, Stmar 
with Rumania, and Salima uren 
with Libya and ocher Arab 
countries. 

The SMCP has decreed that 
"All production (ic. catches) 
carried out in Mauritanian wa- 
ters must be nnlnaAtl and 
scored — at least one week — in 
Nouadhibou.” It has yet to en- 
force this rule but is moving in 
that direction. Boots that fish 
quickly and. then proceed to Las 
Palmas to unload may have a 
bumpy ride, particularly when 
the new surveillance system is 
in place. Mauritania is consider- 
ing joining forces with Senegal 
to focm a coast guard service 
patrol 200 miles 9eawand with 
MTBS, backed up by helicop- 
ters and surveillance aircraft. 

However, ic is not necessary 
to go 200 miles our to sea to 
catch off Mauritania, a 
country blessed with some of 
the richest fishing waters in the 
world. The fish arc teeming just 
100 yards off the SNIM hostel- 
ry at Gee Cansado, seven kilo- 


meters south of Nouadhibou. 
West African waters are indeed 
unique. The sun during the day 
heats up the surface water and 
then, as the land becomes cool- 
er than the sea, reverse currents 
draw the surface water below, 
the sea becomes agitated, and 
seaweed and trace elements are 
released. Most fishermen have 
returned home by then, and fish 
come mir from their lairs and 
feed. Of course, fishermen in 
the know stick around, and the 
harvest is colossaL 

Even in the early morning 
when the surface of the sea is 
coldest, some fish are easy to 
catch, and Senegalese fishermen 
sitting in Cansade cover need 
only paddle our 100 meters to 
fill their (tecs. Similarly, at 
Nouakchott, fishing off the 
beach alongside the Hotel Sa- 
bah is a popular Senegalese pas- 
time. Over five tons of fish are 
brought ashore each evening by 
just a few motorized canoes. 
The fishing is so rich thar her- 
ring and shark fins are just 
discarded on the beach. Sea 


MAURITANIA 

25 Years Afterindependence 


bream (also known as daurade 
or dan ton), red snapper and 
grouper are the most typical 
cacdi. All these are pelagic, or 
surface, fish and represent 
about 7595 of the tool catch in 
Mauritanian waters — over one 
million urns per year. 

The practice of freezing fish 
is relatively new to Mauritania, 
and the notion of fresh fish is 
somewhat open to interpreta- 
tion. With today’s freezer ships 
apetaring offshore, six-week- 
old fish are considered as fresh 
as a daisy. Only long-frozen fish 
develop a woody taste. 

Today’s buyer, wary about 
the freshness of the fish, is very 
demanding about packing stan- 
dards. Fish have to be pressed to 

a certain "load” and in a certain 
way and ro set dimensions. On 
the docks at Nouadhibou, fish- 
ing trawlers are often fined 
with the latest packer/ compres- 
sor equipment. Machines like 
die Maquinaria Hettamiencas 
of Vigo, Spain, have an rpm 
range of 64 to 920 and force all 
types of fish into neat 20-kilo 
ice blocks. The fish are stored 
into these blocks on board, and 
only when the freezer boat 
reaches Nouadhibou ate the 
blocks brought ashore and 
packaged. They are put into 
cardboard boxes, typed and dat- 
ed.. 

The majority of fish landed 
at Nouadhibou are Cephalo- 
poda fish. All become property 
of the government-owned Mau- 
ritanian fith marketing organi- 
zation, SMCP (Soricte mauri- 
caniennc de commercialisation 
de poissons). Pelagic surface- 
dwelling fish such as the sea 
bream, red snapper, shark and 
grouper are fished from small 
boats. The catch is then trans- 
ferred to larger boars chat bring 
the fro z en fish to the quay at 
Mouadhibou. But it is quite 
common to see Demersal fish 
too, the bottom-dwelling Ce- 
phalopoda varieties like squid 
and octopus. In 1980 one con of 
Cephalopoda fish in Nouadhi- 
bou could be bought foe $1500 
and sold in Europe for over 
$7000. In 1985, the market price 
in Nouadhibou foe Cephalo- 
poda fish reached $5800- 


Nouadhibou remains a relative- 
ly (heap fishing port. 

There are also fish like turn, 
lobster and shrimp, and certain 
countries have made one or the 
ocher their specialty. For exam- 
ple, [be North Koreans are ex- 
pert in hunting schools of tuna 
in West African waters arid 
have virtually monopolized this 
market. Haring also prefer to 
move together in schools of 
fish, and the government is 
looking at the latest fishing 
boat designs to see how the 
catch can be increased. The 
Dutch recently invoiced a ship 
that simply sucks great quanti- 
fies of sea and fish into its hold 
and then expels the water. The 
West Germans have improved 
the design and it is now possi- 
ble to buy one of these huge 
fishing trawlers for $18 million 
and to catch and pack a thou- 
sand cons of high-priced tuna in 
just 14 days with a crew of 15. 
In the rich waters of Mauritania 
it is sometimes possible to 
make such a catch in one week. 
The technique is to use sonar 
and surround a feeding school 
of tuna with nets and then suck 
all of tbem into the crawler. 

At the opposite end of the 


scale, old worn-out and rusty 
fishing boats remain a problem. 
In the past, some foreign com- 
panies have broughr boats to 
Nouadhibou, anchored than 
and then, having flown home 


used to a sea-going life. Non- 
French-speaking Mauritanians 
can genaally converse with the 
Senegalese fishermen by talking 
to them in Wolof; Tukulur, 
Solinke and Bambara (Malian) 



the crews, abandoned the boats 
to the elements. 

Fishermen in the Nouadhi- 
bou harbor are a disparate lot, 
but North Koreans, Spanish 
and Japanese provide the back- 
bone. There are many Maurita- 
nians working on rhe quays as 
crane drivers, etc., but few so far 
who put to sea as fishermen; it 
will cakr another ten years for 
nomadic Mauritanians to get 


are other African languages of- 
ten used around the port of 
Nouadhibou. 

Onshore freezing capacity 
reached HjOOO tons in August 
1985. Meanwhile, the Friend- 
ship Port, scheduled to open in 
1987, is expected to handle half 
a million tons of general car- 
goes for Mauritania and reading 
with landlocked neighboring 
West African countries. 


Besides its joint ventures, 
SMCP cooperates with various 
fishing companies that now 
back up the Nouadhibou fish- 
ing operation. Flap, Sofrima, 
Samrna, Smaip, Aim pa, Mau- 
sov, Simar, Salimaurem, Ma- 
tema, Comar, Siap, Somacop, 
Sipcco and Smf provide loading 
and handling equipment, ma- 
rine studies, commercial and in- 
dustrial operations, chandler- 
tng, transit storage, chart erage 
and lighterage, freezing and 
freezer boars. The SMCP real- 
ized a turnover of 1 billion 
ouguiya in 1984 (63.8 ouguiya 
= $1), and operates over 80 
boats under rhe Mauritanian 
flag. Mr. Mohamed Ould Moc- 
can, the managing director, re- 
ports directly to the Minister of 
Fishing and Maritime Economy 

and is in direct personal contact 
with all the buyers- His greatest 
success has been in setting up 
joint ventures with all the main 
trading partners. Another ma- 
jor figure in fishing at Nouad- 
hibou is Mr. Mohamed Salem 
Ould Sidha, the president of 
FLAP and director-general of 
SOFRIMA. He has helped con- 
siderably in exploiting available 
*>sh resources effectively. 


id’s Supply of Fishing Boots 


Following is the breakdown of fishing boats currently in use in 

waters under Mauritania's jurisdiction; 

— 94 national vessels, 62 equipped with freezing rooms and 32 
industrial or semi-industrial ice-boats, all landing at Nouad- 
hibou. Mauritania’s equipment consists of old units. 

— 52 deep-sea boats cha r te r ed by the mixed companies of 
Mausov, Simar and Samip. 

— 4l deep-sea boats and various ochers chartered by companies, 
or nationals landing at Nouadhibou. 

— 89 foreign vessels with licenses, broken down as follows: 

• five South Korean boats fitted with freezing equipment 
and operating under an a gre e m ent with South Korea. 

• seven South Korean boots fitted with freezing equipment 
and operating in accordance with the minutes signed with 
the Daerim group on August 16, 1984. 

• three Algerian ice-boats conducting sales at Almap. 

• 23 tuna or tunney fishing boats (4 Senegalese and 19 
French for die Lagun Arteau cooperative). 

• 15 cod-fishing boats chat belong to the Spanish unit 
known as the "Co-operative Cadix” 

• 10 lobster-fishing boots for "France- Langoustc." 

• 21 shrimp-fishing boats, 18 of which belong to the Spanish 
unit known as Anamar and three to the Senegalese 
company. 

' •three deep-sea vessels for the Iraki company, CLP. 


• two deep-sea boats for the Nigerian partners of Sofrima. 

To chis fleet should be added an as yet unspecified number of 
cold-storage boats (fresh fish) chartered by Mauritanian nation- 
als as pan of the agreement recently concluded with Portugal. 

The most important plans for change in Nouadhibou's 
infrastructure have to do with the naval repair base, the 
extension and reorganization of the Port Autonome and the 
improvement of the fiaie du Repos. 

The necessity and urgency of the naval repairs base project 
are evident to alL Initial contacts for funding have been made 
wich the Kuwait Fund, the World Bank and the Caisse 
Cent rale de Cooperation Economique, all of which have 
expressed a certain interest in rhis project. A note sent in May 
to the Kowair Fund updated the economic data and cited the 
essential technical elements contained in the feasibility study 
realized in 1980 by the Anglo-Saxon firm Kingston Marine 
Technology. This note is in preparation of a meeting to be held 
on the development of fishing in Mauritania and to which the 
above funding organizations have been invited. 

Similarly, an agreement has been signed with the French 
firm Sofremcr to finance, through the Caisse Cencrale de 
Cooperation Economique, the dimensioning of the future base 
and the reorganization of Nouadhibou's Port Autonome The 
team charged with realizing chis study went to Mauritania in 
late October. 


' c ‘ .,v 



p 

V. 

Vi i 






SOCIETE NATIONALS INDUSTRlELLE ET MINIERF 


S'* »'te rl (i.imMir Mm* 

.iu« 

.l.-^OViWJOuOlM 
*C N-ii.il. K- n -lb- ,r » 

NOUAKCHOTT 

RfPteiiouE i Siam* out pf 

MAURI TAIJir 



IRON ORE IN MAURITANIA 


Mohamed Salem ould Heine 
Director General of SHIM. 


On 12 July 1984. the El-Rhein Guelbs iron ore processing plant 
north east of Zoutirate officially came on stream with 4 million 
tons of Guelbs ores already neatly stacked for treatment/en- 
riching in a dry magnetic process. Zou6rate is a mining town 
built over 20 years ago; iron ore has been mined In Mauritania 
since 1963, but the original development was for the hematite 
mines in the great massif of Kedia d’ldjil. Tazadit Is one of the 
most famous mines in the world but the deposits are now 
worked out, except for Tazadit VI. From Tazadit all along the 30 
mile north face of Kedia d'ldjil there are more mines - 
Rouessa. Segazou, and F'Derik (a mine as well as a town), but 
only Tazadit VI and Segazou will be operational in 1990 and the 
tonnage ot Kedia ores exported from Nouadhibou -400 miles 
down the railway track- will only amount to 3/5 million tons. Al- 
ready the F’Derik mine has dosed (June ’85). A typical ship 
loading in Nouadhibou today would take on board a selection 
of Mauritanian ores; tor example, the Fuerte Ventura loaded 
51 ,000 tons of Guelb ores and 73,000 tons of several grades of 
Kedia ores between 1800 on 23rd June and 0800 on 25th June 
1985. 

When SNIM, the mining company based on Nouadhibou, re- 



alised that the Kedia ores would be exhausted well before the 
end of the century, it knew it would have to develop Guelb ores 
at the 81/82 rate of 6.5 to 9.5 million tons per annum. In 1986, 
Mauritania budgets to sell over 10.000 tons of various grades of 
ore In toto. 

Guelbs are mountains of iron protruding through the desert 
plateau north and north-east of the Kedia d'ldjil massif; these 
black quartzite ‘rocks’ rise as high as 675 meters (Atomai 
guelb) above sea-level and are 35/42 per cent magnetic quart- 
zite iron ores. The first two guelbs picked on for development 
were El-Rhein (490 meters when ‘levelling’ work started - the 
iron plug descends into the plateau so the El-Rhein guelb mine 
will soon be worked as a hollow after the mountain top has 
been dug away) and Oum-Arwagen, start-up set for 1989/1991, 
dependant on the development of Guelb ores’ demand. The 
first train of Guelb ores only reached Nouadhibou in November 
1984 and Guelb sales in 1985 are not expected to make a major 
contribution to the projected 10 million tons of exports in 1985 
19% will be the first major Guelb ores’ year. 

Long before the switch that set in motion toe primary 
crusher, the Aerofoils and the magnetic separation plant, was 
operated, giant 80 ton capacity trucks .were carting El-Rhein 
Guelb ores down to the first stockpiles and the summit of the 
Guelb had been sliced off completely. The enriching plant is 
sited close to the Eastern side of El-Rhein and just 10 kms from 
the second Guelb. Oum-Arwagen. Now Mauritania can look 
forward to producing and selling up to 15m ions per annum ol 
Guelb and Kedia ores - a reasonable target for 1989/1990 
Sixty-six millions tons of Guelb mountain has to be dug away to 
produce 33m tons of Guelb ores and then the plant enriches 
this from 37/42 per cent to 65/66 per cent *Fe’ iron ore by 


crushing it and extracting the ore element magnetically - mer- 
cifully a ’dry’ process. Kedia ores are non magnetic and the 
lower grades would need millions of gallons of water in an en- 
riching process, and there is no water 
El-Rhein is close to Zou&rate so. for the Guelb development 
it was possible to use the existing infrastructure. More 
workers’ houses were built In Zou&rate and also a road 
N/NEastwards joining toe El-Rhein mine and plant to the Kedia 
ores complex at Zouferate. A railway was also built northeast- 
wards from F'Derik to El-Rhein as a spur line. Naturally, 400 
miles away in Nouadhibou. a refit was carried out to receive 
toe Guelb ores - three trains a day should be normal by 1987 
and tonnages are steadily increasing from 7.4mt in 1983 
through 9.5mt in 1984 to over lOmt in 1985. Dependent on toe 
economies of Europe, the USA and Japan, the 10m tons high- 
watermark should be passed in 1985/86. Saudi Arabia. Kuwait, 
Abu-Dhabi. Japan. ABD/BAD, OPEC. EC. World Bank. Iraq. 
Morocco and France have all put money into toe SNIM/Guelbs 
project It is a great tribute to SNIM management that there 
were no overmins and toe work was completed within the set 
Dollar tramlines ($450 million maximum) There is nothing to 
hold Nouadhibou back from exporting over 14mt of iron ores a 
year, toe record month to date was May 1983 with 1.28mt and 
work programs currently cater for 6 ships in one week. 
Mauritania's major iron ore customers are Italy, Belgium, 
France and the United Kingdom as the table demonstrates. 

Rupert Bibra. 


Exports of ore to 4 leading customers j 

1978 


1985 

1984 

1.45 

ITALY 

2.32 

2.87 

.51 

BELGIUM 

1.55 

2.23 

2.20 

FRANCE 

1.65 

2.19 

.88 

UK. 

.69 

1.02 

6.50mt 

ALL MARKETS 

7.40mt 

9.52mt 


mt = Millions of Tons 


1 1 


FeT% 

Fe + + % 

Si02% 

AI.O,°o 

P% 

s% 

d50 
l ) 

%de 

—150 

GMAB 

66 

18 

7 

0.3 

0,015 

0,012 

370 

20 

GFM 

65 

6 

6.5 

0,5 

0,02 

0,012 

400 

13 


SNIM symbol at entrance to the mining village of Cansado. 


The chemical spetificartion of the new GUELB ores 




y 

«LL : 


— 





Central iron ore grinders at ore tanker port 


Loading of ore tanker at SNIM ore tanker port 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY. DECEMBER 19, 1985 

— * ’ . ADVERTISING SECTION 

ADVERTISING SECTION ~ 


Societe Internationale 
de Peche et de 
Commerce 

.Cj.u* -J 

S.I.PE. CO. 

rtr •v.l/’ - ItY 
t \ V Lr -^' - T • AT 

RC 447 Boite Postale 243 
Telephone: 20-86 
TSlex: 417 

NOUADHIBOU- MAURITANIA 



SOCIETE D’ACCONAGE 
ETDE 

MANUTENTIONEN 

MAURITANIE 

SOCIETE ANONYME CAPITAL 36 000 000 UM- 
RC NOU A DHI BOU No 1 04 
SIEGE SOCIAL - NOUADHIBOU 
REPUBL1QUE ISLAMIOUE DE MAURITANIE 

- ACENCE MARITIME * MANUTENTION * TRANSIT - 


TELEX: 433 MTN 
BOITE POSTALE: 258 


Directenr General: Mofaamed Latnine 


Bureau Correspondant 
TourAtlantique 
92 Putraux 
(Puis La Defense) 



TELEPHONE: 22-63 - 23-64 
TELEGRAMMES: SAMMAR 


Adresse Posialc 
Cedes N. 6-V20&0 Paris la Defense 
Ttil.(l) 775-15- 1 1 
Teleg. SAGA MALLE PUTEAUX 
Telex, 620558 ARMEMEN 



Agricultural Development Hinges 
on Irrigation Projects 


Sorting and 
washing the 
fish before 
freezing. 



Control room 
The most 
refined 

installation and 
equipment In 

Africa. 


• Capital 4 million $U$ 

• lnvestment16mlllion$US{loanfromtheBanque 
Algeri enne for ALMAP development) 

• Modern factory, the only one of its type in Africa 

• -laboratory- mechanical workshop -electrical 
workshop-net preparation workshop -storage 

system “Stocax" automatic 

• Fresh fish equipment 

-six 22m vessels-5freezera 

• Production 8,000 T/year 

• Export exclusively on the Algerian market In 
collaboration with SMCP 

-8,000 ton in 1885 -15,000 expected for 1986-only fish 
of the highest quality. 


ALMAP -Asst Director General -Ahmed Hechmaoui 

P.O. Box 321 Nouadhibou -Mauritania 
Telex: 424 MTN Tel: 2148 2301 


For the farmers in Mauritania's 
main agricultural area, along 
the southern border, 1986 could 
be a happier new year indeed. 
An important new dam at the 
mouth of the Senegal River will 
stop the incursion of salt water 
washing bade in from the At- 
lantic 

The Djama dam, built as 
pan of chc work of the Organi- 
sation pour la Mxse cn Valeur 
du Fleuve Senegal (OMVS), 
has just been completed ahead 
of schedule by mainly French 
and Spanish contractors. Fi- 
nance for the $156 million dam 
came from several Arab donors 
— Abu Dhabi, Kuwait and 
Saudi Arabia — and from 
France, the Abidjan-based Afri- 
can Development Bank (ADB) 
and the ADFs concessionary- 
lending arm, die African Devel- 
opment Fund 

Salt-water incursion has 
caused se v ere damage to crop- 
land in previous years when 
drought occurred In 1983, for 
• example, Mauritania’s total 
rainfall was only 27 percent of 
the average level for the period 
1940-1971. With less water 
coming in, the volume of chc 
Senegal River fell dramatically, 
and the force of the flow was 
not strong enough to prevent 
salt water from the ocean from 
washing in with the tide over 
vulnerable croplands. This has 
occurred in other years as well 

The Djama dam t on the riv- 
et’s delta, now halts the inflow 
of salt water even when the 
rivet level is very low upstream. 
It also forms a reservoir for 
irrigation. 

Irrigation is of vital impor- 
tance to Mauritanian agricul- 
ture. Only a small proportion erf 
the country’s total land area is 
usable for agricultural pur- 
poses. The Sahara Desert covers 

two thirds of Mauritania, and 
much of this land has too little 
vegetation even to graze cam- 


els. No rainfall at all has ever 
been measured in some pares of 
Mauritania. 

Still, a few larger oases do 
support some forms of agricul- 
tural activity, Atar being a main 
one. Herders raise goats and 
camels, and some oases produce 
tree products like dates and 
gum arable, which comes from 
riie sap of certain types of acacia 
nee. A few oases even support 
millet-growing, though on a 
small scale. 

Most of the other third of 
Mauritania is Sahelian land 
Twenty years ago, the area used 
to support many people who 
grew millet and sorghum and 
raised goats, sheep and cattle 
Drought came year after year, 
though, and herds were deci- 
mated. When enough succes- 
sive crops failed, many people 
left the land 

Often one reads of a 17-year 
drought in Mauritania or of 
similarly lengthy dry periods in 
other countries. Droughr, 
though, is perhaps not a strong 
enough word for whar is hap- 
pening in the Sahel. Experts 
consider 250 millimeters of 
rainfall a year the bare mini- 
mum — the difference between 
marginal land such as the Sahel 
and unproductive true desert 
land like the Sahara. In Mauri- 
tania, chat line has moved 200 
kilometers southward in the 
past 20 years, This means that a 
strip of land 200 kilometers 

wide and potentially running 
the entire 1,000- kilometer 
width of Mauritania — an area 
of 200,000 square kilometers, of 
one fifth of chc country’s entire 
surface area — has changed 
from marginal land to unusable 
land And that ominous line is 
still moving southward today. 
Several projects are under way 
to halt desert encroachmment 
by planting grasses on shifting 
dunes. 

It therefore falls to the cfe- 
mama — that narrow scrip of 
land along the Senegal River — 


to produce most of the coun- 
try’s food and cash oops. Mea- 
suring some 10-25 kilometers 
wide and running about 400 
kilometers Long, the rhemama 
can, given favorable conditions, 
produce millet, sorghum, paddy 
rice, beans, vegetables, ground- 
nuts, sweet potatoes, yams, and 
even com, wheat and barley. 
Official figures for the 1965 
crops are not yet available, but 
it is widely expected char the 
millet and sorghum crops will 
have risen perhaps threefold or 
more from 1984’s drought-re- 
duced level of just 12,000 met- 
ric tons. The 1981 output of 
both grains was 67,000 metric 
tons. 

The Rome-based United Na- 
tions Food and Agriculture Or- 
ganization (FAO) has no fewer 
than 15 projects under way in 
Mauritania at the present rime. 
They range from providing fer- 
tilizers to subascence farmers to 
establishing seed farms, fund- 
ing a system of agricultural 
credit, rehabilitating pumping 
systems foe existing irrigation 
systems, controlling cattle para- 
sites and diseases and improv- 
ing fish-processing techniques 
(see related articles on the fish- 
ing sector). 


Several small-scale irrigation 
schemes wifi soon be imple- 
mented in southern Mauritania. 
The World Bank's soft-lending 
affiliate, the International De-. 
velopmenr Association (IDA), 
extended in 1985 a credit of 7.7 
million special drawing rights 
(SDRs, equivalent to t&2 mil- 
lion), which will partially .fi- 
nance 75 irrigated plots of 20 to 
25 hectares each to benefit 
2£00 farm families and produce 
10,000 metric tons of grain an- 
nually. The French are funding 
a similar scheme involving 82 
plots at Bogfae, and the Europe- 
an Development Fund is now 
appraising (Biruiie and' Partners 
of the LUC is conducting the 
study) a 2 million European 
currency unit (ECU) ($1-7 mil- 
lion) project- to build small 
dams in the Hodhs region. 

Mauritania’s economic plan- 
ners have made it dear, that 
they regard agricultural devel- 
opment as a top priority. Fur- 
ther projects along the lines of 
these are expected in the com- 
ing few yens that will give the 
Mauritanian farmer a better 
chance of harnessing nature, 
rather than falling victim to it. 

liiitla Van Boren 




Kon&oM Mahmoud 
' Director General of the 
Maritime Establishment and 
Friendship Port Nouakchott 


FIAP 


The Federation des industries et 
armements de peche (Federal 
non of the Shipowner and Fish- 
ing Industries) was created on 
June 14, 1982, and is one of the 
members erf the Gonfcderaqqn 
gaierale des employeurs de la 
Mauri canie (General Confeder- 
ation of Employers of Mauri ca- 
nia). 

A professional organization,, 
it includes all the traders within . 
the field of fishing and allied, 
sectors: shipowners, land indus- 
tries, deposit agencies, han- 
dling, suppliers, marine. It has. 
6l members. ' 

like .any syndicated organi-.. 
ration, FIAP has as its objective 


the defense of the material and 
moral interests of its members. 
In addition to these dudes, it 
works for the promotion and 
development of this sector 
■ through studies and research, it 
acts as a hinge' and a "drive 
belt” betweai the economic op- 
erators and civil authorities. It 
informs chc former of the po- 
licy of the national administra- 
tion, making -them aware, mo- 
bilizing them and encouraging 
chem vo contribute. It confronts 
the farter with problems en- 
countered in the sector and acts 
in conjunction with the appro- 
priate authorities toward their 
solution. . . . 


Top left, the pale-skinned Touareg peoples take care not to 


desert Above, a Mauritanian milkman on wheels draws off 
a measure of milk. Left, drinking tea to wash away the dust 
of a long day's, traveling. Middle, a typical Mauritanian 
decoration. ’ '■* 


Islamic Republic of Mauritania 

THE FRIENDSHIP PORT 
OF NOUAKCHOTT 

This port, with a capacity of 

500.000 tons, wiB be made upof MW I Wfl M gSBIfSlll 
two parts: W w 

a) WORK AT SEA mmtr ' Hy ' * 

-an access bridge 730m long ||pP .'if 

and13J5mwide |$F ▼ fiS 

- a docking quay of 585m which ” 

can receive 3 ships skrad- 
taneously with a capacity of 
10.000 to 15,000 tons. ^ ^ 

b) LAND INSTALLATIONS: Koniould Mahmoud 

-2 buOtfings, one tor the Port ’ Director General of the 

Ad minis t ra tion and the other Maritime Establishment end 

for the Police and Customs; Friendship Port Nouakchott 

-Agarage 

- An Infirmary and a rest room for workers 

- 50,000 m 2 of tarred raised areas for the storage of products in 
the open air 

- Lighthouse: this is the highest part of the Pori. 
CONCLUSIONS 

The putting into service of the Friendship Port, planned for 1987, 
win alow Mauritania to not only unload afl tts imports, but also, 
and above alt, will give the land-locked countries of the sub- 
region access to the sea. 

Maritime Establishment and 
Project for a Deep Water 
Port in NOUAKCHOTT 

Created to meet the Import and export requirements of our 
country and therefore reducing its economic dependence vts- 
6-vis foreign countries, the task of the wharf in Nouakchott was 
to unload 50,000 tons annually, with this figure capabte of being 
increased to 100,000 tons by the strengthening of existing 
equipment 

bi 1968 the first extension of the Wharf took place for an 
Investment of 83,081,704 UM from the EDF; the second took 
place in 1975 tor an amount of 84,401 .137 UM from the CIO and 
the last was to become a reafity In 1981 with the construction of 
the c»mert -manufacturing docking wharf. This construction 
cost the Cement Company of Mamitania a sum of .12 mlfflon 
Oguiyas. 

After this last extension, the annual unloadtog capacity of the 
Wharf is 450,000 tons. 

Ini 982, 325,442 tons were unloaded, of which around 94,336 
tons of cement Is the largest figure ever achieved since the 
buBcing of the Wharf. 

ED.R; European Development Fund 

C.(.0.:Cr6dtt Industrial de rOuest(tndustriaICreditotthe West) 

(France). 



TEL: 514-53 516-15: 
B.P. 267-NOUAKCHOTT 
- TELEX 538 MTN"- 


msm 












Statistics Index 




amex pm P48 garmwa rwrti p.w 
AMEX MPa/hMfJL - new rett Mht pjfl 
MYSCpm P.U (MlMriuH P.TS 
MYBE hW AP— -P.H tahnp r«ta» P.15 
CvdOBpKtt P42’ MuMwnMrY PJ* 
Cumncr «*•* P.15 (W* w P.T8 

P.W OTC dock pjl 

P.n othr markets ■ P.22 


licralbS^eribunc 


BUSINESS / FINANCE 


THURSDAY, DECTMBERJL9» 1985 

wall sway WATQt 

There’s Stffl Year-End Rally 
Under the Christmas Tree 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 16 

Page 15 



P 


«-.:i 


By EDWARD ROHRBACH 

Imnmemti RcmM Tribune 

ARIS — With slocks staging one of the strongest quarter- 
ly advances in history, Christmas has come early to Wall 
Street, .But -investors probably haven't opened all their 
presents yet StHl under the tree is the year-end rally, a 
ph en o m e n on the market peren ni ally celebrates. 

.‘’Year-end rally?” chuckled Philip Roth, teriminai analyst at 
ILF. Hutton. “The year-end rally began the end of September!” 

Yet he remains impressed with the stock market’s mom entum 
and. does not see . any reason why Santa Claus 
won't come by again this year, 
though “overextended’* 
stocks, the recent hottest per- 
formers, are not expected to 
participate so avidly. 

■ “In 1985 the market's been 
driven higher by the institu- 
tions,” Mr. Roth said, ■‘with 
the public heavily on the sell 
side;” 

However, for the first time this year he noted buyin g recently In 
the firm’s margin accounts and fhinirg individual investors proba- 
bly are becoming tempted again by Wall Street’s tinseL The 
combination of tax-seOmg abating just before Christmas and the 
impressive gains already made by stocks s ho uld encourage the 
public beck in,” Mr. Roth said. 

B UT HE WARNED that if Wall Street does not rally at the 
year-end, or at least by the first weeks of January with the 
help of normal reinvestment demand t hat develops then, 

' “It will be. distinctly negative for the stock market.” 

Joseph Granville, a market adviser, thinks in a pessimistic 
uunbdty view: “Any further rise now will simply borrow from a 
r-end rally, and the market would risk a major top in Decem- 


Some analyst# call 
this the most 
erratic, unpredictable 
time of the year. 


• j 

■ •-£ 


Carp. 

Mull 


G: Stanley Barge, market analyst for Tucker Anthony, added: 
“Anyone who has carefully studied market action during Decem- 
Ixxs knows that it is by far the most erratic, upredictable, 
frustrating period of the year.” 

.-.NO Significant year-end rally is expected by Peter Stevense, 
director of: equity research and fund management at Amster- 
dam's Bank. Mees * Hope. But he does not see Wall Street 
retreating, other. 

• “knitimttonal window-dressing — buying more of the higb- 
perf arming blue chips that wifi make 1985 portfolios look best — 
shouM’easfly maintain U.S. stocks at their current Ugh level,” he 
said. 

Moreover, Mr. Stevense judges investor confidence is strong, 
reflecting moderate growth for the economy with low inflation 
and interest rates. He added that people are also buying stocks 
because they, think corporate profits, after a “disappointing" 
1985, will accelerate in the next two years. 

“Plus, there’s a lot of cash around, and among the investment 
alternatives, only bonds are competitive, bat equities axe still 
more attractive,” he said. 

However, Wall Street’s advance has probably been too rapid, 
and Me. Stevense thinks a correction is likely in January or 
February. Triggering it, he said, could be continued delay by the 
Federal Reserve in cutting the discount rate. 

If the U.S. economy does continue to grow only moderately, 
Mr. Stevense prefers “technology in its broadest sense” as the 
area on Wall Street to invest. This includes dreg stocks with a 
biotechnology kicker, such as- Bristol-Myers and Merck, in addi- 
tion to issues ranging from -International Business Machines; 
Digital Equipment and Texas Instruments to Avnet and AMP 


'CRT 


tinationals he cited are Coca-Cola and McDonalds. He 
also gave a nod to telephone utilities, notably the Bell group. 

Martin Zweig, editor of Zweig Forecast, calls this by far the 
most significant seasonal period of the year for Wall Street and 
paints out that it is the only one with a strongly upward bias far 
more than just a few days. 

He cited three main reasons far year-end rallies: 

(Coaifanat oo Page 21, CnL 4) 


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Japan 
Ends Bate 
Support 

Will Let Levels 
Move Naturally 

Compiled bf Our Staff Fmm Dbpatdtes 

TOKYO — -The Bank of Japan 
has scrapped its policy of propping 
Japan’s short-tom interest rates, 
the central bank’s governor, Sato- 
shi Sunrita, said Wednesday. 

At the same time. Prime Minister 
Yasohiro Nakasooe told an eco- 
nomic poBcy advisory committee 
meeting that the climate was now 
favorable to lower interest rates 
through international cooperation. 

Mir. Sumita said: “The bank un- 
derstands that it can now let short- 
term interest rates move naturally, 
by altering thesiand of keeping the 
rates at & high level" 

He said the economic environ- 
ment permitted such a change, as 
the yeo-doUar exchange rate had 
stabilized in favor of the yen and 
U.S. interest rates were coining 
down. 

The interest-rate policy was in- 
troduced Ocl 26 to raise the value 
of the yen. The announcement trig- 
gered chaos in Japanese money 
markets and pushed, the yea sharp- 
ly higher against the dollar. 

Monetary sources said that if 
short-term interest rates were 
nminijiinwi at their current high 
level, they would keep corporate 
borrowing costly, hamp erin g Ja- 
pan’s economic growth. 

According to Japan's Jjji sews 
agency, Mr. Nakakme said that 
lower interest rales are important 
for Japan, which wants to e xpa nd 
domestic demand. 

But Makoto Ksroda, who heads 
the International Trade Policy Bu- 
reau of the Ministry of Internation- 
al Trade and Industry, predicted 
Tuesday that despite efforts to 
shrink its huge surplus with die 
United States. Japan would contin- 
ue to record substantial increases in 
exports and declines in imports. 

He said Japan’s policies w31 re- 
main gpared to malnng Japan’s do- 
mestic markets more to 

imports, but he expected that “we 
will be criticized for continuing to 
increase our exports became yh** 
situation will continue." 

Official sources reported 
Wednesday that Japan will aim at., 
an -, infia tion-adjnsted econcrari c 
growth rate of 4 percent in Gjcal 
1986. (AFP, Reuters, NYT) 



Th* KW Yori fun 

Commodore Amiga, right, shown with Atari 520 ST at San Leandro, California, store. 

Commodore , Atari in Showdown 

Battle of New Computers May Decide Who Survives 


By Andrew Pollack 

New York Times Service 

SAN FRANCISCO — To demonstrate the ca- 
pability of its new Amiga computer. Commodore 
often displays os its s cre e n a surprisingly realistic 
picture of a colorful bouncing bah. So it was a 
deliberate challenge when, at a recent trade show, 
rival Atari placed ns new 520 ST computer beside 
the Amiga — and displayed on its screen a virtual- 
ly identical bouncing ball. 

But there was a major difference: “Amiga, 
51,795” read the sign under the Commodore prod- 
uct “Atari ST, 5999,” read the Atari ago. 

“A picture is worth a thousand words,” said 
Jack Tranud, chairman and chief executive of 
Atari. 

The biggest battle between these two com panies. 
and the newest ski rmish in a jaded computer 
market, has begun. Co mmodore Inte rnational Ltd. 
and Atari Carp., fierce competitors for years, are 
challenging each other — as wefl as the industry 
giants. International Business Machines Corp. and 
Apple Computer Inc. — with these two flashy 
machines «m«i at business as well as hnm* users. 

For both companies, success with these products 
is vital if they are to remain in business. Yet there is 
a feeding within the industry that only one product 
will make it. 

The two computers are the major new ones oo 
the s e m e for this year’s holiday buyers. Both are 
selling wdl, according to the companies and their 
retailars, except that both computers have arrived 
on the market too late and with too little software 
available to make a big dent in the market this 

nmflmiK 

In addition, production volumes and distribu- 
tion of the two newcomers are still and 

many machines are bong bought primarily by 
computer enthusiasts. Hence, the battle will actu- 


ally be decided after Christmas, when production 
volumes rise. 

The main attraction of both the Amiga and the 
ST is their color-graphics capability at a relatively 
low price, especially for the business user. Many in 
the industry say that the Amiga, which sells for 
SI .300 without a monitor or $1,795 with one, is 
more impressive technologically than the Atari. 

But the Atari machine, at S999 with the color 
monitor, or 5799 with a monochrome one. has the 
price advantage. 

Atari, which readied the market in midsummer, 
has sold about 50,000 machines to dealers and 
expects to ship 50,000 more by the end of the year, 
according to Mr. TramieL Bui more than 70 per- 
cent of Atari’s sales have beat to dealers in Europe, 
where the murhrnf has hwen accepted more readily 
than in the United States, Mr. Tramiel said in an 
interview. “Fm not happy in the United States," he 
said. 

Commodore h^gan s hipp i ng Amiga* at the end 
of September, but supply has been and 

ddivmr of monitors has been slow. Company 
officials and some analysts estimate that the com- 
pany wfll ship 40,000 to 60.000 by the end of the 
year. But Charles Wolf, an analyst with First 
Boston Corp., says Commodore might ship only 
20,000 to 30,000 by the end rtf the year. 

So far, however, because of limited supplies, the 
computers ne selling as fast as Commodore can 
ship th em 

To sustain early momentum, however, both 
computers need more software and wider distribu- 
tion. Thus, in addition to battling for consumer 
purchases! they are competing for the support of 
software writers and dealers. 

“It reminds me of a presidential election.” said 
Trip TOfwkinv president of Electronic Arts, a 

( C o ntin u ed on Page 21, Col 1) 


Latin Debtors 
Ask for Lower 
Interest Rates 


By Alan Riding 

Ne h- York Tima Service 

MONTEVIDEO — I-ailn Amer- 
ica's leading debtor nations have 
proposed a set of "emergency mea- 
sures” to alleviate the region’s fis- 
cal crisis, including a reduction of 
interest rates on their debts. 

The proposal was made Tuesday 
night at the end of a two-day meet- 
ing in Uruguay that was attended 
by foreign and finance ministers of 
the 11-nation Cartagena group, 
called together to prepare the re- 
gion's response lo a recent U.S. 
debt initiative known as the Baker 
plan. 

The proposal also contained a 
call for new loans from commercial 
banks and for a softening of credit 
conditions of the kind frequently 
demanded until now by the Inter- 
national Monetary Fund. 

A five-nation coramhiee. made 
up of Brazil Mexico. Argentina, 
Colombia and Venezuela, was 
formed to follow the progress or 
the plan and to propose "alterna- 
tive measures” if its objectives are 
not fulfilled. 

Apparently anticipating negative 
reactions to the proposals. Argenti- 
na’s economy minister, Juan Sour- 
rouille, insisted that this was not a 
step toward formation of a debtors' 
cartel. "We are not threatening 
anyone." he said. "We are propos- 
ing a constrictive dialogue.” 

The proposals are expected lo 
face resistance from some creditor 
governments and banks that until 
now have renegotiated an impor- 
tant part of the region’s 5360-bil- 
lion debt but have been unwilling 
to reduce interest payments. 

After meeting in private for two 
days, the region's finance and for- 
eign ministers focused their argu- 
ments on the need to channel cur- 
rent interest payments toward 
internal economic growth. 


They said that they antidpatei 
zero economic growth for the re- 
gion tills year, while S3! hiiU»>a 
would leave Latin America in (In- 
form of debt servicing. 

To achieve an economic recov- 
ery, the minister* proposed not 
only a reduction of interest rase* 
"to historical Ictels,” but also pro- 
vision of new commercial credits, 
with banks reducing their profit 
margins. They urged banks !0 
maintain their "real exposure” in 
the region by providing addition/.) 
loans to compensate for inflation 

Further, while not formally en- 
dorsing Peru's decision to limit in- 
terest payments to 10 percent of its 
earnings from exports, the rmr.i 
ters proposed a ceiling on capital 
outflow linked either in grov.in 
rates or export lev els. 

"It’s quite apparent that if v.e 
pay full interest, we will have •„» 
accept more unemployment, m.>;e 
bankrupt industries and more vio- 
lence,” said Peru's economy mini - 
ter, Luis Alva Castro. “Th- o:t tv- 
way out is to pay less.” 

Looking for new sources of c.:o,- 
lal the Cartagena group also pro- 
posed a 20-percent increase -t 
loans by the World Bank and 
international financial organisa- 
tions over the next three years. 

The group said the United StL'.i:. 
had taken "a positive step” in rr. - 
poring the Baker plan, which offers 
to channel 529 billion in new cr.-J- 
its to 15 heavily indebted nativ.ns 
through 1988. but it added that mre 
was "insufficient." The plan is 
named after the UJS. Treasury sec- 
retary, James A. Baker 3d. 

Other members of the Cartagena 
group, which takes its name Jr. no 
the Colombian city where the dem- 
on first met in June 1984, are Bo- 
livia, Chile, the Dominican Repub- 
lic Ecuador and Uruguay. 


EC Unveils Program 
To Revise Price System 


Japan Gingerly Grasps the Auto-Export Nettle 


By John Burgess 

Washington Poa Sendee 

TOKYO — Reluctantly, Japan 
has begin to grapple again with an 
issue mat has few rivals in potential 
to poison trade relations with the 
United States — whether to extend 
quotas on exports of automobiles. 

The current program, which 
holds sales to the United States to 
23 million care per year, expires 
March 31. But already, manufac- 
turers and government are gearing 
up for dosed-door consultations 
that could continue right up until 
the deadline. 

They hope to avoid a replay of 
last spring, when Japan’s an- 
nouncement that it would raise the 
quota by 24 percent provoked an- 
gry cries from Congnss and helped 
push the two countries’ trade rela- 
tions to their lowest pant in years. 

Many officials in Tokyo concede 
that the timing and tone of that 
announcement was a public rela- 
tions fiasco. Bat they maintain that 
the decision was fundamentally 
just, as a step toward free trade. 


Now they must decide again. 
“We should learn from history and 
experience,” said Makoto Knroda, 
hsid of trade policy at the Ministry 
of International Trade and Indus- 
try. He said no consultations were 
under way yet, and, noting the ex- 
treme sensitivity of the issue, said: 
“Better to keep quiet” 

Last week, Japanese newspapers 
carried brief articles on inside 
an unnamed senior 
at Mi l l as saying that quo- 
tas would not be extended, though 
he said Japan would reconsider m 
the event of unspecified “big 
changes” in the general situation. 

The story attracted only minor 
attention in Tokyo In many ways 
it simply reiterated Japan's official 
position that the quotas are an ab- 
erration and must end as soon as 
posable. The reported reference to 
“big changes” left adequate leeway 
for continuing the restraints. 

In Congress, however, the re- 
marks drew strong q wiwwwii fi n 
and seem to have been read as a 
formal decision for a new “export 


wave” across the Pacific. That 
would further drive np a U.S. trade 
deficit with Japan that this year is 
expected to total about 550 baiion. 
Adding 100.000 cars to (he quota, 
for example, would add around 
5800 million to tbe deficit 

A Mm spokesman quickly de- 
nied that any decision had been 
made. In view of the sensitivity of 
die issue in Washington, it seems 
likely the decision, like last 
spring’s, wiD be made at the elev- 
enth hour. 

MJTI spokesmen also pleaded 
ignorance about who made the 
statement But industry and gov- 
ernment sources say privately that 
it was the minister of international 
trade himself, Kdjiro Murata, 
speaking on background with the 
reporters who regularly cover him. 

Some foreign analysts in Tokyo 
labeled the stay a trial balloon. 
One Japanese official however, 
saying Mr. Murata's statement was 
in response to a reporter’s question, 
called it a case in which a politician 
bad fired off emotional words with- 


out thinking them through. Mr. 
Murata, in any case, is widely ex- 
pected to leave the job in a routine 
cabinet reshuffle soon. 

The quotas began five years ago 
to give (be UJS. automobile indus- 
try lime to retool and recover from 
tbe dark years of the 1970s. Tbe 
“voluntary restraints” were in the- 
ory a unilateral initiative of japan, 
but in fact grew' from consultation 
with Washington. Originally a 
three-year program, they nave 
twice been extended by one year. 

Tbe Japanese contend the quo- 
tas’ purpose is now accomplished. 
“The U25. automobile manufactur- 
ers have completely regained their 
strength and tbe on employment 
rate is going down," Sbotchiro 
Toyoda, president of Toyota Mo- 
tor Coip^ said at a news conference 
Tuesday. 

Mr. Toyoda and others complain 
that the restraints are in force at a 
time when tbe United States is 
pushing Japan to dismantle barri- 
ers to unports in Its own market. 

( C o n ti n ued mi Page 19, Col 4) 


Reuters 

■ BRUSSELS — The European 
Community Commission unveiled 
plans Wednesday to overhaul the 
complex price-support system ad- 
ministered under the EC’s contro- 
versial Common Agricultural Po- 
licy. 

Tbe measures include a program 
to encourage the retirement of 
fanners over 55 years old, cash aid 
to farmers who adopt enviroomei]- 
tally-consrious methods, more-dif- 
ficult access to guaranteed prices, 
and protection of forests from agri- 
cultural land usage- 

Farm lobbyists and agricultural 
experts based in Brussels criticized 
the proposals for failing to include 
precise details, even after six 
months of debate; and said more 
far-reaching schemes first pro- 
posed had now been dropped. 

Outlining the reform initiative at 
a news conference, the agricultural 
commissioner. Frans Andricssen of 
tbe Netherlands, said the broad 
aim of the package was to intro- 
duce more market-oriented policies 
while at the same time accepting 
that price cuts alone could not 
solve the key problem of surplus. 

"A comprehensive approach and 
only a comprehensive approach 
can solve the problems." he told 
reporters. "We found that a policy 
of price cuts would not do the 
trick.” 

Tbe proposals follow a review of 


community agriculture policy tli„i 
was begun in July. 

Mr. Andricssen did not give de- 
tails of the size of a new tax on 
traded cereals, or of tighter qualitv 
controls on grain sold into commu- 
nity silos. He said these would be 
published early next year, before 
EC ministers debate the plans. 


Japan Air Names 
A New President 

United Prat Intcnuuirmuf 

TOKYO — Japan Air Lines ap- 
pointed a new president Weilnes- 
day in a management reshuffle or- 
dered by Prime Minister Yasuhiro 
Nakasoue after the crash of a JAL 
Boeing 747 in August, in which 52l» 
persons were killed. 

At an extraordinary sharehold- 
ers meeting. Susumu Yamajl an 
adviser to the airline, was elected to 
succeed Yasumoto Takagj as presi- 
dent of JAL, which is 34.5- percent- 
owned by the state. Mr. Yaxnaji,6ll 
joined Japan Air Lines in June. 
Shareholders also named Junji 
Itoh, president of the cosmetic 
company Kanebo ltd., to the nr* 
post of vice chairman. 

Mr. Takagl who resigned to take 
responsibility for the crash into .1 
mountainside in central Japan, 
again apologized at the meeting. 


K 1 . 1*1 IrMi c 

****»•.• Bnw da Bmaaku tBrumat Us Banco Cam m arckde rta/tona (MOanjs Oiemknt 
. a* flu (Nam York): Batuam Matlopala do Parte (Ports): Bank at Tokyo (Tokyo); IMP (SDR); 
M/f tdtnar. \ rtyak datam): Gasoonk (nMok O Um t kwm RaManrwtdAP. 


eMW net cm: Nam York Como* currant 
camroet. AH prices In lAi * t 
Source: Radon. 


JVIT, IBM Form 
Joint Venture on 
fonurumications 

Reuters 

TOKYO — Nippon Telegraph Sc 
Telephone Carp, and International 
Business Machines Japan Ltd. an- 
nounced Wednesday that they have 
set up an equal joint telecommuni- 
cations and information-process- 
ing venture. 

The new concern, Nippon Infor- 
mation & Communication Corp., is 
capitalized at 600 million yen 
($2.97 million) and wiB begin oper- 
ations next month. Nippon and 
IBM officials said. 

“The new company will study 
how to link tbe networks of NTT 
and IBM computers,” the officials 
said. A study earlier this year indi- 
cated that it can be done, and both 
concerns announced in September 
that they were planning a joint ven- 
ture. 

Other companies have said that 
tbe new venture could monopolize 
Japan’s tdecomm unications mar- 
ket But the president of the new 
concern, Keizo Kobno said, “Co- 
operation between NTT and IBM 
Japan will maintain fair competi- 
tion.” 

Haiuo Ozawa, president of the 
Communications Industry Associ- 
ation of Japan, noted that NTT has 
Japan's largest telecommunica- 
tions network and IBM is its big- 
gest computer maker. “For them to 
join at a time when there is no NTT 
competitor is a move toward mo- 
nopoly.” he said. 


Bundesbank Sees Trade Surplus Peaking Next Year 


By Warren Geder 

International Herald Tribme 

FRANKFURT —The Bundes- 
bank, West Germany's central 
bank, predicted Wednesday that 
the country’s growing surpluses in 
merchandise trade and the overall 
current account wifi peak next year 
as a result of the appreciation of the 
Deutsche mark against the Hollar 
and of growing domestic demand 
for imports. 

No specific projections were pro- 
vided in the Bundesbank’s Decem- 
ber monthly report, but economists 
here say the surplus in the current 
account will widen to SO Mlioc 
DM (about $20 billion.) from an 
anticipated 37 bfflicai to 40 billkm 
DM this year. 

The current account is a broad 
measure of trade that includes mer- 
chandise and nonmerchandise 
hems, such as services. 

The merchandise trade surplus is 
projected by commercial bank 
economists to widen to about 100 


billion DM in 1986, from about 75 
billion to 80 billion DM this year. 

Since finance ministers of tbe 
Group of Five — the United Stales, 
West Germany, France, Britain 
and Japan — agreed an Sept- 22 in 
New Yak to drive down the value 
of tbe dollar, the U.S. currency has 
depreciated against tbe mark by 
1215 percent, the report said. 

The Bundesbank said current ex- 
change rates appear to have 
achieved a stable relationship, re- 
flecting more precisely than m the 
past the relative economic 
strengths of Western trading part- 
ners. 

The Bundesbank, chastised in re- 
cent weeks by UJS. Treasury offi- 
cials fa not intervening enough 
against the dollar, went to some 
lengths in its report to underscore 
the contribution to worid economic 
recovery that the West German 
economy is set to make next year. 

US. officials also have said that 
they believe West Germany, with a 


budget deficit under control and a 
declining inflation rate of under 2 
percent, has ample scope to spur 
growth in the domestic economy 
through tax reforms and the elimi- 
nation of labor market rigidities. 

In its report, the bank said that 
tbe domestic economy is likely to 
pick up strongly next year, aided by 
an 1 1 -billion DM tax cut and fall- 
ing consumer prices, so that import 
volume wQl show a marked rise on 

stronger demand. 

Because the mark’s recent appre- 
ciation against the dollar and other 
currencies has made imports 
cheaper, the level of imports in val- 
ue terms win not increase as dra- 
matically, the Bundesbank said. 

From August through October 
this year, the current account 
showed a seasonally-adjusted sur- 
plus of } 0.8 billion DM, up from 10 

billion in tbe previous three months 


and from 5.8 billion DM a year 
earlier. 

Exports in the three months 
dropped a seaoti ally- adjusted 3.5 
percent in value terms against the 
previous three months, whQe im- 
ports were down 1 j percent. 

A sharp drop in dcDar-denomi- 
nated o9 prices and other raw ma- 
terial prices played a major role in 
the decline in tbe value of imports 
over the period. 

The Bundesbank’s policy-mak- 
ing council will convene fa its last 
formal session Thursday fa the 
year. Observers expect that the 
hank wiD decide to maintain its 
money supply target ranges of 3 
percent to 5 percent growth. 

There is growing speculation 
that the bank will also decide to 
allow banks to issue certificates of 
deposits den omina ted in marks, a 
move urged by the Association of 
German Banks. 


BANQUE 
DE L’UNION 
EUROPEENNE 

U.S. $50,000,000 
Floating Rate Notes 
1979 - 1989 


In accoidancp with the trmw 
and conditions of the Notre, 
the rale of interest las hern 
fixed at 8!n pa annum for 
the interest period running 
from December 2001. 19SS 
lo March 20th, 1986, 




Weekly net asset value 

Tokyo Pacific Hokfings MV. 


J on Dec. 16 , 1985 : U.S. $ 157 . 19 . 

listed on the Amsterdam Stock Exchange 

Information: Pierson, Hekfring A Pierson N.V^ 

H a r s pgrs cht 214, 101 6 BS Amsterdam. 


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Page 16 


CNTERNATIOINAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 


Dow Jones Averages 


Indus 1543.12 154044 10*54 U4253- 107 

Trpra 71872 7Z7.1I 7100 7HJ9 — 32B 

mhi 17343 1750b 17240 17343 + 147 

tSL 41744 62414 4110 41647- 100 


NYSE index 


„K* p T2ra«I?5Z 

c 13872 13072 WM6 

industrial* Sqj l| 5 JD 114 J 6 

TCBH* l 'Sn -*278 620* 6M1 

ffi5 rnS »Bf »»■» 


NYSE Diaries 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bonds 

uuitim 

Industrials 


MvanOKl 
Dodlnod, 
Unchanged 
Total law** 
Hew HMk 
N ow Lam 


*74 447 

W WC 

oi sn 

”S 

w aa 

17 20 


fiHH-i nt Trading In N.Y 


Bov solos *s*vt 

£ f ZZ—Z 495*M5 734779 4799 

Included In Hie solos Homos 


Wednesdays 

MSE 

dosing 


W.o» M L - 

Prtv.3PJA.wl.- WMJW" 

PiwcouatMoMchM 1H*M» 


Tables Include the 
up t« ttM doslno on Wall S treet and 
do not reflac* tot* trades etaewner*. 
Via The Associated Press 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ index. 


amex Most Actives, 


Advanced 
Dad Med 

unchmed 
Trig) Ina 
Now Htons 
New Laws 


2*6 217 

IS 408 

30 Ml 

tsr m 

a S 

u »7 


composite 
industrial* 
Flf wnc* 
insurance 
U illlllcs 
Bonus 
; Trans*. 


Week jeer 
dace MH *W 

m*. yWM 3175? 
32700 32753 31141 
422.13 - 

mic — 374-75 

3a5 - *M} 

MSS - ^ 

J9171 — 28BJS 


BAT in 
Cnsters 

HmeGn 

wangB 
Wicket 
DomaP 
AM Inti 
OeorfcH 

Ti E - 

CMICp 

KsvPh 

EcMBfl 

AkoCp 


Hl«h LOW 

A 

Uft U* 
25ft 2* 
209k 2?J& 

5 

3* 

5>% M 

13ft ig; 

Bft » 

lift H5 
13 12ft 
30% 19% 

Eft U£ 

TOW 91k 


Last CM. 

4* 

14 — V* 

SS 15 
5 ^ 

“ + s 

E! 

12% 

RjS 

low + * 


Standard & Poor's index 


AMEX Sales 


3 PM. vwume 
Pro*, am*, voteroe 


amex stock index 


10,9907)00 

13540000 


prevleat 

Low 


R iJ 

5 

iff pt 2.18 92 
L 

X UOaU 

J3 20 
272 10.1 
140 2.1 . 

J9 19 1* 

.40 14 17 

J2b 4-1 12 

!.V2e 97 
-40 15 
531 II 


154 115 
240 137 
,12a 5 
2*4 SO 
I 5.190*5 
150 2* 

Ij4S 20 
- 40 U 

l ,10e S3 
A 192 135 
• 57 100 
900 ItU 
1100 105 

*54 ias 

8.16 105 
.16 5 

, JB 15 
Jb 25 
50 27 
154 13 
UN 30 


Prices Dedine After Early Rise 

ne Associated Press believed the moroing ncovm from 1 uesda/s 

vnRK - Prices on the New York loss reflected the na^s nftm-v 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Prices on the New York 
Stock Exchange were weaker late Wednesday 
after being higher in the morning session. But 
Wall Street traders differed over the overall 

direction of the market, which has scored record 

earns in recent weeks. . . _ _ . , 

^Tl’s not as good as it looks, said Mkhad 
Metz of Oppenheimer and Co. Intu, a New Yore 

■ Although prices in tables on these pages areffm 
the 4 PM. close in New York, for time moons, 
this article is based on the market at S rM. 

investment firm. “I think the market is losing a 
bit of momentum and it’s about tune. 

jbe Dow Jones average of 30 industrials, 
which shot up about six points hi -the morning 
session and see-sawed around the IpSMcyei, 
subsided to 1.538.53 at 3:30 P.M., 557 points 
below Tuesday’s close. 

Volume was approximately 126.1 munon 

“It’s like a polo stick, it’s up and down," Mid 
John J Smith of the New York investment firm 
Fahnestock & Co. "It’s getting toward year- 
end, so the market is full of cross-currents, with 
no trend either way." . 

Peter J. DaPuzzo, manager of the retail equity 
group at Sheareon Lehman Brothers, said he 


“It shows there’s an awful lot of money out 
there chasing around fewer stocks,” be said. 

Most active NYSE-listed issues included 
Texaco Inc. at 29%, op 1% on volume exceeding 
3.1 million shares. Texaco said it had o btained a 
temporary restraining order against Pennzoil 
Co., preventing Pennzoil from attaching liens 
on Texaco property to enforce a SI 1.1 billion 
damage award against Texaco. 

IBM, considered a market leader m the blue- 
chip sector, was up to 153. Teledyne, regard- 
ed as another market leader, jumped 5% to 
302V4. The technology firm, which has extensive 
holdings in other companies, was reported to 
have sold of r its GAF shares earUerm the day. 

R.H Macy was up 1% to 63%. Stock of the 
10th largest U.S. retailer has fluctuated recently 
because of a management proposal to buy the 

^Another retailer, Toys “R" Us, dropped 1 % 
to 37% on a volume of mote tha n 1.4 million 
shares. There were reports that suggested Wall 
Street analysts were lowering the firm's earn- 
ings estimates. 

On Tuesday the Dow, which has risen more 
than 140 points in a little over a mouth, retreat- 
ed to 1,544-50, off 8.60 from its record close 
Monday. The Dow had set records in five of the 
past six sessions. 


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For generations GE and RCA have touched 
the lives of millions of people. We have embodied 
the creative spirit of America. Its technological 
greatness, scientific advances, dynamism and 
movement. 

We have entertained America and defended 
it Illuminated its homes and made its airwaves 
dance. 

Above all, we have been a pulse of progress ' 
and free enterprise. 

The planned merger of our two great com- 
panies is an event that makes us very proud. 
And equally optimistic. 

We will be a company whose strengths will 
have profound and beneficial effects. A company 
that will compete with anyone. Anywhere. In 
every market we serve. 

We are proud of the people who over the 
years have built our two companies into great 
organizations achieving modern-day miracles. 
And of the people who’ve worked so diligently 
to keep our companies great— through periods 
of economic difficulties and technological 
change. 

We are two companies with proud pasts. 
We will become one company with an 
important future. For the people of this country 
and countless millions of others around 


Ll m 


the world. 

All will benefit from our products, 
our services, and pur capabilities. < 
That makes us especially proud. / 

And very l 
enthusiastic. 







Wednesd ays 

MSE 

Closing 

Tables include tt» natKwwWeprlces 
in to the dosing on Wall street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


34 20% 

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NYNEX MO 6A 9 


,2 5 IhL'* 
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IMS A 95 96 % + 1 * 


(Continued from Page 16 ) 


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26* 13b PkwtrEI DBa .4 
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713 lib 1Mb 11» + » 

4 129b 129b 129b 4-lb 
2890x115 114*1W% + * 

5D0z82Wi 82* 82* 

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1800Z 64b 64 64 + b 

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i 




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224 23 22* 22* — 

176 6b 6b 6b — 
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153 31* 30* -Mb — b 


779 61 * 60 b 60 b— b 
828 23 * 22 * 21 * + * 
25 17 b 17 b 17 * + b 
929 48 * 47 b 47 *— 1 * 
913 12 11 * 12 f b 

27 17 16 * 16 b + b 

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177 13 b U* 13 %—* 

71 9 8 * 8 *— b 

6 25 * 25 b 25 b- * 

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1407 43 38 b 43 -M* 

3248 13 * 12 * 13 * + % 
49 19* 19 * IWl + b 
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102 bo oo m 

564 23 b a* 23 
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54 35 b 35 * 35 * + b 
80 35 * 34 * 36 * + » 
374 35 * 35 b 35 *— b 
7*7 33 % 33 b 33 % + * 
1002 46 * 4 A* 46 *— * 
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104 28 * 27 * 28 * + b 
518 23 b 22 * 22 *— b 
2513 22 b 21 * »!*- ^ 
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2852 70 b 69 % 70 + * 

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lIS.Ritures 

Via The Associated Press 


Season Season 
High Law 


Onen High Low Close Clb. 


Season Season 
High Low 


Open High Low LHm* Ctw. 



E6J0 18900 May 224J0 Ml 50 22100 129-25 
Fsi Sales ISO Prev. Sales U05 
P^Dot O om Ini- 14J27 w>47 
SUGAR WORLD II {NYCSCE) 
t^l^-c^twrltk M# Mf ^ 

?f 5 ^ r, s ^ ^ 
g s s w “ s 

4& 0« 679 6& L76 U6 

7 7m 4M & 7J7 738 7J4 7J6 

pSJIoS Open lrrt.l0l'>44 up 332 
COCOA (NYCSCE) 

W^ric longer ton 22* 2243 2180 21W 

B 1 5T a a i a 

™ a g ^ 

EsLSalu Pr*v. Sales 1437 

prev. Day Open >nL 1M15 up40 

ORANGE JUICE (NYCE) 

12PM .aaa moo imm 

IWJ0 112J0 *aar 12350 12650 121-75 IBM 

1 6250 I11J9S l»ay m2S 126^ M 121» 

lcrcfl liijn Jii| 1Z35S 126.50 i llS D 1^5 0 

?S3 in" !SS 

39 M iSV 12250 12250 121.95 g 

Wav l " wl 

Est. Sales 4500 Prev. Series W04 
pr«y. Day Onen Inf. 12555 up 743 


20* 20* 20* 
53* 57* 53* 

4 * 4 * 6 * 
12 b u* 

14 13 * 

265 12 * 12 * 

267 10 9 * 

30 14 * 14 * 

190 % * 

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598 11* lib 
340 2* 3* 

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11 11 32 S 

2.1 14 493 
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49 11 <28 

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249 
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78 
85 
85 

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Tetcom 
TeMvn 
Tel cate 
Telex 
Temp in 
Tsmco 
Tencpr 

Tencpr 
Tenon 
Tesora 
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TjcABc 
T ex Cm 
TexEst 
Texlnd 
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28* TxPOC 
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54 * 54 * 

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20 
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13 Veeca 
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37 2 % 

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2240 * 74 
194 27 * 
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CATTLE (CME) „ 

-MOM lbs. ewite per 10 . 

69-15 S5M Dec 64J0 65.0B 

67.45 5435 FeO 60JO 61.10 

67J7 55-30 Apt 60.40 61.15 

66i5 5625 Jun 4035 Ji* 

65.40 5520 Aug 5965 6020 

6000 57 JO Oct 5685 5925 

6520 59.10 Dec 4R.W 6fB5 

E« Sales 19.199 P/ev.SW« MA91 
Prev. Dov Open Ini. MASS ell 562 
FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 

44jno lbs.- cents per b. 

7940 6020 Jun 

71.70 60-6! MOT 6520 66-15 

71 M 6060 APT 65.15 6595 

70M 6010 MOV 6440 64.75 

6650 45.10 Aug 6540 

EH. Sales 1229 Prev. 5aiK 
Prev. Dav Open Ini 11,148 up 1W 

HOGS (CME) 

30.000 lbs.- cents per lb. 

50 as 36 '| 5 Dec 48.70 4920 

§047 M20 Feb 4520 «25 

4725 36.12 Apr 4120 41M 

49.05 39.B Jun 

49AS 40.45 Jul 4425 4520 

51.90 40.25 Auu 4JJ0 44.10 

41.10 3827 Del 4025 4025 

49 JO 3827 Dec 41tt 41.1S 

4125 4040 Feb 41X7, «A7 


4 L 10 3827 Oct 4025 4025 

49 JO 3827 Dec 41 tt 41 . 1 S 

41 75 40.40 Feb 41 X 7 41 X 7 

Est Soles 7 J 20 Prev. Sales BAM 
Prev. Day Ooen Inf. 2 ABI 5 off 1210 

PORK BELLIES (CME) 

*%5l b ^12 its 
FiS SS || gl 

76.00 5720 Jul 6520 6520 

7X15 55 Ml Auu 62.05 60JO 

Est Sales Wl®4 prev. Sales 4M0 
9X39 eft 137 


6195 6407 
59JH 5927 

moo 60.10 

60X0 6020 
59X0 59.90 
5RJ3 »X5 
59.90 59.90 


64.90 6520 
6510 6525 

6502 6502 

64.10 64.15 
6527 6550 


48X0 41J7 

44M 4425 

40J0 40X0 
4325 43X2 
*405 44.13 
4X20 4X22 

4020 4022 
4UH 41.10 
41X7 41X7 


6420 6430 

6 X 65 6165 
6 X 75 6 X 75 
63 X 0 61 X 0 

60 J 5 6055 


m 


«*. 


* ZM 

* 38 * 

5 S 

S 39 b 
% 

% 45 % 

S 14 * 

* 9 b 

ft 3 % 

% 36 * 

8% 




60% 37b Xerox , 32$ 51 20 3436 S9%M%5B%- 
56* 48% Xerox pf 5X5 102 14 54* 54* 54* + * 

» XTRa” M 32 13 358 31* 11b 21% + * 



34 % ZaloCc 

U 2 

46 

13 

302 

39 

38 * 

28 * 







542 



7 % + % 




#48 

X 

19 

791 

63 * 

82 % 

62 % — % 


35 

16 b ZenlttlE 


988 

3360 

20 * 

IV* 

IT*— 1 . 




52 

IX 

19 

80 

32 * 

22 * 

22 %- * 


41 * 

24 * Zumin 

U 3 

35 

14 

234 

38 % 

37 % 

37 % — % 



21*0 22 X 0 +-27 

TIW WM +JJ 


HPMHL3E 


COFFEE 
37 X 00 IDS.' 
31320 
307.96 
311 X 0 
71580 
1)9.14 
173 X 7 
31320 


C (NYCSCE) 
cents per lb. 
13925 Dec 
12 BJ 0 Mar 
13120 May 
13550 Jul 
133.75 See 

13820 DOC 
14250 Mar 


30520 30720 
209 JO 21220 
31120 21720 
21450 221 JO 
31628 2 MJ 0 
2 JOJ 0 32920 
33520 22920 


Currency Options 


Financial 


(indexes com pi ted shortly before market dasej 
5P COMP. INDEX (CME) 

3“]^ SS VSS SiS IBS S5E =1S 

ytis 1MM JUT 215J5 216.90 21410 214X0 -1XS 

M&J™ pS 5 .s 3SLS1" ” 

Prev. Dov Open IP*- 87 X 48 off 412 
VALUE UKECKCBTT 

MC 21250 21350 21120 M100 -X 

Som rn» Mor 21SX0 31620 2T510 2T5M —JA 

MM |9720 Jun 31430 3ISJ0 Z 1720 3JH5 ITS 

om nun dm H 5 J 0 22120 22120 +lm 

Fit. sates PPty. sales 7 X«t 
Prev. Dav Open Ini. WL 273 off 273 

hysg COMP. INDEX (NYPE) 

< ma aBa S dm IJl-S 1 S- 1 " SKS ISS 


Commodilties 


Hive Low Md AUt I 

French francs Per metric Tea 
Mar 1281 U 57 U 69 12 TO 

& -MB «S 35 g 

8^ \S ® ?ffi 1 

Mar 1 J 93 1292 1 S 5 13 B 

EBt. vuL: 220 B lots of 50 ter* Prey, o 
soles: 696 lots. Open Interest: 36262 

COCOA 

French francs pee MO ho 

wSr 3S g 35 

May N.T. H.T. 1.995 . — 

& K: IS = 

Mar HIT. n!t' iS — 

Est. you 25 tots 01 TOtenk Prev. « 
sales: 31 tots. Open Interest; 394 
COFFEE 

Fr*t€» Irentaper 1 ** Mi 
jan 3500 2 X 85 2 X 90 2^0 

Mar 2 X 25 2540 2565 2570 

MOV 2A« MS8 ZJ55 2 m 

JTV 2 J 3 B U 00 2 JM JJJJ 

Sea KH 2358 S'SS 7 * w 

NOV 2280 27 B 0 2780 — 

Jan N.T. NT. 1790 — 

Est. vol.: 140 tots of 5 tons. Prev. i 
sales: 300 tots. Open Interest: 435 
Source: Bouts* do Commerce. 


London 

Commodities 


HtUb.Lmr M MU HI M 

SUGAR 

Stert te p per metric ten 
Mar 162 X 0 16020 160 X 0 160 X 0 16220 . 162 X 0 
May 166 X 0 16460 164 X 0 16480 16430 16460 
AUU 17120 1 * 9 X 0 16920 169 X 0 170 X 0 171 X 0 
OO N.T. N.T. 173 X 0 174*0 17520 175 X 0 
Volume: 1231 lots of 50 Ians. 


Commodities 


SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
UJJNromcB 


Cash Prices 


Ore. IB 
Year 


FKTiT 


III 



Close 

Moody's-^. ■ , _£J-A. * 

Reulers 1-ZW50 

DJ. Futures—-— N-A. 

Com. Resewcn Bureau- Njk. 

Moody's : l»se TOO : Dec 31# TWT. 
p- preliminary 7 f ■ ■ final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. IB# 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 : DeC.31> 1974. 


Market Guide 


Previous 
931.10 f- 
1.79350 
128 JJ 7 
2295 C 


Index Options 


SMke (Mh4Bl nM 

MdOBMMHrtoM 
ITS J6M 38 - ■ - * T/U 

m »R IM - - V]* 

M Wk m 3» 3M 1/16 1/16 

US jm 2» 2» Bjk 1/16 % 

m 16ft 17*' If 3W l/U 5/16 

m imo it* wt i/m * 

an i» A i» ti* *„,i% 

n n I 7% ■* T */U* 

Sp % a 5*. 6 4% M 

IB - 25 / 163 % flft - « 
]2B - 1WI» J% — 14% 

WNmJJwBwi 

TeMomteMFLCMg 

UMPOtteOMS »UM 

Tatol pot te«fl kit 180X61 
tea: 

mrtWXJ LW2BJ1 Gase 38538- 
Sovree: ceoe. ■ 


cocoa 

Steriteu per metric ton 
Dec 1712 1 X 91 1 X 95 1200 

Mnr 1.755 1 . 71 * L 735 1 X 36 

Mar 1265 1 X 46 124 * 1/747 
Jly m 1563 1560 UJJ 

Sep 1595 127 B 1576 1 » 

pec 1 X 00 17 KI 1^)6 12 » 

Mar ixm 1 X 00 1 X 00 lXBi 

Volume: 3 X 76 lots of 10 tans. 

COFFEE _ 

Steriteg eer metric ton 

Jan 2 X 10 2530 3 X 02 2 X 05 

V zm 2jn 2 X 50 7AS1 

MOV 2518 2 X 40 2 XB 5 2 XTO 

Jly 25 dS Z 4 B 5 Z 543 2545 

Sep 2 X 05 2545 2585 2590 

Nov US v.zsn 2522 

357 2530 2 X 30 2 X 30 2 X 60 

Volume: 11886 tote o /5 tore. 

GASOIL ", , 

U 5 . dollars per m*trte ton 
Jan 239 X 0 234 X 0 23400 23450 5 
Feb 23335 23835 S 0 L 75 229 X 0 1 
Mar 22275 ZW 3 S 219 J 0 2 T 9 J 5 1 
AM 211 XO 20475 207 X 0 207 X 5 . 
May fflZJfl MBJ 0 2 HJX 9 
Jon 201 X 0 19750 W 7 XQ ! 9 f» 
Jly 199 X 0 1 * 7 X 0 197 X 0 197 ^ 
Aw 19850 197 X 0 196 X 9 19880 
Sip N.T. NT. 199 X 0 20150 
Volume: IXQ tore at WO tons. 


CRUDE OIL (BRBNT) 

UidoRM* per barrel- 
Ja- 3 SX 5 KX 5 2 SXS SM 2530 2470 

C 5 uxi 21 X 0 24 X 0 UB 3638 3475 

NW NT. NT. BXB' 14 » 23 X 0 2440 

jSl St, NT. .2230 23 X 0 2 U 0 2420 

May N.T. NT. 2250 23 X 0 21 X 0 34 X 0 

j 5 \ H.r. N.T. 2 L 02 33 X 0 3200 24 X 0 

volume: A Iota q/IXOO tw/relA 
5ourzM fteater Tand Ler**** Petroleum £» 
eftanp# (oatoO. eruOe attl. 


liS.1reasuries 


1300 1305 
1344 1345 
L 758 1760 
1374 1375 
170 V 1390 
1390 1395 
1 X 00 1 X 10 


Z375 3X85 
3530 2X35 
2X77 2XKll 
3508 2530 
2570 2500 
2X05 2X30 
2X15 2300 


236 X 0 234251 
229 X 0 229 JO I 
21650 219 X 0 
207 X 0 20735 
I 9 BX 0 19 B 5 C 
19450 19650 
1947519400 
190 X 0 197 X 0 
198 X 0 20400 


Coffee 4 Sot toe. lb 

13 D 

032 

1 X 4 

•31 

473 X 6 


473 XB 

iron 2 Fdrv. Philo- ton _ 
Stem scrap Ho 1 tivy PIH. _ 

2 UJ 0 

71-74 

■MB. 





69-72 



N-A. 



055 



(P -92 


Silver N.Y.oa 

Source: AP. 

KA 



Dividends 


I xmdon Metals 





-L-Ulte 




G 51 * 

9-3 

Q 

50 

3 -H) 

O 

50 

2-1 

Q 

55 

2-1 

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55 

i-ia 

„ 

11 50 

i-n 

Q. 

69 % 

2-28 

a 

X 5 

1 -M 

e. 

. 17 * 

1-15 

Q 

57 

Ml 

Q 

JO 

1-15 

a 

#31 

1-15 

Q 

58 

MS 

O 

#65 

2-15 

o 

JM 

1-13 

0 

. 16 * 

1-30 

a 

JO 

5 MS 

Q 

AO 

2-15 

a 

XI* 

1-32 

a 

.70 

2-3 

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# 41 % 

2-1 

4 

55 

2-14 


TseDaily 

Source far 


• I • M 
























































































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1985 


Page 19 


business roundup 


U.S. Court Grants Texaco a Breather 


NEW YORK. — Texaco Inc. 
said Wednesday (hat it had won a 
temporary federal court, order bar- 
ring PennzoD Co. from attaching 
Texaco assets before cither issues 
are .settled in an SI 1.1-biIIion dam- 


. UJS. District Judge Charles 
1 JBrieant issued the order Tuesday 
'■night m White Plains, New York, 
' the city where Texaco is based. - 

- The order enjoins Pennzoil 
i^nom taking any action of any 
rind whatsoever to enforce or at- 
. tempi to enforce” the damage judg- 
mcni entered last week Vy a Texas 
■ ,-tale court judge, Texaco said. 

Judge Brieant scheduled a hear- 
ng far Friday to hear arguments on 
Texaco's request For a preliminary 
rguncdoo against PennzoiL 

Investors reacted strongly to the 


news. In heavy trading at nridses- 
aoa on the New York Stock Ex- 
change, Texaco shares were up 
$1.50, u> $29,125, while Peanzofl 
was off $4,625 a share, to $59,875. 

A Houston jury ruled Nov. 19 
- that Texaco bad wrongly interfered 
with a merger agreement between 
Pennzoil and Getty Cffl Co., before 
acquiring Getty itself. The jury 
awarded Pennzoil $1(153 billion in 
damages. 

The judge, Solomon Casseb Jr., 
affirmed the award on Dec. 10, as 
wdl as S60Q million in interest: He 
said more interest would accumu- 
late at the rate of 10 percent annu- 
ally. • 

Judge Casseb also temporarily 
waived a Texas requirement that 
Texaco post a $ 12-billion bond af- 
ter the two companies agreed that 
Texaco could continue operating 
for up to 90 days without paying 


West German Unit of ITT 
Expects Higher Net in ’ 85 


Return 

STUTTGART — Standard 
3ektrik Lorenz A G. the West Ger- 
"nfm subsidiary of ITT Coip., ex- 
. Mscts 1985 group net profit to be 
. ligber than last year’s 51.2 million 
Deutsche marks ($20.4 million), 
■ be rtmirman of the management 
. joard said Wednesday. 

This year’s turnover for the 
roup, which is 86-percent owned 
’ iy ITT, should rise to around. 5 
! qllion DM from 4.5 billion in 
: 984 f the chairman, Helmut Lohr, 
aid al a news oonference. 

On another subject, Mr. Lohr 
aid Standard Elektrilc Lorenz had 
'■greed to buy the remaining 51 
jexcent of Conqjntertedmik Mfill- 
t GmbH from Diehl GmbH. He 
ledined to give the purchase price. 

The chairman said he was not 


completely satisfied with turnover 
or profit in Standard Bektrik’s of- 
fice communication division. 

A letter to shareholders said 

O turnover had risen to 3 bQ- 
M in the first nine months of 
1985 from 2.8 billion in the corre- 
sponding period of 1984. 

Orders in hand rose 23.8 percent 
to 3.6 billion DM in the first three 
quarters. Incoming orders rose 6 
percent to 3.8 billion. 

Mr. Lohr said Compniertechnik. 
Muller, which employs 650 people 
and is based in Constance, was ex- 
pected to increase turnover by 25 
percent to more than 130 million 
DM this year. 

Standard Elektrik Lorenz 
bought 49 percent of Compnter- 
tflchniv MOller in October 1984 
from Diehl, after approval from the 
federal government’s cartel office. 


Genentech Given Monopoly 
On Genetically Made Drug 


By Kathleen Day 

Los Angeles Tones Service 

LOS ANGELES — The federal 
Tvenmxnt has awarded Genen- 
cb a seven-year monopoly in the 
Je of a genetically engineered 
■owth hormone. 

The Food and Drug Administra- 
M on Monday gave Genen tech's 
ug, called Pro tropin, status as an 
up ban drug” for the treatment of 
owth hormone deficiency and 
user’s Syndrome, a chromosom- 
disorder in female children. Or- 
an. drugs, are .those intended to 
at maladies affecting no more 
in 200,000 people. 

The status means that even if the 
ug. which is a genetically ent- 
ered version of a human protein. 
Is to win a U.S. patent, it will be 
elected from competing sub- 
inces for seven yeare. 

Genentech. bared in San Fran- 
co. said that it believes it is the 
si company to win such status 
- a drug that is also eligible for 
lent protection. It has filed sev- 
tl requests for patents for the 
rstance. 

The orphan-status system is in- 
ded to give companies an incen- 


tive to develop drugs that otherwise 
might be unprofitable, given the 
small number of people who would 
buy them. 

Growth hormone is like any pre- 
scription drug, however, licensed 
physicians can prescribe it for uses 
other than those for which it has 
been approved. A lucrative second 
market for Genen tech's drug has 
been created by athletes who use it 
to enhance muscle growth. 

Because the Food and Drug Ad- 
ministration has granted the or- 
phan status, the agency will not, , 
even "consider requests from com- 
panies who want approval to mar- 
ket compering drugs. 

Protropin won approval in Octo- 
ber as a treatment of growth hor- 
mone deficiency, making Genen- 
tech the first biotechnology 
company to sell a drug under its 
own label. 

In 1983. Genentech** human in- 
sulin was the fist biotechnology 
drug to get Food and Drug Admin- 
istration approval- But the approv- 
al was granted to Eli Lilly, a giant 
pharmaceutical company that li- 
censed the substance from Genen- 
tech. 


. Itoh Says Net Doubled in First Half 


Return 

TOKYO — C. Itoh & Co., the 
aoese commercial trading con- 
i with activities in textiles, elec- 
" nics and fuels, reported 
doesday that its first-half net 
fit almost doubled from the 
readier figure. 

Act in the six months ended 
L 30 totaled 10.27 billion yen 
T.8 million), or 11.76 yen a 
gC, up 86 percent from 5.52 bil- 
yen, or 6.39 yen a share, 
ales rose 14 percent in (he peri- 
o 8.037 trillion yen. from 7.001 
on yea a year earlier. 

Jt the company said the rise of 


the yen win cause its group sales to 
fall in the second half of its busi- 
ness year, ending March 31. 

Sales for the whole year, howev- 
er, will be higher at around 15.700 
trillion yea from 14345 trillion yen 
in the previous year. 

The group estimated that its net 
for the complete year will be about 
16 billion yen, up from 13 bQlioo 
yen a year earlier- 

A spokesman for the company 
said that if the average yen rate in 
the current October- March half is 
200 to the dollar, sales are project- 
ed dropping around 900 billion 
yen. 


the bondwhile deciding on whether 

to appeal 

Under the accord, Texaco agreed 
not to file for reorganization under 
Chapter 11 of the 13 ^. Bankruptcy 
Code, while Pennzoil agreed oot to 
attach any hens to Texaco proper- 
ty. 

Texaco said Wednesday that the 
federal lawsuit was hummed to en- 
able it to appeal the damage award 
without the threat of attachment of 
its properties or the need to post 
the $12- billian bond, which ii says 
it cannot afford. 

In a memorandum to Judge 
Brieant, Texaco said that terms of 
Judge Casseb’s order designed to 
afford protection from the Texas 
hen and bond provisions did not 
provide Texaco with enough pro- 
tection to enable it to conduct its 
business in an orderly manner. 

' Both Texaco and Pfetaizofl have 
said in the past ’that they are willing 
to discuss a settlement On Tues- 
day, a Pennzoil director, Baine 
Keix, indicated there had been 
some prdnnmary contact between 
them but nothing robstaotive, 

Meanwhile, Texaco appeared 
close to completing a new financ- 
ing package with 30 of its bankers 
that would give the company des- 
perately needed cash. 

According to banking sources, 
Texaco was preparing to sell $1.7 
trillion of accounts receivable to its 
banks. The advantage of such an 
arrangement, known as factoring, 
is that Texaco would receive work- 
ing capital and the banks would 
depend on Texaco’s customers 
rather than Texaco for repayment 

Texaco confirmed Tuesday that 
it was negotiating to sell a package 
of receivables to a syndicate of 
banks led by Manufacturers Hano- 
ver Trust Co. It said the proceeds 
would be used to replace other ma- 
turing obligations, winch include 
its commercial paper. (AP t NYT) 

Turner 9 Viacom 
Fail to Conclude 
Joint Venture 

Reuters 

ATLANTA — Turner Broad- 
casting System said Wednesday it 
had been unable to conclude talks 
with Viacom International Inc. on 
a previously announced joint ven- 
ture within the time constraints of 
Turner's proposed acquisition of 
MGM/UA Entertainment Co. The 
acquisition is . scheduled to dose 
around Jan. 21. 

As a result, the company said, it 
is amending Securities and Ex- 
change Commission filings to up- 
date its financing plan for the ac- 
quisition. But it said Drexel 
Burnham Lambert Inc. has advised . 
ii that- it wflkprocettLan the basis-of-’ 
the financing plan despite the' out- 
come of the Viacom talks. 

Under the acquisition plan. 
Turner had registered with the 
commission to sell $500 million of 
zero coupon notes, $250 nrilHon of 
extendible senior notes, $500 mil- 
lion of senior subordinated deben- 
tures and 5 million convertible pre- 
ferred shares through Drexel 
Burnham to finance the 
MGM/UA acquisition. 

As part of the transaction, 
Turner will also sell MGM/UA’s 
United Artists Corp. unit to Tra- 
rinda Coip. for up vo $480 million. 

Trafalgar Sells Slake 
In Evening Standard 

Return 

LONDON — Trafalgar House 
PLC has sold its 50-percent stake in 
Evening Standard Co. to Associat- 
ed Newspapers PLC a joint state- 
ment by the two British concerns 
said Wednesday. 

Both sides had agreed to give no 
details on the value of the transac- 
tion, in which Evening Standard 
Co. becomes a wholly owned Asso- 
ciated subsidiary. The stake in Eve- 
ning Standard was retained by Tra- 
falgar when it spun off its Express 
Newspaper and Morgan Grampian 
magazine interest in 1982. 


HtlPUms to Offer toPublic 
A Stake in Its AeritaHa Unit 

Reuters ■ 

ROME — Istitutoperla Ricostrozione Industrials, the Italian state 
holding company, said it will offer 35 percent of the share capital of 
the aerospace products manufacturer, AeritaHa SpA, to the public. 

The partial privatization of Aeritalia, npw 20-percent owned by IRI 
and 80 percent by Fmmeecamca SpA, was decided by directors of 
both companies Tuesday, an IRI spokesman said Wednesday. 

The operation would take place in severe! stages, the spokesman 
said. 

■ First Aeritatia’s share capital would be raised to 300 billion lire 
($175 nrillkHt) from a current 250 billion lire in an operation to be 
subscribed by the existing shareholders. 

On approval of a company application for a listing cm I talian stock 
exchanges, 17.5 percent of the total share capital will then be offered 
to the pubHc. This offer is expected to take place from February to 
March 1986. 

The offer price has not been set, but the chairman of Finmeccanica, 
Franco Vkzzob, said in a published report Wednesday that a realistic 
price would be around 1,950 lire per 1.000 lire nominal value share. 

The third stage, which will raise the public h olding to a mux ™ om 
of 35 percent in the next two years, involves the issue of a seven-year, 
105-billioo-lire IRl-Finmeccanica bond convertible into Aeritalia 
shares. IRI and Finmeccanica would raise an estimated 200 trillion 
lire through privatization.- 

Aeritalia shareholders were meeting Wednesday to vote on the 
privatization plus and cm a proposed split of existing 10,000-lire 
Aeritalia shares into 1,000-lire units. 

Aeritalia earned 16J) billian lire on sales of 1,163 billion lire in 1 984 
and expects higher profits and sales this year. 


Deutsche Bank’s Offering 
Of Daimler Is Closed Early 


Reuters 

FRANKFURT — The public 
offering of about 3.4 million shares 
of Daimler-Benz AG has been 
closed early in the face of heavy 
demand, Deutsche Bank AG said 
Wednesday. 

The bank acquired the shares as 
part of its purchase of the Flick 
group earlier this month. 

The bank’s announcement Tues- 
day that it had begun a wide public 
placement through a consortium of 
West German mid foreign banks 
took the stock market by surprise. 

It had been widely expected that 
the shares would be offered early 
□ext year. 

The shares were being offered at 
1,120 Deutsche marks ($446) per 
50 DM nominal, about 100 DM 
below Tuesday's close on the 
Frankfurt bourse. 

The shares amount to 10 percent 
of the automaker's total 2.7 billion 
DM capital 

The offer price ensures Deutsche 
Bank of proceeds totaling 3.8] bil- 
lion DM. The share offer is for 
payment Jan. 8. 

Daimler shares were quoted at 
1,195 Wednesday at the start of 


bourse trading m Frankfurt, but 
closed at 1.186. 

A Deutsche Bank spokesman 
said the banking consortium as- 
sembled Tuesday totaled more 
than 100, including major West 
German banks. 

Deutsche Bank is taking over (be 
whole Flick empire for a price of 
about 5 billion DM. effective Jan. 
1. 

Dealers said demand for the 
Daimler shares had been expected 
to be strong and the early dose was 
no surprise. Some said the shares 
were believed to have been placed 
almost exclusively with institution- 
al investors. 

There were persistent rumors 
last week that at least 2 million of 
the 3.4 million Daimler shares had 
been prc-placed in the Far East and 
Deutsche Bank's purchase of the 
Flick empire has propelled its share 
price to record highs. 

After active trading, Deutsche 
Bank dosed Wednesday ai a record 
857, up 56 over Tuesday’s dose. 

Deutsche Bank's share price has 
been boosted partly by strong oper- 
ating fflitiinp but mainly by a 
growing realization that it will 
make a huge extraordinary profit 
from the Fbck transaction. 


Toyota Reduces 
Output Target, 
Cites Exports 

United Press International 

TOKYO — Japan's top auto- 
maker, Toyota Motor Corp-. 
has cut its production target for 
the first time in 10 years, citing 
a worsening export environ- 
ment. 

“We can hardly expect an in- 
crease in exports m view of slow 
demand in the Middle East, Af- 
rica and China,” Toyota's presi- 
dent. Shoichiro Toyoda. said 
Tuesday. “The U.S. economy 
also is expected to grow ai a 
slow pace." 

The output target for 1986 
has been set at 3.63 million 
units, dawn 30,000 uaits from 
this year, according to company 
officials. 

They said expons are expect- 
ed to decrease by 4 percent 
from this year to an estimated 
1.9 million units- Domestic 
sales are estimated at 1.73 mil- 
lion units, up 3 percent over this 
year. Total demand on the do- 
mestic car market is estimated 
at 4. 12 million units, up 2.5 per- 
cent or 100,000 units over this 
year, the officials said. 


American Cyananrid Co. wiB lay 
off 400 of the 600 workers at its 
plant in Linden, New Jersey, dur- 
ing 1986, it said. The company is 
transferring the manufacture of 
three chemical products to other 
plants. 

BASFAGoTWest Germany said 
it had taken over American Enka, a 
fiber-making unit of Akzo NV, the 
Dutch chemicals company. 

Bodng Co. said it had received 
orders for five 747 jets worth $490 
milli on. Lufthansa bought a 747- 
200B airliner and a 747 brighter. 
All Nippon Airways ordered two 
747-2Q0BS and KLM Royal Dutch 
Airlines ordered a 747-300. 

Coleco Industries Inc. said it had 
begun a tender offer of $2.10 per 
share for the 60 percent of shares in 
Leisure Dynamics Inc. that Coleco 
does not already own. 

ForstnmmLeff Associates Inc., 
a New York Gty-based investment 
firm, said in a filing with the Secu- 
rities and Exchange Commission 
that it had raised its soke in Ham- 
mennill Paper Co. to 1.6 milli on 
common shares, or 10.4 percent of 
the total outstanding. 

Gillette Co. has reached agree- 
ment with La Tqja Co&meticos SA 
to takeover the unprofitable Span- 
ish cosmetics company for 3 billion 
pesetas ($19.2 nnllum), a spokes- 
man for La Tqja said. 


Hoedtst AG said it had sold its 
polystyrene works in Breda, the 
Netherlands, to SheD International 
Nederland Chemie Mij BV, a sub- 
sidiary of SheD Transport & Trad- 
ing CO. 

ILF. Hutton Group Inc's $230 
million of senior debt had its rating 
lowered to A-minus from A, Stan- 
dard & Poor’s Corp. said. It said 
the move was a result of Hutton's 
weak earnings performance. 

Koss Corp. said its fifth modified 
plan of reorganization was con- 
firmed in U.S. bankruptcy court. 

Lwnifa National Carp, said it 
had agreed to acquire 1.768,000 
shares of common stock in Brae 
Col, a 41-percent interest, from 
Brae for about S212 million. 

Mfm Holdings Ud. said it had 
sold copper refinery technology de- 
veloped at its refinery in Towns- 
ville, in the Australian state of 
Queensl and, to Cornpariia Mihera 
de P-anflWM of Mexico. 

PUfips Petroleum Co. said it has 
won Danish government approval 

10 start exploratory drilling on 

Denmark’s North Sea continental 
shelf. 

Sonat Inc. said it would take an 
after-tax charge of about $170 tril- 
lion against fourth-quarter results 
because of a writedown of oil and 
natural gas reserves and a reduc- 
tion of the carrying value of older 
equipment in the ou service field. 




(Continued from Plage 15) 

The Japanese also note that their 
companies export because US. 
consumers want their cars. 

Last year, Japanese officials de- 
picted it as a concession when tbc^ 
raised the quota from 1.85 million 
units to 23 mil H on. They could 
have riimi rutted it altogether, they 
said. 

As of QcL 31, seven months into 
the current program, Japanese 
companies had shipped 1,471,000 
cars to the United Stales and were 
expected to reach the full 2J mil- 
lion. The United States remains 
their most profitable market. 

Quotas are set through a sort of 
economic alchemy. Using press re- 
ports. diplomatic cables, economic 
forecasts and gut feeling, Japanese 
planners try to guess what levd will 
be sufficiently high to keep Japa- 
nese companies in healthy sales but 
sufficiently low to control senti- 
ments in Congress toward erecting 
barrios of its own. 

Japanese companies have al- 
ready opened a campaign for more 
access. Following the remarks last 
week by the official of the Mhtisuy 
of International Trade and Indus- 
try, many issued calls for an end to 
quotas. 

In the same breath, however, 


auto executives continue to talk of 
a need for “orderly marketing," a 
catch-all phrase meaning the avoid- 
ance of torrential exports by less 
formal means, perhaps sdf-re- 
straini by individual companies. 

The Japanese government, then, 
has marry options before it One 
would be to retain a quota, but to 
raise the numbers again. Or, the 
quota might, be allowed to expire, 
with MITI switching to behind- 
the-scenes “administrative guid- 
ance." 


THE TOP 


F R E 



A L I T Y 


FIRMS 


Comite Colbert 
Van Cbef & Arpds: Fabulous Firsts 


Flawless precious stones — rare 
Jonquil diamonds as deep-hued as 
vintage cognac, rich rubies from 
Burma, exceptional emeralds Cram 
Colombia, shimmering sapphires 
from the misty mountains or Kash- 
mir — spring co life as the ukneed 
fingers of masrerc r aftsmcn cran&bue 
the daring dreams of visionary de- 
signers into splendid jewels signed 
Van Cleef St Arpds. This reputa- 
tion for reproducing splendor in 
Imaginative profusion has been syn- 
onymous with this legendary jewel- 
ler since the three Arpds brothers, Juiien, Louis 
and Charles, founded the firm with their brother- 
in-law, Alfred Van Qeef, ar the glittering height 

of the Belle fipodi in 1906. 

Their intemanonal renown is reflected in thriving 
export sales of 520 million to 526 million, 82 
percent of total French turnover, and has attracted 
a connoisseur clientele including some of the 
most .evocative names of the 20th century: Mar- 
lene Dietrich, the Duchess of Windsor, Maria 
Callas and Elizabeth Taylor to name a few. 

At Van Qeef Sc Arpds an audacious artistry finds 
reality in stunning innovation: The celebrated 
"minaudierc" of the 1930s ingeniously incorpo- 
rates space for all the ladylike accoutrements, 
make-up, smoking accessories, even a tiny "domi- 
no" watch, into a slim lacquered gold case with 
jewelled clasp; the mundane ripper is magnifi- 
cently ennobled into a diamond necklace and 
bracelet; in the technical tour de force of the 
"invisible setting," as many as 400 perfectly 
matched precious stones are indeopbecably linked 



Philippe Arpels, General Manager 

to create the soft curves and delicate 
petals of a jewelled flower or a 
ribbon bracelet as supple as silk. 
Equally impressive is the Van Qeef 
; business style: First of the grand 
Parisian haute joailliers to open in 
New York in 1938, first to add a 
boutique of younger, casual jewelry 
in 1933. first to go to Japan 12 years 
ago where they now have 10 stores 
and the firsr to create a highly 
successful fragrance in 197? called, 
no wonder. First 

But Philippe Arpds, 31, director of' 
this family firm, insists on a distinction: "Wc are 
pioneers, bur not avant-gardists. We tty not to 
follow fashion, nor to precede it. What is fashion- 
able, becomes unfashionable. We create jewels 
that live a long rime thanks to classic design and 
the high quality of our materials." Proof of their 
success: The jaunty lion whiskered in diamonds, a 
best-seller since 1953, the delightful butterfly 
brooches. Art Deco designs their clients ask them 
to recreate today and the dazzling prices Van Qeef' 
designs bring ar auction. 

"Drey arc still making miracles. They hardly had 
time to photograph two "invisible setting" neck- 
laces of rubies, sapphires and diamonds which 
took 18 months to make and wete sold two weeks 
later. The exquisite enchantment of a ruffled 
collar in finely spun "Tulle d'or” gold, the intri- 
cate marquetry of a diamond bow brooch, their 
entrancing Christmas windows on an Opera 
theme, all capture the inspired essence of elegance 
that is so distinctly Parisian, so unmistakeably 
Van Qeef Sc Arpels. 


AKi ASSOCIATION OF Till MOST FRLSTUHOUS S AMI *> OF Till FBI II -AST M Vl\ HI ' J BIS RUL Ml LAHAl'MI . TWO* PARIS 


I AN ANNOUNCEMENT BY THE COMITE COLBERT i 


This announcement appears as a matter of record only. 


n: 


So# 


$25,000,000 

Overseas Private Investors, Limited 

Regular Capital Stock 
Accumulation Capital Stock 
$1,000 per share 


located in the United States in association wicn investments to De maoe uy Bessemer 
Securities Corporation. Overseas Private Investors wffl be advised on these investments 
by Bradford Associates and Bessemer Trust Company, N.A. (New York). 


The undersigned have acted as agents in this placement. 


Compagnie Europeenne de Representation Financiere S.A. 

(Cerepfi) 

Callander Securities, Ltd. 

Bessemer Trust Company (Cayman), Ltd. 


IT-*' ' 

t* 






New Issue 
December 19, 1985 


All of these bonds having been placed, this an- 
nouncement appears for fxirposes of record only. 


INTERNATIONAL BANK 

FOR RECONSTRUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT 


Washington, D.C. 

DM 1,000,000,000 

Zero-Coupon Deutsche Mark Bonds of 1985/2015 


,,OSAL 



'On asu 


Issue Price: 

Redemption: 

Listing: 


13% 

on December 20, 2015 at the principal amount 
at all German stock exchanges 


Deutsche Bank 

Aktiengesellschaft 


Commerzbank 

Aktiengesellschaft 

Bayerische Landesbank 
Girozentrale 


Dresdner Bank 

Aktiengesellschaft 


Bayerische Vereinsbank 

Akti engesel I scha it 


DG Bank 

Deutsche Genossenschattsbank 


Salomon Brothers International 
Limited 


Westdeurtsche Landesbank 
Girozentrale 


Etaden-WDrttembergische Bank 
Aktiengesellschaft 

Bayerische Hypotheken- und Wedisel-Bank 

AktiengeseUschaft 

Citibank 

Aktiengesellschaft 

Deutsche Girozentrale 

- Deutsche (Communal bank - 

Industrie bank von Japan (Deutschland) 

Aktiengasallschaft 

Merck, Ftnck&Co. 

Nomura Europe GmbH 

Swiss Bank Corporation 
International Limited 
uerelns- und Westbank 
Aktiengesellschaft 


Badlsche Kommunale Landesbank 
-Girozentrale - 
Berliner Bank 
Aktiengesellschaft 
CSFB-Effeetenbank AG 

Hamburg ische Landesbank 

- Girozentrale - 
Landesbank Rheinland -Pfalz 

- Girozentrale - 

B. Metzler seel. Sohn&Co. 
Norddeutsche Landesbank 
Girozentrale 

Trinkaus&Burlchardt KGaA 

M.M. Warburg -Brinckmann, Wirtz&Co. 


Bank fflr Gemeinwirtschaft 
Aktiengesellschaft 

Berliner Handels- und Frankfurter Bank 

Oelbruck&C©. 

Hessischa Landesbank 
-Girozentrale- 

Landesbank Schleswig-Holstein 
Girozentrale 
Morgan Guaranty GmbH 
Sal. Oppenhaim JcACie. 

Union Bank of Switzerland 
(Securities) limited 

WnmembargtschB Kommunale Landesbank 
Girozentrale 


i 









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22 12% 
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35 3044 

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*4% 28% 

19 UN 
149k 9% 
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1516 10W 
26% 8% 
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LSB 
La Borg 

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LndBnc 40 19 12 
LndmJc J 17 I 
Lasir 18 

Lauren it 

LazKaP 

LeorPP 100 174 
LeePtl 10 

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54 2Vk 24ft 
71 Ilk IN 
4 4% 4% 
9 20% 204ft 
149 21* 20N 
35 10* 104ft 
4 84ft 84ft 
20 4 4 

16 17 16% 

K2 74* 7Vk 

2 34% 34% 
186 44ft 4 (4 

3 64ft 4% 

11 31% 31% 
92 2 1% 

23 13% 13% 

311 1% 1* 

S 15 14% 

5* 5% 

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24 34. 3% 

57 1W 14ft 
12 20% 20% 
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40 T7% 17% 
10 12b 12% 
71 11% II* 
3 15% 15* 
132 12% 11% 
4 9% 9% 


27 + % 

10 % 

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4 — Ik 
16% — % 
7* — % 
34% — * 
«*— % 
4* 

31% 

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134k -f % 
IN— Vk 
14% 

5% 

1 

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3* + % 
1 % 

20% 

424ft— % 
17% 4- U 
12% 

11 * 

sns 

9% + % 


8 % 5% Yank Co 


AMEX Ifighs-Lims 



NVSEHighs-Lo'^ 


ItAft 4 Quebgc .14 11 363 9 



10% 9% 
20% 13* 
TO 24* 
234ft 15% 

6 Z IS 

13% 81ft 
9 34* 

4% 1% 
19% 11 
94* 6% 

12% 7* 
21% 15 
8 % 5 


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Vodftx AO 45 11 
VutcCP JDa 37 12 
vywat . 8. 


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5 f 
10% 10%— % 
44ft 4*k 
2Vk 2% + * 
19% 194fe— % 
8% 8% 
n ■% + % 

27% 214* 

-41k 6%— * 


17 1] NRMn 240 208 

20% 17 NRMBt 240 14J 
*% 54* Nantck .. 13 
144* 18% NIGOO AOb 34 10 
21% 12% NtPotnl .18 4 

2J% 14% NMXAT .79 42 77 
17% 134ft NPbiRt MB 7JD 14 
27* 13 NPrgc 1J09 4J 13 
11* 7%NWWPn 51 


335 124ft 12% 12% + Vk 

S € W W-* 

3 TOW TOW 10W— % 
558 T7% 17* 1744 + * 
23 16% 14 14* + % 

321 15% 15% 15% — * 
41 27 26* 26*— % 

526 VOW 10* 10*— Ik 


NwVt LOWS 17 

BancTems Coowtd M Dressrlnd ElHmEno 

Gaartilnd HeuOilRav LcorPetevB OhEd od]A 

Pangaind PrudRlyCo PrudRiyinc RaadnaBar 

Rowan SatilcMadl Smltninri SwnEngvn 

TramdCnfn 


Company Results 

Rovenw* ond »r»ff « or toirt. fci mHHonx are mueu 
currencies unless omen/rlse mdlcaled. 


ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) Dec. 18, 1985 

Nat (met value nuotottora are rotfled by ttw Punhs lUfad wtth the axceetloa of seme onuiu based an MM price. 

The morgtnoi miUwl* toukxrte freaueaey of euotatiaas tveplled:(d) -ikniv; (w)-weeklr; W -bnaoattiir; (r)~restriurtvi m-lmvu tarty. 


Hoatio^ftale Notes 


AL MAL MNAGEMeilT 

-Jw) Al fttal Trial, SA S 1975* 

BANK JULIU5 BAER ft CO. Ltd. 

•I d I BoerbafKj SF 93400 

-id I CnnOar SF 1329JM 

-f d I Eaufljoer America S 1240000 

-Id 1 Eaulnaar Eurooe SF 1505400 

-(di Enulhoar poclfic — SF v 22100 

-Id) Groaar SF 109300 

■Id! Slock Oar SF 175440 

BNP INTERPUNDS 

-Iwl intertxmd Fund S 13146 

-(»* I tmencurrencv USS— s (024 

-(wilntarcurraficy OM___ dm 30J5 
-lw) Intercurrencv S*er1lng___ c 1033 
-I in J interraMHy Pacific Offer ~ S nxi 
-(wl interoqultv N. Anwr.OHn’_ S 1065 
BARQUE INDOSUEZ 

-i d I Aslan Growth Fund S 1101 

-(«.! Qtuerbond SF 82AS 

[w» FI F- America S 1841 

-iwl FIF-Europe— . .. _ S 164S 

«ltf> FiF-lntarnaiiDnol— s via* 

-|w) F IF- Pacific-. S 20.94 

-ml Indauee MuilibondiA — % 10743 

-I d > lndosu*z Mulhbanth B 4 177J4 

■(dl Indosuaz USD (ALM.FI « KWAflO 

BRITANNULPOB 271. St. Halter. Jersey 

-Iwl BrllMlor income — * 0489* 

-(«*) BrHJ Manog-Curr * 1049 

-I d ) Bril. URLS monODJiortt S 1.194 

-Id) Brit. intUMflnagPftrlf t 1224 

-lw> arii.Am.incs.Fdua s i.i*s 

•fwj arlf^jold Fund- * 0M5' 

-iwl Britjuafloa-Currancv c 1104* 

-l d l Brit. Jaoan Dir Pan. Fd__ s MM 

■I w) BfltJfTirY DIM Fund * 0J1» 

-(d) Bril. World Lete. Fund S USD 

■Id) Brit. wond Teem Fund S 0418 

CAPITAL INTERHATIQMAL 

-Iwl Coottol Inn Fund — . S 47.12 

-Iw) Capitol Italia sa__ S 19J6 

CITICORP INVESTMENT BANK IU*J 
FOB 1373 Llnremoourg T«t.U77.»i77 

( d) CHInvtst Eeu ECyiOWJJ 

I d 1 CJiliwest Liquidity — 8 101 758 

CREDIT SUI55E USSUt PRICES) 

-(dl Actions Suits** 5F 

-Id I Bend Valor Swt SF imjs 

-(d) Bond Valor D-mark^—— dm ioam 

■ (d) Bond VOWrUS-OOLLAR • 1JUJ 

-(d) Bond Valor I Sterling *15^ 

-I d I Bond Volar Yen Yen 10J8140 

■I Of Convert VAJtor 5wf - 5F IH.1J 

-( d I Canven valor uS-bOLLAR., 4 liU; 


FftC MGMT.LTD. INV. ADVISCRS 

1, Laurence Pounty HIIL ECA 01-4234680 

-lw) F8£ Atlantic: S 1344 

■Iwl FAC Europe a n ft 1648 

-(wl FAC Oriental « 3253 

FIDELITY POB <78. Hamilton Berm u da 

•(m) FAA HokUnai. S 7945 

•Id) Fidelity Amor. Assets 5 7945 

-( d j Fidelity Australia Fund ft 11 J3 

-Id) Fidelity Discovery Fund S IMS 

-id! Fktelttr Dir. SvBft.Tr 5 128J4 

-(dl FMefttv Far East Fund. S 2544 

-(01 Fidelity Inn. Fund ft 8094 

-Id) Fidelity Orient Fund—— ft 33J8 

-1 d 1 Fidelity Frontier Fund 6 1640 

-( d 1 Fidelity Pacific Fund — 115546 

-i d 1 Fidelity Spcl. Growth Fd. S 16J3 

-(d) Fidelity World Fund 5 4054 

FORBES PO B8S7 GRAND CAYMAN 

London Aaarrt 01-839-3013 

-(**) Ooltar Income S 675 


-Idl ccnoftcc 

-I d ) CS Fands-Bondft.. — — 
-( d ) cs Fandft-mn — , — 
■(dies Maoey Market Fund. 


SF 49740 
SF 7445 
SF 124JS 
. 1110840 


-Id) CS Money Mortal Fund _ DM106540 
-Id) CS Money Mortal Fund— - M05240 1 
-Id I CS Money Mor-ftel Fd Yen. Y1004040 


-Id) EneroleATolor 9F 1«40 

-tdiutsec — ..... ®J40 

•(di Euroea- Voter SF l«-gl 

-(d) PoeMlc .Voter — SF 14256 

DRSXEL BURNHAM LAMBERT INC 
winchwlw HOtffte . 77 Lond on Wall 
LONDON 6 a (01 9209797) 

-(nr) Finsbury Group LM... 5 I3B73 

-(ml winchester Diver lifted. S 21.90* 

-(M) Winchester Financial LftL— S 946 

• jml winctieswr Frontier — S I0BJB 

(wl Winchester Moldings FF 107 a4 


. S 108JB 
FF 107 Ad ' 
, ft 1246 
- ft 5247 
S lflW.II 


-(w I Worldwide Securities — ft 5247 

-(wl WtirMwfrieSDacJQt - SIB9B.il 

DIT INVESTMENT FPM 

•+l d 1 Content™ DM 36J0 

-+<d) tal l Kenletrtontt — DM 9348, 

Dunq & Horgltt 6 LHryd Dovrgft. BnteMls 

-(m)DftH Commodity Pool S363J3*** 

-(ml Currency ft Gold Pent . . ft 16430 

-(ml Winch. LIM Fut Pool *J63J2*" 

-im) TroiKwnnaFui-Pooi — S879J8*** 1 
EEC TRUST CO-I JERSEY) LTD. 

1-3 Seole St«St. Hdter.-d5M-J6331 
TRADED CURRENCY FUND. 

mailnc; B1d__* 1077* otter S11.103* 

>3(dJC<w BUS | ?ZJ) Offer *(2449 

INTERNATIONAL INCOME FUND 1 

-Id) Short Term 'A‘ lAeeuml — ft l JllS 
■ Id) Sheri Term 'A' IDistrl— S 1. 6097 , 
■( d I Short Term V (Aceuml _ I 1J5J77 
-Id) Short Term -B'IDisir)-__ 5 M699, 


-I w) Dollar Income S 675 

-Iwl Forbes Hlg» tnc. Gill Fd c 9430 

-iff) Gold Income . _ s 7J1 

-Iwl Gold Anorectal ten — 1 445 

-(ml Strotegc Trading ft 140 

GBFIMOR FUNDS. 

•(wl East Investment Fund S 45241 

-Iwl Scottish warm Fund t 13*60 

-( w I State St. American , , ■ ft 18149 

London :dl -49 14Z3& Geneve :41-22355530 
GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT CORE. 
PS 119, SI Peter Pert. Guernsey. 0481-28715 

■ w) FuiarCAM 8A«. f Bin 

• w) GAMArtritreselK S U4J2 

-iwl GAMerlca Inc S 1S7J7 

- w) GAM Austrollo Inc - S 9614 

- Wl GAM Boston me ft 12040 

- w) GAM Ermltaoe , , ... ft 1743 

- wl GAM FrarK-Ydl SF 124J8 

- wl GAM Hong Kona Inc. ft 10025 

- w | GAM International Inc. ft t»J3 

- w) GAM JaBOTl Inc. S 12118 

- w ) gam North America Inc. X T17.I4 

- w) gam N. A merica imi Trait- iiusp 

- W| GAM PoeMlc UK 8 14142 

w> GAM Pone. & Otar. Wondw.^ I09A)p 

- W)GAMPeRftftONr.U.K.Fd.- 105400 

- w) GAMrlnt t 114J1 

-iwiGAMStegonoce/Melavine — ft 8126 

w j GAM Start & intf untf Trusts ISM5- o 

■ w) GAM WortrtwtOc Inc $ 19643 

- W) GAM Tvdlk SA. Clcae A S 131.11 

-(«r) GSAM interest Inc. US Ord. s 181 M 

- wl GSAM Interest Inc IM So«~ t 9742 

- w) GSAM Interest Inc SF 9927 

- W) GSAM Interest inc. -. Yen 9,989 

- wi GSAM interest Inc DM I8U5 

. wi GSAM littemr Inc c loam 

G.T. MANAGEMENT (UK) lid. 

- d) Berry pec. FdAld.. ft Ilia 

■( r ) G.T. Appiiea science S lew 

- d ) g.t. Aseon HX Gwm.Fd - S 1144 

■(diGT-AstaFund ■■ ■■ ■ c 428 

- dl G.T. Australia Fund S 2S2S- 

- dl G.T. Europe Fund ... . t ISM 

- *! G.T. Euro. Small Co* Fund — ft 1649, 

- r)G.T. Donor Fund S 1698 

-id) GT. Bond Fund — S 1161 

-i d ) GlT. Globoi Tedniey FA % U47 

-(d) G.T. Honshu PalMMer ft 3227 

-( d I G.T. Investment Fund ... . ft 
-Iwl G.T. Jotwn 5molt CcPyrtd _ ft 

-i r ) G.T, Technonwy Fund ft 2741 

-I d ) G.T. south China Fund.. - 8 1546 

HILL SAMUEL INVEST. MGMT. INTL. IA 
Jersey. PjO. Bax 61 Tel 853* not 

Berne P.O. Baft 202L Tel 4131 234051 

-id) Croiohow (For East) SF 11.18 

4 d ) CSF (BattnceiU SF 27.18 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1985 


Page 21 


ILS. Thrift Plan to Involve Nonbanks 




By Nathaniel C Nash 

New York Tbtm Savior 

WASHINGTON — He Trea- 
suiy to doWopmg a rescue plan for 
• the ailing tLS. thrift industry under 
. which tig non banking organize 
[ lions, sod) as Sears, Roebuck £ 
' Ca, would be invited to bay insol- 
vent savings and loan associations 
and convert them into commercial 
banks, according to a senior Trea- 
sury offtciaL 

Tbe plan, which would involve 
scores of insolvent thrifts, would 
put the Treasury in direct opposi- 
tion to tbe Federal Hcrae Loan 
Bank Board. Tbe board has sought 
to bar entrance into the savings and 
loan industry by financial con- 
glomerates. 

The tentative Treasury plan, dis- 
closed Tuesday by an official who 
refused to be identified, represents 
a view within the Reagan adminis- 
tration that the thrift industry 
should gradually be merged into 
tbe much stronger commercial 
\ banking industry. 

Such conversions could signifi- 
. candy shrink tbe aze of the U.S. 
'thrift industry. While well over 
1,000 healthy institutions earned 
record profits this year, another 
300 to 400 thrift units were essen- 
tially insolvent, according to indus- 
try estimates. Tbe General Ac- 
.canating Office, an arm of 
■ Congress, estimated a few weeks 


ago that another 1300 thrift insti- 
tutions were approaching budven- 
cy as of the end of October. 

Tbe Treasury's draft plan, which 
the Treasury believes would not 
require legislation, would rep rese nt 
a major entrance of nonbanking 
organizations into the. hanlring in- 
dustry in ezreumventien of federal 
laws. 

Tbe Treasury official said that in 
any solution to the thrift industry's 
problems, substantial sources of 
new capital world have to come 
from the private sector. 

“When you look ai the available 
sources of funds, tire govenuneat is 
not about to crane up with any 
money al this rim* of deficit, * he 


“And there is just so modi yon 
can get from the thrift industry 
itself, so that leaves tire private sec- 
tor. When you get a realistic pro- 
posal from someone like a Sears, 
you should listen to it very careful- 
ly* 

The Treasury could encounter 
some opposition from the new 
Comptroller of the Currency, Rob- 
ert L. Clarke. He told reporters 
Wednesday that he would appose 
nosbaclring concerns entering the 

h anking jwhmry t h rough ppr riiiitf 

of insolvent thrift institutions, un- 
less they came under the sameregn- 
latory restrictions as bank hoidmg 
companies. Bat be did say be would 


favor commercial banks’ baying 
ailing thrift units and converting 
than to commercial hank char ter* 

as a means to infuse caphaL 

The Treasury plan also faces op- 
position from tire Federal Home 
Loan Bank Board — tbe regulatory 
agency for the thrift mdustzy. lie 
board has indicated that Sears was 
not welcome as a bidder, far trou- 
bled thrift units because of its bro- 
kerage subsidiary. Dean' Witter 
-Reynolds Inc. 

But faced with a potential need 
for $16 btition in new capital over 
the next three or four years, indus- 
try sources said tire bank board 
ought came under pressure by the 
. Treasury to change its position. 

Doug Fauweatiur, a spokesman 
for Sian in Chicago, would not say 
whether Sears had made a specific 
proposal to the Treasury, but add- 
ed: “Until tire early 1980s, ii was 
known that we saw the acquisition 
of troubled thrifts as a way to ex- 
pand our presence in tire deposit- 
taking and lending activity. Bm 
then that was cut off by the present 
bank board.” 

Sears, J.C Penney Ox. Merrill 
Lynch & Co. and Others have also 
been pushing to get into the bank- 
ing business through legal loop- 
holes that allow than to set op a 
deposit-taking institution that 
makes consuner loans, but not 
commercial loans. 


Commodore, Atari in Holiday Showdown 


(Continued from ftge IS) 

• home-software producer. “There is 
a lot of innuendo floating around 

about both machines." 

In the software campaign, Atari 
has an early lead. Many industry 
•* - experts were surprised to see more 
ih»n 30 companies displaying pro- 
- nams at a huge Atari booth at 
CVwvtor tire personal-compoter- 
— ^industry trade show held in Las 
5}'„j Vegas late last month. 

* Fra the Amiga, there is virtually 
Wteus software yet, and tins threatens 

• - ■ - jo daw sales. “There’s nothing to 

io with it," said David Ian, presi- 
Jeat of Island Micro Systems, in 
MEhueapoIis, which sells to large 

justnesses. 


Still, many companies have com- 
mitted to developing programs for 
the Amiga, winch remains tire 
choice of tbe software-industry es- 
tablishment - While Atari software 
developers are generally small, El- 
tie-known companies, some from 
Europe, several leading home-com- 
puter software companies, such as 
Electronic Am and Activision, are 
coming out soon with programs for 
the Amiga. 

But the leading business soft- 
ware companies, such as Lotos De- 
velopment, Microsoft and Ashton- 
Tate, have not committed to either 
the Amiga or tbe Atari. This could 


face stiff competition from IBM 
and Apple computers, and it is not 
dear that tbe bosmess-compuler 
user really cares about colorful 


Amiga and tbe ST, since, as ma- 
chines destined for business, they 


In terms of distribution, neither 
company has been able to attract 
the top chains, such as Computer- 
land or Busmessland, and, instead, 
have gone more to independent 
stores. Commodore says that its 
product is carried in-more than 700 
stores and that there is a long wait- 
ing list of dealers. An Atari vice 
president, Michael Katz, said the 
ST js carried in 1,000 outlets, but 
industry analysts think the number 

is analW and cay that P nmnwvlnvw 

seems to have bettra distribution. 


AuditorsSay Chinese Bank 
Kept $9 Million From State 

... The Associated Press 

■ BEIJING — Auditors have discovered serious legal violations at 
tiie state-owned Agricultural Bank of China, including tire withhold- 
ing of more than S9 million payable to the government, it was 


Tbe bank, which holds millions of dollars in rural savings, was 
investigated after officials teamed its Hunan province branch bad 
falsified its 1984 «Hwufl report, tbe fWna Daily 

1 reported. The branch president was dismissed 

The ease led to an audit of all agricultural bank branches in (he 
1 country, starting last April The auditor-general. La Begun, was 
quoted as saying that ins staff had uncovered $18 billion worth of tax 
; evasion, fraud and waste. 

“We have finished checking the reports and are dfaKng with a 
number of cases of serious violation of economic and financial laws,” 
Mr. Ln said. 

The anditiDg adnmristration, with 26,000 staff, was formed in 
September 1983 to tighten financial discipline under Drag Xiaoping, 
China’s paramount leader. 


Wall Street Awaits Big Rally 


■ (Continued hum Page 15) 

begins just about the time most tax- 
selling has ran its coarse. Second, 
reurvestment hits the market in ear- 
ly January. Third, psychology im- 
proves around the holidays, giving 
investors added incentive to buy." 

Normally, Mr. Zweig added, 
year-end strength tends to begin 
tbe day before Christmas and lasts 
through the sixth trading day of 
January, usually about an J 1-day 
stretch. Over the past 20 yean, be 
noted, an index giving equal wright 
to aB New York Stock Exchange 
issues has risen 17 tunes while fad- 
ing in only three of those periods. 

Presently, Mr. Zweig has bis cli- 
ents 100 percent invested in stocks. 

Robert FarreB, duel market ana- 
lyst at Merrill Lynch, also sees Wall 
Street currently at peak momen- 
tum. “This should carry it 
through year-end into early Janu- 
ary, " he said. 

Nevertheless, with all the recent 
positive developments cm UJ5. (ax- 
es and the buaget deficit, he asks: 
“Is this a ‘good-news' final top?” 
such as lat&in-tbe-year rallies that 
occurred in 1972, 1976 or 1983. 

‘Tbe answer is probably not," 
Mr. FaireQ said. “Tbe move is too 


Dollar Gains as Yen, Pound Weaken 


broad and powerful for a last-gasp 
rally. In coder for a meaningful 
decline of more than 10 percent to 
set in, we should see interest rates 
start to rise and some form of spec- 
ulative enwr w that iwaflis compla- 
cency and a narrowing of breadth 
again." 

While he added that investors 
should be “cm guard against a blow 
off or buying-dintax stage develop- 
ing after such a long rise, the signs 
of speculative enthusiasm and 
churning usually associated with 
such a stage are still munnuL” 

If Wall Street does consolidate, 
Salomon Brothers’ Lasrio Birinyi 
Ic. offers a refuge. His analysis of 
bow different stocks performed in 
rest periods after initial market 
surges of August 1982 and 1984 
show that tbe best sector to be in 
was property/casualty insurers. 

Aluminums were tbe worst per- 
formers, he said, “with all the ma- 
jor basic industries substantially 
underperforming daring consolida- 
tion periods following market 
gains." Other areas that did poody, 
he noted, were autos, cosmetics, 
energy services, hospital stocks, in- 
strumentation and semi conduc- 
tors. 


LONDON — The dollar moved 
mainly higher in European trading 
Wednesday as the Japanese yen 
aod British pound lost ground in an 
erratic and sometimes very thin 
pre-Christmas maikeL 

Dealers said there was tittle in- 
terest in the dollar, but that it bene- 
fited from selling of the yen and 
pound. Movements were exagger- 
ated by the low volume. 

In Loudon, the pound closed at 
$1.4203, down from $1.4373 on 
Tuesday. The dollar dosed in Lon- 
don at 203.02S yen, up from 201 .85. 
In Tokyo, however, the dollar end- 
ed at 201.65 yen on Wed n esday, 
down from 202.10. 

Dealers in Loudon said sales of 
yen were triggered when the gover- 
nor of the Bank of Japan, Satosbi 
ftumim miH the central front was 
ending its upward guidance of yen 
interest rates. 

Tbe pound was quoted in Lon- 
don at a low of SI. 4 185 after a large 
sefi order provoked by a statement 
from Iraq’s ofl minister. Qassem 
Ahmed Taqi. He said OPEC was 


determined to protea its share of 
the world crude oil market despite 
the harmful effect of lower ch! 
prices. 

One U.S. bank dealer said the 
market was so thin that people 
werejust reacting to isolated pieces 
of news. 

Tbe relative lack of interest in 
the dollar was illustrated by its lev- 
el against the Deutsche mark. In 
Frankfurt, the dollar was fixed at 
2.5103 DM on Wednesday, very 
slightly down from 2J120on Tues- 
day. 

Softer U.S. credit markets 
Wednesday after Tuesday’s poor 
response to the Treasury’s auction 
of two-yea r notes may have under- 
pinned tbe dollar in afternoon trad- 
ing, deales said. 

The high 8%-percent opening 
federal funds rale was also a sup- 
portive factor. Fed funds closed 
Tuesday at Th percent 

ln Zurich, the dollar closed at 
2.1 133 Swiss francs on Wednesday, 
up from 2.1030 on Tuesday, ln Par- 
is, the U.S. currency was fixed at 


7.7 1 2 French francs, up from 7.692. 
■ Monetary PoKcy Prospects 

Martha Sega, a governor of the 
Federal Reserve Board, has indi- 
cated that further easing in mone- 
tary policy in tbe near future is 
unlikely, according to an article 
published in the American Banker 
newspaper, Reuters reported from 
New York. 

The newspaper story Tuesday 

credit union officials in Dallas last 
week that the Fed had discontinued 
its practice of managing monetary 
policy by controlling money sup- 
ply, as many have suspected. 

The report gained dxcnlatioa in 
the financial markets Wednesday 
and helped produce a bond market 
retreat because it dashed hopes for 
a quick cut in tbe discount rate 
from IVi percent. 

According to the report. Mis. 
Seger also said the dollar's value 
had fallen enough, indicating that 
tbe Fed was unlikely io ease mone- 
tary policy further. Easing would 
tower interest rates and spur addi- 
tional dollar HnrJimc. 


Trading Is Quiet; Another Yen Issue Emerges 


By David Ross 

Reuters 

LONDON — Eurobonds gener- 
ally dosed unchanged to slightly 
firmer Wednesday in quiet trading 
as another borrower tapped tbe 
Euroyen market, dealers said. 

Investor interest is almost at a 
standstill in most sectors of tbe 

rwarW^ SO Steadily fi rming Fur - 

oyen bond prices are offering bor- 
rowers very attractive rates, deders 
said. 

Following Wednesday’s IO-bfl- 
lion-yen issue for CSX Corp., deal- 
ers raid they e xp e ct al least one 
more new issue to emerge in the 
Euroyen sector before the end of 
the week. Credit Fonder de 
France, they predicted, 'rill shortly 
launch a fixed-rate Euroyen bond, 
possibly as early as Thursday. 


The issue for CSX, a major U.S. 
railroad company, pays 6% percent 
over 10 years and was priced at 
100 %. 

The lead manager. Daiwa Eu- 
rope LuL, which is also expected to 
lead manage the Crfedh Fonrifcr is- 
sue, reported strong demand for 
the CSX bonds, while dealers 
quoted them at a discount of 1%, 
within total fees of 2 percent. 

Wednesday's other new issue, a 
5100- million, 9%-percent, 10-year 
bond at 100% for the European 
Coal and Sled Community, also 
won a fairly strong reception, clos- 
ing within total fees atadiscouni of 
1 7/16. 

Trading in more reas o ned dollar 
denominated issues was listless, al- 
though dealers said Texaco Inc. is- 
sues jumped on news that a U-S. 


federal court in New York issued a 
temporary restraining order block- 
ing enforcement of tbe SI l.J -bil- 
lion award won against Texaco by, 
Pennzoil last month. 

Texaco Capital N^s 1 1 ^-per- 
cent convertible bond due 1994 and 
I life- percent convertible due 1994 
both rose two points on the news to 
dose at 97 and 97% respectively. 

Other convertibles finned slight- 
ly, as did fixed-rale dollar bonds. 

With expectations of a U.S. dis- 
count-rate cut already reflected in 
bond prices, dealers attributed 
Wednesday’s finning trend to some 
short covering, as investors move to 
finish squaring positions ahead of 
the year-aid, dealers said. 

They said floating-rate notes 
were steady in almost completely 
inactive trading. 



Frisia 


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SatoB flourrt ora uneMdaL Yearly hiehi and lavnt reded 
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c— Unu kkittne dMdend. 

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err---: • . ■■ 










Page 22 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1985 



1 

2 

3 

4 ” 

14 




17 




20 



■ 


1 Grate 

5 Austen heroine 
9 Kudos (or 
Domingo 

14 Twinge's 
relative 

15 Burden 

16 Asiatic lemur 

17 Bowery 
lodging 

19 Gather 

20 Pile-driver 
head 

21 Gibbons 

22 Erica ceous 
shrub 

23 “Louisiana 
Hayride" 
author 

25 Commercial 
writers 

27 Consign 

28 A Russian 
people 

29 Strikebreaker 

33 Exec's helper 

.34 Street signs 

36 Catching place 
for Caulfield 

37 Phony pretexts 

39 Product sold 

by Paul 
Newman 

41 Dazzle 

42 Orchestral 
passage 

44 Wished for 

45 Simple 


47 Cole Porter’s 

“ to 

Dance": 1936 

48 Some 
receivers 

49 Silk fabric 

51 Asian 
language 

52 Shout 

55 Pasteur’s 
portrayer 

57 Disseminate 

60 Noted netman 

61 Sidewalk sport 

63 Stover, 

Huie heroine 

64 Lamb who had 
a Mary 

65 Rose that 
blossomed in 
Cincinnati 

66 Bay. 

Canadian port 

67 Galloway or 
glass 

68 Homer's one- 
horse town 

DOWN 

1 Finn’s craft 

2 Defenders' 
org. 

3 Little Nell’s 
Grandfather. 
*-g- 

4 Get-up-and-go 

5 Get up and go? 

6 Grimace 

7 Knead 

8 He wrote 
“Doc' Home" 


BULL HALSEY 

By E. B. Boner. 421 pages. $19.95. 

Naval Institute Press, Annapolis, Md. 
21402 

Reviewed by Stansfield Turner 

F LEET Admiral WUHam F. (Bull) Halsey 
ranks with MacArthur and Patton as one 
of the most charismatic and forceful U. S. 
military personalities of World War EL As 
commander in the South Pacific and later of 
the U. S. Third Fleet, he established a swash- 
buckling reputation. As might be expected, he 
has .2rdeoi supporters and vehement detrac- 
tors. The author of this first full biography was 
once close to the ranks of detractors; 26 years 
ago he wrote a draft chapter cm the Battle of 
Leyte Gulf in which he said: “Halsey made tie 
wrong decision. In the light of what we now 
know, there can be no question about that” 

The centerpiece of Professor E. B. Potter’s 
fine biography is his balanced and objective 
view of Halsey’s role at Leyte Gulf, one of the 
more controversial naval actions of World War 
IL where the American and Japanese fleets 
punched at other in a running battle over 
several days in October 1944. Potter's even- 
handed treatment of why Halsey exposed Mac- 
Arthur’s invasion force in order to battle ene- 
my aircraft carriers is au important 
contribution. The book’s value is more than 
historical, though. It is well worth reading for 
its lessons about how best to approach today’s 
militar y problems. Halsey's baric philosophy 
of warfare — which led directly to his actions 
at Leyte Golf — has always appealed to mili- 
tary men and m recent years has become in- 
creasingly espoused by the U. S. Navy. 

Halsey’s philosophy, as be pm it. was: "The 
best defense is a strong offense. Lord Nelson 
expressed this very well: 'No captain can do 
very wrong if be places his ship alongside that 
of an enemy.’ ” Halsey's choice at Leyte Gulf 
was between what he saw as the offense and the 
defense. Chi the one hand be had the opportu- 
nity to seek out and engage what he believed to 
be the last remaining aircraft carriers of the 
Japanese fleet On the other, he could have 
stood guard to ensure that other Japanese 
naval forces heading for Leyte Gulf did not 
overwhelm U. S. forces there. The U. S. Army 
had just made the amphibious assault that 
commenced the fight to retake toe Philippines 
and was still moving men and material ashore. 
There are, of course, strategists who believe 


© New York Times, edited fry Eugene Moteska- 

DENNIS THE MENACE 


Solution to Previous Puzzle 


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MV CALL, DOCTOR' MV BROTHER AMD 1 HAVE 

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PHYSICAL EXAM TURNED OUT ' 



ALTHOUGH WE WONT GET THE REPORT OM 
THE BLOOD STUDIES UNTIL TOMORROW, I ‘ 
aow Y ANTICIPATE ANY PROBLEM ' HE'S fM 
EXCELLENT PHYSICAL HEALTH' 


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tout 3 mi li tars* commander shouW concamale \ 
on achieving specific oojecuves, ™her«not 
that necessarily involves destroymg 
jnv's militarv forces. Potter makes it clear that, 
as'a result of Halsey s following the pnnqpfe 
of toe offense, toe immediate o^ectiveef ap. 
porting toe invasion was placed in coasfe. 

ab ^ c e *U^ > Navy is facing an analogous &- 
lemma as it develops plans for a possib le maj or 
war with toe Soriei Union. Its pnme otjjeHM* 
would be w keep ibe Atlantic sea lam 
Europe, just as in World Wars I and 11. One 
way oT doing that would be to sow toe offa. . 
ave and see* out and defeat the Sovi« flea 
wherever it is. Such a tactic would sohe fc. 
problem once and for alL but would require the , 
U.S. fleet to accept toe risk of going mjp i 
waters where toe Soviet Navy is at us strongest. 
The alternative would be to take advan tage# 
the fact that geography forces Soviet air, sub- 
marine and surface forces to come into the 
Atlantic through toe relatively narrow gaps 
between Greenland. Iceland and Scotland. - 

Potter provides sufficient detail to rive a 
solid description of toe battles in which Halsey 
was involved, yet not so much as io bog ore 
down. Some readers will want io skim the 
descriptions of what various ships did in vari- 
ous battles, but »hat is not difficult. The nu- 
merous anecdotes on Halsey's life and habits 
fhat Potter inserts almost at random make toe 
narrative uneven at times, yet these vignettes 
contribute much to toe fed one gets for toe 
man. I do wish Potter had built more of a 
picture of Halsey toe human being, not just the 
militar y commander. For instance, Fanny - 
Grandy Halsey, his wife: darts in and out of toe 1 
book and the admiral's life with almost no 
exp lanatio n of what must have been an unusu- 
al, distant relationship. 

Another of Halsey's controversial character- 
istics that is brought out dearly in the book 
also has relevance today: How much should 
militar y mmman dgs operate, as did Halsey, 
on intuition and impulse and how miifli on 
methodical, thorough appraisals of toe balance 
of forces? Potter has unearthed interesting 
quotations from Halsey on occasions when his 
intuition drove his decisions. Some of these 
were his great successes. A complaint prevalent 
today is that U. S. military officers are being 
trained to be "managers,” rather than inspira- 
tional leaders, as Halsey dearly was. 

Potter comes dose to direct criticism of 
Halsey in pointing out that ills lack of toe 
manager’s penchant for careful analysis led 
him to two very faulty decisions on "evasive: 
actions in the face of typhoons. And, looking , 
on the impact of motion technology on war- 
fare, one mnst wonderif there are not virtues in 
precision and thoroughness. After all, the day 
is approaching when the time for response wifi 
be so short that toe commander's dearioos wiD 
be only those he has thought out and pro- ' 
grammed into a computer. 

Reading Potter’s descriptions of Halsey’s 
approach to decision-making in war invites 1 
reflections on toe range of demands now 
placed an military leaders. While there wiD 
always be a need for men who can inspire with 
Halsey’s boldness and sense of initiative, the 
dictates of increasingly sophisticated technol- 
ogies are going to demand the calm and thor- 
ough calculations of a scientist 

Admiral Stansfield Turner, former director if 
Central Intelligence and die author if " Secrecy 
and Democracy: The CIA in Transition,’' mote 
‘this review far Ttte'Waskington Post. 


BRIDGE 


♦Phew! '£xjr. beard smelis like 
AVJ maUIS AGAIN THIS YEAR !* 


GARFIELD 


I THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
by Henri Arnold and Bob Lae 


Unscramble these tour Jumbles, 
one letter to each square, to farm 
four ordinary words. 


NILEN 

■ 


■ 

■ 


DAAHEJ 


■■■■ 



GAIMBY 


mmmm 

H 



VOD MAh* NOT KNOW THIS, \ 
GARFIELD, BUT I’M SOMEWHAT 1 
OF AN EXPERT AT REAPING I 
.TEA LEAVES J 

AH.VES, IT SAV5 HERE WOO WILL 
HAVE A LONG ANP FROITRJL J 
UFE. VOUR OWNER IS RINP / 
ANP GENEROUS, ANP WOO WILL/ 

/ ANV \ i MAW I 1 

f QUESTIONS? if HAVE MH» ) 
VT COCOA < 

\f \&ACK?J 





By Alan Truscott 

the diagramed deal, the 
V-/ cOn tract was “only” one 
no-trump, but led to some deli- 
cate cot-and-tonm between 
West and South. 

The one no-trump rebid, 
showing a hand too good for a 
one no-trump opening, ended 
the auction and the lead was a 
spade. Hie nine woo in dum- 
my and a diamond was led to 
the king and ace. West made a 
gpod shift to a heart, forcing 
the play of the queen and re- 
moving dummy’s entry. South 
led a heart to the ace. but West 
shrewdly played the king, cre- 
ating an entry to hex partner's 
hand. 

South cashed two diamond 
winners and exited with a 


heart. East took two heart 
tricks and shifted to a small 
club. Sooth made a good ded- 
son by playing the dub king, 
reasoning that West would 
have done more bidding with 
the dub ace in addition to 13 
known points in toe other 
suits. 

The position, and South 
knew it, was this: 

NORTH 
AS 
O — 

-> 10 

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EAST 
♦ — 

9 — 

« — 

* AS7S 
SOUTH 
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South led a dub, noted the 
appearance erf toe queen and 
made his contract. 


NORTH 

suit 

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1* 1* POT 

1 N.T. Pot POT 

WOT tod the spate mvhl 


VORCLE 



mm\ 


WHAT SHE SAlP 
| TO HERSELF WHEN 
THE CARDPLAYER 
PROPOSED MARRIAGE.I 


Now arrange the circled letters to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


— “mcmcxm 


Yesterday’s 


(Answers tomorr o w) 
Jumbles: AUDIT NEWLY RAVAGE TRICKY 

Answer Whom to coll It you're planning to i ghre a 
banquet for your car— THE "CAT-ERER 

WEATHER 


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^^Mdri Mmr; l*-W'; Mali: oevore ni t: nc«rn* cloudy; r-ndn: 
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THUIMMY'J FORECAST— CHANNEL: Moderate. FRANKFURT: Showers. 
tSJtM- 4 (43 _W. LONDON: Rain. Tenia. 7— *145— 431. MADRID: Fair 
Thu 9—7 (48—361. NSW YORK: Fair. Toma -3 — W (27—141. PAR is. - 
CtaSw. Temp. »-4 (46-391- ROMs: CkwdY. Temp. II — 7M2— 45). TEL 
AVIV: No. ZURICH: m ower*. TommS— 3(41— PI. BANPKQ4C: MW. Tome 
39-— 18 184—64). HOMO KONO; Fok. Toma, 17— 14 (63 —57). MANILA: 
Ooudv. Tempi 30-23 (U-721. sroul: Foggy. (28-14) 

SINGAPORE: Tm o iUo nhj r m L Toma. 38—34 186—751. TOKYO: Fair. T imp 
* — 7 (48—381. 


WMrW Stock Markets 

Via Agence France-Presse Dec. 18 

dosing prices in local amenda mien otherwise indicated. 


ABN 

ACF Holding 


Aloe 

Ahold 

Ann 

A'Dom Rubber 
Amro Bank 

BVG 

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Ht oae fca o 


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KLM 
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NotNodor 
Nedllovd 
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Roilnco 


Dutch 


Royal 

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VMFSlork 

VNU 

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127J0 127 JO 
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74.10 75 

166.70 24X50 

21550 2U20 

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SOB 9630 
5750 SJM 
S3 &2 

201 wa 

378 37550 
R50 9620 

57 JO 57J0 

sue «uo 

IB 13540 
7X90 7X10 
46S0 4670 

171 JO 17X30 

385-70 38X60 

3X30 31 JO 
255JC 255J0 
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4355 OS 
SB 3830 
4995 5008 
2550 2370 
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5670 5720 
2915 2910 
11000 11580 
6490 6SM 
2200 2240 
8710 1330 
6 WE 6100 
4700 4735 
3610 3600 
229S 2265 
5640 5700 


MYNiififl— 1 


AEG 

Allianz Von 
Altana 
BASF 
Barer 

Boy. Hyp o bank 
Bav Vanrinsbank 
BBC 

BHF-eonk 

BMW 

C om n io rJxwK 
Conti Guraml 

Daimler-Benz 

Ooeuoya 

Doutsdw Babcock 
Deutsche Sank 

Dreesner Bank 

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430 438 

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4E3 488 

573 STY 
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37750 371 JO 
246 243 

340 344. 

820 8201 


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153 

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193 

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633 

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173 

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730 

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1 Cemimntoak Mu : 1S6US 

Piwioas : 1B3U8 



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24J0 

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21 

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7JS 

7J5 

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46J0 

4650 

Henderson 

2.15 

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U 

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HK Electric 

BAS 

MO 

HK Realty a 

12 

12 

HKHoteti 

3460 

3625 

HK Land 



HK Shone Sank 

7J0 

7J5 

HK Telephone 

9JS 

090 

HK Yaumatei 

195 

3525 

HK Wharf 

750 

750 

Hutch Wham poo 

26JO 

2650 


055 

064 

IoHCKy 

099 

099 

Jardlne 

1130 

1X30 

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I4J0 

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18.10 

10 

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5950 

5954 

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470 

6-75 


tin 

1238 

SMux 

1.90 

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Swine PadflCA 

38 as 

30 


2025 

2825 

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1J3 

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168 

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172494 

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915 925 

3850 3850 
19009 moo 
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1615 1625 
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1548 1550 
47W 4730 
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7401 705 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1985 


Page 23 


SPORTS 


Blood Clots 
Threaten Life 
Of 'Odyssey’ 

The Associated Pita . 

' HIALEAH, Florida — Ste- 
..pfaan £teunmaxred race courts, undersized playere and little players, is credited with raising 



By Stefan Facsis 

The Associated Press 

ATHENS — Despite makeshift 


league in scoring every year since 
he arrived in 1979 and, along with 
about 15 other Greek-American 


horse worth S10 tniOion, has devel- 
oped Wood clou in his broken 
front left kg and may have to be 
destroyed, according to one of the 
veterinarians treating the'tbor- 
'^ugjhbred. 

“There is severe soft-tissue dam- 
age,” Dr. Stephen Selway said 
Tuesday, adding that “it is qnes- 
. jonable if there's enough blood 


money, Greece's national basket- 
ball team has reached the World 
Cup finals for the first time — 
thanks in part to a contingent of 
Greek-Americans. 

Leading the way is doe country’s 
■ top player, Nick Gaiis, 28, a natu- 
ralized citizen who played college 
ball at Seton Hall in New Jersey. 
He scored .33 pouus as Greece beat 


standards and stimulating interest 
hi basketball m this country.- 
- Weekly television coverage and 
increased state funding for basket* 
ball also have helped promote an 
amateur sport that still is not 
played in most Greek Ugh schools. 

The 14-team first division is 
characterized by inadequate facili- 
ties, inexperienced coaches, under- 




. . . . . , come one of 24 qualifiers for the ml. 

A decision cm whether to operate — aQDS - 


“One problem the Greeks have is 


. , . , - . 1986 tournament m Spain. 

^Tpul off until at kastThwsday rw people.” said David Stergakos Nd- 

SToftocioa^hemL 


Stephan’s Odyssey broke his left and last by a point. Greece is get- 
front sesamoid bone, which is the ting there: 
equivalent of a human knuckle, af- Gaiis. a 6-foot (1 .82-meter) 
ter a half-mile workout Sunday at guard from Union City, New Jer- 
Hialeah Park. Jenny Osteen, the s^.wlm is sixth on Seton Hall's all- 
track's director of special promo- time scoring list, with an average of 
dons, said the colt “pulled up at the 1 7 points a game, plays for Aris of 
mile pole and his ankle collapsed." Sulonica. He has lea the Greek 


Frmch Aioait FIS Decision on Twins 

United Press International 

PARIS — The French ski federation said Wednesday its awaiting 
a decision from skiing's world governing body whether the Polish 
twins, Dorotha and Margot Tlailra, can race for France after they 
having been expelled by the Polish federation. 

AFrench federation spokesman said the slalom specialists are 
training with the French team in Courcfaeval and are ready to enter. 
World Cop races for France. 

“France wants them and they want to race for France, but right 
now we are waiting for FIS officials to make a decision,'' the 
spokesman said. 

“We are hoping (he FIS officials will let them ski for France.” 

The TTalkas married brothers from Grenoble, Christian and Chris- 
topbe Magore, in October and applied for French citizenship. Howev- 
er. the Polish federation refused to release the asters from a license 
that lands them to Poland until next June. 

The FIS recently ruled the sisters could continue training with (he 
French team but most race under Polish colors. 

A report on the state-controlled Polish news agency PAP Tuesday 
said the Polish federation has “officially” expelled the Tlalkas from 
the federation and their club, Legia Zakopane, for “insubordination." 

The report said the measures were taken because the sisters ‘'arbi- 
trarily prolonged their stay abroad” and violated contracts the Polish 
iMtn has with manufacturers to use certain brand names of equip- 
ment. 


who has. played for 
Panathinaikos, the top Athens 
team, since 1978. 

Greece also is (me of the few 
European countries to ban foreign- 
ers from league play. The only ex- 
ceptions are Greek- Americans, but 
even they must become Greek citi- 
zens to be considered for the na- 
tional team. 

The Greek- Amen cans in the 
168-player first division draw big- 
ger crowds to basketball games, but 
say they often have salary disputes 
with their teams. 

“You never know whether you'll 
get paid or not. You’ve always got 
problems with (be team,” Nelson 
said. 

Greek clubs are plagued by 
chronic financial problems 
prevent them from building new 
arenas that would attract enough 
spectators to turn a profit. 

“How are teams supposed to 
make money? From ticket sales? 
The arenas hold 500 or 1,000 peo- 
ple,” said MkhaKs Kiritsis, the 
coach of Panathinaikos, which 
plays on a concrete court covered 
with green plastic beneath a soccer 
stadium stand. 

Aris, the league’s top franchise, 
boasts one of Greece's three hard- 
wood floors and draws about 5,000 
spectators a game. But one league 
source estimated the club wfil lose 
8530,000 this season. 

The imported players sty the 
play in the Greek league often -is 
unorthodox by European and U.S. 



Ewing Gets a Draw With Jabbar 
In First Meeting, but Lakers Win 


The Associated Pros 

NEW YORK — The game 
matched 38-year-old Kareem Abd- 
nklabbar against the rookie Pat- 
rick Ewing, and the team with Na- 
tional Basketball Association’s best 
record against a team with one of 
the worst. Age and talent won oul 
A bduLJabbar scored five of his 
26 points during an 18-9 streak 


NBA FOCUS 


scoring leader, with nearly 34,000 
points, used for most of his 10 bas- 
kets in the game. 

“When be took his first shot, I 
thought to myself, “Oh, man. how 
am I going to stop that book?* 1 

r don't think there's any way to stop 

down die stretch as the Los Angeles dial sky hook," Ewing said. “When 
Lakers improved their record toil-- be gets the ball, you warn to lake 
3 with a 105-99 victory Tuesday him as far away from the basket as 


his New York Knicks feLUo 7-18. 

“Both of them held their own," 
said the Lakers' coach, Pat Riley. 
“They went at each other the whole 
game, both of them played to their 
potential, both got their numbers 


you can. I did O.K., but I made a 
lot of key mistakes.” 

The Lakers, winning tor the 10th 
time in their last 11 games, also had 
Maurice Lucas score 19 points, 
James Worthy 18 and Earvin John- 
son 17. Trent Tucker got 22 for 


and played big ga mrs against de- New York, 
fenses trying to double- or triple- T** Knicks, despite a league-low 

\estm them.” scoring average of 93.9 points, kept 

Abdul- Jabbar also got 8 re- dosc throughout, never 

bounds, 4 assists and 2 blocked 


trailing by more than seven points. 
There were 21 ties and 17 lead 
changes. 

The Lakers scored the first five 
points before Ewing quickly got 
five to give the Knicks a 9-7 lead. 
Los Angeles led, 28*24. at the end 
of that quarter, but the Knicks 
slowed the pace and prevented the 
Lakers from fasi-breaking in the 
second period, holding them to IS 
points. A long pass to Ewing with 
two seconds left allowed him to 
shoot a baseline jumper at the 
buzzer that tied the score at 46 at 
halftime. 

Los Angeles emerged the winner, 
said Lucas, because his team is 
“used to dosing light games. 

“We were just very happy to get 
that game over with," he said. 
“They played with a lot of intensi- 
ly.” 


shots in 33 minutes. Ewing per- T? XT' • I 9 /T 1 

lb or Knicks Loach Brown, 
Another Giant Blessing 




Kareem Abdndklabbar found himself in equal company 
during Iris first encounter with Patrick Ewing of the Knicks. 


standards, with games dominated 
by wild-shooting guards at the ex- 
pense of passing and defense. 

But Greece is spending SI .3 mil- 
lion this year, seven tunes more 
than in 1980, to 'develop coaching 
and playing talent. 

“We're taking gradual steps to 
improve the sport. 1 think we're 
slowly earning our place in the Eu- 
ropean basketball community,*' 
said the national team coach, Cris- 
tas Politis. 

The Greek Basketball Federa- 
tion is recruiting new players from 
aD over the country. Since 1961, 
more than 7,000 young Greeks 


aged 10 and up have signed with 
chib teams 


assists in the 45 minutes be played. 
It was an effort that commanded 
high praise from Abduklabbar. 

“He’s a fine center and he’ll be 
around a long time;” Abdul- Jabbar 
said of Ewing, considered the best 
of the next generation of centers in 
the NBA. “When he gets more sea- 
soning he’ll be a very, very good 
center. He's only been in the league 
two months and he’s doing a very 
gpod job under difficult circum- 
stances.” 

The Lakers, who were held well 
below their soring average of 
123.7 points per game, trailed by 
87-85 midway through the fourth 


By George Vecsey 

New York Tunes Service 

NEW YORK — Hubie Brown's 
past and Hubie Brown’s future 
were present in the same arena 
Tuesday night as the New York 
Knicks took on the Los Angeles 
Lakers. 

His introduction to professional 
basketball was represented by the 
big man in goggles. Kareem Abdul 
Jabbar, and his future as coach of 
the Knicks was represented by Pat- 
rick Ewing. 

Brown spent the 1972-73 and 
*73-74 seasons as an assistant coach 
with the Milwaukee Bucks. He saw 
a young, proud Kareem Jabbar. 
able to dribble the length or the 
court and pass or jump-shoot like 


period. But Abdul-Jabbar’s hook 

“They’ve gone to the villages to 51101 ^ 3:24 10 P 1 ^ ®»ve them 
find these kids," said Kirk Vadis. ti* «ad for good at 96-94. He com- 
who came here from Chicago six P lelcd the streak with another bas- 
years ago to play for Panathinai- ***: 11 103-96 with 56 sec- 

kos. onds left. 

The national recently trav- “It's an understatement to say it 

ded to the United Slates for five was typical the way Kareemgot the your basic^-fool-i-inch (1 1 8-me^ 
gftmes against college im™, in- big pants at the end," Riley said, guard, 
eluding very good u*amc from “He was great and Ewing's a fm- 
Duke, North Carolina and North ished player. When the Knicks fill 
Carolina State. their holes around the perimeter, 

“We lost four of them, but our they will be tough.” 
first-ever trip to America reflects a Ewing was most impressed with 
new commitment to the game," Po- Abdul-Jabbar’s famons “sky 
litis said. hook,” which the NBA's all-time 


Now Brown is coaching another 
of those fellows. The other night, in 
a romp over the Denver Nuggets, 
Ewing made a behmd-the-back 
dribble to set up a pass for a basket. 
Later, with what seemed like put- 
on humor, he insisted he had made 


1 1 1 1 ' 1 1 1 — 1 —— 

* Football 

Basketball 

Hockey 


ational Football League Leaders 


AMERICAN conference 
TERM OFFENSE 


NATIONAL CONFERENCE 
TEAM - OFFENSE ' 



Yardi 

Rub 

Pass 


Yardi 

Rash 

Dtaoo 

6003 

1474 

4509 

Giants 

5513 

2163 

drmotl 

5541 

2092 

3449 

Sait Francisco 

549* 

2121 

s 

5535 

2177 

ywi 

Chicago 

5455 

2600 

■mi 

5535 

1550 

3985 

Dellas 

5183 

1681 

JMwrafi 

5136 

2062 

3074 

Groan Bov 

5040 

2069 

Wen 

5093 

2127 

2*60 

Washington 

4925 

2302 

* England 

5010 

2050 

3030 

EL Louis 

4841 

1819 

Mr 

5017 

1757 

TMn 

Pta'IadetpMa 

mu 

1506 

vetand 

409 

2147 

2532 

Minnesota 

4797 

1443 

IttlB 

4676 

1518 

315B 

Atlanta 

4528 

2216 

tananoO* 

4539 

2140 

2399 

Tamoo Bov 

4436 

1345 

woi aty 

4441 

1388 

3053 

Rams 

4308 

1947 

tala 

4296 

1500 

2796 

New Orleans 

4233 

1615 

nton 

4231 

1494 

2737 

Detroit 

4150 

1465 

TEAM DEFENSE 


TEAM DEFENSE 


Yerd» 

Read 

Pan 


Yards 

Rash 

sffundi 

4280 

1587 

2701 

Chicago 

3809 

1246 

> England 

4355 

1564 

2791 

Gianta 

4106 

1367 

Jam 

4383 

1495 

2888 

Washington 

4235 

157* 


4539 

1378 

3152 

Rams 

4333 

1451 

■fftaoa 

4597 

1716 

2881 

Son Fronctoco 

4772 

1623 

tie 

4681 

1743 

2938 

Philadelphia 

4781 

2132 

ver 

4148 

1847 

3001 

Green Bay 

4843 

WSI 

■ ms City 

5126 

1978 

3140 

St. Louis 

4968 

2157 

anouoHs 

5178 

2069 

3109 

Minnesota 

SOM 

2092 

alo 

5233 

2283 

2949 

Dallas 

5187 

7744 

• Innod 

5244 

1718 

3526 

Detroit 

5209 

2524 

nl 

5468 

2145 

3323 

New Orleans 

5283 

1919 

dan 

5480 

2515 

3173 

Mlorria 

540* 

798* 

t Diego 

5829 

1874 

3955 

Tempo Bav 

5777 

2291 


Pan 

3351 

3376 

2855 

3012 

2971 

2623 

3032 

3320 

3154 

2312 

2WI 

2351 

3618 

2685 


NB i St andings , NHL Standings 

EASTERN CONFERENCE .WALES CO 

- •• - •• ah dmU c o mHM -i- ;C -7r- 


Philadelphia 
Washington 
New Vo rk 

Milwaukee 

Detroit 

Atlanta 

Cleveland 

Chicago 

Indiana 


W L Pet. OB 
30 5 

16 12 
U 12 
12 12 
7 IB 


£38 

-520 

*08 


m 

i 

m 

a' 


Central Mvtahw 
IB 10 
14 13 
13 13 
11 14 
10 1* 
7 IB 


•M3 — 
-STS JM 
*08 4 

M0 5M 
J*S 8Vb 
-2B0 TVS 


INDIVIDUAL 


ATT COM YDS TD 1NT 


POM 

2563 

2730 

2666 

2BB2 

3147 

264* 

3685 

2911 

2*82 

3443 

2ASS 

3464 

3603 


ATT COM YDS TD INT 


INDIVIDUAL 


tan. Jets 

454 

276 3637 » 

7 

Montana, SP. 

460 

279 3331 25 

12 

;wl Cln. 

392 

233 3173 25 

n 

McMahan, °iL 

291 

165 2198 U 

9 

L5J>. 

430 

254 3638 27 

20 

Brock. Rams 

337 

284 2499 16 

13 

too. Mia 

543 

321 4001 31 

20 

D. White. DOJL 

450 

267 3157 21 

17 

«v, me. 

322 

172 2336 15 

9 

Simms, Giants 

479 

265 3723 71 

19 

l Sea 

492 

268 3386 26 

19 

Lomax, SCL 

443 

247 3096 16 

12 

ne. Pm. 

227 

116 1432 13 

7 

h topic, Del. 

362 

281 2665 16 

15 

r. dev. 

225 

114 1457 

a 

4 

Dc Berg. TA 

370 

197 2488 19 

18 

r. Den. 

563 

303 3459 21 

23 

JaworskL Phil. 

440 

234 3161 

15 

18 

Hou. 

337 

178 2345 13 

17 

Dickey. G-B. 

314 

172 2206 15 

17 

L ICE. 

284 

160 2811 

10 

16 

Kramer, Minn. 

470 

256 3201 17 

25 

InrL 

371 

185 2236 11 

15 

D.wtlson. ICO. 

2» 

145 1843 11 

15 

n. Raiders 

359 

174 2420 15 

20 

Thelsmaniv Wash. 

301 

147 1774 

8 

16 






Archer. Alt 

285 

144 1793 

7 

17 

Rushers 




— — 




ATT 

YDS 

AVO 1 

LG TD 

Rashers 




- Raiders 

356 

1636 *6 

61 

11 

ATT 

YDS 

AVG LS TD 

•IL Jets 

26 B 

1257 AJ 

69 

3 

Riggs, ail 

350 

1561 44 

50 

9 

MS. ICE. 

238 

1085 il 

65 

4 

Pavtan, Chi 

307 

1470 4* 

40 

f 

Cfev. 

210 

1074 5.1 

61 

7 

Dor sett. DalL 

286 

1258 44 

60 

7 

*. Sea. 

273 

1802 17 

24 

7 

Wilder. T.B. 

339 

1251 3* 

28 

9 

. Clev. 

239 

901 19 

36 

6 

Dickerson, Ram* 

267 

1136 4* 

43 12 

d pm. 

217 

901 42 

54 

3 

Morris, Giants 

258 

1134 44 

58 18 

' X Cln. 

179 

800 4« 

39 

7 

Craig. S.F. 

201 

978 49 

ta 

8 

toft 

214 

833 19 

77 

8 

EJockson. PHIL 

257 

922 34 

51 

3 

remote, Ptt. 

223 

032 17 

37 

7 

Rogers, wash. 

197 

887 4* 

35 

6 





MHehefl. SIX. 

171 

877 5.1 

60 

7 

RNlivtfl 




— 

— 




NO 

YD5 

AVG LO TD 

Receivers 




ED. 

78 

985 126 

67 

5 

NO 

YDS 

AVG LG TD 

men. Raldn 

78 

945 111 

48 


Monk. wash. 

87 1193 117 

53 

2 

k, Hou, 

78 

798 IU 

80 


Credo, S.F. 

87 

966 11.1 

73 

6 

L Sea 

75 1222 T6J 

43 


HHL Dali. 

74 1113 15* 

53 

7 

rllt PUL 

71 

881 12* 

41 


Quick. PtilL 

68 1182 174 

99 

9 

Jets 

70 

796 1L4 

29 


dark. Wash. 

64 

BOB 124 

55 

4 

.AUa 

69 

973 141 

45 


Spaonola, Pfilf. 

64 

772 111 

35 

S 

. Mia 

66 

606 92 

73 


Lofton. GJL 

63 1058 14* 

56 

4 

wm,cm. 

63 10*3 17* 

71 


Jordan, Mina 

63 

728 114 

32 

0 

»r. ID. 

51 1111 IU 

75 


B Johnson. AH. 

41 

830 111 

6S 

5 

— — 




Costole. DalL 

61 

753 12* 

42 

5 


P oaten 

NO YARDS LONG AVG 
nA 72 3308 08 45.? 

UO. 54 2368 63 41» 

la IL£. W 3036 75 43.1 

7. On. 55 2361 64 42.9 

-■nta. iD. 66 2770 67 424 

Twl Returners 

NO YDS AVG LG TD 
I.E 36 480 1JJ IS 2 

Ift. M 424 IU 71 1 

Routers » 19 1M 32 0 

■no. 3B 41? It* 70 1 

10 30? 103 32 0 


KlekoN R a te rears 

NO YDS AVG LG TD 
lew. 35 Bee 25,7 63 0 

tiML 36 653 35.1 41 0 

>l Den. a 702 SS.1 3? 0 

ir Hou. 25 624 2S0 50 0 

m. 42 989 23* 42 0 


Dwmellv. All. 
Coleman, mm. 
Laudato. Giants 
Botcher, Rams 
Buford. ChL 


Pm tors 

NO YARDS LONG 
59 2S74 68 

61 2641 
77 3312 


avs 

436 
63 43* 
68 4U 


3433 


4» 

423 


Pwl Re t u r ne rs 
NO YDS AVG 


El lard. Roms 
J .Smith. 5LL. 
Mandlev, Del. 
jonktns. Wash. 
McCoakev. Giant* 


36 497 1U 
25 275 IU) 

37 402 lav 
a 272 IDS 
48 407 BS 


KldU)H Ri 
NO YDS 


AVG LG TD 


Brown, Roms 
Gaul!. OIL 
Monroe, 5.F. 
Jenkins. Wash. 
Rhymes. mIia 


25 854 342 
10 525 27* 
25 657 267 
41 1D18 2*i 
48 1183 24* 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
MMwest Dlvtjfcm 

Houston II B 412 - 

Denver 17 9 *64 1 

Utah 16 11 JH M 

San Antonia 15 13 *56 3M 

Dallas 12 11. *22 4V, 

Sacramento ? 17 *46 * 

Pacific Division 

LA. Lakers 21 3 *75 — 

Portland 15 13 *36 I 

Seattle II 16 AO ins 

Golden State 10 19 *45 13W 

LA. Cltopers B 17 *20 131* 

Phoenix t 17 *20 13*4 

TUESDAY'S RESULTS 
Utah Man >6-106 

WaSMeemn » 31 M 25— M 

Danilov F-18 0-14 30. KAIalone 12-20 1-2 25; 
McMIllen 7-14 44 IE JUMatone 7-21 3* 17. Re- 
booads: l/hdi 43 ( Eaton, Badlev lOl.Woeiilna- 
ton 44 (RaMnsao 10). Asstab: Utah 26 ( Stack- 
tan 12 ). WoeMnatan 21 (wnitams to). 

New Jenev 2? 32 11 24—103 

Atlanta 31 19 32 23—164 

Wilkins 11 -Zl V123. Rivero M2 2-4 16; Bird- 
song MS 0-2 W. Gminskl MM 14. Ratomds; 
New Jersey 53 (MJahnson 11). Atlanta 36 
(Wilkins 141. Aeslsts: New Jersey 32 (Bird- 
song 6), Atlanta 2B (Rivers 9). 

Haeeton 29 17 27 SB— ?• 

Cleveland 26 26 22 14—04 

Llovd 15-23 W 38, Otaluwnn 6-la S-7 17; Hin- 
son 17-18 04 34. Free B-23 54 23. RetMWOds: 
Houston 57 (Soxnpeon 14). Cleveland 36 (west 
10). Assists: Houston 20 (Somason 5). Cleve- 
land 26 l Bag ley 11). 

PtkUadeMda 33 26 22 22-102 

Indiana 22 23 3B 21— 96 

Ervins 12-23 4-5 28. Malone 7-19 10-14 24; 
Williams 8-14 2-2 18. Fleming 4-16 4-5 14. Re- 
MMMU: Philadelphia 60 (Barkley 30). Imfl- 
ana 52 (Tisdale, Sttoanavtcn 9). Assists: Phil- 
adelphia 26 (Cheeks 12), Indiana 2fl (Fleming 
8 ). 

LA. Lakers 28 TO 27 32-405 

New York M 22 29 >6- »f 

Abdul- JObbar 10-176-7 26. Lucas 7-145-5 19; 
Ewbig M7 10-M 28. Tucker M4 3-3 22. Re- 
bounds: la. Lakers 54 (Lucas 10), New York 
41 ( EwingO). Assists: LA. Lakers 36 (Johnson 
12). New York 22 l Sparrow 6). 

Boston 28 2A 26 26-1 SB 

Chicago 29 21 2B SV- 114 

WaorrtdfW 17-27 34 37, Gervln 6-14 74 19; 
Johnson 10-23 44 25. Me Hole Ml 64 24. Re- 
bounds: Boston 57 (Parish 151, Chicago SS 
lOtdham 13). Assists: Boston 31 (Johnson B), 
Chicago 27 (Woolrbtte. Maev 71. 

. Portland 2B 28 37 25— 111 

San Antonio 33 27 35 si— 126 

Gilmore 10-M 9-14 29,MUchell 6-13 14-M26; 
vandeweghe FIS 74 23, Bowie B-T4 64 22. Re- 
bounds: Portland 44 (Bowie 11), Son Antonia 
40 (SJohnson 10). Assists: Portland 31 (Pax- 
son, Cotter 7). San Antonia 34 (Moore 13). 
Golden SL 25 29 30 30-114 

Denver 29 30 32 31-422 

English 15-22 1-t 31 NaH 7-13 13-u 27; Cor- 
roll 7-16 13-18 27.5hort 11-24 44 36, Rebaends: 
Golden St. 51 (Baltardl3>.DenverS8(Nattl0 
). Assists: Gaktan St. 18 IFlovd »). Denver 31 
(Lever ID). 

Phoenix 33 IS 38 26—104 

Seattle 22 31 19 27- 99 

Nonce 12-23 24 31. Edwards 10-17 M3 99; 
Sitting 8-13 10-11 26, Chambers 6-M 84 20. Re- 
teamts: Phoenix 37 (Nance 9), Beattie 38 
(5ikma 10)- Assists: Phoenix 26 (Humphries 
91. Seattle 22 (Young 5). 

Detroit 25 42 27 27-121 

Sacramento ea 2& 25 41—121 

Thews M6 8-10 27, E Johnson 11-18 4* 26: 
Thomas 12-22 3-3 28, Trfpucfcs M5 5-523. Rt- 
boaids: Dcfrall 47 (Lalmbeer 10), Sacramen- 
to 40 (KIHne 11). Assists: Del ro(t 26 (Thomas 
14), SaeraitMWtn 27 (Drew 9). 


PMiodatotda 
Washington 
NY I wanders 
Pittsburgh 
NY Rangers 
New Jersey 

Quebec 
Boston 
Montreal 
Buffalo 
Hartford 


.WALBS CONFERENCE 
Division 
W ,L. T PM 
23 9 0 46 

18 7 

12 10 
13 IS 
M 16 
13 16 


4 
8 

4 
1 
I 

Adame Dtvtsian 
17 11 2 

14 Iff 6 

15 11 4 

14 13 2 

14 13 1 



CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 
Nanis Dhrtstoa 

St. Louis 14 12 4 32 112 116 

Minnesota 9 14 7 29 124 121 

Chicago 10 15 4 24 120 139 

Toronto 8 17 5 21 115 135 

Detroit 7 19 4 18 98 156 

Bmvthe Division 

Edmonton 23 3 4 50 173 125 

Calgary- 17 Iff 3 37 133 104 

Vancouver W 19 4 24 121 143 

Winnipeg 10 19 4 24 115 155 

Las Angeles 7 19 4’ iff 101 153 

TUESDAY'S RESULTS 
Philadelphia ■ I 

Hew Jersey 5 2 0—7 

Breton (10). Adams 2 (11). Bridgman (9). 
Gagne (41. Mod. -ear (8). Orel la (jj; Karr 
(291, Bklund (71, Slnteolo (16). Propp (22). 
Shots on gaol: Philadelphia (on Chovrterl 7- 
15-12—3*; New Jersey (on Freese) 14-W— 29. 
Calgary • 1 3—1 

Pittsburgh 2 2 0—4 

Schmidt (5), Bullard (14), Shedden (15), 
Bullard US).- Berezon (8). Macoun (2). Otto 
(6). Shots on gaol: Calgary (on Romano) 10- 
W-15—35; Pittsburgh (on D'Amour) 13-&-*— 
27. 

Buffalo 2 8 V- 3 

M.Y. I Siangan 3 3 1—7 

La Fontaine 2 (17). Boyd (1), Flat lev (10). 
jonsson l6),Troriler (12). Bossy <30); Lever 
(2), Fffltono (141, Orlando (6). Shots ea goal: 
Buffalo (on Smith) 17-14-11—0; N.Y. island- 
ers (on Cloutier. Barroseo) M-7— 2L 
Detroit 0 2 l—d. 

MltlWimhl I 2 2—6' 

accarohi (■). Cavils (1). Acton 2 (12). Gra- 
ham (9), Maruk (4); Klsto (4), Kllma (12), 
Yiarman (71. Shots ea goal: Detroll Ion Ca- 
sey) 12-16-10—38; Minnesota (an Stefan) 12-0- 



UMAnedaedlW 


m The referee, Ed Middleton, had a hand in breaking up a fight between Akeem Olajowon, 
M left, and Mark West of the Cleveland CavaEers’s. The Rockets won the game, 99-94. 


(hat play many times at Geotge- 
Lown Universilv. 

“Every night he does something 
you haven't seen before," Brown 
said. 

One ol Ewings problems, other 
than numerous injuries, is his lack 
of supporting cast. “That means 
the other team triple- learns Pat- 
rick.” said Brown, “which leads to 
anxieties. Does he moke the pass or 
does he take the shot? If he makes 
the pass, he's giving the ball to guys 
who are shooting 35 to 38 percent 
at three positions. So now you say. 
Tm gonna do it myself.' and you 
take a turnaround jump shot, 
which means you don’t get the re- 
bound because you're going away 
from the basket. 

“Also, he busts his tail to get 
downcouri after a rebound and he 
gets into the post in a one-on-one 
situation and a guy with a low per- 
centage lakes a jump shot. So it's 
frustrating all around, but he's a 
great kid and he can do so much 
stuff on the court" 

Ewing made one of Jabbar's 
famed skyhooks to help ensure a 
victory Saturday over the San An- 
tonio Spurs. “1 never saw Patrick 
lake that shot before," Brown said, 
adding that he had told Bob Hill, 
his assistant coach. “This shows 
we're posting him up too close.” 

Brown added: “After the game, 
the kid insisted he had taken it 
before, at Georgetown,” which is 
•not likely, since the coach, John 
Thompson, would have sent Ewing 
back to his dormitory for taking 15- 
foot skyhooks. 

This is pro ball now. and Ewing 
js just developing his own shots, his 
own humor, his own style. Any 
duels with the big fellow in the 
goggles will be a bonus. 

Unfortunately, there will not be 
many, although Jabbar is defying 
all the actuarial tables by remain- 
ing a dominant center, and plans to 
play again next season, when he 
will be 39. Since East is East and 
West is West in the NBA. and rare- 
ly will these [wains meet as long as 
Rudyaxd Kipling makes out the 
schedule, the Knicks and the Lak- 
ers play only once more this season, 
on Feb. 2. And it is not likely the 
Knicks will be meeting the Lakers 
soon for the championship. 


Winnipeg 3 13-6 

SL LOOK 3 2 4—4 

FlockMrt 18). Multan 2 (17). Foderko (8), 
Huntar (17). Roms (3). Paveao (I). GUmour 
(11); Neufold 2 (8). H oiwretiufc (19), Smell 
(7). Morota (3), Mullen (7). Shota on goal: 

Winnipeg [on Ml lien) 144-23 — 45; SL Louis 

(Havwardl 14-7-14-35. 

Washtagfea 1 2 1 0-4 

Vancouver 2 2 8 0-4 

Mureftv 2 191. CnrtsUon (U), Gustotosan 
(7); Crawford (3). Lemay (IB), Sundatrom 2 
(9). Shot* at> goad: worn Inn ton (an Young) 7- 
Vancouver (on Proton) to- 12-1 S- 


European Soccer 


EnOdSh RrU Division 
Queen'S Porte RAnoaro 0. Aston Villa 1 


Faust to Coach 
At U. of Akron 

77if Associated Press 

AKRON, Ohio — Gerry Faust, 
who resigned as the foot ball coach 
at Notre Dame, was to be hired 
Wednesday as the coach at the 
University of Akron, an athletics 
spokesman confirmed. 

“It’s definite, it’s not conjec- 
ture," said Ken MacDonald, the 
sports information director. 

MacDonald also confirmed that 
Akron's coach this season, Jim 
Dennison, will become associate 
athletic director. Dennison, whose 
team was 8-3 this year, could not be 
reached for comment 

The university president Wil- 
liam Muse, told ABC radio sports 
Tuesday night that “we feel he 
[Faust] is a winner and would have 
the potential to develop a very 
strong 1-A football program for 
us.” 

Muse was president at Texas 
A&M when Jackie Sherrill was 

signed to a lucrative contract as 
football coach. Akron, which is a 
member of the Ohio Valley Confer- 
ence, has said it wants to upgrade 
its football program by joining the 
Mid-American Conference. 


McEnroe’s Bad Calls in the Paper 
Often Are Worse Than Those on Court 


By Julie Cart 

Las Angeles Times Service 

LOS ANGELES— John McEn- 
roe' admission recently that his 
girlfriend, Tatum O’Neal, is preg- 
nant accomplished what McEn- 
roe's announcements usually do. It 
sparked controversy. 

That was because McEnroe bad 
spent several weeks denying ru- 
mors that the Oscar-winning ac- 
tress was carrying his child. 

The incident was merely another 
flare-up in his on -again off-again 
feud with the press, one he wages 
with slightly less intensity than his 
ever-hot war with umpires, lines- 
men and tennis officials in general 

Last summer at Wimbledon, 
where personal questions are the 
order of any day, McEnroe tried to 
turn down the beat by making the 
trip to England without O'Neal. 
The usual media battles occurred, 
anyway, with McEnroe getting into 
angry exchanges with reporters. 

O'Neal did travel with McEnroe 
to tin: recent Australian Open, a 
fad not missed by reporters there. 


Naturally, her presence drew ques- 
tions. which McEnroe resented. A 
skirmish between him and the me- 
dia ended in an ugly shoving and 


call him the next day (o check the 
accuracy of the quotes. 

"The- media are asking me 
whether Ihe quotes are accurate — 
spitting incident, and McEnroe has that's kind of funny, if you ihink 

’- about iu" he said. “I'm not anack- 


smee said: “! made an ass of my 
self.” 

McEnroe lost in the quarterfi- 
nals and, because of various code 
violations, was fined S3.750 and 
has began a 42-day suspension. 

“I'm not happy with it,” he said. 
“It makes me think, as a person, I 
need to work on things.” 

When he returned to Los Ange- 
les. be disclosed O’Neal's condition 
in an interview with Pam King of 
the Los Angeles Herald Examiner. 
The story was picked up around the 
world and later, at a press confer- 
ence before an exhibition here. 
McEnroe was asked about iL 

“Very fair,” he said. “It at least 
showed you my side of what is 
going on. Everything’s fairly dear 
and up front in this article." 

He said it surprised hint howev- 
er, that newspapers would print a 
story, then other reporters would 


SeertH! Touchdowns 


setrta*: TmkMovm 


1. 

TD RBI* ROC Ret PH 
15 1 12 2 90 

Mgrrls. Gkmto 

TD Rush Roc Rsf Pit 
II II t 1 100 

SOUTH 

tiers 

14 11 3 

D 84 

Cra to. sp. 

14 0 6 

0 84 

Ata-BlrmtoBhcm 89. Cincinnati 53 

to. 

12 7 1 

0 72 

Dickerson, Rams 

12 12 8 

8 72 

Florida 81. Miami. Flo. 66 

t, Mhs 

12 10 3 

0 72 

Payton, OlL 

II 9 2 

0 66 

Georgia Tech M. Old Dominion 86 

ea 

12 0 12 

0 72 

Dor son. DalL 

10 7 1 

0 60 

Memphis 51 7X AU8SUSMM 56 

Scerimt: Kick lag 

PAT FQ 

PHI. 1U9 B4I 

Cu PH 
St 135 

Scoriae: Kkxtoe 

PAT FG 

Butler, 06. <7-47 28-33 

Lfl MS 
46 131 

North Carolina 69, JoefctwwMe 45 
South Carolina 71, Loyola, lit 66 
SW Louisiana 64, Auburn 64, OT 
Tennessee St- 63, Marenead St. SI 

a 

46-48 22-97 

j? in 

Andersen. NX)- 

26-28 30-34 

55 116 

Wane Forest 64. Georgia Southern 

a 

46-40 21-30 

S3 W 

Murray, Dot 

29-31 25-29 

51 1D4 

MIDWEST 

t 

99-41 23-31 

55 108 

LonsiartL Rams 

38-39 30-26 

52 98 

Marquette 74 Mimweata 63 

I.E. 

3W7 22-27 

50 102 

lowefiuiite. T.B. 

28-30 91-29 

53 91 

N. Illinois 74 Northwestern 70 


By Bill Shirley 

La i Angeles Times Service 

-If you 

dimb a mountain, Switzerland is the place to 
learn. The Swiss climb mountains the way they 
run trains and make watches. Nobody, with the 
possible exception of sheepherders in Nepal, do 
it better. 

Arnold GLatthaid began climbing mountains 
around this neighborhood when he was 12 years 
old, 64 years ago. He has been a mountain guide 
f or 54 ofhis 76 years. 

He climbed mountains for fun because there 
was nothing else for kids to do in this village six 
miles (9.6 kilometers) across the mountains 
from Grindeiwald in the Bernese Oberiand. It 
was not bard to find a good one to dimb; 47 
peaks of various heights surround the village. 

Although he was Switzerland's slalom cham- 
pion and competed in right world ski champion- 


ing the media.” 

Martina Navratilova, who was 
sealed next to McEnroe at the press 
conference, joined in: “He was re- 
sponding to articles in Australia 
that were not true. I've had it hap- 
pen to me. Where do you stop it?” 

A reporter shouted,' “You stop it 
by telling the truth.” 

McEnroe shot back: “I’ve been 
telling the truth all my life. I've got 
news for you: it hasn't gotten me 
anywhere as far as accuracy and 
fairness. 

“If people are ahat accurate 
about what I said in Australia, why 
didn’t they listen to me months 
before when 1 said it in Europe. I 
bad to go through the same thing 
there. Everywhere I go. I deal with 
the same problem. 

“It upsets me simply that I get 
cynical people who mil come up to 
me and 1 think they are not going to . 

see the problem fairly.” 

Referring to the Herald story, 
McEnroe said, “That’s one of the 
first articles I’ve read in a long 
time. 1 was worried because 1 figure 

ships, Glatthard was better known as a moun- Many Americans, about 100 a year normally, ^ ^ a V en J seen “yone in the last 
taingtude A lot of climbers owe him thetf lives. Glatthard said, learn to dimb here. About S325 cot V ie years who has really giv- ■ 

buys a week of training on a mountain, a room “J? fj ? stiatc - .... 

in a 4-star hotel meals, guide Fees and equip- ’* was taking, there's 

menL Glatthard said UJS. students usually stay no doubt , abo *J If- You laic , 
three weeks and take a beginners’ course, a 5,011 w . an w 001 °* 
touring course and a week of real climbing on 1 can tell by the tone of the • 
helped train 13.200 climbers, many of whom the neighborhood peaks. Students learn to cross mlen!Sle ^ 

became guides, the mm mainly responsible for 3 crevice, use an ice ax and actually practice a “ !^ i r^£2? f 1 f > iP* IS0 “ an d • 
the success of Switzerland’s mountain climbing rescue on a glacier. Diplomas are given in rock, “ , a ‘ therefore I ; 

business. Before beclimbed Mount Everest Si ice and granite climWng and for the use of a ^!^- S ^ bw . SOmclhin 8 I 


Switzerland Is the Place to Learn How to dimb 


Not only did be take hundreds of them safely up 
and down such peaks as the Matterhorn and 
Eiger, in 1940 he opened the fust mountaineer- 
ing school in Switzerland. Today, there are 41 
By the time he retired in 1983, Glatthard had 


Edmund Hfihtxy, Tensing Norgay went to rope. 


Glatthard’5 school and was a guide in this area. 

While most tourists come to Switzerland to 
look at the scenery, thousands more come to 
climb a mountain, and most hire a guide to lead 
them up some of the highest and most famous 
peaks in the Alps. Many of the guides learned 
their trade in schools such as the one Glatthard 
started with 200 students in 1940. 


Among the 250 students this season was a boy 
of 7. That is a little too young, Glatthard said; 
14 is a better age to start learning to climb. 
About 50 percent of the students are women. 

“Women are very good climbers,” Glatthard 
said. “In some ways they are better than men. I 
have more confidence with a woman on a rope 
than a man.” 


would have preferred not to tell 
her. 

“1 asked her not to print that * 

part of il But I said, ‘If you do, it’s 

certainly not going f 0 surprise 

me. 

Whatever is said about McEn- 
roe, whether you like his 5^ of 

play or his personal style, tinman 

is usually honesL ^ * 



Page 24 


UNTtKJNATiqrvAL HfcKALD TKIBl'NE, THURSDAY!. DECEMBER 19, 19R5 


ART BUCHWALD 



BHUon-DoUar Jurors 



W ASHINGTON —One of tip 
more interesting legal judg- 
ments this year has the business 
world agog. Pennzoil, a maker of 
motor oil, sued Texaco tor improp- 
erly trying to acquire Getty Oil Co. 

How aaughty was Texaco? Ac- 
cording to a verdict handed down 
by a Houston jury. Texaco behaved 
badly enough to have to cough up 
Sll billion. 

The question that many people 
are asking is 
how the jury ar- 
rived at the $11- 
billion figure. 

Why not S9 bil- 
lion or $15 bil- 
lion? 

1 have a 
hunch that this 
is what hap- 
pened. 

First, it was , 

by no means a Buclrwaiu 

simple lawsuit. It involved charges 
or intrigue, double crossing, and 
many horrendous white-collar 
crimes that cannot be mentioned in 
:i family newspaper. Suffice to say 
that Pennzoil had an agreement to 
purchase Getty Oil and Texaco 
moved in to sabotage the deal. 

Thus Pennzoil brought Texaco 
to court, where a jury oF 12 humble 
citizens was asked to rule on a case 
that 95 percent of all (be judges in 
Texas would have trouble under- 
standing. 

□ 

The jurors listened with rapt at- 
tention to the witnesses and read 
page upon page of evidence. They 
also had to bone up on antitrust 
law. petroleum law. punitive dam- 
ages, merger and acquisition rul- 
ings and Robert's Rules of Order. 

Finally, after hearing the compli- 
cated presentations of both sides, 
the jury retired to discuss the ver- 
dict. 

The first juror rendered bis opin- 
ion. 'Tve heard the evidence and I 
would just like to say one thing. 
Five years qgo I drove into a Tex- 


aco station and the attendant 
would not wipe my windshield. So 1 
say we give the Pennzoil Co. SI 
billion.” 


U. S. Designer Wins Prize 

Frmtct-PrexM 

PARIS — An American design- 
er, Gregg Snyder, 25, beat 70 con- 
testants from seven countries Tues- 
day to win a 15.000-franc ($2,000) 
prize for young fashion designers in 
a competition organized by French 
and Japanese companies. 


A second juror said, “I ixied to 
get air from a Texaco station for 
my bike when l was a kid and the 
man with the star told me to buzz 
off. Let's fine Texaco $2 billion 

**Tbe owner of a Texaco station 
in Louisiana wouldn't lei me use 
the men's room because I didn’t 
buy any gas. If that isn't worth a 
billion dollars I don't know what 
is.” 

Each juror had a different reason 
for ra»«ng the penalty. One hap- 
pened to be a happy Pennzoil con- 
sumer. He said his family bad been 
using their oil for years and found 
the quality outstanding. “It's so 
good you can drink it," be said. 

Another juror socked it to the 
defendant because the Texaco sta- 
tion near him dosed at 9 P. M. _ 

And the juror next to him insist- 
ed on raising the ante another bil- 
lion because he said it might be the 
only chance in his life to give any- 
one a billion dollars. 

□ 

The damages added up to S12 
billion. But the twelfth juror had 
not been heard from. 

He stood up and said, “Aren't 
you ashamed of yourselves? You 
are all punishing Texaco for slights, 
real or imagined, committed 
a gains t you. Our job is to judge the 
merits of the case. We have to ask 
ourselves, was Texaco guilty of 
dirty Iritis, or are the Pennzoil 
people just a bunch of sore losers? 
Forget your personal vendettas and 
let justice be done. Let’s have some 
charity in our hearts and not force a 
poor multinational to go begging at 
this time of year.” 

There were tears in many jurors' 
eyes after hearing the plea. 

The foreman got up. “You are 
>l We were trying to get revenge 
we should judge this case on 
the evidence Let’s start over again 
and decide what penalty to assess 
without rancor.” 

The foreman passed a pad 
around the room. Each person 
wrote a number on it The paper 
came back to the foreman who 
said. ‘This is more like it. The final 
figure is S 10 billion.” 

The twelfth juror jumped up and 
said, “Hey, guys, why not make it 
SI l billion, so we can get into the 
Guinness Book of World Records.” 


Y. S. Pritchett, 85: A Man of Letters 

By Joseph Lelyveld 

New York Time* Service 


L ONDON — T shall never be as old as I 
t was between 20 and 30." V. S. Pritchett 
wrote when, haring reached the reasonably 
ripe age of 70, he was starting to accustom 
hwisetf to die notion that old age might be 
upon him. 

That was a long time ago. Sr Victor, who 
was knighted at 75, turned 85 Monday. So the 
man who is regarded by many as Britain's 
finest writer of short stories, by others as her 
finest literary critic — and who may well be 
both — was asked recently whether he still 
felt younger than he did when .he was chrono- 
logically young. 

“Yes, I wonder,” be replied, and paused. 
Then: “I believe that's true. Yes, certainly. I 
would (hink that most people would fed that. 
I suppose I felt very old in adolescence, but I 
don't fed old nowadays. Tm in fact rather 
embarrassed by the people who say: 'How 
remarkable. You're 85 years of age.’" 

In a room hung with paintings by his 
contemporaries, mostly landscapes, and 
dominated by a case full of exotic stuffed 
birds, the writer described himself as bong 
“rather vain” about his age- But it turned out 
he was not talking about his longevity. Nor 
was be talking about his durability as a writ- 
er, which is doubly impressive — in that he is 
still read, stiB a literary presence, and in that 
be goes on. day after day, living the writer's 
life as he always has. 

What made him “vain” — the word was 


■ ' : 


"I suppose I felt very 


old in adolescence, but I 

. ... 

don’t feel old nowadays. 


Tm in fact rather . 


embarrassed by the ' 


people who say: f How 

- .* - '\ > .3£d£"/j?'iV - 

remarkable. You’re 8(> 


years of age/ ” 


* Taro ItMtemmaTCnmera feat 



instantly qualified by a hint of laughter — - 
was the fact that at the 


the writer, and his valet, “who does the liv- 
ing.” to his role as valet, he does the house- 
hold shopping after Ms nap, in nearby Cam- 
den Town. There he encounters members of 
what the novelist Margaret Drabble describes 
as “the extraordinary cast of ordinary peo- 
ple” who inhabit his stories. The valet is 
rewarded with a cop of tea, then the writer 
returns, ascending again to the top flow, 
where be works until about 7. 


end of each year, his 
age catches up with the century's. Thus he 
does not have to think twice to know how old 
he was when he and his wife, Dorothy — to 
whom he dedicates book after book — finally 
found a permanent abode, after many moves, 
in their late Regency town house near Re- 
gent's Park. It was 1957, so he was 57. 

The routine he established then is the rou- 
tine he still follows: 

By 9 A. M, not excluding weekends, he has 
climbed the three flights to his study on the 
top floor, and by 9:20 — he seldom allows 
himself more than that for the writer’s inev- 
itable evasions and rituals — he is writing, in 
longhand. Or rewriting, for be rarely las a 
short story get away from him until it has 
gone through four or five drafts; in the case of 
critical pieces, maybe only three. 

T was-fanatical about writing,” he wrote in 
“Midnight Oil” his self-portrait of the artist 
as a young man; “the word and the sentence 
were my religion.” They still are, only more 
so. “1 suppose 1 rather work harder nowadays 
than I did,” he said in a speculative tone, 
“because as l get older I write more slowly, or 
get more dissatisfied.” Between his two hy- 
potheses, age and perfectionism, it was plain 
that only toe latter had weight. 

At about a quarter to one. be breaks for 
lunch and then allows hims elf a brief nap. He 
onoe distinguished between his two personae: 


His 35 th book has just appeared in Britain, 


er insisted on calling “A Man of Letters,” He 
is inclined to disown toe title because he 
thinks television and the joyless obscuran- 
tism that passes for literary criticism in uni- 
versities have combined to render the term 
and occupation of a man of letters “totally 
out of date:" Still that is what he is. 

His 36th book, a study of Chekhov, is in its 
final drafts. His preoccupation with the Rus- 
sian master of the short story has kept him 
from writing short stories of his own for 
nearly two years. But his head, he said, is full 
of voices waiting to be attached to characters, 
characters looking for incidents, and unex- 
ploited incidents maybe from last month or 
maybe from his childhood — of stories wait- 
ing to Ik written. 

Staying abreast of bis century as he has. he 
has watched Britain's retreat from power — 
like most Britons, he believes — with no real 
regrets. It was bard for those who were 
trained to rule an empire, but he went as a 
young man to France and Spain instead of 
Oxford or Cambridge — honorary doctorates 
are his only degrees — so Ik was never one of 
those who felt the loss: 

“There are people who had an enormous 
amount of intelligence and also had the great 
experience of how to manage power.” he said. 


“They knew Lbe -difference between confron- 
tation and intrigue. They knew how to ma- 
nipulate. They were wry skillfuL But for 
(hose who were outside it, it was pretty mean- 
ingless. 

“Of course, we fed ourselves a very small 
country, and people do make fun of us. Gore 
Vidal when be comes ovet here, always says. 
Tell me what life is like in Oslo now.’” 
Pritchett laughed, then added appreciatively. 
“It's a very lightly insulting remark.” 

Britons two or three generations younger 
than be is still debate whether they are Euro- 
peans or what sort of Europeans they should 
be. Jt's.an issue be resolved Tor himself more 
than six decades ago, when he first crossed 
the English Channel “I’m tremendously Eu- 
ropean in my connections,” he said. ^Any- 
thing foreign interests me more than England 
does. Tm a natural European.” 

He walked across Spain before writing his 
first book, "Marching Spain,” a work he now 
mentions with an affectionate wince. “I knew 


Spain from toe bottom op," he said “I could 
l" Whc 


speak village Spanish." When the civil war 
came, be knew the land too well to see it as a 
conflict of pure evil against pure good. 

He was nominally a non of the left, writing 
much of his criticism for The New Statesman 
in its heyday, but was never tempted to write 
apolitical article. Basically he did not like the 
way many leftists thought- “I just bale mili- 
tants,” he said. 

He is entirely comfortable in Spanish and 
French but, though be knows no Russian, it is 
to 19th-century Russian literature that he has 
kept returning in recent years. It is a route 
that can sometimes lead him home, as when, 
a few years ago. be found himself, reading a 
now obscure novel by.Sir Waller Scon. “St 
Ronan's WeR” after discovering that Turge- 
nev had read it and liked it. 


PEOPLE 


Yevtushenko Speaks Out 


The Soviet poet Yevgeny Yevtu- 
shenko. addressing a congress of 
Russian writers in Moscow, as- 
sailed censorship, sdf-nauery. dis- 
tortion of history and privilege in 
the literary establishment in Russia 
— and was received with prolonged 
applause. Yevtushenko, 52, an hon- 
ored member of the Soviet literary 
establishment, demanded that the 
Soviet leader, Mikhail S. Gorba- 
chev, apply his much-heralded 
openness and candor to Soviet lit- 
erature. “Today’s long-awaited 
striving for change tor the better in 


Called a sotomon, it holds, the 
equivalent of four more battles 
than the next largest champagne . 
container, the ncbudiadacaar. 


our country gives us profound 
>■ will 


hopes that self-flattery will be for- 
ever rejected, and that non conceal- 
ment will become the norm of civic 
behavior. We. men of letters, will 
not be worth a penny if we simply 
report and laud the social transfor- 
mations taking place independent- 
ly of us,” he said. 

□ 

Jack Lang, the French culture 
minister, attended a celebration in 
Strasbourg as scaffolding around 
the city's 765-year-old Notre Dame 
cathedral was dismantled for the 
first time after 40 years of restora- 
tion. The 514.2-nullion project re- 
paired structural damage and 
equipped the cathedral with subtle 
lighting to Highlig ht the red and 
blue stone decorations, stained 
glass windows and gilded organ- 
case. The restoration is not com- 
pleted. however: Scaffolding will 
go up again in March to correct old 
repairs to the facade that were 
made with improperly matched 
stone. 

□ 

The worker-identification law in 
Palm Beach, Florida, lampooned 
this year by Gany B. Trudeau's 
“Doonesbury” comic strip, is un- 
constitutional, U. S. District Judge 
Norman Roetfger has ruled. The 
law, requiring blue-collar workers 
to be fingerprinted- photographed 
and pay a 54 fee to carry identifica- 
tion cards while in the island town, 
was challenged two and a half years 
ago by Ignatius Wallace and Ro- 
chelle Yana of West Palm Beach. 

□ 

A crystal champagne bottle 
holding 1 8 liters ( 1 9 quarts) is being 
made in France to give to President 
Ronald Reagan for the July cente- 
nary of the Statue of Liberty. The 
bottle, weighing 20 kilograms (44 
ounds), is bong made by toe 
'ompagnie Fran^aise du Crista!. 


An exhibit of hnpressumist and 
Post-Impressionist paintings from 
the Soviet Union that will go to 
Washington and Los Angeles wffl 
also travel to the Metropolitan Mu- 
seum of Art in New York, Ansaad - 
Hammer says. Last week the ratios- 
trialist announced in Moscow toft 
the 40 works from LeningradY 
Hermitage and Moscow's Po&tiq; 
Museum of Fine Arts would. 
pari of the first major an ncliSqgey:. 
under the new U -Soviet tSifetifij/;! 
agreement 

□ •• 

A Swiss-American and two ltd- 
ians have been named wintKreijf - 
ihe King Faisal International Mfe ; 
for medicine, for research into ;• 
beu». it was announced Wedn» 
day. Dr. Albert E. Resold of Geu£_ 
va, a naturalized U. S. citizen who 
researched diabetes at Harvard 
University, will share the prize with 
Dr. LefioOrci and Dr. Gun Franco 
Bottazo. the King Faisal Founda- 
tion announced in Riyadh. Other 
winners of King Faisal prizes in- 
cluded Abdul Aziz al-Dquri of Iraq 
for Islamic studies; Atoned Hussein v- -j 
D idst, chairman of the Internation- 
al Center tor Spreading tire Islamic 
Faith in South Africa; and Raja 
Jarontfi, a French philosopher who 
is a convert to Islam. Mo h ammed 
Bahajal al-Athari of Iraq won for 
Arabic literature and Dr. MJdndt 
Bemdge of England was named the 
science award winner for work on 
cell biology. 


□ 


Pierre Ccrtfin signed a protocol 


S 


with the Soviet V-'uon on Wednes- 
day, under wkicn twice-yeariy col- 
lections of his designer clothing 
will be made in Russia. Cardinsaid 
in Moscow that it was his “dream 
to dress up all toe 280 milium peo- 
ple” of toe country but that he 
realized sales to about five milium 
Russians over toe next few yean 
would be more realistic. The 
French designer will have a : 
the Olympic Village area of 
cow, but said he did not know when 
it would open. Neither be nor has 
-Gritsenko, deputy minis ter for :i till 
industry.- who signed the protocol 
would estimate how much a Cardin 
dress would cost at tire shop. 


'1 


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Studa 2 or 3«oam aportmem. 

One moMh or non. 

IE OAR»OE 43L59A7.97. 


SHORT TERM STAY, fan 1 week. 

WI* equipped studos and 2 rooms, 

up to 4 penons. Chmps Byiees, Latin 

CMarler ardMontpornaae. Mad ser- 

43228250 


SHORT TEW STAY. Advantages of a 

hotel enfant imnmnancev feel at 

home in nior avAa%. arm bedroom 

end more m Parts. SOKEL1M: 80 rue 

de TUnrienithi fans 76v 4544 3940 


SltlDfa rod ROOMS. Wee*, month, 

year rale*. Luxembourg & Mompar- 

notse. No oaency fees. 4325 35WT 


7TH RAC BY OWNS. 2 ackcenl 

ns. New- 


apaments, 2 roams & 3 roae«J 

hr redcne.Td=4S55l0 70. 


METRO EXELMANS. New, femg. 3 

1 Fiisn. 


, parking. I 


PASSY. HWH CLASS STUMO, 30 
sq.ni. Mly ternshed. prraate garden. 
HOW ne>- Tel 47 4280 22. 


4TH MARAS. I bedroom opmtiner*. 

FefeSepl. Monthly rental owdeble. 
Owner 42 78 27 » 


EMPLOYMENT 


FOR TNE FEATURE 

g^BNATiaMU 

POSITIONS 

TURN TO PAGE 4 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


CANADIAN, fate 30 s, broad boM of 

4* 


, Iroicki sysnons & comput- 

er experience (17 ymns) in many nv 
, raproUi, rtWHotin, nF 


(juthiiL 

wlta^orwrttd^ WTl w p ene nce , well 


iravdad, worked & kved ab roa d , is 
locking fer an interesting 
WUkug to relocate ant 
avcAnle in early 1986, far 
cv. write: 505-1450 fa ewyfarlhin 
Dr, Vancouver. !LC Ccnadn V6J “ 
or pfsMe: 604^36d443 or leaw i 
sage 604762-442 9. 


LADY 38. OC NATIONAi, niMte- 

ffxd. vbmmtY bock^cfcod, PS enipe- 


txx»J oriente d, tap leoetand ddh 
seeks position at research eeddate/ 
proof readier to edtor itpgrW 


_ to top man u gy or *j**h- 
tort omiqua/ort dealer nr penerui 
PJL Write Bax 3002. Herald Tribune. 
92521 NeuiBy Gedew, France. 


EXPBBGNCB) PROTBSKMAl 41 

years old. «roS fraoelsd A educated 
lormer U5 gmmrrenert justice ogert 
with legrt oodyosmd looking for 
position in hi busman securny in 
Cenbcf Europe. Have worked mecu- 
live security & very eortsdertici inves- 
tigation. hease reply DX.C. Bax 
114580, T.O. BycLTfexecnd OcJa. 
GA 91360 USA or tel 805-493-1628. 


ATTOMCY-CAIIFORNM UCENSB) 

with bwet management m^swv 

enen, eager ter d id w ngng posrtion 
wdh either pubSc or pmrate orBomo- 
tion. Mother tongue Engfah. Also 
speak Spcetoh and bedon WSng to 
iravdar idoctfo. Write Box 101, Hi 
Herald Tribune; Torre 5, S. FrSce, 
20090 Seowie. Holy. 


MTBMAnONAL 


MARKETING, 
young, dMMife Mq AffiAEagfah. 
Gennar, Frendv Ewqpcan SUSex- 
perience wWi mn l tinptiomd. seeks new 

position m n>cr taring management. 

Write Bax 3015, Herdd Triune; 
92521 NeuXy Codex, Fnmos 


EMPLOYMENT 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


iti .OMC, 39, MS 

‘ brnness 


■ SBto.-eitT 
Ger- 


ousmess e x nenencn. mJtNi tier- 
mat. Spcndi, Dutch, Freq*. fartu- 
guen^ Tree To trinret note omlend- 
mg paalfen. Grf fans 48 74 50 84. 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


US CONSUUMO 
atGnrat COMPANY 
ipecxdml in rxideor and offshore 
engmeming looatod at Paris La Defense 
bas soverrd opeaingi 
1. Two importers pnechaeioat eJectn- 
ort.T miq 

l Two quafry oewrance speddhts 

foudtori, QA praqrom reviewers) 

3. Two f l ow ers JnecHCMionl or afe cfi i- 


4. Oie mspec rio n caordnceor 

5. One proiecMnonager 

6. One puchoser fexxe parte and 


_ . of Encash 

Please send yrtH c.v. and srfray r*. 
quine merti to Box 3003, Herdd Tri- 
bune. 92521 NeuBy Codex, France 


INTERNATIONAL EMPIOYMENT- 
Professronats, m umq p*l & sklfed 

werkmore ' 

wide 


rarhen ok rtways needed cf warid- 

lida project MWl the aid of our 
European office, <n am contact 
126JOT F 


126JX10 firms & American MuMna. 
lionds. Wirite for mfo A fae te Ht m> 
bend Career Consuttaris, 2730 San 

Pedro NE, Suite H, Albuquerque, NM 

87110 USA. 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


EXCEPTIONAL LATIN LADY, 


Lonrion/ft yaAK A.in excfic nge fo r 


FBTtOIBMb BfGWBB - ORflBD. 

Production atd driBng M^pneeu 
wanted fer woric in E uro peim area, 
mnrnrm sqxriencr 5 yoin in fieH 


EMPLOYMENT 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


EMPLOYMENT 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 




Timbim man, 40, good o omm un d of 
Enofeh, French & Arobk. 


Vtid walk 


pyrnit,' seeks ponricn in Fori*. Expert- 
wwotawi 


MW di DNtenorionti enrironmert. 
Sound Vncmfadge af back-office & 
banking operations 8 procedu-efc re- 
demption af ceded bonds, recwpt/defc 
wry of Ewrt-Seawirie* A uatn/cnom of 
papnertL barafen& cashiering, estafe 
fafeng of control & interned OlAeig 
procedures, trefreng of itoff. handing 
of m s ttefanat A •ndmckxd onturoc. 
Handing of di legal A m hwni quAw e 
q ee sn one. free new*. Write toe Ben Mae- 
tadud. 3 rtie Baron, Paris 176^ Franco. 


SCOTTISH LANGUAGE OADIIATE, 

25, bSngurt, 18 mowfe personal sec- 
letoriaferomfence in ftsie, now saeks 
nan-senctorioi job ill oeatrie/medo, 

PA Tel: 4447531923 until 13/01 or 

fare 47 37 61 82 t he reafter 


TRENCH LADY. PoMcd Sdenee grad- 
uate. 23, Engfah, fluent bcAat, kriowi- 
edge of feioktaepng A computer & 
stedt exrfmge mecfianrrim, 
bewkingpon. France 76 09 22 02 


GERMAN LADY, 26, etneltert pe- 

seafctoan seda pmtmne 

ro.PA/lfawl 


as . rA-r trowel amranon. Klocne 

write to Bax 2230, LHX, Friedrich*. 

15. D-6000 FwrtrfurVMtoin 


AMBHCAN 24, 4-YEAR MJSMES5 

degree, speaks French, Ptxfebased 
seen poaition, conetder any location. 

WHto Box 2993 Keren Tribune, 

92521 NBuafr Cede*. Fmnat 


AMBBCAN MAN 31, roamt Marten 

Degree in Irternariaml fafiey Steder 
tews M Iwn# researdh position in 
Wat Germany, Belgium or Franco. 
Tet faewe: 35 66 0379.' 


HBKHMAN 30, BUNGUAL with 

tome Arrtxc k nm ri edfl e, drivtog fc 
cense, seeks private secretary poei- 
■ ' 'raWvbiedix* 

42 74 40 75. 


TOP SALESMAN. 39, Swiss education, 
«en> presentcble, mil badc^ound, 
raufenguci. dynamic. Any country, 
ivel Sdonr, cuanssKn A ex- 
Jhffl, Box 1796 N-S01 1 Bergen 


BBA 2&, TI H JNOUAt, seefapoiihori, 
-froe. ta. *q*teL'I WTYB mr -2W/fadro 
Tcxeirg 8/Modrid 2800(l/5poirs 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


MAIHriff MfEKS far AMB9CAN 
I™™** 6 FIRMS xi PARtSi 


Engfah, 

tecnetariev 


Dutch or German 
ache al Frondi ra- 
quired, Engfah shorthand- Bffingud 
teieMOL Write or phone; .138 Avenue 
Victor Hugo, 75116 Rxfe Frano*. Teh 
(1) 47 TT6 ! 69. 


. Dent min 
MTBNATK3NAL 
SEOBAMAL POSITIONS 

TUESDAYS 

in Vie HT OtteriM Snfin. 


MTL PUBIC RBA1KMS agency m 
Paris seefe experienced bHmnl sec- 
retory En^tfvFrandt. Send CV. with 
photo aid salary requsremorti to: 
&CSA 22 Am. iWle de Serixe. 
75016 Paris, Ante PHip Souhcxn. 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS WANTED 


LANGUAGE A FRBVCH Gvtfeation 

prafencx', very good references, of- 

fers Ihe best at hrmsctf to eduaxed A 


rich family. Whot do you offer hxnf 

Jflrtl B*\, “ 


.. . 115 Bd. St. German, 

75D06-faris. Tdfc 43 26 79 79. 


DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


AU PAK WANTED far 4 month old 

POCVO. 


ravernier. H. 33070. 


RBH’CMSBU COUPLE with woriang 

ond references to tota can 

Wbrii mdudes coolai^. dean- 

» ©“"“d. Switnrtend. 
30)- 45566. 


penertr 

family.' 

ing. dri 
Tdr|4T ! 



ATTENTION EXECUTIVES, 


MM A roar boefa— imunpe 

as ffi# hatentaSoniJ Heretd Iri- 

htrrtm, where more trims a third 


of a mOBan re a d me vradd- 
mtdm, mat* of wham me in 
tmmau and rndenirr, wOt 
nod A M tafax «* (Pari* 

6J3S93) baform lO ajri, «n- 

ttritf mat w* ear trier fart 

bach, and nmr in wpt "48 

amor wmn 48 boors. The 
rate k US f 9.80 or had 

aqomdont par Ate. You ami 

uxtoda co m plete and vmi 5- 
i±h UKag aktan. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


OFFSHORE 8 UC 
LID COMPANIES 


Inavpomqn and monoae u tert itt UK, 
Turk Anflwfc, Orotnd 


pfc of Aten, Tti .. 
paxb. fauna, Ubona,Gm8df and 
|mod Other offshore track 

• Carfxkmlid advice 

• (imnerfafe awxicbSty 

• Noame lervieei 

• Beorer dsaiw 

• Boat regisfrobonf 

• Accaunlmg & adntnrtrobQn 

• Mat, telephone & telex 
free ex pi ain tu ry bqa k kt Brow; 

SELECT CORPORATE 
SfflVKS LID 

Heed Office 

{Mf ffeBMRt Doughri, fate of Mott 
Tet DoMfee 23718 

Teh* 628554 S6UECT G 


London RepreserMive 
ltd St, London W1 


i 2-5 OW Bond «•« mw - • 

ITel 01-493 4244, Dm 28247 SCSLDN G 


USA EXPORT Ca WANTS 
HNANCIAL INVESTOR 
TO EXPAND 

mg over ISO products worldwide 
— r ™SsJ2L! na, D f 001 Soles vateme 
|o«r HjOflOQ. MinutHim nwestmert 
!I50m Prefer in vector who aw hefp 
overseas vrth tales. Good potential. 
American Leveo Cn 
9933 N. lavrier Avenue 
SIwUtL Hnefa USA 60097 
IK Tefax 210011 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


WS ARE A MAJOR NATIONAI. mar- 

knimg. tnerdtmtd bi ng & soles firm 
with total mpnmn it a to n in aflmorfaeta 

mdrxing departmenr stores, mas 

raarcfenaaen, catatag dtowraoms. 


tfeopted aparabara, of w*l a exper- 


tise in tired mail and dr*d ’ 


Ipcnsx. Olt major sates office ii te- 
emed m New York 


wndi supportxig 

offices in Oixxna, San Fraw*», l« 
Angeles DJm. Altento. St. Loud and 
Chariaffe. We are olwsys in search of 
high ouofav products with a broad 
appeal to tea mosi marietflaai and 
we have ftte abily to not only brmg 

you duea to the retad customer, but 

Gfaa can tend our eqsertise xi flte 

Operationd aid dalnburion ureas as 
wet. Please send aonddmOicI 
Ids Box 3011, faridd Tribune, 

Neu«y Cadm, France 


MONEY TRKS? 

UFET1ME SECURITY 


Invert to one of America's mart etc. 
dtirtg te rtma l e a lcnl teecri tt b rou phi 
in the nut nduWy. Over 30.000 nut 
trees pksrted in 1984. Projected annual 
income euertudty readies 52%. 
BROKHtS- ENQUnS KV1TH3. 
Material avaiabte «i Engfeh, French, 
German. Box 2207, Herald Tribune, 
P^l Newly Cortex, France 


FOR SAltCANADlAN Manufacturer 
A importer of men & bays outeruNn- 
& (xenun detfuig. W<d estaUfahqd 


Safes 

3 m 

profit petertid. CDN Si 330000 in. 


ve rt me w reqnmd. Exc rttert yaung 

won? 


fAanqgeraart & oumrt wR rtay on i 
- * telex Canada 


by __ 

WPG tet 204 786- 


AMERICA'S CUP CHAUCNGE 1987 

Avcriabte 42 foot new koary cruiser 
far die Urn fetal of the Amxiaa's Cup 


fart seven races stoma 31/3/8? fa 
ete vnm 


13/2/87. 


atnt and 
nx perienard skipper ol mduttee 
S2000/day. For al detail write to 
Luaxy Cntaers, 100 flaynokte load, 
Mi. rtetoart 6153- Pwth, Western 
Australia Tefi (091 364 3311 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


MALAYSIA 


We have direct lepruertrtun 
md personal corteet. 
Write eoi Fur fart tsi, 
London WCIN 3XX 
Telex - 923753 fief. Na W6Q16 


UNIQUE OFKRnMTY 

In fee Spanah wnter-heari of tile Pyra- 
«w sb matf ‘Cadet Penasm^ 48 
oportn ic to, beautiful eeenorio far euro- 
mer hoSdayv Exoalert invtnhMrt at 
Iqww pnee. Front US$1 5,000 fuly fix- 
nishecL Diree from owner if. Bee- 
haans, Rendenad Pcrdso 56B Esc C. 
Zmjaxe 50008 Spain Tlx 581 56 OH E 


YOUR AGENT M MOROCCO 

SCHAMASCHMAROC5A 


Write] 42, Am Ha ss o n Seghir 
Ccectelcxua 01, Morocco 
Gp4 272604, 272652, Z2222T 
T1» 22901 


PRIVATE INVESTOR Mth irtl buJtiM 

baditf eand vvOfatg fa intert as odne 

portner In rtoriap or establihid i <ioip. 
pony with prOpris Ale r 


consumer produefa such as nut 

JWtMJfe KTOW WW wy. jnw 


... Hereid Tribune" 93S0J 

NttoflyGcfak Prance 


ONSHORE A IK COMPANIES. Save 

Tax. fiduciary trust, tkmdSokn 
avnpany form u han, irt e mofion al tax. 
bertk accounts opened uu axi iti o g, 
Bted, Men etc. Whringtan Serykes 


ZRD.TebOK 


Od,'23 Cofaae HB, London EOR 

“ 01-246 ofltt. 


.Tic 884587 G. 


SWnzERUMi + ABROAD. We 
htntemore ttanSirtcrataQompo- 
nfas, (factories + Iradtng +■ td* d 4-; 
service) for safe. Tur newer up to SH0 
"ntfcaa Smes rendencr pewfe. Gom, 
tod: Ft QQID SA, Tour GriseA; 
0+1007 laMonne. T* 21/25 26 tl. 


DSAWAlfi, R4NAMA, LberteCnr- 

from US$1 SO. Phortt 


G. (via UK). 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


MCTORYOF CMUMONY dathte a 

TO yeon,"«dirtn nedefe Wiote- 
safei .any country drectar raproteo- 
trtiwte. WSeta. OCanoo 102C 
Madrid 2B0^Spaia Tet f»U 
7421479 • ... . 


EXPORTS TO SWW. MIA 


Engfah, Sparfah A friemfi 

experience inti trade A fexxtoe to 


Span, hlh emqaped office in gcxid 
" xl bmlert cc “ 


Ideation. Balert comedm. Tin 

98739 PSCN E or Tet 30-2570960. 


BUtUONDEAIBa - Blfion ooiM, ne+ 

dL foragn endiange; aufafaheto 

the Roateport. Harvey Wdtoei tow, 
Russet House,- 15 Si. fauTs “ 
Leeds l.Englond Tab 
fines) Tbc 


SALES RBVBMMNE WATOH) 

afl mr Europe A *MJe East fer 


ropn ei ert i w g tap ouafay betbroem 
curtains. Corota HoUwk 


Sbnvcxias 24, 166 74 j 
ancTdr-l 


Expdrt Go. 
' ' Alh- 


ROGRESSiVE GLASS ISfiEfe Mfi- 

Sons of . adds over 50 muafly need 
ms runaBc opuca m mwtm 
bomfery betw ee n (oca rinfe & .rood- 
ing parts m a fans.-&»So &.Btritae, 

b5m 68. IMBTyiwnTSwedatt 


HNEST HVGSTMGNT NEWSURTBL 

Awand-w mi n a Irtl Horry Sdxib tet- 
ter in its -2 2nd y o tr. SS3 fer VW 
- sub te npeon. TfRC, P-O. fl«’381, O* 
1001 Ixrtsmne. Switeerttod. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


PAN AMANIAN tdrpart wa nsp w dx 

tkd^SroS Bobifity A LB dafex 

qxreniy envrijrxfie rt. We uJ rxr ax iv 
party fetnatkto'iefvieto an a fart, 
■ refaAle end oompeufea bofe- Con- 
fectKL Oarifegton. POB 1327, ftn». 
rtn 9A. Ponanxi. Tic 31 21 SenfcoPG 
Tri 230634 / 23481 9fevB. 216779) 


GONSUtTANT BASED 

SwiOxrkxxl solves your praHeow 
P riutaiuu t Bong tadfeK - <**i fevJ. 

write to, aSrZS&.faedriehrtr. 
’ 11 D^OOO Frankfvrf/Matn. - -- 


PAMAMA CORPORATIONS, bjmy 

porahotv u wwgwtWl L 'jtoPVi— JT- 

vws, cfl n B danwrily- Sok«Cjotri6- 
- W91, B Dorado. Ponerto. Zft'ftt. 
3219 Sotoso PG/feli ML® 11. ., 


BUSINESS SERVICES OFFICE SERVICES 


- MM 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

UNUMirtD me. 
UJSJL A WORlDWttC 


A caropieto personal & batmen rorvice 
provrttag a wre^c^ o cflon^rf 

^^indeteluds far afi 


312^769-7793 

213-765-7794 
330 W. 56th St, N.YX1 10019 


Sewtae BeprtoonfaW 
-KkrodedWbrUrwIe. 


HOW TO GET A and PASSPORT. 
- 12 countries analyzed. De- 


report - 12 courtnes anriyzed. De- 
hxfe WMA.-C Lvndhww' TerraaL 
Suite 565, Central, Hang Kong. 


OFFICE SERVICES 


Your Offic* in Germany 

wo an “AI Your, 9ernn n 

• Coraptatx office' serrian eC two 
pnetoBL utkrtto, 

• Fully oqifeped offices fer the ritort 
term or the tong tomt - 

• toemotianoSy brained office and 
prafasionrf 3aff at your dfeMML 


• Cm n yaurjarpo- 


rata dawidte tar Genncny/Europe, 

•-Your famines operafete-can' riort 

nraetfeflriy. 


banco Burinm Sendoet GmbH' 
Uxrco-Hous am Hofahcwenparlt 

. Jutfintorair qH e 22 . 

6000 Frankfurt cm Mart 1 
Germany . 

. . 

- TeWbto 69-59 57 70 
Trie* 414561 . 


ZURKH-ZURKH-ZURKH 


UWMORTRASSGS2 
.YOUR OfFICE AWAY FROM HOME 
■ OffioB/MamgemeM Seneca 

• Cotopany Tu "uMfto m 

• Haw to do Butriea ml itr/ 

_ . FROM SWHZBSATC 
Iw few Services Caneelt Cork, 
B*nh*tre»fi2; CH4H2 Zuridv 
Tet 01/211 92 07. Tbr .813 062 BSC 


YOUR fUflMSHB} OTFKE 
fH LONDON 

• 7 day 24 hoar occea & mawerphone 

• fed wppan services i n d u cing; 


• Corporute fleprosenfelion Swice 

• Stail at tana term arraitobitfy 

WerW-Wldv Burinem Cenkae 
TIOTTto Staid tandon WC2ROAA 
TeL- 01 836-891* Tba M973 


MFRUS * ZURICH x 252 76 2L 
PHONE / THBC / TB3KH 


COMMERCIAL 

PREMISES 


CENTER MONTE CARLO 

156 sqm. GROUMMtOOR 
PREMISES for sale near Casino aid 
Htstek. Went for bad. LwasritoU. 
For further drtafe please oentod 

A.GJE.DJ. 

26 fab Bd Princmse Chariofte 
Maato Cafe, MC 98000 Ifanaco 
Trir 93.50.66.00. Tolu 479417 MC 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


THE R5T REASONS TQ HAVE 
YOUR PORttOUO MANAOBJ M 
TW UJULi PStFORMimS 

A LOW GOMMISSiaNS 


use Mfeevedan amxd ceturttS34716 
over th e tert U ywri. OrtHtr the corn. 

337% ower-10 ym. 
However, J you want to manage your 
awn acocxatr, our totanuabnol depart- 
Rtent ts geared to give you The test 
leririca. 

We none of the first dbanttriodtS- 
futures broken in die USA wta b Mted. 
« 1973. We con' set-up nxriogrd oC- 
counls wife ortskfeprafanem htw- 

«B a proven reepni Each stad^ap- 

wrt b inured up to $10 nrifan, • 

. For more m fera xi hen wtif to . 
Voss & Compomr. 6329 Aoauste Dr 
2 2150, . 
vossca? 


Plow Your CSossifierf Ad Quickly and Easily 

In (ho 

INTttNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 


By Pftanei CcA yoiir locai IHT «epieiert«ivie weft yoi* tort. You 
wtfl be informed of fee cast emnMMMy. and c-m prtpeymer-.^ 
mode your adW! appear wahin 48 hours. 

Goefc The batic rated 59 JO per toe per day +. local toxwi. Thera me 
•254to*rrt; signs onthpaaste- the firsrtnoTtod Win fee fatovwrtfl tows. 
MinnnuB space is 2 fines- No ofabrevittoara aoceptod. 

Credit Canto American Express. Diner's Oub, Eixocard. Master 
Card, Access and Viso. 


HEADOmCE 


LATIN AMailCA 


Parixe (For dasafied only)i 
(1)47.47.46.00. 


EUROPE 


! 26^6-15. 
Athens: 361-8397/360-2421. 
Bnmeete 343-1899. 
Copenha g en . (01) 32 9440. 
Franfctort: (069)7267-55- 
Lmramtne: 29-58-94. 

: 67-27 -93/ 66-25-44. 

; [01) 836-4801 
Madrid: 455-2891 7455-3306. 
i (02) 7531445. 
y; (02)41 29 53 
florae: 679-3437. 

Sweden: (W) 7569229. 

Tel Aw. 02455 559. 
Vienna: Contact Frankfurt 


Buenoe Aires: 41 40 31 
(Dopt.312) 

Crasscas: 33 14 54 
Guayaqufl: 51 45 05 
Lima: 417852 
ftanamoi6VQ5 II 
Santiago: 6961 555 
SaaPtouto: 8521893 


MIDDLE EAST 


: 246303. 
Kwwaifc 5614485 
Lebanon: 341 457/8/9. 
Qtrttrtt 416535. 

5autS Arabia: 

Jedcftrin 667-1500. 
U-A-E: Dobed 224161. 


FAR EAST 


UNITED STATES 


Bangkok: 390-06-57 
Haag Kong: 5-213671. 
Jcdoartw 510092 
Mm3 a: 817 07 49. 
Seoul: 735 87 73. 
SfagoBare; 222-2725, 
Ttriwrar. 752 44 25/9. 
Tahya; 504-1925. 




New Yariu (212) 752-3990 
Wes* Coash (415} 362-8339 


AUSTRALIA 


SOUTH AFRICA 


421599. 


Mel bnunm 8908233. 
Sydney^ 56 39, 95743 20- 
Perth: 2S 98 31 
Ifeddhtgtott, Oueen ri o n d: 

369 34 53. 


u-is 

' ‘-I 


EMPLOYMENT 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 


PffltimNO 39, wife 7 years 

■xpwwxs y and [3 at housetop, 
nanny abroad, seete emptaymert. 




Phfeifoei 37T7 


, Cakanba, Laguna, 




AUTOMOBILES 


-WW.IHD.blue 
. __ or ecfxwdant cur- 
rency. Tet Altoona 36811 


AUTO SHIPPING 


TRANSCAR 

TMECABSHFVINO 
S-FOAUSTS 

(1)42 25 64 44 
“ 3? 43 44 


PASS 
CANNES/ NKE 
FRANKaRT 
BOhW / COLOGNE 
STUTTGART 
AttAIOf 

esEMBiHAvm 

NW YORK 
HOUSTON 

tos Angeles 

MONTREAL 


61 07) 80 Sfi 

aaa|2V»2i| 

raoail 

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