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xti--** 11 ^ 


ie Global Newspaper 
Edited in Paris 


,in Para, London. Zurich. 
l\ Hong Kong, Singapore, - 
The Hague and MaiseiJfe - 

tfHERDATA APPEM ON PAGE 12 






I 52/85 


INTEBNATIONAL 



tribune 


Published With The New York Times and He Washington Post 


PARIS, MONDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1985 


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Move Follows 
Secret Return 

By Allistcr Sparks 

■Washington Past Service- . 

JOHANNESBURG — Winnie 
Mandela, the blade activist, was 
arrested and imprisoned Sunday 
after defying an eased restriction 
order that gave her freedom to Hve 
anywhere in South Africa except in 
her home in the blade township of 
Soweto outside J ohannes burg. 

Mrs. Mandela returned to her 
Soweto home early Sunday morn- 
ing after police forably evicted hex 
Saturday and took her to a hotel 
outside the Johannesburg city lim- 
its. She suffered bruises and a 
sprained ankle in the eviction. 

A dozen armed security police- 
mat swqpt into the house shortly 
before noeffl Sunday and arrested 
Mrs. Mandela while this reporter 
was interviewing her in the sitring 
room. 

The reporter withdrew to a bed- 
room, from where be was witness to 

a brawling, shouting confrontation Evnlnnnn rat f>51 

between the opposing forccs of mpi08i0fl HI ITU 

South Africa’s intensfyina racial , 

conflict: the armed and tough secu- Four persons were kfflfldand 

n,l,m rity police of the white minori ty d^xst m Naples owned by A 
Winnie Mandela before her arrest Sunday. regime on one side, and the on- Fire spread to 27 storage tar 

■ | ; aimed but equally tough wife of the 

imprisoned black nationalist lead- 

• V* • „ Tfc _ _ ■ a. Nelson Mandela, on the other. — _ -m-*. 

<met Rejects Protest U.S. Report 

^ _ Mandela, 50, at one point locked • -R 

lyU.S. on Libyan SAMs | On Soviet A 

■ . By Bob Woodward manifestation <* the ad- d °^ entnaIly ^ By Michael R. Gordon 

. andLouCannon muustnition » concern with Uby*. ^ away^ a convoy, of poiioe New York Times Service 

Washington Pm Service The SAM-5, though a relatively cars, while the reporter and five WASHINGTON — A preaden- 

‘ WASHINGTON Soviet- “d slow-flying ground-to-air other correspondents were arrested tial report to Congress on Soviet 

ie anti-aircraft missies are be- ™ ss ^ e ’ ^ *“t targets 95,000 feet under a press restriction decree for compliance with arms cantrol trea- 
mstalled in at least two loca- (2MW meters) in the air and has a being in the black township with- ties has presented new charges 


*'-1 

a 

- Vjgg 
1 * •* 

o • 





Explosion at 03 Depot Kills 4, Darkens Sky Over Naples 

Four persons were Vfll«f and 169 injured when a blast rocked a occurred Saturday as a ship unloaded fueL investigators said 
depot in Naples owned by Agip SpA, Italy’s state ai 1 company. Sunday that it might be two days before the blaze was under 
Fire spread to 27 storage tanks foflowing the explosion, whicA control and they ooukl work to determine the cause of the blast. 


lilipUoUU 

oviet Rejects Protest ' 
lyU.S. on Libyan SAMs “ 

J ‘ J police u 


U.S. Report Presents New Charges 
On Soviet Arms Control Compliance 


By Bob Woodward 
and Lou Cannon 

Washapon Pm Service 


another manifestation of the ad- 
ministration's concern with Libya. 


By Michael R. Gordon 

Net i) York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — A presiden- 


An unclassified digest of the re- gress, accuses the Soviet Union of 
port is due to be made public this nine violations. 


week and was made available to 
The New York Times. . . 


Some of the principal charges 
have been made public previously 


The issue of purported Soviet by the administration. 




_ _ , _ ties has presented new charges 

r^Ubva. ^^ncTthe" United «flgP <rf about 185 miles (300 kilo- out police authority. * against Moscow and modified 

— “cs has protested the action to *“*»?)- »PP“» capable of ^ Mandela was taken to a some eaitiaalkgations in the light 

row amd been rebuffed, ac- )ta0ck * o Z A ^ /a . V’l Kca ^r police station in Kiugosdorp, a of recently acqmred evidaice. 

— Une to Reagan administration saac ^ AU ^ aft ' town about 20 mOes (32 kflpme- The report generally ^affirms «ar- 

. s caled Airborne Warning and Con- tcrs)away. Ka administratiQO drains that 

_ . . , . _ . tiol System survefflancc planes, bn t • T i^„„ l -a there “is a pattern of Soviet non- 

nor high-performance fighters- oomplhuaxT ritk anaa control 


arms contrd vio l a t i o ns has as- But the report »iv> contains new 
sumed particular importance be- dements, 
cause of the debate inside the ad- The report presents a new 


Rebels Flan 
Single Party 
In Salvador 


By James LeMoyrtc 

New York Tima Service 

SAN JUAN EL SITIO, El Salva- 
dor — The military leaders of the 
Salvadoran guerrilla movement say 
that they are trying to unite in a 


town about 20 miles (32.k3pme- 
ters) away. 


The report generally affirms ear- 
lier administration chains that 


security requirements the 
fans have,” a State Department 


ai System surveillance planes, bnt ~j- r ., : T . • . A there “is a pattern of Soviet non- 

it high-performance fighters. compliccco^fh confrol 

The Russians previously have, fheproroaous of South Africa’s In- 


cause of the debate inside the ad- The report presents a new charge Salvadoran guerrilla movement say 
ministration and in Congress over pertaining to the 1979 treaty. It that they are trying to unite in a 
whether the United States should says the Soviet Union has violated s > n e Ie Marust-Leninisi political 
continue abiding by the 1979 trea- ueaty provisions by concealing the party and that a major goal over the 
ty, which the Senate has not ap- “association" of the SS-25 missile next year h to increase support for 
proved. and its launcher at test sites. This cause - 


rans nave, a sunc i/cparuntau i — . — J . — . u* wu»u»wisw juuui/uuwn.iu- -ri.. - ...i 

xm Charles RecSi, said given the Ubyans otha anti-air- tcmal Security Act on charges of SovSreSr 

ay. -“This is p aguificiai and craft missiles m the SAM soies, _ defying _ggyemment orders han^ j Jiirui 

jerbus escalation m the Soviet- a range^ more than nitig her from Johannesburg and . . ^ of the 1972 

manro relationship. 40 mite and none that provided Soweto. The charges would cany a XESl ' 

if. 1 - l„ I. If.. ihf mnnhlhtv to knock down nmulninfim tn iWumn' rmriric. Anu-oalnSOC M1SSU& treaty. 


Even though the treaty has an makes it difficult to determine 
' exp iration date of Dec. 31, the ad- which launcher is used for which 


their cause. 

The derision to try to form a 
Marxist-Leninist party marks the 
Fust time the rebel military Fara- 


jerous escalation m the Soviet- but none wim a range or more man n ing her from Johannesburg and 
. an arms relationship. 40 miles and none that provided Soweto. The charges would cany a 

Ye have made dear” to Mos- the same capability to knock down penalty of up to three years’ impris- 
— “our concern about this escala- U.S. reco nn aissance planes flying onmenL 

;and Soviet support for an irre- the Gulf of ffldra. Libya con- Mrs. Mandela will be formally 

-Visible and erratic regime." Mr. siders the gulf within its tern tonal charged in a Kiugersdorp magis- 
. ™n wki. Asked about the So- waters; the United States regards (rate court “as soon as rimrges 
= reply, Mr. Redman said: “The ^ “ international waters. against ha have been formulated,” 

; et response did not address our In August 1981 two U-S. F-14 Captain Beck said. Her attorney, 

penis." fighters shot down two Soviet-built Akbar Ayob, said she probably 

* rok^ment of tile surface-to-air Libyan fighters over the gulf, would be ordered to appear in 
_jjks. the SAM-5, which U.S. SAM-5s have the theoretical capo- court on Monday... 

ials expect to be manned by bOity to down tighter planes bnt The reporters, meanwhile, were 

(Continued on Page S, CoL 4) (Contimted on Page S. CoL 3) 


It restates an earlier Charge that 
w j i „ , « the Soviet Umcn has violated a 

Mrs. Mandda will be formally prov ision of the J 979 stmlegic arms 
diaiged m a Kiugersdorp magis- tinrits each ride to the 

trate court “as soon as changes development o f one new type of 
agamLh«J|jiiete»fonnotalcxl. sMleEic nisOc by uning and d»- 
Qmtam Bedt said. Her ationwy, pwSTtiy, ^S micdT 

m prob&ty Soviet Union has demed the 

would be ordered to appear in vjdj^s die treaty and has 


.ministration policy is to abide by missiles. ,lrst time tbe rebel n 

ibfi. treaty for an indeterminate pc- Sources said ihi< had been done bundo Marti National Liberation 
noiL.:. " • • ■■■"■” by draping material ova the SS^ ^ Front has puNicly defined itself as 

But Ptesidait Ronald Reagan nusnk and its launcher. Officials a Marxist movemenL 
noted in the unclassified repon «“ d Russians had also been The derision is om 
that the United Stales was “keep- taking steps to bide the SS-24 mis- gest indications yetc 
ing open all programmatic op- sile and its launcher, but the evi- distance between the 
tions” as new UR strategic sys- dcnce in this case was considered that make up the i 
tans are deployed. weaker. front and the handfu 

Unless the United States dis- The.^ report reassesses previous 

m*ntw wvimirta administration contentions that bem allied to them 


ing open all programmatic op- aie aM launcner, out me evi- 
0008 ” as new UR strategic sys- dcnce >n this case was considered 
tons are deployed. weaker. 

Unless the United States dis- report reassess^ previous 

mantles existing missile launchers, administration contentions that 
it wfll exceed a treaty limit when drere was -some^t ambiguaus 


said the SS-25 is an improved ver- 


r^P- troops, may again increase 
'cm between the United Stales 
‘ Libya. Libyan policies have 
• a major concon of the Rea- 

iministratioD sources dis- 
-r'Xl that precautionary military 
T ring was initiated last sotnmer 
. . * . ' ran to- Libya if it attacked a 
lboring North African state or 
— shown to be responsible for a 
.T toiorisl incident, 
it a Pentagon analysis of possi- 
direct UR unitary action 
hst Libya painted a bleak 
..ce of success and effectively 
'■id against it, sources said. 

*,e Pentagon said »h"i, in the 
"t case, a UR military opera- 
** could eventually require a 
riUzKaal of six divisions, or 
soldiers. 

IJLb* flkaior administration, official 
. ^ his week that the military plan 

rever completed or submitted 
• - r ^ While House for action. 

■ J .. ,!r -'c plan was never approved by 
ieat Ronald Reagan and sub- 
. ®! discussions with him about 
roposal were limited because 
'anring occurred while he was 
crating from his colon cancer 
>y. officials said 
- Washington Post reported 
non ih that Mr. Reagan had 
" „ riaed the CIA to undermine 
' . Kr Qadhati’s regime covertly. 


The reporters, meanwhile, were ^ ^ ^ sS-13. The 1979 treaty 


(Cmrimned on Page 5, CoL 3) allows some upgrading of systems, based on a classified report to Con- 


the sea trials of a new Trident sub- I ^ al j lhe i S< ^ et ^ r V? n ^ 

marine occur in May or June. probably” deployed S-16 mis- 

The unclassified digest, which is al lts HesKsk ““ m 
sed on a classified repon to Con- (Continued ou Page 5, CoL 2) 


Ads in U,S. Tout Burgers, Beer by Poking Fun at Russums 


By Ted Rohrlich 

Las Angeles Times Service 

LOS ANGELES —For the first time in 
a generation, advertisers in the United 
States are exploiting anti-Soviet sentiment 
to make their points. 

A spate of commercials, including ones 
for a national hamburger chain, a soft 
drink company, two brands of beer, a re- 
gional appliance chain, an electronics man- 
ufacturer and a televirion show, lampoon 
the Soviet people or their way of fife. 

The humorous tone of these commer- 
cial s is a sharp departure from public- 
service messages used by some co m panies 
during the Cold War in the 1950s. 

Then, a magazine campaign by the Ad- 
vertising Council attempted to persuade 
Americans to build better weapons by 
showing a ribbon-bedecked Russian sol- 
dier named Ivan, of whom it was said, 
“He’s sold to the hilt on Red ideas, which 
means he’s out to get you." 

Any such commensals would have ap- 
peared out of line during the anti-establish- 
ment 1960s and the years of U.S.-Soviet 
detente that followed. 

Then, if Russians were depicted at ah, h 


was likely to be on friendlier terms, in the 
manna of ads for Damian yogurt, which 
featured peasants from tbe republic of 
Georgia who reportedly ate a lot of yogurt 
and lived a lot at years. 

But today, Soviet citizens; and especially 


Tbe commercials, be said, reinforce 
comfortable notions of a primitive Soviet 
economy. 

When Woody’s, the hamburger c hain , 
decided recently to emphasize its choice of 
toppings, it parodied a R u s s ia n fashion 


The humor in the anti-Russian commercials relies in 
pari on a premise that the Russians are a backward 
people, that they are nnconth and that they are 
deprived by their government. 


members of the military, are likely to be 
painted as boobs, and the messages are 
commercial rather than ideological 

The commercials appeal to an American 
sense of superiority by portraying Soviet 
citizens as ineffectual, or culturally and 
economically deprived. 

“There’s an awful lot erf self-satisfied 
smugness around," said Jerry Hough, a 
Russian expert at the Brookings Institu- 
tion, a Washington, D.C., research organi- 
zation. 


show to iUnstrale what it would be like to 
have no choices. 

In the Wendy’s commercial, a bulky 
woman in a housedress lumbers down a 
runway, modeling day wear, then evening 
wear, which turns out to be the same outfit, 
.with a flashlight. 

“The notion of selling fast-food ham- 
burgers by making fun of your greatest 
political enemy is really bizarre,” said John 
Wright, an author who is now writing a 
history of American advertising. 


“But if the president of the United States 
can get up and say that the Soviet Uni cm is 
an evQ empire, and nobody laughs, then 
we’ve had a profound change. And one 
thing we are certain erf is that advertising 
‘follows whatever the current official think- 
ing may be.” 

Tbe humor in the anti-Russian comma- 
rials relies in part on a premise that the 
Russians are a backward people, that they 
are uncouth and that they are deprived by 
their government, not only of tbe opportu- 
nity to purchase quality consu mer goods, 
but also of the opportunity to be individ- 
ualistic in virtually any area of their lives. 

“You get the jokes because they appeal 
to your stereotype;” said Hmfl Draitser, a 
Russian 6migr6 who teaches humor writing 
at UCLA. 

Mr. Draitser said he had no problem 
with advertisers using these stereotypes., 
but that it was unfortunate that Americans 
had no competing images of Russian life. 

“Usually," he said, “satire exists to serve 
as a magnifying glass of a society's foibles. 
Bui here we have something rise: We have 
humor based on stereotypes about one cul- 
ture, brought from another culture which 
does not have wider firsthand knowledge.” 


The derision is one of the stran- 
gest indications yet of the growing 
distance between the five factions 
that make up the rebel military 
front and the handful of small so- 
da] democratic parties that have 
been allied to them for five years 
under the banner of the Democrat- 
ic Revolutionary Front. 

The social democratic parties 
have had an increasingly troubled 
relationship with the aimed guenil- 
la groups. The Democratic Revolu- 
tionary Front has consistently de- 
fined itself as a supporter of 
political pluralism, and its senior 
officials say they will not join tbe 
Marxist-Leninist party. 

Senior officials of the Popular 
Liberation Forces faction spoke of 
tbe guerrillas’ plans during two re- 
cent trips by a reporter toguerrilla 
areas in northeastern Cnalaten- 
ango province. 

A senior Salvadoran official said 
the government welcomed the re- 
bels* declaration that they were 
Marxists. 

“We think they’re taking off 
their mask," he said. “We’ve never 
believed they were democrats inter- 
ested in standing in elections." 

A U.S. diplomat said that it 
would not be easy for the rebels to 
form one party. 

Tm skeptical that they can pa- 
per over the personal and political 
differences that have divided them 
into five groups,” he said. 

In a document summarizing 
their new strategy, the guerrillas 
say tbe long war they believe lies 
ahead is to be “led by a vanguard 
that is frying to construct one 
Marxist-Leninist party." 

That party will possess “a dear 

(Continued on Page 5, CoL 5) 


jo 


fter I g gislating by Crisis but With Deficit Unsolved, Congress Limps Home 


/Y St even V. Roberts 

[j New York Times Service 


L iiSHINGTON — The con- 
,yna! session that limped to a 
Friday was one of the least 
4 rim and most frustrating in 

\ iL metnnry, many members of 
'Css from both parties say. 
; complain that Congress re- 
% missed legislative dead- 
" 4d remained deadlocked un- 

V 'lion was forced by an 
_ S ding crisis, 

r eover, several lawmakers say 
■st session of the 99th Con- 
provided a preview of the 
md turmoil that is likely to 
1 next year when congress- 
1 ^till have to carry out a new 
[ Ti . i-haJaacmg law in an election 



'There was no 
incentive to drive 
toward our goal. 

$ Everybody has been 
{ . basically hiding in 
* the trenches. No 
one was willing to 
get tough. 9 

—Leon E. PonOtta 
Democrat 


,.11 * have 
J j- If t-halanci 

, 1 lilt**’ 

L many, th 

r 4 £ssionsa 

# # i -eemed V 
L ** - i Wfa 

»r11 L ^ over the 
J 1 U ^ twyood 

. 1 k largely 

wY 


many, the final week oflate- auon the single biggest problem reduce deficits by $74 billion over UsT" 

csssfflt -gasss 8 * 

rstt 

-ZlrSTiSX. onions to C.Bvri of Virgil .he tad- record. Homu.P. O^effllr. the 


er of the minority Democrats in the 
Senate. “From the standpoint of 
productive, progressive legislation, 
this session has been, 1 think, the 
worst I haw seen since Fve been 
here." 

Legislators generally agree that 
tbe reasons for this record include 
Archaic congressional procedures, 
particularly in the Senate,, sharp 
divisions over unappetizing choices 
and the widespread impulse to 
nwlrg derisions in terms of politics 
rather than policy. ■ - 

Above all. Republicans and 
Democrats afike blame President 
Ronald Reagan as failing both to 
set a clear legislative agenda and to 
admi t that dosing the budget defi- 
cit would require new taxes and 
steep cuts in military spending. 

“It’s difficult to fmd a silver lin- 
ing in the dark cloud of 1985," 


* Oman. Even so. the lawmak- day night as lamnal 
. 1 k largely for future consider- capital after giving up 


three years. uqj m iuc 

“We haven’t done much, and concluded Representative vfc Fa- 
what we have dote, we’ve done zio, a California Democrat, 
under the pressure of final dead- Congresaonri leaders from each 
lines that came up after we had party searched For those finings as 
i thev defended and explained their 


e Anytime yon still 
produce a budget 
deficit of $200 
billion, Congress 
has not been * 
making the 
decisions it takes to 
do the job. 9 

—John Heins 
Republican 


speaker of the House of Represen- 
tatives, said the Democratic major- 
ity in the House had had an “eicri- 


“ by Congress “falls far short in both 

dollars and substance" of what is 
needed to deal decisively with the 
deficit. 

Mr. Dole also took pride in forg- 
ing compromises that staved off 
potentially embarrassing setbacks 
for Mr. Reagan on such issues as 
the giant MX intercontinental mis- 
sile, aid to rebel forces in Nicara- 
gua, and economic sanctions 
against South Africa because of its 
racial policies. 

“It happened repeatedly," said 
an aide to Mr. Dole. “The Senate 
saved the White House from out- 
right defeat by coming up with a 
compromise.” 

Some legislators suggested that 
^ __ the tedious pace and tendentious 
disputes this year were caused by 


S %* ’ ‘ 


itym the House nau nan an -ex«s- leaner oi me ncpuuuwou Republican ^ Hbcbiaan. “Tbe fact 

lent year." but he defined their m the Senate this year, issued a nx- li ^j^ oas ^ wugber 

success mainly on how they had page account of^s own acbwe- ^ UiSna- 

chccked or altered the hduatives of merits mid don to pm off more and more. 

Sena te Republicans and of Mr. as his ^op priority. But be also K _ _ , ■ 

Reaggu, conceded that the budget adopted (Continued on Page 5, CoL 1J 


(Continued on Page 5, CoL 1 j 


Japan 
Concedes 
On Trade 

U.S. Will Get 
$260 Million 
In Concessions 

By Percr T. Kilborn 

New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — Japan has 
agreed to make $260 million in 
trade concessions and other mea- 
sures to compensate the United 
States for “unfair” trade practices, 
UR officials have announced. 

The agreement, the first of its 
kind with Japan, requires that the 
Japanese import $236 million more 
in U.S. goods as compensation for 
Japanese quotas on the imports of 
UR shoes and other leather goods. 

It also imposes 524 million in 
tariff increases on UR imports of 
tbe leather goods that Japan pro- 
tects at home from foreign compe- 
tition. 

The announcement, made Satur- 
day, was delayed until then partly 
to honor a Japanese request to wait 
until the Japanese parliament 
closed for a recess Friday and part- 
ly because of difficulties with the 
negotiations, according to officials. 

The concessions were made after 
President Ronald Reagan threat- 
ened in September to order retalia- 
tion against Japan. 

“This is significant in that we’re 
finally penetrating Japanese psy- 
chology on issues of ibis nature." 
said Clayton K. Yen tier, the U.S. 
trade representative, who an- 
nounced the agreement. “This is 
the first time in a dispute tike this 
that Japan has significantly opened 
its markets.” 

In the past, Japan has accepted 
imposition of retaliatory quotas or 
tariffs in die face of unfair trade 
practices, Mr. Yeutter said in a 
telephone interview Saturday. In 
agreeing to open its domestic mar- 
kets to more imports, he said, Ja- 
pan is serving the interest of freer 
world trade. 

“We settled this by obtaining ac- 
cess to their markets rather than by 
our closing our markets." Mr. 
Yeutter said. 

The American products that Ja- 
pan has agreed to increase imports 
of include paper, glass, industrial 
diamonds, engines, sporting goods, 
semiconductors and telecommuni- 
cations equipment — a total 137 
products on which tariffs would be 
reduced or eliminated. 

Japan also agreed to make per- 
manent earlier tariff reductions on 
242 other products and to lower 
tariffs on several aluminum prod- 
ucts to bring them into line with 
U.S. tariffs. 

Such Japanese trade concessions 
have often proved ineffective be- 
cause of other practices that inhibit 
sales of foreign goods and because 
they have not been backed up with 
assurances to import a specific val- 
ue of goods. 

Mr. Yeutter said he thought the 
new concessions would hold. 

’'They’re a responsible member 
of the trading community," he said. 

Mr. Reagan's threat was made in 
a trade-policy speech on Sept 23, 
when be said he would continue to 
support free trade but would order 
retaliatory strikes against countries 
that restrict imports of U.S. goods 
or give their exports an unfair ad- 
vantage in the American market 
with special subsidies and other de- 
vices. 

Among the practices the admin- 
istration angled out was Japanese 
protection of its leather industry. It 
estimated (hen that (he practice 
cost the UR leather industry $260 
million in lost sales in Japan. 

Earlier. Japan had refused to ac- 
cept a UR proposal of the sort 
announced Saturday, but, at the 
request of Prime Minister Yasuhiro 
Nakasone, the administration de- 
layed retaliation until adjournment 
of the Diet, where the Japanese 
leather industry is strongly repre- 
sented. 


INSIDE 

■ Tim New York subway “vigi- 

lante” case remains untried and 
judicial reforms have not been 
made. Page 3. 

■ A British hostage in Lebanon 

appealed to his government in a 
videotape to make a deal to 
secure his freedom. Page 5. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ Three Airbus partners have 

proposed talks with the United 
States to defuse friction over 
sales methods. P»ge7. 

■ France's two major oQ com- 

panies will not renew a produc- 
tion agreement with Saudi Ara- 
bia when it expires. Page 7. 

SPORTS 

■ Sweden beat West Germany 
to keep the Davis CupPage 13. 

TOMORROW 


are migrating to the Midwest to 
work on high-tech “factories of 
the future." 






Page 2 ; ; 

Soviet Says 
Afghanistan 
Discontent Is 
Widespread 

United Press Inumtatbnal 

MOSCOW — The Soviet Union 
has admitted there is widespread 
opposition to the pro-Moscow gov- 
ernment of Afghanistan and said 
compromise ana negotiation wore 
needed to win popular support. 

“Far from all people in Afghani- 
stan, even among working sections 
of the population,” accepted die 
revolution, the Communist Party 
newspaper, Pravda, said Saturday. 
The article came only a few daws 
before the sixto anniversary of the 
intervention by Soviet troops. 

The emphasis in the article on 
strong opposition and initial “er- 
rors” by over-enthusiastic Afghan 
Communists contrasted with earli- 
er Soviet attempts to portray the 
Afghan resistance as consisting of 
UiL -financed terrorists. 

Pravda said the opposition “is 
not s urprising for a backward, 

aamfeurial country with deep-root- 
ed religious traditions and nearly 
total illiteracy. 

“A considerable number of peo- 
ple fell for mendacious counter- 
revolutionary propaganda,*’ 
Pravda said, but added that “errors 
of the first stage of the revolution 
had a negative effect too.” 

The newspaper listed those mis- 
takes as a “passion for revohxtion- 
aiy phrases and enforcement of so- 
cial reforms without due account 
for the real situation and social and 
national specifics of the country” 

A statement in November by the 
Afghan president, Babrak Karmal, 
mentioned similar errors. But it did 
not em phflfifyi* the then*- of the 
Pravda article, winch was titled 
“Expanding the social base of the 
Afghan revolution.” 

“Time is needed to remove the 
accumulated prejudices, and to dis- 
pel illusions,” Pravda said. “It is 
necessary to create an atmosphere 
of positive dialogue between public 
and 'political forces, including 
those who so far stick to positions 
hostile to the revolution.” 

The Afghan government is ready 
“to admit representatives of van- 
oui strata and groups into the lead- 
ing bodies of state authority,” 
Pravda said. 

Western diplomats said die 
Pravda article still provided no in- 
dication that Mr. Karmal was will- 
ing to negotiate with any of the 
aimed resistance groups. 

“Naturally it is not easy to over- 
come the differences; reconcilia- 
tion presupposes known compro- 
mises,” Pravda said. “The People's 
Democratic Party of Afghanistan 
proceeds from this premise in Us 
desire to expand the social base of 
the revolution.” 

■ US. Demands Ptrfkrat 

John M. GoshkoofThe Washing- 
ton Post reported from Washington : 

The State Department saia Fri- 
day that six years of Soviet mSitaiy 
intervention have failed to subju- 
gate the Afghan people, and it refr- 
crated the U.S. view that Soviet 
forces must be withdrawn before a 
settlement of the Afghanistan con- 
flict could be negotiated. 

Arnold Raphd. deputy assistant 
secretary of state for Near Eastern 
and South Asian affairs, said that 
Afghan guerrillas have shown 
“heightened capability” this year to 
band together in large-scale attacks 
against the Russians and the Sovi- 
et-controlled Af ghan army. 

Mr. Raphd said the Russians 
had suffered 30,000 casualties in- 
cluding at least 10,000 deaths, and 
added, “Our hope is that the Soviet 
Union is beginning to realize that 
the only way out of this situation is 
a negotiated agreement” 


CNTERNATIOIHAL HERALD TRIBU1NE, MONDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1985 


Dispirited, Walesa Seeks a New Course 


By Jackson Diehl 

Wasfdngtm Pest Smite 

GDANSK, Poland — It is the 
fourth December since the sup- 
| pressjon of the independent trade 
union Solidarity, and Lech Wa- 
[ less is at home in his apartment 
here, nursing an nicer. 

He has been excused on doo 
tore* orders from ids dectrioan’s 
job at the Lenin Shipyard. There 
is no respite, however, from an 
| investigation by a Gdansk prosfi- 
odor, daily meetings with sop- 
I porters and advisers, or the slow, 
j wearing grind of a political strag- 
gle in which, Mr. Walesa says, 

I “there is no posabfiity now to 

I have a solution.” 

Ii is overcast and cold in 
Gdansk, and Mr. Walesa sits rest- 
j tessly at a table in his study, 
chain-smoking cigarettes and sip- 
i ping tea. 

iVlaybe it’s the weather,” he 
says, staring out toe window. But 
there's no disguising his mood: 
Solidarity is stymied, and Mr. 
Walesa, its symbol, spokesman 
and still active 1 H<T i is fading 
deeply frustrated. 

"The effectiveness of our work 
is not very great,” he said in an 
interview. “Until now we were 
fighting with the authorities. Now 
we are looking for different meth- 
ods but we don't have any. If we 
find some they must be better 
orchestrated and better under- 
stood.” 

Above all, this has been a year 
in which Mr. Walesa and thou- 
sands of Poles who still support 
him have began to see their future 
as a long, upbill battle to keep the 
union’s idols alive despite con- 
stant repression, the demoraliza- 
tion and apathy of much of the 
public and the inherent paralysis 
of an organization committed to 
nonviolent tactics in the face of a 
regime that allows no compro- 
mise. 

“We will not give up,” Mr. Wa- 
lesa declared. “Sooner or later my 
way will win and the authorities 
will have to change (bar atti- 
tude:” 



Lech Walesa leading (be 
qngmg of the Pofish na- 
tional anthem at a rally. 

Increasingly, though, the 42- 
year-old Nobd Peace Prize win- 
ner worries that his own methods 
have been discredited among 
frustrated young people and that 
Solidarity's moral appeals will be 
overtaken by violence that Mr. 
Walesa no longer feds he can pre- 
vent. 

“Many times I warned of this 
possibility, and more and more 
the possibility is increasing,” he 
said. “1 want to be always a man 
of agreement, but I wiO not stop 
other people who see my ineffi- 
ciency. I am faithful to my ideals, 
but for others, if they think other 
methods are more effective, I 


don't have any more arguments 
for stopping them." 

Solidarity’s symbolic and cul- 
tural strength is still formidable. 
Much of its underground leader- 
ship has daded security forces for 
four years, and thousands of sup- 
porters participate in a clandes- 
tine publishing industry of a size 
,qnd dynamism without parallel or 
precedent in a Communist-ruled 
country. 

Churches around the cotnury 
overflowed this year for the 
union's anniversaries and cultural 
events, which always end with the 
emotional singing of Polish 
hymns by thousands who raise 
their arms and reread their fin- 
gers in Solidarity^ victory sign. 

Nevertheless, toe- union's ef- 
forts at practical political action 
have been blocked on every front. 
Street de mons t ra tion s no longer 
attract widespread support, and 
an attempt at a national strike in 
July failed. 

“We have losses because of 
that,” Mr. Walesa said. “We have 
good people being arrested, and 
we need them somewhere else.” 

Dozens of Solidarity activists, 
including three of its top leaders, 
remain in prison despite a recent 
government release erf some polit- 
ical prisoners. Those stiB free face 
the possibility of summary arrest 
imd a^immg under a newly 
sanctioned penal code, or the loss 
of their jobs through purges, such 
as one now under way in universi- 
ties. On its fifth anniversary on 
Aug. 31, Solidarity issued a tong 
report on the national situation, 
and Mr. Walesa called on authori- 
ties to discuss it. The official reac- 
tion was scomfuL 

In Mi. Walesa’s view, Solidari- 
ty's best course in the present sit- 
uation is to focus an devising its 
own goals for the countzy, avoid- 
ing confrontations with authori- 
ties that sap its strength. 

“We have to carry out our plan 
and not divert our attention to 
secondary spheres of conflict that 
are not created by ns,” he said. 


“We need peace while working on 
a solution.” 

At the same time. Mr. Walesa 
believes that Solidarity and its 
supporters most remain outride 
the political system or its institu- 
tions, refusing to cooperate with 
Communist authorities as their 
terms. “When I go into the sys- 
tem, I want to know what for ” he 
said, “because it’s difficult to or- 
der someone into a liquor store 
and then decide yon want bread.” 

His views, however, are no 
more dominant within Solidari- 
ty's organization than they were 
when he haded its 16-tnoflto le- 
gal existence. Scmie of the union's 
activists now favor an organized 
move by its supporters into offi- 
cially sanctioned rations, factory 

self- management councils, pro- 
fessional a ysnriatinnq and even 
the legi slatur e and security forces 
in Order to reshape them from the 
inside. Others want militant ac- 
tion to disrupt General Wojekeh 
Janxzdriri’s government. 

In the end, most of the oniaa 
late agree that solidarity mm 
now wait in the expectation that 
the mufcnntitf f«W tO Sohc 
Poland's problems without public 
support wffl lead them toward an- 
other era of liberalization. 

Even in the gloom of another 
December, Mr. Walesa leaves lit- 
tle doubt that he has accepted 
that long, uncertain struggle. 

*Tm not discouraged)” he in- 
sisted. *Tm boding As 

much as lean and as much as I 
am able in my health, I will tty to 
uphold the ideals.” 

■ Walesa Expects Indictment 

Mr. Walesa said Saturday he 
had received a letter from the 
public prosecutor's office in 
Gdansk informing Mm that he 
would be indicted on charges of 
■dandwing P olish authorities dur- 
ing general elections in October, 
Reutos reported from Warsaw. 

Legal sources said a trial date 
would normally be set within a 
month of toe indictment h^ing 
lodged in court. 


Iran Sends 
New Troops 
To Fight 
Against Iraq 

By Norman Kempster 

Las Angles Times Scrrice 

WASHINGTON — Iran has 
sent thousands of fresh troops to 
the front in the war with Iraq, pos- 
ribly indicating that a new offen- 
sives imminent, U5. officials con- 
firmed Friday. 

Most of toe new troops arc poor- 
ly trained conscripts, they said. 

But U.S. administration officials 
and American academic experts 
agreed that neither Iran nor Iraq 
has the raxHtaiy ability to win. 

They say the war has come to 
resemble toe trench warfare of 
Wcdd War 1 in its huge number of 
casualties and lade of a dear-cut 
winner or loser. 

"There are indications the Irani- 
ans are moving troops to toe front 
in large numbers, but they have 
done this in toe past and just left 
them there for months,” a State 
Department official said. “This 
would be a lousy time of year for a 
general offensive because of the 
weather.” 

Another Unofficial said: “It is 
still basically in the stalemate 
mode. There have been troop 
movements and there may be some 
limited probes, but at this point it 
doesn't appear that we are looking 
at toe long-awaited final offen- 
sive.” 

“I don’t thin k either ride wants 
to lay it an toe line, but neither side 
is gping to indicate any intention, to 
give up, either,” he added. 

This official said that Iraq has 
responded to the Iranian buildup 
by moving some of its own troops 
and by conducting frequent bat 
small-scale air raids aping? Iran's 
Khaig Island oil fawliri« 

“The raids are usually with two 
or three planes,” the official said. 
“They drop some bombs and cause 
som e rfmittjt; the Iranians repair 
the damage.” 


Bonner, at Synagogue, Pleads for Soviet Jews Albania Insists 


By Fax Butterfield 

New York Times Service 

NEWTON. Massachusetts — 
Yelena G. Bonner, the Soviet hu- 
man rights activist, went to a syna- 
gogue here and expressed her hope 
that Jews in toe Soviet Union wDl 
be allowed to join their fandfies 
abroad. 

Mrs. Bonner, whose mother is 
Jewish, bet who does Dot consider 
herself a Jew, said it was the first 
time riie had been to a synagogue. 

It was also the first time that 
Mrs. Bonner, wife of Andrei D. 
Sakharov, toe dissident and physi- 
cist, had spoken publidy since rite 
arrived in the United States on 
Dec. 7 for medical treatment 

She has said through her son and 
daughter, Alexei Semyonov and 
Tatiana Yankdevich, who live in 
Newton, that she pledged to toe 
Soviet authorities that she would 
not talk with reportere while she is 
in the West 

It was not dear whether her re- 
marks on Saturday violated that 
promise, which rite has said is a 
condition of her being able to re- 
turn to the Soviet Union and join 
her husband at his place of banteh- 
ment in Gorky. 

Mrs. Bonner, 62. visited the syn- 
agogue, Congregation MishkanTe- 
fHa, Saturday morning at the invi- 
tation of the rabbi. Richard Y eflin. 

Mr. YeQin said the congregation 
indudes nearly two dozen families 
that have relatives who have not 
been allowed to emigrate from the 
Soviet Union. 


Standings the pulpit, Mrs. Bon- 
ner said in Russian, "Even though I 
am not a believer, 1 think I have 
become a part of something very 
close to me.” 

Her hnsband, she said, is consid- 
ered by many Israelis to be a “pris- 
oner of Zion” because of the help 
he has given Jews who are unable to 
leave toe Soviet Union, though he 
himself was bom into a family of 
Russian Orthodox Church mem- 
bers. 

“Today I hope aD toe prisoners 
of Zion will be free, as well as all 
my friends of different nations and 
different religions,” Mrs. Bonner 
said. 

“My many personal friends. Eke 
Anatoli Shcharansky, I hope wiQ 
be reunited with their relatives,” 
she added. Mr. Shcharansky, a 
Jewish dissident, has been in prison 
in the Soviet Union for nearly nine 
years. Mrs. Bonner’s remarks were 
translated by Mr. Semyonov. 

Mrs. Bonner spake briefly with 
journalists outside the synagogue 
after the service: To explain why 
she had come, she said; “My birth 
— I am half-Jewish and half - Arme - 
nian " 

“My upbringing gives me deep 
respect toward all beliefs, all reli- 
gions,” she said. “The most deplor- 
able teaching is the superiority of 
any nation over another.” 

“Especially because there is anti- 
Semitism in the world. I find it 
impossible not to come to a syna- 
gogue,” she said. 



Yelena G. Bonner with Theodore D. Mann, mayor of 
Newton, Massachusetts, after she spoke at a synagogue. 


Italian Embassy 
Give Up Fugitives 

• The Associated Press 

VIENNA — Albania has ruled 
out a compromise over ax Albani- 
ans who fled into the Italian Em- 
bassy in Tirana on Dec. 12 seeking 
to emigrate, and has demanded 
they be handed over at once, the 
state-run Albanian press agency, 
ATA, has reported. 

Prime Minister Bettino Graxi of 
Italy said earlier Saturday that Ita- 
ly had begun negotiations to settle 
toe issue; but he hinted his govern- 
ment was in a weak position be- 
cause the embassy was surrounded 
by police 

Italy is one of the few countries 
that Iras diplomatic relations with 
Albania, and relations between the 
two nations have been improving 
in recent months. 

The Albanian press agency state- 
ment described toe fugitives, a fam- 
ily of two men and four women 
aged 40 to 60, as “individuals im- 
plicated in anti-stale activity in the 
service of a foreign state.” One of 
them was said to have been sen- 
tenced in this connection, but no 
details of their activity woe given. 

The fact that the six fugitives 
were stin being kept at toe Italian 
Embassy, the press agency said, 
“constitutes an Sliest interference 
in the home affairs of Albania and 
an encroachment on its national 
sovereignty.” 


WORLD BRIEFS 

Plan tn Kill Nigerian Leader Reported 

LAGOS (Rentas)— Military officers accused of plotting to topple toe 
Nigerian leader. General Ibrahim Babangida, planned to km him with a 
bomb planted on his airplane, the indeptodem Sunday Tribune newspa- 
per reported. 

lie defense minister. General Dosnkat Bah, said Friday that the 
plotters came from all toe armed services and would be dealt with in 
accordance with military law. According to Western diplomats, the 
plotters are bring tried by a court-martial at an army barracks in Lagos. 

General Bab and toe information minister, Lieutenant Colonel Antho- 
ny Ukpo, declined to name those attested, but senior nuhtaiy sources 
three army generals and many senior air force officers had been 
arrested. 

Tamils Attack Helicopters, Police Fort 

COLOMBO, Sri Lanka (UPI) — Separatist Tamil rebels fired missiles 
at army helicopter gunships and attacked a fort housing military anu 
police headquarters in the northern capital of Jaffha with rockets, 
witnesses and military sources reported. 

It was not known if either side suffered casualties or if the helicopters 
woe damaged. There were unconfirmed reports of civilian deaths and 
injuries. 

A government spokesman, said only that troops kilted five rebels and 
recovered several weapons during a two-day ann-guerrilla operation that 
ended Saturday. 

Basques Protest Death of Detainee 

PAMPLONA, Spain (Rentas) 

— Thousands of Basque national - 
.. ists demonstrated Sunday in. toe 
northern Spanish city of Pamplona 

in protest over toe death of a 
Basque who disappeared while in 
the custody of the Civil Guard. 

Tens of thousands took part ii> 
anotherprotest match Saturday or^ 
ganized by the separatist coalition 
Herd Batasuna, political arm of the 
Basque guerrilla group ETA, in San 
Sebastian. ETA is the Basque-lan- 
guage acronym for Basque Home- 
land and Freedom. 

MDtel Zahaltza, 32, a bus driver, 
disappeared after his arrest Nov. 
26, and his handcuffed body was 
found floating in a river Dec. 15. 
The Qvfl Guard said he escaped 
while kgdmfl guards to an ETA 
arms but bis family accuses 
the paramOitary force of torturing 
Mikd Zabafrza him to death. 

Assam Leader Pledges to Seek Peace 

GAUHATI, India (Reuters) — The Hindu leader of the Assam 
People’s Front, which won elections in toe northeastern state of Assam, 
last week, was chosen by his coDeaguea Sunday lobe chief Hamster of me ‘ 
state and said he Would seek communal peace. 

The party, formed three months ago, overtook the Congress (I) Party in 
toe Dec. 16 poll by winning 64 seats in the 126-seat state assembly. 
Congress (I), India's ruling party, won 25 seats. The United Minorities 
Front, which was formed a month ago to re pr e se nt Modems and other 
minorities, got 17. 

The Assam party leader, PrafuHa Mahanta, 32, a law student, said he 
would carry out an agreement with toe federal government to deport 
some immigrants, most of whom are Moslems from Bangladesh. “My 
first priority will be to implement the Assam accord and to maintain 
peace and amity among all toe peoples,” he said. Mr. Mahanta was to 
meet Governor Binshma Narain Singh on Sunday before being sworn in 
on Monday or Tuesday. 

U.S. Judge Upholds Minority Hiring 

WASHINGTON (WP) — A U.S. federal judge has upheld a mmarity- 
hiring plan in Binnnjgbam, Alabama, rejecting the Justice D epartmen t's 
contention that the aty is discriminating against white employees. 

The U.S. District Court judge,. Sam C Fomta- Jr ? said in a ruling late' 
Friday that a 1981 consent decree allows Birmingham to hire arm 
promote blades and women in municipal jobs over more qualified white 
male candi dates. He said toe agreement was a valid defense against 
charges of discrimination. 

The majority of the people who live in Birmingham are black. Before 
1974, only two of toe fire department's 640 employees were black. In 198 1 
the aty and toe Justice Dqrartnrent signed a consent decree in which 
Bir m ing h am promised to meet minority-feting goals by giving preference 
to blacks and women. The agreement was signed shortly before William 
Bradford Reynolds, who opposes race-conscious Wring plans, became 
head of toe Justice Department’s Civ fl Rights Diviaon. 

For the Record 

At least 21 people were reported missing after a boat capsized Tuesday 
near Maricaban Island in the Philippines, the coast guard said on Sunday. 

(AFP) 

The United Mine Workers of America announced that it was ending a 
1 5- month strike against A.T. Massey Coal Co. following agreement by 
the company to settle charges of unfair labor practices. (NY7) 

Correction * 

A Reuters report in the Dec. 20 business section stated erroneously that 
Messersdmutt-B6Drow-BlDbm GmbH was seeking a stake in Bayerische 
Motoren Werke. BMW is considering acquiring a major interest in MBB. 



Rome Court Ends Travel 
In Papal Attack, Inquiry 


As Hanoi Plans Offensive, Rift Threatens Cambodian Resistance 


By Michael Dobbs 

Washington Post Service 

SOFIA — An Italian court end- 
ed Saturday an exhaustive interna- 
tional inquiry into toe attempted 
assassination of Pope John Paul H 
in May 1981. 

As the uial of three Bulgarians 
and five Turks accused of plotting 
to loll the Polish-born pontiff neazs 
its end, Italian judges visited the 
dty where the alleged Soviet bloc 
conspiracy was supposed to have 
originated in the summer of 1980. 

But they were unable to refute 
denials by the Bulgarian defen- 
dants that they had any dealings 

with Mehmet Ali Agca, the pope's 
assailant 

The session in Bulgaria con- 
cludes hearing of testimony by toe 
Italian court, which already has 
traveled to West Germany, Turkey, 
Switzerland and toe Netherlands in 
its attempts to piece together the 
background of toe assassination at- 
tempt 

Defense and prosecution counsel 
will «w»ke their concluding speech- 
es in mid- January. The verdict is 
expected in early February. 

Under Italian law, there are 
three possible verdicts: guilty, in- 
nocent and acquittal fra- lade of 
proof. 


According to the Italian indict- 
ment, Mr. Agca was paid the equiv- 
alent of 51.8 million to shoot the 
pope on behalf of the Bulgarian 
secret services at a time when the 
Soviet Union was worried about 
soda! and political upheavals in 
Poland. 

Plans for the assassination at- 
tempt were alleged to have been 
made at a series of meetings be- 
tween Mr. Agca and his alleged 
Bulgarian accomplices in Sofia and 
Rome. 

Despite more than 100 court ses- 
sions and the interrogation of more 
than 50 witnesses, toe court has 
been unable to find any trace of the 
money alleged to have been paid to 
the Turkish gunman for shooting 
the pope. 

Nor has there been independent 
corroboration of the numerous 
meetings that Mr. Agca said be had 
with toe Bulgarian defendants. 

The trial began May 27 in Rome. 
It was originally dubbed “the trial 
of the century” by Italian news 
organizations. But it seems tikdy to 
disappoint both Western propo- 
nents of a “Bulgarian connection” 
to the assassination attempt and 
Communist propagandists who ac- 
cused the CIA of launching a smear 




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Much of toe past seven months 
have been taken up by the labori- 
ous examination of contradictory 
testimony by witnesses who proved 
to be unreliable, beginning with 
Mr. Agca. He startled toe coon on 
toe firat day with a claim to be 
Jesus Christ 

A senior Bulgarian official said 
in private that he expected toe trial 
to end with a verdict acquitting the 
Bulgarians for lade of proof, which 
would still leave an dement of 
doubt about to*v r gu3t or inno- 
cence. 


Todor S. Aivazov 

Saturday’s session was devoted 
to a cross-e xaminatio n of Lieuten- 
ant Colonel Zhdyo K. Vasilev and 
Todor S. Aivazov, two Bulgarian 
officials formerly stationed in 
Rome who woe accused by Mr. 
Agca of helping plan the attack mi 
toe pope. Bulgaria has refused Ital- 
ian requests to extradite toe two 
men, who left Italy in 1982 before 
they could be arrested. 

An elaborate alibi presented by 
Mr. Aivazov tor the days leading 
up to toe assassination attanpt was 
challenged by toe Italian judges, 
who cited contradictory testimony 
by other witnesses. 

Mr. Aivazov, toe former cashier 
at the Bulgarian Embassy in Rome, 
pleaded tost ii was difficult to re- 
member his precise movements 
four and a hall years later. 

The one concrete result of the 
trial has been the opening of a new 
investigation into Mr. Agca’s Turk- 
ish acquaintances. Tins opens up 
toe prospect of another round erf 
legal proceedings with a new set oi 
defendants after the current trial. 


By Barbara Crosserce 

New York Times Service 

BANGKOK — A power strug- 
gle within the major noo-Comma- 
nist guerrilla group fighting the 
Vietnamese in Cambodia has burst 
into the open over toe last few days 
and threatens to weaken the resis- 
tance, diplomats say. 

The conflict emerged just as Ha- 

Arson Suspected 
As Cause of fire at 
Paris Food Shop 

Nor York Times Sendee 

PARIS — Police suspect that an 
arsonist was responsible for a fire 
at the luxury food store Fancbon 
that killed the store’s president and 
her daughter and injured II other 
persons, sources said Saturday. 

The police sources said their sos- 

pieiOT was based mainly on toe fact 
that two other fires broke oat in 
nearby buBdmgs within half an 
hoof of the Haze at Faucfaoo, 
which was discovered at 12:36 PJM 
Friday. A fourth fire erupted on a 
neighboring street at 4:30 PM. 

Although their investigation has 
not been completed, toe police said 
they believed that toe arsonist did 
not specifically intend to set fire to 
the gourmet shop. 

Although toe public entrance to 
Fanchtm Is on the Race de la Ma- 
deleine, the fire started in an un- 
marked entrance for employees at 
the rear of the building, on toe Rue 
Vlgoon. 

Investigators said that this sug- 
gested that toe fire was part of a 
series of blazes set by a lone pyro- 
manic Friday around the Place de 
la Madddne and drat it lacked 
political significance. The store re- 
opened for business Saturday 
morning. 


noi was preparing its annual dry- 
season offensive against the guer- 
rillas. 

An urgent meeting has been 
called for Monday in an attempt to 
heal the deep rift in the Khmer 
People’s National Liberation 
Front, according to officials of toe 
group* 

At stake is the leadership of Son 
Sana, the former Cambodian 
prime minister and president of the 
front who has attracted support for 
the guerrillas from the United 
States and other Western nations. 

Congress recently allocated $5 
million far the front and for a 
smaller anti-Hanoi organization 
led by Prince Norodom Sihanouk. 
The groups belong to a three-part 
coalition that also includes the 
Communist Khmer Rouge, toe 
most powerful of the guerrilla 
groups. 

Western and non- Communist 
Asian nations have supported Mr. 
Son Sana at least partly to prevent 
the Khmer Rouge, which has been 
accused of laffmg hu ndreds of 
thousands while ruling Cambodia 
from 1975 to 1979, from complete- 
ly dominating toe coalition. 


Mr. Son Sann, 74, is a soft-spo- 
ken, courtly man who appeals to 
well- e d u cated, middle-class Cam- 
bodians who fear the Khmer Roage 
and have reservations about Prince 
Sihanouk. 

Diplomats and nffimilt m the 
region say the long dispute in the 
Khmer People’s National Libera- 
tion Front has almost completely 
immobilized its 15,000 guerillas, 
leaving the field in Cambodia to 
the Chinese-armed Khmer Rouge. 
The Khmer Rouge has about 
30,000 troops, and the Sthanoukist 
army has fewer than 10,000. 

The Liberation Front, with a ci- 
vilian following of about 250,000 
Cambodians who are living in tem- 
porary camps, dominates a long 
and strategically important stretch 

at toe Thai-Cambodian border. 

The sodousness of toe front’s in- 
ternal disagreements became evi- 
dent Tuesday, when a group of its 
leaders went into open rebellion 
against Mr. Son Sann and estab- 
lished what they called the Provi- 
sional Central Committee for Sal- 
vation. 

They are reported to be dissatis- 
fied with Mr. Son Sami 's tactical 


command of the organization, es- 
pecially since Vietnamese troops 
overran the front's bases inside 
Cambodia last winter. 

Among the rebels is toe front's 
former political and rii ptamarir 
spokesman. Dr. Abdul Gaffar 
Pe&ng Meto, and its military com- 
mander, General Sak Smsakhan, 
who was Cambodia’s last non- 
Cornmnnist armed forces chief. 

According to critics of Mr. Son 
Sann from inside and outside the 
organization, the loss of toe border 
bases last Decexnbo' and January 
should have taught the front that u 
was foolhardy to develop such 
large, vulnerable targets. 

Finally, the liberation Front 
leadership has been faulted by Thai 
officials and aid organizations for 
failing to control its troops. 

Mr. Son Sann has been concen- 
trating much of his effort on frying 
to build a political resistance inside 
Cambodia and a dearer democrat- 
ic ideology among refugees. In in- 
terviews, be pleads fox help from 
the West to train new generations 
of Cambodian teachers, doctors 
and civil servants. 

He said recently that if toe resis- 


tance were to return to power or 
power-sharing in Phnom Penh, the 
country would need a strong, dem- 
ocratic middle-dass base to avoid 
another round of Khmer Rouge 
rule. 

The Khmer Rouge, despite some 
military setbacks last winter, con- 
tinues to inflict casualties on Viet^ 
namese troops in Cambodia, ac- 
cording to diplomats and others 
who have access to toe cksed Cam- 
bodian capital of Phnom Penh. 

There is impartial evidence from 
residents of Phnom Penh that 
Khmer Rouge guerrillas are regu- 
larly within striking distance of the 
city. In September, they fired rock- 
ets into Phnom Penh’s cottral fuel 
storage depot, a resident said. - 

The guerrillas also report success 
at encouraging Cambodian troops 
to rcbeL Diplomats gave cautious 
credence tins week to a Khmer 
Rouge report that several hundred 
Cambodians, possibly as many as 
700 to 900, have been involved in 
mutinies in Pumt and Stem Rean 


DOONESBURY 


P ^ 


. JL 


provinces in the last week. \ t 0 
They reportedly killed more i V-t i 
100 Vietnamese soldiers and a So- 
viet adviser. 


\ WE POOR, 

te, HANDLE. 


,»W 






I 









INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1985 


Page 3 


ll 


hr. 


hh 


4-^ ' 

, By Rick Hampson-. 

J Tke A s s o ci ate d . Pren 

* . 5W YORK— One year afte a 
‘ “ V • man shot feat young ; Uack 

■on a subway train, iJte case 
T ist Bernhard H. Goetz has jet 
IP trial 

■ .e public perception erf 1 the 
' <> ipaJs in the case has dunged 

V'e mouths since the Dec, 22, 
-/ .shooting. Mr. Goetz has 
■. d oat to be something less 
a righteous defender and his 
Is something less than guilt- 
ictnns. • 

; . pes that th^ case would lead 
v onn$ in the tit/s judicial sys- 
iave not been borne out. 

' be case got a lot Of attention 

ias not turned out lo be very 

ictive," said Thomas Rep- 
~ " director of the Gtizens Crime 
■•nission of New York. “A tot 

■ nrcaHstic expectations were 

s e drama tlegan when Mr. 
z, who is white, stepped into a 
Vi£]i l( ff hanan subway on a Saturday 

’■ i^ooco three days before Christ- 
' He sal down and was ap- 
. ' -hwi by a black man who ei- 
asked for ori demanded $5. 
r. Goetz pulled out a revolver, 
“1 have 55 for each of yon," 

■ ygwn shooting. He Bed before 
v « arrived and surrendered nine 
later m Contord, New Hamp- 

I 

. ' r. Goetz, it was soon learned, 
been injured in a mugging in 
-• 'and saw hid attacker released 
7. i Criminal Court before he 
- ;df bad left the courthouse. 

' fter the subwjay shootings, Mr. 
;.“X e’s fame spread. He was the 
• set of a question at a presiden- 
t-news amference and the topic 

- congressioiia] hearing, and ap- 

- ed twice on the cover of Tune 
. lOTitf . Polls showed that he en- 

- •. d overwhelming public sup- 

grand jury indicted him Jan. 

• u weapons charges only. 

ul as time passed, Mr. Goetz 

-« 7 *- !i'V — : : 






Holding a tiny gun, a player tries out The Subway Vtgfbmte Game at a demonstration in 
New York, lie object of the game Is to ride the subway and make it to ihe Bronx alive. 


seemed less heroic. Two of the men 
had been shot in the back, and the 
‘'demand” for SS sounded a lot like 
p anhandlin g 

Mr. Goetz admitted that he bad 
become “a monster” during the in- 
cident, turning to one victim to say, 
‘You don't look too bad, here's 
another,* 1 and firing at the youth 
again. 

The district attorney submitted 
Mr. Goetz's case to a new grand 
jury, which indicted him in March 
on four counts of attempted mur- 
der. The defense has asked Judge 
Stephen Crane to dismiss that in- 
dictment, and he has promised to 
issue a ruling Jan. 21. 

Mayor Edward L Koch, saying 
the incident should be a catalyst for 
changing the criminal justice sys- 
tem, proposed 20 new judgeships, 
detention without bail and special 


courts for crimes committed cm the 
dry’s transit system. 

’ District. Attorney Robert M. 
Morgen than said the publicity 
might help him secure S500.000 for 
a new unit to prosecute subway 
crime. 

Neither man got his wish. But 
the subway system appears to be 
slightly safer than it was a year ago. 
During the first 10 months of 1985, 
the number of subway felonies de- 
creased by almost 10 percent from 
the same period in 1984, and rob- 
beries were down 11-3 percent. 

Some people said Mr. Goetz had 
frightened criminals. But a more 
likely influence was Mr. Koch’s de- 
cision to send more police officers 
into the subway. ' - 

[The Guardian Angels, a group 
of youths that patrols New York 
subways to help deter crime. 


marked the 
shooting Sunday 


of the 
a vigil 


and passing out flyers in support of 
Mr. Goetz, United Press Interna- 
tional monad bom New York. 

[Mr. Goetz said he was gratified 
by the group’s support. Asked if be 
planned to commemorate the 
shootings, he said: “You want an 
encore?” He added, “Last year I 
gave the country a Christmas pre- 
sent,”] 

Mr. Goetz still lives in his apart- 
ment on West 14th Street and 
makes his living calibrating elec- 
tronic equipment. His defense fund 
has received about $28,000 in con- 
tributions. 

But be no longer rides the sub- 
way. Friends say be is leery of be- 
ing spotted in public. 

Of the four people who were 
shot, Darrell Cabey, 20, suffered 


the most serious injuries. He re- 
mains hospitalized, paralyzed from 
the waist down, and doctors say he 
will be confined to a wheelchair the 
-rest of his Dfe. 

.An armed robbery charge 
against Mr. Cabey that was unre- 
lated to the Goetz case was 
dropped in October because he was 
ruled mentally incompetent to 
stand trial. His lawyers have filed a 
$50 milli on lawsuit suit against Mr. 
Goetz. 

James Ramson, 19, is in jail 
awaiting trial on charges that he 
and another man raped and beat a 
young woman on a Bronx rooftop 
m June. 

Baity Allen, 19, is in jail awaiting 
trial on charges that he and an 
accomplice robbed a man of a gold 
neck chain at a Bronx housing pro- 
ject in October. 

Troy Canty, 20, has-been en- 
rolled in a drug rebabiHiation pro- 
gram since April, when he pleaded 
guilty to stealing $14 from a video 
game apparatus and was placed on 
a year’s probation. His lawyer also 

his filed a $5 -million civil suit 
against Mr. Goetz 

In the last month, the stories told 
by the young mm have begun to 
conflict. 

Mr. Cabey says that the other 
three youths approached Mr. 
Goetz with the intention of robbing 
him , but that he was neither travel- 
ing with them nor involved in the 
robbery attempt. He said he was 
shot because Mr. Goetz saw him 
talking to the othen. 

Mr. Ramseur says that Mr. 
Canty walked up to Mr. Goetz 
alone. He contends that he was 
sitting down next to Mr. Cabey 
when Mr. Goetz polled his gun 

In testimony before the grand 
jury, Mr. Canty said be had asked 
Mr. Goetz for 55. But three weeks 
ago, a police officer who arrived 
shortly after the shooting said that 
Mr. Canty told him, “We were 
gonna rob him, but he shot us 
first-" 


lessenger With Access to U.S. House Secrets Is Charged as Spy 


By Ruth Marcus 

. Waditngton Pan Service 

-•-WASHINGTON — Randy 

- a Jeffries, an employee of a 
•: ipany that transcribes secret 

ions in the House of Represen- 
. ves, has been charged with spy- 
• -or tbe Soviet Union after offer- 
to sell secret documents to an 

- , ercomr agent, the Federal Bu- 
.. l of investigation said. 

_ - n FBf agent testified Saturday 
court hearing that Mr. Jeffries 
told an undercover agent pos- 
- as a Soviet official that he had 
I l-'.Cn the Soviet Union 60 “sample 
s” of ebnanfierf material. Mr. 
" ‘to offered to deliver a com- 
s package of three documents 
“ 'SSjOOO, tile agent testified. 

_ lie agent said Mr. Jeffries, a 
' lenger for Acme Reporting 
admitted meeting with Soviet 
- -Sals on two occasions and giv- 


ing them portions of the docu- 
ments. 

Mr. Jeffries, 26, is charged with 
gathering and attempting to deliver 
national defense secrets to the So- 
viet Union. Mr. Jeffries, who was 
held without bond before a formal 
arraignment, rc mrf p. no statement 
during the brief hearing. 

He is the 12th person charged in 
the United States with espionage 
tins year. 

In a statement, the FBI said Mr. 
Jeffries “obtained information re- 
lated to the national defense of the 
United Stales by virtue of his em- 
ployment” with Acme. “After ob- 
taining the classifi ed documents, 
Mr. Jeffries attempted to deliver 
them” Dec 14 to the Soviet Mili- 
tary Office in Washington, 7 the 
statement said. 

A source fantitiar with the case 
said the documents were tran- 


t Christmas Nuts-andrBolts Story: 
Ihe Logistics of Military Fruitcake 

Las Angeles Times Service 

WASHINGTON — For those expecting an army erf friends and 
lathes over for Christmas, Senator Sam Nunn recommends this bit 
Pentagon haute cuisine: the fighting man’s fruitcake, also known as 
vfitiiary Specification MIL-F-1499F, a m e n ded 1980.” 

■ 'The Georgia Democrat, Hiaimuin of the Senate Armed Services 
nmmineft read excerpts of its recipe to colleag u es on the Senate 
■ : 3or recently as part of bus campaign to tweak the Defense Depart- 
eat for needless bureaucracy. 

- “I would call this a ‘Perfect Specification, Cost-Is-N o-Obj ect Fntit- 
— — ke,’ ” Mr. Nunn said, reacting from a Pentagon document detailing 
e proper way for military chefs to prepare the Christmas treat. 

The 18~page “cookbook” also includes six pages of sanitary stan- 
ffds for the kitchen to be met before baking can begin. 

Item 33.1.2.1, on “blending and depositing,” runs: “The fruitcake 
itier shag consist of equal parts by weight of C3ke batter specified in 
rble L and fnnt-and-nul blend specified in Table H blended in such 
.—'manner as to meet the requirements of 3.5.” 

An addendum to the original instructions reduces tolerance levels 
< r the size of candied cherries from 12.8 milli meters (0.49 inches) to 
Is >vi -7 millimeters, and another section details the proper di m e n si ons 
■J J [\*‘ •" r a baked fruitcake: 

“The finished product shall conform to the inside contour of the 
n or can liner. There shall be no point on the top lid greater than Vi- 
:h from the side of the can where (he cake did not touch the lid 
■ring baiting. 

“The pro cessing time shall be adjusted so that the batter portion is 
ated uniformly throughout to produce a finished product having no 
w, stringy or ungelatinized portions. When the cooled product is 
seeled vertically and horizontally with a sharp knife, it shall not 
lmWe nor show any compression streaks, gummy centers, soggy 
as, be excessively dry or over-processed, and shall display an even 
tin structure throughout” 


scripts of dosed hearings of the 
House Armed Services Committee. 
The source said the investigation of 
Mr. Jeffries began Dec. 14 when 
agents observed him al the Soviet 
Mfliiaiy Office. 

In court Saturday, an FBI agent, 
Michael Giglia. said an underrover 

live caltaTMr. Jeffries atttis home 
Friday and arranged a meeting lat- 
er that day at a Washington hold. 

Mr. Jeffries told the agent “he 
had access to a bag foil of top- 
secret and secret documents which 
were ripped up but which could be 
put back together” and three other 
documents that were intact, Mr. 
Giglia said. Mr. Jeffries then 
“agreed to go to another location, 
pick tm the three documents, and 
bring them back to the-undercover 
agent,” Mr. Giglia said. 

He said Mr. Jeffries “also stated 
that he anticipated being able to 
deliver documents on a monthly 
basis as they became available.” 

An Acme official told the FBI 
that the company koeps copies of 
top-secret and secret docume n ts in 
its safe and disposes of them “fry 
ripping them by hand and placing 
them in the tradC Mr. Gigha sod. 

A court document stated that 
Mr. Jeffries was convicted of 
session of heroin in 1983 
racervod a one-year suspended sen- 
tence. The document said Mr. Jef- 
fries had told court officials he used 
heroin and cocaine. 

Acme's board chairman, Charles 
L. Richer, said Mr. Jeffries had 
worked as a “delivery person” at 
the company for six weeks and that 
“the regular background [cbedc per- 
formed before hiring hun did not 
turn up any problem. Among other 


things the imfividnal is a former 
FBI employee.” 

Lane Bonner, an FBI spokes- 
man, said Mr. Jeffries worked for 
the agency as a “support employ- 
ee” from 1978 to 1980 m the identi- 
fication division. 

Mr. Jeffries is married and is the 
father of three. 

■ Israel Removes Official 

Rafael Start, the' man who is 
said to have masterminded the Is- 
raeli espionage operation in Wash- 
ington, has been removed from his 
post as the bead erf ah intelligence 
unit in the Ministry of Defense and 
is expected to retire in the near 
future, The New York Tunes re- 
ported from Jerusalem. 


Israeli officials said Saturday 
that although Mr. Elan is still on 
the government payroll, he is no 
longer associated with the Defense 
Ministry’s Liaison Bureau for Sci- 
entific Affairs, which is being dis- 
mantled. 

The bureau directed Israel's espi- 
onage operation in Washington in- 
volving the American who has been 
accused of spying for Israel, Jona- 
than Jay Pollard, Israeli officials 
said. 

Israeli officials said they did nor 
expect Mr. Elan to be formally 
punished, for his involvement the 
Pollard affair. 


AMERICAN TOPICS 



EDIBLE REAL ESTATE — Laurel Buffer puts the last frosting on the church steeple 
of a 4-foot by 40-foot gingerbread village she baked for a store in Bar Harbor, Maine. 
The 80 candy and gingerbread buildings are for sale, with the proceeds going to charity. 


Film Critic Declares 
A Pox on Sequels 

Paul Aitanasio, film critic for 
the Washington Post, has con- 
demned the current epidemic of 
film sequels with known stories 
and known stars, like “Godfa- 
ther IL" “Rocky IV" or the 
string of “Star Wars” and “Indi- 
ana Jones” films. This kind of 
thinking, he says, “scrupulously 
obeys the law of fast food — if 
people know what lo expect be- 
forehand, tbeyTI flock to it, even 
if the product is second-rate. 

“It wasn't always this way. 
The people who founded Holly- 
wood — men like Louis B. 
Mayer, Harry Cohn, Sam Gold- 
wyn, Kari Laemmle and Jack 
Warner — were uneducated, 
generally boorish and sometimes 
violent, but they knew what they 
liked and were willing to wager 
all they had that the public 
would like it, too. 

“They were risk takers and 
they got rich. What's wrong with 
theNew Hollywood isn’t that it’s 
loo interested in making money, 
but quite the opposite — the stu- 
dios just want to limit their 
losses. A sequel, a big- name star, 
is a kind of insurance policy 


Notes About People 

Lieutenant General Vernon A 
Waiters, the chief US. delegate 
to the United Nations, says of 
the innumerable cocktail parties 
he attends, “I really don't mind 
these things. I wanna kill ’em 


with kindness.” General Walters 
added, “Anyone who doesn't 
Ihinlt you infl uence someone at a 
cocktail party has never been to 
one. A lot of these delegates, for 
better or worse, feel they've been 
neglected by the United States. 
I'm engaged in trying to repair 
that." 


Albert Sbanber, 57, is retiring 
as head of the New York City 
teachers* union local after 21 
stormy years so he can devote all 
his time to the presidency of the 
parent organization, the' Ameri- 
can Federation of Teachers. He 
said, “The c laims of both jobs 
have just been too much." 


Princess Yasmm Aly Khan, the 
daughter of Rita Hayworth, the 
actress, and of the late Aly Khan, 
has given birth to her first child, 
a son, in New York. The prin- 
cess, 35, is die guardian of her 
mother, who has Alzheimer's dis- 
ease. The princess was married 
May 15 to Basil Fmbiricos, 36, 
heir to a Greek shipping fortune, 
but the two have since separated. 


President Ronald Reagan and 
his wife; Nancy, never stopped 
smiting as they stood in the re- 
ceiving tine at the annual White 
House Christmas press party. 
Mr. Reagan was apparently 
keeping a private count. As the 
wife of one reporter shook his 
hand and moved along, the presi- 
dent tamed to Mis. Reagan and 
said, “Thai’s 250." 


Short Takes 

When a bust of Martin Luther 
King Jr. is unveiled in the U.S. 
Capitol next month, it will be ihe 
first of scores of staiues and por- 
traits in that building of a black 
person, although a few unidenti- 
fied blacks figure in murals. The 
unveiling will be pan of the first 
observance Jan. 20 of a national 
holiday in honor of Dr. King. 
The late civil rights leader was 
born Jan. 15. Congress provided 
that the holiday fall on the third 
Monday of January. 

Now that Rajneeshpuram. Or- 
egon, is being disbanded by the 
followers of Bhagwan Shree" Raj- 
neesh, Helen J. Frye, a federal 
district judge in Portland, has 
ruled that the municipality was 
set up “to promote Rajnee- 
shisnT and was therefore an un- 
constitutional merging of church 
and state. The guru returned to 
India after pleading guilty to im- 
migration fraud. 

The autobiography of Lee la- 
cocca, the automobile executive 
who made Chrysler Coip. profit- 
able again, has sold 2J million 
copies in hardback since it came 
out 14 months ago and is in its 
48th printing by Ban Lam Books. 
Another Bantam issue, the auto- 
biography of Chuck Yeager, 
America's leading test pilot in 
the 1940s and 1950s, is in its 12th 
printing and has sold a million 
copies since publication six 
months ago. 

— Compiled bv 

ARTHUR HQGBEE 


ORCHESTRE DC PARIS 
Conductor Dorial BARENBOIM 

Exctmincrtion 

Announcement 

Recruitment of 

AVKXNSr 

(First-category) 

Saturday 18 and Monday 2D, 
Januwy 1986 

ARMCHMMH 

(cO-K&t) 

(F**«*gory) 

Satdd n y 18 and Surdity 19, 
Janucvy 1986 

AIMS' 


(iMd category} 
Sdu^rl and Monday 3, 
Februny 1986 


Atm 

ORCHESTRE DE PAHS 


SMIEHAYB. 

75008 WUHS. Trfj 4&A1.96J9 


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Public Wai, The New York Time* ud TV Vmbipflon Port 


A Dangerous Mirage? 


The “star wan" missile defense program is 
moving steadily forward Hundreds of re- 
search contracts have been Jet. Important tech- 
nical advances have already been claimed. The 
Russians semi desperate to stop the program. 
“Star wars" is building a constituency. 

Although it stoutly resists its formal name, 
the Strategic Defense Initiative has many 
tempting features. Since defensive systems 
stretch engineering and computer design to the 
limits, America is opening a highrtedmotogy 
race in which the Soviet Union will be hard 
pressed to keep up. That edge may compensate 
for the advantage the Russians gained in land- 
based missiles. Effective missile defenses 
might strengthen, deterrence, and diminish ca- 
tastrophe if deterrence failed. 

As its proponents concede, a practical de- 
fense system may not be within immediate 
reach, but the pace of technical advance can be 
forced if enough resources are brought to bear, 
as with the Apollo shots lo the moon. Even if 
the research effort should lead nowhere, Mos- 
cow may pay to buy it off. At the least the 
effort will spin off advanced technology for 
use in the commercial tussle with Japan. 

So what’s to lose? If “star wars" erodes 
deterrence, there is everything to lose. 

The hard questions, unaddressed when Pres- 
ident Reagan floated his vision in March 1983. 
remain unanswered: What combination of de- 
fensive and offensive systems might improve 
stability? Why should the Russians agree to 
limit offensive missiles? WQl defense protect 
cities or only missile silos? If dries are to be 
defended, why not have civil defense, too? 

The SDI is lurching forward, but no one is 
sure in what direction. Officials offer a pot- 
pourri of conflicting goals and justifications. 
Mr. Reagan talks of sharing the technology 


with the Russians, but SDI officials prate 
about gaining strategic superiority. The hire of 
technology and contracts distorts the debate, 
stilling the doubts in laboratories and among 
allies. Even the technology may be a false 
promise, with little commercial spin-off. 

Trying to build “star wars” now, says a 
critic, John Pike, “is roughly comparable to the 
Hayes administration living to decide [in 
1880] if it wanted to buy "an m force." Tech- 
nology can be forced forward by a few years, 
not by decades. So far the claims of progress 
by the SDI director, lieutenant Genera] James 
Abrahamson, have been such empty razzle- 
dazzle that federal scientists are repudiating 
them in embarrassment. They say experiments 
are designed to produce “stunts and demon- 
strations." A much heralded advance with a 
nuclear-powered X-ray laser now seems to rest 
on misinterpretation of a faulty instrument. 

The illusion of progress contrived by Gener- 
al Abrahamson complements the unreality of 
Mr. Reagan's vision. Instead of setting dear 
standards for a new defense-based nudear 
strategy, he has launched a $26-billion jugger- 
naut in pursuit of a technical fix for an unde- 
fined goal. When the juggernaut has finished 
blundering about, will the world be safer? 

Without a dear guide, the SDI promises to 
be a thicket of dangerous illusions. Instead of 
winning Soviet concessions, it may force a ■ 
buildup of new Soviet missiles. IimimH of 
forcing new technology, it may mostly batten 
off civilian advances. Since any defense system 
must work better against & second strike than a 
first, "star wars" wifi come to appear offensive 
and so erode stability. Mr. Reagan has heard a 
voice from the stars. He bears the heavy bur- 
den of proving that it was no Siren’s song. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Listen to Yevtushenko 


Whatever his merits as a poet, Yevgeny 
Yevtushenko’s political ear is highly devel- 
oped. A brilliant polemicist, be expresses the 
ideals of the Soviet Union’s post-Stalin gener- 
ation at shrewdly calculated moments of op- 
portunity. When he and other writers dare to 
escalate their cry for freer speech, they stage a 
political event of major importance. 

Let us first lighten their burden. Invariably, 
the Kremlin responds to such dissent by charg- 
ing that it plays into enemy hands. The Krem- 
lin would do well to understand that cases like 
this bring no joy to thoughtful Americans. 
They deplore repression far the same reasons 
that motivate patriots like Mr. Yevtushenko. 
They believe that free pursuit of the truth is 
essential to progress, and to peace. 

That certainly was Mr. Yevtushenko’s argu- 
ment before the censors wwiifad the (ext of his 
speech at this month’s writers* congress. The 
poet pleaded with the efficiency-minded new 
Soviet leader, Mikhail Gorbachev. Recognize 
that Soviet fanning is a mess because Stalin 
killed off “the precious agricultural wisdom" 
of millions of peasants, he urged. Recognize 
that Soviet industry cannot decently clothe its 
people because party hacks suppressed com- 
puter science in its infancy. Recognize that 
corrupt and inefficient elites will prey on the 


Soviet population as long as scholars and writ- 
ers are barred from criticism of the system. 
Recognize that the ideals of Soviet society will 
ring hollow as long as the most obvious facts 
about the Soviet revolution are suppressed. 

Mr. Yevtushenko is saying that factory 
workers will not be creative until writers, too, 
are allowed to be. To which Americans would 
add that their discussions with the new Soviet 
regime would be greatly advanced if it learned 
to accept more honest discussion among its 
own people. Pursuing the truth about Trotsky 
and Stalin, Khrushchev and Brezhnev is not 
just an academic concern. It goes hand in hand 
with learning to deal with Ranald Reagan and 
to be wise about arms control. 

As Mr. Yevtushenko put it, “Bureaucratic 
check marks indicating ihafan undertaking 
went over smoothly are still not the first signs 
of the long-awaited changes. Articles rhetori- 
cally calling for publicity are not the same as 
publicity itself." When the censors got through 
cutting this and other vital passages, Mr. Yev- 
tushenko’s appeal was reduced to just more 
rhetoric. But unless the poet has lost his fine 
sense of timing, Mr. Gorbachev has not heard 
the last of what some of the smartest Soviet 
people are thinking, and struggling to say. . 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES 


Secretary Shultz Is Right 


It compels attention when a cabinet officer, 
having lost an important argument on the 
inside, goes public in dissent on the outside. 
Secretary of State George Shultz has done this 
now on the use of lie detectors. 

Hard on the heels of a presidential directive 
extending polygraph examinations well be- 
yond the intelligence agencies where their reg- 
ular use is an established condition of employ- 
ment, Mr. Shultz has said that be considers 
them unreliable and erratic. He adds: “The 
minute in this government I am told that I’m 
not trusted is the day that I leave.” 

Mr. Shultz was resoundingly right In re- 
sponse. the president quickly excused him 
(and himself) from taking a lest 
But the implications of the secretary’s state- 
ment surely went beyond the immediate ques- 
tion of whether he himself would be asked to 
submit to a polygraph tesL Having suggested 
that he would consider such a request an 
assault on his integrity and trustworthiness, be 
has surely also suggested that administering 
polygraph tests within his department would 
amount to an assault on the integrity and 
trustworthiness of his employees. 

Lie detector tests are not simply intrusive. 
As Mr. Shultz has indicated, they are also 
fallible. They rest on a presumption of distrust. 
Rather than give a special dispensation to a 
single member of his government, a wise presi- 
dent would make plain that he does not want 


in his cabinet anyone who would take the test. 

From the start, the Reagan administration 
has tended to tilt hard to the security side of 
issues that involve a conflict between security 
and privacy. The past year's spy disclosures 
have enabled the administration to push for- 
ward its lie detector program! But the new 
directive has the look of a hasty catch-up 
meant to cover recent embarrassments and to 
avoid (he burden of less intrusive security 
techniques or the shame of admitting how 
often the people in charge of protecting the 
government’s secrets have been incompetent. 
It is the easiest thing in the world for these 
people, when one of their failures becomes 
prominent, to whine that they do not have 
enough special draconian laws and gimmicks 
to do the job. It is a form of covering up a 
faulty record by blaming it on something else. 

The argument is made that the government 
has an evident, large and growing need to 
protect its secrets, and an unquestionable right 
to do so, and also that lie detectors are useful 
and can be used discreetly and respectably. 
But against these claims must be set the dispir- 
iting record of abuse of this instrument and the 
special alarms of imrusiveoess it sets off. 

It is good to have Secretary Shultz taking a 
stand on principle here. He is right- The gov- 
ernment should listen lo him and absorb the 
full implication of what he is saying. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


1910: British Mine Toll Is 341 Dead 


LONDON — It is now certain that none of the 
men entombed [on Dec. 21] in the Yard mine, 
near Bolton, can be alive. But instead of 352, 
the authorities pul the number of men who 
went below as 341. The reduction of the total 
number of victims still (eaves the disaster the 
most serious in this country for nearly half a 
century. Rescue parties, working among great 
difficulties, found in one place a heap of 47 
bodies of men and of boys evidently caught by 
die flames as they were hurrying to safety. The 
Morning Leader correspondent says the worst 
part of this is to come. Wagons full of coffins 
have been passing through the lines of watch- 
ers. The mine has been regarded as a model 
both by its owner and by colliery experts. 


1935: Spy Ring Arrested in Belgium 
LIEGE — Belgian police say they have put 
behind bars four members of a spy ring which 
furnished the German espionage service with 
valuable Belgian and French military secrets. 
The ring’s specialty was smuggling documents 
into Luxembourg by pinning them on the 
underside of railway carriage seats with thumb 
lacks. After raids on the four men’s homes by 
the police, who found a large number of in- 
criminating documents, aD four confessed, 
Rene Defauves. 33-year-old electrical techni- 
cian and leader of the ring, said he got 46,000 
francs for his activities during the past three 
months. Tbe police claim to have proof that 
the men turned over papers to Dr. Brandt, of 
the German espionage service in Luxembourg. 


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A U.S. Pad 


The Narcotics Problem Is Bad and Getting Worse 

By Stephen S. Rosenfeld 


W ASHINGTON — Drug abuse evolved in the 
1960s and 1970s into a major concern of 


U.S. foreign policy, the focus bang to dose down 
the international drug trade. In the 1980s the 
depressing reality is that things: get worse. 

The Reagan administration major glint, 
incl udin g huge seizures, crop eradication and sub- 
sti ration programs, as well as law enforcement 
campaigns against, especially, the coca growers 
and distributors of South America and Central 
America. Still, from or through a score of nations, 
tens of thousands of tons of drugs a year flow into 
the fabulous U.S. market The supplies of cocaine 
may have quadrupled in the Reagan rime. It gets 
cheaper and more plentiful There are said to be 
5,000 new American users every day. 

Only in Af ghanistan, where the Soviet invasion 
has had the effect of curtailing poppy cultivation, 
is tbe drug situation improving. 

While coca brought income to peasants whose 
alternative was misery, Latin Americans could 
live, uneasily, with the traffic. When local abuse 
started spreading and in particular when the prof- 
its created autonomous centers of power that de- 
fied government authority and even toppled gov- 
ernments, Latins were seized with tree concern 
Not just North American ra gging but their own 
alarm spurs their policy now. 

Drags are still seen in the United States mainly 
as a problem of personal lives or, at worst, dass 
blight- bat in countries with weaker institutions, 
drugs become a threat to the national integrity — 


in Mexico, Colombia, Peru, Bolivia. Jamaica, the 
Bahamas and elsewhere. Persistent allegations 
made against the head of the National Guard, one 
of whose accusers was found headless not long ago. 
in dicate total rottenness at the core in Panama. 

All this has produced some nasty inter-Ameri- 
can political vibrations. For years people in the 
United States have frit that the l^twis were sub- 
verting them with their simply, but now some of 
the l-MtirK feel that the United States is subverting 
them with its demand What they previously saw as 
a gringo problem has become a Latin problem for 
which, in their the United States remains 
ultimately responsible. The mood seems to be one 
of building recrimination tension. Tbe pru- 
dent expectation is that it will darken. 

The Reagan administration has directed special 
rage at Cuba and Nicaragua for suspected com- 
plicity in the drug traffic. It is hard to bdieve that 
no drug money flows in to subversion or terrorism 
connected to those countries. Still, if Cuba and 
Nicaragua fell off the map tbe stuff would keep 
coating through in itmtimw. quantities. That puts 
the United States in the situation of having to work 
out these rending problems with friendly countries 
with which it is conducting a great deal of other 
Hiffimk and necessary business at the same rime 

Politically it is difficult for Latin leaders to ask 
their publics to make economic sacrifices and 


one price that sock 

pay for its past indifference and neglect. 
Something else: 


About a Winter Feast and Our Secular Possibilities 


P ARIS — .If Western society is 
largely secularized today— -and 
it is — why bother with Christ m as? 
By now Christmas has become, for 
most, a secular affair a vast com- 
mercial enterprise exploiting sym- 
bols that are wrenched from their 
setting, gutted and sentimentalized, 
turned to profit and entertainment. 
One might reasonably think it bet- 
ter to go back to the pure paganism 
of celebrating the winter solstice 
with bonfires, rather than carry on 
with this blasphemous parody of 
tbe Christian feast 
And yet ... The Christmas cele- 
brations of the present pay dumb 
but sig ni ficant tribute to the origins 
of a dvfiizalion. Secular though the 
West may be today, the best, and 
sometimes the wont, in its values, 
behavior, expectations and view of 
history and life derive from the reli- 
gion of its origins. Hie ideas of 
progressive and redemptive devel- 
opment in individual lives and in 
history, of individual destiny and 
individual responsibility, which 
characterize the West, are derived 
from Christianity and Judaism. 
These differ fundamentally from 
the ideas of the major Asian rrii- 
that existence is a burden to 
■■ submitted to, or to be escaped. 




By William Pfaff 


The essential theological mean- 
ing of Christinas is that God be- 
came man. This, in religious history, 
is a radical notion. Tbe Greek gods 
mingled famiHariy with o k* 1 and 
women and undawent passion and 
weakness, but they remained im- 
mort al . The God of the Old Testa- 
ment was not only immortal but 
omnipotent, while majestically in- 
tervening in the affairs of the unruly 
humans He had created, hi Chris- 
tianity God becomes fully a human 
being, subjected to the violence, suf- 


the existence of immortality makes 
it possible to bold historical events 
as less than ultimately serious. If a 
just God exists, things win be sorted 
out outside of historical time. Tins 
idea is both consoling for the poor, 
the sick and halt, the persecuted — 


and intimidating for the powerful 
and sucoessfuL Fc 


feting, injustice and mortality of 
Bfe 


human Hie. This is mot something 
gods were supposed to da 

Christmas celebrates this mortal- 
ity of God, the central event in the 
history of the West — since even if 
the event did not occur, even if 
Bethlehem, the manger, the shep- 
herds and kings. Mary and Joseph 
and Jesus were all total invention, 
nothing, nonetheless, was ever the 
same again in Western civilization. 

Western civilization has been 
shaped by this religion. But what, 
then, is implied when a large nuriar- 
ity no longer accept religion? Reli- 
gion offers reason to deal with the 
world with a certain reserve, since 


-or them there are 
always those troubling texts about 
the impossibility of serving both 
God and mamm on, the camel that 
must go through the needle’s eye, 
the rich man and Lazaius. 

Secular man, though, has no rea- 
son to think that justice is going to 
be sorted out after the curtain of 
rime falls. What is he to do? What 
distance can he take from time and 
history? What significance can 
Christmas have to him? It is an 
aspect of the fundamental ethical 
question posed to a non-religious 
society: Why live by any standard 
other than pure self-interest and 
serf-aggrandizement, if life is isolat- 
ed. without larger significance, ex- 
tinguished at the end? 

. Answers exist, of course. Some 
are empirical (altruism pays; coop- 
eration provides its own justifica- 
tions); others involve a form of sto- 


icism, an existential ethic dictating 
that <me behaves well because that 
is what one chooses to do. 

But a religious man or woman 
today makes much tbe same choice. 
In the contemporary world the Pas- 
catian wager that God exists de- 
mands a bigger stake perhaps 
ever before. One simply has to aigue 
that however absurd the idea may 
be of an omnipotent God, it is less 


absurd than the alternatives. It 


make what theologians call the 
erfoocal argument) less absurd than 
to drink that tbe physical universe 
as we know it — m its infinity of 
space and multiplication of solar 
systems, bom in unthinkable explo- 
sion and vanishing into antimatter 
— and (he intimacy and intensity of 
botanical ’ and biological symme- 
tries. not to speak of self-conscious 
man himsdf, are the product of haz- 
ard- Or so this writer says. 

In either case, the winter feast, 
pagan or Christian, offers justifica- 
tion to us stoics, existential or 
Christian, that life itself waxes as 
weD as wanes, like the winter light, 
and that there are possibilities of 
redemption, whether it be of one life 
or of the collectivity of lives, in how 
we conduct ourselves. 

© 1985 William Pfaff. 


The Caper of the Keeper That Didn’t Shock France 


FROM OUR DEC 23 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO E 


P ARIS — A “keeper," in news- 
paper parlance, is a story held for 
ubtication at a time when it can 
ive the most political effect This 
too-careful timing of Qews is frowned 
on in America as advocacy journal- 
ism. Columnists and editorial writers 
are expected to time their blasts to 
influence lawmakers and voters be- 
cause we are licensed mind-benders, 
but news page reporting that happens 
to ©a to print just before a vote sug- 
gests manipulation by the media. 

What looks to me like a Paris- 
Washingtoo “keeper 7 ’ was employed 
recently to affect American support 
for funding of the 40-year-old Ggju to 
prevent takeover of all of Europe’s 


By William Satire 

1986 appropriation, A year ago a am- 
flar stray broke just before the House 


voted, 
lives to cut 
Communist 


panicky represen la- 
funds for the anti- 
onpaign. (The funds 


rence.) A pattern of leftist “keep- 
s’’ to halt aid to hrfp free unions 


labor movement by Communists, 
a left 


On Nov. 27 a left-wing daily in 
Paris, Liberation, which is bidding 
for the circulation of the more sober- 
sided Le Monde, splashed a piece 
originating in a tax-exempt founda- 
tion in Washington supported by 
Greenpeace. Playboy and the Gan- 
nett Foundation, among others. The 
story was about “secret funding" 
of ami -Communist labor unions in 
France by Ihe National Endowment 
for Democracy. That is the Washing- 
ton outfit set up two years ago by the 
Reagan adminis tration to channel 
money to those political parties and 
unions struggling to protect free elec- 
tions and democratic values abroad. 

Not much fuss was raised in 
France, but in Washington some con- 
gressmen professed to be shocked at 
the revelation that the NED was do- 
ing the job it had been set up to do. 

As a New York Tunes article 
pointed out, tbe Liberation story 
“came at a pivotal time for the en- 
dowment," just before a Senate- 
House committee was to decide its 


were restored in a House-Senate con- 
ference, 
ers’ 

protect democracy is emerging. 

To undermine the endowment, tbe 
aroused Democratic congressmen de- 
manded tO know why any money was 
going into a country like France, 
which is a functioning democracy: 
Why didn’t the United States 
such aid only to democratic institu- 
tions in the Third "World? Was it 
trying to destabilize the Socialist gov- 
ernment of Frangois Mitterrand? 

The answer to that is plain to any 1 - - 
one aware of organized labor’s strug- 
gle to resist Communist takeover in 
Europe. Since the end of World War 
II, Communis t organizers have tar- 
geted labor unions as their central 


Brown of the AFL-OO, who at 74 is 
legendary in Europe as the defender 
of free unionism. He says, *T can’t 
understand the logic of not helping to 
protect democracy where it exists." 

When the stray broke in Paris, free 
labor did oot run for cover. Force 


same as last year. However, the ha- 
rassment exacted its toll The portion 
to be given out by organized labor 
was reduced, which takes funds from 
the channel in which they have been 
most effectively used. Moreover, the 
anti-auti-Communisi network 


is 


Ouvrifcre said it was proud to be asso- 

AFL-CK 


seeking to make public the verbatim 
deliberations of the NED. ii 


dated. with the ArL-CIO, adding 
that many recipients were union or- 
ganizers forced out of Poland and 
Afghanistan. The scatdale fizzled. 

:. In Washington. the leftist alliance 
failed again. After some congressmen 
pressed the endowment’s director to 
agree to make public aD grants, con- 
ferees appropriated $18 million, the 


. in the hope 

of intimidating applicants. 

The endowment infuriates the left 
because its money is pm to good use. 
Next November, at appropriations 
time, look for another eve-popping 
revelation by the dwindling clutch rf 
activist congressional staffers and ad- 
vocacy journalists. Objective editors 
may then ask: Why the “keeper"? 
The New York Times. 


With Israd 
Makes Sense 


By Wolf Blilzer •; 

W ashington — tim i* a 
good time for America and fc. 


accept una voidably high-visibility anti-drug co- 
operation with the United States. They can see the 
relatively size of U.S. compensatory aid 
programs and the U.S. inability to protect Latin 
societies against the personal and institutional vio- 
lence of the drug traffic. They can bear frustrated 
Americans threatening to retaliate against the 
trade anH aid of countries whose anti-drug cooper- 
ation is found wanting. Knowing of the exploding 
and app a rently insatiable U.S. demand, they can 
be forgiven for wondering if Washington is a 
reliable and compassionate ally in this deadly war. 

The fight against drugs tends to stiffen those 
who get bound up in it — to make them think that 
Others are lazy and permissive and to turn them to 
ideas that not everyone is yet ready for. Those 
ideas indode using the militar y to intercept drug 
ships nnd planes; making the war a gains t drugs the 
very highest priority; legalizing drugs to take the 
profit out of the trade; toughening the law or 
suspending certain constitutional protections. A 
greater agitation of rough-edged ideas like these is 
■ that society is probably going to have to 


og else: A notion persists in many U.S. 
quarters that a certain noocnminal or “recreation- 
al" use of drags is permissible; anyway it’s not the 
worst thing in the world. Many members of the 
educated classes prefer to concentrate their minds 
on the abstract horrors of nuclear war. But drugs 
are the worst thing in the world, and they are real 

The Washington Past. 


rae! to start moving more 
toward a formal defense pact 
would be in the best interests offcofit. 

Washington and Jerusalem cam 
take quick steps to curtail tbe damage 
caused by the arrest last month of 
Jonathan Jay PoDard, an American 
intelligence analyst accused of setting 
information to Israel The two coon* 
tries have some serious thinking to dc - 
about the state of their relationship, v 
While making certain that the PoOwd - 
affair does not happen again, they 
would do well to consider a formal 
security agreement. 

On the surface it may sound ridicu- 
lous to press this notion now, at a 
time when the two countries are it 
odds. But that is precisely the reason 
to accelerate a project that has appar- 
ently been gaining currency for some 
lime among Israeli and U.S. officials. 

W ashin gton was understandably 
upset by the Pollard case, and US.- 
Israeli cooperation on military and 
intelligence matters has slowed some- 
what since the case came to light. It 
would, however, be a mistake to pro- 
long this slowdown. The United 
States suffers when it punishes fame 1 
in this way, since Israel makes a con- 
siderable contribution to American 
national security. It makes no sense 
for Washington to weaken Israel’s 
intelligence- gathering capabilities. 

When analysts at tbe State Depart- 
ment, the Pentagon or the CIA cut 
back their routine exchange of infor- 
mation with the Israeli Embassy in 
Washington, government officials in 
Israel quickly retaliate by sharing less 
of their information with tbe UJ5. 
Embassy in Tel Aviv. 

The end result of any go-slow 
in intelligence cooperation is lets 
knowledge for both countries about 
terrorist activities, Soviet military ca- 
pabilities, radical Arab poll tics and 
other subjects of mutual interest. 
Who benefits? The Russians, their 
radical Arab allies and terrorists. 

Ironically, Mr. Pollard’s arrest* 
came just as US.- Israeli strategic co- 
operation reached a new high. In the 
past two years Haifa has en raged as 
a major American naval facility in 
the eastern Mediterranean. Tbe two 
countries have engaged in joint mili- 
tary maneuvers, medical evacuation 
exercises and extensive contingency 
p lanning Israel is allowing the Voice 
of America to build a powerful radio 
transmitter on its territory, and Jeru- 
salem has agreed to participate in the 
initial research and development of 
the Strategic Defense Initiative. 

America also has important inUff- 
esis in the Arab world. How would 
the Arab states react lo a formal 
pact? Most Arab leaders understand 
that Washington and Jerusalem have 
a de facto alliance, and they recog- 
nize that America would not altov-t 
Israd to disappear. A signed docu- 
ment would merely confirm this, and 
America’s hands in dealing with the 
Middle East would not be tied much 
more than they are at present There 
would, however, be less room for con- 
fusion and unpleasant surprises. 

There might be some disadvan- 
tages from farad’s point of view. 
Could Israd undertake unilateral 
nuhtaiy actions against the Arabs if it 
were part of a formal pact? Would it 
be able to strike against PLO head- 
quarters in Tunisia, knock out an 
Iraqi nuclear reactor, send forces to 
rescue hostages in Entebbe or invade 
Lebanon? Probably not — not with- 
out formal consultation. 

But in the long run, for most Israe- 
lis the added sense of security would 
probably be worth the price — espe- 
cially as the skyrocketing cost of 
weaponry continues to cripple the 
Israeli economy. Some Israelis would 
surely oppose a pact, and many 
would complain about the loss of 
independence. But there is an emerg- 
ing consensus among both Labor and 
Likud leaders that IsraeTs long-term 
interests would benefit by putting tbe 
alliance in writing. Israeli leaders 
tend to be legalistic negotiators, and 
most would undoubtedly fed more 
secure with such formal oodification. 

In addition, Israelis would be more 
confident about their ability to meet 
future security threats, and as a result 
many would be encouraged to take 
more risks for peace. 

The benefits outweigh the risks. 

Lei America and Israel turn tbePd- 
lard mishap to mutual advantage. 


The writer is Washington _ 
of The Jerusalem Post cmdt 
“Between Washington andjenaabn: A 
Reporter's Notebook." He contributed 
this comment to The New York Times. 


Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed “Letters to the 
Editor" and must contain the wif- 
er's signature, name and fuBod- 
dress. Letters should be Brief and 
we subject to editing. Wt cannot 
be responsible for the return if 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


liberty: Some Questions 


The attack on die USS Liberty in 
source of power .They have concen- .1967 — mentioned in The Washing- 

. t _ • ■ . . _ in • * n i -Jli— ay I. 


trated on strategic industries like 
mines and electricity; in Britain not 
so long ago, the coal miners pro- 
foundly influenced the party that 
controlled the government, and even -■ 
now their leader is crying to form a 
West European pro-Soviet alliance; 

In France, Communfai-run unions 
.represent 13 million workers, with 
poli 


ton Post editorial “Israel: Spying on 


a Friend" (Nov. 28) — was preceded 
hours of low-level aircraft 



country. But 900,000 
are represented by the anti-Comnsu- - 
nist Force Ouvrifee; fortunately, they 
arepredommant in aerospace. 

The man who sensbt 


by seven 

reconnaissance and was requested by 
a torpedo boat commander who, 
while 28 mBes away on. a boat with a 
maxim um speed erf 28 fcnot3,suppo&- 
" bad the liberty plotted- on his 
traveling atSOknotsaway from 
Approaching to within ' 550 

two tapedo bom commanders 

identified the ship as a rusted-out 
Egyptian cattle scow, the EL-Qusdr. 

What the US. gpvernmentigaares 
are the facts that the torpedo boat 
r»<far had a maTimirm ranftg of 12 10 


ensbly and proper: . . . 

ly steered about SI mmion into the 15 mOes, the freshly painted liberty 
free labor unions in France is Irving was traveling at 5 knots {with 8 top 


speed of 18 knots) and the B-Quseir 
had half the beam and one-quarter 
the displacement of the liberty, was 
1 80 feet shorter and had nothing like 
tbeLiberty’s array of antenna. 

The result of the Israeli shooting, 
along with the 34 dead and 171 
wounded, was 821 rocket and camion 
holes and a 40-foot torpedo bole. 

What the survivors are most angry 
about b the aborted rescue attempt. 
The USS Saratoga launched iTIr- 
crafl to our assistance. They woiild 
hraamved overhead prior to the 

of the Navy, 
aner conducting what it repejuedfv 

tiSf“h'^JL'“ CO f plete hivestiga- 

uon, has been unable to tell us why. 

USS L MEAD °RS. 

SS Liberty Veterans Association. 

Woodmvffle, Washington. 




A Low-Tech Problem 


Apcortiing to your series of reports 
00 Europe^s new approaches to com- 
petition, France is ntiasivdy well po- 
sitioned as far as high4ech telecom- 
nmnications are concerned. But try 
to find a working coin ’idephone in 
the Gare do Nora in Paris; 

ROBERT JOHNSTON: 

‘ “ NewYott 


It’s Certifiahly 'Gooses’ 

I hope William Safins emoyedjt^ N 
much as 1 did the letter fKttn Ss* 1 
Charles (Dec. JO) about jibe laikft . ; 
goose. Of course^ had ' “ 

totted his dictkiaaiyTiewroirid^haM' 
known that the plural is a goo$cs7V .; - .'. 

FETERHALL 

- Stros&i Mafajsfa:^.- 






sC*--* 


I ItL ii 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1985 


Page 5 


Jq/^u Lebanon 
s., Appeals to 
[.ILinTape 

■ Sew York Times Service 

" - . ' Balin' — A British employee 
■’ ; he United Nations who was 

. ^Tasked his gova^o^^o 

■ Be a nP wl h ftr of Arabs and 

■ ’ \ Ians who are prisoners in Brit- 

’* ' alls in return for his freedom. 

• * - m message from Alec CdOeti 

. ’cm a videotape that was sent to 
lebanese daily newspaper An- 
• " as, according to an article in its 
.. xday edition. The newspaper 
printed a photograph cf Mr. 
etL 

• s. Collett, 63, a journalist on 

punent for the United Nations 

■ ef and Works Agency for Pal- 
. * iian Refugees, was seized by 

“:men in Barm's southern ont- 
* • is Match 25. A group calling 
... f the Moslem Socialist Revolu- 
.ary Organization claimed re- 
■- lability for abducting him. 

. . " -• /ithtn hours of the publication 
; - vIr..CoDeu’s statement m An- 
-lar. Tarry Waite, the special en- 
of the archbishop of Canter- 
y, said he wished to meet with 

• - hostage’s captors. 

lie Anglican representative re- 
- !C d Fnday to West Beirut to 
tiniie his effort to secure the 
ase of four American hostages 
r.i others held by Moslem funda- 
. itahsts. 

' "■■■ ux Envoy Makes Appeal 
' Tie British ambassador to Leba- 
't, John Gray, appealed Sunday 
'Mr. Collett’s captors to contact 
embassy. Reuters reported 
'm Beirut. 

-I would like to ask the iridnap- 
s to contact the British embassy 
Terry Waite for humanitarian 
sons," Mr. Gray told Aa-Nahar. 
•' dr. Gray said that the videotape 
. '• s authentic and that he was at 
. disposal of the kidnappers if 
y wished to speak to him. The 
■- « was the first news of Mr. Cot 
t since another videotape 
•died his family in May. 



-;s- 


. ■; •>.> v 



X. '• \ 


• ■■■:*# . 

- . '- & ■ 


*- • . . 

s "* . 

-1, 


TtwAaodotedPn- 

Atec Collett making his appeal in the videotape. 

U.S. Presents New Charges 
On Soviet Arms Compliance 

(Coatimred from Page 1) production was “slightly more than 
violation of a provision of the 1979 30 per year uhtil 1984" and haa 
treaty. ■ been “ sl i gh tly below 30 per year” 

In a reconsideration of this issue, since, 
the new presidential report public* unclassi fi ed report makes 

ly affirms intelligence reports dis- public two concerns pertaining tc 
closed by The New York Times compliance with the ABM treaty 
that the Soviet Union has probably that have previously been covered 
removed SS-16 equipment from its in classified reports to Congress, 
test range at Plesetsk and says that (hie involves the Soviet SA-12 
new equipment “associated with a surface-to-air missile, which is do 
different ICBM” has been sent to signed to attack planes. The ABM 
the test range. treaty prohibits upgrading such 

The report also provides the first missiles so tbeycould be used tc 
public administration discussion destroy missBis. The report says 
on the production rate of the Back- tiiere is “insufficient" evidence tc 
fire bomber. In aside agreement to assess Soviet compliance with thii 
the 1979 treaty, the Soviet Union provision, 
pledged that the production rate of The unclassified report also 
the Backfire bomber would not ex- notes that the ABM treaty prohib- 
ceed 30 planes a year. its systems for rapidly reloading 

Last year’s classified report to ABM missile launchers. The report 
Congress concluded that evidence says that Soviet actions on this 
suggested that the production rate score “constitute an ambiguous sit- 
was still slightly more than 30 a nation." 

year. But the unclassified report does 

But the unclassified digest to this not mention steps that the Soviet 
year’s report says there is ambigu- Union has taken to comply with 
ons evidence that Soviet Backfire the treaty. 


J.S. Congress Limps Home 
Jter Frustrating Session 


(Continued from Page 1) 

’re not giving out goodies; wtfre 
king cutbacks.” 

Nbca Mr. Reagan came into of- 
X be advanced an economic pro- 
m with time major goals: cut 
es, increase military spending 
1 balance the budget In the 
-use of the year, most lawmakers 
-red the conclusion that these 

- ts could not be reconciled, given 
political necessity of retaining a 
ial “safety net," and that hewing 
the first two goals would only 
i to ever-expanding deficits, 
jut taking decisive steps to 
ink the deficit proved to be ex- 
nehr difficult After months of 

-uigbng, the lawmakers passed a 
apromise budget Aug. 1. two 
l a half months behind schedule, 
t was supposed to save S5S bQ- 
-t against previously projected 
-idts. But an Friday Congress 
ied the bQJ that contained a 
?e chunk of those savings. 

- Ttis “political gridlock," as Sen- 
rPete V. Domouti, a NewMex- 

Repubtican, described it, was 
sed partly by the divisions wrth- 
3ongress itself. The Republican- 
trolled Senate wanted to cut do- 
ttic programs, including Social 
urity benefits; the Democzaiic- 
House ruled out Social Security 
: and focused primarily on the 
itary budget. 

representative Leon E. Panetla, 
.lanfomia Democrat, gave the 
•t common explanation for con- 
sional paralysis: “The dearest 
8 is the vacuum of leadership 
he crisis issue that needs to be 
reared. In that vacuum, legisla- 
cfaaos developed. There was no 
muvo to drive toward our goaL 
tybody has been basically hid- 
in the trenches. No one was 
<hg to get tough." 
ongress did react to the crisis 
adopting a bill earlier this 
ith that would require annual 
redans in the deficit until it 
ha zero in 1992. 
ven sponsors of the measure 
ed that it had flaws and might 
^constitutional. 

> many lawmakers the deficit 
■ preoccupied Congress and 
focaied the legislative pro- 
" in the words of Rep resen ta- 
fim Wright trf Texas, the leader 
re majority Democrats in the 
se. Only six of the 13 appropri- 
l bills were enacted, and the 
of the government had to be 
reed by a catch-all spending 
that passed Thursday, almost 


three months after the start of the 
fiscal year. 

Congress also failed to meet sev- 
eral deadlines for raising the na- 
tional debt ceding, and the Trea- 
sury was forced mto unorthodox 


fore the ceding was finally raised in 
tandem with the measure to elimi- 
nate tire deficit by 1991. 

Another l andmark of tire legisla- 
tive session was a complex tax' 
package that reduces the top indi- 
vidual tax rate while repealing 
many deductions. The bill, Mr. 
Reagan’s top legislative priority of 
the year, finally passed the House 
last week, after barely surviving a 
revolt by the House Republican 

Agriculture re-emerged as a ma- 
jor issue this fall, and after long 
dehberation the lawmakers adopt- 
ed a $52-billion measure that 
would essentially continue tire cur- 
rent subsidy program for the next 
five years. The bill was far more 
expensive than Mr. Reagan origi- 
nally requested, but he reluctantly 
agreed to sign it. 

Mr. Reagan did veto a measure 
setting strict import quotas on tex- 
tiles and shoes, calling it a protec- 
tionist bill that would incur retalia- 
tion from foreign trading partners. 

In tire foreign policy area, the 
administration suffered frequent 
rebuffs. The president had request- 
ed a force of 100 MX missiles,, but 
Congress limited deployment to 50. 
The president wanted military aid 
for the Nicarag u an rebels, but had 
to accept only nonmOitar^r aid. The 
president asked permission to sell 
advanced arms to Jordan but was 
turned down. In addition, Mr. Rea- 
gan was forced to alter his policy 
toward South Africa and impose 
limi ted economic sanctions as the 
only way to head off a marc drastic 
congressional measure. 

But as they headed home lor a 
monthlong recess, tire lawmakers 
could not comfort themselves with 
thoughts of a fresh start in January. 
The advent of the mandated defi- 
cit-cutting portends a year of in- 
creasingly hard choices. 

“Difficult as it was, tins session 
is going to look very easy compared 
to next year,” said Senator John 
H einz, a Pennsylvania Republican 
who is chairman of the National 
Republican Senatorial Committee. 
“Anytime you still produce a bud- 
get deficit of $200 btffioo, Congress 

has not been making the decisions 
it takes to do tire job ” 


U S. Protest Protests Against Haitian Regime Grow 

T1 • 1 11 O ^ 


prod action was “slightly more than 
30 per year uhtil 1984” and has 
been “ sl i gh tly below 30 per year" 
since. 

The unclassified report makes 
puMc two concerns pertaining to 
compliance with the ABM treaty 
that have previously been covered 
in classified reports to Congress. 

One involves the Soviet SA-12 
surface-to-air missile, which is de- 
signed to attack planes. The ABM 
treaty prohibits upgrading such 
tnksilfs so they could be used to 
destroy missiles. The report says 
there ts “insufficient” evidence to 
assess Soviet compliance with this 
provision. 

The unclassified report also 
notes that the ABM treaty prohib- 
its systems for rapidly reloading 
ABM missile launchers. The report 
says that Soviet actions on this 
score “constitute an ambiguous sit- 
uation.” 

But the unclassified report does 
not mention steps that the Soviet 
Union has taken to comply with 
the treaty. 

Mrs. Mandela 
Is Arrested 

(Continued from Page lj 
driven to a police station in Soweto 
where their names were taken and 
they were released. A spokesman at 
police headquarters in Pretoria said 
later they would be charged under 
emergency regulations promulgat- 
ed last July, which provide for -a 
penalty of up to 10 years imprison- 
ment, or an $8,000 fine, or both. 

The episode means that an at- 
tempt by the South African au- 
thorities to end a politically embar- 
rassing defiance campaign by Mrs. 
Mandela, and thereby improve the 
country’s international image, has 
gone badly wrong. 

South Africa is under strong 
pressure from Western countries 
and creditor Western banks to pro- 
vide evidence of their readiness for 
racial reform. 

Mrs. Mandela had been defying 
a stringent banishment order, in 
force since 1977. confining her to 
the remote village of Brandfort, 250 
miles south of Johannesburg, after 
her house there was destroyed in a 
gasoline-bomb attack four months 
ago. 

On Saturday, the government 
gave Mrs. Mandela the freedom to 
move freely through the country 
except in Johannesburg and 
Soweto and lifted her ban on at- 
tending social gatherings. 

Shelias openly defied her exile in 
recent weeks. In October, she went 
to Pretoria for the execution of 
Benjamin Moloise, an activist in 
the banned African National Con- 
gress convicted of killing a police 
officer. This month, she addressed 
mourners at the funeral in Pretoria 
erf 12 people kill ed in a clash with 
police. 

The authorities seemed reluctant 
to act against her in these circum- 
stances, and particularly in the face 
of increasing local and internation- 
al pressures for them to release Mr. 
Mandela and begin negotiations 
with hu orctkwed bm popular Afri- 
can National Congress. 

More than 1,090 people have 
died in protests linked to apartheid 
since September 1984. 

In the latest unrest early Sunday, 
two people were killed in wide- 
spread racial violence in black 
townships. A black man died from 
shotgun wounds when police 
opened fire on crowds throwing 
stones east of Johannesburg. The 
second man was killed by a mob 
at tacking the home of a policeman 
at PhOlipstown, about 500 miles 
southwest erf Johannesburg. 


Soviet Over 
Libyan Arms 

(Continued from P age 1)' 

, are considered by nuHtary sources 
10 be erf relatively limited value 
again st high-performance aircraft' 
such as the F-14. 

Anthony H. Cordesman, a Mid- 
dle East arms specialist, said of the 
Soviet dcKvoy of the SAM-5s: 

“It’salowiost way of bugging 
the hdl out of Israel, Egypt and the 
United Slates. SA-5 is a museum 
piece, a symbolic gesture, It moves 
very slowly and isiammable.” 

Coland Qadhafi visited Moscow 
an Ocl 10-12, where he sought but 
failed to obtain a treaty of friend- 
ship and cooperation wi th the Sovi- 
et Union, assistance in building a 
nudear reactor and a more favor- 
able treatment for repayment of his 
$4 hflHon to $5 billion debt to the 
Russians. 

According to U.S. diplomatic 
sources and other Middle Bast spe- 
cialists, the visit did not go wefl. A 
U.S. official said that discussions 
between Colonel Qadhafi and his 
Soviet hosts were “acrimonious” 
and that the Russians gave the Lib- 
van leader “a dressing-down” for 
his support of terrorist activities. 

Sources said that the first SAM- 
5s could become operational within 
five months and would be manned 
by Soviet crews. Reports differed 
on the number of missiles that 
would be deployed, ranging from 
36 to 54. 

The Soviet Union has sold Libya 
about $15 billion in arms, such as 
2,800 tanks and 450 combat air- 
craft , mdwdmg MiG-23 and MIG- 
25 fighters. But much of the Soviet 
weaponry remains unused and in 
storage, making Libya in effect a 
Soviet arms depot in the Middle 
East and northern Africa. 


Sihanouk 1 Visits Hong Kong 

Reuierj 

HONG KONG — Prince Noro- 
dom Sihanouk, the Cambodian 
guerrilla leader, arrived Sunday in 
Hong Kong for a private visit. * 


By Joseph B. Treaster 

New York Tunes Serriee 

PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti — 
Thousands trf people have taken to 
the sheets in half a dozen towns 
and dries around the country in the 
last few weeks, challenging as never 
before the family dictatorship that 
has ruled Haiti for nearly 30 years. 

In the first protest march, which 
occurred last month, students car- 
ried placards calling for an end to 
the presidency of Jean-Oaude Du- 
valier; the march met with army 
violence and touched off protests 
elsewhere. Three teen-agars were 
shot to death by soldiers, and a 
fourth was beaten to death. 

A Protestant minister died bier 
in police, custody, the most promi- 
nent opposition leader was jailed 
and the most outspoken and proba- 
bly most popular radio station was 
shut down. Another popular radio 
station has stopped broadcasting 
news. 

About a week ago, policemen 
swinging riot sticks charged into a 
crowd of youths who were chanting 
praise for die banned radio station, 
which is operated by the Roman 
Catholic Church, ana beat and ar- 
rested a dozen of them. 

Western diplomats said tire bold- 
ness and tenor of the demonstra- 
tions in a country where mass polit- 
ical protests have been virtually 
unheard of indicated a fundamen- 
tal shift in the political balance. 

“Clearly the situation here has 
altered,” a diplomat said. 

Several diplomats and many 
Haitians said they believed tire gov- 
ernment had been shaken by the 



Jeao-Claude Duvalier 

protests. A Haitian official ac- 
knowledged that some members of 
the government were worried. 

“No one knows where it is head- 
ed,” he said. "We are waiting to 
see." 

The United States has reportedly 
told Haiti that because of the latest 
violence and repression Washing- 
ton may cut back the $56 nnHioa m 
aid requested for Haiti in 1986. 

The UB. Congress stipulated 
three years ago that one condition 
for U.S. aid to Haiti would be certi- 
fication by the State Ltepartment 
that tire human rights situation in 
the country was improving. 

In the past, tire U.S. Embassy 
has explained giving such certifica- 
tion to Haiti despite some beatings, 
arrests and electoral manip ulation 
by saying there had been at least 
some overall gradual improvement 

Under pressure from the l/nited 
States and other nations that to- 


gether provide aid constituting 
about a third of Haiti's annual bud- 
get of nearly $500 million, the Du- 
valier government has permitted an 
increase in political activity and 
debate. 

But tire latest violence and re- 
pression, a UJS- official in Haiti 
said in an interview, “certainly call 
into serious question any ability to 
certify progress on human rights.” 

Guy Mayer, a spokesman for the 
Haitian government, said Haiti had 
been notified that the United 
States was “baring difficulty certi- 
fying." 

He said that, in response, the 
Haitian foreign minister, Jean 
Robert Estime, had flown to Wash- 
ington last week. The U.S. ambas- 
sador to Haiti, Clayton E. 
McManaway Jr., has been in 
Washington since early this month, 
in part for discussions of the hu- 
man rights issue. The State Depart- 
ment is expected to make a decision 
by mid-January. 

Some diplomats said they be- 
lieved that a reduction in U.S. aid 
would intensify Haiti's severe eco- 
nomic problems and further threat- 
en the stability of the government. 

For those reasons, the diplomats 
said they doubted that aid would 
be reduced. The United Slates con- 
siders Haiti strategically important 
because it is only about 580 miles 
(930 kilometers) from Florida and 
just across the Windward Passage 
from Cuba. 

Diplomats said no clear alterna- 
tive to the Duvalier government 
had emerged. 

Gregoire Eug&ne, a lawyer who 


is one of the government's main 
opponents, said in an interview 
that if chaos developed he believed 
tire army might step in and govern 
until elections could be held. 

Some of the students in the first 
of the recent demonstrations car- 
ried signs saying “Up With tire. 
Array.” 

Diplomats said they had noted 
some signs of discontent within the 
army. But they said the patriarch of 
the Duvalier government. Francois 
Duvalier. who died in 1971. had 
weakened the army, restructuring it 
so that major units reported direct- 
ly to him rather than to the com- 
mander. 

The army's power was also offset 
by creation of the Tontoos Ma- 
coutes. the semi-secret police force 
that survives under the name of (he 
Volunteers for National Security. 

■ Bomb Threat Mars Landing 

An anonymous bomb threat 
maned the spectacle Saturday of 
the first supersonic Concorde plane 
10 land in Haiti, Agence France- 
Presse reported from Port-au- 
Prince. 

The plane, chartered from Air 
France by Mr. Duvalier's father-in- 
law, Ernest Bennett, had been 
scheduled to glide in over the bay at 
sunset. 

Instead it arrived an hour late 
from New York and its passengers 
got off at the end of tire runway, a 
mile from the terminal building at 
Francois Duvalier International 
Airport, while the plane was 
searched because of the telephoned 
bomb threat made from Miami. No 
bomb was found. 


Salvadoran Rebels Plan to Unite in Marxist Party 


(Continued from Page 1) 
anti -imperialist character,” the 
document says, “and its direction is 
toward socialism, expressing tire 
thought of tire vanguard.” 

Victory, it adds, will come only 
with “the liquidation of tire capital- 
ist system." 

The rebel document, dated Sep- 
tember 1985 and tided “Strategic 
Appreciation of the Situation," is 
issued in the name of tire Fara- 
bundo Marti National liberation 
Front, but not the Democratic 
Revolutionary Front. 


A political booklet intended to 
be studied by local commanders, it 
was distributed after a meeting of 
the leaders of the military front’s 
five factions in the northern town 
of Perquin in June and July. 

The officials said they bad cho- 
sen to form a single Marxist party 
so as to wage a “prolonged popular 
war” against the United States and 
the Salvadoran government of 
President Jos6 NapoJe&t Dmum 
Leone! Gonzilez, head of the 
Popular Liberation Forces and one 
of the five top rebel leaders, said in 


an interview, “Duane has to be 
convinced that the FMLN will nev- 
er give up its guns," FMLN are the 
Spanish initials for the rebel move- 
ment. 

Mr. Gonzalez added that the re- 
bels would step up kidnappings 
and attacks in the capital as part of 
the new strategy. 

He said the kidnapping in Sep- 
tember of Mr. Duane's daughter, 
who was later released, and the 
abduction of several village mayors 
were part of the new strategy. He 
defended the rebel killing of four 


U-S. Marines six months ago and 
said U.S. officials were legitimate 
targets. 

The attempt to form a new party, 
as well as other decisions apparent- 
ly made at the Perquin meeting, 
seem to constitute an effort to re- 
solve a long debate within the 
movement over the emphasis to be 
given to political, rather than mili- 
tary. activities. 

The People's Revolutionary 
Army appears to have little backing 
among peasants in the east of the 
country. 


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inkers Foresee a Rush 
‘ New Issues in Early ’86 

ByCAKLGEWIRTZ 

Interaatebtud Herald Tribune 

: k ARIS — Investment bankers predict that there will be. a 
f record vohnne of new issues launched in the Eurobond 
market in the firs: days of the new year. When investors 
return, from their traditional year-end distractions, they 
it, there will be a rush to buy brads. In turn, this is expected 
• prices on existing issues and to narrow, if noi eliminate, the 
r yields that now prevail in the Eurodollar bond mark et 
: arid with New York. 

niters are convinced that interest raxes will be tending lower 
r than higher and that this will attract investors to mating 
ailments before rates * 

Eurobond Yields 

nor Week Ended Dm. It 

U.SJS Id term. Inn Inst. _ 

UJSjS long term, Ind 

UJSJ medium term, Ind. _ 

Can$ medium term — 

French Fr. short term _ 

Sterling medium term 

Yen medium term. Inn Inst. 

Yen 10 term, Int'l Inst 

ECU short term 


ECU medium term 

ECU long term 

EUA hmg term 


LuxF med term Inn Inst. 

LuxF medium term 

Cafadatad by the Luxembourg Stock Cx- 


9J99 % 

1033 % 
1019 % 
1052 % 

1034 % 
1057 % 

MS % 
684 % 
852 % 
936 % 
?81 % 
851 % 
978 % 
923 % 


Market Turnover 

For Week Ended Dec. 19 
(Miltons of LLS. Dalian) 


Cede! 

Eurodcar 


Total 
185295 125425 
44,1915 367S15 


65M 8 
7,9404 


ven. further. 

e expected heavy voL 
. will come on top of a 
d year’s activity. Ac- 
ng to Salomon Brotb- 
rarowly defined Enro- 

' issues totaled $1333 
-n this year, up 67 per- 
. from 1984. Taking the 
oadonal bond market at 
ijdest measure, volume 
sd S164.6 billion, an in- 
■ * of 52 percent. 

S. dollar issues, amount- 
to $92.69 billion, ac- 
; ted for 70 percent of the 
jboud market, down 
■ 77 percent 
te Deutsche mark, with 
iquivaleni of $11.23 bfl- 

was a distant second, 

on ting for 8 percent of the total volume. Eurodollar floating- 
notes, which in 1984 barely exceeded fixed-coupon dollar 
Is, were firmly established as the largest single sector of the 
set — accounting for $47.67 billion, up 63 percent from last 
, and far outdistancing the $41.43 billion of straight dollar 
Is. 

ie current conviction that interest rates are headed down was 
rostrated last week when the World Bank sold $300 million 
>year bonds — the longest maturity the Eurobond market 
:ver seen. The noncallable bonds, initially set at $200 mfllicm 
increased in response to the strong demand, were offered at 
searing a coupon of 9% percent and ended the week down 1 to 
ts, well inside the 2%-percent commission. 

ESS THE full commissioti, the World Bank paid 33 basis 
points more for its money than 30-year Treasury bonds 
J were yielding in New York. The 30-year Treasury, bankers 
, is a favorite of speculators betting on a drop in interest 
l The high liquidity in that market assures easy trading and 
- term rates are regarded as having the farthest to fall when 
hop comes. 

iven die relatively small size of the World Bank issue, it 
Id appear to be a less speculative vehicle. Bankers say the 
and was especially heavy in West Germany, Japan and the 
east. 

igene Rotberg, the World Bank treasurer, noting that the 
: had recently issued 30-year zero-coupon bonds dcno mina l- 
n Swiss francs and Deutsche marks, commented that the 
t issue adds to the evidence that “either Europeans are 
ared to bold bonds for very long periods or that investors in 
nee currencies believe that interest rates are gang to drop 
want [long-term] instruments to maximize their potential 
ud gains.” 

■i. Rotberg said he believed that rates may decline further, 
that “when long-term rates reach an eight-year low we want 
jt liabilities on our books at that rate. If rates go tower, we'll 
ack in the market for more money.” 

-t present, however, he said the bank, which borrows $10 
m to $12 billion annually, is accelerating its plans to issue 
er-dated maturities. 

aw many other borrowers might try to tap the 30-year market 
en to question. Bankers note that the one condition investors 
t upon is that the paper be noncallable, and there are not that 
y high-grade issuers willing to make that commitment. The 
. likely UJS. candidates are public utilities, 
addition to the potential capital gains, buyers of the World 
c bonds are also picking up nearly half a percentage point in 
me buying 30-year bonds rather than the 10-year bonds 
ed last week. 

dy two other fixed-coupon dollar issues were lau nc h ed, both 
0 years and noncallable. The European Coal and Steel 
munity sold $100 million of 9%-percent bonds at a price of 
i. cutting the yield to 9V* percent. Statoil, Norway’s govem- 

^Continoed ou Page 9, CoL 1} 


Last Week’s Markets 

Afl figures ore a of dose of trading Friday 


ock Indexes 


Money Rales 

United States 


UstWk.. 
a — 1543.12 

17474 

is — - 71077 
3— 205JO 

1 2T08B 

P— 12177 

nttLfom Paris. 


138450 

110860 


1720,14 


Prew.Wk. ares 
153452 +056% 
16850 +370% 
722.14 —157% 
70440 +034% 
20979 +052% 
12076 +052% 


138000 +030% 
110450 +034% 


Discount rate _ 


Federal funds rate _ 715716 
Prime rote 9Wi 

Japan 

Discount . 

Call money — - 
60 -day Intwbmk- 

West Germany 

Lombard— 

Overnight. 

1-montti Interbank— 


LastWk. PrmUNk. 

7Vi 
7% 
9 Vi 


71m 


5 

7% 

713/16 


SUi 

5.10 

450 


5 

8VS 

m 


5V» 

435 

450 


Bank base rate. 
173560 —059% Collmonev. 


l-monlh Interbank 11 15/64 1 17/32 

_ Dollar uatWk. PnmJBlL Org* 

5— 13011,10 1310750 —073% ■ 

Bk Enel Index - 12750 12490 +039* 

enaay Gold 

-H* 187150 181150+351* London BJTVfbcS 3X55 31775 +255% 

OnUOLlMBK 


Currency Rates 


’■ Bated 







Dec. SO 

* 

c 

DM. 

FJr. 

ILL. 

CUdr. 

BJF. 

S.F. 

Van 

m U3B 

ua 

11247 • 

3L»- 

8.1451 ■ 

— — 

SJU* 

13416" 

mj2v 

1> 5L437S 

7121 

».«3 

6M* 

1992 • 

1113 

«— 1 ■ 

343*45 

25J8S* 

ISl 

1584 


3240* 

1.464 x 

«L7M* 

4871* 

1WJ8* 

13415* 

■i 1X245 


ISMS 

1L641 

149780 

48435 

71315 

38W3 

3B785 

I777J2S 

U «7B 

68225 

222X1 

— 

at . a 

3UB 

nuo 

8478 

(O 


25075 

7JW2S 

IjTVQO 

2825 

SUP 

IMS 

TOM 

7JJ2 

14.987 

10*85 



L4Mx 

17238 

1499* 

16*9 

3886* 

2Q.15 

mw 

H71 

2LB 

1185* 

7185 

39461 * 

9589 


11151 

LOOM 

suns * 

27 36 • 

a.t22»* 

«J0* 

4.10?' 

— 

14904* 

WAS 

OAW 

2.1875 

+71 H 

14*383 

14543 

446905 

18382 

174258 

1.08455 

SJMtl 

ILQ. 

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Elf, Total 



Firms Prefer 
Netback Pricing 

Room 

BAHRAIN — France’s two ma- 
jor od companies win not, renew a 
three-year, fixed-price production 
contract for about 58,000 barrels 
per day of Saudi Arabian exude, oil 
industry sources said Sunday. 

T^satoiheconyameSjSodeii 
Nationals Hf-Aqmtaine and Ge. 
Fran^afee des Pfctroles, known as 
Total, conader the contract, which 
expires Dec. 31, to have been re- 
placed by a six-month agreement 
for 50,000 hands per day. . 

The new contract, which began 
Nov. J, uses netback pricing, based 
an the price of finished products. 

The companies did not want to 
renew on a fixed-price basis and 
Saudi Arabia did not want to com- 
mit itself to netback pricing for 
three years, the sources said. 

“The ofl world has gone to short- 
term contracts,” an oO executive in 
Saudi Arabia said. "Three-year 
contracts at a fixed price are a thing 
of the past” 

He said he thought that the 
French, companies would be able to 
continue to draw market-priced o3 
after the six-month contract ex- 
pires. 

“I think it’ll be rolled over as 
long as it’s in the interest of both 
parties,” be said, adding that the 
Saudis had declared their interest 
in keeping ail flowing. 

"The decision has been made 
here to be competitive whatever it 
takes. The pricing may shift to a 
different basis, but it will be mar- 
ket-related," he said. 

Under (he new contract. Elf and 
Total each take 25,000 bands a 
day. 

The old contract allocated 

39.000 barrels a day to Elf and 

19.000 bands a days to Total The 
sources said, however, that they 

that agreement since 
March, mainly because of difficul- 
ties that refineries in Europe had in 
mating a profit in processing offi- 
cially priced ofl. 

Hf and Total also have an i 
ly shared contract for 78,000 
ids per day with Iraq. 

One source said the contract 
with Zraq, ^irich expires at the end 
Of the year, was bong continued 
until both sides derided whether to 
renew. 

Iraq has been basing prices for 
much of its ofl on the spot market 
in an effort to increase sales now 
lhat iL has opened a 500,000-barrel- 
pCT-day pipeline across Saudi Ara- 
bia. That pipeline supplements a 1- 
million-barrd line through Turkey. 

Ofl began flowing through the 
Saadi line in September and has 
nearly reached capacity. 

The Iraqi agreement ran out 
June 30 and was renewed for six 
months after Iraq reluctantly ap- 
proved the French companies' de- 
mand for spot pricing. 



Hyundai Ponys, Korea’s first entry in North American market, being loaded for export 


Hyundai Takes Low Road to U.S. 

South Koreans Move to Fill Gap in Subcompact Market 


By James Risen 

Lae Angela Times Service 

DETROIT — The little Hyundai Pony, the first 
South Korean car to enter the North American 
market, is nothing fancy. A bit like a Chevrolet 
Chevette or a Toyota Tercel Its passenger com- 
partment is cramped, and it offers nothing new 
technologically. It comes from a small country that 
has a small auto industry, and few can correctly 
pronounce its brand mme (Run-day). 

Hardly the makings far a big hit in today's car 
maricet, already overcrowded with subcompact 
models, ri g ht? 

Wrong It is cheap and seemingly reliable, and at 
the bargain-basement end of the car market, that is 
all that really matters. 

In Canada, in fact, Hyundai already i* a certi- 
fied success. In less than two years on the market 
and with only two models in its " ’ " 

light]] 


and the slightly larger Stellar, Hyundai has become 
Canada’s No. 1 imported car, stealing the title 
earlier this year from Japan's Honda Motor Co. 

With its sales in Canada still growing, no one 
there seems to know how far Hyundai will go. 
After selling a little more than 25,000 cars in 
Canada in 1984, Hyundai’s 1985 sales through 
November surpassed 74,000, and should easily 
break 80,000 for the fall year. Already, Hyundai 
accounts for 1\2 percent of all tire imported cars 


sold in Canada and commands an impressive 4.6 
percent of the total Canadian car market. 

Meanwhile, it has announced plans to open a 
Canadian assembly plant by 1988, signaling its 
intent to be in North America for the long hauL 

"Nobody in their right mind would have expect- 
ed Hyundai to become the No. 1 impart in Canada 
in two years,” says Max Jatmessou, executive vice 
president and dnef operating officer of Hyundai 
Motor America, the company’s new UR sales arm 
based in Garden Grove, California. 

But after bloodying the established auto compa- 
nies in Canada, Hyundai Motor Co. will not sur- 
prise anyone when it moves south early next year. 

Inwhalis likely to be Ihe first trickle of a flood 
of inexpensive sm»n cars into the United States 
from at least three Sooth Korean automakers, 
Hyundai will introduce an updated, front-whed- 
drive version of the rear-dnve Pony, called the 
Exod, on Feb. 15. It will follow with the Stellar in 
1987, and later it may expand its U.S. lineup with a 
light pickup truck, a mmivan, a two-seat sporty 
car, and possibly an executive-style sedan. 

And if Hyundai's performance in the UR mar- 
ket comes anywhere near its Canadian success, the 
South Koreans will spark an intensified battle in 
the overcrowded subcompact market, mating it 
(Continued on Page II, CoL 5) 


Airbus Proposes 

Talks With U.S. 
On Bid Practices 


2d Westland Rid Called Appealing 


By Bob Hagerty 

hugiyunkHialHerald Tribune 

LONDON — A banking adviser 
to Westland PLC said Sunday that 
a rescue offer for the British maker 
of helicopters from a group of Eu- 
ropean companies appeared more 
attractive financially t h a n an earli- 
er bid from a rival group. 

But the adviser, Michael 
Baughan, a director of Lazard 
Brothers & Co^ said that Westland 
required clarification on some as- 


composed of Aerospatiale of 
France, Agusfa SpA of Italy, Mes- 
serchnmt-Bdlk ow-Blohm GmbH 
of West Germany, British Aero- 
space PLC and General Electric 
Co. of Britain. 


As part of a complex refinanc- 
ing, the group offered Friday to 
pay £37.1 million ($53 million} for 
29.9 percent of Westland, which 
has oo me “perilously dose to re- 
ceivership” recently, according to 
its chairman, Sr John Cockney. 

The rival group, composed of 
United Technologies Cotp. of the 
United States and Bat SpA of Ita- 
ly, has offered £30 million for a 
299-pcrcent stake. Both offers in- 
clude plans for conversion of bank 
debt into equity and sales of shares 
to existing shareholders. 

The compering bids have created 
apolitical furor. Michael Heseltine, 
the defense secretary, has pushed 
for an all-European rescue, while 
Leon Britian, trade and industry 


secretary, backed Westland’s board 
on its earlier preference for the 
UTC-Fiat plan. 

In assessing the bids, Westland is 
focusing on the amount of subcon- 
tracting work promised by the two 
sides. Mr. Baughan said that West- 
land would ask the European group 
to offer guarantees rather than just 
commitments on extra work prom- 
ised under its proposal. 

Meanwhile, some British news- 
papers suggested Sunday that Lib- 
ya’s minority shareholding in Hat 
would create political obstacles for 
the UTC-Fiat offer. But Mr. 
Baughan said Libya’s shareholding 
had not prevented Fut’s aerospace 
division from supplying European 
aircraft makers in the past 


By Axel Krause 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — France, Britain and 
West Germany have jointly pro- 
posed informal talks with the Rea- 
gan administration over U.S. alle- 
gations that unfair practices ore 
used to sell Airbus planes, U.S. and 
West European government offi- 
cials have disclosed. 

The proposal is contained in let- 
ters expected to be delivered Mon- 
day to Clayton K. Yeutcer, the U.S. 
trade representative, and apparent- 
ly is aimed at beading off possible 
U.S. retaliation against Airbus In- 
dustrie, the European aircraft con- 
sortium. 

The Airbus case is based on alle- 
gations by Boeing Co„ a major Air- 
bus competitor, that the West Eu- 
ropean consortium has for well 
over a decade been competing un- 
fairly through government subsi- 
dies and so-called political induce- 
ments to sell the Airbus. 

Boeing has contended that the 
Airbus governments, particularly 
France, regularly sweeten their 
bids to potential customers by 
promising such advantages as new 
landing rights for national carriers, 
substantial aid packages to devel- 
oping countries and unusually at- 
tractive financing for Airbus pur- 
chases. 

“We deny allegations about so- 
called inducements to aircraft sales 
by Airbus, but we also explain ue 
are ready to discuss all the issues, 
including subsidies." an adviser to 
Edith Cresson, France's minister 
for industry and foreign trade, said 
of the letters to Washington. 

Mrs. Cresson, along with Geof- 
frey Pa trie, Britain’s industry min- 
ister and Martin Bangemann, West 
Germany’s economics minister, 
sent the separate but virtually iden- 
tical letters to Mr. Yen iter. 

Administration officials in 
Washington and Boeing executives 
in Seattle reacted favorably to the 
West European proposal. No agen- 
da or schedule has been set, but 
both sides agreed lhat talks could 
begin in early January. West Euro- 
pean officials suggested lhat they 
be hdd at the sub-cabinet levcL 

“We would welcome an opportu- 
nity to talk with the Europeans 
because all the allegations about 
Airbus and increasing pressures 
around here to do something about 
Airbus are getting out of control,” 
an administration trade official 
said Friday in a telephone inter- 
view from Washington. 

“None of the cases of induce- 
ments have yet been proven, but 
the continuous repetition of what 
Airbus is and supposedly does to 
get sales orders can no longer be 
ignored," said the official, who de- 
clined to be identified. 

The officials emphasized that 
Washington still is considering re- 
taliation against Airbus. Similar ac- 
tion also is bring considered, they 
said, against West Germany’s gpv- 


Good Times Return for West Germany’s Machine-Tool Makers 


By John Tagliabue 

New York Times Service 

BIELEFELD, West Germany — 
West Germany's powerful ma- 
chine-tool industry, long the world 
leader, has been having its head- 
aches in recent years. 

The recession and debt crisis bat- 
tered lucrative markets, and where 
people still placed orders, Japanese 
competitors mapped them up. In 
the United States, where the West 
Germans were eminently competi- 
tive thanks to a hamstrung domes- 
tic industry and an undervalued 
Deutsche mark, the threat of im- 
port restrictions loomed large. 

Gfldemrister AG, one of the in- 
dustry leaders, was a case in print 
Development costs to catch up 
with die electronic revolution in 
machine tools swallowed up im- 
mense sums, and a production glut 
amid shrinking markets caused 
losses to amass. The company’s 
banks were forced, to write off rail- 
boas of Deutsche marks in bad 
loans. 

Today the industry and such 
companies as GUdemeisier feel 
that, although problems remain, 
the worst may be over. This year, 
industry ordere jumped men than 
40 percent, and production capaci- 


ty was more than 90 percent ex- 
hausted, demanding overtime and 
extra shifts. Gfldemrister expects 
to break even this year, snapping a 
10-year losing streak. 

•This yearisprofit, and part of 
next year’s, win gp to replenishing 
reserves,” said Hoist GOhrea, Gfl- 
demrister’s duel executive, in a 
mood that reflected the turn in the 


modernize plants and introduce 
new models has begun to take bold. 

Now, buoyed by the fresh pros- 
perity, industry leaders are pushing 
to alter the shape of the business, 
investing heavily to develop new 
“flexible” manufacturing systems, 
with the electronics to run them, 
that they hope will assure future 
growth. By focusing on sales of 


The process is not over, but our philosophy 
is different. Yon might call it a certain 
Mercedes mentality. 9 

— Horst G&hren 
Gildemeister'a chief executive 


industry's fortunes. “But after that 
well be passing some of the profit 
on.” 

What has happened is that first, 
an economic recovery, led by the 
United States, has boosted capital 
investment and with it the demand 
for machine tools, winch are used 
<»gsttntiaTl y tn make other machines. 

Second, a muItibiUios-drilar in- 
dustry-wide investment push to 


engineering and planning know- 
how, they hope to reduce their reli- 
ance on the traditional machines 
chat competit o rs in Japan and else- 
where can build more cheaply. 

The struggle is crucial, for West 
Germany is the traditional world 
leader in machin e tools, and ex- 
ports,' wind) account for about 
two-thirds of sales, are a key strut 
in Bonn’s export-oriented econo- 


my. Moreover, the industry gives 
West Germany an advantage in 
other machine-oriented industries, 
such as automobiles and plant con- 
struction. 

But as demand for machine tools 
has declined, with slower overall 
economic growth and increased use 
of metal substitutes. West Germa- 
ny has been thrown on the defen- 
sive. Moreover, Japan, having cut a 
swath through the United States, 
has leaped the Atlantic, preying in- 
creasingly ou traditional West Ger- 
man markets. 

West Germany remains the 
world’s biggest exporter of ma- 
chine tools, commanding 22.3 per- 
cent of a world market worth $8.8 
billion last year, compared with Ja- 
pan's 192-percent share. But as re- 
cently as 1980, West Germany’s 
share was 26 percent, double that 
of Japan’s. 

Now, however, with capital in- 
vestment reviving worldwide. West 
German machine-tool sales are 
booming. Total sales this year are 
expected to jump 12 to 15 percent, 
from last year's $3.7 biflion. 

Despite the progress, however, 
industry officials agree that much 
remains to be done. Recent market 


studies grimly predict that a rough 
road lies ahead. 

Much of the West German in- 
dustry’s rebound came because of 
ihe overall economic recovery in 
the United States, which edged out 
the Soviet Union this year as West 
Germany’s largest export market 

Bu the Germans face the contin- 
ued threat of inmort curbs de- 
manded by the U.S. National Ma- 
chine Too) Builders’ Association. 
Its president, James A. Gray, has 
argued that imports of West Ger- 
man machine took by the U.S. stra- 
tegic aerospace and defense indus- 
tries endanger national security by 
creating foreign dependence. 

“That threat remains on the ta- 
ble,” said Hans- Ulrich Kokoska, 
an industry association spokesman 
in Frankfurt 

Elsewhere, debt-strapped Third 

(Continued on Page 9, CoL 2) 


/ '.1453 Irish 1 

move ttu Btmaiux tBnssadsH Banco CornwraW# 7ta«W Bcrtoue Ha- 

tera (Paris): Bank at Tokyo (Tokyo): IMP (SOIVf BAH (diner, riyat dirham); 
uWri. Otner aata from Reuter* and AP. 


ADVERTISEMENT 


THEDAIH INC. 

(CDRa) 

The nwItoJaepri announce* Um as lima SOtli 
December 198S a Km Aawdnie N.V. 
SpP M tinil 112, Kaaoabm, dhx»j». 30 
(ecctwranicd by an "Affideru”) of me CDRa 
The Dafei Ine^ will br payable with Dfln. 
2^7 net per CDR, rapr. 25 ehe. and 
with flfla. 94*80 »ei par CDS, rear. 
1.000 aha. (dhr. per recorodtia (XL3L1&5; 
Yen &2S p.sk) after deduction of 19% 
so tax — Yeo 30.- ■ DOs. ..42 pea 
rent 25 aha^ Yen L20G.- - DC*. 
1630 par CM. repr. 1.000 st*. Without on 
Affidavit "SO* Jopjas — Yen 4L- " Dfb. 
.57 par CDR, rear. 25 aba, Yae L640.- “ 
Uk 2230 perOKt. itm. LOOOBbh. wiO be 
deducted. Ate 0331 .1986 thaifiv. wdl only 
be p*'*! uwdjff ^ Hifft i nii of 20% Jap. tax with 
«*p. DOa. 232j Dfla. 8830 hh per qM. 
repr. reap. 2S and . 1.000 ahk, each in aeenr- 
dance with ihe Japanese taa regulation*, 

AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY N.V. 

AtnHadam, 13* Oetrm b r r 1985. 


advertisement 


MITSUI & CO. LTD. 

(CDRa) 


The undeoKuodanumincea tint «f«wa80d» 
December 1985 at Ka» Asodatie KV, 
Sputttrsai 172. Ammetdam. dhmao. 26 
{acaxawtied hj to "AffidwiO dt Bie CDRa 
Hh«ri Go. IbL, will be payable with 
Dfb. 236 net per CDR, nfir. 100 sha. 
a»d with Dfb-aSj6®o« per CDR, nipr. 

1 . 000 aha. (dir. per **wWato0M0J«5: 
Yen 23 p&) after dedurtion of 15% 
bh tw ■ Yen 3730 “ Mfc -32 wj 

repr. lOOehe.. Yen 375.- - tth. 520 

per CDR. repr. 1.000 ih*^ Without an Affida- 
vit 20% JanJa* ■* Yen 50,- - DOs. -.70 per 
CDR. 100 ahu Yen 500,. - Dfls.% 
per CDR, repr. LOOOiIil, will be deducted. 
After 30.041966 the dp. will only be paid 
•W- Llfl*. 
rep. 100 

with the 

Japanese tea regulations. 

AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY XV. 

AsMenbm. 13d) December 1965. 


ADVERTISEMENT 


MITSUBISHI EUECTRIC 
CORPORATION 

(CDJRe) 

The Budenagaed announces that aa {nun 30th 
December, 1085 at Ka+Aaaecudae N.V^ 
Spnu&aal 172, Auateniam, dte^no. 23 


— , will be 

pnsthle vitb Dfb. 2354 am per CDS, 
repr. 500 sb. and with DCs. 47,70 net 
per CDR, repr. 1.000 aha. (div. per re- 
cord-dale 0&&198S( grow Yen 4.- pA) 
after deduction of 15ft inancse tax " Yen 
30Q, - DO*. 422 per CDR. rqa. 500 
Yen 600.- =" Dfh. 8,44 per CE , repr. 1X100 
WBhont an Affidavit 20ft Japan “ Yea 
400.- - Dth. SJ52 per CDR, rent 500 aba. 

Yen aoa- - DO*- 1U» P* COP — 

1.000 aha*, will be deducted. 

0430.1906 the drv. wlB only he pek. 

deduction or 20ft Jap. tax wlih reap. 
DDa.22.4Si DO*. 44,90 net per CDR, repr. 
reap. 500 and 1.000 sb* each, in necoreanoe 
ituimdaba, 

1KDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY N.V. 
AreaKKbaz. 13tb December 19B5, 


After 


ADVERTISEMENT 


TOSHIBA 

CORPORATION 

(CPUs) 

The undernened announces ihal a* from 27 th 
December 1965 at Ka* Aswaatie N.V, 


Corporation, i 
DCU. 20. 14 per CDR, i 
with DOs. 40^28 per ( 
aba. (div. per record-date 09-XJ.iWSj; praps 
Yen 4,- paL) after deduction of 15ft Japanese 
tax “ Yen 300,- " Dfb. 4^1 per CDS, repr. 


500 aha.. Yen 601- - Dfla. H.42 per i 
repr. 1.000 *h&. Without an Affidavit 


20ft 


- Yen 400,' - Dfb. 5.62 prr CDR, 
repr. 500 ahs. Yen 800,- = DOs. 1 1.24 per 
Cl®, repr. 1.000 aha. *iU bededwwi. After 
0430.1965 ihe div. wiU only be raid under 
deduction of 20% Jantax itsp. Cab. f&iS; 
Dfla. 37,46 net per CDR repr. rasp. 500 and 
L000 aha- eadi, in accordance with the Jape- 
near tm regulations. 

AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY N.V. 
Anwenfam, 12ib December 1985 


Notice of prepayment 
BANQUE NATKMALE DE PAWS 
US DIRS 250,000.000 
Floating Rate Notes due 1988 

Notion le hereby given that. In aceor- 
dwee with dense “Early Redemption* 
(A) el thn terma and eondWona of tha 
Notaa, Banqve Nntlonale da Peris wn 
prepay afl ofthe outstanding Notes at 
ttwlr principal amount on January 31. 
1986 When IflWwt on the Notes wtfl 
cease 10 accrue. 

Payment of prlncfea! wBI b« made 
upon presentation and aenintt surren- 
der of the Notes with all unmaturM 
coupons attached at the principal 
often, of Benqua Nationale da Paris 
(New York branchlin Nnw York Qty or, 
of Banqim Nationale do Petto In Pvto 
or, of Algwnone Bank Nndertond NV 
In Amsterdam or, of Bancs Nnzkmale 
dal Lavoro In Roma or. of Banque 
Bruxelles Lambert BA In Brussels or, 
of Banque Nationale de Paris 
(Luxembourg) SA fai Luxembourg 
or, of Banque Internationale a 
Luxembourg In Luxembourg or, of 
BanquB Nationale da Paris Pic hi 
London or. at Dresdner Bank AG In 
FrenfcfurtAlaJn. 

Accrued Interest due January 3L 1388 
wfll be paid In the normal manner upon 
presentation and against surrender of 
no. 21 on or after January 3i, 


c ou pon i 


By: Banque Nattonela do Paris, ftira. 


Airbus Loses 
VASP Order 

Comptlnl hr Our Su[f From Diymtckts 

PARIS— VASP. Brazil’s do- 
mestic airline, has dropped 
plans to buy six planes from 
Airbus Industrie while Trans 
Australia Airlines has decided 
to buy nine aircraft from the 
European consortium, accord- 
ing to officials. 

Pierre Pail 1 ere L an Airbus 
vice-president, said Friday in 
Rio de Janeiro that VASP Jiad 
canceled a 5300-million, 19S4 
order for six Airbus A3 10-200 
airliners. He declined to com- 
ment on the decision. 

The chairman of govern- 
ment-owned TAA, Neil Smith, 
said Friday in Melbourne that 
he had asked the Australian 
government to approve the 
S420-million purchase of the 
nine A320 aircraft. 

(AFP. Reuters) 

eminent telecommunications agen- 
cy and the Brazilian aerospace in- 
dustry because of allegations that 
they compete unfairly or discrimi- 
nate against U.S. companies. 

Washington has already vowed 
to penalize imports of the next gen- 
eration of Japanese semiconduc- 
tors if the government finds that 
Japan is selling existing chips in the 
United Slates at below market val- 
ue. 

The Reagan administration con- 
siders a test case to be the bidding 
for an All Nippon Airways Co. 
contract for 15 wide-body jets to 
replace its Lockheed HOI I fleet. 
Boeing and Airbus have both sub- 
mitted proposals. 

All Nippon said in April 1984 
that it had decided to consider the 
Airbus A -300-600 after having 
signed an option to boy 15 Boeing 
767-200s. The price of both manu- 
facturers’ planes has been estimat- 
ed at around $70 million each, 
making the transaction worth as 
much as $1 billion. 

“The Airbus proposals reflect 
their government subsidies, which 
are among their practices we regu- 
larly bear about and consider un- 
fair competition," said Thomas 
Riedinger, a Boeing marketing di- 
rector. 

“We know lhat the UJS. authori- 
ties also help Boeing on sales con- 
tracts around the world," Mrs. 
Cresson's adviser said. “It is a com- 
plex world.” 

Mr. Rei dinger countered by say- 
ing lhat "in every country. Airbus 
starts with the government and 
works down to the airline, whereas 
we and others start with the airline 
and work up." 


! APPOINTMENT! 


ATCO 



The Honourable 
Peter Lougheed, RC., Q.C. 

Mt R.D. Southern, on behalf of 
(he Board of Directors, ATCO 
Ud., ts pleased to announce 
the appointment of the Hon- 
ourable Peter Lougheed, RC, 
Q.C. as a Director of the 
Corporation. 

Mr. Lougheed, a native Cal- 
garian, graduated in law from 
the University of Alberta and 
obtained his M.BA degree 
from the Harvard School of 
Business. He was appointed a 
Privy Councillor to her Majesty 
the Queen in April 1982 and 
served the people of Alberta 
with distinction as Premier of 
the Province from 1971 to 
1985. 

ATCO Ud. is a Canadian own- 
ed, Alberta-based holding 
company with world-wide 
subsidiaries involved in man- 
ufacturing, natural resources, 
real estate and utilities. 


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\\be^Internaiional Bond Prices 

provided by Credit Suisse First Boston Securities, London, Tel.: 01 - 623 - 1277 . 

Prices may vary according to market conditions and other factors. 


»W Price Htat Ulf Cun' | 4n " 


(Continued from Page 6) 


MOOe AW 

Seam tv % Mai Prka Mai UfaCvrr 

FOREIGN TARGETED BONDS OF THE 
US TREASURY AND OF ITS AGENCIES 


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412 

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625 

4X2 

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70 

70 

70 70 

(33 

40 

40 

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40 

5X1 5 04 

40 

40 

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459 


a 14 Fob 
W> 14 Nov 
7 WAer 
TKHMev 
F* IS Apr 
I M0 Nov 
Si* Ml Apr 
r M2 Jan 
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Ml Ml Jim 
1 14 Dec 
7 MJol 
MM2 Mav 
544 0 Apr 
I Ml Sep 
I N Feb 


30 7* 

487 . 7.U 

533 484 45j 
50 481 

411 90 

40 7X1 

422 4C 

4J4 7JT 

435 7.11. 

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7J1 70 

40 US 

70 70 

7.17 Id* 

7.14 7X7 

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412 4.H 40 

70 70 184 
481 40 7.14 
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434 40 4X7 
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579 50 10 
730 UB 

432 40 475 
497 438 731 
70 133 

70 4*1 

432 40 60 
734 115 

737 IM 

Ut 931 

70 70 

70 7X2 

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141 US 
10 US 
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599 50 40 
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70 444 733 
70 733 

134 10 495 
574 534 575 
444 10 

434 70 

70 741 

7*4 737 70 


NASEMO National list 

OrC consolidated trading for week ended Friday. 



Salas In *0 

1004 High Low Lost ChMe 


Solas hi Nat 

lOOl Hkgtl Low Lost ChUa 


Sales In Net 

loas High Law Last Chile 


Sates hi Net 

100s High Low Last Chtre 


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DNAPun 823 IM life 12 —114 

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DataTr TOllfe MM II +14 

DBaer ,15e 3410114 Of, 4 4—14 


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2714 2714—14 
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314 3 + 14 

1114 1114— 14 
1214 12V?— IV* 
SB 20 
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7214 1314 +1 


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45 45 

494 fl% 414 
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2924 25 

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70 

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535 

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555 

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420 

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781 

70 

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40 

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7.15 

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7X9 

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20 

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70 

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1*7 

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4*3 

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5X7 

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70 

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DtmlMA IjOO 24011 )« 104— 14 

□enlMS U» imiim 1014 1014— M, 

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Derby 1234 1814 1BV. 18V? + 1% 

DOT 2253 M 3%, 3*4 + 14 

Datamas 40915 1314 15 + 14 

Do ICon SO 38 41314 13V. 1314 

Devetoi 3B M 2»S M + <* 

DIchanA 98 5> 514 sS— U 

DICkeoB 33 5t» 514 514 

DMrtb .10a 38 UM m » 

□IvlunS 42 Wh OH M— 14 

DomMt 0 5K 514 51% 

CKakod INTO 19k 114 194 + 44 

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Dvatm 10 41% 314 4„ + 14 

Dvnpoc 4573 314 lft 35% +11% 


104 3*4 3U> 314+1% 

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t 151814 1814 1814 

241171% 151% 151% —2 
84 21% 214 21% + 14 

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l t 114 41% 314 4 — 14 


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180 

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70 

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Explanation of Symbols 

mrwfAx - • 


SB. ComBon DdOar 

«CU Evopeoncurrancy Unll 

l •BaM - *— 


"*n "SESSXKrLmr.OM 


SDR SMdOtfirgwfaie Rtgtds 

LwonUxsiinT Frenc 
SFR ' Sarin Franc 
sf French Franc 








































































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1985 


Page 9 


New EumfHHid Issues 

Compiled by Laurence Desvilettes from information supplied by European bond traders. 


; Issuer 

Amount 

(mSItora) 

Mat. 

Coup.. 

% 

Price 

Price 

end 

weak 

Term* 

.TmeRATENOTB 


> . 




•Lyomwis 

$158; 

1993 

Bbor 

100 

9930 

lm*r«» pegged to '6-monte offered rate for Eurodotor*,- 
CoflaUe cx par in 1988. ftes 0.10%. DerioonXiore $10/100. 
fayofaie Jon. V. 

Bank of Finland 

dm250. 

. 1995 

ft 

100 

9936 

Over 3-monte Liber. Mamun coupon 8%. NoncaAabte- 
FensOm. Portae -km. & 

^COUPON 






. 

eon Cod & 
Community 

$100 

1996 

9ft 

100ft 

9938 

Moncaflgbte. Sinking fend to text ai 1992. Payable Jon. 22. 

1 

$125 

1996 

954 

100ft 

9875 

NoneeNobla, Deflommadere SlQtfXL Payable Jan. 16. 

1 Bank 

$300 

2016 

9ft . 

100 

9875 

Noncdtable. Payable Jon. 23. ■ . 

Fonder de 

te 

Y 15,000 

1996 

6ft 

101ft 

— 

CcAabfe re 102 ai 1992. fopteie Jon. 29. 


Y 10,000 

1996 

fift 

100ft 

9930 

Nmrfobfe Payable Jen. 9. 

xno Metd 
ries 

Y 20,000 

1996 

8 

101ft 

— 

NoncalaUa. Biod— moblrr at maturity at 181 JO yin per 
date for a treat of $1112 mSon. Payable Jan. 17. 

i 

y 20,000 

1993 

6ft 

101 

9975 

Noncdfabb. Payable Jan. 30. 

TY-4JNKED 

& Nephew 
fated Cos 

$60 

2000 

554 

100 

9730 

Moneoteale. ConmrlMe at 218 pence per ihara aid at 

1 .4202 date per pound staffing, feyette Jan. 8. 


inkers See an Early Rush of Issues 


^ootsaed from Page 7) 
owned oil company, offered 
million of 9ft-percent bonds 
ft for a yield of 921 percent 
at is interesting to witness is 
be yield curve is collapsing, 
: jond-maiket rates narrowing 
a money-market rates and 
^market rates virtually flat 
jfally inverted — with one- 
i money ft point more expen- 
lan two, three- or six-month 
and 1/16 point more expen- 
aui one-year funds. 

October, investors could pick 
i percentage points by buying 
j rather than putting on 12 - 
l deposit. Currently, the ad- 
: .ge to buy 10 -year bonds has 
ait in half , a mere 1 ft points. 
ie 100 -baas-poim drop, the 
ic is the 12 -month rate ac- 
s for only 19 basis points. 

.; experts interpret this to 
that the high inflation insur- 
. premium that has been built 
long-term rales is coming 
. . They say that the fall in on 
, the steady price in other 
iodides prices after the dollar 
ic moves to fiscal prudence in 
ni ted States and the generally 
ust rates of economic expan- 
hrcmghout the world all con- 
e to a perceptible lowering of 


fears that inflation is an imminent 
danger. 

And. of course, it feeds the long- 
held view that short-tom rates 
must drop to re-establish the nor- 
mal upward slope of yields from 
shortest dated to longest dated. 

Meanwhile, the flat yield short- 
term curve has shot the market for 
floating-rate notes. That was to 
have been expected in any event 
since the major lakers of paper are 
banks and they are too occupied 
dosing their books for the year to 
lode at new issues. 

The only bo r ro w er to tap the 
market was Credit Lyonnais, which 
paid no margin over the six-month 
London interbank offered rate. 
This is the lowest cost any French 
issuer has yet paid in die FRN 
market. Another notable feature 
was that the lead manager , lehtnan 
Brothers, as in its previous issue for 
the World Bank, acted as sole man- 
ager and underwriter. In T<4iman 
Brothers* view, this helped keep the 
price of the paper relatively steady 
at 99.93. 

The Euroyen market was rela- 
tively active with U.S. issuers — 
Syntexand CSX — who could ben- 
efit from swapping the proceeds 
into dollars, The coupon rates on 
the yen bonds are rather inflexible. 


which means that a top credit-rated 
U.S. corporate cannot set a low 
enough coupon on the yen bond to 
make the swap into dollars suffi- 
ciently Attractive. By contrast, the 
lower rated companies can save 
about half a percentage point by 
doing the swap rather than tapping 
the dollar market directly. 

The CSX issue traded best be- 
cause it offered the highest coupon 
— 6 ft percent, although the yield to 
investors was less because of the 
premium offering price of 100 %. 
Syntex offered a coupon of 6 % per- 
cent at an issue price of T 01 and 
Credit Fonder a coupon of 6 % 
with an issue price of 101. Both 
issues traded at discounts of 
around 2 % points. 

Sumitomo Metal offered a high- 
er coupon of 8 percent (with an 
issue price of IOla), but the higher 
coupon reflects the fact that the 
principal will be repaid in dollars at 
a fixed exchange rate of 181-50 — 
leaving holders of the paper bear- 
ing the exchange risk if the yen has 
appreciated more than that in 10 
.years* time. 

The only European currency of- 
fering was a 250-nriHion-DM float- 
ing-rate note for Union Bank of 
Finland, carrying a capped coupon 
of 8 percent 


TdPand Votes for No Policy Change 335SS 


PiicesHigher 
DespiteLack 
Of Rate Cut 

By Mary Tobin 

linked Press International 

NEW YORK — The Federal 
Reserve’s liberal injection of re- 
serves into the banking system last 
week offset disappotn Unent over its 
failure to lower the" discount rate, 
leaving prices sharply higher. 

The Fed’sripen-market activities 
— outright purchases Thursday 

U.S. CREDIT MARKETS 

and system repurchase agreements, 
or repos, on Friday — “under- 
scored its indination to err on the 
side of ease,” said Henry Kaufman, 
chief economist at Salomon Broth- 
ers Inc. 

The benchmark 30-year Trea- 
sury bond, the 9%-percent coupon 
due is 2015, hit a high of 106, with 
a 928-percent yield, right after the 
Fed's Friday repos ana gave back 
only ft point on profit-taking to 
dose at 10554, with a yield of 932 
percent. That represents a price 
gain of 5 points in two weeks. 

"The market remained in an up- 
beat mood despite some disap- 
pointment over the failure to cut 
the discount rate,” William V. Sul- 
livan, Jr, senior vice president at 
Dean Witter Reynolds, said. “Most 
people believe the Fed’s open mar- 
ket activity was aggressive and a 
prelude to that move.” 

There was some disappointment 
over the Commerce Department’s 
“fl ash " estimate »h«» gross national 
product is growing at a 32-percent 
annual rate in the fourth quarter, 
"but that was offset by the down- 
ward revision in third -quarter 
growth from 43 percent to 3 per- 
cent. 

Mr. Kaufman said that it was not 
the Fed’s practice to change policy 
on the basts of predictions and “the 
GNP flush has generally been an 
unreliable predictor.” 

Philip Bravennan, economist at 
Briggs Scbaecfle & Co-, said it was 
now less likely that a cut in the 
discount rate would be made until 
January. “Nevertheless, any rise in 
rates now should be perceived as an 
opportunity to take on positions,” 
be said. When rates rise, bond 
prices falL 

While TYeasury long bond prices 
were op by as much as 25ft points, 
short-maturity notes were up only 
5ft point and T-bill rates climb ed by 
7 to 9 basis points. 

Corporate bond prices rose % to 
154 points and new issue yield 
scales fefl 13 to 38 basis points. 

No new 
scheduled for 


U.S. 



issues were 
Christmas week. 


piled by Our Staff Fran Dispatches 

\SHINGTON —The Federal 
ve’s chief monetary policy- 
ig body, led by the chairman, 
A Vokker, voted in its meet- 
ist month for no change in 
4 the minutes reveal, 
e Fed governor, Martha 
, dissented, recommending an 
policy, according to a sum- 
of the Nov. 4-5 meeting re- 
1 Friday. “Ms. Seger dissented 
«e she believed that some re- 
in in the degree of reserve 
ini was needed to help relieve 
rial strains in the economy 
promote a more acceptable 
if economic expansion,” the 
al summary said. 

% Friday morning, however, 
: ed’s direct injection of re- 
; into the banking system sent 
er powerful signal that it 
■ to drive rates lower in prepa- 
"*• for a cut in the benchmark 
mi rote, economists said. 

He some expected an immedi- 
it in the 73-percent discount 
most believed that the Fed 
I wait until the new year. 
Sawicz. of Discount Corp., 
rate cat should come within 
xt two weeks. He added that 
er cut, to 6.5 percent, could 
dein iberirsi quarter of 1986. 

' main reason for doubting 
cat in the discount rate was 
ion was that the Fed usually 
s the federal funds rale below 
«<Hmi rate for a while before 
through with a cut in the 
mt rate, analysis said. 

Fed added reserves directly 
1 morning for the third con- 
/e day. but federal funds 
ttill trading well above the 
nt rate at 7 15/16 percent 



Paul A. Volcker 

when it acted. Federal funds aver- 
aged 8.05 percent last week and 
8.03 percent the week before. 

“The Fed won’t cut the discount 
rate until you have fed funds below 
7.5 percent for a few days,” con- 
cluded Danuta Zieionka of Werth- 
cim & Co. 

In the November meeting, nine 
voting members of the Federal 
Open Market Committee — in- 
cluding the vice chairman, Preston 
Martin, who has not voted against 
Mr. Volcker on monetary policy 
recently — supported “essentially 
unchanged” monetary conditions. 

The majority reasoned that 
slightly higher economic activity in 
the fourth quarter might push the 
growth of the money supply up 


slightly for the rest of the year. 
Governor Henry C. Wallich was 
absent and did not vote. 

Mr. Martin and Mrs. Seger are 
both appointees of President Ron- 
ald Reagan. He hn« nominated two 
others to the board, but the Senate 
has not confirmed them. 

The nugority of the committee, 
which consists of the seven Fed 
governors and die presidents of five 
of the 12 Federal Reserve Banks, 
also said that unless the dollar fell 
sharply, recent rates of M-l growth 
“did not appear to suggest strong 
inflationary consequences.” M-l, 
the baric money supply, includes 
currency in cuculaDon. nonbank 
traveler’s checks and checking ac- 
counts. 

Most of tiie members agreed that 
the Fed should be alert to the pos ' 
bQity of easing monetary pemey 
light of the “relatively sluggish 
growth in domestic activity and the 
favorable price performance.” 

As has been the Fed’s position 
for several months, it emphasized 
the importance erf considering busi- 
ness activity, the dollar and infla- 
tion in setting monetary policy and 
permitting the money supply to 
grow in an effort to foster econom- 
ic expansion, the minutes showed. 

The committee said it believed 
ihpi the drop in the do l la r that had 
occurred since the meeting of the 
Group of Five industrial nations on 
Sept. 22 would tend to have aperi- 
tive effect on the economy by re- 
lieving pressures on trade-sensitive 
industries. But it also noted that 
“an unduly large and rapid depre- 
dation could have the potential for 
unsettling economic consequences 
undo 1 present circumstances.” 

(NYT, Reuters) 


U.S. Consumer Rates 

For Wee k Ended Doc. 20 


Passbook Savinas. 


.530 % 


Tax Exempt Bonds 
Bond Surer 20-Bond Index. 


U 8 « 


iwonev Market Rinds 
Donoahue't 7-Day Averaee. 


7.51 % 


Bank Money Market Accounts 
Bank Role Monitor Index 


6 . 8 S % 


FHLB 


.1243 % 




muffle Accord 
iC ompensation 
'ins Approval 

the Alienated Press 

7 NVER — ManvOle Corp. 
it has reached agreement 
Si -billion reorganization 

lhai satisfies a coun-ap- 
tod representative of future 
•to-related disease victims. 

e plan provides compensa- 
to asbestos victims for at 
25 years. Manvtile said. It 
lubes two trust funds to 
claims against Manville 
” include 20 percent erf 
tfoipany’s annual profits 
Ding in its fourth year, the 
ing-products manufactur- 
d Friday. 

xsios-caused health prob- 
can take two to three de- 
to develop and can be 

- plan has been approved 
»n Silverman, appointed 
New York bankruptcy 
to represent future asbes- 
ealih claimants. It still 
.be approved by Manville 
’ ors and shareholders and 
who have already filed 
h- or property- related 
> against the company. 


Germany Sees Turnaround 
In Machine-Tool Industry 


(Continued from Page 7) 
World countries are buying less, as 
are East-bloc nations. 

More seriously, analysts say tbe 
spread of such new materials as 
plastics and ceramics, preferred for 
their light weight or durability, and 
the growing productivity of ma- 
chine tools, enabling fewer ma- 
chines to do more, win mean 
shrinking long-term demand. 

A recent Boston Consulting 
Group report for the European 
Community’s commission predict- 
ed that world demand in the next 
years will probably be about 2.5 to 
3 J percent behind average in- 
creases of gross national product 

Equally grim, a study by the Mu- 
nich-based Roland Berger consult- 
ing group, done for the West Ger- 
man industry association, said 
many erf its 120 members excelled 
with conventional products on 
stagnant markets and faced (he 
n y » nace of strong Japanese incur- 
sions. High labor costs, weak fi- 
nancing and a technological gap 
have hamstrung the industry. 

“The present boom is decep- 
tive.” a Frankfurt bank analyst 
said. “There are a few strong 
era, but a larger number of 


lings. In the long term this cannot 
be viewed as a growth industry.” 

Still, the industry, including 
leaders like Gfldemeister, is hardly 
resigned. And the way it is fighting 
back says a lot about the way West 
German industry does business. 

Some companies, such as Maho 
Werkzeugmaschznenbau, a manu- 
facturer erf machining centers, have 
engaged the Japanese on their own 
turf, producing standardized ma- 
chine tools, a tad more robust, per- 
haps, and better tailored to Euro- 
pean customer needs. 

But the wider trend, at least 
among companies with the finan- 
cial underpinning, is to market a 
broader package of engineering 
ekilh , including machine tools and 
the computer hardware and sort- 
ware needed to link them in large 
production centers. 

"lie process is not ova-," Mr. 
GShren said, “but our philosophy 
is different. We don’t think in-and- 
out. We think long-term about de- 
veloping and exploiting markets 
with a quality product” 

He paused, and added: “You 
might call it a certain Mercedes 
mentality” 


SBB1EB myB.Lt WOTATWHS 


BID ASK 

Apollo Comp. 135ft 1314 

Mr Gasket 894 8ft 

Bitter Corp 5 5)4 

Moduksre 10!ft 10ft 

Rodime lift lift 

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Amsterdam, 12th December 1985. 


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AnutenbiB, 10th December, 1985. 


By Carl Gewirtz 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Financing of hostile 
US- takeovers continues to be big 
business in the iniernationn] credit 
market. 

GAF Corp. was soliciting banks 
to provide $13 billion for its take- 
over bid of Union Carbide Corp. 
While Freeport-McMoran Inc. and 
its partner Wagner & Brown were 
s eeking $1.3 billion for their bid for 
Mid Con Corp. 

GAF is seeking only a bridging 
loan for one year. Lenders will be 
paid 254 percentage points over tbe 
London interbank offered rate or 
154 points over the prime — tempt- 
ingly large fees for batiks who now- 
adays count their Joan charges in 
basis points, or hundredths of a 
percentage poinL 

GAF is asking for replies by no 
later than Dec. 24. It will pay 54 
percent as a commitment fee until 
it actually draws the loan and a 54- 
percent loll fee if the merger never 
goes through and the loan is never 
OtSML 

Freeport-McMoran is seeking an 
8 -year loan, but the terms it is of- 
fering to pay were not divulged. 

In the Euro-commercial paper 
marifB, bankers report de- 
mand for these short-term credits is 
widening, with non-bank investors 
taking an ever lar ger share of the 
paper offered. 

The latest to tap this market is 
Saga Petroleum of Norway, which 
will be seeking up to $250 million. 
Four banks have been appointed to 
distribute the paper; Citicorp, 
Credit Suisse First Boston, Morgan 
Stanley and Merrill Lynch. 

From F inland . Kansalhs-Osake- 
Panklri has named Morgan Guar- 
anty and Shearson Lehman Bros, 
to market as much as S3 00 millio n 
in the form of either commercial 
paper or certificates of deposit. 
AlSO in the market is Union Rank 
of Finland, which hat named Mer- 
rill and Swiss Bank Corp- to sell up 

to $200 milli cm of co mme r cial pa- 
per. 


Citicorp reportedly is 
to market $300 million of commer- 

DVTERNATIONAL CREDIT 

rial paper for the Milan-based sav- 
ings bank Cassa di Rispannio deDe 
Provinrie Lombarde, known by its 
acronym CARIPLO. 

Basque Indosuez is reported to 
be trying to organize a multi-pur- 
pose facility for tbe French nation- 
al railway. SNCF, along the lines 
recently achieved by Gaz de 
France. 

The SNCF is looking for up to 
$700 million, but bankers say there 
is considerable reluctance to sup- 
port another program with terms as 


low as those offered by GdF — 
particularly as the SNCF cannot 
offer banks the more lucrative 
trade-related business that GdF 
can. 

In the dormant syndicated loan 
market, Romania is seeking $150 
million from a syndicate erf Arab 
banks after having lapped Europe- 
an and U3. hanks catty six weeks 
ago. The latest terms on the five- 
year are a touch more favorable for 
the borrower — 154 points over 
Libor for the first 30 months com- 
pared with only 24 months on the 
previous loan, in addition, banks in 
the earlier loan had the option of 
at ft point over the U.S. 
prime rate. 


Hie margin for the balance of 
the period is an identical 1 ft points 
ova’ Libor with no provision for 
154-point pricing over prime. 
Front-end fees are unchanged at 1 
percent and a commitment fee of '4 
percent is offered on undrawn 
amounts. The new loan is targeted 
to finance the modernization of 
Romania’s chemical industry. 

Korea Electric Power Corp. has 
named five banks to syndicate a 
SlOQ-mtlliop, eight-year loan. This 
is split in two equal parts with the 
conventional portion carrying a 
margin of ft point over Libor and a 
tax-sported portion, aimed mainly 
at British hanks, paying 5/ 16 point 
over Libor. Fees total ft percent 


American to Slash 
Fares For Month 

The Associated Press 
NEW YORK — American Air- 
lines has cut fares by 75 percent for 
all mainland U3. flights from Jan. 
8 to Feb. 10, hoping to capture a 
greater number of travelers from 
low-cost competitors. 

The announcement, maHg Fri- 
day, said that prices would range 
from $29 one-way for trips of less 
than 100 mOes to $129 for (hose of 
more than 2,000 mOes. 

Republic Airlines and People 
Express will also have reduced 
fares in the new year. Northwest 
Airlines said it would match Amer- 
ican's discounts in markets where 
they compete. 


THE TOP FRENCH 



A L I T Y FIRMS 


CoMrrfi Colbert 
Parfums Givenchy: Elegant Enchantment) 


Jean Courtien, President 


A sumptuous symphony for the 
senses blended from an elegant en- 
counter with a master of design, 
each Givenchy fragrance plays a 
particular part in the stylish saga of 
the Parfums Givenchy. In 1957, 

Hubert de Givenchy decided to 
crown the burgeoning success of his 
young couture house with die pro- 
vocative enchantment of his first 
perfume, L’lmerdie Dedicated to 
tbe captivating charm of access 
Audrey Hepburn, L’Incerdit, an al- 
dehydic floral blend, is as modern 
and elegantly nonchalant as its namesake. It 
became die intoxicating introduction to a con- 
tinuing success story. 

Another chapter, another twist to the tale, Gi- 
venchy III in 1970, a vital verdant Chypre scent, 
became an instant classic still widely appreciated 
and a best-seller today. A joyful interlude with the 
spirited Eau de Givenchy, then the perfumed plot 
thickens with tbe compelling conquest of Ysaris, 
destined from its 1984 debut to be one of the great 
French fragrances. 

"The success of a fragrance is an ensemble,” says 
Jean Cournot, president of Parfums Givenchy. 
"Like in tbe writing of a novel, style and story 
must concur in a successful accord” Y saris com- 
bines the rich sensuality of a floral blend bom tbe 
Orient with a magically mysterious name, exqui- 
sitely evoking to each his own interpretation. 
"For some, Ysatis is a Greek goddess,” says 
Gourd ere, "for others. Aphrodite’s child or the 
Isis. In 



contraction of Yseulr and . 


! reality, Ysatis is 


the new goddess created by M. Gi- 
venchy.” 

Inspired by the soignee, sophisticat- 
ed and sensual Givenchy evening 
gowns, encased in a prizewinning 
flacon as sleek and sculptural as the 
Givenchy couture and acclaimed for 
an advertising campaign featuring 
the hyper-realist art of Pierre Cou- 
loo, Ysatis was launched last spring 
to an exceptionally enthusiastic re- 
ception in tbe United Scares and has 
quickly become the Givenchy best- 
seller. The big news this fall was the 
addition of a perfumed beauty bock line. 

Mens’ fragrances, too, share the spoclighc at 
Givenchy: the distinctive refinement of Monsieur 
de Givenchy in 1959, die intriguing audacity of 
Gentleman in 1975. The bottom line erf their 
narrative reads as triumphantly as the rest. Ac- 
by the celebrated champagne firm Veuve 
in 1981, Parfums Givenchy bought back 
its American subsidiary this year and will report a 
consolidated turnover of about $56 million in 
1985. a 25 perc en t rise for the French company 
alone, with "profitability one of the best in the 
industry,” according to Courrierc. Exports to 140 
countries account for 70 p ercent of sales with prinri- 

5 1 markets, the United States, Britain and Italy. 

ext to come, a new mens’ fragrance which they 
are currently preparing, chough as Courrierc says, 
"Railways have timetables, creativity does not.” 
When it arrives, ir promises to be yet another 
enthralling episode in (he spellbinding saga of the 
Parfums Givenchy. 


AN ASSOCI STIONOF Tllh MOST fftl.STtUIOUS N4MLSOF Tilt Fill NCIl'AHT DI Vivm HIS KUI til LA HAUMI . 7SWJK PARIS 

SnSii AN ANNOUNCEMENT BY THE GOMTTE COLBERT 


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TRIBUNE, MONDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1985 


Page 11 


Hyundai Moves Into U.S. Auto Bargain Basement 


(Continued from Page 7) 

: eves mote difficult for the few re- 
| numring Ameriam- huilt small cars 
L to survive. 

But the Sooih Koreans also 
could threaten the big Japanese 
automakers, who have been chal- 
lenged for price leadership in the 
UJ3. subcompact market since they 
entered' it themselves nearly 30 
years ago. 

At least a few Japanese industry 
officials still predict that they w31 
■not Mi prey to the Sooth Koreans 
in the same way that the domestics 
have given in to them in the s mall 
car market 

“Hyundai will be competitive, 
and very possibly could cause 
greater price comped don, but we 
are not going to abandon that en- 
try-level market,'* says Cliff 
SchnnUen, senior vice president for 
! U.S. sales at Honda. “And I don’t 
think it’s going to affect our sales at 

But analysts believe that may be 
wishful thinking. 

“Some of the Japanese like to say 
they are not concerned, but they 
are only kidding themselves," notes 
Donald DcSccnza. an auto indus- 


Toyota Submits Application 
For Joint- Venture in Taiwan 

Umttd Press International 

TAIPEI — Japan's Toyota Motor Co. has submitted a formal 
application to Taiwan’s government to establish a joint venture here 
that would produce 60,000 cars and small trucks annually. 

According to the application, submitted Friday to the Investment 
Commission. Toyota and Taiwan's Kuo Jui Motor Co. would produce 
40,000 care and 20,000 trucks each year. The plant, if approved, is 
expected to begin production in 198S. 

Geatano Tsuji, Toyota’s vice president, declined to reveal how 
much the company would invest. Industry observers said, however, 
that Toyota planned to invest $130 milli on fo ihc venture, in which it 
would hold a 49-percent share, and K.uo Jui, a manufacturer or heavy- 
duty trucks, would supply SI percent. 

In September 1984 Toyota withdrew a joint- venture proposal to 
invest $21.6 billion in a factory that would have produced 300,000 
vehicles annually because of high duties on imported parts. Industry 
observers said Toyota reconsidered investing after Taiwan's govern- 
ment revised regulations requiring manufacturers to use a minimum 
percentage of Taiwan-made parts. 


a Japanese-owned brokerage. 

More and more Japanese indus- 
try officials are starting to agree, 
and now concede that they are get- 
ting worried. 

' We think it will become very, 
very competitive at the low end of 
the market with the Koreans com- 
ing in," says Jeny Giaqumta, a 
spokesman for Toyota Motor Co.’s 
U.S. sales operation. “It’s going to 
be a real shoot-out.'’ 

In fact, since the Japanese are so 
dominant in the snbcompact mar- 
ket, they have the most to lose to 
the Sooth Koreans, analysts say. 

“The Japanese basically own the 
low end erf the market already, so 
the Koreans will steal sales mostly 
from than," predicts Vem Lacey, 
an ante industry economist at 
Chase Econometrics, an economic 
forecas tin g con cern in Bala Cyn- 
wyd, Pennsylvania. 

With an expected base sticker of 
about $5,500, the Hyundai Excel 
will be one of the least expensive 
small can on the US. market, 
price-competi-tivewith the cheapest 


Japanese-built offerings such as the 
Nissan Sentra, Toyota Tercel, and 
Chevrolet Sprint. 

Hyundai already has targeted 
customers of the Japanese auto- 
makers and used-car buyers who 
cannot afford other new cars, as its 
primary markets, and has estab- 
lished an ambitious goal of selling 
100,000 passenger care by the end 
of its first year in the Uni ted States. 

“I don’t think we can become the 
No. 1 importer in the United States 
in a couple of years Idee we did in 
Canada," Mr. Jamiesson says. “But 
It would be silly to say that's uot a 
long-range goal for us." 

Tim: South Koreans are coming 
at a time when the Japanese may be 
more vulnerable than ever in the 
U.S. market Because their passen- 
ger-car shipments have been re- 
stricted by import quotas since 
1981, the Japanese automakers 
have been concentrating on selling 
larger, more expensive care in the 
United States to make up in price 
what they have lost in sales volume. 

That strategy has meant repeat- 
ed sticker price increases, price- 
gpuging by dealers on cars in short 
supply, the addition of expensive 
equipment even on the smallest 
Japanese care available in the Unit- 


ed States, and generally less em- 
phasis on supplying basic transpor- 
tation to lower- and middle- income 
Americans. 

Like the domestic automakers 
before them, who effectively ceded 
the subcontract market to the im- 
ports in the early 1980s, the Japa- 
nese are moving away from their 
former base in the subcompact 
field in order to win a bigger share 
of the more lucrative luxury, per- 
formance and full-size segments of 
the car market, where profits are 


That opens the way for automak- 
ers from developing countries such 
as South Korea that are not yet 
restricted by quotas and which can 
produce small care while paying 
wages that are only a fraction of 
whaL autoworkers earn in the Unit- 
ed States or Japan. 

Yugoslavia became the first to 
take advantage of the vacuum. Ear- 
lier this year, its state-run auto in- 
dustry introduced the Yugo to the 
U.S. market. With a base price of 
$3,990, the tiny hatchback now is 
the lowest-priced car by far in the 
United States. 

And while analysts believe that 
its quality does not measure up to 
that of the South Koreans or oLher 


imports, car buyers have still joined 
waiting lists to buy them. Yugo 
sales officials expect to sell 40,000 
in their first full year in the United 
States and predict that sales will 
top 100,000 within three years. 

But it is the fledgling South Ko- 
rean auto industry, controlled by a. 
few huge conglomerates, which is 
moving most aggressively to cx- 

g loit the opportunity in the United 
tales. 

Ironically, the South Koreans 
are rapidly expanding their pro- 
duction capacity with the help of 
the US. and Japanese automakers 
themselves, all of whom want to 
ensure that they have access to a 
supply of Korean-built cars as the 
competition in the UB. car market 
intensifies in the late 1980s. 

One sign that Hyundai has a 
chance erf sweeping the United 
Slates has come from U.S. car deal- 
ers, who have been tripping over 
each other in their efforts to get 
Hyundai franchises. So far, the 
South Korean automaker has re- 
ceived 4,000 applications for deal- 
erships, enabling it to pick and 
choose from among the most suc- 
cessful and established car dealers 
to form the nucleus or its distribu- 
tion system. 

That demand has enabled Hyun- 
dai to insist that each dealer build a 
separate showroom and service fa- 
dniy exclusively for Hyundai, en- 
suring that its cars do note get lost 
inside Toyota or Chevrolet dealer- 
ships. 

With so many South Korean cars 
being sold through domestic deal- 
erships, the U.S. auto companies 
are not likely lo be hurt financially 
by the Korean entry into the mar- 
ket. But U.S. autoworkers will be if 
intense competition from the Kore- 
ans in the subcompacl market 
forces Detroit to consider dropping 
the last of its unprofitable, U.S.- 
built small cars. 

To help its acceptance in the 
United States. Hyundai is Ameri- 
canizing the pronunciation of its 
name. Although Hyundai is pro- 
nounced Hun-da in Korea, the 
company’s U.S. marketing re- 
seachers have decided to tell Amer- 
icans that the company is called 
‘Hunday. as in Sunday,’ Mr. Ja- 
miesson says. 


American Exchange Options 


Option S. or Ice Calls Puts I Option & price Colli Puts 


Figures as of door of trading Friday. 


Oetton & nrtce Call* Puts | Option & dcIcp Call* Puls I Option & price Calls 


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lift 

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44% 

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11k 

r 


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JUUrrtl 25 
Mft 30 
Mft SI 
34ft 40 


SM 45 
PracO SB 
7016 40 

70ft 45 
7Dft la 
7016 75 

TMB 23 
30K 30 

3H6 35 


40ft 70 
40ft 75 
Own NY 30 
43ft 40 
45ft 45 
Omni M 
37ft 40 
CftOHI S 
3116 30 

3516 35 

3SM 40 
Coast a 24ft 
35ft 30 
35ft 33W 
3516 36% 
Dtcra 2316 
27 15 

2 T X 

EmrsEI 70 
01ft 75 
fttft m 
lift *5 
GTE m 
4416 45 

4fft SO 
GUM B 
TOM 40 
TPft 45 
70ft 70 
7M 75 

HOCK »I6 
Mft 15 
Mft 1716 
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HMOJl X 
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30ft 4ft 
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Kmt 5 
7ft 7ft 
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1 2ft 
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r ft 
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4ft 7ft 
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15ft 15ft 
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l-U 2ft 
r ift 


Jan Apr Jan Apr 
AkMkA 13 r r 
1 7ft 1716 13-U 2 

17ft a 7-u 1ft 
17ft 22ft r ft 
AmCvo 30 M r 
55ft S 4 r 
Mft 40 1ft 2 11-16 
Altl EXP 40 13 13ft 

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32ft 50 Sft 5 
52ft B ft 2ft 
Am Ham 4* r Sft 
04ft 45 1ft 216 
Mft 70 r ft 
Anotto 10 r 4ft 

n lm ift 2ft 
U IS 16 1ft 
13 1716 3-14 ft 

13 20 t-14 r 

APOir 12ft Ift 1016 
27ft 15 7ft I 
22ft 17ft 4ft Sft 
22ft 20 2ft Sft 
27ft 22ft Ift 27-14 
27ft 25 7-11 17-11 


r ft 
15-11 1» 


ft Ift 
2ft Sft 
3-U ft 


l-U r 

1-U ft 
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35ft 40 
LUB 23 
L0IU5 1716 
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24 25 

MOOPII2V6 
! 14ft 13 
14ft 17ft 
Mft a 
MyOm IS 
lift 17ft 
10ft 20 
lift 72ft 
10ft 23 
| Netw&v 17ft 
22W 30 

22ft 22ft 
22ft 23 
27ft X 
PMn 20 
27ft 32ft 
22ft 33 
Pitney 45 
40 SB 

QUOtTTI 10 

lift nv*. 
lift IS 

Iter or X 
3716 X 
37ft 40 


SMdee 17ft 
sonat X 

33ft 35 

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Sytiran 17ft 


ft l >11 
1-U r 
r >M 
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r 3 

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l-U r 

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ift ift 
3 • 


0-li 1ft 
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4V» 

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r 

% 

10% 

IS 

m 

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w« 

l>M 

Mi 

i% 

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» 

r 

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S-U 

■ 

r 

40% 

n 

r 

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r 

S 

r 

r 

LTV 

Slll-U 

3 


2* 

3% 

r 

% 

0% 

in 

r 

% 

15-16 

r 

ft 

3 

3% 

Sft 

10 

r 

% 

3% 

* 

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1 

r 

MOCV 

45 

10% 

r 


r 

10% 

r 

r 

43% 

a 

n% 

14% 


r 

MM 

r 

r 

43% 

B 

a% 

r 


«Vk 

4» 

r 

10 

43% 

« 

3% 

5% 

1-14 


7ft 

vw 

1ft 

43ft 

15 

1-U 

1% 

1% 

B 

M4 

9 

su 

43% 

X 

r 

>14 


a 

5% 

a 

% 

Pfizer 

45 

• 

0 


w* 

1 

l-isi n-u 

XI 

a 

3% 

5% 


r 

MS 


5Wi 

S 

B 

1-14 

3% 

3% 

r 

% 

r 

r 

a 

a 

0 

1>U 

a 


PtiMar 70 
36% 75 

Mft M 
Mft 03 


lift Uft 
11 Mft 
0ft 0ft 


X 

2% 

3% 

% 


soft 

X 

1% 

7 

i 

* 

11-14 

1ft 

1% 

r 

20% 

JtVl 

ft 

r 

r 

35 

lift 

r 

r 

r 

Xft 

» 

r 


r 


7ft 

7W 


r 

TRW 

X 

r 

r 

r 






00% 

75 

r 

14% 

r 

SO 


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00% 

M 


r 


B 

0ft 

»ft 



00% 

05 






4% 

3fa 


00% 

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4% 


r 

45111-16 

3% 

2% 

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00% 


2ft 

4 


X 




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17Vz 

«% 







21% 

X 

2% 

3% 

% 

n 

r 

5ft 

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r 

01% 

23% 

1 

2% 

i% 



4 



31% 

35 

ft 

1% 

r 

35 

ns 

2ft 

r 

3ft 

Tandy 

X 

Mft 

r 

1-14 










r 



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r 

30ft 

40 

1ft 

3% 

1% 






30ft 

45 

% 

1 l-U 

r 

a 

4ft 

Sft 

w 

r 

TTwftV 

3 

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r 

r 









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X 

37ft 

• 

r 



15-16 

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r 

72ft 

40 

33% 

% 

r 







45 

37% 

37% 

r 






32ft 

a 

a 

23 

% 






72ft 

55 

17ft 

17ft 

ft 






72ft 

40 

13% 

13% 

i 

40 

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3 

i% 


73% 

45 

7% 

0% 

7ft 






72ft 

X 

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5% 

4% 


3ft 



73% 

n 

t>u 

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7ft 






US HI 1C 

X 

IS-U 

r 

r 






l*ft 

22% 

r 

i% 

r 

7% 

1ft 

3% 


% 

USMCC 

X 

% 

r 

T 

M 

% 

1% 

1% 

r 

USM 

27% 

r 


* 


is 


A 

+ Vt 

4% 

— % 


—2% 
— Mi 

Mft 

■Ml* 

s% 

— % 

14% 

— 1% 

5% 

+ % 

1X0 

+ % 

16% 

+ % 

12% 

-1- % 

1Mb 

+1% 

11 

— % 

30% 

+1% 

30 

— 1% 

3% 

— % 

51 

—VO 

12% 

— % 

23% 

— % 

18% 

+1% 

5% 


34% 


11% 

— 1% 

3tb 

— Vb 

13% 

— % 


Ann 

TTft 

» 

Ift 

1-U 

r 

84% 

n 

1-U 

3% 

r 

4% 

Dome 

40 

4% 

r 

r 

13W 

U 

r 

0-U 

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2Va 

PrimaC 

u 

7ft 

r 

r 

r 

46% 

X 

Ift 

Sft 

2 

13% 

17% 

r 

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r 

r 

X 

17ft 

4% 

r 

r 

r 

DeeOta 

M 

Tft 

3ft 

>U 

AosBmd B 

f 

0% 

r 

r 

a 

xin-is 

z% 

r 

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lift 

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1 

1% 

% 

46% 

40 

4 

0% 

r 

% 

a 

22ft 

% 

IMS 

Mi 

1P-U 

13ft 

15 

% 

1 

r 

46% 

40 

U-I471M4 

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7 

72 

35 

a 

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9 

9% 

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a 

r 

5% 

r 

ss% 

X 

r 

15-U 

6Vo 

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SFeSP 

25 

HH 

mft 

r 

r 

30ft 

a 

1% 

2 

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Anna 

15 

r 

3ft 

r 

3-16 

35% 

X 

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5ft 

r 

1-U 

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35 

r 

% 

r 

10 

17% 

1% 

r 

r 

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35ft 

X 

M*l ||-1t 

1-16 

15-14 

Gould 

22% 

r 

r 

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10 

X 

r 

T>14 

TO 

r 

35ft 

40 

r 

% 

r 

r 

31 

IS 

4ft 

7ft 

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10 

27% 

r 

% 

r 

r 

atoon 

45 

5 

r 

r 

% 

11 

X 

2% 

4% 

Ift 

BegSF 

30 

13% 

r 

r 

r 

50% 

a 

0-14 

3ft 

1-16 

2ft 

31 

35 

1 

Tft 

4ft 

45% 

» 

Uft 

11% 

r 

W 

50% 

s 

r 

Ift 

r 

r 

31 

a 

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1>U 

r 

45% 

X 

9% 

7% 

r 

11-U 

55% 

« 

r 

7-U 

r 

r 

Gravtid 

25 

r 

0% 

r 

45% 

45 

TM4 

3% 

r 

TO 

Toitt 

« 

2T 

3TW 

r 

r 

33ft 

X 

Tft 

4% 

>14 

45% 

X 

r 

H 


TO 

51 

45 

Uft 

14% 

r 

>14 

13ft 

35 

1 

2% 

2% 

Bear 

IS 

l-U 

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« 

r 

•1 

a 

11% 

13% 

r 

% 

Kausm 

» 

7% 

r 

r 

15 

17% 

r 

% 

r 

r 

41 

B 

5ft 

0 

r 

Tft 

47% 

X 

7ft 

r 

r 

BwaPer » 

0% 

r 

r 

r 

41 

a 

ft 

5% 

1-16 

3ft 

43% 

45 

0-U 

1ft 

r 

5X4 

IS 

r 

m 

f 

r 

41 

45 

4 

* 

1 

4% 

IBM 

2 

6% 

r 

ft 

58% 

X 

r 

3 

TO 

r 

VMar* 

5 

7% 

s 

f 

5 

Xft 

X 

% 

2% 

3 

50% 

X 

4 

1% 

1 

r 

n 

7ft 

5% 

r 

r 

r 

Xft 

35 

ft 

r 

r 

Chase 

a 

lift 

r 

r 

r 

13 

W 

3 

3% 

r 

>16 

intech 

77ft 

1 

0 

r 

40ft 

St 

14% 

Uft 

r 

Mi 

T3 

13% 

% 

i% 

1-U 

ft 

35ft 

X 

4 

r 

ft 

Stft 

« 

0ft 

a% 

r 

fe 

11 

15 

r 

% 

r 

3ft 

35ft 

37ft 

3% 

• 

ft 

40ft 

45 

4% 

5ft 

r 

TO 

weittu- 

X 

T 

1ft 

fe 

1% 

35ft 

35 

2% 

4% 

1% 


25ft 35 
2SM X 
U5WSI X 
Kft 85 
Hft X 
walorn X 
wmLm X 


Weotno 33 

45 40 

45 45 

45 X 

Mi May 
AMR 35 

41 40 

41 45 

41 30 

41 B 

A5A X 

34 X 

34 « 

34 45 


r 2>lt 
ft 10-16 
lift r 
0 0ft 
4ft Sft 
2ft Sft 
r r 
5ft r 
116313-li 

Ml 13-1! 
Feb May 
7ft r 
1ft 4» 


r Hi 
>11 ft 
ift 2ft 


4!6 5ft 
1ft 316 
ft 1ft 
ft 0-10 
Ml >U 
1-11 * 

1ft r 


ft 1M 
2 >11 1 
1ft 1ft 
10ft r 


lift 64 3 

lift Id 1>U 
41ft 70 r 

ArUa 17ft Ift 
17ft X Ml 

17ft 23ft ft 

Avnei M r 

3446 X 2 

3416 40 ft 

Batty » 1ft 
Uft 15111-11 
lift 17ft ft 

Uft » ft 

CmuW 15 1ft 

15ft 17ft ft 

Caiero X Hit 

41% IS 7 

41ft 40 2ft 
41ft 45 ft 

Con Ed 35 r 

Xft 40 0-14 

CoouU 22ft r 

2116 25 2% 

2*% X 1 

DinBrri 75 10% 

05ft ■ r 

OSft 05 r 

FIMta 7ft % 

7ft 10 r 
Fires! 17ft r 

27ft X 316 

Bft 23ft 11-11 
22ft X ft 

Fleetur X 3ft 

33ft 22ft Ift 

23ft 33 !>1t 

GCA S 2ft 

7ft 7ft ft 

7ft 10 ft 
7ft 13ft 1-11 

GoWNfl M Ift 

11% lift 7-11 

lift IS Ml 
Grace 40 r 
47ft 45 Ift 
47ft 50 1ft 
HOIIFB22V) r 
2Sft 25 1ft 
25ft M ft 
LO Poe a Sft 
23 22ft 1ft 
23 IS % 
MACDM 10 4% 

14% 12ft 2ft 
14% 15 Ift I 

14% 17ft ft 
14% X 3-U 
NOW X 7ft 
37ft X 3ft 
37ft X ft 
NMedEn X 3ft 
23ft 23ft 3 
27ft 25 ft 
73ft X >lt 
N Sami 10 3% 

17% 12ft r 

12% IS ft 
Nova 23 4 

20% X 15-11 
□DECO X r 
20ft 22ft r 
Penney 30 Sft 
S5ft 55 1% 

55ft *0 Ml 
PttHPt It 2 
12 17ft >11 
17 15 1-11 

12 13% 7-16 

PIIIXv 40713-14 
60% 45 Ift 

Raven 25 1% 

25% X ft 
ROVDlll 40 Sft 
12 45 I>I4 

Sinner 35 Sft 
47% a 4 
43ft 45 1ft 
Shnlfl X OR 
Xft 15 4 

38ft t0 Ift ; 
Termco X % 
Zen Mi II 5ft 
» 17ft T 
X X 1% 

X TJft 1 


Total volume: 317X3 
Open iineral : 3J47J1* 
r— Not traded, s— None ottered, a— Old. 


360 £1 

418 XU 

738 1» 

022 024 

42 72 


4U7UD8 

7&O0UOD 


17JBUW 

10,700000 


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ESCORTS & GUIDES j ESCORTS ft GUIDES | ESCORTS & GUIDES 


Kuwait Ends Jnqniiy 
Into Santa Fe Takeover 

Reuters 

KUWAIT — Kuwait has ended 
an inquiry into insider trading in 
the $15-bflKon takeover of Santa 
Fe International Corp_ a UB. oil 
company, by the government- 
owned Kuwait Petrolenm Co. 

The Kuwait news agency Kuna, 
in a report Saturday, gave no de- 
tails of the investigation into the 
1982 takeover. It said a report an 
the investigation by the attorney- 
^al, winch was ordered in June, 

best sent to the cabinet. 


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Tet 01/09 58 71. 


FRANKFURT & AREA. SIMONE'S bi- 
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6218 01 Ciwdt eerdi accepted. 
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end Fe moh Escort Service. fD} 20- 
WW 

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lervia. Mdfinflud. 261 4142 

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LONDON OMENTAL GUDE Service. 
Tel; 01-243 1442 

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FRANXRflrr PaAID ESCORT Ser- 
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Service. Tet 589 4900. 1 - IQ pm 

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Guide Seny . Tet. 2507995. Co*. 

RUTHPS BCORT AGB4CY Lomlon 
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Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1985 



PEANUTS 


SEE THESE COLORING 
BOOKS? fW ATTENTION! 





BMIMUMn IIIMWIW | 


I ponV have time to 

COLOR EVERS' PICTURE 
AM5ELF, UNPER5TANP7 

y 



WHAT I WANTVOUTO 
DO 15 60 THROUGH EACH I 
BOOK.AND COLOR Ail 
THE 5K1E5 SLUE ..THEN I 

ujohThavetddoit... 


I just uwttte allows 

, UIANTB?TOBE„ A 
COLORING BOOK ASSISTANT,' 




BLOND BE 


BOOKS 


THAT BOWLING ALLEY ON THE 
TIBER: Tales of a Director 


brans formulating a film. In w** “V 
«TSk ,« inuee ut on 


seems, he suns .with 


to 


By Michelangelo Antonioni. Translated 
from the Italian by William Arrowstruth. 
208 pages. $18.95. 

Oxford University Press, 200 Madison Ave- 
nue, New York, N. Y. 10016. 


bon. then works backward 
probable situation. The 
leaving a bowling court in Rome. • _ * 
triggers speculation about bn 
past, leading eventually to a Kenan- - in HiMc, 
{he man casually shoots a young S :r - 
Because few of the sketches are Jaw*** 
difficult to tell whether Antonioni «*** 4 s ® 
.... « f for movies or whether 


vr me C f 


WE WJAJNT SOMETHING, 
FOR OUR CM? 


ACROSS 


1 Female horse 
5 Moby Dick's 
pursuer 

9 Reminders, in 
short 

14 Eastern V.I.P. 

15 Kind of block 

16 Actress Rich 

17 Coed’s escort 

18 Queenly 
nickname 

19 Ocean 
greyhound 

20 Berleor 
Youngman 

23 Diacritical 
marks 

24 One of Curly's 
pals 

25 Pat 

28 Vault 

31 Arrow poison 

33 Lane 

36 Singer Johnny 

38 Eternally 

39 Despite 
everything 

42 In re 

43 Network of 
nerves 

44 Jot 

45 girl 

47 Peak 

49 Rainbow 

50 Perform 

52 Harsh 

57 Not tied down 


60 Comedian 
Brenner 

63 Scorch 

64 Aroma 

65 Lithe 

66 Piece of pastry 

67 A Dumas 

68 Luce’s 

••The " 

69 gin fizz 

70 Customs word 


12/23/65 

25 Lifeboat-rais- 
ing device 

26 Sports palace 

27 "Wozzeck” 
composer 


DOWN 


29 Yearn 

30 Ziti.e.g. 

32 Fix over 

33 Tough puzzle 

34 Garret 

35 Pairs 


1 Center, in 
poesy 

2 Famed violin 

3 Tax base in 
' Britain 

4 Remove errors 

5 Blame 

6 Render 
assistance 

7 Guinness or 
Templeton 

S Flourish 
9 Environment 

10 Leif's 
redheaded sine 

11 Kingsley's 

" in 

While" 

12 Washington 
bill 


37 Kind of mother 
or child 

39 Philippine city 

40 Smidgeon 


41 San Diego 
court star 
46 Solidify 
48 Two-handed 
card game 
51 Orals, e.g. 

53 Take as one's 
own 


54 Legislative 
ploy 

55 Nocturnal 
sound 


13 Indian weight 

21 Former Mogul 
capital 

22 Yemeni 
seaport 


56 Plumed one 

57 Rasp 

58 Waxed closure 

59 Edible root 

60 Margery of 
seesaw fame 

61 Past 

62 Vigor 


© New York Times, edited by Eugene Maleska. 



any of them for movies or t 
Reviewed by Michiko Kakutani them only echo themes and 

1 ■ u.m' rJ ill/* nmw flEfllCl '.Cli-t 


fell 



ccr TOWARD the Frontier,** one of the 33 
JL sketches in tins collection, reads like a 

kind of composite summary of every .Anton* Iut . . 

knri movie you've ever seen. Four people, band and wife who have nothin c more fc* sayte 
thrown together by drcumstance, are traveling MC h other’’; "Two Telegrams" is .i portrait «a 
a bleak landscape toward some un- (foaffccied woman who has be r: rejected w 


such films — 

"The Sknce" suggests a story aront a ^ 



border: the director; a pretty German 
woman whom everyone calls Grethe, though 
Grethe is not her name; a U. S. Army captain; 


and another young girl They do not know one 
they nave in i 


another very well, but they have in common a 
vague sense of alienation, a need to improvise 
thar evenings together. 


They stop at a guest house and receive a 
cordial e 


enough welcome. The mood, however, 
seems rather sinister, though it is undear 
whether something is really wrong or whether 
the travelers are simply a bit died. Occasional- 
ly someone eaters the room, and the atmo- 
sphere appears to shift The travelers leave and 
drive into a dark wood, where they see two 
figures, a man and a woman — possibly people 

S ed earlier at the guest house. A shot is 
and the woman vanishes — maybe she is 
dead, maybe she is noL The travelers continue 
on the read, their headlights turned off. 

Like its companion pieces in “That Bowling 
Alley oo the Tiber,” this sketch represents 
what Antonioni calls a “nodeos” — an idea for 
a film. While each sheds light on the director’s 
decidedly depressive sensibility, they vary 
widely in weight, seriousness and just plain 
interest. Some fed like no more than entries in 
a moody adolescent’s journal — news items or 
observations, jotted down for the sake of their 
bizarreness or irony. One reads, in its entirety: 
“The antarctic glaciers are moving in our direct 
tion at a rate of three millimeters per year. 
Calculate when they'll reach us. Anticipate, in 
a film, what will happen.” Another merely 
-notes that a group of people on a crooodxle- 
hunting expedition was eaten by its prey. 

More interesting are the “nuclei” that hrfp 
illumin a t e the process by wjhch Antonioni 


the husband she despises: "The Oe« T l»i 
Monev” and "The Wheel” are ufc* « 
who shuttle aimlessly between *»■■» 
and “A Pack of Lies” is a study of ihc decep- 
tive sexual transactions that transpire among a 
group of five people. As in Antonioni's 
the people in these stories tend to be ;adeu 
members of the urban bourgeoisie. trapped m 
rote existences that are devoid of values ana or 


meaning 

Human inability to distinguish between ap- 
pearance and reality, between the projections 
of the mind and factual events in the world — a 
theme examined at length in the movie "Blow- 
Up" — is also an issue Lhat surfaces repeatedly. 
Not only do many of the sketches piu’t around 
a mysterious or violent event — a gunshot an 
unexplained brawl, a confession of patricide — ■ 
their narrative method also emph.iMzes the 
subjectivity of experience. A barren landscape 
mirrors a character’s desolate state of mind; V 
dangerous encounter appears to synchronize 
with an individual’s sudden craving for adven- 
ture. 

As the translator William Amwsmisb, 
points out in a pretentious, nearly unreadable 
introduction, "the energy of the nucleus may 
be dormant, abeyant, or latent, but it is there 
— a miniature cinematic potentiality awaiting 
that intervention by director and camera that 
will thrust it toward foil visual and kinetic 
actualization." In other words, the sketches in 
“That Bowling Alley” are just that — sketches, 
bereft of the visual imagery that would endow 
them with cinematic power. As such, they tend 
to underline some of the less : 
of Antonioni's art: his 


art: his penchant for wiufuily 
dwelling upon — and then universalizing — 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


Vl TDD&m&i ’ A 




tHWHVMr 

wm<5& 

Fz^-nUrP 



IT ' 



□dob □□□□ anno 

ECHO □□□□ 3HB0 
□□□□aoaaoBannD 
Donniaa oeq oqq 
□□DOB aona ana 
□am mama ama 
□mom □□□□ □□□ 

BEBaoaamonmao 

eo ammo □□□□ 


his predilection for 
arti/iciallv 


illustrate 

* 


H 

□ 

\n 

□ 

19 

□ 

□ 

□ 

□ 


□ maa 
a □□□□□ 
amaaam 


□□□□□□□□mammam 


WCV DENISON TELLS HER % 
FATHER SHE WOULD LIKE TO SEE HIM /WORE OFTEN, f 
HE SUGGESTS THAT THEV PLAN TO HAN/E DINNER £ 

TOGETHER ONE NIGHT EACH WEEK i K ~ -- ? 

— i — - -Hi- - — u — — J*L 5 


NO — ^ 

that-ll 
FINE, 
DAD.' 


*31nsle bells ah' Christmas smells 
my favorite time of the year ! f 


Unscramble Uiese ton Jumbles, 
on# I otter to each square, to form 
tour onSnary words. 


YOHBB 


□ 

Ll 


TOPIL 


IDG 




m 

■ 

m 

■ 

■ 

il 



Eama 


□Boa amao mu 


T l_ 
ElP 


examples of alienation; 
contriving situations that 
a given intellectual premise. 

Whereas such movies as "The Passenger 
and “L’Awentura” derive much of their power 
from their Molly lyrical documentation of 
fife’s ambiguities — by showing a series of 
enigmatic scenes that may or may not be con- 
nected, they force the audience to make its own 
analogies — these sketches browbeat the read- 
er with moralizing comments and wordy expli- 
cations of what various symbols and actions 
mean. Reading “That Bowling Alley on the 
liber” recalls a statement once made bv the 
director about scripts: "They are dead words 
on the page, trying to explain things which 
should not be explained in words." 


12/21 /as 


Michiko Kakutani is on the staff of The New 
York ratus. 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscoct 


the diagramed deal 


East opened one dub. 
North had a choke of respons- 
es to the one-heart overcall: 
one spade, two spades, two. 
dubs, three hearts and four 
hearts were all possible All 
roads, were likdy to lead to 
four hearts; and one spade did 
so. 

With die actual distribution, 
it was not difficult to make the 
contract. But this was dupli- 
cate, mid overtricks were sig- 
nificant. When the dnb jack 
was led, East won with the king 
and had a problem at the sec- 
ond trick. 

A chib return would allow 
South to score the queen, and a 
trump play would damny the 
defease, if West happened to 


hold the ten. There was a lot to 
recommend a diamond lead, in 
the hope that West had the 


bidding sug- 


icang 

held 


that 


NORTH 
♦ AQ 10*33 
o J53 
O A 12 

*7 


WEST 

♦ KS2 
OSH 

OSB63 

• J 108.2 


EAST (DJ 
♦ J6 
OQ87 
OKU); 
*AK»S4 


SOUTH 
♦ 74 

O AEI0J1 


0 QB4 
*QB3 


Neither side was rataenUe. The 
UdBng; 


1 o 

I N.T. 
4 V 


X* 

3 O 


Wen led tte club Jack. 


FYLLAT 


mmmm 

■:« 


WHAT'S A BALL. 

HIT HIGH IN -me AIR 
I PURIN© A SAME i 
IPLAYEP AFTER PARK^J 


SPORTS BRIEFS 


Yugoslavia’s Petrovic Wins Slalom 


Now orange the circled letters to 

ram the surprise answer, as sug- 

gested by the above cartoon. 

(Answers tomorrow) 

Jumbles: FIFTY SQUAW TROUGH DEMISE 


Friday's 


KR ^ r J SjLA / _,G°RA, Yugoslavia (AP) — Rok Petrovic of Yugoslavia wrax his 
second worn Cop slalom race of the season Saturday, mastering an icy, hard- 
l^ ^ ed track that e hmma ied the co-favorites and many other skiers. 

Petrovic, 1 9, wix> in his second Worid Cup season had won the slalom event Dec. 
I m bestnere. Italy, docked the best time in both runs at Kram'ska Gora for an 
aggregate of 1 minute and 44.83 seconds. 

Jonas Nfisson of Sweden, 22 and the rctgmng worid slalom champion, was 
cond with an overall time at l-as xi Thnn« ^ ^ , _ . 


WEATHER 


: t siairan cnampian, was 
second with an overall tune of 1:45.63. Thomas Stangsssinger of Austria ticked 
1:46.92 overall for thml place. Of 84 competitors, 30 qualified for the second heaL 
and onqr 18 fiind^l the race. Those who dropped out included Marc GirardeQi of 
Ureembourg, the World Cup title holder, and Ingemar Stenmaxk of Sweden, the 
former Olympic and World Cup champion. 


EUROPE 


Algarve 

Amsterdam 


Baneelaaa 
Btlgrads 
Berlin 


Sudumt 

Budapest 

Copenhagen 

Coda DM sal 

DBMIn 

EdinbBroh 

Roroece 

FranMIin 

Oentva 

Helsinki 

inanaui 

Lai Palmas 

Ltaben 

London 

MadrM 

Mllasi 

Maicns 

Monlch 

Nice 

Oslo 

Peril 

Prague 

Rerklavlk 

Rome 

Siocktieini 

Strasbourg 

Venice 

Vhama 

Warsaw 


HIGH 
C F 
II 04 
9 48 

10 so 

13 SS 

* 4| 
7 45 

13 54 
a 4« 

• 44 
7 45 
9 41 

13 53 
9 46 

11 57 


LOW 
C F 
10 50 d 

4 3t d 

s 4i a 

i n ir 

0 32 fr 

3 37 cl 

4 3* Ir 

•4 23 fr 

3 36 fr 

6 43 o 

6 44 r 

5 41 fr 

3 37 fr 

- 0 a el 

6 43 - 4 75 |r 

2 34 -6 21 d 

0 43 0 to o 

* 46 3 37 r 

21 70 M 01 d 

is oi 13 a a 

u 55 ID a r 

o <3 o a r 

2 34 0 33 fo 

-4 25-30 -4 sw 

12 54 - 4 25 cf 

13 M S 41 fr 

17 03 3 37 cl 

t 43 1 34 d 

9 48 0 a fr 

0 M -3 27 fr 

14 17 J 30 tr 

0 43 4 » o 

5 4! -4 25 fr 
4 3* 1 34 to 

3 37 0 32 lo 

7 45 2 30 d 

2 30 - 0 21 d 


ASIA 



HIGH 
CPC 
» 54 20 
3 37 .4 


LOW 


IBS 
21 70 a 
4 a -i 
4 43 3 

32 to 24 


48 fr 
25 fr 
— fr 
73 e 

36 d 
a o 

37 o 
»3 O 


» 68 IS 59 _ 


71 79 14 
8 U I , . 
H a no 


— fr 

— M 
57 fr 
44 d 


Casedbs Beat Soviets, Win Hockey Tourney 

MOSCOW (AP) — Czechoslovakia, the reigning wadd champion, defeated the 
aoviet Union, 3-1, on Saturday to take first place in the Izvestia Cup hockey 
tournament 

The Czechoslovaks finished with two victories and two ties for ax pants, while 
tne Soviet team was second with six points off three victories and the loss to 
Czechoslovakia. 

Sweden finished third, while Canad a placed fourth and Finland was fifth of the 
five teams. Earlier Saturday, Canada beat Finland, 54. The Swedes ended their 
competition on Friday with a 3-1 victory over Finland. 


25 77 20 48 
IB 64 9 '48 


Judge Reverses Dartmouth Coach’s Ouster 


Hurts 

LATIN AMERICA 


a BS 14 41 
31 88 18 M 


Bueno* Alrtt 
Caracas 

Lima 

»*M*»Clhr 18 64 b 
H torteJmirg 


^^?. NC0RD : New Hampshire (AP) — In a decision that was hniwi by a 
coaching ^association as a step toward protecting coaches' jobs, a judge has nded 

5 ° w ^ l ? snu&scd “ football coach ^Dartmouth, 

shOTld be ranstated until his contract cjqjines in June 1987. 

IffftFfAn fAiin^r V. a. T ra. a. 


NORTH AMERICA 


~ - wuuiua expires m jane lysi. 


Zorich 

MIDDLE EAST 

7 45 - 3 28 


Ankara 
Beirut 
Da moscas 
Jerusalem 
TCI Aviv 


OCEANIA 


13 54 6 43 

12 S4 4 
16 61 11 57 


Aa<MaiKi 

Syrtnev 


27 81 17 63 fr 
----- - » 84 » 73 fr 

to-fooov; fr-folrj h-nalf; 
Sh-ahawersf sn-snew; at -stormy. 


Anchorage 

Atlanta 

Saxton 

Ctaeaga 

Danver 

Detralt 

Haaolota 

Housfon 

Los Angelas 

Miami 

Mima aal It 

Montreal 

Nassau 

Mew York 

San Frond see 

Seattle 

Taranto 

Washington 


0 32 
e 43 


4 39 
8 46 

*J 27-10 14 
0 32-10 14 
11 S3 -I 30 


— -r- justified whm he relieved 

- on Nov. 29. Yukica, whose record was 3541-3 overall 
sued Leland to prevail Dartmouth from hiring another 


-1 30-11 12 sw 


66 fr 


39 pc 
52 fr 


54 d 


38 82 19 

20 48 4 

2» 79 11 

21 70 12 „ _ 

0 32 -10 14 pc 

■ 14 7 -16 3 sw 

27 81 2D. 68 K 

■1 30 -8 IB d 

W a 5 41 fr 

6 43 -1 30 to 

-5 23 -9 14 pc 

1 34 .1 30 


Yukica from his __ 
and 2-7-1 this year, 
coach. 

Charles McClendon, executive director of the American Football Coaches 
"‘“i? “ a ^? ark detaaon" that “takes a lot of f carom of 
imhSSt losin f . coachcs - 801 Dartmouth’s lawyer, Th«nas Rath, said the 

^ - to C0UTt - 10 ^ Yukica if the aSSc council 

approves the dismissal at its meeting early next month. ' 


For the Record 


o-JugfCaaf; PC partly ctauav; r-roin.* 


ironBEUVA 

I« -sn. MANILA: Shmara. Toma. 28-MW^S>. «bu2s'oS3S 


J££n!& f"" f Y «8 0sl * fia .scared a lS-rwmd spUt decision over Eddie 
00 Sa !5 rda ? r 1 in P® 8810 - » win the International bS 

m ”““ d ^ “* “f 

tn ^ fa ges* horse in dwhistoiyrfharnraracniit was retired 

to stud Friday at Almahurst Farm near Lotington, Kentucky. (AP) 

speed J s ^ ater > «* a worid record in the 500*ieter 
maxi Saturday, docking 3649 seconds m national competition at a high-altitude 
rink near Alma Ata, the Tass news agency reported, (AJP) 



queen, but the 
gested that South 
card. 

What East did was to lead 
the spade six. an unexpected 
attack on dummy's suit. In the- 
ory, this helped South, for after 
the play of the king and the 
ace, the remaining spades 
could be cashed. In practice, ir 
worked nicely. 

South led the heart jack, 
which was covered by the 
queen. The declarer drew 
trumps and was convinced that 
East had led a singleton spade 
in the hope of an eventual raff. 
He finessed the spade ten con- 
fidently and was deflated when 
East produced the spade jack 
and cashed the club ace: . . „ 

The defense took thrf 1 ' 
tricks and collected all the 
match points. 


Ailing Cheeks 
A Large Pain 
ForCeltics 


Tb* Associated Prest 

, PmLADELPHlA-Inle 
the Philadelphia 76ers in vi 
against their arch-rivals, the B 
titles, Maurice Cheeks agai 
shown he is one of the 
guards in the National 
Association. 


Although his shoulder 
Cheoo scored a scason-hf 
points and added 14 assists ii 

IZlg tlv mfm iv. . - Ci_. ■ - 


NBAFQQTf 
as Philadelphia defcatet 
ics.108-102. The loss” 
sixth for the Celtics in 2 
“Ife played hard; ] 


A N.Y. Record, 
A Boston f Rat’ 


-wiico. ncsoneorthe 
m the league and he h: 
years." . 

Cheeks, a seven-year] 
an, explained his rde in 


Doris. Potrin . got a hug, above, 
uvmq ms teaiwwtfp after Mike 
Bossy’s goal, of! an assist by 
• Mandeni* veteran during 
Fndav n!^f s game assiost rite 
gave Potvinb s 916th 
pomt in the National Hockey 
League; that broke Bobby 
On's record for a defenseman. 
On Satiadnyi in Boston during 

a game against the North Star? 

a fan- had a different response 

to a goal scored by the Brams’ 

Lmsemaa; hb mckname is 
“The Hat" ; " 


“Last tmie, we had a 
£ l nartc r and It cost us 
against the Celtics. 

Tliis time, the Sixers 
the fourth quarter was i 
Trailing by 84-83 at 
the period, they s « 
straight pants while 

rnmud •lu.'.c . 


■ U UK 

The Phfladd^hia t 
Gndcati, did not Emit 
preda- He called ti 


ne catted ti 
gutty effort by a lot < 
Cheeks said '.he r 


~ an^ entire ^ 
- -JOre — as a' rookie. 
««5 aboqtthe.sbouk 
mn &om restate Che 
^Whor he ats for a I 
cold. 



















Page 13 


’INTERI*JATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1985 


SPORTS 




its, Jets j 
in to Gam 



The Associated Press 

• XBORO, MASSAC HU- 
• v . > — Cntig James rushed fot a 

high 142 yards, II coming as 
s ocd down the sideline for a 
-quarter touchdown, and die 

> jngland Patriots won aptoy- 
-Ih Sunday by Hpfaatfng the 

. * Vnari Bengal*. 34-23. 

Patriots, 11-5, also tied a 
■ .joord for victories in a sea- 
:■ 3ndnnati was diminnt<vt 

• --be playoffs when Pittsburgh 
. .the New York Giants Satur- 

:r James’ touchdown, pat 
England ahead, 27-16, with 
. dt in the game, CmrinnatTs 

-iback Boomer Esiason threw 
. ' v-.cond touchdown pass, an 
v . /aider to Cris Coflmswarth, 

• J :43toga 

■■' r New England, which never 
ipairfiwt right back and 
] on Robert Weathers’ 42- 
inn on fourth-and-one with 

“■op lay. . 

’ • ; Patriots appeared to be m 
■ *. A with a 20-6 halftime lead, 
•- aason threw a 33-yard tooch- 
pass to Eddie Brown on the 
>. >uiy of the third quarter and 
Jreecfa kicked Me third field 
r . 4 the game, a 30-yaxder with 

- J left in: the game, to make it 

iy Eason, who had thrown a 
; rd touchdown pass to Stanley 
. an in the first quarter, hooked 
th him for a 48-yard comple- 
__ ui. the second play after the 

- ff to bring the ball to the Cin- 

. ‘ ti 17-yard line. 

. ~ aes, the AFCs third-ranked 
_ . t going into the game, ran 
' for six yards, then took a 
' 1 from Eason, cut up the right 
ind hardy stayed inbounds as 
r ~ mi into the end zone. 

- -,s 37, Brawns 10: In East 
aford, New Jersey, Johnny 
- x rushed for two touchdowns 
Curt Sohn stole a touchdown 
_ *w York gained the playoffs. 

' - -t Jets wiD host the Patriots the 
wild-card game next Satur- 
The Browns fell to 8-8, but 
the AFC Central title and, 
r- te having the worst record of 
"livisoo-winner in NFL hislo- 
dll haw a bye next week. 

: Leahy kicked three field 
— for the Jets, but it was Sohn’s 
. touchdown, at 13:17 of the 
quarter with Cleveland hold- 
t 7-3 lead, that turned the 
". It was the result of a cast on 
lefeoder Don Rogers’ right 

0 protect a broken thumb. 

— aiterback Ken O’Brien's pass 

■verthrown, and right to Rog- 

lantsGain 
ayoff Berth 

pilot by Our Staff From Dupaicha 

ST RUTHERFORD. New 

1 — The New York Giants, 
Joe Morris running for three 
•downs, rooted the Pittsburgh 
as, 28-10, Saturday and, m 
final game of the regular sea- 
dinched a wild-card playoff 

for the second straight year 
be third time in five yeans, 
qr fini s he d the season with a 
. record, their best since they 
• . 11-3 in 1963, and will be the 
next Sunday against the San 
isco 49en or the Washington 
tins in a wild-card game, the 
□ Giants Stadium. 

— — -^nrihadtouiidownrnnsof 9 
, 65 yards and 1 yard. He ran 
llt wt 52 yards of the 65-yard 
4 i jiT ' down ran with only one shoe. 
"* fpcared to have scored anoth- 
chdown in the fourth quarter, 
;i*n official ruled that his knee 
'!mched ground a foot short of 
• >al line. For the game, Morris 
! times for 202 yards, his most 
' s and yards in one contest 
. retiring yardage was the sec- 
highest in Giant history, 
d only by the 218 Gene Rob- 
amedin a game in 1950. For 
*son. Morns rushed for 1 336 
a team record. 

losing, the Steders finished 
i 7-9 record, their first non- 
ig season since 1971. The loss 
®ored the Cleveland Browns 
American Conference’s Cen- 
i vision title and a berth in the 
fs as they beaded into Sun- 
' game in Giants Stadium 
t the New Yak Jets. 

tikfas 27, Cardinals 16: De- 
funbliug on the first play 
scrimmage in Si.- Louis, 

5 Rogers gained a team-re- 
16 yards as Washington won. 
t gave the Redskins a 10-6 

and a chance to make the 
fs Sunday, if the Dallas had 

• the 49ers in San Francisco. 
Crs’ r ushin g total was the 
> for a running back in the 

season- The Redskins’ 
had been 195 yards by Mike 

6 a gamy the farrlinalc in 

cdiaidy afterward the Car- 
coach, Jim H anifan. and his 
u coaches were fired by the 
owner, W illiam V. BidwilL 

as 16, Smuts 10= In New 
>, Atlanta’s Gerald Riggs 
for 157 yards and a toueb- 
Sunday, taking over the 
rushing lead with 1,718 

tuning point came on New 

• second play from scrim- 
■vben Earl Campbell broke 
it midfield and appeared 

for a certain touchdown, 
mddl Casern overtook Mm 
3, kept stride for one step, 
nebed the ball from Camp- 
m (NYT. WP, AP) 


h 1 * 



Sweden Retains Davis Cup in Last Match 
After Becker’s Aces Trump Wilander 


John Ehvay lost nine yards when he was polled down by the Seahawks 7 Jacob Green (79) 
and Greg Games. But in the game’s second half be raffied the Broncos to a 27-24 victory. 


era. But the ball bounced, off Ms- 
chest and cast, and Sofia, the in- 
tended receiver, -wrestled it away at 
the Cleveland eight and scored. 

The Browns, who had taken the 
lead when Brian Brennan returned 
Dave Jennings's weak punt 37 
yards for a touchdown, tied at 10 
on a 32-yaid field goal by Matt 
Bahr. They marched 63 yards in 
seven plays, with Ozzie Newsome 
catching a 24-yard pass to highlight 
the 'drive. 

But New York went ahead for 
good at 17-10 after the Browns' 
quarterback, Benue Kosar, was 
sacked by Mark Gastineau and 
fumbled at his 13. Linebacker Bob 
Crable feO cm the ball and Hector 
scored from the five on third down. 

Hector’s other touchdown came 
on a one-yard dive to complete a 
59-yard drive with the third-quar- 
ter ldckoff that made it 24- 10. After 
Bobby Humphery returned the 
kick 36 yards to his 41, 'the Jets used 
11 plays and 5:50 on the clock. A1 
Toon’s one-handed grab at the one 
on third down set up the score. 

Dolphins 28, Bffls fc ln Miami, 
Dan Marino passed tp Bruce Har- 
dy for two touchdowip as the Dol- 
phins beat Buffalo to'firin the AFC 
East title. • 

Marino hit Hardy -on first-half 
touchdown passes of 19 and 5 
yards. Tony Nathan ran 1 yard for 
a score and Ron Davenport ran J3 
yards for the final touchdown; in 
the fourth period, before a crowd of 
64,81 1 in the Orange Bond. 

The Dolphins finis hed the regu- 
lar season with seven straight vic- 
tories for a 12-4 record, one game 
better than division rivals New En- 
and the New York Jets. The 
[pfains have won or shared the 
AFC East title 13 of the past-46 
years. 


They get a week, off before they 
play tbrar first playoff game, either 
Jan. 4 or Jan. 5 in the Change Bowl 

The Bills contributed to their de- 
mise, grating flagged for 19 penal- 
ties for 123 yards and twice failing 
to score from inside the Miami five- 
yard line. The BiHs also lost three 
interceptions and three fumbles, 
two of the turnovers setting up two 
Miami scores. 

Quels 38, Charge** 34: In Kan- 
sas City, Musocri, Stephone Paige 
broke a 40-year-old NFL record 
with 309 yards in pass receptions 
for the Chiefs. 

Paige, a thud-year pro from 
Fresno State, caught touchdown 
passes of 56 and 84 yards in the 
first half. His 309 yards, on only 
eight receptions, surpassed the 
marie of 303 yards set Nov. 22. 
1945, by Jim Boston of the Cleve- 
land Rams. 

The Chargers rallied valiantly in 
the fourth quarter to dose to four 
points, scoring three unanswered 
touchdowns. 

Paige had 258 yards receiving ui 
the first half alone an receptions 
covering 56, 51, 30, 17, 84, and 20 
He ran ght a 39-yard pass 
BiD Kenney in the third quar- 
ter, was shaken up on the play, but 
returned to the game and Moke the 
record with a 12-yard catch, Ms 
shortest of the. game, in the fourth 
period. . 

The Chargers’ running back, 
Lionel James, set an NFL record 
for all-puipose yardage. He bad 
242 running, receiving and lock re- 
turning for a season total of 2^35, 
breaking the record of 2,462 set by 
Terry Metcalf of the St Louis Car- 
dinals in 1975. 

Bears 37, lions 17: In Pontiac, 
Michigan, 
the second half kidcoff 94 yards for 


a touchdown and Chicago'maiched 
the league record for roost victories 
in a regular season. 

The Bears, who locked up the 
NFC Central Division tide arid a 
home-field advantage for the play- 
riffs five weeks ago, equaled the 15- 
1 marie set by the 1984 San Frands- 
co49era 

The Bears' running bade, Walter 
Payton, also entered the record 
bodes, becoming the first player in 
to go over 2,000 total yards in three 
consecutive seasons. Against the 
Lions, he rushed for 81 yards on 17 
carries and caught 4 passes for 55 
yards. He also threw a 50-yard 
pass. Payton finished the season 
with 2,034 total yards. 

Packers 20, Buccaneers 17: In 
Tampa, Florida, Phillip Epps 
scored on a 30-yard flanker reverse 
in the Drat quarter and Jessie dark 
ran 6 yards for a fourth-quarter 
touchdown as mistake-prone 
Green Bay palled out a victory. 

The triumph enabled the Packers 
to finish the season with their third 
straight 8-8 record, while Tampa 
Bay completed its first campaign 
under then- coach Leeman Bennett 
with a 2-14 mark that will give 
them the first overall pick in next 
spring’s NFL draft 

Eagles 37, VWnH 35: In Minne- 
apolis, Paul McFadden kicked 
three field goals, the last a 35- 
yaider with 40 seconds to play to 
give Philadelphia’s interim corah, 
Fred Bruney, a triumph in his NFL 
debuL 

. The winning kick was set up by 
Ron Jaworslri's 11-yard pass to 
Mike Quick and a personal foul 
on the rookie defensive 
: Holt that gave the Ea- 


By- Nesha. Starcevic 

The Associated Press 

MUNICH— Stefan Edbcig de- 
feated Michael Westpfaal 3-6, 7-5. 
6-4, 6-3, cm Sunday in the last 
match of the Davis Cup final to 
give Sweden its second consecutive 
tide with a dramatic 3-2 victory 
over West Germany in the interna^ 
tioaal team tournament. 

Bods Becker had beaten Mats 
WHandcr, 6-3, 2-6, 6-3, 6-3, in the 
afternoon to even the best-of-fivc 
series at 2-2. 

Wilander, the French Open 
champion, put Sweden ahead on 
Friday by wmmng the opening sin- 
gles against WestphaL Becker, the 
Wimbledon champion, defeated 
Edberg to even the score, but Swe- 
den regained the lead when Wi- 
lander and Joakixn Nystrom won 
Saturday’s doubles against Bec k er 
and Andreas Maurer, 6-4, 6-2, 6-1. 

Westpbal, ranked 51st in the 
world, appeared to be taking West 
Germany to its first Davis Cup title 
when he won the opening set 
against Edberg, 19, the Australian 
Open champion who is ranked fifth 
in ihe world. 

But Edberg broke Westphal's 
booming serve in the 12th game of 
the second set and tied the match. 
In the third set the Swede again 
trailed after dropping Ms service in 
the opening gating but again eamg 
back to cake the lead. 

He saved two game points as the 
12th game went to five deuces, then 
broke Westpbal to win the set, 7-5. 

The tnrning point of the match 
came in the sixth game of the third 
set. Edberg stretched and was able 
to return a cross-court shot Wcsi- 
phal misjudged the ball and let it go 
by him, ana it bounced jast made 

Westpbal then dropped his ser- 
vice and it was 3-3. Edberg, attack- 
ing Westphal's weaker second 
serve, broke again in the 10th game 
to win the set. 

He dominated Westphal in the 
fourth set, breaking serve in the 
eighth game, then bdd Ms own ser- 
vice to win the last game at love and 
keep the tide in Sweden. 

Westphal aced Edberg 23 times, 
bat was too inconsistent late in the 
match. Edberg served 13 aces, and 
was devastating at the net 

Becker, 18, who is ranked sixth 
in the world, was equally devastat- 
ing against Wilander, ranked No. 3. 
He gave Wilander a taste of what 
was to come when he served two 
aces in winning the opening game 
of the match and appeared untrou- 
bled by the Mp injived in training 
several days ago. 

He had received ultra-sonic 
and painrldHing tablets 
shortly before the match, bnt 



Ita Anoodad Pun 

Boris Becker of West Germany concentrated on returning a shot against Mats Wilander 
of Sweden. Becker’s 6-3, 2-6, 6-3, 6-3 victory tied die teams at 2-2 in the Davis Cup finaL 


served 14 aces on the fast carpet 
surface and appeared to be in top 
drape, except m the second set. 

He was especially effective in the 
last set, coming out of the locker 
room following a 10-minute break 
after the third set to take a 3-0 lead 
without dropping a point. 

Wilander squandered two game 
points after bong taken to deuce in 
the sixth game of the first set A 
linesman then called a foot fault 
and WQander was dearly upset as 
he netted a backhand after a rare 
raDy to drop ins service and give 
Becker a 4-2 lead. 

Becker served out the set at love 
to take the lead. 

Wilander started the second set 
aggressively, repeatedly charging 
the net for winning volleys. He 
broke Becker for the first time in 
the second game of the second set 
when Becker double-fanlted twice 
in a row. 

Wilander struggled in the fifth 
game, bnt saved two game points to 
hold Ms serve and take a 4-1 lead. 

In the next game, Becker stum- 
bled and fell to the ground and 
West Germany’s non-playing team 
captain. Wilhelm Btmgert, rushed 
onto the court, fearing that Becker 
might have aggravated his injury. 

Becker quickly got up ana hdd 
Ms serve; but faded to win a single 
point in the next two games, drop- 


ping his service at love in the eighth 
game as Wilander wrapped up the 
set, 6-2, to even the match. 

Becker appeared dqected and 
troubled as he missed several easy 
shots at the start of the third set. As 
be muttered to hinwtf and shook 
his head, Wilander hdd his service 
to take a 1-0 lead. 

The turning point came in the 
next game when Becker stretched 
to full length to return a drop volley 
that landed close to the net. Becker 
won the point and received a thun- 
derous ovation from the capacity 
crowd of 13,000 at Olympic Hall.' 

In a gesture of elation. Barker 
clinched Ms fists and the crowd 
responded. From then on he was 
unstoppable. 

He served three game- winning 
aces as be powered Ms way to vic- 
tory in 2 hours and 16 minutes. 

Becker won the last set and the 
match when he hdd Ms serve at 
love in the final game, the winning 
point coming when Wilander Ml a 
forehand long. 

Becker said be took six pain- 
killing tablets before the match and 
fdtfme. 

“I am is happy about w inning 
these two matches brae in the Davis 
Cup final as I am about winning 
Wimbledon,” he said. “Especially 
because I beat two players who are 
ranked higher than I am." 


"Boris played incredibly well 
and there was nothing 1 could do in 
the fourth set,” Wilander said. “I 
felt bad about losing the first and 
the third sets, but in the fourth 
there was notMng I could do. 

"I don't think my serve is really 
good enough against Boris on a 
surface like this.” 

He got only five aces on the fast 
carpet surface laid on a specially; 
installed asphalt foundation. 

"The hosts always choose a sur- 
face they prefer in the Davis Cup; 
it's normal," he said. “We chose 
clay last year when we beat the 
United States to win the title." 

Wilander and Nystrom, one of 
the lop doubles teams in the world, 
had outclassed Becker and Maurer 
in I hour and 18 minutes Saturday. 

The West Germans were so out- 
played in the second and third sets 
that many in the capacity crowd of 
13.000 started leaving long before 
the end. 

With Sweden leading by 3-2 in 
the second set, Becker and Maurer 
won only two points in the next 
seven games as Wilander and Nys- 
trom dosed out the second set and 
raced to a 4-0 lead in the third. 

"We thought before the match 
that we could break Maurer's serve, 
but we didn't expect to do it so 
often," Wilander said. 

Maurer, ranked 32d in the world, 
lost five of his six serves. 


SCOREBOARD 

— \ TFnm/ni Hrtrrinrr Mon 

Basketball 

Hockey ft OiIicmi' X uICKngi J3m.€&wa 

— -a t\ • TT 7 n 


NBA Standings 

EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic Dtvbtaa 


Selected College Results 


FRIDAY’S RESULTS 
EAST 


Notrv Dam n, vaiparalio 54 
Pantile 7f, Detroit 99 
Wichita Si. M. Mbatalooi SI-57 
SOUTHWEST 

Cteawen *3. Texas Tech M 


NBJL Standings 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick DivUtoo 


Dionne (15). Shots an goal; Loo AnoolM (on 
.Mono) *1+4-31; Sttnonian (an Eliot) IH> 
13— fl. 

1 I w 

4*1-5 




W 

L PCL 

Cl 

Marshall 54 Fresno St- 44 

Houston 94 Lana Beach St. 86 

Boston 

21 

A 

jn 

— 

SOUTH 

Oklahoma lax New Orleans 85 

Now Jorwiv 

17 

13 

sat 

5 

North Carolina 89. Stanford 55 

Rice 54 NW Louisiana 53 

ptiltodotohla 

14 

12 

-571 

■ si* 

MIDWEST 

Texas Christian 74 Ore** 59 

wuntogton 

13 

13 

-500 

7Mr 

Georgia 67, Nebraska 43 

PAR WEST 

Now York 

8 

W 

396 

13 

FAR WEST 

Arizona St. 74 Seattle 59 

Control DtvMon 



California 52. Nov.-Rono 51 

Bradley 79. Cotorado 69 

Mllwaukoo 

19 

12 

413 

— 

Idaho 77^CokDavN 57 • 

Idaho St. 74 Wyoming 42 

Ootralt 

15 

14 

.517 

3 

UCLA *9. LBVOta. Cam. 79 

Montana 74 CaKSanta Barbara 67 

Atlanta 

14 

JOO 

3to 

TOURNAMENTS 

Haw 70, Air Force 53 

Ctovotana 

12 

15 

AM 

5 

Bator 8wl 

Nev.-Rena 94 Puget Sound 81 

CIi tango 

11 

30 

ass 

1 

Fir** Raoul 

New Mexka 94 Atobama St. 83 

Indiana 

*■ 

-19 

-296 

9 

Georgia Tech R, Texas ASM 50 

Oreaon 74 Brigham Yeuno 69 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 


Jacksonville SO. S. Mlsstebml 46 . 

UCLA 109. Miami, Fla. 64 . 

Midwest D hr Man 

■ 


. - • Keetuckv InvHatlaaoA 

Utah 74 Arizona 68 

Denver 

18 

10 

MS 

— 

First Reuwt 

Wetxr SL 54 Santa Clara 53 

Houston 18 11 

431 



«i 

Kentucky 84 East Carolina 5! 

TOURNAMENTS 

San Antonio 

17- 13 

.586- 

lto 

Pcoperdtoe 75. So. Mrethodtot 64 OT 

Qatar Bowl doselc 

Utah 

16 

U 

J33 

3 

Loeahani Classic 

Champtaaskl* 

Dallas 

13 

13 

■500. 

4 

First Round 

Georgia Tech 74 Jacksonville 53 

Sacramento 

9 

19 

J21 

9 

South Florida 54 Sen Diego 55 

Thlrti Ptace 

Padflc Dtvtskm . 



Texas 64 Aloska-Anchorage 57 

Texas ASM 81. S. MlsaiaiJntt 61 

LA. Lakers' 

24 

3 

m 

— 

LeutoNwc nwHettewd 

Kentucky imrttattonai 

Portland 

16 

14 

■533 

9V» 

First Ravad 

(**M i n«r'~*iiita 

Seattle 

11 

« 

479 

14 

Louisiana St. 84 5E Louisiana 61 

Kentucky 84 Pegperdlna 56 

Ptwenl* 

10 

17 

-370 

14 

Southern u. 74 NE Louisiana 70 

Third Place 

LA. CltoMrs 


18 

•357 

14Vj 

Rebel Roaedop 

Sa Mettuxflst 71. E. Carolina 63 

Gokton Stale 

10 

31 

JQ3 

16 

First Round 

Longhorn Classic 


FRIDAY’S RESULTS 

M 73 V »— m 

New Jersey M » J TV— 121 

WHltoms »•» 3*. Gmlnskl 9-11 44 32: 

OMhtwan M0 3-420. Samoeon 3-ISM IB. Lloyd 
MI 4-4 IX Reid MS 4-5 IE RebomkNi Houston 
49 (Olaluwan 13). New Jersey 63 Williams 
20). Assists: Houston S3 (Lucas 6). New Jer- 
sey 3T (Richardson 7). 

Utah ST 35 SB 15— MS 

PhfladetoMa MBS 11-112 

MJMaiona 9-17 19-23 37. Ervins *-17 M 1*; 
Hansen 11-W 2-5 25. Danilov 9-T9 2-2 2H. Re- 
bounds: Utah 3) (Eaton Ml. PUUodotahla SO 
(Malone it). Assists? Ulan 34 (Stockton 17). 
Philadelphia 25 ICtmafcs 11). 

LA. Lakers VM39 u-m 

Cleveland 39 30 21 *4-1 H 

AbduKMboar 12-T0 S4 29. Scott 10-15 1-521: 
Free 4-13 6-6 1& Turpin 4-11 3-2 14. ReboaOds: 
Los Anodes 59 (AMukJaMnr 9). Cleveland 
49(WeGtll)JUUsts: Los Anodes 271 Johnson 
14|, Cleveland 34 (Baaiev 9). 

Milwaukee » 38 39 15-MI 

India OO 29 SI 15 74—114 

FlemtoB7-B9.il 23, Tlsdato 9-14W 21jMon- 
crlef 4-17 w 31. Cummins* M0 *4 14. Re- 
boMdc Milwaukee 54 (Lister 9), Indkma58 
(Tisdale 111. Assists: Milwaukee 21 (Hodsu 
51. Indiana 38 (Ri chardso n ID. 
son Antonia 33 M 27 34-119 

LA. CHPPers 22 31 XI 1*— 1*4 

Robertson 15-33 34 32. MJlened 8-15 3-3 19; 
Edwards S-ll W 19, MJohnson S-u M 17. 
Rebounds: San Antonio 51 (Greenwood 14), 
Las Angelas 44 (Mansell 10). Assfcds: Son 
Anlonle 28 (Moore. Robertson 7). Las Angeles 
31 (Edwards e). 

SATURDAY* RESULTS 
(Summaries unavailable! 

New Jersey list. Indiana 93 
New York 112. DetnUt 110 
LA. Lakers 94, Wash! noion 84 
Atlanta 121 Houston t22 
Philadelphia 108, Boston im 
ChJawa 117. Utah 104 
Milwaukee 132. Dallas 107 
San Antonio 128. Denver 11* 
phoenix n&GMMn Stan w 
LA. Clippers U7, Sacra memo lie 
Portland 114 Seattle ft 


Iona 71. Florida 70 
Nev,-Li»s Vcooa 185, Son Dlcso SL 85 - 
Tlmcs-Dtuxrfch luyttatlonol 
First Round 

Richmond 47, Vo. CammanweaWi 65. OT 
Virginia 48, QM Domtohm 41 
Vofantaer Classic 
First Round 

tLC-Wllminatan 58. Barter 54 
Te nn essee 79. Furman 45 

SATURDAY'S RESULTS 



W 

L 

T PIS GF OA 

Lemav 2 (121, -Skrtko (171, Peterson (3), 

PhUadetahlo 

25 

9 

8 

50 

157 

105 

Smvt (12); Thomas (I). Fergus (111, Valve 

WOshlnatan 

19 

8 

4 

43 

121 

97 

(14). Shots an goal: Toronto (mi Brodeur 17-1 3- 

NY iskxMars 

13 

11 

9 

33 

123 

122 

5— -25; Vancouver (on Wreaaett) 14-12-14-40. 

NY Rangers 

15 

17 

2 

32 

130 

115 

SATURDAY'S RESULTS 

Pttisbureh 

M 

16 

4 

32 

129 

123 

Mtoeeteia 1 a 0 — 3 

New Jersey 

13 

18 

1 

27 

123 

137 

Boston 0 3 1-5 

Adams Dfvtstoe 




Llnseman (9). Miller 2 (3). Cowman (4), 

Quebec 

U 

13 

3 

38 

127 

M3 

Bountue (7); Gramm (11). Ad on 1131. Shota 

Montreal 

17 

13 

4 

38 

144 

131 

an goal: Minnesota (an Keans) 9-7-12— 38; 

Boston 

16 

10 

6 

38 

122 

MO 

Boston (on Beaugre) 17-90—39. 

Hartford 

16 

M 

1 

33 

127 

125 

N.Y. Rangers 2 2 1-5 

Buffalo 

15 

16 

2 

33 

119 

114 

N.Y. menders 1 3 1—4 

CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 


Greschner(ll),Oshame(10),Helfnlnen (5). 

Nanis Dtvtsloa 




Huber (2), Sundstram (3); DAitler (10), U>- 

SL Louis 

15 

12 

4 

34 

117 

118 

Fontaine (18). Potato (8), T rattler ( 13 ). Shots 

Chicago ‘ 

13 

15 

4 

28 

131 

146 

on goal: N.Y. Rangers (on Smith, Hrudev) H- 

AMwiesato 

9 

16 

7 

35 

129 

130 

11-16—38; N.Y. islander* (onVonblesbrwcfc) 

Toronto 

8 

19 

5 

21 

121 

144 

■-14-13-05. 

Detroit 

7 

30 

4 

IS 

Ml 

163 

Hew Jersey 3 • 3—6 

Smythe Dhrtstoa 




Hartford 2 4 1—7 

Edmonton 

24 

6 

4 

52 

184 

134 

Crawford 2 (10), Rnoartsen (6), Lawless 

Calgary 

17 

13 

3 

37 

138 

113 

(11), Gavin (11), Francis (13). MacDemdd 

VOnaxivcr 

12 

19 

4 

38 

133 

148 

(1); Adams (13). Plchetta (4), Muller 2 00). 

Winnipeg 

11 

20 

4 

36 

136 

164 

Gagne (4), Bridgman ( 10 ). shots oeooot: New 

Lee Angataa 

8 

31 

4 

20 

111 

170 

Jersey (an Uut) 164-11-51; Hartford (on 

FRIDAY'S RESULTS 



Chevrler) 5 . 11 - 11 — 57 . 

N.Y. islanders 




1 1 

1 

0-4 

Philadelphia 3 1 1—4 

(LY. Raeasrs 




1 * 

1 

6—2 

ptttatwreh o 1 v-a 


TOXAS 40 South Florida 55 
Third Place 

San Dleoo 70 AiaskonAndwoae 44 
Load Iona mitotlanaf 


Louisiana St. 91, Southern U. S3 
Third Place 

NE Louisiana 79, SE Louisiana 73 


CanEsJus 80 Duquetne 83 

Connecticut TO Minnesota 49 - 

Dominican SL Hofstro 52 

Georoe Was hin gto n 731 GoosM Carolina 41 

La Salle 70 Fordtxun <4 

Lafayette SO Manhattan 70 . 

Maine TO Boston U. 71. OT 
Ohio IJk 99. SL Fronds. Pa. n 
Penn Slate It, Wanner 74 
Pittsburgh 88. Florida SL 75 
Providence 91 Howard U. 84 
Rutgers 82. Long Island U, 47 
SL John* 104, Niagara 41 
SI. Joseph's 43. vilkmova 41 
St Peter'S 53, Marts! 5* 

SyraWM 83. 81. Bangventure 44 
Temple U Wake Pens* », OT 
VandorMIt 49, Princeton 44 
SOUTH 

Davidson 75, Bgtnvne-Goofcman 40 
Florida Tech 81, Dartmouth <7 
Maryland 41 Alabama 98 
N. Carolina St. 92. Rodtord 57 
Tulsa 47. Oklahoma Sfc SI' 

Virginia Taeti u, w. Virginia 49 
w. Kentucky 7i Moraftead SL 48 
MIDWEST 

Bowling Green to. Indiana SL 57 
Cent. Michigan 85. Defiance 74 
Cincinnati 66. Denver 48 
CnbMon U. Kearney St. 71 
Davtan 7a Miami, OWo 48 
Georgetown 85, DePaul 70 
llllnofc 47. Missouri S3 
Indiana 84. Iowa SL 49 
Kansas 19, Arkansas 78 
Michigan 98, N. Michigan 74 
Michigan SL 99, UL-CMaoo 74 
N. Illinois 74, MflTRuette 48 


Nev/Las Vegas 82. Iona 63 
Third Place 
San Diego SI. 43. Florida 63' 

Times Dispatch Irn dta tlonal 


Richmond SB, Virginia io 

Third mace 

Old Dominion 47. Va. Commonwealth 55 
Volunteer Classic 
ChcraglOMNp 

Tennessee 85, N-C-wUmlneton 57 
Third Place 
Bovtor 59, Furman 55 


Bossy (31), Flatter (11); Matonev (3), RkUev 
(ID). Shots oa goto: N.v. Istondera (on Voa- 
blMbrouck) 94-1 1-3— 31; N.Y.RanBars9-i64- 

Calgary 0 • *-* 

SL LOHiS S J *— 5 

PasJawhM no). Hunter 2 (19), Barr (41. 
Meagher CO; Maclimb (4). Pepnnskl (11). 
Shots oa goal: angary (an Warns ley) 21-14- 

8— 43; St. Louis (on LomeHnJ 12-144—34 

1 1 1-4 

2 8 5-7 

Am let (12). Mac Lean 2 (13). Hawerchuk 
(22), Noutokf (10), ArafcH 113). Cortyte 131; 
Duchesne (5). Adams 19), Gu sto ts s on (8), 
Morphy (ID. Shots on esal: Washington (on 
Hayward) 144-9-32; Winnipeg (on Poolers) 

9- 10-13 — 33. 

Los Angeles 1 3 1— 4 

Edmoatoo 3 3 s— * 

Rogers (2), Kurd 4 (28), Coffey 3 (15). Sum- 
manen (9); williams (Ml, Nkitollt 2 (17). 


R. Sutter 14), Kerr 2 (31), Stahato (IT); 
Chabot (7). Cumeyworth (4). Shots on goal: 
PMIadotphto (on Romano) 11-13-13-35; 
PMStwrgft (an Frees*) 73-773-38. 

3 1 3-4 
1 I 1-3 

CHcrvk 2 (10). T .Murray (17). Seward (90). 
Secord 2 (13) ; Lambert (1), Young (10). Pre- 
bert (1). Shots on goal: Chicago (on Laforest) 
43-9—18; Detroit (an Souve) 9-12-4-25. 
Buffalo I ■ 0—1 

Montreal 0 3 0-3 

Naslund (35). Smith [17). Skradlaid 14); 
RuH (141. Shots an goal: Buffalo Ian Roy) 8-7- 
8-23; Montreal (on Barrasso) S-17-W-33. 
Vancouver I S 3-4 

Las Angeles 8 1 1 — 2 

Smrt <13).Tambeltlnl (4).Tanll 121 ). Peter- 
son (4), Shrike 2 (19); Tovlor (11). Erickson 
15). Shots op goal: Vancouver (on Janecvk) 
13-14-11 — 40; Loo Angolas (on Young) 13-13- 
5 — 30. 


European Soccer 


Transition 


BASEBALL 


World Cup Skiing 


MEN 

Slalom 

(at Ktwalska goto. Yagedovta) 

1. Rok Petrov It, Yugoslavia 1 minute, 4L8I 
seconds. 

2. Jonas Nltsson, Sweden, 1:4S4X 

1 Thomas sidnemslneor, Austria 1:44.92. 

4 RkAard Pra mu t ton . Italy, l:47AX 
S. Pam FrommelL Ueehtoastein, imknl 
4 Mm Juien. Swfizertand. 1:4830. 

7. Klaus Hetaeaner, Auenta, 1:4X31 
& Tiger Stew. United States. 1:4838. 

9. DWfcr Bouvet, France. 1:4830, 

IP. Lots Otonw HblvoreuA Bwedea 1:4835. . 
11. cniakl Ishtoka Japan, l;49& 


12 Martin Hanoi, Switzerland, 1:49.94 
11 Dtotmor KoetedcMer. Austria l:ML 
14 Toriu* Betga Norway, 1:50.12. 

Mtmt www Cop 
Overall S tu wd tow 

L More GtnudrtlL.Luumttoara 18 points 
2 Peter MflUer, Swdtzeriand, 70 
X Peter Mrafceraar. Austria 15 
4 Pefrovlc 13 
5. Nilsson, 57 • 

4. (tie) Baton KrfanL Yupoetavto, end Kart 
AIpJffor, Sudtzeriona 55 
X Robert ErkidMr L Italy, S) 

9.' Hubert Strata, Austria 44 
XL Inaemar Stcnmarfc, Sweden. 44 


ENGLISH FIRST DIVISION 
BlrmJMlWffl 1, CheiOH 2 
Coventry 1, Everted 2 
Liverpool 1, Newcastle 1 
Luton 0, West Horn 0 
. Manchester Untied & Arsenal I 
Sheffield Wednesday 1 MMKteder City 2 
Tottenham 2, Ipewtch 0 
Potats: Manchester 49, Uvenwot.45, west 
Ham 45. aiahaa 44 Sheffield 41. Everton 40. 
• Ar»«Wt3X Luton 34 Newc as tle 33. Tot t« ri se n 
31, NatttnglMm 30, Watford 29, Southampton 
27. Queans Fart 27, Coventry 24 Manchester 
22. Alton 22, Leicester 22, Oxford 20k BTrm big* 
ham 17, IPgwfcfi IS. west Bromwich 4 
FRENCH FIRST DIVISION 
Brest 1, la Havre 1 
Lons 2 Ntos 8 
Monaco 2, BasUa 1 " 

Paris St Germoln 4 Aiontre 0 
Rennes & Bordeaux 0 
■ Nantes 5. Ulto 1 
Toulon 1, Toulouse 1 

. Petats; Paris SL Sarmoto 41, Nimtos 35, 
Bordeaux 34 Lens 30. Monoca 28. 

WEST GERMAN FIRST DIVISION 
Cop QgariarlUnli 

Berutsto Dortmund 3. Sandhouun I 
Stuttgart 4. Sdullui 3 
KaUnWoutem 4 Ulm 3 (overtime) 
7T4UAN FIRST OfVIJION 
Atlanta t, Milan 1 
Bari 1, Udlnese * 

Florantlna l, Ptaa I 
imernoztonale l, samgaoria 0 
Juvmtut 4 Lecce 8 
MopoH L Avdllno 0 
Roma L Como 0 
verena 1 , Torino 0 

potato; Juvenfu* 24 nomii 30, inter Milan 
ML AS Roma 18. AC Milan, Ftorenttoo 17, Tor L 
no, Verona 14. 


DET ROfT— Sold Milt Wilcox, pitcher, will 
not be offered a contract far the 1984 noton. 

MILWAUKEE— Said Dawv Darwfn. pilch- 
er, agreed to accept an offer of ar W ra t to n. 

N.Y. YAN KE ES— Sent eantracta ol Alfonso 
Pundo. PtTcher.and Keith Smith, Inllelder, to 
CohmUna. int e rn a t i onal League. 

OAKLAND— Sent Sahara Gareev, outfield- 
er; Sieve KaHer, InfMder, and Jeff Kober, 
pllchcr, to Tacoma Triple AAA. Said Steve 
Mura, pitcher; Mike Warren, pitcher, end 
Dow Ktaamaa desfanafed hfftor, wW naf be 
offered now contracts. 

TEXAS — Sold Duane Walker, outfielder, 
will not be offered a new coniraa. 


FOOTBALL 

Halfoaal Football League 

INDIANAPOLIS— Signed Charles Bergen, 
defensive end. 

L-A. RAIDERS— Waived Dan Bessllflou, 
safety, 

SAN FRANCISCO— Announced Urn retire- 
ment of Froddfo Solomon, wldo receiver, ef- 
fective at the end of Ihe Reason. 


College Football 


PHILADELPHI A R e l e nt e d Tim Corco- 
ran, out fi elder, first b ai emon. 


CHERRY BOWL 
lot Pom toe, MkriUgon) 
Maryland 3S, Syracuse 1* 

INDEPENDENCE BOWL 
(at Shreveport, toaMaan) 
Mtoneeug 30. Clemsan U 


By Larry Gerber 

The Associated Press 

PRAGUE — Sixty years ago, she 
was the lop female aulo racer in the 
world. Now, Eliska Junto va jusi 
walks or lakes public transporta- 
tion. 

Once, Junkova drove Taster than 
some of the best competitors of her 
day, male or female. 

The Royal Sicilian AutomobiJc 
Gub praised her “exceptional 
qualities of courage and striQ" in 
the 1927 Taiga Florio, 335 miles 
(542 kilometers) of grueling driving 
over unpaved, twisting roads. 

Wearing a pair of baggy golf 
pants, the 5-foot (1.52-raetra) Jun- 
kova sat on a pillow while driving 
and stuck a piece of wood on her 
shoe to reach the accelerator. 

Now, reminiscing among scrap- 
books in her small apartment, Jun- 
kova, 85 years old, spoke with pride 
oT a special gold medal she was 
awarded for her participation in 
the race — one she did not even 
finish. 

"It was the first time a woman 
raced against the best in ibe 
world," she said. She had led in the 
first lap, but later the steering 
wheel of her Bugatti locked and she 
went into a ditch. 

Her luck was better in the 1928 
Taiga, where she overcame a water 
pump failure and a blowout to fin- 
ish fifth among the era’s top driv- 
ers: Louis Chiron, Rent Dreyfus, 
Albert Divo and Giuseppe Cam- 
pari. 

“One of my characteristics,'' she 
said, "was to plan carefully for ev- 
ery race. You have to know the 
course weH" 

At the 1928 Targa, her planning 
paid off. She was carrying a pail 
and was able to refill her radiator 
from a spring she knew was nearby. 

Junkova began racing in 1923 
“because 1 wanted to understand 
my husband better." She was riding 
co-pilot with him in a rally in 
Czechoslovakia when a World War 
I wound in his hand began acting 
up and he was unable to shift. Jun- 
kova did it for him. 

Her first triumph was at a hill 


climb near Plzen, Czechoslovakia, 
in 1924. She said a victory in a race 
near Prague in 1926 was the first 
lime a woman had ever beaten men 
in racing competition. 

One of the losers to her that year 
was her husband. In fact, he lost 
twice. 

"He was happy to see me win, 
but not the second time." she said. 

She also won the 23-titer class at 
Ndrburgring, Germany, in 1927 
and two women's races in France 
the same year. In one of those, at 

Junkova began 
racing in 1923 
'because I wanted to 
understand my 
husband better. 7 
She not only drove 
a lot, but drove 
faster than some of 
the best competitors 
of her day, male or 
female. 

Monilbery, she reached her top 
speed ever, 131 miles per hour (210 
lunh), in a 145-horsepower super- 
charged Bugatti. 

Her husband, Cenek Junek, was 
a banker at a time when Czechoslo- 
vakia was very much a part of the 
West, and when the well-to-do 
could indulge in expensive hobbies 
—like buying Bugaitis, the limited- 
production racers now cherished 
by collectors. 

The couple went through 1 1 of 
them before Junek was lolled at the 
German Grand Prix at Nurbuigr- 
ing in 1928. Junkova never raced 
again. 

Would she race today if she were 
younger? 

"I think so. I didn’t know in 
advance that 1 could take on a lot 
Bui now I know." she said. 


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Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1985 


language 


V iolinist V iktoria Mullova’s f Inner Development’ j£ 0 n anc [ ^lay Human , Pkydeau 


By Lon Tuck 

Washington Post Service 

W ASHINGTON — The 
Americanization of Viktoria 
Mull ova began long before she 
got io the United States. The last 
book the award-winning violinist 
read before defecting from the 
Soviet Union two years ago was 
"Gone With the Wind" (“It took 
a whole month"). But a day be- 
fore playing at the Reagans' 
“Christmas in Washington'' pro- 
gram, she kept referring to “this 
mad, crazy life in America." 

Why, then, did she come west? 
"Inner development I could not 
live and die" in the Soviet Union. 

Mullova, who is 26, won the 
gold medal in violin at the Tchai- 
kovsky competition in Moscow in 
1982. In 1983, she and Vakhtang 
Jordania, conductor of the Khar- 
kov Symphony in the Ukraine, 
arranged a performance in Fin- 
land and slipped across the bor- 
der to Sweden. They took with 
them two violin bows in a plastic 
bag. They left behind Mullova’s 
Stradivari us and Jordania's wife 
and two children. 

At the Moscow Conservatory, 
Mull ova's teacher was Leonid 
Kogan, next to David Oistrakh 
the greatest Soviet violinist of his 
generation. Mullova and Jorda- 
nia. now 43, met when he was 
asked to help prepare her Tor the 
1980 Sibelius competition, which 
she won. In 1971 Jordania had 
won the Herbert von Karajan 
competition in Wesi Berlin, but 
the Soviet Ministry of Culture 
bad not allowed him to travel 
since, and his hopes of conducting 
in the West had withered. It was 
his idea that they defect. 

Deciding to defect and actually 
doing iu though, were two differ- 
ent things, especially for the wom- 
an who had just won the Tchai- 
kovsky competition. They' talked 
about the possibility on long 
walks, never within earshot of 
their families. 

Mullova was still a student at 
the Moscow Conservatory, and 
she was supposed to finish her 
studies. She had had a tour of the 
Philippines, because Imelda Mar- 
cos had attended the competition 
and insisted that she come, but 
other invitations were rejected. 

Then, in early 1983, she was 
told she would be able to play In 
Helsinki in late June but would 
have to find a new pianist. If it 







Viktoria Mullova and her Stradivarius: “I was really lucky/ 


In 1983, Mullova and Vakhtang Jordania arranged a 
performance in F inlan d and slipped across the border to 
Sweden. They took with them two violin bows in a plastic bag. 


could be Jordania. they would 
have their chance — except that 
he had not been allowed abroad 
since the Karajan competition. 
And he was not exactly a pianist 

As Mullova told Joe Klein for 
an article in New York magazine, 
she visited Tikhon Khrennikov, 
head of the Soviet Union of Com- 
posers. She told him she and Jor- 
dania, as her pianist, wanted to 
leave for Finland, where they 
planned to play one of his pieces 
as a featured part of the program, 
a debut outside the Soviet Union. 
But, she said, the KGB was giving 
them problems. The day after her 
visit to Khrennikov, the KGB 
gave in. 

In Helsinki, the reviews of Mul- 
lova were ecstatic and those of 
Jordania were, not unexpectedly. 


negative. Mullova told their KGB 
chaperone to leave them alone be- 
cause Jordania was depressed by 
the reviews. The two hailed a taxi 
and crossed the border into Swe- 
den. 

They had not told their families 
of their plans. Mullova said of the 
relatives she left behind: "1 worry 
a lot, of course. And we were 
lucky. Nothing happened to 
them. Maybe it was because they 
did not know." 

Mullova is playing this season 
at the Kennedy Center in Wash- 
ington with the Boston Sympho- 
ny and the Philadelphia Orches- 
tra. She made her Washington 
debut playing the Sibelius Con- 
certo with the Boston Symphony, 
and recently recorded the Sibelius 
and Tchaikovsky concertos with 


that orchestra. Jordania, after a 
long stretch of little employment 
in the United States, is music di- 
rector of the orchestra in Chatta- 
nooga, Tennessee. They live in a 
small apartment on New York’s 
Upper West Side. 

“I terrible difficulty after 
the Tchaikovsky," Mullova said 
of the 1982 competition. “I didn’t 
have so many concerts. And when 
you have concerts you are ready 
to work and it’s a big stimulation 
when you know you are playing 
this particular concerto. When 
you don’t have the concerts bow 
can you work? You can practice 
just for yourself, but it’s better not 
to. Some musicians who stay in 
Russia, of course, play very wdL 
But it is difficult to live like that. 


You get gray hair, white hair, very 
quickly. 

"I had hoped to have lots of 
concerts immediately" after de- 
fecting. “I thought . . . imme- 
diately after you come to the 
West, you play in Carnegie Hall 
with the best orchestras in the 
world- TWause we have disinfor- 
mation in the_ Soviet Union, we 
think everything here is fine, ev- 
erything is fantastic, everybody 
has big Wises, big cars. It’s unbe- 
lievable. 

“For me, it was not surprising 
that I had immediate concerts. 
But now I feel I was really lucky. 
But at the time, I thought it was 
quite nonnaL I didn’t realize it 
usually takes two years ahead to 
plan a concert schedule." 

last summer an anonymous 
foundation bought Mullova a 
Stradivarius for £286,000 (then 
about $343,000) at a London auc- 
tion, and she and Jordania spent 
seven weeks at Rudolf Satin’s 
summer festival at Marlboro, 
Vermont. The latter event seems 
to have left a more lasting impres- 
sion. . 

Of Seridn, 82, she said twice, as 
if in wonder, “He is so serious 
about music" They prepared the 
Beethoven C-minor Trio together. 
"It is his seriousness that makrs 
him so special," she yaj d "He 
doesn't care about career or fame. 
He is this old man. But, in fact, he 
is very young. What he cares 
about is what is written by the 
composer — each dot, each cre- 
scendo. After that, it opened to 
myself so many thing s that I did 
not have before." 

Continuing on the subject of 
influences, sbe came up with an 
unexpected one: Maria Callas. 
“ Listening to her recordings was 
so helpful Sbe was great. Her 
phrasing — it was so musical. 
Sometimes it’s hard to express 
how she does it, the way she 
builds her phrase. It’s vrander- 
fuL" 

She was asked if she wouldn’t 
be a natural talk-show personal- 
ity, like Luciano Pavarotti. She 
seemed to dismiss the idea, but 
not completely: “You can do it 
once. You can do it twice. And I 
understand that for toe public it’s . 
important. Especially for the 
American pnbtic. So you have to . 
do it." Then suddenly she blurted, 
“But can you imagine Seridn on 
toe talk shows?" 


By William Safirc 

W ASHINGTON — Canine nomenclature is tak- 
ing a turn toward the human. 

In omen times, we often named dogs fur their 
disposition. Raver was chosen for dogs who liked to 
wander off. or Fida, from the Latin for “faithful" for 
those who preferred to hang around Friskie was 
considered appropriate if the animal was not unduly 
lackadaisical, and sometimes a touch of sarcasm was 
added by calling a lazy mutt Ugfunin'. In those days 
we named dogs for their appearance: Spot was popu- 
lar, as was Rags for the disheveled, and no neighbor- 
hood was complete without a Labrador retriever 
named Bladde. 

Regal qualities were a source of names: King, 
Prince. Duke and Baron were popular, along with 
Queenie, Princess and Duchess. Ever title-conscious, 
and slightly behind the times. President and Mrs. 
Reagan have just chosen toe name Rex for their new 
Cavalier King Charles spaniel; Rex is the title of a 
reigning king, and a questionable choice made by a 
leader of a democracy (Gerald R. Ford’s dog was toe 
suitable Liberty. Mrs. Reagan explained that Rex was 
named after a member of the White House staff). 

Disposition and appearance are still sources of dog 
names, but lately we tend to give our dogs names left 
over from dukhan we never had. or we name them 
after favorite uncles or cartoon characters or rock 
stars. Instead of turning verbs and adjectives into 
proper nouns (for example, calling a puppy that likes 
to nip your finger Nipper % we are using proper nouns 
directly, calling the little nipper George. Daisy or 
Charley. I used to have a German shepherd named 
Henry, after Henry A. Kissinger, because at one time I 
was irritated with my Nixon administration colleague 
and wanted to be able to say “Down. Henry!" after a 
hard day at toe West Wing. 

My evidence of the growing humanization of dog- 
narmngismore than anecdotal. A few months ago, 410 
Lexicographic Irregulars read a query on the subject 
and responded noth about 12,000 names for dogs- 1 
have toe correspondence piled up in little categorized 
mounds around the office. The biggest pile is “Names 
of People," and the names that appear most frequently 
in it are Max. Belle, Ginger, Walter and Sam. The 
names of cartoon characters appear often: Snoopy and 
his beagle brother Spike are obvious sources that also 
embody characteristics, but Poindexter is a pure 
“name" taken from a smarty-pants human character 
in Felix the Cat. 

Some common human names are rare in dogs: You 
don't find Bill, Bob (although David Letterman talks 
on television about his dog Bob}, Barbara at Jane as 
often as Winston (big in bulldogs) or Sheba We’re 
b eginning to see more of Fred in both humans and 
dogs, and there has been a recent run on Vanessa and 
Rebecca My golden retriever is Rufus, the name of 
Churchill’s dog. and my Bernese mountain dog is 
named James. 

One tradition that continues is the linking of breeds 
identified with specific countries to names of people 
from those coon tries. “Sled dogs — malamutes, Siberi- 
an huskies — often have the Russian ending -asha in 
their names," reports Elizabeth Watson, a breeder and 
trainer, of Brackenbriar Kennels, in Middleway, West 
Vir ginia- “Awful lot of Sasha, Tosha and. Madia." 


Similarly, too many Irish setters are named tekV- 
German shepherds Fritz and hashes Sanaok. Seve^j 
correspondents say they call their French poodle 
Phydeau. which shows some originality: it beat* Ftf 
Not all dog owners are bestowing human names ^ 
animals, however. Disposition is still a Founftjse'ife 
names are symbolic: Pepper is an example of djspog. 
uon once removed, rivaling Bandtt and Misty ifipopy. 
laritv. Some watchers of beer commercials call ihei; 
animals Gusto, and hound owners like SadSact 
Although Raver is now rare, similar qualities are 
recalled in Solo. Gypsy : Scooter, Streaker. Rasta md 
Scamp. This carries on the grand tradition ertod in 
Shakespeare's “Two Gentlemen of Verona." awfcfcli 
the clownish Launce has a dog named Crab: “1 
Crab mv dog be the sounat-natured dog that Ss*-' > 
... a stone, a very pebble stone, and has nojtr ^ 
pity in him than a dog." 

Certain syllables recur -ic and -y ate the fsvmtc 
endings, perhaps because large animals wan less 
frightening if named with a diminutive like fob. 
(Conversely, owners of tvkc-like breeds like to caU 
their tiny friends Killer. Monster or Godzilla.) Another 
hot sound is uf: “Dozens of pets at the Anderson 
Animal Cenier. in South Elgin. Illinois." report* Lesfc 
Mann Smith, “are named Buffy, Duffy. Fluffy, Huffy 
and Puffy." (That sounds preppy: sore enough; ciU: 
lions include Prcppte. Muffie. 1 uppie. I lartmtgfm, 
Percival Cambridge and Andrea. ) <• j _ 

Boozehounds name their dogs after their -favorite 
drinks. Brandy is one of the most popular ttsa* 
names, perhaps because it is also the name of * color, 
but Whisker < f or Scotties, it is spelled Whisky/ a cried 
frequently as are Boozer and Tome. Soda and Chtser 
Foods are also used, because people like to ntar 
animals after things that provide enjoyment. Cook 
Candy. Taffy. Peaches. Oatmeal. Gingersnap. Noadur 
and Cinnamon abound, with more with-it types adding 
Yogurt, Tofu and Mavo. (Hold the Mayof) 

Color? Blackie still prowls the neighborhood, bat is 
likely to be shadowed by Ebony. Charcoal Sooty and 
Midnight. (I once claimed to have a pet named Pcett 
and was hailed by a man with a b&e he called Notre.) 

T HE nicknames of the jobs of owners are often 
applied to pets: lawyers like Shyster and Escrow; 
doctors prefer Bones: tennis stars try Topspin. Techno- 
crats have named their dogs Glitch and Ergo (probably 
rooted in “ergonomics." if the dog is owner-irkndlyi. 
One stereo engineer came up with Woofer. 

A veterinarian. Dr. Steven H. Steinberg of Gathers* 
burg, Maryland spots a trend: “Dogs now c ome ia 
better dressed than we are. You should see toon — 
jeweled collars, fancy vests, some even dressed in car- 
warm ere. To reflect that look, they’ need the names 
they are given — like Madonna" ' 

So farewelL old Span: nobody names yoo-th. 
anymore, or Ace, or Jack London's “Call of the Wud' - 
Buck. A pundit I know- calls his Rhodesian Ridgebuti 
Zim, after Zimbabwe, the new name Tor Rhodesia; 
we're getting sophisticated. The most appropriately 
named dog I ever knew was a German shepherd 
owned by toe novelist Herman Wouk. Barkis was his 
name, after the character in Dickens’s novel “David 
Copperfield" who liked to say, “ Barkis is willin’. 

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