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Cfj,^ ■' Edited is. Pans 
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PARIS, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 26, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 1887 



voys 


j Bernard Gwcrtzman 

. New York Times Service 

ASHINGTQN —The Reagan 
inistration will seek funds next 
th to provide full-time body- 


•d in Washington, a State De- 
ment official said Tuesday. 
k nffirf al said the move grew 
' ■ j the administration's concern 

■ ‘ •'-.ffbat it regarded as threats to 

jhyaeal safety of some ambas- 

ffS. . 

^■ v-obert E. Lamb, the director of 
'■ iepartmenfs newly formed JJu- 
lj of Diplomatic Security, said 
beespected about 10 envoys to 
timhk for bodyguards at any 
^ 1 but that the number 
-U foctuate depending on the 
al threats. 

- {l Lm »h said threats had been 
Je against certain ambassadors, 
• . he declined to be specific, 
le also declined to say which 
-- .jys would receive the increased 
"'action. The State Department’s 
‘ jntfing security fare will ad- 
ister toe new program and pro- 
- the bodyguards, he said. 

" pthnnries said the ambassa- 

- ; would be protected whenever 

- ^movedootade their embassies 

Washington and when they trav- 
Idsewhcn: within the United 
ICS- 

-:.. T hc plan was characterized as 
Lof a larger effort by the admin- 

■ ...tticn;lo bolster security for 

.ted States ^Hussies and per- 
nd overseas that was touched 
by a spate of bombings against 
’ - ericans. 

he eBth e counterterrorist pro- 
•- ji is. to be financed initially un- 
a five-year, $55-bQlion State 
jartnjent proposal that Mr. 


Lamb said had just been “substan- 
tially approved" by the Office of 
Management a*wt Budget. 

Another official said that the ad- 
ministration, despite sharp cost- 
cutting measures throughout the 
government, would seek a supple- 
mental request of about $500 mfl- 
Iioo for the fiscal year 1986 and 
about S14 billion for the 1987 fis- 
cal year. 

1ms represents a dramatic rise in 
funds sought fa- die State Depart- 
ment, winch is receiving about $4 
billion in fiscal 1986, Mr. Lamb 
said, and is seeking $5 HDioa for 
1987, not including the special 
funds for security. 

At present, the United States 
provides no bodyguards for ambas- 
sadors here. The Secret Service, 
which is an agency of the Treasury 
Department, supplies uniformed 
officers who are stationed outside 
foreign embassies. But the personal 
security of the ambassadors until 
now has been left to the embassies. 

There have been no known at- 
tacks on ambassadors here, but 
over the years lower-kvel Turkish 
and Israeli officials have been 
killed. 


said the administration preferred 
providing bodyguards to having 
ibe ambassadors importing their 
own armed men, who would be 
unfaurifiar with the area. 

Overseas, the United States uses 
marines to provide security inside 
embassy buildings. In addition, 
Mr. Lamb’s office provides agents 
to supervise overall security for the 
embassy and its personnel 

But the anbassy usually has to 
rely on local security farces for pro- 
tection of the perimeter of build- 
ings and for bodyguards. Mr. 
Lamb estimated tha t more thun 
half of the U.S. envoys overseas 
required local bodyguards. 

Of the estimated $5.5 bSlian be- 
ing sought through 1990, about 
$3 J bilhon would be used for the 
construction and renovation of 
buildings, officials have said. The 
department has proposed rebuild- 
ing £2 embassies and other official 
buildings, and about the same 
number would undergo substantial 
renovation. 

On another aspect of security, 
Mr. Lamb said that the State De- 
partment was complying with a 



In Beijing, 


Mr. Lamb said the bodyguards congressional mandate to bring the A AL^n ITiw 
j only to- those number of Soviet personnel in (he JjL 1 UJM/ Juf U 


would be provided 
envoys threatened by terrorists. A 
team of about seven agents would 
be assigned to each ambassador. 

Mr. T jimh said that an envoy 
from one of the Gulf countries re- 
turned home last summer to protest 
what be regarded as inadequate 
protection hoe. He would not 
identify the ambassador, but said 
he had returned after “making his 
point.” 

"It was a country in which they 
were giving our ambassador sopefb 
protection,” Mr. Lamb said. Hie 


United States and the nmnhw of 
Americans in the Soviet Union into 
rough balance. 

An initial contract to send about 
two dozen Americans to provide 
wiamtimance at the new U.S. Em- 
baity building m Moscow has been 
awarded arid the first contingent 
will arrive in Moscow next month. 

An additional 60 Americans will 
be hired later next year to replace 
Soviet clerics and other white collar 
employees now at work in the U.S. 
Embassy in Moscow. 


,’olitburo Member Loses Parly Post 
\s Gorbachev Consolidates Power 


By Philip Taubman 

_ New York Times Service 

.. MOSCOW —Viktor V. Grishin, 
'■ ' 'itaaa member of the Politburo, 
- ■ been removed horn his job as 
— 3 of the Moscow cityCoinmu- 

— Hterty, Tass announced. 

Jestcro diplomats said that the 
oval of Mr. Grishin, likely to be 
owed by his retireman from the 
alburn, was an important step in 
v ja3 S. Gorbachev’s campaign 
retire senior officials and con- 
nate his power. 

Grishin has served on the 
tburo for ueariy a quarter ceo- 
longer than any other current 
nber. He was made a candidate, 
Lpn voting, member in 1961 un- 
1 (Nikita S. Khrushchev, and rose 
i»oU member in 1971 under Leo- 
I. Brezhnev. 

ass. the official Soviet news 
said Tuesday that Mr. Gri- 
, 71, was "relieved of the duties 
r irst Secretary of the Moscow 

■ Party CommiUce in cannco 
wiih fais r c t irem enL” 
he city committee met Tues- 

■ witii Mr. Gorbachev present, 
agency said. 

“ass said that Boris N. Yeltsin, 
(a national party secretary for 
1 xmstructioa industry, had been 
\ to the Moscow city post, 
is one of the most powerful 
d party jobs. The incumbent 
frequently been a member of 
Politburo. 

v removal of Mr. Grishin was 


rce 





Viktor V. Grishin 

not unexpected. Since midsummer, 
the work of the Moscow dty party 
has been subjected to increasing 
criticism in the press. 

Though s uppor t in g Mr. Gorba- 
chev’s policies in public, Mr. Gri- 
shin has been finked by Soviet offi- 
cials and Weston diplomats to 
rition within the Kremlin to 


The diplomats said they gave 
credence to unconfirmed reports 


that Mr. Grishin, along with other 
longtime members of the Politburo, 
tried to block Mr. Gorbachev from 
■Miming power after the death of 
Konstantin U. Chernenko in 
March. In the -diplomats view, Mr. 

. Grinfrin -niwy Inrun 1 m*»i n *Tynli-«n- . 

didate ibr the office of general sec- . 
rotary of the party. . 

Earlier this year, Grigori V. Ro- 
manov, another Soviet leader con- 
sidered to be a rival of Mr. Gorba- 
chev, was retired. Mr. Gorbachev 
has directed the removal of dozens 
of ministers and regiona] party 
leaders in recent months. 

Western diplomats said recently 
that Mr. Gorbachev’s power, 
though considerable and steadily 
growing, was not absolute and that 
he faced opposition within the 
leadership. 

Mr. Ydtszn. the new Moscow 
city leader, represents a younger 
generation of professionally 
trained managers promoted to top 
jobs this year. 

He rose to prominence as a re- 
gional leader m Sverdlovsk, in the 
Urals industrial district, and was 
brought to Moscow in April to be- 
come chief of the Construction De- 
partment in the'Central Committee 
secretariat, which carries out the 
policies made by the PoE tburo. In 
July, be was made one of the na- 
tional party secretaries under Mr. 
Gorbachev. 

The press campaign against the 

(Coatmned on Page 5, CoL 4) 


For Catholics 


By John' F. Bums 

New York Times Service 
■ BEUING — Ghmwift Gathnlififi 
of all ages crowded shoulder to 
shoulder Tuesday for a Latin mass 
that marked the reopening of the 
Beitang Church, possibly the most 
historic structure of Qmstianity in 
China. 

Elderly worshipers were tearful 
as the bishop of Beijing, Michael 
Fu Tieshan, spoke from the altar 
about the twin-spired edifice "re- 
turning to the arms of the church.” 

The consecration ceremony was 
followed at midnight by the Christ- 
mas Mass, sung in Latm, with a still 
larger congregation spilling oat 
into a courtyard. 

- Winston Lord, the U8. ambas- 
sador, and his wife Bette, joined 
4,000 other worshipers in singing 
“Stent Night,” "O Come All Ye 
Faithful” and other carols.. 

Apart from children sharing 
-pesra^2Bd-aistejsp4co wbh their 
tanriKea, there was probably no one 
among the thousands present who 
was unaware of the sorrow that 
befell the church after 1958, at the 
start of the Great Lem Forward, 
when it was locked on the orders of 
Mao Zedong and turned into a 
warehouse for electrical generators. 

In 1966, at the start erf the other 
Maoist upheaval of the Cultural 
Revolution, young nnlitanis known 
as Red Guards broke into the 
dmrch, smashed its stained glass 
windows, shattered its stone stat- 
ues and carried off its hand-carved 
pews for firewood. 

This year the authorities decided 
to restore the church to the Catho- 
lic Patriotic Association, the offi- 

(Confinaed on PRge 5, CoL Q 


A Chinese; woman is i 
service at Che reopened Beftang Catholic < 


a Christmas Eve 
in Beijing. 


Ujaclwd Soviet Plane Lands in China 


of forcible actions of an armed 
c riminal on board, and landed in 
the northeastern part of the Peo- 
ple's Republic of Ch i n a.” 

Tass did not say what happened 
to the hi jacker , when the incident 
occurred, what route the plane was 
fly ing, or where it landed in China. 
It stud only that “the Chinese 

_ _ _ _ side adopted measures for finding 

tog, read a statement about the the plane and ret u r n i n g the passen- 
eot but refused to comment gers and crew to the mot herl a n d as 
£ fate of the hijacker or hijack- soon as possible.” It thanked China 

for its “spirit of good neighborly 
cooperation.” 

A Chinese official who identified 
himself only as Mr. Zhao said earli- 
er that the Soviet plane was bound 
firm the Siberian dty of Chita to 


Thr AssacvarJ Press 

3JING — A hijacked Soviet 
ler that had run out of fud 
=d in China last week, and its 
ttigerc and crew w we returned 
y to the Soviet Union two days 
, the Qiinise Foreign Ministry 
Wednesday. 

ministry spokesman, Ma Yuz- 
speaking at a regular news 


. rto say whether the plane was 
n China. 

Moscow, the official Tass 
agency said Wednesday that 
lane was on a local flight when 
«i to alter its course as a result 


North Korea when hijackers 
sought to divert it to South. Korea. 

The Antonov-24 propeller air- 
craft ran out of fud and made an 
emergency landing on flatiand in 
northeast China, be said. 

It later was flown to Bejjing 
pending a settlement of the inci- 
dent, said the official, who was 
from the city government of Hailar 
in Imw Mongolia, He said the 
plane landed in Gannan in Heir 
iongjiang province, which is near 
the border with Inner Mongolia. 

Chinese and East European 
sources reported that the plane car- 
ried 50 peqpte. 

Mr, Ma issued a brief statement 

(Continued on Page 5, CoL I) 


hdn 


CHRISTMAS BLESSING — Pope John Patti II waved to a crowd at die Vatican after his 
annual message, in which he called for a society buBt on sobriety and justice. Page 5. 


Jewish Hostage 
Slain in Beirut; 
Talks Faltering 


PILGRIMS IN BETEDLEHEM — Visitors indndmg about 15,000 tourists crowded 
Manger Square m Bethlehem for celebrations that featured prayers for peace in the area. 



The Associated Prtu 

BEIRUT — The body of a kid- 
napped Lebanese Jew has been 
found in West Beirut as efforts to 
gain the release of American and 

PoHce^d^WeSnnday that the 
body of Chaim Cohen Halala was 
found Tuesday a few hours after a 
militant Moslem group cluiwyid 
that it had killed Him 

A spokesman said Mr. Halala’s 
body was found near a church in 
Bdrut's Riad Solh commercial dis- 
trict. Mr. Halala, 39, had been shot 
three times, be said. 

Meanwhile, negotiators working 
for the release of foreign hostages 
left Beirut this week. 

Terry Waite, the special envoy of 
the archbishop of Canterbury, re- 
turned to London on Tuesday and 
said that there could soon be major 
developments in his efforts to free 
four American h ^ ia gRf . 

“We're at a point where we can 
move forward creatively quite 
quickly or, as is often the case in 
Lebanon, we could really run into 
major difficulties, very severe diffi- 
culties,” Mr. Waite said. 

Before leaving Beirut, Mr. Waite 
acknowledged that the kidnappers, 
from the extremist Islamic Jihad, 
were Still demanding the release of 
17 persons convicted in Kuwait for 
bombing the U.S. and French em- 
bassies in 1983. 

Mr. Waite, on bis third journey 
to Beirut since four American hos- 
tages wrote to Archbishop Robert 
R unri p last month Miring for help 
in gaining their freedom, raid that 
be had not seen the hostages. 

An-Nahar reported Wednesday 
that kidnappers of four French 
hostages had offered to trade them 
fra- five men serving jaQ terms in 
France for attempting to assassi- 
nate former Prime Minister Sha- 
pour Bakhtiar of Iran. 

An-Nahar said Islamic Jihad 
nude the offer during a visit to 
Beirut by a Lebanese-torn French 
mediator, Dr. Razah Raad, who 
left for Paris on Monday. 


An-Nahar said the kidnappers’ 
iP fr i p demand was that President 
Francois Mitterrand, currently' on 
vacation in Egypt, free the prison- 
ers before the end of the year. 

In the eastern Lebanese dty of 
Zable, the dty's Maronite Catholic 
bishop, Georges Iskandar. was in- 
jured on Tuesday when he fought 
off gunmen who tried to kidnap 
him, police reported. 

The police said the gunmen tried 
to drag the bishop into a car. but be 
fought them. After pistol-whipping 
him, the gunmen fled. 

Mr. Halala was kidnapped on 
March 29 from his home in West 
Beirut’s old Jewish quarter of Wadi 
Abu J amil, now inhabited mostly 
by Shiite Moslems. 

A group calling itself the Organi- 
zation of the Oppressed on Earth 
claimed in a statement published 
Tuesday by the An-Nahar indepen- 
dent newspaper that it had killed 
Mr. Halala. 

The typewritten statement said 
he was killed in retaliation for the 
shelling of Shiite Moslem villages 
in south Lebanon by Israeli-backed 
militia gunners of the mainly Chris- 
tian Sooth Lebanon Army. 

■ Milhias Said to Agree 

Reuters reported from Damas- 
cus that rival Lebanese militias 
agreed Wednesday on a plan aimed 
at ending their id-year civil war. 

A source dose to the militias said 
the accord was expected to be 
signed this weekend. 

The source said that representa- 
tives of Lebanon's Shiite Amal 
movement, the mainly Druze Pro- 
gressive Socialist Party and the 
Christian Lebanese Forces had ad- 
vised Vice President Abdel-Halim 
Khaddam of Syria of their agree- 
ment before they left for Beirut cm 
Wednesday evening. 

Hie source said the agreement 
covered all points under discussion 
“but miHtias still have to choose the 
prime minister who will implement 
the agreement” 




TJ.S. Calls Resettlement 
In Ethiopia a 'Tragedy’ 

By Clyde H. Farnsworth 

New York Tunes Service 

WASHINGTON — The lop 
American foreign aid official has 
said the United Stales had ac- 
counts from witnesses of stocking 
conditions in two resettlement vil- 
lages in Gqjjam Province in west- 
ern Ethiopia, suggesting “a vast hu- 
man tragedy of historical 
proportions.” 

M. Peter McPherson, adminis- 
trator of the Agency for Interna- 
tional Development, reported that 
since March “hundreds have al- 
ready died” in (he villages in the 
swampy Pawe area, about ISO 
mites (240 kilometers) northwest of 
Addis Ababa. 

Death was due mainly to malar- 
ia, typhus and other diseases, be 
said. The two villages, designated 
Pawe 5 and Pawe 7, have a total 
population of 1,000. 

Mr. McPherson said Monday the 
information came from American 
government personnel on the scene 
who speak the local language and 
had interviewed the villagers. 

The villagers had been forced, 

"often at gunpoint," into the Pawe 
area from provinces in the arid 
northeast, Mr. McPherson said. He 
added that the villagers were now 
barred from leaving. 

He said the Reagan administra- 
tion was making a pwlic disclosure 
of the situation because it was 
symptomatic of a much broader 
problem — what be called the “hu- 
man tragedy" associated with 
forced resettlement of hundreds of 
thousands of people in Ethiopia, 
which was been ravaged by famine. 

“The problem is that we don’t 
know where the other Pawes are 
located,” be said. “Neither the 
press nor relief workers have free 
access around the country. I firmly 
believe that other Pawes do exist. 


ML Peter McPherson 


INSIDE 

18 outsider has »«hh 1 a state-of-the-art challenge to British new- 
peidonL Page 2. 

scent attacks on Whites appear to have widened the gulf 

‘ loan Ftim erupted durin g earth tremors. One person was killed 
M were injured. P^ 1 

..resident Ronald Reagan was reportedly f ully a ware' of thescopc 
an oder he signal authorizing polygraph tests. Page 3. 

ra letter to Mikhail S. Gorbachev, President Reagan has propc*^ 
reting of experts on the arms verification issue. Fage3. 

SINESS/FINANCE 

tffia derided to bur helicopters from Britain's 
' Aerospatiale of France. 

wrfde goods orders to UiL factories rose in November, the 
annum said. Page 7. 


dinists, Opposing Parlies Meet Under Spanish Peace Plan 


By Stephen Kinzer 

New York Tima Soviet 

MANAGUA — Ni< 
government leaders have _ 
meeting privately with, prominent 
opposition figures as part of a new 
peace initiative sponsored by the 
Spanish government, paniripants 
is the talks raid this week. 

The talks are aimed, ultimately, 
at ending the armed conflict m 
which more than 1S.OOO Nicara- 
guans have died in the last four 
years. 

Prime Minister Fdipe Ganriitez 
of Spain was said to be backing the 
initiativ e out Of COnCCTO. that the 

four-nation peace effort known as 
Contadora was faltering, and that 
no other mechanism existed to pro- 


mote dialogue among political fac- 
tions within h Kcaragna. 

“There was a feding that Conla- 
dora was reaching a dead end, and 
Spain decided to step into the^ vacu- 
nm ," said a European diplomat 
dose to the talks. 

Under the auspices of the Span- 
ish ambassador in Managua, Luis 
Cuervo y Savregas, officials of the 
governing Sandinist Front have 
met twice with activists from two 
leading opposition, parties. A 
session is expected real month. 

Pnr tirmftnH fn thf- tallw Kflid thft 

new irritative was begun without 
announcement m September, as 
the Contadora peace effort, which 
is sponsored by Mcxiob, Panama, 
Venezuela and CcSombia, was suf- 
fering serious reverses. At that 


tinv*^ the 

announced that it would, not sign 
any Contadora agreement unless 
the United Stales joined as a guar- 
antor, and several other countries 
asserted that Nicaragua's action 
bad disrupted the peace effort, 

• The front's nine-nun National 
Directorate, winch is the center of 
power m Nicaragua, has privately 
voted to prnsne the Spanish initia- 
tiye, a senior Sandinist leader said 
this week. Mr. Cuervo said he was 
conridering calling a third meeting 
in January. 

Spain hopes to begin the process 
of pacification by -encouraging 
talks between the front and two 
opposition parties, the Indepm- 
dent liberals and the Social Chris- 
tians. 


According to Rafael Solis Cerda, 
who was the principal Sandinist 
representative at the last talks, in 
November, Spain hopes that the 
Sandmists will be able to reach a 
political accord with the two oppo- 
sition parties. Following such an 
accord, the Independent Liberals 
and the Social Christians would be 
esmected to condemn U S. aid to 
reads and to call on the rebels to 
. put down their weapons and nego- 
tiate. 

At the end of September, shortly 
after the first round of private talks 

at the Spanish Embassy in Mana- 
gua, FtiA Ramirez Benavente, the 
Social Christian leader, said that 
party would seek, during 1986 to 
open direct contacts with rebel 
leaders about ways to reach peace. 


where people are dying unbe- 
knownst to the world.” 

He said the disclosures would 
not cause any change in American 
policy on food aid. The United 
States supplied about one- third of 
Ethiopia’s food needs this year and 
is committed to contributing the 
same amount next year, he said. 

More than 500,000 people have 
been moved in recent months from 
the arid northeast to more fertile 
areas in the southern and western 
parts of the country. 

The Ethiopian government is 
planning to resettle almost three 
times that many people as part of 
its effort to prevent future food 
shortages. 

In some of the northeastern 
provinces such as Tigre and Weflo. 
rebels are fighting the Marxist-led 
government of Lieutenant Colonel 
Mengistu Haile Mariam. 

Some critics of resettlement, 
such as the Tigre People’s Libera- 
tion Front, have charged that the 
government is trying to rid the re- 
gion of rebels and those who sup- 
port them. 

Last month the French private 
relief organization Doctors With- 
out Borders shatply criticized the 
resettlement program and raid as 
“We are g~np to talk to Calero,” “gf “ 100,000 people have died 
Mr. Ramirez said this week, refer- m “® °P cra fr° IL The Ethiopian 
ring to the principal rebel leader, fi°veniment expdled the relief or- 
Adolfo Calm) Portocarrero. gamzanoa tins month. 

Mr. Solis wamedagamst what he 
called “undue optimism” about 
projects for the Danish initiative. 

He said he doubted tint the San- 
dmists could reach a compromise 
with the opposition parties. And he 
speculated that even if such an ac- 
cord were reached, it was by no 
means certain that the rebels would 
respond to a plea to stop fighting. 

VirgiHo Godoy Reyes, head of 
the Indgjendent Liberals, said that 
at the mst session the opposition 
parties presented three 
to the Sandhnsts. “We 

(Conttened on Page 5, CoL 5) 


Mr. McPherson did & 1 LJJ 
these accusations and cammed his 
criticism to the conditions he said 


Several telephone calls were 
Abdbe Beyene. first secre- 
tary of the Ethiopian Embassy to 

obtam his reaction. He decEnS fo 

return the calls. 

Mr. McPherson said the situa- 


Ethiopian government,” 

e proposals hJ,{Sf^7 e *** reason to 
asked them to redocc t£ 

* CoL 5) SSft«Ptafci£lS! 





*4 


An Outsider Issues a State-of-the-Art Challenge to Elect Street 


WORLD BRIEFS 


By Joseph Lelyveld 

New York Tuna Service 


LONDON — Eddie Shah works from an office 
about three miles from Fleet Street, the natural habitat 
of English newspapers. 

He has never set foot in a Fleet Street newspaper, he 
says, and has never laid eyes on a linotype machine, 
the outmoded hot-metal printing machine still in nse 
on every national newspaper in Britain because of the 
inflexible resistance of most labor onions to the intro- 
duction of new technology. 

Yet, in a period of upheaval on Fleet Street, Mr. 
Shah’s name comes up quickly in any conversation on 
the future of the industry in a nation that remains 
ravenous, despite television, for printed news and 
opinion, printed gossip and — in the popular tabloids 
— printed photos of bare-breasted women. 

Mr. Shwb, 41, broke into the business in the prov- 
inces as the publisher of a string of giveaway papers. 
He may not be of the Fleet Street world, but he is the 
vanguard of the technological revolution that is finally 
looming. 

Ten weeks from now, on March 4 or 5 according to 
present plans, the first editions of his new national 
tabloid railed Today vriD roll off the presses at four 
satellite printing plants around England. 

Aimed at youthful and upwardly mobile middle- 
class readers and produced from what was designed to 
be a state-of-the-art newsroom, it will be the first 
national daily in Britain to have dispensed entirely 
with Linotype machines and the trade unions whose 
members operated them. 

Mr. Shut’s Today will not only start with the 
technology, in common use in North America and 
much of continental Europe for more than a decade, 
that enables editors to set type by pushing a batton on 
a video terminaL But it also aims to be one of the first 
major papers anywhere to dispense with cut-and-paste 
layout operations; like the editing, the design and 
makeup of its pages will be handled on display 

te rminal 

In addition, it will be the first British daily capable 
of producing and transmitting color pages from its 
own plant, using the latest computerized equipment. 


Starting from scratch with a reported S30 million 
from outride investors and a staff of only 500 — 
compared with 6,500 on the slumping Minor — Mr. 
Shah has run a detour around the union battles that 
much less ambitious efforts at technological innova- 
tion have provoked on fleet Street 
He won a major confrontation two years ago with 
the printers union, which placed his provincial papers 
under riege to force him to maintain a dosed shop. He 
insists he is not anti-union — Today has signed an- 
agreement with the electricians union — but be rules 
out closed shops. 

Unless his editorial product is a complete failure, 
Mr. Shah is likely to turn a larger profit in his first year 
than the whole of Fleet Street combined. 

Last year, be pointed out in as interview, Britain's 
nine national dailies and eight Sunday papers had 
total revenues of close to $2 billion and totil profits of 
scarcely $15 million; this year, he said, there probably 
would be higher revenues but a net loss. 

If Mr. Shah proves that it is posable to break into 
the national competition from outside Fleet Street, he 
will inevitably have imitators- That prospect, phs the 
losses that some of the old mainstays are now suffer- 
ing, lies behind the industry’s current turmoil 
Control of three of the six highest circulation dailies 
— The Mirror, the Daily Express and the Daily 
Telegraph, — has changed hands in just over a year. 
The three papers together sell more than six million 
copies daily, but each is losing money, mainly, their 
owners contend, because of overstaffing. 


Unless his editorial 
product is a 
complete failure, 
Mr. Shah is likely to 
torn a larger profit 
in his first year than 
the whole of Fleet 
Street combined. 



Mount Etna Erupts; 1 Killed, 14 Hurt . 


CATANIA. Sicfly (Reuters) — Mount Etna erupted Wedamfry, 
spewing streams of molten lava from its ride. Accompany ing ari l 
tremors flattened a hotel where five families were spending OtriRMe, 
killing a man and injuring 14 persons, rescue workers said. 

Officials said the eruption of the volcano was coupled with three rani 
tremors. They said that no houses or villages were m i mme di ate d an ger 
and that no other buildings were damaged by the quakes. 

Geologists said that the largest earthquake’s epicenter was dmedy 
under the hotel on the slopes of Mount Etna. The eruption sent three 
streams of lava oozing down the ride of the m ountain. Two ssaSer 
quakes followed, but geological experts said that no more big tremoit 
were expected. 


50 Vietnam Refugees Reported Slain , 

i rviirm x! iTir»VC X.7 V„rl- f'WTl Fifty Viptnnw rrfrin.., . 


UNITED NATIONS, New York <NYT) — Rfty Vietnamese refugees ? ^ 
were slain and 10 women were raped last week when their boat w» “ 1 

_ - , i ■ n • P _ - -t. - . f .1 '|«M 


intercepted by pirates in the South Coina Sea, a sp okesma n tor the UN 
High Commissioner of Refugees reported. 


Ilti ui 

The victims were among a group of 80 refugees who fled Vietnam far 
c. 12, the spokesman. Leon Davko, raid Tuesday. 

_ j - 


Tha New Ybrii Tima, 


Mr. Shah's challenge to Fleet Street — symbolized 

* other cnA of 


by his decision to situate his wiper at the i 

i Pimlico not far from the 


Eddie at his printing plant in Warrington. England. 


Malaysia on Dec. ... — - — — 

Twenty-nine survivors, mostly women and children, sauedmto Maurysa 
and requested asylum there Thursday, be said. Another survivor was 
rescued by Malaysian fishermen. 

Reports from the high commissioner's office said the pirates were Thai 
fishermen. The location of the attack was unknown. Pirates have killed 
nearly 1,450 refugees and raped more than 2300 women in the South 
China Sea since 1980. authorities have said. The most 'recent modal a 
the third large-scale slaying to have taken place there in two years. . 


town, near the West End in 
Tate GaOoy — win gp beyond technology. 

A hulking figure who looks tike a retired football 
linebacker going to fat, he means to be a new kind of 
publisher producing what will be, for Britain, a new 
kind of paper. 

Fleet Street, tike much of Britain, has suffered from 
elitism, he rays. Publishers have used their papers to 
advance their views, regarding it as thor right to tell 
readers what to think. There is no need to wail till the 
next election to know that the Mirror will be the only 


paper to support the Labor Party, or that the Tele- 
graph will stand, as always, with the Conservatives. 

By contrast, Today will cast itself as an independent 
voice, reflecting the views of an independent 
readership. 

Asked whom his paper would bade in the next 
election, the shirt-sleeved publisher replied: “How can 


Mr. Shah was born in England. His mother was 
British; his father was of Iranian stock, by way of 
India His full name is Sdim Jehan Shah. 


Important newspaper publishers frequently make 

'tedirbecou 


mair* up their iwm/ia as far as that, but ] 
don’t’' 


their way to the House of Lords. Asked if he could see 
himself as Lord Shah, he said be did not believe that 
people who influence public opinion should accept 
titles from the government 

“I wouldn’t take it anyway,” be said. 



Attacks on Whites Harden Attitudes in South Africa 


Zaire Frees Foreign Soldiers cm Florae 

KINSHASA. Zaire (Reuters) — Zaire has freed 44 foreign sokfies who 
were on a plane that made an emergency landing on its territory. 
Kinshasa radio reported Tuesday night. 

The 40 Cubans, three .Angolans and a Cameroonian woe handed over 
to the Angolan deputy foreign minister. Venanciode Mom. after he nxi 
President Mobutu Sese Seko on Monday, the radio said. Mr. De Maura 
left with them later For Angola, it said. 

The Soviet-built Antonov* military transport plane was flying from the 
town of Luene in Angola to the Angolan enclave of CaKnda when it 
landed in Zaire 180 miles (about 500 kilometers) southeast of Kinshasa 
cm Dec. 1. The soldiers set it on fire and destroyed documents. The Cohan 
deputy foreign minister. Jorge Bolanos Suarez, told Mr. Mobutu in Paris 
last week the aircraft had run out of fuel and lost its way. 


IhtaodMdta 

Winnie Mandela, the wife of the jailed Mack nationalist 
leader Nelson Mandela, was given a Christmas card 
Wednesday by Trevor Manuel, a leader of the anti-apart- 
heid United Democratic Front, to deliver to her husband. 


By Alan Cowell 

New York Tuna Sendee 

JOHANNESBURG — Last 
week. South Africa's government- 
run radio had two events involving 
deaths to report: the kitting of six 
whites in a explosion 

near the border with Zimbabwe 
and the deaths of several blacks in a 
bus accident. 

Referring to the whites, the radio 
seemed to suspend the nation's 
TMWmal racial dMafeminm, and 
referred to them simply as “peo- 
ple.” 

By contrast, it drew a distinction 
in describing die bus accident, say- 
ing that those who bad died were 
blacks, as if that somehow softened 
die tragedy. 

After decades of rule by racial 
distinction, the varying descrip- 
tions come as no surprise here. Bat, 
after a fatal bomb attack Monday 
in the white seaside resort of 
Amanzzmtotz, just south of Dur- 
ban, the racial demarcation — a 
demarcation, in South Africa as 


century •»g r> and early this century 
dial pitted Britons and Afrikaners 
and black Africans against one an- 
other for the prize of a continent’s 
wealthiest nation. 

Most of those who died have 
been blades. Some have been as 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


young as the three toddlers who 
were among the five dead in the 
nplori o n near Durban on Mon- yond the shattered glass and blood- 


of the enforcement of what is called 
law and order. 

The slaying of the five whites 
nmr Durban, touching the raw 
nerves of those who control the 
power of the government, by con- 
trast, seems to those same people a 
hurt and a challenge that must be 
met with the punishment that his- 
tory’s overlords reserve for their 
underlings. 

The consequences stretch far be- 


Congress, outlawed for a quarter of 
a century, as it was for whites. 

The organization has not taken 
responsibility for the explosion, 
bur the government and many 
whites have blamed iL 


FBI Tapes Allowed for Donovan Trial 


day. 

A reporter, over the last year, 
might retain twin images of this 
torn land — the truncated mound 
of sand below the blue gum trees 
that marked the grave of a two- 
old black in Cape Town, who 
choked on tear gas fired by the 
police just after Christmas, and the 
smear of red blood on a white plas- 
tic chair where a small, white life 
expired in Amanzimtotijost before* 
Christmas. 

A sentimentalist might say the 
children, had they ever met, might 
have played with one another were 


stained Imntemn of the shopping 
«im!I in Amanznntoti. If there was a 
mood amo ng the whites who saw 
the bloodshed in Amanzimtoti, 
other than shock, h was a desire for 
vengeance: 

In recent days, it has seemed to 
whites, the nature erf the war be- 
tween apartheid rule and a restive 
black majority has changed, funda- 
mentally, and probably irrevers- 
ibly. 

‘Terrorism is becoming a new 
reality in South Africa,” said Busi- 
ness Day, a newspaper that fre- 
quently rptiriffi i the government, 
referring to the land-mine explo- 


M -a 

jg C* 1 A P • TBl 1 of prqudice and attitude — seems has mortgaged its children’s future 

4< South Afcncan rSiacKs i *"“ d “ d ^ ? .■ 


Slain by Police, Militants 


Washington Post Service 

JOHANNESBURG — Four 
more black South Africans died 
Wednesday as racial unrest contin- 
ued unab ated on Christmas Day. 

One of the blades was kffled 
when police opened fire several 
times on crowds in a township 36 
miles (58 kilometers) north of Cape 
Town. The other three died in at- 
tacks by militants on other blades 
whom they regard as collaborators 
in the apartheid system of segrega- 
tion. 


More than 1,000 people have 
now died in political violence since 
September 1984. It has been the 
worst bloodshed since the wars a 


The government and most of the 
media attributed the killings and 
tiie wounding of 61 white shoppers 
at the resort of Amanzimtoti to the 
African National Congress guerril- 
la organization. 


past of separation anumureu. -The response, predictably, is a 

Yet, for those who support the crackdown by the authorities," it 
Afrikaner minority that wields s aid 

power in this divided land, the iro- The bomb explosion Monday 
agexy is different. Black dea t h, to s ee m s to have been is modi a wa- 
many whites, is but a consequence tershed for the African National 


Over the last year, the Congress 
has' built up a remarkable respect- 
ability among South African 
whites: leading businessmen and 
newspaper editors have made the 
pilgrimage to Zambia to meet with 
its leaders; churchmen and Afrika- 
ner students, too, have sought to 
follow the same route, and its own 
sense of u np re cedented influence 
over South Africa's future has bur- 
geoned in direct proportion to the 
continued protest of the nation's 
segregated Mack townships. 

Increasingly, the Congress has 
been cast as tire principal combat- 
ant in the war against the white 
authorities, and the bomb blast 
Monday hardened the lines. Many 
South African commentators be- 
lieve, however, that tire result w31 
not be a weakening erf Afrikaner 
resolve, but a strengthening of it 
that wiD prolong tire nation's crisis. 

Conciliatory gestures by the 
whites are virtually ruled out by the 
recent killings of whites — far few- 
er in number than Made deaths, but 
far greats; in their impact, an 
those Afrikaners who have wielded 
power in Sooth Africa since 1948. 


NEW YORK (NYT) — A New 
York state judge has approved tire 
use of secretly recorded tapes in the 
larceny and fraud trial of Raymond 
J. Donovan, a former U.S. labor 
secretary, and nine other men, and 
said that be would set a date Jan. 6 
for the start of the trial. 

Justice John P. Collins, of State 
Supreme Court, ruled Monday that 
the tapes had been legally obtained 
in 1979 by the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation in an organized- 
crime investigation and could be 
used as evidence in the state trial of 
charges that the defendants partici- 
pated in a scheme to defraud the 
New York City Transit Authority 
of S7.4 million on a Manhattan 
subway construction project 

However, tire judge rebuked the 
FBI’s New York office for “disor- 
der,” Tad: of leadership” and 
“chaos” in conducting a laq^fy un- 
successful inquiry into a reputed 
Mafia ring that was .believed to 
have its .headquarters in a South 
Bronx meatpacking plant. 



Raymond J. Donovan 


China Assails Kremlin on Afghanistan 


BEUING (AP) — China denounced the Soviet presence in Afghani- 
stan on Wednesday, saying that it undermined regional stabiliiy and 
threatened China. 


Angola’s Religion: Christianity Gaining on Marx 


The criticism was delivered by a Foreign Ministry spokesman, Ms 

\i Peng, a deputy 


On Monday, miners stoned a 
white security officer to death and 
two blacks were killed by rubber 
ballets in a Hugh at a gold mine 
near Johannesburg. 

Meanwhile, South African 
whites reacted with anger and 
alarm to the deaths of five whites in 
a bombing near Durban on Mon- 
day. 


■ Fighting Between Tribes 
The police reported Wednesday 
that thousands of blacks from tire 
rival Zulu and Pondo tribes have 
fought battles in which at least 53 
persons were lolled near the Indian 
Ocean pot of Durban, Ageace- 
Fraace Presse reported from Jo- 
hannesburg. 


A police spokesman said about 
2,000 Zulus and 3,000 Pondos 
dashed Tuesday at Umbumbulu, 
about 18 miles southwest of Dur- 
ban in Natal province. Police units 
moved into the area to restore or- 
der, he said. It has not been estab- 
lished what led to the battles. 


Mali and Burkina Faso 


Report Border Fi ghting 


The Associated Pros 
ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast — Two 
neighboring West African nations, 
Mali and Burkina Faso, said 
Wednesday that their forces were 
engaged in combat against each 
other in a long-standing border dis- 
pute. 

The Mali government said it had 
launched a “vast offensive” against 
Burkina Faso. It confirmed Bur- 
kina Faso reports of border fight- 
ing but denied that it had suffered 


any casualties or losses. 
Earlier, 


Burkina Faso, formerly 
known as Upper Volta, had ac- 
cused Mali of attacking four border 
villages and killing four people and 
wounding 11 others — ail civilians. 
Burkina Faso said that its troops 
counterattacked, kilting 10 Malian 


soldiers and destroying six Malian 
tanks. 

The respective claims were made 
in broadcasts by the state radio 
stations controlled by the two 
countries, and there was no way to 
confirm tire reports independently. 

The dispute dates back at Irak 
25 years and involves about 160 
kilometers (100 miles) of land in 
the Agacher region. The land is 
supposed to be rich in minerals and 

natural gas. 

Mali and Burkina Faso agreed to 
take the dispute to the Internation- 
al Court of Justice in 1983. By last 
September, menu than 1,000 kilo- 
meters of their frontier had been 
demarcated to the apparent satis- 
faction of both parties and thdr 
joint border commission. 


By James Brooke 

New York Tima Service 

LUANDA, Angola — On Karl 
Marx Street, a rich chores of Afri- 
can voices brought passersby a tilt- 
ing refrain: “God gives you love, 
God gives you peace, shalom, sha- 
lom.” 

Audible through the open win- 
dows of Our Lady of Carmo 
Giurch, a youth group was holding 
its weekly Sunday session of pray- 
er, discussion and song. 

Composed of 30 adults ran g in g 
in age from 18 to 25, the group 
represented a generation of Ango- 
lans who grew m under Marxism 
and are now fueting a religious re- 
vival 

“Maybe the forbidden fruit is the 
most desirable,” a mm said in ex- 
plaining the revivaL “Our Sunday 
school has increased from 150 chil- 
dren in 1976 to 900 today.” 

Christmas here has beat official- 
ly renamed “Family Day.” Carni- 
val, traditionally held before Lent, 
is now celebrated as “ Carniv al erf 
Victory" with celebrants 
under posters of Marx, Engels 
Lenin. 


estant and Roman Catholic leaders 
say churches throughout Angola 
are packed on Sunday mornings. 
The few s emin a ri es still open have 
to turn away as many as four out of 
five candidates for the lack of 
space, they say. 

*The churches are growing by 8 
percent to 10 percent a year,” said 
Emilio de Carvalho, the presiding 
bishop of the United Methodist 
Giurch of Angola. He said that his 
church, one of die largest Protes- 
tant denominations here, had 
grown to 90,000 today from 42,000 
m 1974, on the eve of indepen- 
dence. 

This retigious renaissance is tak- 
ing place in a society that is one of 
Africa’s most orthodox Marxist re- 
gimes. 


According to a report issued this 
tooth by the Central Committee 


But despite a decade of these and 
other moves against religion, Prct- 


month 

of the ruling Popular Movement 
for the Liberation of Angola, “the 
Party &ouldj)ut more attention to 
tbe propagation of atheist concep- 
tions as expressed by Marxist-Le- 
ninist theory.” 

Although the constitution guar- 
antees freedom of religion, the offi- 
cial policy over the last decade has 
ranged from tolerance to repres- 
sion. 


Shortly after independence, tbe 
Roman Church, winch 

many Angolan nationalists saw as 
an ally of Portuguese colonialism, 
was harshly attacked. In late 1977. 
Angolan bishops protested in a 
pastoral letter written in frank lan- 
guage rarely heard here. 

“Freedom of expression has al- 
most disappeared,” the bishops 
wrote. "Tbe Marxist system is pre- 
senting itself as a new religion.” 

The regime reacted by national- 
izing afl church schools, hospitals, 
nurseries, most seminaries, and 
mast of the warehouses and prop- 
erty of the Roman Catholic relief 
agency Caritas. 

Today, a former Dominican con- 
vent is used as the National Party 
School The broadcast studios of 
Radio Ecdesia, the former Catho- 
lic radio station, are now a school 
for radio tedmidans. 

A former retigious retreat out- 
side Luanda has been used as a 
barracks for Cuban soldiers. A 
Catholic-owned printing press .is 
now used by the go v ernm ent's De- 
partment of Information and Pro- 
paganda. 

The state campaign against reli- 


gion largely spared Protestant 
churches, many of which had been 
partly clandestine in the last de- 
cade of Portuguese rule. 

In addition, by 1982, the authori- 
ties apparently realized that the 
campaign against religion had 
alienated many Angolans and may 
have driven some into the arms erf 
Jonas SavimbFs anti-government 


Yuzben, at a news briefing. It came two days after U _ 
prime minister, met in Moscow with MDchafl S. Gorbachev, the Sow 
leader. That was the highest-level meeting between tbe two countries 
since 1969. 

Mr. Ma expressed China's support for the guerrillas fighting the 
Soviet-backed government in Afghanistan and repeated Bering’s de- 
mand that Moscow withdraw its troops, estimated to number 1 15,000. 


Curfew Is Imposed in Town in Punjab 

CHANDIGARH, India (Reuters) — An indefinite curfew has been 
imposed on the Punjab town of Gurdaspur after at least one person (tied 
and eight were irgured when police opened fire to break up Hindu-Sth 
riots, a senior official said. ; -- 

_ b _._ Tbe official in the state capital of Chandigarh said the shooting Was 

rebel force, the National Union for ontewjlate Tuesday after police using riot sticks and tear garwere 
die Total Independence of Angola, to disperse groups or Hindus and Sikhs battling with iron rods, 

or UNITA. 

He said the clashes erupted when supporters of the rightist Hindu Shiv 
Sena group attacked some Sikhs over several temporary wooden slums 
erased by tbe Sikhs in the town about \Z5 miles (20 kOometere) bum 
India's border with P akistan. 


In late 1982, the architect of the 
campaign, Ambrosio Lukdd, die 
party secretary of ideological af- 
fairs, was dismissed. Since then, an 
uneasy truce has prevailed between 
church and state. 

In the countryside, religions life 
often has fallen victim to the rivil 
war. Catholic leaders complain that 
the guerrillas have kidnapped 60 erf 
their foreign missionaries, forcing 
many miaous to dose. 

But in the dries, church life is 
robust 

“Tbe most important thing is 
that the church can Hve without 

h niHing t,” gait! a CatlwtHr TTTtscirm . 

ary who has worked hoe for 40 


For the Record 


President Augusta Pinochet of Chile met with the archbishop of 
Santiago, Cardinal Juan Francisco Fresno, for the first time in twoan&a 
half years Tuesday. But the cardinal refused to say a private Mass for the 
president in the government palace. (UPD 

The Algerian National Liberation Front party, which has ruled the 
nation ance independence in 1962, opened an extraordinary c on gr es s ‘ 
Tuesday to approve changra in a national charter adopted in 1976 undo’ 
the late President Honan Boomfedienne. (Reuters) 

The death tofl rose to 10 from a train crash Sunday in northern Xiafy xs 
rescoe workers recovered four more bodies, the pouce said. (Reuters) 
Hn ft Wu tce d the appointment of a new governor of Hli # «n ft the 


yrara. “We area poor church, but strategic northwestern region that runs along ^Soriet^bonltt. Tcumr 
we are stronger than ever before.” Dawamat took over from Ismail AmaL 


(Rouen) 


DOONESBURY 


Thatcher Assails Allies OverFaBdands 


The Associated Press 

LONDON — Prime Minister 
Margaret Thatcher has told resi- 
dents of tbe Falkland Island? that 
they have been let down by Brit- 
ain’s friends. 


Chilled 


TIO PEPE 


The natural aperitif. 


In a Christmas message broad- 
cast Tuesday, she criticized allies 
who voted last month for a United 
Nations resolution calling on Brit- 
ain and Argentina to negotiate ail 
aspects of the Sooth Atlantic archi- 
pelago’s future. 


Tbe United Slates and a number 
of Britain’s other allies abstained 
on British amendments endorsing 
the right to self-determination for 


the 1,800 Falkland Islanders and 
supported the resolution. Tbe 
amendments were defeated. 

Australia, Canada, France, 
Greece, Italy, Sweden, Trinidad 
and Turkey, which had abstained 
on a pro- Argentine resolution last 
year, supported this year's resolu- 
tion. 

”1 regret that at the recent Gen- 
eral Assembly so many of. our 
friends proved unwilling to I*** up 
to the real issues at stake,” she said. 
"They were content to have self- 
detenuinatkm for themselves, but 
not all of them were content or 
prepared to vote for it for the peo- 
ples Of the Falkland Islands " 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 26, 1985 


Page 3 


AMERICAN TOPICS 


; Jancy Reagan Says 

4; Nancy Reagan says she 
- : *rees with her husband that 

& constthitional ban on a 
• •• ^■esident’s being elected ; lo 
"wore than two terms is "bad 
- w" and should be mpealedr 
u that a third tom Is not for 

* . yt 

' 

The First Lady, in an inter- 
D aw with Helen Thomas of 
nited Press International, said 
' _ "' •'at when she and President 
. onald Reagan leave the While 
.’ouse they will look fora home 
' 1 : the Los Angeles area. But she 
' id; "I don't want a great big 
;'.i^ house with huge grounds.” 

: "We get along fine," she said 
Donald T. Regan, the White 
■- ouse chief of staff. *Tm sore 
i isn’t trying to take over the 
. hite House. I like somebody 
'■* :.ho b straightforward and has 
■ . .good sense of humor, which 

■* - rjL w 

. : Goes. 

* Mrs. Reagan said Raisa M. 
orbachev, the wife of the So- 
.;4‘ et Mikhail S. Gorba- 
‘^ft-icv, is “very strong, very cran- 
stted to her philosophy.” The 
' w women met in Geneva last 

*■ lOOtiL 

_ Mr. Gorbachev, she said, 

- ass a nice little sense of hu- 
io t" Mrs. Reagan added, "I 

* - rink that he obviously is not 
i pig io change Ronnie’s ideas 

. —ad Ronnie a not going to 
- • 1 Han g e bis ideas. But that’s all 


Abort Takes 

J. The US. Supreme Court has 
1 stand two lower court rul- 
^ that dm late Nelson A. 
was not entitled to 
from his taxable income 
spent on lawyers’ 
its’ fees in his suo- 
o f Senate confir- 
vice president in 
A lower court ruled that 
expenses were not in- 
pursuiog die duties of 
nee, "but m seeking to 
that office." 

Trim Wicker, a columnist for 
New York Times, has 
l, with Random House u> 
:a biography of Richard 

7" 1 that will focus on the 

anner president's foreign po- 
£y. achievements. Mr. Wicker 
kites that Mr. Nixon's first ad- 
ininistralion saw the opening of 
Various with China, the first 
trategic Arms Limitation 
hfts and the start of 


quest 


Van Gordon Sorter, 50, wbo 
was president of CBS News in 
1982-83, has returned to his sec- 
ond tour in the same job, wbich 
he likens to that of a lion tains' 
who, armed solely with a chair, 
whip and gun with blank am- 
munition, must keep the ani- 
mals (m their perches; "You’d 
better keep those cats on the 
stools because if they ever chase 
you out of that cage, theyTl nev- 
er let you bade” 

The Christmas card sent by 
the Citizens Committee for the 
Right to Keep and Bear Arms 
to President Ronald Ragan, 
members of the cabinet and 
Congress among others, shows 
the infant Jesus m a cradle with 
Santa Claus kneeling over him 
Santa is holding a rifle, has a 
pistol strapped to his belt, and 
another rifle is pwaKng oat of 
his bag of gifts. Representative 
G. William Whitehurst, Repub- 
lican of Virginia, said the card 
"hardly captures the sense of 


peace on earth, good wfl] to- 
ward men.” 

Just when you had been plan- 
ning to leave the company 
Christmas party early and beat 
the rush home, the Office Bore 
gets you cornered. The problem 
vanishes with Timely Beeper, a 
fake beeper that lodes and 
sounds like the real thing but 
sells for only S29: a discreet 
flick of the wrist and 20 seconds 
later, your beeper is squawking 
urgently and you are headed for 
freedom. “Got to nm,” you say. 
"Let’s do lunch sometime.” 

For $9.95 at a shopping mall 
in the Washington suburb of 
Woodside, Vir ginia, parents 
can get a three-minute video- 
tape of tbeir children talking to 
Santa Claus. The feature is so 
popular that during peak shop- 
_ hours four Video Santas 
sve been on duty. 

— Compiled by 
ARTHUR HIGBEE 


eagan Was 'Fully Aware 9 of Scope 
y Polygraph Order , Spokesman Says 


- l/taud Press IiUtmaOorml 

WASHINGTON — A White 
' se spokesman insisted Tuesday 
President Ronald Reagan was 
fy aware” of the scene of an 

* he signed requiring lie-detec- 
tests for thousands of govem- 
t workers who see secret docu- 

'ts. 

be Washington Post, citing un- 
tified administration officials, 
r -Jted that the president had pri- 
-'ly said he (fid not completely 
astaud the ramifications of tire 
,-tive he signed secretly Nov. 1 
ghten protection of classified 
rotation. 

her the order, known as Na- 
.il Security Directive 496, was 
. aled in news reports Dec. 11, 
ettry of State George P. Shultz 
Uttied to resign if ordered to 
«t to a Bo-detector, or poly- 

h t£SL 

r. Reagan revised the order 
ay to give individual deparl- 
s wide discretion in using the 

J® White House spokesman, 
' y Speakes, denied the Post re- 
saying; “The president was 
aware, fully briefed. The story 
ong." 

Wes Weren’t ToW 

»kf Hoffman of The Washing- 
*aa reported earlier: 

* order was signed without the 
dedge of some lop White 

‘ officials who have opposed 


the tests, administration sources 
said Monday. 

Fred F. Fielding, White House 
counsel and one of the president’s 
top advisers on legal issues, was 
among those not informed erf the 
lie-detector, or polygraph, provi- 
sions in National Security Decision 
Directive 196 ai the time Mr. Rea- 
gan signed the secret order, the 
sources said. 

Disclosure of the older in news 
reports surprised many other se- 
nior White House aides. 

“The question is, who did 
know?” an aide said. 

Treasury Secretary James A. 
Baker 3d, a National Security 
Council member who objected to 
polygraph tests when he was White 
House chief of staff, was described 
by sources as busy with the tax- 
overhaul bill and not present at one 
of the key meetings leading to the 
order. 

The suB-secrei order was devot- 
ed largely to other measures to 
combat espionage against the Unit- 
ed States. Mr. Reagan apparently 
focused on those, rather than the 
section that would have significant- 
ly broadened use of polygraphs for 
government workers and contrac- 
tor personnel 

Expanded use of polygraphs was 
advocated by the Central Intelli- 
gence Agency director, William J. 
Casey, and Defense Secretary Ca- 
spar W. Weinberger. 

Mr. Reagan approved it after be- 


Reagan Proposes Talks on Arms Verification Issue 


By Michael R. Gordon 

New York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan has written to Mik- 
hail S- Gorbachev, the Soviet lead- 
er, proposing that experts meet to 
discuss improving the verification 
of agreements on underground nu- 
clear testa, according to a senior 
administration official. 

Officials said Tuesday that Mr. 
Reagan’s letter retemed t he long- 
standing position that improved 
verification would allow the United 
Stales to ratify two treaties signed 
in the 1970s that would limit the 
size of underground tests. 

Mr. Reagan also affirnyri the 


United States’s refusal to join the 
Soviet Union in its halt on under- 
ground testing, officials said. Mos- 
cow has said that its moratorium 
will lapse at the end of the year 
unless the United Sates joins in. 
In a report to Congress made 


for evaluating the yield of Soviet 
nudear tests and lower its esti- 
mates of the size of Soviet under- 
ground explosions. 

Government offirinls said the 
recommendations were unrfw re- 
view and had not influenced the 


pubhc on Monday, Mr. Reagan findings in a recent report on pur- 
said the Soviet Union might have ported Soviet violations of aims 
exceeded agreed limits in under- control treaties. 

Mr. Reagan’s letter was said to 
have been sent in response to a 
Dec. 5 letter from Mr. Gorbachev, 
who once again urged the United 
States to join in the Soviet test 
moratorium. 

Mr. Gorbachev proposed that 
observers could visit each other's 


id testing, though he said 
w were “verification uncertain- 
ties.” Some experts do not agree 
with this aHegation. 

A group of scientists chosen by 
the Pentagon recommended in a 
secret report in October that the 
United States alter its procedures 


territory to make sure that the 
United States and the Soviet Union 
abided by the moratorium. He also 
proposed resuming talks with the 
United States and Britain on a 
comprehensive ban on nuclear 
tests. The talks were carried on dur- 
ing (he Carta- administration. 

Larry Speakes, the White House 
spokesman, has said that the Unit- 
ed States finds the Soviet offer of a 
joint moratorium unacceptablc. 
But officials said they welcomed 
the emphasis in Mr. Gorbachev’s 
letter on verification concerns. 

An official said that Mr. Rea- 
gan’s letter had largely restated ear- 
lier positions. but that the proposal 


U.S. Aide Says Ban Won't Kill Satellite Weapons 


Walter Pincus 

Past Service 

WASHINGTON — Defense 
Department officiate plan to con- 
tinue development of a $4-bflSon 
U.S. anti-Mttlfite weapon despite a 
new congressional ban on tests 
a ga i n st objects in space as long as 
the Soviet Unioo does not conduct 
such tests, a Pentagon official said. 

One possibility under study is to 
fire a test weapon against “a point 
in space” rather than at two $20- 
mflfion targets that were pm into 
mint Dec. 12, the official raid 

He sad the air force "won’t do 
anything in direct violation” of the 
congrcational langnage that was at- 
tached loan omimrm spending bill 
and signed into law by President 
Reagan last week. But, he 


added, “We will find a way to go 
ahead.” 

The anti-satellite, or ASAT, 
weapon is bundled from an F-15 
fighter and guides itself into the 
path of a target satellite, destroying 
it on impact. 

The development program was 
initiated in 1977 by President Jim- 
my Garter as a bargaining chip in 
negotiations with the Russians to 
bar such weapons. When those 
talks failed, the Reagan adminis- 
tration pushed development be- 
cause the Russians had a rudimen- 
tary anti-satdfitc weapon. 

In 1983, the Soviet Union an- 
nounced a mo ra to ri um oq testing 
hs ASAT system and called mi the 
United Slates to follow suit. Mr. 


that the 


us 


U.S. Lays Plans to Drop 
New Zealand From Pact 


mg told that the United States 
faced an intensifying espionage 
threat and most take more aggres- 
sive action against it 

Polygraphs have been used com- 
monly m specific espionage investi- 
gations, and by the CIA and the 
National Security Agency. 

Mr. Reagan’s order would have 
authorized their use on a much 
broader baas, applying them to 
“all individuals’ with access to 
three categories of highly classified 
information. 

Mr. Reagan scaled bade the or- 
der Friday after Secretary of State 
Geoige P. Shultz threatened to re- 
sign u asked to take a polygraph. 

Sources quoted Mr. Fielding as 
saying that while using polygraphs 
might be legitimate in specific espi- 
onage investigations, it was wrong 
to use them for such broad screen- 
ing as was suggested in Mr. Rea- 
gan’s order. 

Other officials also said privately 
that they believed (bat the order 
had not been adequately checked 
by the White House staff for legal 
and political implications. There 
has been controversy in the courts 
and in Congress about effective- 
ness and use of polygraphs. 

While advocates say they are a 
useful tool-in investigations, critics 
contend that polygraphs are inac- 
curate and can be evaded. 


By Michael WeissJcopf 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — The United 
States is focmolating dans to re- 
nounce its security obligations to 
New Zealand because erf that na- 
tion’s plans to ben visits by U.S. 
ships carrying nudear weapons, ac- 
cording to administration officials. 
But they said the United States will 
not discard its regional defense 
treaty, which includes Australia. 

The U.S. mutual defense treaty 
with New Zealand and Australia, 
known as ANZUS, would remain 
intact to prevent disruption of U.S. 
militar y relations with Australia, 
which include ties that anchor 
Western security interest in the 
South Pacific. 

"We’d keep (he framework in 
place without the substance,” a De- 
fense Department official stud. 
"New Zealand would remain a 
member in name only, and military 
cooperation, with Australia, would 
continue as usual" 

The 34-year-old treaty has been 
strained since New Zealand decid- 
ed in February to bar port entry to 
a destroyer, the Buchanan, because 
(he United States refused to say 
whether it earned nud ear w eap ons. 

In protest, the a dmin istration 
canceled ANZUS naval exercises, 
halted the sharing of intelligence 
with New Zealand and waned that 
any move to formalize the nudear 
ban would trigger a U.S. reassess- 
ment of its treaty obligations to 
New Zealand. 

But Prime Minister David Lange 
of New Zealand, elected in July 
1984 rai an anti-nuclear platform, 
rejected the wanting and asked his 
Parliament two weeks ago to pro- 
hibit port calls by foreign warships 
.and landings by foreign aircraft un- 
less the prime minister was satis- 
fied that they were free of nudear 
weapons. 

Ada tinistra riOB nffiriak ra id the 
proposed ban on aircraft capable 
of carrying nudear weapons was 
also unacceptable to the United 
States. Tbe legislation that would 
prohibit visits by midear-powered 
ships would involve shorn A0 per- 
cent of the U.S. Pacific fleet. 

Although the two governments 
are attempting to negotiate their 
amlfictrng concerns, OS. officials 

are im TMqng ly peKimiffi g 

A bipartisan group of senators 
sent a lettar Thursday to Mr. Lange 
and President Ronald Reagan say- 
ing that relations were "in danger 
of very serious deterioration” and 


urging them to work out a compro- 
mise. 

New Zealand is considered to be 
of limited strategic importance to 
the United States. A small number 
ofU-S. ships called at New Zealand 
ports each year until the current 
controversy. 

A logistics support facility in 
Christchurch is a refueling point 
for mflitaiy planes transporting 
personnel and equipment for tbe 
National Science Foundation’s ire- 
search in the Antarctic. 

Access to New Zealand prats 
and landing fields is considered im- 
portant chiefly for ANZUS mib- 
laiy exercises, repairs and rest and 

recreation for crews. 

Australia receives dozens of 
American ship visits annually. It 
has six joint military facilities, in- 
cluding important intelligence- 
gathering posts and a center for 
servicing submarine co ramumo - 
ticras equipment 


Reagan refused, 

United States had lo 
own system. 

U.S. critics of that derision said 
the more advanced American 
weapon cook! trigger an anti-satel- 
lite arms race. 

Congressional opponents of the 
anti-satellite system hailed approv- 
al of the House-Senate lan guag e 
banning tests agm'ngt la rgm jn 
space as a major step in arms con- 
trol 

Representative George E Brown 
Jr., Democrat of California, said 
that without the ban the air force 
would have conducted two tests 
nextyear against targets. 

"With two more successful 
tests,” Mr. Brown said, "the air 
force could have declared the sys- 
tem operational and begun the pro- 
cess of fun deployment.” 

Congress also removed $98 mil- 
lion last week the administra- 
tion had sought to begin procure- 
ment of the ASAT in fiscal 1986. 

Mrl Brown said recently that he 
planed to sepk an end to the system 
nextyear. 

"If they want to go after satel- 
lites,” he said, “they should go for a 
modem laser system.” 

One of Defense Secretary Caspar 
W. Weinberger's top assistants raid 
Tuesday, "Tbe congressional ban 
must be undone” He called tbe 
anti-satellite program one of the 
administration’s most important 
efforts that "must be continued." 

A Pentagon spokesman said con- 
tinuing tbe program "win keep the 
Soviets* feet to tbe fire” in arms 
control talk* 

The project has been controver- 
sial with tbe uniformed sendees, in 
part because of its ineffectiveness 
against advanced Soviet mffilea 
and in pan because of its high cost 

About SI .2 bffiton has been 
spent on development. Pentagon 
sources said. That has bought two 
lest weapons, rate of winch was 
fired against a point in space in 
1984 and the other against an old 
satellite in September. 


There also has been funding fra 
nine target missiles, 13 test weap- 
ons and modifications for F-15 
fighters used for testing. 

Congress split this year on limi t., 
ing the program. It approved an 
authorization lull permitting two 
tests. 

Bat when it c»mp time to appro- 
priate funds, tbe House of Repre- 
sentatives voted to prohibit tests 
agai n st a target in space "until the 
president certifies that the Soviet 
Union has conducted, after OcL S. 
1985, a test against an object in 
space of a dedicated anti-satellite 
weapon." 

Pentagon lawyers determined 
that they could finance the two 
tests the air force planned fra next 
year by using 1985 funds. They 
suggested that Senate conferees ac- 
cept the House langti^gf., one par- 
ticipant in the conference recalled, 
because it limited spending of only 
1986 funds. 

However, this source said. Sena- 
tor Ted Stevens, Republican of 
Alaska, chairman of the Senate 
conferees on military spending, 
warned House members rathe Pen- 
tagon plan and they added lan- 
guage that prohibited use of past- 
year funds for the tests. 


for a meeting of experts on measur- 
ing the yield of underground explo- 
sions was a new element 

Under Mr. Reagan, the United 
Stales has taken tbe position that 
the Soviet Union must agree to 
additional verification measures 
before two signed treaties can be 
ratified. 

One is a 1974 treaty on tbe limi- 
tation of underground weapon 
tests, also known as the threshold 
test ban treaty, which limits the 
yield of explosions to ISO urns (136 
metric tons), equivalent to 150,000 
tons of TNT; the other is a 1976 
treaty that extended the limit to 
nudear explosions for excavation 
and other peaceful purposes. 

Underground nuclear tests are 
the only ones allowed since the 
1963 limited test ban treaty banned 
weapon tests in die atmosphere, in 
outer space and under water. 

■ Shevardnadze Criticizes U.S. 

Foreign Minister Eduard A. She- 
vardnadze of the Soviet Union has 
accused the White House of f tiling 
to react poniivdy to last month’s 
summit meeting in Geneva and 
said U.S. allies were helping to un- 
dermine its results, Reuters report- 
ed from Moscow. 

Speaking at a reception Tuesday 
for Foreign Minister the Vaduva of 
Romania, Mr. Shevardnadze said 
Moscow had taken a number of 
positive steps since Geneva to re- 
duce tension, such as removing 
some SS-20 missiles in Europe 
from standby alert 

But Washington had mad e no 
positive response, he added. 

"It is a fact that Washington has 
not reacted positively, has not re- 
sponded to any manifestations of 
goodwill, to any constructive signal 
of ours," Mr. Shevardnadze said, 
according to the Soviet press agen- 
cy Tass. 

He said the willingness of Britain 
and West Germany to discuss join- 
ing in the U.S. Strategic Defense 
Initiative showed "a deep rift be- 
tween statements in support of the 
results of Geneva and actions that 
arc undermining these results." 


mil** 4 


Your first choice 


.S. House Reviewing 
rocedures on Security 


By Ruth Marcus 

Washington Post Service 

^SHINGTON — The House 
,?«SffitHtives has started a ro- 
of its security procedures after 
Rest of a man in Washington 
allegedly tried to pass copies 
1 -Set House documents to the 
t Union. 

: Moose general counsel, Ste- 
i said Monday that House 
were considering having 
he aring s transcribed by ste- 
^'Jjpbers on the House staff, 
->V ‘ than turning to outside re- 
Vtg finns. If outside firms are 
he said, checks of security 
dures in use at the firms 
- be made. 

ie House is conducting a re- 
, Of security procedures and 
w or not we cm continue to 
-Q the security clearances that 
toe by the Department of De- 
- H Mr. Ross said. 

“ "'BeReportingCo^ the com pa- 
, .tore the arrested man, Randy 
^ Jeffries, worked as an mes- 
'r, said m a statement Monday 
t bad undergone a routine 
J « Department check of its 
ty procedures less than three 


weeks ago “and no problems or 
deficiencies were found involving 
document safekeeping.” 

According to an FBI affidavit 
filed in UjS. court Monday, Mr. 
Jeffries took classified documents 
from the company and told a co- 
worker he “needed to find a Rus- 
sian to seD the documents to.” 

In the affidavit, the FBI said 
a gen ts searching Acme on Satur- 
day, the day after the arrest of Mr. 
Jeffries, discovered numerous clas- 
sified documents, marked Secret 
and Top Secret, ripped in four 
pieces and placed in a plastic trash 
can. 

According to Defense Depart- 
ment regulations, classified materi- 
al is supposed to be destroyed by 
rfimlding or burning. 

Two employees arc supposed to 
witness the destruction of Top Se- 
cret material, and “the destruction 
process must be sufficient to pre- 
clude recognition or reconstruction 
of the classified information-” 

The Acme board chairman, 
Charles L Richer, said that “what 
has been published is nowhere sear 
the truth. We don’t rip them up and 
dispose of them in public.” 


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Page 4 


THURSDAY, DECEMBER 26, 1985 


Reralb 


international 


fBnbum Getting the Rules for Military Intervention 


Published Vith The New York Times and The Wmhfaigim Post 


Winnie Mandela’s 'Crime’ 


To appreciate the bullying nature of the 
South African government and its mindless 
resort to coercion, you have first to understand 
the “Crime" committed by Winnie Mandela: 
She went home. That's it Mrs. Mandela, wife 
of the long-imprisoned leader of the African 
National Congress. Nelson Mandela, and a 
strong leader in her own right, spent years 
under an oppressive banning order, combining 
internal exile and severe restrictions on her 
daily activity, which she defied in a variety of 
small ways. Recently, the South African gov- 
ernment. in what it seemed to regard as an act 
of great generosity, cased the terms of the 
order that had required her to live in remote 
Brandfort in the Orange Free State, but en- 
joined her from living in her home in the Black 
township of Soweto near Johannesburg. Twice 
she went there and twice she was routed by 
police, who came into her bouse, pushed her 
around and dragged her from the premises. 

We stress the simple and profoundly nonvi- 
olent character of this so-called “crime," not 
just to point out the disproportion between 
what Mrs. Mandela did and the reaction of the 
security forces, although that will surely strike 
people here as yet further evidence of the 
brutishness of the South African government. 
We stress it also because it so dearly reveals 
how untenable and self-destructive is the 
course that government has chosen. 

To an American visitor or even an American 
onlooker from abroad, it often seems incom- 
prehensible that there has been so relatively 
little peaceful protest or resistance by blacks 
and their white sympathizers in South Africa. 
Why do so many people amply walk through 
the prescribed doors and submit to the painful. 


rigorous separations, indignities and inhibi- 
tions of apartheid? Where are the sit-ins and 
other familiar forms of civil disobedience? The 
answer has bon that the white government's 
reaction to such gestures when they were un- 
dertaken — opening fire on peaceful resisters 
— long since discouraged such action. The 
only recourse, it would then be argued, was the 
violent clandestine attack, the growing gueril- 
la enterprise, responding gunfire. 

We have study seen more of the latter 
activities in recent months. Yet nothing has 
had the power, emotional and moral, in our 
view, of the expulsion of Mrs. Mandela from 
her own home and her determination not to 
submit to the tyranny of the government Her 
resistance shows, first, just how electrifying 
such an organized peaceful resistance could 
be. And it shows, second, how pitiful and 
doomed and evil is the apartheid fantasy the 
government seeks to impose and maintain • 
Grown men running around threatening phys- 
ical punishment for those who merely go to the 
wrong (Le., forbidden) place at the wrong time 
or. under the terms of various banning orders, 
say die wrong thing to the wrong number or 
kind of people on the wrong occasion. What 
fear they must live in! How preposterous the 
“security" they have fashioned for themselves! 
It depends on a whole nation’s accepting their 
elaborate protocols of who may be where when 
and what may be said when they get there. 

Winnie Mandela’s defiance is her dignity. 
The guys with guns secured the house. But 
theirs was an empty victory. By its act the 
South African government revealed not its 
strength, but its fear and weakness. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


For Sanity’s Sake, Tax Oil 


America, r unning a $200 billion defidt for 
the fourth consecutive year, desperately needs 
to reorder its finances. Congress knows that 
and so does the president: They've just com- 
mitted themselves by law to cut the deficit S5S 
billion next year and eliminate it entirely by 
1991. Now the opportunity to take a long 
stride toward that goal is enhanced by the 
collapse of the Organization of Petroleum Ex- 
porting Countries, the oil cartel. The way to do 
it is to tax imported oiL 

Doing so in this time of declining prices 
would raise huge sums for the Treasury with- 
out triggering inflation or causing hardship. 
Hardly anyone would feel the pinch. Gasoline 
and heating oil prices now reflect an average 
cost of about S28 a barrel of crude. 

If the collapse of OPEC cuts the price to 
$20, as is now anticipated, an $8 lee on each 
imported barrel would have the effect of pay- 
ing the United Stales what it has been paying 
to foreign oil producers. The treasury would be 
enriched by 530 billion — $15 billion directly 
from the import tax and another S15 billion in 
income and windfall taxes on domestic oiL 

An import fee offers additional benefits. 
Most taxes, even if necessary for revenue, are 
wasteful because they drive a wedge between 
real costs and prices, discouraging effort and 
reducing demand. But an oil import fee would 
actually improve efficiency, forcing consumers 
to absorb the hidden costs of dependence 
on unstable foreign supplies. 

Those hidden costs can be enormous. The 
first oil shock in 1973-74 sent the world into 
a recession that reduced output by a trillion 
dollars. Another shock might be easier to 
absorb but it would still be costly. At the least, 
oil consumers should pay the true cost of the 


product, which includes the billions spent 
on military preparations to defend foreign 
ml fields and shipping lanes. 

A further benefit is that consumers alone 
would not pay the entire S8 import fee; a 
portion would be paid by foreign oil produc- 
ers. The higher the price, the lower the demand 
for oil and gasoline: And the lower the de- 
mand, the lower the world price for crude. 
Some of the income of foreign oQ exporters 
would thus be transferred to importers; Sena- 
tor Gary Hart, a Democrat of Colorado, esti- 
mates that about one-third of an import fee 
would, in effect, be rebated to consumers. 

Irresponsibly, Americans have refused 
through ah the wrenching years of hi g h oil 
prices to use an oQ tax to retain some revenue 
for themselves. Politicians fear the public 
would revile any plan to tax oil at home rather 
than enrich Arabs abroad. But in a time of 
falling prices, there’s every reason to believe 
that oil-producing states like Texas would sup- 
port an import fee. The fee, after all, would 
increase demand for domestic cal, which in 
turn would create jobs and revenues. 

Yes, President Reagan so opposes any new 
taxes that he would veto even this sensible one. 
But, as will soon be dear, federal spending cuts 
alone will not suffice to reduce the deficit on 
the schedule required by law. Even Mr. Rea- 


gan may prefer some taxes to gutting his mili- 
tary buildup. And he would not be wroon in 


tary buildup. And be would not be wrong in 
con tending that an oQ import fee is less a tax 
than a charge on the use of a public resource: 

The president favors user charges in other 
Adds. Why, then, reject charges on cfl imports 
that create military obligations and threaten 
the security of the United States? 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


Hie Ban on Satellite Killers 


President Reagan said after his Geneva 
meeting with Mikhail S. Gorbachev, the Soviet 
leader, that the summit should be judged not 
by today’s words but by tomorrow’s deeds. 
The vote by Congress to stop further testing of 
satellite-killing weapons until and unless the 
Soviet Union resumes tests of its own was a 
deed that takes Mr. Reagan at his word. 

Satellite killers are the ideal pieces of hard- 
ware for experimenting with a concept of arms 
control by mutual restraint. It is an idea that 
attracts many defense analysts. 

The weapons, known as ASATs. are ideal 
first, because nobody needs them, ir being able 
to shoot out an enemy’s satellite had any value 
in a crisis, it would be very slight far out- 
weighed by the dangers of panicking one side 
into firing in all directions if some satellites 
were destroyed by accident. 

Stopping tests whQe the only such weapons 
in existence are an American system only 
slightly less crude than a similar Soviet system 


makes sense. The real danger with ASATs is 
not what they can do now to low-flying satel- 
lites but what they might do to far more 
important communication satellites. 

Banning ASAT testing also wfllitdp keep 
research on "star wars" honest. Some “star 
wars” tests eventually will violate^ the 1972 
ABM treaty that prohibits widespread ballistic 
missile defenses. But some of those tests wiD 
look much like ASAT tests, and, because satel- 
lite killers are not covered by the treaty, the 
“star wars" tests could be explained away as 
permissible. If neither power is testing ASAT 
systems, neither can disguise space defease 
tests as satellite killer tests. 

If the only way to continue space tests 
would be an open break with the ABM treaty, 
then the logic of negotiating might finally 
dawn on the White House. The choice would 
be between continuing a “star wars" program 
thaL may never work and breaking a function- 
ing ABM treaty that gives Americans more 
protection than the Russians. 

— Los Angeles Tones. 


FROM OUR DEC 26 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910; Merry Minstrels Wake Taft 
NEW YORK. — President Taft was rudely 
awakened from sleep last night [Dec. 24] by 
old-time minstrels, who sang a long selection 
of Christmas carols, terminating with “Hail, 
Smiling Mom!" immediately beneath his bed- 
room window at the While House. The Presi- 
dent finally arose, donned a gorgeous blue 
bath-robe, opened the window and exclaimed: 
“Thanks very much. God bless you, merry 
gentlemen!” Not until then did the minstrels 
depart. Meanwhile, Mme. Luisa Tetrazzini ful- 
filled her promise to sing in a San Francisco 
street on Christinas Eve. One hundred thou- 
sand persons, largely poor Italians, assembled 
to bear and applaud the diva, who sang from 
the Lotta Fountain, in the Italian quarter. It 
was a perfectly warm and beautiful evening. 


1935: Christmas ra a Cxnmtry at War 
ROME — Christmas wasn’t merry in Rome 
this year. The sad gravity which weighs over 
this country at war was more visible than any 
time before. The streets were not animated and 
there was no hearty celebrating until the early 
hours of dawn. Restaurants and clubs have to 
close early now to save light It was visible that, 
the Italian population could not forget the 
dark clouds hanging over the country. Some 
250,000 Italian boys are spending Christmas 
thousands of miles away in the tropical dimale 
of the Ogadeo desert or in the barren MQs Of 
theTigrfc. It had been hoped that peace negoti- 
ations could bring some happy results for 
Christmas. Now that all hopes have been shat- 
tered, everyone understands that the war 
in Ethiopia will be difficult and long. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY. Chairman IW-19S2 


KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


LEE W. HUEBNER, Publisher 

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® 1985. International Herald Tribute. All rights resorted WESSSSB. 


L ondon —A t the end of 1979 , 

t when the Soviet Union invaded 


Is when the Soviet Union invaded 
Afghanistan, the Soviet leadership 
was totally unprepared for (he vehe- 
ment and bitter reaction in over 90 
percent of the world’s capitals. 

After all, it seemed to many, not 
just the Russians, that the Rubicon 
had been crossed when 18 months 
before Nut Mohammed Tarairi had 
come to power in a coup that raised 
the red banner over Kabul But no, 
for Washington and the majority of 
both Western and Third World coun- 
tries, the critical issue was not so 
much the odor of the regime but the 
crossing of international borders. 
This was the cardinal sin. 

Yet six years later the United 
States is in the dock in the World 
Court at The Hague accused of the 
same offense, in this case because it 
mined the territorial waters of Nica- 


By Jonathan Power 


“The Law of Nations.” He wrote: “If 
a prince, by violating the fundamen- 
tal laws, gives his subjects a lawful 
cause for a national revolt a grins t 
him, any foreign power may rightful- 
ly gjve assistance to an oppressed 
people who ask for its aid." - 
Today the general consensus op 


country may answer the request of a 
beleaguered government that is fight- 
ing an insurgency. For example, it is 
within the right of die Salvadoran 


government to request American 
help to fight the guerrilla rebellion. 
Extrapolated from this is an argu- 
ment sometimes deployed that the 
United States is justified in aiding the 
“contras” because this is a way of 
unde rmining the Nicaraguan support 
for the insurgency in El Salvador. 


outside help from the United States. 
Bui this will require looking into un- 
der a microscope. Moreover, Nicara- 
gua will say Cuban and Soviet mili- 
tary support received both before and 
since the contra activity is more in the 
nature of general aid than direct 


The Norms 
Of Persons 
Don’t Apply 


inter national law is far from ibepH- 
losoohv of Vattel Fighting for free- 


losophy of VatteL Fighting for free- 
dom and democracy are not in them- 
selves considered to be sufficient 


counterinsurgency support. 

This may wdl be the court’s debat- 
ing point, not Valtd’s standards of 
opp ression and justice, nor modern 
concepts of the relative worth of de- 
mocracy and dictatorship. 

This literal rendering of interna- 
tional law bothers some democrati- 
cally minded scholars and lawyers. 
One international lawyer, Lloyd Cut- 
ler. legal counsel to Jimmy Carter, the 

former president, argues that outside 
intervention should be allowed if the 
insurgency is manifestly pro-demo- 
cratic fighting a totalitarian regime 
and the repressive government itself 
is receiving aid from outside, even if 
his only general support not engaged 
directly against the rebels. 

Yet even if this were accepted U.5. 
support for the contras could hardly 
be justified since the democratic 
credentials of the contras are, to say 
the least, confused. The justices of the 
World Court, drawn from the wide 
ideological membership of the Unit- 
ed Nations, will not give this argu- 
ment the time of day. 

Mankind can only live tolerably if 
there is law. This we usually accept at 
home, in our own countries. It is the 
dor/ of political leaden to tell us that 
this is the only way to build a civilized 
planet. Ignonng the World Court and 
20 0 years of evolving inte rnati onal 
law is the way of small town politicos, 
not national statesmen. 

International Herald Tribane. 

All rights reserved. 


Bv Flora Lewis 


Ignoring the World Court and some 200 years 
of emhtmg unemotional law h the way of 


ragua. At somepoint during the com- 
ing year the World Court wOl an- 


ing year the World Court wOl an- 
nounce its decision. It wiD be a 
landmark event in the annals of 
world law, not to be underestimated 
merely because the United States has 
announced that it is going to ignore 
the court's deliberations. 

Statesmen, philosophers, theolo- 
gians and lawyers have been grap- 


pling for centuries with the problem 
of the rules of war. From Sl Augns- 


of the rules of war. From Sl Augus- 
tine’s formulations of the just war, 


through the age of chivalry down to 
the Nuremberg tribunals and to the 


the Nuremberg tribunals and to the 
present day considerations in The 
Hague, there have been numerous 
attempts to control the way in which 
armed combat is conducted. 

The debate on the rules of military 
intervention in particular goes back 
two centuries. In 1758 Emmerich de 
Vattel published his seminal work. 


causus belhtm. F-ftch nation has the 
right to its own independent integrity 
unless it itself breaks the rules tty 
attacking another. Conversely, as the 
UN Qtaner makes explicit, the only 
just cause for going to war is self- 
defense. Yet although this is written 
into the UN Char ter and tnm the 
charter of the Organization of Ameri- 
can States it has never been tested in 
a court of law before. 

So now that it is bong put to the 
judicial test are there any mitigating 
arguments th*f the World Court 
could take into consideration? 

It is widdy recognized that when a 
dvil war or insurgency has produced 
such a degree of chaos that law and 
order have broken down, outsiders 
have the right to enter and rescue 
their nationals. But this does not ap- 
ply in the Nicaraguan case. 

Less recognized, but nevertheless 
widely supported, is the view that a 


However, this would stand up better 
if the forces the United States is sup- 
porting against the Nicaraguan gov- 
ernment were primarily those of El 
Salvador's government. 

The rulers of El Salvador have nev- 
er shown any interest in turning their 
guns on Nicaragua. Hus is not simply 
cowardice or even expediency. The 
fact is that the United States has 
never been able to prove convincing- 
ly that the Nicaraguan help to the 
Salvadoran rebels has been anything 
more than a trickle. 

A third argument, following from 
the above, is that once a country aids 
another to help to defeat the rebels 
then the insurgents also have the 
right to arit for outride help. Would 
tms let the Rea gan adnnnig lraimn rtff 
the Worid Court hook? After all, per- 
haps the Nicaraguans did seek Soviet 
and Cuban support to put down the 
resistance before the contras received 


P ARIS — Especially at this hog. 
day season come again tbc dues. 


Life at the Top: Trust Must Outweigh Fear of Spies 


By Philip Geyelin 

W ASHINGTON — In the privacy of his 
taped-recorded office, Richard Nixon 
called George Shultz a “candy ass" when, as 
secretary of the treasury, Mr. Shultz refused to 

r Mr. Nixon’s men access to the tax returns of 
former president’s “enemies.” Considering 
the source and the' circumstances, that’s the next 
best thing to a Medal of Freedom. 

Now, Mr. Shultz as secretary of state has once 
again taken a stand on principle and his presi- 
dent’s men are once ag ain doing him'the miw 
sort of backhanded honors, they are bush- 
whacking Mr. Shultz with anonymous slurs on 
his loyalty and fitness for office: Mr. Shultz 
refused to submit to Mr. Reagan's efforts to 
unmask spies by administering polygraph (fie 
detector) tests to the people he has entrusted with 
the highest offices in his command. 

Do not be put off the point of principle by the 
president's second thoughts and lame retreat: his 
scaling back of the original directive; his slap- 
happy suggestion thaL he would exdude himself 
as wdl as Mr. Shultz, if the secretary is all that 
squeamish. The original impulse is what's inter- 
esting. An administration's character is better 
judged by its initial inclinations- in -the dad: -of- 
night than by its knuckling undef tp public 
pressure in the light of day. 

The point of principle has -to do with old- 
fashioned values like honor, dignity and integri- 
ty. And the implications run far beyond the 
potential of ruining reputations and careers 
by putting them at the ride of a’ notoriously 
unreliable piece of machinery. Hie implications 
go to the mind-set of the president and of 
those who pressed the polygraph upon him as 
an instrument of government. 

What the president would have if he could is a 
sweeping expanaon of a practice earlier adminis- 
trations routinely employed for strictly limited 
purposes, to control the security of a na r row 
range of sensitive intelligence operations. Those 
who have in that business , surrendered - 

more than a few of the rights of ex pr e ssi on and 
freedom eqoyed by other government workers. 

Even the president's efforts to meet most of 
Mr. Shultz’s objections (polygraph examinations 
will now be confined to use nm conjunction with 
other investigations and security procedures in 
espionage cases”) are scarcely reassuring unless 
you know what is meant by “espionage.” The 
espionage laws, dating back to. 1917, are loose 
enough to have allowed the Nixon administra- 
tion to use them to win an indictment against. 
Daniel Ellsbura for purloining and distributing 
the Pentagon Papers in 1971. 


i aw-WtaMBnfOrwmtfPaa. 


i day season come again the ques- 
tions of what lo believe about others. 

Is Mikhail Gorbachev sincere? Can. 
the Russans ever really be trusted? 

There is no satisfying answer be- 
cause these are the wrong questions . 
to put on issues Of foreign pcuicy. _ 

not a matter of choosing a fneod or a 
business partner and ignoring less 
agreeable people. The norms of per* ti 
sonal relations don’t apply io inter- • 
national affairs, neither in terras of 
affection nor of revulsion. 

It can be safely assumed that Mr, - 
Gorbachev is sincere in representing 
what be judges to be the Soviet inter- 
est. We can indeed trust the Russians 
to do what they can to look after 
themselves, their needs and aspira- 
tions. And they would be right to. 
bold the same suppositions about 
President Reagan and Americans. 

Both sides ha\-e made stupid mistakes 
and costly miscalculations at 
but not for lack of national concern. 

That is the real point. The Soviet 
Union exists, wifi not go away and 
cannot be ignored. Therefore Ameri- 
ca must deal with iL The appropriate 
question is: On what terms? j > 

The issue of sincerity is irrelevant. : 
There is a minor image of fear, dis- 
trust, suspicion on both sides, and fee 
nature of the world’s present dram- 
stances wiD not dissipate it, although 
perhaps it can be eased a hula Araer- 
tcans are convinced that the United 
States arms itself only for defense 
and never uses force except on provo- 
cation and with high moral justifica- 
tion. The Soviets think the opposite. 

These are perceptions. They can- 
not be proven. Argument will not 
transform them; invoking good will 
cannot Temove them. There are some . 



fundamental U S a nH Soviet inter- 
ests in conflict, and so long as that is 
true the two will be adversaries. 

But there are also some fundamen- 
tal U.S. and Soviet interests which 
converge. Managing the two coun- 
tries’ relations wwtw finding wavs to' 
identity them, and then devising 
agreements that can work to contain 
die conflict and reduce the tension. 

The most obvious common interest 
is the prevention of war, especially 
nuclear war but also conventional 
war with its high risk of escalation. 
Another is to prevent fights among 
thud countries and upheavals within 
them from luring superpowers into 
direct confrontation. This is more 
difficult and riskier because the fine 
to be drawn is less dear and each 
side’s view of its own interests and 


obligations is less shaiply defined. 

As John Stremlau of the Rockefel- 
ler Foundation has pul it, “In con- 
trast to the rest of the world, both we 
and the Soviets have the luxury d 
having to worry about the behavior 
of only one superpower.” His inright * 
makes the point not only that others. ’ 
worry about both while each super- 
power trusts only itself, but also that 
it is the behavior and not the secret 
intentions of the other side that must 
preoccupy the United States. 

In the long term, all international , 
agreements depend for their fulfill- - 
ment on a sense that they serve mutu- 
al interests. No state will indefinitely 
abide by an obligation that it sees as 
unilaterally disadvantageous if it can 
get out of it by hook or by crook. 

So the test of agreements and rules 
of behavior has to be whether both 
sides are served, even if both rides 
have to make concessions, and 
whether the compacts are observed. 
That is why verification is all impor- 
tant, and why the terms of accord 
must make them possible to be reli- 
ably verified. Trust can only be a « r * 
m at t e r of each side trusting its own 
ability to read the other’s actions. 

That is also why ambiguity, a fa- 
vorite tactic of some diplomats to 
skirt pesky obstacles, is more of a 
trap than a boon in U.S.-Sovicx rela- 
tions. It is very bard to make texts 
truly precase. The meaning of roughly 
equivalent words differs in the two 
la n gu a g e s. But accepting contradic- 
tory interpretations under mines the 
chances that agreements can endure. 

This was at the heart of the break- 
down of dfoeate. Henry Kissinger 
thought he had tacit Soviet agree- 
ment to some rules of the road; be 
thought that the 1972 pledge not to 
seek “unilateral advantage” over 
each other meant that the Soviets 
would stay on their side. For him, it -4T 
collapsed in Angola, although that 

wae a n«n U. . 1 . > ■ ■ 


The Reagan administration apparently reads 
them the same way, having successfully prosecut- 
ed SamnefMorison, a Naval Intelligence analyst, 
for espionage in a case involving the leak of 
dassmed photos of Soviet aircraft carriers to a 
British puhhcatioQ in 1984. 

Weare talking, then, aboat plugging leaks, not 
necessa ri ly by master spies, and not necessarily 
to enemy agents. Hie Reagan administration, 
that is to say, is in the same “plumbmg” business 
as was the Nixon administration, if not onihe 
same scale or by the same criminal means. Bm it 
is acting out of the same overwrought sense of 
insecurity. Mr. Reagan was apparently pggeebon 
by bis director of central intelligence, WiTKam 
Casey, and Defense Secretary Caspar Weinber- 


ger, who both seem to beffeve that polygraph 
tests are so good lor their own employees that 


argument for the widespread use of lie detectors 
has been called into question. 

Bui the case for their use on the scale that the 
president apparently had in mind collapsed com- 
pletely undo- die weight of Mr. Shultz’s princi- 
pled arguments. I would ask you to let your 
imagination ran. Picture some past A meri c an 
policy-making figures — Henry’ Stimpson, 
George Marshall, Dean Achesoo, Dean Rusk, 
Henry Kissinger or Clark Clifford — strapped 
into a polygraph, with wires or other devices 
measuring their pulse; their respiration and the 
sweatiness of their palms. Is that the image you 
cherish of those who grade your destinies at the 
highest level? 

We know what we would drink if that were the 


tests are so good for their own employees that 
they shradd be good far everybody. 

The admmistratiaa has good reason to be 
alarmed by the recent spate of espionage cases. 
Qeariy they call for a tightening of security. But 
in almost every instance, conventional tech- 
rriaues and standard practice have been revealed 
to be astonishingly Uk. And in at least one case, 
involving a Chinese agent' who apparently 
waked from within the GLAfor 30 years and was 
u ndet ected by polygraph testing, the technical 


stated poKcy of the Soviet Union. What would 
we think of the British government of Margaret 


we think of the British government of Margaret 
Thatcher or that of President Franqois Mitter- 
rand of France, as reliable allies, if they started 


wiring thrir cabinet nrimsters to lie detectors to 
see if they were behaving treacherously? And 


see if they were behaving treacherously? And 
what, accordingly, would they be supposed to 
think of a leader of the free worid who did so? 

We ahould be cheered that there is at least one 
voice in the Reagan administration: to remind us 
who we are and what we stand for. 

Washington Pan Writers Group. 


The Anglo-Irish Accord Will Fail Without U.S. Aid 


EW YORK — The time has 
come for the United Slates to 


By Kevin. M. Cahill 


contribute to peace and stability in 
Northern Ireland as it has done so 
generously and often elsewhere. 

The Anglo-Irish accord, signed last 
month, is a historic document. It is, 
however, short on specifics, and with- 
out America’s help it may well re- 
main, to paraphrase W_B. Yeats, 
words, nothing but words. 


^agreements is tocuririon the campro- 
mises required by sharing U.S. 
wealtbJJhe Camp David accords, for 
example, were held together by . vast 

finannal aid to both Israel and 


UJ5. legislation permits the trans- 
fer of $750 nrillksn a year to Israel in 
tax-exempt charitable contributions 
and bonds. Other laws permit almost 
95 percent of Israel's export* to enter 


where, why not in Northern Ireland? 

More than a century ago, Charles 
Stewart Parnell, one of the heroes of 
Ireland’s struggle fra- freedom, ap- 
pealed to the American Congress: 
“You can now obtain for Ireland. 


The accord does not purport to 
settle the conflict: It would give Dub- 
lin a symbolic, advisory role in the 
affairs of Northern Ireland, but it 
guarantees nothing and offers no de- 
tailed program to end the island’s 
dvil strife. It promises no new funds 
or grants and confers no real power 
on either the Irish Republic or the 

beleaguered Roman Catholic minor- 
ity in the north. Nor does it inducts 
any plans to reconstruct the bombed 
dries of Deny and Belfast. 

It does, however, represent a politi- 
cal device through which peace and 
security may be achieved The ac- 
cord's purposefully vague declara- 
tions of cooperation are all that could 
be agreed upon now, but it recog- 
nizes, for die first time, that Dublin 
has a legitimate right to speak for the 
Catholic population in the north. 
This is an important, unprecedented 
gesture on England's part. 

But if these dreams of peace are to 
become reality, more than fine words 
and gracious gestures will be neces- 
sary. Only steady jobs, decent hous- 
ing and equal access to higher educa- 
tion — without which there is neither 
dignity nor personal freedom — will 
break the barriers of suspicion and 
paranoia in Northern Ireland. The 
success of the accord wiD depend 
nltimatdy on concrete changes, paid 
fra with material aid. It is here that 
America can play an essentia] role. 

It is an unflattering fact that Amer- 
ica's major role in many international 


Ireland receives almost 
rw aid from the US. 
govenunaUinspUeof 
strong US,-bishties. 


Wood wtth^^Swing the^SSid, was a dvfl war if ShtahA^ ititod 
Irish have virtually no way to grw without OMtoatemng message, tire States had staked out no bSer^S 

50 * a y m fa* grea* question.” His to primary influoratoMMS 
Nor is there any comparable rad to words need no amending today. The haL Tbe lit straw was A?d«iS 


promote Irish exports. 

Tax credits and investment guar- 


Anglo-Irish accord will not work 
without America’s help. 


Egypt. In the same way, , the Unitea 
States ought to be willing to be the 
atent partner who makes a solution 

possible in Ireland. 

There are many precedents fra 
American aid in stahmzing troubled 
areas. The United States has poured 
hundreds of mfllinns of dollars into 
Central America so that democracy 
might survive terrorism and oppres- 
aon. Why not do the same in Ireland? 
It has spent hundreds of mfifions in 
Cyprus and Turkey to reconstruct 
towns destroyed by chril war. Why 
not in Dory? It has roent more hun- 
dreds of imlliqns to Wd a subway 

Sro. " 

The contrast with Israel is die most 
striking. America allocates S3.73 bil- 
lion a year to 'Israel, most of.it in 
grants. The usual arguments offered 
to justify this largesse focus on the 
strategic significance of Israel and on 
America's 37-year moral commit- 
ment to its survival. But Irish' and 
U.S. ties date back at least three cen- 
turies. There are mrae than 40 n£E5)n 
American Irish. It is not m the best 


turns willing to establish fatuities 
in Northern Ireland could be supple- 
mented by the United States. If this 
has been the policy of America else* 


The writer is president-general 
of the American-Irisk Bistorical Sod • 


oty. He contributed this comment 
to The New York Timet 


to primary influence than Moscow 
had. The last straw was Afghanistan, 
an invasion attempting to end anoth- 
er avil war in Moscow’s favor. 

1 1 o e L thc ? : 0X151 nor mistrust can fix 
u -S.-SavKt relations. Good agree-’ 
ments can be readied so long as tfaty 
are mutual, lurid, and verifiable. 

The New York Timm. 


Peace or Destruction? 


tics seans to be peace nowadays. 
Look at all those peace initiatives. 
The game is to p<nnt tbc finger at die 
other as the aggressor. The worid 
today abounds in aggression, small 
and big scale. Tha t mSes it eaaerior 
the big aggressor to disamnlate his 
actions. The effort to demask .rate 
another as the culprit could escalate 
into a “declaration of peace.” Just 
tftinkef toe gortsnM^^ltyhtesrx. 

arms race continoes. - ' ■ ’ - 
In the, Bible, a peace initiative is 
foreseen in Thessaiomans 1, 5:3. This 
paints out that we have reached a 
■vital point in the history of mankind 


TEKS it) THE EDITOR — “ - 

SDL* Time for Democracy With toe administration actfcraas 
Having read vonr series 


Having read yonr series of articles S“Jfi j. 

on the Strategic Defease Initiative dhu» 

tiding conviction: The peoole of the 

jSSl States must ' 

for thonsdves. A national referaa- S ' 

dum should be* called to determine E™ knefioaiWr- 

"Jether “star wars” should proceed 
after a reasonable period of initial 


a an informed dedriotL^ “““a . 


and goes tike tins: ^Tor when they 
shall say, Peace and safety; toeasutf- 


shall sty, Peace and safety; then sud- 
den' destruction will rianrsb u po n 


interest of Amwi^ ro »lln» iffiniim " them, as. travail upon a woman, with 
to flourish in its nearest European cbfld; and they shall not escape.” 


empt from their own, Z: 

^J^iW^toQfflgressaswdl directly 

as the administration and scientific - ' 

co ™mumty. The ultimate cost of SDI J 

asgggB 

SaTSttsss? sSaSEaKSSfe'?-- 

- - •.NewY«dfciiFV'> 


neighbor. Yet Ireland receives virtu- 
ally no UiL government aid. ' 


HENDRIK C. BLOK. 
SdrinddC^ Switzerland- ” 


ty every U.&citizaL 




: ."cr : 




V t .vsr\ ♦*»«- 







-7~n 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 26, 1985 


Page 5 


* 

n l Calcium 9 s Role as 


SCIENCE 


ii, 


By Jane E Brcxiy ' 

New York Tima Semes . 

C ALCIUM, already drawing a 
great deal of attention for its 
critical role in preventing the de- 


sis, is fast expanding its reputation 
as an essential part of the diet At 
the some time, however, some 
health expats worry that the value 
of tiie nutrient is being overstated 
and that caichnn supplements are 
being oversold. ’ 

Long known as the foundation 
of strong bones and teeth, calcium 
is emerging in scientific research as 
possibly protective against high 
blood pressure and cancer of the 
colon as wdL The typical middle- 
aged American consumes about 
one-half to two-thirds the recom- 
mended gOO-milligram daily allow- 
ance for calcium, a levd many phy- 
sicians beheve is too low. 

In a study in The Annals of In- 
ternal Medicine, Dr. David A. 
McCarroo and Dr. Cynthia D. 
Morris of Oregon Health Sciences 
University in Portland reported 
(hat 21 of 4 8 persons with mUd to 
moderate hypertension achieved a 
significant reduction m blood pres- 
sure when given a 1, 000-milligram 
calcium supplement daily for eight 
weeks. 

Last July, researchers at the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin in Madison 
reported in The American Journal 
of Clinical Nutrition that women 
with hypertension who took 1.500 
milligrams of calcium a day (in 
addition to medication) for four 
years had a significant drop in 
blood pressure, whereas those with- 
out the supplement experienced an 
overall rise in blood pressure. 

Calcium supplements have also 
been shown to lower blood pres- 
sure in pregnant women and to 
reduce the ride of edampsia, a seri- 
ous disorder of late pregnancy. 
And, according to Dr. McCamm, 
diet-health studies among a ran- 
dom sample of more than 20.000 
Americans indicated that those 
with hypertension consumed sig- 
nificantly less calcium than those 
with normal blood pressures. 

In most people, however, calci- 
um supplements seem to have no 
effect on blood pressure. Rather, 
about a third of those with hyper- 
tension are considered likely to be 
helped by caldum. 

As a cancer weapon, calcium 
supplements were described last 
month in The New England Jour- 
nal of Medicine as capable of 
“quieting” the cancer-prone cedis in 
the colons of people who face a 
high risk of developing colon can-, 
cer. When such people were given 
daily supplements of 1,250 milH - 

Cat Gets Heart Pacemaker 

The Associated JPresa 

ITHACA, New York — Doctors 
at Comen University, in a relative- 
ly rare operation, have implanted a 
heart pacemaker in an 1 1-year-old 
Siamese cat. 


grams of caldum fin addition to the 
approximately TQu miTKgmnns they 
consumed in their <fiets)for several 
months; hyperactive edis in the co- 
lon reverted to look more like qm- 
■ escent normal cells, according the 
Dr. Martin Liplria and Harold 
Newmark of Memorial Sloan-Ket- 
tering Cancer Center in New York. 

Just how calcium performs 
redes, if in fact it does, is still very 
much a matte of speculation. With 
regard to colon cancer, one possi- 
ble explanation is that fyi r fr im 

that am irritate the colon. Consid- 
erably more research is needed be- 
fore added calcium — either 
through the diet or supplements— 
can be generally recommended as a 
preventive or treatment for high 
blood pressure or colon cancer. 

Indeed, it is stffl not certain that 
calcium supplements alone can be 
rehed upon to stem the mnfontrp g 
loss of bone that seriously afflicts 
15 million, to 20 million older 
Americans, causing 13 milie u 
fractures that cost the United 
States $3.8 bJDion in matfeai care 
each year. 



are frankly dis- 


UUME experts { 
turbedby what they describe as the 
“oversell” of calcium supplements 
and the alarm generated by mis- 
leading advertisements, although 
they concede that no harm is 
known to result from taking up to 
2,000 mnUgrams erf caldum a day. 

Dr. Bruce Ettinger, an endocri- 
nologist at the Kaiser Hospital in 
San Frandsco who has been study- 
ing rite prevention and treatment of 
osteoporosis for 10 years, believes 
that “calamn is vastly overrated as 
to its ability to prevent osteoporo- 
sis beyond the early years of fife.** 
He cited studies in New York, 
France and Sweden that showed no 
difference in bone density among 
women of various ages who did or 
did not take in lots of calcium 
through their diets or supplements. 
In addition, studies in Denmark 
and at tbe K«im»r Hospital and the 
University of California at San 
Francisco showed no prevention of 
bone loss despite generous calcium 
suppl ementation in postmenopaus- 
al women. 

“Up to age 35 or so. high caldum 
intake may allow the development 
of a stronger skeleton, which would 
reduce the risk of osteoporosis 
when bone loss inevitably occurs 
later in fife, but tbe findings are 
equivocal about the benefits of cal- 
cium later in life,” Dr. Fttfngw 
said. 

Others disagree. Dr. Robert 
Heaney, endocrinologist at 
Creighton University in Omaha, 
Nebraska, who has studied caichnn 
requirements for three decades, 
points to recent studies of hunter- 
gatherer tribes that show.a daily 
railriniw intake of more than 1,500 
millig ram* (mainly from vegeta- 
bles), or three times what the typi- 
cal American woman now con- 
sumes. Although dietary fiber can 


inhibit calcium absorption, the 
studies of Inmier^plherets and 
others have indicated thai. u whea 
caldum intake is 
tolerate a lot of fiber," 
said. 

Twokogbdd notions about the 
influence of diet on caldum levels 
— that high intakes of protein and 
phosphorus lead to a loss of calci- 
um — have been refuted by recent 
findings. Dr. Heaney said that al- 
m animals a 


rus intake depleted cajanm m 

hnnf-s hnrnant (Kit pffiy f ijj<) nnl 

occur even if phosphorus intake 
was very high. And Dr. Hem 
Spencer, a calcinm specialist at the 
Veterans Administration Hospital 
in Hines, Illinois, said her studies 
showed no increased caldum loss 
associated with a diet high in meat 
and other protein foods. 

Still, Dr. Heaney insists: “No 
one knows what percentage of os- 
teoporosis is nmntian-idaied. We 
must avoid dawning consum- 
ing more caldum would solve ad 
our problems with osteoporosis." 
Other impo rtant influences in diwlft 
physical activity, but here too there 
is disagreement at to what type. 

While Dt. Heaney said he be- 
hoved that “the rate of strain oo tbe 
bone, rather than size of the load, is 
important,” which would confer an 
advantage to runners and ju m p er s 
over weight-lifters, Dr. Ettinger 
said that muscle development 
through weight-lifting was more 
likel y than running or walking to 
stimulate an increase in bone 
strength. Dr. Heaney pointed out, 
however, that vigorous exercise of 
all types triggered tbe release erf 
growth hormone, which in turn 
stimulated brae formation in peo- 
ple of all ages. 

Furthermore, there is increasing 
evidence that defideocy of the acti- 
vated form of vitamin D, not cald- 
um pm se,u ultimately responsible 
fra much osteoporosis. As people 
age, not only do they obtain less 
vitamin D from their diets and 
fmm fa p nnwft tn lairiHg ht^ Hot their 

bodies become less able to convert 
the vitamin to its active form, a 
hormone known as caldtrioL With- 
out enough calcitricd, caichnn ab- 
sorption through the intestinal 
tract is greatly reduced, especially 
if the amount of consumed 
is low to begin with. - 

Definitive studies of caldtrioTs 
effectiveness in countering osteo- 
porosis are nearing completion at 
five medical centers and, if die re- 
sults confirm prefimmaxy findings*, 
the Food and Drug Administration 
is expected to approve the hormone 
therapy possibly within a year. The 
hormone would obviate the need 
fra large doses of cakaum and may 
even supplant estrogen therapy to 
prevail bate- loss in postmeno- 
pausal women. •. 

For all the publicity given to cal- 
cium’s contribution to bones, skele- 
tal strength is hardly tin* mineral's 
most vital role. Although 99 per- 
cent of the body’s cakaum is found 


and Source of Dispute 


IN BRIEF 





? y , \'s ' . • • 

CALCIUM 

CALCIUM 

EXCRETION 

INCREASES 

BLOCKED 

IN BLOOD 


HatSTIw N»» YoA Tired 


in bones and teeth, it is tbe 1 per- 
cent in solution that keeps people 
alive. Caldum must be present in 
blood serum and other body fluids 
at all times to maintain or facilitate 
a normal heart beat, nerve conduc- 
tion, muscle contraction, enzyme 
reactions* hormone secretions, cel- 
lular adhesion and blood coagula- 
tion. When blood levels of calcium 
fall too low, fatal convulsive tetany 
can result. 

If inadequate amounts of caka- 
um reach the blood from dietary 
sources, caldum is removed from 
the braes to make up the differ- 
ence. The skeleton can be viewed 
primarily as a storehouse for calci- 
um, releasing the mineral whenever 
it is needed for its other life-sus- 
taining functions. Such a store- 
house became essential when land 
animals evolved, leaving behind a 

perpetual bath of cakium-con lam- 
ing seawater. The normal level of 
calcium in the blood is die same as 
that found in seawater, and an 
elaborate biochemical mechanism 
has evolved to main tain that blood 
leveL 

Dr. Hector DeLuca, a Univer- 
sity of Wisconsin biochemist who 
ha* done to unravel il»« 

mwjiwiiwn, pnH especially the role 
played by vitamin D, says that cal- 
dtnol, a compound manufactured 
in the body from cholesterol is 
“perhaps the most potent steroid 
hormone known.” It is prompted 
into action by parathyroid hor- 
mone, which is secreted when 
blood levels of calcium drop below 
normal 

A substance called vitamin D-3 
is framed in the skin when the skin 
is exposed to ultraviolet light. This 
same vitamin is found m some 
foods, primarily fish liver oils and 
fortified milk products. Vi tamin D- 
3 is inactive unless further 
cessed. The liver transforms D-3 
into cakidiol the main verson of 
vitamin D found circulating in tbe 
blood. When more calcium is need- 
ed in the blood, parathyroid hor- 
mone is released. It stimulates the 
kidneys to convert cakadiol into 
calcitnol or activated vitamin D. 

Caldtnol in turn, acts on three 
major tissues: It irihanrag calranm 
absorption through the intestinal 
waU, it facilitates removal of cald- 
um from banes and it causes tbe 
kidneys to reabsorb more of the 
7,000 to 10,000 millig rams of cald- 
um that Mrh day spin into the 
urine. Tbe net effect is to raise 
blood levels of caldum to normal 
which completes the cyde by turn- 
ing off parathyroid hormone. 

If the Mwint of natrium avail- 
able through the intestine (that is, 
through dietary sources) is not ade- 
quate to keep blood levels up, the 
bones, which serve as a cakaum 
bank, make up for the shortage. 
When calcium withdrawals are 
chronic, as they would be in people 
who perpetually absorb too Hule 
dietary caldum. the bones gradual- 
ly weaken. 


£1 Million for New Natterjack Habitat 

LONDON (AP) — British Nuclear Fuels says it will spend about £1 
million ($1.42 million) to create new breeding pounds for about 500 rare 
Natterjack toads that live in the path of a planned railroad on the site erf 
the company's complex at Sell afield in the northwest English county of 
Cumbria. 

The company said it would dig new ponds, divert a stream and 
landscape an area with the toads' favorite soil and plants. > 

Immune System Affected by Sunlight 

EDINBURGH (Reuter) — Sunshine can temporarily lower tbe body’s 
defeases against disease and unleash latent viruses, according to research- 
ers at Edinburgh University. They said some people were at risk from 
even brief exposure to sunlight, not enough to cause a sunburn. 

A team led by Dr. Mary Norval reported after two years of research 
that the immune system appeared to be suppressed three to ten days after 
exposure to the sun. The subjects were vulnerable to new infections and, 
if they had latent viruses, to eruption of the viruses’ symptoms. 

Two viruses in particular appeared to be unleashed. Dr. Norval said — 
herpes simplex, which produces cold sores, and papilloma, which pro- 
duces wans. The project was the first major study combining research 
into these two viruses and the effects of ultraviolet light. 

Heart Disorder Called Unpresentable 

EVANSTON, Illinois (WP) — The most common congenital heart 
disorder, ventricular septal defect, cannot be prevented, aside from good, 
standard prenatal care to avoid premature birth, a new study concludes. 

Dr. Thomas B. Newman of the University of California at Sar 
Francisco said in an announcement about the study: “Beyond the wc 
definitely known causes erf VSD. which are premature birth of the baby 
and a family history of congenital heart disease, we can find no other risk 
factors. The incidence of VSD seems to be the same everywhere." 

Tbe disorder, in which there is a hole between the two ventricles of llu 
heart, must be corrected with surgery. It occurs in about 3 of every l,00f 
births. Dr. Newman reported his findings in the journal Pediatrics. 


ted Early Trauma, Agoraphobia Linked 


WASHINGTON (WP) — Major childhood traumas, such as separa- 
tion from a parent, appear to be one factor that leads to agoraphobia, tin 
fear of open spaces or fear erf leaving the house. Italian and Briiisl 
scientists report in the American Journal erf Psychiatry. 

Comparing two similar groups of 31 adults, the team found tha 
agoraphobics had almost three rimwc as man y “major traumatic lift 
events," usually between ages 4 and 15. These included death of a pares 
or other relative living at borne; separation from a parent for at hast a> 
months; and divorce or separation of parents. 

£3 Cholesterol-Binding Protein Made 

SAN FRANCISCO (UPI) — American and Israeli scientists usin; 
genetic engineering say they can manufacture the protein apo-E, wind 
removes cholesterol from the blood, in sufficient quantities to study bev 
the substance works. 

Dr. Robert W. Mahley of the University erf California in San Franciso 
said: “Apo-E is very important in cholesterol transport, and yet ii i , 
difficult to study because it is found in such small quantities in the plasm, 
of normal humans or animals We need large concentrations of apo-E u 
work with to see how it affects cholesterol metabolism." 

With larger quantities of apo-E, Dr. Mahley said, scientists can 
the structure of the protein's molecule and might someday create an ape 
E molecule that would bind cholesterol to its receptors more effective) 
than the natural form does. Dr. Mahley was reporting in the Proceeding 
of the National Academy of Sciences on work done with Tikva Vogel am 
Marian Goreciti in Israel. 

Cheaper Hepatiti&JB Shots Are Tried 

CHICAGO (UP!) — Innoculstion withhepatitu-B vaccine, whose ca 
precludes its use in much of the world, can be effective in as tittle as one 
tenth the usual do6e, according to doctors at Walter Reed Army Institiu 
in Washington. 

Dr. Robert Redfidd and colleagues reported in the Journal of th 
American Medical Association that tbe weaker vaccine was administer . 
in a shallow injection under the skin rather than deepin the muscle. Oni i 
one of 25 subjects failed to respond to the dosage. Dr. Redfidd said. 1 
The vaccine has been available since 1982 at a cost of $160 to $151) 
treatment Hepatitis B is a scourge throughout the Third World and i 
considered the leading cause of cancer in young men in many pans i 
southeast Asia. 


Pope, in Annual Christmas Message, 
Calls for a Just, Sober, Godly Society 


Reuters 

VATICAN CITY — Pope John 
Paul n, in his traditional Christmas 
message, urged Roman Catholics 
to build a society based on sobriety, 
justice and godliness. 

Tbe pope, giving his traditional 
Urbi el Orti (To the City and the 
World) message from the balcony 
of St Peter’s Basilica, said Wednes- 
day that a “mass of suffering” 
weighed on humanity but that 
Christ’s birth symbolized the first 
step to creation of a new people. 

This people will know “how to 
be sober with regard to tbe re- 
sources of the universe and wise in 
tbe use of the energies of its own 
mind for it knows how to resist the 
false mirage of a progress that is 
indifferent to moral values," he 
said. 

Society also should be fouuded 
on justice, be said, urging “a people 
ever aiming at tbe goal of a more 
authentic community of persons, in 
which every individual will feel ac- 
cepted, respected and esteemed." 

The pope, whose address was 
televised live to more than 40 coun- 
tries, wished Christians “Merry 
Christmas” in 51 languages. A 
crowd of 50,000 in Sl Peter's 
Square was present for the speech. 

Pope John Paul celebrating his 
eighth Christmas as head of tbe 
church, said society should also 
open itself to God “from whom it 
expects the constant support need- 
ed for traveling forward along the 
road of true progress, toward tbe 
goal of the meeting with Christ.” 

■ Faithful Gather in Bethlehem 

Earlier, Dan Fisher of the Los 
Angeles Tones reported fiirn Bethle- 
hem: 

Pilgrims greeted Christmas in 
the city of Christ's birth as Israeli 
and Palestinian officials expressed 
hopes that 1986 will bring true 
peace to the Holy Land. 

Visitors crowded into the Greek 
Orthodox Church of the Nativity, 
built over the cave said to have 


been the birthplace of Christ, and 
the adjacent Roman Catholic 
Church of Sl Catherine for a mid- 
night mass. 

But tbe crowd in Bethlehem's 
Manger Square, where tourists 
could view tbe mass on a large 
outdoor television screen beneath 
dear but cold skies, was smaller 
than last year. 

Israeli tourism officials said 
about 15,000 pilgrims arrived in the 
country for die Christmas season, 
down about 25 percent from last 
year. They attributed the drop on 
hijackings earlier this year of TWA 
and EgyptAir airliners and tbe 
Achille Lauro cruise ship. 

Bethlehem's Palestinian mayor, 
Elias Frqj, later hdd his dor’s an- 
nual Christmas Eve cocktail party, 
which was attended by Prime Min- 
ister Shimon Peres. 

“Let us aB pray that in 1986 
there will be peace in the Holy 
Land, where the Arabs and the Is- 
raelis can live in peace, in security, 
as good neighbors, as free neigh- 
bors and coral neighbors, as neigh- 
bors who will work hand in hand to 
improve the qoality erf life for all 
the people in the Holy Land,” Mr. 
Frey said in welcoming remarks. 

In response, Mr. Peres said, 
“There is an air of peace blowing in 
our region; let us learn to breathe it 
properly." 

Mr. Pdes said that since last 
Christmas, when he became the 
first Israeli bead of government to 
visit Bethlehem for the holiday cel- 
ebration, there has been important 
progress toward peace. 

“Since we met here a year ago, 
there is one war less — ibe trou- 
bling war in Lebanon.” the prime 
minister said. “And there is one 
rhnnrf more — the completion of 
an agreement with Egypt And 
there is a suggested bridge across 

the Jordan River — to open negoti- 
ations to solve tbe conflict both 
with the Jordanian Kingdom and 
the Palestinian people." 


■ Hess’s Release Urged 

The president of West Germany, 
Richard von Weizsficker, urged the 
Soviet Union Tuesday to release 
Rudolf Hess, former deputy to 
Adolf Hitler, the Associated Press 
reprated from Bonn. 

In his Christmas rrymmo t- Mr. 
WtizsScker also called on South 
Africa to free the blade activist 
Ndsra Mandela, head of the out- 
lawed African National Congress 
who has been jailed since 1964. 

Hess, 91, the last surviving mem- 
ber of Hatter's inner circle, is serv- 
ing a life sentence in West Berim's 
Spandau Prison, where be is the 

only r enttining ipmnt» 

The Western victors of Wodd 
Warn — the United States, Britain 
and. France — have expressed will- 
inguess to free Hess for humaniter- 
fan reasons, but the fourth Allied 
power, the Soviet Union, has 
blocked his release. 

The West German president 
urged tbe Russians to “give relief to 
the very rick” physicist Andrei D. 
Sakharov, the Nobel laureate who 
has been exiled to the dry of Gorky 
for his dissident activity. 

Mr. WeizsScker acknowledged 
that Hess was “truly no champion 
of human rights or freedom.” 

“But Hess has been serving a 
sentence 44 years now,” he said, 
raking into account Hess’s wartime 
internment in Britain. 

In Landau, meanwhile, . Queen 
Elizabeth II said tragic events in 
1985, including plane crashes, 
earthquakes, famine, volcano erup- 
tions and acts of terrorism, should 
not obscure die “bravery and self- 
sacrifice” of people who help man- 
kiad every day. 

Christmas, she said, “is a time to 
look at the good things of hfe and 
to remember that there are a great 
many people trying to make the 
world a better place, even though 
their efforts may go unrecognized.” 



Spain Promotes Peace Initiative in Nicaragua 


Boris N. Yeltsin 

Official Loses 
Moscow Post 

(Continued bran Page 1) 
Moscow party committee that led 
up to the removal of Mr. Grishin 
became a q uintessential Kremlin 
drama, best followed by reading 
between the lines of newspaper re- 
ports. 

Tbe political survival of Mr. Gri- 
shin, in the absence of concrete 
information, was measured by dip- 
lomats in terms of newspaper arti- 
cles ostensibly about tomatoes, 
eggplants, plumbing and concrete. 

The developments began in July 
when Sovietskaya Rossiya, a party 
newspaper that has championed an 
anti-corruption campaign, criti- 
cized the pace and miality of bous- 
ing construction in Moscow. 

Mayor Vladimir F. Promyslov 
was singled out, but Mr. Gnsfain 
seemed to be the primary target, 
even though he was not named. 
Soviet officials and Western diplo- 
mats said they also expected Mr. 
Promyslov to be replaced. 


Soviet Plane Hijacked; China Returns Passengers 


(Combined from Page 1) 

and declined to answer further 
questions. 

_ “On Dec. 19, a Soviet dvfl avia- 
tion passenger plane, an Antonov- 
24, was hijacked to China,” the 
statement said. “The plane landed 
in the western part erf Heilongjiang 
province. On Dec. 21, crew mem- 
bers and all the passengers re- 


turned to the Soviet Union safely.” 

The Soviet Embassy declined 
comment on the incident. 

G asman, which has no airport, is 
12 mites (19 kilometers) from the 
large Heilongjiang aty of Qiqihar 
and about 500 miles southeast erf 
data. 

Officials from the Chinese For- 
eign Minis try and Soviet Embassy 


in Beijing were sent to Railar to 
handle the incident, the Hafiar ofS- 
dalsaid. 

A spokesman for China’s Civil 
Aviation Administration con- 
Unned the hqackmg but declined 
to discuss it in detail 

Diplomats in Beijing said it was 
the first known instance of a hi- 
jacking to Communist China. 


Six Chinese hijacked a domestic 
airlin er to Sooth Korea on May 5, 
19S3, and requested political asy- 
lum. In a response that led to ex- 
panded ties between Seoul and 
Bdjing, the South Koreans couvict- 
ed the hgacfcers of violating territo- 
rial airspace. . 

But they were released a year 
later and sent to Taiwan, where 
they woe welcomed as heroes. 


(Continued from Page 1) 
to lift the state of emergency, de- 
clare a general amnesty and pro- 
duce a calendar for new elections,” 
Mr. Godqy said. “They didn’t like 
this at all of course, bat they didn't 
reject anything." 

Mr. Ramirez said the two ses- 
sions hdd thus far would be best 
described as “an exchange of ideas 
and delineation of common inter- 
ests.” He said tbe Sandinists should 
lift at least those portions of the 
state of emergency that limit per- 
sonal freedoms before seeking co- 
operation from opposition parties. 

“They have asked that the par- 
ties cer tain statements re- 
garding American aggression,” Mr. 
Ramirez said. “But we view inter- 
nal reconciliation as tbe key to the 
peace process. To a certain degree, 
we are at a standstill, but I presume 
the Spanish ambassador wants to 
push things along.” 

Mr. Cuervo said m a brief inter- 
view that the Spanish initiative was 
not intended to counter U5. policy 
in Nicaragua. 

“We are acting as loyal alli es," he 


Government, Foes 
Call 10-Day Trace 
In El Salvador 

United Pros Inierrtaatml 

SAN SALVADOR — The Sal- 
vadoran government, in a surpri se 
move, has agreed to a 10-day holi- 
day cease-fire previously approved 
by leftist rebels. The truce was tbe 
longest ever called in six years of 
civil war. 

“On the basis of Christmas spirit 
and tbe request of the Salvadoran 
Catholic Church, the government 
of the republic decided to suspend 
offensive actions of the armed 
farces during the Christmas peri- 
od,” said a statement from the of- 
fice of President Jos6 Napdefrn 
Duarte. 

Bm the statement said the mili- 
tary “will remain vigDsnt” during 
the truce, scheduled from midnight 
Tuesday to Jan. 2, because the 
army bad a “constitutional obliga- 
tion to watch over public security." 

The cease-fire, proposed Sunday 
.by Catbohc Archbishop Arturo Ri- 
vera y Da mas, was immediately ac- 
cepted by the rebels. 

Cease-fires fra both Christmas 
and New Year’s have been tradi- 
tional But tbe government's accep- 
tance came as a surprise. A imHtary 
observer had said the army would 
be reluctant to agree to a suspen- 
sion of patrols, counterinsurgency 
sweeps or air raids. 


said, “because we honestly believe 
that a final confrontation and 
bloodbath, which seems more and 
more likely in this country, will 
harm everyone’s interests, includ- 
ing those <rf tbe United States.” 

■ IL5. MDHary Aid Opposed 

The Reagan administration’s ef- 
forts to sound out Congress about 
the prospects for restoring military 
aid to Nicaraguan rebels have 
drawn negative responses over the 
last several weeks. The New York 
Times reported some key legisla- 
tors as saying in Washington. 

“My perception is that at this 


stage it would be very difficult for 
them to get military assistance," 
Representative Dave McCurdy, 
Democrat of Oklahoma, said Mon- 
day. 

Mr. McCurdy, who played a 
leading role in fashioning the $27- 
mfllian nonnrihtary aid package 
approved last July, added. “I think 
there could be a continuance of 

h umani tarian aid.” 

Dave Durenberger, Republican 
of Minnesota, chairman of the Sen- 
ate Select Committee on Intelli- 
gence. said in an interview last 
week that be was nol ruling out 


military aid but thought it * 
“premature for the adminis trate 
to think of escalating or change 
the compact." 

Spending authority for the £ 
milli on rum oat on March 31. a 
the administration has said ii * 
formally bring up the issue in Cc 
grass in tbe Oral months of 19St 

Mr. Durenberger ruled out a: 
turn to a CXA-dixected props' 
which Congress has opposed l 
two years, repeating previous b& 
tions that as long as be remain 
chairman of the mtdQgencc at 
nrittce “they just aren’t going to j 
away with using tbe CIA.” 


Catholics Open a New Era in Beijing 


(Continued from Page 1) 
dal group that runs Catholicism in 
China since Mao forced Chinese 
Catholics in 1 957 to break their ti« 
with tbe pope. 

Because of the break. Catholics 
in China have not shared in the 
changes decreed by the Second 
Vatican Council in 1962-65, such as 
the bedding of Mass in indigenous 
languages rather than in Latin. 

Fra the renovation of the Bri- 
tans Church, winch is also known 
as the Church of the Savior, Beijing 
allocated one million yuan 
($310,000) and made available car- 
penters, punters and masonry 
workers. Helped by volunteers, 
they completed the work barely 24 
hours before the consecration cere- 
mony Tuesday, 

A man of 82 who attended the 
ceremony with his son and grand- 
son recalled being baptized in the 
church, taking his first Commu- 
nion there and later, after earning a 
doctorate in Germany, returning to 
be married there. 

“This was our spiritual home,” 
he said in German. “Now we have 
the building back, but a faith is 
more th an buildings. It is here in 
the heart, and our hearts are still 
yearning fra something the party 
has denied us.” 

He was alluding to the Commu- 
nists' continuing refusal to allow 
formal links between Catholics and 
the Vatican. 

According to official figures, 
there are three milli on Catholics in 
China, 30,000 of them in Bering. 

Fra them, the last few years have 
sera improvements from the Mao 
era, when churches were dosed and 
worship was forbidden. This year 
alone has sera the reopening of 
churches in Bdjm& Sh a n g h ai and 
Tian j in , and the independent Chi- 
nese Catholic group has played 
host to Catholic visitors from 


abroad, including Mother Teresa. 

In Rome, Pope John Paul II has 
responded with conciliatory re- 
marks. but his insistence on recog- 
nition of papal authority has been 
rebuffed here. 

According to the old man wfao 
spoke of the lost link with Rome, 
some believers prefer to worship in 
private rather than attend the offi- 
cial churches. Since many of these 
people had managed to observe the 
sacraments throughout the Cultur- 
al Revolution, be said, it was not 
difficult for thou to continue to do 
so. 


“The feeling for the pope is w 
strong particularly this pope," 
said. Referring to the Poli&h-N 
pontiff, be said, “He is loved b 
fra his strength and his vitality, 

because he, too, has known wii 

is to be a believer in a Comm 
land.” 

From the scene in the B dial 
seemed that for many Catholk 
opportunity to warship open 
bear a choir singing “Kyrir.^ 
son,” to listen to the pralinj 
church bells, even if only on » 
cording, was more compelling^ 
doctrinal disputes. 


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Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBE R 26, 1985 



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Dec. 19 383324 $47538 9J5I 

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Dow Drops as Volume Plunges 


New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — Investors abandoned the 
stock market Tuesday, leaving a vacuum in 
which stock prices fefl sharply Ear the second 

consecutive session 

Because of the huge profits made over the last 
four months, traders and mar ke t analysts Mid |t 
was not surprising that investors decided to 
extend the official one-day break for Christmas. 

“Most of the guys mule a big score this 
month, and they indulged themselves not only 
with talcing profits, but with a holiday,” said 
Alan Ackerman, an analyst with Herzfeld & 
Stem. 

So many people took off that volume an the 
New York Stock Exchange plunged to 783 
million shares, making it the slowest session in 
about three and a half months. That compared 
with 107.9 million shares on Monday and 1 703 
million last Friday. Tuesday’s volume was 
above last year's pre-Christmas Day session, 
when only 55 6 million shares were traded. 

There were just enough sellers this year to 
cause the Dow Jones industrial average to de- 
cline 9.63 points, to 1,519.15. When combined 
with Monday’s 1432 drop, the two-day loss was 
the worst since mid-September. 

Prosperity also may cause investors to remain 
maedve when trading resumes oa Thursday and 
Friday, according to market analysts, who sense 
that prices could drift lower through the end of 
(he week. 

The New York Stock Exchange's composite 
index declined 0.76 point Tuesday, to 1 1935, 
and the Standard & Poor's 500-stock index was 
down 1.43, to 207.14. The average share de- 


clined 23 cents as 971 issues fell and only 534 
advanced. 

The American Stock Exchange index de- 
clined by 0.49 to. 242.49, and in over-the- 
counter trading the NASDAQ index dropped 
by 131 to 32037. 

If there was one factor that kept the pmriyt 
busy it was probably tax-related selling. Tues- 
day was the first time this year that investors 
could take profits on their stock holdings white 
deferring the capital gains into the next tax 
year. 

Taxpayers who sell stocks at a profit between 
Tuesday and the year's end have the option of 
either recording those gains this year or next 
Tax-conscious investors are likely to continue 
selling for tins reason until Dec. 31, .analysts 


American Telephone & Telegraph, trading 
ex-dividend, led the consolidated active list 
Tuesday despite only 23 millio n shares being 
traded. Commonwealth Edison, another stock 
that is trading without the dividend, fdl 1M to 
28%. 

MldCon, with the third-best volume, rose 1% 
to 64 44. An investment group headed by pri- 
vately held Wagner & Brown said that it was 
making progress in getting financing for its 
MidCon bid. On Tuesday, MidCon said that h 
had sued the group. 

IBM, the blue-chip leader that has risen 
sharply in recent weeks, backtracked lift to 
152%, on volume of only I million shares. Pezm- 
zoflrose to 65ft, and Texaco edged up % to 
3016. The companies are negotiating the settle- 
ment of a damage dawn under which Texaco 
may have to pay Pennzofl more than $11 billion. 


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™J5 sI)AY. DECEMBER 26 mug 




WALL STREET WATCH 


End-of-the-Year Strategies 
Offer Some Loss Protection 


By VAKTANIG G. VARTAN 

No* York Times Santee 

N EW YORK — In the four trading days remaining this 
year, stock market investors stiQ have time to 
a variety of tax strategies. Losses may be established 
. . for income-tax purposes in 1985 by selling before the 
dostngbdl on Tuesday, Dec. 31, since the US. Tax Code states 
that such losses are recognized on the date of sale. Losses often 
aretelcen to offset gams and thereby reduce tax liability . 

On the other hand , investors who sell stocks at a profit d uri n g 
the find five days of the year have the choice of declaring these 


gains other on their 1985 rir 

1986 tax form, depending 

npon which year appears most Another WOT to 

beneficial, __ , . . 

“Gains are generally not protect tile gdlll » . • IS 

«cc«ni 2 ed for tax purposes to write, or spJI a rail 
until the investor receives the wme, or &ۥ% a can 

proceeds of the sate,” Stan- option on dtp. ntnA.” 
dard A Poor's Outlook said. r 
“If you sell at a gain in the last 

five trading days of 1985, the trade does not settle until 1986. In 
such & case, according to Tntgmat Revenue Service rules, you 
have made an installment sale and the gain is subject to tax in the 
following year. However, a taxpayer who elects not to report the 
sale on the installment method should «m> in 1985 

income.” 

One advantage of postponing a gain rnitfl 1986 involves what 
economists call “the time value of money.” In simple terms, this 
means that people can enjoy funds otherwise used for tax 
payments for an additional period. 

Certain strategies also exist for “locking in” profits made thi* 
year and, at the same time, postpone reporting of the gain until 
1986. 

Some brokers report that man y clients are using this approach, 
since many have substantial gains in the soaring Stock market of 
recent months. Such a tactic is especially appealing to eftents who 
are fearful of seeing their gains erode next year if stock prices 
dedme. 

T HE time-honored technique for locking in such game is 
called “shorting against the box.” The box in this instance 
refers to the safe deposit box, or account, of the short 
sefler. Although a short sale of this type may be used to carry over 
a profit from one year to the next, it cannot change any short- 
term gams into long-term gains. The holding period for long-term 
capital gains is a minimum of six months and a day. 

Foe example, a person may have purchased 200 shares of a 
stock at $30 in September before the market began its spectacular 
rally- The price of the stock by now may have etimbed to $50. 
This gives the stockholder a “paper profit” of $4,000, less 
brokerage commissions. 

In outer to realize this profit, bat not report it as taxable 
income until 1986, the investor can sell short 200 dimes at 
borrowed stock at $50. The price the investor ultimately receives 
— in this case, $50 a share — effectively is set at the time of the 
short sate Then, next year, the holder can realize this price when 


VW *>MA# LVUg LfVOAUAflA, UL\i 

held in the box, against the short sate: In the process, both the 
long and short positions are closed out. 

Certain option-related techniques also can be used to protect a 
gain while postponing the reporting of the g«m until 1986, 

(Continued on Page 11, CoL 3) 

Currency Rates 


Interest Rales 


D epa rt ** 


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1 month 8U-8H 

iMriH 8- 8V, 

>moo«M e-m* 

* moottn 7*5-8*. 

1 V*or 79W-BK. 

Source; Reuters. 


PA Moaey Market FroiAa 

Dee. 23/S* 

«MnW brack Rootfv Amt* 

M ttov ow ng e Tl cW : 7JA 

TUrnW tekorm* RAM IndMu: 1J2 
Source: Morrttt Lvnch, Teterotn. 


Gold 


DMBHllMe 

CflUJMf* 

IMewloMrta* 


Sauna: Reuters. CoaunenBaak. CridR 
Manual* Bank of Tbkfo. 


Dec. 24 

am. pm. ana 

HmKm 32S.U mss + M9 

CM *037 
ZnMl 324& 32S3S —139 

LMRhM 93US Ckaed -275 

Now York — KS*0 Unch. 

Luxatrwowv. Paris ml London trffleto) R*- 
tnsn; Ham Kona and Zurich aponka and 
dosing prices: Ha w York Comex current 
co nt ract ah ivhxsln US-S per ounce. 
Source: Bouton. 


Markets Gosed 

Madwts and tanks ware dosed Wednesday in tta United States, 
Western Europe, Canada,Somti 

of the Christmas holiday. However, markets were open m Bahrain, Saudi 

« oBb^kXjoofcMOJu 
Bdghim, Canada, Hoag Kong, Italy. Netherlands, 

South Africa. Sweden, Switzerland and West Germany. 


ffieralbS^fcributtc. 

BUSINESS /FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report Pag* 6 


P 


Shake-Up Gives Rougher Face to Lorufon Market IlldlH tO Buy 


Deregulation 
Inflates Salaries, 
Doubles Pace 

By Steve Lohr 

New York Tbna Service 

LONDON — In Ins oak-pan- 
eled office adorned with Victori- 
an prints of gentlemen hunting 
and fishing, Somerset Gibbs 
complained good-naturedly 
about the boom in his 
trade: headhunting for clients in 
the City of London, Britain’s 
Wall Street. 

“The problem for headhunters 
now,” he «wV. gri nni n g, “Jj th at 

there’s too much business.” 

Head-hunting — the recruit- 
ment of personnel, especially at 
the executive level — has changed 
not only in its volume, but in its 
maimer, said Mr. Gibbs, a 59- 
year-old former senior partner in 
a London brokerage house. 

For years, job-bopping in tins 
square-mile (2.6 square-kflome- 
ter) City was conducted by un- 
written rotes of civility. Anyone 
who wanted to leave a co mpa ny 
practically had to ask his boss far 
permission. 

“Bat sow if s all rough and 
tough and there are lawyers lurk- 
ing in the background," Mr. 
Gibbs said. “The old boys’ dub is 
disappearing very rapidly.** 

- Indeed, the shake-up now un- 
der way in the City of London is 
probably die most sweeping lib- 
eralization of a financial market 
to occur anywhere in recent 
years. 

It is a revolution of both struc- 
ture and style. The Loudon Stock 
Exchange is being opened to out- 
siders as part of deregulation. Re- 




Activity on die floor of die London Stock Exchange. 


strictive trade practices that pro- 
tect but also limit the activities of 
brokers, dealers and banks are 
being discarded. 

The deregulation will peak 
next October with what is re- 
ferred to here as the “Big Bang.” 
Fired charges on sec uriti es trad- 
ing will be abandoned in favor of 
negotiated commissions, a step 
that Wall Street took in 1975. 

“Anybody who says he knows 
what will happen in October 1986 
is lying,” says Paul Neild, a seniar 
director at Phillips & Drew, a big 
London brokerage. “And six 
month* after that, anyone who 
says he knows the shape things 
wul be in is also lying.” 

The shift in tz yqfitm is being 
watched with great interest, and 


not just in the offices that are 
expanding around the Gty. De- 
regulation in London, Europe's 
leading financial center, is forc- 
ing change on the Continent and 
may have even a more critical 
impact on Wall Street. 

Brokerages and American 
co mme rcial banks have been, 
scrambling to boy stakes in Brit- 
ish companies as Loudon has be- 
come an in c r e asin gly important 
teg in the tri p od of international 
business with New York and To- 
kyo. 

The sharp inc r e as es over (he 
last year in global equity trading, 
in which stocks of some compa- 
nies are traded almost oontian- 
oody around-the-dock, have led 


American b ro k erage to want 
more of a presence in the City. 

Deregulation in London also 
will allow American c onrm n p raa l 
hunks , to sharpen their Afllt in 
the securities markets as they 
await the possible repeal of the 
GUss-SteagaS Act, which bars 
banks in the United States from 

mOSt Of thff wnritj^ g h manwgg 

The opening of the London 
market, which has been pushed 
by Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatchers government, is intend- 
ed to break up the cozy but m- 

rttat Vmk InnAw 

fi nancial marinate 

The shakeout will transform 
the Qty from a cottage industry 
(Corttened on ftge H, CoL 4) 


India Cracks Down on Its Huge 'Black Economy 9 


Dec.2335 

S S DJ*. FJF. Itu OMr. Bf. IF. Van 
An U rt W 21295 4JM T12J9S* 21775* AUH* &5U* UUS* 139,55 y 

■thmMbi sub 7111 mum ur ism- hjsb — aun aa> 

Fraaktelt 2JBI5 UU SUBS- IMS* 887*5 • AJ93* 1W.1I* L2J95* 

LOMtoKU \M 15713 KM6 24K5D U8| 7M75 1800 2WA5 

Mon uiits ims at mss mm — mam sat snzi um 

NtwYcrlltC] ATOQa 2381 748 UOUO 21231 5127 UV 28210 

Pam 74M nsaa u« — - *m s* ith mjw* smt it«* 

twwo ansa mu km aui un • 7171 wssi - «J7 — 

Zurich 21 885 3800 8400* 27435* 0.7222* 713*3 * AIMS* unfl- 

1KCU BD18 0412 21874 *J0» 149134 24*42 444*87 1X128 XHM9 

1SDU 18880 UMB HO- HA. 1803* 3MD NA 239U 22A992 

Cfcwftips In London ond ZurUA fixings In other European confers. New York rates at 2 PM. 
la) Commercial franc lb) Amou nt s noo dad to hay ana pound tc) Amounts needed to buy one 
Honor C> Unftsot 100 (xj Unttsonjoa M Units of 1AOIX N.Q. : not auotrd; HA.: notamttatM 
(*) To bar om pound: susxm 

0AcrBdsrValnM 

C w igacr par IISJ Cwrmer Mr VS* Canuaor par U34 CDmaocy Mr ULSJ 

taWLMH BJ0 Fta.BWtta SMS Mama 437J0 Soviet ruble 07*42 

to etiiA .8 14731 CrvekAvc. 15080 Mmlm 747 15138 

emr.xM. 1743 Hob® Kong 1 7487 PMLMM 1945 SnwLkrwH 7495 

■m. ito-tr. 5T47 IndtanwM 121803 PartHcote 14848 Tatwaas 3940 

■ndon 948&0B tmtorastab 112540 Saadi rlyd 34302 Thai txM 2*4*3 

C— —8 U975 I mb* 0418 SiOB.* 211*5 1MWM 5*945 

miiiew HIM 33015 mtHteak. 1480M S. Aft-. rand 24511 UA84Mara UTS 

DaaWiKrnw 9.11 IteartHWwa- 038V S.Kor. ana 89233 Vmn. Dotty. 1470 

eunt-paumd 136 MMar.rhia. 243*5 

ma te : 11*73 Irttftc 

SourooK Bauouo do Bonohot (Brutsoto); Banco Ommorctoto HaHana (Milan}; OmnUcal 
Bank {Now York}/ BoaouaHatfonato do Porta IPorfs): Bank of Tokyo (Tokyo); IMF (SDR); 
BAII (dbtor. rtyat dfrhaaU; Gathank (ruble}. Other data hum Router* ma ap. 


Donor D-Mark Frattc SterOmi Prme ECU SDK 
1 maatft MM *%VS*. S-5VV IIM-IIW 1ZM-UW 9M-9W IK. 

lmaNOH HU 49M 4H-4W. llVb-HM. IJhrlJW TOk9*V 8 IV 

3ui— 101 7W-6 4%« 46MVi 1VW-1TW T3W-1SM 9 WH t 

ilMMO 7IM AM MWV5 1186-11 W. 12W-WW W-9H 7<M 

1 rear 7 TWO A. 4 9W-5 416-4W 1196-11 W 7146-1196 9416 796 

Source*: Morgan Guaranty (donor, om. SF, Pound. FFU Ltavde Bank (ECU); Routers 
(SDRJ. Rates appltcab/olo Interbank deposit*. of SI m/tUonmbdmum (or eautvmlmt). 


By Steven R. Wasnun 

New York Tima Service 

NEW DELHI — A wave of ar- 
rests of p m mi nent business execu- 
tives and other wealthy people on 
tax-evasion charges has snalrwi the 
Indian business community and 
stirred a new debate over the coun- 
try’s huge “black economy” of illic- 
it and underground business activi- 
Ues. 

Almost every week for the last 
several mouths, tiie Finance Minis- 
try has been announcing annther 
raid or seizure of assets ami records 
of a wdtaonnected business execu- 
tive — in one case holding a power- 
ful Bombay industrialist in custody 
for more than two weeks. 

Business executives who have 
praised Prime Minister R^iv Gan- 
dhi for his program of tax cuts and 
curbs on government regulations 
are flow angrily charging that he is 
singling them out far punishment 
for political reasons. 

*T don’t feel any of us can say 
they shouldn’t carry out these 
raids,” said a New Delhi industrial- 
ist acting not to be identified. “But 
tax evasion is a universal problem. 
Everybody does h. Why Jangle out 
the businessman?” 

• Indeed, a recent government re- 
port concluded after a two-year 
study that last year there was $30 
billion worth of activity in die 


U.S. Cites Rise 
In Orders for 
Durable Goods 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Durable 
goods orders to UJ5. factories 
increased in November for the 
first time in three months, and 
although much of the growth 
was attributable to a surge in 
miHtazy orders, some analysts 
say it could mean growing de- 
mand for UiL goods next year. 

The C ommerce Department 
mi Tuesday reported (hat or- 
ders for durable goods — items 
expected to last for three years 
or more — rose OJ percent in 
November. That compared 
with a sharp 2-percent decline 
in the previous month, and a 

TSta^JKtas wcwd^thflrein- 
creased only a slight 0. 1 percent 
during November if not for a 
17-2-perceal jump in mifitaiy 
goods orders. 

Analysts also noted that the 
csvifisn capital goods category 
— which is considered a due to 
plans for industry expansion 
and modernization — fell 1.4 
percent. Bui that decline in- 
cluded a sharp drop in orders 
for civilian aircraft, without 
which the category would have 
grown 102. percent 

John Albertme, president of 
the American Business Confer- 
ence, a coalition afhigh-growth 
companies, said he believed 
capital spen di n g w ould be “sur- 
prisingly robust” next year. 

“As the effects of the drop- 
png dollar and falling interest 
rates are frit in the marketplace, 
I think we wi9 see a azable 
increase in new orders for do- 
mestically produced capital 
goods,” he said. 

For the first 11 months of 
1985, orders for durable goods 
have risen a sluggish 3.6 pei^ 
cent, reflecting the strong for- 
eign competition aided by a 
strong dollar. 


VJP. Singh 


black economy, where taxes are 
avoided illegally. That represents 
(me- fifth of India's gross national 
product, the total measure of its 
goods arid services. 

“Our qualitative judgment is 
that die malting of black incomes 
has become a my integral, even 
routine dimension of Indian soci- 
ety,” the report said. It cited the 
practice of false bookkeeping in 
real estate, imports and exports, 
large and small retail operations, 
manufacturing and other areas. 

The report’s estimate attributes 


to India one of tbe highest rales of 
underground economic activity in 
tbe wudd. Many expert s ben eve 
that the black ly ptriutpa 

twice as big as the report says. 

The raids have thus struck dose 
to home f or countless people and 
become a major topic tk conversa- 
tion. 

Among the prominent people ar- 
rested recently was Kap al Mehra, 
pliairmoi i rd th^ Oriray ofllf laflh in 

Bombay. He was held for question- 
ing for 18 days, drawing cries of 
protest from the Bombay Mer- 
chants Chamber. 

And SJL Kirioskar, 84, chair- 
man of the Kirioskar Group, one of 
India’s biggest conglomerates, was 
arrested bat released on baiL Same 
business executives called tins a 
“ humiliat i o n” for an elderly man 
who had been associated with In- 
dia's independence movement. 

One Bombay businessman said 
the charges of under-invoking 
against Mr. Kirioskar were en- 
gaged in by 90 percent of India’s 
business community. 

When he took office last year, 
Mr. Gandhi said he would try to 
cut down an illkat economic activi- 
ty, but until recently many people 
criticized him for doing nothing in 
thin area. 

Defending the recent raids. Fi- 
nance Minister VJP. Singh said that 
they woe aimed at complementing 


Fed Criticized Over Junk-Bond l imit 


By Nathaniel C Nash 

New York Tbna Service 

WASHINGTON — The Reagan 
administration, displeased by wbai 
it considers to be an attempt by the 
Federal Reserve Board to slow the 
number of corporate takeovers, has 
criticized the oaatnl bank’s pro- 
posal to limit the use of bekjw- 
mvestment-grade bonds in such 
takeovers. 

In a public comment filed with 
tbe central bank, tbe departments 
of Justice, Treasury, Labor and 
Commerce, along with the Office 
of Management and Budget and 
the Council of Economic Advisers, 
questioned the Federal Reserve’s 
legal authority to apply margin- 
requirsztent rules to takeovers fi- 
nanced with so-called junk bands. 

The Federal Reserve is an inde- 
pendent agency that regulates 
banks that belong to its system mul 
conducts monetary polity. Neither 
Congress nor the administration 
has direct asthoritir over it, so the 
impact of Mondays filings was not 
immediately dear. 

The adm in is t ra tion asked the 
Federal Reserve to delay enact- 
ment of the rule, so as to give “in- 
terested parties additional time to 
respond.” 

It argued that the action would 
cripple the takeover market, reduce 
shareholder prices, lead to higher 
administrative and legal costs for 
acquiring companies, cause a great- 
er regulatory burden for the gov- 


ernment and precipitate an m ft nr 
of hostile takeover offers by foreign 

concerns. 

“The board’s proposal would de- 
stroy tire market for corporate con- 
trol, which disciplines inefficient 
m a nag e m ent and enables stock- 
holders to maximize return on their 
investment,” Douglas H. Gins- 
burg, assistant attorney general 
and bead of the Justice Depart- 
ment's antitrust division, said 
Monday. 

Meanwhile, tire Securities and 
Exchange Commission, which en- 
forces the margin-requirement 
rates, filed a comment letter with 
tVifs cdtrsl Monday, op~ 
posing its proposed action. 

Federal Reserve officiate have 
denied that the bank is trying to 
enter the regulation of takeovers, or 
even to limit the debt on corporate 
balance sheets. But the administra- 
tion and regulatory a genda gaw it 
as an attempt by the central bank 
to expand its regnlatoiy turf. 

Moreover, the move seems to hit 
at the core of the adnmustratiaii’s 
free-market philosophy. The level 
of response, marshaimgjust about 
every agency and branch with an 
interest in the takeovo- market, was 
a barometer of how threatening the 
admmistration felt the Federal Re- 
sere's action to be. 

The implication of the adminis- 
tration’s filing was that it would 
join in any court dia fl ea g e to the 
proposed rule; but it did not overtly 

threaten a legal challenge. 


The Fed’s action, according to 
some Washington sources, could 
lead to a chafing of relations be- 
tween (he board’s chairmm^ Paul 
A Vdcker, and the Treasury under 
Secretary James A Baker 3d. 

Mr. Vokker has made it dear 
that he dislikes the amount of junk 
bonds used in takeovers. He fears 
that too much corporate cash will 
go to paying interest on tbe high- 
mterest-rate bonds; instead of pro- 
ductive assets, which could cripple 
the economy in the event of a reces- 
sion. 

On Dec. 10, a divided board of 
governors at the Federal Reserve 
voted, 3-2, to impose restrictions 
on takeovers that used the debt 
from so-called shell corporations 
with no tangible assets to purchase 
the stock of another corporation. 

The Federal Reserve said that 
after Dec. 31 it would begin apply- 
ing margin requirements, under 
Regulation G of the Securities and 
Exchange Act of 1934. Under tbe 
regulations, only half of the Guano- 
ing for a stock purchase can come 
from debt r 




Weekly net asset valiie 

Tokyo Pacific Hokfings NX 

on Dec 23 , 1985 : U.S. $ 152 . 89 . 

Listed on the Amsterdam Stock Exchange 

i i » torairtio n:Plcr»on, ll rtdri nH *P»ui»onlLV 

HaraogrocM 214, lots BS Amsterdam. 


ADVERTISEMENT 

SEUS HOLDING PLC 

(CDBfl) 

The undenigued announces dur as bom 
3rd January 1986 at Kas-Assodatie 
N.V., Spuia traal 172, Amsterdam, 
22 of tbe CDRo Sears 
Holding Pie, each rep r. 100 ahs. i 
25 p* wifi be payable «nib Dfls. 3^4 
(re interna dividend for the year iwIitm 
3 1st Jannaiy 1986) 9p. per sham. Tax 
credit £.3857 - Dfls. L55 per CDft 
Non-residems of the United Kingdom 
can only dam this tax credit when ti» 
relevant Ox treaty meets this facility. 

AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY N.V. 

Amsterdam, 19th December, 1985. 


21 Helicopters 
From Westland 


the policy of lowering tax rates and 
“rationafiring” the tax systan. 

“The biggest assurance of com- 
pliance with the tax structure is its 
reasonableness,” Mr. Singh said re- 
cently, adding that since taxes had 
been lowered, business executives 
-would have to adjust to a “new 
culture” of obeying the law. 

‘Todustryhastogivenpthisphi- 
losophy that only by oonnxvasce of 
the laws can it flourish,” he de- 
clared. 

Few finance ministera in Indian 
history have been as blunt as this, 
and Mr. Singh has won widespread 
praise for his efforts. The minister 
acknowledged thm he had dealt the 
system “a shock” but denied that 
anyone was being harassed. 

Yet tbe Finance Ministry said 
recently that the number of arrests 
of promment people had been in- 
creased on purpose. 

“We are paying less attention to 
petty violations and going after the 
bigger fish,” a ministry spokesman 


Conyikdby Our Staff FnmDapeldm 

NEW DELHI — India has de- 
cided to bay 21 hdteoptezs from 
Britain's troubled Westland com- 
pany, which is at the center of a 
takeover battle^ and another 21 
from nationally owned Aerospa- 
tiale of Fkance, a government offi- 
cial has said. 

The dedaon involves Westland's 
W-30 Westland helicopters and the 
French group’s Danphin helicop- 
ters. Jaadish TYtler, the minister for 
dv3 aviation, was quoted Tuesday 
by the Press Trust of India as say- 
ing they would be used for ml ex- 
ploration pud passenger service: _ 

Sources dose to Westland said 
tbe British portion of the transac- 
tion was worth £65 million ($92 
mflHonX 

In London, a Westland spokes- 
man ?««( “we have not yet had 
confirmation of the contract, but if 
it is true, it s good news.” 

Tbe order could be important to 
Westland, which is on the brink of 
ryiTlnjw ^iww>iKa» of ilS failure to 
gam contracts on the W-30 helicop- 
ters. 

“Any enter we get win obviously 
be good sews,” the spokesman 
said. 

Westland, which has reported 
losses of £98.7 milli on this year, is 
w eighing bids from a U.S.-ItaIian 
partnership and a European con- 
sortium that includes Aerospatiale. 

Skadaky, a unit of U.S.-based 
United Technologies Corp. and 
Fiat SpA of Italy, have offered £30 
million for a 293-percent stake in 
Westland. 

The European group, which also 
includes Agusta SpA of Italy, Mes- 
sasdtnnidt-BOlkow-Blohm AG of 
West Germany and tbe British 
groups General Electric Co. and 
British Aerospace PLC, have bid 
£37 milHnn for a wmifar jntOCSl 


The offers have been st the heart 
of a bfcter tmnistcriai dispute tn 
Britain. Leon Brittan, the trade and 
industry minister, backed the 
Westland board’s initial deostoo to 
accept the Sikorsky-Fiat o!te. 
white the defense secretary. Mi- 
chael Hesdtine. supports tbe Euro- 
pean solution. . . 

pi y^iptinns between Britain and 
India had continued for two y ears. 
although any possible sate at umes 
seemed jeopardized by fros ty re ta- 
tions b e tw een the two countries. 

fnHia cofnplaincd that tltc Brit- 
ish government had not taken a 
tough stand on some Londoo- 
based Sikh extremists preaching so- 
cessjcmism and terrorism in India. 

Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher of Britain discussed the 
helicopter sale when she visited In- 
dia fay* April and when Prime Min- 
ister Rrjjiv Gandhi of India visited 
Britain in October. 

Mr. Gandhi told the Indian Par- 
liament in May that Britain had 
threatened to cut its development 
aid to India by £45 million because •. 
of India’s refusal to buy the heti- , 
copters costing about £65 million, 1 
Mr. Gandhi, who is a pilot, also 
said in May that tbe helicopters 
were not suitable for use in India’s ; 
coastal areas and were very expos- - 
rive. 

A spokesman for Britain's High 
Commission said Wednesday, 
“Ibere have been certain modifica- 
tions in the helicopters for Indian -« 
conditions — in tbe weight factor.] 
and other aspects.” ^ 

He also said there were soo*^ 
rhatip-c in the fiimwaal package,? 

but did not give any details. "Tbs * 
contract should be signed shortly,*^ 
the spokesman said. <1 

Mr. Tytler said that the fledMlEj 
42 helicopters would begin opera&| 
ing next October. (AFP, \ 


Singapore to Tighten 
Stockbroking Rules 


Almost $150 rmUkm in business 
and individual assets have been 
seized this year, nearly two-thirds 
more than last year. And Indian 
news organizations have reported 
that the number of large companies 

“We have been tdiMr^higb- 
ups,” a tax investigator in Bombay 
(Continued on Page 11, CoL 1) 


Rouen 

SINGAPORE — The govern- 
ment plans to institute more con- 
trol over the Singapore Stock Ex- 
change under draft laws to be 
introduced in Parliament, accord- 
ing to Finance Minister Richard 
Hu. 

In an interview published in 
Tuesday's Business Times, Mr. Hu 
said that amendments to the Secu- 
rities Industry Act would bong the 
stockbroking industry into line 
with changes in the Banking Act 

Mr. Hu said the new laws would 
require broking firms to observe 
capital-to-asset ratios and “pra- 
denUal” debt ratios. 

"Tltey will also have to conform 
to limitation on exposure to a sin- 
gle customer,” he added. 

The minister said the govern- 
ment wants broking firms to in- 
crease their capital bases by allow- 
ing banks to take equity, a move 
drat he said has been strongly re- 
sisted by the exchange. 

“And we are even prepared to 
consider foreign securities compa- 
nies to take equity in local stock 
brokerages,” Mr. Hu said, adding 
that such participation would have 
certain limitations. 


Under existing rules, outside 
stakes are limited to 25 percent of 
total paid-up capital of a broking - 
firm. The stakes arc required to be 
in the farm of preference or prefer- 
ence participating shares, which do 
not cany voting rights. 

Such shareholders arc not at ‘ 
lowed to transact any business ao, 
behalf of the broking firm iq which 
they have a stake, nor can they, 
appoint directors. The outsider: 
shareholders also may not be fmaiv-' 
dal institutions. 

Mr. Hu also said the amended, 
act would ensure that external au- 
ditors report on the exchange’s in- 
dividual member firms in much the' 
same way as they do for the tranks. 

The changes also would allow 
the fi n a n ce minister to nominate 
nonxnembcrs to sit on tbe stock 
exchanges’ management co uun it- 
tee, he said. . .j 

The m dra ngp now is managed i 
by a five-member committee das-/ 
ed annually from among exchanges 
members. The committee is respon-j 
able for rules and bylaws govern-' 
ing operation and adimm c tr u r u T n/ 
of listing rules and enforcement of ] 
corporate disclosure policy. ^ j 


Bong Kong Reports Narrowing 
Of Its Trade Deficit in November - 

Reuters 

HONG KONG — Hong Kong recorded a trade deficit of 159 . 
rmllion Hong Kong dollars ($2038 million) in November after having! 
deficits of 368 minion dollars in October and 39 rmfliou dollars infl 
November 1984, according to the Census and Statistics Depmtmentl 
Total exports in November weare 20.17 biSioQ dollars, upfrcwJ 
19.60 baiion dollars in October and 19.71 bfflion defflaxs mNovembefl 
1984, the department said Tuesday. ® 

Domestic raporo were 1 1.45 billion dollars, up from 1 1.16 bfltiofl 
dollars in October but down from 1 1.70 billion wrilais in November! 
1984. Re-exports rose to 8.72 billion dollars from 8.43 billkra dollars 
in October and 8.01 billion dollars last year. 

r n^^C 5 10 ^ billion doOais in November 

from 19.97 bdhon dollars in October and 19.75 Mlkm dollars ip. 
November 1984. . - ■ - 

The results gave Hong Kong a.trade surplus of 4.1 1 billion dottart i 
For the first 1 1 mouths of 1985, compared with a deficit of L89baIKoft 
dollars for the like period in 1984. :% 

Total exports for the year-to-date were 21336 bffliou doDara 
compared with 20055 billion dollars in the 1984 period. Import* for 
tire year-to-date rose to 20936 billion dollars from 20244 bifliQa 
dollars last year. ■ ; * : 


ADVERTISEMENT 


ffiTACHl LHL 

(CDKs) 


ADVERTISEMENT 


0«OBbor. 198S, at K*Aai ocafc N.V„ 

Swten* 1 72, Anutedom, <Bv. cp.no. 26 

S3T ,i? r B Sa^S 

" Y “ 337.50 " POo 4.73 per 
500 *te 3 .Y«®S, - DO*. 936 
LOCOaha. Without an Affid*- 
2 25i a ** "Yen 450.- - D0t.&3l 


L . » w. OUT 

h* 30% Jap*, tax witn 

«p. DCs. 2122; Dfl*. 50.44 odors CDB. 


He mletwod nmoaMMdiatM 
Junvy, 1986, A KsbAmodsfcXVz 
Spwtwt 172. AoBtadaiB. &v.ta,mJn 

Ufth DO*. 1Q*1 arnofCDR ^ £ W > 

•k. and wtdi Dite. U/raWMp^FjCDK. 
nor. 1.000 ofao. hfi*.- per ranSdri ■ 

Jm- 

I - Dfc9jBporO)lCi«|toXWP^®t ; 

out an AOhuiSM Sea. too >■ 

I DO*. %S per OR. w.aOQ 
- do*, ldftjw-d*. 

he .WooST «T«r 0«ca9e6 


AMSTERDAM DETOSTEARY 
COMPANY H.V. 

Aanfandam. 16tfa Dwtmle, 198S, 


with nap- DO*. 9.96; DOlI 
CDH.t3c.nop.200oodlJ( 
■coonloDce irkkdie JowO« 1 


AjznastWm. ISthI 










t 


Tuesdays 

NM3E 

Gosnr^ 

TcMtt Include flw nalfoowide prices 
up ta me dosing on Wan Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 




3m Ruvfvin ua v 
«% Road St X4 X 
ReMrizn iu 
m RrenEq __ 

7 RHm 33 3A 
8% Reaca 

1» S&C JO 24 
S RtoAtr 
It RrgAwt 
7ft RpCvPS JO U 
30ft RaoNY 1 M U 
19 RNYpf 112 U 
24% RNYptCXW US 
S2ft RNVpfA6X1«U,l 
27% Raafik 1A4 5.1 
24% RspBkPfll2 72 
Ui* RrtCof J3 U 
23% Rwvco JO XI 
10% R*v*re 
32% Revlon IJ4 12 
93 RvlnpfBUB 9J 
10% Rwfun JO 24 

tWi B a. n . 1 11 IX 


«S 


54 W 54 ft— ft 
4V. 4% 

M 6ft + % 
14% 1» + ft 
M% 24%— Vi 
42% 43ft— ft 

n ia% + ft 
UK 18ft— ft 
46ft 46ft— ft 
Wft 14ft 


63 33 QuakOt 140 24 15 <70 57% 56% 57ft— ft 

25 17ft QoafcSO J0O X7 17 100 22ft 21ft 21ft— % 

10% 5 Quanex 19 106 6 5ft 6 + ft 

34ft 27 Qusstar 172 54 12 322 32ft 31% 32 + ft 

35 15% Ok Rati 34a J 20 226 21ft 31% 31ft— ft 


LIS. Futures 

Via The Associated Press 


5ft RSffld 
34ft RCA 
30% RCA P# 
B1 RCA pf 
32ft RCA pf 
4ft RLC 
3ft RPC 
14ft RTF 
ftft Radio 
33ft RatsPur 
5ft Ramod 
16ft Ronco 
2ft RansfO 

52 Ravan 
9ft Rtnrmk 
19ft Ravnrn 


High Lxn* 


Ml 7 61 5ft 

1.04 17 22 8644x59% 
3J8 7J 6601 50 

400 27 40 135% 

345 87 9 42 

20 24 26 494 8% 

ISO 3% 
SO 21 11 37k 21ft 

10 210 15% 

1J0 11 15 094 48ft 

20 1233 7% 

44 43 10 12 20 

2365 3ft 
44 5 21 222 m 

2 11% 
43 20ft 


5ft 5ft 
59V» 59% + % 
49% 49ft— 1ft 
135 1 15ft— ft 

41% 41% 

8ft 8Y» — ft 
3ft 3% 

21ft 71ft + % 
15ft 15ft + ft 
47ft 45ft + % 
7ft 7% 

19% 19ft— ft 
3ft 3ft 
07ft 00 —1 
11% 11%—% 
20% 20% 


Open High Low Ooso Os. 


bason Saason 
HWi Law 


Open High Law Ckna 


Groins 


236J0 14250 Mar • 

239-00 199.00 May 

Ete- Soles Prow. Salas 

Prov.Ooy Open lot. 12742 
SUGARWORL0 II (NYCSCEI 
llZOQOUn.- cents par U>. 

775 300 Jon 

973 134 Mor 

7.15 35B MOV 

670 379 Jwl 

6- 95 474 Sea 

7- 20 402 Oct 

775 675 Jan 

7M 441 Mar 

Esi. Scries Prev. Solas 

Prav. Oar Open Int. 97771 

COCOA {NYCSCEI 
TO mMc Ians- Spar ton 
2192 1955 Mar 

2422 I960 MOV 

2429 1960 Jul 

2430 2023 Sep 

2425 2055 DOC 

2385 2029 Mar 

Est. Soles Prev.SalOf 1 




pi 









2385 2029 Mar 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 1475 . 
Prav. Day Open Int. 17423 

ORANGE JUICE fNYCEJ 
16000 IPS' cents per I b. 

18000 11170 Jan 12200 12340 

177.50 11750 Mar 12500 125J0 

162J0 11175 May 1MX0 12575 

157 SO 11140 Jul 13600 136J0 

1BQJ0 111.00 Sep 

125-00 11 7 JO Nov 

11300 11200 Jan 

16175 111.50 Mar 

Est.Sates 2400 PnrZsateS X174 
Prav.Oay Open Int. 1X942 UP 212 


119 JO 12100 
122.80 12190 
12300 12650 
12X50 12500 
122 50 
12200 
12370 
12360 
12160 





60% 37ft Xerox 100 5J 19 3454 57ft 55% 56ft 


56ft 48% Xanwpf 545 100 5 54ft 54^6 Sfli 

29 20ft XTRA 44 27 13 29 23 22% 22ft 


30ft 

24ft ZotaCp 

U2 

4X 13 

423 

29% 

29 

29 — 



.12 

U 43 

1412 

7% 

7ft 

7ft— 



At 

X 18 

418 

59ft 

59 

59ft — 


14ft ZanltfiE 
17ft 2mi 


963 

408 

19ft 




32 

U 19 

77 

22ft 

32% 

22ft— 

41% 

24ft Zwnln 

1X2 

XL 14 

30 

3Mk 




NVSEH^dons 


SBft 50% —1 
121b 13 +% 
25 25 

2ft 2ft— W 
29ft 29% 

4ft 4ft— % 
14% 14% — % 
27ft 28 + ft 

13ft 13ft 
1 6ft 16ft— % 
10 % 10 %— % 
lift 11% 

raft 12 %+ ft 

53% 54% + % ; 
49 49 +1 

lift Mft +1% 
76 76 —1 

72 73 

73 73 

29ft 29ft— ft 
69ft 70 —ft 
89% 89% — ft 


ACSCptr 
AmHarltU 
Be tog Hem 
CWE 724W 
Excetsr inS 
HonJItn Sec 
LlLCapffi 
SL Indus* 
Teladyna 
WUHarJim 


EntaxEno 

PrudRtyCa 


AJvcsIGrv 

AadrsCMv 

BuynUGspf 

CewiNG 

Firestone 

HouaWMU 

ssEsF 

Tannc748pr 

WolM160pf 


Atexondrs 

APPWJHPI 

ContVfPS 

cum 

RBnkFlos 

lndiM275pt 

OtiEdlSQol 

StdPrud 

TPacfcerov 

WamrCeoi 


AlttedPfd 
BancCtrl n 
OnG47$Pf 
Curtiss Wrt 
GonlDovlwf 
JwnesRiver 

SlgreN < Bra 

UnEI213Pf 


IP Timber n LaorPatevp 
TalBdadlpM UnltDrlll 


WkHRSBl48 
WOKSv Si 1J 
WpNJm 140 13 
WaltJ pf L00 180 
WcrttJpf 160 27 
Women J8 27 
WmCm 

WtomrL 156 13 
WtnbGs 164 7J 
WshHot 1XB 61 
WSbWt 248 ULI 


31ft 31 
25% 25% 
6ft 6ft 
31ft 30% 
2Bft 27% 
23 23 

39ft 39 
43ft 42ft 
r 10 10 

57 57 

30ft 30ft 
37% 35ft 
48ft 47ft 
22ft 22 
26% 25ft 
24ft 24% 


31 — % 
2S%— ft 
6ft + % 
31ft + ft 
38ft— ft 

29ft + ft 
42%-% 

£ft + * 
37% +lft 
47ft— ft 
22 —ft 
+ * 


Industrials 


LUMBER CCMEJ 
1 30000 bd.M-1 perl JXObd ft. 

187X0 13360 Jwi 147JB-T49J0 

19SJJ0 139 J0 Mor 15150 15430 

17640 14530 May 158-00 15HJ0 

18100 14*48 Jul 161-90 T 62 J 0 

176.00 152.90 S«P 16650 16670 

jeUB 15650 Hoy H680 16686 

171 .to 1&6X0 Jan 

Est. Sales 234 Pray. Salas 515 

Prew. Day Open Int 6485 all 65 
grrtgw2(NYCEi. 

50000 Ibs^ cants par tb. 

7675 5671 Mor 6150 6156 

7010 5690 May 61X5 61 XS 

70X5 57 JO Jul 5615 5620 

(A PI 5B60 Oct 

99.25 040 DaC 49X5 4935 

5075 50JS MOV 

Est. Scries 300 Pnev.SofaS 600 

Prav.Oay Open bit. 21409 up 45 
HEATING OIL OfYMEl 
42X00 got- cants per oaf 


747-50 MUD 
ioa 15L20 
157 JO 15650 
161 JO 14270 
16180 16670 
16680 16S5Q 
16650 


61.15 6MS 
6090 6098 
5610 JUS 

4925 

ss 


U.K. Reports Decline 
Of Oil Production 
In tlie North Sea 

Reuters 

LONDON — Oil output from the U.K. sec- 
tor of the North Sea fefl in November from (he 
levels recorded in October, according to the 
Royal Bank of Scotland PLC. 

The bank’s production index, base 1980, 
dropped to 161.6, a fall of 5.5 points from die 
level of October, when production came close to 
the record levels of January. Last month’s index 
figure, which was down 1 percent from the level 
of November 1984, represented an average dai- 
ly output of 2.66 million barrels of crude ofl. 

The bank said Tuesday that production was 
m a rg i nally lower across two-thirds of the 30 
producing fields in the UJL sector and that the 
overall fafl in output was expected to continue 
in December. 

The bank said the greatest declines were in 
Britofl PLCs Beatrice field, where both plat- 
forms were closed for maintenance in the early 
part of the month, and in two British Petroleum 
Co. fields. Forties and Buchan. 

It said Forties is currently producing at only 
75 percent of its potentiaL 

The bank said total North Sea production for 
1985 was expected to average 2.6 million bands 
a day, up I percent from the 1984 totaL 


GM Said to Ready 
Financing Plan 

By John Holusha 

New York Times Service 

DETROIT — General Motors Corp. will 
offer 7.9-percent financing on some cars begin- 
ning on Thursday as an incentive to increase 
flagging sales, according to auto industry 
sources. 

Several GM dealers said the incentives would 
be offered on about half the automobile giant’s 
product tine, including the Chevrolet Nova, the 
product of GM*s venture with Toyota Motor 
Corp. The program is expected to extend 
through February. 

If there was any surprise in the GM plan, it 
was the attention the campaign will draw to the 
slow-selling Nova, a key part of GAfs effort to 
hold on to part of die small car market through 
various alliances with Japanese car makers. 

Auto industry analysts had been predicting 
that GM would be forced to offer some form of 
incentives to dean out stocks of unsold vehicles 
if it hoped to meet its ambitious first-quarter 
production schedule. 

There was no comment from GM on the 
predicted action, nor any response from the 
other auto companies in Detroit, which are 
dosed for Christmas. 

More than one miltion GM cars have piled up 
in dealers’ lots as November «nd December 
tales slumped after the expiration of a 7.7- 
fjercent financing campaign in October. Dealers 
save an 85-day supply of cats, well above the 60 
days’ supply considered normal. 

Chrysler Corp. currently has an 8.6-percent 
financing rate, cm- rebates of $500 to $1,000, in 
effect for most of its smaller and midsize cars. 

Ford Motor Co. is offering 7.9-percent fi- 
nancing on its subcompact Escort, Lynx and 
EXP models, and the program is due to expire 
Jan. 2. However, if past practice is any guide, 
Ford will be forced to respond to GM*s incen- 
tives to avoid losing market share. 


Goimmiities 


London 

Commodities 


Cash IVices 


Dec. 24 

SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
u^ipefBooca Prrr. 

Hteft Low 

tetlW 

Santa 

Steb N.T. H.T. 

X2LU 

32790 

Mor N.T. N.T. 

33040 

329 JO 

Apt ILT. N.T. 

33120 

Now 

Jun N.T. N.T. 

Uotuma: € lots of no «. 
Scarce: Reuters. 

N*w 



Omrency Options 


PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE -**.*■* 

ttJOi artlhR Pwrt*-coif»Per onH. 

*£f So? i » j « . 

. Lgxi Mi 045 r r r ^ > 

sajqo Cunodkw D-riRjrvc*at« pte u«H. r 

% I J f -1 l ; 

Sw2 * r r I- 0L3« 

3992 41 r U1 OX i r 094 

: 

«ay. Jn — g y «R-WCfta of a Cttif par unn. r r 

% 8 ; i S ; > p 

J9J3 2 r r l » tiM 

JtJJ « 1J0 r f 1 T r 

4633 * r r l r r r 

SS 30 0X6 r r r r 044 

51 X 0X8 s ' r r 

fU3 . H r <UJ 2 5 * r r 

Wncwwliyormif. r *" r 

| 1£ tu F 85 


JM T- BILLS UMNO 
*1 million ots of Hopcf. 

WJ6 8640 Mar 9121 9128 

JUO 07X1 Jim 9114 9118 

go* am Sep 9194 92J6 

J244 B9^ Mar 9242 9243 

22 S3 Jun 92.17 9117 

U£S S® s* 

«71 92 M Dec 9249 9169 

fS-Seto* „ . Prev. Sates 2.133 

Prav. Dav Open Int 36941 off 35! 

I!J5l T, 1 Ea SU ry ' (CBT1 

1C 

89-2 DfC 

8 S» 

H » g BS 8® 

83-21 5+29 Sep EH 816 

£29 56-25 Sc &3J BMO 

IP SS US’ s% 

S& 84 IS M 814 

n-ra 67 mqt 80-22 00.22 

66-25 Jun 

-■W, TWO Sop 

^ 91-11 91-15 

3 ' J«* 9M6 90-16 

BM6 538 ft *■ *■» 

M S3 H SS 

SS Sfl is 


93.19 9130 
9113 9114 
9295 9295 
9242 9242 
92.17 92.17 
91X2 
92X8 92X8 


92-13 9W6 
91-21 9>22 
9030 
908 


84-71 8+25 

£T Sf 

81-15 81-15 
81-2 81-2 
8023 
8014 8014 
807 
802 


91-10 91-11 
90S 908 

809 809 

8011 


9238 9228 
92X0 92X0 
9248 
9226 


Stock Indexes 


SP COMP. INDEX(CME) 

< 7!4JB° Od l£30 Mar 2iue 210« Z9L6C 209 35 
22615 U1M Jun 212J5 71 2® 71 HM 21 U5 

221X0 187X0 Ses ZMJS ZU90 21110 2ll£ 

220X0 17840 DM 216X0 

Eat. Sates 40X79, Prav. Sates «H1 
Pnav.DayOMnIML 61377 UP5U89 

VALU E LINE (KCSTJ 
pofotaand cants 

22030 190X0 Mar 21550 21540 21340 214J5 

22730 197X0 JtM 21730 217 JS 216X0 27735 

22640 20005 Step 21J73 

226X0 22UN Dot 22235 

est. solos Prev. Sates 4X31 

Prov.Dav Open lot 16J96 uj»66i 

NYSE COMP. INDEX {NYPE1 

P lSSi flrtd mS Mar 12140 12140 12DX0 I30L65 

12640 MMJ0 Jun 12245 122J3 171X0 121X0 

12740 M8.10 Sop 12X79 12X70 12179 12X15 

DOC 125X0 125X0 «5X0 12640 
Est. Safas 7481 Prow. Sates 10JI1 
Prw, Oar Open Int. 9X41 off W7 
MAJOR MKT INDEX (G&T1 
points one alofrts 

299% Jan 291ft 291ft 288 % 290% 

297ft 273ft Peb 291% 291ft 889 290% 

300% m Mar 291 292 219% 291ft 

Est. Salas Piw.Sofe.. 188 

Prev.Oav Open int- 534 tff!496 


London IVMs 


Ctosa Previous 

Bid A* 950 Ask 

ALUMINUM 
Sterna* per metric ten 
spat 75U0 mao 750X0 731X0 

tonward 77X80 77X90 776J0 777X0 

COPPER CATHODES Often Gradal 
Swrltag par metric tea 
mot 773X0 97150 973X0 974X0 

forward 99450 99551 997X0 fftjM 

COPPER CATHODES (Standard) 


SUGAR 

Steruag gar OKMctea 
Mar I5D40 M7J0 14740 148X0 
May 155X0 152X0 15220 13230 
Aap N.T. N.T. 15740 158X0 
Oct 16440 16460 16260 16X00 
Volume: 421 lots ot SB tons 
COCOA 

stamog par metric toa 

Pec 1.745 1J34 I486 1738 

Mm- 1XW 1^77 1^77 1X70 

Mar 1^91 1X91 1,701 1X03 

Jhr 1302 1X92 17^3 1X75 

1X14 1X12 1X03 1XW 

2SE 3^11 1-512 1525 15S 

Mor 1X96 1X30 1420 use 

Volume: 869 tots oMO tens. 
COFFEE 

SterBag per metric ten 
Jan 1730 2490 2490 2495 

Mar 2X10 2J4D 2750 2JS7 

May 2X75 2X10 2X11 2X15 

Jhr 2.920 2X60 2X61 2X65 

See 2X60 2900 2910 2X20 

Nov 2470 2910 2X35 2940 

Jog 2960 2960 2940 2J60 

Volume: 7X63 Ion of 5 Ians. 
Sovrcma; Ba + rs 


149X014940 
154X0 154X0 
153X0 159X0 
16340164X0 


1X44 1X50 
1X86 1X90 
1X92 Ijn 
1302 1 X 04 
1X14 1X16 
1XU 1X10 
1X28 1X38 


2£t0 2X20 
2X78 2X80 
2X30 2X39 
24*0 2X00 
2X30 2X35 
2M 2944 
2MB 2970 


PstsJxtf 

Joe Ptfc Mar Air 
VHVH - — 

1/16 1716 - -i 
1/M 37U 7716 - 


(pot 92850 950X0 

forward 983X0 905X8 

LEAD 

SierBOB per metric ten 
spot 764-53 24100 

forward Z7SX0 275X5 

NICKEL 

SterUna per DHdrtc tea 
Spot 2815X0 2S2SX0 

tarward 2860X0 28MJJ0 

SILVER 

Pnce per troy aanez 
»POt «1J0 46200 

forward 413X0 41150 

TlNtStaadwdl 
Sterling mt metric tea 
6P0t Stars. Suw>. 

forward SUSP. Susa. 

ZINC 

Sterling aor Metric fan _ 
spot 458X0 460kBD 

Source r Reuierx 


968X0 961X0 
905X0 990X0 


247X0 268X0 
275X0 278X0 


DM Futures 

Options 

K Sena* *art-BUBB marks, on Is Mr a 




411X0 41200 
421X0 434X0 


467X0 469X0 


Die. 24- 

Strike CafcMtta PetsSeme 

Price Mar .tee Sep Mar A* Sep 

31 237 2X6 - 8.10 635 150 

39 1X9 2.14 237 031 140 876 

ft 894 IS 159 U* 0X9 1.12 

4i axi ix» ud i-2i ixo ixt 

e us on i.ii i.« 207 m 

43 - Oft - - 238 - 



Commodify Indexes 


Close 

Moody's Cisd-f 

Reuters 1.777.20 

DJ. Futures. 131.97 

Com. Research Bureau- 230X0 

Moody's : base 100 ; Dec 31, 1931. 
p- preliminary; f- find 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. 18, 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec 31, 1974. 


it 


Previous 
937X0 f 
1,788X0 
131X2 
229X0 




Official at British Steel 
Is Appointed Chairman 

The Associated Press 

LONDON — The deputy chair- 
man of British Steel Corp., Bob 
Scholey, will become chairman of 
(he state-owned corporation next 
April, die government announced 
Thursday. 

Mr. Scboley, 64, who has been 
deputy chairman for 13 years, will 
succeed Sir Robert Haslam, who 
will become chairman of the Na- 
tional Coal Board. Sir Ronald Hal- 
stead, 58. wifi succeed Mr. Scholey 
as deputy chairman 


Average Beijing Salary 
Increased 30% in 1985 

Ageace France - Presse 

BEIJING — The average 
monthly salary of workers in Beij- 
ing increased 30 percent this year 
to 1300 yuan ($406), the Xinhua 
news agency said, quoting Mayen- 
ChenXkocg. 

Mr. Chen said Tuesday that the 
average salary of peasants working 
in rural areas around Beijing had 
mewed up 13 percent to 750 yuan. 
Foreign experts estimate that infla- 
tion in China this year was around 
20 percenL 


Qtibank Plans 

Japan Expansion 

Ageuce France- Prexsc 

TOKYO — Citibank plans to 
establish a retail banking network 
here by acquiring a local bank in 
the Tokyo metropolitan area, the 
newspaper Asahi Shimbun report- 
ed Wednesday. 

Alan Weber, a Citibank vice 
president, was quoted as saying 
that the New York-based bank was 
considering opening more than 50 
brandies in the Tokyo area by ac- 
quiring a Japanese bank in the mu- 
tual savings and loans business. 

The bank now has six brandies 
in Tokyo, Osaka and other major 
cities in Japan, but it opted to pur- 
chase a Japanese bank rather than 
expand its existing network be- 
cause of the Japan’s rapid moves 
toward banking deregulation, Mr. 
Weber said. 


Cammoifltv M Unit 

Const 4 Santo*, lb — 

mnietatE 164730 28 w. Vd _ 

steer biileh cpiwj. tan 

Iron 2 Fdrv. Philo, tan 

sasg fft pjgfgEE 

Copper elect. n> ______ 

Tte isirtrifs). tb 

OntE. St. L. Basis, lb 

PaUadhKTvac - 

Sflwr M.V- or — 

Source: AP. 


Japan to Reduce 
Plywood Tariffs 
ByAprilofl987 

Agence France- Prase 

TOKYO — Japan decided 
Wednesday to lower import tariffs 
on plywood by about 5 percent in 
April 1987, despite a U.S. demand 

u and raductkms, 
the Kyodo news agency reported. 

Tariffs on softwood plywood, 
which comes mainly from the Unit- 
ed States and Canada, would be 
raiuced to about 10 percent, from 
15 percent, Kyodo quoted govern- 
ment officials as saying. 

Tariffs on hardwood plywood 
from Indonesia and other South- 
east Asian nations would be re- 
duced to between 12 and 16 percent 
from the present 17 to 20 percent, 
depending on the thickness of the 
wood, Kyodo said. 

Japan might officially convey the 


the two countries hold a subcabi- 
nei- level meeting in Washington 
Jan. 8-9. 


THE INTERNATIONAL 
MANAGER 

A WEEKLY GUIDE BY SHERRY BUCHANAN 
WEDNESDAY IN THE IHT 


lJ^h^lJJCjhs 


























































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 26, 1985 


Page 9 


INESS ROUNDUP 



ouse 



ueraldine Fabrikanr 

;» York Times Serna 
YORK: — Westinghouse 
,. 3 ofp.has signed as agree- 
* sen its Group W Cable 
-y to five cable operators, 
of about $2.1 bOhon. 

: been negotiating for sever- 

n s with various ladders. 

[yers are American Tetevi- 
i mtn i mi ca dims, which is a 
vc. subsidiary, Tete-Com- 
•ons, Comcast Commum- 
ad two smaller companies, 
. k Associates and the Cen- 
uhwest C ommunications 


_ proceeds from the sale 
. 51.6 billion, hot that tax 
: would make the ultimate 
ghly S2.1 billion, or about 

iBnSding Orders Fall 

Semen 

. '0 —Orders from Japan’s 

retraction firms feu 18.3 
n November to 955.44 bfl- 
'.($475 billion) from 1.17 
-en in October, when they 
to 22.4 percent from Sep- 
the Construction Ministry 
Wednesday. 


S1J050 per subscriber for cadi of 
Group Vs appnoarimatdyjtwo mil- 
lion subscribers. Grom W is the 
third biggest UKcabte television 
operator. Cable systems have been 
selling for about 51,000 per sub- 
scriber. 

. Each of the three principal buy- 
ers, Tune, Comcast and Toe-Com- 
munications, will contribute 20 
percent to 30 percent of the pur- 
chase price, or op to $500 million 
each, according to Bernard Gal- 
lagher, the treasurer of Comcast. 

The buyers are expected to di- 
vide op me systems among them- 
selves, with each keeping those that 
are adjacent to cable systems they 
already own. Some analysts said 
Tuesday that the price was average 
for the cable business and that the 
sale looked attractive for Time and 
the other buyers because of the 
price, the potential economies of 
scale and flexibility in their own tax 
treatment of the purchase. 

For Westmgfaouse, the transac- 
tion would result in an after-tax 
book gain of about $500 million, 
based on current tax rates. 

Westinghouse paid $646 million 
when it bought Teleprompter in 
1980, assuming about $300 million 
in debt. Westmghop.se subsequent- 


ly invested about $800 nrilHm i in 
me cable systems. However, the 
electronics and dectrical equip- 
ment manufacturer wrote off a 
large percentage of that sum for tax 
purposes. 

As a result, for book purposes 
the_ investment was less than $1 
billion, bringing pretax profits on 
Tuesday’s sale to about $700 mil- 
lion, or £500 million after tans. 

Westmghousc said h. plans to use' 
the proceeds to retire short-term 
debt related to the repurchase of its 
stock and to finance acquisitions 
related to its restructuring. 

As pm c# that restructuring pro- 
gram, Westinghouse has said it 

would buy back 25 million rimes, 
or 14 percent, of its common stock. 
Since ih&l program was announced 
in late August, the company has 
repurchased 21 miQioa shares at an 
average price of $4225. 

Westinghouse stock dosed on 
Tuesday at $44.25 a share, down 
37% cents, on the New York Stock 

Exchange. 

The sale, which should be com- 
pleted by 1986, includes all Group 
W Cable properties, except far two 

C hi c ago f ranrfris g y raim-ntTy U n de r 
construction and several smaller 
systems bring sold separately. 


MidConSues 
Takeover Bidder 

The Associated Pros 

, LOMBARD, Illinois — Mid- 
Can Carp, said it has sued a 
partnership attempting a hos- 
tile takeover, alleging violations 
of federal securities laws. 

WB Partners said Monday 
that it had received commit- 
ments covering more than two- 
thirds of the financing needed 
for its 52.7-bChon cash offer to 
acquire MklCon, a natural-gas 
pipeline company. MidCon's 
board rgected the offer mid au- 
thorized an offer to buy back up 
to 10 miffing shares df its own 
common stock in a S75-a-share 
cash and securities stock swap. 

In several lawsuits filed Tues- 
day, MidCon asked for an in- 
junction. a pinff the takeover, 
accused the defendants of 
"making misleading statements 
or omitting pertinent informa- 
tion in the tender offer.** WB 
P art ners is a partnership of 
Freeport-McMoRan Inc., a 
New Orleans energy and mma- 
als company, and Wagner ft 
Brown, an ml and gas concern 
based in Midland, Texas. 


Renault Puts More Cash Into AMC Texaco Gets 

Financing 
From Banks 


By John Holusha 

Ne w York Tbna Sendee 

DETROIT — American Motors 
Corp. said it has received another 
injection of cash from its French 
parent, Renault, in the form of a 
sale of $50 mill i nn in debentures. 

The transaction brings Renault’s 
total stake in the smallest of the 
UK-based auto companies to $645 
million, inefudiog the S405 million 
U spent to buy 46.1 percent of 
AMCs common stock. 

The action, taken on Tuesday, 
does not affect Renault’s owner- 
ship position, an AMC official 
said. 

AMC did not say what the funds 
were to be used for, but the compa- 
ny has been steadily posting losses 
while trying to develop newlines of 


cars to add to its slow-selling Alli- 
ance and Encore subcompacts. 

The company’s losses in the first 
three quarters of 1985 total $11$ 
million. AMC was marginally prof- 
itable in 1984, a banner yearfor the 
UK onto industry, with profits of 
$1 5 million, but it reported aloss of 
$147 minio n in 1983 and $154 mil- 
lion the previous year. 

Renault recently made manage- 
ment changes at AMC Pierre Se- 
merena, 58, formerly an executive 
vice president of Renault, was 
made chairman Jose j, Dedeur* 
waerder, also a former Renault ex- 
ecutive, and AMCs president since 
1982, was retained as chief execu- 
tive and was made chairman of the 
board’s executive committee. 

Since the French government- 


owned Renault gained control of 
AMC in 1979, the company has 
concentrated on modifying for the 
UK market cars developed by Re- 
nault, as wdl as selling Renault 
models imported from France. 

In addition to the Alliance and 
Encore, AMC is planning to intro- 
duce a high-performance model 
the Alpine, m America by 1987 and 
is budding a factory in Brampton, 
Ontario, to build midsize cars. 

AMC officials have also report- 


anese automobile companies about 
the possibility of importing a mini- 
ear to compete with the low-priced 
models coming from South Korea, 
Taiwan, Yugoslavia and other for- 
eign locations. 


EDS Withdraws Proposal to Acquire Logica 


ter First Year , GM-Toyota Plant Called a Success 

ivative Contract Involves Workers in Decisions, but Not AH Are Happy 


.'Henry Weinstein 

» Aegdet Tima Senior 
fONT, California — One 
.. a the first Chevrolet Nova 
, xl off the assembly tine at 
-dashed General Motors 
■ re, the joint venture be- 
M and Toyota Motor Co. 

- tmiWl as a major success 
■r experts and union and 

officials. 

Ve made fabulous pro- 
a relatively short period of 
lid David Cole, director of 
eenty of Michigan’s Office 
^ tody of Automotive Trans- 
\ who visited the J^ra- 
~ plant last month. 

! jon BphHn, vice president 
nited Auto Workers mrion 
Ms is a dramatic step for- 
tbe proper ntilfoatmn of 
resources in an American 

3 £ Warren Jr., GM** vice 
i for industrial relations, 
' think they’ve done a very 
j of taking an American 
. -ce and making it very ef- 

' oint-venture company, 
ew United Motor Manu- 
tg Inc., is known as 
L 

M Mono, coordinator of 
ffrirs, and other company 
praised the way American 
ire responding to manage- 
. xhods adopted from the 
system. It calls for much 
ployee involvement in the 
turn of production than in 
US. factory. 

'NUMMI system meets 
re to expand their capabil- 
id Mr. Mizuo, who is on 
NUMMI from Toyota, 

- worked in labor relations 

- are. 

enutives of labor and 
mi jointly “lay out the 
i sequence of work, and 
job themselves," said ffiH 
the company’s general 
of human resources. ‘This 
departure from the Ameri- 
-af w«irinj > a car.” 
am is not without prob- 
• t the workers’ generally 
racoon is considered par- 
noteworthy. It is the first 
janese company has oper- 
as plant in the United 
ng veteran union workers. 
. 90.percent of the hourly 
s worked at the GM plant 
ne site before it closed in 
82. That work force had a 
a for militancy and absco- 
nd Toyota officials were 
to retire many of them. 
w same workers are pro- 
uu they and company of- 
*s a veiy high quality car, 
..aceot to 70 percent of the 
D Japan. In the first ran- 
three of 20 cars audited 
srsonnd were rated “pes:- 
icb is unusual for any 

roves that what GM said 
people was wrong," said 
ano, the UAW’s bargain- 
ottee chairman, who led 
to get Fremont workers 
if ter GM and Toyota 
rir accord in February 
r people can lake care of 



The Chevrolet Nova made in the joint venture. 


business if they have the right in- 
centives. GM could have done the 
same thing. There’s no magic.” 

The “same thing,” Mr. Nano 
said, Pimm treating workers with 
dignity and malting use of their 
brains as weflas their bodies. 

Primarily under the management 
of former Toyota officials, the 3.1 
million-sqnare-foot (280,000 
square-meter) Fremont plant is 
serving as a laboratory for several 
experiments in labor relations. 
Among innovations for a UK fac- 
tory is the deep involvement of 
workers in quality controL 

“The Japanese have shown great 
patience," Mr. Warren said, “and a 
great deal of effort goes into train- 
ing and d eating with errors: the 
willingness not just to repair a 
damaged part but to stop at that 
point and go back and determine 
what caused that damage and take 
care of it right then and there. 

“In American industry, we tend 
to run and make volume. We tend 
to make repairs and go on, not to 
seek the cause of d a m a ge ." 

Mr. Nano and Jod Smith, the 
union's regional director in Fre- 
mont, lauded the company’s den 
mand for quality from its suppliers 
as wdl as its workers. 

Mr. Nano noted that glass with 
imperfections that GM had previ- 
ously accepted had been sent back 
to a long- term supplier. 

Still, problems lurk under the 
surface. Some workers fed that the 
assembly line moves too fast. They 
say that union representatives, 
many of whom spent two years 
unemployed or bouncing from one 
low-paid job to another after GM 
shut the Fremont plant, are unwill- 
ing to push the issue because they 
fear that the venture wiB fail and 
they will be out in the streets again. 

“We don’t have time to inspect 
any more. We glance,” said Rich- 
ard Aguilar, an inspector oo the 
assembly tine. ‘They work us like 
we’re robots. These people saying 
the plant is great haven't worked on 
the assembly tine." 

Similarly, some labor analysts 
say the union's increased role in 
quality control has diminished its 
ability to represent workers aggres- 
sively on the shop floor. 

“I don’t think it's possible to be 
responsible for defending workers 
and also responsible for productivi- 
ty and absenteeism," said Steve Di- 
amond, a labor educator a l the 
University of California's Institute 
of Industrial Relations in Berkeley. 


But Mr. Epktin said he consid- 
ered that the union can shoulder 
both responsibilities. 

“Our first role must be repre- 
senting the people, protecting their 
contractual rights,” he said. “But at 
tiw same time we must represent 
the total work force by making the 
plant a success, a viable and com- 
petitive on&” 

Mr. Smith acknowledged the 
concerns about tine speed and said 
it probably would be crucial to the 
question of whether harmonious la- 
bor relations are mainiainert. Pro- 
duction started quite slowly at the 
plant but has gradually increased,, 
to nearly 10,000 a month. The cur- 
rent goal is to roll one car off the 
line every 54 seconds, a fast rate. 

The plant is tikdy to reach full 
production of about 20,000 cars a 
month in the second quarter of 
1986, using considerably fewer 
workers than a typical UK auto 
plant would. However, Mr. Win- 
gard said jobs mil be continually 
restructured to make them easier 
and more efficient. 

A union committeeman, Eddie 
Valdez, said some workers are find- 
ing it difficult to adjust to the new 
production system. 

‘The new people are afntid to 
speak out, to stop the tine when 
they should," he said. “I think this 
fear will disappear as people be- 
come familiar with the system and 
they’re there longer." 

Still some union officials fed it is 
too early to predict what will hap- 
pen when full production com- 
mences. 

“I can foresee more problems on 
the production side, not having 
enough people to do the work," Mr. 
Smith said. 

But, he said, “If you make an 
argument with management about 
an issue and the foundation of our 
argument is that it affects the quali- 
ty of the product, they listen quite 
well 

“The problems can be solved if 
we try to do it through the frame- 
work as we wrote it," he said, refer- 
ring to the cm tract between the 
UAW and NUMML 

Among the features of the three- 
year agreement signed in June: 

• Workers are given the right to 
stop the production tine without 
fear of discipline if they believe 
they are unable to do high quality 
work safely. This gives the union a 
role in determining the pace of 
work, but the contract does not set 
minimum staffing levels. 


• NUMMI is obliged before lay- 

ing off any hourly employee to re- 
duce the salaries of officers and 
management staff and to restore to 
the bargaining unit any work that 
has been contracted out This is 
unprecedented in the UK auto in- 
dustry, as is NUMMTs agreement 
“that it wiO not lay off employees 
imless conqxlled to do so by severe 
economic conditions that threaten 
the long-term viability of 

the c omp any" 

• In return, the union surren- 
dered 80 job classifications, tradi- 
tionally considered by the union a 
mechanism to guarantcejob securi- 
ty, but considered by managemen t 
an encumbrance to operating flexi- 
bility. At NUMML all production 
workers are in one job classifica- 
tion and skilled trades workers are 
divided into only three categories. 

• The anion receives access to 
confidential corporate data, in- 
cluding annual objectives and 

p lana (nr twhnfllo g al rhangp that 

wffl affect hooriy employees. 

• NUMMI workers got a wage- 
and-benefit package similar to me 
UAW w orkers got after a brief 
strike at General Motors in Sep- 
tember 1984. 

•The company wiQ pay about 
two dozen union members to serve 
as “coordinators” in the plant, as- 
signed to work groups to assist in 
solving potential and actual prob- 
lems. 

• A program has been estab- 
lished to involve workers in deci- 
sion making. The union partici- 
pates in meetings to determine if 
there arc mitigating circumstances 
that should be considered before an 
employee is fired for discrplmary 
reasons. 

Mr. Valdez said the role of union 
nfrifMis is considerably different 
from what it was when GM ran the 
plant. 

“Before, my relationship with 
management was of a confronta- 
tional nature," he said of ULs 13 
years as a committeeman in the old 
factory. 

“Now, my duties are to try to 
make the thing work, working band 
in hand with management," he 
said. “But the union principles 
aren’t lost: if someone is treated 
unfairly, the grievance will be ad- 
dressed." 

So far, there have not been many 
formal grievances filed. 

Thus far, the four-door subcom- 
pacts axe selling fairly wdl, accord- 
ing to GM officials, although the 
backlogs are higher than GM 
would tike. 

About 28,000 of the four-door 
Nova subcompacts had been sold 
through November, Ed Lechtzm of 
Chevrolet: public relations in De- 
troit said, and about 26,000 are 
available at dealers throughout the 
country. 

Hie said a survey of 1,800 buyers 
showed high ratine feu- the car. Its 
base price is $7,435, and with all 
the options it can cost up to 
$10,345- 

Televistim commercials promot- 
ing the car tout “The Best of Both 
Worlds," a reference to the bi-cul- . 
rural manufacturing process used 
in Fremont. 


By Bob Hagerty 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Electronic Data 
Systems Corp., a umt of General 
Motors Corp„ has said that it has 
withdrawn a proposal to acquire 
Logica FLC, one of Europe’s big- 
gest independent computer-soft- 
ware companies. 

EDS said Tuesday that Logica’s 
board had rgected a proposal 
made last week. Terms were not 
disclosed, but at Lopca’s a m ent 
share price the company is valued 
at about £50 mfltion ($72 million). 

Logica has been highly success- 
ful in creating customized software, 
particularly for the hanking , mili- 
tary and telecommunications in- 
dustries. But a d iv ers ifi cation into 


manufacturing of word processors 
and other equipment has foun- 
dered. As a result, Logica reported 
a loss of £3i million on revenue of 
£80.6 million in the year ended 
June 30. 

The company announced last 
week that it would close most of its 
loss-ridden manufacturing opera- 
tions at an estimated cost of £11 
million, which would effectively 
wipe out its net tangible assets. To 
refinance itself, the company has 
arranged to raise £15.1 million 
through a sale of new shares. 

The stockbrokerage of Grieve- 
son. Grant ft Co. forecasts that 
Logica’s mains tream business will 
show pretax profit of £55 million 
in the current year, up from £3.7 
milli on last year. 


A spokesman for EDS said the 
company never intended to make a 
hostile bid for Logica. Philip 
Hughes, Logica’s chairman, said 
last week that a takeover by EDS 
would lead to “an enormous walk- 
out of staff, starting with the senior 
people.” 

General Motors acquired Dal- 
las-based EDS in October 1984 for 
$2.55 billion. EDS has been seeking 
to increase its data-processing busi- 
ness in Europe, where it has more 
than 1,600 employees. 

EDS announced last week an 
agreement under which it assumed 
responsibility for certain data -pro- 
cessing amt communica tions ser- 
vices for Unilever in Britain and 
the Netherlands. 


Vector Graphic Seeks Chapter 11 Protection 


Lai Angela Times Service 

LOS ANGELES — Vector 
Graphic Inc:, which grew from a 
kitchen-table business to the fore- 
front of the personal-computer rev- 
olution, said it has filed for protec- 
tion from its creditors under 
Chapter 11 of the UK Bankruptcy 
Code. 

The company said Tuesday that 
it will keep trying to find a merger 
partner, and that discussions wifi 
continue with Dual Systems Con- 
trol, a privately held computer 
company in Berkeley, California, 
that had earlier agreed in principle 
to merge with Vector and tempo- 
rarily ran the company under a 
management contract 

Japanese Report 
Sees GNP Growth 
Of 3.9% in 1986 

Reuters 

•TOKYO — The Daiwa Securi- 
ties Research Institute has forecast 
that Japan’s gross national product 
will rise by 3.9 parent in the fiscal 
year beginning April 1, a drop from 
this years GNP of 4 percent 

The government has forecast a 
growth rate of 4 percent for next 
year and other major research orga- 
nizations have forecast GNP 
growth of around 3 percent 

Daiwa said Tuesday that the 
economy would be riiiggish early 
next year but would pick up sharp- 
ly later, in line with economic re- 
covery in the United States. GNP is 
the total measure of the nation's 
goods and services. 

Japan’s current account surplus 
will rise to $57.1 billion from $52.1 
bxfficxa this year, the institute said. 
Current account measures trade in 
goods and services as wdl as inter- 
est, dividends and certain transfers. 

Daiwa’s forecast assumes that 
the average value of the yen would 
be be 191 to the dollar in the next 
fiscal year, a significant drop from 
this year’s 222 yen to the dollar. It 
also is based on the presunmtioa 
that there will be a Japanese official 
discount rate cut of half a point in 
April and July 1986. 


Vector’s board “has determined 
that the best means to proceed with 
merger or alternative reorganiza- 
tion discussions is through the 
Chapter 11 proceeding," the com- 
pany said, adding that it will go on 
selling its products and providing 
support to existing users. 

At its peak in its J 982 fiscal year; 
Vector had S36^ millio n in sales, 
$2.4 million hr profits and 425 em- 
ployees. It speaalized in personal 
computers and nmhiaser systems 
favored by small businesses, and 
once was cate of the three biggest 
companies in that field. 

But management miscues and 
the entry of giant IBM into the 
personal computer business sent 
the company imo a steep slide from 
which it has never recovered. 

The 9-year-old Vector now has 
fewer than 30 employees. It report- 


ed losses of S9J2 miQioa for the 
fiscal year ended June 30 and $7.6 
million the year before. Sates plum- 
meted to 55.1 million, from $15.2 
million in the 1984 fiscal year. 

For die quarter ended SepL 29, 
Vector reported a loss $600,000 on 
sales of $550,000. Its stock, traded 
over the counter, was deleted Fri- 
day from the National Association 
of Securities Dealers Automatic 
Quotation System because the 
company no longer meets NAS- 
DAQ’s minimum net worth re- 
quirement of $375,000. 


United Press International 

WHITE PLAINS, New York — 
Texaco Inc. has agreed to sdl up to 
S1.6 billion of its accounts receiv- 
able to a group of American and 
international banks. 

The oil giant, which earlier this 
month had an SI 1.1 -billion court 
judgment against it. said Monday 
that it had completed the agree- 
ment to sdl accounts receivable 
“on a continuing basis" to the 
banks. 

Texaco said the transaction was 
not connected to a possible settle- 
ment with Pemuoil Co-, in whose 
favor the judgment was made. 

Texaco's treasurer, Edward Wo- 
lahan, said Manufacturers Hano- 
ver Bank (Delaware) is the manag- 
er of the bank syndicate. 

He said the purchase agreement 
had been established to support the 
liquidity positions of Texaco and 
its subsidiaries. 

Texaco said last week it was try- 
ing to reach agreement with its 
lenders for a credit arrangement 
that would give it access to addi- 
tional cash and help allay concerns 
among suppliers about being paid. 

On Friday, Texaco asked UK 
District Court Judge Charles 
Brieant to issue a preliminary in- 
junction to stop Peiinzoil from col- 
lecting the record judgment while 
Texaco appealed a Texas jury's 
finding that Texaco illegally en- 
ticed Getty Oil Co. to renege on a 
merger pact with Pennzoil in 1984. 

The judge adjourned the hearing 
after lawyers for Texaco and Penn- 
zoil said they were discussing set- 
tlement. 

Texaco has argued that it cannot 
afford to pay the S 1 2-billion bond 
required under Texas law to appeal 
the judgment 

■ Progress Reported in Talks 

Representatives of Texaco and 
Pennzoil have made some progress 
in talks aimed at settling their dis- 
pute, sources dose to the talks said, 
according to a New York Tunes 
report 

But Baine P. Kerr, a Pennzoil 
director participating in the negoti- 
ations, said: “We're far from agree- 
ing on anything." 


Inti Secretarial 
Positions 


HGM — 

MEDICAL LASER 
SYSTEM GmbH 

On* of tbv Woffd** Uodng 
Mms B ad Uam Monufad um ri 
i» Making 

EUROPEAN 

SAU5 MANAGER 

To be bawd in Munich, W. C aimony, 
at tha InU mtMim i u l Hmdquorten. 

Tha tuccmfid cmUota will Is* re- 
quired to provider technical A Idas 
support to our existing mrtwodc of 
distributors os w*fl as running sand- 

— -Q~ - - ^ - _ _ _ _ , T_ , ,, , 

nears uini axancancmng prarau|iuiiHi 

at inlanwtiaaal aoaforeness and oxhi- 
bifiom. 

A significant amount of tavol is orra- 
aeod. 

Tho idsal crexfidate should haw a 
first hand fcnaw fa dgo of lason and 
preferably son* raadiad ap p li cat i on 
background In it* MA of optomo- 
logy or cordtovascuiar sugary. 

A working knowfedgo of European 
languages b hatpfal. 

SandCV. end Snt Manat lot 
HGM Mos£«4 Losor Systems, 
3959 W. 1820 S., Salt Lake 
City, IMi B4104, U5JL 

Reloca ti on outdance wS be prodded. 


Beyond the debt crisis- 

Latin 

America 

die next ten years. 



London, January 27-28,1986. 

The International Herald Tribune and 
Inter-American Development Bank are 
presenting a major international conference 
cringing together an outstanding group of 
financial, government and corporate leaders, 
to address the outlook for Latin America over 
th e next ten years. 

For full details, please contact the 
International Herald Tribune conference 
office in Paris, 181 avenue Charies-de-Gaulle, 
92521 Neuilly Cedex, Francs. 

Telephone: ($3.1) 47 47 16 86. 

Telex: 613 #5. 


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Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL 


TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 26, 1985 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 26, 1985 


Page 11 


usiaessmen in India 
ebate Tax Crackdown 


> (Coefi^ftw>P»8fc7> 

' “ihit we don’t have to worry 
tt anyone’s political doitf. It is 
. y /tifferent from the old days 
1 one lad to be careful whose 
" flnewas stq^ingbiL n 

„ '\ie odds haw received enor- 
’ *•' 5 pobGdty and contributed to 
GandhTs reputation a s a 
jj” priftrcwn, although it re- 
. • 's undear how many of those 
S ted wifl be convicted. Bet 
1 / of those sympathetic to the 
idown say that the rights of the 

tdants have been trampled. 

; tder pressure from the bosi- 
-• community, Mr. Singh said 
"-^pvermeat wonJd no longer 
' s jut the names of those arrest- 

‘ rhaps the biggest criticism of 

* 'aids has beat that they have 
ooked what all experts agree is 

. jor aspect of the blade econo- 
: -the flow of cash for payoffs, 
•• ' « dr* bribes and “contribu- 

" to bureaucrats and politi- 

" V recently issued 602-page 
. rt on the underground econo- 
;j*e National Institute of Public 
, lace and Policy — asenrianton- 

• ias. group within the Finance 
stry — said that (his farm of 

» l I 


cent years. 

K institute found that a major 
ce of Mack money came from 
siphoned off for bribes and 
frnrfc* no government expendi- 


programs and other ventures. 

S hr ewd that bribes to gorem- 

tcffidalsareroutmdypaidby 
viduals and businesses no war 
*- .to obtain jobs, contracts and 
‘ services as electricity, tde- 
k connections and irrigation 
: X. 

' - fs easy to avoid taxes by falsi- 
3 your books and bribing your 
. through the Income Tax De- 

* meat,” > businessman said in 

• itovfew. “I have friends in the 
' ing business who make huge 
J mrt« ri money and pav no tax- 

-^:alL* 

— institute study also estimat- 
—^hat perhaps 30 percent of the 
~-^cf the 1980 parfiamentaiy etoc- 


tions was funded by black money. 
There was no estimate for the 1984 
election, which was- won fay Mr. 

. G*ndlii and the nilnig (I) 

Party:. 

A “prime cause trf black-income 
generation” is the need for cash to 
make such “coQtritRitioiis, n tbe m- 

stitnte Study cnnunigjaqn R fljd. 

- Mr.Sngh was asked why in vesti- 
gators bmiust arrested any pronri- 
nent politicians participating jg 
tbissystem. He said only that “at 
some stage” die government would 
have to finance ejections to free the 
system of corruption. 

Part of the debate over the raids 
is the question of whether they win 
have any lasting effect. Some ex- 
perts point out that rads had been 
increased in thepast, and that these 
were followed % a resumption of 
the old activities. 

Mr. Singh contended that the 
raids have already begun to wade. 
He said tax revenues in In dia had 
singed more than 20 percent this 
year because of stepped- up tax en- 
forcement and increased economic 
growth resulting from Mr. Gan- 
dhi’s tax cuts. 

One decade ago, tbe marginal 
in c o m e tax rale in India was asTii gh 

as 75 percent. Mr. Gandhi lowered 
it this year to 50 percent, from 62 


PricesinBrazil 

Vp234%m’85 

Reuters . . 

RIODE JANEIRO — Infla- 
tion in Brazil reached a record 
233.7 percent this year as con- 
sumer prices increased 13.4 per- 
cent m December, according to 
statistics released Tuesday by 
the Planning Ministry. 

The previous reflation: re- 
cord, 208.8 percent, was set m 
1984. Most of tbe upward pres- 
sure this year came from the 
prices of agricultural products, 
which increased 280 percent 
An index used by the inde- 
pendent GetaHo Vargas Foun- 
dation also is expected to show 
an inflation rate of more than 
230 percent for 1985, sources in 
the o rganizat i o n said. 

End-of-Year 

Strategies 

(Conthwed from Page 7) 
according to Thomson McKinnon 
Securities Inc. 


Shake-Up Brings Faster Pace, Soaring Pay to London Market 


down to 40 percent as early as next 
year. Corporate taxes, bcensing re- 
quirements and regulations also 
have been cul 

In interviews, several business- 
men said they detected some 
change in business attitudes toward 
taxes, but that it was too early to 
say if the change would be perma- 
nent 

“I think a lot more people are 
going to pay more taxes, with .both 
these raids and with tax rates rant- 
ing down,” one executive said. “A 
friend of mine who owns two shops 
said it would be worth paying more 
just to avoid all this hassle.'* 

A tax consultant said: “My cli- 
ents lell me this year that they want 
U) Show much higher menme than 

last year. I tell than, ‘Don't overdo 
it, because die authorities will defi- 
nitely ask awkward questions 
about this sudden accumulation of 
wealth.’” 


(Continued from Page 7) 
into a maritet with fewer but larger 
. and more diversified companies. 
The hope is that a handful of 
world-scale British firms will 
. emerge in a few years as toe-to-toe 
competitors with the Gkes of Mer- 
rill Lynch and its Wall Street bretb- 

R3L 

Although economic logic is the 
underpinning for the market open- 
ing, the Gty of London is a turbo- 
lent, .anxiety-ridden place these 
days. Many view the the prepara- 
tions far wholesale deregulation as 
speculation because of uncertainty 
about tbe brave new world that the 
Gty will eater with the “Big Bang.” 

Alan Morgan, a partner of 
McKimey ft Co, sees evidence of a 
broader breakdown in the tradi- 
tional “village culture” of the Gty. 

“The gentleman's agreement ap- 
proach was seen to be increasingly 
out of step with what’s happening 
fcr the international capital markets 
and with business realities,” he 


put option an the long stock that 
already is owned by the investor. A 
put contract gives the buyer a right 
to sell a spcdf - il nnmbet of shares 
of a stock at a set price within a 
certain period. 

“Another way to protect the gain 
from market ridt is U> write, or sell, 
a call option on the stock owned,” 
tbe brokerage firm arid- “By writ- 
ing a call option, yon give the buyer 
a rig ht to purchase your stock al a 
‘strike price? for a specific period of 
time for which you receive a prenri- 

nrn " 

Option-related techniques of 
protecting market gains, however, 
are more complicated than the 
more straightforward method of 
shorting against the box. Thus, in- 
vestors who may wish to utilize 
these approaches should first inves- 
tigate an of the posable permuta- 
tions of die options market 

Moreover, since options are gen- 
erally available only in the larger 
and better-known stocks, tbe tech- 
niqnes cannot be used an many 
smaller stocks. 


■ The changes already are evident 
Die pace in the Gry lias quickened 
dramatically, and there is greater 
ewi pbay i y on performance. .Com- 
pensation is increasingly linked to 

results. Workdays tend to start ear- 
fier and end later. Lunches are 
shorter. Die drinks are fewer. 

Salaries also have risen. Thadere 
are now most in demand, and their 
average compensation has quadru- 
pled in thepast two years, accord- 
ing to recruiters. Bonuses for sign- 
ing some traders have ranged op to 

$2 wiiltinn 

“There simply is no Emit” to 
what they, can make, said Mr. 
Gibbs, president of tbe recruiting 
firm Directorship Appointments. 

Whatever tbe shape of the new 
Gty, the biggest global names in 
the banking and securities indus- 
tries want part of it Outsiders that 
have bought stakes in British bro- 
kers and dealers include Gtiraip, 
Chase Manhattan, Shearsou Leh- 
man Brothers, Credit Suisse, Deut- 
sche Bank, Union Bank of Switzer- 
land and the Hong Kong ft 
Shanghai Ban if 

Foreigners are allowed to pur- 
chase British brokers gradually and 
currently may own up to 29.9 per- 
cent of a British firm. That stake 


can be increased to 100 percent 
starting next March. 

So for, nearly 100 British and 
foreign firms have been included in 
deals. 

Tbe buyers are seeking both en- 
tre 6 into new businesses and easier 
access to London’s important 
equity market. The sdtos need ex- 
tra. capital backing, which can be 
supplied by wdl-beded foreign 
parents, to survive in the unregulat- 
ed game. 

Tbe amount paid by both British 
and foreign buyers is expected to 
reach more than $2 ballioa by tbe 
end of next year, when 100 perce n t 
ownership is allowed. 

With new firms arriving and 
trading expected to rise after tbe 
Kg Bang, office space in London's 
financia l district M become scarce 
and expensive. 

A consortium led by Credit 
Suisse-First Boston and Morgan 
Stanley is planning to build a “sec- 
ond Gty” two mOes away in an 
undeveloped dock area on the 
Thames River called the Isle of 
Dogs. 

Die proposed $2Jl billion pro- 
ject, dubbed Canary Wharf, would 
include three tower blocks, shops, 
apartments, roads and parking. 

Die ripples of the revolution ex- 
tend wdl beyond tire Gty of Lon- 
don. 

In Britain, the opening up of tbe 
capital markets has increased op- 
portunities and competition for all 
tbe playera in the financial markets. 
Institutional investor, for exam- 
ple, are now far more aggressive in 
quick profits and are will- 
ing to sefi tireir shares more often. 

Another byproduct is tire recent 
rash of hostile takeovers in Britain. 
Institutional shareholders who 
were once loyal to management are 
becoming less and less so. Their 
rote is critical because they own 
more than two-thirds of British 
shares. 

The Continent also is fedmg tbe 
change. West Germany, France, 
the Netherlands and Norway have 
ill announced steps to liberalize 
their capital markets in recent 
months ! 

“In the European wmrireue Lon- 
don is dearly the pace-setter for 

financial liberalization,” aid Da- 
vid F. Lomax, chief economic ad- 


viser for the National Westminster 
Bank. 

The rush toward deregulation in 
London is partly a game of catch- 
up. By the early 1980s, it had be- 
come apparent that the British se- 
curities industry was lagging 
behind tbe global financial revolu- 
tion, particularly with develop- 
ments m the United States. 

Gear divisions traditionally 
have existed here between different 
types of institutions and fixed com- 
missions on trades. Merchant 
banks managed portfolios and han- 
dled corporate finance and interna- 
tional trade financing. Brokers sold 


end to fixed raramissioas. The deal 
was struck and abolishment was 
scheduled for October 1986. 

In the United States, tbe advent 
of negotiated commissions in May 
1975 brought a sharp decline in 
commission rates on stock trading 
and a shakeout in tbe securities 
business. But the change also 
boosted trading volume and profits 
for the diversified financial giants 
that survived. 

The extort to which the Wall 
Street experience win serve as a 
guide is uncertain. 

For one thing. Loud cm’s deregu- 
lation is broader in scope. Not only 


The changes already are evident. The pace 
has quickened dramatically. There is 
greater emphasis on performance. 
Compensation is linked to results. Workdays 
start earlier and end later. Lunches are 
shorter. The drinks are fewer. 


stock and so-called jobbing fines 
executed the trades. 

Because the fees collected at each 
stage of a transaction Increased 
costs to the investors, trading in 
British equities slipped overseas to 
more efficient markets. Today, tire 
shares of some big English compa- 
nies are traded more actively on 
Wall Street than on the London 
Stock Exchange. 

The Thatcher go v ernment recog- 
nized that the globalization of fi- 
nancial markets was an irresistible 
force. It reasoned that without de- 
regulation, the Gty of London, 
turned as Britain's “fringe of pros- 
perity," might become just another 
dedining Fnglich industry. 

Britain already bad a striking ex- 
ample within hs borders of the 
growth potential of a lightly regu- 
lated market Sales of Eurobonds, 
securities issued outside the home 
country of the borrower, have 
grown from $48 billion, in 1983 to 
an estimated $120 billion this year. 

In 1983, the government used a 
seven-year-old anti-monopoly soil 
against the London Stock Ex- 
change as a lever for change, offer- 
ing to drop the suit in return for an 


are fixed commissions being abol- 
ished, but also the barriers separat- 
ing the activities of different kinds 
at financial institutions. 

The partial acquisitions already 
completed have given big British 
^fimfnwfial hanks , jqwh as Nation- 
al Westminster and Barclays, and 
merchant banks, such as Morgan 
Grenfell, Kkinwort Benson Ltd. 
and S. G. Warburg & Compositions 
in the brokerage business. 

Because such combinations are 
taboo in tire United States, Ameri- 
can banks sneb as rhaw and Gti- 
bank are coming to London to test 
the waters. 

“Getting rid of fixed commis- 
sions in the U.S. was a relatively 
minor development compared to 
what is going on here," said John 
M. Hemoessy, chief executive of 
Credit Suisse-Firet Boston Ltd. 

Much of what happens in Lon- 
don depends on how active the 
muricei* are as tbe deregulation 
goes completely into effect late 
next year. If a worldwide deflation 
takes place, the assumption that 
thinn er margins will be offset by 
higher volume may not prove accu- 
rate. 


Another major question is the 
degree of impact that the big inter- 
national concerns, especially the 
American banks and securities 
houses, wffl have on the market. 

The consensus seems to be that 
the adjustment wiQ come in two 
stages. First, a shakeout will follow 
the consolidation that is now under 
way and probably will last for the 
next two to three years. 

Second, the new firms that 
emerge wifl focus their efforts with 
leaders developing in such areas as 
stock trading and dealing in British 
government securities or “gilts.” 

Ultimately, the theory that un- 
regulated markets generate greater 
wraith and employment should 
hold, most securities executives 
say. “But the road to that higher 
ground,” one London investment 
banka said, “will be littered with 
bodies.” 

How many of the winners wiD be 
British is another question. As the 
market is internationalized, some 
City firms will find it difficult to 
compete, especially with the capi- 
tal-rich American securities houses. 

In merchant banking, for exam- 
ple, tbe roughly 15 firms may be 
weeded down to three or four, 
bankers say. The strongest appear 
to be S. G. Warburg, Klein wort 
Benson and Morgan GrenfelL 

Yet there is some donbi about 
how significant the U~S. companies 
will be. 

While the new environment will 
force British firms to fight for sur- 
vival, the stakes will be far lower 
for U.S. firms. From a Wall Street 
perspective, the amount of money 
to be made in London may not be 
great because the market is much 
smaller. 

The total capitalization of the 
London market is $290 billion, 
compared with $1.7 trillion in New 
York. That means the United 
States bolds 50 percent oT the world 
equity market while Britain holds 
only 9 percent 

But for the American firms, the 
reasons for enlarging operations in 
London go beyond an effort to 
make a dent in quarterly profits. 

“London is the center of tbe in- 
ternational equities market now,” 
said Norman Lawrence, senior vice 
president of Shearson Lehman 
Brothers International. 


t'ii.Mfc 


Tuesday’s 

arc 

Prices 


NASDAQ prlaw«ef 
3 run. New York time. 

Via The Associated Press 


n«. yu. in HUi 


Nat nMNttt 

a P.M. ai» Hina Low stodt 


Safes N 

Dlv. YkL MX* HM> Law ] P.M. i 


IM | H Month 
n watt Lm 


small* 

oat. YM. tot Malt 


Net 12 Montt 

3 PAL CVaa HK*i Lmr 


Dtv. YkL Uti 


Hat I T3ManBt Soto In 

IPJKLCWto HM Low Stock Dtv. YM- life Him 


Net 

1 PA Ctrta 






















i a fit 


is 


6 

7 

B 

9 

is“ 









10 

11 

12 

13 

16 












1 

25 




PEANUTS 


books 


(he HATES CAT&) 


He WANTS A BOOK 
WHERE ALL THE CATS GET 
EATEN BY ALLIGATORS 
. ONTHERKSTPAGEi 



1 HadLhe 
misery 

G Launching site 

10 Ointment 

14 Western 
classic of 1953 

15 Exploiter 

16 Space 

17 Sunup greeting XJ Sc at 

20 Painter, e.g. 

21 Develop a 
liking for 

22 Bulldogs' 
home 

23 Umpire in the 
Hall of Fame 

25 Northern 
. canals 

26 City near 
; Jerusalem 

28 Of a classi- 
fication of 
people 

31 Hussein, for one 

33 Knock over a 
joint 

34"... in 

Kalamazoo" 

38 “Hold the 

!” (diner 

call) 

39 Portray 

40 Philippine 
; Moslem 

41 Further 

42 Nettled 

44 Regal display 

45 Indulged in 
raillery 

48 Change color 


65 Pigment for 
Joseph Turner 

66 Wine: Comb, 
form 

67 "Quien ?" 

68 Pan capable of 
Flying 

DOWN 


1 Dog star 

2 Karate blow 

3 Start of a 
Streisand hit 

4 Famous B-29's 
first name 

5 Narrow passage 47 Small amount 

6 German indus- 49 Marconi's 

trial region interest 

7 Mrs.Gynt 50 Vapid 

8 Lamed follower Nile d .? m 

54 Go be Is wife 


12/ZS/BS 

19 An incarnation 
of Vishnu 

23 Playing 
marble 

24 Founder of 
antiseptic 
surgery 

26 Dalai 

27 Buccal 

29 Vital center 

30 Light source 

32 Goldberg's 

McNutt 

35 " , sweet 

ladies. . 
Ophelia 

36Coxey’s at 

D.C.: 1894 _ 

37 Run easily ” 

42 Like Junior’s 
room 

43 Breakdown 
result 

46 . 

blue": 
Browning 


ANDY CAPP 


9 Guard 

10 Deposit 

11 Jefferson's 
sign 

12 Slowly, to 
Ormandy 

13 Mr. of 

cartoons 

18 Wheel 
projections 


56 Within: Comb, 
form 

57 Prunelle 
flavoring 

58 Honor, to 
Franz 

59 Suffix with fib 
or road 

61 Winner’s cry 

62 Rifle 


© New York Tones, edited by Eugene Maieaka. 

DENNIS TOE MENACE _ 



I THAT SCRAWLED WORO GAME 
| a by Henri AmoM and Bob Lea 


Unscramble these tour Jumbtae, 
one totter to each square, to form 
tour ordinary words. 


CANKS 


txr 

□ 

□ 


TIELE 


□ 


HAPNOR 

1 3 m 



WELLOB 


Q 


n 


SUCCESS IN 

LIFE OFTEN 
PEPENPS ON BACK- 
BONE, NOT THIS. 


Now avenge tha circled letters to 
form tha surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


aw— r^ rm in n 


Tuesday's 

Wednesday's 


(Answers tomorrow] 

Jumbles: TEASE ABOVE PREFER LUNACY 
Answer What soma wrestling is a form of— 
BRUTE "FARCE" 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


ASIA 


MgraM 


Brussels 


Onto mi set 

DetaUo 


Frankfurt 

Geneva 

HebluM 


Uston 


Madrid 
NUm 
Mssoaw 
Man Ids 

wa 

Ode 

ports 

Franc 

Reykjavik 


Stadthelm 

Hnjimrfl 

Vcnlet 

Vienna 


Zqrlcb 

MIDDLE 


Ankara 

■drat 

Damascus 

JeraiaMm 

TdAvtv 

OCEANIA 


HIGH 

LOW 


c 

F 

C 

F 


17 

63 

16 

61 

d 

9 

48 

6 

43 

d 

14 

57 

6 

43 

d 

14 

S7 

7 

45 

d 

10 

as 

-2 

28 

fr 

5 

41 

0 

32 

r 

11 

52 

6 

43 

d 

•1 

90 

-3 

at 

e 

1 

34 

-1 

30 

e 

6 

43 

3 

38 

0 

20 

68 

ID 

SO 

d 

6 

43 

2 

36 

r 

6 

43 

2 

36 

r 

9 

40 

3 

30 

d 

a 

46 

4 

39 

r 

s 

46 

6 

43 

r 

2 

36 

2 

36 

r 

W 

50 

5 

41 

0 

21 

70 

14 

ST 

0 

16 

61 

13 

55 

0 

7 

«S 

6 

43 

ah 

14 

57 

10 

50 

d 

3 

38 

1 

34 

r 

0 

32 

0 

32 

0 

3 

31 

4 

23 

0 

10 

30 

8 

46 

r 

2 

36 

1 

a 

0 

12 

54 

7 

45 

d 

1 

34 

-1 

a 

0 

-4 

25 

■6 

a 

d 

13 

5S 

5 

41 

d 

3 

36 

2 

36 

r 

9 

48 

4 

39 

r 

3 

31 

0 

a 

e 

0 

32 

0 

32 

0 

1 

34 

-5 

73 

It 

5 

41 

0 

a 

r 

AST 




0 

32 

■2 

a 

0 

— 

— 

— 

“ 

M 

13 

55 

1 

34 

no 

fr 

17 

63 

7 

4S 

fr 

23 

73 

16 

61 

r 


■dime 
Hobo Km 
ManHfl 
New Dew 
Seoul 
SMagtKri 


TOM 

Tokyo 

AFRICA 

Aiders 

Cabo 
Can Town 
CaseManca 


HIGH 
C F 
27 SI 
S 41 

n u 

30 86 
21 70 
3 38 

8 44 

30 86 

20 68 

8 46 


LOW 
C P 
16 61 
■6 23 
12 Si 
34 75 
14 57 
-3 28 
8 32 
24 75 
14 57 
3 38 


16 61 6 43 d 
— — “ — na 


Loom 


20 68 13 55 
17 63 10-20 

24 75 17 63 

30 16 24 7S 


Tents 


16 61 


46 


fr 

d 

d 

o 

no 

fr 


LATIN AMERICA 

BOfMSAbOS 32 H 19 66 st 

Caracas — — — — ra 

Lima 26 If 15 S3 a 

Mexico City 21 70 8 46 el 

R lode Janeiro — — — — na 

NORTH AMERICA 


AscfioroM 

Atlanta 


ancon 


26 79 16 61 « WOSfcmtn 

d-daudv; to-toaov; fr -tali’; n-txjil; 
sh-stewenu emwi sl-stannv. 


-I 
■5 
5 
-14 
10 
■13 
26 
5 
31 
20 
-19 

3 
25 
0 
13 

4 
1 

. 0 

oovercost; pcnartly 


Delta if 

HtxuMuUi 

Houston 

Luo A n n i es 

Miami 

Minneapolis 

Miw tracl 


New York 

SaaFrandm 

Seattle 


X 4 

33 -9 

41 2 

7 -21 
50 -a 
9 -16 
79 20 
41 -3 

n ii 
60 16 
-2 -27 

38 -I 
77 17 
32 -1 
53 5 

39 0 

34 -13 
32 -13 
dowdy : 


10 sw 

r-raini 


THU RS DAY’S FOR RCAST - CHANNS L: RouaK FRAHKFURT: RahtTeriW. 
6 — 3 (43 - 38). LOHDOM; Showers. Temp. 7 -S 143— 411. .MADRID: CkMhr. 
Terra 13-10 CS» — SOI. HEW YORK; Fair. Team. -S— -11 CM - I2J. FARISr 
Showers. Tern. 0-6 146-431. ROME: Roto. Twra 1 1— Pl.-. JEj; 
AVIV: NA. ZURICH: Showers. Team 6—3 (43 — Xk “* 5!*®*'® 
KONG: NA MANILA; NA SEOUL! NA SINGAPORE: NA TOKYO: NA 



, THANKS. RAL/OM. 
BV THEVsWV,COUJ> 
X Hdft/E A LOAN 
. OF TOUR NEW 
ELKTRIC DRILL? 






_J 

V-2L <3 

i 

2> 

m i— 

& 

c 

T" ^ — 7 — 



UU i 


1 


WIZARD of ID 



FDR: THE NEW YORK YEARS 

1928-1933 

By Kenneth S. Davis. 512 pages. S19.95. 
Random House, 201 East 50th Street, New 
York, N. Y. 10022. 

Reviewed by Walter Goodman 

T i HE subtitle of Kenneth S. Davis’s second 
volume of biography of Franklin. Delano 
Roosevelt might be “The Composition of a 
President" Davis presents Roosevelt in his 
jmd-40s as an man* possessed of 

anpa«tng char m, immense physical courage 
and instinctive political savvy. But be seemed 
wanting in commitment to any cause but his 
own and had little comprehension of the ideo- 
logical depths into which be was being drawn. 

Roosevelt’s split political personality, be- 
tween expediency and reform, is a main theme 
of TbeNew York Years 1928-1933” The split 
was personified by his advisers. Some of t hem , 
such as Louis Howe, James Farley and Sam 
Rosenman, were primarily loyal to the man; 
others, including Raymond Moley, Rexfard 
Tugwefl and Adolf Boie, early membere of his 
“brain trust,” were churning out notions for 
transforming the economy and shaking the 
power of the big corporations. 

Looking ahead to the presidency at an horn 
of worldwide depression, the potential candi- 
date was confronted with urgent global issues 
that divided his party — the tariff, the gold 
standard, the T J ”g ne of Nations. At home, 
there were farm disasters, bank failures, crush- 
ing unemployment and a spreading mistrust of 
the system. On these ana other momentous 
matters, Roosevelt moved so cautiously that 
his brain trusters sometimes despaired. 

Inte l l ectuals grew somewhat scornful of the 
governor, and leaden of the left became mis- 
trustful. Although Walter Lippmann support- 
ed his election in 1932, it was in a condescend- 
ing spirit. Norman Thomas saw Roosevelt as 
personally responsible for the Socialist Party’s 
failure to win more d«n 3 percent of the vote 
that year despite the Depression; the new pres- 
ident was a portent of ute laming of American 
radicalism. He dragged his feet until attention 
to the “forgotten man” became good politics, 
but when he did act, it was always with high 
spirits and often with dramatic force. 

“The New York Years” is generally read- 
able, despite a few journalistic tics of this sort: 

Solution to Previous Puzzle 


“short, thin, sharp-faced, sharp-eyed Bad 
O'Connor”; “stocky, broad-teed, mrthfdttL £ 
industrious Sam Rosenman. And the fiftal 
few lines, where Davis pulls out all ihe stops, 
makeone wonder what his editor was doing; 

“Fariev listened, deeply moved, even we* 
stnick. The man beside bun shone wilh as 

°“AKJouBide the train windows was n%faL 
-Deep, dark, wintry night 
Such organ music does the book a thssevia, 
Davis is no hagiographer. He is an 
researcher, a fair-minded analyst amt when 
not trying too hard, an inviting chronicler. 

Walter Goodman is on the staff of The New 
. York Times. * 


BEST SELLERS 


TV Nra York Times 

Tim l«t ts tawed on twora Tma tout tfaw LUCQ cwAstart 
itowigbcM *C United Sun, Week* op 6m *rcnot twsswr3* 
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FICTION 


Its 

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OOQO □□□ 

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DBQoaaa □□□ 
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NEXT WEEK,. 
I’LL TAKE IT 


riX MAKE IT A # 
POINT TO BE HERE ! 
IF YOU GO UP 
NORTH SKI1NQ, I 
, WISH YOU'D TAKE 
l YOUR "SISTER WITH 




, i'll ask her 

BUT 1 DOUBT 

[THAT SHE'D 
GO ! 



I'VE GOT TD RUN/ ra 
SEE YOU IN THE ^ 
MORNING, HARRY/^ 





□ 

o 

□ 

in 

B 

S 

E 

0 

Q 

0 

11 

m 


□□□ 



□ 

□ 

□□□□El 

!EIB 

a 

□ 

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□ 

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□ 

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□ 

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B 

□ 

□□□□ 

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THE MAMMOLTH HUNTERS. b> Jean 

LAK^WOBECON DAYsi by Gamson 

Keillor . — - 

TEXAS, by James M. Michcner - 

CONTACT, bv Carl Sagan - - 

SECRETS, by Danicflc Steel . ■•■■ ■■• 

THE POLAR EXPRESS, b? Chn* Van 

Altsburx — - - ■ 

GALAPAGOS, bv Kuri Vonncgoi — 

WORLD’S FAIR! EL. Docmw — 
THE SECRETS OF HARRY BRIGHT. 

by Joseph Wambaugh • - 

SKELETON CREW, bv Stephen Kim 
THE CAT WHO WALKS THROLGH 

WALLS, bv Robert A Hemltin -. - 

THE ACCIDENTAL TOURIST, by Anne 

WHAT S BREDDJ THE BONE.' by Rob- 

enson Davies 

LUCKY, by Jadae Collins 

THE VAMPIRE 


17 

n 

it 

s 

1 

10 

b 


is / 


8 3 


12/25/85 


LESTAT. by Anne Rice 
NONFICTION 

YEAGER: An Autobiography, by Chuck 

Yeager 

IOCOCCA: An Autobiography, by Lee lo- 

I NEVER _ mJaYED' the" GAME, by 

Hcnvand Cosell — — — 

ELVIS AND ME. by Priscilla Bcalieu Pns- 

ON TffiTd^^CTiX^kUR. 

ALT. by Charles Kurah 

DANCDIG IN THE LIGHT. Shirley Ma- 

cLaine 

HOUSE, bv Tracy Kidder 

ANSEL ADAMS, by Amd Adams with 

Marv Street 

SHOOT LOW. BOYS — THEY'RE RI- 
DIN” SHETLAND PONIES, by Lewi* 

GnzzanJ — 

ONLY ONE WOOF, bv James Hcirio: ... 
-YOU can FOOL ALL'OF THE PEOPLE 
ALL OF THE TIME.” bv Art Bocbwald 
MADE IN AMERICA, by Peter Ueber- 
roth with Richard Le vin a nd Amy Oumn 
A LIGHT IN THE ATTIC by Sbd Silver. 

stein — — 

CHARLES £ DIANA, by Ralph G Mars 

CO^ON GROUNDrSf Anihony j. Lr* 

kas 

ADVICE, HOW-TO AND MISCELLANEOUS 

TO BE (HAPPY) ATTITUDES, bv Robert 

Schuller - . 2 

FIT FOR LIFE, by Harvey Diamond and 

Marilyn Diamond — - - 

THE FRUGAL GOURMET, by Jeff 

Smith 

JANE BRODY'S GOOD FOOD BOOK. 

by Jane E. Brody — 

CALLaNETICS. by CaOan Pinckney with 
Sallie Balson — 


U 

60 

10 

w 

If - 

13 

0 


12 


6 

i 

3* 


13 146 

14 h 

- U 


BRIDGE 


GARFIELD 


! WHAT A GREAT CH WSTWai 
JON GOT ME THE PERFECT GIFT. 



By Alan Truscotx 

O N the diagramed deal. 

North and South reached 
a shaky four-spade contract af- 
ter West showed minor-suit 
length with ajump to two no- 
trump. North's doable fol- 
lowed by three spades was in- 
tended to be invitational, but 
South continued to game, per- 
haps thinkin g that dummy 
would be stronger. 

A lead of the singleton heart 
would have been devastating, 
but West led the dob long. 
East overtook with the ace, 
and his return of the singleton 
diamond queen was taken by 
the ace. Sooth drew trumps 
ending in Ins hand and led a 


diamond on which West had to 
play low. When the jack won in 

dummy a dub was led, giving 
West the lead in tins postion: 

NORTH 

* — 

OAKUM 

£ in 

♦ QJ *jn. 

SOUTH 

*11 

VJI 

♦ 10 s 

*— 

When West led the heart 
nine, North found an elegant 
way to succeed. He put up the 
heart king, unblocked the jack 
from this hand and then ndTed 


a dnb. The finesse of the heart 
four then end-played East to 
mnkf* the game. 

NORTH 
*Q72 
OAKUM 
O J 84 
*874 


WEST 
* 53 
*7 B 

o K 08 7 2 
*KQ JB 3 


EAST 

* J 100 
OQ07I53 
oq 

* A 10 8 


SOUTH CD) 

* AX 004 
O J2 
0 A 10 5 3 
*5 3 

North ana Sauh aen valnmhle. 
The bidding: 


1 * 


1KT. 


DM. 

PM Pm 3 46 
4* Pm pm 
West M tha dob king. 


3* “ 




Wbrfld Stock Markets 

Dec, 24 

Ctoting price* in local cnmnda uniat a&cntuc indicated. 


ABN 

ACF Hokflrtfl 


AHOId 

AMEV 

A'Dom Rubber 
Amro Ben* 

bvg 

BuehrmemT 
CdfHwS Hldg 
Ehwvtar-NDU 
Fokkor 
CM BraeodM 


114JD 11520 
142.18 1425B 


MA VJO 
10940 11040 
N-A. 251 

136 13640 
2950 29J0 

18*50 19150 
73 73 

28550 28950 


Hoooowns 79 JO 1050 

KLM 5350 5U0 

Noonjen 5950 59 

Not. Neder 87.10 87J8 

Nedltoyd ms? 207J0 

OceVDndarG 394 397 

Pahhoad 0550 *520 

Phi Has 4050 40.10 

RatMCC 8A#G 84 

Rodamca 13550 13350 

Roll nco 7X30 7140 

Rormta 4650 4650 

ROVal Dutch NA 177 JO 

Unilever 401 483 

Van Ommoran N A 3350 

VMF-fitork 26*08 268 

VNU 315 315 

ANP.au Gobi Index: NA. 

PravfOeK 2SU0 

Source: R tutor*. 


ArttotJ 

SOO 

aao 

BeSoert 

KA 

mo 

Cackerm 

200 

190 


NA 

4315 

EBES, 

3070 

3870 

GB-limo-BM 

4900 

5020 

GBL 

2315 

2535 


5040 

5030 

Hotnkea 

5730 

5030 


HA 

3000 


NA 

11300 

PotraSnc 

6700 

66H0 


NA 


5oftna 

BMO 

WO 

SdVBV 

&1S8 

6100 


NA 

4975 

UCB 

MA. 

S5R 

Unera 

NA 

2325 

V Montagna 

5690 

5700 

Coma} Slack 

ladex: HA 


Prwrtoai: 2906J1 

Source: Reuters. 


| H— E««iJ 


Bk Eau Asia 
Owunaxono 

China Uahl 
Oraen island 

Hang Sena bk 


China Gas 
HKEtedrfe 
HK Rsalty A 
HKHoMs 
HK Lana 
KKShtmaBfc 

HK Teieanane 

HK Yaumatei 
HK Wharf 


200 

20.90 

15 

NA. 

2.1S 

1350 

840 

12 

34 

6JO 

755 

950 

NA 

745 


200 

2030 

1450 

753 

4450 

2.15 

1378 

8 JS 

1150 

34 

640 

755 

950 

3575 

753 



C6M 

Pn*. 

Hutch Wtmmp 

3B4B 

2640 

Hvaan 



intraty 

0M 


JardbM 

I3J0 

13J0 

JoMmStc 

UN 

use 

Kowloon Motor 

NA 

me 

.Miramar HotM 

NA 


ssswVforW 

A70 

6J0 

SHK Praps 

1160 

1240 

SMux 

1J3 

IN 

SwIraPOdflcA 

29 JO 

79.90 

TalCbama 



wah Kudos 

0JS 

tuz 

Win* On Co 

NA 

173 


SOS 


worn inti 

1475 

2475 

Hon* San tndne 

1717 JH 

Piwloas: 17MJ9 



Source: Revtan. 



1 Jkhwwf 


rg 1 

Aea 

910 

TIB 

Anglo Am*r. 

3925 

3150 

•’KiKlAlllC-a 

NA 

20000 

Bortows 

1400 

1410 

Blyvoar 

1725 

1758 

Buttna 

am 

■125 

Do Brens 

1625 

1645 

DrtofcoWii 

4925 

5000 

GFSA 

3729 

3750 

Harmony 

3300 

3325 

Hlvtod Stool 

600 

610 

Ktaol 

2300 

2330 

Nedbank 

too 

800 

Pm Stoyn 

56/5 

5000 

Rusptaf 

2585 

2590 

SA Brews 

820 

820 

SIHMsw 

4000 

4000 

Sasal 

NA 

060 

WHtHeMta* 

7600 

7550 

COMHSHe Stodi Index: HA 




ma 



1 il 

A Cl 

2J0 

2J0 

ANZ 

4.28 


BMP 

076 

&7D 

Baral 

3.1® 

118 

Bwaalnvflle 

1.90 


CasMamalrM - 

VJ3. 


Cotas. 

<15 

114 

Comalco 

1J0 


CRA 

5J6 

5J4 

CSR 

357 


Dunlop 

£40 


Eldn no 

190 


ICI Australia 

220 


Mcsoilan 

970 


MIM 

245 

242 

Myer 

NA 


Nat Amt Bank 

AAO 


Nows Cora 

8.90 

IN 

N Broken Hill 




IK 

2 40 

QM Coal Trust 

140 


Sortos 

526 


Thomas Hatton 

246 


i f mHf' 

117 

115 


4JD 


VV1XJUVHH 

1.12 

L20 

aB cnawta lotto*: NA 

nwhviiffiJi 



Source: Reuters. 


1 




Akal 

399 

37 S 

Asehl Chem. 

790 

711 

w r Wn> 

HA 

m 

■ :• ; -f-bi- 

760 

7*4 


527 

sn 


1160 

TOO 

Cteria 

ino 

1800 

Clteh 

401 

3*8 


an 

134 * 


NA 

ww— 

DatwaScc 

790 

7 H 

Fanuc 



Full Bank 

Full Photo 


2010 

Fujitsu 

1120 

1090 

Hitachi 

796 

770 

Hitachi Cable 

NA 


Honda 

rm 

wo 

Jal 

■410 

8108 

Kaflma 

4 B 

480 

Kansat rawer 

2070 

2110 

Kaw Steel 

137 

136 

Kirin Brm'Sfrv. 

729 

775 

Komatsu 

522 

493 

Kubota 

341 

352 

Kyocera 

4650 

4530 

Matsu ELImfi 

1310 

neo 

Matsu ELWks 

870 

■pi 

I . 1 H 

1480 

III 


548 

336 

Mltswbl Elec 

30 

3IS 

Mltsub* !-teavy 

3 B 6 

349 

MllsuMshl 

600 

507 

Mitsui & CO 

427 

430 

MJtsukntii 

630 

625 

Mitsumi 

880 

880 

NEC 

1350 

ISO 

NGK Insure 

HA 


NHAoSSC 

715 

707 

NtppKoaaku 

NA 


NIppaiOH 

793 

711 

Nlocon Steel 

157 

137 

Nippon Yusen 

333 

334 

Ntosan 

549 

574 

Nomura See 

1070 

18 S 8 

(Xwjpus 

1030 

mo 

Ptanaer 

1000 

1790 

Risen 

1100 

i me 

Share 

951 

IS 

Shlmazu 

NA 

— 


NA 

— 


au 

4090 


1660 

167 B 



23 D 

- 250 


673 

675 

LXlfl 

140 

140 

TalselCare 

328 

830 

Talitw Martne 

543 

50 

TakedB Oiem 

1010 

970 

TDK 

4530 

4430 

Tellln 

493 

480 


891 

895 


2810 

2848 

Teppan Print 

1 M 0 

999 


522 

515 

Toshiba 

Ml 

380 


1210 


YatixUcW Sec 

748 

762 


1 11 i I*. I'M 


previous: MI 7 J 9 



Source: Reuters. 



NA,: not quoted; NA! net 
auartable; Ml: BMflvktond. 


Arco Has Offered to Settle 
U.S. Price-Control Charges 


-[ 


Nww York Tbna Service 

LOS ANGELES — Atlantic 
Ridfidd Co. has offered to pay 
S22S million to settle U.S. Energy 
Department charges that the. oil 
company violated federal price 
controls from the early 1970s to 
January 1981, the company has dis- 
closed. 

In October, the Economic Regu- 
latory Administration of the Ener- 
gy Department said that Arco 
owed $239.9 million in i 
and S259 J million in interest i 
ed Co oil trades with smaller t 
mes. The charges totaled $4991 

milium . 

The smaller companies included 
Marc Rich & Co, the Swiss-based 

pSed^^^oSSS^SM to 

violating federal price controls and 
other charges and paid a fine of 
SISOmOlkm.- 

Arco’ s proposed settlement, 
which was disclosed Tuesday 
through a filing with the Securities 
and Frrfwmpf ! Commiss iou, stated 
that the company would reduce its 
fontb-ffliarter pretax earnings by 
137.5 mfllim or by the amount erf 
any settlement reached with the de- 
partment 

A spokesman for Arco said the 
department had not responded to 
the. company’s offer. The spokes- 
man declined to say whether Arco 
had admitted or denied any wrong- 
doing. “We fed this is a fair settle- 
ment,” the spokesman said.' A' 
spokesman for die Energy Depart- 
ment said that the case still .was . in 
litigation and declined to riicmag 
any detirik 

Wafl Street analysts said that fhe 
proposed -settlement, when com- 
bined with the SL54nHk)a charges- 
-from the company’s major restruc- 
turing began in April, would bring 
Arco a loss of slightly more than 
$100 million for the year. If the 


agreement is reached, the yearly 
loss will be the Erst ever for Arco. 

Despite the size of the loss, ana- 
lysts raid the company has strong 
operating profits and seems to be in 
good health because of the huge 
restructuring. Trice-control alle- 
gations tend to be complicated, and 
the controls themselves were am- 
biguous,” Jod D. Fischer, an ana- 
lyst with Drexel Burnham Lambert 
Erl, said. “This will technically go 
down as a loss, but the market is 
focusing more on the company’s 
operating earnings. Their opera- 
tions are still very profitable.” 

Arco's stock closed at $61.50 
Tuesday, down 50 cents on the 
New York Stock Exchange. 

Under the price control pro- 
gram, which was dropped m 1981, 
companies with access to low- 
priced supplies of crude oil were 
.required to make payments to com- 
panies without access to soct sup- 
plies. The controls held die prices 
to an average of about $7 a band at 
a tune when uncontrolled dl erf the 
same grade sold for about $30 a 
barrel 

unst Arco are 
„ igatioubythe 
Department In a similar 
action in March, the department 
cfeatgai tiie Cities Service CHI and 

trols betwieeD<i979 and 8 198L^ C ° D ” . 

Cities Services, which was ac- 
quired by the Occidental Petro- 
leum Coro, for $4 billion in 1982, 
tried the. 


denied the charges and said it 
would appeal the case. The govern- 
ment said that Cities Services over- 
chsrged for 13 nriffion barrels of oil 
from wells that were subject to 
price controls and asked for $509 
million in finesind Interest Frank 
Ashley, a spokesman for Ocriden- 

' tal, said that tiie case was stQIpend- 
infr= - - • 


Dec. 24 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 26, 1985 


Page 13 


SPORTS 



-■? RUTHERFORD. New 
-V'-„ Both coaches said forti- 
■<* ^ icy in the New Jersey 
.■'noi National Basketbau 
v. \<» victory over the dev©- 
/ Bins here Monday mght. 
" v .omTs coach. George Karl, 
appointed because I fdt 

FOCUS 

. Ssj.’t iough enough down the 

Tsoy’s coach. Dave WoM, 
Nets are “starting to get 
tough. ... I tiked die fact 
s pushing fatigue, referees 
r distractions aside.” . 
distracted Micheal Ray 

• on in the final quarter as 

all sx shots and scored 1 3 
un-leading 29 points, 
ctmy was the Nets’ fourth 
r ' and eighth in their last 

the only game played in 
,i on Monday night. None 
red Christmas Eve. 

■ &s took the lead for good 
v ; forward Albert King sank 

■ throws with 3:23 left, mak- 
ing. The Nets dosed out 
e with an 11-3 run as the 

' s vwze hdd scoreless until 
ones made a three-point 
lx 37 seconds to play. 

••••. Eng sooted, Richardson 
innpei from the foul line, 
iTtinmc made a free throw, 

. sou drove the key and 
- p for a short jump shot and 
dying tit a jumper inside 


the key, giving the Nets a 106-98 
edge with a inmate, to play. 

“We missed a lot of free throws 
and made a lot of turnovers,” said 
Kari. “A lot of that has to do with 
mental toughness.” 

In that period the Cavaliers were 
a miserable 4-of-ll from the free 
throw lice, with Jones the biggest 
offender, missing all five of bis 
chances. The Cavaliers also com- 
mitted five turnovers, three dnring 
the Nets' dosing drive. . 

Until then it had been a dosely 
played quarter, with eight lead 


“We knew it wouldn’t be easy,” 
said King, who had 14 points. 
“They’re rag and physical and they 
give a lot of teams trouble.” 

World B. Free co ntinu ed to be 
especially troublesome, scoring 30 
points fotiowing a 32-point gt»nw» 

Sunday night- 

“We were short without 
Gminski,” said Richardson, speak- 
ing of Mike Gndnsld, New Jersey’s 
starting center, who was out with a 
pulled groin muscle. “We were 
lading physically without him- I 
wanted to take the outside shot 
because we needed someone to lake 
control. I figured I'd win it ar iose 
it I felt T needed to shoot the hall 
for us to win.” 

Richardson was I3-of-20 on field 
goal attempts, 3-of-4 from the fool 
One, and had 6 rebounds, 9 assists 
and 4 steals. 

But it was a tough fourth quarter 
fra: the Nets’ fool shooters, too. 
They made only 6 of 14. (AP, UPI) 



After OevdauTs John Bagley had dearly overreached 
himself Monday night, Otis Birdsong sank the ensuing two 
fool shots and helped New Jersey to down die Cavs, 108-101. 


Us ? Falcons Begin Season s-End Shuffle 


Three Christmas Stars 9 Rising in the East 


International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — On the eves of three consec- 
utive Christmases, a child from the Orient has 
appeared. 

Three adolescents, in fact, bearing rare 
soccer gifts and a ample mess a g e: that flair 
still exists, still transcends the self-sold obses- 
sion we have that children are lost in sports 
unless immersed in coaching from the cradle. 

In 1983, Chen Ha Van Hoo, having 
reached 14 — the age of legal consent for a 
schoolboy to sign with a British professional 
team — joined Manchester Gty. 

In 1984, Everton, en route to the English 
championship, woo a race to obtain a pledge 
that Dkp Van Lee, another 14-year-old, 
would play for it 

And now Hung Quoc Dang, just 13 and 
therefore only surreptitiously on the run from 
agents and recruiters, has been chosen from 
among 10,000 aspirants for a Bobby Chariton 
soccer scholarship. 

These three boys came separately to En- 
gland via refugee boats out of Vietnam five or 
six years ago. 

They have weathered the country’s winters, 
adjusted to its diet and taken aboard two 
languages — standard English and the sport- 
ing vernacular. 

Where they have missed out is in the drill- 
ing that persuades infants that soccer is a 
game of systems and re gimen ted self-sacrifice 
tO the team 

Organized soccer was a bit thin on the 
ground where the “boat people” came from. 
Diep, for example, lived his first 10 years not 
SO yards from the South China Sea, and 
recollects first seeing soccer played by U.S. 
soldiers stationed nearby. Among Ameri- 
cans, let me tell you, it would certainly have 
been untutored play. 

None the worse lor that. The great Hun- 
garians of the 1950s, like the British of the 
Stanley Matthews era, grew out of the primi- 
tive instincts of boys with little else to do 

faffing hi Inw with mattering anythin g from a 
ball Of rags to a t ennis bafl. 

They developed the control that requires 
endless hours, not under the coaching whip 


but simply because a lad feels for the balL 

Latin Americans, in their shanties, are still 
producing such lads, although scouts with 
sharp eyes and sometimes persuasive bank 

Rob Hughes 

balances are plucking them out at ever-youn- 
ger ages, so that the Brazilian, the Argentine, 
the Uruguayan are herded into structured 
training too early. 

Can it be more coincidence that Chen Ha 
and Diep and Hung have stood out in En- 
gland, where physical running is ingrained 
even in teams of infants? 

Can it be that club scouts — and not just 
this writer — see something more predous in 
the individual than in the mass of conform* 
ers? 

Those dubs, whose budgets for youth pro- 
grams are forever being cut, have a greater 
vested interest in every schoolboy they can 

tempt than they have romantic notions of 
plucking boat boys off the China seas. 

True, by 14, a budding player has ac riima- 


f I just want the kids to 
come, have a laugh, and 
fall in love with sport. 7 


tized to the system. Chen Ha was a noted 
sprinter and high jumper at school in Rugby 
in the midlands before Manchester City’s 
chief scout, Ken Barnes, became entranced 
by his balanc e and meed, his prase with a 
ball 

Bames knows that his discovery, spindly 
and pigeon-toed, has mountains yet to climb. 

So have they aR So has any youngster 
whose precocious flair may or may not blos- 
som; 75 percent of those who sign up as 
schoolboys fail to earn a living in soccer. 

Ful filling the promise of youth is difficult 
enough. Soccer adds die demand! of sus- 
tained physical well-bang, of heightened en- 


thusiasm for repetitive exercise, of the threat 
of the thuggery that sooner or later seeks to 
destroy talent. 

It also places great stress on survival under 
hire-and-fire whims of dub bosses who 
change managers and training staffs roughly 
every three years. 

But then, who can teach the boat children 
survival? 

They have known starvation that only an- 
orexic gymnasts experience. 

They have dodged pirates worse than the 
soccer sharks who would exploit than. 

And the separations demanded of a teen- 
age player are nothing compared to that of 
bong cut adrift on the high seas and then, by 
some miraculous paperwork in Singapore, of 
being reunited with family in England, a 
small island thousands of miles away. 

Whether Diep. to whom that last sentence 
refers, realizes his ambition to become the Ian 

Rush of the 1990s cannot be foretold. Wheth- 
er Chen Ha is Manchester City's next Trevor 
Francis lies with the gods. 

How will Hung, the new boy, shape up at 
Charlton’s summer soccer school? Or at the 
Juventns camp and under the English FA 
scholarship that are included in us prize? 

AD a boy can do is show his potential when 
asked. 

Charlton led the applause for the lad who, 
this month, demonstrated his prowess in five 
soccer disciplines and withstood the roar of 
38,000 onlookers in Manchester. 

With Ins arm around Hung’s slender shoul- 
ders, Charlton, the great ambassador for En- 
glish soccer, said: “I just want the kids to 
come, have a laugh, and fall in love with 
sport.” 

Hung, a tittle shyly, came close to smiting. 
Back at school in Taunton, far, far off soc- 
cer’s beaten trade, be is being told not to 
forget his other games — table tennis, bad- 
minton and teams — or his studies. 

Good for the teach ere. But what a tale we 
will tell if, 10 years from now, the three of 
them realize their aims of playing interna- 
tional soccer — for England, which gave 
them a home. 


Michael Janofsky 

lew York Tones Sendee 

YORK — The end of a 
; J Football League season 
brings changes in person- 
owners conclude that dis- 

- coaches and general man- 
more convenient and less 
re than dumping high-sala- 
yers. 

- Bledsoe, the general man- 
die Buffalo BOk, and Eddie 

NFL NOTES 

•a, the executive vice preri- 
tbc Atlanta Falcons, are the 
i lose their jobs. Both were 
ionday, but for sHghtly dif- 
. . reasons, according to a 
'source familiar with both 
ns. 

oe, the former assistant 
‘““manager of the New York 
did not always get along 
ilph Wilson, owner of the 
—Ralph has been unhappy 
n all year,” the source said, 
ic doesn’t tike to take the 

• r losing. Firing Terry was 

- ~y of laying off some of the 

s that simple.” 

.itlanta, LeBaron was re- 

iy Rankin Smith, who called 
t of die most painful” ded- 
‘2 ever made. LeBaron had 
ilh the Falcons since 1977, 
■al manager and, since 1982, 
cam's chief operating offi- 

. teparture, according to the 
cock! dear the way fra Tay- 
, lh, the 32-year-old son of 
ocr, to be named general 
-x. Smith now is the club's 
- r - lie secretary, his older 

* , Rankin Jr„ is the team’s 
-it- 


, coa- 

, - 0 — , was given a 

t extension, but Ernie Zam- 
t fais title as assistant head 
-0 Al Saunders, promoted 
xjvers coach. Zampese re- 
ie offensive coordinator, 
boston, the ODers have 
Try GlanvQle, the assistant 
.s temporarily promoted to 
ifter Hugh Campbell was 
ri two weeks ago, no more 
■ candidate” for the job. 
x going to begin an exhaus- 
:rch for a new coach,” said 
e rz e g , the general manager. 


Campbell lasted less than two sea- 
sons and had a record of 8-22. 

In Philadelphia, it now appears 
that only agreement cm a contract 
is keeping David Shula, coach of 
the Miami Dolphins’ quarterbacks 
and receivers, from becoming head 
coach of the Eagles. , 

Shula. 26, the son of Dolphin 
coach Don Shula, would become 
one of the youngest head coaches in 
league history. That notable 
achievement aside, many dub offi- 
cials are questioning the wisdom of 
Norman Braman. owner of the Ea- 
gles. And several have e xp ressed 
indignation over the possibility 
that a coach with 50 little experi- 
ence would be hired for so presti- 


gious a job. One dub executive 
allied the potential biting of Shuln 
“an affront” to every assistant coa- 
ch in- the league 


• One of the most , 
dements of Saturday’s divisit 

and^f^^eland BrowmTis the 
return to Miami of Borne Kosar, 
Cleveland’s roolrie quarterback 
from the University of Miami In 
the Orange Bowl two years ago. in 
his last postseason game, Kosar led 
ihe upset of Nebraska that won the 
Hurricanes the national champion- 
ship. 

• Jan StenenuFs 19-year career 


in the league nearly came to a spec- 
tacular end Sunday. But tr ailing 
the .Ragles, 37-35, and with time 
naming out, the Minnesota Vi- 
IringsconW not get Stenerud on the 
fidd in time to attemp t a winning 
field gpnl T be the 

season with 15 field goals on 26 

attemp ts and ended his career with 
an NFL-rcccrd 373 field goals on 
558 attempts. 

• Before the Mis finished the 
season by losing to the Dolphins, 
28-0, then- wwdi, Hank BuEongh, 
said be thought Buffalo could win 
with a “flawless” pafonnance. The 
BQls lost the baD six times on turn- 
overs and committed 19 penalties, 
three shy of tying a leagne record. 


SCOREBOARD 


Football 


Basketball 


Final Regular-Season NFL S tandings 


NBA Leaders 


AMERICAN CONFERENCE 


Canucks Sweep Past Jets, 5-3 



The Associated Pros 

VANCOUVER. British Colum- 
bia — Moe Lemay, the Vancouver 
Canuck wing, has found a soft spot 
in the Winnipeg Jet defense. 

Lemay exploited that weakness 
for two goals Monday night as the 

NHL FOCUS 

Canucks turned a five-goal first pe- 
riod into a 5-3 National Hockey 
League victory over the Jets. 

"They’re big and strong,” said 
Lemay, “but a tittle suspect with 
their skating. That was our plan — 
to go wide — and it waked a 
couple of times.” 

The New York Rangers and the 
New Yak Islanders won Monday 
night's only other NHL games. 
None were played Christmas Eva 

Lemay's plan worked weD cm his 
first goal which tied the score at 2 
nine minutes into the first period. 
The sometimes inconsistent four- 
year veteran powered around de- 
fenseman Bobby Dollas at the Jet 
blue tine, shook off Dollas’s hook 
and waited until goal tender Brian 
Hayward went down before lifting 
the puck into the net. 

At 11:41 of the period, Lemay 
scored bis 14th goal of the season 
(and his fifth in five games) when 
be slipped the puck between Hay- 
ward’s legs after a perfect setup m 
the slot. That made the score 4-2, 
and and the tally stood up as the 
game- winner. 

The victory was the third in a 


row far the Canucks, who recently 
went 10 games without winning. It 
put them in sole possession of third 
place in the Smythe Division, two 
pants ahead of the Winnipeg. 

“Hew do you explain nine paints 
in the last six games after we had 
one in the previous 10?” said Van- 
couver’s coach. Tom Watt. “Bm it’s 
a really nice win and a big confi- 
dence builder fa us. That’s the 
important pan of all this.” 

The Canucks blanketed the Jets 
in the final period, allowing them 
just three shots on the rookie goal- 


tender Wendell Young, who has a 
2-0-1 record since being called up 
from the minors. 

“I don’t Amt the team really 
needed me in the third,” said 
Young, who looked shaky in the 
opening period as be contained to 
give m> big rebounds. “They put up. 
a wall and just played great 
The Jets, said their captain. Dale 
Hawerdmk, “got caught off-guard 
in the first penod. 

“We played five bad minutes — 
and when we play them bad, we 
really play diem bad.” 



Bast 

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TM. PF 

PA 

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320 

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11 5 

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AH 393 

244 

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290 

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386 

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355 

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5 11 

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12 4 

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300 

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11 5 

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329 

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■ I 

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3H 

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Kansas City * 10 0 J75 317 

NATIONAL CONFERENCE 
• -East 

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414 

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359 

Detroit 

7 9 

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452 


(v-cSoched wBd-card playoff tarn) 



AMOdattoo Mhi 


College Top 20s 

Tta Ida SB tom to tm Aswctotsd Pnu 
cotteaebasketboll pan (first-place votes, total 
led aa 28 - 19 - 11 , etc, records through 


JLA. Raiders 14. LA. Rams 6 

PLAYOFF SCHEDULE 


A Top Dog in Cincinnati 

New York Times Senior 

NEW YORK — We first met Schottzie when her owner. Marge Schott, 
brought her to the news conference announcing Schott’s purchase of the 
Cincinnati Reds baseball dob. Schottzie, a Scum Bernard, wore a Reds’ 
cap and sat on the foot of Pete Rose, the team's player-manager. 

A year later, Schottzie is such big stuff that she can call hex own news 
conference. She has her own company, Schottzie Enterprises, whose 
products have been going fast at Cmdnnati stores. The latest is the full- 
color 1986 Schottzie calendar (57.95). “Schottzie’s the only dog to have 
her own calendar — die’s competing with Gatfinkd,” declared Schott, 
who knows baseball better than she knows conrics-page cals. 

Schottzie’s calendar girl versatility is und ri riaMe (die poses in baseball 
cap, derby hat and cap and gown, among other oome-on chapeaus). She 
also sells: The calendar’s first printing numbered 8,000, and many were 
gone in the first week. “Everybody famous has one,” boasts Schott, tiling 
a list that includes Peter Ueberroth, Bob Hope, Howard Cosdl and a 
canine celebrity named Lucky, owned by President and Mrs. Reagan. 

The conglomerate marches on. Flush with calendar success, Schott has 
big plans fa the next baseball season. Tm thinking,” die says, “about a 
wind-up dog that walks and rings Take Me Out to the Ball Game.’ ” 


Doc. Jr. Nw Ena land at N.Y. Jots 
Doc JR San Francisco at N.Y. Slants * 
S ac— d ROOM 

Jan. 4: Cleveland at Miami. Dallas at LA. 
Rams 

J—5:iwFfai dw ) W.V.qtontswig—rat 
CWODBO. New EnatoniMLY. Jets winner at 


Marcus Allen ran for 123 
yards to win the 1985 NFL 
rushing crown on Monday as 
his Los Angeles Raiders beat 
the Rams, 16-6. ADen fin- 
ished the regular season with 
1,759 yards rnshing, 40 more 
than Atlanta's Gerald Riggs. 


Utah 
Portland 
Gold— State 


Chicago 

Dallam 

Denver 

Houston 


Detroll 
LA. Qli 


Hockey 


NHL Leaders 


Matte—! Meeker 
tot Zb 

SCORING 


Philadelphia CO 




G 

A 

Ptrf 

Gretzky, Edm 

23 

48 

91 

Nartunn Mtt 

25 

3) 

58 

Lemleux. Pgh 

20 

37 

57 

Coffey, Edm 

15 

39 

54 

Kurt Edm 

28 

24 

52 

Anderson, Edm 

24 

24 

50 

Propp. Pho 

74 

25 

49 

Hawerchuk. Wpg 

24 

21 

45 

P. Stastnv, Quo. 

18 

27 

45 

Broten. Minn 

15 

30 

45 

Kerr, Pha 

31 

13 

44 

T. Murray, CM 

19 

25 

44 


I Si 
171 


10K 



* 'H SEAS — A crewmember of ApoUo (lower fore- 
■; ®d) photographed from atop its mast some of the 


186 yachts in Syndey harbor that were preparing for 
Thursday’s start of the annual 630-mfle race to Httnrt 


GOAL-TENDING 

(Mmotr-net pools to pot— H i e »w > 

MP GA SO Avg 
10J1 <4 2 156 

w a i u 
jens— its v • 3M 


Puoco 


NHL Standings 

WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick DMitoe 

W L T Pts GF GA 
Philadelphia 24 * 0 a 140 107 

Washington 20 ■ 4 44 1JS 102 

NY Istondm 13 11 • 35 12* 12S 

NY Ran— to 14 17 2 34 130 117 

PtttRmrgft w rr 4 32 tsi 124 

Now Jersev U II 1 27 125 MS 


Quebec HU 2 3B 132 110 

NemtfM 17 12 4 31 144 121 

Boston U 11 4 38 125 113 

Buffalo 14 14 2 34 124 117. 

Hartford II U 1 33 130 131 

CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 
Norris Mvidoa 

SI. Louis is 19 4 34 117 110 

Cfitoao 13 is 4 X vu iso 

Minnesota 10 14 7 27 137 133 

Toronto 1 » 5 n m ut 

Detroit 7 21 4 is 103 172 

Smrtta Dtoisfon 

Edmonton 24 7 4 52 1» 141 

Catoorv 17 n 3 » tc m 

Vonesuver ’ 13 H 4 30 127 151 

Wkmtoep 15 n 4 IS 134 174 

Lo» An—ies I 21 4 20 in 170 

M O — mPi Resu.fi 

N.Y. Isumdsn 2 2 3-4 

Hartford l I 1-3 

Nvsfrgm Cl), LaFontain* 2 <201, Toneill 
CM). Dkfuc* CD. Mak eta (3}j Franc* (T4>. 
Sti tan— IS), BgbyeMB). Stats — gesi: New 
York (on Llut) W-2J; Hartford (on Hru- 
dov) 22-14.10 — 46. 

Detroit ■ 1 t— 1 

N.Y. He w ers 3 2 5— H 

MscLefi— 2 IBI.GrHdmer M2), Rswelich 2 
(17), Miller (4). Suidstrem (41, Laktlcw (3), 
Hahnlnen (4). JJ>atr1e* (4): Ktona (131. 
Ogrodnldt (It). Sheto — seal: Detrol! I— 
Vonbtosbrcwsk) 3-11-4— IS; New York l— Le- 
Joresf,Mfo) TM2-13-W. 

Hfuntow 1 I H 

Vancouver 3 ■ 0-5 

Tomtathnl (7), Lemav 2 114), Crawford (4), 
Udster 15); Carlyle U), Boochmen 2 (17). 
Mean ooaL (Mm leas (— Younal 12-1W— 
2Sf Vancouver (on Hoywore Bouchard) 12- 
154—31 

(Tuesday: No Gooes sefiedetod) 


(3) 


BUHnafon 

a»vrter 
New . 

WregDot • 
B ernh ar dt 
Edwards 
Toronto (1) 
Sows 
to— ■ 

Storodenskl 
Chicago (2) 
Baudiord 
Hayward 
Sehrend 
wi— meg n> 
Etlet 
Janecvfc 
Heolv 

ut segsut tV 
La Forest 
Stolon 
Pusev 
Mkotef 
Wo 

Detroit O) 


*104 l«7 3 US 
1140 54 0 2S3 

424 22 1 AW 

349 23 S 174 

na iet 1 xu 

725 37 2 123 

ion 55 1 327 
267 15 0 137 

m lie 3 ui 
1514 74 2 3JH 

199 U 0 422 
11 0 42) 
14 0 440 
ns ms 
S3 0 107 
490 27 0 321 

4B5 31 0 344 

MIS 113 • 327 
401 21 1 114 

1423 88 2 325 

27 SO 11.11 

2051 in 3142 

334 17 0 104 

1411 99 0 158 

1997 m a us 

1234 46 1 1U 

712 41 0 344 

W 14 0 447 
2124 134 1 154 
430 V 2 271 
924 51 0 320 

450 48 0 443 

Mi 1*1 1342 
1072 42 0 347 

900 40 0420 

1972 122 0 171 
912 51 0 13* 

715 51 0 1*5 

W 1J 0 424 
1891 111 0 174 
390 23 0 154 

1303 84 0 327 

325 24 0 441 

2018 133 0 US 

1424 81 1 341 

699 S3 0 430 
21» 141 1 198 

1344 M 1 W* 
5232 38 843* 

1867 I2S T 4jH 
145 7 0 2S 

1449 111 2 4JM 
208 28 0 545 

2122 148 3 All 
920 57 0172 

240 IS 0 450 
832 6B 6 4.90 
1992 144 B 448 
410 27 0 195 

734 54 0 440 
804 42 D 443 

mo W « 441 
594 38 0 343 

1287 NN I 485 
60 4 0 4X0 

1943 150 I 441 
835 51 0 144 

T2Q1 103 0 5.14 
144 14 0 175 

2144 169 0 444 
1093 89 0 489 

864 72 

51 * 

2008 170 0 548 
240 17 0 425 

82 
3 


End bn. Dsn. 
Danttev. Utah 
WitklttS, AIL 
Wootiidee, COL 
Malone. PhIL 
Davis, Phoe. 
Otaluwan, Hau. 
Short. GA 
Bird. Bos 
Free, Ctev. 
Mitchell, SA. 


O 

PL 

Avg 

Dec a end tad week's renfetoes): 

27 

3277 

121A 

Record 

PtS Pvt 

29 

3430 

1IIJ 

1. Norte Carolina (43) 104 

1255 1 

29 

3392 

1178 

2. MtaMoan (IS) 104 

1)99 2 

31 

3417 

1167 

1 Duke (4) 94 

1144 3 

29 

3175 

114A 

4 Syracuse 74 

Mil 4 

77 

3077 

1143) 

5. Georgetown (2) 94 

1 02* 5 

31 

3504 

1110 

4. Kansas 10-1 

959 6 

Z7 

3011 

I11J 

7. Georato Tech 7-1 

>98 7 

17 

2983 

1115 

1 Oklahoma 94 

797 8 

30 

3305 

1113 

9. Loulstono Slate 114 

733 9 

29 

3187 

109.9 

U Memphis Slate *4 

472 ID 

a 

3B77 

109J 

11. SL JCMTS 10-1 

438 11 

31 

3403 

IWA 

IX Nev^Las Vcoos 7-1 

548 12 

29 

3176 

109.5 

11 Kentucky 7-1 

411 13 

20 

3061 

1093 

M AkL-BIrmteoham 11-1 

444 14 

31 

3359 

1084 

IS Louisville 4-2 

380 14 

28 

3028 

1011 

14. Illbtets 8-2 

340 15 

n 

3024 

MM 

17. Incfiano 4-2 

198 17 

27 

2830 

104A 

11 Notre Dome 5-1 

194 19 

a 

2927 

104J 

19. Virginia Teen 8-1 

in 20 

27 

2813 

1043 

21 DePoul 5-2 

75 18 

29 

2995 

1013 

Tta United Press iDtenwttem 

al board of 

a 

2670 

95A 

coaches lop H college basketball ratings 

DEFENSE 


(flrxHNace vales; recent* teraueb Dec. 72;. 

G 

Nol 

A vo 

total points based m 15 tor Hrst rtocn, 14 tar 

27BB 


99A 

secaad. etc— a last week's rankings): 

29 

2967 

102J 

1. North Carolina (24) (104) 

484 1 

27 

2793 

103A 

X MkMoon (5) (104) 

442 2 

27 

2861 

10AA 

X Duke 12) (94) 

409 3 

27 

2S84 

1048 

4. Kansas (9-1) 

351 4 

a 

2992 

1019 

S Syracuse (74) 

34i 5 

31 

3315 

104A 

4. Georgia T*eh (7-1) 

324 7 

a 

2997 

IC7j0 

7. Georgetown (84) 

315 4 

a 

3041 

109J 

i lsu own 

117 11 

29 

31a 

109A 

9. Oklahoma 194) 

170 8 

2* 

3198 

1113 

H Kentucky (7-1) 

163 14 

27 

2985 

1114 

It. SI. John's (9-1) 

13S 9 

30 

3317 

111* 

IX Nevado-Los Vegas (8-1) 

122 10 

31 

3479 

1122 

IX Memphis SL (84) 

114 11 

31 

3487 

112J 

14. LoulsvIDe (6-2) 

74 17 

27 

3071 

1117 

IX Illinois (74} 

45 13 

31 

3527 

1118 

11 Indiana (6-2) 

64 14 

27 

3085 

1UJ 

17. Notre Dame 15-1) 

» 19 

V 

3324 

IMA 

11 DePoul (4-1) 

15 18 

79 

3327 

IM7 

19. Texas-EI Peso (7-2! 

11 X 

a 

3222 

1111 

»- Washington (6-2) 

ID Z 

79 

3112 

tlL6 

(r-unranked) 


a 

32H 

117A 



IV 1 DUAL 



Selected College Results 

1 PC 1 

FT Pts AVS 

BAST 


39 329 

208 

•64 29.9 

Fonteom 44. cofumbia 43 


79 306 

251 

B63 2M 

Georgetown te. Soattlo 57 


a 288 

148 

738 3L0 

Prtnceton 54, Rutgers 47 


31 289 

1B9 

749 34A 

Providence 104. Ark^ Little Rock 80 

a 214 

252 

684 24A 

SI. John's 98. Monmouth SI 


72 213 

104 

534 244 

SOUTH 


29 245 

164 

6M 729 

GrambllnB 61, Wiley CML 59 


25 239 

116 

S9t 2X9 

Memphis St 82. Murray St 59 



27 244 140 643 238 

25 2DT 153 594 238 

29 272 121 445 219 

28 218 206 442 228 

Johnson, Loc 24 238 118 595 219 

Nance, Phoe. 24 225 144 SM 228 

AbduRfabbr, LAL 27 248 111 607 215 
Aguirre. ML 23 202 no 515 228 

MCHato. Bos. 27 220 135 591 218 

Mo lone, WCOh. 27 243 01 570 21.1 

Field Goal Pt txrnhae 

fo FCA pet 
Thorpe, Sot. 121 W 840 

Dawkins, N J. 154 244 831 

Johnson, SA. 148 239 819 

Worthy, LAL 227 375 805 

Nance, Phoe. 225 383 887 

RetaeMUog 

G Off DOf Tot **» 
Lolmtaer. OeL 29 107 256 343 115 

WU II tans. NJ. 29 111 247 358 113 

Olaluw— .Hou. 29 154 190 344 11.9 

Mo tone. PML 28 126 204 H2 118 

Samos—. HOU. 29 90 236 3» 112 

Assists 

G Ns Ave- 

Johnson. LAL 25 331 132 

Thomas. Dot. 28 32S 118 

Cheeks. PtoL 28 268 98 

BCBley. Clev. 28 245 98 

Moore, SA. 28 253 92 

NBA Standings 

R ASTERN CONFERENCE 
Attaimc Dtvtston 


MIDWEST 
Bradley IL St. Lou Is 67 
Ifllnoto 95. Howard 61 
Kansas 94. Gaorae Woshlnoton 71 
Kansas 51- 71 N. Illinois to 
Miami. Ohio *1 Onctenatl 42 
Minnesota 71. Oklahoma St. 59 
M— raske to. Arizona St. 47 
Peppcrdlno O. Evansville 41 
Purdue 71, DePoul 54 

SOUTHWEST 

Texas Christian as. Lone Beoeft St. to 
New Mexkn 54. New Mexico State 44 
FAR WEST 
Now 91 Army 43 
Frown SL 89, So era memo SL 72 
lowa 84. GtKim— 44 
Montana 78. W ashi ng to n 45 
now Mex ic o 34. New Mexico St. 44 
Orel Roberts 49, CoWrvlne 63 
Pacific 71. Hawaii St 
Weber St. 76, Wyoming 71 

TOURNAMENTS 
Red Lobster Classic 

CtamiWioiMo: Auburn 89, Boston College 13 
TWrd Place: VoMosta StSS C— trot Flo. 44 
ceamlnads Classic 
First Round 

N. Caron— SI. 64. Chomlnade 44 
NavriJB vmw 83, Stanford 65 


Transition 


0 520 
0 726 



W 

L PCt 

GB 

BUN— 

21 6 

.778 

— 

New Jersey 

18 12 

A00 

4*2 

Philadelphia 

16 12 

-571 

5V2 

Washington 

U 14 

AS) 

8 

Now Ybrfc 

9 19 

321 

12Vb 

Central Division 



Milwaukee 

19 12 

ATI 

— 

Detroit 

15 W 

-517 

3 

Atlanta 

14 M 

SOD 

M 

Cleveland 

13 to 

Ate 

5 

Chicago 

11 20 

xs 

8 

Indiana 

t If 

2 H 

9 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 


Midwest DtvUloa 



Denver 

18 11 

A21 

— 

Houston 

18 11 

A21 

— 

San Antonio 

17 12 

JU 

1 

Utah 

16 14 

sa 

TVa 

Balias 

13 14 

ABl 

4 

Sacramento 

9 19 

J21 

HVS 


Paeffic Dtotsl— 



LA. Lakara 

» 3 

J» 

— 

Portland 

17 U 

SM 

9 

Seattle 

11 18 

J79 

14 

Phoenix 

10 17 

an 

14 

LA. aiocen 

10 18 

X7 

V4V. 

Geld— Stele 

10 21 

30 

16 


Monday** Result 



Cteyitond 

a 25 H 17— Ml 

New Jersey 

32 a st is— ne 


BASEBALL 


HOT 

40 

325 

1B0 


0488 
0 480 
36 8486 
21 8 720 


lit 162 ■ 5.16 


Rich— dm 1MB 29. wniloms S>13 2M 18: 
Free 9-14 10-13 30, wins— BM 44 20. Re- 
bounds; Oevet— d 44 (Turpin ■). New jersey 
61 (Williams 12). Assists: Cl e veland 21 (BOW 
ley 9). New Jersey 29 (RJdiards— 91. 
(Tuesday: No HIM* Khedufod) 


NCW^ YORK— Named Tom McCnswmlnor- 
leaaue Wittes instructor. 

SAN DIEGO An no u nced !i wifi net otter 
Luis DeLeon, olicher. a 1»84 cantroct.mosins ■ 
him d free went. 

BASKETBALL 

National Basketball AenelMtai 

LA. CLI PPE R5— Forward Jamool Wilke* 
announced hie rett r em— r. 

FOOTBALL 

None—) Foettafl L— Me 

ATLANTA— Extended me com rod of Dan 
Hatmine, men. Named Marl— Comotall de- 
fensive coordinator. 

LA. RAIDERS— Ad Ivated Mfte Davis, 
safety. 

SAN DIEGO— Extended the axnrnd of Don 
Coryell, head coach. Promoted Al Saunders 
from receivers coodi to assistant cooch. 

SEATTLE— AffltoUtie— the retirement of 
Oiarte Young, Ughf end. 

HOCKEY 

NOHaeai Hockey Leone 

N.Y. RANGERS— Traded Steve Richmond, 
d et e nse mcei . to me Detroit Rod Wings tor 
Mike MeEwen, de l ens oman. 

COLLEGE 

COLUMBIA— Named Larry McEireavr 
football — h, 

NORTH DAKOTA— Hired Roger j, Ttwnvq 
— football coach. 

SALEM— Announced the ruN ouu lk m of 
Terry Bouden, football c—ch, 

YOUNGSTOWN ST. — Hired Jim Treatol as 
toortxdl cnaOk 






Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 26, 1985 


ART BUCHWALD 


Nancy Cannot Tell a Lie 

w. 


'ASH3NGTON —The Great 
Lie Detector Test Flap has 
come to an end. When President 
Reagan si gned a directive ordering 
thousands of government officials 
to hook up to a polygraph machine. 
Secretary of State George Shultz 
balked, and announced he would 


! president then backed down 
and said the lie detector would be 
used only in special cases. 

What nobody knows is that it 
wasn't George 
Shultz who was 
responsible for 
getting Reagan 
to rethink his se- 
curity plan. It 
was Nancy Rea- 
gan. 

Three days af- 
ter Lhe president 
signed the direc- 
tive, two men , 

came into Mrs. Bucnwald 
Reagan’s sitting room and attempt- 
ed to place electrodes on her head. 

Mrs. Reagan said, “What are 
you doing?" 

One of the men replied, “The 
president has ordered everyone to 



take a polygraph Lest We wanted 
the Whitel 


to get the White House people out 
of the way Erst." 

“Leave immediately. 1 will never 
submit to a polygraph test" 

“Gee, Mis. Reagan. It isn’t a big 
deal to take one if you have nothing 
to hide. But it’s going to make ev- 
eryone wonder about you if you 
refuse." 


PEN Congress Set 
Jan. 12-18 in N.Y. 


New York Tima Service 

N EW YORK. — The 48 th Inter- 
national PEN Congress, which 
runs here Jan. 12-18, will be the 
first such meeting in the United 
Slates in 20 years and perhaps the 
largest gathering ever of foreign 
writers on U. S. shores. 

The congress is expected to be 
attended by 400 American writers 
and 27S foreign writers. The theme 
of the congress is “The Writer’s 
Imagination and the Imagination 
of the State." 

The gathering will consist of 
more than 30 events plus parties 
and receptions. Foreign guests of 
honor are expected to include GOn- 
ter Grass and Eugene Ionesco. 


“Tm going to speak to the presi- 
dent about this.” 

□ 

“Nancy, why are yon getting 
your hair done so early?" 

“These are not hair curiers, Ron- 
nie. They are electrodes fa a poly- 
graph test WiH yon please tell me 
why I have to submit to one?” 

“I can’t very weO ask George 
Shultz to take the test if 1 won't 35 k 
my own wife." 

“Ronnie, have I ever lied to 
you?" 

“Of course not. That’s why I 
wasn’t afraid to OX the polygraph 
for you. I knew you would pass 
with Dying colors. Can't you see the 
headlines? 'Nancy Reagan Tells 
Truth Again.' " 

“There is no reason to take a test 
I don't know any state secrets." 

“That’s the point Nancy. If you 
did know any secrets the threat of a 
lie detector test would malm you 
think twice before you passed them 
ou." 

“Ronnie, why are you mat mg 
everyone do this?” 

“BiD Casey and Cap Weinberger 
think it’s a dandy idea. They be- 
lieve the test will have a chilling 
effect cm would-be traitors." 

“Am I considered a would-be 
traitor?" 

“Of coarse not. I know it, and 
you know it, but bow can I prove it 
to everyone else if I can’t produce 
the results of your polygraph 
tests?" 

□ 

“Everyone says lie detector tests 
are no good. They can't even be 
used in court as evidence. And they 
violate people's riv3 rights." 

“I have done more for civil rights 
than any president in the past SO 
years. Let me read you a letter I 
received from a little girl in Iowa.” 

“Ronnie, I want those men out 
of the boudoir in two minutes.” 

“Nancy, you are the crown jewel 
in my administration’s polygraph 
program. We'll make the questions 
very simple, such as why did yon 
exile our dog Lucky to the ranch in 
California?" 

*Tve never hesitated to cooper- 
ate with you before, Ronnie. But 
this time the answer is NO." 

“Since you fed thru strongly 
about it, TU cancel the lie detector 
program. But when the next com- 
mie spy surfaces in the government, 
you'll have nobody to blame but 
George Shultz and yourself." 


Trump’s New Towers: Grandiose but Inhuman 


N 


By Paul Goldbcrger 

New York Tima Service 

EW YORK — Not since 
Philip Johnson and John 


Burgee’s plan for the AT&T 
bunding r 


ig in 1978 has an unbuilt 
project been as talked about as 
Donald Trump's proposal to put 
a 130-story condominium tower 
on Manhattan's Upper West Side. 

The tower, which would be the 
centerpiece of Television City, an 
apartment, office and studio com- 
plex designed for Trump by the 
architect Helmut Jahn, has made 
the network news, numerous na- 
tional magazines and a lot of the 
international press — not bad fa 
a project that is years away from 
bong built, if it gets built at alL 

All this publicity is precisely 

yhat Tp,im p has been h anking qn. 

The world loves drama and power 
and sex appeal, and the plan to 
buDd the world's tallest building 
possesses all three. 

But Trump does not, 1 think, 
have any realistic expectation that 
he will be able to start construc- 
tion on this 2,600-unit tower with- 
in the near future, and I wonder, 
despite all the hoopla, how much 
be rally intends to build this su- 
pertan tower, even if he can over- 
come the political opposition that 
on the Upper West Side is inevita- 
ble with so large a building. 

While a building this tall is 
structurally and technologically 
possible, and has been so for 
man y years, it makes little eco- 
nomic or social sense. It is ex- 
traordinarily expensive and inef- 
ficient to build — so elaborate a 
structural framework is necessary 
and so much space must be devot- 
ed to elevators that such a tower 
can never meet any conventional 
econ omi c standards. 

It can be justified as a symbol, 
and as such it does have the abili- 
ty to hold sway over the imagina- 
tion. The tallest building in the 
world! It is not surprising that 
this potential building has taken 
on the aura, especially given that 
it would be taller by hundreds of 
feet than the 1 10-story Sears Tow- 
er in Chicago, the current record 
holder. 



Nad BomTIfe Now Ycr* T»... 

Dooald Trump with drawings of his Television City, 
which includes 150-story centerpiece, six “smaller" 
towers and a high-rise office maiding (far right). 


When all the excitement fades, 
however, how practical is such a 
tower in a functional sense? Even 
if the economic problems could 
be pul aside; does anyone really 
want to live 150 stories in the air 


in a building with 2^99 other 
apartments? 

Trump arenmt»s that the novel- 
ty of being able to say you live in 
the tallest skyscraper in the world 
will be enough to sell apartments, 
but at lhe 95-siory John Hancock 
Tower in Chicago, which contains 
what are now the world’s highest 
apartments, the units on the top- 
most floors are not the most pop- 
ular. They sway in the wind, they 
are a much longer elevator trip 
from the ground and, most trou- 
bling for some people, it is oftai 
impossible to tell the weather on 
the street. And the view, while 
spectacular on a clear day, is more 
likely to be blocked by haze than 
are the views of neighbors 20 or 
30 stories below. 

In essence, there is little to this 
idea except its appeal as a symbol 
And whue John’s design is only 
schematic at this point, there is 
no thing in the futuristic, three- 
sided shape he has devised so far 
that seems to connect the building 
more dosdy to the city around it 

Trump’s main purpose in pro- 
posing this 150-story tower has 
probably been well saved already 
— people all over the world are 
talking about the Television City 


prqjecL A likely second purpose 
emerges from the first and is 
equally connected with image: By 
proposing to make a 150-story 
tower the centerpiece of his pro- 
ject Trump has deflected atten- 
tion from tire fact that the rest of 
the project includes six 76-story 
apartment towers, which, by com- 
parison to the central building, 
seem small. 

Right now there is no apart- 
ment tower anywhere in New 
York that rises this high. Trump is 
proposing to build six of them. 
Yet he has managed, by virtue of 
juxtaposing these six towers with 
the world's tallest bidding, to 
ranks* them seem small, Kill sing 
observers to refer to these other- 
wise huge towers as the “little 
bondings.” 

The rest of the project seems to 
be what Trump is most serious 
about buildin g. The overall plan 
is simple and straightforward: 
Most of the huge site from 59th 
Street to 72d Street, which once 
contained the Pennsylvania Rail- 
road’s train yards, would be 
decked over with a three-level 
platform that would have park- 
ing, a retail shopping center at the 
north end. television studio space 


The New York Tmu 


at the south end and a park on the 
top LeveL The towers — including 
a 65-story office building — 
would be lined up at the eastern 
edge of the park. 

While the platform makes con- 
siderable sense — it is really the 
best way to deal with the com- 
plexities of the old rail yard and 
the elevated West Side Highway, 
which runs along the western edge 
of the site — what is atop the 


platform is mainly the kind erf 
p lannin g that ought to have been 
left behind a generation ago. Put- 
ting huge towers in open space, 
with little connection to the var- 
ied pattern of streets, smaller 
spaces and different building 
types of the real city, is to see the 
dtv only as an abstraction. 

For some enlightenment about 
what this project might be like, 
look at one of Chicago's notable 
buildings, Lake Point Tower, a 
70-story apartment building of 
curving glass set on a stone base. 
Inspired by an unbuilt design of 
Mies van der Rohe, it is stunning- 
ly beautiful from afar from close 
up. however. Lake Point Tower 
turns out to be a kind of vertical 
island, a sealed object cut off 
from any connection to the city 
around it. 

John's preliminary studies for 
the bases of the Television City 
towers suggest that these will be 
slightly better than Lake Point 
Tower. But the problem is inher- 
ent in any scheme of 7ft- story 
towers set in open space — its 
fundamental abstraction is anti- 
thetical to the elements that make 
a city truly a city, noi merely a 
collection of tall buildings. 

The challenge is to make the 
connections that turn a complex 
into something that possesses 
genuine urban qualities and is not 
simply an array of big buildings 
side by side. Tbe one lajqje project 
that has succeeded at doing this is 
Battery Park City in lower Man- 
hattan, which under its new mas- 
ter plan by Cooper Ecksnn has 
begun to evolve into an ideal ex- 
ample of large-scale development. 

The present Battery Park City 
plan evolved slowly, only after the 
failure of several earlier master 
plans — which bore considerable 
resemblance to the flamboyant 
and overreaching Television City- 
plan — became apparent. 

Battery Park City’s lessons, 
learned through hard experience, 
were that such a never-never (and 
of big and glittering towers stand- 
ing amid nothing doesn’t really 
work. The saddest thing about 
Television Gty is that its sponsors 
seem to have picked up so little of 
the knowledge or cities and urban 
design gained in the last genera- 
tion. To look at Television City is 
to think that the experience of the 
last 20 yean in architecture had 
not happened at alt 


PEOPLE 


AIDS Hospice in X}[ 

Urging mercy and support ~ 
AIDS sufferers Mother Te^Jis 
opened a hospice in New Yak (0 
care for terminally iB victims of 
acquired immune deficiency jvn, 
drome and won furloughs 
state prison for three 
“We want that nobody din 
loved and un cared for." the Renan 
Catholic nun and Nohd 
Prize winner said. Mother . 
asked Major Edward L Koch for 
help in getting the pruoQnj ( K . 
loughed. He put her in contact viih 
Governor Mario Cuomo, 
granted her request. The dun 
founder of the Missionary-^,, r - 
of Charily, called the 14-feg 
pice at St. Veronica's Church m 
Greenwich Village a “guest hose" 
where people with AIDS would he 
given spiritual comfort as «a[ ^ 
medical md. The Roman Cathode 
Archdiocese of New York ^ 
open as many such centers as peb- 
ble, Cardinal John J. O’Chhv 
said. 

□ 


Fidel Castro, who is afejosi » 
well known for his Havana rigjp. 
os his revolutionary rhetoric, his 
quit smoking. “1 haven’t bt up a 
cigar for several months now" the 
Cuban leader said in an imenievt 
on Brazilian television. Cuffing hi-, 
decision a “sacrifice ] nnut-m^* 
for public health.*' he added 
haven’t really missed it ihainnaS^ 
Castro, 59, said be started smoking 
at age 24 or 15 but did not realize 
until recently that his habit could 
endanger his health and ottos. 

□ 

A U. S. federal judge has Hord- 
ed SI. 403 to a Vietnamese refugee 
who bad deposited the money in a 
Saigon bank that was seried when 
the city fell to the North Vietnam, 
ese in 1975. Die judgment by L’S. 
District Judge Horace G&aore 
resented the value of 3 afflkm 
South Vietnamese piasters held br 
Ngoc Qnsng Trinb jz a haift fof. 
merly owned by Citibank <rf Ne*- 
York. Trinh was a student in the 
United Stales in 1974 when his 
(her. Quy Quaag, a South Vkn 
ese senator, set up the account-- SF 
his son's name 10 help pay for his 
schooling. Trinh, now 39. filed suit 
against Citibank last vear. 

□ 


Emperor Hirahixo of Japan. & 
the world’s longest-reigning mor 
arch, began the 60th vear of hi 
reign Wednesday. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


ALCOHOUCS ANONYMOUS in 
friuPo 

1032a 


Enrfnh. Porn (doSy) 4634 5965. Romo 
67803 T 


PEBB g BUREAU, Suite BM 26-52, Old 
Gloucester 73/ A, London WC1 . Aca- 
deme DrffDM. Tempter Krightwood. 


PERSONALS 


MESHY CHRISTMAS AM) a Happy 


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EMPLOYMENT 

FOR TOE FEATURE 

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BUSINESS 

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Incorporation and management in UK, 
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FWEST INVESTMB4T NEWSIETTEL 
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Ceri Property, P.0, fax 670 
Norton, Virginia 24273 


YOUR AGENT N MOROCCO 

SCHAMASCHMAROCSA 


Write 42, Ave Honan Seghr 
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Cal: 272604, 272652, 222221 
Tbe 22901 


WE SEBC CONTACT WITH ewetfmm 
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FINANCIAL 

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THE BEST REASONS TO HAVE 
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