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INTERNATIONAL 



; ' ’HER cWA AWEA* ON PAGE 16 


Published With Hie New Yorit Tunes and The Washington Post 


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PARIS, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 27, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 1887 


>banon Peace Pact 

3 ady for 




Rotten 

JUT — Lebanese Moslem 
nstian leaders - said Thurs- 
, i a Syrian-sponsored agree- 
ai be signed by the end of 
Kith. formally ending tbe 
j-’.. 's lO-year-old dviJ war. 

'h Beni die minister of jus- 
l leader of the Shiite Mos- 
ial militia, said that he, (he 


“We have beard this all before,?, 
a businessman in Moslem West 
Beinit said. “It looks serious, but I 
prefer to wait until it is really im- 
plemented.’' 

The pact is designed to end a 
decade of conflict mat has carved 
much of tbe country into sectarian 
fiefdoms under militia rule, and to 
ensure tbe return of thousands of 
' :hie£, Walid Jumblat, and. Christian and Moslem refugees to 
istian Lebanese Forces mi- their homes. 


rf. Hie Hobdka, would sign 
erd within the next five 
he three men represent the 

- - 's most powerful militias- 
^ dent Amin GemayeL a 

tc Christian, said he hoped 
. dark page hi Lebanon's 
i would be turned. He pre- 
that tbe country would 
■rom a phase of tragedy to 

- ^acc by the end of this year 
-• . beginning of the new year." 

anber has excelled itself in 
un and politics,'* declared 
1 ; Minister Rashid Karami, a 
1 Moslem, as wintry weather 
■ '«r Lebanon. 

3 dri’s statement was the 
; finnation by a militia lead- 
he rival organizations had 
-'.differences over the draft 
Wednesday’s talks in Da- 

- - with the Syrian vice presi- 

- »dd Halim Rhaddam. 

. owned Beirut Radio said 

- Agates had already ini- 

- e accord, but this could not 
- Trfiialy confirmed. 

haft plan, in the works 
: Sober, has not been pub- 
tal it is known to contain 
-- to reduce the political 
ijoyed by Lebanon's Chris- 
unity since independence 

jese greeted the news with 


Syria, which has troops deployed 
in east and north Lebanon, will 
play a key role in ce menting the 
deal it has brokered. 

The accord’s success also is likely 
to depend on the attitude of Israel, 
which has about 1,000 troops and 
intelligence agents in what it term^ 
a “security zone" along Lebanon’s 
southern border. 

“The silent majority fee] nause- 
a ted by war, but can the rmTitiac 
stop die fighting?" a doctor agVi-fj 
*T cannot allow myself to nourish- 
the illusion that our problem is in- 1 
rental only." 

The accord, between the Leba- 
nese Forces, Amal and the Druze 
Progressive Socialist Party, has yet 
to win the approval of other 
groups. 

Syria had been pressing the mili- 
tias to compromise over reforms 
designed to end Lebanon’s system 
of sharing political power and to 
give Moslems more say in govern- 
ment. 

Sources said the new formula in- 
cludes a compromise on the riming 
Of the phasing-out of prerogatives 
that currently favor the C hristian 
minority. They did not give details. 

Tbe Lebanese pound, a sensitive 
political barometer, recovered 
slightly against the UJS. dollar 
when news of the .accord was an- 
nounced. 



Soviet to Restore 
Ties With Israel, 
U.S. Rabbi Told 


A leader of the Pondo tribe spoke to fellow tribesmen Thursday in preparation for possible new dashes with Zulus. 

Families Flee South African Tribal Clashes 


By Peter Kenny 

Agenee France-Praae 

UMBUMBULU, South Africa 
— Young Zulu warriors patrolled 
pathways in the shanty and hut 
areas of this nigged MU district 
southwest of Durban an Thursday 
where 56 persons died in in ter- trib- 
al dashes that flared on Tuesday. 

Members of the South African 
Red Cross in Durban said about 
150 families bad been forced to flee 
their homes and were receiving 
some help from the organization. 
Other families were seen loading 
furniture into light trucks as they 




liopia’s Civil War in Its 25th Year 

Is Persist Despite Army’s Major Victory in Eritrea 

/ Blaine Harden 

i «— ■nrfeiytut Pan Service 

~“JCET. Ethiopia — An. 
i military offensive last 
~n Eritrea — the eighth in 
ight years — proved to be 
successful of the 25-year- 

ive seized more territory 
' previous offensive and 
,'ihiopia’s Marxist gov em- 
its strongest position ever 
, according to U.S. diplo- 
'Ued Nations officials and 
elief workers here in Eri- 

fensive, which the U.S. 
nt says was supported by 
i . worth of Soviet weapons 
unition. involved 200,000 
soldiers fighting Eritre- 
l*who bold the mountains 
?on in tbe northernmost 
hiopia, wedged between 
1 the Red Sea. 
jed on the ground by So- 
..and T-55 tanks, covered 
" air by MiG-23 figbter- 
. Et hio pian troops overran 
iUages held by rebels. In 
j land, sea and air opera- 
recaptured the towns of 
ad Tessenei in western 
Ky took the rebels' key 
" 1 area in the Baraka Val- 
iblished sea supply tingy 
ig tlx Red Sea coastal 

d that the rebels were 
the gpycnjjjwnt pushed 
arfew in Aanara, Eri- 
*1. from j I P.M. to raid- 

it 40 miles (64 kilome- 
of here, at Nakfa, the 
artress of the Eritrean 
s rom, the government’s 
id on Page 4, CoL 5) 


prepared to leave the area in fear of 
further fighting. 

Tbe Natal province area of llm- 
buxnbulu, where the battle was 
fought on Tuesday and Wednes- 
day, was quiet Thursday, the police 
said. 

A few burned-out shacks could 
be seen on the surrounding hills 
where about 2,000 Zulus ana 3,000 
Xhosa-spealring Pondo people bat- 
tled with dobs, short spears, sticks, 
knives, machetes and a few shot- 
guns. . 

South African policemen, still in 
the area in force, found three more 
bodies Thursday, poshing up the 
death toll from what was the most 
serious tribal disturbance in the 
area in recent years. 

Some of the 150 injured who 
were being- treated Thursday in 
Durban sard the toll could end up 
being much higher than the 56 an- 
nounced soTar by the police. 

Police casualty lists could not be 
yerifiati .independently, because. 


dos may have fought over a wom- 
an's dowry. 

Meanwhile, the police reported 
six others dead, one of them a while 

How apartheid affects one black 
South African family. Page 4. 

policeman, and 21 persons injured 
In other dashes around the coun- 
try- 

Most of the dead in the past two 
days of violence have been killed in 
fighting between blades. 

■ KiHed by Machetes 

Michael Parks of the Los Angeles 
Times reported earlier from Johan- 
nesburg: 

Many of those killed in the tribal 
dash were hacked to death, dis- 
membered and sometimes behead- 
ed, with sharp-edged machetes 
used for cutting sugar cane, accord- 
ing to policemen and medical 
workers who helped gather up the 
dead and wounded. Other victims 
had. spears driven through their 


The battle at Umbumbulu, al- 
though by far the bloodiest, was 
only tbe most recent of a series of 
clashes between the Zulus, who are 
predominant in the Durban area, 
and tbe Pondos, a branch of the 
Xhosas. who are drawn north from 
the Xhosa tribal homeland of 
Transkei in search of work. 

Although the police maintain 
that those dashes are not political 
nor part of the country s wide- 
spread civil unrest, other observers 
noted that friction has increased as 
competition has sharpened for jobs 
in the Durban area as a result of 
South Africa's economic recession. 

The traditional rivalries between 
(he groups also have been aggravat- 
ed, these analysts said, by the bitter 
and sometimes murderous feuding 
between tbe Zulus' Inkatha politi- 
cal movement and the African Na- 
tional Congress and the United 
Democratic Front, which draw 
strong Xbosa support 

South Africa's government often. 


By Bernard Gwertzman 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — A Soviet 
diplomat reportedly has told a rep- 
resentative of an American Jewish 
organization that he believes Mos- 
cow will restore diplomatic rela- 
tions with Israel in February and 
dramatically increase the number 
of Jews permitted to emigrate to 
Israel. 

The conversation, which oc- 
curred a few days ago, was dis- 
closed Wednesday by Rabbi Mar- 
vin Hier, dean of the Simon 
Wiesenlbal Center for Holocaust 
Studies in Los Angeles. 

According to Rabbi Hier, the 
diplomat from the Soviet Embassy 
in Washington initiated tbe lun- 
cheon and seemed eager to put 
across two points. These were that 
he think s there will be fuD diplo- 
matic relations between Israel and 
the Soviet Union in February, be- 
fore the Communist Party congress 
that month, and that Moscow is 
going to resolve the question of 
Jewish emigration by allowing 
many more Jews to leave than are 
permitted now. 



Shimon Peres 


Syrian Missiles 

Rabbi Hier asked that the names T__ T _L ____ 

of tbe diplomat and the Washing- JLTI JLAZDClTlOTlm 
ton representative of the Wir- 7 

Peres Says 


, . ... ™ - bodies. *otfc «aj£r. -force that they 

restnciKJns piacod on the jfppj-d boles in . the flesh that were . points to such tribal fighting to 


representative 
senthal Center not be mentioned. 
He said that the substance of the 
discussion had been conveyed to 
the Israeli Embassy 1 in Washington, 
and that the Israelis said the Soviet 
diplomat, who is listed officially as 
one of many first secretaries in' the 
embassy, was known to them for 
years as a RGB agent who has 
specialized in Jewish affairs. 

The Israelis speculated that the 
diplomat was unlikely lo have spo- 
ken as be had with the Jewish rep- 
resentative except under instruc- 
tions, Rabbi Hier said. 

Israeli officials said, however, 
that while they were interested in 
such reports, they still were waiting 
for some firm indications from 
Moscow that a more conciliatory 
approach toward Israel and Soviet 
Jews was planned. 

In a separate conversation. Rab- 
bi Hier’s representative confirmed 


By William Claiborne 

Washington Peat Seme* 

JERUSALEM — Prime Minis- 
ter Shimon Peres said Thursday 
thaL Syria has moved surface-io-air 
missile batteries back into Leba- 
non. but he said Israel was deter- 
mined not to fuel an escalation of 
tension over the issue. 

Mr. Peres said Israel was seeking 
a return to the “status quo," appar- 
ently meaning that diplomatic ef- 
forts are under way to try to per- 
suade President Hafez a! -Assad of 
Syria to order the removal of the 
missiles in the Bekaa Valiev in east- 
ern Lebanon. 

Speaking to Israeli newspaper 
editors at a luncheon in Tel Aviv, 
the prime minister stressed that 


iiibi 0 i vyiwwuuunv wiUHUUAi ■ t j » n 

the-c^rrcTf hirtalts but .tressed *“! no Syrian troop 


A witness to the disturbances, 
Colleen Gwala, said the fighting 
erupted when Zulus assembled 
Tuesday along the Umbogmtwim 
River, ringing and calling Pondos 
out to Fight 

Some survivors of the fighting 
said at a Durban. Red Gross center 
thaL the 2,000 Zulus and 3,000 Pon- 


thana fist 

ie pobce officer said after re- 
turning from the scene of the bat- 
tle, “Toere was so much blood that 
tbe grass wasn’t green; it was red." 

“What is surprising in view of 
the number of warriors and the 
ferocity of the battle is that there 
were not 500 kilted," a doctor said 
after visiting the scene. 


support its argument that blocks 
cannot govern the racially and eth- 
nically divided country. 

. Opponents of apartheid reply 
that the government plays on tribal 
distinctions and even encourages 
the rivalries by giving blacks politi- 
cal rights only in tribal homelands 
and by supporting tribal leaders 
who often rule like feudal lords. 


The Washington Pa«f 

Mohammed Emir AH, left, and Mohammed Adam escaped 
with their families when the Edriopiao Army invaded the 
Eritrean village of Habero Salim one dawn in October. 


140 Mayan, Aztec Treasures Stolen 
From State Museum in Mexico Gty 



The Asmehrred Press 

MEXICO CITY — Priceless 
Mayan and Aztec treasures and 
golden- objects dating back centu- 
ries have been stolen from the Na- 
tional Museum of Anthropology 
and History in tbe largest archeo- 
logical theft ever in Mexico, the 
museum announced Thursday. 

The 140 pieces were discovered 
iraVring Chnstmds Day from seven 
showcases in the museum, one of 
the best known tourist attractions 
in Mexico Gty, newspapers report- 
ed. 

Among the objects listed as tniss- 


from the sacred reservoir at 
chen-itza in the Yucatan peninsu- 
la. several pieces from the Palenque 
ruins in southern Mexico and gold- 
en objects in tbe Mixuc room. 

Also missing was tbe Zapolec 
mask of the “murridago," cm- bat 
god. and an Aztec Indian obsidian 


sculpture representing a monkey, 
listed in guidebooks as one of the 
most valuable pieces in the muse- 
um, It represents the god of dance, 
.games and love. 

The theft was described as the 
worst ever from a national muse- 
um, but there was no immediate 
estimate of value of loss and details 
of therobbery wore not immediate- 
ly known. 

The museum was dosed because 
of tbe robbery. About 10 police 
guards were outside. 

Enrique Florescano, director of 
the museum, said it was “the big- 
gest plundering that has been done 
to the Mexican archaeological heri- 
tage and the biggest and most im- 
portant robbery suffered by any 
museum in our country.". 

Mr. Florescano said the value 
had not been determined. But he 
said that the objects had “an im- 


portant archaeological and cultural 
value, more than economic." 

He also said the robbery “by its 
scale and dimension” had to be 
linked to tbe international traffic in 
cultural and archaeological trea- 
sures. He said such trafficking was 
a “constant threat to all museums 
in tbe world." 

An archaeologist of (he National 
Geographic magazine, Dr. George 
Stuart, said in Washington: “These 
are famous, old pieces. They’ve il- 
lustrated lots of literature. I can't 
imagine why these were stolen be- 
cause I can't really see what they’re 
going to do with them. J guess they 
could sell them to somebody, but 
they could never be shown. They’re 
as hot as the Mona Lisa would be if 
it were for sale on the illicit mar- 
ket.” 

Mexican law restricts the export 
of archaeological objects. 


the need for caution, since there 
has been no official Indication 
from Moscow of an imminent 
chan©; in policy. The Soviet diplo- 
mat did not respond to a reporter's 
request to talk to him. 

This was the blest in a series of 
reports about possible improve- 
ment in Soviet relations with Israel 
that have circulated in recent 
months. As with other such reports, 
there is no confirmation from the 
Soviet side that anything is about 
to happen. 

What is dear from the pattern of 
meetings and conversations, Rea- 
gan admmistration officials said, is 
that Moscow seems interested in 
maintaining contacts both with Is- 
raeli officials and with leading Jews 
in the West, 

Prune Minister Shimon Peres of 
Israel bos said publidy that Israel 
would be willing to attend a Middle 
East peace conference, long sought 
by Moscow and more recently by 
Jordan, only if the Soviet Union 
restored diplomatic relations, 
which it severed at the time of the 
1967 Arab- Israeli war. 

Mr. Peres also has said that such 

(Continued on Page 4, CoL 3) 


buildup in the strategic Golan 
Heights, and that the Israeli gov- 
ernment was trying to avoid mak- 
ing any statements that could lead 
to a further deterioration in rela- 
tions between the two countries. 

The Israeli Defense Forces 
would not comment officially on 
tbe deploymenL 

[Jane’s Defense Weekly reported 
this week a buildup of Syrian forces 
opposite the Golan Heights. The 
Associated Press reported. Israel 
captured the area from Syria in the 
1967 Arab-Isradi war and annexed 
it in 1981. 

[Quoting an Israeli Army offi- 
riaL Jane’s said that Syria bad built 
up an “impressive force" in tbe 
Golan area and could move rapidly 
into offensive positions.] 

Last month, the Syrians de- 
ployed a number of SAM-6 and 
SAM-8 weapons along (he D am as- 
ciis- lo- Beirut highway in Lebanon 
after Israeli jets shot down two Syr- 
ian MiG-23 fighters on Nov. "19 
during a reconnaissance mission. 

However, the missiles were 
moved back inside Syria several 
days bier after diplomatic inter- 

(Continoed on Page 4, CoL I) 


NSBDE 

k oa Japan’s rail sys- 
icais has revealed the 
■ly of a society depen- 
^taology. Page 2. 

747 design has been 
o intensive re-exand- 
r accidents. Page 3. 

% intdEgentsia is 
where Mikhail S. 
stands on cultural 
Page 4. 

k\v 

■ 

| j c ttagesinihewod£ 
Tk^porary Germans 
search for tnean- 


(tamed to seize the 
W oil companies in 
er taxes. Page II. 

ts won a $I-S2-bil- 
* am AH Nippon Air- 
t competition from 
Mrie. Page 11. 

jORROW 

immortalized in 
tories and explor- 
es longer a central 
'-douin life. 


In Mexico, 12,000 Homeless Scorn Quake Shelters 


By William Stockton 

New York Times Service 

MEXICO CITY — Living in tents and makeshift shelters 
of plywood and plastic sheets, about 12,000 people left 
homeless by the September earthquakes are eking out an 
existence on the streets of the capital. 

Generally, they scorn the more comfortable accommoda- 
tions in government-run shelters. 

They spent Christmas Day b their tents, in the median 
strips of avenues and traffic circles in the busy city center. 
Adults sat in front of tbe tents as their children played annd 
the din and fumes of traffic. 

Bits of itntel and a few decorations that hung from a 
welter of ropes supporting tbe tents were the only reminders 
of the holiday season. 

Three months after two major earthquakes killed 7,000 to 
10.000 people and left more than' 50,000 homeless, tbe tent 
people ana the Mexican government have reached a stand- 
off. 

The government wants the homeless to leave their tents 
and shacks and move into government shelters for earth- 
quake victims. 

Many of the homeless fear that if they move to distant 
shelters, they will lose whatever rights they have to rebuild 
their homes and continue their lives in the neighborhoods 
where they were born. They also fear the possibility of being 
relocated outride the city.- 

In an effort to force compliance, the government has cut 
off food and other services to the tent people. 

Many of the residents draw salaries from the same jobs 
they had before the earthquakes struck. They care for thdr 
families just as they did before their homes were destroyed 
and are able to survive without government aid. 


Members of religious and volunteer groups deliver food to 
the tents on an irregular basis, and health care is dispensed 
by volunteer doctors. 

No one interviewed during a tour of the tent cities died a 
case of anyone going hungry, although there were com- 
plaints about tbe cold. Temperatures reach above 21 degrees 

TEven if we are cold and they have 
cot off onr food, we prefer onr life 
here because we have freedom. Ike 
shelters are far away, and life there 
is too rigid. 9 

— Tent dweller in Mexico City 

centigrade (70 degrees Fahrenheit) during the day, but drop 
below 4 degrees centigrade (40 degrees Fahrenheit} at night. 

The homeless are among the poorest of tbe earthquake 
victims. Many nf diem lived in tenements whose ownership 
was unclear before the disaster and arc afraid of losing then 
housing rights, 

“That is my home right over there, I don't want to leave 
it,” said Carmen M6ndez Ramirez, holding her 2-year-old 
daughter and pointing across the street to a partly collapsed 
tenement 

She said the tenement budding was owned by a man who 
Hved in Los Angeles, and that neither she nor her neighbors 
knew what would become of it 


The collection of tents in which Mrs. Ramirez lives is 
pitched along two city blocks. T he group's leader, Ricardo 
TCIler B4ez, said 426 people live in the tents. 193 of them 
children less than five years old. 

“Most of us were bora here," be said. “This is our home. 
We are not going to leave. We have rights to a place to live 
here. If we leave we may lose that right.” 

Other homeless people have chosen to live in the tents 
because they dislike tbe regimented atmosphere in the gov- 
ernment shelters. 

“The people who ran the shelters are despotic in their 
approach to us,” said a man who lives with 550 other people 
in a community of tents and crude shacks in a small pait 

The park adjoins a middle-class apartment complex that 
was heavily damaged in the earthquakes. As many as 1J300 
people were killed when one of buddings collapsed in tbe 
gist earthquake Sept. 19. 

“Even if we are cold and they have cut off our food, we 
prefer our life here because we have freedom," the man said. 
“The shelters are far away, and life there is too rigid.” 

The government acknowledges that it has cut off food and 
Other forms of aid to encourage tbe homeless to move. 

The city administration recently began issuing certificates 
to the tent petmle stating that they lived at a specif c address 
in a building that was destroyed in tbe earthquake. Officials 
say the people are entitled to housing. 

The government hoped that the homeless, armed with tbe 
certificates, would no longer feel the need to camp next to 
their wrecked homes. But many of the homeless say they 
intend to remain in their camps regardless of the certificates. 

They say they trust neither the certificates, the govern- 
ment’s promises nor the intentions of the landlords whose 
buddings wore destroyed by the earthquakes. 


AtHarrods, Phone line 
To Lure U.S. Customers 


By Smart Auerbach 

Washington Port Service 

WASHINGTON — With 
the British pound at near-re- 
cord lows last year, Harrods, 
London’s largest department 
store invited Americans to fly 
over to pick up bargains at its 
annual after -Christmas sale. 

But the pound is up this year, 
and trans-Atlantic flights are 
not quite the bargain they once 
were. So, this week Harrods is 
using a toll-free, trans-Atlantic 

telephone number to try lo lure 

U.S. dollars to the store. - 

Americans who use the num- 
ber can buy cashmere sweaters 
and coats, a Harrods specialty, 
a week before the start of die 
store’s annual sale. 

American Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co. said that Harrods 
was the first store to use an 
international “800" number to 
attract overseas buyers since 
the service started 13 months 
ago. A caller pays no charge 
when he dials a number with an 
800 code. 

AT&T said the telephone ser- 
vice costs Harrods $90 for each 
hour that the toll-free number 
actually is used by customers. 

Beginning Friday morning, 
when the Harrods advertise- 
ment announcing the new ser- 
vice appears in The New York 
Times, customers in the United 
States will be able to did direct- 
ly to an order desk at the store, 
which is situated in the 


Knightsbridge section of Lon- 
don. The service will run until 
Jon. 5. 

Purchases can be charged on 
an American Express card. In- 
stead of refunding the British 
value-added tax. Harrods will 
pay the cost of shipping the 
purchases to the United States 
by air. 

The sale, which traditionally 
has attracted customers from 
around the world, actually be- 
gins Jan. 8, three days after the 
toll-free telephone service for 
Americans ends, and runs to 
Feb. 1. 

An estimated 300,000 shop- 
pers are expected to pour 
through the store during the 
first two days of the sale. 

The last after-Christmas sale, 
which was held when the pound 
was worth S1.15, attracted un- 
precedented numbers of Ameri- 
cans who found the prices low 
enough to justify the cost of a 
round-trip ticket to London. 
Cashmere sweaters cost them 
$73. 

Tbe prices are higher this 
year, with the pound at $1.42. 
Harrods said it would charge 
$85 for a woman's sweater and 
$130 for a man's sweater. A 
woman’s cashmere coat costs 
$225. 

L. F. Drewitt, the store’s 
managing director, said the 
company expected the service 
to “give us increased access to 
the American market" 






Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL ingRAIJO TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 27, 1985 




Attack in Japan Reveals Vulnerability of Technology 



WORLD BRIEFS 


% John Burgess 

U'abtngtort Past Serving 

TOKYO — A lightning shut- 
down of much of Japan's commut- 
er rail netwoik.by leftist radicals 
Last month has - unnerved the au- 
thorities and demonstrated just 
bow easily a few determined people 
can paralyze a society dependent 
on technology. 

Acting with military precision, 
belmeied radicals attacked the 
state-owned Japanese National 
Railways system at 34 points, most 
of them in Tokyo, early on Nov. 29. 
Trains were idled on 24 lines, af- 
fecting 18 million commuters, by 
affinal estimate. 

Tbc radicals used firebombs and 
other weapons. But most of the 
chaos resulted because they sys- 
tematically sought out and severed 
electronic cables that run along the 
tracks and direct the movement of 


trains. 

Trains were running again by 
evening. But the stunning success 
of the attacks, in a country that 
prides itself on (rains that run on 
time, shocked the public and led to 
fears of the commas bang hostage 
to anyone with baric technological 

drills. 

“Without using great physical 
power,” said Takuro Suzuki, a 
commentator who specializes in 
criminal issues, “it is now possible 
to threaten the entire mechanism of 
the city." 

In the Diet, Japan's legislature, 
Prime Minister Yasuhiro Naka- 
seme denounced the "evil acts" of 
the saboteurs, some of whom were 
said to be railroad employees. “I 
want to establish a system that en- 
sures that this never happens 
again." 

Attention is turning to the sum- 
mit meeting of Western leaders 
that Mr. Nakasone is to host in 
Tokyo in May. The attacks have led 



hair can handle 5,700 calk,” said 
Moriyuki Torii senior researcher 
at the privately run Japan Informa- 
tion Processing Development Cen- 
ter. But a single cut win knock out 
that many calk, loo. ■ 

In November 1984 an accidental 
fire in an underground cable con- 
duit in Tokyo knocked out 90,000 
telephone hues and revealed the 
fragility of the communication net- 
work- 

Data service on the main com- 
puters of major b anks snch as Mil- 


Anti-Nuclear Convention Revises Algeria’s Charter 

Tfc T) H ALGIERS (Reuters) — A convention of Algeria's ruling party, crikd 

rfntprt K 5)1 IV to approve changes in the national charter defining ideolo gy, ende d 
M. IllWyOl XWMIJ -njogdav with Presided Chadli Bendjedid appealing for economic 

realism and issuing a stem warning to hk poUbcal The 


Is Reported 


The Associated Press 

BEIJING — Several hundred 
people, mostly members of the Uy- 
gur minority group, protested 
Thursday in Shanghai against nu- 
clear testing in China’s vast Xin- 


amended charter is to be the subject of a referendum » Jan. 16. 

In an address to the convention of the National Liberation FWbI, 
Colonel Bendjedid called for an understanding of the role of the print* 
sector in the economy of socialist Algeria. He saidjh at^m ao wajrcaa the 

private sector be a substitute for the public sector, adding: It willow* 
complimentary role.” 


Kabul Appoints Non-Communists 

_ _ . . r_, i. amk 


jh^ Itygor region, a Western dip- ISLAMABAD tReutera) - Afghanistan’s Con^amho^ 
and fire emergency lines namil wml noo-Commumsts to scum government poste on the 

The diplomat, who is based in Friday’s sixth anniversary of the Soviet military intervention. . 
Sha^i. said by ufcphoaa to 


The wiwin target of attacks by a radical group in Japan has been the New Tokyo 
Inter national Airport at Narita, where move than LOW ) protesters were arrested in July. 


a police committee planning securi- 
ty for the meeting to focus more 
attention on dry services, rather 
than just the physical safety of the 
leaders. 

"It has signaled more need to 
secure the communication and 
transportation systems." said a se- 
nior officer at the government's 
National Police Agency. 

The police say the Nov. 29 attack 
was the work of an underground 
group called Chukaku-ha, or Mid- 
dle Core Faction. Last year it suc- 
ceeded in burning out much of the 
headquarters of the governing Lib- 


eral Democratic Party in a fire- 
bomb attack. 

The attackers obviously knew 
what they were doing in their as- 
sault on the rail lines. They brought 
heavy shears, lifted the lias off con- 
crete trenches that house the cables 
and cut them. 

According to press reports, they 
also tried to jam police communi- 
cations with a radio transmitter. 

It was the group’s most success- 
ful attack on high technology, but 
not their first In 1978 they cut 
cables leading to the control tower 
at the New Tokyo International 


Airport at Narita. stopping take- 
offs and landings. 

In 1 982 they hit ibe railroad sys- 
tem, chopping cables in a similar 
but less widespread action. 

The attack last month came at a 


time when Nippon Telegraph and 
the m 


Telephone, the national phone 
company, is rewiring the country 
with a high-capadty optical fiber. 
Banks and corporations are becom- 
ing more dependent cm data trans- 
fer networks for transactions. 

Optical fiber is far more efficient 
than conventional metal lines. 

“A single fiber the thickness of a 


were cut 

The radical student movement 
that nourished in Japan in the late 
1960s has vanished from many 
campuses. Those who remain with 
it, however, are fervently commit- 
ted,- and the authorities say they 

fear the radicals win try to make up 
for their low numbers with know- 
how. 

Their main target in recent years 
has been the airport at Narita, 
which they call a symbol of govern- 
ment oppression. They say they are 
acting m the interests of farmers 
whose land was taken over for con- 
struction of the airport 

It opened in 1978 after years of 
pitched battles between armed 
demonstrators and the police. De- 
spite some of the world's strictest 
security, the airport continues to be 
hit periodically by homemade 
bombs and rockets. 

The Nov. 29 attacks were osten- 
ably in support of a railroad labor 
union that has supported the air- 
port fight and also had staged a 
one-day strike to protest plans to 
Henatifmfliwtt the rail system. The 
union denounced the attaHr* 

The police have arrested 38 per- 
sons in connection with the No- 
vember attacks, including two em- 
ployees of the railroad. 


P akistanis Expect End to Martial Law This Week 


Reuters 

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan — Hie 
end to right and a half years of 
mar tial law in Pakis tan may be for- 
mally announced on Saturday, pol- 
iticians and officials said Thursday. 

They noted that President Mo- 
hammed Zia ul-Haq failed to use 
the national holiday Wednesday as 
the occasion for a speech lining 
military rule. 

The holiday marks the birth of 
Pakistan’s founder, Mohammed 
Ali Jmnah, and this year the lime- 
light was taken by banned political 
parties trying to stage a rally in 
Lahore. The police tear-gassed 
rain-soaked protesters and arrested 
about 200 of them. They were or- 
dered released Thursday. 

A joint session of the National 


Assembly and Senate, the most 
probable platform for General 
Zia’s speech, resumed a debate on 
foreign policy Thursday. 

General has promised to lift 
martial law by Jan. 1 and give pow- 
er to the civilian National Assem- 
bly elected last February. The as- 
sembly already has empowered 
him to keep parts of the constitu- 
tion suspended for as long as he 
sees fit. 

The general Zia, who seized pow- 


er in a July 1977 coup, has yet to 

le Will lift martial 


say exactly when he < 
law, what will be allowed afterward 
or whether he will leave his real 
power base, the army, to continue 
as a civilian president. 

"I cannot tell you when the 
speech will be.” said an Informa- 


tion Ministry official, but he added 
that he exported it to be on Satur- 
day because that was the last day of 
the joint legislative session. 

General Zia's critics took the po- 
lice action in Lahore as a sign that 
General Zia would not announce 
any major liberalization along with 
the end of army rule. 

"You don’t tear-gas and jail 
demonstrators if you are going to 
restore basic rights in a few days," 
one of them said. 

Meanwhile, the Pakistani au- 
thorities ordered more than 260 po- 
litical dissidents fr e ed Thur sday in 
the province of Punjab, official 
sources said. 

The sources, speaking in Lahore, 
said orders were issued for the im- 
mediate release of all opposition 


politicians and workers arrested 
since Dec. 22, including the 200 
arrested Wednesday trying to stage 
the rally in Lahore. 

Opposition sources said most of 
the imprisoned dissidents had been 
freed Thursday. 

In the Karachi daily newspaper 
Dawn, retired Brigadier AJL Sid- 
diqi, a frequent commentator on 
military and political affairs, 
wrote: 

"Political opinion seems over- 
whelmingly weighted in favor of 
the depressing prospect that what- 
ever is going to come to tight in the 
next few days in the name of the 
lifting of martial law and revival of 
the democratic process would be 
mere eyewash.” 



Mohammed Zia ni-Haq 


the demonstration occurred along 
the Bund, Shanghai's main water- 
front area. There was no indepen- 
dent confirmation of the report. 

Speaking on die condition that 
he not be identified, the diplomat 

said he bad no other details and 
that it was undear whether the 
demonstrators were students. 

He noted that many students 
r-nnrw from Xinjiang from a 
Uygur community in Shanghai. 

Tan Longxiang, an official of the 
Foreign Affairs Office of the 
shanghai Public Security Bureau 
said, “We know nothing about a 
demonstration." 

About 200 Uygur students from 
Xinjiang demonstrated Sunday in 
Beijing’s Tiananmen Square 
against the weapons testing. 

A caller to a Western news agen- 
cy said earlier this week that the 
students also were demanding 
more autonomy for the northwest- 
ern region, exemption from the 
governments family planning po- 
licy, and die reinstatement of the 
former governor of Xinjiang. 

The caller said simil ar protests 
occurred earlier in Xinjiang. The 
region is home to many minority 
groups, including an estimated six 
minion Uygnxs, f * nf - million Ka- 
zaks an d seven minion of China's 
13 million Moslems. 

This autumn, students in several 
cities also protested against eco- 
nomic inroads by the Japanese, 
corruption in China’s government 
and poor living conditions. 

The Lop N or testing groan d, 
where China exploded its first 
atomic bomb in 1964, is in Xinjiang 
Uygur. 

■ Police Search for Killers 

The Chinese police have mount- 
ed a national manhunt for six men 
who killed a Moslem man in an 
attack on Moslems in the city of 
Xian in Shaanxi province, a Public 
Security Bureau source said Thurs- 
day, Reuters reported from Xian. 

He said the man’s funeral set off 
a street demonstration by 2,000 
Morions, who marched from the 
(sty’s Great Mosque to City Hall 
on Dec. 15 to demand police ac- 
tion. 


preparations for the anniversary. ........ 

The radio, monitored in Islamabad, said a majority of the 14 


appointed as ministers, advisers and deputy ministers did not 
tfaeruling People’s Democratic Party of Afghanistan. It sawtiat, _ 
Amanuddin .Amin, a textile executive who is not a party member, wffl he 


a deputy prime minister. 

State Asks Review of Junta Verdicts 

BUENOS AIRES(AP) —Prose- 



cutors have asked the 
Court to review a trial court’s ac- 
quittal of four former rrafiUry rul- 
ers and its conviction of five otfcns 
cm only some of the human ngfais 
charges that they faced. 

Roberto Viola, the farmer Ar- 
gentine president, also filed aadp- 


Roberto Viola 


to strike down his conviction ttr 
the 17-year prison sentence thtffae ‘ 
received Dec. 9. The other men who 
were convicted, including the (far- 
mer president Jorge VidcU, already 
had filed appeals. The case 
stemmed from the kidnap, torture 
and execution of at feast 9JM& wh- 
pected leftists by military and po- 
lice forces in die 1970s. 

The Federal Court of Appeals, 
which conducted die trial, mud de- 
cide whether U> forward the ip- 
peals to the Supreme Coart. ! 


One Dies as Punjab Violence Contmnes 


CHANDIGARH, India (Reuters) — A man was ItiBed and a shop- 
keeper was wounded Wednesday by Sikh extremists as sectarian violence 
continued in Punjab state, the police said Thursday. 

The attacks came as Hindus of the rightist Shiv Sena group criled for a 
statewide strike on Friday to protest Hmdu-Sikh violence on TuesdrjS 
Gurdaspur. At least one person was lulled and 12 were injure d whca tL. 
police opened fire to break up the disturbances. An indefinite curfew hut 
been imposed in Gurdaspur. 

Tbc press Trust of India news agency said a man was killed Wednesday 
nigfn jn the Ferozpur district near the bonier with Pakistan and a 
shopkeeper was shot in Amritsar. 


Jews Seek Compensation From Flick 




• 7Sr,* J jr 


"T.-v/' ••f'i v 

“ - v * ,v--* *■■■ ' “ "v i 


me 






.f*- 


Belaid the debt crisis- 

Latin 

America 

the next ten years 


Sponsored by the International Herald Tribune & the Inter-American Desdopmoxt Bant 

Londoo, January 27-28, 1986. 


a< 


Europe anefi the 


Stares to examine 


and 

die outlook for Latin America over fee next ten years. 

As places at ffaeccmfqeooe are sliicftyHimted, we recommend that senior ooBCgthre from the 

hanVing anr? business i^mpnimity interested attendi n g nnmplrtp. and rpflil re g str aljon form today. 


JANUARY 27, 1986 


JANUARY 28, 1986 


Chairman: Lae W. Husbner, Publisher, 

International Harold Tribune. 

KEYNOTE ADDRESS 
Antonio Ortiz Mono, President, 

Inter-American Development Bank, Washington D.C 

SNAPSHOT OF THE DEBT CRISIS, RESOH3UUNG MOVES, 
ADJUSTMENT PROGRAMS 

Eduardo Wiesner Duran, Western Hemisphere Director, 
International Monetary Fund, Washington D.C 
LATIN AMWCAN INITIATIVES TO TACKLE 
THE DEBT PROBLEM 

Jesus Silva Herzog, Finance Minister, Mexico. 

FemSo Brother, Governor, Centred Bank, Brazil. 

HOW THE INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL SYSTEM 
SHOULD ADAPT 

Michel Camdessus, Governor, Banque de France. 

Rohm teigh-Fernberfon, Governor, Bank of England 
HCW MULTINATIONALS HAVE MADE A SUCCESS OF 
OPERATING IN THE REGION 
CJ. van der KJugt, Vk&Chatrmctn, 

Philips Industries, Gndhoven. 

Peter Wallenberg, First Vice Chairman, 

SfamO&K M sIcaEnririda Banfasn, Stockholm. 

REVIVING INDUSTRIES IN LATIN AMERICA 

The Honorable Edward Seago, MF, Prime Minister, Jamaica. 

Francisco S m elt, Finance Minister, Ecuador. . 

Amdkfe Munich, Director, Organization Techint, Buenos Aires. 


Chairman: Anthony Sampson , internation a l writer. 

Editor of The Sampson Letter. 

NEW EFFORTS TO STIMULATE TRADE WITH THE AREA 
Claude Chey&son, Etropecm Commissioner, Brussels. 

Fetipe JaramBlo, Charman of the Contracting Pa-ties 
to the GATT, Geneva. 

THE NEED FOR A LONG-TERM SOLUTION TO THE DEBT 
PROBLEM AND FOR NEW CRHXTS 
Enrique Iglesias, Foreign Minister, Uruguay. 

Manuel Ufloa Bias, former Prime Minister, Peru. 

THE COMMSOAL BANKS’ VIEW OF LATIN AMERICA 
David Rodeefetier, Chairman, International Advisory 
C o m m ittee, The Chose Man h attan Bank, New York. 

WHBam Rhodes, Chatrmai, ffa^ructuring Committee, 
Citibank, New York. 

Werner Blessing, Member of the Board of Managing 
Directors, Deutsche Bank; Frankfort. 

PeRSPECnVB ON ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL DEVHOPhWT 
aj Central America 

Carlas Mantel GariS b, former Vfoe President, Casta Bco. 
b) Andean Region: 

Manuel Azpurua Ameaza, Finance Minister, Venezuela 
THE FUTURE: REVIVING GROWTH AND DEVELOPMBVT. 
THE COMMON 1NTBIEST 

Lard Harold Lower, fanner Chancellor, Duchy of Lcmoaster. 
ROUND TAfif: DiSCUSSONOF A CURRENT K3JE 
Partidpation from severd key speaker. 


KB(3SnUT!ON INFORMATION 

The fee for the conference is $995 or the 
equivdert in a convertWe currency for each 

ATLU^bosed partitiparts ore subject to^ W 
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relumed in ful for any araUan postmarked 
on or before January 13. 

Please return regsftafon form to: 

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181 Avenue CHcrieKteGoufc, 

92521 N«Jy Cedex, fixxxa Or t el ephon e: 

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DEVELOPMENT BANK 


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urn i imw. 


CONFERENCE LOCAHON 

Dm ftA toe Hot* floufly, London WlYBBCTtata* {44 1)499 $321. Tetoa 21531 
A bbd rf mens hot bm maned fcr conference portion*. FIhbb contact hetoi <SncAf. 

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■ TBSC. 


27-12-83 


Burkina Faso Reported 
To Bomb Malian Town 


i .• 


BONN (Reuters) —The Central Council of Jews in West Germany 
urged the Flick conglomerate on Thursday to compensate people it toed 
as slave labor under the Nazis. 

The council's chajt mim^ Werner Nachmanti. toM the Cologne Express 
newspaper that Flick should pay out six millian to eight million Deutsche 
marks ($2.4 million to $3 2 nniiion), which he described as a trifle for such 
a huge company. 

"The money would go to poor, old people who suffered especially 
under farced labor to support than in the evening of their lives," Mr, 
Nachmarm said. He did not say how many people were eligible, Friedrich 
* Karl Flick, the company's sole owner and the son of Its founder, rectull v 
sold the conglomerate to the Deutsche Bank, West Germany’s larj£. 
bank, for abexit five billion DM. ■ ■ 


World Chess lineup Is Announced 


ConpUed bj Our Staff From Dtyadta 

ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast — Bur- 
kina Faso said Thursday night that 
its air force had launched a raid on 
the southern Malian town of Si- 
kasso in a further escalation of the 
two-day dash between the two 
neighboring West Afrknn nations. 

Burkina Faso's government ra- 
dio, monitored here, gave no details 
on the air attack an the town, which 
is located about 30 miles (50 kilo- 
meters) inside Malian territory. 

The announcement followed re- 
ports from Burkina Faso of a sec- 
ond day of fighting on its frontier 
with Mali. Both sides have accused 
the other of launching raids. 

The zarfio said the raid on Si- 
kasso was aimed at nnKtajry targets, 
adding it had caused "immense 
damage,” Reuters reported from 
Abugaa. 

It did not say how many aircraft 
took part but said they had aB 
returned to base. . 

Both rides have claimed victory 
in the conflict, both have denied 
responsibility for starting h and 
both have denied incurring serious 
casualties. r 

Burkina Faso contended that it 
had recaptured four border towns 
after a "barbarous"- attack by Mali 
an Wednesday, The Associated 
Press reported from Abidjan. 

No reason was given for the 
fighting, but Burkina Faso, former- 
ly known as Upper Volta, was re- 
ported to have occupied (he four 
towns in Mali on Deo 14. Burkina 
Faso announced Friday it had 
withdrawn all its soldiers from the 
area, but MaE contended that 
troopa remained. 

Burkina Faso radio said from the 
capital, Ouagadougou, that MaH 
began the fighting with a ground 
and air attack on the four towns in 
whidi four civilians were ldBed and 
11 were wounded. 

However, Foreign Minister 
AHoune Bkmdin Bey e of Mali said 
that Malian forces had expelled 
Burkina Faso’s troops from the 
contested villages and had pushed 
forward into Boririna Faso, Ageoce 
France-Prcsse reported from Da- 
kar, SenegaL 

Contacted by telephone from the 
Senegalese capital, Mr. Beye said 
(hat Malf 5 armed forces had ex- 



LUCERNE, Switzerland (A F) — The World Chess Federation an- 
nounced Wednesday the dates and places for the semifinal matches in tbc 
1986 World Chess Championships. ■ 

The Dutch grandmaster, Jan Tunman, is to play Artur Yusu^pov of pe 
Soviet Union beginning Jan. 15 in Tilburg, the Netherlands, with a prize 
fund of S38JXX). Two Soviet grandmasters, Rafael Vaganian and Andrei 
Sokolov, are to face each other in Minsk in the Soviet Union beginning 
Jam 8, with a purse of SI 1,900. the federation said. 

It said the winners would meet in March or April at a place yet to he 
derided. The winner of that match is to play the loser of the return match 
between Gary Kasparov of the Soviet Union, the world champion, and 
the former world champion, Anatoli Karpov. That winner, the federation 
said, would have the right to challenge the world champion in a title 
match scheduled at the aid of 1986. 


For the Record 


Cup — 


"Of course we did not stop 
there," be said. Officials in Bama- 
ko, Mali's capital, said that Malian 
troops had pushed 18 miles (30 
kflometers) inside Burkina Faso at 
two points near the northern towns 
of Ooahigoaya and Djibo. 

The dispute, Currently before the 
International Court of Justice in 
The Hague, centers on an area that 
supposedly is rich in minerals; it is 
100 miles long and 35 miles wide 
and situated near where Burkina 
Faso, Mali and Niger meet 

The last serious fighting was in 
1974, when Mali sent in troops to 
occupy the disputed area. The dis- 
pute was settled when the Mahans 
withdrew under pressure from the 
Organ ira tioa of African Unity. 

The two nations look the dilute 

to the World Court in October 


King Hussein of Jordan vrifl visit Syria on Saturday after four mortar * 
talks, sponsored by the Arab League, at earing years of t&Z * 
between the two countries, diplomatic sources said Thursday. (Reuters) 
A second Irish nationalist goenilk, Gerard Anthony Steeason, 28, has 
joined a threatened hunger strike to the death at Northern Ireland’s Maze 
prison, a government spokesman said Thursday. (AP) 

AU.S. Air Force F-4 fighter jet crashed while taking off Thursday on a 
routine training mission from Spangdahlem Air Base in West Germany, 
but the two-man crew ejected safely, the Air Force said. (Ar) 

As Algerian coart has sentenced 22 alleged supporters of Ahmed Ben 
Bella, the country’s fast president, to prison terms ranging up to TOyem 
following their conviction on charges Of threatening national security. 
Another 21 defendants were acquitted. IAP, ) 


Iraqis, Awaiting an Offensive 
By Iran, Build Miles of fiams 


Rouen 

BAGHDAD — Iraqi civilians 
have built hundreds of miles of 
dams and em bankm ents jn [he 
country’s southern marshe s to help 
the army repel an expected Ir anian 
offensive, a government official 
said. 


Wednesday that 85,0001^’i <££ been Hied or-ariurei' ‘ J 
ians from nine provinces iSk Mr. Latif saSwhudtoda “pop- 


The vice chairman of Iraq's ml- 
ing Revolutionary Command 
Council, Izzat Ibrahim, said 


three Iraqi army corps are 
tioned. • • 

Mr. Ibrahim said -that Iranian 
troops fired 2.85 1 aifflery sheik' os 
the Iraqi civilians who worked on 
the dams *nd embankments-. 

He gave no figures on casualties, 
but Abdnl-Wahab Mohammed La- 
tif, the mayor of Baghdad, said in a 
similar message to President Hus- 
sdn that a number of P 00 ^ ^ 


not meet until April 29 tins year. A 
judgment is expected next year. 

MaH and Burkina Faso are two 
of the world's poorest countries. 
Mali has a per-capiut gross nation- 
al product $180; Burkina Faso’s is 
S210. 

Both countries are members of 
the West African Economic Com- 
munity of seven former French col- 
onies, through whidi they techni- 
cally have a nonaggression and 
mutual defense agre emen t. Their 


1 provinces took part 
m a monthlong campaign to cut 
reeds in the marshes, where Iran 
has launched previous 'offensives. 


armies each have about 4,000 men, 

petted the troops from the villages but Matf s is better-equipped, nota- 


wiihcvt loss to themselves. 



UNIVERSITY 

DEGREE 


MCHaOfSvMASIBrS -DOCTORATE 

Fof .IrwWc, UN Eapwtonf. 

Send itefened rmm» 
for fm evamaffon. 


PAQRC WESTERN UNIVERSITY 

600 N. Swulvsdo Blvd- . 

Los Aneeles, California 
90047. Datf.13, UjSJL ' 


bly having a combat air arm com- 
posed of half a dozen obsolete So- 
viet-supplied MiG- 17s. 

(Reuters, AP, AFP) 


The civilians also built <lam« jg 
areas that are about '275 yards (250 
metera) from enemy positions, Mr. 
Ibrahim said in a telegram to Presi- 
dent Sad d a m Hussein, the official 
Iraqi news agency INA reported. 

The marsh reeds have been 
turned into “a carpet for the Iraqi 
armed forces, into a mountain of 
fire between us and the evil." be 
said in the message - 
Reports in Baghdad and Tehran 
have said that Iran recently 
troops on the other ade of the bor- 
der, opposite an area where at least 



( £ok ® 

■ fe.1911 

"the Bteth p^cc of ^ Btaodv Mary- 

Just rcU tfo* m< dnver "sank roo doenoo" 

• 5 Rue Daunou, PARIS 

. • Bukenturm Str. 9 , MUNICH 

• Pbtnr Hoed ANIF-SALZBUBH 



ular weak drive” tint built huge 
defenave embankments and ap- 
proaches from the marshes south- 
ward to the scfflifeermhbst-pc^Qf 
A1 Faw on the Gulf.. -Toe 
stretches more than 250 rates (4W 
kflometers} akmg the warfrojfL : 

Meanw&fc, the Kuwait 
Agency rqxjned- that an irsno. 
haicopter aaacked a Kuwaiti 
tanker on Wednesday wfafle'rt 
anchored in Qatar’s teaiio aaaJ wa- 

The ftwirm^p of die Kuwait OH 
Tasker Ccanpray. Abcfe^*^ 
ai-Badr, said that the tanka'. «e 
Karimah, was canimig . 261 .WB 
tons of Kuwaiti crude, -.z: 

m Qirin^ V^^ 

. A Roman CatbdtecanfinaLfrOffl 

France led a Christmas Mbs qo 
pHnsday in fran for 
dans who. are prisoners <tf 17** 
United -Press^ Internatiood 
edfrora Brirut, : - . ; \ 

The- Iranbn state news SgcB? , 
IRNA said that Cardinal 
che^aEaysIso carried a 
President Alt Kharort& 'of 
from Pope JohaTted JL'. 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 27, 1985 


Page 3 


By Douglas B. Beaver 

If. ■ Washington Post Service ■ 

; ' < „ : < WASHINGTON — Hie Boring 747, 
• *' : poshed to theJBmit thebonndaiks of 

"-^ ynrnr aal aviation technology when it ea- 

''v^'-rtd'savicpin.lStfSjhasbeaanethcOTlgect 
fntm^e rc-cxaminatinti in tbi? year that 
" ^ ’is srio almost 2,000 deaths, the most in 
■ > /D aviation history. 

’v The fonr-eorane 747 has a remarkable re- 
ji r ni for retiaSDity, hot re-examination of 
* '^thv me of its basic design concepts has been 
. _ sliced this year by two catastrophic events 
■ “ d two disquieting but not fatal incidents. 

: .TVjlie catasttophes were the crashes of an 
*. " t i-IntHa 747 that killed 329 people in Jane 
" ' „\;d a Japan Air Lines jumbo in winch 520 
”■ '•< :*1 hi Angnst. 

The first troubling but nonfatai incident 
_ ‘ 1 '--. birred Dec. 2 when an Air France 747 
^ iding in Rio dc Janeiro ran off the runway 

, ' -'-Off one engine ran amok. And on Dec. IS, a 
1 itish Airways 747 carrying 271 people 
typed a hn^! wing-flap section on a snbur- 
i . q Boston neighboihood wb2e landing at 
’ *■ JUjifr- r gan International Airport " 

*' 4 ' 6 No injuries were reported in either inei- 
. ; at, bat casualty-free conclusions would 
- 'i be assured if the same thing? happened 
other points in flight or with less skillful 
.7 ota. 

. - Thac are more than 600 Boeing 747 jum- 
' .jets in service. Each carries as many as 550 


- . ’ **Ij bis been a bad year for that airplane, 


tat there is nothing we are serine that has 
tied it together,” said Leroy A. Keith, who is 
in charge of aircraft certification for the 
Federal Aviation Administration's regional 
office in Seattle, where Boeings are built 
“We haven’t found any common thread.” 

. The Air-India crash into the Irish Sea on 
June 23 remains a gnawing worry for Mr. 
Keith and others in aviation safety became 
they do not know exactly what ha ppened 

The crash has afl the earmarks of a terror- 
ist bombing, and Sikh separatists have 
claimed responsibility. But no evidence con- 
firms that account despite an international 
investigation, induding salvage of many 
pieces of the aircraft from the ocean floor, 
6,000 feet (about 1,800 meters) below sea 
IcveL 

One piece was a section of a baggage- 
compartment wall and hnH 13 holes punched 
in it, from the inside. That was first thought 
to confirm a bombing but, when the section 
was exa mi n e d ashore, the holes were found 
to have been caused by popping rivets as the 
wall was tom from supporting strings 
while the airplane was coming, aparL 

The Japan Air lines crash occurred Aug. 
12 after the plane lost a tail-fin section and 
Hew uncontrollably for about 40 minutes 
after takeoff from Tokyo. Much evidence 
prints to coQajpse of the rear-cabin wall un- 
der air pressure as the 747 climbed to cruis- 
ing altitude. The wall, called the aft pressure 
bu lkhead , had been cracked in 1978 in a 
landing accident and repaired by Boring. 


oing Intensive Re-examination After Accidents 


Boring said its “examination of the aft make other problems worse,” Mr. Keith said, 
pressure bulkhead at the rite of the crash” As for pressure bulkheads generally, the 
has revealed “that a relatively small section FAA’s study is to make certain that no basic 
of the bu lkhead splice (approximately 17 design problem, as oppose! to a maiute- 
percent) was not correctly assembled during nance-created problem, is lurking to surprise 
- —— which Boring made." a pilot. 

Boring has not slated that the 


faulty re pai r caused the crash, the company 
has agreed to split with JAL compensation 
payments to victims’ fanatics. 

That accident set off a major U.S, study of 
the integrity of pressure bulkheads on all 
aircraft, not just 747s, and restudy of the 
integrity of the 


Changes also have been ordered in the 747 
tail to ascertain that air escaping explosively 
through the bulkhead win not expand into 
the ta3 section. That is being done by cover- 
ing a maintenance-access hole in the tail. 

The Air France in cident in Brazil is simply 
explained and apparently simple to avoid. A 


i fcJnSt 

about the latter ittue Burma initial reviews of broke just after touchdown. As the tension 

was released, the engine surged beyond take- 
off power, pulling the plane off of the run- 
way as the crew fought for control with the 
otno’ three engines. 

The FAA has ordered a fleetwide inspec- 
tion of engine-control cables for wear, then 

regular remspectiaos while it studies whether 


about the latter issue during initial reviews of 
die 747 design 20 years ago. 

The 747 is. so large that constructing me- 
chanical linkages from the cockpit to all of 
the plane’s controls is impossible. Hydraulic 
limes do the job instead. 

Tbc FAA’s concern at the time of 747 
design was that if one hydraulic system were 


to fail, another coold pick up the load. The” deagn changes arenceded. 


result is four separate, redundant hydraulic 

systems. 

However, all four systems have connec- 
tions to controls in the tail, and hoses for all 
four systems pass through the aft pressure 

bulkhead. “1 have asked our folks to make 
sure the systems are separated, to revalidate 
-the design," Mr. Keith said. 

Hie tricky part of snch revalidating is that 
any change will probably affect something 
rise. “AH the changes we have looked at can 


In Boston, pitinmnaxy analysis indicated 
that a nut sheared off a bolt holding the wing 
flap, one of the large control panels that 
extends from the rear of the wingfor takeoffs 
and landtpp 

Whatever the 74 Ts problems, they have 
not affected the order book at Boring, which 
sold a record S 12.44 billion worth of new 
airplanes this year, inducing a $3 riDion 
deal with Unitol Airlines aim a $2 billion 
transaction with Northwest Airlines. 



Two models of rite 747. The 747SP (special performance) is 47 feet shorter than the 
standard version. The smaller one carries 288 passengers and the larger as many as 550. 

r It has been a bad year for dial airplane, bat there is no thing tha t has 
tied it together. We haven't found any common thread.' 

— Leroy A. Keith , FAA official 




11b Now Yak Ta 


A gunshop in lima, above, selling weapons in response 
to a spate of kidnappings. At left, a gang of youths, one 
of them a child, robbing a man in daylight in Tima. 


7* 


l do R.I.P.: U.S. Pet Cemetery Thrives 


By Steve Harvey 

Las Angeles Times Service • 

ARSON, California — A Christinas tree, covered 
h ornaments, stood by Puke’s grave Wednesday. A 
■Jjiiature Nativity scene decorated Tiger's final rest- 
place. A jovial, plastic Santa Claus watched over 
jbPs marker. 

Jeath rid not exclude several of the animals buried 
he Bet Haven Memorial Cemetery and Crematory 
Carson, about 20 miles (32 kilome t e r s) south of 
tral Los Angeles, from being a part of the Christ- 
) celebrations of their surviving owners. 

, Has is a time for remembering loved ones,” a 
tetay spokesman said, “and for many people, pets 

a part of the family " 

- : rands Sbarvat visited Pet Haven on Christmas 


maraing to leave a potted plant near the markers of his 
poodles, Julie, Puff and Metta. 

“Every holiday — I never miss,” said Mr. Sharvat, a 
Los Angeles hairdresser. ‘‘They meant too TTinr ^ 1 to 
me." 

Nearby, a man and woman were digging with 
spades as they prepared to plant a <on«ll Christmas 
tree. Another couple was arranging cut flowers around 
a grave. Only a pay cat that licked hexsdf as she lay oo 
the marker of a dog named Duchess seemed unaffect- 
ed by the Christmas sentiments. 

The holiday season is such a bustling time at Pet 
Haven that the cemetery floodlights are left on until 9 
PAL for the convenience -of evening visitors and 
passers-by, the spokesman said. 

Pet Haven, which has been open since 1948, con- 
tains the remains of about 22,000 pets. 


incoln’s Descendant, 
lobert Beckwith, Dies 


Milr 


71r Associated Press 
1ARTF1ELD, Virginia — Rob- 
- rodd Lincoln Bedcwith, 81, the 
' direct descendant of Abraham 
join, died Tuesday. 

' lr. Beckwith, the greai-grand- 
' ?f the 16th president, died in a 
- tog home in Saluda, Vi rginia. 
-* family’s attorney said that in 
’ yean Mr. Beckwith had been 
with Paririnsan’s disease, 
ut year, Mr. Beckwith told an 
if v * e * cr for Life Magazine that 
0 JE ■ * Youth he had enjoyed sailing 
•> lesapeake Bay, raising Black 
os cattle on his ranch in Hart- 
and car racing. 

’m a spoiled brat," he said, 
r- Beckwith received a law de- 
fram what is now Georgetown 
erripr. He donated most of his 
us forebear’s documents, art 
-'urniture to the state of Ab- 
raham Lincoln and his wife 
Todd had four sons, but only 
revived to manbood. 

: eldest, Robert Todd Un- 
ited a law career in Chicago, 
1 as secretary of war under 
ten James A Garfield, was 
aador to Britain and preri- 

f the P ullman c ompan y. He 

t moltimfllionaire in 1926 at 

*cxt Todd Lincoln and his 
Maty, had three children. 
Youngest, Jessie, eloped in 


& Defeat Motion 
formon University 

Reuters 

JSALEM - The Israeli 
neat has defeated a pariia- 
> no-confidence motion by 
titra-reli^ous Jewish party 
a protesting the construe- 
a Jerusalem branch of a 
‘ a university. 

five members of the 120- 
teset supported the motion 
day, induding its sponsors, 
representatives of the Agu- 
d Party. They say they fear 
eh of Brigham Young Uni- 
n Provo, Utah, would be 
convert Jews to Mormon- 


1897 with Warren Beckwith, a 
i-Jnccmate and football star at Iowa 
Wesleyan College. 

They had two cbfldrcn: Mary 
Lincoln Beckwith, who died in 
1975, and Robert Todd Lincoln 
Beckwith, who was bom in River- 
ride, Illinois, on July 19, 1904. 
Ferhat Abbas, Headed 
Algerian Regime in War 

ALGIERS (AP) — Ferhat Ab- 
bas, 86, a moderate named by Alge- 
rian independence forces as presi- 
dent of their provisional 
government while the country was 
still governed by France, has died, 
the APS news agency said Wednes- 
day. 

Mr. Abbas, a pharmacist, was 
named the first president of the 
Provisional Government of the Al- 
gerian Republic in 1958 by the Al- 
gerian National Liberation Front 

He held the post through 1961, 
during some of the Woodiest fight- 
ing between the independence 
forces and French troops. 

After Algeria gained indepen- 
dence in 1962. Mr. Abbas support- 
ed Ahmed Ben Bella as the new 
slate’s first president. Mr. Abbas 
was elected president of the Na- 
tional Assembly. 

He resigned in 1963 after break- 
ing with Mr. Ben Bella’s moves to 
develop a socialist state. Mr. Abbas 
was placed under house arrest and 
remained so under President 
Houari Boumfidienne, who de- 
posed Mr. Ben Bella. 

Mr. Abbas was released from 



Robert Lincoln Beckwith 

bouse arrest after a year and deco- 
rated by ChadH Bendjedid* Mr. 
Boom&fienne’s successor, an the 
30th anniversary of independence 
in November last year. 

■ Other deaths: 

Ivan Grishin, 74, the Soviet depu- 
ty foreign trade minister, Monday, 
Tass said Thursday. 

Cortland Anderson, 50, director 
of the E.W. Scripps School of Jour- 
nalism at Ohio University in Ath- 
ens, Tuesday of cancer. 

Kozo Sasaki, 84. who served 1 1 
terms in the Japanese Diet mid was 
pace c hairman of the Socialist Par- 
ty, Tuesday. . 

SaDy Gannett McAdam, 63, a 
trustee of the Gannett Foundation 
and daughter of the founder of 
Gannett Co. Imx, Monday of can- 
cer in Greenwich, Connecticut. 

Otto Zansmer, 78, a retired asso- 
ciate editor of Die Boston Globe 
who specialized in reporting on for- 
eign affairs, Friday in Newton, 
Massachusetts. 


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Kid nappi ng Wave Drives Peruvians to Buy Guns 


By Alan Riding 

New York Times Service 

LIMA — With a 257 ma gnum 
revolver in his shoulder bolster and 
a sho t gun on his desk, Edgard Ri- 
vera sat in front of two television 
monitors watching clients enter his 
weapons store. 

“The security situation has got 
out of hand." he said. “Our sales 
are three »un*< higher than last, 
year. People are having to arm 
thansdves because the police can’t 
protect them.” 

Even for a city that in the last 
year has experienced car bombings, 
blackouts and daytime InHinpc by 
leftist guerrillas, a recent wave of 
kidnappings has come as a shock 
here, suddenly forcing Lima's mid- 
dle and upper to change 

their way of hfe. 

“The rich are hiring bodyguards 
by the hundreds,” Mr. Riven said. 
“Husbands are teaching their wives 
how to use guns. Famines are buy- 
ing savage dogs. They’ve stopped 
going out alone. They're keeping 
their children at home. And they’re 
right in doing so.” 

The government asserts that 48 
kidnappings have been reported to 


police this year, compared with 
only nine in 1984. But officials con- 
cede that the real fignre is far high- 
er because the families or most vic- 
tims follow orders and negotiate 
quietly. 

What is more surprising is that 
.the widespread fear has been creat- 
ed not by Peruvian guerrillas, but 
rather by bands of ordinary crimi- 
nals who, one official said, “have 
suddenly found that it is a safer and 
more profitable way of earning a 
living than robbing banks." 

This has , in turn, spotli ghted the 
police’s inability to cope with the 
crime wave. And with several for- 
mer policemen among the 22 peo- 

{ ile arrested and 52 being sought 
or kidnappings, h also has served 
to enforce the public's image of the 
police as comipL 
The government of Presklent 
Alan Garda Pfrez, which took of- 
fice in July, has mounted a major 
cleanup of the 70,000-member Gv- 
fl Guard, Republican Guard and 
Investigative Police. So far, the 
government has dismisrad more 
than 300 senior officers, in many 
cases for suspected involvement in 
narcotics trafficking. 


Yet, while hiring former Scot- 
land Yard detectives as security ad- 
visers and promoting legislation 
that increases punishment for kid- 
napping from a maximum of six 
years to a minimum of 25 years in 
prison, it has so far had little suc- 
cess in addressing what the interior 
minister, Abel Salinas, has called 
“an aggressive, cruel and very dar- 
ing form of crime." 

A police detective said the kid- 
napping wave was “very difficult to 
combat because it doesn’t involve a 
■angle organization." 

Few members of Lima’s social or 
political elite have so far been kid- 
napped, perhaps because they have 
traditionally taken security precau- 
tions. Rather, most victims have 
been little known but wealthy in- 
dustrialists or mem ber s of their 
famili es, prompting speculation 
that some kidnappers have banking 
sources that identify targets. 

Two particular kidnappings have 
drawn widespread attention in the 
press. The kidnappers of Alejandro 
Muncher Puppo, a prominent in- 
dustrialist. tried for more than a 
month to negotiate a ransom but 
failed because they could not dem- 


onstrate be was still alive. He had 
in fact been killed accidentally dur- 
ing his capture. 

On the other hand, the affluent 
family erf Herbert Sea vino Jock ell, 
a 17-year-old motocross champion 
who was kidnapped more than two 
months ago, obtained shocking 
proof that the youth was still alive 
when they received his ear in the 
mail accompanied by a tape re- 
cording of his screams as the muti- 
lation took place. 

Most kidnappings, however, ap- 
pear to be resolved within 48 to 72 
hours, without police involvement 
and with the victim released after 
payment of ransoms 

Paradoxically, the streets ana 
sidewalks of downtown Lima are 
crowded with armed policemen, yet 
security experts say they provide 
little protection because they lack 
training. 

“I gel 30 to 40 policemen coming 
into my shop every day just to buy 
two or three bullets with their own 
money” Mr. Rivera said as he 
ginTimt at ihf tele vision monitor 
by his side. “The only way they can 
have target practice is by paying for 
it themselves.” 


2 Doctors Say 
Baby Powder Is 
Unsafe if Inhaled 

United Press International 

BOSTON — Baby powder is un- 
safe for infants and may even cause 
death if inhaled by children with 
tracheotomy tubes, two doctors 
said Thursday in a letter urging 
parents to stop using the popular 
product. 

Representatives erf Johnson & 
Johnson, the largest manufacturer 
of baby powder in the United 
States, disagreed, saying that the 
“product is safe when used as it is 
intended.” 

Dr. .William H. Cotton, & pedia- 
trician at the University of Gncin- 
natfs Children’s Hospital Medical 
Center, and Dr. Patnaa J. David- 
son said in a letter to The New 
England Journal of Medicine that 
the death last summer of a four- 
month-old infant with a tracheoto- 
my tube, inserted into the neck to 
assist breathing, shows the danger 
caused by inhalation of baby pow- 
der. 

Dr. Cotton said that other chil- 
dren also can congh and choke on 
the powder. “Usually the powder 
doesn’t get further than the month, 
but if the dose is big enough and it 
gets into the lungs, a chemical 
pneumonia can result," be said in a 
telephone interview. 

Adoption Theory 
Refuted by Study 

Washington Pest Service 

WASHINGTON — Black and 
other nonwhite children adopted 
by white families have high self- 
esteem, do well in school and show 
no signs of major emotional dam- 
age from the adoption experience, 
according to a recently released 
study. 

Rita James Simon of American 
University and Howard Altstem of 
the University of Maryland said 
their study contradicted the idea 
that blade children adopted by 
whites suffered severe psychologi- 
cal damage.“We found the children 
remarkably weD-adjusted and weil- 
integrated into their adoptive fam- 
ilies,” Ms. Simon said. ‘The y did 
reasonably well at school, and they 
had a good self-image. This will 
break some stereotypes.” 

About 85 percent erf the parents 
who adopted nonwhite children 
said they would do it again. 


The ultimate by 
Metaxa 







reek classic 






Syrian Missiles Are Back 
In Lebanon, Peres Says 


(Continued from Page 1) 
vention by ibe United States, Israe- 
li government sources said. 

When the Syrian missile deploy- 
ment was disclosed on Dec. 15, the 
Israeli Army chief of staff. Lieuten- 
ant General Mosbe Levy, warned 
that Israel would not tolerate an 
infringement on its ability to con- 
duct fljghts over Lebanon. 

An army command official, 
while refusing to discuss details of 
the new deployment said, “If it 
happened, there is really not much 
difference'’ in whether the missiles 
“are on the border or six or seven 
kilometers inside Lebanon." 

"It is not something crucial, ” he 
added. “We don’t like them in ei- 
ther place." 

The official said that the air force 
was conducting fewer reconnais- 
sance flights than before the missile 
deployment, and that Israeli jets 
were now Dying at higher altitudes 
to keep out of range of the SAM-6 
and SAM-8 batteries, as well as 
beyond the reach of SAM -2 medi- 
um-range missiles that the Syrians 
pul into fixed positions just inside 
their Lebanese border last month. 

“We are continuing to get the 
information we need.” he said. 
“Maybe not as complete as two 
months ago, but what we consider 
vital we are getting." 

Mr. Peres’s disclosure came after 
Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin 


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issued a strong warning that Israel 
would launch a “massive” strike 
against Arab civilian population 
centers if Israeli dries are attacked 
by Arab missies. He did not say to 
which Arab state he was referring. 

■ Soviet Promises to Aid Syria 

Earlier, Ihsan A. Hijazi of The 
New York Times reported from Bei- 
rut: 

The Soviet Union has assured 
Syria of support in its dispute with 
Israel over the deployment of anti- 
aircraft missiles along the border 
with Lebanon and accused the Is- 
raelis of carrying out underground 
nuclear tests in the Negev, accord- 
ing to reports published Wednes- 
day in Beirut. 

Damascus Radio said President 
Assad had received a message from 
Mikhail s. Gorbachev, the Soviet 
leader, about the missiles. 

The contents were not officially 
disclosed. But according to Beirut’s 
leading daily newspaper, An-Na- 
har, the letter dealt with “Israeli 
threats" over Syria’s deployment of 
Soviet-built surface-to-air missiles. 

Citing unnamed officials in the 
Syrian capital, the newspaper said 
Mr. Gorbachev had assured Mr. 
Assad of Soviet solidarity. 

In a separate development, the 
Soviet news agency Novosli ac- 
cused Israel of “escalating its nu- 
clear capability,” saying in a report 
issued to news organizations in Bei- 
rut on Wednesday that the Israelis 
had engaged in underground test- 
ing of nuclear devices in the Negev 
desert region in southern IsraeL 

Dim on a, where Israel has its 
largest reactor, is in the Negev. 

The agency’s report, citing no 
sources for its assertions, said Isra- 
el increased its nuclear strength in 
1985 and now possessed as many as 
40 nuclear warheads. 

The Israelis, the agency added, 
have the missfles to carty these war- 
heads. Novosti did not specify the 
type of missil es. 

The Soviet article came two 
weeks after Syria's defense minis- 
ter, Lien tenant General Mustafa 
Has, told Kuwaiti editors that the 
R ussians would aid his country in 
the face of an Israeli nuclear thrat. 
He did not elaborate. 


Gorbachev’s Stand on Cultural Freedom Remains Uncertain 


By Celcscine Bohlen 

Washington Pan Service 

MOSCOW — Mikhail S. Gorbachev 
has given only a few, contradictory hints 
of his policy on cultural freedom, leaving 
the Moscow intelligentsia uncertain of 
whether the new leader wants to loosen 
controls on artistic expression or lighten 
than. 

The uncertainty has led to debates as 
some intellectuals hold out the hope that 
Mr. Gorbachev will cany his efforts at- 
revitalhation into the arts and literature. 
Others doubt that any Soviet leader 
would risk such a move. 

Yevgeni Yevtushenko, once a maver- 
ick poet but now considered part of the 

establishment, recently called for more 
cultural freedom. In a speech toa Soviet 
Writers’ Union congress, he said, “The 
acceleration of scientific and technical 
progress is unthink able without accelera- 
tion of the spiritual." 

Mr. Yevtushenko's challenge closely 
hewed to the themes or Mr. Gorbachev's 
campaigns for more “openness*' and less 
“obsequiousness" to authority, but the 
poet challenged the government to go 
further. 

“Articles rhetorically calling for open- 


ness are not the same as openness itself" 
Mr. Yevtushenko said, this and other 
provocative thoughts were excised from 
the excerpts of his speech printed after 
the congress. 

Unlike the rest of government, from 
which many veteran officials have been 


police and far five years was the repub- 
lic’s internal affairs minister. 

The appointment of Mr. Aksyonov to 
bead Gosteleradio coincided with a stem 
call for more and better propaganda 
from the state-controlled media. 

K. Ligachev, the Politburo 


watch him build up his own base, they 

worry that he will tighten his grip on the 

AttSe same time, they note that when 
Mr. Ligachev poshed for more “effec- 
tive" propaganda on television he was 
also pushing for beucr quality. For some 


The acceleration of scientific and technical progress is unthinkable without 
acceleration of the spiritual. 9 

— Yevgeni Yevtushenko* Soviet poet 


retired, the bureaucracy that handles cul- 
tural life has remained largely un- 
changed. This ranges from the Ministry 
of Culture to the Writers’ Union to film 
studios. 

The one exception has been at the 
giant state Television and Radio Com- 
mittee, or Gosteleradio — where enter- 
tainment is entwined with ideological 
propaganda. 

Sexgei G. Lapin, 73, a veteran of 15 
years there, was replaced last week by 
Alexander Aksyonov, 61, the ambassa- 
dor to Poland who once served as deputy 
head of the Byelorussian KGB security 


member in charge of both personnel and 
ideology, told Communist Party mem- 
bers at Gosteleradio on Nov. 20 that 
television and radio “should wholly pro- 
mote our political anus." 

“We most use television and radio 
more effectively to promote our specific 
objectives in the economy and ideologi- 
cal education,” he said. 

Mr. Ligachev’s speech, and the ap- 
pointment of a man with background in 
police work to head the powerful Goste- 
leradio, alarmed some intellectuals here, 
particularly those who find Mr. Gorba- 
chev’s assertive style frightening. As they 


mtfUwrtnalg , that was a recognition that 
creativity and hard work should be re- 
warded, even if among handmaidens of a 
political line. 

“Now they are saying they want 50 
percent propaganda and 50 percent en- 
tertainment," an actress said. “That’s 
better than what they have now, which is 
100-pexcent nonsense." 

There has been much criticism of late 
about the media in general. Mr. Ligachev 
accused television and radio journalists 
of "resting on their laurels," and an edi- 
torial in the Communist Party daily 
Pravda chided the press for being boring. 

The rampnig n for a new openness in 


the media has already had some results 

Government ministers have appealed 
on television shows to face questions 
about their shortcomings, and a radio 
program invites listeners to give itigges- 
tioos on, for instance, saving electricity 
on landings in state-owned apartment 
buildings. 

There are signs that some artists are 
beginning to test the concept of open- 
ness. A play is being staged that for the 
first time airs the issue of emigration, 
portraying a family whose sons uant to 
leave the Soviet Union — one for Israel 
the other for the United States. 

People cite a short but interesting hst 
or films that have been released after 
having been bottled op for years, includ- 
ing “Agonia,” called “Rasputin" in the 
West The film came out shortly after Mr. 
Gorbachev took office. 

Most intellectuals assume that Mr. 
Gorbachev has not yet focused on the 
cultural sphere because the economy and 
foreign affairs must come as his lop pri- 
orities. 

A Soviet official sympathetic to Mr. 
Gorbachev’s efforts in other areas <jjd: 
“You cannot cover all areas at once, and 
remember, the cultural bureaucracy is 
very conservative. These things take 
time." 


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Rabbi Is Told 
Soviet Hans 

(Continued from Page 1) 
a conference should serve only as a 
vehicle to allow Israel and a Jorda- 
nian-Palestmian group to negotiate 
directly. 

In October, at the United Na- 
tions, Mr. Peres met with the Soviet 
foreign minis ter, Eduard A She- 
vardnadze, and raised the possibili- 
ty of diplomatic relations and 
eased Soviet emigration rules for 
lews. Mr. Shevardnadze told him 
that Moscow was then preoccupied 
with preparing for the November 
meeting with President Ronald 
Reagan of the United States but 
would look at such questions after- 
ward. 

At the summit meeting in Gene- 
va, Mikhail S. Gorbachev, the Sovi- 
et leader, agreed to come to Wash- 
ington next year, possibly as early 
as June, and Mr. Reagan agreed to 
go to Moscow in 1987. 

Rabbi Hier speculated that Mos- 



Apartheid: Often an Absent Father 

Mother and Children Wait Months for Each Homecoming 


Oinnitril Plan Set for Jan. 20 

Reuters 

PARIS — President Francois 
Mitterrand of France and Prime 
. Minister Margaret Thatcher of 
Britain are to meet in Ulle on Jan. 
20 to announc e the winning bid for 

budding a link across the English 
Channel, a French Transport Min- 
istry spokesman stud. 


Rabbi Marvin Hier 

cow was interested in blunting crit- 
icism among American Jews before 
Mr. Gorbachev came to the United 
States. During the Geneva meeting, 
Rabbi Hler’s group was active in 
protesting the treatment, of Soviet 
Jews, as were some other organiza- 
tions. 

He said this could be “a new and 
significant development" 

Mr. Peres also has proposed to 
Moscow, through intermediaries, 
that there be a large-scale increase 
in emigration to Israel of Soviet 
Jews. After reaching a high of near- 
ly 60,000 in 1979, the number of 
Jewish emigrants has fallen below 
1,000 in recent years. 


By Sheila Rule 

Nevr York Times Service 

OKKERNOOTBOOM, South 
Africa — The letter came not long 
ago to this village, and prepara- 
tions for celebration began imme- 
diately. fiainah TilSa' t husband 
was coming home. 

Mrs. Zitha and her four chfldien 
had not seen Him since (he four 
days he spent with them at Easter 
in Okkemootboom, in the impov- 
erished. so-called homeland of Gar 
zankuln. 

Now they would have a mouth 
together before be took the 16-hour 
train ride back to Johannesburg 
and his job as a construction work- 
er. It is a situation that has repeated 
itself for 20 years of marriage. In all 
those years, the family has been 
together a total of about 20 
months. 

Tbe homecoming represents one 
of the peculiar rituals of many 
black people in a country where the 
laws of apartheid can transform a 


family into so many scattered 
pieces. 

Under laws intended to control 
the influx of blades into urban ar- 
eas, no black can remain for more 
than 72 hours in a “white" city 
unless astringent group of require- 
ments are met 

Among other things, a black 
must have lived somewhere in the 
area continuously since birth, 
worked there continuously for at 
Least 10 years or be the wife, un- 
married daughter or son under the 
of 18 of a person who meets 
i regulations. 

Others, specifically migrant 
workers from the “homelands,” 
must have special permission to be 
in the urban areas to work at cer- 
tain jobs for specific 
They are barred from 
their families to Hve with them. 

It is this Last regulation that 
forces Mrs. Zitha's husband to live 
in a drab single-sex hostel far from 
home for most of the year, as the 


woman goes about life's chores and 
waits for his infrequent return. 

She speaks of how the children 
mi«ts their father and how joy flow- 
ers within the household when the 
letters bring news of his imminent 
arrival and then wilts when he must 
return to Johannesburg for work 
that brings an income equivalent to 
about $76 a month. 

But there are few other options 
in this patch of Gazankulu. a place 
of inferior soil where people can 
grow enough vegetables to last only 
five months and where half of the 
children die before they are 5 years 
old. No major industries or dries 
are nearby to absorb tbe employ- 
able adults. 

The absence of large numbers of 
men leaves many children with no 
strong male role models and fam- 
ilies with little to guard against 
slow disintegration. By custom, the 
man of the family is the judge and 
jury and word of a crisis at home 
must be relayed by telephone, tele- 
graph or letter. 



S aiaah Zitha v 

News of the death of a child, for 
example, may take two weeks to 
reach him. The family wails anx- 
iously, hoping that the head of the 
household will be allowed to return 
for die burial. No one is to be 
buried without the presence of die 
man of the family. It is tradition. 


Rebels Persist Despite Ethiopian Army’s Offensive 


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(Continued from Page 1) 
offensive foundered last month 
where it has often foundered before 
in Africa’s longest-running civil 
war. 

The war started in 1962 when 
Ethiopia annexed Eritrea, which 
had been an Italian colony before 
World War H. 

“They were on a roll, their mo- 
rale was really high, until they hit 
Nakfa." said a senior relief official 
with contacts throughout Eritrea. 

The Eritrean liberation Front 
has retreated deep into the hillsides 
near Nakfa and seeded approach- 
ing lowlands with land mines. 
When Ethiopian infantry and 
tanks tried to advance on Nakfa, 
they suffered heavy casualties, with 
8,000 wounded and 1,200 dead, the 
senior relief official said 

Repeated air n tfagfcf with na- 
palm and cluster bombs subse- 
quently have failed to dislodge the 
rebels, diplomatic sources said. The 
once-prosperous town of Nakfa, 
meanwhile, has been reduced to 
nibble. 

So far, the Ethiopian govern- 
ment has hdd on to aJJ tbe territory 
it seized in the offensive, but it is 
too early to tell if the rebels will be 
able to counterattack and retake 
the territory they have lost as they 
have done m the past 

Stalemate and wholesale de- 
struction of the countryside have 
been the halhnarint of the war be- 
tween the Eritrean rebels, who are 
committed to creating their own 


The conflict, now into its 25th 
year, has scarred much of Eritrea, 
exacerbating the damage wrought 
by nearly a decade of drought. 

Tbe advance northward this year 
of Ethiopian soldiers, wrath tanks, 
bombs and napalm, further pun- 
ished Eritrea. 

Many of the soldiers in the Ethi- 
opian Anny are conscripts from 
southern areas of the country. They 


of the fighting here, has adminis- 
tered harsh discipline on officers 
who perform poorly, as many have 
since the series of “final” offensives 
began in I97S. 

Colonel Mengistu has ordered 
his officers shot when he considers 
their units delinquent, according to 
Panl B. Henze, a scholar specializ- 
ing in Ethiopia at the Rand Corp. 
in Santa Monica, California. 


The liberation front 'and the government 
are both cruel to villagers they suspect of 
being sympathetic to the other side. This is a 
particularly barbaric conflict.’ 

— A UNICEF official 


speak different languages and 
corns from Afferent cultures titan 
the Eritreans. Relief workers said 
government soldiers treat civilians 
caught up in the war Hke foreign 
enemies. 

Advancing soldiers routinely 
bum crops and bouses, steal and 
shoot livestock and rape Eritrean 
women, relief workers said. Peas- 
ant farmers in Eritrea, as a matter 
of course, move their wives and 
daughters as far away as possible 
ffimi anny 

Government troops do not have 


When rebels of the Eritrean Lib- 
eration Front move out of the areas 
they have controlled for years, 
they, too, brutalize the citizenry, 
according to a senior official with 
the UN Children's Fund. 

“The EPLF and the government 
are both crad to villagers they sus- 
pect of being sympa thetic to tbe 
other side;” the UNICEF official 
said. “This is a particularly barbar- 
ic conflict.” 

The government’s fan offensive 
blasted through Mohammed Emir 
AH’s village one day two months 


an easy time of it in Eritrea. Rebel . ago. Mr. AIL his wife and five chil- 
kaders often comment on the wifl- dren were asleep in thdr hut when 


nation, and the Ethiopian govern- 
ment, which is determined never to 
let that happen. Without Eritrea, 
Ethiopia would lose its two mqor 
ports and be landlocked. 


bigness of government officers to 
waste the lives of their men. Not 
surprisingly, the rate of desertion in 
Eritrea is high. - 
Ethiopia’s ruler, lieutenant Col- 
onel Meogistu Haile Mariam, who 
s ometimes takes direct. command 


government soldiers routed rebels 
who had held the village for years. 

That morning Mr. AH and his 
family became refugees in their 
own country. With five goats and 
the clothes on their bads, they 
were forced out to wander the fron- 


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tier of the war filled with land 
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Mr. All and his family, along 
with about 140 other families from 
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mountains and arrived here in early r 
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Mr. AIL a wizened man of 60 
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an peasants when he said be had 
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“We cannot tell who is our ene- 
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“All 1 know is we cannot go back to 
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Besides the refugees created by 
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returning to Eritrea. 

Singer Is Arrested in Sudan 

Agence France ■ Prcssc 

KHARTOUM, Sudan — A pop- 
ular singer. Salih Abdul Gadir Abu 
Groun, better known as Ibn al Ba- 
dia, was arrested here Tuesday for 
bis allegedly “hostile attitude" to- 
ward the coup last April in which 
the 17-year rule of the former Suda- 
nese president. Gaafar NimeirL. 
was brought to an end. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


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Page 5 


, - INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 27, 1985 

' 1 

if you like German engineering 
why don’t you drive it? Audi 90 qUattro. 


- - -< 



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engineering just happens 
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Audi 90 quattro. For once, 
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to appreciate that you are 
driving one of the most 
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Thanks to quattro. the most 
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The art of engmeering. 


Page 6 


FRIDAY, DECEMBER 27, 1985 


Ucralb 


INTERNATIONAL 


Pn hlra hcd With Ht New York time* ud The Tnh^tao Post 

Papering Over Budget Facts 


SriblUtC Turkey Tends to Its Human Rights Image 


President Reagan's new budget director, 
James Miller, has been given an impossible 
last His orders in ibe budget he is drawing up 
for the next fiscal year are to cot the deficit to 
S 144 billion. But he has been denied the means 
to do so in a credible way. There is gimmickry 
in every federal budget; in this there will be 
more. To make the numbers work, Mr. Miller 
is now proposing selling off f amiliar govern- 
ment assets, such as the Bonneville Power 
Administration and Naval Petroleum Reserves 

Think what you please about the meats of 
such transfers, they are not answers to the 
budget problem. Assume even that the $al«s 
could be easily consummated, as thi« year’s 
proposed sale of Conrad, far example, was not 
They would lower the deficit only artificially 
and temporarily. The underlying gap between 
revenues and costs would be about the same. 
The power administration serves to reduce the 
deficit; it makes a little money every year. If it 
didn't, you couldn’t sell iL That is the ultimate 
perversity of this approach. 

You cannot fault Mr. Miller. Indeed, you 
have to admire his inventiveness. The budget is 
now in the neighborhood of SI trillion. De- 
fense spending, which the president wants to 
continue to increase rather than cut, is now 
about 29 percent of this amount. Social Securi- 
ty. which he has also pot off limits, is about 21 
percent, and interest on the debt 15 percent. 
Mr. Miller needs to nmlre about $50 Mbon in 
speeding cuts to hit his deficit target (the 
president has also ruled out a tax increase). 


The World’s Best Shots 


What seemed an implausible idea last De- 
cember has somehow crept into the tents of 
power and refuses to be denied. Most of the 
world's children, it appears, can be immunized, 
by 1990 against their deadliest enemies: mea- 
sles, tetanus, whooping cough, polio, diphthe- 
ria and tuberculosis. What better time than the 
Christmas and New Year holiday to agitate for 
the money and goodwill this project requires? 

What better place than the cradle for the 
United Nations to redeem some promise? 

There is no sadder statistic than the 40,000 
children who perish on die average day in 
poorer countries. Inoculation alone won't save 
them all, and universal immunization by 1990 
won’t protect the next generation. But the 
national campaigns to reduce child deaths 
have a vital multiplier effect: They turn par- 
ents into front-line health workers and provide 
them basic information that is the Long-run 
key to better health services. 

That is the salubrious discovery of the Unit- 
ed Nations Children’s Fund, which promotes 
simple and inexpensive mea ns to help parents. 
Besides immunization, UNICEF promotes the 
use of simple salts to counter diarrheal 
dehydration (which annually kills 4 million 
young children), breast-feeding and growth- 
checking. And it promotes family spacing, 
because when mote children survive, parents 


wQl ge nerall y trad to have fewer children. 

UNICEF’s executive director, James Grant, 
is giving highest priority to immunization. 
Vaccines are cheap, and can be kept potent 
and carried to remote areas by “cold chains** 
of refrigeration, like styrofoam boxes. This 
benign new technology has already been tried 
in a score of Third World countries, including 
Colombia, India, Turkey, Brazil and Bolivia. 
B Salvador interrupted its civil war for three 
“days of tranquillity” to inncnlate children. 

For national leaders, a successful campaign 
is a political gain. And at the village level, 
a new and useftil idea is taking root: volunta- 
rism. In Indonesia, trained volunteers chosen 
by the community are working with mothers in 
some 40,000 villages, resulting in tangible 
benefits for children and society. 

Down the road, after initial mihiwiMin, lies 
the challenge of sustaining these programs. 
Immediately, stricken Africa is a specia l case, 
requiring heroic efforts. But UNICEF’s work, 
detailed in its “Year of the Children" report, is 
a tocstn for a jaded world. 

Mr. Giant ralnilati^ that universal immuni- 
zation would cost $5 billion aver five years, 
requiring richer donors to triple their $500 
million commitment over that time. That’s not 
an impossible sum for a posable dream. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


December: A SAD Story 


Once in a while an ailment comes along that 
sorts out your life, clarifies mysteries and 
leaves you feeling better about yourself. More 
often than not it is self-diagnosed. Thirty or so 
years ago. that ailment was thyroid deficiency. 
That was the reason so many college students 
gave for sleeping through their three o'clock 
classes. More recently it was hypoglycemia, 
used to explain everything from lost boy- 
friends to gained pounds. Now it is SAD. 

Seasonal Affective Disorder is a recurrent 
winter depression brought on by light depriva- 
tion. The more sun, it seems, the less SADness 
— which is why it’s fair to assume that every- 
body in Australia is madly happy just now. 

Although SAD is rare, there's no one alive 


who hasn’t experienced at least some of its 
symptoms. Ealing like ahorse is one of than; 
so is yawning on the job; getting bored at 
cocktail parties; becoming irritated at the 
noise the kids next door are making 
Dr. Michael Terman, a research psychdo- . 
gist who's studying SAD, said earlier this 
month, “Patients are calling in daily now re- 
porting onset-" That is because for some peo- 
ple, Dec. 21, the winter solstice, is the SADdest 
day of the year. Women sufferers outnumber 
men four to one. But what with all the traffic 
and the shopping and the Christmas and New 
Year holiday crowds and all that terrible egg- 
nog who wouldn't be SAD? 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


Ted Kennedy’s Early Decision 

On the Monday before Christmas, Senator 
Edward M. Kennedy*, a Democrat of Massa- 
chusetts, was not resting comfortably at home, 
savoring holiday cheer with the extended fam- 
ily dial he heads. Rather, and characteristical- 
ly. he was meeting with flood victims in West 
Virginia to make sure that the government was 
doing what it could to ease their distress. The 
meeting in the little town of Albright was part 
of a tour that Mr. Kennedy is making to focus 
attention on hunger and suffering in America. 

It was perhaps characteristic, also, that dur- 
ing the Albright meeting a woman burst from 


the room yelling obscenities, saying in effect 
that the meeting was baloney. It is difficult to 
be neutral about the Kennedy*. 

For years it seemed almost inevitable that 
Ted Kennedy one day would be president of 
the United States. But now, after his early 
withdrawal from the 1988 contest, it is becom- 
ing clear that this may never happen. The 
public mood has changed. Many voters now 
know the John F. Kennedy presidency only 
through history texts. And Chappaqm'ddick 
always lurks near Ted Kennedy. Most Ameri- 
cans admire him, bat the electorate seems 
unwilling to entrust him with tbe presidency. 

— Las Angeles Tones. 


FROM OUR DEC 2 7 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: An Anglo-American Alliance? 
PARIS — (A Herald editorial says:] “Along 
the Pacific coast, the sole possible invader is 
Japan. But she is England's ally, and in the 
event of a war, England's treaty obligations 
would compel her to give at least moral sup- 
port (0 Japan. If the “foreign invasion" the 
Standard's correspondent had in view [on Dec. 
26] was a Japanese invasion, what material 
assistance could England give the United 
States? An alliance with England would be 
worthless to America, if it were merely platon- 
ic. Yet an alliance with America would materi- 
ally strengthen England’s bands, tearing her 
free to concentrate her attention upon Germa- 
ny. Fear erf Germany, not solicitude for Ameri- 
ca's safety, appears to underlie the weird prop- 
osition of an Anglo-American alliance. 


1935: Chinese Student Protests Grow 
SHANGHAI — Martial law was proclaimed 
[on Dec. 26] in the Chinese quarter of Shang- 
hai and in Nanking and Hankow, owing, it was 
officially stated, to the presence of “undesir- 
able dements" in tbe student movement 
against Japanese encroachment in North Chi- 
na, but really because of the strained Sino- 
Japanese relations resulting from this move- 
ment, Demonstrations against (he establish- 
ment Of autonomy in North China have been 
progressing. Students recently trudged in (he 
direction of Nanking trying to prevent the 
trains from reaching that city by lying on the 
tracks. The efforts were foiled for the trains 
slowed while gendarmes rolled the students off 
the line. Meanwhile, Prince Teh Wang has 
declared the independence of Inner Mongolia. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WBJ TNEY, Chairma n 1958-1982 
KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M- FOIHE 
WALTER WELLS 
SAMUEL ABT 

ROBERT K McCABE 
carlgewirtz 


LEEW. HUEBNER, /afahsfcer 

Executive Editor 
E&u* 

Deputy Editor 
Deputy Editor 
Associate Editor 


Deputy PubE&er 
Associate PubBsker 
Assedtae PubBsktr 
Director of Operations 
Director e/OmAsm 
rear cf Atoatsng Stats 

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OX. svosenpa ^ International Herald Tribune. AB rights reserved. 


But he has been given only about a third of 
the budget in which to work. 

Nor is even that third as collapsible as Mr. 
Miller might wish. About $100 billion of it — 
almost a third of the cuttable third —is taken 
up by Medicare and Medicaid. Another $50 
billion is in programs for tbe poor — food 
stamps, rent supplements, aid to the needy 
dderiy, blind and disabled, the federal share of 

Aid to Families with Dependent Children. 
Major forms of income support for other sec- 
tors of society make up another $100 billion. 
These are benefits to federal civilian and mQi- 
tary retirees ($43 Wlion), unemployment com- 
pensation (an estimated $16 billion next year), 
farm-price and income supports (perhaps $18 
billion) and the veterans’ budget (527 bfflion). 

Any of these major programs can of course 
be cut, but as a practical matter there are no 
great instant savings to be had here: No one is 
proposing that whole programs in tins catego- 
ry be excised. It is tbe rest of the budget — a 
span of at most $150 billion — in which most 
of tbe defirit-redudng work must occur. Even 
here it is hard; this remainder includes such 
well-protected items as the highway program 
(perhaps $17 billion)' college student aid (58 
billion), aid to elementary and secondary edu- 
cation ($7 billion) and the administration's 
foreign aid program ($14 trillion). 

The president’s budget positions don’t add 
up. Mr. Miner's proposed sales may help to 
paper over that, but the paper’s getting thin. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


N EW YORK — The human 
rights dimate in Turkey seems 
to be getting better, slowly. America 
and the rest of Europe should of 
course welcome this progress, tenta- 
tive as it is, but we should also keep 
up tbe scrutiny and p r e s sur e that 
spurred it in the first puce. 

On Dec. 9, five natrons — France, 
Norway, Denmark, the Netherlands 
and Sweden —announced that they 
had readied & friendly settlement 
with Turkey and were dropping the 
coomiamts they had lodged against it 
in 1982 in tbe European Co mmissi on 

announcement a reafftriiiation of 
its place in the European community. 
The United Stales welcomed it as an 
acknowledgment of Turkey’s efforts 
to restore democracy. It was also wel- 
comed, (hough somewhat more cau- 
tiously, by Turkish victims of human 
rights abase. They hope that the 
agreement — and the expectations 
that come with it — will bring 
them further relief. 

We were in Turkey when the settle- 
ment was announced. During this 
visit, in dramatic contrast to a previ- 
ous mission in 1983, we were given 
unlimited opportunities to meet with 
whomever we wished, including 
Prime Minister Target Oral, mem- 
bers of the government and the new 
Parliament, party leaders and private 
citizens from all walks of life. We 


By Jeri Laber and Alice H. Henkin 


explored a confusing landscape — a 
combination of encouraging changes 
and severe human rights violations. 

A new openness in Turkish society 
— it aS began with tbe legislative 
elections in November 1983 — is 
most apparent in its exuberant, out- 
spoken press. Private citizens who are 
critical of the system also seem less 


sands of young people who were 
swept up on terrorism charges in 
1980, following the mQhaiy takeover, 
are still awaiting the outcome of 
prolonged group trials. 

Members of the Turkish Peace As- 
sociation, prominent people such as 
the former nead of die Turkish Medi- 
cal Association, a theater director 


Major cotters for torture are still easy to find in 
Istanbul and Ankara. Wharfs needednow 
is continued scrutiny and pressure from abroad. 


fearful than they were two years ago, 
more inclined to speak out, both pub- 
licly and privately. Parliamentarians 
and other political leaden are en- 
gaged in lively, often acrimonious de- 
bate on subjects that would have 
been unmentionable a short time ago, 
including prison conditions, torture 

and human ri ght* violations. 

Yet abuses continue. There is tor- 
hire in police detention centers where 
suspects are denied the right to see 
their families or lawyers. Interroga- 
tion techniques routinely include 
electric shocks, suspension by the 
aims and merciles s beating of the 
soles of the feet Prison conditions 


and the wife of the former mayor of 
Istanbul, have spent three years in 
military prisons, for views that were 
expressed before 1980. 

At the same time, human rights 
have become a major domestic issue: 
A recent poll indicated that if elec- 
tions were held now, the majority of 
votes would gp to a leftist opposition 
party that has made human rights its 
focus. Some Turks daim that tbe op- 
position is “using*’ human rights as a 
convenient issue with which to attack 
the government. Others question the 
sincerity of the government's 
response that it is correcting these 
abuses. But no one denies that 


tremdy sensitive to international 
pressure about human rights. 

Contradictions abound. Martial 
law has been lifted in all but mite of 
67 provinces. It has, however, been 
replaced in most places by an emer- 
gency-measures law that is almost as 
severe. There is a new “police law” 
that reduces the permissible period of 
police detention, bat it is still posa- 
ble, and usual, to hold a suspect in- 
communicado for as long as 15 days. 

Hie government of Mr. Ozal, 
winch has taken some steps to punish 
torturers, claims to have difficulty in 
bringing the police under control 
However it was easy for ns to find 
major centers for torture in both 
Istanbul and Ankara. 

Nevertheless, we are hopefuL We 

met many courageous people fighting 
for freedom despite, a restrictive con- 
stitution and other repressive legisla- 
tion. Human rights issues are being 
discussed everywhere, and there is 
strong momentum for change. 
What's needed now is continued at- 
tention from abroad to encourage the 
moral leadership and political will of 
Turkey’s highest authorities. 


The Quality 
Of Mercy , 
Is Lacking ' 

By Anthony Lewis : 

B OSTON — One of America's 
glories is its tradition of welcome 


are abominable, and the many thou- Turkish politicians have become ex- 


Jeri Laber is execrate (Erector of 
Helsinki Watch, a human rights orga- 
nization. Alice H. Henkin is a lawyer 
with the Aspen Institute for Humanis- 
tic Studies. They contributed this com- 
ment to The New York Times. 


Choice of Successor to Khomeini 
Makes Smooth Transfer Unlikely 

By Samad Haferi 

Mr. Hqfezi is an aide to AH Arrum, the former prime minister who heads the Front far the 
liberation of Iran. The front advocates 'democracy and a constitutional monarchy for die country. 


P ARIS — The election of Ayatollah Hussein 
All Montazeri as the successor to Ayatollah 
RnhoQah Khomeini bolds little promise of serv- 
ing Ayatollah Khomeini's aim to pave the way 
for a smooth transition of power after his death. 

Although it had been assumed for the part few 
years that Ayatollah Montazeri would be named 
successor, tins was not expected to lumpen while 
Ayatollah Khomeini was still alive. The Islamic 
Republic’s constitution stipulates that a succes- 
sor to the governing ayatollah will be chosen 
only when the leader is incapable of performing 
his duties or after his death. 

The annniinmniBit by the Assembly of Ex- 

lahMontazeri should be viewed as a significant 
development. It may indicate Ayatollah Kho- 
meini's inability to continue in tbe job. 

Reports in Iran suggest that several weeks ago. 
Ayatollah Khomeini wanted to retire: The Irani- 
an leader, according to these reports, was disiDu- 
siooed with the negative turn of events for Iran. 
These indnde the costly war with Iraq, with no 
victory in sight; mounting social unrest; pressing 
economic problems; division within the Revolu- 
tionary Guards, and general dissatisfaction in- 
ode the army. Added to these problems are the 
regime’s inability to export its revolution, the 
country’s international isolation and the growing 
power struggle within the ruling hierarchy. 

Although Ayatollah Khomeini" was reportedly 
dissuaded by aides from announcing his retire- 
ment, it appears that he forced tbe election be- 
fore his death of Ayatollah Montazeri in the hope 
that the successor would lean an, him to gain die 
legitimacy required to consolidate power. 

Whatever Ayatollah Khomeini's . motives, it 
seems inconceivable that Ayatollah Montazeri 
will be able to exercise the influence and author- 
ity initially enjoyed by Ayatollah Khomeini. Al- 
though the Iranian leader has lost much of his 
power and popularity and is despised by most of 
his people, he nevertheless has considerable in- 
fluence. And he is still capable of bolding togeth- 
er his crumbling regime, through sheer force and 
the power of his personality. 

Ayatollah Montazeri lacks this charisma. He 
also lacks Ayatollah Khomeini's legitimacy as 
tbe leader of the Islamic revolution. A minor 


cleric during the late Shah's reign. Ayatollah 
Montazeri rose to prominence after the revolu- 
tion through the personal support of Ayatollah 
Khomeini. It is doubtful that Ayatollah Monta- 
zeri alone could command sufficient confidence 
and respect to rule. Moreover, he has declared 
that he would accept tbe post only reluctantly. 

Many powerful religious leaders are bound to 
attack Ayatollah Montazerfs leadership. Even 
Ayatollah Khomeini was challenged as Vali Fa- 
gfh_ , the governing ayatollah, when at the height 
of his popularity he was accused of being too 
dictatorial and compromising Islamic principles. 

Ayatollah Khomeini became leader partly be- 
cause of the unique circumstances which sur- 
rounded tbe revolution and partly as a result of 
his readiness to use brutal mrans to silence 
opposition. Despite this, formidable opposition 
to the concept of Veiayai Faph, that a supreme 
guide should govern the country, continues to 
grow. There are now virtually no supporters of 
this concept left in the country. 

Ayatollah Khomeini derived some of his legiti- 
macy as a leader from his status as a Marfa 
Taqlid , the Source of Emulation. In Shiite tradi- 
tion, a Marfa Taqlid is chosen among ayatollahs 
who have distinguish ad themselves by their 
knowledge, virtue and social service, ff more 
than one person is qualified for the title, the 
person who is a Saved, one daipring dfrect des- 
cendance from Mohammed, is chosen. A final 
determining qualification is a good appearance. 

Ayatollah Montazeri meets none of these re- 
quirements. He is not known far his good intel- 
lect, nor is he a real ayatollah. Ayatollah Kho- 
meini always refers to him as hqjaioleslam, a title 
inferior in rank to that of ayatollah. 

There are now many Marfa TatAids in Iran 
who have precedence over Ayatollah Montazeri 
for the position of leader. These include Ayatol- 
lahs Abolghassem Khoi, Hassan Qorni and Ka- 
zan Shariatmadari, opponents of the. regime. 
Among its supporters are Shahaboldin Najafi 
Marashi and Mohammed Reza Golpayeghani. 

Even Ayatollah Khomeini's status as Marfa 
Taqlid has been challenged. Many religious lead- 
ers point oat that this title was granted in tbe 
early 1960s by Ayatollah Shariatmadari to help 
Ayatollah Khomeini escape imprisonment and 



By KAL In Ihi Economist (London). 

possible death after being an anti-government 
activist under the late Shah. 

Ayatollah Montazerfs leadership would also 
be challenged by Ayatollah Khomeini's son, 
Sajed Ahmad ’Khomeini, ant]. his. supporters. 
This group has vested interests in retaining at 
least part of its privileged position. Ahmad Kho- 
meini has controlled his father's office; playing a 
key rok in day-to-day affairs of state. He has a. 
large band of armed supporters and has pnt Ins 
followers in key posts. If Ayatollah Montazeri 
succeeds Ayatollah Khomeini, a clash could arise 
between Ahmad Khomeini and Mefadi Hasheuri, 
Ayatollah Montazerfs closest aide. 

Considering all these facts, it seems reasonable 
to assume that the transfer of power from Aya- 
tollah Khomeini to Ayatollah Montazeri could 
develop into a major crisis, pushing the regime 
further toward disintegration mid collapse. 

The writer, a former Iranian government offi- 
cial, has taught political science at several universi- 
ties in the United States. He contributed this com- 
ment to the International Herald Tribune. 


Kennedy’s Exit: Both Sides Are Counting the Cost 


W ASHINGTON — The most 
unequivocal reactions in the 
United States to Senator Edward M_ 
Kennedy's announcement that be 
would not seek tbe presidential nomi- 
nation in 1988 came from opposite 
ends of the political spectrum. 

X Rol lins, the mana ger of 

recently political 

director, said, “It takes away the one 
candidate we were sure we could 
beaL” Jesse L. Jackson, tbe cavil 


By David S. Broder 



□rowing try Lurie. 


rights activist and. Democratic presi- 
dential contender, said, “It removes 
one of the fingers in the dike, bolding 
bade those pushing the Democratic 
Party to the right." 

That people as opposed in philoso- 
phy and politics as Mr. Rollins and 
Mr. Jackson found reason to lament 
Mr. Kennedy’s departure says vol- 
umes about the centrality of the place 
he occupied in 1988 politics. 

For 25 years, Democrats have 
found in the name Kennedy the em- 
blem of their past success and their 
hope for regaining the winning touch. 
For 16 years, since Chappaquiddick, 
Republicans have seen the holder of 
that name as tbe symbol of the hol- 
lowness of that Democratic dream. 

With Ted Kennedy sidelined, both 
parties now know that the Democrats 
will be led into tbe next election by a 


stranger, and perhaps one — like heavy minority support in Wflming- 
Sena tor Joseph R. Biden Jr. of Dela- ton and New York City, and both 
ware or Representative Richard A are, like Mr. Kennedy, the kind of 
Gephardt of Missouri — who was too orators who can sway audiences in 
young even to vote for John F. churcbes with black congregations. 
Kennedy. Thai changes tbe dynamics At the same time, both Mr. Cuomo 

far both parties, immediately for and Mr. Biden have emotional ap- 

the Democrats and ultimately for 

the Republican Party. . 

Mr. Jackson's comment defines the lhe last time Democrats 

Democratic dilemma: Who can hold . . , 

the party’s voter base, winch is UOHUIUIteattSutii^er 

SSHEWS* SSfi forthepMuy, his 

StotSS name vxu Carter. . 

das married couples? 

Mr. Kennedy, a Democrat of Mas- peals to middle-class families. Mr. 
sachiisetts, was the one prospective Cuomo evokes the immigrant trsdi- 
1988 contender who could challenge non of ethnic pride. It lives on 
Mr. JacksOn, at tbe level of emotion in many second- and third-genera- 
and enthusiasm, for tbe allegiance of tion Irish, Polish, Hispanic and 
minorities and the poor. Tnat gave Italian families tike his own, which 
him freedom to reach for the middle have achieved success by Ihrir own 
class, as he began us do this year with sacrifices and efforts but crave accep- 
bis votes on the Gramro-Rudman tance and recognition, 
budget process and other issues. Mr. Biden’s appeal is embedded in 

- Mr. RoDins and other Republicans a classic story of triumph and trage- 
calculaled that Mr. Kennedy would dy. A few weeks after he was elected 
ultimately be defeated by “the char- to the Senate ai age 30 in 1972, his 
acter issue," winch cuts deeply with wife and infant daughter were lolled 
many middle-class married women, 

especially among fellow Catholics. 

Bui the very fact that Mr. Kennedy t pr 

abandoned the presidential quest so 1 -J .i . 

early suggests how difficult it will be _ 

for any Democrat to hold that cur- U.S. Most Be Cautions 
rent party base and expand into the n ... 

American middle classes. Jkgan/rii g the opinion column 

Neither Senator Garv Hart, a Court Action, Not Words, Needed to 
Democrat of Colorado and the pee- terrorism (Dec. 21): 
sumed front-runner, nor Mr. Gep- The United States should exercise 
hardt, nor any of the Sou them and extreme caution in how far it is wiU- 
Westem Democratic governors and ing to extend its “belief in the rule of 
senators who are speculative con- law" in order to apprehend petpetra- 
tendeis for 1988, can voice cheir teeb- tots of terrorist crimes “regardless of 

- nocratic visions of a growth-oriented the nationality of victims or the geo- 
economy and society without bong graphic location of the crimes.'' Con- 
accused by Mr. Jackson of turning gross may have intended that tbe stat- 
tbeir backs on tbe Democrats' most ute be “applied retroactively” But 
loyal and needy constituencies. if this policy were put into general 

With Mr. Jackson dearly contem- practice, it would allow other states 
plating the option of an independent to claim like privilege, 
candidacy after the 1988 primaries, We might then see a long line of 
the threat of sundering the Demo- former and' current American offi- 
cratic coalition is not an idle one. • rials named in international war- 

Mr. Biden and the governor of rants, indicted for “terrorist" crimes 
New York, Mario M. Cuomo, ore they have permitted, authorized 
better positioned, because both of or “masterminded," such as indis- 
tbem nave won campaigns with criminate killings of civilians in 


in an accident. For 13 yearn he has 
put his family first, commuting daily 
between Wilmington and Washing- 
ton in order to be with his new wife 
and daughter and bis two sons from 
his first marriage. 

At this point, none of tbe Demo- 


suspect m- to the victims of war and persecution 
js IS days. ^ world. From Jews fleeing Czar- 
Mr. Ozal, pogroms to Vietnamese boat peo- 
& to punish America has opened its arms to 

difficulty in refugee groups and individuals scck- 
sr control, jpg p ol itical asylum: the “wmpwt- 
n* to find tossed," in Emma Lazarus's words on 
c in both die Statue of Liberty. - - - 

That generous tradition is defied m* 
spoiii- We today by U.S. government policy to- 
jle fighting ward refugees worn El Salvador. As 
ictive coo- manifested now in different wins the 
ive legisla- policy is rate of harshness. 
i are bang r vftulc North and Central 

d there £ American countries give refuge lo 
change. Salvadorans, the United Suites sends 
itinaed at- f h»m home as fast as possible. The' 

outage the Reagan administration, denying that 
ical will of there is any need for asylum, has 
*• done its best to suppress the facts oT 

continuing human rights violations in 
director of a Salvador. It has infiltrated the asyy 
igfrtsorga- i im movement in America, uring 
is a lawyer informers to disrupt the effort 
■ Humanis- by dmi cho. synagogues and others: 
d this cam- T^ e relentless quality of the gov- 
ras- . enune&t's attitude toward Salvador- 

an refugees has been tellingly di>r 

played in recent weeks in a federal IP* 
courtroom in Los Angeles. There a 
trial has begun of a suit against fedcr* 
al officials by a class of Salvadorans 
in the United States, represented by 
American Civil Liberties Union 
lawyers among others. 

The suit asks the court to make 
IH^P officers of the Immigration and Nar- 
uralization Service do two things in 
r d ealing with Salvadorans found if) 

America: First, advise them of their 
right to apply for political asylum, 
and their right to consult a lawyer. 
Second, refrain from coerring them 
to leave without seeking asylum. 

Those seem like mud requests. 
Surely the INS could live with them. 

In fact, David V. Kenyon, a federal 
district judge, issued a preliminary 
. injunction in 1982 ordering officials 

L to tell Salvadorans their rights. Thc'V 

^ question now is whether to make the 

WL injunction permanent. 

j||\ But the Justice Department has 

strenuously resisted the lawsuit. It 
il|| delayed for two-and-one-half years 

before complying with an order by 
s| |j|| tbe judge to provide a list of State 
Department documents on the hu- 
man rights situation in El Salvador, 
in And than it indicated that it would 
ask Secretary of State George Shultz 
m to declare the documents secret. 

|9| That produced a sharp reaction 

from Judge Kenyon. If there was go- 
ing to be a claim of secrecy, he told 
jondon). the government, have the documents 
ready for him by the first week in 
rament January in case he then decides be 
must examine them in private, 
ild also The list belatedly supplied to the 
i's son, . court last month included document * 
sorters. with titles~stroogly suggesting that" 

rung at they would be relevant to the case, 
dKho- namely “Prevalence of Torture," 

aying a “Death Squad KHUngs" and “Death 

e has a. Squad Connections With Salvadoran 
pnt has Expatriates in the U-S." 

ntazeri How can U.S. officials maintain 
Id arise that Acre is nothing for Salvadoran 
isbeuri, refugees to fear at home and at the 
same time try to keep the court from 
enable seeing such documents? Could it be 
n Ayar that they {ear they would be shewn to 
i could know about a network of terror in EJ 
regime Salvador? Does Mr. Shultz really 
e. want to endorse such a position? 

Elliott Abrams, assistant secretary 
nt affi- of state for inter-American affairs 
niversi- was questioned by deposition in the 
is com- lawsuit. His answers showed extraor- 
dinary indifference to official vio- 
J lence and lawlessness in El Salvador. 

Mr. Abrams, former assistant sec- ^ 
retaiy for human rights, was askeaV 
igt about Decree 50, a Salvadoran ordqr 
" R' that suspends constitutional guaran- 
- tees. He said: “It doesn't ring a bell.” 
its he has U.S. representatives in El Salvador 
rang daily have been (tying to diminate death 
Washing- squad activity, Mr. Abrams said, and 
; new wife they have “succeeded.” He said Jose 
sons from Napolefa Duarte’s government had 
“progressed far enough to stop the 
lie Demo- human rights violations, but not to 


crats, not even a previous contender prosecute people for old violations." 


like Mr. Hart, commands deep loyal- 
ty from more than a tiny handful of 
Ins fellow partisans. Most of the pro- 
spective candidates are total strang- 
ers to the 1988 primary electorate. _ 
The prospect of a political blind 
date is theoretically exciting. But tbe 
last time Democrats nominated a 


The fact is that death squad kill- 
ings continue in El Salvador. Those 
murders and disappearances and tar- 
geted a s sas s i n ations by . uniformed 
government forces Have averaged ‘ 
30 a month this year. 

No member of the armed forces 
has been convicted of killing a Salva- Y 
doran. Current as well as Mr 1 . 


stranger, his name was Jimmy Carter, doran. Current as well as I< 
and the experience was ultimately Abrams's “old" violations go unp 
disillusioning. Tbe Democratic nomi- ished. A commission set up by Pri 


nee in 1988 wQl be unencumbered by 
direct links to the party’s checkered, 
recent past He will be someone who 
has created his own constituency and 
defined his own approach in the cru- 
cible of a tough nomination contest 
Especially if the Republicans 
nominate Vice President George 
Bush or anyone rise attempting to 

S Reaganism without Mr. 
they may find the country 
r something otha- than hand- 
me-down leadershqj. 

The Washington Pan 


dent Duarte IS mouths ago to inves- 
tigate political killings has disbanded 
without doing a thing. 

The issue in all this is not Ameri- 
can foreign policy in El Salvador. It is 
human decency toward innocent peo- 
ple who flee from brutal conditions iii 
that country. Why should U.S. offi- 
cials deny that brutalities take place? 
Why should they try to force people 
back without a hearing? What has 
happened to America’s tradition of 
sympathy for refugees? 

The New York Times. 


LETTERS TO TBE EDITOR 


U.S. Must Be Cautions 

Regarding the opinion column 
“Court Action, Not Words, Needed to 
Fight Terrorism " (Dec. 21): 

The United States should exercise 
extreme caution in how far it is will- 
ing to extend its “belief in the rule of 
law” in order to apprehend perpetra- 
tors of terrorist crimes “regardless of 
the nationality of victims or the geo- 


ute be “applied retroactively” But 
if this policy were put into general 
practice, it would allow other states 
to claim like privilege. 

We might then see a long line of 
former and' current American offi- 
cials named in international war- 
rants, indicted for “terrorist” crimes 
they have permitted, authorized 
or “masterminded," such as indis- 
criminate killings of civilians in 


Cambodia, Lebanon, Nicaragua, Q 
Salvador and elsewhere. 

Tbe idea that state-authorized 
murder is somehow sanctified is 
absurd. No article in the Constitution 
of the United States or in internation- 
al law permits this sort of hypocriti- 
cal stance. Those who would truly 
fight the horror of terrorism would 
do well to start by reducing their 
own complicity in it 

sterling DOUGHTY. 

Chesfaes, Switzerland. 


tetters intended for piddication 
should be addr&sed “Learn U> the 
Editor" and must contain the writ- 
ers signature, name and full ad- 
dress. Letters should be brief and 
tye subject to editing. We cannot 
b* responsible for the return of 
unsolicited manuscripts. 


No More Boycotts, Please 

It seems that more and matt of the 
large stores, well inientioned but to- 
tally misguided, are to boycott South 
African goods. All this will do is 
create mote unemployment, not 
much among South African blacks, 
but among the hundreds of thou- 
sands of illegal Mack immigrants 
there. It would be ironic if President 
P.W. Botha is forced to expel them 
from bis “cruel apartheid system." 
and then have the West criticize him 
for not letting them slay and work, v 
If people really want to helo South M 
African blades, then spend on goods 
they help produce. Surely it is better 
to eucouragp black wealth through 
capitalist means than incur more 
poverty and race hatred through 
Marxist inspired sanctions. 

PHILIP WINTER. ' 
Bristol. England. 





international 


f 

i 

« 



umb er 27, 198S 


WEEKEND 


Page 7 



by Anna Eissdgoff 

-r- EW YORK —Has month’s New 

- * I York debut by Susanne I.ink&, a 
^ dancer and c&oreograpber from 

' West Germany, constituted the 

lance entry in tbe Brooklyn Academy of 
jc*s Next Wave Festival — an event that 
ipts some reflections not only on the 
can choreographers in the festival but 
on the whole series. 

K festival has been criticized for soup- 
m presentations by avant-garde artists, 
•Tally choreographers. The idea here is 

choreographos who have been content 

- igh to perform in the streets of SoHo or 
■ ft theaters have now consciously made 

■ work more palatable in order to attract 
4 er mainstream audience. This has been 
eved supposedly through the use of pop- 
nted composers or collaborations with 
al artists or architects, some with “big 
gs," who attract their own constituency, 
is true that such wrappings or trappings 
given those who do not care for dance 
dhing to look at At its simplest, the 
ege is that the Next Wave Festival has 
le experimental dance, at least, unduly 
asiblfl. That is, that the choreographers 
s in some way sold out, that lhdr coo- 
t-oriented complexity has been diluted, 
hi the basis of both last year's and this 
f s festivals, one could venture that the 
Hom ties elsewhere. In some cases, the 
reograpby is not complex. So that instead 

- fluting key concepts, the trappings may 
e have actually concealed weaknesses. A 


certain confusion ensues. This has occurred 
molt than once — when, for instance, the 
viewer attempts to make a connection be- 
tween the decor and the choreography, and 
cannot do so because that connection, is 
artificial. This certainly does not make for 
accessibility, 

A further point is almost the obverse. 
. Namely, that if we now notice a move away 
from the concern with pure form that has 

characterized American expe rimental Harw 

this by no means should suggest that dance 
will be less cerebral and easier to “under- 
stand-" It is here that the works presented by 
the West German choreographers — Pina 
Bausch, Rembfld Hoffmann and Susanne 
linke — need to be put into a general 
perspective. The fact that they do not deal 
with pure movement and that, in varying 
degrees, theyp resent dramatic theatrical im- 
ages (sometimes with deceptive realism) 
does not make them more accessible 
Mesne fbmnin gharn for iw ytaTM^ 

What the Next Wave Festival has brought 
out is a paradox that refers back to a nVmfa r 
situation of 30 years ago. Dance that focuses 
on formalist values is not more difficult for 
viewers than dance that relies on traditional 
expressive content or narrative elements. 
This was the point made by fo rmalis ts such 
as George Balanchine, Alwin Nikolais and 
Cunningham be ginning with the 1950s. 
Their work needed no symbols or bidden 
meanings in order to be appreciated 

In fact, viewers who were afraid of dance 
because they did not understand the “story” 
onstage were now released from their fears. 
All they needed was to look at the movement 


in g in Experimental Dance 


in order to appreciate the donee work before 
them. TTns was, in fact, the lesson of formal- 
ist work. And when the modem dance ex- 
perimentalists of the 1960s and 70s present- 
ed formal structures that could be followed 
— how many times a movement was picked 
up by dancers, atwhat time and so on — 
this, too, reassured the viewer that the 
dances were accessible on some, albeit possi- 
bly, complex level . 

To choreographers such as- Raltmehing, 
Nikolais and Cunningham, dance drama 
and psychological works often required a 
mental process that interfered with an un- 
derstanding of dance. In. the 1960s, new 
young audiences with no preconceptions 
about what dance should be learned to ap- 
proach dance directly. Dance; through its 
essence — movement — did speak to audi- 
ences. 


N OW, suddenly, the Germans arrive 
with enigmatic images full of con- 
flicts (hat are never fully explained. 
They tdl stories that are not so mum unfin- 
ished as never unraveled. Repeatedly, mem- 
bers of the audience and of the press throw 
out explanations and interpretations. Re- 
peatedly no consensus is reached on what 
the work is about 

We have come full circle. Even for Ameri- 
can choreographers, pure movement is not 
always a prune concern today. It should be 
pointed out that the three Goman choreog- 
raphers in the festival are remarkably strict 
about using formal structures. But these are 
underpinnings. Tbey are used as a means to 


an end, to express feelings, and this expres- 
sion is usually pictorial in the German 
works. 

It is also true that the German choreogra- 
phers use a formalist device to open up their 
works toward the viewers. They ask the view- 
er to “complete" the work of art. A plotless 
Balanchine ballet can have a variety of 
meanings for different viewers because it 
functions like abstract art, with no specific 
meaning, Bausch in particular asks the view- 
er to bring his or her reactions to her works, 
knowing that a specific image might evoke 
contrasting reactions. Hence the reason why 
we cannot agree on the “point” of the Ger- 
man pieces. 

In short, the offerings in the Next Wave 
dance series are anything but accessible. Ac- 
cessible is simply not the relevant word. 

One reason is that American choreogra- 
phers brought up on pure movement doc- 
trines are not now completely at home with 
emotional and narrative elements. They have 
not learned to make form generate content. 
Margaret Jenkins and Nina Wiener pro- 
duced works that were swamped by their 
decor. The resulting confusion came from 
the choreographers' inability to clarify their 
intent. Laura Dean, whose new pieces were 
the most formal, offered the strongest works 
among the Americans. Eschewing narrative 
and scenery seems to have kept her mind 
free. 

The Germans, on the contrary, know how 
to integrate such dements into their work 
albeit with varying success. The fact that 
there was no consensus on whether Hoff- 
mann’s “Callus” was about Maria Cabas, the 



Susanne Linke in a work with a bathtub as a prop. 


role or the artist in society, male-female 
relations or anything else, was not a weak 
point. Rather it was that the images them- 
selves and the projection of the performers 
were not indsive enough. By contrast, 
Bausch’s work remains a model of the genre. 

For this reason, Linke is of particular 
interest. She diverges from the German 
dance-theater genre, at least as a soloist- And 


while another American in the festival, 
Carolyn Carlson, offered a more coherent 
solo presentation (a reverie that — true to 
her Nikolais training — never used psycho- 
logical bod}- language), Linke managed to 
create a theater of her own. out of her own 
body. 

Continued on page 9 


Llie Lively, Amusing and Short Life 
Ma Magazine in the Last Silly Season 


3 VER the years many magazines 
I have tried to imitate The New 
1 Yorker including at times The 
New Yorker itself. The weekly that 
ne closest was Night and Day, which 
seared in London in July 1937, complete 
h New Yorker-style typography, squibs 
he bottom of the page, Thurber drawings, 
<$sy ads (“Bentley — the Slent Sports 
r, “Smoot's Shaving Cream for Beardless 
Jtiance"), a Talk of the Town-style diary, 
i a cheeky and highly literate tone. Its 
tors were John Marks, translator of Cfc- 
e, and Graham Greene, who also reviewed 
»vies. The magazine’s title came from Cole 
tier’s song. 

(n a diary item in the first issue headed 
east of Fun," Peter Fleming wrote, under 
« pseudonym Stingsby, “Our aim is to 

Mary Blume 

oise. We shall try to doit intelligently; and 
thout, if posable, being smart, fatuous, 
oomsbuiy or i t- seems- there- were- two- 
shmen. But what we actually stand for. we 
II don't know." 

In a time of deeply committed little maga- 
tes, just trying not to take stands was a 
lant and doomed attempt. Reality con- 
ntiy intruded — Spanish Civil War, the 
aihitkjn in Germany of "Degenerate Art," 
ipes taken at both Right and Left — but 
ghtand Day’s hope was to be frivolous, to 
use. Anything that wishes to be frivolous 
certain io be short-lived and Night and 
iy closed, sadly, within the year for the 
dest of reasons. 

\ facsimile anthology of Night and Day 
s published in London this winter by 
alto and Windus, who also brought out 
• original. The introduction is by Christo- 
ff Hawtree, the preface by Graham 
eenfi, who writes, “On 1 July, 1937, when 
§b( and Day appeared on the bookstalls 
'the first time, the shadow was very dark 
i that perhaps accounts for the rather 
smous determination of the editors, John 
uks and myself, to make the weekly lively 
1 amusing at all costs." 

Harold Nkxdsou thought the project ab- 
d because the English could be funny, in 
opinion, but never witty; ”1 think En- 
nd should face the fact that the best she 
i do in the way of jokes is Punch and 
ben and Sullivan," he predicted and was 
RJg. Soon Virginia Woolf was reporting 
1 John Maynard Keynes's wife found The 
w Statesman hopeless and preferred 
jpu and Day. Nancy Mitford offered a 
ce and was turned down; so was Henry 
Off. 

jreene's choice of regular columnists was 
jous and inspired. He got the an worid 


mandarin Herbert Read to review mystery 
stories (“Mr. Peter Gheyney is the bones."), 
Evelyn Waugh to review books, Osbert Lan- 
caster and Hugh Casson to write on art and 
architecture respectively, and A.J.A. Sy- 
mons, author of “The Quest for Corvo,” to 
review restaurants. There was a motoring 
coftxmn signed “Supercharger” and pieces an 
such neglected sports as wrestling and 
snooker. The novelist Pamela Hansford 
Johnson took on croquet (“a small bat rever- 
ent gallery followed the game, which is just 
as jolly to watch as chess”) and the poet 
Louis MacNeice wrote learnedly and anony- 
mously about a dog shew. 

“11017 Blues," he states, “do not look 
themselves at all when they are pruned tike 
Airedales." He enjoyed the sight of 21 New- 
foundlands walking about like sofas but ex- 
cept for the pleasingly grumpy Tibetan mas- 
tiff found- other Tibetan breeds "twhat you 
would expect from a country where people 
are holy and never undress." He decided he 
rather tiked Afghans (“I revised my opinion 
that these are essentially ludicrous dogs — 
baboons dressed up in pyjamas”) and ig- 
□oredtbe gundogs because “their praises are 
printed in that eternity where stuffed trout 
swim in glass cases and it is always the 12 th 
of August." 

Other contributors included Rose Macau- 
ley, William Empson, Cyril Connolly, John 
Betjeman and Constant Lambert, with short' 
stories from V. S. Pritchett and Paul Mar- 
aud, poetry by Stevie Smith, drawings by 
“Paul Crum" (Roger Pettiward). who died at 
Dunkirk, and theater reviews by Elizabeth 
Bowen, who shows a novelist’s insights 
(“Richard ITT is a “horrific play about a 
handicapped person getting even with life") 
and who has a damnable habit of omitting 
playwrights’ names. 

The anthology is an invaluable period 
piece: there is au edginess to its frivolity, and 
to its Liveliness an inevitable dying fall Some 
of it is awful and labored but then as the 
epigraph in the first issue, quoting Groucho 
Marx, said, “riff the jokes can’t be good.” 

“We live in stirring times and relish but 
little." Peter Fleming wrote in one of his 
diary notes. “We met the other day a jour- 
nalist of some note who epitomized the cur- 
rent situation neatly enough- “None of us,' he 
said, ’will live to see another SSUy Season.' " 
For the magazine, this turned out to be true. 

Night and Day was done in by Shirley 
Temple, whose studio turned litigious over a 
Graham Greene review. Greene’s fihn re- 
views for Night and Day and for The Specta- 
tor deserve to be collected in a book and 
were in 1972 (“The Pleasure Dome," pub- 
lished by Oxford University Press). 

His taste may be thought odd. He found 
that Hitchcock had “aD inadequate sense of 
reality," confessed to “a kind of perverse 


passion for Miss Maureen O'Sullivan (she 
satisfies a primeval instinct for a really nice 
mri)" and couldn't bear Garbo. He described 
her fihn “Marie Walewska” as afloat in “the 
awful ocean of American vulgarity and good 
taste (they are the same thing)," and began 
his review. 

“She is , of course, the finest filly of them 
ati. . . . And yet a dreadful inertia always 
falls upon me before a new Garbo film. It is 
rather like reading ‘Sartor Resartus* — Car- 
lyle is a great writer, but need one — now — 
this week . . . he's waited half a century: be 
can afford to wait a tittle longer." 

Garbo is a great actress, Greene says, “but 
what dull films they make for her, hardly 
movies at all so retarded are they by her 
haggard equine renunciations, the slow con- 
summation of her noble adulteries; She is a 
Houyhn hnm in a world of Yahoos, but bang 
Yahoos ourselves, we -sometimes- yearn far 
less exalted passions, for people who sin for 
recognizable reasons, because it’s pleasur- 
able; It’s a bawdy planet/ " 


N O good, dearly, could come from 
Greene's seeing a Shirley Temple 
picture, and none did. He saw in the 
adroitly manipulated tiny moppet an adult 
sexuality: “In ‘Captain January she wore 
trousers with the mature suggestiveoess of a 
Dietrich: her neat and well-developed rump 
twisted in the tapdance, her eyes had a side- 
long searching coquetry. Now in ‘Wee Willie 
Winkie’ wearing snort kilts, she is a complete 
totsy." 

Lord knows what a complete totsy is, but 
the review was enough to offend. 20th Centu- 
ry-Fox, who felt Greene was suggesting they 
Had procured tittle Miss Temple for immoral 
purposes. All hell broke loose. The libel 
settlement cost £3,500 (Fox was cruel 
enough to insist that £500 crane from 
Greene's own pocket), which was more than 
a new magazine, however successful and 
promising, could afford. Night and Day, the 
feast of fun, closed in December 1937, after a 
scant six months of life. 

It was a sad blow to frivolity, but there 
was to be no more of that anyway. Greene, 
who had completed nine novels, of which 
two remained unpublished and two others 
were later suppressed, was deprived of any 
hopes he might have entertained of financial 
security but was free to wind up work on his 
first great book, “Brighton Rock," which 
was published in 1938. His review of “Wee 
Willie Winkie" is reprinted in the “Night 
and Day" anthology with a black-bordered 
note explaining that it is included for histori- 
cal reasons only and without any intention 
of further maligning the good name of Mrs. 
Shirley Temple Blade. As Groucho said,“rifi 
the jokes can’t be good" ■ 



Hard Times for U. S. Orchestras 


by Will Crutchfield 


N EW YORK — The symphony 
orchestra in America, outwardly 
gleaming and efficient, is inward- 
ly adrift Buffeted by a generation 
of unprecedented change, the institution 
that once stood as the unquestioned pinnacle 
of musical activity has emerged with its cul- 
tural identity fundamentally altered. 

The impact of those changes is now bang 
felt with special fence, as the musicians 
whose values were formed before die long- 
playing record and the jet plane relinquish 
what influence they st£D retain. The tradi- 
tional audience is in disarray, and with it the 
subscription system. The new American or- 
chestra is a professionally managed business 
rather than the instrument of an inspired 
dictator; is quite explicitly a museum and 
not the exponent of a living tradition; is 
more the reliable producer of an identifiable 
marketable product and less •*— relatively 
less — a dabbler in the mysterious alchemy 
of art. 

It has also developed a nagging gap be- 
tween costi and income, lost its social cachet 
and fallen significantly behind its European 
counterpart in the recording industry. 

Finally and paradoxically, it brings more 
great music to more thousands of listeners 
with each passing year — and at the same 
time the fundamental artistic validity of its 
work is increasingly under c h alle n ge. 

Hie postwar developments that have 
shaped these new realities are familiar. Ef- 
fective' unionization has dramatically im- 
proved musicians’ income, job security and 
working conditions. The “major” orchestras 
(the American Symphony Orchestra League 
places 34 in this category) have moved over 
the past decade or so to 52-week contracts, 
adding hundreds of performances and alter- 
ing profoundly the character of an ensem- 
ble’s working life. 

Jet travel has allowed major music direc- 
tors to diversify their activities, reducing by 
half or more the time devoted to their own 
orchestras — while at the same time the 
orchestras are adding summer seasons in 
which the music directors often do not par- 
ticipate. Meanwhile, the on in which vital 
new orchestral works were regularly intro- 
duced and accepted as standards has receded 
far enough into the past to be unremembered 
by most musicians. 

Perpetual expansion has also had wide- 
ranging financial implications, and brought 
an enormous development of the orchestra’s 
noo-artistic activities. Now there are market- 
ing staffs with sophisticated new techniques, 
administrators who shoulder many of the 
(V»gialfMis once made by music directors, 
highl y developed fund-raising operations 
which exploit resources far beyond the high- 
“* and earned income that 


arrived. It's a tremendously unhealthy situa- 
tion." 

Meanwhile, the charitable dollar that 
helps meet rising costs is under new pressure, 
both from federal cuts and from competition 
within the arts world. Among a new genera- 
tion of potential donors, ns likely to buy 
popular-music records and attend the ballet 
as to go to the symphony, orchestras have 
quite recently lost both a hard-to-quantify 
share of contributed income and the social 
niche they once occupied in American cities. 

With it they have lost the subscription 
audience that treated the symphony as a 
weekly part of life. “An observant player," 
the conductor Michael Tilson Thomas re- 
calls, “once told me. Tl used to be that 
anyone who was anyone in society was at 
these concerts. The women came to be seen, 
the men came to make certain kinds of 
business contacts.' That’s certainly been 
split up." 

Orchestras have responded by splitting up 
subscriptions to match. Detroit, for instance, 
now offers series of 24, 12, 8 or 6 concerts. 
Gevdand sells 3s, 6 s, 12s, 15s and 24s, 


short, snappy sentences emphasize the stim- 
ulation that subscribers can expect (“daz- 
zling" appears in almost every subscription 
brochure that comes io hand)! 

H is hard not to hear in such promotion a 
suggestion that symphonic music is enjoy- 
able in something of the some way that 
prime-time television, popular movies and 
sports are enjoyable — and that suggestion is 
not only false but dangerous, in that it puts 
pressure on the music to conform to the 
image. The media tail, many fear, is wagging 
the musical dog. 

A FORM of promotion deeply rooted 
in music itself is the making of re- 
cords. Orchestral recordings have 
been historically important for both prestige 
and income. The long recording series of 
Reiner-Chicago, Szell -Cleveland. Onnandy- 
Philadelphia. Bernstein-New York Philhar- 
monic and others are recognized as land- 
marks in 20ih-centiuy musical history. High 
American recording fees have been a build- 
ing block of the new economic status of 
players in America's top half-dozen orches- 


The U. S. symphony orchestra has developed a 
nagging gap between costs and income, lost its 
social cachet and fallen significantly behind its 
European counterpart in the recording industry. 


once 

One immediate new reality is that income 
is not keeping pace with organizational 
growth. Some “majors" are having problems 
filling tbe house, and some are showing defi- 
cits. a rare occurrence even six years ago. The 
combined deficit of American orchestras is 
said now to top $10 mini on. 

A hefty chunk of that is owned by a few 
ensembles for whom costs and income have 
gone fairly seriously out of phase. The Balti- 
more Symphony, for example, fell about SI 
mill inn short last year, and its accumulated 
deficit is over twice that (the armual budget 
is $9 million). 

“1 see a strong pattern,” said John Gid- 
wiR, the orchestra’s executive director, "of 
labor settlements that aren’t really justifiable 
on the basis of the financial status of the 
orchestra, the cost of living, or anything else 
but a built-up momentum. Orchestras axe 
very aware of what’s signed elsewhere — and 
in orchestras that have traditionally paid 
more, players are very zealous to preserve 
the differential, because in a way salary 
establishes a pecking order. If someone were 
to aigne that the problems are largely a 
result of unjustified settlements, Fd nave a 
hard time refuting that" 

“I think there was a kind of honeymoon 
period in the late seventies when orchestras 
could meet tbe rising labor demands by 
reaching into endowments,” says Phihp 
Hart, a former orchestra administrator and 
author of “Orpheus in the New Worid,” a 
landmark 1973 study of American orches- 
tras, “They may have said what you always 
say when you use your capital — this is 
something to bridge the transitional period, 
until we can generate the income to make it 
on our own," he said, “but that day has never 


Minnesota has a whole group of separately 
and colorfully promoted four-concert “sam- 
plers." And most ensembles report that the 
majority of their subscribers, especially new 
ones, choose the smaller categories. 

The split-subscription system increases 
enormously the work of juggling, coordinat- 
ing and balancing of repertory and soloists 
within the season. It also increases the bur- 
den on each concert to be salable: A 24-week 
subscription will absorb an adventurous or 
experimental program that would sink the 
sales of a five-concert mini-series. And the 
decision about that concert is now less likely 
to be made by a musician and more likely to 
be made by the management 

“They're all very taken now with market- 
ing research,” says Thomas, who sees many 
of the majors on a regular guest basis, “a 
field about which I have the gravest doubts. 1 
remember proposing a terrific combination 
of Sibelius, Janacek and Ives. These are not 
fringe composers. But it was rejected as too 
esoteric.” 

The orchestras know what their audiences 
want: “More Masterpieces," cries the first 
page of the Pittsburgh Symphony’s lavish 
subscription brochure, leading off its list 
with Beethoven's Fifth. (A market survey 
had determined that audiences thought past 
programs were loo esoteric and “didn’t use 
the fuD orchestra enough.") “Rediscover the 
Classics,” suggests the Rochester Philhar- 
monic. 

T HE fragmented system has tended to 
turn an orchestral season into some- 
thing more like the smorgasbord of a 
miscellaneous concert series — a parade of 
soloists and guest conductors to choose 
from, giving concerts in which an orchestra 
participates. It is hardly surprising to see tbe 
next step of diversification into miscella- 
neous concert promotion: Even the Chicago 
Symphony now sells major n on-orchestral 
concerts, and offers Daniel Barenboim's 
Beethoven sonata cycle in its own subscrip- 
tion brochure. In Rochester, Broadway road 
companies are brought in under the Philhar- 
monic’s auspices. 

And along with marketing research, 
meanwhile, comes marketing itself, the lone 
of which troubles many observers. It has 
beat a long time since Leopold Stokowski 
shocked conservatives by shaking hands 
with Mickey Mouse in “Fantasia,” With 
ever-growing aggressiveness, orchestras are 
turning to the techniques and tone of com- 
mercial advertising. In Pittsburgh (where 
subscriptions fell from near sellout levels to 
some 68 percent of capacity over the Last five 
years), the new nti Bi-subscriptions have titles 
like “The Smart Set,” “Midweek Escape" 
and “Tbe Big Dozen.” The Gevdand Or- 
chestra pitches “Experience ... Excite- 
ment . . . Eloquence . . . Enjoyment 
. . .Encore," with lots of color ana lively 
graphics. Conductors are posed in sweaters; 


tras; when such an orchestra does not record 
consistently it is in trouble bmb fiscally and 
artistically. 

Bui as record production has become 
more economically parlous, record compa- 
nies have become increasingly reluctant to 
swallow tbe large differential between Amer- 
ican and European recording fees. A stan- 
dard symphonic work done in three sessions, 
exclusive of conductor’s fees, costs a little 
under $20,000 in London and four times that 
in Philadelphia, according to Angel Records. 

Exacerbating this problem has been the 
ever-increasing mobility of conductors, 
which makes it easier to record the star 
music director of an American orchestra 
with a European ensemble, as was hardly 
ever feasible for Reiner, Szell. Munch or 
Oruiandy during their American director- 
ates. As conductors and orchestras have be- 
come less firmly linked to one another, it has 
become clear that the recording industry's 
allegiance is to the conductors. 

“If Riccardo Muti went to Lhc New York 
Philharmonic,” says John Pattrick, Angel's 
vice president for artists and repertory, “we 
would absolutely be making lots of records 
with the New York Philharmonic.” As it 
stands, nobody is making lots of records of 
the Philharmonic, whose music director. Zu- 
bin Mehta, is said not to be a strong seller. 

“The furore of American orchestral re- 
cording." says Angel's president Brown 
Meggs, “depends on the orchestras making 
themselves more economically available.” A 
new development here is joint assumption by 
the orchestra and the record company of the 
musicians’ high recording fees in return for a 
royalty on profits — risk shoring, in other 
words. “In 1976 this was unheard of." says 
Meggs. “In England, all recording is still on 
a fiat-fee basis. But more and more -Ameri- 
can orchestras are sharing the cost," 

The bottom line still is, or should be. 
musical quality. More than one observer has 
wondered whether complaints about stan- 
dard programming might not evaporate if 
standard repertory were played in a fully 
satisfying way — but serious doubts about 
musical content of performances have deep- 
ened dramatically in the past few tears. 
There is a pervasive sense that symphony 
orchestras are no longer 3t the center of 
musical life. 

David Hamilton, a respected and unsen- 
saiionalist critic, wrote a few years ago in 
Keynote magazine that “cur major orches- 
tras are particularly distressing: except un- 
der a few special guest conductors, they 
don’t seem to be able to play Mozart or 
Beethoven or Brahms symphonies these days 
in any meaningful way at all." 

That such a statement could be made is in 
itself a bit shocking. Yet many prominent 
musicians react not with shock but with 
rueful acknowledgment of the concern. "We 
no longer know whether what we're doing is 
Continued on page 9 








Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 27, 1985 


TRAVEL 


Taking in Barbados, in Two Phases 






by Robert W. Stock 

T HE British have left their mark on 
Barbados. The language is English, 
the sport is cricket, the driving is 
on tl»s left, politics is taken very 
seriously. Barbadians are proud of their 
hard-won struggle for national indepen- 
dence. But oo this most easterly of Caribbe- 
an isles, politics gets a special spin. 

One sunny noontime, a boisterous crowd 
had gathered outside the big, coral Parlia- 
ment buildings, just olf Trafalgar Square 
and wi thin sight of Lord Nelson’s statue. 
When a cabinet minister's car drove into the 
courtyard, the crowd cheered him to the 
skies. Then Prime Minister Bernard St John 
arrived, and a group of women greeted him 
with song: “I just called to say, 1 love you." 

That blend of good humor and personal 
pride is encountered wherever visitors travel 
in Barbados, along the sidewalks of its bus- 
tling capital, Bridgetown, and on the narrow, 
winding roads of the interior. Car horns toot 
constantly, not in anger over traffic jams but 
in greeting. Barbadians, or Bajans, as they 
mil themselves, never miss a chance to wave, 
shout, whistle in acknowledgement of the 
wonder of seeing an acquaintance. 

Their response to a stranger is more sub- 
dued, of course. But over several days of 
driving, with little help from the local maps, 
1 must have asked directions of 75 Bajans, 
from teen-agers on bikes to elderly people on 



benches. Never did I receive anything less 
than a smile and advice willingly supplied. 

Barbados has aB of the requisites tourists 
demand of a tropical island: sun, soft 
breezes, endless beai&es, starry nights. But it 
offers something else quite rare in someparts 
of the Caribbean: a population that seems to 
accept the presence of strangers with good 
cheer. 

A visit to a Caribbean isiadd tends to split 
neatly into two phases. Your first .days are 
spent in a state of collapse, sprawled on the 
beach or alongside the pod. Meals are con- 
sumed at the botd or somewhere within easy 
walking distance. Thai, properly — or pain- 
fully — sunburned, with energy levels nsing, 
you fed the urge to explore. 

I spent Phase One at the Tamarind Cove 
Hold on Barbados’s western coast, on the 
Caribbean side, where most of the dozens of 
resorts are concentrated; the east coast faces 
the stormy Atlantic. Thoe are more elabo- 
rate places to stay, including the luxurious 
Sam Lord’s Castle, once home to a notorious 
pirate captain. And there are a host of apart- 
ments awt a pftrtrrant hotels available. But 
the Tamarind Cove a full measure of the 
amenities at a price I could mare or less 
afford. 

Which is to say, the food is adequate (you 
don’t go to the Caribbean for gourmet fare); 
the atmosphere, friendly, the 87 rooms, com- 
fortable; the water sports, extensive. The 
island, surrounded by coral reefs, is a happy 
hunting ground for snorkders, and the ho- 
ld's long waterfront is alive with wind surf- 
ers and water skiers. 

Only one section of the seafront, however, 
is approved for swimming — an area kept 
free of sea urchins. I discovered this fact too 
late. But 24 hours after stepping on one of 
the spiny creatures, I was back on the tennis 
court, courtesy of the hold's barman, who 
.applied cool lime juice and a dollop of excru- 
ciatingly hot candle wax to my wounds. 


\\ T HEN Phase Two arrived, I set out 
\m/for Bridgetown, where 100,000 of 
Tf the island's 260,000 residents live. 
The streets were busy with shoppers, many 
of them headed for the huge indoor Cheap- 
side Market, with its fnrit-and-vegetable 
stands. (At first glance, prices seemed exor- 
bitant, but not so — the Barbadian dollar is 
pegged at half the value of the U. S. dollar.) 
Schoolchildren in blue-and-white uniforms 
threaded their way through the throngs — 
Barbados has the highest literacy rate in the 
Caribbean. Fishing boats and small mer- 
chant ships plied the harbor. 

Down the street from Parliament is St 


Tha Now York Tn 


•v. ^ 



St. Nicholas Abbey. 

Michael's Cathedral, with its vaulted eating 
and an acre of wooden pews. The plaques on 
its walls and the tombs in its cemetery offer a 
quick course in the history of this tiny island, 
half the size of New York City. Inside, for 
example, there is a tribute to Mrs. Laetittia 
Austin: “This amiable and accompHsbed 
Woman arrived from England in Sept. 1801 
and was removed by a Fever Nov. the 19th 
following.” In the graveyard are the remains 
of such departed leaders as Sr Grand ey 
Adams, the black man who became Barba- 
dos’s first prime minister. 

Barbados was under British dominion 
from the time of its settlement in 1627 until 
its independence in 1966. In the early years, 
sugar cane, farmed by slaves brought over 
from Africa, made the island the richest of 
all Britain’s colonies in the New World. The 
slaves were freed in 1834, and gradually their 
descendants — 90 percent of the population 
— have taken over the political reins. 

Bridgetown’s museum has daylight visit- 
ing hours, but its stuffy rooms can be ex- 


plored in the evening as part of a twice-a- 
week show on the premises. “1627 and All 
That” turned out to be a mOdhr entertaining 
historical revue whipped up for the tourist 
trade, complete with colorful costumes and 
lively dancers. A buffet dinner was part of 
the package, providing limitless quantities of 
sura specialties as plantain, fried flying fish 
and calypso chicken. The museum has an 
eclectic collection — moths, porcelain, 
prints, costumes. Here, a series of rooms 
furnished in the style of a 19th-century plan- 
tation owner; there, a room full of sketches 
of slave life by an 18th century artist 

Most of the rites and sights of Barbados 
can be seen in a day’s drive with one of 
several touring companies, in a taxi or rental 
car. But those who enjoy poking around 
should schedule two days, which allows rime 
for a leisurely hutch and a swim. I rented a 
compact car, obtained my SIS visitor’s driv- 
ing license and headed for the MTh On the 
left-hand side of the road, of course, and 
with care. Winding two-lane roads lead past 
sugar-cane fields and through- tiny villages, 
along empty east coast beaches lined with 
palm trees. 

At the most elaborate of the island’s tour- 
ist rites, Harrison’s Cave, the radio in tire 
visitors’ center was playing “Love on the 
Rocks” as vacation as Imed up for & brief 
slide show and then climbed aboard a tram. 
The next half-hour was spent below ground, 
rolling slowly among limestone stalactites 
and stalagmites glowing in red and green 
lights, listening to the guide hail the wonders 
of “Tire Village” (the stalagmites look like 
bufldings) or “The Casade Pool” (fed by a 
40-foot-high waterfall), and dodging occa- 
sional drippings from the eatings. 

Andromeda Gardens offers another kind 
of natural wonder. Endless paths wander 
through a fairy-tale landscape blooming 
with gorgeous exotic plants from the world 
over: orchids in every color of the spectrum, 
frangipani and bougainvillea, yiang-yiang 
and canary bush, ixora from Thailand 
eucalyptus from Australia. The glowing red 
and yellow wild banana was velvety to the 
touch. The f oot-and-a-half-long cattail from 
India was funy. 

The style of the gardens is half their 
charm: the sudden stone archways, the quiet, 
hidden pools with accents of pink and blue 
watcriibes, the pots of greenery hanging here 
and there. A visit is tike happening upoa an 
extraordinary private garden, winch it is — 
the result of 30 years of collecting and nur- 
turing by the owner of the estate. Ins Banno- 
drif- 

A few minutes’ drive from the gardens is 
the Atlantis Hotel, where 1 lunched on the 




rf >“ 


7/ /. , 

•. «*£! OhtRti-.U ■ 

*S&V..r,# r'*' . : 


a .. 






ki - 










The beach at Hastings, on the west coast. 


balcony, watching the fishing boats come in 
and gorging on delicate, crusty spinach balls, 
pumpkin fritters and tingf kh, topped off by 
a tangy pumpkin pie. 

Atop Chalky Mount, farther up the Atlan- 
tic coast, there is a bumpy road lined with 
potters’ cottages and potters’ children eager 
for custom. Some of the potters have been 
firing up their loins for 30 years. The Coral 
Island shop nearby is a very different mat- 
ten big, modern, cbockablock with vases 
and ashtrays and souvenirs. The workers 
give brief lectures and demonstrations of 
their craft 


T HERE are other historic rites. St. 
Nicholas Abbey, for example, is the 
island’s oldest house, btnh before 
1660. Visitors can watch a film that shows 
the island as it was a half-century ago, and 
then take a guided tour past remnants of a 
past age — an 1810 dinner service, a 200 - 
year-old wine cooler. So mething for every- 
one’s string room: a centuries-old reading 
chair that smacks of Robe Goldberg, com- 
plete with adjustable back and metal arms 
that bring reading books drinks and 
food within a gentleman’s easy reach. And 
there are other scenic spots to sample, in- 


cluding Welchman Hal! Gully, where visi- 
tors stroll through a tropical jungle. 

Eventually, though, even the most curi- 
ous-ai-heart begins to overdose on history 
and nature arid it's time to return to basics. 
Food, for instance. After the bland fare at 
my hotel, I tried a few restaurants. My favor- . 
ite was Reid's, an open-air establishment 
that nicely, if expensively, combined local 
Specialties with European cuisine. If you go. 
reserve a table on the raised platform and try 
the fresh fish. 

The Ship Inn is the place for a snack 
(homemade meat pies), a beer and some 
lively talk in the atmosphere of an English 
pub. Talk turns to singalongs four nights a , 
week when musical combos perform. And if 
you're still running on Phase Two energy, 
you can dance until all hours at the Boat- 
yard, a funky outdoor dub beside the sea. . 

The chances are, though, what you'll re-; 
member most about Barbados is not the* 
night life, the food or the sightseeing. Those 
lazy, sun-drenched days beside the ?ea are ' 
what you go there for. and they’re certainly 
memorable. Still. 1 remember best what I 
had expected least: the fun of visiting an' 
island where I was mads to feel welcome. * 

3 /VS5 The \w York Time* 


AUSTRIA 


VIENNA, Konzerth3US (tel: 
72.12.11). 

CONCERTS — Jan. 1: Vienna 
Symphony, Georges Prttre con- 
ductor, “Wienner Singakadetnie," 
(Beethoven). 

Jan. 11, 12: “Wienner Kammeror- 
ch ester,” Herbert Prikopa, conduc- 
tor, Ola Rndner violin (Vivaldi). 
Jan. 21: Vienna Symphony, Ric- 
cardo Chaflly conductor, Radu 
Lupu piano (Rossini. Beethoven, 
Schumann). 

Jan. 27: ORF Symphony Orches- 
tra, “Wienner Singakadenne,” Ye- 
hudi Menuhin conductor (Furt- 
wdngler). 

Jan. 30: ORF Symphony Orches- 
tra, Guido Ajmone-Marsan con- 
ductor, Radovan Vlatkovic bom 
(Mozart). 

RECITALS — Jan. 1: Elisabeth 
Leonskaja piano. (Josef Strauss). 
Jan. 13: Lrouid Brumbag piano 
(Uszt). 

Jan. 15: Heinrich Schiff violoncel- 
lo, Rudolf Buchbinder piano (Bee- 
thoven). 

Jan. 16: Hans Peterxnandl piano 
(Schubert). 

Jan. 22: Garrick O&lsson piano 
(Schubert, Haydn, Wuorinen, We- 
bern, Barber). 


Jan. 23: “Haydn Trio” (Schumann, 
Brahms). 

Jan. 28: “Liederabend” Gundnla 
Janowitz soprano. Peter Waters pi- 
ano (Hindemith). 

•Musikverem (id: 65.81.90). 
CONCERTS — Jan. 2: Hungarian 
Philharmonic. Kurt Rapf conduc- 
tor (Beethoven). 

Jan. 6 : Czechoslovak Philharmon- 
ic, Gunter Lehmann conductor. 
Jan. 11, 12: Vienna Philharmonic 
Herbert von Karajan conductor 
(Bruckner). 

Jan. 14: “Wttrttemberg” Chamber 
Orchestra, Jorg Farber conductor, 
Martha Aigerich, soloist. 

Jan. 17: ORF Symphony Orches- 
tra, Lothar Zagrosek conductor, 
Paul Badura-Skoda piano (Beetho- 
ven). 

Jan. 29, 30: Vienna Symphony, 
Garcia Navarro conductor 
(Brahms, Mendelssohn). 
RECITALS— Jan. 9, 11: “Lieder- 
abend,” Jose van Dam soloist, 
Claude van den Cyden piano 
(Schumann, Poulenc, Ibert). 

Jaa. 15, 17: “Kflchl -Quartet t” 
(Schmidt, Beethoven. Mozart). 

Jan. 16: “Klavierabend,” (Liszt, 
SchlQsslmayrV 

Jan. 31: “Sonaiabend,” Angelica 
May violoncello, Ivan Klansky, pi- 
ano (Brahms, Bach, Martinu. R. 
Strauss). 

•Staatsoper (td: 5324.45). 


JANUARY CALENDAR 


Jan. 1, 6 : “Die Fledermaus” 
(Strauss). 

Jan. 4: “Der Rosenkavalier” 
(Strauss). 

Jan. 5, 8 . 12: “Macbeth”(Verdi). 
Jan. 14, 18: “Die Zauberfbte” 


WEEKEND 


RESTAURANT 


LEISURE 


>ER MYSTERY 
WEEKENDS 


In the tradition of A ga tha Christie , 
fjt BlyfhSfCompany will offer for the first time 
| across Europe a series of Murder Mystery 
? Weekends in English. They represent both an 
f intellectuai challenge and great amusement to a 
small number of paying guests infiltrated by 
professional actors, amid the splendour of 
some of Europe’s finest hotels and restau ran ts. 


VENICE • "A Death in Venice", the Cipriani Hotel. March 1-1- 16. 

NICE - "Death by Descent". Chateau E/a. Chateau de la Chine d'Or. March 21-23 
FLORENCE - “A Murderous Habit". Ihe Villa San Michele. April 4-6. 

GENEVA - “Guilty She Crwd". Aubeifc du Pita: Bise. Talloires. April I M3. 
VIENNA • “A Vintage Affair". Hotel Schloss Durostein. April 18-2(1. 

BRUSSELS - "Murder Most Foul". Relais du Marquis, litre. April 25-27. 
FRANKFURT - "Crimes of Passion". Sdttaskld Kronberg. May 2-4. 

PARIS - "Sing to Me a Lullaby". Argle Noir. Fontainebleau. May 24. 

About $300 per person. Including meats. For reservations and brochures, 
contact 

BlyfhfifCompany & avenue (tehMff-OBaSWeairi^Fenat.Haica 
M 93012838 Tehx 470673 F. fn the USA (80Q) 228-7712 


SHOPPING 


\mm% look 

I Perfumes - Cosmetics - Leather Goods 
I Fashion Accessories 
I DUTY FREE - 40% * 

1 13 Avenue de (Opera PARIS 1st I 
l297.43.88 I 


WEEKEND 

appears every 
Friday 

For information 
call Dominique Bouvet 
in Paris 
on 47.47.12.65 
or your local 1HT 
representative 

(List in Classified 
Section ) 


Jan. 16, 20: “Faust”(Gounod). 
Jan. 28, 31: *Tosca" (Puccini). 
BALLET— Jan. 10, 13. 17: Letzte 
Lieder/ Josephs Legende. 

Jan. 21, 24, 30: “DomrOschen” . 
•20th Century Museum (tel: 
78.25.50). 

EXHIBITION — To Jan. 26: 
“Kandinsky in Paris”. 

•Volksoper (td: 53240). 

OPERA — Jan. 1, “Die Fleder- 
maus’ (Strauss). 

Jan. 2, 7: “Hansel und GretcT 
(Humperdinck). 

Jan. 4, 12, 15: “La Bohfcme” (Pucd- 
m). 

MUSICAL — Jan. II: “My Fair 
Lady (Loewe). 

BELGIUM 

BRUSSELS, Cirque Royal, (td: 
218.20.15). 

OPERA —To Jan. 5: “La Chauve- 
Souris” (B^g art/ Strauss). 


LONDON, Barbican Centre (td: 
638.41.41). 

CONCERTS — London Sympho- 
ny Orchestra. — Dec. 31, Jan. I: 
“New Year Viennese Evening” 
John Georgiadis conductor/ violin 
(J. Strauss). 

Jan. 2, 4 : London Symphony Or- 
chestra, James Paul conductor. An- J 
gustin D nmay violin. 

Jan. 5: Royal Philharmonic Or- 
chestra, Paul Freeman conductor, 
Einar Henning Smeybe piano 
(Rossini Handel, Grieg). 

Jan. 11: “Gala Night of Gilbert & 


24, 25: “Mrs. Warren’s Profession” from the Thy 
(Shaw). lection.” 

Jan. 3, 4, 5, 16, 17, 18: “The Duch- •Mus&e ( 
ess of MaHT (Webster). 4Z72J1.13). 


piano, Kolja Blacher. violin 
“Streichquartett Na 3” (Manfred 
Trqjahn); “Streichquartett (Karl A 
Hartmann); “Phantasy for Violin 
from the Tbyssen-Bornemisza Col- and Piano” (Todd Brief); “Four 


Dec. 31, Jan. 1, 2, 14, 15, 24, 25: EXHIBITION — To Jan. 5: “Eu 
“The Cherry Orchard” (Chekov). g&ne BtioL” 

Jan. 3, 4, 20,21, 22. 23, 28, 29: “The To Jan. 6 : “La Gldre de Victo 
Road to Mecca" (Fugard). Hugo.". 

•Royal Academy of Arts •Musce du Loqyre (tel: 
. (734.9032). ’ 42.6039.26). . 


Nocturnes,” (George Crumb). 
Carnavalet (tel : •Deutsche Oper (td: 341 .44.49). 

■ T _ _ _ ^ BALLET — Jan. 1: “The Nut- 

>N —To Jan. 5: “Eu- cracker” (Petipa, Tchaikovski). 

3: “Les Sylphides” (Fokine, 


gftne B^ot.” . Jan. 3: “Les Sylphides” (Fokine, 

To Jan. 6 : “La Glare de Victor Cbopin) 

" J » , , Jan. 13, 20. 29: “Gisdle” (Adam). 

du Lowrre ( leI: ’ OPERA— Jan. 7, 10,14: “Cosi fan 


EXHIBITION — From Jan. 16: EXHIBITION — To Jan. 6 : “Le r.m 9 n 23 26 30: “Aida” (Ver- 
“Rejmdds.” • Bnm & Versailles.” di). ’ 

•TatoGdlay Od: 82L13.13). •Musec du Petit Palais (tel: •NationalmJcrie: (td: 2^6.6L 
EXHIBITIONS — To Jan. 5: 42.65.12.73). - . 

“Kurt Schwitters.” EXHIBITION — To Jam5: “Soldi EJOCTmON — ToJam ffi: An 

•Victoria and Albert Museum (td: D*Encre,” Victor Hugo's manu- *^-85. 

589.63.71), ^ sogteS id drawing . •P^hamome (td: 25488^). 

EXHIBITIONS — To Feb. 2: ~ 


•Pfnlharmome (td: 254884)). 


bon. 47.47.6 

To Jan. 26: “Hats from India.” EXHH 
To Mty 25: “British Waterco- -LesFi 


ditlon. Pop ul dr« 

David Atherton conductor, John ^ nt ^ 1 Wateroo 

till piano (Tchaikovski, Raduncm- : l0UrS - 

inov). 

Jan. 23: City of Birmingham Sym- BIAItCT 

phony Orchestra, Smon Rattle . 

conductor, Peter Dooohoe piano, 

Tristan MnraO oudes marteoot MONTPELLIER, Opera (tel: 


•Mus£e Nationale des Arts et Tra- CONCERTS — Berlin Philhar- 
diiions Populaires (tel.: monk Orchestra — Jan. 4, 5: Colin 
47.47.69.80). Davis conductor (Stravinsky, Tip- 

EXHIBmON — To April 21: pett). 


m^ais et la Table." 
(td: 47.42J57.50). 


Jan. 7, 8 : Christoph von Dohnanyi 
conductor, Mitsuko Uchida soloist 


— From Jan. 20: “La Tra- (Mozart, Schubert). 


Jan. 10, 


•Theatre des Champs-Etys£es (td: nanyi conductor, 


11: Christoph 
inductor, Sal' 


h von Ddb- 
j vat ore Ac- 


47J0J6J7). 


cardo soloist (Ives. Berg. Dvorak). 


(Murafl, Messiaen). 


66J1.UX 


Jan. 25: London Symphony Or- OPERETTA — Dec. 30, 31: “G- Trio^CSrahms). 
chestra, Mstislav Rostropovich, boulette" (de Flers, de Croisset). TJTi _^ uslcal “ 
conductor (Beethoren). _ 


CONCERTS — Jan. 13: “Aimra- Jan. 14, 15: Bernard Haitink con- 
Voos Brahms” La Belle Mague- ductor (Brahms, Haydn, Ban ok). 


lonne, Trio (Brahms). Jan 17, 18: Bernard Haitink con- 

•ThfcStre Musical de Paris (td: ductor, Horatio Gutierrez, Jorg 


Jan. 26: “Opera Gala Night," Lon- T Acn ?? ) 1 i?,r~ E^^MTiON JA22 MUSICAL — To Jan. 25: Beethoven). 

I don Cocto^^ Orchestra, David — To Jan - 13: Raoul Doty. “Black and Bind’ (Scgovia/Orez- Jan. 25, 26: 

Coleman, conductor, Josephine PARIS , conductor. 


Baumann; Klaus Stoll (Genzmer, 


Barstow smtrano (Rossini, Verdi, 

MMrsgrii Syamhony Or- i??? 18: Jc ^ NcW1 ^' HXHlBmON — To Jan. 5: Tour tor, Yo Vo Ma soloist, (Dvorak, 

£t^Ri£riRS>raiihiq- VuXOr Hug ° (lA Centuries of Ballet in Paris.” Sibelius). 

un^Rrcge Bolet piano (Rossini, exJUBITION —To J an. 31 : “Vic- ttmmmmtrr COLOGNE. Oper der Stadt (td: 

tor Hugo’s Drawings.” 21^5.81). 

Jan. 31 : ^Pbnhamom a ^ Orcfae soa, d’Art Moderne (tel: OPERA — Jan. 1. 8 . 11: “A 

H 47^3.6127). . BERLIN. Acadcmie der KQnste, 

Knii violm (Bizet, Tchaikovski, H- EXHIBITIONS — To Jan. 5: (teL 391.1031). Jan. 4, ! 8 : “Zar und Zirmnecnumn" 

®EMA-J^. 13-26: Kurosawa “V=« &ekdy,” ‘Modem M«« RECITAL -Jen. 22: Aim M.oks _ 


Jan. 25, 26: Herbert von Karajan 
conductor, Yo Yo Ma soloist 


’Hold Mfcridien (td: 758.1230). 42.72.93 41V 

IAT7 1 O . 1 - - - - ! “Z 


•Tour Montparnasse (tel: (Schubert. Strauss). 
42.72.93.41V Jan. 30, 31: Lorin } 


Lorin Maazti conduc- 


eauuNY $0$^ 01X1 dcr ** (,d: 

OPERA — Jan. 1. 8. 11: “A 

BERLIN. Acadcmie der Kflnste, “asked BaJT (Ver^). 

ltd: 391.10J1V Jan. 4, 18: “Zar und Zirmnecraann" 


-Jan. 22: Alan Marks 


EXHIBITION — Festival of Tra- 
ditional Japanese Culture — 
“Told: Tradition in Japan Today.” 
To Jan. 26: “NUtonga,” (Japanese 
painting). “Tokyo Lifestyle” (pho- 
tographs). 

To Feb. 26: “The Japanese Gar- 
den: Its Beauties and Traditions.” 
To Jan. 26: “Matthew Smith.” 
MUSICAL — Dec. 30: “The Pi- 
rates of Penzance” (Gilbert & Sulli- 
van). 

THEATER — Royal Shakespeare 
Company — Jan. % 3, 6, 7, 8, 9, 13, 
14, 17, 18: “Othello” (Shake- 


USSte 

1 ’ ' 

a : V v • - 




Jan. 10, 11, 15, 16. 31: “As You 

Like It” (Shakespeare). 

Jan. 23-25, 27-30: “The Meny 
Wives of WindsoT (Shakespeare). 
Jan. 2-4, 6-9, 13, 14: “Les-LUtsons 
Dangereuses” (Hampton). 

Jan. 10. 11, 15, 16, 31: “Mdans” 
(Pomerance). 

Jan. 22-28, 30: “Philistines” 
(Gority). 

•Hayward Gallery (teL* 928 .57.08). 
EXHIBITIONS — To Feb. 23: 
“Homage to Barcelona.’’ 

■To Feb. 16: “Torres- Garda: Grid- 
Pattetn-Sign.” 

•London Coliseum : (tel: 
836.01.11). 

OPERA — English National Op- 
1 era — Jan. 2, 8 , 11, 14, 18, 23, 28: 
"Don Giovanni” (Mozart), 
j Jan.3,9,15:“TbeMastersingeisqf 
I Nuranberg” (Wagner). • • - 
Jan. 16,22, 24, 29: “Moses" (Rossi- 
ni). 

•National Theatre (td: 633.08^0). 
THEATER— Dec. 30, Jan. 10, U, 
13, 14, 22, 23: “The Real Inspector 
Hound” (Stoppard) & “The Critic” 
(Sheridan). 

Dec. 30, 31, Jan. 1,2.9,10,11,23. 


, • 

- •- •/! 

• • .. 

• “-V " ’ . 



=5- c : i 

; ; v /-v 


ii , ini* lit 

... v ' • V- 

•7::| mm tm 

I -V-" _ 5 7 

'jr.V '■ ••• ’.S* 

.■ Mm 

.‘i s jig 

' ^ t 

■ f #gv. * 

^ r i* 1 

J 









Jan. 10: “Elektra” (Strauss). 

STUTTGART, Staatstheater, (tel* 
20320V 

BALLET — Jan. 1-5: “Wieder- 
kehr," (ADeyne, MenddssohnV 
Jan. 21 , 22 : “Vergessenes Land” 
(Kylian, Britten), “Brouillards” 
(Cranko, Debussy). “Le Sacrt du 
Prin temps" ^Tetley. Stravinsky). 
OPERA— Jan. 10: “Fiddio" (Bee- 
thoven). 

Jan. 16, 26: “Don Giovanni" (Mo- 
zart). 

?« PER SF A Jaa 1-5: “The 
Merry Widow,” (Ltiiar). 


ITALY 


Comuaale 

(teL- 277.9136). 

BALLET — Jan. 3-5, 7: “Gisdle” 
(Pttiyakov/Petipa. Adam). 

MILAN, Padiglione d’Arte Con- 
temporanea (Id: 78.46.88 0 . 
BanBmONS - To Jan. 13- 
Pane: Partitions," “Richard 
I-ong - Salvatore Scaipiua.” 
•Teatro alia Scala (teL 887-92.1 1). 

MiET-JatLi-l^ 14,15: “Bai- 
Tii^n. lnip t? ia[c (Balanchine. 

v ~- 

“Bolero” (B^jart, Ravel).. 

OP^A — 3 1JaiL 4 5 a u 

pano (Beetho- 


Paul Klee’s "The Heto With the Wlnf 
in San Francisco show. . 


*OMt Braschi (tel: 

gmsmON-ToJ^f: "Ti- 

oer-SJfcmc. two aties, two-rivws.” 


SCOTLAND 


EDINBURGH. National Gal- 
lery (tel: 556.89.21). 

EXHIBITION — From Jan. 3: 
“Turner Wateronlours." 

To Jan. 5: “The Christmas Story.*' ' 
•National Gallen of Modem Art 
(id: 556.89.21). 

EXHIBITIONS — To Jan. 5: 
“Bela Uilz. Prims 1920- ?923.” ; j 
From Jan. 1 1 : “American Images.” *- 

MONACO 

MONTE-CARLO. Opera de Mon- 
te-Carlo (id: 50.76.54). 

BALLET — Dec. 30: “Jours Tran- 
quilies” (D'At. Cantdoube). “Steps 
After Dawn" (Haigen, Mendels- 
sohn), "Life Circles” tAmmann, 
Adams). 

I)ec. 31: “Pxs de Six de la Vivan- 
diere” (St. Leon, Pugni). "Gisdle" 
(Lacotte. Adam). 


THE NETHERLANDS 

AMSTERDAM, Concengebouw 
(tel: 7 1.83.451. 

CONCERTS — Jan. 3: Concertge- 
bouw Orchestra, chamber musk 
series (Beethoven). 

Jan. 4: Concengebouw Orchestra, 
Wolfgang Sawaliiscb conductor^ 
(Martinu. Schubert). 

Jan. 9: Concengebouw Orchestra. 
Lucas Vis conductor, Yuri Bash-’ 
met, violin. 

Jan. 10. 13. 14: Amsterdam PhiP 
harmonic Orchestra. Emmanuel 
Krivine, conductor. Stephen Bi&h-i 
op-Kovacetich. piano (Mozart). 
Jan. J 1 : Netherlands Philharmoak:. 
Orchestra. Lev Markiz conductor ., 
Jan. 17. 18. 23: Concengebouw Ori 
dies tra, Colin Da%is conductor 
(TippetL Beethoven). 

Jan. 24: Brabant Orchestra. Rodot 
van Dnesten. conductor, Andrzq 
Ratusmski piano (Rachmoninovt 
Bruckner). 

Jan. 25; Radio Philharmonic Or- 
chestra, Sergiu Comissiraa ccm : ' 
ductor. Ronald Brautigam, piano 
(Mozart, Bruckner). 

RECITALS — Jan. 6 : Nod I 
piano (Debusssy). j 

Jan. 8 : Walter van Hatrwe. Woutcr 
Mollcr. Gleu Wilson Trio (Tele- 
man, Bach). 

Jan. 19: Jorge Bolet, piano (Cho- 
pin). 

Jan. 29: Trio di Milano” (Hayden, 
Rihm, Brahms j. 

EXHIBITIONS — To Jan. 26V 
The Age of Velasquez,” ■' 

12: “Amsterdam Insicte- 

and Out” 


wwro srATES 

NEW YORK, Metropolitan 1 
um of Art (id: 535.77.10}. 

EXHIBITION -To Jan. 5 

dial " 

•Museum of- Modern 
(tel:708.94.00). 

To Jan. 7: “Contrasts of 1 

Geometric Abstract An 
1980.” 

SAN FRANSISCO, Museu 
Modem An (td: 86188 . 00 ). 

SpHBmONS — To Fe 
EhnerBischoff 1947-1985." 
From Jan. 23: “Paul Bee: FI 
tive Graphics from the Di 
Collection.” 

WASHINGTON D.G. Na 
gate*?, fid: 737.42.15). 

J? March 6 : "The Treasure H 
of Britain.” .... - 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 27, 1985 


Page 9 





FOR FUN AND PROFIT 



dDoDars and Cents 


liy Paul Grimes 


EW YORK Htst, in Jvoe, k 
was thchfladdng ct Trans World 
Airlines Flight 847 leaving Atfi- 
, . ens. Tkenit was the earthquake in 

? xx hurric anes in the Atlantic and the 
£.Modco; the fagadting of the cruise 
^dufle Lanro off Alexandria, Egypt; 
ilcamc eruption in Colombia, and the 
ing of an Egyptian atriiner and the 
tan do storming of the plane on Malta. 
» after the other, these tragic events 
red worldwide attention. And as they 
ay raised questions about the safety of 
opmg in certain parts of the world and 
travel industry might best cope with 
; uneasiness. 

both the industry and the consumer, 
questions involve a lot of dollars and 
Hotels, cruise companies and tour 
xors cannot stay in business without 
steed bookings. They schedule their 
[tkms many months, even years, in ad- 
V For a company to cancel a cruise or 
or to discourage hotel patronage be- 
sot a natural disaster, terrorism or po- 
1 unrest could sped financial ruin. A 
. operator, far example, would not only 
ncomc from passengers but would also 
ably have to compensate the hotels and 
sompames for whose facilities he had 
iacted 

ns issue has attracted substantial atten- 
both inside and outside the travel indus- 
is- diverse disasters have occurred this 
. inevitably affecting tourism. As one 
cation. Attorney General Robert 
tms of New York state announced in 
ember that he would introduce a bin in 
cgtsiatore next month to require travel 
js and tour operators to provide full 
uds to cansnmexs if terrorism, natural 
stem, epidemics, strikes, riots, boycotts 
oteroatKnial political conflicts disrupt 
.d plans. 

legislation, believed to be 


uw will never put iris clients? safety in ques- 
tion just to make additional money." 

When a tour operates as scheduled but 
uneasiness compels you to drop out, the 
extent of your refund depends on several 
circumstances. If you cancel at least 30 days 
before departure, yon will usually get a com- 
plete refund less an administrative fee of $25 
to $50 a ticket Within 30 days, p enalties 
often escalate sharply, tan even, men can 


-or example, Coulouvatos said that if a 
TraveKne tour includes a Greek island 
cruise, as many do in summer, the tour 
operator may not be aide to obtain any 
refund from the ship fine to 'pass on to 


How the industry 
copes, or not, 
with disaster 


first of its kind in the industry, was 
- ted by Assistant Attorney General Stc- 
j MinddL “We're not saying the indus- 
E 5 at fault, but we have to spread the 
” Mmdefl said in a telephone interview, 
(rink the industry should bear the risk 
ugh insurance or self-insurance orpossi- 
Ihrough raising the cost of travri.” 

Hudrii said he expected many reasons 
anedbtion to be dear cut, but that there 
hi be some hazy areas. “I don’t have the 
■*Ner to that,” he said. “We don’t want 
- -pie to caned became of a whim. There 
Agoing to be dear cases and stupid cases 
cases in between, and there the courts 
gnmg to have to determine who’s right-* 1 
k spot check of five m^jor tour operators 
Red a lack of uniformity in bow they deal 
jtions beyond their controL 


afctng of Iqjadtings, Alexander W. Har- 
preadeni of General Tours of New York, 

■ £ “We're just as dumbfounded by this 
i rfiwmnq'an that’s entered international 
•■d as the traveler is. We’re geared to deal 

safe worid, and all of a sodden the world 
.0 longer safe.” 

— (arris, who is chair man of the govem- 
- I jt affairs committee of the United States 
jr Operators Association, said that in aD 

■ s involving traveler security, “we work 
/ dofidy with five State Department and 
c guidance from the respective country 
Icon the gravity of the situation.” 
fcnsnntine Coulouvatos, president of 
vetirarf New Yoric, a major organizer or 
•d to Greece, said he did not think hijack- 
> caused many cancellations of tours he- 
re “a hijacking is regarded as an incident 
t doesn’t have too many chances to reoc- 

He insisted, however, that where acts 
^3od are concerned, “a serious torn opera- 


consumers. although just after the TWA hi- 
jacking the lines tended to waive penalties. 
Late fall and winter tours of Greece, howev- 
er, do not include cruises, he said, so refunds 
following the Egyptair hijacking could be 
more generous. 

One way to offset penalties is to buy trip 
cancellation or interruption insurance, 
which is widely available through travel 
agencies. Until recently, it usually paid off 
only if the traveler or a close relative became 
critically 31 or died, but some policies have 
been broadened to cover such “unforeseen 
circumstances” as hijackings, defaults in the 
travel industry, jury duty or strains or traffic 
jams that result in missed departures. 

Premiums range from about $5 to $5 JO 
per $100 of coverage, but costs could rise 
Substantially because of high payout rates. 
Read the conditions carefully, however, be- 
fore you buy any such insurance, and be sure 
that the amount you get will cover any con- 
tingency. 

Some major tour operators, such as Mau- 
mntour of Lawrence, Kansas, and Tauck 
Tours of Westport, Connecticut, have their 
own plans that, fora fee of $25, allow travel- 
ers to cancel without penalty for almost any 
reason. 

A perennial question is whether, in the 
aftermath of a natural disaster, it is the 
responsibility of a tour operator, travel agent 
or airline to notify a potential traveler that 
conditions at a destination may not be nor- 
mal. A typical consumer complaint wjts that 
of Lois Jocham of Nutley, New Jersey, who 
said that late last year, when she and her 
husband, Peter, arrived at Mullet Bay in Sl 
M aarten, they found considerable damage at 
their hotel and disruption in the area from a 
hurricane three weeks earlier. She said they 
should have been forewarned. 

The company seDing the tour package, 
GoGo Tours of Paramus, New Jersey, of- 
fered the couple a $160 refund and a 20 
percent discount on a future vacation pack- 
age “as a gesture, of good wifi,” but h dis- 
claimed responsibility. In a telephone inter- 
view, Michael Norton, GoGo’s vice 
president for operations, said hurricane 
news is usually widely covered by broadcasts 
and newspapers, and “if I am a diem going 
to SL Maarten, I'd {ride up the phone and 
call the tourist board of that island or my 
travel agent and find out the details.” 

“We don’t know about conditions at a 
hotel unless the hotel contacts us,” be said, 
“and when we do know we try and warn 
travel agents. But 9 out of 10 hotels don’t 
volunteer this information unless they’re 
really in bad shape.” ■ 

C 1983 The New York Times 


TRAVEL 


Eating in Barcelona: Catalan and Worldly 


by Mary Peiison Kennedy 


B 


ARCELON A — Barcelona’s restau- 
rants — like the city itself — are 
Catalan, Iberian and ooBoopolitan. 
They offer not only Catalan dishes 
but regional cooking from all over Spain, as 
well as South America, Europe and Asia. For 
the night owl there are more than a dozen 
places that stay open after midnight, includ- 
ing El Drugstore at 61 Paseo de Gratia, 
which stays open for eating until 5:30 AM. 

Barcelona is deserted on weekends so 
finding places to eat on Sundays can be a 
problem, although local entertainment 
guides run a list of those duct stay open. 

Getting Catalans to agree on their best 
restaurants can be another problem. Every- 
one has a favorite and they aD seem to be 
different, although many agree that some of 
the best CMnim cooking is found at Agut 
d* Avignon, nestled in a modest corner of die 
Barrio Gotico, the oldest part of the city. 

Mercedes Giralt, the owner, and Jufiftn 
Tfefleria, the chef, have traveled the worid as 
members of the World Gastronomic Council 
offering some of the specialties that have 
won awards for this restaurant. 

The menu, while not large is divided be- 
tween Catalan and French dishes . 

On the Catalan side, one particularly in- 
triguing first course is a plump little hot- 
lowed-out winter squash baked in the oven 
udth a mixture of smoked herring, Gntyfere, 
sherry and fresh cream. Or there is spinach 
cooked with raisins and pine nuts. During 
the fall and winter there is always game on 
the menu — wild boar with raspberry sauce 
or partridge p&tL 

Catalan «v»Ving often consists of a mix- 
ture of the sweet and the salty. For the main 
course yon can try dude with figs, goose with 
pears, or prawns wich a garlic sauce. There is 
always rap romesqo, (lotte or monkfish, Ro- 
man style) which according to Giralt is prob- 
ably one of the oldest rectipes in Spain, 
having been served to the Roman legions. It 
was modified in the 16th century when the 
conquistadors brought bade tomatoes and 
green peppers. The best beef in Spain is 
round m this region and solomillo (sirloin) 
cooked in red wine is excellent 

“If 1 could only eat one dessert for the rest 
of my life, let it be crane Catalan,” was the 
way one Catalan put it Whether the restau- 
rant is humble or elegant, there will always 
be on the «wim this extraordinary custard 
with burnt sugar and no one should leave 
Cataluna without trying it At the Agut d’A- 
vignon it is perfect, as is the requhon con 
ndel, a soft pot cheese served with honey that 
is also a. traditional dah. 

In the narrow alley b ehin d the restaurant 
there is an old buMmg with a temperature- 
controlled wine cellar that contains some of 
the rarest wines of Spain. Among them are 
bottles of Vega Sicilia, Reserva Ulrica, from 
1936 to 1945 (this fruity red wine is consid- 
ered by many to be the most noble wine of 
Spain); Marques de Riscal, Reserva, 1925; 
Vina Albina, Reserva 1962. These wines are 
usually offered only at auctions, but should 
you like to see them, Giranll null be glad to 
accompany you. 

At the restaurant, for a white wine, tire 
Blanc de Baldtis is dry and plearing. It is 
from the Penfcdes region in the northeast 
part of Catalonia, where they also make an 
excellent red, Sangre de Toro (the bouse red 
here is a good Tones). The wine list is large 
and includes a good selection of Riqjas, 
Spain's most famous wine growing region. 

If you go to this restaurant on the first 
Thursday of the month you will see a trig 
round table of very old men. Titty are the art 
critics of the city and the tradition of having . 
lunch at the Agut d’Avignon is an old one, as 
is the restaurant, which has three levels of 
large and small dining areas, hand-painted 
ceifings and courteous and friendly service. 


Experimental Dance 


Continued from page 7 


'rue; props were present. But even when 
/ were literal, as a bathtub or a toilet seal 
TBath Tubbing,” the prosaic everyday 
aems of real life became a springboard 
a metaphoric meditation. In this solo, 
kc mooted around the tub, wiping its rim 
i a towd, and shot off to the floor. She 
med to seesaw atop the tub, to dip in an 
or her torso. This high drama was coa- 
ted with woman-as-char, scrubbing the 
r or with a virtuoso display of muscular 
troj as the dancer used the tub for mini- 
support Finally, the tub tumbled to one 
and Linke lay in it and then rolled 
»fc — unsheltered. 


Unlike American psychologically oriented 
choreographers, linke seems to favor an 
Existentialist The figure she embod- 

ies in each solo struggles against hopeless 
odds and then is resigned to her fate. A 
familiar Expressionist image comes to mind 
in “Occident-Orient” when Linke, hair over 
her face, moves along a beam flight, usual- 
ly on her knees, and then is pulled bade 
toward a no-man Viand. The quality of the 
movement is what makes such potentially 
trite images of interest In “Fkxxv* a carpet 
runner of light blue doth is rolled out by the 
dancer’s own movement until finally it is 


spread out into a “lake.” Suddenly the entire 
doth is yanked off into the wings. Again the 
ambiguity is present Has tins doth flood, 
which seemed to wind around Linke’s ankles 
like quicksand, also left her high and dry? 

This kind of unanswered question is often 
the very point or the beauty of a dance work. 

But, generally speaking, the Next Wave Fes- 
tival does not have to worry about being 
accessible. Too often, one could have won- 
dered whether the artists on stage really 
knew what they were doing. ■ 

CJ985 The New York runes 


J. S. Orchestras 


Continued from page 7 


C says Leonard Slatkin. music three tor 
be St Louis Symphony, summing up a 
td speculation on the the impact of in- 
t co mmunica tion, recordings, muricolo- 
awareness of historical style. He also 
^ as so many have done, the potentially 
rating effects of year-round activity — 
® of it under- rehearsed — and the de- 
* of recognizable regional sounds under 
ical absentee landlords, 
fn, meanwhile, sees Lhe landlords as less 
ul for major orchestras than the coher- 
•of the ensemble itself. He is particularly 
Wed by one aspect of the power shift 
l music directors to unions: the insis- 
c On open auditions, often with the play- 
^tind a screen and nrmamgH “Several of 
nftjars," he says, “have had a tradition of 
■8 vacancies with students of their own 
Eft, students who have gotten to know 


the orchestra over a long period. ... In a 
blind audition, when you don’t know any- 
thing about the player’s background or stud- 
ies, you risk losing that cohesion.” 

“The musicians ,” says Thomas, “are very 
concerned. They are aware of this question 
of keeping their souls intact amid all the 
expansion of activity and income. They’re 
aware that it is threatened. The worst thing 
that has happened to music is that there is no 
more off-season. Of course the musicians 
deserve the economic security, but it’s just 
not possible to achieve an apocalyptic level 
of performance cm a 52-week basis.” 

But if all this sounds pessimistic, a cheery 
voice from across the ocean suggests that « 
may all be nothing worse than a little bit of 
growing pains. Peter Jonas, long a Chicago 
Symphony Orchestra administrator and now 
in his second year running the E ngl i sh Na- 


tional Opera, hails the 52-week contract: “It 
completes the institution.” 

“The orchestras will have to become more 
commercial.” he says. “Yes, they are often 
marking time and filling up weeks in their 
summer seasons. Is it so bad? Art and fi- 
nance are intertwined in America in a way 
that’s more alive than in Europe; these re- 
sources in the U.S.A. create a tremendous 
strength that can preserve quality and free 
the mnstriarre to do their work” 

If the American symphony orchestra can 
draw on tfiftse strengths to define for itself a 
fresh role — perhaps a more modest one, 
preserving one part of our musical tradition 
m performances of artistic worth and vitality 
— the future may be bright But if the 
orchestra's destiny is to be a crackerjack unit 
of 100 well- trained employees, efficiently 
producing a known salable commodity for 
the culture'market — the question of wheth- 
er the financial challenges can be surmount- 
ed will no longer matter. ■ 

0 1985 The New Yofk Times 


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In the last few years there has been a trend 
to move restaurants away from the old sec- 
tion of the city (due in pait to the crime rate 
in the narrow streets and in part to the lad; 
of parking). Luis Cxwhas, one of Spam's 
best known chefs, has opened a second El- 
dorado Petit (the first one in the 
resort of San Fetid de Girixctis an the Costa 
Brava is one of Catalonia's most famous 
restaurants) in a magnificent Victorian man- 
sion in a residential area of the city. 

It is set in a garden where one can dine in 
the warm weather. Inride, the roans are 
intimate and beautifully appointed. The 
waiters are solicitous and knowledgeable 
about the menus —the Catalans tend to be 
serious diners like to know as much as 
possible about anything they order — and 
Luis Cruafias is usually on hand to offer 
suggestions. 

The selection is large and full of interest- 
ing combinations. For starters there is an 
excellent vegetable paid; sligh tly warm brain 
and spinach salad or a marinated codfish 
salad seasoned with coriander and thyme. 

For the m^tn course there are the tradi- 
tional Catalan dishes like arroz negro (for 
two), a spicy rice and squid dish that uses the 
ink from the squid Tor the sauce ar,pajell al 
homo al estila de las Pescadores (also only for 
two) a mouth-watering dish with mackerel 
cooked the way the fisherman of San Fefiti 
prepared their catch, with potatoes, toma- 
toes and green peppers. 

Then there is steak with Gorgonzola and 
walnuts; partridge stuffed with fois gras and 
truffles, and wild rabbit cooked with mush- 
rooms and vegetables. 

If one of your quests in life is the perfect 
strawberry tart you can stop the search at 
Eldorado Petit Hojaldre templado def resit as 
de bosque takes 15 minutes to prepare, but 
worth the wait A delicate warm puff pastry 
crammed with wild st rawb e rri es that come 
from woods of Maresme, near Barcelona, are 
nestled onto a subtly flavored custard sauce. 

Other desserts here are baked 

fresh figs (this also takes 15 minutes), mar- 
velous ice creams or periled pomegranates in 
muscatel wine. 

The wine list includes excellent choices 
from aD over the country. Cruafias recom- 
mends a Raimat red and a Jean Leon caber- 
net from the Lerida region. If you prefer 
sparkling wines, try abottle of Brut Natural, 
Juves Y Camps, Reserva del La F amilia — H 
is light and tart 


k NOTHER recently opened restaurant 
and bar that has become popular 
.here is the Azalete. Toya Roque, the 
owner and chef, has also opted for a Victori- 
an mansio n and with the help of her archi- 
tect husband has tinned the bade garden into 
an indoor-outdoor dining experience. A 
huge, artfully designed glass structure en- 
closes the dizung room but leaves the impres- 
sion that one is stfll outdoors. The service is 
rapid and each plate is a work of art 
Roqu6 calls her cuisine eclectic, with per- 
haps a bit of nouveOe cuisine. For starters, 
the fresh garden salad comes with thinly 
sliced avocados, cucumbers, tomatoes, car- 



Dining area under glass at the Azulete. 


Emc MWtanon Rom* 


rots and beets so beautifully arranged one is 
loath to disturb them, and artichokes stuffed 
with crabs and covered with an excellent 
sauce. Then there is the chefs favorite, turn 
de sardinas, sardines with tomatoes, egg- 
plant zucchini and a creamy egg sauce. 

As in the other two restaurants, the menu 
here changes four tunes a year, with each 
season. 

Main courses include steamed medallions 
of monkfish (rapi) in champagne sauce, pork 
sirloin with sweet and sour sauce, paio del 
Ampurdan (duck, Ampurdan style, from a 
region west of Barcelona famous for its 
cooking) breasts of duck served with a sauce 
of sherry vinegar and honey. 

For desserts the lemon tart with unsweet- 
ened whipped cream is superb, there is rice 
pudding with chocolate sauce, fresh figs in 
honey and an excellent grape gelatine with a 
powdered almond sauce that would be much 
better if the grapes were seeded. 

This restaurant has chosen as a house wine 
both reds and whites from the Rioja area, 
from the Bodegas Olara. They also offer a 


sweet white wine to have with desserts, vino 
Zaconia that can be ordered either by the 
bottle or the glass. The wine list is extensive. 

What does it cost to eat well in Barcelona? 
For the three establishments mentioned fig- 
ure between 2500 and 5.000 pesetas ($18 to 
$32) a person, depending on wines. All the 
house wines mentioned as well as many of 
the good Spanish wines are less than 1,000 
pesetas a bottle (about S6). First courses go 
from 650 to 1,800 pesetas, main courses can 
go from around 1000 to 3JOO, but most are 
under 2,000 pesetas and aD the desserts are 
under 1000 pesetas. 

Service and taxes are included, although 
most people leave a small tip if the service 
has been good. Meals are served from 1 to 4 
P.M. and 9 to 1 1 . Reservations are necessary. 
All major credit cards are accepted. 

AGUT iTA VIGNON. 3 Trinidad; /el: 
302.60.34. Closed Sundays. 

ELDORADO PETIT, 51 Dolors Mon- 
serdd; tel: 204.5 J. 53 Closed Sundays. 

AZULETE. 281 Via Augusia; tel: 
203.59.43. Closed Saturday nights and Sun- 
days. ■ 


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Tram WB.V? iust tfu* wijtb + 340 

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United Press International 

NEW YORK — Prices on the New York 
Stock Exchange rose Tbnrsday in the slowest 
trading session of the year. 

The Dow Jones industrial average climbed 
7.34 to 1526.49. 

Broader market indexes edged higher. Hie 
New York Stock Exchange composite index 
rose 0.28 to 119.53. Standard & Poor's 500- 
stock index added 0.51 to 207.65. The price of 
an average share rose nine cents. 

Advances beat dedining issues 4-3 ratio. Vol- 
ume was 62.1 million shares, down from 78.3 
million Tuesday. 

“The market is wading through several cross 
currents, said Alan Ackerman of Hexzfeld & 
Stern. SeUing to establish losses for 1985 tax 
returns continues until Dec. 31, he noted. 

Investors who benefited from the market’s 
extraordinary move over the last few months 
have also taken some profits and are indulging 
in a long holiday, Mr. Ackerman said. 

Another trend in an initial stage is some 
modestly b ullish sentiment about secondary 
and tertiary stocks that did not follow the Dow 
to all-time hi ghs 

“There may be some rotation into the second- 
ary stocks as investors look for other opportuni- 
ties." Mr. Ackerman said. 

Warren Hall, senior vice president in charge 
of funds management at National Gty Bank m 
Cleveland, said the market was not s timulating 
much interest. 

‘'Everyone’s taking a holiday,** Mr. Kail said. 
“They made their statements in early December 
and now that their portfolios are in shape, they 
are celebrating the holidays. 


Mr. Hall said other than for a short-term 
technical correction, (here is no reason for the 
market to sell off. 


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“The fundamental factors remain positive,” 
he said. 

Union Carbide was the most active NYSE- 
listed issue, adding 1% to 72% after GAF Corp. 
sweetened its takeover bid for Carbide to S74 a 
share. 

Northern States Power (ex-dividend) fol- 
lowed, easing % to 50%. 

Bankers Trust was third, unchanged at 71%. 

Mid Con rose 1% to 65%. The natural gas 
pipeline company said it has obtained a tempo- 
rary restraining order to prevent Chemical 
Bank of New York from disclosing confidential 
financial information about Mid Con. MidCon 
has rejected a $2.6-billion buyout offer pro- 
posed by Freeport-McMoRan Inc., an energy 
firm based in New Orleans, and WB Partners of 
Midland, Texas, a large oil partnership. 

In the technology sector, IBM added % to 
153%, Digital Equipment rose 1% to 130% and 
Cray Research was np 1% to 62%. 

Westinghouse fell 1 to 43%. The company 
said Tuesday that it would realize S1.6 billion 
from the sale of its stock in its Group W unit. 

Among other active blue chips, AT&T added 
% to 24% and Exxon rose Vs. to 53%. 

Campbell Soup fdl 1% to 50% and Borden 
lost 1% to 50%. 

Aetna Life Insurance rose % to 51%. USF&G 
Corp. rose 1% to 39%. 

Paces dosed higher in moderate trading on 
the American Stock Exchange. 



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701 9M 

2 X 

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537 69M 

fin 
49M 
51M 


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3S 
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5M 
84 63 

73* 55* 
9* 4* 
22 11* 

<2* 41* 
83 6416 

43* 36 
5816 49 
4AM 19* 
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B* <16 



High Tech 
Stocks that will 
Ride the 

Energy Rebound! 


By creating a Third 7985 oil-price panic ini 
early December, the OPEC ministers finally j 
swept the light-crude and heating-oil mar-i 
kets so dean that Indigo technicians pub-; 
lished a price-doubling projection squarely; 
in the middle of The shakeout. We were also | 
recommending accumulation of deeply- 1 
underpriced Texaco as it became the las' 
major oil stock to sag prior to what we feel j 
will be a new five-year bull market in shares j 
of explorers and drillers which commenced j 
major corrections in late 1980 and finally; 
attracted terminal public liquidation half a ; 
decade later. With a cyclical recovery of the j 
energy market will come a resurgence of j 
interest in technologies which ride the same } 
tide - Rooting Point in the array processors 
which are used in seismic tests. Perkin Elmer 
and Spectra Physics in lasers whose energy- 
related uses will proliferate until nuclear 
fusion is finally a usable technique. Our New 
'fear's report will cover the field; and we'll 


be happy to add your name to our compfi- ! 


mentary list upon receipt of the coupon. 


Indigo 


Keizersgracht 534, 1017 EK Amsterdam j 


J Gentlemen: : 

Please send a complimentary copy o! your cA- \ 
[and-technology report and keep m-= on your list ; 


! ADDRESS. 


] PHONE 


35* 23* JWT* 1.12 IS 18 I 31* 31* 31* ■ 

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59* 50* JhnCpf 425 72 A SB* 5BM 58* +• * 

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BUSINESS/FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 10 


HUY, DECEMBER 27, 1985 


* * 


Page 11 



TECHNOLOGY 


fis die High-Tech Season 



Compact due 
players, pocket TVs 
and talking bears 
are the hot hems. 


* - U)-ie of the finest state-of-the-art technology around^ 

K In Tgb-tech products that were barely a gleam in a company’s 
VJ? i. five years ago are now selling m the millions. Laser-based 
- Vipact disc players, pocket tdevisions, hand-sized video cam- 
i C’ JJ and high-tech talking teddy bears are some of the hottest 
* 0} Ivus this year. 

'".'bey’re all selling at prices that would have been impossible 
a three years ago. — 

- -• These high-tech toys are 
• -.'illy low-cost," says Steven 
.... ^niafc. the co-founder of 

pie Computer Co. and now 
iiniin frf Cloud 9, a con- 
. . oer electronics company 
* 1 makes remote-control de- 
ss. ^Tbese things were not 
■ jsble 10 years ago. Five 
' . its ago they were barely perceptible.'’ 

Indeed, Mr. Woztriak and others point oat, consumers are no 

- jger just the beneficiaries of a “high-tech trickle-down" from 

- : military and aerospace industries, but a driving force behind 
; development of cutting-edge technologies. Cost savings 

;• aned &om high-volume consumer production can be used for 
histrial market advantage. 

" -You get the production levels through the consumer side,” 
d Robert Lucky, executive director of communications science 
' earth at Bell Laboratories. “That’s the only way you get the 
Mume to make this stuff cheap.” 

T /I" LUCKY died the example of the compact disc 

- i/| player, which now seQs for less than $200, and which he 
' ' ; TJ_ calls one of the most complex packages of low-cost high 

h components ever put onto the consumer market. 

~rhe players, which sold for more than $1,000 just three years 
'• j, use a single-mode diode laser to “read" the silvery surfaces 
die compact discs. These tiny pulses of light reproduce the 
rahigh fidelity sound, which has been recorded as a series of 
jp-il.s and bytes. 

>M, ':>To make sure the reproduced sound is absolutely perfect, the 
s read by the laser go into a computer chip programmed with 
iat’s known as the “Reid -Solomon ” error-correcting decoder 
- ■Orilhms. 

“When I went to school this was the end of the world in 
nfition,” Mr. Lucky recalled. “Nobody thought they’d be used 
r anything. They were so esoteric that they were m the back 
apter of the information- theory textbook.” 

‘This was a totally unexpected use," says Irving Reed, a co- 
aler of the set of equations. “I originally thought it might be 
:d for deep- space communications systems that send data back 
on Uranus or Neptune." 

The compact-disc technology even astonishes Gordon Gould, 
: inventor of the laser in the 1960s. 

T foresaw an optical radar application and heating apphea- 
os,” he recalled, “but I must say I didn’t think of them in the 
^rrtext of compact discs." 

Perhaps the most impressive high-tech gains in the consumer- 
jctromcs world in the past decade have been on silicon, the 
(Continued on Page 15, CoL 7) > 


Oil Firms 
Wanted 
By Peru 

3 Companies Are 
Cited on Taxes 


Compiled by Our Sufi From DUpadtet 

LIMA. — Peru said Thursday 
that it would take over the opera- 
tions of three foreign o3 rampanjp* 
unless they agree to invest more in 
oil exploration and pay higher tax- 
es. 

The three — Occidental Petro- 
leum Carp, of Los Angeles, Belco 
Petroleum Corp. of New York, a 
wholly owned subsidiary of IhIct- 
North of Omaha, Nebraska, and 
Bridas Exploractones y Produrion 
SA of Buenos Aires, a joint venture 
with Occidental — vahie their as- 
sets in Peru at $1.9 billion. 

Together, they pump about two- 
thirds of Peru’s 180,000 barrels per 
day outpoL 

In four decrees published Thurs- 
day, the five-month-old govern- 
ment of President Alan Garda Pfe- 
rez said the companies most invest 
about $425 million to explore for 
new oil and pay about $45 miTli on 
in back taxes if their canceled oil- 
exploration and production con- 
tracts are to be renewed. 

The contracts were canceled on 
Aug. 28, shortly after Mr. Garcia 
took office. A 90-day negotiating 
period, subsequently extended for 
a month, was to expire Friday. 

The four decrees scrapped a law 
passed by the previous administra- 
tion allowing the companies to pay 
only a 41-percent tax instead of the 
68 .5-percent rate, provided they in- 
vested the other 275 percent. 

Mr. Garda said the disputed tax- 
es had been forgiven “illegally'’ by 
theprior grovemment. 

Toe tax dispute centos on a sys- 
tem that granted tax credits for 
companies that reinvested profits 
in exploration and development 
The system was adopted in 1980 
and sponsored fry the then energy 
and mines minis ter, Pedro Pablo 
Kuczynski. 

Mr. Garcia, however, has 
charged that the tax credits should 
not have been used, as they woe 
almost exclusively, for develop- 
ment of known reserves. 

Mr. Garcia said Thmsday that 
the contracts would be renewed 

(Continued on Page 15, CoL 5) 



Tha Nm Torii Turn 

A family shopping in Rio de Janeiro, where Christmas week signals the start of summer. 

Inflation Mars Brazilian Re 

Jobs and Output Are Rising, but Cost of living Soars 

By Juan de Onis Deeded new loans. Factories shut down and layoffs 

Los Angela Tma Service 

RIO DE JANEIRO — Lygia Pedrcira hauled 
down one of the fringed hammocks floating over 
her wooden stall A quick sale followed, and the 
customer paid hex with a fistful of cruzeiro notes 
Worth about $20. 

The transaction in the hubbub of the Sfio Crisio- 
vao market could be seen as a symbol of the 
consumer boom sweeping through Brazil litis holi- 
day season. 

“This has been the best Chris tmas I have seen 
since I began selling here four years ago," Mrs. 

Pedrcira said, as she stuffed the bills into her purse. 

“But this money is worth less every day so it’s 
always the same race to keep up." 

In all the big shopping centers here and in Sao 
Paulo, business was excellent. Sales were up be- 
tween 10 percent and 25 percent over last year's 
levels, according to reports. The patten was the 
same for sales of automobiles, clothing and toys. 

Every Brazilian seemed to have more money to 
spend. Bus terminals were jammed with travelers 
loaded with gifts. 

The weekend before Christmas, on a bus to 
Cabo Frio, 100 miles (162 kilometers) northeast of 
here, Evaldo Simoes and his wife were taking their 
2-year-old daughter to visit her grandparents for 
the first time. 

“We couldn't do it last year," said Mr. Simoes, 

25, who works in a Rio de Janeiro print shop. “I 
didn't have a job." 

This country of 135 million people has the 
largest, most industrialized economy in Latin 
Airerica. It also has the largest foreign debt, slight- 
ly over $100 bittion. 

In 1981, recession set in as debt payments ex- 


But last March, Brazil installed a democratically 
elected civilian government and its economy be- 
came one of the fastest-growing in the world. 

There are 1.5 million more workers employed 
than before. There is more money, with unions 
winning wage increases after several major strikes. 

But, most basically, there has been a 7-percent 
increase over 1984 in the production of goods and 
sendees. The higher output has provided $26 bil- 
lion in exports, nearly half of which has gone to 
pay interest on the foreign debt. 

The worm in this candied apple is inflation. 
Prices rose 225 percent last year and inflation has 
not been tamed, h is expected that the cost of 
living will rise 14 percent in December alone and 
that the annual inflation rate will be the same as 
last year’s. 

Higher employment and the consumer boom 
have yielded political dividends to the government 
of President Jos£ Sam try. but it is still worried 
aboul inflation. 

This year, crops were good and covered local 
demand, with a surplus for exports. However, the 
prospect for next year, after a serious drought in 
the major southern food producing states, is for 
shortages. Up to SI billion m imports of rice, beans 
and beef will be needed to control prices. 

Congress has approved a budget for 1986 and 
tax legislation that is supposed to e limina te most 
of a 516-billion deficit in federal spending that 
contributed to inflation this year. 

Bnt Mr. Sorney and Finance Minister Dilson 
Funaro are determined to keep the economic 
boom going through the end of next year, when 
elections are scheduled fix' state governors and a 
(Continued on Page 13, CoL 6) 


Japanese Airline 
Chooses Boeing 
Over Airbus 


Agence France- Prrue 

TOKYO — AH Nippon Air- 
ways, Japan's leading domestic air- 
line, said Thursday that ii will re- 
stock its fleet with Boeing 
767-300s. It is a major victory for 
the U.S. company, which faced 
fierce competition from its Europe- 
an rival Airbus Industrie. 

An All Nippon spokesman said 
the airline had lodged firm orders 
with Boring Tor 15 planes, with an 
option to buy another 10, in a sale 
worth 370 billion yen (about SI. 82 
billion). 

The U.S.-made jetliners will re- 
place All Nippon’s Lockheed Tris- 
tars and Boeing 727s. The first 
plane is expected to be delivered 
around the middle of 1987. 

AH Nippon chose the Boeing 
767-300 over the Airbus A-300-600 
after a two-year commercial battle 
that featured lobbying efforts by 
Washington and European govern- 
ments. Airbus is a consortium of 
French, West German, British and 
Spanish aircraft companies. 

Akira Hasegawa, a director of 
AH Nippon Airways, said there was 
little difference between the Boeing 
and the Airbus A-300-600 as re- 
gards “credibOitv and dependabili- 
ty-" 

AH Nippon, which already oper- 
ates Boeing 767-200s, had chosen 
the 767-300 from the overall finan- 
cial angle, bearing in mind the fac- 
tors of glares, maintenance and 
air-crew training, he said. 

AH Nippon may also use the 767- 
300 for international routes it plans 
to establish after a recent govern- 
ment derision to end Japan Air 
Lines’ monopoly on overseas 
flights by Japanese carriers. 

The announce ment comes four 
months after (be crash of a Japan 
Air Lines Boring 747 that killed 
520 people, the world’s worst sin- 
gle-plane disaster. 

The Japanese news agency, Jrji 
Press, said that AH Nippon’s com- 
mercial department had pressed for 
the Airbus 300-600 because of its 
larger capacity, with 3U seats 
against 290 for the Boring. 

It quoted sources as saying that 
AH Nippon pilots also preferred 
the European plane because they 
felt it was easier to navigate and 


belter on takeoffs and landings 
than the Boring. 

But Boeing received public sup- 
port from Japanese companies in- 
volved in budding the fuselage for 
Ihe 767. 

Yotaro Iida, head of Mitsubishi 
Heavy Industries and the president 
of the Society of Japanese Aero- 
space Companies, announced on 
Dec. 9 (bat the group would go all 
out to secure the order for Boeing. 

Laurens Brinkhorst, a European 
Community representative in To- 
kyo. said that the All Nippon deri- 
sion was largely the result of 
Boeing’s support Tor the Japanese 
aeronautical industry. 

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, 
Kawasaki Heavy Industries and 
Fuji Heavy Industries are subcon- 
tractors for pan of the 767 fuselage. 

Boeing recently placed orders 
with them worth 5500 million, cov- 

(Continued on Page 13, CoL 2) 


Japan Output 
Fellby 1.2% 

In November 

Agence France- Prase 

TOKYO — Japan's industri- 
al and mining production fell 
by 1.2 percent in November 
from October, according to sea- 
sonally adjusted prcuminaiy 
figures released Thursday by 
the Ministry of International 
Trade and Industry. 

Industrial production was up 
by 05 percent over November 
1984. but right of the 14 indus- 
trial categories considered re- 
corded setbacks. 

The industrial production in- 
dex, which accounts for about 
30 percent of Japan’s gross na- 
tional product, finished No- 
vember at 121.4, after hitting 
124.8 in May. GNP measures a 
nation’s total output of goods 
and services. 

Exports fell by 0.8 percent 
last month, according to sea- 
sonally adjusted figures, but 
they were up 0.4 percent over 
the same month last year. 


Garency Rates | New U.S. Stock Issues 

Surge With BuH Market 


ms Bates 

t 

E 

D4*. 

F4=. 

ILL. 



Dec. 23-26 

SJ=. Van 

vtgem 

UK 

04 

112395 * 

5*775- 

01654- 



4514 * 

13445* 

13*45* 

■total 

SIXS 

7X11 

SIU4W 

447 

28001- 

18.1565 

— 

2*338 

2533- 

fcfcrt 

zaws 

UK 

■ 

32*01- 

1»t»x 

08769* 

*OW* 

1W.T8 * 

IJOK* 

MW 

14U 

— 

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KM4 

243350 

6fN 

71075 

7iw« 

20VJH 

i 

unjs 

2M 5» 

48195 

au» 

— — 

40314 

33360 

01271 

0444 

Yuciiid 

— 

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250 

748 

UKUD 

2BT77 

51.1* 

XM3« 

30235 

i 

77IB 

1M6 

an** 

— 

45075 X 

2735 

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1*57 

loo- 

0 

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mst 

8037 

24*3 

TUB- 

7170 

59471 • 

9429 

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110*5 

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8430- 

Z7XH- 

31237- 

73545- 

4.11*6 • 

— 

ms*] - 

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#3718 

un 

2117* 

*7056 

M71J* 

2*442 

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TJJ37J 

174349 

i 

INK 

47MZ2 

Nil. 

MW 

13623* 

3JR03 

NA 

2291* 

221.173 


mutiumun and Zurich, mh Ai other European oaten. New York rates at 4 PM. 

■ ommenMfrancfOl Amounts needed to bur one pound (cl Amounts needed la bur one 
r CJUntttaf 100 (x) UnHaottMOfv) Units O*mO00N.Q.: not Quoted: fLA^ no! ovaUobi*. 
ntmrvoamemi; SUJUM13 

MrSallarValBM 


MET Mr U3J 

Cumae* par uso 

Currency put I 2SJ 

Currency par U3US 

6MH 

OBO 

Fin. markka 

5475 

MUX. MM 

45200 

SavM rutole 

07442 

W.I 

14184 

Croak amc. 

15030 

Narw. tonne 

737 

Span, peseta 

15400 

'OEM. 

1743 

HoapKoop* 

7305 

RMLbvm 

1905 

OwuftRr— 

74*5 

On.*. 

51-57 

Indian rupee 

121003 

PorLMCudo 

14000 

Tdwsi 

3938 

Icra. 934500 

iDdo-ruptah 

1.12500 

Saudi rival 

24SQ2 

Thalbcdit 

26445 

tail 

140 

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0310 

Stau.1 

21185 

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54*45 


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147500 

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24511 

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24725 

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24305 






Urn; I.un Irish i 

*»: Omnarn do Benelux ( Brussels J: bantu Cemmerckde iMm {Milan}: Bamtue No- 
•tk Paris (Parts}: Bank of Tokyo (Tokyo): IMP (SDR): BAD (tRnar. rfyet iBrtiem i: 
*** IrM M. Other data from neuters andAP. 


Interest Rales 


■»*wrre«M*y BefwsiU -ft* 2M*> 

Dollar D-Mark Franc Storting F PrtJOC ecu SDR 
»MVi 5 W5 to 5 WS to 11 5fc.ll "to 12MM3 B Ok 

■* BttrBto 4+s JJ W17 to Ula-UU, 9Vr-W* 8 lb 

** «k-S flHH 11*4-11* lMfc-UK 9VS-90* • 

•*« MM 4 tv-4 -to 4U.-M4 ll<to-ll>K 12H-I31* HMd 7*. 

MU < tv-4 tv 4U-4M HV-im I1H-11M WVk 7% 
**■' Guaranty (donor, DM. SF, Pound. PFi : LMnds Bank (ECU): Reuters 

opolkutne to Interbank deposits at SI million minimum lor eoutrolent). 


By Bamaby J. Feder 

New York Ttma Service 

NEW YORK — UJS. companies 
eager to take advantage of rising 
share prices are surging into the 
market with new offerings of com- 
mon stock at the fastest pace since 
the record-breaking year of 1983. 

The rale of stock issues in gener- 
al has neatly doubted from 43 a 
month in the first quarter to 80 a 
month during the past three 
months, with offerings by compa- 
nies that have never sold shares to 
the public up even mare sharply. 
The steep rise in share paces since 
September is accelerating the 
trend. 

“Things are beginning to heat 
up,” said Norman Fosback, editor 
of New Issues, a Florida-based 
publication that tracks major first- 
time offerings, known as initial 
public offerings. “Our late Novem- 
ber issue recorded 35 sales and 90 
registrations with the Securities 
and Exchange CcmmisKkxi. That 

suggests areal upsurge is coming in 
January.” 



rues 
markets 

now that they can sell their shares 
at higher prices. The development 
is welcome news to those bank reg- 
ulators and economists who have 
been worried that corporations 


have relied too heavily on borrow- 
ing in recent years. 

Upswings in new stock offerings 
are a regular feature of bull mar- 
kets. The coming to market of com- 
panies offering shares for the first 
time generally lags & market surge 
by three to five months because it 
takes that long to complete the nec- 
essary accounting for offering doc- 
uments, to file registration state- 
ments with (he SEC and to wait for 
clearance. 

To date, almost $25 billion has 
been raised tins year by 753 stock 
issues of seasoned as weD as fledg- 
ling public companies, according to 
Securities Data Co, a market-re- 
search firm. About one-third of the 
money went to 353 companies sell- 
ing stock for the first time. 

In 1983, $37 billion was raised by 
common stock offerings, up from 
about $14 bHHon in eada of the two 
previous years. Last year, as the 
market in general stagnated, the 
volume of new offerings slumped 
to S9.2 bOlion. 

Bankers and investors say that 
initial public offerings in the cur- 
rent market have been of high qnal- 
in contrast with the end of 


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IBook at Tokyo. 


Art— Dollar B eptri ts 

Dec. 26 

IRNMHI 8<4.Sft 

imams B-BW 

3 months B-8W 

• months B -4V> 

7 rear l-BM 

Source: Reuters. 


ILS. Mwev Market Fuads 

Dec. 26 

Merrill Lynch Ready Asset* 

SB day o e orooa rl old: 7JI 

Telerate interest Rate index; 7J17 
Source: Merrill imrt. Tolerate. 



Ike 2*/ Dec. 26 
am. pm. are* 

Hour Kong 32S1S BSSS +UH 

LuranMwe CM 

Parts (IXJ kHo} 32&W 33134 - 3X7 

Zurich 3 VM 3X25 -200 

London 3WJ5 CM -17S 

Mew York — MSJO -0J0 

Luxembourg. Paris and London otfKiat Hx- 
ing sr Mono Kang and Zurich opening and 
datlno prices: New York Cemex current 
amtroct. An prices In US. ffper ounce. 
Source: Reuter*- 


rids Gosed 

Mrial markets and banks were dosed Wednesday for holidays in 
\ West Germany, Belgium, ranatin , Sweden, the Netherlands, 
ark, Switzerland, Australia, Italy, Hong Kong and South Africa, 
ngapore Futures Exchange was also closed. On Friday, the Tokyo 
md government-bond markets wflf be open for a half day only. 


East Bloc Trade 
Up, China Says 

The Associated Press 

BEIJING — Trade between 
China and Eastern Europe, ex- 
cluding the Soviet Union, grew 
at its fastest rate in more than 
30 years during 1985, with total 
volume reaching $164 billion, 
China’s offidal press agency re- 
ported Thareday. 

The Xinhua news agency, 
quoting Zheng Toobm, minis- 
ter of foreign economic rela- 
tions and trade, said Romania 
was China’s biggest trade part- 
ner in the region, with volume 
expected to reach $760 million 
by year’s end. 

A trade protocol between the 
two countries was signed 
Wednesday in Beijing. Under 
It, China is to supply Romania 
with soy beans, cotton, doth 
aprl machin e tools, while Ro- 
mania is to export rolled steel 
telephone cables and other 
products to China. Under a 
trade protocol with East Ger- 
many signed Tuesday, the two 
nations will increase their bilat- 
eral trade by 33 percent next 
year in such items as trucks, 
factory equipment, grains and 
cotton. 


1983, when scores of embryonic 
companies cashed in on an over- 
heated market in which investors 
were willing to buy almost any- 
* thing. 

“The market rally has been 
largely in blue-chip companies, so 
thm are stiff plenty of good values 
around in secondary stocks," said 
Ronald Komig, chairman of La- 
denburg, Thalmann ft Co., the in- 
vestmeni bank. “Thai means thai il 
still takes a high-quality new issue 
to attract investors. 

“The other thing is that the mar- 
ket is increasin^y institutional- 
ized,” Mr. Koenig said, referring to 
the growing share of stock trading 
that is accounted for by pension 
funds, insurance companies mutu- 
al funds and other large investors. 
“They are less likdy to get taken in 
than the small investor," be added. 

One sign that the new issue mar- 
ket is healthy is that the prices of 
nearly all first-time offerings and 
even offerings by already-listed 
companies have risen on the day of 
sale, say investment bankers. 

To some extent the volume in 
recent months has been pumped up 
by two giant first- time offerings, 
they were the sale of a7I5-peroent 
stake in Rockefeller Center and 49 
parent of the shares in Fireman's 
Fund Insurance Co., a subsidiary 
of American Express Co. 

The success of new issues in 1986 
probably hinges on a continued rise 
in share prices. 

“It takes a good stock market to 
bring out tbesupplyofnew issues." 
Mr. Fosback said. “But it takes a 
■-rtniirming good market to keep 
investor demand." 



For the man with exceptional goals, 
a new dimension in private banking. 


W ’hat makes TDB exceptional? 

To start with, there is our 
traditional policy of concentrating 
on things we do unusually well. 
For example, foreign exchange, 
precious metals - and, very im- 
portantly, private banking. 

Today, as part of American 
Express Bank Ltd., we offer you 
private banking with a totally new 
dimension. This includes access to 
the broad range of asset manage- 
ment services and global invest- 
ment opportunities provided by 
the American Express family of 
companies. And for certain clients. 


we also offer such valuable “extras" 
as Gold Card® privileges and the 
exclusive Premier Services, SM for 
round-the-clock personal and travel 
assistance. 

While we move with the times, 
our traditional policies do not 
change. At the heart of our business 
is die maintenance of a strong and 
diversified deposit base: Our portfo- 
lio of assets is also wdl-diversified, 
and it is a point of principle with us 
to keep a conservative ratio of capi- 
tal to deposits and a high degree of 
liquidity - sensible strategies in 
these uncertain times. 


If TDB sounds like the sort of 
hank that meets your requirements, 
visit us on your next trip to Switzer- 
land. Or telephone: in Geneva, 
022/3721 11; in Chiasso, 091/44 1991. 


TDB affias in Gaiwa. London, Parti, 
Luxembourg. Chiasso. Monte Carlo, 
Natuu. Zurich . Buenos Airts. S.fo 
Paulo. 

TDB. list 6th largest commt trial bank 
in Su'ifctrlanJ. ir a member of list 
Amaican Express Company, u hieb 
has assets of US$ 69-3 billion and 
shareMdtrs’ ujnity of US$ 4 . 9 billion. 



liade Development Bank 


Il The Trade Development Bank building in Geneva, 


. at ( ;Xr98, m du Rh&ne. 


An American Express company 











Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL 


Thursdays 

INI SE 

Closing 

Tables Include Ibe nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


47% N 
4$U 3Tth N 
an* 13* w 

1BU 13* N 

tic* m n 

Sf* 4 It* 

43 33 

45 35 

ITV: 36V} 
07* 70 t* 
41V* 31 Vi 
4T6 2H 
MV* 314* 

m am> 

141* B 
4W* 33 
311* 73* 

35 23 

SS44 304*0 
64* 3 

OBI* 73 n 




m 






m 


LLSiHitures 

Via The Associated Press 


Season Season 
Htoti Law 


Oden High Low Close CIS. 


Grains 


WHEAT (CBT) 

5JM0 bu minimum- dollars per bushel 
1741* 731 Mar 3421* 145 

453 2J4 MOV 123 32£>S s 

1721* 163 Jul 2091* 192 

145 147 Sea 2JW1* 192 

Met* 253 Dec loou, 3JHU 

Est. Sales Prev. Sains 19S7 

Prev. Dot Open Int. 31.405 up 685 
CORN (CBT) 

5AQ0 bu minimum- dollars per bushel 


177 

1911c, 

IB* 

170 

las*, 

1741* 

143 

ESL Sates 


Mar 14«te 1491* 
Mav 1574a. 2_S3 
Jul 153 L, 253 Vj 
S ee 138b 138W 
Dec 177 1774* 

Mar 13416 1344u 
May 139 139 

Prey. Sales 7744 


Prev. Day Open lnt.l23jU9 up 471 
SOYBEANS I CBT) 

SJlOObu minimum -dollars per bushel 
6.7V 478 Jon 5-38Vj MTtt 

752 4JBb Mar 551 Vi 5551* 

7 39 459 Mav 5_62>* 547 

658 4.97 Jul 5J1 5J5Vj 

674 AMI* Aug 570 5J2 

128 4.96 Sep 553 553 '6 

6-32 198 Nov 5471* 5491* 

555 &0V - Jon 559 559 

657V* S.1P* Mm 557 557V* 

EsI. Sales Prev. Soles @43® 

Prev. Day Open ln1J83J4Q UP 3565 
SOYBEAN MEAL (CBT) 
HXMan»-do(lar5 per tan 
16100 127-00 Jan 1495D 15050 


3541* +.05** 
124V* 4- JED* 
29116 +JBV* 
1911* +JJ2V6 

ns 4-Jiite 


i49b +jom 
1521* +5016 
253 -^80 1* 

238b +80b 
127V* +JB0V* 
234V* +JXH* 


SL35V* —JH\Vt 
54816 —Oil* 
559V* —m 
558b —.(Mb 
557V* —sm* 
559 — .02 

Sg*^Nt 

554V* —81 


Season Season 

Hteh Low Open Hleh 

COCOA I NY CSCE) 

» me Irlc Ions- S per fon 

2392 19S5 Mar 22SS 2260 

2422 I960 MOV 2298 2102 

2439 1940 Jul 2325 2327 

2430 2023 Sep 2133 2333 

2425 3555 Dec 

2385 2029 Mar 

Est.Sates Prwv.Sales IJ03 

Prev. Dav Open Int 17586 UP 63 
ORANGE JUICE (NYCE) 

I SJB0 lbs.- cants per Ox 
180.00 Til JO Jan 11630 11670 

17750 11150 Mar 11970 12070 

16250 111.95 May 11950 12050 

S5758 111.40 Jul 12150 12055 

18050 11150 Sen 11850 11850 

12S4W 11150 NOV 11750 11825 

11300 11100 Jan 

16175 11150 Mar 

Mov 11950 11950 

EsI. Sales MOO Prev. Sales 1328 
Prev. Day Onen Ini. 14578 up 516 


2241 2255 

2287 2299 

2325 2335 

2)32 2340 

2335 
2370 


11600 11650 
HAS? H8.90 
11950 11950 
12050 12050 
11750 11750 
117.90 1 18.15 
11855 
11950 
11840 11950 



CATTLE (CME) 

40500 mo.- cents per lb. 

6745 5455 Feb 6250 6350 

6757 5550 Apr 6170 6357 

6475 5655 Jun 6275 6355 

6540 5420 Aug 61.40 *145 

6050 5750 Oct 59.98 *015 

6430 39-10 Doc 6145 6145 

Est. Sales 14303 Prev. Sales 10421 
Prev. Day Open int. 57458 up 7 
FEEDER CATTLE (CME) - 
44JI0Q lb*., cents per lb. 

7940 *050 Jon 6645 6695 

71.70 6042 Mar 6740 5795 

7150 6040 Apr 57.15 5740 

7050 6010 Mav 6450 6590 

5050 55.10 Auo 6645 6645 

Est. Sales 1792 Prev. Sales 1JS» 
Prev. Day Open Ini. 11433 up 130 
HOG5(CME) 

30500 nn.- cents per lb 
50-47 38.10 Feb 4740 4792 

4775 36.12 Apt 4450 4450 

4955 3940 Jim 46.00 4645 

4955 40.45 Jul 4*45 4*40 

5190 4095 Auo 45J0 4542 

4142 3857 Oct 4150 4160 

49-50 3877 Dec 4350 43J0 

4100 40.40 Feb 4160 4340 

4040 4090 Apr 4140 4140 

Est. Sates 5551 Prev. Sales 1646 
Prev. Day Open Int. 21409 up 141 

PORK BELLIES (CME) 

38400106. -cent* per lb 
7690 5595 Feb 6592 65.92 

7540 5545 Mar 6670 6670 

7540 5755 Mav 6792 6792 

7650 5790 Jul *740 6740 

_ 73.15 5540 Aup *55B 65JO 

Es>. Sales 3984 Prev. Sales 667 
Prev. Day Open Ini. 0441 up 66 


6290 +48 

6255 +90 

6252 +97 

619S —55 

9955 — .10 

6177 —58 


6647 —.10 

SIMM +40 
6745 +90 

6595 +55 

*650 —55 


4773 +.10 

4397 +55 

45.90 +50 

4695 +J0 

4455 +.15 

4195 +93 

43.15 +95 

4140 +J5 

4150 —47 


6577 +145 
6577 +97 

6640 +178 
&MJ) +150 
6150 +90 



Drc.26 

PHILADELPHIA EXCHANGE 
optflaa a strike 

Underlying Price Colb— Lost Pub — Last 

Jen Feb Mar Jan Feb Mar 
12500 British PoandKMiK per unit. 

B Pound 130 r r r r r 040 

14298 135 r r r r r 105 

14178 140 r r 475 r r 240 

9MM Canadian bolters-ceals per wilt, 

COalir 71 r r r r r 0a3 

7177 72 r r r r r 199 

7177 73 r t 0.1S t r r 

62580 west Gorman Maru-cenN per unit. 

□Mark 38 r r r r r O.ifl 

48 t t t t t 

39.93 41 055 879 0J0 r r r 

125508 PrcncB Frencs-lOTtis ola cent per vnlt. 

FFrane no r s r r g a 15 

6. 75 0 50 8 Japanese Yen-lOOttii of a cnl per unit. 

JYen 46 r s r r s 054 

4971 47 r r 2148 r r r 

4971 48 r r 140 r r 094 

4071 49 r r 058 r 076 059 

4991 50 056 094 040 r r 159 

4951 51 S 057 S S ft 

4991 52 f 1Un r r t t 

62500 swin Prona-cenn per wit. 

5 F tone 45 r r Z92 r r f 

47J4 47 045 r r r r r 

4754 49 r r 044 r r r 

Total son nL 5563 Call anon Int. 169,641 

Total nut VOL 1363 Put DPfle Int. 120973 

r— Not traded, s— No option ottered. 

Lost Is premium (purchase price). 

Source: AP. 


US T. BILLS HUM) 

Si milllon-ptsotHBncf. 

9396 8660 Mar 93.18 9399 

93-30 0751 Jun 93.12 9393 

93.06 8850 Sep 92.91 «UB 

9291 9030 Jun 9292 9292 

91.94 9053 Seo 9253 9203 

9291 9264 Dec 9293 9293 

Est.Sates Prev. Sales 1508 

Prev. Oav Open Ini. 35,156 up 21 5 
10 VR. TREASURY (C8T) 

S 100500 PTliMils & 32nds ollOO Pd 
93 75-14 Mar 92-14 93-3 

92-5 7+70 Jun 9M 92-3 

90- 30 OT-7 Sw 

904 80-3 Dec 

EsI. Sales , Pm. Sales 4,902 
Prev. Day Onen Int. 74513 up29S5 
US TREASURY BONDS (CBT) 

IB PCt4100500+rf8& 32nds of 180 pen 
85-13 57-2 Mar 8+29 85-15 

84-16 56-29 Jun 81-25 8+16 

83-21 56-29 Sen B3-6 B3-23 

82- 79 56-25 Dec 82-19 13-2 

83- 13 56-27 Mar 82-8 83-16 

81-22 63-12 Jun 81-78 81-31 

81-8 634 Stt 81-17 81-17 

80-28 62-24 Dee 81-4 81-7 

80-22 67 MOT 

80-10 6+25 Jul 

Est. Salas Prav. Sales ZUPS 

Prev. Day Open lnt306A15 oH 1551 
MUNICIPAL BONDS (CBT) 

51 OflOx index-ots & JZnds at wo pel 

91- 28 80-4 Mw 91-12 92 

90-79 79 Jun 90-51 90-26 

90-3 79-10 Sen 

88-26 88-28 Dec 

Est. Sates Prev. Sates 447 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 12708 up 54 

CERT. DEPOSIT (IMM) 

SI million- pis of 100 net 

9250 8574 Dec 

9273 8656 Mar 9265 9265 

9251 84.43 Jim 

9276 8756 Sen 

9158 8874 Dec 

9025 8870 Mar 

Es>.5ale3 Prev. Spies 55 

Prev. Day Open int. 1557 oH 33 
EURODOLLARS (IMM) 
SlfnllllDn-etsotlOupet. 

9244 86.10 Mar 9277 9275 

9274 8673 Jun 9116 9274 

92.09 B7JS Sep 91.92 9200 

9179 8770 Dec 9169 9172 

9168 8764 Mar 

9171 ELM Jun 

90,96 8979 Sep 9070 9090 

g«- Sales Pm. Sale* 7688 

Prev. Day Open lnt.125734 oH 1553 • 

BRITISH POUND (16AM) 

Spur pound- 1 point eauatsSMHOI 
1.4865 15680 Mar 15185 15205 

M7SS 1.1905 Jun 1.4060 15060 

1.000 17705 Sep 

1.4550 1.1910 Dec 

j=*l. Sates 1553 Pray. Solos 1273 
Prev. Day Open Int. 22665 off 319 




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63 33 QuakOt 160 23 15 541 57V* 56 5646—1 

25 17b QuakSO 500 36 18 106 221* 21K 22b + V* 

101* 5 Quanex 19 234 6 596 596— V* 

3496 27 Questar 172 S3 11 38 32 31b 3Tb— 96 

33 15V* Ok ReU 740621 119 3296 31V* 32 +1* 


3b RBInd 541 3 
34b RCA 154 U 22 
30V* RCA pf 360 65 
81 RCA pt 450 25 
324* RCA pf 365 87 
6b RLC JO 27 26 
3V6 RPC 

14Vi RTE 60 25 11 

3396 RoisPur 150 2.1 U 
5b Ramod 20 

lAb RancD 54 47 10 
3Vi RonorO 

199* Ramrn 

3990 Rayihn 160 3.1 12 
490 ReadBt 54 5 

1196 RdBatpf 2.12 167 
1690 RdBatpf 373C19 5 


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337 1590 
1272 4890 
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823 0896 
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590 51* + VO 
5940 59* + b 
4tn* 50VS + 96 
13690 1361* + 90 
4180 4116 
890 890 + VO 
3% 316—1* 
2196 3196 
15 15—96 

475k 48 — 4k 

790 71* 

1990 1990 
3b 3b — 16 
8796 88 
11 1140 + U 

3H4 2DV* 

52b 5290— b 
4th 5 +■ b 

121* 129o— b 
17 17 


Season Season 
High Law 


Open High Low dose 



CANADIAN DOLLAR (IMM) 

Sper dir- 1 paint equate 500001 
J304 jWBl Mar J117 7117 JW9 7111 

-7368 Jm Jun JOBS J1Q0 7081 7091 

7301 7070 Sep 7065 7065 7065 7071 

7568 7083 Dec 70*5 7045 7045 7051 

7070 JOTS Mar .7025 7025 7025 7D3T 

Est.Sates 619 Prev. Soles 1470 
Prev. Day Open Int. 11443 up 1,138 
FRENCH FRANC (IMM) 

Soar franc- 1 point equals SLDOOCi 
.12905 .10983 Mar .12900 

.12933J .12130 Jun .12750 

Est.Sates Prow. Sales 
Prev. Day Onen int. 130 

GERMAN MARK UMM) 

Sper mark- 1 point eauals 504001 
4046 sm Mar 4017 4026 4017 4819 

ssm .3335 Jun 4055 .4056 .4050 .41150 

•iis 7742 Sen 4092 4092 4088 40g 

4156 JESS'D Dec 4138 

Est. Sales 4156 Prev. Sates 5441 
Prev. Dor Open int. 449S2 up 1.356 
JAPANESE YEN (IINM) 

Spot yen- 1 paint eaualsSOJOOOOOl 
704V96 JXM01S Mar JXMV36 JI04942 J104930 J9D4939 
JHS010 .004220 Jun J0049S3 JXM956 J049SS JJ049S7 
■005005 2XWSW Sep .004975 

JJ3WS5 J30415B Dec .004991 

Est.Sates 2,125 Prev. Sain 1719 
Prev. Dav Open int. 22408 off iw 
SWISS FRANC (IMM) 

Sporfrano- 1 o«nt equals 500001 

4885 -3835 Mar 4777 4795 4775 4777 

4925 4190 Jun 4831 4834 4821 4821 

4930 4790 Sad 4870 4870 4870 4867 

4925 4015 Dec 4713 

Est.Sates 4432 Prev. Sates 2478 
Prev. Day Omui int 23466 oft 112 


Industrials 


LUMBER (CME) 

130400 bd.tt.-f nor 14)00 bd. tt. 

187JD0 13340 Jan 14UH 14940 

1VSJK) 13970 Mar 154.10 15470 

17640 145J0 MOV 15EJM 

18X00 149.50 Jul 16250 16X00 

17X00 15290 Sep 16470 16470 

181-3$ ISfS) Nov 16570 16570 

57J.0D 14AW Jan 

Est.Sates 512 Prev. Sates 258 

Prev. Day Onen int. 6449 oR3t 
COTTON 3 (NYCE) 

50JM0 Ibsr cents per lb. 

7675 5677 Mar 6U5 617S 

mm 5190 MOV 61JH *145 

70J03 5770 Jul 5800 040 

flXSfl 5040 Oct 5145 51.45 

9725 4140 Dec 49J5 4945 

667S •».» Mar 

5 335 5B9J May 

Est.Sates Prev. Sales 29S 

Prev. Day Open inL 21405 aff«W 
HEATING OIL(NYME) 

42400 gal- cants per oal 
9075 6940 Jan 8070 81-50 

9015 7000 Fob 7840 7940 

8S4S 6080 Mar 73J0 7440 

8030 6555 Apr 68JK 69.3S 

7690 6340 May 65JB 6570 

75J9 6250 Jun 64JS1 SSLfflffl 

7440 6250 Jut 6445 6440 

74.15 61.95 Aug 6+25 6475 

EM. Sates Prev. Sates X339 

Prev. Day Open InL 3&SS0 
CRUDE OILMYME} 

WOO bM.-ctollare nor bbt 
3843 24JS Feb 2SJ0 2674 

2948 24.10 Mar 24.40 2134 

1943 2357 APT 2-00 2449 

2835 2120 Mav 2445 24JJ0 

2746 2295 Jun 2X70 2X89 

2753 2275 Jul 2340 2X60 

2773 40 AUO 2X20 21SJ 

262U 2225 Dec 2275 2275 

Est.Sates Prev. Sales 4402 

Prev. Day Open Int. 59486 


14860 149.10 
15440 15470 
15040 159.10 
162.10 16X00 
16430 16470 
16570 16570 
16040 


<1.12 6147 

6045 61.55 
5840 5848 
5145 5145 
49.15 4955 
50-10 


8080 8150 
7840 7949 
7350 7440 
6846 6090 
65.10 6545 
6440 6540 


2575 26J1 

2448 2544 
205 2449 
2440 2430 

2370 2X89 

2340 2340 

2320 2350 

2275 2275 





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AGSCntr 

A/rnouBcowl 

CoraiNG 

GertCarp 

ITT CPPfO 

AAMcon 

NSPw880pf 

PSEG 96201 

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GtfW 57501 
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Stuck Indexes 


SP COMP. INDEX (CME) 
points and cents 

21640 1 8238 Mar 20940 21050 20935 21045 

228.15 18370 Jun 21140 21245 21150 212.15 

22140 18740 3w 21370 21375 21340 21415 

22050 178JHJ Dec 21640 

Est.Sates 314®$ Prev. Bales 29406 
Prev. Day Open Int. 614S1 aft 826 
VALUE LINE (KCBT) 
points and cants 

22030 19050 Mar 21S.M 21645 21440 21633 

22130 19740 Jun 21X15 21850 29740 21050 

joans sen 22140 

22640 22400 Dec ZEL50 

Eat. Sales Prev. Sates 2705 

Prev. Day Open Int. 15706 off 190 
NYSE CO MP.. I NDEX (NYFE) 
points and cents 

T2S45 10550 Mar 12Q7D 12130 12040 121.15 

12640 10670 Jun 12175 12245 12175 12245 

12740 106.10 SCP 12375 12375 12355 12375 

12540 123 M Dec 123.10 125.10 12405 12545 

Est. Sales 5463 Prev. Sates. 7414 
Prev. Day Open int. 8339 oft 302 
MAJOR NUCT INDEX (CBT) 

’*»yf nd 270b Jan 290b 291 29016 29W6 

297b 273b Feb 291b 291V* 291 291b 

30086 271 Mar 292b 292b 292 292b 

Est.Sates Prev. Salts 165 

Prev. Day Open ltd. 550 i®26 


Previous 
Clsd.f 
1777 JD 
T31.97 
230X0 


Commodify Indexes 


Close 

Moody’s 94740 f 

Reulero Clad. 

DJ. Futures 133.23 

Com. Raseorch Bureau. 230X0 

Moody's : boose 100 : Dec 31, 1931. 

p - preliminary; f - final 

Reuters : base 100 : Sep. 18,1931. 
Dow Janes : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1974. 


Market Guide 


Ottcan Board o> Trade 
CnJaaeo Meramttle Exchanae 
intamaUanal Monetorv Market 
Of ChtoaM Mercantile Exchange 
New York Cocoa Sugar, coffee Exchange 
New York Cotton Exchange 

Kamos Clhr Board ot Trade 
New York Futures Exchange 


Coimwlities 


Close 

Htgti Law BM Ask art# 

SUGAR 

French francs per metric ton 
Mar MOO 1781 MSI MM —30 

May 1J2S MIS 1J12 M16 —29 

Aug 1-385 UBS 1J8S M87 -21 

Oct 1425 142* 1410 1424 —43 

Dec N.T. N.T. 1440 1460 — 25 

Mar N.T. N.T. 1520 1538 —40 

Est.. vaL: 888 lets of 50 tons. Prev. actual 
sates: 946 lots. Open Interest: 31,747 

COCOA 

French francs per 1M kg 
Dec N.T. N.T. 1490 1715 —20 

Mar N.T. N.T. 1730 1750 . — 2 

May N.T. N.T. 174S — Unch. 

J|y I4T. N.T. I75S — Unch. 

SOP N.T. N.T. 1765 — Unch. 

Dec N.T. N.T. 1,965 — Unch. 

Mar tLT. N.T. 1775 — Unch. 

Est. Ml.: 0 lots o(10 tens. Prev. actual sales: 
0 lots. Cwan Interest: 359 . 


P ranch francs per 199 kg 
Jon tLT. N.T. 2460 — —30 

Mar 2.960 2740 2730 2799 +2 

May N-T. N.T. 2 .930 3030 —W 

Jiy N.T. N.T. 3jno Xim unch. 

50P N.T. N.T. 3,134 3.M4 +9 

Nov 1180 1180 1155 1190 +42 

Jan N-T. N.T. — 3,156 + 40 

Est rate 32 lots ats tons. Prev. actual sales: 
22 lots. Open Interest: 442 
Source; Bourse Ou Commerce. 


Company 

Results 

Revenue and nroftts or iosJas, In 

millions, ore 8 j tocuf correncies unless 
ot herw is e In dl cana. 


Coimwitties 


SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
U JLS per oapce 

Prev. 

High Low Seine Mtte 

Feb 32440 32440 32740 32440 

Mar N.T. N.T. 32940 33040 

API N-T. N.T. 33158 332J20 

Volume: 0 lots of 100 as. 

KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
MalayslSB ringgits per 21 tons 

Close Prev tout 

BM Ask BM ASK 

JOT 780 830 79ft B20 

Feb . 828 S40 B2Z 834 

Mar— 830 B40 820 840 

API ..... 830 87® 830 870 

MOV 820 860 820 860 

Jun 810 850 810 B5U 

Jly 810 BS9 810 850 

SOP SD0 840 800 840 

Nov 000 840 800 840 

Volume: 0 lots ot 25 tons. 

Source: Reuters. 


DM Futures 
Options 

K Geram Mark- 125400 marts, ante per mark 


Cash Prices 



Estimated total vot. 1,119 
Cons: Tue. voL l JUS open he. 105(7 
Puts : Tut. voL 1427 ooeo InL 21433 
Sour**: CME. 


Com modify and Unit 

Coffee 4 Santas, lb 

Prfntclolh tin 0 38 vd „ 

Steel bfllets (Pitt.), ten 

Iron 2 Fdrv. Phils, ton .- 

Steel scrap No 1 hvy Pin. * 

Lead Spot, lb 

Copper elect, lb 

Tin (Streltsi, fb 

Ztet E. St. L. Basis, lb 

PollQdSlHTt. oz 

Sliver N.Y.ot 

Source: AP. 


Thu km 
145 MB 

072 030 

47348 <2240 

71348 2T348x 

73-74 tl-iyT 

18-19 30-23 

*9-72 6447 

NA 57334 
0-35 145 

9*93 127-131 
5-79 6435 


ILSaTreasuries 


Dec. 26 . 

Dtscoant Prev. 

Otter BM YleM Yteltf 
hMMth&M 679 <77 773 7JB 

6-meattl bn <99 677 747 744 

l-yew bHI 745 744 755 743 

Prev. 

Bid Utter YkM YtaM 
18-vr.band 10527/32 MS 29/32 949 9J2 

Source: Salomon Brothers. 

MerrtB Lvndi Tie ui eit lodex: 13777 
Owpge ter tbe day: + 043 

Average yield: 847 it 

Source: MenUt Lunch. 



NYCSCB: 

NYCE: 

COMEX: 

NYME: 

KCBT: 

NYFE: 


Singapore to Amend 
Laws on Insolvency 

Reuters 

SINGAPORE — Singapore plans to amend 
provisions in its bankruptcy and corporate in- 
solvency laws next year, Finance Minister Rich- 
ard Hu said Thursday. 

He told the Business Times newspaper that 
the laws would include features of UA. British 
and New Zealand legislation. 

“Our main objective is to ensure that when a 
company gets into difficulties, there is more 
parity of treatment between debtor anH credi- 
tor," be said. 

“Q u* sum is to ensure that companies in 
temporary (fifficulties are not forced prema- 
turely into liquidation without giving them a 
chance to restore their financial health." 


Putt-Lad 

Jn Ft* Mar Mr 
1 H 4 1/14 — - 

1/16 * * - 
1 / 16 . 1/16 * — 
1 /U Ik . 17 / 16 - 
9 / 1 * W> 27/163 

.1*3*1414 Pit 

Ot Sfc 6% 7 
i p* n w. 
m, - - n 
33* - - - 


Strta CobLad 
Trice Joe Mr Her Apr 
175 WB — - -• 

M WMS - - 

W 5 IH* .19 TO — 

in nuiin- 

195 9b 11 11% - 

11 » n N 9h 

A » vh 
7K 12/W» 3*1 R 
715 7/16 Hk 7N 2* 

28.3/1*1. m lb 

VMafl«aMM mm 
nMC8fll8HM.5IM54 
Tatotiwl Mten JU59 
nMHMK0K5SU51 


HNb 20235 LwWja Dan 2JUS-fQJM 
Somnm: CBOE. 


JapaneseExport Contracts 

Reuters . 

.TOKYO — Export contracts 
won by Japan's. 13 m^jor trading 
houses rose 13.2 percent in Novem- 
ber to $432 billion from 53^2 bil- 
lion in October, but the figure rep- 
resented a fall of 11.5 percent from 
$4.88 hilUon in November 1984, 
the Japan Forei^ .Trade Council 
said Thursday: . 


Big Japanese Stone Sales 
FeQ 0.4% in November 

Reuters 

TOKYO — Japan's seasonally 
adjusted index of sales in depart- 
ment stores and large supermarkets 
fell 0.4 percent, to 1 26.6, in Novem- 
ber from 127.1 in October, when it 
was up 1 percent from September, 
the Ministry of International Trade 
and Industry said Thursday. 

Unadjusted, November sales to- 
taled 1,252.6 billion yen ($62 bil- 
lion), up 4.1 percenL from a year 
earlier, compared with a 52-per- 
cent year-to-year October gain, to 
1,261.2 bQlion. The unadjusted to- 
tal included department-store sales 
of 665.7 billion yen, up 5.2 percent 
year to year, and supermarket sales 
of 586.9 bQlion, up 3 percent from a ! 
year earlier. 


Taiwan Allows 3 Ranlts 
To SetUp Mutual Funds 

Reuters 

TAIPEI — The central bank has 
authorized three local banks to set 
up mutual funds in Taiwan for in- 
vestment abroad, an official said 
Thursday. 

The decision is part of govern- 
ment efforts to liberalize capital 
outflow because of Taiwan’s 
mounting foreign currency re- 
serves, which are expected to reach 
a record $22 billion a! the end of 
the year, the official said. Bank of 
Taiwan, Central Trust of China 
and International Commercial 
Bank of China will start accepting 
subscriptions on Jan. J. 


Chile Seeking 
Debt Rollover 

Reuters 

SANTIAGO — Finance Minis- 
ter H email Buchi has asked foreign 
bank creditors for another 180-day 
rollover of foreign debt repay- 
ments, according to a decree pub- 
lished Thursday in the official ga- 
zette. Rescheduling contract*? 
agreed to in principle have still to 
be signed 

The rollovers have been routine- 
ly agreed to by creditors as negotia- 
tions with Chile have proceeded 
smoothly. 

The decree said that in of 
the rollover, the central bank has 
agreed also to defer for 180 days 
hard-currency transfers for f««g n 
debt repayments of private compa- 
nies while they too finish resched- 
uling agreements. 


KUALA LUMPUR — Peninai 
lar Malaysia’s irate 












































ilia 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 27, 1985 


Page 13 


a HESSKOtlNPUP 

4F Increases Its Bid 
>r Union Carbide 

lej^OarS^FfamDapatdies Union Carbide said that if 

V YORK — GAF Corp., which already owns slightly 
. |jj e in its effort to buy than 10 percent of Union O 

Carbide Corp., announced stock, acquired more than 3 
lay a nw offer of $74 a share cent of Union Carbide s 
Tor the 90 percent of Union Union Carbide would increa 
e Corp- stock that it does scope of its offer to inclu 
gaily own. percent of Union Carbide 

previously had bid $68 for outstanding. 

• 48 million shares, which is ^ a staterorot annonna 

1 3 percent of Union Car- £ f fer ’ 

iaxa outstanding. The new ctemcaU aid bmldmg-ma 
odd be valued at about S5.1 niaker based m Wayne, Ne 
The old one was valued at »*d * hadalrady secu, 
S413 billion- Union Car- nancrng for 5175 btlbonofdi 
uock closed at 571 ashare. that lXs aewest bd 

5 cents, in New York Slock .... 

ige trading Tuesday. GAF ***£ * “vestnont h 
It S66.50T up $2, on the Dnad Burnham Lambert, u 

Wl 1 HID nHHlhrtml CPtimp r«nir 


Joion Carbide’s Danbury, 
tticul, headquarters, a 
man. Tom Sprick, said the 
nv bad no comment on the 
3AF mtive. 

week. Union Carbide had 
red the previous offer with a 
« bid that it valued at $85 a 
_ S20 in cash and $65 in 
jes for 35 percent of its 

l Street responded to the lat- 
• a by sending Union Car- 
sutdc higher. Union Carbide 
dosed at S71125 on Thure- 

p Sl-125- 


badd Sets Date 
tr Start in U,S. 

Reuters 

OKYO — Hitachi Ltd. will 
t pro ducing videotape He- 
len in the United Slates 
- June, a company spokes- 
1 said Thursday, 
jtacfai Consumer Products 
unerica Ino, the company’s 
. subsidiary, is installing as- 
bly equipment at its color 
/iaon plant in Anaheim, 
fornia. at a cost of $1.5 miJ- 
. Initial output will be 
.000 videotape recorders a 
r, rising to 500,000 to 
.000 by 1990. the spokes- 
1 said- 

will be Hitachi's third over- 
assembly line, following 
—,e already set up in West 
‘-many and Britain. Hitachi 
be the first Japanese 00 m- 
. .,y to produce the recorders 
—x United States, but other 
inese makers have indicated 
• intend to do so, the spokes- 
1 said. 


Union Carbide said that if GAF, 
which already owns slightly more 
than 10 percent of Union Carbide 
stock, acquired more than 30 per- 
cent of Union Carbide shares, 
Union Carbide would increase the 
scope of its offer to include 70 
percent of Union Carbide stock 
outstanding. 

In a statement announcing its 
latest offer, GAF, a specialty-, 
chemicals and budding-materials 
maker based in Wayne, New Jer- 
sey, said it had already secured fi- 
nancing for $3.75 billion of the 55.1 
billion that its newest bid would 
cost 

It said its investment banker, 
Drexel Burnham Lambert, is rais- 
ing additional senior secured fi- 
nancing “and has provided GAF 
with a letter stating that it is highly 
confident that it will obtain the 
remaining funds necessary 10 com- 
plete the tender offer.” 

Hie GAF statement said fees re- 
lating to the initial $3.75-bilhon fi- 
nancing amounted to more thim 
$32 million and that GAF had 
committed itself to paying addi- 
tional related fees of $16 million. 

In a letter to Warren M. Ander- 
son, Union Carbide’s chairman 
and chief executive, GAFs chair- 
man, Samuel J. Heyman, called on 
Union Carbide to' drop its offer 
and accept a peaceful merger with 
GAF “in view of the plain fact that 
the GAF offer represents both a 
full price for Carbide shares and a 
superior alternative to your own 
exchange offer.” (AP, UP1) 

AU Nippon 
Buys Boeings 

(Continued from Page 11) 
ering components for the 747. It 
has also brought them into its 
“7J7" project for a 150-seat plane 
intended as a competitor to the 
Airbus A-320. 

Airbus Industrie, which has 
dominated the Asian market, re- 
cently won a $1.2-billion order by 
Indian Airlines for 31 A-320 air- 
craft 

But the All Nippon decision is 
Airbus’s second recent defeat in 
Japan. The national earner, Japan 
Air Lines, chose the 767 over the 
European plane in September 
1983. 

On Thursday a spokesman for 
the Foreign Ministry said the gov- 
ernment was neutral in regard to 
the decision by All Nippon. 


British , French to Develop 
Rapid Modular Computer 

Agaice Femur-Prase 

PARIS — British and French interests have set op a three-year 
project to develop a modular computer able to handle 500 millio n 
operations a second, a French company involved in the project said 
Inursday. 

The computer system, known as Supersede, has a development 
budget of about 70 million francs (S9.1 million), according to the 
French company. Apsis. 

It said the European Community’s Esprit program, the European 
Strategic Program for Research and Development in Information 
Technology, would provide half the money. 

Key to the Supernode project is a new integrated circuit by Inmos 
International PLC, a subsidiary of Thom EMI PLG The circuit 
facilitates connection between calculating units. 

Each module will have 16 processors, which are individual decen- 
tralized computers. 

Applications will include image synthesis, computer-assisted de-, 
sign and management, and signal and image processing. 

Other participants in the project are the Royal Signals and Radar ' 
Establishment and Southampton University in Britain, and Tetonat 
and Grenoble University in France. 

Resisting Takeover, MidCon Wins 
Court Order Against Chemical Bank 

Compiled by Our Stqff Firm Dispatches The temporary restraining order 

LOMBARD, Illinois — MidCon against Chemical Bank, issued by a 
Corp., trying to ward of r a takeover New York state court, covers infor- 
attempt, said Thursday that it had ' mation that Chemical obtained in 
obtained a temporary restraining May when MidCon was seeking 
order to prevent Chemical Bank of financing to acquire United Energy 
New York from disclosing confi- Resources Inc., MidCon said in a 
den tial financial information about statement MidCon completed its 
the natural gas supplier. $1.3 -billion takeover ol United En- 

MidCon said Chemical Bank two weeks ago. 
was the lead hank in providing fi- The statement said the New 
n an ting for the $2.7-bQlion take- York suit asserts that Chemical 
over attempt, which was launched Bank used the information to eval- 
Dec. 16 by WB Partners, an affili- uate the risk of backing loans to be 
ate of W ag ner & Brown and Free- used by WB Partners in the offer to 
port-McMoRan Inc. buy MidCon’s stock. 

MidCon filed lawsuits in Illinois. WB Partners has offered $62J0 
Delaware and New York on Tues- a share for each of MidCon’s 41.5 
day seeking a pr eliminar y irrjanc- million common shares outstand- 
lion blocking ibe takeover attempt, ing. (AP, Reuters) 


COMPANY NOTES 

ACCOR, a French hotel group, 
and SARI, a Compagnie Gfinfcrale 
des Earn property subsidiary, are 
planning a public offering for Cen- 
tre National des Industries et des 
Techniques, which has about 4,800 
square yards (4,000 square meters) 
of exhibition space outside Paris, 
an Accor spokesman said. 

Bafly Manufacturing Corp. has 
begun an offering of $240 million 
in debt securities. In a prospectus 
fifed with the U.S. Securities and 
Exchange Commission, it said it 
plans to use up to $145 million 
from the offering to acquire MGM 
Grand, a Nevada company that op- 
erates casino-hotels in Las Vegas 
and Reno. 


Deutsche Bank AG, which is 
planning to buy the Flick group for 
5 bfflion Deutsche marks (nearly $2 
billion), has pledged to seO the 
Flick holdings within a year to 
third parties and not exercise any 
voting rights, the Federal Cartel 
Office said. It said it did cot there- 
fore object to the sale. 

Lukas Inc. of Coatesville, Penn- 
sylvania, said depressed ail and gas 
drilling and low prices for foreign 
steel plates will cause a fourth- 
quarter loss. The company pro- 
vides engineering services, coats 
petroleum pipes and bttfids steel 
plates, materials-handling equip- 
ment, glass beads and highway 
safety products. 


Ford,GM 
Offer 7.9% 

Financing 

The Assocuued Press 

DETROIT — Ford Motor Co. 
followed General Motors Corp. on 
Thursday in announcing cut-rate 
financing for several car and track 
models through Feb. 22. 

Ford and GM both said they 
would offer 7.9-percent financing 
for deliveries taken from existing 
inventories. 

GM has been losing market 
share to Ford and Chrysler Corp. 
Its dealers have an 86-day backlog 
of unsold cars compared with the 
desired level of 60 days, according 
to Automotive News. 

GM offered 7.7-percent financ- 
ing in a campaign that ended in 
October. Chrysler currently has an 
8.6-perceni rate in effect for most 
of its smaller and midsize can. 

Ford, has a 7. 9- percent campaign 
in effect through Jan. 2 for 1985 
and 1986 subcompact Escort, Lynx 
and EXP models. 

The Ford financing announced 
Thursday applies that rate through 
Feb. 22 to aD Tempo and Topaz 
models, Thunderbird and Cougar 
models with 3.8-liter V6 engines, 
Merkur XR4Ti models, F-150 4X2 
trucks and Ranger 4X2 trucks. 

GM said that among the cars 
covered by its 7.9-percent financ- 
ing was the Chevrolet Nova, which 
has not been selling well. 

Other vehicles included some 
models of the Chevrolet Cavalier 
and Celebrity; the Pontiac Fiero, 
Sun bird. 6000, Grand Prix and 
Bonneville; the Oldsmobile Cutlass 
Gera and the Cutlass Supreme; 
Buick Somerset, Skylark and Cen- 
tury, and the Cadillac DeVijle. 
Trucks indude the Chevrolet El 
Camino and GMC Caballero. 


Nikko International Capital 
Management Gx, an investment 
advisory subsidiary of Japan's Nik- 
ko Securities Co- has acquired a 
5 1 -percent share in a British invest- 
ment advisory company, Fraser 
Green LuL, at a cost of £408.000 
(about $580,000). a senior Nikko 
official said. 

Revlon Inc. shareholders ap- 
proved a merger agreement under 
which Pantry Pride Inc. will ac- 
quire all of its common stock for 
$58 a share in cash. The merger, 
agreed to by the two companies on 
Nov. 15, had been assured when 
Pantry Pride reported that it held 
90.2 percent of the voting power of 
the outstanding shares. 


Inflation Mars Brazilian Recovery 


(Confirmed from Page 11) 
new congress that will have the 
responsibility of reforming the con- 
stitution. 

The political climate does not 
seem conducive to budget-cutting 
and austerity. 

Mr. Funaro has called on busi- 
nessmen and union leaders to agree 
to a temporary freeze in wages and 
prices while the government puts 
spending cuts into effect However, 
business and labor have called on 
the government to cut spending be- 
fore asking the private sector to 
make sacrifices. 

Mr. Saraey has rejected “reces- 
sionary” austerity measures that 
would be required by the Interna- 
tional Monetary Fund as a condi- 
tion for refinancing the foreign 
debt. He favors an expansionary 
economic policy, even if presmi 
rates of inflation continue. 

But growing inflation, which is 
widely Teared because of the pros- 
pect of higher demand and loose 
fiscal management, threatens la- 
bor- manage- mem relations and the 
government's relations with both 
sectors. 

Businessmen are opposed to 
paying higher taxes, even after a 
1 2- percent rise in industrial output 
this year, because they say they 
need to make new investments to 
keep up with increased consumer 
demand and exports. 

And workers in the big Sao Pau- 
lo industrial unions, now that they 
have lasted the fruits of economic 
recovery, are pushing for more 
gains, not less. The major unions 
want a reduction in the workweek, 
without a reduction in pay, from 48 
to 40 hours. This is seen by the 
unions as a way of increasing em- 
ployment 

■ Big Mineral Deposits Found 

Indications of massive mineral 
deposits have been found in a large 
area of the south east Amazon ba- 
sin. a senior government official 


For the blest information on 
De Voe-Holbein International nv 
and Gty -Clock International nv 
please call collect 31-20-627762. 


SEASONS GREETINGS AND 
A VERY PROSPEROUS 1986. 

Please note: our soles office 
wiD be dosed from December 20 
to January 6. The accounts 
department remain open. 


First Commerce Securities bv 
World Trade Center 
Stravinsky] aan 837 
1077 XX Amsterdam. 

The Netherlands 
Telex: 14507 Oreo nl 


said Thursday, according to a Unit- 
ed Press International report from 
Brasilia. 

Francisco Ferreira, director of 
the federal Carajas mining project, 
said geologists detected deposits of 
iron, copper, gold and tin in the 
southern Amazonian states of Para 
and Maranhao. 

“We will conduct further geolog- 
ical surveys which should confirm 
these deposits by the middle of next 
year," he said. 

The new finds lie south of the 


Carajas fields, which have proven 
reserves of 18 billion tons (16.2 
billion metric tons) of iron ore. 80 
mi llio n tons of manganese, 1 bil- 
lion tons of copper and 40 million 
loos of bauxite, plus smaller depos- 
its of gpld, uranium and other valu- 
able minerals. 

Mr. Ferreira said initial surveys 
by a Japanese technical agency in- 
dicated a total mineral region of at 
least 86,000 square miles (220.000 
square kilometers), establishing the 
southeast Amazon as one of the 
world’s major ore reserves. 


WbrW Stock Markds 

Via Age nee Frcmce-Pre&e Dec. 26 

doting prim in local eurrmdn unless otherwise indicated. 


AtrLlauJdt 
Atalhom AU. 

Aw DououH 

Boncolra 

BIC 

Benertf) 

Bouvmn 

BSN-OD 

Corrotaur 

Cnoroours 

Chib Mod 

Dartv 

Dunn 

Elf-AaullOIMi 

Einnaa 1 

GmnEaux 

HodlattB 

LataroeCap 

Loorond 

Losleur 

rarooi 

Mon ill 
Mona 
Marlin 
Mi chol In 
MOOT Heiumsv 

Maullne* 

Occ Mania la 
Pernod ftlc 
Porrtor 
P n QWI 
i Prtatompt 
Rodtotedin 
Podmria 
Roussn Octal 
Sonofl 

Skit Raulpnol 
Talomac 
Thomson CSF 
Total 

CAC l Max : SMI 
Prowloo* : 2S7J* 


Malayan Banking 

OCBC 

OUB 

OUE 

ShanorMa 
SlmoDorov 
S pot* Lund 
S’para Praia 
5 StwKmhla 
Si t rookie 
UOB 

Unites Ovartaoi 


5JO £» 
IJ7 I .TO 

1.45 I JO 

08 09 
7 JO 70S 
zse m 
2.12 2 . 1 # 
l.eo N_Q. 
144 140 
NS. 147 
SJO 540 
D42 041 

2.10 UR 
im u# : 

1.10 1.17 


Strain Time* IKK. i uui 
Prevtou : Mi.ll 


AaaM Chemical 

Asaftl Glass 

Bank ol Tokyo 

BHoacctona 

Canon 

Casio 

Citon 

Dal Nippon Print 
OaAaa Hanoi 
Dalwa Sacurlllas 
Fanuc 
Full Bonk 
Fuji PTKKO 
Fujitsu 
Hitachi 
Hiloatl Cotila 
Honda 

Japan Air Limn 
Kallma 
Kama! Power 

Kawasaki Stool 

Kirin Primary 
Komatsu 


Ki *ota 

Kyocera 

Menu Elec inos 

MOl Ml EMC Works 

Mitsubishi Bank 
Mitsubishi Chom 
MltMiMiM CMC 
luutsutxml Heavy 
MltMtfifll Com 
Mitsui ona Co 
Mlrsukosnl 
Mihaurtl 
NEC 

NGK insula tort 
Nikko Sac 
Nippon KoMfcu 
Nippon Oil 
Nlopon Stool 
Nippon Vusen 
Nfcuon 
Norn urn Sac 
Otvmpui 
Pienaar 
Rican 
Sharp 
SMrnoiu 
SWnirtsu Chem 
Sony 

Sumitomo Bank 
Sumitomo Cham 
Sumitomo Marine 
Sumitomo Matal 
Tubcl Corp 
Tabno Marino 
TokHMChom 
TDK 
Tallin 

Toklo Mortna 
Tokyo El Pwr 
Topoon Prlnttnp 
Torav Ina 
TOthUM 
Toyota 
Yemolchi Sac 

Mkkat BS : MOSS. St 
Pr av ta ai ; imibji 

Haw Indm : IMJ1 
pravtoos : WJ7J7 


TRUSTCOR MANAGEMENT COMPANY S.A. 

So aW Anonym* 

11, Avenue GuSkaume 
Luxembourg 
BLC. Lro mmhnur g B 8349 

Notice to the holders of shares in 
TRUSTCOR INTERNATIONAL FUND 

By «Win« i of Thjstror Munenm Company SLA. and ftoycan latanational 
R, nlrimi limited {fonnerfy ftoyWeet Banking; Corporation Limited), article 
17. L oT the management regulations of Tnnlcor International Fund is a men d e d 
to read ns IoDowk 

17.1 The hind a established for on unlimited period, h may be tCtwohied. 
however, by mutnal agzeeman of the management company and the 
deponbiy bank if in ritrir jndgmmi the termination of the undivided co- 
pnrnrietDiBlnp can beat serve the interests of the shateholden. Such decision 
wdlbe published owe in the memorial recuetl special des eod&es et 
aaori M imi of biwwili nuBi and in at least three newspapers in countries 
wtwe tberinres of the fund are offered and sold. Iwuance and redemptions 
of shares will cease at the time die deririon is Inkm. 

By order of the board of 
TnutOOr ■ I V..|mni sjl 


HCVNKSS TOBACCO Ca 






Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 27, 1985 


Thursday^ 

AMEX 

Closing 


Tables include The nationwide prices 
up to the dosing an Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 
Via The Associated Press 


I UMonlti 
I Ht9tl Low StOCT 


SK. CIjtc ■■ Avxf 

1C5> Le w BifJt. Cfr'po 


S.i 


33th 1M 
13 4ft 
ISM 5ft 
32ft ISM 
30ft lift 
7M 3ft 
7Yl A 
8 4ft 
7th 4ft 
2ft ft 
2BM 14ft 
IBM 6 ft 
ua Bft 


Ocdtwds 

OdetAn 

OdetB 

OtiArt J4 
Olsten i 2t 
OOklep 
Opoetrfi JBe 
OrtolHA .15 : 
OrtotHB JO 
Ormond 
OSirivni M 
OxIrrtP J2t ■ 
OwwfcH JO 


33 18ft 
33 7ft 
3 7ft 
13 34 
3ft 29W 
13 4ft 
130 5ft 
73 6ft 
22 6ft 
11 ft 
5 27 
15 17 
14ft 12V* 


if ft Iff* — M 
7 7ft + ft 
7ft 7ft 
32ft 34 +1Y. 

28ft 29W + ft 
4ft 4ft 
5ft 5ft 
ftV> Aft +■ M 

It * 

26ft 26ft — M 
lAft lift 
lift 12 


16ft 11 Jochm 30b 43 11 18 11M lift lift 

7ft 5ft Jacobi 17 343 7ft 7 7ft + ft 

4ft 2ft Jot Am 4 23 3ft 3 3 

9ft Aft Jetron Jit W 13 IB I 7ft B + M 

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lift 5 JohnAm JO 43 t 88 6ft 4ft *£- Vi 

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AMEX Ifiglis-Lovis 




NEW HIGHS 15 


Sinks Ml* CDI Cp 
G orman Runs HUBCO 


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Deposits at U.S. Hirifts 
Up Sharply in November 

The Associated Pros 

WASHDVGTON — Dqxuits at federally in- 
sured savings and loan associations grew by 
$4,33 billion in November, up sharply from the 
October increase of $1.74 billion, the Federal 
Home Loan Bank Board reported Thursday. 

However, for the first 1 1 months of the vear, 
deposits have grown by S45.47 biflion, down 
from the $98 JS billion in growth recorded dur- 
ing the same period in 19S4. 

Analysts have attributed part of the sharp 
downturn to new federal regulations that have 
limited the pace at which savings and loans can 
attract new deposits. 


Christmas Offers 
Fail to Fill Up 
Planes in U.S. 

The .4 mi J l'm> 

NEW YORK — U.S. airlines that used sleep 
discounts to hdp fill planes at Thanksgjvinc say 
tbe> did not have as much luck with .similar 
discounts for Christmas. s 

Mivst of the big airlines offered tome seats at 
70 percent off ihe economy-class fare from Dec. 
25 to Dec. 28. Business travel traditionally 
drops off during Christmas week. 

The discount tickets carried restrictions, such 
as on advance purchase requirement, designed 
to keep travelers who would have flown anyway 
from taking advantage of them. 

Spokesmen for some (he airlines speculated 
Tuesday that some peepie who took advantage 
of the low fares at Thanksgiving might have 
decided not to fly again so soon afterword. 

The airlines also have announced offers for . 
around the New Year's holiday and for most of - 
January. February and March, an off-peak peri- 
od. 

Mosl airlines announced their Christinas of- 
fers around Dec. 10. Joseph Hopkins, a spokes- 
man for Chicago-based United, said people 
might have made their travel plans by then. 

“They've had limited impact." he said, agree? 
bag that the Thanksgiving fares were a bigger hit 
with the public. 

John Hctani. a spokesman for American Air- 
lines in Dallas, called the response to the Christ- 
mas offer “pretty good." but said it was proba- 
bly not as successful as the Thanksgiving fare 
was. American is the second largest U.S. airline 
after United Airlines. 

Dick Jones, a spokesman at Delta Air Lines' 
headquarters in Atlanta, said. “I don't have any 
question that the bookings increased after the 
announcement was made, but probably not as 
much as people might have hoped.” 

Eastern Airlines, one of the few carriers that 
made figures available, said bookings were up 
10 percent from last year's strong Christmas 
travel period. Mack Wegel. a spokesman for the 
Miami-based airline, called that “an excellent 
response.” 

Sandra Allen, a spokeswoman for Frontier. 
Airlines, said the Denver-based carrier had na£ *■ 
seen "too much stimulation" from the fare cuts. 
But she said bookings were alreudy healthy 
before the announcement. 

Mr. Jones of Delta said the major airlines 
were offering the discounts in part to prove that 
passengers could find seats as cheap or cheaper 
than those on no-frills airlines like People Ex- 
press. 

A People Express spokesman, Russell Mar- 
ietta, in Newark. New Jersey, said the major 
airlines’ discounts possibly would lake away 
some business from People, but he said the 
airline is doing well. 

“You increase the size of the pot because 
more people can afford to fly," he said. 

Louis Fourie, an airline analyst for the invest- 
ment firm of Mahon, Nugent & Co., said the 
airlines had avoided a costly fare war by target- 
ing their offers to bargain hunters, excluding 
business travelers who would have flown any- 
way. 

The airlines' revenue probably was staying 
about even because of the balance between 
more traffic and lower fares, he said. 


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appears every 

FRIDAY 


To place on advertisement 
contact our office in your 
country (listed in Oassified 
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Dominique Bouvet, 
International Harold Tribune, 
181 Ave. Querie s de Gaul le, 
92521 Neuifly Cedes, 
Franca. 

Tal.: 47.47.12.65, 
Tdox: 613595. 



ADVERTISEMENT — 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) Dec, 26, 1985 

„ net asset value quotations cue seurttod Uv It* Funds listed with the exception of sotmqtxrtes based on Issue price. 

Tbttmareual symbols Indicate frequency of quotation* sappOeCtUl -OaUv; (w) -weekly; (M - bt-montbly; (r)-remlarty; (l> - Irregularly. 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 27, 1985 


Page 15 


ness people 


IF 


gan Executives Switch Posts 


fecwh Erdmann 

^gjoajjrtrald Tribune 
OK -7 Morgan Guaranty 


ltd posts in June, 
ok id David Band, se- 
pjmidott in the bank’s 
^^headquarters and bead 
onding services- group, 
w to London to become 
» direct 01 " of Morgan 
LttL» the bank’s Euro- 
ndawriting and market- 
nil. 

. .. Mayer Jr., a senior vice 
’of the bank and manag* 
lor of Morgan Guaranty 

[vndon, will move to New 
lake over frean Mr. Band 

" \of the funding services 

. gj gna l Inc., the U.S. in- 
•^jbogioaterate, said its in- 
afunit, which was formed 
.Mi , ponth, had begun organiz- 
i !! S «attons on a geographical 
" 'eirait, AIHed-Signal Inter- 
laCn said it bad appointed 
Laronnis as regional vice 
‘‘i for Europe, the Middle 
i A ft*” He is based in 
Ins «w position. The com- 
• expected to shortly an- 
the appointment of Ernest 
as regional vice presi- 
japan. South Korea and 
asaHirTokya 
c.Wbedar Cttrpt, the US. 
of heavy industrial plants, 
^ ned VuBam C. Chatman 


pianagmg fSnector of 1 its British- 
based subsidiary, Foster Wheeler 
Ltd. He succeeds Donald New- 
bold, w!k> remains chairman of the 
unit. Mr. Chatman previously was 
director of the process plants divi- 
sion of; Sodst 6 Foster Wheeler 
Fran^aise, a Paris-based subsid- 
iary. 

National Westminster Bede PLC 
has named Roy Haines to the new 
post of group treasurer. He was 
treasurer and assistant general 
m ana ger, international banking di- 
vision. 

Sogemin (Hohfiugs) Ltd. has 
named David C Blundell manag- 
ing director and pbaimum of its 
subsidiary companies, s»rra*sdmg 
Frank Gregory, who retired. Soge- 
min is the British arm of the Brits- 
sab-based group Sodfctfc Gtnferale 
des Minerals, which trades worid- 
widein minerals, metals and relat- 
ed nroducts. 

I. Henry Schroder Wagg ft Co. 
of London said Michael Laden- 
burg, a director, would be general 
manag er of the branch that its 
Schroder Securities (Japan) Co. 
unit has received permission to 
open in Tokyo. 

Bank Julius Baer’s head of re- 
search, Heinrich Looser, has been" 
named chairman of the Swiss Soci- 
ety for Financial Analysts. He suc- 
ceeds MididPetitpiene of Pictet & 
CSe. 

Menfl Lynch & Co., the New 
York-based securities firm that re- 
cently won a seat on the Tokyo 
Stock Exchange, has named John 


A. Williams to the new post of 
president ofMenffl Lynch Japan, a 
unit Mr. Williams was senior vice 
president and. director of world- 
wide equity trading for the parent. 

Novo lndustri A/S, theDanish 
biotechnology concern, said- Kim 
A Hpeg, its executive vice presi- 
dent in charge of engineering and 
logistic functions, would leave die 
company al yearis end. Novo said 
his functions would, until further 
notice, be assumed by the chief 
operating officer, Niels W. Holm. 

GTE Com. said it has named 
Armen dcr-Marderorian to head 
the new Tactical Systems division 
of its Government Systems unit. 
He Was ggn ^t l manage- 

of GTE’s Communication Systems 
unit Tactical Systems will produce 
eftmtniwrifytionS frpii pfT^nt under 
a 54J-Wflion U.S. Array contract 
recently woo with Paris-based 
Thomson-CSF. 

Pacific Gas £ Electric Co, of San 
Francisco said Ira Michad Bey- 
man, chancellor of the University 
of California at Berkeley, has been 
named to its board, tie succeeds 
L.W. Lane Jr., who left to become 
US. ambassador to Australia. 

. Westpac Banking Carp, of Syd- 
ney said its managing director, RJ. 
White, had agreed to continue in 
that post for two years beyond his 
normal retirement in October 1986. 

Extd Gmp PIC die informa- 
tion and comnnm icaticcs group, 
has opened a representative office 
in Brussels and appointed Mark 
Hynes as manager. 


New Stock Exchange Opens 
In Turkey, First in 60 Years 


CURRENCY MARKETS 


Dollar Ends Mixed in U.S. Trading 


Reuten 

ISTANBUL — Turkey’s Em 
stock exchange in more than 60 
years was opened here Thursday by 
Deputy Prime Monster 1. Kaya Er- 
dem. 

The new trading flow for securi- 
ties is part of a plan drawn up by 
the government to regulate capital 
markets. 

Twenty-five banks, nine broker- 
age houses and two individual bro- 
kers are licensed to operate. 

The exchange’s chairman, Mu- 
bairan Karsh, saidiules foe admis- 
sion as a broker and for trading of 
shares were very strict, in reaction 
to a market crash in 1982. 

Thai summer, Turkey’s leading 
brokerage bouse banker, Kastefl, 
collapsed because of the default of 
some borrowers. The collapse 
brought down. three small banks, 
whose certificates of deposit Kas- 
teDi was selling. 

The government set up a capital 

ii)aricehfn m m i «ri ftn in A "for a nnrl 

drew op strict rales for market op- 
erations. 

Brokers did not anticipate exten- 
sive trading in the new n*r*i«ngp 
No shares were traded Thursday. 

They said that because of the 
family ownership of most big Turk- 
ish industrial companies, not many 
shares reach the marketplace. 

Although there are more than 
600 companies registered at the ex- 
change, only 40 to 50 of them were 
previously traded through the bro- 
kers’ offices. 


Thursday^ 

arc 


Brices 


NASDAQ prices os of 
1 pjn. New York time. 

.Via The .Associated Press 




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Mr. Karsli urged the government 
to do more to encourage companies 
to issue shares and people to buy 
than. 

Turkish brokets do most of their 
business in bonds. 

Government and private-sector 
bonds issued in the first 1& months 
of this year totaled 469 billion lira 
(about 5820 million). 

Peru’s Threat 
On Oil Assets 

(Continued from Page 11) 
“only if an a gr ee m ent favorable to 
the national interasT were reached. 
Otherwise, be said, the state-run 
PetroFeru will take over the corn- 
fatties’ oil exploration and produc- 
tion activities. 

Mr. Garcia set a deadline of mid- 
night Thursday for the companies 
to accept the conditions. 

He said the companies also 
would have to agree to share ex- 

e tion. of new oil deposits with 
Peru, as well as to build pipe- 
lines and to keep profits under 50 
percent of their per-barrel sales 
price. 

In New York, a spokesman for 
Occidental <aiH ian» Thursday that 
he had no detailed word on how the 
talks were progressi n g. 

“Negotiations are. continuing,** 
the spokesman said. He declined to 
elaborate. (AFP. Reuters, WP) 


CorpUai 6y Our Stuff Fm Dapaidi a 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
closed mixed to slightly weaker in 
U.S. trading Thursday in what 
traders termed the dullest day of 
the year. Dealers said that commer- 
cial, year-end position-squaring 
was the main feature of the 
post-Christmas session and was 
confined to odd orders. 

“We’re still involved with holi- 
day markets, and activity is at ex- 
tremely low levels," raid Gary 
Dorsch, senior money market ana- 
lyst with the Chicago commodities 
brokerage G JrL Miller & Co. 

In New York, the dollar ended at 
Z5030 DM, down marginally from 
Tuesday’s dose of 15080; at 202.75 
yen. down from 20190; at 7.6800 
French francs, unchanged: and at 
2.1030 Swiss francs, down from 
2.1070. The British pound rose to 
S1.4275 from 51.4260. 

All European markets except 
Paris remained closed for the holi- 
day. There, the U.S. currency was 
fixed at midafiemoon at 7.7125 
French francs, up from 7.6940 on 
Tuesday. In later trading in Paris 
on Thursday, the franc strength- 
ened to 7.6800 to the dollar. 

New York dealers said the dollar 
traded in a narrow range between 
2.5030 and 2.5070 DM throughout 
the session, hitting the lower rate 
after the Federal Reserve injected 
reserves into the banking system 
with four-day system re p urch ase 
agreements. 

“The only important news was 
the Fed’s f oar-day repos, but sane 


people think even that was a tech- 
nical move to ease year-end pres- 
sures.” a bank trader said. 

Meanwhile, the Canadian dollar 
remained on the defensive on both 
technical and fundamental 
grounds, dealers said. The Canadi- 
an c ur r en cy fell in New York to 
$1.4000 against its U.S. cousin 
from SI J990 Tuesday, after hover- 
ing above the key $1.40-Level 
throughout the day. 

Dealers pegged the dollar's near- 
term trading range at $1.4000 to 
51.4030 and said it would likely fall 
further to about $1.4100. 

Lower Canadian interest rates 
and declining prices for commod- 


ities that Canada exports, includ- 
ing oil, lumber and minerals, con- 
tinued to hurt the Canadian unit, 
analysts said. 

In earlier trading in Tokyo, 
meanwhile, the dollar rose slightly 
to 202.91 yen from Tuesday’s close 
of 202.60 after the Governor of the 
Bank of Japan, Satoshi Sumita, 
said in a television interview that 
the yen’s exchange value has 
“reached a reasonable leveL" 

Mr. Sumita, who made the re- 
mark during an interview with a 
reporter of the Japan Broadcasting 
Carp-, did not refer to a specific 
doUar/ycn level 

(Reuters, AP, VPI) 


Hewing a High-Tech Christmas 

Ron Milner is (he designer of the 
popular toy AG. Bear for the com- 
pany. Axlon. He said that inside 
the bear is a microphone connected 
to a chip that converts sound waves 
into a computer series of binary 
digits. 

The catch is that the chip doesn’t 
digitize every single sound. Instead, 
it "subsamples" the sound it hears. 

Then it plays back that sample 
through its amplifier. 

Meantime, advances in liquid 
crystal display technologies — dis- 
play media that allow crystals to 
recreate high-resolution color — 
have made lightweight, low-cost 
and hand-beld television sets a con- 
sumer reality. 


(Continued from Page 11) 
electronic medium for storing and 
manipulating information. 

It now costs about as much to 
“print” a chip as it does a newspa- 
per. 

“The drop in the cost of micro- 
processors pretty much made this 
a]} possible,” said Mr. Wazniak, 
who buih the Apple computer — 
and the personal computer indus- 
try — around these low-cost silicon 
chips. 

A new company of Nolan Bush- 
aril co-founder of Atari Corp., has 
found a way to use silicon to make 
teddy bears talk, or at least mum- 
ble, in response to questions and 
conversation. 


Economic Indexes Improve in 7 Major Nations 


The AssodateJ Press 

NEW YORK — Leading eco- 
nomic indexes in seven of the 
worltfs nine major industrialized 
countries are strengthening, a sig- 
nal that growth forecasts may have 
to be revised upward, a business- 
research organization reported 
Thunsday- 

The Conference Board said the 
index of the United States, which 
had shown almost no growth three 
months ago, increased to an annual 
rate of 4 percent in December. 

The strongest rate was Austra- 
lia’s at 13 percent, the same as in 
September, followed by Taiwan at 


10 percent, compared with 6 per- 
cent three months ago. 

Italy was at 9 percent, a I-per- 
ceniage- point increase; West Ger- 
many 8 percent, up from 7 percent, 
and f -Anuria 7 percent, up from 5 
percent France’s rate was 5 per- 
cent, a l-pcrcentage-poml drop, 
but the board said the figure was 
stiD strong compared with Fiance’s 
1969-79 growth rate of 4 percent 

The major exceptions were Ja- 
pan, where the animal rate weak- 
ened from 9 percent to 1 percent, 
and Britain, which dropped from 2 
percent to minus 1 percent, the 
board said in a statement summa- 
rizing the survey. 


It defined the leading index as a 
measurement projecting the future 
direction of the economy, based on 
a broad sdectioa of major indica- 
tors. 

Taken in total the annual index 
for all ninecountries amounted to 5 
percent in December, compared 
with 4 percent in September. 

“While the latest gains are mod- 
erate in most countries, the eco- 
nomic signs are now better than 
generally expected,” Edgar R. 
Fiedler, the board's economic 
counselor, said in the summary. “If 
current trends continue, most eco- 
nomic forecasts may weD have to 
be revised upward.” 


The summary said the economic- 
performance indexes in the nine 
countries, which track current eco- 
nomic conditions, continue to ad- 
vance but the pace remains slow 
with the exception of Australia’s 
index of 10 percenL 

Japan's performance index has 
slowed from 3 percent to 1 percent, 
the summary said. The Japanese 
economy has been sharply affected 
by the rapid appreciation of the 
yen. 

Founded in 1916. the Confer- 
ence Board is a New York-based 
group that conducts research and 
publishes studies on business eco- 
nomics and management experi- 
ence. 


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The Global Newspaper. 



-Sst+iSh 


































Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 27, 1985 


4 * 



ACROSS 
1 Part of an 
ellipse 

4 Kind of house 

8 Little type 
12 Burden 

14 Ambiance 

15 Bucket wheel 
17 Start of an 

epigram 

20 Uses 

21 Exercises an 
option 

22 Type of meal 

23 Actor Hinkles 

24 Epigram: Part 
II 

32 Cut 

33 Tommy of 
Broadway 

34 Erode 

36 Get rid of 

37 Prohibit 

38 Hard to come 

by 

39 Augsburg 
article 

40 Single 

41 Some are 
liberal 

42 Epigram: Part 
HI 

47 Onassis 

48 Year in the 
reign of 
Claudius I 

49 Memorable 
Dodger 
manager 


52 Leaky radiator 
remedy, e.g. 

56 End of 
epigram 

59 Jack 

60 Frat quarters, 
sometimes 

61 Down Under 
bird 

62 Free spirit 

63 Is obliged 

64 Stake 

DOWN 

1 "Tbe 
Greatest" 

2 Teased 

3 Prestorm state 

4 "House of 
Flowers" 
author 

5 A nephew of 
Donald Duck 

6 Grampuses 

7 French winter 
report 

8 Kind of 
computer 

9 Like some 
drinks 

10 Skater-cyclist 
Heiden 

11 Funny one 

13 Testified 

16 Belgian 
commune 

18 Rembrandt's 
"The Noble 


12/27786 

19 “Brigaaoon" 
lyricist 

24 Hadrian's 
"himself" 

25 Hindu master 

26 1 reland, to 

Spenser 

27 Anagrammati- 
cally, she takes 
notes 

28 Shylock's 
friend 

29 Counting 
everything 

30 Author 
Lafcadio 

31 Hasan the 

ground 

35 Experiment 

37 In tbe time of 

38 Shine 

43 One way logo 

44 Norwegian 
dollars 

45 Slumberiand 
intruders 

46 African 
irrigator 

49 Question 

50 Curtain fabric 

51 Playwright 
O'Casey 

52 Popocatepetl's 
covering 

53 Judicial 
journey 

54 Without feeling 

55 Cork, e.g. 

57 Trouble 

58 Zany 


A Selection of Noteworthy Nonfiction Books Published in 1985 


Fdkiwing is a selection of nonfiction boob re* 
viewed in The New York limes since the Christinas 
issue of 1984. Quoted comments are from The Book 
Review. 


ALONG WITH YOUTH; 


way, the Early 
idexfui and 


Years. By Peter G riffin (Oxford) A 

intimate hnnlr” that “ hring o fn Ufa th* yo ung Hamfri g - 

way with all his charm, vitality, good lodes [and] 
passionate dedication to writing.'’ 

BRIGHAM YOUNG: American Moses. By Leon- 
ard J. Arrington. (Knopf) “Replaces older, badly 
flawed biographies and gives readers as good a picture 
as they are hkdy to get of the man who assumed 
leadership" of the Mormons in 1844. 

CAVOUR. By Denis Mack Smith. (Knopf) An 
“extraordinary saga of deception, mthlessness, blun- 
ders and teems of fortune in the life of the man who 
more than anyone else brought about the unification 
of Italy in 1861." 

CHAPLIN: His Life and Art By David Robinson. 
(McGraw-Hill) The Times of London film critic’s 
“account of Chaplin's career as filmmaker, actor, 
director, writer, husband, producer, composer, lover 
and tycoon is . . . certainly the major biography thus 
far” 

THE DANGEROUS SUMMER By Ernest Hem- 
ingway. (Scribners) A posthumously edited version of 
Hemingway’s 1959 account (parts were published in 
Life in 1960) of a summer-long duel between Spam’s 
two leading matadors. 

FDR By Ted Morgan. (Simon & Schuster) This 
“one- volume biography” provides “a fascinating 
three-dimensional portrait” of “a great man with hu- 
man frailties.” 

GIACOMETTI. By James Lord. (Farrar, Straus & 
Giroux) A “fascinating'’ gossipy biography that shows 
that the Swiss sculptor was “one of the few artists of 
our time to lead a life, rather than to make a career, 
and to pursue art as a religion as wdl as a vocation.” 

HENRY JAMES: A Life. By Leon EdeL (Harper & 
Row) A one-volume condensation and revision of the 
author’s five-volume work, “one of the most ambitious 
of modem life histories." 

IVY; The Life of L Comp ton - Burnett. By Hillary 
Spurting. (Knopf) The reclusive British novelist Ivy 
Compton-Burnett died in 1969. This “voluminous” 
biography is “intelligent, richly detailed, warm and 
sympathetic.” 

OUR THREE SELVES: The Life of Ruddy ffe 


Hafl. By Michael Baker. (Morrow) A “fine new biog- 
raphy" of the “well-regarded middle-brow” British 
novdist and lesbian advocate. 

ROBERT CAPA; A Biography. By Richard Whe- 
lan. (Knopf) “As portrayed in Richard Whelan’s fact- 
packed, fast-paced biography,” Robert Capa “was a 
lovable libertine who became the world’s greatest war 
photographer” 

THE TRUE CONFESSIONS OF AN ALBINO 
TERRORIST. By Breyten Breytmbach. (Farrar, 
Straus & Giroux) Tbe political and literary memoirs of 
“the pre- eminent living Afrikaans poet, ’ who spent 
seven years in a South African prison. 

T. S. ELIOT: A Life. By Peter Ackroyd. (Simon & 
Schuster) Given the fact that Peter Ackroyd was not 
allowed to quote from the poet’s unpublished works 
and letters and was limited in what he could quote 
from Biot’s published works, this is “as good a biogra- 
phy as we have any right to expect” 

WALLACE STEVENS; A Mythology of Self. By 
Mihon J. Bates (University of California) A “compre- 
hensive biological study” that “documents how the 
poet’s life ran a soberly determined course worthy erf 
his most stolid Pennsyrvania-Dutch ancestor ” 

WOMAN IN THE CRESTED KIMONO: The 
Life of Sbibue Io and Her Family Drawn from Mori 
OgaTs “Shibue ChusaL” By Edwin McClellan. (Yale) 
Mori OgaTs “Sbibue Chusai" (1916) is (he “chronicle 
of a scholarly doctor who lived in the last decades of 
pre-modem Japan” and who died in 1858. Edwin 
McCMtan focuses on the life of one character in the 
bock — Shibne Io, “a remarkable woman'’ who was 
Chusaf s fourth wife and who outlived him by 26 
years. 

History 

BRIBES. By John T. Noonan Jr. (Macmillan) This 
history of bribery from ancient times to Lhe present is 
also concaned with “morals, rehgkxis doctrine and 
literary criti cism. ” 

THE BRITISH EMPIRE IN THE MIDDLE EAST 
1945-1951: Arab Nationalism, tbe United States, and 

“Based an^Tstaggeri^ amoun^c^recently ^released 
official and private papers,” this “magnificent and 
comprehensive” book unravels with com pelling de- 
tail the way in which the British 'official mind' en- 
gaged in [an] imperial and strategic juggling act, as it 
sought to presave national interests.” 

EAGLE AGAINST THE SUN : The American War 
With Japan. By Ronald Spector. (Free Press) Demon- 


strating “depth, breadth and careful scholarship, this 
history is the “most concise and comprehensive ac- 
count so far of the Pacific war from the Amen can 
point of view." 

THE FALL OF SAIGON: Scenes From the Sud- 
den End of a Long War. By David Butler. (Simon * 
Schuster) “Inriinting the format employed ... in ‘Is 
Paris Burning?’” David Butler "presents some a- 
traordinaiy vignettes from what he aptly describes as 
the FeDmi-Iike atmosphere” of South Vietnam as the 
Communists took over in 1975. 

GERMAN BIG BUSINESS AND THE RISE OF 
HITLER By Henry Ashby Turner Jr. (Oxford) This 
“absorbing” account of “the personal and fina nci al 
links” between German business and Nazism argues 
that “big-business money was of marginal importance 
to the rapidly expanding Hitler movement.” 

HEART OF EUROPE: A Short History of Poland 
By Norman Davies. (Oxford) The author of “God's 
Playground: A History of Poland” has written a work 
with “sweep, a rare analytical depth and a courageous 
display of . . . personal convictions.’' 

A HISTORY OF ARCHITECTURE: Settings and 
Rituals. By Spiro Kostof. (Oxford) “A magnificent 


historic caves to tbe extension of Harvard University's 
Fogg Museum.” 

THE LONG MARCH: The Untold Story. By Har- 
rison E. Salisbury (CorocHa & Michael Bessie/Harper 
& Row) An “engrossing and revealing" re-creation of 
the fhinagg Red Army’s 1934-35 Long March by a 
former New York Times foreign correspondent. 

THE SOONG DYNASTY. By Sterling Seagrave. 
(Harper & Row) The lives and times of Charlie 
Soong's three sons and three daughters, who “carved 
out a permanent niche in the steamy politics of the 
Chinese republic in the years from its founding in 1911 
to its fall m 1949 ” 

Correal Affairs and Social Comment 

AFRICA; The People and Politics of an Emerging 
Continent By Stanford J. Ungar (Simon & Schuster) 
“This thoughtful safari through sub-Saharan Africa 
. . . generally maps out tbe history and salient mod- 
ern features of the place with cool clarity and without 
dogma or pantification.” 

THE BUTTON: The Pentagon’s Strategic Com- 
mand and Control System. By Daniel Ford. (Simon & 
Schuster) Drawing “attention to some fundamental 
problems of nndear strategy,” the author introduces 


“the layman io the world of radars, surveinmxKtttd* 
tiles and nudear command posts.” 

FINAL CUT: Dreams and Disaster in the tefcf 
of “Heavens Gate." By Steven Bach. (Man**/ X 
“readable and enlightening'* account of the atrrk 
business in general, and lhe 536- million fUmfratam 
particular, that would itself make a good mowe; 

FUNNY MONEY. By Mark Singer. (KnopO “A 
down-and-dirtv look at the people who fed off this 
boom in oil and gas exploration" m the late Wtm, and 
the collapse of the Penn Square bank. 

HOLY DAYS: The World of a Hasidic Famtiy. By 
Lis Harris. (Summit) A “beautiful partrau"* of *n 
Ultra-Orthodox Jewish family from Crown 
Brooklyn, told “with precision and deganic. 

ILLITERATE .AMERICA. By Jonatha n Spa A 
(Donbledayl A passionate yet “carefully document- 
ed" e xamin ation of the plight of “60 million dfetac^ 
and semiliterate American adults." 

THE MANTLE OF THE PROPHET: Religion isd 
Politics in Iran. By Roy Mottahcdeh. (Simon « Scfca»- 
ter) A work of “reconciliation and reflection," this 
book rises above “the current feud between Iran and 
the West [and] leaves open the possibility of a wy 
beyond one of rage and bitterness." 

NICARAGUA: Revolution in the Family. By Shir- 
ley Chri st ian (Random House) “Very much a report- 
er's book." this study of what happened in revohmon- 
ary Nicaragua, by a Pulitzer Prize-winner, now i 
reporter for The New York Times, focuses on Ameri- 
can policy and missed opportunities. 

THE PENTAGON AND THE ART OF WAR- 
The Question of Military Reform. By Edward N. 
Luttwak. (Simon & Schuster) “The author, a hawkish 
advocate of increased defense spending but nonethe- 
less a severe critic of the military establishment, sake, 
a very persuasive case for radical and fundamental) 
reform” of the U. S. military. 

SO FAR FROM GOD: A Journey to Central 
America. By Patrick Mamham. (Elisabeth Sfton/ 
Viking) “A book of travels . . . reflecting tbe wfahns 
and incidents" experienced by a British reporter “as he 
wandered overland down Cahfomia. through Mexico 
and into Central America.” 

WAITING: Tbe Whites of South Africa. By Vin- 
cent Crapanzano. (Random House) This account of 
the anthropologist author's encounters with white 
South Africans in a small country town in 1980-81 is 
“insightful into the processes of deception and set 
deception." 


PEANUTS 


O New York Times, edited by Eugene MaJeska. 



BOOKS 


AROUND THE WORLD ON HOT 
ADR & TWO WHEELS 

By Malcolm Forbes. 27 J pages. $24.95. 
Simon & Schuster, 1230 Avenue of the 
Americas, New York, N. Y. 10020. 

Reviewed by Christopher Buckley 



wearing ... 

TOOLS" colors and heD bait for foie gras. 
There goes Malcolm Forbes in a whoosh of 
propane, heaven bent in a hot-air balloon the 
shape and approximate size of the chiteau. 

A reporter mice asked Forbes for the secret 
of his success. His answer: “Hazd work, imagi- 
nation, perseverance and a father who left me 
5100 mufioo.” Malcolm Forbes is a guiltless, 
happy mail, and, to judge from this book — a 
coffeo-tableadventure book written with a half 
dozen or so of his bike-and-balloon compan- 
ions — be is also very good company on the 
road and in the air. Hiere is something winning 
about a hugely rich man who is at peace with 
himself and humanity and who likes to have 
fun on the grand scale. 

He owns, aside from Forbes magazine and 
the chflteau in Normandy, estates more or less 
all over tbe world, including an island in Fiji. 
-He also owns a DC-9, a yacht large enough to 
invade the Falklaral Islands, and a huge ccffle& 
tion of woiis by Faberge. And 30 motorcycles. 
He racked up (hat particular bug when he was 
48 (he’s now 66), and promptly became an 
enthusiast. This book is perhaps the only place 
you will find it argued that motorcycles can 
mcreasc human life expectancy — and Forbes 
is probably the only person who could make it 
sound convincmg- 

Sometimc later he picked -up ballooning — 
in a big way, characteristically, since Forbes 
does not do things in a snail way. Described 
and photographed in this bode are his trips 
across the untied States, through Europe, Rus- 
sia, China and the Middle ana Far East. 

Hie likes firsts. In 1973, a year after his first 
ascent, he became tbe first man to cross the 
United States by hoi-air balloon. It look just 
over a month. He landed, somewhat ingjori- 
oosly, in the freezing water of Chesapeake Bay. 
Two years later he almost became the first to 
cross from California to Europe by helium 
balloon. It was a grand undertaking. One reads 
the account of the nearly disastrous launch 


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with gratitude that the mission foundered 
the tarmac and not at 40,000 feet 

That left the problem of what next lo do 
first, so he set his sights on leading a motorcy- 
cle caravan of his mends through the Soviet 
Union, in 1979. It had never been done, oral 
least not since World War IL for the simple 
reason that the Soviet Union had not permit- 
ted iL So Forbes made the Erst of many calls to 
Armand Hammer, chairman of Occidental Re-, 
trdeum and dram of Leonid Brezhnev, and die 
tiling was done, faster than you can say "The 
capitalists will fight among themselves for the 
privilege of selling ns the rope with which to 
tang them." 

In the Soviet Union the Capitalist Tods 
encountered lies, bugged hotel rooms, body 
odor, slow service t-id paeans to Stalin, accord- 
ing to the book. The one bright spot came when 
their motorcycle tour-pads were j i mm i ed 
open and robbed in Red Square in broad 
daylight whOe they were inside the Kreztig , 
ad mi ri ng the Fabages. Having made a ta&y. 
Forbes's son Bob announced. “I'm afraid 
they've got us fry one egg. Dad." 

Another caQ ro Hammer produced a China 
opening. No one had ever ballooned and mo- 
torcycled there. “Firatness is always fun," Say* 
Forbes, “and it's the one record that do one 
else can break” But in China (he Tools woe 
presented with a dilemma: Their consummate- 
ly gracious hosts would not allow the balloon, 
emblazoned with FORBES MAGAZINE' 
HAILS CHINA-U.S. FRIENDSHIP, to fly 
nntethered. It was all right to float it above a 
stadium, but it had to be tied. 

Forbes, however, contrived to have (be teth- 
er dip, and off be went, to the great consterna- 
tion of Mr. Chen, their guide. He landed wot 
far away, in the middle of an artilleiy base, 
where he was greeted not as an incoming bomb 
but as a welcome curiosity. Lest Mr. Chen be 
sent off to be re-educated. Forbes explained hir 
action in a toast that night to the minister £ 
sport and culture: “It wasn’t to be naughty or 
unfriendly. It was to demonstrate the sport of 
ballooning. A balloon is not meant to be tied 
down. It’s part of the wind. It's a beautiful 
thing to see — if you’re not with tbe security 
section of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.” 

As one who can claim to have helped intro- 
duce the Frisbee to fliina two years after 
President Richard M. Nixon’s first visit; I 
sy mp a thiz e with Forbes about the value of .tins 
land of diplomacy. Balloons are inherently 
friendly. That might not stop the Russians 
from shooting one down, but to most. of. the 
world they are objects of gaiety and pleasure, 
borne gracefully and sflendy by the wind. 
“There isn’t anybody who doesn’t love a bal- 
loon, says one of the Forbes gang drifting 
over the French countryside, waving back at 
t he c hildren who have come out to see. the 
extraordinary thing above. 

The crowds that came out to see the yellow 
sphinx-shaped balloon over Cairo, the 240- 
foot-high balloon replica of Pakistan’s inde- 
pendence monument and the cant 
balloon over Thailand must haw wnwi a 
nation capable of producing a man of jh 

^ fnradly and decent and good- 
rorbes IS tobecongrai nliiiwl f^* mart- a e 
wdl as Tor having produced such a defobtfo! 
book. 


HSEARL 


m 


ght 


NATlSHOOlOCHRlE 


egde □□□□ aaoBia 


12/27/85 


Christopher Buckley, author of "Siear&lgU 
Bamboda" and the forthcoming * The wtut 
House Mess, wrote this review for The WaA 
mgtonPosL 


BRIDGE 


V, 


T«l A»(Y 

OCEANIA 

Aoddowl H 73 

MMY 27 SI 

d-d «*Wl ftHwwv; fr-fafr; Mu 

yreftownrs; wronow ri-dor my. 

FRIDAY’S FORECAST --CHANNEL: MWMroNL FRANKFURT: Sfowara. 
Temp. 8— S M4— 411. lOnOON: Vartatrie. Temp. 7— S (0—41). MADRID: 
rSTtwiF. 0-3 YORK: CtftrfV. Temp. O-VTfcTw). 

PARIS: Rain »artv,faJr later. Temp, is — 4 (40—3?). HOME: Variable, Temp. 
IS— It (it — 52J. TEL AVIV: NA. ZURICH: Oowtfv, Temp. S-2146-Mh 
BANGKOK: Few. Temp. 30 — -186 K HONGKONG; Fair. Temp. 21 — is 

170 — 90). MANILA: Fair. Temp. 77 — 20(11 — 61), SEOUL: NA. SINGAPORE : 

Thunderstorm*. Temp. 2» — 24 (04 — 75). TOKYO: Fowtrr. Temp. 2— -7 
(35 — 1*1- 


By Alan Tmseotr 

O N .the diagramed deal. 
South was given the op- 
portunity to demonstrate his 
considerable skill in card play. 

North's four no-trump bid was 
4 natural, and the response was 

an acceptance that showed one 

ace. • 

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dummy and two top spades 
were cashed; uncovering the 
bad split. It was now tempting 
to cash the ace and king of 
- diamonds, hoping for a good, 
break in that, suit, but (hat 

would have been fatal as the 

cards Bt Instead, South con- 
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to the Music of Time 


• New York Ttma Service 

t . . ' 

' y'ivjiaoOD t California — The rhythm by which 
/- '■ x j^taUabbar has phgtd, wed, for most of 

*v. 'jeges I tea always been a different one. From die 
'Unuog* of to signature skyhook in junior-high 
. --ptSuato days as a mainstream member of the 

- ' •. f qv T ,nggnltpre and onward through this, his 17th 

. / / n BaAketb^ Assodanon, he has been 

: v»Hc of fl generation whose ideal was ta bqw to ao 
.Vf-sngMonrtwBg-haitsOTa. 

v hasn't been easy: Abdul-Jabbar has been 
ooce times than should have been his share. At 
pdas, be has ntfnsed to play for his oommy’s 
c am (1968) as a protest against racism in the 
% .States; his zeugmas oeifcis were scorned by same, 
-■.' 3 of the news media and some fans when be 
"■ ced his ccmverson to Islam and changed his name 
-v" w Atemdor (1971); ha first m a rria ge was tom 
•r\ ns Skills were denigrated by observers who fdt his 
had loQS ago, and his house and most 
. M possessions were destroyed in a fire three years 
-..jst snnsner came another loss, when a California 
s v :fl nrded custody of Us fourth child, Amir, to her 
' % with whom his relationship had recently ended. 

^fietbe struggles, Abdul-Jabbar has made his music 
c js the league's oldest player, yet is still the most 
' ■il spirit of the talent-rich Los. Angeles Lakes. 
- v dW most prolific NBA scorer ever, he leads his 
' ntb a 223-poial average, and only Earvin Johnson 
.; w» more than his 31.4 nrinotes per game. Amid 
’bung and gifted athletes as Johnson, James Worthy, 

- '< Scott and the surprising rookie AC. Green, Abdr&- 
S| f js a primary reason that the defending world 

gooshave exploded to a 24-3 record, the best start in 
' uKhtse’s 38 years of the existence. 

AbdnWabbar’s umquc rhythm has endured is a 
I'seio many and a shock to some. “I amply don’t 
bowhe does it," says Jerry West, the Laker general 
•'~ T[ w ^o retired 11 yean ago at 36. “His legs should 
Sjas timing and quickness should be gone. But he 
■ . iD r mfre the great pass or get his shot when he needs 


to. Sometimes I just sit there and thjnfc, 'He looks like lie 
could go on forever.’ * . 

Although pro basketball has evolved toward faster and 
more, physical play since the tben-Lew Aldndor left 
UCLA in 1969, his style hastft changed much through the 
yews. Grace is stiE the standard; he cares about it. A 
missed ricyhook or inexcusable turnover will elicit aadible 
setf-deprecation, and if heis charged withafonl he feds he 
didn’t commit, he’ll wave his long arms, yank off his 


like a tail child whose favorite toy has been taken away. 

And tbs Los Angeles center is continuing his success 
when he isn’t even supposed to be playing. Before last 
season, he said 1984-8S would be his final one. But last 
Dec. 5 te said be bad agreed to ptay another seastm — at a 
cost of 52.1 million to the Lakers’ relieved owner, Jeny 
Buss. Last summer, Abdrit- Jabbar said he had no plans to 
play after 1985-86, but during training camp he signed a 
contract to play yet another season, ms 18th (no one dse 
has played more than 16), in 198587. At the end of that 
season’s playoffs, he will be 40. 


After that? The rhythm will go on. Eadier tins month he 
signed a five-year MCA Records contract that will allow 
hm to produce at least two albums of new jazz, talent each 
year. He will also oversee the re-release of vintage jazz and 
blues albums produced under various labels decades ago 
and now in MCA's possession. 

The contract provides him with the ideal vehicle for 
making the sometimes traumatic transition into life after 
basketball. As he put it: “The prospect of bang paid to 
travel around the world and to music is just as 
exciting as it has been being paid to play basketball.” 

But why the decision to keep playing? He says it’s a 
compilation of the effects of the forces that have strongly 
influenced his Bfe. For many years he has said he (fid not 
want to be an athlete who played despite diminished 
skills; one of the reasons he has been yes-and-ao about his 
retirement ohms is that be finds he can still play. 

“I could leave without any regrets,” he says. “Tve had a 
remarkable career by any standards. But I feh I was still 
able to do most of the things I always could. It just wasn't 
the right time.” 


Tom Coffins, his longtime agent and confidant, says 
Abdul-Jabbar bets about knowing when that time will be. 
"The No. 1 pressure on him is keeping up his level of play. 
When be retires, he wants you to write, “He probably could 
have played one mare.’ ” 

His team’s success is another cause for fending off 
retirement. Dating to last January, the Lakers have bom 
afibrninvindbile, winning 74 of 88 games, indudmga 15- 


'I could leave without any regrets. 
But I felt I was still able to do most 
of the things I always could. It just 
Wasn’t the right lime.’ 


4 mark in die playoffs. “Work is still work,” says Abdul- 
Jabbar.. "But winning is definitely fun. I’ve enjoyed the 
success a lot mere than Tve enjoyed the records." 

Other than trying to find time to spend with Us chil- 
dren, Abdul- Jabbar says the reconstruction of his expan- 
sive Bd-Air house is his most important obligation. In the 

fire, he lost almost an of his most treasured books, his 
-valuable rugs and art works, as weO as perhaps his fondest 
possession — a lifetime of music, a collection of jazz 
wl bu t T w that numbered in *iie ‘'They didn't get 

very much out," he says softly. “A few odds and ends?’ 
But om of the rnbbte emerged a new discovery, and even a 
reward that has paved the way to his future. 

He found that people cared. For months after the fire, 
Abdul- Jabbar was besieged with gifts of albums. "People 
came oat of nowhere all the time,” be says. “After a game 
we had played in St Louis, these two old ladies came 
running up to the |«»»i bus waving these albums in the air 
and saying, ‘Here, we want you to have these.' That’s all 
they wanted. It was something.” 

The payoff for his future came with the signing of the 
MCA contract; in sports-speak, it's three years guaranteed 
with a two-year option. Abdul- Jabbar will be producing 
albums under his own label, Cranberry. 

It won't be bis first experience with music as a way of 


life and a business. His father was a musician, and in his 
youth Abdul- Jabbar got to know Manhattan's under- 
ground jazz dubs. More recently, be has taken advantage 
of the provisions in his Laker contract that provide him 
with use of The Forum for a specified number of nights 
annually for promoting concerts. Among those whose 
concern he has overseen are Tom Petty and the Heart- 
breakers, Diana Ross, Lionel Richie and Tina Turner. 

The pressures on him now will be greater than in 
promoting those one-night stands. “You’ve got to produce 
in both places," says Collins, who negotiated the contract 
with MCA “If he can produce on the same level as he does 
in basketball, there is the possibility that Cranberry can 
become a major record company." 

MCA was drawn to Abdul- Jabbar not only because of 
his weD-chromded lore of jazz, but also because of the 
way be has, in recent years, towered the barriers he pm up 


“I think they're hoping that he’ll be a magne t that will 

draw young artists to MCA that might otherwise go to 
CBS or any other company," says Collins — the kid from 
Detroit or the Bronx who thinks, TVon’i anybody listen to 
me? His style will be. Hey, we need you.'" 

Even before his contract was signed, Abdul- Jabbar was 
at work in his new vocation. After a recent game against 
Dallas, he slipped into Hop Sing’s, a popular dub in 
Marina Del Rey, to listen to a group that had sent him a 
tape. The reason: “Just to let than know I was there." 

Besides the chance to develop new talent, Abdul-Jabbar 
sees an opportunity to help correct some of the injustices 
be believes jazz museums have endured for decades: 

“In this country, jazz musicians weren't considered 
artists, just entertainers. Few people appreciated their 
artistry. Part of that has to do with the attitudes of this 
coon try. Jazz has its roots in the Afro-American culture, 
which as a group has been suppressed for long time. 

“It's sad that a lot of American artists were forced to 
live in Europe because of the lack of appreciation and 
racism that existed over here. Herbie Hancock, Dexter 
Gordon and a lot of others lived there for long periods. 
Some of them even died over there. But they had to go. 

"Jazz dubs even have a different ambiance in other 
parts of the world. Once when I was in Paris, this guy 
grabbed me and said he just had to take me to this clulx 




Th. Nan fork Trnei 

Rareem Abdul-Jabbar: The rhythm will go on. 

We goi lbere and there was no band, but the jukebox was 
fantastic 1 . It had everything you could ever want and (he 
people were loving it." 

His eyes had brightened, his expression had changed. 
“I've known places like that all my life," he said. "Jazz is 
confined to small cabarets ova Here. Getting the music 
before the public in the right manna is what 1 hope to do.” 

The beat to which Abdul-Jabbar plays basketball win 
assuredly end sometime soon. But it seems that all his 
success and adversity have helped him find a way to make 
the music — his music — far longer. 


town by 25, Knicks 
ally to Beat Celtics 


__^pSed ^ 0*r Staff From D'apadm 

YORK. — On Christmas 
• the Miracle on 34th Street 
" id a Wocfc south. 

’ i my four years here, this is by 
- he greatest comeback,” said 

-h Rubk Brown said after bis 

^ NBA FOCUS 

Yak Knicks overcame a 25- 
■J/l third-quarter deficit Wedncs- 
^7 b bett the Boston Celtics 1 13- 
-'7 n dot&te overtime, 
he. soul of Madison Square 
. .".dm. backed a very young 
he said, “and turned the 
Attorn m our favor.” The lat- 
f Patrick Ewing bad a lot to do 
_ it, too. The rookie center led 
TJiarge with a career-high 32 
B, mefading 18 in the fourth 
' ter, and pulled in 1 1 rebounds. 

Ewing’s performance. Brown 
. “‘“It was so easy, so effortless. 
'.js staggering.” 

“ Ye lost because there was a lid 
~je basket m OT,” said the Cd- 
“ 7 rich, K.G Jones. "We couldn't 
-.7 ' get defensive rebounds in the 
; , ttd overtime, and Ewing took it 
’ > Ewing hosted os tip. 

: the day’s only other game, 
'land brat the Los Angeles 
•■.pen, 121-107. 

-‘ew York won its their third 
. gilt, matching its longest streak 




of the season. Boston, which had 
not lost to the Knicfat since the 
1984 playoffs, fell for the fifth time 

in rimp garm-y 

“It proved we have heart,” Ew- 
ing said. “I told you before — we’re 
not losers, we were just losing.” 

Boston led, 23-14, after one 
quarter and by 46-32 at halftime 
With 6:39 left in the third quarter. 

New York had scored but a tingle 
point in the period, and the Celtics 
led, 58-33. 

“When we were down 25," Ew- 
ing said, “we called time out and 
said, ’Let’s everybody hold his man 
scoreless for two minutes.' Three 
minutes lata, we were down only 
13. At the end of the quarter it was 
10 and 1 knew we had a chance." 

The Knicks dosed to 63-53 by 
the end of the period, and with 2: 23 
Ml in regulation time,' Ewing — 
who had scared 12 straight points 
— pulled them within two by sink- 
ing a hook shot- Rory Sparrow tied 
the game at 86 with 34 seconds left 

Kmck starters Louis Orr and Pal 
Cummings fooled out in die first 
overtime. But with 1:37 left. New 
York raffle d from a 5-point deficit 
to tie it 97-97 on Trent Tucker's 3- 
pointer with 1 1 seconds remaining. 

New York oulscored Boston, 16-3, . _ ^ __ , , . „ . . t** *■“**“« *»* 

in the first 4:34 of the second ovw- Patrick Ewing, whose career-high 32 points paced New 
time. (UPhKYT.AP) Yodc’s victory, taking the bafl past Robert Parish of Boston. 


Football 


uiRegakr^Season N ation al Football League Leaders 


UmiCAJ* CONFERENCE 
TEAM OFFINSS 



Yard* 

Radi 

Fan 

-■»•* - 

4535 

1445 

4870 

iralf 

5900 

2103 

3717 


SIM 

2312 

3504 

H 

SKI 

1729 

4114 

Eflotetf 

54*9 

2331 

3140 

•r 

sen 

1151 

3445 

. w 

5408 

2242 

3146 

ami 

ns 

2177 

3172 

-to 

5087 

1444 

3343 

MMU* 

5006 

209 

2547 

Mm 

4921 

2285 

2834 

m CWy 

4077 

1484 

3391 

. too 

4642 

1570 

3082 

to 

4595 

1411 

2904 

TEAM DEFENSE 



Tara* 

Rom 

Paxs 

n 

4401 

1405 

2990 

Durtfi 

4459 

1874 

2783 

Fwiliml 

4714 

1455 

3059 


4773 WM 
4MB 1BS1 
5M0 107 

5179 1TO 
5540 2442 

SSn 2145 
SUB 2149 
5 m 7999 
5747 2254 

BUS 2814 
4245 1973 


INDIVIDUAL 


Basketball 


. Caster* conference 

"i"*c DMaion 

w L Pet. GB 

" ll ? JSO — 

II 12 -400 4 

"WHO !« 12 471 5 

B « M\ Tti 
ToM ‘ TO T9 J45 ITW 

Control otvtsfan 

T9 T2 ATS — 

. " 15 14 517 3 

”, U 14 JOB 314 

“d TJ 14 Am 5 

® 11 30 J55 I 

.* « 19 JM » 

WaSTWN CONFERENCE 
MUmd DfvtsiMi 

* II 11 421 — 

0,1 11 II ACT — 

«B0D 17 U 3U I 

' 14 14 -533 TVS 

6 » 14 .481 A 

"woo s 19 jn tv, 

Pucmc DMilon 

*“«« 24 3 m — 

11 14 .543 8W 

■ 11 H J79 14 

r. 10 17 JN U 

TO T9 .345 1$ 
***“• 10 21 30 W 

W OwNfayf IWfHt 
" » 31 W W 11 2-104 

M » I? a If I*— TIT 
» a-M M 32. Soorrtw MS 44 22; 
W7-Zn5-1t2P.PttrUiB-lSB.102A.lt*- 

* 75 iPoritft wj, m.v. iS tBanvg. 
I- AM tl«; Bos. 24 (AlnM M, M.Y. 27 
^Jl. 

*** 33 27 29 JM — 167 

2 30 41 It 2F-121 

WwioM Wli 04 2L Tnonwun 0-13 GO 
1 **n*on 14-33 34 31, Nbcon 0-15 4* 19. 
■ Wc LA. 40 {M. Johnson 101, Part. 59 
WWIBOwUlD.AMili: ULZUNlMH) 
IPouan 91. 

lege Results 

TOURNAMENT 
Owwihw do Ctonlc 
"wNBp: N. Carolina ». «& NavRda- 
•Hi 71 

■Mm: Slontart n, ChamkKKSt 0 


J*f» 

Ontlond 

Seottlo 

□amiw 

Buffalo 

indtanaaoiH 

KunsaS Cl hr 

CkKfiMOfl 

Miami 

Houston 

Son DIMM 


ATT COM YDS TD INT 
O'Brien. J«ts 480 377 3888 35 8 

Eskimo, On 431 351 3443 27 12 

Pouts. SJL 430 254 3438 27 20 

Marfaw. Mte. 547 334 4137 30 21 

Kednrv. KLC 338 181 2534 17 9 

Krfaa. Sbo. 532 3S5 3403 37 30 

Malone. PM. 233 117 1438 13 7 

Etwov. 0«v 405 337 3891 23 33 

Koxar. 0«V. 248 124 1570 8 7 

Moon, Hau. 377 200 2709 IS 19 

Eason, KLE. 299 140 2154 11 17 

POML I nO- 393 199 2414 14 IS 

Wilson. R aiders 318 HQ 2408 14 21 

MHtifson, Buff. m 113 1 435 4 M 

Rwun 

ATT YDS AIMS LG TD 
Allen, R aWom 380 ITS? 44 41 IT 

McNeil. Jets 294 1331 4J 49 3 

CJameS. N.E_ 243 1237 47 45 5 

Mart. Clav. 222 1104 &0 41 7 

Wttmer. Sea. 2*1 1094 ZB 38 0 

R*cstws 

NO YDS A VC LG TD 
James. SU.IRBJ 84 TOO 11.9 67 4 

ChrMensMi. Raldrs BJ 987 120 40 4 

WooMolK. HwJ.tRBI 80 814 102 80 4 

Lvaenr, So a. 79 I2B7 1*3 43 4 

Shuler. J«S 74 B7?lt4 35 7 

5oHm CToudidowiNl 

TD Dunn Rec Ret Ptt 
Unn. Pitt. IS 1 12 2 90 

Allan. Balder* 14 11 3 0 04 


tOCkaf* 

HO 

Yauna, Clow. 
BentlvY. Ind. 
Dreiwray. Hou. 
VJohnsorv Dan. 
Manta, On. 

NATIONAL 

TEAM 

San Frandscn 

Warm 

CWcaoo 

Dallas 

Oman Bov 

Woshlnaton 

PWlodototita 

Mhinmoto 

St. Louis 

Atlanta 

Tampa Bov 

Rams 


Roturmrs 

YDS AV8 LG TD 
35 89B 257 43 0 

27 674 2SA 48 0 

at 441 347 50 0 

30 740 2*7 29 0 

40 1104 22j0 45 0 

CONFERENCE 
OFFENSE 

Yorts Ram Pass 
5930 2332 3480 

5884 2*51 3433 

5837 2761 3074 

5402 1741 3841 

5371 3008 7143 

5338 2523 3SU 

5216 1430 3584 

5151 1514 343S 

5084 1974 3112 

4940 2444 2*94 

4764 1644 3122 

4530 2057 MO 


Son Francteto 

5191 

1483 

sAe 

SI- UMb 

5381 

2378 

3003 

Mlnnuota 

5444 

2223 

3241 

Detroit 

5991 

2485 

3904 

Dal kb 

5408 

1853 

3755 

Now Orto*m* 

5815 

2142 

3453 

Atlanta 

5850 

2052 

1798 

Tamm Bay 

4108 

2430 

3478 


INDIVIDUAL 


ATT 

Monkm. S.F. 
McMahon. QiL 
Brack. Roms 
D.Wtdlc, DaL 
Lomax, SM- 
SJmms, dams 
HlPPie, DoL 
DrfBro. TJL 
Dlcksv, tLB- 
JaworskJ, PfilL 
Kramer, Mkm. 
□.Wilson. N.O. 
Thshmonrv Utah. 


YDS TD INT 
303 3453 27 13 
178 2392 15 11 
218 2658 14 13 
167 3157 21 17 
265 3214 18 12 
275 3829 23 20 
323 2952 17 10 
197 24M IV 10 
172 2304 15 17 
255 3450 17 20 
277 3522 19 26 
145 1043 11 15 
10 1774 0 M 


Nov, Orleans 

4479 

1683 

2798 


Detroit 

4476 

1538 

2930 

A 


TEAM DEFENSE 


RKMKk AIL 


Yonb 

ROM 

Pate 

Payton. ChL 

CMeaoo 

4135 

1319 

2016 

Morris. G tents 

Giants 

4320 

1482 

2*38 

Damn. DaL 

wtastitoaton 

4480 

1734 

2744 

Winter, TA 

Ram 

4448 

1504 

3042 


PMkxtoiPiUa 

5135 

2205 

2930 


Gram Bay 

sm 

2047 

3136 

Crate, Lf.lAO) 


Liam. PHt 
Allan. RoWars 14 11 3 0 04 

Davanport, Mla. 13 11 2 0 7B 

Turner, 5«a. M 0 T3 0 78 

Brooks. Cln 13 7 5 0 72 

Scditm nocking) 

PAT FG 

Anderson. Pin. «-40 33-42 52 139 

Loativ. Jets 4^45 26^4 55 121 

Bn» cn-Qn. 4« 3M3 53 120 

Rmmlz. Mla. 50-S2 22^7 40 lie 

Franklin. N.E. 4W1 2M8 50 112 

Interceptions 

N# YDS Lo TD 
Uarts.K.C 0 99 M 0 

Daniel, ind- B S » 0 

MBrton, N.E. 7 109 «I 0 

Griffin. Oil 7 114 33 1 

Cherry, ICC- 7 87 47 l 


11 2 0 7B 
0 T3 0 78 


TlpPOlf. N.E. 
GasHnoau, J*f» 
Green. Sea. 
Mecklenburg. Den. 
Picker. Raw. 


Morris, Otonta 
Grata. SJ=. 
Dickerson. Rams 
Pavton, CtiL 
Quick. PML 


Buffer. OH. 
Andersen. 9L0. 
Murray, Dei 
Lonstcrti, Ram* 
MclHxMon, PML 


NO 

YARDS 

LONG AVO 

Mar*. Intt 

70 3884 

48 

4SJ9 

Robv. Mia. 

59 2574 

43 

417 

Camarilla. N.E. 

92 3953 

7S 

43J) 

Mebtofenka, !LD. 

40 2081 

47 

424 

Me Inal iv. Cln. 

57 2410 

44 

<23 

Foot Returners 




HO 

YDS AVG 

US 

TD 

Frvor, Nf. 

37 520 

14,1 

OS 

2 

Lteo*. Pitt. 

34 437 

12.1 

71 

2 

Walker, Rofaera 

42 493 

112 

32 

0 

Martin, incL 

40 443 

11.1 

TO 

t 

SfcoraL 3«a- 

31 312 

10.1 

32 

0 


Defensive end Bkhard Dent 

With 17, the NFL leader in souks. 

European Soccer 

ENGLISH FIRST DIVISION 
Leicester 2, Aston Villa 1 
Tottenham 1, West Ham 0 
Sheffield Wednesday 2, NevrtSWtte 3 
BJmUnanoni a Nottingham Fores! l 
Coventry a iRMrtch 1 
Everien % Manehssier United 1 
Manchester CMv I. Liverpool D 
Oxford X Southampton 0 
West Bromwich 1, Luton 2 
Points: Mandwttgr U. 49! Liverpool 45: 
westMam.O>eb«j44,-Everfaft«3:Shel.wed. 
42;Araenai38.‘Lufon37; roffonhaiivNewosp 
H« 34 j Not pot. 33: wattord 22; Southampton, 
QJ», Rangers 27; Mandissier aty, Loteeder 
35,- CMVHfY Ml Oxford 23; ADM Villa 22; 
lpswWil5;Blrffllnoiiami7;W.Bnariiifchl1. . 


DetiLCM. 
MarsnalL Gionts 
Mortbrr. Wash. 
Mona WMh. 
G.Brawa Pnlt 


37 501 m 

BO 

1 

. 24 283 119 

31 

0 

38 403 1M 

43 

1 

26 272 1M 

28. 

0 

43 JM 15 

54 

0 

Rotoraen 



YDS AVO 

Lfi TD 


Norseth Sparks Blue All-Stars Past Gray, 27-20 


COmpUtd by Our Staff From Dispatches 

MONTGOMERY. Alabama — 
Kansas quarterback Michael Nor- 
seth, who says he has always en- 
joyed, watching the pass-happy at- 
tack of Purdue, got a chance to try 
a verson of it in the 48th annual 
Ku e-Gray college football all-star 
game here Wednesday. 

Norseth, directing the Blue of- 
fense, which was coached by Pur- 
due’s Leon Burtnett, passed for 228 
yards and the winning touchdown 
m a 27-20 victory over the Gray. 

“We came out throwing and 
that's the kind of offense I like," 
said Norseth, who passed for 168 
yards in the first half. 

Both offenses exploded earfy, 
and at halftime the Gray held a 20- 
19 lead. But Norseth put the Blue 
on top for good midway through 
the third quarter with a 16-yard TD 
to Purdue wide recover Steve Grif- 
fin followed by a two-point conver- 
sion pass to Greg Baty of Stanford. 

' “Westarted out throwing a lot to- 
the bacfcs, but after the Gray ad- 
justed Michael did a great job of 
hitting the wideouls,” said Burt- 
nett. “It’s hard to adopt m a few 
days to an offense you’ve never 
seen, but he did amazingly welL” 

But that’s just what more than 
200 pro scouts were looking for 
when they came to Montgomery 
for practice week. Running back 
Allen Pinietl called it “enhancing 
our NFL draft position." 

“We were determined to win this 
one," said Pinkett, Notre Dame's 
all-time leading rusher. “The North 
bad lost the last three games." 

Norseth, who shared time at 
quarterback with Indiana’s Steve 


Bradley, was named (he game’s 
most valuable player. Pinkett, with 
two touchdowns before halftime, 
was named the Blue's top offensive 
player. Syracuse place-kicker Don 
McAulay kicked two field goals in 


the first half for the winners’ other 
fust-half points. 

Ken Korda cr of Tulane gave the 
Gray the early lead with a pair of 
touchdown passes in the first quar- 
ter. Florida running back Neal An- 


Navy’s Napoleon McCaHum (tackled above by Venae Qem of 


derson scored the other Gray 
touchdown in the second quarter. 

The Gray drove deep into Blue 
territory twice in the fourth quar- 
ter, but the defense held both times. 
Willie Pless of Kansas, who recov- 
ered a fumble to kill one of the 
threats, was the winners' top defen- 
sive player. Napoleon McCaDum 
of Navy, gaining a game-high 106 
yards on 14 carries, was named the 
Gray’s outstanding offensive play- 
er and Mississippi State's Aaron 
Pearson its defensive sumdouL 

The Blue scored first on McAu- 
lay*s 41-yard field goal, set up by a 
56-yard drive in which Norseth 
completed four passes for 44 yards. 

Alter Louisiana Tech's Douglas 
Landry intercepted a pass, the 
Gray drove 62 yards for a score. 
McCall urn's 39-yard run set up the 
TD, Karcber hitting Kent Hagpod 
of South .Carolina on a 19-varder. 
Rice's James Hamrick kicked the 
extra point for a 7-3 lead. 

The Blue’s Erroll Tucker fum- 
bled the- ensuing kickoff and Pear- 
son recovered at the 15-yard line. 
Karcber connected with Anderson 
on a 15-yard touchdown pass and 
Hamrick added the extra point. 

McAulay's 25-yard field made it 
14*6, and the Blue further nar- 
rowed the gap when Pinkett capped 
a 66-yard dirve with a 1-yard scor- 
ing run. A two-point conversion tty 
failed. 

The Blue went ahead when Brad- 
ley directed a 60-yard scoring drive 
that ended with Pinkett taking the 
ball in from the 1. McAulay's extra 
'point gave the Blue a 19-14 lead. 

The Gray regained the lead on 
Anderson's ]-j£ird run with 3:50 
left in the half. (AP, UP I) 


VANTAGE POINT/ Ira Berkow 


A Few of This Year’s Sporting Santas 


ATT YDS AVO LO TD 
RIM* AIL 397 1719 4J 50 10 

'Payton. ChL 324 issi 4S 40 9 

Morris. Giants 294 1334 45 45 2T 

Dorutt, DaL 305 1307 43 <0 7 

wilder, T JS. 345 1308 34 28 10 

Racafvart 

NO YDS AVG LO TD 
Crafa. SJt.lHB) 92 1814 11A 73 6 

Monk, Wash. 91 1224 1Z5 53 2 

MIL DoL 74 1113 liO 53 7 

Quick. PtllL 73 1247 17.1 99 11 

Clark, Wall 72 926 12J) 55 5 

Scoring rrncMMNl 

TD RUB Roc Rol Pt» 
Morris. Gtanta 21 21 8 8 124 

Crate. 5F. is 9 6 0 98 

Dickerson. Rams 12 12 0 0 72 

Pavton, CtiL 11 9 2 0 64 

Quick, pun. 11 0 11 0 44 

Storing uockMi 

PAT FG Lg Pto 
Buffer. CHI. J1"5I 31-77 44 144 

AMlenon. NO. 27.29 3V2S 55 T3Q 

Murray, Del 3103 2A-31 SI 109 

London!. Rams 38-39 23-29 52 104 

McFOddOn. PML 29-29 25-30 52 104 

iBhrawfioM 

No Yds La TD 
Walk DaL' 9 31 19 0 

Castillo. TJL 7 49 20 0 

Frarfer.CW. 4 H» » l 

Patterson, Giants 6 68 2# 1 

Grain. Ram* * 84 41 l 

Sacra 

NO 

Deni CM- ™ 

MarsnalL Gionto l£5 

Manlor, Wash. 1M 

Mona wash. 

G.Brown. PML 

Ponton 

NO YARDS LONG AVG 
DomoUV.AU 59 25M 4* A4 

Hatcher, RssmS 87 3761 <7 4M 

Landeta Giants n 3472 44 *1? 

Coleman. Minn. 47 3B47 42 CA 

Hansen. NLO. B9 3743 58 413 

runt RstOMM 

HO YDS AVG LG TD 
EllarrL Ram 37 501 m 80 1 

JAMttL SLL. .36 » 189 31 » 

MandteV, Del. 30 4M 1M *3 1 

Jmklns. Wash 26 272 1M » . J 

Coaoor, PhtL 43 JM M 54 0 


New York Timet Service 

NEW YORK — It's official: 
Santa Claus exists, at least for a 
resounding majority of kids in the 
United States — as if it needed 
affirmation at alL But, just check- 
ing, The New York Times conduct- 
ed a highly sophisticated telephone 


U.S. Coach 
Cries Foul 
At Referee 

The Associated Press 

PITTSBURGH — Allied 
chmrnniness between a basket- 
ball referee and the Canisuis 
coach during a game has Du- 
quesne University Coach Jim 
Satahn crying fcaiL 

Satalin said be plans to re- 
port referee George Clark's be- 
havior to the Eastern Collegiate 
Athletic Conference. *Tm go- 
ing to report blow by blow what 
happened," Satalin sahL “He 
made a mockery of the whole 
game. If we ever see him again, 
PH take my team off the court 
Td like to make sure he never 


Bnswn. R0fti4 

28 918 

328 

91 

3 

GotULChL 

22 577 

26J2 

99 

1 

Mootoa. S.P. 

28 717 

25* 

95 

1 

fVwmes, Mbm. 

53 1345 

MU 

BO 

0 

Jenkins, Was*. 

41 1018 

nt 

95 

0 


Satalin said Oazk refused to 
shake ins hand More Du- 
quesne’s 80-62 loss at Canisuis 
cm Saturday and kept telling 
him, “Take that, Atlantic 10" as 
the Dukes fell well behind. He 
said Clark spent much of the 
game swapping jokes with Nick 
Macardiuk, the Canisius coach. 

Hark was dismissed from the 
Atlantic 10’s pool of officials 

ference commissioner Charlie 
Theckas, Satalin said. 

Tve never been treated like 
that before," said Satalin. “Af- 
ter he wouldn 't shake my hand, 
1 idd them [his assistant coach- 
es], ‘We’re In deep trouble.' ” 
The loss was Duquesne’s first 
in six games this year. 


poll of children between the ages of 
3 and 10 and learned that 87 per- 
cent believe. 

There was wide difference of 
opinion, however, concerning de- 
tails of age (“20," “25," “he’s an old 
man”), looks, residence, eating 
habits of bis reindeer and so forth. 

Regardless, the bottom line was 
that Santa, if nothing else, brings 
pleasure. With that, the vision of 
some people in sports as Santa 
Claus comes to mind. 

One who gave us great delight 
this past year fit the descripton of 
Santa Claus as provided in the poll 
by 6-ysn>old Allison Calagna of 
Pearland, Texas. “He likes kids. He 
likes the color red.” That’s Pete 
Rose, naturally, of (he Cincinnati 
Reds. 

Last September, after a 23-year 
pursuit. Rose broke Ty Cobb's ma- 
jor-league record for most base hits 
m a career. Much of the nation 
followed and cheered, many of 
ihem children. 

Memory recalls an evening with 
Rose seated in a fast-food restau- 
rant in CmcumatL A girl of about 
10 shyly approached him. Her 
movements wise uncertain and she 
wore a leg brace. She held out a 
paper napkin and pen for his auto- 
graph. 

“Should I sign?" Rose asked a 
companion. 

“Oh, I think so,** said the com- 
panion. “She’s so pretty." 

“What's your name?" asked 
Rose. 

The gurTs mother, beside her, 
“Monica." 


“They name Santo Monica after 
you?” 

The girl shook her head, no. 

“They should have," said Rose, 

*Th?giri birher* lip with happi- 
ness. 

No one has bounded onto the 
sports scene in recent years and 
given so much joy to so many so 
quickly as William (The Refrigera- 
tor) Perry, the Chicago Bears’ all- 
purpose 308-pound (139.7-kiio- 
gram) rookie. He plays defense, he 
plays offense, he eats hamburgers 


at a staggering rate. He also fits 
rather dosely one of the descrip- 
tions of Santa Claus, according io 
one of the poll’s respondents, an 8- 
year-old giri from Missoula, Mon- 
tana. "He's a big fat man in a red 
suit,” said Melissa OdelL 
Who knows — if Santa ever 
shaved, we might see that be has, 
like Perry, a gap in his teeth. 

Almost every week Perry does 
something that brings a lilt to the 
heart: diving for a touchdown, 

f I told him, "Wil- 
liam, don’t look 
back. Keep run- 
ning. Yon could 
have made it.” He 
said, "Next time.” * 

catching a pass for one, blocking 
for one, trying to drag one of his 
r unning backs over the goal line 
like a helpful Saint Bernard. Last 
week he scooped up a fumble 
against the Detroit Lions and ram- 
bled hi the open field 59 ponderous 
but high-stepping yards. It was a 
little like observing Santa trying to 
wriggle down a chimney. 

“I was watching on television," 
said Perry's wife, Sherry, “and I got 
kinds hysterical there. It tickled 
me. it was wonderfuL" In a quick 
but unofficial poll, it seemed that 
much of the nation, watching the 

r ie live or later chi replays, had 
same reaction. Perry was tack- 
led from behind just 15 yards short 
of a touchdown, his uniform in 
disarray. 

“He kepi looking back to see 
who was behind him,” said his wife. 
“It was like, ‘Get me if you can.’ 
When he came home that nigh! I 
told him, 'William, don't look bade 
Keep running. You could have 
made it’ He said, “Next time.' ” 

A man who brought joy — and 
two world championships — to 
New York is the former coach of 
the Knicks, and now a consultant 


to the team. Red Holzman (remem- 
ber, Santa likes red.) Holzman re- 
cently had a problem with his own 
chimney. It was damaged in an 
electrical storm, as was the rest of 
his roof and upper part of his house 
on Long Island. Not only that, but 
one or his two sleighs, a sleek vehi- N 
de with substantial reindeer power, 
was stolen. 

“People were telling me how 
lucky I was, that it could have been 
worse," said Holzman. “They said I 
was lucky that 1 wasn't sleeping 
when the bouse bunted, and that 
only pan of the home burned. And 
they said I was lucky that the car 
wasn’t a new car. and that I still 
had one car left. 

"It was comforting. I never knew 
how lucky 1 was until half my house 
burned down and my car was sto- 
len.” 

Manure Bol, at 7-foot-6 , .e (2JL3 
meters) and weighing around 200 
pounds, may be a Utile longer and 
leaner than the conventional no- 
tion of San La Claus, but the Wash- 
ington Bullet center does conform 
to another description of Sl Nick. 

It is the one given by an 8-year-old 
from Gray, Louisiana. 

Santa, says the youngster, is fa- 
miliar with both sides of the world. 
That's how he always delivers pre- 
sents at night. “On one side of (he 
world it’s nighttime, and be does 
that side. Then it's day, and he does 
the other side ” 

Rookie Bol, whose shot-blocking 
and surprisi n g dexterity has de- 
lighted many, is from the Sudan. 
He is the tallest player in the histo- 
ry of the National Basketball Asso- 
ciation. It was recently reported 
that Bol's driver’s license sized him 
up as 5-foot-l Rumor had it that 
Bol had been measured for the li- 
cense while sitting down. It turns 
out it is was all nothing but a ru- 
mor. 

“Manure doesn't have a driver's 
license," said Mark Pray of the Bul- 
let public-relations office. “Manute 
doesn't even know how to drive a 
car." So it was a tall story after all, 
unlike, according to good author- 
ity, the Santa legend. 






Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, DECEMBER 27, 1985 


OBSERVER 


Get a Slice of 'Star Wars 9 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — Now at last 
“Star Wars” can be yours. 
Yon bave read about “Star 
Wars” in the newspapers. 

You have heard about "Star 
Ware” on television. 

You have seen famous men rave 
about what “Star Wars” has meant 
to them. 

Here is a typical letter from Mr. 
C K.. president of a large muni- 
tions plant in one of the most fam- 
ous states of the Union: 

“After I was indicted on i 
of being a cheap chisel er just 
cause a few bookkeeping errors re- 
sulted in a S 35-miHion overcharge 
to the Pentagon," he writes, “it 
looked like I would have to go to 
die end of the line for the big mili- 
tary contracts. Then I saw Prcsi- 
dcot Reagan selling ‘Star Wars' on 
TV, and today I have a new lease 
on life.” 

□ 


Yes, friends, Mr. G K. not only 
has a new lease on life, be also has 
his daws into one sweet and juicy 
deal that calls for bouncing a laser 
beam off an Earth-orbiting target 
of army surplus uniforms. 

Does that sound like fun? You 
bet it does. But C. K. didn’t go into 
“Star Wars” just for fun alone. No, 
ma’am. He also gets a federal guar- 
antee that no matter bow much 
money “Star Wars” pays him, he 
will not be required to pay any tax 
whatever on that money until “Star 
Ware” is absolutely and entirely 
completed, just like any other de- 
fense contractor. 

All right, I know what you're 
hearing. Mother. Right there in 
your paries' at this very moment. 
Dad is raising a lot of questions, 
isn't he? 

Dad is saying, “I don’t see why I 
have to put out a lot of dough for 
’Star Wars’ when we still haven’t 
used up that whole case of Penina 
that door-to-door Mlwwnan talked 
me into back in 1947 ” 

But Dad, have you ever asked 
yourself this question? Isn't Presi- 
dent Reagan a dad? 

Isn't Secretary of Defense Wein- 
berger a dad? 

□ 


you 

what Mr. M. J„ a former doubling 
dad of Moline, Illinois, writes to 
the makers of “Star Wars**: 

“I was formerly a doubting dad 
and then 1 saw a little girl with a 
crayon, cm TV illustrate what fun it 
would be to have 'Star Wars.’ Next 
day I called the ‘Star Wars’ sales- 
man and told him I'd been a fool 
because I wanted to keep my mon- 
ey to send my daughter to college, 
but now 1 wanted them to take it 
for *Siar Wars.”’ 

Yes, folks, Mr. M.J., former 
doubting dad, got his priorities 
straight at last. That’s why (he 
money for his daughter’s college 
education has already been deliv- 
ered to (he crack scientific labora- 
tories of a famous munitions plant 
in California where cheap chiseters 
will soon be providing hilariously 
amusing alibis for spending it on 
Caribbean vacations. 

Now I hear a skeptic out there 
saying, “Sure, we all want to pro- 
vide cheap chisel ers with Caribbe- 
an vacations, but just exactly what 
is this ‘Star Wars’ that’s going to 
make their chiseling so fruitful?” 

Well, Mr. Skeptic, I suppose 
you’ve heard of the H-bomb and 
the kind of people who’ve got their 
hands on it and what they’d like to 
do if they could get away with it. 


Are you going to say all those 
dads are wrong? Do you wantto be 
the only dad who says we don’t 
need “Star Ware” as long as the 
Peruna holds out? 


Skeptic. They’d like to bounce 
those bombs right off America's 
noodle. Thank heaven for “Star 
Wars.” Do you know what you get 
with “Star Wars, 1 " Mr. Skeptic? A 
big umbrella all over America. 

When those people, and I men- 
tion no names, aim their bombs at 
our noodle, “Star Wars” catches 
them between the umbrella ribs 
and bounces them right back where 
they came from. If you laughed last 
time you saw a hog try to walk on 
ice, wait until you see “Star Ware” 
bounce those bombs back to the 
workers’ paradise. 

So for thousands of laughs, 
phone the White House, Pentagon 
or Congress right away and tell 
them you want “Star Wars,” or 
send a certified check or money 
order immediately to the cheap 
chiseler of your choice. 

Remember, for a daringly differ- 
ent way to put life into that tired 
old military industrial complex — 
“Star Wars”! 


Hew York Tones Senior 


French Radio Jazzman Is TV Pioneer 


By Katherine Knocr 

International Herald Tribune 

P I ARK —By all the rules of sfick modem 
broadcasting, Jean-Chrisiophe Averty 
. should not be on the air. He Bsps, and he talks 
a mile a minute But be puts on one of the 
best jazz/tnusic hall programs on French ra- 
dio, drawing on his encyclopedic knowledge 
of the music and on Us collection of 30,000 
records. 

What a newcomer to the radio program 
may not know is that Averty has beat one of 
France's most innovative television directors, 
though now shunned by French TV, hugely 
because he frightens people. 

He has won scores of prizes, including an 
Emmy award in the United States, has been 
awarded the Legion of Honor and has direct- 
ed many acclaimed artistic productions and 
variety shows for French and American tele- 
vision. But since the breakup in 1975 of tire 
French radio-television network ORTF into 
separate, semi-autonomous channels, work 
by this pioneer in audiovisual technique has 
only rarely been seen on the small screen. His 
proposals are repeatedly turned down, and 
often the programs be does film are delayed 
several years before bring aired. 

Averty. 37, has shocked and scared people 
for 20 years with his unusual programs and 
because he speaks up against what, be consid- 
ers the mass leveling of television — and 
probably also because, according to some 
people, he is not easy to work. with. 

The conservative French press again and 
again h as complai ned that his humor is sick 
and his work too strange. Other critics, who 
tend to call him r enfant terrible and the “im- 
penitent genius,” have praised bis imagina- 
tion and the breakthroughs he made; using 
television in ways it had not been used before, 
with techniques — split screens, surrealistic 
collages, the muting of media — that have 
since become routine, though in a tamer way. 

“Twenty years after his thundering and 
scandalous debut, Jean-Christopbe Averty 
remains the television man who surprises,” 
the newspaper Le Matin said in 1953. “He 
continues, for better or worse, to write the 
legend of video.” 

He is famous for, among other things, Ms 
shows with Yves Montand (the last one in 
1980) and his staging of the works of the 
French writer Alfred Jarry — not every cate's 
cup of tea — with the help of sets drawn from 
the works rtf Marcel Duchamp. He is infa- 
mous for “Raisins Verts” (Sour Grapes), the 
variety program that launched Mm as a scan- 
dalous celebrity in 1963: On. it were scenes of 
babies run through shredders, people shot- 
gunned in phone booths, and dancing coffins. 
Averty has also been described as a tyrant on 
the set, though he leavens his style with a 
good deal of humor. 

When he entered television as an assistant 
after the war, “I wanted to put into a produc- 
tion the things that I loved, the values I 



than by cncour- 
. pging ~the kind of thing Averty was doing. 

ORTF was “an instrument of national cre- 
ation that was not perfect, and that did not 
only create great men, but that allowed me to 
stay out of commercial paths, of mercantile 
alibis, of ratings," he said. “My work interest- 
ed only a email part of the population, but, 
still, it interested a part of the population that 
was highly respectable, that is, the intellectu- 
als, or people who were curious. I am better 
known abroad both as a director and as a 
specialist in jazz than I am in France." 


Not surprisingly, Averty has strong op in- 
take French 


ions about the powers that make 

television and about the controversy over the 
heavy use of programs such as “Dallas” and 
“Dynasty.” But rather than castigating all 
American influence and imports, as same 
French political figures have done, Averty 
says the French generally import the worst of 
American culture, forgetting where the Unit- 
ed States is really strong. 


J—vPtetr* Forfbad 

Jean-Christophe Averty: A casualty. 


believed in as an adolescent. Then came the 
first generations of electronics, winch permit- 
ted us to do what all the Surrealists were 
doing — that is, people like Duchamp, people 
like Man Ray, people like Picasso. 

“1 sought to make audiovisual collages, to 
translate the nonexistent, what was hang in g 
around in our heads ... or to allow great 
artists that did not have the chance in their 
lifetimes —let's say Laptrtamont. Raymond 
Roussel, Jarry — the opportunity to be 
staged the way they wanted to be, the way 
they would have hoped for, had they had the 
resources.” 


He Added: “Suddenly, on a television 
screen, images appeared that did not conform 
to the norms of realism. It was closer to 
printing, a form of television d plat, that 
shocked a lot in the beginning, the whole 
thing swimming in black humor.” 

Averty is largely a casualty of the breakup 
of ORTF. The network had encouraged cre- 
ativity and artistic productions, but then the 
French discovered ratings and mass audi- 
ences, and they found that audiences were 
more easily — and more cheaply — drawn by 


Jazz is one of those areas, Averty believes. 
He plays jazz, piano — badly, he says — and 
was long part of a French jazz band. His eady 
interest in jazz led him to spend years in the 
United States, notably in Chicago and New 
Orleans, working tor American radio and 
television, and buying records. 

Over the years, he conducted the research 
that is the backbone of his program, working 
at the Library of Congress and in archives at 
Variety, and at newspaper? in New York, 
Chicago and San Francisco. On the show, 
between songs, be cites newspaper reviews 
from the 1920s and 1930s, for example, and 
tells stories that reveal such detailed knowl- 
edge of each era or singer — or performance 
— that it is dizzying to listen to hhn 

He began collecting records in the 1940s, in 
shops and flea markets in France and the 
Umted States. When he started earning more 
money, “I bought records at auction, more 
and more expensively. I can remember climb- 
ing on a mountain of records in the Salvation 
Anny of San Francisco.” He added: “1 also 
have a lot of sheet music, in industrial quanti- 
ties. And newroapers.” Where does one store 
30,000 records? “I have a house full, and 1 
walk on them.” After a wink, if they get too 
heavy, “the house will fall down, and m fall 
down with it, willingly.” 

Averty is any thing but resigned to his exile 
from television, although there is not much he 
can do about it Over the years he has spoken 
up tor better television, and he took the 
industry seriously enough to sue the rightist 
newspaper Minute in 1978 for saying that 
there were 3,100 people getting fat off the 
state at tire Buttes Chairman t (where the 
television and radio studios are). 

“1 am a machine- to make pictures, and 
sounds,” he said. “I am underutilized.” He 
added: “They gave me the Legion of Honor. 
That was nice. But less and less work.” 


PEOPLE 

Display for Kulda & Co . 


A serpent named OHie and a 
down named Kukla have found a 
home with the CMcago Historical 
Society following the death of Burr 
Tfflstrom, their creator. The muse- 
um hopes to display the puppets 
and other memorabilia in an addi- 
tion to be built next year, said a 
spokeswoman. Betsy Raymond. 
Tillsirom, a Chicago native, was 
found dead Dec. 6 at his borne in 
Palm Springs, California, at age 68. 
His “Kukla, Fran and OBie” pup- 
pet show delighted millions during 
the early days of television. He 
worked backstage wMle Fran Alli- 
son shared the Limelight with the 
single- toothed serpent Oliver J. 

Dragon and Kukla the gentle 
down. Shortly before his death, 
Tillstrom donated tapes of 54 of 
the shows to the Chicago Museum 
of Broadcast Communications, 
which hopes to make them avail- 
able for public viewing within a 
year, said the museum director, 
Beverly Kennedy. 

□ 


Members of the Beach Boys may 
have to pay a price for failing to 
appear in court: 5S.4 million, 
awarded to three sheriffs deputies 
in Clark County. Washington. The 
Oregonian newspaper in Portland. 


traffic cop many fans. New Tu _ 
war. 43. has scheduled 
traffic tango. “I made every motor - 
ist who passed me smdt, ^ 
brought somejov and order ta baf- 
fle chaos,” said Tan war. who h 
leaving the force after Tuesday sad 
says he hopes to go to the United 
States. He has been a landmark 4 
Raj Path, opposite the forma Brit- 
ish viceroy’s palace, now govenj. 
meat offices, faring India Gaic*^ 
Parliament. The late Prime M105- 
ter Indira Gandhi Used Jo slop occa- 
sionally, watch him and smile, Tnj- 
war said, and her son » n( j 
successor, R*jfr, frequently p iw^ - 
by. “i got tired of our static, robot- 
like traffic signals and decided to 
vitalize it with some theater aal 
spirit.” he {arid. “AH I want todois 
introduce some harmony and 
rhythm in the traffic fiasco during; 
my three hours ia the morning and 
mv stint in the afternoon.” 

D 

Staka Stevens, who retired ias 
month as president of Sierra Leon, 
was robbed of almost S£0, 000 dur- 


ing a flight stopover in_the Canary 
Islai 


Oregon, said Deputies Fred L 
Kerr 


Byler, Donald Kerr and Kevin 
McVkker filed a suit claiming that 
the/ were battered and falsely im- 
prisoned when they were stopped 
from taking photographs at a 198 1 
B each Boys concert in Portland. 
Each was awarded $300,000 in gen- 
eral damages and 51.S million in 
punitive damages after a brief ap- 
pearance before Multnomah Coun- 
ty Circuit Judge Mercedes F. Deiz 
last week, the Oregonian said. A 
default judgment had been entered 
against the rock group in August 
1984. The Beach Boys did not ap- 
pear at a court hearing on the suit 
or file papers contesting the legal 
action, the newspaper said. Court 
documents indicated that Mike 
Love, Demris WQson, Brace John- 
ston and A1 Jsnfine were served 
with copies of the complaint when 


they gave a concert in Portland in 
1983. — 


Wilson has since died. 

□ 

Twice a day for 13 years. Head 
Constable Inder Singh Tanwar has 
guided traffic near India's Parlia- 
ment with arm signals and fancy 
steps that critics say confuse driv- 
ers but that have won the dancing 


lands, police say. Despite his 
eight bodyguards, one of Steven's 
bags containing $35,000, £6.500 
($9,100) and 600,000 pesetas 
(53.845) disappeared from the tran- 
sit lounge of Las Palmas airport 
Stevens continued his journey k 
Tenerife. 

□ 

Madonna “owns all the fast-food 
restaurants in America.” Mkiad 
Jackson is a former U. S. president 
and Prince is the son of Queen 
Elizabeth H, according to a poD on 
Western pop music carried out 
among 400 university students in 
the northwestern Chinese city of 
Xian. Many of the students said 
they listened to music on the Voice 
of America, the BBC and Radio 
Australia. All said they knew and 
enjoyed the music of the Swedish 
group Abbe. Michael Jackson won ' 
10 percent recognition. Madonna 7 
percent. Brace Springsteen 5 per- 
cent and the Beatles 4 per ecru. In 
addition to the mump between 
Prince and the British royal family 
one student confused Madotuu. 
with the Princess of Wales, 4 per- 
cent of the students thought the 
Beatles were “a typical middle dass 
family living in the United States or 
Canada.” 8 percent thought S tiag 
was a woman and 4 percent said he 
was a dangerous insect. 


Place Your Classified Ad Quickly and Easily 

bllw 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 


By Phan*: Call yow local IHT roprmertative with your taut. You 
Wil bn informed at the cad immeri ifl nly. and ones prepayment ■ 
made /our ad will appear within 48 Inin. 

Cost. The baric rifle e $980 per ine per day + local toxn. There ore 
25 leftary, vgns and voces fa the first Ena and 35 fa the Mowing Sees. 
Mirimun tpaon is 2 lines. No abbrevwfliora accepted. 

Credit Card*: Anwriar Express. Diner's Gab, Eurocard, Master 
Card, Access and Vow 


WAD OFFICE 


LATIN AMBUCA 


Ifortr (For darafed only): 
PJ47A7A4.00. 


EUROPE 


Atfci 


: 2636-15. 
361-8397/360-2431. 
: 343-1899. 
C ope nh age n: (01) 329440. 
Frankfort: (069) 72-67.55. 
Lausanne; 29-58-94. 

Lisbon: 67-27-93/66-25-44, 
London: (01) 8364802: 
Madrid: 455-2891 /4553306. 
AHra (02) 7531445. 
Norway: (02)41 29 51 
i 679-3437. 

17569229. 

Tel Aviv: (0455 559. 
Vienna: Contact Frankfort. 


Baertoe Airee: 41 4031 
PepCSia 
Creaooc: 33 14 54 
Guayaquil: 51 4505 
Lew 417 BS2 
Pmmitu 6905 11 
SmsMago: 6961 555 
Saa Paula: 852 1893 


HUDDLE EAST 


Bcfaraku 246303. 
Kuwait: 5614485. 
Lebanon: 341 457/8/9. 
Qatar 416535. 

Srwrfl Arabia: 

Jeddsdc 667-1500. 
UJLEL: Dubai 224161. 


MR EAST 


UNITED STATES 


New Yorfc (212) 752-3890. 
West Coast: (415) 362-8339. 


Bangkok: 3900657. 
Hang Kang: 5-213671. 
J nh ruta 510092. 
Mamta 817 0749. 
Seoul: 735 87 73, 
S n gqi ue 232-2725. 
Taiwan: 752 44 25/9. 
.Tokyo: 504-1925. 


AUSTRALIA 


SOUTH AFRICA 


Bryanulon: 421599. 


* 

■ tRHHiyilBI, 

36934 53. 


690 8233. 

: 929 56 39, 957 43 20. 
“9833. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS in 
, . Pons (ttfy) 4634 5965. Bona 

Icq 20. 


SUN. N.Y. TIMES - .. 

Write Keytar. 908 2, 81 


OOMMCAN DIVORCES. Bar 20802, 
Santa ttonnga, Dominican Republic 


PERSONALS 


MERKY CHOSTMAS AND a Happy 
New Year. BakeL 


MOVING 


ALLIED 


VAN LINES INTI 
ova 1300 offices 

WORLDWIDE 

USA ABM Vm Lfatei btfl Corp 
(0101) 312-681-8100 
Or cci our Agency European offices 

PARIS Desbordes Inta neHonot 

(1) 43 43 23 64 

BANKRJKT 

(089) 250066 

DUSSHDORF/ RATINGS* 

(02102) 45023 IMS. 

MUNICH ms. 

(089) 142244 

LONDON JtTSU, 

(01) 9S3 3636 

BRUSSELS: ItogUrS*. 

(02) 425 66 14 

GENEVA gJFsa. 

(0221 32 64 40 
Cal far Afafs free triuncM 


AlPHArTKANStT-Font & 42 89 25 77 
Sea/air, car, baggage, al countries 


REAL ESTATE 
INVESTMENTS 


US- REAL STATE Opportuneiee 

Please send yo 
Gary E. Trotted, 
bird Lane, Suite 
75247. Trf: (214) 637 


Please send your requirement to 

- - ” ‘ d,_134jW. Mocking, 


bird Lane, Suite 7rB4j,^Ddfas, Texas 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FOB THE FEATURE 

INTERNATIONAL 
REAL STATE 

TURN TO PAGE 14 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


BIOT, FRENCH RIVERA 
RESIDENTIAL DISTRICT 
NEAR GOLF A AIRPORT 
SEA VIEW - QUIET 


- Luxurious vJIa, 2300 sqjn. flat land, 
pool house, large OrienMi- 


tawns,pocJ, . _ _ 

Style bring 60 KUn,, fireplace tiring, 4 
bedroo m . luxurious biXimx un. 2 show- 


er room, colon. autfauUnn, 

* * ‘ F2.900.0ar 


for 3 an Price: .... 

-Luxurious 8 large Prow en y d style vita, 
modern new, gently doping lantL iatj~ 
BO sqm. kvng opening on terrace* _ 
pwin, 6 bedrooms. 5 both*. double go- 
odors, autbu M ntp, Pace: 


- Beguwtf pone Provencal Mrs, 3£00 
sqjn. doped garden, wel equipped, 
way large terraces, large pad, 50 sqm. 


Bring with Fireplace, large affice/E- 
Ixary room. 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, obL 
bn outbuAing, 2<ar shelter. Price: 
F3JOO.OOO. 


Other eompnwr-mteetod opporturifaa 
at el (meet. 


FREE BROCHURE 

Upon request: 

CABINET PROTAT 


0 ^te deGo * 


I Antibes (Fnjwe] 

T«fe 93.34.27.72 


GB*VA REGION 


^jfrtewfa Free Zone 


Geneva take) 


Vfcs, aparmw* & burking land for 
sale. No restrictions for foreigners. 
mXE SUNBELT 
P.O. Bon 40 
157 Rto DUermance 


CH-1245 CoUonflfrBelkrive 
GENEVA - SWTZERLAND 
PtattegB 52 35 95 
Telex: <29603 FMS Qt 


CANNES COTE D'AZUR 

dots bs La Creisaite & Gorfan Hotel 
Med & elegant 2 -room up ortmenl m 
i toodem huking. upper floor view 
r the sea Pbrfea coninon AD com- 
forts and rmeirf eL Asking pne* 

""•Mtmre* 

55 La Gabotte 

' 06400 Coma - 

Tet 93 38 00 66. Tbc 470921 F 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


ALPS DC HAUTE PROVENCE 
r Fonxitiuiar. Superb re sto re d P 
Mas, 8 rooms, 54 sqm docio, 2 
bdt * 

314 


an, gnage. 
77 


eienn^ bteftredav 2 raw 


land. Price R600.000. 

Tet 75 53 54 66 


sqjn, terraces, 
V 14J2* sqjn.. 


AUTHENTIC 18THGBHIUKY Bastion, 

restored with care & lam, wooden 

beans In d rooms. Grata stone 
bread ovetu 2 bepiacci, large 1 -acre 
gotten with room far pooT& terra 

court Lope guest apartment, 2-cor 


ffWfl*’ j ® 3 _ 

FU iriBon. Col MoV, 59, 47 La 

Croisette, 06400 Coera 93 38 19 19. 


far rapid sale at 
MsekS, 


COIF D’AZUR. Acrid view on sect 


7' l minutes Monaco, ufco- 
nd— 300 


„ (sqjn. 

)«pqa, 1ft ha. Und er wteie price 
Promotion Itemt. *Le 
. . I Nta. Tet 93 88 37 37. 
Telex 461235. 


MECEVE - IWENCH ALPS. S h. golf 
resort. Beautiful didst on large da 
domain. 7 bednaone, 416 bale. Din- 
ing, Ering, frefkxe, do room. Gelar. 
2-car garage. 45 nritei Fran Gene- 
»a by freeway. Tel France 5021 1076 


YOUR CONTACT M PROVENCE. 

Houses wth chcrater. Chanrina 

Estates. Me GAJtQH 

Sr-AEMY-D&PRO- 
VENCE Cede*. Tel 90923)1 J8 +. 


EXCEPTIONAL MAR MONTOUR 

(airport): ErAefy restored property, 

to be ecyepped evidc^ 600 sqjn. Bring 
d / _pdia 1JXD sqm 
Tak 674404 5T 


GREAT BRITAIN 


CBffltAL LONDON PROPOnS. fa- 
Inniceiaid Compmy wR (rid far so- 


phisticated dwtifei the property of 
their dvwB, q ra d w ts in renouation. 
wwteshnient, art end antiques. R- 


BYANT1SA, 
ZURICH 


Write 

6936,0+8023 


MONACO 


MONTE CARLO 

Private morion, near Monaco P rince 
fldoos. fawt eic sea view. 

Td: 93304654. 


PARIS & SUBURBS 


3 rnfce 


& MILES NORM 

GhteiHy, an beeutflul land 

farest, sefino 6 0 riofales far race- 
horses with 2 modem houses & 2 
e ne rris e bads, etc. Brcelent return. 

Write or afl M. Jacques B0650N, 11 

Bd. dm bd&ora, FJ5O02 Paris. Tet 42 
96 41 lOJoffimj or 42 63 21 54 
(evening). Triec 212 718 Franco. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SPAIN 


UN QUE OPPORTUNITY 
fa the Spanish winter-heart of the Pyre- 
nees sfa resort ’Geriv* (Benasque), 48 
apartiiwntt, beaulHul seentra tor sum- 
mer hoidays. Esogflenf investment at 
lowest price. From US$15fl00 fufy fur- 
nished Dirod from owner JJP. Bas- 
ttoara, Besetend ri Poraiso 568 Esc G. 
Zoragou 50008 Spain Tbt 58156 GW E 


PHIA SEAFRONT LUXURY HOM^ 

3 bedroom, 2 bcrthroccis, 2 tarraces. 
Solar, pond. FuBy fwnehed mdud- 


mg museum piece artiques. Architect 

‘. No agents. Codad 8ri- 


owner bub." 


■p- Ap T,iij5z a ' Jti * 




SOUIH SPAM. 2^00 sqja v*v sea- 
front, golf, marina. PooL 6 beds, 6 
bdhs, etc. S235JXXL Write Conesa, 
Torrerieta, Afate 13*651 710985. 


18- 


SOUTH SPAM Vlas and 
hdn 

SHUSH For idannatior* Conesa. 

Torrarieiq, Afcnda. (34 dfl 710985. 


SWITZERLAND 


SWTIZBtLAM) 

Foretenen am buy JTUDtOS/ APART- 
MENTS / CHALETS, LAKE OBSVA - 
MONITOIX ar in these woiU fdnous 
resorts: CRANS-MONT “ 


AJRA&regkmoF 

1O000. Mo^ages 


CHATEAU 

G5TAAD. From 

60 * d m% its 

REVACSJL 

52 MorifarSant, CH-1202 GB4EVA. 
Tet 022/341540. Tehee 22030 


USA RESIDENTIAL 


NYC 


43£tory CONDO 

Dag HcHnmankioM Tower 

240 EAST 47Bi ST. 

1 Bock To United Notions 
-SPECTACULAR 

mu 


New Fufl Service Boerfqg With 
S wimuwng Pool. Heath Odo and 




. APAKTMN15 
ARE ALSO AVASWaE 
For Hb Cal 212-759-8844 
Sat Sun 104 Mon to Fri 9-6 


BOSTON AREA - WAIEXHtONT 


pager ty.^ 8 enrated rtekm .1835 


B acres of land faring 
Merrimack Bay. Indudes private 
creek, tarn + oubriUngv 5 bed- 


rooms. 4 botfo. 45 Rent from dowrv 
tton. Situated in NewbuY- 


town Boskn. , 

port Pnaperty values have esodated 
at «% per year far the tort 5 yeas. A 




... Plenty of pom far e 

dock. Ms Purintcn at617- ““ 


write 36 Main St^ Byfield MA 01922 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


USA RESIDENTIAL 


MARK COUNTY, CA. 40 rates Sen 

Frcrasco. BeauMU fum-ofeentury 
Vieterian fermhome on 25 acres. 
Born pool hoi lubb faJoes. Ideal ececu- 
live ertert ij met* rriretf. Cantad 
Lara Wton, 114991 1-713-179 Iran 
12-21 to 1-2 or 200 Wehnore la, 

Pbtofamo. CA 94952 707-762-8926, 


DARIH4 8 NEW CANAAN Carvredi- 

cut. Execotve type homes far real A 

sole. Pleourt N.Y. Gly suburts. 
French raken. Nationwide conrMc- 
Hont. Cm Tfabetls R-L 203-6S-7724. 


SUNNY FLORIDA. 

ttas.aR 
Coda 


' ROHM. Prraerririgpropor- 

I types. Please write to Ru^C/J 
1r5 Vrienda 46005, Span. 


USA 

COMMERCIAL 
& INDUSTRIAL 


TUDOR HOTH. 

FOR SAlf 

_ NEW YORK cny 
480 Roams dose to Urited Nations 
„ John G. Strong 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


ntENCH PROVINCES 


CAP D*ANTK5. Lcnriy house right on 

the writer, ver -~ - 

4 bedrooms. 

front of R» house for 


wwenei 
very m c egonten writ pool, 
ra. rarinimy fa space in 
he house for a boat For red 


COTE D’AZUR. Aw your vocations 

mur omi epartmert or estate in Cop 

cf Artises or Ara Ws P™. Rentols/ 


^M1646lk461SB5JCBbnnK>l 


Tot 93 6716461 


GREAT BRITAIN 


UptURY EXECUTIVE AMUMNTi. 

Kngliiibridge/Giebea. Over 100 
My serrioed dwtas, 1 & 2 bedroom 

naf 22 days rnces frwn 
£145 per eerie. Phase anted NGH 


Apartments, Nafl Gwym House. 
Stoane AveLondan SW1 Trir 0I4B9 
1105. TTk 295817 G. 


CDUIAL bONKM - Emoufive ser- 
vm» cprrteerts to new buHngs, 
trashed ml My 
maid service (Mon. 

. r in ^ TV. Phone forlra 

dwekh] S8 1342 or wrbe.PnNetev 




LUXURY SBnnCED HATS IN Ken- 
snrai is theotancrive to (Mpereive 
hotel accommodation. Cantad Aw- 




Telex 418216 


589 2956. 


International Business Message Center 


ATTENTION EXECUTIVES 

PobEAywh 


in fhm bi t m n o t ional HmnS¥n- 

buno, whmo man than a toed 

or a oflton mten worM- 
wkk, matt td whom an to 
battoaa and industry, mV 
road it Just talon as (Fork 


613593} baton 10 run, «- 

that we tan max you 


suring _. 

bank, rad 


mtanga w it 

I* 6ate!«. The 

rate k US$9.80 or lotto 

•qtovtoant par Bnm. You and 

“yfofrj* **** and ratm- 

abto Uttog adtomm. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


MICHAEL SHONE 
sEonresuD 

Notional Ariodotian of Security 
Derien and Investment M mauert 
wehes to hear from bored investors 
over Christines period 
Teh tendon pi) 3 77 1933 8. 263 76B1 


SWlTZBdAND + ABROAD. We 

rim mare than 25 interesting canpa- 
rra jfaaeries + tracing + refcd + 
WrySsj far kAl Twnorw up to SF3Q 

rnBOon. Svria reedeney possible. Con- 
tad-. K S8BOID SA, tour Grise 4, 
Qf .1007 taoMMo. Tet 21/25 26 II. 


DQAWARE, PANAMA, Liberia. Cor- 
porations from LISSISa Hm 
28933/ 20240. Telao 628352 
G. Ivia UKL 


2ND PASSPORT 35 countria. GMQ 
26 Kk omenou. 106 76 Athens Greece 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


SS% ream on nl finmdd morkets. 
We can you proof of our quai- 
ficorians. Write Box 2W2, HerrioTri- 

bunq 92521 Needy Ceitei Ftmce 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


MU 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPlf 


UNUMJTH) MC 
UJJL l WORLDWDE 


A complete personal & buriness teMiee 
pravidng a unique ooledion of 
sdenied, vemrie & 
nfividuab for ofl sociri 


212-765-7793 

212-7A5-77M 
330 W. 56lh St. N.YJC 10019 
Service Re 
Needed' 


HOW TO GET A 2nd PASSPORT, 

t - 12 co u Htrws enriys e d. De- 
WMA. 45 Lyndtunt Terrace,; 
566. CenlraJ, Hong Kong. 


Sute 566,1 


OFFICE SERVICES 


8JRO RUSMESS ONTS 
62 KefeerKradtt 1015 CS Amsterdam 
Trir 31-2021 S 49 Teiex 16183. 
WMd-MJt Bmttm Cstorm 


YOUR Oma M PARS: TH£X, 

ANSWBW4G SERVICE, secretary, 

errands, mofaoie. foe 2M/cfay. 
TeL PATi 4609 95 95. 


OFFICE SERVICES 


PARS ABDiPW 

Snca 1 957 LSJ*. provida* mbi. 

neetrg rooms. 5 rue a Artofc, 

Tel 4S9 4704. Tin 642504. 


DIAMONDS 


DIAMONDS 


Your best buy. 

Rne cEtenonds in arty price range 
at lovest wholesale prion 
daccl from Antwerp 
center of the daraond world 
Fufl guarantee. .- 
for free price fet write 
Joaddns GoMmetefa 


&h*SthedlW8 

Petluxmstraet 6ZB-2018 Antwerp 
, - T«fcp2 31334 07 51 

K 71779 »l b. AMhe Diamond Chi 


1J» 7l?79iyl b. At the'Dranond Oub. 
Heol of A rt werp Diriaond iaduory 


OFFICES FOR RENT 


POMAFHONE 


BUSRVSSCBNTK 
WBL KNOWN SMOE1M5 


Furnished offices, telex, mol 
a n swe rw p service, domraatiow * 
> formalon, etc For farther 
' 1 i eontoc* us o> 


ftfnjpphone, 76 Otamps Sysees Pots 
B h Phans (1)43 5? 68 04 Tin 660364 F 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


GREAT BRITAIN 


LONDON MARBLE ARCH, near, m 8- 
cate ri itg buy 2-heciroora fak faRy 
e qu i pped ,, rid er TV , Keen one 

phones. £1504250 per wads. < 

ford Hofiday Hats. 33 Gawfard 
Sheet, London W1. 01-402 6165, 


LONDON. For the bat funished flats 

and houses. Comril the Spedcfc W 


PMipfc Kay end Lewis. Tri Sorih of 
" ‘ '12 Bill, North of Park 722 


Pbrfc 352 „ r. 

5135. Triex 27846 RESIDE Gw 


CENTRAL Umdon. Luxury farmshod 
here. £280/' 


flah, American kitchens. £29D/w*ak- 


rieep>4 or £I75/rak - stem Z Tefc 
064471 22P* or 01-486 3415RJK1 


FOR HJRNHHD LETTINGS M S.W 

landosi. Sonny & Berfahire. Cortad 
MAYS. OwhoH |037 284) 3811 UK, 
Tele* 89551 11 


JOHN BfKH has 20 yean experience 


to Rentals. Long or short tenancies, 

atoustsan London &Aber- 


Centrd8i 

deen. Efirdr & Co. 01-499-8802. 


KENSINGTON, LUXURY furnished 


MAYFAM, LUXURY APARTMENTS. 

■ Rto Propertie s . Tet London 01-629 
1788. Trior 3&3001 FANR UK G.H 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


74 CHAMPS-Q.Y5SS 8th 

5tucfia2 orJroom op o tont 
Oto morrit Or more. 


IE OAHOOE 43J59.67.97. 


SHORT TOWI STAY. AAontages of a 

hcrid wmKMt UKXmvenienoeirfMl ct 
home In mat StedaLone bedroom 

•adman « Ports. SORHUk 80 rue 

do FXhitteniM, Paris 7th. 4544 3940 


SHORT TERM STAY. From 1 


Fi*r nqtped duefios rmd 2 reomi, 
up to 4 person*. Qanps Byra, Lrrin 

Qucster aid Mrieparnoitn. A4ad Mrw 


wapojAkjjr 


Mari p o m os s e. 

.MrOeorBfc43 


43228250 


STUDIO TO 4 ROOMS. Week, monlfo 

ir rote*. UoatrixiuTg & Mortpor 

SO- No opnncy feet. 4325 35W. 


nm rasaite. meet rra sunny mod- 

3 room *' F72tJa Tel 

454060 9a 


LARGE ROOM M HOUSE. FZSOOpw 
roortti net. Teh 1-436721 0a 


TROCMttRO. UDOMOUS 2 room. 

Tet 1-46475382 / 45534275 


SWITZERLAND 


Brand New 


THE EXCELSIOR 


‘ A Unique 

Hotel Suite 
Residence 


Featuring 

l- f 2-, aod 3- 
Bedroom Suites 


AHMagnificenffy . 
Furreshed /With Luxuriously 
Appointed )0tchem & Baths 


Offering 

RESIDMG POL FORSttBS 

r - 

FISCAL ADVANTAGE 
UNIQUE SETIWO 


BWIRONMBa FOR ' 

SPORTS AM) IBSURE 


5W1MMMO POOL 
FITNESS RAOUTR5 
2* HOUR MBHCAL ASSISTANCE 


EXECUTIVE SBnnCES AVA0AIU 
MODB-5WES 


l-SWnZBttAND ( 21^ 63-51-04 


. tC BON l 
1820MONTRHJX 

Cril for OTpaWment 


BEAL ESTATE 
TO RE3NT/SHARE 


SWITZERLAND 


room flat, atntral, rmwt; antiques, i 
tnce. SR^OQ/monm. Cun veer J : 
wotoessnea TeL 4787 70. 


HOLLAND 


DUTCH HOUSING ONTRE B.V. 
Dekute mtek Vrieriwtr. 174. 
Amsterdam. 020421234 or GZ3Z12 


ISRAEL 


03^39787 USA 8187664568. 


USA 


Brand New 

THE KIMBERLY 

145 E. 50th 


A Unique 

Hotel Suite 
Residence 


pre-openmg savings on 


Firiwtog 

Studio, 1-Bedroom & 
.2-Bedroom Suites 
All magnificently 
furnished and all with 
luxurious!/ appointed 
kitchens & marble baths. 


Executive Services Available 

Model Suites 

(212) 371-8866 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 


5HK PtOfBSIONAL FAMILY to e*, 
change ok 5 borkoam home 38 min. 


front NYC. Need hout w ^luge 


opammni to Parii Aoa 1986.. .... 
MLMnrran, 13Can®raR±,Aitfrtoy, 


NY10502USA- 


AMBDCAN 5690 jmd oportmentto 

Para , front Feb. 1 flint Much IS' 

Prefer 6th or Tflt unuiiriweff** Bok 
2W0, Herrid Tribune, 92Sfl NeuBy 
Cedes, Franc* 


EMPLOYMENT 


-[ EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE | 




” SECRETAKIAL 

- POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

UUDH/E SfflCS for AMBBCAN 
FIRMS in PAJ8S: 

“ Engfeh, BelgicA. Dutch or Gernra 
leritetones. lnwrlaifa* of French re- 
“ qufred, BnEih dwreicind. BRngoai 
tikwti. Wrbe or akomb 138 Arena* 
Victor Itoga. 7511* Pbrii, fronce. TeL 

mtrinXo. 

Dpa'I n2n 

RflERNATIONAl 

SECRET ARML.PQSIIIQN5 

TUESDAYS 

■ the IHT CtnreWed Sretav 



AUTO RENTALS 

CHANC RQ4T A CARS. Ptattoe an 

with phone: Ifob Spur, Spirit, farrari. 
Poncho, Mercedes iegrar, BMW, 
foioiuinee,- unto cats. 46 r Pierre 
Onrron, 75006 Print. Trir 47203040. 
Tel» 630797 FCHAROC 

AUTO SHOPPING 

T RANSCAR 

THE CAR SWNNa 
SKOAUSI5 

PABS (1) 42 25 64 44 

CANNK/MCE >3)39 43 44 

fSANKFUKT (Hi 07) 80 51 

BONN/Q3LOGNE (0228)21 2921 ’ 
STUTTGART W7031) 88081 

MUNICH P8Sjrai0 45 

BRBWBIHAVBM JD471) 0063 

NEW row; nfgafe 7061 - 

HOUSTON 931 7605 

LOS ANGELES pi 3 568 9288 _ 

MONTREAL S14) 866 6681 

AOB4TS WORLD WR3E 
l*we fr to us to bring if fa yon 


AUTO CONVERSION 

MemdetBera POnehe BMW Ferran 

EPA/DOT 

mwawnw 

Fart hrrn-axxmd tune. AS work: dorm 

■ 114 Andemon -Street 
, Hodawodt, Nl 07601 USA 

322234 2014884)667 


HOODAYS and TRAVEL 


LOW COST FLIGHTS ] HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


ACCESS USA 

One Woy Rouod Trip 
New Vo* FI 500 F2990 

Los Angriee F2600 F4T70 

Ownoo ••'-■FI59D- F3450 

nbaT ■ . F2960 F3450 

afando . F2S90 . ;f3450 

Pels F3430 : F3660 

Manfred .- ' -R8», .. . F3000 
'and mare deetiii ufora 
15X decount an dm 


PAMS tab (11 42 31 4A M 
r. lie 1502) 


(Cor. 


TO LAX/SFO <k*y drafafa from 


Europe rrivm fW. AM 1 w ay A 
other US dtetinuifont. Para 4225 KS0 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


JOR THE HEATURE 

- WSCEND , 

TURN TQ PAOE-.fW 


HEUAS YACHT140. Yo*t Chortwy. 
Amdenwi 28, Athens 10671, Greece. 


(SHOIMAN YACHTS. FSeCrpn 7, 
■ Aftnm. 3230330, Rb 216034 Greece. 


HOTELS 


FRANCE 


PAWS-fteiMhribeau •••VKi, W 
;.iS5 & ’■S? raamftafr, bo*, 

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and pteowre. Al raomWfi / foow 
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■ **fx&t.'.$to#es f3S douriw £48 
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