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INTERNATIONAL 



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PARIS, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, DECEMBER 28-29, 1985 


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~~ ESTABLISHED 1887 


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War 


far 6 Years, . 
mi Is Firm 
it Remaining 

/‘ By Arthur Bonner 

•: /fa# York Times Service 
• y YORK — Six years lo the 
' tn Soviet forces swept into 
gfctan, more than 100,000 
* . >jife s and airmen con- 
' f stubborn and dusive gaa- 
-njy in a war with no end in 


fighting, which began after 
; - 3 v^TJnion intervened an 
27 1979, has fallen into a 
j, ’and the war is stalemated, 
*•-=: ling to gacnitta fightCTS in- 

* ' ffed in Afghanistan in .five 

half nymihs of travel through . 
"• > nntiy with rebel convoys. 

: . .iBaviel-backed leadens of Af- 
- nan do not permit visits by 
.~*a.nporters to the govem- 
■- sale 5 the front. 

•- • Russians have said repeat- 

• 'hat they will negotiate on a 
' Sana of Soviet troops only 
-■ Weston and other aid to the 
' is cot off. 

- ’-.s jfj leaders are unanimous m 
. j that the Russians, estimated 
: -i>J,000 troops, most withdraw 
- - last man and that they will 
xept any formula that would 
. - . ihe Communist government 

■ , £t ' ■ 

--.xtf finals in Washington and 
' Western diplomats, xmKtaiy 
■ 'rides and scholars agree that 
’ Wffl be no quick solution, 
theviewof these sources, the 
, . . d Hawms-spoosored negoti- 
... i k Geneva, where indirect 
«nwd at the eventual with- 
«Mti o( Soviet troops from Af- 
Star have been under way 

1982, aremerdy a propagan- 

rain for the Russians. 

, *!pse sources say the Russians 
1 ,. li y r to picture themselves as 

.^ndy interested in peace while 
~jg tune to educate a new gen- 
. . Va.af Afghans who wiO give 
■* »•« rabble surrogate army and 
J *'4?cal and administrative group 
the government 

* '* **¥. the. United Stales and . 
countries should increase aid 
; rebels to prod the Russians 

i ^negotiations to withdraw. 

** " iSeNovember meeting in Ge~ 
-MCf between President Ronald, 
v r*tm of the United Stales and 
Jnl S. Gorbachev, the Soviet 
.<r.\ some American officials 

- ' hey detected a readiness by 
' usaans for a settlement. 

encourage this, officials in 
7 inglonsmd, the Unitfid States 
■ jd to act as a guarantor to a 
f^Srehensm: and balanced set- 
it” that would indude the 
-* nnraiqf Soviet troops and an 
) A merican and other aid to 
—hds. 

v : . ,^ly;a village has escaped 

- ?c during the six years of war, 
through direct action or be- 
at the disruption of com- 

— < and trade. Schools, hospi- 
^^Jadories and much else that 
fanedin 20 years of modero- 
' ~ - i starting in the 1950s has 
_Jcstroye«i 

. anritian continues. About 
-^to 3,000 refugees are estimat- 
. . - "Uee to Pakistan each month, 
be city of Khanabad in Kim- 
■ovinoe, bordering the Soviet 
, not a single home is habit- 



16 Killed in Attacks 
At 2 Europe Airport^ 
Israelis Vow Revenge 


r v 


Israel Blames 
PLO, Hints at 
Strike Soon 


By William Claiborne 

Washington Peat Service 

JERUSALEM — Israel vowed 
Friday that it would retaliate for 
the Rome and Vienna airport at- 
tacks “in every place and at any 
time it sees fit” 

Although the Palestine Libera- 
tion Organization issued a denial 
that it was responsible for tbe at- 
tacks, Israeli leaders laid the blame 
squarely on the PLO and hinted 
broadly that armed retribution 
would soon follow. Yitzhak Rabin 

As they did after the hijacking of 

•he Italian cruise liner Adulle , 

Laura in October, Israeli leaders Tenor is blind, and anyone iwbo 

declared that Friday's attacks had "tempt* jojimify any form of ter- 
ruled the PLO out of any possible ™ r ^ 

role in Middle East peace negotk- ^ ^7°"- ^ sovermnent of 



role m Middle East peace negotia- 
tions. 

The government urged “all coun- 
tries which give shelter and support 


Israel wfll protect its citizens at 
borne and abroad, and will fight in 
all ways against terrorists.’' 
Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin 


. .. — ” . .< a 1 11 DUMUb IVAiliUlM 1 lUllilDi IV W A 1I 

to the PLO to immediatdy expel all ^ ^ PL0 

reproeatanves of that orgaruza- |Ser, Y^ser Arafat, for responsi- 


representanves or that organiza- 
tion." 

Prime Minister Shimon Peres 
said: “The attacks only emphasize 
the need facing the countries of the 
world to organize against all forms 
of terrorism and prevent the con- 
tinuation of its rampage. 


El Alls Target 
Of Gunmen in 
Rome, Vienna 

Compiled by Our SuifJ From Dupotdtn 

ROME — Gunmen attacked 
check-in counters of El Al, the Is- 
raeli national airline, at the Rome 
and Vienna airports on Friday, kill- 
ing at least 16 persons and injuring 
about 100 others. 

After the attacks, which ended in 
gun battles between anti-terrorist 
units and guerrillas described as 
being of Arab origin. Israel vowed 
to strike bock at what it called tbe 
“beasts" responsible. 

A telephone caller to a Spanish 
radio station claimed the attacks 
were carried out by a radical group 
calling itself the Palestinian Abu 
Nidal Organization of the Costa 
del SoL Abu Nidal is tbe code name 
of a fierce rival of Yasser Arafat, 
the leader of the Palestine Libera- 
tion Organization, which is being 
blamed for a series of terrorist at- 
tacks. 

The Israeli Foreign Ministry 
linked Friday's attacks to the PLO, 


bQity in tbe airport attacks, saying but at the organization’s headquar- 
tbat there was a “tragic irony” in ters in Tunis a spokesman said the 


the gunmen's selection of Italy and 
Austria for their targets. 


PLO was not involved. PLO 
spokesmen there and in Rome and 


Tbe Israeli government has long Vienna condemned the attacks. 


(Continued on Page 5, CoL 1) 



For Terrorists, 
Death or Capture 

The bodies of seven men and 
women lying on the floor of 
the international lounge at 
Rome's Leonardo da Vied 
r r Ty3poft,abovt^afterArab-- 
spealririg terrorists opened 
fire on an El Al airline 
check-in counter. The attack 
ended in a gun battle 
between the guerrillas and 
anti- terrorist units. An 
unidentified Arab man, 
marked with A, was shot to 
dearii by police. A Rome 
policeman hit a suspected 
Arab guerrilla after his 
arrest, kft One of the men 
invested in a simultaneous 
attack st Vienna's Sdhwechat 
airport was shot to death 
while trying to escape, right. 



The assault al Leonardo da Vinci 
Airport in Rome ended with at 
least 13 persons dead and about 75 
injured. Three gunmen were among 
the dead and a fourth, who was 
wounded, was captured. 

Magistrates were waiting to 
question the surviving gunmnn, de- 
scribed by Italian television as an 
Arabic speaker, after he underwent 
surgery at a military hospital 

At Schwechat Airport in Vienna, 
three persons died, including a gun- 
man. The police captured his two 
companions as they tried to flee by. 
car. Dozens of bystanders were in- 
jured. 

In the two attacks, -the gunmen 
stormed crowded departure areas 
where passengers were checking in 
baggage for flights. They fired So- 
viet-made Kalashnikov assault ri- 
fles and hurled or rolled grenades 
along the floor. 

At both airports, witnesses said 
El Al security men joined in the 
shooting. 

In Israel, Deputy Prune Minister 
David Levy said: “These beasts 
know no borders and we will hit 
them wherever they are." 

In Washington, the Reagan ad- 
ministration called on all nations to 
combat “this menace." Egypt, 
West European countries and the 

(Continued on Page 5, CoL 2) 


U.S. Spy Suspect Said to Steal House Transcripts 


By Ruth Marcus 

and Fred mart session on Feb. 28. 

WAS^rTON ' Ossified T* declassified version of the 
WASHINGTON — Oassfied ej - gj nagre, ^chiding 

chartsfbut there isnoway of doer- 


vices subcommittee. Sources ides- Obtaining the entire hearing 
Lifted it as a two and a half hour transcript, one source familiar with 
session on Feb. 28. the contents of the hearing said. 


Obtaining the entire hearing ven Ross, said Thursday he would 
transcript, one source f amilia r with “very likely” recommend, at least 
the contents of the hearing said, as an interim measure, that all 
would have been “a significan t Bouse bearings on classified mal- 
coup for the Russians." ters be transcribed by stenogra- 


the Soviet Union by an accused 


ndndmK coup for the Russians.” ters be transcribed by stenogra- 

ofdeS- Mr. Jeffries offered to sell a g*” m ^ House staff rather 
Mr.Jef- “complete package” of three hear- than by such outsule companies as 
to the Soviet mg transcripts, including two otb- Acme. 

sensitive ers classified secret, for S5.000, Mr. He said that “a matter of days 


.not a sngle boose is habit- y^spy^froma«mgr^ Acme 

tr^r, . nri , , heann S thar mcl uded disoission erf Union blamed tbe most sensitive ers classified secret, for 55,000, Mr. He said that “a i 

information, or how sensitive any Giglia testified. He said tiw Mr. before" Mr. Jeffries 

sp* Randy Miles . £“>2 

cson.aomf^Ttr^smM of Myrified .^ scripts. rttalllL" 

JL2sa52.tr 

1 a comminee lhat drafted a Russians at least 13 “sample” retary of defense for command, 
utkm for Afghanistan in the pa «y of the hearing transcript, control, communications and inld- 
Now 80 years old, he lives which was classified top secret, an ligence, testified on the compara- 


ble said that “a matter of days 
before" Mr. Jeffries allegedly stole 
a stack of classified documents 
from tbe company. Defense De- 
partment investigators visited 


But tbe declassified report, with them 13 pages from each of the partmeni investigators visited 
numerous passages deleted, touch- three bearings and an additional 15 Acme and “gave them a dean bill 
es on some^ ofthle military’s most pages of unspecified transcripts. of health." 
sanative programs and plans. Mr. Jrffries allegedly obtained ^ j. Hiere that recently, 

Donald C. Latham, assistant sec the franscnpls from Aime Report- ^ a systemic problem." Mr. 

retary of defense for command, ingCa, where he wor ked as a ^jd. Either Acme was going 

control, communications and intd- sstiBJf- Ac “f has a eootract wun ^ ^ ^ ^ to fool the inspectors, 
ligen^testifiedmi the .compare; he said, or the level of inspection 


is son in Pakistan. “Our hu- FBI agent testified Tuesday at a live nuclear strengths of theUniial that was being done was inade- 

smitrvME «na tMsA nmniiK r.-.- x/r TaffnK nnrf Swirl UmtHL the vnl- tees to trenscribe hearings for them ... 


m 


-sources and fdod supplies court bearing for Mr. Jeffries, 
exhausted," he said. The agent, Michael Giglia 


i^fually people will have to the congressional hearing took 


States and Soviet Union, the vnl- 

Tbe“agenC‘Nfi<*Ml Giglia, said nerability of military satellites and 

e“n&°nal heaiST took the capabDfy of UE. coastal radar IheHwue staff is available. 


ura vu uaiuwmv umhui^f fi nal 

when none of the 12 reporters on 4 


utiuBed on PageS, CoL 5) place before a House Anned Ser- to track Soviet cruise missiles. The House general counsel, Ste- 


“1 have no indication that Acme 
(Continued on Page 5, CoL 5) 


INSIDE 

■ Israel said it would continue 

flights over Lebanon despite 
Syrian missiles. Page Z 

■ Corazon Aquino said that if 

elected, she would permit two 
U.S. bases in the Philippines 
until at least 1991. Page 3. 

ARTS/LEISURE 

■ Komar and MebmSd, two So- 

viet 6migr&, mock Stalin in 
their own style of Socialist Re- 
alism. Page 6. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ Japan’s mmqilqymeot rate 
reached a record high of 19 
percent in November. Page 7. 

MONDAY 

In Wisconsin, parents must 
now pay for the care of a baby 
born to their unmarried teen- 
age son or daughter. 


Peru to Take Control 
Of U.S. OH Finn’s Assets 


By Michael L Smith 

Washington Pan Service 

LIMA — President Alan Garcia 
P&rez announced Friday that the 
government would take control of 
the Peruvian oil fields of Beko Pe- 
troleum Corp„ a U.S. company. 

Mr. Garda said that Bdco had 
refused to accept the government’s 
conditions for continuing opera- 
tions in Peru and that he would 
sign a decree ordering the govern- 
ment-owned oil company, Petro- 
peru, to take over BeJco’s installa- 
tions. 


burden on oil companies and set 
other conditions. 

Mr. Garcia said the Peruvian 
court system would make an as- 
sessment of Belco’s assets in the 
country and calculate taxes that the 
government is claiming The differ- 
ence between assets and taxes 
would be paid to Belco, be said. 

A company- by-company break- 
down of back taxes claimed by 
Peru is not available, but govern- 
ment officials have mentioning a 
figure of about S35 million. Kir. 
Garda said Peru would not seek 


#w« « ■■ 1 VJqiUlii OUIU l blU UUI 

. 01 c ? ltracl ? 1 ?’ reimbursement or the tax credits, 

dental Petroleum Corp. of Los An- . 


vmedaries’ Importance Fades Into legend 

ids Are Taking a Back Seat as Bedouin Take to Pickup Trucks 


By Christopher DickCT food, and a man who owned many of the 
WashiaguiPau Sendee * beasts was considered wealthy. 

R0 — “We identify the Middle Now wealth is more likely to be roea- 
idt that romantic image of camels .sured id hard cash, cars or more tractable 
ravans," said Donald Cole, an an- animals than the lumbering, often Ui- 
ferisi with the Ameriran 1 Iniversi- tempered camd. 

®0, toeaking above the din of car As a means of transport, camels have 
and jevring. engines. “But that B ivM 10 Suzubs and Datsuns and 
much exist anymore." ■ Land Rovers throughout most of the 


side. In Sudan, traders still traverse the 
remote recesses of tbe desert in small 


legist with the American Universi- 
‘mro, qjeakiqg above the din <rf car 
4 and jewing. engjbes. “But that 
i much exist anymore,” ■ 


Now wealth is more likely to be mea- caravans. Sometimes they, are armed with 
sured in hard cash, cars or more tractable swords and spears, and sometimes with 
animals than the lumbering, often ill- Kalashnikov automatic nfles. 
tempered camd. In Cairo, the poorest of the poor still 


eat the camel’s 


stringy meaL 


Every Friday morning, thousands of 


1 I L'h^anrastm^ 

Ji [I,*' : wise men arming in Bethle- 

' * X) unosinlv hilmiwt itrMiwlwiie 


Middle EasL Asa source of food, herders camels are assembled for sale, mainly to 
have placed them with sbeep and $0*. 


ungainly humped drontedaries. burgeoning dries. Cairo. 

Still, "camels have a son rfpereonaBjy A few tourists wander nervously 

meted camels an?r!Se dim ImS ^ a sbfie P doesn ’ 1 ^ ^?* e through the hobbled ranks of beasts and 

camels and rode them into o0lfi d. He said the bedouin have fomid it enngein fear of being bitten or trampled. 

very difficult to write poems about sheep, Boys whack the animals back into place. 
^*he importance of camels in the life “whereas they did write poetry about swinging long bats against their haunch- 
• region, particularly that of the. camels and horses." es. . 


whose meal is more in demand in the tracks in the Imbaba slum in northern 
area’s burgeoning cities. Cairo- 

Still, “camels have a son of personality A few tourists wander nervously 

that a sbeep doesn't have,” Mr. Cole thr ough the hobbled ranks of beasts and 


’lit- ' 


1 tribes, has faded slowly. 

te past, (he camel-herding bedou- 
the elite,” said Mr. rote who 
*rs among nomadic tribes. Cam- 
their owners both mobility and ■ 


In Arabia, Mr. Cok said, “you 
hear bgdo 111 * 0 who mite poems about 
their pickup trucks." 

Vet, oamris continue to serve as beasts 
of burden in Egypt’s primitive Country- 



Merchants sell assorted truck bearings — — - ■ — jsss ^ 


(Coo tinned on Page S, CoL 1) 


transports his camd across ftie SaudB Andrian desert in a Japanese truck. 


getes and Bridas Expioradones y 
Prod ucd 6n SA of Buenos Aires, 
had made counterproposals that 
the government was evaluating. 
The deadline for talks between the 
oD companies and the Peruvian 
government negotiating team was 
midnight Thursday. 

“I am sure that a fair deal can be 
reached with the other oil compa- 
nies without having to go to the 
extreme of expropriation,” Mr. 
Garcia said. 

In August, Mr. Garcia ordered 
lhat the contracts with the foreign 
oil companies be canceled and that 
rhangp * be made in oil legislation. 
Negotiations with the three compa- 
nies began in early November. 

Bdco, a subsidiary of ImerNorth 
Inc. of Omaha, Nebraska, has off- 
shore oil concessions in northern 
Peru near the Ecuadoran border. It 
produces about 15 percent of Pe- 
. ru's petroleum output of 180,000 
bands per day. 

According to sources dose to the 
negotiations, Belco had the tough- 
est negotiating position of the three 
companies. The Belco management 
apparently would not accept what 
Mr. Garcia railed a “contractual 
prerequisite," that Belco guarantee 
to invest 5127 million in explora- 
tion to compensate for tax credits 
received in the past four years. 

The Peruvian government also 
has substantially increased the tax 


Mr. Garda said: “This is not 
against foreign investment or an 
anti-North American position. It 
should not affect relations with the 
United Slates.” 


U.S., Soviet Plan 
TV Greetings 

United Press International 

LOS ANGELES — Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan and Mik- 
hail S. Gorbachev, the Soviet 
leader, will exchange New 
Year’s greetings in televised ad- 
dresses to the American and So- 
viet people, the White House 
said Friday. 

Larry Sp cakes, the White 
House spokesman, said the ad- 
dresses, agreed upon this week 
after the United Slates pro- 
posed the idea at the Geneva 
Summit, would last about five 
minutes. He said that “both 
leaders are expected to extend 
New Year’s greetings in the 
spirit of good relations.” 

A Soviet spokesman in Mos- 
cow also announced die plan. It 
will be the first tune an Ameri- 
can president has addressed the 
Soviet people in a televised 
speech smee Richard Nixon did 
so in Moscow in 1972, 




Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATORPAY-SUNDAY, DECEMBER 28-29, 1985 


a* 



Israel Vows to Pursue 
Flights Over Lebanon 
Despite Syrian Missiles 


WORLD BRIEFS 


President Francois Mitterrand of France received roses offered by Us supporters when he visited Brittany in October. 


Many French Believe a Tin de Regne’ Is at Hand 


By Richard Bernstein 

Ne*> York Tima Service 

PARIS — With legislative elections less than 
three months away, a deep political uncertainty 
has settled ova France; often summed op by a. 
widespread, if improved, feeling that the cotm- 
try faces what is being called a "fin de rim," 
the end of the era of the Socialists, who have 
governed since 1981. 

In essence, die mood of uncertainty stems 
from the assumption that the Socialists are go- 
ing to lose the dections March 16, leading to a 
situation in France whereby President Francois 
Mitterrand, whose term does not end until 1988, 
will have to govern with a prime minister and 
government opposed to his policies. 

The mood of uncertainty can be seen in 
several ways: in a new tension in political life; in 
a slowness, a wait-and-see attitude in the bu- 
reaucracy, in speculation about who will wield 
real power after March, the president himself or 
the majority in the National Assembly. 

. There is, of coarse, the possibility that the 
polls and even the pessimism of some Socialist 
leaders will tun out to be inco rr ect and, after 
the elections, the party will continue to hold its 
majority. Yet the belief that this will not happen 
is widespread, leading in to the assumption that 
the election will begin a period of instability and 
could even lead to a constitutional crisis. 

. Specifically, this is what seems likely to occur 
if the right takes control of the National Assem- 
bly. 

First, Prime Minister Lament Fahras and the 
cabinet would have to step down to be replaced 


by another figure who would govern tinder Pres- 
ident Mitterrand in an arrangement never be- 
fore seen — bat these days frequently discussed 
— that goes by the name cohabitation. 

' Second, according to the views of many, the 
opposition would try to overturn Mr. Mitter- 
rand's program, pressing for a crisis. This in 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


turn would force him either to accede to a state 
of poweriessness or to dissolve the National 
Assembly and call fa new dections. If the 
opposition were returned to power again, the 
president would then have little choice but to 


means that some of the basic questions 
about the leadership wQl remain open even after 
Match 16: Will Mr. Mitterrand remain as presi- 
dent? Will he be able to govern with a rightist 
majority? What authority will he have? 

The answers, some commentators say, will 
not be in the ballot boxes. 


Specifically, political life is colored by the 
nectation mat after the dections the Socialists 


no longer run the government, an element 
that has introduced both considerable harshness 
and greater complexity into current debates. 

One isroe, involving a Socialist plan to create 
a new private TV station, the first in a country 
where the government has always had a monop- 
oly on broadcasting, caused a storm recently m 
large part because of the end-of-an-era mood. 

ut an action that called forth a crescendo of 
Hgminraarinni^ Mr. Mitterrand pushed through 
legislation giving a license for a new station to a 


French-Italian consortium, some of whose 
members are personally close to him. A com- 
mon perception has it that Mr. Mitterrand acted 
when he did to get the station started while be 
still enjoys a parliamentary majority. 

The ri gh t, on the other hand, has accused him 
erf opportunism and of abuse of power, and has 
vowed to reverse the plan after the dections. 
The result is that nobody knows for sure wheth- 
er there will be a new station or not, although 
the best betting seems to be that the process set 
in motion by me So cialis ts is irreversible. 

To many of the French aO this will seem a 
normal part of what, with a degree of cynicism, 
is called “la politique potitidame,” or “politi- 
cians’ politics.” The phrase suggests that some 
of the common tone of moral outrage adopted 
by French political leaders is just part of the 
game played by the ambitious. 

The usual political game has beat accompa- 
nied by disarray in the Socialist camp as each 
major figur e calculates what will be best for his 
future. 

Speculation abounds that Mr. Mitterrand 
and Mr. Fabius are no longer in a mood to 
cooperate with each other. This notion Rimed 
currency earlier this month when Mr. Fabius 
publicly questioned Mr. Mitterrand's reception 
of the Polish leader, General Wqjrioch Jaru- 
zdslri- The prime minis ter said be was “person- 
ally troubled” by the president’s action. 

Many Socialists said this created an image of 
disunity. Mr. Fabms seemed to be separating 


Ratten 

TEL AVIV — Israel will contin- 
ue military reconnaissance flights 
over Lebanon despite a buildup of 
Syrian anti-aircraft missiles there. 
Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin 
said Friday. 

Mr. Rabin also warned of a firm 
Israeli response to the deployment, 
and said the move bad “the poten- 
tial for escalation.’' 

“Israel reserves for itself the 
ways, means and time of how to 
cope with this problem,” he said, 
adding that Israel would “continue 
our flights ova Lebanon." 

Western diplomats, meanwhile, 
said concern was mounting that the 
missiles would lead to a confronta- 
tion, and that the United States 
was deeply involved in efforts to 
defuse the' tension. 

On Thursday, Prime Minister 
Shimon Poes said Syria had rede- 
ployed Soviet-built SAM-6 and 
SAM-8 weapons in eastern Leba- 
non. Fjftiw ibis month, Damascus 
withdrew the missiles after U.S. 
diplomatic intovention. 

Deputy Prime Minister David 
Levy said Friday that Damascus 
should not interpret Israeli re- 
straint as weakness. In addition, 
aides said that Foreign Minister 
Yitzhak S hamir had told a visiting 
UJS. congressman that the missiles 
posed a serious problem. 

The batteries, designed to be 
fired at aircraft flying at low alti- 
tude, apparently are to protect 
long-range SAM-2 weapons de- 
ployed recently on the Syrian side 
of the Lebanese border, Israeli ex- 
perts said. The SAM-2s were de- 
ployed after Israel shot down two 
Syrian MiG-23 fighters on Nov. 19. 

Israel has said it must carry out 
surveillance flights to monitor Pal- 
estinian guerrilla movements in the 
Syrian-controlled Bekaa Valley. It 
has depicted the SAM -6s and 
SAM-8s as a challenge to its free- 
dom to do this. 

In the first week of the June 1982 
invasion of Lebanon, Israel 
launched a broad air operation to 
wipe out Syrian missiles in the Be- 
kaa, and downed 80 Syrian fighters 
in the process. 

The reports of the missile build- 
up came against a background of 
Israeli concern over a recent Syrian 
rapprochement with Jordan, which 
is more moderate. Israeli officials 


fairs, was closely following the mis- 
sile situation ova the holidays, at a 
time when other high-ranking offi- 
cials were on vacation. The New 
York Times reported from Wash- 
ington. 

Although the United States has 
not blamed either Syria or Israel 
for the tensions, State Department 
officials have said that Israel pro- 
voked the Syrians last month by 
shooting down the MiGs inside 
Syrian airspace rather than break- 
ing off the fight when the MiGs 
retreated. 

There is additional concern 
about the effect of the tensions on 
the prospects for Middle East 
peace. Any military engagement 


Nigeria Identifies 14 Coop Plotters 

LAGOS (AFPl — Nigeria named 14 officas Friday, one of them a 
government minister, who have been arrested ova th e paa two week* for 
plotting to overthrow the four-month-old regime of Mqor General 

Ibrahim Babangida. . . 

The list, released by the Infonnauoa Mimstty. appeared to contradict 
widespread speculation that the coup plot had been hatched by nh&rs 
from the north of the country. It included only one northerner, with one 
of the other alleged plotters coming from the niiddle-beU states and four 

from the south. _ , ,, 

The highest-ranking officer on the fist ts Major General Mamm a 
Vatsa. a northerner who also is minister in charge of die federal capfttfof 
Abuja. 


between Israel and Syria would 
; toward pe 


make movement toward peace ne- 
gotiations more difficult, L'.S. offi- 
cials said. 


West Bank Reporter Feared Revenge 

JERUSALEM (Reuters) — A story by a Palestinian jottraalw whose 
body was found last week was published by his newspaper Friday with a 
note in which he asked that the article not be signed because be fearedJor 
his safety. 

Hassan Abdel Halim. 36. of the East Jerusalem daily aJ-Fajr. was 
investigating reports of fraudulent land purchases on the West Bonk. 
Colleagues have said be was killed because of his discoveries, Israeli 
police said an autopsy bad shown that Mr. Halim, who disappeared on 
Oct. 3. died when an explosive charge went off in his bands and tint he 
was not murdered. 

In Friday's story. Mr. Halim named three Arabs who he sai d wak ed 
for Israeli contractors seeking to build Jewish settlements ccyth cf 
Jerusalem. Mr. Halim said the three had used threats and pressure when 
purchasing land from local Arabs. 


MUitiaChiefs End of Martial Law Nears in Pakistan 

Set to Sign 
Lebanon Pact 


have said that Syria appeared to be 
> influence Jordan as 


himself from the president. He appeared to 

' *r March and 


know he would not be in office after 
was trying to enhance his longer-term status. 


striving to influence Jordan against 
entering peace talks with Israel. 

■ U.S. Watching Situation 
State Department officials said 
Thursday that Richard W. Mur- 
phy, assistant secretary of state fra 
Near Eastern and South Asian af~ 



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Reuters 

BEIRUT — Lebanese militia 
leaders prepared Friday to sign a 
peace pact formally ending nearly 
11 years erf a avfl war that has 
killed at least 100,000 people and 
caused up to S20 billion in damage. 

Nabih Beni, the minister of jus- 
tice and leader of the Shiite Mos- 
lem Amal militia, left for Damas- 
cus to sign the Syrian-backed 
accord with Christian and Druze 
militia chiefs. The accord aims to 
end hostilities and introduce wide- 
ranging political reforms, Mr. Ber- 
n's office said. 

There was no immediate indica- 
tion of when EUe Hobeika, the 
leader of the Christian Lebanese 
Forces militia, and WaHd Jumblat, 
the Druze leader, would follow Mr. 
Bern to Syria. 

But after talks on the accord with 
Prime Minister Rashid Karami. a 
Sunni Moslem, Mr. Jumblat said: 
“It’s time for congratulations.” 

Syria's state-controlled press 
said that the pact would strike at 
what it called Israeli designs to par- 
tition Lebanon. The daily newspa- 
per Tishrm warned Israel, whose 
troops patrol a border strip in 
southern Lebanon, to withdraw its 
forces unconditionally. 

Mr. Beni has said only that the 
pacL will be signed before the new 
year starts next Wednesday. Politi- 
cal sources said the ceremony 
might take place on Saturday. 

A scheduled meeting fra Satur- 
day between President Hafez al- 
Assad and King Hussein of Jordan 
was postponed until Monday, Jor- 
danian sources said. There was 
speculation that the meeting was 
postponed to allow the Lebanese 
accord to be signed. 

Details of the Lebanese accord 
remain secret, but political sources 
said it would phaseout the state of 
war, ensure the return of refugees 
to tbeir homes and gradually abol- 
ish the sectarian political system 
favoring the Christian minority. 

Some Christian leaders have ex- 
pressed reservations about reforms, 
which reportedly include measures 
lo curb the power of the Christian- 
held presidency. 

The Christian Phalangjst Party, 
usually loyal to President Amin 
Gemayd, said the pact should be 
submitted to a broad-based Chris- 
tian congress for approval 
The National Liberal Party of 
Camille Chamoun, the rightist 
Christian minister for finance, 
bousing and cooperatives, criti- 
cized the militia peace initiative. A 
party statement said: “The aboli- 
tion of sectarianism in Lebanon 
cannot be accomplished by a stroke 
of the pen. Sectarianism must first 
be removed from the heart.” 



Mohammed Khan June jo 


ISLAMABAD, Pakistan (Reu- 
ters) — Pakistan’s Chilian cabinet 
met Friday to discuss fund prepa- 
rations for ending eight and a half 
years of martial law, tbetauges'. 
period of mfliiary rule in the 38 
years since independence. 

The announcement had seemed 
set for Saturday, but the official 
daily Pakistan Tunes said that 
President Mohammed Zia ul-Haq 
now would probably proclaim the 
end of military rule cm Sunday. A 
civ ilian parliament was chosen last 
February in dections from which 
political parties were banned. 

The cabinet, presided over by 
Prime Minister Mohammed Khan 
Junejo. discussed the political situ- 
ation mid “matters connected with 
the lifting of martial low,” a gov- 
ernment statement said. 


U.S. Court Extends Rights of Spouses 


NEW YORK (NYT) — Medical licenses obtained during a marriage' 
are “marital property” whose value must be divided equitably at the time 


of a divorce. New York state's highest court has 

In a decision that broadens the rights of spouses in divorce actions, the 
New York Court of Appeals ruled unanimously Thursday that a woman 
who helped pay fra her former husband’s Muraiing was entitled 
toashareof the value of the license he subsequently received. 

The derision came in the case of Loretta and Michael O’Brien, a 
Westchester County couple whose nine-and-a-balf-year marriage ended 
in divorce in 1980. During much of their marriage, Mrs. O’Brien waked 
as a teacher while Dr. O'Brien was in t raini ng. In December 

1980, three months after he received his me d ic a l license, Dr. O'Brien sued 
for divorce, then quickly remarried. 


War in West Africa Is Said to Spread 

ABIDJAN, Ivory Coast (AFP) — • Fighting between Burkina Faso and 
Mali entered its third day Friday, amid signs that the war was spreading 
outside the border area that the two sides are struggling to control. 

Each country reported attacks from the other on areas outride the 
Agacher Strip, the contested zone, which is said to be rich in mineral 
Mali said planes from Burkina Faso bombed the town of Sikasso, morS* 
than 300 miles from the contested zone. Burkina Faso said Mali attacked 
the town of Koloko, which is also outride the Agacber Strip. 

The reports followed an announcement of a cease-fire on Thursday by 
the Libyan foreign minister. Ali Abdd-Salem Treild, who traveled to 
both West African countries in an effort to mediate the conflict New 
fighting was reported less than an hour after he announced the cease-fire. 

Chinese to Design U.S* Shuttle Tests 

BELTING (Reuters) — Chinese science students will be invited to 
design experiments to be carried out aboard the UK space shuttle under 
an agreement signed in Beijing on Friday. 

The official Xinhua news agency said that the American Association 
fra Promotion of Scientific Popularization in China, which signed the 
agreement with the Chinese Society of Astronautics, already had booked 
cabin space for the necessary equipment on a future shuttle mission. 

The agency said the Society of Astronautics would seek project 
■“■gestions next year from high school and polytechnic school students 
select those suitable fra the shuttle. 


For the Record 


Spain's lower honse of parfiameat approved a motion Friday in favor of 
the country remaining in the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, offi- 
cials said. (Reuters) 

The Soviet state antine Amrflot and Pan American World Airways, the 
UJS. carrier, will resume direct flights between New York and Moscow on 
April 27, Civil Aviation Minister Boris Bogayev of the Soviet Union said 
Friday. The flights were suspended in 1981. (Reuters) 

Members of Japan's cabinet and ruling party agreed Friday on a 6.58- 
perceni increase in defense spending for the 1986 fiscal year to 33 trillion 
yen (SI 6.5 billion), a Defense Agency official said. (AP) 

Cyprus and the Soviet Union have signed two-year scientific and 
cultural cooperation agreements, the Cyprus News Agency reported 

Frf day- (Reuters) 


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North Korea Joins Treaty 
On Nuclear Containment 


By Michael R. Gordon 

Hew York Tuna Service 

WASHINGTON — North Ko- 
rea has joined the Nuclear Nonpro- 
liferation Treaty, Reagan adminis- 
tration officials have announced. 

North Korea's move was de- 
scribed by government officials 
and private experts Thursday as an 
important development in efforts 
to prevent the spread of the ability 
to make nuclear weapons to the 
Korean peninsula. 

North Korea formally acceded 
to the treaty in Moscow on Dec. 12. 
The Soviet Union informed the 
United States of the action cm Dec. 
19, a. State Department official 
said. 

The North Korean nuclear pro- 
gram has been a matter of concern 
because the North Koreans have 
been building a nuclear research 
reactor that has not been subject to 
international .inspection. The con- 
struction apparently is being done 
without the help of other natioos, 
officials said. 

The United States has long 
sought Soviet help in. persuading 
North Korea to sign the 1968 trea- 
ty, a dmin i s tration officials said. 

Nations can join the treaty by 
providing documents to the United 
States, Britain or the Soviet' Union, 
the only signatory countries al- 
lowed to have nuclear weapons. . 

Under the treaty, nations not 


wives and agree to inspections 
the International Atomic Ener- 


gy Agency, About 132 nations have 
joined. 

The treaty, however, does no* 
prohibit nations, in the course erf a 


as 


accumulating «at»riifl r such 
lutonhun, that could be used to 
:e nuclear weapons. Signatories 
also pledge to share peaceful nucle- 
ar technology. 


nor to make or receive, nadear ex- 


•wiuc nmgnasunuu sources, wn 
have discussed the, matter with ac 
ministration experts, say the Non 
Korean research facility now und< 
construction win be a 30-megawa 
reactor that will use natural uran 
am and graphite to produce a nt 
dear reaction. 

In addition, a small four-meg 
wan research reactor that b subja 
to international .safeguards hr 
been supplied to North Korea fc 
the Soviet Union. 

Under the t r eaty, the larger rea 
tor would now be open to fanera 
tional inspection. The pr w w pn 
cedures under which sue 
inspections would be carried a 
stiD must be worked out. 

The United States has long bee 
concerned about the spread to th 
Korean peninsula of the ability t 
make nuclear weapons. U& fora 
based in Sooth Korea have 
nndear weaprais. 

. South Korea ratified the treat 
to 1975 under pressure from tl 
United States and Canada. 


-f 













INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDA Y-SUNDAY , DECEMBER 28-29, 1985 


Page 3 


ions of Dollars Lost 



AMERICAN TOPICS 


>)f Agencies, GAO Says 


, By Fred Hiart 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. 
: . (vernntent lost bfflkms of dollars 


* - , -is yeM Pccuuae ui pum iiwiiny 
'iot in virtually every msjOT agen- 
tbe General Accounting Office 
k fcu.i ududed this week. ■ 

^B.Ib a year-aid report^card that 
. ' 'edits the administration with 
- 7 «d mien dons but poor foflow- 
- ■ ■[" lough, the GAO found agnifi- 


cmmeotal function involving large 

..sums of money. 

Although each department has 
pledged improvements, the GAO 
said, “the major problems so far 
remain largely unchanged* 

In a letter presenting the report 
to. Congress, Charles A. Bawdier, 
the comptroller general and twad 
of the accounting office, wrote: 

“Widespread and often long- 
standing weaknesses and break- 


; nt breakdowns in weapons pro- downs ip agency internal controls 
- remeoi. Social Security continue to result in wasteful 
ministration, property manage- spending, poor management and 
: jnr and almost every other gov- involving billions of dollars 

•. _ of federal funds. The weaknesses 

have also made outright fraud more 
feasible.” 

The GAO, the investigative arm 
of Congress, examined 23 agwwfoc 
that together spend more than 95 
percent of the federal budget. It 
found that none of t hem has fully 
put into effect the .Federal Manag- 
ers’ Financial Integrity Act of 1982, 
which was meant to improve inter- 
nal financial controls in federal bu- 
reaucracies and bring some consis- 
tency to the 427 separate 
accounting systems that they use. 

The Office of Management and 
Budget, winch is responsible for 
putting the act into effect, respond- 
ed to the GAO report by claiming 



Joseph R. Wright Jr„ deputy di- 
• -V I Paid Austin recU)r •** o£Cce - said that im- 

, proving financial management is a 

JP . # top ad m in i stration objective but 

AllfitiTI cautioned that the calls by the ao- 
iflUSliU counting office for closer mooitor- 
" • ing of agency progress could back- 

|_/I \jOCfl"vtOlfl “We are concerned that comply- 
ing with the GAO recommenda- 
. r J *7£\ “oas would impose an audit-ori- 

’■ ' AS DCttU (H 4 U ented approach, require much 

more detailed testing and result in 
\juud Press immatkexd cumbersome reporting and even 
,,, . ati amt a — J Paul Austin. “*ore paperwork,” Mr. Wright said 

«r a* C n. who e*. Many of the problems a ted m 
■ • " the 71-page GA<5 report have been 

• -* mredW^a ling reporr<x ? Py ** 

'■••best ^ ^ accounting office or by the tnspec- 

V- Mr. Austin, who was bom in , .... 


Many of the emblems cited in 
■- “ the 71-page GA<5 report have been 

1 • ■ mred^afS^a ling reporra ? «d«r - by ^ 

• '-besx ^ ^ accounting office or by the tnspec- 

Mr. Austin, who was bom in , . . , 

■ ^Grange, Georgia, retired on The problems detailed included 

- -Jndtiflttl. after 15 years at the ** 

dm of Coke. *The Treasury Department's 

• timw his leadership . Coke re- computer systems are vulnerable to 

- .anted to in 1979, where it accidental or intentional misuse, 

- ad been harmed following the the GAO found. The result is “con- 
tommy's revolution more than 30 t^ued potential for fraudulent di- 

- r ears earlier. Mr. Austin also version of electronic funds trans- 

lated the return af Coke to Egypt fers totaling billions of dollars.” 
i the 1970s. • The Veterans Administration 

s ■ Mr. Anstin was opposed to trade wastes mfllions of dollais by failing 

■ '.I* ©ycotts and believed strong busi- to control medically unnecessary 

ess ties encouraged community ad m issions, according to the re- 
r datiops among nations. port. In addition, the agency main- 



Marcos Foes Say They’d Let 
U.S. Keep Bases Until 1991 


The Associated Press 

OLONGAPO, Philippines — 
Corazon C. Aquino, the opposition 
presidential candidate, has told Fil- 
ipinos who live near the Subic Bay 
Naval Base that if elected presi- 
dent, she would allow the United 
States to keep two large military 
bases at least until 1991. 

Appearing Thursday in Olon- 
gapo, which is near Subic and the 
dark Air Base, Mrs. Aquino and 
her vice presidential candidate, Sal- 
vador H. Laurel, tried to counter 
local feats that an Aquino- Laurd 
victory over President Ferdinand 
E Marcos would mean an end to 
U.S. use of the bases. Nearly 40,000 
Filipino civ ilians are employed 
there. 

Under the treaty allowing the 
United States to use the bases, ei- 
ther side may end the agreement 
after 1991, upon giving a year’s 



Corazon C Aquino 
of fomenting fears that a Marcos 


alter twi, upon giving a years of fomenting fears that a Marcos 
nonce. Technically, Subic and defeat would mean an end to the 
Clark are Philippine bases, al- U.S. presence there 
though the U5. presence dwarfs Leftist groups, including some 
the any Philippine military contin- that have supported Mrs. Aquino, 
gent at both. have advocated immediaie removal 

Mrs. Aquino told the crowd, “1 of the bases. 
wQl respect the bases up until 1991 In a separate development Fri- 
and keep all of our options open." day in the campaign for the FHl 7 


The economy of Olongapo, election, Mr. Marcos accused Mrs. 


band, Benigno S. Aquino Jr. Mr. 
Aquino, who had been Mr. Mar- 
cos’s strongest political rival was 
assassinated in August (983 as be 
returned from three yean: of self- 
imposed exile in the United States. 

In 1977, a military court convict- 
ed Mr. Aquino on the charge, 
which he had denied. 

Mr. Marcos made the accusation 
against Mrs. Aquino in a cerempny 
at the presidential palace. “Gory 
and the opposition are hiding" The 
killing. Mr. Marcos said, using 
Mrs. Aquino's nickname. 

Mrs. Aquino's spokeswoman - re- 
plied: “Obviously, this ploy is a 
dear indication of how bankrupt 
the regime is of substantive issues. 
Mr. Marcos is now employ ing. his 
traditional tactic of black propa- 
ganda." 

■ Rebels May Weigh Truce; 

The accused chief of the out- 
lawed Communist Party of .the 
Philippines has said that rebel 
forces would "seriously consider" 
Mrs. Aquino'scall for a cease-fire if 
she is elected. United Press Inter- 
national reported Friday from Ma- 
nila. quoting an opposition news- 
paper. 

Jose Maria Sisco, who has been 


northwest of Manila, is heavily de- Aquino of covering up the killing of imprisoned since 1977 as the sus- 


pended upon Subic. Mr. Laurel a local official in the 1960s. 


accused Mr. Marcos and Olongi 
po’s mayor. Richard Gordon, wb 


After martial law was declared in 
1972, the same accusation was 


both want to keep Subic and Clark, made against Mrs. Aquino's bus- 


pec ted chairman of the party, said 
Mrs. Aquino bad adopted a “wise 
and commendable position." the 
newspaper Maiaya said Friday. 


Mob Killing Removed Heir Apparent 

New York Experts Say No. 2 Man Was a Primary Target 


By Sclwyn Rabb 

New York Timer Service 


Mr. Gotti for the top position are: 
Joseph N. Gallo, the current con- 


NEW YORK —After a week of rtptere, or counselor, who will be 
inieQigence analysis of the slayings ^ 0011 month and is a member of 
of two alleged Mafia figures, Paul **« Castellano faction, and James 
C Castellano and Thomas BOotti, Failla. also known as Jimmy 
law-enforcement officials now say Brown, who will be 67 next month 


FROZEN FALLS —Winter has considerably slowed the 01 
western Oregon, which. Iflte mucb of the United States, is su 


-- A Harvard Law School graduate, to“is such poor watch over drag 
b. Austin went to work for the supplies that “it was very difficult 
.Kama-based company in 1949 10 determine whether a particular 


manta-based company m ism# «uoua * 

flowing service in World War IL drag was missing, or in cases where 
ewSs dected a vice preadeni in VA could "*“t quantity was 
953 and became prcsidtml in 1962. missing, how it disappeared.” 

~ j 1970, he was also named chair- • The Defense Department’s 
- ian of the board. Logistics Agency, which buys sup- 


- Coca-Cola had sales of $567 mil- plies for the military, reported last 

- on and eanrings of $46-7 million year that it had paid S22.6 million 
: ^ien Mr. Austin took over as pres- for items that it could not verify 

knL When he retired in 1981, the hod been received. Another $53 
% company had reached saks of over million had been spent for prod- 
“" 5i hiffion and earnings over $460 nets that were already 90 days past 

- riOifln. delivery at the time of the GAO 

He went to China in 1979 to join review. 

jvonmenl officials in dedicating • The GAO said the Pentagon 
te first Coke bottling plant since procurement system, which will 
-* Communist revolution. That spend $100 billion this year, con- 
nne year, Fanta Orange, another tinoes to be marked by weak aw- 
oke soft drink, went on sale in the trols leading to overpriced spare 
oviet Union. parts, lack of competition, cost 

- Mr. Austin is survived by his growth and a reliance on contrac- 
ife and two sons, aO of Atlanta; _ tor cost estimates, 
is mother and & sister, of Braden- ® The accounting office also 
®, Florida, and six grandchildren, found that the National Aeronau- 
I Other deaths: tics and Space Administration does 


I Other deaths- tics and Space Administration does 

MeSL'CLTuS ™,on ^ 

- -asper the Friendly Ghost” and . _1 
3 d« the Cat,” Wednesday in 

•^ensaefc, New Jersey. -w-w • 

Police Officii 

- mhem England. Sir James served _ 

World War I in France as an {9/V^m-m 
te%nce and staff officer and IflllY UB 11WO 
tended the 1919 Versailles peace J 

inference as a member erf the Brit- The Associated Press 

.- ^delega tion. MEXICO CITY — Tbe theft of 

*Opes GhazeSe, 64, France’s 140 priceless pre-Columbian arti- 


Pofl finds little Siga 
OfaNewParitamsm 

A Los Angles Times poD 
shows no coavindng evidence 
of the rmtrh talked-aboot reviv- 
al ot pnriumsm in the United 
Stales. Many attitudes, in fact, 
have not changed since the so- 
called sexual revolution of the 
late 1960s. 

In the case of premarital sex, 
views are becoming more liber- 
al: Of (he Z308 people polled 
throughout tire United States, 
35 percent called it wrong, com- 
pared to 46 percent in a poO 
conducted in 1972. Bnt extra- 
marital sex is held to be wrong 
by 85 percent, up one percent- 
age point from a 1973 poIL 

As recently as 1982, 74 per- 
cent of those polled said it was 
easy to tell right from wrong. 
Now only 59 percent say so. In 
a poD in 1968, 36 percent saw 
the United Stats as a “side so- 
ciety.” This has since climbed 
to 39 percent. 

In tbe midst of the publicity 
about acquired immune defi- 
ciency syndrome, or AIDS, the 
Americas public has not eased 
its profound disapproval of ho~ 
mceexnafity: A 73-percent ma- 
jority viewed “sexual relations 
between two adults of the same 
sex" as wrong, down only three 
percentage points from a 1973 
poIL 

On the other hand, there are 
growing expressions of sympa- 


high-risk group for AIDS. Ttao 
years ago, when AIDS was not 
the public issue h is today, onty 
30 percent of the public said it 
was sympathetic to the homo- 
sexual co mmuni ty The figure 
now is 41 percent. 

Short Takes 

As 61 P Mad d pliia dwellings 
lay smoldering last May, gutted 
in the city’s bombing of tbe 
MOVE group’s headquarters. 
Mayor W. Wilson Goode said 
be hoped the rebuilding of the 
houses would be completed by 
Christmas “if everything goes 
like clockwork." It did not go 
like dodcwoik. Because of legal 
difficulties and construction de- 
lays, only five of the 61 houses 
have been finished, and none of 
tbe 250 displaced persons has 
yet moved in. Mayer Goode 
now ays that all of the bouses 
should be ready by March. 

Wornea how influence 81 per- 
cent Of all automobile pur- 
chases and are the primary ded- 
aon makers in 39 percent of 
titan, up hon 33 percent in 
1978 and 25 percent in 1973, 
wreradmg to a 1984 marketing 
snryey. Makers are modifying 
their rfeyjg ns and »h«r advertis- 
ing accordingly, Tbe New York 
Times reports. Women like 
smaller, fud-effidenl 
and they shop around more 
than men da Chevrolet is drop- 
ping its sponsorship of some 


Unihri ftt» luHrntfi f i u l 

rfpat erf Multnomah Falls in 
Bering thr ou gh a cold snap. 

(devision sports programs and 
buying more prime-time and 
daytime drama programming. 

Professors at the 169 law 
schnp ig in the United States 
publish scholarly papers up to a 
point, two law professors re- 
port, and that is the point at 
which they receive tenure and 
cannot be without se- 

rious cause. Michael L Swygen 
of Stetson University in De 
TanH , Florida, and Nathaniel 
E. Gozansky of Emory Univer- 
sity in Atlanta said that of 1 ,950 
professors surveyed beginning 
in 1980, 862 had published 
nothing within three or four 
years of receiving tenure, and 
404 had work published only 
once. 

Las Vegas officials are study- 
ing the feasibility of building a 
300-milc-per-hour (490-kDome- 
ter-per-hour) magnetically levi- 
tated train by the end of the 

century to bring people from 
Southern California in an hour 
or so. Such trains are being de- 
veloped in Japan and West Ger- 
many but noosis in service any- 
where. Bill Briare, mayor of Las 
Vegas, says, “If it’s inevitable 
that this technology is going to 
be accepted in the United 
Stales — and I think it is — 
then the sooner somebody gets 
started, the better, and it might 
as well be Las Vegas.” 

Compiled by 
ARTHUR HIGBEE 


)tti was a primary tar- and is a member of the rival Ddh- 

ibly tbe main one, be- croce faction 

emerged as the under- Amdlo Dellacroee, who died 


that Mr. Bilotti was a primary tar- 
get and possibly tbe main one. be- 
cause he had emerged as the under- 
boss erf the Gambino crime family. 


blocked from acquiring top posts in 
the Gambino group. 

The director erf New York State's 
Organized Crime Strike Force. 
Ronald Goldstock, and other offi- 
cials. said last week that Mr. Cas- 
tellano apparently had become a 
liability to members of his own 
organization and leaders of the 
four other Mafia families in New 


As underboss, he would have treated cancer, had been the 
been the family’s No. 2 leader and noderboss and was considered a 
the heir apparent to Mr. Caste!- peacemaker among the factions in 
lano the sa»d. Thev added groep. 


Dec. 2, at the age of 71, while bring York- 

treated for cancer, bad been the These officials asserted that Mr. 


Castellano was believed to have 
been neglecting business matters 
and impeding profitable criminal 


that a faction of the groap led by From the onset of the homicide undertakings because of his diffi- 
John Gotti feared that ifMr. Cas- investigation, local state and feder- cullies in a current federal racke- 


teering trial and other pending 


tellano were killed or sattenced to 21 prosecutors and investigators leering trial and other p 
prison. Mr. Bilotti stffl would be ^ ^ suspected Mr. Gotti's criminal cases against him. 
powerful enough to lake over as unit had been responsible for (he According to confidenti 
arriTip boss. murder of Mr. Castellano. and police intelligence r 

After reviewing information once the death of Carlo Ga 


acting boss. 

Based on confidential intelli- 


dais from the New York Gty Po- electronic eavesdroppmg, 
lice Department and the U.S. ptore smd they bebwed tiie GolU 
JustioeDepartment said that Mr. 

Bilotti had been down «n equal target with Mr Osienwio 

along with Mr. cSno on a ° F 

Manhattan sidewalk Dec. 16 as congo 1 .of the entire family.^ 


unit had been responsible for (he According to confidential FBI 
murder of Mr. CasieDano. and police intelligence repents. 

After reviewing information since the death of Carlo Gambino. 
gleaned mainly from informers and the founder of the family, in 1976 
electronic eavesdropping, invest]- the group had been split between 
gators said they believed the Gotti factions led by Mr. Castellano and 
faction had marked Mr. Bilotti as Mr. DeHacroce. 
an equal target with Mr. Castellano Mr. Gotti, who is a caporegima. 
to prevent him from fighting for was identified by the police as loyal 


.1 w. Officials emphasized that Mr. 

Bilotti had become a chief confi- death, law-enforcement officials 
£^^^““ beadofaieGam - dam to Mr. Castellano and had said Thursday. Mr. CasteUano was 
Dmooymnoo. been promoted recently to tbe rank ready to name Mr. Bilotti as the 

Mf- Lasteuano, TO, and Mr. Bi- of caporegima. or capiain. underboss. Mr. Bilotti, who lived 

100445 , were kffledm a fusillade as A high New York City Police on Staten Island near Mr. Castcl- 

tney emerged from ajimousitt Department official said that Mr. lano, had a reputation, according 
driven by Mr. Booth. Organized- Gotti, 45. had a long feud with Mr. to police intelligence reports, as 
enme experts puMcy laenttfied According to the officials, one of the toughest leaders in the 

Mr. Castellano as tbe leader of the hiformanls have reported that Mr. Castellano faction and had been 
Oandxiio orgamzauop smee 1976 fcarcd ^ ^ Bilotti be- known 10 smash opponents over 

and Mr. Bilotti as a nsmg and on- Mmi ! ^ underboss, then Mr. the head with a baseball bat to end 
portant figure in the group. Gotti and his faction would be disputes. 


to the Dellacroee faction. 

Following Mr. Dellacroce's 
death, law-enforcement officials 
said Thursday. Mr. Castellano was 


been promoted recently to the rank ready to name Mr. Bilotti as the 
of caporegima, or capiain. underboss. Mr. Bilotti, who lived 

A high New York City Police on Staten Island near Mr. Castcl- 
Department official said that Mr. lano, had a reputation, according 
Gotti, 45, had a long feud with Mr. to police intelligence reports, as 


portant figure in the group. 

Federal and local law-enforce- 
ment officials said that since the 
slaying homicide detectives and 
agents of the Federal Bureau of 
investigation have observed mem- 
bers of the Gotti and Castellano 
factions meeting in the Ozone Park 
section of Queens, and the Little 
Italy section of Manhattan. The 
sessions, informers have told the 
police, were called to smooth over 
differences and to determine a suc- 
cessor to Mr. Castellano as tbe 
heflrf of the Gambino family. 

Among those cited by organized- 
crime experts as potential rivals to 


the head with a baseball bat to end 
disputes. 



Police Official Suggests Museum Staff 
May Be Involved in Mexican Art Theft 


suerence as a member of the Brit- The Associated Press 

^delega tion. MEXICO CITY — The theft of 

"tapes ChazeBe, 64, France’s 140 priceless pre-Columbian arti- 
abassador to Portugal, of a cere- facts here this wed: may have been 
1 « hemorrhage m Lisbon, the an inside job, a senior police offi- 

fi W •• ‘JJKh Embassy said Thursday. cial has been quoted as saying. 
fityMcNkbois, 71, a UA Di ~ 


Meanwhile, police checked trav- er museum director, said. 


Enrique Florescano, a director of judkaaty police forensic service, 
the museum. was quoted by the Notrinex news 

“They were systematic in what agency as saying that the thieves 
they wanted, choosing the best left numerous fingerprints, 
known pieces, as if they bad a list in Police have been X-raying pas- 

hand,” Marda Castro Le6n, anoth- sengers* luggage at the country's 55 


( ' : ct Court judge, Wednesday in e lers leaving the country in hopes 


airports^and conducting spot 


' : «t Court judge, Wednesday in elers leaving the country in hopes Exc&sior quoted Mr. Rocha searches at roadblocks, ports, refi- 
ll ,7l.'(]t sse > Idaho. He was appointed a 0 f preventing tbe thieves from Cordero as saying that the thieves road stations and bus depots. But 
{ i “ fcral judge in 1964 by President smuggling out the centuries-old scaled tbe museum’s high steel authorities said they had no dues 


.'“dou B. Johnson. 


1964 by President smuggling out the centuries-old 


scaled tbe museum’s high steel authorities said they had no dues 
fence, crawled through a broken to tbe whereabouts of the artifacts. 


'“on B. Johnson. gold, jade and stone relics from fence, crawled through a broken to tne wnereaoou 

R»if Denktash, 34, the son of the Aztec, Mayan and other Indian civ- air-oondiuomng tunnel to the base- A worldwide 
ifkish Cypriot leader. Rauf ifizations. tnent, then went through the first tiirough Interpol 

abash, Friday in Ankara from The relics annarentlv were stolen and second-floor showrooms. No m leraabonal pol 
im« sustained in a traffic acri- ChristmasSrebul the theft was locks were picked, no glass broken The Mexicmt Rm 

m, tar forred op^, offidak . . te e me d. 

f ar f; museum of- M ^^ os Tornero. director o, the mli 

CHURCH SERVICES 

M Salvador Army Leade 

'S&SRSSSlW UMESS^aB ^n, Nn 4 nr i 

Sunday «nhip in En^ivh W5 at ibc ease with which the thieves I fifty nfl fl I lO W ora OI 


CHURCH SERVICES 


air-conditioning tunnel to the base- A worldwide alert was sent 
mea t, that went through the first tiirough Interpol the Paris-based 
and second-floor showrooms. No international police organization. 


id. stolen artifacts to 

Carlos Tornero. director of the ments. 


nistry said 
turn of the 
ly govem- 


A. Soimnarvilla. Tel.j „ nr ked 

wonsea. 


Salvador Army Leaders Say 
They Had No Word of Truce 


MfiBSUttJttS 


In less than three hours, between 
two and four thieves selectively 


Lm Angela Times Service 

SAN SALVADOR — Guerrillas 


•*>45| Wonhip: 10:45. 0*w ftdivfliBt. dero reportedly said. 

* hr- B.C. Thomas, Pastor . . r. 

47j4P.t5.29. knew perfe 


Los Angela Times Service dent lost Napoleon Duarte on 

SAN SALVADOR— Guerrillas Tuesday. The commandere said 
accused H Salvadofs government they were launching operations as 
Thursday of violating a holiday usual during the hobdays. 
truce with an air raid of bombs and On Tuesday, the government an- 

rockets against the rebels in tbe notmeed that it would accept a pro- 
irn inra nf MnrazAn. but oosal bv the Roman Catholic 


STOCKHOLM 


BRUSSELS 


“They knew perfectly weD tow ^ Mo razAn, but posal by the Roman Catholic 

tbe place functioned the pobce ^ gonavmder there and Church for a 10-day trace to cease 
official was quoted as saying. remmsndas in ot h CT conflict areas offensives and aDow soldiers and 
“They had enough tune to go they had not been informed of combatants to return home for the 
through half the museum, winch holidays. 

places suspicion on the guards, who 3 ■ He rebd militaiy Farabundo 

were oblieed to do the rounds every A mtiiiaiy spokesman here said National liberation Frtal 


CTorvHniM official was quoted as saymg. 

j *4nub church mar dty amtor. “They had enough lime to go 
■^dvinianMawihip. Suidm ilool through half the museum, which 
^tQ8) 316051, ist 225. places suspicion on the guards, who 

Brussels were obliged to do the rounds every 


^CAN LUTHERAN CHURCH wskoniM tW0 hOUR. 

w»8ifwt!aii*. Sunday poo, 4«e. So- Sght guards who were on duty 
WotuwSt. Pmt*. ToLi 77U140. at the museum during Christinas 

7 j Eve were being questioned bat 

0 place an adverthement [ none has been charged. The Atior- 
in this section I nev GeneraTs Office said Thursday 


combatants to return home for the 
holidays. 

The rebd militaiy Farabundo 
Marti National Liberation Front 


that the armed forces maintained said that it would agree to the 
their positions during Ouistmas uucejf the government would. 

end mat artmr ra wio honc nw>r»» . . 


In a broadcast over their clan- 


and that all army operations were 
undertaken in response to guoiiCa 


&U Elimbetb HER WOOD 
181 Ave. Qb-de-GiMiIIe, 
2521 NeatiK Cedex, France. 
T«L: 747,12.65. 


none has been charged. The Attor- attaiis. 

ncx GeneraTs Office said Thursday Military commanders in the 

that they were not considered sus- provinces of Morazin, Chalaten- 
pects. apg n and Oiscatttn, areas.of nor- 

The museum had no electronic mafiy heavy fighting raid they 
detection devices and relied on were not informed by thebgfa cma- 
guards to protect its treasures, said mand of a trace agreed to by Frea- 


accused the armed forces Thursday 
of bombing and rocketing several 
areas of Morazan on Christmas 
Day, hitting at least eight tomes of 
dvdians ami wounding a women 
and two children in the hamlet of 
La Jqya. 





Page 4 


SATURDAY-SUNDAY, DECEMBER 28-29, 1985 


Reralh 


INTERNATIONAL 


(tribune 


PuhlMifd WithTbe New York Ting «nd The W»»hiBgm> Port 


A Poor Year on the Hill 


The backside of a departing Congress is 
always a tempting target, and never more so 
than this year. A farm bill was finally enacted, 
and tax reform passed the House, but the 
members left town without having passed an 
immigration bill, a Superfund bOl, a civil rights 
bQl, a Conrad bill, a higher education bill, a 
biU setting up a new retirement system for 
federal employees. The excuse is that the bud- 
get and the deficit took up so much time. Yet 
the deficit was not dealt with either. 

' It took Congress seven months just to adopt 
the budget resolution — the declaration of 
goals and intentions with which the budget 
process each year is supposed to start The 
declaration was weak; efforts by the Senate to 
strengthen it by opening the way to Social 
Security cuts and possible tax increases, were 
defeated by President Reagan and the House. 
Hie last months of the session were then sup- 
posed to be spent carrying out the resolution, 
partly by trimming appropriations, partly by 
tinkering in a recondlation bill with the under- 
lying laws on which spending each year — 
both benefits and appropriations — is based. 

This book-length reooncOiatioa biU was the 
perfect metaphor for the session. It sounded 
more important than it was. It reached into 
many comers — Medicare reimbursement 
rates, federal pay, the tobacco program, eligi- 
bility for Aid to Families with Dependent 
Children and college student loans, the right to 
free care at veterans 1 hospitals. The congres- 
sional budget committees said the bill would 
cut the deficit by S20 billion this fiscal year 


and $75 billion through fiscal 1988 — impres- 
sive numb ers. But part of the 520 billion the 
administration had already achieved by execu- 
tive order, part was fanciful accounting and 
only part was “real.” The bill would have left 
the deficit about where it found it. 

And even then, it did not pass. In the final 
hours it was put over until next year because of 
a breakdown between the House and the Sen- 
ate over the use of a sales tax to finance the 
Superfund. A fiscal remedy was sidetracked 
because of a programmatic dispute; it has 
happened all year. Nor apparently would it 
have mattered if the two houses had resolved 
their differences. The president was waiting to 
veto the bill, also on assorted programmatic 
grounds. "From the standpoint of deficit re- 
duction we end the year on a very di s m a l 
note,” said Fete Domenid, the dogged chair- 
man of the Senate Budget Committee. 

On another level it is possible to argue that 
this was a year of reassertioa for Congress on 
the budget. In the defense authorization and 
appropriation bills and again in the Gramm- 
Ru dman amendment to the budget process, it 
sent the president the message that he can no 
longer count on increases in spending author- 
ity for defense if he will not propose a way to 
finance than. And in fact some part of Con- 
gress’s dereliction may be traced directly to an 
absence of c ommit ment in the White House. 
But you can make too much of this. It would 
be a cop-out to suggest that Congress's failures 
are not largely of its own making. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


So Bake It Bulletproof 


Every year at this time, millions or fruit- 
cakes are given to people. We are reliably 
informed that many are eaten, but we have 
also seen quite a bit of evidence that many are 
not. That is why we think Senator Sam Nunn 
should go a little easier on the Pentagon and its 
I£-page instructions for baking fruitcake. 

The recipe is printed in the official military 
specifications for bakers who might want to 
produce tbe cakes for troops overseas. It stipu- 
lates, for example, that flavoring “shall be pure 
or artificial v anill a in such quantities that its 
presence shall be organoleptically detected.” 
Mr. Nunn told tbe Senate about fills recipe in 
order to make a point concerning overspecify- 
ing by the military and how it contributes to 
America's military procurement problems. But 
he faded to pat it in the larger context of 
America’s fruitcake problem. 

■ In some households, as we said, the fruit- 
cake is eaten, but in others it is storal away in 


its unopened tin; or a few slices are cut and 
partially eaten, but the rest is stored. Some- 
times it is passed on as a gift for someone else. 
As it lies in some dark comer of the house, it is 
recalled with feigned fondness when tbe per- 
son who gave it comes to visit. No-one has the 
heart or the nerve to throw one away. 

It becomes, then, a simple matter of morale 
for tbe Pentagon to insist on a fruitcake that is 
built to rigid tolerances, capable of bang 
stored for bog periods in a footlocker or duffle 
bag, of being carried in a field pack on maneu- 
vers, of surviving a direct hit or a white-glove 
inspection, of enduring extreme climates from 
the tropics to the Arctic. Under the anUtar/s 
exacting specifications, 12 tons (10.8 metric 
tons) of fruitcake were produced for the troops 
this year at a cost of 5151 a pound (454 
grams), which seems to us a bargain when you 
consider that, quite often, fruitcake is forever. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


For a Declared War on Terror 

[Gradually the people of the United States 
are coming to understand that terrorism is the 
characteristic form of warfare of this age, and 
that the choice of strategies to counter it is no 
different from what it was when Hitler was the 
threat: alliance or appeasement. 

• .This threat has a different face to it. Its 
weapons are not Panzer divisions and Stuka 
dive bombers but handguns and grenades. It is 
the form of warfare that those who are weak in 
conventional arms employ against powers 
which are stronger. It relies on stealth, obvi- 
ously, but it also relies on intimidation, and 
that was part of Hitler’s arsenal. He managed 
for too many years to stare down tbe free 
nations of the West, and convince them that 
they might buy peace and safety for them- 
selves by ignoring his attacks on others. Even- 
tually even America, which had an ocean’s 
protection from his assaults, came to see there 
was no way to avoid the inevitable confronta- 
tion. But the lost time cost countless lives. 

-So it is with terrorism. A nation that sits 
back and hopes that its citizens will not be 
targets of terrorism makes it ever more likely 
that they will be targeted. But a nation that 
demonstrates its readiness — indeed, its eager- 
ness — to make terrorists pay for their crimes 
will offer its citizens the only real protection 
they can have in such an age. 

President Reagan and his associates are en- 
titled to credit for gradually but steadily mov- 
ing the United States toward a realistic anti- 
terrorist policy. Instead of concealing 
American cooperation and participation in 
counterterrorist strikes, we should publicize 
and proclaim that it will be U.S. policy to lend 
all possible assistance to any friendly govern- 
ment whose citizens are taken hostage. That 
notice — tbe clear, advance warning to terror- 
ists- anywhere that if they strike against any- 
one; we are coming aTier them — is the best 
insurance policy against terrorism we can buy. 
' Does such a policy make us accomplices in 


the deaths of innocents? I do not bdieve so, far 
( really do think it is the most effective deter- 
rent against repeated terrorist attacks. 

Let us not use our compassion for the inno- 
cent as an excuse for appearing terrorism. And 
let us not conceal or be coy about the fact that 
the policy of the government of the United 
States is to go after terrorists, rather than to 
wait passively for them to strike again 
— David S. Broder in The Washington Post. 

Arafat’s Time Is Running Out 

King Hussein of Jordan has tried with great 
persistence during tbe past 12 months to per- 
suade Yasser Arafat of (he Palestine Libera- 
tion Organization to make an unequivocal 
statement of his willingness to come to the 
negotiating table on the basis of United Na- 
tions Resolution 242. It is the only internation- 
ally agreed formula for resolving the conflict 
and enshrines the principle of Israel exchang- 
ing land for peace. Instead. Mr. Arafat shelters 
behind the unconvincing explanation that as 
recognition of Israel is the biggest card in his 
hand, it must be the last one to be played. 

In fact be has no other cants to play if he 
genuinely wishes to accelerate the peace pro- 
cess. He is now more isolated dun ever before 
and is thus less able to appear as a credible 
spokesman for the 1.2 mflfiou Palestinians 
Irving under Israeli occupation. 

King Hussein believes, as do some Israelis, 
that occupation is rapidly becoming indistin- 
guishable from colonization. If Mr. Arafat 
wishes to check that process, which contains 
all tbe seeds of another war, be has the obliga- 
tion to follow tbe advice of King Hussein and 
President Mubarak of Egypt [to seek a negoti- 
ated peace]. If he cannot do that be will find 
that he has been deserted even by those who 
currently profess friendship. Once that hap- 
pens — and it is coming steadily closer — no 
one wiD be listening when Mr. Arafat does 
finally accept 242. 

— The Financial Times (London). 


FROM OUR DEC 28 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Wedding Ring BiU Is Proposed 
NEW YORK — An amusing illustration of 
the land of legislation which women's suffrage 
may be expected to promote is furnished [on 
Dec. 27] in New Jersey, where thousands of 
matrons are organizing a campaign in favor of 
the compulsory wearing of wedding rings by 
married mat. Under the auspices of the Cu- 
pid’s Wing Cub, a “bill for the protection 
Of our daughters against the wiles of married 
men who masquerade as bachelors” has beat 
prepared for the next sesaon of tbe legis- 
lative assembly. The bDl makes it a felony 
punishable by a fine of 5500, or two years’ 
imprisonment, for any married man to neglect, 
when away from home, to wear on his thumb a 
ring to show that he is married. 


1935: Austria Frees Socialists, Nazis 
VIENNA — The doors of Austrian prisons 
were thrown open [on Dec. 27] for hundreds of 
Socialists and Nazis released under the gov- 
ernment's Christmas amnesty. Many were sen- 
tenced for their part in the uprising of Febru- 
ary, 1934. when the government wiped out the 
Socialists in Vienna. It is understood that Dr. 
Anton Rintelen, Minister to Italy at the time 
of the Nazi putsch in July, 1934, will also be 
released. It is claimed that Rintelen was to 
have been Chancellor if tbe putsch bad suc- 
ceeded. The amnesty followed persistent pres- 
sure by the Socialists. It is taken as indicating 
the Cabinet's intention of patching up peace 
with the workers in order to present a strong 
front against the Nazi movement during 1936. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chatman 1938-1982 

KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 



LEE W. HUEBNER, Publisher 
Eteattrie Editor 
Editor 
Deputy Editor 
Deputy Editor 
Associate EMtor 


Deputy Pub&ther 
Associate PiAtidur 
Associate PuNiskcr 


Director of Gmdatwn 
rector of Adrertmng Saks 
International Herald Tribune, 181 Avenue Chtttef-de-GauIk, 92200 Neuffly-snr-Srine, 

France. TeL: (I) 47.47.12.65. Telex: 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Paris. ISSN: 02948052. 

Director de la publication: Walter N. Thayer 

Managing Dir. Asia Mtdnin Gem, 24-34 Honesty M, Rone Kane TA 5-285618. TAtae 611 7tt 
Mmaffng Dir. UJL; Brijm Mx/jdvtn, 63 Lang Acre, London WCL Td 836-4&R Tdex 26200 r >. 


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U.S. subscription: S 322 yearly. Second-doss postage pad a Long Island City, N.Y. 1 1101. 
0 1985, International Herald Tribune, All rigte reserved 


Contender 
For Crisis 
Of the Year 

By Philip Geyelin 

W ASHINGTON — The Reagan 
administration will be malting 
a serious mistake if h does not put the 
Philippines high on its fist of favorites 
for loti’s crisis of the year. 

The worst theory of the case rests 
on evidence all too common to post- 
war experience; a growing Commu- 
nist insurgency, valuable if not vital 
American strategic “assets”; a politi- 
cally repressive regime; a crumbling 

economy and a corrupted society; an 

agings afltngj autho r i tarian leader 
who trades heavily on the reputation 
of old friendship and alliance with 
the Americans; a weak and divided 
opposition that holds out only tbe 
most forlorn hope of delivering its 
country to democratic ways. 

And, yes, there is even the prospect 
of an “dectian” to lend a measure of 
legitimacy to the 20 years of govern- 
ment by Ferdinand Marcos — most 
of those years under martial law. Bit- 
ter campaigning is under way. 

You will have recognized bits and 
pieces of assorted sad analogies: Iran 
m the last years of the shah, Nicara- 
gnain Anastasio Somoza’s last years; 
Vietnam in tbe period just before the 
downfall erf Ngo Dinh Diem. In each 
instance the United States was con- 
fronted with agonizing choices. In 
each case there was the same funda- 
mental confusion when it spoke of 
“friends” — the confusion between 
leaders and regimes congenial to 
America’s immediate purposes and 
the nations and/or peoples over 
which they presided. There was the 
same noble talk of promoting The 
American Way, of advancing human 
rights, of elections and all the rest in 
nations where the stage was amply 
not set, either institutionally or tradi- 
tionally, for easy revolution to de- 
mocracy, American-style. 

In the Philippines there is a demo- 
cratic tradition, an American bequest 
in 1946 after 48 years of colonial rule. 
There is also a genuine friendship 


HCM LOOK WHAT WVE CDNE 
WIH WR5ILLYME [SWING- 

MimMlAW 






lWYSKDRTO', 

ft YUCWSUSiw. 


and there are business connections as Administration officials have confi- 


wdL .UJS, security interests in the 
Pacific and westward to the China 
Sea and the Indian Ocean depend 
heavily on access to the naval base at 
Subic Bay and the dark Air Base. 
Those Installations are fixtures that 
even Mr. Marcos’s opposition would, 
for all its campaign ralk, be unlikely 
to remove, not least because of the 5 
percent of Philippine GNP that they 
generate, together with generous U.S. 
militar y and economic aid. 

But the appearance of promise in 
tbe February elections is deceiving. 
The roots of Mr. Marcos’s power run 
deep into the military and the econo- 
my. His leading opponent, the widow 
or Benigno Aquino, has the appeal of 
martyrdom (her husband was the op- 
position leader) but is the first to 
say she knows nothing about the job 
she seeks. It is widely accepted that, 
one way or another, Mr. Marcos will 
not allow himself to lose. 

It is at fins point that yon have to 
look to the American contribution to 
the problem. Unlike past situations 
of this sort, there is extraordinary 
agreement on the setent of the threat 


dentiy predicted “civil war on a mas- 
sive scale” within three to five years. 
The only difference of opinion is with 
Mr. Marcos (and this nas a familiar 
ring), who finds it convenient to 
boast that he can crash (he Commu- 
nists within a year without undertak- 
ing any of the military, economic and 
social reforms that U.S. officials 
unanimously agree are imperative. 

This American consensus on the 
Communist threat — ranging from 
Senator Paul Laxalt, the president's 
special emissary to Mr. Marcos, to 
Representative Stephen Solan, a 
Democrat of New York and chair- 
man of the House subcommittee re- 
sponsible for the region — distin- 
guishes tbe Philippines f rom , say, 
Iran or Vietnam. True, the adminis- 
tration has let it be known that it is 
looking for alternatives to the navy 
and air force bases. But such talk is 
mostly for the effect this might have 
on Mr. Marcos. Estimates of the cost 
of alternative rites at Guam or else- 
where range from £2 billion to $8 
billion. (You might as well take the 
high ride, because the military will.) 


To See Ahead in the West , Start by Looking Back 


P ARIS — A disturbing new French film by 
Agn&s Varda is a reminder of how much has 
changed in the Western world since 1968. Titled 

“Without a Roof or a Law,” the film is the story ployable youth in most industrial countries ro- 
of the degradation and death of a pretty, stub- lates to that spent rebellion against social norms, 
bom girl with but one thought on her mind: to The 1968 upheavals came near the end of an 
live by and for herself alone. imprecedented growth of prosperity in the devd- 

The film is set in the present, not in the heyday oped world. Affluence was taken for granted. 
of hippiedom. The gin is frankly portrayed as Freedom was redefined as the individual’s right 


By Flora Lewis 


selfish, insensitive, uncaring, if brave: The char- 
acter excites pity but not sympathy because these 
is no suggestion that society is to blame for her 
plight. Her willful indolence, her insistence an 
absolute personal freedom at whatever cost It 
may impose on others is all that is offered to 


lappens 

Miss Varda does not preach or draw the im- 
plicit conclusion, but the change of perspective 
from a generation ago is striking- It does reflect 
the rise and consolidation of a more conserva- 
tive, traditional outlook in modem societies. 

There are no politics or polemics, no sociologi- 
cal or ideological abstractions. The background 
is rural France and the ordinary people who live 
in it, peasants. Noth African migrants, universi- 
ty educated agronomists, vestiges of the gentry, 
trade drivers, gas station attendants. They have 
became rather open-minded, bat the gid is not. 

It is her view that seems obsolete. The film's 
approach makes a sharp contrast with the domi- 
nant intellectual fashion of tbe late 1960s. It 
rerives a need to seek better understanding of 
what happened, why the counterculture move- 
ment arose and exploded, why it collapsed, what 
it left and what it means for the future — how a 
new underclass of unemployed and often unem- 


Freedom was redefined as the individual’s right 
to defy social authority in whatever way he or she 
might choose, not as the best way to accommo- 
date all lands of people and spirits who must 

Whatever the source of 
the 1968 upheavals, it is 
probably still there. 

share a society. Permissiveness was the word 
nsed to describe the attitude, but it wasn't a good 
word. No permission was asked, no acceptance 
given that rules should apply because they serve 
most people's tranquil purposes. 

In each of the many countries that underwent 


States experts said it was about Vietnam and ciril 
rights. In France they said it was about the rigid 
system of education and the disgrun dement of 
workers. In West Germany they cited education, 
the environment and the authoritarian family. 
But underdeveloped Turkey and socialist Yugo- 
slavia had rimiTar experiences. So did Japan, the 
world’s most consensual community. 

Some kind of lightning boll leapt around tbe 


world, igniting tinder that had been accumulat- 
ing. There must have been some deeper common 
urge than was identified. The fires burned out 
and the old answers returned with the old ques- 
tions of jobs, religion, bringing up children, mak- 
ing ends meet But it would be a mistake to sweep 
aside the memory as an aberration, a fuzzy- 
minded disturbance with no significance for the 
evolution of economically advanced societies. 

Those hairy, deliberately bedraggled youth 
were misguided, seeking something they could 
not name and foolishly imagining that to de- 
mand obtrusively enough would suffice to obtain 
it They felt something wrong. But not knowing 
quite what it was or what to do about it most 
returned to everyday life. Miss Varda's film is a 
cool, brooding commentary on the inevitable 
failure of a mindless attempt at a solution. 

Whatever the source, it is probably still there 
lurking under current apprehensions. 

There is no reason to suppose that if there 
is success in restoring steady growth without a 
bust due to debts and budget deficits, the emo- 
tional and psychological malaise of modem soci- 
ety wfl] not resurface. There was a message in tbe 
restive noise of 1968 that the rapid transforma- 
tions of the second half of the 20th century have 
been hard to digest, that there is a gap between 
our habits and assumptions and the way tbe 
world is hurtling through change. 

Now, with quiet hindsight, it is time to peer 
through the emotional fog and try to figure oat 
what it was really about and what it signals for 
modernism. Otherwise there is still little chanoe 
to chart the rapturing reefs that may lie ahead. 

The New York Tima. , 


NATO in the New Year: Stick to the Right Formula 

BHRtSSWSS By Lord Carrington 83^*13^““ 

The writer, a former British foreign secretary, is secretary-general of NATO. 


alone, are rather food of looking back 
to tbe good old days, when Punch 
was f unnier, En glish summers more 
summery, the younger generation 
somehow l ess nwHitwiing and the At- 
lantic alliance strooger and more sta- 
ble. As it happens, people started 
talking about crises m the alliance 
even before the good old days had 
had time to grow rad. But tbe obituar- 
ies were premature, and they still are. 
We have, in fact, had rather a good 
year, and we have every reason to 
look to the future with confidence. 

We have had a good year first of all 
on the military side. At one end erf the 
spectrum, tbe deployment of muse 
and Pershing-2 missiles in Europe is 
proceeding on schedule, despite an 
unrelenting Soviet campaign to blow 
us off course. At the other, we are 


lems that would not hit the headlines 
until it was too late: weaknesses in 
infrastructure, shortages of ammuni- 
tion and the like. And to link the two 
ends we have established a decision- 
making framework that combines the 
identification of key deficiencies 
with the political commitment to do 
something about them. 

I do not expect miracles, but I do 
expect a steady pattern of improve- 
ment as a result of those derations. 
Defease ministers collectively will 
check on progress every six months. 
And there is a lot that they can do, 
including further action on aims co- 
operationy to get more effective out- 
put from the resources that are and 
will become available. 

Defense ministers cannot do it all 
themselves, and it must be for allied 
governments as a whole to ensure 
that we get the resources we need. 
That is where the politics come in. 
Here again we have had a good year. 
We now have an opportnnity to open 
a new and more constructive diopter 
in East-West relations, which has 
come in response .not to wishful 
thinking and anti-nuclear protests 
but to the determination of demo- 
cratic governments to work together 
to build a safer world. 

That determination will be more 
necessary than ever during a period 
in which we expeetto have two sum- 


mit meetings at which the level of 
public expectation will inevitably be 
much higher than it was in Geneva. 
The Soviet Union will no doubt seek 
to take advantage of ibis, by persuad- 
ing Western public opinion to bring 
pressure to bear on western govern- 
ments, and European governments to 
pressure the United States. 

There is tittle reason to expect that 
tire Soviet negotiators in Geneva will 
work seriously for a g ree men t in the 
conference room while their leaders 
hope that the scales can be tilted by 
political activity outside it. So the 
challeng e to allied governments is 
clear. It is to i2aLorate a negotiating 
strategy that is realistic and construc- 
tive, and can convincingly be drawn 
to be so. And then to stick to it 

If that proves as easy to do as il is 
to say, the next two years at NATO 
will be a lot less busy than I expect 
The more realistic view is that the 
Geneva summit will prove to be only 
(he start of a difficult road. 

The Strategic Defense Initiative , is 
sometimes presented as a focus of 
conflict between tbe United States 
and Europe, as if each had only a 
single view on the subject. The begin- 
ning of wisdom is to recognize that 
the true picture is one of controversy 
on both sides of the Atlantic. 

That is not to say that there are no 
specifically European concerns — or, 
at least, concerns fdt strongly in Eu- 
rope. The principal one; I ihmk, sees 
a future in which both America and 
the Soviet Union, and perhaps also 
Western Europe, have acquired a 
measure of protection against ballis- 
tic missile*, and in which we shall 
still have to mam tain a credible de- 
terrent and an effective defense in the 
face of the Soviet ctmventi onal capa- 
bflity and the continuing vuhierabili- . 


plications could be thrashed out 
within NATO and with the Soviet 
Union. But the SDI cannot be looked 
at in isolation, because the Soviet 
Union has es tablishe d a link between 
negotiated reductions in strategic of- 
fenave weapons and a position on 
the Strategic Defense Initiative that 
appears to oppose even research. 

That may not, erf course, be Soviet 
leader Mikhail Gorbachev’s last 
word. And if it is, tbe blame for 
preventing agreement on arms reduc- 
tions will faQ clearly cm the Soviet 
side, because be must know very weD 
that the Soviet research program is 
well established, substantial and to a 
large extent impassible to verify. 

The more difficnlt questions for 
the allianc e will come if the Soviet 
Union abandons its unreasonable 
position on research hot puts forward 
as a condition for strategic arms re- 
ductions other constraints on the SDI 
that some might continue to find ex- 
cessive but that others might regard 
as worth tbe price, or at least worth 
exploring as a basis far negotiation, 
These are questions to which we shall 
have to find answers, as an alliance, if 
.we are to persuade the Soviet leaders 
to give np the no doubt fascinating 
ganttbfvmge-driyingin favor of tbe 
hard grind of negotiation. 

Finding solutions as an alliance 
will require a continuation and prob- 
ably sook intensification of the con- 
sultations that have been a very suc- 
cessful feature .of the past year. 
President Reagan’s visit to NATO 
headquarters on Nov. 21 was greatly 

appreciated, and tbe December meet- 
ing of die North Atlantic Council 
gave foreign ministers the opportuni- 
ty to pursue the discusaon^nth U.S. 
Secretary of Suite GeorgeShultz. The 


good idea of what the other side's 
defenses are likely to be. 

In other words, it may be sensible 
to explore the possibility of some 
form of reassurance or negotiated 
safeguard against a sodden breakout 
into strategic defense by the other 
side. Concern about such a breakout 
has always seemed at least as much 
an American as a Soviet point 
To provide such safeguards, equal- 
ly constraining on both sides, is sure- 
ly within the two negotiating teams’ 
capability. And that sort of approach 
cook! bdp to dissipate the smoke 
screen with which the Soviet position 
now surrounds the relationship be- 
tween offensive and defensive arms, 
and to pin down the objective of 
enhanced stability at s ubstantiall y 
lower levels of offensive armament 
This is a time of opportunity. But it 
is also very much a b eginning It will 
take patience and determination, as 
well as political courage and negoti- 
ating slalL to make the best <rf it The 
real challenge to the Atlantic anianrr. 
is to do what democracies are often, 
rather bad at: to stick to the right 
formula for long enough for it to 
produce tbe results we want 
Los Angeles Times. 


In any event no alternative would 
serve U.S. strategic interests as wdL 

But there are distinctly f amil i ar 
differences of opinion over bow to 
handle Mr. Marcos — the same sen 
of liberal vs. conservative argument 
that confounded policy-making for 
Tran. Nicaragua and Vietnam. It 
comes down to three choices: Stick 
with the devil one knows, and risk 
going down with his ship; actively 
intervene in an effort to replace him 
with something better, the tactic that 
failed in Vietnam with Diem; or 
somehow exercise UJS. leverage to 
bring about an orderly transition, 
with Mr. Marcos agreeing to band 
over power to whatever forces seem 
most likely to be able to cope with the 
insurgency the economy. 

This last course is the only one that 
offers much hope. That it is also the 
most difficult course is only a mea- 
sure of the gravity of tbe crisis now 
b uilding in the Philippines. The larg- 
er the rule of Mr. Marcos drags on, 
the likelier it is that the Philippines 
win fulfill the worst expectations — 
soon enough, if not in 1986. 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


Forecasts 
For 1986 
Are Mixed 

By Hobart Rowen 

W ashington — M ost econo- 
mise consulting their crystal 
balls expect a better year in 1986. btf 
just how much better is a matter of 
debate. In 1985, real growth was only 
2,4 percent, down from the 6.4-per* 

cent boon of 1984 and weQ below Oe 
Reagan adminis tration’s forecast of 
3.9 percent at the start of 1985. 

Beryl Sprint el, the ever optimistic 
chairman of President Reagan's 
Council of Economic Advisers, says 
he expects at least a 4-percent growth 
rate m 1986. He cites the surging 
stock market, lower interest rates arm 
strong growth in the money supply ai 
the main factors- “We’re quite confi- 
dent that, moving into the year 
ahead, we will see substantial oontia- 
ued improvement in real GNP num- 
bers and strong trends cm the em- 
ployment front, Mr. Sprinkd says. 

Most private economists think be 
is painting too rosy a picture. Some 
pessimists among them forecast the 
start of a gfrewbig recession. Others 
believe that the economy will contin- 
ue to be sluggish for much of 1986, 
but that it wm turn out margi na lly 
better than the 2.4-percent real 
growth rate of this year. 

The latter group note that, taken 
together, tbe Gramm- Rudman bud- 
get -cutting exercise and the tax over- 
haul (if enacted) create a great deal cf 
uncertainty. The federal budget stim- 
ulus to the economy will be less as 
military and non-nnlilaiy programs 
are scaled back. Morgan Guaranty 
Hank economists think that the oat- 
come of the new initiatives on the 
budget and tax code will be a bigger 
tax bill, ratting private demand. 

More optimistic assessments by- 
private economists indude those of 
Jack Albenine, president of the 
American Business Conference, and 
Allen Sinai of Shearson Lehman. 

Mr. Albenine believes that the 
Gramro-Rudman process makes a 
tax increase inevitable. He says that 
“the recovery won't roll over and die 
next year, as some are predicting," 
but that the price (rf a growth rate 
near 4 percent will be a jump in the 
rate of Inflation to 5 or 6 percent. The 
major econo m ic problem in the new 
year “wfll be finding ways to cut the 
billowing federal deficits, and 1 ex- 
pect a full-scale war on Capitol Hfll 
as Congress is forced to take the scal- 
pel to same politically popular pro- 
grams." Mr. Albertine raid. 

Mr. Sinai sees a 1986 growth rate 
of around 33 percent. He counts on 
lower interest rates, the sharp drop in 
the dollar and a basic shift in the 
policy of the Federal Reserve. “The 
politics of economic performance in- 
dicate that the administration cannot 
afford to let the economy deteriorate 
with elections coming m 1986 and 
1988,” Mr. Sinai says. “The policy 
moves of recent months are a dead 
tip-off (hat the Reagan administra- 
tion Will not waituntil it is too late to 
turn around a weak economy." 

That somewhat cynical evaluation 
is supported by many collateral de- 
velopments. The drop in ofl prices, 
after OPEC’s decision to hold back 
less of its potential output, will hdp 
offset the inflationary effect of the 
decline in the value of tbe dollar. 
Economic profits of corporations 
(taking into account changes in infla- 
tion rates and depredation allow- 
ances) are at (he highest level in 25 
years, according to Morgan Guaran- 
ty. This booming corporate cash flow 
should support a good levd of capital 
investment next year. 

Meanwhile consumo- debt is high, 
and one might expect consumers to 
pull in their horns and try to rebuild 
their savings. But the recent stock 
market boom provides at least the 
illusion of greater wealth, and proba- 
bly will encourage consumers to keep 
spending at high levels. 

The big question marks relate to 
the uncertainties caused by budget 
and tax legislation, and to (be dollar 
and Third World debt. It is true that a 
declining dollar should be a tonic for 
A m erican manufacturers, and even- 
tually help reduce the U3. trade defi- 
cit. But that may not be seen until 
1987 or later. And in any event there 
would be no benefit from a drop in 
the dollar if it comes too sharply. 

If the dollar crashes, as Stephen 
Mams of the Institute for Inter- 
national Economics predicts, it coaid 
lead to a panic in world financi al 
markets, and all bets on 1986 and 
1987 would be off. 

Those Tlnrd Worid debts, especial- 
ly the $350 billion owed by Latin 
American countries, are also an ever 
present danger. Bankers around (be 
world are reluctant to put . up the 
extra $20 trillion in loans demanded 
by Treasury Secretary James Baker. 
Lower interest rates should hdp im- 
measurably, but a few key nations, 
including Mexico, are again teetering 
cm the brink. It would not take much 
to precipitate a crisis that would com- 
pound the problems of an already 
shaky American banking, system. 

The Washington Past 


LETTER TO THE EDITOR 

Interventions in Angola Of thousands have gone as 

o mVRmmmlJwU trm inu , 


Representative Jack Kemp ("For 
American Intervention in Angola," 
Dec. 12) seems to be nnsmfwxted on 
several critical matters of fact. 


government-held towns saying that 
CFor UNTTA no longer provides food* 
pain" health services or protection, 
ed on Jonas Savimbi may well be buv- 

lM* mm, g O .L i a ■ . J 


bflity and toe continuing vuhierabili- . Strategic Defease : Initiative and, 
tyof Western Europe to non-ballistic more generally, (he rdatipnshqj be- 
means erf unclear delivery. • tween offensive and defensive stratc- 

If the SDI could be rooked «f in gjc systems were a major topic. One 
isolation, the best approach might be point that will need a convincing an- 
te wait nstfi the research program swer already seems to be emerging; 


severalcntical matters of fact. , able away from South Africa, but 
did not tnm to South Afti- South Africa is providing about $250 
Soto prigton a year mnZy and noo- 
'^ ac ? n ^F^S*** to 1 ® 1 support, several himdrcdtech- 
^ “osl personnel and many more mer- 
(Mdffltoifyrfs “The oenanra, phis logistical and str&e 
Diplomacy ^Isolation") with access aircraft support Cff leadership. In ad- 

SJS±J rcgPlarty.^Sivaaons 


?5«r-AidofS27nnI&»LvSaS5 


be seen as UiL mflitmy support 
tbe Repubfie of SoutoAfricu 


which toe political and strategic irn- weapons unless you tow a pretty support base' appears to be low. Tens 


R-H. GREEN. 
Lewes, F-ngiftTfj 





Page 5 


EVTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUISPAY, DECEMBER 28-29, 1985 


slisYow 


r e jToRetaliate | 
Vor Attacks " 





critical of the goyermwntt of 
-> • v j talimi prime minister. Bettino 

• '.'-ran, and Austria's former ctan- 
'Vrita; Bruno Kxasky, for. being 
"V vntpathetic to the PLO anfl for 
;* V4virig official recognitioato its 
: K adsr. 

_*>,v “ft is tragic because the target 
‘as Israeli or anyone connected 
' -.%h Isad," Mr- Rabin told a 
r. Teeting of economists in Tel Aviv. 
> e said it was ironic because the 
~ ; :: 'rrorists “chose the countries of 

• “.'. 'Van and Kiefcky to execute these 
i .'•jacks." 

f c *Thi5 murderous attack comes 
a mnindcr to. those who are 

- ying to forget and ignore that the 
> Palestinian terrorist biganizatiass 
' we not give® up,” Mr- Rabin said. 

■ ■They continue to try to hit ds as 

• >'ioch as they can.” 

-v "/’■ ibc defense condemned 

-•■-lose who 1 m said “are trying to 
ma Arafat and his organization 
•- *s those who want peace,” and he 
•: ;;^id the airport attacks sbodd “re- 
- uud aB of os wk 0 is Arafat and 

- ' *ai are the real aims of this nmr- 
cverons urrorist organization.” 

isracfi officials did riot explicitly 

• ssert that military strikes against 
\ ; . 'alestiman guerrilla bases were in- 

i - * vdtabky-hut the suggestion of such 
. ^tefiaiwy raids was implicit in an 
'tBdal statement issued by the 
. foreign Ministry spokesman, Avi 
'azner. 

- It said: “Israel mil continue its 
^ higgle against terrorism in every 

" jace and at any time it sees fit" 

-. * ? Following the Sept. 25 murder of 
. Three Israelis aboard their yacht in 
Cyprus marina, the Israeli gov- 

- - Ynman t issued a suriOariy winded 
- ”7 taiemaiL Six days later, Israeli 
... Vur Force jets bombed the PLO 

. ; eadquMtere in Tunisia in the most 
"fistant air sttike ever carried out by 

- . he Israelis against a Palestinian 
.’ ;nemlla base. 

Mr. Rabin, in the past has 

• . irongly condemned the presence 
. .if PLO offices in Amman, from 

vhitii, he has said, terrorist opera- 
" i ions against Israeli targets in Israel 

■ 'Imd abroad are directed. Trade 

ifinistcr Ariel Sharon, Israel’s for- 
. “ ;her defense minister, has repeated- 
ly urged that ah strikes be conduct- 
."•jd against PLO headqnarters in 
Iordan, but Mr. Peres and most 
. ' wmbm of his cabinet have reject- 
id such suggestions as being pre- 
“apitbus. 

. "J. Another posable option of Israe- 

* '.iimfitaiy retaliation would be Pal- 
estinian guerrilla bases in Leba- 
non's central Bekaa valley, 
" (penned by several PLO splinter 

joaps that in recent weeks have 
“lainKidreqjonabihty for terrorist 

— lUrtjt'madK lmiiil; 

However, a recent buildup of 
~'^rian surface-to-air missiles in the 
lekaa valley and along the Syrian- 
' ebanese border could mean that 
■ etaHatory air strikes in Lebanon 
rould lead to a wider Syrian-Isradi 

- onffict that Mr. Peres has said " 

' van is to avoid. 

- IsracTs deputy prime minister, 
>avid Levy, bluntly warned that 

• 'he IriRing c at the H A1 Airlines 
' ^beck-in counters at Rome and Vi- 

- .*n» would be avenged. 



For Israel, a Christian Feud in Bethlehem 

Dispute Over Wall in Church of the Nativity Casts Jewish State as Mediator 


An injured suspect 

after a terrorist attack 


taken away from Leonardo da Vind Airport to a Rome hospital 
"day in winch at least 13 persons were kitted and dozens injured. 


Gunmen Kill 16 in Rome, Vienna 


(Continued from Page 1) 
secretary- general of the United Na- 
tions. Javier P&rez de CufeUar, 
speedily condemned the attacks. 

In Amsterdam, a security 
spokesman at Schiphol Airport 
said a warning bad been issued to 
major European airports before 
Chris tmas that Arab guerrillas 
might strike during the holiday. 

A spokesman for Italy’s Interior 
Ministry said that erf 13 persons 
killed at the Rome airport, there 
were two Americans, three Greeks, 
two Mexicans, one Algerian and 
five persons who were not identi- 
fied yet. The toll included three of 
the assailants. 

Although B A1 was a target in 
both instances,' witnesses at the 
Rome airport said the attackers, 
jumping and screaming, fired indis- 
criminately at passengers checking 
in at Trans World Airlines, Pan 
American World Airways and El 
Al. 


Among civilians killed at the 
Rome airport was an American 
girl, Natasha Simpson, II. She was 
the daughter of Victor Simpson, 
the Associated Press news editor in 
Rome. Mr. Simpson and his son, 
Michael, were hospitalized with in- 
juries. 

Another American who died, ac- 
cording to the Interior Minittry, 
was identified as John Buonocore, 
20, a U.S. military man. 

Also killed were General Donato 
Miranda, the Mexican military at- 
tache in Rome, and Gtaoveva 
Jaime, bis secretary. 

Prime Minister Bettino Craxi of 
Italy said that according to a first 
evaluation the attackers “probably 
belong to the extreme Arab-Pales- 
rinian frin ge, either acting on their 
own or as a crazy splinter group." 

The ministry spokesman said 
those killed at the Rook airport 
included three presumed terrorists 
— “Middle East types" — and one 


man who “we presume is an Israeli 
security agent.” 



Charles Shinn, 69, an American, was hospitalized in Rome 
after being seriously wounded in the attack on the airport 


Role of Camels Fades Into Legend 


(Cootuued from Page 1) 
ficoraied harnesses for horses, 
• ’hmkets and cheap sweaters from 
-'he Orient. 

Women can be seen cooking odd 
. ieces of meat on oily fires. Some 
■ repair! the shisha for men to 
. moke out of makeshift hookahs. 


* The drivers say they prefer the be water there. You think you see 
journey to Cairo over similar trips water. But you don't” 


to Libya, where bandits lie in wait 
for them b ehin d dunes and ridges 
in hopes of killing them and steal- 
ing their herds. 

“They come when you are sleep- 
ing and" they steal them.” said Aba- 
In Sudan, things are just as they yj Rahman, 47, of Kassala. “We 
■oe in the old days," said a driver, follow their trail. I fight them by 
escribing a recent trip. “In Egypt myself or with my weapons, with are sold and slaughtered, 
nags are modern." anything I have." “I don’t think about that," said 

The camel herders left their The drivers carry long whips and Abdullah Kheir Allah Rahama, a 
°nxs in Kordofan in western Su- wear daggers up the wide sleeves of young Sudanese. “I fed that all die 
■ an or in Kassala in the east to their long gaJabias in Cairo, but camels I bring are like my sons. 

other weapons are taken from them 


rake the monthlong trip to Cairo. 
Some followed the track once 
nown as the Darb Arbain, “the 
1510140 days," through the west- 
™ desert before loading their 
onto trucks and trains. 

Less than a century ago, tens of 
ansaods of taiwln might move in 
single caravan, bringing ivory and 
ans, ebony and slaves to the rich 
arkete erf Cairo. Today the cara- 
ms rarely exceed 1,000 camels 
rat are brought to Cairo. 


at the Egyptian fronuer. 

A drought that turned once ara- 
ble lands into desert has proved in 
recent years to be a greater test 
than banditry, many of the drivers 
said 

“You become crazy a little." said 
an older driver whose long whip 
seemed like an extension of his 
hand. “You become crazy from be- 
ing tired. You think there might be 
water here. You think there could 


were under arrest in hospitals, with 
one in serious condilion. 

The ministry spokesman and 
witnesses said the attackers first 
threw hand grenades at the check- 
in area around 9:10 AJVL and then 
fired submachine guns. 

Witnesses said the men had 
masks partially covering their faces 
and were dressed in blue jeans and 
jackets. 

Judge Do mini co Sica, a top anti- 
terrorist investigator, said investi- 
gators were convinced that El AL 
near TWA and Pan Am, was the 
target. He said no one had claimed 
responsibility for the attack. 

The Reverend Franco Serfustini, 
the airport chaplain, said he saw 
police officers capture one gunmen 
and defend him “because there 
were those who would have 
lynched him.” 

In Vienna, the police said that 
the attackers began throwing hand 
grenades and shooting in the de- 
parture lounge of Schwechai Air- 
port at about 9:15 AJvi. 

The airport's police director, 
Franz Kaefer, said the attack ap- 
peared directed at passengers 
checking in for an El Al flight 
“The terrorists were particularly 
brutal,” Mr. Kaefer said. “They 
even sprayed bullets into a hair- 
dresser’s shop nearby.” A 40- mem- 
ber anti-terror police unit immedi- 
ately launched a counterattack. 

The police opened fire on the 
gunmen, killing one. Two others 
escaped briefly by hijacking a car, 
but were apprehended a short tune 
later, a pence spokesman said. 

* The attack in Rome was the 
(*t - X \ worst ever staged aganst El Al out- 

•• .' side Israel and was exceeded only 

*4-.. by an assault on May 30, 1972, 
when three members of the Japa- 
nese Red Army attacked Lod — 
now Ben-Gurion International — 
Airport on behalf of the Popular 
Front for the Liberation of Pales- 
tine. That attack left 26 civilians 
and two attackers dead. 

Leonardo da Vind Airport was 
the site of a Palestinian attack in 
which 32 persons were lolled on 
Dec. 17, 1973. (Reuters, AP, UPI) 

■ PLO Statement 
In Tonis, the PLO said in a state- 
ment: “None of the services of the 
PLO were involved in these attacks 
which took place on the territory of 
two friendly countries.” 

It noted that Mr. Arafat, in Cai- 
ro on Nov. 7, had condemned “all 
forms of slate terrorism, both 
group and individual" and had 
pledged to restrict PLO attacks to 
Arab areas occupied by Israel 
In Washington, President Ron- 
ald Reagan, condemning what be 
called the “cowardly” attacks, 
urged punishment for those re- 
sponsible. 

“The United States deeply de- 
plores the attacks,” said Larry 
Speokes, the White House spokes- 
man. 

In Cairo, (he Egyptian foreign 
minister, Esmat Abdel Megmd, 
said: “Egypt strongly condemns 
and expresses deep regret for the 
two terrorist operations in Rome 
and Vienna in which a number of 
innocent souls, regardless of their 
nationalities, were killed.” 

Mr. Abdel Meguid said that it 
was Egypt’s “solid policy to con- 
demn all terrorist acts, no matter 
what the reasons behind them, the 
source or the who the wrongdoers 
are." ( Reuters, UPI) 


By Dan Fisher 

Los Angela Tima Service 

BETHLEHEM — As thousands 
of Latin tile Christians prayed for 
peace on earth Wednesday, the Is- 
raeli authorities worried about reli- 
gious rivalries threatening next 
week’s scheduled cleaning of the 
Church of the Nativity for Ortho- 
dox Christinas celebrations. 

Intense negotiations have failed 
to resolve a dispute between the 
Greek and Armenian Orthodox 
communities over which will have 
the privilege of cleaning a small 
section of the northern wall of the 
1, 600-year-old church built over 
the spot where Christ is believed to 
have been bom. 

Last year the same argument 
touched off a mdee between Greek 
Orthodox and Arm enian clergy- 
men, broken up only after the inter- 
vention of Israeli Army troops. 

The dispute is one of many stem- 
ming from the complicated rela- 
tions of about 70 Christian 

churches and denominations repre- 
sented in the Holy Land. 

The conflicts tend to flare 
around the time of the two impor- 
tant Christian feasts — Christmas 
and Easier — when the various 
religious communities focus simul- 
taneously on the sacred places that 
they all revere. 

And since 1967, when Israel cap- 
tured from Jordan the West Bank 
lands where those holy places are 
situated, it has been up to the Jew- 
ish state to mediate the Christian 
disputes. 

“We inherited a box with broken 
said one Israeli official fa- 
with the situation. “These 
are ancient rivalries — inter-Chris- 
tian sensitivities that Jews are re- 
sponsible to handle." 

A dispute over the key to the 
Church of the Holy Sepulchre in 


Jerusalem — said to be standing 
over the site both of Calvary, where 
Jesus was crucified, and the tomb 
where his body was interred after- 
ward — reputedly was a proximate 
cause of the 19th-century Crimean 
War. 

The Turks got so fed up with the 
religious bickering during their rule 
here that in 1952 they pushed 
through the so-called “status quo” 
agreement that was to have settled 
the basic questions of which sect 
holds sway at various times and 
locations. 

The agreement was reaffirmed 
several times, and was enshrined 
most recently in the Oust Memo- 
randum. The 1929 document is 
named for the district officer for 
Jerusalem under the League of Na- 
tions mandate extending British 
rule to Palestine. 

Israel continues to oversee the 
holy places according to the guide- 
lines in the memo randum. The gen- 
eral guidelines do not always suf- 
fice; however, when circumstances 


change or institutional sensitivities 
become aroused. 

“Things do get down to centime- 
ters in this issue.” said Daniel 
Rossing, director of the depart- 
ment of Christian communities in 
Israel's Religious Affairs Ministry. 

Spokesmen for the Greek and 
Armenian Orthodox communities, 
by mutual agreement, refused com- 
ment on the dispute over the 
Church erf the Nativity wall. How- 
ever. Mr. Rossing said that the dis- 
pute centers on a 50-square-foot 
(4.6-square-meter) section of upper 
wall in the north apse or the church. 

The apse is one of the few areas 
of the edifice where the Armenian 
Orthodox and Latin communities 
have any rights in what is, under 
the “status quo” agreement, basi- 
cally a Greek Orthodox church. 

“The cleaning is not a real clean- 
ing, but an expression of political 
rights," said an Israeli official. “It's 
unimportant whether or not a cer- 
tain wall is dirty; what is important 
is who win put the broom to it.” 


On the appointed cleaning day 
last year, Mr. Rossing said, “rivi! 
authorities who were present dis- 
covered that the respective sides 
had brought in additional man- 
power,” adding: “They literally 
had clubs, pipes and broken bot- 
tles” 

The Israeli authorities kept the 
lay reinforcements out. but a brawl 
erupted nonetheless inside the 
church, involving about 25 Arme- 
nian Orthodox and Greek Ortho- 
dox clergymen. 

This year's ceremonial cleaning 
has been tentatively set for Tues; 
day, prior to Greek Orthodox 
Christmas celebrations scheduled 
for Jan. 6 and 7. and Armenian 
Orthodox holiday services on Jan. 
IS and 19. 

Elias M. Freij. the mayor- .of 
Bethlehem who is a Christian Arab; 
said: "I will personally attend the 
cleaning to ensure that there is no 
violence. 1 believe they cannot re:, 
peat what happened last year.” • 


3 Sikh Guards Slain in Punjab Unrest 


Return 

NEW DELHI — Three Sikh 

temple guards were killed in a fight 
with swords, spears and guns Fri- 
day and a strike by miliiam Hindus 
shut many stores in the Punjab as 
fresh unrest swept the Indian state. 

Policemen in Chandigarh, Pun- 
jab's capital said that the temple 
guards, known as NIhangs, were 
killed in a dash between two 
groups of the sect at Fatehgarh 
Sahib in southern Punjab’s Patiala 
district. 

The fighting started after an ar- 
gument over which group would 
lead a religious procession of about 


Pretoria Troops Crossed 
Border, Swazis Report 


Reuters 

MBABANE, Swaziland — 
South African troops crossed the 
border into Swaziland several times 
this week, residents and police said 
Friday. But a military spokesman 
in South Africa said he could not 
confine the reports. 

Villagers said South African 
troops crossed into the sparsely 
populated southeastern corner erf 
Swaziland near Lavusima and 
threatened to attack them if they 
gave shelter to guerrillas. 

A Swazi police spokesman said 
he was aware that South African 
troops had crossed the border but 
bad no details. 

South Africa recently repealed 
warnings to its Nack neighbors that 
it would ignore international 
boundaries in pursuit of guerrillas 
after a series of border incidents. In 
recent years. South Africa has 
launched cross-border attacks 
against what it said were guerrilla 
targets in Lesotho, Mozambique, 
Angola and Botswana. 

In Pretoria, a South African raili- 
taiy spokesman said no confirma- 
tion of the Swazi reports could be 
found despite all posable inquiries. 

[The South African security 
forces said in Pretoria Friday that 
South African police and troops 
had taken part in a sweep near the 
border with the small mountain 
kingdom Tuesday but that the op- 
eration had been restricted to the 


area bordering western Swaziland, 
Agence France-Presse reported. 
There were “no incursions into 
Swaziland itself,” a statement said.] 

Residents said South African 
border patrols crossed into Swazi- 
land four or five times Tuesday and 
the next day and warned people 
they would attack them if they shel- 
tered members of the African Na- 
tional Congress, the outlawed 
black nationalist organization 
seeking to overthrow white rule in 
South Africa. 

Swaziland signed a nonaggres- 
sion treaty with South Africa in 
1982. 

Meanwhile, in Umbogeutwem, 
Sooth Africa, talks between feud- 
ing- Zulu and Pondo tribes failed to 
remove the threat of more fighting 
following dashes that killed at least 
58 persons over Christmas. 

Nine armored personnel carriers, 
packed with police carrying rifles 
and shotguns, stood guard outside 
a local community hall as leaders of 
the Pondo and Zulu tribes meL 

The local Zulu chief issued an 
ultimatum to Pondos to leave the 
3rea by Saturday. He did not say 
what steps be would ta~c if they 
ignored the order. 

In Johannesburg, the black ac- 
tivist Winnie Mandela filed an ap- 
peal Friday against a South African 
government order banning- her 
from engaging in political activity 
and barring her from Soweto town- 
ship, one of her lawyers said. 


The travelers sleep perhaps an 
hour, perhaps four hours a night 
They say they navigate by the stars. 

Many ™»nels die along the way. 
One driver who arrived with a herd 
of several hundred said that he had 
lost about 50 on the trip. 

The camels that survive the trek 


House Papers Reported Stolen 


Mr. Cole, the anthropologist, 
sometimes likens the bedouin and 
camel traders to cowboys. 

In Saudi Arabia and some other 
wealthy oil stales, camel racing has 
been revived, partly for sport and 
partly to preserve a cultural legacy. 
Mr. Cole said the races are “tike 
rodeos. 

The bedouin, he suggested, has 
gone the way of the cowboy in the 
American West; the camel the way 
of the horse. 


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(Continued from Page 1) 
was going out of their way to fool 
people," he said. 

The hearing before the House 
Armed Services subcommittee on 
procurement and military nuclear 
systems included an assessment of 
the overall stale of U.S. tactical and 
strategic communications, the ca- 
pabilities and limitations of exist- 
ing systems and plans, and funding 
levels for new command, control, 
communications and mtelhgeuce 
programs. 

Command, control, communica- 
tions and intelligence (referred to 
as C3L and pronounced cee-cu bed- 
eye in the Pentagon) is one of the 
military’s most secrei program ar- 
eas and a top priority in the nuclear 
field of the Reagan administration. 

The subcommittee hearing, 
headed by Representative Samuel 
S. Stratton, a New York Democrat, 


was held in closed session. In a 
normal procedure for such hear- 
ings, the committee released a 
“sanitized” transcript of the hear- 
ing this fall after Defense Depart- 
meat and congressional officials 
deleted sections containing classi- 
fied information. 

Much of the testimony sur- 
rounding the deletions concerns 
systems still in development that 
would improve UJS. co mm a nder s' 
ability to communicate with nude-, 
ar submarines, missile silos and 
bombers after a Soviet nuclear at- 
tack. 

At one point, for example, Mr. 
T ar ham discussed the potential of 
“bhie-green lasers," a system still in 
the research stage that might allow 
satellites to communicate with hid- 
den submarines by sending pulses 
of tight from space through the 
ocean. 


Afghans See War Stalemated 


(Continued from Page 1) 
turn to the Russians for help, and 
the Russians will be able to estab- 
lish a position in Afghanistan,” he 
said. 

For the moment, rebel morale 
seems high and new recruits con- 
tinue to-join the cause. 

“Despite the shortage of weap- 
ons and weapons of poor quality, if 
we have been able to achieve what 
we have in the past six or seven 
years, you can imagine what we 
could achieve with proper weap- 
ons,” said Pir Sayyid Ahmed Gai- 
lani, a leader of one of the tradi- 
tionalist political parties. 

A steady flow of small arms and 
ammunition, mostly of Chinese 
manufacture but paid for by the 
United States, is reaching the fight- 
ing fronts, according to foreign 
traveler; in Af gh a ni stan. 

According to the Institute of 
Strategic Studies in Islamabad, Pa- 
kistan, about 5,000 rebels are killed 
in fighting each year. The organiza- 
tion estimates that 2JS00 Afghan 
government troops and an equal 


number of Soviet troops are killed 
each year. 

■ Reagan Denounces Moscow 

Mr. Reagan accused the Soviet 

Union on Friday of employing 
“barbaric methods of waging war” 
in Afghanistan, and called on Mos- 
cow to withdraw its troops and 
consent to UN -sponsored talks for 
8 political settlement. The Associ- 
ated Press reported from Washing- 
ion. 

Saying that the Afghan resis- 
tance has grown increasingly effec- 
tive, Mr. Reagan said in a written 
statement, “The Soviets and their 
Afghan surrogates have resorted to 
barbaric methods of waging war in 
their effort to crush this war of 
national liberation," including at- 
tacks on civilian areas. 

■ Anmverssny Unmarked 

The sixth anniversary of the So- 
viet intervention in Afghanistan 
passed unmarked by the official 
Soviet press Friday, Reuters re- 
ported from Moscow. 


30,000 Sikhs. The procession was 
to mark the execution 300 years 
ago of two sons of Gobind Singh, 
the tenth and last guru of ihe Sikh 
religion. 

Nihangs, who carry swords, 
spears and guns, guard Sikh reli- 
gious shrines and ore regarded as 
the elite warrior branch of the reli- 
gion. 

The police said the Nihang kill- 
ings were not connected with Sikh 
extremist attacks earlier in the 
week in which one person was 
killed and one was injured. 

Hindu-Sikh violence Tuesday in 


ihe northwest Punjab lown of Gur- 
daspur left one person dead and at 
least 12 injured. The rightist Hindu 
Shiv Sena group called u strike of 
shopkeepers in the state for Friday 
to protest the killing. 

The police said most Hindu 
shopkeepers in 10 of Punjab's 12 
districts obeyed the strike call but 
Sikh businessmen opened their 
stores. They said the strike was 
peaceful. 

An indefinite curfew was in force 
in Gurdaspur to head off more 
clashes over the building of shops, 
□ear a Hindu temple. 


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Page 6 


* \ • . ; 


ARTS / LEISURE 


Jesters of Art: 2 Soviet Emigres Embrace Father Stalin, Greatness of Social Reahsm 


By Michael Gibson 

rntermaional HemU Tribune 

F ) ARIS — “We realty love Sta- 
lin," say Komar ana Melamid. 
Only (me of them is speaking 
(probably Melamid) but the other 
approves and elaborates. The ac- 
cent is richly Russian, the tone is 
straightforward, but something in 
their beating suggests the basic 
truthfulness and deadpan irony of 
the stand-up comic. One of their 
activities is lecturing (with slides) 
and they are much in demand. It is 
apparent that these two artists 
found their proper place when they 
assumed Lheir tricky, tightrope 
roles as jesters at the court of art in 
New York. 

Vitaly Komar, 42, and AJek- 
sander Melamid, 40, both bom in 
Moscow (at the same clinic) and 
both 1967 graduates of the Slro- 
ganov Institute for Art and Design 
in Moscow, were in Paris to talk at 
the opening of their exhibition at 
tbe Musde des Arts Dficoratifs, 
which runs through Jan. 19. 

The show includes 16 big (72-by- 
5 0-inch. 1 84- by- 128-centimeter), 
somber oils in the heavily academ- 
ic, plush-curtained Socialist Realist 
style imposed by Stalin. There are 
also quite a number of eclectic se- 
quences of small paintings. “We 
were convinced that this official 
style was bad style, but we discov- 
ered that it was in fact a really great 
style of historical significance," tbe 
artists said. The Russian accent ap- 
pears to add subtler implications 
than tbe words convey. Are they 
serious about this? Yes and no. 



Komar and M alamifT s “Stalin and the Muses” (detail). 


The serious point they are con- 111113 “ their imaginations when structivists who “remembered, se- 
stantly making is that an does not toy were children. The Stalin they cretly, in their souls, the experi- 
appear in a historical vacuum. “We i° V(5d “ever existed; this they hap- meals of the heroic times of the 
have taken history, we have taken pity acknowledge. But he remains avant-garde and the illusions of the 
dme itself as an aesthetic category. to real Stalin as far as they are fust years of the revolution.” The 
For the Western an world, aesthet- concerned. latter talked freely about their aspt- 

ics means color, line, composition. Komar and Melamid began rations when it finally became pos- 
But time and history also deter- working together while still in tbe sible to do so under Khrushchev, 
mine the value of a work of art.” Soviet Union. They had, they say, “Many people thought things 

“quite a contradictory education” would pick up where they had left 
Their profession of love for Sta- because some of their teachers were off under Lenin, that S talin had 
lin refers to the figure that was former members of the Stalin just been a small mistake" 
endowed with a powerful, godlike Academy and others were old Con- One of the first joint ventures of 


Komar and Melamid was “a theo- 
retical-conceptual piece" or, more 
simply, an fflustraied lecture on tbe 
roots of Soviet revolutionary art 
“We did some research and found 
that Socialist Realism was not 
something new. It had, for in- 
stance, many points in common 
with tbe commemorative medals 
minted by the czars after great bat- 
tles and other important events.” 

This led them to toy around with 
the official style. One summer they 
gpt a job doing patriotic decora- 
tions for a Pioneer camp: portraits 
of Lenin, of Pioneer heroes, ere. 
While they were working at this 
expression of conventional enthusi- 
asm they amused themselves by 
imagining an artist who did this 
sort of work not for a living but 
“for soul, for self-expression, for 
love of Lenin” just so that it might 
hang in somebody’s home. They 
painrat such things as portraits of 
Komar’s father and Melamid’s wife 
and child in the approved home 
style, as their imaginary artist 
might have done. 

In 1973 they decided to take on 
the dogma of “realism” by carrying 
it to absurd limits. Their vehicle 
was another imaginary painter, 
whom they called Nikolai Bucho- 
mov. In their lectures, they show a 
tum-of-lhe-centuxy photo of Bu- 
cbomov: He wears a patch over the 
left eye, winch he lost when “he was 
punched in the eye by a Russian 
Futurist." Next comes a slide 
showing several of his works. Bu- 
chomov is obviously the ultimate 
realist: He devoted lus Kfe to paint- 


ing a single scene at different times 
of tbe year. The scene represents 
the field in which he was born (his 
mother, a farm laborer, gave birth 
at work). Because he could always 
see part of his nose with his single 
eye, he felt it was his obligation, as 
a true realist, to include it in the 
picture — “only from one season to 
the next," says Komar, “it would 
change color somewhat.” 

In 1974 Komar and Mdantid 
participated in the Bdijaevo exhi- 
bition in a vacant lot in Moscow. 
The police came with bulldozers 
and destroyed the show — “not 
because it was dissident or forbid- 
den,” the artists recalled. “Simply, 
h had not been authorized.” Two 
years later friends smuggled some 
of their painting * out and they had 
a show at the Ronald Feldman 
Gallery in New York. 

In 1977 they emigrated to Israel. 
“It was not a rational decision," 
Komar said. “We were just part of 
a big movement — like birds who 
takeoff together and fly to another 
part of the globe.” After a year in 
Israel they wait to die United 
States for a show, and stayed. 

At this point they began playing 
around with capitalism: a coupon, 
for instance, inserted in Art Forum 
magazine, offering to buy the read- 
er's souL They gpt about 6,000 re- 
plies. “It was interesting to see how 
the amount they asked varied ac- 
cording to people's beliefs,” Komar 
said. “Those who considered that a 
soul was something real and pre- 
cious would pm a value of several 
million dollani. Others gave it away 


free. Thai was the case with .Andy 
Warhol." 

“Yes.” said Melamid. “but we 
told him we believed this was not 
the first transaction he had under- 
taken on his souL” Ultimately the 
Warhol coupon was sold for 30 
rubles in Moscow. 

Stalin remains the subject of 
much of their work. Mdantid was 8 
yean old and Komar 10 when Sta- 
lin died. “Everybody cried, even 
our teacher cried. It was a very cold 
day in March and it was as though 

the whole structure of the world 
had collapsed. We just went on 
living in the ruins." 

Apparently it was Khrushchev's 
revelations and the consequent col- 
lapse of the values they were 
brought up to believe in that led 
them to their parodic maimer — 
large paintings in which Stalin ap- 
pears in full Socialist Realist splen- 
dor. In one, be is given a volume by 
a muse of history who is obviously 
18th-century French. Another, 
called “I Saw Stalin Once When I 
Was a Child" shows the great man 
peering out or the back window of 
an old-fashioned car. looking into 
the eyes of the spectator. 

Komar and Melamid do not 
min d bong described as jesters, but 
it might be more appropriate to 
refer to the Russian figure of the 
yurodevyi Th te yurodevyi is primari- 
ly a simpleton who is impelled to 
tell the truth. In the opera “Boris 
Godunov,” a yurodevyi tells Boris 
be has done wrong — and Boris 
does not allow his soldiers to harm 
the fellow. Shostakovich has been 
referred to as a yurodevyi. a suffer- 


ing witness who tells the bitter 
truth in the irony of his name. 

Komar and Melamid take advan- 
tage of the license thetr role given 
them, and proclaim opinions that . ' < 

would normally have someone dis- 
franchised in the art world. Dfteb- — \ 
rations such as “Malevitch » a bad / 4 
painter” or “Jackson Pollock is no 
good" are part of their strategy: 

“We are purely ami-aesthetic, and 
we are irying to convince the snob- 
bish. aesthetic circles that they are -• 
wrong." One important point they • ■ . | 
are making is that Soviet artists ^ -* 
cannot 50 years later, pick things < . 
up where Malevitdr left off. 

This strategy has also allowed 
them to survive the difficult de- 
compression or culture shock mast 

artists arriving from the Soviet 
Union undergo in the West. Komar 
and Melamid have not denounced 
the whole basis of the doctrines of 
an they were brought up on. “h 
was an important period of modem : 
art," they say of Socialist Realism 
— speaking with obvious ambigu- 
ity — but, while accepting the use 1 
of it, they have taken it to unpre- 
dictable extremes. This has canted 
them some measure of success in - 
the United States; they have works 
in the Museum of Modern Art and * " 
the Guggenheim in New York, and •’ 
private collectors have acquired .. 
some of their big p ainting *. 

“Millionaires are such strange 
people," they say, “that even an 
image of Stalin can be sold in the 
United States — tbe only country 
in the world where this is possible, 
we hope." 


Fanmaking, Handel, Screen Stars 


And Fashion at London Galleries 


By Max Wykes-Joyce 

L ONDON — Four livdy shows 
/ in public galleries are provid- 
ing a delightful conspectus of En- 
glish social history. 

At the Museum of London, “Ivo- 
ry, Feathers and Lace" brings to- 
gether a selection from the muse- 
um's fan collection and related 
works, such as a fan design of tbe 
1720s in etching and aquatint 
showing SL Bartholomew's Fair, an 
annual doth fair that took place at 
Snrithfield, in the City of London, 
from about 1 150 to 1855. 

F anmnlq ng in England dates 
from the early 17th century. The 
trade was given considerable im- 
pulse by tbe arrival of the Hugue- 
nots In the 1680s; there were 
enough fanmakers in London by 
1709 to necessitate the creation of 
the Gw Lively Company of the 
Fan Makers. By 1754, engraved 
trade bills were bring printed, such 
as that of the firm Bar, Fisher and 
Sister “At Gordon’s Old Fan 
Ware-House the Golden Fan & 
Crown in Tavistock Street, Covent 
Garden is to be sold all Manner of 
Fans Wholesale and Retail; Like- 
wise Lace, Childbed Linnen, & all 
kinds of MUlinaiy.” 

The museum's collection is rich 
in fans associated with the royal 
family (the museum was originally 
housed in a wing of Kensington 
Palace). The show indudes a fan 
thought to have been made for 
Queen Victoria as a a present for 
her 39th birthday (May 24, 1858). 
It is made of cream silk, with the 
roses of England, thistles of Scot- 
land and shamrocks of Ireland. Tbe 
queen's cypher is in tbe center, and 
the guards and sticks are carved 
mother-of-pearl with gilt decora- 
tion. 

Other fans have an indirect asso- 
ciation with the court. It was the 
custom for debutantes to be 
brought to court and introduced to 
their reigning majesties. An indis- 
pensable part of a debutante’s 
equipment was a court presenta- 
tion fan of white egret and ostrich 
feathers. To facilitate easy han- 
dling (the trembling teen-ager had 
not only to manipulate the fan but 
contrive to mam tain a tiara and 
headdress in balance while malting 


repeated curtsies, moving back- 
ward, without falling over her long 
lace train) presentation fans were 
simplified from the 1890s* five or 
six feathers set in a mother-of-pearl 
handle to the 1922 example, two 
feathers in delicately carved ivory. 

By the 1890s ordinary fans had 
deteriorated to fairly plebeian sou- 
venirs such as “Loins Fribleman's 
Celebrity Fan,” bedecked with 
photographs of 70 actors and ac- 
tresses. They recovered their ele- 
gance in tbe 1920s with advertising 
prints for holds and restaurants. 

“ Ivory, Feathers and Lace: Fans 
From the Museum’s Costume Col- 
lection,” Museum of London, Lon- 
don Wall, through April 27. 

□ 


Tbe life and times of George 
Frederick Handel (1685-1759), the 
German-bom musician who was 
arguably the greatest En glish com- 
poser, are celebrated in “Hallelu- 
jah!” a 300-item exhibition at the 
National Portrait Gallery marking 
the composer's tercentenary year. 

Hie show comprises not only 
portraits of Handel and his con- 
temporaries and friends, but a visu- 
al history of artistic Europe in the 
first half of the 1 8th century. Han- 
del never seems to have been short 
of patrons, and many of them com- 
missioned portraits of their favorite 
music man. A miniature by Georg 
Andreas Wolfgang the Younger 
(1703-45) was lent from the royal 
collection; two late portraits by 
Thomas Hudson (1701-79) come, 
respectively, from from the Royal 
Society of Musicians of Great Brit- 
ain and from the Hamburg city and 
university library. 

Not everyone was delighted with 
the composer. It is reported that he 
much offended one erstwhile 
friend, the artist Joseph Goupy 
(c. 1680-c. 1770). by inviting him to 
a frugal dinner, then excusing him-, 
self to take a meal of rich delicacies 
by himself. Goupy left Handel's 
lodgings in a rage and made a pas- 
tel drawing of the composer with a- 
pig’s head. 

For two of his greatest English 
patrons, however, he was the divine 
Handel. There are masterly por- 
traits of both these grandees: Rich- 
ard Boyle, 3d Earl of Burlington 


(whose town house in Piccadilly 
became the headquarters of the 
Royal Academy of Arts) and James 
Brydges, first Duke of Chandos. 
for whose chapel Handel composed 
the 11 Chandos Anthems. These 
two were prime movers in the foun- 
dation of the Royal Academy of 
Music, of which Handel was the 
only official composer and first 
master of tbe orchestra. One of the 
small treasures in this exhibition is 
the earliest handwritten list of 
“Gentlemen Subscribers to the 
Royal Academy of Muskk," lent 
by tbe Public Record Office: 

Each phase of Handel’s career is 
illustrated with paintings, mints, 
musical instruments, models and 
manuscript music, to the final sec- 
tion of the show, “The Commemo- 
ration of Handd," which depicts 
the editors, biographers and great 
Handelians who bring his story to 
the present 

“ Hallelujah ! Handel,’' National 
Portrait Gallery, SL Martin’s Place, 
WC2, through Feb. 23. 

a 

In another part of the National 
Portrait Gallery is an almost un- 
bearably nostalgic exhibition of 
170 photographs of British cinema 
stars from the 1930s to the 1980s by 
such photographers as Cornel Lu- 
cas, Angus McBean, Sir Cecil Bea- 
ton, Norman Parkinson and Lord 
Snowdon. Here are splendid re- 
minders. stills of roles one may 
have long forgotten. 

“Stan of the British Screen," Na- 
tional Portrait Gallery, through 
March 2; RPS National Center of 
Photography, The Octagon, Milson 
Street, Bath, March 8 through May 

a 

At the Henry Cole Wing of the 
Victoria & Albert Museum is 
“Shots of Style.” fashion photo- 
graphs by 39 photographers, from 



The Pick of ’85 Classical Recordings 


By John Rockwell 

New York Tuna Sender 


YORK — Hie year in 


Restaurant advertising fan of the 1920s. 


tbe 1918 images of Baron Adolphe 
de Meyer (1868-1949) and thenear- 
surreal 1928 and 1930 shots by Bar- 
on George Hoynigen-Huen6 (1900- 
68) to the romantic 1984 fantasies 
of tbe American Bruce Weber (b. 
1946) and this year's dramatically 
lighted works by the Italian Paolo 
Roverai (b. 1947). 

Famous photographers repre- 
sented by strong imagery include 
Richard Avedon (b. 1923), Edward 
Steuben (1879-1973), Man Ray 
(1890-1977), Cecfl Beaton (1904- 
80), Irving Peon (b. 1917), Norman 
Parkinson (b. 1913) and Erwin Bhi- 


menfdd (1897-1969). For style, 
drama and the essential portrayal 
of women wearing fashions, my 
choices would be the Japanese Ya- 
sohiro Wakabayashi (b. 1930), who 


I classical recordings was as 
much a story of business and mar- 
keting as of music. This was a year 
of reissues — not just of more and 
more analog recordings onto com- 
pact disk, most notably the Bruno 
Walter, Otto Klemperer, Fritz Rei- 
ner and Ernest Ansennet series, but 
of endless recyclings of material 
onto budget labels. 

On CDs, coral music was 
constrained by the continuing pres- 
sure on the few plants that malt* 
tbe disks, and thus, paradoxically, 
by tbe very success of the new me- 
dium. As more people buy CD 
players, tbe pop marketeers be- 
come increasingly interested in get- 
ting hit albums onto CD. That 
means the classical labels, whose 
customers fueled the CD explosion, 
must wait while plants grind out 
Michael Jackson and Bruce Spring- 
steen dido. 

One would not want to leave the 
impression that no new releases 
have appeared this year, though. 
Once again, one of the most fertile 
areas of innovation was early mu- 
sic. especially “authentic” perfor- 
mances of baroque music. Here the 
most striking releases came from 
Andrew Parrottof England. There 
was a musicologically probing, mu- 
sically inspiring account of Monte- 
verdi's grand “Vespro della Beata 
Virgine” of 1610 (Angel, two LPs 
— al LPs are available on cassette 
unless otherwise indicated — and 
two CDs). There was a lush, picto- 
rial Vivaldi “Four Seasons" 


signs his work Hirer, the German- (Denon, CD only). At year’s end 


John Eliot Gardiner's strong ver- 
sion of the oratorio “Solomon" 
(Philips, two disks) and Hans-Mar- 
tin Linde's bucolic “Water Music" 
(AngeL no CD). 

There were some fine choral re- 
cords, the earliest of which, chrono- 
logically, is a Marc- Antoine Char 
pentier disk of the Te Deom and 
two other works, stirringly led by 
Louis Devos (Erato. CD). Mozart's 
“Coronation" Mass and the Miss a 
Solemnis (K. 337) received noble 
performances from tbe soprano 
Margaret Marshall, the King’s Col- 
lege Choir, Cambridge, and the En- 
glish Chamber Orchestra under 
Stephen Geobury (Argo, CD). En- 
gland's Conifer label had a refined 
CD of the simpler, original version 
of Faurt's Requiem with his “Can- 
tique de Jean Racine." 

SymphoaicaUy, the Hi ghlight of 
the year was Marriner’s set of the 
“complete" Schubert symphonies, 
with fascinating reconstructions of 
lost movements and entire works 
by the musicologist Brian New- 
bould (Philips, seven LPs, six CDs). 
Other notable releases included the 
second installment of Christopher 
Hogwood’s “authentic" Haydn 
symphonies, devoted to Nos. 94 
and 96 (Oiseau-Lyre) and tbe ninth 
volume of Derek Solomons’s more 
austere and extreme Haydn sym- 
phonies, with Nos. 42, 45, 46, 47, 5 1 
and 65 (CBS, three LPs, no CDs). 
Bernard Haitink had a sober, warm 
set of the four Schumann sympho- 
nies (Philips, two CDs). Larin 
Maazel conducted a luxurious 
Mahler Fourth, with Kathleen Bat- 
tie as soprano soloist (CBS). 

In smaller-scaled instrumental 


bran Australian Helmut Newton 
(b. 1920) and the Frenchman Jean- 
LoupSeff (b. 1933). 

“ Shots of Style,” Victoria A Al- 
bert Museum, Exhibition Road, 
SW7, through Jan. 19. 


Max Wykes-Joyce writes regular- 
ly in the IHT on London art exhibi- 
tions. 


came a pungent, small-scaled Bach 
Mass in B minor (AngeL two LPs, 
CDs planned). 

The Handel year, predictably, 
produced some fine recordings. 
Among the best were Neville Mar- 
riner’s bracing “Coronation" An- 
thems (Philips; when no format 
designation is given, a release is 
available as LP, cassette and CD), 


music, Maniner released a lovely 
disk of Mozart’s “Posthora" Sere- 


New Company Revives Monte Carlo Ballet Tradition 


By David Stevens 

International Herald Tribune 


J^JONTE CARLO — Diaghi- 


I INTERNATIONAL 
ART EXHIBITIONS 


PARIS 


3ALERIE MERMOZ 


PRE-COLUMBIAN ART 


,6, Rue Jeon-Mennoz, 75008 PARIS. Tel.! 43.59.82.44 . 


IF= WALLY FINDLAY =a 

Galleries international 

new york • Chicago - pdm beach 
beverly hills - parts 


2 Ave. Matignon - Paris 8th 
T*U 4125 .7074, bador few. tatadar 

10 tun. Is 1 pjn, - 2>30 M 7 p.nL 


EXHIBITION 


GANINER 


Permanent exhibition of 

ADAMOfF, AADtSSONE, AUG€, 
BOUDEI, BOURRIE, CANU, 
CASSX5NEUL, CHAURAY, DUCAJRE, 
era. FABIEN, GALL GAVEAU, 
GORHT1, HAMBOURG, HEKBO, 
KHME, KLUGE, LEPHO, MAK. 

M1CHH.-HENKY, M1UNKOV, NESS!, 
NEUGU ELMAN, SORE, SIMILAR], 
THOMAS, VTGNOIES, VOUET. 


A. VttJAWSUADRAS; Portraits 
BALAHN: Sail fibre* 


Hotel George V - 47 .23.54.00 
31 Ave. George-V - Paris 8fh 

tat ■dLIOJO paAJO Is 9 fun 
Sunk* ond Moods? 7 tofiua. 


— MUSfe RODIN 

Tl, ns * In — . tea (Is) • 

50 DRAWINGS 

RODIN 

From tin Mcand weleaM of 
L'INVENTAJRE 
dally mapt Tuesday. 10 tun. - S pjtl 
I— DECEMBER 21 - MARCH 17 — J 


"ART EXHIBITIONS” 
"ANTIQUES' 1 


"AUCTION SALES” 

appear 


on Saturday 

Write to: 

Fmofoise CLEMENT. 
International 
Herald Tribune, 

181 Ave. Charies-de-GauUt, 
92521 NeuBly Codex. France. 


lev, the Ballets Russes and 
their various successors fixed Mon- 
te Carlo in 20th-century ballet his- 
tory, but not fra more than 35 years 
has it been home to a permanent 
dance company. 

That long hiatus has ended with 
the creation of Les Ballets de Mon- 
te Carlo, which is giving its first 
series of performances here 
through New Year’s Day with a 
busy agenda — a total of 13 perfor- 
mances of five programs compris- 
ing 11 ballets, six of them in first 
performances. This does not count 
gala lifts by visiting stars joining in 
the inaugural hoopla. 

The co-directors are Pierre La- 
cotte, the French choreographer 
whose principal specialty is the re- 
constitution of “original" versions 
of Romantic ballets (a service he is 
poforming here fra “Giselle"), and 
his wife, Ghislaine Thesmar, long 
an itoile of the Paris Opfra Ballet 
and who will also be a star for her 
own company. Their principal dep- 
uties are Kevin Haigen, former 



nade (Philips). Gidon Kroner. Kim 
Kashkashiao and Yo Yo Ma com- 
bined for a bracing performance of 
Mozart’s Divertimento in E flat (K. 
563) on CBS. 

This was a good yeas for solo 
pianists. Mitsuko Uchida contin- 
ued her fine traversal of the Mozart 
sonatas (Philips). Richard Goode 
had a straightforward but person- 
able collection of Beethoven sona- 
tas (Book-of- thc-Momh Records). 
There was elegant Chopin from 
Murray Perahia (CBS) and stirring 
Schumann from Andras Schiff 


of Cantdoube’s “Songs of the An- . 

vergne” (on tape) that provided the (Denon, CD). Vladimir Ashkenazy 
moods, playful to passionate, for a offered a suave Ravel recital (Lon- 
— of pieces for different combi- drat). Yuji Takahashi had several 

s Satie 


nations of dancers; as with Hai- 
gen’s work, the format was reminis- 
cent of Robbins’s “Dances at a 
Gathering." It also provided a good 
showcase for tbe willowy Murid 
Maffre. . 


pristine Satie CDs on Denon, in- 
cluding a grouping of his better 
known works. 

The best opera recording of rite 


year was DG*s first-ever, super- 
complete French version of Verdi's 
“Don Carlos," superbly conducted 
by Claudio Abbado and well sung 
by a cast that normally essays this 
opera in Italian (five LPs, four 
CDs). A dose second was Charles 
Du toil's charming account of Cha- 
brier's “Roi Malgre Lui” with Bar- 
bara Hendricks (Erato, two CDs). 

Other notable operatic albums 
included a smmie, sensitive version 
of Monteverdi's “Orfeo" (Angri, 
no CDs); aweU-sang, idiomatically 
led recording of Rossini's rare 
“Maometto II" (Philips, three 
disks); and Georg Solti's effectively 
opulent album of Schoenberg's 
“Moses und Aron" (London, two 
disks). 

The most important historical 
reissues of the year were operatic. 
Heading the hst was the New York 
Public Library's complete collec- 
tion of the legendary Mapleson cyl- 
inders from live performances at . 
the Metropolitan Opera b e twe en 
1900 and 1904 (four LPs). Sera- 
phim came forth with the third vol- 
ume of the monumental scries “The 
Record of Singing,” this rare devot- 
ed to 1926-39 (13 LPs). Of the com- 
plete broadcast operas that came 
on tbe market this year, Mdo- 
dram’s 1 957 Bayreuth “Tristan und . 
Isolde,” with Birgit Nilsson and 
Wolfgang Wlndgassen, seemed es- 
pecially striking (MEL, five LPs). 

Appealing vocal recordings in- 
cluded Barbara Hendricks's coQeo 
tion of Mozart arias (Angd, CD), 
and Frederica von Slade’s pairing 
of Berlioz's “Nuits tFEtfc" at vl De- 
bussy’s “Damoiselle Ehie," with 
Seiji Ozawa and the Boston Sym- 
phony (CBS). 

Finally, modem music, starting 
with Pierre Boulez’s wonderful 
three-disk Schoenberg album 
(CBS, no CDs). Gidon Kramer. 
Keith Jarred, Dennis Russcfl Da- 
vies and friends combined for a CD 
of quietly rapturous by Arvo 
Paert (ECM), One of Torn Take- 
mitsu's most profound works, fra ■ 
tbe traditional Japanese gogaku en- 
semble, “In an Autumn Garden,” 
appeared on Varese Sarabande 
(CD only). 

_ In the realm of experimental mu - . 
sic. Takahashi had a cha rmin g col- 
lection of John Cage's prepared pi- 
ano pieces (Denon, CD). Robert 
Ashley's bizarre but com pelling ' 
“opera," “Atalanta,” could be 
heard on Lovely Music (three 
LPs). Pauline Otiveros had a char- 




'> 


act cristi colly mystical, eccentric LP ' 
on Lovely Music. 


W. 


Kevin Haigen in “Te Dam.” 


SyMat 


Olivieri made a strong impres- 
sion in the mam role of Dieter 
A mm a nn' s “life Circles,” which 
had fined choreography, a blandly 
expressionist atmosphere, a sub- 
stantial score by John Adains and a 
story of sorts — a young man in 
seaztii of Love is caught first by 
Death. . • ' 

The opening tail had the advun- 
tage of bdng performed in the Salle 
Gander with the Monte Cado Phil- 
harmonic under Lawrence Foster 
and .in a program of rnmareil sub- 
stance, bat it was undernourished 
rat the Hunring side. 

Balanchine's “Theme and Varia- 
tions,” with Stephant and Graffin 
as principals, is a testing work for a 
yoong Company to acquire, but the 


DOONESBURY 


S* 001 an i sevcral s®*** 5 Bt to poraiy choreogrmhets, of which cor^Thesmar a^Mmra^w 
SKltSSS Deutsche Oper Berlin, and Muriel the most attSve was “After an attractive account of tbe“&an 


Peter 


a featured dancer, and 
Stamm as ballet master. 

The troupe proper numbers 37 
dancers, a corps of 30 and seven 
principals, including Yannick Ste- 
phant, Frederic Olivieri and Guil- 
laume Graffin, who were rising 
young soloists in the luerareby of 
tbe Paris Op&ra Ballet; Panl 
Chalmer, late of (he National Bal- 
let of Canada and the Stuttgart 
Ballet; Jean-Baptiste Bello- Portu, 
Paris-trained and most recently 
with Maurice B^j art’s Ballet of the 
20th Century; Judy Holme, a prod- 
uct of London's Royal Ballet 


Maffre. a prize-winner in the first 
Paris International Dance Compe- 
tition. 

In the first two programs, cue in 
tbe historic and sumptuous Salle 
Gamier and another in the modan 
auditorium of the Centre de 
Congres, the prevailing impression 
was of a young and attractive 
troupe of dancers, a high level of 
talent and enthusiasm and a variety 
of badtground that should be use- 
ful in the eclectic repertory they 
obviously are going to have. 

The program that showed the 
company in the best light was a 
triple-bill of new works by contem- 


Dawn" by Kevin Haigen, a riotiess 
ballet of nine episodes for afferent 
combinations of dancers to a group 
of Mendelssohn’s “Songs Without 
Words.” StephantV corn elegance 
and Olivieri’s brooding intensity- 
were handsomely matched in some 
dances, and a solo by De Ann Dn- 
tril was an indication that there is 


Lake” Act 2 pas de deux. 

Bin the two novelties on the bill, 
Dukas’s “Sorcerer's Apprentice” 
and Bizet’s “Te Deura," both cho- 
reographies by Lacotte, were work- 
manlike but routinn And the ‘Te 
Deum” (tike the earlier Symphony 
in CayouthfnI work) merely shows 
that religious music was not really 

nr— r. . _ * r 


talent waiting to be seen in the* Bizet's line, although it got a hearty 
corps. Elzbieta Ziomek was the ex- musical performance under Foster, 


cellent pianist. 

. Bertrand d’At’s “Jours Tran- 
quHles” came equipped with .a 
Henry Miller program-note about 
the end of childhood, but was 

shaped more by the muse, a group 


with a chorus and soprano Knri 
Loyas and tenor Ryiand Davies as 
soloists. Otivieri^ ''was the unlucky 
.apprentice in the Dukas work; 
'while Haigen did sontelmpressive 
leaping in the “Te Demm." 



.r*' 








a fades 




_ Hon***™*** — 

jrt-oP.TI FSnoroferwJM — 
" p. | arid raerfcats P. 7 
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HcralbSSlieribunc 


BUSINESS / FINANCE 


U-S. Stocks 
Report, M-l, Page 8 


rPAY-SUNDAY, DECEMBER 28 - 29, 1985 


** 


Page 7 


ECONOMIC SCENE 


prediction of Bad Times, 
ild landing for the Dollar 


f 


By LEONARD SELK 

New York Times Service 

EWYORK — The end of the year inevitably brings on 
a spoil of nostalgia and a fit of futurism Nostalgia has 
its pleasures, hut is the effort to peer into the darfr 
future worth die candle? Forecasting, by its nature, 
mpEfy the ancient paradox of Epimcnidex, a Cretan who 
- jl Cretans are liars." The Epimemdes paradox contra- 
t assumption that aE statements are either true or false, 
t epigraph to his new study. “Deficits and the Dollar the 
: - Economy at Risk," Stephen Maxris of the Institute of 
• 'tfonal Economics quotes an Arab proverb, “He who 
■ . j the -foure lies, even if he tells the truth," which is a 
d the anrieni Greek — — — 


He believes that 
tiie dollar is still 
25 percent to 30 
percent too high. 


Re 


It implies that any 
uanent about the fu- 
' . l&ange the future and 

• : iie false. 

Mania, fonneriy the 
” vgonamist of the Paris- 
"■ \ Organization for Eco- 
Cooperation and De- 

- ‘ (jit, docs not want the ■ 

- ~~ - ae foresees. He predicts a “hard landing” for the dollar and 
^cession in the Western world, unless corrective actions 

■ CD. 

alcotates that at earistmg exchange rates, even after the 
; { 20 -percent decline from its February 1985 peak, the U.S. 
efjdt will go on growing and the United States will have an 
~ - tl debt of more than SI trillion by 1990. more than all the 
' oing countries combined. The reason is that the dollar is 
' ' percent to 30 percent too high and the United States is 
jp g almost 50 percent more than it is earning abroad. 

that, even with a rapid fall in the dollar, further Urge 
^acooont deficits are bound to be incurred and will have to 
unced- 

('AfcHeed,” he says, “the fragility of the U.S. position is vividly 
J1 Hted by tin fact that, even in a hard-landing scenario 
ng rapid external adjustment, asset holders would have to 
increasing their exposure in dollars by up to $400 billion 

- -±e dollar declined by over 40 percent” 

RTS THREATENS enormous exchange-rate losses for 
‘.other countries and implies, in his view, "that a time is 
1 bound to come, as the dollar's decline gathers momentum, 
oragners’ willingness to invest their savings in the United 
_ - dries up faster than the U.S. economy’s need for them.” 

■ t may not happen for a while, he says, but when it does, 
viD be a “crunch" in U.S. financial markets. Inflation and 

~t ales wiU climb, the economy mil drop into recession, 
/fog standards will sustain their greatest fall since the Great 
soon of the 1930s. 

Mams does not want this to happen any more than 
~Hy dse does, but sees no easy way out. To restore confi- 
the United States would have to cut its budget deficit 

- at x tirna when the recession was on. The Federal Reserve 
not be able to ease interest rates because that would 

7 l inflationary expectations and generate even greater capi- 
flow. 

[he United States cuts its trade deficit, other countries* 
twiD rise, and their economies decline. Mr. Mams esti- 
tbai ^employment would rise to more than 14 percent in 
ean countries if they took no offsetting actions to stimulate 
cooonries. Japan would lose seven percentage points off its 
Rational product by 1990. 

'cad off this dreary, outcome, he urges Europe and Japan to 
(Qnfoued on Page 9, CoL 5) 


Currency Rates 


Dec. 37 



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4.10*3 • 

— — 

15316* 


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6JM 

1,0151 

14618 

44502* 

1J3BS 

178566 


UJT77 

urn 

271687 

13247S 

na 

10613 

SM428 

23878 

221 J66 


WllrVl 


MT U5J 

CuntoOr RCr 

U S3 

Currency par U54 

Currency per 1154 

<ru QJ8 

Fla. markka 

3491 

Max. paw 

45750 

Soviet raWa 

07642 

Ltm 

Crack dree 

I5O00 

Horw.krm 

74225 

Spm.pasata 

1S6JO 

- 7741 

HoaoKonvl 

75105 

PUL peso 

1850 

Swed. krona 

7435 

: 5141 

IndbtorwM 

11.90 

Purl escudo 

1W75 

Taiwan S 

3957 

. *56540 

Mo.ra*tat| 1,12350 

Sandl rtyal 

16505 

Thai boM 

31M5 

140 

Hues 

0518 

Hito.* 

1116 

TarUsJi Ora 

56945 

to 338U 

ItoMflSMk. 148050 

S. Air. rand 

26595 

UAE dirtum 

34735 

* 8*61 

•tewnIHdhw 05900 

IKor.mn 

89152 

veoaz. bod*. 

1470 

H 138 

Holey, non. 

24395 






Interest Rates 


■’■Ritei.j Bepealta 



Dm. 27 

onto- 

Mark 

Swtei 

Franc 

StorHne 

Franck 

Franc 

ECU SDR 



4Mh 

11 9*11 *. 

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am 

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rwovi. 



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Dec. 27 


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8 711/T4 
* 7 1S/1S 7 IMS 

. H Ctaawwawte Cr*» 



Aslu Dollar Deposit* 

Dec. 27 

1 montti 

I morttn 8-8<* 

Imonttn S-BW 

5 maattH B - B 1 * 

1 raw • 

Source: Reuters- 


(7JS. Money Market Fande 

Det.Z? 

Menu Lynch Rwtfv Am*H 
SMrMWswrlfM: 7 JO 

Tolerate Interest Bole index: 7-427 

Source; Morrill L vneto. Telerote. 




Gold 


Dec. 27 



AM. 

PM. 

Cfte 

1*000 Kaog 

32140 

J25iO 

-045 

Lnembaura 

32U0 

— 

+ 0J0 

Paris nisklki) £t« 

EM6 

+ 372 

Zorich 

325J0 

32775 

+ 200 

London 

sue 

32885 

+ 2M 

New York 

— 

32870 

+ 140 


Lu x e mbou rg Paris ana London otiiaal Wa- 
in ps.- Mono <ooo ana Zurich opening ana 
Chrshto prices: Now York Comes current 
eemneLAli prices toU£-S per ounce. 
Source: Reuters. 


Closed 


i woe closed Friday in South Korea for a holiday- 
stack Exchange was also dosed as were the London 
and the Baltic Exchange in Britain and the Johannes- 
w On Monday, markets will be closed in the Philip- 
touth Korea. 


European 
Extras lor 
Westland 

Work Offered as 
Part of Rescue 

. Reuters 

LONDON — ■ A European con- 
sortium bidding to rescue West- 
land PLC offered on Friday to give 
the ailing British helico pter maker 
guarantees of extra work, in an ef- 
fort to defeat a rival rescue package 
led by United Technologies Corp. 

The group of five European 
aerospace manufacturers pledged 
to guarantee Westland more than 
13 million man-hours of subcon- 
tracting work in 1987-89 if the 
company accepted its rescue offer, 
a statement from Lloyds Mer chan t 
Bank Ltd. said. 

Those hours would be in addi- 
tion to existing orders for six Sea 
King helicopters needing 300,000 
man-hours in the period. 

The offer of guarantees for work 
was prompted by queries on the 
consortium's offer from the West- 
land board. 

The board agreed Dec. 13 to the 
capital reconstruction program 
proposed by United Technologies 
and Fiat SpA, which are offering 
£30 million ($43 m3Eon) for 29.9 
percent of Westland. 

A counterbid of £37.1 million 
was made last Friday by the Euro- 
pean group. It is made up of British 
Aerospace PLC and General Flee , 
trie Co. of Britain, Messerschmitt- 
-BOlkow-Blohm GmbH of West 
Germany, Aerospatiale of France 
and Agusta SpA of Italy. 

Both offers include plans for 
conversion of bank debt into equity 
and sales of shares to existing 
shareholders. 

The Lloyds statement said the 
European consortium realized that 
Westland’s key concern was the 
provision of work through 1989. 

The European consortium's 
work offer compares with 1 million 
man-hours offered under the Unit- 
ed Technologies-Fiat arrangement, 
the Iloyds statement said. 

If Westland were to go ahead 
with the United Technologies-Fiat 
plan, Westland could find that Eu- 
ropean governments would review 
its participation in joint helicopter 
programs in Europe, Lloyds added. 

The Lloyds’ statement said the 
European consortium hoped West- 
land would recommend its terms 
by early next week. 

Michael Hesdtine, Britain’s de- 
fense secretary, has pushed for an 
all-European rescue of the compa- 
ny, while Leon Brittan, trade and 
industry secretary, backed West- 
land's board in its original prefer- 
ence for the United Technologies- 
Fiat plan. 


Egypt Pushes Prices Up, Quietly 

Aim Is to Cut Subsidies 
On Bread, Power, Fuel 


By Michael Ross 

Las Angela Tima Service 

CAIRO — Discreetly, with oat any public an- 
nouncement, the government of President Hosni 
Mubarak is increasing prices in an attempt to ease 
the burden of state subsdies on Egypt's economy. 

The prices of a number of essent ia l commodities 
and services have been quietly raised recently. The 
price of bread has risen by the equivalent of as 
much as 3 cents, gasoline has gone up by 14 cents a 
gallon (4.23 liters) and electricity has increased by 
20 to 50 percent, depending on the type of user. 
Prices for industrial goods, such as steel and coke, 
have also crept up. 

The increases, along with others being contem- 
plated, are meant to help reduce state subsidies 
that, according to Western economists, cost the 
Egyptian government S6 billion to $8 billion a 
year. 

Cutting the huge subsidies, roughly equivalent 
to a third of the national budget, is now considered 
essential by Western and Egyptian economists if 
Egypt is to solve the economic crisis into which it is 
sliding. 

The situation is critical, economists say, because 
foreign debts are mounting while Egypt’s tradi- 
tional sounxs of revenue are shrinking Tbe imbal- 
ance is reflected in a SI J-bQlion balance-of-pay- 
meats deficit this year, in contrast to the modest 
surplus of previous years. 

The balance of payments is a detailed account of 
a country’s foreign trade position, including trade 
in goods and services, capital flows and official 
settlements. , 

In a report issued last summer, the International 
Monetary Fund warned that there was an “urgent 
need” to' implement a “comprehensive package of 
vigorous measures” to expand the export sector, 
reduce imports, rimrinatc subsidies and rationalize 
a chaotic, multitiered system of exchange rates. 
The Egyptian pound is traded at from 0.7 to 1.8 to 
the defiar, the higher figure being the black-market 
rate. 

Without such reforms. Western bankas warn. 
Egypt will run into increasing difficulties in ob- 
taining the foreign loans on which its economy is 
still heavily dependent Already, major foreign 
banks are talking about slashing supplier credits — 
credit extended for the purchase of capital equip- 
ment — from the normal 360 days to 180. 

So far, Egypt has managed to make the pay- 
ments on high-visibility co wimrarJal loans, but it 
has been stalling on the repayment of supplier 
credits and is now estimated to be more than $1 
billion in arrears. 

“Because the delayed payments have been scat- 



Hosni Mubarak 


tered, it doesn't have the same impact as putting 
off payment on one big loan," a Western banker in 
Cairo said. “But within the financial community, 
people know what’s happening. As a result, there’s 
very little appetite for more supplier credits from 
the U.S. and Europe.” 

A Western diplomat said: “They’ve been string- 
ing out their payments, but now they’ve used up all 
their maneuvering room. They no longer have that 
option open to them” 

To the extent that it feds that it can, the govern- 
ment is trying to follow the IMFs advice by 
reducing subsidies, expanding the private sector, 
boosting productivity m the still-dominant public 
sector and curbing imports. A new economic team 
headed by Prime Minister Ali Lutfi, an economist 
brought into the government by Mr. Mubarak last 
September, has begun to introduce reforms, start- 
ing with the price increases. 

But it is moving cautiously, much more slowly 
than the IMF would like, because of fears of soda! 
unrest. The last time that the government tried to 
increase bread prices, in 1977. there was wide- 
spread rioting and the increase was rescinded. 
With urban infla tion estimated to be running as 
high as 20 percent, the government “is dearly 
worried about the soda! impact of further price 
increases," a Western diplomat said. 

Ragaa Rassoui, an economist who is director of 
(Continued cm P^e 9. CoL 5) 



ent 


In Japan Rises 
To Record 2.9% 


The Associalni Press 

TOKYO — Japan’s unemploy- 
ment rate rose to 2.9 percent in 
November, the highest since the 
government started keeping the 
statistic in January 1953. the Man- 
agement and Coordination Agency 
said Friday. 

The seasonally adjusted unem- 
ployment rate has been increasing 
since September, when it stood at 
2.7 percent. In November, 1.59 mil- 
lion Japanese were jobless, an in- 
crease of 80,000 from November 
last year, Tsnyoshi Toya. an agency 
official, said. 

“The unemployment rate is high 
especially among young workers 
aged 15 to 34, who probably have 
not settled in one job, whereas once 
they find one, they rend to stay 
through their lifetime,** Mr. Toya 
said. 

The government said the number 
of Japanese who held jobs in No- 
vember totaled 58J0 million, a rise 
of 1 10,000 from a year earlier. The 
rise was the highest since the in- 
crease of 50,000 recorded in Febru- 
ary 1984. 

The number of workers em- 
ployed in manufacturing declined 
by 30,000 from a year earlier, and 
Mr. Toya said the yen’s rise against 
the U.S. dollar since September 
may have had some effect. 

He said the statistics are based 
on questionnaires answered by 
100,000 Japanese over the age of 
15. People who have worked more 
than one hour in the last week of 
each mouth are considered em- 
ployed in Japan. 

Although the unemployment 
rale in Japan has been rising, it is 
still one oi the lowest among indus- 
trialized nations. In the United 
States in November, fix example, 
the rate fell to 7 percent, which 
matched the lowest of the Reagan 
administration. 


Britain's seasonally adjusted un- 
eraploymem rate stood at 13.1 per- 
cent in November, and West Ger- 
many’s, unadjusted, at S.9 percent 

■ Cut in Long-Term Prime 

Japan will cut its long-term 
prime rate to 12 percent from 15 
percent on Saturday, according to 
an announcement Friday by Indus- 
trial Bank of Japan Ltd., Long- 
Term Credit Bank of Japan Ltd. 
and Nippon Credit Bank Lld„ 
Reuters reported from Tokyo. 

The 7.5-pereeni rate had been in 
effect since Dec, 2. The cut follows 
a recent rally on the yen cosh bond 
market based on belief that interest 
rates in the United Slates and Ja- 
pan are heading lower, long-term 
bank officials said. 

The reduction also follows the 
Finance Ministry’s proposal for a 
cut to 6.1 percent from 6.5 percent 
for the coupon on the government’s 
new 10-year January bond, which 
the underwriting syndicate accept- 
ed Dec. 25. 


Spain Approves SEAT Aid, Key to VW Takeover 


Reuters 

MADRID — Spain's cabinet on 
Friday approved a Sl.l-bfllion aid 
package for the state-owned auto- 
maker SEAT, clearing the way for 
Volkswagen AG to take a 5 1 -per- 
cent stake in the company. 

VW had insisted on the aid pack- 
age as a condition to its acquiring a 
stake in SEAT. 

The funds will be used by the 
government holding company, 
INI, to assume SEAT’S debt before 
transferring majority ownership to 
the West German car maker. 



SEAT’S sole shareholder, with SI 
billion in cash and will subscribe to 
a $1 00-million INI bond issue. 

SEAT is the only one of Spain’s 
six car makers not utmW multina- 
tional ownership. It had a loss of 
S231 milli nn in 1984 with similar 
results forecast for this year. 

An INI spokesman said the fi- 
nancial package was the last hurdle 
in the negotiations with Volks- 
wagen. He said he expected the 
takeover to be signed in February 
at the latest 

Volkswagen’s supervisory board, 
has not fo: 


however, still 
deared the accord. 


formally 


Spanish trade union sources said 
in October that SEAT workers had 
agreed to 4*500 job cuts sought by 
VW in exchange for a £1.9- billion 
outlay by the West German com- 
pany to upgrade and expand the 
automaker's production facilities. 

SEAT now employs 23,000 
workers, more than twice as many 
as its chief rivals. Ford Motor Co. 
and General Motors Corp.. winch 
operate Spanish assembly plants. 

A government official dose to 
the negotiations said the accord 
with VW called for the immediate 
elimination of 1,000 jobs, with the 
rest to go by 1990. 


Since the withdrawal of Italy's 
Fiat SpA from SEAT in 1980. three 
successive chairmen have under- 
lined the need to find a multina- 
tional partner to inject badly need- 
ed capital and technology to 
guarantee the automaker’s survival. 

VW and SEAT signed a joint- 
veature agreement in 1982 under 
Much the Spanish car maker now 
produces 120,000 VW Polos. Pas- 
sats and Santanas a year under li- 
cense in its Barcelona and Pamplo- 
na factories. 

SEAT also imports and distrib- 
utes VW and Audi vehicles in 
Spain. 


Lower Spending, 
Taxes Studied 
In Singapore 

Reuters 

SINGAPORE — Singapore, 
struggling with an ailing econo- 
my. is studying ways to cut pub- 
lic expenditure, lower corporate 
taxes and make its industry 
more competitive in Asia, Fi- 
nance Minister Richard Hu was 
quoted Friday as saying. 

At the same time, the minis- 
ter or trade and industry, Tony- 
Tan. suggested that Singapore 
reduce contributions to a com- 
pulsory. government-managed 
savings fund in order to free 
capital to stimulate business. 

Singapore’s gross domestic 
product — the value of goods 
and services produced — is 
forecast to shrink by 2 percent 
in 1985 after growing 12 per- 
cent in 1984. 

The Business Times newspa- 
per quoted Mr. Hu as saying 
that once “reasonable growth” 
was restored, “there should be 
□o reason why taxes cannot 
come down.” Corporate tax 
amounts to 40 percent at pre- 
sent 

Mr. Tan. in a speech to civil 
servants, recommended a tem- 
porary reduction in contribu- 
tions to the Central Provident 
Fund, into which each worker 
must pay 25 percent of his 
monthly salary. The employer 
must match this. 


London and Zurich, fixing* in other European centers. New York rates at t PM. 

" etkk franc (bl Amounts needed to buv one poont/ (cl Amounts neetteC buv ana 
UtRsefm te) Units oft AW (yj UnUs of 10000 N.Q.: not quoted; HA.: notaenllaOle. 
Oi MUM JUS 


UMMrWit 

*** <*/ Benelux t Brussels); Banco Commentate Indiana (MUon); Bomue No- 
(Paris); Bonk of Tokyo (Tokyo); IMF tSOR); BAH (dinar, rtyat, Otrham); 
<OUl). Other data from Reuters and AF. 




Growth of Junk Bonds 




U.S. Turns to Aiding Development of Thailand’s Private Sector 





fi 

UdJ 

J 



Bonn*; Onwtf eatrfWatwaowt Pic. 


, Guaranty (aortor. OK. SF. Pound, FFt UorOs Bank (ECU); Reuters 

BaWfcoM- to tnterbtnk d e p o sits of 51 mutton minimum (or equivalent). 


Fed Delays 
Strictures on 
Junk Bonds 

By Edward Cowan 

(few York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON —The Federal 
Reserve Board, facing opposition 
from the Reagan administration, 
has postponed the effective dale of 
its proposed restriction cm the use 
of low-quality bonds to finance 
corporate takeovers. 

The proposal had been sched- 
uled to take effect Jan. I, but the 
board announced Thursday that it 
would hold a public meeting Jan- 8 

to discuss the large number of com- 
ments received about the plan. 

The board’s spokesman, Joseph 
R. Coyne, asserted that the delay 
was unrelated to the strong objec- 
tions registered by the White 
House, the Justice Department and 
other U.S. government agencies in 
comments filed Monday. 

He said the Federal Reserve had 
uo intention of dropping the pro- 
posed restrictions, and that a new 
effective date would be considered 
at the Jan. 8 meeting. Ask ed if the 
regulation might be made retroac- 
tive, Mr. Coyne replied. “Typically, 
the board doesn’t ad retroactive- 
ly” 

In New York, Edward L O’Bri- 
en, president of the Securities In- 
dustry Association, called the post- 

(Contimied on Page It, CoL 2) 


By Nancy Yoshihara 

Los Angela Tima Service 

LOS ANGELES — Foreign gov- 
ernments and companies often dis- 
patch officials to court UJS. busi- 
ness, but a recent Thai investment 
mission in Los Angeles had an un- 
usual wrinkle: Its effort was not 
financed by its own government 
but by the United States. 

, The UJS. Agency for Interna- 
tional Development is providing 
$3.5 millinn to Thailand’s private- 
sector development program. Thai- 
land has used the money to hire a 
consulting company, Arthur D. 
Little Inc. of Cambridge, Massa- 
chusetts, and a public relations 
company. Ruder, Firm & Rotman 
of New York. 

The Thai program is caoe of the 
first private-sector, bilateral pro- 
jects funded by the Agency for In- 
ternational Development. 

“More and more, AID is becom- 
ing involved in tning to support 
the private sector, explained Wil- 
liam Nance, officer in charge of the 
Thai desk at the Agency for Inter- 
national Development in Washing- 
ton. 

“We strongly believe the stron- 
ger the private sector, the more 
vibrant the economy,” he said 
"The purpose of the project is to oy 
to increase private-sector employ- 
mem, export-oriented ventures in 
Thailand outride of Bangkok.” 

The shift to the private sector is a 
departure from the agency’s past 
t»m nfiagre on more-public areas, 
such, as health and agriculture. It 
reflects the Reagan admunstra- 


eageni _ 

ey should be used to help develop 
employment in foreign countries. 

With the help of the U.S. AID 
office is Thailand, the country has 
identified three US. industries — 
electronics, metal »nd machinery 
fabrication, and agribusiness — 
ihm might find Thauand an attrac- 
tive area in which to develop. 

“The U.S. agency wants us to 
develop Thailand so we can stay 
free. It is part of the Reagan po- 
licy," explained Chac kch a i Pani- 
chap&L, assistant secretary-general 
of me Thailand Board qf Invest- 
ment and leader of the latest Thai 
mission, which visited the United 
States last month. 

“When you support my country 
in an economic way, you don’t have 
to send in troops, which costs much 
more,” Mr. Pamchapat said. 

Richard L. Drobmck, director of 
the University of Southern Califor- 
nia's international business, educa- 
tion and research program, said, 
“Thailand is considered a very im- 
portant country” to the United 
States — politically, economically 
and militarily because of its prox- 
imity to Vietnam. 

It has been a strong ally of the 
United States, aiding U.S. troops in 
Vietnam and providing camps for 
large numbers of refugees from 
Vietnam and Cambodia. 

In economic development, it lags 
far behind its more developed 
Asian asters — Japan, Hong Kong, 
Taiwan and South Korea. It is 
more commonly compared with 
other members of the Association 
of Southeast Asian Nations — Ma- 


laysia, Singapore, Indonesia and 
the Philippines. 

All are export-oriented and all 
are dependent on foreign invest- 
ment 

Between 1979 and 1983, Thai- 
land’s gross domestic product — 
the country’s total output of goods 
and services, minus income from 
operations abroad — grew at an 
average annual rate of 5 percent, 
discounting inflation. At the same 
time, Malaysia posted a 12-percent 
annual rate of growth; Singapore, 9 
percent; Indonesia, 6 percent, and 
the Philippines, 4 percent 

However, Thailand’s growth rate 
has slowed to 4.5 percent this year 
and is expected to continue at that 
rate next year, according to Mr. 
Panichapat. He attributed the 
slowdown mostly to a drop in com- 
modity food prices. Thailand is the 
world's fifth- largest food exporter. 
About 60 percent of its worldwide 


exports are food and 40 perceoi are 
manufactured goods. 

Mr. Drobnick says Thailand’s 
economic growth, while slower 
than other ASEAN countries, has 
been moire coosisient and less vola- 
tile than Indonesia’s or Malaysia's, 
both of which are heavily depen- 
dent on volatile ofl exports. 

He said economic growth in all 
of the Asian countries is likely to 
slow. The growth has been the re- 
mit of a huge increase in exports to 
the United States. That increase 
has triggered strong protectionist 
sentimentsin Congress. 

"The Thais are worried and con- 
cerned, as all the Asian nations are, 
of the possibility of the U.S. market 
being closed to them," Mr. Drob- 
rtick said. They also want to reduce 
the dominance of Japanese invest- 
ment, he added. 

Uik investment in Thailand as 
of the third quarter of 1983, the 
latest for which figures are avail- 


able, totaled $3 billion, with $684.7 
million in manufacturing. Hie 
United States is the second-largest 
foreign investor but lags far behind 
Japan, which has invested more 
than 56 billion. 

Thai government and business 
representatives wound up an in- 
vestment mission in November 
that took them through 10 U.S. 
dties. They visited 52 American 
companies in search of new busi- 
ness opportunities in metal and 
machinery fabricating. 

They did not take any firm com- 
mitments home to Thailand, but 
they expect officials of five Ameri- 
can companies to visit their coun- 
try. With the electronics industry in 
a worldwide slump, however, a pre- 
vious Thai trade mission aimed at 
enticing U.S. electronic companies 
to manufacture in Thailand was 
less productive. 

Thailand will dispatch one more 
trade mission to the United States. 


During Christmas and New Year period 

HARRY WINSTON 



will be presenting 
its latest creations in 

Badrutt’s Palace - St Moritz 
and 

Palace Hotel - Gstaad 

NEW YORK GENEVE PARIS MONTE-CARLO 




& 


ail RESERVE 

^ INSURED DEPOSITS TRUST 


RES IN DEP 

An Account for the Cautious Investor 

fo Protect and fncreara Capital 


U.S. DoBor Denom i nated 
Insured by U5. Govt. Entities 
Important Tex Advantages 
Competitive 
Money Market Yields 
No Modest Risk 
Immediate Liquidity 
Absolute Confidentidfty 


CHEMICAL RANK, New York 
Custocfian 

CAYMAN NATIONAL BANK 
AND TRUST 
Registrar 

RESIN DEP 

Case Pas fate P3 

121 1 Geneva 25, Switzeriraid ■ 

Please send prospectus and 
account application tm 


Name. 


Address. 


i He USA 


A' 



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Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURPAY-SUNPAY, DECEMBER 28-29, 3985^ 


NYSE Most Actives 


Dow Jones Averages 


NYSE Index 


i] 


VaL High Law Lost CUB. 


Fridays 


AMEX Diaries 


nasdaQ index 


AMEX MOS!Ac£jv« 


23688 74V, 
13905 25% 

am si% 

7774 \SM, 
7ta aps 
7412 24*. 
7219 155% 
*922 17% 
<722 2Mb 
Mil J>h 
4361 14% 

4248 44 
6194 34 
6185 6% 
6074 15 


72V. — % 
25% + % 
31 + % 

15% + % 

65% 

34% + V. 
155% -MU 
17% 

24% +W 
38% + % 
14% + % 

45% 

35% 

6 — % 

14% + W 


Dm High UW Last Cbg. 


Indus 1530.16 154X85 1527*9 150*0 4 16J1 

Irons 7DLW 711*4 7WUB MJS + 647 

UIII 170.91 17245 170*5 172*9 + 6*2 

Como 609.07 41445 607.73 41420 + 553 


Can posits 

Industrials 

Tramp. 

utilities 

Finance 


High Low CW*« arg* 
12X62 1T9M 12042 +1*7 
13X35 13743 13135 +1*4 
114*7 112*4 114*7 +1*4 
42*4 62J9 +044 
129*1 12044 127J1 +144 


msi; 


Closing 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
New HWa 
New Lews 


373 28* 

197 244 

244 243 

«K 794 

32 IS 

10 9 


eomuosiie 

industrials 

Finance 

Insurance 

Utilities 

Banks 

Irens*. 


Wren 
cn’ue Am 
+ 244 32112 
+ 2M 327*7 
4-2*3 43U1 
4-1*9 38245 
+ 1*0 383*4 
rut, 34846 
+ 3*8 29343 


Volume up 
Volutnedown 


NYSE Diaries 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


Close Pns*. 


VaLaMPJU ITJ4M0B 

Pre9.4PJA.VOl «W5MW 

PTBV consol total dose 7MJ4418 


Standard & Poor's Index 


AMEX Sales 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bonds 

Utilities 

Industrials 


Advanced 

Decibwd 

unchanged 

Total ISSum 

New Highs 
New Lews 
Volume up 
Volume down 


1142 85* 

443 618 

435 489 

1990 1966 

94 49 

4 5 


But Sales ’StTrt 


150*67 331*85 
105415 444*02 
an. njL 
34X192 549*25 
282*26 517438 


57.94X350 

11712*90 


■included In me sales figure 


Tattles include toe nationwide prices 
up fa the dost no on Wall Street and 
do not reflect late trades etsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


industrials 

Tramp. 

Utilities 

Finance 

Composite 


High Low dose ChW« 
233*7 208*3 233*3 + 2.10 
18948 186*8 189*5 + 2.16 
91*4 91.11 9174 + ft*2 
ms 25L01 25*2 +8*1 

20942 20745 20941 +1*6 


4 PAIL volume 
Prev.4 PJA. volume 
Pfgv. eons, volume 


AMEX Stockjndex 



*6 22 16 48 

17 4E0 


NYSE Stages Strong Advance 


7 4023 

1,8 ,J 5 3 

15 40 

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*2 2* 394 

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The Associated Press 

NEW YORK. — Hopes for lower interest 
rates helped the New York Stock Exchange 
stage a sharp advance Friday, recouping losses 
suffered early in the week. 

Trading continued at a sluggish pace, howev- 
er. 

The Dow Jones average of 30 industrials 
jumped 16.51 to 1,543.00, finishing the week 
unchanged from last Friday's dose. 

Volume on the NYSE came to 81.36 million 
shares, up from 62.05 milli on traded Thursday. 

A holiday-season atmosphere continued to 
prevail on Wall Street. But among those traders 
who were taking part, buying interest was 
spurred by renewed talk of a posable cut in the 
Federal Reserve's discount rate. 

In the credit markets, that speculation helped 
push prices of government bonds, which move 
in the opposite direction From interest rates, up 
slightly. 

Falling interest rates have been died as a 
major reason for widespread hopes among in- 
vestors that the economy will turn in a solid 
performance in 1986. 

With a drop of almost 23.83 points Monday 
and Tuesday, and a rise of exactly the same 
amount Thursday and Friday, the chart of the 
Dow Jones industrial average for the week 
forms a pronounced “V," with the Christmas 
holiday at the turning point. 

But analysts said it was fitting that the sum of 
all the fluctuations came out at zero, at least in 
terms of the Dow. In the absence of so many 
vacationing iraders, they said it was a chancy 
proposition to read any significance in the ups 
and downs of the market. 


M-l Falk $600 Million 


Reuters 

NEW YORK — M-l, the narrowest mea- 
sure of the UJS. money supply, fell $600 
milli on to a seasonally adjusted $622.6 bfl- 
licm in the week ended Dec. 16, the Federal 
Reserve said Thursday. 

The previous week’s M-l was revised to 
$6232 billion from $623 billion. The four- 
-week moving average of M-l rose to $6233 
billion from$6213 billion. 

M-l includes cash in circulation and 
checking accounts and traveler’s checks. 


139k 9% 
19 I0K I 
21% 17% ' 
40% 21V. : 
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mu 14% : 
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17 79b 

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83 12% 
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11 55 10% 

23 118 38% 

3756 5% 
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9 338 38V. 
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14 178 15% 

15 4 24% 

14 125 19% 

48 199x18 

16 1279 28 

12 40 4a V. 

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MW IT + H 
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8% B% + % 
15 15% + % 

2414 2414— 14 
19% 1994— % 
17% 17% + % 
27% 27% 

47% 48 
17% 17% 

53% 53% + % 


Next week holds out the prospect of more of 
the same, with the New year’s holiday on 
Wednesday splitting the week in half. However, 
it was generally expected that the pace of activi- 
ty would quicken as year-end passes. 

In Friday's advance, computer and technol- 
ogy stocks chalked up some of the best gains. 
International Business Machines gained 2W to 
15514; Digital Equipment 3\k to 133%; Sperry 
1% to 54V4, and Burroughs IK to 63%. 

Auto issues did well, apparently on hopes 
that new below-market financing offers by 
General Motors and Ford Motor for certain 
models would serve to work down car inven- 
tories quickly. GM rose % to 71%; Ford 1 V6 to 
5714, and Cmysler 1*4 to 45*4. 

Boeing, which got an order for 13 passenger 
planes from All Nippon Airways, added 1*4 to 
5014. 


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Hongkong Bank Names 
A New Chief Executive 

Ago tee France- Press e 

HONG KONG — William Purves is to be- 
come chairman and chief executive of Hong- 
kong & Shanghai Banking Corp. next year, 
s ucceeding Michael Sandberg, who is retiring, 
the bank announced Friday. 

Mr. Punres, 54, currently deputy chairman, 
will take over as chief executive in orid-Marcb- 
He will replace Mr. Sandberg in the c hairm a n ’s 
post later in 1986. Mr. Sandberg, 58. has headed 
the bank for nine years. 


Toyo Soda and DMS Are to Bn3d 
Aspartame Plant in Netherlands 

ftemm 

TOKYO — Toyo Soda Manufacturing Co. 
Announced Friday that il and DMS NV of die 
Netherlands had signed an agreement with 
Chiyoda Chemical Engineering & Construction 
Co. for Chiyoda to build a plant in Gdeen, 
southern Netherlands, to produce aspartame, 
the artificial sweetener. 

The plant is to be completed in 1987 at a cost 
of more than 100 mOBon guilders ($353 mO- 
lionl a Toyo Soda spokesman said, but gave no 
more details. Two Soda, which has a pilot plant 
in Japan, plans to start full marketing of aspar- 
tame in major world markets in 1987 under the 
joint venture. 


China to Impose 
New Port Fees 

Compiled by Oar Staff From Dispatches 

BEIJING — China will impose new port fees 
beginning Jan. 1 on all cargo passing through its 
26 major ports, an official news report said 
Friday. 

The Xinhua news agency quoted Huang 
Zhendnng, vice minis ter of communications, as 
saying that the fees would average 2 yuan (62 
cents) per ton and would be used to finance port 
construction. The fees will help national port 
capacity grow from 300 million to 500 million 
tons per year by 1990, Mr. Huang stud. 

Orma also said it would invest a total of 10 
billion yuan in the next five years to upgrade its 
port anchorage facilities. The Hong Kong news- 
paper Wen Wei Po reported Friday that the 
investment would provide 200 port anchorage 
points stretching from Hainan Island in South 

China to Shanghai on the East coast. 

“This plan is designed to ease congestion 
affecting imports and exports at China's major 
ports,” the report said, quoting a marine trans- 
portation official in China. (AP. AFP ) 


Wholesale Prices Fall in France 

Raders 

PARIS — Industrial wholesale prices in 
France fell a provisional 1.0 percent in Novem- 
ber, after a revised 0.7-percent drop in October, 
the National Statistics institute said Friday. In 
the 12 months to November, wholesale prices 
registered a provisional 13-percent drop. 


The 

Inten 


onree for 
Investors. 



BUSINESS PROFILE / John F. Welch Jr., Guru of Business 


Merger Diplomacy lor Demanding GE Chairman 


By Thomas J. Lueck 

Mew York Tima Service 

STAMFORD, Connecticut — In 
four years as the cha irman of Gen- 
eral Electric Co., John F. Welch Jr. 
has became known as one of the 
toughest executives in the United 
States, as an astute manager and as 
a ttmh more inc lined to demand 
action immediately than wait for a 
second opinion. 

Mr. welch has madehis mark era 
GE, where sharp cost cutting, plant 
modernization and a host of man* 
agemeat changes have made him 
something of a guru in business 
eardea. 

Still, one of the questions that 
loomed large after the announce- 
ment on Dec. 11 that GEand RCA 
Corp. would merge was whether he 
has the diplomatic skins to mesh 
the assets aid personalities of two 
major companies. 

“Diplomacy?” Mr. Welch re- 
marked. ”1 don’t think anybody 
could recall a more diplomatic 
merger.” 

“This was not a takeover,” he 
said. This is a merger that mr*^^ 
great strategic sense to both rides.” 

Indeed, Mr. Welch and other se- 
nior GE officers said that they 
would not have agreed to merge 
with RCA unless they were con- 
vinced that the two companies 
could be combined without a major 
change in RCA’s business or man- 
agement style. 


“This is a merger of two similar 
cultures; 1 don't see any major con- 
flict,” said Michael Carpenter, 
GE's director of pl anning , who in 
the past has been an outspoken 
critic of the wave of mergers end 
acquisitions on Wall Street. 

Mr. Welch saud he expected 
RCA to remain largely intact be- 
cause ah its businesses are in areas 
where GE has experience and be- 
cause most of RCA’s operating 
companies rank .nn^eg the leaders 
in their Grids. 

“My job is to give them the re- 
sources they need to win,'* said Mr. 
Welch, 50, who has pruned layers 
of middle-level management at 
GE, dosed down dozens of its 
plants and reduced overall employ- 
ment by about 20 percent At the 
Mme time, he has funnded more 
than $8 billion in capital spending 
into the automation, reorganiza- 
tion and growth of the company’s 
remaining businesses. 

Even beyond the GE headquar- 
ters in Fairfield, Connecticut, Mr. 
Welch’s demanding style has be- 
come well known. A chemical engi- 
neer by tr aining , Mr. Welch nor- 
mally works 12- to- 14-hour days in 
shirt-sleeves. He insists on fresh, 
entrepreneurial inright from his ex- 
ecutives, often in spontaneous 
meetings. 

Mr. Welch’s style contrasts 


Or ■* 


■k f>> v j. 


resigned, or been discharged, under 
Mr. Welch. About 600 remain. 

Another change has been in the 
day-to-day relations between GE 
executives and the chairman. 

“You’d make an appointment 
with Mr- Jones; you’d cover all the 
bases, and he would listen quietly ” 
Frank Doyle, the company’s senior 
vice president for communications, 
recalled in an interview earlier this 
year. “But your encounters with 
Jack are often when he walks in the 
door." 

Still, the GE executives said they 
did not expect Mr. Welch's hard- 
charging personal style to create 


problems for their merger with 


John F. Welch Jr. 


. P —B iK WUiUU JCJVC 1UUM U UIC ucuu 

rnfied man who was himself one of of meshing the merged companie 
the country’s most pnamnenl exw- Robert R. Frederick. RCA’: 

u lives. Among other things, Mr. r^rrm-r n 


sharply with that of his predeces- 
sor, Reginald Jones, a refined, dig- 
nified man who was himself one of 
the country’s mostprommeni exec- 
utives. Among other things, Mr. 
Jones was credited with pioneering 
the concept of formal strategic 
planning at large corporations, and 
he built a planning department at 
GE with 30 employees. 

Mr. Welch quickly changed 
things. The company’s planning 
department, under Mr. Carpenter, 
has shrunk to eight employees. And 
those who have left are among 
more than 100 employees at the 
Fairfield headquarters who have 


RCA 

“Jack is aggressive; but when 
someone is running a show well, he 
keeps out of it,” Mr. Doyle said. 

As for himself. Mr. Welch said 
be would leave mast of the details 
of meshing the merged companies 
to Robert R. Frederick. RCA’s 
president and a former colleague at 
GE Mr. Frederick, whom many 
had considered a candidate to re- 
place Mr. Jones, joined RCA after 
being beaten out for the job bv Mr. 
Welch. 

Mr. Welch added that be expects 
the job of meshing the two compa- 
nies to take about a year. Beyond 
that, he declined to say what Mr. 
Frederick's role would be. 

“I don’t know whai his prefer- 
ences will be,” Mr. Welch said. 


Egypt Quietly Raises Prices in Bid to Cut Subsidies 


(Continued from Page 7) 

Egypt’s Institute of National Plan- 
ning. said: The IMF writes its 
prescriptions from a technical 
pant of view, but we have to be 
very careful about how we imple- 
ment them.” 

The latest price increases have 
resulted in a lot of grumbling on 


Hard Landing 
Is Predicted 

(Coo turned from Page 7) 
take a strong dose of expansionary 
acti o", especially by cutting taxes 
even if this nramt bigger budget 
deficits. He says inflation would be 
h<»iH in rherk because their curren- 
cies would be appreciating, and 
budget deficits would not push in- 
terest rates up because savings 
would be flowing back to Europe 
and Japan from the United States. 
If only they realized it, he says, the 
other industrial countries could ex- 
perience a “Reagan miracle” of the 
kind experienced by the United 
States in 1983-84. 

But the Europeans and Japanese 
do not want a Reagan miracle. 
They are resisting U.S. and OECD 
counsels to spur their economies, 
fearing inflation and a deteriora- 
tion of their trade positions. Sever- 
al national leaden have indicated 
their belief that the dollar has gone 
down enough a gains t their curren- 
cies. 

Hence, sluggish growth looks in 
prospect for the industrial world in 
1986. The OECD is forecasting 
that the entire group's real growth 
wfll average 23 percent, down from 
2.75 percent in 1985 and 4.9 per- 
cent in 1984. 

So, at the start of 1 986 the Manis 
dock, or bomb, is still ticking. And 
the policy actions to defuse it have 
not been taken. 


the streets, but so far have not 
caused any serious unrest Never- 
theless. the government “isn’t pub- 
licizing these price increases, be- 
cause it’s afraid of what the 
reaction will be,” a Western diplo- 
mat said. 

Thu time around, a greater effort 
is being made to prepare people to 
accept fiscal austerity by. incre- 
ments. Appealing to their patrio- 
tism and sense of pride, Mr. Mu- 
barak last mouth called upon his 49 
milli on countrymen to join in a 
“great awakening" to arouse the 
slumbering economic gam that 
Egypt, he implied, could be. 

Toe president offered visions of 
economic seif-sufficiency, higher 
productivity and wealth. But first, 
he suggested, Egyptians would 
have to start by helping their gov- 
ernment pay off $31 billion in for- 
eign debts. 

A national “debt campaign” was 
launched, and Egyptians were 
asked to contribute to it. To foster 
the feeling that everyone has a 
stake in solving Egypt’s problems, 
a nationwide suggestion box. called 
the Idea Bank, was set up, and 
people were asked to phone or 
write in with their suggestions for 
improving economic performance. 

Launched amid much hoopla, 
the campaign appears to have fal- 
tered- When voluntary donations 
appeared to be less forthcoming 
than had been hoped, some govern- 
ment ministries began deducting 
“contributions" from their employ- 
ees’ paychecks, provoking a chorus 
of complaints. Although die gov- 
ernment insists that the contribu- 
tions are voluntary. Foreign Minis- 
try sources fonfem that a letter 
went around their offices notifying 
every chic of a 10-percent salary de- 
duction last month. 

The sources added that Egyptian 
diplomats abroad, wbo hove been 
paid in dollars, have now been told 
that henceforth they will have to 
take 25 percent of their salaries in 
Egyptian pounds, which are virtu- 
ally useless outride Egypt. 

Officials also seem to be having 


second thoughts about the Idea 
Bank, judging from their reluc- 
tance to talk about it. An Egyptian 
journalist said one official he inter- 
viewed was transferred to another 
post after talking to him about the 
ideas he had received, some of 
which were considered impractical 
or likely to cause controversy. 

Western diplomats say the cam- 
paign is not likely to have any im- 
pact od the debt problem because 
the contributions have all been in 
Egyptian pounds rather than in the 
hard currency needed for loan pay- 
ments. 

The problems, according to the 
IMF. are largely structural. They 
stem from a rapidly growing popu- 
lation that needs to import 50 per- 
cent of its food and from distor- 
tions created by economic swings 
from socialism to capitalism to the 
present position somewhere in the 
middle. 

The oil boom of the 1970s exac- 
erbated the problems as Egypt sud- 


denly received large infusions of 
foreign exchange, which dwindled 
as the boom went bust. 

Egypt’s economy is heavily de- 
pendent on oil or oil-related reve- 
nues, all of which are declining. 
Remittances from expatriate work- 
ers, most of them in the Gulf area, 
are Egypt’s main source of foreign 
exchange. But, in the fiscal year 
that ended in June, these declined 
to S3.75 billion from 54 billion be- 
cause of production cutbacks that 
are expected to continue. 

Egypt's oil earnings come next, 
and these fell to S2.T7 billion from 
$2,957 billion last year, a further 
decline is considered inevitable as 
oil prices come down. The cutback 
in oil production also hit another 
major source of hard currency, 
Suez Canal revenues, which de- 
clined to $950 million from $970 
milbofL 

The slide promises to gel steep- 
er in the coming year," a Western 
diplomat said. 


THE EUROMARKETS 

Trading Remaim at Low Ebb 


LONDON — The secondaiy ar- 
eas of the Eurobond market dosed 
bide changed Friday, with trading 
remaining at a low ebb. dealers 
said. 

They added that roost bouses 
were operating with only small 
staffs because many operators had 
decided to lake time off until after 
Jan. I. 

One doDar-straight trader at a 
major U.S. bouse said, “effectively, 
we closed days ago. I’ve just done 
three trades today and they were 
with retail" diems. He added it was 
unlikely that the market would re- 
turn to its usual trading volume 
until after New Year’s Day. 

Dollar-straight traders said that 
had there been a normal, profes- 
sional market, prices could well 


have risen ‘A to Vi point. But as il 
was, the market rose !% to \\ point. 

‘It’s not a real market at the 
moment When everyone comes 
back they may decide to sell and I’d 
look pretty silly because I marked 
prices up.” a senior dealer at o 
European bank said. 

He noted that the factors behind 
the cureent bull market remain un- 
changed. 

“Fed funds are low, the Fed 
seems accommodative and a dis- 
count-rate cut seems virtually cer- 
tain," one trader at a European 
bank said. 

No new issues were launched 
during the day, but International 
Finance Corp. privately placed a 
$50-million. 10-year Eurobond 
paying 9 V* percent and priced at 
99% percenL 


ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS (Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed) Dec. 27 , 1985 

Net bum vatu* quotations art wood by ttw Funds ns%d wttn tbo oacoptlon of moma quotes bcued on Issuo price. 

Tkc marginal symbols tadicoto frequency of q u otation s stippnod: td) -daBv; tw>- woatty.- (ti)-bl-roocttJy; lr) -rraoiarty; til - Irregularly. 


dm ■ Deutsdte Marla BF - Belgium Fronts; FL- Dutch Florin: LF ■ Luxembourg Francs; 

p/V SlOia 81 per unit: NA'Nal Available; fLCt-MafCommunlcaf ' -• 

Redaimt- Prion- Cx-Couponj *• - Pornwiv Worldwide Fund Lid 







































Page 10 


Tobies include the nationwide prices 
up to the cfosfns on Wall street 
ana do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 

Via The Associated Press 


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194 36% 
41 U9b 
81 38% 
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71% 1191 
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25% 25% 
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11 % 11 % 
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179b 179b 

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23% 24 
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HSifiilures 

Via The Associated Press 


Hiatt Law 


Open HWi Low don Ois. 



_ Grains 


WHEAT CCBT1 

5400 bu minimum- dot tars per bushel 
3-74% 2J7 MOT 143% 146% 

184 Wav 124 136% 

172% 243 Jut 281 193% 

345 147 SW 201% 193% 

188% 203 Dec 101% 3JXI% 

Est. Sales p rev. Sales 7395 

Prav. Day Open Int. 313B up 432 
CORN (CBT) 

MJOQba minimum- dollars per bushel 
197 224% Mar 150 150 

2.91% 2J1 May 253% 153% 

284 133 Jul 253% 254% 

278 124% Sep 238% 239% 

2JS% 120% Dec 227% 129 

274% 131% Mar 135 135% 

-242 139 May 240 240 

Est. Sales Prev. Sates 7JM 

Prav.OayOpen litl.123401 UP332 
SOYBEANS (CBT) 

SJXntw minim urn- dollars per burtiel 
*70 478 Jan 587 587% 

742 485% Mar 5.49 £51 

770 489 May 542% 582% 

45B 457 Jul 5J0 570% 

AW 4.98% Aao 544 584% 

*28 4.96 Sea 548 548 

612 *98 MOV 544% 546% 

585 589 Jan 541% 542 

*37% 5.19% Mar 541 543 

Est. Sales Prav. Sales 9*m 

Prev.DavOpenlnUM.3SO UP 4810 
SOYBEAN MEAL (CBT) 

100 tans- dodare per Ian - 
M100 12780 Jan 14980 14040 

30*50 13080 Mar 15140 15340 

MX50 13250 May 15*50 15*50 

14780 13480 Jill 157 JO 157.70 

16850 13540 AW 15550 15*50 

14780 13*00 Sep 

15100 13*00 Oct 15L80 15180 

15350 13*00 Dec 1S2JB 15250 

15180 13680 JOT 

15380 14948 Mar 

EstsaMs prev. Sales 117W 

Praw. Day Open Inf. 4*361 up 799 
SOYBEAN OIL (CBT) 

40800 Ita- dollars per TOO lbs. 

2945 1883 Doc 2140 2145 

2987 1*72 JOT 2145 2140 

2*40 1*98 Mar 2185 2L92 

77A5 1985 May 2220 2225 

2*25 1946 Jill 3240 2240 

2*15 1948 AW 2230 2230 

2*05 1945 Sep 21 JO 2180 

2280 1940 Od 2148 Z180 

2235 1980 Jan 

EM. Sales Prev.Sales *974 

Prev. Day Open ML 49477 up 781 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CMC) 

*0800 lbs.- cents per lt>- 

6745 5*35 Fed 6285 6185 

4747 5580 Apr 6385 6295 

4*25 5*25 Jim 6282 6285 

4540 5520 AUO 4120 4125 

4080 5740 Oct 5925 5922 

6*30 99.10 OOC 6125 6125 

ESI. Sales 9780 Pray- Sales 13252 
Prav.DayOpeninL 57478 off 188 
FEEDER CATTLE (CME1 
4*000 lbs.- cents per lb. 

7940 6*50 Jon 6*35 *645 

71 JO 6042 Mar 6747 *780 

7180 4040 APT 6720 6725 

7*00 4020 May 6523 4523 

6840 6*10 AW. 6*60 4*40 

E sl. Sales 1887 Prev.Sales 1258 
Prav. Day Open Ini. IU8 w7 
HOGS (CME) 

4725 3*12 Apr 4340 4340 

4985 3980 JOT 46J0 4480 

4985 40.45 JMl 4*35 4*35 

5120 402S AW 4580 4580 

4240 3*07 Oct 4125 4205 

4940 3827 DOC 4290 4295 

4380 4*40 Feb 4320 4328 

4140 4020 Aar 

esl sales 2934 Prav. Sales 7851 
Prev. Day Open Inf. 22454 up 845 
PORK BELLIES (CME) 

6540 «4S 

7540 5546 MOT 4542 6582 

7540 5785 MOV 4680 6*40 

7480 5720 Jul 4*« 4440 

73.15 5*50 AW 4380 6320 

EM- Sales 28*3 Prav. 5*%*. 323* 
Prav.OayOpen inf. *354 off 187 


382% 386% 4-81% 
322% 325% +81% 
291 203% +81% 

201 203% 481% 

381 383% +81% 


289% 289% +80% 
253% 253% +80% 
253% 253% +80% 
238% 229 +8B% 

227% 22B% +80% 
234% 235% +81 

240 2C +81 


*27% *27% — 87% 
*39 589% — 89 

*51 *51% —88% 

*59 *59% — 89% 

*50% *58% —89 

582 582 -87 

*39% 529% —84 

589 550 — -84 

*60 *40% —84 


14*50 14480 — 230 
lei JO 15*10 —280 
15220 15280 —250 
15480 155JO —280 
TSS5D 15680 —200 
15180 — 170 
ISUB 15080 — UD 
1*1-50 15250 —JO 
15180 —1J0 
15*20 +20 


2125 2187 —83 
21.10 21.15 —.15 

2185 2140 — .W 

2182 2123 -.70 

77 nn yiyi 

2205 2280 -.17 

2127 +87 

21-30 2180 — *10 

2120 —85 


4185 6282 
6205 6220 

6205 4217 

4*75 4080 

59.10 59.10 
6080 4180 


4480 4485 
6720 4727 
4*73 4*75 
*580 4585 

4*50 4680 


4*90 4*92 
4385 43.12 
4*52 4*67 
4*85 4*90 

4*55 4477 

4180 4185 
4180 42jg 
4330 4237 
4125 


6*98 4*97 
*580 6582 

4*90 4*00 

*585 4*12 

6330 4385 


OOCOA (NYCSCE) 

ID metric tons- S Per ton 

2392 1955 Mar 2240 2263 

2422 I960 May 22*3 2304 

2429 I960 Jul 2315 2328 

2430 mr» SCP wn 2344 

3JS5 D*C 2251 2351 

23B3 2029 Mar 

Est. Sales Prev.Sales 507 

Prav.OayOpen Ini 17729 up 43 
ORANGE JUICE (NYCE) 

1*000 Ibv cents per lb 
IBB 80 11170 Jan 11480 11*60 

T7A5D 11250 Mar 11*50 11*75 

14250 111.95 May 11930 119.55 

15750 11180 Jut 11980 13080 

18ZL50 11180 Sep 1T735 11735 

12*00 11150 NOV 

11380 11280 Jan 

161.25 11150 Mar 

May 

Est Sales *000 Prev. Sole* 2863 
Prav. Day Open InL I4M up 445 


Metals 


2279 2294 

2314 2321 

2333 2345 

2351 2360 

2375 


11180 11180 
11*90 115JD 
11*80 11*10 
11*50 11690 
11780 11550 
11*00 
11650 
117.10 
117.10 


Hioil Law Open HWi Low Oase 

7303 7065 Sap J009 

-»g a* Ok jm 

707Q JT32S Mar 70S 

Est. sates 1804 Prev.Sales 091 
; Prav.OayOpen lot. 12841 up 390 
FRENCH FRANC (IMM) 

S P(W trnnc- 1 potart eauo Vs S080001 
.12905 .W98S Mar .DIM 

.12930 .12130 Jot .13875 .12X75 .12075 .12070 

Est. Sates 1 Prev.Sales 
Prav.OayOpen Inf. IX 
GERMAN MARK (IMM) 

Sper mar*- 1 petal equals 808001 
8044 5040 M or 8053 8891 8047 80BS 

8080 -3335 Jun 8087 8124 800 *120 

8122 7763 Sep 8136 8159 8D6 8154 

8156 8300 Dec 8194 

Est. Sales 17818 Prev.Sales 1775 
Prav.OayOpen Inf. 4*009 off 4543 
JAPANESE YEN (IMM) 

5 Per yea- 1 Petal eautris *0800001 
804094 804035 Mor 804954 804940 804*49 804914 

805010 804220 Jun 804973 804905 804967 804985 

806005 804490 Sep 804002 804992 804902 805005 

004985 .OD4150 D*C 805024 

Est. Sato 7844 Prev.Sales 1800 
Prev.DayOPWlnL 22732 off 76 
SWISS FRANC (IMM) 

Soar franc- 1 paint equals 508001 
8885 8835 Mar MSS 8044 8822 8842 

-4925 -4190 Jun 8875 8904 8870 8909 

8930 87W Sep 8931 8031 8931 8925 

8925 8815 Dec JQ01 

Est. Sales 1*505 Prev.Sales US0 
Prav.OayOpen Int 23L704 up3ll 


Industrials 


14% 

s% 

7% 
15% 
8% 
15% 15% 
2% 2% 

^ * 
3% 3% 
14b 14* 

14 14% 

2 % 2 % 
10 % 10 % 
34 24% 

22% 22% 
23% 23% 

Tfc % 

19% 10% 
4% 6% 
3% 3% 


DM 4% 
12% 94b 
14% Mb 


m 7% 
14% 41A 
75% 9»b 

15% 4V» 


10 % 
W 34b 

H % 

4% 4% 
3 % 2 % 

0% 08b 
1% 11% 


26% 

14% OEA 


17 

10 

23* 

23% 

33% + ft 

22% 

15ft Oakwds 


15 

61 

19 

10% 

18% + * 

12 

4% Odd An 



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7% 

7% 

7% f ft 

14ft 

5% OdetB 



8 

7% 

7% 

7% + % 

34 

13% OtlArt 

31 

3494 

7 

34% 

34% 

34% + % 

24% 

18% oaolnd 

80 

30 04 

4 

19* 

19* 

19% 

30ft 

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5 23 

24 

29% 

29ft 

29% + % 

7ft 

3% oawep 



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4% 

4% 

4% + ft 

7% 

4 Oopeno 

JBe 

S 

"5 

5% 

5% 

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8 

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.15 

23 34 

4% 

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7* 

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% Ormond 

30 

28 31 

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4% 

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2% 



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asft 

14% OSufvne 

82 

15 18 

2$ 

24% 

24 

24 — % 

is* 

6% OxfntF 

JOS *9 12 

c 

M* 

14% 

16* 

14* 

8ft OmrkH 

30 

15 » 

526 

12ft 

12- 

12ft + ft 


Mb 

see 

0% 

3CEC 

9% 

SCEC 

1Mb 

seed 

17% 


40 


a* 

SwBc 

SK 

*>«r 

4* 

rr—Ti 

5% 

Spent 

3ft 

SMKM 

ft 

l.- r ' . 7 . i 

4% 

StHoi 

% 

StHm 

44ft 

LT|. -- | 

7% 

Stoirv 


104b 108b 
11% 11% 
14% 14% 
22% 22% 
75% 75% 
3% 3% 
11 % 11 % 
444 Mb 
7% 7% 

a % 

%'% 
73% 73% 
IN* 10% 


1 y- 


rPr* ■r.f-.g 

~vr 

r.'-a'-.r-J 

L'„! . 1 ' 

y/T, 



1* .'i 




r .>At' 


14% 11 JacJyn 500 *5 11 
7% 5% Jacob* 77 

4% 2% JciAra 4 

m lb JetAwt 
0% «% Jatren Jit 00 13 

6% 2% JnfmPd 

lift 5 JaftnAm JO 47 0 

11% 6 Jabnlnd 3 

6% 2% JumpJk 21 


W 11% 11% 11%—% 
145 7% 7% 7% + % 

57 3% 3 3 

17 % % % 

*4 . «% a a 

10 3 2 % 2 %— % 

S7 Mb 4% 4% + % 

30 b% a% + % 
16 3% 3% 3% 


48 

31ft KnOspf 

*50 115 


20X 38 - 

30 

30 — ft 

r 

4% 

2ft Kopek C 


2 

36 

3ft 

3ft 

3ft 

30 

19ft 

10* KoyCp 

30 1.1 

12 

197 

19 

Mft 

18% 

n 

17ft 

10% KnyJn 

» 13 

14 

19 

14% 

16 

14% + % 

IT 

15ft 

10 .. KearNf 

80 XI 

17 

7 

13 

13 

13 

4: 

23% 

14% Kafdun 

85J 3.1 

21 

IS 

21% 

21ft 

71ft— % 


4% 

2* KsyCoB 

.IS 43 

5 

4 

3% 

3 

3ft 

tr 

4 

2ft KeyCoA 

.150X8 

5 

7 

3 

2ft 

3 +ft 

11 

12% 

7ft KeyPfi 

301 

27 

1291 

11 

10% 

11 

15 

7ft 

3ft 

2ft Keyco 
ft Kavcawt 

8 

KB 

70 


Z= 

s 

4ft 

2% Klddewt 



29 

* 

2% 

3 +ft 


4% 

3ft Kllerti 


15 

22 

4% 

4ft 

4ft + ft 

T 

4ft 

3ft KJnark 



2 

3% 

3% 

3% 

5 

4 

2ft KJrtry 



703 

2* 

2% 

2% 

171 

5% 

4 KJfMta 


IS 

22 

5h 

5% 

5ft + ft 

77S 

3% 

2 Klewv 

JOr u 


54 

2% 

3ft 

2ft 

10! 

14% 

HJft Knot! 


14 

185 

14ft 

14 

14 

201 

30% 

22% KaoarC 

232 9.1 

91 

173 

25% 

25ft 

25% + ft 

171 


Stock indexes 


21*9 T02JB Mar ZHJ5 21275 21*75 21220 +2J5 

22*15 WU0 Jun 2UBi 21*00 31280 714JD +2JS 

22LOO M780 Sep 21S85 21*15 21X85 21*75 +240 

22050 17040 Dec _____ 2WJ0 +230 

Eri. Sotos 29403 Prav. Sales 2250 
Prav. Boy O p en M L 42.145 Up 1804 



16 

2ft 

2 

2ft + ft 

54 

1ft 

1% 

1%— ft 

12 

4ft 

4ft 

4ft— ft 

43 

17% 

14ft 

17ft + ft 

9 

20% 

20ft 

20% 

51 

Mb 

9ft 

♦ft 

9 

0ft 

8% 

8ft + ft 

42 

3* 

3ft 

3* 

SO 

Mft 

15% 

16% + % 

1A 

7ft 

7 

7% + % 

1 

32ft 

32ft 

32ft + ft 

82 

4ft 

4ft 

6% + ft 

0 

5* 

5ft 

5ft— ft 

3 

32 

31% 

32 + ft 



.12 U B 
1JO 108 
137 108 
135 1*1 
135 93 
130 108 
04 1U 
*04 125 
330 103 
257 102 
232 TOO 
254 103 
283 108 

1.12 tai 

237 1*1 
285 lOl 
280 10.1 
194 102 
235 IBS 
IM 1*3 
232 113 
180 HL0 
134 43 11 
480 108 
*50 105 
475 107 
80 1.1 21 

130a 13 11 
X 
13 
SO 


Accounting Board 
Issues New Rules 
On Pension Costs 

The Associated Press 

STAMFORD, Connecticut — After IQ years 
of study, the Financial Accounting Standards 
Board has issued new rules for the way compa- 
nies account for their pension costs and obliga- 
tions. 

The new rule, called “Statement 87, Employ- 
ers Accounting for Pensions," requires compa- 
nies to use a standardized method for measur- 
ing net periodic pension cost over the 
employee's service life, to disclose more infor- 
mation about the status of tfiar plans in the 
notes u> financial statements and to recognize a 
liability when the accumulated benefit ofaf$a- 
tion exceeds the fair value of plan assets. ' 

Statement 87, issued Thursday, a nd a state- 
ment on settlements and ctutaihnents of pen- 
sion plans, which will be issued in the commj r 
week, represent the final stages of the pension 
projects that the board has dealt wittrsince 
1974. The FASB’s chairman, Donald J. Kirk, 
said die board voted 4-3 to accept Statement 87. 

In Statement 87, he said, the board 
the method used to calculate the return on 
pension plan assets, one component of net pen- 
son cost 

“Many co mment ators believed that the pro- 
posed method would cause net pension cost to 
be excessively volatile," he said. “The method 
pe rmitt ed by Statement 87 will allow employees 
to reduce the volatility by eatenUr;^ return on 
assets using an averaging technique that would 
lessen the the effects of changes in asset value." 

Another change is that Statement 87 dpms 
certain of the proposed disclosure re quiiot fc a ts 
that respondents to the exposure draft believed 
to be excessive or difficult to provide. 



.Financial 



XM +.12 
688 +.12 


Currency Options 



Prav. Day Own InL *370 up 
MAJOR MICT INDEX (CBT) 

potaNondvtaMl _____ _____ 

299% 270% Jan 291% 2M% 201% 203% +2% 

297% 273V. Fvfc 291% 295 292% 294% +2% 

300% 271 Mar 293 296% 203 295% +3 

Est. Sales Prav.SaMe _ 114 
Prev. Day OptninL 545 eft 5 


Commodity Indexes 


Close Previous 

Moody's 94*00 f 947-40 f 

Reuters 1.771.90 1,777.20 

D_J. Futures T32J4 13333 

Com. Research Bureau. 22950 230JS0 

Moody's : base 100 : Dec 31, 1931. 
p - preliminary; f - final 
Re uters : bas® 100 : Sep. 18. 1931. 

Dow Jones : boM IN : Dec. 31, 1974. 


Market Guide 


CBT: CMcdm Board of Trade 

CME: auoogo Mercantile Exdrnm 

IMMl JtTfejTtattonoI Monetary Martel 

: Of Chtajoo MercOTfiie Exaxmoe 

ny cscs; Now York Cocoa, Sueor, Coffee Exeftawe 

NYCE: New York Caftan Eachonse 

COMEX: Commodity Exdvuw* New York 

NY MS: Hew York Mercaittle Exchonee 

KCBT: Kamos Qty Boad of Trade 

NYFE; New York Futures Exchange 


Web LOW BM AM 

SUGAR 

SferUna err metric tan 
MOT 14930 14480 14730 14*28 
Mar 1394 1394 1377 1378 —5 Mar 15230 15030 15230 1522D 

May L330 uas 1301 1385 -1? « 15BJ0 7S48B T£30 1^80 

Aw 1395 13M 1373 1376 —11 061 «130 14T30 14280 

Oci 1845 1830 7825 18X +n Volume: 1J02 lot* of 5C ton* 

Dec N.T. NT. 1840 1850 —30 

MjW __ NT. NT. 1300 1315 —43 COCOA 

EiL «L:.7D0 Ms of 59 ton* Prav. ocfual SterHoy pw metric tan 
iniai: 1314 kes. Open Wrtwaet: 31801 Dec 1739 1730 1729 1722 

Mar 1782 1770 1770 1771 

OOCOA. May 17% 1779 1770 177? 

jfy Ijn 1790 1709 1790 

seo 1311 1310 1300 1303 

Dec N.T. NT. 7305 1309 

Mar NT. NT. 1315 1324 

Volume: 133} lots of 10 too*. 



1433014030 
15228 15230 
15780 15830 


1734 1738 
13g 1770 
ITU 1703 
1793 T79S 
1303 1310 
1305 1312 
1320 1324 


GmmocUies 


SINGAP ORE P OLO FUTURES 

Prev. 

Hfeti Law Seme Seme 

Feb NT. NT. 32730 32730 

Mar NT. NT. 32930 32930 

AM NT. NT. 33150 33150 

VMuim: 0 lots of 100 a* 


KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 


Cash Prices 


toae 

1 A 

IS 

9 

■p 

ale Bl 
no 71 
B35 K 

S 

S 

B35 8! 

B45 0 

0 

a 

s 

5 

s 

SSS K 

•45 < V 

U5 Bl 

135 at 

EH ■ 


Dec. 37 

Comeamr Per Amt Pay Rec 

USUAL 

Ameran Ine q 80 2-14 1.34 

Bits ef Mid-America a 35 1-U 12-21 

James River Coro q ,u 141 1.15 

LLAEwyoffvTr MJD273 W6 m 

Vermont Bancorp. q JT i- 2 12>1s 

Mwed; RHaoaliify; wwaanMrt im. 
Source: upl 



Jot 2335 2528 2510 2525 2390 2895 

Mar 2710 2545 2545 2570 2750 2757 

May 2770 2500 2801 2808 2311 2315 

JlT 2320 2*35 2636 2350 2361 2345 

Sea 2345 2710 2719. 2720 2918 2920 

NOW 23*0 2705 2720 2760 2735 2M0 

Job 2305 2720 2720 2750 2340 2340 

Volume: B349 latsof 5 tom. 

GASOIL 

UA-dottars per metric tea 
An 24430 24230 24450 24530 NA. NA. 

Feb JH75 33*25 24UB 34175 — — 

MOT 23030 22L2J 22930 22950 — — 

Art 71630 2UOO 21558 21*08 — — 

May N.T. N.T. 2D530 28*80 — — 

Job NT. N.T. 20008 20SJH — — 

JlT NT. N.T, 19830 20X00 — — 

*W N.T. NT. 19730 20*00 — — 

sea NT. NT. 19*00 20730 — — 

Volume: 1516 lo»of me tan* 

pRUpSOILfBREItp 
ILS. dollars eer barrel 

E* M-T. NT. 2570 2530 NA. NA. 

Mar NT. NT. 34 M UM - - 

Art NT. N.T. 2U0 3*30 — — 

M^7 NT. NT. 2120 2*00 — — 

NT. N.T. 2250 5*80 — — 

Jfr N.T. NT. 2UP 2430 — — 

Volume: 0 Ms bf 1300 bwwfc. 

Swra»: (teuton vx/LonOon Petroleum Ex- 
eftsrae (oasoii, crude rtf). 


S&PWO 
Index: Options 


Volume: 0 lots of 25 ton* 
Source: fteutarx 


BoemgOrder 
Was Delayed 
By Japan Crash 

Tht Associated Press 

TOKYO — All Nippon Airways 
delayed its announcement of pur- 
chase of Boeing 767 jetliners by 
about three months because of the 
crash of a Boring 747 in Japan in 
August that tailed 520 people, the 
airline said. 


jWfct oe m m e 

Price mw Aa see Mar 

3? 139 2*1 101 PJ3 

% 13 177 2J9 089 

41 ID 18 Ul 192 

C 054 097 180 154 

a — 047 — — 

gnawed total vot 7834 
CaWi: Tfiur.TN3Mflpnbtf.31S6 
Pols: Tfwr.wt. 357 toes let 2M7i 
Source: CME. 


S2?^_ ^M*cu 
Prim Jm M Dr M 
IBJ9N--- 
M HR- - 
» *»»- 
no 15% w> m - 

2J i D n u 

S L 5* » n 

* a a a n 

S m 19/106 4ft 5ft 
tnt Tft M jft 

vie a m 2 » 

TsWcaOnimN 159 JU 

nMmlapa«M.4IU97 

Tggmt total 7*199 
w>mW.5Bjn 

NMXU3 lOTtaUi C 

Seance: c BOS. 


Jm FA Iter tat 
UN VU - - 

l/R 1U4 sne - 
.1/14 ft 904 - 
VU UU lib - 

s 

gs S f 1 

m lift im - 


liS-Treasurie^ 


MembW 734 734 754 75S 

BM Oftar tad YM0 
Jftyr.baad % 64 m 1 UV 3 I 926 979 

Source: Salomon Brothers. 

"MfTDi unm Trawnr UMbk win 
Ooet* lertaeOcy: +*14 
AvtraaeyMU:** 

Source: MmrUUmelL 


Rapid-American 

ToBuyTG&Y^ 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Rapid-Ameri- 
can Corp. has agreed to buy ihe739 
variety stores of theTG&Y unit of 
Household International ] n g. for 
mrae than J300 million. 

Rapid-American already owns 
McCrary Cotp n the second-largest 
U^. vanety-sttffe chain, after F.W. 
Wodworth Com with 748 stores 
and revenues of $918 million in its 
last fiscal year. 

TG&Y Stores Ox, which carries 
the initials of its founders in the 
1930s. is being grid by Household 
Merchandising Inc., a dn iiS s# 
Household International that age- 
ing acquired in a leveraged buyout 
for more than S700 m^oa-by a 
group of investors led by Donald- 
son, Lufkin A Jenrette fryuritH 
Cop. • 






















































































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, DECEMBER 28-29, 1985 


Page 11 



/erseas 1 nisi iLxpecK 
Loss in Current Year 


■ Ream 

> 4(5 KONG — Overseas 
• ' jgnfc iJjd-, which had a loss 
V yffioi) Hong Kong dollars 
• nriBion) in the year ended 


issue of 2 billion redeemable pref- 
erence shares. - 
Wit Mr. Nendkk said he believes 
that further capital injection* by 
the government will not be re- 


rwu.jnm^ Japas Pmfahes Ciba-Geigy 
N$w Subcompact For Deception on Drug Tests 

biUS.inl987 Ream are reouired hv Ism/ tn r+ir*iV u/hr-lh 


Dollar Falls to 2V2-Year Low in Europe, U.S. 


rm TYmo* Tpstc C*r?M b?OjrSwffF™» Dupadus 2.4630 Denlschc marks from currency markets were dosed 

W 1/1 **8 A NEW YORK — The dollar fell 2.5030 on Thursday, hs Iowtft rate Thmsday for Boxing Day. 

w tj .j a „ ■ c irrrt __ ;w* rinitMl cinr»> Mav 1983' to 73550 French The dollar also fdl in London to 

are required by law to wbeib- sSto S^rSnM and to 2.0770 202,18 yen from 202.75 in New 


L expects another loss m the qtrired, and (hat the bank has ade- 
fiscal year, its chairman, qnate provisions for bad debts. 
Sfeodick, said Friday. • OTB win consider the disposal of 

J ; ... assets considered not to be viable, 

•, tai® 1 °y a ^ said without giving details. 

1 ^ • He also said that he expects 

A bad a p rofit” 5M4nu> gfong Kong Industrial k Commer- 
hrsayeareaifaer.Mr.Ncap <**1 Bank LkL, which is 63 J-per- 
d not estimate ^current ^ ^ 0TBi to 

■ xss, but ssid it would reflect profitabffitv m the vear endine 


, 55 , 00 ! swanwumoioKLi profitaMgty & the year ending 
lending because of slack 3 

• maud and carrying costs of The subsidiary, which had a loss 
hat are not providing a re- ^ 3 ^ mminn ^ ^ u 

months before it came under gov- 
s hst year included prow- enunent coning has said it is not 
: g bad debts, he said, bat he Ekely to be profitable before that 
details. ‘ year. 

qendick, who also is Hoi^ _ _ * 

secretary far monetsryaf- reople Express to Bay Britt 
aid be could not pro*” The Asaeaud Pna 

,ebank will return to profit- NEW YORK — People Express 

uTfw^/Ks this year is (treater .1 Svrii, 


ytinuww “ 

secretary far monetary af- 
aid be could not predict 
tebank wffl return to profit- 


^ people had annopat- Britt Airways, a regional ^rkr 
: said. based in Chicago, for an nndis- 

ajij (be bank's share capital dosed amonni. The accord marks 
m increased to 133 biffioa People's second airline acquiation 
•; from 333 milli on dollars a in the past three months. Brin 
0 by the government’s previ- serves 29 cities in the UJ>. Middle 
tmounced subscription 10 an West. 


Reuters 

TROY, Michigan — Volks- 
wagen of America said Friday 
that it would introduce a new 
low-priced subcompact car in 
1987. 

Tom McDonald, a spokes- 
man far VW, said it would be a 
front- wheel-drive subcompact 
based on the Brazilian Partlti 
modeL 

VW also said it would raise 
the prices of some of its models 
by abort $163, effective Jan. 1. 

At the same time, it sad, it 
expects its share of the VS. 
market to rise to about 3 per- 
cent in 1986. It said it expected 
to sell a total of 325,000 VW s 
and Andis in the United States 
next year, np from 300,000 this 
year, even though the total U.S. 
auto market is expected to fall 
below 105 miDion cars from 
almost 11 miiHtw this year. 

The foreign share of the U.S. 
auto market is expected to top 
25 percent this year, compared 
with 23.5 percent in 1984. Of 
that, Japanese imports outsell 
European imports by about 
four to one. 


TOKYO — The Japanese gov- 
ernment ordered on Friday a 20- 
day suspension of manufact uring 
and sales fay a subsidiary of CSba- 
■ Geigy AG, the mnlrinnTinnal p bar - 
ma cm ric als group, that falsified 
data on drug testing. 

An official of. the Ministry of 
Health and Welfare said the penal- 
ties against Ciba-Gagy (Japan) 
Ltd. were to run from Jan. 6 to Jan. 
26. Two factories will be dosed. 

At its headquarters in Basel, 
Switzerland, Ciba-Gogy issued a 
s t a t e men t Friday saying that it 
“deeply regrets the irregularities 
which occurred and condemns 
them.” The chemicals and pharma- 
ceuticals company said it had taken 
steps to prevent a recurrence. 

The Japanese official said the 
CSba-Gdgy subsidiary had been 

submitting false data on stability 
testing of 46 new products since 
1980. 

The Ministry of Health ap- 


i Investment 

K Apmx Franee-Rnaae 

' 2 JJNG — Offshore ail ex- 
“ . ittoa in Orinahas attracted 

; ‘ * ; than $1.7 ballion in for- 
4 investment since 1979, the 
. ’ aDaily said Friday. 

■ -• "■ .1 Iasi month, 110 explor- 
1 shafts had been sunk and 
^•ad shown ofl or gas depos- 
— he paper quoted Qin Wen- 
'jresjdect of China Natiott- 
EbboreCotm as saying, 
pi it in China has twice invited 
1 for offshore o 0 

oration and exploitation 
Ut 4 !* \ p ( l fora ® 1 companies. 


Fed Delays New Curbs on Use of Junk Bonds 


(Continued from Page 7) 
ment by the Federal Reserve 


“I think it wiU give an opportuni- 
ty far people to crane forth with 
stronger arguments,” be said. 

Mr. O’Brien said that opinions 
within the securities industry were 
mixed regarding the proposal to 
curtail the use of the low-quality 
bonds, known as junk bonds. But, 
he said, “Our industry tends to be 
rather free- market oriented, and I 
don’t ihmlt the case for all of the 
so-called deficiencies of junk bonds 
has been made.” 

The delay also appeared to give 


NASDAQ prices OS of 
3 ml New York Nine. 
Via The Associated Press 


» AOrtW 

a Acad Hi -Mr XI 
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71 20K 

T3K 12K 
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MK 15K 
9% 4K 
24K UK 
19U 13VS 
T7K fK 
UK MS 

n* Ik 

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21 K 14 
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' their products remain stable over sold it and Swiss francs from 2.1030. The Brit- York on Thursday, and to 2.0875 

^y^pcnodlylestmste, S^Ttrengte.^ to 51.4465 Sma fm.es from 11030 

as of samples made tmMtmt ^SSS posidoe rouanei from tl-4275. . . , „!» 


er their products remain stable over 
a three-year period by testing three 
lots of samples made on different 
days. 

Gba-Gdgy failed to complete 
the required number of tests and 
compiling of data on the 46 prod- 
ucts, the ministry official said 

In its statement, the parent com- 
pany called the qwpwiqnn “a stan- 
dard Japanese sanction for a viola- 
tion of the pharmaceutical affairs 
law.” 


in war-end position squaring. from 51.4275. _ “ 

Dealers srnd the thmnessof the There was no attempt by central Friday, the doUar wk fixed at rnd- 
market exaggerated the sharpness banks to stem the losses. Dealers aftwnopn m Franlrfimat -4885 
of the'doBaPsftdL said there has been no noticeaWe DM, down from 2-5095 at the 

“There hasn’t been much activity intervention since central banks Tuesday fixing, and at 7.6250 
and there’s been virtually no inter- spent roughly $10 billion m hte French fianra m Pans, down from 
hank tradine." one dealer in Frank- September and October to weaken 7.7125 at the Thursday fixing. _ 


and there’s been virtually no inter- spent roughly S10 buhon m tate 
h f>T<k trading," one dealer in Frank- Septanber and October to weaken 
fun “Under normal market tbc dollar. 

conditions, the dollar’s decline may In earlier trading in London, the 

not have been as sleep." dollar closed at 2.4745 DM, up 

In New York, the dollar fefl to from its day’s low of 14700. Loa- 


the dollar. In Zurich, the dollar closed at 

In earlier trading in London, the 10865 Swiss francs, down from 
dollar closed at 2.4745 DM, up 11085 thereon Tuesday, 
from its day’s low of 14700. Lon- ' (Return, AP. 1HT) 


Fridays 

AY1EX 

Closing 


Tablet include tba nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


12 tenth 

HIM Low Stack 


Dta.YM.PE WtaHWiLow OnbOftt 

1JB 32 till 21K 21K— K 

2 IMS 1SK 15 15K— K 

82 4K 4K 4K 4* K 

057 U7 122 I7K 17K 17K 
» 11 IK IK IK 

« U 13 K 3K 3K 3K 

.10 2* 13 R W » 3K— K 


O Month 
H table- Stag! 




businesses at least an extra wedc to evenly divided” fix' and against the 
execute takeovers through the use proposal, had been received since it 
of these bonds. was maAi Dec. 6 . Asked if die de- 

The proposed regulation would IflT in the dtocrive d«c wm ■ re- 
apply titeW’s^STsO-per- 

cent stock margin requirement to ^ ons - re P Ked en^haticaBy, 
junk braids. That would mean that _ 

an issuer would have to hold cash The Justu* Departtnait s arm- 
or other assets equal to half the meate Monday were also s^ned by 
bonds’ face val B r ^ Treasury, Labor and Com- 

merce departments, the Office of 
Mr. Coyne said that the five gov- Management and Budget and the 
emora who voted on the orional Councfl of Economic Advisers. The 
proposal would not all be available rt c.«-h «> phaiany A f 

for a meeting before Jan. 8 . fjcecu t ive V»mrTi pgtwj ^: in npjw- 

Tbe spokesman said that more sitioo to & Federal Reserve propos- 
than 80 letters of comment, “about al was extraordinary. 



9K 4KTBOT ja A3 38 104 
13K «K TBC .16 22 21 2D 

10K 4K TIE «M5 

12K » Til 23 14 

21 Vi 13* TobPrd 30 1.1 14 33 

9K 6V» TondBr 7 X 

X* 11 Tosty A0 19 14 54 

4K 2K Tram 49 

3K IK TchAtn *7 

2ZK «4 TctiSym 13 283 

25K 14K TdiOos II 42 

6 3% ToChTp 13 33 

20V* UK Tratrtrl Jl 27 9 22 

2K m Tcchnd 4 


104 SK 5M SM 
2D 7K 4K 7K + K 
I&5 7 Mb 7 4-K 

14 7K 7K 7K— K 
33 UK 17* 18K + K 
X IK 9K 9K 
54 2DK 20 V* 20K + K 
49 2K 2K '2M— K 
47 2U 2K 2K K 
E83 13V1 UK UK + Mr 

42 23V, 22V. 2216 — K 
33 5 S 5 

22 14K I3K 14 + K 

4 IV* 116 IK 




Teton R 

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3940 

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IX 

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52 

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3996 




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48 

UK 

1366 

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6K Tetsd 


SI 

94 

9* 

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216 Tetosti 



244 

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Trnnev 


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566 

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1096 

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Tto 




UK 9K VST 
30K 1816 Voters 
M 79. Vnlt 
23K 15K VtAmC 
<K 3K VTR*h 
K K Varna 
UK IK Varnll 
416 2K VwtPta 
1046 4K vtotodl 
9 3K Vlcon 
4K IK VTnfOB 
Xl* 13 Vbxo 
I2K 716 voalax 
71K 15 VukCP 
•K 5 Vvoust 


JMr j u 
JO <6 10 
JOa 35 13 

B 


19 10 9K 10 + K 

34 30K 30 30K + K 

12 BM IK BK + H 
IS 20K m, 20K + K 
74 M6 4K 4K + K 
19 S 16 16— K 

81 10 TI TOK 10 K 
2 3K 3K 3K— K 
28 5K 516 5K + K 
116 4K 4V. 4K + K 

I n M » + k 

14 19K 1*K 7W4 + 16 

14 n n m 

24 23 22K 22K +1 

B Ah 616 6H + K 


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l 54 7K 7K 7K 

I SI K K K 

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4 z u * u z'%n 

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51 K K K— K 
AM 109 IQz 4016 40V* 40V. + >6 
109 8V. 916 9K + K 

322 I2K 12 17 — K 

543 10K 1016 IKh + K 
45 119a UK UK + K 
5 UK 1BK 1BK— U. 
119 14K 14K UK— K 
11 H ill 2 K— K 
231 49* 4K 466 u 

176 2K 27. Jfc + h 
401 32K 32 32V. 

254 29K 29K 29K — Vt 

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XI ft 1 

31 3K 39. 3K— K 

11 19 36 3K— K 

12 UK UK UK + K 

2 3 3 3 

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308 3 71 I +11 

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122 12K T2Vh 12h— K 

35 II 17K 11 


AMEX Higfis4Lo\\s 


7» 3K WTC 
7K 4K WlkEn n IX 205 
29K 15 WcmsB .U J 
X MK WtmoC .11 5 

IK S WmCart 


153 5K 4K 516 + 16 
292 SK 6ta 616 
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4 20KXK20K.K 


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27K 21 
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3796 21 
12K 5 
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UK 7K 
72K 40 
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47K 23 
1596 1096 
21K I3K 
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PrkxCo 444 

Prtnnx M 

ProctQp .16 L7 44 
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Provln 48 

PurtBn M IJ 17 


30H 3096 
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UK 1096 
2296 22 
24K 34 K 
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1316 13 
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7096 68K 
UK UK 
4H 4K 
4696 44K 
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2196 21K 
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27 — K 
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34 22K 

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12 UK 
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15^1 1596 

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2 4 — K 
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396 + 96 

2*16— 96 
1396 + K 
VK 

2596 + K 


1496 4K 
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3296 1796 
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3296 + 16 

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I5K 4 QMS 
9* 396 Quodrx 

3296 II Qwmtm 
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1896 916 Qubcot* 

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96* 9 t — K 
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24K 2596 26K + K 
496 496 49* + K 

11 17K II + K 

UK 11 11 



11 + K 
27*— 16 

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22 

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1596 * 

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1996 + K 

2K 

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17K + K 

4096 — 96 
70 + 96 

15 — K 
3896 — 96 
23 + K 

1496 + 96 

21 +K 
3K + K 
7 

SK + K 
596 

2K + K 

% 

7K + K 
22K + K 
4K — K 
43K 
3K 
23 

IK— K 

12 — K 
2296— 96 
10K + K 
3496 — K 
2896 + K 
17 — K 
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34K + K 
1B96— 96 

22 +1K 
J96 

14 — 96 
17K + K 


896— K 
31 + K 

UK + 96 

7K 

1596 + K 
5K 

5194 + 96 
2BK— K 
T7K + K 

i? 6+K 

W6 + 96 
29 + K 
4K 
IK 

UK + K 
1596 + K 

1S6+1K 
I3K + K 


12 

VK — 96 


WK + 96 
49* + 96 
4496 + K 
M 6 — V4 

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22K + K 
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2ZK 21K 2496 + 94 

13K 12K 13 + 16 

219* 2116 2116— 16 

S 529* 53 +96 



296 

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1416 

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966 

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1216 

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1396 1316 13* + 16 


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Solas nouns on uneMctoL Yaorty hiohs and lows r eflect 
the oravtauh 57 wa tl c a Plus the current week, but not the liilert 
trnflng OBY. Whore o bpIH or Mate dMOend omeuntino » 25 

porceni w mw* has boon poW, ttie yaorta fUDWow ronoe ond 

dMOend ora thown lor the new stock only, unless tftanrtt 

notea rotas ot dividends ore annual disbursements twad on 

me totw» dednrotton. 

a — dividend also axMllL/l 

b — annual rote at dividend Plus stock dividend./! 

e— Ikwfdottng dhrtdencl/l 

dd— coiieafl 

d — new vsarlv ioml/I 

s— dividend declared or paid In preceding 12 mortteil 

B— dividend InCanodlon funds* *uNoci to IS* non -residence 

lax. 

I —dMdand dodaitad after splIMio or woe* dividend. 

I— dlvkwtd MU this Year, omitted, deferred or no aeHon 
taken cH totes} dividend meeting. 

k— tSvfdend declared or paid IMS vear. on acnmulollvt 

Issue adth dlvktandO In arrears. 

n — now Issue ta the poS 57 weeks. The Mph+ow rameMBlm 
wflli the Mart al Iradlno. 
nd— n«j dav delivery. 
p/E — price e omtnai ratio. 

r— dividend dodorofl or paid In precMIna 12 months, pwi 
stock dvldend. 

■— Mode soin. Divldond boBkis «Wo of min. 
sis— mas. 

t — dMdtatd neld In doc* In orecedms 12 months. *«imoted 
ash value an es-divldand or n-aurltaillon date, 
u— no w warty high, 
if-— tradkta huMd 

vl - fat tanhwlcv or recehiorailp or totnu reorwnlied un- 
der IM BMkruntcr Ad, or a«urtHes aosumed by s*«n com- 
panfx. 

wd —when tflsir muled, 
wl — wtien Istued. 
ww— with warrants, 
x— ett-dtakiend or wrlohfs. 
xd«— ex-dtatrlbuftan. 
xw— without wwTortls. 
y — a^Mdend and sales fn full, 
rid— yield 
z— tales hi fulL 













































Page 12 


TNTERNATIOINAL HERALD tribune, SATUBDAY-SUNDAY, DECEMBER 2B-29, 1985 


JL* 


ACROSS 

1 R.b.i.,e.g. 

5 Plastered on 

10 James Jones's 
heroes 

13 Declines 

17 Have coming 

18 The end 

19 Terra's 
companion 

20 Dark, as some 
streets 

21 With 41 Across, 
timely Loesser 
song 

24 Inclined 

25 Immeasurable 
period 

20 Famed diva 

27 Flax pods 

28 Buffet item 

29 Answer 

31 Former ice 
queen 

32 Grange subject 

33 A feast — 
famine 

34 Weight 
allowance 

35 Awned 

38 Full range 

41 See 21 Across 

44 Prefix with 
cycle 

45 Blind as 


DOWN 

1 Bushel man, at 
times 

2 Western resort 
lake 

3 Islands off 
Galway 

4 Explosive 

5 Fine cigar 

0 Better 

7 Openers 

8 Freud word 

9 Bad art 

10 Deceit 

11 of Court 

12 Yield to 
gravity 

13 Spellbound 

14 See 86 Across 

15 Hop5tem 


ACROSS 

40 Kind of pony 

47 Adjuvant or 
adjutant 

48 "That's one 
small step for 

49 Stir-irybuy 

50 Timely 
bandsman of 
yesteryear 

54 Reels 

55 Foreshadows 

57 Berlin avenue 

58 Fokker foes 

59 Spring 
beauties 

60 Old plane 

61 Delhi appeal 
method 

62 "The Balcony" 
playwright 

63 Jay Silvertieels 
role 

64 Drill 

66 Speculates 

67 Timely site 

69 Big Board 
corp. 

70 Sonny Shroyer 
TV role 

71 Certain Prat. 

72 Yen 

73 Unit of 
loudness 

74 Intimate 


i ACROSS 

75 Timely looters 

79 Famed singing 
cowboy 

80 In multiple 
style 

82 Stuart , 

U.S. artist: 
1908-74 

83 Grads-to-be 
64 Hoists a few 

too many 

85 Cause to 
happen 

86 With 14 Down, 
Jack Benny 
movie of 1945 

90 Hotel offerings 

92 Entitled 

93 Happy look 

94 Tuition, e.g. 

95 Like football 
crowds 

96 Timely words 
from Bums 

99 Like a dryer 

trap 

100 Impartial 

101 Weaken 
gradually 

192 Campus figure 

103 Ovid's being 

104 Pop 

105 Gulled 

106 One of the 
Longs 


1 

2 

3 

4 

17 




21 




29 



■ 

S“ 



□ 


Timely Theme ByweamuitwMak 


PEANUTS 


38 

39 

40 

n 

45 




48 



■ 

«T 



3 


DOWN 

16 Ending with 
song 

19 Fictional 
nymphet 

20 Revolted 

22 To the left, at 
sea 

23 Gift receiver 
28 What drinkers 

shouldn't do 

30 Sulky look 

31 Water 

32 Set of beliefs 

35 Out of the way 

36 Dealer 

37 One, in Bonn 

38 Stare slack- 
jawed 

39 Native 


DOWN 

40 Timely 

• imperative 

41 “The High- 
wayman" poet 

42 Pipe bends 

'43 Street show 

46 Washington 
sound 

48 In pieces 

50 Argon and 
neon 

51 Seine feeder 

52 Sheepish 
sounds 

53 Some 
choristers 

54 Latitude 

56 Goes down 



aM, tkt* M*vu 


.A ** lUfr 




a 

tM.tr- fa. 


6 New York Tones, edited by Eugene, Mdhedn. 


DOWN 

58 Portion 

60 French 
nobleman 

61 Uses a grapnel 

63 Under the 
alfluenceor 
incohol 

64 Run smoothly 

65 Couming-out 
word 

66 Tie fabric 


DOWN 

67 Toss call 

68 Caine's 
skipper 

71 Tree trunks 

73 This may come 
to shove 

75 Linens 

76 "Anything 
Goes" star 

77"Goodbye. 

cheri" 


DOWN 

78 Used tinder 

79 Malayan palm 
81 Birl 

83 Polished 

85 Stripped 

86 This for that 

87 "The Very 

Thought 

Ray Noble hit 

88 Ballerina 
Jeanmaire 


DOWN 

89 Hard up 

90 Mall event 

91 "Topaz” au- 
thor 

92 TV science 
show 

93 Gluey stuff 

96 G-man, e.g. 

97 Actress Joanne 

98 Milieu of a 
prin. 



*- 


ANDY CAPP 


SHOW Y3UR MLHVLTHeN 
SNCOKER TROPHY 

I WON LAS’NJGHT. PETJ 

s 


""•“"SSSISSR&ii 


THE BURNING FOREST: Emits on 
Chinese Culture and Politics 

By Simon Leys. 257 pages. $16.95. 

New Republic/ Holt, Rinehart & Winston, 

521 Fifth Avenue, New York, N. Y. 10175. 

Reviewed by John Gross 

S IMON LEYS is the pen name of Pierre Ryck- 
mans, a Belgian-born scholar who teaches Chi- 
nese literature at the Australian National University 
in Canberra. Ever since the appearance of ‘‘Chinese 
Shadows,” his account of returning to China after 
the Cultural Revolution, it has been dear that he is 
one of the most incisive commentators on the con- 
temporary Chinese scene, unsurpassed in his deter- 
mination to strip away myths and misconceptions. 
What has been equally plain is that he writes out of 
deep affection for the Chinese people and deep 
admiration for Chinese culture — an admiration 
that gives him the measure of how much has been 
squandered or betrayed in the last 30 years. 

The two longest pieces in his new collection of 
essays take os into the Chinese past While they are 
of great intrinsic interest, they also help set the stage 
for the political pieces that make up the larger part 
of the book. 

“Poetry and Painting” is an exposition of sane 
key aspects of classical Chinese aesthetics. There is 


BOOKS 


the "power of emptiness,” for instance, which can 
make the blank spaces in a painting or poem count 
for as much as the rest, or the assumption that an 
artist's role is not to provide a facsimile of nature 
but to enter into and manifest its essential spirit. 

Although Leys stresses how far removed such an 
approach is from the predominant Western tradi- 
tion, he does not resort to mystification. There are 
also, as he reminds ns, many individual cases of 
Western artists arriving at such conclusions. As for 
the respect he draws for Chinese culture when it 
does significantly differ from the West’s, it makes 
one all the more willing to go along with him later 
when he argues against those who invoke a mythical 
"China difference” to explain away political abuses. 

Leys’ account of Fire Hue, a French missionary 
who was active in China in the 1840s and whose 
travels took him as far as Tibet, is partly a study in 
cultural imperialism. Hue displayed a great deal of 
Eurocentric intolerance and obmseness, but the 
books he wrote about China would not still be 
worth reading if he hadn't also tried to set down 
what he saw, much of which cut across his precon- 
ceived notions. 

One of the things Hue makes dear, if the passages 
that Leys quotes are any guide, is that the Chinese 
empire, even at a time when the Mancfau dynasty 
was already in decline, was much less of a despotism 


than Westerners had been led to believe. Imperial 
power was held in check by public opinion, by the 
civil service and by the influence or innum erable 
private associations. 

For present-day readers, Leys contends, one mor- 
al at least should be obvious. The Maoist system was 
very far from being the natural continuation of a 


mythical Chinese absolutism. On the contrary, in 
what he calls its “monstrous excesses,” it was “prac- 
tically without a historical precedent.” 

How far have those excesses been properly under- 
stood in the West, let alone judged m the context of 
Chinese history? In die course of “The Bunting 
Forest” Leys dies a great many instances of Maoist 
tyranny, from the major bloodbaths to horrifying 
but by no means unrepresentative incidents Hke that 
of the man convicted (without right of appeal! and 
publicly executed in Nanjing during the Cultural 
Revolution for defacing a portrait of Mao; the only 
testimony against him was furnished by his 12-year- 
old daughter. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


Solution to Last Week's Puzzle 




Most of the facts are no longer seriously In 
dispute, but Leys is surely right when he maintains 
that they still have to be adequately registered — as 
opposed to dimly and fitfully conceded — by edu- 
cated Western opinion. Take the Chinese Gulag. 
One day, be suggests, Chinese Solzhenitsyns will 
appear to shock us all with the passion and thor- 
oughness of their indictments, but they will not be 
telling us anything essentially new, any more than 
Solzhenitsyn did; the basic evidence is available. 

Then there is the even more pressing question at 
how much things have really loosened up since 
Mao’s death. Leys welcomes improvements where 
he can discern them, and he believes it is possible 
that the Cultural Revolution injected “a completely 
new and irreducible component into the chiamsuy 
of the regime,” which may lead to its eventual 
transformation. But he also reminds us that for the 
time being the m en in charge are Mao's heirs. 

Leys lays most of the blame for Western incom- 
prehension at the door of other China specialists. 
Their evasions have made it difficult, be argues, for 
people to appreciate the nature of the regime and 
the rental power struggles that determine its poli- 
cies. He will doubtless be aitidzed in some qumters 
far being too polemical. Bm if you agree with him — 
and he makes a very strong case — yon are more 
likely to be impressed by his relative restraint. 


John Gross is on the swft of The New York Times. 



* HOW LONG 010 YOU EXPECT 'EM TO SKY YOUR 
GOOD SCISSORS, ANYWAY?' 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


Algarve 


Berllo 

Brunets 

Bochorast 

Budapest 

Copenhag en 

Costa Del Sol 

DoWhl 

MUftanA 

Florence 

Frankfort 

Geneva 

HdsMtl 

Istanbul 

Las Palmas 


Madrid 

Milan 

Moscow 

Matadi 

Nice 

Oslo 

Parts 


HIGH 

LOW 


C 

F 

C 

F 


15 

59 

13 

54 

r 

2 

36 

1 

34 

s 

20 

68 

3 

44 

d 

17 

43 

4 

39 

fr 

8 

44 

2 

34 

0 

1 

34 


30 

0 

1 

34 

1 

34 

e 

1 

34 

■ 2 

28 

la 

9 

41 

2 

36 

cl 


30 

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25 

\r 

14 

61 

7 

45 

0 

1 

3< 

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28 

d 


30 

-6 

21 

fr 

16 

61 

7 

45 

ef 

7 

45 

6 

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r 

7 

45 

4 

39 

r 

.9 

16 

-9 

16 

0 

11 

S2 

9 

48 

sh 

20 

68 

13 

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11 

52 

0 

4 

39 

3 

37 

d 

9 

43 

3 

37 

d 

3 

37 

2 

34 

0 

2 

34 

-3 

27 

0 

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2 

36 

d 

15 

59 

5 

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■10 

M' 

■15 

5 

d 

5 

41 

9 

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45 

3 

37 

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Zl 

• 7 

19 

fr 

17 

43 

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48 

H- 

■10 

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1 

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7 

45 

5 

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7 

45 

2 

34 

d 

9 

48 

1 

34 

0 

3 

37 

2 

34 

r 

« 

44 

3 

37 

d 


ASIA 








COW 



C 

P 

c 

F 


BtmsfiaiA 

28 

32 

17 

43 

fr 

Bditefi 

4 

39 

-7 

If 


Hao« K«Ha 

21 

70 

M 

99 

fr 

ManUo 

30 

36 




KewDriM 

20 

68 

10 

50 

fr 

Seoul 

5 

41 

-3 

27 

d 

ShamsSKUl 






Singapore 

31 

88 

23 

73 


TCI pel 

19 

« 

IB 

44 


Tokyo 

12 

54 

4 

39 

d 

AFRICA 






Algiers 

20 

48 

10 

50 

ct 


28 

m 

9 



capo Tom 







11 

44 

14 

57 

d 

Harare 






Logos 

29 





Hamm 






Twill 

19 

44 

12 

54 

d 

LATIN AMERICA 



Baum Mm 

25 

77 

13 

a ' 

ir 

Cora cn» 

27 





Lima 

29 

84 


d 

Mexico Chy 

22 

72 

8 



Made Janeiro 

21 

82 

21 

TO 

r 


Reykjavik 
Room 
S taddwlm 
StradMOfo 
VMM 
Vienna 
Warsaw 
Strict) 

middle east 

Ankara 7 14 O 27 sw 

‘Bainit — — — — no 

Damascus IS St 1 X d 

Jerusalem 10 SO 5 41 d 

TelAvfv U M 9 48 Hr 

OCEANIA 

Auckland 3S 71 U 57 Fr 

Sydney 26 79 18 64 d 

a-doodvj fa-fowv; If -f air; MM I; 

sh-showun: suranow; si-stormy. 


NORTH AMERICA 


AndMrm 

3 

37 -2 

28 

d 

Atlanta 

10 

X -3 



Boston 

0 

32 -■ 

18 


CMgobo 

-4 

25 -8 

11 

d 

Dimer 

5 

41 -6 

21 


Detroit 

•5 

23-10 



HMKiAl 

27 

81 14 



Houston 

-9 

14 I 



lbs Angola* 

23 

73 10 



Miami 

20 

M 4 



Mlmamib 

-13 

9-15 



Maalreffll 

-9 

14-15 



Nesses 

22 

72 14 



mwYora 

2 

36 -6 

21 


Son Francisco 

12 

5* 5 



Seattle 

4 

39 -1 



Toronto 

-10 

14-15 



WoftloMfi 

6 

43 -4 

25 

fr 


SATURDAY'S FORECAST — CHANNEL: HA. FRANKFURT: NA. LONDON: 
■HA. MADRID: NA. NEW YORK: Mr. Temp. 2— -4 (34— 25). PARISiftML 
ROMS: NA. TEL AVIV: NA. ZURICH: NA BANGKOK: NA HO HO KONG: 
Fair. Temp. 22— 1« (72 — 41 ). Manila: Fair. Toma. 28 — 19 (82— 44). SEOUL: 
Faoov- Temp, 5 — 4 (41—251. SINGAPORE: Th un derstor ms. TemaSl— 24 
(84— 75}. TOKYO? Fair. Temp. 13—4 (55 — 391- 


W)Hd Stock Markets 

Via Agence France-Presse Dec. 27 

Qosing jmca in load amende* unless otherwise indicated. . 


Artaed 
Bekoert 
Cockerill 
Cabepc 
EBES 

GB-lnno-BM 
GBL 
Cowcrert 
Hoboken 
Intercom 
Krodfeita* 
Petroflno 
Sac Generate 
Safina 
So 

Tr__ 

UCB 
Unera 

VI elllo Montagna 


264a 2700 
89S0 BB1Q 

.9 m 

4400 4280 
3843 3870 
4985 4980 
2320 2520 

5030 5040 

5750 5730 
,3000 3058 
1T7B0 11300 
£40 6790 
ZDS 2315 

81 80 81(55 

4100 6100 

fSSS 4,80 
552 5550 

S3 SSS 


Currant stock Index ; SNUB 
Previous : 252L2S 


AEG 

Allianz Vers 
Altora 
BASF 
Dover 

Bay. Hypo bonk - 
Bov Verafnstiank 
BBC 

BHF-Bmk 

BMW 

Commerzbank 
Conti Gammi 

Daimler- o«m 

Dcvusso 

Deutsche Babcock 
Deutsche Bonk 

Drwdner Bcnk 

GHH 

Harpsner 

Hochtief 

Hoodtst 

Hootch 

Horfin 

Hussui 

IWKA 

Kail + Sals 

Kantadt 

Kaufhot 

KktodawH-D 

Ktaoctaurwarlu 

Kruop Stahl 

Unde 

Lu f tha ns a 

MAN 

Momesmonn 

MuenctiRueck 

Nlxdorf 

PKI 

Porsche 

Praussos 

pwa 

RWE 

Rnetnmetoll 

gfteriw, 

Siemens 

Thvasen 

Veda 

VoU aw ngu n we rk 

Welle 


235L58 T» 
2065 2025 
4S7 


249 24860 
- 278 270 



715 

7J1 


.174 

174 


<3J0 

45 

MstalBax 

518 

516 

Henderson 

2.15 


AAWIancI Bank 

444 

434 


14.18 

1370 

Nat West Bank 

604 

677 

in-< 

MS 

M0 


«S 

411 

HK Realty A 

12.TO 

12 

Pllklngton 

325 

321 

HK Hotels 

35 

34 


174 

174 

HK Land 

480 

478 

PrudcTitKi: 

777 

777 

HK Shorn Bank 

7JS 

7J5 

Rncoi Elect 

.158 

154 


fja 

980 


S65U 

M5to 


IBS 

1873 


42* 

422 


7 JO 

785 


679 









047 

0 At 


13 13/32 

43to 


0L99 

089 


522 

524 


1140 

1150 



775 


15.10 

15 


372 

370 

Kowloon Motor 

1IL2D 

1878 

Sears Hokfl nos 









Newmrid 

475 

470 

STC 


W 








LW 

183 

Sun Alliance 




30J0 

2980 

Tata and Lyle 


528 


2 

2 


280 

w 

w«h Kweng 

(L8B 

088 

Thorn EMI 

399 

397 

Wing On Co 

173 

173 

T.I. Group 


365 



585 




World inn 

Z 55 

Kr.-J 

THF 


in 





194 

195 

Hang Seng index : 

T73BJ7 



ISto 

13to 





240 

240 




Vickers’ 

300 

298 




Woolworlti 

515 

>518 


569 JO 5*0, 
345 33350 
1644Q 14450 
1224 1243 

424 424 

202 204 

91450 
415 
24250 
343 34150 

SS SSS 

273 273 

146 16630 
206 713 

£ 420 

22 an 
297 S9 
313 231 

3*950 341 

313 310 
W 91 
15950 142 
5» 592 

W 23150 
2jU 223 

sot sno 
' it 543 
72950 
1250 1234 

19219350 

493 49650 

342 34SJ0 
«50 UMO 

294 
459 

72D 


505 
513 

m iAA Cora 


*1 


Commerzbank Index : mr.ll 

Pibvmh a 19HJ0 


SiMgKtaag | 


Bk Cast Asia 

Otcurta Kona 

CMnaUont 


2450 2420 
2050 2050 
15.10 15 


Alltod-Lvons 

Angle Am Gold 

Ass Brit Foods 

Ass Dairies 

Bardays 

Bass 

B AT, 

Bcccham 

BICC 

BL 

BHm Circle 
BOC Group 
Boots 

Bowoter Indus 
BP 

BrHHomeSt 
Brit T elecom 
Brit Aerospace 
Brttoll 
BTR 
Burmah 
Cable Wireless 
CadbvrvSchw 
Charter Cons 

Commercial U 

Cons Gold 
Courimilds 
Datoetv 
De Beers* 
Distillers 
DrlofoMaln 
Flsans 
Free SI Gal 

Gen Accident 
GKN 
GkUOC 
Grand Met 
GRE 
Guinness 
GUS 


SUM StHfr 

266 263 

WJto *531* 
258 


M2 
474 
445 
316 
343 
241 
24 
573 

287 
259 
303 
543 
336 

189 
438 
205 
373 
270 
595 
154 

190 
227 
442 
119 
225 

433 440 

son a 
3129b 31244 
433 434 

ST744 3179b 
144 144 

713 713 

257 253 

151X1S29/64 
398 400 


142 

457 

440 

313 

341 

235 

26 

570 

237 

259 

300 

551 

334 

137 

453 

204 

37V 

270 

5»0 

157 

200 

227 

449 

134 

220 


Hawker 

■Ci 

imaerkd Group 
Jaguar 

LsndSecurllles 
Legal General 
Lloyds Bank 
Lnnrho 


718 

307 

9S0 

195 

4S1 

747 

238 

332 

297 

727 

434 

200 

43D 


718 

30 

930 

SF 

733 

2S9 

332 

294 

727 

477 

199 


F.T.1B Index : 112U3 
Previous : IllUO 
F.TUM Index : HNN 
PreWou* : on jo 


Banco Comm 
Ogcrtotris 
Credit* 
Erwesdo 
Farmltalla 
Flat - 
Generali 
IF1 

ItakumenH 
I taigas 
iialmaMITari 

Medlobonca 

Montedison 

NBA 

Olivetti 

PlroW 

RAS 

Rlnascente 
SIP ■ 

SME 

Snfo 

Stonda 

Slot 


M1B Cummt index : 23H 
Preview : tin • 


- 12210 12050' 
3130 3150 

HMB 

5908 5TO 
77800 73000 
14340 15400 

51150 51850 

2315 2270 
101900101100 

131000129950 

2610 2610 

3750 3749 
1 7» 8790 
MW 1*55 

-TPI 

2730 2766 

1322 1290 

5428 5390 
JfiBffiJ 14299 
3700 37*0 


AirLkwW* 
AWtiam Afl. 
Av Dassault 
Banco Iro 
BIC 

Bdtwrain 

Bouvaues 

B5N-GD 

Carrefeur 

Chargewrs 

Gub Med 

Darty 

Dome* 

EH-Aauttdfte 


SSS .614 
427 42SJB 
1293 1190 
849 348 

SSS 332 
1423 1375 

2% ^ 
2940 2920 
715 714 

476 47550 
IMS 1958 
1052 1047 
m - m 
1200 1192 



Cfose 

tow. 


936 

925 

Hochette 

ran 

1210 


77V 

744 

Learand 

2S2D 

25U 

Lesleur 

751 

730 

POrwn 

2835 


Mariall 

1523 

mfLM 


1418 

1581 

Merlin 

2800 

2728 

Mlchdln 

1598 

■ LuJ 

Moet 1 1 Blowy 

2330 


Moulinex 

71 M 

7130 

tVrM^ntnto 

7*4 

721 

fl. , 1 




489 

4B8 


ms 

484 

Prlntifinpi 

SM 4D2J0 

RadMflctiii 

395 

3*4. 

Rtdouti 

1898 

1910 

RlQIff-IHtf Uctfff 

1472 

1480 

Sonoff 

715 

*715 

Sbli Bnvdgnnl 

12(1 

1240 

Tdemicaii 


TIiAmfiii r*lC 

74» 

7(2 

ram 

282 

285 



ptovIom : 25988 


' 

fl StaNH^NtaTC - |J 

Cold Storage 

2JB 

249 

DBS 




SA0 

■ ‘•a 


188 

■lTJ 

inchcape 

188 

145 

Malayan Bdnfclm 

484 

488 

OCBC 

7-8 

R- 1 

OUB 

234 

250 1 


2.10 



188 

L98 

Sima Darby 

184 

R ’ II 

Sinara Land 

L73 

N8. 

SwePress . 

SM 

■ II 

SSteamdilP 

DL63 

042. 

St Trading 

111 

2.10 

U08 

32D 

■ ‘ :ii 

United Overseas 

. ue 

1.18 

I stram TbiMS 100 indui : «1M* 

ProvM»:(«JS 


.1 

II ‘irmhhBlRi || 

AOA . 

180 

182 

AH0 Laval 

264 

244 

ASM 

.252 

SI 

Astra 

500 

■ I 

AHas Copco - 

178 

■l/JI 

Boil den 

tia 

1*5 


190 

T91 


228 

2 a 

Euselte 

447 

■«» 


232 

233 

llwi.'iaity-.-nMNl 


189 

1 1 V*: 7 * rfr?. 


uw 

Soodvtk 

680 

NA 

Skomfca 

119 

T16 

SKF 

294 

289 

SwudbhMalch 

240 

240 

Volvo 

285 

m 

Affaeronieriden Index : 47XM 

| ptevkMtf : 449J8 



II 1.1 


282 

240 


. 438 

440 


880 

174 


328 

3.18 


130 

150 


8 



4.15 

4J7 


.182 

1J2 

CRA v 

542 

548 

CSR 

asi 

3JB 


248 

248 


382 

3 


. 225- 

.an 


228 

240 

MIM ' 

US 

245 


HA 

— i 


446. 

448 


9 

198 

N Broken HUI 

234 

228 


240 

248 

aid Coai Trout 

142 

V42. 


Ctose _ Prev. 

SJO S24 
250 248 
350 117 
450 458 
1.13 150 

All O f dtawlo e isdek : 99739 
Prevtaus : 994.M 


Sontos 

Thomas Nation 
Western Mining 
Westpac Banking 




Altar 

Aeaftl Chemlosi 
Asalil Glass 
Bank of Tokyo 


Conan 


Clieh 

Daf Nippon Print 
DaiwaHouse 
O.-Ya Securities 


Full Bank 
Full Photo 
.Fujitsu 
Hitachi 
Hitachi Cable 


•Jam Mr Lines 

Ktrflma 

Kaneal P ow er 
KawtnaM Steel 

Kirin Bre wer y 

Komatsu 
Kubota 
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PfBERNATIONAL HERAUD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, DECEMBER 28-29, 1985 


. SPORTS 


Page 13 


:tS, 


^ vVV Gcold Eskenazr 
“ JiumSmiee 

'^ •VpSTE(U>. New York — 
\ te iriks again in the lodrer 
“ New York Jets and 

v\idind Patriots. Winning in 
\ttond Football League 
"IpJayen suddenly, discover 
~ . jni qualities in teammates 


s (be dubs approach their 
v miff meeting ever in the 
in Conference wild-card 
itunlay with identical 11-5 
y .and scalar reasons for 
. mod, there is one obvious 
: ^between the two. On one 
't coach was changed jrod on 
. Hr the coach changed the 


teams have' carried the 
ind of reputation virtually 
ey began fife together in the 

' bn Football League in 1960 
:‘5 personnel, baa attitude; 
’T paper, lose an the field. 
^ l ong}!, one of them will bee 
lAnpcs RjrideBin an AFC 
jl on Jan, 5. 

li year we all came together 
®r said Ray Claybom, the 
L patriot cotwrback. "Yon 
tel Coacfr Raymond Beny. 

J ^brought ns into meeting 
frs- ot p The offense watched 
dm defense and the defense 
ihe offense. We’d all 
'iie special teams. He would 
' — a group what we have to 
particular game.” 

J pg the middle of last season, 
- ^motivational speaker, was 
-jed to deBver a talk to the 
i;c week before their game 
'• the Patriots. He missed that 
jtanent and was instead 
- J New England’s coach, re- 
V Ron Meyer. la his first 
The Patriots beat the Jets. 


Perhaps undeservedly, the Patri- 
ots had gained a reputation, for 
folding in some situations They 
have stiD never- won an overtime 
game (their mark is 0-8). On the 
other hand, as Gayboro pointed 
but, “alot of our reputation was a 
myth. I guess bemuse wt had so 
many first-round draft picks, peo- 
ple thought we should have the best 
teams.” 

Starting in 1976, the Patriots be- 
gan hoarding draft rads — they’ve 
had 16 first-round choices ' in 10 

m PLAYOFF PREVIEW 

seasons. Yet this win be only their 
sixth playoff game, and only the 
founb smee all the No. 1 picks be- 
gan piling up. 

Meanwfufe, the Jus amanwi 12 
first-round picks, but this will be 
only their third playoff appearance 
in that span, and only the eighth 
playoff game since their first post- 
season appearance in the Super 
Bowl season erf 1968. 

The Jets have said that their coa- 
ch, Joe Walton, ti ghtened up, too. 
Joe Fields, who has more tune on 
the chib than Walton, said the coa- 
ch has learned to accept a defeat 
without being a tyrannical anntw 
in the meeting rooms the next day. 

The Patriot defensive stars will 
need the most attention from the 
Jets, who are favored by three 
points. They include Andie Tip- 
pett, perhaps the most respected 
linebacker m the AFC and leading 
sacker with 165. 

Qaybom is another concern at 
come-back against the Jet wide re- 
ceivers, and Steve Nelson, the in- 
side left linebacker, will be watch- 
ing For running back Freeman 
McNeil 

Tippett Sc Co. sacked quarter- 


back Ken O’Brien 11 times in the 
clubs’ two previous ™»*fngc this 
season and .also findted the New 
York r unning game The Patriots 
won the Erst game, 20-13, and lost 
the second in overtime. 16-13. 

Johnny Hector sobbed for an in- 
jured McNeil the first time the 
dobs met, and it took him 21 car- 
ries to amass 80 yards. In fact, it 
was the Jets’ poorest rushing day of 
the season — only 83 yards. In the 
second meeting. Hector replaced 
McNeil after the first quarter; in 
that ga m e, Jet rushers totaled only 
118 yards. . . 

New Yolk’s r unning jwmi^ may 

not be any healthier Saturdigq 
McNeil is nursing a bruised left 
k nee. That might require an adroit 
short-passing game from O’Brien, 
who is likely to produce half-roll- 
outs to avoid the Patriot rush. In 
the ga m e s tins season against the 
Patriots, Wesley Walker «mgh 1 12 
passes far 308 yards and was par- 
ticularly effective against Clay- 
bom. 

The Patriot offense, under quar- 
terback Tony Eason, creates differ- 
ent problems for the intelligent Jet 
defease, led by Joe Kkcko at nose 
tackle. New England has been able 
to nm in recent weeks — 281 yards 
against Cin cinna ti, 122 against Mi- 
ami, 216 against Detroit, 136 
against Indianapolis and 174 
against the Jets. 

. Eason started II games thin sear 
son and Sieve Grogan, now in- 
jured, the other five. With Eason 
there is less erf a long-bomb threat 
(Tony Collins, a naming back, is 
the chib’s leading recover). But the 
Patriots do have two long-ball re- 
ceivers in Stanley Morgan, averag- 
ing 295 yards a catch, and Irvine 
Fryar, at 172 


; Giants Wary of Agile Quarterback Montana 


. >- 

: *llf 


mmsz 









■ H- ' 

. *, v.n\ v l 


By Frank Licsky 

Ww York Times Se true 

EAST RUTHERFORD, New 
Jersey — If the three-point under- 
dog New York Giants hope to beat 
San Francisco in the National Con- 
ference wild-card playoff game 
Sunday, they must contain quarter- 
back Joe Montana. Not only his 
passing, but his scrambling. 

“I remember one play in our 
playoff game last year” Giant line- 
backer Harry Carson said Thurs- 
day. “Montana was scrambling 
ana started to run up the middle. 
We started converging on him. He 
was on his from foot when he 
flicked a pass and completed it to a 
back 

“After the play. Lawrence Tay- 
lor’’ — New York's all-pro line- 
backer — “and I looked at each 
other. Lawrence said, ’Did you see 
that?* Montana was off balance 
and off the wrong foot, and he 
made it lode simple." 

The 49ers won that playoff 
game. 21 - 10 , and would go ou to 
their second Super Bowl victory in 
four years. Montana made several 
memorable plays against the Gi- 
ants that day, none more unexpect- 
ed than a 53-yard scramble. What 


J 



glp ed than a 53-yard scramble. What 
f -.tp? made it so surprising was that the 
quarterback who always seemed to 
scramble to his right t hi s tune 
scrambled to his Jeft. 

That run made the point: Moo- 
ytft tana, dangerous in the pocket, is 
even more dangerous out of it. The 
»"***•$ f* ; ; responsibility for keeping him con- 
i-vf tamed falls to the outride lineback- 
% {: ers. If one of them is rushing the 
'•V” passer, the defensive end on that 
ride must keep Montana from 
- breaking out 

This i$ Montana’s seventh year 
*M«r*ur«wi hmt Mwmfcond . in the National Football League 
AH-pro Bnebacker Lawrence Taylor hopes his New York Giants have the hot hand Sunday. He has twice been the mosTralu- 




tanUM Ran ktammoed 


able player in the Super Bowl He 
has the best career statistical rating 
of any veteran quarterback in NFL 
history. He had the highest rating 
among NFC quarterbacks this sea- 
son. 

Still, 1985 has not been a vintage 
season, at least the first half. The 
49ere lost four of their fust seven 
games and five of their first 10 . 
Montana was not playing the way 
he had. There were rumors that he 
bad a drug problem, and he called a 
news conference to deny iL 

“i think it’s a phenomenon you 
go through after winning a champi- 
onship." said San Francisco's coa- 
ch, Bill Walsh. “You spend your- 
self emotionally, and you don’t 
recuperate before the next season 
starts and you're fiat.” 

Montana did not go into a deep 
dissertation about the team's poor 
start “It was our own mistakes that 
were killing us early in the season," 
he said. “That’s basically iL" 

Mistakes or not, the NFC coach- 
es and players chose Montana as 
their starting quarterback for the 
Pro Bow] Feb. 2. His backup will 
be Phil Simms of the Giants. 

Coach BQl Parcells of the Giants 
sees differences between the two. 
“Montana has proved he’s a great 
quarterback," he said, “and I think 
Phil is on the verge of proving be is. 
Phil is a little more of a classic 
pocket guy and Montana has a lit- 
tle better improvising ability." 

Thai ad-lib capability is the the 
main concern of the Giants. If they 
can control it, they will have taken 
away a major weapon from the 49 er 
offense. 

"It’s ample," said defensive end 
Casey MenilL “He’s probably the 
best in the game when be runs to 
his right ana throws, so we have to 
contain him. If we do that, watch 

OUL" 


Spinal Injury Decline Reflects Football Rule Changes 


By James Lidce 

The Associated Pros 

CHICAGO — Disabling spinal 
injuries to football players in col- 
lege, high school and recreational 
programs have declined by 85 per- 
cent since rule changes in 1976 out- 
lawed “spearing" and other bead- 
first tgrfrimfc a new m edial study 
concludes. 

The number of dwirhs resulting 
from bead injuries after 1976, how- 
ever. showed a much more modest 
decline, dropping 22 percent, ac- 
cording to the study published Fri- 
day in The Journal of the American 
Medical Association. 

“Those numbers are very en- 
couraging, but not good enough," 
said Joseph Vegso, a trainer and 
staff member at the University of 


Pennsylvania Sports Medicine 
Center in Philadelphia, where the 
study was performed. 

“Kids think they’re invincible, 
that their head is just another part 
of the body to tackle with," Vegso 
said in an interview. “The burden 
□ow is to educate the parents, 
coaches, school administrators and 
the kids themselves before the bad 
habits become ingrained." 

The study also looked at noufa- 
tal and nondisabling head and neck 
injuries by comparing statistics for 
1959-63, compiled by previous re- 
searchers, with those from the 
Football Head and Neck Registry 
for 1971-75 and 1976-84. 

The last two reporting periods 
followed significant improvements 
in the strength and protection af- 


forded by helmets and face masks. 

"As a result,” (he journal’s au- 
thors noted, “the use of the bead as 
a primary point of contact in block- 
ing, tackling and bead-batting oc- 
curred." 

Vegso said the researchers stud- 
ied slow-motiou films of more than 
a dozen tackles that resulted in dis- 
abling injuries and calculated that 
the force exerted on the spine dur- 
ing such collisions ranges between 
400 and 800 pounds. Defensive 
backs were the players mosL at risk 
of suffering disabling neck injuries, 
followed by linebackers, the study 

said. 

While an average of six players 
each year from 1959 to 1963 suf- 
fered neck injuries resulting in cer- 
vical quadriplegia — permanent 


paralysis below the neck — that 
number bad rise u to an average of 
20 players* being disabled each 
year by the 1971-75 figures. 

In 1976, the first season in which 
the National Collegiate Athletic 
Association’s rule modification 
went into effect and was adopted 
by the National State High School 
Athletic Associations, the number 
of paralyzing injuries was 34. 

But by the 1 977 season, the num- 
ber bad dropped to 18, beginning a 
steady decline that totaled just five 
such injuries in 1984 —a decrease 
of 85 percent since the rule weal 
into effect. 

“The problem with the 1976 fig- 


ure, we believe, is that while the 
rule was changed, you don’t see a 
true effect because the referees and 
players weren't really familiar with 
it." said Vegso. who was the chief 
sports trainer at Temple University 
before joining the center. 

“The dramatic decreases in just 
about every category begin in 
1977," he added. 

But the rule changes and better 
equipment has not significantly re- 
duced the number of head injuries 
resulting in deaths. Statistics 
showed an average of 13 such fatal- 
ities each year in the reporting peri- 
od 1959-63; 11.6 in 1971-75 and 9 
in 1984. 


SCOREBOARD 


Spurs Dig In Against Lakers, 109-91 


Basketball 
NBA Standings 


htfnUM New taamationri 


JefcioY of die Red Army team skated through a net-side hook by the Kings’ Doug 
^.'Thursday night; the Soviet squad won the first game of an NHL exhibition tour, 5-2. 

j,tssians, NHL Are Blending Styles 


By Jeff Hascn 

^jiietl rrm Inlernmionoi 
^ EWQOD. California — 
iff- West exchange has 
Ae hockey world upside 

. Pom international compc- 
k is, the more you see an 
5 d styles,” Victor Tik- 
- jo®** of the Soviet Red 
Olympic and national 
aid recently. “You see 
y sod adapt to the way 
moon win play and these 
tings that stay with a play- 

style of skating you 
prope is beco ming more 
in the National Hockey 
while you see Europeans 
nore physically than they 
■go." 

tov and his Red Army 
; participating in a six- 
|cs with NHL squads; in 
’’s tour opener, the Soviet 
a the Los Angeles Kings, 
second game of the series 
inled for Friday night in 
^againsnhe mo-time d£- 
^ey Cup champion Oil- 

'’from the Soviet Union 
North America 10 
» recently in the 1984 
-up, which was won by 
uda. 

1972, 1 have periodically 
r to Canada and to the 
kfaoftov said. “I’ve met 
of NHL coaches to dis- 
wns. exchange ideas." 
d Army team is coming 
** record and its 28tn 
tonal League champion- 
} ysars. Twelve of its 21 
-on the national team. 
Ppoitonity to compete 
.rafessional is a 

wnce for us," said T&- 
* jMias been the national 
4f«nc years and was the 
W'oech m 1980 and 1984. 
m Bdes Coach Pat Quinn 


an environment for better teaching, 
better selection of players. 

“In the U.S_, we seldom get the 
better athletes because (hey go into 
other sports. In Canada, we get the 
best athletes, but we don’t have 
total control and that’s the differ- 
ence. We can’t control, say. the 
juniors we have in our organizer 
non, or the kind of coaching they 
receive. 

“When you come right down to 
it, their system is better if you’re 
amply in die business of producing 
the best athletes." 

The Russians are amateurs in the 
eyes of the International Olympic 
Committee, although Soviet stars 
are believed to live as comfortably 
as an American earning 550,000 
tax-free. 


Five members of tbe Red Army 
team made the Soviet Union Na- 
tional League first all-star team — 
left wing Vladimir Krutov (goal 
and assist Thursday night), right 
wing Sergei Makarov, defensemen 
Viacheslav Fetisov fa goal and an 
assist) and Alexei Kasatonov 
(whose third-period tally ignited a 
game-winning three-goal outburst), 
and goalie Vladimir Myshkin. 

The Russians are m is sin g two 
top players — Igor Larionov and 
Vladimir Zubkov; Tikhonov says 
they have the flu. 

Tikhonov was behind the bench 
at Lake Placid, New York, when 
his Olympic squad fell to the 1980 
gold medal-winning U.S. team. 
“It’s impossible," he said, “to win 
aD the time.” 


CempUedby Ow Staff flw Dispatches 
SAN ANTONIO, Texas— Coa- 
ch Cotton Fitzsimmons realizes 
that one victory does not a season 
make, even if it comes against the 

flis San Antonio Span, playing 
without playmaker guard Johnny 
Moore (hospitalized with migraine 
headachesX scared a 109-91 tri- 
umph over Los Angeles here 
Thursday night, snapping the Lak- 
es’ five-game wimung streak and 
handing tbe National Basketball 
Association champions only then- 
fourth loss in 28 games this season. 

“I don’t get excited about any 
one game," said Fitzsimmons, 
whose 18-12 team has won four 
straight. “This is a very nice win for 
us, but we have to keep things in 
perspective, on an even keel with 
no peaks and valleys. We’re not 
going to get on a roller coaster. We 
beat the best team in basketball, 
but we won’t get cocky about iL" 
Other NBA winners Thursday 
night were New Jersey, New York, 
Milwaukee, Houston, Dallas, 
Golden State and Philadelphia. 

The Spurs took a 51-39 halftime 
lead and coasted the rest of the way 
as forward Steve Johnson scored 26 
points and sddom-nsed guard Jon 
Sundvdd added 18. 

J ohns on, third in the league in 
field-goal percentage, hit 10 of 11 
shots from tbe Geld. “I got off to a 


NBA FOCUS 

quick start and then my teammates 
started looking for me,” he said. 
“We’ve been jumping off to some 
quick starts lately and then out 
beach has been coming on and 
bolding the lead for us. We defi- 
nitely missed Johnny Moore, but 
you still have to come out and play, 
and we did." 

Said Sundvold, who has aver- 
aged 7.1 points while appearing in 
only 23 of San Antonio's 30 games: 
“Everyone gave us a lift The key to 
a good dub is when someone goes 
out aad someone else steps for- 
ward. In the NBA. everyone can 
beat anyone, so you have to be 
ready to play every night” 

“It was just a good, old-fash- 
ioned whipping in every way," said 
Laker Coach Coach Pat Riley. “We 
shot only 4-for-22 in the second 
quarter, and that really hurt os. 
This was a big game for the Spurs, 
and they wanted it more than we 
did." The contest was played be- 
fore a crowd of 15,786 at Hemis- 
Fair Arena, San Antonio’s first ca- 
pacity attendance in two and a half 
years. 

In addition to Johnson and 
Sundvold, Mike Mitchell tallied 19 
points and Alvin Robertston had 
17 points, 13 rebounds and eight 
assists for tbe winners. Los Angeles 


was led by Korean AbdnJ-Jabbar 
with 24 points and Earvin Johnson 
with 22 . 

“The Spurs are probably the hot- 
test team in the NBA right now, 
and all tbe bounces are going their 
way," said Laker guard Johnson. 
“We know how that feels, because 
when we play well, all the bounces 
go our way.” (UPI. AP) 


m. 


EASTS RH CONFERENCE 
Atlantic Otvtdofl 

W L Pc*. Ol 


Baaton 
New Jcrsav 
PtUkxMpMo 
Washington 
New Yurt 

( 

MMwoukaa 

Detroit 

Atlanta 

Oevefcml 

Chicago 


1* T5 A 13 3M> 


13 14 AST 7V, 


Central dmiIn 


30 13 MB — 

is is sn 4 

U U 4 

13 W A4S SVJ 
11 21 JM * 

8 30 JM 10 


Hockey 

NHL Standings 

WALES CONFERENCE 
PoMCk OlvbHM 

W L TWl CF OA 
PhllOdalp],IO 38 9 0 S3 160 107 

Washington 31 8 * 46 133 105- 

NY l Burners 11 12 * is 13) 129 

NY Rangers 16 18 3 34 131 123 

Pittsburgh IS 17 4 34 13S 139 

New Jersey 13 19 1 27 Ks 145 

Adams Division 

Queftee 18 14 7 38 135 114 



Chicago 11 21 J44 * 

Indfamo 8 30 J86 10 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 
MIMS DivtokM 

Houston 19 II -633 — 

Denver 18 It 431 to 

San Antonio II tj Ada I 

Lttan 16 IS .516 3to 

Dallas 14 14 .500 4 

Sacramento 9 20 JIB 9V, 

PacHIC DtvtUoo 

LA. Lakers 24 4 AST — 


38 135 114 
38 <44 131 
38 13 117 
36 13 118 


Portland 
Seattle 
Phoenix 
Gotten State 
LA- Clippers 


24 4 AST — 

18 14 3U I 
11 18 J79 lJto 

TO 18 J57 14 

it n J 44 i s 

10 ZD 333 IS 


Steve Johnson, 10-for-ll 

7 got off too quick start. . 


VANTAGE POINT/ George Vecsey 


A Surprise Weekend at Home Opens a Reporter’s Notebook 


■ *eir population, they 
few teams at the elite 
finssid “TbarsystaiB 
and they're very sdec- 
t have control of the 
jho plays with whal t eam . 
<M.’L That provides for 


New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — The awesome events 9 ? 
last week — Giants and Jets Both Win Big 
G ames — set up a cozy double-barreled 
weekend of wildcard National Football 
League playoff games. 

The last-ditch victories kept some of us 
camp followers from one or two more distant 
da tdine s in this calendar year. While the 
hometown victories saved us from another 
wait on an airport tarmac, they doomed 
some of us to two more unspeakable delays 
at the George Washington Bridge toll plaza. 

So, spared one last road trip this year, let 
us review some of the highlights of 1985: 

• DALLAS, Jan. 1 — After Doug Flutie 
helps win the Cotton Bowl in his last game 
for Boston College, 2 dismal sleet falls on 
north Texas. New Year's night is spent 
watching motorists drive too slowly up 
ramps and drive too fast down them. More 
action out on tbe freeway than in the Orange 
Bowl an the tube. 

• DUBLIN. California Jan. 14 — On a 
misty night straight out of Bret Harte. a band 
of starving Eastemeis crosses obscure moun- 
tain passes in search of the perfect enchilada. 
Through the fog, a sign beckons: La Codna 
de Lms, it says. From the kitchen conies a 
stupendous assortment of delicacies. Say, 
why don’t we do the Super Bowl right hoe? 

• TAMPA, Florida. Feb. 27 — Dennis 
McLain, a Cy Young Award winner on trial 


for racketeering, enjoys a heaping plate of 
zdti Airing a recess mid makes a gaflows- 
hurnor joke about whether the food in prison 
will be this good. A few weeks later he is 
convicted and goes dxrctfy tojafl. 

• SLADE, Kentucky, April 1 — On a 
brisk, dotuBess day, nothing like a hike in 
the Red River Gorge and Natural Bridge 
State Park to prepare for the Geor^etown- 
vnianova final in Lexington. That night, all 
over America, eariy-exfition columns about 
“Thompson & Ewing: For the Ages” are just 
hitting the street when Vlflanova gets its 
teeth in Georgetown's ankle and won’t let go. 

• PHILADELPHIA. April 28 — All the 
way down in the car there are the Hair- 
breadth Harry adventures of the New York 
Mets (Jesse Orosco bunts. Rusty Staub 
fields) on the radio from Shea Stadium. At 
the same time. Yogi Berra is walking the 
plank in Chicago, and in tbe evening the 
New York Islanders are taken to the guillo- 
tine by the swarming Flyers. 

• LOS ANGELES, June 4 —A basketball 
columnist from an English- la ng u ag e after- 
noon tabloid in New York attends his first 
b aseball game in years. His brother assures 
him that most baseball games are just as 
good as this dud between a couple of patch- 
ers named Gooden and V almzuela . 

• BRECON, Wales, June 15 —Our friend 

Alastair Mackintosh deftly explains the Aus- 


tralia- England cricket test matches on the 

television, and after an hour — is it possible? 
— I find myself understanding almost all of 
iL . . 

• WIMBLEDON, England, July 2 —Tim 
Mayotte is one of tbe more popular Yanks at 
Wimbledon, but today the crowd at the side 
court is rooting for a red-headed young man 
from West Germany, particularly after he 
bounces back from a twisted ankle. It be- 
comes quite dear this is the fortnight of Boris 
Becker. 

• COOPERSTOWN, New York, July 29 
— 7 have just finished telling my son about 
the remarkable memory of Happy Chandler 
when the former commissioner strides over 
after a Hall of Fame ceremony and recalls 
me covering his last campaign for governor 
of Kentucky in October 1971. 

•NEW YORK, SepL 12 — A scattering 
of Yankee Stadium fans boo tbe Can a d ian 
national anthem before a game with the 
Toronto Bloc Jays. But SgL Preston’s Re- 
venge sets in the next day, and the Blue Jays 
eventually win the division race. 

• LENEXA, Kansas. Oct. 20 — Some of 
the boys and oris on the bus are miffed at 
b«ng bivouacked in tins Kansas City sub- 
urb, but tbe hosts are so nice that it is 
impossible to feel deprived. Besides, a Sun- 
day-morning fall-colors lope around a lake 

in a Stare park easily qualifies as Best Run of 

die Year. 


• ST. LOUIS, Oct. 23 — What could be 
more Pinieresque than watching Harold Pin- 
ter in his own play, ‘Did Times,” along with 
Lav UUmantL, right here in $L Louis, a few 
hoars before watching Cardinal Owner Gos- 
sie (Here Comes tire King) Busch riding 
around a World Series ballpark on a beer 
wagon? 

• WASHINGTON. Nov. 18 — Every- 
body knows football is a violent game, but 
nobody expects to sec aplayer like Joe Theis- 
mann suddenly have his leg snap like a 
matcbstick during a sacking. The first ago 
that TJttasmann is badly injured is Giant 
bnebacker Lawrence Taylors frantic mo- 
tioning for the Redskin medical corps to 
come onto the field. 

• EAST RUTHERFORD, New Jersey, 
Dec. 21-22 — The Giants and the Jets defy 
recent history and win big games to qualify 
for the wild -card round. Another victory by 
either team would set off full-fledged foot- 
ball mania among New Yorkers anticipating 
a trip to the Super BowL 

Such was 1985, and, let's face it, nothing in 
1986 really matters until May 31 in Mexico 
City, when Italy will kick off its defense erf 
the World Cup of soccer. Whom do you like? 
France? Brazil? West Germany? Canada? 
Iraq? 

In the meantime, happy weekend and 
Happy New Yeat 


THURSDAY'S RESULTS 
Detroit IS 38 13 38-116 

NOW Jenwr as 38 » sa— 134 

Williams 10-166-636. Richardson 8-18 7-823; 
Trtoucko 9-18 9-10 37. Thomas 9-22 4-4 2X 
VJahnsan 11-21 04) 23. Robo on ds: Detroit 52 
fCurgfon 13). New Jmrsov IS {Williams 131. 
AubH: Detroit Z7 1 Thomas II). Now Jersey 
27 (Rlchoraon 10). 

New Verk 3* 25 » 29— 113 

CMCOO 38 21 M 17— M 

Cummins* 10-31 2-5 22. Tucker 7-10 3-3 17; 
Gervln 11-20 84) 30. Woolrtogo 7-18 7-18 31. 
Rebound: New York 44 (Curmrringi ID), Chi- 
cago S3 (OeAlew 12). iiMtots; New York 26 
(Sparrow 7. walker 71. Chicago 22 (Mac* 9). 
Indiana 23 31 tl 36- 87 

Milwaukee 28 24 31 23— Ms 

Preseey 7-12 8-11 22. Brower M 84 16; S1I- 
oanovlch 6-13 1-3 13, Williams 5-11 64 11 Re- 
bounds: Indiana 59 ITHdolc. Orav 10), Mil- 
waukee 64 {Ustor 10). Acslsta: Indiana 21 
(SUmsbury 8). Mllwowkae 23 (Hodges 7). 
Utah 38 21 33 M— ft 

Houston ZS 27 38 34—106 

Ola I uwon 7-137-921, Uayd 7-14*421! Dani- 
ley 14-327-9 31, Motoni 11-194-626. Rabaewtt: 
Utah 57 (Malone IS), Houston «9 ISomatan 
2S). Assists: Ulan 36 (Stockton ID), Houston 22 
(Lucas 7). 

LA. Lakers » 21 36 36— 91 

San Antonio 16 H 37 31— let 

SJohnson ID-11 6-10 24. Mtlcftwl 8-18 >5 19: 
AMuf-Jabtar 10-19 4-* 24. E-tohneon 8-M 6-7 
22. Rotxwtfs: Los Angelos 39 (RamRkM.San 
Antonio 47 (RaOortson 13). Assists: Los Ange- 
las 24 ( E— Johnson 9). San Antonio 30 ( Robert, 
son B). 

Dallas 21 29 U 36-105 

Pboeahc 37 B 31 31— ft 

Aguirre 1V1V 2-2 24. Blackmon 44 10-14 18; 
Nonce 14-25 54 33, Wttman 11-13 04) 22. Ro- 
bounds: Dallas 48 (vtocenf 9), Ptioonle so 
(Nance 15). Assists: Dallas H (Harper a). 
Phoenix 26 (Humphries 8). 
pblkxMbbla 22 35 38 30-117 

LA. CUM ert * 21 21 20-188 

Matone 1 1-25 9-1 231. Jones 9-113-4 2L Cheeks 
8-125-721 jiVLioh neon 12-21 6-8 30, Nlwn6-143- 
2 14. Rebounds: Philadelphia S3 (Malone 13). 
Lne Aniwtes 40 [MJotason 1M. Assists: PWh 
adelpMo 34 (Cheeks 71. Lee Angeles 38 INIesn 
8 ). 

SaaroiMnte » 36 » JO-121 

Ootdoa State 33 n 3) 33-m 

swnTMOW 41, Carroll 10-23 6-9 30; John- 
son 14-18 1-2 38. Ttwus 13-S9 +4 3a Rebounds: 
Sacramento 31 IThamawi 8). Golden 5tat* 55 
(Comoll 13). Assists: Sacramento 29 (Tbous 
It), Golden state 30 iFioyd 131. 


U.S. College Results 

PAR WEST 

Howan-Hiio 72i Alaska-Andwraoe M 
Southern Alabama 80, Brooklyn Cal. 63 
TOURNAMENTS 
ECAC Monday Festival 
First tutted 

Si. Bonaventure 74. Iona 72. OT 
Si. John's 79. James Madison 57 
Fwe West Classic 
First Round 

Oregon Sh 0, Tennessee Tech 94 
SL Joseph's 64 Kansas » 43 


Boston 16 17 6 38 la 117 

Buffalo 17 16 3 36 130 118 

Harttant 17 IS I 35 134 134 

CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 
Norris Division 

SL Louis 16 12 4 36 126 134 

CMcogo 13 16 4 30 142 159 

Min nemo (I 16 7 » US 131 

Toronto V 19 5 S la 148 

Detroit 7 » 4 18 107 177 

smvthe Division 

Edmonton 2* 7 4 53 189 Ml 

Cotoorv 17 13 3 37 143 118 

Vancouver 13 19 4 a 137 151 

Winnipeg 12 22 4 a l«l in 

Los Angeles 8 21 4 a ill 170 

THURSDAY'S RESULTS 
Boston 1 i i— a 

Pittsburgh 2 8 2-4 

BlohMWi (9). Sheddon (16). Mon too (5), 
Bodoer 14); Pasin (10), Bourque (8), Crowder 
(14). Shots so goal: Boson (an Romm) 56- 
7—30; Pttireurgti (an Keens) 8-10-11—29. 
N.Y. R an gers o o l—l 

Buffalo 3 2 3-6 

Hamel (BI.LacombeZ <21. Androvctoik (13), 
Tucker (ii), Ortondo (7); Ruotsaiainen (8). 
Shots sn goal: Now York (an Borman) 6-11- 
4—21; Buffalo (on VonhtaOroM*) 13-11-9— 
35. 

Qoehec l i 1—3 

WaeMootM 3 l 0—4 

Christian (191, Andaman (41. Guslefston 
(9). PnmcoKtwrtl 12): PAestny (19). Ooutoi 
(26 ). AilaHnv (10). Shots on goo); Quebec (on 
Priors) 9-11-9—29; Washington (cn Motor- 

Chuk) 10 - 12 - 0 — X. 

Toronto 0 * s— 5 

Detroit 3 1 0-4 

Frycer (13), Cowrmall (81. Stoatny 3 (14). 
Ihnocsk (6): Ktsta (5). Duguav (10). Oeroa- 
nlck2 (18). Shots sn ooal: Toronto (on Lofor- 
est) 9-14-6—31; Del roll (on wrogoeL Ed- 
nards) 11-16-18— 4£ 

Hartford 2 2 0-4 

H.Y. islanders 0 1 3-3 

Ttopelt (7). Kieinnndorsa (1). Bubvch 19). 
Evonon (4); Gilbert (3). Potvln (9), TroMler 
(14). Shots oo goal: Hertford (on Hrudey, 
Smith) 11-9-4— 24; New York (on Weeks) 13-e- 
9—31. 

Chicago 3 2 1—4 

SL Louis 3 5 7—9 

Mullen (IB), Hunter (20), Baron (1). Sutter 
(16), PaOtowskl 3 (13). Ftockftort 2 (10) i Se- 
cord (14), Protley (31. SLarmr (ll).Savnrd 
(21 l.oiczvk 2(12). Shots on goal; Chicago (on 
Mlllen) 8-16-12— 38; SL Louis (on Bonmrmon. 
SOUVfl) 8-11-13— 35. 

Minnesota 1 4 1-4 

Wlnaiweg 2 2 W 

Horfsburo (5). Roberto (t), BfuMtad (20). 
Acton (14). PcnmeS (3) i MacLeanS 115), MuF 
len (9). MawMrchuk (25). Turnbull 133). Shot* 
on aeal: Mbmecota ion Hayward) 8-17-8— 33; 
Winnipeg Ion Casey) U-l)-)0— 37. 


Transition 

BASEBALL 
American L eego e 

CALIFORNIA— Dropped ftrsl b o wman 
Daryl Sconlars from tne 40-mo n rover. 

FOOTBALL 

National Football Leagae 

SAN FRANCISCO— Placed Erie Wrlahi. 
camerbock. on tn lured reserve. Signed Tim 
Collier, aomertiock. 

SEATTLE— Stoned Tony caidwoU, line- 
backer; Jaek Sims, offensive lineman; Rlk 
Pearson and Tim McMatogie. rtoceUcftera, 
aid Dirk Nebon, punter. 

HOCKEY 

ttattemil Hadw ■ — - 

BUFFALO— Recalled Attorn CwtobWiand 

Norm Locombe, forwards, (ram Ro chester ol 
Hie American Hotkey League. 

PITTSBUROH— Sent Jim Mcfieougti, right 
wtno. to Battlmore or mo AHL 

COLLEOE 

KENT STATE— Nomad Robert OOonnell 
track eaortv 

MISSOURI WESTERN— Named Dennis 
Dornefi toeiban roach. 








Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, DECEMBER 28-29, 1985 


POSTCARD .to . , „ ,, m t • ■ — ■* 

A Genuinely Bogus Cult Nigeria Playwngftt Bridges Traditions CapimBstafYeanlk^ 


PEOPLE 



By Amy Wallace 

New Tiorfc Tima Service 

S AN FRANCISCO — The po- 
lice at Central Station are still 
talking about a recent Church ol 
the SubGemus DevivaJ meeting. 
They call it the M-16 caper. 

It was a Saturday night at He 
Slone Bar in the city’s North Beach 
section. The Zombies-for-Bob 
choir had sung, the Band That 
Dares Not Speak Its Name had 
played and a watch-smashing cere- 
mony had freed the audience of its 
“time addiction." Then officers 
spotted a man loading what looked 
like a machine gun. 

“He was putting the magazine in 
when I got to him,” said Sergeant 
Dale Boyd. The sergeant said he 
dashed across the dimly lit bar and 
confiscated the weapon. It turned 
out to be a plastic prop. 

“M-16s are not something you 
forget very quickly,” Boyd said. “It 
wasn’t very funny." 

The Church of the SubGenius, a 
pseudo- theology that says it bias 
thousands of members worldwide, 
is an elaborate spoof of religious 
cult mentality. Sometimes, as in 
San Francisco, SubGenius humor 
can be frightening. But members 
insist that their mythical leader, 
J. R. (Bob) Dobbs, works in myste- 
rious (and often hilarious) ways. 

It all began when David N. Mey- 
er 2d opened a magazine in 1980 m 
New York and was, he says, show- 
ered by tiny pictures of Dobbs’s 
smiling face. Merer is now the 
reigning SubGenius Pope of All 
New York and Idaho. 

In Geveland. Randy Woodling, 
22, an archaeology major at Case 
Western Reserve University, began 
a radio program, “The Bob Dobbs 
Radio Revival” last year after 
reading that blistering beat had not 
prevented a merry band of Sub- 
Genii from demonstrating at the 
Republican National Convention 
in Dallas. The issue they rallied 
around: Nothing in particular. 

McGraw-Hill published "The 
Book of the SubGenius: Lunatic 
Prophecies for the Coming Weird 
Times," the group’s btble, in 1983. 
Since then, the movement that calls 
itself “an inherently bogus reli- 
gion” has become a cult in its own 
right. About 18,000 copies of. the 
bible, a compilation of satire and 
graphics, have sold at $9.95 each. 

Since the organization was 
founded in 1980, 5,000 people have 
sent $20 each to the SubGenius 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 

KBP UPWITH WORTS NEW at 
hams. Subscribe to the monthly Oier- 
seas Spam Oust, 4630 faster Ave, 
9wmai Qata^CA 91403, $25 y«xty. 
checker money order only. 

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS m 
EngfakPori* (daly) 4634 5965. Rome 

DOMINICAN DIVORCES- Bax 20B& 
Santo DaaningD, Domniam Republic. 

PERSONALS . 

MERRY CHRISTMAS AND a Happy 
Now Year, Bahai. 

BIRTH 

Bone DAVID MARTIN 
Decenftar 23, 1985 

Merton aid Jod Wyler 
Sharon 

hSevw Dreef B 
B-2328 Hoogtirrten 

MOVING 


INTERDEAN 


WHO BSE FOR YOUR 
NEXT INTHMATiaNAL MOVE 


FOR A FIE ESTIMATE CALL 


Foundation in Dallas to be or- 
dained as high priests or pries- 
tesses, and 20,000 more consider 
themselves nonpaying members, 
spokesmen say. Not for nothing 
does an official SubGenius slogan 
warn, “YoaH pay to know what 
you really think." 

Bob Dobbs is said to preach with 
one goal in mind: “The SubGenius 
must have slack.” a fragile state of 
relaxation too often impinged upon 
by pushy waiters, insensitive em- 
ployers and withheld taxes, among 
other things. 

Most SubGemi are in their 30s. 
“They’re in that middle ground — 
too young to be hippies and too old 
to be punks,” said Douglas Smith, 
32, a film editor who is the church's 
co-founder and Sacred Scribe. 

Tun McGinnis, who edited the 
SubGenius book for McGraw-Hill 
and is now a senior editor at Fire- 
side Books/ Simon & Schuster, said 
of the cult: “It has all the complex- 
ity and appeal of a religion: good, 
old-fashioned zeal with an avant- 
garde chip on its shoulder.” 

That is no accident “We borrow 
the best from each major world 
religion and all the greatest cults,” 
said Smith. Scholars say such a 
practice is not uncommon. “Even 
the Kiwanis, the Odd Fellows and 
the Elks had some elements of cari- 
cature in their beginnings,” said the 
Harvard Divinity School theolo- 
gian Harvey Cox. 

“No one has ever really met Bob 
— he's a mystery wrapped in enig- 
ma,” said Woodling. But SubGen- 
ius members manage to keep then- 
leader in the public eye. His face, 
Lifted from the generic clip-art cre- 
ated to illustrate telephone books, 
turns up in subway stations and 
bathrooms, on sidewalks and on 
liner notes of records by the rock 
group Devo. It is now a registered 
trademark, as is SubGenius. 

In the last few weeks, Devival 
meetings have been held in Seattle, 
Dallas and little Rock, Arkansas, 
Always original, they often feature 
any of the more than 20 musical 
(and “ami-mustcal”) SubGenius 
bands, as well as healings, sicken- 
ings, acu-beatings and live-on- 
stage glandscapings. 

As a result, the word of Bob 
continues to spread. SubGenii re- 
side in Kuala Lumpur, Bolivia and 
England, the church says, and one 
enthusiast has translated the litera- 
ture into Portuguese. 

MOVING | 


By Edward A. Gargan 

Nm York Time Service 
T AGOS — J. p. Clark leaned 
J_4 against the edge of the stage, 
his hands pushing against its 
nxigh painted planks, his atten- 
tion riveted by two actresses re- 


A 


“Cut! Cut!” he commanded. 
“You are too civilized,!" He 
pointed to one of the women. 
“You are too tame. I want it 
rough! You are a busybody wom- 
an?You are a gossip, a woman 
around town. 

“AD right- Cue!" 

The two women began again, 
rehearsing a scene from Clark’s 
most recent work, “Return to 
Dear Native Land,” a play that 
recounts the experiences of a 
forcibly retired Nigerian dvil ser- 
vant who decides to return to his 
native village. One of Nigeria’s 
best-known English-language 
playwrights and poets, dark is in 
his fifth season as director of the 
country’s only English repertory 
theater. 

“A number of people, includ- 
ing me, have been writing plays 
over the years without being able 
to have them performed for their 
home audience,” Clark said in his 
backstage office after rehearsal 
“It has always been easier to have 
plays staged in London on an 
exhibition basis than at home. I 
talked to my wife; who is a the- 
ater person, and I said, Tm going 
to find a place where I can get all 
these plays I have been writing 
performed.’" 

Repertory companies have al- 
ways had a distinct place in the 
theatrical tradition of the Yoruba 
people of eastern Nigeria. Until 
the last decade or so, the huge 
eastern swath of Nigeria was alive 
with hundreds of traveling Yoru- 
ba troupes. In recent years, how- 
ever, many actors with these com- 
panies have gpoe into movie- 
making, following the e xamp le of 
Hubert Ogunde, who was for de- 
cades the greatest name in Yoru- 
ba theater. There is now only a 
scattering of Yoruba troupes. 

In this century, the advent of a 
British-stylc university system 
brought with it the development 
of university drama departments 
and a growing f amiliari ty among 
the country’s educated elite with 
classical and modem theater. 
University drama departments 
train hundreds of students as ao- 


I 



\S ‘‘ 


Mfc ' ” K'; tV 


11 

.jrV| 


••• 





A magazine that celebrates capi- the reason “there’s a new iRtg’" ■ 
rnlism has chosen Deng Xiaoping, today’s hunks”; the 
leader of the world’s hugest com- lowe, who “keeps ihegjr&Siiafcj 
munist nation, as its success story pounding every tune he showim 
of the year. Deng “makes a Horatio on the. big screen”; the -Kwr -jaJl. 

.Alger hero look like a piker.” Sue- mode* Jack Sofia of “Hefijwagtf: 

TnftgarinA frftjrf in a profile of Beal": “There would be a te-aopj • 
the Hiintw leader that appears in women in Hollywood if they lmniir 
its January-Febniary issue. Sue- he would be roaming the 
cess’s editor in chief. Scott De- and Brace Willis, co-siar^f 
Garmo, said: "We’ve chosen the "Moonlighting": “Janies DehL ' 
world’s leading communist because Hranphrey Bogart and Cary Graft' • 
his perseverance, courage and pro- all rolled up into one. ’ 
motion of free enterprise make him □ \ 

a universal role model." Deng “has to ^v« n *m.tta«tate 

been counted out a bidf-dozen DodSo, 48, has aar-- ' ‘ j 

times — finished politically, dis- A 

Biassjsar aara® 


tors and provide a continuous 
flow of new productions. 

Treading somewhere between 
these two traditions — Yoruba 
theater and tmivereity drama — is 
Gaik. “I was in a university sys- 
tem for years," he said. “I wrote 
plays, but I didn't belong to the 
theater department I watched 
my colleagues perfo rming What 
I’ve now tried to do is set up this 
shop, bring the university system 
into town and see whether this 
thing, this theater, is needed." . 

Johnson Pepper Clark was 
bom in 1935 to Chief Clark Fu- 
lndu Bakodaremo and Us wife, 
Poro, in Kiagbodo, a village 
about 200 miles (325 kilotnetere) 
southeast of Lagos. In 1963 he 
was a Panin feQow at Princeton 
University. The next year he pro- 
duced his first book of plays. 

In 1972, he was appointed a 
professor of English at the Uni- 
versity of Lagos, and he spent the 
1975-76 school year as a visiting 
distinguished fellow at Wesleyan 
University in Middletown, Con- 
necticut. Foot years later he re- 
tired from teaching to devote 
himself to writing and directing. 


He has published five books of 
poetry, three of criticism and four 
of plays. The latest — “The Bi- 
karoa Plays: The Boat. The Re- 
turn Home and Full Circle" — 
was published this year by Ox- 
ford University Press. 

“Pm very concerned with the 
business of people living together 

imrl na ming things together and 
squabbling oyer common proper- 

to the state," Clark saicL He fre- 
quently drops bis glasses from his 
nose when be speaks, letting them 
hang from a cord. Without the 
thick black frames, the small trib- 
al scan on his cheeks seem more 
pronounced. “The business of 
trust between men, the business 
of liability, the respraudbOity of 
one to another — is it really pos- 
sible for people to own things 
without q uarreling ?" ■ 

“My recent plays actually deal 
with recent history, from the tom 
of the century to the present, the 
whole business of one person's 
right being another person's 
wrong.” This theme is pursued in 
brutal fashion in “The Boat,” a 
short play that explores the teu- 


Edwtrd K Gatgcn/Tha New Yori Tina 

J. P. Clark (left) 
and scene from bis 
most recent work, 
“Return to Dear 
Native Land.” 


goes between two brothers who 
jointly own a wooden boat 

“Two brothers own some- 
thing,” Glade said. “One wants to 
do this, one wants to do that And 
tragedy comes when there is a 
i-.lash of claims with no arbiter 
around. There is a fight to the 
bloody end. This happens to peo- 
ple all over the world.” 

In “Return to Dear Native 
Land,” the play now in produc- 
tion. Clark departs from the omi- 
nous foreboding that shatters 
many of his earlier plays. This is 
the third of a series, beginning 
with “Dear Native Land,” a so- 
cial satire on corruption. 

The new play, dark said, tries 
to moderate the despair of his 
earlier efforts. “In the past, we 
have done pure satire. Here, we 
want some solution. This is the 
story of a public servant who was 
.retired before his time. There is 
also this glib call by the govern- 
ment to go back w the land. 

“The question is, What land is 
there to go back to? Here, we 
make it possible for the civil ser- 
vant to go bade to die land.” 


mem. And yet he keeps coming 
back,” the magazine said The arti- 
cle by the former New York Times 
correspondent Harrison Salisbury 
described Deng as “bold and inno- 


writer Brooke Hayward, also 48.; ,. 

□ • 

Kevin Meffish claimed a wortd 
record Friday for (be longest writ 
for a sale after camping outside 
Self ridge's department store, in 


vative" and said he had “put China London for 18 days and one hoar. - 
on a new and successful fast track.” Mellish, 37, an unemployed fortw 
. . . John Forsythe, the silver- supermarket porter, maintained an 
haired star of the television show around-the-clock vigil outside S* 
“Dynasty,” “gets better looking ev- street store starting Dec. % 


ay year” and so was a natural for ro money for chari ty. TV 
inclusion on the annual list of Guinness Book of Records says the; 
“most watch able men” compiled previous record was 17 da vs and 
by Man Watchers Inc. The group four hours, set in 1984. 
said a poll of its members chose q 

Forsythe and nine others. ‘Dace 

npnin, our members have come up The grandest hotel on Holly ; 
with someone who wQ] appeal to wood Boulevard, a second home to- 
every woman,” said Man Watch- the stars during Hollywood’s hey- 
ers’ president, Suzy Maflery. Every day and the site of the first A cade- 
woman but the diehard political my Awards ceremony, has been re- 
buff, that is: No politicians made stored to its original gutter in a bid 
the roster this year. “We named to return some luster to the somc- 
President »p*gan to last year's list what seedy entertainment capital 
but, aside from the president, our About 3(X) celebrities including 
members have not found many June Lockhart, Morey Amsterdam, 
waichable men in public office," Caesar Roman, Richard Thomas, 
Mallory said. In addition to For- Ross Hunter. Rmfy VaHee, Mac- 
sythe, the winners and the group’s Donald Carey and Virgfarfa Grey 
comments about thwn are: the attended a ribbon-catting bash at 
■laniw and actor MBduul B aiy s h n i - the Hollywood Roosevelt Hold, a 
kov, who “combines the most beau- 12-story Spanish colonial edifice 
tiful el emen ts of dance with the built for S25 million in 1927. The 
power and strength of an athlete"; Roosevelt reigned over the movie 
Eric Dickerson of the Los Angeles kingdom through the 1940s bid feB 
Rams football team, with “a smile out of favor and into disrepair be- 
which lights up a room”; the talk- fore dosing two years ago. It k 


show host Merv Griffin, “such a 
good listener that he makes every- 
one fed at home"; Kareem Abdul- 
Jabbar of the Los Angeles Lakers 
basketball team, “cod, cabn and 
collected"; Peter Jennings, the 
ABC news anchorman, “wonder- 
ful” for “not only the way he re- 
ports the news, but how he gets 
involved In it": Don Johnson of 
television's “Miami Vice," who is 


reopening following a £3-S- mjttio r~ ; l 
restoration. “This renaissance 
the Hollywood Roosevdl Hotd-is 
more than just a renovation of me 
building in Hollywood." said Mty- 
or Tom Bradley of Los Angeles. 

“The fact that the very first Oscar 
awards were presented here means 
that in 1 929 it was good enough for 
tbebest-Asfarasrmconcerned.it j 

still is." ' 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIE 


ALLIED 

VAN LINES INTL 

OVHt 1300 OFFICES 

wonnwnx 

USA ABed Vioi Unee hfl Corjs 
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Or cd our Agency European afficwi 

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FOR SALE 

SWITZERLAND 


SWITZERLAND 

LAKE GENEVA OR 
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SWITZERLAND 

STUDIOS/ APABT- 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 

HOLLAND 

WE WISH YOU ALL 
A VERY GOOD NEW YEAR 
DUTCH HOU9NO CENTRE 6.V. 
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reiBl U1XN MAKHAAJBX! BV for 
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Phan* 67W325, 6793450. 
Write; Via dal Vtfabro 16, 
00186 Ram 

PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


74 CHAMPS-aYSEES 8lh 



LONDON; 

MADRID: 


MUNICH: 

NAPLES: 






NBLIA SEAFRONT UfXURT HOME. 
3 bedroona, 2 bu llr uun a, 2 tefroCBt 
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owner bufli. No agent. Cortact Bri- 
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phone; [52)520634. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 
AUSTRIA 

VENA’S HOUSMG AGMCY. 
0222-527964, Hadosy, Gratsen 31. 
Rentdbi driuw Reft & houui. 


PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


WBT PAJW neor iaY) A US tdxKk. 
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REAL ESTATE 
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USA 

Brand New 

THE KIMBERLY 

145 E. 50th 
New York 10022 

A Unique 
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Residence 


pre-opening savings on 
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fniiring 

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AR magniftcentfy 
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kitchens & marble baths. 


EMPLOYMENT 

GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


EMPLOYMENT 

DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 


AUTO CONVERSION 


MAIKH1NGMANAj(» 27, bating CQUWIwetaJwwawo^IxfepH^ 
for preferably US bated mariceteig 
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“VCpnew I*. Yqwi»Bck 2985. CHAUft*UR r bacltetar 1 »e«Y good nl 
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POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

WORIBS LEADING h tennfo nol 
new*. HlformcCon and canmunoo- 
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tengua saavtanr for nraar eotecutna 
in Pom. Firs dan wariang environ- 
monl wiihin smA very sartor man- 
agenart tun. Goad French, after 
bngogwHrftoriand a dbiad advan- 
tage. High salary. Eles ring Mb X 
Young (rorid 42 94 09 06 or 42 33 44 
29 for cppOMment 

DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


for oportrn Brt Executive Services Available 


15TH 1 bedroom ep ort n e gL * 
m My equipped F 5300 dfmd 
«L Key money. Ttfc 457B 74 11 


Model Suites 


Flaw Your Classified Ad Quickly and Easily 

fai ths 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

By Ptwna: Call your local BHT representative with your tent. You wfl be Manned of Ihe cod immedi ate ly, and once prepayment is made your ad wl 
appear within 48 hours. 

Cart: The been: rote it 5980 per tne per day + bcol tacei. Them are 25 lemon, sigm end spaces in the fin* Ene end 36 in the foflowing Enel. MMmunt 
space a 2 Enas. No abbreviations naupteri 

Cnttfo Candu American Express, Diner's Oub, Eurocard, Master Can), Access and Visa 


HEAD OFFICE 

PARIS; Far France and aflcouiv 
tria not Sswd below: 181 A«a 
Charl«5*de-Gaulle, 92521 
Nawlly Cedes. TeL 4747-46- 

00^^ OaSSrfWd only], Telex: 

EUROPE 

AUSTRIA X GStMANY: 5gnd 
Konrad, IH.T., FnedrkhdrasM 
15. D6O0O Frankfurf. TeL 
1069)72 67 55. Telex; 416721, 

BELGIUM A LUXEMBOURG! Ar- 
thur Moaner, 6 Rue louis Hy- 
mans, 1060 Brussels. Tot.; 
343.l4.99. Telex; 23922 AMX, 
GREECE & CYPRUS: J.C Remev 
son, Pindarou 26, Athens 
106h. TeL 3618397/3602421. 
Telex: 218344 IBS GR. 

I5RAH; Dai Bridt, 92 Usishlrin 
Street, PO. Box 11297, Tel 
Aviv. TeL 45 55 59/4591 37. 
Tlx: 341118 BXT\ B. EXT 6376. 


ROME: Antorna Samfar otto, 55 
Via della Mercede, 00187 
Rome. Tel: 6T9-34-3?. Telex: 
620500 PPCSA. 

MOAN: Lxgi Rancati. 20090 
Searate Milan S. Poke, Torre 5. 
TeL 7531 445-Tel™ 3^1 1010. 

NETHBtLAIGK: Arnold Teev 
<ng/AKorts Grim. Prof. Tulp- 
stroat 17, 1018 GZ Amsterdam. 
Te|. ; OW-26 36 15. Telex: 
13131 

PORTUGAL Rita Ambar, 32 Xua 
das Janekn Verdes. Lisbon. 
Tel: 672793 & 662544. 
SCANDINAVIA 
DENMARK; MB3tA-8QQKING 
tNTCKNATlONAL, Abenra 31, 
DK-1124 Kobenhavn K, Den- 
marie. TeL 1-3294 40. Tehx: 
16447 nwfadfo 

NORWAY: Medo-Boofong Enler- 
no b onrt AS., Krfesgaten 15. 
01 S3 Oda 1 . Norway. TeL 02) 
412951 Teten 72731 (Saw). 


SWH3B4: Mrs. Marie Felbgm, 
frefbom Mutating & Drdriou- 
rvon HB, UtrtkMvagen 2, 18352 
Toby Sweden. TrtLOG 7W229. 

SPAM Alfredo Umlouff Scr- 
mienlo. Iberia Mart 1, 6 D. Pe- 
dro Taxrta 8. Mam 28320. 
TeL 455 28 91-455 33 06. Tin 
47747 SUYAE. 

SWITZERLAND: Guy Van 
Ihuyne and Mcnhcd Waller, 
“Us Vignes", 1 5 Gwnim Davel. 
1009 Puffy/lauwnne. Tef.: 
(0211 29-58-94. Tele*= 



KOREA: Uitanrsal PufaGcatiom 
Agency tm. .UPA Building, 
CTO Bax lteo, 54 Kypr» 
Dong, Chonano-taj, SEOUL 
T«L >35i773. Telex: 28504 
UNffUfl. 


(212) 371-8866 


EMPLOYMENT 

FCK THE FEATURE 

MTBNATIONAL 

POSITIONS 

1UVI TO PAGE 2 

GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 

MACK SHS> RNANOER needs v. 



AUTOMOBILES 

MBKBB foam EUROPE 

WE FEDSJAUZE CARS TO MET US. 
SAFETY STANDARDS 

D.O.T. & E.PA 

5 YEARS EXPHBB4CE 
iHUMMC 

Indmpafa, Mana 317-2914108 

ROUS ROYGE Sftw Sprit, I9»C 
37JOOO tans. UD. Btack/charnpa^* 
bather. Tefc London 01-589 flSlfc 

SaUNGI 9WWNG worldwide <p«L 
on, BMW & Merosdm, hyrori. Ant- 
wwp 32 25 1047. Pcra 42 29 79 79. 


AUTO RENTALS 

CHAHC BBC A CARS. Prestige cars- 

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Oiarron, 75008 Park Tefc 47203040. 
Telex 630797 FCHARjOC 


AUTO SHIPPING 

Worldwide Car Shtatag 
TRAN5JHP GfrtbH 

B^n.-5radt-5<r. 58/60 
■2000 Bremen 1 

Tel, (0)421/14364 U» 246584 Tran. D 
lei dsn Moehren 91 
2000 Hmrtxirg 11 

Tefc (0)40/373703 Tlx. 214944 Tran D 
ofao DOT/H’A + bond n USA. 
Member of AICA, Washington 


DOT / EPA 

PER50NA1IZED A COMPIBE 

camaami service 

Hem your MBtCHXfr, BMW, 
POKCIC or JAGUAR amertiy eon- 
verted to U5 sftmdanis, or ityau do not 
yettxn* the ax you wish to report, we 
may rtrnady have the Car you want 
Our hi tareioes induda; SAI£5, 
SHVFR4G, BONDMG / CUSTOMS 
CUEAIMWZ. Our work is My 
GUAIANTEto wBh air US. affiatat 
"CA 



AUTOS TAX FREE 


U5 AUTOMOBOES 

EXTSAORDfNAIRB 

BCCAUMLctocr, siurz, 

1 MMBL J&eat TVR a othk 
FRB 1KBOU5 AUTOMOMES 
Monte Grfo p3) 25 74 79 
Tfct *9SSQ WTO MC 


HOW TO GET A CRMttNEW 
GBIMAM GAR W SHORTEST TIME. 
Contact aar office In Munch: 
Peter Uefaedtertax Free Care. 
Hx 5214751 Td 89-8576021 
We mD new MBKBXS. BMW, 
Porsche, Ferrari and after motas. 


MercedevBenc Porsche BMW Ferrari 

EPA/ DOT 

CONVERSIONS 

Feat furrMxound tens. AJ work done 
an pwnries. Sales & laaung. 

Airec exotic motor gar 

114 Anderson Street 
Hactareadt Nl 07601 USA 
Tbc 322234 201-4888667 


RG TEAM | 

Offori tax free cars , exotics and i 
daisies, all mdnrt New & used. 

PO Boo. 2050, 4800 CB. BRBJA / , 
HoBand. Tel Q 74651550 The 74282 , 


M t I I GM 


LEGAL SERVICES 

U5 IMMIGRATION wm, Atfys, SpArt 
& Rodney, 1925 Bridd Am, Mesmi R 
33129. Tm POS 6*39600. tx 441469. 


DO YOU WANT A 2ND PASSPORT? 
IMC BOri 6567 London WCIN 3XX 


LOW COST FUCHTS ^ 

TO IAX/SFO drtjy depjrture“Ew r 
Europa rafum 8489. Abo l w oy 6 wi 
othar US cMmikm. Paris 4225 V2W 

HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 

HB1AS YACHHNG. Yodrf OurMre 
Acadeneos 28. Athens 1 0671. Greece. 

CKKXMAN YACHTS. RteGnan-X 
Afters, 3230330. fc 216(04 Green. 

RESTAURANTS ■ 
NIGHTCLUBS - 
SWITZERLAND 
AU VlHDC CAVEAU - PUU.Y: Superb 


AUTOS TAX FREE 

TRASCO 

LONDON 

The Mercedes Specidist 


BMOPQRT TAX FRB CARS 
Q4 for free neta 
Bok 12011, Roitardan Aeport, HMand. 
Td. 010623077. Tbc 25071 EPGAR NL I 


MBtCHKS / PORSCHE 
New/wed. Imniactate delivery. Fb AVI. 
Tel: Germany ([q 6234-4092, tfau 464986 


mg, imye ona prwate po*n 
Summer terrace. Let the fondy Morel 
serve you at the beautiful Au *S»* 
Caveau, 11 rue de la Got, 1009 
Puffy /’Lausanne. 021 / 28 27 49 


EDUCATION 



Arokmijnc 
woridwide sh 


AU PAM SAN FRANCISCO area. 
Care of 2 chiton ages 4M & 2H. 
Housederaerg. no nemola nfc driven 
Bcwse, fiigSi spertana. Gd or 
write. Soodrt, 35 Wentworth La, N> 
wAy CA 94$6f. Tel 415J8M3S2. i 

USASmddne-2 Ao Pain needed, 2 



iwc* scud- rawnuH. rwffi vwry wnwree-.w™™*,. 

aggrarive salesmn now. P.G^3, PO riridren, 3 north 

Bax 1832, Evraux 27018, France old boy 6. 14 north old rtri, non- 

smotar, EngUi spedm Send re- 


Juan WuK, Aro- 
tadadlll, Caracas 1010, 

TeL 33 1454. Tbc: Ven- 
ezuela 24508 SSW VC 

MIDDLE EAST 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


UMTS) KINGDOM: &. OM, 
LKL.63 Long AeraLondon, 
VTCS9JK TeL 01 836 4801 
Tete* 262009. 


hone Rcnafo, Intentaiknal Her- 
ald Tribune, B50 Third Ave., 
New Yertt, N.Y. 10021 TeL 
212752 3890. Teh* 427 175. 


15)362^339. - Tbu 510 100 


L AfiNAMHBCA 

ARG84TMA: Iris Parad, Aw. At- 
year 1891, Dept 312. Buenos 
Axes 1129. TeL4l 4031 D«H. 
312. Telex: 21930 AffOri Afc 

BRAZIL Artanb Seavene, 5JX, 
Ccro Paid 3099. CB> 01442 
Sao Paulo. TeL 852 1891 Tbu 
1124491 SOS BR. 

CAMBBEAN: Jam Pursy, 210 
Bad 47ft Street, 5ute 1 IF New 
York N.Y. 10017 USA Tab 
(21^355 70 34. 

CHILE: Be e rdo Fuertes Stone, 
CasBkt 13678, Correa 21, Sante 
OOP. TeL 6961 555. Tl*: 440001 
ItTPBCZ. 

ECUADOR! Luigi Lantermo, P.O. 
flat 300 PoVoentro, Guawqud. 
TeL 525461, 514505. Ife 43361 
PGCGYt 




smoker, English speddig, Send re- , 
sume, ptaure & tefc Mrs. Gertmoi, 

. 8341 NW52 St. LouderM R 33321 | 

DOMESTIC I 

POSITIONS WANTED 

ENGU9I NANNB I maOten' helps 
Nash Agency, S3 Church (td. Have, | 
Stssax, DC. Tek Brighton (27% 29044 




AUTO CONVERSION 



TAIWANi Ye Chang, EPOCH 
Pubfirity Agency. P.O. Box 
1642, Taipei, Taiwan. Tala 
7514425. Telex: 25626. . 


International Business Message Center 



ATIBmON OffiCUTTVES 


€M *-■ TJ 

pw dwrimtoiw nvTm irr- 


FAR EAST 

HONGKONOtCOmySAi- 
sabotes Ltd. 17 th Root DAgw- 
lar Place 1-13 D’Agufar Sbert 
Cenhd, Horej Kang . TeL 5- 
713fi71.Tdm,63079CCALHX. 
Cafala REPCHEhEY HONG- 

JAKAgth: Honk T? tajab/Enga- 
Ene Tan, P.T. Supra, Roam 
1006, Frtra BWa, J L Gam 
Subroto, Kqv. £34, Jakarta 
Final, Indonesia TeL 510092. 
TbL.- 46218 PAJASIA. 

JAPAN: lUtcM Mori, Meda 
Sdes Japai Inc. T an u radho 
BdkSng, 3-3-14. SKmbashi, 
Mmal^j, Tokyo IBS. Tdj 
504 1925L Telex: 25666. 


AUSTRALIA 

MEUOURNE: IW. Robert Gaff, 
Held Faroe Arietta R q xesenta- 
Ply. LteL 349 Ariorm SUL 
ArielbaurmVic 3205, Td.i 00- 
8233, Tbu 39182. 

SYDNEY: J. McGowan. J. 
McGowan Media Fly, lid, 
P.O. Box 884, North Sydney, 
KS.W. 2060, Australia. T*L 
929S639or95743 20L 

QUEENSLAND: Edward N. Vln- 

a Tndvin Promodans Pty„ 
Side 17, 1st Root, Pact 
dngton Mcrtat, 26! Given Ter- 
race, Pedcfington 4064. TeL 


l Mo, nod a f wftent one ft 
bwuMKs and industry. wSI 
mod 9. JM Adte as (Ptrk 
6135951 baton 10 am, an 
taring no# ww an riefoir van 
bodt Md four mang a wM 
appear wmdn * 9 boon. Tha 
13a k US. 99S0 at food 
aq uirid m d fiar Jha, Yam matt , 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


AMCHAEL SHONE 
SEQMI1G5 UD 
NoMnd Astodatan of Seccrity 
Deafen red bwestreed MdWflen 
wftel la hear from bored investors 
orar OnJlmcs period 
Tefc tendon (01} 377 19W 8. 262 7681 

US GOVBMNBNT UOMSED IdL 
Foreign freghi f erwardere ft US U- 
ceraedTrenspoitenvAteB oontp 
partner. Owner m buonei* 30 yeas, 
Semi- retires Feb. 86. Efflployws to 
retnein vrift company. General tew- 


WESTON AUSTRAUAi BA. AJ- 
len, Aha ft Assodates, 7 Fere 
Street, Perth 6000, Tel.i 
328 98 !& Tbu 94382 AK 

SOUTH AHUCA 

1303S1, Bryamiton 2mL TeL 
706.140)8. Tde* 4 21599. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 

U. S. A, 

UNIQUE OPPORTUNmr 


retngte van company. ( 
icon SKppm, hte. 450 
NY.NYTOia. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 

wn 

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imumited Inc 

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pywdfo g Q uniy e cpfocticw ol 
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21 2-745-7794 
330 W. 56lh St, MYC. 10019 
Service Represontativs 


Stretched Limoueina 
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Woridwide Defrvery. 

6567 Farit tone, tendon W.l. 

Tefc (M 1 . 6297779 
Telex. [51) 8956022 Trw G 

Gennany - London - Switeericnd 


TRANSCO 

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AM) STOCK IN EUROPE 
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Send Isr imMcdwIrae esddsgse. 
frames SA, 9s Hoorri ek s my 

Tel 323/5«6SSS^x MS^Trem 


PROM STOCK 
Menxdns 500 5L, new, whte 
Porsche 928 S Automatic, 85 new 
Ateroedes 300 5D. 1983, 3200 KM, red 
Toyota Supra, 1904, ZfflOO km, white 
>m<m- and models upon request. 
Sane day reysti jiun paasUe. 

KZKOVfTS 

Ctaritfemtnse 36. OL8027 Zurich . 
Tefc 01/202 76 10. Tetec 815915. 


DAWAJI TRADE 

WTT DELIVERY 

We keep a fora* stock of 
mast oar brands 
Tefc 02/648 55 13 
Telex 65668 
42 rue Las, 

109) Brussels. 


OCEAJNWm 
MOTORS GmbH 




ROUS ROTCT OORNICHE CABHO, 
i 6/85 QMZXUnO. MUC, Tefc Germqh 
ny (0) 431-19)50? Tbc ^2606. 




FLORENCE, ttafian 
weda, 4 weata w, 

Wood of BtaTz wneb hoUay fo jv 
gnoge ernnes. toddng hrtd or - 
cparlnMrrt, private Sport aentw. Aik 
for ttaaiobrochure frexn CENTRO 
RORB^ZA. Vffl S. Sprfr o 14. 5W25 - ! 

Brerae, Tefc 055/296274. 

I BRITISH DEOBES ONXUOBIG 
er Doctorate io mast subjects. F« a ' 
praspnaia send |8 ta Samarssf (fo- 


LEGAL SERVICES 



PAGE 5 
FOR MORE 
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luts 


in the Trib. 




Severth Ave, 




DIAMONDS 

DIAMONDS 

Y our best buy, 

fine damonds m any pnae nxtge 
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For free, price fat write 


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dealer. Oaeanw 
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Gonrexty(D1 21 


for touritf end 
ters^ G^H,^ 


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