Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1985, France, English"

See other formats


£■? 


-'-e 


Gt 

■jcrr, . 

tfls '' 


■ s*=- 



o 





The Global News 1 
Edited in Pahs 
Printed Simultaneously 
in Paris, London, Zurich, 
Hong Kong, Singapore. 
Tbe Hogue and Marseille 


Heralb 


INTERNATIONAL 


vtcatwr mta appear on page id 


Published With Hie New York 


-"A-. ■ 


oil'll 

, , - 

\:LSt 

«» 

~.U~ u ^u r 


S? No- 31,710 


** 


Leading U.S. Index Declines, 

conomy May Slow 





. 'i. 

- . a. 

■ v* v5>; 


r * 

. 6 >. 

=»cir.'in S -^t 
-If! 


; .'iUi 


■o. -i 

- . .V' Jte :' 


ane Seaberry 

Washington Port Service 

WASHINGTON — The U.S. 
government's main index of future 
economic activity declined Q2 per- 
cent in December, the Department 
of Commerce reported Thursday, 
• and its earlier figures for the 
k *■ months of October and November 
& were revised downward. 

However, other economic si gnals 
released Thursday woe mixed: 
Factory orders declined, while sales 
of new homes ended 1984 at the 

. - highest level in five years. 

The decline in the Index of Lead- 
1 ing Economic Indicators suggested 

‘ ‘-’4 (hat the economic rebound may not 
be as strong as bad been expected, 
economists said. Hie index esti- 
mates economic activity six to nine 
months in the future. 

The new Figures indicated to 
some economists that the hoped- 
for pickup in economic activity 
that began in the fourth quarter 
would be moderate during the first 
half of this year. 

Hie leading indicators increased 
0.6 percent in November following 
a 0.6-percent decline in October, 
the Commerce Department said, it 
had originally estimated a 13-per- 
cem increase in November and a 
05-percent decline in October. 

The repeal Thursday contrasted 
sharply with a recent report of 
fourth-quarter gross national prod- 
uct, which measures the output of 
goods and services. The GNP 
port showed the economy 
at a 3.9-percent pace in the f< 
quarter following a f.6-percen( 
growth rate daring the third quar- 
ter. 

Economists interpreted this leap 


1986 Budget 
ByReaganto 
S Hold Outlays 
To 15% Rise 


in activity as a sign that growth 
would pick up sharply during the 
first half of this year. 

However, after Thursday's re- 
port of the indicators, some econo- 
mists said growth would not be so 
robust ana that much of the im- 
provement in GNP had been in 
foreign trade, which is not expected 
to reoccur this quarter. 

In other reports Thursday, the 
Commerce Department said new 
orders for manufactured goods in 
December dropped 0.7 percent. A 

2.9- perceni decline in durable- 
goods orders more than offset a 

1. 9- percent increase in nondurable 
goods, the department said. 

However, it also said that sales of 
new single-family homes lose 3.1 
percent m December, following a 
9.8-percem decline in November. 
During 1984, new home sales in- 
creased 2.6 percent over 1983. 

The average price of a new house 
slipped back by S800 to $99,000 in 
December and was 597,600 for all 
of last year, 8.7 percent above 1983. 

Meanwhile, most of the nation’s 


major retailers Thursday reported 
good sales gains for January over a 
year earlier. (Story, Page 13.) 

The White House Thursday dis- 
missed the December drop in the 
index of leading indicators. 

“This does not cause us any con- 
cern at all,” said the White noose 
spokesman, Larry Speakes, “be- 
cause we know the economy re- 
mains exceptionally strong. The 
growth is there and will continue." 

A Commerce Department un- 
dersecretary, Sidney L. Jones, said 
that although the index had been 
erratic in the past few months, “the 
year ended with renewed upward 
momentum in economic activity." 

Several key economic indicators 
rose in December, he said, “thus, 
the economy entered (be new year 
already above the fourth quarter 
average leveL" 

One of the If indicators avail- 
able for December which rose was 
manufacturers' new orders for con- 
sumer goods and materials, which 
has shown upward momentum in 
the last few months. 




PAKIS, FRIDAY, 


©! Washington Post 




Mom bin Dm brwi IS 340 Nw**— .7110 NJti 

Audna SOS. My ISO Lai a** aTO)B«* 

Bohan OifiODm uwf HIR frr i MgB — • <0&c - 

*»*■ Konya Shi USD 

Canada Cl 1.20 

ST—UM ST.— 1 Sf—rX 

Dmrafc— BSODJCi- “TLvn-B ***" 1,0 ?“■ 

Emu I00P. ***-. — ^ir 5 Sw*»i_7mS* 

M M 0 fM J-*"' S^M.220 Sfi 

Fraw 600 F. ,0SE * T«« 0*00" 

CtmtHiy 2J0DM '**’ 15 C “* Twtay— ' TX.AXUQ 

Great P. *kwwo — SSOH l UaL. ASOCWh 

C>wr BO Df. N**«rtw*_J75 R U5.ML (&ri-SO» 

Ion. 115 Iki h*a«ria__17DC Tm«bwci__lX)a 


ESTABLISHED 1887 





'-‘ i *> % 

I ^*\ 


Russia Downed 
Its Own Missile 
Over Laplau 
Weinberger Says 


*9 


A Famish official with part of the Soviet target nrissQe on Hie frozen surface of Lake loan. 


Europeans Accept U.S. Offer to Participate in Spare Station 


re- 


y-t 




. . 

f-.tre. • <m ■ 


■ • 

>*• 1 
■ - 

-I* • ~ 


. : : !*■ 


i 




:g. 










»it>: 



f 

' . c:- 


By Robert Pear 

New York Times Service 

Washington—^ fteadem 
Ronald Reagan MU send Congress 
a stringent 1986 budget that calls 
for $974 bfllkw in rpending in the 
next fiscal year, or 1 5 percent more 
than the government expects to 
spend this year, according to ad- 
' ministration officials and budget 
documents. 

If Congress were to accept lie 
president’s 1986 budget in every 
. respect, which is uohkdy, it would 
hold growth in the federal budget 
' to its lowest rate in two decades. 

In the budget to be submitted to 
Congress an Monday for the fiscal 
year that starts OcL 1, President 
Reagan proposes outright reduc- 
tions in spending — not just a slow- 
er rate of increase — in 8 off the 13 
cabinet departments, most notably 
.Agriculture, Education, Energy 
and Housing and Urban Develop- 
■menL 

Military oatJays would rise from 
$2463 button this year to $2775 
trillion in the fiscal year 1986. This 
Ggure is projected by the president 
torcachMJ&3MboDin 1990, rep- 
resenting 35 percent of total out- 
lays for that year, as against 26 
percent this year. 

. The deficit for the fiscal year 
1986, as previously reported, is- ex- 
pected to be $178 bilboo. 

The 1986 budget would not keep 
pace with inflation, as reflected in 
the official economic assumptions. 
This implies that the government 
would be smaller, as Mr. Reagan 
has often urged. 

The stringency of the proposed 
budget is indicated by the fan that 
Mr. Reagan proposes a slight re- 
duction in total outlays from Medi- 
care’s hospital insurance trust 
fund, which finances hospital care 
for the elderly. Administration of- 
ficials have expressed concern 
about this category of spending, 
which, until recmtly, had been 
growing at annual rales of 13 to 15 
percent. 

The budget protects that under 
current law. Medicare's hospital 
outlays woaid rise from $48.7 bil- 
lion this year to $49.1 billion next 
year. Bnt Mr. Reagan's budget 
seeks S48 billion for 1986, with leg- 
islative changes designed to save 
$1.1 button. The changes would re- 
duce the adjustment for inflation 
that has historically been made in 
Medicare payments to hospitals. 

Under 'Medicaid, a separate 
health program /or poor people, 
federal grants to the states would 
rise 3 percent, from $23 billion in 
die current fiscal year to $23.7 bil- 
lion next year. This increase is less 
dun the overall 4.3 percent rate of 
inflation that the budget assumes 
for 1986. 

Under President Reagan's bud- 
get, outlays t<x the Department of 
Housing and Urban Development 
would drop 47 percent, from $28.9 
billion (hu year to $15-4 bTlfion 
next year. Subsidized housing pro- 
grams and community develop- 
ment grants would be reduced; ur- 
ban development action grants 
would be eliminated over several 
years. 


The Associated Pros 

ROME — The European Space 
Agency approved Thursday its par- 
ticipation in a U.S. permanent 
space station and the construction 
of a more powerful launcher, an 
agency official said 

Delegates to the agency’s meet- 
ing also agreed to increase their 
budget 70 percent by 1989, to $15 
bQlion, according to Gijs Van Aar- 
denne, the Netherlands’ economics 
minister and deputy pr ime minis- 
ter. 

Mr. Van Aardeone said that del- 
egates postponed a decision rat two 
other projects: the Hermes space 
shuttle proposed by France, and a 
British plan for a rocket launcher 
that resembles an airplane, called 
HotoL 

Last year. President Ronald 
Reagan invited Europe to lake part 
in the space station. 

“We welcome and accept the of- 
fer by.ihe president of the United 
States srdijeci to reaching an agree- 
ment,” said .Me. Vac Aardenn^the 
president of the conference of gov- 
ernment ministers who oversee the 
agency. 


Delegates 
launcher, the 
Ariane 


the Ariane5 
base of the 
France in 


An ane project begun by France u 
1973. That project, which is expect 
ed to cost about $2. 1 billion, would 
increase Europe's payload capacity 
and could be used for launching 
maimed flights and the Hermes 
mini-shuttle. 

The European Space Agency is 
expected to build a separate section 
of the SI 0-bill ion U.S. space sta- 
tion, winch is scheduled to be 


launched in the early 1990s. The 
cost of the European section, 
named Columbus, was not given 
but it also is expected to be about 
$2. 1 billion. 

Plans call for the Columbus to be 
detachable from the U.S. space sta- 
tion. and able to form the basis of a 
separate European space station. 

The meeting was the second of 
government ministers from agency 
members since the agency was 


founded in 1975. The last meeting 
was in 1977. 

The member nations are Bel- 
gium, Denmark, France, Ireland. 
Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Swe- 
den, Switzerland, Britain and West 
Germany. Norway and Austria are 
associate members, while Canada 
has a limited cooperation agree- 
ment. 

The space agency has launched a 
number erf communications and 
weather satellites. It also sponsored 


a $1 billion reusable manned lab- 
oratory launched aboard the U.S. 
space shuttle Columbia in 1983. 

Eurospace, a group of about 40 
aeronautical companies and banks, 
estimates that by expanding its 
program, the European Space 
Agency could capture 20 percent of 
the world market for satellite and 
launching services by 1993. 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — A Soviet 
missil e that crashed in Finland af- 
ter flying over northern Norway in 
December was shot down by the 
Russians, Defense Secretary Ca- 
spar W. Weinberger said Thursday. 

Mr. Weinberger, testifying be- 
fore the Senate Foreign Relations 
Committee, made the disclosure 
while telling senators that- there 
were means of making a strategic 
defense system secure against the 
slow, low-flying cruise weapons. 

“They shot down one of their 
own cruise missiles that got away 
from them and was starting to work 
its way across Norway and Fin- 
land.” Mr. Weinberger said. “So 
there are defensive systems.” 

Mr. Weinberger gave no details 
of bow the tnis^le was downed or 
what weapon was used to destroy 
it. A Pentagon spokesman also de- 
clined to provide details. 

Furnish authorities said Wednes- 
day in Helsinki that they had found 
the nose of the drone target missile 
on frozen Lake Inari in Lapland. 
The unarmed missil e crashed in 
northern Finland after crossing 
Norwegian and Finnish territory 
on Dec. 28. It was believed to have 
strayed from Soviet naval exercises 
in the Barents Sea. 


■ Ariane to Launch 2 Satellites The missile's flight, over a 
Europe's Ariane rocket will place sparsely populated area of north- 
two satellites in orbit Feb. 8, one em Norway and then over Finland, 


Test on U.S. Shuttle Will Be Child’s Play 


Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON - The crew of the next space 
shuttle mission wifi lake into orbit a grab bag of 
mechanical toys to see if they behave differently in 
weightlessness than they do on Earth. 

Among the toys to be flown aboard the Chal- 
lenger on Feb. 20 will be a paddle and ball, a 
windup car, a set of magnetic mar Dies, a set of 
jacks, a heHxrriin?ed spring, a gyroscope a yo-yo 
and a mechanical mouse. 

“We’re serious about this experiment, and we 


plan to film these toys to see bow they act in zero 
g." or zero gravity, Jeffrey A Hoffman, an astro- 
naut said Wednesday at Johnson Space Center in 
Houston. 

Besides Mr. Hoffman and Senator Jake Gam, a 
Republican of Utah, the crew will include Karol 
Bobko, Donald E Williams. Dr. Margaret Rhea 
Seddon. David Griggs and Dr. Patrick Baudiy, a 
French scientist wbo.is ihejirst person to train as 
boih w ;uamnaut and a u >, smonauL H u spsnt mo 
years in the Soviet Union saining for a flight he 
never took. 


for the Arab League countries and 
one for BrazO, the Arianespace 
company announced Thursday, 
Reuters reported. 

The Arabsat 1-A, a communica- 
tions orbiter built by the French 
company Aerospatiale in Toulouse, 
will provide telephone; telex, televi- 
sion and radio transmissions for 22 
countries in the Arab League. 

The satellite is the first of three 
being built by Aerospatiale at a 
cost of $135 million. The second 


caused a sensation after Norwegian 
officials described it as a stray 
cruise missile, which is designed to 
carry midear warheads. 

The Soviet Union apologized to 
Finland and Norway for the inci- 
dent, offering the explanation that 
a target missile had gone off course 
during a firing exercise. 

Earlier Thursday, officials in 
several countries denied a British 
newspaper report that the missile 
had been aimed at West Germany 


will be launched later this year. • - "and fca<ib*.:s-shoi dcr.-n by Soviet 
Brasiisai-1, built by Star Aero- forces - 
space Ltd., of Canada, will provide The pafly Express reported that 
similar services for BraziL the missile was heading for either 


Iraq Launches 2d Offensive in 4 Days, 
Says Many Iranian Soldiers Are Killed 


United Press International 

BEIRUT — - Iraqi troops Thurs- 
day launched their second offen- 
sive of the Golf War in four days, 
kittin g “large numbers" of Iranian 
soldiers and taking new positions 
in the central sector of the battle- 
ground, Iraqi officials said. 

But Iran said the “limited and 
futile offensive'' fatted and the 
Iraqi Army “suffered heavy casual- 
ties” in the Chagha Hamman re- 


gion, near the Iranian border town 
of Qasr-e-Shirin, 100 miles (160 ki- 
lometers) northeast of Baghdad. 

An Iraqi mili tary spokesman in 
Baghdad said tire Iraqis launched 
tbar surprise attack at dawn in ibe 
central part of the 733-mfle front 
with Iran, taking “large numbers" 
of prisoners. 

“Troops of the 16th Division 
completed their mission and se- 
cured new positions at dawn after 


Sudanese Express Disgust 
Over Public Humiliations 

By Judith 

New York Tim 


Miller 

Times Service 

KHARTOUM, Sudan — 
One by one the four men could 
be seen being led into the 
strobe-lighted room, earning 
the chains that bound their feet. 

The small room in the prison 
resembled a cheap cafe. Half- 
empty tea glasses were strewn 
across the table, which was cov- 
ered by a plastic tablecloth. 
Flies buz2fid overhead. 

Around the table sat six mul- 
lahs, or Moslem sheikhs. They 
.had beat salt to encourage the 
four convicted heretics to re- 
pent. The men had chosen re- 
pentance rather than death, a 
day before their scheduled exe- 
cution and two days after they 
had been forced to witness the 
execution of their leader, Mah- 
moud Mohammed Taha. 

Mr. Taha, 76, the founder 
and head of the opposition — 
but moderate — Republican 
Brothers, was publicly hanged 
here Jan. 18. The other four 
were sentenced to death for 
handing out a leaflet opposing 
President Gaafar Nimrin’s im- 
ation of a harsh version of 
tic law. 

Farh was asked to sign a con- 
fession that he had deviated 
from the true path of Islam. 
Then the four were bullied into 
denouncing Mr. Taha as a here- 
tic. 

One hesitated. He had 
worked with Mr. Taha for 30 
years, he said. He would admit 
the error of his ways and vow to 

re main a good Moslem, but he 

could not denounce his friend. 

A mullah sporting a bright 
white turban and mirrored sun- 
glasses warned him that unless 


Mr. Taha was unequivocally 
denounced, the convict’s recan- 
tation would not save him from 
the gallows. After some hesita- 
tion and more threats, the con- 
vict succumbed. 

Mr. Taha’s execution was 
open to the public, but no pic- 
tures were permitted. The re- 
cantations, by contrast, were 
crudely videotaped and broad- 
cast on national television 
hours after they took place. 

Sudanese have talked of little 
else since the broadcast Many 
have privately expressed shock 
and disgust at the display. 

“If Fellini bad wanted 20 film 
a modern Spanish Inquisition, 
he could hardly have found a 
more suitable evem,” said a 
professor at Khartoum Univer- 
sity. 

Not only intellectuals were 
appalled by tbe video, which 
was broadcast during prime 
time. 

“My children were so upset 
they could not eat their dinner,” 
a young servant said. 

The event alarmed the Suda- 
nese precisely because it was 
out of character. A proud, gen- 
erally tolerant people, Sudanese 
abhor public displays of vio- 
lence or humiliation. 

“President Nimeiri may have 
intended this as a warning to 
opponents,” said a European 
diplomat and longtime resi- 
dent. “He may have wished to 
show that he is still in charge, 
still to be feared and obeyed. 

“But tbe hanging and recan- 
tations were morally repugnant 
to his people, even to his dwin- 
dling supporters," the diplomat 
said. “We may look back and 
say that it signaled the begin- 
ning of the end for him." 


killin g large numbers of I ranians 
and destroying their positions, ar- 
tillery and ammunition,” the Iraqi 
News Agency said. 

Bul Iran's Islamic Republic 
News Agency denied the Iraqi re- 
ports. saying “the Iraqi forces 
failed to capture Iranian positions 
and suffered heavy casualties in 
their attack.” 

“The Iraqi regime, in a bid 10 
attract media coverage and to 
boost the shattered morale of its 
troops, launched a limited and fu- 
tile mfliiaiy offensive,” IRNA said. 

Iran has said its army “crushed" 
the first Iraqi -offensive in three 
years of their four-year conflict 
Monday, killing more than 200 
Iraqi soldiers. 

Iraq said its men overran three 
posts near the disputed Majuoon 
Islands in the southern battle zone. 
The islands were captured in an 
Iranian offensive last February. 

The Iraqi spokesman said the 
objects of die second push were to 
“reaffirm Iraq’s right 10 p unish the 
aggressor, extend its sovereignty, 
reaffirm Iraq's troop superiority 
and teach Iranian forces a fresh 
lesson in good behavior.” 

Egypt’s A1 Abram newspaper 
said Wednesday there were indica- 
tions Iraq had received satellite in- 
formation from either the Soviet 
Union or United States before 
mounting Monday's three-pronged 
attack. 

Iraq, which has a friendship and 
cooperation treaty with Moscow, 
resumed diplomatic relations with 
Washington in November. 

The London-based International 
Institute for Strategic Studies has 
estimated the strength of the Iraqi 
armed forces at 642^00, while Iran 
has about 555,000 and another 
200,000 paramilitary troops re- 
cruited for specific offensives. 

The iran-lraq war broke out in 
September 1980. 



A CALL TO DISARM — Prime Minister (Hof Palme of Sweden, left, President Radi 
Aifonsin of Argentina, and Prime Minister Andreas Papandreou of Greece, right, at an 
Athens conference aimed at pressing the nuclear powers to stop tbe arms race. Page 2. 


Apportioning the Blame for Bhopal 

Disaster Bares Flaws in Regulation of Industry in India 


Iran has indicated that it is pre- 
pared to resume cooperation with 
the International Committee of the 
Red Cross, which it ended after 
being accused, of grave violations of 
(he Geneva conventions on hu- 
manitarian law. The Associated 
Press reported from Geneva. 

A Red Cross spokesman said 
Thursday the organization had no 
confirmation yet from its delegates 
in Tehran. But be said a dispatch 
by tbe Iranian news agency dial 30 
disabled Iraqi prisoners would 
soon be repatriated “was the first 
concrete sign" tiiat cooperation 
would be resumed. 


By Robert Reinhold 

New York Times Service 

BHOPAL, India — A few weeks 
before the gas leak at the Union 
Carbide factory hoe, the state pol- 
lution control board had named 
the plant mi “environmental clear- 
ance certificate." 

It was a routine clearance re- 
quired by the central government 
of India, and il was readily granted 
since, in the words of a board offi- 
cial, “only slight modifications 
were needed" in the plant's emis- 
sion controls. 

In fact, the plant was soon to 
suffer a chemical reaction that 
spewed lethal methyl isixyanate 
gas across this city in central India 
on Dec. 3, leaving more than 2,000 
dead and 200.000 injured. 

The aftermath has brought much 
soul-searching and finger-pointing 
over who was ultimately responsi- 
ble for the tragedy. Plant workers, 
technical experts and former 
Union Carbide officials have de- 
scribed a deterioration of safety 


standards at the plant that, they 
say, helped provoke a disaster. 

The tragedy has also led many to 
accuse tbe state pollution board, as 
well as many other agencies of the 
stale and central government re- 
sponsible for overseeing industry, 
for not having adequately moni- 
tored the plant. 

Their failure has raised questions 
about the ability of India and its 
fast-developing states to regulate 
the new industry they seek. And it 
has led many to say that the re- 
sponsibility for the deaths must be 
shared by the government 

Under Indian law, industrial li- 
censes are issued by the Ministry of 
Industry in New Delhi. But en- 
forcement of worker safety, envi- 
ronmental and other rules is left 
largely to the state governments. 

Bhopal is the capital of Madhya 
Pradesh, the largest state in India. 
The state's Department of Labor 
employs 15 Factory inspectors to 
moniior more than 8,000 plants 
statewide, and Lbe Bhopal office 
responsible for monitoring the 


Union Carbide plant has only two 
inspectors, both mechanical engi- 
neers with tittle knowledge of 
chemical hazards. 

Inspection records show that 
they made many visits to the plant 
after internal leaks and other mis- 
haps, but offered only minor reme- 
dial recommendations, generally 
urging tbe company to Mow its 
own operating procedures more 
closely. 

Similarly, the Madhya Pradesh 
air and water pollution control 
bovd has acquired not a single 
instrument to measure air pollu- 
tion, nor has it hired any new staff 
-since the central government 
passed its first air-pollution law 
more than two years ago. 

Almost all government officials 
interviewed maintained that they 
were not responsible tor ' 
after the methyl isocyanate 
that leaked. 

An official of the state labor de- 
partment's division of industrial 

(Continued on Page 5, CoL 1) 


Hamburg or Bremen, West Germa- 
ny’s two biggest ports, because of 
an erroneous flight path program, 
and had to be snot down by Soviet 
jet fighters. 

Lieutenant Colonel Antti Mus- 
tonen at the Finnish Army head- 
quarters said the report had “no 
basis whatsoever.” In Bonn, Lieu- 
tenant Colonel Norbert Huebner 
of the West German Defense Min- 
istry said tbe missile “was not capa- 
ble of covering such a distance.” 

Britain's Defense Minis try said 
tbe Datty Express report was incor- 
rect. “That version isn’t borne out 
by any assessment that anyone else 
has, " a ministry spokesman said. 

Tbe article also said the United 
States had arranged unofficially 
with the Soviet Union to conceal 
the details of the accident to avoid 
any harm to planned arms talks 
between the superpowers. 

In Washington, the White House 
spokesman, Larry Speakes, denial 
there had been any such communi- 
cation between the Soviet Union 
and United States. 

A Pentagon spokesman. Major 
Pete Wyro, said earlier: “We fmd 
absolutely nothing to indicate there 
is any truth to thM article." 

The account written by the Daily 
Express's defense correspondent, 
Michael Evans, citing authoritative 
sources, said that ana* the missile 
was fired, the Russians suddenly 
realized that a war code plan in- 
stead of a target flight plan had 
been fed into the computer. 

He wrote that the Russians 
warned the Americans of the mis- 
take over a military hotline and 
that specially trained pilots in two 
jets were sent to shoot the missile 
down, and that one “did shoot it 
down.” 

Tbe story said experts worked 
out from the missile’s soeed and 
K^ctory that it wasbeading-fifr 
Bremen or Hamburg, which are 
about 50 miles (80 kilometers) 
apart. 


U.S. Will Halt 
Arms Sales 
In Mideast 


By Bernard Gwertzman 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The Reagan 
administration had Hnnrmmyfl rhai 
it is halting new arms sales to the 
Middle East for at least several 
months while it prepares a “com- 
prehensive review” of the connec- 
tion between U.S. security assis- 
tance and peace and stability in the 
region. 

It was the first time in the memo- 
ry of senior State Department offi- 
cials that there bad been a deliber- 
ate derision to suspend new arms 
sales to all Middle East nations 
since the United States became a 
major supplier in the 1960s. 

The officials said that the deri- 
sion announced Wednesday 16-de- 
lay new arms sales was taken pri- 
marily to avoid an early clash with 
some members of Congress over a 
contemplated large-scale sale of F- 
15 fighter planes and other equip- 
ment to Saudi Arabia. 

It was also taken to allow time to 
resolve sharp disagreements within 
the administration over arms sales 
policy to various Arab states such 
as Jordan, Oman and Kuwait, the 
officials said. 

A third consideration, some offi- 
cials said, was to reduce pressures 
on Israel, now faring an economic 
crisis, to match expensive arms 
purchases by Arab countries. 

Richard W. Murphy, an assis- 
tant secretary of state, divulged the 
move Wednesday 10 a House For- 
eign Affairs subcommittee. 


INSIDE 

■ Tbe farm-debt crisis is threat- 

ening to cause chaos for U.S. 
agriculture. Page 3. 

■ Egypt’s village life is being 

transformed by the money that 
continues to flow from foreign 
jobs. Page 5. 

WEEKEND 

■ Gustav Mahler’s life and ep- 
och are the subject trf a minor 
exhibition in Paris. Page 7 . 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ West Germany's central bank 
decided to raise its key Lom- 
bard interest rate Vi point to 6 
percent, as of Friday. Page 11 . 


1 






* 


Chess Marathon Has Become as Much a Test of Will as Wits 



By Serh Mydans 

New York Times Service 

MOSCOW — In the most grueling world 
championship in modem chess history, two 


There have been 40 draws of which a 
record 17 came consecutively. The longest 
previous match was the 34-game series be- 
tween Alexander Alekhine of France and 


young players from the Soviet Union remain Jose Raul Gipablanca of Cuba in Buenos 
locked in a battle that has become as much a Aires in 1927. 


test of endurance as of skill. 


Tor me, the match is already less imerest- 


Af ter 47 games and nearly five months, the mg than what will follow after the match." 


score stands at 5-1 with the defending cham- said another grandmaster. “Will their abQi- 


pion, Anatoli Karpov, 33, needing only one ties suffer lasting effects from the contest?" 


more victory to defeat his challenger, Gary 
Kasparov. 21. 


The games are played on Mondays, 
Wednesdays and Fridays, with adjourned 
games finished on die following days. A 
member of Mr. Kasparov’s delegation said 
the challenger sometimes spends much of the 
night after an adjourned game analyzing 
what happened. His doctor sometimes insists 
that he take time off to relax until midnight. 
“After midnight he is free to work as long as 
he wants," the delegation member said. 


Despite the players' unnerving self-control 
at the board, the tournament's official doc- 


But in a match that has set records for wr< py 0 {j> Nasimov, has detected signs of 
duration and for the number of its unscored When Mr. Kasparov is nervous, Mr. 


draws, that final victory has eluded Mr. Kar- N asim Av said, he rests his elbows on the 
pov. The challenger's backers point out that ^blc and places his hands at his temples, bis 

.k. 11 nnnac Ur VomRv’e fourth — . r .. „t 


AKawtob TKacoapob 


in the 37 games after Mr. Karpovs fourth finger* shading his eyes as he struggles to 
victory, the score had been even, at 1-1. Hmsdf under control. 

By now. gran dmas ters say, it is a struggle P ^ 5,15 W1 . t ^ 1 hardly 

: eJ. a muscle moving, swallowing occasionally as 


After ni ghts of analysis, both men return 
to face each other again in the ornate Hall of 
Columns in the House of Unions in central 
Moscow. “You come in each day and see the 
same man across the chessboard from you, 
and you get fed up with him," Mr. Smyslov 
said. “That alone contributes to the psycho- 
logical pressure.'’ 


.. 'Tssrc-siasT 


I 


M 

T.X7Z, ^ i 


in which the players, who for hours sit almost 
motionless at the chessboard, are fighting 


motionless at the chessboard, are fighting 
both each other and the ruinous errors that 
exhaustion can bring. 


“The score itself is no longer of interest to pounds. 


a muscle moving, swallowing occasionally as 
he thinks. Under pressure, his cheeks flush 
and his ear lobes turn white, the doctor said. 
He said both players have Lost several 


When the match opened in September. 
Mr. Karpov, who has been world chess 


champion since 1975, quickly won four 
games. Chess experts and members of Mr. 


anyone," said the Russian grandmaster. Va- “There is no break in the tension," a Soviet 


sili Smyslov, a former world champion. “The chess journalist said. “This is like taking 
extraordinary thing about this match is the examinations for four straight months. There 


Anatoli Karpov, left, studied move as the challenger, Gary Kasparov, watched in 41st game. 


way both men continue a battle that would 
already seem to have gone beyond the limits 
of endurance.” 


is no relaxation even between games because 
Lhe players must do analyses and plan their 
strategies” 


games. Chess experts and members of Mr. 
Kasparov's delegation now agree that the 
challenger, who is the youngest man ever to 
play in a championship final, was overconfi- 
dent. A brilliant player who had won bis 
previous games with style and daring, he had 
not often faced strong challenges, especially 
in the end game. 

The extraordinary aspect of the match, the 
experts say. is that’ Mr. Kasparov has man- 


aged since then to stave off a final defeat, 
and by playing strong chess. 

Had ‘Mr. Kasparov lost all six games 
quickly, they say, he would have been 
crushed And Mr. Karpov might have re- 
p>aim»H at the. summit of the chess world for 
years without a serious challenge. 

By han ging on, they say, Mr. Kasparov 
has displayed a striking strength of chanc* 
ter, re-establishing himself as a worthy oppo- 
nent no matter the outcome. 

Mr. Karpov, for his part has shown ex- 
traordinary control in conti n uing to play 
carefully and coolly although Ik has not been 
able to win again. Twenty games have passed 
since his last victory. 

“After his first four wins, he wanted to win 
the match, 6-0. to crush his opponent,” said a 
close associate of Mr. Karpov, Alexander 
Roshal, the Fust deputy editor of the chess 
journal called 64. 

"Then, when Kasparov won a game, you 
might think Karpov would feel he had noth- 
ing lg lose and would lash ouL He might 
drop a couple of games perhaps, and then 
win. But in chess there is never nothing to 
lose." 


Attacks on Israeli Troops Expected to Increase 


By John Kifner 

New York Times Service 

. BEIRUT — Israeli troops likely 
will be faced with more guerrilla 
'attacks, not fewer, after completing 
■ the first stage of their p lan Ti ed 
withdrawal from southern Leba- 
non, military officials and other 
authorities here believe. 

In the last few days there already 
has been a noticeable increase in 
attacks on the Israelis and the local 
militia forces they set up. Most of 
the attacks have occurred in the 
territory Israel win continue hold- 
ing after it pulls out of the area 
around the port city of Sidon. 

The Israeli government, tired of 
tile occupation because of the in- 
cessant ambushes made, largely, by 
militant Shiite Moslems, decided 
on the withdrawal plan over sharp 
internal objections. 

But if the major goal is to cut 
down the attacks and the casual- 
ties, the withdrawal from Sidon will 
present several new problems, ac- 
cording to diplomats in Beirut, 
Western military sources, leaders 
of Lebanese factions ami others fa- 
miliar with the area. 

The most important, and most 


obvious problem, they say, is that 
the area Israeli forces still will oc- 


tbe area Israeli forces still will oc- 
cupy is the heartland of Shiite resis- 
tance. They say the Israelis also 
face these dangers: 

• Israel's new lines, which cover 
ragged mountains and valleys be- 
tween tiny villages, will be much 


more difficult to control and pro- 
tect against infiltrators. 

• The vacated area around Tyre, 
even if the weak Lebanese Army is 
able to exert some control, is likely 
to turn into a staging area for new 
attacks. 

• The Lebanese guerrillas, 
sources familiar with their thinking 
say, will take the first-stage with- 
drawal as a rare victory and harry 
the Israelis all the more, rather than 
believing that the Israelis eventual- 
ly will leave the country on their 
own. 

There were a number of signs 
that the Israelis plan to pull out of 
the Sidon area well ahead of the 
Feb. 18 deadline they have set- The 
withdrawal possibly could be com- 
pleted in the next few days. 

Since Monday, Israeli soldiers 
and the Israeli-paid militia , the 
South Lebanese Army, have pre- 
vented foreign journalists based in 
Beirut from crossing into southern 
Lebanon. 

But journalists who were in the 
Sidon area last week saw convoys 
rolling in and oat of Sidon. They 
were taking away what could hie 
salvaged, from prefabricated sheds 
to concrete “dragon's teeth” road- 
blocks, from an installation report- 
ed to cost about $30 milli on. 

Wednesday morning, the Beirut 
daily newspaper An Nahar quoted 


umns of flatbed trucks carrying communications command post 


tanks were leaving Sidon. 

The Lebanese Army says it has a 


and a building said to have served 
as a radio station The demolition 


force of 3,000 men ready to enter squads operated Wednesday in the 


Sidon after the Israelis leave. 

However, there are a number of 
other possibilities. The Progressive 
Socialist Party of Walid Jumblat, 
the Draze leader and minister of 


vicinity of the Zaharani River and 
near Sarafand and Arab el Salim 


I Four Guerrillas Killed 

Four guerrillas were killed in a 


public works and tourism, has an- clash with the Israeli Army north- 
nounced that it is ready to go in east of Jezzine in southern Leba- 


with a Marouf Saad brigade, non, the army said Thursday. Unit- 
named after the father of a Sunni ed Press International, in a story 


leader severely wounded by a car from Jerusalem, said no Israeli ca- 




WORLD BRIEFS 


bomb last wedc. 

■ PLO Caves Destroyed 


suallies were reported. 

Details were scant. The army 


Israeli forces in southern Leba- of its detachments en- 

non blew up caves Wednesday that countow? a toronsi squad and 


had served as secret PLO arms de- 
pots before Israel's invasion in 


opened fire. In the ensuing search, 
the army said, the bodies of four 


pww uwvi v iomim J mveuivu ui -it e < ■ >.« 

June 1982, The New York Tunes fi"* 11 ? “ wei * found : wUh 


reported from Tel Aviv. 

Officers said they also began de- 
molishing Israeli installations 
Wednesday, having removed all the 


Kalashnikov rifles and rocket-pro- 
pelled grenades. 

In Beirut, seven persons, includ- 
ing a schoolboy and a Roman 


Valerian V. Mikhailov, left, leader of the Soviet delegation 
to the Mutual and Balanced Force Reduction talks In 
Vienna, spoke with the U.S. envoy, Maynard W. Gfitman, 
on Thursday as the 35th round of the negotiations began. 


Clemency Urged for Polish Ex- C a pt ain 

TORUN, Poland (AP) —The lawyer for a former captain in the secret 
police accused as the ringleader in the slaying of a pro- Solidarity priest 
said Thursday his client was not guilty of premeai dated murder and 
asked that his life be spared. 

Three of the lawyers of the four defendants made their final arguments 
to the court Thursday bat the judge ordered a four-day adjournment until 
Tuesday after Barbara Marczuk, the lawyer for the fourth, fainted in the 
courtroom. She is one of two lawyers representing former Colonel Adam 
Pietraszka, who is charged with instigating October’s abduction and 
slaying of Father Jerzy Popiduszko. ^ 

in lus closing arguments, Janusz Dasz, the attorney for former Captain 
Gizegorz Piotrowski, denied suggestions by Roman Catholic lawyen; in 
the trial that the officers were acting in the interest of a foreign power. 
“Some people shout that the CIA is responsible, others through Radio 
Free Europe that it was the KGB,” said Mr. Dasz. “The only ht^tor-np 
involved was Pietruszka. Only Pietraszka had an interest in this. 


Botha Sets Terms for Mandela Release 


heavy equipment it was feasible to Catholic priest, were wounded by a 
repatriate from the 200-square- mortar barrage in the Christian sec- 


mile (324-square-kDomeier) area to *° r - Schools m the area were shut 


be evacuated by Feb. 18. 

Among the Palestine Liberation 
Front installations demolished 


for fear of more attacks. 

Police sources said they had no 
explanation for the shelling. Chris- 


NATO’s Primary Benefit 
Is to Europe, Shultz Says 


Thr dsttuued Press 


were bunkers, artillery positions, a tian mflitaraen did not retaliate. WASHINGTON — Secretary of 


talks in Geneva on Jan. 7 and 8 for 
“serious and fruitful negotiations” 


CAPE TOWN (AP) — President P.W. Botha told Parliament Thurs- 
day that South Africa was prepared to consider the release of the black 
nationalist leader. Nelson Mandela, the South African Press .Association 
reported. 

The news agency said Mr. Botha's government would require only that 
Mr. Mandela, imprisoned for life for sabotage, divorce himself from the 
violence carried out by the African National Congress, which he heads. 

Mr. Botha's remarks appeared to be the farthest any government 
official has gone in suggesting that Mr. Mandela, 66, might be freed. He 
was sentenced in 1964. 


Lebanese military sources as saying 
the Israelis were preparing to pull 
out within 24 hours. That evening, 


20 Jailed Arabs Allege 
Israelis Tortured Them 


State George P. Shultz said Thurs- on nuclear and space-based weap- 
day that Western Europeans ons.] 


Shamir Confronts Israeli Settlers 


should regard North Atlantic Trea- In Vienna, a Warsaw Pact 


ty Organization defenses as bene- spokesman said Thursday that 


filing their own future, not that of 
the United States. 

He said that “brute Soviet pow 


East-West talks on reducing con- 
ventional forces in Central Europe 
could go into a third decade unless 

■ ■ 1 f 


the state radio reported that cd- 


Corryited by Our Staff From Dispatcher 

WASHINGTON —Twenty Pal- 


er” perpetuated the political divi- NATO countries changed their me- 
sion of Europe. go dating stand. 


sionof Europe. 

The report, prepared by a group In a review of U.S. foreign policy 
f West Bank Palestinian lawyers before the Senate Foreign Rela- 


® ; ': RcralbXSribttttcI|!| 


WASHINGTON — Twenty Pal- of West Bank Palestinian lawyers before the Senate Foreign Rela- 
estinian youths have signed affida- who have beettouispoken critics of lions Corhmiuee, Mr. Shultz made 
vits stating that they were tortured the Israeli government, was distrib- no direct reference to opposition in 
and humiliated by Israeli soldiers uled by the Washington represen- Western Europe to the deployment 
at the Fare prison near the city of tative of the jurists' commission, of U.S. missiles. 


Opening far Talk- 
h Seen hi Hn**w* - 


unit Leaders Vow to Pre*b 
an Economic Recover? 


Nablus on the Israeli -occupied The report was released on the last 
West Bank. day of an official visit to the United 


The report was released on the last “The peoples of Western Europe 
day of an official visit to the United should see defense as an endeavor 







The affidavits were made public States by Israel's defense minister, they undertake for their own fu- 


Wednesday by the International Yitzhak Rabin. 


Lure, not as a favor to the United 


Commission of Jurists, based in Mr. Rabin, whose mmistry is in Slates,” he said. 

Geneva. charge of the prison, described the But, be added, “the security and 

The Palestinians were “security report as “total nonsense." He said well-being of Western Europe con- 
prisoners” at the prison, which they he would allow impartial observers unue to be a vital interest of the 


ssKaa described as an interrogation and to visit the prison to observe condi- United States.” 


a vital interest of the 


MMe Em WofcroUwtewn..* —SsHiS 

tSS gE. C-S- Wm'i Pmt ~V~ Jv£r: 


torture center. They said they had lions. . . . . .. 

been beaten, forced to stand for Another statement, attributed to review or U.S. foreign policy by the msislence tial ** * dcs “ oul “ 

hours in cold showers, held in fetid military sources, was issued in Tel committee. Mr. Shultz repealed a agree dn P r wisely now many 

toilet stalls or forced to lie on floors Aviv. It said Israeli security forces theme of the Reagan administra- lroo P s , the y “ad Central Europe, 

awash in urine, subjected to sexual “have no intention of addressing Lion when he condemned the politi- P ro P os, “g instead that they should 


His statement began a six-week 


Mikhail Kakeyev of the Soviet 
Union said that without a change 
by the West, “the negotiations 
might go on for over 20 years and 
they would not yield a mutually 
acceptable result." 

He was speaking after the first 
session of Mutual and Balanced 
Force Reduction talks since Mr. 
Shultz and Foreign Minister An- 
drei A. Gromyko agreed in Geneva 
to resume talks on limiting nudear 
weapons. The Vienna talks began 
more than 1 1 years ago. 

Last ApriL NATO dropped its 


JERUSALEM (NYT) — Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir discussed a 
recent wave of attacks on Israeli vehicles in the occupied West Bank on 
Thursday with Jewish settlers who blamed the government for the 
situation and demanded the resignation of Defense Minister Yitzhak 
Rabin, the army radio reported. 

Mr. Shamir reportedly called the settlers’ accusations “hysteria" and 
“exaggerations." He told the settlers: “I love you with all my heart, and I 
have expressed it, but I also know your mistakes. The history of the 
people of Israel is full of such examples: The best people, with the best 
intentions, have sometimes harmed, out of miscalculation, their own 
ambitions.” 

The radio described the settlers as “surprised" with the thrust of Mr. 
Shamir’s remarks. During the previous 10 days there have been repeated 
attacks of gunfire, stones and firebombs on Israeli vehicles traveling in 
the West Bank. 


Kinnock Assails Thatcher on Pound 


safaS 


Mtmawsz* 




awash in unne, subjected to sexual have no intention of addressing lion when he condemned the politi- 
abuse and ordered to insult them- the web of false claims and baseless cal division of Europe, 
selves and their families. facts" pul out by “hostile organiza- “U exists only because it has 


I se l ves and their families. 


2FOR1 


WORLDWIDE 

ENTERTAINMENT 


tions who make cynical use of le- been imposed by brute Soviet pow- 
gal-juridical organizations to er," he said. “The United Slates has 


spread their base opinions." never recognized it as legitimate or 
In rejecting the charges, the permanent. Behind this cruel barri- 


commiltee. Mr. Shultz repealed a f^ ee ? n precisely how many 

theme of the Reagan adSnistra- lroo P s . lhe y“ d “ 

tion when he rondemned the politi- proposing mstrad that they should 

cal division of Europe. agree only on the approximate size 

“U exists only because it has ^ co f mbal and cora ^ 1 ^P- 
been imposed by brute Soviet pow- port forces iwhile not corn ring rear 

er," hesaid“Tlie United Stales has ^ca! ^ 

□ever recognized it as legitimate or SmM Um dismissed Lhe 


Subscribe to the IHT at special introductory 
rates for new subscribers and save almost 50% 
off the newsstand price in most European 
countries. 


roucfftsse 


statement said, “The Fara deten- er lie political repression and eco- 
tion facility is under the snpervi- nomic stagnation." 


sion and control of Israeli military “We hope to see the day when 


and civilian legal bodies and or the Soviet Union learns to think 
other public bodies as wefl. For- anew of its own security in terms 


CABARET 

* 


LOEWS MONTE-CARLO 

presents 


therm ore, the International Com- compatible with the freedom, secu- 
mittee of Lhe Red Cross has free rity and independence of ils neigh- 


access, just as it has to other deten- bors,” Mr. Shultz said, 
tion facilities in the area.” [President Konsianti 


plan at the time. 

■ Chernenko Interview 
Mr. Chernenko told Cable News 
Network that the goals set in Gene- 
va were "a correct scheme, in Tact 
the only possible scheme," Reuters 
said. 

The network's Moscow bureau 


LONDON (Reuters) — Neil Kinnock, leader of Britain's opposition 
Labor Party, accused Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher on Thursday of 
turning Britain into the “punchbag of international speculators.” 

Opening a six-hour censure debate in the House of Commons, Mr. 
Kinnock charged that Mrs. Thatcher wanted “a land fit for speculators.” 
The motion was prompted by falls in the value of the pound and the 
government’s move Monday to institute a 2-percent rise in interest rales. 
If Mrs. Thatcher lost the vote she would be obliged to resign, but the 
government was assured of an easy victory, given its 140-seat majority in 
She lower house. 

The debate coincided with a government announcement that unem- 
ployment had risen by 121 J50 in January to a record 3.340,958. Thomas 
King, the secretary of state for employment, laid pan of the blame on the 
10-monlh miners' strike, which he stud had damaged job prospects. 


French Seize 2 Top Basque Guerrillas 


BAYONNE, France (AP) — French police have arrested two top 
leaders of the Spanish Basque guerrilla movement, ETA. and a major 
stock or arms and explosives, they said Thursday. 

First arrested was Juan Lorenza Lasa Michelena. 29, as be left a villa in 


Twice as much news for your money. 

lb: Subscription Manager; International Herald 
■ Tribune, 181, avenue Charies-de-GauIle, 92521 Neuilly 
Cedex, Franca TfeL : 74Z0Z29. Tlx 612832. 

Yes, I would like to accept your bargain offer. 
Please send me the International Herald Tribune for 
tiie time period and at the reduced price circled on 

this COUpOn. r“ Please cncte beiow the reduced subscription 


A spokesman for the Geneva- nenko said in written replies to a 
based ICRC Jean-Jacques Kurz. U.S. television interviewer Thurs- 


□ My payment 
is enclosed 
(check or 
money ardor 
totbeBTT) 


Please cncte below the reduced subscription 
pneeseleaed For new subscribers only 
(Rales yahd through April 30. jjfl&j 


E3 IB 

UlB 


Please charge my: 

□ Access 

□ American 


Belgium 
Denmark 
Finland 
France 
Germany 
Great Britain 
Greece 
Ir aland 

Italy 

Luxembourg 
Netherlands 
Norway 
Rxrugal 


Currency 
A Seta. 
B. Ft 
P.Kr 
F.M. 
rr. 

DM 


Lire 216.000) 1C 


□ Diners Club 

□ Eurocard 

□ Mastercard 

□ Visa 


Luxembourg U Fl 7,300 3.6S0 

Netherlands FT -ISO 225 

Norway N.Fx _ 1.160 580 

Rjnuaal Esc 11.200 5,000 

Spam Ftaa 17,400 8 700 

Sweden S Kz 1.160 580 

Swicenand £ Ft. 372 166 

The rest of Europe. North Africa former French 
Africa. US. A. French Polynesia, Middle East 

I S i 384 1 1431. 

Rest cl Africa. Canada, l^na America. Gulf States 
Asia. I Si 339 1 ISfll 


Card exptrv date 


Signature 




[President Konstantin U. Cher- ch ief, Stuart Loory. said the Soviet 
nko said in written replies to a Foreign Ministry spokesman, Vla- 
,S. television interviewer Thurs- dimir B. Lomriko, told him that 
iv that the conditions were set for Mr- Chernenko would have liked to 


Anglet, near Bayonne. Wednesday. He was carrying a pistol. He is 
reputed to be the head of the so-called action commando of ETA. which 


confirmed that Red Cross visits at day that the conditions were set for Mr. Chernenko would have liked to 
Fara camp are continuing. Bui he fruitful arms i-tllr* Reuters report- received him personally “but at 
| but added (hat “this does not give ed from Washington. present he is on vacation." Mr. 

| any indication on the treatment of [In replies to questions from the Chernenko has not been wen in 


WITH 

THE DORISS GIRLS 
* 


prisoners." He said conditions of Cable News Network, Mr. Cher- 
their detention are being discussed nenko charged that President Ron- 


S.B1/L0EWS CASINO 
QUIPS 
BUCK JACK 
ROULETTE 


confidentially with Israeli authori- aid Reagan's proposed space-based 
tics in accordance with the ICRCs anti-missile defense system was 
policy of maintaining strict confi- “offensive and a gg ressive." But he 


poucy ui maintaining strict conn- ~oi tensive and aggressive, out ne 
dentiality on its observations, said he had no doubt that the con- 


(LA T. AP) ditions had been set at U^. -Soviet 


present he is on vacation." Mr. 
Chernenko has not been seen in 
public since Dec. 27. 

Mr. Lomeiko denied rumors that 
Mr. Chernenko, 73. was seriously 
UL He said top Soviet leaders were 
entitled to a one-month winter va- 
cation and Mr. Chernenko was on 
leave “somewhere near Moscow.” 


reputed to be the head of the so-called action commando of ETA, which 
stands for Basque Homeland and Liberty. He is alleged in Spain to have 
killed or instigated the murders of army officers, a Madrid judge and 
local officials in the Basque Country between 1975 and 1979. 

The villa was said by the police to be a logistics base for commandos 
operating in Spain. The police seized seven other persons, including two 
women. Jos£ Ramon Martinez de la Fueme, alleged to be (he ETA trader 
in Spain’s Navarre province, was also captured carrying a pistol The 
police found more pistols, shotguns, hand grenades, plastic explosive, 
detonators, fuses and a Soviet RPG-7 anti-tank rocket. 


Sudan Hostages Said to Seek Release 


Papandreou Urges End to Arms Race 


The .issoaaied Press The one-day meeting was called The Delhi declaration was 

ATHENS — Prime Minister An- to work out practical ways of pres- signed by the four leaders, as well 
dreas Papandreou appealed Thurs- suring the nuclear powers to halt as by Prune Minister Rajiv Gandhi 
day for a “world campaign" to per- the arms race and ban weapons in of India and President Miguel de la 
suade the nuclear powers “to listen space. Madrid of Mexico, 

to the voice of reason and stop the President Raul Alfonsih of Ar- 1IC 
arms race on Earth and in space." gentina said that the disarmament ™ Request Rejected 


The Delhi declaration was 


FOR INFORMATION 
PLEASE CALL MONTE-CARLO 

(93| 50.6S.00 


to the voice of reason and stop the 
arms race on Earth and in space." 


of India and President Miguel de la 
Madrid of Mexico. 


IZ.cv. qcorgeV tsI.7Z3 . 3Z. 32 

PARIS -FRANCE 


He said that a declaration for a initiative was “designed to give 


■ U.S. Request Rejected 
Greece has refused the United 


PARIS [IHT) — The families of two Swiss free-lance journalists held 
captive in Sudan for almost a year discounted Thursday a Sudanese rebel 
spokesman’s claim that the two had decided to remain in the southern 
rebel-held area of their own free will. 

The two, Till M. Lincke and Astrid HoDenstein. were supposed to have 
been released last Monday with four employees of International Con- 
struction Co., a French concern. Their captors, however, failed to bring 
them to Gambela, the Ethiopian border town where the others were freed. 
Yves Parris and Gwync Morson, two of the released hostages, told Mr. 
Lincke’s mother in Zurich Wednesday. 

Mis. Lincke said in a telephone interview that Mr. Parris and Mr. 
Morson told her they were held in the same camp as the two Swiss for 


most or their captivity but were separated from them last December. Mrs. 
lincke said both released hostages thought it was “totally out of the 
question” that the two stayed behind voluntarily as Stephen Baak, 
spokesman for the Sudanese Popular Liberation Anny, told Agence 

France- Pressc in London Thursday. 

Mr. Lincke. 31. went to Sudan to report on the rebellion there for the 
Zurich newspaper Tages-Anzeigar. He and Miss HoUenstem were cap- 
tured last February at about the same time as the four employees of the 
French company but is an unrelated action. 


nuclear ban issued by six heads of people a chance to Ove in a more Slates permission to modernize nu- 



state and government Monday in just and correct society.” clear installations for weapons in 

New Delhi also aimed at “inform- President Julius K. Nyerere of Greece that were installed in the 
ing public opinion of the imminent Tanzania said that Third World 1950s, Mr. Papandreou revealed, 
danger threatening mankind so countries “have no hope at all” if according to a Washington Post 
that people may exert strong pres- the arms race continues. "The report from Athens, 
sure” on the states with nuclear funds that would be freed as a re- He said Greece had rgected a 


weapons. suit of disarmament would bdp request to update “the areas where 

Mr. Papandreou was addressing combat famine and sickness the weapons are stored." He made 
a conference attendol by four of around the world,” he said clear that Athens would also reject 


a comerence attended by jour of around the world, he said clear that Athens would also reject 
the six leaders and a group of 50 Prime Minister Olof Palme of any application to replace the exist- 
personahties ranging from politi- Sweden said: “The message of New ing weapons, which he called “ob- 
cians, international relations ex- Delhi is that our future isn’t in the solete." He did not say whether any 
perts and churchmen to poets. hands of the superpowers." such petition had been made. 


For die Record 


Thirty-five member of West European parliaments have asked Aasiw 
to dismiss Defense Minister Friedhelm FrischenscMager for bavins 
greeted a Nazi war criminal on his return from an Italian jail last week. 
Most of the members to the Socialist group of the Council of Europe's 


1-2-85 j 


"• far and away 
the best nuda revue 
in the? universe" 

icyt (hr prt>« 


HARRY’S NEW YORK BAR <& 

Est. 1911 

Just tell the taxi driver “sank roo doe noo* 

• 5 Rue Daunou, PARIS 

9 Falkenturm Str. 9 , MUNICH 

• M/5 ASTOR at sea 


UNIVERSITY 


Far Ltt*. to dut c * wont Up i Hwh 

*tm may uuaWy lot 

«ai HfioflS UUSTFnsORpOCIQfUIE 

Sena detailed resume ' 

>or a h pe avftfaattofl 
PACIFIC WESTERN UNIVERSITY 

■ 4 M 0 NM e«a !•*>! Et-t.MfMiUSA 


Most of the members to the Socialist group of the Council of Europes 
Parliamentary Assembly. No Austrian or West German deputies sS>- 
ported the dolararioiL {AP) 

Turkish mifitary authorities have arrested 37 suspected leftist tenons^ 
in a series of operations in Istanbul and the provinces of Ankara aw 
Tunceti, the martial law command announced Thursday. It said the 
suspected terrorists, belonging to an outlawed extremist leftist oigflnha- 
tion, were accused of lolling three persons, including a poticeman-frir) 
Italian authorities in Naples indicted 75 Red Brigades suspectslfi* 5 ’ 
day and charged them with a series of terrorist attacks between 1978^ 
1983. The charges included the 1980 killing of a aty government tKfiaal, 


Pino Amato, and the kidnapping for ransom of a 
politician. Cut) Cirillo. the following year. 


Democrat 

\AP) 


3 v>w 



*,«’ ’"O 

.-'■-s'.wr 


The champion “has a sttongeharacter, a 
strong will,” Mr. Roshal said.^Organically, 
be cannot stand to lose. He cannot lose. It 
turns out that Kasparov is made of the same 
clay.” 


leiiiocral Sa 

i: 'Beneath - 


ZJ"C 


-JU- ■ 




'•r.f 


±1--* - 


-!fi - 
tri: \i- i ' 

ti. •* - - • 




3 • 






Wp is 

■— v -L_ ra 


*on s 


ff;V 

*5 Cl; 


















'** u a MX * MW *1-1^ M " »» * M » MXMX&immMl 


Outcry ^M OverDebt Crisis for V^fcirmers 



Farm Income bi the U^. 

Not Income of farm operators from farming. In btfllbna of 
constant 1 967 dotes, wfltNtod for inflation. Estimates for 1984 
range from S9 bffltonJtoSI 1 bfflon. 


Source: Oeoertatent at Aariadturm 


By Ward Sinclair 

Jrart ington Pott Service ■ 
WASHINGTON — Furnas, 
hankers and clergy .have warned a 
congressional meeriiw that »nk« 
Washington acts quiddy to resolve 
the growing farm-debt squeeze, 

utionsflriU be ilirawnlr^'^iaofi. 

“The scope of the present crisis is 
unparalleled, even in the 1930s. 
We're astounded at (he rapidly es- 
calating nature of the crisis,” Bish- 
op Maurice Dingman of the Ro- 
man Catholic Diocese of Des 
Moines, Iowa, said Wednesday in a 
statement that brought a standing 
ovation from the audience. 

'“It is a Himg'CT of astounding 

are unaware of or don't care about 
the gathering storm,” the bishop 
said on behalf of the National 
Catholic Rural Life Conference. 

“We’re dying,” he added, and 
maintained, “If we lose those fam- 
ily fanners and businessmen in 
small towns, we have lost the. bed- 
rock of democracy.” 

Other witnesses brought much 
the game message to the meeriwgj 
convened by Senator John Me? 
cber, Democrat of Montana, as 


hEx<W 

*75£» 


™«ikiat e d^ 

JT-dav 


Democrat Says Meese 
3s 'Beneath’ New Post 


^fonnercSS 

ab^ 


; e- others UaS? 
iT-Etereab:'^ 

idelaRda 

s -'Id Parian j 
r is idatedte 
'faaaftraii 

-1 ’-'■rtiidrSBESl 

> cress, vfeiaij 
'ribas xr. ato 


i Settlers 

S.Tacg 
: .xcutik Wsfc 
:hr uvraaat 
fefara Mask 

.V^ilLCtS IfiSE.. 

wuhsErate 
uses. Tls cot: 
r^: peah.ri&s 
iiaaaBB 

-i" mitisibse 
- ;br: ca«te= 
t.-v issbss 


>T OnP(HE 


SisSMSs:^ 

c ssp- 
V- i^tsass 1 

— -•*22-^ 

;-.:;Ssc :ts& 

jueGue^ 

<7£*= 5 3S 

i Mag-* 

, issbm 1 ^ . 

r.vkr- 


By Xoictte Tofani 

JfiaAingffflj Past Service 

/ WASHINGTON — The senior 
'Democrat on the Senate Judkuuy 
^Committee broke into a long sec- 
ond day of hearings dominated by 
“dry questions and nttwJrwt Edwin. 
.Meese 3d, die nominee for attorney 
general, saying his conduct -was 
"ethical but “beneath die. office” to 
.whte he aspired. 

aiHtia?’ Senator Joseph R. Biden 
Jr, Democrat of Doawarc, de- 
manded Wednesday after Mr. 
Meete- defended his participation 
in. discussions about a federal job 
for Jus' accountant, John R. 
McKean, who arranged two leans 
•totaling 560,000 fa him. 

“In themretmg.whcn McKean's 
-hflmccameup,yousayitwasnota 
formal meeting,” Mr. Biden said. 
vWhothe heft cares whether it was 
4 formal meeting?. Who tbebril 
lares whether he was a trustee of 
the loan or tbermson who foamed 
hT ‘ : V"v:y ■ 

. Mr. Meese had. said. he. did not: 
believe he laid a ccaaflici of interest 
•because the dfacossioiis did not oc- 
cur during a formal meeting and 
because Mr. McKean had arranged 
■for the loans but was not the source 
of the money. 

< Mr. .Biden alsa castigated Ml 
M ccsc for his ncwilEngncss t o say 
Jac had received a .rawer -faun ■ 
■Tboattfr Jtflfaraaefe Ift^whqn Afa*. 
Barradkagi^foJBiitiabi^ftr 
Mc-Mecse’shranemLa Mesa, Cat 
jfama. Mr.Barrack alto received a 
federal job later. . 

• “Ifs an attitude," Mr. Biden 
add, “Why fa it so fifficult for you 
to go bade and say, “In hindsight, it 
was wrong tor me to do sum and 
■udflT. • 

■, “l -have said, that,” Mr. Meese 
responded .... 

the White House counselor 
seemed shaken by Mr. Bute's: out- 
burst He said rbai in bis 25 years in 
public life he. had met “the high 
standards^Mr. Kden described. 

' “If I had a chance to do Ova 
^nf.we talked about, I would do 
sotoe things over,” Mr. Meese said. 
•‘JBut you can’t rehvc history. My 
dearipos weremade-on the hrgh 251 
. -standards l had at the-ttme.” . . 

.Theat&dc on Mr. Meese previ- 
ously was led by Senator Howard 
M Metambamn, Democrat of 


Ohio, and had been. ocJy balfheart- 
edly followed by tbeax other Dem- 
ocrats oa the 17-member jmhriaiy 
panel Few of the Republican 
members were present for Wednes- 
day’s Second day of omfirmation 


The impact of Mr. Bideft's prob- 
ing was softened by the comnntlee 
diahman, Strom Thnrmand, Re- 
publican of South Carofina, who 
told Mr. Meesr. “If you were not a 
man of tibieripht chancier, you'd be 
a multimillionaire. Ttmw^ you 
can't make the payments on your 
house,” 

In a, related development, 5caa- 
tor^ WnHam Prcwmire, Democrat of 
Wisconsin, who is not on the com- 
mittee, called for a freeze <m the 
nominatiosi paidmg further inqui- 
ry into wfaetna Ml Meese had a 
role in a Jastioe Department deri- 
sion, to, halt an investigation of 
General Dynamics Coup, a major 
defense contractor. The investiga- 
tion was rcopcned r last year, 

Ina Jettor Mr. ft uxmire rcceaved 
this week, Ml Meese wrote that he 
met briefly with two top oflSoers of 
the Gem in 1981 and 1983. But he 
denied. suggesting -to the Justice' 
Department that u end its investi- 
gation of the firm. 

“Neither I nor my staff,” Ml 
M eese wrote, “ever bad any contact 
with the Departmeat of Justicere- 
ranfing* %ny iriattor' cMBfmUg 
General D^iamics, other than re- 
cent routine briefings for my cur- 
rent confirmation hearings” 

. Mr. P ronnire said be was trou- 
bled by Mr. Meese’s willingness to 
contact Defease Secretary Caspar 
W. Weinberger to anange a meet- 
ing between Mr. Weintager and 
General Dynamics officials to dis- 
cuss a conflict over construction of 
the Trident nuclear submarine. 

Mr. Meese pronrised to call Mr. 

Weinberger after an Ang.7, 1981, 
meeting with General Dynamics 
officials, according ^to a summary 
.of toe meetinra . that Ml Meese 
attached to hfaletter. 1 

Ml Pruxmire questioned why 
the company felt it needed to ^o 
througb. Mr. Meese at toe White 
House and whether it hoped that 
his call to Ml Weinberger “would 
be viewed as anafr««ubtle sign <rf 
White House favoritism.” 





PAPAL PONCHO —Pope John Paul H tried on an 
Inca shanLin Quito, Ecuador. In an address to about 
200,000 Indians he urged them to search for justice and 
f*|iM»Biy god criticized alcoholism and' lack ri'fsiflt. 


Georgia Gazette Is to Close; 
Weekly Won Pulitzer in ’84 


The Associated Press 

. ATLANTA —The Georgia Ga- 
zette, the weekly Savannah news- 
paper that won the 1984 P u li tzer 


publication March 1 because of f> 
nanrial difficulties, according to 
the paper's former editor. 

Albert Scardmo said Wednesday 
by telephone from New York, 


where he has a job with The 
New York Times, that the Ga- 
zette’s already precarious financial 
situation had been dealt the fatal 
blow Jan. 2, when Ch at h am Coun- 
ty officials took away the legal ad- 
vertising* that bad provided 60 per- 
cent of its revenues. 


Hanae MorVs Beaded Gowns Steal Couture Show 


>&g». 

, • ST-w*' 

".r* 

vL- 



Com^Utd by Otr Staff From Dapatcha 

PARIS -rr .As this week’s haute 
couture spring collections drew to a 


i». ud. jojmuw — 6“ — ; 

Mrwi outfid the 22 houses showing 
this .season - with some exquisite 
.beaded evening gowns,- blanketed 
byaTratnne in hand-sewn bead- 
"voAL _■ ■ 

Miss Mori’s gowns were such. 

'£■-} Dorics of art that they bdongmthe- 

. .Paris fashkm mnseam due to opai 
. in a wing cl the Louvre later this 
year. _■..;••• . 

...Most impressive. among them 
was a figure-hugging long dress 
beaded with, large squares that xe- 

.- ' PABB FASHBON 

scmWed sraarate paistins of but- 
terflies anaflawers. Another num- 
ber fit for a millionairera was. an 
ankle-length flared white gown 
beaded all over with white pearls. 
Beaded flowers with stems 
- curled around a stiver of long black 

crepe. Scadett O’Hara ball gowns 
' of blade dotted lace sported huge 
sleeves and skirts swaymg over stiff 

petticoats. ' . “ 


satin sheaths with crossed straps on 
the back and spariding jackets in 
bold abstract patterns were unfor- 
gettable. 

He also knows how to match 
angora cardigans with sarin blouses 
- d gabardine pants to make the 
wearer fed both dressy and yet 
comfortable. 

As toe high fashion shows ended, 
Philippe Venet won the annual best 
designer prize awarded by fashion 
critics. 

The mayor of Paris, Jacques 
Chirac, presided over the ceremo- 
ny, congratulating toe couturiers 
for toeir contribution to French 



Senator -Tom Haridn 


part of a hip artisan Farm Belt cam- 
paign to focus toe Reagan adminfa- 
tration’s attention on the farm fi- 
nanring crisis. 

Speaker after speaker empha- 
sized that, toe- dem-restrnctuxing 

^ a announced by President 
Reagan last September fa 
not working and will nor work un- 
less rapid and major change are 
made so it reaches more fanners 


'We Ye dying. If we 
lose those family 
farmers and 
businessmen in small 
towns, we have lest 
the bedrock of ' 
democracy.’' - 


and draws more paitiorpatian by 
country banks. 

Although toe cabinet diseased 
the situation this week, government 
spekesmen said there .was so indi- 
cation toat the administration in- 
tended to respond to the increasing 
calls fra help. 

Mr. Mdcber, who set up the ses- 
sion after he was told it was “pre- 
mature” for toe Senate Agricuftnre 


Committee to take it up. said, “Ir is 

very alarming to find an attitude in 

Washington that pushes aside what 
gumy of ns fed ts a most critical 
crisis.” 

ffis meeting drew 13 House and 
Sfn at* members. Republicans and 
Democrats, who took turns urging 
quick actiofrbyihe ' White House to 
■vert a situation that, in the^ view of 
many bankers and pubfic officials, 
could throw thousands of farmers 

in toe next 60 


Senator Tom Haridn, a Democrat. 
**ln toe first six years of the Great 
Depression, Iowa lost 7.8 percent 
of ns farmers; This year, we will 
lose 10 percent in one year.” 

“We dart have the time or the 
need for father Study,” said AJ. 
King of Kaltedl, Montana, presi-. 
dent of toe- Independent Bankers 
Assadation of America, which rep- 
resents most of the rural banks that 
finance fanners. 

He said toe administration must 
increase funding “to several billion 
dollars" far toe Fanners Home Ad- 
ministration, which firaniceg farm- 
ers who cannot get credit else* 
where. 


.’Tt fa not just a crisis. We’reseg- 
ino a. farm collapse,” said D#v» 
Setter, an official of the AmericM 
Agriculture Movement. “Not only 
the collapse of rural America, mu 
we’re about to see an expiosran- 
'•‘'CoafamUHiati,*' added Senator. 
J. Jame£ Exon, Democrat of . Ne- 
braska, »Ss something we usc:w;a 
■last reson, 1 and'we're.ahnost there. 

■ “Marti \ is .the magical date 

because rents hnd payments come 
due,” said Tun Winze, a Nebraska- 
fertilizer dealer, “If they are not 
paid, land and machinery values 
would collapse; It is paraqwWM 
»h at some good news come, from 
Washington to shore up confi- 
dence.” • . ' ■' 

■ Reagan Meeting Sougjrt ' : - 

Twenty-thrcc senators asked 

Thursday that President Reaggn 
meet with a' bipartisan group -of 
lawmakers- on the fam crisis, tank- 
ed Tress International reporteo-?-' 

The request wasmade in aletto' 
by Senatra Haridn that raid; "We 
believe a meeting is necessary, to 
apprise yrai of just how serioos te 
situation, is- and how much it hds 
worsened in just the last • two 
months.” 

A rimflaf later was bemg ciren- 

lated in toe House. 


Former C3A Aide Backs 
CBS on Troop Count 


The Gazette, which claims a cir- 
culation of 3,000, became the first 
Georgia newspaper to win a Pulit- 
zer since 1966 when h won the 
award for editorial writing in April 
It was also toe first weekly in 20 
years to win the prize. 

In addition, Mr. Scardmo’s edi- 
torials won him the 1982. Golden 
Quill, offered by the Tnlfinratinnal 
Society of Weekly Newspaper Edi- 
tors for the best editorial writing 
among weeklies. 

It has won awards for its report- 
ing, particularly fa- exposing and 
pursuing the political corruption 
somamding a former stale labor 
commissioner. 


— — — — — i . — 

also present wore a superb two- 
piece houndstootorduxk outfit by 
Guy Laroche. ■ 

As the week of collections' 
wound to a dose, the mood was 
exuberant A spokesman for the 
indastry, Jacques Mouclier. 


seemed elated by the renewed vigor 
of couture after the doldrums of 
several years back. 

Not since the rise of the ready- 
to-wear industry in the early 1960s 
have couture do toes looked better. 
Now that the novelty of buying 
expensive clothes off the racks has 
worn off, the clients far made- to- 
order fashion are back in force, 
and, in particular, the Americans, 
who are encouraged by the ex- 
change rate of almost 10 francs to 
the dollar. j 

Most of (he 23 houses showing , 
their collections this week report 
gains of at least 20 percent in sales 
over last year.-Chand insisted that j 
its figures had doubled and the 
Chainbre Syndicate which orga- 
nizes toe shows, announced that 
toe industry average is up 33 per- 
cent. 

tUPI.AP.NYT) 


Intruder Arrested at toe White House 
’Bears Yokes,’ Spent Time in Asylum 







tioo was almost entirely dressy, 
without a tailored outfit in si|hL 
Late day dresses as w eflas d aytime 
ante were draped w tfrined. 

, The Norwegian designer Per 
Spook- reaffirmed hfa taedrand- 
true sportybut degant look,b^ 
loved % such Ftendi^ women as the 
actress Jeanne Moreau. 

• : Tank tops,- trousera,- gftteram 


- plenum sura mu “““6“ - 

came in oiks and satms m softest 
. Si . , . conn nm- 





hi sarin. 


in tum T 

shades rf brown, xust, sand, carar 
tnd and tobacco. The skirts were 
-loqg, -pants were fnH, and some 
dresses woe very fitted. 

Some argnelltoi'firia pared-down 
simplicity fa not couture. But hfa 


The Associated Pros 

WASHINGTON —Robert Lat- 
ta, who was arrested last week after 
straffing uninvited into the White 
House, “hears voices” and spent 
time in a mental hospital in June, 
according to documents filed in 
District of Columbia Superior 
Court 

Mr. Latta, a wars meter reader 
firm Denver, was arrested one 
floor below President Ronald Rea- 
gan’s Hving quartos. Jan. 20, hours 
before the president was sworn in 
for a second tom. He wzs charged 
with unlawful entry, a misdemean- 
or, and faces up to six months in 
prison and a S100 fine if convicted. 

A psychiatrist, Norman L Wil- 
son, spoke to Mr. Latta in his cell 
before he was released He reported 


Mr. Latta told him “he wanted to I 
enter the White House to see the 
president.’’ Mr. Latta was in a men - 1 
tal hospital in June, Dr. Wilson, 
said, and “be hears voices saying, 
*You blew it'” The psychiatrist 
recommended further psychiatric 
study. 

At a hearing Jan. 21,. Mr. Latta 
was ordered to undergo a menial 
evaluation. But the order was not 
received by city psychiatrists until 
three days later. Hours' after' Mr. 
Latta had posted bond fa Us re-! 
lease: 

Hfa attorney said Wednesday 
that Mr. Latta would return to 
Washington in a few weeks for a 
psychiatric examination to deter- 
mine whether he fa competent to 
stand trial 


: By Eleanor Randolph 

Washington Poa Service 
NEW YORK — Richard Kovar, 
a Central Intelligence Agency offi- 
cial for more than 30 years, was toe 
land of witness CBS officials have 
been promising for months, a man 
who would overcome the intelli- 
gence official’s instincts to remain 
silent and speak out in court about 
a troubling event 17 years ago. 

In un emotional speech Wednes- 
day during die S 120-million tibd 
action by retired General William 
G Westmoreland’s against the net- 
work, Mr. Kovar said he felt that 
many CIA employees had “pa- 
pered over their consciences” after 
a controversial 1967 estimate erf 
Vietnam enemy troop strength that 
is a central issue in this case. 

.“I myself do not feel voy good 
about it,” he told the jury. 

Supporting Samuel A. Adams, a 
CBS d^ fenrumt and former CIA 
analyst, Mr. Kovar said, “He didn't 
sahiteand shut up,” when he dis- 

r jed with the agency's estimates 
enemy troop strength. “Not 
only did be not shut up,n£ pushed 
his arguments, and be pushed his 
outrage.” 

like some other CIA witnesses 
called by the network, Mr. Kovar 
blamed General -Westnxmland’s 
.command for wtoat he bdieved was 


a serious undemounting of theerie-l 
my in Vietnam in 1967 — as 
charged in the 1982 CBS documen- 1 
Cary at issue in the case. 

. He said General Westmoreland's | 
intelligence officers failed to in- 
dude toe “home militia” units in' 
toe official order of battle that he 
said was “supposed to produce the 
best judgment of the best minds in 
the United States government*’ on 
the enemy m Vietnam. 

Mr. Kovar said after the dA ■ 
agreed with General Westmore- 
land’s Military Assistance Com- 
mand, Vietnam, to lower the offi- 
cial enemy figures, he encouraged 
Mr. Adams “to go out and find die 
real story, to dig up what had hap- 
pened in this thing .” 

Mr. Adams, who reagned from 
toe agency in 1973, was a crucial 
source for toe CBS documentary, 
and he served as a paid consultant 
for the program. 

Mr. Kovar said he tdd Mr. Ad- 
ams in 1968 that he felt there was 
“a direct guilt trafl” between the 
lowering of the estimate and the 
“debacle in January 1968,” a refer- 
ence to the Tet offensive by toe 
North Vietnamese and toe Via 
Cong, regarded by many as a turn- 
ing point in Ammcan support for 
the war. 



Aldebert 

1 h. pliii Wnilumi- 
I . Ini dr l<> Mxlrlcinr 
70. kj S<iii'it-Honorc 
Pa l,i K des (.oiujrrv Porir Maillol 
Pans 


“98% of their 



“So there is still room 



Recent surveys show that passengers recognize - and appreciate - KLM’s continuous 
search for improvement Test ;’us, try us, fly us. . 


The Reliable Airline ICLIVV 


Royal Dutch Airfne& 



V'.' -r-— - — 










Page 4 


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1985 


* 


Beralb 


P^^^ithTVW^YgA Tb» TVWwUngio^ P Zt 


eribunc 


Cheaper Oil’s Impact 


The drop in the OPEC price of oil wfll have 
an incalculable political impact in the export- 
rag countries. while the importers in thehl- 
wraM celebrate their good fortune, 
they wffl need to keep aneye on the reaction in 
pans of the world that are not entirely stable 
even under the best of conditions. 

In the 1 970s, the OPIEC price became a great 
symbol m the world’s poor countries, and 
particularly among Arab nationalists. It stood 
for economic retaliation and the righting of 
longstanding gri ranees. The break in the 
OPOj structure is a severe blow to pride as 
well as to financial balances among the export- 
It will inevitably exacerbate the hostility 
between the anti-Western radicals of the Orga- 
nization of Petroleum Exporting Countries, 
led by Iran and Libya, and the conservative 
Arab stales of the Gulf such as Saudi Arabia. 

It was the Saudis who, nearly two years ago, 
forced the radicals to reduce their ambitions 
and accept an OPEC price of 529 a barrel. 
That, the Saudis argued, would balance the 
world's supply and demand and everyone in 
OPEC would get richer. It has not worked out 
that way, chiefly because the wodd is getting 
along with mnch less of that expensive nfl than 
seemed likely even in 1983. The Saudis have 
cut their production repeatedly in a dogged 
attempt to defend the $29 price. 

But the OPEC meeting that ended Wednes- 
day was a confession of failure. In effect, 
OPEC is leaving the price to the market, and 


Iran and the Hijackers 


It has been nearly two months since the 
revolutionary Islami c government of Iran col- 
lared a band of terrorists who had hijacked a 
Kuwaiti airliner and flown it to Tehran, mur- 
dering two American officials of the Agency 
for International Development and torturing 
other passengers in the process. In the Gulf as 
elsewhere, there was a sharp outcry at the 
spectacle of Iran's seemingly cozy treatment of 
the killers. In response, Iran, while refusing to 
extradite the four Arabic-speaking terrorists, 
had its public prosecutor promise to try them 
in an Islamic COUTt. But nothing has sinon been 
heard from Iran about a trial. Without infor- 
mation to the contrary, the presumption must 
be that Iran is going back on its word. 

Should anyone be surprised? The current 
regime in Tehran is, after all a confirmed and 
defiant violator of the rights that most govern- 
ments at Least tip their hat to. It could be called 
a world ‘‘leader’’ in this regard: Recently it 
achieved the distinction of becoming the Gist 
government to renounce the Universal Decla- 
ration of Human Rights. It continues to con- 
duct a savage repression, mdndmg repeated 


instances of murder, against its pitiful Bahai 
minority. No change is evident in its policy of 
aiding and sponsoring the terrorist groups that 
have wreaked havoc in the Middle East in 
recent years. One of those groups claims to 
hold five Americans hostage in Lebanon. 

No realistic observer will expea very much 
from Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini's Iran 
when it comes to making good its word. Still, 
his regime did promise to try the hijackers. 
Presumably it did so because, being bogged 
down in its war against Iraq and in some of its 
domestic enterprises, it thought it could gain 
something of value by accommodating its irate 
Gulf neighbors in this regard. In some quar- 
ters, its promise was tentatively taken as a sign 
that the balance of internal forces, as between 
the extremists and those more inclined to settle 
Iran down, might be tipping the right way. 

Iran's failure to carry out its promise on the 
hijackers' trial is a boost for terrorism and a 
display of contempt for its neighbors. It means 
that Iran is still playing the outlaw and still 
deserving to be treated as one. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


Talking , Not Negotiating 

The United Stales and the Soviet Union are 
planning to confer on the Middle East, but 
President Reagan's national security adviser 
says they will only be talking, not negotiating. 
The main aim of the get-together, according to 
Robert G McFarlane, is to allow the two 
countries to exchange views and define their 
interests and concerns in the region. 

There is a lot to be said for talks that, free 
from the propaganda of the public arena, 
could help clarify national aims and lessen the 
Hisranns of posabty Hangprnus miscalcula- 
tions. By all means let Washington and Mos- 
cow exchange views about the Middle East, so 
long as it is understood that these discussions 
are no substitute for the real thing. If Israel 
and its Arab neighbors make peace, it will only 
be after they have negotiated directly the terms 
of the agreement There may of course be a 
facilitating role for others to play, as there was 
in the case of the Egypt-lsrael peace. But the 
will to act and the decisions to be made can 
originate oily with the Middle East 

— The Los Angeles Times. 


extraordinary general bishops synod will be 
convened in Rome at the end of this year. 
There, the bishops wfll have to consider which 
.statements of the second Vatican Council to 
review or modify in the light of new demands. 

It is not immediately clear what demands 
the pope has in mind. But one can assume that 
with h is belief that the “new theology” in the 
Third World and in Western Europe has be- 
come too progressive and less aimed at eterni- 
ty, he will want to tighten the reins. 


If the next synod should lead to the bishops 
Catholic 


ensuring that Catholics permit themselves less 
liberty and are more obaiient than at present 
to the Church's authority, one can expect that 
the exodus from the Church will assume even 
more massive proportions than was the case 
after the second Vatican Council. 

— NRC Handebblad (Rotterdam). 


Reagan’s Justified Caution 


Hie Pope and Liberation 


The pope is cm tour again. On the very first 
day of his trip, John Paul II talked with the 
Venezuelan president about the political situa- 
tion in Central and South America and with 
the Venezuelan bishops about the errors of 
liberation theology, which, according to 
Rome, mutilates the gospel and is at the ser- 
vice of ideologies and political strategies bent 
upon a deceptive, earthly freedom. 

With his performance, the pope is showing 
once more that his pastoral care has an outspo- 
ken political nature. More remarkable was his 
announcement at the end of last week that an 


Presdeni Reagan's words of caution about 
the future of the Geneva talks are both timely 
and realistic. He sees a Jong haul ahead with 
the talks possibly taking longer to complete 
than the four years of his second term, and 
even then he went out of his way to stress he is 
more optimistic about an agreement on reduc- 
ing the two superpowers' nuclear arsenals than 
some of those he is sending to Geneva. Mr. 
Reagan has struck exactly the right note in 
assessing the prospects of an arms agreement 
with the Kremlin. 

Nothing that has come from Moscow since 
the Gromyko-Shultz meeting established the 
infrastructure for talks on midear arms sug- 
gests that the Soviet team is eager to get to 
Geneva in March (to take up where it left off 
two years ago) and wrap up a neat and quick 
agreement in any of the areas. 

— The Daily Telegraph (London). 


FROM OUR FEB. 1 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: American Factories in Russia 1935: BBC Gets Its First TV License 


BERLIN — Mr. Philip Sydney, of the Singer 
Manufacturing Company, has arrived from 
Moscow, where he had gone to inspect a [com- 


pany] factory. He also made an inspection in 
tes Harvester 


the interest of the United States 
Company of a factory that company had just 
purchased from the Air Broke Company near 
Moscow for 1,500,000 roubles. The Harvester 
Company resolved to acquire the factory and 
fit it up with the latest American machinery. 
The factory, one of the largest in Russia, is 
twenty miles southwest of Moscow. Mr. Burr 
A. Kennedy has arrived in Moscow to fit up 
the plant for the Harvester Company. He is an 
expert in machinery and wfl] have under him a 
number of skilled American workmen from 
the company's plants in the United States. 


LONDON — The British Broadcasting Cor- 
poration will be granted the exclusive license 
to establish and operate an ultra-short wave 
television program, and the first television 
station, which will be in Loudon, will be estab- 
lished in the latter part of this year. Sir Kings- 
ley Wood announced in the House of Com- 
mons [on Jan. 31]. The television program, be 
said, would be supplied to the public without 
payment beyond the present wireless receiver 
license tax of EL5C a year. An official commit- 
tee, appointed to consider the development of 
television, reported that probably half the 
population could be served by ten ultra-short 
wave stations in suitable locations, and recom- 
mended the establishment of additional sta- 
tions until a national network was built up. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chairman 1958-1982 


KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M. FOISIE 
WALTER WELLS „ 
ROBERT KL McCABE 
SAMUEL ABT 
CARLGEWIRTZ 


LEEW. HUEBNER. PMohtr 

Exeame Editor RENE BOND Y Deaiay Pvbkskrr 

Editor ALAIN LECOUR Astadau Pubitsker 

Dam Editor RICHARD H. MORGAN Associate Pt&uhcr 

Denay Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Director tj Oper atio n s 

Associate Editor FRANCOIS DESMAISONS Director of Cuudaaor 

ROLF u KRANEPUHL Director of Adiertising Saks 

International Herald Tribune. 1S1 Avenue Cbartcs-de-GauDe; 92200 Neuffly^ur-Seine, 

France. Telephone: 747-1265. Telex: 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Puis. 

Director de h pvbUm U k Wader N. Thayer. 

Asia Headauarten, 24*34 Htnntssy R±, Haag Kong, TeL 5-285618. Telex 61170. 
Mart&nsIXrV.K.: Robin MocKkhtm, 63 Long Acre, London WCL TeL 8364801 Tekx 262009. 
sjLau capital de 1.200.000 F. PCS Nantm B 732021126. Commission Panwire Na 61337. 



the cartel has, at least for now, collapsed. 

Sane of the poor countries among the ex- 
porters —Nigeria is the most important— are 
already running deeply into debt OPEC as a 
whole ran an international deficit on current 
accounts of about S 1 8 billion last year, accord- 
ing to a prescient analysis published several 
weeks ago by Graham Bishop and Paul Mlo- 
tok of Salomon Brothers, the investment bank- 
ing firm. The OPEC countries have learned to 
spend their oil money faster than seemed pos- 
sible a decade ago. Curbing their present im- 
ports cannot be done without great strain. 

In the Gulf region, any great reduction in oil 
income jeopardizes the whole system of subsi- 
dies by which the Gulf Arabs assist various 
friends and clients — for example, Iraq in its 
endless war with Iran. Internally, the Saudis 
have used steadily increasing income to help 
keep the peace among the various factions of 
the ruling family. Whether matters will remain 
quite so peaceful in a time of dec lining in- 
come is yet to be seen. 

For the rest of the world —the importers of 
oil, rich countries and poor alike — the fall in 
od prices can mean nothing but good. It means 
faster growth, more jobs and higher standards 
of living — if prices remain lower. But this is 
also a time for caution. It should be kept in 
mind that the two great oil crises of the 1970s 
began, respectively, with a war in the Middle 
East and a revolution. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


A frica Divided: The Legacies of Berlin 


H ARARE, Zimbabwe — Africa is quietly 
marking an important centennial, but it n 
not an occasion for trumpets and speeches. It has 
been 100 years since the Berlin Conference, that 
extraordinary conclave of European diplomats, 
divided Africa into spheres of influence and 
ushered in an era of colonial rule whose effects 
are still seen across the continent 
At a time when f amin e is again on the front 
page and the West is viewing Africa and its 
Haunting problems with a mixture of sympathy, 
horror and disdain, it is instructive to recall those 
days when Europe carved up Africa like a Christ- 


By Glenn Frankel 


turkey, each participant fighting for his 
t problems 


favorite piece. Many problems that haunt Africa 
today have their origins at that diplomatic table. 


The conference was a breathing spell in what 

tor Africa.” 


became known as the “scramble 
After nibbling at the edges of the continent for 
centuries, the Europeans had begun a rush into 
the interior in the 1870s. Armed with superior 
weapons, Bibles and makeshift treaties, imperial 
agents laid claim to more than 25 million square 
kilometers (10 milli on square miles) of territory 
and 100 million people within a decade. 


It was a haphazard, chaotic process that 


threatened several times to plunge the European 
powers into war. Bismarck, who abhorred disor- 


der and wanted to ensure Germany aj)i ece of the 


spoils, decided it was time to lay down some 
ground rules. His French and British counter- 
parts, his main competitors in Africa, agreed. 

Fourteen nations attended the three- month 
session. Conspicuous by their absence were those 
who had the most at stake — the Africans. But 
there was little hypocrisy: No one pretended tint 
the tines were drawn for any interests other than 
those of the countries at the table. 

“The Europeans came and assumed command 
of African history,” wrote the British historian 
Basil Davidson. ‘The solutions they found were 
solutions for themselves, not for Africans.” 

The Africa of a century ago consisted of sever- 


al hundred independent states, some large, pow- 
erful and relatively advanced, others smaller, 
weaker and primitive. When the Europeans fin- 
ished drawing their lines; these states had been 
condensed into about 40 pieces of territory. 

It was not an easy or neat process. Ethnic 

K s were cleaved into fragments — the 
bo were split in half by the boundary 
dividing Portuguese Angola from German 
South-West Africa. Others were combined with 
disparate neighbors: The Ibos and Yorubas of 
the West African coast were thrown together 
with the Moslem Hausas and Fulanis of the 
north into a country that became British-ruled 
Nigeria, where their rivalries helped set off the 
Biatra war and still cause problems. 

The Germans were given title to what became 
Tanganyika not because they had claimed it but 
because the British thought it best to placate 
Bismarck. Similarly, Portugal was given reign 
over territory 22 times larger than itself mostly 
because Lisbon's British allies used the Portu- 
guese as a tool to deny African land to their 
principal competitors in Paris. Belgium's King 
Leopold won the grand prize: the mineral-rich 
lease to what became the Belgian Congo. 

At first, Afri cans paid little attention to the 
new tines, which seemed to have everything to do 
with European rivalries and little to do with 
them. But gradually the lines on the paper map 
became real borders, not only to the Europeans 
but to the Africans themselves. Africa's acquies- 
cence became pan of its general acceptance of 
the standards, mores and ideas of the Europeans 
who sought to rule iL 

One of the great issues for African intellectuals 
during the independence movement that fol- 
lowed World Wax II was whether to accept those 
borders, draw new ones or have none at all The 
movement for a United States of Africa had 


strong intellectual and emotional force behind it 

That idealism was undermined and ultimately 
overruled by the stronger reality of power poli- 
tics and the ambitions of those who inherited 
governments from the Europeans. In the end, the 
Organization of .African Unity, designed to bring 
Africans together, became a tragicomic monu- 
ment to their enduring separation. 

But borders alone do not make nations, and 
this has been one of the crudest lessons recent 
history has taught Africa. In countries such as 
Angola. Uganda, Burundi Nigeria and even 
South Africa, the concept of nationhood is at 
best only marginally understood. Most of these 
countries lack a George Washington — someone 
from the political or cultural past who provides 


the glue to hold diverse groups together. 
Larking that glue, Africa has become atom- 


ized into smaller, conflicting groups. People 
Y. professk 


identify by tribe ideology, profession, religion or 
economic class, seldom "by nation. 

Thus, in the 27 years since Ghana became the 
first colonial stale to gain independence, Africa 
has had a dozen wars, 70 military coups and the 
assassination of 1 3 beads of state. It has 5 million 
refugees, pan of the heritage of maladjusted 
borders and nations that exist mostly an paper. 

In analyzing Africa's woes, Africans them- 
selves tend to blame European colonialism. 
Westerners, for their pan, tend to treat the conti- 
nent as a blank slate whose real history only 
began at independence and whose problems can 
be laid at the feet of corrupt African leaders and 
misplaced priorities. 

Both are right, and both are wrong, but the 
Westerners who for three decades have been so 
free with their advice and criticism of the new 
Africa should not forget that it was their ances- 
tors who designed and launched the continent's 
modem history 100 years ago in Berlin. 


The writer reports on African affairs for The 
Washington Post. 


Sorting Out 
'Star Wars’ 


Arguments 


By Flora Lewis 


P ARIS — The “star ware” argu- 
ment is burgeoning. It is being 
conducted on so many levels, inher- 
ently contradictory, that the heat ob- 
scures light- They need to be sorted 
out and judged separately. 

The issue of offense and defense 
regarding strategic missiles is certain- 
ly a valid subject for debate. It is not 
new. In the past, proposals for de- 
fease were generally dismissed be- 
cause they did not seem viable. Strat- 
egists felt obliged to rely on the threat 
of retaliation to prevent war. 

Now technological advance revives 
the debate in new terms. Offensive 
missiles are enormously more accu- 
rate. increasing the danger that a 
first, pre-emptive strike can over- 
whelm the ability to retaliate. That is 
the so-called window of vulnerabili- 
ty, which either never existed or is 
Mill open; it has not been closed by 
weaponry, only by rhetoric. 

On the level of strategic analysis, 
the proponents of defense now argue 
that the “window’’ can be dosed with 
new weapons in space and on land to 
destroy attacking missiles. They do 
not claim, as President Reagan has 
said, that this would remove the nu- 
clear menace. They only daim that it 
would make the threat of retaliation 
with offensive missiles, deterrence, 
more credible. 

Opponents argue that it would ac- 
celerate the arms race, on Earth as 
well as in space, and increase the 



Delivery SvsreiAs 'stap wn%' wwt affect 



f) CPUKe gi«iLK 


B) mee& 



c) Peer 


The sdentific debate is useful but it 
is misleading to mix it up with strate- 
gy, diplomacy, politics and emotion. 


On *Jie level of diplomacy, propo- 
ne De- 


nents say Mr. Reagan's Strategic 
fense Initiative is what brought Mos- 
cow to negotiate, so it has already 


proved its value. Opponents say this 


danger of pre-emptive war. They say 
lould p 


attempted defense, which could pro- 
tect only some missiles and not cities, 
would stimulate additions to already 
absurd offensive arsenals. No reduc- 
tions would be likely. And defense is 
enormously more costly. 

On the level of technology, propo- 
nents admit that the defensive ideas 
are far on L But they say: Let us start; 
we can protect at least some missiles, 
and you never know what scientists 
can do if you give them enough mon- 
ey. Opponents admit that it is pru- 
dent to continue modest research, but 
they say the prospects are not good 
enough to risk a crash effort which 
could provoke war in the meantime. 


is not necessarily so. We do not really 
know Moscow’s reasons. Soviet no- 
talk, war-scare policy was counter- 
productive and there has been a 
change of leadership. Besides, “star 
wars* is either a bargaining chip to be 
negotiated away or a real asset to 
pursue. It cannot be both. 

An article (IHT, Jan. 28) by Zbig- 
niew Brzezinski, Robert Jastrow and 
Max Kampelman urging strategic de- 
fense claims that ii is both. Presum- 
ably that is a compromise among (he 
authors — another example of con- 
tradictory mix in the arguments. 

On the level of politics, which 
comes closer to the heart of the cur- 
rent debate, proponents argue that 
aims control is too difficult and too 
unreliable not to seek an active de- 
fense. They seldom explain their un- 
derlying reasons, which are too ugly 
to publicize. 

One school holds that war is inev- 
itable and that America must prepare 
to “prevail." Norman Podhoretz 
( IHT, Jan. 25) veQs this reasoning 
with analogies to the 1930s appease- 
ment of Germany and Japan. Anoth- 


er school holds that America can pre- 
vail without war by ou (spending and 
out-inventing the Russians. Another 
lap in the arms race, in this view, will 
leave Moscow pleading for relief. 

Opponents argue that we have to 
live with the Russians, without liking 
them, and it is better to seek agree- 
ments. Intensifying the arras race 
heightens the danger of conflict, and 
the cost will undermine the sturdiness 
of American society. 

Finally, there is the level of sheer 
emotion and wish-dream. Mr. Rea- 
gan says that his program mil make 
nuclear weapons “impotent and ob- 
solete.” removing the “immoral” reli- 
ance on threats to deter war. Nobody 
else who is informed says that, ft 
would be lovely if future generations 
could achieve it, providing their at- 
tempt did not encourage outer forms 
of mass-destructive war. 


la France, 
Reasons for 


Skepticism 


But if there is any real possibility, it 
is too far away to include in contem- 


porary grounds for judgmenL 
There is too much at stake to mud- 
dle the public with deliberately con- 
fused argument. The scientists have a 
long way io go before they can settle 
the question of feasibility. 

Meanwhile, the rest of us have ev- 
ery reason to be cautious and dubi- 
ous. Defense Is appealing, but for 
now it is an illusion that could block 
the search for peace. 

The New York Times. 


Chun Has Yet to Keep His Promises 


N EW YORK — After seizing 
power in 1980, President 
Chun Doo Hwan of South Korea 
announced plans to restore democ- 
racy and human rights. He pledged 
to uphold the nation's constitution 


By Nina Shea 


lions in 1988. In 1984, be freed 
some political prisoners, lifted 
some political bans and reinstated 
some demonstrators expelled from 


college^Laidy. Mr. Chun talks as if 


South Korea were well on the road 
to democracy. It is noL 

Mr. Chun's gestures, although 
welcome, have not altered the re- 
gime's basic authoritarianism. The 
repressive apparatus that is a legacy 
of bis coup is intact, and he remains 
intolerant of pluralistic institutions 
that underlie true democracy. 

In South Korea, key members of 
the Reagan administration have 
praised Mr. Chun’s democratiza- 
tion plans. But America's quiet dip- 
lomatic efforts have failed to pro- 
duce pluralistic institutions. If 
democratization is a serious goal 
the second Reagan administration 
must press publicly for tougher, 
more specific measures to ensure 
that Mr. Chun keeps his promises. 

Though a balance of power is 
crucial for democracy. South Ko- 
rea’s government remains central- 
ized in Mr. Chun. He limits the 
National Assembly, the only direct- 
ly elected body, to airing opinions 
rather than generating legislation. 

Though democracy requires po- 
litical competition, Seoul curtails 
political activity. The 15 principal 
opposition leaders remain barred 
from politics and are targets of 
ermnent harassment. One, 


Young Sam, was put under house 
arrest Jan. 8. The world mil be 
watching how the Chun govern- 
ment treats the return home of the 
democratic opposition leader Kim 
Dae Jung, who is to arrive Feb. 8 
from exile in the United Slates. 

Though political parties in a de- 
mocracy must be free to organize 
and candidates to get their message 


South Koreans were 
freer during the 
Korean War. 


tactics suppress strikes, collective 
action and independent unions' 
ability to organize workers. Domes- 
tic rights groups that protest too 
loudly are intimidated. Last Sep- 
tember, thugs linked to the police 
abducted and beat the Reverend 
Park Hyung Kyu, past director of 
the Korean Presbyterian Church 
and now head of a human rights 
committee. Student demonstrators, 
a significant dissident bloc, are rou- 
tinely arrested and roughed up. 

pressure can Washington 


apply? New legislation suggests 
that duty-f 


iity-free treatment of imports 
under the 


to voters, Seoul restricts the permit- 
ted opposition. Seoul retains power 
to veto opposition parties' choices 
of leaders, candidates and plat- 
forms. Candidates for the Feb. 12 
parliamentary election may cam- 
paign only a few weeks and make 
appearances only when all parties 
are represented. 

Though democracy requires a 
free exchange of information, Seoul 
tightly controls the media. About 
800 journalists remain banned, per- 
iodicals remain dosed, and censor- 
ship regulations are still issued. The 
press law maintains control by re- 
quiring licenses for publishers and 
limiting purchases of small proses. 
Such topics as Mr. Chun's political 
legitimacy are never discussed. 

Though democracy requires plu- 
ralistic associations as checks on 
government, Seoul stifles watchdog 
groups. Tough labor laws and harsh 


Generalized System of 
Preferences be withheld from coun- 
tries that violate workers’ rights. 
Since the United States is South 
Korea's largest trading partner and 
South Korea benefits greatly from 
such preferences, denying imports 
duty-free stares would be a signifi- 
cant incentive for reform. 

While any move must consider 
South Korea's security concerns — 
mainly over North Korea — Wash- 
ington should appreciate that South 
Koreans enjoyed greater freedom 
during the Korean war, when dan- 
ger was greater. Today in South 
Korea there is no domestic aimed 
guerrilla movement and little sym- 
pathy for communism. On the con- 
trary, the opposition, including a 
growing mioale class, is committed 
to democracy. It is in the interests 
of both America and South Korea 
to ensure that democracy develops. 


The writer is program director of 
the huemadomu League for Human 
Rights. She contributed this com- 
ment to The New York Times. 


support the resumption of dialogue. 

But the French fear that their ca- 
pacity to maintain a credible nuclear 
force wfll be limited if French forces 
are included in the negotiations on 
strategic weapons. Such an inclusion, 
as requested earlier by the Soviet side 
and again in Geneva by Mr. Gromy- 
ko, is viewed in Paris as part of a 
Soviet maneuver to create discord in 
the Atlantic allianc e. 

The French also fear that Mr. Rea- 
gan’s Strategic Defense Initiative, or 
“star wars'’ system, will make the 
world less safe, not more so. 

In French eyes, the SDI raises the 
specter of a neo-isolationist “Fortress 
America” nailing — and motivated 
by economic factors — to decouple 
its security from that of Europe. 

For the French, the idea that weap- 
ons in space can successfully fight a 
war above man's head is seen as a 


reflection of the inherent optimism of 
the American character. Such a vi- 


rion can only dash with the more 
cynical and tragic view of the world 
(hat Europeans have learned. 

The French see a common inspira- 
tion in SDI and in the greater reliance 
on sophisticated new conventional 
arms. Both stem from a desire to 
transcend a nuclear wodd. Such an 


attempt may threaten the security of 


the west by reducing nuclear deter- 
rence, and may reduce France's inter- 
national status. At tremendous cost, 
France has built an independent nu- 
clear force. If nuclear weapons are 
discarded as irrelevant, France's ef- 
forts will have been in vain. 

“Star wars” may have a destabiliz- 
ing impact by contributing to the 
breakdown of the Anti-Ballistic Mis- 
sile treaty. And SDI research may 
render the technological race so cost- 
ly as to leave the Europeans far be- 
hind in their attempts to build a com- 
petitive arms procurement industry. 

It is difficult for the Europeans to 
criticize “star wars,” for without it, 
the Soviet Union probably would not 
have returned so quickly to the bar- 
gaining table. 


But once negotiations begin, the 
of SDI ma‘ 


existence of SDI makes a g reements 
on strategic and intermediate nuclear 
weapons more difficult to achieve. 

Since the early 1950s, the interna- 
tional system and European security 
have been based on (he frightening, 


but ultimately comfortable, logic of 


the balance of nuclear terror. 

The French {conservatives by ne- 
cessity, in spite of their attachment to 
arms control) view with growing dis- 
comfort America’s increased aloof- 
ness toward the nuclear sword. 


The writer, associate director of the 
Instinu Francois des Relations Inter- 
nationales. contributed this comment 
to the International Herald Tribune. 


r 


icsr* 


Rethinking 
Militancy 
In Brazil 



By Jonathan Power 

L ONDON --The public furor over 
t liberation theology has momen- 
tarily died down, but the i nner ten- 
sion isjnst b eg i nnin g to build up. The 
catalyst this time is not the heavy 
hand of papal disapproval and a Vat* ; 
Iran enquiry, but the return of de- 
mocracy to Brazil with the election of . 


Brazil's first civilian president in 20 


years on Jan. 15. The liberation theo- 
logians, no kmger up against the easy L 
target of a brutal military regime, 
must decide where to go next. 

Liberation theology has been . 
bursting out all over — in the Philip- 
pines, in South Africa, in Nicaragua, ; 
wherever there are large numbers of". 
Onhnfics and Immense political and 
soda] problems. But the weflspringu ~ 
Brazil, where the theology has been " 
nurtured and has spread out from the 
activist clergy to bishops on one side 
and to congregations on the other. 
What Catholic thinkers dedde to do - 
in Brazil will echo to a large audience. 

Democracy is a concept the Brazil- 
ian theologians have never had to 
deal with — evolution not confronta- 
tion, a means not an end, a route full 
of compromises, without any promise 
that the ideal state will be realized. 
The liberation theologians who have 
known only dictatorship and dwelt 
on its antithesis, revolution, will find 
it very difficult to adapt their ideals 
to the imperfect state of slow political 
compromise by vote, especially given 
the magnitude of Brazil's problems. 

The Br azilian liberation philoso- 
phers, until now, have had a role . 
model in Luis Ign&tio da Siva* 
(“ Lula £ be union leader who rose' 
to prominence at the time of the met- 
alworkers’ strike in 1978 in the an to 
factories that ring S3o Paulo. He was 
the first working-class leader to be- 
come nationally prominent, helped 
by the decision of the tmhtary regime 
to strip him of his union offices and 
put him in prison. His prominence 
was also boosted by the personal in- 
terest in his welfare of visiting heads 
of government, who recognized that^ 
the future of their investments in Bra- C 
zO depended on the working class. > 

The archbishop of Sao Paula Car- ' 
dmal Paulo Evansto Arm, once told 




me that Lula held the political ideas 
to ms on 


By Dominique. MoTsi 

P ARIS —The French government 
greeted the Gromyko-Sbultz 
meeting in Geneva with apprehensive 
satisfaction. Having advocated an 
end to the frigid relations between 


the superpowers, France could only 
port the resun 


that were closest to his own. And 
certainly if the Church had formally 
supported a political party in the gen- 
eral elections, it would have cast its 
vote for Lula's Workers' Party. 

This unabashed admiration of 
Lula made a certain amount of sense 
when it was stiD uncertain if the gen- 
erals were going to allow a return to. 
fully fledged democracy. Lula stood ' 
for the tights of the poor and the 
weak against the oppressive machin- 
ery of a heavy-handed state. 

Now it is modi more complicated. • 
The democrats are in power — not • 
the Workers' Party, but opposition . 
parties that long were opposed to all 
that the military stood for. Moreover, , 
Lula is taking a dogmatic line, rerisl- . 
ing the proposals of the new presi- 
dent, Tancredo Neves, to follow the - 4 
precedent of post-Franco Spain and ! 
have a period in which all the parties 
agree to refrain from disruptive ac- 
tion so as to guarantee a peaceful 
transition to democracy. 

The choice for the Church no long- ! 
er can be painted in the stark terms it ■ 
was before. There are democratic 


choices and shades of left and right, ! 

liable 


all of which could make a rcasonai 
claim on the Christian conscience. 

The Catholic Church in Brazil has " 
evolved so fast that it is still finding 
its feet Moreover, it is a part of a ; 
country that has tom itself up by its 
roots and transformed itself within a • 
angle generation from a primarily . 
rural society to one that can export 
airplanes and computers. 

The temptation for the Church will ’ 
be to remain the total critic — to go 
on simply denouncing. The fact is 
that if the Church appeared to be 
succeeding in as anti-establishment - 
campaign it would lead to enormous ; 
civil strife and assuredly bring back 

mar - 

of civil liber-’ 
the Church has 
to learn to do in a democracy is to 
bend the farces of production to be . 
more socially itsponable, rather than j 
undermine such forces. _ ' 

Fortunately, liberation theology in-. 
Brazil owes its primary heritage not - ■ 
to Marxism, despite some of its rhet- 
oric and sociological analysis, but to 
the writings of the French philoso- - 
phers of the early 20th century, Jac- 
ques Mari tain, Emmanuel Mounier. 
and the Dominican LJL Lcbret. So- 



cial reformers they were, but they 
were highly critical erf 


Marxism and 
one cannot imagine they would have 
had much time for the extremes of 
present-day liberation theology with 
its unequivocal condemnation of for- 
eign investment, multinationals and 
banks as if they were more the root of - 
evil than man's own nature. 

The liberation theologians are go- 
ing to have to do a Ing rethink. In a 

democracy being the Church militant 

does not mean being the Church red. 
International Herald Tribune. 




The Purpose of V-E Day 


V-E Day is not meant to be a 
celebration nor an exercise in nostaJ- 1 
gia. After World War I, the Allies 1 
“celebrated" Armistice Day every- 

Nov. 11. It was a time to pay homage 

to dead soldiers and sailors. 

Present and future generations of 

all countries should not be allowed to 

forget the tremendous suffering, loss 
of fives and unbelievable destruc ti on 
caused by the Axis leaders of Wor® 
War IL the Soviet Union lost more 
than 20 million people in the last war - 
and had a major role in defeating 
Nazi Gtamany.Kegardless of present, 
day Gild War politics, Russia s hero 
ic struggle deserves recognition too 

and should not be subjeetto our “his-. 

torical distortions.” 

EDWARD E D0R5ON. 
Gfftdqje, Denmark- 



;. T'-i, *T --_ 

{jin-w -or* - * . W ~ 


: it 

V 


Sjkeshirirf’-. !'•:* -w"' 1 


ippoilkminc 


lerRpvtrii* Ugh 

' iO'Jri h ‘ i 




^ .. 










L - __ 


■ vq 


• • • 

‘ 1 
Ur ‘ - . 

>'ehSr'v.- 

'tiirr.i.-' : 

ad Ki - - 

■ tha.-;.: 

fjfensi fa. 


iflc 


jn- i l 


r - 

. Tic; 


^ lcC U>r.-'. „ 

k 


Ji 

JiCri 

r.'Ot 

>axi 

■ion 

p-.'Li 

nuv 


ia ik. '■ - . 


c. 




Mat 

A 





fie 



-a-’. 


... 

t- hr<... ’ w f.CT!. 


1 -Cj 


PtouSfc f-v “Tom-.-! 









INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1985 


Page 5 


Wealth, From Foreign Jobs Transforms Egyptian Village Life, Class Structure 


B, 

*im c VSS,) 

Cn!i 


By David B.. Grcaway 

■ Washington Fan Service 

DAHSHOUR, Egypt — Samir 
Mohammed, a 30-year-old peasant 
in this protfflcring NUeRiver Village 
23 miles (40 kilometers} south of 
Cairo, is restless again. 

In 1980, he went to Libya, 
worked on a farm for three years 
jnd brought bade enough money to 
doable his half-acre (two-tenths of 
a hectare) plot, build a modest 
mod-brick house, get manied and 
buy 'animals and a television set. 

Now his savings are exhausted 
andhe wants to go abroad again, to 
Saudi Arabia if possible, because, 
as be says, got used to having a 
tot of money and my land doesn’t 
earn me that much. 

Mr. Mohammed, in his new- 
found wealth, opportunities and 
aspirations, is a typical example of 
the ' two million to three million 
EgyptLans working abroad. They 
are sending bade to their villages an 
estimated S6 billion to $10 biDh» 
annually,'. 


The billions of dollars flowing 
from Egyptian workers in the Arab 
world directly to their families is 
radically transforming life in 
Egypt’s villages. It has put the so- 

Mubarak’s Egypt: 

Seeking the Middle Path 

Third of four articles . 

rial structure of highly class- 
consdous nation in turmoil. 

U A silent revolution," as a sociol- 
ogist, Saad Iddin Ibrahim, calls it, 
is taking place. 

Some Egyptian and U»S. ana- 
lysts see this revolution as part of 
the late President Anwar Sadat's 
“open-door policy.*' declared in 
1974. That policy not only encour- 
aged free enterprise and foreign in- 
vestment but opened the door to 
mass Egyptian migration for the 
first time since the 1952 revolution. 

Sadat’s policy coincided with the 
stan of a decade of vast oil wealth 


in the Arab world that set off a 
boom in the sparsely populated 
Arab countries of die Gulf and a 
tremendous demand for labor, par- 
ticularly in Saudi Arabia and Iraq. 
In Iraq alone, there are more than a 
million Egyptians, many settling 
down to stay. 

Other economists see this revolu- 
tion as a by-product of tbe peace 

process (hat got under way in ear- 
nest in November 1977 with Sa- 
dat’s historic trip to Jerusalem. 
This, they contend, allowed tbe 
government to release the work 
force from the war effort to go 
abroad and reap “a personal peace 
dividend.” 

Tbe sweeping social change that 
has hit Egypt in the past decade has 
had a profound effect in the ddes 
as well as in the villages. 

In Cairo, the old social and intel- 
lectual elite seems totally disorient- 
ed in today's fast-changing eco- 
nomic landscape where even an 
Egyptian housemaid has become 
too costly to afford. 








r ou - taeBr 

■*—-> K-osassj, 

**— acvJjisQt 

r- : 

c’.cfiatBis 
: ■>= "it -kus£ 

z : 

:i ~.i.Z ir-sj. 
:c i v_, 

iW Ca JT5 hs-'V- 






Tl» New York Tim 

Makeshif t dwellings crowd streets outside tbe Union Carbide plant in BhopaL 

Apportioning the Blame lor Bhopal 

Disaster RevealsFktws in Regulation of Industry in India 


?•’ ?r r.. rr.ee; 

: ..T£*e}jssB. 
l-jrf -‘MilrJfB 

uV^siv 

roi: 

: .f 

:r. 2? mom 

i::zizz 
Z'^ZXi? 

: zir.xr^: 

... TV «•» 

Jj Zii! 

;* ■- ,:•» 

-vv.: Lizrz-Z’ 

..£z 

~T" /T.'r* I 


d.'u.: •^j. 
. iv— ^ 

. . ... :£& 



(Continued brat Page 1) . What tbe company told the cen- 

hcalth and safety said the factory and state governments about 
inspectors' job was limited to look- the potential hazards of this pro- 
ing after safety devices to protect cess is unclear, since all records 
workers. . have been impounded by an offi- 

U-K-Tiwari, chairman .of the -■ - 

pdlltifiriit^bri^^ bwridi'saa J)dln .gpveqiments 

agency did not Bave responsibility 01 ^ 

because methyl isocyanate, called M3 ^'^ eD f e 
MIC, has not a nonnal emission of 5?®^ 1 * su f*“ e °* 

The top offidal in the Madhya 

Union ,!* J° “ in * Btrial 

Carbide Parted manufacturing rorel 5 rate (24 bloomers) awy. 
MIC, which is used to makeaUthe . The plan was not followed. The 

pesticides produced at the factory. 5*2? **.»■ dnm 

! TrT “ ZT~-fy dwdlmgs and even middfe-mcome 

^ angh kmsdf was afl^ housing\«« being buflt nearby. 

If3e nontechnical political and 
thm^ that Jim burden rest- dvil authorities in Bht&l were un- 
ed witb pe conqjany io inform aware ^ ^ danger in their 
local aulhonties about potential. aMst ^ why did the teSnical and 
2u ^ n r‘ • ' industrial agencies involved in fi- 

So far, Mr. Singn s government raging and monitoring the plant 
has brought criminal charges n i^ mT<wr nothingj? 

And why was so little actum tak- 
en after several signs, including a 
fatal accident in 1981, showed that 
all was not well at tbe plant? 

Industrial licenses are issued by 
the Ministry of Industry after con- 
sultation with several other agen- 
cies, such as in this case the Minis- 
try of Chemicals and Fertilizers, 
the directorate-general of technical 
development, the Ministry of Agri- 
culture and its Central Pesticides 
Board, as well as the Madhya Pra- 
desh state government- 
just what Union Carbide dis- 
closed about the hazards of MIC 


•c 


y. 


several officials of Union 
rbide. I n c luding Warren M. An- 
derson, chairman of the Union 
Carbide Coro, of Danbmy, Con- 
noctumt, and Keshub Mahindra 
arid, V-P.vGokhale, chairman and 
nwnagteg director, respectively, of 
Union Carbide India . Ltd. Tbe 
Union Carbide Coro, owns 50.9 
percent of Union Carbide India, 
which owns the Bhopal plant 
In addition, charges have been 
brought against Jaganaihan Mu- 
kund, the factory manager, and 
SJP. Cboudhaiy, the assistant fac- 
tory manager: All have been re- 

^ ssssvta 

non predated India’s air and water 
pollution laws. Also unclear is how 
much scrutiny tbe central govern- 
ment gave the application. 

“This is a big weakness in the 
process," said a former official of 
the Department of Industry. “The 
depth of scrutiny is so shallow and 


Sunder Patidar, and dismissed the 
chief inspector of factories, C.P. 
TyagL woo Mr. Singh said had re- 
newed tl» factory’s license annual- 
ly without acting on reports of safe- 
ty lapses from the labor 
it - 

lot even Dr. M.N. Nasi, direc- 


itasthm^Mto leave thoussmdsS what it was about, and just said it 
self, choiring-, gasping for breath 



and half 
Nor did Bhopal's part-time may- 
or, Dr. RJL Bsaiya, also a phya- 
dan, know mnch about MIC. -Nei- 
ther did Raigit Singh, the diief 


Madhya Pradesh.' 

An official of the Madhya Pra- 
desh department of industries said 
there were some in the department 
who objected to the plant location. 
Bat, he added, they were overruled 


3 s - 


'•v^v 


■ ; . r . 

‘•".Tv*- 


: -j- ,V>- 
j. ' 

A » r 


admmistratire officeTof the Bho- by nontechnical people and the 
pal district and the man chiefly plant applications were recom- 
responsihte fw OOTtnuKacy plans mcori^i lo the central ^veramcnL 
in case of disasters. There was none “It is not Carbides fault, be 
in case of a leak from CarKde. said., “We did not tell them what to 

The police -superintendent, Swa- 
ntj Pus, sqid ho first-learned of 
MIC, with his eyesand lungs burn- 
ing, at about 3:30- A^L on Dec. 3, 
when he was infonned ofit by K.V. 

Svetty, tbe plant- superintendent 
for the shift. 

“Wemadehimspdl it," Mr. Pun 


do. They never refused to install 
what we asked. They were never 
advised what was needed." 

Once licensed by the central gov- 
ernment, the Carbide factory was 
theoretically monitored by the 
state government under four main 
national laws: the Factories Act of 
1948, the Insecticides Act of 1968, 
tbe Water Act of 1974 and the Air 
Act of 1982. 

Thus far, the Madhya Pradesh 
government has placed the burden 
of blame on its labor department, 
which enforces the Factories Act, 
mainly at providing safe 
working conditions at the plant, 
rather than protecting the general 
public. 

The dismissal of the chief factory 
inspector, Mr. Tyagi, has incensed 
the inspectors’ office at Indore, 120 
miles southwest of BhopaL 

Mr. Tyagi declined to comment, 
but another member of the inspec- 
tors’ office described the condi- 
tions under which factory inspec- 
tors must operate in Madhya 
Pradesh with the proviso that he 
not be identified. 

Each inspector, he said, has re- 
sponsibility for more than ISO fac- 
tories , triple tbe standard recom- 
mended by the International Labor 
Organization. 

Each is given a quota of 400 
inspections a year, to be done in 
only 200 or so working days. More- 
over, he added, they are expected to 
travel about this large state by pub- 
lic transportation. 

Requests for better support from 
the state government have gone un- 
heeded, the staff member said. 
They have no hygiene laboratory 
and few instruments. 

“We don’t even have instru- 
ments to collect samples," he said. 
“AD we can say is there is dust and 
you stop it It is very difficult to 
prove in a court of law because we 
don't know what the nonnal level 
is." 

Moreover, the official said, in- 
spectors have little authority lo or- 
der that unsafe conditions be reme- 
died, apart from going to court. 
That process often takes years and 
that tbe fines are minimaL 

As for Union Carbide, he said 
that by comparison to tbe safety 
violations committed by other 
plants in the state. Carbide was 
considered almost a model citizen. 
It had only one fatal aeddent in 
recent years, while one steel plant 
had 25 in one year and deaths were 
common in other plants, he said. 



These officials said nobody-at 
the company suggested a simple 
antidote of covering the Face with a 
wM-cloth. Had that been known in 
advance,- they said, many lives 


Wm 

i ug^ seeds -of the accident were 
planted in 1972, when, under gov- 
eroment-pressure to reduce imports 
and loss of foreign exchange, the 
company proposed to manufacture 

and store MIC at the {riant. 


BROADCASTING TO CABLE COMPANIES 
IN EUROPE S THE UK VIA SATELLITE 


[c H A N N E 


PROGRAM, FRIDAY lat FEBRUARY 

Sl^S^SKteS 
1*55 SKVTRAX1 
15.40 SKYTRAX2 
teas SKY TRAX3 
17.30 GREEN ACRES 
1&00 THE BRADY BUNCH 
1030 MORK 4 MINDY 
19.26 STARS KY & HUTCH 
20.15 CAMMD CAM ERA 

2?;$ T>«MADLY B1NBT HORROR SHOW 
2250 SKYTRAX 

CONTACT SKY CHANNEL, SATELLITE TELE VISION f*tC FOR FURTHER INFORMATION 
TELEPHONE LONDON (Dll 636 4077 TELEX 266843 


An illiterate maid can easily earn 
twice the starting salary of a uni- 
versity graduate or teacher. Many 
wives waking as secretaries in pri- 
vate firms bring home bigger pay- 
checks than their husbands em- 
ployed by the government 
Mohammed Hrikal. an Egyptian 
writer and political commentator, 
discussed die upheaval at his own 
plush, wood-panefed apartment 
overlooking the Nile in Giza. 

"The whole social and intellectu- 
al map is changing," be said. 
“What is needed is a social survey 
of Egypt The layers have changed 
and are changing. It's the effect of 
education — 9.5 million in our 
schools and universities — and $6 
billion from the Arab world." 

It is in the villages that the deep- 
est changes seem to be taking place. 
In the past decade, the standard 
farm wage has soared from a half- 
pound (about S.63 at current rates) 
for a dnwn-to-dusk workday to 5 
pounds for an eight-hour day com- 
plete with a meat cigarettes and tea 
breaks. 

Tenant farmers have suddenly 
become landowners; illiterate peas- 
ants, or their tons, have become 
plumbers, carpenters and masons, 
earning 59 to S12 a day. This is four 
or five times the wages of the vil- 
lage teacher or civil servant 
From landless peasants to doc- 
tors, engineers and teachers, those 
going abroad are piling up savings 
that can equal the wealth of the big 
old families who once ruled the 
villages like lords and pashas but 
can no longer afford tbe nigh wages 
to keep thor estates going 
"The returning workers put a lot 
of economic pressure, but also po- 
litical pressure, on the villages," 
said Abdul-Moheim Mashat. a Cai- 
ro University professor who is 
studying rite effects of the migra- 
tion. “They are going to compete 
with tbe old. established order.” 

Mr. Mashat, a specialist in na- 
tional security affairs, said that 
those returning may pose a danger 
not only to the dominant old fam- 


ilies in the villages but to the cen- 
tral government as welL 

They are coming home, he said, 
with “religion and new wealth." 
These two factors make for far 
greater political activism and thus 
raise the potential for violence and 
social struggle. 

“When those people came back, 
they will pressure the government 
to allow them to participate in poll- 
lies. Unless the government adjusts 
to these demands, they will go into 
the opposition," he predicted 

So far, be does not see the ruling 
National Democratic Party making 
those adjustments. He dies an arti- 
cle in the local press in December 
that criticized it for having “no ties 
to the streets or the villages.” 

Mr. Mashat predicts the opposi- 
tion New Wafd Party will be the 
main beneficiary of this migration 
and give it a “big push" m elections 

expected in 1 989. The party wot 57 
of the 448 seats in legislative elec- 
tions last May. 

Since the old families are aQ part 
of the ruling party, the struggle of 
the “new rich” to displace them in 
the village social hierarchy wfl] in- 
evitably pit them against the offi- 
cial party, Mr. Mashat said 

It is clear from even a brief visit 
to Dahshour and talks with resi- 
dents that much has changed in this 
booming village of 13^000. 

‘ At least 1,000 Of its inhab itants 
have gone abroad already, and ev- 
ery day 15 more apply to the village 
council for passports, according to 
Nalril Abdulrarik Bayoum, a coun- 
cil member. 

The story of the new wealth from 
this mass migration can be told and 
seen in dozens of ways. 

“Fifteen years ago, if yon had 
come here in a car, you would have 
been mobbed." Mr. Bayoum said 
“Today, there are 50 to 60 cars and 
trucks in the village and nobody 
notices." 

Houses are no longer buDi with 
mud but with red-clay brick. One 
can tel] immediately from the siy<» 
and fancy designs on their facades 
which family has sent a son or fa- 


ther abroad and which has not yet. 

One sign of the new weaith/ac- 
cording to Mr. Bayoum, is the cost 
of land. A decade ago. an acre cost 
about 1,000 pounds, about SI.20O 
at the current official exchange 
rate. Today, a plot called a qirat, 
175 square yards (146 square me- 
ters) or about 127th of an acre, 
costs seven to eight times that 
amount. 

Land has become so costly and 
fragmented into qirats that the con- 
solidation of plots into larger tracts 
to allow for mechanization of agri- 
culture has become very difficult. A 
big business today is selling off 
these tiny plots for construction of 
buildings, a main factor in Egypt's 
loss of f milli on acres of agricultur- 
al land in the past 12 yean. 


The usual pattern of family life 
in the Egyptian village is for one 
member to go abroad and stay 
however Jong it lakes to save 
enough money to set up a business. 

“It's the people who don't have 
enough money to stan life here 
who go abroad and stay two or four 
years," explained Abdul-Monehn 
Ebeid. an agricultural extension 
agent for the village. “First, they 
want a house and land. Then they 
buy a small shop, a car or truck or 
something to make money.” 

Mr. Ebeid himself is a good ex- 
ample. His cousin went to Libya 
and with the 524,000 he saved up, 
they built a two-story building on 
the family’s quarter-acre plot to 


raise > 


tens. 


Sihanouk Rejects Vietnam’s Offer 
To Meet With Cambodian Regime 


BANGKOK — Prince Noro- 
dom Sihanouk, the former leader of 
Cambodia who now leads one of 
the three resistance factions, said 
Thursday that he had refused Viet- 
nam's offer for him to meet with 
the Hanoi-installed Heng Samrin 
regime in Cambodia. 

Prince Sihanouk said such talk* 
would split the resistance and pos- 
sibly result in a cutoff of Chinese 
aid. Tbe coalition includes the 
prince’s small noncommanisi 
group, the Khmer Peoples’ Nation- 
al Liberation Front, also noncom- 
munist, and the Communist 
Khmer Rouge. 

He also said China would not 
improve ties with Vie tnam until it 
withdraws its 160,000 troops from 
Cambodia. 

The prince and Son Sann . leader 
of the Liberation Front, met for an 
hour with the UN secretary -gener- 
al, Javier Pfcrez de Cuellar, who just 
returned from Vietnam. 

Meanwhile, 69 children fathered 

Vietnam War flew to Bangkok on 


Thursday from Ho Chi Minh City 
on ibdr way to new homes in the 
United States. The airlift raised to 
2,017 the total of Amerasian chil- 
dren allowed to leave Vietnam 
since the program began in Sep- 
tember 1982. 


Mr. Ebeid, 25. who learned iron- 
wdding at a vocational school, said 
they could have bought more land 
with the same capital bur “the prof- 
its are better because everyone 
needs chickens and eggs." There 
are now right such poultry projects 
around Dahshour. 

Mr. Ebeid, who has a fiancte, 
has set his eyes on adding a third 
floor to the chicken building and 
then putting up a bouse before he 
gets married. 

Mr. Bayoum. 30. is even more 
ambitious! He has a degree in agri- 
cultural engineering from Cairo 
University but is now working for a 
master’s degree in literature so he 
can get a better job teaching in 
Saudi Arabia, or elsewhere in the 
Gulf. He plans to stay abroad for 
five years. 

A teacher with a master’s degree 
can save up to 512,000 a year in 
Saudi Arabia, he said In Dah- 
shour, a teacher earns only about 
5600 to 5720 a year. 

Teachers earn so little in Egypt 
that Dahsh our is in full crisis be- 
cause “they have all gone abroad" 
according to Mr. Bayoum. 

Tomorrow: Eppt remains adrift 
in the Arab world 


jL — u, tfL. 

Beveriy Wilshire Hotel 

IN THE HEART OF LOS ANGELES 
Wilshire Boulevard at Rodeo Drive 
Beveriy Hills. Calif. 90212 
(213) 275-4282 Telex 698-220 


c 1hcFjeadaiff}fatch>tii thr^Worid j 

London (01) 563-3050 
Frankfurt 1069) 29 04 71 
Hong Kong (5) 22 it 42 





London (01)409-0814 
Frank fun (069) 28 7; 24 
Hong Kong (3) 68 23 35 


INTERNATIONAL REAL ESTATE 


Yz/nmsojQ' 


TORONTO, CANADA 

C$10,500 — A SMALL DOWNPAYMENT 
FOR A BIG INVESTMENT IN 
PRIME LOCATION CONDOMINIUMS 

• only 15% cash downpayment 

• 3 years rental and management guarantee 

• prices: CS82£0OC$9e,00O 

• 2 , 3, 4 bedrooms, multl-fevet 

• Apartment sizes: 1196 sq. fL (1 1 tor) —2010 sq. d (1B7nr) 

• Modem conveniences and recreation facilities 

• Constant appreciation, fully rented, professionally managed 

WINZEN CORPORATION LIMITED 

Ate Marketing Manager, 67 Yonge Street, Suita 700 
Toronto. Ontario, Canada, M5E IJfl 
T»l: f41E0Bto«7l — TBfaK 06534301 

— IN ADDITION WINZEN OFFERS: 

— quality commercial properties & rentalapartment buildings 

— comprehensive services to potential immigrating entrepreneurs 


Prestige Store For Rent 

FIFTH AVENUE 
50’S EAST SIDE 

New York City 

Between Saks and Tiffany's 

•High Quality Tenant Only 
Principals Only 
270-900 square meters 
3,000-10,000 square feet 

Telephone: 212-936-0001, 

Box D-2133, International Herald Tribune, 
92521 Neuitty Cede* France. 


STAMFORD, CONNECTICUT 

U.S.A. 



LUXURIOUS FRENCH VILLA ON 3.9 ACRES 
IN IDYLLIC SET APART CONCLAVE 

A custom buitt palatiaHy large 7 bedroom 8 V 1 bath home of exquisite 
detailing and dauicolly French decor, with swimming pod, a winding stroom 
edging the beautifully landscaped property. Provisions for guest suites 
indude second kitchen. Exceptional space for entertaining. In one of our finest 
residential areas, total privacy, just 5 minutes from the Greenwich line. 
Handsomely furnished at $ 1 , 060,000 or unfurnished at $ 995 , 000 . 


Investment 

Opportunities 

Commercial reat estate investments and 
imesfanent mmogement. Undeveloped 
land to be held for appreciation. Turn- 
key projects with substantial a p p re do- 
tiv* po te ntial d es ign, construction, 
lease up and management. Completed 
projects fully leased, finandng ma3- 
oble to achieve leverage. For Informa- 
tion on investment opportunities in 
southwest United Stotos contact! 

TARHC, Inc. 

4742 North Oracle Road 
Suite 213 

Tucson, Arizona 85705 
Telex: 165541 EX1UC 


CANNES 


Wonderful vifla buih in 1977 

8 double bedrooms - 7 bathrooms 
big swimming pool 
FOR RENT; 

FF.60,000. — per month 
(1S5/154) 

FF. 30,000 other months 
FOR SALE: 

FF.3, 800,000. — 

Further in form at ions ham: 

IMMOBILIZE DE VELARS S. A 
Box 62 - CH - 1884 VBars 
TdL: 41-25-35.35.31 
Telex: 456 213 GESE 


5th AVE 

TRUMP TOWS 
EXCLUSIVITY 

Panoramic views of Central Park & 
New York City skyline from 
renovated and fuBy furnished one- 
of-okind ap a rtment. Perfect for 
Ihe International Corporate pied-6- 
terre or investor. 

NEW YORK’S 
FASHIONABLE 50’s 


A CONDO perfect for c or porate 
Hving/enteriaining/ investment. 
Grade? DJI, 2BR’s on either side 
of apartment and a den. 
$1,100,000 including tasteful 
furniture. 

AMBROSE-MAR ELLA 
MEANS MANHATTAN 


For MMffflwif properties, fewnflime* 

cooperative and nmdbmDWBn apart- 
raenfs contact? 

Mrs. Margaret Bay 
or Miss Pierof. 
AMBROSE-MAR EUA Co., Inc. 
770 Lexington Avenue 

New York, New York 1002! 
(212)752-7789 


Fernhill Park 

ROYAL BERKSHIRE. ENGLAND 



A Luxurious country estate of 210 acres in Windsor Forest 
Located approximately 40 minutes from 
Central London 

Close to Ascot and Windsor Great Park 
with Heathrow only 15 minutes away 
Price - £10.5 million sterling 

HHKnight Frank&RutJey 

20 Hanover Square 01-629 8171 

London W1R 0AH Telex 265384 


Global Vision 

As the largest full service 
real estate'firm in Texas 
and the southwestern U.S., 
we provide expertise in 
property acquisitions and 
management 


Please note specific interest 
in request to 


HENRY S. MILLER CO., 
REALTORS* 

David Donosky, CEO 
Corporate Headquarters: 
2001 Bryan Tower 
Dallas, Texas 7S201 
214/748-9171 Telex 732459 

The Dnvtog Force In Tiucas Ro&l Estate 
Pa/ mare m Service with Grubb a 01b. 


sfiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiumiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiim 

i ON THE BEACH I 
| SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA | 

= This TOuOOO sq. ft Matfimnecn VBa h = 
= kxxdid in Santo Monica cn the scfcu and = 
= read beautiful beach fat Southern Goiter- = 
nfa.D»dywdby ienowix^crdtrled,tW = 
WWarre, the fuS jecurity home hai Hiph, = 
berened ceSngs in fang mom, dram = 
roam, room. Tht tongs reader be* = 
room wfe hae frapioM aid t» end here ~ 
mariJo betivaam. three adtffond bed- 3 
roonn witii M bafr i roa m , theater/ ptoyr- = 
00 m and projection booth, itdixted office s 
aite and workshop an ttd floor with = 
magrtfeent 18(7 p en onp u ie view of tee = 
ocm, two lereantt room with M bcriL = 

Swimming pool &f0y lie privacy of s 
beach Evmgmdtiin conve ni enc e of being s 
20 mfredee drMng time to Las Angrito, = 
tot Angel as Airprel, or Bewerty Hfc. 5 

for mere infonanttm and = 

a picserki b toclam , phase contact: = 

WOon l Kefly *. (2131 82*4521 = 
1 1942 Soi Vicente Btvd. = 

Lo* Angeles, CA 90049. = 

miiiniiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiitif; 


Votre adresse 
a Paris 8 feme 

22, ruejean Goujon, 
entre PAlma et les Champs-Elysees. 



Du studio au 4 pieces 
habitables immediatemenL 


Visite sur place le samedi « le lundi 
de 14 h a 18 h. 

Auers jours sur R.V. (l) 745.66.22 


0 


Commercialisation 

PM Pabice Mnsy 

26. n» Tbry - 33200 Neuffly 


INVEST NOW 

before tbe dollar devalues. 

Select PUEBLO in Marbelia 
British management and 
guaranteed income of 10% 
per annum. 

TdL Mrebdki {from UX 010 34 52} 
771047/777500 
London 01-428-39A2 
Manchester 061-793-1900 


SAN FRANQSC 0 PWN 5 UIA 

OCEAN VIEW ESTATE . 
FABULOUS LUXURY 

24JOOO cqJL residence just complete d . 
P^edioafli sites ol with ocm views 4- 
privaie bates, bmy orarr div buy in- 
ducting 9 wftripoo! tubs. 14 fr rpbiUT . 
Indoor swimting pooL Appr oxi m ate ly 8 
acres (addtional acreage auaMde). h . 
port at frort doer. Large bai^ Garages & 
temb aourt induded. 

US$7,000000. 

Brochure avrifeUe 
HAMtKM* WaONMUUR OX 

344 Kecniy Street 
San Fmnckco, CA. 94108 
141514343600 














Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1983 


NYSE Most Acfwes 


vo>. HM Low Last Cbm 


Dow Jones Averages 1 

Oha Hlfb Law Last CM 


NYSE Index 


»ft 20% 
43ft 37ft 
18% TJJ 
48% 47ft 

3* S' 4 

13% 12% 
33% 47% 
39% 37% 
33% 3% 
lift Iftfe 
Wft 135% 
40ft 37% 
26ft 25% 
37% 26% 


»ft -ft 
4a + 3 % 
lBft 

« + % 
34ft + ft 
■49 +1 

13% + VI 
49ft 4-1 

39ft - ft 
33% 

II 

136% —ft 
37% + ft 
25ft 

27ft + ft 


Indus 13BU4 139140 127164 12*477— l.H 
Trans iOMl 61470 6000* 489 JO— 134 
I Util 14065 149X7 14633 14034— 034 
! Comp 51023 51160 51009— 1X9 


Composite 

industrials 

Transa 

utilities 

Finance 


Hloh Lew aou Ch er 
1037* 10372 10175 +010 
11937 11974 1197V + 0.16 
10173 10031 10137 — 032 
5176 5153 5274-0-02 
107X3 107J03 107X3 +119 


Ihursdms 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ index 


AMEX Mast Actives 


NYSE Diaries 


dosing 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
New Htehs 
New Laws 
Volume ub 
V olume down 


Commtle 

Industrials 

Finance 

Insurance 

Utilities 

Bonks 

Tramp. 


week 
i CB'oe Ago 
I +0.12 Z7234 
I + DJ0 79172 
+ 035 31775 
’ + 135 25735 
1 — 432 26141 
I -034 24460 
I +134 25831 


VOL HM Law UNt Cbm 


Aawncw 
Declined 
Undfonoed 
Total issues 
New Hfeh3 

New Um 

Volume up 

volume dawn 


Clen Pnnr. 

Bn 9M 

112 682 

42S 393 

2067 2071 

164 309 

5 1 

63379.950 

51348710 


Odd-Lot Trading In N.Y. 


4812 1% 1% 

4172 4ft 3% 
3922 W W 
3291 21 2«£ 

2429 » 8% 

2375 13ft 13ft 
3390 10ft 9ft 
2090 Oft 9 
1950 35% 33 
1685 36% 35 
1681 VS 14ft 
1507- H 15% 


lft + ft 
4ft + % 
28 — ft 

21 + ft 

9V4 -% 
13% - ft 
9% —ft 
9 + ft 

35% — fti 

»* “ST* 

15% — ft 

W + %* 


■Included In Itie sales Houres 


Bey Sales ‘ShVt 
278X16 666449 MU 
240657 551777 3716 

254331 430496 18X58 
307,127 SSLS73 2.910 
241,772 662786 8060 


Vol. at 4 PJ4 13247WKB 

Prev.9PM.vol. 17M2R808 

prev censelldaled close 197X8TJ64 


standard & Poor's Index 


TeUes mettle me nationwide prices 

op to the dosing aa Wol Street 


Industrials 

Transo. 

Utilities 

Finance 

Composite 


Hied Low Close Oi’oo 
20171 19774 201.15 +070 
1615)6 15870 16071 —0X3 
77.14 7677 77.13 + 006 
20X7 2052 20X7 +0JM 
179X3 17856 1:9X3 +074 


I Dow Jones Bond Averages | 


AMEX Stock Index 


Bands 

UllOtlcs 

Industrials 


High Low Close Cbm 

< 8^4 1 22373 22+07 —833 


y\i i 




12 Month 
High Low Slack 


SHl rk&e I 

Dlv. Yld. PE lOQsHIgti LowQuot.Ol'ee I 


’SS^s" M »\ 

12ft AMCA 15X1 65 
13W AMP -SO XI t 
24ft AMR 

18ft AMR pf 2.18 IIJ) 
27ft AMR pt 2.12a SJ 
=2% AN Rot 2X7 104 
8% APL 

*J% ASA 370 50 
16 AVX 72 17 1 
W% Apt Lap 170 2X l 
14ft AccoWd 3 M 1 J 3 
12ft AcmeC xo li 
8ft AcmeE 72i 13 1 
15 Ada Ex 2.118120 
lift AdmMI 72 17 
AdvSvs Tit 67 1 
2SW AMD l 

«k Advert .12 17 
8% AerfhM 1 

27ft AetnLI 2X4 6X ; 

ArtLof SJCelOX 
15% Atoms 170 M 1 
2% Atom 3 


NYSE Mixed in Active Trading 


l2MOnlti 
High Low Stack 


Sis. Close 

Dlv. YUL PE 1 005 H left Lmw Ouol.Cn 'Pe 


36ft AJrPnf 170 25 1 


AlrbFrt X0 2J 1 
AiMoas 3 

Ate-P pf A 372 T2X 
AhlPdpt 77 11X 
AloPpr 9X0 12X 
AklPpf 1170 10.9 
Alappt 878 T2X 
Alooscs 91 7.1 
AlskAir .14 7 

Alberto 74 27 2 
Alptsra X8 2 X l 
AJcon 170 19 l 
AlcoStd 170 37 1 
AlexAlx 15W 3J 
Alexdr 2 

AlluCp 276t 2 X 
AhtCppf 276 117 
Alalnt 1X0 5.1 3 
Alain pf 2.19 117 

AislPtCllTS 13.1 
AUdPw 33® 93 
AlhsiG X0P 37 I 
AUdCPS 170 4X 
AhtCppf 6.74 117 
AMCppTOXO 117 
AldC pf 12X9812.1 
AlldPd 

AlldStr 270 37 

AltlsCh 

AlIsC Pf 

ALLTL 174 69 
AtahPr AOs 17 1 
Alcoa 170 1.1 1 
Amro 70 1.1 
f 370 9.1 
1.10 +3 
150 31 



Untied Press International 


NEW YORK — After a day-long snuggle 
ainst orofit-takine. prices on the New York 


against profit-taking, prices on the New York 
Slock Exchange finished mixed Thursday. 

Oil issues firmed for the second day while 
technology stocks came under pressure. 

The Dow Jones industrial average fdJ 1 . II to 
1.286.77. The Dow had been down nearly 10 
points in late afternoon before recovering most 
of the loss. For the entire month of January, the 
blue-chip barometer gained 7520. 

Declining stocks exceeded advancing ones 
slightly. Volume totaled 1325 million shares, 
down from 170 milli on shares traded Wednes- 
day. 

After the stock market closed, the Federal 
Reserve reported that the narrowest measure of 
the U.S. money supply, M-l, increased $4.7 
billion in the week ended Jan. 21. 

“People are looking for the next gro-.p that’s 
going to rally,** said Jon Gnveman ot Laden- 
burg,, T hai man n & Co. Inc., explaining the 
move in the oil stocks. He said firmer crude oil 
prices Thursday had convinced souse investors 
that the oil companies fortunes would take a 
turn for the better. 

Mr. Groveman said the recent rally started 
when the yield difference "between slocks and 
short-term money rates got to such a point that 
stocks were irresistible. 

He said the market looks “very strong" over 
the near term although it might have readied “a 
crescendo of optimism.” He expects the stock 
market to fluctuate in a narrow range between 
1260 and 1,310 on the Dow for the next week or 
two. After that, he said, there could be some 
consolidation and then another big advance. 

The mixed finish amounted to early signs of 
some son of pause," said Charles Comer of 


M-l Rises $4.7 BUlnn 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — The basic U. S. money sup- 


ply rose $4.7 billion in mid-January, the Federal 
Reserve Board reported Thursday. 


Reserve Board reported Thursday. 

The Fed said the M-l aggregate rose to a 
seasonally adjusted S56I.6 billion in the week 
that ended Jan. 21. from a revised S536.9 billion 
the previous week. M-l includes cash in circula- 
tion, deposits in checking accounts and travel- 
er's checks. 


Oppenheimer & Co. However, he said he was 
locking for a “sideways pause" rather than a 
“major correction." 

Mr. Comer said the force behind the market’s 
rise in January has been a shift in perception 
rather than a drastic change in fundamentals. 
Concerns about a recession, be said, “are rapid- 
ly losing currency," while “equities suddenly 
look cheap" as interest rates falL 
Before the stock market opened, the Com- 
merce Department reported the index of lead- 
ing indicators dropped 02 percent in Decem- 
ber. the fifth decline in seven months. The index 
is designed to forecast future economic trends. 

The Commerce Department also reported 
that sales of new single-family homes increased 
3.1 percent in December. 

New factory orders in December fell 0.7 
percent, according to another reporL 
On the trading floor. AT&T was the most 
active NYSE-listed issue, off 'A to 20H. 

Unocal was second, jumping 4 to 42ft. The 
stock was a subject of takeover rumors that bad 
T. Boone Pickens Jr. linin g up financing for a 
bid. 


Emppf JO 11.1 
EnExc 

i EnolCp 72 U 
Enl&Bu 56 17 
Enurdi 1X0 67 
EnxfipniL32 10.1 
EiMl pf 475811.4 
Erection 17381 IX 
Ensrca 
Entara 

EntxEn its* 77 
Entrain 1J0 67 
E outfox 170 4X 
Eoulmk 

EamkPf 271 157 
EqTRes 172 47 
E quite n .12 17 
ErbfTmt 70 b 15 
Esi Ban 5)98 X 
EnroC 70b 37 
Ertrtns 72 LI 
Eltiyl 71 24 
EvanP 

Evan pf 1X0 117 
Evan of 110 19.1 
ExCeto 1X0 47 
Excels/- 1710115 
Exxon 3X0 7.1 


600Z 4ft 
834 % 

17 811 31% 
13 4 33% 

22 5631 27 
1512OZ102 
?24Hte 53% 
32 98ft 
20 153 2ft 
94 9ft 
75 18 

j w m 
IS 72 37ft 
67 4ft 
4 14% 

4 89 35ft 

8 125 12 
17 43 13% 

11 203 16ft 
11 52 21ft 

11 459 23% 

10 626 36ft 
1161 6 
106 7ft 

io n 

10 206 40ft 
9 16 

716314 48% 


4% 4ft + ft 

30% 31%+ % 
33ft 33%+ ft 
2Sft 96% +1% 
101% 1D2 + ft 
53% 537b + % 
98ft 98ft — % 
Z 2 
9% 9% 

17% T7% — ft 
2Dft 20% — ft 
36ft 37U+lft 
4% 4ft + ft 
14% 14% — ft 
35ft 359b— ft 
11% lift— ft 
13% 13ft 
15% 14ft— ft 
21 21ft+ ft 

22% 23ft— ft 
35% 36 +% 

5ft 5%+ H 
7ft 7ft + ft 
10% 11 + ft 

39% 39% — 1% 
15% 15%—% 
47ft 48 + ft 


Vi A ■' ■ 

■ > \ - M %. 

1 ) • t V 


GOLD, LASSIES and 800% PROFITS 


. i .V 


l ; f 



4 43 

220 35 10 11B9 
9 852 
78 22 15 35 

19 

70 AS 10 1692 
3X0 99 18 

.18 1.1 10 330 
22 7 23 1154 

X0*3X 14 130 

73 47 S 98 
70 IX 19 925 
11 184 

1X4 44 7 18 

21 3183 


67 +1% 
22ft— % 
12ft— ft 
12% 

17% — ft 
36% + ft 
15% 

29%— ft 
17% + ft 
18% — ft 
12%+ % 
6ft— ft 
37ft— % 
33ft— % 
40ft + ft 
38ft + ft 
17% — % 
21% + % 
21ft— ft 
17% + % 
S4%— ft 
26ft 
31 
11 

5ft— ft 
37% — ft 
4 

18% 

25% + ft 
32ft— ft 
28% — ft 
64%+lft 

24 — % 

49%+ % 
15 + ft 
42ft + ft 
17%+ ft 
17%+ ft 
44% — ft 
29ft— ft 
W +■ ft 
a + ft 
DOM + ft 
7ft 

27% — ft 
29% + % 
20 %+ % 
26%+ ft 
50%— I Vi 
Mft + ft 
10% 

12% + % 
•6ft + ft 
27% 

* 

Jl% 

12ft 

88=1* 
17%+ ft 
14ft— % 
15% — ft 

iift+ft 
18% + ft 
C1ft+ ft 
Wft— ft 
12ft 

14%+% 
13ft— ft 
Oft 
HM 
9 

19ft + % 
16ft— % 
17 —1 
H -ft 
□ —1ft 


Thepriceof gold has tarnished, atoitirigPheJantasieaofgoldlx^sandthwBurus.^ngftem. 
the Aden Sisters -the lissome lassies who persistently purrin their investment sendee that gold wHl 
gBsten to $3400 an ounce; a prediction our analysts have ridiculed. The Adensare sisters uider the 
skin to promoters of gold seminars, ‘currency experts - who make great gobs of paper money, 
debunking “paper". The distribution ol gold trom High Priests of Finance to naive belieyers m the 
pews has been articulated by C.Gfl.; a distribution, a madness, that wit join the ranks* the i South 
Sea Bubble fiasco as evidence of man's culpability and greed. The insecticide of rationality has 
destroyed gold bugs: still, there is tomorrow. For once everyone is convinced that gold, asubstanca 
the Inca's called "The Sweat of the Sun", cannot glitter again, it wlH. To con vince t he C rowd astotne 
efficacy of the law of contrary reason, is as difficult as sneaking sunrise past a rooster.- . . 

Months ago, our researchers mocked the "consensus", writing— "Look tor one more sledge 
hammer blow betorea sparisftng ratty occurs." Thehammer has decimated thousands^ dreamera 
Money never moves out of gold or any other commodity, it merely changes pockets. Every atvajyst 
and airfine attendant has names of gold shares that have been pulverized; few appear on "buy fete 
tor. as always, the "Street" is selling Into weakness, violating every shred of 
contrarians, we urge investors to stash away ASA $47. CAMPBBJ-REp LAKES $ 16, HO MESTAKE 
$21 and WESTERN DEEP UEVELS $33, emulating the pirouettes of Ttower Bitets" and other 
perceptive Iconoclasts who are absorbing, at wholesale levels, the discards of the disenchanted. 
The scenario in goto is reminiscent of the malaise that Infected the "StreeT in 1982, when the DOW 

was miredbelowSOO. At the depths of despair, ourresearchers mused “THE DOWWILLTOUCHIJKjO 

BEFORE HITTING 750"; a prophecy Ihal was sustained. 

And now? We believe the DJI will vault overf500and.asacoroBary, gold wiUupswing.Ourcunent 
letter delineates why the "barbarous relic" win regain rts lustre; in addition, C.GR. highBghts a tow- 
priced equity that could catapult to prominence, duplicating the success of a recently 
recommended "special situation' that spiralled 800% In less than a year. 

For your compAnenfary copy, please write to. or telephone: 


MmL 




B CAPITAL 
_ GAINS 
RESEARCH 


FPJS. Financial Planning Services bv 

Katverstraat112, 

1012 PK Amsterdam, The Netherlands 
Phone: (020) - 27 51 81 
Telex 18536 


' ■ : 

W !i .» I f r 
" \ 'j / 


.vi 


Name: 



i ' ! 
i. < 

- • J - Ji#- 


LTD 163 
X0 27 12 

76 17 14 

77 2 2 
6X0 77 8 
278 

73 IX tl 
2X0 7X 8 

70 IX M 

78 37 11 
Of 471 47 

s> 270 SA 9 
pf 430 127 
pf 450 12J 
sri 570 U 
pf 270 127 
.158 13 11 
10 
13 

74 17 13 
70 27 

570 117 
270 11.1 _ 
72 9 21 

70 3X 19 
X4 M 13 
1.92 4.9 .8 
76 27 II 
2X0 47 13 
1X0 27 B 
170 47 19 
TOO 97 

A a 

47 9 
37 11 


13 12% 13 + ft 

31% 32ft 37% + ft 
16% 16U 16% + ft 
22 % 22 % 22 % — % 
lft 1% 1% 

49ft 48ft 49ft + ft 
14% 1 3ft 14% + % 
10% KM 10%— ft 
39% 29% 39%+ ft 

42ft 47U, 42ft 
28ft 26% 28 +1% 

9 9 9 

5 4% 4%— ft 

£8 57ft 57ft + 99 
45% 45ft 45ft— ft 
50ft 50% 50% 

38ft 37ft 37% + ft 
26K. 25% 26 + ft 

19% 19Vb 19% 

45% 44% 45ft + % 
73 71ft 72ft 
15% 15ft 15% + ft 
32 31% 31% + M 

62% 61% 62% + ft 
23% 23ft 23ft— ft 
lift U lift— ft 
» 23ft 24 + % 

24ft 23ft 24U + % 
47ft 46ft 47 
48% 48% 48%— % 
28V* 27% 28ft— ft 
11% TIM 11% + ft 
aft 28 28ft— ft 

15ft 14% 15ft— ft 
24% 24% 24% — ft 
21% 2Bft 3B% 

38 37% 37% — ft 

79 2B% 28% 

S3% 53% JW.+ % 

44% 43% 44%+ Ml 
7ft 6% 6*9— ft 

1CM 10% IBM 
16 16 16 — M 

J9% » 29%-% 

29% 29 ft 29% — ft 
82ft 82 62ft+ ft 

28% 28ft 28 ft— % 

23 23ft 2 2ft 

34% 33% 34% + ft 
49 4«% 4S%— ft 

28% 27% 27%+ ft 
89 88 89 + ft 

37ft 36% 37 + % 

35 35 35 + ft 

3Sft 3SVt 35ft 
165 165 165 
20% 20% 20% 

4% 4% 4ft+ ft 
16ft 16ft 16% 

5ft 5M 5ft 
12 % 12% 12ft— ft 
18% 17ft 18% +% 
44ft 43% 44% + % 
22% 21% 22ft + % 
36% 36 Mi 36ft 

24 23ft 23ft— ft 
25% 2SU 25% — % 
27% 27% Z7%+ ft 
19% 19ft 19% + % 
SOft 49ft 49ft— ft 
62ft 61% 63% — ft 
42ft 42 «2ft + % 
55% 55ft 55ft— ft 
35% 25% 25% + ft 
64ft 63ft 64 — ft 
24ft M 24ft— ft 

6ft 5% 6ft + % 
35 34% 35 

7S 74ft 75 +1% 

10ft >0ft Wft 
12% TZft 12ft— ft 


26 
29ft 

38 

39 24ft 

66 4* 

19ft 9% 
36% 25ft 
26ft 2>ft 
43% 27ft 

19 % n 
am 

39% 
27 


tJO 4.1 It 
1.200 54 ID 
128 32 7 

.16 a u 

L40 &0 9 
150 42 10 
3.11 9.9 6 
5X8 109 
5X0810? 
3X5 

2X0 52 10 
1X4 5JS 13 
20 IX 11 
J6 2.1 13 
3 

3X0 109 6 









1X3 52 
123 11.9 
2X0 112 
1170 117 
187 112 
8X0 127 
724 115 
132 10.1 5 
9X0 112 
120 3.9 12 
24 X 26 
-S5e 17 II 



u 

21 

700 

3S-3I 

IX 

14 

3100 

28% 

38 

9 

390 

27ft 

23 


1KB 

T9ft 



1=34 

4% 



6* 

288 




65 

13 



253 

14% 



57 

Mft 

SJ 

34 

7560 

24% 

11.2 


56 

17% 

i AA 

14 

4838 

73% 

20 

10 

403 

60ft 

37 

M 

7% 

27% 

32 

14 

1733 

33ft 

4J 

8 

5 

36% 

IX 

13 

572 

17% 

?J 

22 

2703 

32% 

103 


15 

23 

139 


« 

39ft 



33 

28ft 


14 

674 

14 




10ft 



14? 

3% 


17 

57 

5% 

mo 


5 

10 

J 

29 

91 

25 

52 

14 

» 

l&ft 


34 

76 

Bft 

34 

U 

546 

76% 





2X 

12 

10M 

19% 

4 A 

10 

308 

33% 

8.9 

7 

30 

19% 

10-’ 


102 

4% 


1X0 3X 1593 
1X0 5X 11 1047 
■08 5X138 395 
26 6.1 107 

Hi 41 8 Ml 
1XM0X 32 
TX4o 9X 62 
22 2X 16 145 
X6 16 18 156 
XO II 13 18 

1X0 U 14 304 
1,12 82 19 106 
* 294 
XO IX 10 7 

XI 27 14 1857 

US 4111 243 
128 42 9 96 

1X0 IIX 10 6 

1X4 72 9 170 
.10b J 9 ■ 

J6 U 47 63 

22 II 20 34 
28 2X 29 156 
20« 12 34 U« 
X8b 27 9 443 
26 17 12 63 

1X0 37 « 5482 
25 29 

24 IX 25 345 
50*77 6 

1X0 4X 10 1583 
25* 2 34 58 

1X0 62 9 

1X0 37 11 1973 

10 

22 X 14 4711 
20 2.1 U 449 
X0 27 26 32 

.15 12 I) 254 
X4 22 13 190 
1X0 3.1 14 462 
28* X 12 912 
JO L8 1414979 
1X8 L5 11 106 
30 492 
7 381 


5% 5ft 
27% 26% 
31ft 30ft 
1% lft 
Oft 9 
47% 47M 
13% 13% 
19ft 19 
46 45% 

»ft 17% 
19ft 19M 
49ft 48ft 
57 56 

DM lift 

31 30% 

32% 32 
15% 15% 
27 26% 

30% 30% 
15% 15% 
23 22% 
17% 12ft 
20 27% 

11% lift 
lift lift 
15% 15% 
17% 16% 

21ft 20ft 

43% 42ft 
14% 14ft 
71% 21 
11% 11% 
36% 36% 
19% 19ft 
2tft 24ft 
37% 37% 

8ft 8ft 
37% 37ft 
29 28ft 
Mft IS 
12 11% 
23ft 22% 


14% 14ft 
47 48 

6M 65% 
16% 16ft 
21 % 


5ft 
27% 

31 
1 % 

9% 

47% + ft 
13% 

19ft + M, 

46 + % 
18ft + % 
19% — ft 
49ft 

56%—% 

11% 

30% — M 
32ft— ft 
15%—% 
26% — M 
30% + % 
15% 

22%- M 
12% 

2* — ft 
U%— ft 
lift + M 
15%+ ft 
17 % + % 
20%— ft 
43 

14%+ ft 
21M+ « 
11 % 

36%—% 
W%+ M 
24ft— ft 
37ft— % 
lft + ft 
37ft— % 
28ft— ft 
18%+ M 
12 + ft 
2J%+ ft 

58% + ft 
MU.— % 

47 +1 
64%— % 
16% 

Sift— ft 


Mft KCSopf 1X0 75 
12ft KonOfc 136 13.1 6 
an, KonPU 1» U 7 
18 KOPLpf 232 11X 
17% KoPLpf 20 11.1 
17% Ketyln 
49 Kotyef 1X6 IX 
10% KaufBr X0 12 6 
12% Koutfri 158 &6 
60 Koufpf 873 HU 
» Kef too 176 4X 13 


21% KeltMl 1X0 35 
1 Kanat 

19% Kanml 50 3.1 


20% KvUtll 2X4 97 8 
11 ICBITQJ X4 It 


M% Kerf) Pi LTD BJ 
26% KorrMc l.lfl 37 13 
Mft KeyBk 150 SO 8 
,2ft KevCnn 
J4 Kcnrrtrt .X» 2X » 
36% KMde 150 37 71 
61% KM PTE AM 3X 
62 KlflpfC 4X0 SJ 
39% KbnOC » 250 47 10 
n% KnsftjfSW 74 12 17 
17% Kooer 130 8J 82 
Mft Koimar 52 u 15 
17ft K am JO 17 26 

w% Mwpnaoo iox 

12% Korean 

29ft Kroner 2X0 SI 12 
IT Kuntans X0 3.1 11 
44% Kvoeers 041 J 29 
13 KV*ar A 41 7 


137 7% 

471 13ft 

2 36% 
3545 40 

51 3Sft 

1801 16M 
111 15ft 
l 17ft 
1200 11 
553 30% 
11 18% 
t 19% 
627 5<ft 
lOOz 13ft 
1945 18% 
497 35ft 
48 31ft 

3 20ft 
668 35% 

19 90 
32D IBM 
51 mt 
12 BSM 
594 44% 
92 31 
IS lft 
504 26 
302 39% 

29 13% 
11 20M 

28) 37% 
57 26ft 

30 3M 
173* 19ft 
514 32% 

1 74 

2 79ft 
810 47% 

1171 34% 
IS 28% 
313 21% 
454 20% 

I 99% 
149 13ft 
260 3* 

77 Htk 
51 54ft 
81 20% 


1 .T> 9% 

Uft 13% + ft 
36% 36% 

39ft 40 + ft 

»% 35% — ft 
15% 16ft + ft 
17% 17%— ft 

J26 122- Y* 

®% 2 0%— ft 
18% 18% 

19ft 19ft 
53% S4% +1 
13ft Uft 
18 18 — ft 

35 JSW+ ft 
2Tft 21ft + ft 
20ft 20M+ ft 
33% 35 + ft 

87 m +lft 
Wft Uft+ lb 
17% rj%— ft 
85ft SSft— ft 
44 44ft 
30% 30% 
lft 1ft— ft 
25% 25ft + % 
35ft 15%+ ft 
12ft 13% 

30ft 30ft 
28% 39% + % 
25% 26 - ft 

3 3ft— ft 
19ft 17ft— ft 
22% 32ft- ft 
74 74 

75ft 75ft +1% 
46% 44% — % 
33 34 +| 

27% 57% 

21ft 21ft + % 
Wb 2B» + % 
99% 99%— ft 
12% U + ft 
38ft 38% + ft 

53% 52%— 1ft 
30 20 — % 






























































Mahler's gestures as conductor, caricatured by Hans Schliessmann. 

Mahler and His World 


by David Stevens 


P ARIS — Ordinarily, exhibitions de- 
voted to musicians are of limited 
interest, circumscribed as they are 
by the necessity of m a lting visual a 
world that essentially aural. Bat Gustav 
Mahler is a notable exception, as is demon- 
strated by the compact but intensely rich 
show devoted to the composer at the Music 
d’Art Modems de la VDlede Paris. 

The main reason for this is that the key 
period in Mahler’s worldly and creative life 
was from 1 897 to 1907, when he was director 
of the Vienna Court Opera (today's State 
Opera) and thus in the thick of the artistic 
me of a city that was then a turbulent c api ta l 
of a turning point in all the arts. He also 
meat his summers composing symphonies 
that despite Ms preeminent position in the 
city were never heard first in Vienna. 

Then there was the composer's music, fre- 
quently misiiiiderstood and rejected by audi- 
ences of the time, yet prophetic in a way that 


has led to extraordinary popularity today. 
But his music has never lacked for ch amp i- 
on* whetha Willem Mengdlxrg, director of 
the Concertgebouw Orchestra of Amster- 
dam, in Mahler's lifetime and up to World 
War II; or Bruno Walter, Mahler’s disciple 
and colleague, or Leonard Be rn ste in , whose 
programs with the New Yorit Philharmonic 
in the 1950s had much to do with launching 
the wave of popularity for the composer’s 
music that is still going strong. 

Then, in his personal life, there was his 
marriage to Alma Schindler, a celebrated 
beauty 20 years his junior, the daughter of a 
mment Viennese painter and step-daugh- 


pxomment K 

ter of another. She outlived Mm by more 
Than half a century, married two other men 
of genius (Walter Gropius, the architect, and 
Franz WerfeL, the writer) and had love af- 
fairs with others (notably the artist Oskar 
Kokoschka), although none ever really sup- 
planted the importance of Mahler in her life 
or in her titillating memoirs. 

Vienna at the turn of the century was not 


only the focal point of nmch that was new in 
the arts and sciences, but it was a small world 
in which everybody who counted knew ev- 
erybody else and there was an extraordinary 
interpenetration among the various disci- 
plines. Thus, for instance, Sigmund Freud 
saw a kindred spirit in the playwright Arthur 
Schni trier, while in 1910 Mahler, during a 
serious marital crisis, was "analyzed" by 
Freud during a four-hour walk when the two 
men were in the Dutch city of Laden. 

Take, for example, the architect Josef 
Hoff mann. He designed what was to be the 
first braiding of an artists’ colony in the 
Hohe Wane district of Vienna. It became the 
home of Carl M6Q, an artist prominent in 
the Secession movement and step-father of 
Alma. She lived here when she was courted 
by Mahler, and they later lived bens together 
for a while. Furthermore, Moll did a number 
of paintings that are in the first place family 
scenes, and in the second place a fortuitous 
record of Hoffmann's pioneering example as 

Continued on page 8 


A New Brother Act for the Movies 


by Jody Klemesrod 


N EW YORK— Before them came 
the Warner Brothers, and the 
Korda Brothers, and the Boulting 
Brothers, and the Maysles Broth- 
ers, and the Taviam Brothers. Now we have 
the Coen Brothers, Joel and Ethan, 30 and 27 
years old, Minneap olis natives living an the 
Upper-West Side, whose first featur e film , a 
Texas Gothic thriller called “Blood Simple, 
has been praised at fihn festivals in Dallas, 
Taronto and New York. _ .. 

Jod, the director (“because I'm die old- 
est"), is a graduate of the New York Umye^ 

aty film scho ol Ethan, the producer, studied 
■ philosophy at Princeton. They wrote the 
script of “Blood Simple” together with mini- 
mal arguing, they say, because their tastes 
are so snmlar. They get along so well, in fact, 
dm* they plan to cafiabaratc for the rest of 
their careers, because, as Ethan puts it, “Two 
heads are better than none." 

■ “Blood Simple” has a complex plot m- 
votvisgadnlleiy, murder and revenge. But it 
also nvflpd ffs humor, and some critics see it 
as a spoof of the so-called film ntnr style of 
the 1940s. It stars M. Emmet Walsh as a 
‘ sleazy detective who is hired by a Tots bar 
.owner (Dan Hedaya) who suspects ms wife 
(Frances McDormand) is haying an affair 
. with one of Ms bartenders (John Getz), inc 
story has. almost as many twists, dues, rover- 

ups and misunderstandings as "The Maltese 

Falcon." . 

But the Coen brothers say they were not 
. inspired by 1940s films as much as they woe 
by the books of James M. Cain, Dashieu 
Hammett and Raymond C han dler. The 
film’s title, in fact, came from one of Ham- 
mett's novels. “It’s an expression he used in 
referring to what happens to a person once 
they, cammil murder, Ethan Coen said. 

It. was Cain’s books, though, that^me 


The Postman Always Rings Twice,’ ’Double 
Indemnity,’ Mildred Pierce,’ and a relatively 
unkn own one called ‘Career in C~ Major.’ He 
wrote that one because he was a frustrated 
opera anger himself. We liked, his hard- 
boiled style, and we wanted to write a James 
M. story and put it in a modem con- 
text." 


MT U1U9HIW1 

both stalled reading his novels abontflvj 
years ago,” Joel said. “We especially Eked 


rmrrthZr story- thrill cr set in Texas — and 
worked from there. “We also wanted a dou- 

bteKioss,” said Ethan, “because we liked the 
idea erf somebody hiring a killer who faked it 
and then killed the guy who hired him.” 

“We hadn’t seen that one before," Jod 
“We also wanted to avoid doing a 
dichfe story of two lovers plotting to kill a 
husband or wife. We wanted to in vat that a 
little biL” l . w . 

And so they sat down in their Manhattan 
apartment, with Ethan at the typewriter, 
talking through the scenes together and then 
putting than on paper. They said they wrote 
the part of the sleazy detective with the 
veteran character actor Walsh in mind. 
“We'd seen him as the parole officer in 
‘Straight Time,’” Ethan said, “and we 
thought he would be perfect for the part. ' 

They chose Texas as the locale, Joel said, 
“because it was a logical milieu for a passion 
murder story. People cany a lot of baggage 
about Texas around, a lot of stereotypes and 
cliches, and these are easy to play off of. We 
were after the Gothic, mythic, overblown, 
overheated Texas.” 

T HEN came what Joel calls “the hard- 
est, longest and most frustrating 
part": hying to raise $1.5 million to 
produce the fQm. They made a two-minute 
trader, which Joel described as “a short, dick 
two-minute promo reel that we would schlep 
to various people " After a year of knocking 
on doors m New York, Minneapolis and 

Texas, they finally had their money. All of it 

rome. from private investors. 70 percent of 
whom were from their native Minneapolis. 


From Folies to Drama 


N EW YORK — If clowns want to be Hamlet, it is perfectly 
reasonable that Lilian c Monteveochi who has incarnated 
French Folies glamour from Vancouver to Las Vegas, 
should be thrilled to plav a 70-year-old grandmother. 
“No more the oh la la thing with the leg in the air." says Miss 
Montevecchi. whose legs are notable. The play, by the well-known 
American playwright Tom Eyen, is “The Melody of the Glittering 
Parrot," and the grandmother's role was originally written for the 
late Lotte Lenya. In a long career of wild plumes and black tights, 
this is Montevecchi’s first straight play and she is very exdted. 

“With a serious play I can eat before the show. My stomach can 
hang out a little more and no one will say, look at that figure, she 
shouldn't dance anymore." 

The figur e is perfect, the glamour authentic, and she can when she 
feds like it sweep into a room as if she were descending the famous 
26 steps of the Folies Bagfcre. There is also humor and compassion: 
When she starred in the Folies in Paris, she used to sit nightly with 
the former male nude star, now reduced to dressed minor pans and 
too poor to buy false teeth, and chat with him while be painstakingly 
carved little bits of candle wax into teeth for the show. 

She has starred in the Folies on Broadway, where nightly a 


“They were a ward mixture — doctors, 
lawyers, entrepreneurs," Joel said. Their par- 
ents, who are both university professors, also 
invested a small amount. 

Shooting began in Austin and Hutto, Tex- 
as, in the fall of 1982, and was completed 
eight weeks later. To the Coens’ surprise and 
delight, Walsh accepted the role erf me detec- 
tive, and got along well with the neophyte 
producer and director. “Oh. he’d joke about 
it a lot.” Joel said. “He'd say things like, 
‘Let's cut this sophomoric stuff, it’s not 
N.Y.U. anymore.’ We would have argu- 
ments and disagreements, but they would 
generally be fruitful. One time 1 asked him to 
do something just to humor me, and he said, 
‘Joel, this whole damn movie is just to humor 

_____ I 99 

you. 

The brothers spent a year editing the film, 
then began searching for a distributor, which 
in the beginning seemed almost as difficult 
as the search for money. “Nobody would 
touch it at first." Joel said. "Four or five of 
the majors saw it, and most gave us a good 
unequivocal no. They would always say. 
‘How am I going to sell this movieT ‘Blood 
Simple’ is not easily pigeon-holed genetical- 
ly. It's a murder film that seems to be an art 
film, and some distributors were afraid the 
murder crowd would think it was an art film, 
and die art crowd would think it was a 
murder fflm.” 

When word got out on the independent 
film grapevine that “Blood Simple" was 
completed, the Coen brothers began to re- 
ceive screening requests from festivals. The 
film was selected for the U.SA Film Festi- 
val in Dallas, and then the Toronto Him 
Festival. Impressed with the accolades it was 
receiving, Circle Releasing Corp. of New 
York signed a distribution agreement with 
the Coen brothers before the 1984 New York 
Film Festival. "I’ve seen a lot of first films, 
and there was something about this film that 
was so good and so natural," said Ben Barca- 
holtz, vice president of Circle. 

The brothers deny that they deliberately 


Mary Blume 


showgirl named Monica absentmindediy fell into the pit, and in 
Paris between 1970 and 1978 she gave some 2,000 Folies Bergfcre 
perfor mances, learning to change costumes in 15 seconds and win- 
ning what she rails the Cross of Labor for shea endurance. 

The big leap from revue came on Broadway with “Nine." a 
mneirai adaptation of Federico Fellini's “814," for which she won a 
1982 Tony award and was hailed by The New York Times as “a 
knockout — a glorious amalg am of music-hall feistiness and balletic 
grace, with Toulouse-Lautrec shadows about the eyes.” 

“Nine" was staged by the relentlessly inventive danoer-singer- 
director Tommy Tune, who will also direct "The Melody of the 
Glittering Parrot," _ T . 

When Montevecchi and Tune met at the start of Nine,’ he asked 
if she didn’t remember the night she sat in his lap in Paris at the 
Folies Bergfcre. “How could I remember?” she says. “I sat in 

eV Sh^has'been a trouper too long to start kicking up ha heels as a 
Toast of Broadway. There have perhaps been too many ups and 
downs to believe the ups are forever: What is forever is daily ballet 
class and hope. . . 

Bom in Paris of an Italian father and a French mother who had 
wanted to be a ballerina, Lilians began ballet classes during the 
German occupation. “We had no beat and no tights. I always 
remember my legs bong blue and the smell of the toe shoes, winch 
were held togetha by fish glue." She was spotted by Roland Petit 
and at 18 became his leading ballerina while Petit's wife, Zizi 
Jeanmaire, was on Broadway. She thought only about ballet but one 
day Petit heard ha sing and gave ha the lead in his “The Diamond 
Cruncher” which included a song, “I am a diamond-crunching 
dame.” 

“I had a standing ovation and my mother came and said you have 
a triumph and I said no, no Pm not a ringer, I am a dancer. Leave me 
alone everyone." 

Petit’s company appeared on Broadway in 1954 and then went to 
California, where they bought little green MGs and LUiane was given 
one of the last seven-year contracts by MGM. “I was supposed to be 
the new Ava Gardner but I turned out not to be." 



S 


HE m ade about 15 films ranging from “Dadd} 

“King Creole" with Elvis Presley. Ha last 
was “The Young Lions," in which she played a ypungprosh- 
tute who refuses to many Marion Brando because he is a German 
soldier. She spoke no English at first and ha screen test, with George 
Sidney, was a scene from “For Whom the Bell Tolls” in which she 
had to try to say, “Now I have to borrow the scissors of Pilar." 

“Until I die rll know that phrase. I couldn't say it then. Scissors. 
Pilar. The agony." Once signed, she was given a protector-escort, 
Walta Pidgeon, and lessons in everything. 

“We had fencing lessons, drama lessons, I had five hours of 
English a day for a year. Thank God I loved my teacher, bnt my head 
— T learned everything by Shakespeare and I couldn't undostand a 
word. Thou! Thee!” 

Ballet, she says, is not especially good training for screen acting. 
“Ballet is like silent movies. Because if you do ‘Swan Lake’ you have 
to translate all tMs drama with your hand, your eye.” She turns 
briefly into a glaring Black Swan. “That’s why we all look insane in 
ballet, the eyes are all like this.” . . . 

In the Folies she learned acting of sorts by impersonating in one 
revue 17 characters ranging from Charlie Chaplin to Elizabeth the 
Virgin Queen. And she used the quick-change techniques she learned 
at the Folies when she did a highly praised New Yoik nightclub act 
during the run of “Nine." . 

“I had a gimmi ck when I did my act 1 changed my dress each tune 
I sa n g another song because I was afraid people would get bored 
because I am not considering myself much as a sing e r . The critics 
couldn’t fall asleep, they had to see what I would wear next. 

Hie person who brought together LUiane Momevecchi's unsettled 
talents was Tommy Tune. When she auditioned for “Nine," every- 
one agreed she was wonderful and that it was a pity there was no role 
for ha. Tune, who says he believes you must go with the talent, 
rfiangpd the entire concept of the show and cast ha as a woman 


JJliane Montevecchi in “Nine.” 

producer. “Up to this point,” he says, “the producer was a Goman 
man, like Otto Preminger. She was my inspiration for making it a 
cast of all women and one man. 

“Liliane," he says, “is the sun and the moon and the stars. She 
brings ha own light wherever she goes. I think that's important in 
the world and I think that’s important onstage, sending that into the 
world every night." 

In “Nine,” which won five Tony awards, Tune had Montevecchi 
do a Folies parody with a 30-foot blade feather boa, “ mag i cally 
refracted into Freudian shapes,” according to The New York Times. 

“The Melody of the Glittering Parrot,” which they will do togetha 
next season, came about because Tune wanted to work with Monte- 
veochi in a dramatic, nonmusical role that will make enormous 
demands, one being that she plays a very old woman and, in 
flashback, a very young one. Tune wanted to put Montevecchi in an 
exotic setting and so be sensibly imagined ha in an American 
Midwestern living room “because she just doesn't belong there. I 
know if she went into my mother's living room, something strange 
would happen." 

“I play the understudy of Sarah Berhardt,” says Montevecchi 
“She's never put ha foot onstage because Sarah Bernhardt was never 
sick. Anyway she got married and had a little girl who married an 
American and went to five in Ohio." 

So Montevecchi’s character goes to exotic Ohio and sees ha 
daughter, whom she doesn't much like, and ha 7-year-old grandson, 
whom she does. “This lady is full of mischief and so is he. This 
connivance, this understanding we have lasts until he is 25 and I die 
in his arms.” 

Since she is playing a 70-year-old, Monteveochi is thrilled that at 
least she won't have to show ha legs. Or so she believes. 

“Well, that’s Lihane’s thing,” says Tommy Tune. “I will always 
want to see her legs. They’re the most perfect legs in the world, the 
best pair of legs I have ever seen. eva. And I major in legs.” ■ 


set out to do a spoof of die film noir. “We 
wanted it to be funny, but it’s definitely not a 
parody," Joel said. "The plot is very grim, 
but we didn’t want the movie to have a grim 
tone. Hitchcock always mixed humor with 
grimness very well. And Cain, Hammett and 
Chan dler deal with murder, mayhem and 
simmering passions, but the lone is fairly 
shipper and there is a sense of fun to the 
siqrytdling.” 

Typical or the Coens’ humor is a string of 
dead fish that grows more rancid as the 
movie progresses; a murderer using a piggy- 
bank as a weapon; and a getaway car that 
won’t start after the driver has buried a 
victim alive. . 

"What always gets the biggest laugh is a 
scene showing the tire tracks in the Geld 
leading to the burial rite," Ethan said. The 
car is driven to the site at night, so the viewer 
is not aware that the grave is in the middle of 
a freshly furrowed field. A subsequent early 
morning scene, shot from overhead, shows 
the very clear tracks the car has made to and 

from the grave. L ^ . , 

“Blood Simple" contains much blood and 
gpre, and the Coens say they are surprised 
the critics haven’t taken them to task for the 
violence. “But the violence is bound up in 
the story, rather than gratuitous,” Joel said. 
“It's very different from a horror movie 
where the characters are mechanically set up 
to be slaughtered. We have no slasher scenes. 
This is more of a story movie.” 

Ethan explained the violence this way: 
"When you're thinking about how to handle 
a murder, you can either say, ‘This characta 
dies,’ or you can make the audience feel it 
We want to grab them by the lapels and 
make ihem feel it. They’re not there to get 
information, they’re there to feel iL" 

H OW can two brothers who grew up 
in Minneapolis have such wDd and 
bloody ideas? “It’s to compensate 
for the fact that our lives were incredibly 
mundane," Joel said with a smile. “We grew 



Joel, the director , and Ethan, the producer. 

up in a typically middle-class family in the 
United States’ equivalent of Siberia. All that 
cold weather drives you inside to watch mov- 
ies. I kid with my father that he’s living in the 
closed city of Gorky." 

Their father, Edward, teaches economics 
at the University of Minnesota, and their 
mother, Rena teaches art history at St. 

Goud State University. The brothers grew 
up in the Minneapolis suburb of St Louis 
Park, where they spent the warm weather 
months making Super-8 movies of their 
friends. "We used to watch the muscle mov- 
ies on Saturday matinees, such as ’Hercules 
Unchained,’ ” Ethan recalled. “Then we'd go 
outside and do a remake of it. Once we made 
‘The Naked Prey,' with all the neighborhood 
kids chasing each other through ihe bushes. I 
was hoping for the Cornel Wude part, but I 
didn't get iL" 

After what he .considers an undistin- 
guished career at New York University — “I 
was a cipher there; I sat in the bock of the 
room with an insane grin on my face” — Joel 


Ctfi Web Broun 


went to work as an assistant editor on low- 
budget horror films. After Princeton, Ethan 
took a number of temporary jobs, the longest 
of which was as a statistical typist at Many's. 
In their spare time, they wrote scripts for 
themselves and for independent producers. 
One, “The XYZ Murders,” written with Sam 
Raimi is scheduled to be released this spring 
by Embassy Pictures. Ethan described it as 
an action comedy about two rat extermina- 
tors who are hired to kill a h uman. 

The Coens are now working on another 
script with Rairrn, “a screwball comedy set in 
the late ’50s in which nobody dies,” Ethan 
said. The brothers’ goal is to keep making 
films togetha from their own scripts. Both 
said they could not imagine breaking up 
their team to go out on their own. 

“Ethan has nightmares of one day finding 
me on the set of something like ‘The Incredi- 
ble Hulk,' wearing gold chains and saying, 
'I’ve gpt to eat. don’t I?' " Joel said. ■ 

£1985 The Nov York Times 


2 

e 


i 

l 









Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1985 


TRAVEL 


New Chic in a Historic Arcade 


by Vicky Elliott 


P ARIS—! 

new: Baudelaire and Balzac had 
thar own here. The arcades, built in 
a rush from the 1820s to ’40s, were 
glass-covered and marble-floored, “a new 
contrivance of industrial luxury as one 
mustrated guide to the capital put it, where 
the leisured classes could worship the latest 
wanmodities. “Around 1840” writes the 
German philosopher Walter Benjamin, “it 
was briefly fashionable to talcc turtles for a 
walk in the arcades. The flaneurs Hked to 
have the turtles set the pace for them.” 

Lithographs of the period show the pas- 
sages awash with crinolines and top hats, 
safe from the mud and the wheels of what 
the French called “hippomobile traffic.” The 
shop windows had a magnetic effect on tour- 
ists. “The great poem of display chants its 
stanzas of color from the Madeleine to the 
Porte Saint-Denis,” wrote Honortde Ralro*- 
Tbc Galerie Vivienne, not far from the 
restful colonnades of the Palais-Royal gar- 
dens, was one of the first of the arcades, or 
gffleries, built in 1823, when the Bourbons 
were back on the throne. It still has its ornate 
mosaic floor, wrought- iron grillwork, lumi- 
nous ro tu n d a, and bas-reliefs of the muses 
bolding wreaths, and it is slowly doming 
back to life. The fashion colony around the 
corner in Place des Victoires has found it, 
and the shop fronts are bri ghtening up 
with fancy dothes, zany jewdzy and st 
of artificial flowers. 

Luis Bunuel came here to shoot parts of 
“That Obscure Object of Desire,” and it is 
the kind of place a photographer loves to 
chance upon, with its majestic stairways and 
vaulted ceilings made to frame a solitary 
figure down a distant perspective. The si g ns, 
even the new ones, speak of of the past: 
“Luden Legrand, FIQes et Fils," “Manufac- 
turer of pasta and flours of France, Italy and 
the Isles" and one that says: “Academy of 
Magic, founded in 1786 Under the Patron- 
age of the Queen of France and the illustri- 
ous Cagliostro.” 


The last is a sham, a relic left by a film 
crew. It hangs on the wall of an establish- 
ment that likes to call itself the oldest book- 
shop in Paris, founded three years afto* the 
galerie, in 1826. It seems unchivalrous re 
quibble, especially since the owner of the 
ubrairie Petit-Sir oux, who inherited the 
business from his father-in-law, is now 90 
and manifestly one of the most venerable of 
Paris booksellers. 

His stock, mainly secondhand, includes 
hand-colored, block-printed homilies in 
verse, and copies of illustrated magazines 
that cost IS francs ($1.50) apiece and prom- 
ise fruitful reading on “Events in China” (in 
1906) and, more up-to-date, “Pioneers of 
Space,” including such heroes as Gus Gris- 
som and Wally Schirra in the heal of their 
1960s endeavors. 

Madame Petit-Siroux — who is 80 and 
free with her outbursts of such textbook 
terms as “Zutr — wifl, with a little coaxing, 
volunteer the information that the shop once 
sold new books and classics, for everybody. 
“Now that they give books out free in the 
town ha Ik for a month,” she adds, making 
the habit sound as newfangled and un- 
French as fast food, “nobody wants to buy 
than anymore.” 

The Ffetit-Suoux, marooned in their back- 
water, have watched the galerie change. An 
ancient newspaper clipping in their window 
paints the picture in the 1920s, when the 
crinolines woe gone, leaving in place such 
worthy but unglamorous enterprises as a 
printer, an importer of Chinese mats and 
two lively washerwomen. “The past is there, 
but dusty and moth-eaten,” complains the 
writer, gloomily comparing the place to a 
necropolis, to the dried- up riverbed of “a 
laughing river” and to the skeletons in a 
Museum of Natural History. 


s|§§||||.^ 



I N the 1960s, there were boards over the 
shopfronts, and graffiti wandering over 
the boards — the very thought of it 
makes Madame Petit-Siroox wince. There 
was also Huguette Spengler. a friend of Jean 
Cocteau, who held court here and put 
strangle tableaux in the windows, the most 
dramatic being a “mortuary” scene showing 
a lady assassinated in an aquarium. Spengler 
began to interest the authorities in the pres- 
ervation of the galerie, but it was not until 
1980 that the most magnifi cent section of the 
passage was classified as a national monu- 
ment and restored. 


One of the nouveaux-venus is Christian Astu- 
guevieflle. something of a high priest of 
High-Tech in Paris, whose gallery (42 Ga- 
lerie Vivienne, telephone: 260-8181: open 2 
to 6.30 P.M. Monday to Friday) now pro- 
duces bold and fashionable jewelry for Ga- 
ieties Lafayette in Paris, as well as Bergdorf 
Goodman and Tiffany’s in New York. 

His showroom here sells one-off pieces, 
for example, strings of huge fake pearls tied 
to red leather thongs (800 francs), a necklace 
of pearls trapped in a net bag, bracelets 
made of the pistils of artificial flowers, ar- 
rowhead perspex earrings and so on. 

Astuguevieule, who set up the Pompidou 
Crater's children’s workshop before he be- 
gan designing jewelry for such young bloods 
of the Paris fashion scene as Claude Mon- 
tana, Thierry Mugler and Jean -Claude de 
Lucca, is currently working through an ob- 
session with forosniki, a Japanese custom of 
wrapping parcels in doth and knotting the 
ends together. 

His limited editions of wrapped objets. 
molded in colored resin, are now arrayed in 
the starkly fashionable gray showroom, 
complete with High-Tech assistants. (In his 
much-photographed apartment in the 16 tb 
Arrondissement, AstugueyieQle's complete 
library is now shrouded in a series of 20 
forashila bundles). 

Opposite Astuguevieille in the central gal- 
lery is a splash of color: the artificial flowers 
designed by Emilio Robba in this, his central 
showroom, (Nos. 29-33, tel: 261-7143 and 
296-0889; open 10 AM. to 6 P.M. Monday 
to Friday) for manufacture in Thailand and 
Taiwan. The majestic bouquets of hydrangea 
and poinseida, arum lilies and orchids, are, it 
turns out, made of Tergal and washable 
under a urn; there are two new collections a 
year. Single stems, which may bear multiple 
flowers, cost between 13 and 80 francs. 

The galerie is now diverting some of the 
fashion traffic in the Place des Victoires, and 
it is sure to pull in more next year, when 
Jean-Pa ill Gaultier opens his new headquar- 
ters in a huge warehouse on Rue Vivienne. 

Camille Blin, at No. 54 (tel: 261-2354; 
open 1 to 7 PM. Monday to Saturday), a 
young designer who set up on her own last 
spring, has a very wearable range of knitted 
women’s dothes in wool, cashmere and an- 
gora at reasonable prices. Blin updates on 
classic themes include softly pleated jersey 
skirts with strategic splits, and baggy pants 




Buyer s 



if©' *:" 


.... the < 


V* 




M. and Mme. Petit-Siroux a few years ago. 


Bebart Dpi— 


“ ' 7T" 

. - • - JV Z -1 

1 i .. 

, > -■'«* kl* 1 *** 

fi-.-'y -* 

f *:« > 




— 1 — ‘ 


* "• — “ ’ _ V 


. .. - 'V.’CC'A * 

» r-'- 

r; t he 

1' 

' . "c- .i-. thiY. 


Cat. i txy 

'-ct/*' " - - 

; f.r;t v 

.jr / 

.; - .-r.- 3 . 5 i v 




- -ye:. - 

., _. 2 i 

^ ~ . - - 

— 5 - 1- ■■ • 


--rrrr r? 




rector, at No. 26 (tel: 261-3160; open 11 
AM. to 7 P.M. Monday to Saturday), at- 
tracts the show-business crowd with her 
flash evening wear, a riot of sequins, satins 

and silk quilting. 


weaves complicated concoctions of wool 
into such creations as the shaggy and icy 
“Himalayas." on offer at 20.000 francs. 

Younger window-shoppers are catered for 
at “Si tu veux” (No. 68, tel: 260-5997; open 
1 1 AM. to 7 PM., Monday re Friday; 2 to 6 


an 


In 1970, one of Spengler’s proiigfis, 

o Takada, 


suits with strategic splits, and baggy pants 
with wrap-around bdts. There is also a range 
of bracelets in teak by Catherine NolL 


unknown Japanese designer, Kenzo 
moved in and painted a wall of lianas in 
what became the first outlet of Jungle Jap. 
This forgotten comer of the Right Bank 
began to swing onto the fashion map. 


At No. 48-50 is the Paris headquarters of 
ring, in French, of 


Kenzo left, although only as far as Place 
1 in the I 


Thn N*w Yoric Tima 


des Victoires, but in the last four years, other 
talents have enlivened the mix of travel agen- 
cies, thrift shops and untenanted-iookhig 
offices offering sinister beauty treatments. 


(DG:Z). a phonetic rendering, 
the Roman numerals XX, a men’s store that 
sells snappy shirts and cords and accessories 
in 100 parent cotton and every known color. 
The designers, Faizal Khan and Fariba 
Sanai, also have outlets in Los An°dcs and 
New York as well as Japan, where the 
clothes are made (td: 297-4875, open 10 
AM to 7 P.M. Monday to Saturday). 

Catherine Vernoux, a former casting di- 


O PPOSITE, A Priori Th6 (No. 35-37; 
td: 297-4875; open from noon to 7 
PM Monday to Saturday), a cozy 
tearoom run by three American women, 
does an energetic job of refreshing the PLD. 
candidates who haunt the Bibliothfeque Na- 
tionals with light and homemade meals. 
They are inventive with their pasta salads 
and sure-banded with their spinach quiches, 
and, says one habitut, they are known 
throughout Paris for their brownies. A meal 
will cost under 100 francs. 

The Casa Lopez, at No. 39-41, has a range 
of all-wool carpets (from 2,600 to 7,000 
francs) in elegantly restrained shades of ficni 
and dude blue that are woven to original 
jacquard patterns in France and Spain. The 
wool is thick and the designs soothing and 
sophisticated, and the decorating magazines 
feature them regularly. (Open 9.30 AM. to 
6.30 P.M. Monday to Saturday). 

Yet more original work is produced at No. 
6-8. where Martine Moisan (td: 297-4665) 


PM Saturday), a cheery establishment that 
has a range of im 


inexpensive toys and a rack of 
specially designed party costumes in satin 
and tulle, including Little Red Riding Hood 
outfits, poisonous-looking toadstool outfits 
and a Pierrot kit at 85 francs that includes a 
white ruff, a black skullcap, a white mask 
anti a stick of black makeup. 

There is an ingenious plain doth doll at 65 
francs that comes with fell-tip pens with 
winch you can paint in the character you like 
(it all wadies off in the machine); there are 


kaleidoscopes and finger paint and thing s 
~ “ French 


for making noises. Characteristically Freac 
offerings indode a stuffed Babar in a smart 
g re e n elephantine jacket, and an enticing 
selection of dollhouse patisserie. 

At the other end of the gallery is a more 
convincing spread of French fare. Luden 
Legrand's wine store is a recent extension of 
his long established ipicerie on Rue de la 
Banque. The wine store at No. 12 (tel: 260- 
0712; open from 9 AM to 7 PM Tuesday 
to Saturday) stocks a huge and well-chosen 


array of wine that can be bought by case or 
bottle from Fiona Beeslon, one of Paris’s 
resident British wine experts, and the ipi- 
cerie is everything you ever wished a French 
grocery to be, with gleaming jars of candy 
outside and cookies and jams of all kinds: ' 
Legrand himself has lived all of his almost 
three-score-years-and-ten in this corner ef 
Paris: his father died here, he points out. aqd 
his children and grandchildren were bom 
here. He is a true champion of France andits 
produce, and is eloquent on the virtues of the 
soil of the lie de France and its fruit and 
vegetables. The peaches of Monlreufl, the 
asparagus of ArgememL, the Calville apples 
of Bagndet, he says, were all prime among 
their species. ! 

He also insists, in his mystical way, on the 
importance of the location of the Galerie 
Vivienne. To the east and west, be points 
out, tie the basilica of Notre-Dame-des-Vic- 
toires and the Bibliothftque Nationale, two 

r ‘ ’dial and cultural lines of influence; to 
north and south the commercial and 
financial poles of the Bourse, or stock ex- 
change, and the Banque de France, the 
French Fort Knox. 

This is, after all as Legrand has every 
interest in maintaining, the bean of Paris. ■ 


; v.t i-ji 


.njr 

, -i jdvtsli; 

•- \ *.• >.V«j £5 


"TVS IMi! 

Lost 




,:r.c w;:) 

y 


•-“■Cl 






£7. -.— 




oc:rrr? 

. - CUB) 
• .It •-.'Ut 




.•r.;ce t 
-CHIP 


pir - ; 


CSS* 


C 1083 The New York Tima 




VufiNNA, Historisches Museum (Id: 
42804). 

EXHIBITION —To Feb. 26: “Rich- 
ard GeratL” 


Feb. 20. 24, 27: “Simon Boccanegra" 
(Venfi). 

Feb. 22, 25. 28: “TannMuser" (Wag- 
ner). 

OPERETTA — Feb. 4 and 10: “Die 


FEBRUARY CALENDAR 


Fledermaus”(J. Strauss). 
Feb. 14: “Der 


Cambrdihg conductor (Mahler, Mo- 
zart). 


•International Theatre (td: 3 1.62.72). 
THEATER— Feb. 2- 13: “OurTown” 


(Wilder). 

•Koozerthaus (tel: 72.12.1 1). 
CONCERTS — Feb. 5: Alban Bag 
Quartet (Mozart. Schubert). 

Feb. 21 : Vienna Youth Choir/ Vienna 
Symphoniker, Gianandrea Gavazzeni 
conductor, Cristina Ortiz piano (Che- 
rubini, Franck). 

Feb. 28: Vienna Symphoniker, Mazed 
Janowski conductor (Beethoven, Mes- 
siaen). 

RECITALS — Feb. 7: Julia Varady 
soprano, Makus Palm piano (Prokof- 
iev. Tchaikovsky) 

Feb. 12: Leonid Bromberg piano 
(Brahms, Weber). 

Feb. 26: Andras Sdriff piano (Bach). 
•Suatsoper(tel: 53240V 
BALLET — Feb. 8, II, 16: “Ray- 
monda” (Petipa, Glazunov). 

OPERA — Feb. 2. 7, 17: "Manon” 
(Massenet). 

Feb. 3: "The Flying Dutchman”(Wag- 
ner). 

Feb. 5: “LTdisir d’Amore” (Donizei- 
Feb. 12. 15, 18.21:“Tosca~(Pucdni). 


Opera bah" (Heu- 

berger). 

•Vo&soper(td:53240> 

OPERETTA — Feb. 2-12: “Die Fle- 
dermaus” (J. Strauss). 'The Beggar 
Student" (MiHOckcr). 


Feb. 8 and 10: Belgian National Or- 
Octors conductor. 


BELGIUM 


ANTWERP. Elisabethzaal (td: 237. 
22.47). 

CONCERTS — Flanders Philhar- 
monic Orchestra — Feb. 16: Uwe 
Mund conductor. William Forman 


chestra, Georges 
Idil Biret piano (Haydn, Kodahr). 
Feb. 20: Gabridh String Quartet 
(Brahms, Mozart). 

Feb. 22: Bdgian National Orchestra, 
Heinz Wallberg conductor, Luc Devos 
piano (Chopin. Schubert). 

Feb.27: LQle Philharmonic Orchestra. 
Jean-Claude Casadesus conductor. 
Carlo Chiarappa violin (Rich. Han- 
del). 


GHENT, Royal Opera (td: 252A25). 
OPERA — Feb. 2: “Eugene Onegin" 


(Tchaikovsky). 
Feb. 3, 6. 9: “J 


OPERA — Feb. 6, 12 16: “La Tra- 
viata" (Verdi). 

Feb. 8. 1 1 . 14. 1 8, 21 : “Der Rcsenkava- 
liei”(R. Strains). 

•Victoria and Albert Museum (td: 
589.63.71). 

EXHIBITION— ToFeb.28:“Briiish 
Biscuit Tins." 

•Wigmore Hall (td: 93521.41 ). 
CONCERTS — Feb.5: Hanson String 
Quartet (Brahms, Mozart). 

Feb. 12: Vienna Muskvrrein Quartet 
(Beethoven. Schubert). 

Feb. 27: Varsovia String Quarter (Bee- 
thoven. Boccherini). 

RECITALS— Feb. 3: Sharon Gould 


Feb. 26: Emil Tchakarov conductor, 
Walter Boeykens clarinet (Mozart). 
•Royal Flemish Opera (tel: 
233.68.85). 

OPERA — Feb. 15, 17. 23: “Eugene 
Onegin” (Tchaikovsky). 

BRUSSELS. Optra National (td: 
217J2.il). 

OPERA— Feb. 15. 17,21.23: “L*Eli- 
sir d’Amore” (Donizetti). 

•Palais des Beaux Arts(td: 51 129.95). 
CONCERTS —Feb. 3: National Op- 
era Symphony Orchestra, Sylvarn 


‘La Bohdnc" (Puccini). 
UEGE. Theatre Royal dc Liige (id: 
2329. 10). 

OPERA — Feb. 2 and 5: “The Escape 
from the Seraglio" (Mozart). 

Feb. 8 and 10: “Eugene Onegin" 
(Tchaikovsky). 


harpsichord (Bach, Handel). 
Feb. 10: Sophie Langdon violi 
bgh Sutherland piano (Bartdk 


violin. She- 
piano (Bartdk, Jana- 


Feb. 18: Leonora Carney piano(Schu- 
mann). 

Feb. 28: Anthony Rolfc Johnson ten- 
or, Graham Johnson piano (Massenet. 

Ravel). 


•New Morning (tel: 523J639). 

JAZZ —Feb. 6-9: Art Blakey and the 
Jazz Messengers. 

Feb. 15 and >6: Jazira Orchestra. 

Feb. 28: Freddie Hubbard Quintet 
•Notre Dame Cathedral (td: 
589J5.79). 

RECITAL — Lyn Hublcr organ 
(Alain. Franck). 

•Opira (td: 74257 JO). 

OPERA —Feb. 5, 9, 13. 16. 19. 23. 26: 
“Tristan and Isolde” (Wagner). 

Feb. 20. 22, 25, 27: "Doctor Faustos" 
(Boehmer). 

•Salle Cortot (td: 535.92.92). 
RECITAL — Feb. 9: Musique 
Oblique (Schoenberg, ZemlinskY). 
•Salle Pleyd (563.07.96). 
CONCERTS — Orchestre de Paris— 
Feb. 6-8: Carlo Maria Giulini conduc- 
tor (Brahms). 

Feb. 20 and 21: Alain Lombard con- 
ductor, Dmitry Sitkovetsky violin 
(Mendelssohn. Roussel). 

RECITAL — Rudolf Serkin piano 
(Beethoven). 


COPENHAGEN, Carisbag Museum 
(Id: 21.01.12). 

EXHIBITION — Through February: 
“Paul G augui n in Copenhagen in 
1884.” 



PRIVATE CLINICS j 


1 


VALMOffT 
WORLD RENOWNED MEDICAL CLINIC 

Glion-sur-Montreux, Lake Geneva, Switzerland 


Located at 2,000 feet altitude fan a moderate and p r otected dimate, the 
clinic hoi the finest accommodations available far your co m fort. In a 
beautiful and calm setting over l ooking the Lake of Geneva and the Morrt- 
Btanc chain the CUNIC VALMONT provid e s complete imd k ol dwek-ups, 
o utstand ing medical care as well as rest, individual diet arid rejuvenation. 
Centers are prodded for cardiology, physiothe ra py, electrotherapy, 
hydrotherapy, electrocardiogram. X-ray and laboratory analysis. 
Rooms with air c ondition in g. 

Mease ask for our broehvrm and prion. 

Write to Mr. H. Tuor - Mnsctar 
CUNIC VALMONT, 1823 GOort-eur-Mo ntrux , Switzerland 
Tatoptwnw 021 /63 48 51 (lODgrws) -Telex; 453 I57vafmt-<f> 


The 

International 
Herald Tribune 

invites you to 

Meet the 
New French 
Cabinet 

as February 26, 1985 at the 
Inter-Continental Hotel 
in Paris. 



HOTELS 



HOTEL tUnXIA PARIS **** 

FT 319 rot mtSON 

nouatt oGamror ■ ikm not. a to mmkh itj 
A TttUXTtONAL 1939’ STYLE. 

ISNOVATCD NOTH, 
naHTMIW HEART OF RUB 


COCKTAIL tOUNtt AHD 
TYHCAL PNUMN ttSTAUUNt 


4S. U. tmpd - 7S0M -Tst (1 ) 54UI.10 

.Tdw270r 


HOLIDAYS 


ROME 


RESIDaMTlAL AREA 

work or 
. autonomous 
hooting, bar, restaurant, garage, 
24 hour service. 


Lovely ap art ments by day, by 1 
by month. Deed phone, owte 


REStDBfCE 

CORTWA D’AMPEZZO 
(39-6) 3387012 - 338701 S. J 


•NikoUq Gallery (td: 1 3. 1 6 T6). 
EXHIBuIONS — To! 


■ToMarch 3: “Sovi- 
et Revolution Posters,’’ “Aboriginal 
An." 

•Radio House Concert Hall (tel: 
35.06.47). 

CONCERTS — Radio Symphony Or- 
chestra — Feb. 7: Michael Scfaon- 
wandt conductor (Ruders. Tchaikov- 


Fd>. 14: Hans Graf conductor (Mo- 
zart. Suauss). 

Feb. 20: Gunnar Tagmose conductor 
(Gade, Schubert). 

Feb. 23: Christopher Hogwood con- 
ductor (Handd). 


ENGLAND 


LONDON, Barbican Centre (tel: 
628.87.95). 

Barbican Art Gallery — To March 2: 
“Printmakers at the 'Royal College of 
Art." 

Frit. 14-Aprfl 8: “Munch and the 
Workers," ^Tradition and Renewal: 
Cont emp o rary Art in the German 
Democratic Republic." 

Barbican Hall — Feb. 6: New Japan 


OF SPECIAL INTEREST 


HONG KONG 
ARTS FESTIVAL 


HONG KONG — This festi- 
val celebrates its 13th year with 
the .participation of approxi- 
mately 600 performers. It runs 
until February 16 and will in- 
dude the following events: 

CONCERTS — Feb. 2. 3, 5: 
Chilingirian String Quartet 
(Beethoven. Schubert). 

Feb. 6: Australian Wind Virtu- 
osi (Beethoven. Poulenc). 


Feb. 9. 10, 12, 13, 15. 17: Mon- 
treal Symphony Orchestra. 
Charles Du toil conductor, Yu- 
zndo Horigorae violin. Timothy 
Hutchins flute (Mozart. Ravel). 
Feb. ] ] : Hong Kong Philhar- 
monic Orchestra, Kenneth Jean 
conductor, Rafael Orozco pi- 
ano (Prokofiev, Tchaikovsky). 


Feb. 13-16: The Cedron Quar- 
tet (Argentinian Tango). 
EXHIBITION — Feb. 7-9: 
“Modern Chinese Painting." 
JAZZ — Feb 2; Louisiana Rep- 
ertory Jazz Ensemble. 

MIME — Feb. 4-9: Trestle 
Theatre Company. 

OPERA — Feb. '2 and 3: “The 
Barber of Seville” (Rossini). 
RECITALS — Feb. 5: Cheng 
Wai piano (Chopin). 

Feb. 7 and 8: George Malcolm 
harpsichord (Bach, Handd). 
Feb. 14: Brenda Poon piano 
(Bach. Beethoven). 

THEATER — Feb. 2: “Of 
Mice and Men" (Steinbeck). 
Feb. 9-12: “The King’s Trum- 
peter (Gerald Harper). 

People’s An Theatre of Beijing 
— Feb. 11-16: "Death of a 
Salesman" (Miller). 

For further information tel: 
23.05.27. 


ROCK — Feb. 15: Soulhside Johnny 
and the Jukes. 

•Nabonalgalerieftd: 266-6). 
EXHIBITION — To Feb. 27: 
“Adolph Meuzel: Drawings and 
Graphics." 

•Phil harm onic (td: 54880). 
CONCERTS — Feb. 3: Berlin Sym- 
pbonisebes Orchestra, Daniel Naza- 
reth conductor (Mendelssohn. Mo- 
zart). 

Feb. 6 and 7: Berlin Phflhannonic Or- 
chestra. Gary Batini conductor (Mah- 
ler, Mendelsohn). 

Feb. 13 and 14: Beilin Philharmonic 
Orchestra. Lorin Maazd conductor 
(Tchaikovsky). 

Feb. 18: Benin Radio Symphony Or- 
chestra. Riocardo Chaifly conductor 
(RachmaninofO- 

Feb. 26: Brandis Quartet (Bethoven. 
Haydn). 

FRANKFURT, Alte Oper Frankfurt 
(td: 134.0400). 

CONCERTS — Feb. 3: Frankfur Op- 
era and Museum Orchestra, Michael 
Gielen conductor, Anne-Sophie Mut- 
ter violin (Brahms). 

Feb. 21 : Robert Schumann Chamber 
Ensemble (mozartk 
Feb. 24: Munich Bach Collegium. 
Florian Sonnietner conductor. 


EXHIBITIONS — To Feb. 28: 
“Eliahu Gat-Women and Nature.” “A 
V anished World - Roman Vishniac,” 
photographs. 

To Apr. 15:“LeaNikd — The Sponta- 
neous Disciplinarian, 1980-1984." 


•Tsubaki House (td: 3S4J2J6). 
ROCK — Feb. 7: Johnny Thunden 
and the Heart Breakers. 

•Yamatane Museum (td: 669. 40.56). 
EXHIBITION — To Mar. 24: “Be- 
quest," Japanese paintings and crafts. 


TUC2" ■ 


•_ ’ £•: 
:t ?<r. 
i:r- 0 
-z.ee r; 


z&sa 


-.'I— N. 

zr.:' 
rturf :: 

.Q-j- - 


ITALY 




tr: : 

m 

\ T‘- 

fc-.- 


P-i'l 
• :-.rc n 

■■ 

\ >r f*. 


BOLOGNA, Galleria d'Ane Mo- 
derna(td: 50J8J9). 
EXHIBITIONS — To Feb. 28: 
“Mario Nanni." “Post War Photogra- 
phy.” 


MONTE-CARLO, Salle Gamier (td: 
50.76.54). 

OPERA— Feb. 8, 10. 12: “EugeneOo- 


•Tealro Comunale (td: 22T9.99). 
CONCERTS — Fd>. 12 “ 


Feb.27: “Manon 


mt" (Puccini). 


and 13: Or- 
chestra e Coro del Teatro Comunale, 
Alain Lombard conductor (Berlioz, 
Debussvt- 

OPERA — Feb. 2, 5. 8. la 14, 17. 20, 
23: “Attila" (Verdi). 

GENOA. Teatro Margherita (tel: 
58.9329). 

OPERA — Feb. 7. 10. 12, 15, 17: 
“Wenher" (Massenet). 


AMSTERDAM,? rint Gallery (td: 

22.42.65). 

EXHIBITION — To Mar. 8: “Mi- 
cfaiaki Sakamoto.” 

•Rijksmuseum Vincent Van Gogh 


(ieL76.48.8U 


at*.- 

■?SK i .. 
' 

■Mi.: v : 
•Eih> j 
SKL--: 

ilil 

ISKrct; 
shctii v 

?4tr(i-;c 

•SCSI 


:: -.'tr p*i 

-- -m 


— .. ^ i. 


~'Fas 


. ~ > 


r •.-.'■jc 


r > .* 
■ f. - 




‘ ■ -i. 

■ C'-UTi 

• ; T\ 1 

s-r? 


■To April 15: “Dutch 


Tomes: Young Italian Artists," 
lioPexicolL" 


“Tul- 


Rudolf Buchbinder piano (Mahler. 
Mozart). 

RECITALS — Feb. 5: Maurizio Pol- 
tini piano (Bach). 

Feb. 27: Murray Perahiapiano(Bacb). 
• Cafe Theater (td: 77.74.66). 
THEATER — Feb. 6-28: ’’The 
Mousetrap" (Christie). 

HAMBURG, Staaisopcr (tel: 
35.15.55). 

BALLET— Feb. 3 and 5: “Othello”; 
(Chaboukiani, Madtavariani). 

Feb. 1 1-13. 15: “Swan Lake" (Tchai- 
kovsky). 

Feb. 18.21.24,26: "Gisdle" (Coralli- 
/PcttoL Adam). 

OPERA — Feb. 3 and 5: "Madame 


Butterfly" (Puccini). 

\ 2 i: “Der RosenkavaljeT (R_ 


Philharmonic Orchestra. Seiji Ozawa 
baikovsky). 


conductor (Beethoven, Tel 

Royal P 

tra, Yehudi Menuhin conductor, Colin 




Fdb. 12: Royal Philharmonic Orcbes- 
iMei 

Carr cello ( 


b (Ddius. Walton). 

Feb. 24: City of London Sinfonia, 
Doron Sdotnoo conductor. Anthony 
Goldstone piano (Bach. Mozart). 


London Symphony Orchestra — Feb. 
3: Qandio Abbado conductor, Rudolf 


NICE, Mus6e International d'An Naif 
(tel: 71.78.33). 

EXHIBITION —To Feb. 15: “Rous- 
seau, Bon bios. Banchanu Seraphine, 
Vivin.” 


•Theatre des Champs Etystes (id: 
723.47.771 

CONCERTS — New Philharmoxiic 
Orchestra — Feb. 2: Stephan Card on 
conductor (Dukas. Poulenc). 

Feb. 22: Mared Janowski conductor, 


Helga Storck harp (Dvorak). 
•Theatre Musical de Paris (tel: 


Seririn piano (Mendelssohn, Mozart). 
Feb. 9: Maxim Shostakovich conduc- 
tor, Viktoria MuOova violin (Shosta- 
kovich, Tchikovsky). 

Feb. 17: Richard Htckox conductor, 

Eiddwtn Harrhy soprano (Mendels- 
sohn). 

Feb. 28: Jeffrey Tate conductor. Jorge 
Bolet piano (B rahms , Schuben). 
RECITAL— Feb. 18: IvoPogordich 


PARIS. Ballard (td: (873.45.81). 
ROCK: Feb. 24: Meat Loaf. 


•Bercy(ieL 341.72.04). 
ROCK— F« 


-Feb. 10: U2. 

•Centre Georges Pompidou (tel: 

277.1133). 

EXHIBITION— To Feb. 24: “Sharon 
Ki viand." 


piano (Chopin. Schumann). 

Barbican Theatre — Royal Shake- 
speare Company — Feb. 4-7. 13-19: 
“Twelfth Night (Shakespeare). 

Feb. 8,9. 11. 12. 22-28: “Mother Cour- 
age” (BrecbO- 

•Hayward Gallery (td: 928 SIJBSU 
EXHIBITIONS —To April 30: “R 


SainlMeni(td: 271.93.93). 

' — Feb. 2: Emilia Baran- 


233.44.44). 

CONCERT — Feb. 4: The Academy 
of Samt-Marun-in-the-Fidds, Ken- 
neth Sililo conductor/ violin (Rossini. 

Verdi). 

OPERA — Feb. 19, 21. 23, 24, 26-28: 

“La Traviau" (Verdi). 

OPERETTA — Feb. 3: “Die Fleder- 

maus“ (J. Strauss). 

Feb. 4: “La Fille dc Madame Angot” 
(Lecocq). 

•Thditrc 3 sur 4 (td: 327.09.16). 


Feb 

Strauss). 

Feb. 27: “La Bobbme" (Puccini). 
MUNICH, National Theater (id: 
22.13.16). 

BALLET — Feb. 8: “Swan Lake” 
(Tchaikovsky). 

OPERA — Feb. 3 and 6: "Don Car- 
los." 

Feb. 1 1. 14, 18. 23. 28: “Eugeae One- 
gin" (Tchaikovsky). 

Feb. 12. 20. 22, 27: “Woneck”(Bergl. 
Feb. 21 and 24: “Orpheus ana Euri- 
dice" (Gluck), 

Feb. 25: “Aida" (Verdi). 

OPERETTA — Feb. 17 and 19: "Die 
Fledermaus" (J. Strauss). 
•Staatstheaterfld: 260.32JZ). 
ing). 

OPERA 


PARMA. Teatro RcgkXtcL 22003). 
RECITAL — Feb. 23: Ewa Podles 
mezzosoprano. Jerzy Maidiwinski pi- 
ano (Chopin, Handd). 

ROME. Accademia Nazionale di San- 
ta Cecilia ( td: 679.03.89). 
CONCERTS — Orchestre ddl’Acca- 
demia Nazionale de Santa Cecilia — 
Feb. 3-5: Giuseppe Snopdi conduc- 
tor, Karan Armstron soprano (Beetho- 
ven. Nemo). 

Feb. 10-12: Giuseppe Smopoti con- 
ductor. Martha Argericb piano (Mo- 
zart. Schubert). 

Feb. 17-19: Norbert Balaisch conduc- 
tor( 

Feb. 

conductor, 
piano (Brahms. Ban6k). 

Feb. 9: New Japan Philharmonic Or- 
chestra. Seiji Ozawa conductor (Bar- 
tok). 

TURIN. Tea iro Redo (tel: 54.80.00). 
OPERA —Feb. 5. 8. 12. 14. 1 7. 20. 24. 
27: “Manon Lescaut" (Puccini). 
VENICE, Palazzo Fortuny (lei: 
70.99.09). 

EXHIBITION —To April 28: “High 
Fashion: 50’s and 60‘s." 

•Teatro La Fenicc ( id : 25191). 
BALLET— Feb. 14. 15. 17, 19.20: “Le 
Carnaval" ( Fokin c. Schumann), “Le 
Bourgeois Gentilhomme'’ (Balan- 
chine. R. Strauss). 

OPERA —Feb. 2. 3. 5. 7-9: “Orpheus 
in (he Underworld" (Offenbach). 


EXHIBIT! Or 
Identity.*' 

•Stadsschouwburg (td: 24J13.il). 
BALLET — Feb. 6-10. 13. 15: “Pe- 
trushka" (Fokine. Stravinsky). 
ROTTERDAM. De Doelen (tel: 



1429.11). 

f CERTS — Feb. 2 and 3: Rotter- 


er and 


CON< 

dam Philharmonic Orchestra. Janies 
Conioa conductor, Kuo Woo Paik pi- 
ano (Mozart. Ravel). 


SCOTLAND 


□. 1 1 - ivorocn i>aiaisui couuuc- 

r(Bnidcner). 

b. 24-26: Oiristcmh von Dohndnyl 
ndnetor. Bruno Leonardo Gdber 


EDINBURGH. National GaDerv(td; 
556.8921). 

EXHIBITION — Feb. 6-Apr. 28: 
“The Face of Nature: Landscape 
drawings from the permanent collec- 
tion-” 

•Queen’s Hall (id: 66821.17). 
CONERTS— Fcb.2: Scottish Cham- 
ber Orchestra. Ian McCroric conduc- 
tor. JohnTunndl violin (Brahms. Dvo- 
rak). 

Feb.9: Scottish Chamber Ordjespu, 
Trevor Pinnock conductor, Gabriw 
Sima soprano (Bach, Handel). J 
Feb. 17: Scottish Sinfonia, Neil Marf- 
tle conductor (Brahms, Moeart). 

Feb. 21: Edinburgh Quartet, John 
McCabe piano (Shostakovich). 


Feb. 23: Edinburgh Symphony Or- 
' ur Mitt ‘ 


JAPAN 


OPERA — Feb. 4: “Cosi fan tutte” 
(Mozart). 

Feb. 13: "Don Giovani" (Mozart). 
Feb. 20 and 22: “La Bobdne” (Pucci- 
m). 


GREECE 


TAL 

owska cello (Bach. Faore). 


sur4(td:: 

RECITAL— Feb. 4 and 1 1: Elena U- 


» Hotel Burgundy (td: 26034.12). 

mON— ToM 


-To March I : “Alain 


To April 30: “Re- 
noir," "John Walker: Paintings from 
the Alba and Oceania Series.” 
•Royal Academy of Arts (tel: 
734-90,52). 

EXHIBITION —To March 3 1 : “Cha- 
gall/ 


EXHIBIT!! 

MalhioL” 

•Musie d’Art Moderne (tel: 
723.61/27). 

EXHIBITION— To March 31 : “Gus- 
tav Mahler/' 

• Mus£e du Grand Palais (tel: 
26134.10). 


koubovitch guitar, Russian ballads, 
gypsy songs and poetry ( Pushkin, Pas- 
ternak). 


GERMANY 


ATHENS. Medusa Gallery (tel: 

724.45.52). 

EXHIBITION — To Feb. 9: "Bull- 
fight." drawings by Yiannis Dimi Ira- 
kis. 

•Hydrohoo5 Gallery (td: 72L36.84). 
EXHIBITION — To Feb. 7: "Maria 
SotirL r 


TOKYO, Azabu Museum of Art (td: 
582.14.10). 

EXHIBITION— To Feb. 24: “Ultiyo- 
E Prints of the Hisfaikawa ScfaooL" 
•Idemitsu An Gallery (Id: 21 3.3 1 28). 
EXHIBITION —To Feb. 3: The In- 
terinfluence of Ceramic An in East 
and West" 

•Kant Hokcn Hall (td: 480i 1.1 1). 
CONCERT— Feb. 2: Vienna Johann 
Strauss Orchestra. Shibuya Kokaido, 
Kun Woss, Atsushi Nuku conductors 
(J. Strauss). 

•Korakuen Stadium (id: 811.2M1). 
CIRCUS — To Feb. 17: Korakuen 
Great American Circus. 


chestra, Alasdair Mitchell conductor; 
Daphne Godson violin (Gtazounov. 
Franck). 

Feb. 28: Reid Chamber Orchestra, 
Ruth Hardwicke. Rob Moist 
conductors, Ted Brown cello (I 
rini, Morsberger). . . 

GLASGOW, Theatre Royal (tel: 
331.12^4). - 

OPERA — Feb. 2. 20, 22, 27: “Thfi 
Bartered Bride” (Smetana). 


UNim STATES 


*Jfecscsd 

i. - 

Jfw ih- 

r^^Bbtlir.r 

iCJPfPhsoia 

jC® ~ the 

iv 


NEW YORK. Guggenheim MusaAo 
(id: 360.35.00). 

EXHlBITlONfi — Feb. 8-March 24: 

“Ree Morton." 


Fd>. i ^April 14: “Kadiiisky in Pans: 


•Kosd Nenkin HaU (id: 356.1 1.1 Ik 

Ju- 


BERLIN, Deutsche Oper (tel: 
341.44,49). 


>Nees Morphea (tel: 361.61.65). 

BrnON —To Feb. 16: “Yior- 


EXHIBITIONS — Feb. 9-April 22: 

rencoCoun- 


i Royal Opera (id: 240.10.66). 
1. 15, 19. 22. 27; 


“lng?ressionismand the Fi 
pygde." 


BALLET— Feb. 4, 5. 

“The Seqring Beauty" (Pdipa, Tchai- 
kovsky). 

Feb. 7 and 13: “Manon" (MacMillan, 
Massenet). 


•eb. 16- April 15: “Edouard Pi|_ 
•Museedn Louvre (td: 260.39.26). 
EXHIBITIONS— To April 15: “Ho- 
bdn al the Louvre." 

Feb. 15- May 6: “French Engraven 
from the XVIII Century." 


BALLET— Feb. 7: “Giselle" (Coralli- 
/Pcrrot, Adam), 

OPERA— Feb.2and6: “DicZauber- 
riOte"(Mozart) 

Feb. 9: “Tosca" (Pucdni). 

Feb. 15, 19, 23: “Carmen" (Bizet). 
OPERETTA — Feb. 22, 24, 26: “Die 
Fledermaus" (J. Strauss). 

•Metroool (tel: 52.40.80). 


EXHIBIT! i 

gps Nikolopoulcs." 

•Polyplaoo Gallery (td; 362.98.77). 
EXHIBITION —To Feb. 10: "Foula 
SakeHi.” 


ISRAEL 


JERUSALEM. Israel Museum (tel: 
69B2.11). 


BALLET — Feb. 2: "Romeo and 
litt" (Profokiev). 

•Matsuoka Muslim of An (td; 
437.27.87). 

EXHIBITION— To Mar. 31: "Mas- 
terpieces of Japanese Paintings and 
Old Potteries." 

•Nakano Sun Plaza (tel: 388. 1L51). 
ROCK — To Feb. 4: Quiet Riot. 
•Suntory Museum (id: 403JW.80). 
EXHIBITION — To Feb. II : ’The 
Two Screens of ‘Western Princes on 
Horseback’." 

•Tokyo Bunka Kaigan (tel; 
828.2I.il). 

OPERA— Fd>.2and3:“DieZauber- 

fiote" (Mozart). 


1934-1 

•Lincoln Center (td: 870J9.60). 
New YorkGty^Ballei — Feb. 9 and W: 

(Robbins. Rdch). 

Feb. 17 and 24: TheCW'<Robhids. 
Stravinsky). "Adantino 1 (RoMw? 5 * 
Tchaikovsky). * 

•Metropolitan Museum of Art (P : 
535.77. fo). 

EXHIBITIONS —To Feb. 24: “Cft- 
nese Painting and CaBigimrby. m \ » 
To SepL 1 : “Man and the Horse. . . 
•Museum of Modern .Aft 

ExiSmo fe — To Fda 12: “fxe 
Krasner. A Retrospective." , . 

•Whitney Museum of American Art 
(tel: 570 J6J3). • 

EXHIBITION — To March 3: “TJ* 
Third Dimension: Sculpture of ®c 
New York SchooL" 










m?-.- 


FOE FUN AND PROFIT 

eking a Travel Agent 
a Buyer’s Market 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUA RY 1, 1985 

TRAVEL 


Page 9 


by Roger Collis 





HOOSING a travel agent is similar 
in many ways to choosing an ad- 
vertising agency. And given the 
complexity and cost of travel, it 
^ Ba^jegnallY important business ded- 

^texfc isV -': same emphasis on creativity. 

canthetiav- 


losing flexibility? Are they 
. of antirip aung problems, like the 
; ofjniWg a tight connection at certain 
or with carriers that have a record 



- 5=c;;.n _ ■■ 

■ c .C, CTt c 1 

S-telBEjS* 

"‘."f''" . C tiSfr 
" '•ipSi; 


-■ »• C.i ££ 
' '' v' Mi** 


'i , j. 

-sv 

'i: 

;r 




r^ow^pbfiden t are they at buying travel 
services (i je travel equivalent of media buy- 
ing)? For sample, can they deliver a better- 
Ujan-cori irate rate on hoed rooms through 
disc unt arrangements? Can they get 
to a upgr led to business or even first class 
fenoexti cost? Can they pull strings to get 
^btf-your avo rile seat? 

Just as mportaut, how efficient are they? 
For exam >le, do they have a 24-hour infor- 
mation a d reservation service that can be 
accessed iy a collect call anywhere in the 
world? 

Acconng to an American Express survey 
carried o t in the United States last July, a 
majority f companies said that they look for 
staff pro iency more than any otho- service 
feature, here’s truth in the old advertising 
adage th an agency is only as good as the 
- people «yidng your account 

Soil’s Iways a good idea to check out the 
folks at e front desk. As Lance Coleman, 
general i ma ger of Knoth Travel in London, 
.puts iu 1 fe always encourage new clients to 
their , cretaries spend more time with our 
booking erics. It’s important that they have 
' freigh t id better understanding of each 
other's pblems and needs. The trouble is 
that sea aries aren't always sure what their 
jxxs wa is. Sometimes the boss isn’t sure 
■other.” 

" Knov tg what you want can detenmne 
' which ti rd agent you choose. For example, 
4 const iog firm that charges its out-of- 
-pocket ivd expenses to its clients may be 
more a cerncd about efficient service than 
.saving oney. A manufacturing company 
may w: . to shop around far the best rebate 
on tola ravd expenditure. Another compa- 
ny may e more interested in getting a maxi- 
mum d :»unt on holds, or special expertise 
with a ss meetings and trade fairs.. Clout 
with ai Liriine cm a frequently traveled route 
or km edge of a certain geographical area 
* may b t deciding factor. Hogg Robinson, a 
Londcr based travd agency, has a resident 
expert on die huddle East and 
se services, ranging bom help on 
t tenders to translations and mar- 
. are free to corporate dienes. 
^ is a smorgasbord of services 
sho uld expect from a major bnsi- 
vd agent: 

nd-the-dock, tm-hne compnter- 
onnation and reservations service, 
travd agents have their own high- 
ems such as Travicom/DPAS and 
ta and Videotex, which provide in- 
to the reservatum centers of all 


• Documents delivery. A reliable door-to- 
door service for tickets, visas and other trav- 
el documents. 

• Packages for conferences, trade fairs and 
exhibitions. Expertise on travd incentives. 
•Travel insurance. Corporate discounts for 
personal, baggage and medical expenses. 

• Health. Advice and information on shots 
and other precautions. Details of climate 
and weather conditions. 

• Hotel discounts and reservations, a service 
that is often neglected by corporate diems. 
Agents should offer special rates up to 50 
per c e n t less than published tariffs. 

• Special services. Membership in airline 
dubs (especially exclusive ones like Swiss- 
air), a meet-and-greet service at major air- 
ports, discounts on car and air taxi rentals, 
help with visas and passports, no 1 percent 
service charge on travelers c heck s. 

• Credit facilities. Most agents give extend- 
ed credit to corporate cheats (Kuani, for 
example, allows 45 days to pay). Others 
(Limn Poly and Hogg Robinson, also in 
London) have a corporate account service 
linked to Diners CIud, which extends credit 
to €0 days. American Express Travd Man- 
agement has its own system. 

• Travd pattern analyses. A customized 
management report showing how much 


Staff proficiency 
put first among 
qualities sought 


money the agent is saving you (or could 
have) each month, by comparing the normal 
fare with the fare offered. Typically, this will 
be categorized by traveler, department, des- 
tination, and by type of travd service i.e. 
airKnf* car rentals and SO on. 

Travd agents traditionally make their 




tior^n av ailability , ticketing and itiner ari e s . 
NETKSUJUB 4good agency has staff members who 

_ jauJ 1 the ins and outs of promotional fare 

offs and can juggle rates and travd sectors 
. r ;u y 1 ‘toll the best possible deaL For example, 

tin} should be able to match APEX, PEX 

• ‘ artotber fare deals without the same sort of 

.. r relictions. 


groups, not by charging 

There is a growing tendency, however, 
especially in the United Stares, for such 
major corporations as IBM and General 
Motors to establish their own in-house travd 
facilities (called “in-plants” in trade jargon), 
often financed and controlled by a travd 
agent In return, the company pays a man- 
agement fee to the agent, which depends on 
who pays for what: personnel, office space 
and soon. 

Since the demise of the Cml Aeronautics 
Board at the end of last year, airlines are now 
free to pay commissions direct to companies. 
So far, no major airline has done so, but the 
possibility of this happening is causing an 
uproar in the travd industry. 

It's a buyer's market. And competition feu 
the business dollar is so intense that travd 
agents routinely give rebates, or kickbacks, 
to corporate clients (2 to 3 percent is normal, 
6 to 7 percent is not uncommon). Conse- 
quently, agents may be earning as little as 1 
to 2 percent of turnover. 

This practice can result in diminishing 
returns. 

The American Express survey noted that 
ability to get the lowest airfares, to monitor 
corporate travd policy and to supply man- 
agement information reports weigh much 
heavier than die availability of rebates. 

As one travd agent says: “Getting a .dis- 
count doesn't mean you won’t get wrong 
advice:” 


“The American Express 1984/85 Si 
Business Travel” is obtainable at $1 42.50, 
Box 13829 ‘ Phoenix. Arizona 85002. 


of 


The Song That Makes Strong Swiss Cry 


by Mavis Gurnard 


I AUSANNE, Switzerland — It’s just an 
old Swiss song that sums up most 
Alpine clich&s, but it has been 
- worked into music familiar the 
world over and helped cement the many 
differences of this tiny country. 

“Pastoral calls have been known from the 
beginning of tune and may be one of man’s 
most ancient forms of communication,’’ says 
Guy Mdraux, a cross-cultural historian who 
has traced its evolution over 500 years from a 
folk song to the equivalent of a Swiss nation- 
al anthem. “What is unique is that it has 
survived into the 20th century, possibly be- 
cause of its emotional content” 

Setting off on travels through Switzerland 
in 1828, James Fenimore Cooper made a 
note to hims elf to. as he put it, “enquire the 
true meaning of the ranz des caches'” The 
author of “The Last of the Mohicans” was 
curious to see the Swiss in their native wilds, 
and hwir toe tune that was said to make 
Swiss mercenaries weep and desert 
When he finally beard it played on the 
long alphorns, which carry sound for miles 
around, the sour notes of the instrument 
grated on his ears. But even today, Swiss 
admit that when they bear the ranz. or Kith- 
reihen, as it is called in German, the melody 

tU fiwiss herd^re 1 — - from Gruy&re and the 
Oberland all the way to Appeazdl — have 
vocalized the ranz des vaches to soothe, sum- 
mon or guide their cows along the pastures. 
From dozens of regional variations, the mu- 
sicologist Max Peter Baumann has found a 
single basic pattern. The words, which were 
added far later, once varied from one chalet 
to the next, but fall in three parts: a repeated 
call (“Liauba, liauba” is the refrain in Gru- 
yfcre); a chaining roll call of the herd; then 
anecdotes of mountain life, ending on a 
plaintive note. 

:d down orally, there is 
the ranz was originally 
but in the 18 th and 19th 
a favorite musical theme 
to suggest Alpine or rustic scenes. 

The notes were transcribed as early as 
1545 by a companion of Martin Luther. 
Jean-Jacques Rousseau next entered it 
among exotic “savage” times — hemmun 


Since it was 
no way to tell 
sung or 
centuries it 


Persian and Chinese airs and a Canadian jig 
— in his 1767 Dictionary of Music. He also 
recorded an earlier medical observation that 
it made Swiss recruits so homesick that they 
were forbidden to sing, play or whistle it on 
pain of death. 

This legend was never verified, but 
rhargeri the tune with such romantic content 
that Goethe, Wordsworth. Byron and all the 
romantic travelers in (heir trail tried to bear 
and describe its powerful effect 

For the Romantics, it evoked specially a 
proud, free people in their natural surround- 
ings — 4nrV pines, lush valleys and snow- 
" Alps in the distance, 
o conjure up this mood, the composer 
Andrfe Gittry inserted the air into his opera 
“Guillaume TdlT staged in Paris durum the 
French Revolution. Almost forty years later. 
Rossini wove it into the score of ms opera on 
the same legend, following the mention of 
cowbells in the Schiller drama on which the 
libretto was based. 

Franz Liszt borrowed the air for piano 
improvisations, and Robert Schumann styl- 
ized it for the background of “Manfred,” the 
dramatic poem that Byron set in the Alps. 

M USICIANS did not limit it to the 
Alpine scene: one heats ranz des 
vaches in the last movement — be- 
fore the storm — of Beethoven’s “Pastoral” 
Symphony as well as in Berlioz’s “Sym- 
phonic Fantastique.” Richard Strauss trans- 
posed the melody to the Spanish countryside 
in “Don Quixote.” 

Richard Wagner, vacationing on the Rigi 
mountain, wrote to Minna, that the call of an 


[abler and His World 








s ; ' 


v 






iittf 




anrchiteci and interior decorator. Finally, 
■ ; .afcr Mahler's death in 1911, it was Moll 
• -.w> made tire death mask and Hoffmann 
' to dwd gnad the composer’s simple but 
?Hng tombstone, inscribed merely with 
name. All of these are amply documented 
- ithe Paris exhibition. 

There is also a fascinating series of inior- 
■jfl photographs of a coffee nour at the MoD 
. jodence, with a breathtaking cast of char- 
iters that includes — besides the Molls and 
ie Mahlers — the theater director Max 
vbinhardt, the painter Gustav K l im t, the 
&ge designer Alfred Roller, the composer 
twng Pfitzner, and Josef Ho ffmann . 

4 While this must have been an exciting time 
i Vienna, it was also a time of great ten- 
ions, for the Hapsburg capital was then as it 

5 now one of the most conservative cities of 
jhe Weston world, deeply resistant to 
change. Mahler wanted very much to be 
director of the Hofoper, but he was deto- 
' mined to shake it out of its easy-going ways 
imii make it a home of model operatic pro- 
duction. “What yon theater people call your 
tradition is p/tfbmg but yoor slonoiness, he 
is supposed to have raid to 
chorus on one occasion — a remark that is 
was pop ularize d as “Tradition ist Swam- 
pcreL" 

'•‘Not only was he rigorous in his musical 
standards, but he was. often his own stage 
director as well,' arid as designer he brought 
in Alfred Roller, an artist and tiacher who 
bad not previously worked in the uu^«r- 
Rdler became one of the most edebratra of 
theater designers, abandoning painted flats 
'or scenery that occupied space and making 
"ich psychological use of form and color, 
rwfany of Ins Vienna sets and costumes are 
documented here, including those of such 



vnai you 

nothing but ypor doppmtsishe Mahler, by Enrico Caruso. 
d to have raid to the Operas 


famous Mahler-era productions as “Don 
Giovanni,” “Fiddio" and “Tristan und Isol- 
de.” Now that conductors, stage directors 
and designers are practically toe stars of 
opera, it is hard to fathom that feu the new 
production of “Don Giovanni” in 1905, nei- 
ther Mahler's name nor Roller’s can be 
found on the poster. 

The exhibition also includes an extensive 
sample of manuscript scores and annotated 
copies, particularly fascinating in toe case of 
such a fastidions composer. One of the most 
interesting is Willem Mengdberg's copy of 


Continued from page 7 


the score of the Fourth Symphony with de- 
tailed notes by the conductor. “AH the 
changes in red ink are made in Gustav Mah- 
ler's own hand.” Next to this, circled, is the 
notation, “Guaranteed. W. Mengdbexg." 
Bdow that: “AH those in red penal are by 
me.” An arrow prants to the words “Word of 
honor. W. Mengdberg.” 

Not only was Mahler immortalized by 
famous contemporaries, among them Au- 
guste Rodin, and some not so famous, but 
the resurgence in popularity of his music is 
apparently paralleled by the popularity of 
his likeness as a krnd of Pop art artifact- 
Several recent works of art in the show 
testify to ihi-t- 

Two films of about 15 minutes each are 
included in the exhibition. One is an audiovi- 
sual survey of his life that parallels the exhi- 
bition but does not really add much to it. 
The other is a unique document — the aged 
Alma Mahler-Werfel (with the Mahlers’ 
daughter, Anna, a sculptor) reminiscing 
mainly about Mahler's sittings m Paris for 
Rodin and about his relationship with the 
young Arnold Schoenberg in Vienna. 

On successive Sundays during the show, 
documents in sound will be played, the rar- 
est of them being piano rolls of Mahler 
playing some of ms own music. Others in- 
clude singers from his era at the Vienna 
Opera, and historic interpretations the com- 
poser’s works by Bruno Walter, Oskar Fried 
and Mengelbeig. 


“ Gustav Mahler, un horrme, me oeuvre, 
imeepoque,” Music d ‘Art Moderns de la ViUe 
de Paris. 11 Avenue du Prisidem-Wilson. 
Paris 16: to March 31. ■ 


BOONESBtRY 

' GOT A •; Ofm& 

j- GmOY DOW 

CCUiT&CK THINK 

BSCN7EL- 


Aruuarw** ns £££5ae 
SM&DO&tT 

ujoku&aW' an owr 



m/ONE 

KN0UH0U M/m 
Mmsfm 40. so. 
WERE FIRED? / WPS. 



509m __ 

/WHO THR HOT 

urrf MW6 >Q VKNQHI 
m ‘ SHOPS. 



alphora summoning hotel guests to view the 
sunrise had awakened him at 4 A.M. Since it 
was raining, he did not get up, but the 
melody kept running through bus head to 
become the tune a shepherd plays to an- 
nounce the arrival of Isolde's ship. 

The ranz was adapted to many operettas 
with tides like “Swiss Family” “The Cha- 
let," “The Cowherds” and even “Home! 
Sweet Home! or the Ranz des Vaches,” first 
sung at Covent Garden. 

It may have been in the lost score of one of 
the first operas performed in the United 
States, in 1796: “The Archers, or the Moun- 
taineers of Switzerland." And. in I913.it was 
brought to Chicago in an Austrian opera 
based on the pathetic legend of the Swiss 
soldier sentenced to death for sin gin g the 

ranz des vaches. 

In Switzerland itself, such composers as 



to compose music for men’s choirs, bands 


jompose mi 
and orchestras. 

Commercialized and even ridiculed in 
Pierre Larousse's Dictionary of the 1 9th 
Century, as the “Marseillaise” of cattle, still 
the song has given the diverse people of 
Switzerland common roots. Mountain peo- 
ple, posted by waterfalls, lakes and Alpine 
huts, obligingly performed the ranz — for a 
fee — for curious tourists. It is the one 
recognizable air that crosses cantonal barri- 
ers of langua ge and religion. 

It was performed at the first Alpine jousts 
held in Unspunnen in 1805, it has always 
been the heart of the F&tes des Vignerons, an 
event held every 25 years in Vevey, the pub- 
lic fervently picking up the refrain. 

At the last such festival, in 1977, a power- 
ful rendering by one cowherd, Bernard Ro- 
manens, was so applauded that he went as 
far as New York and Beijing toperform it 
Nor was it the first time the Chinese had 
heard it Fine watches that played the tune 
were often made for the Far Eastern market 
in the 19th century. 

The ranz expresses an ancient image: 
against the mountain setting on romantic 
engravings, tourist posters or postcards, a 
solemn procession of cows winds across the 
pastures. The scene has been painted over 
and over on farm implements, on panels 
han g in g with the big bells in front of the 
barn, cut into lacy paper silhouette dtcou- 
pages, chisel ed on silver buckles, carved in 
wood, etched on i 
may be brightly 1 
toudringly naive. 

After many years abroad as a Red Cross 
delegate, professor, and editor of historical 
works. Metrairx, who is Swiss-born but holds 
a doctorate from Yale, has retired here and 
spent the last years studying this aspect of 
popular music. His recent book, published in 
t jnwamne in 1984, prompted a Lausanne 
wn<iinm u> mount an exhibition of docu- 
ments, paintings, partitions and folk art re- 
lating to the Alpine pastoral theme. 

“Le Ranz des Vaches” will be shown at the 
Musee de tAnden-Evichi, Place de la Cathi- 
drale 2, Lausanne, until March 17. Daily 
except Monday, from2 to 5 P~M.: Thursday2 
to 7 PM. ■ 



A hearty rendition of the Ranz des Vaches in the 1920s. 

Tr $ 

^/^unq In ^ 

//t /Jr m /)w/r/ f'Y - — ~ 

^ "in- thfiian? ira ilitdi ^ 

acssnKr s-BitasH-oa*. 


a*. Jim M. 


hw f tl 


traiJut fWJtfMf*- dmUat/kO. Ilmmnm. ZO Salt- Apmur. kStlrhmftftiS Mtair SrFtrr or thr rnknt Am*#** 


Andante 
ran muto. 
(iratmto rd 
Knpreutivo. 



Ham,. lAOr.y.WJTrJrMl.j 

A page from an English operatic version. 


| THE 

NEW 

YORK 

HERALD. 

| WHOLE XtL: JVSS. BUKO FEAN EDITION— PARIS. WKhNKfflAY, JANUARY li. 19M.-TWT. 

.\i: PAGES. Jim, 15.; LQKDOX, 2^; HKFlfiTHEm, 20. 


QUEEN VICTORIA PASSES AWAY AT OSBORNE HOUSE. 


I Cum H Uf-ta l Six, 
IMribllji tarnmM 
It Bv CMM- 

m. 


Tnciibg Tirirtnt it th* Lut J 
Kara ; Su Hu Hnr lot 
Dog Bnagkt ti 
Bar. 



THE FRONT PAGE 1887-1980 

International Herald Tribune, Book Division, 

181, avenue Chari es-de -Gaulle, 92521 NeuiDy Cedex, Fiance. 

Please send me copies ofHe Fraat Fag* al U.S. S 37 each, 

plus postage: S 2J0 each in Europe * S 8 each outside Europe. 

□ Enclosed is my payment, (Payment may be made m the convertible 
European currency of your choice at ament exchange rales.) 

□ Please chaige my VISA Card number — 


Name (in block letieisi: _ 


Address:. 


City and Code:. 


Exp, dateu 


. Signature: — — 

(Necessary for VISA Crd mudumL 


Country:. 


1-2-85 















Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1985 


R 


IROYCEI 


Your Company has achieved record 
profits in 1984, its seventy-fifth 
operational year, largely due to the 
performance of subsidiaries in the 
United Kingdom and the Americas. 
Earnings per share have increased by a 
substantial 35 per cent and the total 
dividends for the year are the highest 
ever. The trend continues into the 
current year. 

The Group balance sheet continues 
to strengthen with gross assets 
increasing to over £2 billion at the year 
end, including cash balances of £126 
million which increased by the receipt 
of £166 million in November following 
the sale of our investment in House of 
Fraser and a bond issue in Germany. 
This resulted in total net borrowings, 
excluding those relating to our 
confirming businesses, decreasing 
from 30 per cent in 1983 to 21 per cent 
of gross assets. 

Net assets per share have also 
increased by nearly 22 per cent to 241 
pence per share. 

Whilst still maintaining our 
investments in Africa, we have been 
expanding in the United Kingdom, 
Europe and the Americas which has, 
we consider, resulted in a significantly 
well balanced business, with profit 
contribution from these three areas 
now accounting for 47 per cent of total 
profits. 

The hotel and casino divisions have 
substantially increased their 
profitability in the year with the 
Princess Properties International 
Group performing particularly well. A 
large proportion of the Group’s capital 
expenditure during the year has been 
spent on upgrading and expanding 
these divisions. 

I am glad to report that our 
manufacturing companies in the 
United Kingdom have also had a very 
good year, with greatly improved 
results being achieved by the Firsteel 
Group, Lonrho Textiles and George 
Outram. Some of our ( pm l c l 
manufacturing com- | MJL La| 
panics in Africa have, 1 15V 

however, been affected \\Jm 
by reduced demand in I HSvT 
| local markets, but there I If I 
are already signs of I I 
some improvement in the IROYCE I 
current year. 

Our traditional 
activities of 
agriculture and 
mining continue to 

improve. We are the — 

largest commercial food 
producer in Africa and, f 
through well managed I Yy-wJ 1 
companies, have been Y\ A f J 
able not only to supply ^ 

local markets with 
produce but also to earn valuable 
foreign exchange for the countries 
concerned through the export of 
agricultural products not in demand 
locally. It is in this manner that we 
have been able to make a positive 
contribution to the alleviation of the 
plight of many people in the areas 
affected by drought. 

You will already be aware that we 
disposed of our investment in House of 
Fraser in November for a cash 
consideration of £138 million and 
retained the right to receive a gross 
dividend of £2 million. This investment 
was acquired at a cost of slightly under 
£67 million, thereby producing, 1 am 
sure you will agree, a handsome return 
even without taking account of the £25 
million dividend income received over 
the years. 

Since the sale we have acquired a 
6.3 per cent shareholding in House of 
Fraser. With our knowledge of the 
business we considered our purchases, 
at around 300 pence per share, to be an 
attractive investment. We have also 
been before the Monopolies 
Commission and the outcome of their 
deliberations will have a direct bearing 
on our future policy regarding House 
of Fraser. 

it was with sadness that we learned 
that Lord Duncan-Sandys was 
intending to stand down as Chairman 
of your Company after many years. 

Sir Edward du Cann, who has been 
acting Chairman for the past year, has 
accepted the Board's unanimous offer 
of the Chairmanship. However, I am 
sure you will be pleased to know that 
Lord Duncan-Sandys has accepted the 
position of President and will, 
therefore, remain with your Company. 

Finally, I would like to thank all 
employees worldwide for their hard 
work, loyally and enthusiasm, 
without which we would not have been 
able to report such fine results this 
year. 


Audi 


m 


MINING AND REFINING 

Our platinum operations had a 
successful year with record output and 
profits. Production expanded to 
235, (XX) ounces of platinum group 
metals in the year from 134,000 ounces 
only three years ago, and we have 
started a two year programme to 
increase output by a further 35,000 
ounces per year. In addition, 
construction of our new plant to refine 
rhodium, ruthenium and iridium is 
now nearing completion and 
we will complete the 
erection of the copper/ 
nickel refinery on the 
mine site by the end of 
the current year 
Group gold 
production was 
again well 
maintained 
at the 
400,000 
ounce per 
year level 
and 
profit- 
ability has 

increased. 


I 

jpp"! 




tmm 

■■*41 IT ; 


Lonrho has achieved record profits 


in its 75th operational year 


THE TREND CONTINUES INTO THE CURRENT YEAR 

R W Rowland, Chief Executive 


Apart from other expansion 
programmes, a major increase in 
production is planned at the Ashanti 
gold mine in Ghana using funds from 
a consortium led by the International 
Finance Corporation. 

The first of two large shaft systems 
to exploit the extensive gold reserves of 
Eastern Gold Holdings, the major new 
mine administered by The Anglo 
American Corporation, is nearing 
completion and underground 
development has commenced. 

We continue to have a 36 per cent 
shareholding in this property. 

Significant improvements in profits 
from bituminous coal and anthracite 
mining have recently been forthcoming 
as a result of strengthening demand. 

In equal partnership with Atlantic 
Richfield and Shell, we have been 
awarded a concession by the Bahamian 
Government for offshore oil and gas 
exploration covering some 2.4 million 
acres. 


The Group's hotels in the United 
Kingdom handled over one thousand 
conferences in the period under review, 
thus maintaining their position as the 
leading exhibition and conference 
group in (he country. 

Major improvements were made to 
several of the Meiropole hotels. 

Record occupancies were achieved 
by all hotels with our new hotel in 
Blackpool doing particularly well, 
reaching an average occupancy of 
73 per cent in Us second full year of 
operation. 

The casino division has also had a 
very satisfactory year. It was the first 
full year of operation at new premises 
for Crockford’s Club, which has 
proved immensely successful. 


Jetta, were successfully introduced to 
the market and are already outselling 
rheir predecessors. 

The company’s prestige marque. 
Audi, also continued in make excellent 
progress. 

The Group is also the sole importer 
for M.A.N. and Volkswagen 
commercial vehicles, and this part 
of the business reported a further 
improvement in sales performance. 

Dutton-Forshaw has maintained its 
position as the fourth biggest retailer 
of Austin Rover vehicles within the 
United Kingdom and sold almost 
19,000 BL vehicles. 

Jack Barclay maintained its position 
as the world's leading distributor of 
Rolls-Royce and Bentley cars. 


AGRICULTURE 

Despite a lower crop yield than in the 
previous year, due to the lowest level of 
rainfall in over a decade, our tea 
growing company in Malawi achieved 
by far the highest profit ever recorded 
as a result of strong tea prices. 

The expansion of the factory at Mindali 
has been completed, one year ahead 
of schedule. 

Production at our seven sugar 
estates in Malawi, Mauritius, South 
Africa and Swaziland increased to 
426,000 tonnes during the year and 
overall profitability increased. 

The main area of the Group’s 
expansion in Zambia is in the 
agricultural sector, where Kalangwa 
Estates, one of the largest producers of 
agricultural goods in the country, has 
made significant progress growing 
vegetables for export. The company 
continues to supply a large range of 
dairy and other produce for the home 
market. 

Despite a third successive year of 
drought our agricultural activities in 
Zimbabwe achieved profit growth. The 
policy of strictly controlled stocking 
levels and continuing good ranch 
management has resulted in 



The Princess— Hamilton, Bermuda 


1984 AT A GLANCE 


1984 



Cattle— East African Tanning Extract Go., Kenya 

satisfactory results from the ranches 
where 14,000 head of cattle were sold 
in the year. Revenue from wattle and 
coffee sales benefited from the strong 
U.S. dollar with 6,158 tonnes of wattle 
extract being exported and coffee 
production increasing. 

At East African Tanning Extract in 
Kenya, prolonged periods without rain 
affected crop yields. It continues to be 


Turnover 

£2, 367m 

£2,356m 

Profit before tax 

£135.4m 

£1 13.2m 

Profit attributable to 
shareholders 

£55. 0m 

£40.6m 

Earnings per share 

20.9p 

15.5p 

Dividends per share 

ll.Op 

9.0p 

Net assets per share 

24 lp 

198p 


The seventy-sixth Annual General Meeting of Lonrho Pic will be held at the 
Great Room , Grosvenor House, Park Lane, London, W.l. on Thursday, 

28th March, 1985. 


The international Sporting Club was 
transferred to its new premises in 
Mayfair on 18 July, and the opening was 
a huge success. The building has been 









Tea estates— Malxtbi 


a major exporter of wattle extract and 
its production of mushrooms during 
the year amounted to nearly 300 tons. 

We are currently investigating 
suitable agricultural opportunities in 
Tanzania, and it is hoped that we may 
enter into a joint venture in the near 
future. 


HOTELS 

The Princess Hotel Group has 
exceeded last year’s record profits by 
50 per cent, with a particularly strong 
performance from the hotels in Mexico. 

The Acapulco Princess achieved 
occupancy levels in excess of 90 per 
cent during the first half of the year 
and continues to attract both tourist 
and conference trade with its fine 
facilities which include two golf 
courses, five swimming pools and 
conference rooms capable of handling 
groups of up to 2,000 people. 

Phase three of the major renovation 
plan for the Hamilton Princess in 
Bermuda was completed in January, 
substantially improving the facilities at 
this hotel. 

The Princess Casino in the Bahamas 
was opened in October 1983 and in its 
first year of operation has firmly 
established itself in the casino market. 

The Meiropole Group of Hotels has 
had a highly successful year, with the 
Birmingham. Blackpool and Brighton 
hotels returning record profits. 


beautifully refurbished by Fassnidge, 
Son & Norris, who carried out the 
building work and improvements, 
working to a very tight schedule. 

This enhancement has turned the 
International Sporting Club into the 
flagship of the casino division. 

Our casinos in the provinces have 
also had a highly encouraging year, 
increasing profits by 80 per cent. 

We firmly believe that profits will be 
even more substantial by the end of 
the current year. 


Western Machinery & Equipment 
introduced a new range of forage 
harvesters manufactured by Taarup 
which have achieved the No. 1 position 
in the United Kingdom market for this 
equipment and Watveare has made 
spectacular progress in sales of Deutz- 
Fahr combine harvesters. 

Lonrho has been appointed United 
Kingdom concessionnaire for the 
range of vehicles produced by the 
Spanish motor manufacturer SEAT. 

In many African countries we 
continue to be agents and distributors 
for a number of major vehicle 
and agricultural equipment 
manufacturers, 
including 
Mercedes Benz, 

Massey Ferguson, 

Toyota, Peugeot, 

Land Rover, 

Volkswagen, 

BL and the 
range of 
General 
Motors. 


MOTOR DISTRIBUTION 

V.A.G (United Kingdom), the sole 
U.K. importer for Audi and 
Volkswagen products, again had a 
highly successful year with profits and 
sales of 106,000 vehicles the second 
highest ever, narrowly missing last 
year’s record performance. 


Watveare, Dents- Fahr distributors— Wiltshire 


PRINTING AND 
PUBLISHING 



Bus and trucks huh by 
IT. Dahmcr & Co. -Zimbabwe 


The company has maintained its . 
position as the leading importer of 
European cars with a market share of 
5.5 per cent. Two important new 
Volkswagen models, the Golf and 


There has been a significant 
resurgence in the fortunes of the 
Glasgow Herald and Evening Times. 
Circulations of both papers improved 
steadily and advertising volumes have 
also shown very encouraging increases. 

The Observer continued to maintain 
its position in the quality Sunday 
newspaper market, with six of its 
journalists winning major awards for 
their work. 

Our 22 provincial newspapers, 
published by Scottish & Universal 
Newspapers, increased circulation 
levels whilst most of our competitors 
were showing varying levels of decline. 

Greenaway ■ Harrison, in 
conjunction with Harrison & Sons, 


1909 


75 YEARS 


strict security 
conditions. 

Harrison & 
Sons celebrated 
the 50th year of 
holding the 
British Post 


holding the Stamps by Harmons— 

British Post High wfivmbc 

Office stamp printing contract and are 
the world's largest commercial stamp 
producers. 

Holmes McDougall undertook a co- 
publishing venture with the EEC for a 
book outlining the role of the EEC to 
be distributed to schools in the United 
Kingdom. 


ENGINEERING 

The Firsteel Group in the United 
Kingdom has produced very pleasing 
results with profits almost double those 
of 1983. The successful introduction of 
new products played a major part in 
increasing the activity levels of these 
companies by 50 per cent over the 
previous year. 





& i .wi 


Yamaha motorcycles assembled by John Holt— Nigeria 

The engineering and process plant 
companies continue to be affected by 
the recession. Despite this, most of 
these companies traded profitably. 
Tollemache successfully completed the 
refuse transfer station at Blackpool 
and Light foot Refrigeration was highly 
profitable. 

There has been a substantial 
reorganisation of our stainless steel 
sinks division, which achieved a 
comfortable profit compared to losses 
last year. 

Our water treatment contracting 
company, S.E.E. in Belgium, has made 
progress with major contracts in Africa 
and the United Arab Emirates. 

The division of Holts in Nigeria, 
which assembles and sells generators 
based on Rolls-Royce and Deutz 
engines, had a very good year. 

Our engineering company in 
Zimbabwe, W. Dahmer, exported a 
fleet of buses to Zambia during the 
year and continues to dominate the 
Zimbabwe market with its fine, robust 
vehicles, as much as 70 per cent of the 
constituent parts of which are 
manufactured locally. 

Vitretex Paints in Zambia achieved 
an increase in profitability in the year 
with demand for its products far 
exceeding its production levels. 


WINES AND SPIRITS 

Whyte & Mackay continued to 
pursue its policy of long term brand 
development. 

Whyte & Mackay Special is now 
judged to be the ninth biggest brand of 
all spirit types in the United Kingdom 
and sixth in England. During the year 
an important association was formed 
with IDV (UK) Ltd., who now 
represent Whyte & Mackay in various 
major English outlets. 

Our French wine interests have had 
another satisfactory year with recent 
vintages from Chateaux Rausan-Segla 
and Smith-Haut-Lafitte receiving some 
particularly favourable comment. 

in Kenya we commenced production 
and distribution of traditional African 
beer during the year and we also 
continue to operate 1 8 breweries 
elsewhere in partnership with African 
Governments and Municipalities. 

The Group now has three bottling 
plants in Nigeria and a plant in 
Zambia, principally handling Pepsi- 
Cola and Coca-Cola in the respective 
countries. 


TEXTILES 







?fCH#G 


- 1 . Firm 1 


Hint!?- " 




have penetrated the bond market for 
prospectus and bond priming sold as 
one package. They are the only printers 

within a single . M ; 

organisation who can ^ W- 

offer the printing of 

prospectuses, bonds 

and official ad ve rt- , 

isemems under Taji* QlfiBBlwy' 

strict security * 

conditions. l" r 


Cutting ljbr h -i.i>nrh,> /VtfiK Cramhagtim 

Lonrho Textiles made substantial 
progress, achieving its first ever trading 
profit. The Accord Shops, Brent fords ~ 
and the recently acquired John Wilson 
Household Fashions, sell through over 
250 retail high street and shop-jn-shop 
operations, making Lonrho Textiles 
one of the largest bedlinen retailers in 
(he United Kingdom. 

The factory at Cramlington is by far 
the largest vertically integrated :>ne-site 
textile operation in the United 
Kingdom, processing 250 miles of 
wide-width fabric per week. «. 

Overall. David Whitehead and Sons 
in the United Kingdom did welltiuring 
the year, despite some problem.^with 
(he jersey knitting line in John Barnes. 
Our household textile company 1 Besco 
Baron, had a reasonable year, _ 
recovering strongly in the secora half. 

David Whiteheads in Zimbabwe had 
a poor year caused largely by a veak 
domestic market which led to tie 
company exporting more of its { 
products at lower profit levels. 

David Whiteheads in Malawi 
performed creditably. 

A large proportion of Malaw's 
agricultural produce is now packed in 
“Produsaks" manufactured by 
Blamyre Netting. Productivity • 
increased by 10 per cent in the sek 
section, which has been operatig 
virtually non-stop throughout be year. 




KUHNE& NAGEL 

Kiihne & Nagel, who emplojnearly 
7,500 people, have had anothet 
excellent year, particularly in tbir 
Western Hemisphere group whre 
profits in Canada and the Unitd 
States have increased considersly. 
Trading in Germany, the Unite 
Kingdom, the Far East and Aurelia 
also progressed satisfactorily. 

In addition to their transport 
connected activities, including (eight 
forwarding, warehousing, port 
handling, stevedoring and ship 
agencies, Kflhne & Nagel have si; up 
an insurance brokerage group hndling 
both marine and non-marine btiness. 





KuJute & Nagel terminal facilities— Rotterdam 


Two warehousing companies we: 
acquired in the United States, whiUa 
container terminal in the port of 
Rotterdam is currently under 
construction. 

Ktthne & Nagel are continually 
endeavouring to expand their spreatof 
agencies throughout the world. 


FINANCE, GENERAL 
TRADE AND AIRCRAH 

The Group's property investment . 
companies have had another very 
successful year. 



Gulf stream III— one cf the Group operated aircraft 


The programme of selective sales ha 
continued but, notwithstanding these, 
the overall value of the portfolio at the 
end of the year has increased to in 
excess of £66 million. The annual net 
rental income, both in the United 
Kingdom and in France, has also 
substantially improved. 

The international financing and 
confirming operations of Balfour 
Williamson were again seriously 
affected by world trading conditions, 
but prospects for 1985 are considerably 
brighter. 

Tradewinds Airways became 
Britain's first scheduled all-cargo 
carrier in November 1983, and 
scheduled services to Toronto and 
Chicago operated during the year. 





1984 


Shaft headgear— Western 
Platinum, MariMam 


LONRHO 


Southern Watch and Clock, who are 1 
suppliers to the horological trade, had 
a very satisfactory year and continue to 
be a consistently good profit earner for 
the Group.. , 

Baumann Hinde, the Group’s cottoj 
merchanting company, traded well 
despite unsettled market conditions. 


Ptatmum, Mankan* , Lonrho Pic, Cheapside House, 138 Cheapside, London, EC2V 6BL. 1 ‘ 

The text is taken from the Chief Executive’s Review contained in the Report and Accounts for the year ended JO September. 1984 which will be published in late February. Copies will be available from the Secretary, Lonrho Pic, Cheapside House, 1 38 Cheapside, London, EC2 V 6L 


: "....vs 
l ie ■' 


N.i: vvencx 


•‘-liar \ 


-r 25 ** : 
. 7 * 0 -", 

:5* 5n Wr-. 3 


•- H:*» >n"t 

• 1 wo 

:::: 3,1 ^ 

■ - SfirtJ, .-(T3? 


"■'i' 1 ' 

ta-.- ‘ •' ■ 


r Sta-Iin 




.v-w. ‘ ‘ • ? 


iar H a , 




■O V 

,9 v 






a 









^tatisties Index 


Jm£X prices P.H 
4J&X ftWo/JswsP-M 
NYSE ertce P- 6 
jjvSE WWti/kwn P.M 

Tccm^oamoo P- 1 * 

! fcorrwKy P-»1 
: Comrpcdflk* M2 
; OMdMrtS P-M 


■Eorn4n« report* P.15 
ntmrato notes Pi— 
Go U market* P.11 
interest rates P.ii 
Mortal summon P. * 
Options p.n 

OTC stock PJ4 
Oltw nwus P.U 



/ FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1985 


V' 


TECHNOLOGY 


-e 

■ 

4 V. I- .. . K - . 

, , / “^eada*. 

SS; 

:i?. 


^ ; '■-ior.ijv 

- “«r. 0 ^ 

" • - -ir-c-ui ( . 

NAGEL 

7. 




.'•.-■."r'rizl 


: •* '-ii 

* ;::_r2 


I'LH 


British Firm Tests Chips 
Capable of 'Juggling’ Tasks 


wiih building the super inf or- ¥ « . , n 

mation processors of the fu- Cater Chips Will 
line —r sometimes known as 
fifth-generation computers — IOC08 Oil Other 

believe that the path to a real processing tasks, 
breakthrough is through sys- r ® ^ 

terns that operate more like such a S graphics, 

the human mind. Their jargon ° r 

for samulianeously handling 

several problems, or several parts of one problem, is “parallel 
processing” 

This year will be a crucial one for what currently looks to be the 
most advanced design of such a processor — a microchip called 
Lhe transputer. The transputer is the first processor made by 
lnmos International PLC, the company set up in 1978 with 
funding from the British government to give Britain a domestic 
microchip maker. The government sold lnmos last summer to 
Thom EMI PLC 

The Thorn takeover has given lnmos solid financial backing 
for plans to offer test transputers to computer makers by the 
middle of this year. The schedule calls for regular sales by the end 
of the third quarter, and volume output by the end of the year, 
along with the introduction of the second transputer in the 
family. 

The first device is intended to operate in central processing, 
and the second will be tailored to bringing parallel processing 
capabilities to peripheral equipment. Later chips will focus on 
other processing tasks, such as graphics. 

A an isolated processor, the transputer is a competitor for the 
processing microchips of companies such as Intel Corp. 
and Motorola Inc*, with performance, cost and on-chip 
memory characteristics that probably win make it better than 
those of established chip makers for some applications, and not 
as good for others. 

The difference is that the transputer is designed to be linked 
with other transputers in a way that allows processing functions 
to be shared easily among them, and, equally importantly, it is 
designed to use a new computer lan g ua ge , known as Occam, 
especially suited to parallel processing. 

lnmos says that it has been able gam a lead in parallel 
processing because established chip manufacturers are commit- 
ted to advancing conventional designs so that current customers 
can trade up to their new products. It is an appealing argument — 
an airp lane designed from scratch probably will fly better than a 
car modified for air travel — but the catch is that it may take 
potential consumers quite a while to figure out how to use 
something as different as the transputer. 

In theory,, there are numerals applications: complex tdecom- 
mu gte^ti'my; mixing sight, sound, and data; advanced graphics 
and s imulati on; robotics; interpretation of data from arrays of 


^^g^eV^r fl i e ' jih ^i'Trdm^Sfitig ’ approaches to using the 
transputer for parallel processing coma be a risky (me for 
designers. The key may be the spread of Occam, the language 
dcykdoped m tandem with the transputer and named after Wil- 
liam or. Occam. the medieval philosopher whose ideas on problem 
solving are today known .as the “Kiss” Principle — Keep It 
Simple, Stupid. 


p'Trdm' 


Currency Rates 


Lute interba n k rates on Jan. 31 , excluding fees. 

Official fixings for Amsterdam, Brands, Frankfurt, Mm, Paris. New York rates a» 
r.M : 4 P.M. 


. gesem 

ND AffCt 



* l 

, Amsterdam 15805 4* 35 

. amsetsta) 6307 7145 

Fmkfart- 11677 1573 

, London Urt 1.1305 

, Milan . 1954*0 1301.90 

I NewYorfttc) 1.1285 

. Ports 9*805 18909S 

( Tokyo 

i Zurich 16775 3J0W2 

• 1 ECU 03829 NA 

• 1 SOU 0974993 0*64739 


■ * _ Per 

'«**. Cnrr ™ CY U4A 

’ UOt Aaxtra fiaaS 1-2259 

‘ tUKJ Austrian idlllllM 2124 
’ 0*1S8 Bripton flu. tome 6348 
1 17KB Cmadtanl 13271 
- &EB87 DaitM) knae 1127V 
! tun Finnish nark 6426 
1 assn Brad dracftaxi 129*0 
’ 81282 Hang Konst 73905 


DM F3. 

11112* 3638 
3031145 A545 

3230 1 

15753 1893S3 
61630 20134 

3.1655 938 

10584 


IU_ Star. UF. 
nurw ■ — . 5452" 

1247 • 173016 — — 

1421 x GUI* 4J99- 
220455 40485 7141 

— 54144 30*34 

1.95000 158 6135 

43575 X 2304 11289* 


84535* 27665* 0.1372 74355* *22- 

12418 6*746 148149 1526 44.9008 

108849 943842 9LO. 1491 613853 

Dollar Values 

* _ Per * , 

Mote C * Y * CT USS * 

05S36 Irtrtl 1*167 04528 SUN 

0*015 town shekel 67831 0582 1A 

1269 Knraltl Moor 0J0W 0*012 5. K 

84014 MMoy.rtMsH 24915 80057 Son 

0.1094 Mono. krone 9.M IIW See 

0J0SS2 PMLpWO lint 8*266 Toll 

0*056 Port escudo 173*0 8*365 Tta 

82710 Scodlrttol 15805 63724 UA 


53. Yen 
13179*140439 
2X46 24451 * 
11830*13405* 
3*238 teA* 2 
72933 7*51 
i«n 2SL40 
1162517916* 
Not Aval table 

1A4M* 

1*887 179384 
16105 248382 


Caafv. n<« 

84528 SMOMnS 23085 
0582 S.AM«rnid 1392 
8*012 5. Korean wan 83130 
0*057 San. peseta 17555 
81K7 5 wed. krona 9*1 
8*256 TahnI 19*1 
80365 TM bate 27J6S 
83721 UJLE.dbtxoa 34707 


* 4 5ln1taa:LMSS(rteft* 

: j (elCamnieretallranctb) Amou nts neede d tc buy one pound Cel Anwnts needed to bur one debar 1*) 

| Untts el UBUUHdtsot 1*00 (vl Unmet >0*00 
i NO-' not <aartad; NA.: not awttoMe. 

. • Saurses: Bpnaue OuBonotux (Brvssots): Banco CammenMe l/nl lorn (Mnan); B anoue 
\ Nationals dt> Parti (Paris); IMF (SDR); Banqua Arabe el internal knots trinvostistament 
i Honor. rtyoLOtrtiom). Other data from Reuters ana AP. 


Interest Rates 


.Eurocurrency Deposits 



MB French __ 

Donor D-Mark Franc Sterltoo ftaoc ECU 5DR 

IM. S»w - 5% - 5% 591 - SVk 12H - 1314 -Mlh- M9* W* - 99fc 8lfc - 8*. 

2M. 89k - BM 50k --.6 59h ■ SVj 12 at 12*W 10 th- W6 996 - 9 9k Bib - 8H 

366. BN -fln. 6 - 69k SM - 5Vk I2ta - 12* ID *- 10 * 9^ - » 8IW-BA. 

666. 6«.'in 5K-5N IIM-llHill -11H.99W-W 6Vi-8ta 

iy. rik-fn, AH - 614 5 *w-sh nw-ia n%. u* fm, . ion aw - «» 

Pales ooaHcatM to tntsrlxxnk deposits of SI million minimum (or ottutvaSmti). 

Sources: Manan Guaranty (Mar. DM. SF, PeunA FF); Uorts Bank f ECU, U Citibank 


Dollar Rates 

»> ■ . * . . - . ; . 


^.e- •IW 

^ 'Setacbf Reuters ■ 


Aims. 

B9k-B9w 




Close ' Prev. Britain 


,ObcourifHote 
p Federal Funds 
Prune Rote 
Broker Leon Rale 
jCamm. Pm, 30-179 flow 
^unrdh Traosurv Bills 
frmontti Treasury Bills 
. CCWs 3869 dovs 
-C?* <taW 

:.J West Gwmanv 
i Lombard Rate 

. Owemtow Rate 
i One Mown inMrtxmk 
3-menth Interbank 
. i 6-month Interbank 




9-1014 9-1014 
812 BJB 


6*0 5*0 

5*0 US 
5*5 4*5 

6*0 6*0 
815 6-15 


*r. fntnvenUan Rata W» 

.'Call Money WW0 llTW 

. OBoenontii mterbanfc 1096 10H 

jt ^twxith Interbank 109a 10H 

>: 6-monlh interbank 10 3716 10 3/16 

Siumai-Reum Cammeabank, CrMBLv- 
■ onmti. Uayat Bank. Bank of Tek/O- 


Bantc Base Sol* 

Call Money 

91 -day Treasury Bill 

3-month interbank 


Discount Rate 
Coll Money 
M-day interbank 


14 M 
1414 1414 
1794 nvt 
1294 1294 


5 5 

6U. 6 5/16 
6 5/16 4 5/14 




7# | 8 IVTEBMpCnU. Fte* 

Itcraliua^enbunc 


BUSINESS / FINANCE 


* * 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, M-l,Page 6 


Page 11 


By BARNABY J. FEDER 

Mew York Times Service 

I ON DON — Anyone struggling to soothe an upset infant 
while carrying on a telephone conversation and makin g 
, dinner can take comfort from the thought of bow 
glorious the performance would seem to a computer 
designer. Computers can handle incomprehensible amounts of 
information at dazzling speed, but they are, for all intents and 
purposes, hopeless at doing several things at once. Somehow, 
they have to sort out an order in which to handle pyh pi m * of 
information. 

Although the computer's sequential approach works wonder- 
fully on some problems, and acceptably on many more, many 
computer designers concerned — -- - - 


Gold Prices 


AM. PJ8 Olte 

H-ioKora, 

ISrgJSw 30435 1034 

E£. IOS 30U5 107JD +835 

SSS, 30890 30665 * 3JS 

SXra - 30810 -020 

Otfidai (IxJnn for London. PATH D™* Uiwii- 
SL^op*M« and 

aid Zurich. No* Vert Como* aorant cwUrad. 
AH price# In US* iw ounce. 

Soiree: Reuters 


Oil Prices 

Increase 

Sharply 

Analysts Split 
On OPEC Move 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Oil prices shot 
higher in hectic trading Thursday, a 
day after most OPEC members 
agreed to modest (rice reductions. 

Analysis attributed the buying to 
refiners who had put off earner 
purchases amid uncertainty over 
the price outlook and to specula- 
tors who had bet on a price collapse 
and were scrambling to limit losses. 
Analysts remained divided on 
whether OPECs meeting had sta- 
bilized markets. 

In record trading on the New 
York Mercantile Exchange, the 
price of a barrel of the top U.S. 
domestic oil. West Texas interme- 
diate, rose 74 cents a barrel to fin- 
ish the day at $26.41 in contracts! 
for March delivery. 

As recently as Monday, when it 
seemed possible that a conference 
of the Organization of Petroleum 
Exporting Countries was going to 
collapse and the cartel unravel. 
West Texas intermediate briefly 
fell to a five-year low of $24.66 a 
band. 

A record 36,300 contracts for 
crude oQ changed hands on the 
exchange Thursday, surpassing the 
previous high of 24,934 set Dec. 12. 
Each contract represents 1.000 bar- 
rels of oiL 

Andrew Lebow, an analyst at 
Sheanon Lehman Brothers Inc., 
said the buying began in Europe 
among refiners and traders and 
then gained momentum 

“There was tremendous pent-up 
demand,” Mr. Lebow said. “But as 
long as yon bad the threat of OPEC 
unraveling, people would not go in 
and buy.” 

At the end of a meeting in Gene- 
va, nine of the 13 OPEC members 
agreed to cut some prices while 
Nigeria would roll back part of an 
earlier price cul 

On the spot or noncontract mar- 
ket, Arabian light oil for February 
delivery rose 15 cents a barrel to 
$27.75. On Wednesday. OPEC 
agreed to cut that blend SI a barrel 
to $28. 

Meanwhile, spot prices for Brent 
oil from the North Sea rose 55 cents 
for February delivery. 


An Old Hand Is Taking IBM Helm 


Lombard Rate 


After 25 Years in the Firm, Akers Is Ready to Be Chief Raised V2 Point 

By Bundesbank 


By David E. Sanger 

New York Times Sentee 

ARMONK, New York — This weekend, John 
F. Akers is to be on a brief visit to Europe to 
address a conference on how to spur entrepreneur- 
ship in a pant company. 

When he returns Monday morning, movers will 
have shuttled his oval desk 50 feet down the hall to 
a comer office, and Mr. Akers, 50, will begin what 
is likely to be a decade-long career as the chief 
executive of the rapidly diversifying International 
Business Machines Corp. 

Anyone who misses the movers, though, might 
not immediately notice the change: Mr. Akers, 
only the fifth person to take the helm of IBM since 
its founder, Thomas J. Watson, has been the con- 
summate inside man, a veteran of IBM's ruling 
inner circle. 

“I worked under Frank Cary and John Opel for 
15 years,” a relaxed, confident-sounding Mr. 
Akers said in a recent interview. He was referring 
to the company’s last two chief executives. 

“I’ve had just about every experience in the 
business — service, marketing, federal business, 
world trade.” Flashing a broad smile, be added. “I 
fed pretty well prepared.” 

But if the rite of passage at IBM's headquarters 
later this week appears seamless — Mr. Akers has 
been with IBM for 25 years, the last two as its 
president — few doubt that it will mark a major 
new era for the giant of the computer industry. 

John R. Opel will remain chair man but under 
company policy be had to step down as chief 
executive when he reached age 60. Mr. Opel served 
four years in the top job after a decade as Mr. 
Cary’s right-hand man. 

Mr. Akers will not turn 60 until late 1994, time 
enough to bring a host of new IBM ventures to 



John F. Akers 


Tho New York Trass 


fruition, including IBM’s push into personal com- 
puters. software and tdecommunicaticns. 

Mr. Akers predicted that within a decade IBM 
would pass 51S0 billion a year. Last year it earned 
about S6 billion on revenues of $46 billion, making 
it nearly twice the size of the company Mr. Opel 
took over four years ago. 

“The industry will be in 10 years probably the 
biggest industry in the world,” Mr. Akers said. 
With some understatement, he added. “The IBM 
(Condoned on Page 13, CoL 1) 


By Warren Getler 

International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — The Bundes- 
bank. West Germany’s central 
bank, on Thursday said it would 
raise its key Lombard interest rale 
46 point to 6 percent to gain tighter 
control of the domestic money 
market 

The increase, effective Friday, 
was the first since September 1983 
for the Lombard, the rate at which 
commercial banks get short-term 
loans from the Bundesbank on de- 
posit of securities as collateral. 

Industry sources said the in- 
crease was largely discounted in the 
finanHal markets because the in- 
crease had been widely expected 
among dealers. 

Following a Bundesbank council 
meeting Thursday, the central bank 
said that it was attempting to steer 


Reagan Targets Export-Import B ank 


By Gyde H. Farnsworth 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan, as part of his defi- 
cit-reduction effort, will ask Con- 
gress for a deep cutback in opera- 
tions of the Export-Import Bank, 
which finances the purchase of 
various American products abroad 

Administration and congressio- 
nal sources said the president had 
adopted a proposal made in De- 
cember by David A. Stockman, the 
budget director, seeking to end the 
agency's direct lending. Advocates 
of such loans say they are one of the 
principal tools of U. S. industry in 
its fight for foreign markets. 

Instead of the direct loans, the 
administration will propose pay- 
ment of interest subsidies to banks 
that make export loans. 

Some members of Congress who 


were aware of this provision of the 
budget that Mr. Reagan will send 
to Congress next week reacted 
coolly. Export industries are cer- 
tain to lobby energetically against 
the proposal. 

The president's bndget a year 
ago sought $3.8 billion of lending 
authority, which Congress provid- 
ed. The Export- Import Bank, like 
similar agencies in competing in- 
dustrial countries, usually lends at 
interest rates below co mmer cial 
levels to promote foreign purchases 
of U.S.-made products. Elimina- 
tion of direct loans would require 
congressional approval. It would 
be one of the most radical changes 
in operations of the agency since it 
was created in 1934. 

Administration officials said di- 
rect lending would be replaced by a 
novel program under which the Ex- 
port-Import Bank would pay up to 


$130 million in interest rate subsi- 
dies. This money would go to com- 
mercial banks when they agree to 
lend at bdow-maiket rates to pro- 
spective buyers of U. S. goods. 

If the agency substituted subsidy 
payments for direct loans it would 
disburse less money. That would 
count as reduced federal spending, 
lowering the budget deficit. Even- 
tually, Ijowever, money coming 
into the Treasury as Export-Import 
loans are repaid would dimmish 

“It wOl end up costing more for 
the same amount of exports sup- 
ported said Representative Ste- 
phen L. Neal, Democrat of North 
Carolina and the chairman of the 
House Banking Subcommittee on 
International Trade, Investment 
and Monetary Policy. “We'D be 
following the proposal carefully to 
insure that Ex-lm is doing the job it 
was supposed to under the law. 


borrowers toward longer-term 
loans and preserve the Lombard 
rale’s role as a vehicle for urgent, 
short-tom borrowing. 

Market rates that have been at 
parity or even higher ihan the Lom- 
bard rate now would fall between 
the Lombard and the central 
bank's unchanged 4.5-discount 
rate, thus discouraging banks from 
borrowing at Lombard and allow- 
ing market rates to rise more flexi- 
bly without need for Bundesbank 
response. 

The discount rate is the rate at 
which hanlts borrow medium-term 
from the Bundesbank using trea- 
sury bills as collateral 

The Bundesbank said th»r it 
would provide necessary liquidity 
to the money market via a securi- 
ties repurchase agreement at a 
fixed rate of 5.7 percent. Addition- 
ally, in order to drain what may 
evolve into excess liquidity, the 
central bank said it would be wan- 
ing to sell b anks treasury bills at a 
fired 53-percent rate. 

“This appears to be an anticipa- 
tory move by the Bundesbank in 
order to be in a better position to 
fight a possible further rise in the 
dollar,” said Hans-Jurgen Muller, 
chairman of Morgan Guaranty 
GmbH. “But it's clearly not a panic 
move. The central tank is con- 
cerned about the doDar, but were 


they really worried, we would have 
seen an increase of Lombard by a 
full percentage point.” 

On Wednesday, the Bundes- 
bank's vice president, Helmut 
Schlesinger, made specific refer- 
ence to the Bundesbank's concern 
about sharply higher capital out- 
flows, whii± in December had 
nearly doubled to 12.4 billion 
Deutsche marks ($3.92 billion) 
from 6.9 billion DM in November. 

But the Bundesbank’s announce- 
ment Thursday did not menti on 
capital outflows in explaining the 
Lombard rate increase. 

Industry sources said the 
Bundesbank may not have wanted 
to be seen as having its hand forced 
by external factors in setting its 
credit policies, as appeared the case 
when the Bank of England raised 
its rates recently for the stated in- 
tent of propping up the plummet- 
ing pound. 

The Bundesbank said that total 
capital outflows from West Germa- 
ny increased to 29.1 billion DM in 
1984 from 16J billion DM a year 

(Continued 00 Page 13, CoL 4) 


Dollar Rallies 
After Early Fall 

United Press International 

NEW YORK — A surprising 
drop in the U.S. leading indica- 
tors index and an increase in 
West German interest rates un- 
dercut the dollar Wednesday 1 
but it recouped late in the day. 

In London, the pound ad- < 
vanned to 31.1305 late Thais- ; 
day, its highest level in three ' 
weeks, from S 1 . 1 265 on 
Wednesday. In New York, it 
feD to $1.1285 from $1.1330. 

Other late dollar rales, com- 
pared to late rates Wednesday: 
3.165 Deutsche marks, down 
from 3.167, and 9.580 French 
francs, down from 9.681 . In To- 
kyo overnight, the dollar con- • 
tmued to rise, dosing at 254.78 ' 
yen, op from 254.25 and in New 
York it soared to 255.40 from 
254.27. 


S/4S Is to Join Boeing 
In Planning New Plane 


By Juris Kara 

International Herald Tribune 

STOCKHOLM — Scandinavian 
Airlines System will join the U. S. 
aircraft maker Boeing Co. in efforts 
to develop a plane designed pri- 
marily around a comfortable cabin 
rather than new propulsion or air- 
frame technology, SASs president, 
Jan Carizon. announced Thursday. 

SAS officials said the airliner 
would probably have new energy- 
saving engines, using jets to drive 
large backward-facing propellers. 

The airline, the joint national 
airlines of Denmark, Norway and 
Sweden, accepted Boring’s invita- 
tion to be the first airline to join it 
in developing a 150- passenger air- 
liner based on the concept of a 
“passenger-pleasing” cabin. 

For Boring, the move appears to 
signal abandonment of the so- 
called 7-7 project to build a new 
conventional 150-passenger jet for 
the mid-1990s. Boeing is expected 
to ask other airlines to join in the 
latest preyed, including Delta Air- 
tines of the United Slates. 

Mr. Carizon for some time has 
publicly called fra design of a new 
airplane based on passenger com- 
fort considerations that could radi- 
cally depart from conventional 
seating arrangements, cabin con- 
figurations and boarding facilities. 

Agreement to cooperate with 
Boeing does not mean that SAS 
will ultimately buy the new airliner. 


or even that Boeing will decide to 
produce the plane, SAS officials 
stressed. 

They did not say what the agree- 
ment meant in financial terms but 
explained that it would involve 
committing some SAS personnel to 
a project group with Boring. 

Even if the agreement does not 
commit SAS to buy any airliners 
developed by Boring, it gives the 
U. S. company additional incentive 
to develop the concept and reason 
to hope that it could eventually gel 
orders for the 200 or so planes that 
are needed to make any new design 
profitable. • 

SAS will need more than 80 new 
airliners by the mid-1990s to re- 
place its current fleet of just over 70 
DC -9s, winch it uses mainly on 
short to medium-length Nordic 
and European Routes: 

SAS aho said Thursday that it 
had placed orders with McDonnell 
Douglas Corp., aU.S. competitor 
of Boeing, for five DC-9s. Last fail 
SAS ordered six DC-9s and it holds 
options on an additional (8. 

In the long run, SAS. officials 
said, the airline will probably re- 
place 30 to 40 DC-9s with 90- to 
100-seat airliners and look for 40 to 
50 new planes seating 130 to 150 
passengers to replace the rest of its 
medium-range fleet. Officials said 
this need could be filled by the new 
Boring plane if the project is suc- 
cessful and the price attractive. 












: J :M ~.t *• i fis*. 










For the man with exceptional goals, 
a new dimension in banking services. 


U.S. Sees Few Objections 
To Norfolk Bid for Conrail 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The Justice 
Department said Thursday that a 
proposed merger of the Norfolk 
Southern Railroad and Conrail, the 
U.S.-owned rail carrier in the 
Northeast, would pose no antitrust 
problems if Norfolk Southern sold 
certain sections of track where the 
two railroads now compete. 

Transportation Secretary Eliza- 
beth Dole has been awaiting Justice 
Department findings before choos- 
ing a buyer for Conrail from among 
three potential bidders. Govern- 
ment sources said an announce- 
ment on a purchaser was expected 
early next week. 

The Justice Department said 
that, although possible competitive 
problems would remain in “some 
isolated markets” as a result of 
Norfolk Southern buying Conrail 
they would likely be “insignificant 
relative to the merger’s expected 
efficiencies.” 

Norfolk Southern is willing to 
divest itself of the property died by 
the department, a Justice Depart- 
ment spokeswoman said. Norfolk 


Southern Corp., the holding com- 
pany for the railroad and other 
transportation interests, has been 
widely reported as being the buys 
favored by Mrs. Dole. 

Earlier this week, rail labor 
groups representing 35.000 Conrail 
workers voted unanimously in fa- 
vor of Alleghany Coip n a New 
York holding company. Mrs. Dole 
said she would rake the endorse- 
ment into consideration. 

Richard Burdette, a Transporta- 
tion Department spokesman, said 
Thursday that Norfolk Southern. 
Alleghany and the third bidder, an 
investment group haded by a hotel 
executive, J. Willard Marriott, all 
remained tinder consideration. 

Paul McGrath, head of the Jus- 
tice Department’s antitrust divi- 
sion, said Norfolk Southern’s ac- 
quisition of Conrail would be 
acceptable to the department if 
tracks belonging to Norfolk South- 
ern or Conrail along a corridor be- 
tween Buffalo, New York, and 
Pittsburgh in die east, and Eas t St. 
Louis, Illinois, and Chicago on the 


W 'hat makes Trade Develop- 
ment Bank exceptional ? 
To start with, there is our 
policy of concentrating on 
things we do unusually well. 
For example, trade and export 
financing, foreign exchange 
and banknotes, money market 
transactions and precious 
metals. 

Equally important, we are 
now even better placed to 
serve your needs, wherever ' 
you do business. Reason: 

We have recendy joined 
American Express International 


Banking Corporation, with its 
89 offices in 39 countries, to 
bring you a whole new dimen- 
sion in banking services. 

While we move fast in 
serving our clients, were dis- 
tinctly traditionalist in our 
basic policies. At the heart ot 
our business is the maintenance 
of a strong and diversified 
deposit base. Our portfolio of 
assets is also well-diversified, 
and it is a point of principle 
with us to Keep a conservative 
ratio of capital to deposits and 
a high degree of liquidity- 


sensible strategies in these un- 
certain times. 

If TDB sounds like the 
sort of bank you would 
entrust with your business, 
get in touch with us. 

TDB banks in Geneva . London, 
Paris. Luxembourg, Chiasso, Monte 
Carlo. Nassau, Zurich. 

TDB a member of American 
Express Company which has 
assets ofUS$ 62 £ billion and 
shareholders' equity of 
US$ 44 billion. 


west, were sold. 



Hade Development Bank 


Shown at left, the head office 
of Trade Development Bank. Geneva. 


An American Express Company 






! 


Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY I, 1985 


Thursdays 


NIKE 


Tables inaude the nationwide prices 
to the dosing on Woll Street 


« Month 
Wan Law St** 


D'w. YkL PE 


SIS. 

lOBs High urn 


Chat 

QuoLCirW 


32V, 23V, 
4 % 

«4 5% 
24% tab 

is% m 

n 144k 
51 40ft 
31% 26 
30b toft 
18% 14% 
W, &ft 
£46 34% 
25% 18ft 
38% 23Vi 
45% 38% 
B*ft 75% 
38 26% 

31% 18% 
20 12 
am 20 

44b 2Tb 
24% 15% 
29% 14 
43 26 

30% 23% 
23% 10% 
13% 11 
11% 3% 


(Continued from Page 6) 


70 9 7737 28 


Mobil 220 

vIMoblH 

ModCRt ~gy 

“5JWK A U 11 574 
MohkDt ojt 

Monrcfl M 44 27 4 

Morans 230 Sul B 2681 

MntDU 156 12 8 102 

MonPw 2410 1(M B 2D48 

14V 
150 


AAortSt 

MONY 


lStalO.1 

- - JO M B 

MoorcC 2JO 53 13 

MonM 104 44 12 
MOTMpf ISO 94 
M° f Wl ».2J0 50 0 
Monmof 7J7o 9J 
MorKnd 140 3J 

MOfTfS JO 4.1 

MUoRly iJieSJ 
Motipn a 44 2X 
Mofrtas 44 17 
AAunfrd 44b 24 
Mums 

MurahC 140 34 
MurpO 100 34 
MurryO 1JD 5uV 
144*104 


34 

22? 

93S 

24 


27% 28 + % 

% S % 

8% 7% 7%— b 
25% 24% 25% + % 
12 % 11 % 11 %+% 
U 18 18 + % 

46% 45% 45% — % 
31% 31% 31%— % 

im iv% i?% + % 

IB 17% 17% — % 
9% 9 9% 

51% 51 51% + % 

23% 23% 23% + % 
26% 26% 26% 

43% 43% 43% + % 
79 78% 79 


MutOm 

MverLn 


9 

439 

37% 

37% 



35 

19ft 

19% 

ins + % 

11 

977 

19ft 

19b 

19% 



470 

29ft 

20ft 

29% + % 


3742 

38% 

36% 

37b— ft 

17 

SO 

22% 

22b 



16 

w 

18% 

18ft 

18%— % 

9 

70 

41ft 

41b 

4ib— 

b 

W 

157 

2Bb 

27 

27% - 

ft 

10 

39 

20% 

20% 

20b 



87 

13ft 

IWi 

13ft 



51 

-4ft 

4% 

4ft ■ 

% 


25% 

SHh 

24% 

21 

39% 

30% 

21% 

17 

33 

2% 

45% 

54 

28% 


37% 

18% 

29% 

33 

19% 

20 

29% 

27 


36% 

74% 

27% 

12% 

28 

Mft 

29% 

17 

11% 

29% 

16% 

14% 

39% 

26% 

24% 

23% 

40 

18 
29% 
18% 
42% 
13% 
10% 


6% 

17% 

27% 

28% 

32 


48 

25 

<2 

19% 

18% 

29% 


19 

66% 

37% 


16 NAFCO 
39% NBD 
14% NBI 
16% NCH 

23 NCNB 
20% NCR! 

13 Nllnd 
10% NLInd 
25% NU1 

% NVF 
33% NWA 
38% NabscB 

71 NO ICO 
20 Nadiua 
30% NatCCm 
11% NtCnva 
22% NotDbT 
26% NDIstpf 
16% NOW or 
12% NIEdus 
17% NatFGs 
19% NPOPl 
27 NatGyp 
2% NtHom 
21% Nil 
56 Nil pf 
17% NMcdE 
6% N MlneS 
20% NIProst 
9% NISemt 
21% NlSvcln 
11% N Stand 

10 NMxon 
21% NevPw 
14% NevPpf 
8% NevSvL 

28% n Ena El 
21% NEnPpf 
19 NJRK 
14% NYSEC 
55% NYSpf 
13% NYSpt 

24 NYSpfD 
13% Newell 
29 Ncwtiol 

11 NewMI 
7% NwhIRs 

31 Ncwmt 
1% Nwparfe 

12 NtaMP 
22 NlaMpf 
22% NlaMpf 
24% NlaMpf 
34 NtaMPf 
38% NtaMpf 
19% NlaMpf 
4PM NlaMpf 
15% NtasSh 
10% Nloolet 
24% NICOR 
24 NICOPf 
12% NoMAf 
48% NorfkSo 
16% Norlln 


J0b 3D 
2X0 4.1 


19 58 

8 112 


71 15 
1X2 15 
J8 10 


11 27 

9 966 


21% 

59% 

16 


JO U 
232 70 


SO 2J 
248 4.9 
MO 44 


9 4653 
9 278 
910 
7 11 

266 


21% 21% + % 
58% 59% + % 
15% 16 + % 
20 % 20 %— % 
30 37 37%— % 

29% 28% 28% —1 
21% 21% 21% + % 
12 % 11 % 12 + % 
33 32ft 33 +ft 
1 % 1 1 % 


1J0 10 
-36 2.1 
120 8J 
225 AS 
1JS 9J 


1J8 72 
2X0 11J 
1-76 <1 


25 J 
500 72 
S3 IS 


IDO 14 
>40 22 


226 9.9 
1JS UJ 
50 42 
160 92 
226 112 
2J4 8.1 
144 10J 
820 116 
112 112 
325 119 
20 17 
04 12 
428034.1 
48> 74 
UK) 22 


100 112 
3X0 126 
360 126 
190 114 
525 111 
6.10 12 3 
2D4e11D 
722 117 
M5elll 
.12 2 
304 102 
MO 62 
.12 J 
140 52 


10 

1682 

45 

44b 

45 — % 

10 

1237 

51% 

51 

51 — 1% 

13 

1276 

26% 

25ft 


8 

148 

29b 

28% 

28%— b 

8 

B5 

33% 

33b 

33% + % 

17 

173 

17 

16% 

16ft— % 

18 

594 

3 

200 

26% 

39% 

18% 

26 

32% 

18% 

26% + ft 
32%+ % 
18%+ ft 

12 

234 

Mft 

13ft 

13ft— ft 

6 

79 

3 

26% 

21 

26 

21 

26 — % 
21 

7 

596 

145 

2482 

30 

43 

«% 

32% 

65 

42% 

4% 

31 

63% 

43 + b 

4b— % 
32 +1 

65 +2 

14 

2638 

28 

27% 

9% 

27% 

9 

27% — % 
9%+ ft 

14 

09 

29 

28 

39 +1 

1413415 

13ft 

17% 

13ft + U 

11 

22 

29ft 

29 

29 — % 

9 

30 

taft 

Mft 

14% — % 

7 

19H 

11 

VM 

10% 

8 

102 

18 

28 

16ft 

27% 

16% 

28 — % 
16ft 

7 

25 

lift 

11% 

lift 

6 

116 

2 

39 

24% 

38ft 

24% 

38ft— ft 
»% 

7 

38 

25b 

29 

25b 

6 

798 22ft 
J5GZ 78J 

2 18 

12 29% 

22% 

69 

18 

28% 

22% — b 
70 +2 

18 

29 —ft 

13. 

113 

18ft 

18% 

18% 

28 

71 

20 

42% 

14 

9 

Ob 

13ft 

9 

42% — % 
14 + % 

9 

32 

1301 

408 

44% 

2% 

42ft 

2% 

44b +2 
2% + % 

6 

1373 17ft 
500* 27 

17ft 

27 

17%+ % 
27 


1 23 
KHtfir 61 
IV 16% 
25 395 17% 
15 719 20% 
I 28% 
36 2277 14% 
8 4647 64% 
22 17% 


28% 27% 28% +1 
3Z% 31 31% +1% 

41 40 40 — % 

47% 47% 


% 


2 s 
saw-* 

28% 38%—% 
28% 21% + % 
14% 14% 4- % 
61% 64 
17% 17% — IA 


17 Meath 
H Mi Low Slock 


Oh. YkL PE 


Sh. 

KBs HMl Low 


Close 

Quot.Oi'oe 


38% 29% Nprstr 2X0 6.4 3 
SO 43 Narefrpf 423B10.1 
17% 12 Nartch J8 2 8 
54 42 NACoal 1JD0 1J 7 

41% 28% NAPtil 5 IDO IS 9 
21% 13% NEurO I44e 9.9 10 


61 

68 

153 

106 

718 

37 


S 3316 
7 9909 
7 441 


15 10% NoestUt 1J8 1U 

15% 10% NlndPS MS 132 

44b 33% NoStPw 124 72 

36 30 NSPwpf 4DB 112 

36% 31% N5Pwpf 4.10 112 

40% 34% NSPwpf 426 T1X 

76% 62% NSPwpf MO 112 

42% 29% Nor Tel XO ID 

5 Vi 2% Nlhoato 
39% 23% Nortros 120 14 11 

47 41 NwCPpf 5X4ell7 

02b 40% Nwtlnd 2JB 52 14 3089 S2b 51% 52 + b 
22% 19% NwtPpf 228 11D M . 22% 22% 22% + % 

22% 19% NwtPpf 226 102 1 22% 23% 22b— % 

25% 8% NwStW 3 13 13% 13 

38 90% Norton 2DQ 52 12 475 3B% 37% 38%+% 

32% 21% Norwst 128 M M 2993 26% 96 26b— % 

58b 48% Nwstpf 6.15B1M 45 53% 53% 53%+% 

56% 20% Novo XJe 9 12 4131 31% 30% 30%— % 

39% 26 Nucor 26 ID 13 252 36% 26 36b- % 

9% 4b Nutns 27 62 151 44* 4% 4% + % 

79% 58% NYNEX 400 70 8 711 79ft 7»ft 79 — % 


38% 37% 37% 

46% 46% 46%+ b 
17% 17b 17b— b 
54% 52% 54% +3 
40% 40 40%+ b 

16% 16b 16% + % 
14% 14% 14% — % 
12 11% ll%- M 

40% 42% 43b + b 
50b 36 36 36 
300* 36% 36% 36% 
1450b 40% 40 40 +1% 

458b 78 K 78 +1% 
1416 39% 39% 39%- % 
67 3% 3% 3% + % 

90' 35% 34% 34ft— % 
6 43 41b 43 — % 


5% 2 oakind 
34b 23% Oak IMP 122 42 13 
35% 23% OcdPel 150 U 7 
112% 80 OCClPpf 340 4J3 
23% » OccIPpf 250 114 
20% 17% OcdPpf 2.12 11 J 
S% 18% OocIPPl 220 122 
51% 48% OcdPpf 625 12X 
113 109% OcdPpf 1520 14.1 
M9 100 OodP pfl4Xi ! 13D 
34% 22 OOECO 1D0 3D 16 
31% 24% Ogden IDO 6D 14 
85 71% Oudn Pf 147 22 

14% 9% OtlioEd 1D4 121 5 

30 22% OflEdPf 3D0 117 

33% 25% OtlEfJ pf 440 140 
33% 25% Oh Ed pf 4X4 142 
51% 41 OhEtfPf 724 142 
55 42 OhEdpf 726 134 

60% 45 OflEdPf 820 137 
26% 18b OflEdPf 150 1 3D 
28b 21 OhEdpr 192 119 
14% 10% OflEdPf 1J0 125 
66 51 OhEdPf 9.12 142 

62 47% OhEdpf 844 142 

91 77 OflEPf 1076 T22 

17b 12b OhMatr M 

63 52 OhPpf BD4 116 
19b IS OtiPpfO 227 110 

107 98 OflPpfAMDO 111 

107 98% OtlPpfP14D0 112 

23% 19% OklaOE 2D0 9D 9 
Bb 7 OfclaGpf JO I0D 
34% 25% aim 1J0 4X 9 
29% 5% On acre 9 

22% 14 Oneida JO 47 10 
33b 26% ONEOK 256 80 ID 

25% 19b OranRk 3X4 85 S 

13% 5% Oranae J3f 54 12 

27% 19% Oft OflC 76 32264 

15 8% OrtonP 37 

11% 6% Orion Pf DO 6.1 

30% 24 Orton pf 279 9X 
29% lff% OutDMs 44 2J 9 
30ft 17 OvrnTr 
20 13 OvShlp 

36b 25% OwenC 

46b 31U Owenlil 


259 

23 

1956 

1 

1 


3 2% 3 

33% 33% 33% — % 

28% 27b 28 + % 

19% 89b 89b + % 

21% 91% 31%— b 

18b 18% 18% — % 

18% 1«% 18% 

50b 91 50b 

38 Wft 109ft 109ft 
15b MS 108 108 
652 26% 2Sb 25% + % 

5B7 30% 29% 29% — ft 

1 86% 86% 86% +1% 


5 

2854 


1589 

14 

1» 

14 

+ % 

100* 

20% 28% 

3SU 

— 1% 

to* 

31% 31% 31% 

— % 

SOOz 

32 

31 

31 

— 1 

90* 

51 

Si 

41 

—7% 

100* 

54 

54 

54 

+1 

Lr3 

mm 

60 

25b 

+ % 
— % 


EE 

27ft 28% 

+ % 

2D 

14% Uft 14ft 

— % 

Kb* 

66 W 

64 

64 


70* 

60% 40b 

60b 

— b 


2D 18 3349* 16b 16 16%+ % 

lb 64 64 64 +lb 

4 19% 19 19 

20x106% 106% 106% — % 
20:106 106 106 —1 
510 22% 21b 22% + % 
62b 8 7% 8 + % 

182 34b 33b 34 + % 


DO 

1X0 

1. 


18% 10% Oxfords X4 


22 13 
32 9 
3D 9 2024 
4.1 8 1480 
13 9 56 


b% m - _ 

17% T7 17 — % 
32 31% 31% 

24% 24 24 

Vb 9% 9%— b 

33b 23% 23b + b 

11 Mb 11 
8% 8% Bb + % 
29% 29 29%+ % 

27% 27% 27%+ % 
29% 29% 29%+ b 
14b 15% 15% — % 
36% 35% 34 — % 
40% 4QU, 40%— % 
13% 13% 13b— % 


31% 18 PHH JS 32 11 
40 24b PPG 148 +1 9 

24 % 15 PSA 40 24 
18% 13b PSA dpi 1D0 10X 
13 11% POCAS 1 JO 1IX 

17b 12% PscGE 172 102 6 
42% am PacLIO 322 82 11 
29 20% PcLum 120 42 14 

im 5b PocRes D5r 7 
20 13% Pacta Pf 2X0 11D 

17% 11% Poc5d X0 2D 13 
71% 52% PacTeto 5X0 74 
26% 21 Ppdfqp 222 8D 
33% 27% Pacffpf 4D7 IZX 


27% 27b 27% + % 
39b 38b 36b— 1 
23% 22% 23%+ % 


18b 18^ 18b 


199 

65 

19 

49 

171 


38% 2% PalnWb 
31b 26% PainW pf 225 
39 24% Pal in Be 120 

8% 4 PanAm 
5% lb PanAwt 
20% 13% Panddc n 20 
39% 31 PanhEC 230 
4% 3 PanIPr 

16% 12 Paprcff JO 
io% 10b Pardyn 
36 12% ParkEs 

12% 5% Parvon 
38b 25b PorfcH 
18b 12% ParkPn 
7% 1% PatPtrl 
27% 14 PayINW 
17% 11% PavNP 
9lb 13% PavCsti 
13b 6b Peabdy 
1% Ferno 
53% 36% PenCen 


B 1216 
7 117D 
49 


13% 12% 13% + % 
16b 16% 16b + % 
40 39% 39% 

27% 27% 27%+ % 
6b 6% 4b+ % 
15% 15% 15% — % 
16b 16% 16b + % 
70% 7Q% 70b— % 
26% 36 26 

32% 82% 32b + b 


40 ID 68 5730 39% 37% 39% +1% 


7.1 

32 ID 


1.1 18 
6.1 10 
13 

DO 44 14 
57 
12 

.16 25 
.19 2.9 12 
59 32 27 


1053 

150 

2379 

342 
271 
450 

343 
55 

1927 

173 

696 

480 

263 

120 

366 

432 


29% 19% PaPL 


226 

2X8 


36% 30% PaPLpf 4X0 T2J 


12 18 
4X 12 
J 18 4966 
22 744 

83 

13 760 
44 I 1957 
90 B MZ1 


31% 30% 31% + % 
37b 37b 37b. 

4% 4% 4%— % 
2 % 2 2 %+ % 
18% 18b 18b + b 
39 37b 37b— lb 

4b 4% 4%— M 
16% 16% 16% + b 
17% 17 17% — % 

17 toft 15% + % 
6% 6% 6%— % 
39 38% 38%+ % 

16b 15% 15% + % 
2 1 % 2 
26b 26b 26b 
13b 13% 13b 
2Tb 20b 20b— % 
9% 8ft 9 + % 
b % b+ft 
52 51% 51H— b 

49b 48b 48*5— 1 
25% 24% 25V* 


20* 34% 34% 34% — b 


12 Month 
High Low Stock 


Dlv. YkL PE 


5b. 

Was High Lew 


Qm 
0od.Cn De 


37% 30 PaPLpf 450 127 
47b 57b PaPLpf 840 12D 
27% 23% PaPLdDfOC 125 
24b 20 PaPLdPdDO 11J 
65% 56% PaPL pr 8X0 124 
26% 22% PaPLdPf025 I2X 
29b 2Sb PaPLdprSJS IU 
, 84% 65% PaPLpf 924 114 
fc- 97% Bib PaPLprllDO 11 J 
63 54% PaPL cr IDO 12.9 

69b 58% POPL nr BJO I2D 
39b 31% Penwlt 220 5J II 
22b 20 Pemrpf 140 


AS 


340* 35% 34% 35% + % 
3180* 67% 66 67 

49 27% 25% 27%+ % 
8 24% 24% 24%+ % 
44QZ 65% 64% 65% + b 

32 26% 24b 26b— % 
8 29% 29% 29% 

no* 82 bo n +i 

230* 96 94 94 —lb 

801 63 63 42—1 

90* 70 69b 69% 

33 37% 17% 37b- % 
8 23b 23% 23b 


16% 9b PeooEn 
34b Zlb PepBov 


30% 17% Perk El 
10% 7b Prmlon 
20% 12% PeryDr 
38% 26% Pefrto ... . 

XP* 24% PotRs ' 172eT4J 69 

17% 14 Pet Rapt 1D7 102 72 

7b 4 Ptrlnv 1038215 28 

42% 29% Pllrcr 1X8 V 13 8755 

27% 12% PhelpD 7134 

48b 34 Phelppr SD0 11D 34 

41% 20b PhlbrS Si 12 12 9093 


200 4D 

20 

1756 

45 

43 


+2 


106 65 

A 

236 

16% 

15% 16ft 

+ 

ft 

19% 

06 10 

16 

106 

35% 

35 

35% 

+ 

ft 

40 

IXB 2D 

20 

4374 

43ft 

43 

43b 


b 

34 

X6 ID 

17 

2577 

79ft 

2BV 

29 



ft 

91 

105e1L7 

7 

485 

Bft 

Bft 



31% 

08 1J 

16 

263 

21 

20b 

7T 

+ 

ft 

34ft 

1X0 3D 

U 

174 

37ft 

37 

37ft 

+ 

% 

10ft 


26% 25% 26% + % 
15% 15 15% + % 

4% 4% 4% 


106% 87 
72 55 

66% 51 
56 


JS 

28 

232 


16 9 PtillaE! 220 IM 

32% 24 PhilEpf 420 13.9 

33 25 PtiUE pf 4X0 13J 

34 25% PKILE pf 4X8 14X 

52 40 PMIE Pf 7D0 137 

61b 50b PtlOEpf 875 142 
10% Phlie Pf 1X1 I3X 

M% 6% PtiUE pf 123 IU 
55b 40 PMIE Pf 7D5 143 
10 6b PMIE pf 120 115 
117 97 Ptdlpt 17.12 144 

PMIE Pf 1525 VO 
PhilEpf 9D2 13D 
PMIE Pf 9 JO 142 
. PMIE pf 7J0 142 
56% 40% PMIE Pf 7.75 144 
28 15b PMISub M2 7D 11 

84% 6Z% PhllMr 3X0 4.1 10 
22% 19% Pnlloln XS 22 12 
54% 26 Phil In pf IDO ID 
56W 33% PKIIPef 2X0 5D 
28% 16b PhllVM 
36b 27% PledAvt 
32% 23b PleNG 
21 14 Pier 1 

45b 33 Pllsbrv 
33 21b P io n eer 

29% 17 PtonrEI 
41b 36% PltnvB 
82% 53b PltnBpf 2.12 
15% 9% Pllfstn 
16 ' 8% PlonRs 
22% 12% Ptanfiri 
13b 7% Ptovcov 
Kb 28 Plesev 
22b is** PeoePd 

32 24b Poiartd 

23% 11% Pundn 
25 15 PopTof 

19% 13b Portae 
86 72% Pnrfrpf 5 DO 72 

18 13 PortGE 1X2 103 5 

98% 90 PoGnf 11X0 1IJ 

21% 17% PorGpf 2X0 12.1 

33b 28b PorG pf 4X0 13J 

33 28b POTGPf 422 132 

35b 25b Potttch IDS 4J 13 

26% 19% PotmEI 2.1+ BJ 8 

42% 36 PotElpf 458 11D 


6 1621 


322 

146 


39ft 39b 

Wh 


% 

» 

19% 

20 

+ 

% 

45ft 45% 

45% 

+ 

% 

40% 39% 

40% 

+ 

% 

16 

15ft 

16 



31 

31 

31 

— 

U 

32 

31 

37 

+1 

32% 32% 

32% 

+ 

% 

51? 

51b 

51b 


ft 

62 

61% 

61% 



10% iob 

10% 


b 

10 

fft 

fft 



55% 54ft 

U 




362 
2 

• 8SM 

IX 9 51 

D 7 789 
7J 7 82 

13 317 
1X6 37 10 677 
U* 4J 7 2404 
,17r 7 SO 71 
1D4 ZD 12 380 
2X 2 


ID 13 
1.1 15 


X5e 3D 10 
XO 3X 18 
IDO 37 20 
X0 2 8 
JO 42 
22 67 


64 9% 9% 9% + V* 

740*117% 116b 117% + % 
60*107 105 107 +3% 

20* 68% 68% 68% 

Z90z 67 66 67 + % 

1040* B 54b 54b + b 
100* 53b 53b 53b— b 
18 17% 17% 17% + b 
83% 82% B2%— % 
22 21% 21% 

52% 52% 52% — % 
48b 47% 48 + % 
24% 24% 24%+ b 
34b 34b 34% — % 
31 30 31 + b 

19% 18% 19% + % 
43 42b 42%— % 

31% 31 31%— % 

25b 25% 25% —1% 
41% 40% 41 + b 

Bib Bib 81b + b 
11% 11% 11%+ % 

. . 11% 13% I3b+ b 
VOX 14% M 14% + b 
257 12% 12% 12% + h 
21% 21b 21% + % 
17b 17% 17% 

27% 26% 27 
Mb 14% 14% 

19% 19b 19b 
IM 18 18 — % 

300* 75 75 75 +% 

420 17% 17b 17b— b 
140* 90% 97% 97% —1 
2 21 % 21 % 21 % — % 
75 33% 32b 31% 

37 33U. 32% 32% — % 
186 34% 34 34% + % 

264 26b 25% 26 — % 
5430* 41% 39% 41 — % 


447 


161 

305 

■941 

69 


IS 


37% 31 PotElpf 4D4 112 2100* 37 36 36 

24% 16% Prom I « 16 76 34% 24 24 — % 

35b 23 Prbnrk 200 U 6 31 34% 34b 34b 

20b 11b PrlrneC 15 3775 19% 18% 19 — b 

27% 16 PrtmM .12 X 23 353 30 29% 29% + % 

5«% 45% ProetG 2X0 46 12 338 57 55b 56b— % 

13% 7b PrdRsta 28 22 23 211 13b 12b 17%— b 
47b 31 Prefer 1X0 32 9 


1X4 I3X 
1X0 1X7 
9X4 IM 
9X0 14J 


18b 

26% 

Zlb 

24% 

20% 

22b 


19% 16b PSvCol M2 1U 
41% 51% PSCUIpf 7.15 IU 
19b 16b P5Col pf 2.10 10D 
9% 6% PSlnd IDO. UX 
Bb 6 P5fn pf 
8 6% PSinpt 

66 49% PSinpt 

66b SOb PSInnf 
12% 3% PSvNH 

6% PNHpfB 
8% PNHpfC 
7 PNHpfD 

7 PNHpfE 

sb PNMpfF 
7% PNHptG 
26b 19% PSvNM 2D8 112 

27% 20% PSvEG 272 1IU 

13b 10% PSEGPf 1X0 UX 

34b 28 PSEGpI 4DB 12D 

36 29% PSEGpI 420 122 

42% 33% PSEGPf 5DS 122 

43% 35% PSEGPf 5K 122 

103 92 PSEGpfllX2 1IX 

18% 15 PSEGPf 117 11.9 

56% 46% PSEGPf 6 JO 122 

20b 16% PSEG pf 2X3 I1D 

66% S3 PSEGPf 720 IM 

66b 55 PSEGPf 7 JO 123 

66 55 PSEG pf 8DB 12X 

62% 51% PSEG pf 7D2 122 

AS 51 PSEGPI 7X0 I1J 

79 65% PSEGPf 9X2 122 

4% 2% Public* 

13% 7b PuefKo .16 IX 
KHk 6% PR Cam 
15 9b PuWfP 126 124 


12 42% 42 42 — % 

976 19% 18% 19% — % 
50* 5B% 58% 5B%— 3% 
11 19b 19b 19b 
867 8% 8% 8%+ b 

300* 7b 7b 7b + U 

1350* B 7% 7% — % 

640* 60 59% 59b 

31680* 65 62 46 +3% 


2 

32 
9 
7 
16 
2 

34 
9 8328 
7 1241 

2 ._ 

2050: 34 
40* 35 


48 M M 
11 % 11 % 11 %+ % 
16 16 16 
Mb 14% 14%— % 
14b 14% Mb + % 
12% 12% 12% 

13% 13% 13b— % 
24% 24b 24% + % 
26b 25% 26% 

12b 12b 12b— b 

34 34 

35 


41% 41% 41% + % 

1158* 43% 43 43 — % 

4 101% 101% Wl% +2% 
19 18% IM 18b 
3500* 56 55% SSV»— % 

12 20% 20b 20%+ b 
7KB* 64% 64 64% + % 

SOOz 63b 63% 63% — 1 
30* 64b 64b 64b + U 
200* 61% 41% 41% — % 
140* 62% 60% 62% +2% 
630* TV 78 7V +1 
120 3 2b 3 + b 

7 11% Tib TT»+ % 
M 7b 7% 7b— b 
527 14% Mb Mb 


U.S. Futures Jan. 31 


Seaeon Season 
High U>w 


Open High Low dose Chg. 


Grains 


WHEAT (CBTJ 
5X00 bu minimum- dollar* per 
4X4 337% Mar 3D3 

Am 322% May 3X6 3X7 

3D0 327% Jul 334% 135b 

274% 3L2Sb Sep 326 326% 

3X3% 327% Dec 3X6b 3X6b 

174% 3X3 Mar 

Esf. Sales Prev. Sales 8204 

Prev. Dav Open Inf. 39.973 UP 244 
CORN (CBT1 

5X00 bu mini irupn- dal lore per bushel 
325% 245. Mar 2.73b 273b 


149% 3D0b — DI% 
3X3 3X3% — m01% 

323 323b — XI 

324b 13416 — M0* 
3X5 3X5b — 20% 
3X8% 


320 

321 
321% 
2DS 
110 
121b 
EM. Sales 


172b 

176b 

270b 

165 

174% 

229% 


May 279 179 

Jul 180b 281 
3ep 173 173% 

Oec 2X6b 247b 
Mar 275 276b 

May 180% 2X1 b 
Prev. Sales 72.03 


172% 172% +20% 
278b 278% +20% 
2J0 2J0b +D0b 
172% 173 +D0% 

2X5% 2X5* 

175 175 

180% 180% +D0b 


Prev. Dav Open IM.131X30 off 948 


SOYBEANS (CBT1 
1000 tai minimum- dollar, per bushel 
7D0% 5X9% Mar AD9 609 


7.97 5D1% 

7S9 3D1% 

7J6 5D5 

6J1 195 

6X8 S.97 

629 6.10 

7X2 624 

729 4X5% 

Esf. Sato* 


May 6.19 620% 

Jul 620 621 

Aug 621 621 

Sep 619% 619% 
Nov 621 621b 

Jan 622% 622% 


5D9% 

612 

622% 

624 

616 

616% 

629% 


May 655 655 

Prev. Sato* 34.W1 


601b — DZb 
613b -dOb 
624 — J2 
624% — D2 

616 

617b +D0% 
630 +D0% 

6X4 +X0% 

653 +J1% 


Prev. Day Open Inf. 71D95 off 475 


SOYBEAN MEALCCBT1 
TOO fora- dollar* per Ian 
209X0 140.10 Mar 14220 M2X0 

205X0 145XO May 147X0 148X0 

W*D0 15650 Jul 15350 15610 

18000 15220 Aua 15600 15670 

17950 15400 SeP 158X0 158D0 

1*050 15550 Oct 16100 16100 

I84D0 162X0 

Esf. Safe* 


Prev. Day Open inf. 38282 uwlSfi 
SOYBEAN OIL (CBTl 
40000 lbs- dollars per 100 Ita. 


1 41 DO 14120 
147 JO 147X0 
15300 15320 
155J0 15570 
150X0 157 JO 

16000 16020 

Dec 16600 16600 16500 16650 +1X0 
Prev. Sale* 7763 


+.10 

+20 

+X0 

+70 

+.10 

+xo 


30X0 

22D5 

Mar 

Z7D0 

27DS 

2702 

2708 

—08 

30.10 

2200 

May 

27.15 

27X0 

26X2 

2607 

— 06 

[ 30X0 

22JO 

Jill 

26X0 

26X0 

2SD5 

2603 

— J4 

27X0 

22X0 


2600 

2600 

25X0 

7553 

— X2 

2SX0 

22X0 


25XS 

25X5 

2505 

25.15 

— XO 

2600 

22.90 

Oct 

24X0 

2460 

24X0 

24X0 

—.IS 

24D5 2290 

Est. Sotos 

Doc 24.15 34X0 

Prev.Sales 1011 


2200 

— 05 


Prev. Day Open int 36564 up 404 
OATS (CBT) 

5X00 (w minimum- dollars per bushel 
1D6% 170b Mar 1J6 176b 


1.91 lX9b 

178% lXBb 
129 1X5% 

1X2% 1X8 

E*f.5ekn 


May 173 173 

Jul 1X9% 1X9% 
Seo 1X6% 1X6% 
Dec 1X9 1X9 

Prev. Safes 592 


175b 175% — DOb 
172 172b — DO*. 
1X8% lXffb +X0b 
IX4b 1X6% 

1X9 1X9 —20% 


Prev. Dav Open inL 3X90 up 3? 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CME) 

4(1000 lbs.- cents Perth. 
67X0 6280 Ftob 

66.10 

64.17 

MiA 

65.92 

—08 

68D2 

63X0 

Apr 

68X5 

68X7 

6700 

6805 


6900 

6500 


66X5 

68X5 

68X2 

68X5 

—.15 

6602 

63.15 

Aua 

66D0 

66D0 

66X2 

66X2 

—.13 

65.10 

61X0 

Oct 

64D5 

6L75 

64X0 

64X5 

-07 

65D0 

AIM 

Dec 

*505 

6505 

657® 

65.75 


65X0 

65X5 

Pea 

6L10 

ALIO 

6605 

6605 



Em. Sale* 13D06 Prwv.Salea 15X17 
Prev. Day Open Int. 59,152 up 1200 


FEEDER CATTLE CCME) 


44000 U».- cento Perth 

74X5 

74X0 

73J7 

7305 

—37 

7405 

67X0 


73X5 

73D0 

73.15 

73X2 

—33 

71X2 

6495 

May 

71X0 

71X5 

70.90 

70.97 

—33 










6700 

Sep 

7107 

71X7 

71.15 

71.15 

—3S 



Oct 


70X0 

7025 

70X5 

—.12 


70X0 

Nov 

7105 

7TX7 

71X5 


— lOS 

Est. Sales 1X57 Prev.Sotos 1X50 





Prev. Day Open InL 10X24 up 11 
HOGS(CMB) 


3U00 ItaL- eorrts per th 

51 DO 

5100 

5092 

51.12 

— X8 

5445 

45.10 


49X2 

49X0 

48X7 




48.40 


54X5 

54X5 

5340 







5472 





47X0 

Aus 

5162 

S3X7 

53.12 

5127 


51 D3 

4500 

Oft 

4905 

49X0 

4805 

4800 

— XO 


46X0 

Dec 

49.13 

49.15 

49.10 

49X5 

-05 


4L2S 

Pea 

4900 

4900 

4075 

48D5 

+X0 


45.75 

Apt 

4605 

46D5 

46D5 

4603 

-K20 

Est. Sates >379 Prev.Sotos 7X6 5 
Prev. Dav open Inf. 29X94 up 561 





PORK BELLIES (CMEJ 


38000 Ibv canto per to. 

81 RS 4005 Peb 

72D5 

7300 

7105 

71X5 —1X5 




73X0 

73X5 

71X0 

71X7 — 1D3 

pan 

61.15 

Mtrv 

7500 

75.15 

7270 

7275 —IDS 



Jul 

7520 

75X5 

7105 

73X2 —1X3 




73X0 

73X0 

71.10 

71.12 —IXB 



Feb 

6600 

6600 

600 

6450 —1X0 





ALSO 

6L50 


Est.Sotes 7D39 Prev. Sa; * 7056 



Prtv. Oov Op«n Int. IX67B off 7 





Food 


COFFEE C {NY CSCE 
■ i per lb. 


37DOO Ra.- cents par .— 

1 53X0 123DD Mar M7X0 15050 


152X0 

14920 

M7J0 

141X0 

13920 

13820 


122X1 
121 DO 
127X0 

12925 

128.50 

131X0 


May 14619 147X0 
Jul 142X0 14655 
Sop 140X0 14110 

Dee 139X0 141X0 
Mar 13725 137D1 


E*t.5afeE 2.900 Prev. Sale* M00 
Prev. Day Open Int. 13X78 off 88 


147.10 150DS 
14619 14724 
141X0 14654 
140X0 14207 
139X0 141X0 
13725 13925 
138X1 


+242 

4274 

42X4 

+1X6 

+1D9 

+1.97 

+238 


13X0 

1BJ0 

V.9S 

975 

9X5 

775 

933 

7.15 


-centoperlh 
401 Mar 

LS3 

454 

4X8 

4X2 

—34 

4X4 

Mav 

486 

407 

402 

462 

—36 

403 

Jut 

5.15 

S.17 

490 

491 

— XO 

L90 

E«a 

5X0 

5X0 

5X9 

5.19 

— J6 

507 

Ocf 

5X8 

S59 

5X5 

SX7 

— JS 

5X5 

Jan 

L10 

Lll 

410 

Lll 

+04 

602 

iWar 

6X5 

6X6 

6J0 

6X1 

—.18 

6X9 

May 

671 

6J4 

643 

609 

—.16 


Esi. aura ■«« — 

pnv.DovOpgfitnf.VM3i up 186 

COCOA (NYCSCEJ 
10 nwfrte tan*- 5 per tan 
7570 >988 Mar 

2570 " 

2400 
2415 
7337 
2165 

Esf. Sales *™ Prru’scfes 5.936 
tarev. Day Open inf. 24X72 off 240 


2049 Jul 
2053 Sen 

1999 Dec 
2020 Mar 

2000 May 


2396 

zmr 

2302 

2230 

2145 

2125 

3130 


2309 

23M 

2317 

2282 

2150 

2130 

2130 


2259 2371 

ZKM 


-13 


2275 2292 

rtfA 2240 


JIM 3140 
2110 21*f 


2110 2125 


+10 

+10 


Season Season 
High Low 


Open Htoti Low dace chg. 


1BSD0 


ORANGE JUICE WYCC) 
isxoo n>*^ cent* per lb. 

18550 11630 Mar 177X0 178.10 17680 17770 —145 

Mav 17650 l»J 177X0 178X0 -120 

Jul 17680 17? DO 12680 17VD0 —1X3 

SOP T76J5 17730 T76D5 17730 —130 

Nov 17625 —125 

Jon 17650 I74D0 17650 17325 >.125 

Mar 17523 —121 

May 17525 —125 

Pnv.SfllB 1.128 


151X0 
. __ 155X0 

182X0 157.75 

1B1D0 157X0 

100X0 156X0 

177 JO 15630 

162 JO 14000 

Esf. Safes 


Prev. Day Opm InL 7 JS4 offl 


Metals 


COPPER f COM BO 
25X00 Ibs^ cents per B 


Season Season 
High Law 


Opm Hit* Low Close Chg. 


1445D 1X783 Sep 1.1190 L1155 1.1100 1.HD5 

1.2710 1X750 Dec 1.1100 1.1100 1.1070 1.1050 

Esi. Sales 11.150 Prev. Saha 13J39 
Prov. Dav Open Int 21 DM up395 
CANADIAN DOLLAR (IM8U 
8 par dir- 1 point equataSOXOOi 
JBB50 2446 Mar 2515 2S26 

2635 2440 Jun 2502 2509 

SMS 2495 Sop 

2566 2474 DSC 248* 2495 

2304 25®» Mar 

EstSoiea 988 Prev. Safes 1J44 
Prev. Day Open f nL 9296 up 404 
FRENCH FRANC <IMM] 


2515 

2501 


2409 


250 

2506 

2496 

2489 

2487 


+2 


f franc- 1 aolrtf oquafsSUNOOl 


62.15 

93X0 

62.15 

55X0 

Feb 

Mar 

63X0 

6305 

6250 

4020 —1.15 
6200 —1X0 

*250 

56X0 

Apr 

Mav 

6405 

6415 

4100 

6290 —1X5 

B8X5 

5700 

Jut 

64X5 

6460 

63D5 


8210 

57X0 


6500 

65X0. 

64X0 



8425 

58X0 

Dec 

65X0 

6500 

6500 

65.15 

— D5 

8420 

8000 

5908 

5900 

Jan 

Mar 

66X0 

66X0 

6550 

65X5 —05 

7400 

61.10 

May 

66X0 

6700 

6650 

ALSO 

— XO 

74X0 

61J0 

jul 

67X0 

67X0 

67X0 

6700 — 25 

7000 62X0 

Est. Sales _ 

Sep 

Dec 

Prev.Sales 14076 


67X0 

68X5 

—.13 

+05 


Prev. Day Open Int. 9U67 up 571 
SILVER ICOMEX) 

5X00 Irov o*.- cent* per tray a*. 


723J 

3U 

Feb 

6410 

MIX 

6410 


+L5 

16280 

Mar 

Apr 

6450 

6720 

6330 


+45 

15130 

5950 

May 

66Q . 0 

6620 

6410 

6470 


M610 

6030 

Jul 

6710 

6710 

6510 



11830 

6140 

Seo 


6800 

6600 



12300 

12150 

4SZ4 

Dec 

4930 

6930 

*680 

a t ■ 

+70 

11930 

6490 

Mar 

7030 

7120 

7020 



10480 

6600 

Mov 

7110 

7230 

7110 


■HU 

9450 

9400 

6730 

6010 

Jul 

sw 

Dec 

7250 

7250 

7250 


+8D 

+9.1 

490 


Esf. Sales Prev. Sale* 34JV5 

Prev. Day Opm Int. 86098 up 12 
PLATINUM OfYME) 

50 frov a*.- dollars per Iroy a*. 

306JD 777X0 Feb 276J0 —MO 

274X0 27600 Mar 2B2D0 2CD0 282D0 278X0 —1D0 

447 JO 36550 Apr 2B3XQ 287 JO Z79XO 28030 —1X0 

449 JO 272X0 Jul 290X0 29130 28*30 285X0 —1X0 

393X0 27650 Ocf 29350 2V4XO 291 JO 271X0 —140 

37130 284X0 Jan 277X0 —130 

Esf. Sales 21X44 Prev. Sales 2D61 
Prev. Dav Opm Int. 14D74 up 7 
PALLADIUM IffYMB] 

100 froy az- donor* per at 

125X0 121X8 Feb 138X0 

14050 10750 Mar 12900 13200 12900 129X0 

15930 10650 Jgn I273S 12850 12673 127X8 

147X0 10650 Sec 124X0 127X5 12600 1K.10 

14130 10673 Dec 12600 1Z7JD 12600 125X5 

12050 114X0 Mar 125X0 12730 123X0 134X5 

Est. safe* 512 Prev. Sales 655 

Prev. Day Open Int. 6X91 upM 
GOLD [ COME XI 
1 00 troy az^ doltari per fray ok. 

522X0 29670 Feb 506X0 50750 303X0 30610 

290X0 Mar 50050 50650 507X0 305X0 

300X0 Apr 309X0 311X0 30650 307X0 

304X0 Jun 31230 313X0 311X0 311X0 

30830 Aug 318X0 319X0 31600 313.90 

314X0 Oct 32350 32120 32320 32QXO 

317X0 Dec 32650 32670 32530 3M90 

325X0 Feb 33290 33290 330.90 330X0 

33050 Apr 340X0 340.00 337 JO 335XO 

33600 Jun 546X0 546X0 34600 341X0 

342X0 Aug 347.10 

34230 Ocf 353X0 

Dec 35670 

Eat. Sales Prev. Saha 3S52T 

P rev. Dav Opm InLl 37X04 offXlB/ 


+X0 

+X0 

+X0 

+X0 

+X0 

+X0 


311X0 

51650 

510X0 

485X0 

4534® 

48950 

405JO 

49680 

43570 


— JO 


—50 


39SD0 


—50 


Financial 


9200 

91X4 

9125 

9002 

90.46 

9020 

89J6 


9207 

91X9 

9125 

«L85 

9046 

9020 

89X6 


IIS T. BILLS f IMM1 
81 million- oh of TOO PCI. 

9221 8729 Mar 

9101 87.14 Jim 

9123 8694 Sap 

9QD0 8577 CMC 

9055 8660 Mar 

9027 87X1 Jun 

90XG 88X0 SOP 

8953 8953 Dec 

EM. Sales Prev. Saks* 15243 

Prev. Dav Open In). M.12S off 387 
18 YR. TREASURY (CBTl 
SKXUHB prtn- p)s& 32ndsaf IDOpct 
83 70-25 Mar 83-9 82-16 

IM 70-9 Jun 81-11 *1-17 

81-13 75-18 Sap 80-18 80-20 

00-22 75-13 DOC 

804 75-18 MOT 

79-26 77-21 Jun 

Est.5oies Pm. Sates 10.931 

Prev. Day Open int. 41X35 up54Z 


91 JB 
9151 
91X4 
9045 
90X6 
9020 
8906 


91 DO —.15 
9154 — .U 

91D6 —.15 

90X6 — .16 

9022 —.16 

90X4 —.17 

SS 


81-31 

no 

80-10 


ex 

m-7 

80-16 

7628 

7611 

78-28 


Jjn 


.10285 


.18160 


2170 

2191 

2215 

2347 


.11020 .10100 

.10430 .10130 Sen 

Eat. Sales Prev. Saha 

Prev. Day Open InL 1X30 
GERMAN MARK (I MM) 

-Spermatic- 1 paint anuatoUDQOl 
X110 2137 Mar 2172 2180 ' 2167 

2733 2160 Jun 2195 2703 1-2190 

2545 2195 Sap 5225 2225 2215 

2610 2234 DOC 2255 2255 2298 

Est. Sales 15280 Prev. Soles 17X22 
Prev. Day Open InL 49X39 Up 866 
JAPANESE YEH(IMM) 

Spot van- lpotat adapts HUMMOT -r ^ 

004695 X03921 Mar X83931 X03937 X03923 X03V28 
004450 D03933 Jun XB3956 X03961 00)950 X03952 
004TH -003991 Jap 003988 083908 JH9S4 JB3«M 

0043S9 X04Q20 DOC D04020 

Eat. Sales 4X3* Prev. Sato* 6359 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 13X50 uo395 

SWISS FRANC {IMMI 
Sperfrane-1 Point oduab 30X001 
JKU 2734 Mar 2756 2765 2739 2743 

.4900 2768 Jun 2706 2795 2771 J77S 

•4830 2812 Sep 2030 2830 2820 2807 

■flfO. 28G Dec 2856 2856 2855 2847 
Est. Sales 13031 Prev. Sales 1X136 
Prev, Day Open int. 24204 up 743 


+1 

+2 

+1 

+2 


-14 
•—15 
' — T7 


— W 
— 13 
— 13 
—17 


Indusfrials 


LUMBER CCMEI 
130X00 bd. Hr % per 1000 bd. fL 

220X0 13920 Mar 15650 VS520 152X0 IS3J0 — UB 

May 164X0 145J0 16300 16600 —1X0 
Jul 17200 172X0 170X0 170.10 —3X0 
Sap 17520 17620- I7SJ0 I75D0 —1D0 
Nov 177.10 17X20 176X0 17BX0 


22508 
23050 
197 JO 
186.10 
1S7X0 
195X0 


147X0 

153D0 

157X0 

16700 

T7SX0 

178X0 


Est.Salas 2205 Prev.Sales 3X46 
Prev. Day Open InL 9052 dp 151 


18200 —120 
18680 — 120 


COTTON KNYCE) 
50X00 ib£r cents per lb. 


79XS 

6455 

Mar 

4600 

65LM 

64X0 

64X3 


65D0 

Mav 

*417 

6430 

USDS 

A5D4 

7905 

6477 

Jut 

67.15 

67X3 

6LB5 

6603 


67.15 

Oct 

67X0 

67X0 

<7X0 

BM 

7300 

67X3 

Dec 

67X0 

67X0 

67X5 

67X0 

7475 

7000 

7005 

6805 

59X0 

7000 

Mar 

May 

Jut 

5900 

6900 

69D5 

6BJ5 

69X0 

69D5 


+28 


Est.Salas Prev.Sales 2286. 

Prev. Dav Oam InL 19X21 up SB 


HEATING OIL OfYME) 
42X00 gal- cants nor gat 


86.75 

4905 Feb 

7203 

7350 

72X5 73X0 

+127 

8300 

6708 Alar 

7070 

7200 

70X0 7172 

+106 

S2D5 

6505 APT 

67X0 

69.10 

6720 6805 

+105 

8260 

6400 Mav 

6LXS 

6700 

6440 67D2 

+1J4 



6425 

67X0 

6625 67X0 

+100 

*473 


6620 

6430 

46J0 6705 


75L50 75X0 Dec 

Est. Sales Prev.Sales 1105? 

7300 

300 



Prev. Day Opm int. 20236 off 1X71 


CRUDE OIL(NYME) 
1000 bbO- dollars par bbL 


31X0 

2406 


2SL95 

36X3 

2502 

2638 

31X5 

2447 


25X5 

2400 






23X5 

2SD8 






25.17 

2500 

-jjf 




Jul 

2500 

25X0 

Tin*; 

'-V 1 ! 

29X7 

2425 

Au® 

2502 

25.10 

■IT-*- 


2?50 

2465 

Oct 

24D2 

2402 



29X0 

24X0 

Nov 

2490 

25.15 



29X0 

2300 

Dec 

2402 

3402 


Tv 








29X3 

29X3 


2492 

2402 







2492 

’XT 

"|T7 

27X0 

27X0 

Mav 

Feb 

2402 

2492 

2402 

2402 

~^T7 

III 

esf. saios 

Prev.Sales 20355 




+21 

+XS 

+J1 


+X3 

+.18 


+23 


Prev. Dav Open InL 57.983 im62 


Stock indexes 


U5 TREASURY BONDS (CBT) 
(8PCt-S10fiX00-PtS&32ndsof 1OOp0) 
77-15 57-27 Mar 73-12 73-21 

77-15 57-2fl Jun 72-11 77-19 

7+2 57-10 Sea 71-23 71-23 

76-5 57-8 Dae 7D-Z7 70-31 

72-30 57-2 Mar 7M 70+ 

70-16 56-29 Am 69-12 69-14 

703 56-29 SOP 69+ 609 

69-26 56-25 Dee 68+ 68-18 

69.12 5+27 Mar 

69-2 64-3 Jun 

68-26 6+21 Sep 

EM. Sales Prev.SatasT79.SS9 

Prev. Day Opm lnL297.98S up 3290 


77-31 

71-36 

71-2 

70-12 

69-23 

«M 

6+22 

60+ 


73-S 

72-3 

2+ 

70-19 

49-31 

59-14 

4+31 

4+18 


—10 

—11 

—11 


47.27 

67-18 


GNMA (CBT) 

5100000 prtn-pts&32ndsaf KM pet 
70-17 57-5 Mar 6+25 69-29 

69-27 57-17 Jun 69-2 69-5 

6«-4 59-U Sap 

6+13 IM DOC 

60 3+20 Mar 

67-8 5+25 Jun 

<7-3 6+21 Sap 

Est. Sates Pm. Sates 1X10 
Pm. Day Open Int. 7X59 up 240 


8* 

47-36 

47-10 

6+27 

6+15 


CERT. DEPOSIT (IMMI 
31 million- pfa of IM pet 


91 JO 

8503 

M or 

*1X7 

91X3 

9TX4 

91X4 

— .14 

91XD 

85X0 

Jun 

9104 

71 JM 

9001 

9009 

— -U 

9000 

90.17 

89 JB 
1906 

0706 

8500 

BSJ4 

*646 

86X3 

8706 

Sop 

Dec 

Mar 

Jun 

Sap 

90X3 

90X3 

90X3 

90X6 

8901 

89X1 

89.19 

8800 

— .W 
-.15 
—OS 
—.13 
— .13 

Est. Sdes 

Prev.Sales 

579 





prev. Dav Oom mi. M.139 off in 


EURODOLLARS (IMMI 
ti militon-pKeflOOpeL h 


91X8 

8514 

Mar 

91.13 

91X4 

9104 

9107 — J2 

9ftBB 

82X9 

Jun 

9067 

♦073 

90X3 

98X7 —.13 

90X3 

8453 

Sep 

90.18 

♦0X1 

9000 


8907 

B40D 

Dec 

8975 

89D5 

89X9 

89X7 —.14 

89.48 

8418 

Mar 

89J6 

89X4 

09X4 


89.15 

8L73 

Jun 

B9JD 

8903 

8808 

BUS — .is 

8804 

89X7 

8708 

17.99 

See 

Dec 

88JB 

0BJ8 

88D8 

8S =* 


EsLSalca Prev. Safes 3U% 

Prev. Day Open [nl.T03.9J1 up i, 9W 
BRITISH POUND (IAUU 
3 per pound- 1 paint eauatsBQMOl 
1J1» 1XWT Mar 1.1240 1.1275 1.1170 1.1195 

1-3350 1X8W Jun 1.1200 1.1210 1.1085 LI no 


SP COMP. INDEX (CMEJ 

eojiita and canto ibojO 1BIX5 17900 180X5 

1B5D0 156.10 Jun 18325 184X5 1*205 18355 

188X0 160X0 Son 18400 187-15 1B6J0 106X5 

IVOXO 17520 DOC 189X5 UVX5 189X5 1B92S 

Est. Sales 57057 Prev.Sales 7L9S0 
Prev. Dav Open InL 57X81 Oft L736 


VALUE L IMB O CCBT) 

paints and cant* 

202.10 168.10 MOT I99JS 20000 10000 1WD5 

206X0 17300 Jun 204.10 70475 30X0 203D0 

20305 1*505 Sap 20000 200JXI 20000 20605 

. Est. Salas Prev.Sales 5X35 

Prev. Dav Oam IM. 7012 up 744 
NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYPE) 
potato and cents _ „ 

105X0 8800 Mar 10405 10900 10405 W40O 

101X0 9000 Jim 106X5 10680 106.15 106X5 

10900 9105 SOP 10805 108X5 107.90 108X5 

10900 101 DO Dm 110.15 110.15 118.18 11025 

Est. Salas 12.170 Prev. Salas M0O4 
Prev. Dav Open Int, im off 19? 


— v45 


+.10 

+.10 

+.18 

+.M 


Commodity Indexes 


Afteodvs- 


Reuters. 


DJ. Futures. 


Close 
971.90 f 
201900 
126.10 
247.10 


Com. Research Bureau. 

Moody's : base 100 : Oec 31# 1931. 
p - preliminary; I - final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sen. 10. 1931. 
Dow Jones ; base 100 : Dec. 31. 1974. 


Prov tans 
971.10 t 
2006.90 
12425 
247.90 


Market Guide 


CBT: 

CMC: 


NYCSCE: 
NYCE: 
COM EX: 
KYME; 
KC8T: 

NYPE; 


Chicago Board of Trade 
Chicago Mercantile Exchange 
Infernal tonal Monetary Mamet 
Ol CMcaoo Mereaittle Exdwnge 
New York Cocoa. Sugar, Caffes Exchano* 
New York Cotton Exchange 
Commodity Exchange. New Ygrli 
New York MoreonfBe Emhonge 
Kansas at? Board of Trade 
New- York Puhires Ex ch ange 


c 


T! Month 
High low Stock 


□iv, YktPE 


SK. 

lOK High low 


Cicse 

dual Oi'Te 


2Z% 10% PulteHm .12 
54b 23% Pur-trial 108 
9% 5% Pyro 


X 32 
50 15 


485 

290 

881 


20% 20% 30%— % 
25% 25% 25% + % 
«b 8% 9% % 


38% 27V. QuafcOs 
17% IS QuakSO 00 
12% 6% Quanex 
32% 23 Quostar 1X0 
24% 14 QkRcil 71k 


11 1407 
LI 14 1025 
51 1fe9 
SX 9 6X9 
D 19 370 


37b 36% 36% + % 
28 19% 19% + % 
10% 9% 9%— U 
30 2?% 291* + % 

33% 22% 23% 


6b RBind 
28% RCA 
29 RCA pf 
67% RCA Pf 


.16 

104 


1.9 14 

17 12 2001 


300 100 
400 AS 
2.12 7.1 
3X5 100 . 
00 21 11 


b% m 8%—% 

30% 38 38b 


06 


15 
20 24 
13 


00 20 10 
4 


XO 

06 

1X4 


IX II 
19 9 

40 7 


00 


6b RLC 

4% 3 RPCn 

17b 12b RTE 
36% 35 RataPur 100 
9ft 5% Ramad 
21 16% Rnncn 04 

10b 4b RangrO 
75 47% R a y on X4 

17% B% Raymk 
40 34% Rantm 1X0 

13% 7% ReadBt XO - 
23% 16% RdBatpf 212 HU 

25 20 RdBatPf 304el50 , 

15% 9% RHRef IJSe 8X (2 
15% 9 RecnEq 

14% 8 Redmn 
10% 7% Reece 

2% % Regal 

37% 23 RelcftC 
6b 3b RepAIr 
2 1% RepAwt 

<2% 25% RgpCp 
21ft 9 RapGyp 
41% 31% RapNY _ 

26 20% RNY pfC XT2 120 
58% 52 RNYpfA6X9e11D 
02% 40 RNY pfB 4X7e 88 
37% 21% RmBk 1X4 50 6 
2V 30b RapBkpf2.12 77 
IBft 14 RshCof 02 10 24 
33% 22% RevCO 
13ft 9ft vl Rover 
40ft 28ft Revlon 
24b 17% Rexhm 
20 lift Rexnrri 
75 52ft Reynln 
48% 46 Reylnpf L10 
40% 26 ReyMtt 100 
05 SOb RevMpf 400 
30% 24b RchVck 1X8 
34ft 10% RlegafT 

»ft 17% RiteAld 
7ft 5% RvrOk n 
36 » Rabshw 

48% 35-A RabtSI 
24% 12 Robins 
19ft 12b RochG 

35 27% RochTI 

36 23 Rocfcwrt 
128 B3 Rklntpf 105 

48ft 40% RahmH 200 
52% 27b Rohrln 
21% 10ft RolOnn 
18b 6 RallnE * 

13% 6ft Rail Ins 
6% 2% Raman 
22% 12ft Roper 
34% 24 Rarer 
14ft 8% Rowan 
54ft 41b RoylD 
49ft 32ft Rutx-md 
23ft 13 RussBn 
20 15ft RusToa 
33% 17% RvenH 
56% 38ft RyderS 
24ft 12% Rykmd 
18% B% Rymers 


101 

29 

75 

91 

113 


34 S 

79 12 1710 
36 2131 

U 9 20 

1122 
0 17 2190 

9 

34 17 IMS 
JD 68 736 
10 
14 
202 
138 
314 
6 

181 
331 
1683 
141 
126 
M 
37 

10 
10 

IBM 
147 
30 

35 

30 12 1589 
517 

5.1 IT 1014 
25 9 75 

3D 11 135 
40 10 3152 
8X 45 

20 6 523 

5X 2 

50 9 115 

80 5 
ID 18 2946 

18 14V 

21 8 211 
43 IS 122 
17 15 1105 

200 I IX 5 334 
2X4 7.1 9 29 

100 20 10 2672 


104 

DO 


3X0 


00 


1.12 

1X0 

36 


1.1 

2D 10 
10 

00c 10 30 
jDSe 0 22 
X6 40 17 


X4 30 8 619 

1.12 40 14 49 

08 0120 «ni 
207a 5.4 5 6457 
04 ID 19 S3 
16 81 
76 A3 9 23 

100 3X 16 39 

MWb ID 10 606 
X0 2D IS 139 
5 240 


150* 34 34 34 +1% 

2 89% 8?% 89% + ft 
30% 29ft X — ’•i 
34% 34ft 34ft + l* 
9% 8% 9% + ft 
3ft 3ft 3% 

16ft 16ft 16ft 
34% 34% 34% + b 
7ft 7 7b— % 

IBft 17% 17% — ft 

5 4% 4ft 4- ft 

50ft 57% 57b— 2b 
IJft 13% IJ%— ft 
46ft 46ft 46ft— ft 
10b Oft 10b + % 
20% 20ft 20ft 
22 71 22 +lb 

14b 15% 16 4- ft 
14% tab 14ft 
12 11% 12 — ft 

8% B% B%-,ft 

% ft % 4- lb* 
37b 36% 36b— ft 

6 5ft 5L- b 
1ft tft 1ft 

42 41ft 41ft— ft 
19% 19ft 19ft— b 
40% 40% 40% — % 
26ft 26 76% + b 

56 56 56 + % 

Sift 50b 51 + % 

30% 30 30 — b 

26b 26 26 — ft 

17% 17ft 17ft 
26ft 26% 26% 

11% 10ft 11% 4- % 
35ft 35% 35ft + ft 
70 19ft 20 
14ft MU taft 
75ft 74ft 75% + % 
49 48ft 49 + ft 

35b 38ft 38% 

B3ft 83 B3ft + ft 
29% 29b 29ft + b 
22 21% 91%— b 

30 70% 29ft 4- ft 

7ft 7b 7ft 
36ft 35ft 36ft 4- ft 
38ft 37ft 38ft + ft 
30% 20b 20ft— b 
19ft 19ft 19Vi>— b 
34% 34b 34b— ft 
35% 34b 35ft 
124b 124b 124b —1% 
68% 68 68ft— ft 

52 51% Sl«— U 

20ft 20b 20% — ft 
17% 16% 17ft— b 
11 10% 10ft + ft 

2ft 2% 2% 

18 17ft 17ft— ft 
28% 28b 28b— ft 
10b 9% I0b 4- % 

53ft 52% 53ft 4- % 
49A 49ft 49ft— ft 
23b 22ft 22ft — ft 
17% 17% 17% 

27% 27b 27% + % 

57 56% 57 + ft 
23ft 72% 22ft— % 
14% 13% tab+1 


200 4X 12 402 
US 2D 29 1002 
00b 10 11 12 

00 30 W 45 
04 J 22 1004 
153 


21 

1X0 5D 9 
02 10 13 
ID2 BD 7 
100 110 


47% 33ft 5CM 
43% 23ft SFN 
12b 7ft SLInds 
30 19% SPSTec 

26 IS Sabine 
23 16 Safer Rr ZMSalSS 

17% 11% SfgdBs 04 10 16 
10 5b 8tod5c 68 

7ft SfgdS wt 
32% 19% SafKIni 

29% 21b Safewv 

35% 24ft Saga 
20 15% SIJOLP 

TO% 9 spam 
lib 6% Salad 
34% 21 SalUaM 
23% 17ft SOtoOa 
10ft 6% SJuanB 
10ft 8% SJuanR 
51 31 Sandri 

24ft 18% SAnitRt 
29ft 20b SFafloP 

34b 24b SotWef 

17ft 13b SaufRE 

19ft tab SavElP 

20% 15ft SavE A 
11% 9ft SavE pf 
Bft 3ft Savin 
lift 8% Savtnpt 1JQ 150 
23ft 17b SCANA 2.14 90 
40 33 SchrPto 

65 34% ScMmb 

Mft 7b SdAfl 
29 19b Scoalnd 

59b 39ft ScotPef 
36% Sb ScottP 1.12 
15% lift Scatty* 02 
37ft 18% SeaCntn X2 
lift 9% Sana pf 1X6 127 
15ft 12% SeaC pfB 2.10 13D 
15b 12 SeaC pfC 210 130 


227 

267 

70 


34 

83 

73 

0 

546 

287 

W2 

10 

354 

27 


.16 0 17 

210 9.1 ■ 

JOB 90 10 
19 

06 10 15 
ID4 80 14 _ 

100 30 11 6214 

1X0 40 15 8 

00 10 43 2 

1X0 10 A 26 

104 70 5 

108 UX M 

36 
* 

_ I BOS 
4X II 3436 
10 1011244 
D 23 1379 
10 12 109 
10 
21 ID 
34 11 
10 6 


1X8 

100 

.12 

D6 


118 

636 

305 

501 


ID 


X0 

100 

S3 

1.76 

2X4 


20 9 
17 
IX 15 
33 9 


40 7 


25% Mft SeaLdn 
5ft 2ft Sea Can 
40ft 30 Seagrm 
21% 12% Seagul 

28% IBft SaalAIr 

31b 19% SealPw 
65% 37% ScartoG 

SBiriS&c 

BfcS - 
FstBr 

0ft 4% snoefwn 

18ft 12 smwtri 

16ft 12% Star Poe 1X0 121 B 
37 24% StonoJ 100 2D 15 3505 

59% 45% Stafri Pf 4.12 7.1 53 

u 20% singer .10 j 10 882 
31 36b sinarpf 300 110 7 

IS 12b Skyline AS 28 24 227 
20% 9% Smith In 
60% SO SmkB 


10 

X0 10 II 
D7 50 31 
XO 25 8 
200 3X 10 
212e60 5 
00 30 7 
D6 23 12 

40 M 


56b 36% Smuckr 

ISSS?" 

17ft 12% SonvCn 
29% 22% SooUn 

38% Z7% 50UITC 

21% 18 
28% 22 


28 20 398 
4D 10 2464 

10 15 26 

11 12 354 
... SD 6 7133 
■lie 10 13 1757 

100 40 17 37 

no ox -ss 

SrcCppf 240 110 B 

Sojcrln 244 BD 10 100 


02 

280 

D6 

1.16 

105 


45ft 38b Soudwn 100 20 II 60 

28% 22 SaefBk 100 40 8 102 

lift 5ft SoetPS 1X5120+ 25 83 

24% 17% SCcriE s 204 SD 7 7634 

19 14% SouthCa 1.92 116 619234 

36 25% SoInGE 2X8 70 7 628 

17% 27% SNETI 272 7X 9 731 

36 31% SaNEpf 302 11.1 A 

49% 41ft SoNEpf 4X2 100 

31 21b SoUnCo 1D2 Al 18 

36% 23 Soutlnd 100 30 9 3057 

IBft lib SaRDV 08 X 10 1066 

Wft 6b soamrfc 00 2X 5 585 
54% 48 Sonde pf 7.l5e140 2 

26% 14% SwAirf .13 0 15 2828 


100 

5X0 


102 

102 

104 


22% 13 SwtPgr 
15 Mft SwfGdS 
73% 55 SwBefl 
27ft 19% SwEnr 
22 17 SwfPS 

19b 11% spartan 
77% Jfl SoectP 
48b 33% sparry 

37ft 30% springs 
43ft 31% SquorD 
55b 37% Saufbb 

26 17% Staley 

22 16% SfBPnt 

21 13 StMatr 

60ft 48ft StOInd 
50% 39ft StdOOtl .... ... 

78 74% SDOh pf 3D5 4D 

24ft 9% StPacCp X0 ID 9 
17 11 Sfanttox J2 30 11 

30% 19% StonWk .96 30 11 
30ft 23ft Slarratt 1.00 30 TI 
10% 8% StaMSe 109O1 ID 

34% 15% SloufCh 1X4 70 
4% 2ft SNwoe .12 
IBft 14b stercM 
Qb 9ft 5trlBa> 

30 23% StartDg 

23% 15b SlevnJ _. 

36 25ft StwWm 1X8 
44ft 32ft Stonew ixa 
40 25% StonaC X0 


45ft 45% 45% — % 
44ft 43% 44% + ft 
ii% lib lift— ft 
27% 26ft 27 — ft 
17 16ft 14% + ft 
17% 17ft 17% 

16ft 16% 16% — ft 
6ft 5ft 6ft— ft 
1ft lb 1ft— ft 
170 31ft 30ft 31b— b 
1371 28b 27% 28b 
34% 34 34 

19ft 19% 19% 

10% 10% 10%— ft 
7 7 7 — ft 

31% .'»'n 31% + % 
23b 23 23ft 
Bft 8% Bft + ft 
9ft 9ft 9ft— ft 
38ft 37% 37% — % 
23ft 23% 23%— ft 
30% 29 30 f ft 

30% 30% 30% 

16% 16% 16% 

18% 18ft IBft — ft 
19% 19ft 19b— ft 
11 10% 11 
5ft 5% 5b 
10% 10 10 - ft 

23% 23ft 23ft— ft 
38ft 37ft 38 + ft 
40ft 39% 39ft + ft 
13b 12% 13 — b 
27% 27ft 27ft + ft 
58% 56% 58ft + b 
35% 35% 35% — ft 
15ft 15 15% + ft 

36% 35% 35ft— ft 
11% 11% 11%— % 
15% 15ft 15%— b 
15b 15ft 15ft— ft 
35ft 24% 24ft— % 
S 4% 4ft + ft 
40b 40% 40% — ft 
16 15% 15ft— ft 

& ££ 

418R -% 

56% 56% Mft— % 
28% 2B% 28%- ft 
13% IJb 13% — % 
33ft 33b 33ft + ft 
14% tab 14% + ft 
24% 23ft 23ft- ft 
55% 55b 55% + % 
34% 33% 34ft + % 

27 26% 26ft — b 
33ft 33ft 33%+ b 

6% 6ft 6% 

15 14% IS + ft 

BttrTS 

££££§*=£ 

31 31 31 

17ft 17b 17% — ft 
lift 11% lift- ft 
59ft 59b 59% 

54ft 54 54% — b 

36ft 36b 36ft + b 
33ft 31% 31 %— ft 
16% 15% 16 
26ft 25% 26%+ % 
37% 37% 37% — b 
21% 21ft 21%+ b 
27% 27% 27% 

45% 45 45% + b 

28 27% 27ft— ft 

Bft 8 8 

22ft 23% 22ft + b 
18ft 18 IBft 
34% 34b 34b— b 
37b 36% 36ft— b 
34ft 34% 34% 

100* 44 44 44 

78 38% 28ft 28b— b 
31% 29% 30ft +1 
12% lift 1Z%+ % 
7% 7% 7%— ft 
50 49% 50 + % 

25b 24% 25b— % 
15b 14% 15b + % 
14% 14% 14%— ft 
73ft 72ft 72%+ b 
22 % 22 % 22 %+ % 
21b 21 21ft 
15% 14ft 15 — % 
22% 22ft 22%+ b 
50ft 47% 49 + ft 

35% 35ft 35% + % 
43b 42% 43ft + % 
54ft 53% SJft— ft 
23b 22% 23 — b 
20% 19% 20% + % 
15% 15% 15% — % 

7 7444X 5B 57b 57%+% 

7 3417 44ft 44 44% + ft 


628 

27 

27 

172 

116 

2*74 

348 

293 

124 

65 

103 


462 

U 13 T42 

73 B 1476 
20 16 142 

BD 8 3606 
30 21 263 
2? 115 
19 1013299 
43 9 M2 
43 12 1007 
1X0 30 15 516 
00 30 19 342 
04 ZX 12 441 
02 2.1 9 296 

100 30 
300 60 


50* 76 76 76 

366 24ft 23ft 24 


J6 

.72 

1.16 

100 


305 

519 

3* 

76 

442 

83 

4 

38 


+lb 

ft 


3D 

40 10 
60 9 
42 12 1740 
60 16 527 
53 If 31 
U 8 50 

ID 23 207 


16% 16% 16% 
m 29 29 — 1 

30 30 30 

10% 10b 18b— ft 
19% 19b 19b— ft 
3b 3ft 3b 
IBft 18ft 18ft — b 
10% M% 10% — ft 
37% 27% 27% — b 
19% 19 19% + ft 

29% 29% 29% + ft 
42b 42b 42%+ ft 

31 30ft 31 + b 


KflUnltl 
4ijh Low ll» 


Tut 1 10. PE 


icos men La* 


Close 
Goal Ch'je 


100 

.48 


53'* 32' # SlooStv 
151* SlorEa 
taft 2 vIStorT 
521* 30b Starer 
20% 20 S-mMln 
23% taft Sir MR! 

3ft SuavSh 
Mb 21% SunBks 
31% 24b SunCh 
18b TVS 5unEI 
59% 431a S jnCa 
122 ?0b SltiC pt 

49% 34% SUIKBIr 
15ft 7% BynMn 
34b 23% SUPTVI 
36% 19b SupMkl 
18b 14 Swank 
221a f6ft 5v6ron 
36b 28ft 5yom pf 2X0 
14% 10 SvmsCu 
53% 37% Syntax 1.92 
38% 25b Svso 06 


100 20 9 

104 10.4 14 


XO 0 


00 40 24 


40 10 
10 22 


230 

205 

100 


XS 

XT 

.90 

108 


400 
42 
!?35 
328 
195 

69 
048 
91 
64 
69 

LB 10 1229 

24 3 

3D 15 219 
13 1420 
20 12 4683 

1.1 15 202 

50 10 » 

5X 12 U1 

7.1 1 

21 2B 

3X 13 1261 
10 15 173 


£1% 42% 43% + ft 
IB 17% 17b— b 
3% 3% 3%— ft 
52% 51% 51b— ft 
20% 20% 20% 

17% 171* 17% + ft 
5 5 5 - ft 

30% 30ft 30b 
31% 31 31 — ft 

10ft 10 10 — Ml 

47% 46% 47% +1 
95'.. 95 Vu 95b— b 
48% 47% 48ft- ft 
Bft 8ft 8% + ft 
34b 33b 33ft + ft 
38 37% 37ft- b 

16b 16b 16b 
20ft 20 20% — ft 

34 34 34 + ft 

13ft 13% 13% + % 
5346 52ft 53ft + ft 
35b 34ft 34% — V% 


39a J 
220 70 


19 


1.19 

100 

3.00 


18 
70 S 
Ll 17 
17 12 
10 


91 

B70 

IBS 

31 

S3 

536 


100 


J32 


00 

2D2 


1.9 12 

12 144 

50 11 

60 13 90 

11 2157 

12 7 
10 9 220 

5 99 

10 

10 33 

13 

10 10 
7 X 


62* 
423 
813046 
3 
710 
517 
54 
4708 
538 
1302 
310 
3 

4 


62 35ft TDK 
31% 24 teCO 
13b 7ft TG1F 
tab lift TNP 

30 17 TR6 
00ft 59% TRW 
146% 110 TRW or 4X0 

13ft 3% TOC Boat 
70 40 b ToffBrtf 1.12 

15ft 9b Toller 
IBb 13% Talley pf 100 
as ft 4o% Tam fed no 
34b 23b Tandv 
15ft lift Tnarcff 
70% 51 Va Tekfrru 
3% 2% Telcom 
302ft UT.. Teldvn 
22U it* Telrate 
43b IBft Tele* 

381 « 25% Tempi n 
44b 32ft Tennco 
97ft 37% Twic pr 1100 1)J 
35ft 21b Terdvn 16 

20% Oft Tesoro XO 3J 18 
36ft 20ft Teaar of 216 *.l 
48ft 3i% Texaco zoo Bx 34 
47ft 32ft TtcABc 1X2 4D 9 
48b 36b Tex Cm 1X6 18 7 
35% 26% TxEatS 200 7J V 
26% roft T>ETpf 2XOB 9.1 
77 24b TxETPf 207e1OD 

38b 25 Texlnd XDb 2X 19 
149% 11 1b Tex I rat 200 IX 10 
3ft 1 Tcwlnt 
27ft 16% TexOGs .18 
39 2Bb T.Poc XO 
28% 20b Te>UIII 7X6 
7ft 2 Taxfl In 
43% 257* Textron 100 
4 TV# 23b Tevtrpf 7.0S 
38 23b Textrct 1X0 

9 'a 5% Thccfc 
71% 13b Therm E 
41 28b ThmBIS 104 

IBft 17ft Thom In Mb X8 10 

26% 13b ThmMed M 77 B 

27ft 11% Thrifty X0 17 15 

29% 17b Tldwtr .90 40 

9 4ft Tlgerln 
481* 33b Time 02 ID 14 
85% 60% Tim I pfB 107 10 
22 12 Tlmptx 21 

47 28b TlmeM 106 30 14 

65b 47% Timken 100a 3+ 13 

36b 28b TodShp 102 30 7 

31 22b Tafchm J2 24 ti 

IBft 13% TolEdta 2X2 14X 5 

271* 24ft TolEd pf 3D2 I3D 
277* 22 TolEd Pf 3D5 130 
25ft 20 Tot Ed Pf 3.47 13X 

32 25% TolEd pf 408 137 

18b 13b TolEd Df 206 13J 
17% 13% TolEd of 201 130 
48b 23% Tanka X0 D 

34% 16 TaafRol XS ID 10 

35% 13% Trchms 100 20 13 

15 fft ToroCD 00 10 10 

4b 1 Tosco 

Sb 11% Towle 

35*4 21 Vi TavRUl 25 

30% 18% Trocar 04 1.1 14 . 

12% 7ft TWA 69 2533 

15ft lift TWA at 205 l&X 219 

23ft 16% TWA pfB 205 90 144 

28b 203* Trqnsm 104 50 11 2040 


787 271 
364 22 


.9 12 5911 
10 18 22 
80 6 1796 
76 

L7 14 2656 


26 
30 17 


20 16b Tranlnc 202 110 

12ft 10b TARIty IDOe 30 8 
551* 33% Trartsoo 2.16 Ll 10 
59ft 42ft TmSCDf 307 6J 
25b 19 TrcnEx 200 90 
16 6% Transcn 7 

76% 63 TrGPpf 6X5 BD 
89 77 TrGPpf 804 100 

lift 6ft TrroOh 21 

35b 2S Tranwy 100 50 10 
34b 23ft Trnwfd X0 10 II 
17b 9% TwIdwtA 

30b 721* Twldpf 200 6X 
17ft 14b Twldpf 1.90 110 


44ft 44 44 — b 

30ft 30% 30ft— b 
11 10% 10% + % 
15b 14% 15b + ft 
24ft 74b 24b— % 
. 80ft 79ft 80ft ... 
3 148b 148 taBb+lft 
45 4% 4b 4b— % 

82 61b 59 97%— 2ft 
144 15ft IV* 15% 

11 18 17% 18 + V6 

90 Mb 65ft 66 — ft 
28ft 27ft 28ft + % 
13b 13ft 1 3b ^ 
65ft 64b 65% — ft 
2ft 2% 2%— % 

266% 369ft +1% 
_ 21% 21ft + % 

43ft 43% 43ft + ft 
371* 37ft 37ft— % 
39ft 39ft 39% — % 
97% 97% 97%— ft 
38% 29ft 29ft— ft 
10% 9% 10% + % 
23ft 23% 23% + % 
34ft 34ft 34ft + ft 
36% 35ft » + % 

47ft 40b 41b— Tft 
30b 30ft + % 
26% 26% 26% — ft 
26ft 26b 26ft— b 
33% 33V* 33% 

856 129% 128% 129% + % 
554 lb 1% lb 

20 19% 19% + b 

31% 31 31 — b 

37 24ft 26ft— % 
3ft 3ft Jft 
38b 37ft 38 + ft 
41% 41 41%+ % 

34 33ft 33ft— % 
B 7ft 8 +ft 
21% 20% 21ft + ft 
41ft 40ft 41% +1 
18 17ft 17ft— % 
18 17ft 18 
22% 22 22% — % 
19'* 18% left + % 
8ft 8ft Bft 
48% 48b 48% + % 
86% B6% 86% +1 
22V# 21 22 + ft 

46ft 44ft 45% —1 
50% 49b 49ft— % 
Mft 34% 34% 

30% 29% 30% + ft 
17% 17b 17ft 
27% 26ft 36ft 
27ft 27b 27b + % 
2S% 25b 25% + ft 
31b 31b 31b 
17% 17ft 17% + % 
16ft Tsb 16ft + ft 
43b 42% 42% — ft 
28% 2Bb 28ft 
35% 35 35ft + % 
15% taft 15% + b 
lb i% iu + % 
16b 16 16% + % 

30% 29% 30% + ft 
30% 30ft 30ft— % 
13 11% lift— ft 

14ft 14ft 14ft 
23 Z2ft 23 — % 
29% 28b 29b + ft 
19ft 19ft lPft+ % 
4 13ft 12% 12% 

427 52ft 52% 52ft + b 
16 59% 58ft 59% + % 
374 23ft 23ft 23ft— % 

a 12 lift UTfe 
76% 76%- 76% 

ZIOz 86b 86% S6b + b 
B4 10ft 10% 10%— % 
7 34ft 34ft 34ft 
792 34 33b 33ft— ft 

150 17 16% 16%— ft 

• 30% 30% 30%— % 
17b 17% 17b 


11 

27 

259 

106 

183 

56 

210 

424 

896 

1133 


1 

390 

333 

306 

2S 

40 

848 

59 

10 

20 

4 

6 

13 

21 

6 

430 

336 

223 

21 

3837 

396 


42 25% Trovler 204 50 ID 3352 41b 40ft 41 

24ft 19ft TrlCon 3J3e1L5 
21ft 20b TrtCnpf 250 10X 


6ft 5 Trtsoln 
22ft 12ft Trfotnd 
* 20ft TrtaPc 
37ft 24 Tribune 
6ft 4 Trial fr 
9ft 5ft Trico 
22% 13% Trfnfy 
19ft 11b TrtfEng _ 

11% BftTrftEpt 1.10 110 
36b 28ft TuoEP 300 85 7 
16 10ft TulUM 32 Ll 10 
21ft 16 TwtnDs 00 46 9 
40% 25% Tv co Lb 00 20 10 
34% 23% Tyler DO 2.1 9 


10 

X0 2.1 46 
100 IX 9 
04 20 15 
J6o 00 9 
.16 2A 20 
-58 Ll 
.10b D 17 


259 

6 

14 

4 

170 

870 

U 

a 

565 

in 

3 

12Z7 

50 

172 

37* 


24ft Mb 24ft— b 
23ft 23ft 23ft— % 
5ft 5ft 5ft— % 
10% 18ft IBft— % 
29 28b 2Bft + % 

37ft 36ft 37% — ft 
4% 4% 4% + % 
6% 6% 6% 

16 15ft 15ft— % 
m ia m 

Iff 10 10 — % 

35b 34ft 35% — % 
13% 12% 12ft + % 
17ft 17 17% + b 

40U 39ft 40ft + b 
34ft 33ft 33ft— % 


U 


48b 28 UAL 
32ft 24 UAL Pi 
15ft 7ft UCCEL 
23% 16% UGI 
23% 19*9 UGI Pf 
11% 3 UNCRea 
14 10 URS 

30ft 17ft USFGs 
Rift 45 USG 
63 40% USG pf 

28ft 17ft UnlDvn 
19% 13% UnlFrid 
Mft 75 UiUNV 
41b 30ft U Comps 1X4 
58ft 32ft UnCoiti 3X0 
7b «ft UntanC 
56% 12 UnElec 
29ft 21 UnEI Pf 
32 25% UnEI pf 

49ft 39% UnEIpf _ 

30ft 24% UnEI pfMLOO 130 
61 48% UEI pfL 800 113 

24% 18% UnEI Pi 2.9B 12X 
17% 13% UnEI Pi 2.13 12D 
61 45 UnEI pf 7X4 130 



43ft 45 -ft 
SOb 31 —ft 
Mft 15 + b 
22% 22ft 
22ft 22%+ % 
. 9% 9% 

13 12ft U + % 
30% 28ft 29ft +lft 
67ft 62 AS —3b 
“ 57% — 3% 

... 28ft— % 

_ 18b 18b— % 
94 93b 93ft 

38 37ft 37ft 
38ft 38% 38ft— b 
5ft 5% 5% 

‘ 16ft 16ft— ft- 
27ft 27ft + % 


49 UEtpfH 800 13.1 


34b UnPac 100 
82 UnPcpf 70S 
9ft Unirovl 


*1 
so 
111 
16ft 

68 53% Unrvlaf 

6T* 3b unltDr 
21ft 10b UnBrnd 
17ft "ft UBrdpf 
33ft 20ft UOX7V 
30 22% UnEnrg 

23ft 9 Ulitum 
28b 19 Ulllvpt 
16% 11 Ulltupf 
28 20% Ulltupf 

13% 10 Ulltupf 
Bft 14% Unfllnd 
41% 33% unlllnn 
37 25% UJerBk 

Iff* 9ft UtdMM 
3% 2% UPkMn 
38b 22 UaatrG 
10% 5% USMOdl 

41% 28ft uSLeas 
34ft 23 USShoe 
31ft 22 USSteel 


61 30ft 30% 30ft+ % 

iS'SbSfti +b 

13 17 taft 16ft— b 
1250* 57b 57b 57b + b 
15& 61 58ft 61 +1 


30 12 1798 47% 


L9 


24 IQSft 105b 105% 


03e 

X A 1715 

16% 

15% 

16 — b 

800 

ID 620] 

67% 

66% 

67% +1 


52 62 

3ft 

Jft 

3% 



9 170 

12% 

11% 

lift- ft 


24 

11% 

11% 

n%— b 

.14 

A 60 81 

33ft 

33b 

33ft- 

b 

2X8 

53 13 523 


29% 

30 ■ 

- b 

200 

24 3 160 

ta.1i 

15ft 

lift- 

b 

307 15X 16 

25% 

25b 

25ft- 

% 

2X0 142 300i 

15% 

15 

15% 


400 151 1 

■44% 

26% 

24% 


1.90 

40 10 


rh 1 

12ft - 

% 

X2b 

2x 13 1 23 

tjL 


21ft— % 

32 

0 27 3S 


tUa 

39ft +1% 

1X6 

42 9 156 

37 

36ft 

37 - 

b 


7 361 

lib 

Mft 

14ft— ft 



2ft 

2ft 

2ft 


.12 

X 7 17*7 

J/b 

36b 

36ft— M 


2Z72 

8ft 

lift 

8ft -t 

ft 


00 

06 

100 


Ml* 49ft USSlInf 6X9CI22 


20 10 
30 11 
3D 10 5648 
235 


45 

409 


9D 


108 

J® 


19 115ft U55tlPrl2DS 

30M Wft UMIfa# 994 
41 31b USTob 1X4 

73 S5ft U5Wesf 5X0 
«3b 28% UnTchs 1X0 
38 77ft UTcJipf 2X5 
24 17ft unlTef 1.92 
177b 12 UWRs 
33% 22 UnJtrde 

2Zb 14ft Unlvor 

26% IBft UnlvPd 
22 15b ULeals 

43b 30 Unocal 

75 45 UDlohn 

38% 23ft USLIFE 104 27 II 626 
36% 25 U5LF pf 225 Ll 31 
?ft Bft UsItaFd 104a 100 48 

25% 20ft UtaPL 202 9.9 10 1114 
2Sb 21ft UIPLpf 200 11.5 
25ft 21ft UfPLPf 2D0 1IX 
21% 17% UfPLPf 206 110 
19 15ft UfPLPf 204 11.1 


41 40ft 40ft— % 
28ft 28% 28ft + b 
27b 26ft 27%— b 
53ft 53 53 — % 

171 134 130% 131b— 2ft 

- __ SOB 98ft 97ft 28 — ft 

40 12 2542 34% 33ft 34% + % 
7X 8 MOV 72% 71ft 72% + ft 
2541 42ft 41% 42% + ft 

172 37% 36ft 37%+ % 
1965 23b 22% 23V* + % 

82 17% 17% 17% + % 
94 28% 39 b 23ft + ft 
15 8S% IffSS. 1» 

36 23b 23b 23% 

20% 20% 20ft— I* 
42b 37ft 41% +8ft 
73b 71ft 72ft— b 
39 38% 38% + ft 

36ft 35ft 36ft +1 
9ft 9% 9ft— % 
231k 23% 23ft + % 
24ft Mft 24H— b 
2Sft 25% 25% + % 
21 30ft 21 + ft 

IBft 18ft 18ft 


30 

60 

80 9 
7J ID 
D 1? 94 

Mb 3.7 13 15 

104 4J 15 36 

.92 4J 8 111 

100 20 1021699 
2X6 3J 13 994 


19 


L6 


30% 21ft VP COfP 1.12 
23ft 5ft Valero 
26 ta Valor sf 304 19.9 
5% 2b Vofevin 


976 

3393 

54 

40 


31b 30ft 31%+ % 
7% 6ft 7ft + ft 
17% 17% 17b + % 
Jft 2ft 2ft— b 


NACIONAL 
FINANCIERA FL.R. 
NOTES DUE 1981 



For six months, from January 28, 
1985 to July 28, 1985 the notes 
will carry an interest rate of 9 % 
per annum. 

The interest due on July 29, 1985 
against coupon number 12 will be 
$ US 45,50 and has been computed 
on the actual number of days 
elapsed { 182) divided by 360. 


\ rroP* 


THE PRINCIPAL PAYING 
AGENT 

SOCJETE GENERALE 
ALSACIENNE DE BANQUE 
LUXEMBOURG BRANCH 






.-.w 


tk 






V 


r 


SOCIETE GENERALE 
FL.R. NOTES 1981/1991 
$ US 100 MILLION 




For six months, from January 25 , 
1985, to July 24, 1985 the notes will 
carry an interest rate of 8 7 /8 % 
per annum. 

The interest due on July 25, 1985 
against coupon number 8 will be 
S US 223,1 1 and has been computed 
on the actual number of days elapsed 
(181) divided by 360. : 


THE PRINCIPAL PAYING 
AGENT 

SOCIETE GENERALE 
ALSACIENNE DE BANQUE 
LUXEMBOURG BRANCH 




j'-.s 


y "r ' ■ ■ ' 


Reach 


iscask 


'•y r T. I 4^’- 


s 


12 Month 
High Low 


Stock 


Sfi. Close r. £T' — - 

Dlv. YKL PE lOOsHtahLowQupt-ChW V 7 J 


92 as 7 


7 M 
3.1 18 
ID 15 


24% 14% VbnOrs 
6ft 2b VUrco 
20% 5% Voroopf 
50ft 30b Vartan 
13% 9% Vara 
25% 17ft Veaca 
6% 3ft Vanda 
10ft Bb Vasts* 10OO1JX 
39% 23ft VlDcnril 02 1.1 IS 

6Sft 54 VaEPpf 731 110 

75% 60% VaEPpf 804 12.1 

78% 67ft VaEPpf 8X0 110 

79% 67ft VcEtPf 860 11 J 

82 68% VdEPPf 9D5 1 ID 

64b 52% VcEofJ 772 11D 

61ft 49% VaEPpf 700 11D 

21% 14ft Vtahay 105t 7D ta 

30ft 25ft V Dmod 13 

75 SB VUfaiM 204 3J 11 


79 

93 

9 

936 

86 

309 

32 

38 

<36 




is' r: 


24 21% *771 + 14 

3b 3 3b + ft 
8 7ft 8 + ft' 

39% 38ft 39b + b 
13 12ft 12ft- M 
23% 32% 23V, + ft. 

4b 4ft 4M— tb 

im* raft M% . i 

_ 39% 39% 39% + ft, 

250* mb 65b 65b— b 
100* 73 n 73 -3 ft T— 
73 73 73 ' * 

310* 76 7S 75—1 

6060* 83 82 82 ■ 

420* 66% 65 65 +ft. .*5— ' 

3800* 60% 60% 69%+Tft' ... 

230 23% 22ft 23% + fti -ij- 
22 35% 34ft 35% + %. ; 

25 74% 74% 74b— ft ~r 


.. £ .. 


■r-w. 




'.V 


w 


27 11 - 

12 11 466 TO* 19 
152 188 9% 9 

J 26 2428 45ft 44ft 
10 17 265 49ft 49 
302 20ft ass 
10 18 127 3+ 25ft 


a 20b WICOR 200 83 6 

49 34% WctoRpf LSD 90 

33ft 20% WOCftV I .92 

25b 16% Wocfcht 00 

9% 6b Wofnec 
47ft 30b WalMrt 01 

40ft 28ft WBfgrn 08 

Z1% 15ft WkHRlfl 1X0 

36 23ft WalCSv 05 _ 

36ft 22 WaftJi 100 30 8 1520 

9ft 7% WoffJ pf 100 100 20tt 
28ft 17ft Wareca 08 40 8 167 

29% 17 WntCm 1138 

37% 28ft WarerL 1X8 Ll 18 1024 

19ft 14ft WashGs 106 80 7 70 

27% 15% WshNat 108 40 13 168 

20ft 1* WshWf 

soft 27b Waste 

Mft 18 Watkjn 

13% Bft WayGo* 

9ft 4 WaanU 
lift 9ftWaanpf 
21ft 12% WabbO 

37b 29% WrtsMk 

S2ft 30% WalbF __ . 

50 40 Wtffpf 50361OD 

MM 22ft YMFM 200 IM 12 


21 27ft 27% 27ft 
60z 45ft 45 45b+«. 

354 34 33ft 33H .+ ft 


1 is” 


■uct 






2X8 120 8 286 
00 IX 18 1664 
02 10 11 349 
00 20 10 6 
156 


20b 2D 
24ft 24% 

36% 36th 
IBft 18% 1L 

M% 20* 28% 



>‘A ■” Al 




. r. o 


at«8s& a 


006 D 15 1 
DO 10 14 12 

2.16 Ll B 108 

79 


40 34 W PWlP pfkSO IU 

48% 34ft WsfWP 200 SjA 
12% 9% WstdTg 104 
2% WnAfrL 
ft wiAlrwf 
8% WAIrpf 200 118 
Bft WAIrpf 2.M 1L1 
4 WCNA 

47 WCNA pf 705 US 
81 WPoel 
5ft wunton 


08 10 15 2290 
44 11 11 58 


5b 

2b 

18 

15% 

m 


36b 




. WnUpfS 
15% 4%WnUPfE 
48% 20 WUTIpf 
28 5% WUTI Pf A 

31b IPftWStgES 100 
40% 31ft WttSfVC 102 
34 25 Wifyerh 100 

44ft 34ft WOVT Pf 200 
51ft 43ft Wevrpr 4X0 
34ft 12ft WheJPU 


1X0 


43 31% WbPlf pf 600 17.1 

38 25 WnPItPf 500 1L9 

49% 36% Whirl Pf 208 40 
41ft 24% WhMC 1X0 
49 47% WhltC Pf/8J» 60 

36b 17ft Wtlltehl 
24% 14% Wilfttok 
12b 6ft Wlobtdt 
13% B WTlfrdn 
31% 22ft William 
8% 3 WllmEl 

6% WllshrO 

25ft WlnDl* 

7ft Wliwbg 
5% Winner 
_ Ift Wlntarj 
33ft 25b WtocEP 208 70 
25ft 23% WfsGpf 2X5 10X 
31 2Sft WtfcFL 2X4 90 
32% 24b WfKPS 2X4 LI 
39% 27ft WttCa 
17ft 9% WolvrW 
27% 18ft Wood Pi 
43% 29% Wotwth 
60ft 42% Wofwpf 200 
5b 3ft WrWAr 
61 45 Wrlgly 

7% 3% Wurttor 
18% 10ft WyloLtj 
21% 16% Wvnra 


10% 

35 

17% 

14% 

9% 


267 
279 
70 

6 1055 
20? 

.10 IX 16 31 

IXB 5.1 12 24 

.10* J 17 2779 

14 33 


Guide to 
Business 
and Erser tafrw 
EUROPE 


8 

7 

40 9 
20 16 
14 15 
4X 10 1205 
30 1 

20 

100a 20 11 529 

36 

02 20 10 241 
00 30 7 61 


1X8 

04 

D2 

100 


13% 13ft 13%—' M, 
29b 20% »-+-%; 
3ft 3% 3ft + % 
6b 6% 4ft + %i 
33b 32ft 33 ' . 

19ft 1B% 19 —SB 
6ft 6ft 6ft - 
- 4% 4% 4%- | 

269 31% 31ft 31ft + %< 
■ Mft 34% W% " , 
29% 29ft »J*— » 
22% 31% 3»%— * 
30% 36ft »%-*£: 
12 lift lift- Jfi 

21b 20% 21 
41ft 40% 41 +% 
58 58 SB +«■ 

3% 3ft % 

59% 59 59b + % 

3% 3ft 3ft— % 
16 15% 15% ■ 

20% 19% 20%-% 


1 

152 

185 

730 

400 

145 



49ft 33b Xerox 300 6D 13 810* 
50% 45b xarmpf 5X5 10.7 332 

33b 19 XTRA M 20 II 1393 


43% 41% 43b +1' 
51 50ft SM4+ft 
28ft 27% 27ft — lb 


29ft M ZaieCn 
24% 14% Zapata 
54ft 3Tb zovre 
34ft IBM ZanllfiE 
27b 18 Zero 
29% 31% Zumln 


102 40 0 30 27% 27b 27% + Jfr 

04 5.1 13 1115 16% tab 16% + %, 

XOb D M 904 54% 53% SPA— * 

8 1374 24ft 23% 3»— M 
X0 IX 20 24 24ft 26ft 26% „ 

102 44 HI 93 28ft 28ft Mft— * 


London Commodities 


Jan. 31 

Figures in sterling per metric Ion. 
Gasoil In U.5. dollars per metric run. 
Gold In US. dollars per ounce. 


Law 


Previous 


Mav 


Oct 

Dec 

Mar 

MOV 


MOV 

Jfy 

Sea 

Dec 

Mar 

May 


High 
SUGAR 

Mar 12800 120X0 12100 12100 12800 12900 
13600 12B0O 12800 12800 130X0 13*00 
143X0 13600 13500 13600 144X0 I4L60 
150X0 14400 14300 14400 1 51 00 151X0 
N.T. N.T. 150X0 151X0 15700 15700 
N.T. N.T. 145X0 16400 17100 171X0 
17600 inn 17100 17200 17700 178X0 
3.149 lots of 50 tons. 

COCOA 

Mar 2010 2171 2183 2190 2178 2179 
2235 2193 2208 2209 2196 2197 
2020 2188 2188 2190 2190 2191 
2006 2175 2173 2177 2184 2186 
20M 2025 2028 2030 2048 2050 
2030 f-IW 2010 2020 6 4Vi inv 
^T- 2000 2020 2010 2040 

6.197 toll of 10 tons. 

COFFEE 

Jan 2311 2096 Exp. - 2325 2333 

Mar 2365 2335 2360 2305 2352 2355 

MOV USD 2356 2374 1375 2376 2380 

Jlv 2391 2J72 2389 2091 2092 23*5 

5» 2395 2075 2393 2395 1392 2395 

Now 2X05 2387 2X02 2X85 %m 2X12 

Jen 2090 2088 2090 2400 2090 2x00 

2730 lot* of 5 Ions. 

GASOIL 

Jan 53000 23*00 26900 25000 23L00 239X0 
mM 225X0 231 JS 23200 224X0 224J5 
271D5 216X0 221 DS 271X0 21600 21605 

2MDS 211X0 2140S 2V4.7S 21100 211D5 
21300 20900 71205 21100 20900 20905 
21200 209D5 21100 21250 20000 20900 
20900 20900 210X0 21)00 20600 209X0 
N.T. RT. 20600 J1EJB 20600 2U75 
N.T. N.T. 20600 22000 20600 22900 
6,111 lab of 160 tons. 

Sources: Reuters and Lawton Pe t ro le um Ex- 
efmwe focaoRj. 


Paris Commodities 

Jon. 31 


Sugar hi French Francs oer melric Ian. 
Other figures in Prana Per 100 kg. 


High 

SUGAR 
Mar 1X10 

May 1045 

Aua 1X20 

Ocf 1X85 

Dec 1X60 

Mar I./75 


Law 


Close 


CITae 


1J8S 

1X22 

IXOS 

1X70 

1X55 

1.765 


1085 

1X78 

1X04 

1X70 

1X50 

IDtO 


1X31 

1X05 

1X75 

1X55 

ID7D 


+ 25 
+ 23 

+ 74 
+ 30 
+ 25 
+ 25 


EM. vol.: 1000 tots at 50 Ians. Prev. actual 
sales: 3X57 lots. Ooen Interest: 19X23 
COCOA 


Feb 


API 

MOV 

Jun 

JlY 

Aua 

Sep 


DM Futures Options 

Jan, 31 

W. Gwiwm Mwk-12S0OD m6fb,caM pa moli 


CMk-SeMe 


Price Mar 

M 

Sept 

Mar 

JIM 

30 

1J8 

288 


Ml 

820 

31 

006 

m 

IM 

817 

8X9 

32 

0X9 

80S 

UO 

UO 

844 

XI 

O0t 

847 

oj? 

IJ7 

1X5 

34 

M2 

835 

Ml 

230 

229 

Si 

081 

8.M 

OJt 

3J0 

3.16 


Pub-Settle 

Sagl 


1.18 
J DP 


EsHonMd total wri. &.931 
Oom: w«L*ol. 3.171 awn InL 35.940 
Pets: Wni voL 2074 9PW kit 1BJK 
Sourer: CME- 


Mar 

Mav 

Jlv 

Sea 

Dec 

Mar 

Mov 


2045 

2080 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2220 

N.T. 

N.T. 


2005 

2037 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2030 

RT. 

N.T. 


2J10 

2057 

2030 

2045 


2320 — 1 

2056 +10 

— unen. 

— —20 
2050 Unch. 
2250 Unch. 
2050 Unch. 


Asian Commodities 

Jan. 31 


HONG-KONG GOLD FUTURES 
UXX ner ounce 

Close Previous 
High LOW Bid Ask Bid AU 
Jon _ N.T. N.T. 30400 306.00 302.00 304.00 
Feta _ N.T. N.T. 30400 30400 30200 30400 
Mar „ N T N.T. 30400 30800 30400 30400 
AW _ N.T. N.T. 30800 31000 30500 307.00 
Jun _. 31300 31100 31200 31400 31000 31200 
Aua _ 31700 31700 31400 31800 31400 31400 
00 _ N.T. N.T. 32100 32300 31800 32000 
Dec _ N T. N.T. 32600 32800 32100 32500 
Volume: a tots of 100 oz. 


SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 

UXX Per nance 


Est. vat.- 250 lots of to tons. Prev. actual 


setes: 244 toto. Ooen interest: ?20 
COFFEE 

— 7 

May 

N T. 

N.T. 

3020 

2X40 

+ S 

Jlv 


N.T. 

2X3S 

— 

+ 10 

Sre 

2X40 

2X60 

2X55 

2X75 

+ 5 

NOT 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2XS5 

2X80 

+ 18 

Jan 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2X52 


+ 23 

a 

IU 

vet.: M lots ot 5 tom. Prev. actual 


sates: 1 lots. Ooen Interest: 232 
Source: Boursa tin Commerce. 



Per Amf Par 
INCREASED 


Amor Home Prod 
Charier Medical 
Lee Enterprises 
uilv Industrial 
TetecradH 


Q .72% 
0 06 
Q 33 
O 09% 

a 08 

OMITTED 
Waldwaad of Canada 

STOCK SPLITS 


3-1 

3- 1 

4- 1 
Ll 
34 


3-13 

213 

3-1 

3-15 

2-20 


Data Cord — S-for-4 
Hammermlll Pooer — J-for-2 
Spectre industries— 2-lqr-l 
This Can! be Yogurt — Hor-2 

USUAL 


Cnatiem Inc 
Chilton Carp 
Dreyfus Core 
Houghton Mlliln 
Hawaii Carp 
indtoAOoeiis Wafer 
McDonald & Co Invf 
Poaetom Chain 
PtjlC Svcr Inahma 
ScrtPPLHwrd BdCsi 
Soufhamlnc 


Q .12 

Q 03ft 

a . 12 % 

O 04 

o .10 

Q X6% 

a 05 
a 0 s 
a 25 
q do 
a xo 


3-t 

3-M 

^2q 

2- 27 

3- 18 
3-1 

2- 2Z 
3-1 
3-1 

34 

3- 29 


2- 14 
2-28 
Ml 
2-1] 

3- 1 
Ml 
2-12 
2-15 
2-11 

2- 2J 

3- 15 


A-Amwal j M-Maattily; O-Goarierfy f S-Seml- 
Aonyali 


Xouree: UPI. 



volume. 268 toft of 100 ox. 


y. U . ftt -A LUMPUR RUBBER 
Ma torsion cents per kilo 
close 
Bid Ask 

™ — 18800 119.00 

Mar — _ 192D5 193X0 

APT — 19700 198.00 

Mav 20000 20100 

j™, »1X0 203X0 

volume: lows 


Previous 
aw Ask 
188X0 19000 

193X0 194X0 

19700 198X0 

200X0 2D1XO 
20200 20400 


SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Slggsoore cents per kilo 
Close 


RSS I Fob- 
RSSlMor- 
RS3 2 Feb „ 
RSS 3 Feb_ 
HSS4 Feb— 
RSS 5 Feb- 


BU 

I44DS 

17100 

15725 

1S5J5 

14825 

14025 


Ack 

1650S 

171X0 

15825 

15625 

150.25 

1J225 


Previous 
. BM Ask 
148X0 16900 

17200 17225 

15805 1 59 25 
15405 1 5705 
MODS 15105 
141.25 14325 


KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
*4atovucui rtnaaita per 25 hMM 
Close 



Bid 

Ash 

Bid 

AM 

1.175 

1,196 

U70 

1.190 

1,150 

1,190 

1.150 

1.190 

1,130 

1.180 

1,1» 

1.168 

1.1X0 

1,170 

1,120 

1.160 

1.120 

1.170 

1.110 

1.160 

1,110 

1.160 

l.toa 

1.150 

1.110 

1.160 

1.100 

1.150 

1.100 

1.150 

1090 

1,140 

1,100 

USD 

UNO 

1.140 


Source; /teuton 


SATKEIN WORDS ANOPICTUffiS 
DOONE5BURY 
DAILY IN TkSWT 


Cash Prices Jan. 3Z 


Comrmyflty and Unll 
Coffee 4 Santos, ib_ 


Prlntctaih 38 %. yd _ 

Steel Wliela (Pltf.J, Ion- 

iron 2 Fdry. Phlla, ton 

Steel scrap No 1 hvy Pin. _ 
Load Snot, lb 


Copper otocl. lb . 
Tin ISlrolIsl.lD. 


Thu 

1X4 

0.74% 

17300 

21300 

7900 

20-21 


IXB 
004 ; 
45X00 • 
21300 , 
96X7 

w-a ' 


Zinc. E. St. L. Basis, lb . 

Palladium, az 

Silver n.y, oz 

9o«»rce: AP 


67-70 67ftj7B 
1738 4D482 - 

0X3 051 

|3 155% 

607 801 


London Metals Jan. 31 

Figures in sterling per metric ton. 
Sliver in pence per Irov ounce. 


Tribes 

^ines? h- Su ^ de f0! 
SSS brin 

uifonnj 




N . -p .1 


CD 


!>i0£ 


Tudor 

Mtoh or ode cooper cofnodes: _ 1 

wot 105300 105400 106200 LH30O > 
amonihs 107200 1072X0 108050 10BLW . 
Conper cathodes: 

soot >04300 104500 105000 I0S2» , 
3 months 106000 106200 106900 107080 , 
Tin. BOOT 9.91000 9D2D0O 900100 19&* . 

3 months 9,90000 9.90700 9JS50O 9A401J0 . 
LMdispol 339X0 340X0 36100 J**® , 

3 months 341X0 J420O 34800 348X0 

73500 7J70O 71400 73*00 

73500 73600 73400 73500 

56650 56700 54908 

58400 5BSD0 56L0D 567X0 


^?' ew - *lih 1 ‘ 1 

fj r ^ ’ tin k . • ir-urm,.: 

,<rr Sior 


J. 0n buv- . " 

^ p;,-; \ ; 


'-•cud - 




-■ -VUt 


Zlncispoi 
3 monttis 
Silver ;spol 
J months 
Ahimimum: 
MJOf 


97100 97400 97 400 97500 

3 months 1003X0 100400 100500 1006* 
Nickel -Shot 449000 4X0000 4X6500 4X7000 
3 month* 4X0000 LS10J8 L56O0O LS0i». 
Source: Reuters. 


%.Th ri ‘ d '•&.?' 1 


^ktnsr^ 11 ^ ^ W.‘ 

■ " v - ’-“■iveit 


| S&P 100 Index Oplioiw 

Jan. 31 


Vn ^ i nr - . !:'* '■ bic d i 


Strike CsB»ud 
Pifa Ft? Mar Apt Mot 

IM - 2» - - 

us a w» » - 

Hd II m SVi 2T> 

161 IP) US IU - 

nt n % ufe u 

ITS W ft k * 

180 1+ 4 0> Td 

l*J Vi TO » £J 

W8 to 1 » W 





... 

Sure 


TOIOI COP VW WTH 1RJ5? 
1*W toe ggn Ml S3U34 
Tefal M eoknm HUB 
total pel «gn M.4B6Q6 


• m. cr-v '- r - : "-'Jv S- 


MODI n4t 10RT7JJJ? 

tow; C sae. 


cue in.i» fun 








s- t*i T _ .j.: 1 .. : 


ion a 7S 

^Sf 


INTERNATIONA^ HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY I, 1985 


Page 13 


Vli likLM'j ■ IjJ 


V" 9 Vn £ dsia Bank Most Major U.S. Retailers Report Gain in Sales 

1 ' tre *i ra! 1 ^ \ uOIVS rrofus vr _, ”** ,,oriflWrf Pm, Sears. Roebuck & Co, the Na 1 The retailers operate on a fiscal with $533.6 million a year a 

* •' ^ _ NEW YORK — Most major U.S. retailer, and several other year that begins in February so that year's sales increased to $9 


V*Hi. ! 

•. rv*. . 


Spewed Pn n Sears. Roebuck & Co, ihe Na 1 The retailers operate on a fiscal 

NEW YORK — Most major U.S. retailer, and several otter year that begins in February so that 
U -S. retailers reported on Thursday chains planned to release their fig- the crucial Christmas and post- 
that they had good gains in sales ures next week. holiday sales can be included in the 


Rose 2.8% 


with $533.6 million a year ago. The 
yea^s sales increased to $954 tril- 
lion from 58.62 billion. 


KJ 

nurf 'i*r, 


By Dinah Lee ^<rf“ , ^!r C Sr i, "‘ h,I " IW ' . Al ^ °f 

jaterrauimaJ Herald Tribune The companies also had satisfac- un P I 7 vc ^ 111 ^traary because cold 

HONG KONG —The Bank of tory sales increases for their fiscal ' wsuiier encouraged shoppers to 
ist Asia Ltd. reported 1984 prof- year, analysts said. buy warm dottang. Its just the 

; on Thursday of ]42 million ^ mart Corp., the second largest sudden cold wave that allowed 
mg Kong dollars ($18.2 million), U.S. retail chain, said its January them to sell alot of fall goods that 


Minneapolis-based Dayton 
Hudson said its four-week sales 


' Qfc nuuu I1K DtllllL OI 

'■* by jJ-. East Asia Ltd. reported 1984 prof- 
• its on Thursday of 142 million 
r , * 1 - Pav,.. Hong Kong dollars ($18.2 million), 
; J -NT ” a 18 -percent increase over the pre- 


ures next week. holiday sales can be included in the M . .. . , „ 

i , . . . . annual results. The companies will Minneapolis-based Dayton 

Al tarn one analyst sari silo M| an- H"*™ ^ 

improved m January because cold ^ ^ came to $436 mflhon, compared 

weather encouraged shoppers to „ wzth 5387 million the previous 

buv warm dolttnT “Iftiusi the K ba f cd # m 7™?' Mk ^' year. Sales for the 52 weeks came to 
miy warm aoimng. it jwi “e ^ its sales for the four weeks $759 billion, compared with 5657 
sudden cold wave that allowed ended Jan. 23 came to SL24 billion, pareawimjojr 

them to sell a lot of fall goods that compared with $1.07 billion in the 




vjous year. penoa a year ago. J.t_ Penney (.c. 

per-share earnings rose 3 percent said its four-week sales increased 
to 156 dollars. The directors rec- 7-4 percent, 
oouneaded a final dividend of 45 Dayton Hudson Corp. posted a 
cents, payable in April, bringing 117-percent rain, and F.W. Wool- 
the total 1984 dividends to 70 cents worth Co. said its sales climbed 9.7. 


sales rose 16 J percent over the like had moved sluggishly earlier in the same peiod a year earlier. For the 
period a year ago. J.C Penney Co. season," said Edward WelJer, an fiscal year, K mart reported sales of 
said its four-week sales increased analyst with the investment firm $20.8 Wlion, compared with $18.6 
7.4 percent. f-.F Hutton Group Inc. in New bilhon in 1983. 

Dayton Hudson Corp.posied a York. Penney, based in New York, said 


— the total 1984 dividends to 70 cents worth Co. said its sales climbed 9.7. 

a share, an increase of 7.7 percent Federated Department Stores 
frtwn 1983. Inc. reported a 4.7-petcent rise. 

1 Qsryur, "Pj® bank ttid not provide a On the downside, Montgomery 
T-o breakdown of its profit, and Hong Ward & Co. said its vdum^fdill 

1=5 I9»t^f Kong banks are not required to percent. 

(s report the amount of profits trans- 

:> ULL[Qi fened to inner reserves. 

^ ,'ResnltsfortheBankof East Asa o r» 1 - oi 

generally are viewed as a bcH- uUCZ ORIlK tO Oil© 

* weather for other Hong Kong bank 

^Htiings and local analysts had _ . 

/ . predicted that profits would in- PARIS— Tire investment ban 

: ~ ' Stare 3 to 5 percent pull out entirely from the retail hi 


For the year. K man poslcd a 12- 

c . . . „ _ percent gam; Penney, 111 percent; 

Federated Derailment Stores Rdemtedi 10.7-pmxnt increase-, 


od a year earlier. For the Montgomery Ward, the Chica- 
r, Kmart reported sales of go-based unit of Mobil Corp, said 
ion, compared with $18.6 its sales for the month rose to $366 
1983. million from $378 million. For the 

'. based in New York, said ?. 2 wecks - ^ 

or the month rose to 5712 hon, compared with 56.06 billion. 


Penney, based in New York, said 
its sales tor the month rose to $712 
milioQ from 5663 million a year 
earlier. For the year, sales totaled 


Dayton Hudsori 155-percent rise; 1114 m ° a ' «P from Sll billion. 
Momgomay Ward 7.1-percent im- Federated, headquartered it 


provement and Wool worth a 5-per- 
cent gain. 


Cincinnati, said January sales to- 


Wool worth, headquartered in 
New York, said its sales for the 
four weeks dimbed to 53465 mil- 
lion from $315.8 million a year ear- 
lier. Full-year sales rose to S5.7 


taled $5585 million, compared billion from 55.4 billion. 


GannetttoBuy 
US. Newspapers 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON— Gannen 
Co, announced Thursday it had 
reached “agreement in princi- 
ple" to buy The Des Moines 
(Iowa) Register and the Jackson 
(Tennessee) Sun. both owned 
by the Des Moines Register & 
Tribune Co„ for $200 million. 

The gtuwtnranienT did not 

S what portion of the 5200 
on wm be paid for The 
Register, a 240,000-dxcuIadon 
morning newspaper that is the 
only statewide newspaper in 
Iowa. 

The acquisition of the two 
daily publications will increase 
Gannett's newspaper holdings 
to 87 daily papers, including 
USA Today. 


Lonrho Says Profits 
Rose 19.6% in 1984 


Suez Bank to Shed 40.5% CJC Stake Interest Rate 

PARIS —The investment bank Cie. Fmandfere de Suez intends to I Raised to 6% 

pull out entirely from the retail banking group Cie. Fran^aise de CIC, 


• 8 be identified, termed the 1984 rc- 

"! ~ suits “uninspiring." 

'’I’vh.st' J* bad been exported that the 
oi bank, which emphasizes trade fi- 
nancing, would have benefited 
--j- . . from Hong Kong’s trading boom 

• - . ‘‘ of the last 18 months and from the 


m which it has a 405-percent stake, Suez said Thursday. 

Suez's c h airman, Jean Peyrdevade, has long made it dear that CIC 
does not fit into his group's strategy. In November be announced an 
arrangement to acquire 51 percent each of Banque Vanes et Com- 
mercial e de Paris), a troubled industrial bank, and Banque Paiiaenne 
de Credit, a highly profitable regional retail bank. 

The two are meant to complement the international Banque Indo- 


(Cootumed from Page H) ™ “gPP 

.. , _ , ^ , , 17.75 million 

earlier as the Deutsche mark depre- 87.04 percent, 
dated against the dollar last year HammU - Bi 
by some 14 perccoL hensKasseEC 


land Group PLC have readied caved necessary permits to 
17.75 million ordinary shares, or ceed with development of the 


87.04 percent. commercial oil production from 

Hammer Bank Sp&vtmd Dade- under the Beaufort Sea offshore 
hens Kasse EG will berescoed with Alaska's north slope. Sohio said 


:\ l> - 3av#i 

1 


activities of its merchant banking 
aim, East Aria Warburg. 


Suez, which is fully owned by Suez. 
Groupe des Assurances Nationak 


Groupe des Assurances Nationales (GAN) said it would acquire a 
2 1.87- percent stake in CIC by the end erf - 1985. 


Veteran Ready To Take IBM Helm 

(Coathmed from Page II) that he pips to devote more time when a broad shakeout in the com- 


company, given the success I fore- to explaining IBM's actions. 

n T frtr if nrefl Ka a vatu cirmifi/NiMi *TTL - v r i « 


*: cast for it, win be a very significant 

r { . entrsprise.” 


**Tbe people who have been giv- 
ing me advice about the next 10 


puter industry — involving new 
companies and established ones — 
has prompted numerous charges 


It alro may be a differently man- years, and, there have been lots of about ISM'S market power. 


~ £ v aged one, boause, by all accounts, them, say I should be prepared to Exposing some frustration ou[ agains t a rate increase, centra te iSbeoi 

rad Mr. Atos have spciri maybe as much ashalf my -boui, ^ rmrwcd dAatt ovcr Sri d 
= 1 somewhat contrasting personalities time in external affairs as opposed what te termed The me and auj^ R , nowninn mSbSmjj ruh 

to internal management, ” he 


However, the Bundesbank’s mg the suspension of a mqor La Littorale, the U5. compa- 
re rankled some commercial smelting contract. The company n/s French subsidiary. He said the 
nk leaders who this week had said jts inventory of comer con- M ™ str > r “ Envmmment had 


2 ; and operating styles. 


power of the IBM Corp.,’’ 
ers said critics of the com- 


MksubisM Electric Corp. of To- 


^ c i ■ “Opel is somewhat m at ease in -That’s not a tad way to think ma of com- “ w «««re t theBimdesbank saw 

^ putSut SsatSic ImoSedge about how I should spend my P^y shociid take note of the out- no otter way, besides upping its «id 

. r ; 5 p 7,.~ ’ ^ .,. 71 :^ rimaT rZi ,-Tf thn«" J comes of the extensive investiga- key interest rate, to counter the manufacture of large integrated West^hrase flertnc Carp. said 

u..u w- rw, J w lions connected with antitrust Goman economy's vulnerability to aremts. Photomasks, wbch are the ithasdeaded nqttoreoi>enatrans- 
Ss^S extonal factors as a result of the eqi^oit of uteto n^ativ^gen- ’ ~ 

— sore. The uffi Stales govern- weakened mark," said Herbert erally are made of chrome, wind a 

tiK company's , ^ ^ Wolf, chief economist at Commere- unsuitable for large circuits, the 

ismanager, who can convey a broad- mana g e m e n t Both, for example, bank AG company said. 

- ? r . ; ear sense of vision, of IBM’s role." are known for a habit of seeking was dropped ml 982, and the Euro- au. sxnupauy «uu. 

_ . . ■ . r , «■ . ° rmn I miininnitvc Jirtirm whs re- . — 


tanned acceptance oi further ship- 
ments of the chemical until safety 
studies had been made at the pesti- 
cide manufacturing plant in Be- 
ziers, France. 


former 
ilia, w. 


lin Sharon, Pennsylva- 
600 employees nave 


unsuitable for large circuits, the been laid off for six months be- 
companv said. cause of slow business. 


. Indeed, on first meeting , Mr. 
T ~ p- r- Akers appears as a charismatic 


mlonuation by calli 
far down in IBM’s 


r~~° pean Community’s action was re- . 
solved last summer, requiring little 


?r ^f dpinpionofwhaltetennsn“new draunventing levels of executivesi *di»JgP ® IBM’s p^mcea, 


ADVERTISEMENT 


ADVERTISEMENT 


. f who openly discusses how Like virtually all of hi 

- :^<fandamentaDy the company has sots as chief executive. 


■edeces- Moreover, he said, the conqmter 
. ^03 industry is thriving. “It’s a mistake 


- -1 .aunuaiuemiuiy uk wiupony nas sore as ana executive, mt. was „„ „ ■ „ ’ - , 

z 1i ? changed since its sale business was rose through IBM’s sales ranks. His Tnlw- 

~ f.rgtnt mainframe computos. Mr. succession seemed assured two ^"inie und^igped announces that theiTheuiK 

-J ^CPpeL in contrast, stressed m an years ago, wfam he edged crat Paul characteristic: of an indus- 1 Annual 1984 of Sony DU al R, 


SONY CORPORATION MM)IIOIK8lffOMTI8H 

The undenugoed announces (bat the The undemigiKd announces that the An- 


APVEBTISEMENT ' 

MITSUI & CO., LTD. 

(CDBn) 




.izr*™’. — -j j-ugu 8U , nu « 1 »w tl wv-.. r . “The characteristic nr an indus- Annum nepori ivtyt ox aony mmi Kepon lor me year ended am 

•_> ;Jnterwew last month the themes of Rizzo, now the coumanjfs vice k-, i» douSatol bv a rinrie Corponuioi will be available in March 1984 of Mnmben: Corpora- 
“ :' -:COOtmmtym the company. chairman, for tte president's job. n rLl V Arcstenkmal Bob will be available in Amsterdam at 

■ ^ Moreover, Mr. Akere indkated Mr. Aim ulca office it t time 

; u f- : horns, prices that are stable or ns- %«««» B^k Nedd^dN^ Bank Me® & Hope NV, 

^ ; ' in& an environmenl in the compa- ™™ 1 '"?;eidam Bank n. v., ru™*K HeUring* Renm N.V„ 

ny of relaxation, Jie said. Bank Mo« & Hope NV, Kas^Asnodatie NTV. 

x r.r . “Do you see people coming in Kaa-Awociaue N.V. 

here at 9:30 in the morning and AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 

potting their feet up, wondering COMPANY N.V. COMPANY N.v. 

what they are going to do. as a 

monopolist would?" hr asked. “We Amsterdam, 2Sth January 1985. aStb January. 1985. 

are just trying to stay even with the anuary 

industry, and we are working like 
the dickens to do it" 

The company, he said, had be- " 

come a fiercer competitor in recent fiTEJkL IT" 

years by chang in g tactics and real- w I I I § 

izing that to get into new niches of 
the computer market “you have to 
do something different, in an incu- 
bation way, as opposed to an incre- 
mental way.” He pointed to IBM’s 
independent business units — es- 
sentially separate companies set up 
to explore new markets — as an 
example of the way ideas are now 


ngned announces that the An- ^ mdeaigned announces that the 
it for the year ended 31st Semi- Annual Report ended September 
14 of Manubeni Corpora- 1984 of Milan! ft Cik, Ltd. will be 

je available in Amsterdam at: available in Amsterdam at 

Algemene Bank Nederland N.V., Algemene Bank Nederland N.V.. 

Amsterdam-Rotterdam Bank NX Amstenkm-Rotladam Bank N V 
fenkMea &HopeNV, Bank Mees ft Hope NV, 

F'T 1 ’ S?v 4 en! “ N '^" Reason, Haldrin/ft Pierson NX 

Kan-Aaaacmlie NX 


AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY N.V. 


Amaierdam, 2Sth January, 1985. 


STEAL IT! 


AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY N.V. 

Amsterdam, 25th January 1985. 




copcr ,^.. 3 cn 

*<■-« 

P -’' 


The THb’s 

new guide for ^- 0 $; 
business travel brims witb V ; . 
valuable information 

There’s never beep a guide quite like it. Thirteen 
European business cities, analysed in detail according 
to a business traveler’s- wants arid needs. It’s the key to 
tu rning that, ordinary business trip into a more pleasant, 
more efficient journey. _ 

Seven subdivisions under each city include: 1. Basic 
city overview with vital information. 2. Hotels, with 
emphasis on business services. 3. Restaurants, for on 
and off-duty pleasure,. 4. After hours suggestions. 
5. Diversions, from grand opera to jogging. 6. Shopping. 
7. Weekending ideas. . . . 

Trib business reader all across Europe shared their 
most treasured travel secrets with journalist Peter 
Graham. The result: a book for business travelers with 
contributions from business travelers. Over 200 pages, 
this hardcover edition is availabJedirectly from the Trib. 
A great gift idea for colleagues, business contacts,, or 
yourself. Order today. 


LH.T GUIDE TO BUSINESS TRAVEL 1 
& ENTERTAINMENT: EUROPE, 
v international Herald Tribune, Book Division- 

181, avenue Charles-dc^ulle, 92521 NeuiUy Cedes, France. 

Please send me cotries of the I JIT Europe Guide ai 

-US. SM each, plus postage: 

S 15D each inEurope-S 4 each outside Europe. . . 

□Enclosed is my paymenL {Payment may be made m the convertible 
European currency of your choice at current exchange rales.) 

□ Please charge my VISA Card number- — — 

Exp, dale Signature: , ; 

(Neccmry to 'IS* C-nt ' 

Name (in Uock.ietteisk— — 

Address: — — — — 

Cfty and code: — 777- 

Country. - — _ — , — — ~ ^ . 


"Chances are. you are going to 
fail in some of those," he said. ‘Tn 
fact, you ought to fad in some of 
them.” But without taking the risk, 
and bringing in new technologies 
from outside companies — such as 
ROLM Corp-. the idecotmmirdca- 
tkras equipment maker that IBM 
bought last year for SI 25 billion — 
IBM would be unable to keep up 
with industry upstarts. 

Where IBM's chief U.S. compet- 
itors — known as the Bunch, an 
acronym for Burroughs Corp.. 
Sperry Corp.’s old Univac division, 
NCR Corp., Control Data Corp. 
and Honeywell Inc. — failed, Mr. 
Akers said, was in their inability to 
“incubate" new technology. 

“It’s not that IBM has taken care 
of the Bunch,” Mr. Akers said. 
“The marketplace has just been 
captured by companies that were 
not around 20 years ago. That's not 
bad for the market or the consum- 
er." 


,A*v- 


"*5*. 

# rsz: - * - 


Yw, you con Wad An 13QT yacht vAh 13^300 mh mg* Cor only $3^750000. Itn Mb Abowo— In ownari 
yortw, lniii^a, t* olarbnnin. tobuft in 1983 ala cod of ovar $5400000 . CrWNhh MflCmft ffiASHt 
YACHT5, 2160 SE 17fc 5ftw4 Forf LaudMalw H. 33316 USA; Pham No. (309) 463 OttQi TW« >09910 FrarafloHL 



GdUi 3U7D-3QU0 

VtkasWUteWeM&A. 

I. Qob da hiaM-Btaoc 
1211 Caw 1. Satnetb arf 
TeL 3 1825 1 - Telex 2*3*5 


STOCK 

DeVoe-HoIbein 
International bv 
Gly-Oock 
lntematkmal nv 


BID ASK 
US* US* 


•m I 3 Vi 


Quotes as of: Jan. 31, 1965 


Investors seeking above average 
capital gains in global stock 
markets can simply write us a 
note and the weekly 
INVESTORS ALERT newsletter 
will be sent free and without 
obligation. 


First Commerce Securities bv 
Herengradlt 483 

1017 BT Amsterdam 
TheNetherlands 
Telephone: (0)5120 260901 
Telex: 14507 firconl 


We are pleased to announce that 
by arrangement witb 

Charles Fulton (U.K.) Ltd. 

34-40 Ludgftle Hill 
London EC 4 M 7 JT England 

access to our 

U.S. Government Securities Brokerage Markets 
was made available, effective February 1, 1985, 
to those London affiliates of 
government securities dealers reporting to the 
Federal Reserve Bank of New York 


One World Trade Center, New York, NY 10048 
(212) 938-5000 

February 1, 1985 


company warts 

Consolidated Gold Fields FLC of SoMo Petroleum Co. of Hous- 
Lcmdon has said that acceptances ton, a subsidiary of Standard 03 
of iLs bid for The Bath ana Port- Co. of Ohio, says that it has re- 


Jtnam 

LONDON — Lonrho PLC, the 
international trading group, said 
Thursday that gains in British and 
U.S. holdings helped boost 1984 
pretax profit 19.6 percent to £135.4 
million (5151.6 million). 

Pretax profit for the fiscal year 
ending Sept. 30. 1983. was £113.2 
million 

Profit in Britain rose more than 
23 percent from 1983 and jumped 
58 percent in the United Slates. 
Lonrho said. The company also re- 
ported unproved performances in 
its hold and casino divisions, agri- 
culture and mining and manufac- 
turing in Britain. 

Lonrho said gross assets exceed- 
ed £2 billion and year-end cash 
balances stood at £126 million. Net 
assets have risen to 241 pence per 
share. 


In November. Lonrho sold its 
29.9-percent stake in House of Fra- 
ser PLC, Britain’s bugs: depart- 
ment store group, for £3 per snare, 
for a total price of £1383 million. 
The sale to al-Fayed Investment & 
Trust (UK), a private Egyptian 

company, produeni a £49.1 -million 
surplus that has been credited to 
reserves. Lonrho said. 

That sale, coupled with a bond 
issue in West Germany, brought in 
£166 million. Lonrho said. 

In December. Lonrho said it had 
purchased 9.75 million shares of 
House of Fraser and that its stake 
was 6.3 percent. 

Lonrho, which has more than 
850 companies in 80 countries, also 
is involved in mining, engineering 
and sieel production, printing and 
publishing, exporting and property 
management 


‘Today's move was a domestic a financial plan approved by the production was expected to start in 
measure,” said a Bundesbank West Ger man Cooperative Bank 1988 at a rate of about 100,000 
spokesman. “It may have the effect Association, its president, Berbard bands a day. 
of halting some of the capital out- Schramm, said Thursday. The as- straits gfa-mrf.ii> Co. Ltd. of 
flow, but the specific intent of the sedation said the bailout would Singapore said that its subsidiary 
Lombard increase was different " require 495.2 million Deutsche Ofl Asia Ltd, has signed a contract 
Finance Minister Gerhard Stol- (SJ56.7 million) and that manage and operate a new oil 

ten bar said Thursday that the Hammer Bank ^wiU mage with an- supply base in Zhahai, China. 

Umbard rate increase would not Minin* Unioa Carbide Corp/s stocks of 

jeopardize West Germany^ eco- -i. -j ?. .... .. the poisonous rfwqniraii methyl iso- 

b»nk iq )ectea liquidity ^ SZlta* w^ ^onimg « 

mar * eL because of a large inventorjrfoilow- Hanz Trautmann, chairman of So- 


SILVER SPUR 
SILVER SPIRIT 

Paris delivery tax free 
F.F. 786000 & 682000 



FRANCO BRITANNIC 

25, rue P.-V. Couturier, 92300 Levallois 
Tei. : (01) 757.50.80/Telex 620420 

JAGUAR - ROVER - RANGE ROVER 


ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 

Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed 
31 January 1985 

The iMtowt valM qauatlons shown Maw are smflad brtfca Ponds listed with the 
aecea H oa of smm foods whose q u ote at hosed on Issue priest. The IoUowIm 
morainal symbols indicate frequency of q u otations supplied tor the IHT: 

(d) -dotty; (w)- weekly; (b) -bi-monthly; (rl-reoutoity; (D-Ureoa tarty. 

AL MAL MANAGEMENT no . we u1 ,»i> 

fur) ALMol Trust. &A S M4JU p B J 557 J, Tlw Haoue'm^ 44Mh) 

BANK JULIUS BAER & CO. LM. — Id I Bewtr EMcosItwoH-. — S3«i0 

— Id) B OirtXX Ml PA RI5BA5— GROUP 

-** ? r??5 S 7r jum-ri^ T — frti Cortoxa mtenwtlnnal SNLM 

=12 ) f 1M7J0 "IS! 

-idljou.lbaerPdeHIC VF IIM« ig sTl&fi 

_ 52 5 S2S?Lr —— e s F ,12S2 — «*»> obli-yen y idsotjs 

—id J 5tockbor — SF1WW — iwlOBLMJULOEN FI_10H.11 

— (d)CSF Find SF JS.1» — to J PAROIL-FUND 

7(d ! awSow FS57I77I sf nJ7 -« i parinter fund s jo**] 

ltd I ITFpS2 n!v_Z 11L11_ I14M —Id I PAR US treosury Band S10I-M 

BANQUE INDOSUEZ mIioSt 

=IS) fSSSSS !^ Fant ilS rbc 

43BfcssE== 

7(d) IndnwaMiitttowwSB SMS.V7 SKANDIFONOINTLFUNPJ4ME1CS0) 


ORANGE NASSAU GROUP 
PB IS5/S tha Hague (07B) 4i9£n 
— (d I Bower BytMBtaUBoH- 


PARI58AS— GROUP 

- — mirwtuw im*rrwi«i.Mi SMM 

— iWlOBLI-O** DMU4SJ1 

I W® — (w) OBLIGESTION SF VI JO 

= — MoBLI-OOU-AR S 1,104.1* 

F ,]“%2 — iw) OBLI-YEN Y 10&7WJH 

i mar —(^ioallculden flioslu 

SFaS.l» — (d)PAROlL-FUND S«JS 

SF 11J7 —Id ] PARINTER FUND S 10L61 

S14B0 — Id) PARUSTrocaury Band__ S 10146 
ROYAL a 

s 1046 

SF822S i}2lSS 
SUM TJ* 5K 
smi5 5K 

sisw % iinne 

S89J7 KBt 

SM6.97 SKANDIFONO IMTL. FUND (460-2000) 

— (Wllnc: BW_ -S4.TO Otter SSJfl 

— twIACC.: Bid S4JOOHur S&3S 

iSo- SVENSXA INTERNATIONAL LTO. 

SO .975 17 OevaMWro S«tLondan-ffH7M0«l 

' CUM — tbJSHB Bond Fund. S2144 

S0M0 — <**) SHB Inll GrowMi Fond S1T40 

S0£6! SWISS BANK CORP. 

(UUQ — <d I Amerloa Vaior SF 60X75 

. S0JH5 — (d J D-Mork Bond SetecHM) DM12224 

(0221 -u ] Dealer Band B els d te n S 13458 

J1JTO —id ) Florin Bond Sotedon FL 12BJ3 

S07T7 — (di intomutor SF 8B50 

— (d ) Jem Portlollo SFBQJ0 

sum —«>*•*■ Fonrim Bond Soi SFIJ0L31 

lirSY — tdi Swtewalor NowSor SF 29100 

—(d) Unlv. Bond SstecL 5F8175 

-Hd l Unlvennl Fund SF 12248 


— (wk OBLI-DOLLAS 
— lw) OBLI-YEN 




-+ldl RBC 
-Hwi RBC 



SKANDIFONO INTL FUND (4642300) 

— (w)lnc: Bld_ —1490 Otter S&20 


CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 

— <«*} CapTfol Inti Fund 

-lw) Caoitol Holla SA 



SF 4240 
SF 6475 
SF 13340 
SF96UM 
SF 47100 
SFiwun 

UNION INVESTMENT Frankfurt 

— (d ) Unhenta DM4340 

— fdMMtonds dm 21 .so 

—id) Unirak DM 7445 

Other Funds 


DIT INVESTMENT FFM 

■— Hdl Cunonlra 

— -Hd ) inti R e ntwi l ond_ 


FAC MGMT. LTD. INV. ADVISERS 
T. Unirone* Pountv Hill. EC4. Dt-tSMABO _ 

—iw) FAC Atlantic SI 142 

— <w) FK. EeieNon — S9S7 

— (w) FAC Oriental 125.90 

FIDELITY POB 67D. Hamnton Bermudo 
— fra AmertGan Values Common^ S >'>157 

— lm Amer VaUns CwnJ>rel _ — f 10025 

—Id Fidelity Amor. Assets IMJO 

—Id FkleRtv AustraUa Fund S7J9* 

— Id FldeOty Dir. 5vos.Tr S 12049 

—Id FktelHv Far East Fund HMD 

—Id FkteUlv InVL FiM S 53.70 

—Id Fidelity Orient Fund *25.17 

— (d FkteniY Frontier Fund Sli53 


FORBES POB8B7 GRAND CAYMAN 
London Aowit ©1-839-3013 

— Ini ftutrt Inrwn, 5 845" 

—lw) Gold Appreciation SA42 

— (w) Dollar income- S8J6 

— Im) srrnteaJc Trodlna 1100 

GEFINOR FUNDS. 

— (w) East liaratmeri Fund I34JM 

— lw) ScattWiWOrid Fund - I122021B 

— lw) Slate SL American S14SJ4 

Coe>tLGuld.Ltd.l.«»ftAoeWAI-49U238 



>> Q « 













Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1985 


Thursdays 

AMEX 


\z 


VoL 014 P.M. 

Prei.4PjM.voL \%mm 


Tables Include the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall street 


m m 

I 2 M 
38 2i9 m 
54 11* 

21 57 5 

A i jm 
24 21 im 

? a 4vs 
16 8 7% 

11 3 32M 

13 J59 llVh 
23 W 
9 41 1M 

? 3ft 
709 4V, 

11 231 1714 

9 U 12% 
13 23 -40 

12 24 39H 

13 6 20 

731 6 


2 2 
St 3V: 

7% 7%— H 

ft lit + vt 

3te 3V»— it 
13 HU + Vt 
34* 4 + Vt 
74* 7%- % 
3214 3214- It 
10* 109k— 16 
314 314 
im 154* 

34* 34* — l* 
** 41* 

1514 1414— Hi 
12ft 124* + V4 
40 40 — It 

391k 39H— te 
HI* 1904 — 14 
714 71k- 14 


2tUi 1414 
221* 141* 
79k 4 < 

734 At 
2144 16* 
23V* 13* 
it* 31* 
614. 3* 

I 514 
79b Bk 
4 I 
49b 2* 
35 21* 

79b 614 
1094 6Vt 
1114 7* 


12 

JB» A 14 
55 
a 

40 221 15 
30 1J 15 


24 

JO *3 13 
40 74 13 
II 


MX 4J 12 
31 17 1 


24 20 
92 Ate 
77 7* 

■ 7 

5 70 
10* 23* 
226 7* 

2 Sft 
45 0 
23 7* 

i 1** 

31 3 

20 34*k 
t 6* 
58 9 

342 104, 


19« 20 
Ate 21*+ V. 
6ft 71k— 14 
6ft **k— lb 
SO 20 
239* 23* 

*Vk 69k + * 
54* 5ft+te 
704 77k— 1* 
794 79k 
19* Hb 
21k 77k— 1* 
341k 344*+ 9* 
4*. 694+ Ik 

m om— m 

109k 104k— >* 




Close 

Low Oo«. O90 


IT Month 
HtahLow Stock 


Sis. ■ Close 

Dlv. YW- P E lOOiHtohLOwQuot.Oi'ae 


6 0 
166 291* 
5 SVi 
77 109* 
2 4V» 


62 221k 
47 70 
7TI 17* 


W 94* 
4 2294 
4 17 
4 51* 

19 29* 
27 2294 
515 0* 


38 2tVk 
315 l«b 
95 1094 
55 14V* 
S> 6* 
22 4 

5 >44 

70 21 
5 SVk 
3 149* 


79k 79* 

2BV* 29 4-9* 

5Va 51*— 1* 
10 HR* 

4Vi 4V* -4- V* 

ift «* 

2194 Z> — 14 
6094 699k— 94 
16% 169*— 9k 
94* 94k 
22* 22* 

169k 169k— lb 
59* 51*+ * 
21 * 21 * 

TZV* 22V*— 1* 
79k B + 9* 
m 29*— 1* 
5* 59*+V* 
69* 696 
64k 69k 
J49k 1A* 

26* 2614— 14 
14* 194+14 
1014 10*+ 14 
14 14—14 

6 It *9*+ Vk 
3 * 3 *- * 
14* 14* + V* 

279* 271*+ 1* 
51* 51k 
149* 149* 


1694 

IB* 

*14 
319* 

361* 

"K » 

37* 37* 
7V, 7* 


17* li\4 Jociyn JOb 12 9 

9* 5v* Jacobs 

16 10* Jensen 7 

61k 294 Jet Am 1 

3Vh 9* JetAwt 

Sik 3* Jotron MX 42 16 

69* 21k JoftnPd 

lit* 714 JehnAm 30 10 15 

714 4Vk JmpJfcn 6 

2V* 219* Jupiter 6 


3 159* 151k 15V* — lb 
31 71k 79* 79*— 1* 
2 15* 1514 15* 


*B 3 * ** V* 


40 BV* 79* 79*— 9* 
57 flk A* 4M — * 
51 10* 79k 10 + 1* 

37 41* 5* 59*— 9* 

28 30* 299* 30* +11* 


If* 20 
11* 11U 
5* 5* 
121k 12V, 
9* 9* 
A* 
17* 
1* 
33 
124k 


111* 

2Vk 
149* 

31* 

61k 
194 
151* ElcAm 
31k ClccSd 


59* 11* 
14V, 10 
16* K 
74* 8 
189* 14* 
189* TO* 
8* 5* 

18V* • 
15 5 

5 214 

41k 31* 
5* 3* 

6*k a 

39k 21* 
15* B* 
15* 89* 
26** 21 


KuvCp 30 
Kea run AO ' 
Kentrn 

Kanwtn JOB ■ 
Ketctwn J» 
KevCo JO \ 

KovPh 30 ' 

KcyCB 
KhJOewt 
Kltom 
Kmart 
lOrhy 

KtearVs J2r 


KnoN 

KuparC 232 


17 2* 
15 119* 

1 14* 
98 4* 

1 17 
21 15* 

4 8 

2328 101k 

18 6 

70 39* 

10 414 

10 4* 

6V 39* 
20 3* 

10 13* 
24 13V, 

341 26* 


24* 294 
111* 111* 

14* 14* 

41k 41* 

17 17 

15* 15*— * 
8 8 — 1 * 
9* 99b— 9* 
5* 59b— * 
3* 39*— I* 
4* 4* 

4* 41* 

394 39k 
39k 3* 

139* 139* 

13% 13te+ te 
25* 26 


3 IV* 
494 2V* 
7* 2* 
41* 23* 
14% 11* 
>79* 11 
1794 9Vk 1 
4V* 2V* I 
50* 25* I 
79* 396 
99* 5 
4V* 194 
3194 18 I 
36 TD 
71V* 3196 
1694 49* 
1294 4V* 
Ute 10* 
149* «1k 
2096 129* I 
109* 894 1 


.lie 

54 33 18 
.16# U> >0 
A 
21 
17 
25 
4 


a 4ii 
18 

LOO IJ 17 
JOB 5 16 

21 

At 12 10 
4 

M 3 20 
50 20 15 


194 194 
21* 29* 
5* 59k 

30* am 

14* 14* 
161* 16V* 
12V* 12 
49* 41* 
50* 50 
6 5* 

7* 7* 
TV, 21k 
311* A 
as* 25 
711* 71* 
13 12* 

12* 129* 
13* 13 
!4Vk 14* 
27* 27 
99* 0* 


19* 

39* 

5*—* 
299k + * 
W%+ te 
761k — * 
13 — * 
494+ H 
SO —9* 
4 + V4 

7* 

2V, 

A + * 
35*— 14 
At* 

T2Vi— V* 
12*+ 9* 
13 — Ik 
14*— * 
m 4 
79* 


5* 5*— V. 
1214 12*— 94 
8 * 9 + % 

1914 1914 + * 
14* 1494— 14 
Z* 2* 

23* 23*— * 
514 5* 

014 9* 

T79* 17* 

29* 29*— 9b 
69* 69b— V* 
22* 22*+ 14 

. Tt h. 

9 9 

39* 3*— * 
28 V* + * 
25* 25* 

36 3594+96 

i> lav* 

Ate Ate 
19* TO +9* 


SW 
16* 
3* 
2 * 
21 
9* 4* 

W T6 
12* 8* 
18* 1114 
1814 1314 
7* 
3* 
3* 
2 * 
094 
20* 
3* 


212 «% 
A 349* 

1 89* 

3 m 

IS 49* 
16 1614 
316 Ztt 
5 41* 
97 im 

8 ' ift 

9 914 
53 II* 

2 39* 

25 2*9* 
46 194 

60t 3594 
A U 

a io 

015 129a 
106 IS* 
25 18* 
455 22* 
186 20* 
9 3* 
44 914 

2 194 

9 15* 
135 2314 
22 14 
001 4* 

21 15 
13 A 14 


87* 07 +1* 
34* 34*+ * 
8 * 8 *—* 
0* m+* 

41k «* + * 
16Vk (614 
2 V* 2K + * 
4 «k + M 
M* 1694—* 
4* .4ft— U 
9* 914 — Mr 

TO* 11 — 1* 
3* 3* + Vk 
23* 23*— * 
1* Mb— ft 
35* 3594 
15 W —ft 
0* 9* 

12 * 12 *—* 
a 13* + * 
IBM 78M— 14 
279k 28*+* 

19* .3014 + Vk 
3. 3*—.* 
9 .014+* 

W H 6 ' 
15* 1514 
22* 22*— * 
1394 M +14 
4* 49k+ te 
14* 14*—* 
30* A — * 



6 

18 

6ft 

6* 

4ft- % 

5ft 4 Yorttov 

JOB 1J 13 






Highs- Lows 


Jan. 31 



NEW Hi OHS 45 


AMCEntn 
Boncrft Pnd 
CO l corps 
FrfsehsRsts 
Greenmons 
Lundy Elec 
MetexCp 
OOktap 

SDie 248pf 

Spectra 

Tyler wl 

Wash Post 

AtfllHoap 

BergenBrun 

Oomtoro 

FurVouHn 

Huacon 

Marti nProc 

MinPLptC 

PGE 1 90pll 

SanJaeeW 

Tecnops 

Vlatoch Inc 

AmBIHr n 
BtoVSup 
Duplexprds 
GarmRuP 

Jupiter Ind 
MatSdn 
Nichols SE 
PSvCrH 4 2S> 
SCE1 19PI 
Teleflex 
VtrcoMf 

AmExnrwt 
Mwteiok . 
esoa 
CrtAmrtad 

LeaPhorm 

MetPra 

OMn 

PBSPLofD 

SCEarppre 

TenoevEnus 

Vulcan Carp 


HEW LOWS 5 


Arrow Auto 
WtoMtolnd 

IrvtrtctiDto 

Spencer Coe 

Ultimate 


NYSE Higbs-Lows 


Jan. 31 


7 2 I 

1594 111k I 


lift 894 
19* 14V* 
Jte I* 

3* lte 
75 I0W 


229, 10V, 
11* 514 


23 10 Quaboi 38 


2 22Vk 22Vk 22Vk 


9* 6* 
137, 74* 
10* 5* 
23* 15 
14 9V, 


Unlmrn 

UAtrPd 

UFoodA 

UFoodB 

UlMmS 

USAGwt 

U5h*n 

UntMV 

UnvOn 

UrrtyRs 

UntvBo 

UnvPof 


168 

.75 58 69 

590 

54b U 10 18 

.10 US 29 
22 20 
ASt SA JS 34 

A A 
Ml 130 14 30 

17 20 

a A9 

MO 42 B 4 
90 


7V, 3* 

’"ft “ft 
15V, 14* 
994 9* 
17* 17* 
2 1* 
1 * 1 * 
12* 17 
A* A* 
111k 18* 
6 * 6 * 
1314 13 
8* 8 
II* 10* 
12* 12 


21 * 

’fc-te* 

15 —ft 
994+ M 
17*+ V4 
1* 

196— t* 
131*— * 
AM— % 
11 — V* 
694 — te 
13 —M 
89* + M 


12* 344 
119* 3» 
9* 4M 
5M 2V, 

20 m 
3* lVk 
33 24* 

IBM 10 
TO* 7 
15V. 994 

5* 2* 
IS* 12M 
2* 
11M 
2* 
11* 
714 
I* 
814 
1914 




7 

45 11% 

17 

IB) 2ft 

5J 

34 IM 


34 1ft 

3J S 

192 TO* 


3 3M 

1.1 77 

434 13 


aa i% 

1A 3 3 

31 )3M 


96 9M 

40 

X 24V* 

10 

47 5M 

tt 

30 5% 

107 

3 33 

I 

36 24ft 

14 

74 16% 

IS 8 

54 13* 

19 

72 7ft 

J 73 

264 20ft 


15B7 16 

2S 

400 2114 

13J as 

43 15 

2J 11 

448 84% 

zu 

M 9ft 

2.1 

1 4M 
7 2* 
4 2M 

S 8 

15 10% 

1J 13 

18 70* 

1J 14 

4 16* 

45 7 

47 Bte 

13 17 

49 13M 

1J M 

143 17ft 

23 

242 7% 

40 12 

M 11 

IS 8 

3 20* 

11J 

27 9 

2Bz 76M 
13 9H 

U 12 

449 14* 

22 11 
S3 7 
I1J 

30 44* 
ii iote 
TOQz 37ft 

13 IB 

10 15* 

1J 18 

134 15ft 


10 9* 

2ZM 1514 
25V, 1514 
1514 4* 
5V, 2* 
33 14* 


VST n 

Voltyft 102 
Vtrijprs A4 


TO* 4M 
T7 12 
1314 9V. 
Ill* 7V, 
2 * 11 * ! 
34* 9V, 
SOM 22M 
46* 23V* 
A* 14M 
0* 5M 
19* ISM I 
13* 10W 
9M 4Vk 
13* 7* I 


7 10 8M 8M St* + te 

4J 4 12M I3M T2M— * 

i 44 10 A 13% I3M II* + * 

9A 7 10 9* 9* 9* + M 

5 Hfc I* 1ft— M 

10 502 24 23* 23*— M 

26 30 2994 X 

I 1J) 7 14 3914 38* 38*— Ut 

Ml a MB 20% 20 20 — M 

10 132 7* 7* 7V, 

38 28 IS 14% 15 + te 

43 9 32 l3Vk 13% 139k— te 

i 22 13 28 8* S* B*+ ft 

J 13 AS 13* 12* 1394 + 94 





11 

3* 

3ft 

3* 

Cp 



66 

4% 

4te 

4% 



11 

64 

7* 

7ft 

7* 

n 

30r 3J 


10 

KH 

8ft 

8ft 

to 



5 

lVr 

Ift 

Ift 

iPt 

a itj 


5 

7ft 

7ft 

7* 

)Pt 

SO IL6 


1 

7* 

7* 

7* 


730 122 


60Qz 59 

59 

59 

>pf 

247 121 


3 

20M 

TOM 

2Dft 

im 

445 127 


A 

36ft 

36ft 36ft 


248 117 


26 

22ft 

22* 

22ft 

w 

290 48 

8 

14 

48* 

47M 

48* 

irk 

A3t BA 

13 

13 

5% 

5V, 

5te 

de 

.15 25 

6 

I 

4 

4 

4 

dA 

20 13 

6 

5 

6ft 

ite 

4% 

irn 



10 

4% 

4% 

ilb 

46 24 11 

12 

Aft 21* 

Aft 

POb 

At 40 

a 

2 

12M 

171* 

T7M 

Bt 

.18 17 


77 

4 

5* 

4 



13 

7S 

29ft 

2VM 

29ft 

» 

-34 J 

11 

19 

381* 37ft 

38 


SO T JO 

6 

1 

48% 

48% 

48%- 

an 


15 

7 

1* 

1* 

1*- 

IPT 



3BC 

ite 

5Vk 

si* 

Jto 

.160 1.1 

a 

115 

mm 

13ft 

Ml* 

*n» 



3 

2ft 

2ft 

2ft 

3» 



042 

Ift 

Ite 

NO- 

. 



73 

6to 

6ft 

«*- 

As 


12 

38 

4V, 

4ft 

4ft 

d> 



10 

3ft 

3te 

SVk- 

eg 

A* 11 

W 

7 

Ml* 

13ft 

14te 

» 


■ 

18 

I0M 

10% 

10ft- 

Or 

J2t 75 

7 

a 

8ft 

8ft 

8% 

ie 

.12 7 

12 

16 

16ft 

16% 

16ft 

ra 

IjOOo 9 A 

5 

20 

11 

lUft 

I0M- 

v> 



76 

Ift 

1ft 

IM- 

to 

.16b 12 64 

2 

I3M 

13ft 

ISM- 

T1 

JO 11 

10 

12 

13% 

IJ 

13 


20 29 a 

16 

7 

6ft 

7 

As 

2D 14 12 

B4 

13 

17ft 

17ft 

.m 

At 19 


64 

1/ 

16* 

16*- 

Lfl 

J8 30 


62 

lift 

15M 

15ft 

IT 

280 148 

11 

71 

lift 

13ft 

I3M 

U«1 


17 

121 

/ft 

7ft 

7ft 

» 



6 

ft 

ft 

ft 

Ak 

350 12 


SO 

10ft 

10ft 

10ft 

inf 

182 112 


14/ 

Vft 

Vte 

Vft- 

ltd 

126 ILS 


10 

V% 

9% 

9% 

Inf 

186 114 


3 

9ft 

9ft 

9ft- 

Ipf 

1.19 102 


56 

lift 

Wft 

11* 

IM 

488 94 


6501 43ft CM 

42M- 

IM 

145 109 


73 

13% 

13 

13% 

IM 

230 114 


46 

2UV, 

20% 

20%- 


221 108 


34 

20% 



Pt 

7J8 117 


1 

64* 

64* 

66*- 

M 

186 114 


11 

77 

76 

77 - 

mn 


9 

34 

/ft 

7% 

7ft- 


mm mt 

994 4* 
914 SM 
794 2* 
17* 10* 
99 45 

Bft 6M 
12* 8 
16* 1294 


Vertt 

VtARlC Mb 
viRah 

Vomit JO 
Viator* 

Wear 

Vlime 

Vlrco JMr 
Vo Inti 

VteuoKS 38 
Voptox M 
VufcCp 40a 


37 10 
11 221* 
IB 25* 
534 6* 

5 H4 

56 22 
41 5M 
88 12* 
14 10 
13 7* 

3 Ak 

4 17M 
2 58 

32 SVh 
18 18* 

6 T7V* 


9* 18 + V* 

22* 22* 

25 25 —ft 

6 614 

314 3* + * 
22 22 
5 SVk—* 
12* 1ZH+ 14 
9ft W + ft 
7* 714 + V* 
4* 4* + * 
17V, 17* + 14 
57* 58 + M 

8 8—14 

»% W* + * 
17 171* + * 


8* 6* WTC 
34 17* Wotbar 

15 io* wales 
A* 23 Wono8 
37* 2296 WOTKlC 
4% 96 WmCwt 

9 3* WshH 3 


A 120 7* 7 794+ * 

AO 13 13 9 23* 23% 23% — 14 

AO 34) S 4 1314 1314 l3te + te 

.16 417386328 27*k 28 — te 

.11 A 17 11 2796 27M STM— 1 . 

117 1* 114 1* + te 

6 38 B* ite BM— * 


Sales (Ipures ore unofficial. Yearly Mate and lows reflea 
the DravtoeeS weeks Pius the current week, but not m* latest 
trading day. Where a split or sloc k dividend amounting la 25 
peregnt or more has been gold, the year's high-tow range tmd 
dividend we shown for The new stock only. Unless otherwise 
notea rotes o! dividend* are annual dbtwraemonts based on 
the latest deck, ration, 
a — dividend also extra<*)-/l 
b — annual rale of dividend plus stock dtvklancL/1 
C — liquidation dtvktona/i 
cW — calledJt 
d — new yearly lewTI 

e — dividend declared or poki In preceding 12 manttisjl 
9 — dividend in Ccmadlon funds. sutHed to 15% nanretidance 
lax. 

1 — dtvtdend declared offer ipllt+gi or slock dividend. 

I —dividend paid inis year, omitted, deferred, or no action 
taken at latest (Svktend mealing. 

k — dividend dec l ared or Paid this year, an accumulative 
Issue with dividends In arrears. 

n — now issue In /he east 52 weeks. The WetMow range begins 
with the start of trading, 
nd — next day delivery. 

P/E — ortce-eamlnas rat to. 

r — dividend declared or paid in preceding 12 months, plus 

stoex dividend. 

s— stock sell*. Dividend begins with dale of sol It. 
sis— soles. 

i —dividend paid In stock In preceding 12 months, estli m ie d 
cash value on ox-cflvhtend or ex-dWrtbutlon date, 
u —new yearly high 
v— trading halted. 

vl— in bankruptcy or receivers h ip or being jeorgo nl yed un- 
der me Bonk rup lev Act. or securities assumed bv such com- 
panies. 

wd — when distributed. 

wl — when Issued. 

ww— with warrants. 

x — ex-dividend or ex-rfahts. 

xdls — ex-dWri button. 

xw— without warrants. 

y — ox-dlvldend and sales In full. 

Wd— yield, 
i— soles In full. 


SS' *«3, 


Over-the-Coimter 


Jan. 31 


NASDAQ National Market Prices 


Sales In Net 

ISOs Hl9ft Lew 3P-M.cn He 


Sates la Net 

106s Hfgh Lew 3PM.ChHe 


30 4A 9 4M 414 4V* 

5 214 2* 214— 14 


10 5 
2727V, 
93 2216 
36424 
19 AM 
•20b 20 1732 10% 
47 9* 


30 1 385 25* 

235 6* 
166 914 
264 7* 
82 6* 
162 5 

M 33 16714* 


140 14 3422 39% 
653 20* 
17 996 
46217 

A0 20 82 20% 

M 13 122025* 


100a 47 7A94 

479 4V, 
173 7* 
509 IBM 
40 22 59 19 

302 8M 
I 13 

50 35 71013% 


146 34 161 4196 

SO 14 2187 33 * 
40e 33 114 1214 


257 1 

SjO 3620% 
3317* 
175 4te 
309 96 
54 2662% 

377 Ate 
192 714 
34 127 AM 


S — % 
24M 261k— 1% 
73 22% + % 

22V, 34 +1% 

A 21M+ te 
10 10*— M 

994 9* 

Ate 25V, +114 
6M 6M— te 
BV, B9k— * 
7* 7* 

5* 6*— 14 

4* 4*— M 
14* 14M— M 
29M 29M— M 
12* 13M+ te 
10* llte + * 
14 14 — U 

35 3696 +396 

19M 2014 + 94 
9M 9M 
15* I6M+1 
201* 201* 

25* 2SM 
AM 211k— te 
4* 4% 

7 714+14 

10V* 10* 

ISM IBM— M 
8% 8*— te 
13 13 + 14 

13 13te + V* 
13* 13* 

8* 0*+ * 

14 14 — % 
0% Bte— Hi 

4114 41M 
35% 8 5V, 

12 1214 + 14 

6* 4*+ ft 
llte 11M 
1896 1896— * 
!6te 16* 

3296 32% 

6* 694 + * 


40 21 16720 

.10 1J 25 7 


1444 13* 
1» 7te 
SB 1216 

an ate 

32 6M 
.12 12 A TO* 
9485 27% 
1156830 

577 35* 
54713* 
170835% 
68 BM 
130 * 
294 4* 
261 TOM 
JOB 13 2524% 

119 ■* 
498 814 
.12 1J 48511ft 


39 5ft 
144 7 

AD 33 236 18% 


1A 10 


% r + * 

19M 20%— % 
17% 1714— % 

6194 62 +te 
20% A + te 

7 7—14 

A* A*— M 
18* 19Vk + M 
6ft 6ft— te 
13% T3» + 14 
7% 7M+ 14 
12 12 — Ik 

3714 3714— Ilk 

596 6te— M 
101k 10%— M 
AM MM— * 
28* 29 — ft 
as 3514 
13% 13*+ ft 
33M 35Vk +1ft 
8% Bte— % 
% *+ te 

4* 4* 

20 201k + te 

» 24% + «k 

BM 8ft— » 

8 8—14 
10ft llte— ft 
S S - ft 
6* 7 + te 

18 + % 
15 

8%— te 
IBM 

77 — ft 
9ft— % 
lift 

36*— % 
161* +1 
4ft 
16M 

!0%— te 
11 
6ft 
7ft 

9*— te 
16ft- ft 
251*— te 
16* 

20 


W* 

8% + M 
7 

294 + ft 
1394+ V, 
7*— % 
19*— % 
3D*— % 


7M+ % 
7*— V* 
61 — % 
lift + ft 
llte 

39* + 96 

t — % 

9»+M 

Si*- % 

a +»* 

12 

6M— ft 


I?* 

9* 

13V, + % 
* 

36* 

7% + M 

’?*+% 

’B 

M*— % 
4% 

7%— M 

W 4*7E 

B=8 
**— % 
M 

30 +1M 
T9M+ % 
9 

BM 

1714— M 
T2M 

30 +1* 

J* + % 

2316— te 
20+14 
MV, + % 

4946+ % 

7 

M% 


Sotos hi n«i 

100s Htok Low 3 PJU.CS Hu 


lotos Ml 

MO* High Low 1 PM. Ch ur 


212 34 

13 9 
1002 2V. 

288 4 A 293 47 
330 4* 
154 7 
.14 9 IS 16 

14 9M 

20 13* 
JO 28 29029% 

913% 
84 1.9 207 23M 
9* 15 140 27M 

36 28 25 20% 

21 a 


29% 23V, — 2M 
8* B% 

I 814 + te 
46* 46ft— % 
4M 4M 
6* 4*+ te 
ISM 16 
8* 914— H 
13M 13* 

28* Kft- te 
12* 13*— M 
73 23M + * 

Z7 27ft + * 
20 30 

22* a* 


104 16M U 14V, + * 
48 31* 3 3 — ft 

304 Ate 1B14 191k + * 
213 1 7V, 16* 17ft— ft 
314 19% If* 19% + ft 
10O 6ft 6ft 61k — M 
SM 33* A 32* +1 
IBS 15V, 14* 14*—* 
37 M * M+ft 

228 12M II* 11*— * 


EogTwtA 

EariCol 



Soles in 



Net 


Sotos in 


Net 


tees 

Mot 

Low 3 P.M. Clip* 



Hlob Low 3PJHLCVW 


JBe 27 



17* 

Jock Lie 



09 37* 

36* 

37 — * 

GSoyCs 




15ft 

JomWlr 



340 20% 

18ft 

30 +1 


JOe 73 




ift— * 

JeffBtfi 

1J0 

47 

3 33* 

13% 

33*+ % 



299 20ft 

IP* 

20% + ft 

JefSmrl 

JOB 28 

»3W* 

20ft 2019 — te 










sib a 

7* 

7*—* 

Gtoeh 



17ft 

>2*—* 

Jerlco 



2M319, 

17* 

18ft +IM 






JWrs 














49 5Vk 

4ft 

4ft— % 

GtfNuc 





Zft 




117 5 

4* 

4te 






Josrtro 



401 9* 

9% 

9% 













1 


1 

Justins 

301 

13 

3510 

171k 

18 + te 


310 28% 

19* 

639 20ft 

30 

419* 

ms 

38 23% 

33 

44334 

33* 

816* 

36% 

4132% 

32 

A 18% 

18 

1 52* 

52* 

200 15ft 

14% 

225 20ft 

20te 

MXV4 

X 

55 22 

Ate 

53 91k 

9ft 

A 22ft 22% 

24 37% 

32* 

272 37% 

37% 

10 34* 

24* 

404 6* 

6* 

a 151k 

15 

425 T7* 

T7ft 

345 321k A* 

511 W 

18* 

as la* 

17ft 




30 «H 

Sft 

Bft 


1.1 

4213* 

13% 

13*+ % 

.18 

507 9% 

9 

916+ ft 



117 12 

lift 

lift— 1* 



257 3* 

3% 

3% 



386 44% 

0% 44 



36 6* 

6* 

A*+ te 



180 8* 

8% 

Bte- ft 



71 3% 

3% 

3% 



6 4% 

ite 

4% 



448 7 

6* 

ift— % 



3A 7M 

6* 

41*— te 

.TO 1+ 

32 6% 

4 

61* 



140112* 

lift 

171*+ % 

JB 

ii 

40 6% 

6% 

6% 

J6 

56 329% 29ft 29ft 



619% 

llte 

IBM 



1217 12 

11% 

lift— ft 

Jle U 

44 mt 

is ft 

”8 

"Rif 



1692 M* 

M 

16 —ft 



144 13M 

13% 

13ft— M 

34 

a 

6618 

17* 

17ft— ft 

A4 

SB 14% 

13% 

14% +1 



165 Bft 

8* 

Bft— U 



3611% 

W% 

llte + ft 



1014 4ft 

4* 

4* — U 



12510ft 

H% 

10% 


KLAs 

KMWSv 

Kansan 

Kwcttr 

•Caster 

Kovdon 

KetvJn 

Kemp 

KvCnU 

KlWX 

KevTm 

Klmbal 

Khnbrk 

Kincaid 

Kinders 

WKass 

Kray 

Kruars 

Kuicfce 


1750 A 
1 10* 

34 2.1 47 26* 

96619% 
JOt 43 3414 

208 B* 
250 1ft 

180 17 set 49 


2.1 D 37* 
155 6V, 
14011 
13 829 

33 7 
3 8* 
A 73816* 
31 1 

J 461 8M 
22 138414* 
3 1125 29* 


23% — M 
10* + * 
34* 

IBM— M 
14 

fr* 

49 +1 

37M— ft 
6 % 

10 * 

29+14 
7 + M 
8 * 

14% 


8M + M 
14% — M 
29te— K 


6 % + % 
40% — % 
3ft 

8ft— % 
5Vk + % 
9%— % 
4% 

2% 

4M— % 
23*+ ft 
35 + * 
Jft+ ft 
28 — * 
IA4— * 
4% 

1* + * 
10ft— * 
13ft— 1k 
4te+ 14 
22M 

30te— * 
I*- ft 

3U— % 
I3M +1% 

m+> 
li — te 
7*— te 
65M— 1 
7*- ft 
19ft + lk 
6ft+ M 
8% + % 
3 —ft 
15 * % 

ISM— * 
19ft — M 
13*— 14 

•ft— ft 
1%— ft 
16* 

5ft— % 

5% 

10ft— 14 
13% 

4% 


34 U 1781714 17 17 

t in W M 4%— % 



193 TO* 


149 f% 


484 15* 


651 23ft 


466 17% 

38 

25 40% 

J 

JO 

842 17* 
KM >4 

5 A 

7 14* 

4.1 

48 MM 

4J 

67414 


.34 7* 

U 

J414SM 

JJ 

la 71* 

L8 

a 27* 


2M 7ft 


*1* iB L ™‘“ 


76 Aft 20* A>+ 
203*1 40* 40*— £ 

5946M 44 4616— » 

17 23* 23V, 23M 
2258 11% H* lift J ft 
3020 27% 28 ♦ ft 

M 3% 5% 5% • 

185J 4* 414 A*-* 

20 3* » St 2 

M3 4* 4* <* + £ 

1119 7 6* 6ft- w 


10 IM !M IM- £ 



1979S 10M 


»*— * 



32 6M 

6 

6 



169 6% 

5ft 

S* + ft 

M 

IJ 

11 M 

171k 

18 + te 



1066 19ft 

19% 

19M+ % 



VO 13 

T2M 

13 +1k 



137 1% 

7% 

7ft— te 



125316* 

1AM 


730 

9J 

40 33ft 

23* 

a* + ik 



2Z13M 

12% 

7314— Vs 






-01* 


IX 13% 

12ft 

13%+ M 



338 14ft 

14 

14% — * 

JO 

M 

133 Ate 

A 

A 

280 

48 

13950% 

49ft 

49ft- Vk 

JSs 

U 

715ft 

15* 

iSft + ta 

-Qto 


1 7* 

7* 

7*— % 

A 

a 9 

■te 

8ft— te 



454 13 


T7%+T% 


U 

176 51* 

50* 

SO*— ft 



4637ft 

A 

37V, 



A 69 61k 

Sft 

51k+ te 



195 13 

12M 

13 + 16 

.10 

J 

50 Aft 

Aft 

311ft— % 



45128ft 

27% 

37% — 1 



1411% 

HBft 

I Oft— Ik 



484 4* 

4* 

4te 



142 4 

3ft 

3ft— % 

Jt 

u 






4 10 

10 

M 

JK 


45 12% 

12 

17 

A 

■ Sft 

Ite 

Bte— ft 



297 a 

7ft 

8 + * 



St 17 

Mft 

lift 



W7 Ate 

Ate 

am— % 


in 7 » 

29311 

327 BM ■% Sft-“5 
9»2n* !»■ 2 

2AZ7 » 

81 8Vk 7* 8 -* 
MAM 30M Aft? 1 * 

’S ^ % PI 


A llte M» mj— S 
357 27* 36* 2 

339 4% 5* 

18 3* 3* 3*-' 1 
AS * ft *• u. 

42 6* 6K> Jte- ” 
36 8% 8 B%+ 5 

89 8ft •* g9~~ S 
Bin 9* 9M Tte— 

1A17V, 17% T7* 

242M 42% <» 
IS23<ft Aft 34M 

2022ft 22% 5*- JJ 

84 16% 16 W 1% 

in » A*- aft*" 

7* 47V, 47% «% ^ 

413 «ft 5? fiSl* 
549 9te 8* *ft+7! 
13 9ft 9 * — ft 

41 12ft 1JV* 17* 












































































'JA 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1, 1985 


Page 15 


international classified 

[ (Continued From Back Page) | AUTOS TAX F 


SPAIN 


USA RESIDENTIAL 


OCEAHFRONT ESTATE 
SANTA BARBARA, CALIFORNIA 
42 oem. 450 ft. beoch Froraoga, pne 
teest, vnmvd orator mom home, 2 
flues* cottage. cHf hongxig 
beoch home, S2.9 mOon, Ccrtod wur 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


HOLLAND 


DUTCH HOUSING CENTRE B.V. 
Dahnra math. Volenua*. 174, 
Amsterdam. (EO-621234 or 623222 


PETBt BRUM MAXBAARDU 
tan Housing Service-Rental* 
A autmiW . Tol: 020764022. 



EMPLOYMENT 


SECRETARIAL 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


AVAILABLE 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


AUTOS TAX FREE 

TAX FSB CAfiSi MBCEHB, Bdh 
Boyce, Audi, Votvo, PondwT EMW. 
We keep a urge stoat of brand new 
and good wed can. We do the 
D.O.i. and EPA or our own »e- 
mea. We aho tide care 
ping and bondng bi U5A Contact 
at these numbers: teL Beta 
050/715071. (eLlLSA 


Company Earnings 

Revenue and profits, in mitiions. are In local currencies 
unless otherwise Indicated 


MUAS, Costa del Sol. vUa, 4 bed- 


vkw, near ullage. U5312DujO. 
Errand 604 740342 after 7pm. 


ESgggSBa 


G 5 T A A D 

VALLEY 

YOUR INVESTMENT IN 
SWITZERLAND 

We ore seSmg very exclusive A com- 
FcytnHe homes wnh 2 to 5 large ream. 

Tlie complex cl 3 chalets a foccM d 
do to o me heart of the viloge with a 
h ealKtabna view oner the da dopes & 
the wide vcuey. 

A comprehensive range of unices 'A 
la Carte', iudi as raanenance, servic- 
ing. leasing & maragemeril is avcdebte. 

For further information or 
oi appMiteient, please contact. 

On SHe i (029) 4 52 49 

HAZA CONSTRUCTIONS 
OS DU IHONE 100 
CH-1204 GS4EVA 
Tcfc (022) 21 60 44. Thu 421121 


SWITZERLAND 

FAMOUS RESORT AREA 

DO YOU WISH - 

• 70 BUY AN APAJfTMBWT 

OS A HOUSE? 

• TO RETIRE IN SWITZERLAND 

• TO INVEST IN SWnZBOANDT 

CONTACT US: 25 YEARS OF EXPERI- 
ENCE IN HADING AND S&UNG 
HNE SWISS REAL ESTATE 

50NMSA. 

P.Ol Bax 62, 

1884 Vi Bars, Switzerland. 

H* 45621 3 GESE CH 


r .; ; > 'te . yH pr i fr t ^ 


•TAX HIEE FEW MERCEDES* 
500 5EL, 5EC, SL, imnadtan dstaery 
full export service- Save money) 
Unbeatab l e wbotamta priced 
CoS SELECTION - coll nperiencel 
SELECTION Import-Export GmbH 


Britain 

Lonrho 

Year TO 1983 

Revenue im 2J6CL 

Profits 5541 406 

Per Share 120V 0.155 

Switzerland 

Bank Leu 

Year IBM TO 

Profit 39.35 3S4Q 


United States 

Ako Standard 
lit over. ins 19M 

Revenue M16 797.1 

Ooer Net 146 146 

Oner snore— 075 065 

Hers exclude fosses at 
at/jm vs ssum tram at* 
continued operations. 

Amur. President 
4ttiQww. m* ms 

Revenue 240.1 2066 

Net inc 117 157 

Per Share I JO 1 J1 

Year to IW 

Revenue 9262 7456 

Net inc. 1015 26.4 

Per Shore 467 224 


Revenue 

Net inc. — 

p.a Bm T®TSa6e ’syke," ' p %!^ r * _ 

W. Germany. Tel: (0) 4242-40458, 

60459, 60450. Tfc 24109. 

Per Shore, 


TAX FRS AUTO SAIES 
Order your European ■ US - and UK 
autamobJes. 

Car rentd, utfintad nieoge. 
Leasing new car 1 la 6 monte. 
Telex 200572. Tab AST 4342. 
liinn, 2 AvePtate descent Cloud 
Paris 75016. 



EUROPORJ TAX RISE CABS 
CaB for free ovtiog. 

Box 1201 1 , Rotterdam Airport. Holland. 
Tel 01040077. T&u 25071 EfOUf t*. 


AUTOMOBILES 


PARIS AREA 




REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


I'M--- -’.in 


AUTO RENTALS 




Bwyrut^rie 
4th Qaor. 1*S4 1K3 

Ooer loss 166 5SJA 

Year 1*54 TO 

Oner Net 461 (a)MJ 

Oper Share— 234 — 

a: lass. 

Qiampian kit'l 

4 Hi a ear. ItM TO 

Revenue 14ML UW0. 

Net inc. (0)1156 2368 

Per Share— — 0-37 

Yew lfM TO 

Revenue S.T20. 

Net Inc (0166 B2J 

Per Share — 1.22 

a: loss. 

Cooper Ind. 

4tti Oaar. ItM TO 

Revenue—. 5393 efts 

Net Inc K73 TWM 

Per Share 066 Oil 


Year t*M TO 

Revenue 2AM. 1650. 

Net inc. 10M 71.17 

Per Share— 2.13 1 29 

Dow Otemied 

4th Over. ItM TO 

Revenue 2690. 2920. 

Net inc 796 720 

Per Share 062 037 

Year mi TO 

Revenue 11620. 10.950 

Net inc 5856 3340 

Per Share 362 171 

Nets Include gains at SIS 

minion vs SI2 million In Quar- 
ters and of SM million vs MI 
million In rears, 

Equimark 

4th Oaar. IfM TO 

Oner loss — 11.9 142 

Year 19M TO 

Oner loss _ 396 11.1 

Meta exclude gains of StL} 

million vs tlJ million In 
Quarters and of SSJ million vs 
SIS million In rears. 

Federal-Mogul 

4th Over. ItM TO 

Revenue 2126 1*06 

Net Inc 96 76 

Per snare 067 055 

Year ItM TO 

Revenue 911.7 7476 

Net Inc 404 41.1 

Per Share 361 3.10 

I«S3 vear net Includes gain 
at million from sole a! 
unit. 

Htanmermili Paper 
4th Oaar. ItM TO 

Revenue 5400 5309 

Net Inc 142 105 

Per Shore— 162 1.95 

Year 1*84 TO 

Revenue 1650 U20 

Net Inc 509 325 

Per Share— S47 325 

Ogden 

41b Oaar. TO TO 

Revenue—, SHJ 4736 

Onr Nat 011 11 J 

Op er Shore— 062 061 

Year TO TO 

Revenue IB. 1,72ft. 

Oper Net 375 525 

oser Snore— 265 274 

1 933 nets exclude less ofSIJ 
million In avorter and gain of 
SS3XOOO Mm vear from CHS- 
can tlnuec opera Hons. 


Owens-UBnois 

41b Our. ItM TO 

Revenue— 8400 1146 

Oper Net 496 196 

Oper Shore— 161 068 

Year TO TO 

Revenue— 33DO 3620. 

Ooer Net — 1496 821 

Ooer Shane- 562 267 

Peabody Inti 

1st Qvar. INS lfM 

Revenue 412 96.9 

Oper Net 12 JtO 

Ooer Shares OH OIS 

I90S net excludes loss of 3 
cents p than from dbconnn- 
ueti operations. 


St Pad Cos 

emOtrar. 19*4 WB 

Revenue 4277 5446 

Oper Net (0)1014 124 

Oper Snare— — 047 

Year TO TO 

Revenue 2240 24WL 

Oper Net (a)i9M 11463 

Oper snore— — 051 

a: loss. 


Tandem Camp. 

1st Oaar. TO TO 

Revenue 1597 >246 

Net Inc 146 10-1 

Per Share 034 024 


Utd Financial 

«h Quar. to TO 

Net Inc 425 faM6 

Per Share 433 — 

Year TO TO 

Net Inc 503 <0)12 

Per Snare 550 — 

a: loss. 1 964 n eta Include 
gain of SSI J million from sale 
afwiffli 


Witco Chemkcd 

em Quar. 1*M TO 

Revenue 3717 3612 

Net Inc 1529 1567 

Per Share US UM 

Year TO TO 

Revenue 1500. 1290 

Ncl Inc 426 52D2 

Per Share 428 360 

tM nets toctuOe gain aiSSS 

million. 


Rolls-Royce 
Picks Tombs 
As Chairman 

By Brenda Hagcrty 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Rolls-Royce Lid, 
the British staie-owned aircraft en- 
gine group, has appointed Sir Frau- 
ds Tombs, 60, as rbairmnn 
He takes over from Sir Arnold 
Hall, chairman of Hawker Sidddey 
Group PLC, whom the board ap- 
pointed Acting chairman after the 


Chase Manhattan Bank say Ser- 
gio de Chiara will become country 
manag er for Italy in addition to 
being regional executive for the 
Mediterranean, including Spain, 
Portugal, Greece, Turkey, Cyprus 
and Israel, and for Ireland. He suc- 
ceeds Dimitri Papadinritriou, who 
moves to Geneva os general matt- 
ager for Chase’s new branches in 
Geneva and 7-nrieh , which will be 
responsible for the bank’s corpo- 
rate and wholesale business. 
Qiase’s Swiss subsidiary, Chase 
Manhattan Bank (Switzerland), 
will continue to handle the bank's 
private banking and capital mar- 
kets business. 

Akzo NV says it will recommend 


ttrf.liJiNlfriHMiiuy.tMij 


November. Sir WilK.tm who was 
61 and had been chairman and 
chief executive of Rolls-Royce 
since April 1983, had been involved 
in a major reorganization designed 
to reverse the company’s losses and 
make it profitable. 

‘ Sr Francis has been a nonexecu- 
tive member of the Rolls-Royce 
board since March 1982. He is 
chairman of Tomer & Ncwall PLC 
and a director of CeUiech Ltd, 
N. M. Rothschild & Sons Ltd. and 
Shell UK Lid. 

Citibank has appointed James J. 
Collins as division, head for Japan 
and South Korea. Based in Tokyo, 
be will also function as country 
corporate officer for Japan. Since 
1982 he has been division head for 
North Asia. He succeeds Tatsuo 
Umezono, who has been trans- 
ferred to New York to start a unit 
designed to aid Asian businesses in 
the United States and U.S. busi- 
nesses planning to enter Asian 
markets. 


April 25 the appointments of A. 
BatenbuiE, president of the man- 
agement board of Algemeoe Bank 
Nederland NV, and G van Veen, 
formerly chairman of the Federa- 
tion of Netherlands Industries, to 
its supervisory council. Retiring 
from the board of the Dutch chemi- 
cals and man-made fibers group 
will be J. R. M. van den Brink, dep- 
uty chairman of the supervisory 
council, and S. C. Bakkenisi. 

National WretmiiK lw B ank PI XI 

has name d Tim Finlow deputy 
chief manager of British h anking 
operations in its international 
h anking division. He succeeds Ted 
Stamp, who becomes chief manag- 
er of International Westminster 
Bank PLC in London. Ken Freaihy 
has been appointed senior regional 
manager of NaiWest's Africa. Mid- 
dle East and India region, based in 
London. He succeeds Mr. Finlow. 
Mr. Freaihy was previously an ad- 
vances manager in the internation- 
al h ankin g division in London. 


Over-the-Couhter 


NASDAQ National Market Prices 


AUTO SHIPPING 


LEGAL SERVICES 


gflift in Nut 

IMS HloU LOW 3PJM.Cirge 

(Continued from Plage 14) 


NYC - 47th St Eat 

RIVER PLAZA COUP 


m 


mm 


COTE D’AZUR 

SAINT PAUL DE VBKX AREA 
2 - 5 betfrooms. Hots & wita owdobie 
(or summer ‘B5. 

Affrfjn JOHN TAYUK SA 
Rode de St. Foul 
06480 1* Cofla Sur Loup. 

Tot (93) 32 83 40 


32E 




TO 


M 






mz 


5E3r 


V/lf 




TTl 


55355 


mH 


mrtnr 


RTTT 




rn:/'VJ:H,7TT 





PAJHC AVE, NYC 7CS EAST 
Furnished apoluer * «i exdusiue Man- 
hanan buSmna 2 bedrooms + maid's 
+ dan, 3 bam, Formd lining room. 
SlILOOO/motah. 4 year tami. 

VtOO MU8BAY 
Office (212} 687-6767 
Residence [212) 532-4773 



Ptt 


AUTOS TAX 


BUY YOUR NEXT CAR 
TAX FRS AND USE OUR 
BUY-BACK PROGRAM 

AND SAVE 

WDTE FOR ns CATALOG OR 
HIS BtlY-BACX FOLDS! TO 
SHTSU* IV, PXL Bax 7568, 1 118 ZH 
Aimtenkirn Aspen, The Netherlmts. 
“Phone (02)1 Si. Telex.- 12568 


SHPSDE tat, 576 fifth Avenue. 
7th Hoor. New YoS. N.Y. 1003MJSA. 
Phone (212) 8694484. Tetat 4279&5 


SHWSDE SA. Chausire de Wovre 
465, 1040 Brussels. Belgium. 
Phono; (02)6499062. Telex: 63290 


Tcer Itm LHD.AB models indudng 1000 
SB. & sketch Gmouunes far nsiwfate 
shipment ham stack. 

EPA/ DOT certification & shipping by 
the experts. 


SERVICES 


YOUNG LADY 

PA/ Interpreter & Tourism Guide 

PARIS 562 0587 


PARIS P-A. 

BUNGUAL YOUNG LADY 

PARIS: 520 97 95 


YOUNG GERMAN LADIES. Mutrirv 
gual, immecEctt service. Travel com- 
pinons from BRUSSB5/ FSANKfUKT 
to Europe. Bniaeh 322/734 38 86 


VIP LADY GUIDE 

Young, educated, efegart & bnitigud 
(or days, evenings & travel 
PAHS 533 80 26 


YOUNG ELEGANT LADY 

MULTILINGUAL PAMS: 525 81 01 



-T7rr 


£ 


Telephone. 

EQtJESG. 


m 




REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 


WANTED TO HJKHASE or ex- 
change far Manhattan, NYC slvdfa 
co-op* 1 or 2 berkoom a p artment 
vrith chcxni in Par^ left Bank De de la 
Ole, 2nd, 5fh, 6lh or Trh. Ibmond to 
R. Outatoi, ill 5 Fifth Ave/NfC, NY 
10128 USA. Tefc 21 2-5348686. 



QMS S 
Quadhrx 

QuakrC 61 56 

QualSv 

Quantm 

QuestM 

Quixote 

Quolm 


RAX 
RPMs 

fad^comparion. j g«X« 


391 894 BVt m— VS 
64 36 393 T7VX 17 17% + U 

1445 Wli UV4 13H + to 
49 *Hr 9to 914— to 



US ATTORNEY, wife & 2 grown cbL 
dren would fte 2 bedroom epartmenf 
m Paris or Florence for month or June. 
Please respond ro ARA, 10 Bantsvdle 
ltd- Armork. N.Y. 10504 USA. 


ROLLS-ROYCE 

BBMTLEY 

BRITISH MOTORS 
WRIGHT BROTHERS 

MONTE CAMO 
Principality of Monaco 
Tab (93) 50 64 84 
Tetexi 459475 MC 
Ofikhi Dead Factory Deato 
Con Supply WoriewUe 
EstabfaSed stare 1925 




1 «V.s 71 

EsriE?alflflflilBili 




TT7T1 


V/.'J 1 V. 


TTH 


Ritifi-'; 


iUal qX. 




REOUtRE A COOK FOR o resort Is- 

land of 100 beds in the Motives. 
Arinim u m aqaeri en cB 3 yean wartang 
in a hotel with knowfadge of parity. 
Salary USS80Q. 2-year eontrac± 1 
worth pad leow with retwn re hd»* 
per yea. Free bachelor oc cornrnt xfa- 
hon. Pleose nppfy with bfadrto to 
Unwrsol Entnrp rues Ltd. P.O. Bax 
2015, Mcto. Ecpubtc of MaUvas. 




LOS ANGBLB -714 - 828 3238 - 


HONG KONG 3-671 267 young lady 





TAX FRS CARS 
P.CT. 

I regert Showroom A In ventory 
AS makes, all models, brand new 
Iperfaan 1, 2008 Antwerp, Belgium 
TeL 3/231 5? 00 
Th 35546 FHCABT B 
Apply far our colour mtofague 
USSScash 




mm t 


ESCORTS & 


INTSNATIONAL 

ESCORT 

savtcE 

USA & WORLDWIDE 

Head office in New York 
330 W. 56th St. N.YC 10019 USA 

212-765-7896 
21 2-765-7754 

MAJOR CRBMT CAROS AND 


P rhrato Marnberiliipi AvaflaMe 

This tn uortf swta e servire has 
been fo triurod as 6s lap I mast 
ucMn Escort Service by 
USA & intemafiood naan eawfia 
ta d mi nfl mis and TV. 


* USA & TRANSWORLD 

A-AMERICAN 

ESCORT SBtVICE 
EVBlYVimffiYOU ASE OR G0L. 

1-813-921-7946 

Cdl free from US.- 1-800-23741892 
Cell free from Florida 1-800-282-0692 
Lowel Eastnm wetcomes you badd 


CAPRICE 

ESCORT SERVICE 
IN NEW YORK 
TEL- 212-737 3291. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


Escort Agency 


ESCORTS & 


LONDON 

BOGRAWA 

Escort Samoa. 

Tel: 736 5877. 


LONDON 

BEST ESCORT SERVICE 
TEL 200 8585 


ESCORTS & 


★ MADRID ★ 


Tab 411 72S7 - 411 7602 


ZURICH 

CAROIN: BOOST SERVICE. 
Tab 01/252 61 74 


★ ZURICH* 

GMG8PS ESCORT SERVICE. 
TBc 01/363 08 64 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 
AMSTERDAM JASMAE 

ESCORT SOVKX. 020-366655 


TEL: 29 51 30 


GB4EVA ESCORT 

SERVICE. Tab 46 11 58 


LONDON MALE ESCORT SBEVKX. 
Tet 385 94 76. 


VIENNA CLEOPATRA Escort Service. 
TeL 52 73 88k 





rrx 


SECRETAB1AL 
FOSmONS AVAILABLE 




Turn 


rr fm 


nr 






DUE5SBDORF 

GCa Escort Agency. 0211-304369 


ZURICH B8USSBS MKHB1E ES0QRT AM) 
Samantha's Escort & Guide Service GU0E SBMGL TBj 733 07 98 


12 noon - midnight 


ZURICH 


IB.- 01/47 55 82. 


MIAMI, FL USA 
EXCLUSIVE ESCORT 5SVKZ 
Box 520554 Mam, A 33152 



Pbrimcm Escort Agency 

67 Oaten Street. 

London W1 

Tab 486 3724 or 486 1158 

AH major credit ccrds ac rep tad 


APPLE 


T&: 2503496. C8BXT CARDS. 



GENEVA FUST ESCORT SBVTCE 
Reservations TRAVEL/ WEUfW 
6 SU STATONS. 1EL 3) 49 87 


GENEVA -BEST 


THi 022/29.1174 



BRUSSOS. CHANT AL ESCORT Set-1 MADRID IMPACT ESCORT & Guide 
vkb: TeL 02/520 23 66. , | Sennre. MuttanguaL 261 41 SI 



LADY ESCORT service, Hsothrow/ 
Gatwick, London areas. 0895-448152 


LONDON LUCY ESCORT & Guda 
Service. Tet 01-373 021! 


DOMNA JADE GENEVA Escort Ser- 
vice. TeL 022 / 31 2671 


MUNKH tears tat + Guide 
Service. TeL 089/4486038 


VTB4NA - DESKS ESCORT Service. 
TeL 5230355. 


IOMION U5A ESCORT SBtVKZ TeL 
4(00557 


IOMX3N BAKBE ESCORT Service. 
Heottvm/Gatwicfc. Tel 624 9844. 


MUNOi - BL0NDY & TANIA Eimrt 
Service. TeL 311 II 06 or 311 79 01 


«IN WEST - JET SET ES CORT & 
Travel Service. 030/8838881 


KAREN - FRANKFURT ESCORT Ser- 
vice. Tet 069/88 62 88 


AMSTERDAM; CLASS Etoort 5etyice. 
Tab (0) 20-198758 


FRANKFURT SQNJA ESCORT Ser- 
ure. Tab 05968 34 42. 


TIC HAGUE: RUST CHOKE Escort 
Service. » 70646328. 


AMSTERDAM CITY boxt Servo. 
Tet (020134 05 07. 


BMJSSBS. ANTWHP NATASCHA 

Escort Servo. TeL 02/7317641. 


nAMOUff. ANNE'S Ekoti Servo 
TeL Off / 28-81-03. 


RAMOURT- KBSTM ESCORT + 
Trawl Stavice. 06172-74540 


FRANKRBT AREA. BABBITS Et 

I avt&Trowl Service. Off/ 62 B80i 


ftANKHJRT AREA. SHERAZADPS 

Eicott & Trawl Service. 62 84 32. 


HAMBURG- BMGflTE &cort Ssvire. 
TeL 040/58 65 3S. 


VENNA ETORE ESCORT SERVKZ. 
TeL 56 78 Si 


VIENNA'S FIRST ESCORT Stavece. 
022444191 or 722-432. multinaud. 


FUFKRJKrJBMY ESCORT rt-trau- 
d saves. TeL- flff/5572-HJ 


FRAMOWT/MUNtCH Mde Ecowt 
Service. 069/336441 & 069/3518226 











































































































■>£1 aaaia mmmm 

I!!! HIM* Hill 

!■■■ UHHHHU 

iiiihii iiiiiii 
ar ,£■■■■ am 
IS!!!!! aiaiuaa 


PEANUTS 


(THIS IS MY REPORT 
L ON 5LE EP J 



SLEEP IS SO VOU 
WON'T LIE AWAKE 
ALL NIGHT WORRYING 
ABOUT TOMORROW... 


TO BE BEAUTIFUL, YOU 
SHOULD GO TO SEP 
EARLY, AND NOT STAY UP 
ALL NIGHT WATCHING 
PUMB PROGRAMS 


WAKE UP AUAM 


BOOKS 



THE PAINTING OF MODERN 
LIFE: Paris in the Art of Manet and 
His Followers 


2-1 I 


aiaaaaa aaaaaH 

aamn aaaaaaa 


By T. J. Clark. 33 8 pp, Illustrated. S25. 
Knopf, 201 East 50th Street, 

New York, N. Y. 10022. 


BLOND IE 


^ DOTJT TBJ_ ME 
VOUB NAME, I'LL 
—» think op rr y— 


aaaaaaa aBaaaaa 
aaiiinaii aaaa 


^ ISN'T THIS M 0£SWO CO i iNO.TWATSl, f M 

SILLY ! WHAT'S BUV\STEAD ) > NOT IT r' J V 

w V- { it } ' 


{ IP I'M NO 
S THEN WH 
* ? 


NOT AAS, 
WHO AM 


Reviewed by John Gross 


I MPRESSIONISM has traditionally been 
defined in terms of its methods — never 


more eloquently than in the account written by 
Lbe poet Jules Laforgue in 1883, which T.J. 


ACROSS 

1 Venue 

5 "Cave " 

10 Radar signal 

14 Genus of 
freshwater fish 

15 Three-time 
A.L. batting 
champ 

16 Punjabi 
potentate 

17 Border on 

18 Talent for 
making 
million s 

20 Ornamental 
handwork 

22 All-day rains 

23 Belle taken to 
Troy 

24 As to 

25 Cotton cloth 

27 Called on 

31 Eating area 

32 Keynes's topic 

33 Browning’s 

" Brans’* 

34 Fiddler-crab 
genus 

35 Become 
greater 

40 Tidied (up) 

44 Famed twister 
of words 

45 Throws out 

46 Dante 
Illustrator 


47 What the 
toxophilite did 

48 Characteristic 
marks 

51 Burst inward 

54 Criterion 

56 Pitcher 

57 Two-toed sloth 

58 Passover feast 

59 Cozy 

OOJupati.e.g. 

61 Hebrew 
months 

62 Tupolevs, for 
short 


13 Cries of 
contempt 
19 Ankle: Comb, 
form 

21 Got out of the 
saddle 

25Ferberetal. 


BEETLE BAILEY 


Lbe poet Jules Laforgue in 1883, which T.J. 
Gaik quotes in his introduction to “The Paint- 
ing of Modem Life." The Impressionist, ac- 
cording* io Laforgue, “sees and renders nature 
as she is. which is to say solely by means of 
colored vibrations.” Instead of the hard edges 
of academic art. he paints living irregular lines; 
instead of relying on mechanical rules, he es- 
tablishes perspective by means of subtle atmo- 
spheric touches: where an academic landscape 
is bathed in an even white light, he sees “rich 
prismatic decompositions of color.” 


Their painting was often problematic uj 
turn, never more so than in “Olympia.” A 
prostitute, evidently, but everything else about 
the wav she was depicted baffled or outraged 
Manet's contemporaries. Analyzing the rea- 
sons for their discomfiture. Claik concludes 
that it was because of the way the picture 
signals —obliquely, and therefore all the more 
disturbingly — the pan played by dass in the 
game of prostitution. 

By comparison with the p ast, th e social Sta- 
tus of prostitution was becoming blurred. A; 
different but equally modem kind of oncer-, 
tainry characterized the emergence of those- 
resorts on the outskirts of big cities — Aigen- 
leuil was a classic example — where industry, 
encroached on the countryside, and where at- 
the same time the working class and the lower 
middle dass increasingly came to spend their 

. ■ .L!. 1 UanM ■ 


leisure. In painting this border zone Manet; 
Monet and Seurat might conceal or modify its 
less agreeable features (the boys portrayed by 
Seurat in tbc river at Asnifcres. Tor instance, 
were in fact bathing opposite the mouth of a 
sewer), but in their best pictures they brought- 
out its contradictions, ami those of the society; 
it symbolized. , , ■ 

Two key developments taking place in that 
society were the emergence of the lower middle 
class and the commercialization erf leisure- 
Boih can be sensed in the background of “A 
Bar at the Folies-Ber^fcre," although it is an; 
wii gT^arir- picture, which sets out to defeat 


26 Mooring place 
28 Scores of 


28 Scores of 

aiinimnal 

scores 


29 Role at a roast 

30 Pairs 

36 Bit 

37 Philanthropist 
Pratt 


DOWN 


IPartofa 

baseball 

2 Russian hut 

3 Iffy 

4 Ultra 

5 Remark 

6 Property-title 
receiver 

7 Nest, in Nice 

8 Not straight- 
forward 

9 Of a secret 
society 

10 Trained; 

oriented 
llNobelistin 
Physics: 1914 
12 Addition: 
Abbr. 


38 Gratiano’s 
bride 

39 Handled 

40 Hue man 

41 Elementary 
texts 


42 Sloping 
walkway 

43 Nugatory 

48 “Rip 

Presley hit 

49 Singer- 
songwriter 
Hendryx 

50 Like certain 
controls 

520.T.book 
53 Energy units 
55 Scheherazade 
slept here 


New York Tams, edited by Eugene Makska. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


f Listen... he£ sayin’ his purrs / 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
m by Henri Arnold and Bqb Lee 


Unscramble these loir Jumbles, 
one latter to aach square, to farm 
lour ordinary words. 


CLOIG 


ZEBAL 


INCUVA 


DANCEN 



Now arrange the circled letters to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


Print answer here: 


Yesterday's 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Jumbles: TOPAZ CYCLE MOROSE TRUANT 


Answer What the losing team was when mere was 
an upset In the ball game— UPSET 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


Barcelona 
Belem de 
Berlin 
Brussels 


fulling 
Heme Kuos 


Cota Del Sol 

Dobfln 

EdtaborM 

Florence 

FRwHfnrt 


New Delhi 

Seoul 

Shanghai 

Singapore 

ToM 

Tokyo 


AFRICA 


Algiers 
Cairo 
Cepe Town 


Lai 

LUMP 

London 

MNSrM 


Rrrklovflt 

Same 

stoddtfta 

Strasbourg 

Venice 


311 d 

1 * 61 fr 

8 46 lr 

i a ci 

I 31 Ci 

-7 19 If 

■6 XI fr 

-l 30 d 

* -a d 

-12 10 sw 

9 44 r 

0 32 a 

■S 23 d 

1 31 fr 

-16 3 sw 

1 34 a 

-I » ef 

2 36 O 

I 34 o 

1 34 cl 


M 64 3 38 

22 72 11 52 
24 75 13 55 
14 61 6 43 

22 72 16 *1 
26 82 12 54 
16 61 8 46 


Tunis 16 61 B 46 cl 

LATIN AMERICA 


BamesAAvs no 

Una 27 B1 18 64 d 

MetfcaCHy 25 77 6 43 IY 

Rlo da Janeiro 2B 82 23 73 a 

saa Paolo — — — — na 


NORTH AMERICA 


MIDDLE 


6 43 1 34 cl 

EAST 

5 41 1 34 d 


TelAriv 

OCEANIA 
Auckland 
Svaanr _ „ 


14 57 4 39 cl 

12 55 B 46 a 

18 64 11 H a 


Dcktund 34 75 15 59 d 

MOM 31 B8 50 68 Cl 

d-doudv; fa-tooav; fr-f qir: tu alii 
soenawers; iw -a n ow ; st-stertny. 


AndiorMo 1 

Atlanta 18 

Boston i 

CMCBSO -11 

Dm -15 

Detroit -7 

Honolulu 25 

Kaastan 2 

Las ApooUs 17 

Miami 26 

M inn eapo li s -21 

Montreal .11 

Nassao M 

New York 2 

San Fraud ice 14 

Seattle 2 

Toronto -4 

WasMaataa 5 

twmli- pc-earHv i 


Nassao 
New York 
SanFraadKO 
Seattle 


O^irca S. ToniftM ' — 8 15Z — 46). ROME: Partly cloudy. Temp. 16—2 (M — 361- 
TELAVIV: Cloudy. Temp. 19-12 ( 66 - 541. ZURICH: Cloudv. Toma 7-1 
IM—34). BANGKOK*. Foow. Toma H— 21 (90— TO). HONG KONG: Fair. 
Tama. 17 — 11 (63— 52>. MANILA: Fair. Ten*. 29 — 20 (84 - 681. SBOUL: Snow. 
Toma. 2 — l 136—301. SINGAPORE: Stormv. Temp. 29— J« (84 — 75). 
TOKYO: Fair. Tamm 8— 2 146— 36). 



Clark does not dissent, but he argues that the 
form of the new an created by Manet and his 
followers was inseparable from its content. 
Taking his cue from an essay by Meyer Scha- 
plro. he sees it as an art dedicated to a certain 
idea — or illusion — of modernity, which its 
practitioners found embodied in “the objective 
forms of bourgeois recreation in the 1860s and 
1 870s." The boulevards and parks and boating 
parties that they painted were an image of 
social change, of die new pleasures on offer in 
an expanding, rapidly developing world; 
though it is a major part of their achievement 
that they saw through those pleasures to the 
uncertainties beneath. 


man y of our normal expectations. But at least 
Clark has no doubts about why the young 
woman at the bar wears such an impassive 
look. Sine* she is not a member of the bour- 
geoisie, expression of any kind is the enemy, 
“fw to express oneself would be to have one's 
dass be legible." 

“The Paintingof Modern Life" has much to 
recommend it. Clark, who teaches art history 
at Harvard University, writes with consider- 
able verve; his interpretations of individnal- 
paimings are often ill uminating , and he is 
soaked m the social history of the period with 
which be deals. 

Yei ul timat ely be remains weighed down by 1 
the chums of ideology. Indeed, he begins by 
rather defiandy shaking his fetters, delivering a 
short prologue on class, “social, practice" and 
neo- Marxist concepts such as the “spectacular 
society” (“The spectacle is ccpital accumulatejl 
until it becomes an image"). Economic rela- 
tions are treated not merely as important, bin 
absolute, and stretches of intricate argument 
have a way of culminating in an abrupt ampli- 
fication. “What is visible in modem life," we 
are told at the end of a comparison between 
Manet and Degas, “is not character but class 1 ” 
— as though erne excluded the other. 

There is in fact an interesting tension in the 
book between Clark’s admir ation for Impres- 
sionist ait and his disapproval of its bourgeois 
tendencies, which sometimes surfaces quite 
sharply. On the very last page he berates it for 
its "complaisance at modernity,” though be 
also concedes that it has redeeming political 
qualities. Seurat's “La Grande Jatte m partic- 
ular is singled out for praise, though it wffl 
come as no surprise to anyone who has accom- 
panied Clark thus far that what he values it for 
is above all its successful attempt “to find form 
for the appearance of dass in capitalist soci- 
ety." 


ANDY CAPP 


C-i—s H iwp tp w . w 

Oai a, Amwtca SymMow 


r mouldthatbethe IT IS. BUT DCNT 

y ANC*V CAPP THEY ^ BEUEVEALL'OjJ'VE 

[H/EKEGCIN3GN ABOUT? HEARD -HE’S ^ 

BUXEWHBMVOU 
T ^3, GET TO KNOW HIM- 


jusryouhMCH 

S YOUR AHQUTHHr' 


The four long sections that make up the 
main body of “The Painting of Modem Life" 



WIZARD of ID 

tb«1rgWP5IX0WC% 1 

A&inll irt Wti&rAom? ] 

omce 




r i* ^ 

A&WHfetiO 

\ Yc*) j 


\&ES& 
TH& is 
GOG*- 
Bariev 


JPSt is 


are neatly balanced. Tbe focus of the first is 
Paris, the Paris that was drastically remodeled 
by Napoleon HI and Baron Haussmann. Then 
there is a disquisition built a round one of 
Manet’s most famous images of a woman, tbe 
courtesan Olympia with her cat at the foot of 
the bed and her black maid bringing in flowers. 
After that we move back to a topographical 
theme — ArgemeuiL the liule riverside town 
on the outskirts of Paris that the Impressionists 
particularly favored; and then there are a set of 
reflections prompted by another woman paint- 
ed by Manet, the barmaid at the Folies-Ber- 
gere- 

Since 1830. Clark writes. Parisians had be- 
lieved that their dty was disappearing and that 
a new one was bang reared on its ruins. To 
start with, this was largely a fantasy, but it was 
a fantasy that was to be turned into solid 
reality bv Haussmann’s schemes, which drove 
much of the working class out of tbe center of 
the city and left it in the hands of the bourgeoi- 
sie. 

A critic who was hostile to the Impression- 
ists might contend that essentially they were 


met'. 


celebrating tbe new dispensation — only when 
the city had been taken over by members of 


REX MORGAN 


ALL W 

MARTHA DANE HAVE A P 
SHE CAME QUITE CHEAP? 
PAID TEN TIMES THAT A 
w SAVE you FROM MAR* 




SAVE ME? PONT YOU WITHOUT 

REALIZE WHAT YOU'VE DONE? HER, 
MARTHA IS THE ONLY WQVlAKJ NOTHING 
rVE EVER BEEN IN LOVE . I HAVE IS 
WITH' ^ rT*l IMPORTANT, 
BARBARA! 


the city had been taken over by members of 
their own class did they regard it as worth 
depicting on its own accounL A defender 


would reton that although they did indeed 
devote themselves to Daintine the new Paris, 


devote themselves to painting the new Paris, 
they found it strange and problematic rather 
than charming. 


John Gross is on the staff of The New York 
Times. I 



BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 


O N the diagramed deal 
west found the winning 


GARFIELD 


opening lead against three 
spades doubled. East who had 
made his vulnerable overcall 
with little defensive strength, 
was feeling nervous about tbe 
penalty doable. 

After tbe routine lead of a 
heart. South would have had a 
good chance to make the con- 
tract, since a losing club from 
the closed hand would be dis- 
carded on hearts. But the lead 
of tbe club queen was derisive. 

South ducked in dummy, 
and East overtook with the 
king and shifted to a diamond. 
West took two diamond tricks 
and played a (hud round, after 


NER/WAL.WOOLP VOO 

like to ee like me 

WHEN WOO GROW OP? 


GOSH VE6/ IV LIKE TO 

ee like voo when r 
T GROW OP _ r' 


ANP OP, « 
AND OP, 
AND OOT 
ANDOOT. 
AND OP f 


l THAT BOV WAV 
NOT SEE HIS 
NEXT BIRTHDAV 




s&ssS I 


pm 


j?m paves 


g) 19B5 Ur«M Feature Syrvscale inc J 


which Sooth did well to take 
right tricks. 

The diamond was ruffed 
with the spade nine, and a low 
heart wasted. East had to con- 
sider the danger that South 
was void in hearts but reached 
the conclusion: A double 
would be less appealing to 
West with three hearts, and 
South had not attempted to 
dispose of a dub loser by a 
quick ruffing finesse against 
East's presumed heart ace. 

So East pul up the heart ace 
and shifted to tne spade eight. 
This was won in dummy , the 
club ace was cashed and a club 
was ruffed. The North and 
South hands each held two 
(rumps and West had three. 


but he was only able to score 
one of them, for a ooe-tridt 
defeat, when diamonds were 
led from the closed hand. 


NORTH (D) 

6AEI7 

VKQ7 

084 

4A885 

WEST EAST 

it««, 

6 A Q 8 1,111,11 0 72 

• QJ94 4 K 10 3 

SOUTH 
4 J 8S4 
9 J 

o x j io o 8 a 

472 

BoD a Idea wore TUtoeraMe. Tho 


ttokfiog: 

North 

Boot 

Senh 

Wai 

1 N.T. 

25 

2* 

3 <9 

3 ♦ 

Pan 

Pan 

DbL 

Put 

Para 

Pan 



West M tba dob quoen. 


Canadian Stock Markets Jan. 31 


i Amsterdam i Bow.vw.Bai* 

n... ITT BMW 

rra*. Commerzbank 
386 Conttoumml 
1*8 Daimler-Benz 
142 Deaurao 
Wl 10 Deutvbe Babcock 
216 Deutsche Bank 
221 JO Dresdner Bonk 
8J0 DUB-Sdiuthe 
73J0 GHH 
152.00 Had* let 
S5J0 HDKfHT 
3X50 Hoescft 
lliTO Holanonn 
7120 Horton 
mat Mo u-tsafe 
1S5J0 Karstodt 
62 J 0 Kaufhof 
4&60 KHD 
48 PCJoacfcner Werfco 
28450 Kruap SMil 
159 JO Linde 
301 Lufllnma 
69 MAN 

WJO M a rine s n m i b i 
74 Metal loasellsclian 
J3L7D MuenOkAuedc 
6740 Pr*mao 

44 RuetoervWerfce 
185 RWE 
33S Scherina 
29 Sieme ns 
U3 Thvsson 
119 Varto 
VOba 

ANP.CBS Caaaral Index :19MB VEW 
l*rivkw» : HSN Valkswooemverk 

Source: AFP. . 


Prices In Canadian cents unless marked S 


Toronto 


82 Aotl Prce 

1 00 Ack lands 
SSOOAorrtcoE 
1300 Agra Intf A 

17953 AH Enerar 
5600 Alto Nat 
550 Alto Cant 

14153 Ataoma SI 

101 Anars WAf 
14246 Ai-Bcm 

SArousCpr 
17400 Aten 1 1 
2126 BP Canada 
| 2932SBq>ik BC 
103531 Bank H S 
4M95 Bdrrlck 0 
14226 Bonanza R 
13250 Brolomj 
5515 Brctmnlea 
2100 Brenda M 
65328 BCFP 
218460 BC Res 
15713 BC Phone 
19660 Bnmswk 
4530 Budd Can 
123467 CAE 
S00CCLA 
58000 CDlsIbBt 
7200 Cod Frv 
4100 C Nor W09l 
UMCPockrs 
8150 Con Trust 


2SDOCdn Nat Res 
84717 CTIre A l 
1000 C Util B 
350 Cara 
10496 CWcnase 
2900CDts!t>A 
58000 CDistb B ( 
0400 CTL Bank 
BtCenmlA 
12400 CaaokaR 
loo Conran A 
U900 Crown* 
i 28200 Czar Res 
155788 Doon Dev 
500 Doan A 
78458 Denison A 
135613 Denison Bf 
3820 Dovetcon 
2S55Q Dldmsn A I 

inoDKknonB 

am gisr 1 * 

13000 Equity Sw 
22905 F 



200 IfigUl 
2055 inland Cos 
16018 inter Pipe 
750 Ivans 


Ml e* Lew Oaee Cbae 
S3344 3376 3J*— to 

517 I? 17 
SI3U 131b 13VS 

*6 6 6 —Hi 

52IW 204b 2DVs— 
515V* 15«i 1513- 
S19to to 19Ya + to 
5344. 23 Hi 27to— 1 
5241. 36« 2*16— to 
5179* 17VS 17to— W 
SIHk llto llto — to 
89* BW 813— 
*20 27to a + to 
s* 5to 6 
SWto l4to 14»— 3b 
13S 129 130 —3 

410 *00 410 

S5to 5to 5to + 
SIB . 17to 174b— 
SUM llto 1134— to 

si 2 to llto nto+to 

254 241 241 —11 

S23to 2» 23 
*16 151i 16 + 

51 8 to 18Va 181V— to 
ST 7to 1*to 17 — 

S27to 27V, 27to + V. 
86 V, 6Va 6 to — to 
515V , I5VS 15to 
S23to 23to 2Jto— to 
S29to 29V2 29 to 
*33to 33 33'A- 

*15to IS 15to+ to 
S32H 31to J1TV— 
33 33 32 —3 

SlOto 10V> lOto — to 
SITto 17to 17to + 
5lito llto llto 
5771 Tto 758— V» 
*6to 6>i 6to+ to 
S6*i 6to 6VV— 
Siito llto llto 
Uto 0 B —to 
251 240 250 — 5 

513 13 13 

5l7to 17to I7to 
156 145 155 — I 

298 297 297 —1 

300 300 300 —10 
SI 4 to 13to 17to— Ito 
SI3to l» 12to— Ito 
sidto in toto+ to 
475 435 440 +20 

485 470 48S +15 

260 HO 260 

529 28 28to + 

S17» T7V, ITto— to 
S34to 33 to 34 

<20 aa 420 —is 

siivi n iito + to 
56to 6to 64V- to 
820to » 20to+ to 

SIBto 1814 18to 4- to 
S95to Mto NV-. 
*22 Tito 21to-to 
*12 llto 11CI + 
S18to 18 18 

nsto llto IBto-to 

S»to 2614 26 to— to 
suit llto uto— to 
223 318 218 

sioto in* in* 

4 7 4 s /-V 

591 B7to 901H+ 3 
52Bto av* 2IVV — to 
825 25 25 — to 

STY] 714 Tto— Ik 
145 145 145 

*2046 20to 2048— 

* WO Bfc 24J4 — 1 
51 W. 57V, IVA + to 
*53 5148 51 to— 

SM 13to 13to 
SITto 12to 12to 
S15W 15V, IS48+ to 

535 3436 3446— to 

820 20 20 


1900 Jonnock 
1000 Korn Kalla 
lioj Kerr Add 
' 11440* LoUatt 
6110 Lac Mnrts 
lBOOLOntCem 
iWOLacafia 
1385 LL Lac 
3100 LobtawCo 
i W0MDSHA 
1815 MICC 
15364 McfcmHX 
30379 MenandE 
15517 Mo&on A I 
I 1300 Mo Ison B 
11950 Murativ 
I 60625 NoWscpL 
88207Non)nda 
KllONarcen 
10*023 Nva AHA I 
3300 Neenca W 
3636 NuWeT Sp A 
13787 Ookwaad 
32150 Oshawa A f 
400 0 Pa moor 
20000 PonConP 
700 Psmbfna 
700 Pnonlx OT1 
B65S5 Pina Pol M 
1500 Ptace GOa 
31055 Placer 
5273 ProvKjo 


6400 Qua Slurs c 
11900 Rav rack f 


3485 RKtoatti 
6231s Rd StadtsA 
300o Ras Sen, t. 


766 Revn Pro A 
2060 Rogers A 


4500 Raman 
1100 Rothman 
86219 Scedtre 
nooscottst 
24660 Soars pm 

68517 Shell Can 

58060 snetTltt . 


2500 Staler Bt 
3X14 Soutnm 
4900 51 Bradcsf 
115366 StekoA 
2300SUlPtra 


1500 Stoae R 
HJOSuncorpr 
sooo Sydney o 
1200 two. 

3775 Tgck Car A 

97603 TecXBf 


2718 Tax Can 
10940 Thom N A 
101205 Tor Dm Bk 
59275 Tgrstar B I 


64024 TrcdarsA t 
MMTrmMt 
3000 Trtnttv Res 
31782 TmAHn UA 
WBTSTrCan PL 
300STrlnwc 
ITOOTriiac Af 
51800 Turbot 
7938 Unlearn A f 
821 gnCartrfd 
302K7 u Entartsa 


8400 u Keno 
SOU Cltj-HK 
44700 Varan At 
JSOOVestorwi 
15300 WBktwod 
11050 Wastmfci 
944 Weston 
17TM waeovfd A 
lOIOVk Boar 


Hlah Low Clasa Ch'ee 
517V. I2to 12H+to 
105 105 105 +3 

517 17 17 + to 

sasto 25to 25to + 

*87to 27to 2738+ to 
Sioto IB 1 * lOto— to 

siwt im i «* + 

S29Vj 29to 29to 
517% 19Vj 19VS 
sioto im iito 
Z» 225 230 

S2SV, 25 25 — to 

465 460 460 

SlSto II 11 

518 IB 18 + to 

S3R4 20 to aito+to 

S26to 25to 25to— to 
571 to aw 201%- to 
sisto i5v» isto — to 
S7Va 7to Tl— to 
smi 19to l?to 
59 S 59 

85 465 490 —10 

SHto 25 » - 

47S 675 <75 

S26to Mto -26 V) 
S17H 77to 17to+ to 
57 w TV, 714+ to 
527 25to 27 +1J8 
97 M 96 ■— • 1 
S25to 25to 2SU + 
SI 9 T8 19 +Tto 

370 360^360 -S 

57to 7to 7to + 
S3275 32to 32to- to 
52046 20to 20to + 
172 T70 170 — S 

125 121 121 + I 

sjto 8to OH . 
812 llto IWfc- J* 
547to an an— to 
SSto 5to 5H— 
ItVto 19 19to 
S8 7to a 
523 nvb 22to+ to 
SBto Bto Ito— to 
*n io* Kw- a 

559 58Vi 59 + 

51 TV, 12to 12Vh — to 
szjto 2Jto to 

260 245 230 —10 

260 240 360 +90 

suit 2 t to 2*to+^ 
30 28 30 +9 

519*. I9to..l9to + 
512 V, Uto Uto— to 
SI 2to 12to 12to— 
Sllto 11 llto— 
*36 35to ISto— to 
Oi SJto 53to— to 
*1936 in 19—to 
SIB to 18 llto+ to 
S22to 22to 2216 — to 
S7Yl 736 _7to + 
ssvta Sto S\m— to 
574 U. 23*. 24 — to 
5221 m 22to 27to 
44Q 43) 440 

12<3i 2<Vj ZC3K+ to 
47 43to U — 2 
S8to Sto 8to+ to 

*12 llto ins— to 

5123m 12to lZto— to 
SHJto 9to «V- 
112 112 112 
47V) 716 7to+ to 

SUto Uto llto— to 
S16to 16to 16to— Ito 


Cleie Pre«. ] 
339 336 


Other Markets Jan- 31 


Ciosine Prices In local currencies 


AKZO 

Ahotd 

AMEV 

ADom Rub 

Amrobanh 

BVG 

Bueta-maitfi T 

Caiand Hldo 

Etsevier-NDU 

Fakkar 

GW Brocades 

Heineken 

Hoaoovens 

KLM 

Naorden 

Mol H eader 

wadiloyo. _ 

OeeVmSer G 

Pakhoed 

Pfilllps 


Wtnsor 
World Inn 


Close Prow. . 

5J0 5.10 I FnwStGad 


Mona Seng Inden AMSJX2 
PraWeai :1J3SJ4 
Source: Pouter*. 


Johannesburg 


« SS 

CkMC 

Grand Met 
Guhmess 

GU* 

7 Hanoon 

I Hawker 

ZZ ICI 

£8 ■'f* 1 

WO Uouds Bank 


Close Prt* 
521 to S20to 
200 200 
190 199 

12 12 3 m 
295 295 

277 230 

704 714 

218 219 

435 437 


Podamco 

RollncD 


Royal Dutch 
Unilever 

Van Onwneren 
VMF Stork 
VNU 


Psf Sfeyn 
RusJrtat 
SA Brews 
St Helena 


no 720 Imps 193 m 

,28 ,28 Liovds Bank 573 569 

canrho ns 179 

66“ tSS Loans 370 374 

i?S *t°hkaandSp T36 127 

“00 7450 wvrtnl Bos 416 421 

£5 ^ MkTtand Bonk 339 339 

6W0 Hot West Bank 662 659 

*£ Ptlklnofon 283 285 

5575 pfaosev 116 114 

1600 1640 Rocol Elect 312 20B 

» MJ Randtonteta S89to S87to 

3300 3300 Rank 338 3*0 

560 560 Reed kltt 57* 57* 

w(by 'MM . 330 328 

Bdex .989JB Rovol Dutch C 4637764 46 9/32 
RTZ 647 649 

Shew 743 71 B 

STC 253 2S2 

IZ I SW cnartered 519 514 

on | Tote and Lvle 45B 440 

1 Tesco 330 227 

”15 ”!£ Si 

T. I- group 236 21* 

Tmtotoar Hse 364 365 

IS ™ p 151 ’51 

6M 6B Ultramar 203 2ftS 

4*4 499 iMMavar E 11 61/64 12 

“ ^ united .Biscuits 195 191 

363 376 VI Aen 333 220 

“ » WJ300P *36 V. S3S 

37 33 WtloWm S38 S27U. 

* S Wor Loan jto c34to aa 6 

lto in Wool worth 593 S9B 

S S ZCI " " 

245 247 PtoanOal Timas ladeK : fts.ii 

134to >Z3to PneMaas : 98478 

«4 6S2 source: AFP. 


5625 5575 Ptemev 
1600 1640 RocolElect 


» M9 Randlonreln 
*300 3300 Rank 


CampoUto Stock index :9<9JI 


Source: APP. 


Brussels 


Artwd 

Bekaert 

Cocke rill 

EBES 

OBL 

GB-lnno-BM 


ConaefiSMS Index L14IJ9 
Prevteus : U4840 

Source: AFP. 


London 


AACorn 
Allied- Lyons 
I Anolo Am Gold 


Hong Kong 


Hoooken 
KrerOrtbank 
Petroflno 
Soo Generals 
5eflna 
Salvor 
Traction Elec 
VteHie Montooae 


Stock BUdi a n es Index ; IA6SJ7 
Prtvloos : 1A6L02 

Source: APP. 


Frankfurt 


AEG-Telolunken 
Allianz Vara 
Bast 
Bayer 

Bcver-Hvea. 


Bk East Asia 
Oteuna Kang 
CMnaUoht 
Crass Harbor 
Hang Sang 
HKEIac 
HK Hotels 
HK Land 
HK Shanghai 
HK Tel 

SJrt5!wUpod 

JardbatMatti 

Jerome s*c 
■■ ~~1 New veer id 

jrf I Shaw Bras 

ci-I 1 SHK Props 

174 113 Slnje Darby 

1067 1066 Sfehm 
1B1 181 JD Swire Pacific B 
1B9.5D 189J0 Wheef/tom- 
fit m 323 Wheelock 


„ BAT. 

24J0 XUS Beectiom 
13^0 I3J0 BICC 
1L80 14 *0 BL 

1099 II BOC Group 
46J5 44J0 Boots 

B 7Z0 Bawater Indus 
32J0 31 JO BP 

4A0 A2S Brit Home St 

9 8.90 Brit T e lec om 

61 60 JD BTH 

5J0 555 Bwmtan 

20 19J0 Cotfttory Scltw 

BJ5 »J5 Owner Cons 

&50 WS Coats Patens 

5 S5 MB Cons Gold 
2A5 18 Caurtoukts 

9 JO tjts Doigety 
6J0 6.10 De Beers 

1A5 1 jo Distillers 


i metal 

LotargeCap 

Legrond 

I ‘Oreo I 
Metro 
MIOtelLn 
MM Pertnar 
Meet Henneuv 
Moulinex 
Nani-Eot 
Occidental 
Pernod Rlc. 
Petrules I tool 
Peugeot 
Pacta In 
Prlntamoe 
Rod lot echo 
Redoute 
Roussel Udnf 
Skis Rosslunol 
Sour .Perrier 

Tele me can 
Thomson CSF 
Voted 


ton 

Prev 


Clew 

Prev 

7*40 

77,10 

Santos 

528 

516 

406 

40450 

Sleigh 

180 

HI 

1984 

2086 

Southland 

25 

-22 

ZI7S 

2395 


91 

80 

two 

1077 

WBrtTtakJ 

330 

JIB 

66 

1957 

67.90 

1955 

AB until Mule* index: 77340 
previous: 76M0 


10050 100.10 
7940 7190 
712 693 

71* 716 

2SD40 353 

275 374.90 
SO ^ 
19240 T9d 
268 *57 I 

1240 1221 I 

1597 1599 . 

1990 2010 I 

*8550 «0 


Tokyo 


Aka! 

Asahl Cham. 
Arab l Class 
BK Tokyo 


4BS 

715 675 


<54 456 

253 3*6 


Agon index : 19195 
Prevtout : n&22 
CAC Index ; 1964 
Prev i o us : 1952 

Source: AFP. 


5310 5320. 

272 .775 


Singapore 


Beushtod 
Cold storage 

DBS 

FmerNeav* 

How Par 


Kappet Shio 
Mol Banking 
OCBC 
OUB 

Sen* Shlpvard 
S Darby 

SSieamsMp 
St Tradlna 
UOB 


773 147 

249 243 
6.10 60S 

540 535 

221 217 

245 Z61 

148 140 

6.10 6.10 
9-35 9.10 

442 4 

149 141 

1.94 129 

1.1* 129 

450 446 

440 454 


OUB index :«ZL77 

Previous :4T*J7 

Source: Overseas Union Bank. 


Stockholm 


320 2340 1 orlafanteln 


4J0 4,175] RiOM 


T» 153 

497 492 

141 Ml 

47B 476 

«<73 r*55 

306 Ml 

524to *22to 

36to 37 

281 295 


376 

'£ I Mi 

IS Banco Comm 
uf Centra le 
™ agstaleb 
Cred Hat 


AGA 

SnoLaeal 


1 Conodian indexes Jan. 37 t 

dose Praetart 
Montreal .134.116 

Toronto 1595JW W0190 

Montreti: Stock Exchange Industrials index. 
Toronto: TSE 380 Index. 


Solution to Previous Puzzle 


Montreal 


r ITY B PL rrrl ACB r 

A R I y 0 |v|iT gpMBT|MjT[Hpr 

1 t 1 a|s 1 t 1 eMQUJ|R u I sPBaIcIc 

^■hIoIsmpioh ■fIrIeIe 


™ 3£ T "™' a 

a 2 F Insider 

— itotcamantl 
NtocNobanca 

_ Montctfeqn 
p Oftoem 
_ Pirelli 
N KA5 

— Rlrmscarrte 

H sip 

— sma 
A Stonda 


Astra 

Atlas Caeca 
Bollden 
Electrolux 
Ericsson 
ElNttl . 


Scab-Scan lq 
Sondvlk 
Ucoaska 
SKF 

SwedlShMQtdi 

Valve 


362 360 . 

196 197 

345 350 

N.Q. 400 
113 111 

17* TO 
277 269 

290 279 

375 NjQ. 
107 1 07 

213 20* 

44* 440 

385 383 

9550 9* 

192 no 
248 269 

263 255 


Conan 1420 

Dal Nip. Prim 
Dohn 
Full Bonk 
Full Photo 
Fuiltsu 
Hitachi 

Hondo Meter 
IHI 
IMi 

Jot 5310 5320 

Kallma 
KaneaJ Pv» 

Kao Soap 
Kaw steel 
Kirin Brew 
Komatsu 

Kubota NA 

Matsu Elind 
Matsu ELWks 
Mitsubishi Bk 
MircubiOwm. 

MBsuM Elec 
MltsuM Heavy 
Mitsubishi 
Mitsui Co. 

Mltsukoshl 

Mitsumi NjQ. 1110 

NtokoSac 
NEC 

Nlppansieei 

N kroon Yusen 

Nissan Molar 

Nomura 

Olvmnvs 

Rtaob .„ 

Shots 1110 1988 

Sony Carp 4110 4890 

Sumli Bank lore 16» 

Sumir Cham. Zll 210 

Sumlt Metal 145 M5 

Tatsel 190 

TalsnaMar 372 

Takeaa B26 — , 

Tallin 446 

Tokyo Cl Pwr 1580 

Tokyo Marine 7Z7 7^ 

Torov 453 <38 

Toyota 1>«8 13« 

Yomalcni 610 617 

Kaw Umax: 92126 
PlBUhHH: 929.79 


Mkke+OJ Index: 1WI2J1 
Praelow: lUtQO 

I Zurltfi 


Pre v io us :«9lJ0 
Source: AFP. 


Sydney 


MIB lodes : 1.153 

PravidM ; 1,1*3 
Source: AFP. 


SlSto 12to 12to— to 
*80 79to 79to— 

si ih lift llto— to 

siOto wto ioto+to 


IFIHFITIH101F J tiTLm 


Total Sales: I8531J<0 shores 


04692 Bonk Mont 


100CIL 

13600 Son Betti *18 

10510 Dam Tm A 512Vi 

4908Mitf Trst ItjVi 

147499 Not Bk Me 5Wt 

18945 Power Corn s2Sto 

725 Rotlcnd A 517 

*1353 ROVdl Bonk Ulto 

2050 Rov Tr^Co OlBto 

ratal Soles: 2491344 shares 


MOf£ NEWS IN LE55 TIME 

THE WOUII IN 16 PAGES 

DAILY IN THE IHT 


High Low Dass Cftgt 
OTA 278k Z79V— ■ «k 
STSto 28to 2*to— to 
SIB 17*h 10 + to 
S12to l2to I2to — to 
JMto Mto J4to+ to 
51 ito 16to 16 to + to 
S2Sto 2! 2TA+ to 
517 17 17 — to 

S3)to 31to 31 to— to 
(lBto I7to 18to 


T A LjCMAjl |N WA|P|g»pK!| 

- - E B |o| R E |Aj M W p l E l T l A l L ( 

t ± mBi t 3Mi imi i itiaItIei 
A N l S)EMBe |T)A)SBBI iria] 
[n Th E[t]e|E|N|T|HIHJ0|1.|E|S| 
I N Q A MP A T E rMIh 0 S E 
C| E|stsMAlTiolNlEMQ|R|TlSl 

a /1785 


Air Ltquida 
Ah thorn ati 
A v Dassault 




BlC 

Bauyaues 
B5N-GD 
Corretaur 
Club Mod 
CodmoB 

DWMZ 
EH-AoolTUine 
Europe 1 
Gen Earn 


596 590 

222 Z25 

880 TO 
61 1 410 

ffi 98 

2365 240* 
1845 1» 

1201 1202 
262 268 
700 711 

231.90 23* 

9*1 1026 

iSB 


AO 

AN! 

ANZ 

BMP 

Beret 

paugglftvfne 

BromoMs 

COM 

Coraekd 


C9R 

Dunlop 

Elders 

Hooker 

Mooolfan 

miM 

Mrsr 

OakbrMue 


Bank Lou 
Brow n Bovert 

OboGefgr 

Credit srnw 

Etectnnmtt 

Oearv Ftscher 

Jacob Suchard 

jetraoJi- 

LandieDvr 

Nestle 

Onrtfkon-a 

Roche Babv 

Sondor 

Schindler 

Sutler 

SBC 

Swissair 
Swiss vollabeuk 
Union Bonk 
Winterthur 
Zurich ins 


ssg 
3s m 

2745 V* 
752 1* 

6450 64S) 
2020 ij5 
1450 Mg 
6140 4UJ 
«79 M* 

X* 50 S& 

7800 77 TS 
3*50 3 m 
35 

ii 1 

3710 52 
<350 4P» 

awoossoflo 


SBC Index :«U0 


HA: not ouored; NA: *P 
evewabla: xd: ex ^ etaend. 






^v ( - «, „ . 




Hocke v 


^iMiding* 




•; a ; v ■ ,o - 

* a l - ■; 

is a •• J 

'5 'i < 

1 | y 


k : 

1 6 !. 

In n 








- “■nrgwjp.. m •-* 


'■ ir- 


^ Ciev* 




'“’CTOO 

“har.ft, 

i r -'=na 

‘■'tovgicr 


uenup, 

^JSIOn 

^ Ante 
;->?«*! 
^s'sas ; 




itior 


. :r- , — 

.ygSiS ir " s ' " 


=>£Hv: 
r *S®"Wr. 
U'a Br W 


='STR6 
r ^"- 'a/ 
L -*°Oue. 






aL ,l,rn ' 
80 ^ L 


•to*.."®- 
V LtCn e-l' 


^w* | SS Cboa *i:n 


1 O.L'^toe 
^e! 1 







.:-Y- 




s • 

I nil. 

« i$\\ 

t -J {.'fit 

,; !.: 4 fe*f 

u ■ iS|i 

u •* *H* 

:■ lr pi 

a . :; g jU? 

S ? ||i 

n ■ i i 1 

u ■ \ 

: -i i-| 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1. 1985 


Pi ige 17 


r^Bg, rr 
“ S'. S., L. 

. s&i 


r id 

SV' <? 
t? 

•* «*s , 


.i 

r- : ^ 5 - 

te'aii * 

S - 
: - ?. rf > " 



Chris Evert Lloyd: “I can still play my best" 1 


; "t •- 


76ers, on Home Court, 
Down Celtics, 122-104 


ur 
s 


a 



■" The Associated Press 

~ PHILADELPHIA — Maybe the 
: only way to settle the issue of supe- 
~ riority between the Phfladelphia 
i 76ers and die Boston Celtics is to 
> jtai them on a neutral court. 

•: The 76ers, with Moses Malone 
, ; scoring 38 pants and gathering 24 

"• ‘ NBA FOCUS 

j rebounds, rooted the Celtics 
___ Wednesday night, 122-104. 

“ That evened the season series be- 
tween the National Basketball As- 
sociation powerhouses at two vic- 
tories each, Boston winnin g both at 
home and Philadelphia a pair on its 
home court. 

, Elsewhere in the NBA, its was 
Indiana 120, Cleveland 115; De- 
troit 120, Kansas Gty 1 16; Wash- 
ington.. 106, Chicago 95; Phoenix 
1 10. New York 93. and Houston 
lid. the Los Angeles Lakers 113. 
“It’s always tough to win down * 
—here,” said Boston’s Larry Bird, 
who was held to 16 points. 

. Philadelphia's Julios Erving, 
.who scored . 15 points, said. “In 
Boston we fell apart at the end. 
Tonight they fell apart at the end." 

Both teams managed 45 field 
goals, but the 76ers were 31 for 32 
from the foul line; while Boston 


had only 11 of 19. Malone was a 
perfect 16-for-16 on free throws. 

There also was the possibility 
(hat Boston could have been tired 
from having played an back-to- 
back nights. 

“We might be a tired team but 
that doesn’t take away from Phila- 
delphia's fine performance.” said 
Boston’s coach. K.C Jones. 

The weariness theory made the 
Sheen' coach, BOly Cunningham, 
bristle. 

“If you followed us, yon know 
we have the most road games of 
any team in the league and have 
been to the West Coast twice. If 
anything, we are the ones who need 
the resv he said. 

Neither Cunningham dot Erring 
felt the score would have any im- 
pact on die series. 

“It means we’re 2-2 for the series 
and that's all," said Cunningham. 

Erving said th e victo ry “keeps us 
f^Taffl&Two^~a _ half gams 
behind” the Atlantic Division- 
1 Karifng Celtics, who now lead Phil- 
adelphia by half a game. 

Bird, who had scored 80 points 
including two game- winning bas- 
kets in the last two games, said the 
76ers played him very aggressively. 

“They doubled on me and I just 
couldn’t get into position,” he said. 


ire 


SCOREBOAR D 

Hockey ~~j j 


SPORTS 


For Evert, Still a Process of Growing 


By Peter Alfano 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — When she reflects on her 
career, Chris Evert Lloyd prefers to think in 
terms of how she has grown, not aged. It is a 
subtle but an important distinction. 

Evert remembers her emergence as a bash- 
ful teen-ager, nicknamed Chnssie, Liule Miss 
Cool, the Ice Maiden. She remembers being 
“inhibited and a little afraid,” compared to 
the way she sees herself now — as a 30-year- 
old, self-assured role model for women's ten- 
nis who is still improving. Chnssie, she says, 
would be no match for Even. 

Until last weekend, however, some fans 
may have preferred to remember her as 
Chnssie, a shy but also a steely tough base- 
liner who would rally interminably for a 
point, until winning it became more a matter 
of principle than worth. Chnssie was the 
young woman who dominant tennis dttring 
ihel970s, when her sole purpose was to be 
.the best 

“I was more single-minded then,” Evert 
said Tuesday. ”1 bad better con centra lion. 1 
had nerves of stecL” 

In the past two years, her nerves became 
jangled when she faced Martina Navratilova. 
Thirteen times they had played since the 1982 
Australian Open, and all 13 times Navrati- 
lova had won. Most times the matches were 
excruciatingly dose, and Even could single 
out a point or two that had made the differ- 
ence, but that bad made losing more frustrat- 
ing. 

If Navratilova had not become an obses- 
sion, she had become an obstacle for Evert, 
whose ambition was to regain her No. 1 spot 
in the world. Instead, she heard that she 
would never beat her again and that Navrati- 


lova might be the most dominant player of all 
time. 

'The leiiers and response 1 got from people 
the last two years mostly said. 'Please beat 
Martina,’ " Evert said Tuesday in an inter- 
view. “They weren’t used to seeing me lose.” 

Then last Sunday, in the final of a tour 
event at Key Biscayne, Florida, she defeated 
Navratilova, 6-2, 6-4. The victory was espe- 
cially sweet because Navratilova had said 
that, even on an off day, she thought she 
could beat Even. It was a victory that might 
have silenced some .skeptics — for now. 

“People were starting to doubt me, to lose 
faith.” Even said. “And I wondered some- 
times whether 1 would ever beat her a gain 
That’s why winning gave me a lot of satisfac- 
tion. I had been coming dose, but instead of 
giving up, thinking it was futile, I showed I 
can still play my best." 

She showed that the toughness was still 
there, the need to compete and win. She may 
not be as driven as she once was, she said, but 
she is willing to make the sacrifices necessary 
to remain at the top. 

In the 1970s, when she was dominant, it 
was the other women who had to measure up. 
When Tracy Austin beat Even at her own 
baseline game five consecutive times, she un- 
derstood it was time for her to change. She 
was introduced to the net. 

Then, when Navratilova began to over- 
power her with a more physical style. Evert, 
the one who never appeared to sweat, began 
pumping iron. “Not to be a body builder ” 
she said, “but for more strength. Martina is 
stronger than any of the women. I wanted to 
be a better athlete because now it isn't enough 
to be a great player.” 

She exhibits a reuse of purpose when ad- 
mirers wonder why she has not retired. What 


is there Mi to prove? Even said that some 
women do ask, “Why don’t you have a 
baby?” 

“I used to say 1 would when I was in my 
30s," she said. “Now I’m 30 but I'm not 
impetuous a a good planner. I feel comfort- 
able now and I don’t feel any pressure. 
There’s plenty of time.” 

As with most celebrities, her career and 
personal life have been a matter of public 
record. And as she has matured. Even has 
been willing to share some of her innermost 
thoughts, something Chrissie would not have 
been capable of doing. 

There was her fling with Jimmy Connors, 
her marriage to John Lloyd, which has sur- 
vived a brief separation, and the self-imposed 
sabbaticals she took to pureue other interests, 
even one as seemingly mnndanc as sunbath- 
ing at the beach. 

Last month Evert, a native Floridian, was 
persuaded to go snorkding for the first time. 
She picked a place in Australia that occasion- 
ally drew sharks. 

Those interests can be distractions for 
someone working her way back to the top. 
but now they are part of Evert’s challenge. 
The risk is that she will linger too long, 
becoming a stepping stone for a new genera- 
tion of teen-agers. But she is ready to accept 
that. too. 

“Everyone dreams of going out on top, of 
winning Wimbledon or the U.S. Open and 
then waving goodbye,” she said. “But 1 think 
it may be more normal not to go out on top. 
That may be reality. 

“I think in know when I’ve reached my 
peak, though. But I don't think I'm there vo- 
lt's just that for five years I dominated so 
easily, people think that Chris isn’t as good 
anymore." 



MUHorirDoUar Montana: 
Contracts Are Rotting In 



Dudley Bradley, left, of the Washington Bullets, and the 
Chicago BoDs' Sidney Green, both have eyes for a loose 
ball during their NBA game, which the Bullets won, 106-95. 


Basketball 


The Associated Press 

SAN FRANCISCO — Just call 
him Golden Joe Montana, the man 
whose nam e is worth a mint 

The San Francisco 49ers > quar- 
terback powered his team to a 38- 
1 6 Super Bowl XIX victory over the 
Miami Dolphins and walked away 
with the most valuable player 
award — two facts that could mean 
milli ons of dollars for him in en- 
dorsements and appearances. 

Tve been negotiating all day on 
two big deals,” said Lany Muno, 
Montana's Los Angeles-based 
agenL “One is for a beverage deal, 
the other I can’t talk about yet 
Both are in six figures.” 

Not that Montana's salary really 
needs any supplementing. Last 
year, the 28-year-old quarterback 
signed a six-year, $6 J-mfllion con- 
tract with tire 49ers, including 
5120,000 in incentive pay and 
S250JHJ0 for each “Super Bowl ap- 
pearance. 

But in a sport where even a su- 
perstar’s career can be over in one 
painful play, the philosophy is: Gel 
it while you can. 

“Eighty-four was good for us,” 
Muno said. “We did new deals with 
the Concorde watch people, signed 
for an Atari deal, a new contract 


•*» 

2S: 











Rogers. UC-lrv 

JR 20 176 106 458 219 












JR 17 136 113 385 226 

* WALES CONFERENCE 


NCAA's College Basketball leaden througb 

George lom 

» 18 21154 57.7 

Stevens, lowaSi 

SR 70 184 

84 452 224 


Patrick OMtkm 



Jan 28: 




Houston Baptist 

IB 14 41051 5H4 

Comma. Army 

SR 16 126 108 360 225 

' „ / 

W L T 

Pis 

GF 

GA 

TEAM OFFENSE 


Murray SL 

19 16 31112 584 

Sooretalnen, BYU 

sr 19 154 115 423 22J 

WasWngton 

31 13 7 

69 

214 

151 


G 

raw.) 

PfS. A VO. 

SL Peter's 

17 10 7 99* 584 

WashlnotarUIttiSI 

SR 17 132 110 374 22JI 

PttOaMphla 

28 M t 

63 

2M 

146 

Ofcfahanxi 


19 15 

47761 927 

San Diego 

18 12 61054 587 

Corrnhlno. Hrwrxf 

SR II 87 

48 242 220 

N.Y. Inlanders 7b 21 3 

55 

229 

201 

Alcorn State 


17 13 

41519 B94 

Va Military 

15 9 4 887 49.1 

Harris, NOrtn 

SR 19 153 111 417 212 

N.Y. Rangers 

17 23 8 

42 

173 

192 

Utah Shite 


17 W 

71513 894 

Washington 

19 14 51TZ7 594 

Truesdale, atom 

SR 17 152 

69 373 217 

Pittsburgh 

IB 25 S 

41 

179 

220 

Southern 


17 11 

61457 857 

SCORING 

Moore, Crettt 

SR 21 1B3 

94 460 21.9 

New Jersey 

IS 28 5 

35 

166 

203 

Tulsa 


18 16 

21541 014 


Cl G FG FT PtsAVO. 

KrvstkowtKMnfn 

JR 20 148 138 434 27 J 

- w • • • 

Adams Division . 



Bandar 


18 8 101519 844 

PatombtztaBattSi 

JR 17 1B4 120 488 2&J 

Tucker. Butter 

SO 16 145 

56 346 314 

invuiam 

25 14 10 

60 

198 

169 

Nevj-La» Veeoa 


17 IS 

71413 811 

McOanleL WchSI 

SR 18 198 » 492 27J 

Lee. Mem St 

SR 17 138 

88 364 214 

Bbnrio 

23 15 12 

58 

1B1 

146 

Loyola (IIL) 


IB 13 

51485 824 

Catlodge, USA 

sr IB 188 96 472 267 

Battle, No ill 

FR 17 130 1 04 364 214 

Cffetec 

24 19 7 

55 

194 

17S 

Virginia Tech 


17 13 

41400 824 

Mitchell. Mercer 

SR 18 ISO 108 468 264 

Person. Auburn 

JR 17 158 

47 363 214 

Boston 

23 21 7 

S3 

IBS 

175 

5aum Alabama 


18 11 

71480 827 

williams, ind St 

JR 17 181 77 439 254 

Burden. St L 

gr 17 152 

58 362 21 J 

Hartford 

17 24 S 

m 

156 

200 

Indiana SL 


17 10 

71389 81.7 

Tisdale. Ok la 

JR 19 1B7 107 481 254 

Vincent. MichSt 

SR 17 131 

99 361 2U 

CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 


Michigan 


17 14 

31389 817 

Hughes, LOV-il 

SR 18 1» 64 446 248 

Grier. Kantst 

SR 17 140 

78 358 21.1 


Nerrte Divtdaa 




Citadel 


17 10 

71386 814 

Hopnen. Neo 

JR 17 159 99 417 245 

Grant. UtahSt 

JR 17 143 

71 357 210 

51. LouJl 

28 19 9 

49 

181 

187 

Duke 


17 14 

JUKI 814 

Smith. Lov-Ca 

JR 18 182 76 440 244 

Winters. Brodty 

SR 18 157 

63 377 20J 

Chicago 

.22 26 3 

47 

200 

194 

Northeastern 


17 10 

71380 812 

Gervtn. Tex SA 

lr 17 154 107 415 244 

Patties. W Mich 

JR 17 142 

72 356 20.9 

Minnesota . 

14 25 10 

48 

IK 

204 

TEAM DEFENSE 


D urn am. McNaes 

SR 16 129 130 388 24J 

Stakes. Iowa 

SR 20 174 

70 418 209 


15 29 7 

37 

100 

233 


G 

tw-u 

Pis. A VS. 

Harper, Mia O 

|r 17 172 68 412 242 

McIntosh, Fordh 

SR 19 1S5 

85 395 208 


71 32 6 

28 

154 

210 

Princeton 


13 5 

0 7M 544 

Harris, Tulsa 

SR 18 159 108 42k 217 

Scurry, LIU 

sr 18 M3 

89 373 207 






Fresno State 


17 12 

5 908 557 

Beard, Eonrird 

SR 20 705 61 471 2U 

Pass. MONMTH 

sr 15 131 

48 310 207 


36 9 -d 

78 

259 

167 

Oregon Slate 


17 IS 

2 948 56.9 

Beniamin, Croht 

JR 21 183 125 491 214 

Tavtor. BwiGm 

SR 17 MS 

60 350 204 

tSdgarv 

2S. » 2 

57 

236 

200 

lawa 


20 16 

41139 600 

Rah In son. Navy 

SO 16 142 90 174 214 



V^tmtpeg •• 

- -26 21 5 

sr 

226 

228 

Ganzago 


18 13 

51026 57j0 

Ktolne, Ark 

SR 20 181 105 467 214 


Cl G No. Avg. 

LjtoAnaofe* 

21 20 9 

51 

228 

211 

Temoto 


16 13 

3 919 574 

Yales, G Moran 

SR 16 130 110 370 211 


JR 21 314 1£J> 

Vancouver 

U 32 7 

33 

176 

275 

Illinois 


21 17 

41209 574 

Battle. Ruturs 

SR IS 136 74 346 23.1 

McDaniel, wkhSt 

SR 18 265 147 

j..' WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS 


Morquette 


17 11 

6 979 574 

Lewis. Naastn 


Scurry, LIU 

sr 18 258 143 


College Results 

EAST 

Army 65. Dartmouth 59 
Boston CoH. 82. N o rthe as tern 75 
Connecticut 81, Setan Hall 76 
51. Johnl 77. Providence 60 
SOUTH 

Aieeamo 5*. Mississippi 47 
Auburn U. Vanderbilt B0 
Clemson 52, N. Carolina 50 
Duka 76. Woke Forest 70 
Florida 7£ Mississippi 51. 57 
Maryland 71. Vlrgmla 9 
n. Carolina St. 4], Georgia Tech 53 
Tennessee SO. Georgia 79 

MIDWEST 

Iowa SI. 7d Nebraska 65 
Kamos 75. Kansas SC 57 
Miami, Ohio 82. W. Michigan 59 
Missouri 66. Oklahoma SC 63 
Notre Dame 48, 5t Louis 42 
Purdue 54, mmols 34 
Tulsa 67, Drake 66 

SOUTHWEST 
Arkansas 64. Bov tor 57 
So. Meftiodlsi 85. Houston 78 
Texas A&M 64. Rice S3 


J- -.'Mae 1 8 1—3 

,y BPIRda 3 1 3-6 

Jtorreautt fl7|, Peterson CIO). Ptavtalr (2>. 
Qt (T 2). Hawley flD.Follgno mi; Or R rUIy 
> Raid (31. Huts oa goal: Boston (on Bar- 
. -' nmol 4-10-73-36; Buffalo (on Keans) 12-7- 

r 

v .--‘TyrMto -31 1-6 

p fl ta tw roa ii a-t 

J ■_ ■ JFryoer (21). Ihnacak 2-414L Banning U ). 
j Anderson {12}, Dagust (10); Lemteuc 121), 
Sft»dea2 (26>,Young (sn.Rfeeflno (4 J. Shots 
- anneal: Taranto (an Hamm, Ramona) 15-22- 
' ^-46; PHUtxjroIx (Un-BemhardTJ 7-10-77—28. 
„ Wtanto ea • l 1 4—6 

^..CWODOO 1 1 v- 3 

JWcBafn Oh AmM (15), Turnbull 2 (14). 
Cgrtyte r9),Mubeo 12U; McMurchy (O.So- 
^ rant (271. Ludz£k(BCStwlsoa goal: wbinlpea 
> I®? SkoradenskD 15-10-12-37; Chicago (on 
• ' HavaardJ 15-W8— 33. 

» 'Montreal 13 8 a-H 

; .‘ v anco usej .- .1111-5 

; Jjttotor (5). Tanfi.3 (22), Skrtka (12); 
-l«':UePbee (6), Tbeartto (4), CttbonMOU (15). 

GOtoev (11). Shots on goat: Montreal (on Bra- 
^ : tout) 9-M-s-v-XU Vancouver (on Penney) 
i - tfcMM-at 


National Basketball Association Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 



Pad He Dtobloa 



Atlantic Dtvbton 



UA. Lakers 

31 16 

■660 — 


W L 

POL 

GB 

Phoenix 

22 25 

468 9 

Boston 

37 9 

-804 

— 

Seattle 

20 26 

415 10W 

PhlhKWcMa 

36 9 

jm 

Vi 

Portland 

19 26 

422 11 

Washington 

27 20 

-574 

low 

LA C1I poors 

19 27 

413 UW 

New Jersey 

20 26 

.435 

17 

Golden State 

10 34 

xn i9w 

New York 

17 30 

.362 

20W 




Ce—rnl Dhttan 



WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS 

Milwaukee 

32 14 

496 

— 

Kansas aty 

36 38 

18 32—116 

Detroit 

28 17 

422 

3V2 

Detroit 

18 39 

26 27-120 

Chicago 

24 22 

SO 

1 

Longs'll 7-7l7,TVIer7-142-4 16; E Johnson 

Atlanta 

If 26 

m 

12W 

0-164-4 22. Tlwus 9-144-4 22, Thorpe 10-12 M2Q. 

Indiana 

15 31 

J26 

17 

Rebounds: Kansas City 51 (Thompson id); 

Cleveland 

13 31 

395 

18 

Detroit 52 (Laimbeer 13). Assists: Kansas 


Sanders, Mlsval 
Neac Fulitn 

Sttvrlm. Colo 
Towns MONMTH 
PalombizksBallSt 
Catiedoe. USA 
Hamer. Mia O 
Brown, GWasti 
Koncak, SMU 
Johnson, MkhSt 
Vonos, SCI ora 
Moore. Lov-il 
Kaopmgn, Newt tom 


SR U 197 13.1 
SR 17 215 12A 
SR 16 197 12J 
sr 15 183 12J 
JR 17 200 118 
sr IB 209 1U 
lr 17 196 11.5 
SR 14 19 11J 
sr 18 197 189 
SR 16 174 I0 l9 
SR 19 205 1DJ 
SO 14 149 106 
JR 19 282 1IU 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Midwest Dhrtstoa 


Denver 
Houston 
Dallas 
San Antonia 
Utah 

Kansas CHV 


29 

17 

-630 

— 

26 

20 

J65 

3 

24 

21 

-533 

4 Va 

22 

22 

SOD 

6 

20 

26 

435 

9 

IS 

30 

JM 

13U 


Transition 


V CAUFOfUllA—AnnooncaiJ Biot Mike Witt, 

etcher, aareod to terna on Qtt ira e year con- 

.-.wet-' : - : 

> U^LWAUXE E— Announced that JoUne Co- 
: * tonaw er oodBHI WsgmotoPItchRi^nnd Juan 
- JteWUoi Randy Ready, and DOAO Sutanc hi- 
■ -Mttorvhad oamd to ccntroc ) terms- 

4 ■ ipT-. " national T 

- J , '-COS ANGELES- Sipnod AMandra Pena. 
: • .*tor, to a ont-vear contract 
^•.i**0**TWtAL-SlBiiedVi*!« 
.^-toMnac'lo a tta rae -yoo r contract Flue two 

srton toon. 

- .< ^PlTTSBURCH— StonedLee Tunnell, pftch- 
! ■= ^ Junior Ortta and Ritoto RadrtaMacaich- 
, . ;wjSoiwnvKidHa.ehort»toft and Leon 

"ri*- second boeemon, to one-year antradi. 

-JkT. LOUIS— Aaneunced that JeORUinAKlu- 

v, plhiier,and Tom Herr, second wsomon. 
, ato agreed in principle to, now carthoOs- 
.POOTBALL 

; . Fentiwtl i mm e • 

oi.l* RAMS- Sto ned Rowell Endeben, 

- “ «Mier, to o cnevear centrncL 


DENVER— Honed Murray Jarman, wide 

recatveriGrao Kroaen,nasetadcJ«,widDon- 

oM Bracken, mmtor. to tme-vegr flomroen. 
HOCKEY 

HatlOBcri Hockey League ^ 
DETROIT— Sent Larry Trader, defense- 
moo, to Adirondack at toe Anwfcai Hockey 
League. 

COLLEGE 

NEW MEXICO— Announce d ttw 

Hamel Roy Qreaonr.awtatBiiHw^h tfl c^g; 

andrecrulilnBcoordkintor.soheean become 

anaoNstom eeachat vondertrfll.md JNmni* 
Mac Honmger.oHensivR line coach, so no ot 

l*aumltaoHinslmeoo«anotorBrViildoita 

S MRTHERN MHJRADO— AimOWtCBd 
that Dove Doww socondory tootooll BHll 

epoch and recruiting ooonRnator with Doia- 

“oRESON STATE— Announced thrt,Nj d» 
Greene. guartertsoaL hm transterred to 
Western Oregon State Cot 
VAL E — Nam e d Robert Ectoc* assJW * rt 
tootoon ceodL 


atv 27 (Drew Ills Da Irall 38 (Thomas IS). 

Ctevetand 32 31 34 u— 115 

indbua 34 32 34 »— no 

H.WIIIIams11-1B4-6 3c Fleming 10-183-4 23; 
Fuse 17-27 44 39. Hubbard 6-10 6-0 18 Re- 
boeoas: Cleveland 39 IPoouette lit; Indlaw 
so ( h. win to ms ie). Assists: Cleveland 31 
(Bog ley M); Indiana 30 (Fleming 6). 

Chicago 32 25 22 16— 95 

wuhfaetoa 2) 26 24 33-186 

Gus Williams 9-19 11-11 29. Ballard 8-16 3-3 
1*3 Jordan 12-19 14-15 38, Dailey 9-14 2-2 20. 
Rebeoads: Chicago 37 (Green 10): Washing 
tan 36 (Bo! lard, McMillan? ). Assists: Chicago 
21 (Jordan 8); Washington 27 (Monom 7). 

Boston 27 31 31 li-lM 

PUtadefcMa 26 35 36 25-122 

Malone 11-2] 16-16 38. Taney 7-14 3-7 17: 
□Johnson 9-19 2-2 20. McHale 1-12 2-4 18. Re- 
bounds: Boston 47 (Parish Bl.’PhllodelpWoSl 
(Matone 24). AssisH: Boston 25 (BlrdS); Phll- 
odelphto 28 (Toney 7J. 

New York II M U 25- 93 

Phoenix 25 29 28 28-111 

Nonce 9-12 36 21, HOJTon 7-12 4-5 18; Cum- 
mings 13-21 10-10 34. Tucker «■!$ 32 20. Re- 
beonds; New York S3 1 Cum mlnas 111; Phoe- 
nlx»(NotKX,Lvco*lll. Asslsh: New York 18 
( Walker, Seorrnw 4) ; Phoenix 34 (Humphries 
7). 

Houston 26 24 15 31—116 

UA. Ldwt 24 27 38 32—113 

Otoluwon 10-15 46 24. Sampson 11-21 00 22; 
Abdul -Jobber 14-206-634, Johnson 14-18 66 XL 
Rebounds; Houston 40 (Sompson 10); LA 
Lakers 47 (AUdukJabbor 9). Assists: Houston 
32 (Hollins 17); LA cokers 26 (Johnson 10). 



Cl i 

& FGFGA 

Pel 

Walker, Utica 

SR 

» 

119 

168 

704 

Moo me, Croht 

SR 

21 

183 

261 

mi 

Salley. GaTech 

JR 

18 

116 

173 

67.1 

Ewlno, Giown 

SR 

19 

116 

175 

663 

Happen. Nee 

JR 

17 

159 

240 

66a 

Stoves, Souttat 

JR 

It 

98 

148 

6L2 

Thomas, C curly 

JR 

19 

139 

212 

654 

Scott. NewMex 

SR 

19 

114 

177 

644 

Ktolne. Arfc 

SR 

20 

181 

284 

637 

Robinson, Navy 

SO 

16 

142 

24 

614 

Pinckney, Villa 

SR 

17 

93 

IM 

628 

Bantam. Comii 

SR 

13 

84 

134 

627 

a me. Duke 

JR 

17 

112 

188 

627 

Ferry, Harvrd 

SR 

11 

65 

105 

61.9 

Beniamin, Ctahl 

JR 

21 

183 

296 

eiJ 

Koncak, SMU 

sr 

It 

124 

201 

617 

PoetZKft. Siena 

5R 

17 

117 

190 

614 

Walker, Mercer 

SR 

18 

156 

254 

614 

CanaDUM. Harvrd 

SR 

11 

87 

142 

617 

□adman, Sauttwi 

SR 

16 

97 

159 

617 

Mocker, Texas 

SR 

11 

122 

201 

607 


World Championships 

WOMEN’S COMBINED TTlC 87 i 

Downhill pn xuArr f; 

(at Santo caterlno. Italy) *7 ' 

l. MOKiaWOiileor, Switzer tamL I minuto 1636 UW mouni 


2. Traudl Haedier, West Germany, 1:1641 

3. Ctaudlne Emanet, France, 1:1650 

4. Brigitte OcHIL Switzerland, 1:1650 

5. Veronika Wolllnoer. Austria. 1:7657 
o. SyMo Eder, Austria. 1:1658 

7. Ml chela FtobiL Switzertona 1:1674 
B. Elisabeth KlretUer, Austria 1:16X3 

9. Mortno KloM, West Germany. 1:16J93 

10. Reglne Masenlechnsr, West Germany. 
1:16.96 

11. Slarid won. Austria i;i6J8 

12. Karin Percy. Canada 1:17.18 

and AAktnela Gera, west Germany, i : 17.18 

14. Karla Detoaa Italy, 1:17J8 

15. Ellsooetti aioud, Frtma, i:27J2 

16. Dobbta Armstrong, UA 1:1747 
and Erika Hess. Switzerland. 1:1747 

18. Olaa Chwvotova, CMChesigvokla 1 : OSt 

19. Ondy Nelson. U5. 1:1733 

20. Kerrln Lee. Canada 1:1737 






j.’’ . 



Maria WaDiser after her ran in the World Championships. 

Walliser Wins Downhill 
In Women’s Combined 


Joe Montana 

with Schick and a Lake Tahoe 
time-share condo endorsement," 

Montana signed a shoe endorse- 
ment contract with Minin o earlier 
this mouth worth SI million over 
the next three years. He also is an 
“adviser” to Wilson Sporting 
Goods Co., has signed a deal for 
five posters and is negotiating for a 
giant product endorsement con- 
tract with AT&T, Muno said. 

“It doesn’t fall in your face,” the 
agent said. “Even a guy like Joe has 
to be marketed. We have been for- 
tunate to secure products we want- 
ed to da We have thrown out the 
magazine beefcake stuff. That’s not 
Joe, and he's not interested. We 
want no fast bucks, but quality 
stuff with long-term contracts.” 

Montana has earned more than 
SI millioa in endorsements and 
personal appearance fees since the 
1982 Super Bowl, but his perfor- 
mance in Super Bow 1 . XXX. elevated 
him to a whole new level of nation- 
al name recognition and celebrity 
earning power. 


Monte Carlo Rally 
Enters Last Stage 

77to Associated Press 

MONTE CARLO, Monaco — 
The final stage of the Monte Carlo 
Rally started Thursday with Ari 
Vatinen of Finland continuing a 
superb rally from a heavy penalty 
that gave German Walter Rohrl the 
rally lead. 

The 87 survivors of the 131 start- 
ers were faring 11 special stages in 
the mountains behind Monaco for 
the final stage of the rally, which 
wide Saturday. 

Rohrl, in an Audi Quattro, took 
the first stage Thursday by just 
three seconds from Vatanen's Peu- 
geot 205 in the 18-kilometer (11 
mile) race over the Col de la Ma- 
done. After the Mad one, Rohrl led 
Vatanen by 2:01, with Tnno Sa- 
lonen of Finland, in another Peu- 
geot 205, third, 5:25 behind Rohrl 


The Associated Press 

SANTA CATERINA, Italy — 
Maria Walliser of Switzerland won 
the women's dow nhill for the com- 
bined standings, the opening event 
Thursday mme World Alpine Ski 
Championships. 

The 21 -year-old Swiss mastered 
the 2,138 meters of the Cevedale 
course in one minute, 16.26 sec- 
onds. Traudl Haecher of West Ger- 
many was second in 1:16.41, and 
Claudme Emonet of France third 
in 1: 16 JO, both unexpectedly com- 
ing in ahead of many of the heavy 
favorites in the race. 

The women's combined title will 
be awarded after the slalom on 
Monday. 

Despite WaDiser's victory, the 
Swiss were a disappointment. They 
were expected to sweep the top 
honors after docking the fastest 
times in trials earlier this week. 

Brigitte Oerth of Switzerland 
was fourth in 1: 16.60, Veronika 
Wallinger of Austria fifth in 
1 : 16.67, and another Austrian, Syl- 
via Eder, sixth in 1:16.68. 

The Olympic champion and 
Would Cup leader, Mkbda Figini 
of Switzerland, the favorite in the 
-race, was seventh-in 1:16.74. 
had the fastest time on the second 
part of the course, but she made 
mistakes early in the race that 
killed her chances of winning. 

Another Swiss, Zoe Haas, fdl 
shortly after the start and suffered 
a dislocated shoulder, officials said. 
She was taken from the course by 
helicopter. 

Haecber was the sensation of the 
day. Starting No. 20 and ninth at 
the intermediate docking, she had 
a strong finish to come close to 
Walliser. 

Elisabeth Kirch! er of Austria 
was eighth in 1:16.83, and West 
Germans Marina Kiehl ninth in 
1:16.93 and Regine Mfisenlechner 
10th in 1:16.96. 

Walliser said she was very 
pleased with her run. 

“I want a medal in the combina- 
tion but 1 doubt I can slay out in 
from after the slalom,” she said. 
"There are too many good slalo- 
mists dose behind mer 

Haecber also said, “I am not very 
good in slalom and I am afraid I 
will not make it to a medal.” 

Emonet complained about a 
poor start that cost her precious 
time. “I was really hoping to do 
better,” she said. 

“1 made too many mistakes,” Fi- 
gini lamented. “I almost lost con- 
trol at the second curve. But I’ll do 
belter in the title downhill.” 

Men’s trials continued on Thurs- 
day in Bormio, Italy. The first 
men's event is the downhill portion 
of the combined on Friday. 

The president of the Internation- 
al Ski Federation, Marc Hodler, 
announced Thursday that Marc 
Girard elli of Luxembourg would 
be allowed to compete at the cham- 
pionshms if the Austrian-born ski- 
er produced a written pledge that 
he would pursue an application for 
Luxembourg nationality. 

The derision was immediately 
contested by the president of the 
Italian Winter Sports Federation, 
Arrigp Gattai, who said the orga- 
nizers would not let Girardelli 
compete unless he produced a Lux- 


embourg passport. Gattai said 
Hodler was “acting against the 
rules.” 

But Hodler’s statement seemed 
to end the doubts about Girardel- 
li's eligibility. 

Girardelli was excluded from the 
last World Championships three 
years ago and from the 1984 Olym- 
pics. Tbe winner of seven World 
Cup races this season, he will be a 
favorite in next week's men’s sla- 
lom and giant slalom races. 




Irene Epple 

Irene Epple 

Announces 

Retirement 

The Associated Press 

SANTA CATERINA, Italy — 
Irene Epple of West Germany an- 
nounced bar retirement Thursday, 
two days before her scheduled per- 
formance in the women's downhill 
race at the World Ski Champion- 
ships. 

The 27-year-old skier from Seeg- 
ADgau made the announcement as 
her younger teammates. Traudl 
Haecher, Marina Kiehl, Regine 
MOsenlechner and Michaela Gerg 
finished among the top 12 in the 
combined downhill, the opening 
event of the competition. 

Epple. appearing close to tears, 
said she realized in practice runs 
for her founh world champion- 
ships that she was no longer able to 
keep the pace of the best competi- 
tors. 

“I thought it was fair to make 
room for the younger teammates. It 
was a difficult derision, but I real- 
ized it was the due time for it,” she 
said. 

Irene, tbe eldest of ihe Epple 
family of talented skiers, was a sil- 
ver medalist in the Olympic giant 
slalom at Lake Placid, New York. 
She also won a silver in the down- 
hill of the 1978 Wold Champion- 
ships. 

In the World Cup she scored 
nine victories — six in giant slalom, 
one in super-giant, one combined 
and one in downhill, the discipline 
she liked most 

She said she planned to devote 
more time to her medical studies 
and to begin practicing in a Mu- 
nich hospital next spring. 


Sabres Defeat Ailing Bruins, 6-2 


Tennis 



Cl G FT FT A 

Pd. 


Hagan, Weber 

5R 18 

59 

62 

957 

DUN'S SINGLES 

Timka. Youngs 

lr 20 

53 

56 

94A 

(Ot Memphis. Tennessee) 

Fernandez. Stolen 

SR 20 

50 

S3 

947 

Second Round 

Alford, ind 

SO 16 

60 

64 

938 

Jimmy Connors. U.S- det. Jan Gunnartww 

Brawn, TftxA&M 

lr 11 

64 

69 

928 

Sweden, 4-6. 4-4, M. 

Teague, BostnU 

sr 16 

S3 

60 

917 

Boris Becker, West Germany, def. Tomas 

Etzov, Pom 

SO 13 

33 

36 

917 

Smld. Czechoslovakia, 6-2, 6-4. 

Burden. St L 

sr 17 

58 

64 

904 

Ramesh Krishnon. India (W. Mllodav Mo- 

Elmore, VMI 

SO 14 

72 

80 

900 

dr, Czech astavoMa, 6>2, 6-3. 

Buttard. So til 

SR 18 

54 

60 

900 

Kevin Curran, UA. dfti. Marat Ostaia Yu- 

Thorpe. Otodi 

JR )7 

44 

49 

S98 

goslavia, 6-2, 6-4. 

Elltoff. TenTch 

SR IB 

51 

57 

897 

Brad Gilbert. UA. dot Tim Wllklsan, U A. 6- 

WasMngtofkUtonSI 

SR 17 110 123 

894 

4, 6-1 

Harris. Tulsa 

SR 18 108 121 

89J 

Ld l Shiros, UTLOeL Heinz Gunttwrai, Swit- 

Johnson, Richmd 

SR 15 

48 

54 

I8.« 

zerland. 7-6 <7-31, 6a 

Redden. LSU 

lr 17 

47 

S3 

887 

Shahar Per kiss. Israel, dot David Pole, 

Corbin, Deoaul 

SR 17 

46 

52 

887 

UA. 44. 7-5, 6-1. 

Hole, Necora 

JR 18 

53 

40 

817 

Yannick Mean, U.S.def. Sandy Mover. Uj_ 

Carrablne. Harvrd 

SR 11 

61 

77 

887 

6-4, 6a 

Holman, W III 

SR 13 

68 

77 

887 

Eilat Tethcher, ujl del. Dtarfc Dickson, 

Gadls, Purdue 

JR 18 

45 

51 

062 

UA. 7-6 (7-4), 6-4. 


United Press International 
BUFFALO, New York — Tom 
Barrasso, the National Hockey 
League's leading goaltender, had 
no doubt that the Buffalo Sabres 
would defeat the Boston Bruins in 
their Adams Division game 
Wednesday night. 

His confidence was bolstered by 
injuries to Boston that have weak- 
ened its roster, but regardless, Bar- 
rasso, who stopped 24 shots, felt his 
team could have beaten any squad 
Boston skated. 

“There was no question in my 
mind that we played well enough to 
win this game no matter who they 
had out there,” he said after Buffa- 
lo had defeated Boston, 6-1 
The Brains played without some 


key players, including Ray Bour- 
que and Charlie Simmer. 

Buffalo, with 58 points, climbed 
to within two points of Adams Di- 
vision leader Montreal who lost to 

NHL FOCUS 

the •Vancouver Canucks, 54, in 
overtime Wednesday mghL 

Elsewhere in the NHL, it was 
Winnipeg 6, Chicago 3. and Toron- 
to 6, Pittsburgh 5. 

The game didn’t begin well for 
the Sabres. 

Boston struck first when Tory 
O'Reilly scored off def enseman 
Dave Fenyves’s stick at 1:09. 

Almost nine minutes went by be- 
fore the Sabres were able to counter 


with Gil Perreault's goal off Lany 
Playfair’s rebound, but they moved 
ahead by scoring two goals 51 sec- 
onds apart with less than three 
minutes left in the period. 

One minute into the second. Paul 
Cyr upped the Sabres lead to 4-1 
when his blast from the top of the 
left face off circle sped past Keans 
for the only goal of the middle 
period. 

Boston Coach Gerry Cheever 
said his team increased its effort 
after Cyr's goaL 

“It's getting to the point where 
you realty can’t lose a divisional 
game anymore,” Barrasso said. 
“It’s too close and if you lose yon 
might go from second to fourth 
place in two nights.” 






JK- 


Just a Hairline Case 


Songwriter Jerome Kern: Thanks lor the Melody 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — lam Thinking 
of nay hair. I am proud of our 
relationship. It is a good relation- 
ship. My hair and I nave been good 
for each other. 

As I tell all who care to know, my 
hair has been good to me, not fall- 
ing out and leaving me half bald 

and psychologically vulnerable in 
the years when I needed a really 
secure psychology, and not giving 
me any really bad dandruff prob- 
lems either, to speak of, though 
naturally there has been a little of 
the white rain on the old blue serge 
suit now and then, as there is for 
everybody. It’s only natural, like 
bloodshot eyeballs on Sunday 
morning. Big deal, right? 

So I can sincerely say. “My hair 
has been good to me.” And if ray 
hair could speak it would say the 
same about yours truly. 

“You migh t think that, bang 
hair, I don’t have much sensitiv- 
ity," it would say, “but HI tell you 
this, friend: This guy in whose skull 
I live has been good to me," 


All right, I don't want to put 
words in my hair's mouth, so 
enough of that. I will merely point 
out that if my hair were unhappy 
would it still tie on my head after ail 
these years? 

Now there are people who say 
thinking about my hair is sick, sick, 
sick. And what do these people 
think about? They think about 
their teeth and are the teeth r uining 
their smile. Or they think about 
their posture and is unrigid spine 
causing them to leave a poor im- 
pression when they are being in- 
spected by rich ana famous people. 

Or they think about their in- 
nards: Are their arteries getting the 
blood around handily, is the liver 
working off the beer OK, and so 
on. 

□ 

All this is all right with me. 
When it comes to the carcass, ev- 
erybody ought to be entitled to 
concentrate on the part of their 
choice, without other people railing 
them “sick, sick, sick." 

Personally, though, I get the 
deeps whatever 1 have to sit 
around with people thinking about 
their livers and arteries, but a lot of 
people just can’t find contentment 
thinking of something as pleasant 
as hair. With these people, it's got 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


SUBSCRIBE 
to Hie 

INTERNATIONAL 

HERALD 

TRIBUNE 

AND SAVE 

As a new jutworSjer to the 
Intemationqi Herald Tribune, 
you an laws up to hdf 
the newsstand price, depend ng 
an your awntry or leadence. 

For detail 

an this spend introductory offer, 
unite to: 


to be liver and arteries day and 
nigbL 

Say. “A penny for your 
thoughts.” and right away theyTI 
say, “Liver and arteries. How about 
yours?” 

"Hair," you say. “I was thinking 
that my hair has been good to me.” 

And they sneer because they 
can't understand anybody thinking 
about a body part that might not 
betray diem and suddenly leave 
them dead, the way the liver and 
arteries can, or the heart, the kid- 
neys, the spinal fluid, and so on. 
With these people, the whole idea 
of the thing is to worry about a 
pan that might kill them at any 
minute. 

□ 

I was with a man once who liked 
to think about his lungs. Why? 
“Don't you realize," he repliol, 
“that if your lungs quit you won’t 
be able to breathe?” 

This man enjoyed thinking about 
his lungs, but — 

“You like to think about hair?” 
He laughed. “You must be a half- 
wit." 

Here is your typical prototype of 
the person who likes to think about 
innar ds. It never occurs to him that 
one of the many nice things in 
ihinking about hair is that even if 
your hair quits, you still go on 
breathing. With people like him, 
the rule is: If thinking about it can't 
make you miserable, why bother? 

□ 

Another good thing about hair is 
this: You really don’t have to hu- 
mor hair a lot to keep in good 
spirits. I probably humor mine 
more than necessary. I wash it with 
costly shampoo instead of soap, 
and treat it to an expensive goo 
that's supposed to “condition" it, 
whatever that means, and now, 
having learned that the best hair 
needs mousse, whatever that is, I'm 
going to stan moussing it 

Next year, if hair science says 
hair ought to have coconut custard 
to enjoy perfect fulfillment. I’ll rub 
that in, too. Sure, I’m spoiling it. 
but what the heck? Scrubbing it 
with coconut custard will still be a 
lot easier than running miles and 
miles every day, like people do who 
think about their arteries, hearts, 
livers and lights. 

Hair has been good to me; I'm 
going to be good to hair. 

New York Tunes Service 


MOVING 


By Richard Harrington 

Washington Post Service 

W ASHINGTON — Jerome 
Kern was the master of pure 
melody, the greatest melodist in 
the history of American music. 

Or Man River . . . Smoke 
Gels in Your Eyes . . . The Song 
Is You . . . 

Along with Irving Berlin and 
George Gershwin, he helped 
emancipate popular song from 
the stultifying clichfe of Tin Pan 
Alley. 

All the Things You Are . . . 
The Way You Look Tonipa . . . 

He also revolutionized the 
American musical theater in 1927 
with “Show Boat," a landmark 
work that extricated Broadway 
from the dominance of Viennese 
operettas and English revues. 

Kern, who died in 1945, was 
born 100 years ago. In this cen- 
tennial year, be is celebrated as 
much for being the father of the 
contemporary musical as for be- 
ing the first great native master of 
the popular song genre. He is the 
subject of a new 22-cent U. S. 
stamp, but more important, his 
legacy remains vibrant in a score 
of songs culled from the thousand 
that he wrote for 104 stage pro- 
ductions and films, including naif 
a dozen from “Show Boat" alone. 

Jerome Kern was bom a gener- 
ation after Victor Herbert, a gen- 
eration before Richard Rodgers. 
As such he provided the vital link 
between the operetta tradition 
Herbert embodied and the mod- 
ernism of Rodgers. 

Jerome Kem was bom Jan. 27, 
1885, in New York City, to com- 
paratively well-off parents. His 
mother was an accomplished pia- 
nist, his father the manager of a 
department store. Surprisingly lit- 
tle is known about his early life 
except that the family moved to 
Newark, New Jersey, when Kern 
was 12 and that he had some 
formal musical training early on 
(he was described as a good but 
unexceptional student). 

The most important early event 
in Kent's life may have happened 
on his 10th birthday. His mother 
took him to a Broadway show and 
the vital connection was made. 
He eventually studied piano and 
harmony at the New York Col- 
lege of Music, but his father re- 
fused to let him go to Europe for 
further study. 

Thai changed several years Iai- 






u,\ ■ 








Wtoff E Snsti'Dis Nt> York Time 


Betty Kern Miller, daughter of the composer, and friends at stamp unveiling. 


er. Kern's father bad tried to get 
him involved in the family busi- 
ness. Young Kern was seat to 
New York to buy two pianos but, 
spellbound by the sales talk, 
bought 200, almost ruining his 
father. Soon Kem was sailing for 
Germany, where he studied the- 
ory and harmony. He also spent 
some time in London. The father, 
incidentally, sold the pianos on 
installm ent plans and ultimately 
made a profit 

Although his first published 
song, “At the Casino," had ap- 
peared in 3902, Kan’s first job at 
a publishing house was as a bill- 
ing clerk. Hu first significant suc- 
cess came when he signed with 
Max Dreyfus, who headed the 
T. B. Haims publishing company. 
Dreyfus rejected Kem's initial 
songs, but saw the potential of the 
songwriter. Dreyfus provided a 
rigorous apprenticeship for Kem, 
who worked as a song plugger, 
playing new songs for performers 
who might add them to their rep- 
ertoire and played songs in de- 
partment stores to push sheet mu- 
sic sales. 

Kem’s big breakthrough didn’t 
occur until 1912, when he wrote 
his first complete score. “The Red 


Petticoat.” Up to that time, 
Broadway had been dominated 
by light revues imported from En- 
gland or Viennese operettas. Few 
scores integrated music and book, 
and most of the plots were inane. 
There was less concern with plot 
or character than with event and 
dichfe, and scripts were expected 
to do nothing more than provide a 
loose framework for the sin ging 
and dancing on stage. “Follies. 
“Scandals” and “Vanities" were 
the order of the day. Kem took 
his first decisive, and ultimately 
revolutionary, step in establishing 
the distinction between operettas 
and musicals when he teamed up 
with P. G. Wodehouse (their first 
collaborations had come in En- 
gland a decade earlier) and Guy 
Bolton to create what came to be 
known as the Princess Theater 
shows (named after the 300-seai 
theater that housed them). Bolton 
would do the book, Wodehouse 
the lyrics and Kem the music. 

The Princess shows used small 
casts and economical sets and had 
an informal, intimate atmosphere 
that was sophisticated and Amer- 
ican. The songs were not interjec- 
tions. but flowed as pan of the 
plots — which were still prepos- 


terous. however. Kem had major 
hits with “Sally” (1920) and “Sun- 
ny”(I925). both of which had 
more than 500 performances. 
Among the songs those shows 
produced: “Look for the Silver 
linin g" and "Who?” 

The who turned out to be Edna 
Ferber. and (he silver lining was 
her best-selling epic novel. "Show 
Boat.” Kem was only halfway 
through it when he realized this 
was wbat he had been waiting for. 
He called up lyricist Oscar Ham- 
merstein 11 and within days they 
were at work on the show. 

It was Kem's passion that im- 
bued it with a sense of purpose. 
Producer Florenz Ziegfeld was 
not always happy with this som- 
ber musical that examined broken 
marriages, compulsive gambling, 
miscegenation and the harsh life 
style of southern blacks. 

In order to distinguish it form 
operettas, Kem called “Show 
Boat” “an American musical 
play.'' Kem and Hammerstein 
(who also did the show's book), 
treated Ferber’s novel as a legiti- 
mate piece of Americana; as a 
result, their work was much closer 
to legitimate theater than to the 
musical form. 


While “Show Boat" was still in 
rehearsal. Edna Ferber was invit- 
ed to hear a new song, a late 
addition that would serve as a 
Greek chorus throughout the 
show. Years later, she recalled her 
first encounter with “01* Man 
River." 

“My hai r stood on end, tears 
came to my eyes. I knew that this 
was a great song. This was a song 
that would outlast Kem and 
Hammerstein' s day and my day 
and your dav." 

When “Show Boat” opened at 
Washington's National Theater 
on Nov. 15, 1927, for its first 
tryout, it was more than four 
hours long. It was said that Zieg- 
feld s weeping, and the gn a sh i n g 
of his teeth, could be heard in the 
back of the theater. Ecstatic re- 
views and sellout crowds showed 
that the music was the show's sell- 
ing poinL, and by the time it got to 
New York two months later, most 
of what was cut was dialogue. 

‘‘Show Boat,” immediately 
identified as a masterpia^ revo- 
lutionized America's musical the- 
ater. ft ran for almost 600 perfor- 
mances. Eventually, there would 
be five Broadway revivals, three 
motion pictures and countless 
road shows. Bat the stock market 
crash in October of 1929 would 
have a debilitating effect on 
Broadway, as would the advent of 
“talkies.’* which virtually killed 
the road shows that had been a 
major source of income. 

As a result, in terms of serious 
subject matter and integrated dra- 
matic development, there would 
be no immediate successor to 
“Show Boat" (“Porgy and Bess" 
did poorly in 1935) until Rodgers 
and H amm o-stein's “Oklahoma" 
in 1943. 

Though be worked exclusively 
in Hollywood after 1939, Kern 
was more than ready when Rod- 
gers and Hammerstein invited 
him back to Broadway to provide 
the music for a new musical that 
eventually became “Annie Get 
Your Gun." In November of 
1945, he suffered a cerebral hem- 
orrhage on the street in New 
York. Ten days later, without 
halting come out of a coma, Je- 
rome Kern died. He was 60 years 
old. 

He left behind more than 100 
scores for stage shows and mov- 
ies; more than 1 ,000 songs written 
with more than 60 collaborators. 


i 

Conduct July 4 Concert 

Leonard Bernstein will conduct 
the National Symphony Orchestra 
on its Fourth of July concert at the 
Capitol grounds in Washington 
this year. The program will include 
Bernstein's “An American Song- 
fesL” Other highlights of the NSO; 
1985-86 season include a four 
week-tour of Europe next Septem- 
ber and the American premiere of 
Krzysztof Penderecki's recently 
completed “Polish Requiem." parts 
of which Mstislav Rostropovich 
conducted in the 1983-84 season. 
There will also be the world pre- 
miere of the Fifth Symphony of 
Finnish composer Aufis Saffian. 1 

□ 

The actress Farrah Fawcett, who 
will be 38 Saturday, gave birth to a 
son Wednesday m Los Angeles 
while Iter companion of five years, 
the actor Ryan O’Neal, 43, watched 
over her through the natural deliv- 
ery. 

□ 

Author Mark Twain once scold- 
ed an 8-year-old neighbor boy for 
reading “Tom Sawyer" and “Huck- 
leberry Finn" because they were 
“books about bad boys,” it was 
reported Wednesday. Coley Taylor, 
a retired editor ana publisher and 
former neighbor of Twain in Redd- 
ing, Conna^kut, told American 
Heritage magazine the author said 
he should read instead his “best 
book, ‘Recollections of Joan of 
Arc.’ " Taylor said in 1908, when 
he was 8 years old. he met Twain, 
then 73, and told him how much he 
loved “Tom Sawyer" and “Huckle- 
berry Finn." “He listened to me, 
and then, to my surprise, he bent 
over and shook his finger at me and 
scolded: You shouldn’t read dime 
books about bad boys! Why librar- 
ians won’t allow them in the chil- 
dren's rooms in the libraries! Now 
don’t you go and imitate those ras- 
cals Tom and Huck/ ” 

□ 

A new type of artificial foot, an 
apartment complex for young pro- 
fessionals and a monument to Ben- 
jamin FrankKn were among 13 win.- 
ners of presidential design awards 
announced by President Ronald 
Reagan on Wednesday. The 
awards, announced at a ceremony 
in the Oval Office, were the first to 
be made under a program estab- 
lished in December 1983. Winners 
were selected by a jury of design 
experts headed by architect LM. 
Pci 


5 _ A- 

* 

V 


. ,-v 

All 

i- * * 


«r. 


lie' 


il,C 


1 !ood 


nei'u 


■led 


CONITCEX (MKT Opera): Costbus- 
tan to 300 ofa* worldwide -Air/Sea 
Ci£ Charlie 281 18 B1 Pom-Gat* too 

REAL ESTATE 
CONSULTANTS 


PALM BEACH 
FLORIDA 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 






RAW LAND SALES 


Waiaro t Hutton Ui 
Red Estate 
177 Seawew Ave. 
Teh (305) 6W-64Q0 
71* 510-9527721 
WWUTTON 


WHO SAY5 THERFS NOTHING 
FUN HAPHMNG SUMJATS? 
Brunch & Dinner. Bock by popukr de- 
mand food & muse wilti a country west- 
ern flavor, good Of rodc'n roll after 
midnight to top it all off of the 
HOUTWOOef SAVOY, 44 n* N. D. 
dee Vktahei. Pare 2. TeL 236 1673 





REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


con D’AZUR 

iECAPMET 

A rare opportunity at a very reason- 
able priceu the famous poDiter Bamvd 
(wed here. 2 floors forming a duple* 
c ojtm ent. 2 recepfans & Jbedooms. 
192 sqjn. in cS + bdeony & terrace. 
Lovely view. 

Price only P945.000. 

Ref 347. Apply sole agent: 
JOHN TAYLOR sX 
a la Goisette 
06400 Cannes 

ret (93) 38 00 66 R» 470921. 


Core D’AZUR. 

ST. PAUL DE VENCE vib, 4 bed- 
rooms, 3 bathe, pool half aae prank, 

■^MONTB CARLO . 

5 minutes from Monte Crete. Oired sea- 
fronton. one of the finest v9m an the 
Cote clAnr. T okd privacy A proto c- 
liou. Fufly furnished. Separate staff vi- 
ta F35.CBOJWQ. 

ARTHUR CHR1STOPWR. 63 York 
Mresians, Prince of Wdes Drive. 
London SW11. Tet (01) 622 7674. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


GREAT BRITAIN 


ISP 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


GREAT BRITAIN 


LOOKING FOR A MEWS HOUSE IN 
London? One adl to receive our com- 
prehensive lot cantoning over ISO 
Mews houses for sale from £55,000 to 
over EVj ndion. Tel Lurot Brcnd 01- 
584 6221 UK 



COTE D'AZUR 

VBKE 

1st d ass propertHH, 5 bedr o oms. 5 
bathrooms, lovely greden with pad, 
marvelous jw noro t mc sea view 
Apply: XWN TAYLOR SJL 
Route de St. Paul, 

06480 l* Cafe Sur Loup 
(931 32 83 40 


MOST BEAUTIFUL HOUSE tip Cap 
Martin, 3 km. Monte Carlo, on the 
wtaer's edge, 26,000 sqjiu, exotic 
garden. Eft, very toge seawater 
swimming pool, 12 room, 10 bath- 
rooms. Justified price S5.2O0.GO0. No 
agents. Contact: Ban 1689, Herald 
Tnhwse 92521 NeuJvCede*. France 


EXCBTKJNAL SUPS CANM5. 
Splendd vffla 240 sq.nL two recep- 
tions with fireptooe. 4 bedrooms. 4 
bathroom, staff owners 65 sqm. 
nice swimm in g pod with pod house. 
Fork 2000 sqm. feity sea new. SSI, 47 
laOwserte. 06400CAWE5. Tet (93) 
38 19 19. 



imsm 

BratiraEsi 







UirM'livM 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FOB MORE REAL ESTATE 


PARK LANE PRESTIGIOUS flats over- 
looking Hyde Pork 2/3 bedrooms. 
2/3 bathrooms. From £170.000. 
HYDE PARK. Mogmf«nt house. 6 
bedrooms, swtnwrmg pod. jacusii. 
sauna. PUThCY BRIDGE, attractive 
flat lounge 2 double bedrooms. 
£56X00. DUBLIN, Ireland Terraced 
Victorian home, 2 bedrooms, 2 large 
farina roams, mefuily restored 
CTBflOO. GABi Real E Ucte Co., 1 14 
New Bond St, London. Tel- 01-493 
5299. Tba 27646 


Triune, 92521 


f.-' .V'i-JVn'.jiyJSi? 


MOVING 



COURCHEVEL Luxury didst, an 3.600 
sqjn. 7 bedrooms with brehs. Wood 
& carpet. Fufly eqwppecL Triple ga- 
rage. Bax 1/13, Hordd Tribune. 
92521 NeuiRy Cedex, France. 


DORDOGNE NEAR MUSStDAKSpo 

oous comfortable fondy home. Con- 
verted Sbedroom bom Ml oftham 
m beautiful surrounc&ngs. Perfect far 
permanent or holiday use. F540JB0. 
Mr. Kenwh, Redonrfe. Scxxzoc, 
24400 - Muswdan. France. 


International Business Message Center 


Engfah Colarid house overlooking 
ocean. 14 rooms, + 5-room gmdan 


M S 






BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


CANADA 

OUCfl^BX. 

5 acre lots with view, rarurd trees, 12 
minute west of city on pavement. 
Priced to ioC rtf Canadtoi 512,000. 
Write-. AJ. Pdey, 462 Bm St.. Quml, 
ELC. V2J 3W9 Canada or phone 
604-747-1834. 


GERMANY 


REAL ESTA1E INVESTMENT. 
NEXT TO aXOGNE/BCW 

Wei done construction, apartment 
house vwth 24 units • 1 to 3 bedrooms - 
excellent looawjn, ides price DMS.^S 
mUon. fuky ranted, rental ncome p.a. 
DM320.000. For further dettds, rteose 
contact. 

LUEKEN A DUWE KG 
DodenhutW Str. 30 
D-2O00 Hcxnburg 55 
Teh Wief Germany 
(O) 40-86 36 27 
Telex 2173509 UJP D 


GREAT BRITAIN 


rata is U-S. S9.SO or toot/ 
oqohmhntporbto. You most 
in dude u meileta aid vtinSff- 
abtm bBirsg esfshsm. 


BUSINESS 




WHHM 30 DAYS - OR LESS 
You dor have your own basinets... 
..aid pedtel mare me n oy in a day 
than most peofie cam in a week. How? 
Easy, ft's not hard at al when you own 
a tana Computer Portrait System. 

A wre wmner that combines 3 af to- 
day's hottest trends*, video, computers 

md irate x pictures— phis the dq» 

how and gucrantoes of Texas btjjrv- 
meres, Panasonic and tana. An d cash 
business. Customers come to you. No 
sdtng. No Area. It's nd a franatoB. Al 
the money aid the profits ore TOOK 
yarn, lded far funnies, indvidudx at 
daertae owners. RaMirne, FuS-dmeor 
wtakendL Them's iw need to leave 
your present job. With the tana system 
you take someone's deture with a T.V. 
camera aid nsftntiy pnrt if writ a 
computer. It’s so [xcrvtwtton simple a 
chfld can run it But me profits aw t kid 
stuff. The tana system a portable, safe 
up in 30 minute or less, anytime, any- 
where, The world is yorf territory. 
Them are thousands of toeduxa wort- 
ing to be BW__ plus tremendous moil 
order op pU cotion 

Kamo Computer Co. Dept. F34 
Dai ho ueidr. 9 

6000 FrankfurtAV. Germany 
Tat 069/747808 Tt* 412713 KEMA 




IRELAND 


SOUTHEAST IRELAND, 3 bedroom 
cottage on 1 aae. nee town + 
beach Irish 05,000. Tel: Ireland 
053 '58819. 


SARDINIA HOLIDAY APARTMENTS 

near Coda Smerdda in exdwvr resi- 
dsnee with svMmnvng pad & garden, 
optimum pan nan/ views. 300 m. from 
beach. 5 new apartments, 1 furreshed. 
60 to 90 sqjii. From USJ800 to 
US$950 per sqjii. each, or US$800 
per sqm. for afl 5. Tel Italy 51-781 148 
iA for Kay or lb 21331 1’ Pico 


PRINCIPALITY OF 
MONACO 

Beautiful 3 ROOM APART MBIT 
for vale in luxurious re w fet tt id bidding: 
12B sqm v fully eaupped kitchen, part- 
ing space end ceflar Price F2 .500 .000 
For further detads please contact: 


Place Your Classifiod Ad Quiddy and Easily 

In 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

By Phone: Cal your load HT representative with your tout. You 
will be informed af the cod immedkedy. and once prepayment a 
made you r ad wiR appear within 48 hours. 

CaefcTho basic rate is $9 JO per fine per cby + fcxd know. Tfsere are 
25 tetters. 991 s and spocei in the first bn and 36 in the fdtowmg hies. 
Minimum spots is 2 fanes. No abbreviations aocepted. 

Credit Cards: American Express, Diner's Oub, Eurocard, Master 
Card, Access and Visa 


HEAD OFFICE 


ftarix: (For classified only): 
747-4600. 

EUROPE 

Amsterdam: 26-36-15. 
Athens: 361-8397/360-2421. 
Brussels: 343-1899. 
Copenhage n : fOl) 329440. 
rro n fcfar t: (069) 72-67-55. 
Lausanne: 29-58-94. 

Lisbon: 67-27-93/6625-44. 
London: {01 1 8364802. 
Madrid: 455-2891 7455-3306. 
Milan: (02) 7531445. 
Norway: [03) 845545. 
Rome: 679-3437. 

Sweden: 08 7569229. 

Tol Aviv. 03-455 559. 
Vienna Contact Frankfurt 


Mew York (212) 752-3890. 


LATIN AMERICA 


Bogota 212-9608 
Roams Aires: 41 4031 
(Dept. 312) 

Gamas: 331454 
Goayaqul: 431 943/431 
Uma 417852 
I ton n n i ai 64 4372 
San Jam 22-1055 
S ceit hufO. 69 61 555 
SaoAaukK 852 1893 

MIDPIE EAST 

Btdwain: 246303. 
Jordan: 25214. 

Kuwait: 5614485. 
Qatar: 416535. 

Sam* Arefcta: 

Joddafa: 667-1500. 
U-AJE.: Dubai 224161. 

EAR EAST 

Bangkok: 390-9657. 
Hang Kenre 5-420906. 
Manta 817 07 49. 
Soowk 725 87 73. 
Singmo re : 222-2725. 
Teiwan; 752 44 25/9. 
Tokyo: 504-1925. 


Sydnay: 929 56 39. 
Metttoumr 690 8233. 


26 be Bd. ftinww! Chorion* 
MONTE CARLO MC 98000, MONACO 
Tefp31 50 66 00(Ew I51J 
Tl* 479417 MC 


LONDON WI1. MOOBtN town 
house, e re ele d rand non, 3 bed- 
rooan, garden, parking. 6,000. 
Gladstones Tet 01-450 0T99 


PASSING THROUGH Monte Carta 
not inveH mo modem 
. . . snxfio *i the heart of 
. Moke the best of your money 
today. Le Montogne ■ located just 2 
mins, away from the cxzana offers 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


MOROCCO 


MOROCCO 

Tsmgier s 

Beautiful yBlq on 3000 iqjn. 
Spedocufa’ views. Landscaped gar- 
dens Great value at SlBS.fmWnta: 
RAP. 59 Worn Awl. New Sfodwfe 
NY 10801 or phone (914) 576-6011. 


PARIS & SUBURBS 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PARIS & SUBURBS 




SSlAS 7TH near champ mars 

-450 0T99 | 50.6307. Th 470 022. I h*gh «*» npure nem . enceptiend 

am bufcSna 315 tqjn 


HOLIDAYS and TRAVEL 


LOW COST FLIGHTS HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


DIAMONDS 


BUSINESS SERVICES 








|v>f| 




^c.iAV 


til#). KW 





3 
30 

(01)363.20.00 


START YOUR OWN BU5MES3 
with £8^00 & earn £30,000. Na seSng 
waived. Ready retail outlets supplied 
far new product. Pbranounl. 144 


London NW1. Tfc 295MI 





OFFICE SERVICES 


YOUR LONDON OflrtGE 
a the 

CHESHAM EtHamVE CENTRE 
Comprehensive range of services 
150 Regent Street, Lotion Wl. 
Tet ( 01 ) 439 6288 Tlx: 261426 


EURO BUSINESS CENTER 
99 Keawegrachf, 1015 Oi Amsterdam 
T* 31.2036 57 49 Tatar 16183. 
WoM-WSde Business Centers 


EAST COAST FROM £119 

MD WEST ROM £160 

WEST COAST ROM £212 

SOUTH EAST ROM £19S 

Anywhere to anyWhere 
in USA an BSANffiF £95 

NATC London 734 8100 


NEW YORK 

FI 990 ONE WAY 

+ Amsterdam to: NYC, Okago. LA. 
ffiSTOUS - Tek 260 40 231*0*) 


BOAT EXCHANGE - Owners wish to 
to chenqe 86 ft. Burger-nutf condi- 
tion, oew af 3, deeps 6 h owners 
quarters-tor comppaMe bool m Am 
M erSterronewi hme-Jufy Aug. Aval- 
uhte Caribbean, Bchanas or East 
Coast USA. Flexible. EKT, Bax 394 
Ocean Reef Oub, Key lorao, FL 
33037 USA. 



HUNT SPAIN! 
CAZATUR 

CCNTACT.- MR. CARBON 
THj 2759699021 TLX: 23972 






otd bukfing, 3>5 sqm fa. 000.000 

16TH NEAR TROCADQK) 

500 sun. lewdumi) 
with larae greoen 4- caretakers house. 
ExcdW canMan. FlSjOOOOOa 

CABINET MAROEAU 

720 01 44 


NBJttiY, V. HUGO 

IX sqjiv. ground Boor with 300 sqm- 




PARIS & NEUHLY 

PS3-A-TRSE, HKSH CLASS 
2-3 ROOMS. H* ptt 360 26 88 
AGENGE OE UETOttE 


If IB'y-Ti c .’ I . ■ i4 1 


>..TVr-TS,TO 


















PAGE 15 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIHEDS