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Hie Global Newspaper 

Edited in Paris 
Primed Simultaneously 
ia Paris, London, Zuriti, 

. “fg Kon & Singapore, 

« The Hague and Marseille 


WEATHER DATA APPEAR ON PaGE 12 



INTERNATIONAL 




Published With Hie New York Times and The Washington Post 


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John Paul Seeking 
New Social Doctrine 
for Latin America 


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By EJ. Dionne Jr. 

New York Tima Service 

GUAYAQUIL. Ecuador — 
When the Vatican issued its paper 
criticizing the theology of libera- 
tion last year, it promised to come 
up with its own version that would 
express both orthodoxy and a com- 
mitment to the poor. 

' During his trip through South 
America, which began last week. 
Pope John Paul II has done just 
that. He has elaborated a wiat 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

doctrine that, if ever put into effect, 
would change the face of Latin 
America. 

—On issue after issue, the pope has 
staked out positions dearly in line 
with the reformist spirit of those 
who adopted liberation theology as 
their banner, notably priests and 


be respected as persons and citi- 
zens.” 

“The church makes this its own 
aspiration,” he declared, “so that 
your dignity is not inferior to that 
of any other person or race.” 

These wen just parts of the 
pope’s social program. He came 
out in favor of trade unions, social 
security and pensions —more radi- 
cal appeals for Latin Americans 
than they would be for West Euro- 
peans or North Americans. 

And he has not been shy about 
using tough language. He spoke of 
the “exploitation’’ of workers and 
of inequalities between rich and 
poor as an "intolerable abyss." He 
repeatedly chastised the wealthy, as 
in a speech to workers in Quito on 
Wednesday, as “the very few who 
possess excessive riches." 

John Paul has, from almost the 
beginning of his pontificate, sought 
to elaborate a social doctrine that is 


theologians who have spent a good a kind of “third way" between what 
part of their bves with Latin Amen- he sees as the materialism of both 
ca’s most impoverished people. 

They advocate political action to 
bring about change in society. 


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Is explaining his doctrine, the 
pope has not backed away from the 
Vatican’s original document. In- 
deed, he has mentioned it by nam* 
several times and criticized over 
mid over the very aspects of libera- 
tion theology that the document 
found offensive. 

The pope has said often, for ex- 
ample. that what has become 
known as the church’s “preferential 
option for tbepoor" should not be 
“exclusive." That is, the non-poor 
should not be read out of the 
atfircfa. 

He has criticized materialism 
and doctrines that pit class against 
class. In other words, Marxist the- 
ory remains unacceptable. And he 
told the bishops of Venezuela that 
they should firmly correct “error." 
Church leaders, in the pope’s view, 
must not surrender their authority. 

But what the pope has added to 
these criticisms is a series of, at 
times, remarkably specific calls for 
social reftHtn. If the church is 
aga in st Marxism, the pope was say- 
ing, then so. too, is it against an 
unjust status qua ' 

Twice this past week, for exam- 
ple, the pope threw himself on the 
side of peasants and land redistri- 
bution, And he said dial redistrib- 
uting large plots was nor enough. 
Governments, he said, must make 
sure that the newly landed peasants 
also have the means to make tbeir 
plots productive. 

& On Thursday, in Lalacungg, Ec- 
Wdor, the pope spoke as an ally of 
the Indiana, often the poorest of 
the poor in Latin America. He told 
a crowd of 250,000 that the church 
supported the Indians' desire “to 


capitalism and communism. 

Still, the key to virtually all the 
pontiffs speeches and writings is 
the need for personal redemption. 

He is for free elections, trade 
unions and organizing the poor, 
but in Jus view, no earthly reform is 
sufficient Individuals must redeem 
themselves through faith. f7i«ng* 
hearts, the pope is saying, and you 
wfl) change the world. And that he 
says, is the church’s first obligation. 
The church, he said at the be gin - 
(Continued on Page 2, Col. 7) 


Chernenko: The Talk Is of a Successor 

Rumors Abound as Ailing Soviet Leader Ends Y ear in Power 


By Serge Sdimemann 

Mar York Tuna Service 

MOSCOW — Konstantin U. Chernenko 
will soon mark his first year in power and 
once again a Soviet leader is approaching the 
anniversary under a cloud of rumor and fore-- 
boding. 

From the evidence, Mr. Chernenko is HI, 
perhaps seriously. Soviet officials, lifting a bit 
the taboo on discussing the leader’s health, 
have said as much. 

They have not said what ails him The 73- 
year-old leader has not bees seen in public 
since Dec. 27. A conference of Warsaw Pact 
leaders set for mid-January has been post- 
poned. A visit by Willy Brandt the Social 
Democrat from West Germany, planned for 
mid-February, has also been put off. 

(However, on Thursday, a Soviet Foreign 
Ministry spokesman told a correspondent of 
the Cable News Network that Mr. Cher- 
nenko was taking his winter vacation. He 
denied that he was ill] 

The uncertainty over Mr. Chernenko’s 
health has spawned rumors ranging from a 
report that his respiratory problems have 
been aggravated by the winter to one that be 
may resign at the next meeting of the Central 
Committee, reportedly set fa March. 

Much of the speculation has a f amiliar 
ring. Mr. Chernenko, suffering from emphy- 
sema, has been subject to scrutiny from the 
time be became the party's general secretary 
last Feb. 13. 

What is new this time is ibai the issue 
seems to have roused little suspense or appre- 
hension. Western diplomats have advanced 
several explanations. 

One is that, in the transitions from Leonid 
L Brezhnev to Yuri V. Andropov and from 
Andropov to Mr. Chernenko, the leadership 
has shown it can transfer power without dis- 
ruption. Another is that the succession seems 
to have been decided in advance and that 



8mmn 

Konstantin U. Chernenko 

Mikhail S. Gorbachov, 53, the second-rank- 
ing party secretary, is the heir. 

A third explanation is that Mr. Chernenko 
has been perceived as a transitional leader, to 
hold the fort a little longer before the transfer 
of power to a new generation. 

In Mr. Chernenko’s absence, the Soviet 
press has continued to give him exposure, 
printing letters he addressed to a conference 
of peace advocates and to a high school 
student in Canada. There has been publicity 


for the publication of his writings in Poland 
and in France. 

He has been assigned a Moscow constitu- 
ency in the single slate of candidates for 
elections next month to [he n ominal legisla- 
ture of oik of the Soviet Union’s many gov- 
ernmental entities, the Russian Republic, and 
his name has been mentioned in the weekly 
communiques of Politburo meetings. 

But to practiced readers such spurts of 
publicity only signal that something is awry 
behind the Kremlin walls. 

There were similar flurries last summer 
when Mr. Chernenko was ill. and also after 
Andropov dropped from view tow ard the end 
of his reign. 

Mr. Chernenko’s selection as Andropov's 
successor was greeted initially with some dis- 
may here. Andropov had initiated measures 
to discipline the economy and its bloated 
bureaucracy, and to shake them out of the 
doldrums of the later Brezhnev years. 

The measures — the campaigns to get more 
out of workers, to rout corrupt officials, to 
shake op the bureaucrats — caught ibe ] 
lar imagination, and as a critically 
Andropov faded from public view, thele_ 
grew of a man who would have got Russia 
moving if only be had kept his health. 

Mr. Chernenko, rising to power on the 
strength of a lifetime spent serving Brezhnev, 
was viewed as a threat to the fledgling revival 
as a return to the benign neglect of the Brezh- 
nev era. 

Bm whether he sensed the popular mood 
or shared to some degree the feeling that 
change was critical, Mr. Chernenko did not 
uy to undo what Andropov had started. 

One Moscow intellectual voiced what 
seemed to be the general view: “We have 
come to peace with Mr. Chernenko. He has 
contributed nothing new, the pace has 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 7) 


Gunman Kills 
West German 
Arms Magnate 


France Calls Home Envoy From India 
After the Withdmuxd of Military Aide 


miff 







John Paul Makes 
Appeal For Poor 
In Ecuador Slum 

The Associated Press 

GUAYAQUIL, Ecuador — 
Pope John Paul II cm Friday 
visited a crowded shim on the 
outskirts of Ecuador's biggest 
. city and made an urgent appeal 
\fto the governments of Latin 
America on behalf of tbepoor. 

Speaking before 30,000 
cheering residents of the shan- 
tytown jd Ecuador’s main sea- 
port, the pontiff expressed bis 
“interest, solidarity and love" 
i for the urban -poor. He urged 
the governments “to seek a 
greater equilibrium and 
to show a greater solidarity" 
with the needy. 

The pontiff urged the slum 
, -dwellers to reject both exploita- 
tion and “extremist ideologies 
that .only bring hatred, revenge 
and atheism.” 


The Associated Press 

NEW DELHI — The French 
ambassador to India, Serge Boide- 
vaix, has been recalled to Paris, the 
Indian government announced Fri- 
day. 

The withdrawal of Mr. Boide- 
vaix followed by 12 days the recall 
of the French deputy military atta- 
chfc, Cotond Alain Bofley, who was 
accused in Indian press reports of 
buying classified Indian defense 
documents. Colonel Bolley has de- 
nied the accusations. 

The United News of India news 
agency and The Hindu -newspaper 
both reported that the recall of Mr. 
Bcsdevaix was linked to Colonel 
Boiler’s departure. The reports said 
the withdrawal did not imply that 
Mr. Boidevaix was involved in espi- 
onage but rather that he had to 
“bear the responsibility” for Colo- 
nel Bdley’ s actions. 

The political correspondent for 
The Hindu, G.K. Reddy, who is 
dose to the gove rnm e n t’s inner cir- 
cle, reported that the ambassador 
was recalled at India’s request 

Salman Haidar, a spokesman for 
the Indian External Affairs Minis- 
try, said the French government 


informed India of Mr. Boidevaix’s 
recall in a meeting Wednesday in 
Paris between the French minister 
of external relations, Roland Du- 
mas, and the Indian ambassador, 
Narendra Singh. 

Mr. Haidar declined to comment 
ooLwhether (he recall of Mr. Boide- 
vaix/who was assigned to India in 
January 1983, was made at India’s 
request 

The French External Relations 
Ministry said in Paris that Mr. Boi- 
devaix had been appointed to the 
position of assistant secretary-gen- 
eral starting June 1 and that France 
was asking New Delhi’s agreemem 
on a replacement. The name of the 
replacement was not announced. 

The espionage case, which broke 
in mid- Janaary. involved the leak- 
age of defense and other stale se- 
crets to unidentified foreigners. 
The Indian government has so far 
not named the country or countries 
involved or said what secrets were 
leaked. 

There was no immediate word 
when the French envoy would 
leave India. French Embassy offi- 
cials said he was still in New Delhi 


and was not preparing to leave im- 
mediately. 

Indian news reports also said 
that a countmntefljgeace team has 
been sent to Poland as part of an 
investigation of a possible East- 
bloc link to the spy case. 

Relations between India and 
France; soured, by the spy case, lud 
expanded rapidly since President 
Francois Mitterrand won election; 
in 1981 and formed his Socialist 

government. 

At least three French cabinet 
ministers visited India last year to 
promote bilateral trade and eco- 
nomic cooperation Mr. Mitterrand 
attended a small-scale nonaligned 
summit meeting called last year in 
New York by the late Indian prime 
minister, Indira Gandhi. 

Mrs. Gandhi's son and succes- 
sor, Rajiv Gandhi, is scheduled to 
visit Paris this summer to open an 
Indian festival and bold talks with 
Mr. Mitterrand to enhance rela- 
tions. His plans have cot been 
changed. 

The espionage ring was broken 
when France was about to deliver 
the first batch of Mirage-2000 com- 
bat planes to India and coincided 



Serge Boidevaix 


with negotiations try French mann- 
facturers to sell India sophisticated 
missiles, artillery guns and other 
electronic equipment in a deal said 
to total about SI trillion. 

The independent Statesman 
newspaper reported earlier that 
France might lose the deal as part 
of India’s actions against Paris for 
the alleged French connection in 
the scandaL 


U.S. Charges Russia Violated ABM, Other Treaties 


Untied Press International 

WASHINGTON —The Reagan 
administration charged Friday for 
the first time Lhat the Soviet Union 
dearly has violated the 1972 anti- 
ballistic missile treaty by starting 
construction of a huge radar facili- 
ty. 

In a report to Congress ou Soviet 
noncompliance with arms control 
agreements, the administration 
also reiterated earlier charges that 
the Russians probably have violat- 
ed other agreements. 

The reports said that evidence 
gathered in 1984 straightens last 
year’s conclusion that the Russians 
are maintaining “an offensive bio- 
logical warfare program and capa- 


bility in violation of its legal obliga- 
tion" under another international 
agreement 

In a letter accompanying the re- 
port, President Ronald Reagan 
said the Soviet Union “has violated 
the ABM treaty" through the sit- 
ing, orientation and capability of 
the Krasnoyarsk Radar." violated 
the Limited' Test Ban Treaty, and 
violated the SALT-2 provision pro- 
hibiting more than one type of in- 
tercontinental ballistic missile. The 
letter said the Russians “probably 
violated the ABM treaty provision 
on concurrent testing of SAM and 
ABM components." SAM refers to 
surface to air missiles. 

Administration officials previ- 


ously had expressed concern about 
the construction of the radar facili- 
ty in Krasnoyarsk, in the central 
Soviet Union. But they bad 
stopped short of calling it a clear- 
cut violation of the treaty, saying 
the Russians were “almost certain- 
ly” violating the treaty. That was 
the conclusion of last year’s report 
to Congress on the same subject 

The new report was due Dec. 1, 
but the administration decided in 
November to delay its release until 
February, after the meeting be- 
tween Secretary of Slate George P. 
Shultz and Foreign Minister An- 
drei A. Gromyko of the Soviet 
Union on Jan. 7 and 8. 

Officials said the report makes 


three new charges of treaty viola- 
tions: the radar installation in vio- 
lation of the ABM treaty, under- 
ground nuclear testing in violation 
of the 1963 Limited Test Ban Trea- 
ty, and construction of a new type 
of I CBM missile in violation of the 
turatified Strategic Arms Limita- 
tion Treaty. Both superpowers 
have agreed to abide by the SALT- 
2 treaty. 

Last year’s report made charges 
of probable violations on two of the 
three points — the radar and 
ICBM — and those findings were 
upgraded Friday. The under- 
ground testing was not alleged as a 
probable violation in the 
1984 report. 


anuary 


Weinberger 
Contradicted 
By Aides on 
Soviet Mmile 


By Bill Keller 

New York Tima Semce 

. . WASHINGTON — Pentagon 
officials have contradicted, an as- 
sertion by Defense Secretary Ca- 
spar W. Weinberger that the Soviet 
Union recently shot down a missile 
that had strayed over Norway and 
-Finland. Some said that their chief 
was mistaken. 

Mr. Weinberger was apparently 
referring to an incident on Dec. 28, 
in which a Soviet missile, which 
Moscow said was being used for 
target practice over the Barents 
Sea, veered off course over Norway 
and crashed in Finland. Moscow 
subsequently apologized to Fin- 
land and Norway fra the episode. 

Before the Senate Foreign Rela- 
tions Committee, which was hear- 
ing testimony on President Ronald 
Reagan’s plan to develop a defease 
against incoming missiles, the de- 
fense secretary twee said Thursday 
that the missile had been shot 
down. 

But his spokesman, Michael I. 
Burch, said later in the day: “The 
secretary did not mean to imply 
lhat it was shot dow n by a Soviet 
airplane over Finnish airspace. 
What the secretary is trying to say 
is that the Soviets are working on a 
cruise missile defense system. It is 
within the technology. They can do 
it, and we can do it” 

Mr. Burch declined to say that 
Mr. Weinberger’s remarks were a 
misstatement, saying only: “I have 
issued a subsequent statement to 
clarify his statement." 

Adminis tration officials familiar 
with intelligence information about 
the Soviet Union said they were 
unaware of any data that' would 
suggest Russia sent fighters to in- 
tercept the errant missile. 

Mr. Weinberger's remarks were 
made after a British newspaper, cit- 
ing “authoritative” sources, said 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 5) 


By James Markham 

l.ui Tunes Same 

BONN — The chief executive of 
West Germany’s biggest manufac- 
turer of military engines was shot 
in the head early Friday by two 
urban terrorists at his home outside 
Munich. He died later of his 
wounds. 

The killing of Ernst Zimmer- 
man n. ihe 55-year-old chief execu- 
tive of the giant Moioren und Tur- 
binen Union GmbH, appeared to 
mark an escalation in an offensive 
launched in December by the self- 
styled Red Army Faction. 

A caller to a local newspaper in 
the Munich suburb of Gauiing. 
where Mr. Zimmermann lived, an- 
nounced “the attack" by the Red 
Array Faction “Patrick O’Hara 
Commando" — the name of an 
Irish Republican .Army member 
who died in Belfast in 1981 after a 
61-day hunger strike. 

The assassination followed the 
killing in a Paris suburb of Rene 
A urban, a three-star French gener- 
al who had coordinated France’s 
overseas military sales, on Jan. 25. 
Responsibility for that killing was 
claimed by the French terrorist 
group Direct Action, but by a 
“commando" bearing the name of 
a West German terrorist slain in a 
Nuremberg police shoot-out in 
1979. 

On Jan. 15, in twinned commu- 
niques written in French and Ger- 
man. Direct Action and the Red 
Army Faction announced that they 
were forming “a political-military 
front in Western Europe” to attack 
North Atlantic Treaty Organiza- 
tion targets. Some anti-terrorist 
specialists believe that this “front" 
indudes a shadowy B elgian group 
called Fighting Communist Cells, 
which has claimed a string of ex- 
plosions against military installa- 
tions in Belgium. 

[On Thursday, Direct Action 
and the Red Army Faction issued 
their second joint statement claim- 
ing General Audran's killing. Unit- 
ed Press International reported 
from Paris. It said they planned to 
continue attacks against NATO. 

[General Audran was killed, 
Thursday’s communique said, be- 
cause he was “responsible for arms 
production, exports and sales to 
NATO. His economic and military 
role put him at the bean of NA- 



tout** 

Ernst Zimmermann 

TO’s strategic project of imperial- 
ism to homogenize European states 
under its control."] 

In another act suggesting coordi- 
nation among Western European 
terrorists, a Portuguese group 
called FP-25 announced that it had 
placed eight bombs that damaged 
cars and homes at a West German 
air base in Beja on Friday. 

The base in southern Portugal is 
used by the West German Air 
Force for practice flights. The wife 
of a West German ai rman was re- 
ported to have been cut slightly by 
flying glass. 

The manner in which Mr. Ziro- 
merauum was lured to his front 
door at 7:20 A.M. —a young wom- 
an said she had a letter for which he 
had to sign — recalled the methods 
of the Red Anny Faction during a 
sanguinary terrorist offensive in 
1977. 

According to various official ac- 
counts, a man in his tnid-20s carry- 
ing a submachine gun then forced 
the door of the Zimmermana 
home, bound the executive and his 
wife, and, after removing the hus- 
band to a bedroom, seated him on a 
chair and shot him once in the 
head. The two terrorists were then 
said to have fled on foot. 

The parallelism between the Au- 

( Continued on Page 2, CoL 3) 


Ethiopia Said to Unload 
Arms Before Food Aid 

By Gifford D. May 

New York Tima Service 






Legendary r Lost City 1 of Unknown Pre-Incan Civilisation Found in Andes 


kti By John Noble Wilford 

iVew York Times Service 


S' 


meters) above sea leveL It is a place of almost 
perpetual rain, dense jungle growth and no 
human habitation. 

“•NEW YORK — High in the Andes of One of the mysteries of these people, be- 
Peni, explorers have examined and photo- their identity and relationship to- the 

graphed in great detail the remains of a ^ lo 0 iher known prehistoric cul- 

legpudaiy “lost city” that archaeologjsis b^- ^ Peru’s north coast, is how they 

ti&vc may rival the spectacular Inca ruins at manag ed to maintain an apparently thriving 
Macho Pinch u. culture under such d aun ting circumstances. 

The ruins of vast walls and terraces, build- Jane Wheeler, an anthropologist at the 
mgs and tombs and statuary, all overlooking University of Colorado, said: “We’re in- 
a nver on the steep, cloud-shrouded eastern trigued by the evidence of dense hu ma n 


slope of the Andes, were presumably a major 
center of as early, resourceful and mysten- 
- whose civilization flourished long 

Incas. 


OUS 
before 


people 
we mvs 





habitation, because such jungle areas are 
apparently unoccupied in other pans of the 
world." 

Tom Lennon, a University of Colorado 
archaeologist, who explored the rile last 
summer, said that the evidence at Gran Paja- 
' afoot a previously unsnowu viu- ten was of a “high civilization that devd- 
SfS^SdpCrTitiradfly to return to oped a distinaive style ofi architecture and 
summer to begin com- might have had an advanced agriculture. The 
^S^ttodi^SSdcantinue/orl5 ate is probably only rare of many in thearra, 
mnouncement was made at the Mr. Lennon said, and may not even.be the 
“ ,1 -' most important one. 

The two University of Colorado scientists 
are to direct the new exploration program, 


imversity of Colorado, at Boulder. 

The site, known as Gran Pajaten, 

ea^w^omfaedftwAJJ.SOOto l566by 

ncaudhm lo prebnn- 


-<*> 


ah unknown r — r — . . , 

nary studies by Univereify of 
endsts. The rums are m the 

Martin, in a “cioud forest 


prelum- which is being undertaken with (he cocpera- 
do sri- tion of the Peruvian Institute of Culture and 

of San two Peruvian universities. 

feet (2,608 Commenting on the plans, Craig Morris, 


the South American curator at the American 
Museum of Natural History in New York 
City, said that Gran Pajaten “is an impres- 
sive rite way likely to produce interesting 
and important discoveries." 

According lo Luis Lumbreras. a scholar of 
prehistory at the Institute of Andean Ar- 
chaeology, in Lima, the ancient peoples who 
inhabited the remote eastern slopes of the 
Andes are “the last undescribed pre- Hispan- 
ic dvilizaikra in Peru." 

Scholars regard the pTe- Hispanic civiliza- 
tions centered in Peru as the most impressive 
in South America. At the bright of their 
civilization, the Incas controlled a region 
from Colombia south to Chile and Argenti- 
na. But it lasted less than 300 years, ending 
with the arrival of the Spanish in the early 
16th century. 

Gran Pajaten has been a legend that has 
fascinated archaeologists for years, particu- 
larly after the discovery of Machu Ptcchu in 
1911. The phrase “lost cities” was popular- 
ized by Hiram Bingham, the archaeologist 
who lea the Yale University expedition mat 
discovered Machu PicchtL He used it to 
characterize the ruins of ancient dues in the 
mountains of Peru, which had been lost to all 
but a few nearby residents. 

Gran Pajaten “has been the subject of 


rumors and unsuccessful expeditions since 
the beginning erf this century," Mr. Lennon 
said. 

In 1963, Peruvian archaeologists found the 
site, spent a few days exploring it, then 
abandoned it again to the jungle. The lost 
dty was “lost" again. 

But last summer, four Coloradans, in- 
spired by the legends and the 1963 discovery, 
trekked to the site. The arduous journey, by 
mule and then by foot, took several days, and 
they spent more than a week e xamining and 
photographing the ruins. Accompanying Mr. 
Lennon were Alan Stonno. a surgeon; John 
Lovett, a businessman, and Stan Bren ton. 
another surgeon, all of Boulder. 

Mr. Lennon said many of the structures at 
Gran Pajaten were in remarkably good con- 
dition. Threo-foot-hjgb wood carvings, still 
weD preserved, hung from the eaves of slate- 
tiled roofs over burial towers buQi into the 
mountainside. Large pieces erf fabric and 
undamaged pottery were found. 

The burial towers were connected by a 
narrow pathway skirting the edge of a thou- 
sand-foot cliff. Cairns, possibly burial 
plans, dotted the site. Below the burial 
towers were at least 16 multi-storied, round 
buildings and two rectangular structures. 



ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia — 
Aid officials and Western diplo- 
mats here say they have become 
concerned that ships delivering 
military equipment to Ethiopia are 
bring given priority over ships 
bringing food to famine victims. 

A senior Western aid official 
said Wednesday that the apparent 
priority treatment given to Soviet 
weapons over Western food “is 
only the most prominent incident" 
in “a long series of hurdles and 
constraints put in the way of our 
helping” famine victims. 

The officials said two Soviet 
ships sailed into the Red Sea prat 
of Assab-two weeks ago. 

Western travelers, including dip- 
lomats, who have returned from 
Assab in recent days said they had 
seen military equipment being tak- 
en off both vessels. The equipment, 
they said, included as many as 45 
tanks, tons of artillery, smafl arms, 
ammunition and bombs. 

“It is a major military import for 
a country of this size," said a West- 
ern official who returned from As- 
sab this week. 

Two other ships — a Danish ship 
reportedly carrying 16,000 metric 
tons of bagged gram from Austra- 
lia, and a vessel reportedly carrying 
24,500 metric tons of balk grain 
from Canada — sailed into Assab 
on Jan. 14 and Jan. 2 1 , respectively, 
the officials said. 

The Ethiopian government has 
agreed to give priority to food aid 
over any other type of cargo and 
has pledged that the three berths in 
Assab would be available at all 
tunes fra relief shipments. Western 
diplomats and aid officials said 
Wednesday that instead, the Soviet 
ships had been using the berths 
reserved for relief. 

Kurt Jansson, the United Na- 
tions assistant secretary general in 
charge of cmsgency operations in 
Ethiopia, said that senior Ethiopi- 
an government officials responded 
Wednesday to a letter of concent 
he had sent by rcconfinning their 
commitments on food priority. 

They assured him, he said, that 
the ship carrying the Australian 
grain would be allowed to dock 
Wednesday. The ship did dock and 
began unloading its cargo, relief 
officials in the capital said. 

According, to UN officials in 
New York, a Soria ship was 
moved to make way for the relief 
vessel. The officials said fire ship 


carrying Canadian grain was ex- 
pected to unload its cargo Saturday 
“as scheduled." 

The senior Western aid official 
said, however. “The practical effect 
of the Ethiopian government’s ac- 
tions has been to seriously slow- 
down the aid we are trying to pro- 
vide. All of us are terribly frustrat- 
ed." 

According lo several embassy 
and relief officials, two West Ger- 
man ships carrying food for famine 
victims also encountered difficul- 
ties (his month. They said one of 
the ships, the Papua^ was held in 
Assab after unloading grain and 
500 tents for relief organizations in 
Ethiopia. 

Port authorities, the officials 
said, inspected the remaining 
goods on board and found about 60 
tons of food and medical supplies 
consigned to a West German relief 
organization in Sudan and intend- 
ed fra famine victims there, many 
of whom are refugees from Ethio- 
pia. 

The authorities seized those sup- 
plies, refused to give the ship per- 

( Continued on Page 2, CoL 6) 


INSIDE 

■ Jeane J. Kirkpatrick says she 
has mixed feelings about her 
four years as chief UJ5. delegate 
to the United Nations. Page 3. 

■ North and South Korea have 

returned to a pattern of mutual 
scorn and attacks on one anoth- 
er’s intentions. Page 5. 

ARTS/LEISURE 

■ Max Wykes-Joyce reviews a 
major exhibition of the work of 
Pierre-Aaguste Renoir. Page 6. 

■ An i m pressive “Tristan und 
Isolde” opens in Paris, but the 
English National Opera's “Tris- 
tan” has problems. Page 6. 


BUSINESS/ FINANCE 

■ US. dviSan unemployment 
rose 02 of a percentage point to 
7.4 percent in January. Page 7. 

MONDAY 

In the coming aims talks. Hen- 
ry Kissinger writes, a great deal 
depends on the US. ability to 
avoid raising expectations. 
Some suggestions in his regular 
column. 








Page 2 


i, ■ 

Pad Between Socialists, 
Spanish Basque Party 
Ends Estrangement 


By Edward Schumacher six weeks in the Basque country. 
New York Tima Serna the four northern provinces that 

MADRID — Spam’s ruling So- bold 50106 2 miUl<nl SP** 0 ’ 5 
tialists and the Basque region’s ofarty *9 rnfflion people. The re- 
governing party have ended five gioo, an mdustnal base, has tugged 
yero of estrangenteatty signing a for centuries against Madrid. 


legislative pact designed in part to 

politically isolate separatist Basque 
guerrillas. 

Government officials said 'that 
the pact, signed on Wednesday, is 
the most important development in 
the troubled relations between Ma- 
drid and the Basque region since 
i of the Sta 



the signing of the Statute of Guer- 
nica five years ago giving the region 

limited autonomy. — — . . 

The fulfillment of that statute party disputes that had paralyzed 
has been mired since its signing in re® 002 ! government. In one of 


Although under negotiation for 
nearly two years, the pact grows 
largely out of the political ascen- 
sion erf Mr. Ardanza. A lawyer 
known to be a conciliator, be was 
elected on Jan. 24 by the Basque 
parliament as the new “lendakari," 
or government head. 

He replaced Carlos Garai- 
koetxea, who was foxed to resign 
in December because of internal 


Car Bomb Blast Kills 12 inLdbano^ 

TRIPOLI, Lebanon (Combined Dispatches) — A booby-trapped car 
blew up Friday outside a mosque packed with hundreds of people at noon 
wavers, tilling at least 12 persons and wounding 58 ottos, ponce said. 

Tbe estimated 1 76 pounds (80 kilograms) of TOT in the canspfodaj 
just after noon as about 200 worshippers were jn the Im a m Ah mosque, 
police said. The streets outside were crowded with shoppers and children 
going home for lunch in Tripoli, about 49 miles (8) kilometers) north of 

Beirut. . • 

Meanwhile, in ShI on, fighting with heavy machin e guns and rocket- 
- ■ ■ •■> xt *7 i j propelled grenades erupted when about a dozen unidentified gu nmen 

bassy in Wellington, New Zealand attacked Dio-Isradi militiamen. Aimored posonto earners of the South 

km. in/t,oa« 0 «t that it wiTI tin! nprmi. ^ xxSgaa ^ fire With machine $1108. • " 

There was no immediate word of casualties m the 30-minute battle, 
which as Israeli and South Lebanese Army troops prepared to leave 

the city in the first part of a three-stage withdrawal from southern: 
Lebanon. (UP I, Hanoi) 


Txflfl Senegas, left, a regional Socialist leader, and Jos6 Antonio Ardanza, bead of tbe 
Basque government, sign a legislative pact partly designed to isolate separatist guerrillas. 


i West German Arms Magnate Is Killed 


chiding hundreds of kidnappings 
and assassinations by Basque guer- 
rillas demanding independence. 

Tbe pact calls for cooperation 
between the two governing parties 
to carry out the Guernica statute 
and “to work together, within the 
demands of a state of law, in the 
fight against violence and terror- 
ism.” 

Although the regional party, the 
Basque Nationalist Party, opposes 
the gunmen of ETA, the Basque- 
language acronym for Basque 
Homeland and Freedom, Madrid 
has accused the party of often turn- 
ing a blind eye. 

“I think this agreement is going 
to be the be ginning of a new era," 
Josfc Antonio Ardanza, 43, tbe new 
head of the Basque government, 
said after the signing in Vitoria, the 
Basque capital. 

TxOd Benegas, a Basque who is 
the No. 3 man in the Socialist Par- 
ty, signed for the Socialists and said 
it would help make the Basque 
country “governable.” 

Tbe pact climaxes a tumultuous 
turn of political events over the last 


and quickly worked out compro- 
mises. 

The pact effectively forms a co- 
alition in the Basque parliament for 
the next three years, giving the re- 
gional party a solid majority, par- 
ticularly over ETA’s political arm. 
Hem Batasuna. In addition to 
pledging the Gonzikz government 
to working with tbe Basque Na- 
tionalist Party to fight regional un- 
employment and liberalize regional 
autonomy, the pact commits both 
parties not to negotiate with ETA. 

For Mr. Gonz&lez, it is a key 
piece in a strategy to isolate the 
gunmen from the region’s moder- 
ate nationalist majo rity while 
cracking down on the ETA. 

But most political leaders also 
cautioned that the violence was not 
about to end. Herri Batasuna called 
tbe pact “treason” and ETA guer- 
rillas have responded in the last 
three weeks by ltining a barber and 
kidnapping a politically moderate 
Basque industrialist, Angel Ur- 
im ga, for whom they are demand- 
ing a $ 3-million ransom. 


(Cantinaed from Page 1) 
dran tilling a nd Friday’s assassina- 
tion, both against men involved in 
the international arms business, 
suggested further cooperation be- 
tween West German and French 
terrorists. The slaying of General 


Tbe attacks include a botched 
car-bombing of a NATO training 
school at Oberammeigan, anon at 
a Siemens warehouse m Frankfurt, 
and the bombings of a computer 
center in Reutlingjen, an annex of 
the French Embassy in B onn and a 


Audran was the first time that Di- U.S. Army communications center 
rect Action, which had previously near M a nnh ei m . 


confined itself to bombing, had re- 
sorted to assassination. 

Mr. Zimmermann’s firm, widely 
known by its initials MTU, pro- 
duces engines for NATO’s multi- 
purpose combat plane, Tornado, as 
well as for West Germany’s mam 
battle tank, the Leopard-2. In an 
interview published Friday in a 
French magazine. Mr. Zimmer- 
marm called for closer cooperation 
between Bonn and Paris in space. 

A coordinated hunger strike on 
Dec. 4 by 32 Red Army Faction 
prisoners in scattered Goman pris- 
ons was the signal for a terrorist 
offensive of about 30 bombings 
and fires attributed to the group by 
the Interim' Ministry. 


On Jan. 21, a 28-year-old terror- 
ist, Johannes Thimine, was killed 
outside a Stuttgart computer center 
when a bomb borne in a baby car- 
riage apparently detonated prema- 
turely; his 23-year-old comrade, 
fbmdifl Wannersdorfer, was se- 
verely wounded. 

• Several of the hunger strikers 
have abandoned their fast — nomi- 
nally to demand the gather- 
ing of all Red Army Faction pris- 
oners in one jail — but officials are 
concerned that some may die soon. 
The condition of one terrorist in a 
Stuttgart prison was said to have 
worsened after he resumed eating. 

Interior Minister Friedrich Zim- 
mc ranann said Friday that the 


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“hard core” of terrorists in West 
Germany numbered 20 to 40 per- 
sons, and that they were supported 
by a wider circle of sympathizers 
numbering 100 to 130. He said that, 
in contrast to the 1970s, the terror- 
ists did not have a wide circle of 
extreme leftists willing to shelter 

thtran 

■ Portuguese Concern 

The renewed violence of the FP- 
23 guerrilla group comes seven 
months after a roundup of guerrilla 
suspects, Reuters reported from 

Other actions this week included 
a mortar attack against NATO 
warships and the parcel bomb mur- 
der of a car racing champion. 

Police mounted a sweep last June 
against the FP-25. About SO people 
were arrested, including a revolu- 
tionary hero. Lieutenant Colonel 
Oteio Saraiva de Carvalho. 

Security chiefs believe the 
planned trial later thi< year of the 
colonel and other suspects may 
have triggered the current violence. 

Tbe unsuccessful attack on a 
NATO naval squadron off Lisbon 
on Monday followed other abor- 
tive actions against the U.S. Em- 
bassy in No v e mb er and NATO’s 
Iberian headquarters in December. 
FP-25 said the embassy attack was 
aimed at what it called imperialist 
threats to Portugal's independence. 


has indicated that it wiD not permit 
a U.S. Navy ship to make a port 
call next month without assurances 
that tbe ship is not carrying nudear 
arms. 

A senior administration official 
in Washington said it was “not a 
definitive response” bat “it looks 
like we are facing a turndown on 
this request” 

If the visit of tbe U.S. warship is 
denied, & State Department 
spokesman «»«t, the United States 
“would have to reconsider our par- 
ticipation with New Zealand" in an 
ANZUS naval exercise scheduled 
for March and “tbe implications 
for our overall cooperation with 
New Zealand” under tbe ANZUS 
alliance treaty. 

by Australia, New Zealand arufthe Reagan Gets Nobel Prize Nomination 

United States as a mutual defense osLO(UPI)— President Ronald Reagan was nominated for the 1983 

Nobel Peace Prize just four hours before die deadline at midnight, Jam 
31, it was reported Friday. ; 

The Norwegian Nobd Committee’s secretary, Jacob Sverdrup, re 
ceived Mr. Reagan’s n ominatio n among three letters delivered to Iras 
hours before the deadline for nominations for die 1983 prize, the dg& 
newspaper Verdens Gang said. The three letters apparently had been mo- 
ddivered to Stockholm, then rushed to Norway when the mistake was 
discovered. 

Mr. Sverdrup confirmed that Mr. Reagan was nominated- But under 
the secret selection procedures of the Nobel Institute, committee mem: 
bets were prohibited from revealing details of the nominations 
accepted only from past winners, some academicians and parliamentari- 
ans. 


Iran and Iraq Both Claim Successes ^ 


BEIRUT (UP!) —Iranian and Iraqi forces battled in the central sector 
of border front Friday in what Baghdad called a failed Iranian 
counter-offensive and Tehran termed a “rutile" Iraqi assa ul t. * 

Iraq’s official news agency said Iraqi soldiers crushed an Iranian 
counterattack that was apparently aimed at regaining territory lost 
during Baghdad's two offensives tins week. The Iraqi statement said the 
co unter at tack was repelled shortly after midnight in the central sector erf 
their 730-mile (1,180-kflorocter) battiefronL 
However, Iran's official news agency described the only battle in the 
central sector Friday as Iranian forces forcing back another “futile 
attack" by Iraq near the town of Sumar, about 78 znfles northeast of 


pact more than 30 years ago. 

At a news conference in Welling- 
ton earlier Thursday, Prime Minis- 
ter David Lange referred to the 
U.S. request and reaffirmed his La- 
bor Party government's policy of 
refusing to allow port visits by any 
warships that are nud ear-powered 
or armed with atomic weapons. 

“This is gang to be our continu- 
ing policy. It is not anti-American, 
it is not anti-alliance; it is anti- 
nuclear,” be said. 


ear^canabfe ships U.S. Democrats Elect Parly Chairman 


Weinberger 
Contradicted 

(Continued from Page 1) 
tbe Soviet missile was a cruise mis- 
sile that had been misprogrammed 
to fly toward West Germany, and 
had been shot down by two MiG 
interceptors. 

The Daily Express said the Rus- 
sians had used the so-called ‘Twt 
line” to inform U.S. officials of tbe 
mishap, but the incident was kept 
quiet to avoid jeopardizing arms 
control talks. 

The report was emphatically de- 
nied by officials in West Germany, 

Finland, Britain and the United 
States. 

Mr. Burch said Mr. Weinberger 
“in no way intended to confirm the 
false report in the British newspa- 
per." 

He added: “We know it was not 
shot down. It apparently crashed. 

It either flew into the ground or it 
ran out of fuel” 

Mr. Weinberger made his com- 
ments in response to a question-. German church organization that 
from Senator Claiborne Pell, a had donated tbe supplies agreed to 


fying that nuclear-cap ab 
did come to New Zealand with no- 
dear arms on board, then of course 
such ships would not be accept- 
able," Mr. Lange said. United 
Press Internationa} reported from 
Wellington. “If we don’t know 
whether they are nuclear-arm ed or 
not then they can’t come.” 

Hie United States never dis- 
closes whether a ship is carrying 
nnelgar aims, a position Australia 
supports. New Zealand's ban on 
nuclear-armed warship thus could 
predude port calls by any U.S. 
Navy vessel 

In a strong response to Mr. 
Lange's statements, a U.S. State 
Department spokesman said: “Tbe 
denial of prat access would be a 
matter of grave concern which ; 
to tbe core of oar mutual oi 
lions as allies.” 

A senior State Department offi- 
cial said the New Zealand reply 
“still leaves the door open a crack." 
He said U.S. officials are in contact 
with Mr. Lange and are trying to 
obtain a “definitive” response. 

Even if Washington is unsuccess- 
ful in this particular request, he 
said, ihe United States will keep 
trying with other requests and 
hopes to have the issue resolved 
before the ANZUS meeting in July. 


WASHINGTON (. 
former aide to Senator 


— Paul G. Kirk Jr„ a Washington lawyer and 
M. Kennedy, was elected chairman of the 


Democratic Party on Friday and declared that “today marks the end at 
tbe soul-searching, tbe cad of the identity crisis of the Democratic Party.* 
The decision ends morn 


WASHINGTON fUPI) 
Watergate case, testified tl 
attorn 
Mr. 


aspirants seeking to succeed Charles T. Manatt, a 

whn hararmf; chairman finnr years agn Mr Manatl stayed on as chairman 

during the 1984 election campaign after a brief moment of doubt when 
Walter F. Mondale said he wanted Bert Lance, a Carter a dmini st rati on 
official 

The Democratic National Committee elected Mr. Kiric, 47, overfatmer 
Governor Terry Sanford of North Carolina by a first-ballot vote, 203 to 
130. with support from organized labor. Hie new chairman sud that 
Democrats, rather than becoming more like Republicans, “must rec^fe 
tore the principles, the spirit and the values” of the party. 

Watergate Prosecutor Opposes Meese 

— Archibald Cox. the prosecutor in the 
that the confirmation of Edwin Meese 3d as 
a lon g slide" m gove rnm ent 
’s harsh comments Thursday followed testimony fay David 
Martin, director of tbe Office of Government Ethics, who said he thought 
Mr. Meese did not engage in any actual misconduct in his finanoal 

riwrltngg 

The two men appeared on the last of three days of hearings by the 
committee, which wiD vote Tuesday whether to recommend Mr. Meese to 
the Senate. While Mr. Meese is likely to win the committee’s approval, 
Senator Edward M. Kennedy, a Democrat of Massachusetts, became the 
third Democrat on the Judiciary Committee to publicly disclose he wifi 
not vote for Mr. Meese. 

FortfaeReoord 

Survivors of the poison gas leak at a Union Carbide pesticide plant in 
Bhopal, India, are showing signs af cyanide poisoning, a doctor investi- 
gating tbe effects of history’s worst chemical disaster said Friday. (UPI) 
The chief of staff of the PMfppme armed forces. General Fabian C 
Ver, and 23 other military men pleaded not guilty Friday as their trial for 
the murder of the opposition leader, Benigno S. Aquino Jr., opened. (AP) 
The 48th game of the world chess championship between the tidL 
Anatoli Karpov, and Gary Kasparov was postponed Friday while l— ■ 
match was moved to a hotel outside Moscow, chess officials said. (AP) 


Democrat of Rhode bland, on 
whether the U.S. plan for a defease 
against missiles would not be vul- 
nerable to attacks from low-flying 
cruise ntisaks. 

Mr. Weinberger replied that 
“there are other defenses against 
cruise missiles which we are work- 
ing on and which the Soviets are 
working on." 

He added: “The Soviets demon- 
strated their defense against cruise 
missiles a couple of days ago when 
they shot down one of their errant 
missiles that was on its way at least 
into Finland.” 

L ate r , responding to questioning 
from Senator Larry Pressler, a Re- 
publican of South Dakota, Mr. 
Weinberger said: “The Soviets 
have already demonstrated one 
method by shooting down their 
cruise missile that somehow got 
away from them and was starting 
to vrork its way across Norway and 
Finland." 


Arms Ships 
Get Priority 

(Ctmlimrd from Page 1) 
mission to sail and threatened die 

Chernenko’s Role Clouded 
By Rumors of a Successor 


change tbe consignment of tbe sup- 
plies to Ethiopia to free the ship. 

Earlier this month Ethiopian au- 
thorities seized aid from an Austra- 
lian ship under similar circum- 
stances. 

Many aid officials have been 
com plaining of increasing difficul- 
ties and delays in their day-to-day 
work: getting permits to travel, 
which are needed for all trips out- 
side the capital area, not receiving 
responses to queries made to gov- 
ernment officials, difficulties in ob- 
taining visas and other bureaucrat- 
ic roadblocks. 

Western officials have been un- 
willing to air their views openly 
because of concern that this would 
further damage their working rela- 
tionship with the government and 
also because, as a senior envoy of a 
donor nation said: “We don't want 
people bade home to stop giving. 
Hundreds of thousands could die 
as a result" 



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(Continued from Page 1) 
slowed, the results are bumble, but 
at least he has not turned back the 
dock." 

The experiments to give workers 
and managers more financial in- 
centive and responsibility have 
been expanded. 

Statistics for 1984 show respect- 
able growth in industry, up 4 per- 
cent in output and 3.8 percent in 
labor productivity. But agriculture 
st a g na te d , and there was a poten- 
tially worrisome dip in oil produc- 
tion. 

Tbe drive against corruption 
may not have the d rama it had 
under Andropov, but Mr. Cher- 
nenko confounded critics by sus- 
taining the campaign. The leader of 
Rostov province was dismissed and 
a major purge has been under way- 
in Central Asia. More surprisingly. 

a a Sf ms ] Nikolai alone among Politburo members 

A. Sbebdokov. Brezhnev’s friend has been ismwt f«r 
and interior minister, was revived. 


Western diplomats give the cred- 
it — or the blame — for policy 
shifts to Foreign Minister Andrei 
A. Gromyko, who is also a member 
of the ruling Politburo. But they 
acknowledge th*» in the centralized 
Soviet system, Mr. Chernenko has 
the power to block — or bless — 
any decision. 

According to one Soviet source, 
Mr. Chernenko has not been loj£ 
office since the beginning of tat 
year, and Westerners with good 
contacts have been told that he has 
been under intensive care. 

Attention has tamed, predict- 
ably, to succession. 

Mr. Gorbachov is an overwhelm- 
ing favorite. He has amassed an 
array of responsibilities, ran g in g 
from high-level appointments to 
his original control over agricul- 
ture. Aside from Mr. Gromyko, be 


He died, possibly by his own hand, 
after being stripped of his general’s 
rank in September. 

In foreign policy, Mr. Cher- 
nenko presided over a turnaround 
in the Soviet position on arms con- 
trol. from insistence that President 
Ronald Reagan could not be dealt 
with to an agreement to revive ne- 
gotiations. 


has been tapped for sensitive trips 
to the West, notably a two-week 
visit to Britain. 

Grigori V. Romanov, who over- 
sos the military- industrial com- 
plex. is the only other person who 
has the combination of full mem- 
bership in die Politburo, a party 
secretary’s post and a Russian 
background considered requisite . . 
for the top job. But he is considered 
a long shot at best 


Pope Presses I&tin Doctrine 

■ Sj™ Page owl place and argue that their ef- 

IjF ^ p \ k? «ls own and forts to nourish social justice also 

SSh fi il5 I ^| 0a ,“ edpC % , ^ inlile nourish Faith in God/ And they 
fart h an d salvation in Christ the insist that radical activism can of” 


Redeemer. 

“That can never be forgotten, 
nor relegated to a second place," he 
said. The church, in other words, is 
not made for politics alone. 

_ That is the Vatican’s main criti- 
cism of some forms of liberation 
theology. In the view of the pope 
and his allies, some supporters of 

the theology have been too quick to 

embrace social action to the neglect 
of religious commitment. To these 
critics, they have put politics first. 

The advocates of liberation the- 
ology deny oQ this emphatically 
They deny that they are Marxists 

and point to a variety of passages in 

their writings to prove it Tlev 
deny they are putting God in sec- 


ten be the only hope fra- the poor. 

. In fact, advocates of social actin'- 
ism can claim so mething of a vic- 

tory in the pope’s unequivocal re- 
marks on behalf of the poor. And 
more-traditionalist Catholi cs iriH 
appreciate the pope's emp hasis on 
authority and the chur ch’s nefcirtP 
remember that its primary misnft 
is religious. 

But differences between the two 
groups will remain profound after 
the pope is gone. In speaking of the 
requirements of social justice, the 
P°pe said on Wednesday (hat “ev- 
erything possible must be done, al- 
most the impossible.” That may be 
a fair description erf the pope's mis- 
sron to Latin America. 




















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J Page 3 


AMERICAN TOPICS 


J^'sasappi Schools: 
Aand-Rich, Cash-Poor 

Of the 27 stales granted 
schwl trust lands by ibe federal 
government in the past two cen- 
on Jy *0 retain all or most 
of them One of these is Missis- 
sippi, which holds all 644.559 
acres (about 260,000 hectares) 
^anjed m 1804. when Missis- 
sippi was still a territory, in ac- 
cordance with the Jeffersonian 
ideal that the young republic 
depended upon an educated 
people. 

Despite this, Mississippi lone 
has ranked Last or near-last in 
■ most national ratings of public 
^education. The trust lands yield 
4 - no taxes and little income, hav- 
ing been handed out from the 
beginning on long-term leases 
at mveaway prices. The 72-acre 
Niknar Country Club in Ran- 
kin County pays 13 cents an 
acre per year, which nets the 
local school district 59.36 annu- 
ally- A Lowndes County lease- 
holder pays 510 a year for his 
o40-acre section of prime farm- 
land. 

Despite Tierce opposition 
from such leaseholders, Dick 
Molpus, 34, Mississippi's secre- 
tary of state, is pushing for 
strict enforcement of a widely 
ignored law requiring that the 
land be leased at S percent of its 
fair market value. Mr. Molpus. 
who has two young children in 
.the public schools, foresees the 
.day when Mississippi will lead 
the country in education. He 
says, “They won’t have Missis- 
sippi to kick around anymore." 



J 


Donald K. Slayton 

Death Imitates Art: 
Orbiting the Ashes 

In the 1965 film, “The Loved 
One,” an enterprising under- 
; taker played by Jonathan Win- 
ters concaved the notion of 
shooting corpses into space in- 
stead orburying them- Now the 
U.S. government is reviewing a 
formal request by a group of 

• Florida undertakers who want 
to do just that with the ashes of 
the dead. 

The Celestis company of 
Melbourne, Florida, has'con- 

• tractcd with Space Services of 
Houston, headed by Donald K. 
(Deke) Slayton, one of the orig- 
inal seven American astronauts, 
to fire a payload of cremated 
human remains into orbit 1,900 
miles (3,080 kilometers) above 
the Earth in late 1986 or 1987. 
Offered as an alternative to 
mote conventional burial, the 
project's estimated cost is about 
$15 million. 

The nose cone, containing as 
many as 13,000 capsules two 
indies long and half an inch 
thick (about 5 by 1 centimeters) 
containing compacted ashes. 


would be coated with a reflec- 
tive material to help relatives of 
the deceased view the satmhf 
mausoleum as it passes over- 
head. 

The charge: 53.900 per 
suit. Later m issi o ns will u* iu 
deep-space burial, in which 
capsules would be Reeled from 
the nose cone and dispersed 
mio the cosmos. 


Books on Succeeding 
Are Doing Just That 

Books on personal computers 
and celebrity fitness are sliding 
off the best-seller lists, to be 
replaced by an old category that 
has gained new life: how to suc- 
ceed in business. 

“Success Is a State of Mind” 
by Dr. Joyce Brothers, a televi- 
sion psychologist, ami “Strate- 
gies for Personal and Business 
Growth" by Mary Cunning- 
ham, an executive, are two such 
boo ks, and much pop-business 
advice also is bring purveyed in 
audio cassettes, seminars, vid- 
eotapes, computer programs 
and such magazines as Success, 
Venture, Wealth, Entrepreneur 
and Working Woman. 

The Los Angeles Times as- 
cribes the public’s growing ap- 
petite for business know-how to 
Americans’ time-honored pas- 
sion for self-help, concern 
about competition from abroad 
and the country's more conser- 
vative tOt 

Short Takes 

PhSaattaopy by organized re- 
ligion in the United States to- 
taled at least $7.5 billion in 
1983, far exceeding the much 
more publicized gifts of $3.1 
billion by corporations through 
their own foundations and 
$3.46 billion given by other seo- 
ular funds, according to the 
U.S. Council on Foundations. 
Religious grants have shifted 
from saving souls to helping so- 
ciety, in everything from inner- 
city soup kitchens to digging 
wells in Sudan. 

The atarinistratire commi t- 
tee of the U.S. House of Repre- 
sentatives reimburses traveling 
congressmen and their aid es a 
Oat $75 a day for hotels and 
meak except for “high-cost geo- 
graphical areas” like Manhat- 
tan (SI 643$) and Vail, Colora- 
do ($128.65 during the riding 
season, December through 
April). Louisville, Kentucky, 
rates oily raw thin dime (10 
cents) over the $75 minimum 
and Madison, Wisconsin, a 
mere nickel more for $75.05. 

More than two- thirds of 
American women of 


age, including three-fifths 
those with children under 18, 
bold jobs, according to the U 3. 
Department of Labor. Tim fig- 
ures are not new. What is new is 
that 46.8 percent, or nearly half, 
of the women whose children 
are less than a year old are at 
work, nearly double the 24 per- 
cent of such mothers employed 
in 1970. 


the nationwide drive 
dr unk dnvez$, drtaking 
ie driving is permitted in no 
fewer than 26 of the 50 states, 
according to the National Safe- 
ty Cornual A traveler driving 
from Key West, Florida, in the 
southeastern tip of the country, 
to the Idaho-Canadian bonier 
in the northwest, could pick a 
reasonably direct route that 
would allow nonstop drinking 
for the entire 3,700 miles. 


ARTHUR HI 


Poll Finds Fear of World War 
Declining in Europe and U.S. 


By Barbara G- Farah 

New Ycrk Tunes Service 

NEW YORK — Fear that a 
world war will break out in the next 
, decade is dramatically destining in 
- Western Europe, according to a re- 
cent public-opinion poll conducted 


CHURCH SERVICES 


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for the European Crammssioa, the 
European Community's executive 
body. A similar trend has been 
found in the United Stales. 

Only 13 percent of the West Eu- 
ropeans polled, down from 34 per- 
cent in 1980, indicated they frit a 
world war was probable within 10 
years, according to a consortium of 
European polling companies head- 
ed by Jacques-Rent Rabier, special 
counselor to the EC. 

Last fall, 9,91 1 people were in- 
terviewed in the 10 EC countries 
and were asked to estimate the 

chances of a war in the next decade 
on a scale that began at 0 and 
moved by tens to 100. 

Two percent indicated that war 
was certain, and 11 percent chose 
answers that Mr. Rabier and his 
associates interpret as meaning 
that a respondent dunks war is 
probable. 

In 1983, 19 percent indicated 
they thought a world war probable. 

In the United States, a similar 
pattern was found in results from a 
slightly different question. In 1981, 
a Gallup Poll found that 47 percent 
or Americans surveyed felt a nucle- 
ar war was very likely or fairly 
likely within 10 years. In a New 
York Times-CBS News Poll this 
month, 29 percent of the respon- 
dents said a nuclear war was very 
likely or fairly likely in the next 
decade. 

The previous EC poll on the sub- 
ject, in 1980, was conducted at a 
time of brightened international 
tension. The bolding of the Ameri- 
can hostages in Iran, the Soviet 
military intervention in Afghani- 
stan and President Jimmy Cartels 
call for a boycott of the Olympic 
Games in Moscow dominated the 
news. 


Air Safely 
Questioned 
After Spate of 
U.S. Crashes 


By Richard Wirkin 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Eight U.S. air- 
line accidents in the Iasi two 
months, five involving fatalities, 
have brought new urgency to the 
debate over whether the U$. gov- 
ernment’s control of air safety is 
a jmnne. 

The Federal Aviation Adminis- 
tration said Thursday it was con- 
ducting as extensive analysis of its 
inspection system. It also acknowl- 
edged sane problems and indicat- 
ed that it might seek more money in 
coming months. 

The debate was reinforced most 
recently by the crash Jan. 21 of a 
Galaxy Airlines turboprop Hectra 
in Repo, Nevada, in which 68 peo- 
ple died, and the crash Tuesday of 
another Galaxy plane that the FAA 
had specially inspected. 

Officials of the aviation agency 
repeatedly have noted that the 
overall record of airline safety has 
been much better the last five yean 
than it was in the previous, five. 
'Members of-Congress and offi- 
cials who keep a close watch on air 
safety acknowledge that the figures 
are good. But, because of the recent 
accidents, they are questioning 
whether the agency has enough 
safety inspectors, and whether it 
reties too much on the airlines’ 
sense of responsibility and self-in- 
terest to insure adherence to oper- 
ating rules. 


Kirkpatrick Says She Was f Misunderstood 9 as UN Delegate 


By Bernard Wcinraub 

New York Tunes Service 

WASHINGTON — Jeane J. Kirkpatrick, 
who will leave her post as chief U.S. delegate 
to the United Nations in March, says »h»* ^ 
was convinced that hex views bad been “mis- 
understood” and distorted by key Reagan 
administration officials. 

But she said Thursday that she was 1 
by her diplomatic and personal “ac 
meats" over die last four years. 

"I was a woman in a man’s world," she 
said. was a Democrat in a Republican 
administration. I was an intellectual in a 
world of bureaucrats. I talked differently. 
This may have made me a bit like an ink blot. 
Ie projected around me." 

ednesday. Mis. Kirkpatrick, 58, told 
President Ronald Reagan that die would re- 
sign her post and return to private life. 

In a telephone interview several hours be- 
fore she was scheduled to fly to Europe for a 
week, she voiced mixed feelings about her 
four stormy years at the UN mid about her 
role in the foreign policy establishment, in 
which she tangled repeatedly with some 
White House and State Department officials. 

“A lot of people said thing s about me «ha* 
were not true,*' she said. “There was a very 
large distortion of ray views. Initially, it may 
have come from the State Department-" 
Although she had a “marvelous relation- 
ship" with many ranking administration offi- 
cials. Mrs. Kirkpatrick said, “there were 
about three people who have taken a negative 
view of me." 

“They’ve been accusing me of not being a 
team player." she added, but she declined to 
identify them. 

“Frankly, 1 am not interested in 
struggles for power," she <aiH “I find it 
oppressive ana offensive. The pram is, I am 
.7" leaving the UN feeling very good about the 
Jeane J. K irkpatrick last four years. I really do. It was an extreme- 



ly interesting, stretching, personal experi- 
ence." 

Mrs. Kirkpatrick plainly preferred to dis- 
cuss her years with the administration in the 
most positive light- Bur she has confided to 
dose friends that she had been especially 
annoyed at what she fdt were the efforts to 
dhnintsh her role by such key White House 
officials as James A. Baker 3d. tbe chieJ of 
staff; Michael K. Deaver, a deputy chief of 
s taff ynri Richard G. Darinas, a presidential 
assistant. 

“Sure; 1 fed misunderstood," said Mrs. 
Kirkpatrick, who has many offers to write 
bodes and also is planning to lecture around 
the country, resume teaching at Georgetown 
University and work at the American Enter- 
prise Institute in Washington. 

One of the reasons she encountered diffi- 
culties, she said, was that “no woman has ever 
occupied as important a role in foreign policy, 
as I have." 

“That’s extraordinary," she said. “Diplo- 
macy and defense have been especially exclu- 
sive male preserves. They ought to lake a hard 
look at women inside the State Department" 

Beyond this, she indicated that the confi- 
dence with which she addressed issues 
alarmed bureaucrats. “I'm a professor of 
comparative pobucs,” she said. “Fve read 
and thought and taught about political sys- 
tems. 

“I came to the job with both a good deal of 
expertise and a good many opinions," she 
continued. “That kind of background stands 
in sharp contrast to the normal political ap- 
pointee brought into a foreign policy post." 

She declined to discuss speculation that 
Mr. Reagan offered her the directorship of 
the Agency fer International Development, 
but that she found the post, and posably 
several others, unacceptable because they did 
not have cabinet rank and meant she would 


no longer be a member of the National Secu- 
rity CounriL 

Asked about her differences with the ad- 
ministration, she said: “I was not happy 
about our policy in Lebanon. Almost every- 
thing about it. not ready to to a critique. 1 
was just not happy with our policy." 

On a positive note, the envoy said that the 
UJS. position at the United Nations had ' 
steadily improved, although she spoke of the 
world organization with some distaste. 
“There have been accomplishments," she 
said. “Four years ago, the United States 
could be and was isolated and humiliated, 
and that is not easy anymore. 

“A great deal less time is spent is the UN 
on festivals of hate, invective, abuse;” she 
said. “It was ritualized. Someone would bring 
a complaint against Israel, a nd 20 countries 
would make long speeches denouncing Isra- 
eL” 

She recalled a favorite comment made by a 
friend, Yehuda Blum, a former Israeli ambas- 
sador to the UN. “He said I bad taken the fun 
out of this ritual condemnation of Israel," she 
said. 

Asked what she anri the a dminist ration 
bad failed so far to achieve in its foreign 
policy goals, Mrs. Kirkpatrick replied, 
“Lots!” 

Although Mrs. Kirkpatrick has a reputa- 
tion as a hard-liner in the administration, she 
made it plain that she generally opposed U.S. 
military involvement and what she called 
“interventionism." 

“I am an opponent of direct U S. interven- 
tionism almost any place in the world," she 
said. “1 am a strong partisan of an active U.S. 
role, helping others. Having the U.S. out 
front is not workable, and I prefer the region- 
al approach. 

U 1 don’t believe in this whole superpower 
analysis," she added. “I frankly believe we’re 
not all that powerful." 


In a letter announcing the analy- 

s that was sent Thursday to Rep- fr ittW/lo 

ssentative Norman Y. Mmeta, the 

Reportedly 


SIS 

resentative 

Democrat from California who is 
rfwirman of the aviation subcom- 
mittee of the House Public Works 
and Transportation Committee, § rtfv TT\f Pncf 

the FAA CTTi phaqTfrl that it ms wp vUM JL (/*(' 

to the airlines to obey the rales. 


The letter, from Donald D. En- 
gen, a pilot and retired navy admi- 
ral who beads the FAA. said; “Ibe 
air carrier must shoulder the re- 
sponsibility for safety of its mainte- 
nance procedures and operations. 
We cannot let an attitude develop 
that would let the corporation and 
the public think that, unless fin light 
by the FAA, air carriers can oper- 
ate and maintain equipment ID «HY 

Tnannif that they wish." 

Mr. Engea said the agency was 
making an intensive study of the 
workload of its 674 inspectors who, 
with some help from others con- 
centrating cm private aircraft, keep 
watch on the 320 airlines in the 
United States. 

To underscore its determination 

(O maintain s tric t adhemuv. to the 

rales, the FAA used the letter to 
announce two new actions taken. 

According to Edmund Pinto, an 
FAA spokesman, the agency pro- 
posed to revoke the licenses of 
three pilots who flew a Boeing 727 
for People Express on a flight from 
Newark, New Jersey, to Buffalo, 
New York, on July 26. Mr. Pinto 
said plane’s crew had been accused 
of ignoring severe vibrations that 
shook thejet fra several minutes on 
takeoff and landing. 

While the plane was taxiing be- 
fore its next takeoff, Mr. Pinto said, 
two portions erf the left wing flap 
were found to be missing. 

Russell Marchetta, a spokesman 
for People Express, railed the 
charges “allegations that are not 
proven" and said they would be 
contested. 

In the other case, the agency 
said. Pan American World Airways 
has paid a $30,000 fine for carrying 
10 passengers too many on a DC- 
10 night from Guadeloupe, Mexi- 
co, to New York City on New 
Year's Day 1984. 

115. Seized Eastern Jet 
The US. Customs Service seized 
an Eastern Airlines jumbo jet in 
April after finding cocaine aboard. 
The Associated Press reported 
from Washington. It was the 22d 
rime in six months that cocaine had 
been discovered in the crew section 
of an Easiernpassenger plane, ac- 
cording to Wuhan) Von Raab, the 
UJS. customs commissioner. 

Mr. Von Raab said Thursday 
that early last year he bad issued a 
wanting that ships or airplanes 
used to smuggle drugs into the 
United States can be seized. 

After bis warning, he said, on 
April 25 “our inspectors found co- 
caine in the avionics section" of the 
Easton jet. “This was the last 
straw," he said. 


By Lou Cannon 
and David Hoffman 

Washmgion Pest Service 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan has decided to 
name retired Lieutenant General 
Vernon A- Walters to replace Jeane 
J. Kirkpatrick as chief U.S. dele- 
gate to the United Nations, well- 
placed administration officials said 
Thursday. 

General Walters, the chief diplo- 
matic troubleshooter at the State 
Department, has the support of 
Secretary of Stale Gemge P. Shultz, 
the officials said, and also is con- 
sidered acceptable to more conser- 
vative elements in the administra- 
tion.- 

Reputed to be fluent in seven 
languages besides English (Dutch, 
French, German, Italian, Portu- 
guese. Russian and Spanish), Gen- 
eral Wallers served as an aide to 
President Dwight D. Eisenhower at 
various summit meetings and was 
with then- Vice President Richard 
M. Nixon when his party was 
stoned by demonstrators is Cara- 
cas in 1958. 

President Nixon appointed Gen- 
eral Walters deputy director of the 
Central Intelligence Agency in 
1972. 

Administration officials who 
said that General Walters would be 
named by the president said the 
issue of whether the UN 
would remain cabinet rank 
unresolved. 

Reportedly. Mrs. Kirkpatrick 
bad urged General Walters not to 
accept the job unless it was a cabi- 
net position, while Mr. Shultz does 
not want it to be a cabinet post The 
sources said the status at the job 
would “be worked out soon" by the 
president but indicated that Gener- 
al Walters would accept the post in 
any case. 

General Walters retired from the 
CIA in 1976 and since 1981 has 
been used widely as a consultant 
and a m bassador-at-large by the 
State Department He saved on an 
advisory committee to Mr. Reagan 
during the 1984 campaign. 

Meanwhile, sources also said 
that Max L. Fried ersdorf, a veteran 
of the Nixon. Ford and Reagan 
administrations, ha* (tiwwwi the 
possibility of returning to the 
White House at the outset of Mr. 
Reagan's second term as chief of 
liaison with Congress. 

Mr. Friedersdorf, who held 
similar post in 1981, has talked 
about coming back to the White 
House with the incoming chief of 
staff, Donald T. Regan, but 
have not agreed on details, offi 
said. 


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Pact Is Readied on Credit Aid lor U.S. Fanners 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON —The Rragan 
administration and congressional 
leaders said Friday they had pul 
together an agricultural aid pack- 
age in an attempt to avert wide- 
spread farm bankruptcies. 

The proposal includes up to $650 
million in farm loan guarantees. 

However, even the Senate major- 
ity leader, Robert!. Dole, a Kansas 
Republican who was a central fig- 
ure in working out the compromise 
plan, said it was “a Band-Aid, it’s 
not a solution." 

Farmers' financial problems, 
highlighted by protest demonstra- 
tions and foreclosure auctions in 
the Farm Belt and by growing pres- 
sure and rhetoric in Washington, 
are the worst since the Depression. 

The aid program is aimed at alle- 
viating the most immediate need, 
credit to buy fertilizer, fuel and 
seed to plant spring oops. 

After weeks of pressure by mem- 
bers of Congress from farm states, 
the administration fust advanced 
its latest relief plan in meetings 


Thursday night with House and 
Senate Republicans. Mine details 
fell into place at a bipartisan meet- 
ing with senators on Friday. 

Earlier in the week, the White 
House said that no such credit pro- 
gram was contemplated. Adminis- 
tration officials had also indicated 
they would seek to reduce budget 
programs that aid farmers. 

Participants in the Turnings said 
the program includes these ele- 
ments: 

• Allowing banks to reduce pan 
of the interest on farmers’ loans 
under the federal loan guarantee 
plan announced last fall by Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan. Current po- 
licy covers only the principal — not 
the interest — although interest is 
the bulk of repayments in the early 
years of a loan. 

Tbe help would be extended 
both to commercial banks and to 
Production Credit Associations, 
borrower-owned banks that are 
part of the quaa-federal Farm 
Credit System. More than $650 
minion might be available if there 


is sufficient demand from banks. 
Senator Dole said. 

• An easing of pressure on farm 
banks by federal regulators. Bank- 
ers say that pressure is forcing them 
to foredose on some farm borrow- 
ers prematurely and is making 
them reluctant to extend new loans, 
even to fanners whose fmamrec are 
in relatively good shape. 

• Putting teams of credit special- 
ists to work with rural banks in 
handling tbe paperwork for loans 
that fanners need for spring planl- 


>t September, during a farm- 
stale campaign swing by President 
Reagan, (he administration an- 
nounced a credit aid pari ta g p (hat 
included $630 million in loan guar- 
antees. But only $25 million of that 
has been used, and banks say that is 
because (hey were required to make 
too great a sacrifice in order to 
participate. 

When Agriculture Secretary 
John R. Block and David A. Stock- 
man, President Reagan's budget di- 
rector, proposed the program 


Thursday, they angered many law- 
makers from farm stales by seeking 
in return pledges of support for the 
administration’s austere, business- 
oriented farm program proposals. 

“What he's saying to fanners is, 
‘we’ll give you a Band-Aid if you’ll 
sign your fives away,’ ” said Sena- 
tor Tom Hazkm. a Democrat of 
Iowa, after Friday’s session with 
Mr. Stockman. “I just think that is 
the most reprehensible form of 
blackmail." 

By Friday, any effort to obtain 
formal promises of support for the 
farm tail had apparently been 
dropped. Some congressmen, how- 
ever, continued to express sympa- 
thy for the administration’s efforts 
to cut farm program spending by 
$16 billion. 

The meetings followed days of 
intense campaigning for credit aid 
by legislators from farm states, par- 
ticularly Republican senators who 
face re-election campaigns next 
year, and after days of the adminis- 
tration rejecting their efforts. 


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Page 4 


Hcralb 



INTERNATIONAL 

Publislied WhhTbe Nn York Thnen and The Warfringgsa Past 


tribune 


Slow Progress in Jamaica 


Ideology makes less difference to economic 
performance than pnlitirinns like to think 
Worse, new policies — even the best of polities 
—sometimes lake effect only slowly. Take the 
interesting case of Jamaica, whose voters 
turned out a bankrupt Socialist government 
under Michael Manley four years ago. His 
successor, Edward Seaga, is a conservative 
politician who is determined to return the 
country to the rules of open market economics. 

Are things better? Not much, not yet. Events 
in Jamaica say a lot about the trials of a 
country at the midpoint in the range of the 
poorest to the richest nations. 

The voters were right to reject Mr. Manley, 
not because be was a socialist but because be 
was a persistently unrealistic one. He incited a 
capital flight and could not end it. He bor- 
rowed desperately to maintain a subsidized 
standard of living for the country. 

The remedies were pretty obvious, but they 
have not made Mr. Seaga popular. Earlier this 
month, the latest round of ae- subsidizing re- 
sulted in sharp increases in the price of oil and, 
in response, riots in which seven people died. 
As Blaine Harden of The Washington Post 
reported (IBT. Jan. 30), the unpopularity of 
Mr. Seaga’s austerity is helping Mr. Manley. 

J amaica 's most urgent economic need is 
investment capital. President Reagan has tried 
to encourage UJS. companies to invest, but it 


goes slowly. Reversing a capital flight is a 
difficult feat, and it’s going to take time. 
Meanwhile, the country staggers along under 
the debts of the 1970s,’ and the bauxite busi- 
ness is not improving. A better bet for Jamaica 
is agri culture, where there are now pro misin g 
indications of sustainable growth. 

But there is more to it than economics. 
Jamaica is a small English-speaking country 
not far off the coast erf North America, and 
there is hardly a Jamaican family that does not 
have relatives in the United States or Ca nada . 
Jamaicans are extremely well informed on the 
style of life in the rich countries, including the 
availability of consumer goods and govern- 
ment benefits. If people in Jamaica work as 
hard as their cousins in Washington, why 
should they not live as weD? The answer is that 
they are living in a society whose infrastruc- 
ture — from the roads to the phone service to 
the school system — is not as strong. They can 
be strengthened, but only gradually. 

Jamaica's greatest resources are not the 
bauxite mines but levels of education and 
public health that are among the highest in the 
Caribbean. The country is equipped to achieve 
rising prosperity over time — if Jamaicans 
have the endurance to resist frustration and 
impatience. That is the choice around which 
Jamaican politics is now revolving. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Stone Age Eating Habits 


. A study by two Emory University doctors 
concludes that it might be good for our health 
if we took some dietary lessons from our Stone 
Age ancestors. He Paleolithic diet included 
not only a lot of fruits and vegetables, as might 
be expected, but a high percentage of meat. 
The difference is that theirs was lean meat, 
coming from rangy beasts that ran loose and 
were hunted by man, while ours comes from 
animals that have been fatted in captivity. 

"The diet of our remote ancestors may be a 
reference standard for modem h uman nutri- 
tion and a model for defense a gains t certain 
‘diseases of dvflization,’ " Doctors S. Boyd 
Eaton and Melvin Konner write in the study in 
the New England Journal of Medicine. It may 
be that, and it is almost certainly something 
more: a reference standard for a best-selling 
bock, the surest sure bet imaginable outside of 
a volume of financial advice, self-improve- 
ment hints and one-liners by Lee A. Iacocca. 


Chrysler' s chairman, as told to Garfield the 
cat. Consider the top-selling bodes in their 
categories last year, as reported by The New 
York Times: “Eat to Win," “Megatrends," 
“The One Minute Manager and Mr. lacoo- 
ca’s autobiography. If you don’t see “The Cave 
Man Diet” (as it will inevitably be entitled) cm 
these charts, then yon don't have much of a 
feel for the Stone Age forces at work to exert 
some influence on present times. 

So count on this: Some day in the near 
future you’ll lode out at daybreak and see 
people all up and down your street come 
loping out of their homes wearing designer 
dons and wielding L L. Bean stoneaxes, while 
every dog, cat and squirrel in the neighbor- 
hood runs for cover, and those people who are 
too old to hunt and gather hurry out to post 
“No Foraging" signs on their shrubs in the 
hope that cave men read more than diet books. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 

Reder Affair Raises Doubts 


Austria has an ambivalent relationship with 
the Nazi past Officially it has always been 
regarded as the first country to fall victim to 
Nazi aggression, and many Austrians honor- 
ably, even heroically, resisted the Anschluss 
and the ensuing Nazi rule. But many wel- 
comed it, and fought enthusiastically as Ger- 
mans in the Wehrmacht during World War IL 
By and large, the world accepts thru the Aus- 
tria of today represents the forma rather than 
the latter, and the willingness of the World 
Jewish Congress to meet in Vienna is evidence 
of that. But the presence of someone like Herr 
Frischenschlager (the Austrian defense minis- 
ter who personally met Nazi war criminal 
Walter Rederafter Mr. Rcder’s repatriation to 
Austria from Italy] in the gpveramait inevita- 
bly casts doubt on that assumption, and is 
bound to place a strain on the relations be- 
tween Austria and those who would like to 
be her friends. 

— The Tones ( London Jl 


tire kifHng s- General Ver is a relative and 
lifelong associate of President Marcos: if the 


buck still has not stopped, there is not much 
x U this trend continues the 


Calm in the Philippines 

The prolonged crisis over the murder of 
Beaigno S. Aquino combined with the equally 
protracted absence [of the ailing President 


Ferdinand E. Marcos] from public view have 
arcnip 


shown that the turbulent archipelago can not 
only function without him but also has a fair 
chance of avoiding a deluge after his departure 
from office. Another political figure, Jovito 
Salonga, has just returned from years of self- 
imposed exile, but tins time, in safety. 

Transcending all this is the undoubted pro- 
gress in the past few weeks of the due process 
of law in the Aquino case, thanks largely to the 
moral courage of the government’s own om- 
budsman, Bernardo Fernandez. Now 17 men, 
including the generals in charge of air security 
and the Manila police, face charges of alleged 
complicity in the murder or Aquino and his 
“assassin* while another eight, including Gen- 
eral Fabian Ver, the Chief of Staff of the 
forces, stand accused of conspiracy to cover up 


higher for it to go. 

United States will have less cause to worry 
about the communist New People’s Army. 

— The Guardian (London). 

Belgium Under Piressnre 

Twice in this century Belgium has been 
occupied by invading armies. If Soviet troops 
ever move west, they, too, wffl want Belgium. 
That gives Brussels a very large stake in collec- 
tive defenses that are strong enough to keep 
the Soviet Union from crossing any borders. 

The Brussels government has accepted the 
basing of 48 cruise missiles on Belgian soD as 
its share in the collective defense. But domestic 
sentiment against the deployment compels it 
to stall until the ruling center-right govern- 
ment is safely past next December’s elections. 

For Brussels that makes political sense. But 
the Western allies worry that if Belgium re- 
treats from tire deployment schedule agreed on 
more than five years ago the united front could 
come unraveled, relieving pressures on the 
Soviet Union to reduce its own missile force. 

Belgium’s coalition government is under 
heavy domestic pressure to cancel or at Least to 
postpone the deployment of its share of the 
new weapons. But if Belgium backs off from 
its commitment, the Dutch government — 
which has similar political problems — would 
almost certainly do the same. Would public 
opinion in West Germany then force it to back 
away from deploying its full quota of Pfcr- 
shing-2s? Washington worries that it would; 
so, it seems, does the Bonn government. 

In purely military terms the situation might 
be tolerable, given the existence of the global 
U.S. nuclear deterrent. But Europe’s self-con- 
fidence in standing up to Soviet pressures 
could suffer. For that reason Britain. West 
Germany and other allied nations have joined 
the United States in urging Belgium to stick by 
the schedule. 

— The Los Angeles Times. 


FROM OUR FEB. 2 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: "Strong People’ Talk and Talk 
LONDON — “The Strong People," a new 
play by Mr. CALS. McLellan, is a strong play, 
without doubt; as strong as iron and just about 
as attractive. As a lecture on political econo- 
my, it is a painstaking affair. It was produced 
on [Jan. 31] at the Lyric Theatre. To give a 
lecture you must have lots of talk. That is what 
this play mainly is — talk, talk, and then some 
more talk. Occasionally, to brighten it up, the 
dialogue attempts to be snappy. “You haver 
“Indeed, yes." “Oh, mustard!" This is not 


quoted from the play. I would not be so mean 
to Mr. McLellan. It is < 


; only typical. The story is 

about a strike in a mining town in Pennsylva- 
nia, where federal troops have taken posses- 
sion and begun to shoot people. [But] I am 
afraid Mr. McLellan, who has written so many 

good plays, has taken himself too seriously. He 
did not appear before the curtain. Just as wefL 


1935: U.S.-Soviet Debt Talks Fail 
WASHINGTON — A strain was placed on 
the year-old Soviet-American diplomatic rela- 
tions [on Feb. 1] when Secretary of State 
Cordell Hull announced collapse of negotia- 
tions for settlement of the Russian debts 
claimed by the United States, and for the 
establishment of a trade agreement with the 
Soviet government on a long-term credit basis 
through the Export and Import Bank. Blame 
for the collapse was placed on Moscow's rejec- 
tion of America’s terms, and a serious interpre- 
tation was placed on that mailer in view of the 
fact that American recognition of the Soviet 
government and the re-establishment of diplo- 
matic relations with Russia were conditioned 
on settlement of the debt question. The United 
States [had] indicated its willingness to accept 
a greatly reduced sum in settlement of all 
claims, to be paid over a long period of years. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY. Chairman 1958-1982 


KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

ObOmmen 


PHILIP M. FOISIE 
WALTER WELLS 
ROBERT K. MeCABE 
SAMUEL ABT 
CARL GEWIRTZ 


Dtpw PtMuher 
Associate PuNahtr 

Asueute Pobtuher 


LEE W. HUEBNER. Pubiaktr 
Exmam EJUor RENE BOND Y 

Editor ALAIN LECOUR 

Deputy EJaar RICH ARD HL MORGAN 

Dtp*? Edaor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY 

Anoaau Editor FRANCOIS DESMAISONS Director cf 

ROLFD. KRANEPUHL Duvcttr ef Admtumg Sola 
International Herald Tribune. 181 Avenue Ch&rlcs-dc-Gaullc, 92200 NanDv-sor-Sduc. 

France. Telephone: 747-1265. Tdec 612718 (Herald). Cibks Herald Pam. 

Director de la pubhtaUon: Waiter N. Thayer. 

Asia Headquarters, 24,34 Hennessy Rd. Hong Kang. TeL' 5-285618. Telex 61170 
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VS. subscription: S284 parly. Second-class postage paid at Lorn Island City. N.Y. I HOI. 

C 1985, Itwmauonal Htrdd Tnbune AS ngkarntrvtd 




Awaiting a Firm U.S. Policy for Middle East Peace 


By Judith Kipper 

W ashington — As several 

important Middle Eastern 

it: 


visitors, md 
Saudi Arabia 
Mubarak of 
through W: 


Fahd of 
it Hosm 
rt, prepare to pass 
igton in coming 
weeks, expectations are high among 
Arabs and Israelis alike that these 
visits win saw to reengage Ameri- 
ca in the search for a peaceful settle- 
ment of Middle East discord. 

The missing factor in the Middle 
East today is a firm American po- 
licy. Most Arabs and Israelis under- 
stand that the United States cannot 
impose a peace settlement or even 
serve as a mediator unless the par- 
ties- to the conflict are prepared to 
negotiate. But leaders m many re- 
gional capitals now say that (hey- 
need the United States to become 
more actively involved. As Israelis, 
Jordanians, Palestinians and Syri- 
ans awkwardly move toward a 
readiness to negotiate, the United 
Stales cannot afford to remain 
aloof. Unfortunately, Washington 
has shown little sign that it under- 
stands the need for action now. 

Stagnation in the Middle East 
nearly always leads to crisis, which 
□suafly leads in turn to yet another 
stalemate. The last major crisis. Is- 
rael’s 1982 invasion of Lebanon, 
blocked any movement in the peace 
process by forcing a change m the 
regional agenda. Paradoxically, it 
drew the United States into the re- 
gion but severely limited its ability 
to influence events. In the wake of 
that policy failure, administration 
officials have understandably been 
extremely cautious. By now, howev- 
er, Washington should be actively 
promoting the peace negotiations 
that are so vital to US. interests. 

What can the United States rea- 
sonably be expected to do this year? 
The agreement by Washington and 
Moscow to exchange views on the 
Middle East is an important step. 
The eventual goal of such an ex- 



-^aSsfiSSS 


oiighi or might not be a 
regional peace conference, but even 
in the meantime the superpowers 
could be working separately to be- 
gin to prepare the political climate 
for negotiations. As part of the 
peace process, Moscow should be 


encouraged to restore diplomatic re- 
while Washing- 


lations with Israel 
ton actively moves to improve its 
relations with Syria. 

Second, Washington urgently 
needs to work closely with Israel 
and Egypt to help them restore bet- 
ter relations. If the Israeli-Egyplian 
treaty remains a cold peace, it will 
be increasingly difficult to convince 
Israelis and other Arabs to take the 
necessary risks to achieve a wider 
understanding. Egypt is slowly reas- 
suming its role as a leader in the 
Arab world while maintaining peace 
with Israel Washington ought to 


encourage this if Cairo's policy — 
the exchange of land for peace — is 
to be a precedent for agreements 
between Israel and other Arab par- 
ties. Egypt's return to the Arab 
world should be a foundation of 
American policy today. 

Third, Washington should recog- 
nize that King Hussein of Jordan 
and Prime Minister Shimon Peres of 


Israel need time to get their respec- 
'.haveaeli- 


tive houses in order. Both I 
cate tasks ahead. Jordan is trying 
desperately to work out its differ- 
ences with the Palestine liberation 
Organization — trying to reach a 
common approach to the peace pro- 
cess. Similarly, the Israeli Labor 
Party is trying to accommodate the 


nomic crisis. Both Jordan and Israel 
must come to terms with these re- 
spective “partners" if there is to be 
peace in the Middle East. 

Fourth, Washington cannot over- 
look the plight of the 1.3 million 
Palestinians living under military 
rule in the West Bank and Gaza. In 
particular, the United States should 
encourage Israel to ease up on its 
restrictions in the occupied territo- 
ries and improve what the adminis- 
tration calls the Pales tinians ’ “quali- 
ty of life.” Surety, in the long ran 
such an effort would be in Israel's 
own economic and political interest: 
Cosmetic gestures to make the occu- 
pation appear more benign will not 
help create the self-confidence nee- 


approach. The objective of Ameri- 
can policy must be a camprehcnCTw ^ 
peace based on United Nations Sc- j 
curity Council resolutions 242 and 
338 — a peace that makes provision. £ 
for the Golan Heights, the West -. 
Rank, the Gaza Strip and the final 

status of Jerusalem. L - 

ThealteniativeroabreaWirough 

will almost certainty be a defeat of 
moderation in the region. The trend 
toward extremism in the name ct , 
religion is evident in Israel and the . 
Arab countries. Among die threats *■ 
looming in the months ahead are the 
possibility of another war, an in- . 
crease in terrorism and the further ■' 
erosion of American influence and 
credibility. But most dangerous of 
all, there is a real possibility that the^j 
Arab- Israeli conflict will be trans- 
formed into an all-or-nothing con- 
frontation among Moslems, Chris- 
tians and Jews. Until now, both 
sides’ legitimate clainrs for land and j 
rights have been political issues, H 
which, in theory at least, lent them- ■ 

selves to negotiated solutions. With- 
out a political breakthrough soon, 
thispossibflity may disappear. 

The signs of the impending trans- 
formation of the conflict are evident ■ 
to everyone in the region. Will the i 
United States alone miss the signals 
— and thus allow the Middle East to 


slip into chaos, anarchy and terror? < 
Or will the Reagan aamwisuatton - 


recognize the dangers and seize the 
opportunity, this year, to achieve a 
real breakthrough? Middle East is- 
sues are always complex, and it isn’t , 
hard to understand why they look so 
intractable to Washington todays* 
Yet a firm and determined Amen- .. 
can policy, sensitive to the needs of.-; 
Arabs and Israelis, could still 
achieve political results and avoid - 
the area's looming catastrophe. 


needs of the Likud bloc, its partner* essary for Israelis and Palestinians 
in the governing coalition, as the to engage in negotiations, 
country moves to extricate itself The situation in the Middle East 
from Lebanon and resolve its eco- today requires a hands-on American 


The writer is a resident fellow at 
the American Enterprise Institute 
for Public Policy R esearch . She con- -j 
tributed this comment to The New A 
York Times. 


Silesia Arouses Little Anguish in West Germany 


A UGSBURG. West Germany — 
It is all very wdl to blame young 
Thomas Fmke — he is only 20 — for 
his recent article in The Silesian, a 
weekly edited by an organization of 
Silesian refugees and their descen- 
dants, and to oust him from the rul- 
ing Christian Democratic Party. But 
it would be better to find out how 
that article — which envisaged the 
West German Bundeswehr liberating 
one-time German territories from 
domination tty Soviet-backed East 
European regimes — was accepted 
for publication in the first place. 

It is the second time the Silesian 
group has made the headlines recent- 
ly. The organization is due to hold a 
reunion in June in Hannover. Helmut 
Kohl, the West German chancellor, 
threatened to scrap plans to attend 
the meeting because of the group's 
motto, which ran: “Forty years of 
banishment — Silesia remains ours.” 
The group’s leader, Herbert Hupka, 
later announced a new slogan. This 
reads: “Forty years of banishment — 
Silesia remams our future in a Europe 
of free people." The league represents 
Germans who fled from Silesia when 
it was incorporated into Polish and 
Czechoslovak territory. 

It still hurts to say so, but Silesia is 
gone. That is not just because of in- 
ternational treaties, but by a combi- 
nation of such accords and develop- 
ments since the war. The 
incorporation into Poland of Silesia, 
parts of Pomerania and Eastern Pnis- 
sa — provinces that were German 
for many centuries — was one of the 
prices Germany paid for Hitler’s po- 
licy. If ever a peace treaty with Ger- 
many is to be negotiated, that price 
will have to be included into the bal- 
ance sheet at its M value. Payment, 
however, has already been made de- 
spite a reservation contained in the 
Warsaw treaty of 1970. In tins, the 


By Karl N. Meessen 


reflect nothing but a general attitude 


feelings, perhaps not even his own. In 
his incredibly silty scenario, he pre- 
ferred to view the Soviet soldiers as 
staying in their barracks. 

Secondly, if asked to formulate an 
opinion now on what is likely to hap- 
pen in Silesia, many would shrug 
their shoulders. Not everybody is car- 
anxmd definite views on as 


ic a question. But all things 
would 


considered, practically no one ' 
reach the conclusion that Silesia 
could ag ain be attached to Germany. 

Vagueness over the Sile sian Ques- 
tion remains, and some prefer to keep 
the issue vague. They argue that 
nothing would be offered in return 


for a clear prognoss except some 
condescending remarks from govern- 
ments of Socialist states. Others, such 
as the writer of this article, consider a 
clarification to be helpful in the long 
ran. Reunification of the two Ger- 
man states would then lose its dis- 
turbing aspects for the Poles. 

Associations of refugees definitely 
favor vagueness. During the first 
years of the Federal Republic, they 
had reason to hope that, within the 
framework of a peace treaty with 
Germany, something might still be 
changed. Later, when in the 1950s the 
prospect of concluding a peace treaty 
had vanished, vagueness started to 


favoring a tough policy toward the 
a. Evoking personal 


Soviet Union. Evoking pei 
memories of refugees contributes to 
advocate such policy and might 
thereby influence parts of the elector- 
ate whose voting behavior would oth- 
erwise be determined by preferences 


The Traps ) 
Being Laid 
By History ^ 


of economic and social policy. Thns 
their le 


the associations and their leaders 
maintain a political standing they 
would have lost if limited to the pres- 
ervation of ethnic traditions and re- 
lated matters. 


By Flora Lewis 

P ARIS — “The anniversaries" 
have now become an urgent issue 
in every Western and East-bloc gov- 
ernment. There are no agreements on 


The writer is professor of interna- 
tional law at the University of Augs- 
burg. He contributed this comment to 
the International Herald Tribune. 


NA T0 9 s Low-Profile Arms Reduction 


Federal Republic declared iu recog- 
of the t 


ration or the western border of Po- 
land in its own behalf and not of a 
reunited Germany. 

A reunified Germany would have 
to face the fact (hat there are oily 
relatively few Germans left in the 
former eastern territories. Some fled 
before the arrival of the Soviet army, 
others were expelled daring the initial 


postwar period, and yet others were 
titled to emu 


emigrate to the Federal 
lie under humanitarian ar- 
ents after the Warsaw treaty, 
bday, the vast majority of the 
population consists of Poles. Having 
lived there for 40 years they are enti- 
tled to stay and, since many of them 
came from the eastern provinces of 
Poland that now belong to the Soviet 
Union, they could not return to their 
former home anyway. A “Europe of 


free people," a_ooncept 
lorn fori' 


freedom for the East as wdl, does not 
offer any prospect of territorial 
change either. At best, the frontier of 
Poland, will matter less. It wfll not be 
altered unless the Poles so wish. But 


O SLO — While the spotlight these 
days is on the forthcoming 
American-Soviet negotiations in Ge- 
neva regarding nudear aims, a team 
of military officers is quietly working 
at NATO'S military headquarters 
outside Brussels. Its task is to recom- 
mend bow to remove nearly 2,000 
nudear warheads from the NATO 
stockpile by ihe end of this decade. 

This work flows from a decision 
made by the Nudear Planning Group 
of the North Atlantic Treaty Organi- 
zation in 1983 at Montebello in Que- 
bec. At that meeting, defense minis- 
ters decided to reduce the 
approximately 6,000 warhead inven- 
tory by 1,400. This reduction comes 
on top of an earlier reduction of the 
stockpile to 6,000 from 7,000, which 
was decided on at the time of the 
1979 decision to deploy Pershing- 2 
and cruise imsilcs to Europe. 

Ironically, NATO did not get as 
modi political mileage as it would 
have liked out of the withdrawal of 
the 1,000. which was completed in 
1980. The Carter administration, 
concerned that Ronald Reagan 
would use this in the election cam- 
paign to demonstrate that Mr. Carter 
was soft, discouraged any extensive 
NATO publicity campaign. 

Since a warhead will also be with- 
drawn for each of the cruise missiles 
deployed to Europe, the ministers 
have in fact charged General Bernard 
Roms, the supreme commander of 
NATO forces in Europe, with gening 
rid of a total of 1,864 warheads (as- 
suming the Dutch and Belgian de- 
ployments proceed as planned). 

At a seminar here in Oslo last year. 
General Rogers explained in rather 
candid terms the problems that con- 
front him He intimated, further- 
more, that he was not entirely happy 
with the ministers' decision. He had 
just completed a lengthy exercise, de- 
signed to produce a better rationale 
for NATO nudear targeting plans, 
“wrestled that beast to the 


By John C. A ns land 


Congress who are concerned with nu- 
clear matters. There is a general re- 
luctance to discuss the decision mak- 
ing process which led up to the 
Montebello decision. The main rea- 
son for this is that NATO govern- 
ments would like to keep the spot- 
light on consultations regarding 
negotiations. Hence, meetings of 
NATQj;s Special Consultative Group, 
which is treaded by Assistant Secre- 
tary Richard Burt from the State De- 
partment, are given much publidty. 

On the other hand, when the de- 
fense ministers' workhorse, the High 


attitude by dedining the Pentagon 
funds to build a new 155-millimeter 
(6-inch) nuclear artillery shefl. 

General Rogers is due to make his 
recommendations to the NATO min- 
isters at a Nuclear Planning Group 
meeting in Luxembourg in late 
March. Judging by his comments 
here in Oslo and guarded observa- 
tions by various civilian and raffitmy 
officials on both sides of the Atlantic, 
he will recommend that most of the 
anti-demolition mines be removed. 
The Nike- Hercules will also go, since 
they are due to be replaced by the 
Patriot, which uses a conventional 
warhead. These two systems wfll take 
care of about half the reductions. 


what to do, and few firm dedacnsT 

This is really a bad sign. Forty 
years after World War H the riiea 
question of bow to commemorate die, 
end of hostilities is a Hve political and 
diplomatic booby trap. It shows hoy 
intricate international affairs hare 
become, and how volatile the feelings 
these dates can aroosec"' . 

West Germany/as a solid member 
of the Western does not 

want to be left oat, as it was in the 
spectacular celebration of the Nor- 
mandy landings last year. GhanceQar 
Helmut Kohl sees the date of the 
Thud Reich's unconditional surren- 
der on May 8, 194S, as a time to 
honor the revival of Ge rman democ- 
racy in what was to become the mod- 
em Federal Republic. 

Because of contemporary patide 
the U.S. and West European «1H« do 
not want to offend him_ The Soviet 
Union, on the other hand, broke off 
its sometime flirtation with Bonn 
when medium-range American mi- 
clear missiles were deployed in Ea- 
rope. Moscow is determined to use 
the 40th anniversaries to bolster its 
charges of German “revanchism" 
and its drive to limit Bonn's recondh- 


European allies cited 
the dangers posed by 
warheads scattered 
over the continent. 


r*- _ .i ^ - a iu viiw iv uiuiL uuirn a ituwuu: 

r 1 ?ki >0 i«« ca ^-iP r ^f ures ' a acion moves toward East Germany.' 
number of the 155-nummetft war- some in America and E r 

heads are bound to disappear. Since Lively want to mourn 1945 


Level Group, meets, it gathers in 
some out or the way place in secret. 
The High Level Group was created 
back in 1977. It was responsible for 

the staff work which led up to the 
1979 decisions to deploy the Per- 
shing-25 and cruise missiles and to 
remove 1 jOOO warheads. This group is 
headed by Richard Perle, who is the 
assistant secretary of defense for in- 
ternational security policy. 

At the time of the 1979 decisions, 
the European allies realized that they 
were going to have domestic difficul- 


ties with the deployment derisions. 

felt that further unilat- 


whjjr should they wish to? 


to what extent would this view be 
shared in Germany? Firstly, no one 
even contemplates the use of West 
German military force. Thus, the au- 
thor did not e xpr e s s anyone rise’s 


Having “wrestled that beast to the 
ground,” be was not happy to be 
presented with a political decision to 


make large stockpile reductions. 

During a recent visit to Washir 
ton, 1 talked to various officials in I 
Pentagon. State Department, and in 


Some of them 

eral reductions would be politically 

helpful Furthermore, some of them 
better understood the risks involved 
in having thousands of warheads 
scattered about the continent There 
was particular concern with the anti- 
demolition mines, which would be 
used to delay Warsaw Pact ground 
forces, with Nike-Hercules anti-air- 
craft and with short-range artillery. 
There would be pressures to use all of 
these early in any conflict. 

These concerns were shared in 
Congress, which has demonstrated its 


there are estimated at present to be 
over 2,000 artillery warheads, there 
will still be a large number left Most 
hkdy, some of the estimated 1.850 
aircraft bombs will also go, thus al- 
lowing some dual capable aircraft to 
focus on conventional missions. 

One should not assume, however, 
that General Rogers's recommenda- 
tions, if they are approved by the 
ministers, will settle the stockpile 
question forever. Other changes are 
already in train. For example, the 
U.S. Army has developed a Pershing- 
1B with which the Pentagon would 
like to replace the 72 Pershing- 1 As 
held by the German Air Force. (The 
Pershing- IB has a somewhat longer 
range than the Pershing- 1 A and 
would use a more accurate, variable- 
yield warhead.) The German govern- 
ment has apparently not yet made a 
decision on this, but it will in due 
course run out of spare parts for the 
Pershing- 1 A. In addition. Congress 
will soon have to deride whether to 
keq> the production line going on 
some of the components for the Per- 
shing-2 which would be used in 
the Pershing- IB. 

Finally, there is the question as to 
whether .ihe Soviet-American negoti- 
ations will lead to a further reduction 


that brought, aic 
end, the partition < 
Yalta. 


year 

; with the tot's 
^ Europe, symbol- 
ized by Yalta. ^ 

Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher 
of Britain, not usually the embodi- 
ment of delicacy, proposed a discreet 
observance in Wes tmins ter- But her 
compatriots made her back dow£” 
World War II caused too mneh suf- 
fering and was too important in shap- 
ing today's world to imagine it ran, (JT 
should, be forgotten. 

Especially for Germans, it is essen- 
tial to remind new generations thru 
the division of their country and a 
whole series of current problems stem 
from the Nazi war. Bum is important 
for everybody to realize what the war 
meant, and what resort to war would 
mean for the future. 

It is a sorty fact of con t emp o nuy 
relations that there simply is nowhere 
where all countries that suffered from 
the war, and all involved did suffer, 
can appropriately send representa- 
tives for a ceremony of r&m*mhr*neiL 
President Ronald Reagan will be 
in Bonn shortly before V-E Day for 
the seven-nation industrial summit 
meeting, and will probably stay cu 
for the anniversary. But it has not 
been decided how he will observe it; 

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in which weapons systems. ' ” rt " c 

International Herald Tribune. 


sons, one by one. 
could 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Who Cared About Tibet? 

Reganhng m Ddiauns That Undermine 
Democray 9 (Jot. 17) by George F. Witb 

Mr. Will, quoting Jean-Francots 
Revel, writes of the^ “total secrecy* of 
the gorodde committed by the Chi- 
nese in Tibet, There are errors of fact 
and of logic here; 

Tim Chinese invasion and the 
genodde were not secret As early as 
1961, an international committee of 
jurists looking into charges of geno- 
cide in Tibet concluded that genocide 
had indeed been China’s policy. But 
no one cared then, any more than Mr. 
Will appears to care now. 

Nor was CIA assistance to Tibetan 
freedom fighters a secret That mini- 


mal assistance was terminated by 
Richard Nixon when he found that 
: for the Tibetans was incom- 
; with recognition of China. 
What Mr. Will Mr. Revel and cur-, 
rent American policy fonmilatois fail 
to realize is that murder is the same in 
Tibet Cambodia and Vietnam as in 
South Africa, Honduras and Leba- 
non. Democracies perish when their 
actions 
When 
one 

forces and another to “anti- Ameri- 
can" forces. Wben they find .excuses 
for not following the logical impera- 
tives of their morality if morality con- 
flicts with “strategic concerns. 

When we join the bullies we be- 


come a bully. The greatest Hangar to 
the survival of democracy 1 is the fear 
to stand up and be counted on moral 
grounds, which are neither left nor 
righL The danger is that we will be 
shaped by our weaknesses rather 
than our strength. 

THOMAS LAIRD. 

Katmandu, Nepal. 


to their country and lo the game of 
tennis. When watching them play 
which I now refuse to do. I have fen 
embarrassed to be American They 
degrade us all, and set a terrible ex- 
ample for the young. 

EVELYN E. LAWSON. 
Vtllefranche-dc-ConflenL France. 


ions are not based on morality. Bounce tha SiinprhrntA 
ten thqy find excuses for applying OupOTDraiS 

e moral set to “pro-American I am glad that the president of 


the president of the 
U-S. Olympic Committee, William E. 
Simon, has called for censorship of 
the vulgar, shameful and unpardon- 
able behavior of tennis players John 
McEnroe and Jimmy Connors (Other 
Opinion, Jan. 29). They are a disgrace 


Immigranl From Florida 

A report (Jan. 25) referring to the 
150th anniversary of Mark Twain’s 


birth says he was bora in HannibaL 
Missouri. He grew up in Hannibal 
but was born in Florida. Missouri. 
MARC HL HOLLENDER. 
Nashville, Tennessee. 


They could fight side by side bpt 
they cannot honor their dead side by 
side. This is a commentary an the 
deterioration of the high resolve with 
which the war ended and the United 
Nations was established. 

Perhaps unofficial people should 
take over in this failure of leadership 
for peace, reconciliation and atone* 
menL The world is whai it is tfflW 
bemuse of the terrible war. 

Community 
erans everywfc 

monies, actively seeking guests froffl 
other lands on both sides of the af- 
flict then and both sides of the anrE" 
tmism now. All can give thanks that 
there has not been another world w$r. 
All can show humility before the hor- 
ror mankind perpetrated. And all can 
snow leaden that if they are too etb* 
oroued in tricky politics to know hew 
to honor the past and inspire the 
future, other people do. " 

the New York Times. ‘‘ 


ity groups, churches, vtt- 
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Page 5 


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Old Pattern 
Of Bicke ring 
Resumed 
By 2 Koreas 

• By Clyde Haberman 

-*£•’ *•* Srm«- 

J S 0UL ~ T 6 * road fr °m here 
io Faamunjom in the denrili tarized 
zone has a new asphalt surface, a 
him>np ipb completed recently. 

iJS^ to *how off 

jubest, expecting that Red Cross 
r «PKseWatives from North Korea 

Mir'a.-sasjs 

^asj^fss ; Korao 

Instead, earlier in January. 
North Korea announced that it was 
noteoming — no t to Seoul for the 
Ked Cross discussions, nor to Pan- 
munjom for negotiations that had 
o®eu scheduled for mid-January to 
dismiss possibilities for trade be- 
tween the long-hostile countries. 

Now South Korean officials do 
not expect talks to resume before 
mid-spring, if then. After a brief 
penod of friendlier relations in the 
«w>nd half of 1984, the two Koreas 
have returned to a pattern of mutu- 
al scorn and attacks on one anoth- 
er's intentions. 

“Maybe the feeling was that it all 
was going a little too fast,” a West- 


In a Vacuum of Arab Power 9 Egypt Gropes to Regain Its Political Might 


By David B. Ortaway 

Washington Pan Serrice 

CAIRO — More than three 
years into the “Mubarak era.*' 
Egypt still remains adrift in the 
Arab world. It is at considerable 
odds with its peace partner. Israel, 
and is stumbling in search of a new 
role for itself in a changing cons td- 


Mubarak’s Egypt: 


Fourth of four artides. 

latioa of Middle bast power play- 
ers. 

With time and astute diplomacy, 
the Arab world's most populous 
nation has regained a seat m the 
councils of the nonaligned move- 
ment and in the Idaimc Conference 
Organization, from which it was 
banished after signing a peace trea- 
ty with the Jewish state m 1979. 
But in the arena (Imw to 


the birth of a new “Egyptian era," 
expected here after Swat’s assassi- 
nation and bis replacement by 
President Hosrri Mubarak, who 
showed a pro-Arab till, has been 
blocked by this bickering. 

The roots of Egypt's present pre- 
dicameat seem to gp far deeper. A 
begrudging realization is dawning 
among same Egyptian intellectuals 
that its old leadership role may 
never be regained because Egypt 
has permanently lost its place m 
the carter of Arab politics. 

The Arab worm appears more 
ilyzed than ever, and not only 
its internal fends and personal 
rivalries. Its power has fragmented 
in the vacuum left by Egypt’s exo- 
dus from the Arab League six years 
ago. and by Saudi Arabia’s failure 
tofffl this vacuum. 

Ah Dissooki, a prominent politi- 
cal science professor at Cairo Uni- 
versity, calls it “the eta of polvcen- 
trism.” It is an era in which the 
Arab states sow form shifting co- 
alitions around different issues, 


Egypt’s heart, the Arab world wih no country capable of acting 
where it once held center stage, all the time as the central “poteJ 


Egypt has become the latest victim 
of perennial intra-Arab feuding. 
Despite a concerted diplomatic 
campaign, it has been denied re- 
entry into the Arab League by a 
strange alliance of interests, those 
of Saudi Arabia and Syria. 


This, he says, is because none com- 
bines any more all the prerequisites 
for leadership: wealth, population, 
military prowess and cultural or 
educational superiority. 

Egypt, he said, now may have to 
content itself for to come 



Old World and with three conti- 
nents meeting around its borders, 
continues to be the center of a cir- 
cle which may widen or narrow bat 
always remains as the head of a 
body,” Mr. Butros Ghali wrote, 
“She did sot accept, or was des- 
tined. to be on the periphery during 

her tong history.” 


between his country and Israel a 
cold peace.** He stiU believes there 
will be no real thaw unless progress 
is on the Palestinian, issne. 

“Nothing could be built unless 
we solve the Palestinian jHobtan,” 
be said. “By solving the Palestinian 
problem, we are offering an incen- 
tive to all the other Arab countries 


Prime Minister Kama! Hassan Ali of 
c M wfc tjppft main diplomatic obj 



South Africa 


fc 1 " flapping these sessions, 
t^ongyang died U-S.-South Kore- 
an military exercises that b egan 
Fnday and are scheduled to test 
until ApriL North Korea called the 
-maneuvers a “war rehearsal” and 
Mid it could not negotiate while 
they were under way. 

South Korean officials itiwniwql 
'the Neath’s charges as an excuse, 

pointing out that the militar y exer- 
cise has been held each year for the 
Jast decade. Pyongyang's state- 
ments were “an utterly wicked 
scheme to shift (he blame,” said 
Sohn Jae Sink, head of the Nation- 
al Unification Board in SeouL Last R^rlnxir 

week, Mr. Sohn called on North J- O UcVICW 
Korea to resume talks. 

Some analysts speculated that 

Pyongyang saw an opportunity to XlUoUlUCllICIll 
prove its toughness to the Soviet 
Union at a time when it was trying 
to acquire Soviet tanks and MK3- 
^3 fighter planes. 

-In seeking to strike a balance 
between its principal aTH t y, North 
Korea has tilted conspicuously in 
recent years toward China and 
away from Moscow. Lately, China 
has urged the North to adopt a 
softer foreign policy. By suddenly 
taking a harder line; it was argued, 

Pyongyang could be signaling a 
readiness to get somewhat closer to 
t|ie Russians, 


Many in the Egyptian political with being only the Arab- world's 
establishment firmly believe these “cultural cento” unless it some- 
how succeeds in becoming the 
“pole” of a new coalition. 

This, in fact, is now the main, 
Making peace with Israel was the although undeclared, objective erf 
initial reason for its banishment Egyptian diplomacy in the Arab 
“Everybody, including the Sau- world: the building of an alliance 
dis, is trying to extract a price for among Egypt, Jordan and (he Pal- 
res 


Mr. Mubarak and other 
tian policymakers strenuously < 
any intention of creating a new axis 
in Arab politics. But tins is what is 
emerging, in the view of many ana- 
lysts, and it is leading both Jordan 
and Egypt into a pohtical confron- 
tation with Syria. 

It remains far from dear whether 
Egypt can take the lead in this new 
coalition of Arab powers seeking to 
renew the peace process. The cen- 
tral figure m Middle East diploma- 
cy, if there is any today, appears to 


back into the Arab L eagu e. But 
Syria is opposed to this and every- 
thing for which Egypt stands, espe- 
cially its U.S.-sponsored peace 
treaty with Israel 
What irks the E g yp tians far 
more, however, is the position of 
Saudi Arabia. Riyadh oty’ects to 
Cairo’s return to the Arab I ^ a gp g 
on the grounds that there must be 

an A rah e nmapnan^ , a dcarim pQIB - 
biliiy is that divided world. Egypt 
is convinced that the Saudi attitude 
stems from a vindictive wish to 


Butros Ghafi, minister of state for 
foreign affairs and perhaps the gov- 
ernment’s chief philosopher, re- 
cently published a series of articles 
harkmg back to the times of Gsmal 
Abdel Nasser and his “three cir- 
cles’* of Egyptian influence: the 
Arab, African and nonj " 
countries. In those circles, 
saw itself 
Mr. Butros 
fourth, the “Islamic order in def- 
erence to Egypt’s recent re-admis- 
sion into the 45-nation Mamie 



playing a leading 
3S Ghali even adde d a 


.tonne diplomatic relations with estme Liberation Organization, be King Hussein of Jordan. He has keep Egypt in the diplomatic cold Conference Organization. 

1 a ieadlD 8 Egyptian political with Iraq acting as a backstop, in taken several bold initiatives re- so Saudi Arabia’s own influence in What was most strikii 

IHTTIPnlatflr Win nrrl^ I/, mnkXi. J. A .1- J' -- .. 1 .1. A _1 -II _ . . . .... i ■■ . 


US, _ _ _ _ - 

commentator said. order to mobilize enough Arab*dtp- 

The “Saudi era” of ofl-fmanced Ionia tic muscle to bnng about a 
checkbook diplomacy has, to all settlement of the Palestinian piob- 
appearasces, come to an end. But Ion. 


cently to try to end the paralysis 
gripping the Arab world. 

Egypt hopes to use Jordan and 
Yasser Arafat, of the PLO, to get 


Arab councils will be greater. 

Egypt's shrunken political stat- 
ure is proring a bitter pall to swal- 
low for its proud leaders. Butros 


striking about 
his artides was his bold re-asser- 
tion of Egypt’s central position in 
world diplomacy, even today. 

“Egypt, being the center of die 


Yet, there are voces articulating to accept the existence of Israel and 
a more modest view of Egypt’s role to acoept the peace process." 

What Mr. Butros Ghali indtcal-. 
ed, without openly swing it, is that 
the Lrcaiy has left Egypt with a 
monumental guilty conscience to- 
ward the Palestinians and other Ar- 
abs. It can atone, it feels, only by 
solving the Palestinian issue before 
accepting any improvement its re- 
lationship with Israel. 

Egyptian officials and intellectu- 
als are generally gloomy about the 
whole Middle East situation, be- 
cause of a combination of UJS. in- 
difference, an unstable Israeli co- 
alition and Arab paralysis. 

With Mr. Mubarak scheduled to 
visit Washington in early March, 
the Egyptians are scrambling to 
find a new formula that would get 
peace talks going a gain. More out 
of desperation than conviction, 
they have latched onto King Hus- 
sein's proposal for holding an inter- 
national conference with the PLO 
in attendance, a move that both the 
Reagan adminis tration and Israel 
oppose. 

“The whole area is in & mess,” 
Mr. Heflral said. “To my mind, an 
era in the Middle East has ended 
and another era is being bom now. 
How is it going to come? Which 
way? We can see the signs: Modem 
fundamentalism, the vulgarity 
which you see. The dtmeni* of 
contradiction are there and acceler- 
ating day by day. 

“What’s going to come at the 
end. 1 cannot tdl you. But we are 
heading for trouble, all of os.” 


today, like those of Mr. 
and Mohammed Hassanean Ha- 
lts!, former confidant of Nasser 
and perhaps his country’s best- 
known writer and commentator. 

In an interview, Mr. Hrikal re- 
flected on Egypt’s diminished stat- 
ure as the Arab world's “center rtf 
enlightenment” even before it 
signed the Ca m p David peace ac- 
cords in 1978. 

“There was a certain erosion in 
the role of Egypt,” he said. “It was 
there before Camp David, but 
Camp David came and it was as if 
there was an official declaration of 
desertion.” 

The other factor in Egypt's de- 
clining fortunes was the vindictive- 
ness of the Arab conservatives, ac- 
cording to Mr. HeikaL 

“There were traditional dements 
in the area which always disliked 
Egypt 1 s role, especially the conser- 
vatives,” he said. When Eg/pt ab- 
dicated this role; by signing the 
peace treaty, “those people felt lib- 
erated from the Egyptian pressure 
which they fell before. 

Remarkably, the peace treaty 
has weathered the assassination of 
Sadat, its coauthor and real inspi- 
ration. h also has survived Israel's 
annexation of Jerusalem and the 
Golan Heights, the Israeli attack 
on an Iraqi nuclear reactor and 
even the Israeli invasion of Leba- 
non. 

Two years ago, Mr. Butros Ghali 
called the strange state of relations 


Another possibility was that 
North Korea decided against nego- 
tiations that the South Korean 
president, Chun Doo Hwan, could, 
have used to political advantage in 
national legislative elections 
planned in the South foe Feb. 12. 

An almost uni vasal view within 
the go v ernment was that the North 
had merely gone through the mo- 
tions of seeking a dialogue in the 
hope of establishing contacts with 
West, especially the United States. 
This opmioQ is shared by many 
^foreign diplomats here. 

»? v Accardmg to tins theory, Pyong- 
yang, which is hard pressed finan- 
cially and under pressure from Gti- 
qa to open up to foreign investors, 
needs to hire outsiders. The only 
way to do that is to alter its reputa- 
tion for erratic behavior by first 
sitting down with the South. 

■ Gum’s U A Visit 
' The Reagan administration has 
agreed to receive Mr. Chun in 
April, evidently having received as- 
surances that the exiled opposition 
leader Kim Dae Jung wfif not be 
harmed cm his return to South Ko- 
rea next week. The Associated 
press reported front Washington, 
quoting adminis tration sources. 

The announcement of Mr. 
Chun’s visit has been held up pend- 
i clarification of reports that Mr. 


qned upon his return to Seoul 1 
the United States. Mr. Kim was 
convicted on sedition charges in 
1980 and had served three years of 
his 20-year sentence when he was 
allowed to go to the United States. 


The Associated Pros 

CAPE TOWN — South Africa 
said Friday that it would partly 
suspend the forced resettlement of 
blade communities pending a gov- 
ernment review of toe policy. 

Getrit Vfljoen, minister of coop- 
eration, development and educa- 
tion, said the review would affect 
hundreds of thousands of blacks, 
faring resettlement to tribal home- 
lands from land set aside fori 
whites. 

However, Mr. Vfijoen also said 
that the government would contin- 
ue to resettle blade communities if 
their leaders agreed, making the 
practical effects of the suspension 
unclear. 

Mr. V2joeQ said the review of 
farced removals was initiated be- 
cause “the government is sensitive 
to the general critical attitude to- 
ward resettlement.’' 

He said the review would exam- 
ine 25 to 30 of rural blade villages 
in white areas, and about the same 
number of urban blade townships, 
that are scheduled to be incorpo- 
rated into the nation’s 10 black 
homelands. 

By some estimates, more than 3 
million of toe country’s 22 million 
blacks have been forced off torirl 
land over the past three decades asj 
part of a government drive to sepa- 
rate the races. 

Meanwhile, black students 
stoned students attending school in 
the township of Kwathema, near 
Johannesburg, police said Friday. 
The dispute apparently centered on 
whether to continue school boy- 
cotts designed to draw attention to 
toe disparity in funds spent on fa- 
cilities for blacks and 


NewFmichNew^japerFtJdsj 

Reiners 

PARIS — A new French evening 
newspaper, Paris Ce Scar, whose 
m am editorial writer was a centrist 
foreign minister in the Pompidou 
government, Michel Jobert, has 
suspended publication after three 
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Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HE RALD TRIBUNE, S ATURDA Y-SUND A Y, FEBRUARY 2- 3. 1985 

ARTS /LEISURE 


Wide-Ranging Show 
Of Renoirs Opens 


By Max Wykes-Joyce 

International Herald Tribune 

L ONDON —The first exhibition 
/ in London since 1953 of the 
work of Pierre-Auguste Renoir has 
been greeted rapturously by the 
media. Some color newspaper sup- 
plements last Sunday earned re- 
productions on the front page: 
‘‘Blonde Bather I" in the Observer 
alerted the reader to an apprecia- 
tion within by Clive James, the 
Australian man of letters and hu- 
morist; a detail from “Dance at 
BougivaT on the Telegraph cover 
indicated an article inside on Re- 
noir’s “Fair Women” by the televi- 
sion pundit and art historian Ed- 
ward Mullins. 

On the same evening the British 
Broadcasting Corp. presented “The 
Divine Sun, a radio portrait of 
Renoir written and narrated by 
John House, one of the selectors of 
about 100 of Renoir's finest paint- 
ings for the Arts Council exhibi- 
tion, sponsored by International 
Business Machines Corp., at the 
Hayward Gallery. 



Pierre-Auguste Renoir 


The three selectors — House, of 
the Courtauld Institute of Art in 
London. Anne Disiel of the Louvre 
in Paris and John Walsh, formerly 
of the Museum of Fine Arts in 
Boston and now director of the J. 
Paul Getty Museum — ranged ex- 
tremely widely in time, subject and 
collection in their choices, to make 
this one of the most enjoyable exhi- 
bitions ever mounted. It will be 
shown later in Boston and Paris. 

The earliest work in London and 
Boston is the “Portrait of Romaine 
Lacaux." the 9-year-old daughter 
of a porcelain manufacturer, paint- 
ed in 1864; in Paris, the earliest 
work, dating from the same year, 
wQl be a “Portrait of William Sis- 
ley,” the English father of the Im- 
pressionist painter Alfred Sisley. 
Renoir and Sisley were fellow stu- 
dents at the Ecole dies Beaux- Arts 
in Paris in 1862-1864. 

Renoir was born in Limoges in 
1841, one of many children of a 
jobbing tailor, Leonard Renoir. 
The family moved to Paris four 
years later. At the state school in 
Paris, be showed no particular ar- 
tistic lalem, though his musical 
abilities were singled out by his 
music master, the then impover- 
ished and quite unknown Charles 
Gounod. At 13, young Renoir he 
had to rake a job to contribute to 
the family resources. He was ap- 
prenticed to the Levy brothers as a 
porcelain decorator. 

This apprenticeship excited his 
appreciation of color and com- 
pelled precise brushworfc, resulting 
in some of his finest Flower pieces 
— in bis early years, orthodox Sa- 
lon works such as his “Flower Still 
Life”; in his later days luxuriant 
and splendid work such as “Gera- 
niums and Kittens” (1881), “Flow- 
ers and Fruit” ( 1889) and the bou- 



Renoir’s “Gabrielle With Jewelery,” painted about 1910. 


German Exhibit Set for U.K. 


The Associated Press 

L ONDON — An exhibition of 
t German painting from 1905 to 
1985 will be the Royal Academy's 
major show this fall, Roger de 
Grey, who was elected the 21st 
president of the acadamey in De- 
cember, has announced at a news 
conference <m the academy’s plans 
for the coming year. 

“This will be the first of a series 
of exhibitions in which we have 
decided to deal with each country 
separately in presenting the great 
art movements of our century," de 
Grey said Thursday. '‘We’ve nearly 
finished the 20th century and it is 
time we started looking seriously at 


it. Our first choice is less weD 
blown than it should be. Later, we 
hope to do the same with Italy and 
France.” 

He said the West German For- 
eign Ministry and a group of Ger- 
man and British companies were 
helping to pay for the exhibition. It 
will run at the academy Oct II 
through Dec. 22 and be shown later 
in Stuttgart 

The other major exhibition at the 
academy this year will be of the 
works of Edward Lear, the Victori- 
an who made a living as a painter 
though he became famous for his 
nonsense verse. 




it Leaders Vow to Ptah [. 
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quels of roses or single rases in the 
hair or the corsage of beautiful 
women — “The Theater Box" 
(1874), “Dance in the Gty” (1882), 
“Nude on the Cushions" (1907), 
“Gabrielle with a Rose” (191 1). In 
all of these his painting of roses 
involved, as he told his dealer, Am- 
brose Vcflard, “experiments with 
flesh tints that I mak e for my 
nudes.” 

For his paintings of nudes, argu- 
ably the genre for which Renoir is 
best known, he chose a succession 
of young models, who often joined 

his household as a child minders, 
housemaids or cooks (he observed 
of one of his cooks that his main 
reason for employing her was not 
her skill in the kitchen but that “her 
skin takes the light so well”). Most 
of his favorites are represented 
here, including: 

• Lise Trehot, the statuesque 
nude in “Bather with a Griffon” 
(1870), who was his principal mod- 
el from 186S until in 1872 she mar- 
ried the architect Georges Bri&e de 
lisle. 

• Aline Charigot in “Blonde 
Bather I” (1881, probably painted 

Renoir. (Italy did not impresshiin 
greatly. “Do you want to know 
what I have seen?” he wrote to one 
of his patrons, Madame Chaipen- 
fier. “Take a boat and go to the 
quai des Oifevres, or opposite (he 
Tuileries, and there's Venice. For 
Veronese, go td the Louvre.") 

• Gabrielle Renard in “Redin- 
ing Nude” (1903), who joined the 
Renoir household as a I6-year-oki 
nursemaid for his and Alice's el- 
dest son, Jean, in 1894, and from 
1900 to 1912 was his most admired 
model 

• Madeleine Bruno in the “Seat- 
ed Bather” (191 1). 

• Andrte (Deofe) Hess ling, later 
to become Jean Renoir’s first wife. 
She modeled for “The Bathere” 
(1918-19), an extraordinary tour- 
do-force by a 77-year-old arthritic 
who painted it seated in his wheel- 
chair with the long-handled broad 
brush taped to his hand — the 
strapping on of which he jocularly 
termed “putting on my thumb ” 


place in art history as the tenderly 


caring mother of Maurice Utrillo. 

For all of them, the world wa; 
then, in Renoir’s words, as it had 
been for the Greeks: “They lived so 
happy a life that they imagined the 
gods came down to earth in order 
to find their true love. Yes, indeed, 
the earth was the paradise of the 
gods.” 

"Renoir,” Hayward Gallery, 
South Bank, London SEl, through 
April 21; Paris, Grand Palais, May 
14 through Sept. 2; Boston, Museum 
of Fine .4ns, Oct. 9 through Jan, 5, 
1986. 


INTERNATIONAL 
ART EXHIBITIONS 



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PRE-COLUMBIAN ART 


6, Rue Jean-Mermoz, 75008 PARIS. Tel.: 359.82.44 


MUSEe RODIN 


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Robert JACOBSEN 


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A Limited Craze for Neoclassical Works g 

V . • .,nA r xiiJ 


International Herald Tribune 


LONDON 


= MIRO & SPtZMAN — 
FINE ARTS 

37 Craven fed.. London W2_ 723 1948. 
A Hour Battery speetaUalnp In 
Randan Cmbsnporarr Art, shotting : 

ANATOLI ZVEREV 
VLADIMIR YAKOVLEV 
VALENTIN VOROBIOV 

iiwMiim 8 Korkt Jrem the 
COSTAKtS CtnUrmponoy CoitecsSon. 

jl Jcituary 16 - February 10. 
Mw-FW., 10-5. Sad. 101 = 


P I ARIS — The vogue enjoyed by neodassi- 
rism in France is turning into a craze where 
paintings and drawings are concerned. 

On Monday, a sale conducted at Drouot by 
Dominique Ribeyre offered a rare opportunity 
to compare the effects of this vogue on Old 
Master paintings, drawings and decorative ob- 
jets d’art all in a single session. The occasion was 
an estate sale. "Gagnereaux. who was bom in Dijon in 1756 

The response is traditionally strong to a col- and ccmmited suicide in Florence in 1793. had 
lector's choice, but on Monday it reached aston- his moments of glory as a purely neoclassical 
ishing heights on the most trifling drawings and artist. As a young student he was sent to Romt 
paintings, subject to one condition — a signa- where he put himself on the map by dashing off 


led the collectors of today — one of Lhem forked 
out 14.000 francs to gtfl it- . . 

But this was peanuts compared with Uie mm 
painting in the auction, the portrait of a man 
done bv the little-known Bemgne Gagnereaux 
in 1789' If his signature had not appeared in toe 
righihand comer of a Roman-inspired sarcoph- 
agus. even specialists would not have had a clue 
that he ever painted in that relatively free man- 
ner. 


French collector for 1.800 francs. Nt^ 
rare terra-cotta bas-relieQof a yo®g / 


ture was required, no matter how obscure, to 
send the works skyrocketing. 

This became apparent from the beginning 
with an extraordinary price contrast between 
two matching gouaches, unsigned, and two 


SOUREN MELIKL4N 


on the walls of a monastery four scenes in black 
and white chalk representing bacchanalians, 
matching watercolors, one of which carried the Soon after, he got commissions from King Gus- 
□ame Antoine Genain. The unsigned gouaches tav III of Sweden, who bought from him “The 
were capriccios or imaginary urban landscapes. Blind Oedipus” and “The King of Sweden and 


young 

woman and child striding by a Romany. 
Sinned “J. M. Ifor Jean MarunJ Renaud. dated; 
1792 and retaining its giltwood penod ftapg.: 
went for 7.000 francs. The fact that the MusfeL 
Carnavalet in Paris has a group of lawotta ; - 
raedailions by Renaud. who also worked mfe?- 
bas-relief decoration of the column m the Has : 
Vendome in Paris, made no difference. 

Finally, there were two terra-cotta medaiHpos 
bv Joseph Chinard. who spent his life in Lyotr : 

( 1 75o- 1 S 1 3) and was famous in his lifetime, with 
better reason than Gagnereaux. Conventional nr; 
his adherence to neoclassicisra. Chinard was a . 
skilled sculptor, as shown by the small bas^-relM 
portraits of Prince Eug&ne de Beauharnaismd 
of General Philibert Guillaume Duhesmes. 
known how many specimens the artist 


. -.nt 




ulE* ^ " f:' 

f t 

mYSE F J. v- *•' - 

— -'r'^rvT) 

nrrfRPV* 


-.-71 ***1 



Br l.M } 


not 


The late William Gaum, painter as 
well as art historian of genius, 
wrote, on contemplating this mas- 
terpiece: “We cease to think of the 
real world; we enter the world of 
Renoir’s mind, the ultimate vision 
of timeless beauty.” 

For all that, Renoir, who died in 
1919, had ever concerned himself 
with the people and places around 
him, never forgetting that, as he put 
iL “the purpose of a painter is to 
decorate a walL” The decorative 
qualities of his painting are most 
clearly apparent in the trio “Dance 
at Bougivai.'’ “Dance in the City" 
and “Dance in the Country,” all 
painted in 1882-1883. Each canvas 
portrays in life size a dancing cou- 


Briliiantly done in a matter suggestive of Hubert 
Robert and Jacques Pillemem. with stairs, clas- 
sical urns and pillars under a windswept sky. 
they are just the right size for gouaches. 48.5 by 
35 centimeters (about 18.8 by 13.6 inches). At 
23,000 francs ($2,400) they are cheap and will 
allow a substantial markup when the name of 
some well-known petit-maitre is eventually at- 
tached to them, as will undoubtedly be the case 
— the style is too confident to be that of a gifted 
amateur. 


Pope Pius VII having a talk in the Vatican.” and 
then had him paint "The Education of Achilles” 
when Gagnereaux was only 21. This led to 
further work for the Swedish royal family and 
the Swedish prime minister. Baron Taube. 
Eventually. Gagnereaux painted frescoes on the 
ceiling of the third great room at the Villa 
Borghese — in a neoclassical vein, needless to 
say. His choice was “Jupiter and Antiopus.” 

Compared with such lofty subject matter, the 
Drouot painting is lighthearted. A youthful gen- 


The watercolors by Genain that followed il- demon In a bright red coat, with a white lace 
lustrate the stylistic abyss that separates the first scarf billowing out or his black waistcoat, rests 
wave of neoclassicism in 18 th -century France, his elbow on the sarcophagus while a bsemmind- 
light and graceful from the heavy solemnity of edly fondling a white poodle. 

Napoleonic times. In one, the colonnade of a Although inexplicably perched on tbe sharp 
Roman temple appears at left, with characters ridge or a tombstone, parallel to the sarcopha- 
in Roman garb looking at an equestrian statue gus, the young man appears to be impervious to 
on a pedestal. Genain, who exhibited watered- the agony of discomfort he must be suffering. 


pie. In Bou|ivaI. the woman 


“waltzes with delicious abandon in 
the arms of an alluring oarsman.” 
as a story by Renoir’s writer friend 
Paul Lhote describes the scene. Tbe 


ors at the Salon de Paris from 1793 to 1 808. was 
a hack. He picked up the trend of his time, 
which was Roman subjects. One of his pieces 
found its way to the Perpignan city art museum, 
but that is hardly enough to justify the 42.000 
francs offered Monday for his gouaches. 

Equally unexpected was the price paid for an 
interior scene, signed and dated. “Nicolle E 
1861." Is this Emile Frederic Nicolle (1830- 
1894), as the expert Bruno de Bayser unreserv- 
edly stated? This Nicdle, known from land- 
scapes, made an appearance at the 1864 Salon. 


The expert Luden Ryaux said that the Louvre 
curators had looked at the painting with great 
interest, and there was speculation that the 
French national museum agency might get in- 
volved. It did not, but within seconds the por- 
trait rose to an improbable 180.000 francs. 

There is a Musee Gagnereaux in Dijon, which 
may have mildly stimulated bidding from the 
area. A more likely factor, however, is the con- 
tinuing effect of the sensation created at Drouot 
in December when Luden Solanet knocked 
down at 1.9 million francs a large neoclassical 


would have executed of such portraits — 
were made from moulds, the detail being carved - 
with a point before firing. They cannot haw 
been numerous. There are few recorded cases of 
duplicated portraits. At 30.000 francs, thejaif. 
was considers bly cheaper than paintings or eyes 
drawings by an anist of comparable fame would 
be. •• 

Neoclassical furniture and furnishings are 
just taking off. There were pieces worthy of,a 
museum in Mondays sale. They included a pan 
of torcheres designed like Roman three-wick 08- 
laraps on tall stands. The shafts, made of brown 
pa Lina ted bronze, glittering gilt bronze and or- 
molu. rise from naturalistic bird claws and are 
supported by mahogany pedestals. They look 
like some anticipation of Surrealism. The highly 
knowledgeable experts Roland Lepic and Alain 
Nazare Aga could not remember seeingjhe 
model before. The pair went for 120.000 f rafts, 
well below their potential price on the interna- 
tional market. 

The other highly important item was a bergere 
gortdole or armchair with upholstered sides. The 
mahogany veneer is inlaid with ebony marque 
try of neoclassical design. Signed with the mark 
“Jacob Frtos rue Meslee.” indicating that it 
was made by the great cabinetmakers not later 
than 1803, the model appears to be unique. The 
price. 176,000 francs, is laughably low com- 
pared with what a piece of similar importance to 
18th-century cabineLmaking would fetch. 


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Ernest Philippe Nicolle. who exhibited at the pen-and-wash drawing by Lou is- Leopold Boil- 


same couple, smartly turned out. 
in ball gown, he in tails, appear 


she ii 

in “Dance in the City,” while “In 


the Country” the man and his com- 
plin 


fortably plump girlfriend shuffle 
against a background at s umm er 
chestnut trees in full leaf. 

The man who modeled for all 
three paintings was Lhote. The 
country girlfriend is Aline Chari- 
got, Renoir's mistress at the time. 
The startlingly beautiful redhead 
dancing in tire city and ai Bougivai 
is tbe teen-ager Maria O&mentine, 
an acrobat from the M oiler Circus. 
She later achieved a considerable 
reputation as a painter, encouraged 
by Renoir and Edgar Degas, under 
the name Suzanne Valadon, and a 


Salon in 1868, is another plausible candidate. 
The elusive Nicolle did a scene in pen and 
brown ink with touches of white showing a 
room with walls covered with drawings from top 
to bottom. A framed piece laid on a chair of 
early Empire design, and objects carelessly piled 
up on a Napoleon I writing desk in the fore- 
ground. suggest the study room of a dealer or 
collector of sloppy habits. 

This record of an art-obsessed forebear tick- 


ly. The work was a study for his picture showing 
a crowd in the Louvre in front of David's 
“Coronation of Napoleon.” 

Other neoclassical works of art are la gg in g far 
behind paintings and drawings. Monday’s sale 
included four small sculptures, all of the finest 
quality and all inexpensive. The first was a gilt 
bronze medallion in high relief bearing the por- 
trait of one of the sons of King Louis Philippe. 
Signed J. Pradier. it was knocked down to a 


■ Mottahedeh Porcelain Brings $1 Mflfion 

A collection of Chinese export porcelain de- 
scribed by the late Nelson A. Rockefeller as “an 
artistic and cultural treasure without compari- 
son in its field” brought S1.05 million at auction 
Wednesday, The Associated Press reported 
from New York. Of the 375 items, 97 percent 
were sold at Sotheby’s Manhattan auction 
house. 

The collection, accumulated by Mildred Mot- 
tahedeh and her late husband, Rafi. over 
year period, spans the history of Chinese export 
porcelain from the 16th century onward. 


Two Tristans’: A Memorable Mark in Paris . . . 


By David Stevens 

Iniemaiitmat Herald Tribune 

P I ARIS — It has been 20 years 
since Wagner's "Tristan und 
Isolde” last had a new staging at 
the Paris Opera — in Wieland 
Wagner’s replica of his now histor- 
ic Bayreuth production and with 
Birgit Nilsson and Wolfgang 
Windgassep in the title roles — and 
13 years since il has been heard 
here at all so its return this week in 
new hands is not premature. 

The abstraction and stark sym- 
bolism of 1960s Bayreuth have 
been succeeded by a" number of 
stylistic fads, so that now there 
seems to be a return to tradition, 
moderately updated, and to gener- 
ally straightforward staging. So it is 
with this production, which Paris 
shares with the Cologne Opera; it is 
staged by Michael Hampe, director 
of the Cologne Opera. 

The designer. Mauro Pagano, 
has constructed a flexible and ef- 
fective unit set consisting or a cir- 
cular, raked playing area semi-en- 
circled by a plateau at a higher level 
— equally adjustable for -the two 
decks of the ship, the garden and 
walls of King Mark's castle or the 
courtyard and ramparts of Tris- 
tan’s fortress. Aside from a prepos- 
terously phallic ship's tiller in Act I 
or a heavy insistence on Tristan's 


theless provided a strong forward 
impulse, and even in low’ gear he 
never let the tension slacken. 

In a generally honorable cast 
there was one truly memorable per- 
formance. the King Marie of Kurt 
MolL Richly sonorous throughout 
the role's range and profoundly ex- 
pressive in word and gesture, be 
made deeply moving a part that is 
generally redroned a noble bore. 
Siegraund Nimsgpm was a strong 
Kurwenal, robust of voice and 
gently protective toward Tristan, 
while Nadine Denizes Brangaene 
was smoothly vocalized and bland- 
ly acted. 


The eternal problem of casting 
the title roles was, as usual only 
partly solved. Ute W Lazing made a 
formidable looking Irish princess, 
outfitted with a profusion of red 
tresses, but vocally she had a very 
uneven night Hers is a soprano 
that blossoms on high and under 


Kollo's Tristan is becoming a 
known quantity. His is an essential- 
ly lyric voice that is pressed hard in 
the heavier Wagnerian roles he has 
been singing in recent years, but his 
careful pacing and diligent, if not 
na t u ra l, acting stood him in good 
stead for the rigors of Tristan’s 


stress, but produces some strange tinrd-act ravings. 


sounds at the lower end and in soft 
passages. Tbe dramatic shipboard 
outbursts were exciting and the 
high Cs of Act II posed no prob- 
lem, but tbe Liebestod was 
cautiously and the love duet, wit 
Rend Kollo, counted for little. 


At some later performances, 
Gwyneth Jones is scheduled losing 
Isolde with William Johns as Tris- 
tan 


Other performances are scheduled 
for Feb. 5, 9, 13. 16, 19, 23 and 26. 


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Too Much Symbolism at ENO 




role in his own wounding, Haxnjie 


and Pagano took it easy on 
symbolism, making effective use 
(aided by Bruno Boyer's lighting) 
of the psychological opposition of 
night and day. For the closing Lie- 
bestod. the circular platform slowly 
rose as the stage was enveloped in a 
starry night. 

The considerable musical merits 
of the opening performance had 
much to do with the conducting of 
Marek Janowski. an experienced 
and spirited Wagnerian. While 
considerate of the singers, he none- 


By Henry Pleasants 

International Herald Tribune 

L ONDON — The postponement 
* of a scheduled new production 
of Massenet's “Manon” has 
prompted the Royal Opera to fill 
the gap with a revival of Luchino 
Visconti's 1957 production of Ver- 
di’s “La Traviata." 

It is no routine revival. This pro- 
duction has been revived and re- 
vised from lime to time in the inter- 
vening years. Now, Michael 
Rnmison. going back to Visconti’s 
original production books, has re- 
staged it in a manner as faithful as 
possible to Visconti's admirable in- 
tentions. 

The result, with Nato Frasca’s 
1890s sets and Vera Marzot’s pre- 
dominantly black and white cos- 
tumes. is both a visual and aural 
delight, aural because this produc- 
tion draws its inspiration from the 
music and so solicitously sen es the 
music, ft is faithful to Visconti and 
js such is also faithful to Verdi. 

It could not have come at a more 
opportune time, following new pro- 


ductions at the English National 
Opera of Tchaikovsky's “Ma- 
zeppa” by Darid Alden and Wag- 
neT’s 'Tristan and Isolde" by G6tz 
Friedrich that accomplished just 
the opposite; attempting elucida- 
tion and ramification rather than 
presentation, superimposing a pro- 
ducer’s notions on those of the 
composer and librettist as recorded 
in score and text. 


Alden's “Mazeppa” was wildly 
overproduced, brutal, violent, sa- 

1 „ - l — j 


distic, gory and garish, and was 
roundly booed at (he premit 


DOONESBURY 


premiere and 

subsequent performances. Frie- 
drich's "Tristan ” a resiaging of a 
production mounted by the Neth- 
erlands Opera in 1974, is restrained 
by Friedrich’s standards, but none- 
theless problematical. 

It is fashionably built around a 
basic set, or shape, or symbol, a 
spiral structure rather resembling a 
bent horseshoe, tilted at various 
degrees and subjected to endless 
lighting gimmickry. The lighting, 
by Stephen Watson, is the thing, 
the whole opera being given pretty 
much in the dark with the charac- 
ters illuminated, often insufficient- 
ly, by spots. 


rupted by the sudden collapse of a 
starry skyscape and their exposure 
in the harsh glare of banks of stadi- 
um floodlights. It's a coup de th£- 
fltre, all right, and doubtless be- 
longs to Friedrich's "Tristan and 
Isolde,” but it does not belong to 
Wagner's. 

The conductor is the recently 
knighted octogenarion Reginald 
GoodaU, regarded by British Wag- 
ner lovers much as Hans Knap- 
pertsbusch was once regarded by 
their German counterparts. If last 
Saturday’s opening performance; 
was less incandescent than is ex- 
ported of Sir Reginald, it may ’ 
have been because the product 


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It is all symbolic, of course. As 
one critic described the setting of 
the spiral for Act 3. “the whole 
structure has been inverted to mir- 
ror the inversion in the myth by 
which the Isolde, unconsciously 
longing for Tristan, becomes Tris- 
tan consciously longing for Isolde.” 
What a less impressionable eye sees 
in Act 1 is Tristan and Isolde at the 
bottom of an empty swimming 
pool, and in Acl 2 collapsing in 
ecstasy upon a bed of live coals. 

Their rapture in Act 2 is inler- 


tends to distract attention from 
music. 

Johanna Meier, who has sung the 
role at Bayreuth, substituting for 
Linda Esther Gray, had valian tly 
relearned the part in English, and, 
troubled by a cold, sang, valiantly 
too, as did the veteran Alberto Re- 
medies as Tristan. The supporting 
roles are all in capable hands and 
throats. 

“La Traviata" comes off better 
musically, not only because the 
production serves orchestra and 
singers but also because the con- 
ductor is Sir Colin Davis and the 
principal singers Ileana Cotrubas, 
Neil Schicofr and Norman Bailey. 
Cotrubas's voice is showing signs 
of wear and tear, but she is so 
resourceful in its use and so splen- 
did an actress that her Violet 
takes its place among the finest v? 
recent memory. 

Further performances of “Tristan 
and Isolde ” are Feb. 7, 15, 22 and 
March 1; “La Traviata ” on Feb. 6, 
9, 12 and 16. 


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Chinese to Build Film Gty 

United Press International v . „„ 

zi4H £nn "i . . 



Untied Press International Y 

B eijing - a J70-mmion ram <3lra ? s | 1 1.- 000 

city intended to rival that of Begrng. 

Universal Studios in Los Angeles thr0u $ h 1 1 

will be bull, near Ihc endeni fg* .1“°™ for ihe 

jssiss !®,asr* 

rv«™ f«cio ia> ■ i . 9 .. ~ e unpcnal«ts nightmare, starting 






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uifa i pur LUC 

ping [618-1911] will be built for wiih a Tam. 25T *. />«“““«> 

historical films and tourism, like ^ ^ 

Hollywood’s Universal Citv ** Yin concubine bathing pools. 

huawedWuSSLd^ 

Xian Film Studio, ^Wrialgar- 

“The ciiv will h* nn t ° cns WIt ^ 1 fountains, a lake, pavil- 

Qujiang Park, hauol of TIuig Em- b™b«i graves. A 

- Worn, end H.’SL*. 






poor hi bool, water 

concubin^Yang GuifeC Wu'sid be added for 








Statistics Index 


AMEX DrtCK P.l# 
AMEX Ngfcs/towsP.ll) 
NYSE prtoai p, a 
NYSE TiMK/toM P.10 
COMdtaB Itocks P.12 
Curronor rata* p. 7 
CmmimMcs P.ll 
DMdandt P.ll 


Swpinp* cram p. 9 
P*** rat* notes p. 9 
morkati p. 7 
' !*!?■ ** nM *i P. 7 
*ummory p. a 
OMhlB p, * 

OTC stock p\\ 

«»»■ markets p. n 


Hcralh^^Sribunc 


■ . >' 

• . _.. t 


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u •_ ~- 


ECONOMIC SCENE 

OPEC Price Cut Expected 
■ To Benefit U.S. Economy 

By LEONARD SILK 

New York Tima Service 

jsgood news for almost, evetyone. But here in Houma, 
^seat of Louisiana s Terrebonne Parish, a place that 


BUSINESS / FINANCE 


Dollar 

Broadly 

Stronger 

Central Banks 
Said to Intervene 


•p^ rn ««»■ iPSiTi CL. 

3=BaSs?«R5=f*s , aft 

thr«-q^rfe^ oPfe 10 P®*" 1 - About 

bonne’s work force is em- 
ployed directly or indirectly in 
the energy business — in ex- 
ploring for or producing pe- 
troleum or natural gas, in ma- 
rine companies, shipyards, 
dry docks, machine and weld- 


"Now we’re sore at 
OPEC for price 
catting.” 




I* - Mark in Paris., 


80 «»■ I* is the service companies 
. ™ “ ve *»?i hanJest hit as the oil producers cut back. Delta 

5fS!^f!S , ?i? ad em P ] °y ed yearly 1,000 workers doing a 

- vanity of c»l field support operations, has just shut down, 

v. Tjjf of Louisiana is feeling the pain as world ofl 

^pnees suae. Mark. Drennen, the state’s legislative fiscal officer 
* Mys “ e average price of Louisiana oil over the 1985-86 fiscal 

year will probably be about $25 to $2d a barrel, “and that’s a far 
' from the $34 we were looking at a couple of years ago.” 
Allowing for inflation — and the Consumer Price Index has risen 

• mare than 20 percent since 1980 —the slide in ofl prices has been 

- even greater. 

“OPEC’s benchmark price is not necessarily what Louisiana 
gets for its oil,” said Bob Keeton, the chief fiscal analy st of the 
‘ Stale Seriate in Baton Rouge. Mr. Keeton is staying with his 
earlier esti m ates that Louisiana will end its current year 

- next June 30 with a deficit of about $100 million. “And if our oil 
price projections are right,” he told Jack Wardlaw, a reporter for 

•• The Times-Picaynne of New Orleans, “they’re going to cut about 
$127 millian off the top of that.” 

OUISlANA’s woes can be matched in other big oil-produc- 
ing states such as Texas and Oklahoma. But even after 
taking fuQ account of the damage that falling oil prices 

" ! _Z. 0 may do to oil-producing States and nati ons, the gain fnr^i mnmer c 

■ and business in the United States and in most of the world 
economy looks still greater. A 10-percent decline in oil prices is 
Hkety to reduce inflation by about one-half percentage point 
- i.\i . .< And that could mean an extra half-point off interest rates tmd 
- - . ^ half a point of faster economic growth. 

*■' This will not be a simple matter of matching winners against 

_ losers. For if the n a tion al and world economy as a whole advance, 

even many of the losers will benefit if they are able to adjust and 
shift to areas of activity that will be expanding more rapidly and 
profitably. 

Graham Bishop and Paul Mlotok, in a new study for Salomon 
Brothers, have warned that the Organization of Petroleum Ex- 
porting Countries is facing a major fi nancia l crisis. The richer 
countries — especially Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Libya and the 
United Arab Emirates — have absorbed aB the reduction in 
export revenues since 1982, they say, but the poorer countries 

(Continued on Page 9, Coi 6) 


L° 


By Mary Tobin 

United Press International 

NEW YORK — A surge in the 
U.S. money supply propelled the 
dollar sharply higher Friday de- 
spite reported intervention by Eu- 
ropean central banks. Gold eased 
slightly and silver fell sharply. 

Gold dosed in Zurich at $303.75 
an ounce, down from $307.50 
Thursday, and in London bullion 
was fixed in the afternoon at 
$303.60, down from $306.65. 

In late trading in New York, the 
pound weakened by almost a cent 
to dose at $1.1195 from $1.1285 
Thursday. The dollar rose to 9.7375 
French francs from 9.58 in the pre- 
vious session. Against the Deutsche 
mark, it jumped to 3.1930 from 
3.1655, and agunst the yen the U.S. 
currency rose to 257-25 from 
255.40. 

The dollar rose at the outset in 
the Far East in response to a laiger- 
than-expected $4.7-bilhon jump in 
the narrowest measure of the mon- 
ey supply reported late Thursday 
that left money growth above the 
Federal Reserve’s targets. 

Most Fed watchers do not be- 
lieve the Fed wiD tighten credit 
substantially. But most said the 
money supply strength raises a 
strong possibility of higher rates in 
the weeks ahead and this buoyed 
the already strong dollar. 

Dealers said European activity 
was dampened by fear of central 
bank intervention that reportedly 
occurred when the dollar bit 3.1785 
German marks. 

“The dollar fell to 3.17 marks 
after the intervention but then be- 
gan inching forward again after 
Europe dosed,” said Daniel Hol- 
land, vice president at Discount 
Corp. of New York. “Once it wait 
through 3.1820, a really important 
chart point, the dollar was very well 
bid.” It rose to 3. 1 995 before easing 
back. 

Mr. Holland said there was “lots 
of corporate activity to buy dollars 
against the mark when the dollar 
started up.” 


Toyota Calls Tune at Its GM Venture 

Concern Insists 
On the System 
Used in Japan 

By John Holusba 

New York Times Service 

FREMONT, California — 

Japanese automakers help insure 
that the interior of a car is in- 
doors, siTI^GiS notbe in the 
way. and then putting them back 
cm farther down the assembly 
hue. U.S. auto executives have 
resisted the technique, saying it 
is loo hard to get the doors to fit 
right the second time. 

But there is no argument 
about doors hoe, at the fanner 
General Motors Corp. assembly 
plant now operated by New 
United Motor Manufacturing 
Inc., a 50-50 joint venture of GM 
and Toyota Motor Corp. On the 
Chevrolet Nova, the product of 
the new venture, the doors crane 
off and go back on just as they do 
in Japan. 

Under the direction of Tatsuro 
Toyoda, a member of Toyota's 
r uling family, a Japanese auto- 
production system has been in- 
stalled hoe that is slowly turning 
out the four-door snbcompacts, 
which are derived from the 
Toyota Corolla model. The 
front- wheel-drive car, andlar to 
a Chevette in size, is expected to 
go on sale sometime this year. 

“There are a lot of differences 
between the way we do things 
here and the way. they are done 
elsewhere, but many of them are 
quite subtle.” said Robert W. 

Hendry, a former GM financial 
executive who is manager of gen- 
eral affairs and comptroller at 
the Fremont plant. “The impor- 
tant thing is that they are all pan 
of a system.” 

One significant way the 
Toyota-managed venture differs 



IV* New Yuri TonTOw tocriefed Pfan 

Tatsuro Toyoda, die co-president of New United 
Motor Manufacturing lac, dining in die coacern’s 
cafeteria, where all of the company’s employees eat 


from the plants now being oper- 
ated in the United States by its 
Japanese rivals, Honda Motor 
Co. and Nissan Motor Co., is in 
the composition of hs work 
force. Where the other compa- 
nies set up plants in ratal areas 
and hired young, mostly white, 
nonunion workers, the Fremont 
plant is populated by older 
workers who reflect the diverse 
racial and ethnic mixture of the 
San Francisco Bay area. And 
they have been represented from 
the first day by the United Auto- 
mobile Workers ration. 


GM and Toyota established 
their new company in December 
1983, and the first car was pro- 
duced last month. Unlike U.S. 
companies, which rapidly in- 
crease production rates after the 
first car is completed, the accel- 
eration rate here has been slow, 
with fewer than 20 cars coming 
off the line in December. The 
current production rale is about 
a car a day, and fuD-line speed of 
60 cars an hour is not expected to 
be reached ontfl this faU. 

This output level is well below 
the expectations of GM officials, 
who had said they expected 
enough production from the 
plant to hop with the company’s 
1984 average fuel economy rat- 
ing. But it is the Toyota execu- 
tives. not those from GM, who 
are making the crucial decisions 
here, and they are determined to 
assure quality by not rushing the 
process. 

The importance of the plant 
goes beyond the 250,000 small 
care a year that wiD be produced 
when a second shift is added in 
early 1986, GM executives say. 

“I don’t think we would be 


able to sit hoe today announcing 
Saturn, if we did not have the 
joint venture experience coming 
on,” said Roger B. Smith, the 
chairman of GM. He was refer- 
ring to the company’s recently 
annniinwfi plan io buQd small 
cars on its own. “We’ve learned 
an awful lot from that already” 

Officials of the oompany and 
of the union here are stressing 
cooperation. Production workers 
are divided into “teams” of five 
to 12, who operate under the 
direction of a “team leader,” who 
would be a subforeman in a tra- 
ditional plant. The teams divide 
up work assignments and eadi 
worker is expected to be able to 
do any job in the team’s area. 

The UAW, which has jealous- 
ly guarded multiple job classifi- 
cations in other plants, has al- 
most completely given th«n up 
here. There is just one classifica- 
tion for prodiunkm workers and 
three fra* those in skilled trades, 
compared with dozens when the 
plant was operated by GM. 

Auto company executives and 

( Confirm e d on Page 9, Cot 1) 


I Currency Rates | Papua New Guinea Orders Closure of Gold Mine 


Late interbank rates on Feb. 1 , excluding fees. 

Official fixings for Amsterdcan, Brussels, Frankfurt, Milan, Paris- New York rates erf 
4 PM 


/ * * * 


sin (ii EM 


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ism 40S 

* BramMM 6SL9 71415 

£ Fraikhrt 11725 3-579 

London <U 1.1245 

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Parts 9J0S 1IUW 

Tokyo 255X5 38M7 

Zorich 24935 MM 

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Uttl AosMHBil 1J3W 
IMS Antrim uttmap 2222 
Bu8157 Bil o tno Bn- franc 4355 
67534 OMOSflonS U274 

AMD bmMkraH 11X095 
0.1509 FkaMnort 4436 
00677 GrMkdr-tKkoM 12MB 
01281 Hong Komi 7JM5 


DM 
113.185 • 

auras 

35725 

41632 

1193 

3QSS9 

8063 

HU’ 

322 « 
109825 


FA 
57X115 ‘ 
63513 
13715 1 

1091 

28354 

9.7375 

2631 

27615* 

67977 

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ILL. 
0.1831 
US* 
1423 x 
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1.94650 
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1109 ■ 
0.1377 
137137 
MA 


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17.702$ 

88415* 


54104 

16114 

2702 

TOM 

7448* 

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10373 2SBJ35 
72621 7435 
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14874 179413 
2i2 248027 


Dollar Values 


82834 IrtoM 
88015 ItrtnHshika 
124 69 KnflH ttaor 
04014 fewnr.rMga 
8109 Nanr.kram 
QASSZ PMLMW 
DOBS PartHCHto 
02793 ScnN rival 


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UM EnW. 044 

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<8838 6582 IMtanraNl 1292 

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24915 6JBS7 17528 

9.175 81W5 fiMSd.kraM 9883 

16125 08254 Totem I 3»8» 

17308 08365 1UMI 27J95 

15868 62723 UAJE-MfUn 14725 


The Associated Pros 

MELBOURNE — The Papua 
New Guinea government has or- 
dered the £iaM Ok Tedi gold and 
copper mming prefect to close 
within 28 days, company officials 
said Friday. 

The government has been feud- 
ing with the private companies in- 
volved in the project over the tim- 
ing of developing the copper 
mining stage of the project 

With copper prices lew, the com- 
panies have been trying to stall the 
development The government 
wants it completed on schedule. 

Papua New Guinea's minister 


for minerals and energy, Francis 
Pusal, in a telex to the partners of 
Ok Tedi Mining LtrL, said the com- 
panies have failed to comply with 
an agreement to build a copper 
mine and other facilities. 

The remote mine has already 
cost more than SI billion to devel- 
op and is currently producing just 
gold. 

The government of Papua New 
Guinea owns 20 percent of the 
mine. The other shareholders are 
Australia's Broken Hill Proprietary 
Co., 30 percent Standard Oil Co. 
(Indiana), 30 percent. Metallge- 
seUschaft AG mid Degussa AG of 


West Germany, 15 percent each, 
and the state-owned West German 
Development Co n 5 percent 

Mr. Pusal said the government 
has been trying to negotiate the 
issues since June. 

Broken H3Ts general manager, 
David Adam, said negotiations 
with the government on the future 
of the Ok Tedi project are proceed- 
ing, but the private shareholders 
refuse the inflexible development 
program the government demands.-. 

Mr. Adam sard in a prepared 
statement that the investment need 
would be uneconomic given gold 
and copper prices. 


.* *S»w*te:USKirMii 

. lol ComiracW Irene tWAnwriliixwlBS io tewoMBOunfl lei AniowiNiiraafliolwvm dollar 1*1 

Unite at 160 (x J IMM Of WBB (VJ Unite Of 18880 

. NA: nol Hooted; HA.: not nvoBaMo. , M( . .. 

Samoa: norm* du OormMc (Bnasets); Banco QmmanMo /ferttew 7M»on7. 8^ra 
MMtamM * Paris (Ports); IMP (SDR); Bottom Aratm at Internationale trimmstuaarmnt 
■ (dinar, rtyaL dtrttam). Other data from Rooters and AP. 


Interest Rates 


] 


Major Union 
St31 at Odds 
With Eastern 

United Press International 


Brock Sets Japan Trip on Trade Curbs 


Eurocurrency Deposits 


D4te* Sterling Franc ECU SM 

1M. 8 9k - 8 K 5W - 4 5 Hi - 5 H. 13TU. - IM 10*W- VPk 9*i ■ 10 Vfc >16 - 8* 

2M. EK-BA 6. -616 516-58* 18 tep. 12 91. 16 1M6 98* . 10 Hi 816 - 816 

St m 4H..4H 5H.-5* -«? 

ML 1K..I6 M -4U 5 M. - 5 IS. 12 »W- l2te 11 - 11»- - W«. « 6 - 

IV. 9H6-9HS. 416 - lOk 5*. - 594 11% - 11 1196-11% 9% - WV6 8% -8% 

Rotes aPPttetOM to Interbank deposits ott! million mtntwam 

Sources: Maroon Ouaronty (dollar. DM. SF, Pound, FFI; (Mats Bonk (ECU). CUUm He 
(SDR). 


MIAMI — Eastern Airlines and 
its biggest labor union remained 
Fefa. I deadlocked Friday in negotiations 
for wage concessions. The disagree- 
ment led Eastern to notify its banks 
thfli jt had technically de f aul t ed on 
some of its S2J billion in loans and 


Asian Dollar Rates 


Feb. 1 


1 IM. 

■ K -896 
Sauna: Reuters. 


8 96-8% 


Itnw. 

896-8% 


CMOS. 
896 -9H. 




Key Money Rates 

United States 


,i^ ,! 


Discount Rote 
Federal Fvndl, 

.. Prime Rote 
Broker Leon Rate 
Coram. Pacer, 38-179 dm 
3month Treasury anus 
•— 4 mortltt Treasury Bills 
CD<ta*9»daya 
CD1 4089 dm 

• West Germany 

, ‘ Lombard note 
("i’! '. ■ Overntetit Rote 
»]/.■' ” One Month Interbank 
i ■' Xnanfli interbank 
4-month m i w tonlt 


8 8 

8 9/14 * 

HH6 1«6 

9-1016 9-»16 
845 112 

8.14 &1» 

847 120 

744 7 JO 

7M 7J9 


606 400 
610 560 
SJ0 545 

615 &0D 
625 61S 


Bank Boat Role 
Call Monev 
pY-day Treasury Bill 
34nonl<i Interbank 


DbCMAd note 
Cad Money 
tO - dav Interbank 


14 U 

1416 1416 

12% 12% 

12% 1296 


5 5 

4% 

4 5/14 4 5/14 


Gold Prices 






France 


intervention Rato 
CoH Money 


iRtaramfc 
6monin Interbank 


18% 10% 
l«% >0% 

18 7/14 10% 

10 7/14 

1016 10 3/14 


H0M WW 
uwwnboora 
Ports 1125 61W 
Zurich 
London 
Hew York 


AM. 

30655 


pjm. arae 

3DA95 +0-10 

— + 8.10 

28*48 30X85 - 141 

30545 38175 — 3.75 

vtim — IDS 

*nn i — a«) 


Sources; Reuters CBmmerzBomc.Cr*M L v- 
otmah. uords Bade. Bank o* Tom 


nowgj fixings tor London. Paris and unorn- 
^raTepenmand etesli* arioe* »r Hm Kra 
ml Zurich. No* 1 York Cemex ajrreoi eonfraet. 
Ml price* m U4A ww ounce. 

Soiree: Reuters 


Markets Qosed 

. ■ waiovsia were closed Friday because 

All finan cial markets m Malaysia 

of a holiday. 


Earlier Friday, the airline 
readied an agreement in principle 
with its flight attendants’ and pi- 
lots* unions. But by afternoon, 
there was no agreement with the 
largest union, the 17,000- member 
International Association of Ma- 
chinists, which represents mechan- 
ics, baggage handlers and other 
ground workers. 

Eastern notified First Boston, 
the lead bank in its group of more 
than 60 lenders, that it was unaMw 
to obtain cost-cutting measures by 
the midnight Jan. 31 Handling and 
that it had technically defaulted on 
its loan a g ree m e n ts. 

The airline also notified the New 
York Stock Exchange that it was in 
noncompliance with some of its 
loan restrictions. The Securities 
and Exchange Commission re- 
quires such notification to mini- 
mize the impact on stock trading. 

Eastern asked its lenders Friday 
far an extension on the loan agree- 
ments. A spokesman, Richard 
McGraw, said the extension proba- 
bly would be granted if the labor 
agreements appeared imminent. 

The technical default had no im- 
pact on Eastern’s flights or opera- 
tions, Mr. McGraw said. But it put 
Eastern in an uncertain position in 
which its lenders, if they wished, 
could cal) in certain of Eastern's 
loans that are due. This might rc- 
siricL the airline’s access to a S400- 
mfflion revolving tine of credit 


By Clyde H. Farnsworth 

New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — William E 
Brock, the U5. trade representa- 
tive, will lead a special rugotiating 
mission to Tokyo in mid-February 
to impress upon die Japanese the 
importance Washington attaches 
to a relaxation of Japan’s restric- 
tions on imports, according to ad- 
ministration officials. 

Disclosure of the Brock mission 
came Thursday after a cabinet 
meeting at which, officials said, a 
majority of presidential advisers 
said they favraed allowing quotas 
on Japan’s automobile exports to 
lapse. The quotas are scheduled to 
expire on March 31. 

However, while shying away 
from a renewal of the quotas, which 


have been criticized as driving up 
auto prices, the cabinet was said to 
have affirmed that Washington 
should make a new effort to per- 
suade the Japanese to open their 
markets to more U.S. products. 

Last year’s $37-bulion deficit 
with Japan, twice the deficit of the 
year before, was higher than the 
total U& deficit as recently as 
.1980. 

Mr. Brock will be in Tokyo on 
Feb. 12. The weekend before his 
arrival, European, Japanese, UJ5. 
and ranBdian trade ministers wQl 
meet in Kyoto. 

In a recent interview, Mr. Brock 
said that some Japanese trade bar- 
riers, such as the refusal to buy U A 

co mmuni cations satellites, were 
“outrageous.” 


“We've got a product available 
on thfisbdl, and they have no com- 
parable product, and yet they’re 
masting on developing their own 
production at home,” be said. “It’s 
outrageous; 

The link between ending the 
quotas and trade cancesskms 


Japan was expected to be 
explicitly Friday in a proposal for a 


one of the administration’s chief 
Capi tol H5B allies, the Senate Com- 
merce Committee chairman, John 
C Dan/orth, Republican of Mis- 
souri. 

For the current 12 months the 
Japanese are permitted to ship 
1,850,000 cars here, which repre- 
sents something under 20 percent 
of total sales in the United States. 


U.S. Unit Limits S&L Growth, Investments 


*1 


Nancy L Ross 

'ashmpon Peat Service 


WASHINGTON —The Federal 
Home Loan Rank Board, con- 
cerned that rapid growth and risky 
investments have contributed to 
failures in the U.S. savings amt 
loan industry, has voted to limit 
both the growth of savings institu- 
tions and the range of tbdr invest- 
ments. 

The board on Thursday unani- 
mously approved restrictions cm in- 
ordinate growth and direct invest- 
ments by thrifts in real estate, 
securities and other activities dun 
are not related to bnnWmg finance. 
The rules take effect in a month. 

William B. CCameD of the U.S. 


League of Savings Institutions 
praised the rules. But George Hanc 
of the National Council of Savings 
Institntkjos expressed reservations 
that the growth limits would prove 
“unrealistic in many market areas.” 

One regulation will eliminate 
five-year averaging of net worth, 
with certain exceptions, and will 
increase the capital required to 
back new deposits that exceed IS 
percent of an institution’s annual 
growth. 

The new regulations wiD mean 
that perhaps 10 percent of the 


S&Ls'in business wiD have to in- 
crease their net worth. One uniden- 
tified S&L grew 950 percent in two 
years, a board economist said 
Thursday. It had a net-worth ratio 
of .076, or just $91,000 in capital to 
back $119 million in deposits. 


i= CHARTER =n 

“AEGEAN CHALLENGE" M/Y 

125 R 12 persons go a ny w h e re . 

We are the best in Greek Islands. 

Mediterranean Cruises Ltd. 

3 Stadiou St, Athens. 

TeL- 3236*94. Xbu 222288. 


[Gold Options (j*icc 8 1 > s/ol). 


Men 

fall 


fa* 

ZD 

17354875 


ra - 

300 

935-UI75 

19103050 

HSHMD 

310 

4IO- 5S1 

139-1510 

935975 

39 

1JD-250 

875-1025 

1550-17X0 

39 

048 140 

£25 675 

iisi-ia® 

340 

010-09 

3X0-69 

825- V5 


Cold 3C&00' 30550 

IVakmWUteWeM&A. 

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aaowoca dal as fan 7 tb 
1 81 KwAnide N.Y, Safe 
_ 172. A Mted tm. tfir.qmq .4S of fee 
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VAN DE KANOUE OEPARB 
ASB.V4 
Amtodan. Bttb Jbrany, WB5L 


U^. Stocks 
Report, Page 8 


U.S. Joblessness 
Climbed to 7.4% 
InPastMonth 


By Pete Yost 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON —CwiBaa un- 
employment in the United States 
rose to 7.4 percent in January as the 
ranks of the jobless grew by 
300,000, the Labor Department 
said Friday. 

The number of Americans hold- 
ing jobs rose about 120,000 10 a 
record 106.4 mDtian, bat the total 
of the unemployed grew to 8.5 mil- 
lion, the department said. Many of 
those were laid- off Christmas 
workers who failed to find new 
jobs. 

In a separate report, the govern- 
ment also said Friday that new 
construction rose 0.9 percent in 
December, helping to push con- 
struction spending for the year to 
19 percent more than 1983. 

The Commerce Department said 
“ _ for 1984 totaled $3115 
ion last year, up from a 1983 
total of $2612 billion. 

In December, spending was pnt 
at a seasonally adjusted annual rate 
of $318.7 bmion, compared with 
the revised November estimate of 
S316b3ticsL 

A Labor Department analyst, 
Deborah Klein, said that more sea- 
sonally employed women laid off 
afte the Christmas season derided 
to look far new jobs last month 
than had been the case in recent 
years, pushing the rate up 02 per- 
centage point. 


She said the January survey was 
done unusually early — in the sec- 
ond week of the month. Many of 
the recently laid-off people looking 
for wodc might have given up the 
search later in the month, in which 
case they would not have been 
counted among the unemployed 
had the survey been conducted lat- 
er in January. 

There was widespread stability 
among other worker groups, after 
the figures were adjusted for sea- 
sonal variations. 

At the White House, the prea- 
dential spokesman, Larry Speakes, 
said the January rate “represents 
end-of-the-year volatility,” and 
added: 

“We know the economy is strorig 
and growing and wiD continue to 
create jobs m 1985.” 

These were the January figures: . 

•Adult men, 63 percent, no ■ 
change from December. L - 

• Adult women, 6.8 percent, up 

from 6.4 percent. - 1 . 

• Teen-agers, UL9 percent, un- • 
changed- 

• Whites, 6.4 percent, up from 
6 2 percent 

• Blacks, 14.9 percent, no 

change ‘■ J ‘. 

• Efispanks, 10.6 percent, no 

change “ ,- - 

Among black teen-agers, the 
group with the highest unemploy- 
ment, the jobless rate of 42.1 per- 
cent was also nwHiangpri 


Egypt Trims Oil Price, 
Breaks With OPEC 


The A sso ci a t ed Pros 

NEW YORK — Egypt, until this 


week a strong aBy of t>PEC, said 
Friday It has cut the price of its top 
grade of <ril by 50 cents a barrel to 
$27.50 and that it was disassociat- 
ing itself from the carters policies. 

Meanwhile, in the United States, 
Texaco Inc. became the first of the 
major oil companies to cut the 
price it is wifling to pay for the top 
domestic grade of ofl to $27 a bar- 
rel, a drop of SI. 

In addition to it* price cut for its 
topGulf of Suez grade of oil, Egypt 
said it was increasing the mice of 
its least expensive aO, Ras Ghareb, 
by 15 cents to $25.75 a barrel. Oth- 


The cuts included a $1 reduction 
in West Texas Intermediate, the. 
major U3. grade of ofl. 

Meantime, on the root or non- 
contract market. West Texas Intov 
mediate was quoted Friday at 
$26.45 a barrel, up 15 cents from 
Thursday, according to Tdentte 
Energy Service, a mffiket-mfonna- 
tion Iron. Suez oil was unchang ed 
at $27 a band and Arabian Light 
was nnchanged at $27.75. 


Broken HD1 said it still hoped an 
agreement could be reached with 
the government to allow the mine 
to continue operation. 

■ StiO Room to Talk 
Papua New Guinea's Prime 
Minister Somare said that there 
was still room to talk with Ok Tedi 
Mines following his government's 
closure order, Reuters reported 
Friday from Port Moresby. 

The closure would be bad for the 
shareholders as weD as for the gov- 
ernment, Mr. Somare said. 

“Tm sure there wiD be some rea- 
sonable dunking in the next 30 
days,” Mr. Somme said. 



production of 870.000 barrels daily 
wiD be maintained. Half of the ofl 
is exported, mostty to customers in 

Europe. 

Suez oil is similar in quality to 
Arabian light, which until this week 
was the base for setting the price of 
aD oils produced by the Organiza- 
tion of Petroleum Exporting Coun- 
tries. 

Nine of OPEC’s 13 members 
agreed Wednesday on a plan that 
including cutting the price of Ara- 
bian light to $28 from $29. Four 
other members said they would go 
their own way. 

Texaco, meantime, said it was 
cutting prices on nine grades of 
US (2 by SI a barrel and cm two 
others by 50 cents to “reflect cur- 
rent market and delivery condi- 
tions. ” 



Qll RESERVE 

“N* INSURED DEPOSITS TRUST 


RES IN DEP 
An Account far The Cautious Investor 
to Protect end Increase Capital 


U5. Deter Denominated 
Insured by U.5. Govt. Entities 
Important Tax Advantages 
Co m p etiti ve 
Monty Market Yields 

No Market Risk 
Immediate Liquidity 
Absolute Conf H s n HqBly 


CHEMICAL BANK, New York 
Custodian 

CAYMAN NATIONAL BANK 
AND TRUST 
Registrar 


RESIN DEP 

Case Postale 93 

1211 Geneva 25, Switzerland 

and 
to: 


Please send 
account 


Name. 


Address. 


Afaf onfefab h#m the USA. 


INTERNATIONAL POSITIONS 


“TRANS EURASIA CO. LTD. HONG KONG- 

REQUIRES MARKETING MANAGER 

We are a leacfing export firm tajoytag good lep utaH o n who wfah to 
«x*eed marfeet to West 6emnaay rad UL5JLv loekfag for a cenpeleal 
party to take up fhb poet, either an agent or a mldwgMl penan, need 
eoramctfam wHh bnporten, omB order houses, departnra* ream far 
the prMbdi sxMifuilwxcl hi Far East hdadng Bong Kongt Matna and 
T«*wn sorft as toys, UfdMBMn, alw 

•to Sppfcaitt mart be wall va ried hi 1 

under contract farm but on probation far r 

trave lli ng 9a Far tost vriS bo ofhnml which 

Application* wilt bn treated eonfidanttaHy, p l nn«o w rite: 
Managing Mrecfar 
Trans Eurasia Co. lid. 

P.O. BOX 9861 1 

T.5.T. POST OFFICE HONG KONG 




OVERSEAS ASSIGNMENTS 


Contract positions are available for qualified profesrionate and 
technicians in Asia, the Pacific Batin and the Middle Fa*- 
Candidates must have a minimum of 5+ years experience and 
appropriate training or educational background in Construction^ 
Petrochemical, Communications, Logistics and most Medical and > 
Engineering disciplines. Housing, Travel, Medical Insurance ariffj 
excellent salaries are available. Some positions are tax exempt. 

For consideration forward resum e/C.V, to: 


TANTALUS INTERNATIONAL 

THE TANTALUS GROUP 


13 Floor OTB Tew/?.-, 

3 Queens Roa3. Cmrai 
Hong Kong 
5-214CA6 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAV, FEBRUARY 2-3, 1985 



Dow Jones Averages 


NYSE index 


Opm Utah LOW Lent 


intus UJ6M uss.il iwj7 mm— ub 

Trans 40974 61441 60SJ7 WM+ 044 
Utu M8.W MM2 147.14 UUS + Ml 
Can» 51641 £2052 51X28 51753- 144 


Composite 
indwsinals 
Transp. 
u Himes 
Finance 


High Low close enve 
1(036 1(0.12 10350— OiS 
HUS Ilf. IB 119.18—041 
100J3 1QUV 10041 -M4 
5245 5257 5259 -017 
10652 10644 10644 — OJf 


Fridays 


Ml* 


NYSE Diaries 


Closing 


Advanced 

Declined 

Unchained 
Tefal letvn 
New Hkdw 
New Laws 
Volume up 
Volume down 


an# piw. 
442 SB 
937 007 

437 424 

0036 2066 

m .6- 

31433UM 

58521490 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 



NASDAQ index. 




Composite 

IndusJrlol* 

Finance 

Insurance 

Uillllles 

Banks 

TranSP. 


Week 
» CHIP Aoo 
1 — 0.27 27440 
1-0.41 59457 
1-046 31955 
1 +2J5 300.11 
| +0.47 26440 
-043 24X29 
1 — 344 26X73 


wW 3% 
10939 




Jon.31 21X2B 558461 

Jan. 30 — 278416 666449 

IS. vt 240457 551477 

S 254431 630496 

Jan. 25 207,127 S5S473 

•Included (nine sales Baures 


Buy sales 'Shfl 
215458 558463 10490 
Z7&016 666449 3411 

240457 HI 477 3416 

254431 630496 1&058 
207,127 55X573 2.910 


VoLaMPJft 1B/KMW 

Prev.4PJH.voL 13247MM 

prev coasoHdated dose 15748UM 


Standard & Poor's index 


SIlCJ ■> r; ■ -■ > :. •- - 


tyvew Band Avera9gsj 


Tobte iodode tfte oonotwfdc prices 
wMitadatta on HMI Street 


Industrials 

Transp. 

Utilities 

Finance 

Composite 


HMi Law Close Ofoe 
20145 19945 199.95 — 1.10 
16045 15945 15947 — 0.74 
77.13 7677 7680—043 
2047 2045 2046 — 041 
17943 17844 17343 -UM 


~&aaPX StocKjndex^ 


******* 


Bonas 

Utilities 

Industrials 


OI». YM. PE 1005 HW Low QuatQrw 


AAR 48 25 I 
ACS 1 

AMCA 150 68 
AMF JO 3.1 I 
AMR 

AMR pi £18 11.1 
AMR pf 2.12a 58 
ANRpf 247 104 
ANRpf 2.12 104 
APL 

ASA 340 58 
AVX 33 1J 1 
AbtLafa 170 24 1 
AccoWds 44 14 1 
AcmeC 40 21 
AcmeE J2bU 1 
AdoBi 211el27 
AdmMI 32 14 
AdvSvs 41 1 64 2 
AMD 1 

AOuwst .12 14 
Aerfln 1 

AOMLf 244 64 1 
Aan.Pl 547al04 
Atman 170 35 1 
Alteon i 

Air Prd 140 25 1 
AlrbFrt 40 28 I 
AIMacs 2 

AtaP pfA 382 124 
AlaPdat 47 114 
AloPpf 940 125 
AlaPpt 1140 114 
AlaPpf 944 122 
AlaPpt &16 123 
AlaPpt 828 124 
Aloosci 82 7.1 
AJskAir .14 4 

AHjorto 44 22 2 
Albfsns 48 24 1 
Alcan 120 44 l: 
AlcoSM T20 34 1 
AlexAlx 140 37 
Alandr 2 

AJIdCp 2061 24 
AlaCppf 246 11.1 
Alslnt 140 51 2 
Alain pf 2.19 11.7 
Alai PIC U25 121 
AJISPW 270 9J I 
AllenG 40b 32 1 
AlhfCPs 140 47 i 
AMCPPt 674 11.1 
AJOCPP41240 114 
AMClri 12496120 
Alla pa 

AftdSfr 240 19 I 

AllbOi 

AilsCpf 

ALLTL 144 74 1 
AKUlPr -406 14 11 
Alcoa 120 32 K 
A max 20 l.l 
340 &A 
1.10 43 1 
350 32 


II 

3.90 61 1 
140 25 1C 

56 £S 13 
46 24 1} 

2.90 56 11 
280 112 
340 47 
270 114 
6566212 

4 

1.90 34 12 
22 37 34 

2260104 S 
128 11 15 
44b 24 13 
20 XI 10 


220 53 12 
200 4 

1.12 35 10 
640 74 0 
44 4 16 

545 46 
72 32 13 


4275 
354 26 V* 
414 2B9A 
09 9% 

220 549* 
16 77% 

lU lOVk 


272 XI 8 
741 24 4 

2.19 112 
40 57 15 
140 47 12 

44 12 10 
438 72 


170 52 16 
344 10.1 
374 10.1 
240 48 7 
143 27 
125 114 
248 94 11 
535a 8.1 


4H 19* 

fi. 

33% m 
361* 2414 
in* 9% 
z»ft 
TBVk 
57% 

am 
m 


62 
07 

14 24 341 

27 12 272 
27 IS US 
64 438 

15 22 100 

3§ W » 

27 


37V* + VC, 

am— Vi 




2Z9h HJVi 
sat* im 
zn * w 
pH, im% 

n* h 
vn, 2 

SO 33% 
Z3V4 lit* 
IM 71* 
4m oou 
44 361* 

28% 3D1* 
■ H* 3% 
59 38 

4* 89 

S3S* 43 
56 69 

38ft 26 VC, 
26% 1S%* 
231* 141* 


48 34 15 
.50 15 13 
23 55 16 
J6 L7 15 


171 24 12 
20 14 177 
11 

320 XI 7 
450 107 
1.10 38 10 


19% 11th 
32V* 22#* 
M% ms 
231* 1914 
17ft TV* 
23V* 19 
24V, 18 


25V* 164* 
30 1916 


36 Sflfe 
60* 461* 
441* 3096 


&* a 

30V* V9V6 


1.10 1.9 12 
240 53 5 
5131100 
105 

244 95 6 
140 U 9 
152 78 10 
5316114 

2JI 

240 75 9 
270 43 7 
250 MJ 
436 J 21 
44 18 10 
50 XS 7 
126 19 8 
J» 13 « 
,12b 14 12 
78 24 16 

23 23 70 
20* 2 23 
240 9.1 B 
140 27 12 
170 58 9 
330 64 
120 27 14 


■3 66 

28% 23ft* 

30 im 

359* 37% 


■9 73 

37V* 23 
35V* 3016 
165 104V* 
20% 17 
.4% 3% 
Uto 7% 
7 3ft 
n% io#h 

28V* 14% 


170 162 . 
56 18 14 
440 7J 8 
258 

22 14 12 
240 77 I 
40 14 20 
48 33 11 


§ 'U 3716 

Ik 181* 
369k 19V* 
26* VJV4 
371* 17V* 
2ft* 3D 
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Indiistrials Lose 9.05 Points 


United Press International 

NEW YORK — Prices on the New York 
Stock Exchange were lower at the close Friday 
in moderate trading. 

The Dow Jones industrial average, which fell 
1.1 1 Thursday. fdJ 9.05 points to 1,277.72. 

Declines led advances by a 3-2 margin among 
the 2,014 issues traded. 

Volume was about 1 05.8 million shares, down 
from 132J million in the equivalent Thursday. 

Analysts said the stock market was due for a 
brief consolidation after a sharp rise during 
January that took the average to all-time highs. 

Before the stock market opened, the Labor 
Department reported that the U2v unemploy- 
ment rate increased to 7.4 percent in January, 
from 7 2 percent in December. 

It was the second consecutive monthly in- 
crease in unemployment and brought the total 
of workers looking for jobs to 8.5 miUkra. 

Alter the stock market closed Thursday, the 

* Federal Reserve reported the basic money snp- 
JJ ply measure known as M-I increased S4.7 bu- 
h, [ion in the week ended Jan. 21. The increase was 

-n* bigger than expected and may put ’investors in a 

Z £ cautious mood. 

+ u A trade group reported that assets of money 
market mutual funds fell $2.76 bQlion in the 
week ended Wednesday. That could help the 
_i market if some of that money finds its way into 

* stocks. 

£ The federal funds rate, which banks charge 
v» one another for overnight loans, was 8* percent 
i» at midday. Salomon Brothers economist Henry 
£ Kaufman said the fed funds rale has bottomed 

„ OUL 

v* L- Crandall Hays of Robert W. Baird & Co„ 


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Milwaukee, said the market was waiting for an 
excuse to go lower after recent gains, and the 
“money supply. was too high.” 

He said that report combined with news of a 
0.2-percent decrease in leading indicators and a 
0.7-percent drop in factory orders combined to 
send the market lower. 

“A/ ter a few days of correction we see the 
stock market higher,” Mr. Hays said, “ft’s so 
stroag now I can’t imagine anything to stop il al 
this point." He said a rise to 1,350 or 1,400 on 
the Dow is possible. 

Advances lopped declines for the 19th con- 
secutive session Thursday, although the excess 
was the smallest since the streak started. 

William Raftery of Smith Barney, Harris 
Uphamsaid the string of advances over declines 
was not necessarily of extraordinary signifi- 
cance. 

He said it’s just one indicator and “too many 
others have to be followed." The positive 
breadth figures may just result from Lbe fact 
that many secondary issues became oversold in 
the last pan of 1984, he said. 

Exxon was near the top of the active list and 
up a fraction at midsession. 

Elsewhere in the oils, Atlantic Richfield, In- 
diana Standard and Ohio Standard were frac- 
tionally lower while Chevron was slightly high- 
er. Unocal lost ground after gaining in recent 
sessions on takeover rumors. 

Federal Express Corp. was higher at midday. 
The company said Thursday orders for a new 
ZapMail service are running ahead of expecta- 
tions. 

AT&T was up a fraction on heavy vol ume. 


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W — % 
10#*— to 
U — % 
24V* — to 
55% + to 
13to— % 
5V* 

20% + 9* 
111* 

31* 

251*— II* 
29%— to 
28V* — % 

14 + to 
25% — #fe 
41%+ to 
66% — 1% 

15 — V* 
15%+ to 
43%+ V6 
16ft— to 
37 + % 
9P%— % 
27 — % 
17V*— V* 
15% + to 
26ft — % 
42% — 96 

3V* 

13V* + % 
9V*— to 
28% — V* 
25% + to 
6 % 

23% 

23%- % 
39 — % 

]«*— % 
20 — % 
11 %— % 
49 + V* 

29%+ to 
32% — % 
14ft— V* 
M 



I oto i> tfi • ir - ; £' " a. ' . -- 

• 

gained. 

mom. . - 

-You - ; . . 

TCoaar’" / - 

tail job.' - ■ 

«Ub dcctst 

10 be wiKv. . 

Solar, fee 

case here- 

Jjjl [hi •*••• • 

aanreiiiii"* ' - - • 

ihcpl3trii. • * 

speed- _ . . 

“Events-" j •: • 

no*."' Nt Sr.t' 
count} - ;iur ^ - . • 

luEdlica^:^ ‘ -r- - 

The ' 

V35 operas- ' - •' - 
mostiBiherr- r - . ' '• - 
Gne worked - - - ‘ 

^ New L'^re- >' ' 

%K0UiCi ■ 

the pen- ' 

bfne and -.V- 
mgHedp:oc«_ " - 
pan. Ber-rcv- 
Toyodi ejy - - 

and preferred • . . . 

longer ecsL Fj: -■ 

keihaC hoop:- . 

have bee - -■ 
donsoftheri'-r'.. . : : 


F loaihsHd-- \<>u 


§s§ m. 


:x#r 



■ft 
43% 
2% 

179* I7V* 

30V* 30V* 
33 33 

27V* *71* 
41 


■ftmisiii 




21% 

64% 

30 171* 

IM 12 
m* b% 
23 ft in* 

5896 4M 
44ft 


150 37 455 

150 57 10 9965 
50 55138 463 
■56 XI «s 
254 45 8 53 

1470107 80 

154a 97 SO 
.92 2.1 U 57 
44 X7 13 37 

40 11 13 3$ 

150 25 14 181 
1.12 25 19 Wl 

50 24 18 *72 
58 27 14 np 

158 47 14 394 
158 XI 9 204 
150 IU 11 4 

174 75 9 87 

-Wo 4 9 67 
56 U 47 46 

30 

50 £S 28 92 

304 L3 34 1021 
41b 25 9 428 
,56 17 12 IS7 
170 37 12 B73 
23 50 

,54 17 35 US 
170 44 H 1123 
,53a J 14 8s 
1.4) XJ II 232 

52 7 14 8686 

70 £1 II 34 
50 37 27 442 
-15 U 11 69 

.54 £3 12 86 
150 XI M M4 
*,111 781 
.50 14 14 89S 
>50 15 11 V 
30 2743 

1.10 124 7 V Ts 

40o 7 W 5T8 
170 XI 13 na 
156 19 10 ItO 
1.12 47 | 40 

27801X7 7 

1ST 

78 1.1 14 1405 
Iff 95 13 no 
76 24 14 100 
40 23 II 578 
ITS XI ■ 991 
653 17 22 

UW 6 1176 
150 AS 10 762 
2JS«307 32 

40 11 25 184 
£20 87 12 43 


5% 516 
27% 27V* 

TIM 30% 

1% 1% 

9V* 9 
4796 47*6 
13% 13V* 

19% toft 
45ft 44% 

18% 17% 

19% 19 
49% 48V* 

56% 55% 

11% 11 

J2* ** 

32% 32 
W** 15% 

27V* 26% 

31 to 30% 

15% 15% 

22% 22% 

12a n 

28% 274* 

11% 1196 
11% 11% 

15ft 15V* 

1796 17% 

2196 20% 

44% <2% 44 
IS 18% 1$ 
21% 21 2114 

»* 36% 

20 19% 81 

271* 37% 37% 
Hi 8V* 8% 
37V* 36% 36% 
» 29% 28% 

19% 18V* 1914 
12V* 11% 

23% 23 
38% sn* 

33% 23V* 


198 
195 
49 

427 12to 
Ml 24 
136 Oft 
44 UV* 
15% 


16% MV* 
17% 179* 
29ft 28% 
14ft 14V* 
65% 64 
17% 17% 
45 38 379* 

196 17% 1696 
13 54% 53% 
Iff 4M 40 
89 16% Uto 
to« W% 


£6 

13 

17 

17 

AS 

9 

35 

TO 

U 

H 

1X5 


1X9 


9.1 

7 

42 

7 

15 

17 

A9 

14 

17 

21 

XI 

W 

£4171 




661* 65V* 
V49* 16 
21% 2096 
M 8% 
33% 23% 
15 UU 
S5V* 56% 
63% cm 
3496 26% 
H* 24% 
22V, 23% 
Sto 5 
45 44% 

Uto 28% 

3496 34% 
«% 189* 
94% 84% 

2S? 

2% 

SS% 259* : 


33% 13to 
469* 34% 
26% 16% 
42 36 

1396 79* 
4# im 
m ns 
16% w 
5% 2% 
2596 17% 
24% 17ft 
50 2S 
53% 38% 
41% 36 
1*96 11% 
3996 24 
>9% 20% 
23ft 12% 
19 11** 

21 % 10 % 
41% 22% 
59 41 

57 40 

1296 5% 
28% 18% 
3096 21 


2ft ft 

3294 19% 
STM 40% 
49 27% 

13% 996 
19 14*6 

on* say* 

63 3596 

51% 30% 
80 56 

1596 8% 
33% 22% 



40 2496 

249* 15 
IK* 13% 
12% 11% 
17% T396 
#2% 30ft 
» 20% 
15% 69* 
20 13% 

2% lift 

711* S2% 

2 *% 

26% 21 

an* zn* 
lift 26% 
39 24ft 
24% 20% 
S*k 4 
J»* 196 
30% 13% 
Mt 31 
,4ft 3 
lift 12 
189* W% 
26 12 % 
2* 3 

39 25% 

10% 12% 
7% 1% 

27% U 

1394 6ft 


58 35 
UQ 45 
-40 2J 
150 103 
150 I1J 
172 103 
352 85 
150 A4 
* 4 
250 125 
40 £5 
X40 74 
■40 45 
252 94 


S ffll 

ill £ * 

4 g WS 27 
13 S « 

"4 


t 


ssr 




I 33 rL** 4/96 

8 ,*1 23to 23 

’SS ffi 1 fft 


m ^ 


ffl 4% 4 


11 ? 




if -S* Iff* 16 

n ^ S** 


57 % TS 

» .32? _?% 2 


H ']« 2696 3696 


18 30% 20 

“J 9 8* 

77 96 a 


Continued on Page 10) 





























































a,- / 




% 




: : ^ 


BUSIWK ); Bnyrii ^ international herald tribun 

f h ^l Expec * 8 Profi t Drop Over Next 2 Years 


DVITONATXONAL HEBALD TRIBUNE, SATURPAY^UNDAY. Ffpdiuov ^ l9g$ 


•teuzn Co. < P^ccled P RridIy Pj i£ *“S?«nS iTsSfc^ w®- also is based on estimates by (Jbe bonds to finance the repurchase of 
earnings would fall in the Phillips affremi »- QCI ^' ■ . conyany and its financial advisers shares. 

»aSp?fflM<lmachslia«ofiB 

* BStn,ct “™IS plan that wniv^r ? 11 **om to «ui a t od pnoes, was induded m a proxy common-stock would he wrfmmwf 


vSSSS 


- 

y 

. ^ 


•••• 


S£ft—~= sasESsSte* sas?^ 

■ It also disclosed that T iw, <*■ toaan ^ <* Mesa P«roleum Much of tbeWTt drop i 
■Pickens Jr, whose bid in iw!? The company D rai«-j«i that „„ ** amibutKl to higher intere 

to bay Phillips led to ** «h?TSSF2S2£l?SE *2*2*2S&V*** 


economy and PhilHps said that each share of its 
ed in a proxy commoorstock would be exdiaiieed 
it the Feb. 22 for -$ 2?..80 face amount in 

and bonds and 0.62 of a dure of 
■ d rop wo uld common stock, ftyanff the notes 
t interest esc- and bonds will be issued only in 
proposed re- denominations of $ 1 , 000 , sbare- 



3,500 Groups Sue Manville 

For Asbestos Removal Funds 

NEW^YMK^^u 1 )» , „^ anv ^ e was able to meet its 

3 _snnS« 7 £ 5 ^w^r More **““ hills at the time it filed, box it faced 

^lawstritsfraoSdividuahS 
hSK atrwvore of individuals who said 




S=srav= 

the protection qfiMcnl bankrupt- a-J^TS „i._i 


■- 

-Mssafc 


1585 and drop ijwT™ , ™ “ ™n= stoat to 

f^saSSlF* fc «rts 

Undcra teveraosM w. The •, , sold have yet to be identified, the 

. ievB ragCd buyout, n ~—r Iorecasi said it croected imm 
company is porcha^H -A. C 


sharp tunmra^HlTioR-i wtuon m assets. The assets to be 

rSSS'E , “WW^^beidemified.^ 


In trading Friday on the New 
York Stock Exchange, Phillips 
shares closed at $48 apiece, un- 


- 1 : g ^ “toer selling off a sse 

; s& ? “«^ 9 >any’s earnings. 


- 'r. *£9* ' 

.. • 


S^flT«Sr iUiero “ “S'sSSt^mSliOT inTw ? 11 “* 
14 but still believe the restructuring iFEL£f 5.76Mfion. Under the pla£ Z com 

l he rmaocial f ««ast. which will issue nsrSfin in notes 

Toyota Calk Tune at Its GM Venture 


« Qn_ — O * V UUiUi. 

lr" ~ a level that would be 
pejeem from 1984 results. 


Asbestos is valued for its fire- 

bon known as asbestosis, according 
‘"™ ^ Thursday mghL to medical studies. 

a gas sr ms§HH 

«* SdSsfi^lSiin^ 986 Mfr'CS-1-!-*-? 5SSE.t5.SfF"— . 


somewhat to S 61 S million in 1986 


Sl teflion to buy its shares on the Ford Motor Co, He was cwporahons from their creditors ing operators rambmse- 

^ ? lcceeded by FonTs presi- ISL*^^ ? c ?" t “ ^^ttecoflrframwnghS 

falls below $50 a share. dent, Donald Petersen dC ” SC * ***“ 10 ardous asbestos froTthrir 


property. 


- 1 


( Confirmed from Plage 7) 

iDdastT y analysts have said that 
nanow, rigid job cla.«ifin 9 fin>w. 


COMPANY NOTES 

Alcan Ahmimum Ltd. has sold 

tie f.i ■ .■ . _ ■ 


Page 9 


Hutchison Sells 
Tunnel Stake 

Rnaers 

HONG KONG — Hutchi- 
son Whamqpoa Ltd. has sold its 
26.17 million shares, a 20 . 6 -per- 
cent stake, in Crcss-Hartxnir 
Ttmnd Co. for more than 250 
million Hong Kong dollars ($32 - 
miflioa) to msti tu tional ^ 1 ^- 
ests in Hong Kong and in Lon- 
don, a company spokesman 
said Friday. 

He said the funds would help 
finance Hutchison's acquisition 
of 34 . 6 -percent of Hongkong 
Electric Holdings Ltd. from 
Hongkong Land Co. 

Separately, Simon Murray, 
Hntdiison's chief executive of- 
ficer, Is to succeed Hongkong 
Land's chairman, Simon Kes- 
wick, on the board of Hong- 
kong Electric, the utility said 
Friday. 


Federal Express Corp. said it wiH 


Oil-Price Cut 


■-*.* -T ,; ccfe? 

-■'T^ 
' •: : " s ^- 


nanw, rigid job classifications c ? rs ’ 10 emphasize the importanct 

« 80 m each jpdtviduaL *“ ” Pf^°> ajaly hoMro. in Aicm ± O 

with the right clu^fir- 3, P 6 ™ 3 - 0 'Workers, or “team members,” that uacar is not painted right the camnanv^to, thULlF^' a holding Jeep Gout, a unit of Amwiram (Continued from Page 7 ) 

called to do ajib ^ ,s ^ company mrifonns on a vol- fo« time, it can be nm back AfSn^tid operating sub- Motors Coip, and the United Auto Jaws borne the bulk of the deficits. 

Joel Smith, J< the Uaw ft f r.« 1 “ d through mimediately, ralher than 0 t Workers umon have reached a ten- The poor nations have become net 

whoismanaSnnLnH^ -. 5 ^ lrelchin ? “erases before be- waiting for repair at the end of the »AT faduflnes PLC has an- tative agreement on a three-year debits. Their accumulated sur- 
tf»npa^ 3 ^|e ^ p nm f S work, both standard prac- hne. pounced that bid aocwtances have cot tract. Details of the agreement, pluses were exhausted in 1984 , and 

s tices in Japanese auto factories. TW a «» a iw„r ,u. “o^sed Us_stakemHambro Life affoong 7.000 workers. were not their fonden-exchanee mvrvM 


pace. The pauuing facility 
equipped wim a feedback loop, 
that 11 a car is not right 1 


wjtopnttni m customers' offices. 


(Continued from Page 7 ) 


Company Ea rning s 

Revenu * ®d profits, Fn millions, are In local currendos 

unless otherwise Indicated 


iuoa 10 do a 10 b J -“-vmu vu a vw- r uau ut iuu msaa 

Joel Smilh, the Uaw «rr. ■ , “ d “““V paniripale through immediately, ralher than 

ho is manaoing t ^j«i AW “ stretching exerases before be- waiting for repair at the end of the 

j-i-saSKassai ^ 


Australia 

Comako 


Coat Tnlnfnm n J rtar 1*M 19B 

raiecom rmhim — wwa isakl 

WiQaor. lfH ltl3 JWInt 810. 77UJ 

*15.1 BW Per Shore — S26 471 

"•nc. __ 5B.1 «6 Nets locfutto cftoror at S33 

r Shorn — W VM mlllktn In /MM warier, and 

Year HM ini arins of sg million v* 5<3 m/A 


id. rather than L i ^ . Management styles have be 


nounced that bid 
increased its staki 


There are about 200 robots in the Asmnl S w 11 7,000 workers, were not their foram-exchange reserves 

gained, ratbo- thaSTTosT at rS! , Man ®Sement styles have been most of them used forwdd- ^ 10 ^ Percent would vmnaDy vamsh if they were **nada 

monL 0St ' Fre “ 'toged as wdL When GM opwat- ing and painting. BuL overall it is BHP hffinenb Ltd, Shell Co. of A ™ w 5 * ss 9 ™??** said its 10 P®y off their trade arrears. Domfat 

“Yon have to ask. ‘whHfls h .Ka* fd *** plant, executives operated less highly automated than many in Australia, Reynolds Australia Ain- Australian subsidiary has comptet- Amor test of the OPEC na- D *»ooar. rm 

we wantT ” he sS “W? wall. ' h 41 from otGcss arranged along the Japan and this country, andinten- «nna Lid. and Kobe Alumina As- “J^agpnshonofHarhison-Aa ^Jpears to be ap- KJTnJS-ZT ^3 

cent jobs in dSmt sunSnt while the clerical staff .tionaUy so, New United officials f 0 ?*® 8 (Australia) Proprietary a ““t of Dresser Ijis ts Skdy 10 be, a c- °^l! horo - ^ 

with decent nav anH worked at open desks in the middle said. Ltd. plan to develop a gold mine at Jndusines Inc, and of tbe refrao- “t^ng to the Sakanon Brothers teSS 5 » aS£ 

»mui pay ana DeneriLl. and rJ , 1 .. . ° * ,. (on/ Anmtimu a# v.;». 11 ;■ efttrfu • rz t Omthm 


IjlWL 917.16 
3U6 19J1 

urn cum 


Canada 

Domfctf 


R 0 vmw_ 

INS Met 10c. 

17.16 Per Shorn _ 
I9J1 v __ 

ReSSo_ 

Met Inc. 

Per Shore 


rua * Quartern and of SI9 
J 60 mimonvsazmBHanlnyoatt. 


Results restated. 


wewantr-hesaid-wTwant^r "T *™s ranged along the Japa 
coir jobs in decent surroundi^ whde the clerical staff 

with decent nav and !!?3 asd al desks in the middle s^d- 


6th door. 
Revenue 


it-., ■ , 

rofiaioi 


SJX7 479.1 
19J 15.7 

096 086 


Donoafley (RJL) 

MOW. me in 


^SSlKtSSStP rf “me emphasis here is not on WesienT Austral 

So far. he saidTSiaS^ die the offices have technolo^KuS rtkSfon? amrounced 

case here, althou gh he camion«? c ”° va1cd “to conference a company official said. ^ he a n extension of 

that the frireiStli r , rooms - T^ are a lot confer- jCEZ Z 7 T IT f . *** Worslc y almnma project J 1 

loor.ijuJ™ ““.r Toyota S hit- ence rooms. The final report card on Toyota's r-#*— -r 7 . , for the pro 

“an rdations would not come until w„. r ., , , approach is as much as two years -,F aie Tf® ar s Cater- trucks, the 

the plant was operating dose to fuE ^ plants madunoy away, company offirials said, when ^*7 VentUre Capital Inc. has said, 

speed. and tooling have been imported the realiiyoF produrinTr eara ** 8 ^“ agreement to purchase 12 4 =^„ r , 

“Everything is new and exciting SS, J 2 pai L? e I^T 108 ^P’ mim,te ’ “iir after ho^sets pcrcml of a Tocas-based robotics 
xww, Mr. Smith said. “It's like? w ? ucfa ■ ^ on to the ^ company, Flexible Automation & „ a 5 

oe» saisRSiea “«rs. , ss S?* 

JjgSm sag—--- ash?*— ai-— sx-j 

was operated by GM. althonvh aL . T> .asranWy line splits into two 7 

most afl the people on the assrablv “ dw body shqp, where the critical A DVERTISEMENT nra ”™f n 1 

dnnenaons of the car are fixed, so INTERNATIONAL FUNDS | Stoat m 


The Trap 

foingk 

Byffistor 

V 

- fan Levj. 


So far. he smrtoaTSi^fjU the open and toe offices have 
case lire, attkugh h ? ^, C ^ verted “ to ««ference 
^^.^h^rfToyota's^S *“ * lot <* confer - 

the plant T^operatingd^tofiS 3 s dj® plants machinay 

speed. and tooling have been imported 

“Everything is new and exciting f T ra , J ? pai V Tl “ faiiqjing shop, 

iiAni " ijf* p — _ ■ j u* . *Aiig which has hn*n ftHrlpH nn in rha 


an. Western Australia, ^ Ahimm- study, a fi n an c ial test because oEESlsz £a m? 

government announced. lu ^^. ^" ® nT, c; d Corp. OPEC/s needs are measured in dol- 

wiU be an extension of C1 ?^uck Gorp. has won a I 31 * export revenues ralher dmn Malaysia 

fy alumina project St 12.8-mmion U5. Array contract “the bands a day required to mm, r— t- 

tor r«». r„.« ! or . tbc production of $63 M977 ^ance the physical oil market wVS 


Revnun — 

Mel Inc 

Per Slut* __ 

Revenue 

Mel Inc 

Per Shore 


546JJ 4478 

41JJ7 3659 

U7 091 
MJM 1983 
1510 1540 

13159 11444 
ISO UD 


M OhOnor. 

Revenue 

__ Netine. 

u /5 P Z*T‘- 

^ Rmeruo_. 

Net Inc 

Per Shore 


im an 

236.1 2333 

<& is 
AS 88 
SS Si 


Dun t, Bradsiroet 


trucks, the Defense Department “The weak finks in the chain are SSSES'Sk - ReSSSe^L SH &SS 


-ML drady dose to bra^TSl 

09 — . Ri4«...4tf. »fi — 1. __r% We»s5S»Mwi _ Veor 


Speny CorpL has announced toe Mr. Mlc«ok smd. 

ut of a multi-milBon dollar re- ,™_™f week’s Geneva meeting 


65*0 5475 

6157 4144 

US* IfO 
AflO 2560 


Slates 

Carriers 


^ Scott Paper 

^ <Ul Qaar. T«4 1983 

lOt R«y?«»e 747.2 7SU 

Hn - — OS 354 

Per Shore — 152 071 

044 vear im 1*0 

Revenue — 2580. 2300 

£ 2 ? Ef! 1 K 1 * 7 iG mS 

Per Share — 353 158 


Revenue ZMM. zan S** l" 6, — — - 

OperNet jjSn PerShare — 

Oner Shorn_ in 2^ 

results restated. 0m . . 


Houston Nat. Gas 


A New United's managers have 
gone out of their way to eliminate 
toe petty social differences between 
blue and white collars that have 

angered production wtukcxs in the 

past Everybody, including Mr. 
Toyoda, eats m the same cafeteria. 


Remm 

BRUSSELS — ■ Belgium’s na - 1 
ttonal debt rose 548.9 billion Bd- 


A DVERTISEMENT 

international funds 

Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed 
1 February 1985 

eeete»S»£awSSto-]S 

mu ami (w-weeklr, won hit y; (r]-ro«ularty; nj -Irreaukvly. 


Western Unfoe Corp. has an- 
“ a ^ eemem 3 i 


on OPEC producen to cot their 


Revenue _ 
Op» > Wei 


The price of gold, Enked to (he 
price of oil, could also fall farther 


Revenue 
Nut Inc . 


— 361.7 

— 551 

— US 


Sfftom N. Eng. TaL 
«hcHMr. im na 

MB R«yunue 32U 2W4 

™ Met Inc. 245 245 

H« Per Share 055 055 

374 1M4 |fU 

ajn ^ Mft 

Nuf Inc ___ 1345 1206 

W Pur Shore 453 m 


banks that provides about S 33 m 2 - also tail furtber 

Hon in cash to meet its business ff “toitionaiy expectations weak- m 


obligations for the first quarter. 


And the dollar could strengthen SSsESreZ: 


Bawdy Ent. 
•Oar. im na 
Ruvunue urn mo 

MUMK. nj 1U 




®“® teM ’ ^ tom* ( 58.64 bflfion) in 1984 , 
and pn*sred pariang places no to 4265 trilfion francs, accord™ 

^n e ES^ S ^J°Sfi2£L'S ,bas ' to Fnunce Mi*SyVJSiS 

volleyball nets leased Friday. The debTSwto 
have b«D installed m empty sec- compared with an increase of 631 
tions of toe cavernous plant for use ffinfianainl 983 “* 


AL MAL MANAGEMENT 

(w> AMWal True. S A SU456 ORANGE NASSAU GROUP 

^KJUUlSBAERamLM. S3498 

—Id ) Conbnr _* SF IttM PARI SBAS-G ROUP 

— (d ) Eo uftne r Atnerlco S11B75B Zj!! S i^nu ^,< * fT,^rtlo,,0, — - — — **<W0 

—Id I Eouftxssr Europe SF 1174M i w ! DM Ui2.li 

-io i «oo ^__ sfiK? z\z\h "vKSS 

^{SJSSrtSfed dSi 

—<0 J ITF Fund NV_ 


Floating Rate Notes 


I M4iM ORANGE NASSAU GROUP 

— W»BuwB el 4BU*nMn r 4- _ . 
■IK’S PARIS8A5— GROUP 


SFionSo q; gS, L t 5 ib LAa - 

SF 170150- n|wj OBUGULDEN 
- SF2SL33 — PAROIL-FUND. 


Feb. 1 


Imur/Mlucm/IM. Cuuoa Not Bkl AiU : 


1 Dollar 

ipfssssffiw* s 

hnir/Mln ruWUut. Co wa n Mum BU Astd Htonn gAwwicaneKMS nlJ 

?JS5?J*SSS M * ** WM 9956 78UM ^ 

AIBfflfliMi 514-92 1IM 1M nOOtSa (CWUMrt W-^l ffl, 

2 S SSBSr R 


BAMQUE INDOSUEZ _ _ 

-id f AMn n Grw vWl Funrf *io 66 'U®? "BC 

— Iwj Dlwrimul SFbuj -HelRBCFbrEnilJfhJdflcFd— S1042 

-jw) FIF-^mertcn -He.1 RBC InltcStnrM ^ 0 i}?5 

— * P ^-a*- s ia.15 -H*) RBC inn income Fd 11073- 

— jyj f 1 l^-PoeHfc 51080 "tfai RBCManCurnencvB d. « T>-U 

— (d j lndo«iu Mu Hi bonds A -Uw} RBC Noftti Amef. F aT jg?- 

— <U 1 IndORiez Milttlbonds B 514497 5KANDI FOND INTL FUND (46-6-2M270) 

^'T^MiftPOaro.St.Huilur.Jerrev *woo « w tsjo 

— (*} BrftDQllor Inrnm e 505872- ■"'MCC. Bid S490 Offer ,16J0 

Z/lfl KHljjgff^ UTT — t; *8^7- SV ENSKA INT ERNATIONAL LTD. 

1 ‘rtJ-SJfcraOJXXtf RL9B0 Dovomhlro S«iXn*loiKlI 377-aB« 

! d J g-S-.IntUMawtuPorH 1 1.174 — {t» I SHB Bo5f53I!!1Z_Z__* 2154 

__f*i fd!-HJS!f^5l. GroiwM * 50*60 — (wl SHB lull Gnwttt Fund Is lv3o 

*0^: SWISS BANK CORP. 

53440 aiffiasteracr 

-twlCopHoi ualto sa SI 141 sf»So 

gjj>LI^ H5»”»EPR. C E 5 l „ ir -.d, 

^ssaassS^- SiBi qB Sggg sss sf^ 

— <d[ Bond Valor US-DOLLAR S IM J 9* ld ~ l !? l, “ l - = — . SF 4750 

Zf2 j S fls** SF7S2S UNION INVESTMENT Frankfurt 

J Q Pann^— J11M SF i nn tin Wti ) UnlfMln iui nm 

ZJ2 J Sc Fund SUnwB — JdJUnHoodi DM2L50 

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Pape 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY* FEBRUARY 2-3, 1985 


I ACROSS 


ACROSS 


1 Joshua's 
spying 
companion 
8 Actress 
Siddons 

II Tappet mover 

14" a little 

pony" 

18 Unburni brick 

IB Tequila plant 

20 Lady from 
Leiria 

21 Parnassian 
number 

22 Soviet money 
producer 

24 Hermaphro- 
ditic plant 

28 Enclose 

27 Polish area 

29 Citified 

32 Azimuth 

34 Tale: Abbr. 

35 Violinist 
Kavafian 

38 Smelting 
residue 


be!": E. Lear 

49 Burler’s need 

50 Sprinkle 

52 Glac6 

53 Group for J.D. 
and R.E.L. 

54 Indian 
carriage 

57 Position 
document 

59 Round farm 
basket 

60 Comical trio 

62 Steno's 
concern 

63 Jot 

64 Gentles 


ACROSS 

87 Walked 
through 
puddles 

89 Musical intro 

90 Of durability 

94 Azores seaport 

95 New Zealand 
native 


Tee Off on the Biggies! by judith c. dalton 


1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

“ 





ST 






96 Unwed 

97 Trapplst 
cheese 

99 Alsatian artist 
100 Concha 


e 

7 

9 

9 

10 

IB 













1 



103 Bumbo and 
ombu 


37 Famed 
Canadian 
physician: 
1349-1919 


65 Jackson and 
Clay, e.g. 

66 Common 
cold's cousin 

68 Calm, in Calais 
70 Singer Ed 

72 Autocrat 

74 Strong ale 

75 Chooses 

78 Empty 

79 Chimpanzee 
criterion 


104 Milwaukee 
assents 
109 Daises 

111 "A virtue that 

was . ■ 

Shale 


39 Gosling on la 
ferine 


43 Short songs for 
Scocto 


46 Writer Foley et 
al. 


47 . . strange 

could 


82 Like some 
committees 

83 J.F.K. info 

84 Astound 

85 Site of half of 
Lake Victoria 

86 Alma , 

Russian city 


112 Contests at 
Cambridge 

118 Jewish month 

119 "Meet Me 

Louis" 

120 Moslem ruler 

121 Emulate Red 
Jacket 


122 Charged atoms 

123 Calendar abbr. 


124 Billiard shot 

125 Insurance - 
premium 
estimator 


DOWN 

1 LaSalle or 
Mercer 

2 Fuss 

3 First Lady in 
1929 

4 Wane 

5 Site of Queen's 
University 


DOWN 


6 Muttonfish 

7 Old World 
lizard 

8 Fall guy? 

9 Rosary bead 

10 Linen marking 

11 Andean flier 


12 "The Breeze 
1940 song 

13 Singer Nixon 

14 Kind of carpet 
or dye 

15" , Silver 1" 

16 Part of A.D. 

17 Judge 

20 Count of Monte 
Cristo 

23 Surrealist Max 
25 Eight 

28 In the arms of 
Morpheus 

29 Eradicate 


DOWN 

30 Foolocracy 
period • 

31 AnM.I.T. 
degree 

33 Debase 
36 Preserves 
38 Wise admin- 
istrator 


40 Bout in a ring 

41 A Caucasian 

42 Wagon 
tongues, Down 
East 


44 Sign on a 
second 


ECONOMICS IN THE REAL WORLD 

By Leonard Silk. 299 pp. SI 6.95 
Simon & Schuster , , 1230 Avenue of the Ameri- 
cas, New York, N. Y.10020. 


Reviewed by Robert B. Reich 

L EONARD SILK is among the most perspica- 
/ rious of journalists writing about economics. 
As economics columnist for The New York Times 
since the early 1970s. he has had a ringside seal at 
the unfolding drama In “Economics and the Real 
World" he shares his accumulated wisdom. 

The book is largely an account of the United 
States's political-economic turbulence since Lyn- 
don Johnson sought both Vietnam guns and Great 



DOWN 

45 U.S N. policing 
groups 


47 Vinegar: 
Comb, form 


48 Sonoran’s garb 

51 Teeming 

52 Malaysian city 

55 Toulouse, e.g. 

56 Space or Stone 
follower 

58 Device for 
spraying paint 

59 Caught sight of 
61 Property 

hoidii 


66 Norman city 

67 Patron sau . . 
Palermo 

69 Miss, neighbor 

70 Flummox 

71 Actress 
Thomas 


73 Weeding tool 


ngu 
75 Establish in 


office 

76 Bottom lines 

77 Squama 

80 Mother of 
Minos 

81 Klnofsts. 


j. i. M .;i. 

89 Dam, to a 
Iamb 

91 Up and about 

92 Balcony 

93 Ending for 
hero 

95 “Thou not 

sacrifice the 
passover": 
Deut. 16:5 
98 Upbeat, in 
music 

101 After, in Arles 

■162 Is nomadic 


114 Bikini part 

115 Break a fast 

116 Midi season 

117 Rev.'s talk 


BOOKS 


ing for the bottom of the recession to occur before 
the election year so that the voters experience a 
vigorous recovery by the time they go to the polls. 
He also shows how administrations aim for a “mis- 
ery index” (the combined rates of inflation and 
unemployment) under 10 on Election Day regard- 
less of what happens afterward, and how they play 
cat-and-mouse with the Federal Reserve Board — 
often prodding, cajoling and threatening it into 
political expedience. 


Society butter. Silk takes us through Nixon's deval- 
rols, the fire 


nation and wage-price controls, the Dret ofl shock. 
Ford's efforts to “Whip Inflation Now,” Carter's 
fiscal stimulus, the second oil shock, Paul Volcker's 
success at breaking the back of inflation by throw- 
ing the economy into reverse, and Reagan's yawn- 
ing budget deficits. 

Some of this story is familiar. Silk documents the 
grim trade-offs presidents have to make between 
inflation and unemployment, and their belated ef- 
forts at countering toe business cycle. But overlying 
all is the rhythm of American politics. Silk shows us 
presidents opting for a lower-unemployment, high- 
er-inflation trade-off in election years.’ and arrang- 


AJong this historic joumey. Silk takes the reader 
on assorted detours — a conversation with the 
conservative economist Frederich August von 
Hayek, ruminations on the relationship between 
democracy and capitalism, a tour through the Soviet 
ecooomy. a samp lin g of Carter oil diplomacy, an 
exegesis on the cultural differences between New 
York and Washington. Throughout, Silk is on the 
lookout for clues about how ideals and organiza- 
tions influence economic outcomes, bow politics 
shapes markets. These engagin g vignettes, many 
based an personal experience, provide further in- 
sights into the political management of the econo- 
my, suggesting the practical and ideological limits 
within which our past five administrations have 
operated. 


; messy, practical compro- 


DEN1N1S THE MENACE 


Solution to Last Week's Puzzle 




There are lessons to be learned from all this, and 
Silk is not reticent about articulating them. He 
warns that presidents must make tough economic 
decisions when there's still tune. From Johnson’s 
War to Reagan's Deficit, U. S. leaders have dis- 
played an unremitlent tendency to wait until the 
economic consequences of their actions have grown 
severe. In addition, be says, the United States must 
pay more heed to the international economy in 
setting fiscal and monetary policies. The globe is 
fast becoming an integrated banking, production 
and technology system. Everything the United 
Stales does reverberates through this larger system 
and then comes back again. 

Silk also counsels that the United Slates should 
rely less on tight money as a cure for fiscal profliga- 
cy and that it should explore income policies for 
restraining inflation. He concludes that the United 
States shouldn't try to ^plan" its economy, but that 
Americans should realize they already have an ag- 
gressive industrial policy. The United Slates’ s 
“mixed" economy reflects m 
raises with ideology. 

None of this is particularly controversial. It is the 
very model of conventional wisdom. Indeed, the 
bode suffers from a tendency toward glibness- At 
one point, for example, Silk reduces_the contest 
between Republicans and Democrats in Congress 
over Reagan’s 1981 economic program to a simple 
two-person game in which each participant has just 
two choices. And Silk tends to focus almost exclu- 
sively on fiscal and monetary policies and the goals 
of taming inflation and unemployment. He barely 
mentions improving productivity and international 
competitiveness, or the ubiquitous policies, such as 
trade, education, antitrust, government procure- 
ment and subsidized research, that bear upon these 
more structural goals. 

Still, “Economics in the Real World” is a wonder- 
ful antidote to the posturing, pontificating and 
theorizing of economists who refuse to deal with (or 
are incapable of recognizing) the very human world 
we live in. Silk puts economics back where it belongs 
— into politics and social psychology. It wil] leak 
out, to be sure. But in light of this book it will never 
look quite the same to you again - 


WIZARD of ID 


1 M&Al* IN A 3A& 

J, 

ml 


if. ii 




jUACAM- 



'W&niAvz 

Fii&rcL fee 

Something 

RE5MUR48T 

ti£CA N 1AY& 


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kill 


J 


REX MORGAN 


MARTHA, IS 
KENNV ALL 
RIGHT? I JUST 
HEARD ABOUT 
THE ATTEMPTED j 
ABDUCTION f 


/ YES, HE'S FINE— 

/ THANKS TO BERT ' 
FORTUNATELY, HE WAS 
DRIVING ME HOME 
WHEN IT HAPPENED i 



I KNOW YOU'RE HERE TO / LETS SEE MY 
MAKE YOUR MORNING ROLtt® f PATIENTS — AND THENj 
— BUT MAY I TALK TO WELL GO DOWN TO 

YOU WHEN YOU'RE THROUGH, THE CA FETER IA FOR 

COFFEE BREAK? 



|>. ptnuml^’ - ■" 

uw »> s'— .. 

IfW Lcerr " 

4. T«M Siw>f * : 'c— 

■ 

1 . Dam u** -* • " 

7. Franc* ■ :••• 

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IltKIosiOcwT" - ' 

1 15. Aflf Stains v-: 
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17. Mike B ran -i. : -- 

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It. Jan Inprr 
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IP ...... 


GARFIELD 


Robert B. Reich teaches business and public policy 
at Harvard. He wrote this review for The Washington 
Post. 



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EUROPE 


HIGH LOW 


ASIA 


HIGH LOW 


Algarve 
Amsterdam 
Athens 
Barcelona 
Beta rode 

Berlin 

Brussels 

BucBaresl 

Budapest 


10 50 

12 54 


43 


16 61 
8 46 


Casta Del Sal 

Dublin 

Edinburgh 

Florence 

Frankfurt 

Geneva 

Helsinki 

Istanbul 

Las Palmas 

Lisbon 

London 

Madrid 

Milan 

Moscow 

Munich 

Nice 

OsM 


4 39 


17 63 
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12 54 

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11 53 
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5 41 r 

B 46 r 

II 12 sw 

1 34 o 

1 30 r 

5 41 fr 


Bangkok 

Beilina 

Horn Kan* 

Manila 

New Dead 

Seoul 

Shanghai 

Singapore 

Taloel 

Tokyo 


C F C 
3D 86 20 


11 52 
19 66 

2B e 

21 70 
S 41 
13 55 
29 84 
18 64 
T3 55 


75 sn 

54 a 


AFRICA 


39 sh 

38 a 


41 

39 fr 
■ « 16 SW 
34 


Alaien 
Cairo 
Cap* Town 
CasaMonca 


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16 61 
10 50 


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Nairobi 

Tunis 


W 64 4 

17 63 7 

22 72 17 
17 63 9 

24 75 17 
30 86 26 
27 81 14 
15 59 8 


LATIN AMERICA 


Buena* Aires 27 II 14 

Urn 29 84 19 

Mexico Citv 25 77 B 

Rlade Janeiro 30 86 24 

Soo Paolo — — — 


Fran as 

Rev* lor I* 

Rome 

Stockholm 

Strasbourg 

Venice 

Vienna 

Warsaw 

Zurich 


4 39 
■10 14 


15 59 

0 32 


2 36 

U 12 


5 41 4 39 


NORTH AMERICA 
30 


Aectaraoe 

Atlanta 


■1 


11 52 
1 34 


Detroit 

Honolulu 


MIDDLE EAST 


Ankara 

Brinit 

Damascus 

Jerusalem 

TelAelv 


2 36 
17 61 
15 59 
11 52 
14 57 


32 SW 
54 Cl 


LesAMeltf 

Miami 

Minneapolis 


OCEANIA 


Auckland 

Sydney 


24 75 
22 72 


15 59 
19 66 


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San Francisco 
Seattle 

Toronto 

Washington 


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» JS -6 

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26 79 20 

17 1 -22 

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cloudy: r rain; sn-sh e awr c ; swsnow: U-siormy. 


IDA VS FORECAST - CHANNEL: Sllutil I V ClKWOV. F RANKFU RT : 
Temp 10 — 6 (50 — 43). LONDON: floln. Temp. 10 — 7 ( 50 — 451. 
ID^Fair Ternp. 15 - 2 (CT - 341. NEW YORK: Snow. Temp 0—5 
m 'PARIS' Ov e rc as t. Temp. 17 — 8 154 — 461. ROME: Cloudv. Temp. 
7w_1»lTELAV|V Ctaudv Temo. 15-9 ISO - 481. ZURICH: ROM. 

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/__£ fnmo 19—13 166 — 55). MANILA: Fair. Temp. 30—23 186—71 
L: F^r/fSna. S-0 M»-M S,w " ri TcmR 30-14 

51. TOKYO: Cloudy Temo 13 — l (55 — 301. 


Canadian Stock Markets Feb. i 


Prices in Gonodion cents unless morfcadS 


Toronto 


200 A tiff Prcc 
3350 Asm cnE 
5745 Alt Energy 
•000 Alia Nel 
5304 Alpama St 
490SAreeen 
19(J Asbestos 
tOQAICOll 
6010 BP Canada 
48818 Bonk 8C 
44072 BonVNS 
760S3 Barrtc* a 
2200 Baton A f 
334324 Bonanza R 
1400 Bralome 
161905 Bramolea 
1250 Brenda M 
22670 BCFP 
18420 BC Res 
1«10 BC Phone 
33000 Brunswk 
1525 Budd Can 
44000 CAE 
400CCLA 
IMSSCDUtbBI 
11350 Cad Frv 
14400 C Nor West 
3450 C Pockrs 
19900 Can Trust 
7500 c Tunc 

500 CGE 

3500* Cl Bk Com 

MOOO Cdn Not Res 
38516 CTlre A I 
B0OCUIUB 

501 Cora 
1456 Colonel* 

40 Celan 175a 
45400 C Dfctb A 
1*855 CDIstb 0 » 
4J62 CTL Bank 
7100 CoMka R 
4050 Crown • 

*800 Czar Res 
312884 Doan Dev 
T500DaonA 
155135 Denison A 
147703 Denison b I 
'3090 Dewelcan 
3833 Dick ran A f 
_933 Dfckmn B 
2156 Daman A 

MUDoiascoA 
5700 Du Pant A 
5603 Drier A 
1000 Eiethan, x 

500 Eidcd 
539* Eautlv Svr 
27740 FCA lull 
7900 C Falcon C 
0837 Flcnbrdoe 
2870 Fed Ind a 
4800 F City Fm 
•DO Fraser 
lOOFruefwH 
2300 GendNA 
10103 Geae Comp 
7850 Geocrude 


10740 Gibraltar 
72S0GoMcorp| 
500 Goodyear 
4000 Grandma 
™ GL Form 
1009 Grcyhnd 
6100 M Group A 
I3D0 Hrdbio A I 
2950 Hawker 
474? Haves O 

iTQOindui 
— -400 1 nails 
1170 inland Gas 
18447 Inlar Ptpo 
400 ivaeoB 
*800 Jomock 
3000 Kam Kalla 
.300 Krlscv H 
3600 Kerr Add 


SSk 33Vj 33V>— 
513% 13% 13% + 
520% 3B* 2DV3 
515% IS 15%— 
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*1713 I7h 17W 

£<. SV. 5b 

58* 5H FH— % 

sm 271% 271%— Vs 
86 54% 6 

8141% 1P% 134b— V, 
134 123 133 + 3 

8164% 161% 16H + 4% 
430 400 415 + 5 

854% SJ% Sl%— 16 
*18 17--* IB +4% 

sim 11 11 _ 3 

8124% 12 I2>% 

243 235 243 +2 

*23 22V% Z2W- 

SI* 152% 16 
8181% 171% 17Tb— 
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86V, 6'.% 6*% 

S15W is 154% 

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*334% 33 334a + U 

*154. 1SW 15V, 

862 62 62 
S32V< 311% 311% 

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*104% 1016 104%— 
817 17 17 — 

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*736 71% 74% 

*174% 174% 174%— 3. 
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*6<J. 61% 64% 

8113% 1146 ll'u— 
253 250 2SO 

1773k 174% 174% 

1 55 , 148 153 —2 

32T 297 310 +13 

298 290 298 -2 

11 m 124% 13«u- 4% 

*13 » 122% 4- lb 

110 94% 10 — 4. 

475 465 475 -FIS 

«S 475 47S -18 

260 250 250 —ID 

82897 28 28 — 

*17’A 17V% 174%- 
5334k 33W 331% — 
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*174% 174% in*— 
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224 218 23* + 6 

SUP* lO'-i HP*— 4% 
S5«i SVi 51*- 
*394. 39k. J946 + 
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SR 89 92 +|l- 

*25 25 25 

*74% 7*v 74* + 

145 145 145 

MOV, nil 20Va— •% 
*214% 7JU. 2146- l) 
*191% 191% 19'% 

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8151% 1597 ISY, + 1* 
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9211 Matson At 

400 Mo ton B 
5300 Murphy 
7400 Nabisco L 
54645 Norondo 

15*1 Noran 

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77300 NOWICOW 

49520 NuWsI %p A 

51357 Oofcwaad 
21710shcwaAf 
16600 Pameur 
74440 PanConP 
3200 Pembina 

700 Pnonl, Oil 

I4» Pme Point 
500 Piece GOo 
16935 Plocor 
2315 Provkoo 
3400 Que smra a 
1400 Rom Pet 
2*000 Rayrockt 

77640 Redeath 
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1940 RaeersA 
23093 Ramon 
174 Rothman 
800 Sceptre 
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138 ID Sears Can 

4*450 Shell Can 

57004 Sherri tt 

1RN Stoma 
1500 Slater B I 
12035 Souhttn 

XBOStBrodttl 

34159 SfefcoA 

2400 Swtptro 
2500 Sleep « 

7268 Sydney a 
700 Tara 
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41143 Teck B I 
294 Teledyne 
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33141 TmAltoUA 

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170 170 170 

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181% 8 L « B'b 

SI2’6 lf% IT'. *■ 36 

*127% 121% 1736 + l| 
S»T* 9 9 - 

115 115 US +3 

V, 7'-% 73»— 

*114% 11’4 114% + 
816%. U'% 16'.-, 


15 

IS 

15 

*13'- 

13 

13 - V. 

*54 

54 

54 


Total Sales: 14.152653 attorn 


880%. 79W 8046+1% 
Sltfc 113% UV, 
*104. 104. 103k 


MORE NEWS W LESS TIME 

THE WORLD IN 16 PAGES 

DAILY IN THE IH7 


Amsterdam 


ABN 

ACF Holding 


AICZO 

Ahold 


A'DamRwb 
Amro 
BVG 


Ehm.ler.KDU 
R+tm- 
(Ml 


19750 393 

198 199 JO 
160 168 
104- K) 10X70 
3UA* 71650 

22239 221X1 

LIS £30 
76J9 78 

15266 15X60 
87 JO 86J8 
33J0 3X58 
115 7M JO 
9150 9X50 

177.7b 180 

1*LS0 15*50 
61X8 63 

47.9* 4848 


Oce Vender G 
Pali hoed 
PM Dpi 


161 1MLS0 

29*50 10050 
6848 6950 
S930 59.90 

7SJ8 7X80 


Rotlnon 
(Toronto 
Ravat Dutch 


vanOrnmeren 

vMFStem 

VNU 


6750 6750 

4X*0 44 

189 JO 1« 
33550 337 


ANPXBS1 

Previous :19*J8 

Source: AFP. 


21850 220 

Index :I97JS 


Brussels 


Arbed 

Bekaert 

CackerlH 

EBES 

GBL 

GB-lnne-BM 

Gevaert 

Habofean 

Kradietbonk 

Patratlna 

Sac Generate 

Sottna 

SOlVOY 

Traction Elec 
Vlelite Menlaene 


1570 15*8 
4800 4800 
is* -no 


1985 1990 
2940 2958 
3605 3630 


7720 7730 
*620 *500 
1790 I960 
7150 711* 


3900 3895 
5440 5428 


Sleek Exchange index : 14W0J4 
wt : L065J7 


PrevlaM : ! 

Sourer: AFP. 


Frankfurt 


ASG-Tekfunken 114 114 

Allianz Vers 1057 1067 

Bail 1 79 JO 1*1 

Bayer 1%BJ0 1X950 

Saver J-typa. 32550 32650 


| CMS* 

Prev. 

1 Baver. Ver. Bex* 

335 

339 




r 11 

169 

172 

i !"• i.i • 

12130 

124 

D«s4mlcr-D«nz 

635 63730 


344 

343 

i-. uT.ti.-7, 

1M 

164 

r-."T'-rt - 1 mi 

39V 400 JO 


190 

192 

[■'Vr.'T'TM 

207 

205 

GHH 

1*7 167 JO 

Hochtief 

445 

480 ( 

Hoecttst 

LT..IUAJ 

Hoesch 

r?:ll All 


381 

391- 

ttof+en 


171 

Koll + 5ctz 


266 

Korstofft 

218J0 

223 

Kauthot 

215 

716 

KHD 

254 25U0 

Ktoecknar Warfce 

78 

7i 

} f < i } . , 

81 

81 

Unde 

39A50 

398 

Luftftonso 

IS4 15X20 

MAN 

159 JO 

161 

MflnriFtiTinun 

15X50 

SX5U 


Bifl 

234 

1210 

Prevssag 

252 34750 


325 

336 

RWE 

16250 16&JD 

Sctwrtng 

4675 

46X0 

Siemens 

513 51050 


93JP 


Verb, 

176 

177 



VEW 

13260 122J0 

VomsxMBenwerk 

193 

>95 

Cemmerzbank index : 1.15*44 

Prevtoos : i,ui jo 
Source: AFP. 


1 

j Hong Kong 1 1 

Bk East Asia 

200 

24 80 


1150 

1160 


14.90 

1480 


KUO 

10.90 


4*55 

4*35 




HK HOIStS 

XUS 

J3« 




MK Shanghai 

A90 

9 


A0J0 

61 

HK Wharf 

5J0 

560 

Hu ten Whampoa 

19J0 

20 

Jordlne Math 

8.70 

195 


8J0 

8J0 

New Wend 

SAS 


Shaw Bros 

2575 

3J5 

SHK Props 

950 

9J0 

St me DtPbv 

650 

630 

Stetu* 

IAS 

\M 

Swire Pacific A 

2420 

U 

Wheel Mar 

1 

i 

wneetock 



wnraor 




,T*hR»r! 




Other Markets Feb. 1 

Closing Prices in local currencies 


Ct«M Pru 

World Inl'l 1.96 1.93 


Hod* Sena ladex ; 1JS6J6 
Previess : 15*582 
Source: AFP. 


Johannesburg 


AECI 

Bartow* 

Blvvoor 

Battels 

Elands 

GFSA 


Kloof 


PstStmvn 
Rustplat 
SA Brews 
51 Helena 


720 720 

990 970 

1600 1450 
6675 6600 
1325 1325 
2750 2600 
2600 2625 
7000 7025 
915 940 

5700 5*25 

i*ss i*eo 

5TO 585 
3375 3300 
567 560 


CentPMH* Stock Index : 95*50 
Provlms : 9*9 jo 

Source.' AFP. 


London 


AACorp 

S11*% 

sitto 

Allied +. vara 

175 

179 

Anglo Am Gold 

SS3'% 

*85 

Babcock 

146 

IS1 

Sore tars 

639 

634 

Boss 

491 

4*4 - 

BAT. 

363 

368 

Beechqm 

360 

363 

BICC 

254 

258 

BL 

37 

37 

BOC Group 

284 

288 

Boots 

170 

176 

Bammter Indus 

228 

230 

BP 

52* 

sn 

Brit Home St 

239 

245 

Brn Telecom 

124 

1241% 

BTR 

639 

654 

Burmoh 

212 

213 

Codbury Scftw 

161 

161 

Charter Cons 

206 

30* 

Coats Paten* 

155 

1SS 

Cans Gold 

499 

497 | 

CeurtauMs 

140 

141 1 

Oatgetv 

47* 

47t 1 

D* Beene 

473 

473 ' 

Distillers 

305 

306 . 

Drletontein 

S341% 

S34V* 1 

Dun too 

35V, 

36*% 

Flsans 

280 

28Bi 

Freest Ged 

*21*4 

S21t> 1 

GEC 

204 

SO* 


GKN 
Glaxo c 
Grand Met 
Guhmess 
GUS 
H anion 

Hawker 

ICI 


CKnc Pr*v 
204 198 


Uovdt Bank 

Lonrho 

Luca* 

Marks and So 
Metal Box 
Mknand Bank 

Not West Bank 

Pllhlngton 
Piesiey 
Rocal Elect 

Randtontetn 

Rank 

Read Inti 

Reuters 

Royal Duteftl 

RTZ 

Shell 

STC 

5td Chartered 

Tote end Lvie 

Te sco 
Thom EMI 
T.l.araue 
Tratalaar Hse 
THF 

Ultramar 
Unilever C 
United Biscuits 
Vickers 
W-Deep 
WJfaldlim 
War Loan 3<% c 
WMlworfh 
ZCI 


1127/37 

295 

23* 

699 

214 

*29 

842 

194 

577 

182 

217 

124 

415 

349 


183 
208 

SB7V, 589v, 

338 338 

512 -574 

330 330 

4625/3246 37/64 
639 647 

746 743 

252 252 

917 519 

455 458 

233 230 

419 421 

232 73* 

3*2 364 

150 151 

. 302 203 

1127/3211 61/61 

194 19$ 

234 233 

USVj S36W. 

*27*. *28 

344% 34*. 

58* 593 

■1% 19 


rOreal 
Matra 
Ml chelln 
MM Pennor 
Moot Hennessv 
Mouttnex 
Nard-Est 
Occldenlakr 
Pernod Rlc. 
Petroles l»S*> 
Peugeot 
Poclaln 
Prlntemps 
Radlotechn 
Redaute 
Roussel udaf 
SMs Roistgnol 
Seur .Perrier 
Telemecon 
Thomson CSF 
Valeo 


Close 

197* 

237S 

1711 

800 

70.10 

1975 

100.10 

7X70 

710 

709 

251 

375 

51 

195 

272 

12*0 

1S99 

1990 

480 

2270 

499 

257 


Prev 
1985 
2375 
1808 
790 
66 
1957 
100 50 
79 JO 
712 
715 
250.40 
775 
50 
193 JO 
268 
7M> 
1597 
1990 
48X50 
2385 
<54 
253 


Southland 
Woods! dc 
Wormald 


Close pr 


25 

88 

318 


;«SI7 

'*>**--- 


Agefl Index : ifsji 
PreylOBl ; IBIS 
CAC Index 1 19X7* 
Previous : INJI 
Source.- A FP. 


Singapore 


Bouslead 

CrtdStoraa* 

D85 

FrararNeove 
Mow Par 
tnchcope 
Keppel Ship 
Mai Banking 
OCBC 
OUB 

Sen* ShUtyard 
S Oorbv 
5 Weamshto 

SI Trading 
UOB 


1.70 1J3 

2J9 

5^5 XIO 

249 241 

2J5 2J5 

IJ6 1JB 
AJ5 6.10 
9 JO 9J5 
. < U| 
41 1J» 

1.96 1.94 

l-<6 1.15 

4J6 4J0 

«8 4 JO 


F.T. 38 Index : 777 Jfi 
Pr wb si ; mxii 
Source; AFP. 


Montreal 


*3752 Bank blent 
500 Cl L _ 

11717 Can Bath 
3591 Dom 7*1 A 
2D25M/W Tr»l 
125143 Net HkCdo 
17150 Power Cara 
1100 Holland A 
59582 Astral Bank 
500 Rev TrstCn 

nO Stetflbrg A 

TOW Soles: 118X053 


HWI 

S27T% 


129 

518 

*12Mi 

S14"i 

J16'< 

cm 

51*^1 

5311% 

1181% 

5281% 

share* 


Law Close CMe 
271% 27H— *4. 
29 29 ♦ '% 

ITSk 17*i — '•* 
12 T2 — '% 
14'% UV— t« 

164 T4W 
28'% 2M+ >.% 
16V, 148— 
30T% 30V 1% 
18 1B<« 

28V, 3fl + •« 


Canadian Indexes Feb. 1 


Close Prevleat 

122.94 124.16 

2^75.40 2J95JW 
wontreo!; siock E«ctiofige intfustfiots index. 
Toronto: TSE 300 Index. 


Montroal 

Toronto 


Qiicago Market to Offer 
New Currency Futures 


/tcWiTS 

CHICAGO — The Chicago 
Mercantile Exchange will begin 
trading options in British pound 
and Swiss franc futures on Feb. 25. 
the exchange has announced. 

Trading must still be approved 
by the Commodity Futures Trad- 
ing Commission, the exchange said 
Thursday. Normal trading hours 
will be 7:30 A.M. to 1:20 P.M. local 
time (1330 to 1920 GMT> for 
pound options and 7:30 to 13:24 
for Swiss franc options. 


I Milan | 

Banco Comm 

18950 


Centraie 

2930 


aeonoteis 

5920 



2240 

2191 

Farm 1 lotto 

10010 10IM9 


2425 

2400 

FlnskJer 

53JS 

54 75 

Ceneroll 

39*00 39195 

IFI 

7000 


llatcemxntl 


Mediouenca 

sjaat 


Montedison 

1405 


Olivetti 

6550 

6630 

Pkreiu 

2285 

2229 

RAS 

69700 68350 

RtfwcofU* 

585 JO 

511 

SIP 

2170 

3161 

Snio 

2630 

2625 

Sianda 


9410 

MIB Index : 1.199 



=Terfoos :L1» 



Source: AFP. 



Paris 1 


OUB index :422J0 
Frevtou* ;4JL77 
sovra: Orrmes uniat Sank. 


Stockholm 


Air Ltauide 
Aismam All 
»v Oassauti 
BartCalr* 

BIC 

BomrWM 
BSH-GO 
Carrefour 
Clud Msd 
cotuiwa 
Dumez 
Etf-Arnrimne 
Estml 
Gan Eaux 
Hactiatts 
imefot _ 
Laiarge Coo 


59* 

330.10 

£ 

881 

■80 

618 

411 

578 

500 

749 

743 

3357 

2365 

1851 

1843 

1200 

1301 

2*3 

2*3 

699 

TOO 

226 331 W 

!W1 

991 

572 

510 


1900 1895 

78 7560 
406 JO 406 


AGA 

AHa Laval 

Amo 

Astra 

Atlas Caeca 
BOIIOOT 
Electrolux 
Er Mason 
EsselM 
Honan stmon 

Phormucto 

5aob-Scanta 

Sandvlk 

Skanska 

SKF 


Source: AFP. 


367 

3*2 

198 

196 

160 

NA 

357 

N.O. 

114 

>13 

179 

175 

21* 

277 

291 

290 


375 

106 

>87 

221 

212 

4SS 

44J 

390 

385 

97 

«SJD 

191 

192 

249 

248 

268 

263 


:44448 


1T~ Sydney ] 


ACI 

ANI 

ANZ 

Bhp 

Boral 

Bougainville 

Brambles 

Caws 

Cemaica 

CRA 

CSR 

Dunlap 

Elders ini 

Hooker 

Mopellan 

MIM 

Mver 

Ookbriaee 

P#ko 

Poseidon 

ROC 

s»mai 

Sleigh 


l!9 ’*■ 

2S4 2J5 


472 46* 

?* So 


335 55 

I?5 194 


365 

413 


233 235 

sg nS 


330 m 

«« 2H 


to* w 
2!i 313 


310 23Q 

460 


'*i m 

65 


920 430 

?65 265 


52 w 

HO 52a 


'88 in 


AH Ord too Has Index :77Z7s 
Previous : 77X48 
Source: Reuters. 




Tokyo 


Ahol 

Asotll Chem 
Asatu Glass 
Bank Ol Tokyo 
Bridges lone 

Canon 

□ Nippon Print 

Dalwm 
Full Bonk 

PudPhoio 

Fulltsu 

Hlfoctll 

Honda 

■HI 

non 

JAL 

Kdllma 

Kanwi Elec Pwr 
KaaSaop 
Kaw Steel 
Kirin 
Komatsu 
Kubota 


450 

681 

870 

630 

530 


. Dbb »I 

‘I-:.’ 


930 
%51 
1350 
1750 
1350 
863 
1420 
148 
W 
5250 
274 
1370 
B3S 
147 
561 
453 

JJotSu Elec Inds lS 


715 

875 

648 

528 

1420 






660 

1350 

1770 

1380 

>76 

1440 

145 

340 

5310 

272 

1380 


Mlisub Bank 

MtsubOwm 

M 2"? Elec 

Mijsub Heavy 

Mitsubishi 

Mitsui 

MUsukastit 

Mitsumi 

NEC 

Nlkkosec 
Nippon Steel 
UjPBon Yusen 
Nissan 
Nomura Sec 
Olympus 
Rican 
Sharp 
Sony 

Sum) Bank 

Sum Chem 

Syrnl Metal 

Tahei 

TaJsho 

Takedo 

TMIIn 

TJMortne 

Tk Power 

Toruv 

Toshiba 

Toyota 

Vo mol chi sk 


635 

1400 

428 

403 

234 

525 

33* 

383 

1160 

1180 

605 

150 

240 

608 

910 

1230 

895 

1090 


1680 

216 

ISO 

195 

370 

820 

453 

72* 

1550 

<77 

415 

1290 

598 


147 
567 
455 
330 ■ 
1590 
635 
1300 
365 
4W 
235 . 
525 
329 
385 ■ 
N-Q, 
1220 
635 

238 ■ 
612 
909 . 
1280 ■ 
906 I 
1110/ 
4»D»j 
1670 
211 
145 
198 
372 
82* 
SS 

727 ■ 








gm* index ; Run 


453 
420 
1340 • 
610 - 



Bank Leu 

Brown Baverl 
Clbo G#lgy 

£2««SmMe 
Eiectrowatr 

a Cvr 

gwllkon-6 

SSSJz 80 ^ 

Schindler 

IS'c“ r 

S*rHsalr 

Source: AFP. 


abb 

7B0Q 2800 

7440 SS 

»S0 VK 
151 
SS? 

'640 

5'OS a, 

1360 M 

7800 7M0 
3625 3*3jj 

ii 

B w 




Hv . 




"cr^^rn n ■ 


a&8. 

















NASDAQ Notional 


* m + * 


33 

in 

n 

. ie 

'S s s 

.1* 1J H 

■10b 4 110 
'-a u ’45; 

•W 64 i» 

V i.i w: 

231 

.»*» J 21 W! 

MU ^ 


n nt k 

ST2X % 


NiS A 
®*48 45 

U 6* 6% 
g 5* in 
g SW 3 
30 4W 4 

mb m «, 

187 7 A** 

• M M «4 6% 
,, ra n im 
iJ a tv, t 
’■* «»* »% 
ion Hu u 

8931 life m 

■“ £"S "£ 

„ gsise 

*3 WlBH 171* 
U 26 14 13% 

4* 9 (W 
12,1% « 
2215 4% 4* 

„ 706 10*7 yv 

U 385 18% 17V 
„ 8 15% 14V 

73 ID 7V. 4% 
147 2D* IN* 
44 S% S3* 
32112% 12*. 
4715% IS 
400514% UV 
31 23* Tit 
■5 57*11 I0V3 1 


* * + % 
* 13V— 4* 
9% + V. 

t'St=* 

.l Mh 

» 51* 

3 -V 
4—1* 
i 7 + % 

> 6 %— % 

I 6* + b 
,11V-V 

i 2m 

!* + % 

i M0fc— V 

13% 

18 

13%— % 

•P^S 

1^=5 
18% + % 
15% + V 
AM 

w%- i* 

5V— % 
124*— % 
15% 

14%+ % 
2% — % 
10 % + % 


TCACb 
TocVIv 
Tandem 
Tondon 
TcCom 
Taka 
TlcmA 
TeiPAn 
Tel cm 
Taiacm 
TWapict 
Taivld 
Tatataa 
Tefarni 
Temeo 
Tennant 

„ I TermDt 

*gW% 14% 15% + % TBMBW 


BBOO 1 no 4.1 
BFlCm " 
BCS 

SPTs? 10 “ M 


IS 4 ?. 48% 4* + % 
481 1% 1% T* 

3 8% 8% l%+ V, 
2 7% 716 7%+% 

n a* a* an— % 


23 

3*7 

18* 

M 3, 

» 4^ 
14A 
.1 711 

31*1 
102 
73*1 
7 

A A 54 
122 
45 2D4 
45 7 

8 1 

,5 3 


1582 
39 
57 
554 
21 *' 
*741 
1121 
482 
5782 
4071 
731 


aiMlFfti X2B> 25 1480% MH 80% + % 


125 M% 

14% 

14% 

5 7% 

7% 

7% 

28 TO* 

M% 

10% 

S9SJ4V 34% 

34V 

*0 26% 

25% 

26 + % 

27 5* 

5% 

5* 

44)00 

97 

100 +2 

M 30% 

19* 

SB 

2?«% 

13% 

13*— % 

eu a 

7% 

7%— % 

25 5 

5 

5 + U 

35 13% 

13V 

13V— U 

81 5 

4* 

4*+ * 

M 7 

6* 

6*— * 

64 7% 

6* 

Mi— * 

74 20% 

a 

20 — % 

raw* 

15 

15*+ * 

54 21% 21% 

21% + M 

19 16* 

16% 

16%+ % 

15 1% 

1* 

1% + * 

Q 5* 

5% 

5% 


U.S. Futures Feb. 1 


jww Season 
High Low 


Open Hloh Law Oats 


Season 

Season 


High 

Lew 

Own High Low Close a*. 


m*NOEjuKEanrcEi 
15400 Um.- cants par lb. 

JS5 JfiT EM2 F 7 - 2 * '7340 17440 —3130 
iSa? JfHS ** < ? Y >23 H5 T7S40 T7640 -M0 

i»»ra H55S i“L HH5 2*25 I7 *a> 17750 ^aS 

i«SS JS2 S? IS 4 ® tfBTS 17550 T7140 — 1JO 

mSS 1SS T75 - 7S 175L75 17425 17435 — IJO 

TO® 133 S 17425 17425 “ «g =1 
14250 as “ zjs 


Et-Solaa 2500 Prev.Sales 800 
Prev. Day Open InL 1242 up38B 


Metals 


Close 


5 1.1145 


5 1.1070 


I 1.1105 


1 LMOO 

—50 

! J516 

—6 

1 .7501 

—& 

! 3492 

—4 

> .7465 


-7483 

—6 

.10260 

-^S 

.10215 

—25 


—45 

J137 

—33 

-3158 


3183 

—32 

3216 

—31 

«■»» —92 1 


InstNtw 

■Mean 

intoOv 

IntoGen 

1SSCO 

Intel 

IntlSy 

IntrTel 

Intrnd 

Intdvn 

IntrfPir 

intrfoc 

I morph 

lull man 

fnfmec 

Intimet 

InBWM 

IBkWsA 

InCopE 

imam 

I Game 

fnjjtuw 

IntLse 

InMobll 

IRIS 

IT Cora 

jntTotat 

Invcrw 


'W 4% AH. «%+ % 

JO 3 13040% 40* 40% + * 
117 2% 216 216—% 

» m-% 
17A 4% 4 416 

33 2% 2% 2* 

S3 A% 4% A%— 16 
_ - 13121% 2 1* 23* 

140 45 113 35% 35 35% + % 

1»* 29% 29% +1% 
24 19% I* 19% + % 
14420 18% W +! 

TOW 1016 % H — % 
133 13* 1316 13% + % 
210 4% 4 4% + 16 

_ 22216 2216 22% 
310S3M6 30 30 — % 

7« 0% 0% 0% ^ 

85 2% 2% 2% 

34*15 14 14% +1 

1*21816 *% 1016 + % 
.14 15 4*1 1116 11 II 

24 7% 7% 746— % 
23*7 47 4516 44% + % 
330 7% 7% 7% 

Xa 19% m* 1*%—% 

im 

3~ KtS 

2SI2J u i5%+% 

; 15% 15V 15% + % 

* 390 20 19% 19% 

44 Mb IW 1416 + 16 

g» S 

5,e , 

5>e J 72 516 5 516 

1508 W% 10 1B% + 16 

30 13 IM* 12% — % 
402 416 4 4 — 16 


NCACd 

NMS 

NapcoS 

NBnTax 

NlfCty 

Ntaypf 

NICMr 

NPata 

NHIthC 

Nti_umb 

MAUcm 

NTech 

NatrBly 

NOUS la 

NettnT 

Nelson 

NmkSec 

NstwfcS 

NtwkEl 

Natibvs 

N Brans 

NE Bus 

NHmpB 

NJNots 1 

NYAJrl 

NY Awl 

NwldBk 

Nawpts 

NtMPPtl 

NlCala 

NlckOC 

WksB 

Neman 

Nordstr 

Norsks , 

Nonrinn 

NoANot . 

NAillns 

NaslSv 

NhtNG t. 

NwIPn u 

NwNLx i 


JBRext M U 

Jackpot t 

Jack Lie 

JamWTr 

JaffSKi UO 45 

2SK ? 

#? 12 J 

Jam as i 

Jonsl A t 

Jouptun 
Juno 

Justins J0I 17 


k 17 17% + % 

1 416 4% 

. 36% 37 

> 1*% 30 

isgsr* 
: ^ "Sa* 

« 4% 

> *% *16 


18 816 
34 3% 
1113% 
5 1172116 
J 7140% 
1 1546 

5 2423% 

5 4301116 
1 428 

6 5% 
658 4% 
87 3% 
112 4% 
295 4% 

* 137 7 
7710% 

127 8% 
771627% 
77 «% 
94 22 
333 |% 

> 8 30% . 

I 17*3* 

' 12416 : 

SIS 

• ; 

35B 4 
62 3% 
10 % 
427 9% 
*18% 1 
20* 37 1 

5147 * 

45 6% 

57 616 
32 8% 
182 9% 
129 17% I 
U42% 4 
23234% 3 
60 32V Z 
2401416 l! 
137 3% : 
22747% « 
174 4% f 
27 916 I 
75 *M I 

1413% n 


r 3% 3% + 
i 13% 13%+ % 
> 30% 21% 
i 40% 40%—% 
45V 45%— % 
23% 21% 

10% II — 16 
27% 28 
516 5%+ % 
4 416—% 

3 % 3 %— % 
4% 4% 

A 6% 

C% 7 +% 
1016 1016—16 
8 % 8 % 

27% 27% — 16 
A «%+% 
21 21W— % 

J 8V+ % 
20% 30% —1 
OTfc 23%— 16 
3416 3416— 16 

n 

5% 516—16 


12* 4% 4% 4% 

613% » 13% 

5* 316 ] 3 

14*330% 29% 29V + % 

443 4% 3% 3%— % 1 ThdN l 

.26 12 11% 11%— Vi Thocln 

151811% 10% I0%— I6 Thortec 
TTieuTs 
3Com 
TlmeEs 
T me FID 
Tlprary 
Tofux 
ToNSvs 
TrokAu 
Trr.M 
TrlodSy 

TrlMJc 
TrusJe 
TBkGo 
Tuck Dr 
TwnCly 
Tyson F 


U5LICO 
% UTL 
% UltTScP 
LMtrty 
Unamn 
Unm 
UnPbtir 
UnTrBc 
UACom 
UBAtak 
UBCol 
UnDonr 

UnEdS 
UFnCrp 
UFsiPd 
UGrdn 
UPresd 
US Ant 
U5Bca ' 
US Cop 
USD ran 
US Enr 
USHts 
US am 
USSur 
USTrk 
USTr 
USiotns 
UnTetev 
UVaBs \ 
UmrFm 
UnvHH 
UFSBk 
UiaeCr 
Usade 


.12 J 3 17 
113 «% 
■ 8*7*25% 

5734 7 
7 7% 
401 21% 
t 33* 24% 
1363 10% 

m 7% 

-32 |j 300 20% 
*13 2116 
709 3% 
51818% 
■Ole 147120% 
4* <% 

JO 45 21 22 

t 9 n* 
8 1 % 
11 * 1 % 
J5e 15 6*13% 

114 13% 
461316 

1-29 U 7 35% . 
67012% 
14211 
7319 
8*331016 
74012% 
*5 9% 
t 236 1% 
71 1416 1 
1515% 1 
4015V. 1 
54 3% 
33510% 1 
14 5 

M 13 0 30 2 

1J0 25 283 3516 3 
293 6 


17 17—16 

% * *16 + 16 
6 23% 24%— % 
4% *V+ % 
A 7% 7% 

6 ]*% 21% +1% 
fe 26% 24% + % 
II 10% IO% + % 
6 7% 7%— % 
6 20% 20%+ % 
6 20% 21 - % 
k 3% 3%+ % 
k 17% 17%— % 
k 15V 1*46 + % 

i m, <v+ % 

22 23 —16 

1 8% 8%— % 
t Ilk 1% + % 

■ 1% 1% + % 
l 13 U%— % 

i 13% 72% — % 

> 11% 1216 
1 35% 35% 
i H % 13 — % 
TO* lWfc— % 
10% tSV— 16 
*% *H— 1% 
1316 12V— % 
9% 9% 
i% m+% 

14 1416+16 

15% 15V 
14% 15 
3% 3%— % 

10% 10% + % 
4% 4%_ % 

29% 29V— % 
34% 34% — % 
5% 5*+ % 
1% IV,— % 
3SU 34 —V 


0 4430% 38 

2 20% 20% 
3 3 30 30 

9 24T 4% 4* 
1105 3016 20 
*09 10% TO 
430 l*% 

1 1354 54 

I 5430 2*% 

I 5*10% 1016 
I 124 21% 2AW 
I 14411% 11* 
1 2% 2% 
13010* IS 
25 14% 15V 
4518% 18 
151116 11 
42 3% 3% 
27725% 25 

S3 i S 

1WW 34Vk 
38 4% 4 
7431816 17% 
4213% 1316 
544 45V 

57 23V 23 
7818% 18% 
37 36* 34% 
1401816 IT* 
37513V 13% 
18*10* 10 
3*9 6 5% 

70 3% 3% 


30 — % 
■ 2B%+ % 
X 

. *%— * 

2016 

10*+ % 
i 1*16 

54 —16 
X 

1014- 16 
34% — % 
11V— % 
2% 

10 *— % 
14%+ * 
10 -% 
1116 
3% 

25 

TV + * 
5Vfc— * 
5% + % 
25% + 16 
4 - % 
18% + * 
13% 

44 

23V + % 
18%— % 
36%— % 
17%—* 
13% 

10*— % 
5*— % 
3% + % 


.9% 9* 

U 18 — % 
36% 37 + % 
44% 44*+ % 
4% 4%— % 
8 % 8 % 

0% 016— * 
*% *%-% 
17% 17* 

4216 42*— % 
3416 34% — % 
22% 22%—* 
15% 14% + 16 
3% 3* 

47% 47% 

.4 4% 

Nfa 9% 

8* #*— % 
12 % 12 *+ % 


III 


VLI 

VLSI 

VMX 

VSE 

Valid La 

VaiFSL 

ValNH 

VaILn 

VanOuc 

Vanzetl 

VectrG 

VetoBd 

Ventrax 

veto 

VtomF 

Vkorn 

Vidros 

VtodePr 

VHclna 

Vlnotak 

VUTccll 

VodovI 

Voninf 

Volvo 

Vtortae 

VyqusT 


385 7% 7% 
144 10V 10* 
45411 18* 

.150 1 J ***** 

151918 17* 

7610% W16 
1JD 3J 31232* XI* 
Me 1J 2606 27% 2616 
•40 11 7$ 13% n 

11414 13% 

2S> 1 * 

*16% 16% 

* 

398 4% 416 
.IX 3 14818* 18% 
713 3% X* 
J2s 17 13*13% 13 
514 13% 

101*% 1* 
ra 2 iv 
113 8% 7* 
5920 1« 

158532* 31* 

.13r 14 5 *16 9% 

115 0 7% 


10%— % 
18V— % 
9*+ % 
17%—% 

art* 

14 

% 

16%—% 
V + ,t 

«js 

3*+ % 
U%— * 
14 + V 
19%+ % 
2 + % 
0 — % 
19V— V 
32* +1% 
*% 

8 + M 


III 


Industrials 


110223V 33 
8 5% 5 

J6 2.1 8326% 26% 

■4M 4J W 14% 13* 
518 9% 0% 

'■M 17 1 m>49V 49 
JO 11 2J37V 37* 

199 416 4 

.54 u sir & 

J6 A 4905 15% 14* 

■06 3 2g 0V 8% 

■32 23 1500 M% 14 
■14 A 238 29% 28% 


23%—% 

jJ%-% 

s* + . lt 

4% — % 
18*+ % 

X +1 
7 

14*+ * 
1* + * 


7B5 

221 

47 

29* 

126 

JO 11 24* 
27 


U0O 28 34. 

■15s J 44; 
40 1J 136! 

'i» 4J 3J - 

i 5 B 2£ 3 


i 24%— % 
> 12 % — % 
i X 

27 + % 
12* + * 
16% — % 
B%— % 
13 

11 *+ % 
64* +12% 
.9*+ % 
10 %- % 
18 - % 
21 + % 
34% 

29. +1 * 

25%— % 
4% 

B%+ % 
3*%+% 

.■*— * 
M* + % 
10% 

12* + % 
**— % 
4%—* 
21 — tfe 
5V— % 
17% — 1 
27* 

«-* 


472 5% 5% 5% 

689 12* n* 12* — % 
744 15% 1516 15% + % 


Livestock 


CATTLE (C44E] 

40800 bs^ rants nor b. 

67J0 42S0 Fob 4680 4655 6&90 <635 +43 

Ain 63.40 A4W 60.10 60.90 47.92 4075 +70 

*9J» 6SM Jim 68140 4*JB *835 6690 +J5 

66B2 43.15 Aim 6645 6677 6627 6665 +J3 

65.10 6140 Oct 66J7 64J5 6635 4475 +J0 

6550 4348 Dec 4570 4190 6165 6550 +.15 

6610 6125 Feb 6610 6610 6610 6620 +.15 

Est.Oolas 14406 Prev.Sales 15457 
Prw. Dmr open ML 58789 off 303 
FEEDER CATTLE (CMC! 

+*4KW ms.- csnfgper m. 

7475 6535 Mar 73J0 7445 73J0 7617 +32 

7405 4740 Apt 7122 73LB5 7117 7175 +43 

7142 6695 Mav TtSS 7140 7100 7140 +43 

71.97 6640 Aug 7145 7270 7145 72.10 +45 

7140 4700 SOP 71.15 71JS 71.15 7145 +40 

7040 <7.10 Oct 7040 7DJ0 7D45 WM) +43 

7147 7040 NOV 7145 7140 7145 7140 +.15 

' Est. Sates 1434 Prev. Sola* 1342 
Prev. Day Open ird. njos up179 
KOCS(CME) 

XJOO #I6f cents per lb. 

5830 4747 Feb 5172 5140 51.10 5175 +.13 

5445 6S.10 Apr 40 35 69.10 4670 «92 +.T7 

5540 4840 JIM 5175 5612 5175 5405 +70 

• 5577 4695 Jut 5635 5448 5630 5452 +.12 

5637 4740 Aug 5375 5340 5372 5372 —.05 

5175 4500 Oct 4195 49.15 4M0 41*7 +47 

mos 4630 Dee 4100 49.15 4975 

4970 4475 Fab 4930 4930 6930 4140 —35 

4735 4575 Apr 4690 —35 

E*t Sales 5341 Prev. Safe* 7754 
Pi-sv. Day Open inL 29.917 up 223 
IlPORK BELLIES (CJHE1 
^38300 csnts per lb. 

8145 <095 Feb 7078 7175 7050 7375 +730 

8170 60.10 MOT 71X 7147 7097 7X47 +230 

8230 6L15 Mav 7270 7660 7240 7650 +175 

. 8247 6X15 JM 7195 7670 7235 7655 +173 

. 8035 6020 AUB 71.10 7230 7130 7270 +138 

75.15 6115 Feb 6425 6605 6425 6655 +135 

7330 6430 Mar 4530 6150 6550 6577 +77 

Eft Sales 6MD Prev.Sales 9303 
Prev. Day Opra InL 16452 ua 774 


xm ’S* 1= *6 0250% 9M 30%-% 

StSvSSSrS ^ 170a 23 fiSvs&sSTS 

139317% 17 T7%+% SSS 30 16 “l2% 14* iSk + S 


ZenLbB 
ZOntec 

| Orator 40a 17 
* p-JUt ,34 « 


X» 23% 

147 5% 5 5 — % 

64 13V 13 13 — C 

4 W 33% 33V 

Sj&St S£ + ^ 
,2 « + “ 

1354 1* 1* 1% 


Financial 


HOMG-KONO COLD FUTURES 
U33 per ernes 

HMi Law BU* AU 

Pet _ N.T. N.T. 306SQ 30600 3D600 M 
Mar- N.T. K.T. 30630 30830 X630 XUO 
API — N.T. N.T. 307.00 309JM 30100 31030 
Jun — N.T. N.T. XI X00 31400 3,230 31400 
Aug - N.T. N.T. 31600 31830 31600 ItRMJ 
Od _ 32130 32130 3X30 32230 32130 
Dee 32630 3M30J2530 32730 3%30 »30 
Volume: 24 lot* of 100 az. 

SINGAPORE COLD FUTURE5 
UES Per aaace 


Stock Indexes 


^ HU Law 

Feb N.T. N.T. 

Men- N.T. N.T. 

AbJ 3UB.S3 307.70 

JfD) M T M T 

Volume: 475 tots of 100 az." 
SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Smgapore cents per kfle 
Close 

Bid Aik 
RfSIFsb- ,6630 16730 

RS51Mar_ 17175 172.15 

RSS2Ffb- 15830 15930 

RSS 3 Fsb_ 15630 15730 

RS5 4Fsb_ 14930 15130 

RSS 5 Feb _ 141.00 14330 

Source: Routers. 


Sefflt Settle 
30430 30630 

3065) 30730 

30870 308L40 
31230 3T240 


Previous 
Bid Ask 

16675 1657S 
17130 17150 
15775 15875 

1557S 15675 

14875 15075 

14075 1427S 


In 


Dividends Feb. 1 


COFFEE cmvcsce) 

37400 lbs.- cants per ib. 

15X50 12X50 Mss- I49J0 15UV 

,15230 12231 May 14690 14645 

14930 12130 Jw, 14634 14545 

14750 12730 Sep 14130 143.10 

Ml JO 12975 Dec 14175 14155 

1X30 12850 Mar 13975 13975 

13830 131J0 Mav 

Jul 

EkLSaM* 1575 Prev.Setes M77 
Prev. Dav Open Int 16435 UP7S7 
SUGARWORUD 11 OIYCSCE} 

412J00 Bm- cents «w lb. 

1X60 601 Mar 479 645 

JUM 634 May 680 67B 

‘ASM 653 Jul 69* SJ8 

T0M5 6» Sep 615 £72 

•935 5J7 Od 536 551 

775 555 Jai 573 5.93 

1 933 602 Mar 628 643 

' 7.1 S 639 May .680 671 

Ft ! 7570 Prev. Sotos Ti'« 

Prev. Day Openlnt 91773 up 547 
COCOA MYCKE> 
nmetrlc%«iiMT9o" 99 ~. 

2570 1988 Mar *27 8 229B 

2570 23M May ^ 

sm Jul Vgl BB 
2415 mm Sep 22X5 2275 

SS7 M S5 M 213B 

2145 2020 MOT 2115 211* 

2130 2080 May , _ 

Est. Soft* 1514 Prev.Sales S389 
Prev. Dav Open InL 21616 M>lJU 


14950 IS0J5 
14660 14750 
14330 14665 
14159 14232 
141J5 1J1J0 
13975 13975 
13838 
13730 


627 643 
660 671 
691 S04 
5.15 530 
535 646 
573 537 
620 643 

640 669 


2287 2292 

2295 2319 

2202 2295 

2250 5275 

2125 2145 
2115 2133 

2133 


Commodity Indexes 


Close 

W»dy's 972JHJ f 

Reuter* miavi 

DJ. F ufares: ~ ^26J? 

Com. Researcli Bureau _ 248.10 

Moody's : base 100 : Dec 31, 1931 
P - Preliminary; t - final ” * 
Routers : base 100 : Sep. 11 mi. 
Dow Jonas : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1974, 


Market Guide 


Comoan Par Amt Pay Rec 

INCREASED 

Commanwirti Tele. o 30 2-25 3-11 

Donnelley (R.R.) Q 39 j-t 2-11 

INITIAL 

Prtnceviiie Dev. Co . X 2-22 2-11 


Previous 
. WlJOf 
24)1 9 JO 
126.10 
247.10 


USUAL 

AH. Perm Fed S6L 0 
Bankers Trust Sc C 
Cameron iron Works a 

Corson Plrle Scott Q 

Consolidated Fds Q 

Data Cant Q 

Demtar Inc 0 

EnsarchCorn o 

Entax Inc O 

Rrstoulf Bancorp Q 

cn Lks Forest Prds O 

Key Phorm. Q 

Litton Industries 0 

Atary Kav Cosmetics Q 

Nan Med. Enierprs a 

Ookwaad Homes O 

CHin Carp 0 

Sandgale Corn o 

T» Amer Jncsbrs Q 

WDiohott Lumber q 

XTRACorp Q 


O 33 2-21 2-1 T 

O 35 +1 3-X 

0 J3 3-15 3-1 

§ 0 JO 3-8 2-27 
■36 4-1 3-1 

56 3-20 3-6 

Q J3 3-15 Ml 
O AO 14 2-lj 

O 32 % 3-22 2 .33 
9 » 4-1 ns 

O 40 +1 3-1 

Q M +10 3-15 

0 50 +1 247 

Q JJ 3-29 M 

0 .13 3-15 2-25 

□ 52 2-25 9-11 


High Low dose Previous 
SUGAR 

Mar 12540 12150 1233D 12140 121 JO 121JD 
May moo 129JM 130J0 131 .DO I3U0 12&2D 
Auo 14040 137JD T3930 13940 mao T36M 
Od 14740 I44J30 14580 14630 14M0 144JV) 
Dec I5ZDQ 15X00 15240 15600 15040 15140 
Mar ,6840 16530 16660 167X iSS 16680 
«W «.T. N-T-17340 175JJ0 17150 172J0 
IT* lots of SO tans. 

COCOA 

Mar 2300 2.168 X187 XI SB XI 82 2.1M 

MOV 2323 UM 2313 2315 2300 2309 

Jfy 2304 2.168 X185 1187 XlS X19B 

5eo U85 1153 X165 X166 ZT73 X177 

Dec X035 X005 2517 2020 X02S X030 

Mar 2520 2500 2501 2507 2510 2520 

N-T. N.T. 1580 2510 2500 25X 

4521 lots at 10 Ions. 

COFFEE 

Mar 2385 2362 2378 2380 2360 236S 

May 239S 2380 2383 23*7 2374 2J75 

Jl» 2410 2JM 23*2 2397 2389 2391 

Sea 2415 2394 2393 2J«8 23*3 2395 

Nov 24X 2404 2404 2405 2402 24K 

Jan 24 TO 2398 2395 2405 2390 200 

M« N.T NT. JJ75 2400 New _ 

2510 lots of Stent. 

GASOIL 

Feb 23435 22935 23050 23035 23135 23250 
Mar 22600 22050 222.75 70 .00 22,35 BUD 
API 21650 21350 21535 21625 21625 $1435 
May 21600 21235 21650 31550 21X25 31350 
Jim 21350 21250 21350 21450 31150 21250 
JIV 21350 21150 31150 31600 21050 31350 
Aug N.T. N.T. 21150 21750 20650 21850 

Sep N.T. NLT. 21150 71V50 20650 23050 

_ ,"-T. ,JjLT. 2,150 22250 New 
2547 lots of 100 tons. 

COLD 

Feb 30550 305150 N.Q. NX. NJ2. NA. 

API X8J0X6X N.Q. NJ3. N.a NA. 

Ju ?*, HjQ - Nj0 ' N -° Na - 

13 lore of too tray oz. 

Sources: Reuters and London Petroleum Ex- 
cnenoo (mswi. 1 . 


5Ut5AR HW ' ^ a “* CSTse 

Mar 1380 1360 1367 l jm _ <• 

aS? ^ 1-22 14,7 ,4 T» -11 

IS }S2 J5M ,301 —9 

Oct un 1336 Uio 1570 — 10 

Dec N.T. N.T. 1440 JAM —IB 

Mar 1.753 1350 1347 TJS2 Z,5 

^ tens- Prev- octuol 
rates: 1374 lots. Open Interest: 20,127 
COCOA 

Mar 2340 2310 2314 2330 +3 

Mav 2385 X342% 2360 2364 +1 

JIV M.T. N.T. X34f — +1 

N.T. N.T. MM 2370 UnefL 
D«C N.T. N.T. _ iSa —ID 

Mar N.T. N.T. — xS — 70 

MOV N.T. N.T. — — ID 

pf 10 tens. Prev. actual 
soles: 334 Ml Open interest: 916 
COFFEE 

Mar 2345 2340 2340 2343 +37 

S h: ss «“ ti 

S sst ;& ss a IB 

J?" N.T. N.T. 2370 23M I Te 

M°£_ N-T. N.T. 2365 XMQ _! 

2J2*. J* 5 tpn6 Prev. actual 
sales. ,6 lots. Open Interest: 229 
Source: Bourse do Commerce. 


London Metals Feb. 1 

Rgum In Bferilna per metric ton. 
Silver (n penes per trov ounce. 


Commodity and UnH 
Coffee 4 Santas. %___ 
Pnmdoth 64/30 38 %. yd _ 

Steel billets ( PI ft. J, ton 

lron 2Fdrv.Pfllloi.ton 

Steel scrap No 1 fiw Pitt. . 

LeodSaot.ib 

Cooper elect- Ib 

Ttn (Strolls). Ib — 

I'PfcS-St.t-BasIs.lb 

Palladium, ez — 

Silver N.Y.az _______ 

Source: AP. 


S&p 100 Index Options 

Feb. I 


51H| Cflhr ) art H- l, I ^ 

w * Ur M iln 

}S - - - - - 1/14 - _ 

S 5k" - ~ JAI I/M - 

JS I5f IE? S 5 


in m i*'? Kw 

MS S ni % - iS ft 

S » « >* - is ? \ 

ITS 3% 56 n OL. iJ* U 

no Hk IS N U A If 9 

m % I*. B 55 s* « » 

W8 1/16 *. IB 3% 13% nt - 

Wrfcrtwteme MU39 

%g csij mesiw . gt7i9 

%W«it notawe USB 
SB?* «anbl5»3in 
MW! 

HWI17LU Lav 1767] Ckae 17756— 1 18 

Source: CBOE. 


Today 

h Wi erode cooper cathodes : 
SPOt 134450 134550 

Xmonths 136550 136530 
Coaner cothodes: 


DM Futures Options 

Feb. 1 

H. Gannon MorUKUSD mnt cbE Mr mort 


»ot 133950 134150 
Xmonms 135450 135650 
Tbl: SPOt 9,95350 956050 
3 months 9.90550 9,90650 
Leod;spot 33950 34150 


OJ7% 3-11 3-11 
O 30 +25 4-4 

Q . J8 +3 US 

Q 54 37 3-15 

Q .15 a-a j-a 


A-Aonyol, M-Montaty; Q-Ouorterlv; s-Seml- 

A nn uoL 


Wee Mar in SW1 Mar Jim SM 

s » — — QJJl — ^ 

* IJ8 MO — UM 024 — 

I VO 0J9 fSa L» 

| s s o is a ^ 

B — 0.10 — — 155 — 

MJmtrtM letel VSL64U 

Ster*- 1«£ 6066 InL J7JO 

Pvti : Thurs. vei 1353 oph InL I9JQ4 

Anew: CMC. 


Lead;spot 33950 34150 

9 months 36050 3425B 

Zrnc:BPOt 73600 73650 

3 months 73550 73650 

Stiver: aoot 

9 months 56*30 57050 

Aluminium: 

*POt 97050 97150 

Imanlta 150050 150150 
Nickel: spot 651050 651550 
3 months 651050 651550 
Source: ffeufrrs. 


> 1353.00 135450 
I 137250 1 37X91 

I 134350 134550 
I 136050 136250 
l 9510.00 952050 
i 9,90050 9,90750 
33950 34050 
341-50 34250 
73550 73750 
73550 73650 
$6650 56750 
58650 wfiM 

97X00 77450 
150X5) 150600 
649050 450050 
450050 451050 



Japanese Firm Pulls Out 
Of Canada Gas Venture 

Reuters 

TOKYO — Osaka Gas Co. an- 
nounced Friday that it has with- 
drawn from a Canadian liquefied 
natural gas project with Dome Pe- 
troleum Lid. because it expects de- 
lays in gas shipments that would 
cause problems in its supply sched- 

Osaka Gas was one of six Japa- 
nese companies participating in the 
project The others are Chubn Elec- 
jnc Power Co., Kyushu Electric 
Power Co, Chugoku Electric Pow- 
er Co., Toho Gas Co. and Nissho 
I wax Corp. 


Source: UP! 













































PfTKBMA'nONAl. HERALD imB HWE.SATUBDAY^nvnj, 

SPORTS 


Page 13 





: NBA Standings 

BASTE Du nuiDr. 


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Chicago 

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Cleveland 








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_ M « 39 39-129 

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Hockey 


NHL S tandin gs 


Five Nations Rugby: 
French Team Emerges 
As the One to Beat 

By Bob Donahue 

t AMnnv £f to "“ w * rf Retail Tribune 

F™* « !2 “ 1116 Rv ? 1 Nations rugby season starts Saturday with 
^b^Z be “*w »“<* of tta four British 

"« F&«* a, "the tans. 

XfS^| a ” y [ rom ht “ Fouroujt, 
t>°^ pbym ' ktq>! “^“S hfs nm “a good tSmtnjt not yet a 


,,r 


you 
great one. 
England 


S-SXl iSfJSi mck - flt ‘b® Freocb “d ias home advantage 


Seattle 


Skiing J 
World Championships 

MEITS COMBINED 
Downhill 

, ... (“ Bormta. Italy) 

s "«wrtand. two min- 

• «w 8034 seconds 
J Pater Lueedwr. Switzerland. 2:0054 

l «« J9 

A Todd Braoker, Canada 2:01.7* 

S. Michael Molr. Italy. 2:0141 
A Doug Lewie. U4^ 2:02.04 
7. Franck Piccard, France, 2:1050 
*■ Anton Steiner. Aistrla 2:0244 
9. PUlippe Verneret, France, 2:0240 
* “t* St«Yan Lea Australia 2:0240 
& «®«er, Lleetilemtala 2:0179 

Sy ””* "** 1 . Wwt Germany, 2:0tt4l 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick tMvluoe 

W L T m GP CA 

33 13 7 *9 214 151 

” u 4 44 207 147 

24 21 1 55 229 201 

»7 24 B 42 175 1*9 

18 25 5 41 17V 220 

15 29 5 3$ |*7 

Adams Division 

3S 14 IB 40 198 
33 >5 12 a in 
24 SO 7 55 199 

24 21 7 55 191 
17 25 5 39 159 
CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 
Norris Division 

Chiasm* 31 19 9 51 184 

2S2SL 22 24 3 47 200 

“‘ mwo,n 15 25 ID 40 17S 

15 30 7 37 182 234 
11 32 4 28 154 218 
_, Sinvft» Division 

36 9 4 78 2» 147 
T » 19 7 59 243 202 

Mnnloeg 24 21 5 57 224 228 

U» Angeles 22 20 9 53 233 214 

Vancouver 13 32 7 33 TO m 

THURSDAY’S RESULTS 
New Jersey 0 8 V-l 

PMtaMpMa 2 | £5 

J^. to /3° , ' Br0 " T1 (31, Eriksson (SI; Mull- 

erilM. Skats oggsa!: Now Jersm- («, Lhkt. 

berah) ^2^-lV; Pfiitadeighla (on 
Rasau 6-U4-23. 

Quebec 
Baslaa 


are 

’s 


Washlnolon 
PWtodeWita 
NY Islanders 
NY Ronoers 

Pittsburgh 
New Jersey 

Montreal 
Birftaio 
Quebec 
Baatan 
Hanford 


Dofrott 

Toronto 


206 

14* 

146 

181 

180 

205 


109 

194 

201 


A-Vr ““(cues at l wick cnh-im 

^-•stssys?- ^ 



tmght la bLT^'^-to ?ym,netricl1 ^ ^ 

I iPOnH i'llteei — S 4»_ . ^ * 


. rr . — — uiu jr&u, but not much. 

Scntl^oK^ 1 , w ? mers ? flen decompress and slump the next year 

?=^'=a£=s,'s.Tl».5' 


»SSSisssisa33BSS 



^ejapiaincy reverts to scru mhalf 1X 
Ireland is an unknown quantity. Of 
opening day last year, nine are gont i 
Keane, WniielXi ~ 


imealder 
Newcem- 
rugby, Iwan Tukalo. 

ayed oo 
Moss 



Ziirbriggin Is Victor 
In Combined Downhill 


Compiled bt Our Staff From Zhipaicha 

BORMIO. Italy — Pinnin ZClr- 
briggen of Swiizemnd. racing onlv 
18 days after knee surgery, on Fri- 
day won the downhill portion of 
the World Ski Championships 
combined tide. 

Zflrbriggen. who will be 32 on 
Monday, mastered the 3.480 me- 
ters of the Sirivio course in 2:0036 
mrnuws. The 1984 World Cup 
champion edged a teammate. Peter 
Luescher. who was second at 
2:00.56. Luescher. 28. bad been 
dropped from the Swiss downhill 
team on Thursday and included in 
the combined lineup. 

Markus Wasmaier of West Ger- 
nuny^was a surprising third in 

Friday’s race, the first in men's 
competition at the Championships, 
will be paired with a slalom next 
Tuesday to determine the final re- 
sulp of the combined event. 

“I was a bii nervous hmn 


was a bit nervous because this 
was my first race since Kitzbuhel.” 
Zflrbriggen said. He injured his left 
knee in winning the second of two 
dow nh ills at the Austrian resort 
Jan. 12. 

“My mental attitude is fine. I 


race a warmup for Sundav's down- 
hill title. 

“1 was very tired at the end. It 
was an obvious consequence of my 
illness yesterday and I did not ex- 
pea to do better. HI surely im- 
prove hi the downhill title race on 
Sunday," he said. 

Fresh snow overnight slowed 
down the course, mainly for the 
early starters. 

“It was like racing on two 
courses," said Zurbriggen. who 
started 1 1th. “Slower up .on top and 
faster afterwards. I had a good run. 

I am a pretty good slalomist and I 
expea to win a combined medaL 
“But my favorite for the mid is 
Luescher. 

“I am fit and I feel I have excel- 
lent chances for the gold. I am the 
best slalom specialist among the 
leaders." Luescher said. 

Liechtenstein's Andreas Wenzel 
the World Cup combined champi- 
on. had an unlucky draw, starting 
second. Wenzel could new make the 
top 15 with his lime of 2:03.52. 3.16 
seconds off the pace. 

Only seven of the lop 15 skiers 
who have been practicing for the 
men's downhill scheduled for Suri- 


- r . . .. * -HU , uvniiwu. auituuicu IW OUII- 

US®, ^Jf ! ? rs J abc,ul again, day. entered the combined compe- 
and I hope to do as well Sunday as tirion. , 

In the final practice session for 


French team (raining Friday near Windsor Castie. 




LOW, 

1—3 


cap Lain. 

Mick Doyle, Ireland’s new coach, has announced 


■el 




Bill Johnson. U.S. 2:02J8 

« ^■. ?”V lan,vW ” t G«™mv.2:0112 

1& Alia Skaantal, Norway 

amt Luc Alphand, Franca 7:0X58 
37. Mke Bnmm. U&, 2:0X51 
III. Andreas wwaeL LlecWmwWn. 2:0152 
J*" (navar Dakkaa Norway, 2:0144 
2a Martin Beit Britain, 2:0345 
21. Lose Arnasea Norway. 2^0.79 
“■ Ernsl fUadaNpargar, Austria 2; 8X84 
B- Gary. Alhans, Canada 2:0X9$ 

24. Danlio SbonMiatta Italy, 2:098 

25. Martin HangL SwitnrlancL 2:0421 


Tennis 


U.SvPro Indoor 



MBITS SINGLES 
(of Memphis, Tomas 
Third Rrnnd 

Stafan Edbera. Swedaa dtfc Marty Davis, 
.---Ji Ui. 7A (7-4). 64L 

Greg HalmeaUA, dot. Johan Krtek.ua, 3- 

4. 74 05), 4-1 

— . EUMTeUscher.UJLdet Ramosti Krlshnan. 
India M.M. 

Yannick No«8v Franca deL^ Tim Culilksaa 

. — ■ 05, 7-6 (74), >6. (LX 

■.' TC- ^Brad Gilbert. U^det. Jay Lopldus,UJ5.4-l, 

M NevNi Qirraa UJk, del. John Sadr 1, U-5,6-4. 

• Shatter Peru* Israel, del Boris Becker, w. 
— “■ Germany. +4. 4-4, 4-4. 

Jimmy Connors, dot. LoH Shims. UJ5, 

■ 4-7 18-6), 42, 7^ 


3 2 

i ] a * 

Oaw Mer 121). Few (24), MJiburv O). 
O Redly (91. O'Connell (13). Reid (4); GIIDs3 
(9). Cole (8). Maxwell (4). Shots ea goal: Que- 
bec (on Poofm) 9-J2-13—34; Boston (on S*- 
vtony) 10-4-7— OX 

OetaBB • 0 *_a 

SLLOMS , a 

WHaun (5), Sutter (24), Federico (2D); Lnm- 
berireu, pork (9). Shots m goal: Detroit (on 
y^lMtavJ 8-12-11—31; SL Louis (on Mirataf) 
U-M-IO— 35. 

Helhrt I | |. 

Lo« Anaetes I , ^ 

Svkes CM), ShuM tUhWttm (3), Ruskamfcl 
(ll). NICkoll * (3i) } QuaanavtHe (SI. From* 
(l»). Malone (11 ). Shota on goal: Hartford (on 
Loo Angoles (on Weeks) 

NT Rangers j g M 

W«nr g 4 ” 

Laab (22). Wllsan (14), Macsun (6), NIIssim 

'•-MBtahtataS rran'h^T 3 m,i • 

(O)-swWsiriNir(lo). Shots an gOBItivewYonc ' 

Ion Lem elln) 1V12-7-30.- Ctagorv (on Vton- 
Mwhraucfc) 13-19-13—45, 


to 33^ and 12 tncs to one — raised an ootoy of dEfl? L m£?a 

S E ^r“sr ncd th,t 

WpSS “P 1 *® to retirement of 

^ “n™ ““ tot Australian feat. As 

«« «°n« began at Twickenham. The 



against 

(No. 3) 
IX PM 


i^score was 19-3, 


Five Nations play is 
suow in Dublin forced 


two weeks laic; frozen turf in Paris and 
lining of both Jan. 19 matches to March 


30. Who benefits, if anyone? 

Telfer thinks the untried Irish team ought to be 


easier to beat now 


^sano, wmen has not won in Cardiff since 1963 
French reject for the difficulty of winning at Twickenham th«r 

fa °“«Smh«rSio D t u^ 

“ mb " 

wS) -rtKL S cratimcters ) mi •»«« 230 pounds 

sa3ju^«iaEi!ttSa5 

siW sfBttsr -* s 


. is well Sunday as 
today,” said Zurbriggen. “I ihinir f 
pay have regained the condition I 
had before the acddenL I had no 
problems with the knee.” 

Todd Brooker of Canada was 
fourth in 2:01.76, Michael Mair of 
Italy fifth in 2:01.81 and Doug of Austria. 
Dswisof the United States sixth in 
2:02.02. Franck Piccard of France 
was seventh in 2:02J0 and Ans tri- 


Saturday's women's downhill at 
Santa Caterina, Laurie G raham of 
Canada set the fastest time of 
1:28.94, ahead of fCatrin Guten- 
sohn and Veronika Wallinger. both 
(AP. UPI) 


miveteran Anton Steiner eighth in 
2:0236. 

Bill Johnson of the United 
States, the Olympic champion, who 
had skipped the trial runs on 
Thursday because of an intestinal 
flu, managed to make the starting 
lineup but could do no better than 
13th in 2:02.98. 

Johnson said he considered this 


■ Soviet Team Withdraws 
The Soviet team has withdrawn 
from the championships “for tech- 
nical reasons.” International Ski 
Federation official Toni Kaegi said 
Friday. United Press International 
reported. 

. The Soviet Union had entered 
six competitors in the men's events 
ptd three in the women's. None 
had been expected to be a medal 
contender. 


Transition 


Anto Racing 


- ‘fj- 


^£> ' 


Monte Carlo Rally 

Final Results 

• L Art VOtanatv Finland, Pouooat 20L 10 
how*, 20 minutes. 49 seconds 
2. Walter RotirL West Germany, Audi Quot- 
fro at £17 

X Tima sotansa Fintana Peugeot 205. at 
HUB 

A Site BJwnavfsL Swadea Audi Quatfra at 
W22 

5 Brans Saliy, Franca Peugeot 205 at 19.56 
4. Henri Tatvooea Fintana Lancia ot 2127 
7.DanvSnabecfc, Franca Renault & at 48.16 
-X JearhClMle AndrueL France. Citroen 
Q(f1*a at 52.23 

9 - Masehno Biattoa Italy. Lancia at 5X02 
10, Maurice Oiatnaf, Franca Citroen visa 
at 59.li 


BASEBALL 
American League 

MIL WAUKE B-Slonad Danny Dat^ta and 
Tem T eUmana attdwra and Ed Rtmara In- 
Brkter. Acquired BIU Hanca catcher, mm 
the Texas Raws to complete an earlier 
trade and assigned Mm to El Pan of tn. 
Texas League. 

SEATT LE— «wied Jack Perconta second 
oasamaik Dave Hendersaa autfieldor. and 
Mike Moore, altrtwr, to ana-year contracts. 
Notfnaai Lgagae 

CINCINNATI— Slmied Joe Price. pHctier, 
□ndDucme Wtaker. ouHWder. to one-year 
contracts. 

MONTREAL — 54gned Terry Franama 
Fral boseman-aitflelder, to a ane-year con- 
trocL 

ST. LOU IS— Signed Ran Jackson, first base- 
man-autflelder. 

BASKETBALL 

National Bartettaalt Assactattoa 
CLEVELAND— Released Buldi Graves, 
guard. 

PHOENIX — Ad Hated Walter Davis, 

guard. 

FOOTBALL 

Naltonal Football League 
DENVER— Awalnted Chan Galley as m 
oaelstant coach. 

SAN DIEGO— Named Gunther Cunning- 
ham defensive line coach. 

TAMPA BAY— Named Doug Shively defen- 
sive coordinator and linebackers coach. 
COLLEGE 

KANSAS Announced that Jim Pelton, cen- 
ter, has ten the basketball team. 

SOUTHWESTERN LOUISIANA — Named 
Jimmy Hoggins defensive end coach. 


WadMns 
Won’t Try 
For Bonus 


smarts*, its2L»« 













By Gordon S. White Jr. 

New York Tima Service 

PEBBLE BEACH, California — 
Not even the attraction of a Sl- 
mulion bonus could get Lanny 
Wadlrins, the hottest player on the 
current Professional Gdfere’ Asso- 
ciation Tour, to play in the Las 
Vegas Invitational March 20-24. 
Three weeks ago during the Bob 

Hope Classic, which opened the 
1985 tour, ii was announced that if 
a golfer won the Classic, the Bing 
Crosby National Pro-Am and then 
the Las Vegas Invitational this 
year, he would earn SI million in 
addition to the regular prize mon- 
cy- If Ihe golfer won either the Bob 
Hope or Bing Crosby and then won 
the Las Vegas tournament he 
would get a 5250.000 bonus. He 
must wm al Las Vegas to get either 
award. 

Wadldns won the Bob Hope 
Classic in a five-hole playoff 
against Craig Stadler Jan. 13. Then 
he won the Los Angeles Open last 
Sunday with a course record score 
of 20-rmder-par 264 at the Riviera 
Country Club. 

Now he has a good chance to get 
to second leg toward that $ I -mil- 
lion bonus in the first round of the 
44th annual Bing Crosby Pro-Am. 
Bui even if he wins the Crosby, 
Wadkins said, he is not going to 
play in Las Vegas. 

Tm not knocking Las Vegas," 
he said. “Tin just not playing. If I 
win this week Tm still not playing. 
That’s all there is to it. You've got 
to understand that I’ve got a really 
busy schedule that Tm already 
committed to and going to plav.” 

Wad kin s. who said he had 'not 
been home for 10 days at a tim* in 
four months, is going to (akg a 
month off after the Crosby tourna- 
ment, which is played on three 
courses: Pebble Beach, Spyglass 
Hill and Cypress Point. 

He will then pick up the tour at 
the Hertz Bay Hill Classic in Orlan- 
do, Florida, Man* 7-10. From 
then through the Memorial Tour- 
nament in Ohio, May 23-26. Wad- 
kins said he was set to plav in lOof 
the 12 tournaments. Las'Vegas is 
not one of them even thouguthe 
first prize is $171,000 of the 
5950,000 purse, the biggest purse 
on the tour. That prize does not 
include any bonus. 

“If I play in every tournament, 
rm not going to be worth a thingin 
those tournaments I really want to 
play ” Wadkins said 
Asked whether it was unusual for 
a player to give up the chance at 


*v. 


■ j— 


M 




Lanny Wadkins in first round of the Crosby tournament 


of golf and it’s a long way off. This 
week has to happen first and even 
then, if I win, Tm not going to plav 
there.” . J 

Then Wadkins said, “rm 98 per- 
cent sure Tm not going to plav 
there:" 3 

Maybe there was a 2 percent 
chance? 

He responded, “No, Tm not go- 

mg to play there. The Tournament 
Players Championship m«ame a lot 
to me and that has a 5900.000 
puree. I consider it to be the fifth 
major. 

Wadkins, who has hurried his 
way to 5172J50 in earnings in less 


in the Bing Crosby tournament. 
The Associated Press reported 

“It was a tough, tough round of 
golf today,” Miller said after he 
negotiated Spyglass Hill in 68. That 
is four under the listed par but, 
according to Miller, much, much 
belter. 

“It was a three-club wind out 
there, maybe five or six on some 
holes. I’d say par, on any of the 
courses, was at least 74 today," he 

«aiH. 

Wadkins had a 73. It was the first 
lime in 14 rounds this year that he 
had gone over par. 


Bruins Post 

Victory Over 

Nordiqnes 

The Aaodatcd Press 
BOSTON — Although they 
didn’t prosper in the last two 
weeks, the Boston Bruins survived 
their most critical stretch of the 
season. 

The Bruins played all four of 
their Adams Division rivals over a 

NHL FOCUS 

seven-game stretch that ended 
Thursday night with a 6-5 victory 
oyer the Quebec Norcbques. The 
victory moved Boston into a tie for 
third place with the North ques, 
three points behind Buffalo and 
five in back of Mmtreal in the 
National Hodcey League’s tightest 
divisional race. 

Elsewhere in the NHL, it was Sl 
L ouis 3, Detroit 2; Calgary 7,’the 
New York Rangers 2; PhOaddphia 

3, New Jersey 

Hartford 3. 

“We thought this stretch would 
be the turning point of the season," 
said goalie Pete Peelers. “We didn’t 
win every game, but we beat every 
team we had to beat. We ended 4-3 
and beat everybody in our division. 
That’s what we needed to do.” 

“It was a struggle^ but well take 
the two points,” the Bruins’ m»rh 
Gerry Cheevere, said. “We weren’t 
very sharp defensively. We gave 
them too many opportunities. 

“Tm not too happy with the fact 
toy got five goals, but Tm really 
happy we got six goals. If it takes 
giving Quebec five goals for you to 
gel six goals, then that’s the way to 
play them.” 



Pinnin Ziirbriggin in his downhill ran al BormS!^ 


Stennwrk Wants Chance 
To Race With GirardeUi 



V^aneo whh , 

glass of mQk and Hanyman wrthdiamp^e. Vata^n, m a to happen to collecnSt million 
Peugeot 205, came in 5:17 ahead of the defentfi^^ampi- dollars. First, I’d have to win here 
on, Waite* Rohrl of West Germany, in an Audi Qnattro. and then win there, and there’s a lot 


st victory on the 
ipurm uts y^as." He was refer- 
Mg to the I972Sahara Invitation- 

**® ut I have just 
scheduled not to play there and did 
so before they announced this bo- 
nus. Tm not changing my plans If 
you got that million right away In- 
st«d of installments it might mob. 
a difference.” 

The Sl -million bonus, if won. 
Would be paid in annual install, 
menu of 5100,000 for 10 years, and 
the first installment would not be 

o/ l jiL 0ycars ^ il was won. 
So if Wadbns were to win the Bma 
Ocoby, change his mind and nlav 
rnand wm Us Vegas, he would 

“Who knows where we’ll all be in 
1995.” Wadkins said. 

■ MtDer Takes 
Wadkins’s siring of sub-par 
rounds came to an end in cold, 
howling winds, and Johnny Minor 
wok the first-round lead Thursday 


Nuggets Defeat Mavericks 


United Press International 

BORMIO, Italy — If Marc Gir- 
araelli turns up to compete at the 
World Alpine Ski Championships, 
many rivals can kiss goodbye any 
hopes they had of gold medals. 

But one man with more lo lose 
than most by Girardellfs racing 
here is lngemar Stemnait, and he 
welcomes the chance to 
against the skier who has replaced 
him as the world’s top slalom and 
giant slalom star. 

Its great that he's allowed to 


license from the Luxembourg ski 
federation. 

That is good enough Tor World 
Cup races but under the interna- 
tional federation's rules, a skier 
™y represent a nation in major 
championships only if he holds-a 
passport from that country, or has 
residence there and is in the process 
of obtaining citizenship. 

The problem for GirardeUi until 

he changed his mind Jess than two 

weeks ago was that he refused to 
pve up Austrian citizenship and 


^^ltIf Sleimiai i.- sa,d Fjtoy- ^Luxembourg nahonabtyT T7iai 
^ Afterihe fuK over Girardelli's na- niled lum out of the last World 


The Associated Press 

DENVER — The Denver Nug- 
gets stayed red hot thank* to the 
blazing guns of Alex Rn g lieh 
Denver won its eighth straight 
National Basketball Association 
game Thursday with a 121-1 10 de- 

NBA FOCUS 

cison over the Dallas Mavericks. 
The victory gave Denver a thnsc- 
and-a-half-game lead in the Mid- 
west Division. 

In other NBA games, it was Seat- 
tle 96, San Antonio 94; New Jersey 


tonality, all the pressure will be on QwmjionsKps in 1982 and thfe 
him. I m wry pleased to be coming 1984 Olympics, but things are dif- 
fuse we were tough defensively, DOt die favor- that he is one of the 

^ ^ «« tor once. hottest properties in dtiing 


we won il 

JSMtiassEs 

third quarter. BuTthHiddrSvi dunng far long career, will 


pressure forced several turnovers 
and the Nuggets surged ahead to 
stay. 

“1 liked the way we played to- 
night,” Denver’s coach, Doug Moe, 
said. “We got off to a great start 
but faded some at the half. They 
came out and got the lead for 
awhile in the third. That’s when we 
could have panicked, but we stayed 


122. the Los Angeles Clippers 99. U “ t of a 

and Portland no c,— 89™ leam * 

109. 


be hoping to add to the haul at his 
last major championships. But the 
meteoric rise of GirardeUi the win- 
ner of seven World Cup races this 

season, means Stenmark will have 
to be m superlative form to bow out 
with farther golds. 

Girardelli’s participation in the 
championships became possible 
only Thursday when the Interna- 
tional Ski Federation ruled that the 


The decision on whether Girar- 
deDi races in the giant slalom and 
slaloms scheduled for next week 
rests with him. 

The international federation ac- 
cepted documents from the Lux- 
embourg government confi rming 
that GirardeUi had ini tiated nn- 
nonality proceedings, but the fed- 
eration’s president, Marc Hodler, 
roasted the skier must provide a 
written aiarantee, on his word of 
honor, that the proceedings will 
continue after these Champion- 


Ji, uolden State with confidence.” F “he gave wntten assurances “in . That did dot satisfy man y skep- 

t i «,/ . good ftith" that he would seek full ,K ** convinced that Girarddli vras 

usmg Luxembourg as a “flag of 


E^ish hi. 16 of 22 fidd goal La fay e It? Le ver scor t d 15 t«^S' dSa!kf “ 1) 
attempts and was eight for nine at points, had eight asrists and pulled v 

the free throw line. in eight rebounds for Denver. He 

“It’s been a fun year so far,” ^ Sad five steals. 

sweat and playing hard and be- ^aan^W^t^P™ 



J 


1 

l 

t 


e 

t 

s 

s 

r. 

n 

d 

iS 

-i 

it 

o 

r, 


ie 


a 

w 

y- 


in 

le 









Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 2-3, 1985 


it WmlamFaob Royalist s Attract Youth in France AFi J^rwBa§ 

J “HEEL. T'" "Tll l ilM SS»jSaa£L 1 ?£ _ „ r^Moysi 


people 


X\l ASHTNGTON —The thing a very good record about their 
*' 1 enjoy most about bang a facts, and I've accepted them. But i 
newspaperman is that the public assure you when I get back home 
holds me personally responsible for Pm going to make certain the rune 
every sin committed by someone in editors get their act together.” 
my profession, □ 

Lately I’ve found myself defend- x thought this would satisfy 

them, but they weren’t going to let 
M oft that tastiy. 


■ v . “Where do you stand on the 

What happens is that Ame ricans Westmoreland libel trial?" some- 
tend to lump all |pnn me asked, 
journalists to- -j wasn’t in Vietnam at the 

gether, and Hm*” t mnlifvt “Rut I have to 




when somebody 
goofs, anyone 
who carries a 
press card must 
answer to the 
charges. 

Some years 
back, when I 

was on the road n . . . 

lecturing, 1 took BucbwaW 
the coward’s way out by claiming I 
had nothing to do with a particular 



one asked. 

“I wasn’t in Vietnam at the 
time,” I replied. “But I have to 
assume the intelligence figures 
were fudged to make them accept- 
able to people on the homefronL” 

“You people at CBS should have 
checked before you libeled an 
American general." 

“Since the trial is still going on 
Td rather not comment any further 
about it, other than to say although 
I had nothing to do with the show, I 
will take full responsibility if CBS 
is found to be in error. When it 


story that the public was enraged tv news, the buck stops 

abouL But I noticed bow disap- 

pointed the people were when I “Can you guarantee us," another 
pleaded not guilty. person asked, “that it will never 

So recently I decided to make happen again?” 
people feel better by admitting 1 “You nave my word on it,” I 


pleaded not guilty. person asked, “that it will never 

So recently I decided to make happen again?” 
people feel better by admitting 1 “You nave my word on it,” I 
was pan of the national media con- assured the entire group. “I have 
spiracy to delude (he American given aO three networks instruc- 
public tions that when they produce a doc- 

My last trip to Arizona coincided umentary, I want to see not only 
with the Ariel Sharon-Time maga- what goes on the air, but what 
zine libel suit verdict While Tune wound up on the cutting room 
was found innocent of maliciously floor." 
libeling Sharon, the jury ruled that □ 

it was guilty of shoddy reporting. drunk with 


At a small dinner in Phoenix I power," a man told me. 
was asked to explain how some- “Not aD of us," I said defensive- 
thing like this could happen. ly. “Some of us are just drunk. But 
“We ran the story in good faith;*' we have a job to do, and although 


1 protested. "But the Israelis re- we make mistakes they are never 
fused to lei us see their secret docu- done with malice." 
moats. You have to realize that I “One more question. Why did 
write a column, and I can't read you permit a Wall Street Journal 
everything before it appears in Tune columnist to profit from inside in- 
magazine. In the past they have hod formation gathered on his job?” 

— “If he did it — and until his trial 

is over we have to presume inno- 

Disney Relenlg on Rocketles 

The Associated pros bottom to see it never happens 

NEW YORK. — Walt Disney again" 

Productions will allow the high- 1 made a lot of people in Phoenix 
kicking Rockeries to appear in its happy last weekend. Not only did 
summer show at Radio City Music they have a chance to voice their 
Hall after aB, the hall announced grievances to someone in the elite 
Friday. The precision dancers had Eastern media establishment, but 
been picketing the hall daily since by my behavior I was able to reas- 


Friday. The precision dancers had Eastern media establishment, but 
been picketing the hall daily since by my behavior I was able to reas- 
Radio City announced last month sure them that their perception of 
that Disney would not use them in the anogance and bias of the na- 
the 10-week show. donal press was justified. 


By James Rupert 

International Herald Tribune 
D AFJS — Under the somber 
lgray dome of the Chape lie Ex- 
piatoire off the Boulevard Hauss- 
mann, 600 French people stood 
bundled against the cold on a 
recent weekend to welcome the 
man they consider their king. 

He arrived in a small Peugeot 
and was led in by several Catholic 
priests, who conducted a solemn 
Mass. Alphonse, Duke of Anjou 
and Cadiz, head of the house of 
I Bourbon, had returned from 
S p ain on his annual pilgrimage in 
memory of King Louis XVI, who 
was originally buried on the site 
of this “Chapel of Atonement." 

Nearly two centuries after the 
French Revolution sent Louis 
and his queen, Marie- Antoinette, 
to the guillotine, France’s two ri- 
val claimants to the Bourbon 
throne rind more supporters each 
year, including a surprising num- 
ber of young people. French 
monarchists remain a tiny, splint- 
ered minority, but their growing 
numbers ana the turbulence of 
French politics convince them 
ihai the country’s future belongs 
to a Kingdom of France instead 
of the Fifth Republic. 

Royalist sentiment in France 
never completely died. There has 
always remained at least a mar- 
ginal community of monarchists, 
including families of the old aris- 
tocracy and some far-right 
groups. 

They are sharply divided be- 
tween two branches of the Bour- 
bon family: the Spanish branch 
of Alphonse and the Orleanist 
branch headed by Henri d’Or- 
Idans, Count of Paris. The dispute 
stems from 1830. when Paris's 
powerful middle class helped 
force the abdication of lung 
Charles X and pushed its own 
candidate, the Duke of Orleans, 
onto the throne as King Louis 
Philippe. 

The orleanisies and the legili- 
mines continue an intense, if usu- 
ally dignified, argument over 
musty historical issues ranging 
from the Treaty of Utrecht to the 
Spanish Bourbons" rights under 
the French Constitution of 1791. 

Henri, 76, lived in exile for 24 
years under a law that banned the 
heirs of former monarchs from 
France. Since the law's repeal in 
1950, be has lived near Paris and 
riirertfd the famil y foundations. 



Alphonse 


imta Rupert 


Controversy shook the count's 
household in October, when his 
divorced son remarried outside 
the Roman Catholic Church. 
Henri, judging the marriage “in- 
acceptable and inadmissible be- 
havior for a prince of France.” 
stripped his sod (also named 
Henri) of his title. The row made 
headlines in Paris, especially 
when the younger Henri an- 
nounced that he remained the 
rightful heir. 

Alphonse, 48. himself divorced 
from the granddaughter of the 
Spanish dictator Franco, lives in 
Madrid. Under the rules of suc- 
cession he could have been king 
of Spain, but Franco chose to 
install Alphonse’s cousin, Juan 
Carlos. 

Alphonse is a Spanish Air 
Force officer and has been 
Spain’s ambassador to Sweden. 
Inis S panishrMKs leads man y Or- 
ganists to oppose him. 

“Let’s be realistic." one young 
partisan said after an Orl&mist 
Mass: “Do you think France 
would accept a Spanish lon g ?*' 

Each claimant shrinks from de- 
claring openly that he should be 
installed on a French throne. 
Henri says be is “at the disposi- 
tion" of France, while Alphonse 
avoids the subject. 

Despite their public discretion, 
however, neither discourages the 
organizations supporting them 

Outside the monarchist 
Masses, campaigners sell flair de 
lis ties and T-shirts with the slo- 
gan “line France, Un RoT (One 
France, One King). Last month, 
on the anniversary of Louis XVTs 


execution, the two side sched- 
uled rival memorial Masses at the 
same time. 

About 350 leginmiste support- 
ers of Alphonse gathered at the 
basilica of Saint Denis just north 
of Paris, the final resting place of 
Louis XVI, Standing among the 
tombs of French kings, Jacques. 
Duke of BauffremonL director of 
the Institute of the House of 
Bourbon, said the monarchist 
movement bad seen a spurt of 
growth in recent years. 

“Each January, we find more 
people at our ceremonies," he 
said. “Even in the countryside, 
new groups have been forming," 
The competing Orlfeanisl cere- 
mony at Sl Germain I’Auxerrois. 
the church at the Place du Louvre 
that once served reigning French 
kings, was one of several Masses 
that drew surprisingly youthful 
crowds. One of the “new monar- 
chists." 2l-year-old Franck La- 
personne, said be and his friends 
saw a monarchy as a way of 
damping the political divisions in 
France. 

“We are not trying to re-estab- 
lish the old system of a privileged 
class." he said. “Instead, we want 
a head of state who is a moral 
guide and independent of parties 
or private interests." 

Marie-CIotilde Remold, legiti- 
mist? and a student at the Sor- 
bonne, said a number of students 
felt that a “monarchy is what 
suits France best. In part, it is an 
expression of our Catholic tradi- 
tion." 

Slephane Bent said he saw 
both traditions and disaffection 
with current politics as important 
elements in the “new monar- 
chist” sentiment among young 
people. Bern, 21, a business stu- 
dent. founded the Association 
des Amis de la Maisou de France 
(Association of Friends of the 
House of France) last ApriL The 
Orleanist group now has 1,000 
members, he said. 

Bern said be used to support 
the French republic but grew dis- 
couraged bv what he saw as a 
deadlock in French politics: “The 
right failed to unite the country, 
and now the left is doing no bel- 
ter. Part of the problem is that the 
presidency is so highly politi- 
cized Look at Mitterrand — in 
one sentence be speaks as the 
head of state, and in the next as a 
party politician.” 

Bern wants the Count of Paris 



elected president. Then, he said, 
the constitution could be amend- 
ed to make him king and restore 
the mooarchy. Bern, and almost 
all the monarchists questioned, 
have a clear model for their royal- 
ty: King Juan Carlos 1 of Spain. 

“He is an inspiration." Bern 
said. “He symbolizes his country, 
protects its democracy and pro- 
vides just the kind of moral lead- 
ership we want here.” 

The nearest equivalent to a 
campaign manager for Henri is 
Bertrand Renouvin. 41. who in 
1971 fouuded a group called 
Nouvelle Action Royalisie (New 
Royalist Action). The organiza- 
tion claims 10.000 members with 
an average age of 35. and includes 
a broad swath of France’s politi- 
cal spectrum. Renouvin. who is 
generally sympathetic to the left 
was a royalist candidate in the 
1974 presidential elections and 
won 43.000 votes, or 0. 17 percent. 

Renouvin might be called a 
leading theoretician of the “new 
monarchist" movement. “De- 
mocracy has always had prob- 
lems in France." he said, “be- 
cause there has been no real 
arbitrator among political par- 
lies. That is a special problem 
here, because the French parties 
are so much more sharply divided 
than in. say. the Uoiied Siates.” 

He said the monarchist move- 
ment had to build credibility, 
partly by shedding its rightist im- 
age. ' 

“It's very difficult to predict 
our future." be said, “but I think 
10 or 15 years should be enough 
to resolve this question.” 


Many people might be tongue- 
tied on meeting a Supreme Court 
justice. Not the Washington Red- 
skins fullback. John Riggins. 
“Come on Sandv baby, loosen up- 
You're too tight.” he admonished 
Sandra Day O'Connor. One of the 
people at Riggins's table. People 
magazine s Washington bureau 
chief. Carry Gifford, said O'Con- 
nor laughed and appeared not to be 
insulted. The 240-pound 1 108-kilo- 
gram) football player slept on the 
floor for an hour as Vice President 
George Bush and other dignitaries 
spoke to a crowd of 1.300 at the 
Was hing ton Press Club’s annual 
banquet saluting Congress. Riggins 
was later helped from the room by 
two People editors who had been at 
his table. “It was a very funny eve- 
ning. No one was dying of embar- 
rassment" Clifford said. Riggins, 
at 35 the oldest running back in the 
National Football League, was 
sidelined several times over ibe last 
two seasons because of recurring 
back problems. 

□ 

Alain Senderens, a leading pro- 
ponent erf nouvelle cuisine, has 
bought the Lucas-Carton restau- 
rant in Paris, a bastion of classic 
French fare, reportedly for 10 mil- 
lion to 15 million francs ($1.05 mil- 
lion to $1.6 million). Senderens 
owns a top Paris nouvelle cuisine 
restaurant Archestrate. Lucas- 
Carton. on the Place de la Made- 
leine. has attracted titled and mul- 
timillionaire customers since 
prewar days. It has dosed for two 
months for repairs, though some of 
the interior cannot be changed, as it 
is listed as a historic monument 
Senderens, 45, was once a chef at 
Lucas-Carton. ... La Cdte 
Basque, the posh Manhattan res- 
tuarant threatened with closure 
two weeks ago because of “slime- 
laden" ice machines and mouse 
droppings, has received a clean bill 
of health in its most recent inspec- 
tion. the city Health Department 
says. The french restaurant where 
tbe prix fixe lunch runs $25. had 
failed two inspections since No- 
vember and was given two weeks 
from Jan. 17 to correct the prob- 
lems. “All violations were re- 
moved; it passed the final inspec- 
tion late Wednesday, ’’ a 
department spokesman told the 
Daily News. Joseph Reyers, man- 
ager of La Cdte Basque, had not 
disputed the department's findings 
but said shortly after the second 


M 




John Riggins 


warning that the problems hadj 1 
been corrected. 

□ .vv 

. ■» 

Christopher Hoewood. director 
of the Academy of Ancient Moskr 
in London, has been invited to6a£? 
duct the first staged version # 
Handel's “Messiah" to be per - 
formed in Berlin, the academy as^’ 
nounced. Hogwood. who conduce 
ed the “Messiah" last JuJytK - 
celebrate the Los Angeles Olyinge:/ 1 
games, will direct musicians, and 
cast of 20 singers from Beriihjt.;' 
seven performances of the omtmjc 
between Feb. 10 and Feb. 25. Thi.' 
three-part production is by Ad 
Freyer, a painter and stage direct^" 
who lives in West ..Berlin;-... 
. . . Former Prime Minister, E$ 
ward Heath of Britain conducted 
the Jerusalem Symphony Orchesufc. 
on Thursday night, but tbe loudest -' 
applause was saved for a younjf 
Israeli pianist. Dan Rednma$. 
Heath, a Conservative, who was 
prime minister in 1969-1974, con* 
ducted Dvorak's “New Wqrkf? 
Symphony and Borodin's “FokMj 
s£an Dances" from “Prince Igon" ’ 
The audience, which filled the Bitt* 
yanei Ha'ooma auditorium; 
brought Rechtman, 21, badt-..fo> ~ 
round after round of applauseafiet- 
his performance of Rachmaninovas 
Piano Concerto No. 2 Heath, who . 
arrived Saturday and led the or? ... 
chestra in a performance at Kife/ 
butz Ein-Hashofet Wednesdtj^ 
night, was an organ scholar at Ot 
ford. He conducted the Loodod -. 
Symphony in 1971. V. 


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