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Strength of Economic Recovery 2 Nations 

In Europe Surprises Analysts To Fight 

T _ ..... J W 




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By Bamaby J. Fcdcr 

New York Times Service 

LONDON — Analysts are being 
pic&samly surprised by the cco- 
v^jc recovery that began in Brit- 
ain m 1982, gathered steam last 
year in West Germany and now is 
taking hold in virtually every coun- 
try from Scandinavia to the Medi- 
terranean. 

“The recovery in Europe has 
been stronger than expected," said 
David Kingston, chief economist 
for PA Management Consultants 


Economic Outlook far 


Jmd a specialist in business strategy t crisis like plastics, it is moving 
tv London-based firm. quite rapidly." 

reason, according to A few analysts see an even 
£»??? Md "“?* cd- brighter picture. Economists at 
leagues, is the strength, of the dd- DreXd Burnham Lambert Inn, a 
mr, ^toeh has rouned European New York-based investment firm, 
exports to the United States. But argue that it is a mistake to attri- 
fflodest increases in domestic con- bute Europe's progress to hig he r 
^™°^cmand and more industrial exports. They note that high ex- 
invatmeoi than some analysts had pom are a result of exchange-rare 
predicted are also factors. »-*-■» 


urr *. v % “ — — . MMiwii miw r t u i niMi tv uiyi mvwwt 

5 pc* 0 ? sharp mcrease in rates in the United States, and that 


.OAP/Gmuh 


MUinRata 


[ Wart Germany 

France 

United Kingdom 
Italy 


'GiXP^araweoinMc product 


terials like plastics, it is moving FT1 

quite rapidly." I pWAT* 

A few analysts see an even '*■ 
brighter picture Economists at 
Drexd Burnham Lambert Inn, a n •. L 1LJ f 
New York-based investment firm, MrtOTS flttu DOTOt 
argue that it is a mistake to attri- n j r. j , 

bute Europe's progress to higher MuXOCBUt MMutS ffl 
export s. They note that high ex- , n , . 

ports are a result of exchange-rate UpDQSG AltiWWB 
unbalances related to high interest 

rates in the United States, and that Rv William Drozdiak 
grates have also h^adepressing ^ZSSiSSSr 
eftet on Europe by lunng some B ONN-?rance and West Ger- 

mvesunent funds across the Allan- Q^y agreed Tuesday to increase 

airf finamMl hmiK m order dc g ™ £nfl 

spite, Mlba^of dnetopmoils S a hoUixKtoao^ro ifcS 
in the United States, they wrote m dana ofWomStaSreS £e 
the fim’s lawn monthly ralerrn- 

honal investment study. “We be- TSTmtsures were announced 
hev^rttoaceomphshedaed after talks here Sa^taMM 
aaccpmpl.shn.g a to greater^ Prime Minister uSfSTc 3 
tow than It now realizes. France and Chancellor Hdmrn 

lEhiS TO^t^Tesotof^tocoortoue 




Th. Now York Tm 


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After Years of Disputes, 
U.S., Europe Are Ooser 
On Technology Exports 

By Joseph Fitchecr In special circumstances, this 

International Retold Tribune could even be applied to a NATO 

• STOCKHOLM — After several country, such as West Germany, if 
years of trans-Atlantic wrangling other government agencies agreed 
over strategic exports to the Soviet that technology leaks seemed to be 
bkc, officials in the United Stales a problem there. 

•dN in European countries say that A decision to pul a North Atlan- 
tfiar national policies have can- tic Treaty Oigamzation country cm 
verged significantly on a sharply the so-called “gray fist,” which 
■' mire restrictive approach. would almost certainly cause a dip- 


grew more than 4 percent last year, xl the last twn mA* 
,or 

SSSSdSt'SSSf’lfSlEffi ittg official in the French 
fdl more than 2 percent. In aridi- Mirmtrv whn n^vm 


non, as in the United States, per- 
formance varies widely from mous- 


ing oincuu in the french Udense 
Munstiy who was responsible for 
arms sues and of a leading West 
German industrialist whose com- 


tryroindmtiy^dfromreponto 

ffi&atySLSitSs 


bly^iOynmy S 4p^t r dSSS Action, a French group, 
nual growth rate smee the end of a Vesponribility foithe 

Maafi^the footing of Brigadier General 

Re^Audran in France; the Red 
mwnm Western Europe s largest Army Faction, in West Gerarany, 



economy. 


said that its members kilted 


fourth year of growth, could get an -i- 


incre^ Of JSSJZmSmSSSSi 




.-T, 






While impAwng controls on a lomatic outcry, is the rcspousibiliiy 
^wideir range of sensitive technol- of a new steering committee rqne- 


—■ ■■ ■ ■! ■■! ■■■■■■i. i — . . in . I seating the Defense Department, 

High-Tech Smuggling: 

Ckiwne the Loopholes “jj; u 

i ^ The current gray fist, as dis* 

Second of two articles. dosed this week, reportedly covers 

— Austria, India, Finland, Liechten- 

flgy. West European governments stein, ifong Kons Syria, Malaysia, 
are cooperating more doseJy with Sweden, Singapore, Iraq, Iran; 
U& omdals, to catch and punish South Africa, Sweden, Switzeriand 
efienders. and Libya. 

The Reagan administration, in Europeans also worry that con- 


The fear that French and West 
German terrorists may be extend- 


BttWSWSSS 

PC SomiE mwi is also opect- 


TKt Ptmi 

THE ROCK REOPENS ■— Gibraltar was opened to traffic for the first time in nearly 
16 years. Britain and Spain began talks Tuesday about the disputed colony. Page 2. 

Peres Says Egypt Is Failing to Respond 
To His Efforts to Improve Relations 


By Thomas L Friedman 

New York Times Service 

JERUSALEM — Prime Mans- 
r Shimon Peres has expressed dis- 
ipotniment with what be said had 


i‘c aiw* mwn “Both our governments agree ter Shimon Peres has expressed dis- 
completdy that all that is humanly iqipomtment with wiithe said had 
e dtopn^ o p mFranceal th ough, al most be done to bomsh bSE^pt’s Mure to respond to 

aprqretallpCTcCTt zmw l niz. * a* sconce of dvUizotion.- Mr. hi, eftas to improve nSTbe- 
t vonMre ^ below th e Btrepon ^^4* twnea the two oSmtria. 

Mr- FaWns said that the recent Mr. Feres said that if Bnpfs 


tween the two countries. 


are cooperating more dosety witn Sweden, Sin 
US. offioab: to catch and punish South Africa, 
efienders. and Libya. 

Die Reagan admini st ra tion, in Europeans 
response to European cooperation cfoLs, essentia 
and lobbying by U5. industry, has United States 
watered down some hard-line pro- applied in a v 
poaals aimed at curtBifing the flow against foreig 
of Uil. technology. of their UJ5. < 

The Defense Dqjaitmait, for eat- In addition 
ample, hasbeen daned the anthar- main uncon 


SnTSiys TeS to have a Mr. Fabius said that the recent Mr. Feres said that if Egypt's 
i^L.1 outbreak, erf violence underscored cool attitude toward brad contra- 
^r“re g, S^S IFP “» tonn a united^ front wf. rtare w» . .d^recr Urer ths 

ag«Mt tenonsm betweoi France forces fw peace m Israel would 


last year to 25 percent this year. ure . nce “ 10 tonn a uraicanoni ^ ^ ™ 

“iw against teiTonsm between France forces for peace, m Iaael would 
•pa nonsar e aeahiig with ma- yy^st Germany, as well as-tbe become discouraged and. question. 

tSEBSSF*"* m olher EmSSrn ionatrte in- the value of rfforn *&&& 

man^sectore. volved.” ndations with Arab ueighbore. 

Inflation, which IS generally de- a . . Mr Pems'ii TWnarirs^VMitRBvnt 


rdationswith Arab ae 
Mr. Peres's remarks 


cJi Hesaidtlrnmterimministriesin Mr. mess remamaboutEopt 

^ “d Boon would increase 

those Tates have been achieved de- carperation on “an operational son Monday m Ins JeriiaUem of- 
spire thoirdS^to^rfS levd” to combat rerrorisro, fe sod wm hre to rerh- 

rising dollar, which is uS topav Friedrich Zimmcnnann, the ®{ H«ni S MuSSk Jina 
forhuponed commodities. ThS. West German interior minister, 

analysts have concluded, most of said that the new cooperation was £*£j2LS2? ine P mmstcI 
Europe has made more progress in necessary berause “tbe latest at- 

contmUine the domestic sources of tacks show that there are three! While Mr. Foes has expressed 


applied in a way that cuscriminates 
against foreign companies in favor 
of their U5. competitors. 

In addition, many Europeans re- 
main unconvinced, despite the 


iry it sought to rnd^high-tcdnml- dampdown, that technology leaks 
fcgy sales to allied countries, can be -<c M » nchg^ For example. Pa- 


spite the inflationary impact of the ^ evc ^ ^ combat terrorism, 
rising dollar, which is used to pay Friedrich Zimmcnnann, the 
for imported commodities. Thus, West German interior minister, 
analysts have concluded, most of said that the new cooperation was 



Stockman 
Criticizes 
Pentagon 

He Urges Cutting 
Military Pensions 
To Trim Deficit 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The While 
House budget director. David A. 
Stockman, conceded Tuesday that 
the S30- military increase in Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan's fiscal 1986 
budget could be trimmed, and sug- 
gested reducing military retirement 
benefits as a way to do it 
Mr. Stockman, testifying before 
the Senate Budget Committee, 
turned what was supposed to be a 
defense of President Reagan's bud- 
get request into an attack on the 
military establishment 
The director of the Office of 
Management and Budget acknowl- 
edged that he did not support the 
increased amount of military 
spending in the$974-bDlion budget 
released Monday. 

“You may not need" the $314 
billion in new spending authority 
the president requested for the Pen- 
tagon, Mr. Stockman said. “Ill 
grant that." 

But “the president made his de- 
cision." he stud. “I have to defend 
the budget" And he said it was 
“unrealistic" to think in terms of a 
Awatod ft«« freeze in the nrifitaiy budget. 

' for the first time in nearly If Congress wants to cut military 

e disputed colony. Page 2. spending, Mr. Stockman said, it 

should seek to persuade the Joint 

Chiefs of Staff to accept lower rc- 
- T) f tirement benefits for the military. 

y m MABSOGTIjU, “ It,s a to M outrage," 

J W Mr. Stockman told the Budget 

| m - Committee. “If push comes to 

rtolntlgm e shove tfa eyTl give up on [the na- 

L \XsiAMMAJi W tion's] security before they pve up 

on retirement" 

peace” in Israel Israelis, he sad, Mr. Stockman said that he had 
wifi begin to say, “Took, whatever been told daring administration 
we are trying in the peaceful direc- discussions that cutting military ra- 
tion doesn't bear fruit’ This is the tirement “would have some adverse 
major danger." impact on recruiting and morale." 

In his first five months hi office “That argument doesn't per- 
his popularity has risen sharply. A suade me,” he said- “If you have to 


tion doesn't bear fruit’ This is the 
mqor danger." 

In his rest five months hi office 
hispopularity has risen sharply, A 


poll published last Wednesday by spend a half- minio n or a million 
the newspaper Ma'ariv indicated over a lifetime to recruit someone, 
that 42.4 petoeni of the Israeli pub- you better find a different way to 
lie considered Mr. Peres best suited recruit people." 
to be prime minister, compared The nrihtary pension program 
with 8.6 .percent for hisjpzedeces- .will post nearly $16 Inffimi this year 
sor. Foreign Minister Yitzhak Sba- and would rise io"S17.8 bUSonin 
mir, and 4.7 percent for Arid Star- the new budget. Military personnel 
on, the former defense minister who retire after 20 years of acxive- 
wbo is now minister of industry duty service can receive retirement 


Europe has made more progress in necessary because “the latest at- 


Shimon Peres 


and commerce. 

Mr. Peres emphasized that he 
intended to pull the Israeli Army 
out of Lebanon completely and 
was not likely to be deterred by any 
unrest Lhat follows the first stage of 
the withdrawal the departure from 


Congress declined to pass a new dfic basin countries such as Singa- 
Ejqiort Administration Act that ex- pone, Taiwan and South Korea are 
panded the Pentagon's trade over- rapidly acquiring a high- technol- 
sight beyond exports to Comma- ogy sector, yet largely ignore the 
ntst countries. Weston rules an technology ex- 

And tire Commerce Department, ports, 
in new export regulations about to A Swedish official’s comment 
be puhhshed, reportedly has elirm- scans up this problem tins way: 
nated requirements for foreign “The Stockholm Chamber of 


££ fiaftaESfS -KMMB -us-aas 


inflation than the recorded infla- 
tion figures indicate. 


To be sure, Europe’s growth fig- rorism above all affects France and 
ores and outlook remain unimp res- West Germany.” 


IClESSiSiSSKfS: ^^ts^e^tberammting and are asking, 'Did 


frustration in his administration 
over the continued absence of nor- 


percent of peace? 


“We have made a whole deci- 
sion," he said, “and while theded- 


Arab ade must see the way sion is based on stages, it is also 


His French 


mat relations between Egypt and people are looking at it here,” he based on completion, and I don’t 
counterpart, fterre despite what Mr. Peres sees continued. “We lock some imDai- think we shall change our minds." 
the rsmid and nre- ■/. « __ .. i j i_ ■< j. _e tv,. u_a 


985, according to the most ro- loxe, said that the “rmid and pro- ^ efforts on iris pan to 

forecast by the Organization ase exchange of information Egypfs <5^^ ^ re- 


dealos who have blanket import Commerce regularly organizes 
authorizations known as distribu- seminars to teach Swedish export- 
tkm licenses Jo re port extensively era how to comply with U.S. rales 
op. all their foreign customers. covering the U.S. technology in 
. “Europeans have moved or been their products. As they wrestle with 
shoved to accept export controls on the forms, a Japanese bu sin e ssm a n 
a broader fixrattrf technology, and invariably thnws down his pen in 
the Reagan a dminis tration has dramatic disgust, complains about 
made concessions," said David American bureaucracy and walks 
Buchan, the British author of a re- out — but not without first giving 
cent study of the question for the his card to all the Swedish attend- 


for Economic ^operatkm and De- ^ A«V tW frSiSSS IhTdu 

velopment Westeni Europe s LionanddirKt mvolvemrat of “00- andw^nring up the stxaDed cold in the policy of settlements, 
economy will grow 2J5 percent, the eranonal woriuuR groups weretbe rh» no * * in Rant 


eral decisions in the domain of The prime teamster dearly had 
Arab- Israeli relations: the with- no illusions that peace and serenity 
draws! from Lebanon, the change would follow the first stage of the 


economy will grow 2J percent, the eranonal working groups” were me p ^ g ^. 

United States will expand 3 per- most practical means of active co- Askedjf he was satisfied with the 

cent, Japan 5 percent However, the operation between the two.com- ^ ^ Egyptian-Isradi relations 
trends suggest that, like ns more mes in fighting urban imonsm in in light of t£ c recent deadlocked 
prosperoiM trading partners, Eu- Europe. talksm Beeraheba. Israel over the 


m- Israeli relations 
recent deadlocked 


in the policy of settlements, the withdrawal, but he indicated that 
changes in the West Bank and he expected the Syrians and the 
Gaza, the open invitation to King Lebanese Shiites — each for their 
Hussein and the readiness ex- own reasons — to damp down on 


rope may have emerged from the 
volatile 1970s into an exa where it 


u °P e - talks in Beerabeba, Israel, over the improve our relations with 

In recent weeks, U.S. and NATO tiny disputed Taba border strip. Now it most be a mutual 


pressed in so many ways to really the Palestinians and mate sure that 


targets in Belgium, Portugal, the Mr. Pores said: 


ypL no new independent Palestinian 
on. guerrilla organization takes root in 


can achieve sustained growth with Netherlands, Spain and Greece “Frankly, I wish it could 
low inflation, ■ - - -- - - 


and I can’t say that I am satisfied southern Lebanon. 


i in London. 


Institute of Strategic ees, inviting them to buy their lech- (Continued on Page 2, CoL 5) 


contentious issues remain. 


nology in Japan, free of red tape.” 
proposals to attend the Weston 
system of controls to Asia are pn- 


towmJiaiion. have also been bombed, but it re- little bit further than it does. Yon 

“lbe second half of the 19«te mains unclear whether afi. the at- see some Israelis can say, rightly, 
will be a better period, said David mcks were related to an offensive took, the Arabs want l«nd for 
(Continued oh Page 2, CoL 5) by a terrorist alliance. peace.’ In the case of Egypt, 99.999 


“Frankly, I wish it could so a with the mutuality of the effort.” The prime 
little bit further than it does. Yon Mr. Peres warned that acontmn- that he mcreas 
see some Israelis can say, rightly, ation of the current state of xda- as a country erf 
•Look, the Arabs want land for lions between Egypt and Israel “Lebanon fen 
peace.’ In the case of Egypt, 99.999 “will discourage the fares for (Continued t 


The prime minister indicated 
at he increasingly saw Lebanon 
a country erf Shiite Moslems. 
“Lebanon for a good many years 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 7) 


benefits of 50 percent of base pay, 
regardless of age. 

Benefits are increased each year 
to account for inflation, and recent 
Congressional Budget Office fig- 
ures show that a typical Ueutenani 
colonel, retiring after 20 years of 
service, can expect to receive 
5576,000 in pension benefits. 

Mr, Stockman defended spend- 
ing for other military programs, 
saying they had already been 
trimmed as much as they could 
without jeopardizing national de- 
fense. He reminded the senators 
that the nation's high military bud- 
get was due partly to the weapons 
programs approved by Congress. 

Mr. Stockman also said that too 
many members of Congress were 
complaining about the military fig- 
ures in the budget while few woe 
coming forward with specific sug- 
gestions for cuts. 

And he defended the budget's 
sharp reductions in domestic pro- 
grams, saying that while each con- 
stituency would try to protect its 

(Continued on Page 3, CoL 5) 


U-S. poficy, nffiranls say, seems dor discussion at a special meeting 
firmly seton strict controls on tech- this week of COCOM, the conmrit- 
nology exports, indoding the sensi- lee of NATO membas and Japan 
live matter of controlling European that controls strategic trade with 
re-exports of goods containing the Soviet Union. 

U -licensed components. “COCOM will probably want to 

Countries that defy U.S. views reach some arrangement with 
frequently find the flow of U.S- Asian countries since, if you belong 
tedmoJogy slowing as Reagan ad- to an embargo lik e COC OM, you 
urimstration officials delay export have an interest in getting others to 
approval and hint to American join it instead of rompeting win 
companies that a particular coon- it,” according to Richard N. Psrie, 
tty is risky, U.S. and European offi- the LLS. a ssis t a n t secretary of de- 
cuds sav. fense. 



1 / V 

‘-d ? 

. ,4 • ", : 



V£ 


■Tins informal leverage will be Rather than at^L to create a 
iwatased by a confidential press- separate Asian COCOM , the imnat 
dential direction, signed Jan. 4 and Western approach probably will at- 
fflaclosed this week, that authorizes tempLto grt Asian nations to join 
the Pentagon to review seven cate- the orga^raticn. 

ectries of hiph-i^JmrJn gy exports This COCOM s®®®* whidi 
^up to IS non-Conmumist coun- opens Wednesday in Fans, is 
WatattoT *^**£™* 


l to create a 
Vf the initial 


• ‘ y -r 

- r ‘-p 

• •• .,-v 
« 


gon to review seven cate- theorga^tion. 

hipfa- technology exports This COCOM session, whidi 

1 5 non-Comnumist coun- opens Wednesday in Pans, is 
HnuT sdieduled to discuss lbe modeni- 

izarion of COCOM —for example, 
■ — l— bgecting more military expertise 

Into its export-application reviews. 

INSIDE In previous COCOM meetings. 

-- the United States and t heEu rope- 

. , am reached a central compromise 

Voted States canceled ^ mud, iccbnology to con- 

5 pact exercises because ^ 

atmdrdusedtoallowa Europeans were and are 

stroyer to dock. Page 3- fcai fai of a U-S. approach that, 

( reatorts stow re- acconfing ip tto heaJ o f the Wes' 

% - ^t.w- avv Ciennan Qisinbcr of Codudgcc, 

ilnesmtheface^^ oSo^tiff von AmeranMn, “ends 

ESS/HNANCE oology as having a military poten- 
tly. has offered to buy rial. "To Europeans, _^_not^y 








Castro Looks to Improved U.S. Ties 

He Cites Reagan 9 s Hostility , Urges Him to Change Views 


By Leonard Downie Jr. 
and Karen DeYoung 

Washington Past Service 

HAVANA — President Fidel 
Castro believes that recent diplo- 
matic contacts between the United 
States and Cuba have been “con- 


and signs “vis-a-vis Cuba itself," 
such as the immigration agreement. 


“very costly” to the United Slates. 
At the same rime, however, Mr. 


For its part, the Reagan admiais- Castro credited the Reagan admin- 
txation has emphasized the narrow istration with being the first since 


and limited nature of the immigrn- he 100k power in 1 959 to definitive- 
tion accord and its belief that rda- ly stop anti-Castro exile attacks 

■" - ; n-1 — t- v_ A r .1 n. . _ 


^ md Cuba Mve tions wffl not improve until Cuba’s launched from the United States 

SStoTt % cl(«tira 10^ Stwiet Union are gainst riteidaiid, to takembstan- 
that confiden^bmlding agree- and Havana ends its sop- nve legal ac^on agamst otiles who 

mmtstas«era] other ai4s^uld port for the Irftist Nicaraguan go^ have committed anti-Cuba crimes 


e^t and insurgencies else- in U5. temtoiy, mid to ^discourage 
ment of UA-CutorelatiS d^ wl f re m Jh^enugranwi fran Cuba, to the 

ing Pi^ident Ronald Reagan's sec- > ^tmm^.and oimveisa- United Slates. He referred with ap- 

ond term. * Dons with other American visiLors, proval 10 wfaat he said were secoud- 

ouaicrm. Mr. Castro has taken a conrihaiory term Reagan statements iudicatine 

Mr. Castro, m an tmemew m lone ^ largely has been rqected a trend away from “warmonger- 

^vana, listed cwst guard activi- ^ adjmuistration as a public ing" and toward “the goal of find- 
ues, fishing rights, mtetferenoe relations ploy lacking substance. ing solutions to international prob- 
wnh radio signals and auplane hi- During six bWtf convma- leL through dialogue.” ^ 
jacking as areas in which uegoaa- ^ ^ ^ Mr. Castro said - Mr 

tions could oonsutute an exms- . ^ • ■ — t-astro saia it was incoo- 


In recent speeches .and conversa- 
tions with other American visitors, 
Mr. Castro has taken a conciliatory 


■ The United States canceled 
,'ANZUS pact exercises because 
NewZesuand refused to allow a 
U.S, destroyer to dock. Page 3. 

A Hanoi residents show re- 
sourcefulness in the face of eco- 
nomic hardship. Page 4. 

BUSDMESS/HNANCE 

■ T«hn offered to buy 
^uUips Petroleum for S 8 B 9 biF 

the company said. Page"* 

TOMORKOV 

South Korea’s national asseo- 
! Myelo^ons are shaping up asa 
test of two men who wiu not « 
i on the ballot. President Chun 
. Doo Hwan and a dissident ex- 
ile, Kim Dae Jung. 


President Fidel Castro of Cuba during a recent speech to a crowd In Nicaragua. 

As Dawn Nears, Things Cuban Worry Castro 

By Jim Hoagian d to emphasize his point. lt is a virtuoso performance by 

* inston Past Service “ ” ' " '* * ’ 


a man who has stirred curiosity, admiration, haired 0 f the 


immigration agreement agned in 
December. 

That agreement, which grew out 


diplomatic 


HAVANA — “I want to know two things," Fidel and other passions in Americans for a quarter of a contact between Cuba and the Rea- 


Castro said through the mental fog that is roBing century. 


across my side of the conference table in the sixth hour 


gan administration, provides for 


The Cuban revoLutkxi, kqn afloat against official the emigration of up to 20,000 Cu- 

of toe post-midnight interview. “Who is the ggnips US. hostility by massive Soviet aid, has taken on toe bans to toe United Stales each 
who did away with the jade of all trades in Cuba? And form of its quixotic but apparently mellowing comm- year, the return to Cuba of 
who is lbe genius who invented toe coffee break?" dante. The system has settled into an enduring reality 2.800 orcvious emiarants fou 


hurts business 


appearing 


ho is the genius who invented the coffee break?" 
“What happened to the person who could do ma 


dante. The system has settled into an enduring reality 2.800 
in the streets -of Havana, and Mr. Castro voices a dears 


Cuba of neatly 
rants found un- 
Le for U.S. resi- 


rciauuu* gua” through direct intervention 

But he repeated vtoai ^he said was ^ jnsistwthat a solution could 

be found within toe framework of 


with the united States on any top- 

ic and to cooperate m achurring ^ said toe ruling sS- 

Ssfasss? 6 "' 1 ^ 

of cSbS Mffloimc presmre m- 

troops from Angola. . . He said thai he had 


to the Soviet Union as a belligerent j 0 bs instead of just one? 5 he fulminated with toe preoccupation not with spreading revolution abroad deucy and toe admission to toe 
embargo- fervor of an executive who has just read “In Search of bui with fine-tuning the economy at home. United States Of former Cuban po- 

But toe United States putood toe Excellence," the best-sdling book on efficiency in U.S. After the snuffing out in 1983 of toe leftist revolu- lineal prisoners. 


His Jaw wag^es beneath one of the world’s roost term.” He cited “»me positive point^here“any military adven- • Mr. Castro said that Cuba sup- 

famous beards, which contains tufts of gray now, and throughout toe hemisphere, only to wind up now intentionally," including Jure against Cuba would be P 0 ^ negotiations between the 

his evebrOWS fl« as hf*. l^anc fnranmt rn ran rhf lahli* IC nntmmiH net Pm* f. Cnl <11 ik. TIC Cmi!w mnml anflr. i « j u _ in ^ .j n -% 


if* mn. . J’ aw waggles beneath one of toe world’s most 
So COCOM broadened its con- famous beards, which contains tufts of gray now, and 
(Contomed on Page 4, CoL 5) his eyebrows flex as be leans forward to tap the table 


iSpautong m Sese and other 

■5?c»o- otta E3iS“fi 

CTntc^CubaiaiOTisofeco- ^nsgotiaKttteSh cS- 

low^dnwmyor^pSSm 

S&tShisSriKr l c ^ Kanat 

ad oquaded its defenses to the , *“ d ** Su “ taB - 


(Continued on Page 2, CoL 4) 


the U^.-Soviet arms control talks doomed to failure" and would be (Contiboed tm Page 2, CoL I) 


Z a a 5-{« v £ 9- ■8 5'i??-g 9g. 









t V **. 


Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HEKALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1985 


New Leader of Europe of the 21 Strives to Bridge the Gulf With Europe of the 10 


By Henry Tanner 

InioTumonal Herald Tribune 

STRASBOURG. France — Marcelino Oreja, 
the diminutive former foreign minister of Spain, 
is afraid that one day soon there may be one 
Europe too many. 

He points out that within Western Europe; 
itself only half of Europe, there is a deepening 
gulf between the 10 European Community 
countries striving for supranational institutions 
and the neutral democracies, such as Sweden, 
Switzerland and Austria, that want European 
dialogue and cooperation but refuse integration. 

Mr. Oreja’s ambition is to arrest and reverse 
this trend. 

The dynamic secretary-general of the 21-na- 
tion Council of Europe has been campaigning 
since his election four months ago to instill a 
new sense of purpose into this somnolent orga- 
nization. He has been exhorting the govern- 
ments of the European Community to use the 
council more intensively as a forum for political 
consultation with the Europeans who are not in 
the EC and by persuading the neutrals to be 
more active in iL 

The council members, aside from the 10 EC 



Cultural Org; 
organizations 
forts and the 


One of' the council's next projects may be » 


ian with EC activities. pollution and legal issues. car insurance and tne protection oi auupmu Mirtenand visited Stras- 

He wants to concentrate on three areas, he The council takes no practical action. It is not children. 

said in arecent interview. Interpol, and does not substitute itself for jus- The council has a permanent staff of about 

• His first priority is to create greater cohe- lice ministries of member nations. The represen- S5Q and brings about 3,000 government officials West Germany^ oreign * . . . » 

sion between the EC members and nomnern- tatives that come here, unlike those in the EC and experts together for consultation a year. Its 


bets. He argues that because thecoundTsmem- cannot commit their governments 
beta constitute a majority of the world's But they can set standards and sj 


democracies, they - have a’imique potential for cal approaches in the three or four conventions if inflation is taken into account. 
assuring stricter application of democratic val- they adopt annually. They organize consults- Karl Ahrens, a Soaa^Democrattc member of wmtm cm for 


assuring stricter application of democratic val- 
ues within Europe and for serving as a model 


(UCy OUUUI nmiiurnf. JLUWT uinmilLW w mmur ammri — — . . - . m i_. 

lions between officials working on the mm the West German Bundestag and current pres- twice-yeariy sessions only. 

«■ a * --1 Dm n/it mianrtuvlu lit A 


ues Wltmn Europe ana IDr scivwg an a aiuun uvn* dgiwccu umuau wuiwjij vu me ^ p r — J - rtnrimiefir nhmit tho 

outside the Gmtinent, if only they manage to problems and they can, in Mr. Orga's words, dent of the Parliamentary Assembly suggested But not eraybody is optimisuc about the 

™ ^ ■ 3 c i.—. ™ that ihorvTiinHi\u-rakn«s— its council s future role. 


coordinate their 21 voices. 


UWIVUU emu U1VT VU1A, 1U AWU. VIWJU 0 - r -• 7 ^ . h. m . . ' 1 . 

try to mobilize the political will of govern- in an interview that the council s weakness — us counol s^roture role. 
1 n.hn.,1 Uplr nt a nmnnalinivil inanHaW and its inabll- Whcfl Mr. Oreja C2 


• Mr. Ora a also wants to improve the opera- meats" to make cooperation between national lack of a supranational mandate and its inabil- When Mr. Oi^a ^ 

ions of th^oundl in the areaof human rights enforcement agetHe^er. ity to commit its member governments - may 

-a— . 1- w- When the cSmSwas founded in May 1949, also be its strength. him cold and imenthnsiasuc about the counts 


does of the council in the area of human rights 

activities, where the organization has had its niKu uk uwuui »« iwumiw w »u; * —» — —o— .... , v „ _ - j 

most solid achievements. the member governments intended it as a first The council can be an effective i force for activities, a SI 

Every year several thousand individuals sub- step toward unifying Europe. It marked the fust moral and political persuasion, he said, because team m Brussels and they auepreocoupied wnh 
imt their complants to the oounriTs Human time that a parliamentary assembly was at- the constraints that inhibit the EC countries their 

Rights Commisrioo. If the commission finds the tached to an international organization and the striving for integration do not east here and Anoffkaal at the J^dquartmm tneime^e- 
ca» admissible, it sends it to the organization’s first time that opposition members of national because the organization’s geographical reach is an Parliamratjm^e upof P^xuan^itanans 
Court on Human Rights, whose judgment is parliaments could be heard in such a forum, much wider. f J . from iO Cm^ oom^^a 

transmitted to the member gpvern^tcon- council officials point out. The council can afford to be ahead of its time, visitor that he did I not see 

ceraed with a recommendation for action if But the time for political unification of En- he said. It took up the problems erf air and nver council could make to the unification <rf Europe 
necessary rope had not yet come. The leading govern- pollution throughout Europe long before the even though it might have its uses in the dia- 


When Mr. Oreja called on Jacques Ddors, the' 
new president of the EC Commission, he foqgid 
him cold and imenthnsiasuc about thecomas 


Marcefino Oreja 


awiizenana ana lurtcy. yj promote 

The council consists of a Committee of For- democracy, 
dga Ministers and a 170-seat Parliamentary Since the 


parliamentary 


dga Ministers and a 170-seat Parliamentary Since the 10 arc soon scheduled to become 12 
Assembly chosen by the national parliaments, with the entry of Spain and Portugal in January, 
Between tbdr twice-yeariy meetings, the minis- the imbalance between the Europe of the Coul- 
ters are represented by permanent delegates, m unity and the Europe of the 21 can only grow. 
The assembly meets three times a year. The Mindful perhaps of Western charges that the 
council's function, under its statute, is to bring United Nations Educational, Scientific and 


necessary. 


the imbalance between the Europe of the Com- pressure is such that Britain's House of com- coal and Steel Community came into oemg m noiomg an or curope lagpno. ^ 

munity and the Europe of the 21can only grow, moos is discussing two bills, on phone tapping 1952. The council went mto echpse, except m said, adding “You can t deal with long-distance liament. although clos 

Mindful perhaps erf Western charges that the and corporal punishment in schools, in response the field of human rights, where it became a pollution, for instance, without going beyond passage, stand backti 

United Nations Fd"™*™ 1 ™ 1 . Sdaotific and to action by the council’s rights court. leader with the adoption of its Human Rights national and Common Market borders. virtually invisible from 


He smiled and pointed out that the two bmld- 
gs housing the council and the European PBr- 
men l although dose and connected by a 
ssage, stand back to back and that one is 
luallv invisible from the other. 


Spain, ILK. Begin Gibraltar Talks 


United Press International 

GENEVA — Britain and Spain 
agreed Tuesday to begin immeoiaie 
negotiations on resolving their dis- 
pute over the British colony of Gi- 
braltar. 


Howe of Britain and Fernando said , "could only be in accordance 
Mordn of Spain decided at a one- with the wishes" of the people 


The talks followed the opening 
of the frontier at midnight Monday 


nmLtiafr day meeting here that lower-level 
tbdr dis- officials should begin work this 

ay of Gi- wcek - 

They said the talks would in- 
nprntn p vtrfve cooperation involving Brit- 


themsdves. 

Mr. Morin repeated Spain's 
claim to sovereignty over Gibraltar 
but reaffirmed Madrid’s commit- 
ment to "respect the feelings and 


after a blockade of more than 15 lhal mclude aviation, economic 
ycais. matters, tourism, the environment. 

Foreign Ministers Geoffrey tnmsport Md defense. 


Foreign Ministers Geoffrey transport Mddrfense. 

senior offi cials will mom tor this 

work at regular intervals while far- 

Crre-rf Sirin It Dinr-imrirfl eign ministers will meet annually to 
Greece says it mscoseeti review progress, with the issue of 

Arms Safe With libya smrereignty reserved for the minis- 

Reuten Sir Geoffrey said that the agree- 

ATHENS — A government mem represented “a significant 
spokesman said Tuesday that a measure of success" in overcoming 
Libyan delegation had been in Ath- British-Spanish differences over 
ens recently to discuss military pur- the colony since its capture by the 
chases worth $500 nriflion. Greece, English and the Dutoi in 1704. 
be said, hopes to seD Libya military Spun ceded the colony to Britain 
equipment worth SI billion during in 1713, but has long reclaimed iL 


aim Spain and Gibraltar in areas interests*' of Gibraltar's residents, 
that include aviation, economic The green iron gates that cut off 
matters, tourism, the environment, Gibraltar from the European main- 
transport and defense. land were opened by Spanish offi- 


the next five years. 


Sir Geoffrey said that he had 


Greek officials said that the Lib- "repeated the British government’s 
yans showed interest in the Artemis commitment to honor the wishes of 
ground-to-air missil es system and the Gibraltarian people." 


in fast patrol boats. 


dais at nudnight Monday, ending a 
diplomatic siege that began when 
Franco sealed the border in June 
1969. 

Minutes after the gates swung 
open, five cars bearing Gibraltar 
license plates were set afire in La 
Iinea, the Spanish border town op- 
posite Gibraltar. 

The opening followed an agree- 
ment Britain and Spain reached 
Nov. 27. 

Two years ago authorities began 
allowing people- who live in Gibral- 
tar and Spaniards with relatives in 
the colony to go in an out Tuesday 
was the fust time people and goods 
had been allowed to pass without 
restriction. 


Reagan Assails 
SovietonYataa 

United Press International 

WASHINGTON — Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan assailed 
the Soviet Union on Tuesday 
for breaking promises made 40 
years ago at the Yalta Confer- 
ence. 

Mr. Reagan, who in the past 
has said he does cot accept the 
division of Europe into Western 
and Soviet spheres, issued a 
statement commemorating the 
anniversary of the World War 
II talks involving the British, 
Soviet and U.S. leaders. 

“ Since fhat tirw, Yalta 
had a double meaning," Mr. 
Reagan said. "It recalls an epi- 
sode of cooperation between 
the Soviet Union and free na- 
tions, in a great common cause. 
But it also recalls the reasons 
that this cooperation could not 
continne — the Soviet promises 
that were not kept the elections 
that were not held, the two 
halves of Europe that have re- 
mained apafL 


Force of Economic Recovery WORLD BRIEFS 

In Europe Surprises Analysts I j^ r 


(Continued from Page 1) 
Kern, chief economist at National 
Westminster Rank in London. "We 
haven't eliminated economic cy- 
cles, but the low points will be a 
very email decline and remain high- 
er than the average for the previous 
10 years." 


^ __ i men held 

States's economy by the second hostage for nearly 10 months after British police besieged the Libyan 
half of the year." Embass y in London and Britain broke off relations with Colonel Mourner 

Such positive developments are Qadhafi's gpvemmenL 
not quite enough to eliminate the The men were arrested in Libya after British police laid siege to the 
grimace that economists normally embassy when a policewoman was killed by gunfire coming from the 
wear when discussing Europe, budding. They were released after months of mediation and foot trips to 
"Things are looking better, but Libya by Terry Waite, the personal envoy of the Most Reverend Robert 


) years " they are not rosy," said Richard 

f . ’ Freeman, chief economist for Im- 

As the OECD now sees 'L 1985 p^a] C hemi cal Industries PLG 


will be the first year since 1978 in 


neeman, chief economist for Im- The men. two teachers and two engineers, were released at a news 
ml Chamcal Industries PLG conference in Tripoli, which was broadcast by the BBG The four Britons 
The main problem is that pro- — Robin Plummer, 32, Malcolm Andersen, 27. Alan Russell, 48, and 


|_ r* - | ■ MW »IWU I W HIM hi — JWUU1 A llUiliUWf a/ 4a, |V1(U1A/UU i UIUMOVU, a ■!* * « ■ m 

which no European nanon records jaged growth rates are not nearly Michael Badinner, 52 — are scheduled to leave Tripoli on Thursday with 
a dedme m ourpuL Moreover, jt raough to prcvent m5 ^ archbishop's envoy. 

will be a year m wmen Europe s f roin being the I3th consecutive Their release was (Hayed for a day as a Libyan protest against last 
growth rate increases SUghtly While UH, nt ni»mf,lni'ni«,t TTn_ l.« X W.. P.:.... u««v««4 Tkali>ha, nt a nwnwial (A 


strong enough to prevent 1985 the archbishop’s envoy. 

from being the 1 3th consecutive Their release was (Hayed for a day as a Libyan protest against last 
year of rising unemployment Un- week’s unveiling by Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher of a memorial to 


—r .. I J . - j | J — ■ WVVBl a till Mt ailliy A 1UUV ITLUU^lVI LVUUUUVk ■ Iinwmvi nm ■■■ ww ■■■< 

thatof theLimtedStaiK ^id Japan employment f OT the region may Yvonne Fletcher, the policewoman who was killed, 
declines- This will at least tempo- creep up to 12 percent in 1986. with 

so “ ie e 9 oa . ( 5™ sts ^ e ^. eve in the nacTfow yeaj^Unem^^ Veterans Gmtradict Westmoreland 


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highlights the si^oificance of a 
healthy Europe to its trading part- 
ners. 

"There is. at the moment, a re- 
versing of the roles between the 
United States and Europe.” said 


ment in the 10- nation European NEW YORK (NYT) — Two combat veterans of the Vietnam War 
Com ^, UI ^ t 7 December was a took die stand at General WUEara G Westmoreland’s libd trial againff 
post- World War LI record of 1 1 J egg wielding a mock grenade and trip wire, demonstrated how$e 
percent, the EC has reported. Viet Cong’s self-defense forces rigged booby traps that, they said, caused 

But business profits have soared American casualties, 
during the recovery and so, in The veterans — Daniel A. Friedman, a twice-wounded private who 


mwar . 

St .'-Senate tow 


Hans Mast, chief economist of many cases, has confidence in Eu- served as an infantryman, and Howard Embree, a captain wbo graduated 
Credit Suisse in Zurich. Growth m rope's ability to compete interna- f,„ m w-« vnint in 1 QA 3 whim Onml W«tnvm-l#nrf «» amermtm- 


Credit Suisse in Zurich. "Growth in rope's ability 
Europe will be helping the United tionally. 


(Continued from Page 1) 

U -backed government in El Sal- 


ie Chbraltanan people." had been allowed to pass without credit Suisse in z.uncn. urowtn in rope s ability to compete mteraa- from Wesl p^t ^ 1963 when General Westmoreland was superinleu- 

Any change in sovereignty, he restriction. | ^ j Europe will be helping the Umted tionally. ^ lhere _ were ^ ^^3335 Monday by CBS to counter the 

1 1 — general’s testimony that the self-defense forces were “basically dvflians” 

___ who posed no offensive threat ‘ u 

to Improved Ties With U.S., Urges Reagan to Change Views numerous injuries, route fataL “Those people were fighting us. We were 

X y O O G t tyin g to fi gh t them," said Captain Howard Embree, a professes' of 

The Cuban leader would give no gressmen accompanied by several that Latin Americans, long sepa- the United States, which has op- talks and the uncertain position of English at Kfiss^ppi 

sedfic figures on his country’s scientists and businessmen. rated by an “every man for him- posed as inadequate a pending the Salvadoran Army, Mr. Casuo *”P- <»>n* th* 

tilitaxy presence in Africa. U.S. At the end of the interview in his setT attitude, were starting to see Comadora treaty that deals with said, “Duarte is not now in a posi- cred that many of the d^d m ieta^ wot IBM 

- * u._ o_i r jtn^a .r nnu. i Jt -a tn~n* ,n .Un ^ same Deoolc who had earlier been waving ar Amencan soldieis atm 


Castro Looks to Improved Ties With U.S . , Urges Reagan to Change Views 


specific figures on bis country’s scientists and businessmen. 


rated by an “every man for bun- 


vador and Cuban-backed goerril- military presence in Africa. UJS. At tbe end of the interview in his self" attitude, were starting to see 
las, and insisted that the rebels are estimates pul the current force in office in the Palace of the Revob- joint efforts as the only solution, 
seriously interested in a political Ethiopia at about 5,000, down from lion, Mr. Castro emphasized that "Latin America is a powder 


ed as inadequate a pendu 
uadora treaty that deals wi 


said, "Duarte is not now in a posi- 


seriously interested in a political Ethiopia at about 5,000, down from 
settlement While be said that nei- a peak of 17,000. It is estimated 
tber side will be able to achieve a that there are 25,000 Cuban com- 


Ethiopia at about 5,000, down from (ton, Mr. Castro emphasized that 
a peak of 17,000. It is estimated "nothing 1 have said here was in- 


mflitary victory in the short term, bat soldiers in An ge la 

and noted that logistics had be- c . 

come "highly difficult” for the Situ* tire eariyl 970s, 


the withdrawal of all foreign forces tion to resume the dialogue" start- 
from Central America. ed last October but "has to wait for 


anphasized that "Latin America is a powder from Central America. ed last October but "has to wait for 

"nothing 1 have said here was in- keg,” he said. "It's an explosive Ruling out the probability of di- elections to be over” next month, 
tended to be hostile toward the situation It's a serious thing, and red US. intervention in Nicara- But, Mr. Castro said: “As long as 

* j ” He bad noted how are they going to solve it? It’s gua, Mr. Castro said: "I think that there is tbe idea that military vic- 

Cuba had ob- better that we start thinking about tbe United States at the moment tory is possible, that they can dimi- 


United States.” He had noted how are they going to solve it? It’s 
throughout that Cuba had ob- better that we start thinking about 


ered that many of the enemy dead from firefights in Vietnam were the 
same people who had earlier been “waving at American soldiers and 
taking C-rations from ihem. 

For the Record 

Another 625 British coal uraeis abandoned their strike Tuesday, 


Since the eariv 1971k. Mr Castm uuuu S uuul unu uun uau uu- utiiH uuu m. amu uiiihiiib ouuui UK umtm JU1« si UH uwuihm uhj a (xamuic, uui uicj uiu cuur niiuura o« uiium m™ bimuuuimi uiw 

come “highly difficult" for the . . . JL served favorably both tire sub- aD of these problems." hopes to destroy tbe Nicaraguan nate [the guerrillas] down to the last management said, as intermediaries attempted to reviw 

guerrillas, he said that the rebels ^ crvLressmen. other officials stance ^ the tone of the recent In particular, he said, tbe United revolution from within," by con- revolutionary, as an example that end the 47-week walkouL About 100,000 remain on sir 

could “resist indefinitely” in the ^ immigration negotiations, which he Slates needs to change some of its Uniting to support the operation of there would never again be revolu- A Yugoslav district coart found a philosophy professor 

ab«nMrf a negotiate d agre ement. — chraren^-aceDenl — very views about Cuba. “I think that anti-Sandinist rebds and “by com- tionaries in Central America or ovic, gmlty of anti-state activity and sentenced him t 

• Mr. Castro also indicated that serious and reroectfuL” many times in the United States, pounding Nicaragua's economic anywhere dse, then there will be no prison, tbe newspaper Politika reported Tuesday, 

be may be prepared to scate back ^ twooomtiries. Sutioontacti; However, Mr. Castro said, the opiniems are held on the basis of difficulties." readiness on the part of the United A verdict in the PoBshtrial of four secret police office 

Cuba’s mflhaiy efforts in Africa, a . , , . . Reagan administration had beliefs rather than ideas sustained “I am convinced that the U.S. States, on the part of Duarte or of killing of a pro- Solidarity priest, the Reverend Jerzy 

mar Or point of conflict between . . , ^ U 1 K V stermed im miKlarv maneuvers off bv solid annunents." Mr. Castro hones to end the revolution the armv In negotiate I Inform- exnecredThurKri.lv. 


hopes to destroy the Nicaraguan nate [the guerrillas] down to the last management said, as intermediaries attempted to revive negotiations to 
revolution from within," by con- revolutionary, as an example that end the 47-week walkouL About 100,000 remain on strike. (AP) 
Uniting to support tbe operation of there would never again be revolu- A Yugoslav district cool found a philosophy professor, Milan Mladen- 
anti-Sandiiiist rebds and “by com- tionaries in Central America or ovic, gmlty of anti-state activity and sentenced him to 18 months in 
pounding Nicaragua's economic anywhere dse, then there will be no prison, tbe newspaper Politika reported Tuesday. (AP), 

difficulties." readiness on the part of the United A verdict in the Polish trial of four secret police officers charged in til. . 


A Yugoslav flsinci court iouna a pnuosopny professor, Milan jvmaen- 
ovic, gmlty of anti-state activity and sentenced him to 18 months in 
prison, tbe newspaper Politika reported Tuesday. (AP)*— 


ar pant of cpnlhcl between ^ the R^ S stepped up militaiy maneuvers off by, solid arguments,” Mr. Castro 

SiSbS ^Jhfch Si its coast and at the UX. naval base said. Instead of hostility, he added, 
ed that Cuba has reduced sig- . uigmeA rnha n<c the kohrv c!i 81 Guantftnamo on the eastern tip the international situation requires 


Castro hopes to end the revolution the army to negotiate. Unfortu- expected Thursday. 


SSrnSTmT 

has in Elhiopia. and he offered conflict n. Central Amenca. S nSndl 

qualified praise for a U.S.-spon- But since the immigration agree- In a list (rf what be called “hos- 
rored mediation effort between ment was concluded Dec. 14, Mr. tile" acts by the adnrimstra 
Angola and South Africa that even- Castro has played host to a delcga- Mr. Castro also included "ini 
tuaDy could lead to Cuban with- tion of U.S. Catholic bishops mid fieri eemumrir. meaam* the 


efforts to understand each other's 
point of view. 

Mr. Castro acknowledged that 


through this combination," be said, natdy, one would have to wait until 
"As long as the United States has they were persuaded otherwise." 


A verdict in the Polish trial of four secret police officers charged in til. . 
killing of a pro- Solidarity priesL the Reverend Jerzy PopkTnszko, is 
expected Thursday. (AP) 

An Aeroflot jetiner canying up to 80 people crashed on takeoff from 
the Minsk airport in Belorussta, killing an unknown number of passen- 


WaSKI; “ 
Jwlkur- v 
Ttwdaj " 
licaoi'Er 1 ” 

getseni^::.:' 
ber. whi^.1 . .■■ 
cndorwirr:: 
Mr.Mdf.— 
for * ; ir F 
was jp::.- 5 ;: 
tines. i:n l 

bU\ R-J C. • . 

aussi. 

-Not :-. . • • 
to be aiu.*:;* 
man « . 

dedicaiici" 
chaimm 
South ; 
ooisce::: 
Sena- 

Denkx:;; • • . 

‘ -before 
"Tbs \ 


tually could lead to Cuban with- tion of U.S. Catholic bishops and 
drawals from Angola. has been visited by three U.S. con- 


Beverly Wilshire Hotel 

IN THE HEART OF LOS ANGELES 
Wilshire Boulevard at Rodeo Drive 
Beverly Hills, Calif. 90212 
1213) 275-4282 Telex 698-220 


tile" acts by the adminis tration, the question of Central America 
Mr. Castro also included "interna- was “very delicate" but insisted 
Bed economic measures, the eco- that tbe issue of Nicaragua could 
nounc blockade." and the exertion be resolved through negotiations. 
of "great pressure to obstruct the He raterated his pledge to abide, 
rescheduling of Cuba’s external with verification, by any agreement 
debt” with the West Nicaragua would sign calling for 

“In the political Gdd, 'it also has tbe withdrawal from Nicaragua of 
been very .aggressive," he said. Cubans — numbered by the San- 
“and in the military field. It has dilusts at 4,000 and by the Reagan 


press the trill to find a solution.” cific Cuban assistance to the giier- 
edged that El Salvador, Mr. Castro said, riUas but said that rebel supply 
il America presents a much more difficult lines from the outside largely are 
ut insisted problem, Imt one that he said still is nonexistent because logistics are 
agoa could solvable. "If both sides want to find "almost impossible." He said the 
egotiations. peace," he said, “then peace can be guerrillas get most of their weapons 
e to abide, found." from the Salvadoran Army itself, 

agreement Talks between (he Salvadoran While he said that Cuba would 
calling to president, Jose Napde6n Duarte, never give up the “moral prind- 
icaragna (rf and the guerrillas “are to be en- pies" that govern its support for the 


He declined to comment on spe- gers, a Soviet newspaper reported Tuesday, 
cific Cuban assistance to the guer- 


Peres Says Egypt Is Failing 
To Respond to Peace Efforts 

(Continued from Page 1) reel and Tune ma gari™» l think 


‘JhdJg M bi^HafdsU ibtfWodd n 

London (01) 583-3050 
Frankfurt (069) 29 04 71 
Hong Kong (5) 22 II 42 


London (01) 409-081 4 
Frank fun (069) 28 75 24 
Hong Kong (3) 68 23 35 


Kidney Stones? 
Here's Relief 


London is pleased to announce the opening 
of its first lithotripter centre for the non-surgical 

removal of kidney stones. 

Under the care of some of Britain's leading 
kidney specialists, this revolutionary new 
treatment offers the patient: 

■ Four days hospitalisation instead of ten 
or more. 

• An immediate return to worker normal 
activity. 

• No open wound or scarring. 

• No risk of infection . 

• No damage or impairment to the kidney. 
An uncomplicated stone removal costs 

approximately £3.200 inclusive of physician's 
and urologists fees. 

Enquiries in strictest confidence to: 

Penny Brown, Administrator, 
Lithotripter Centre, (H.T.2), Devonshire Hospital, 
27 IVelbcck Street, London W1M 7PG. England. 
Telephone: 01-M35 4214 Telex: 21283 STM ART G 


"and in the military field, it has dirusts at 4,000 and by l 
constantly threatened us. All that is administration at 6(000. 
true. But nevertheless, we are grate- BuLbesakkthededaonisupto 
fuL Fm speaking seriously, we are 
very grateful, why? Because it . 
forced us to undertake two big rev- fk cl I fflWTl 

One, he said, amounted to a re- m| m « 

thinking of Cuba's economic struc- I fllTI.Q'S I ,1 
ture that has resulted in an ongoing o 

austerity drive, an emphasis on b- (Omtimed from PS 

port substitution and the fulfill- ^,,5^ . ■ _ f 
Sent of trade commitments with 
the Soviet bloc. £fi!5ffi22?2 

More importanL Mr. Castro 
said, “during the past four years, in roadasw »n 
ST ^ the threat of the United 
States, we have totally changed our dudon SS revduti 
conceptiro reprding defose. We result ofa ^ (rf^nS 
have mid tipUedqn forces by many historic ^ f 

SSXSSSESu 

amounted to 

armed hundreds of thousands of -1-^- • 

Cubans along the lines erf the fora t - , 

that eri^foDowing the Bay of 
Pigs invasion in 196L of mounting debt, fal 

“Every citizen in this country soc j^ *5 

knows what to do." Mr. Castro the United 1 StSli!?' I 
said, “in the event of a blockade, a ^ 
war of attrition, bombin^^^a- 
sion, even in case of an occupation _ ftTam™ 3 * 13 ’ 

rf asssa&— SSES 


man*;'. . . 

EraeteCi'.- 
irom ib; ;• > 


wouldn’t use other terms. I would 
the not fly into die philosophical field 


couraged, and work has to proceed guerrillas. Mr. Ostro noted that W on X 

in this direction," he said. Because "there are other ways" of address- - unfortunate- Sharon and Tune on this roerific 

of what he desmbed as Salvadoran ing the problem with the United £ jjjf* 4 ^ » rearing the end, 

“right-wing opposition" to the States. he said ^otte lermt 1 wwdd 

“I am speaking of a readiness to 0x1 the Israeli economy, the ^ fly m to the philorophical firfd 

. __ work, to strive in order to find ’P Time minister radicated that he ^ c i? iake far ' reachin S descrijj 

S 1H riJIVJITHI sohaiions to the problem," he said. feIt two voluntary wage-price DO rr n . ' 

111 IliiVa ll ii} “That is the portion we maintain, agreements worked out by his gov- Mr. Peres ago firmly dented that 

It's not a question of us giving up emmenL the labor unions, and ^ selli ng ar ms to a 
W rtTTV I ilfitTA principles or views, but rather business had put the Israeli econo- d ‘? uaJ “at has been supported by 
” vll V to workm such a direction that my on a road to recovery. Tbe sec- other government sources here and 


a T»T # TT wore, io strive in oraer ro rraa 

As Dawn Nears m Havana, 

rail • 1 T%T7 o It's not a question of us giving up 

1 hings Cuban Worry Castro 

(CnUhned from Page 1) licy. A small puff of smoke from lhcre “ E no fo T. war ’/ or wea P 

accusing him nf havmc nimwlnj fhorAkihinnorli* nAtu 1,™ oos or tor ammumtion. It is not a 


un tne Israeli economy, tne j uou 

prime miniew radicated that he make far-re a c hing desenjt 
felt two voluntary wage-price 

agreements worked out by his gov- ™- Peres also firmly dented that 
eminent, the tabor unions, and Isrsol wts selling arms to Iran, a 
business had put the Israeli econo- denial that has been supported by 


accusing him of having succeeded the Cohibadgar he toys with hangs 
in doing just that through the San- for an instant in his beard, 
dinists in Nicaragua. And Mr. Cas- The upskle-down schedule seems 


question of us solemnly pledging 
that we win abide by (his or that, or 


dimstsmNKxiragua.AndMr.Cas- The upside-down schedule seems 

tro is now cm the other side of the pan ritual part metabolism. Mr. 10 ““ ** “* “PP? 

road as weD. Castro apparratiy needs only four Reunited 

It is impassible to export a rev- or five hours' sleep, which he 011 basis of pronhsmg 

dution because revolutions are the catches on the run. that we will nevo 1 send a bullet to a 

results of a set of economic, social. The interview may break a bore- J evt " UUOTa *y- “ B . pnpe 
historic, cultural factors that no dom and isolation that would seem ™ a£,oos WIth * he 

one can export," Mr. Castro said, predictable at this stage of his and Un,le J? Slatcs - w cannot W 
“Nor can they be avoided. We can’t Cuba’s history. The Toss of such ? nce ' 


ond phase of those agreements a PP e ^ rs to reflect a sharp change in 
took rffect Tuesday. Israeli attitudes toward the Iran- 

“In Washington, they were very M wm sina Mr. Peres took of- 

skepticai about the means we have Tot .- . . 

w employ, had 


"»e»as s ; iF 

rr-V 

og c :.. 


awui me lucmia wc nave tl. i— ■ — 

decided to employ, and even had i 

the slight fSg that we took the ^ y - u> .? ec ^ Irat J i ?v who m 

easy mmislcr said 


one can export," Mr. Castro sakL predicta 
“Nor can they be avoided. We can’t Cuba’s : 
export revohxtions in Latin Ameri- revoluti 
ca. nor can the United States pre- Guevara 
vent soda! changes if the problems Castro a 


comrades as Che * U.S. Lists Disagreements 
ca. nor can toe United States pre- Guevara and others leaves Mr. A White House spokesman said 
vent sooai changes if the problems Castro a giant among pygmies on a Monday (hat “lines of comrmraica- 
conunue to pile up in Latin Ameri- national scene devoid of the renew- tion remain open" between the 
ca ‘ u . ... ing political freedoms and competi- United States and Mr. Castro but 

Latin America is a powder tion of a non-Co mm unisl Systran, that tbe Cubans “have laifpn very 


S themselves with Egypt, as 

a much less dangerous lt^terra 

trols “I don’t airee tlui ? ai * an ^ ude 1 ™ u_ 

__ agree. an-tnspired Shiite fundamentahsai, 

Tne government is taking the especially now that such funda- 
necessary drastic measures to cure mentalism is lapp ing at Israel’s 
theeconomy, painfui as they may border with Lebanon. As a result, 
be, Mr. mes said. Referring to all Israeli arms shipments to Iran 
toe Iaaeh finaj lyear that starts —which Israel has always pubhdy 
April 1, he said: vut of the opera- demed male mg — are believed to 
tional budget of $ 1 1 billion, 32 bil- have been halted, 
hop to S2 . S bfflion wffl be actually “W c are not going to seD any 
ait during the coming . fiscal year. I arms to Iran." the pome mmiS ■ 


«<JIL ^ * 

“W 


i P 0 ^ tton of anon-Communisl system, that tbe Cubans “have taken very cut during the comragfiscai year. I arms to Iran," the mLe S^iisS • 
keg, he said, reding^ statistics Mr. Castro is quick to turn to the little action" toward better rda- “ Positive that we will implement said. “We consider the Khomrihi 

or motmtmg debt, falling hvmg mternational slMp be sought so tions in the last Tour years. The “** 0,15 md casc *** economy.” revolution a very sad eroeriencein 

standards and social npheaval m avidly ra the 196& and 70s, rumi- Washington Post reported. “I think the facts are speaking die 20th century. It Saverv es- 

nating on the budget defidts of Responding to a conciliatory for themselves." he concluded, dt- treme and hostile movemS? and 

rJL! .Si “ t ? n " Wc ^ Germany and Inm, the un- tone struck by Mr. Casbo in a Post ing the sharp reduction in Israel's we do not have any reasons to sup- 

.“^, Ulut 5r ^ mter * toymen t rates of France and interview, the spokesman, Lany inflation rate, to a little more than 3 port Khomeini." 

venew Grenada, wtodi is a com- Bn tai n. Then he becomes the Speakes, said, “Recently we have percent a month from 20 percent a ■ Gmcprv 

s^an Idhmeters (152 Grand Old Man <rf the Revolution, been successful in discussing with month; the rise in exports; the fall Uroc^y Prices Rise 

sguaremiles)and 120,000 poputa- comparing what he has accom- the Cubans the matter of immigra- in imports, and the voluntary but began paying 4 to 20 per- 

Pbsited with the rest of the Carib- tioo. and our lines of commumca- limited cutbacks in linking wasas “nt more for some groceries Toes- 

UmiaJ Stares invade BraanTT bean and Latin America, tion, for our part, remain open." to inflation — all accomplished ^ urK *f r ^ second phase <rf the 


^positive that we will implement said. “We consider the Khomrihi 
these cuts and cure tbe economy ” revolution a very sad experience in 


“1 think the facts are 
for themselves," be cone! 


:ing the 20th century. It is a very ex- 
dt- treme and hostile movement and 


World, particularly in Latin Ameri- - T' ~T7 T — . ■»«* uk icvoiuuou, ne saw, mu, ne aaoca, ~we ao 

ca, Mr. Castro indicated his bdirf p. he adds,^ is playing with fire “we have graduated nearly 20GJXX) damental disagreements. 

iL«a !_■ . j i* D€SuC 3 DOWoCT ttniirwclhr nmf uppiAniilp U/1 im rm **71— a I ' . 




■irS?: 




United Shares invade Brazil?" 

UJS. intervention in Latin Amer- 


bean and Latin America. 

“Since the revolution," he said. 


But, be added, “we do have fun- 


percent amtmihfrom 20 percent a ■ Grocm Prices Rise • 2.V 

month; thensem exports; the fall ,'"7? ** , lose ; 

in imports, and the voluntary but ‘faais began paying 4 to 20 per- 

limited cutbacks in linking waass “ nt more for some grocenes Toes- FtrjJ> 

to inflation — all accomplish un< to r the second phase of the 


to inflation — all accomplished 3 “T ™ secon 9 pna» or me 
with little rise in unemployment. w ^ge and price restraint agreement, 

■n-™ .... whlch «#l months. Rentos 


that time is working toward dia- 
logue and against what he charac- 
terized as an interventionist U.S. 
policy in the hemisphere. He said 


££d£ “M**; ' . _ mtmAfiSSSftiSZ T&SBktSTmbm*. taKTSfcSKSS 

1 hecharac* . A Pmk Caribbean dawn is begm- began our health program, there activities in Central America and States would aimS^Knn J? postal charges dou- 

itiotiist U5. to creepacross Hawna asMr. were only 3,000 doctors. Now we South America, targe deployment bted and clectridty prices rose 25 

ire. He said CaTOs^mtos soft but unmfr have 20500. We have doctors in of Cuban troops TyuSdSe pe !Sf L 

? kab y -^ C fe° gK m ? ner - w *“ dl ow 25 countries, some 1,500 of allegiance to the Soviet Union and Sw the iranatiM^ noted ■ °J erecon otoic measures are de- 

' ” ,,^,1 ^ ^ ^cance the convasa- them. We have 255,000 working their violation of human rights in agned to stem the decline in fg 

mmtY hrab^ m his ravernous office teachers. Infant mortafity in Cuba Cuba," Mr. Speakes sakL “On ISS curtency reserves. These m& 

S”* Y at 2:30 AM. is 15 fw every 1.000 live births. tlWfoar pomtT^ diia^ We ^ dangerously suresdoubkd the S100 tax that 


UNIVERSITY 

DEGREE 


began our health program, there activities in Central America and States would aoorove J800 2S , ^ addition, postal charges dtxi- 
woe only 3,000 doctras. Now we South America, targe deployment ^ electriaty prices rose 25 

hre 2gj00. We h,« doctors m of Cub m wop, T gte ^ 

over 25 countries, some 1^00 of allegiance to the Soviet Union and STth/ ImnnliAn nm i n d J--‘ — ■ lUCSSUTCS 


>£n' 




1 

*■". m j, -ju^ulf Iqi 

H' ■«» 0“ , .«5f:nsoa i j)oC , O n 4>E 

S*nu dfltwM resume 
(Or a tr.ee evaluation 
wane WESTERN UNIVERSITY 
tM00«»»Tii«4Biva iWT| Eiw^o CM.0MMUS* 


41 t is 15 fw every 1,000 live births. those four pointswe disagree. We 

pressed is tailored, olive green “We are among the first 15 na- want to see actions from the Cn- 
laugues with smgte-starred q»u- timis in the world and only three bans. We have seen only words." 

lets, Mr. Castro, at 58, appears trim points away from the United 

a nd alert as he notes that he must States. We don’t compare our 
break off soon for an 8 A.M. meet- health situation to that of Jamaica 
mg with MamH Pimero, the Com- or Central America. We compare il 
munist Party's expert on U.S. po- to the United States." 


Asked if be thought die conclu- 
sion of Arid Sharon’s libel suit 
against Time Inc. constituted a 
“moral victory" for Israel, as Mr. 
Sharon has described it, Mr, Peres 
said: “I don’t think this was a con- 
frontation between the state of Is- 


Isradis pay to leave toe country 
and imposed a 15-percent tax on 
air tickets and a 20-percent rise on 
such imports as cars and cosmetics. 

The price increases on groceries 
were for more than 200 products 
whose prices had been restricted 
from rising for three months. 









ti., 

• 5 < £, 


Off ] \ 

'H 


;;1) ^r5fT 

"' H^|> 


•’ -saorek 




Reagan Seeks Escatotion 
^Aid to Guatemala 

Among Budget Proposals 
toeing Strong Resistance in Congress 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1985 


Page 3 


Estimates tor the fiscal year begJnnlnfl Oct. l . 



Where It would 


come from: 


Excbataxm 396 


Other 4% 


Corporate Income twee 


u.s. 


Military 


Where It :• 
would go: .-4^ 

Other Federal operation® 

5% J§£ 

Grants to state® and tocafittes 

10 % 


Direct benefit 


41% 



The Associated Press 

Washington — T he united 

States has withdrawn from planned 
naval exercises with New Zealand 
and Australia to protest New Zea- 
land’s refusal to permit an Ameri- 
can destroyer to step at a New 
Zealand port, the Reagan adminis- 
tration announced Tuesday. 

The White House spokesman. 
Larry Speakes. also said that A us- 

U.S. Pensions 
Are Criticized 


tralia had canceled the exercise fol- nutter would be discussed when fusel to reveal such information. 


lowing the L'-S. decision. New Zea- Prime Minister Bob Hawke of A up- 
land has imposed a ban on nuclear uaUa meets with President Ronald 


weapons entering the country, 
“We deeply regret this derision 


Reagan on Thursday. 

In the past week. New Zealand 


WirtiiEMn Post Service ,. 0 

Washington— T hp»-«» wou ? d mean ,hc md of «« train 

'tSMSs sis. 0 "- '■ flK r ™ ^ * 

^creasing military assistances p J* 1 * proposcd acliori > which is 
Guatemala from ? f enera ^g » counterattack from 

raJhoo, despite sewn Amtrak and such advocates as the 
as human-rights record CnUC ' Sm ° f Nauonal Assodalion of Rail Pas- 

£ 

"'*» I&£~ Sh0Uld 1,01 ™ 

■. AMakani * ]asam2 

"JPUDGET NOTFRAAt- cc ? 1 ^ in,crcil y passengers and re- 
* ^IfcPOOK caves exceptionally large federal 

Central America's conflicts bv em absi(iie5 relative to the number of 
phasizmg military solutions. passengers carried” the Reagan 

Guatemala has received U S budget sa > s - That subsidy was S35 
economic aid for the last wo yean *** paiiSen S er in 1984. 
out, except For S300.00Q this year Amtra k responded. “By the 
for training, has had no U.S. mili- sajne analysis, for each airline pas- 
tary assistance since 1977 because sca S^' federal tax expenditures 

o» its poor record on human rights due 10 business travel deductions n» ti t to n ^, lL ' Z c . ?“£ “ WBI ^ mL 

But administration officials said alone averi »g£ S33. if all federal “ ,s - Mr. Stockman said, add- 

Monday they the request for an “PPon for such services as airtraf- . . _ ,. , L , . . . , ing that Mr .Reagan was absolute 

additional $35 million in sunrvvri fic control were included, the feder- L Mr -. ~agan added, however. Two of the administrations in insisting that taxes not be raised 
funds and credits to buv lis al cost per airline passenger would j!“ r , “ ^ of ,he cumnl men most loyal allies on Capitol Hill, to reduce the deficit, 

weapons is justified because Gut ** considerably higher ihan Am- . 1 P re p* u ) :s > to administration Senator Jesse Helms. Republican As Mr. Stockman was testifying 

temaia’s military regime has mom- trak ’ s -’* is not budgeting at this lime lor the of North Carolina, chairman of the on the military budget in the Sen- 
sed elections that could nroduST Amtrak recovers 58 percent of its f H‘ ure replenishments of these par- Senate Agriculture Commit lee, and ate. Defense Secretary Caspar W. 

civilian government by Oct. 1 operating budget from fares, higher UcuIar “tsUtitooos." Representative Lany J. Hopkins, Weinberger was before the House 

Senator Christopher J Dodd 115:111 Congress has asked it to do The bank’s programs for the Republican of Kentucky, have pul Armed Services Committee for a 

Democrat of Connecticut, a nereis^ Amtrak said that if it ceases to P 00 "* 1 natioas m on Agriculture Secretary John R. secondconsecuiivedavofcongres- 

tent critic of President RonaldRea- operate, it would lav off 25 000 through the International Develop- Block on notice that the proposal is sional questioning. f 

gan’s policy on Central America, employees; the cost of severance Association, an affiliate that as good as dead. Representative L« Aspin. a | 

s>.d the Guatemala request Sa pay to the federal government fhe Umted Slates helped to launch Tobacco is central to the econo- Democrat of Wisconsin who is the 

would be $2.1 billicf over six atTElMlSR SASSLi SL5SS 


to deny pon access io a U.S. Navy has twice refused a U.S. request for 
ship that contributes to the com- a port call by an .American destroy- 
men defense of the ANZUS alii- er. the USS Buchanan. Prime Mih- 


ance.” Mr. Speakes said, 
it as “a matter of grave 
“We are considenng t 
tions for our overall c 


ikes said, describing isier David Lange said in New Zea- 
of grave concern." land on Tuesday that the ban 
ridenng the implica- wou,d ** “ ntinued - 
overall cooperation [Australian defense officials said 


nons tor our overall cooperation [Ausirauan aeiense omciaissaia 
with New. Zealand under AN- in Canberra that the three coun- 
ZUS.” he said. The alliance was tries would hold a series of bilateral 
established more than 30 years ago naval exercises instead of the three- 
by Australia. New Zealand and the way maneuvers. Reuters reported,] 
United States to provide for mutu- Mr. Lange has refused to grant 


Mr. Reagan added, however, 
ar “in light of the current severe 


(Continued from Page 1) 
interests in Congress, the main ob- 
jective was to bring down the defi- 
cit. “The president's budget will do 
just that," be said. 

The committee’s chairman. Pete 
V. Domenici. a Republican of New 
Mexico, asked, “Is this budget ne- 
gotiable, Mr. Stockman? Because if 
n» T«i Tnu * isn’t, wemay as**U quiL” 

It is, Mr. Stockman said, add- 1 
ing that Mr. Reagan was absolute 
Two of the administration’s in insisting that taxes not be raised 
most loyal allies on Capitol Hill, to reduce the deficit. 


and has said that New Zealand's 
policy could wreck the ANZUS al- 
liance. 

The prime minister said in a ra- 
dio interview that the ban on nucle- 
ar weaponry would not be lifted 
and that he would not bow to pres- 
sure from VS. officials. 

“If they make it a condition, then 
they have made a unilateral with- 
drawal from ANZUS.” Mr. Lange 
said, but added he was certain that 
the United States wanted to keep 
the alliance. 

New Zealand's position, accord- 
ing to Mr. Lange, was that “we 


United States to provide for rouiu- Mr. Lange has refused to grant ing to Mr. Lange, was that “we 

al defense. access to New Zealand ports to have a conventional defense rda- 

He added: “We are considering ships armed with nuclear weapons tionship with the United States, 
other actions we might take, but at and he insists that the United that we are going to continue in 
this time we have no further deci- States declare whether military ves- that relationship and that we are 
sions and no further comment.'’ sels carry such weapons when ap- committed to a policy which does 
Mr. Speakes, the deputy White plying for pon privileges. Bui the not have nudear weapons in New 
House press secretary, said the U.S. government has steadfastly re- Zealand.” 


my of several states, but critics, new chairman of the committee. 


il .V harmful to health. 

haw? a iTVTnenHniK imnar-f nn nCW legislation seeks Ctlt- 


and not justified.” n view. “Signals by the United States “y ^harmful to health. might end his support for the MX 

Almost half of the adimnistra- The Reaean ndminiv.rAimn have a tremendous impart on other n «f Iqpsation t seeks cut- multiple warhead utoooaimepta! 

lion's foreign-aid request would go served notice Monday on the which i3rsiand that missile, a weapon for which helped 

SSkSsk 

- VC Th- .a ooorcxHm,^ Mo^ylS aSugh SJSS 

s - 2 111 5“ « Con - 1 0011(1 ^ ^ 01(1 0f Oration plans to cut both direct ^tetantive arms conuT agree- 

on. will be submitted later. gress for fiscal 1986, Mr. Reagan 115 A. subsidies and support-loan levels ment with the Soviet Union. ^ 

~ saminisiraijon “intends to □ — which set a floor under hade Prm'fUnt Hmnn • o/kWa 


In London 

there's a friendly hotel. 

You'll call it your club. 

THEPORTMAN 
INTER • CONTINENTAL 


— ■»«*, U1V U UilUvIUidiJU I I I -T f mm ■ - J * ■ • • * 

IDA is a burden-sharing program. pro ^ raras m aD . efr ° r i_ tbe adramis- preserve funding in congressional 
-ir 1 j o. 6 v T u 1,811011 s^y 5 |S intended to reduce maneuvering a year ago. 

If the Urnted States took the costs and make U.S. agriculture . Mr. Weinberger said a congres- 
ptwraon that u wouldn t contnb- more competitive worldwide. sional vote to kill the MX missile or 

ute. n would bedrfficult to negou- Mr. Block said at a briefing to block other iZ^Srary 

S M ° aday allhou S h admin- goals would “endM^hope” SZ 
saii ^ It could spell the end of ist ration plans to cut both direct substantive arms control agree- 

subsidies and support-loan levels ment with the Soviet Union. 

O — which set a floor under basic President Reagan, at a White 


tv,™ t , — - — : : — . — ttuivu ati a nuut uuuci oasic rresiaent KeaEan. at a wmte 

Dqiartmem honor easting comnutments to The Reagan administration’s farm prices — the changes must go House ceremony tosign copies of 

u ^ 10 d “. 1 «^toiialDevdoraratAs- proposals for a “xnarket-oritaued” hand in hand with a fam bill that his annual economic nSirtto Con- 

diminate gpvemmem suteidies to soctabon, as well as lo the Asian 1985 farm bill will include a plan to would help fanners get better gress. was asked wlretherlhe strong 

Amtrak. the National Railroad Development Fund and the Afri- end the government's tobacco sup- prices and regain their competitive opposition in Congress made him 

Passenger Corp. Amtrak says it can Development Fund. — - J - — - ^ 



pon program. 


Senate Committee Approves Nomination of Meese 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches miuneni to fair and impartial en- There also was a six-month in- del to the Interior Department, or by not offering its initial military 

WASHINGTON — The Senate forcemeat of laws is in question, vestigation of him by an indepen- his replacement at the Energy De- proposals with no reductions so 

Judiciary Committee voted, 12-6. Mr. Meese is associated with this dent counsel Jacob A. Stein, who parnnem by John S. Herrington, that Congress, itself, could cut the 

Tuesday to approve the nomma- administration’s policies that on- round no basis to prosecute Mr. now the chief of personnel at the military budget, 

tion of Edwin Meese 3d as attorney dermine the principles of fairness Meese but left decisions about his White House. (AP. UP I) The military buildun was also 


more willing to yield on his military 
spending requests. 

The president said that abobt 
$30 billion had been cut from the 
Pentagon's original spending re- 
quest. He suggested that the ad- 
minis t ration had made a “mistake” 
by not offering its initial military 


Tuesday to approve the nomma- administration’s policies that nn- found no basis to prosecute 
tion of Edwin Meese 3d as attorney dermine the pruuaples of fairness Meese but left decisions abou 
genera] and sent it to the full ebam- and justice and with an administra- ethical conduct lo the Senate, 
ber, which is expected to give its tion which has hung out a sign Mr. Meese was questioned 


out a sign 

• w 


(AP. UP1) 


■ New Communications Chief 


saying *white men only.’ ” 

Senator Robert C Byrd, Dexoo- 


The military buildup was also 
expected to be a major theme in 
Mr. Reagan’s State of the Union 


Patrick J. Buchanan, a conserva- address to Congress. TTie president 
live columnist and commentator, is to deliver the speech Wednesday 


ber, which is expected to give its tion which has hung out a sign Mr. Meese was questioned ex- ■ New Communications Chief Mr. Reagan’s State of tb 
endorsement. saying Vhite men only.’ ” tensively at the hearings about his Patrick J. Buchanan, a conserva- address to Congress. The p 

Mr. Meese’s nomination, held up Senator Robert C Byrd, Dtano- role in approving VS. government hve col umnis t and commentator, is to deliver the speech We 

for a year by questions of ethics, crat of West Virginia, said the jobs for his financial benefactors; was appointed the new White evening, his 74th birthday. 

was approved largely along party “standard has to be set to which the his promotion to colonel in the House communications director on 

lines, with all 10 of the panel’s people in this country can look Army Reserve, and his acceptance Tuesday, The Washington Post re- 

Republicans voting for hun andall with confidence and faith and par- of a SJ 0.000 payment from a presi- ported. • . ... 

but two of its Democrats voting ticulariy our young people.” dential transition organization. The White House chief of staff 

against “I’m sorry to say I don’t believe The nominee said he had done Donald T R,*m„ -.i 


THE ADVANTAGE IS INTER-CONTINENTAL 

0 INTER-CONTINENTAL HOTELS 

22 Fbrtman Square. (441)486-5844. Telex: 261526 
For reservations call: Paris'. (01) 742-07-92. 

Frankfurt: (069)230561. Amsterdam: (020) 262021 


Republicans voting for him and all with confidence and faith and par 
but two of its Democrats voting ticulariy our young people.” 
against. “I’m sorry to say I don’t bdievt 


against. I m sorry to say I don t believe 

“Not only is Mr. Meese qualified the nominee meets these stan- nothing wrong, but he pledged to that Max L Fried ersdorf. a veteran 
to be attorney general, bat he is a dank,” Mr. Byrd said. be more careful about creating ap- ^ ^ Nixon, Ford and Reagan 

man of honesty, competency and But he said the nomination was pearances of conflict of interest. administrations, was returning to 

dedication,” said the committee expected to be approved by the full Also Tuesday. President Ronald the White House to handlerela- 

chainuan, Strom Thurmond, a Senate. Reagan’s choices to bead the Imeii- tions with Congress. 


The White House chief of staff. 
Donald T. Regan, also announced 


South Carolina 
ments before the 


The presidential counselor was or and Energy departments easO 


Also Tuesday. President Ronald the White House to handle rela- 
Reagan’s choices to head the Imeri- tions with Congress. 


__ ms easuy 

nominated as the nation's 75th al- won Senate committee approval, ward J. Ro t! 

Senator Edward M. Kennedy, toraey general in January 1984, but clearing the way for their confirma- House pobncal dirertor and ReiH 
^Democrat of Massachusetts, said since then, he has been through two tion by the fuD Senate. • gan-Biish campaign director, was 

-before vo ting against Mr. Meese: rounds erf committee appearances. No lawmaker opposed the move returning to nnKtimi 


before voting a 
“The degree of 


He further announced that Ed- 
ward J. Rollins, the former White 



ist Mr. Meese: rounds of committee appearances, 
. Meese’s com- last March and last week. 


gan-Bush 


director, was 
political and 


no lawmaker opposed tne move returning to handle political a 
of Energy Secretary Donald P. Ho- intergovernmental affairs. 
The three appointees, and 


Managua Official Suspended as Priest 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

MANAGUA — The Reverend 
Ernesto Carden*!, Nicaragua’s cul- 
ture minis ter, says Pope John Paul 
II has formally suspended him 
from the Roman Catholic priest- 
hood because he refused to resign 
from his government post 
. “It is with profound pain that I 
have received an official communi- 
cation from Rome that imposes the 
canon suspension, suspending me 
from exercising priestly duties,” 
", father Cardenal said Monday. 

He said the order came “directly 
from the pope." 

Father Cardenal, 60, said he 
would respect the Vatican decision, 
but criticized the church hierarchy 
for “harasring" him and the other 
priests in the Sandinisl govern- 
ment. 

“We are victims erf an injustice,” 
be said. “They have punished us for 
serving the people.” 

The priest said he hopes “that 
God will better defend my people.” 

“What I say is that His Holiness 
falls before the aggression against 
our people and that his action coin- 
cides with the policies of Reagan,” 
be added. 

Father Cardenal, along with 
three other priests in the Nicara- 
guan government, had been or- 
dered to resign their posts, but all 




fourth to be named later for policy, i 
are to be senior deputies to Mx. ! 
Regan, who look his oath of office j 
this week after swapping jobs with | 
James A. Baker 3d, who became 
Treasury secretary. 

Mr. Buchanan has been critical 
of Secretary of State George P. 
Shultz and others poceived as 
moderates in the administration. A 
syndicated columnist and televi- 
sion commentator, he was an assis- 
tant to President Richard M Nix- 
on. specializing in the news media 
and speech writing. 

The communications post has 
been vacant since David R. Gergen 
resigned Dec. 8, 1983. Mr. Gergen’s 
duties have been shared by the dq>- 
uty chief of staff, Mkhad K. 
Denver, who is leaving the White 
House for a public-rda tions job; 
Richard G. Darman, a presidential 
assistant; and the president’s 
spokesman, Lany Speakes. 


JlL ' 

Baume & Mercier 


The Reverend Ernesto Cardenal, Nicaragua’s culture min- 
ister, announcing he has been suspended as a priest by the 
Vatican because be refuses to leave his government post. 


♦four vowed to remain m the gov- ajj ^ rules, including his vow of the pope on Sunday in Ayacucho, 
Hf.r rm-H-n t _ celibacy- die bean of the area where the 


the heart of the area where the 


The other priests are Foreign The pope has repeatedly warned 
Minis ter Miguel tfEscoto Brock- y ial canon law prohibits priests 
mann, Edgar Parrales, represents- f rom holding government posi- 


Tbe pope has repeatedly warned guerrilla movement is waging its 
that canon law prohibits priests campaign against the government. 


live to the Organization of Amen- dons. name ot God" to end tbeir cam- 

can States, anS Education Minister During his current visit to Latin paign and to “seek the roads of 
Fernando Cardenal, Father Car- America, the pope has criticized dialogue and not those of vio- 
denal's brother. dergy who follow what has been fence.” 

Fernando Cardenal was expelled called “liberation theology” be- John Paul’s comments in Ayacu- 
from the Society of Jesus — the cause it contains what many view cbo were seen as significant not 
Jesuits — in Deoanber and Father as Marxist dements. . only because of his unusually direct 

iSrafes voluntarily left the priest- In the Penman desert city of miervenuon in a political simauon, 
So weeks ago. Father d’Es- Piura on Monday. John Paul re- but also because the pope did not 
iScT reportedly was given until pea ted that Catholic clergy cannot mention reports of human rights 

Wednesday to decide xSat he will deviate from church uachings in violauons by the govmnnem in its 
vyeuurauaj " fichl apaiTKi ShininH Path. 


The pope asked the rebels “in the 
name of God” to end their cam- 



During his current visit to Latin paign and to “seek the roads of 
America, the pope has criticized dialogue and not those of vio- 
dergy who follow what has been fence.” 

nZj “irKa— ,hnn tliwilnov 7 ' Jnhn Paul't oimiTienK in Avum. 


The Great Departure — Gandhara art, Gandhara Civilization, some 2,000 years ago. 

At Pakistan International, you’ll find that 
our values have not eroded over 
the centuries. 




' Quartz, water -resist ant 


favor of “opposing ided 


°*TTie significance of the suspen- (UP/.AP) Rfru is the fluid stop on 

^ BfclCked °* WeSS in to Sribb. 

% jfis * ’SEJMS - OQOfTrinidAdamiT ° b3S 

ftM ? CU0I h Monday’s rail parts of Lima about 30 minutes 

twJnn^sav Mass or after 'ope John Paul II arrived Papandreou to Visit Ri 
from nonbem Peru, The New YorV 


Lima Partly Blacked Out 


fight against Shining Path. 

Peru is the third stop on a four- 
nation papal tour that is to end 
Wednesday in the Caribbean na- 



Peruvian rebels set off an explo- tion of Trinidad and Tobago. 

on Monday night that blacked — 

at Darts of Lima about 30 minutes „ 



^PIA 

Pakistan Intel 


•‘SSmh'fa ^SS*<SfifcSBOi- Times reported. ATHENS— Prime Minister. An- ' 

Me- ■”* acl,QQ b y to Shining Path dreas Papandreou of Greece is to 
^^Kto Cardmal said Monday rebel gioup appeaied to be a re- begin a lour-day visit to the Sown 
observing sponse to to strong words from Union on Monday. 


Union on Monday. 


Pakistan international 
Great people to fly with 


FLYIMG TO. ABV.' DHABI. AMMAN. AMSTERDAM. ATHENS. BAGHDAD. BAHRAIN. BANGKOK. BEUING.BOMBAV.CAtRO. COLOMBO. 
COPENHAGEN. DAMASCUS. DELHI. DHAHRAN. DHAKA. DOHA. DUBaI. FRANKFURT. ISTANBUL. JEDDAH. KANO. KATHMANDU. 
KUALA LUMPUR. KUWAIT. LONDON. MANILA. MUSCAT. NAIROBI. NEW YORK. PARIS. RIYADH. ROME. SINGAPORE. TEHRAN. 
TOKYO. TRIPOLI and 24 (k&iioafinf* within Pakistan. _ 


\ • ■ 

















Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1985 


• * * 


Short of Consumer Goods, Hanoi’s Long Suits Are Celebrations and War 


By Barbara Crossette 

New York Times Service 

HANOI — The old man sits on the post office 
steps, a bathroom scale on the sidewalk beside 
him. The little scale, a vintage model, is his liveli- 
hood, and he has covered all but its dial with a 
piece of used plastic to protect this most valuable 
possession from the mod of a drizzly day. 

For less than a penny the old man weighs 
people, bending down slowly and with great effort 


thousands, of snmil entrepreneurial efforts on dry 
sidewalks. 

Other people fix bicycles, refill the refills of ball- 
point pens, or sell dungs: dumplings, bowls of 
soup, vegetables from their gardens, individual 
envelopes or cigarettes, handmade objects of bam- 
boo and straw. Moneychangers, paying more than 
20 times the official exchange rate, thrive. 

Recycling is an art: Pull tabs from imported 
aluminum rams are bought for a fraction of a cent 


to focns his weak eyes on the numbers. Routing and used to make curtain rings. A can fetches 

— - — * — * -* -■ ** anywhere from a dime to more than a dollar and 

has man y uses. Old movie film is fashioned into 
celluloid picture frames. 

At night, a visitor passes an old woman selling 
used bottles of all sizes in the front room of her 
home. A few people beg, and others sleep huddled 
in doorways. 

Frequent visitors to Hanoi say that over the last 
five or six years life has improved in this capital 
city, a fine example of French colonial archi lecture 
that was little damaged by American bombing in 
1972. There are more goods in the stores, more 
television sets in homes and brighter colors on 


out a customer's weight is pan of the service. He 
accepts payment without expression and retains 
wearily to the steps. 

Although the scenes of everyday life might not 
suggest it this is a year of celebrations for Viet- 
nam. In October, Hanoi celebrated 30 years of 
liberation from the French. In April, Ho Chi Minh 
City, which its own tourist bureau still calls Sai- 
gon, will mark the 10th anniversary of the commu- 
nist victory over South Vietnam's U.S.-supported 
government 

In between, the army celebrated its 40th birth- 
day in December, a reminder that after 40 years, 

Vietnam is still at war— now in Cambodia and on " people and buildings 


the border with China — and another generation 
is being called on to make sacrifices. 

With severe shortages of most consumer goods 
and minimal public services, Hanoi's residents 
continue to draw on their resourcefulness. The old 
man with his scale is but one of hundreds, if not 


But Hanoi and the overpopulated, impover- 
ished north, its soil depleted and its forests fast 
disappea ring , are still a world away from southern 
Vie tnam In the south, consumer goods appear to 
be in abundance. Ho Chi Minh City's deputy 
mayor boasts that food rations have tripled in a 


decade and most businesses with fewer than 20 
employees (and two-thirds of the city's housing) 
are in private hands. 

'‘One country, two systems," people say sardon- 
ically, echoing the formula the Chinese have used 


With severe shortages of most 
consumer goods and minimal 
* public services, Hanoi’s 
residents continue to draw on 
their resourcefulness. 


to describe how Beijing hopes to coexist with 
Hong Kong when it reverts to Chinese rule. 

This is not to say that there are no amusements 
in Hanoi. The city's young people seek their plea- 
sures in movies, in window-shopping at govern- 


ment department stores, or in walks by the city’s 
several picturesque lakes or in its numerous parks, 

now sprinkled with the pink peach blossoms that and they hate Russians,” she said, 
are the Dower of Tet, the Vietnamese New Year, in Diplomats and international aid officials may 


At the Honoi-Hue-Saigon bookstore, the city's 
largest, a clerk in the section marked "Literature" 
reported that her biggest sellers were romantic 
novels and detective stories. 

She said that a favorite among the books, which 
were priced inexpensively, was “Romeo, Juliet and 
Darkness,” a love story by an author named Jan 
Otsenasech set against the' evil of Nazi Germany. 
“A lot of books come from the Russians.” an 
English-speaking browser volunteered. 

The store, which had one copy of a Vietnamese 
translation of Graham Greene’s “The Quiet Amer- 
ican." also sold collections of contemporary Viet- 
namese short stories, published locally in pam- 
phlet form on coarse brawn paper. 

Themes of war, heroics and grief mark these 
stories, which often are short morality lessons. 
They jolt the foreign reader into an awareness of 
how “the American war” already has slipped back 
into history, taking its place behind the newest 
threat from the Chinese. 

“The Vietnamese are ambivalent about Ameri- 
cans,” a Western diplomat said. "Despite the war. 
they respond more to American culture than to 
Russian, and want more contacts with American 
people." 

A Hungarian was more blunt, and bitter. “They 
hate us because they associate us with Russians. 


the north. The young also read. 


find life in Hanoi challenging. Housing, which is 


controlled bv the government, is JJ 

by at least one international ageneyfa 

to build apartments at its own expense have met 

countless bureaucratic obstacles 

There are no international schools for the thti 
dren. “That's the real reason we want 

cans back." one European ambassador said, we 

hope ihevll open a school. 

All diplomatic eyes are on a mysieHOtwgreen 
villa, which, bv common understanding, seems to 
be reserved for the American Embassy if ‘and 
the United States and Vietnam renew diplomatic 

k'vviih even basic foods like eggs and bread [some- 
times unobtainable in Hanoi most embassies d 
almost all their grocery shopping m Bangkok. A 
few favored supermarkets offer a packing for 
Hanoi” service. "We just zip by in a taxi on the 
way to the airport-” a diplomat said, ana they 
have iL all ready in cartons with our names on. 

The Fridav afternoon Vietnam Airline flight 
from Bangkok to Hanoi was dubbed the vjua 
Express" by one diplomat, in honor of a tnai 
supermarket. The boxes of food and dnnk are 
fussed over more lovingly than diplomatic 
pouches at Bangkok's airport. 

Cocktail party crowds in Hanoi are regaled with 
stories of how a canon of meat, butter or ice 
cream missed a flight. It is a standing joke that 
flights to Vietnam from Bangkok fly at a n angle 
because of all the canned goods at the bacK. 



A man with a scale in Hanoi' 
weighs people for a living, , 


EMPLOYMENT 


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INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Back Page) 


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U.S., Europe Are Closer on Technology Exports 


{Continued from Page 1) 
trols to cover Technologies that in- 
clude personal computers above 
the smallest size and digital-switch- 
ing telephone systems. But the 
United States abandoned its call 
that a broad range of energy-rdat- 
ed technology should be included. 

As a result, hundreds of export 
applications in recent months have 
been turned down that might previ- 
ously have been approved, accord- 
ing to UiL officials. 

A U.S. study of the applications 
rejected over a one-year period 
shows, Mr. Perie said, that export 
of the equipment involved would 
have saved the Soviet military bud- 
get S13 billion over the technol- 
ogy's life span and cost the West 
$14 billion if it had tried to offset 
the Soviet gain. 

The whole issue of technology 
controls, however, remains so sen- 
sitive that European officials do 
not like to talk about iL Govern- 
ments in Europe “don't want to 
publicize their policies and police 
work because the new approach is 
widely perceived as a cave-in to 
U.S. pressure." a U.S. Customs 
agent explained, adding: “And 
they don't like admitting failures 
because that riles Washington.” 

The most sensitive country is 
West Germany, which is the most 
important industrial outlet to the 
East bloc and the allied nation that 

re mains the mast divided on the 
issue. 

Bonn officials acknowledge a po- 
licy change- “We have a new out- 
look compared to three years ago." 
said Konrad Seitz, head of policy 


[planning at the Foreign Ministry, 
ly because of lIS. concern, 
partly because the problem seems 
to be more real than many thought 
at first” 

Bat other influential West Ger- 


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maos resist the policy change. Eco- 
nomics Minister Martin Bange- 
mann has warned lhai additional 
U.S. moves to lighten trade con- 
trols would cause a political explo- 
sion. 

Other European counuies are 
much closer to U.S. views on the 
issue. 

France, which. like Britain, has 
increased its intelligence work in 
Lhis field, is alarmed about the loss 
of French technology to Soviet 
forces and to industrial competi- 
tors. 

“We were able to get some of the 
Russians’ own data on the cost- 
effectiveness of their industrial es- 
pionage for military purposes, and 
it was conclusive and alarming." 
said Francois Heisbourg, until re- 
cently director of international af- 
fairs in the Defense Ministry. 

Shortly after the Socialist gov- 
ernment took office in 1981. 
France established an interagency 
group, led by the Ministry of De- 
fense and reporting to the prime 
minister, to review technology ex- 
ports before they are submitted to 
COCOM- As a result. France “has 
not had a single controversial new 
case for a couple of years." Mr. 
Heisbourg said. 

In 1982. France expelled 47 Sovi- 
et diplomats, most of whom were 
engaged in industrial espionage. 
French intelligence reports about 
the problem circulated in Europe, 
providing independent corrobora- 
tion of the Reagan administration's 
warnings. Britain and West Ger- 
many have established national 
lists of sensitive technology. 

Neutral countries, including 
Austria. Sweden. India and Swit- 
zerland, have all quietly agreed to 
damp down on technology smug- 
gling rather than risk a cutoff of 
U.S. technology. 

The new rules are being better 
enforced. In Britain, a crack cus- 
toms unit, known as “the A- team" 
or Project Arrow, has been set up 
along the lines of the UJL program. 
Operation Exodus, to halt outgoing 
technology. Four offenders have 
been jailed in the last two months. 

France and Sweden have sharply 
increased (heir budgets and staff 
for intelligence and enforcemeut 
on technology issues. 

In Sweden, more vigorous inves- 
tigations have brought to light a 
backlog of problems. Now “the 
government is determined to stop 
Sweden from being a smuggle 
bouse for illegal strategic goods,” 
said Lars StahTberg, undersecretary 
at the Foreign Affairs Ministry. 

Politically, West Germany is the 
country with the deepest conflicts 
over the issue. A strong lobby 
wants to avoid jeopardizing trade 
with Eastern Europe, which under- 
pins important political and emo- 
tional ties. But other strong groups 
argue that West Germany cannot 


jeopardize its high-technology ties 
to the United States by appearing 
■•soft" on technology transfer. 

The Interior Ministry recently 
leaked information about the Sovi- 
et Union’s “Red Book." a secret 
shopping list of Western technol- 
ogy for Soviet diplomats. The 
book, thick as a big-city telephone 
directory. lists target technologies 
and contains instructions about 
how to circumvent Western regula- 
tions. 

Although the book has been in 
the hands of Western intelligence 
services for more than a year. West 
Germany's Interior Ministry timed 
its disclosure to coincide with a 
meeting in Bonn of the West Ger- 
man-Soviet joint trade commis- 
sion. The move seemed to be an 
effort to embarrass West German 
proponents of relaxing controls in 
the interest of freer trade. 

West Germany, unlike its neigh- 
bors. has not assigned more man- 
power to combat technology leaks. 
But its courts have begun to hand 
down jail terms, not just fines, for 
trade violations. 

But the Reagan administration 
still is using arm-twisting tactics in 
West Germany of the kind that 
marked the initial, turbulent phases 
of the US. campaign. A Cyber su- 
percomputer, made by Control 
Data Corp.. is being withheld from 
the weather laboratory at the pres- 
tigious Max Planck Institute in 
Hamburg. 

The O.S. authorities are de- 
manding that German researchers 
undergo security checks before the 
machine is put at their disposal. 

Similar tactics were employed 
against France early in the Reagan 
administration, when Cray super- 
computers were withheld from the 
French armed forces and the 
Atomic Energy Commissariat. 
Once “we were confident that 
France would protect the technol- 
ogy, we cleared their delivery,” said 
a U.S. official involved in the pro- 
cess. 

(The official denied a report last 
weekend in the U.S. newspaper 
Newsday that the computers were 
delivered in exchange for French 
political support for NATO and 
the deployment of new NATO in- 
termediate missiles in Europe in 
1983.) 

Currently, Spain is being similar- 
ly pressured. Because Spain, al- 
though a NATO countiy, has not 
joined COCOM. the U.S. govern- 
ment is set to block an American 
Telephone & Telegraph Co. con- 
tract to build a microchip plant in 
Spain unless the Spanish govern- 
ment agrees to cooperate on trade 
controls. 

The intrusive U.S. approach, as- 
sociated with the Pentagon and 
particularly with Mr. Perie, has cre- 
ated bitter resistance among the 
U.S. allies. Britain and West Ger- 


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many have criticized what they call 
U.S. concepts of “extraterritorial- 
ity,” a phrase covering American 
attempts to extend its laws over 
goods sold to foreign companks 
under U.S. export licenses. 

■‘Since we are allies, with a mecS 
anism in COCOM.” said a seniqr 
British official, “there is no justifi- 
cation for this unilateral intrusion 
in our affairs." % 

Some of the heat has gone out of 
the issue as the Reagan administra- 
tion has Focused on military issues. 
The administration. Mr. Heisbourg 
said, “seems to have learned from 
the Siberian pipeline fiasco, when 
we exported our lechnology despite 
U.S. opposition, that it has to draw 
lines in the dust clearly and sensi- 
bly." 

The more finely tuned U.S. ap- 
proach appeared last summer in 
Belgium, where the Pentagon 
agreed to pay $700,000 to prevent a 
computer-controlled lathe from b&. 
ing sold to a Soviet factory that 
U.S. intelligence reports say is 
manufacturing SS-20 missile com. 
ponents. 

The Belgian manufacturer, Pe- 
gard, which had been set up to 
provide high-technology jobs in ‘a 
depressed region, had said that 
workers' jobs depended on the sale,' 
so the Reagan adminis tration paid 
the surcharge that the Soviet cus- 
tomer was willing to (jay for iC 
Now the Reaun Adminis tration is 
trying to resell the lathe to China 
and hoping the case will not set a 
precedent 

As the Reagan administration 
tries to develop a solid front among 
industrial countries, neutral coun- 
tries sometimes present fewer prob- 
lems than the allies. 

"We have no problem of ‘extra- 
territoriality' because it is not a 
government- to-govemmenl issue," 
said Mr. Stahlberg in his Stock- 
holm office. Since neutral countries 
are not in COCOM, the govern- 
ments can let their companies com- 
ply with any UJS. laws that are^ 
covered in licensing agreements. rJ 

What worries companies in neu- 
tral countries, a Swedish executive 
said, is “that the Untied States or 
European countries, in the CO- 
COM meetings, will bend the rules 
in favor of themselves and dis- 
criminate against neutrals." 

China is the focus of this weary. 
Several executives cited a COCOM 
license for telecommunications 
sales to China granted j ust w hen 
the Belgian subsidiary of ITT was 
ready to sign a contract 

So Tar, a Swedish executive said, 
Sweden is satisfied that the new 
arrangements are working equita- 
bly for all Western countries. 

1/ the United States wants coop- 
eration from neutral countries 1 
governments and companies, ,hfr 
Swedish executive said, “We must 
be confident that we are being 
treated fairly.” 

For the moment, the U.S. em- 
phasis on restrictions seems to have 
prevailed over U.S. and European 
aitics, who argue that the West's 
best policy is to let technology flow 
freely, so the West’s superior abili- 
ty to apply technology will safe- 
guard NATO’s edge in weapons 
quality. 

The trouble with this policy of 
“achievement," according to Mr. 
Perie and like-minded Europeans, 
-that Western technology can en- 
able the Soviet military to “cross 
critical thresholds — once they can 
see in Ihe dark with sophisticated 
devices, it doesn’t matter much that 
you can see better in the dark.” 




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JPageS 


ARTS /LEISURE 


Food and Philanthropy 


By Carol Lawson 

York Tit net Sm.r- 


organizations in the United States 
and overseas. Recipients ranged 



Se ^g his home-made tore Studio, the Cystic Fibrosis 
C” ” a ar ^ s to& ■* niade a promise: Foundation, several programs that 
cha4I^‘V d0nai f ?“ P rofit5 to MP children with cancer and a 
1 w o and a half years later group of children of migrant labor- 

rzrf* are working out just as he crs in Florida who needed a new 
expected. . , , 

- w'har m ■ school bus. 

- — "^ enterprise, which has who is president of the company. 


“It’s almost a full- time job." 

The two hugest grants last year 
went to the University of Southern 
California’s Scott Newman Center, 
which received S 300.000 for its 
drug prevention program lor teen- 

S , and Catholic Relief Services. 

i received S250JX)0 for its ef- 
forts to aid faunae victims in Ethio- 
pia. The Scott Newman Center is 
named for Newman's son, who 
died from a drug overdose. 

Newman said he derided to give 
the profits away because “it would 


however wTchr,,,, ncM “P** 1 - Tfac decision on how to disuib- 
culinary mfe/ST saa ^ s ™Jis ute the money is made by Newman. 
groi^i^^SSS, wh ^ h has who * Presi^t of the company, 

ration, iSbe^SS f* 1 ^ V 3 ?™*' *■ E Hotcbner. A be really tacky for us to become 

fricnd - Hotchner is the food enbepreneure." 
toned over to chart- vice president and treasurer of the ... Z d 

Newman. who is also a direc- mmrunv w* -ic ... „...i 11 15 «L9 enough 

tor and race car driver, can now sav 
^Jto^multunUiioo^joihr phf. 


His food company, which he 
says began in his basement “as an 
imade joke," has generated profits 
of nearly $4 million, all of which 
have been given away. In 1984 
alone, Newman collected and dis- 
bursed $1.9 million. The profits 
came not only from the salad dress- 
ing, but from two other items that 
have been added to the “Newman’s 
Own” line of products, spaghetti 
sauce and popcorn. 

Last year profits from the New- 
man products went to 80 medical, 
cultural, social and environmental 


company. He is also an author and 
an authority on Hemingway. 

Over their board table, which is 
actually a Ping-Pong table, in their 
toy Westport, Connecticut head- 
quarters. Newman and Hotchner 
recently sifted through requests 
from more than 700 charities last 
year. “We give to little charities, 
not to mainstream charities.” 


we sell our- 
selves on film and on pages,” he 
said. “We shouldn’t sell ourselves 
on food shelves. If we give the mon- 
ey back to the people who support, 
us, then no one can call us tacky." 

The salad dressing is made in 
factories near San Francisco and 
Los Angeles, and in Boston. It is 
labeled as 'TetoHe du rinaigre et de 
I'huile — Vhmie et le yintagre des 


■ *_. « . , . # nwic — tttuuQ n str yi/ecuKrtr oca 

HotchMrsatd. We give to the very eroito” (the star of oil and vinegar 
old and the very young. You can and the oil and vinegar ol the 
pinpoint your giving if you really 
iL You can bap a par- 


care about it r 

titular group, a particular cause." 

“We’ve discovered that being 
philanthropists is more difficult 
than being an actor or a writer,” he 


U. S. Hit by Thirsty Craze 
For Chocolate Fudge Soda 


The Associated Press 

C HICAGO — The United 
States is being swept by fudge 
fever, a thirsty frenzy for a choco- 
late fudge drink that contains only 
two calories per serving, say the 
beverage's makers. 

' “In nine days we sold 1.5 million 
cans,” said Alan Canfield, senior 
vice president of Canfield's Bever- 
age Co., which produces the soda. 
“Now we’re way over 2 million 
cans in three weeks,” twice the 
amount sold in all of 1984. 

■ The company has beat flooded 
by hundreds of requests far its Diet 
Chocolate Fudge Soda from diet- 
' j 5 chocolate lovers, Canfiel d said 
Monday. 

- “We make 1,200 cans a minute. 
We've been running double shifts. 
We still can’t keep up with de- 
mand.” 

_ A recent check found 33 of 35 
stores were out of the drink. Can- 
field said. “It’s a Cabbage Patch 
situation if I ever saw one.” 


fudjtf : 

made with NntraSweet. 

Canfield said that recently 
worker driving a Canfield 
car vras stopped by a. 


who said, “I'm not going to give 
you a ticket. Just tdl me where I 
can buy it." 

The sweet smefl of success has 
drawn requests for franchises, dis- 
tributorships and even a few offers 
to buy the company, Canfield said. 
Stockbrokers have called to ask if 
the company will gp public. 

Meanwhile, Canfield’s has 
shipped the drink to a few stales 
outside its normal distribution 
area: Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, 
Wisconsin and Iowa. 

Canfield attributes the craze to 
the United Stales’s never-ending 
battle with the bulge. 

“People aD year have been eai 
and enjoying themselves,” he sail 
“In January they decide maybe 
tiro should go on a diet” 

Canfield drinks the soda and has 
been personally trying to keep the 
shelves stocked. He said he recently 
stopped at his neighborhood gro- 
cery to help put some cans on dis- 
play. 

“By the time I got to the bever- 
age section, there was a trail of 
people behind me.” he said. “Be- 
fore I got it on the shelf, it was all 

gone." 


stars}. 

The spaghetti sauce, which is 
called Newman’s Own Industrial 
Strength Venetian Spaghetti Sauce, 
comes in two varieties, with or 
without mushrooms. It is made in 
factories in Buffalo and Toronto. 

There are also factories in Aus- 
tralia and Japan that are producing 
Newman products. 

“We put up $40,000 to start the 
company, and we got it all back in 
two weeks,” Hotchner said “Our 
intention was to put the salad 
dressing in the gourmet food stores 
in Westport for the fun of iL Three 
weeks later, we were getting calls 
from the A.&P. Neither of us 
could believe it took off the way it 
did.” 

Only a few months after starting 
his company, Newman devised a 
new formula for bis salad dressing 
after Minn Sheraton, the food crit- 
ic, said it had an “unpleasant oily 



Gogol’s f The Government Inspector’: 
A Feverish, Funny Nightmare of Fear 


Paul Newman: An “inside joke” pays off. 


feel" and “overpowering dehydrat- 
ed onion and garlic flavors." 

“Paul changed it completely," 
Hotchner said. “We have nothing 
but all-natural foods.” 

The company, which operates in 
offices furnished with lounge chairs 
from Newman’s swimming pool 
has a tiny staff consisting of a part- 
time bookkeeper and a pan-time 
secretary. Its growth has been 
made possible through its alliance 
with Advantage Food, a food bro- 
kerage company in Port Washing- 
ton, New York. 

“They lake the orders and sell 
the products,” Hotchner said. 
“They send the orders to the fac- 


tories, and the factories send the 
products direct to the buyers. They 
deal with 80 percent of the large 
supermarkets in the country.” 
“Advantage Food has had to 
hire more people,” Hotchner add- 
ed. “They are stunned by what has 
happened to them.” 

Hotchner reported that he and 
Newman have received several of- 
fers to purchase their company. 
“We have been offered countless 
nuDrods to be bought out,” he said. 
“Beatrice Food inquired about our 
availability. We won’t meet with 
them. It’s more fun to have a cou- 
ple of bumbling idiots running the 
company.” 


By Michael Billington 

/ntermawrtal HrraU Tnteme 

L ONDON — Easily the most 
* dramatic event in the London 
theater last week was a speech by 
Sr Peter Hall director of rhe Na- 
tional Theater, at a drama awards 
lunch. Speaking with quiet fury. 
Hall wanted that impending gov- 
ernment cutbacks to the arts would 
crucify the subsidized theater, dis- 
mantle 30 years of sustained 
achievement and deter tourists by 
turning Britain into “a In lie Ameri- 
ca.” 

He said later that unless extra 
funds were forthcoming, the Na- 
tional would have to dose one of its 
theaters in April and abandon all 
touring. 

Hail is right. The whole subsi- 
dized theater is on a knife-edge. 
But. for the moment, the effects are 
not visible, as the National has 
proved by launching a spectacular, 
feverish, often funny production in 
the Olivier theater of Gogol’s 1 836 
classic. “The Government Inspec- 
tor.” The casting of Rik Mayall, a 
26-year-old television comic, as the 
Sl Petersburg clerk mistaken for a 
prying government official guar- 
antees the laughs. But the original 
feature of Richard Eyre’s produc- 
tion is that it presents Gogol’s play 
as much more than a comedy of 
mistaken identity. It emerges in- 
stead as a nightmarish study of a 
fear-ridden provincial town domi- 
nated by paranoia and paperwork. 

John Gunter's set makes this 
point before a word has been spo- 
ken. The stage is dominated by a 
vast fly-blown piece of yellowing 
parchment, by mountains of piled- 
up ledgers and pencils the of 
lamp-standards: it is lilf« a lillipu- 
tian view of a super-bureaucracy. 

A blown-up image of a snarling 
inspector general shatters the 
parchment, smoke fills the stage, 
and through it emerges a group of 


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petrified provincial officials seated 
around a paper-strewn table and 
looking like figures seen in a dis- 
torting fairground mirror. Eyre and 
Gunter have interpreted literally 
Vladimir Nabokov's point that 
“the play begins with a blinding 

THE LONDON STAGE 

flash of ligh tning and ends in a 
thunderclap." What occupies the 
interim is a mad. bad dream. 

The production is based on an 
extremely intelligent idea: that a 
society governed by terror is ripe 
for takeover by an impostor. The 
only problem in practice is that Rik 
Mayall plays Khlestakov, the petty 
clerk with delusions of grandeur, as 
too palpably a psychopath. He is 
admittedly very funny with his cas- 
cade of hair that looks like a forest 
fire, his wide, peg-top trousers and 
his sudden seething rage. He has 
the unshackled ego of a furious 
child: when the- governor suggests 
he might inspect the town's institu- 
tions, he screams. “What have you 
got?” and (he response is so vio- 
lently disproportionate it makes 
one laugh. 

But Khlestakov should grow 
from a booby into a fantasist What 
Mayall presents us with, from the 
start is an insecure psychotic, and 
when the governor’s wife praises 
his Si. Petersburg sophistication, 
after he has leaped frenzied ly on a 
tabletop 3nd smashed her hus- 
band’s bust to smithereens, you feel 
she is the one in need of attention. 
But although a good idea is pushed 
too far through Mayall’s ultra- 
modern, bead-banging comic style, 
he makes a perfect exit. Matching 
Gogol’s own fantasy (from “Dead 
Souls") of flying in a troika, he 
floats off into space still burbling 
his dreams of omnipotence. 

Adrian Mitchell has also come 
up with a sprightly new translation 
of the play full of funny one-liners, 
and Jim Broadbeni as the provin- 
cial governor successfully holds his 
own against MayalTs comic on- 
slaught, turning the character into 
a petrified creep only too happy to 
exact savage revenge when he 
thinks his time has come. For all its 
occasional excess, it is a modi 
sharper production than the one I 
saw at the Moscow Satire theater 
two years ago; and when the aghast 
townsfolk finally retreat into dark- 
ness at the arrival of the real in- 
spector-general you get a thrilling 
sense of the stark panic at the heart 
of Czarist Russia. 

□ 

While the National gives us Go- 
gol the tiny Orange Tree theater, 
Richmond, revives Alexander Os- 
trovsky’s "The Diary of a Scoun- 


drel” written in 1868. Ii is the story 
of a calculating Muscovite oppor- 
tunist crying to wheedle his . way 
into a civil service job and find a 
bride with a fat dowry: his one 
mistake is to commit his private 
thoughts about Russian hypocrisy 
to a diary ultimately discovered by 
his benefactors. Gogol’s not dis- 
similar "Government Inspector" is 
a masterpiece precisely because it 
gives you a shivering sense of the 
Russian nightmare; Ostrovsky's 
play is merely mild social comedy 
about a world full oF ingratiation 
and corruption. 

However, it is worth exploring 
the byways as well as the highways 
of world drama: and Ostrovsky 
paints a lively picture of a beat 
bureacracy where the civil service is 
a safe haven for mediocrities and 
where the serfs are liberated but 
still cruelly patronized. Peter 
Rowe’s production, given in Rod- 
ney AcUand's 1949 translation, is 
penny-plain but boasts a couple of 
animated performances from Paul 
Bradley as the upwardly mobile 
hero (an ancestor of Joe lampton 
in “Room at the Top") and from 
Philippa Gail as an icy sexpoi who 
believes adultery is best kept within 
the family. : 


In theory a new play by the Po- 
lish-bom. Paris-based Siawomir 
Mrozek should be an event But 
despite rumors that Mrozek had 
abandoned absurdist comedy for 
political reality. “A Sommer’s 
Day," given its British premiere at 
the Polish Theatre in Hammer- 
smith, turns out to be a fragilepiece 
about the whimsical cruelty of life; 
it might almost be Anouilh on an 
off-day. Two men, representing the 
essence of comedy and tragedy, are 
rescued from suicide in a pant by 
the arrival of a beautiful woman. 
The comic one ultimately dies 
while the tragic rate get the girl. 
Human character is manipulated to 
prove a point and the result is clos- 
er to the abstract logic of mathe- 
matics than the messy reality of 
life. This is a long way from the 
brilliance of Mrazek’s “Tango.” 
Bui at least Jonathan Hackett and 
Philip Voss play the two men to 
perfection even if Linda Marlowe, 
required to be mysterious for three 
acts, outdoes the Mona Lisa in 
enigmatic smiles. 


r Cop’ Stffl Film Favorite 

The Associated Press 7 

LOS ANGELES — “Beverly 
Hills Cop” remained the favorite of 
U. S. movie audiences, boosting its 
nine-week total to $142.7 million:* 


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Page 6 


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1985 


XraliZSrilmiM 

P , fl»hAed With 7bc Ne w YoA TimM tod TV Washington Ptart 

Reagan’s Budget Bluster 


Leaked prematurely. President Reagan's 
budget proposals had an trnmwiiatff bad 
reception. Recollected in tranquillity, they 
don’t seem better. Distance does not lend 
enchantment to the view. 

One damning cri ticism is that they don't 
face op to the problems in the years succeed- 
ing fiscal 1986 (beginning this October). 
Even by the end of the 1980s, when we shall 
all be some five years older, the deficit on 
present estimates will still be well over 2 
percent of America’s GNP, which may 
sound small but is far higher than a healthy 
American economy — not to speak of the 
world economy — can digest Even this 
disappointing prospect is unlikely to be 
achieved, because the assumptions underly- 
ing it — uninterrupted fast growth pins low 
inflation — will prove unreal unless history 
takes an improbable turn for the better. 
Even the administration realizes this, which 
is why it calls the present proposals simply 
another down payment on the problem — 
just nibbling at its edges. A sad counterpoint 
to the Reagan cry of “if not now, when?” 

For fiscal 1986 itself we are asked, inap- 
propriately, to stay with a deficit of some 
$180 billion. This is almost certainly too 
high to permit orderly de-escalation of inter- 
est rates and the dollar. So both will stay 
high — or come down in disorderly fashion 
as world markets lose faith in America. 

Nothing stands still in our market econo- 
mies, not even with a remarkably popular 
president and a particularly successful eco- 
nomic year behind you. It is worrying to see 
a period of doubt about American policy 
ahead, because doubt is the enemy of stabil- 
ity and prosperity. Unfortunately, the world 
is going to see months of partisan combat, 


because anything like the expenditure cuts 
envisaged by Mr. Reagan will be a labor of 
Hercules. You cannot hope to achieve the 
overall economies proposed by the adminis- 
tration when you concentrate them on only 
40 percent of the expenditure ride — be- 
cause you do not want to cut social security 
and defense, and because you cannot cut 
interest on the public debt. 

Our alarm stems not from any special 
disapproval of the precise spending cuts 
proposed, nor from any deep desire (far 
from it) to see taxes raised. There is no 
preordained “right” pattern for expenditure 
programs, whether you are talking about are 
for the aged, support for the farmer, or 
defense. Cuts don’t necessarily reduce the 
efficadty of a program. They may well lead 
to better value for each dollar spent, by 
cutting back administrative lassitude. 

Nor is there any preordained “correct” 
level for the bottom line of the budget. 
Whether it ought to be in big deficit or small 
— or, indeed, in surplus — depends entirely 
on the state of the economy in any given 
year, and on the level of savings available to 
finance the needs of die business sector and 
the requirements of the government. 

We dislike the budget message because all 
the deficits foreseen for the next few years 
seem too big to be financed without relying 
on a continued heavy inflow of money from 
abroad, requiring American interest rates to 
stay inappropriately hi g h, with damaging 
effects for America and the world as a 
whole. And we don't believe the proposals 
for the coming fiscal year have much chance 
of success in Congress. We may be in a 
syndrome that can lead to a syncope. 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. 


Make OPEC Pay Our Debt 


The world is awash in ofl. With or without 
OPECs permission, prices are tumbling. 

Twice In a decade the oil exporters have 
exploited political crises in -the Mideast with 
shocking increases in oQ prices, triggering re- 
cessions that cost the world a trillion dollars in 
lost production. Now economic reality has 
intervened. At (he official cartel price of $29 a 
barrel, supply far exceeds demand. Saudi Ara- 
bia, which single-handedly kept prices up by 
limiting exports, seems to have lost control. 

But as nice as it is to see monopolists in 
trouble, crowing about OPECs problems dis- 
tracts attention from the golden opportunity 
offered by falling oil prices. Congress could 
insure that the Organization of Petroleum Ex- 
porting Countries remains on the run, and also 
raise revenues by taxing imported ofl. 

Two years ago, gasoline prices hovered at 
about $1.25 a gallon. Now gas is available for 
less than a dollar. If bearish industry analysts 
are correct and the world supply of ofl in- 
creases, prices to consumers, adjusted for in- 
flation, will soon fall to the mid-1960s level! 

Why not sit back and enjoy it? First, be- 
cause the oil glut won’t last unless steps are 
taken to prolong it. Ofl wifl be plentiful for 
several years, but the long-term outlook re- 
mains bleak. It is a depleting resource and 


there is still no practical substitute for it as 
transportation fuel. Moreover, most remaining 
reserves of ofl that can be exploited at low cost 
are in politically unstable countries. Thus if 
deman d keeps inching up toward the limits of 
potential production, a repeat of the 1974 or 
1979 oil shocks becomes ever more likely. 

There is another reason not to sit on our 
gluL A program to contain the demand for oil 
could yield a timely bonus: tax revenue. Amer- 
ica badly needs to reduce its budget deficit, 
$200 billion and growing. A duty of, say. $10 a 
barrel on imports would yield about $20 bil- 
lion directly and generate $25 billion more in 
higher income and windfall taxes on domestic 
ofl. Best of all, much of the revenue would 
come from OPECs pockets; conservation 
would cat the price for oil and diminish the 
incentive for Saudi Arabia to limit output 

Conventional wisdom says Americans will 
not stand for a tax at the pump. But compare 
the pain of such a tax with the pain of draconi- 
an spending cuts — or of higher income taxes. 
A SlO-a-band import tax would raise a lot of 
revenue, put OPEC to rout and stfll leave 
gasoline prices lower than they were in 1982. 
Never has there been a belter moment to strike 
a blow for energy independence. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


Ike Challenge on Trade 

There is no quick and easy remedy to the 
staggering trade deficit accumulated by the 
United States last year, because it is both an 
integral part of the nation’s resurgent prosperi- 
ty and part of more complex economic prob- 
lems that have resisted efforts at correction. 

History is repeating itself in a curious way. 
The nation has not known such a prolonged 
period of trade deficits, nine consecutive years, 
for 1 10 years — not since the era when heavy 
importation was essential to bringing the in- 
dustrial revolution to America. Now, paradox- 
ically, the United States is again in some ways 
like a distant colony — agricultural commod- 
ities a major export, manufactured goods a 
major import. In fact. Foreign manufactured 
goods shipped to the United States increased 
so rapidly in 1984 that they constituted 22 
percent of the American market 

Implicit in a 51233-billion deficit are seri- 
ous economic losses. Some people have calcu- 
lated that it represents the loss of 23 million 
jobs. For that reason alone there will be a 
temptation to impose more protection, a tariff 


wall to contain the flood of imports. But pro- 
tection wfll do more harm than good. 

In the search for a remedy the nation nrast 
keep in mind the advantages as wdl as the 
disadvantages of trade deficits. The most im- 
portant advantage is the effect of the imports 
on inflation — an important factor in the 
achievement of three consecutive yean with an 
annual rate of inflation below 4 percent. 

But there is no question that American com- 
panies that are moving into world trade face 
serious handicaps for their exports. The high 
value of the dollar is the most critical one. 

Despite these handicaps, there was substan- 
tial growth last year in American exports — up 
'8.7 percent to a total of $217.9 billion, the third 
highest yet, and near the $237-billion record 
which was achieved during 1981. 

The restoration of growth in exports, an 
area too long neglected by many American 
businesses, signals important employment op- 
portunities. That export growth also justifies 
the Reagan policy of trying to avoid protec- 
tionist measures while assuring fair access of 
A m erican exports to foreign markets. 

— The Los Angeles Tunes. 


FROM OUR FEB. 6 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Universal Suffrage in Prussia? 
PARIS — The Prussian Government intro- 
duced a bill [on Feb. 5] for the reform of the 
electoral system. Recently there have been 
armed conflicts between the police and the 
Socialists. The result has been a fresh instance 
of the saying, “The mountain was in labor, and 
has brought forth a ridiculous moose.” The 
electoral system of Prussia is the most anti- 
quated in Europe. Electors are divided into 
three categories, according to the taxes they 
pay. Any multi-millionaire may form a catego- 
ry by himself. Each category elects a delegate 
for every 250 electors. These delegates elect the 
member of the Diet. The reform movement 
[wants] direct universal suffrage. But the pre- 
sent system has to now assured the Conserva- 
tive majority and excluded the Socialist ele- 
ment, the Government continues to turn a deaf 
ear to all proposals to change the system. 


1935: Poli^DrihHtalsDeniocr^ 

PARIS — One of the most trusted of the 
representatives of British rule in India speak- 
ing al a lunch recently about the difficulties 
attendant upon the development of democra- 
cy, emphasized the perplexity and uncertainty 
caused by fluctuations in policy. The dangers 
thus created in the life of a nation are familiar 
to us all, especially those who have followed 
world history dining the last twenty years. 
They have seen nations plunge from expendi- 
ture to economy, from militarism to pacifism, 
from alliances to isolation, from friendship to 
hostility, as public opinion was swayed this 
way or that and through the mechanism of 
democratic government pot in control of the 
policy of the State. The paralysis of initiative, 
the waste of energy, the perplexity of derision 
these changes bring about are so widespread 
that every nation tries to avoid them. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 
JOHN HA Y WHITNEY, Chairma n 19581982 

KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Ca&uunnen 


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C 1985, International Herald Tribune. AO rights resented. 



A Return to the Middle Ages in Sudan 


L ONDON — rt is never possible, 
/ or wise, to predict the immi- 
nence of the downfall of a leader in 
the Third World; but it would be 
surprising if President Gaafar Ni- 
meiri of Sudan has not hastened the 
end of his regime by his decision to 
order the han ging of Mahmoud 
Mohamm ed Taha, the respected 
sage of the Republican Brothers, for 
the crime of heresy. 

Heretics have not been hanged in 
Islamic societies since medieval 
tunes; it is doubtful whether even 
under Ayatollah Ruhollab Khomei- 
ni's Shiite revolution Moslems have 
been pul to death as heretics. In 
Sudan — one of the most tolerant 
and civilized of Moslem societies — 
General NixneuTs act marked the 
culmination of his fanatical deter- 
mination to set back the clock to the 
Middle Ages which began with his 
higb-handed action in turning the 
country into an Islamic Republic 
and introducing sharia laws. 

Not only did his action deepen 
the cultural cleavage between the 
mainl y Idami r North and the main- 
ly Christian and animistic South; it 
also divided the Moslems — the 
modem-minded believers from the 
Moslem fundamentalists, and the 
secularists from mosque attenders. 

One of the consequences of his 
action was to strengthen the incipi- 
ent revolt in the South, which has 
now developed to the dangerous 
point for the country where General 
Nimeiii himself admitted, in an in- 
terview on Jan. 21, that the security 
situation is “very bad,” and that his 
army has been pushed into what he 
termed “a defensive posture.” 

What this means, in fact, is that 
his army is now engaged in a war 
that cannot be won militarily, and 
sinre the ch alleng in g Sudan Peo- 
ple’s Liberation Army insists that it 


By Colin Legum 


will not negotiate with Khartoum so 
long as General Nimeiri remains 
president, the political outlook is — 


to put it mildly — unpromising. 
The! 


hanging of Mr. Taha has not 
only outraged foreigners — Mos- 
lems and non-Moslems — but ac- 
cording the influential sources in- 
side the country, it has deeply 
offended Sudanese Moslems and 
non-Moslems. They speak of the 
han g in g as a national crime which 
has tarnished Sudan's reputation. 

There is also a sense of deep out- 
rage over the cruelty of forcing four 
of Mr. Taha’s disciples, who had 
been sentenced to death with him. 


his moral strength and integrity 
have become a beacon in a country 
where the harshness of the laws 
against dissent has put any political 
activism at a premium. 

In such a political environmertL 
Mr. Taha came to assume the status 
of a Gandhi. Like the Indian mar- 
tyr, he had consistently advocated 
that “the price of freedom is the 
continuous, sleepless sustenance of. 
and alertness for it. by each and 


to recant Lheir beliefs by forcing 
)UC 


them to witness the public execu- 
tion of their leader and giving them 
three days in which to repent. 

Influential Sudanese say it is un- 
thinkable that President Reagan 
should agree to receive General Ni- 
meiri when he visits the United 
States on March 1. They argue that 
for Mr. Reagan to shake General 
Nimeiri’s hand would amount to 
acceptance of the medieval prac- 
tices of the Sudanese leader. 

“How is it possible,” they ask. 
“for President Reagan to denounce 
the barbarities of Ayatollah Kho- 
meini while, at the same time, show- 
ing friendship for Nimeiri?” 

It would be difficult to exaggerate 
the strength of feeling among Suda- 
nese of all political and religious 
persuasions over continued Ameri- 
can support Tor General Nimeiri. 

The Republican Brothers do not 
command extensive support in Su- 
dan. They can count, at most, on a 
few thousand supporters. But if Mr. 
Taha's philosophy and religious 
views have failed to win much sup- 
port in the 40 years of its existence, 



num . 


JJ 


every individual” For his beliefs be 
was imprisoned by the British and 
by the Sudanese. Bul throughout 
the 40 years of his struggle, he main- 
tained a philosophic calm and good 
humor. Even when he was sen- 
tenced to death he received the ver- 
dict with a gentle smile, having 
stubbornly refused to defend him- 
self in the court on the grounds that 
it was unconstitutional and that the 
judges were “unqualified and tech- 
nically incompetent” 

The main charge against Mr. 
Taha and his colleagues was that 


they had distributed leaflets and or- 
earSzed peaceful chanting izuffl) 
circles in the capital. The offencun 0 
leaflet contained three sp^tfic de- 
mands: abolition of the 1983 so- 
called” Islamic laws because they 
conflict with religion and the coun- 
try's constitution, and are harmful 
to national integration and to the 
right of individuals; a political solu- 
tion to the question of southern Su- 
dan: and advocacy of the Islamic 
teachings of Sufloah codes. which 
are more humanitarian than the 7th 
century (sharia) codes, considered 
unsuitable to the 20th century. 

The leaflet called for the halung 
of bloodshed in the south and for 
the implementation of a peaceful, 
political solution instead of a mili- 
tary solution. “This." it said, “was 
the national duty of both the gov- 
ernment and the armed Southern- 
ers.” It called for recognition of the 
fact that the south faces a problem. 

Explaining the stand of the Re- 
publican Brothers, the offending 
leaflet said that under sharia laws, 
non -Moslem believers do not have 
equal rights. “It is not enough for a 
citizen today merely to enjoy free- 
dom of worship. He is entitled to 
enjoy the full rights of a citizen in 
total equity with all other citizens." 

In General Nimeiri' s Sudan such 
views are treated as heresy and its 
advocates are punished by hanging; 
in democratic societies such views 
ore considered normal and held up 
as an example. Indeed “action by 
example” was the vision prescribed 
by the martyred Mr. Taha. 

General Nimieri has ordered that 


all of Mr. Taha's writings and all the 
literature of the Republican Broth- 


literature of the Republican Broth- 
ers should be considered illegal The 
police have been ordered to collect 
ihem up and bum them. 

International Herald Tribune 


Star Wars’ Debate Reaches More Serious Orbit 


By Philip Geyeiin 


W ASHINGTON — The fate of 
President Reagan’s Strategic 
Defense Initiative (also known as 
“Star Wars”) is probably going to 
turn on unpredictable technology — 
or diplomacy — in the end. In the 
meantime, owing in large part to two 
high-powered, high-profile ex- 
changes, a certain sanity has at least 
been restored to the debate. 

The opening volley came from for- 
mer Defense Secretary Robert Mc- 
Namara, Soviet expert George Ken- 
nan, one-time national security 
advisor McGeorge Bundy and ex- 
arms controller Gerard Smith 
(known as the Gang of Four). They 
said the Strategic Defense Initiative 
as originally presented was a 
“dream” and ought to be abandoned. 

This has now drawn heavy coun- 
terfire from Jimmy Carter’s national 
security advisor, Zbigniew Brzezrn- 
ski, Dartmouth physicist Robert Jas- 
trow, and Max Kampdman, whose 
recent appointment as the top U.S. 
arms-conlrol negotiator in the fonh- 


tlH.H m mnw rmte 

****t%i^ /torn \ 

j 

/V» .,*■***?.." "f 


coming U.S.-Soviet negotiations 
gives their joint effort a Reagan ad 


ministration imprimatur. Mr.' Rea- 
gan’s defenders insist that “the idea 
of basing our security on the ability 
to defend ourselves deserves serious 
consideration.” So it does. 

In fact, that is what has been the 
matter all along. This is not to say 
that the Foot were any less serious 
than the Three. Together, these and 
other recent contributions from both 
sides have gone a long way toward 
getting the ronnd-and-round debate 
over “Star Wars" back into a steady, 
serious orbit. One way to keqp it there 
is to keep in mind bow and why the 
whole idea spun so far out of orbit. 

The problem started on the launch- 
ing pad. How many remember exact- 
ly what it was the president said that 
gave rise to the mischievous nick- 
name, “Star Wars"? I’ll confess I 
didn’t Having gone back and looked 
it up, IT] also concede that it is not all 
that far out — when you reread it 
today in the context of what his man- 
agers now tell ns that he really mean L 

The trouble was that Mr. Reagan 
himself dearly did not know nearly 
enough about what he really meant at 
the time. His propose for going on 
nationwide television was political — 



an admitted appeal for public sup- 
port, over the heads of congressional 
doubters, for his defense program. 
He was asking for more — and more 
devastating — weaponry. And so. in 
a brief, almost personal, passage at 
the end of some pretty hairy stuff 
about the Soviet threat, be offered the 
vision of a nuclear-free world as sug- 
ar-coating for the bitter pill of a 
world on a nuclear hair-trigger. 

There was light at the end of the 
tunnel, he was saying. But, in fair- 


He was “sharing a vision" of “render- 
ing these nuclear weapons impotent 
and obsolete” — of “changing the 
course of human history.” 

Small wonder that attention cen- 


Shultz’s principal 
sor, Paul Nitze. 

The new, official line projects a 10- 
year effort to “seek a radical reduc- 
tion in the number and power of 
existing and planned offensive and 
defensive nuidear arms, whether 
land-based, space-based or other- 
wise." Then would come “a period of 
transition, beginning possibly ten 
years from now. to effective, non- 
nuclear defensive forces, including 
defenses against offensive nuclear 
weapons. This period of transition 
should lead to the eventual elimina- 
tion of nudear arms both offensive 
and defensive. A nuclear-free world 
is an ultimate objective to which we, 
the Soviet Union and all other na- 
tions can agree." 

Reasonable people can argue with 
the practicality of even that proposi- 
tion. But if that’s the wav it bad been 
put forward on March "23, 1983 — 
with a judicious background briefing 
— we would almost certainly have 
been spared months of argument 


arms-control advi- 


tered on the sci-fi, pic-in-the-sky at 
fir 


ness, be was cardful to say that the 
tuned’s end he had in mina lay some- 


where around the turn of the century. 
He acknowledged that the develop- 
ment of a nuclear defense system 
would be a “formidable technical 
task [that] will lake years, maybe de- 
cades . . . There will be failures and 
setbacks.” He was careful, at least 
once, to talk about defenses only 
against “strategic ballistic missiles,** 
leaving horrendous holes in the anti- 
nuclear shield he was offering. 

Bul he also spoke about Ruminat- 
ing a threat posed by strategic nucle- 
ar missiles, presumably thereby in- 
cluding air-breathing cruise missiles. 


the expense of the fine print that is 
only now beinj* carefully spelled out 
in official White House briefing pa- 
pers as well as in the Brasrinski-Jas- 
trow-Kampdman article This is all 
the more so when you think back on 
Mr. Reagan's embellishment of his 
“vision” in the second, foreign policy, 
debate in the October Campaign- 
Then, he claimed we could develop 
our own nuclear-defense technology 
to such an advanced state that we 
would be in a position to share it with 
the Soviet Union and end, once and 
for all, to the threat of nuclear war. 

We do not bear much about that 
anymore. Rather, what we are now 
getting is a carefully crafted “new 
strategic concept.” Prepared for Sec- 
retary or State George Shultz to pre- 
sent to Soviet Foreign Minister An- 
drei Gromyko at Geneva, it was 


called pointedly to public notice the 
other day in a press briefing by Mr. 


over something as senseless as the 
image conjured" up by “Star Wan." 


Washington Post Writers Croup. 


Unemployment 


Philippines 
Puts Blam# 
On IMF 


By Mark R. Thompson 
and Gregory W. Slayton 


M ANILA in other ‘Haiti 
World countries where 
programs have brought painM aus- 
terity measures, many people in the 
Philippines are blaming the Interna- 
tional Monetary Fund for their pre- 
sent economic difficulties. Devalua- 
tion. tight credit and the erosion of 
buying power are all seen asthercsnli 
of strict IMF decisions. . f* 

Yet lough fund conditions for a 
standvby credit are hardly a cause of 
the current crisis; they are merely a 
consequence of an economic sima- 
tion — the country’s wont since the 
end of World War IL 
But if the IMF's bitter economic 
medicine is not to be blamed, its lack 
of preventive care under almost con- 
tinuous credit programs with the 
Philippines since 1962 can certainly 
be faulted. Had more stringent pot 
cies been applied earlier, the draconi- 


an measures necessary now might 
n avoided. 


well have been - 
A review of past IMF programs 
with the Philippines reveals; 

• Fund programs in the 1960s did 


not impose tight demand manage- 
ment or sirictGmiis 


on foreign bor- 
rowing, allowing the first Marcos ad- 
ministration to pursue expansionj$- 
moneiaiy and fiscal policies and in- 
crease foreign debt by 26 percent a 
year. The result; an economic crisis in 
1970 that leads one to view correal 
difficulties with considerable dgd vu. 

• The IMF did not take firm ac- 
tion when the government failed to 
control a rapid expansion in liquidity 
associated with the commodity price 
boom of 1973. The fund programmed 
an even heftier increase m credit into 


the next year’s standby arrangement. 

• The fund failed to enforce the 
conditions of a three-year credit 
(1976-78) designed to bring needed 
structural change to the Philippine 
economy. When tariff reform — nec- 
essary to shift resources from a heavi- 
ly protected, inefficient import sub- 
stitution sector towards exports — 
was blocked by special interests, the 
IMF did not demand of the govern- 
ment that credit terms be observed. 

• In 1980, wben the Philippine 
obviously needed to adjust to a rapid- 
ly deteriorating external situation — 
the second oil shock and world reces- 
sion — the IMF granted the country 
a two-year credit under terms that in 
hindsight Sewn disastrously lenient 
No devaluation was programmed 
even though the peso had appreciated 
the year before and its value would 
continue to rise in real terms through- 
out the period covered by the agree- 
ment Two performance criteria, one 
with the fund’s permission, were ex- 
ceeded by mid- 1980 and another on 
credit was widely missed in 198I.- A 
fourth criteria hunting foreign bor- 
rowing proved to be the Waterloo of 
an already weak program as the gov- 
ernment simply shifted to short-term 
debt which the fund did not monitor. 

The failure of IMF programs to 
bring much adjustment m the Philip- 
pine economy before crisis bad al- 
ready occurred is due in large pan to 
the government's apparent lack of 
interest in conventional economic 
stabilization measures. Gregorio Li-* 
caros, the central bank governor in 
the 1970s, was said to have regarded 
fund credits as “no strings attached 
balance of payments loans.” 

But the government was not only 
interested m IMF money, it also 
wanted the fund’s so-called “good 
housekeeping seal of approval." As a 
World Bank document says: “The 
government regards the IMF's role as 
essential not only for die large vol- 
ume of resources provided, but also 
Tor the reassurance on economic 


management provided^ to private 
credits 


G ENEVA — We are just over a 
decade away from the end of 
the 20th century — a century marked 
by traumatic changes and dramatic 
progress in human history. 

The past 20 years alone have seen 
the crumbling of many barriers to a 
better and more rewarding life for all 
the people on our planet. We are 
today in a position to start enjoying 
the fruits of scientific breakthroughs 
and modem technology and to erase 
poverty and suffering from all cor- 
ners of the world. How is it then that 
we find ourselves bogged down in the 
quicksands of conflicts and confron- 
tation, with attention of world lead- 
as f ocused more on political and 

unemployed and underemployed. 

The answers are not difficult to 
find. For over a decad e , as director- 
general of the International Labor 
Organization, 2 have observed the 
lopsided economic priorities of the 
world community and called on 
statesmen and polity planners not to 
forget the human dimension in their 
efforts to reduce inflation and revive 
economic activity. The apparent toll 
in human suffering and joblessness 
from the current world recession is 
vividly illustrated in the ILO*s World 
Labor Report, just published. This 
comprehensive survey, based on 
three years of research, provides a 
sobering portrait of the problems and 
prospects of the nearly 2,000 million- 
strong world labor force who consti- 
tute the main motor for all produc- 
tive activities in our societies today. 


By Francis Blanchard 


The writer is director-general of the International Labor Organization. 
He contributed uSs view to the International Herald Tribune. 


It is a depressing picture of deterio- 
ration in the world labor situation. 
There is a declining trade union 
membership, unequal wages and 
work opportunities for women, a 
heavy accident toll particularly of 
Third World workers, an increasing 
mass of young men and women head- 
ing towards the scrap heap because of 


everyday life. Traditional approaches 
to economic problems which could 
have produced results in the pre-mi- 
crochip era are no longer effective in 
tackling our present-day problems. 
The emergence of machines which 
can take over the work of tens or even 
hundreds of employees have led to 
the immense problem of retraining 


merely by policies for economic improvement. 


lack of appropriate training and the 
prevalence of forced labor. 

I have initiated action to convene, 
under ILO auspices, a conference of 
minis ters of labor, finance and plan- 
ning, as well as with senior officials of 
international organizations con- 
cerned with financial, monetary and 
trade policies, to discuss and find 
solutions to these problems of unem- 
ployment and poverty. International 
conferences have often tended to be 
mere forums for public debates, but 
the agenda for the meeting I propose 
will focus cm ways of linking social 
development to financial and eco- 
nomic policies- Social aspects of de- 
velopment cannot be divorced from 
financial and monetary policies. 

The fast pace of tedinologica] pro- 
gress in recent years has revolution- 
ized the norms and modes of our 


the redundant work force to make 
them play a productive role in soci- 
ety. Tens of millions of young school- 
leavers find themselves ill-equipped, 
without appropriate vocational (rain- 
ing, to secure entry into (he world of 
work. Unless they are helped to ac- 
quire the necessary skills, nations will 
find themselves facing a dangerously 
explosive situation with a revolt of 
frustrated youth on their hands. 

Nations, policy planners and inter- 
national organizations concerned 
with these social problems need to 
reorient their policies and approach- 
es to tackle the issues that confront us 
today. The ILO programs and pro- 
jects for the next biennium (1986-87) 
reflea this trend. 

Employment and development re- 
main the main focus of these pro- 
grams, but special attention is bang 


paid to several new facets which have 
surfaced under this bread umbrella. 
Research activities into the problems 
generated bv the advent of new tech- 
nology, including the changes in the 
pattern of skill requirements rising 
from the process of industrial restruc- 
turing, constraints on the access to 
employment opportunities of young 
people and the urban poor, and" iden- 
tifi ca tion of policies regarding the 
employment of women, are all facets 
of the modest but comprehensive 
program that the ILO wifi be tack- 
ling. The list is incomplete but repre- 
sents an effort to identify the prob- 
lems of the technological society. 

The seeds of social unrest, so ap- 
parent in the current economic crias. 
cannot be removed by amply con- 
centrating, on muzzling inflation and 
restoring fiscal equilibrium. The hu- 
man cost of such deflationary poli- 
cies is already evident in the stagger- 
ing rise in unemployment in many of 
the industrialized countries. Much of 
what is bang done in the industrial- 
ized countries to curb inflation and 
restore economic coherence affect the 
less developed countries as well. It is 
clear that economic revival at a glob- 
al level cannot be realized without a 
reflation of the economies of the rich- 
er countries of the North. The world 
today is too interdependent for par- 
ticularly the richer nations to pursue 
narrow nationalistic policies which, 
while producing posable short-term 
benefits, seem certain to widen the 
rift between the rich and poor and 
contribute to destabilization of the 
global economic structure. 



a 


IN 


9 - 


t . 


Haifa Crniyf' 

Begin to 

'Rape of Nans:-' 


;• • 


vyv 


2TCU7 m i': ■ 
ow.tos 
to:': : 
tnastiv'. 
its thee: ■ 
Lno»- _• *■ 
»£■ 

inax-iT- 

lit:. 

'liV--. 
ktiij --j 

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Fast: ; 


sources of finance.” IMF credits im- 
proved the country’s image which 
was important “because in banking, 
like anything else, there are fads ... 
The credit of a particular country 
becomes hot in the market.” 

The Philippines, as high levels rib 
foreign loans show, became a fad m 
foreign financial circles. This allowed 
the country to achieve relatively high 
levels of growth throughout the 1970s 
without much structural adjustment. 

If the government was more con- 
cerned^ with the fund's “seal of ap- 
provaT than with real adjustment, 
why did the IMF conclude an almost 
unbroken series of credit with the 
rfunppines For over two d ecade s? 

To some extent the fund was sira- 

?i it?. Ied * Tbe rectify discovered 
»!.«. billion overstatement of interna- 
tional reserves masked the extent of 
tae deterioration in the external ac- 
count until 1984. Short-term loans 
fully monitored until then, 
r * l * k pnrtly to blame 

for the Philippine crisis in that its 
tight conditionality allowed the Phil- 
ippines to use its “seal of approval” 
to secure large loans which enabled 

Pipette adjustment/**, 
More stringent policies might weir 
have prevented the present tfebadeL 


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Chifia. •: .-■ 
JapsziiV/ 
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,J] ,e y riler ? “re *orA recent graduate 
Uni ? er *ity of thePhitip- 
i*? 1 dtis comment 

to the International Herald Tribune. 


letter 


fdrix 


Only 10-Percent Dead 




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MoxM.K^l^ nJostrowand 


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printout 011 a “nnputer 

SSssS-lfe 

^MOTHY DeVINNEY. 

Athens. 








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Page 


INSIGHTS 


£ 


TS 


By William E. Geist 

N'fl* York Times Service 

N taK nSu ~I A vexh, s “UonaJ ur- 
wif P ! ^ come 10 roost 00 

Harold mS» SveeU and il “ Harold, 
ttarow might be more easily described as 

3J?sk»^as? 

I Uve bens like everybody else.*’ 

Not quite. He lives on a nicer street than 
most, a picturesque block lined with trees, 
heavy ornamental iron fences and miffiS 
dollar browns tones and town houses— albeit 
on the sidewalk. 

He is wintering on a choice location, a 
' 2*?®? *?““* with an updraft of balmy, 
epical exhaust — “feels tike it’s from the 
laundry room, he said — from Saint Vin- 
cent s Hospital and Medical Center. Harold 
s 1 *** and other belongings there 
to hold his claim on the spot, and he tries to 
return in early evening, before someone dse 
takes il 

What is almost too good to be true is that 
thoe is a house on his little patch of property, 
a big metal box. about four feet square and 
five feet tall (U meters square and 1.5 meters 
tall), designed by a neighbor across the street 
to cover the grate and keep people Hke Har- 
old from living there. 

It is in the shape of an old cash register, 
with a curved front that makes for terribly 
uncomfortable lounging. But Harold found a 
way to sleep on the top pan of the box and 
then a way to get inside. 

The presence of Harold and others like him 
cm the block has prompted some spirited 
discussions among block residents, some of 


Homeless 'Neighbors 5 Vex Residents 




mm 


whom find their concern for the homeless 
heightened and others who now think that 
“the homeless should be locked upT in one 
man’s words. 

“It’s different,” said a passerby, who 
stopped recently in front of Harold’s box, 
“M»en they live in front of your bouse than 

There was the wild man 
who woke the 
neighborhood nearly every 
night with lond 
obscenities. "It was like 
Walter Cronkite gone 
berserk,” a resident said. 

when you see them on the TV news." A 
woman companion asked, "Why doesn’t he 
get out of here and go to a shelter where he 
belongs?” 

Others on the block, such as Steven 
Gaines, can be sharply critical of neighbors 
who react this way, but Mr. Gaines said it 
also was a mistake to r omanticize the home- 
less. He said the issue of the homeless living 
on the block was far from cosmetic. "They 
fool the streets in every conceivable manner, 
he said. 

There is, for instance, the matter of the 
wild man who lived on the sidewalk lor about 
two years who had the habit of waking the 
neighborhood nearly every night yelling loud. 


graphic obscenities. “The man's voice was 
unbelievably deep and strong," said Harriet 
Heyman, another resident. 

“It was like Walter Cronkite gone ber- 
serk." she said, referring to the television 
journalist. 

Many neighbors railed at hospital officials 
to do something about the screaming man at 
their property, but no matter bow many times 
the man was chased away or escorted to 
shelters and emergency rooms by the police 
he always returned. Mr. Gaines and others 
asked the hospital to put some barbed wire on 
the grate, which the hospital did months later. 

"Then," said Dan Sorrenti, a spokesman 
for the hospital, “we received calls from 
neighbors saying how inh umane it was to put 
up the barbed wire. It's a real Catch-22 situa- 
tion." 

N OT to mention that men still put 
pieces of cardboard over the barbed 
wire and sleep there. Gerard Bany, a 
police officer who answers many of the neigh- 
bors’ calls, said it was difficult for the police 
to do much if the homeless men refused to be 
taken to a shelter. 

“It’s a terribly uncomfortable position to 
be in," said Car) Stein, who owns a town 
house across from Harold’s box. "to be sit- 
ting in your living room warm and comfort- 
able and know a man is on your doorstep 
freezing." 

Mr. Stein said his 7-year-old daughter fre- 
quently had nightmares about the screamer. 
"For my wife and 1." be said, "it’s a real 
dilemma. If having the homeless on the side- 
walks is simply unsightly and an inconve- 
nience, that’s one thing. But when does an 
inconvenience become so great that it inter- 
feres with the way we live?" 


Mr. Stein is an architect, and part of his 
work is re designin g living spaces as shelters 
for the homeless. “I have learned a lot," he 
said, “mainly that the homeless are not all 
deinstitutionalized mental patients by any 
means. A lot of them are people who can’t 
afford hnnqng. who cann ot firyj a job." 

“It becomes the law of survival." Mr. 
Gaines said. “When you can’t sleep or work, 
it becomes you or them. The problems of 
living in New York mount up. You start to 
think about leaving. I love this city. I want to 
stay here.” 

"Pan of you aches for the people on the 
sidewalks," said Cynthia Story, another 
neighbor. She said sne had offered some of 
the men clothing, but that they had refused 
the offers. 

“People are hardening to seeing the home- 
less out there," she said. "We step looking at 
them. Thai’s what is frightening." 

“Fm happy the screamer is gone,” Miss 
Heyman said! “but it concerns me that no one 
can do anything for him. It seems we just 
don’t care enough. That’s the bottom line." 

“It is," Mr. Gaines said, “the character and 
nature of people in this city not to care, to 
walk on by and not look, to not start up with 
somebody. The terrible thing is that after we 
asked for the barbed wire and got it mid the 
screamer left 1 fd t sorry for him. 1 felt like we 
had evicted him from his home: 1 wonder 
where he is and if he is all right." 

Out on the sidewalk, Harold was rising on 
a sunny, springlike day. The sidewalk next to 
his box was littered with cigar butts. Harold 
explained that he had entertained som e 
guests the previous evening and had not had a 
chance to clean up. 



TT* New Yort Ima 

Barbed wire covers an exhaust grate at New York's St Vincent's Hospital. 


& 






Hall a Century 
Later, Japanese 
Begin to Question 
'Rape ol N anking ’ 

By John Burgess 

Washington Post Service 

| OKYO— The “rape of Nanking," one of 
the harshest symbols of Japanese brutal- 
ity during World War U, has come under 
increasing attack from historians and veterans’ 
groups hoe as a myth fabricated by the victori- 
ous Allies. 

Articles and books published in recent 
months concede that some atrocities took place 
in the dty in northeastern China, which is now 
known as Nanjing. But they say the death toll 
was nowhere near the 200,000 Genre cited dur- 
ing war crimes trials after Japan's surrender in 
1945. 

“It was absolutely necessary for the trials to 
have a crime against humanity," said MasaaJri 
Tanaka, author ofa new book entitled ^The 
Fiction of the Nanking Massacre.” 

“In Japan there was no Auschwitz,” Mr. Ta- 
naka said. "Therefore they needed Nanking." 

The debate threatens to reopen a dispute with 
China. In 1982, China reacted angrily when the 
Japanese Ministry of Education proposed soft- 
ening school textbook accounts of Japanese 
brutality in Nanking and elsewhere in China. 

Japanese officials had proposed the deletion 
from the textbooks of precise death tolls at 
Nanking and to write instead that “many” 
deaths occurred, on the ground that accurate 
figures were unknown. They later agreed to 
restore the numbers, but they have deleted refer- 
ences to rape cm the ground that soldiers in 
battle have abused women throughout history. 

A relatively small group of people and organi- 
zations are publicly arguing the new Japanese 
case. Still, their actions and the publicity they 
have received offer new evidence that the Japa- 
nese are gradually dropping taboos against 
questioning the victors’ account of their conduct 
in the war. 

T HE Japanese Imperial /umy seized 
Manchuria, in northeastern China, in 
1931 By 1937, Japan had launched at- 
tacks all over China and had quickly overrun 

large sections of the country. 

That December, Japanese troops advanced ful Asahi Shurbun newspaper group, 
on Nanking the capital of the Nationalist Chi- In December, nine Japanese scholars spent a 
, uese government of C hia n g Kai-shek. With hurt- week in Nanjing interviewing survivors and ex- 

W*dreds of thousands of residents huddled in a - * * — * J -*■ — •**-- 

“safety zone” adminis tered by neutral foreign- 
ers, Japanese artDleiy and bombers pounded the 

walled dty. . , . . 

Mainstream historians say that much of the 
bombing and shelling was indisc rim i n ate, and 
that man y civilians were slaughtered in tbe dty 
and on escape routes toward the Yangtze River, 
now known as the Chang Xiang. Mr. Tanaka and 
other historians who dispute the assertions 
counter that most civilian deaths were uninten- 
tional, and were in the heat of battle. 



Patients Without Hope: Doctors Face 
Daily Dilemma of Keeping Them Alive 


By Dena Kidman 


New York Times Service 


N 


“That lady's dead now," Dr. Lustbader said 
of the alcoholic. 

“I asked her husband what he wanted," a 
EW YORK - It was an ordinary day WF resi 4 cnl J Reeled. “I said, ‘If your 
for Dr. David Finley, the chid of mien- again, do you want me to resuscitate 

sive care at a Manhattan hospital. There ‘’^hat did he sayT asked Dr. FrnJey. 

“He did,” said the resident. 


were seven terminally ill patients in his ward 
and he had to decide bow long to keep them 
alive. 

He called a lawyer. 

Dr. Finley oversees seven doctors in an 18- 
bed world of tubes, capsules, wires, pumps and 
pins that allow modern medicine to keep the 
heart bearing, lungs breathing, kidneys pump- 
ing and immunological system fighting — long 
after the body has given ouL 
It is the most expensive unit at SL Luke’s- 
Roosevelt Hospital, a place that sparkles with 
large monitors whose screens blink green sq nig- 
gles and lines all day long. Buzzers, bells and 
gongs punctuate the otherwise soothing sound 
or running oxygen. It is the place where day 
after day. hourafter boor, the most difficult new 

issues of dying are played ouL 

Of the 143 patients who died at Sl Luke’s- 


“Well spend more time idling him what life 
would be like,” Dr. Finley said. 

HE resident agreed to speak with the 
family again. "OK." Dr. Fmley said, and 
he brought up the butcher. "This case is 
distinctly different. He is awake and alert and he 
has to refuse resuscitation. The family has no 
say in iL” 

“Thai’s because he’s with it,” Dr. Lustbader 
said. 

“Right,” Dr. Fmley said. 

Dr. Fmley said the retired lawyer also had to 
decide whether she wanted resuscitation. “But I 
don’t think she wants it," he added. 

“That’s not dear to me.” Dr. Lustbader said. 


Hu Manietii NtMpapan 

Troops of the Japanese Imperial Army’s 114th Division celebrate their victory 
over the Chinese Nationalist Army atop Nanking’s dty wall in December 1937. 


historians, meanwhile. 



a minin g historical documents and sites. The 
group, whose members tend to reject the new 

position, plan to condude a study of the ind- 
dent soon. 

“For many years, the people of Nanking have 
been trying to ascertain what happened," said 
Akira Fujiwara, an historian ai Tokyo’s Hiiot- 
subashi University who beaded the delegation. 
“They want to preserve the evidence." 

According to the new theory, the Japanese 
rroops were generally well disciplined after the 
As evidence, they point to 


u fall of N . 

But mu ch of the debate concerns what nap- official documents issued by a committee of 15 
pened after the dty was captured. According to foreigners that administered the safety zone, 
testimony at the Tokyo war crimes tribunal Mr. Tanaka, the historian, said the committee 
which in 1048 sentenced seven Japanese leaders complained in 69 letters to the Japanese au- 
to death and 18 to prison terms, the conquerors then ties of only 49 civilian de a ths caused by < .. 

embarked on an orgy of murder, rape and pil- Japanese soldiers. Mr. Tanaka said that many of be said- Reports and complaints io the Japan 

lane that lasted six weeks. these complaints were unconfirmed. without a doubt understate the extent of the r 

According to the testimony, drey executed a later survey of the dty and environs by 
jens of thousands of prisoners of war and men Chinese students, he said, turned up only about 
^ Knee ted of being soldiers out of uniform, 2,150 civilian deaths caused by Japanese. 

Sued whole sections of the city and killed Foreign journalists who were present in Nan- 

E inhabitants, and raped thousands of worn- king, he said, used hearsay in reporting mass 
Ul executions after the occupation. In any case, be 

ina. the “rape of Nanking" is unques- maintained, numbers quoted were nowhere near 

■ ’ ,hlt> Official Chinese accounts put tire the 200.000 figure that gained legitimacy at the 

t j C ’ rh rnil at 300 000 A spokesman at tire Chi- Tokyo trial and at a separate trial in Nanking. 

JCa Pmhassv noting that his government is The new theory on Nanking also refers to 
nes fv!^ t^dehareT^id: “The Japanese inva- reports that poorly disciplined Chinese soldiers 
watcning me numbers of civilians ihe run killed civilians, sometimes to obtain 

their Clothes. 


* en- 


was 


first 


nns is a historical fact, 
jv, «ew theory m Nanking . 

g£ry month since March. 


A" 


, TTEMPTS by attorneys for the Japanese 
defendants to introduce such evidence 
. at the trials was unfairly quashed by the 
judges, according to Mr. Tanaka. 

“The purpose of the trials was to demoralize 
and create a sense of criminality” in Japan, be 
said. 

In rebuttal the Asahi Journal a weekly maga- 
zine owned by tire Asahi Shimbun newspaper 


group, recently published a 25-part series writ- 
ten by a reporter who spent months conducting 
research in China. 

Entitled “The Road to Nanking,” it con- 
cludes that the tribunal’s account of Japanese 
atrocities was essentially correct. 

Similar views are voiced by Tonao Hora, 
author of a book on Nanking and professor of 
history at Tokyo's Waseda University. He cited 
records of two Chinese organizations that oper- 
ated burial squads. 

“The records of these two groups show 

150.000 corpses were disposed of," he aid. “In 
addition, the Japanese Army killed many pris- 
oners of war and threw their bodies into the 
river and fired on people trying to escape along 
the river" 

Mr. Hora conceded that the burial records 
may be unreliable. But he estimated that about 

200.000 people died in the dty. That includes aQ 
deaths, of both soldiers and civilians, in combat 
and by execution. 

His own research suggests that “the Japanese 
Army had no respect for the safety zone at all” 

* . • esc 

real 

crimes, he said, because “people preferred to be 
sQent, afraid of revenge." 

The debate also has led to publication of 
diaries of Japanese soldiers who served at Nan- 
king. One, put on display Iasi s umm er at a 
Kyoto peace exhibit, told of a Dec. 14 massacre 
of 500 Chinese men picked from among refu- 
gees in the belief that they were soldiers who had 
abandoned their uniforms. 

“The Chinese were too many for a platoon tc 
kill" with rifles, the soldier wrote, “so we bor- 
rowed two heavy machine guns and six light 
machine guns” from a Japanese Army compa- 
ny. The Chinese were gunned down in front of 
the city wall he said. 

Mr. Hora said that execution of prisoners was 
common in China. Members of one Japanese 
regiment have reported that it killed 13,000 
prisoners, he noted. Mr. Tanaka acknowledged 
some deaths of the sort, but said that guerrillas 
could legally be shot under international rules of 

war. 


HeraltafcSrtbunc 


R^rhineMoreThan a Third ofa Million Readers 
in 164 Countries Around the World 


“She could pull that little sucker right off” He 

Roosevelt during one typical month - June. 

1984 nearly 40 percent received this highly ^ ^ respirator if she no longer wanted to 

sp ^ a ^ edc ^ ie - The bottom hue is she has to decide," Dr. 

Finley said. “Her wishes have to be respected. 
You have to cooperate within the limits of your 
best judgment.” , 

“Or we can simply say we did what we could,” 
Dir. Lustbader said. 

“Who would know?" said Dr. Finley. 
“Right,” said a resident. 

“OK — Purpura," Dr. Finley continued, re- 
ferring to the interpreter. Foscolo Purpura. “We 
have to be up front with him and his wife.” The 
question, be said, was not whether to resuscitate 
but whether to place him bade on a respirator. 
Then they reviewed the cases again. 

“So what do you think?" Dr. Finley asked. 

“I think we should all write living mils,” Dr. 
Lustbader said sarcastically. ‘Today ” 

But now it was time to deal with these deci- 
sions — to talk spin to the alcoholic's family, to 
broach the subject of death with the retired 
lawyer. 

Dr. Finley said he would do it, confident that 
be knew the lawyer’s answer. 

The woman, who at one time was with the 
City Corporation Counsel's office, had been in 
the intensive-care unit since July. There was 
nothing medically left to be done for her, so she 

was on a waiting list for placement in a chronic- 
care facility. 

She had been waiting for two months, her life 
measured by the rounds of nurses taking her 
temperature, watching her heart monitor, exam- 
ining the relative gas ratios of her blood. 

Her view was a room with three other beds, 
each connected to a heart monitor and numer- 
ous tubes and pumps. Dr. Finley was standing 
at the bedside of this rail-dim wo man She 
acknowledged him with her large, dark eyes. 

“We have to talk about a problem,” he said. 
“And we need your help.” 

S HE nodded, her eyes not leaving his. "Re- 
member we had to talk about how impor- 
tant it was to decide to have the tracb?” he 
continued, referring to the surgery that she had 
undergone to install the respirator tube in her 
throat 
She nodded. 

“Well we have to make another derision 
about your care.” Again, she looked at him 
intently. 

“Now, I don’t want this to upset you," Dr. 
Finley said. “Nothing has changed in your situ- 
ation. But we have to ask you this now so we wQl 
be better able to handle your care." She smiled. 

“We are not optimistic we can take you off 
the ventilator," Dr. Finley said, referring to the 
respirator. “We've known that for a while, and 
we’re looking to send you to a nursing home. 
But we need to know, if something unexpected 
should happen, if you should have an irregular 
heartbeat, do you want us to resuscitate you?" 

The frail woman paused for a moment. And 
then she nodded. 

“You understand what I am asking?” 

She nodded a gain 

“As it stands, you want everything done." 

To the surprise of Dr. Finley and the two 
others standing at her bedside, she nodded yet 
again. 

I T was now 2:40 PJVL, and as he left that 
patient Dr. Finley walked right into the 
daughter of the butcher. 

“The fact is,” she announced suddenly, “we 
never got along. He was an opinionated, dog- 
matic, stubborn man.” Then she began to cry. 

“Bm you stiD love him, " Dr. Finley said, 
trying to soothe her. “And he’s your father” 

"I woke up last night,” she said, sobb ing as 
she spoke, “and said, if we take him off the 


The intensive-care unit is a trying place to 
work, a place where doctors speak in euphe- 
misms. They talk of “levels of commitment,” a 
phrase that measures whether a patient is worth 
the effort of keeping alive They speak of "ag- 
gressive" care, reserved for those patients with 
hope, and care that is “supportive.” for those 
without. 

At a time when technology has made heroic 
life-sustaining procedures routine, doctors and 
nurses in the unit increasingly are finding them- 
selves professionally and emotionally til-pre- 
pared to undertake what amounts to a new 
addendum to the Hippocratic oath to “do no 
harm.” 

They are being asked not merely to preserve 
life at all costs, but to sometimes deride when 
the cost of preserving life is too high — and thus, 
when to shut off respirators, to withhold dialy- 
sis, to deny resuscitation. In short, they are 
asked to decide when life should end. 

“More than ever," Dr. Finley said, “the house 
staff is lost. You don’t have to do everything for 
everybody. The question is, ‘Where do you 
stop? 1 At what point do you say, ‘What are we 
doing? Do we care what we are doing? ” 

T HE seven patients whom Dr. Finley dis- 
cussed with the hospital's attorney on 
that ordinary morning last October were 
an alcoholic, a retired lawyer, a prominent inte- 
rior designer, a retired batcher, a former inter- 
preter for the U.S. Embassy in Egypt, the moth- 
er of an internationally known cardiologist, and 
a derelict whose home was the doorway of the 
Chock Full 0*Nuts restaurant at 57th Street and 
Eighth Avenue. 

The alcoholic, who was suffering from liver 
disease, was in a coma, the result of her brain 
being deprived of oxygen the week before, when 
she had suddenly stopped breathing. The wom- 
an, 54, was on a respirator and her kidneys had 
stqpped functioning. She had been resuscitated 
once and had been given repeated transfusions 
because of unconuoUable bleeding. The retired 
batcher, 83, also was recently resusc i tated and 
was on a respirator. The family was demanding 
that he be allowed to die but his private physi- 
cian wanted to da everything possible to keep 
him alive. Dr. Finley, as supervisor of the unit, 
was caught in the middle. 

The retired lawyer. .77, was permanently at- 
tached to a respirator; she was dying of lung 
disease. 

The former interpreter, 77, also suffering 
from lung disease, had been off and on a respi- 
rator for the last two months. He had refused to 
allow doctors to surgically attach the respirator 
tube to his windpipe, which meant he spent 
much of his day inside an iron lung — a machine 
that fences the lungs to expand and contract by 
creating a vacuum. His wife insisted that the 
doctors “do everything.” 

The last three patients all were in comas: the 
designer, 54, who had AIDS, or acquired im- 
mune deficiency syndrome; the cardiologist’s 
mother, 84, a stroke victim in renal failure and 
dying of cancer, and the derelict, 65, who had 
suffered a stroke. 

The advice of Edward S. Komreich, the law- 
yer, was straightforward; When in doubt, con- 
sult the patienL When that is not possible, ask 
the family. In the end, always use good judg- 
maiL 

U was 1:30 P.M., and Dr. Finley had called a 
meeting to discuss Mr. Komreicb's advice with 
bis staff. 

“I feel like this is a football huddle,” said Dr. 
Ian Lustbader, the resident in charge, as the 
doctors took their seats in front of a large X-ray 
machine. 


respirator, maybe he’ll choke to death. I can’t let 
him go through that." 

The woman spoke about the guilt she fell 
about having brought her father to the hospital; 
how divided the family was; how he had not left 
a win, how someone had accused her of wanting 
her father dead. 

“How do you feel now?” Dr. Finley asked 
“How closely do you want him followed?" 

“Not at all” she said. "But I don’t want him 
to be in any discomfort What can we do, 
doctor? I'd like to see him go quietly. Shall we 
withhold antibiotics? What are the options?” 

“But what if he could go home?” Dr. Fmley 
asked. 

“He can’t go home.” she said firmly. “He 
can’t live with me. And a nursing home? He’d 
hate it" 

“What does the rest of the family expect?" 
Dr. Finley asked. 

“A funeral” she said. 

An AIDS. patient was next. “The thing that 
makes no sense to me," Dr. Fmley said, “is that 
there is no cure for AIDS,” yet people with the 
disease arc fed through die heart and put on 
respirators to keep than alive. 

“What are we going to do for these people in 
terms of their outcome or benefit?" he asked. 


H E entered yet another room, that of the 
84-year-old mother of the well-known 
heart surgeon. 

“Lode at her.” Dr. Fmley said, standing be- 
fore the woman, who was unconscious and con- 
nected to a respirator and no less than a dozen 
other hoses and machines. She could no longer 
breathe on her own, nor could she see the card 
taped to the pole from which antibiotics were 
bong administered intravenously. “We love 
you. Grandma.” it read. 

• ‘“She’ll never get out of here," Dr. Fmley 
continued. “Never, ever. Why was she resusci- 
tated? Why are we doing all this stuff? She's not 
going back to be Grandma. We mislead families 
about medicine when we talk about survival." 

Dr. Fmley, an outgoing man of gentle de- 
meanor, who manages to defuse tension in even 
the most difficult of situations with a smile, now 
was angry. 

“There’s a point where you wish they'd die," 
be said, looking away. He spoke about how 
some doctors make a game of resuscitation; bow 
the challenge for some young doctors becomes 
having patients (tie a so-called “Harvard” death, 
in which their blood gas numbers perfectly 
match those given in textbooks. 

“The tragic thing for me," he said, “is how 
they die and where ‘ 
in rooms where 
they see and hear everything. 

Not long after that, the heart of the cardiolo- 
gist's mother stopped. “No heroic measures 
were taken," Dr. Finley said, meaning she was 
not resuscitated. 

The alcoholic died soon after, despite pro- 
longed efforts to save her. 

The next day the lawyer's heart stopped. As 
agreed, doctors tried to revive her but were 
unsuccessful. 

The butcher died the following Sunday, and 
because his situation had never been resolved, 
unsuccessful efforts were made to revive him as 
well. 

The interior designer improved rapidly and 
was sent home. But contrary to everyone's new 
hopes, a week later he, too, died. The derelict 
died a short time later. 

Only Mr. Purpura, the interpreter, remained. 
His bill thus far was $181,712. 

Mr. Purpura was one of Dr. Finley’s favorite 
patients. He had been in the intensive-care uni t 
since July 17. He and his wife knew there was 
virtually no hope that he would survive this 
hospitalization. 

“You have to draw an arbitrary line," said Dr. 
Finley, who had become personally involved in 
.this case but recognized that the length and 
expense of Mr. Purpura’s care had implications 
for others. “We’ve given him not one chanr*^ 
not two chances, but many chances to make it 
on his own. Age has to be a factor. Family has to 
be a factor. Expense to society has to be a factor, 
too." 

But where is that line drawn? 

“1 sure don’t want to make that decision," he 
said. Six weeks later, Mr. Purpura died. 

“There are times where you cry all night," 
said a nurse in the unit, Mary Muller Piso. 
“When you see patients dying long-term, slow 
deaths. 1 used to feel families should have every- 
thing to say. But whal if families don’t under- 
stand?” 

“There are so many times where we’re left in 
the woods;” she said. “Who are we responsible 
to? Who should decide?’ 


Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1985 


17 NYSE Most Actives | 


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Blue Chips Slide at Day’s End 



Prov.4PJ14.vof. 

Pm comoltdofed dose 136031080 


ftif" 


United Press Iniemanemol 

NEW YORK — The stock market had a 
bumpy ride to a mixed finish Tuesday, with 
blue-chip issues sliding but (he broader market 
pushing higher. 

The Dow Jones industrial average dropped 
4.85 to 1,285.23. The Dow was above its aH-tnue 
high of I,29Z62 in the first hoar, then declined. 

A subsequent rise into record tenitozy 
abruptly came to an end in the last hour when 
some major brokerages came into the market 
with organized selling programs. 

The Dow Jones transportation average ad- 
vanced 6.65 to a record 626.1 1. 

The New York Stock Exchange index gained 
0.26 to 104.42, an all-time high The price of an 
average share increased 9 cents. Standard & 
Poor's 500-stock index rose 0J26 to a new high 
of 180.61. Advances topped declines by a 5-3 
ratio among the 2,040 issues traded. 

Big Board volume was 143.90 million shares, 
up from the 1 13.72 milli on traded Monday. 

“Buyers moved to the siddmesT when the sdl 
programs hit the market in the last hour, sa id 
Keith Hertefi of Dreed Burnham Lambert. He 
said the selling programs represented a read- 
justment of portfolios rather than a reflection of 
any chang es in fundamentals. 

Mr. HerteU said a lowering of earnings esti- 
mates for General Motors by his firm pushed 
the automakers stock lower. 

He said the stock market is still headed higher 
with a break through the I J00 level on the Dow 
Hkdy to occur soon. 

Investors so far have ignored news that the 
Reagan administration’s fiscal year 1986 bud- 
get totals S973.7 billion, with a deficit of S180 
billion. 


in testimony before Congress, Federal Re- 
serve Board Chairman Paul A. Volcker called 
Tuesday for immedia te action to shrink the 
deficit He repeated bis warnings that the Unit- 
ed States had become too dependent on foreign 
funds. 

Eugene Peroni of Bat eman Eichkx. Hill Rich- 
ards rn Los Angeles said “underlying momen- 
tum is still extremely positive here." 

He said “institutions are focusing more cm 
high-technology quality issues instead of high- 
capitalization issues." 

The stock market is able to take warnings 
about (he deficit in stride and instead focus on 
future economic vitality, Mr. Peroni said. 

Harry Vdlec of Sutro & Co.. Palo Alto, Cali- 
fornia, sees the stock market rising to 1,350 
before long and thereafter a move that could go 
as far as the 1.500 levd by the end of the year. 

“Any setback along the way will be confined 
to be said. 

On the floor, PiuQms Petroleum was the most 
active NYSE-listed issue, jumping 2% to 50. 
Icahn Capital Corp. announced an offer for 
P hilli ps amounting to S55 per share, Half in cash 
and half in notes. 

Unocal was second among the actives, rising 
5ft to 47ft. The company has been a rumored 
takeover candidate; with T. Boone Pickens said 
to be a possible suitor. 

KN Energy gained 3ft to 39. Mr. Pickens has 
a 7.2-percent stake in KN Energy. 

Merrill Lynch was third among the actives, 
fining % to 35ft. The stock has been in the 
spotlight with daily stock-market volume run- 
ning over 100 million shares for nearly four 
weeks. 


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II* 10% 11* +1 
12% 12% 12% 

51% 50% 50% —2 
31* 32* 33 — % 
■ZZ 62% 60* 41* +2 
5D2 34% 33* 33*—* 
97 45 44* 44% — * 

583 14* 14* 14%+ % 
1404 30 30 30 

200z 33* 33* 33* 

50 CMGPf 951 140 990Qz 64% *6% 66% 

66 C%Gpf 1202 140 5 87% 17% 87% + % 

39 20 CtaMll 03 20 40 175 26* 25* 2* 

36 20* ClrcJK 04 11 15 477 JS* 3S* 35% 

29% 14* Ordtr 08 0 T7 425 28* 28* 28%— % 

20* 13% areas 14 606 21* 20* 21* + * 

44* 27* CIHcrn 20*46 7 7778 44* 43% 44% + % 

8* 68% atieppf 803*109 60 76* 76 76* 

75% Clteppf A 905*109 10 91% 91% 91% 

32 a trim, 200 50 10 953 40* 40 40*+* 

49% CtVlnpf 200 33 15 63* 61% *2* + * 

25* 21* CtVlnpf 287 110 139 24% 24* 24* 

11* 6% aaMr 02 10.9 49 6% 6* 6*— % 

36* 23* Clark E 1.70 30 20 78* 31% 30% 31* +1% 

16 6% CknHm 17 199 1* 15* 15% — % 

23% I7_. avOf 108 40 9 195 2Dtk 20* 30* + U 


50 12 
7.1 8 5451 
10 

75 

0 
9 344 
036 38146 73 

08f 10 107 

112 
523 
71 

100 30 5 8038 


60 34% Chubb 9 230 30 13 

34* 21* Church 80 20 19 

45* 35% C In Bell XT2 TO S 

15* 8% ClrrGE XI* 148 6 

31 24 ChtGpf 400 130 

33* 24* ClnGpf 405 14.1 

M 


F 


5 2519 19 18* 18*— % 

145Qz 58 56 56 — * 

TOOi 50 58 51 +r% 

98 T3*k 13 U — % 
6 17 17 17 

27 17H 17* 17* + % 


20* 13* CtovEI 202 130 

59* 46% Ovfflpf 700 1X2 

59 47 ChflEIPf 706 1X0 

16% 10 Ctevpfc 00 40 

17* 15* OwpkPf 223 1X1 

» 14* OvpkPf 18* 100 _ 

31* 22% Ctorax 130 40 10 1659 30% 29* 29*— 1 
18 U* CluhMn 33* 18% 17% U 

31 22% ChiettP 100 30 9 fit 

19% 14* Chief pf 100 54 1 

23 12* Coadiffl 00 20 9 935 

00a 10 7 3*0 

103 50 1 

28* 48 13 6369 

1498 

100 41 10 79 

I08& 51 10 3280 

M U 7 436 

.16 0 10 - 
100 50 9 
250 40 18 
111 90 7 


39 23% Coastal 

39 34% Cstlpf 

M 49 Cocoa 
19% 9* Cefsco 
34* 25% Golemn 
26% 20% Colo Pol 
m 27% CollAlk 
17* 9% ColFdSS 
31* 20* ColPen 
63% 39% Colli nd 
37% 27 ceiGas 
SS 48 CotGspf 5*08100 
36% 31% CSOPf 305 
20 159k CSOPf 202 126 

41* 27V. COfhbln 208 48 11 
34* 25* CffitlEn 104 53 13 
15% 8 Contdts 
28% 15%ComMf 
37% 11% Comdra 
28% 21% CmwE 
14* 13 CwE pl 
16% 13* CwE Pt 

161 H CwEpf MJfl 110 
67% S3* CwE Pf 808 126 
22 18% CwC pf 

24% 20% CwErf 
SB 46 CwE pf 
35% 16% CornSS 
31* 20* Comsat 
32* 16% CftKl 

36% 36 222T 

18% II Conwsc 
46* 29 Cptan 
30% 19* COflABS 


xsa lOLf 
100 110 
ZOO 11.9 


207 187 
3J7 ll J 
704 120 
202 90 
100 
0 * 


29 28% 28*— % 

18 M 18 — % 

30* 20 20 - % 

30% 30 30%+* 

33* m 33* + % 
•1% 40* *1* + * 
1M 12% 12% — % 
29* 29 29* 

25 24* 26%+ * 

42* 41* 42% +1% 
575 19* 11% 19* + % 
1344 28 27* 27% 

374 62* 61% 63 — % 
441 33% 32% 33* +1* 
200 526k 53% 52% + % 

1 26* 26* 26* + V, 

2 19% 19* 19*— % 

761 C 42 43 +1* 

906 35* W* 36*+ * 

10 12 11B5 16 15* 15* + * 

U 13 41 18% 17% 18% + % 

410872 13* 11% 12%—% 
6 6000 27% 27% 27%+ * 
25 K* 14 16% + % 

6 16% 16* 14*— % 
5000x101 Ml 101 
20% 44% <6% 66% — % 
318 22% 72 22* + * 

S 24% 26% Mb— % 
, 25% 58* 58* 58* + * 

30 12 1441 S* M Sk— % 
0 2* 819 31* 31% 31%+ * 


>0 II 3 33% 33 3H + % 

am is* 15% 15% 

» 2g3 44* 43* 44 + % 

Z0 14 33S 30 20% 29*- % 


II Month 
toed Low 5fock 


Otv. YKL PE Mb IW Low Quctf. QlVa 


22% 13* Conolr 04b 1.1 12 
18% 12% ComES 102 80 8 

26 19% CimNG 208 90 9 

17% 10* Conroe 00 20 6 

31* 22b ConsEd 200 XO 7 

194 145 ConEpf 600 X2 

42 35 ConEpf 405 110 

ConEpf 500 110 


34% 25 Cans Ed 104 40 10 1897 
34 Vj 20* CmFrtS 100 20 12 1127 
42% 31 C(MNG 202 50 8 164 

12% 4VS CoraPvr 
29% 13* CnPpfB 400 17.1 
48% 21* CnP PfO 70S 170 
50* 25* CnPpfE 702 17.7 
50% 25 CnPpfG 736 170 
28% 11% CnPprV 400 182 
23% 9* CnP prU 5*0 170 
25* 19* CnPprT 308 180 
51 25% ChPpfH 708 17.9 

25% 11* CnPprR 400 183 
36 10* CnP prP 198 170 

25* 10* CnPprN 105 18.1 
16% 7* CnP prM 250 160 
15 7 CnP orL 223 170 

26% 11 CnPprS 402 18.1 
16% 7* CnPprK 203 17.1 
40% 23% CnttCp 200 40 
9% 4% Conti II 
3% % Conti I rt 

4% % ctllHdn 

34 18 ConJTel 102 70 

41% 24% CtOota 
40 33 CnOtpf ... _ 

33% 22* Conwd 100 30 12 
**k 1 vlCookll 

32% 24 Cooar 103 40 15 
35% 30 Coaplnf 298 80 
27 10% Coop Lb JOo-J 3 

19* 12% CoorTr 00 20 9 

24% 11% Coopyfs 00 ll 

23 11% Copwld 04 30 

28* 19* CpwtdPf 208 11J 
2* 14% Cardura 04 30 14 

14% 10% Car* In 06 4.1 12 
75% 59% CernG 254 30 14 

1 

20 33 740 
0 T7 1939 

108b 40 11 ^ 

00 . 0 “ 


94 22% 22* 22* 

45 18% 17% 17% — % 

22 25* 25* 2S%— * 

144 14% 14% 14* 

2258 30 29* 38 + * 

1 188 IM 188 
9Mb 41* 40* 40*— 1* 
24 43% 43% 43H+ % 


33* 33 33* — % 

36* 33* 34* 

41% 41% 41%— % 

963 6% 6* 

500* 26* 25% 26* + % 
SHOE 43 4] 43 — * 

100Z <3% 43% 43% 

2502 44* 44 44 — % 

27 24* 23% 24% + % 
76 20% 2D 20% + % 
284 30* 20% 20* + * 
670, 43 43 Z 

187 22 21% 22 + % 

25 22% 22 Vi 22% + % 
31 21* 20* 21* + % 
4 15 14% 14% 

21 13 12% 13 + * 

79 22* 21% 22* + % 
14* 13% 14* + * 


48% 39* FdHmpf 1 00 

39 29% FdMOB 102 +1 10 459 

23* 109b FedNM .16 3 3623 

77 16% FedPBb 00 12 7 382 

22* 76 Fed Rif 104 60 17 47 
18* 13% FdSoW 00 40 20 323 

56% 42% FedOSI 200 40 9 1724 

32* 22* Ferra 100 40 9 229 

37 25* Finest 200 AS TO 7 

22% 4 FlflCpA JO 10 2936 

5* 3% FInCppt 00 110 4 

479b 14* FWCppf 604al82 52 

9* 2% FnSBar 120 

199k 15% Flrosfn 00 40 10 1179 

26% 19 FtAllIn 08 15 B 125 

33% 21* FBkSvs 108 40 8 2080 

33 24% FBfcFla 1 20 4.1 19 1006 

6* 36% F 60s, 0Ba S 12 1973 

27 1894 FSfChfc 102 50 20 6846 

20 13* FtBTex 100 87 8 763 

71 11% Ffaty 13 471 

189k 10% FFedAz 725 

47 30* Flldste 204 50 I 2570 

30* 21 Flnfsfpt 737 82 366 

12% 7* FtMIU 06 20 9 449 

46% 31* FHSfB 208 6.1 7 60 

107% 90% FN51B Pf 100*1 10 
7* 4V, FSlPa 

28% 20* Fit Pa pf 262 90 687 

30% 20 FtUnRI 106 6.1 15 131 

20% 14* FtVaBk 04 40 I 97 

28% 16 FfWfsc IJ0 40 I 35 

52 459k FWIsc Pf 60S 120 400: 

54* 30* Flschb 100 20 20 21 

12% 8* FIShFd 05* 0 41 

32% 20* FHFnG % 102 *2 8 IS 

47% 42V, FffFpf 403* 90 370 

28* 14% Fleet&i 06 10 11 1664 

36% 22* Flemnp 08 26 13 212 

32% 23* Flexiv 00 25 13 46 

12% 10* Flexlpf 161 120 14 

36% 19% FllatSf 00 0 21 113 

2B% 12% FloalPt 16 461 

33% 29* FUEC .160 0 12 7 

25* 18% FlaPra 116 80 9 328 

21% 11% FtoSM 00 20 13 99 

89b 3* FlwGen 244 

19* 11% Flows 00 20 18 241 

23% 14% Fluor 00 ll 863 2687 

54% 43% FaoteC 200 40 10 58 

51% 33 FardM 2.00 40 316775 

12* 10* FtOear 106 11.1 X 
*5* 45* FrHwd 104 25 16 153 

14% 10 FosflMl 04 30 14 328 

11* 6% FdkStP 08 70 14 56 

35% 26% Foxbra 104 X9 54 1784 
11% 5% FMOG 2.13*2X7 187 

25% 13% Frp, Me ja 3D 15 2216 

36% 20% Frtetm 00 20 15 257 

2E% 19 Fruehta 00 20 6 767 

33 25 FruhfPf 200 65 39 

34% 20 Funuo 00 10 9 776 

53% 35 Fund pf 105 25 2 


8 * 8 * 8 % + % 
65% 65% 65% 

81% 81% 81 %— % 
22 21% 21% — % 
129k 12% 12% + * 
13 12* 1Z%— * 

19% 18% 19% + % 
38% 37% 3SW + % 
15* 15% ink + % 
21* 30% 31* + % 
17% 17* 17% + * 
199k IV* 199k + % 
12% 12% 12%— * 
6% 6% 6* 

37* 37 37 

36* 35% 36%+ % 
40 40 40 

38 37% 37%— % : 

18% 179k 17% — % 

21% 21* Xl% + % 

23 22% 23 + % 

18 17% 179k + % 

55* 54% B%+ % 
37* 26% 27 
30* 30% 30*+ % 
II 10 % 10 * + % 
5% 5 5% 

37% 37 37%+ % 

4 1% 4 +% 

19% 19% 19% + * , 
25% 24% 2S%— % 1 
34% 33% 36 + % 

29% *% »* + % 
68% 67* <7% +1% 
24* Z>% 24 + % 

15 149k 15 

17% 16% 17% — % , 
18 17% 17% + % 

47% 44% 46% + % 
2M4 » 29 — * 

99b 9% 9 
47% 47 47% + % 

320 1IB%1(B 102% +2% 

B 1145 7% 7* 7* 

29% 28% 29 + % 
30% 30 30*— % 

20* 19% 20% 

25* 25% 25*+ % 

iki 35* 35*— % | 
10 % 10 % 10 % + % 
319h 31% 31% + % 
46* 46% 46% + * 
279b 27 27%— % | 

35 34 34% 

32% 32% 32% + * , 
12 % 12 % 12 % — % 
35% 35% 35%+ * 
28* 27* 28* +1* 
38% 38* 38% + % 
24% 24% 24*— % 
16% 15* 14% + % . 
5% 5* 5%— % I 
18*6 18% 18* 

19* 18% 18% — % 
52 51%. S + % 

48% 46 46*— 1* | 

12* 12 12* 

66* 65 65* + % 

13% 13% 13% — % 
8% B% B9b + % 
26% 26* 36% — % 
9* v 9 
20% 199b 70 — % 
36* 36* 31% + % l 
27% 36% 36% — * 
31% 31 31 — % | 

S* 31% 32* + * , 
49% 49% 49% —3% 


34% 

21 ICInds 

100 

16 

12 

5658 

35 

33* 









19* 





199 

18* 

18* 

11* 

4* icn 



60 

307 

10* 

10* 

27* 

22% ICNPt 

200 

9J 


11 

27* 


17ft 


102 

110 


13 

16* 

16* 

19* 

13* IRTPrs 

100 

X4 

11 

11 

19% 

19% 

42ft 

20* ITT CP 

100 

10 

8 

4546 

31% 


70* 

44 ITT pfJ 

400 

70 


1 

57 



40 ITT piK 400 
44% ITT pfO 500 
SZ 28 ITTpfN 205 
71 42% ITT pf! 4J0 

23% 15* 1U Irtf 100 


70 

80 

50 

74 

60 34 


308 80 7 


40% 30* idohcP 
24 13% idealB 

23% 17% IllPowr 204 110 
17% 13% IIRowpf 7M 110 
19% 14% IIPOWPI 2-10 115 
19 15 lIPBWPf 221 120 

19% 15% 1 1 PoW Pf 205 720 
34% 27* UPtMPl 4.12 120 
31% 25 llPoWPf 308 120 
51% 48% llPoWPt 505 110 
36* 28% llPoWPf 407 126 
33V, 25% UPowPf 440 120 
36 21* ITW9 04 10 18 

38% 27* Impchm 200 50 14 

9% 5% ImpICP 13 

14* 8% IMCO 00 M 

17% 14 IndlMPf 2.15 1X4 
18% 14% IndlMPf 205 120 
28% 23% IndlMPf 303 1X1 


13 

3 

3 

617 

T 1 S 


.14 


70 6 
XI 18 
15 

260 54 18 
205 6.9 
04 19 20 
00 20 


* 2995 


928 

216 

*m 

27 

17 

S 

16 

562 

118 


200 


6 3643 42* 40% 41% *2 
491 9% 9 


9% 9 9%+ * 

98 m K + * 

02 20 14 7398 37% 3** 36%+ % 
4ip 110 XU 39 39 39 —1 


SS 


38^ 29* CornGu 


493 

tS 

S3 

194 

XI IS 1822 
12 
7 

112 

111 


100 

04 


70 


22% GorBtk 
55* 39% Ca*On 
8% «* Cra% 

40* 27 Cram 
75% 38% CravRs 

28* M* Crock N 00 10 155 

23 15* CrcfeNPf X18 110 8 

23% 19* CrnwK 100 SJ 10 21 

50 34* CrwnCk 14 111 

30* 27* CrwZel 100 30 13 439 

51% 43 CrZalPf 403 90 IS 

63% 50 CrZe, PtC40O 70 12 

26* 18* Culbro 00 20 6 W 

29% 12% Cullnets 42 1418 

88% 61* CumEn 200 26 4 1582 
10 * s* Currlnc l.loaiOJ 5 

47* 30% CurTW 1J0 X4 ia to 

48 27% Cyclops 1.1a 23 10 83 


29% 27% 29 +1% 
1% 1% 1%— % 
32% 32% 32% 

35% 35% 25% 

15% 15 15% + * 

19% 19% 19% + * 
19% 19 19% + % 

14% 14% 14% — % 
22 * 22 22 - % 
23% 23* 23*-% 
11% 13% 13% + % 
75* 74* IS + * 
38 M 11 
42 41* 41% — * 

53* 52* S3%+% 
8* 7* 8*+ % 
3«% 34* 34% + % 
78% 74% 77% +2% 
25% 25* 25* + Vh 
19% 19 19% + % 

23% 22% 22% — * 
499b 49% *9% + * 
14 33% 33%—% 

43* 48 48%— Vb 

57% 57% 57% 

25 3<)b 24% 

28% 27% 28% +1% 
88* 83 83*— 4* 

10* W* ID*— % 
35% 15* 35% + % 
47% 46* 47* + % 


22% 13* Daltai 00 10 10 m 
19% «* Damon C 00 10 56 1184 
30 21% DanaCp 108 40 9 993 

B* 5% Dtnihr 60 

15 8% Daniel ,18b 10 478 

89% 64* DartKr 404 48 10 611 

72% 19 DatdGfl 21 2929 

25% 13% Datpnt 19 754 

12* 8% DtaDso 00 10 12 70 

18% 12% Day CD 04 10 7 102 

37* 24% DavtHd 04 20 14 3125 

16% 11% DavtPL 300 120 7 1377 

57* 45 OPLpf 707 130 

103 75% OPLpf I2J0 125 


29% 20* DeonFs 08 10 16 316 

35% 24% Deere 100 11 20 2234 

22% 17% DehnP 102 BJ 6 1224 

45* 27 DeftaAr 00 10 7 4455 
8% 4* Deltona 17 

61% 35% DtaChk 174 20 16 193 

— 17* DenMfs 100 40 12 9* 


23* 21* 23 + % 
12% 11% II* + % 
39% 29 39% + * 

8* 8% 8* 

13* 12% 13 — * 
88% 87* 88 + * 
75% 73% 74% +3% 
21% 20* 20*— % 
11* 11 11%+ % 
17 16% 16% — % 

17% 16% 37%+ % 
15* 15% 15%+ % 
20Qz 57% 54% 56% — I 
115IU100 98% 100 42% 


36% 26% DeSoto 
16% 11% DsfEd 


28% 27% 2S%+ % 
32* 11* 31*— % 
21 * 21 % 21 * + % 
45% 44 44% +1* 

4 5% 6 

6Kb 63% 63*+ * 
27% 27* 37*— * 


28% 15 GAF .15* S 1577 29% 38* 39 + * 

35* 20 GAF pf 100 U 459 36% 36 36 + * 

37% 25* GAT X 100 X4 15 189 26 35* 35%—% 

34% 19% GCA 15 2676 31* 30* 31% +1 

64% 48% GEICO 08 10 11 95 63% 63* 63%- % 

10% 4 GEO 292 5% 5* 5* 

13% S* GF Cp 84 6% 6* 6% + % 

. 44% 34% GTE 308 70 8 3205 43* 42% <J%— % 

26% 31% GTE pf 200 70 6 26% 36% 36% + % 

23* 19% GTE pf 208 110 23 22% 27% 23% 

10 4% GcdHou 178 7 6* 7 + % 

56% 33% Gcnett 108 27 21 850 55* 54% 54%+% 

2S% 17V, GOPSfT 00 Z1 13 1Z7 24% 24* 24*— % 

30% 10% Georttf 00 XI 15 281 13 12% 12%- % 

19% 13% Getca 06 XI 15 776 18% 17* 18% + * 

48* 53% GtmCo 134 37 68% 48% 68% 

39 30* GflCora 100 30117 428 3B% 38* 38% + % 

17V, 14% GAinv 103* 90 34 16% 16* 16* + % 

46* 29* GnBcsh 100 22 9 XI 45* 44% 65* + % 

31 16* GCloms 00 1J 10 171 30% 30% 30*— % 

31 16* GCfiPfS 06 10 6 30% JOV, X%— * 

21 12V* GnOatt 22 567 19* 18* Wb + 1b 

78* 42 GnDyn 100 10 10 880 75* 75 75% — % 

65* 48* GenEI 200 30 13 6846 64% 63* 63%— % 

59% 45% GnFdS 200 40 9 3479 55* 55% 55* — . 

31% 24% GGIh 00 1.9115 149 T! 30% 31 + * 

22 13* GnHost 00 20 3 735 20V, 20 20*— * 

18* 8% GnHaut 04 20 31 70 10% W* 10*— % 
33% 15% Gainst 00 20 18 1*30 19% 18% 19% + * 

» 41% GnMIDi 204 *0 13 2345 54* 55% 56 — * 

85 6T GMot iOOr 60 610547 81 80* 81 —1% 

65 33 GMEn .189 0 1040 41* 59% 59* + % 

38% 33* GMOf pf 375 1X1 7 J7% 37 37 — * 

50% 44% GMotpf S0O 90 34 50* 50 50* + * 

10* 3% GNC .16 20 15 175 6* 4* 4% + % 

12% 7* GPU 7 2SM 13% 11% 12 — % 

70% 46* GeoRe 104 20 26 1661 74 72% 73 +2% 

12% S GnFUfr 7 563 12% 12 12% + % 

53% 39% GnSIsnl 100 30 14 7» 53% S3 53*— % 

12% 10 GTFIPf 100 110 2d 11% 11% 11% 

5* Gertsen 9 238 6* 6% 6*— % 

30* 13% Ga Rod .18 0 20 719 19* 18% 18% + * 

2J% 15 GartSfD lJB 645 23* 23% 23% + * 

32 16% Gsf Pf 108 70 523 22 23+% 

36 24 Gen PU 102 29 17 1225 35% 35* 35%— % 

36% 18 Goffoc 00 XI 13 2942 24* 24 26 + % 

38* 22% GaPw Pf 304 130 23Z7H27 27— % 

10 25% GaPwpf 374 120 24 29% 29% 29% 

21* 17* GaPwef XS6 120 13 21 20* 2D* + % 

21 17 GaPwpf 202 1X3 7 28% 20% 30% 

S' 4 H5 !H .»»»?«* w%- % 

*2% 52 GaPwpf 700 >20 I60z 42* 62* 63*— * 

?T* 55^ '-J* +5 » 324 36% 25* 25%— % 

?!.. 12 GerbSs .12 0T7 7OiaMb2O 20%+% 


26 14% IncfIGS S 

15 SV, Inrjcco 

24* 13* Wh i ne 
51% 35% InperR 
33* 27* ineRPf 
15% 10% insrTec 
X 19% InktStl _ 

48% 38% inUSf Pf 405 10.1 
2Mb 14 Insllco 100b 5.1 10 
12% 3% InspRS 

26% 11% Irrtoftsc 7 

31 19 intsRPf 303 120 

54* 42 IntBRPf 601*140 
37* 25* IntaRpf 405 130 
14* 7* IntRFit 

19 15% ItCPSe 
45* 55 Inferco 

V4Q 120 inter pf 
15% 9% wrrtsf 
52 41 Intrtk 

16% 6* Intmed 

21* 14* IntAlw 
138* 99 IBM 
21% 13% intCtrf 
28% 22% IntFtov 
11* SVb IntHorv 
7% 2% InIHrwt 
50 23% IntHpfC 

43 20* WtHpfA 

34* 17* IMHpfD 
44* 32% IntMJn 
29% 23 WtMutt 
57% 46 intPopr 200 
17% 9 inIRcs 
42% 32* IMNrth 208 5.9 
75 68% IntNtpf 600 BJ? 

96* 86* IntNt pfHQ0O 109 
34 2«% IntsbGP 100 20 

17* ID I nt Bohr 

20 15% lltfstPw 100 9.7 

20 16* InPwPf 2JB 110 

19* 14* lowoEl 170 10.1 
29% 31% lowilG 274 90 
19% 17 lowlllPf 201 110 
31% 23 lOwaRS 108 10.1 
33* 26 I pa I co X92 VO _ 

13% 9* IpcoCp 04 X9 11 3464 
34% 23% IrvBks 104 SJ 7 138 
54 42* IrvBkPf X19*10L6 


260 

176 


„ 57 

57* 57*— * 
58% 58 58 — * 

41* 41* 41* + % 
40 59% 99% 

18% 17% 18 — % 
38* 37* M + W 
16 IS* 1«— * 
22 % 22 * 22 * + * 
17% 17% 17% 

2B0Z 18* 18* 18* ^ 

1B30Z 17% 17% 17% — % 
100Z 19* 19* 19*— * 
sat 33* 32% 33*— % 
1001 30* 30* 30* 

198 51% 51 S% 

320b 35% 35% 25% + % 
22 32* 32* 32* + % 
SB 35V. 35% 25* 

38* 38* 38% + % 
9 8* 9 + * 

14* 13* 14* + * 
17% 17% 17% + % 
18 18 18 
2B 27* 27*— * 
25* 25 25*— % 

7 6* 6*— * 

18% 18* 18% 

48 47% 47*+ * 

34 33% 34 + * 

14% 14 14 — * 

25% 24% 34*— * 
47% 46% 47%+ % 
2D 19* 19*— * 

5* SVb 5* + % 
18% 17 17 —1 

24* 24% 2*% — % 
46* 46% 46%— U 
33% 31* 31*— Vi 
12% 11% 11% + % 
18% 18% 18% + % 
65* 64* 64*— % 
139*139*139* +1% 
12% 11% 12 
52 51* 52 + * 

10V, 10* **— * 

23 21% 22* +1* 

30 1312644 138*136 136%—' 1% 
10 11 79 20* 19% 19% + % 

27% 27 27%—% 

10% 10V, 10%—% 
7 6% 7 + % 

48 47% 47% — % 

40 39% 40 + % 

33* 37* 33 — * 
41* 47* 41 + % 

27% 27% 27%+% 
40 2* 4920 54% 53% 53%— * 
18 510 14% 14 14% 

42% 42* 42% 

6b 72 73 72 +2% 

51 96% VS* 96% + * 
947 35V, 34 35% +1 

69 16* 16* 14*— % 
40 19% 19% 19% + % 
22b 19* 19 19* +1 

87 19 18* 189b + Vb 

53 28% 28 28%— Hi 

Mb 19% 19* 19%— % 
65 30% 30% 30% — * 
470 32% 32% 32% — % 

11* to* 11% + % 

35 34% 35 +% 

364 49% 49 49% 


10 
446 
» 
153 
153 
415 
37 
8 
22 
592 

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705 50 25 

SD 7 1535 
50 8 36 

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Long-term security with 

instant Uquiditv: 

Krugerrand gold bullion . 
coins. fc 

In 1QS4 investors around the worid. raw 
again put pan of their assets into gold w 
Si forfie long term And fornaUwasof 
Srioui investor g3d roeansKrugoraiids. 

The fact is that two out of three newly 
minted bulhoo coins were Knigmandsi to 
26i million ounces— that isjusl about dou^k d 
all other newly minted buLGra? ajns combmed. 

Knigenands are siandarduedm 1 02, 1/2 
oz. 1/4 ca and l/IOoz pieces of 9999 fine goW 
mins a touch of hardening alloyH 10 sun 
investors and sawi* ahfct 

Because they are 50 widely bdo— and 
universally recognized— Krugerrands represent 
instant liquidity. The are traded 24 hours 2 day. 
around ine clock, around ihe world. 

Ask your bank or broker. Or wme for your 
free copy of ihe “European Guide to Gold and 
Krugerrands" to: 

International Gold Corporation 
Coin Division . 

Line dels Rdmsene 
CH-I2G4 Geneva - Switzerland 



KRUGERRAND 

Money you can trust 

Please note ihat [niernarioaaJ Gold Cofporanoo doa 
om pnnidc a buying or uDu( vcnicc 


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40% 27 % « -H* 

52* 52* 52* 

47% 47* 47*-* 
7% 6% 7* + K 
21* 21 21 
29* 26* 28* — 1b 

3Z* 31% 32 + M 
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649 52* 50% 52*43 
38 11% 11* 11% 

17 16% it*— U 

84* 83% 84%+llb 
65 42 44* +9* 

50% 49% 49% I 


21% 10% MonrCs .16 0 21 343 

40V, 22V, MtrHon 120 >0 6 4IM 
59 41 MfrHpl 657*120 397 

57 40 Mtrtfpf 5.92c! 20 205 

12% 5% vIMom) 5 3334 

28* 18* vlMnwIpf 238 

30* 21 MAPCO 100 30 11 354 

4% 3 Morntz 25 

2% %. Morcde 252 

32* If* Mar Mid 100 50 8 350 
51% 40* MorMpf 502011.1 175 

49* 27* Marlon 02 10 35 
13* 9* MarkC 02 20 39 
19 14* Marh pf 100 70 43 

83% 58% MoiTM 04 0 18 340 

43 35* MrahM 200 30 40 1164 

51* 30* MartM 104 20 859 . _ 

90 55 MTtMpf 407 40 Ik 78 78 78 

14% 8% MarvK .12 10 15 1348 11* 11% 11%— lb 
33% 22% Masco 06 10 15 531 
10 15 254 
90 12 788 
928 

308 105 39 

102 110 90 

4» J 10 1815 
36M 
157 
3S3 
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102 30 10 448 
240a 54 10 277 

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13 7* MassMr 

20 15% MosM 

34b 2* MasavF 
26% 2Rb MasCp 
11% 9% Maslnc 
88% 51* Matsu E 
13% 6% Mattel 
10% 4* Motel wt 
38* 16% Matftpf 
15% 9* Maxain 
48% 30* MavD s 
49% 36M Marta . 

32% 29% McDrpf 200 7 A 
23* 28% McDrpf 240 120 


27* 20 JWTS 
34% 23% J River 
22% 12% Jofnswy 
M* 10% JapnF 

41* 23* JaHPI S _ 

92* 78* JerCpf 1108 120 
16% 13* JerCpf X18 134 
9* 5% Jtwfcr 

39% 38 Jahnjn' 

46* 37% JatoiCn 
29% 21% J croon 
23* 15% Jostens 
28% 21* JovMfa 


1.12 44 11 181 

06 20 ■ 2371 
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1448100 212 

102 30 10 


22 

100 XI 15 
104c 4.1 10 
100 42 16 
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140 SJ 14 


25% 25* 25*— % 
28% 27% 2B* + % 
23% 22% 23%+ % 
212 13% 13% 13%— % 
854 41% 40% 41 + * 

lb 86 86 86 —1 

10 16% 15% 16% + % 
48 9 8* ■*— * 

4908 .38% 37%- 18* + %- 
54 46* 45% 45% — Vb 
25 24% 23% 23%—% 
302 23% 22% 23%+ * 
413 25* 24* 2**— % 


40 29 3970 
125 


24 9 677 


I0O X7 


31% 23% IMCOH-I 1 
12 6* McDrl wf 

10% 6% McOM 00 
W* 46* McDnlb 
76% 47% McDnD 
42 31% MeGEd 

48* 34 MCGTH 
33* 19* Me tat g 
«% 32% McKess 240 4.1 H , 
15% TO McLean IX a 

Vti 3% McLeavrt ll! 

2S% 19* McMcB .90 X7 6 
41* Z7% Mead 
22% 12* Mearux 
41 34% Msdtrn 

48% 33% Met ton 


100 

04 

36 

X48 


JO 2A 9 
14 

400 122 
104 XI 10 

10 

00 33 
30 l.l 
107 80 
m 3 3 

s 


70% 59 DetEPf 902 130 
40% 47% DetEPt 708 1X0 
99 46 OefEpf 705 128 

40 45% OefEpf 706 1X1 

34% 199b 0E PlF 20S 114 
26* 2D DEprR X34 1X1 
25% 19% DEplQ 113 100 
24% 19 DEpfP X12 1X2 
23% 19* DE PfB 225 1X0 
26* 19% DEpfO 140 110 
27* 19% DEpfM ia 122 
38% 34* DEprL 400 1X3 
31 24% OEpfK 4.12 130 

ts 72% tMEgl 922 114 
77% 13* petEpr 208 120 
23% 17* Dexter 00 XS 13 
15* fkb DIGtor 04 4.1 23 315 

38 21* DIGtoaf 225 80 2 

22% 16* DtamS 126 9.1 11 5531 

38% 34* OiaShPf 400 182 12 


100 X9 18 44 36 35% 36 + % 
108 10.9 7 3614 15* 15% IS%— % 


20b 71% 71% 71%+1% 
32b 59 W 59 
30b 53 58 56 +1 

Tib 54 54 S6 — 1 

14 34* 24% 34% 

25 *4* 34*— 1. 

34* 34 34 — * 

24 23% 2J%— % 

23 23 23 

26 * 26 26% 

27 25* 27 + % 

30% 30 30 — % 

30% 3D%— % 
84 84 —1 


11* 7% CtarrtP 
11 S* GtbfFn 
26* 16* GttfHIII 
58% 42% Gillette 
12" n% G lease 
9* 4% GtaMM 

12% 


5 573 
02 20 14 1164 
200 40 11 1348 
17 

04 A3 837 

17* Grow* „4 300 140 84 

|% GldNug 13 ups 


11* 

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17 
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24 
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9 

If 31 

4b 84 


1* GtdN Wt 
27* 11 GkJWF 
□6% 34% Gdrleh 
29% 23 Goodvr 
19% 13* GarpnJ 
32* If GouKI 
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229 

08 0 i 988 

106 XJ 7 161 
100 50 7 1404 
02 10 8 153 

04 20 64 1132 
200 60 10 348 


17 


59 43% OWMl 108 

722% 77* DtgtroJ 
75% 45* CHsnn 108 
40 30 DEI 200 

6% J9b Dfvrsin 
16% 6% Domea .12 


17% 17% 17*— Vb 
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15% 15% 15%+ % 
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19% 19% 19%+ % 
37i4 37% 37* + U 


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490 

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202 90 
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10 22 10SS 
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200 109 
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300 50 9 


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30% 20% DaniRs 
23* 16 DOnakJ 
52% 32 DorUar 
38% 23* ooraev 
40% 28% Dover 
33% 25* DawCh 
51* 35% DowJn 
>4% 10% Drava 
23% 15* Drear 
19 14* DnsxB 

44% 23* Droyfin 

53% 42% duPont 

34* 30% OUPntpl 300 100 
43* 39 OUFntPf 4J0 102 
Wk 22* DukeP 206 83 
72* 99% OutoBl UD 110 
» 57 Oukepl 700 110 

21% Dukept 209 100 
33% 20 Dufeepf IBS 110 

M* 77% Dub PfN 804 100 

72% 51% DunBrd 108 20 21 1951 
W% 11% OuqLt 206 1X0 7 'Si 
M* 14 Qua pf A z.10 1X9 
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16% 12% DuaprK X10 1X8 
J7* 13% DIM pr 2J1 1X3 
18% 8% DVCOPt 08 20 
24* 17% DynArn 00 J 


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15 5731 125 122% 124% -MM 
10 39 1917 75* 74* 74* + * 
70 5 9 37* 37% J7% 

4 99 4% 4% 4% 

594 8* 8 8% 


763 29 28% 28% — * 

264 21 20* 20* — * 

532* 57% 52 52% + % 

112 28% 28% 28* + % 
014 41 40% 40%— % 


12 


30% 29% 38% + % 
46 44% 45 —1% 

12 11 % 11 % 

21 % 21 21 — % 

4 WV, I*% 18*— * 

133* 44* <3% 43%— * 
809 54 53 53% +% 

24 33% 33% XPk— % 

5 44 43% 44 + * 

811870 30% 29% 299k + % 

5b 71 71 71 

142b 67% 67% *7% 

9 25% 25% 2S% 

7 33% 33* 33% 

562b 65 M BS +1% 
73 7T% 71% 

15% U* 15* + % 
40b 16* 14* 14*— * 
lb 15 15 IS + Vk 

3 16* 16% 16%—% 
2b 17% 17 17% + % 

8 58 11* 10% 10*— * 

24* 24 24% + % 


48 47 Gratnor 104 

15* 8% GfAFSt 00 

U 119k GtAfPc 
45* 27% GILkln 
21% 15% GMIIH 
43* 31 GtNNk 
47% 51% GtNNk P(4.7S 
28% 16% GIVfFIn 
19* 9% GWHtp 
16% 11* GMP 
n 10% Gravti 
5 2* Cruller 

13* s% GrawGi 
9% 6* Grub El 
29% 21* Grunin ... 

24* 24Vi Grump! 206 180 
8* 4* Cruntnl .16 20 30 IM 

23% 14% Guorfl 02 10 13 42 

26* 2D GuUfrd 08 20 V 288 

35 25% GtfWsf .90 28 10 2329 

24* 11% GuHRa 20 6 141 

14% 18 GffSIUf 104 I1J 6 2345 

50* 39 GffSUPf S49ell4 41 

38 24 df3U pr 303 1X9 

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20* 12% CAero J5e 30 10 
17* 14 Gotten 00 30 12 


30 II 2060 
to 797 
102 110 V 26 
100 40 13 4353 
6 591 
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08 0 12 3M 

100 30 I 403 


11% 11 
9% 9* 

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57 54 56*— * 

IT* IT* 13*— * 
5% 5 SVb 
20 % 20 * 20 % + * 
12 11* 11*+ % 
3* 3* 3* 

25* 24* 25* + % 
29* 29* 29*- * 
28* 28 76 — %' 

16* 16 16* + * 
26* 25% 25*— * 
42 41* 42 + % 

126* 47 44* 47 +1% 

15% 14* IS + % 
15% 15% 15* + % 
44* 44 44 + % 

16% 16% 14% + * 
39 a* 38* + * 
68* 99% 40* +1 
27* 07 27*+ % 

17* 16% 17 + % 

15% 15% 15%— % 
27* 24% 27* + % 
3* 3% 3*+ * 
13% 13% 13% — % 
9% 94b 9*— V. 

28% 38% 289* — * 
2S9. 25% 25k»+ * 
4% 4% 6H+ % 
23% 23* 23%+ % 
25% 34* 25* +1 
22% 31* 32 
15* 14% 15% + % 
14% 13% 13% 

. 49* 48% 49* +1 
9 29% 29* 29* 

21 33* 31* 33*+ % 
11b 72* 72* 72*— 1% 
539 17 IS* M% + * 

54 16 15* 15*— * 


■0% 6* KOI 

13% 9% KLMs 
39% 33 KM I pt 
41% 26* Kmart 
34* 24% KN EnO 
20* 12* KabrAI 
34* 14% KalsCe 
20* 15* KalCpf 
16% 8% Koneti . . _ 
70% 14* KClvPL X34 110 
34% 29* KCPLPf 408 130 
20 15% KCPLPf 233 125 

54% 36% KCSau 100 1.9 11 
14% 10* KCSopf 100 70 
18% 12% KanGE 206 1X1 6 
3S% 28% KanPLT XW 80 7 
■n 18 KaPLpf 202 109 
37% 17* KatVlII 
95 49 KatVPf 

19% Iff* KaufBr 
18 1Z% Kaufpf 

87% 48 Kaufpf 
«% 27 Kellogg 
31* 21% KWIwd 
4% i Kami 
38 19% Kenmt 

25* 20% Kvutll 
17 11 KgrrGI 

26% 18% KerGpf 
35 24* KgrrMc 

27 16% KevBk 

]?% 14 Kerslnt 
35* 24* KUde 10B 
77* 61* KklprB LOO 
5DU 39% KlmbCa 200 
34* 21* K right Rd 06 
28* 17* KOB9T 230 
29* 14* Kobnor 02 
23* 17* K opera JO 
103 96* Koppr pflOOO 

14 12% Komar, 

39% 29% Kroger 200 
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36* 36* 36*— * 
41* 40% 40% — % 
39* 34% 39 +3% 
16% 16% 16% — % 
18 17% 17% 

17* 17% 17% + % 
11 10% 10% 

20% 20* 20% — % 
20b 34% 34% 34% 

5 18% 18% 18% + % 
336 54% 53 S3*— 1* 

lb 13% 13% 1J%— % 
IB* 17% 18 — * 
34* 33% 34* + % 
21 % 21 * 21 *— * 
37% 35* 35% — 1% 
94 92 92% — 1% 

19% 19% 19% 

18% 17* 18 + % 
88 87* 88 + * 

44% 44 44% — % 

32 31% 32 + % 

I* lie i%— % 
25% 25 25 — * 

2»k 25% 25% + * 
12 11* 12 — % 
19% 19* 19% + % 
29* 29* 29% — % 
27* 26* Z7% + % 
19% 18% 18% — % 
32* 319b 32 
74% 74% 74% + * 
48* 47* 47% + % 
34 33% 33%— * 

28% 27% 28% + % 
22* 21% 22% + % 
»* 20 20 — * 
183 102 102 +1 

13% 13 13 

39* 38* 38% — % 
19 18* 18% 

51* 51% 51* + * 
20% 19% 20 


27 22% Mellon pf 200 100 

45% 30* MeMII 104 30 12 1557 


33* 32* SBb— » 
13 12* D +«k 

18* 18% 18%-* 
2% 2* »+* 
26% 26% 36%+* 
11% 11* 11%+* 
58* SB* 58% + % 

is% 12% n . . . 
9* 9 9 — * 

31% 30* 30*- ft 
13% 13 13 — ft 

48* 47% 48 
48% 48 48 -ft 

29* 2m 29*+* 
22 21* 21*- 14 

38% 27* 28% + ft 
. 8* 8% 8* + * 
1J 22 28k TO* 10% 10%+ ft 

10 14 2994 48% 59* 40 + ft 

75% 74% 75* + * 
41* 41% 41%— « 
47% 46% 46% + * 
32% .31* 31*- ft 
39* 38% 39* + ft 
U% Q% U + * 
S* 5* 5% 

24* 24* 34* + Ik 
31 37% 37% + ft 

21% 21% -21ft + ft 

31* 38* 31* +1* 
47% 47% 47* + ft 


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619b 40* Merest 100 20 10 313 
97% 78% Merck 300 30 14 2247 
67* 39% Mmftti 09 10 IS 299 
35 22 McrLvn 00 13 3425918 

3% 2 Mesa Of 962 

22. n% MesaPt 5 2790 

TMk 24% MaiaR I02e 53 46 

8% 5% MaKb 08e1O6 8 241 

5% 2V, Mcsfefc 14 

• 71* MIEpfC 190 140 

57% 47% MtEpU 802 140 
54% 48% Mf E DfH 802 140 
3* 2% MexFd .17e 60 
24 22* MhCnpf 119 120 

16% 12 McflER 101 85 M 
6% 4% Mlcfclbs 06 10 11 
44 32% MMam 231 54 ■ 

14* 9* MW5W 1J8 128 5 2829 
17 Mid Rot 100 XT 20 177 
28% 22 MWE 208 9.9 7 61 

2?* MI,,nR 00 X7 IS 51 

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222? J?°£ Spr 441 111 134 

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15 8% MohkDf 704 

^ IS ^ « 40 29 367 

SI «% Monwis 200 50 8 4792 

MntDU 204 80 B 37 


2S% 25% 25» + ft 
43* 42* 42% +1* 


40% 60% 40%+ ft 
97% 96% 98*— ft 
<8* 65* 46* -1 
34 35 35ft + ft 

2* 2% 2* 

19 17% II* -M* 

30* 29% 30* +1* 
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W 3V, 3% 3*+» 

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4b 56% 56% 56% . 

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24* Halbtn 100 50 11 4800 
1% * Hal hid 08 50138 491 

9V, 5* HalbrtJ Pf 06 40 83 

55* 38* HurrirP 204 40 I 316 


13% 11% HaniS 
19% 15% HOTUl 
47 21% Hanam 

15% MondH 
33% 16* Hanno 
50% 23% HOT or J 


104 


38% 28% EGG 
30% 21* E Srst 
38* 20% EaaieP 
2fle 12 Eases 
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1ft ft EAL wtA 
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15% 6* EAk-ptB 
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28% 19* EOStGF 
» 13ft EOStUff 

71 60* EsKod 
68* 37* Eaton 
30% 20* EcULl 
s* 20* Eekerd 
39* 32ft EctoBf 100 40 _ 
>8% 13 EDO 04 I, 12 
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a* IT* EPGdpf 205 180 
»% 5% EPGpf 175 130 
38ft 23% EPGpr 
w% v Errors 14 

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7* 2% EleCAs 
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10* 7* EMMPf 108 1X1 

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120a 40 14 5641 
100 20 10 1093 

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108 XI 14 2787 32% 31% 32 

" 64 36* 36* 36* — ft 

258 17% 16ft 16%— * 
2W 38% 22* 33% + % 
12x 22% 22% 22% + * 
2 Bk2*% 27% 21* 

37* 27% 27 27 — % 

267 14% n* 14 +% 

13 9ft 9* 9ft + * 

146 4ft 3ft 3%—* 
140 5% 5* 5% + % 

* 9% 9% 9% 

214 25* 34% 25* + % 

14 15* 15* 15*— * 
2BS 9Vb |ft 8% + % 


38% 37% 38% +1 
29% 29% 29%+* 
28* 27* 27*—* 
19% 18% ft 

4ft 4* 4ft + ft 

\ ’% \ 

10* 10% Wk + % 
12 % 12 12 
H 13% 13* 

25% 24 % 25 
17% 17% 17% 

73% 72% 72*+ ft 
60 59% 57%+ % 
29* 38* 29%+ % 


10701X9 
104a 90 
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04 30 18 
4 11 U 
100 10 IS 
102 20 19 

ID HM3 
00 20 18 41 

08 20 15 1653 
447 

1 08 40 14 171 
108 4.1 9 311 
100 110 11 


27V, 24% 27 - * 
31% 30% 31 
1% 1* 1% 

9% 9* 9% 

47% 47ft 47*—% 
92 13% 13% 13% 

X 19* ft 19* 

196 45* 44% 45% + % 
44 18* 17% 18% + % 
SO 19% 19% 19% + * 

446 52* 51* 52% +1% 
190 57% 56% 57* +1* 
12* 11% 12% + * 
31ft 30% 31% + % 
33% 33% 33* 

16* 15* 16ft + % 
28% 27% Z7* + % 
31% 30* 38% — % 
4 19% IS* 15% 

164* 22% S 22% + % 
584 13% 17* 13% + * 
101 22* 27% 27ft + % 
59 12 11% 12 + % 

81 11% 11% lift— ft 
796 16 15% M + U 

197 12% 17 12% + % 


J7ft 58% EmrsEI XU 30 15 11® 76* »' 76ft + % 

21* 1H? iSSf S* Vi J* **>6 13* 12% 12ft— % 

5% 24% f £££ !«. 19* 19* 19ft + ft 

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Sift EAfCtlPf 40Seil_S 23003 54ft 54% 54ft— ft 


12% 7% HarnUh 
Sift 14% HrpRW 

38% 22* Harrtt 

15* 10% HorGrn 

27% 17 Hones 

32% 23% Harmw 

it* 13% HoffSe .. .. 

23* 10% HewEls 104 70 9 
12% I HavesA .lOe J 18 
34% 15* Hazfefn 04 10 47 181 
11% 9 HuzLOb J! 17 71 Sf 
13* 9% Hecks 08 20 S 81 
21% lift HOClaM 009 I J 36 794 

77 14% Heflmn 08b XI 9 197 

15% Heiua j* 10 12 aa 
45 32 Hefni 100 30 73 961 

99 77% MellKpf 1JD 10 1 

30 12% HefneC . 25 54 

25% U Helm* 34 U 25 300 
5% 3% Hem Co 19 

12% lift Hem Inc .90> 70 4 

37ft Z7% Hereun 700 40 10 931 
39ft 13% HerttC 05# 0 ® 132 
34% IH HerltCPf 108 6.1 .1 

41* a* Hereby X4D 30 IT 264 
21% 5ft lie Mid 13 

44ft 31% HetrtPk 22 A 15 7511 
30 17ft Htxcef 00 U W 3D 
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12ft 8% HIVOlt .15 U II CT 
23% T7ft Hlbftcd 04 20 t2 137 
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44* 31 HlteOll 0% S II T398 
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75 49% HoIhrS 12» T0 M 29 

27% 13 HameO 2t 2963 

22* 11* HmFffl „ 0 390 

.2? JL HmeGPf 1.10 1X6 U 
34* 30% HlTNfU 00 -9 30 919 

l^A^tSSS n AVd % <5* 54% 54% + % 

46% 46% H unwell 100 30 13 4448 44* 63% 64% +1% 

27* ink Hewn; um xo to to at% am at% 

26% 18 HTTHBn 1.12 *5 * W 25* 25 25 — % 

10 3% Horizon 159 5% S 5% + ft 

4M 35* HBJpCp 00 1.1 14 4113 45% 45% 45* + % 


®% 22% LN Ho 2046100 10 23 

» 7% LFE X 

17% 17* LLE Ry 2039140 320 

4% 2 LLCCp 33 

J* » LLC Pi 1 

17% 8% LTV 3930 

24* 14 LTV A XII 24 1 

60 45% LTV pf 2 

31 10ft L7V pt 306 1X9 347 

69 S0% LTVPf 535 80 27 

JJ* 13 LTV pf 105 70 242 

17 10% LOublf 15 431 

2** 15ft LocGsi 100 70 7 <3 

I?2? Lntgroe 30 20 45 

31% 23ft Urfrgpf 204 90 19 

’S 'S* , Umour 04 10 IS 47 
LomSes 25 

14% 10% Lowtlns 04 40 14 186 
®% 13% LeorPt 30 .9 14 440 

®» 20% LaorP d U7 1U 83 
,5]* 47% LeorSo 100 1* 10 464 
124 *5 LeorSpf 205 10 1 

19% 14 LeoRnls 00 XI 15 35 

W4 «% LswyTr 100 40 11 215 
3». 20% LeeEnl .92 XB M, 19 r . 

U 9 LeoMos 00 U 25 M, 

19* 1$% LegPkot 04 20 9 51 

,4ft 2% UofrVol 136 

16* <3% Lehrrm 10SelD0 252 
16 % 9ft Lennar 00 10 21 72 

34 ft 16 LeucNt 6 8 

37% O Levi SI 105 X7 30 311 
S? L * vni 02 10 9 24 

SKb 38ft LOF 702 17 8 627 
79% 42 LOF pf 435 40 33 

5J* 71 UbtvCp 02 20 14 17 

7Wb S3 Lilly 308 4J II 1390 

33% 15* Limited 04 0 23 4228 _ „ 

42% 24* LbMpitt 104 40 TO IBM 42ft 41ft 47* + Vb 

16J* lljft UnCN pf 300 10 1 T70 170 170 +1I1C 

®% 18% UncPI 22*0103 M2 21% 21ft- % 

ZOO XS 9 407 7l 69* 69%— * 

jST 1* IS JES 47% 2% +1% 

08 20 13 223 35* 34ft Tiy u 

108 III M 130 129ft 128% — 1* 
71 43ft 43ft 43ft 

173 3Mk 32% Kft+ ft 

22* S** M* +1% 

249 B 24* 3I%— ft 

3 .in ^ 

3 1183 7% 7% 7*+ % 

78b 43% 47% ctv, J £ 

IE? *5* 19% + % 


®% 77 77ft + ft 
17* 17% 12ft + * 

15% 15ft 15% + % 
2* 2ft 2ft 
9* 9* 9*— ft 

12* 11% 12 + * 
17% 17% 17% + * 
49% 49% 4V%— * 
23* 33% 23ft + * 
*4 43 64 +2 

17* 17 17* + U 

12ft 11% ll%— VI 
2®b 23ft 23ft 
m 8* 8ft + ft 
* 25% 26 

16 15* 14 + ft 

1 2% 3 + ft 

l»k 12* 12ft + ft 
27% 22 72*— U 

»Vb 75Vi 25ft— ft 
.50% 49ft 50 + * 

123*123* 123* +1* 
19% 19ft 19% + * 
JJ* 33 33* 

32% 31* 37% +1 
14ft 13% 14ft + * 
19% 19ft 19% + ft 
3ft 3* 5ft 
IS 14% 14% 

33% 33% 33ft + ft 

48ft 47% 48ft +1 

76* 76 76 + * 

X 29% 29%—* 
74% 3* 74 + ft 

32 31% 31ft + % 


31% 26 

»* 16ft MonPvr 200 90 
18% 14% MonSt iJOaiai 

6 ft MONT 00 8.9 8 

S5 ?£: MooreC 200 40 13 
=* 18ft MaraM 104 45 12 
»% 23% MorMpf 250 90 

S»™ns 200 40 8 
sm 75* Moron pf 7J7e 90 
39* 36% MorKnd 100 30 10 
S? JJ" MoraeS 00 30 9 
MtgRrv IJle BJ 11 
2i? St, CJ2I? 0 " 8 04 23 13 1494 

f4* 29* Motrtas 04 10 lj 73M 

23ft 14^ JfJESE 23 12 47 

1* Muring 16 15 

2.. 100 aj i6 171 

MV, 23 5 MlirpO 100 30 10 531 

^ Murrao 100 50 11 72 

ll MutOm !04eiO0 90 

Oft MverL n 40 


8 1484 
49 
130 
225 
94 
1 

4155 

63 

253 

1® 

ai7 


11% 


16* 16 16* + * 
5% 5* 5*-* 
44* 43* 43*-* 

14 13* 13% 

19* 19% 19%- % 
27ft 77 27ft + * 

15 14* 14ft + ft 
as* 84* 85 —1 
30% 30ft 30% _ 

8% 8 8% + * 
20W 20 20* + ft 

21* Zlft ZHh 
34% 33% 3«ft + ft 
7ft 7* 7ft + ft 
2*6^2^ 

7% 7% 7ft— ft 
25% 25% 25* „ 

11% 11* II*.— % 
19* IB* 19* + * 
46 44* 46 +1 

31* 30% 31* + ft 

am 19 % 20 % + ft 

17% 17ft 17% + % 
9ft 9 9 

SI SOft 50% ^ 

23* 23% ZJW + * 
26% 26% 26%+% 
45% 45 45*+% 

79 78% 79 ' 

39% 39 V —ft 
21* »* 21%+tft 
® 19% 19* ,, 

30ft 29* 29* IL 
38ft 37% 37* 

23Va 22* 23ft + % 
18ft 18% Tift + ft 
43 42% 42ft 

28* 27* 28ft 
21% 20* 2Hb+ft 
13ft 13% 13ft 
4* 4ft 4ft 



•"■ft.: r- 

Fftfep- 

Uftib 

Ite 

ftkTw- 


7*U 
hda 
1 ECU 

ux 




N 


91 98 98 +5 

15 M* 15 +U 
21% 21% 21ft + * 
5* 5* 5*+%, 
11% 11% 11% 

36* 35ft 36ft + ft 
20% 20 20%+ ft 

24% 24% 24%+ % 
Jl 37% 2?Vb— ft 
8* 8% 8% 

Mk 37% 37*— ft 
2Mb 29% 29ft + ft 
19% 11% lift— ft 
12ft 12% T2%+ % 
22% 23% 23% 

59ft 58% 59% + ft 
33 32* 32% — % 

51% 49% 49ft— ft 
73 74% 75 +3% 

64ft 66% 66ft + % 
lift 15 15 %— - 

21 ft 21 lift + ft 

8* Dft «% 

23% 22%'.ZJVb + « 
15% 14ft 15% + ft 


80 56% Litton 

48* 30% Locum 

«2W 3m Loctite 

131% 70% LXMeos 

44 * 23 % Loews w! 

33* 19 LomFkl 1.16 30 13 

36% Mft LomMt 4046110 10 

am T7ft LnSfOT 1.98 70 9 

53 44 LoneS Pf SJ7 1X8 

10ft 3* LILCo 
52 23ft LILPfK 
73 8% Ll L PfX 

23 9 ULPtW 

27* 9% LILnfV 

2 TH 11 * LILPfU 
22% 8% LILpfT 
65 27* LILOIS 

14ft 6 LILpfP 
17% 7 ULpfO 
49* 34 LsnoDr 
30% 18% Loral 
15 . 10 % LoGeni 
34 % 22 * La Long 
26* 17 LaPoc 
31% 2Mk LoPLnl 408 U0 

24 Mft LaPLpf 3.16 1X8 
38% 22ft LOVlvGS 204 U 7 
49% 36 Lowsts 200 O 4 
29ft M% Lowes 
24% 18% Lufcrzl 
32 23 ft LiibVSa 

19% 15% Ludivfi 
15* 10% Lukera 


19ft 19k, 19% 

»% 20 * 20 % 

23% 23% 23*— % 
18ft lift 18% 

108 25 14 44b ^ ^ 

5 13 'i? Vo* 

'job uit » Mb ffik 34* + "^ 
» 3Ub Jl £% + % 

M ZZ% 22* 22ft + ft 
sm 26% 26ft 26% — ft 
51 47% 46* 46ft— * 
02 1.1 17 4U 28% ® 28% 

1.16 40 14 2538 24 23 24 +1 

M U 21 18 22 31* 31% + % 

1.16 60 10 515 19 181b IB%— * 

08 30184 SOX 14ft 14* 14% + ft 


M 


23% 13% MACOM 02 10 24 839 

46ft 34ft MCA 08 10 22 404 

36% 16ft MCn 108 62 6 650 

43 34 MCarpf XU « 

13% ,7ft MDC 03 23 ll 

40 31% MCI 04 >0 13 

14 -9* MGMGr 04 30 34 

12 * 9 MGMGr Pf 04 16 

14% 10 MGMUa 0Ot 10 B 
5* 2% MGMuWt 
25* 17% MGMHO 00a 13 14 
68% S Maemll 100 20 M 

53% 38% MOCT 104 

19* 11% MadRff 
39* 34 MaBlCf JO Xt T 419 

29% a* MotAri m , SB 
23% 12% MonMn JOb 20 6 525 
If 1368 Marti Nt 02 10 17 298 


22 % 21 * 31*— ft 
*Hb 46% +2% 
23 ntu 23% 

38 37% 38 

U* 13* 14% + * 
38% 37* 38* + ft 
13* 13% 13* + ft 
12% 12 12% + Hi 

13 12% 12ft 

2% 2% 2ft— % 
975 73 21ft 22 — % 
546 51% 49* SB* + ft 
XI II 1153 46* 46* 46%+ % 
92 13% 12* IM 

Jff* 37ft 28*+ * 
Sift 36% 26% 

15* IS 15% — % 
18% U* 18% — % 


3 

213 


23 

549 

18 


33ft 14 NAFCO 
59% 39ft NBD 
24% 14ft NBI 
21 14% NCH 

SL MCNB 
??* NCR * 
;*ft 12 mum 
JJ 10% NL ina 
33 25* NUI 

2% ft NVF 
45ft n% NVVA 
54 38% NofascB 

21 Nalea 
29ft B Nashua 
37 % am NorCan 
»% 11% PffCnvs 


JOb 30 18 56 

200 40 8 59 

TO 327 
UM go 
H ! *92 
30 9 5S7o 

10 

7.1 7 


02 

103 


10 

20 11 1794 
40 11 3504 
45 14 lies 
8 214 

IS S 1328 
XT 17 575 


20% 20ft 2Wk— » 
59% 59ft S9* + W 
1** 16% 16%- ? 
21 % 20 * 20 *— * 
34V, 3S* 36 — * 
JO* 29% 29% + * 
JO 21* ®* 21* 

800 11* 1116 lift— H 

33 32% 32ft— ft 

1% I 1% 

46ft 45% 46%+ * 
54ft 52% 53* +1 * 
®ft 26 26% + * 

29* 28% 29% + % 
34% 33 34% + M 

17* 16* 17% + ft 


SS K3K “ “ |f iss-as SS Sit B 

3 5% srst ,J4 41 7 

32ft 23% Nil 


6J S* Nil pf 

® 17ft NM9BE 

6ft N MlneS 
29 *9* H,p ras* 


05 

500 

02 


16* 


859 

, 122 

7 J 3 “1 

t-9 14 5059 

X6I3 3 


12ft 11% 12ft + ft 
26% 25ft 2616 + * 
42% 41% 42% +1% 
4* 4 4 — * 

33% 31% 33% +1* 
M* 64* 64* + * 
28% 27* 27ft— ft 
9% 9* 9%— ft 
77% Z7W 27*+ ft 




•* NevPpf Mg j|. 

u* "l j 

39% If*?' S vL 00 40 7 

2ft !3f^ OE, 3M W * 

Svb SiSS. 204 7.9 10 

r £ ^ ^ is 4 

2 NYSof xn 120 

W "Xf-S* 301el25 

3o K HX5EL S- 1 * 1*1 

IrSssji 


.1* Nwparh 

NIomp 


S3 31 
208 I1J 6 


M 

78 

16 

13 

9 

033 

045 

1053 


» SJSKf xS 3.1 
NtaMri SS JJi 
3 fft NlaMpf 4 ^ IM 

« 4 Wb NIoMpf 77 ? lib 

IB* "IgSh 1-SrtS 

«P I2i; IS 3" m3 » 20ri 

-sSihil a 

K it . 

S ,a-s '! 

w M n?Sp 5 B ]?3 5 

pfcWajS 

™ ® a a t* 


Wh 13% 13* 13* . . 

17* 17* 17*+ ft 
»V30% aw 28U + * 
8 16% 16* 16% + ft 
W lift ll* nu „ 

»! jwaw am + ft 

M 25ft 25ft 25% + ft 

4« »ft 22ft. 22* + ft 

J5£* 5 M ao +ift 

14b 69 68% 68% — % 

If 24% 34% 24%— V. 

1 l^Va 17% — % 

5W W% 29*— * 

18% law 1816 — ft 
42* 42% 42* + * 
14* 14% 14ft 

4&4§3i4£+% 

.3% 3* 3*— % 
17% 17% 17ft— ft 
.«£ 5 »»b 27% —1 

^ 31 31 + Kr 

WW 37% 37% 

7202 41 if 41 

!2? £* 47* 47*— * 
’“S « 92 92 -8% 

75 lift 16 M 

JS* »ft + ?r 

»ft » 29% — * 

js% i4* -u 
^ 65* 66% +1* 
]Jft Mft 39ft|L% 
«% 45% 45%ff » 
« J7% 17* + * 

“% 53 54%+lft 

fSf 41* 42% +2* 
IS% 15 IS — * 
w 14ft 14*— % 
lift lift— * 
43 Q 43 —ft 
** 43 43 


202 

838 

370 

112 

494 

19 

3062 

1165 

30 

174 



«_2* 21% 31% 31% 
222*35% 36ft 36ft + ft 


(Continued on Page 


10) 




















Statistics Index 

AMEX priGU P.13 Eornlnes marts P II 
„ vj _ juheX nWa/tomP-iO FHao ret* notes p u 
. V . - NYSE erica P. 8 Gob) markets »' e 
'■ ' ' nYSC Mata/tows P.10 i merest ram p* a 
Conation**** P.W Marfan mmmory P 0 
Currency rate P. 9 Option* p\ 0 

Cermnadme* P.10 OTC riocfc pn 
OteVfamtt P.10 Other markets p M 






T 



Lata interbank rates on Feb. 5 , exducSng fees. 

Official fbanpi for Amsterdam, Brussels, Frankfurt, Nflan, Paris. New YoA rates at 
4 PM 


. 

- 

S 

C 

DA 

FJ. 

IU- 

OUT. 

BJ=. 5J=. Yea 


Amsterdam 

16445 

052 

113.18* 

37465 * 

0.1843 

— 

5456* 13273 * 14846 y 


BniiialiTnl 

6X415 

71.63 

2SJ0095 

6-5515 

US5* 

17.6825 

23-514 24435* 


Frankfurt 

13195 

3-58 

_ 

32.755 * 

1-629 E 

MW 

6998* 117,51 • 1741 • 


| ffMfW CM 

1.1115 



15851 

119455 

2.197.45 

4.061 

7770 2046 288745 


MHan 

137680 

2.199 JO 

61460 

20130 

— — 

543.15 

30715 72249 7438 


HawYartCe) 


1.115 

U2 

934 

1,979.00 

3443 

5346 2735 25740 


parte 

9329 

HL93 

1053 



4.97 x 

2-6973 

15362 * 2589237915 * 

’ - 

Tafcva 

Zorich 

25M5 

291.16 

BOM 

26-53 

1332 * 

71.47 

40441 - 9UM5 


17346 

33)437 

84-96 * 

27335* 

0.1383 

75J065 " 

42475 * 14531 ■ 


1 ECU 

06911 

04216 

12254 

6794 

1,34789 

25184 

44.5405 10935 17944 


. 1 SDR 

0.968391 

047029 

3.11493 951832 NA 

Dollar Values 

B» 

35293 

42-3789 24522 251782 

1 Per 


* 

Eaofv. Uil 

- 87893 AartraHaoc U*» 
84443 Antrian scMBM 2248 

00156 Bntatan fln. fane 600 

- 0JA4 Canadians 1J3M 
H0B7 taM krone 1L4V 

V 0.1491 PMnixh mart OK 

'40007/ (Mwk drachma BUS 
U28 Haw Kong S 7J115 


I 

Eont*. 

0.970ft IrtrtI 
00014 Israeli shoftfi 
12*61 Knaaltt (finer 

0J9S3 Malay, riaoefl 
B.1P/B Non*, krone 
00554 pa B. peso 

(L0057 Port, •tarda 

82784 SaocfiriyaJ 


ULSJ 

lJODJ 

6HJ0 

03071 

lass 

9.290S 

iaoM 

176D0 

1592 


Eool*. 


OSS 


0493 S. African road 2JOS3 
00012 S. Korean hod KS35 
00056 Span, peseta 177a 
OUR Suitd. krona 9.1615 
•JOSS Totem t 39.T7 
0361 Thai tx*t 277SS 
13731 UJULinrhom 16715 


faT^^L'^IM Amounts nwdod to taiv owooaad (cl Amounts wotfadto buy owdotarl-l 
Unite of KB U) Unite at 1«0 lV> Unite td 1U» 

M * .*** *y ’Jt^feBrutseW: Banco Commercials itoHona IMOant i Borenw 

Mb tar. rtvatfdMtoml, Ottmr data tram Bouton ano nr. 



lorocarrencj Deposits 

Curftu 


Feb. 5 


Fnadi 


— MM » n TL , vTm 

« ‘m! S?-Sta Iji-Uta 10 lh- 10 H IB - 10 KW-W 

S - -tsisrsrs :KS:S 

iiw.iita -•* 

« awOnNe to Sank IfCUf/ C/Hfion* 

reel: /Worsen GuorwiV ftWtor. >r« 


% 


Asian Dollar Rates 


Feb. 5 


BMi -8* 

Sourer; Aotrters. 


2 mas. 
» -Ota 


last. 

m -p 


c was. 
9K.-9W 


SH t" 


Key Money Rates 

United States 


Ooca prw- 
o « 

0 5/16 w 


023 037 

735 7J8 

7.97 7.9S 


Discount Rata 

r ede ra i Funds - - 

Mmo Rate 1D |* “!? 

Brakar Lean Rate w f£ 

Comm. Poor. 30-179 days 035 J" 

3-raenth Treasury Bills O-” 

Pflwntti Treasury Bills 

CD* 3*59 flay* 

CD* 6049 days 


West Germany 

Rote 
non 

i Month Interbank 
3-moatti Interbank 
fraantti interbank 

France 

intervention Rato 
Call Money 
One-nwnth Interbank 

. ’-month interbank 
. Brnoam interbank 


Britain 

Bonk Base Rat* 
Call Mon« 
tt-ckr? Treasury Bill 
iraonlh intefbank 
Japan 
ptecourri Rote 
Coll Money 
oWov interbank 


Close Pray. 

i» 1* 

14 W 

13 TM 
1346 13 7/16 


5 5 

6 V. 6 Wi 

616 *5/14 


ABO 4B0 

££ 4- 10 

Sjo SJO 

t35 42 s 


10lk 

1046 ,BV| 
10 7/14 WJ 

IBM* lB>6 



tutors. Commerzbank. Cr& nLy ' 

nit Book. Bank of Tokyo. 


AN. PM Cb*» 

h»k-- s ;s 
^SS ‘“' 3S3 SS *S 

SS -- s JS 

-sis 

aji price* in uii oar ««. 

Bruton. 


Hcralb^Ss^eribunc 


Wednesday, February 6. i98 s~ 

INTERHATIONAI. MAHAQER 

Europe Roundtable Aims 
To Open Up the Borders 

By PAUL LEWIS 

New Turk Tima Smnce 

P ISliTu 1 0f cxccutivc officers from 

leadmg U. S. corporations, convinced that the business 

miamdeistood. 

v ness Ronndtable to get their point of view across to 

government officials and the general poblia to 

- - ! c ^f n iycr. a group of Buropean chief executives, 
amnarty ^satisfied if the way tiSrgSvmmKsnts SS 
formed a Business Roundtable of their own. ™ 
goak of **“ ^ oi^ganizaiions are the same, 
m IpZny wa ^ 1 ' ^ European one is mS 

~H abO Ut 20 

of limiting themselves to lob- , 

bying, the Europeans have put We Ve been wai ting 

forward a $60- bill! on plan for „ i -• 
spurring economic growth. a ,on g ame for 

JSSrr politicians to act, 

jESyiLSSSSSS Dekker says. 

and unemployment as well as 

its technological backwardness. The reason, the business leaders 
say is that officials have failed to create the authentic free- 
trading aria that they promised when they started to build the 
, A European Community more than 25 years ago. 

™ Unless Europe's frontiers are stripped of red tape, the Round- 
table fears, the Continent will never be able to develop enough 
world-scale companies and winning technologies. 

“European integration has stopped — it’s going backwards,” 
said the chief executive officer of the Swedish group Volvo AB, 
Pehr G. GyUenhammar. who in 1983 founded the Roundtable. 
“Governments focus on the problems of agriculture and declin- 
ing industry, not on industries that can succeed.” 

“If we wait for the politicians to act — well, all I can say is that 
we've been waiting a long time already,” said Wisse Dekker, 

- president of Philips NV, the big Dutch electronics group. He was 
explaining why he had agreed to become a vice chairman of the 
Roundtable. 

Rather than complain, Europe's Business Roundtable last year 
put forward its $60-billion plan, which «mrg at revitalizing tr ad e, 
increasing growth and promo ting industrial efficiency by open- 
ing up Europe's frontiers. 

I HE project, known as Missing links, foresees a web of 
tunnels, bridges and high-speed train tracks that would 
speed the movement of goods and people around Europe. 

; By increasing the volume erf traffic, the project could mahe 

\ frontier controls soon petty nuisances and could strengthen 
: political pressure for their abolition. As Mr. GyUenhammar put 

it, “Our links make frontiers irrelevant” 
b While the Roundtable hopes economic pressure will sweep 
j away Europe's trade barriers, a new group m frustrated Europe- 
ans is trying to do the same thing by political means. 

Calling itself the Action Gxmmttee for Europe, this group 
Z ■ comprises politicians, trade unionists, business executives and 
' . _ bankers. On June 7, at its inaugural meeting in Stuttgart, it plans 
*; . to introduce a detailed plan for transforming die European 
Community. Key features induce a timetable for eliminating 
■ i - specific trade barriers. 

The Action Committee for Emope is a recreation of the Action 
. Committee far a United States of Europe, founded in 1955 by 
i. - Jean Monnet, the legendary “Father of Europe,” and disbanded a 
. few years before his death in 1979. 
i - Lie its predecessor, the new committee plans to work from 

within the existing power structure, recruiting people in high 
. places who will use their influence to advance its aims. 

. But its objectives are different. Monnet saw the nationalism of 
1 de Gaulle as the threat to Europe’s future. The new Action 
Committee think* the threat is economic, stemming from Eu- 
(Contftmed on Page H, CoL 5) 


BUSINESS / FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 8 


Mexico 
Cuts Price 

Of Oil 

Per-Barrel Cost 
Slashed $1.25 

By Robert J. McCartney 

Washin gton P ast Service 
MEXICO CITY — Mexico has 
lowered the price of its light crude 
ofl by a modest amount in line with 
last week's redactions by the Orga- 
nization of Petroleum Exporting 
Countries. 

Mexico cut the price Monday of 
its Isthmus crude by SI .25 a barrel 
to S27.75 a barrel. It left unchanged 
the price of its heavy crude, called 
Maya, at $25.50 a barrel light 
erodes cost more than heavy ones 
because they yield more gasoline 
when refined. 

The price cut, which mainly will 
benefit Japan, was too small to seri- 
ously hurt Mexico's debt-burdened 
economy, according to government 
officials and foreign economic spe- 
cialists. 

It will cost Mexico $300 million a 
year in lost revenues, which is 
equivalent to only 1.9 percent of 
the nation's total petroleum in- 
come, according to a joint commu- 
nique from the Energy Ministry 
and the state oil company, Petrb- 
leos Mericanos, or Pemex. 

“The reduction in the price of 
Isthmus affects us, but not cata- 
strophically," the co mmuniq ue 
said. “The contraction in foreign- 
exchange income that it implies is 
manageable for our economy." 

Mexico is not a member of 
OPEC, but generally follows the 
cartel's guidelines and the relative- 
ly modest size of the price cut sig- 
naled that Mexico was continuing 
its policy of avoiding a price war 
with OPEC 

However, industry analysts said 
that Mexico might lower its price 
again if OPEC members steal its 
customers by granting under-the- 
table discounts. 

Mexico, which produces 2.7 mil- 
lion barrels a day, is the world's 
fourtb-iargest oil producer and the 
largest single supplier to the United 
States. The United States mainly 
buys Mexico’s heavy crude, Maya, 
however, while Japan is the mam 
purchaser of Isthmus. 

The Mexican communique ap- . 
peared to be defiberaiely vague 
about how much oil Mexico in- 
tended to export this month. It said . 
that it was ending its November 
commitment to reduce expons by 
100.000 barrels a day. Bui it also 
pledged not to increase exports. 

■ OPEC Output Drops 
A sharp drop in Iranian ofl pro- 
duction, due m part to increased 
attacks on tankas in the Persian 
Gnlf, resulted in a significant faD in 
OPECs crude ofl output in Janu- 
ary, the Internationa] Energy 
Agency said Tuesday, The Associ- 
ated Press reported from Paris. 

OPECs overall crude oil produc- 
tion was 15J million barrels a day 
in January, compared with 16.7 
minion barrels a day in the fourth 
quarter of 1984, the agency said. 


U.S. Wood-Products Firms in Trouble 



By Thomas G Hayes 

New York Times Senw 

LOS ANGELES — 'With in- 
terest rales falling and another 
good year in housing starts like- 
ly, wood-products companies in 
the United States should be cele- 
brating. 

Instead, several major compa- 
nies are struggling amid an over- 
supply of lumber and declining 
timbenand values. 

Many, including International 
Paper Co., Champion Interna- 
tional Corp., Boise Cascade 
Corp. and Crown Zeflerbach 
Com, posted writedowns for 
the fourth quarter of 1984. 

International Paper, based in 
New York, took the biggest 
write-down for 1984, $163 mil- 
lion, with $155 milli rat directly 
tied to troubles in wood prod- 
ucts. It closed a mill in Gardner, 
Oregon, laying off 490 workers, 
and is planning more shutdowns. 

“By taking the write-off, we 
are trying to face reality,” said 
Ann Silvernail, a company 
spokeswoman. “The wood-prod- 
ucts business was unprofitable 
for the entire year in 1984.” 

The forces behind the timber 
glut include less use of wood in 
home construction and a surge of 
imports from Panada, Brazil and 
Venezuela, made less costly by 
the strength of the dollar. 

In some ways this glut mirrors 
troubles faced by the ofl indss- 



m •— 


BouaKtlalmOBt 


try. And to some analysts, they 
appear equally intractable. 

“It's quite dear that the over- 
supply is not going to readily go 
away," said Thomas P. Ge- 
phane. a forest-products analyst 
with Morgan Stanley & Co. “If 
the industry did not prosper with 
houring starts at 1.8 mflnon last 
year, one has to wonder how it 
will do when starts are much 
lower.” 

Companies have dosed mills 
across the Pacific Northwest, re- 
duced the value of their timber- 
lands and raised questions on 
Wall Street about the long-term 
benefits of owning vast acres erf 
forests. 

“Certainly for the short term, 
timber prices will not go up,” 
said Gary Palmero, paper and 
forest-products analyst with Op- 
penhenner & Co. “If anything, 
they coaid come down some 
more.” 

The amount of timberiand put 
up for sale began to rise during 


Sorting logs at a Crown 
Zellerbach-managed 
forest in Washington. 

the steep recession in 1981 and 
1982, and is still growing. Indus- 
try analysts estimate that as 
much as 9 million acres (3.62 
million hectares) are for sale, 
with few buyers evident. 

Sir James Goldsmith, a British 
investor who earlier last year 
waged an unsuccessful effort to 
take over St. Regis Corp., said 
last month that be might buy up 
to 25 percent of Crown Zdler- 
bach's common shares. Sources 
dose to the San Frandsco-based 
company said, however, that 
they had seen little evidence of 
buying by Sr James. 

Zeller bach reduced net in- 
come in 1984 by $30.1 million, 
saying it was partly to increase 
reserves needed to cover losses 
expected on timber-cutting con- 
tracts. William T. Cresoo, Zdler- 
bach’s chairman and chief execu- 
tive, described the long-term 
outlook for solid-wood products 
as “cloudy at best” 

Many analysts said that they 
expected more bad news from 
the forest companies (his year. 

*T think there will be more 
write-offs in 1985.” said H.G 
Bowen Smith, an analyst with 
Salomon Brothers. “For some 
companies it will be because of 
(Continued on Page 11, CoL ft 


Icahn Offers 
To Buy Phillips 
For $8.5 Billion 


By Mark Ports 

Washington Past Semnr 

WASHINGTON — Carl C. 
Icahn. a New York financier, of- 
fered $8.5 billion Tuesday for Phil- 
lips Petroleum Co., putting the oil 
company under threat of a take- 
over for the second time in two 
months. 

But Mr. Icahn's bid was condi- 
tioned on his ability to obtain fi- 
nancing — which some analysis 
questioned — and Phillips said it 
would not consider the offer until 
Mr. I cahn foiled up f inancial back- 
ing. 

The S55-a-share bid comes as 
Phillips is trying to convince its 
shareholders to accept a recapital- 
ization plan valued by the company 
at $53 a share but' estimated by 
many on Wall Street to be wortn 
somewhat less. 

The plan, which is scheduled for 
a stockholder vote Feb. 22, is the 
key part of a package assembled by 
Phillips to chase off a takeover 
threat by Mesa Petroleum Co.’s 
chairman, T. Boone Pickens. 

Wall Street analysts were divided 
on the effect of die offer by Mr. 
Icahn, one of several investors who 
bought big positions in Phillips in 
anticipation of a takeover by Mr. 
Pickens. 

By the time Mr. Pickens and 
Phillips readied a truce, the price 
of Phillips stock had slid into the 
mid-$40s. 

On the New York Stock Ex- 
change Tuesday, Phillips common 
was the most actively traded stock 
of the day, closing at $50, up 
$2,875. 

Alan Edgar, an oil-industry ana- 
lyst at Schneider Bemei and Hick- 
man in Dallas, said Mr. Icahn 
probably had the PhiTKps manage- 
ment “Wed in” with bis offer. 
“Fifty-five dollars is a lot higher 
and fairer than the blended price in 
the high-40s,” he said. 

But Sanford Margoshes, who fol- 
lows the ofl industry for Shearson 
I .eh man / American Express, said 
too many questions surrounded the 
Icahn offer. 


"You have a known quantity at 
$53 and on the other side you have 
an unknown quantity at $55.” he 
said. “I think that institutions and 
more conservative investors will 
opt for the known.” 

Nearly half of Phillips's 154.6 
million common shares are owned 
by institutional investors. 

Mr. Margoshes said a key flaw in 
Mr. Icahn's offer was the question 
of iis financing. Mr. Icahn said be 
planned to offer $55 in cash for half 
of the Phillips shares, and securities 
with the same value for the other 
half. 

Mr. Icahn said in a letter to Phil- 
lips that he had not yet arranged 
loans to pay for the cash pan of the 
offer, although his financial advis- 
er, Drexel Burnham Lamb ert, was 
confident it could put together the 
financing in the next couple of 
weeks if Phillips agreed to the offer, 
he said. 

Phillips seemed unwilling even 
to consider the bid without the fi- 
nancing. thus, apparently, putting 
the two rides at an impasse. Nei- 
ther Mr. Icahn nor Dread Burn- 
ham offidals could not be reached 
for comment. 

“There's no assurance that Mr. 
Icahn can come up with firm fi- 
nancing,” Mr. Margoshes said. 
“My best guess is that tomorrow 
Phillips will graciously decline the 
offer.” 

Rumors have circulated on Wall 
Street for a few weeks that Mr. 
Icahn or some other large share- 
holder might make a bid for Phil- 
lips in an effort to recoop some- 
thing from Mesa's abandonment of 
its offer. 

Another name prominently men- 
tioned has been the Minneapolis 
investor Irwin L Jacobs, who like 
Mr. Icahn owns something under 5 
percent of Phillips stock. 

Dissatisfied investors have been 
said to be massing opposition to 
Phillips's recapitalization plan. 


which would greatly increase the 
company’s debt and offer roughly 
15 percent of the company to PhiL 


lrps employees. 


Overseas Sales Push Siemens’s First-Quarter Net Up 23% 


By Warren Gctler 

International Herald Tribute 

MUNICH — Siemens AG, ben- 
efiting from strong overseas sales, 
reported Tuesday that net earnings 
surged 23 percent in the first quar- 
ter of fiscal 1985. 

The West German electronics gi- 
ant, which generates more than half 
its sales abroad, said earnings for 
October through December rose to 
242 mflhon Deutsche marks (about 
$75.6 mflhon), from 196 million 
DM a year earlier. 

Domestic sales feS 2 percent, to 
4.7 billion DM, from 4.8 bilfion 
DM in the previous year’s first 
quarter. Foreign sales, however. 


jumped 9 percent, to 53 billion 
DM from 4.9 billion DM. 

Semens’s chairman, Karlheinz 
Kaske, said separately Tuestfay 
that the company planned to in- 
crease capital investment by about 
50 percent this year to a record 
level of 3.5 billion to 4 bfllioa DM, 
from 14 billion DM last year. He 
said Siemens also intended to raise 
outlays for research and develop- 
ment 18 percent, to 43 bflHon DM, 
from 3.8 bflhon DM a year earlier. 

An analyst at Westdeutsche 
Landesbank in Dosseldorf called 
Siemen’s first-quarter results “fan- 
tastic" and added that the compa- 
ny, with its strengths in electronics. 


engineering and tdecommonica; 
tions, was well-placed to benefit 
from projected strong domestic 
and foreign demand for capital 
goods this year. 

“Much of Siemens's prospects 
for fiscal 1985 depend, however, on 
which way the dollar moves,” said 
the West LB analyst, who asked not 
to be identified. 

The analyst predicted: "The 
electronics industry’s boom is not 
yet over. We expect to see double- 
digit growth for the electronic com- 
ponents industry, as well as data 
processing and information tech- 
nologies — all areas where Siemens 
has a prominent market share.” 


Mr. Kaske said he expected the 
company to increase sales about 10 
percent this year, excluding reve- 
nue from the Kraftwerk Union AG 
subsidiary, a builder of nuclear 
power plants. Including revenue 
from Kraftwerk Union, Mr. Kaske 
said, group sales will certainly top 
50 billion DM for the first time, up 
from 45.8 billion DM last year. 

As reported, Siemens bad record 
group net profit in 1983-1984 of 
1.066 billion DM on a 16-percent 
sales increase to nearly 46 billion 
DM, also a record. Mr. Kaske said 
the 33-percent rise in profit last 
year reflected not only significantly 
improved sales but also higher ca- 


S use, at 81 percent compared 
6 percent the year before. 
Siemens, which lifted its divi- 
dend to 10 DM from 8 DM on the 
previous year's results, wfll adopt a 
more flexible dividend policy, one 
that reflects the company's earn- 
ings more than in the past, when 
the dividend was kept at a steady 8 
DM for 12 years. Mr. Kaske said. 

He cautioned that the strong dol- 
lar's boost to company sales should 
not be overestimated, noting that 
only 30 percent of U. S. sales were 
generated by exports from West 
Germany. Siemens expects to in- 
crease sales in the United States to 
more than 5 billion DM this year. 


DollarRemains 
Near Records 
In Late Trading 


United Press Traentadonal 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
polled back slightly Tuesday 
from its record advance Mon- 
day but remained at what deal- 
ers called “breathtaking" levels. 

The dollar hit a high of 
33320 Deutsche marks in New 
York before retreating in prof- 
it-taking to end still sharply 
higher on the day. 

“Everybody was waiting for 
the dollar to come down after 
Monday’s advance.'* said 
Christian Holterman, ’senior 
trader at First American Bank 
of New York. “Some tentative- 
ly sold, but when the dollar 
started forward they had to buy 
it back.” 

A dealer for Barclays Bank 
International in London said 
the dollar appeared “unstoppa- 
ble,” especially against the 
mark. 

In late New York Lrading 
against key currencies, the dol- 
lar was at 3320 marks, up from 
3317 Monday; 9.8400 French 
francs, up from 9.8224, and 
2.735 Swiss francs, down from 
2.742. The British pound fin- 
ished in New York at $1.1150, 
down from $1.1165 Monday. 


Credit Markets Await Budget Action 


By David A Vise 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — While the 
immediate impact of President 
Ronald Reagan’s proposed $973.7- 
billion budget on the credit mar- 
kets appears to be minimal, experts 
said t»»i con g ressional reaction to 
the package could significantly in- 
fluence interest rates. 

Wall Street economists and trad- 
ers also said Monday that the presi- 
dent's proposal contained no sur- 
prises. They said that the financial 
markets already had discounted the 
budget because of leaks on what it 
proposed. 

But they warned that if Congress 
fails to go at least as far in cutting 
spending as the president —whose 
plan leaves a 5180-billion deficit 
next fiscal year — there will be 
upward pressure on interest rates. 

“The proposed budget is already 
discounted in the market so the real 


issue is how much of what is pro- 
posed is gping to make its way 
through the legislative process and 
get signed into law,” said Charles 
Lieberman, senior economist at 
Shearson Lehman Brothers. “It is 
sobering to look to the end erf the 
decade and see die budget esti- 
mates of the administration, which 
contain incredibly large deficits.” 

Mr. Lieberman said that the 
bond market is troubled by the 
uncertainty over congressional re- 
action. He said that the proposed 
budget is “far from satisfactory” 
and implies high real interest rates 
in the future because of the Urge 
deficits. 

Edward Yardeni, chief econo- 
mist at Prudential Bache Securities, 
said that if Congress does not go 
along with spending cats of at least 
$50 billion, it will hurt credit mar- 
kets, driving up interest rates. He 
said that if Congress proposes 


higher cuts, the market would react 
positively, satding bond prices up 
and yields down. 

But the attention that (he federal 
deficit gets from Wall Street ex- 
pals is less than was the case only 
two or three years ago, Mr. Yardeni 
said. 

“They are so bored with hysteria 
about the deficit that they are fo- 
cusing cm other things like low in- 
flation,” he said. “At some point 
the deficit will have to be ad- 
dressed, but economists have been 
saying that for two years runn 
and we are all still alive and w 
with the economy np and interest 
rates and inflation down. 

“Every economist in his heart of 
hearts has this notion that the defi- 
cit can't keep going up, but we 
don't know when this will be the 
paramount concern of the credit 
markets," he said. 





r 

fc 

i : 

El 


a 


The 

Carlyle 

Hotel 


MadtaanAmrant 
at 7flth Street 
Now York 10021 
Cabto Tl»e Co*iyta Mew York 
b iw wi u wtatwl Ttete* 880082 
Telephone 212 - 744-1600 

A member ef the Sharp Group 
since 1067 


GOLDLETTER INTERNATIONAL 

HOW TO PROFIT FROM THE NEXT GOLD BOOM 


Learn how you can multiply your money by investing in futures 
contracts and goUmining shares. 


For complimentary copies of Gold letter international and 
special reports, write: 

TRANSCO SERVICES 

10, Route du Port 
CH-1299 Crans/Celigny 
Switzerland. 


Name 

Addrejo... 

Phone N°: 


jllPTAPMAN 

MANAGED 

COMMODITY ACCOUNTS. 

PERFORMANCE 
RESULTS FOR 
COMPTRENDII 

BEGINNING EQUITIES 
OF $100,000 
ON JANUARY 1 
OF EACH YEAR 
yielded the foBowtng 


IN 1980: +165% 

IN 1981.- +137% 

BN 1982: +32% 

IN 1983: —24% 

IN 1984; -34% 

JAN. “31, 1985 
EQUITY 
STOOD AT 
US. $101,437.49 
Mora than $50,000,000.00 
cumsnfjy under management. 

Cafi or write Royal Frazier a 
TAPMAN, Trend Analysis and 
ftxtfcfio Management, Ina; 

Street Plaza, Newtek, 
New tek 10005 212-269-1041 
"fetex BMI 6871 73 UW, 


Mezzanine Capital Corporation 
Limited 

Notice to holders of Bearer Depositary Receipts 
(“SDRs”) evidencing Participating Redeemable Pre- 
ference Shares of US 1 cent each (“Shares”) of Mez- 
zanine Capital Corporation Limited (the “Company”). 

Notice of Dividend 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN to the holders of the BDRs 
that the Company has declared an interim dividend for the 
financial year ending on 31st May, 1985 of US$0.4854 
per Share. The BDRs are denominated in multiples of 
Units (“Units"), and each Unit currently comprises 100 
Shares. The dividend is, therefore, equivalent to 
USS4&54 per Unit. 

Payment of this dividend will be made, subject to 
receipt thereof by Manufacturers Hanover Bank 
(Guernsey) Limited (“the Depositary"), against surrender 
of Income Coupon No. 2, at the specified office of the 
Depositary or of any of the Paying Agents (set out on the 
reverse of the BDRs and at the foot of this Notice), at 
any time on or after 7th February, 1985. Since no 
redemption of Shares has occurred, Redemption 
Coupon No. 2 should be discarded. 

Payment will be made subject to any laws and/or 
regulations applicable thereto by dollar cheque drawn 
upon, or, at the option of the holder of the relevant 
Coupon, by transfer to a dollar account maintained by 
the payee with, a Bank in New York City. 

Copies of the Company's Interim Report may also be 
obtained from the Depositary and the Paying Agents 
listed below and Euroclear and Cedel. 

Depositary and Principal Paying Agent 
Manufacturers Hanover Bank (Guernsey) Limited, 
Manufacturers Hanover House, LeTruchot, 

St Peter Port, Guernsey, Channel Islands 
Paying Agents 

Manufacturers Hanover Bank/Belgium SA.. 

Rue de Ligne 13, B-1000 Brussels, Belgium 
Manufacturers Hanover Trust Company, 
Bockenheimer Landstrasse 51 -53, 

D 6000 Frankfurt/Main 1 , West Germany 
Manufacturers Hanover Trust Company, 

Shell Tower, 33/34th Storey, 

50 Raffles Place, Singapore 0104 
Manufacturers Hanover Trust Company. 

7 Princes Street, London EC2P 2LR 
Manufacturers Hanover Bank Luxembourg SA. 

39 Boulevard Prince Henri, 

Luxembourg, Grand Duchy of Luxembourg 
Manufacturers Hanover Trust Company. 

Edinburgh Tower, 43rd Floor, 

1 5 Queens Street. Central. Hong Kong 
Manufacturers Hanover Trust Company, 
Stockerstrasse 33, 8027 Zurich, Switzerland 
Morgan Guaranty T rust Company of New York, 

1 4 Place Vendfime. 75001 Paris, France 

St Peter Pott, Guernsey by: Manufacturers Hanover 

Dated 6th February, 1 985 Bank (Guernsey) Limited 

Depositary 








Page XO 


** 


j- u.s. 


Futures f*s 


Season Season 
Hiati Low 


Open Hid) Low Close Ch9- 


Groins 


WHEAT(CTT) 

S^bumWr^-aoiUraw bushel 
jE J5S 1 Mar 3St 3 58 3JSV. 157* — J0% 

U2U May 140% 14m 147*. 149V — JOU 

190 127% Jut 137* UM 137 UK 

1» Sa» m UK Uh Uh -jo* 

137% DfC 148 V) 3J9* 147V 348% -JOto 

1« Mar IS ism 132 15Z* +3)0 Vi 

Ear. Sales Prev. sales 17,436 

Prav. Day Open int. 3B.9M oft 918 
CabH (CBT) 

SOODbu minimum- dailareper bushel 
USVk 16S Mar £72* £74U 272V 274U +JD2V* 

130 £72* MOV 179% 281 £78* 280V. +J2U 

3-31 276V Jul 2J1U 283 281 2J2* +83% 

JSte 270% See 273U 225% 273V 273V +82% 

IB 265 Dec 2 Mi 269V 266% 269 +J2w 

110 274V Mor 276 £77% 275% 2771* +82 

121V 27VM) May 281 £B2% 280% 282V* +81* 

E3f- Sato Prev. Sales U475 

Prev. Day Open mt.i3£75B aH724 
SOYBEANS (CBT] 

MOO bumtnfmum- dollars per bushel 


7J0U 

5J9U 

Mar 

5JSU 

+03 

£93* 

+01* 

+J7* 


LSI* 

Mav 607% 

+14% 

6JS* 

+13* 


7.99 

£91% 


+19 

+KV, 

+16% 

62516 

+J0 

7J6 

5.95 

Auo 

+20 

+26 

+T9 

+26 

+J6U 

671 

SH 

Sap 

+I2U 

+18 

+12U 

+18 


+68 

£97 

NOV 

+16 

+19 

+14% 

+18* 

+J4U 

+79 

+10 


6J0 

6J1U 

+29% 

+31% 

+J4* 

7J2 

+24 

Mor 

+43 

+44% 

+42 

+44% 

+J3* 

7J9. 

6J5U 

MOV 




+51% 

+J2% 


Est. Sales Prev. Sales 29401 

Prev, Day Open inf. 71,853 off 31 
SOYBEAN MEAL (CBT) 

100 tom- dollars per ton 

T9 JO 1 37 JO Mar 137 JO 139 JO 137 JO 13740 

14330 MOV 14180 14540 14130 14130 

.149.10 Jul 14970 158-90 14970 14930 

15170 Alia 15210 15330 15130 15200 

15200 sec 15440 15SJD 15430 154J0 

155-50 Oct 157J0 158.00 154J0 157110 

HI JO Dec 163-50 M3J0 16200 16200 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 10.990 

Prev. Day Oeen inf. 40339 no 277 
SOYBEAN OIL (CBT] 


K 

’179 JO 
100J0 
U4J0 


—.10 

—.10 

+70 

+70 

+70 


AOJOOQu- dollars per 100 lbs. 




+J9 

3QJ0 

22.95 

Mar 

2775 


27J7 

28J7 

3+10 

2£H 


2+95 

27 JO 

2+80 

27 J8 


3+X 


Jul 

2AJ0 

2+77 

2+25 

2+9* 










25.95 




2+25 

2580 

2+25 




Oct 

2481 

2SJ5 

2+81 

2884 


2475 

22.90 


2625 

Z4J0 

2625 

24J0 


Est. Sales 


Prev. sales 14J« 





Ptev. Day Open inf. 41717 up 278 
OATS (CBT) 

5800 bti minimum- dollars per bushel 


1.96% 

1J8* 

Mar 

176% 

177 

176% 

176% 


IJ9to 


1.73* 




178% 

1J8* 

Jul 

1J9 

1J9* 

1J9 

IJ9to 

1.79 

IJS% 


1J4* 

1J7 

1J6* 

1J7 

1J2U 

1 JB 

Dec 

1J9U 

1J9% 

1J9% 

1J9U 


Est. Series Prev. sales 106 
Prev. Day Open InL 3863 up 19 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CME) 
40000 lbs.- cents aer lb. 


67 JQ 

6180 

Feb 

4535 

6+01 


AM 

—.18 

6980 

63.«J 

Apr 

4870 

6+85 

6+35 

6+72 

— JB 

4985 

6580 

Jun 

4+90 

49.15 

4+77 

4895 

— JB 

A+00 

6115 

Auo 

6670 

67 JO 

6+70 

6+97 

-K25 

6+10 

61 ja 

Qd 

6485 

6+20 

64J5 

6505 

+.15 

6+00 

6180 

Dec 

4+02 

A+X 

6+00 

6+25 

+75 

6+10 

65.25 

Feb 




4+20 



E si. Sales 14703 Prev. Sales 18.976 
Prev. day Open InL 40237 oH7l 
FEEDER CATTLE (CMC) 

4+000 lbs.- cents per lb. 









—35 

74J05 

67 JO 


7370 

73.95 

7+45 

7377 


t7>80- 

64.95 

May 

71 JO 

71 JO 

71-52 

7167 


72LBD 

A+J0 


72M 

7270 

TUG 

7549 


' 7275 

67 JO 

Sen 

7115 

7125 

72J0 

7110 

—.17 

71 JO 

67.10 

Oct 

71 JO 

71 J7 

7175 

71 JO 

-JO 

7£45 

70.40 

NOV 

7150 

7155 

7230 

7£55 



Esi. sales 1424 Prev. safes un 
Prev. Day Open Inf. 11,480 up 242 
HOOSICME) 


jQjootbs.- 

5+30 

can Is par lb. 

47J7 Feb 

51 JO 

assn 

5135 

52.15 

-6.90 

5+45 

45.10 

Apr 

4+55 

49 J7 

4+40 

4+97 

+J0 

55.40 

4+40 

Jun 

5385 

507 

5380 

5+07 

-622 

5577 

4+95 

Jui 

5+35 

5+67 

5435 

5+67 

-6.15 

5+37 

47.50 

Aua 

5122 

5365 

5320 

5147 

-677 

5175 

45J0 

Oct 

4+95 

49 JO 

4+95 

4920 

+20 

EBBS 

4+30 

Dec 

4930 

4985 

4930 

4935 

+85 

.4970 

4+2S 

Feb 

4875 

4930 

4+75 

49 JO 

+30 

47 JS 

45.75 

Apr 




4670 



Esi. Sales 7355 Prev. Sales 7,926 
Prev. Day Open Inf. 29.933 up 192 
PORK BELLIES (CME) 

38J00 lbs.- cents per lb. 


BUIS 

4+95 

Feb 

71 JO 

737/ 

71 JO 

7+67 

+1.90 

8170 

6+10 

Mar 

71J5 

7310 

71 JO 

72J0 

+T.13 


61.15 

Mav 

72.90 

7+90 

7140 

7382 


B£47 

AILS 

Jul 

7380 

7380 

72J5 

7142 

+J2 

B0 65 

6070 


71 JO 

71 JS 

7095 

7130 

+J5 

75.15 

63.15 

Feb 

6SJ0 

65.90 

6580 

6580 

+J8 

73J0 

64J0 

Mar 




64J0 



Eat. Sales 6384 Prev. Sales 8432 
Prev. Day Open Inf. 13475 up 133 


Food 


COFFEE C< NY CSCE) 

37J00 lbs.- cents per lb. 

15X50 12150 Mar 15145 15170 150.90 15204 

15200 12201 MOV 15030 15070 14940 149J4 

(4970 12140 Jul 14775 14740 146.10 14672 

147 JO 12740 Sea 14450 14430 14170 14433 

14240 12975 Dec 142J0 14273 14225 14248 

13975 12830 Mar 14030 14140 14030 14140 


13 


13140 


May 
Jul 

Est. Sales 2925 Prev. sales 2921 
Prev. Day Open Ini, 144)0 off 322 
SUGAR WOULD 11 (IfYCSCE) 


13945 

13730 


-143 

—41 

+.13 

S3 

+.17 

-48 

+130 


Season season 
High Low 


Own Hton LOW Close Chn. 



ORANGE JUICE (NYCE) 
15400 lbs.- cents per lb. 


18550 

11850 


174J5 

17+00 

I74J5 

174J0 

+1.15 

18580 

151 JO 


17+40 

17+85 

17+10 

17+60 

+IJ5 

18485 

15580 

Jul 

177 JO 

17+10 

17730 

17S80 

+80 

13280 

157 JS 

Sep 

17+40 

17+50 

17+30 

17+50 

+1.10 

181JD 

157 JO 

NOV 

T75J0 

17530 

17+10 

17525 

+J5 

18080 

156JQ 


17+50 

17438 

17430 

17+60 

+1.10 

177 JO 

15+30 





17+60 

+1.10 

1S25Q 

16+00 





17+60 

+1.10 



JUI 




17+60 

+1.10 


Est. Sales too Prev. Sales 1423 
Prev, Day Open Int. 7490 oft 123 


Metals 


COPPER (COMEX) 


25jOOQ lbs.- cents per lb. 
42.15 61JS Feb 

7120 5530 MOT 

6230 

6M5 


rr. 

— JE 
-<.10 

9230 

5+20 

Apr 

MOV 

UK 

6340 

6100 


8+25 

5780 

JUI 

63.90 

6+15 

6350 




5730 


6+75 

«+« 

6330 

•JJ'- 

—JO 


au» 

Dec 

6575 

45J5 

6+Ab 



8*70 

99 J0 

Jan 

6+15 

*A9n 

6575 

w. 

— AS 
—JS 


41.10 

MOV 

6+80 

4680 

4680 

WJ 


7+40 

41 JO 

Jul 

67 JO 

67 JO 

6+70 


— i5 

70JO 

Est. Sales 

«sm sep 

Dec 4+50 6830 
11800 Prey. Sole* 10J27 

4830 

A 

—JO 
— M 


Prav. Day Open int. 94495 up 1770 
SILVER (COMEX) 



6173 

6173 

6187 

+2J 





142DJ 

5853 

Mar 

6188 

62+0 

41 /3 







6253 





62+0 

6323 

A-9A n 

63QJ 

+28 



Jul 

63+0 

6423 

63+0 

6393 



41+0 

Sen 

6483 

4513 

447J 

649J 

+13 




xxa n 

66+5 

6623 

66+6 



*Tln 





671.1 





emo 

6803 

6808 

4822 



6608 

Ntav 














9408 

4818 





7193 

+1.1 

Dec 




7388 



27SJ0 

277.10 


Est. Sales 14400 Prev. Sale* 19754 
Prev. Day Ooen Inf. 84J50 upX 5 
PLATINUM (NYME] 
a travoz.- dollars per fray or. 

306.50 27740 Feb 

*nnn 37640 Mar 

44730 265-50 Apr Z77J0 27940 £740 £540 

44930 27200 JUl 78100 28430 3270 28190 

39340 276JD Oct 28840 28540 28040 289-40 

37340 28440 Jan 29340 297JH 29940 29540 

Est. Sales 901 Prev. Sales 1418 
Prev. Dav Open ML 15465 effBS 
PALLADIUM (NYMN) 

100 troy az-doUara per at 

16250 10740 Mar 125.75 12640 12575 12625 

Apr 2775 

159 JO 10640 Jun 12345 12440 12325 12425 

14940 10630 Sep 12240 12110 12240 12340 

14140 ID67S Dec 12240 12325 12240 12225 

12730 11440 Mar 12125 

Est. Sales 191 Prev. Sales 437 
Prev. Day Open int. 6484 up 13 
GOLD (COMEX) 

KO iray (bl- dollars per trey os. 

52240 29670 Feb 30170 30270 30140 30220 

29880 MOT 30330 30150 30350 30340 
30040 Apr 305.10 30+90 30420 30530 
30440 Jun 3*940 71020 30070 30980 
30830 Aug 314.10 314.10 31340 31420 
31480 Oct 31880 

31740 Dec 32330 32440 32270 32170 

73540 Feb 326.90 

33040 Apr 33530 33530 33440 33630 

33640 Jun 34040 

34240 Aug 34330 34530 34516 34680 

39570 342J0 Oct 

Dec 

Est. Sales 20400 Prev. Sales 25487 
Prev. Day Open Id. 133444 oft 1722 


31140 

51430 

51040 


49180 

48930 

48530 

49840 

435.70 


+140 

+40 

+30 

+140 

+130 


+12S 

+12S 

+125 

+125 

+12S 


+20 

+.10 

+.10 

+.10 

+.10 

+.10 

—20 


35880 


Financial 


US T. BILLS (IMM) 

51 million- PtS of 100 pci. 


9121 

8739 

Mar 

91 J9 

9133 

91J8 

91J9 

+33 

9131 

87.14 

Jim 

91 JO 

91J5 

7189 

91 JO 

+J6 

9133 

8+94 


90.95 

90.95 

m» 

9031 

+J6 

ftt-90 

8177 

Dec 

9030 

9033 

9030 

90J9 

+35 

9075 

8+60 

Mar 

90.18 

9070 

90.18 

9+14 

+J5 









9030 

8830 





09 J2 

+35 

8933 

8933 

Dec 

8989 

9939 

8939 

8939 

+J4 


Est. Sales 9726 Prev. Sales 12496 
Prev. Day Open ML 48440 up 19474 
t0 YR. TREASURY (CBT) 

$100400 nr In- pts A 32nds of 100 pet 


81 

70-25 

Mor 

81-17 

81-71 

81-11 

81-14 

+4 

82-3 

708 

Jun 

80-21 

80-26 

80-17 

80-22 

+6 







80-3 

. +6 

80-22 

75-13 

Dec 




79-15 

+4 

808 

75-18 

Mar 




78-29 

+4 

79-24 

77-22 

Jun 




78-14 

+4 

Est. Sale* 


Prev. Sales 7353 





Prev. Dav Open Inf. 42724 off 789 
US TREASURY BONDS (CBT) 
fiPd-siaajoD-irfsAJanitsaHaopctj 


77-15 

77-15 

76-2 

76-5 

72-30 

7B-16 

70-3 

69-26 

69-12 

19-2 

EriJoln 


57-27 

57-30 

57-10 

57-8 

57-2 

56-29 

56-29 

56-25 

56-27 

64-3 

6+21 


72-22 
71-20 
70-28 
70-7 
69-24 
49-7 
68-25 
Dec 68-13 
Mar 

Jun 67-30 67-30 
Sea 67-23 67-36 

Prev. Sa last 13.197 


Mor 

Jun 

Sep 

Dec 

Mar 

Jun 


72-27 

71-31 

71 

70-12 
69-26 
69-9 
68-2 9 
68-17 


73-15 

71-14 

BP 

69-16 

6+5 

60-24 

68-13 

67-27 

67-21 


73-22 

71-21 

7+38 

708 

69-22 

6+7 

68-26 

68-15 

6+5 

67-28 

67-21 


+9 

49 

49 

49 


Prev. Day Open lnLZl+745 off 293 
GNMA (CBT) 

CTOtUMOprin- pts A 32ndsof 100 PCf 

££ 

69-4 

68-13 
68 
678 

874 ___ 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 565 

Prev. Day Open int. 7,195 off 47 
CERT. DEPOSIT (IMM) 


57-5 

Mar 

4+9 

49- U 

0+5 

IU 

+5 

57-17 

Jun 

68-16 

48-23 

<8-15 

48-19 

+5 

59-13 





67-31 

+5 

S9~4 

Dec 




67-1 J 

+5 

58-20 

Mar 




66-29 

+5 

5845 

Jun 




66-14 

+5 

65-21 

Sen 




66-1 

+S 









—.14 

51 million- ptyaf IM PCf 







4J4 






—a 

91 JO 

■533 

Mar 

9122 

Via 

9137 

91a 

+83 





+93 

+75 

+77 

-a 

91 J0 

8530 

Jun 

98.73 

V0J4 

90 JO 

9039 

+83 








-.17 

9030 

8530 

Sen 

98.18 

90.11 

90.17 

90.13 

+83 




531 


520 



90.17 

8534 

Dee 





+83 

775 



530 




-.13 

59.78 

8+54 

Mar 

8933 

8933 

8933 

8926 

+83 








—.19 



Jun 





+83 








— .19 

8734 

8734 





■834 

+83 









EN.Scries 

644 Prev. Salas 

470 




Est. Sales 15-625 Prev. Sales 7275 




Prev. Day Open Irrt. U337 up 69 





Prev. Day Open Int. 92711 up 138 





EURODOLLARS (IMM) 






COCOA (NYC5CE ) 






SI mlllioivptsDflOOpct. 












91 38 

85.14 

Mor 

90.93 

90.95 

9034 

9088 

+83 








m 

9038 

B2J9 

Jun 

9040 

90J3 

9032 

9035 

+83 




2350 

2358 

2280 

2285 

—81 

9033 

8+53 

Sep 

8935 

B937 

89 J7 

89 J9 

+83 



Jul 


23X 

2255 

2258 

—82 




8939 

89 JO 

89 JO 

eva 

+83 








—80 

89 J8 

8+10 

Mar 

wa 

«930 

8+93 


+83 




7140 

2140 

2110 

3110 


89.15 

8+73 

Jun 

8835 

8838 

8838 

8830 

+83 

2145 

2020 





2094 

—40 

8834 

8738 


8838 

8838 

8832 

■831 

+83 

21X 

2080 





2094 

—40 

8927 

07.93 

DOC 

88.10 

88.10 

88.10 

8884 

+83 

Est. Sales 






Est. Solas 32-322 

Prev. Sales 31J66 




Prev. Day Open InL £6373 up 422 




| Prev. Day Open Int.lQSJAl up 97 






Season Sanson 
HKrti Low 

BRITISH POUND (IMM) 

S p«r pound- 1 point eauaissoaoi 
13170 1Jȣ Mar 1.10*0 I.MO0 I.1BS 1.1005 

1J3S0 14890 Jun 14985 1.1000 14938 14195 

13450 14785 Sep 14940 14945 14900 14BS 

14710 14750 Dec 14900 14)940 14900 14925 

Est. Sale* £681 Prev. Sales 6J13 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 22469 un246 
CANADIAN DOLLAR (IMM1 


>20 


—25 

-25 


4050 

.7105 

4585 

J564 

JSM 


7446 

J449 

J464 

J474 

7487 


Mor 

J409 

J4M 

.7472 

7478 

—11 

Juft 

.74/1 

.7477 

J457 

7461 

—11 

Sen 

7465 

7465 

7444 

7449 

—16 

Dec 

.7447 

.7447 

7447 

7«1 

—17 

Mor 

7447 

7447 

.7447 

7435 

-81 


Est. Sales U75 Prev. Sole* 2497 
Prov. Day Open int. 10418 UP 550 
FRENCH FRANC (IMM) 

‘!5r ne :, , .iri5i; l ‘.SS"!,OT« ..mis .me -u 

.11020 .10100 Jun .10075 —45 

.10430 .10130 Sep .10030 .10030 .10030 .10025 — 45 

Est. Sales 60 Prev. Sates 681 
Prev, Day OJwn Inf. 2493 up 653 

GERMAN MARK (IMM) 

2 per mart- 1 point enuals 504001 
4110 J114 MOT 4114 4118 4102 4111 —7 

4733 4136 Jun 4135 4138 4125 4132 —7 

4545 4163 Sen 4158 4159 JIM 4154 —7 

JS18 4205 D« 4186 4184 JT86 JIM -8 

4251 4251 Mor 4238 —7 

Ext. Sales 18413 Prev. Sales 22416 
Prev. Day Open int. 44481 oft 1,153 
JAPANESE YEN (IMM) 

Spot vetL I potnleaua Is 28400001 

004695 403859 Mar 403*47 483872 . 003856 JCM44 +3 

OSWSSO . 00X84 Jun 403885 4*3*99 4 03882 4*3*90 +3 

004150 40393 0 Sep 40393B J103932 403915 4039 22 —3 

004350 483976 D*C 403965 4039*5 403965 403942 

Est. Sales 6379 Prev. Sales 7303 
Prev. Day Ocen Inf. 16401 up 985 

SWISS FRANC (IMM) 


.-jKl ^.-'■,,.11 

J679 

3AOI 

3670 

+7 





3718 

3689 

3701 

+6 




3732 

3732 

3732 

3735 


JSM 

3781 

Dec 

3777 

3782 

3773 

3775 



Est. Sales 12472 Prev. Sales 11999 
Prev. Day Open Inf. 24,247 aft 269 


Industrials 


LUMBER (CME) 

1 30400 bd. n.- S per IJOObd. ft. 

220-40 13940 Mar 15130 153.10 15140 15110 

22540 14740 May 14TJ0 16140 16140 16140 

23030 15100 Jul 16740 16940 16740 16820 

197 JO 157 JO Sep 172J0 17160 172.40 17X00 

184.10 167.00 Nov 17440 17440 17340 17190 

18740 17540 Jan 17830 17830 17830 17730 


19940 17840 Mar 

Est. Sales 2341 Prev. Sales 2J32 
Prev. Dav Open int. 9491 up 15 

COTTON 2 (NYCE) 


18140 


+130 

+.90 

+130 

+1JO 

+140 

+130 

+240 


50800 lb+-cenlsper lb. 
7935 6+25 Mor 

64*0 

«5a 

6+51 

6+18 

+20 

79a 

65J2 

MOV 

65.75 

6+25 

65.75 

6+28 

+40 

7985 

6+55 

Jul 

6+88 

6730 

6+80 

67a 

+43 

77a 

6784 

Oct 

67a 

67a 

67a 

67a 

+.15 

7380 

am 

Dec 

47a 

67 J5 

67a 

67a 

+.15 

7+75 

4835 

Mar 

6850 

6+50 

6+50 

6845 


7080 

7085 

Est. Sates 

69.11 May 
69a Jul 

£500 Prev. Sates £173 


69.10 

tfiM 

+82 

+J7 


Prev. Dav Open Int. 19467 up 171 
HEATING OIL (NYME) 

42400 na I- cents aer gal 

ms — - ■ 

8275 

B£60 

78.40 

4849 6SJS Jul 6830 6*35 

Est Sales Prev. Sates II476 

Prev. Day Open Int. 17411 up541 
CRUDE OIL (NYME) 

1 400 DWr dollars per bbL 



Mor 

7X10 

7130 

TL10 

7130 

+94 



49a 

7050 

49.X 

7050 

+41 

6+00 


6840 

69X 

68a 

69a 

+52 

4150 

Jun 

6840 

4ea 

6+20 




Tuesdays 

MSE 

Closing 


Tobies Indude the notlonwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street 


12 Worth 
High Low Slock 


Dlv. YU PE 


SlL 

IMS High Law 


Close 

QuoLCtrse 


(Continued from Page 8) 


225* 19ft NwtP pf 244 103 
24% 84b NwStW 

304b 30% Norton 
3214 21 U Norwst 
58* 48% NwstPt 
574b 50 NwstPt 
56 20ft Novo 
39% 26 Nucor 
9ft 4% NutiiS 


I 
5 

240 SJ 12 554 
140 63 14 345 
6.15*113 140 

541*1U 10 

4*e .9 12 2486 
JA 14 14 33* 
42 6.9 


79H 584b NYHEX 640 7J * 945 


224b 22% 224b— ft 
124* 13% 121b + % 
384b 37% 36 
27% Z7 27% + % 
54 53% 54 + % 

53% 51 52%+lU 

30% 30% J04b + 9, 
371b 36% 37% + % 

4% 4% «4b 

78% 77% 774b + % 


5M 2 Ookind 
34% 23% OaklteP 132 
3546 23% OcdPet 230 
17 9% OcctP wt 

1129b B0 OccIPpf 330 


23% 20 OccIPpf 230 113 

51% 48% OcdPpf +25 123 

113 105% OccIPpf 1530 1+1 

108% 101% Ocdpf 1+42 13.9 

34% 22 ODECO 1J» 33 U 

3146 24% Oaden 130 53 15 

14% 94b OhfaEd 134 1X0 

34 26% Oh Ed pf +56 133 

53% 41 OtiEdPt 7J4 1X6 

604b 45 OH Ed at O0 137 

2646 18% OhEdPt 330 1X5 

28% 71 OtlEdpr 193 1+1 

14% 1046 ObEdpf 130 115 
64% 51 OnEdpf 9.12 1+0 
62 47% OftEdpf 834 1X3 

87% 76 OtlEPt 1038 123 
91 77 OhE Pf 1076 122 

17% 12% OrUMafr 30 23 19 
62 S3 OlIPpfC 730 123 
19% 15 OhPpfG 227 11.9 
108 98 OOP ptA 1+00 1X2 

107 98% OOP pfF 1+00 1X1 

61% 51% OhPpfD 776 123 
23% 19% OklaGE 230 9.1 B 
8% 7 OMoGpf 30 10.7 


34ft 

25% Olln 

150 

43 

9 

910* 

2Sto 




9 

131 

22* 

14 Oneida 

JO 

+0 

10 


J2U 

»% ONEOK 

£56 

88 

10 

367 

25% 

19* OnnRk 

£04 

83 

9 

71 

13% 

5% Orange 

53/ 5.4 

12 

383 

a* 

19% OrlonC 

.76 

11273 

83 

14 

8% OrlonP 



36 

739 

10ft 

6% Orion rt 

a 

62 


2 

30% 


2.75 

94 


X 

2*ft 

1S% OutbMi 

4* 

£1 

10 

784 

SOft 

17 Ovm/r 

M 

£1 

13 


20 

13 OvSTllp 

50 

38 

9 

647 

Xto 

25% OwerrC 

/a 

U 

9 

1055 

46* 

31 to Owetilll 

158b 42 

9 

1170 

16ft 

10% Oxford 

M 

16 

a 

573 


846 2% 2% 2ft— % 

43 13 21 33% 33% 33to — % 

83 7 4644 28% 28% 28%— 4b 

2 11% 11% 11%— % 

19 4 914. VI 46 914. +3 

2 22 22 22 
58 SOL. Sfflb 50% 

140 1104b 109% 110% + % 
1 105% 105% 105% — % 
590 25% 25% 2$ft — % 
304 31 20% 30% + % 

6 1454 14% 14 14% + % 

ma 34 33% 34 + 4i 

2400z 5346 53b. 53L, 4246 
WHte 604b 60 m 
28 26 25% 25*. 4 % 

57 28 2746 7746 4 % 

14 1J% 14* 14% + to 
lOOz 65 65 65 41 

300z 62% 62 63% 4 Vi 

1109* 87 87 87 

2540Z 88 87% 88 

344 16% 16% 14% — % 
ISb 60% 60% 60% — % 
13 19 19 19 

901107 1D6 (06 —2 

WrlB7 105% 107 +1 

10Z 60% 60% 60%— % 

271 21% 71% 219b 

/Oz b 7% 7%— % 


8% 8% 8%— % 
1646 16% 16% — % 
32b. 31% 31% — % 
24% 34% 24% + % 
10 9% 99b + % 

24% 24% 24% + % 
10% 104k 104k— % 
8 % 8 % 8 % 

2+4 2846 28%— % 
31% 29% 3016 4 46 
31* 304. 31 4 % 

17% 16W 16% 

36% 35% 36% 4 % 
40% 40% 40% 

17% 12 12V# — % 


MW 4gJS IK 


na 

3456 


2440 

24X 

2434 

2+76 

+34 

31J5 

2+47 


2+10 

26a 

2+09 

2+39 

+a 


2+X 


25.90 

2+25 

2U3 







2585 




vs* 

2+10 

JUI 

2548 

25.72 

2545 

KAS 

— JB 

2957 

2+25 


2540 

2540 

2sa 

2555 

—.10 

2950 

2+08 

Sen 

2555 

2555 

2555 

2555 

—.15 

Est. Sales 


Prev. Sates 38578 






10 PHH 


3.9 

13 

900 

X 

79ft 

X + ft 



140 

42 

9 

796 

JBH 

30 

Xto— to 

35% 


40 

23 


953 

26% 

25% 

24% +1% 

19to 

13U PSAdpf 

UD 

94 


948 

19* 

19* 

19* + % 

13% 

11% PncAS 

150 115 


S3 

13 

12ft 

13 

1716 

12ft PocGE 

1J2 103 

6 

SAX 

17% 

14ft 

14ft- to 

47ft 

30ft PocLtg 

132 

85 

11 

653 

39ft 

39% 

39% — ft 

39 


MD 

+S 

14 

274 

27* 

37* 

27* 

10% 

5* PacRn 

JBr 

J 


40 

6ft 




Prev. Day Ooen ML 6+93S off 199 


Stock Indexes 


SP COMP. INDEX (CMB) 
point* and cent s 

18248 1SU0 Men- 18170 18270 180JO 181JB0 

185-45 154.10 Jun 18500 185.95 16X50 18+10 

limn 164LOD Sep 1B875 189J0 1BU0 16770 

197 JO 17570 Dec 191 JO 191J0 18970 190J0 

Est- Sales Prev. Sales 7L835 

Prev. Day Open InL 5M01 up 2384 

VALUE LINE (KCBT) 
patois and cents 

202.10 160.10 Mar 2*170 70230 19970 20040 

28+00 17X00 Jun 20500 20+50 20+90 20473 

20X65 18575 S*P 208.15 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 5,184 

Prav. Day Open int. 7769 up 906 


NYSE COMP. INDEX (HYFE1 
paints and cants 

10XW 8+20 Mar 10540 10+00 10+40 10X05 

10740 90 JO Jun 10775 107.90 10640 10630 

10970 9175 S*P 10975 M97S 10975 10870 

110JS 10170 Doc TIMS 110.95 11X95 11030 

Est. Sales 15399 Prev. Sales 15403 
Prev. Day Open InL 11341 ueB 


19% 13% PacRsPf 200 128 

17% 119* PacSd 40 " 

71% 52% PacTeie 540 

13 9% PacTln 40 

26V6 21 PacHcp 272 

334b 27% Pact! pf +07 124 

41 234b PalnWb 40 

32% 26% Pa InW Bt 2.25 

3V 24% PaJmBc 170 

2416 70% PanABk 46 

7% 4 PanAm 

4% 1% PanAwt 

19% 13% Pandcfcn 70 
39% 31 PantiEC 270 
52b 3 PontPr 
166* 17 Poor eft JO 

Wft 10* Pordvn 
76 17% ParkE s 

126* 59b Park Drl 
399* 2516 PnrkH 
18% 17% ParirPn 
5% 1% PafPtrl 
27% 14 PaviNW 
17% 11% PayNP 
21% 13% PavCtft 
13% 616 Peabdv 
Ift Pengo 
53% 363b PenCan 
55% 44% Penney 
25% 19% PoPL 
27% 30 PePLpf 


.16 

1.12 

32 

74 


276 


128 


50 

IS* 

15% 

15ft 



% 

25 

13 

147 

16* 

lift 

16% 



7J 

8 

5404 

X* 

69* 

X 

+ 

% 

+1 


4 

10% 

9Tk 

9ft 



* 

U 

7 

803 

24ft 

»% 

34% 



U 

134 


.17 

37% 

.17* 

32* 



* 

IJ 

73 

4913 

47ft 

40* 

42% 

+1% 



940 

33ft 

32% 

X* 

+1 

12 

10 

591 

» 

37ft 

X 

+ 

% 

£9 

8 

3 

33 

22ft 

22 ft 

— 

% 



3807 


4* 

Aft 



ft 



311 

7% 

3 

7 



IJ 

If 

12*7 

19ft 

18ft 

I9to 

+ 

ft 

58 

10 

937 

19* 

39% 

39* 

+ 

ft 


13 

XI 

416 

4 

4% 

— 

ft 

£1 

14 

1ST 

16 

13ft 

15* 





913 


17% 





12 

46 

17% 

16% 

16% 



25 


934 

7 

6ft 

6% 

— 

to 

79 

12 

477 

39ft 

39% 

39* 

+ 

% 

12 

70 

175 

16ft 

16% 

16% 

+ 

ft 



198 

7% 

2 

2 



13 

18 

924 

26% 

24% 

24ft 




47 13 714 
J 18 236* 
177 
380 


24 


1416 14 14% + % 

21 20% 20% + to 

8% 8V,— to 

% % 


‘ft 


Commodify Indexes 


Moody's- 

Reuters. 


Close Previous 

TO-lOf 9TI.10 f 

Z028J0 2-01400 

126-32 125.91 

24730 24730 

Moody’s : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1931. 
p - preliminary; f - final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. 18, 1931. 

Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1974. 


DJ. Futures __________ 

Com. Research Bureau- 


58% 48% Panwpf 250 
2396 20 Penwpf 140 
46% 30*4 Pewuol 270 
16% 916 PeopEn 1-06 
37 7316 Pep Bov M 

45% 34% Pops! Co US 
30% 17% Perk El 36 __ 
10% 796 Prmtan lJ5nU7 7 

22 17% PeryDr 78 17 16 



12 

744 

a 

52* 

52* 


u 

+9 

8 

1133 

48ft 

48* 

48ft 

+ 

% 

inn 

8 

■13 

34ft 

24ft 

74ft 



1£9 


2B0z 

35* 

35 

X 



110 


SOr 

44 

46 

44 

— 


124 


X 

77* 

27ft 

37% 

+ 

ft 

120 


19 

34* 

24% 

34% 

uem 

% 

1£6 


340/ 

46% 

66 

66% 

+1* 

17J 


18 

36ft 

X 

Xto 

+ 

* 

129 


17 

29ft 

29% 

29% 

— 

% 

11J 


lOr 

94 

94 

94 



111 


70/ 

62 

41* 

61* 

— - 

* 

53 

17 

400 

Xft 

X* 

X* 

+ 

to 

+4 


1 

57% 

57% 

57% 

+ 

ft 

+8 


79 

23% 

n* 

23% 

+ 

* 

43 

X 

985 

45 

44% 

44* 

+ 

11 

+4 

7 

431 

16% 

16 

14% 

+ 

% 

10 

17 

B? 

37ft 

36* 

37ft 

+ 

* 

u 

31 

3823 

44% 

40* 

44% 

+ 

% 

£0 

17 

773 

29 

XU 

28% 

— 

% 


602 

«e 


896 

?'% 


8% 


896 + lb 
+ % 


3896 87 - Petrie- MO X7 W- 5213 
379* 249* PetRs 3.72el+4 74 

179b 14 PetRspf 1-57 lflsO 25 

796 4 Ptrlnv UJ3KHJ 13 

<2% 29% Pfizer 1.48 i7 13 3435 

27% 12% PtxripD 1878 _ 

4896 34 PtWlppr 5J0 11.1 85 4516 45% 45% + % 

41% 20% PtllbrS J4 17 1313057 41% 40% 41W+ 96 

16 9 PtrilaEI 270 13J 6 1867 16 15% 16 + % 


.% 25% 25%- % 
15»4 15% 15to 
496 4% 496 

4096 40 40%+ 9b 

19% 19% 19% 


Market Guide 


CBT: CMcago Board of Trad* 

CME: Chicago Mercantile Exchange 

IMM: International Monetary Market 

Of Chicane Mercantile Exchange 
NY CSCE : Now York Cocoa. Sugar. Caffe* Exchange 

NYCE: New York Cotton Exchange 

COMEX: Commodity Exchange. New York 

NYME: Now York Mercantile Exchange 

Karr: Kansas atv Board of Trade 

NYFE: New Yam Future* Exchange 


32% 25 PtdlE pf +40 1+1 
34 25% PNIE P< +68 147 

52 40 PtVUE of 7JM U4 

62% 50% PhilEpf 875 1+7 
10% 9% Phil E of Ml 1X6 
10% 4% PhilEpf 173 116 
10 69b PtdlE pi ITS 137 


100z 31% 31% 31to 
SSz 33 33 33 — 96 

TOO*. 51% 519b 51% 

260z 62% 6116 61% —116 
110 10% UMb 10% — % 
122 9% 99k 996 

107 9% 99b 9%— % 


117% 

97 

Phil pf 

17.12 

1+7 

limz116* 116* 116* 

— % 

111/ 

■7 

PhilEpf 15J5 

Ml 

20/107 

106 

107 

+2 

72 

55 

PhilEpf 

952 

123 

5760* 78 

m 

X 

+11 

4/ 

SI 

PhilEpf 

9a 

1+3 

320* 67 

66 

6/ 

+ % 

56 

44 

PhilEpf 

/a 

1+0 

230* 55* 

55 

55* +2 

a 

15* 

PMISub 

IJ2 

7J 11 

733 18 

17ft 

IB 

+ ft 


London Commodities 

FeJb. 5 

Figures In sterling per metric ton. 
Gasoil In U.S. dollars per metric ton. 
Goldin U-Si dollars per ounce. 


LOW 


Prev leas 


Mav 

Aug 

Oct 

Dec 

Mor 

May 


Mav 

Jly 

See 

Dec 

Mar 


2025 2400 2040 


High 
SUGAR 

12140 11870 11860 11BJ0 17140 171 JO 
12960 12570 12560 12600 12970 12960 
137 JO 13X60 13+00 13+40 13760 13840 
14460 14170 14140 14160 14+60 14103 
N.T. N.T. 148.00 149 JO 152.00 154J® 
N.T. N.T. 16200 16370 165J0 164-DO 
17270 17000 168J0 17060 17100 17X4)0 
2J61 tots of JO tons. 

COCOA 

7766 2708 2723 2725 2750 2757 
2785 2726 2740 2744 27*6 27*7 
2767 2701 2710 272D 2748 Z749 
27*3 2.186 &192 2,197 2724 2726 
7/*n 2J4S 2J46 2JJ4S 2J64 24)68 
24U0 24)29 24128 2405 24141 24U5 

urn 24M4 24)31 24TIB 

7726 lots of 1 iO tans. 

COFFEE 

Mar 7408 2790 2790 2794 2789 7790 

May 2430 2408 2412 1414 2413 2415 

Jly 2440 2420 2426 2428 2422 2425 

Sep 2439 2421 1430 2435 2423 1434 

Nov 2452 2440 2445 2446 1*16 1441 

Jan 2435 1432 2440 1444 2420 1434 

Mar 2440 1448 2432 2435 2416 2430 

2J08 lata of 5 ton+ 

GASOIL 

Feb 23075 23070 23075 23091 231JS 23100 
223J0 271-75 22150 22175 22+75 22508 
21775 21500 21675 217 JO 71775 218-00 
215J0 21375 21560 21575 21675 21650 
21+25 21+08 21+25 21+50 21575 21+00 
21+00 21+00 Z1100 21+00 21+00 7L5J0 
N.T. N.T. 71 (MX) 27870 21500 22050 
N.T. N.T. 21X00 221 JO 21+00 225J0 
N.T. N.T. 210JM 22+D0 71570 23070 
1598 lots of HO tans. 

GOLD 

API 30570 30+70 N.Q. NA NJJ NA 
9 lata Of 100 trov OZ. 

Sowress: Reuters and London Petroleum Ex- 
change laasalli. 


Mar 

Apt 

May 

Jun 

Jly 

Aue 

Sop 

Oct 


DM Futures Options 

Feb. 5 

W. Gam Morfc-QUOO moffcs* czaCi w nurt 




igJsRMer Joe Seal 

x “Tib i6i — 

31 044 +97 140 

32 111 W UQ 

33 M2 079 060 

34 OJl 9.14 078 


0J2 

DJ7 

074 

UP 

M8 

2J» 


049 


XI2 
071 

068 

173 »74 

172 175 

274 - 


Estimated total *sL 5667 
CNN: Stan. *aL +6R apsa toL 39783 
Peis : Mao. <0L 3738 opm Inf . 20602 
Source: CME. 



armwATioNAt 

OEMMOUMUCAL 

M IS T1TUT E 

CERTIFICATES ACCEPTED AND 
RECOG NlMO ALL OVER THE WORLD 

ANTWERP NEW YORK 

tef 

ONE WEEKINTENSJVE 
DIAMOND AND COLORED 
STONES COURSES. 

Fa> noo Milo, mil ion 

Mwipstroe* 1/7 - 2018 Antwe r p 
TeU 03/ 232.0738 Beiflkin 



KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Malaysian cants per kilo 
Oom 



BU 

Ask 

BU 


185a 

18+00 

187.00 

Mar 

19235 

19175 

193a 

Apr 

if6a 

197a 

197a 

May — 

TO SO 

ana 

300a 

Jun - 

xi a 

202a 

201a 


Volume: 37 lota. 


SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Singapore cents per kilo 


RSS 1 Feb _ 
RSS1 Mar_ 
RS5 2 Feb_ 
RSS3 F*0_ 
R554 FBtJ _ 

RSS 5 Feb— 


16+00 

17075 

157JJ0 

155J0 

148JQ 

140.00 


16SJ0 

178J0 

I5BJ0 

156JU 

•SSSdB 

142-00 


TB8J0 

19360 

19BJ0 

Ti un 

20X50 


Previous 
Bid At 
1«JD U+J 
17175 17225 
15X00 159 JB 
15+00 157 JO 
49 JO 151 JO 
141 JO 14100 


KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
Maiavilan rlimrib per 35 tans 
Close 



PM 

Ask 

Feb 

1.150 

UH 

Mar . — 

1.140 

1.175 

Apl 

1.130 

1,170 

Mav 

M2S 

1.165 

Jun 

1.110 

1,160 

Jlv 

l.TOO 

1.150 


MOO 

1.1X 



1-140 

Jan 

.UW. 

1.140 


Prev lees 
BJd Ask 


Volwno: 0 lots of 25 ton*. 
Source: Reuters. 


U*o 
1.160 
1,150 
1.140 
1.130 
1.120 
1,120 
1.110 
1.1 HI 


1715 

1710 

1,280 

1.190 

1.110 

1,120 

1.170 

l.ltO 

1.140 


S&P 100 Index Options 
Feb. S 


Mm Ft* Mar AN Hn 

150 - - 32 - 

IS 341* IM V - 

MS m> HU & - 

IS U* 14% 16 - 

IN m nu n% m 

175 4 M R II 

at i* A n ) 

185 % 1% 3ft 4% 

ns VU b 2+1 


- 1/4 1/4 - 

1/16 1(4 % — 

1/4 1/4 % % 

1/16 ini 9/4 1% 
I/M 11/4 1+ W 
9/4 l» M 3M 
1*4 A » 

M 7M 74 I 
Mto W» - — 


2742H 

M.5HH5 

Tata set ntana BLU9 
THstpel SMntaL54L01 
todec 

M** 17979 L*W 17753 
. Te o na : cnoE. 


0*4817847-045 


Italy’s Unemjdoymenl Rises 

Reuters 

■ ROME — Italy’s unemployment 
rate rose to 10-2 percent in October 
from 10.1 percent in July, but was 
imchangpa from October 1983, the 
government announced Tuesday in 
its quarterly report. Its survey 
showed that 2.37 nriHion people 
were unemployed in October com- 
pared with 134 million in July. 


■Gold OptlOllS (piets iiS/az.). 


!|3 

U. 

May 

A* 

1 ®o 

U5DMJ0 

3+253575 

pi i 

1 300 

7 JO- BSD 

17251373 


1 310 

250 375 

11.50130) 

TV 002050 

1 32) 

a/s- IX 

775-925 

1425-1575 

1 SO 

025- IJO 

+50 600 

1 . -1IT 1 

1 340 


200 400 

7X0 850 


GaU 30175-30X25 

Vfclems White WeM&A. 

I. punt 4m M*p| Wmk 
1211 Geneve 1, Sw ton rik m d 
TeL 31*251 - Tda 2S3IS 


Paris Commodities 
Feb. 5 

Subb- I n Frendi Francs per metric tan. 
Other Rsure* bi Francs par lOOks. 

cm 



MW) 

LOW 

Clare 

5 UGAR 





Mar 

1.377 

U 4 A 

U 6 B 

078 

May 

1.425 

Mil 

1 J 1 S 

M 18 

Aug 

1-502 

1 J 9 S 

M 95 

iai 

Oct 

UMp 

1 JS 5 

USB 

MAS 

Doc 

N.T. 

N.T. 

MX 

1-450 

Mar 

U 5 S 

1,745 

no 

1735 

Est. vol.: Mffli lots of 50 tors. Prev 


sales: 1643 lets. Open Interest: 2X500 
COCOA 


May 

Jly 


Ooc 


2447 

IMS 

N.T. 

L4D1 

N.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 


2774 2773 


N.T. 

2^08 

H.T. 

N.T. 

N.T. 


2776 —34 

2792 —36 

2765 — —40 

2750 2700 —15 

— 2730 —2D 

— 2725 —28 

— 2725 —20 


voL: 220 lots of 10 tens. Prev. actual 
■alei: 19V lots. Open interest: 931 


Mar 

£865 

£541 

£955 

2547 

+ 13 

Mav 

K_T. 

l+T. 

£543 

£9*0 


Jlv 

1SX 

2-990 

£575 


+ 15 

SeP 

£595 

£990 

£500 

2500 

+ 18 

Nov 

N.T. 

N.T. 

un 


+ 20 

Jan 

f+T. 

N.T. 

£575 


+ 18 

Mar 

N.T. 

N.T. 

£578 




sales: 

vol: 23 lots at 5 tarn. 
2 lots. Open interest: 221 

Prev. 

mmi 


Source: Bourse Ou Commerce. 


London Metals Feb. 5 

Figures ki stertlng per metric ton. 
Sliver in pence p*r frw ounce. 


Today 

High grade cooper cathodes: 
soot 1769 J0 177000 T7SL00 175+00 

3 months 1787 JO 178X00 177+00 177+50 
Capper eathodas: 

SPOf 1766J0 1768-00 1750 JO 17SSJ0 

3 months 1781 JO 178+00 1T65J0 176870 
9,97570 9785.00 9.750 JO 9,96X00 
9.931J0 9.93X00 9.915.00 9.92000 
347 JO 34M0 340J0 341 JO 

349 JO 35070 36+00 34570 
762J0 76370 74+00 74770 

759-50 76000 74+00 74+50 

55X00 55+00 548J0 549 JO 
571 JO 57270 567 JO 56X00 


Tin: spot 
3 months 
Lood:spat 
3 months 
Zinc: gaol 
3 months 
Sitver:spot 
3 months 
Aluminium: 
soot 99370 99+00 98170 982JD 

3 months 1J2600 1726J0 1J12JB 171370 

Nlefcelispot +57070 +58000 +™iy) i.ctiwi 

3 months +SBSJ0 +S9070 +SX500 +54570 

Source: Reuters. 


^ Caah Prices Feb. 5 


Commodity and IMI 
Coffee 4 Sartos. Ol. 


Prlntcioth 64/30 38 %.vd_ 

Steel Milefs (Pm.), tan 

iron 7 Fdrv. Phils, (an 

Steal scrap No 1 hw PUL _ 

Lead Spot, a> 

Coaaer Mac), to - 
Tin (Straits), lb . 


Zto&E. St. L. Basts, n>. 
Palladium, ai — 

Silver N.Y. a 

Source; AP. 



Year 

42% 

XU PltnvB 

1J4 

£5 




84 

S3* PltnBpf 

£12 




152 

15% 

9ft PltWn 





084 

15ft 

8ft PlonRs 

a 

15 

13 

473a 

4S3a 

22% 





2ua 

213a 

13* 







35* 





2+28 

22* 

15ft PogoPd 

M 

3J X 

67-70 

69*b-7Q 








ftviAe 

11% Pamirs 






27m 






161 

19ft 

13* Portae 

JO 

£2 6V 



IB 

13 ParfGE 

M2 10J 

6 


^Dividends Feb. 5 


Company 


Per Amt 
INCREASED 


Pay Roc 


Plenum PuMINi 
StmwlCes 


7* 

75 


3-27 

3-9 


3-12 

2-19 


Compusave 


Airhorna FreHM 
Aasodafed Banc 
Batdor Electric 
Bonfcamerlca Corn 

Bovertv Ent 
Ctachmatl Bed 


STOCK 

_ 100 % 
STOCK SPLIT 
MacMillan Inc — 2^#r-l 
USUAL 

a .is 

Q .19 

a 79 

a ji 

i I 

Di am ond Crystal 
DIT Current 
eeco Inc 
General Binding 
Graham Carp 
Inca Ltd 
Lockheed Carp 
Loetcon 
NCHCorp 
New Jersov Res 
Ooklte Predu cH 
Pioneer Group 
Putnam CV Tr 
Putnam Inv Fd 
Putnam Inc Fd 
Putnam Utah Tr 
Rohm A Haas Co 
Service Merch 
SotvIks 
S outhwest water 
Storer Comm 
Tetetlex Inc 
TransTectmelogv 
Trko industrlas 
UKrnavstems 
Xerox Cora 


3-1 MS 


3-1 

2- 15 

3- 29 

z-a 

4h» 

4- 1 
3-29 
7-28 


a 77% 

o jn 

Q J6 
M 766 
M .18% 
50 


7D 

J9 3-25 

78 3-1 

79 3-20 

Jt 3-1 
J5 3-15 
.IS 3-11 
75 4-8 

.18 3-15 
51 +1 

3-8 
3-8 


2-20 

7-20 

2-25 

2- 25 
3-1 

3- 25 
38 

+20 

3-8 

MS 

3-1 

2-25 

2-28 

+1 


MS 

3-7 

3-1 

2- 14 

3- 29 
36 
31 
M4 
MS 
MB 
330 
MS 
M4 
2-1* 
3-22 

3-1 

MS 

2- 15 
3-1 
2-0 
76 

7-15 

3- 15 
MS 
3-28 
3-21 
3-31 

M 

MS 

2-14 

7-11 

2-15 

3-1 


A-Aeaeal; M-MonftKy.- a Quwtaifr; S-SamF 


Source: UPI. 


Company Earnings 

Rbvwiub and profits. In millions, or* hi local currencies 
unless otherwise Indicated 


EG AG 


(Other Earnings on Page II) 



Year HU 1982 Year mi 1983 

Net int 1+1 15J Revenue 601.1 57U 

Per Share 375 171 Oner Net (a)+5 1357 

f*W Quarter net Includes Ooer 9xar_ - US 
uaJa otStSJ million from sale a: toss. Nct^n&mtepcwL 


Yi 

Revenue 
Nef Int 
Per Share __ 


m ktnqn Brew. 


ethOaor. 

Revenue 

Net Inc. 

Per Share 

Year 

Revenue __ 

Net inc. 

Per Shore 


19*4 

285.7 

177 

673 

1M4 

1441 

45J 

153 


1413 

2967 

IOTA 

141 

m2 

USL 

5657 

2.1S 


H o matta u d Rn. 

JftQwr. 1484 1483 

Net Inc +9 13 

Per Share-. 151 050 


otseeurmes 

Lena Star btd, 

^ 4% Quer. 1484 1481 

Revenue 257.1 335.1 

Net Inc 385 387 

Per Share— 27* U9 

„ Year 148* 1483 

Revenue--, 1J0Q. 91U 

jjel lita- SX4 217 

Per Share— £60 077 

«WJm toctude tux crodtta at 
ssoumtn ipu quarter an a at 
SSeS JKUla rear. and oatra of 
ffUHthrslUmtUhnlnauar- 
tare, and at tan, 000 us 541 
million to mors tram tiebt re- 
tirement. 

Ravare Copper 
«H»Qaor. 1*81 14*0 

Revenue. 14X1 u+4 

OPer Net — 165 1276 

Oo*r Shore- 151 £11 


•ten of 596 
Quarter ana gain at 579/7® 
ks charge of zi mJtlhh In 
auorten from otattt ctastno. 


Rufabenndd 


Year 

Revenue — 

Net inc 

Par Share 


14*4 

5666 

4+9 

277 


190 

4746 

396 

235 


Results restated. 


Signal Compani 
m* vm 

Lssa 
687 



5,920. 

38U 

£50 


Lsoa 

5+0 

047 

1481 

5.400. 

10X0 

0.90 


84% 62% PhllMr 
24% 10% Phflpln 68 
56% 26 Phil In pf 1JQ 
56to 33% PtlllPot 260 
28% 16% PhilVH 
36% 27% PledAvt 
37% 23% PieNG 
71 14 Pier l 

45% 32 Pllibry 
33 71% Pioneer 

28% 17 PlonrEI 


360 


60 

78 

272 

156 

174 

.I7r 


98% 90 PoGpf 1150 11J 
21% 17% PotGpI 260 126 
2% 23% PorGpf +40 llj 
33% 2Sto POrGpf +32 13J 
35 2S% PoTUctl 176 +6 

26% 19% Potmei £16 £J 
C% 36 PotElpf +50 11.1 
37% 31 PotElpf +04 117 
24% 16% Premia 

S % 23 Pfimrk ZJQ 67 
% 17% PiimeC 


+0 12 4094 86% 85% 86 +1% 

2J 14 1016 34% 23% 24%— % 

1J 10 60 SPA 6B +3% 

+8 1051070 51 49 50 -T7% 

IJ 9 5B7 75% 24% 25% +1% 

7 7 689 34 33 33%+% 

75 0 74 31% 30% 31%+ % 

13 94 19% 19 IV 

37 10 1014 42% 42% 42% + % 

XJ 8 4018 33 32% 32%+ % 

7 47 113 24% 24% 24%+ % 

652 42% 42% 42% + % 

2 84% 84% 84% + % 

455 11% 11% UH— % 

54 13% 13% 13%— % 

123 14% 14% 14%— % 
238 13% 13% 13% + % 
144 20% 19% 20%— % 
62 18% 17% 18 + % 
549 27% 26% 26% 

1007 14 13% 14 + % 

18 19% 19% 19% + % 
Xfix 18% 18 18% + % 

331 17% 17% 17% 

20l 90% 98% 90% — % 
14 71% 71 71 — % 

38 33% 32% 32% — % 
16 3Z% 22% 32% — % 
12 53 34% 34 34% 

a 270 26% 25% 26% + to 
14002 41% 40% 40% — % 
3602 36 35% 36 


.12 

260 

78 

160 

1.92 


VJ 8 


S H 16 PrlmM 
%.4S9b ProcfC 
19% 7% PnlRsh 

47% 31 Protar 
19% 16 to PSvCoi .. _ 

19% 16% PSCol pf £10 11 J 
9% 6% PSInd 1-00 12.1 
8% A PSInet 1.04 1+3 
8 6% PSInpf 1-08 117 

47% 36% PS In pi 7.15 1+0 
S3 49% PSInpf 964 157 
57 43 PSInpf £38 1SJ 

SO 46% PSInpf 8.96 167 
12% 3% PSvNH 
17% 6 PSNHpf 
18% 6% PNH pfB 

76% 8% PNH pfC 
23% 7 PNH CfD 

24% 7 PNH pfE 

70% 5% PNH pfF 

21% 7% PNH pfG 
33% 19% PSvNM 2J8 117 
27% 2D% PSvEG TJX 105 
35 28% PS EG Pf +18 11 J 

10% 15 PSEGpf £17 1U 
20% 169* PSEGpf £43 127 
KO% 96 PSEG pflZTS 1£1 
65 55 PSEG Pf BdOS 12J 

62% 51% PSEG pf 7J2 127 
kS ST PSEGpf 760 1U 
79% 65% PSEGpf 962 125 
4% 2% PuWFck 
13% 7% Puahto .16 16 

9% 6% PRCem 

15 9% PuoetP 176 125 

21% 10% PMtaHm .12 6 ; 

46% 23% PUTUtof 15* 5.1 
9% 5% Pvre 


17 

6 307 
14 9842 
6 23 562 
+7 12 2236 
£1 24 107 

25 9 10 

1108 
4 
3 


24% 24 24% + % 

33% 32% 33% + Vb 
189* 17% 17% — 1 
31% 31% 31% + % 
54% 55% S5%— % 
13% 13% 13% 

42% 42% 42% + % 
19% 19% 19% + % 
18% 18% 18% 

536* 8% 8% Bto — % 

520v 7% 7% 7% 

350v 7% 7% 7%+ % 

200V 44% 44% 44*. + % 
600V 60% SO *0 +1% 

470v 53 52 52% 

lOOz 55% 55% 55% + % 
4% 4% 4% 

lOOt 10% 10% 10b. + to 
13 11% 11% 11%+ % 
S 16% 16 16 

14 13% l»— % 

14% 14 I4ta— % 

12% 12% ia%— % 
13% 12% 12% — % 
24% 24% 24%— % 
26% 26 26 — % 
301 35% XSto 35% +1% 
4 11% 18% 11% 

17 20% 20 20 — to 

210X101% 101% 101% — to 
lOOx 63U 63% 63% — % 
lOOz 61% 61% 61% 

SOX to 60 60 —1% 
71b 79 78% 78 to— to 

126 3% 3% 3 

80 12 11% 11% 

8 7% 7 7% 

521 14% 13% 14% + Ik 

94* 20% 20% 20% — to 

251 25% 25 25% + % 

916 9% 8% 8%— % 


2 604 


13 

24 

5 

17 

706 

853 


38% 27Vb OuokOs 
21 IS QuokSQ 
Dto 6% Quonex 
3Z% 23 Qvabtor 
24% 14 Ok Rail 


II 980 
JO 3J 26 2282 
51 144 

140 SJ ID 712 
70e J 20 2025 


37% 37 37%+ % 

31% 20% 21% + % 
9% 9% *%+ % 

32% 30% 31% +1% 
24% 24% 24% + % 


7ft 

Si 1 : 

RvrOkn 



18 

453 

7ft 

7ft 

34ft 

75 

RotKhw 

1.12 

12 

8 

127 

34ft 

34% 

48% 

Xto 

RDOIMI 

140 

4J 

15 

94 

39% 

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Page 11 



Eastern Plans Salary Cuts 
After Labor Negotiations Fail 


- V: * - 






• . '* - n't. 


United Press International 

MIAMI — Eastern Air Lines 
said Tuesday that it would cut the 
salaries of its 37,500 employees by 
18 percent to 22 percent beginning 
tms week because negotiations with 
three labor unions faded to bring 
new cost-cutting agreements. 

Eastern’s action was likely to" 
send the unions back to court to 
press the lawsuits they filed against 
the carrier when it unilaterally at- 
tended 1984 pay cuts beyond' Jan. 

k.. The airline and its unions agreed 
w January that full pay would be 
restored for that month if a new 
cost-cutting plan could be in place 
by Feb. 1. Talks broke down during 
the weekend and Eastern said it 
would reinstate the cuts. 

**Tbe agreements were only for 
the month of January," said Rich- 
ard McGraw, the carrier’s vice 
president for communications. 
“We are now in February.” 

Eastern went into technical de- 
fault on some of its S2.4 billion in 
loans at 12:01 AJri. on Feb. 1. 
when it failed to reach agreement 


wiih the unions on new cost-cutting 
measures. 

The cost reductions were de- 
manded by the airline’s 60 lender 
banks as prooT that in 1985. East- 
ern could achieve a profit for the 
first time in six years. The lenders 
reportedly would like a wage-and- 
°perating plan that projects a $9^ 
million profit. 

On Monday. Eastern met with a 
small group representing the 
Md asked for an extension of the 
Feb. 1 deadline. The banks have 
not responded. 

Two unions, the pilots and flight 
attendants, reached agreement last 
with Eastern. But the biggest 
union, the 17,000-member Interna- 
tional Association of Machinists, 
balked. 

The two sides did not meet Mon- 
day and no talks were scheduled 
Tuesday. 

Eastern got agreements from its 
37.000 employees last year to give 
up 18 percent to 22 percent of their 
pay in exchange for stock and four 
seats on the board of directors. 
That agreement expired Dec. 31. 


COMPANY NOTES 


; ji;; 



• . 


. --- -*i- 






Trans World Airlines will expand 
service between New York and 
flfiaireapdis-SL Paul and between 
rffiw York and Charlotte, North 
Carolina, in late April It will start 
routes to Copenhagen, via London, 
and Geneva, via Paris; extend its 
Cairo-Kuwait service to Bombay; 
and fly nonstop to Munich on the 
route that now stops in Frankfurt 
■ Applied Intelligent Systems Inc. 
has completed the sale of 12.6 per- 
cent of its stock to Genera] Motors 
Carp. 

» Bafly Ma n u f ag ft mng Corp/s Bal- 
ly Sente unit has entered into an 
exclusive licensing agreement with 
Horn Abbott Ltd. to produce and 
market “Trivial Pursuit Think 
Tank," a video-arcade version of 
the board game Trivial Pursuit 

Entnd Coqt, Australia’s leading 
textile producer, has begun an a- 
fort to acquire Tootal, a major Brit- 
ish textile company, for £124 mil- 
lion ($138 milli on) Entrad bolds a 
,178-percent interest in Tootal. 
lUirteniafittal Business Machines 
Corp. has added two new mode! 
types to its 3380 family of direct- 
access storage devices and en- 
hanced-assotiated control units. 

Kdfam Co. and Hudson Enter- 
prise will sen their Bermuda joint 
venture, Savarua Corp-, the hold- 
ing company of Panamanian-regis- 
tcredEvercet Steamship Corp., to a 
consortium of Sea Containers Ltd. 
and Marine Chartering Co. 

The Los Angeles Tnues-Wasb- 
rngton Post News Service has bo- 


les to select v ot America lul, a 
subsidiary of Clarion Co., Japan’s 
largest independent maker or ste- 


gun a financial news service called 
Business Data Call. 

Manri&e Corp, has a 

SI 12-million settlement with Insur- 
ance Company of North America. 
Midland Insurance Co. and All- 
state insurance Co„ which had 
written its supplementary insur- 
ance for asbestos-related injuries. 

Oak Industries Inc has sold its 
ailing ON-TV sendee in Los Ange- 
les to SelecTV of America LttL, a 

’s 

ste- 
reo equipment. 

Rockefeller Group, the owner of 
New York’s Rockefeller Center, 
will buy from Columbia University 
the 1 1.7 acres (4.7 hectares) of land 
Columbia owns under the center 
for S400 milli on. 

Samsung Construction Co. of 
Seoul is approaching banks for a 
$45- million working capital facility 
to hdp finance construction pro- 
jects in the Middle East . 

Saxos 09 PLC said Du Pont 
Co.’s Conoco Ltd. subsidiary was 
operator an two gas discoveries in 
the British North Sea in which Sax- 
on holds shares. 

Pacific lighting, parent compa- 
ny of Southern California Gas Co.; 
Houston Natural Gas Corp., and 
El Paso Natural Gas Co„ a subsid- 
iary of Burlington Northern Intx. 
plan to build a $250- million pipe- 
line from Topock, Arizona, to Cali- 
fornia’s San Joaquin Valley to pro- 
vide gas for use in oil production. 


China Negotiates 
With Boeing on 
Airplane Buys 

Reuters 

BEIJING — China has been 
negotiating with Boeing Co. (or 
the possible purchase of 747, 
767 and 737 airliners, the offi- 
cial Xinhua news agency said 
Tuesday, quoting the bead of 
the Gvu Aviation Authority of 
China. 

Shen Tu, the authority's di- 
rector, said China also was ne- 
gotiating purchases from the 
European consortium Airbus 
Industrie, British Aerospace 
PLC and other manufacturers. 
He gave no details. 

The aviation authority an- 
nounced last month that it was 
buying 19 aircraft — three Air- 
bus A310s, seven Boeing 737- 
200s and nine Soviet Tupolev- 
154Ms. Mr. Shen did not 
specify the number of addition- 
al aircraft that the authority 
was seeking. 

“The next three years will 
witness a lug boom m China's 
dvfl aviation, relieving over- 
strained services on both do- 
mestic and international 
routes,” he said in a statement 
released by Xinhua. 

The aviation authority’s mo- 
nopoly is being ended and the 
company will be split into five 
airlines. 


Earnings Outlook Is Gloomy 
For Some U.S. Retail Chains 


By Isadore Barm ash 

■ H ew York Times Service 

NEW YORK : Jha.-difficylt 
fiscal year for reiaDcis, particularly 
the disappointing Christinas sea- 
son, has caused Wag Street ana- 
lysis to predict earomg^ declines in 
the year for about half of the 12 
largest retail chains in' the United 
States 

According to a consensus of ana- 
lysts, declines from the 1983 fiscal 
year are expected at J.G Penney 
Co., Federated Department Stores, 
Carter Hawley Hale Stores lnc_ t 
Associated Dry Goods Corp. and 
Seans, Roebuck & Co. 

Fariitngc oaiiy in the fiscal year 
that ended Saturday were 
for K mart Carp . 

Corp.. R_H. Macy & (Uk May De- 
partment Stores Co, Wal-Mart 
Stores Inc and Zayre Corp. 

Earnings at Allied Stores Corp. 
are expected to be flaL 

“The problem with 1984 wasn't 
consumer spending, which was 
generally satisfactory, but that re- 
tailers over-anticipated and 
over-planned their inventories,” 
said Jeffrey B. FAtim.™ an analyst 
for Dean Winer Reynolds Inc. 

The entire retail industry 
emerged from 1983 with strong 
sales results, and therefore had 
high expectations for 1984, Mr. 
Fridman said. 


“Many companies became 
greedy in terms of trying to in- 
crease their market share and over- 
stocked to do that," he added. 
“And when sales fed below expec- 
tations, they had to mark down 
considerable merchandise, which 
hurt their profits-” 

Walter r. Lodi, an analyst for 
Morgan Stanley & Co„ said that 
the year's best performance was 
turned in by the discounters, such 
as K man, Wal-Mart and Zayre. 

“The department stores, due to 
the competitive environment, were 
forced to operate on much lower 
profit margins,” he said. “Weather 
problems several times rinring the 
year [caused havoc with sales, build- 
ing inventories grid ranging hi ghrr 
soling costs than expected!'’ 

But it was the final fiscal quarter, 
Nov. 1 and rnrhitfeng the 
selling period, 
that hurt the year most, analysts 
said. That holiday-shopping season 
normally contributes as much as 25 
percent of the entire year's rales 
and up to 50 percent of profits. 

“In fact, tire last half of the year 
saw severely competitive price 
pressures on retailers, bringing an 
erosion in their profit margins in a 
Jess- than -expected sales environ- 
ment,” said Thomas H. Tasbjtan, 
an analyst for PrudentiaJ-Bache Se- 
curities Inc 


3 Appointed 
As Advisers 
At Chemical 

By Brenda Hagerty 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Chemical Bank of 
New York has appointed Fritz 
Lentwikr, James B, I.edie and 
Washington Syrip to its interna- 
tional advisory board. 

On May 30, Mr. Lentwiler twQ 
become president of the Swiss engi- 
neering concent Brown, Boveri & 
Co. Until the end of 1984 he served 
as head of Bank for International 
Settlements and tire Swiss National 
Bank. He became an adviser to 
Robeco, a Dutch investment 
group, in January and joined tire 
board of directors of the Prince of 
iMfht^mwn Fo undation 

Mr. Leslie was appointed chair- 
man of Sydney-based Qantas Air- 
ways Ltd. in July 1980. He retired 
as managing director of Mob9 03 
Australia lid. in Jtily 1980, and as 
chairman of that company in Janu- 
ary 1981. after right years in that 
position. Mr. Leslie was the first 
Australian to hold these posts at 
MobiL In addition, be is a director 
of several Australian companies. 

Mr. Syrip is founder and chair- 
man of the SGV Group, a Manila- 
based auditing and management 
consulting firm that has member 
firms throughput Asia and the 


Middle East. Mr. Syrip also serves 
as chairman of tire board of trust- 
ees and the board of governors of 
the Asian Institute erf Management 
in tire Philippines and as president 
of the International Federation of 
Accountants. In addition, he is 
chairman ot the Euro Aria center 
of the European Graduate Business 
School in Fontainebleau. France. 

Juan Pandas head of itt^tadrid 
representative office. He succeeds 
Mark F. Fries, who is moving to 
London as general branch manag- 
er. Mr Parra formerly was assistant 
representative in Madrid for tire 
San Francisco-based bank. 

Banco cfl Scffia said Ettore Sa- 
lem! has become general manager 
of its London branch. He succeeds 
Antonio Sued, who has been 
named deputy chief manager for 
the foreign-relations division of the 
hank in Rome. Mr. Salemi previ- 
ously was deputy general manager 
of Banco di Sicilia’s London 
branch. 

Westpac Banking Corp^ Austra- 
lia’s largest financial-services 
group, said it plans to open a repre- 
sentative office in Kuala Lumpur 
later this month. Derek Philips, 
currently manager of Malaysian 
business at Westpac’s Singapore 
branch and regional office, will be 
tire chief representative in Kuala 
Lumpur. 

Dana Corp. has named Alejan- 
dro Valenzuela president of Dana 
Europe: He succeeds Joe Maglio- 
chetn, who was transferred to the 
Toledo, Ohio, head office of Dana, 
a maker of components and parts 


for tire transportation industry, to 
ate up tire post of vice president. 
Mr. Valenzuela will continue as 


ri u ri pwan of Floquet Monopole 
SA, one of the French c ompani e s 
within Dana Europe. 

County Bank Trit. the merchant- 
banking arm of National Westmin- 
ster Bank PLC, is to establish two 
subsidiaries in Australia to provide 
services in tire domestic atm inter- 
national capital markets, corporate 
advice and investment manage- 
mem. Trading is expected to start 
at midyear. Peter Hall, an Austra- 
lian who was until recently a 
al manager of CbflSC-NBA 

Ltd., Melbourne, has been recruit- 
ed by County Bank lo run its Aus- 
tralian operations. He wiD also join 
the boards of County Aria Securi- 
ties Ltd. m Hong Kong and County 
Bank in London. 

Rnn/piP Scanduntve en Suisse 
said that as a further development 
of its trust activities, it plans to 
open a representative office in Lon- 
don in the first half of this year. 
The bank, the Swiss subsidiary of 
Scan dinav ian Bank Ltd, the Loir 
don-based consortium, said the of- 
fice will be headed by Michad Nes- 

Dataserv fee. said Vdker Hri- 
derich has become a managing di- 
rector of its Dflsseldorf-baied sub- 
sidiary, Premier Computers 
GmbH. He returns to the company 
following a year as managing direc- 
tor of EBL Computer GmbH in 
DOsseldorf. Dataserv, which is 
based near Minneapolis, is a com- 
puter-leasing and maintenance 
group. 


Company Earnings 

Revenue end profits, in millions, ore in focal currencies 
unless otherwise Indicated 


Canada 

Dofasco 

Tear 1934 ms 

Revenue 1,030. MW. 

Profits 17M IBM 

Per snore— 147 no 

South Africa 

Goldfields 


first Boston 
Roar. w* ms 

Revenue 154.9 1117 

Net Inc. . 23-9 200 

Per Share __ 1JS I JO 

Year nw HH 

Revenue 565.9 5114 

Net Inc. 79 j6 mu 

Per Share 557 113 


General Motors 


1st Half 

Profit, 


ms 19*4 


4011 


Per Share 271 


dlbo ml Inc 


United States 


Amor. Cyananid 
im na 

9710 9213 

s _ 513 

Per Share— 104 1.13 

Year 1984 19*3 

Revenue I860. ISttL 

Net Inc 2119 1414 

Per Share 141 141 


«tfiQuur. 

Revenue . — 

Nel Inc 50L8 

re— 104 


Amer. 
Miaow. 
Revenue — 

Net Inc 

Per Share 

Year 

Net Inc I 
par Share 


P dwftw 
in* mi 

sju mo 

17J 214 

IM 7.14 
no* ms 
2.140. 1080. 

451 553 

450 il* 


1.294. 
Ill 

Year lf*4 W*3 

Revenue 81900 74500 

Net Inc 4J17. 1730. 

Per Share U22 1154 

Mosa PMrokvm 

4th Qaar. 1904 19*3 

Revenue KJ2J 1050 

Net inc 1374 IMS 

Per Shorn 113 026 

Year 79*1 m3 

Revenue— 405 391.1 

Net Inc 77018 12191 

Per Share 135 172 

Year nets tnetude trains of 
SZU million vs SS9 million 


MQ Comm 


Pionoor ■ 

4th Qatar. 19M mi 

Revenue 1402 704J 

Net Inc 3009 U5S 

PerShore-^. 1.U 039 

Yew 19*4 im 

Revenue 442 3 <397 

Net me 7551 7558 

Per Shore 190 201 

Soult wfc 

2nd Qaar. 19*5 T904 

Revenue 1455 114J 

Net roc 2x4 177 

Per Share aso 0X3 

10 Half ms WM 
Revenue — 2414 2094 

O Per Net — 377 202 

Op er Shares. 07V 070 

Tanneco . 

m Quw. - 1904 MU 

Revenue 18M. xsta 

mnwe. 1307 3417 

Per Share— UO 1J3 
Yaw 19*4 HU 

Revenue 1479a. UA40. 

Net inc ; 4317 7110 

Per Shore — 4*1 47 5 

1994 nmts Include write- 
down of STS million. 


Group Seeks 
Freer Trade 

(Cqutiuued from Page 9) 

rope’s divided market and protec- 
tionist impulses. 

“The economy is the priority — 
that's why we are bringing in indns- 
. i rial id s and bankers,” said Sinmn 
May, the group's British-born dep- 
uty secretary general and a former 
EC civil servant ' - 

Britain and West Germany are 
leading a drive to resolve what in 
Eurpjaigon is called “tire internal 
market problem/* This would 
mean reducing costoms paperwork 
and eHminafin g differing safety 
standards and arcane regulations 
that a recent study says are the 
leal of a. 15-percent tariff on 


Wood-Products Firms in Trouble 


Emerson Bee 
lMQuw. w mi 

RnMM 17*0. 9352 

Nat Inc 924 • klb 

Per Shore — ITS T.1* 


112 

106 


4th QOW. 
Rrvet<u«_ 

Nel inc — 

Per Shore. 

Year 19*4 

Revenue __ 1740- 

Net Inc — _ 592 

Pier Share— 075 


ds. 

Textron 



naouar. 

19*4 

1983 


Revenue __ 

ms 

1003 


Net Inc. 

347 


1983 

Per Srtare — 

095 

142 

430.1 

Year 


1983 



im 

2970. 


Net Inc. 

1115 

887 ' 

19*3 

f*erSW>r*_^ 



IJ20. 

I9B4 auorter 

net 'Includes 


OOln of srmnOon from sole of 


goods moving across Europe's 
supposedly tariff-free frontiers. 

It would also mean removing le- 
gal barriers to cross-frontier merg- 
ers'and dumnating. rules that stop 
European— insurance companies 
from writing Taistness in other 
countries. 


(Combined from Page 9) 
the timberiand situation, for some 

it Will be maniifartiirmg atwtt imif 

fra others h will be bo&_" 

Last October, President Ronald 
Reagan signed a bill that gives doz- 
ens of companies in tire Pacific 
Northwest the ri gh t to caned $2J> 
billion in pre-1982 contracts to buy 
and cut timber on government- 
owned lands. 

StiD, the industry will have to 
pay cancellation fees and stands to 
lore about $220 million in settling 
the contracts, according to Douglas 
McDonald, publisher of Timber 
Data, an industry newsletter in Eu- 
gene, Oregon. Under the MI, rights 
to the uncut timber revert to tire 
government 

In tire first quarter of 1980. with 

inflation r unning high and (he gov- 
ernment restricting forests avail- 
able for timber sues, bidding for 
Douglas fir reached $486 per thou- 
sand board feet, a measure of lum- 
ber equal to I2-by-12-by-l inches" 
(3 l-by-31-by-2 centimeters). ' 

The price fell to $92 in 1982, 
rebounded to S180 early in 1983, 
but has- steadily declined, and at 


TT- 


* 


UP TO NOW 
EPS BEEN 
APIECE OFCAKE 

But don’t be fooled. 

Beyond the current euphoria are signs of serious trouble. 

The huge and potentially crippling budget deficit requires immediate 
action from the White House and Congress. 

And tax reform can only survive if Ronald Reagan gets solidly behind it. 

Every week of the year Business Week brings you this kind of significant 
story. Dynamically 
written, and insight- 
fully analyzed. 

To get a sub- 
scription to Business 
Week, the only news- 
weekly of business, 
call 1-800-635-1200. 


. * 


* 





I- re-, . • 

mm 


the end of Iasi year was $108, ac- 
cording to Umber Data. The gov- 
ernment is the major supplier of 
timber in the Northwestern United 
States. 

The government tried to help, by 
extending contract limits until 
1991. If the market fra lumber and 
plywood does not improve by then, 
however, “there are a lot of compa- 
nies that won’t be around,” said 
C W. Knodcfi, executive rice presi- 
dent of finance at Willamette In- 
dustries, in Portland, Oregon. 

A major reason fra the declining 
timber values is Canada’s increas- 
ing share of tire lumber market in 
the United Stales. It hasgrown to 
about 30 percent, from 22 percent 
in 1975, according to Fred Reso- 
burg, director of econonac services 
at the Western Wood Products As- 
sociation, in Portland. 

The fall of the Canadian dollar, 
to about 75 cents currently, gives 
Canadian mills a cost advantage 
that has helped them overcome 
long stripping distances to pene- 
trate most American markets. 

The sharp climb in lumber 
prices, which more than tripled be- 

r — ■ .irB' -■ 


tween 1974 and 1979, forced build- 
ers to reduce tire size of homes and 
tire amount of lumber used, said 
Mr. Qephane, of Morgan Stanley. 

‘This is a logical economic re- 
sponse,” Ire said. “It’s analogous to 
what is going on in tire oil market, 
where very sharp increases in tire 
price of a natural resource triggered 
changes in the uses of the materi- 
al” 

Most executives say they wil] 
have to wail for a weakening of the 
dollar before important export 
markets in Japan, South Korea and 
Western Europe revive and the Ca- 
nadian imports can be beaten back. 
They also are hoping fra lower 
mortgage rales and 2 mfflion hous- 
ing starts a year, but few expect to 
see that in tiris decade, 

TJ. Tomjack. general sales man- 
ager fra the Potlatch Corp. in its 
Western wood-products division, 
in Spokane, Washington, said tire 
comparatively high timber costs m 
the Northwestern United States 
have caused many companies to 
shift their new operations to the 
Southeast, where timber is .less 
costly. 


7SS 






February 26, 1985, Fans 


Following the success of our 1982 conference, we are pleased to announce a one day briefing session 
focusing on Modernization: Priority for the French Economy " 

With the cooperation of the French Xjovernment, we have gathered together the key ministers most 
directly involved with policies affecting business activities in Ranee. 

The progr^ will mclude presentations by: 

Pfesre Beregovoy, Minister of Economy, Finance and Budget 
Edith Oesson, Minister oflndiistrial Redeployment and Foreign Trade. 

Hnbeit Oakn, MmiSter of Research and Technology. 

Michel Ddetane, Minister of Labour, Employment and Vocational Trading. 

Roland Diniras^ Minister of External Relations. 

‘Yfr-tautaanr'eilaiin-apigL 


Ackftiond raighh yM be provided by a 
panelofirtaTKjfbnd^ 
braJters^indudh^BTcBourdcssdeChar- 
bonruere, S.VJ 5 . and General Manager, 
Morgan Guaranty Trust Company of New 
York andLakle HodvPrigent, Charman 
ofKhfireFoulenc 

Eoehpresentationvvibefelowedbya 

quesfofM3nd<3n5Vverp&kxl,arri5imute> 
neots French-English trendafon wS be pro- 
vided at cfl times. - 


An roportartf aspect of the conference 
w9 be Hre extensive opportunihasto engage 
in infbmKj discussion vrith the current poScy 
makers and Mlh other business executives 
actively doing business with Finance. 

O^Feb^Lo , 27,the^%lislTyaflndu5hi• 
d Redeployment raid Foreign Trade is arga- 
nsripg fui day^ visits, exclusively for confer- 
ence dtendess, to industrial 
pkmbindudffig 


theAerospcrioiepbntinTcxjkxisaFiilde- 
tafewflbeserrftoaBpartid^x i feregstering ' 
for the ccxrference. To register fcvtf^excep- 
tiond c onference, please oom p lete raid 
return the registration form today. 

JlcralbS^Sribunc 


•6 1985. McGRWfilLL. INC- 


BusinessWeek:^. 

the voice of authority 




SURNAME 


HRST NAME 

. 



& - rosmoN 

: 

COMPANY 



\ ADDRESS 




CHYyCOUNIKY 




mEx 



■ ’ 

6-2-85 


1 


I 



Over-the-Counter 


NASDAQ Notional Market Prices 



SMMtn "Cl 

IMS HU Law SPMCh'Se 

100 ij u n’i m a=4 + ** 

ISIS. I2W 12*—* 
W A A A 
JM 23 20 29* 7ft 29* + * 

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307 11'* me 11W + * 
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Jt 11 9010 17V, 10 + 1* 

UK) 10 403 3J* 

IJOO 34 Ml 30 


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9* 

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126 2* 

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7948 6 

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lmune« 



281 9 

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23 'i 

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23 6 






392 30* 

29 

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135 19* 






273 B<-> 

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738 2D* 

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1313 104k 

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4748 IS 

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83 41k 

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423 






4042 32-u 

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intlSv 



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35 2* 

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14* 

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298 11* 

10* 

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IrttrfFlr 

.16 

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340 11* 

nw 

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8 

8*— * 




4577 70 

67* 

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1738 S* 

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320 204k 

20 





47 64k 

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.25 

28 

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12* 

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96 a* 

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314 14* 

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B9 5* 

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71 5* 

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4274 114k 












942 A* 

6* 

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12 2B* 

28 

28* + * 



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1A 

4317* 

17* 

17*— * 


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185 44k 

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184 37* 

34* 


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1Z0 

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35 34* 




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642 22* 

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592 7*k 

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944 19 
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110 8* 

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1054 9* 

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26* 

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14 

200 18* 

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748 4* 
33V l 1 ** 
356 J* 
1578 16'i 

!SiJg|3 

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479 Tn 
383 14W 
600 41 
16 15* 
276 TVs 
36 SMi 
74 19* 

.«■ i-2 2 ;?je: 


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33% - V 
22 ■& 

6W + Vi. 
19* +1 p. 
316 

42 + Up 

6V. + 1*. 

fl*— 6k 
12Vk + 16 


3% 3J«— % 

4% 4H 

3 3 - % 

,r ,f? +, r 

38** 38 - W 

r* 34 +uv 

3&3S$s 

« &£ 
39* 40* +1* 
IS 15% 

7 7% 

.V 5% + % 
1816 >9% + % 
18 IB* + W 
29* 29Vk — W 
14 Ulu * a 
14* 14*- W 
3% 3% >' 


FOP 96 ?W B* 8* — % 

FM1 B2r 2 8V8 6th 6* 4% 

FairLns .16 U 39 6 5* 5* 

FamHI 6 58 1W 1% IVk — Vt 


743 14 23U 

810 * to* 
30 5M. 4% 
7 S* 5*1 
.56 2.1 1175 26* 25* 
741 19’- 18% 
401 4.1 12114* 14* 

473 10 W* 
401 1% 1% 
140 34 132 50 49* 

40 U 173 40 38111 

378 6% 6* 
3410% 10* 
M <J 100 31 39* 

3 8* B* 
M A 2271 16% 164k 
149 1* 1% 
M J 500 9 Bit 

J3 22 84714* 14 

.16 4 721 294k 29 


234k— lb 
iff*— * | 
5* + 4k 
5% 

24 'A + * 
19 + % 

1444 + * 

’?* + * 
sn + 4k 
40 +1* 

44% + 'k 
10% 4- * 
30* + * 
8* 

16%+ 4% 
1* + >6 
9 + Ik 

14V4 + <4 
29 — 'k 


New Issue 
February, 1985 


All at these securities having been placed, this 
announcement appears for purposes of record only. 


INTERNATIONAL BANK 

FOR RECONSTRUCTION AND DEVELOPMENT 

' 0“‘ NW «|. 

Washington, D.C. 


U.S.$ 300,000,000 

1 1 % U.S. Dollar Notes of 1985, due 1992 


WORLD BANK 


, 'f)\ \M» W 


Deutsche Bank 

A> uengesallschafi 

Algemene Bank Nederland N.V. 

Goldman Sachs 
International Corp. 

Morgan Stanley International 
Soci6t6 Generate de Banque S.A. 


Amro International 

Limited 

Julius Baer International 
Limited 

Banco di Roma 

Bank Leu International Lid. 

Bankers Trust International 
Limited 

Banque Gfinfeale du Luxembourg S.A. 
Banque Populate Suisse S.A. Luxembourg 
Barclays Merchant Bank 
Limited 

Bayarische Landasbank 
Girozentraie 
Casanova & Co. 

Citicorp International Bank 
Limited 

Credit Commercial de France 
Crddh du Nord 
Deibriick & Co. 

DG Bank 

Deutsche Genosse ns draft shank 
Dreadner Bank 
AktiangeseKschaft 
Ensklda Securities 
Skandinaviska Enskilda Limitad 

First Chicago 
Limited 

Hambroa Bank 
limited 

Hit Samuel & Co. 

Limited 

tatbuto Ban carte San Paolo dl Torino 

Landasbank HheMand-Pfafz 
- Gfro z e n b al e ■ 

McLeod Young Warr Irttamatlonal 
Limited 

Mitsubishi Finance Internal tonal 

Limited 

Norddeutsche Landasbank 
Girozentraie 

Pierson, Haldring & Pierson N.V 

Rabobank Nadotfand 

Socket 4 Girtorate 

Ibksl International United 

MJM. Watburg-Bdncfcmann. Whtz ft Co. 


Credit Suisse First Boston 

Limited 

Banque Nationale de Paris 

Merrill Lynch 
International & Co. 

Orion Royal Bank 

Limned 

, Swiss Bank Corporation 
International Limited 

S.G. Warburg & Co. Ltd. 

Amhold and S. BWchroeder. Inc. 

Banco Commercial* Italians 

Bank of America International 
Limited 

Bank Mm & Hope NV 

Banque Bmxetas Lambert SA. 

Banque tetemationafe i Luxembourg SJL 

Banque de rUnlon EuropAerme 

Baring Brothers & Co- 

Limited 

Berflner Bank 

Akti eng aseTIsc haft 

Chemical Bank International 

Limited 

Commerzbank 

Aktiengasallschaft 

Crftdh Industrial d'Alsace at da Lorraine 

Croditanstalt-Barikverabi 

Deutsche Bank Capital 

Corporation 

Dflkw. Read Limited 

Draxel Burnham Lambert 
Incorporated 
EurgcnobDiars S.pA 

GanossenschaftEcha Zamralbank AG 
Vienna 

Georg Hauck. & Sohn Bankfera 
KommanditgeseKschofi auf Akiien 
E.F. Hutton International Jne. 

Kidder, Peabody International 

Limbed 

' Lloyd* Bank International 
- Limited 

Merck, Fmck & Co. 

Morgan Grenfel & C& 

Umiied 

Sal. Oppenhaim Jr. & Cle. 

PK Christiania Bank (UK) 

Limited 

N.M. Rothschild & Sons 
Limited 

Sumitomo "Bust International 
Limited 

THnkaus & Burkhardt 

Wostfalenbank 

AkriengesedlGchah 

Yamaichi International {fhaopel 

Limited 


Nomura International Limited 

Banque Paribas 
Morgan Guaranty Ltd 

Salomon Brothers 
International Limited 

Union Bank of Switzerland 
(Securities) Limited 


Baden-WQrttembargische Bank 

Aktiengesellschaft 

Banco del Gortardo 

Bank Gutzwfller. Kura. Bunganer (Overseas) 
Limited 

Bank of Tokyo International 
Limited 

Banque Franpakse du Commerce ExtArieur 

Banque de Neuffize. Schfumberger. Mefat 
Banque Worms 

Bayarische Hypathakan- und WechseFBank 
Aktienqasellscfiaft 

Barfiner Handels- und Frankfurter Bank 

CISC Limited 

Compagnie de Banque 
at cfTnvestissememo, CBI 
CrMOt Lyonnais 
Daiwa Europe Limitad 
Deutsche Qrozentrale 

- Deutsche Kommunatbank - 
Dom in ion Securities RtfWd 
Limitad 

DSL Bank 

Deutsche Siedlungs- und Landesrentenbank 

European Banking Company 

Limited 

Gknzamrale und Bank 
der Bsturaidibdwi Sparkassan 
Aktiengesellschaft 
Hassischa Landesbank 

- Grozantrale - 

Industrie bank von Japan (Deutschland) 

Akiiengeseflschaft 
IQ ei nwort, Benson 
Limited 

LTCB Intamational 

Limited 

B. Master eeeL Sohn & Co. 

The NWco Securities Co,. (Europol Ltd. 

PainaWebber International 

Prudential Bache 

Securities International 

Smith Barney, Harris Upham & Co. 

tncorporaied 

Svenska International 

Limited 

Vanins- und Westbank 
Akbengeselbcbaft 
Wood Gundy Inc. 


140 5J 148 29* 
JO 14 4011* 

Xt 19 24 9* 

9701944 
151744 
22 7% 
544 344 
.16 .7 172 2344 

.10 A 54 2444 
199 m 
22 33* 
.92 2 A 938* 
140 U 71 44* 
32 5% 


LDBrak 

t_JN 

LSI Loo 

LTX 

UaPeWk 

LoZBv 

LadFm 

Laktlw 

LomoT 

Lsncast 

LndBF 

L_dmk5 

LaneCo 

Longlv 

Lawsns 

LreDto 

Leiner 

LewteP 

Lmicon 

Le* kilo 

LMFPn 

Lhfbrt 


276104% 
63 Blh 
112S 15V3 
929 22’- 
21017* 
4)40* 
993 17 1 — 
11016 
16 14’*i 
161 14* 
337 14* 
22 7ly 
88 45* 

78 7* 
143 27* 
266 7* 

31 M'A 
138 94k 
237 fK 

79 3* 
212* 

M23W 


10* 10* 

84k 8* + * 
14* ISVa + * 
21* 22* + * 
17* 17Vj 
39* 39* 

I6lh 164k 
15* 154% + * 
14* 14>g 
16* 16* 

14 14* + * 

7 * 7* 

45 45* + Vi 

7 7* 

27* 27* 

7 7l'« + * 

144* 144k— * 
«* «■-— * 
3 r * 3* + * 
2* 3 — * 
12* 1212— * 
22* 23* + * 


75 

144 
44 
281 
744 

JO 10 67 

286 
166 
2172 
48 
75 
392 

32 V 
M 13 


758 91 — 

54 12 , 
i 23 1118 52* 
374 9* 

, M 4«3* 

SJ 80 U* 

129 11* 

13 187 Vi 1 
578 19* 

24 II* 
11 32* 

4.1 117 14* 

32 14* 
97 6* 
181 S* 

17 14 27 

4 7 12 33 

278 16* 

24 8* 

14 33 22* 
148 12* 
871 15* 
347 25* 

U0 134 6 
. 18 25 42 

77 24 26* 

18 420 X* 

35 9* 

BIO 11* 
1602 * 
20 8* 
135 ID* 
35 429 29* 

88 8 * 
52 10* 
3 B* 
1516 94k 
r 19 248016* 
32 3* 
5 7* 
2595 24* 
16 543 23 

3.1 943 31* 

U « 9* 

1512* 
129 32 
238 24* 
31 2* 
71 19* 
35 B* 
S 57 34* 
14 5 30* 

25 64k 
189 4* 
981 7* 
22216* 
903 54* 

C 1 A 725x 5* 
1347 16* 
37 105 5* 

A 4» 
411 54k 
I 84 3 14* 

457 21* 
34 3 
41 14* 
! ftjO 3421* 
1973 54k 
I 12 39418* 


*i<ti 51* +1* 
9* 10 

52* 57*— « 
94k 9* 

23* 23* 

14* 14* + * 
104k It* + * 
7V, 7*— * 

19 19* + 4k 

11* 11»+ * 
32* 32* +144 
14* 14* + 16 
14* 14* + * 
6 * 6 * .. 
8* 8* + * 
24 27 — * 

32* 33 
16* 14* + * 
84k 84k-* 

22* 2244 
12 12 - * 
14* 15*+/* 
24* 25* ®'. 
5* 6 -W.f 
42 42 — * 

26 26 
29* 30* + * 
9* 9* + *■ 

11 11 * „ . 
4e+Hi 

8* «*— * 
10 10* . 
28* 28*— * 
8 8 
10* 10* 

8* 844 
94k 9*+ * 
164k Iff* 

14k 344 

7* 7* + * 
22* 23* + * 
22* 22* + ** 
30 JO —1*. 
9* 9* + * 

12* 12* r 

3144 32 
24* 24*—* 
2* 2&— Hi 
19 19 , 

8* 8* 

33* 34* + * 
mi's 30* + * 
i* 6* — * 
4* .4* 

7* 7* + * 

15* 15* + H 

*3*«# 

IS* 14* + 44 

s s 

37 37 

5 544+ * 

14* 14*— * 
21 21* + Vk 

2 * 2 * Kg 

14* 14*-J{- 
21* 21*+"* 

mS 18* + 44 


u. OMSs 
Quadrx 

" Quakes M 16 
" QualSy 

u. Quern Im 

™ QucstM 
Quixote 
„ Qualm 


831 15* 14* 14* 

68 44k 4* 4* + * 
17 13* 13 13* , 

243 3* 3 3* 

543 30* 29 29 —1' 

299 4 3* -3ft- * 

4712 11* 12 *•* 

210110* 104k 10* 


(Continued on Page 13) 


New Issue 
February 0. 1985 . 


This advortisem ant appears 
as a matter of rvoord only. 


Republic of Austria 

DM 300,000,000 

7% Deutsche Mark Bonds of 1985/1992 



Offering Price: 
Interest: 
Maturity: 
Listing: 


100 % 

7% p. a., payable annually on February 1 
February 1, 1992 
Frankfurt am Main 


Deutsche Bank 

AkbBnge&aUschah 


Credrtanstaft-Bankverem 


Bayerische Vereinsbank 
AktiengesaDschah 


Osterreichische Ldnderbank 

Aktiengesellschaft 


Commerzbank 

Aktiengeselkschatt 


Orion Royal Bank 

Limited 


Girozentraie und Bank der 
bstn notch ischen Sparkassen 
Akbengesaflschaft 

Schoeller&Co. 

BankakttengesellHdiaft 


Union Bank of Switzerland 
(Securities) Limited 


S.G. Warburg &Co. Ltd. 


Abu Dhabi Investment Company 

Arab Banking Corporation - 
Daus & Co. GmbH 
Baden-WOrtiamberglsche Bank 
AktiengesellBchjiff 
Banco del Gottardo 

BankGutzwillar, Kura. Bungener (Overseas) 
Limited 

Bank filr Tirol und Vorarlberg 
AkHengesettschoft 

Banque FrangalBe du Commerce ExtSriaur 
Banque Internationale a Luxembourg S.A 
Banque Paribas 

Bayerhcha Hypot he ken- und WeehseLBank 
AktiengeseUschalt 

Berliner Handels- und Frankfurter Bank 
Cotese das IMpAts at Consignations 

Compagnie da Banque 
et (flnvestisMmants. CBI 
Credit SuIsm First Boston 
Limited 

Den norsfce Crodhbank 
DG Bank 

Deutsche Ganossenschaftsbank 
DSL Bank 

Deutsche Stedlungs- und Landesrentenbank 
Euromobltiare S.P-A. 

Goldman Saohf International Corp. 

Hessbehc Landesbank 
- Girozentraie - 

Istitulo Bancs rio San Paolo dl Torino 
Kredietbank S.A. Luxembourgeoisfl 

Kuwait Investment Company (S.A.K.) 

Lloyds Bank Intamational 
Limited 

Merrill Lynch kite mat tonal ft Co. 

Morgen GrenfoitftCo. 

Umiied 

The National Bank of Kuwait S.A.K. 
Norddeutsche Landasbank 
Girozentraie 
PK Christiania Bank (UK) 

Umiied 

4. Henry SchratferWbggftCo. 

Limited 

SocMtft Gftnftrale do Banque S.A, 

Trinkaus ft Burkhardt 

M.M. WDTburg'Brimilimann, Wlrtz ft Co- 

Wood Gundy Inc. 


Algemene Bank Nederland N.V. 

Amhold and S. Bleichroeder, Inc. 

Julius Baer International 
Limited 

Bank of America International 
Limited 

Bank Leo International Ltd. 

Bank of Tokyo International 
Limited 

Banque Gfntralc du Luxembourg S.A. - 

Banque Nationale de Paris 

Banque Populaire Suisse S.A Luxembourg 

Bayerische Landesbank 
Girozentraie 

Bankhsus GebrUder Bethmarm 
Chemical Bank International 
Limited 

Credit Commercial de France 

Dntwa Europe Limited 

Deutsche Bank Capital Corporation 

Dominion Securities PitfMd 
Limited 

Effactenbank -Warburg 
Akttengaaellsehafi 
European Banking Company 
Limited 

Hambroa Bank 
Limited 

Hill Samuel ft Co. 

Limited 

Kidder. Peabody International 
Limited 

Kuwait Foreign Trading Contracting ft 
Investment Co. (S.AK.) 

LftAdesbank RhainLsnd-Pfalz 

- Gliozentrala - 

Mamifecturers Hanover 
bruited 

B. Metcler setL Sohn ft Co. 

Morgan Guaranty Ltd 

The nllkko Socuritiee Co. (Europe) Ltd. 
Gstarraichlsehe Poatsparkasse 

N.M. Rothschild ft Sons 
Limited 

Smith Barney, Harris Upham ft Co. 
Incorporated 
Svenska Intamational 
brmted 

Vsrband Sohwolzariwhar Kantonalbanken 

weatdautsche Landesbank 
Girozentraie 


Amro International 
Limited 

Bankhaus H. Aufhluser 

Benca Commeroiale Italians 

Bank Mr Gemeinwbtschaft 
AkttengeseUschafl 

Bank Mr Oberftstarralch und Salzburg 
Banqua Bruxelles Lambert S. A 
Banque btdosuez 

Banqua de Naufliae. Schlumbergar. Mallet 

Baring Brothers ft Co- 

Limited 

Berliner Bank 

AkhengeseHsctiah 

Bremer Landesbank 

Citicorp International Bank 

Umiied 

Crftdlt Lyonnais 

DelbrQck&Co. 

Deutsche Girozentraie 
- Deutsche Kommunalbank - 
Dreadner Bank 
AkMngtaellschah 
Enskilda Securities 
Skandineviska Enskilda Limited 
Genoese nschartllche Zantralbenk AG 
Vienna 

Gwrg Hauck ft Sohn Banklers 

Kommandugesellsehaft auf Aktien 

Industrie bank von Japan [Deutschland] 

Akbengaseilxhaft 

Kleinwort. Benson 

Limited 

Kuwait International Investment Co.s.a.k. 

Lehman Brothers 
IniernaiKHui. Inc. 

Merck. RnckftCo. 

Samuel Montagu ft Co. 

Umitod 

Morgan Stanley Intamational 

Nomura Intematianaf Limited 
Sal. Oppenhelm Ir.ftCa. 

Salomon Brothers international Limited 
SoctdM G4n6rah> 

&n)bb Bank Corporation International 
Unvitott 

Vdrains- und Westbank 
AkiiengBaeftachafr 
Vtesttalenbank 
AkUengoselltchatt 

Ta match I Imamatlonal (Europe) 

Limited ' 

























































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Over-the-Counter 

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“ft** 

"•* Hin t,*,, ipjw.0^;. 


(Continued from Page 12) 


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Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6* 1985 


■si! 


PEANUTS 


hinihubbb 

bih aia bib 

111 IIIBII 1111 
iiibi an ana 
bbbbbbhbbbbbbbb 


BRACE \ VOUR SUPPER 1 

wmlfJ Bfjgjg 10 

vf"“y 5EC0ND5 LATE . 

b . T0NI6HT J 


qp 

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I TRA6EW HAS STRUCK*. 



6* Mt4 u i 




BLOND IE 


BBBBHBBBBiiaa 


ACROSS 

1 Dummies 
5 Legal offenses 
9 Fleece 

14 Viva voce 

15 Suffix for 
axiom 

16 Nickname for 
anew prince 

17 lad. city 

18 Strawberry 
patch? 

19 Incensed 

20 Manacles 
manipulator 

23 Tennyson 
product 

24 Abstract being 

25 Airport label 
for Caracas 

28 Essen 
exclamation 

31 Fodder for 
Freud 

33 Paducah's 
river 

34 Macbeth title 

36 New York inst. 

37 Wood: Comb, 
form 

38 Politician, 
publisher and 
P.M. 

42 Heroic poetry 

43 Corrode 

44 Framework 

45 Colorful river 

46 December 
sight 

49 Partofi.e. 

50 To boot 

51 Pop's partner 


52 Author Rand et 
al. 

54 Scre e nwriter 
for* ‘Acci- 
dent": 1967 

59 European 
heath 

62 Lover's sound 

63 Without, in 
Dresden 

64 Corporate 
checkup 

65 Gen. Robert 

60 Foray 
87 Maiamud 

product 

68 Pool in a range 

69 Completes 


21 Vaud vibrato 

22 Briefly 

25 Wltha ODown. 

27 Petrarch 
specialty 

28 Adviser to 
Odysseus 

29 "Motherhood” 
painter 

38 See 25 Down 

32 Having wings 

33 Stewpot 

35 Kind of cone or 
dive 

39 Inigo J cooes 
concern 

40 Long-tailed 



BEETLE BAILEY 


THE CHAPLAIN! REALLV 
MAKES A RITUAL OUT 
OF TEATfME ^ 


1 One of the 
recent trash 

2 Kind of code 
SHenryVHI’s 

last wife 

4 Drink noisily 

5 Kitchen utensil 

6 Reception 

7 Place 

8 Brahms's 

Festival” 

9 Climbs, in a 
way 

lOSpydom’sZelle 

11 Failed 
amendment 

12 Cinematics, 
e.g. 

13 Caulfield's 
spot 


41 Tribe 

conquered by 
the Romans 

47 Sponge 

48 Well-known 

mark 

51 Chayefsky's 
butcher 

53 Zzzzz 

54 Prince Charles 
is one 

55 Actress 
Kedrova 

50 Larger 

life 

57 Author 
Bagnold 

58 Beatty movie 

59 relief 

69 Boring routine 

01 Half a musical 
title 


£’ New York Times, edited by Eugene Maleska. 

DENNIS THE MENACE"" 



'Margaret helped me draw the picture of you, 

BUT I DREW THE MUSTACHE ALL SYMySELF!* 


Unscramble these four Jumbles, 
one letterlo each square, to tarn 
tour onftrury words. 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
0 by Henri Arnold and Bob Lee 

r Tell me more ^ 


RUPEN 


ORNED 





WIZARD of ID 


SAY \ 







REX MORGAN 


I THINK yOU I 
KNOW THAT I S 
RESPECT KEITH 
AS MUCH AS ANY 
MAN rVE KNOWN,, 
^ REX t rr.^ / 


r KEITH NOT 
ONLV 

respects you' 

HE'S IN LOVE 
WITH YOU, 

^ MARTHA ' A 


I HAVE BE&UN TO 1 
SUSPECT AS MUCH— J 
AND THAT’S WHY I 4 
WANTED TO TALK WITH 
YOU ! I DON'T WANT J 
TO HURT HI Mf AND I A 
WANT HIM AS A FRIEND/, 


BUT m 
NOT IN 
LOVE 
WITH 
KEITH/ 


l3? -£ fy I 

,1 K’ClElS&U l 

•.a-eir 


f" 

T^U- 
YOJ‘)& [fe 
GOT A 
/HIUAOR- 

^A\iey 


WHAT ABOUT BERT 1 
VON DALE? 


GARFIELD 



books 


MEXICO SET 

By Len Deighton 374 pp. SI 6 . ^ 

Knopf. 201 East 5(tth Street. 

New York. N. Y. 10022 . 

Reviewed bv Ross Thomas 

T HE first novel in len Brighton's new 
espionage trilogy was "Berlin Game. Now 
comes “Mexico Sei" jnd keener intellects Ihan 
mine already will have anticipated a third nov- 
el to be called "Some place-or-other-Malch 
— thus completing what l suspect will be 
referred to as the lennis trilogy. 

I confess ihai 1 didn't tumble w the Mme- 
set and mulch conceit unlil aTier finishing 
Deighton's entertaining second novel in this 
trilogy that again features fortvish Bernard 
Samson, the British spy who is afflicted with 
far more than the usual amount of both career 
and domestic difficulties. 

But as in ail trilogies, the problem is the back 
story. The author has to fill it in for those who 
haven't read the first novel without irritating 
those who have. Having previously read "Ber- 
lin Game." I wasn't at all bothered when 
Deighton again tells of Samson and his rich, 
beautiful, upper-middle-class wife. Fiona, who 
both work for the British secret intelligence 
sen ice until . . . WelL I won’t spoil the first 
book for those who want to start the series at 
the beginning. 

Mexico itself doesn't provide much more 
than a routinely exotic locale and Deighton 
gives us a mere sidelong glance at it — certain- 
ly not the long. cool, sometimes almost loving 
stare that he has turned time and again on 
Berlin and London and even Paris. Mexico is 
only a backdrop, a place where a passed-over 
KGB major might be approached by a British 
agent to see if he is interested in defecting to 
the West. 

Bernard Samson was bom into the spy trade. 
His father was head of the Berlin station for the 
British after World War If and saw to it that 
his son was reared and educated in the former 
German capital thus providing us with a spy 
who virtually from the cradle on was indoctri- 
nated in cold war lore. In facL Samson once 
describes himself as a “lapsed fascisL" 

But while Samson is traipsing around Mexi- 
co. his rivals hack in London are jockeying for 
position in the spy bureaucracy. Suppose, it is 
murmured, that the traitor uncovered in “Ber- 
lin Game" fled East only to deflect suspicion 
from the real KGB mole who is still burrowing 
into the department? And who else could the 
real mole be but Bernard Samson? 

DeighLon manages to bring it all off nicely, 
as he usually does, writing with perhaps less 
sprightliness than in his previous novels, but 
with complete authority and control. When it 
comes to pitting working-class sharpies against 
Oxbridge twits. Deighton has few equals. He 
even gives us an American who has wormed his 
way up into the British spy hierarchy and is 
now lusting for a knighthood to show off back 
in the United States. The American somehow 
is utterly believable. 

Deighton also serves up fascinating glimpses 
of such types as Lhe nearly senile head of 
British intelligence: a KGB major with a pas- 
sion for Sherlock Holmes; and Samson’s boy- 
hood friend and Jewish orphan. Werner Volk.- 
mann. who managed to survive and even 
prosper in postwar Berlin, and now flits effort- 
lessly back and forth between East and West. 

However, it's Bernard Samson himself who 
deserves and gets both our allention and sym- 


, c * m m with his problems of civil 
pathy — Sam* « ™ L *jldren. a vengeance: 
service pay* mother^ ^ ^ jeatous *** 

bent wife. on lvjob he know — 

eito kill him or land hrm 

on io ^nsm lhis n ^ ^ jngredi. 

and ir “ ch .f^' ihrillers. And once again 
ents of all 8*^ intricate and wholly 
Deiahion has W '°'^ W h with convincing' 

wonder w here ma tch will be set. ~ 

Ross Thomas, author of Bnarpateh.-' wrote 
this review far The H ashmgtm Post. ^ 


BEST SEL LERS - 

ii__ Nw \ arfc iimt* 


FICTION 


Let W«fcs 
*ta <nLkf < 


J IF TOMORROW COMES, by Sidney ^ 
Sheldon , 

2 THE SICILIAN, by Mime Puzo — 

3 THE TALISMAN, by Sicphcn Kin* and , 

Peier Siraub iiT ” 

4 SO LONG. AND THANKS FOR ALL 

THE FISH. by Do4i» Adw ..--.g-. > 

V THE LIFE AND HARP TIMES OF HEI- 
DI ABROMOWITZ. by Joan R«w» - * 

0 LOVE AND WAR. by John Jakes...-—- 5 

7 ILLUSIONS OF LOVE, by Cynthia Free- & 

R T^E FOURTH PROTOCOL t>> Frvder- g 

9 “!a3d LADIES' OF THE CLuYliy . 

Helen Hoovm Sanunyer — 1 * 

10 LIFErrSOWNSELF.bv DanJcnkinj-.... * 

J I JITTERBUG PERFUME. Tom Robbins 10 

12 STRONG MEDICINE, by Arthur Hailey 15 

13 ST1LLWATCH. by Mar> Higgin* Clark _ 14 

14 DREAMS OF ORCHIDS, by Phyllis A 

Whiincv ... - 

15 FIRST AMONG EQUALS. by lettiey Ar- ^ 

NONFICTION 

1 lACOCCA: An Aulohiography. by Lee la- 

cocca with w miam Novak • 

2 LOVING EACH OTHER, by Leo Btucag- 

3 THE BIU DGE ACROSS FOREVER, by 

Richard Bach - - 

4 “THE GOOD WAR," by Studs Tetkel 6 

5 PIECES OF MY MIND, by Andrew A. 


b MOSES THE KJTTEN. bv James Hemot r «*. 

7 HEY. WAIT A MINUTE. I WROTE A 
BOOK- try John Madden with DaieAnder- 

son 3 

8 A LIGHT IN THE ATTIC, by She! Silver- 

Man - . 10 115 

9 DR. BURNS' PRESCRIPTION FOR 

happiness, bv George Bums 7 13 

10 SON OF THE MORNING STAR, by 

Evan S. Connell — 9 X 

I! ELVIS IS DEAD AND I DONT FEEL 

SO GOOD MYSELF, by Lewis Grizzard \2 11 

12 THE BRAIN, bv Richard M. ResLai 13 8 

13 HERITAGE by Abba Eban It (£. 

14 THE WEAKER VESSEL, by Aniouia Fra- 

ser 14 16 

15 ONE WRITER'S BEGINNING, by En- 

dcra Wdty 15 45 

ADVICE, HOW-TO AND MISCELLANEOUS 

1 WHAT THEY DONT TEACH YOU AT 
HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL by 

Mark H. McConnack I 20 

2 NOTHING DOWN, by Robert G. Allen 3 9 

3 WOMEN COMING OF AGE by Jane 

Fooda with Mignon McCarthy 4 9 

4 THE ONE MWUTT SALESPERSON, by 

Spencer Johnson, and Larry Wilson 5 1 1 

5 WEIGHT WATCHERS QUICK START 

PROGRAM, by Jean Nidetdt 2 3 


ItJTM PAVTS 


By Alan Truscoct 

O N the diagramed deal 
dummy hod the opportu- 
nity to admire some brilliant 
play by his partner. The dou- 
ble of tbe pre-emptive tbree- 
spade bid was negative, and 
the four no-trump bid asked 
South to bid a minor. It was 
virtually certain in the light of 
the bidding that South held 
five cards in at least one minor 
suiL South guessed to pLay 
clubs and the lead was the 
heart ace. 

West was hoping to give his 
partner a heart ruff but 
changed his mind. He should 
no doubt have shifted to a safe 


BRIDGE 


spade, but he gave South some 
help try leading a trump. South 
took the queen with the ace, 
crossed to the club king and 
pitched a spade on the heart 
king. When be then led to tbe 
dub jack be was able to count 
the hand accurately. East had 
certainly begun with a single- 
ton heart and a doubleton dub 
and probably had a seven-card 
spade suiL That left him with 
three Diamonds. 

South dedded to play West 
for a doubleton ten or jack 
rather than a doubleton long. 
Planning an “intra-finesse," he 
led to the diamond eight, forc- 
ing the jack and subsequently 
played the diamond queen 


from dummy. This pinned 
West's ten and brought home 
the game. 

NORTH (Q) 

* A 

0 K J 9 7 6 3 

« QM 

sHL III 

oios 11,1,111 or jr a 

• 0 93 • Q 4 

SOUTH 

* S3 

03 

0 A 9 76 3 

* A J 10 fl 7 

North and South wore ndnenihte. 
Tbe (ridding: 


Nnrtb 

Cast 

South 

Wail 

1 V 

3* 

ObL 

4* 

4 N.T. 

Pur 

9 * 

PUS 

Pass 

Pan 



i m 

h m?. 


IP? 

fw 

? -A? 7 


v?ir\* ; 

?■;% S 

■ >■• tz‘ 

' £ 


T ' • ffe' 

J.17 

.IgkL 

&■ 


W«r led tbe been ece. 


MESTIK 


LAFTUR 


vyhata flatterer 

SELE70M IS. 

- 

Now arrange lhe carded totter* to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


Yesterday's 


EUROPE 


A toerve 
Amsterdam 
Athens 
BarcclMM 
Bale rode 

Benin 

Brussels 

Badianst 

Budapest 

Cop ee hog c n 

Casta Dal Sal 

DMriln 

Edlnhareti 

FI araaca 

Frankfurt 

Geneva 

Helsinki 

lifantMl 

Las Palmas 

Lisbon 

London 

Madrid 

Milan 

Moscow 

Munich 

Mica 

Oslo 

Ports 

Prneae 

PerkknrUi 

Borne 

Stockholm 

Straabeera 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Jumbles; CHICK TAFFY ARCTIC BRUTAL 
Answer; Whet dermeiology is lhe science of— 
"ITCH CRAFT' 


WEATHER 


12 S4 o 

-I 30 fr 

1 34 fr 

4 39 It 

-7 19 a 

0 32 r 

-2 28 cl 

-1 30 fr 

■S 23 a 

-2 26 r 

7 45 a 

0 4t d 

5 41 a 

5 41 o 

-3 21 fr 

-2 26 o 

-22 -0 fr 


HIGH LOW 
C F C F 

32 W 24 75 d 

6 43 -4 25 fr 

21 70 17 42 r 

32 90 25 77 Ir 

22 72 10 9 fr 

H 52 0 32 fr 

10 SO 7 45 r 

32 90 25 77 d 

22 72 17 41 a 

7 45 4 39 r 


7 45 a 

-Zt -4 cw 

4 25 fr 

-2 28 fr 

-I 30 e 

-4 at a 

-1 X cl 


MIDDLE EAST 


•3 2t -12 10 Iw 

17 43 5 41 el 

15 57 B 44 Cl 

B 44 4 43 , 

17 43 12 54 cl 


Banakok 32 90 24 

Baffin? 4 43 -4 

Hone Kane 21 70 17 

Manila 32 90 25 

New Dead 22 72 10 

Seoul II 52 0 

ShMNlKri 10 SO 7 

Shmpare 33 90 25 

Taipei 22 72 17 

Tokyo 7 45 4 

AFRICA 

Alders 20 to 4 

Cairo X 48 12 

Cape Town 27 01 17 

Cntotfanca 21 76 12 

Harare 25 77 17 

LOBM 24 82 23 

Nairobi 28 52. 14 

Tools IB 44 4 

LATIN AMERICA 

Buenos Aires 25 02 IB 

Lima 24 79 16 

Mexico Clbr 25 77 5 

Rtsde JimeJre as 95 25 

son Petrie — — — 

NORTH AMERICA 

Ancharoge -2 28 -4 

Attala B 44 2 

Boston -2 26 -V 

CMeaee 4 5 4 


Honolulu 25 

Houston 8 

Los Annum 14 

Miami 27 

Mlmeapotts -13 

„ Montreal -11 .. .. _ 

jerusotom B 44 4 43 Nassau V 81 14 M Ir 

Tel Aviv 17 63 12 54 cl New York 1 34 -1 X tw 

OCEANIA SanFraadlCS 13 55 4 39 Ir 

Seattle 3. 41 -2 26 sw 

Auckland 25 77 21 70 fr Toronto -10 14 -17 1 fr 

Svdnev 25 77 15 59 fr WasUoetan 1 34 -1 X sw 

cf-cloudv: fo-toeov; fr-falr; tvhoifj o-overcast; oc-Borflv daudy; r-raln; 
sh^funrara; sw-snav.-' <t-sfor mv. 

WEDNESDAYS FORECAST — CHANNEL: SltohttV ehOPBV. FRANKFURT! 
Partlr chxrdv.Temp.7 — 2 145— 28L LONDON: Cwudv. Temp. 9—1 148 — JOh 

MADRID: Claudv. Temp- M — i (57 — 39). NEW YORK: Snow. Temp. 1 ) 

(34— X). PARIS: Partlvcloudv.TBmp.IO — 1 (50— Xl.ROMB: Partly doudv. 
Temp. 14—8 141 - 44). TEL AVIV: Cloudy. Tema T8- 13 (44 -95). ZURICH: 
Partly Cloudy. Temp, 8—3 (44— 2S). BANGKOK: Fwoy. Temp. 33—21 
191—791. HONG KONG: Cteudv. Toma. 18—13 S&JMtfILAl FMr . 
Temp. 32-23 (»-73). SEOUL: F<wv.TemjLjB—0(®—M. SINGAPORE’ 
Farr. Temp. 31 — 25 188— 77). TOKYO! Fopov. TOfttA 7— 5 (45 —41). 


Canadian Stock Markets 

Prices In Canadian cents unless marked S 


Amsterdam 


Toronto | 

Hlali LawCtosaCtiee at00ln*u C ° 

A MV, s<4 4 V, + ^ “IWBB 
ry tXfUm 3DVa mx JOOOJannock 
^ MgtojH 

S19V4 19*s 19V, i ?rn. IC S?r.ft d< 

S24 23V, 24 +1 >2! n Lertxjll 

rt SH__ 247J 25 + V, ,|lfl!-J!S.fH. rr1ls 


^ zT £21 Z 3WL«SSco 

« 579 4 400MDSHA 

S14U 14 )4 — !*- 45823 Melon H X 

134 131 134 + 4 13330 MertandE 

ST 7V, T7 I7Vi — '<■ T4349AloIsonAf 

425 420 420 SOOMaisanB 

55 V. S’s 5^+Ve PB Munahv 

SIBW 1BL. 1BL.+ 50750 N0M3GO L 

Siva iva iva+’« 40713 Nerando 

SI2 mi Tl’k— 14 5013 Moreen 

257 Ml 3S2 — 3 43777 Nva AHA I 

S2ZL 22V, 27to- 25145 NuWsf se A 

5ISJ '* 3200 Oakwood 

JJSf » 'S' 1 + 73510 Osbawa A f 

*171, I7VB 17W— tv 11000 Pamuur 
VB 27 27 + V, 1040 PanCan P 

..S’* ,£ •* 100,1 Pembina 

15. *WIPhoni,OII 

zr« 1IK0 Pine Point 

SS; S, Place GO a 

331« 33ti— 1240a Placer 

Jlfto J5y, 15%, + 2104 Proviao 

BCG-> sastfs" 

?!?'* 15** to^ non Rnwwk • 


J ABN 

ACFHokNns 

4*904 

AKZO 

Ahold 

High Low Close Wee AMEV 

A ■Dam Rub 

S52V, 511% 52 K. + 1 Amrob«pU» 

S14 14 14 — V* BVG 

S15U IS 1 *, m + H Bu el l I mai n T 
43499 34V, 34W Cakma Hldo 

SI9U 19V, m Elsevler-NDU 
41294 1294, 131*— V* £<**er 
S3BV* 38 3 GlM Brocades 

418 1724 I7V.+ W Helnekefl 

S25V. 24Te J5W+ Hoooovens 

*2724 2744 279e- 94 KLM 
51Z 1014 liw+to Noanaen 

SIOVs ion 1094— 14 Nat Nedder 

S29'4 2914 2e^+ Nedlloyd 

*20 1994 m— Dee Voider G 

419 1* 19+14 

S25Vf 249u 2SV4+J4 ?*l llp5 
445 440 440 — 5 Kooeco 

S17*4 IP* 1P4— 

517177 17Vj |7V»- ™“nc« 

S30'i 20 20 —^3 Rorenfo 

CAU- 26U, 2tfM»+ 2 SB g_Bu Wl 
*2094 20Vi 3tH4— Umiever 

S149- 14V; T41ft_ V, V^qrmtyren 

5794 7V, ru— 14 X5K S,orh 

Ml 57 ,0 4 I VNU 


uurn I Bover.verAonk 
— p_— BMW 

"T!: commerebonk 
Cantlgumml 
193 Dblrnler^Benz 
IS* Deausso 

Deutsche Babcock 
Deutsche Bank 
Dresdoer Br-*- 
DUB-Schutti 
GHH 
Hochtief 
HoectBt 
Haesch 
Holzmann 
Horten 
Kali + Salz 
xarstodt 
KOufhof 
KHD 

Kioecknar W 
Krups Stahl 
Linde 

Lufthansa 
MAN 

Mannesmon 
Metallpesek 
MuenctLRue 
Preussoa 


Close Fre*. 

324 
351 
142X0 
120X0 
414 
30 
143 
39250 


Other Markets Feb. s 

Closing Prices In local currencies 


Ruetoers-Wt 
RWE 
Soierlne 
Siemens 
Thvssen 
Varta 

S&£S?-%Sg a,lnan : '"* vsi? 

Source: AFP. Volkswooem 


KMO PanCan P 
1000 Pembina 

MW Phoni, Oil 
1080 Pine Point 
l-MD Place GO a 
17400 Plccer 
2104 Proviao 
100 Que Store a 
750 Hom Pel 
BOO Ravrock I 


40 57 40 + 3 VN W 

t ^ O0 2r, t5S m :^ 

118'i* 18 IB r a — — 

*7yi 79e_ 71- I Brussels 

S2794 279u 279b + 11 

IBS IDS 105 Arbed 

S25fe 259a 259#— 1ft Bekaert 
S18 17*4 IB +14 Cackwlll 

340 340 340 +10 fBES 

SSVi 9ft 51ft— Si 1 ! ... 

*744 TU 794— GB-Inno-BM 


Coaimenlmc 
Previous : V 
Source: AFP 


500AM1 Prce 

30kMASm C fndA *4W ett ilft + ,3SS l . wacoB L 5ISJ 35! 3S . |®evior-NDU 

9045 Al, Erwray S209, 33V2 2094+ 3400 Jan nock 51294 1214 121ft— W> fofcker 

2S00 Alto Nal *1514 15V; 15Vi + 2100 Kelsey H S3BVft 38 3 GIB Brocades 

WO Algo Cent 5191ft 19*4 i9Vj ,??S 1 K 51^ dd l, Sn« 17 3^ ,7 2Si w Hfnek en 

1087 Alaoma 51 *24 zsu. 24 + 1 17133 LabaH S25**- 24t4 2514+ Hoaeovens 

14907 AiSraWAf W Un S +?i ,2154 Lot «nns *2794 2794 279*- 94 KLM 

1975Argcen 5)794 17 179#+ 12315 LOfll Cem 512 lDlii II 1 * + 1ft Noansmi 

372 AravaCpr *1194 1 lift 11*4+ Vb IWOOLaama SlOto UWft 1094- Ift No* Nedder 

SSetWAtcal | w 8*3 K+ 2 W J-L Loc *29«> 291* IW#+ Nvdltovd 

1*75 UP Canada *2714 27 27\4— < m 3790LobtawCo *20 1994 199»— DCS Voider G 

I 32SD0 Bank BC *4 *74 * 400 UDS H A Cl# 19 II Pokhaed 

114340 Bank N 5 
. 200 Bor rick g 

15900 Baton At _ . .. . _ „ 

140^ Bonanza R 425 420 420 1 SOOMolMnB SI3V4 17Vj 171ft— l Rnlinco 

S2400 Bra lame 

2550 Bramafeo 
1S00 Brando M 
2822SBCFP 
*4045 BC Res 
9470 BC Phone 
7703 Branswk 
13145 BuM Can 
25890 CAE 
346CCL A 
90aCDfStbBf 
6320 Cod Frv 

*OMC Nor West *2314 23 L. 2 Tm I IK 0 pim'polril "eHs,. 'm. 'm. H ^ Jaclil I I 

1450C Packrs 
5700 Con Trust 
900 C Tung 
133 CGE 
27544 Cl Bk Com 
74000 C Tine A I 
50074 C Util B 
1020a Cam 
line Cetaeee 
. 850 Colon 175P 
3*50 C Dlstb A 
. WOCOWtoBI 
19750 CTL Bank 
SOCanventrs 
420 Conwesf A 
1 133449 Caseka R 
365 Conran A 
15204 Crown K 
24500 Czar Res 
97445 Doan Dev 
1875 Doan A 

gj yf Dq ni t on A _ 

377« Oenivm b t iii" iiift ir’+'rtl .jsi’Y .fri* sbv,' "I 1 — 1 1 sinie'oarB 

'125 ST^con SlOVft Uu, 1094 + ( 512 12 12 AEG-Tefetonken 112 injo Stelu* 

tepiaiiBnAf 473 470 47S +* I 8 ?S4S , S’“A _ SXT* 2344 23*4 +! Allianz Vers ikm inS I Swire Pad! 

29 Dicknsn B 
itoo Daman A 
<8931 DofaseoA 
2000 Dv Pant A 
2MiaOvtoxA 
ITUEICihomx 

150 Emca 
4570 EauItvSvr 
WISFCAlnN 
.wgCFofcertC 

i mv» FiaUirgse rft ^ V4*# 95 + iikoj 1 or um bk *J9lft 1914 ig<a + 'u .- 1ZL54 122.93 

ScSSftJS* 270 +13 153* Torstor Bf »9% 19 lT'ft + 91 Toronto 2^05 JM 2588.90 

%SE?S!n dA *225*1 2Hfc 2)Vft+ v 3 13302 Traders A f S22tt 22te 2294+ Mnnlmnl- twv c„^ W8B.W 

3 2 - STBs 7*4 7*4—14 iMwtrlolS l(l*X. 

<700 FCHy Fin 512 lit# it 38B Trinity Re* 49s ms — V Toronto: TSE 300 Imbw. 


*33 32V4 321ft + Vft ^yaerl 

ni*4 3R- 2194+ <4 S**S*“! . 

S14ift 14V, l4'i + 4 Kredtofbonk 

173 148 148 — 5 P*lroflna 

110 105 105 —15 §oc Ge nerate 

Sffte B*4 8*4 sofhio 

*1294 111ft 13 Soivav 


citu. r^u. w RUYioat i Uim 754 7%_ wo-rnn» 

5 (S JiJS J?S + ^ 5187 Redoath 533 331* 331*3 4- w C*vo«1 

S7T4 K194 3)2 2lteT«S HESfiSl 

*1794 1794 I79b_ 57^0 ReidWcid 5141ft 14>4 14V, + 4 Kredte fb 

SAW, 6ii stfjTT 2200 Res Serv I 172 146 148 — 5 fetooflix 

MW AW 414 + “ eJ?2S?? Pn,A 110 ,0S ,0S —IS frSPwie 

Mllft ltS 3f£5 0weriA S89fl B*4 8*4 

430 Jao * 7I0Q Roman 1)394 111ft 13 Sqlvy 

Wi Ifi W 43lft+lft 

253 240 U0 83800 S ceolr o *4 Vi 5*4 «<b + ' /<Hk! M 

*1794 12J4 1 129S + (4 S19 19 19 _ Stock Ex 

*17*4 17V- ir*. ’ 3M8 Sears Can S8 794 7^ 5"* ".-— * 

150 tjjc “ in * Shell Can S2Pb 22%i 23!A + 

3W 2VB no -10 3, ^|fir flH Ste 8 8 - 

300 2B5 295 +10 Ultimo 5814 894 By — 1 

*1414 14V. 14*4+ lift 'ST , Rj + '“ F 

SH 13V4 14 + ’.1 -MI'Y SBtft u 

SlOVft tow. 1094+ * ,J - ,J 12 AEG-Teft 

,4P JS» S? +S “iMoiSSn* 


as As m 3 
360 252 252 + 2 SVVeo R 

09 ^28^ mSi 4S«fneorpi 

S177k 17>i )7^+ ift Sidney o 

5349ft 33V. 34 + 77800 Tajcorg 

440 425 440 +10 1100 Torn 

*18 IB IB + 94 1410 Ted, Car A 

*7 ift nk+ 8269 7 Tack B f 

*20 Vft 20'* 20*4 + ’.ft 5600 To, Can 
5189ft KPfe lBVft+U SWAThomN7 


*1394 llift 12 SiST 

«3Vft 43m 43V* + ift 

Wtk 56t AVfl Hh VW Ie 

£ d d.l Sanw*""— Sts 

ss 1 - b b — smrce - New Warm 

I Frankfurt j smk , *55S» 

.SBift u - — 1 Store Darbi 

5‘ 2. 17 12 AEG-Tefetofiken 112 III Jo Slefu* 

* 23, » 23*4 239V + Allianz Vers 1024 11M Swire Paclf 

K S S TJ S® 1 17817AM Wh*e Mur 

3°5, 280. 3M +5S Bow 187 JO "« Wheelock 

TO* 14 B<,ve, '■ Hv,,0 ■ 721 319 Wlnsw 

115 9A IQS +29 ■- 

Lgg ngt fi gn Indexes Feb. si 

Sf SS .. . . ci«e Preview 


Bk East Asia 
Cheung Korn 

China Light 
cross Hartai 

HanaSenaB 

HK Electric 
HK Hotels 
HK Land 
hk Shanghai 
HK Teiaubon 
HK Wharf 
m, • ihun Hutch Wham 
sx . iasu jnrdinc vialf 
JardtneSec 
New World 
— 7 i Show Bras 

rt I fHK Proas 

1 Stole Darby 

113 uixo Stems 
1024 nan Swire.Poeinc 
178 176* Ww»e;Mgr 


, irono i 

187 jo las 

321 319 WlMw 



id** UV3 f 

air? iu r 4 amt ife rwu ivium Sic sc ic iih riAH. — 

»s 'm> , K + +'‘ .S?W B A k (Si; SS 

SB&3U 1 , s, SUV B a-i> *««» tmut 


300 Fed Pi on 
4700 F CHy Fin 
Itoo Fraser 
-100 Fruenauf 
3T33Gend(s a 


SB Zt 22 — 

513 ills l- 
S18 1794 17L— 

519 19 19 


3I33Gend(t A fMVft 3AU 34’u 135*44 Trimoc 

IDIgGeocComo sin* id*# io*s— ^ 67350 Tflzec A f 

41805 Geacrude 342 322 342 +30 114899 Turbo f 

sSOOGfbraifar m ‘~“- — 

10660 Galdcarsf 
100 Goodyear 
lOOGraffG 
78og Grandma 
eJOOGranduc 
2J£GLForasi 

300Gf Pacific 
irtOGrevhnd 
*M0hGrw»A 
lOTOOHrdtoaAf 
^5 Hawker 
4774 Hoyn D 
1432 H Bay C« 


5109ft 10% 10Vr- '.s , 
S594 5 S _ 

S39«i 39*4 39+, 
g09ft 30Vj 309s 
47 45 45 + 2 


47 

45 

45 


£96 

93 

«8te 

28te 

$2S«ft 


*/te 

ru 

150 

145 

S2Bft 

3CVn 

SMk 

24te 

$19te 

19ft. 


:^{;^Sc PL 

nS«T r ^!f. Af atVa 74^3 

114899 Turbot 57 i7 54+8 

1300 Unicom A f *8ift 8Vft B Vs+ W 
MTUnCarbfd Sill. 119k )|S4 

22IW4U EnfprlM SI I 7 # ms nn#— 
1300 (J Kano WV, 9Vi 99* 

1000 Van Der 775 240 375 +15 

41400VerttlAf *7to TV. TVs + 

arevestoran 8UVft llift tUft 

59MWefdwod SiE 149+ IB +1 

iSJOWesftorto 15 )5 IS 

44025 Wesrmln 613ft. 12 12^ + U< 

3870 Weston S8I 80Vft 81 + U.I 

10725WoodWdA SIIMi 1114 ll«ft 

450 Yk Bear SION IffL ION + >4 

Total sates ll*46Jrc shares 


Montreol 


4890B Bank Mom 
. 350 CIL 
16178 Con Bath 
54444 DamTutA 
. TOOMmTrst 


^NrtBkCda sw 

- I 1 M00 Power Cam *29 

9000 RsHOndA 6175 

700 RnilandB stT* 

4745B Roval Bank fin 

r— ,u it vi 4818 Roy Trstco S1BV 

res | Total Sales V77343 shanK. 


High LewCIoMCtoH 

gP*ft Vft 

5ZJJft 271ft 29Jft— <A 
JJIJft IB 181h+ 9ft 
*tl*ft llUlIftt— *» 
5141ft 149k 14'A 
Jlfte 16Vft l«tft + <4 
*» 28Sft28to+to 
5175* |7 1714 + lb 

ill?* TO + % 

Mite 31 31 — Vft 

*18te IB 181ft + 1ft. 


Solufibn to Previous Puzzle 


tlBUDI.1 23CJEIQ HD!Qi3 

□EjnEQ □□□□ ansa 

□iJtSQn □□□□ □□□□ 

c 3GB aanaaonnaas 

□□HBQQa 

anaiaa Hnansa 
□caa EumiaBa son 
□cnaa aag aaaaa 
□on asacias aoiaa 
□cianaa assiaa 
Eaaa nciaiiinizia 
OBnoaaaaaQa aaa 
didhs oana aaaaa 
mBHEi oaaa atsama 
BB0nQaai3 oaaoa 


GKN 

Gtovot 

Grand Mai 

GuhHwss 

GUS 

Hanson 

Hawker 

IC( 

Imps 

Lloyds Bank 

Lonrtw 

Lucas 

Marks cmd So 

Meial Bax 

Midland Bank 

Nat West Bank 

Pilklngton 

Ptessav 

Raoal Eloci 

Randtontefn 

Rank 

Roed inti 

Reuters 


Cteie Pm*. 
304 304 

li 27/3311 19/32 
298 391 

337 223 

494 

214 TOT 

439 435 

842 639 

* m 

587 579 

181 Ifll 

242 36S 

129 125 

415 415 

349 349 

449 662 

3N 288 

IS ,M 

202 206 

*849, StiVi 

334 33B . 

948 544 

M3 _ 330 


Lolurys Cop 

Leorand 

TOreal 

Akatra 

Mlcheiln 

MM Pennar 

Moel Hemessy 

Moulinex l 

Nord-Est 

Ocd dentate 

Pernod Rlc. 

Peiraies (fiel i 

Peugeot 

Pock, to 

Prlniemas 

Radiolechn 

Redoule 

Roussel Uclat 

5fcls Rosstonol 

Sour terrier 

Tetemecan 

Thomson C5F 

Vatea 2 

Agefl Index : lt7.ii 
Previous : 195X4 
CAC Index : 194X9 
PrewlaaB : HUB 

Source: AFP. 


Close Prev 
406X0 404X0 
2010 1990 

2330 2349 

1718 1750 

808 Ml 
.73 71 

1955 1955 

ioa40 ioi 
78 74.90 
713 710 

700 701 

350.90 251 

274 273 

51 JO 51 

198 191 JO 
»7 365 

1285 1240 

1585 1585 

1999 2000 

448 4a7 

2310 2360 

468 453 | 

360X0 258 


I ffSjW 528 510 

Stoloh 194 no 

Southland a 2 

Woodftde u as 

Worm old 321 322 

**' °ry*>°rtes lode# .-777X0 
Pmvioui : 776X0 
Sowce.- Reuters. 


Tokyo 


Roval Dutch t 47+, 47 5/44 


Singapore 


RTZ 

Shell 

5TC 

SM Chartered 
Tale and Lvle 
Tosco 
Them EMI 
T.l. group 
Trafalgar Hg 

Ultramar 


770 74* 

254 252 

S 403 

237 232 

439 427 

320 220 

364 360 

IS 149 

210 20# ] 


Unjtewc 1129/321177/32 
United Biscuits 195 191 

Vickers 228 

W.Doeo 1359, §5 

W.HOWIngs S279i 527^ 

Mar Loan 3W c 34W 349k 

Wertworth 583 ^ 

Kl 18*4 lBtft 

9.TJ0 Index : 9B2X0 
’rrv lows r 96U0 
Source: AFP. 


Bauslead 
Cold Storage 
DBS 

FraserNeave 
How Par 
InChcaae 
Kegpel Shto 
Mel Banking 
OCBC 
OUB 

Semto Shtovard 
S Darby 
S Steamship 
51 Trading 
UOB 


1X8 1.70 

2X6 174 

SfS S.9B 
SX0 5J5 
2-28 2J3 

2 M 3X1 

UD IJ3 

US 5.95 
9X5 9jm 
3X6 3X6 

1X0 N.T. 
I.J4 1.94 
1.14 1.17 

«X2 4X4 

4JD 4J9 


OUB index :4l(.l? 

Previous :«M6 

Source: Overseas Union Bank. 


Stockholm 


Milan 


kmeoComm 

tentraie 

Ugabotela 

>od Hal 

’armllalla 

'tot 

; Insider 
tenoral I 
FI 

toleetnenil 
talftbbnca 
fan ledi son 
niveiti 

'Ir, III 

1A1 

iinaecMte 

IP 

nla 

tomto 


’WOO IB700 
2949 two 
MOO 4010 

2220 27a 

"833 ,0 °* 

23*0 2425 

38950 38850 

79000 TBOO 
bi no 11500 
IMS i486 
6541 6420 

2310 
40500 6B50D 
» 581 

a 07 

M30 3610 
9510 9490 


ACA 

Alfa Laval 

Asea 

Asfra 

AHeuCoKO 

Ballden 

Electrolux 

Ericsson 

Esse He 
Handel sbkon 
PParmoclo 
Scania 
Sandvik 
Ekanska 
SKF 

Swj^sh Match 

ssarffir* 

Source; AFP. 


S5 373 
301 

378 36B 

415 

113 114 

174 

28V 283 

M4 306 
225 — 

HP, i°s 

234 23s 

NX). _ 

"■ft 390 

Ift 1*1 

247 547 

280 272 


Aka I 444 

Asohl Cham 664 67T/ 

Asohi Gloss 852 fl#2 

Btoik of Tokyo 630 625 

Bridgestone 520 531 

Conan 1350 73® 

Dal Nippon Print 930 9ZB 

Ddiwo House 535 <45 

P“!J l55 I3« 

Full PtmtO T760 1730 

EHES - Imo 

Htrochl 858 850 

HJp*> 1430 1360 

“L U6 146 

'.fan 337 3*3 

KMiSLf ,r Unes 4950 5X0 

Kollma 272 274 

Konsalictower 7330 3330 

Kao Soap 825 825 

Steal 145 1« 

Kirin Brewery 5641 sH 

Komatsu ltd 449 456 

Kubota 329 338 

KS& 1 1510 1470 

aWsSra? 1 & 

a 

Mitsui and Co 330 3X 

Mifsukosbl M4 S 

Wiroml Aft 

ii6o 115a 

Nlkko sec 60S 4»4 

Nippon Steel Uj Xo 

EKS2? V ' u8en M2 243 

NcxnuraSec & $ 

S&" » 

sS? 1 1080 ’ 070 id 

&ornoBank S ffll# 

™ s 

Stln. iS 

tSE? 0 Cfwm 785 799 

• ®*|h 1 ijn mam 

TSrs&fepopw isio 1 


Tokyo Marine 
Torgv Ind 
Toshiba 
Tovalo 
VamahcfilSec 


704 707 
440 450 
400 412 
1300 1290 
590 590 


New Index :9l7xs 

Previous :«s.a 

Source: AFP. 


Zurich 


teGMKWco index iLisb 
revteus : 1.157 
turn: AFP. 


Sydney 


Air Lkwlde 
Aisthom Atj. 
AvDassauFt 
Saneaim 
BIC 

Beuvaues 

BSN-GO 

CftWw 

ctua Med 

Codmefi 

Dwmm 

Ell-Awl tntoe 

Europe 1 

Gen Eaux 

Hacfietie 

Imefal 


598 

Z17X0 237 

890 870 

iis sii 

5! ^ 
J 10 
3£! 

JjS 1870 

1200 H96 

US 24170 
701 700 

577 *74 

1880 1790 

W 11.90 1 


ACI 

ANI 

ANZ 

BHP 

Boral 

wnioainvllit 

Brambles 

Cotes 

Cwnaiea 

CRa 

csr 

Dunlop 

ss w 

SSff"" 

Myer 

^ta^ 


■2 158 

258 3S5 

SI 

«S 515 

® 329 

(93 IK 

2SS « 
4!S 400 

330 23a 

5M 532 

27 295 

221 jjn 

300 308 

220 230 
265 B8 

M 65 
422 
2° 265 

170 370 


Bank Leu 

SSsSr' S8 S 

CroSllISJ- 2780 3760 

Eleetr«SS£° M0 

Georg Fischer 7 700 2710 

JocobSiteSTd ,727 725 

J«tovon K,rd 6«g ODD 

LonalsGvr l 900 

» 182 Iffl* 

OmikgihB 85 

gs 2 r 

psr- l ss 

SBC 229 316 

Swissair 37D 363 

Swiss VeUaho^. 1128 

Union 1475 

*22 

burton ins 

... 'roOQ 19885 

S^WjJrtx : 41*48 
: 42UB 

Source: afpT^ 

BvaliaMe- SP tmi: NJL w 

nirome, w ex^^y,^ 



















INTERNATIO NAL HHULD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY. FFRnm nv 6 , 1985 

SPORTS 


I’ ra iities, Casualties of the Winter Grind 


laummonal Herald Tribune 


rad ^^^of^sinjoriesand 

unreasonahfr .w - ^ *“* Bomsaa Donnuc 

fo “ - *■ 


LONDON — Players, we some- 
times forget in a business that 

.7 

ties of flesh, heart and mind as the “^winter break: The soccer nilSf His we begins anew m exile, with 

— — -s FSSffssi'w 

JV, nas little time to complications other than East- 


• V;:v : -^gw " 


v-^3sSS 
■ ’ : 

- a «o4* * 


briefs 

Prison* 


s Held B 

■*£ 


— i -=5»ith< 


PK 


Hidirt W'eii 



Italy’s most creative, and seemingly 
most d oomed, player. Gian carlo 
Autognoni y<Ri may remember, 
made a brave and spectacular rt- 
covery in 1982 after being resusd- 
tated by the kiss of life when a 
goalkeeper’s knee had smashed his 
sknlL 

He thought he was making 


Rob Hughes 


, — , T ■ — —v» - “»-uu ytut*. 

nas had to be removed. The riKin 


flair 

the 


denominate the 
and speed as a free man 
once had in Romania. 

. 11 «s now three and a half 
since Radacanu defected by leign- 
pg injury at halftime durin g an 
international in Dortmund and bc- 
^ driven off by Ro mania^ and 
raish friends wide the second half 
was underway. Since then, the slim, 
oark forward has never known 
peace of mind . 


West relations, are FerSoCha-' E£EX?£S*i2frl* 
lana and Mickey Walsh. ^ ul * s^y. ametal plate 

Chfllap n 

summer 
transfer 

^a^poundsst^gtook 

the crafty little player from Benfica skm in Florence. wervi 

to Bordeaux to join the all-star nu- 
cleus of France’s victorious mid- 
field. 



J cannot tell if his criticisms have 
any validity, but 1 do know, as the 
He hK win w , U. r Bordeaux coach observed, nothing 

? ™" ric “ ihe “ 4k ” 

part of the club. A thigh injury in inp 
preseason training, flowed by an — E 
operation and a breakdown in De- by the 


years wasted. Notb- 
: duffing finality that 
to a recent statement 

J3£--* ton* Don- SSSlS 

nmnd has been erratic, his fim«c «m« import. West German Dieter in the last three years. y 

“l. A lad named 

„ Cumin *“ na 8 nu BP salary causes resent- " evilie Hamilton has just learned 

“There was nothing in the uewsna- “?iv „ career is over before it can be- 

pere or on TVabom my cWmSr- . Above aU, says Aixni Jacquet, frjewf with Wolverhampton 
ance, said the player who harfren. Bordeaux coach, u jt is a terrible wanderare, a roobe on the verge of 
resented bis country 27 times^Jr ^low w mora %- Do you through, until he «rf- 

was as if I never ousted."^ know anything more terrible for a “Psed dunng training. 

He knew he was being erased as a n V° ** ? Wc 10 , Specialists warn that he has a 

nonpereon because Ms wife Nico- », "ofcssion^y, perhaps nothing, heart defect and that overexenion 
' NVXh Jut even sportsmen have private — which caused the blackout — 
lives, and until a week ago few could kill him. “If they’d said it was 
people knew that while Ir ishman a leg broken in five places, Fd try to 
Walsh was consistently scoring for overcome it,” Hamilton said. “But 
drei-FIKri uti ««- f 0 ™ “ Portugal his hopes of a fife is precious, and Tm lucky that 

wLT ^ mp t ! rere ?^,“?fimd, unmo- family of his own had met with a 
i«ted captives in their own conn- decade’s failure. Now he has as 

many as he can cope with — his 
wife; Christine, gave birth to test- 
uibe quads in a London hospital 10 
days ago. 

. Walsh is not the only goal -scorer 
in Portugal to be grateful to the 




en Victor in Combined 


Iwn 

PuuBD Zurbriggen 

‘Well nothing's inpossible now. ' 


fina, told him so. She passed the 
Massage on by telephone from Bu- 
charest. 

She and their 2-year-old son A n- 
left behind, unmo- 
in their own coun- 
ty; while Radacanu, previously a 
major in the army, was outside, 

“I bad given up hope of seeing 
my wife and son again,” he said 
recently. Sometimes I was in 
despair I considered retunriiig to 


Compiled ty Our Suff From Dopjzcka 
BORMIO. Italy — P b rn iq Zur- 
briggen of Switzerland easily won 

the men’s combined title here Tues- 
day and captured his second gold 
medal at the world Alpine ski 
championships. 

Zurbriggen. who turned 22 Mon- 
day, had already won the men's 
individual do wnhill compe tit ion, 
and on Tuesday be made Switzer- 
land four-for-four in gold m«»rf«]g 
so far at the 1985 championships. 
Micbda Fighri won the wo men 's 
downhill Sunday and Erika Hess 
retained her combined dile Mon- 
day. Switzerland had never before 
won the men’s combined world ti- 
tle. 

The Swiss gold meda l sweep 
could well continue Wednesday in 
the women's giant slalom. 

With morale in the Swiss r»mp 
so high . Hef wiping champion Hess 
and her teammates Figini and Ma- 
ria Walliser could all be swept 
along on the tide. 

Thor main opposition should 
come form West Germany's Mari- 
na Kiehl and Elisabeth Kirchler of 
Austria. 

Zurbriggen had a total of only 
7.67 penalty points in the final 
combined standings, having placed 
fina in the do wnhill portion on 
Friday and finishing fifth in Tues- 
day's slalom. 

Another Swiss, 24-year-old 


Thomas Bflrgler. unexpectedly won. 

the combii 


the slalom to take 
bronze maH^ l 


jined 


the downhill was second Tuesday 
and second overall — on 37.84 pen- 
alty points — to give Austria its 
third silver medal of (he champion- 
ships. 

Bfirgler, a giant slalom specialist, 
scored his first-ever slalom victory 
by docking the fastest times in 
both runs down the icy Order 
His winning aggregate of 1: 
came on heat times of 48.45 and 
4SJ8 seconds. 

Riedlsperger- 22. finished 0.48 
seconds behind, after trailing 
BOrgler by 0.06 after the first leg. 

Zurbriggen. the overall 19S4 
World Cup champion, skied with 
apparent ease down the difficult 
course and compiled an aggregate 
of 1:37.82 to finish 0.28 seconds 
behind fourth-place Ivano Udalini 
of Italy. Third in the slalom was 
Frenchman Michel Vion, the 1982 
combined champion, in 1:37.36. 

“I'm happy to get a second title." 
Zurbriggen said. “I had two steady, 
controlled runs. I was confident 


Killy as a triple gold medalist at 
one Olympics or one world cham- 

^“Well^ nothing's impossible 
now." Zurbriggen said. “But I 
know that winning the giant slalom 
will be tougher." 

His return to top form has been 
remarkable, since he underwent an 
operation on his left knee the day 
after being injured en route to the 
second of his downhill victories at 
KitzbQheL Austria, on Jan. 12. Last 
week's combined dow nhill was his 
first competitive outing since the 
injury. 

Riedlsperger said he had only 
hoped to finish among the top five, 
and that the silver medal came as a 
surprise. “I made some mistakes in 
the second heat, but I cannot com- 
plain about the outcome.” he said. 

Liechtenstein's Andreas Wenzel 
an original favorite for the com- 
bined title, was fourth overalL 

BOrgler was amazed at his vic- 
tonr. “It was pretty dramatic at the 
end. 1 certainly didn’t expect to 
beat people like Wenzel and Anion 
Steiner.” 

Switzerland’s Peter LOscher. 
who was exi 


and I felt sure that I would win. It who was expected to make the po- 
was quite dear to me — I just dium after finishing second in the 
wantai to get safely to the finish." combined downhill fell and with- 
A victOTy in Thursday's giant sla- drew in the slalom’s fust heaL 
loin would put Zurbriggen up with Austrian veteran Steiner was dis- 
aU-tune greats Tom Sailer of Aus- . qualified during the second run af- 
tna and Frenchman Jean-Claude ter missing a gate. (AP. AFP. UPI) 


I’ve got a very close-kSa 
around me.” 


amjly 


SCOREBOARD 


Hockey 

Basketball 


Romania, although I knew] would wonders of modem MdicbeTBen- 

mly be sent to prison.” c ~’ 


Hamilton is fortunate that Brian 
Clough, manager of Nottingham 
Forest, lost his own playing career 
through injury. Harsh and de- 
manding and sometimes tmsuffer- 

able though Ckmgh may be, he was S!^'i£!ET 

the first cme on the phone to prom- Hwwretn*. wiraton 

BOOV, N.Y.I. 


MrtiMMl Hocfear Uagu* taadtti tfrroaeh 
F®b. 3! 


NBA Leaders 


OFFENSE 

Overall 


NaSfaMl Basketball Assadathw leaden 
nnaBk Feb. 3: 


Valentine, Purl. 
Baoley, ciev. 
Gs-Winiams. iwash. 


373 

350 

329 


ReuMn 

Qou^i: Harsh, but hnmiuw. 


ah ^^S^ besaaU>p $ XUL ” fica ’ s veteran striker Nene isTecov- 

But no drug and no medicine yet 
invented can hasten the return of 


— - -- — - weupoaoiuuaic mic ana 
Nicouna and the boy, now five; 
arnved by train in Dor tmund To 
complete the fairy tale, Radacanu 


man 


;. :rr~ 

• - - 

■ ■* • --- 2H,- 

" _ . 



■ . - - 

-i'razScj 


' 7' --v 

«?• t si 
•r-2'i..r.V^ 


Like life, the sport has all shades 
of humanity. 


VANTAGE POINT/Williom Gildea 


Rooted to ihe Spot) uHot Coolie Stuys Cool 

Dl I . . , . . *S 


Playing goal is not Jim. It is a The soaH^ thmlona u- 
motive, requiring hule physical all reaction —and 

rrarsfssffi 

<Mn m lurfR aa jumUa S'*™; p Blftck _ Hawks. He rays a goalie 


must have “an edge.” ffis r edge 


game acts, a goalie reacts. How he 

reacts. .. is not ip to him. Unable to a^sT'OuS^as riLSf 

‘r UUBe ^F m i S Wwbk “^ e ' re -going iood riaht n^' 
focus as direction, he can only do they’re no * Daa ” n B« t now . 

what he’s given to do, what the game 


demands of him, and that he must do. 
— “TheGame" byKen Dryden 

'»■ tVtahbtgian Past Service 

rvixz WASHINGTON — Pit Riggin 
•rxi was born to be a goalie. His father, 

Mir. Dennis, was a goaltender for the 

- : •; r Detroit Red Wings in the 1950s, 

m - ihe National Hockey League 
■ ;r .^pr ^had six teams and goal tenders 

- played with no masks. A different 
era. He look a puck in the eye — 


Riggin has been around. Three 
years of junior hockey; stints with 
Knningfaam and with the names 
in Atlanta and Calgaiy before be- 
ing traded to Washington three 
seasons ago. Real mental toughness 
— the ultimate “edge” — came 
early last season when he went 0-8- 
1 and was sent down to the minors. 
He didn’t want to go. Now he’s 
glad he did. 

“I just couldn’t win for anytb- 


detached retina — and was newer MS- ■ • • I thought I could get out of 


i? 

Peace 






■er ■< 




the same. But he had a son. . . . 

“It was tough at hrane, 
Riggin, the Washington Ca. 

No- 1 goalie, “Desire, dedication, 
attitude — how many times did I 
hear it? There were always sacri- 
fices. 'You can't go skiing, you'll 

you’ll geUiun.' But ifrauld stand 
up there in front of pucks for an 
hour and a half and not get hurt, 
why not football? I didn't under- 
stand. I was 6 years old.” Thus was 
he molded. . 

Ri ggi n is 25. At 19, be became 
one of tire youngest starting goalies 

waiiB) of the now-defunct World 
Hockey Association. Squat at 5- 
foot-9 (1.75 meters), he is a thrown 
back — more the shape erf the re- 
doubtable Gump Worsty.than in 
the mold of the taB, rangy Diydea. 
But psychologically all goalies are 
fundamentally the same. 


it, but I had to go. It changed my 
altitude toward the game. You 
can't expect to be good every night. 
A given game may be what he calls 
a “rollercoaster ride," but in the 
goalie’s mind it can’t be; it has to 
be as smooth and even as the ice 
itself. 

Of bis fust 17 outings after re- 
turning to Washington, the Capi- 
tals won or tied 13. He finished the 
season with a 2.66 goals-against av- 
erage, best in the league. His cur- 
rent GAA (276) is second in the 
NHL, as is his 21 victories. Wash- 
ington leads the Patrick Divisoa by 
eight points over Philadelphia. 

“When the team’s going good, 
you look good,” Riggin says. 
“When the team's going bad, you 
look terrible.’* Says Warren sire- 
low, the Capitals’ goaltending coa- 
ch: “The average ran sees the puck 
go in the net and always wants to 
put the blame on the goaltender. 



Dtomt, LM Angelas 
B- Suitor, N.YJ. 
MocLaon, Wlmtipafl 
Coffev. Edmonton 
Hibson, catoarv 
Gartner. Washington 
Nkswlh. Lm AnMtas 
Savant Chicago 
Fadarkoy SCLouJi 
OonxMck. Dtlrott 
Karr, PtiHoMntaki 
Garanror, WoHKnutm 
Toned]. N.V.I. 

P. Stasmy. Quebec 
Vzerman. Detroit 


Gretzky, Edm 
Kuril. Edm 
Bo»sv. N.YJ. 
Carpenter, was 
Karr. Pha 


G A P Plm 
SI «4 148 24 
SI S3 103 30 
31 S3 It IS* 
39 45 84 14 

31 52 S3 31 

32 44 78 35 
29 48 75 79 

20 52 72 JU 
25 48 71 12 
34 38 70 45 
31 39 7D 41 

21 42 70 30 

22 40 70 19 

33 35 88 18 
39 28 <729 
39 28 <7 81 
28 39 87 87 

23 44 <7 72 
21 44 85 38 

CoG 

5354 

5051 

4839 

5339 

4839 


Denver 

TEAM OFFENSE 

G Pt. 

49 U» 

Avg 

11X9 

NBA Standings 



Detroit 

46 

5355 

1144 

EASTERN CONFERENCE 


Son Antonio 

47 

5425 

1154 


Atlantic Division 



Boston 

48 

5519 

1158 


W L 

Pet. 

GB 

la. Lolcere 

50 

5723 

1145 

Boston 

39 V 

JI3 



Portlond 

48 

5479 

114.1 

Philadelphia 

38 10 

m 

1 

Kansas aty 

47 

5330 

1114 

Washington 

27 22 

340 

13 

PhUactelphlo 

47 

5276 

11X3 

New Jersey 

22 28 

A5B 

17 

Utah 

48 

5249 

109a 

New York 

17 32 

.347 

22Vj 

Atlanta 

47 

5118 

10X9 


Central Division 



CMcago 

47 

5087 

U83 

Milwaukee 

34 15 

394 



□atlas 

48 

5119 

10X2 

Detroit 

30 17 

338 

3 

Mltwookee 

48 

5183 

18BD 

Chisago 

24 23 

311 

9 

Indiana 

48 

5176 

18X5 

Atlanta 

20 28 

.417 

13V4 

Houston 

47 

5868 

107A 

Indiana 

16 33 

J27 

18 


TEAM DEFENSE 


Cleveland 

15 32 

319 

18 


Assist* 


Gretzky, Edm 
Coffey. Edm 

Dlmm. la. 

Hawarchuk. Win 
Kurrl, Edm 

PNMvNarfiMh 

■ Kerr, Pha 
Andreychuk. Rut 
Otorme. LA. 

Gartner, Was 
Hnwerchuk. wm 

SberMtondcd Geab 

Gretzky, Edm 
Kasper, Bos 
Pnom, Ptil 

GaiMMMaalna Goafs 


Kurrl Edm 
Gartner, Was 
Gretzky, Edm 
Patastnv. On 


Bourque. Bos 
Gretzky. Edm 
Macimle. Cal 
a tonne. LA. 

Osrndnlck, Dei 


Go A 
5394 
5352 
5252 
5452 
5052 

C#PpB 
• -4818 
4813 
5312 
5312 
5412 

GpSItg 

5310 

50 4 
48 4 

SpGwb 
5010 
53 7 

51 7 
SO 7 

Gp S 
50347 
53 232 
53211 
52 2U 
54272 




G 

NO. 

Avg 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 


Milwaukee 


48 

4872 

1015 


Midwest DtvWee 



Seattle 


49 

5041 

10X9 

Denver 

38 19 

313 



Washington 


4V 

5083 

10X7 

Houston 

27 28 

374 

7 

Houston 


47 

4997 

1013 

Danas 

25 23 

321 

41ft 

Dallas 


48 

5127 

1083 

San Antonia 

24 24 

300 

51ft 

New Jersey 


48 

5133 

1019 

Utah 

22 28 

358 

7VS 

Philadelphia 


47 

5030 

1070 

Kansas City 

15 32 

J19 

14 

New York 


4V 

5247 

187.1 


Pacific Division 



Boston 


48 

5161 

1075 

LA. Lakers 

34 18 

380 



Phoenix 


48 

5182 

1075 

Phoenix 

23 25 

A79 

ID 

Chicago 

• 

47 

5073 

1075 

Seattle 

21 28 

429 

121ft 

Atlanta 


47 

5128 

10X9 

Portlond 

20 28 

4T7 

13 

LA. Lakers 


so 

5451 

1093 

LA. Clippers 

28 29 

408 

131ft 

LA. Otppers 


48 

5234 

IBRD 

Gofcten State 

11 38 

.234 

21V4 

Utah 


48 

5300 

1104 






MONDAYS RESULTS 
Cleveland 39 38 29 25-121 

Waihinghia 22 32 M 34—112 

Baaley 18-19 34 35, Free 9-23 4-5 22; Malone 
14-23 84 34, Ballom 10-15 34 21 RebDMds; 
Cleveland 55 (Ponuefte 81; WadUnalon 48 
(Ballard 12). Assists: Cleveland 31 (Bagiev 
10); Washington 38 I Johnson 1D>. 

Atlanta 21 n 13 25— 92 

nWadelpliMi 31 26 28 21—101 

Ervtng 9-20 5-5 2X Barkley 7-12 3-3 17; WTV 
klns 10-24 5-a 2&WUtman 7-12 l-Tl&E Johnson 
5-105415 Rebaends: Atlanta 47 (Rollins 15); 
Philadelphia 55 (Malone 18). Assists; Atlanta 
21 (E Johnson 8); Phlladetehia 24 (Cheeks 7) 
Detroit 20 30 33 28 10-113 

MBsmukee 29 IS M 25 8— Ml 

Laimbeer 10-25 12-13 32. Lons 10-18 M 22; 
Pr «**ev 12-23 3-5 27, Cummings 8-2 9 10-10 26, 
Manaief 12-25 2-2 36. Rebounds: Detroit 85 
(Laimbeer 17); Milwaukee <7 (Cummings 
13). Assists: Detroit 27 (Thomas 12); Milwau- 
kee 25 (Moncrlef 10). 

Geldea State 28 21 31 27 4 -VO 

Saa Antonia 35 28 21 21 9-1)4 

Genrin 10-18 7-7 27, Gilman 54 15-21 25; 
Ftovd 9-23 *-9 27, Whitehead M3 5-1 19. Re- 
bound*! Golden Stale 58 (Smith 15); San Anto- 
nio64 (Gilmore 13). Assists: Golden state It 
(Floyd 8); San Antonio 27 (Atoore is). 

17 25 34 19- 98 
LA. CUwen 82 24 25 84-115 

Nixon 9-20 3-3 21, Smith 7- 12 57 19; williams 
1525 1-4 21. Slchtlno 513 2-2 18. Rebaeeds: 
Indiana 51 (W1 1 Ikons 9],- Las Anodes 50 (Don- 
aldian 8). Assists; Indiana 23 (Williams *); 
Las Angeles 28 (Nbcan 10). 


SCORING 

a FG FT PtS Avg 
King, N,Y. 33 398 242 1022 313) 

Short. GJ. 44 484 285 1281 287 

Oonflev, Utah 38 345 297 987 274 

Bird. BOS. 48 SJ9 208 1313 274 

Jordan, Chi 47 .475 327 1281 Z7J 

English. Don, 49 50 239 1334 272 

wnuns. AIL 47 489 289 IZ78 27.1 

Malone, PWL 47 381 431 1199 254 

Cumminn MR. 47 487 211 1)45 244 

Agulrret Da|L 47 444 238 1)42 243 

FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE 
FG FGA 


Dona l dson. LAC 
GUmore, la. 
Banks. &A. 

Nance. Phoe. 
Abdul- Jatjbar. LAL 
Worthy. LAL 
Thorpe, ICC 
Cheeks. Phil. 
McHale, Bos. 
Roland. Wash. 


Ptf 

208 295 478 
305 482 433 
174 282 4T7 
408 872 487 
480 781 519 
381 858 581 
204 354 576 
244 <24 575 
387 539 570 
250 439 589 


Young, Pit 
Simmer. LJL-Bas 
Kurrl, Edm 
D .Sutter, CM 
Tavlor. LA. 
Nashmd. Man 


Go G 5 Pet 
4921 83 225 
4528 90285 
3051180283 
2914 51275 
52 38 111 275 
5229110284 


a feeling that goes with maturity, he 
says. “You like to think you have a 
little bit of an idea what's going 10 
happen. You can't play with the 
switch going on and off. You don’t 


* “Fm not a rah-rah guy in the ““d doesn’t realize it might not be 5® 11 ™ S“hg on and off. You dc 
dressing room," Riggin says. “My fa «R- That's why it takes an Ilke screwing with that switch." 
game’s a mental wme I shut my- emotionally stable person, to be Armed with pads, stick, bloc! 



game 5 a mental game. I suut my- 
sdf in. I talk a lot between now and 
then” —-between games, when, as 
tit, a goalie is finally 




" .'is 


.f* r 


.. Dryden says a goalie must have 
•*a mind under oontnrf. The de- 
iuands are mostly mentaL . . . The 
biggest .enemy is himself.” Riggin 
knows that, “I didn’t help myself 
along the way," he says. “When I 
first rante into the league, if I lost a 
couple erf games, Td be sour for a 
.couple of days. It’s tough to get a 
abad goal out erf 
jhe team down.: 
from 60 feet out. But you've got to 
pick up;” 


able to take the bad with the good.’ 
A goalie can't just wait and hope. 
Said Riggin that recent day: 
“When I get on the plane tomorrow 
for Chicago, FD be thinking hock- 
ey. Strictly business. It keeps build- 
ing, building, building. You can set 
your dock by me, by us. The plane: 
Bus ride to the hold. Team meal 
Sleep. 

“Nice big meal 1 sleep good.” 
Then “I wash up, brush my teeth, 
put ou deodorant. I don’t know 
mind. You let why I put on deodorant — it's not 
guy beats you going to last long.” 

Talcing the ice. Riggin usually 
thinks he knows what’s coming. It’s 


blocker 

and catching glove, like a man leav- 
ing a supermarket with his hands 
full he need be only alert: A goalie 
knows not the instanL 
“I'm standing up more now, 
which helps cover the net, but 
that’s experience, too," Riggin 
says. He know when to come out, 
to cut down the shooter’s angle. 
That’s a big part of playing the 
position. 


lx» A«eefei Trom: ZUndnani by Jn Ovwra 

They! 

’em in. 
teams have 

point and a ^ , 

in front, 220 pounds leaning on me. juanf 11 
I'm 175. Who’s going to win that Dmkoiakb 
one? b««wi a) 

Bouchard 

You gel a look, you can see it G “** ,ln 
coning,’’ Riggin says. “Yon can Se ^ c ni 
guess where’s it’s going to end op. Heinz 
You’ll make your motion. Then it “ — 1 

“tE". d0e8I1 ’ L " SL Louis (3) 

. ™u is pleasure, and even prac- sn o roowgki 
tice can tan The other day, five Banf * rman 
Caps stood abreast at the blue line 
and took turns firing at Riggin. 
inen three players formed a trian- 
gle a couple * 


GOALTENDING 

(Empty-net goals In parentheses) 

MP GA 50 Avg 
2,223 95 4 256 
895 47 0 3.15 
AS 4 0359 
LW U8 4 253 
1281 104 2 276 
881 31 1 251 
305 18 0 115 
3327 154 tut 
484 17 0 111 
2558 133 1 3.13 
UM 1S3 1 3JH 

1477 71 1 258 
1J34 98 1 3J9 



Jensen 

Washington (5) 
flaw 
Undhorgh 

NfloMpkla (M 
MOO0 
Fuhr 


Maione. PttIL 
Lnlmhser, Det 
Olalinwon, Hou. 
WllDams. NJ. 
Eataa Utah 
SUcma. Sea. 

Gil more, SA. 
Thompson, ICC. 
Smith, GJL 
Partsh, B os. 
Sanmon, Hou. 


Thomas. Dot. 
Johnson, LAL 
Moore. 3JL 
Them ICC 
Green. Utah 
Nixon, LAC 
Richardson, nj. 


REBOUNDING 

G OH Del Tot Avg 

47 214 389 583 124 

48 U3 394 548 115 

47 251 299 UD TIJ 

48 182 372 554 115 

48 124 418 542 1IJ 

49 128 418 548 11.1 

47 143 373 516 HE 

47 151 358 507 10J 

44 220 771 491 10J 

48 189 330 499 104 

47 137 350 487 1(U 

ASSISTS 

G Na Avg. 
48 801 111 
47 571 111 
47 485 103 
47 383 XI 
44 358 XI 

47 381 XI 

48 384 X0 


Fi*r and Mas shored shutout Jot. X 
Edmantao (2) 


Skiing 


X211 171 
2E9S 110 
1E85 57 
3JM 178 


1 328 

1 3.15 
8X15 
1 121 



Z128 112 0 3.16 
182 6 0 353 

831 49 8 154 


Wamsiev 

Llllf 


(4) 

Lome! In 
Edwards 
Calgarv CD 
HruJey 
Smith 


. - , - . . . - feet m front of the »«„n 

My eyes never leave the puck—- net and slapped the puck among muamm 
tfnnttn"nm.«™-;— 1 themselves until one, without ,LV “ 


I cry not to.” But sometimes a 

ie is screened, especially on o 

shots. “From the point, quite a few 
hit yoa You can’t see. The percent- 
ages say they’re going to come low. 


Laimbeer Leads Pistons Past Bucks 


United Press International 

■ 'MILWAUKEE — BiD Laimbeer 
is usually classified as a National 
Basketball Association overachiev- 
er. The 6-foot- 1 1 (2.10-meter) De- 
troit center devoutly practices the 


job,” said Laimbeer. “My job is to Elsewhere Monday it was Cleve- 
rebonnd, and lately it’s also been to land 121, Washington 112; Phiin. 
score a few pants.” Obviously, the delphia 106, Atlanta 92; San Anto- 




■Xi 


IVBA FOCUS 


formula is working for Laimbeer, 
who is gaining accolades from all 
corners. 

“He was just outstanding,” said 


nio 1 14, Golden State 109. and the 
Los Angeles Clippers 115. Indiana 
96. 

Ijrimbeer had to be especially 


warning, would shoot —hard. Thai 
little dim can loosen up a goalie’s 
eyeballs. 

“When I was young, I wanted to 
play ’em all,” Riggin says. “But you 
can’t play them all You've got to 
nave the other guy. 

More than one “other guy," the 
Capitals have bad a rare abun- 
dance of goalies. Riggin’s backup is 
Bob Masai, tall at 6-1 and a 
nnnember of tbe 1984 U.S. Olym- 
pic team. And AI Jensen, currently 
injured, shared last season’s Jen- 
nings Trophy with Riggin for al- 
lowing the NHL’s fewest gnat 9 

Bowen ga m es, neither is as 




work ethic to get things done. In 
{he Pistons’ 113-111 victory over 
Milwaukee here Monday night, 
laimbeer worked overtime. 

* He scored 32 points, hauled 
down 17 rebounds and hit the 
game-winning basket with 44 sec- 
onds left in overtime play. 

“I just go out there and do my 


ne was jUM o(ii5ianums, sain Launoeer nan 10 oe especially ehutlimt « wZ. — “ , MOfT * or 

Milwaukee coach Don Nelson, good against the sizzling Bocks, pbmnmenai 11 ^^ EwS" 1 

“He hit oatside shots and was tbe considering the fact that the Pis- 

10 ns wereplsrying without suiting BUS * » 

forwards KeflyTripucka and^^ 

At miennrt MCOie 


XV. istamen 
MaloctM 
Beatwa 
Mfrianson 
Sands 

Minnesota ai 
vantatesbrouck 
Hanlon 

M.Y. ibmen CJJ 
Low 
Resch 
Kamppurl 
Nm Jersey (I) 
Janecyk 
Eliot 

Las An— Ini (4) 
Barntiantt 
Bastnr 
St. Crefx 
WrtMttt 
Taranto {4) 
Stu nlo wsfcl 
Mil ion 
WMfcS 

(I) 


184 

14 

0 5.12 

X22S 

IM 

0 343 

1433 

80 

0 X35 

1395 

77 

a 337 

499 

30 

1 181 

X237 188 

1 X5B 

70 

3 

0 237 

1467 

03 

0 349 

1389 

105 

0 442 

XH6 HM 

0 US 

868 

48 

1 1ll 

2333 

155 

0339 

UR 385 

1 344 

24032 

119 

O 331 

1,100 

87 

0 439 

X2Z2 2H 

0 347 

1333 

87 

2 141 

1,194 

82 

0 4.12 

425 

35 

0 434 

3,151 3M 

2 111 

1JES 

76 

0170 

1385 

71 

i in 

774 

52 

0 443 

87 

8 

0 532 

X178 21B 

1 338 

1360 102 

T 332 

1352 103 

0X98 


MENS COMBINED: SLALOM 
(At Barm la, Italy) 

1. Thomas BOrglor. Swttzarfand (4X45- 
4828) 1:3553 mtaute 

3. Ernst RhKRspanMf, Austria (4X51-4X80) 
1-57J1 

X MldNH Vlon, Francs (4855-4851) 1:3758 

X Ivano EdadnL Italy (4X804X94) 1 J754 

X Pirmtn Zurbrtsaen. Switzerland 14859- 
4853) 1:3752 

X Roden Ertachar. Italy . (49.1949531 
1:3852 

7. Yves Tavemlar. Franca (49484954) 
7:2952 

X Andraas WanzeL Ltoditensttln (49.17- 
4951) IUI9JB 

9. Gunther Matter. Austria (4954-5058) 
1:3954 

IX Valentin SManav. Bulgaria (49544057) 
1:4051. 

COMBINED RESULTS 
I.Zurtx-toen, 757 pmaltv points; Z RIMI- 
Mrear. 3754; 1 BOreter. 3951; X WanznL 
4851; X Vtorv 5X38; X Franck Piccard, 
FnneajB.U; 7. Marian Wasmaiar. West Gar- 
manv, 5855; X Modor, 6156; 9. Tavemlar, 
8158; IX Ertachar, 86.11 


BS Waraigton (23) of St John’s had 20 points m an 87-76 
Monday rig* over Seton Hal The top-ranked Redmen 
rafted from a 48-34 seoond-hatf deficit to win thdr 13th strait. 

CoUege Top-20 Ratings CoUege Results 

The tup-20 teams In the Associated Press' 
callage basketball pan (first-placn votes In 
porentnasea; total paints based aa 28-tt-u, 

Wcj records ttu-eogti Feb. 4 and last wears 
rankings): 


1 C81 
1 345 


big factor In the game.” 

The vicnxy was the third in a 
row few the Pistons and No. 1 1 in RoundfielcL 
their last 12 games. Detroit is now 
within three games of the first- 

place Bucks in the Central Divi- lead with 4:04 left. Milwaukee ra- 
tion. bounded to tie it, but Laimbeeris 

Tbe loss snapped Milwaukee's basket with 44 seconds lefi made it 
1 i-game winning streak. 113-111. 


Bohrand 
wbinipae Ifl 



overtime, 
lead 


cago, be was still smiling — the 
Qipitals had won, 3-2 — at still 
finding a bit of between-games re- 
lease. 


MlcoJef 
DotraH 14) 
Romano 
Dion 
Harm 


Bradeur 
COFTlOD 
Gorrstt 
Vo 


(2) 


cn 


XI12 288 
953 58 
1-730 115 0 359 
412 37 0 529 
1895 213 1 X13 
1558 123 1 377 
1518 92 0 453 
X178 119 7 434 

1572 61 0 342 
833 43 1 458 
540 41 0 458 
913 75 0 453 
3,101 234 1 453 

20 1 
2414 184 
545 49 
2579 215 
2508 140 0 X73 
213 15 0 453 

1508 77 1 449 

*477 237 1 454 

376 27 0 431 
1500 IDS 0 432 

1509 105 0 447 

*385 244 0 441 

I.IOS 75 1 457 
352 43 0457 
U13 W4 0 475 
2571 ZM 1 452 
WM 147 0 484 
900 85 0 X20 
807 44 0 M9 
12M 37V 0 S59 


Figure Skating 


tin 

1 458 

0 SJ9 

1 433 


SUROPRAN CHAMPIONSHIPS 
(At Ootaborg) 

Man’s Comaatsanr Ffaurns 
1, Pomona Fadronle. France, (L8 placa- 
mants. Z Josef Saveudk, Czodnsiavaitia li 
XHMka Fisher, Wat Germany, 14. 4 Vladi- 
mir Kalin, Soviet Union, 14. & Grzeyorz F1IL 
pewskl. Patent 35. 6. Lars Akesson. Sweden, 
34 7, Richard Zander, West Germany, 42. X 
Viktor Petrenko. Soviet Union, 4ft. V, Fatko 
Kirsten. East Germany 54 IX Poor Baraa. 
CzechasJavla, 40. 


1. 51. John* (801 

2. Gaoraefmm (1) 
X Memphis SL (1) 
4 So. Methodist 

X Duke 
X Syracuse 
7. Oklahoma 
X Michigan 
9. Illinois 
U. Georgia Taeh 
11. Mev.-Las Vegas 
n. Iowa 
IX Kansas 
14 Louisiana Tech 
IS- North Carolina 
It Oregon SL 
17. Tulsa 
IX DePom 
19. Viitonava 
2X Maryland 


Record 

1H 

19-2 

17- 1 

18- 2 
18-3 
15-3 

17- 4 

18- 3 
18-5 

184 
17-3 

104 

104 

102 

185 

184 
17-3 
14-5 

185 
108 


PtS Pvs 
1238 1 

1153 2 

1126 3 

1033 4 

909 6 

899 9 

855 7 

789 » 
748 5 

704 8 

458 16 
419 — 

393 
380 
385 
295 
277 
210 


Transition 


BASEBALL 
American League 

CHICAGO — Announced the retirement of 
Grog LuzhnkLaailanatedhitfar.SlBnedJuan 
m* ai Jones, pitchers; Ron Kcrto- 
vtobcaf cher.and Ken W1IHams,ouMeMsr.tD 
“w-vaor contracts. 

MILWAUKEE— signed Pet* Luaxoircfter, 
cm Billy RtbMoux, Enflektor. 

FOOTBALL 

united States Feafball League 

ei!!^* , .' JER5EY '~ Sle,nad wortertaek Doug 
Flutto tg a five year contract. 


187 18 
Us 17 


The United Press Internet toed board of 
amekes taMO caBege basketball ratings 
(first -piece votes and records tfcnxigti Feu. l 
topwwiteei*!,- tutnl paints based on 1 5 Mists 
for Brit Mace. 14 lor second, etcj: 

1. 5L John's (38) (17-11 
1 Georgetown (3) (19.21 
1 Memphis St. (1) (17-1) 

4 Sol Methodist (18-2) 

X Dime riM> 

4 Illinois llfl-fl 
7. Georgia Tech (1*4) 

X Syracuse (150) 

9. Oklahoma (174) 

IX Mtctilaan (18-3) 

II. Oregon st. [isj> 
li Nev^Las vega (17-2) 

IX Iowa (184) 

14 Kenan (174) 

IS, North Carolina (1 6-51 

15 Loubtana Tech (17-2) 

17. Tulsa (17-31 
IX VRtanova (14-5) 

19. Maryland |i7-a) 

Alobomo-Binninoham (?M) 

(Note: Teams on ncaa probation are inell- 
DlMe tor UPCs top-20 and not Imlchamplon- 

**> conskterathm. The ante such team cur- 
Is the Unlvsrsliv of Akran). 


613 

582 

525 

424 

389 

348 

338 

330 

308 

260 

179 

123 

106 

94 

39 
08 
72 

40 
37 
2V 


EAST 

Branded 71. Suffolk 67 
Buffalo 5t. 75. BrockPOrt 69 
Connecticut Col. 97, Nichols 71 
George Mason 77. Amarleen 71 
Hartford 84 Brooklyn Cal. 83 
Loyola. MtL 92, Drexal 71 
Maryland 87, Did Dominion 75 
Navy 83. FMrlelgh Dlckfaisan 74 
Pittsburgh 77. Duauesne 61 
Rutgers H. Mavnoulh 74 
SL Fronds. N.Y. 71 CCNY 55 
Siena 60. Vermoni 59 
SL Banaventure 64 Penn 5L 59 
SL John's B7. Seton Hall 76 
Swarthmare IK Beaver M 
Tuffs 111. Now Ena land 63 
SOUTH 

Appalachian SI. 73L Davidson m 
Citadel 71, Term. -Chattanooga 63 
Duke 82. Harvard 53 
Florida 84 Florida St. 79 
G rambling *L Tannesaae St. 53 
Louisiana Tech 73. NE Louisiana 63 
Mississippi 6X Vanderbilt 55 
Now Orleans 57. Alabama SL 42 
Nichols St. 65. Jackson SL 61 
SE Louisiana 84 McNeeso St. 60 
South Carolina 9X Georgia St. 86 
Tamaa 83. Rollins 87 
Vtrointa 51, George Washington 42 
Vlratola Tech 94 S. Mississippi 80 
VMI 8X E. Tennessee St. S3 
Wlnthrap 6i, Coastal Carolina 57 
MIDWEST 
Case Western 68. Wooster a 
Creighton 87, w. Tones SI. 83 
DotraH 5X Butler 53 
Evansville 79. Oral Roberts 75 
Kansas OX Colorado 89 
Lovota. IIL 99, Xavier. Ohio 89 
Obariin n, Kenyan 48 
Ohio Wesleyan 71 Denison 79 
SOUTHWEST 

Abilene Christian 74 Howard Payne 67 
Lamar so, Texas-San Antonio 70 
Ponhandla St. 97, Langston 86 
Som Houston 5t. 84 nw Louisiana 71 
Tonga a&i 84 E. Texas St. 78 
Texas Southern 75. SW Texas St. 61 
FAR WEST 

E. Oregon si. Col. 87. Whlhnon 80 
Fullerlon St. a Fresno SI. SI 
Son Jose SL 74 PacHle 46 
Southern Cal 6X Oregon SL SB 
WhHwwth 89, Puget Soum a 






Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1985 


OBSERVER 

The Importance of Flab 


By Russell Baker 


N EW YORK — Though not a 

Student nf hictrtrv 1 find it 


■LN student of history, I fin d it 
bard to believe that any civilization 
bas ever been so totally absorbed in 
its own fat as the American during 
the late 20th century. 

Authropokwists exhuming our 
shards a few ihousand years hence 
win doubtless draw eerie conclu- 
sions about us if their artifacts in- 
clude The Firm Upper Arms 
Book,” subtitled “Beautiful Arms 
in Thirty Days,” which McGraw- 
Hill’s spring catalog announces for 
publication in May. 

I have not seen The Firm Upper 
Arms Book,” and know about it 
only from a angle page in the cata- 
log, but it is on just such scanty 
evidence that anthropologists re- 
construct long-dead societies. 

Note that McGraw-Hill is a suc- 
cessful publishing house that is 
highly astute about giving the 
American market what it demands. 
I myself have wandered into its 
catalog only because of an urgent 
need for a book cm how to get rid of 
household pests without dangerous 

rfi^miralc 

Sure enough, I find exactly what 
I am looking for on page 32. It is 
“Bug Busters: Getting Rid of 
Household Pests Without Danger- 
ous Chemicals," to be published in 
May “for the millions who use bug 
sprays and wonder why they stm 
have bugs." 

I instantly fell into a daydream 
about building walls of Vaseline, 
wood ash, sawdust, tin cans and 
steel woo) to keep houseflies out of 
the ldtchen this July. (“Barricade 
them,” said the catalog copy, “us- 
ing Vaseline, wood ash and saw- 
dust, tin cans, steel wool”) 


say goodbye to flabby upper arms 
forever with this proven and 
unique five-minute . . .") 

I did not take offense at the fe- 
male chauvinist sexism of the sug- 
gestion that men have no desire to 


Getting Serious About Darts as a Sport 

U. S. Promoters p Want to Clean Up for Televison, Take the Drinking Away From It' 


PEOPLE 


4 Share $1 00,000 Prize 


New York Tima Service 

EW YORK —“Darts needs 


N EW YORK —Darts needs 
a major facelift," says Steven 


say goodbye to disgusting flabby 
upper aims. Blessed since child- 


upper arms. Blessed since child- 
hood with upper arms of the pipe- 
stem, Popeye variety, I have ever 
felt contempt for men with flabby 
upper arms and have no urge to 
defend them from female chauvin- 
ist slurs. 


Moreover, I am too occupied 
studying a photo of a young wom- 
an in a form-fitting one-piece tiger- 
stripe leotard, who appears to 
weigh perhaps 87 pounds. She is 
striking a dunning pose obviously 
meant to illustrate that she and 
flabby arms have said their last 
goodbyes. 

Some print worked skillfully into 
the curve of her waistline says 
“Beautiful Arms in Thirty Days," 
from which 1 deduce that this time 
last month she must have cut a 
revolting figure: a woman so petite 
as this tiny beauty could only have 
looked like a mecucal freak had she 
been afflicted with flabby upper 
arms. 


Incompetent to drive a nail with- 
out splitting the board, I let my 
daydream take its full course — my 
wall of Vaseline, wood ash and 
sawdust being ground into the par- 
lor carpet because the tin cans 
weren't properly welded to the steel 
wool — battalions of flies swarm- 
ing through the breach — and so on 
to the inevitable end when, losing 
my temper, 1 turn once again to 
dangerOUS rfiawrinstlc 

Du ring my doze, a breeze flipped 
the catalog back to page 30. and I 
woke to The Firm Upper Anns 
Bock.” (“Now every woman can 


Closer examination of the ad 
copy, however, suggests that maybe 
it au hasn't happened in 30 days. 
There is a strong hint that she has 
previously bought McGraw-Hill's 
best-selling “How to Flatten Your 
Stomach” and “Thin Thighs in 
Thirty Days." 

If so, this woman must spend 
most of her waiting hours warding 
off faL When, I wander, does she 
find time to think about inmme 
taxes? In my experience life affords 
only enough time to keep abreast of 
the income-tax code or keep flab 
off the carcass, not both. 

Questions buzz like houseflies in 
July. Why is it that Americans who 
worry hardest about fat are usually 
those who are little more than 
bones and hidc7 I leave it for the 
next mfllanniiim ’s anthropologists 
and turn back to “Bug Busters,” 
reading: 

Trap them: using beer, flour, 
cheese, cotton batting . . 

1 daydream of beer-flour-cheese- 
stuffed flies with upper aims so 
flabby not one can move in time to 
escape my lethal fly swatter. 

New Yak Tima Service 


Si mo n s , a sports promoter from 
Beverly Hills, California. 

“They want to clean up darts 
for television, take the drinking 
away from it," Jeny Umbcrger of 
New Philadelphia, the second- 
ranked American player, says 
with a trace of bitterness. They 
can’t.” 

As the professional darts tour 
made its annual stop here last 
weekend for the New York Open, 
few spectators or even partici- 
pants were aware of the friction 
beneath the surface of this clubby 
and insular game. Its snug rela- 
tionship with pubs and drinking 
a source of strength tin the past, is 
seen by some as a hindrance to its 

growth in an arena in which suc- 
cess is measured by television ex- 
posure. 

Simons, 40, sees just such a 
hindrance. He has hopes of dupli- 
cating his earlier coup of malang 
a television sport of aim-wres- 
tling. He says darts needs middle- 
class respectability to appeal to a 
mass audience. So far, dans tour- 
naments have been syndicated 
twice on U. S. television. 

There’s a belief that it's only 
played by blue-collar people in 
bare, that it’s not a serious sport,” 
Simons said. 

In fact, many of the United 




Treble Ring ^p— 
Double Ring 


Slates’s best players mew up in 
tough eastern Pennsylvania coal 


tough eastern Pennsylvania coal 
towns like Hazel ton and Pons- 
ville, enclaves where darts is a 
way of life, like basketball in the 
city: 

The stakes, never high in the 
past, arc rising as the game grows 
in popularity, spreading rapidly 
in Sun Belt states tike Florida, 

Texas and California. 

The American Dart Organiza- 
tion, the largest of several com- 
peting darts associations, has ex- 
panded from 8,000 members in 
1976, the year after its founding, 
to 100,000. It sponsors tourna- 
ments offering prize money total- 
ing $13. milli on, a sixfold in- 
crease since 1979. The money 
most often comes from sponsors, 
which frequently are beer and 
cigarette companies. A tourna- 
ment in Las Vegas, Nevada, the 
last weekend in January offered a 
purse of 5101,000, the most ever. 


With television coverage, the re- 
wards could increase. 

Promoters like Simons and Da- 
vid Irete; a media consultant to 
the A.D.O., believe that attract- 
ing stars from show business or 
other sports is a key to getting 
dans before the public. But it is 
virtually impossible to get celeb- 
rities involved in the game, Si- 
mons contended, because of its 
connection to bars. 

“You can’t improve your game 
without going to a pub.” he said. 
“But the pub doesn't have the 
same image here, as a social insti- 
tution, that it does in England. 
Established athletes and celebri- 
ties are friends with people who 
are achievers. Achuwers aren't 
going to darts bars on the week- 
ends.” 

Simply producing champion- 
ship players is not enough, the 


Rick Ney, 23, is considered the top U. S. darts player. 
Another problem dans pro- He began placing bv 

r r_ , . L. I 


moters face is educating the pub- 
lic about the subtleties of the 


promoters say. For example, 
Sandy Rea tan, a 32-year-old Cali- 
fornian, is ranked No.l in the 
world among women after vic- 
tories in the Pacific Cup in 1982 
and the World Cup in Edinburgh, 
Scotland Inst September. She is 
among only three Americans ever 
to win a major darts tournament 
outside the United States, but is 
still virtually unknown, even to 
the estimated three min inn Amer- 
icans who play darts. 


lie about the subtleties of the 
game that make it attractive to 
educated fans in Britain. “People 
have to learn that there's more to 
it than throwing dans at the 
bull’s-eye," Simons said “They 
just don’t understand what a ce- 
rebral game it is.” 

Most Americans are blind to 
darts’ subtleties because they do 
not play. “You cannot force-feed 
people on dans.” Irete said “It’s 
like golf. You have to get them 
out there to play iL Then they get 
hooked” 

Darts came to the area from 
Philadelphia, where it had been 
transplanted from England. Play- 
ers stan early, throwing “Ameri- 
can” dans — bulky, agar-sized 
and wooden, weighing only 1 1 or 
12 grams — rather than English 
darts, the world standard which 
are thin as a pencil, made from 
metal and typically weigh 23 to 
25 grams. 

Rick Ney, who at 23 is consid- 
ered the top American shooter, is 
typical or the Pennsylvania 
breed. Though he has never 
worked in a coal mine. Ney en- 
joys the coal-country image and 
seems to regard each victory as a 
regional as wrD as a personal tri- 
umph. 


He began playing by age 6. 
when he needed a chair to retrieve 
his dans from the board at his 
parents' bar and resiauram in 
Schuylkill Haven. As a teen-ager. 


he played two or three nights a 
week in area leagues, and hustled 


week in area leagues, and hustled 
anyone foolish enough to take 
him on in a side game. “When I 
was 15," he said between rounds 
of a recent tournament in Atlan- 
tic City, “I made $2,000 one night 
in a bar.” 

At a hulking 6 feet ( 1.83 me- 
ters) and 240 pounds (109 kilo- 
grams), Ney. whose nickname is 

the Ice man, in timi dates all but 


Three Japanese scientists and an 
American who discovered the 
cause of a form of leukemia have 
been named co-winners of the third 
annual S100.000 Hammer prize. 
The prize, awarded by the Hammer 
Prize Foundation of Occidental Pe- 
troleum chairman Armand Hasft- 
nier, was awarded to Yorio Hutnoa 
of Kvoio University’s Institute for 
Virus Research. Isao Miyostai of 
Kochi Medical School and Kiyoshi 
Takatsuki of the Kumamoto Uni- 
versity School of Medicine. They 
will share S50.000. The remaining 
550.000 was awarded to Dr. Robert 
Gallo, chief of the U. S. National 
Cancer Institute’s laboratory of tu- 
mor cell biology and a co-disco- 
verer of the virus suspected to be 
responsible for acquired immune 
deficiency syndrome (AIDS). 

□ 

“F mman nelle.’* the smash-hit 
erotic film of the 70s. has been 
taken off the screen on the 
r hamp s-Flvsees in Paris after a run 
of nearly 1 1 years. But a successor. 
“EmmanueUe IV," is starting its 
second year just along the avenue 
from the cinema where the original, 
starring Svlvia KristeL, opened May 
26, 1974. ’The first film attracted 
just under 3.270.000 spectators and 
in recent years had become one of 
the tourist attractions of the 
French capitaL 

a 

Nancy Reagan has hired Jen- 
□efer Hirsbberg, a government 


new pyramid of power in winch r , 
people have no say." The program 
was made during a recent Bogun 
concert UHir by Theoiorakis. It will 
be aired Feb. 17. 




T 


A member of Parliament says 
Princess Diana’s former hairdress- 
er is a rat for telling a newspaper 
about her mousy brown hair, dye 
job and predilection for U. S. soap 
operas. Kerin Stanley, who report- 
edly sold his story to the Sunday 
Mirror for a five-figure sum, said 
he and Diana fell out in a disagree- 
ment ova ha new look for the 
state opening of Parhamem. “h 
wasn't ba,” he said. "This was ’Dft 
nasty DL' glossy plastic ami vefy 
very American." Stanley said, *1 
like to believe that I nave been 
more than just a hairdresser to her. 
We were mends, good friends until 
we had our differences of opinion.’' 


, if :)[ - 


< » 


Shanley also revealed that the prin- 
cess loves “Dynasty” and “Danas” 


( K< 

prf 

trjk. 

ih^rv 

m* 

Tt 


hates being called “Di" and has to 
dye her “mousy” brown hair. 
Member of Parliament Teddy T«." 


Member of Parliament Teddy Tay- 
lor said Shanley’s tale was “acien- 
ing and diabolical. The man's a rat 
and must be boycotted by his cus- 
tomers. The kind of people who 
take royal patronage and then sdl 
their stones are beneath con- 
tempt” 


public relations employee, as her 
new press secretary, replacing Shei- 
la Tale, wbo is joining a public 
relations firm. The appointment is 
effective Feb- 11. Hixshberg, 42, a 
former reporter for the Washington 
Star, has been a director of the 
Office of Public Affairs for the 
Federal Trade Commission. Ha 
new job pays 555,733 a year. 

□ 

Mikas Theodorakis, the Greek 
composer and member of parlia- 
ment, says on a soon-to-be-aired 
television show he is disillusioned 
with Greece’s socialist government 
and may once again go into exile: 
Theodorakis, an exile during the 
Greek “colonel’s regime” of 1967- 
1974. which he harshly criticized, 
says in an interview for the Greek 
migrant show “Babel” he had ex- 
pected Prime Minister Andreas Pa- 

mbJbmh tnlra n u rnt«illv rliffnr. 


his most experienced opponents. 
“I always think I'm the besL" he 


“I always think I'm the best." he 
said. “1 don’t think anyone can 
beat me.” 


Unlike most top players, who 
trow gracefully ana effortlessly. 


throw gracefully and effortlessly, 
Ney attacks the board with a fe- 
rocity that cools only slightly 
when the match is over. During a 
tournament, he stalks about rest- 
lessly, often with a can of bea in 
hand. When someone remarked 
that he seemed agitated, his wife. 
Lynn, said simply. “He's always 
like that." 

For now, darts remains a back- 
water, a game. Umbergcr said, 
that “nobody can mnke a living 
aL" 


A Kuwaiti princess wbo beat her 
two maids, one a Sri Lankan a& : 
one an Indian, far such things Tes 
sweeping too slowly or looking out 
the window received a suspended 


zus^r • 

niO 

pTfd^ j: ' 

p 

KBS U S- ■ 
the >-Y 

«3l& 


the window received a suspended 
jail sentence Monday. According 
to testimony. Princess Faria aJ-Sa- 
tah, 30, who maintains a luxurious 
home in London, whipped her 
maids with a riding crop - and 
lengths of electric cord and once 
held a maid’s hand ova a hot [date. 
Both maids had scars ova modi of 
their bodies. Princess Faria had 


Zes iJBw . 

■■7 Im- 


pleaded guilty to causing- them 
bodily harm. “Your conduct was 
disgraceful verging on the barbar- 
ic,” said Crown Court Judge Join 
Hayman. He ordered the princess 
to pay a total of £1,950 (about 
52,164) in fines, court costs and 
compensation to the maids. He also 
sentenced her to six mouths in jail 
but suspended the sentence for two 
years. “Count yourself fortunate;’' 
the judge said. “You have avoidgfc 
being sent to prison by the skin W 
your teeth.” " ' 


pandreou to take a “totally differ- 
ent" political course when he came 
to office in 1981, “but there is a 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


SPECIAL REPORT 
THE FUTURE OF OPEC 

Another fodder report From Tropics 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 

FRENCH PHOVLXCES 

M THE HEART OF OlO ANTIBES; 
SO m. from part, d mirfog tunny 2- ! 
bedroom apartment, equaled titdv I 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 
PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


* r£ ‘~2’ 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 1 


14 chapters, fndudav Reftteatory Moo 
«n Homed Aoarat Western Nations 


sunn Planned Agrarai Western Nations 
and Compares rf Needed la Prevent 
OPEC ran Being Crushed by Western 
Irterests. Power Brokering in OPEC 


en. garage, large terrace, mw an 
garden end mdStonce c o rned rf axf i 
anrie. SSI, 47 La CroisetiE, 06400 j 
CANNES. Tefc {93 38 19 19. I 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


MONACO 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 

GREECE 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 
PARIS A SUBURBS 


IRELAND 


Price: £81 Cr US$99 per copy. 


HOTEL FOB SALE See Business Oppor- 

turtles 


Order from: 

Tropics Infl Co. he 
Orient Haam, 42-45 New Broad ST 
London EC2M TOY. 

Tel: 01-428 0898 


MONACO 


MONTE CARLO 
Principality of Monaco 

SBUNG VERY EXCEPTIONAL 
APAMMSW 

270 KJJR, private garden, p w orpmi c 


HYDRA- 412 hjjti. terrain, mpgntficart 
view, $50,000. let Alliens 75 39 01 
or 02. telex 021 69 14 CAST. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 

USA RESIDENTIAL 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


SWITZERLAND 


PL VICTOR HUGO (necr) 

Hecknerre, high dan, ail d ecor a t ed 


NYC LOW 80'S. Ecet Side. 1 bedroom 
ped«-tene with terrace cmrloaiang 


GREAT BRITAIN 
SURREY lUt SUPBUOR QUALITY 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


Embassy Service 


16TNTROCAMBOMEA. Snrfokr 
sublet. fumidwt Sffh dan tor Tjeat 
or mare. Tet Norway 02449747 . 


SrV: A - 


& furnished. B8 sqjrv, fcving -f 
2 bedrooms, 2 baths 


USUMNOVOLUNTSCS needed far 
505 HELP aids Bne ei Engfah. Reauit- 
rrJBrrt sessions Thun. Feb.7, Tubs. Feb. 


MONTE CARLO 
Principality of Monaco 


sea view, harbor, 180 iqjn. bring 
space, ontrance, reception. 3 bed- 
raaaB, 2 baths, I room far staff with 
shower, 1 fuly ory^iped modem kitch- 
en with doing area Prxtong, dearie 
binds. 


12, 630 pm, at American Chord), 65 
Qua d’Orsoir ftjris 7 or write for 


Center necr Casria, highdou 

tefing lowly 2-room, l lOsqjn. posAi- 
dy porting. 

EXCLUSIVE AG94CE INTERMEDIA 

BJ>. 54 

MC 98001 MONACO CHZX 
Tel: (931 50 66 84 


a p pdnlmenti $OS HRP UPJ39-16 P, 
75675 Paris Cedes 16. 


EXPHHE HCH? AM BOCAN 
coups smbarang on year* 
ro-Ccpe Town owrknd joc 


Sefag prim KJOOnOp. 
EXCLUSIVE AGBiGMWABHA 


BJ>. 54 

MC 98001 MONACO CB3EX 
Tet (93) SO 66 84 
Toe 469477 


CHOOSE 

SWnZBUAND 

We have for fbrriawii A very big 
choice of beautiful APAKTMMv 
VEiAS / CHALETS m the whole 
region of Ldoe Geneva, Mortrewt & ri 
famous mounfrxn resorts. Very rmnn- 1 
abhr prtod but also the best and most 
exclusive. Prim from about U5S40.QOO. 
Mortgages at 6MX. Hease rist us ar 
phane before you recite a deasiaa 
K SEBOID SA. 


2 bedroom^ 2 baths 

KAHN HE ROSEN 272 40 19 


tee river. Safe quiet resdentid area 
Offtnvtd privacy. Price $295jjQ0 
caih. let 212^62-1134 or Thomas 


Lochner, 330 W. 106 St, NY, NY 
10025 USA 


oSSr&f 74 CHAMPS-aYSBB 8tfi 

— ' ■ ii. i Studio. 2 or 3-coom utiuHui e ie . \ 

HOLLAND One monh or mare. 

IE OARJDGE 359 67 97. 


8 Ave. de Mew i ne 
75008 ft™ 

Telex 231696 P 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT IN PARIS 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 


ltaatircfn 
T20 lo 1» 


14th me JOUVBEL 16JR 
New, high doss, sunny, 3 rooms + 


tenner, upper floor, wit 2-6 pjn. : 
TiSfe504 81 <7 am. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 

GREAT BRITAIN 


Renthouse International 


u if u> fished apertnen* 120 to IBP 
Ktra, 273 bedrooms, Ptxk Idltv Ttfv 
«i,17ih, & Netriiy. Avcdabie nowa> 


020448751 (4 lines) 

Aimterdaiv Bolesfrin G. 


AV04UE FOCH 

Sun, duple*, reatpbon, 5 bedroom s , 
4 bam. Tet 563 68 38 


5 anPIGALLE, 5 BOOMS, IBOsqjn. 
in townhouse. Luxurious anatae- 
merts. Tet 605 26 56. VnS to£y 

between 2 and 6 pun. 


, Tour Gri» 6, CH-1007 Ixnacme. 
TaL 21/25 26 lITalex.- 24298 5EK7CH 


TffTH: 17Ave.TheophileGautier.yery 


oridnal & luxurious duplex. Resden. 
tiaaroo, 110sqjH.Cdf:637 i4 40ar 
wii today between 48 pm 



PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


7Ms VARDtNE. line 4-room + new 
be* & kitchen, sunny, cpsef. Fl 0,000. 
Tri 5Q4 3824 before 1 gn / aflBr 6 pm 


AGB4CE DE L'ETOILE 

REAL ESTATE AG84T 

764 03 17 


2 - 4 MONTHS luxury big Sluta. *7K) 
monte. 3 blocks ham Les Deux Mo- 
gats Tdr 548 26 55 [2 -mxWflhtl 
SHORT TB2M in Latin Quarter. 
No agents. Tet 329 38 83. 


FLATS FOR RENT 

PHONE 562-7899 

FIATS FOR SALE 

mONE 562-1640 

OFFICE FOR RENT/ SALE 

PHONE 562-6214 


soon. Pais 763 82 70 


US FAM0.Y Of 4. seeks 3t«*K» 
•washed fla Poe or subwhs. Now 
H8 June. Tet Pare 797 31 99 


i .... .. . 

ft 


EVEN TOR SHORT TBtNL seekqxvt- - 
mail for cent Paris. ExasSad inenae. 
Soreiiit Tet (1) 544 39 40. 


I 

if: 




EMPLOYMENT 


IDEAL FOR SHORT 1BIM STAY. Poe 
Aides & 2 rooms, decorated. Contact 
Sorefctt 80 rue Unhersite, Poris 7th. 
Tel: (1J 544 39 40. 


EXECUTIVE • 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 




BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 



International Business Message Center 


■■OTEXEanil 

mama 


: - '-v_~- £ r; -i 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


ENIB fMENO JB NETWORK. We 
need create*, tucoes driwn indvid- 


ucds who act on oppatwil m Singer 
Products Co. Inc is a 50 year old $30 
ma«jn+ N.Y. bated conqiaiy trad- 
ing in 130 axeftieL Our greatest 
a mows hove been with entr^jre- 

a aWPaHW now nw now pfW- 
en pradudi & tedmdoipBS- Depend- 
ing upon yaw situation, expertise & 
mtirt, vwl wort outdated* to mutu- 
al benefit. Write or telex SSchad J. 


M LL5. - FOR MUUINATfONAlS 
CPA HUM 

M'l & U5L lax planning, ooawntmg, 
fnmdd & busnea seneces - real es- 


tate, inwdmeai, 

tanoLD GC 


225 W. 34 St, New Yak. NY 10122. 
Tek 212-W4-3771. 



FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


OFFICE SERVICES 


800,000 FRB4CH FRANC LOAN 
Required fa Working Captd. Returns 
25% pa awwi with cover, a m unices 
aid msironca. Box 1748, Herald Tri- 
bute, 92521 NeuSty Cede*. Fronoe. 


Snaer, Dir, Smger Produdi Ca Inc, 
B5 terrick Ave, Westeury, NY 
11590. Tbu 229011. 


THE FINANCIAL TIMES 


now operates a morning of pufafenlian 
ddlvuy service to suhKrteere Sring in 
the fofcrvring areas; 

Para - Lyon - Nice - Comes - Monaco. 

For a free hid ad further detcA, 




-• ; ■>> 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


WALL STREET-, vted's next? GNUti- 
ler hca tee answers. SEC regaterecL 
GMl, CP. 54, CH-1000 LousSne 7 


• Teles and foaknde te nrurn ini on 

• Corporate RepreMafcsflan Service 

• Shat or long term ovaBabXty. 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


WTL 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPlf 

INC 


Ben Huphes - F.T. Pail 
Tet (1) »7 0623, 297 0630 
Telex: 220044 
No FT no comment 












YOUR AGENT M THE UX. 

Our asn party. old edrtelahed 1883, A 
I financed standna offers la act as 
your agent a yswr branch oflke in UK 
to find eanpetmve and rdkabie souren 
c4 a to tnartet ycu products. 
No teev o>4y corntmaion an resutax. 


The 291112 A8/EPORAD G or voile: 
Baxhor TnxEng Ud, PO Bat 13d, 
17719 fledcroa Way, London SE1 1TB 
England. Tet 01-403 5566 




COMMERCIAL 

PREMISES 


FOR B84T 

Chaks de Gaulle Akport 

TECHNICAL ZONE 
OfScex: from 250-1000 «un. 
WaiihouMn from 800-2000 Hun. 
tarleing: fran 500 to 1500 sqjn! 


AMeiteauAM Euro Busmen Center 
jCaw™raade99 10I5OH Amsterdam 
TeW20j 227035. Telex: 16183 
AT1«iS ^Executive Services, Athens 
Tower 8, Sate 506, Athens 610. 

Tel: poll 7796 231 Telex: 216343 
ROMAYi Bdtem ChombB^ 213 
NaWnan Point, Bombay 400 021. 
W. 244949. Telex: 011-6897. 


Balsas: 4' Rue de io Preae 
1000 Brunet Tet 217 83 60 


DIAMONDS 



Telex: 25327 

DUBAI: P.O. Box 1515. DNATA 
Awtne Centre tXjbai, UA£. 

Tet 214565 Telex: 48911 
LONDON: 110 The Strand, 

London WC2R OAA, 

Madrid 2B02a Tel 270 MM / 

270 6604, Telex: 46642 
MILAN: Via Boccaccio 1 

30123 MBon. Tcf 86 75 87/BO 59 279 
Telex: 320343 

WR YORK S75 Mcxfrson Avenue 


AGENTS WANT® 

Ugh comoxsoon paid. Latest 
tee-ort security products. 

• N igte vman 

• Surveilance 

• Aai-terrarism 

• Counter -mteligence 

• Many, many more. ” 
Protected aw* avadoUe to cyrafW 
agents who vwh to rep this exdan 
padud fan rf world famous searty 
systems. Contact M Henri, 

CCS in Pwifc 297 5600. 


New York, NY 10022. Teh 012) 605- 
0200. Telex: 125864 / 237*9 

I BOS, 15 Avenue Vida Hugo 
75116 Para. Tel: 502 18 00 
Telex: 620693/. 

ROME Via Savon 78, 00198 Rons. 
Tel 85 32 41 . 844 fc 70 . 

Telex: 613458 

SINGAPORE 111 Norte Bridge Rd. 
*11-04/05 Fennsula Plazn/ 

STore 0617. Tel 3366577. The 36033. 
ZURtm Renown 32, 8001 zSdT 
Tet 01/214 61 ft 
Telex: 812656/812981. 


OFFICE SERVICES 


ASTON COMPANY FORMATIONS 
Dept HI, 

8 Victoria St 


Douglas, We rf Man. 

Ti 0624 36591 
Telex 6Z7691 SPYA G 


ZURICH-ZUMCH-ZURICH 


HOIE FOR SALE j us. public cv ^pany sbxs ^ 


TTit 100-raom RRST P ASS wel 
wry upped hotel with exduM bon aid 
nataunHi it silueSed at tee soutewest 
coast rf Maxi Near rarport, beadi 
and world rammed gaff course. Run- 
ning Ama i con qc &oas. good mmme 
one! prow poocunoik 
PteaM write Box 174], l-terdd Trtoune: 
92521 NeriRy Cedes, France 


EL‘K?£?* c,,r I® 1 * to nv 
ket S4XD0 mvapment hi moia US red 
eStetednelopmenL Have told S60M 
to date. Finf tone offered outride US. 
LHrm4cd noorae 
HK RDOPL or 


ANSWB PHONE. 

Your penenal Jefeefrone operator on 
duty 24 hours far F1950 oSyl 4 voice 
synthesis programmable message: 

• An nouncer your home phone 
nwnber. 

• GoB back bter. 

• Ca i be reodnd at (blowing number. 

• Cn bade after mdcsted nme. 


A dax nh le to normd oaasfte reconkr 
+ 13, 16 dait memory + hands free 


dot mmxy + hands free 
t5o*ng,ete_ 


COTE D'AZUR 

NICE CWBZ RESDENTTAL 


160 sqjn, Kring space, hoi, entrance. 
Bring, dnmg, 3 bedrooms, 2 bote- 
roams. My equipped kitchen, laundry 
room, fc xge terrace faring souifaceBa, 

9 V§Y HIGH OASS APARTMENT 
Inviolate panotai w. seo view 
Price: FZJSOflCD 

LUFflVSSHJJE 

6 Ave Georges Oemenceou 
06800 Nh*. TrtjVS) 88 44 98 


UK & OFFSHORE 

COMPANIES ROM £78 


UX 4- We rf Mm + AnguBo 
Guernsey + leney + Garftar 
Uberia + Panama -I- Denwara 

Reed ym odi or to nit 
Pul nominee, odnenatraowe 
aid oecourting bock -up indixfing 
bate udrodudians 


SWITZERLAND 

ZU mCH - ZUG - LUZERN 
From SF300 pa annum ■ up 
Confideso, Bouei sir. 36^0-1-6300 Zug 
Tdi 0041 42 21 32 bTUx.- 86 49 I3C 

A Present for Your Son 


IMMEUAT 

UP-TO-DATE ehdrori c far offices, 
homes & leisure. 



RAHNHOF5TRA55E 52 
TW FINANCIAL CHVTB! 

• Your C Bm pl uto otfea at oa ful ser- 
vice address 

• Buanetj dednons by deasian makers 
■ Matagemenl sovkhs: company for- 
mations, tax ptawxng, business & 

- “**19 crerded to meet your needs 

• S 01 !** 1*** oddrm^aFfice en 
Zurichs renowned business street. 

Bwewm SemigM Consrft Carp. 



gbcva ka,s ^^ nbs 

Fulr «wped offices to rent. Dormri&- 
ttoon (mrf. telqi & phone). Trade, sales 
qainnuahon & seaelond services, 
OgJ*. 1207 Geneva 
Tet (22) B6 17 33, ttx: 428388 KBS 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


Bohrfoohtnasse 52, CH-8022 Zuridi. 
Tel: 01/211 92 07. Thu 813 062 


SNGUSH LADY 

Zsz&vsgsiif. 


ecufive seaetarid experience, refa; 
enc8s._wou!d study aiy serious aapod- 


TAX SHI VICES 


SH£CT COMPANY FORMATIONS 
Mr Pleased. Douglas. Me rf Mon 
Teh Daugfas Jffl41 23718 
TdmTS^54^KTG 



los Aieeacs 

Ftmwhed offices xi Bevaly Hfc. Con. 

wem, presirfow address. Tlx, nyj 
MO * q "d & foil services. 


center famous tounst mart riCasto 
Bram near France. Froffiwsy, amort, 
harbor, efc Yearly income + M 

iPnareAHikS 

Cedn. France 


YOW bushes address 

iiJL W.Tf€ MEBHBAND5 
n*y serviced offices, seaetaries ml 
w*"* 6 * °*«orY services, phone, telex, 
mastto aodress, 

EXECUTIVE SSrVKK AMSTERDAM 
007 !U AmstSr 
Hofand- Tel: (030-716566. Tk 14271 


“jwwing, telex, ireeling rooms, ms- 

trftent range of office 





tV-H-til-