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The Global Newspaper 
Edited in Paiis 
Printed Simultaoeouslv 
in ^aris, Londmi, Zuricli, 
Bou Kong. 

' The Httue adBUucU!^ 


INTERNATIONAL 



WEtfHBlDATAAf 

IVo. 31,715 


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PtaMidied WhSa. Tlie Nw York Hmeg and Tke WadiiiigtcHi Post 

zuBiCH, tnuRSDAYT February 7, i985 


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ESTABU^IED 1887 


5 W|;i^‘|> U-S- Will Not Use Facilities 

§ 1 ^ In Australia for MX Testiiig 

dal to ite SUB Dgwnnail Mid 

W. jwuld used. Pentagpn officials “New &aUad is sdn a frieod,- 
Pmme Kfim ster Ha^ of Ads- haw said that the icstt are sched- said the offidaL who requestedu- 
tialia announced Wednesday that uled for late summer. oavmiiv “tfl^Zealud does not 

ibe^ll^SausvWimtuxAia- The United States called off ifac wMU?beanalIy.ii^nMmM 


j.^ewdifj the United Sut 

j r;: Kalian suroon 

... -V-riX-ni^iSiiC MXmb^in 




Kalian suTOOfl faciliiies in tots of itaval maneuvers aiia New 

MX missues in the South Padfic. land refused port access to a U.S. 

Hw devdopment came just one destroy os the grounds that it officii saidi was Slot to 
day after the Umted States an^y might be canying nuclear weapons, tii*. Aaroay h»t Umii tk» « » 
esBceled naval maneuvers with Mr. Hawke arrived Tuesday /rier 


It IS an enemy. 

The U.S. reaction to the ban, the 


are 


:-.;-“*^^Pnncesufc. 

.7'- i rwKA^ 


Amj-fluckar leados on Wednes- 
day declaied a victoiy after Mr. 
Hawke derided to pufi out of an 


esBceled naval maneuvers with Mr. Hawke arrived Tuesday fUPI Ivp\ 

Anstxalia and New Zealand Those night on an official visit to Wasb> ' * ^ ’ 

aerrises were to be conducted next ington, met several top offidids on ■ AustnSaa RenctiMi 
month under the Sd-yearHirid AN’ Wednesday and is to see Presideoi Anti-nuclear leados on Wedoes- 
ZUS mutual d^ense pact among Rtmald Reigan on Thurs^y. d^ declaied a victory aflo Mr. 
the three conntri^ In New Z^and cm Wednesday, Hawke dedAyd to puO out of an 

Mr. ^i^tz said the Australian Prime Minister Etevid Lange dis- a g re em ent to bdp uis. tests di the 
prime nanister “raised the comnni- missed Reagan administraiion crii- mv mi«n«», Th» Ptm** 

lUQr concerns in AustTalia“ about a icism of his government’s Hwrici/in reported fmn Sydney. 

SSf .SSTSSl T conservative politioans and 

Questioned about Washington newspaper editorials expressed 
rep^ of possible U.S. retaliation ooncem^ttbcreversalthfeai- 
«^ ^torsplasWow t^ against the ban. which caused the coed to scuttle the already tmpo- 
|X the MX m^fle ffi the Gulf of canceDation of an ANZUS naval ifal ANZUS alliance. 

^anan, which hes m mteniauonal exercise. Mr. Lange said be was Hawke abandonol his MX 

US. side bioughi 0111 Ihai ag^iNM^aSd lie mighi^noi have Ihe votes lo gel il 

d»e.?eavMie.,of™^to„.om- 


j UIJ6I aum astuvi mindma otoaaiww 

IS.wi ^ 1 ^ saacuons he might not have the votes to get it 


against New Zealand. 
“I i^ard it as onao 


approved in a 


caucus and 


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approved in a party canais and 

ttr'anMX t« ^ tte tKwdtorine ”» JWl it as onaciMtabte that would suffer a humifialiiig defeaL 
effort need not involve the provi- ^“er counliy sh^a by thrat Anti-nuclear groups, leftist poU- 
sion of Aimralian suppoft,^ Mr. ticians, trade union leaders and 

Shultz “A decisioa has beta W “** others proteaed die missile test 

made by the United States to con- Zeal^ people, be said at a saying the MX was “a first 
duct the MX tests without the ose *”*** cooiemwe. strike*’ weapem (hat poses a threat 


of Australian support arrai^ 
menls.** 


New Zealand and Australia have 
tried to ease tension in the aDinoce 


Mr. Hawke, during a brief news by going ahead with a joint naval 
coofeimice with Mr. Shultz, saM c’mrcise tbm had been planned as a 
fhat w hiia he Aosttalian ^vtain raiser to the cannded xna- 

conoenis .about providing support ueuvers with the United States. 
hdUties (or the MX tests, the Rea- Meanwhile, the United States 
gan administration alr^y had wiO not take economic «iTicti»n« 
made its decision to monitor the against New a «*»««« ' otti- 


io worid pmce. 

The Noclear Disarmament Party 
said Mr. Hawke’s reversal was a 
victon for the peace movematt 
and <Wwwi<rtfat»n that many Aus- 
' tralians were unhi^ipy ^lout the 
country’s Rowing im^vement in 
the nudear arms race. 



Ethiopia Assails 
UN Agency on 
Aid for Sudan 


By Iain Guest complicate the UN role in co- 

himaaand Herald Tribune ordinating a w! n^l^lioi^ 
GENEVA — The Ethiopian fyune relief effon y Egioga 
governineDt threatened Wemies- J^berc between six a^ agbt mil- . 
d^Mo lake measures agaiiS^ lionpeoptearesaidlvihegoveni- 
oftice of the UN HighcSmmis- meoiiobemdangerofsiarvmgio 
skmer for Refugees, allegiiiE that ..«!,>■ 

the agency is favoring Suffil the 1“ ® “»«««»• ^ 

expeScSr Ethiopia m distributing bede ^ the Ethiopian gen^ 
ramicyaid.^ ^ bad two chief coi^amts 

TteEihiopian ambassador to 

the United NaUons in Geneva, ^ He said ite agency had aax^ 
KaffaKebede, said in an interview "esamud estimates of rrfu- 
that his government had conununi- gees from the govenunents of So- 
cated its disoleasure at atliigwf hfog ■ ' — 

against Ethiopta by the UNHCR to Wnd Kowfi, an Eadopiap refu- 
the hi^ commissioner. Fbul Har- cauup^ is the fastest growing 
tling, in Geneva and sen ior UN city in Sudan. Phge 4. 

{petals in Addis Ababa. — ; 

“We are studying what measures malia and Sudan. He also chaiged 
we should take.” he said. “We have ihai UNHCR aid to the refugees in 
not yet on ^Mcifics,’’ but Sudan has “enticed” people out of 

UNHCR policy “cannot roniip up Ethiopia and that the agency bad 

^ ilsitiDS i mil ■#» mffnM 


this way.” 

Mr. Kebede declined to com- 


divertro funds from its relief efTort 
inside EiUoiria to hrip guerrillas 


fiwini cm repom that the UNHCR from Tigre and Eritrea provinces 
bad been warned that it could be who draw supprni from among the 


ezpeDed from Ethiopia. 

The Ettuoi^ thfUt is seen here 


refugees. 

Kebede referred 


U.S. Secretaiy of State Geoi^ P. SInihz, left; taBang wifli Austrian Prime Mimster Bob 
Hanrice before they announced AustraBa would not provide snpport for MX missile tests. 


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Reagan to Stress Positive in State of Union Message 


By Bernard Weinraub 

Nev Ycdr Tina SerWrr 


employment tnumng (or minority the Pentagon budget, as mai^ 
youth and the oeadtai of islafors seek, could nndammit the 


recovay,” said one offiriaL but will 
urge a c o m p rehensive Western ap- 


WASHINGTGN through the suspension of the mmi- U.S. bargaining poritkai in sirate- proach to agricultural programs m dom m Nkaragoa. 


by diplomats and aid officiids as to a r^uest 1^ Ethiopia for bdp in 
acutely embarrasring for the Gen^ rehabilitadng more than 300,000 
va-based refugee agency, which is refugees who have returned to Ethi- 
expected Thnrsday to l atmch a new opia from Somalia. 
multiinillion-doUar appeal for refu- Mr. Kebede, a former Ethitmian 
gees in the Horn of Africa. minista of labor and social affairs, 

D^kunats the threat could dso said that the UNHCR is yield- 

iog to pressure from Western gov- 

eraments, particularly the United 
States wUch contributes 30 percent 
'MM' of the agency’s budget and has 

IWg^QQ^jQtMy strained relaaons with the Marxist 

government in Addis Ababa. 

The ambassador said Ethiopia 
its people, the church. We need to would like the UNHCR “to stop 
aid those that are interested in free- bong a servant to pcrfidcally mou- 

• %.ti — I n 


Rondd^SutatawSS: gic arms talks in CcncviL ^ 

thre priorities for bis second term tn m forogn polity aib- ^ 

with an upbeat Stale tlK Union rir^ jects in this speech are vAat can be ^ 

Message on Wednesday night. done to Bfi the threat of 


Afiaca in order to "wk* nations 
there self-sufficieni and avert fam- 


“ThU is essenriaPy the choice 


vaied groups.” 

Hie UNHCR is the mqor inter- 


In the address, White House offi- 


eoab&og low-mcome tenants io 
pubfic houring prog ecta to purchase 


“ the idea that we arc now able to security, or we face the coose- mates that there are more than one 

exn^ worid, a more quences at snne fatnie date.” million Ethiopian refugees in 

peacefiil world, a world that’s more Mr. Rea^ also is expected to oaghborinE Sudan and Somalia, 
fmc,** the official said. "He wants talk of anlaririnfl qq a space pro- Responding to the EihiopiBn 
that to be a legacy." gram that would open the way for diarges, diplomats and aid oJBoals 

M^y, an ouioai sa^ ^xanfically. Mr. Reagan vSIT piri^te 'investmem and ^ dei^ here conceded that there is a “puD 

b*. Reagan hot only will disenss - press for the admiirisaaiioD’s rian'* ‘r^pment motiripi-n agH cwnp iifiy factor” at woik in &daa, and that 
) Amestcan contiibutiim airi for S4 fafllioD worth of new MX in space. The ptesidcut plans the UNHCR's efforts are probably 
eiship in the globB] eooaioniic nussiles and S3.7 billion in research to disotts the development of high- attracting people from iosule Elhi- 

on inri-fflisiilc drfaises. tedmology industries and efiorts to opia. About 230,000 refugees have 

Aides said that altboogh lufr. spur emplospneai in newer Gd^ arrived in eastern Sudan from Ethi- 
Reagan. in die foreign poliiw por- outsde tiaditioiial or dying bus- opin since last October in the wake 
ndi AfftfniiaiitMflvGn tion of his remarks, would brieQv nesses. of increased Ggbtmg in a lO-year- 


ere self-sufficieni and avert fam- Coaigress has to nmlm Either we nadonal agency assisting refugees 
e support the democratic forces wto nnd has awarded the Nobel 

“What the qiee eh wQ] stress is stn^Slo there as tied to our own Peace Prize twice. The agency esti- 


dals said, he wfll seek to reach out thdr units. At the same tin*, lx: 
ton^xitygiaii^aiiph^^- jdans to press his proposal to revive 


_n;^. create a more safe worid, a more 

;Sl^btoId»viI™.tworH 


oil reducuon and tax smqilifica- 
lirai, and stress his desire to eax 
the tfacear of nudear war ■ 

One official described the 


blighted urban areas by providma ™ -!?' 

bno~n»«cAn , Mr. Reagsn hot only will 

“He’s d^&tdy readhng out,” '*thb American contributu 


million Ethiopian refugees in 
neighboring Sudan and Somalia. 
RKponding to the EihiopiBn 


thi AaodolKl 




PAPAL GIFT — Pope John Pud 11 tried on ui Indwn 
beadAoss pr e s ente d to him by tfie Yagua tribe of 
Amazonian Indians in Iquitos, Peru, befora flying to 
Tfinid^ oidDg a 12-day visit to Latin America. P^ 4. 


Israel’s Recession Slows 
Settling of West Bank 


speech, which was discussed at a said a rankmg White House offi 
cabinet meeting Tiiesday after- oaL 

noon, u poat^ The nationally televised speech 

Another offi^ win be Mr. Reagan’s fifth State of 
ni^ ^Giai he wante to Imre be- theUiuoaaddiess.ltw{llbedcfiv- 
bmdtfta tbenextfourymisa and at 9 PJll in Washington be- 
meaningM arms coutrd agrre- fore ajoint session of Congress, 
menl with the Soviets and conlm- in ^ domestic poitiM of the 
uedsta^ecoDoi^^ «Pe«h,anoffic«J 5 akLMr.Rca- 

^ui^lyuigtiKsoeoCi]^^ 8*“ ^ 

Mess:^ officials secondtennbysiTes 5 ingthe“cp- 
^^beant^^bytheira- poromity for ir thatlwaits the 
dm to reach m AaoKsas, in- natkm ^ redudng the dehdl and 
eluding members of mmoniy ovedianhngthnilx system. 

Pwps. Acoortog to White House (rffi- 

Mi. Retail, who asserted test dais. Mr. Re^9&’& foreign pohey 
month that some black leados had portion of the speech wiilughlight 
distorted 1^ lecord, is ejqiected to his cfioris a! reaching what one 
onphama his endorsement of an official tamed ’Tasting achieve- 
array of (HOgrams hdping imiior- ments” m arms contn^ He is a- 
ities. Th^ indude fair housm^ pected to am phagi?# that cutting 


Reagsn not only will disdiss - press for the admutistrstioD's 
“chb Amstcan coutributim and for S4 fafllioD worth of new MX 
leadership in the '^bal ecoaioiiiic mkioTiwt and S3.7 bilUnn jn research 
on inn-fflisiDc ddaises. 


Sfludl AstVOIlSIltMRyGo tun of hu ranarts. would brieOy 
rk_¥To c »*• • discuss maiqr areas of the wodd, be 

tiD Uo, Space MlSBion would conceotrate on Central 

The Astaaaied Prexs Am w^ 

OTVAFIH _ C...HJ A«w. ix.c _ Accocd^ io_ Otte officuO, Mt. 


BssesL ctf increased Ggbtmg in a lO-year- 

On the dcsnestic side, officials old guerrilla war and the continu- 
lid the dommanl themes would ing ramine. 


RIYADH — Saudi Aratm has 
beenasked losdectanastnnaulto 


conceotrate on Central said, the dominant ihemes would hig (amine, 
a. be Mr. Reagan’s effort to shrink They conceded that the Eihiqu- 

(dtog to ooe officiaL Mr. the size of the govemment and to an char^ dononstrste the pns- 
1 win narinmil support reduce the deficit with cuts in do- nires wmcb face UN agendes t^ 
poli^ in CentzaJ America, mestic qieodiD^ plus the aggres- ing to teach victims on all sides of a 


^ 

^^io^PressAgmeyro ^ 


1-uf.ajl Wa/lnBexlBv am*, niu uw MUA wiipuoau.- umw ww. 

porreu weanesoay. among other timg^ the le- “The ^leecbrdlects Read’s vi- 

Ihe agojcy said King Fabd gion's geop^ihic proxhm^ to the sioo of America,” an aide said "It’s 


The agea^ said King Fabd gion's aoBvpbie proximxy to the 
made the disdosure to a grow of Umied^Stues. 

Ui». busmessmen Tuesd^. The ‘“Ihe atgoment is, and the argu- 
Idite added that the Mnnstry of ment to be made in the ^eecb is, 
Defeose and Aviatioa would draw we need to defy Soviet-siroported 
up a list of candidates, dioso from aggresaoo.” tte official sa& “Tte 
the ranks of Saadi pQots. SawHaniaa govemment posecutes 


UN officials said that the sew 
UNHCR qipeal foresees that at 
least 300.000 more refugees will en- 


filtefl with his np tiwriaw, bis com- ta Sudan in the near future. Tl^ 
mitmenf (o basic values, bis com- th^ predicted, would add to Eihio- 
mitment to budgdl reduction and pia’s suspicions that the ageiiQi is 
tax lefcxm. He’s going to sound as uncritically accepting estimates of 
optimistic as be always is. It's cme numbers from Sudan, 
of tbe hallinaiks of the maiL” So far, according to UN figures, 


: . rrai By niQmas L Friedmjtn ornate 

^Intermaicmd Herald Tribune 

■ ; AMR YAACOV, Ixll«dH)cc.^ 






. . 1 pennanenl housmg and enough 

piedWe^Bank — Israwsecooc^ sasolinetoiuntheirdectridtygeD’ 
« lacesskm appears to be domg ^ instead of the few 

what years of Peace Now de^- niegt now 

strations and politu^Mttltt have ^ wted. Bu, for the present, 
not: slow the growth of Jewsh set- must waiL The money that 
tlemeota in tl* West Brak. nMifB this place a viable settle- 

Cous i d g tiny AWr Yaacov. It not available. And it is not 


cnnw si-«t of fouT one di 

and four kradi ^£ers who riai 


dear when it wQl be. 

‘^fs land of funny, four soldiers 



OITwo Deaths 


of tbe hallinaiks of the maiL” So far, according to UN figures, 

$313 million in multilateral and bi- 

lateral rdid aid has been diaii- 

_ _ ndled to Ethic^ since the ema- 

Israel to Increase ^cyprogrambeganlasifaljinthc 

largest sin^e emergency famme re- 

Security in Wake "'M^^nofihepro- 

i\g fw' pam is due to be reviewed at a 

Ul 1 wo Ileatns meeting here at the end of the 

Keureis month. The meeting may be at- 

RAMALLAH, Israeli Occupied- taujed Vice Pread«t G^ 
WMt Bank — Defense Minister Bum, accordmg to diplomatic 


guard aroiind the dock. Tte plate p.^^ng so few people;” said a 
IS so smaD that late-moming via- j^gerv^l from Td Aviv, one of 
tots often find no one home. thn^ aMignarf to ANr Yaacov. 


tots often find no one home. to ANr Yaacov. I . - 

Abir Yaacov was built hastily on ^sometimes everyone goes, and we 

! 2 ,t.-.-sss,'sa assjajsis's 
j/gaa'siissE 


IIm ^WwTe■t r— i/Mi jM BvwVn 

Abir Yaacov, started by 30 families last Jufy, has oofy four houses because tbe goyernmeiit has ^orided Ihfle moD^. 


debated in ecoooanc terms. When setikmeots like Abir Yaacov are 


iteurees monin. iiie meeting may oe ai- 

RAMALLAH, Israeli Occupied- taMjed Via Preadtet G^ 
West — Defense Mister Bum, accordmg to diplomatic 

Yitzhak Rabin said Wednesday P®j!^ _ . , ... . 

that IsraeU forces would increase The officials that the ^ 
tbar presence on the West Bank “d oalan of ihe new UNHCR 
following the deaths of two Israelis, appeal appeals to te a mc^ge to 
Mr. fehiji,midCT pressure from Sovernmente^uduigtbe Umied 
rtehtists to take action against Pd- Stales, wluch have been critical for 
^fon militants, alsoraid that ^ »W;’s (**” » respoad 
other security measures were row quickly, 
ojanned. The message, he said, appears to 

^liei,>olc,tliiw-iiisiii»IH)l 5 be “piil up or shul up." 
fanned out througb the streets of 

R«alHfeioricSw«Office 

orders . ^ Assoeuaed Pres 

Mr. Rabin said that decile tbe GENEVA — The Palais WDsoo. 


C "...x'- money for only four trafla nomes, 
eveiyone moved bade to Je- 
insalem and Td Aviv. 

V • The remaining lesidenis of Ato 
Ya«ov .are holoiag out atop this 


value compared with that of otha asonomic titnatiem now 

government investments. says you have to make chotces,” be 

For tbe seven years in which the sakL “That is why e^«xy issue zxrw, 
Likud bloc governed Israd, accord- tnchidmg the aetttements, is being 


That question is asked often govenuneni investments. 
Tcsi^is of Abir these d^is, with a new national For tbe seven years in 
na out atop this ddiate on tbe seltlemenis iqipar- Likud bloc governed Israi 


it becomes a matter of choice be- bong anected by IsraeTs severe ,uafhs of the past 10 days he did near Lake Gen^ was da^gpH 
tween the defense budget and un- reretessioa. So too are tbe two ma- qql believe security bad deteriorat- iw a fire on Tuesday. Now offices, 
enmk^mtent and the settlanents, jor forms ctf oaostrnction in the ed, adding, ‘There has not been a ifebuildmgwastheGfstheadqiiar- 
01 ^ a Email minority of Israelis oectroied laritories: (he large West mmor change in the numba of ta- ters the League of Nations for 
wm malte the buildiDg of new set- Bank “bedroom” suburbs where acts, but, unfortnnaiely, two more than a before Worid 
tlanenis the top prionfy.” biindieds of apartment blodcs are of i fwwi have been more success- War n a*irf subsecpientiy a hotd 

Not only tbe small ideolorical (Conthmed on Plage Z, CoL Q fiiL” until 1966. 


(Conthmed on Plage Z, CoL Q 


War n and subsecpientiy a hotel 
until 1966. 



INSIDE 


■ FoEsh authorities m u^g 

qmet ways to dmcipline dis^ 
& Phgei 

■ Scholars scold President Rea- 

gan for ttwaiMfijg the Kble to 
siqjport his bnildiip of U.S. mit 
itary forces. ^ 

■ South Kmea^ national as- 
semMy riectkms have become a 
test between Presidenl 

Doo Hwan and a dissideiA 
Kim Dae Jung. 1^8^ ^ 

business/finance 

■ EoQDQUBSts say recent fi^ires 

indicate West Germany's ecoa- 
mny aiuld be stagnant in tte 
first half of 1985. Rage 11. 


Castro lies Barking for US. Peace Bole in Angola to Nanubia 



Kayeow/IWe 


tied that U. S. interest rates 
flonthme to isteease: IT. 


James Hadl^ Chase, a 
mysteiy writer, tfied in 
Smtzenand at 7& Page 3. 


By Jim Hoagland 

Wariiinffon PostSemee 

HAVANA — Cuba is prepared 
to cooperate with an American- 
qxsosored peace sime^ a 
getting aD Cuban troops out of An- 
gola m return for inth^wal d* 
South African iroc^ from ^th- 
West Africa, or Namibia, and inde- 
pendence For that disputed territo- 
ry, President Fidel Cartro of Cuba 
ha* said. 

Mr. Castro also smd in an inta- 
view here last week that Cuba’s 
troc^ strength in Eihiqiia has fall- 
en to a symbolic level Hedecbied 
to give figures, although U.S. offi- 
cials have pui the curreut niitwtv^ 
at 5,000, down from an initial 
17,000 in 1977. 

In his first full account of the 
Cuban reaction to a series of (fipb- 


maiic devdopments in souttaem 
Africa in reont months, Mr. Cas- 
tro esdoned the U.S. mediatioa 
effort there as having tbe potential 
to “exerose a posUive mf fiwvy ju 
the international sphere” and im- 
prove teUtions between Washing- 
ton and Havana if it is successful 

Wiule hinrina at A so bsUmrial 
lowering of mOiiBiy ambi- 
tions in Africa, Mr. Castro also 
Trained that his units would stay in 
Angola *Tiv^ 10, 13 years” or long- 
a u the remonal peace settkment 
sought by the United States is not 
achieved. 

But bdttsd the strong assertions 
by Mr. Castro and otha officials of 
Cuba’s ootnnntment to staying in 
Areola as tong as needed, tboe are 
emerri&g signs here a lessening 
of public enthusiasm for the nine- 
yor war effort in whicb an esiimai- 


ed 2,000 to 3J)00 Ctiban soldiers 
have died. 

Mr; Castro detuned to give any 
casual^ figures, raying emW that 

200.000 Cuban sddiers and dvil- 
iant have saved in Angda, where 
as estimated force of 2SJ)00 to 

30.000 Cuban troops has been snp- 
poriiog tbe Marxist govenunent 
against a series of South Afri^ 
invaaosis and the Angola guerrilla 
forces, led by Jonas Savimbi, which 
are al^ to South Aftica. 

One of Cuba’s most popular ftdk 
songs today carries veOed allusions 
10 a war weariness with Angola, 
to Havana residents who 
report that, in contrast to eariier 
yean, they are now aware (tf grow- 
ing Qombm d Cuban soldiers re- 
fusbg to serve in Angola. Cuban 
forces in Angola reportedly are vd- 


nnteers, mostly drawn from reserve 
nnits. 

After three years of conversa- 
tions with the P«w>giin admimstra- 
tion and the South African govon- 
ment, Angola annonflced in 
Novemba the conations it had 
put to South Afiica for a settle- 
ment Thisjr induded canyiita out 
UN Secunfy Comdl Rra6(atk» 
435, wfaidi calls for indqpendenee 
for Namibia, a conqilete ^ih Af- 
rican mOitaiy withdrawal from that 
terriuny and a halt to lo^tical aid 
to Mr. Savimbi's guen^ group 
UNITA, or tl» Union f<v the Total 
Independence Angola. 

in return, Ang^ said it would 
agree to a phaste withdravral of 
^000 Cubm sed^eas from south- 
ern Angola ovCT a period of ihm 
years. A residual Cuban forte, the 
size of which is not disclosed in the 


published Angolan proposal, 
would remain for an indefinite pe- 
riod lUHth of the 13ih paraild 
around the c^tal dty of Luanda 
and in tbe coastal oitpfoducmg 
exclave of Cahinda, white is sqia- 
rated from tbe rest Angola by a 
strip of Zaire. 

Sooth Afiica swiftly accepted the 
princtoles of mthdravml outlined 
by the Angolans but rgected the 
procedures. Frank G. Wisna, dep- 
uty asastaot secretary of state for 
African affairs, has engaged both 
governments in a new round of 
discussions in recent weeks in an 
effort to break the deadlocL 

In his interview, Mr. Castro pro- 
vided some new details of (he pro- 
posals as understood by the Ca- 
bans. He indicated that tbe Cuban 
force that would remain behind 
would number up to 10.000 sol- 


diers and would be ganisooed 
around airports, etwiirmiiii faitiffn 
pemts, the c^tal and Cabinda, 
where Gulf (m Corp, produces 
155,000 barrels of oil a day. 

“Cabinda is vital for tbe Ang^ 
Ian economy,” Mr. Castro ■iai d- 
“Gulf Oil worics there, and I ihml 
they are ratisfied they have been 
woi defended. Clearly we don’t do 
it to defend the interests of Gulf. 
We are defending the inierests of 
Angola, and the m suits An- 
gola and Gulf. Our forces there are 
not part of those in the 

negotiations taking place.” 

“If an agreement is reached,” 
said Castro of the Namil^ 
negotiations, “we will comply rig- 
orously to the part which involves 
us. It is the Angolans who have to 

(Condnued on t^ge 2, C(d. 1). 





Page 2 


DSTEBNATIONAL HERALD TRlBinSE. THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7. 198j 


Quiet Repression Affects Polish Doctor 


By Bradley Graham 

K'oiftfiigniii Pen Sernce 

WARSAW — Dr. Zofia Kura- 
towska remembers the threat wdl 
It was autuom and she 
beeu summoaed to the Interior 
for another inlerrogatioD 
about htf work for political iniemr 


umbrdla. But rite was warned by 
secret pc^ officers that she would 
eventually suffer consequences at 
her icA) tor protog the medical 
coiuntioD detaines. 


The authorities could not do 
much to ha then. Ha posidon as 
medical counselor on the Polish 
Roman Catholic primate's oommit- 
tee aidiim pt^tical prisoners pro* 
vided 3 amd of protective diurd 


Pdisb officials in late Decemba 
closed the Warsaw ho^tal ward 
for blood disease victims (hat Dr. 
Kuratowska beaded, cut ha salaiy 
and reassigned ilw weU^known 
physidan to an outpatient clinic in 
a suburi) of the capital 

Archbishop Bronislaw Da- 
browski. secretary of Polaud's 
Catholic episcopate, has written to 


the govenunent protesting the ac^ 
tioo, which he charged was directed 
as much against the church as 
against the doctor. 

The case illustrates the quiet 
forms of r^nnsrion bong used now 
by Communist authorities gainst 
optical oppcments. Such measures 
uve the advant^ of boldi^ 
down tte numba political pris* 
oners, avoi^ onfavorable inta- 
national attention that could dis- 
turb improving ties between 
Warsaw and Watem capitals, 
while siBl intimidating and punish- 
ing the opposition. 


Soares Asks Aide to Sluy in (halUion 


LISBON — Prime Minister 
Mdrio Soares Wednesday asked his 
dqjiuty, Carlos Mota Pinto, to stay 
in his coalition government until a 
solution was found to a crisis 
catmed by Mr. ^tota Pinto's reag- 
lution as head of the Social Demo- 
cratic Party. 

Mr. Soares, who beads the So- 
ciaiisi-ted coalition, had sum- 
moned Mr. Mota Pinto to discuss 
his resignation late on Tuesday as 
leader of the Social Demociat& He 
had said he would leave his funire 
in the coalition to be decided by 
Mr. Soares and his parly. 

HSs resignation from the party 
leadership, following fierce criti- 
cism from Sodal Democratic re- 
has raised fears of new insta- 
bility in the l9-monih government 


after a lengthy dispute between the 
cc^tion paitmas late last you. 

A statei&eat said Mr. Soares had 
ask^ Mr. Mota Knto to stay on as 
d^u^ prime nnnister and defense 
minister '*1ot the stabiliQr of the 
government, which is essential for 
economic rccovoy.” 

He fldced Mr. Mota Eteto to car- 
ry on at least untQ the issue of 
ieadershm of Uk Social Democrat- 
ic Partynad been resolved. 

The 48-year-old deputy prime 
minister announced be was quit- 
ting as par^ leader after be nar- 
rowly survii^ a confidence vote 
duringapartycouncfl meeting over 
theweel^d. 

Mr. Mota Pinto had appealed for 
support after criticism party r^Is 
oppos^ to government policies 
badt^ by the depu^ prime m'mis- 


ter, particularly plans for the econ- 
otm. 

the current crisis has come as 
the govonmeni is seeking to revi- 


C^ten the dimce con^ooting 
Poles is not between freedom and 
imprisonment but between keqnng 
a good job and beu^ forced into a 
poor one, between obtaining a 
passport (0 travel abroad or not, 
between protecting famOy mem- 
bers or exposing them to politically 
motivated repercusrions. 

Dr. Kuratowska, S3, graduaied 
from the Warsaw Medical Acade* 
my in 19SS. She won inteniatioaal 
notice 2S^eais ago for locating in 
brnn^f i a substance mat 

r^ulates the production of red 
blood c^s. 

Ten yean ago, she was appmnt- 
ed to bead a ward at Warsaw’s 
Bar^ Street Hospital She pro- 
ceeded to build iqi a cluuc spe^- 
izing in the treatment of acute leu- 
kemia and other blood diseases. 

During tile 1980-1981 SolidariQ' 


talize the ecooociy foUon^ tough 
austeritv measures in I9S4. It is 


austerity measures m 1984. It is 
also satiating a new foreign loan. 

Party sources expressed fears 
that the divisions amoos Sodal 
Democrats and the effect at this on 
the niUng coition would play into 
the hands of siipportep of Fortu- 
m’s preridem. Antonio RamaUio 
Banes, who are fonnii^ a new po- 
litical movemenL 

Mr. Eanes is due to step down at 
the end of the year and the issue of 
possible candidates to succeed him 
has already caused disagreement 
both among Social Democrats and 
between tnm and their Sodalisl 
coalition partners. 


Castro Backs Peace Role of U.S. in Angola 


(Goatumed frani Page !)• 
dedde.” Mr. Castro said it would 
take the Angolans three years to 
“to replace our troops with their 
troops." 

“Our troops in the south ap- 
proach a figure of 20,000 men and 
constitute the bulk of the Cuban 
forces" in Angola, Mr. Castro said. 

Withdrawal of the residual force 
in the north “could be discussed 


and agreed upon between the Cu- 
bans and Andrians in confpnnance 
with Angola’s security needs." he 
said. 


Killing of Belg^ Pilots 
By Pt^isario Gmfirmed 

The AssodaifJ Pms 

BRUSSELS — Two Bdgiaos 
woe kUled Jan. 21 when Poluario 
Front guerrillas shot down a small 
plane over (he di^ut^ Western 
Sahara, a Foreign bfinistry spokes- 
man. Frans Van Daele, ouifinaed 
Wednesday. 

“Personal documents bdcHiging 
to Fran^fois Mertens, 41 . and Ca- 
rried Lenez. 35, were found fioating 
on the waters" off the West African 
coast, the spokesman said. The two 
pilots were competing in the Paris- 
to-Daksu air race when shot down. 
A communique issued last week by 
the gueniUas said the aircraft had 
been mistaken for a Moroccan mil- 
itaiy plane. 


Exi^mning his willingness to 
consider cormration with the U.S. 
diplomatic effort, Mr. Castro said; 
“I believe that the United Slates is 
interested in its relations iiHih black 
Africa and really doesn't want to 
appear tied to the policy of raan- 
bttd. 1 believe the United sUtes 
also has an obsessive desire for the 
withdrawal (tf Cuban troops from 
Angola. For tile United States, a 
smail country like Cuba having 


they could be at the mercy of South 
Africa. 

Mr. Castro drew a contrast be- 
tween Angola and Ethiopia, where 
up to 17,(XI0 Cuban troops arrived 
in 1977 to help repel an invasion 
from Somalia. 

“In Ethiopia, our force is very 
sm^. composed of weQ-aimed 
uruts, with a good fire potentiaL" 
he said. “Our presence mere now is 
more ^mbohc at the side of the 
Ethiopian force; it is not the same 
as An^la." 


some troops in some places seems 
(o be a violation of tradition, of the 


to be a 
nonns.' 


U.K. Evicts Protesters 
From Base for Missiles 


At tiie end of December, the 
whole ward was closed technically 
fOT renovation, and Dr. Kura- 
towska was permanentiy reas- 
signed In a ci^ vdiere hospital 
b^ are in short simply and emrt 
medical attention is hard to nnd 
the actitm suudt many Poles as 
outrageous. An effort to have Dr. 
Kuratowska appointed to oversee a 
ward at another Warsaw hospital 
rmrtedly was blocked by party 
officials. 


But he seemM to indicate that 
other Aitican states may have mis- 
^vings about the nt^otiatioos. Cvl- 
ing public declarations by nei^- 
boring African states criiicuiDs the 
UJS. effort Mr. Castro said, 
front-Une states, black Africa in 
gpaeraL is not pleased about the 
idea of a Cuban troop withdrawal. 
They fed v«y threatened by South 
Africa." 


The only outside forces that have 
suppoited them, he said have been 
the Cuban forces, and they feel that 
when these fortes are withdrawn. 


Vnited Press Inunnaional 

LONDON More than 1,500 
policemen and troops Tuesday 
night raided a disused Royal Alir 
Force camp earmarked as a cruise 
missile base and evicted more than 
100 peace demonstratras. who had 
occupied the site since the summa. 

Troops built a wire fence around 
the Molesworth RAF camp. 70 
mOes (113 kilometers) north of 
London as the police rounded up 
and evicted the protesters, the Min* 
isuy of Defense said All the dem- 
oostrators left peacefully, a minis- 
try spokesman added 


■ Poles Return Activist to Paris 
A prominent Solidarity activist 
was denied permission to return to 
Poland after three years of exile in 
France because be carried an im- 
proper pas^rt, a goverumeni 
spokesman said Wednesday, ac- 
cordng to The Associated Pr^ 
Seweryn Blumsztajn. former 
head of SoUdari^ press service, 
was detained by pol^ at Warsaw 
airport Tuesday after airivi^ on 
an Air France fl^t from Paris and 
was placed on the next flight back 
to the French capital 


Don’t cut the cord. 


It’s a shame when distance cuts you off from the folks you were 
once close to. But it doesn't have to. A simple phone call to the folks 
you miss in the States helps keep you close. Surprisingly close, even 
though you're far apart. 


AT&T 




- IRAN 


period Kuratowska chaired a 
io^ branch of physicians aligned 
vrith the independcDt union move- 
menL After martial law was de- 
clared in December 1^1, she re- 
fused to sign a govomneat loyalty 
oath. She was recruited to wort for 
the primam’s aid comnuttee. for 
which she attempted to visit several 
intemment camps. 

One report she wrote in the sum- 
mer of 1982 detailed on attack by 
prison guards on inmates in the 
northern town of Kwids^ Several 
prisrmers were hospiulim as a re- 
sult of beatings, which authorities 
allied were 'm response to a riot by 
the inmates. Siortiy after the inci- 
dent was publicize Dr. Kura- 
towska was summoned to the Inte- 
rior Ministry and given the warning 
that her ho^tal position was in 
jeopardy. 

A first attempt to shut her ward 
came not long after that, in early 
1983. But a petition drive that col- 
lected 6.000 rignatures succeeded 
in postponing the closure. Her in- 
tenave care unit was disbanded in 
the meantime and the beds under 
ber care shrunk from 90 to 30. 







T-« Anseree 

IKAN ANNIVERSARY — Firefighters W^esda.v 
tried to put out a fire started by an Iranian royalist group 
at die Melli Iran in central Frankfurt In Tehran, 
two persons were killed by a greimde explosion and 
police gunfire as Iran marked ^ sixth anniversary of 
the return frwn exile of Ayatollah RuhoUafa Khomeini. 


Mubarak Accuses Israel 
Of Inflexibility on Ties 


By Judith Miller 

Sew York Time* Senice 

CAIRO — Piesideni Hosni Mu- 
barak has accused Israel of not be- 
ing ne.xible enough in the search for 
peace. 

The Egyptian leader also criti- 
cize the Israelis for not withdraw- 
ing immediately fr<»a Lebanon. 

It was Mr. Mubarak's most 
sweepi^ expression of dissatisfac- 
tioa with Israeli policies since SM- 
moo I^res became Israel's prime 
minisia in Septemba. 

Mr. Pbres. speaking Monday in 
Jerusalem, had made his first pub- 
lic criticism of what he described as 
Egypt's failure to respond to his 
efforts to inqjrove rations be- 
tween the riko countries. 

Mr. Mubarak, asked Tuesday to 
coQuneai on those remarks, re- 
plied. “Egypt is also not satisfiol 
wth the efforts ih^ are making to 
solve problems for the sake of 
peace." He did not elaborate. 

In ceqjoose to another question, 
Mr. Mubarak said be expected 
deadlocked o^tiatioos over the 
liny border strip of Taba to resume 
soon. 



Mr. Mubarak will stop in Lon- 
don for talks with Prime Minister 
Margaret Thatcher either before or 
after his visit to the United Slates. 
The Associated Press reported gov- 
emmcni officials in London as say- 
ing Tuesday night. 


WORLD BRIEFS 



Kyprianou Rules Out E^y Eleclioiis 

ATHENS (Reuters) — President Spyros Kyprianou of Cyprus, Tito • 
has come under heaty domestic criticism ova the failure of United 
Nations talks to reunite the island, Wednesday ruled out early ekettons. 

over the issue. , « . « 

The pro-Westem Democratic Rally and the pF0*Soviet Coassmisl^- 
who between them coflunand a majority of votes in the Creek 
paiUamsau have chac|ed Mr. Kyprianou, who was dected m 
five years, with b^ in/lerible in last month’s talb aboot endmg.tbe- 

partition of Cyprus. 

But Mr. Kyprianou, visiting Athens to discuss the breakdown oTihe.. 
talks with Greek leaders, defended his stance at the talks with tiieTudt^. 
Cypriot leader. Rauf Denktaslu in New Yoric and ruled out an eu^ ^ 
“We are not near to elections, ft’s a presidential system in Cypnis.-fae 
told journalists. The two q)posiion parties said Mr. Kyprixacn tivtitildr' 
have agreed to Turkish Cypnot demands to sign a document settingi^V ' 
federal republic. .’db' 


Rep. Crane Joins Anti-CBS Crusade 


RALEIGH. North Carolina (UPI) — Representative Fhil Crav hs 
joined Senator Jesse Helms's conservative crusade to buy control of (Ik 
CBS television network. 

.Mr. Crane, a R^ublican from Iflinois, announced Tuesday that he was 
joininB the campaign because “it is the best conservatives have 
ever had to end the liboal bias in media." Mr. Hdms, a Republicm front 
North Carolina, mailed a million letters to consovatives last meoib 
asking them to buy enot^ stock to end what to called die network’s 
“libe^ onti-Reagiui bias." 

The network's mainnan, Thomas H. Wyman, has called the canqui^ 
a “politiLal game" with little chance of succeeding. "We're not more anti- 
Reagan than NBC or .ABC." to said Tuesday at Duke Univershy in 
Durham, North Carolina. “Complaining about the cover^ you go, or 
about the covaage your opponents get is part of the pditical game." 


French Communist Aftadss Sodalists 


“1 expat soon, but i am asking 
the Israelis to be much more flexi- 
ble;'' he added. 

A Forei^ Ministry official de- 
nied Mr. Peres’s amnion that 
Egypt had not responded to efforts 
to improve ties.' Egypt recently 
made several gestures to try to im- 
prove the political climate, be said. 

For example, be said, Cairo re- 
sponded positively to Israeli re- 
quests for compeiisaiioa for water 
pipes installed m the Sinai during 
its occupation, and for greata help 
for refugees in Canada Camp, near 
the Many of them had lived 

in the divided Sinai city of Rafa. 

E^pt made these decitions tiuee 
or four weeks ago. the official said, 
and conveyed them to the Israeli 
antiMtssador in Cairo. 

Finally, the official said, ^pt 
had permitted Israel to participate 
in the Cairo Book Fair, an annual 
mternational exhibit and sale from 
which Israel w;as haired last year. 

"We have been very fonheom- 
iog,'' the official assert 

On anotba subject, Mr. Mu- 
barak was asked whether he 
thought Israel should keq) some of 
its troops in Lebanon unttl the Leb- 
anese Army was strong enough to 
maintain order. He replied. “I 
think h is not right" 

“The best thing is to withdraw 
completdy to their mternational 
border" be said. "They can defend 
their borda because Israel is not a 
w^ country and can defend itself 
against any ag gressor.'* 

He ur^ that the Lebanese fac- 
tions be left alone “to solve their 
problems independently'.'' 

The Forei^ Ministry official 
said he thought Mr. raes's re- 
nurks were aimed at Wariiingion 
ratha than at Cairo. 

“We see it as something of a plea 
to the Americans to pressure Egyp- 
tian officials into ctiangiiig long- 
held positions.'' the official said. 

Mr. Mubarak is scheduled to 
tnea with P^deni Ronald Rea- 
^ and other senior U.S. officials 
10 Washington eariy next month. 
Foreign Minista Esmat .Abdel Me- 
guid is expected in Washii^ion this 
week to prepare for the risit. 

■ Mubarak to Visit London 


PARIS (Reuters) — Georgies Maxchais, the leader oS the Fre^L- 
Communist ^rty. opened the party’s 25th Congress on Wednesday with 
a deoundatioo of the record of die Sod^isi govommeoL His fivohtw 
speech buried any chance that the leftist aUianoe, broken when the 
Communists left the government last July, ntighi be r^MulL 

Maichais. 64, who has been blamra by reformers for leading ins 
party into decline, said most of the Commuoisls’ difficulties stemmed 
from 25 years of nustaton dfoits to forge an alhanoe with the Socialists. 
He said the Communists had been right to enta the government in 1981 
but also ri^i to leave it tiiree years lata. "In three years, the portion oi 
France has seriously deteriorated," be said. 

Marebais. who has led the party since 1972, traced the pai^s 
dedine to its failure to distance fis^ from the Soriet model and tqito 
its ideas until 1976. However.hergectedc^for the parly to improve its 
public im^ by breaking complemy 'with Moscow. 


Iraq May (^t German Pesticide Gear 

KASSEL West Germany (Reuters) — A West German court Wednes- 
day overturned a government export ban on pesticide plant equipneot 
pr^uced for Iraq afta saying that it could not be used to make poson 
gas. 

The Hesse State Court in Kassd said hs main objection to the ord^ 
was a procedural one — only two ministers signed it in the absaio^' 
their cabinet colleagues duriz^ paitiamenf s summa recess. A deoskn <k 
such sfgmficance could not be taken by a minority of tiie cabinet it ruled. 

But it also said the plant produced by the Frankfurt-based Pilot Rant 
Engin ing and Eqtwmenu was not suitable for {xodudi^ poison gps 
for military purposes. Bono banned exports of chemical plant eq nq Mtagrt 
to Iraq in August follow^ rqxvts that Baghdad was using dimiicid 
weapons in its war against li^ and that a West German-siqiplied 
chemical plant could be adapted to produce pmsoa gas. Iraq denied the 
allegations. 


U.S. Stops Aid for Population Fund 


WASHINGTON (WP) —The U.S. Agency for International Develop- 
meat has decided to posq)^e an allocatitNi of $23 million for the United 
Nations Fund for Population Activities. 

M. Peter MePboson. the agency’s administrator, said he had ordered 
"a careful review" of tto assistance because of concerns expressed about 
China's peculation program by private groups and members of Congress 
and because of recent press arucles on the subject. Otha AID officials 
said the review would probably take sevoal months. 

Questions raised ab^ China's family planmng pixtoam have aj^- 
ently cast doubts witiiin the Reagan adrainistratioa and the Coogtess on 
the UN program os a whole. The population ^nd has provided $50 
anllioD to China for it program from 1980 thre^ 1984. The holdup 
reflects opposilion of the r^t-to-Ufe movement inside Congress as wu 
as last year's shift within the Reagan administration away from UiiT 
governroent support (or population programs. 


For the Record 


The 48di gane of the worU chess dumpioiislBp between the title 
holda. Anat^ Ka^v, and the ctollenger, kas[»rov. has been 
postpemed until Friday because Mr. Kaipov is taking a time-out, Tass 
rafted Wednesday. Mr. Kaipov leads, 5-2, and needs one more vrin to 
retain his title. fAP) 

Turkey denied Wednesday a charge by Greece that its troops croued 
the border and exchanged fire with a Greek patroL A Greek Foreign 
Ministiy statement said three Turks crossed the border and opened fire 
when a^ed by a Greek patrol to turn b^. {Reuters^ 

The bead of die Foreto* Relations Comndssioa in Argentina 's Chamber 
of Deputies, FederiM Storani. who is a memba of President Raul 
Alfonsin's Radical Civic Union Party, said Wethiesday ttoi the govent- 
ment studied the possibility of leasing the disputed Falkland (elands 
to Brilmn if London recognizes Argentine sovereignty. (UPI) 

An imanned Minntecian-S interconticenta] ballistic missile launched 
early Wednesday in an operational test was destroyed over the PadlS.* 
when an anomaly was detected, a U.S. Air Force spokesman at Vanden- 
beig Air Force Bose in California said. The cause of the problem was not 
known and there was no additional infonnatioo, he raid. fdPJ 

Troops of (be Dondnican R^ubBc patrolled the capital of Suto 


Domingo Wednesday after a wave of strikes and violent cUrihes in -witich 
two persons were killed and scores of arrests were made. The violence was 


two persons were killed wd scores of arrests were made. The violence was 
sparked by proids wluch began last week against economre austerity 
measures sought by the International Monetary Fund. (Reuters) 


Recession Slows Settlement of West Bank 



(Cnatimied from Page 1) 

g^g up within easy commuting 
distance of Td Aviv or Jerusalem, 
and the build-your-own-home pro- 
jects. in wtuch anyone with enough 
money can buy a plot of bind from 
the government. 

“There are now very few projects 

li nrtiBfc — !■> !■ ^ J 1 ^ T ^ ..I L. J 


b^onr^" sard Israel Harei, head 
of the Council of Jewish &ule- 
meots, which coordinates the areas' 
activities. ‘*Bul we have some 7J0Q0 
apartments already in the works 
and these diould ^ve us some 
breathing roace for a year or so. 
Only after that will we really have 
to worry." 

The slowdown has affected both 
individual builders and major con- 
tractors, because the government 
has had to cut back spending on 
such basic prefects as roa^, sewer; 
and decirical lines. Moreova, in- 
flation has driven up mortgage 
rates to a pewt where many young 
couples cannot qu^y for Inns. 

West Bank and Gaza Strip set- 
(leis ray tb^ are worried about the 
impUc^ot^ (or iheiT areas. Mr, 
Hard noted that no one worries 



UNIVERSITY 


DB3REE 


R>f Uta. AtatfMlIe 4 «Mfe EmewlMM 

•Oulijy uuvUy Igi 

H*: "FiJRS U«S>EBSOflpOCfOfl*»f 
Sene tleiaMd resumk 
for a (me evaluation 
PACIFIC WESTERN UNIVERSITY 

■6100 iHTi gnemo CAk9M3tUS* 


that, if there is little building in Tel 
A^v for two years, the city will to 
^vea to the Jordanians. The same 
is not true of the West Bank settie- 
mems, he said. 

The settlers, for all their 122 
communities and 35,000 inhatal- 
ants, do worry that the West Bank, 
which Israel sdzed in the 1967 war, 
might be given back one day and 
that they have not yet “creat^ 
enough facts" to prevent it 

Outside the bedroom communi- 
ties near Jerus^em and Tel Aviv, 
many of the West Bank settlements 
still are little more than viUa^, or 
mobile-home parb mth 12 to 20 
families. These are not the kind 
“facts" that m^t block the territo- 
ry’s return. 

That feeling was clearly ex- 
pressed in a recent debate ova set- 
ting up fix new Jewish settiements. 
Wnra the Likud and Labor agreed 
to form a coalition govertunent in 
September, part of the deal was 
that those su communities would 
be bull within a year. 

As some settlement leaders from 
Gtuh Emunim, or Bloc of the 
Faithful, frody acknowledge, there 
is no real need for the new settle- 
ments. In fact their constniction 
would divert much-needed re- 
souFca from weak settlements such 
u Abir Yaacov. Their real purpose 
in pushing for new areas, (toy sav, 
is to test ^ Labor-led govenunent 
and to ensure that the settlement 
movement does not lose momen- 
tum. 


Prime Minister Shimon Petes of 
the Labor Parn. has bera qui- 
etiy allowing the economic crisis to 
freeze settlement building, did not 
oppose the vote on the new seule- 
ments because he knew ihai virtu- 
ally no money was avail^le. 

The money is supposed to come 
largely from the budget of Nissinl^/' 
ZvUi, the Labor-appointed co-'* 
chairman of the settlement com- 
mittee of the Jewi^ Agency, a 
semiofficial body dealing with set- 
tlement and immigration. 

Buu Mr. Zvili said, it would cost 
$12 iniUion to $15 million to build 
six settlements, an amount, to said, 
that would be rou^y 50 pocenl of 
“what he expected his budget to be 
in fiscal year 1985 fa all settle- 
ments in &e West Bank and Gaza. 


“If we are passing tiirough sn 
economic criris,'* he said, "you 
can't go on building new settle- 
ments, especially wl^ there are 
already 500 emp^ apartments on 
the Wki Bank. Umess we get inq|p 
money, we are not going to fiw' 
any or these six settlements. If you 
ask me. every penny being ^lenl on 
new settlements now is a waste of 
fflon^. When settlements that al- 
ready exist are about to collapse, it 
is completely stupid to build new 


Mr. Hard said there were empty 
houses at his settlement. Ofra, but 
that was only because tdwl^c^y 
and socially compatible peoj^ had 
not been found ycL 


if /r.rrli -.r ' 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1985 


Page 3 





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Scholars Attack Reagan Use of Rible to Justify Defense Budget 


By Kaineeh A. Briggs 

Nett York Tima Seniee 
NEW YORK — Several Uteo^ 
pans and biUical sdKdais criti- 
cized Prerident Ronald Reagan’s 
use of Scripture to apperi fw sup- 


out of context and had failed to 
grasp the manner of teaming em- 
fay Jesus. Mam srid the 
pcdnt of the passage had nothing to 
do with militaiy strategy. 

The president referred to Luke 


port for his adminisnatiofi's pro* 14:31-32 in remarics to a Mond^ 
po^ to increase the military md- .gatherum of business leadm at the 
set. White Iteose. Calline for a contm- 


Among the critidsms Tuesday 
were that Mr. Rea^ had taken a 
passage ftom the Goq>d of Luke 


Calling for; 
ued military buildup, Mr. Reagan 
said the stoiy meant dm 'The 
Scriptures are on our ade." 


In the account from Luke, as 
uM by the president, Jesus tells of 
a general finds WttUrif 
10,000 soldiers against an ap* 
prOBcfaing enemy force of 20J)0a 
In the face of such odds, the gen^ 
sues for peace. 

Mr. Reagan thm drew a lesson 
from the passage. "WdL I don’t 
think we evo- want to be in a posi- 
tion of only being half as strong 
and having to send a delation to 


negotiate, under those circum- 
stances, peace terms with the Soviet 
Union." 

Reacting to Mr. Reagan’s re- 
marks. David Adams, prcraisor of 
N^‘ Testament statues at the 
Princeton Theological Sembaiy, 
said: "RTten the merident cates dus 
verse as a prop for adidnistration 
policy, he misuses the BiUe. It is 
not an ansv^er bode but a record ttf 
faith.” 


Reagan Budget Breaks His Campaign Promises 


ENVIRONMENTAL ACCORD — AlaTSTHSht, 
Kit, of the U.S. Nalioiial Oceanic and Atmospheric' 
Ad^nistnition, and Victor G. Boldyrev of AeSoriet 
Unim s Naturai Envinmnient Agrat^ shake haiwh ig 

Washington iriter signing a protocol for ctMiliniied sden- 
hfic cooperation oa climate roeardi tiK two nariAng 

James Hadley Chase, 78 , 
Mystery Writer, Is Dead 




Peitioidftj 

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[ ’Tetnain mdepeadent ; 

i sBcretaiy 10 Leon Trotsl 


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The Aisoeiated Prea 

CORSEAUX, Switzerland — 
James Hadley Oi^ 78, a widely 
read mystery writer, died at his 
hmne here Wednesday* 

A police officer said that he did 
not know the cause of death but 
said that the Bridsh-bom writer 
‘'died in bis bed.” 

Mr. Hadley Chase’s wife, 


Groop Buys Le Madn; 
Paper to Remain Leftist 

T' The Asiodated Prat 

‘PARIS — Claude Fuidtiel, the 
founder oi Le Matin, has an- 
noonced that he is selling a mdor- 
ity holding in the Soculist 
newspaper to a groop cf leftist in- 
vestors headed by Max Thdret, 
owner of a drain ofdiscoimt sUhcs. 

Mr. Perdrid said Tuesdi^ that 
the paper would not efaan^ under 
its new owners. £fe said it would 
*Tietnain independent and of the 
left” and ‘indoendeait of all au- 
thorities.*' Mr. ih&et, 72, was a 
secretary 10 Leon Trot^, the Rus- 
sian Communist psoncer, vriien 
Trotsky lived in France. 


readied at her home by idqihone, 
coofumed that her husband was 
dead but declined fuiiber informa- 
tion. 

“My husband never liked public^ 
ity wnm he was alive and I am not 
go^ to 9 ve it to Urn ixiw," she 
said. 

The coiqsle had been living in 
this wine-growing village above 
Lake Geneva for at least ax yea^ 

Mr. Hadjey Chase was b^ in 
London. His teal name was Ren6 
Brabazon Raymond. He wrote 
more than a 100 bo^ induding: 
“No Orchids for Miss Blandish," 
“Buy Me Dead," "Thi^ Men 
Do" and ''More Deadly Than the 
Mate." 

About thirty of his books were 
turned into mories. 

Late in his literary career, which 
bq^ before World War U, Mr. 
Hadley Chase turned to ^nonage 
novdte, whose hero was a fictitious 
agent of the Central Intdligoice 
Ageni^ named Made Cuirland. 

The bodes were translated into 
many langiMgrs. Some d them 
were pubhshed under other pen 
names, incloding James JL Do- 
cber^ Ambrose Grant and Ray- 
mond Marshall. 


By David Ho^an 

N^shtngm Pnt Semee 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reiman, who benefit^ 
from a wave pf support among 
youi% voters in his rtHdectioD cam- 
paign, was asked in Ocbober at a 
politi^ rally at the University of 
Alabama wnetber he favored more 
federal aid to codqB^ students. 

“Tbere is govenunent bdp now 
for me out <u every two studmts in 
the United States," Mr. Rea^ re- 
plied, "and we haw no intendra of 
redudngthaL" 

Today, however, Mr. Reagan is 
seeking sharp cuts in student aid, a 
limit on the amount per student per 
year and income cediogs for fam- 
ilies to qualify. His budget office 
contend^ this week that there has 
been a ^leoding "binge" m ccdlege 
loans arid grants with a "shotgun 
approach that indiscriminately 
sprayed assistance at students re- 
garrfl^ of income for almost any 
conceivable type of education." 

In this case and many erthers, 
Mr. Reagan has now shifi^ from a 
candidate who extolled many fed- 
eral spending programs uhen run- 
ning for re-dectioD to a president 
asbng Congress to cut or abolish 
the same programs. 

Mr. Reagan did not break any of 
bis 1^ promises oi taxes, Sooal 
Security and ddense roending in 
the budget he sent to Capitol HID 
this week. But he has come a long 
way in a short tune from the reas- 
sunne prouuses of bis campaign, 
that he could reduce the Imdgei 
deficit vrithout cutring other ptditi- 
cal^r popular domestic programs. 

He insisted in ^tember that 
‘Tve can make further budget cots 


without affecting how mudi actual- they're entitled." This we^ he 
ly goes to help the needy." But by prt^wsed a »««»«« test dim would 
his own adrmnistratioD estimatesi, limit free health care to veterans 
programs for the poor win be cuts below certain income levds. 
percent next year. Ibe preadent told the Farm 

Reagan camuimed at the Journal during the eam paign that 
dedication of a BuffalorNewYoik, “withnut he mwld <wn- 

apartmeoi oomlex built with tinue the exlst^ dairy price-sup- 
eral houring aid for the elderly and pM progranL 1ms w^ the ad- 
handic^red, calling it "truly a ministration iwc^osed to oveitaul 
great thii^" Ibis wed:, he pro- cbepro^am. 


posed no funding for the next two 
years for the same federal bousing 
program. 

He acknowledged during the 
campaign that major regions 
m^t be required in Medicare, the 
fedmal prqgram of health care for 
die dd^. But he suggested theK 
revisions wouid be "not in restfki- 
ing the patient” but rather in con- 
troUing payments to ho^tals and 
doctors. 

This week, in addition to prqioS' 
ing limits on payments to docuus 
arid hospitals, be proposed that 
Medicare patients pay somewbat 
more for then care. 

In Oaober, in an interview with 
Scripps-How^ newspaper editms 
and rqwners, the preadent said 
that "we now have budget^ iot 


He sard at the Missouri State 
Fair in August that the Farmers 
Home Admudsuation "will contin- 
ue reaching out to hdp tens of 
thousands of Eann boricwers hold 
ooto their farms and stay in biisi- 
ness.” On a campaign swing 
through Iowa, he boasted that the 
agency bad "doubled its regular 
operating loans for farmers" in his 
first term. 

This week, he prt^iosed maj or 
letreochments in toe propam. 

Beyond all these promises, the 
presideai avoided sayi^ in his 
camprign bow far he mi^ go in 
trimming dooiestic pto^ums in a 
second term. Instead, bmro^g a 
tactic from his 1980 campaign, M 
claimed the budget could be 
trimmed by eliminating waste, 


gCMDg back to purchasing land for fraud and abuse, and then cut prey 
parks." grams after die election was over. 

In bis new budg^ he said there 

will now be a "si^iificant decrease 
in land acquisitioa,” and the ad- 
ministration is propoang "a tiiree- 
year moratorium on discretionary 
acquisitioa of recrealuHi lan^" 

Mr. Reagan never mentioned 
possible ents in veterans' ben^is 
in a speech to the Veterans of Fot- 
eign Wars in AugusL Later in the 
campaign, he saio he would 
veterans the "boiefits to 


The direaor of the Office of 
Management and Budget, David 
A. Stockman. includoTin Senate 
testimony a \*ear ago a list <rf possi- 
ble cuts that foim^ the baubone 
of this wedc's budget. In an inter- 
view with Fortune roagaTtftg 
he mentioned possiUe cuts in farm 
programs, mass tranat and coQ^ 
student loans. He added, "You 
could find several tens ^ InlHons to 
throw o\'erfaoanL" 

But, Mr. Stodeman said at that 
time, "the point is that we Imve 
knocked on all those doors for 
three years and three budget 
rounds. And the lesuh is that pe^ 
pie want to have mass transit subsi- 
dies and middle-class subsidies for 
education. And the agriculture 
sector wants all those benefits. 

"I can’t see any time in this de- 
cade that we will have the kind of 
people in Congress who will abol- 
ish those things, even if it is pl^ 
sopfaically correct to do so." 

This week, Mr. Stodeman has 
been urgii^ Confess to tackle all 
these senritive programs. 

"We have no choice but to pare 
back in a fundamental and far- 
reaching way the built-in commit- 
ments, the bmlt-ia programs that 
are driving the budgn" up, he said. 


The Reverend Richard J. Neu- 
haus, a omservaiive theologian 
who 'is director of the Center of 
Rdigion and Society in New York, 
said, "] think the president wouid 
be well-advised to make the argu- 
ment f(v his military butto iSad 
straiq^ on the buis of public 
reasoning rather than invdui^ du- 
Uous biblical authority.” 

Both liberal and omservaiive 
duirdi scbolats assailed the presi- 
dent's effort to give scriptural war- 
rant to his milHary pdi^. Many 
warned against the practice of ex- 
tracting smgle verses of the Bible to 
buttress pMtical policies. 

Most of the schdars said the use 
of a military example was intended 
to serve a larger principle, the high 
personal cost of serving Jesus. In 
other sections of the diapter, Jesus 
em phariget the aama point bj’ 
drawing on other scenes from ev- 
eryday ule. Such p^bles. many of 

tMm crwilaining hidd^ mmming , 

were dlen utilinsd by Jesus to in- 
struct his followers. 

In the dupler from whidi Mr. 
Reagan drew his source, scriptural 
sdxdan triddy agree that the main 
teaching here is underscored in the 
verse immediately following the 
passage dted by Mr. Reagan. 

"So, theiefme,” Jesus says as re- 
corded in the Revised Standard 
Vergm, "vriioever of you does not 
renounce all that be canno t be 
my disciple.” 

Tbe Reverend .Arie Brouwer, 
secrelaiy of the National 
icfl of Cburcbes. said Mr. Rea- 
gan had taken the passage "com- 
pkiely out of context” He added, 
"Read in its context, it is uoi at all a 
siaiement that craild be u^ to 
confiim an emphasis on min tary 
migbL That woiud be conqrleiety in 
con^t with the whole tenor of 
Jesns's teaching to suggest relying 
on nnlitaiy might." 


"li was a call to prudence rather 
than to power,” be said. "Jesus was 
saying to die people coming to him 
in great numbers, ’Have you conr 
sideied carduUy what it means to 
gnnwnit youTsdf in this wayT ” 

The Reverend Robert P. Dugan 
Jr. erf the National Association of 
Evangelicals, said the passage 
stresses "personal discipleship” 
and counsra preparation before 
talcing cn a total lue dedaon. 

Donald 9iijver. president of the 
Union Theological Semiiia^ in 
New York, said the verses dealt not 
with militaiy strategy but with "the 
need to bepiepared for ^lat you 
say you will do.” 

Mr. Adams said the passage "ad- 
vocates s^-exaznination on the 
part (rf Jesus’s followers, not inili- 
parity as a condition for uego- 
liatioo.” 


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Army Colonel Disputes 
Westmoreland Figures 


■ADVERTISEMENT' 


COUNCIL OF EUROPE 


51>mMr I9» 


CONSEIL DE UEUROPE 


Dk.336) 


rri 






< oi ^ 



PARLIAMENTARY ASSEMBLY 
WRITTEN DECLARATTON N» 123 
ON ABUSE OF HUMAN RIGHTS IN IRAN 



The undersigned membees of tbe Assembly, 

1. Pemizbed by the coodnuii^ abuse of human p^us in Iran; 

2. Appalled aciqioits of anesc,coRuie and execution of polia'cal 
opponents of tbe rqgirne tesuldrig in 40,000 execudoos and 120^000 
pdiriod pnsoners since June 20, 1981; 

Concaned at die violation of hutnan lights of natinngl god 
leligioiis minorides; 

4. Having xq^id CO cbc list published by the Mojahedin 
Organizadon of lOJOO pdlidcal opponents killed bf die regime, 
intLding many ptqgnanc women a^ under-18 youth; 

5. Nodiig die grav e oonsequenoes of the lian-ltaq conflict 
which has alteady cost the lives trf hundreds of riwuMivIg of people in 
bodi counedes, and has tesuked in tbe inoeasir^ destruction m the 
economics of both Izan and Itaq; 

d Nodqg the constant dura of the spread ci tbe conflia to 
countries of the iqgion and die instabtlicy to die ^obal peace 

to the w wfimiafinn and escaladon of die Iran-liaq conflict, 
a) Deplore the Khomeini iqgiine’s condnuing policy of 
abux of human rights in Iran and voice the s t rongest 
protest ^gaihsc die tieptessive measures of the 
Kbomdiii iq^ne; 

Welcomeanyinidadve to restore peace between Iran and 
Iraq a&id support to the Written Dedaiadon rP li(^ 
May 10, 1964, of die European Council Assembly, 
and the peace plan ^ tbe National Council of Resiscance' 
Rajavi’s Dedaodon of Match 13, 1983: 
r) Stmgly urge the undercaldiw of every poss^ stq> in 
securing an end to the abuse m human dghrs io Icm, and 
in «-roMi*iiing 8 ceasefire to tbe lian-I^ omfUct, via 
every ^ypn^niace means, induding by recommendadons 
to the United Nations Organiza^ and the Bimpean 
Goomiunity. 

fW efB^M dUgatmr, Sec.). Aknmt (pmidett, ParBjmmtMj 
brCnoK^^&n - ^ 


lirimfV C3mr. d Pcaue a it Cm., SPP, IT. Gtmaxj), 


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By M.A Farber 

N ew York Times Seniee 

NEW YORK — Cdood Donald 
W. Blascak. a U.S. Army intelli- 
genoe officer who Is still on active 
duty, testified that be believed 
General William C. Westmoreland 
imposed a ceiling on enemy 
strength estimates in Vietnam in 
1967 that led to a "corrupt” rqxirl 
for Ptesident London B. Jobn^ 

At Genera] Westnioieix(urs Ubd 
trial ^amst CBS in U.S. District 
Court m Manhattan. Cedond BU^ 
cak said Tuesday tiut the '23-pas^ 
report riiould nave put enemy 
strength at 50(X000 to 600J)00, 
twice what it rmovted, and shouU 
have included me Vieicoiig’s sdf- 
defense fttces. 

David Boies, a lawyer for CBS, 
read the cdlonel a sdtmice fnnn 
the rqiort that said "current evi- 
dence does not enable os to esti- 
mate the present size" of self-de- 
fose forces. 

"Is that a true statement, rii?" 
Mr. Boies asked. 

“No, it is not," replied Coiond 
Blascak. "It’s a very carefully pack- 
aged lie" 

David M. Dorsen, a lawyer for 
General WesUnmdaisd. les^ to 
his feet, otgecung. The answer was 
ordered suideen ^ Judge Pierre N. 
LevaL 

In 1967, Colonel Blascak was on 
tenqiorary assignment to the ^fiet- 
affairs staff of the Central 
Intdligeoce Agency, vdiere he met 
Samuel A Adams, a CIA analyst 
who is now a defen dant in the case. 

On Tuesday, Mr. Boies asked the 
cerfond vdwtber, at the time, he had 
discussed with Mr. Adams his fed- 
ings about the estimate for the 
White House of Craununist troop 
strength. 

Cdond Blascak said he told Mr. 
Adams that "at the very UghM 
level" of the milicaty cranmand in 
Saigon "tbere had to have been a 
cemog placed on tbe numben." 

"1 bdieve and 1 urfd Sam Adams 
that I fdt General Westnmdand 
had placed a ceOing on the figures 
and would ntx allow his analysts to 
raise the estimate higher than tha t 
figure," he said. 

General Westmoreland was 
MMnmanriw of U.S. foices in Viet- 
nam from 1964 to 1968. His SI20- 
million suit was prompted by a 
1982 CBS Rqiorts docomentary. 


Adams, ydio left the CIA in 1973, 
was a paid consuliaoL 

The documoitaiy asserted that, 
for political and public relations 
reastms intended to show thai tbe 
^fietnam War was being won, the 
generaTs command en^geri in a 
“ctmsiMracy” in 1967 to understate 
the size and nature of the North 
Vietnamese and Vieteexw forces. 

Over the objectiems ot tiie CIA, 
the program said. General West- 
moreland bad set an "arlxtraiy 
ceiling" of 301X000 on reports of 
enemy size, mainly Iqr removing the 
Vietoonj^s sdf-defense forces from 
the official listing of enemy 
strength known as the order of bat- 
tle and insisting that a current 
number for them not be included in 
tbe report for the preadenL 

General Wesimmrdand testified 
ffl November that he ddeied the 
Vietcrag's sdf-defense forces b^ 
cause he bdieved they pos^ no 
offensive threat and could not be 
counted accuratdy, and 
their inclusion in the order (rf battle 
at a lugih number would nusl^ 
WashtngoQ and tbe press about 
the real might of t^ enemy. 

Those forces had been luiwiy es- 
timated in 1967 at 120,000 — an 
increase oa paper, if not in the 
field, of SOjOOO. 

Coload Bbscak, who has served 
28 years in the anqy, is now the 
senior intdligenoe offim for V 
Corps, stationed in Frankfuro 
■ Hunt Loses Ubd Case 

A federal jury on Wednesday de- 
nied damages to E Howard Hunt 
in (he retrial of a 19^ libd suit he 
filed over an article simgesting that 
be had oonmred in toe assassina- 
don of Preadent John F. Kennetfy, 
The Associated Press reported. 

Pour years ago, a jury awarded 
Mr. Hunt S100;000 in <nnpmsa- 
damages and S5S0JXK) in pu- 
nitive rifliTMgps^ txit an app^ 
court ovaturoed tbe verdet, dtmg 
flawed jury instructiens. 

Tbe jury m the seemd trial de- 
cided that Mr. Hunt was not libded 
by an article in spotlight, a pubti- 
calicm of the far-n^t Liberty Ixib- 
by. 

He qient 33 months in prison for 
con^iracy, buzglaiy and wiretap- 
ping m the Waterg^ case. 


"Tbe Uncounted Enemy: A Viet- AflWI Aslfg IIN 
nam Deception," for wbii± Mr. ^ 


Goetz Pleads Not Guil^ 
To m^al Anns Obai^ 

UaUeA Press Imenattienal 

NEW YORK —Bonhaid Goetz 
pleaded not guilty Wednesday to 
weapons phai^ « and a Man- 
hattan judge ordered bis bail re- 
duced from SSOJXX) to $5,000 be- 
cause an atlempied-miirder charge 
has been drcqifm. 

Mr. Goetz is charged mth 
sessioD of an unlicen^ loadeapis- 
loX a felony, when be shot and 
wounded four yom^ men who 
asked him f^or $5 on a subway train 
Dec. 21 He also faces two misde- 
meanor counts of having two un- 
loaded pistols in his apartmenL 
Meanwlme, another of the four 
men shot ^ Mr. Goetz, Trey 
Cany, has ffled a S5-imllioo suit 
afi^ng that Mr. Goetz shot him 
"witiumi just cause or provoca- 
tion." 


To Act on Hostage 

The Assadated Press 

ROME — The man vriio riiot 
P(^ John Paul n in 1981, Mefamet 
All Agca, called Wednesday for 
Secretary-General Javier Pkrez de 
Cuiflar of the United Nations to 
help free the teen-age duighta* of a 
Vatican messenger from kidn^ 
pers who want to aarfiang p herfm 
Mr. Agca. 

"I the secretaiy-general of 
tile UniiM Nations, Pro de CuS- 
lar, to mtervene to the uncondi- 
tional liberation of the young 
Emanuda Oriandi," Mr. Agca said 
in a letter sent to the Italian news 
agency, ANSA 

Mr. ^pa is servii^ a Ufe sen- 
tence in an lialim prison to at- 
tempting to kill the pope, Or- 
lanoi was kidnai^ in June 1983. 
UN intervoition would be a si^f. 
leant act in the "Year of the 
Young" that the United Nations is 
pnxnoting, Mr. Agca sud. 


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Page 4 


Overnight, a Refugee ^City’ Springs Up in Eastern Sudan 


By Jonathan C Randal 

Washingun Fat Stnke 

WAD KOWU, Sudan — Six 
weeks ago, Wad Kondi was a river 
bank overgrown mth grass 
known for miles around as a favor- 
ite watering bole for thousands of 
cattle. Today, Wad Kowli is Su- 
dan’s fastest gcowingdty, amrawl- 
ing unplanned maze races a 
multitude of major problems, in- 
duding lack of food, water and 
medidne as well as a danger of 
disease, flood and Hie. 

. %Doe Dec. 10, when the fust 
'10,000 rdugees from Eihi(^’s 
droi^t-stricken Hgre ftovince ar- 
rivea on foot, more than 70,000 
have foUowd, bearing to find food 
and medical care until tl^ rains 
finally come in EUiir^ia and they 
can ^ home. Many parts of Tigre 
Pnmoce have had dronght condi- 
doos for three to four years. 

A total of 127 JXX) rdugees have 


arrived in Sudan from Ethiopia 
since October and relief woti^ 
have estimated that ^,000 may be 
here by the end of March. 

Late last month, there was talk 
among relief ofEci^ from the 
danese governmenL the United 
Nations Commissioner for 
Refugees and various private relief 
agencies that the numbers had fi- 
nally stabilized. 

Arrivals had eased from as high 
as 3,000 a day to 600, then 20 and 
84 on successive ^ys early last 
weeL But then on one day, a record 
4,320 arrived. Some of them had 
been on tbe mardi for three weeks, 
some for much longer. 

In tbe Sudanese capital of Khar- 
toum, a relief official of the anti- 
government Tigrean Petmle's Lib- 
eration Front estimated that '^1,300 
are starving to death every day 
among tbe 6 million to 7 milli on 
pet^le" he maj ntainefl are under 


the control of the guerrilla front 
and its allies in Elhu^ The insur- 
gents have bm fighting tbe Ethitv 
pian gpvenuDent for a decade. 

Tekk Woin Assefu of tbe Relief 
Society for Tigre (REST), an arm 
the insurgent movement that is 
omanizing the exodus of refugees, 
samT^IfM had proper transporta- 
tion, eveiyone would come out" 
Osman Meki of the Sudanese 
Commission of Refugees and 
Western idief workers do not like 
to think about those numbers. 
They keep revising their estimates, 
stiU hewing that Wad Kowli will 
not exceed 100,000 people. 

The daily routine here begins af- 
ter dait, vriien the refugees, who 
have been fed by REST at regular 
intervals along the line of march, 
walk the last 8 ndles (13 kilometers) 
in from tbe border, to avmd tbe 
afternoon heat Lined up in disci- 
plined rows by village, mth men in 


Russiaa Reportedly Expelled in Indian Spy Investigation 


The AssoeiaaJ Frees 
NEW DELHI — Inrii.m news- 
papere said Wednesday that a Sovi- 
et citizen, an East Goman diplo- 
mat and a Polish diplomat have 
been expdied in connection with 
an invesiigation into an allied spy 
ring. 

The government refused to con- 
Hrm or deny the reports. 


Tbe Express newspaper said a 
‘‘Soviet national attached to the 
U.S.S.R. Embas^ m New Delhi" 
was expelled. It did not identify the 
person. 

Vladimir N. Thatsyne, a spokes- 
man for tbe Soviet ^bassy, said, 
‘'There are no grounds whatsoever 
behind the aH^ations of Soviet in- 
votvemenL" The Express and otba 


major newspapers also reported 
that the Polisfa and East German 
diplomats had been expelled in 
connection with a oontmuing in- 
vestigation into alleged spyii% ac- 
tivities. 

Nearly 20 people have been ar- 
rested in recent vndts on suspicion 
of spying. 


one line and women and children in 
another, tbe newcomen are count- 
ed. 

Tbe next morm^ the)' are re^ 
tered, issued identity ca^ and de- 
loused 10 prevent outbreaks of Q- 
pbus. Tbtrir i^dren are vaccinal^ 
and sent for special feeding. 

Responsibilipf for distributing 
the food remains with the villas 
elders. This is to encourage cohe- 
sion and maintain thc rc^pcct for 
hierarchy that remains typically 
Ethiopian despite 10 years of revo- 
lution and upheaval. 

As the refugees are organized. 
Wad Kowli is taking on many of 
tbe attributes of a medium-sized 
dty, albeit one without plumbing, 
electricity or other hallmaiks of 
civilization. A hospital run by the 
French relief orgamzatitm Mhde- 
cins Sans Fronliires (Doctors 
Without Borders), is about to start 
operating so the group's two doc- 
tors and four nurses wiD no longer 
have to treat patients under tbe 
trees. 

Tbe International Rescue Com- 
mittee is organizing public sanita- 
tion and teaching 120 home visitors 
to instnicL refugees about hygiene. 
Four more chOdrea's feeding sta- 
tions are about to gp up to join tbe 
ori^nal twa A nanl warehouse 
was erected with Norw^an aid in 
two days. 

The major concern is water. The 
first refugees chose this rite because 


the Aibara River still had some 
nimiing water, but American spe- 
dalists recently estimated that tbe 
now stagnant, isolated pools will be 
exhausted in four to 10 weeks. 

So acute is the water shortage 
that some relief workers are having 
second ttougbts about the 10 re- 
cently installed U.S. Army inflat- 
able water tanks each capable of 
bolding 1I.S00 quarts and each 
equipp^ with a row of 10 faucets. 

“fi^ore thc refugees had to fetch 
water from the river," a retief work- 
er said. "Now they just turn on the 
s|Hgoi and waste a Iol" 

A team from Britain's Oxfam re- 
lief society is due to arrive shortly 
to look for more a^ier. No cme here 
likes to think what wili happen if 
none is found. 

A l^k of water, however, could 
turn into Gooding if the Atbara fills 
up as il uaai to do before the 
drou^t here and in Elhiopb start- 
ed three years ago. If gi^ rains 
come, the camp could be at least 
parti^y under water by June or 
July. 

De^te problems with thc site, 
the Sudanese govenvmeni has polit- 
ical reasons for keeping the refu- 
gees here. 

The refu^ are on the side of 
the Atbara River nearest to the 
Ethiopian bMder. And the Suda- 
nese government, while willing to 
accept refugees, prefers to keep 
them as ett^ lo its frontiers as 
pottible. That way. they provoke a 


minimuni of friction with Sudanese 
citizens and are less tempted to stay 
than if they were moved farther 
from the border. 

So. despite all the lucenainties. 
the relief organizations are pro- 
c^ng as if extra water is sure to 
be found. 

Although the Sudanese govern- 
ment maintains that the refugees 
should leave by May. plans &ve 
been made to keep the camp open 
for at least a year. The rains wfll not 
come in Tigre before late spring if 
they are on time and those remam- 
ing in Tigre will not harvest the 
crops until November. Only then 
could tbe refugees be^ tiie long 
trek home. 

Day by day. the relief workers 
are getting Wad Kowli more orga- 
Tuzed to cope with the flood of 
refugees. Fo^ supplies have im- 
pro^ recently after shortages at 
first caused undersized rations. 

StilL at daw-D when the camp 
stirs, the burial parties gather up 
the dead on rudimentary stretchers 
and take them to the cemetery. Ev- 
ery night the refugees sing thdr 
dirges as tbe death rate has doubled 
to 20 in just a weeL 

If the rate falls, then perhaps 
some village elders will stop threat- 
ening to march their flock back 
home. Some have argued that the 
promised food is nowhere to be 
seen and that they would rather die 
at home. 



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Two refugee children arrive at the Wad Kowli ran^p j- 
eastern Sudan aftn* fleeing famine and war in 


John Paul Ends Latin America Tour, 
Repeating His Comnutment to Poor 


By EJ. Dionne 

.Vo» r<vi 77mer Sen-ice 

PORT OF SPAIN. Trinidad — 
Pope John Paul n clc^ his South 
American tour on Tuesday night 
after a day of travel from the slums 
of Lima to an Amazonjungle town 
in Peru and fmally to this prospCT- 
ou5 and temperale Caribbean is- 
land. 

The pope celebrated Mass here 
Tuesday night and gave the 4Sth 
and address of & 12-day trip 
before flying back to the Vatican, 
where be arrived Wednesday morn- 
ing. 

John Paul continued Tuesday to 
shift back and forth between mes- 
sages of consolation to the poor 
and calls for |reater church disci- 
pline, r^pecL tor church authority 
and avoidance of doctrines that he 


sees as contrary to Roman Catholic 
teaching. 

Having spent much of his Peru- 
vian journey calling on Catholics to 
avoid theologies auen to the faith 
— a series of addresses seen as 
critical of certain aspects of libera- 
tion theology — John Paul re- 
turned Tuesday to the themes of 
conunitment to the impoverished. 

In the morning, he visited the 
Lima slum of Villa el Salvador, the 
scene of active orgaiuzing by Chris- 
tian "base communities," some of 
them leftist There he reiterated his 
support for the church's rde as an 
advocate the poor and praised 
the work of the communities. 

"Never cease denouncing iiyus- 
tice," tbe pope declared to the 
crowrd. 

He also made a rare reference to 


The I^ubUc of Trinidad and 
Tobago is the one countiy that die 
pope visited on his trip t^i is not 
pr^minantly Roman Cathrfje 
Its popu^tioQ of about 1 miUMm 
people is roughly 36 percent Catho- 
lic, 23 percent Hindu, 13 peroal 
Protestant and 6 percent Modern. 

Racially, tbe island is dirided 
almost equally between East Indi- 
ans and blacte with about 14 per- 
cent consisting of people ^ moced 
race. 

In his arrival speech, the 
praised the island's pi 

"I wanttoteUyouofmyadmirar 
tion for the way in which people of 
different races, reli^mis ^ tradi- 
tions live towtber in harmcaiy in 
your countiy, he said. 

"While so places in tbe 
world suffer iragic caiiflicls due to 


pjLKi''-- 

Bui 


K^uPioDAjfwrrN 

BUSUCSSPEORE 

AFPEARNG WBINSMy 
ANDHKMTINTHEHT 




////( 


ABU DHABI NATIONAL OIL COMPANY 

ASNOC is one of the najor oil cco^aiiies in tbe Middle East controllii^ 
the Exploration, Production and Processing of Oil, Gas and Associated 
Products in Abu Dhabi. 

The Cemipany wishes to appoint a nunber of eiq^eriaKed professionals in 
its Exploration ^ Production Directorate as follows : 

SENIOR GEOLX)GIST 

Responsible for the preparation of all kinds of sub-surface geological maps on local and 
regional scales. Prepares evaluation reports on prospective exploratory areas using ail 
available geological and geophysical data He should also be able to prepare and evaluate 
exploration and development programmes and prepare technical reports on the proposed 
locations. 

The candidate should have a aSc. in Geology with a minimum of 8 years experience in 
Petroleum Geology and Log interpretation. Knowledge of Computer applications in 
Petroleum Geology is preferabla 

SENIOR GEOPHYSICIST 

Responsible for interpreting seismic information, preparing technical reports and providing 
recommendations.-He will also be responsible for establishing the parameters for field data 
acquisition (Land and Marine). 

‘ The candidate should have a asc. in Geology and Geophysics with a minimum of 8 years 

experience in the field of seismic prospecting. 

GEOPHYSICIST 

Assists in interpreting seismic results and controlling field data acquisition (Land and 
Marine). 

The candidate should have a aSa in Geology and Geophysics with a minimum of 5 years 
experience with Companies active in the field of seismic prospecting. 

SURVEYOR 

Assists in general surveying and control on surveying jobs conducted by Contractors He 
should be able to use modem surveying instruments (theodolites, levelling instruments 
eta), and: ' 

w Assist in establishing permanent geodetic control in remote areas. 

it Assist in programming and computing triangulation points and general geodetic data 

* Plan well locations and Indicate some of old drilled well locationa 

The candidate should have High School education and a Diploma In Surveying (at least one 
year duration) from a recognized Institute plus a minimum of 5 years experience with 
Companies active in the field of oil prosp^lng. 

Good knowledge of English and Arabic Is required, for these jobs. 

These appointments are based In Abu Dhabi city, working on an off-shore concession areas. 

ADNOC benefits Include a competitive tax-free remuneration, good career prospects, free medical 
cars, free family accommodation, furniture allowance, paid home leave for the family and 
educational assistance for eligible children. ' 

lulu®!'!**' candidates are invited to forwatd their d^ied applications, together with photocopies of 
their education and experience certificates, within three weeks from the date hereof to: 

EMPLOYMENT DIVISION MANAGER 
PEr,SONNEL DiRECnORATE 
ADNOC 
P-0. BOX 898 
ABU DHABI UAE. 



m 


ver expanding 
in the middie East 

SODEXHO, an international service company specia- 
lized in catering and maintenanca is looking for two 
senior executives : 

□ Area safes manager 

Applicants should be fluent in English previous 
successful sales experience — in commerciai acti- 
vity — is r^uired. MBA or equivalent degree and 
other foreign languages are an advantage. 

(RSh ASM) 

□ Maintenance manager 

Applicants should be fluent in English at least 
5 years experience in general maintenance along 
with technical certificates. Arabic a plus. 

Should be capable to manage the existing opera- 
tions and to actively participate' in Bid preparation, 
sales and follow up of new operations. 

(R8f. MM) 

Attractive salary + fringe benefit 
offered. 


fnnmism. asking ihe people of Vil- .. 

la el SaNador to Bghi "the “BO“y “d prqodica you are a 
mentality of manhmnn ^ihiai “ex- added *Tfouf 

ploits women.'’ fraternal understandug makes 

TTic pope spent about an hour P^^^***^ cooperation 1»- 

later Tuesday in Iquiios. a urwn groups, and 


dav m 

carved out of the Amazon iungie. 

There, ^eeted with a Bamboo 
carpel instead of a red one. he gave 


this CDoperaiioh is miitualJyeziridt' 
ing." . . 

Later, at an open air Mass, he 


his unequivocal support to tbe warned young people against matB- 
who be said had .riaIlsni.pTeiiiaiita] sexual rdaiioos. 


S 


requested to send handwritten 
application + C.V. to T. GARCIA, 
Personnel Manager - ABBAR & 
ZAiNY - SODEXHO - PO Box 
41491 - RIYADH 11521 - SAUDI 
ARASiA. 


m 

SODEXHO 


SCI TEX develops, monufbefures 

a ond markets sophistioofed 

turnkey computer systems for 
printing, publishing and 
CAD/CAM opplicotions. 

L The company is continuously 

broodenlng its reputation as on 
Innovotive leoder in computer 
Imaging technology venturing 
Into new areas of business and 
launching new product lines. 

An ambitious marketing program enabled us to 
achieve o considerable growth rate over many 
year's. To sustain this momentum we are looking for 
a high-level marketing professional to take up the 
position of (m/f) 

ADVANCED PRODUa 
PLANNING MANAGER 

otour Europeon headquarters in Brussels. 

The successful candidote will 
• form an important link between our R 8t D 
resources and the market place in terms of 
strategic planning; 

• come from a high-tech environment with a 
sucessful frock record in marketing high-value 
capital equipment; his experience or exposure In 
the printing or publishing industries will be 
considered an odvanfoge; 

• he will hoveo technicol education and possess a 
post-groduote business qualification; 

• be fluent in English ondoneortwo other maior 

European languages. 

The remunerotion package will be in line with the 
level of responsibilities. 

Condidates should submit their handwritten 
application and detoiled cv. to 
Universal Communication (Ref. RM/027), 
chQussw de La Huipe 12Z lOSO Brussels. 


claims of ladians 
been defrauded of Ihdr land. 

‘'From time imnieiiiin ial 
were oa these lands,*’ J(^ 
void a crowd ai tbe airport, "but 
you were tbe victims of the gnxd of 
the last arrivals who thratened 
your reserves, knowing that you did 
not have written title to your 
lands." 

He urged that tbe Indians be 
given the land titles be said they 
deserved 


abonioQ. dni^ and aloAol — a 
frequent theme on his trip. 

Tbe Mass, in a seaside stadhun, 
was punctuated by rfaylbrak chants 
and steel-drum bud musk. 

Earlier in his trip, the pope visit- 
ed Venezuela and Ecuador. - 


"HT- 


11.5. to Abstain on Vote 
frem a tambeo pi..- Over Loan to Santiago 


form m swdiering heaL be also told 
the Indians that they must not 
"close themselves off from others." 

"Open the doors to those who 
come to you with a message of 
pea c e and are disposed to help 
you." the pope said, urging tbe In- 
dians to acc^i Christian mission- 
aries. 

The pope also urged tbe Peruvi- 
an authorities to do more on behalf 
of the ladians. He asked the au- 
thorities to support "more ade- 
quate” l^slatioD that would pro- 
tect the Indians from "the abuses" 
they had suffered. 

Then the pope flew to Trinidad, 
an island made rich by oil. but 
troubled by the recent drop in oil 
prices. 


Neiv Tarfc Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — Tbe United 
Slates intends to abstain when tbe; 
Inter-American Development 
Bank votes this week on a $130- 
million loan lo Chile, partly in pro- 
test of Chilean humaa rights viola- 
lions, Reagan administration and 
congressiomd officials said Tues- 
day. 

. Tbe vote would be the first tune 
that the Reagan administration has 
acted to protest tbe h uman ri^ts 
situation in Cliile. where on ^Dir- 
day a military state of si^ was k 
extended for three nxmilu. 
ministration official said, "We/elt 
|t was time to send a signal," add- 
ing that the ex tension of tbe state of 
seige was "the main calaiysL" 



WF 

WANT 

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Our passengers did aU ot the above and we 
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It gives more. 

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If you want to know how mudi nicer bu^iess^ 
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‘ - -'i to 


In Korea’s Election, 
The 2 Key Politicians 
Are Not on the BaUot 


CSTERNATIONAL HERALP TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 19B5 


Pages 


John Bu^ess 

mg^Pou^Tfut 

SEOUL — FoUowii^ a 2D-dav 
c wnipaig a conducted amid bitter 
cold and dose government regula- 
tion, South Koi^ voters will elen 
a new National Assembly next 
Tuesd^. 

In maiqr leqrects, the vote is 
diainim up as a test erf two men 
who wffl n(X be on the ballot, Presi- 
dat Chun Doo Hwan and the dis- 
«.^at erule, Kim Dae Jung. 

Chu n , a former Army gener- 
aL is determined to see an orderly 
campaign and vote that will dec^ 
onstrateiK^ular siroort and polit- 
ical stabdity in his ^ year of rule. 

But Mr. Kim, who is ex p e c ted to 
return to South Korea four days 
before the Feb. 12 voting, has dif- 
ferent plans. He appears to hem it 
^ b^ propdimg 1 ^ the 
opposition to prominence. 

Mr. Kim’s return has presented a 
dilemma for the president — 
whether to arrest him a^ risk a 
popular reaction or to let him circu- 
late and h<^ that people foigel 
about him. The government has 
saU it does not plan to arrest Mr. 
Kim upon his return. 

Many membm of the t^pod- 
hm distrust Mr. Kim, but 
irjHt seem to wetccane ^ reuira as 
a means of ^ving focus to anti- 
Chun sentiments and lifting their 
ca^’s spirits. 

Thus, some anal^ts see tuibu- 
lent limes ahead in &>u th Korea, an 
important Lr.S. aOy. ‘’When Kim 
Dae Jung is back in the country,” a 
Western diplomat said, ^tension is 
going to be higher.” 

Mudi could depend on whether 
the ^position succeeds in mobiliz- 
ing &nith Korea's student pecula- 
tion, tradltionaSy a potent force in 
politics but now relad^y quiet 

Bui other analysts, ineinHing 
many in the government argue that 


Mr. Kim is a has-been, an oppm^ 
tunist who has tittle slanoing 
anmttg the public and wffl have 
cmly a marginal inpaci. He is dan- 
gerous, they say. not due to his 
popularity but to an aUeged will- 
uiguess to use any mwme to g**" 
power. 

There is little expectation diat 
the deciion results will affect the 
preadent’s grip an j^tics ber& 
‘This is not a contention for pow- 
er,” said Lee Jong Ryod, qp^es- 
man for the ruling Deioocintic Jus- 
tice Party. “This u a contention for 
control of die National AssemUy.” 

Power in South Korea rests not 
there but in the Blue Hou^ as tte 
presideotia] mansion is known. Mr, 
Chun is only halfway thitaigb a 
term that runs until 1988, when he 
ha^ledged to step down. 

The campiaign formally began in 
late Januaiy. By Western stan- 
dards, it is not free. Although Chun 
has loosened sane controls. IS of 
the <mx>sition's senior leadm re- 
main Ivmrwt front any participa- 
tion in pditics, die press is con- 
trolled and p^oe agents loiter 
conspicuously outside dii^dents' 
ofnees. 

Gmtrols extend to the minute 
details of the campaign. Recently, 
the government reportedly 
that posters cannot allude to any 
association a candi^te may have 
had with a banned poliiiriao. Slo- 
gans deemed too iniummatory are 
not allowed. 

The government maintains that 
such contn^ are aeoessaiy to brii^ 
order to an inbemtly cHaotic pq- 
liticai scene and rein in ”uTespc^- 
ble” and ‘'’demagopc” pt^udans 
who are prone to committing elec- 
tion frand. 

The threat from North Korea, 
government c^idals argue, makes 
the speedy introduction of full 
demomtic freedoms inqxssible. 



Hanoi Seeks Better Ties With Beijing 


fim Dae Jung, the South Km^an onMmtkn leadmr, at a fuiess conferoice in Wasfaii^tOD 
befeve his denature for Kmea. At Im is Robert White, a fdnner U.S, ambassador to El 
Salvador who wiD be one of sereral Americans to accompany Mr. Kim as a security dddd. 


But many disrident leaders see the 
controls as a means of preserving 
power for Mr. Chun. 

In an interview last wedc, Kim 
Young Sa^ a fenroer qmosition 
party jxesid^t, diarg^ that the 
government is committing cam- 
paign improprieties. He said it ex- 
ceeds spending b'miiations, uses 
police and otb^ ofDcials to gather 
votes and liidts rallies to limes 
«hen attendance is sure to be low. 

"Seats in the National Assembly 
are not important,” be said "What 
is impmlant is to tell the citizens 
the truth and fight the present re- 
gime.” 

Mr. Chun came to power in 1980 
in a miUtary coim. He was dected 
president the following year under 
a constitution drafted with the su- 
pervision (rf his party, wUch con- 


trds SS percent of the National 
Assembly seats. It is gpierally be- 
Ueved that Mr. Chim'^ Democratic 
Justice ParQr wQ) retain about that 
number of seats. 

In its campaign, the ruling party 
is stressing the relative calm (rf the 
past four years and South Kmea’s 
continuing economic growth, 
wtUdi was about 8 percent last 
year. 

Of^xisi tioo candidates are focus- 
ing on conUnuiDg limiiations on 
draocratic freedi^ and on Mr. 
Chun, whose legitimacy as piesi- 
deni many never have recogiuzed. 

In paroeular. they demand that 
the amsilmdon be animderi to al- 
low dired dection <rf the p^denL 
Under the current OTStem. it is 
I 9 an dectoral college with more 
than 5,000 membeis, wtaidi 


DOONESBURY 

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DishtMhf 

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mainiain 15 Open to manipulation 
by the rulii% pa^. 

The opposilioD continues to 

have trOObte in nmintaintng nnhy, 
however. 'Ihere are csneni^ three 
parties arrayed against Mr. Giun’s 
.party. 

The most dynamic of the three is 
the New Korea Democratic Phny. 
formed test month in Seoul after 
Mr. Chun lifted bans on M politi- 
daos. The party is commonly be- 
lieved to represent Kim Dde Jun| 
and Kim Young S^ although nf 
ther bolds fonnal of^ in IL 

Kim Dae Jung has spent the past 
two years in the Unitra Stales, f<rf- 
lomng his release for medical rea- 
sons in 1982 from a South Korean 
prison, where he was serving a 20 - 
year sentence after being convicted 
(rf sedititm by a militaiy court 

For the present, the bte question 
is how the goyerninent wm respe^ 
«dwn he arrives here Friday with 
about 20 synmathetic Americans 
and crowds of fordgn journalists. 

World interest has been aroused 
by parall^ between Mr. Kim and 
the PbiUppine dxssidenl leader, 
WMignn S. ^uino Jr., who was 
acM-oanatRil in 1^ juSt seccsds 
after stq>piag off a plane that 
brought mm home from exile in the 
United States. 

Government officials ermtend 
that no one is more interested in 
Mr. Kim’s safe^ than they. The 
government invariab^ wo^ be 
blamed to anythiiig ttmt ha 0 >eited 
to him, they say. Nmih Korean 
^enlS: or local extremists ntight 
view fais tuning as an ea^ way to 
feunent unresL 


By Borbaia Crossene 

.V«w Yerk Times Sem'er 

BANGKOK — Vieinam’s Cmn- 
mnnist ParQr leader has adcnowl- 
edged in a ^eedi the par^ 

tjTs 5Stb anniveesan that there are 
*^shortoonnngs and mistakes” in 
^^etnam’s economic and ideologi- 
cal affaiis, aooxding to rqiocts 
from tbe'\^emam News Agency. 

The official Hancn ^ency, moni- 
tored in Ban^mk, said the par^ 
secretaiy-gaienl, Le Doan, also 
idd par^ and government officials 
that the country should improve its 
retedoos China and with non- 
C o numini st nations of Southed 
Aria, vriule comimring to build ties 
with Moscow. 

The qieech last weekend came at 
a time when diplomats in Hanoi 
suggest that a faetko of Vietnam’s 
teadorii^ has become wary of 
growing dqiendencc on the Sioviet 


Union and would like to keep aline 
(pen to Beijbig. 

Relaiioos between the Chinese 
and Vietnamese, who were tradi- 
tional until this oountiy’s 

war against the French and Ameri- 
cans^ve deteriorated again over 
the test rix years, as Beijing has 
given substantial material support 
to r^ids in Cambodia, who are 
trying to overthrow the Vjetiian> 
fse-instaPed government in Phnom 
Penh. 

Last week in Bangkcdc, Prince 
Norodexn Sihanouk, a leader of the 
ramis<v«ttn cc»!itioti. saU he 
ha^t been urfd in B^j »ng that Viet- 
nam bad been aaalfiwg ifllltg with 
Qwna- Along with tbOT disagree 
meat over Cambodia, the Vietnam- 
ese and Chiiiese have been fighting 
qmradieaDy along their common 
border. 

"We are prepared to nonnaliae 


rriaiioas with Chma,” the Vkt- 
iMwne^ parly’s secreuuy-general 
was rqmned to have said, addiu 
that Hanoi "firmly believes that the 
friendship between the two coun- 
tries win nave to be restored.” 

Mr. Duan’s speech follows a re- 
port by Hanoi in December that 
acknowledged a failure to mem 
neatly all the country’s economic 
targets in 1984. 


African Rebels Given Autos 

Retuea 

DAR ES SALAAM. Tanzania 
— llie Soviet Union’s ambassador 
to Tanzania, Yuri Yukalov, has giv- 
en 10 automcMes to tiie African 
National Cemgrms, the main ^9*' 
lilte group fighting wUte nue in 
South Africa, the oninal new a^- 
cy, Shniaia, reported Wednesday. 



In Amman 

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Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL 



TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1985 


Danes Growing Hostile to Gulf Refugees 


COPENHAGEN — An influx 
of Gulf war refugees is straimog (he 
traditionally liberal attitude of 
Danes and Swedes toward fordgD' 
ers sedting as3dunL 
In Denmark, ecoomuc recesaoo 
and high unemployment have erod- 
pi mu^ of the country’s hospital- 
ity toward immigrants. 

The flow of refugees to Demnaik 
increased 12-fold to 4,200 last year 
from 3S0 in 1983. according lo esti- 
mates by the Danish Refugee Aid 
Organization. Denmark’s popula- 
tion is d>out five nnllioiL 
Growing hostility toward for- 
d^ers prompted Queen Margre- 
tbe 11 to rebuke her pet^le in her 
annual New Year's Eve television 
and radio address to the natioiL 
“Foe Danes' initial pride that ^ 
foreign immigrants and refugees 
have chosen to live in their little 
parat^ i^Fteo quickly gives way to 
hostility," the queen said. *‘&icb 
behavior is a shame on the nariorL" 
Althou^ welcomed by immi- 
grants. comments caum a fu- 
ror among Danes. Seven of 10 let- 
ters to the leading Copenhagen 
daily newspaper, Berlingske Ti- ^ 
dende, sharply criticized her. 

“ItisallveiywellforaprivU^ed - ^ 
pei^D like the queen to talk atout ^ 
understanding and being hospita- 
ble." said one. while another crili- „ 
ciz^ the queen and the weD-lo-do ^ 
for not understanding the fear that ^ 
causes racism in other people. 

“The queen talks of the Danes , 
so-called silly, smart jokes about 
immigrants." said a third corre- 
spondent "The fact is that the 3Q 
Danes are silly to let immigranis 
from all over the globe into their ^ 
country at aU. Foreigners who see p^] 
bow easy it is to enter our httie ^ 
paradise are the smart ones." g 3 
Most of last year's total of 2,700 refi 
were Iranians escaping from the flgi 
Gulf WOT. mainly deserters and y 
educated conscientious Directors, iag 
The second largest group was 32S boi 
Iraqis. anc 

The main escape route to the OJe: 
north is via Turkey to East fierlin tbei 
and then by train and ferry to Scan- ma 
dinavia. S«^ refugees say the cost 1 
of tbejourne)' can exceed $10,000 a ty 
person. maj 

Ofndals attribute the steep rise seel 



A group of I ranian refi^ees aiTivii^ recendy at Q^ienhagen's centra railroad station. 


in the number of refugees to a liber- the media for whipping up anti- 
aUzatioa of Demnaik’s laws on immigrant hysteria, 
aliens last year. Frontier police In Sweden, wfakb has a long lib- 
may not refuse entry to refugees, gjjj ifadition, racism is sddom cx- 
who are g u a r a n teed a beming for pressed except by such fringe 


tbeir applications for political asy- groups as the Keep Sweden Swed- 

lum. isli organization. 

Almost 30 percent of the new . .. . . , 


5 media for whipping up anti- A govemmeot-appointed com- 
imigrant hysteria. missioahasrecominmdedabanon 

In Sweden, wfakb has a long lib- racUt groups and the govenunent is 
il tradition, racism is sddom ex- to introduce a bill on immigrant 
essed except by such fringe policy and discrimination in the 
3ups as the Keep Sweden Swed- spring. 


Gulf war refill h^ moved on 

aneg^tions that have 

SSat a sparsely attended rally last been angrily rgected by represen- 


^licaoons to be processed. 

Sweden’s traditional open-door °teauL 

policy has also come undCT strain. 

Swed^ with a population of about 

Top French Polieenum 

About 80 percent of those seek- -m-Y 1 fW\ O 1 

10 Head lerror Squad 

and 7,000 refuge and their fam- A 

Dies are stQl awaiting a decision (m RMtm Germany's Red Anny Faction, 

their fate, according to a ^kes- PARIS — The French govern- that they were joining faces, 
man for the Imniigratioa Mi^try. ment cm Wediiesday named one rf * m 

Thepresshasgivenwidepublici- its top police officials to take ^ 
ty to tte influx of hundreds of charge of the fi gh t gainst in- Genam_ Aodr^ was 
mainly Iranian and Iraqi a^Ium- creased ui^ guerrilla and assaMiMted m Paiu 00 JaiL 25, 
seekers, and officials partly blame complained about Italian mririem both groiqss claimed responri- 


tatives of both ptofessioas. 


that It bad been too lax. 

Robert Broussard, 49. wbo has 


biliQr. A few days later, the Red 
Army Faction claimed respontibil- 
ity for the murder of Er^ Zim- 


BRQ4DCASTING TO CABl£ COMFANIES 
tN EUROPE & THE UK VIA SATELLITE 


led a can^gn againsi separatist 

vinlence on Clptrsica. will enordi- mcrmann, an mdustTialist who 


riolence on Corsica, will coordi- . . . ^ 

cate police anti-terrorist action West German/s associa- 

throu^out France. tion of acaoqiace manufacturers. 

Mr. Broussard's apporntment A govemmeui spokeswoman 
was after a cabinet ®®id Wednesday that the minister 

mw>ring at which fYime Minister for external relations, Roland Du- 
Laureot FaUius rqiorted back on mas, had complained to the Italian 
his two-day trip to West Gomany, defense minister , Giovanni S^tado- 
where he discussed doser coopera- lii^ over recent remarks he had 
tiott between' France and West made that France’s policy toward 
Germany over uiban guenOla vio- urban guerrilla was loo 


PROGRAM. THURSDAY 7lh PeSRUARY 


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. . 1 


INTERWATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1985 


Page? 


Russia Stepping Up Prosecutions of Jews 


By Scch Mydans 

Wnir York Tunes Senkt 

MOSCOW — A Hebrew teadier 

wno bad attracted a wide foDowine 
Binong Soviet Jews has been seo- 
tmeed to aa I8<«aoath tens is a 
labor camp os a charge of possess 
u>S a weapen, his fiiods oid 
The sestendsi last Friday of the 
uacber, Alexander Kht^yansky. 
3 32jwar-(M oenqniter scientist in 
w Esto ni an dty of Voni, was the 
latest in a series of cases that au- 
thorities have broughi against 
ers of unof^al Jewidi cnltuid life. 

Mr. Kbobnyanslv was also fined 

100 nibles (about $120) for nuHt . 
hox tainpeiiiig. Ins frieii^ said. 


results of the two-day t^ said a 
pistol and cartxute had been 
planted in ^ Mr. JQiohnyansky’s 
apartment in Moscow durin o a 
search. Aoccmhiig to the activists, 
what they called the fabrication of 
diaiges against Mr. Kholm yandry 
followed a pattern seen in other 
recent cases bmigbi a gama He- 
brew teadiers. 

In December, Yah 
was sentenced to three years in a 
labor canq> on a charge of posses- 
sion cS o^um. Hs trae saM the 
drug had been ]^ted in their 
apartment. 

In Kiev in November, aiwthw 

Helnew and p rominen t 

was sentenced years 
^camp oa a darge of resisting ar- 
After his aantenejng ^ his wife 
said, his face was mmiiaited aa^j bis 
evm were badly cm in an unex- 
plained prison inddenL 
[On Tuesday, a campai^Mr for 
the right of Jews to emigrate, MaA 
Nepomoishy, was sentenced to 
three years imprisonment on 
charges of ‘‘defaming the state,** 
dissident sonrees in^oscow s^ 
Wednesday, according to Reuters.] 
The Jewish activists said that ar- 
rests of such people had increased 
in recent menths and that severd 
other cases were awaiting tiiaL 
said seaxdies of the homes of 
activists had increased, with a wave 
of SO seardies toward the end of 
last year and about IS in January. 


**TbM are trying to frighten us months in an isolatkm cdl and has 
into sutnee,** an activut saiA develtyed ton trouble. 

have decided to cut the links At the time of his arrest, his 


within the Jemsh community.** 
The Jevrish utmsts emre sse d 
CMceru about the health or Joseph 


friawhi saiA be bad 10 slodenls 
from five dries. 


cartridges had been found under a 
dresser in a seaidt tb^ conducted 
at a later date. 

In another devdopment, spcdu» 
men for a groim of 44 Jews said 
they actwii ihat dieir na»n»c ba 


«ncerD aoom me bealtti of Joseph Mr Kbolmyansbr was first ar^ tnqr nad asaea tnai tneu names oe 
Begun, an activist and oa diaiga of lamp^ring stnidt off the register of voters for 


teacher who has .wmrthhi 
of a symbol for the movement ani 


with a maSbox and u 
ers, his friends said. 


^ ^ — _ r — Sl0| MIA Allfcinift itolMi 

who htfrepn^ been broughi to immediately searched his 


trial sinoe 1977. 


paent, tiiey said, in a step 


He was senteaiced 10 seven years sometimes to assure agaiiist 


the deetiOD tins month of dekgito 
to the nflrHawvwt of tbc P»«^n 
Fedeiuira of the So^ UnioL 
They said they had sent a peti- 
tion to the Siquone Soviet, par^ 


and Gve in internal etile etmtiscation (tf an arrested man's Hament, stating that thqr were tak- 


m October 1983 on a of piopvty. iss tins st» because now 

produd^ and distributing anti- Iney said that no wemon was considered themselves citixens of 
Soviet bterature. His friends say found during the seanATrai that IsreeL Ihe signers were among 133 i 
that sinee tfa», he has qxnt right the autbpritim said a psud and Jews awaiting pennisrioa to leave, j 

SofuiDemes U.S. Charges onDrugs 


The Aasoaaud Pms 

SOFIA — Bulgarian ofCdals on 
Wednesday denied U.S. of 
ini^vement Iw Bulgarian oigan^ 
aatums or inmviduals in interna- 
tional drug irafnddxtg. 

Stefan Pietiov, diiectorgieaetal 
of the Sofia Press Agpn^, s^: 
‘‘Westera mass met^ are distort- 
ing Bulgaria's policy, making 
sw^iog accusations that doty our 
achievements” in dmg contnd. 

He and other officials were 
spealungaianewsconfeteneecotir- 
yeoed by Bulgaria to spotlight w^t 
it said are its cITorts to suppress 
sfatpmaits through the country. 

Georgi Pirinski, a dqniiy forrign 
trade minister, also repudiated 
charges that Kintex, a sute arms 
d ealer, was actively engaged in 
truisborder drug tnide. 

Asked for comment, a Western 
diplomatic source said: “Bulgarian 
authorities hare been invoived in 
one way or another in drugs tradeL** 
But he suggested that dams that 
nUKh of me hecoin in the United 
States comes ihrou^ Bulgaria 
were exaggerated by offid^ of the 
U.S. State DqMTtment and Dmg 

Enforcement AHtninig tra ftiftn 

Testif^g before a congresskmal 
sobcommittee in Wariungton in 

Juite U.S. nffiraalfi mamtaineri (hat 
as much as a quarter of the drug 


that readied the United States orig- 
inated in Bulgar^ 

The diploimtic source here said 
the amount may be under 10 per^ 
cent “but we’re not even sure about 
that figure.” 

The l).S. govonment, mean- 
while, cmitinuM its oitkaan ttf 
Bulgaria's record on drugs. 

“The UB. govenunent has been 
awaie for some time that known 
narcotics and drugs traffickers 
have operated (Ki Bulgarian territo- 
ly.” a U.S. Emba^ statement 
Mid. Its release coindded with the 
news conference. 

The statement also said that the 
Bulgarian government did not co- 
operate eoou^ with Uil. efforts to 
obtain “meanmgf ul tnfonnaiion on 


narcotics trafficking and seizure.” 

A UB, dedaon in 1981 to sus- 
pend talks on a custmns coopera- 
tion agreeme n t with the Bulgarians 
was “due to the acammlatiou of 
reliable reports r^an^ tite active 
ides of known narcotics smuttlea 
on Bulgarian territory,” it saoT 

Teo£>r Tsvetkov, t^uty direc- 
tor-general of Bnlgarian customs, 
presented a fist of drug sei- 
zures at Bulgarian brnders in the 
past 18 years. 

He s^ customs officers had 
foiled about 1,000 attempts to 
smug^ drugs amountitu to about 
30J)QO kilcttrams (66J)Q0 pounds), 
induding 500 Idlograms of mor- 
phiae base and more thaw 200 
grams of hmnn. 


Vielllall^ Khmer Rouge Tro(^ 


United has /alemaOPnai 

ARANYAPRATHET. Ihanand 
— Vietnamese troops badted 1^ 
artillery fire battled Communist 
Khmer Rouge goerrillas aloiu a 
stretch of ^ai-Cambodian 
border oa Wednesday in a mqra' 
drive to ^ all anned reastance in 
Cambodia. 

Thailand's nnlitam barred re- 
porters from the fitting along a 
22-mile (35-kilomet^ band south 


of the border town of Aramra- 
prathei from Klong Ian to Knao 
Leum. Bui the s(W^ attilleiy 
and mortar aq)losions amt smaU 
arms fire could be beard aooss the 
fimtier. 

Thai military sources said that 
many Vietnamese artillery and 
mortar ahatls ^an^^^ lusidc Thai- 
lamt afiH fi ghting 

was taldng place only half a mQe 
from the border. No immediate ca- . 
sudty reports were 8vaild>le. 


Anti-U.S. Sentiment Is Blamed in Greek Bombing 


Wn^mfian Pat Seniee 

WASHINGTON — Defense 
Secretan Caqiar W. Wembeiger 
has saia that anti-Amodcan senti- 
ment aroused by Peto Minister 
Andreas P^iandreou Gmoe 
was partly respcmrible for a Unor- 
irt bombi^ tto injured 57 Ameri- 
cans near Athens. 

“Certain^ there's been an awful 
lot of totally umiecessaiy and very 
tiamaging anti- American feding 
tiiat has been stined up,** Mr. 
Weinbei^ told the.House Aoned 
Services Crenmittee Tuesdiqr. 


He sud that it is undear who 
planted the bomb last Satnr^ in a 
bar popular with U.S. servicemen. 
He added: “It is one of the thmg K 
you tend to |et Mien tins anti- 
American seatiment is stirred iqi.” 

**Il is ^te triKi*’ Mr. Weinber- 
ger said, '^thal Mr. P^tandreou has 

made difficult and damaging 
comments about our country and 
about the rdationriiip betweoi the 
countries.” - 

Mr. Weznbaga’scntidsm.inro- 
spo^ to a question fnmi Rqi^ 
sentative Nocman Ssisky, Dono- 


cras of Virginia, was the first by as 

admfninrariftn nfficig! Iwlring crit- 
ical remadts I9 the Gredt prime 
nnnister with the branlring. 

A previously unknown groop, 
calling itsdf the Natumal Fnmu 
claimed respoosibiHty for the at- 
tack and warned of more attacks 
“agabst the Americans who ate 
responsible for the continued situa- 
tion in Cyintts.” 

Mr. Wendierger viated Mr. Pa-' 
^dreoD in Athens last AprO. 
Since then, however, the U.S. ad- 


ministratioD has become increas- 
ii^ dismayed the Giedc lead- 
ed criticism of the United States. 

Mr. Papandreou idsohas sou^ 
to readi agreements Mth Ins Com- 
munist na^bofs — Albania, Bul- 
garia and Yugo^via — without 
consulting the North Atlantic 
Treaty Oi]|8nizatioD. He has court- 
ed the Libyan leader. Colonel 
Moamer Qadhafi, and hM diarged 
tto the South Korean passenger 
ahfiner that was tiiot do^ by So-, 
viet missiles M 11^ was on a U.S.: ; 
spymisaon.' 


Tlte intoiariQiid Herald Ttibiiire mvto ^ 



Meet the 
NewEench 
Cabinet 

Fdhraaiy 26, 1985, Paris 

FbUowing the success of our 1982 corference, we are pleased to announce a one day bribing session 
focusing on '‘Modernization: Priority for the French Economy T 
With the cooperation of the French Government, we have gathered together the key ministers most 
direedy involved with policies affecting business activities in France. 

The program will indude presentations by: 

P!eire Minister of Economy, Finance and Budget 

Cresson, Minister of Industrial Redeployment and foreign Trade. 

Habert On^ Minister of Research and Technology. 

Michel Delebane) Minister of Labour, Employment and Vocational Trading. 

Rdand Damasf Minister of External Relations. 


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in vdonnal dscusaon Mlh Ihe current poE^ 
makers and other busness executives 


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./ Making (^rs Sof^ 

iijiiinirBitiV intbrm the n*croproce»or control unit about the rotolien epe^d of eoch road wheel- Tte control unit compare* the speed of the front and rear wheeh, wtii-n the ^ererue exceed* ocertoiR fimil (e.g a* a re«ull of oqua-ploning or rear ««heel spin) it lelli iIk eompulenred, electronic Kiel iniection system to lower etuirw 

ETC Wheel ^ , ' output until wheel spin is cheded. Thus retaining optimum performance on any rood surfate. The nC u ovoiloble on \ti)vo cars witf, 73 lilie. mtereoaled petrol turbo erigmes and niomtol tronunission 

The cw in the picture it the Vbl«o 7b0 Ijrbd. For lu/ther inlormation please conlaet rour neunrsl Vniro dealer or Volvo Car Corporotic-n, Marleling and Seh'S Oivltion 5-405 06 Goteboig. Swederj 


I 



U 2* 


Pages 


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1985 


Keral^ 


FuLfafaed Vitfa Hm New Ycrii Tfann aid Hie Wahn^loil ^mI 


S^rtbune 


Too Much Farm Support 


i^ime banister Bob Hawke has swooped 
cm Bnissds the south, tamhasring the 
CommuniQr’s agricultural policy. Subsi- 
dized food &(Hn Eurt^'s me^ern farms 
omstitutes unfair cmnpetitton against A»*- 
tndia (be might have added New Zealand) 
on w(^ maitets, Mr. Hawke conqslaboed. 
Let him not spare American polU^, either. 

Hie supennadcet client and the starving 
African ^ doubt that food is being over- 
produced. Meat and gn^ries seem scarce 
goods, to judge from ^eir price. The fact is 
that the rich woild is producing, at high cost, 
far more food than its own inhabitants can 
consume or the poor worid can pay for. 

The unsahdile surpluses have to be pur- 
chased by governments and financed by 
taxes. Ginsuniers have to pay absurdly high 
prices because their govemmeots have to 
ke^ cheap inqmrts out. To dispose of tbdr 
unwanted sto^ governments dunq) on 
world maikets — including cut-price sales to 
the Russians — exacerbating trade and dip- 
lomaiic relations in the Western alliance. 

Conventional wisdom has long decreed 
that a stop sluaild be put to this prcrfligacy. 
But the surpluses have swollen steadily, and 
in a timely report the Organization of Eco* 
nomic Cooperation and Devek^meot pre- 
dicts that th^ will continue to ^ sa 

This ilh^^ cmnbination of high food 
prices and oversupply is not due soldy to the 
featherbedding of farmers. A mqor compo- 
nent of price is the cost of distribution after 
the food has left the farm. 

And it would be unfair to suggest that 
agriculture can be ^ven the same pure mar- 
kM tieatment dial we recommend for other 
prodnoeis. Farmers are exposed to the 
weather’s v^aries, and th^ production 
schedules are relativdy inflexible. The auto 
industry slows production for a few months 
u4ten trade w^eos, but fanners cannot 
slop the ripening of com or the calves’ 
growth. To protect them from big changes in 
cash flow and debt, a floor has to be put 
under thrir incomes. Nonetheless, the price 
paid for agricultural si^port is excesave. 


Wl^ do societies want to preserve all 
these famiets, and how? Farm protection is 
advocat^ford^tosepuiposes — to ensure 
siqjply in the case of drawn out war. But 
what sort of war, if any, is envisioned? 
tection is also ^voc^ because fanners 
lode after the countryside. Those concerned 
by soil erosion, tree-feDing and the disap- 
pearance of the Entppean hedgerow may 
qiiestKMi this. Environmental protection can 
be achieved more cheaply than by indis- 
criminale support for apiculture. 

The advantage of keqjing reasonable dis- 
tribution of the pop^tion between urban 
and rural areas nee^ little advocacy, there 
has already been too great a drift to the 
cities. But there are often better alternatives 
than agriculture for the rural pppulatioo. 

Hksc are other, balf-Goaviadz^ social 
arguments. The eldPly farmer must be 
bdped to flnish his career in peace. But 
current support sdiemes also encourage the 
young to stay in fanning. More fundmnen- 
tally. tb^ are disaimiiiatoiy in exactly the 
wrong way, in the sense that thq' benefit the 
rich farmer mudi more than the poor one. 

Justifiable protection for the farmer could 
be obtained at far less cost to the taxpayer 
than at present It is curious that urban tax 
revolt is not stnxiger. The farm pt^mlatitui 
has dropped, and even in Japan less than 
one worker in 10 is employed in agriculture. 
Yet governments of all complexions spend 
Ug money indiscriminatdy.in tbdr favor. 

There are a few encomnging signs. J^an 
hesitates to rationalize its faopdessly uneco- 
nomic lice producers, but Buope hu timid- 
ly b^un to cut the tnilk Qow. More impor- 
tant the Reagan administfation pranises an 
aggressive fann bill that would force ^ricol- 
ture to sdl its surplus at market-related 
prices instead of cosily handing it over to 
government European agriculture will hate 
this, but it may be forced to cut down 
its dependence on extravagant farm siqiport 
Meanwhfle, let Mr. Hawke keep swoop- 
ing. The West needs friends in the south. 
INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 


A Warning From Volcker 


As Congress cheerlesdy took up the prea- 
dent's boAfjSi, the Joint Economic CtHumittee 
adeed Paul Volcker on Tuesday for his view of 
the general sioiarion. Mr. Volcker, rfmifwan 
of the Federal Reserve Board, re^)mided with 
an emphatic waming that American prasperi- 
9 is on a shaky foundatim. threaten^ by the 
accelerating foredgn debt The ddn is related 
to the federal budget deficit he said, and “we 
are on an ultiinately unsustainable path.** The 
United States is in tiie process of bmisfaiining 
itself from (he world's Inggest aeditca to the 
world's biggest dditor. By next summer its 
foreign dd>t will be larger than BrazO’s. 

Someeme asked Mr. Volcker whethff and 
v4icn the present inflow of foreigo mon^ 
might slow down or reveise itself. That he 
rqiUed, is entirely unpredictable He did not 
add, although it is alro true, that any sudden 
drop in that mondy mflow would mean higher 
interest rates in the United States, higher infla- 
tion and probably a severe recession. 

The posability of a recession has also oc- 
enned to the ^^te House, where, also on 
Thesday, tiie presidea^s Cmmcil of Economic 
Advisers published its annual repoa Combat- 
ive in tone, it enthusiastically embraces the 
econ<»iic theory known as mooetarism. There 
are doubtless inan;y Gonpdlmg reastms for the 

ap pal l of manglarism tft thf Rgagpl adSBsiS- 
tiatiai at the present difficult moment One, 
dearly, is nunetarism's d»irn thai if anything 


unpleasant happens to economic growt^ it has 
to be the fault of the monetaiy authorities — 
that is. tile Federal Reserve and I^. Vokker. 

Inflkitxt the Counefl of Economic Advisers 
argues, is fundamoitally a monetary phenom- 
enon. If monetaiy poli^ is too loose, the 
inflation rate rises. If poi^ then clan^ down 
on the money supi^y to resirun infGiuon, a 
recession results. All four of the reoessioiu ci 
the past two decades, the cmindl says, are 
“quite clearly related to prior outbrraks of 
inflation and subsequent dedines in the rate (rf 
mon^ growth." So if there is a recession a year 
from now. you wifl know whom to blame. 

The coundJ’s influence is now at ebb tide, 
and its report will not have much effect on 
economic pdicy, but the rqporl probably ro> 
fleets accuratdy the stale mind at the White 
House. The adnnsustraliiaQ's pdUucal pec^ 
have been tliinidag about the diances (tf trou- 
ble ahead in the economy, and there appears to 
be a rising tenqitaticni to reqxmd with attado 
on the Federal Reserve That would be exceed- 
ingly unwise, since it wotdd frighten foreign 
investors and mske matters worse than ever. 
But, unwise or nol, the sdvisen' report is a 
heavy hint that it n^t iuqipea. 

There is one more Uom that you can say 
about ibis mteresting difravnoe of opinion; 
Mi. Voicka is right and the council, in tins 
attempt at soqi^oating, is wrong. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


CMier Opinion 

New Zealand Strains Allianoe 


David Lange, the New Tgalanri prime min- 
ister, is nmoiog an unnecessary risk with his 
country’s futore by barring the country’s ports 
to U.S. nudear warships. It is hard to c^- 
lenge tiie American argument that New Zea- 
land cannot opM to be protected by tbt 
Americans if it will not admit to its pons the 
of its protection, which happen to in- 
dude nuclear arms and oudear-propdled ves- 
sels. Mr. Lange need not be suipri^ to find 
that his policy has encountered a testy IJ.S. 
reaction.HK)ugb the southern Pacific has not 
been an area oX great power teosioa, there are 
signs of increasing Soviet activity there. New 
Zealand has exerosed its i^t as a soveieigD 


state to condoct its own policy. But the Amoi- 
cans are perfectly entit^ to ask Mr. Lange 
vdiether he does or does not wish to be part of 
the aUianoe, vritii aU that entails, and to aooqn 
the consequences if he does noL 

— Fmandal Tmes (London). 

OPEC Slides Down to Market 

OPEC countries are gradually surrendering 
ccmirol over prices and t^ volume of oil 
production to maiket faces. It would be pre- 
mature to pronounce OPEC dead, but the 
cartd is suidy sliding down the slqie on its 
back. A price war anxmg its members [is] likdy 
if the <xl maiket does not listen soon. 

— Detrat Free Press. 


FROM OUR FEB. 7 PAGES, 75 AM) so YEARS AGO 


1910: U.S. Trusts Said to Hoard Food 
NEW YORK — Considerable attention lias 
been directed to tiie iqiort filed by tte packing 
and refrigerating companies showmg the 
quantity ctf food stuffs now held in cM stor- 
age: Throughout the inquiries into tte hi^ 
cost of liy^ the food trusts have maintained 
thai the t^ in peto is due to the scarcity of 
food. This contention has by no means been 
substantiated by the official returns just pub- 
lished. Statistics show that there is enough 
food lodted in cold storage plmis to feed the 
whole ptqiulation of the United States fa- 
months. The value of the stodt is shown to be 
S3,000JX)0,000. and it is dear that eaonnous 
quantities of beef and otba necesrides cit life 
have been hoarded up for some time. Cold 
storage warehouses the country over hold the 
total nombff Of 14,000^)00 cattle carcasses. 


1935: ALeStenantmtfaeLlxKT'try 
PARIS — Lord Lee of Fareham pleads fa the 
discontinuance of “Americanisms" in the 
of British sound films. Ifis oountiy- 

men ajC pUZZled, he matiilaiTic^ \iy qiA 

phrases as being “bumped off" a “taken fa a 
buggy ride." But what aboit oa own pec^ 
who are twaplussed not oitiy by wads coo- 
monly used in Fn gland and almnw unknown 
m America, but by prooimdations which dif- 
fer from ours? Can Americans be expected to 
know that a bowler is a deTOy hat, a even that 
a pub is almost the same as a post-^Hxrtnbitioa 
drinking place? Who would realize on hearing 
that the *1tffteoant is in the HKnYtiy" that the 
lieutenant is in the laboratoy — even though 
what he might be doing ibm may be as much 
a OQfsteiy as Mark Twain's bird that was in the 
bladcsmilh’s shop on aocount of the rain? 


INTERNATIONAL WERAm TRIBUNE 

JOHN HA Y WHITNEY. CWrwm 1958-1982 

KATHARINE GRAHAM, WIUJAM S. RALEY, ARTHUR OCRS SULZBERGER 

Co-ChaOineii 


PHILIP M.FOISIE 

WALTER WELLS 
ROBERT KMcCABE 
samueLabt 
CARLGEWIRTZ 


LEE W. HUEBNER. PiAfisJv 

Exeaane Ediur RENE BONDY Dtputv PMdnr 

E^tor ALAINLECOUR 

UCHW H. MORGAN AaodaepSZ 

DrpetfEAtet S1EPHAN W. CtWAWAY rfrTrmrnfnnmirliwi 

AoBdat ESter FRANCOIS PE SMA iSONS 

ROLFIXKRANEPUHL Dinaer^AAmSsSr 
laienatioaai Herald TrSnme, 181 AtcDoe Qiarles-de-Gatilla 92200 NeniBwsBriSaneL 
Fnoce. Tdephooe: 747-126$, Tdes: 612718 (HeraUirStda Henld 
^ . I^ea^de la pOBcauKW^N. Timer. 

^ Headjamas. 24-M ifcfiiiei7 Rd, Hong Kang. TeL 5>2856i8. Takx 6H70, 
Uait^^Dr. I/JCi'ileHsMadCjAst (PCI TeL 836^810. Tdas262a09 






Double Features 
^AUiance Wars^ 
Plus ^Star Wars’ 

By Robert Kleiman 

L ondon — The Soviet-U.S. dedsfon to re- 
/ sume arms mUcs on March 12 arouses eves 
less eu|Aoria in Europe than in Watinngu^ 
President Reagan exprets long years of negotia- 
tioL Eurqieans predict an impasse that 
«in plant a «««* under the Western alliance. 

Mr. Regan’s drive to build a missilfrproaf 
astrodome um a coOirian course, Europeans 
fed, with Moso^s detenmoatian to maintain 
tire ban on space-based defeases tiial is con- 
(ained in the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile Trea^. 

Eoropeans are more concerned with reduemg 
the number <tf Soriet SS-2Qs aimed at them and 
America’s counterdeplcymeiit of Peitiung-l and 
ernise missiles. EunmussOe negotiations are hos- 
tage to the ipaoe diqNite: For Moscow cannot 
Sjgree to reduM strainjc and iniennediate offen- 
^ve misriles when bim^ng more of them may be 
the best counter to America’s prqeeted defenses. 

Political crises witinn Europe and with the 
Uoiied States are likely as this becomes clear. 
Vigorous revival ot Europe's peace de m o n str a - 
tioos by summer is predicted Thn wiQ have the 
baddng, except in France, of mirape’s maja 
opposition parties — and of Europe's embittei^ 
you^ frustrated by record imemploymcot that 
is now 9 percent in West Germany, 13 percent in 
Britain and IS peromt in BelgRim. Left-t^t 
polarization rmA suppot muke this a 

maja worry fa key NATO leaders. 

Egg-throwiiu at Prime Minister Maci^ret 
Thatcher led ha to curtail weekend 
appearances long before the Brighton bombing. 

show popuiw^ down to 40 peicnt fa ha 
and 35 peroent for President Fraimas Mtta- 
raod o/f France, while ChanceOor frehuut Kohl 
faces diaintegiation of Ids m^oci^ coalition in 
Bonn. Soviet effots to fan nnresl could bdp 
blo^ the delayed emplacement of Euroimssiles 
in Bel^um and the Netheriands. That could 
undennine West German d^ifoyment, vduch i& 



condidoial on Benelux participation. Presidnt 
Miilerrand has sent his mpressive new faeign 
nhnlsla, RcAand Dumas, to Washix^on to sug- 
gest a Western summil meeting to dikuss these 
and otha “star wars" coocems. 

Until now, Europe’s maior govenuDents have 
withstood puUic protests, political turmoil and 
Soviet pressure, Britain, luUy and West Germa- 
ny. stron^y supported France, have deployed 
EurootisSes despite disagreemeots with W^- 
ingUm ova negotiating tactics. But the equation 
has changed. Ail of Europe’s governments 
swwi giy ofqiose “star wars" as too costly, de- 
stabilizing and ineffemive. Several face elections 
in the next two years. Th^ are unhkdy to quietiy 
accept a space-related stalemate in the Euromis- 
rile talks thrrotens thdr political funue. 

A showdown could be triggered by the first 
tests of tiie new American anti-saiellite onsale 
agains t spscc targets. Soviet demands for a test 
moratorium were muted at the Shultz-Gromyko 
meeting last mon ih by advance word to Moscow 
that tite tests sdieduled for March, when a two- 
year congressiiMial ban expires, had been post- 
poned to June for “technic^" reasons. But Mos- 
cow stiU insists on an extended moraioriuin. It 


may mount a maja anti-.American canqiaiga in 
June and might eien walk out again. 

Europeans worry* that tests now can make the 
artos race in space irreverstblc Also, ^lace de- 
fenses. if effective, would decouple a fortrera 
America from an unshielded Europe. And if 
ineffective they would set off an offense-defense 
race and heighten crisis instability. What might 
be rendaed “impoteot and obsolete" would na 
be the huge Soviet and American deterreDts but 
the Britirii and French nuclear Comes. 

If. as Washington claims, concern ova “star 
»-ars*' is w'hat Im brought Moscow bade into 
oegoliatioQS. then. Europeans feel. Washington 
should not refuse as now to trade it away fa 
Soviet cuts in offensive missiles. But the lUmo- 
lin’s calculus undoubtedly is more complex. 
What the Reagan adinlni^tion is ovak 
IS that the political opportunities on the 
in Europe may have as much to do as “star wars" 
with the tactics Moscow now is pursuing. 

The HTT/er. a member of The New York Times 
Editorial Board is on leave and writing a book on 
the Western aJUance os a visiting fellow at the 
Royal Institute of International Affairs in London. 



Is Washington's Budget Deficit AU That Dreadful? 

By Tom Wicker 


W ASHINGTON — Not snoe 
Confederate General Jubal A. 
Early threatened to capture Wadnng- 
ton in 18M, and maj^ie nol even 
since the British bumM the Cqtiiol 
in ldl4. has there been such hysteria 
aloig the Pbtomac. If the federal 
bud^ defidt is not cut drasticaOy. 
emyooa baa Preadent Reagan at 
down seems to be saying, the mes — 
ma^ie even the republic —wQI fall 
Yes, this year’s defidt will be an 
unpreoedeniro S222 tuition and next 
year's wQl be only slightly Iowa. But 
only a few brave souls with not 
many Democrats anu^ them — are 
adring ff those dcfidis really make 
it necessary to kill most of the ac- 
complishmmts of liberal government 
unda Democratic and Repubtican 
presidents aEke in the last hu centu- 
ry. With dties in decay, must aid to 
mass traost be diminat^? Must the 
Small Butincss Adimmstratiffii go? 1$ 
aid to libraries loo expensive? 

Here is how a “Rquiblican tacti- 
cian and advisei" described Mr. Rea- 
’s goal to Bernard Wdoraub of 
Yoik Times; "In orda to 
pay for defense, he actually intends 
to shrink the size of (be welfare 


state." The advisa was not rglinwg 
about food stamps and aid to depen- 
dent children. “To Rea gan .’’ he 
said,“tiie wdfare state has oecome a 
stmport system for the middle class." 

That means cutting a eliminating 
oill^ loans, Medicare, bousing as- 
sistaaoe, rural development, the Ex- 
port-Import Bank and many ot^ 
programs that the Reuan adminis- 
tration rega^ as benefiting “spectal 
interests." Since when did the middle 
class get to be a “^lecial interest"? 

And if a 5}residuit re-elect^ by 
that same middle class has ins my, 
ndUtaiy spending will total S277J5 
bilbon in 1^, plus SS.2 billion for 
biddiiffi nudear weapons. 

If, Of course, America’s siiuatioD 
were door-di^ ndtha ridi aa poa 
oa in-between should be excused 
from saoifioe. But nothing hke a do- 
a-die •:risis impends. 

The ddDciL at roughly 5 to 6 pa- 
cent of GNP, is na overybehning 
and is in fact (he maja stimulus to 
recent solid economic growth. Frivato 
corpoate debt is far lai^. The 
stares and local governments are 


heavily in snrplus. due not least to 
federal revenue sharing. And if the 
federal government kept a capital 
budget, as businesses and the stares 
do, its operating deficii would be seen 
as entity manageable: 

The d^cit is not caused by proQi- 



by forma Treasury Secretary Donald 
Rian’s estimate,' contributes S13S 
bfliioD to this year’s deficit; and also 
by the indigestible Reagan increases 
in military spendii^ There is good 
reason to believe that (he administra- 
tion has run iq) the cutrent deficits 
precisely in of^ to bring pressure 
on Congress to loll what Mr. Reagan 
calls “(£: wrifaie state." 

One strong reason why Republican 
senators cb^r fa budget cuts is 
that they fear that deficits wiH cause 
interest raies to rise and produce re- 
cession in 1986. damaging their pros- 
pects for re-election and coDUnued 
control of the Senate. But interest 
rates have been falling while the defi- 
cit rose; and little evidence, in the 
polls a anywhere else, demonstrates 


Riding High on the DoUar 
Begins to Scare the Crew 


By Hobart Rowen 


W ASHINGTON — Any fedoal 
budg^ and Pseddeat Rea- 
gan’s latest is no exc^tioi, is based 
on eoooomic assumpMua Express- 
ing ^dde in an economic reoovoy 
that u “fasta than any oiha upiam 
dace 1951," Mr. Re:^ forecast a 
oontinuaiioa of good omes. 

“The timying ventni&a^tal mar- 
ket is financing a new Amencan revo- 
lution of entrqxaieoisfam ud ted- 
noU^etti cha^" MrTRman stud 
in his ecoaotme i^iot to Coigress. 
*The American eco iioir y is once 
again the envy of the ww." 

Mr. Regan’s satisfactioi mth the 
eoonanic surge is understandable. 
Yet at the fairest levds of his govem- 
ment there uk nagging doubt about 
the fn tore, perhapsbest opressed ^ 
Budget Dinretor David Stockman — 
vibo may soon leave Washington af-> 
rer a stormy carea. He warns that 
“the how is almost too late already’* 
fa dealing with the budget defidt. 

That, to be sure, is part of Mr. 
Stockman's pilch to Congress to do 
the budget-dcTidt job the preadent's 
way: by attacking middle-mcome d- 
vilikn expenditures, ddng little to 
reairaid nnliiaiy programs a Social 
Security entitlemeDts and ignoring 
the DM to raise taxes. 

But the real weakness anth the ad- 
ministration's iocdc into the future is 
iu failure to deal effectivdy with 
what may be the single most unpa- 
tant variable in its economic assump- 
tions; (he high value of tte dollar. 
According to the but^ document, it 
has risen 70 pe^t in ford^ ex- 
diangemarketssuicetheendof 19%. 

The doctunent some candid 
observations on the dollar problem, 
but then walJcs aw^ from It; 

• Because the high value of the 
dollar has made American exports 
more eimensive fa foreigners, and 

lanialfyiTig ly (heap 


Mr. Bogsten, will be S150 billion this 
year and S200 bilhcm ^ 1988. 

How long can such an tnflow of 
foreiga capnal be susiaiiied? If it 
uuiAmsu guous toDianzuigiy coeap skra« down markedly, tiun the ddlar 
fa Americans, the corrent account, could foil sharply, boosting iataesi 
t^ broadest measure of trade, sa- rates skywaid aro sowing the sffj s 


news is that foreign mon^ has 
ilp^ finance the budget deficit, 
avoting a credit enm^ in America. 

The bad news is that the resultant 
cnirent-account dHidi has scared 
out of aghL Foragn investos now 
have a lai^ role in deuamining the 
eooQOimc future of the Umted Suuea. 

What happens if fordgom get 
about tiwir American invest- 
ments and riow them down? What 
happ^ if thoe is a sudden, sharp 
drn m the value of the doiiar? 

Ik budget document offer^ tins 
cautious ajmraua]; "The [doQar's] 
long-run problems roacern the con- 
sequences fa the ecooomy sb^d 
foreimen attempt to reduce their 
purcKses dollar assets while we 
are still nuutiim a large current- 
account defidLUnda such circum- 
stances, the itiflarion nte mighi tem- 
porarily rise as the dole's exchange 
rate falls. In addition, there could be 
a rise in interest rates and slowa 
overall econoDsc growth." 

The mmlication is dear, but not 
made expiidt by (he budget docu- 
ment: A doflar decide of any signiTi- 
cance would make mincemeat of the 
Rea^ admimstratioo's scenario fa 
steady eoononuc growth, low infla- 
tion rates ^ furtha interest-rale 
declines. The huge defidu prnecred 
by the administraiiai mnila in- 
credil^, even bigga. 

C. J^ed Berplen, a forma assis- 
tant secretary of the Treasury, points 
out (bat even unda (he adstinistra- 

AsmecoiKKiiBtandhiitoriaiiliij 
buildup m intow pay- lo rnaintain impartial and realistic 

S??iM ^ *be same of a 

Sf ^«POOs5bleaewspapCT. The Western 

lo^r^y found a 
leada like Ronald Reagan. 



public demand for defidt reduction. 

Reduciog unemployment ffom 7.4 
percent to S.4 p er c e nt would cut SS8 
billion off the defidt. more than all 

Perhaps the fare^j^ 
ing the defidt is that interest pay- 
ments are rising steeply; but nm* 
decreased revenues prMU^ most of 
the shortfall, ihoe mould be nothing 
unholy about inoeasing revenues. 

The Ecoiomist rna g<miw« has pro- 
pel a 3&<eDts-pa-gallon tax on 
ga^nitni* and a 204»it tax on diesel 
fud that would raise S37 billioo a 
year: such increases inqxsed three 
years in a row would relieve whai 
defidt crisis there is. with added ena- 
gy benefits. Oil prices are down and 
falling, so the ecemomy would be wdl 
able to absorb the incraues. 

At the moment, the only debate 
seems to be wfaetba miliiaiy spend- 
ing should be cut, as wdl as schod 
lunches. But when the hysteria sub- 
sides and the public gets a good kxA 
at what Mr. Reagan mtends ddng to ' 
the country, be may find he is not the 
first presideat to ovoestimate the 
mandate that even a landslide yidds. 

The New York Times. 


In Moscow, 
Successors 
Talk Tough 

By Allen Ljnch 

N ew YORK — The disappear- 
aace d Konstantin Chemadto 
from public life du^ the 
month raises once agam the querocn 
of the Soi^ suoces^ ai^ the ^ 
hire diFCCtioo of Soviet sodety. 

Most analysts see Politburo maiy . 
ba Mikhail Gorbachov as Mr. Ow- 
nei^'s probabk suooessa. TIk ec- ' 
may bewray d^OQUiSfcl^^. 

cptipring the leadeidiq) chances of 
Nikita Khinriidiev, Leonid foshnev 
and Yuri Andropov. But in this care 
it may not matta mudL Wbethaa- - 
not Kfr. Gofbadiov is in line to beAle 
next Soriet leada, be rgw M cnte a. 
poyrerful tendency in Soviet poli^ 
articiilating the concaus of a sienfi- - - 
cant group cf leaders who havebm 
waltiK fa soK time to have thdr 
say. Tms might becaHed the“let'sga. 
Russia movmg again" tendesc^. - 
Qiaiw is (» (he agenda in the. 
Soviet Union. That much has hm i 
dear to everytme sinoe Mr. Andro- 
pov's brief rdgn. The question is: 
what kind of changiB. undual, re 
envisiaied then Premia Aleifli - 
Ko^gininhisI96Sn)eedicaIlniif(0r ' 
liinitK eoonanic aecentralizreioii?'. 
StnichuaL as urged by many, ind^ 
ing pabaps Mr. Khimbchev 
at the end, in the eady 1960s? 
maigwal, as tended to be die ca^ ■ 
dur^ the Brezhnev period? . ^ . 

More to the pdnt, whre oombimi- 
tion of reform and reaction — for 
some conservative backlash win -be . 
inevhaiUe — wfflprevdl? 

Much win depeu on the cfaaiada . 
of Soviet politic alignments in ^ 
succession period and on the pditical 
dimate facmg any serious raonna. 
(He almost certainly bavetddi^ 
guise the fact that be is pmsuing 
ftindamentaT change.) It is Safe tos^, 
boweva, that if Mir. Gorbachov pre- 
vails. the Soviet Union wiD eqieri- 
ence a degree political flux un- 
known since the Khnishdiev period. 

Mr. Gorbachov is in a strong por- 
tion to build a powa base. IBs w- 
tbori^ has bear extended to indode 
decisii^ about party pessoond ts 
weD as agriculture. He appeare to- 
have a goK deal of siqiport whh^ 
the Central Committee qiparatDS. 

Agrioiltnre is the area a Us jrett- 
est expertise and originality. Taka 
logetfaa. Us ideas on agricultoie 
w^d probaUy ensure agnificaoi 
change from foe cutrent qrstem of 
centralized control. The measures he 
has advocated indude easiag restrio- 
tions on private plots, albAWg fv 
greaier flmbiEty m the organization 
a farms and relying more on pim^ 
ecntmmic criteria 111 Ha mnining the 
pattern of agricultural producrioo. In 
fact. Mr. Gorbaihov bar iiErcady 

drtllwig ert Mr r'hw mMifcn flirrii inim . 

ba (rf these issues. 

Whai about the industrial SKilai? 
Mr. Gorbadwv has less experience 
there; but in Decemba be made a 
^reech calling fa “deqi transfomia- 
tioas" not 00^ in the economy but in 
"the entire system of social rda- 
tions," involvmg "a restrachuiog of 
the forms and methods of economic 
ifianagemcDL" The qieecb contained 
tittle m the way of qioific propos^ 
snggestiu that be was pi&a^ in-^ 
tent on wtancma himsw from Mr. ' 
Qurnenko. Wbeina he succe^ win 


. .tt'% 





Rev-. 


T ^ I ' 

£ « 

s . ■ • ■ 



facing a . 
involve muiuuy spendiiig. Wgnifigant 
reductions in this area will be out of 
the oiestion for any jentier faring 
Roni^ Reagan's America. But Mr. 
Goboebov seems sensitive to the so- 
cial and ectmomic costs of a big n^ 
tary budget and be can be expected to 
resist signiOcant increases. In short, 
in this realm the West should probo 
bly expect more of the same — a 
continuation of Uie modest 2-percat 
annual increase that is thought to 
have been in effect since 1976. 

We should not assume that Soriei 
reform wiD neossai^ ent^ easiea ' 
E^-West rdations. True, it may be^ 
difficult to pursue such 
cept in a tranquS iiiteniaiiramenri- 
loiinenL fot any rdTorma will at 
most oertaioly nave to cova Us 
political flanks if be is to advance tn 
bis main olgective. Given the inevita- 
ble flux ai succession politics, few 
Soviet leaders are likdy to fed sdf- 
assured enough to puisK a flexible 
forrign polic]^. Here, too, the status 
quo mi^i bnng agnificant b ene fit* 
fa any refonnist Soviet l earfg trying 
to consolidate his authority. 

The writv is a research associate at 
the Institute /or East- West Security 
Studies in New York. He contr^uted 
this eomment to The New York Tones. 


VAi.H!'--'* 

-■ 

nKre.';- • 

-i-’ 

Tm j'—- ’ 

Uw 

• ■ 

poiiiiUi'j - 

- ■ • 

wveKf. '• • 

ibtEtb’ 
tt’Silir 

thssD: Pr-. . 

.4dhe!ivt‘T.. 

AfiaC':::'-' 

ctiiUi::;..- 

DrsVs..’ 
suac'irvt : - 
Wi’fc.-.s: . 
beSB CM';. • 

wuL; Ti'-.' ■ 

uochivt 

_ ■ 

BKQp;-- . 

" Drf:.':... • 

TOSV: . 
Paits-.r-" 


ekttr:;:"-: . 


ffia'}’-.. 


LETraiB TO THE EDITOR 

Impartiallj Piro and Coa 


Atomj 

• •• 
■ ■ 

•IV>: • 

- ■ 


. '■ji; ■’ 

1 ' ■" 


«noi 




vmes and interest payments between 
the United States and otha coun- 
tries, vriiidi had been about in bal- 
ance in 1980. was in defigt last year 
to the tune of S104 biOioo. 

* ^Because this defidt is likely to 
continue “fa the forese^le future," 
the Uniled Slates this year wUl be- 
come a debtor nation. Assets owned 
by fordioeis in America will exciyd 
those that Americans own abro^ 

The dramatic shift in international 
accounts is in pan the result of the 
budget deficit's effect on interest 
ratre: The Itigh-priced dollar attracts 
coital investment from a br oad. 

That is good and bad news. The 


of a new recessioa. 

Asked for his opinion, Reagan ect^ 
nomic relvisa William Niskanen said 
that the United Stares should not 
eqiect "any rigniTtcaai decline in the 
dcrilar" because intoest-rare diffa- 
ences between the United Staire and 
otha countries have bera narrowing. 

By itself, that is not reassuring. It 
assmnes a willingness on the part of 
foTQgners to invest in America de- 
^te growing debt. It also assumes 
coaunmng acceptance by Amcricaii 
manufacturers and fanners of lost 
markets fa thdr exports, while im- 
ports soar to irew be^ts. 

The Waakinvon Pifji. 


Why have you bect^ so short- 
sighted that you only critidze >iifn 
and oeva give him any credit? How 
can a man who has had so mu^ 
success always be in the wioig? 

WOLFGANG OPPENHEIMER 
Ascona, Switzerland. 

i grow tired of your contributors* 
loiannnnble conmestaries on the 
ddli. the effectiveness and the intdli- 
gence of President Reagan. Mr. Rea- 
rer’s success is mostly a testament to 
the stupidity and gullibility of the 
many voters who supported him in 
clear qpposiikm to tb^ own olgeC' 
live interests and in spite of his fatu- 
ously impossible ciaims and his gross 
mUrepnesentatioo of his recod. 

The poliu^ economic and moral 
cost of electing Mr. Reagan tadee to 
the presidency is as great as it is 
urvappreriated. Mr. Reagan's “bill’’ 


will req^eeneratioos of sacrifice to 
settle. We shall have plenty con- 
mentaries then by your contributors 
who “knew it all along." 

graham BETTS. 
Loo^n. 

In Defense of New York 

Regarding “N 
CnmAdaiui (Ji 


Afta 10 


IfTt^ 

*•>-1 


Noisy. Dirty, Smdfy, 
'nstffe” (Jai. 29): 


IU yem in darkest New 
York, Mr. w niiaim he g cusi jd 
fa coofuaim the movie “IBe Takmg 
of Pelham 1^" ~ a fantaw about 
eyesy New Yokel's nightmar e of 
log trapped in a rumtww subway fuS 
of craaes — with “Dath wsh," 
about “a New Yoika gtaiiring tfae 
subways" and alitp parks and su eets. 
It is harda to aco^i the irrele- 





Roger M.WiUifflm-s min point 
seems to be that he and his wife tada 
Lrigbmningeaperiem.inNewS sS^ 

It takes courage to live by the 
ideals our la^ r^resenL The trouble 


Everyone who has lived there has at 
least one stoiy of a dose call a ha- 
rassmcDt But his exaggerated ac- 
count only serves to increase the fear 
outsiders have of New York, and 
thereby to distract attention from the 
wondoful things the ci^ has to offa. 

His exanqiles are from the street 
and ^d have happened in any city. 
Having lived in Queago, New Yoii 
and Los Angeles, I spok from expe- 
rience. His column is like a gen^ 
letrer on uitan crime, with “New 
York" filling in the blanks. 1 am from 
New York and wQl take it any time. 

ROGER GUY. 

Paris. 


with cowbcqnsm IS that some of us are 
Indians, dudes and strangers. 

LEE A. ARCHER 3d. - 
Paris. 


letters intended for pubtietttiM 
digiddj» addres5ea''Lettas to the 
Editor" and must contain the writ- 
er's rignature, name and full ad- 
dress. Letters should be brief and 
are stdgeet to editing. We cannot 
be re^onsilde for the return of 
unsoiieited awnuscripts. 







Bv 


A!U„ 


Cheimslry-of-Hiberiiation Researchers Can’t Let Sleeping Bears Lie 


By Walcer Sullivan 

f/ev York Times Sernee 


T om beck, homing in on the coUec^ Trom during hi* 

radiCHbeacon collar ci a sleqv bcmatioa and in mitlsununer has 
inn bln^ bear, dins ihroueh 10 feet disclosed a basic 


Over (he mr three years, anoly* A. Ndsoo and iUannel. Steiger of nires. bopnig 
is of blood samples that he has the Carle Foundation Hosoiial in "wgh» be used 






.•- ■.' ia Sn2?^ 


“5 ^fehn*" 

..'•L'ss, 

ilK. 


low 

... "•'•‘atto 

-.-■■■: 

: -i'cciiia.; 





ing block bear, dies through 10 feet 
of snow to reach uie entrance to its 


in body diemistry. It shews an 


^lal in m^t be used to induce su^)^ed colly esc^ng a charging bear. “I 
animaiion in human beings to sur* punched it in the nose,'* he said 
inarfr geiy. iwld climate survival or long Dr, George Edgar Folk Jr. of the 
son the space joixmeys. University of Iowa, working in 

Alaska, lias found that the pulse 


Urbai^ DHiiois. animation in l««^n hriiiy ft 

Thv finding reported in a re- gay, cold cKmatB survival o 
crat issue of Science, apport the space joixmeys. 
viea* that bears ‘‘are, peimps, the In hibernation the body 


den. He lakes blood samples and aputkm to proloaged starve don so most successful at starving of any perature of bew remains close to ntes nf hihematinv hears I 
nipidlyretreats.aspartorareveal- j/fioeni that, when the bears rtnd^^ mat^" nonnal. TTiis coatrasis with “true SS,iv HeSSS 

mg new study of the dtemislry of 1y awaken, they search for food Although in winter a hibemating hibemators," whose tenqieratuie ihat tnmsmii thdr 

drops m freeang, oulse rates ihmuflhoui the winter. 


hibemalioa. _ 

If the dangerous bear wakes, Mr. Thomas D.I. Bak is a wildlife food calories a day, it 

Beck crawls wk out of ibe cave as ^pedalisi with the pe- iBree mooths or mne without 

fast as he can. paiumnt ^ Natural Resourtfs. ^ wata. Human beings can 

“1 never wear a gun on my belt,** His samples, eoUecled from black so for only a limited number of 
he said “There wr^ be no lime to bears in the Black Mesa-Crystal 

useone.** But he adds that the bears Crerit urea of western Colorado, Reearchers have long sought to 


only half-heanedly. 


bear bums the energy eqidvaleni of 


ar^» to ireezmg. pulse rates ihrougboui the winter. 

Hie l^analy^ have show The nonnal sum^pulse rate U 40 
that ^ bears their prod^ to 50 beats a tmnuie, depending on 

the bear's age. he saOuidSing 
hvered by blood to the kidneys and hiTjernaikwit drops to 8 or 10 
excreted They also appear to -n.. . jj_j • _r h •. 
tain and re^e cieatm^ a sub- ^1**?®? 


ua,.wu«. wu.nkauiMUMik Uib inpoia lUGB Ul V^UtOTSOU, KeCarCIKtS OaVC 1002 SOUgQt ID * ****** fcn. <i ii iii iic. a juw *|a_I.~. 

normally don 1 follow because near his homeiown of Crawford, learn what enable some animals to *Bat is released as muscles ^”.7 ??“Y® 

“they only want to get you out.* have been analyaed Dr. Ralph endure extremely low tempera- «msnme eneigy. TTie result is a 

- — sharp increase in the blood’s con- ^?T““r.zri. “ 

Alaska, often known as Kodiak or 


With Halley’s Comet Due Shortly^ 
Telescope Business Is Looking Up 


By Louis Sahagun 

Lta Angela Tima Senke 

S ILVIA SWEANEY has always 
dreamed of owning a telescope, 
and now she figures there is a good 
reason to buy one. 

“1 was lookiog to spend $ 1 , 200 .“ 
said Sweaney, 34, ogkog the gleam- 
ing tubes of mostly expensive tele- 
scopes on display at a Sam City 
store in Costa Mesa, Camomia. 
“Because of Hallo's ennet. I'm 
going to spend $2,400, which really 
means S^OOO. induding accesso- 
ries.” 

People sudi as Sweanqf have 
caught So(^ City President Mau- 
rice Sweiss, among other retailers. 

Researcher Beck with hibernating subject w^^^em ^^EaS 

ay 76 yeais, won't be visible to llm 

■■ ■■ ■ ■■ naked eye until about December, 

but customers already are flooding 
1 ^ f<RT| 7 |^ retailers vrith requests to amateur 

-■-I- V J^J.1.XXUX astronomical equipntent 

Indeed, lelesa^ manufacturers 

Second-Hand Smoke Found Deadly 

WASHINGTON (UPI) — An Environmental Protection Agency Cateber. Comet Seeker, 

spokesman says its analysis supptMts some of the concliiaon f} of an Finda and even Halley- 

iodependent study that found hundreds of people in the United States die antidpaiion of what ih^ 

arm year of cancer cau^ by breathing other people's tobacco smoke. f® ^ 

The study by James Rn^ an EPA policy analyst, and Alfred “* tdescopes 

Lowrey, a eliwnifl at the Naval Research Laboratory, onnrind^ that bmootlars reflecla nmai haj^ 

secood-hand tobacco smdee is (me of the most dadly indoor air P^t^d the last time Hallos comet 
pollutants. They estimated that between 500 and S,000 flon-smokera die 

eacfayearoflimgcaocercausedbybreathiDgsecoDd-hand— or“passive“ nr^l® that appeared m The New 
— smdee. The two the studies indepeadeatly, not to the T*®*? j®"? I?]®’ 

government, but the EPA’sCaicinoflen Assessment Group reviewed thdr otample. said that demand for op- 
finHitip ucal instmmeats almost exhaustra 



tent erf cnatiniiw relative to urea. «tcn as or 

, In summer ibe urea-creatinine *»««• »«• “> 

Sll/hlWV ratio, as in other mammals, is 22 or wI-W gnalws. 

m more parts urea to one pan creati- When small, inland grizzlies 

^ nine. In winter it drops to 10 pans raised on vegetaiion are m a diet 

y * ^ Tf T urea or less, and until s pri ng the cooqiarable to that of the salnum- 

C^j 9 bear does not eat, drink, d^cate eating coast ^edes, they get just as 

9 ^ or urinate. big. When offspring of the pant 

wide. Diebel said, and he expects "n* surprising discovery 

that to increase to 4,000 a n^tK has been that the urea-creatinme **®®™>* ^ do no! get 

“within the next three months.” ratio dianicterisiic (rf bibematioD teiga. 

But not everyone is happy that begins to appear weeks ^ore- That bears are not true hiberna- 
the rel tf s wp f hitdni«<y is inrtHwa hand, in Anaist and September, tors in ierms of their body leoqjera- 
up. The bears bleating less, but not iurewase$tablishedmiheI9S0sby 

“1 hnciniiu irv ii> Aierrmt-^m. ^atc October Of cariy Novem- the experiments of Dr. Raymond 5. 
nJile ber do most of them eiier their Hock at the Arctic Aeromedical 

<!«* :uKi so u> sleep. Utapw,, pear FairbanU .Ala^ 


people from buyma ttksa»es:“ ~ ®Kr 

said astronomer St^enEdberg of ®®<* S® to sleep, 
the Jet Propulsion Laboratory The low urea-to-creatinine 

here, which is beadquaners for In- pn^ts after they awaken i 
ternational Hall^ Watch, an orga- spring. Three we^ after enx 
ni>atifti\ that will be organizing ob- from hibernatioo, a grizzly 
servatiOQs of the comeL raay still eat no foexi and 


dens and go to sleep. Laboratory near Fairbanks, Alas- 

The low urea-to<natiiiine ratio 

persists after they awaken in the hibernate, their 

Sring. Three wei^ after emerging *cm^itire clore to 

frot^Wnation, a grizzly beS freeang and their pul« rate falls 10 
may stiU eat no food and drink litdcTOrc than one beai^mm- 


“Usiog a teksoope, just like us- 
ing a computer, takes practice and 
persistence,” Erlb^ sakL ‘The 
fact of the matter is. unaided eyes 
or a p|W of binoculars are aO any- 
body is going to need.” 

What is more, he sai^ “John and 
Mary South standing in tl^ front 
yard in a suburban area ate sanmly 
not going to see Hailes comeL^ 
He said that Hallers cornel is 


w^ “«• T** beart begins to 

I. I V - flutter cf fibriUate whn the bodv 

*1116 htai apparenUy bttins temperature falls to about 78 
preparatira for desnmg wMe food Fahrenhdi (26 Centigrade). 


IS available.” the researchers re- 
ported, the metabolic adapta- 


rees Fafarenheii (26 Centigrade). 
Dr. Hodc, in an interview in the 


tioiDs remoDsible for freedom from l^^Os, described his efforts to ob- 
the need to food and water persist tain the rectal temperat^ of hi- 
into spring when food is usually beniating beats. He said be was 
scarce:” fortunately unsuccessful in his 

-r. ^ _ . . search for bear dens in the Brooks 

{indu^ wm based o p an Baring his aim, he faid 

“These scars were from tame 


tiooal Corp., whkfa ts based in Tor- 
raoce, Califoroia, a^ has made its 
reputation selling mme expenrive 
ptoduels for serious amateurs. 
“Probably not I dc«*t think any- 
ooewnU." 

Nonethtiess, be added, “I want 
to tide tfte tail of that comet as 
mitcb as ] «n. “ Last year, Celes- 
lioo broke with tradition and intro- 
duced a lower-priced “Cometroa” 
and “Comet Cateber” line aimed at 
the mass marlun. 


jpngtobefa^f^^eartii 48 anmaheli^ bears. The arumak 
than rt was duimg Its last visit, and, were captured in summer with 

beoauseofiisorbitalconfiguration, sprmg-a^led leg snares baited he tends 10 

it win be best seen in the Sontbere with meat To prevent trap^ 

Hemispbere, He added llmt “light bears &om dmaagmg thf^ less the Oaechallmgowasgmtia|acap- 


pollutibo,” wiiiirfi is light from snares were fastened to logs that tive bear to its feet dimng mbema- 
man-niade sources which iiqiairs ccxild be dragged short dtctain-x tion so a teumeranue-Tecordin^e- 
tdeseope viewing at ni ght, win and th^ gfi«m e ww? eh^Vuri dail y vice could be inserted. The 
make tteoomei at best odW a faint, tv a- solution, he expUined, was to take 

BlusdyaFparidni. .dvwiuge cl . pBrion bean hive 

Even under ideal conditions. maraschmo cherries. A bucket 

At... said be DOW oas 39 bears fitted With RtiA,4 ».‘*k »ka /Oaomac 


said Alan MMaoRobert, editorial partly fined with the cherries was 

h^"«r>l«=<««of«±deepin& 

sem-t^ .aaga- Aa ii awakeoed die bucket was 


WaiiamTooluy of the Tohaa» Institute criticized the findings, ane. “Venus wiU be owIMtima to » of them m their dens before dowly piitiM away, tsHiTningTS 

that Dr. Riacc, a phynast, was “out of his area of expertise here." for mined at the short- i^y as we can, he “Wc'w briehtet^ than HaUcVs comcL sp™fi- bear lomS hui 


term markeL 

Adhesive Tape Helpliil in Psoriasis 

BALTIMORE (NYT) — A rfnmce (rfjservation showed that (he bage htch dolls, many manufac- 
adbearve pratioD of a Band-Aid is helpful in treeing psoriasis, a mysteri- txirers these days are worried that- 
ous mid sometiinea severe ddn ^aease,'aaxirding to Rcmald N. Shore of thqr win not be able to meet the 
Jo^ Hopldns Umvenity; demands (rf retaOcTS already dam- 

Or. Shm said that he Bellied a Band-Aid after taldag a small tirin oiing for more. 


• M .. . sample from the center of one psoriatic (rfaque, and “when the Band-Aid 

SZ.' was removed, it was noted that the part (rf the psoriatic pla^ that had 

T'.T been covered by the adherive portions of the Band-Aid had cleared 

totally. The part <rf die plaque that had been covered by the pad remained 
.. .J] unchaagfid. 

“Because of Uds in^ressive rcqxmse, adherive was applied as a 
V" treatment to the remaining plaques on both elbows, and these lemons 
Z V cleared also.” 

'".Lr Or. Store said that “pnrfauged qjplication of tape ... will probably 

! ; T. prove most benefidal when comUntf with other UMrqiies. since lesions 
'.f:.'' m Gdy a minority of patients dear totally vdien it is uacA alone.” 

Jq)an’s'E:qio85’:Hffitoiy,Hi^Tech 

■ ~ TOKYO (Reuters) — Europe old and new, from Renaissance art and 

Paris sewers to rodt^ and sat^tea, will form a mqor part of “Expo 85," 
an inteniatic^ sdeoce exhibition opening near hioe next fflontn. 

• ' About 20 millim visitois. 95 pa cent oi them Japanese, are expected to 

M see the gxhihrtiou during its ax-monUi run from March 16 at Tsukuba 

Science City, 45 miles ^ l^ometera) north of Tdtyo and home of many 
Japanese research institutions. 

For japan its elf, “Expo 85” will be a glitteiing shop window for its 
■■ dcctronics conyanies. 

Atom Smasher Probes Meteorites 

LOS ALAMOS. New Mexieo (NYT) — Physidsts and geochemists at 
. the Los Alamos National Laboraioiy are umig a new teefamejue caQed a 
VtirJtMiT probe to study elements in meteonu samples that hold dues 
about the formation of tte solar system. 

^ A Van de Graaf accelerator, or atom smasher, is used to generate a 
.r imlHon-deetraD-volt beam of protons, or poritively charged nudear 

partides. TTrebcam is projected onto roedmens, and X-rays are produced 

that diaiacteiize the distribution an<l quantity of material in the ^rea- 


“Will we meet demand?” arited 
Kevin Ritscbel. vice prerident of 
marketing for Gdestron Intema- 


many as we can,” be sakL “WeVe 
already increased prtxhictioa SO 
pereenL” 

“Halley’s comet feva Q already 
here,” a^eed John Diebel, presi- 
deat of Meade Insintments of C^, 
ta Mesa, which is maAering a 
Comet Sedeer line of tdescopes. 
‘The earlincffi with u^icb this has 
caught on, caught us by surprise.” 

Meade normally sells about 
2,000 tdescopes a month nation- 


“I get in real quiet and slow,” he monacter was inserted and before 
said in an interaw, adding that the bear was fully awake; the buck- 


bri^ter^ than Halley's comeL ^ ^icax to arise, but after ihc ihor- 

Nonelheless, to tdemnoe man- .‘*f S^t in real qt^ and sdow,” he monacter was inserted and before 
ufacturers and retaflers. Hallos tii u interiviw, adding that the bear was fully awake; the buck- 

comet is to the asuonon^ business bear “lUy Ujft its head up and et was totally wiihdrawn, allowing 

what the Olyiiqncs are to qxnts — ^ ^ hibernation to. resume. It was 

a r vgritar iniw narinnal event that -pine. With a Dcedte at tile end (rf a shown that the body lempeiature 
few wQ] want to "riix pole he tnnqnilizes the animal, never wnlfc very low. 


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'VOIa'VO 

'feuWSDSdamWSBha 


Beware of the Killer Palms 


By Bayard Wd>sccr 

New York Tima Senwv 

I N MOST of the worid's urban 
areas the m^'or cause of acd- 
dental deaths and izguries u (he 
automolnle. Bui in Femote rural 
oommmiities where there are no 
cars or roods, trees cause propo'- 
tkmately as many casualties. 

In a recent issue of the British 


safeQf equipment and that some of 
the p«Qni trees they climbed were W 
feet (about 28 meters) taH 

Tlie' researchers noted that the 
m^ority of deaths occ ur red after 
falls fr(mi trees. 

The researchers concluded, “A 
tropical islander is imagined as re- 
cUnin^ beneath Ms trees, languid^ 
plucking the ever-present barv^ 


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Falda is the foremost monthly of business and 
;| technology in Finland, 
fi.^; i?" Fakta is the most effident, economical 

\i0 way to get the attention of Rnnish 

level dedaon makers. 


Medical Journal, a four-year study 'Btc cnitfa is that most villagers 
of adimaoniM (o tfac Piovi^al planting their pnfcns 

Hospital in Milne Bay Province, ^ nsk their lives umbxng 
Papua New Guiiiea, snowed I® the produce of their 

from trees and otbatree-ielat- tauest trees.” 

ed incidents woe the most com- 

mon cause of izyurtes, acoountiog 

for 41 percent of admisrioiis to !?««*«— 

woimds and iqaries. f ISll tSfeed f RSter 

The Qrpes of aeddents included . -m w? 
falling off a tree wMle dimbmfr m A-rlailt Water 
beiiig struck by a falliDg tree linto 

or by a falling ooconut, trippmg The Assoemiml Pros 

over fallen tree limbs, and bong a NTWERP, Belgium » Sden- 
struck by a crasMng tree wtaQe try- xxtists breeding eel and bass in 


ing to cut it down. The tree usually thccooUi— 

was the coctmut palm. say th^TEave greatly 

The lesearcbers noted (hat most the breeding process. T 
village tree dimbers did iret use hope to turn tiiarescpei 

coaunercial operation. 


Fish BreedFaster 
In A-Flant Water 

The Asneiatml Pros 

A ntwerp, Belgium — Sden- 
■lists breeding eel and bass in 






m^nc n ihiVii jn tum Can fead to information about lentperalure and wm the coconut palin 

and cooling rates under which minerals solidified to fonn the The research notrt that mo 
. p ® viUage tree cumDcrs did iret u 

Call Maggiore, the physicist who designed the Los Alamos device, said 
111.. n.»ri«ir pmhe, a tech^ue fiTSt developed in Britain a decade and ^ 

tmpiriu^ oo, is 100 times more sensitive than standard electron tSiack Long Uisease 

which generate beams of eieciroos. or ncgauvelyefaar^ May Damage the Brain 

Cat Vaociiie May Yield Cancer Ones wuxiamson. west vir^ 

/RMiters) — A vaccine for cats, claimed to be the first to — Coal ndnen with black lu^ 
codd provide clues to fighting cancer and diseare could suffer brain damage, 

top!™“ ?euS teSS a tea^gausc of St^R^din said pi^ 

aJih 10 veterinary clinics in the Umied States and nary wvim suggests airbort 

toth mcais.I^^nOTpvc«3u«uj particles that dog the lungs could 

nSStv where the vaedne was developed by shut off oxygen to the brain. 
Kidiani lAsen, saio uw (acquired immune defiaency , — 

?i,SS^,S=n!fflth,poradL J I 

various yiniig of human cancer. | |V j% 

Uchens Monitor Air PoDutioii ■ J 

London'sKrstB^ 

faving in a unique symbiOTC re ^ bypersensitivc to toxic Room now extends its 

arihwMfiinc OH lOCkS. tfCC 081* JU»* 

substances in t he air. i k» .he National Park Service and the ---£5j5l) •Orthopae 

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Fed«I Bureau of 

set up licben ifeh^ and by using a newly devised • LanliOiOg 

NwC^oldRocoveryMelhodSpreads 

ilCW a new method Of exiraciing gold MEDICAL EXPRESS is sta 

NEW YORK (AP) fiy 50 percent or more. ® Surgeons and Phj^ans and 

fit^ore ledulique. according to Business niaga medical insurance comf 

rBvohitioomgoidnuningi«»*“'i ». 


wata (rf a nudear plant 
ire greatly speeded up 


V\C 




The Leuven Univeraty research- 
ers said they found tb^ ed and 
baa develcto up to fire dmw 
meve qiddtly in the warmer and 
oiqrgea-enriched cooHng water of 
(he Doel plant mjuide Antwerp. 

ProfesBW Frans Oflivicr, bead of 
(he research prqecL said no traces 
of radioactivity trere found in the 


Dt. Stanley Rudin said ptehint- oooUt^ water or in the fish. **We 
nary evidence suggests airborne only hare to make a feasibility 


maraet study before we can start 
lookmg for inresiors,” be said. 




c 




MEDICAL 

EXPRESS 






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Room now extends its range of special services; 


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Orthopaedics 

Gynaecology 

Cardiology 


' Dermatology 
'Urology 
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States was recover^ by by tiie turn of ihc ceutuiy. heap 

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■ the latest ffilS-report 

of Finnish business executives / 

Faldo. Of oi! the people who read FACT^ 

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■■ : 

IS A MEMBER OF INTERNATlONALMANAGEMa^ NETWORK. ^ 

rbkh,SF.008WHphi„UF«londn,cn,,M843,7K311'fc^.Wi / FoldolfellO.'s^WelSnld • 

— ^ _f 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1985 


NVSE Aftosf Actives 


NYSE [ndex 


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AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ Index 


eiM prev. 


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Odd-Lot Trading in N,Y. 


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AMgx stock Index 


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Prices on NYSE Turn Mixed 


Umted Prea tnumaHonal 

NEW YORK — Hie New Yoik Suxk. £x- 
ehme ^ adrance stalled late Wednesday vdieo 
prices Unned siixed io active oading. 

The Dow Jones industrial average was down 
132 to 1 ^91 diortly btfore 3 P.M. The Dow 
was showing a modest gain thioogb the first 
thm hours. 

Advances led declines 916420 among the 
1,965 issues oossiiig the NYSE tape. The five- 
Imur Bie Boanl volume amounied to about 
119.9 ™i»«n shares, comiaied with 118.8 mil- 
lion in the same period Tuesday. 


. Abhou^ prices in uMes on these pages are 
front the 4 ?.hL dose in New Yoric, for time 
raisons this article is based on the market at 3 
PM 


1986 budget totals S973.7 Irillioii, with a drfrit 
of $180 bfllioD. 

Smith of Bear, Steams said the st o ck 
maitet is **beaded for the low to mid-1400's 
near term and, on a longer run, substantially 
higher. ** 

He said that the small mvestor has been 
drawn into the stock maricet “^t not to the 
pmnl where he is a doninant facUv.** He noted 
that die ‘little guy causes con^tioa on the 
tape,” and so far there have notheen any days 

Stock-market bre^^was postive Tuesday 
for the 21st in 22 segnof tf The breadth 


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“says we are m a persistent strong qi market 
with a lot further to go," Mr. Smith said. 

Unocal was near the top of the active list and 
lower. The stock jos^ped 5% Tuesd^ on take- 
over speculatioa. 

Phifl^ Petiolenm, which was weighing a 
new takeover bid, was active and showed little 
diang^ 

Ensoch Cotp.., Amerada Hess and Son Co. 
advanced m uuceover rumors. 

'Elsewhere in the oil eroup. Exxon and Qiev- 
KM were lower at miduy, vriiile iTidiaM Stan- 
dard and Texaco had gams. 

Actrv^ Oaded ATAT was up a fraction at 
nudday. 

Tecfanol^ issues weakened at midaessioii 
after abawing in ea^ trading. Digital 
Equpinent, Data General, Gay Research, Pec- 
Idn Elmer, Hewlett Packard and Naticmal Sod- 
cooduetor were lower at midday. 

Pitn» Bowes, udiich reported fourtb-qnarter 
net of $1.14 per riiate vs. $1.01, was tucker at 
midday. 


“You’ve got a littl^roGt-takmg after quite a 
run-up," saxi Bdon Cnamm <d Birr Wlson Ca 
Sinm many investors have large profits, Mr. 
Grimm «»id thur gains from diis point rm mi^t 
be more sdective, vrith mcne dom days nnxed 
in with iq> d^ On the other hand, he said. 
rfaHines nughi attract new buying from inves- 
tors who see (he baric trend as upward. 
Investors may have been lod^ to Washing- 
tofl for cUzificatioD of the administration’s po- 
ation on tax reform. President Ronald 'Rea- 
gan’s aieech to a joint session of Confess was 
scbixliued for 9 PM £ST. When tax prtqiosals 
drawn up by the Treasuiy Dqiartniait were 
annnonewd l^e last year, they helped send the 
su^ maikei lower. 

Until now, investors have shrugged off news 
thaf the Reagan 6dmimgfr atiofl*s fiscal year 


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■4i.PMwnai p.ia awiwh 


lientlbS^Sribunc 


P.U 

P.U 


BUSINESS / FINANCE 


Slocks 

Report, Fage 10 


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7. 1985 


Page 11 


WAU, STREET WATCH 

"Nervously Bullish’ Market: 
One M a na ger’s Optimisni 

By EDWARD ROHBBACQ 

/MenwrienBf Hmirf TtOtaie 

T he muiut is “nervously bullish," says Alan D. Schwartz, 
pMtroljo m a na ge r for Bear Stoms, in describinz inves- 
tor sentiMt as WaD Sireet flirts with record hto bui 
shy afaaut ma king any long-term com^&nL 
•. .r * ? P®?'®™ upward move that hasn't g nftwi of 

hes^. What I also like is the fact the ratty has been 
dan ouTSere^ self-conecdng. Phis, there's skqjii- 

Schwartz, who remained “basically bearish" towards 
stodcs from the summer of 1983 until late in Dei^ber. would not 
speculate how high the rally — 


mi^igo. 

“There's a tremendous 
amount of volatOi^ and lever- 
age built into the stock mar- 
ket, euggeiating smngs in ei- 
ther direction," he said. “So, 
when the fnndameatals are 
r^t, I just let it ride untQ the 
situation is reversed. ] d<m*t 


^IdonHsee 
anyconditioiis 
now that would 
abort the xaOy/ 


see any conditions sow th^ would abort the rally." 

^ *1^ Hrst thix^ that nugjht speiU trouble, he says, would be a 
^ "reviv^ of credit demands straining liqui^ty," Uiat is, Hmiting 
fi n a nci a l capitaL It was “aggressive easing by the Fed," which be 
said became apparent onlyute in 1984, that Intimate 

concerns that 198S “would be a recession year." 

As for cash available now to fuel the rally. Mr. Sdiwanz argued 
that “financial capital can flow from one maricet to another, 
d^iending on the relative attractiveness — it's a nw«tt«tre to say 
that this one particular pod of is jnsi thoe. for say, bo nd s 
or equities." 

Bnr Stearns’s basic investment theme has been ancbmed to 
disinflatioa, Mr. Schwartz said, which means em phadg on “ooze 
positicnis” in stitide*growtb, high-quality, l^ger-capitalization 
stocks. 

The firm’s direclcff of researdi, Bruce Usnuin said top pieirg 
remain Kellogg’s, Genend Flowers Industries, donut and 
Philip Mmris. 

N OW, however, the prospec t of a stronger econon^ indi- 
cates that stodcs with grater esqxisiire to business cmdi- 
tions will perform wdl, Mr. Ij^nan noted. ^>erty Corp. 
has recently been recommended, jdiung sudi mamfraine-coin- 
puter chdces as IBM, Digital Eqoqmient and National Cash 
Renter. 

T<» pick among the cbm makers is Texas Instnimeats. Retail- 
' ers aJk> are favor^ notably Mat^s and Dayton-Hudscm. 

Overseas investors are also wanxmig to U.S. stodcs, aocczidiztg 
. to Jod Levy, Eurcfxam equity manager for ^th Bainw. 

“It’s around and gaimng some momentum,” said. 
“All European countries are particqziumg in the ralfy. Ibe U.K. 

< sticks out as when the strongest btgmg is originating. Ifs less 
aggressive in Switzerland and Gennany.” 

Mr. l,evy said that a lot of portfcdio reshuffling is occorring, 
but the eirq)ha.ri.s anumg Eun^ean investors is toward tdcing an 
investment position rather tium just “tradizig stodcs.” This phe- 
Domenon. hie said, contrasts with the last surge on WaD Street in 
August 1984, wbra the market gave bade its gains in subsequent 
months. 

“Euicqieans now are rec^tive to new ideas,” he said. “For 
instance, tb^ like our concrat erf switebmg out if the hpqntal 
supply and management sto^ into drug issues, vdiich are not 
onty cheap but where a shde in the dollar would benefit them." 

Johnson & Jirfinsoa, Bristol-Myers, SmitMCline Beckman and 
Pfizer are stodcs he cited. He also mentioned Scott Fsper, IBM 
and General Electric. 

However. HdnzNiro, investment manaaer at Bank in liecb- 
toistein, in Vaduz, said he does not think “biqdng has started" 
(CowtioMd 00 13^ CoL 3) 




Currency Rates 


Lota i nierbonfc rolas on Feb. 6 , exdueing fees. 

Offidd fixings far A i itsterdoni,flnBsel8, FTankfart,M1si,PariL New York rotas at 
2 PM 


:a) 


on 


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10956 

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381.43 


54346 

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24467 3S14a 



Dollar Valnes 






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■rt 0732$ 

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IION eoil TMtaM 3733S 
3M3 03739 UAE.Mwe 3i73S 


■awtae a mUTishs 

(a) CenHnareWfnne (b) AnauitsnMMtobuy oittMUid <e> Amounts oMded to bwmdolta- (M 
Uitfta of MO (X) (Mis ofUN IV) Units of 10MD 

teMfm mnosslsl; Boom C ummt nle^Jia^w tflWaiM ; C tam loai 
fiifimnrflwifcfrfm-sTffTi * rrfow.rfiwt awww/. onwrmmtnm tttumnmnMr. 


.Interest Rates 


] 


EnroGiiiTracj Deposits 


Feb. 6 

naSc* ecu SM 

n. OK Sh.6» 51b- S»b M -141% TO»W- 10* 10 .10*0* -t* 
Cl M •* 9* - M 13*. 13* 10*. W* 10 .10*0* ■•* 

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3nL 

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IV 


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Asian Dollar Rates 

im* 3IIMS. 

0*.0* Olb-0* 

SoHTDo; Kmitwrs 


Feb. 6 


flw -OSb 


• mOA 

9 -9* 


fta -9* 


Money Rates 

IMted States 


Clow pm. 


Britain 


Disaiiini Rota 
Fodorol Funds 
Prinw Roiu 
Broker Loon Ro* 

Comm. 1 

»flioiitli Treasury BUM 
e^noiiih Troowry BlUs 
COV 3059 dovs 
cm «oe* days 


8 

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j^nonilt intartoi* 

BMtfc Bans «< n*** 



SUM. PM. 

90&15 30XU •I.IM 

38X45 — * 135 

30X01 3iaa + 306 

sous suss + 1.U 

30X85 4-050 
— _ aio 

O^M^Hrlnos ior UMHw Peril end Uixom- 

hoBrg.OBenlBB«0 ctaMta prlen* Mri^ 

S^Lfte* Voik Conie* wrrenl eenlrort. 
All prices * U55 per nmet. 

Mum.' ion/iw* 


mo Kene 
uwemoeutv 
Ports (1X5 kDel 
Ziifidi ‘ 

Londeo 
New York 


U.S. Sees 
Benefit in 
Mergers 

Tideeavers Said 
To AidEctmm^ 

By David A. Vise 

WasMbigioa fast Serrice 

WASHINGTON —Hie Reapn 
administration tme told 
ihal there is “poweifiil ewideDce" 
that ooqNzate takeovers benefit 
(he UA economy. 

The admimstration said in the 
annual Economic Rqiort of the 
Presideni that if some individiials 
and communhies ere advent af- 
fected by mergers when jobs are 
lost as plants and irffices are riiut 
down, “the ^mropriale goven- 
ment re^wnse^ if any, sbmiid be to 
ease local adjustment p^lems 
father Ami to interfere with the 
takeover process itsdf.” 

Coogr^onaJ hearings have 
been set fm^ this year to e^Iore (he 
dangers of mergers. In its n^ion 
Monday, the amninistraiion ind- 
cated that it on>oses legislation 
that would alter the takeover pro- 
cess. 

“Although mudi addiiional re- 
search lemaiiis to be do^ and ri- 
ihou^ there are not a^uaie ex- 
planations for all phenomena 
obsened in the iriceover maiket, 
the current state of knoiriedge 
strongly indicaies that further fed- 
eral r^ulation of the takeover pro- 
cess, particularly insofar as it 
would make takeovers mom coaly, 
woidd be p(w economic policy," 
the rqxMi sakL 

The total value of repnled meig- 
er and acquiatioD actmty more 
t^ doub&L in i9M to $123.dS 
billion in 2390 competed transac- 
tions from SS3,6 mllian in 138S 
completed accords in 1983, accord- 
ing to Mergers & Acquisitions 
itM Eaane, which tdeased the num- 
betsMm^y. 

Tbe phflos^y in the presi- 
dent’s leport is that U.S. merger 
aciivi^ is driven 1^ fundamental 
economic forois, induding changes 
in oQ-maiket amdhions and der^ 

nlarimi in the hanHng , tn«ainin«> 
transportatum and brokerage in- 
dustnes. 

U added that the bea defmse 
a^inst a takeover is a high stock 
price idative (o outsidm* esti- 
mates of tbe potential value trf a 
oopcaation’s shares. It also said 
that some analysts bdieve defen- 
rive tactics, sum as the paying <rf 
“greenmail," eatable management 
(^daLs to protect their tenure at 
stoddidders' aq>ens& 

Greenmail occurs when a ocmh 
pany rqnmriiases a suitor’s shares 
at a piendom over the stock price. 


PtuWpsBid Tests Icahn’s Skills 
As (MijM}rcae~Takeov&' l^feciaUst 


By James Scangold 

Nf» Ydflt TZoms Sentar 

NEW YORK — Cari C. Icafan once confided to 
an acquaintance: “Qtess was one thing I was really 
good at I could have been a master or something, 
but there was no futttre in iL" 

If the game faOed lum on that scor^ the preda- 
ti^ sl^ he hm^ over a diess board have seived 
Iiiffl wdl dsewfaeie. Mr. Icahn, 4^ has scored mme 
corporate dwekmates than jm about any otto 

Ups Petr^nm^C^ he now is stalking his Gist 
inultDiillion-daQar pcey. 

The move reflects a growing bddness amoitg 
takeover specialists, vrix) are encouraged by the 
increasiDg successes (rf ihdr bids. For Mr. Ici^ it 
also reflects a steep increase in risk. Phillips is 
about 20 times lai^ than his biggest {nevious 
taiM and. to meet fats $8.1-biIlioa 1^ he will bare 
to borrow huge sams to pull tbe deal off. 

If the rise of the ta^ has grown, the plan looks 
faimliar. Mr. Icahn is Nttding for a conqieiiy be 
briieves is poorly mana^ ara thus is worth Ear 
toon than the value or its stock. HU Ud U an 
rttempt to capture that unrealbarf value. 

Tbe hkriy result, if the past b any gui^ is that 
the company will (rffer to buy back ibe Phillips 
stodc he holds at a price signiucutly above wUm 
be paid, or Phillips vi^ be driven into tbe anus of a 
friendly buyer, again for a above Miat Mr. 
Icahn has paid fm Us 7.S nuUion shares. 

Yet anrther posriUlity is that Phillips could 
eleet to go private to evade him, buying up all t^ 
shares outstanding, as some of Mr. fcahii's other 
companies nm done, 
time, tbe stakes are Ugbec, hut the strata 
U amilar to used by Mt. Icaho to dff il his way 
into heooiaing one of the wealtbi^ men in the 
United States. Although he refuses to divnlge Us 
net worth, those dose to Urn say that, at the 
mmimnin his fortune tOtalS SISO milKnn and 
probably is muck higher. 

Ifis success as a ocuporaie raider has made hU 
name one of the roost feared in coiporate board 



taigeto 

T&i 


Cali C Icabn 

rooms, along with sudi other takeover specialists 
as Ivan F. Boesky, Irwin L Jacobs and T. Boone 
Pideens — all of whom have taken strategic invest- 
ments in PUlfips rince Mr. Pideens b^n a take- 
over effort last year and then had his shara bought 
bade tbe conqiany for a profit estimated at 
about ^ million. 

A emporate hunter, Mr. Icahn keqis trophies 
framrtl on hU office wall: covers of tbe annual 
rqxirts of companies with wUdi be has tangled. 
Tb^ indude Tappan Cc^ Marshall FIdd & Co., 
Gulf ft Western industries, Dan River Ina and 
Andior Hoddng. 

After he bid for Marshall Field in 1982, it 
(Conthi^ on 13, 3) 


Economists See 
Slow Growth in 


West Ger 



Volcker Ties Deficit Git, Lower Bates 


By Gyde H. Rtmsworth 

New Yerk Tuner Seniee 

WASHINGTON — Paul A Volcker. ehairmim of 
the Federal Reserve Board, has assured Congress that 
kTwei interest rates would acconqiafly cots in tite 
federal but^ defidL 

Mr. Volcker, in testimony Tuesday before tbe Jdnt 
EoonoDifa CcMBmittee of Congress, mged IqpslaiOffs to 
“do as much as ^ can as soon as you can —have no 
fear that yon wm do too mudi" to cot the defidL 

Mr. Voldcer said that interest rates would be ooe 
percentage point lower than th^ would otherwise be 
if the President and Congress succeed in cutting the 
ddidt by 350 billion in tbe 1986 fiscal year, b^mning 
OcL I. 

Mr. Vdckcz sdd that interest rates would dedine 
even more if the defidi reductions were larger. 

However, he warned that if there was a smaller 
reduction, ssy oC $30 biUion instead of SSO b^cm, 
“there oould ccoiccivably be an adverse impact" on 
rales “to tbe extent itiai current ‘expectations are 
disappuated." 

The admintEuaiioQ says tbe de&dt wQl be S1075 
bflUon by 1989, or ab^ 2 percent trf t he 
oatimial product Ibis is about half the $222.2 ' 


deficit forecast m tbe budget document for tbe current 
fiscal year. 

To finance tbe boi^et and trade defidts, Mr. 
Vdeker said that tbe “largest and richest economy in 
the wold has perforce been reqmred for the tnne 
bring to draw on savings geimted abroad.” He 
added, “In tMt real sense we are living beyond our 
means." 

Mr. Voldcer picndded figures to show the 
U.S. dependence m foreign savir^ In 1! 
figures showed, foreign savings satisfied neariy one- 
quarter of the total demand for savings in the United 
States, conqiared with about 12 percent in 1983. 

Mr. Vokkersaid that carrent fiscal and trade imbal- 
ances were leading to strong pressures tot protectiem- 
tsm, a paint that was ediora Wednesday m a speech 
hy Jacques de Larorifere. managing dirertor <rf the 
Inte rnational Monetaiy Fund. 

In remarics premtied fm- ddfvay in Stockholm and 
rrieased his omce here. Mr. de Lmosirie provided 
some new data on the extent to Miidh protectimosm 
has already affected trade. 

He re^xuted (hat in 1983 products sutyect to trade 
restoctum accounted fm 30 peicent of consunqjtimi of 
mamifactured goods in tte United States and the 
Burc^Tean Ccmmiunity. iqi from 20 peacent in 1980. 


3 


Fordgn Banks Weigh Egypfs Currency Bides 


By Ollac Tohamy 
iHiemaiioiiai HeraU Triaate 

CAIRO — Egypt’s newly adopt- 
ed currency measures, aimed at 
curbiog imports and streimthenmg 
the Egyptian pourid, also have far- 
reaching implicaUoiis for forrign 
invesunents and frorign famks op- 
erating in tbe country. 

The currency measures, vltich 
have been in force since Jan. S, 
include a partial float of the local 
currency to attract transfers 
through the banking ^stem to fi- 
nance these imports. 

Bnt officials at some trf the 20 
forrign bank branches here have 
reacted most stroi^ to the new 
requiremeni that all impoct-finan^ 
ing be made in Egyptian pounds. 

The savemment is hoping that 
with the new competitive rate and 
restrictions <» the use of forrign- 
Gurcency accounts to im- 

ports, banks rq>laoe tbe black 
maricet as the main scpplier of im- 
port-financing 

This reverses tbe infmmal, but 
traditional system that hae io 

force for sei«ral years under whirii 
a thriring blade maricet covoed 
two-tbirds of these needs — 


amounting to a total of S2.8 IrfUion 
last year. 

The new rate, amounting to an 
effective devaluation of ^ pound, 

hae hMMm oTightly fterillafiTig during 

the last two weeks around 124 
pounds per dollar. 

Many local or forrign bankers 
e xpre ssed confidence that the latest 
moves would help cure the coun- 
try’s balanceKif-paymeDis defidL 
expected to ex ceed $1 billioa this 
y^, as writ the Egyptian pound's 
Mehany! lam agaiost the U.& dol- 
lar. has surged by an annual 

average erf 10 percent over the last 
three yearn, ibe balance of pay- 
ments is a detailed account of a 
countiy*s total forrign trade in 
goods and services, crius the flow of 
^ts and forrign aid, ea pimi loans, 
crfGoal setlVements and Tcsemes. 

Tho fmrign-bank branches are 
allowed to cmlyinforrigncar- 
tency and the govemment has 51^ 
gfisted that they form joint ventures 
with local pubiiO' or private-sector 
boiks that are alknra to deal in 
tbe local cutren^. But few foreign 
bankers have rmeted positi^y to 
the si^gestion. 

Salavatore Mbilica, a vice presi- 
dent at Qtibank and a membCT of a 


recently fmmed committee of offi- 
cials bom fore^n and joint-ven- 

tme famlfgj has indinatwH that the 
group would loblv tbe government 
to wave the resfirietioDS agamst 
those banks dea^ in Eg;n>traB 
poonds os accqitiiJg local oiirency 
dqiosits. 

The fore^ branches Imve asked 
to be allowed to open accounts 
withalocalbankortohaveanotb- 
ec bank open a window to receive 
letier-(rf-credit covers and pay- 
ments at tbe branch bank, niiw 
Minister Kamal Hassan AU has ao- 
cqrted both propt^ pending fur- 
tl^ disenssioDS with omdals at the 
Ministiy irf Eeon^y and the cen- 
tralbank. 

“In my oftinioiL it was a speedy 
and fotb^ action, ^ we appre- 
ciated the prime miiiister’s open- 
-muidedness," Satmid M. Za- 
vatti. vice preadent and comtiy 
manage at the Bank of America, 

“Fran our pomt of view, tins is a 
short-term sriutioa," raid Mr. Za- 
vatti, also a membo' of the new 
committee. “We wiO tbe 

dialogue with the gpvemment and 
fHepare mwe detriled reccanmen- 
dations." 


Mr. Mollica ^ the group also 
wanted the 
criUngon 
to be calculati 

Mtal at tbe branch banks* hM/f 



All N^m, dqmQr governor of 
the central bank ana hfinj (rf the 
comminefr superviring nnplemen- 
tatkm of the new regiiTations, criti- 
cized the foreign and joint-venture 
bank^ for concatratnig on tbe is- 
suance of letteis of errat for im- 
pmters. 

“Their dealing in Egyptian 
pounds cannot be ruled ouL bnt it 
would gnfai| an amMutmimt of the 
forrign-^nvestniait law, and sub- 
jecting them to oentral bank oon- 
tiol tel tbe rates trf credit ejqian- 
sion," Mr. N^m said. 

But he has strongly indicated 
tlun their /fgnanH anneemtiig the 
cefla^ on lending Stood 00 chance 
(rf bemg approved. 

The forriga-lHnndi banks, which 
b^n operating here 10 yeara ago, 
bm extoided $12 billian in sbort- 
-teem loans, according to a survey 
carried out by these banks, in addi- 
tion to SSOO milliai in l^-tenn 
loans. 


^ Warren Gerier 

tatematiimal Herald T>ibiaie 

FRANKFURT — West Germa- 
ny’s economy ooidd be headed for a 
It first half of 1985 if indus- 
output and order intake last 
Decembm* are any indicatioii, 
economists say. 

Industrial production in Decem- 
ber rose a seasonally-atSusted 0.8 
percent fiom Novanber, Bonn’s 
Economics Ministry said Wednes- 
day. 

The marrinal increase, however, 
stems diuffy from a 13f)erceat 
siuge in construction ouqmt in De- 
cember, when weather conditions 
were imusually favorable for the 
building industry, the ministry 
said. 

On tbe other hand, ouq»t in the 
mentifaefiirtng indllStiy fdl (L5 
percent fromNovairf)ers levd. 

‘Xeaving aside the construction, 
mining and Utilities seeb^ we see 
a 0.7-percent dedine in industrial 
production Cron November," said 
Peter Wolfineyer, an econmnisl at 
Westdeutsefae Lanrieahanlr GilD- 

zentrale in DSssridoef. 

“Well see an increase in manu- 
facturii^indDstiy ouqmt in Janu- 
ary," hfr. Wdlmieyer said. “But 
due to fieezzng ctdd weather last 
month, construction industry out- 
put was rirtual^ oiU, and as a re- 
sult we could see ove^ tn/faMrial 
{Hoduction dragged^ down 2 per- 
cait in Januaiy Iran December." 

On a stmtesi^ more encourag- 
ing note, the Economics Ministiy 
said that the maimfoefnmg loduS- 
tiy recrived, on a seasooaOy-^d- 
jiirted basis, 3.8 pefeent more or- 
ders in.Deceober November. 
Forrign (wders were up 3J peroenL 
coa^i^ with a 4-pe(cent rise in 
domestic otdos. 

December order intab showed 
an iin p royemeat over a 1.9-pereeQt 
setback in industrial asdas last 
November. But economists cau- 
tioned that December productum 
and. (Hder figures hriect cimsider- 
able uncertam^ about viiether 
West'Gennan axnpamcs will be 
wilting to increase capital invest- 
mail tins year by 10 perceuL as 
predicted by Bonn’s five-man 
coonefl of economic advisos. 

Bonn is banking cm continued 
strong exports andjenewed c^tal 
investmem to generate growm of 
2J jiercent or more and thus, ao- 
oorifing 10 estimates by Ecomnnics 
MLoister Martin BaDgemaim. re- 
duce the number (rf anenqiloy^ ly 
100,000 by year end 

In Januaiy, due laigefy to ex- 
tremdy oeda weather, uneoiploy- 
' moit rose to a to a seasonally unad- 
justed 10.6 percent of the 
worirforee fiom9A perceati in De- 
cember. 

“The swing in industaal ouqnit 
seen'm recent months does not {ao- 
vide a very favoraUe envinmineat 
for making investment decisions," 
Mr. W(rffmeyer said 

Norbert Walter, head (rf macro- 
ecoDomic f(mcasting ai Kiri Uni- 
versity’s Institute for Worid £co- 


DMirRises 

biEwvpeas 

GoidAAjonces 

The Astodaed Prea 

LONDON — The dollar, 
badeed siicxig commercial 
demand, rose Wednesday 
against ffl^or Enropean curen- 
des> hitting a record bi^ 
Bgrinst tbe Frendi ffann Gold 
prices also rose. 

Foreigii exchange dealers 
said the U.S. cuneocy was 
again boosted ty demand from 
businesaes that need ft^azs to 
buy Amarican goods, as wdl as 
by expectalkms that U.S. inters 
esi rates wiU stiy high Aud the 
econony win prosier. 

European raeiga exchange 

(tealers said the absence of m- 
terveotion by cestral banks to 
hah tbe (imlar's also 
hd^ the denar’s rise. 

The doOar ended at a record 
level against the franc. “De- 
mand is so strong right now that 
central banks vkime interven- 
tion is oonqrfetdy useless,” one 
Paris trader said. 

In late Europe tradm^ the 
pound slhmea in London to 
$1.1 MfromSl.l IS oolhesday. 
In Paris the dollar gamed to 
9.845 francs from 9J8& the day 
before, whOe in Frankfurt the 
U.S. currency rose to 3223 
Deutsche maiks from 32195 on 
Ihesday. 

Gold loie 80 cents in London 
to stand at S^83 at the after- 
noon fixiiig. 


nomics, said that domestic 
industrial otdets in December re- 
flected what he believes is an nir 
creasing widespread decision. 
among West Gernm conqianies to 
posqmne mqor capital hivestnieat 
deciskuis “because coa pan y man- 
agers don’t bdieve the currait dirf- 
lar CTfimiig e rate is pennaiienL” 

Mr. WdfmyCT of Westdentsebe 
Landesbank ^aA that caiatal in- 
vestment in 1985 may increase ly 
only 5 peroaiL in part because tie 
auto imustiy is stiuggl^ mth 
sharply dqiressed domestic orders 
in the midst (rf debate on eimssioo 
controls and wonld be hard- 
pressed to make nujtM' invest- 
ments. Tbe same would be true for 
the construction industry, be said. 

He foresees a stagnant first half, 
with tbe econo^ picking up in (he 
fall after the West Gtnnan and 
othtt E u ropean govcpnnento make 
(dear various r^olatums concern- 
ing auto emfesioa contnrf. 

Brendan Brown, a West Gennan 
eoQDomic analyst at Phillips ft 
Drew in Lemdon. said that Decem- 
ber produetkm and order figures 
shcKild not give ilse to new pesai- 
mism about West Germany’s 
growth prospects this year. 


Dome to G)nyert Some Debt 
To Fixed-Rate Obligations 


The Asoeiated Preat 

TORONTO — Dome Petroleum 
Ltd. plans to coDven large portions 
of its dd>t frmn variable-rate loans 
into fixed-rate obligations, the 
cosmany’s pjiaiman, J. 'Howard 
MacDmiald, s^ Wednesday. 

Mr. MacDonald said at a news 
confaenoe that Dome series in the 
next year to convert about half (rf 
the company's 52 billioa OanaHian 
dollars ($3.97 bQlion) in long-tenn 
debL Ihis represents 83 percent of 
the oompanys total debL 

In late 1%^ the f-anariinn gpv- 


eroment and four laige banks ef- 
fectivdy resent Dome'frcm bank- 
nmtey proceedings by refinancing 
1 bOlimi dollars ra its debL Sinoe, 
Dome has sold (rfl some assets. 

• Interest on the portion (rf the 
debt that Dtnne se^ to convert 
into fixed-rate (rf>ligations is sub- 
ject to floating rates, in which hex'' 
Fou^ costs rise when open-mar- 
ket interest rates rise. 

On Tuesday, Dome announced 
that Us 56 leaden bad approved 
changes in Us debt-resmeduling 
agreemeoL 


Major NYSE firm 

has opening in Lausanne branch for 

AN EXPEIUB4GED 

FINANCIAL CONSULTANT 

In SBQIUVIES and or FUIIMS wMi prewen record of producifen, 
Meow writer 

Be«D-2134, htamationol Herald Tribune, 

92521 Neudly Cedex, France 




HARRY WINSTON 




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Page 12 



INTERNATIONAL 



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^ 3S%4 V 

■% 0% 



U.S. Futures Fd..6 


Open Hlah Low Clo*e Ob. 


Seoben Season 
Hlon Low 


Ofwn HBh Low Ckae Che. 


Grains 


WHEAT (CBT) 

S600fau fninlmvni- dollars per binhel 


464 

465 
190 
174% 
363% 
174% 

Est. Seles 


Mar 167 36BM ISIM 364 —63V 

MOV 368 360V 144 144V -.b 

Jul 3JBM 130 U7M 138% -60v 
Sep 138 3J9 360 ia% 

Dec 36SM 360 368 148% — J»V 

Mar 162 152V 151V 152 — 6DV 

Prw.Salee £711 


Seaaon Season 
High Lew 


ORANGE JUICE INYCE) 

IS600lbb.-»ntbPerlb. •— m inn —00 

18560 11050 Mar 17£00 17560 1^00 1«* ^iBO 

iSib 15150 MOV l7e.7Q 17^ l»b 

18455 »««n Jtil 17119 IT86S 17660 .a 

Sep I7£» 17^ \JVS -W 

1SI6D 15750 Nov 17460 17460 1745S 1^ 

15060 1S650 Jon 

ina IMJd Mar ^ 

16150 16050 *MV |gg 

Esi.Sales 408 Prev.Sale* 700 
Prev. Day Oeen int. 7666 oil 34 


season Season 
Hleh 


open Hl»h Low Close Oib. 


Prev.DovOaenlnl 38678 off Sb 
CORN (CST) 

5.000 bu minimum, dollars per bushel 


3JSM £65 Atar £73% £74% £73 £73V ^1% 

£30 £73V IMOV £/0v £80V £7»V Z50 -50V 

131 £76% JUi £81V 2B3V £81% £82% -50% 

361% £79% Sep £74% 26SV £74% £75 —50% 

£9$ £66 Dec £60% £49% £k8% £69% — 50U 

£10 £74% DAor £77% IbV £77 £77% -50V 

12tV £79% Moy 181V 263 £81V U3V 4-50% 

Esf.Soles prev.Soies 30577 

Prev.DovQpBAinl.lSSJBI up2633 

SOYBEANS (CBT) 

5500 bu mlniRKim- dollars per bushel 
7.90% 969M Mar 662 663 


7.97 

7.99 

766 

6J1 

660 

4.70 

7%3 

7J9 

Esf.Soles 


Mar 662 663 &07 5.97% —64 

MOV 6.13% 4.15 6 00% 4.10 — a% 

Jul 464 665% 660 &a% —65 

Aue 664 666M 662 463 —64 

500 4.15 A17 AlS 6.1SM — 62M 

Nov A17 6.I9M £14% £17 —61V 

Jon 461% 661% £20% 669% — JI2 

Mar 463 643 9.43 663 —61% 

MOV £50% -61 

Prev.Soies 22674 


Prsv.Oav Open Ini. 72.302 up449 
SOTBEAH MBALICBTI 
I CO iorw- del lors per Ion 

30050 137a Mar 137a 138a 13£90 137a -M 

30sa uaa mov uia i44a leia i4360 -r.io 

19460 149.10 jul 140.10 IHa l4Sa 149a 

leoa i5ia auo isia isza isia isia —a 

179a 154a sep 154a issa i54a 154a —a 

looa issa oci iS6.n —a 

iB4a i6ia Dec laio 142a 141a leia —a 

Est.Soles Prev.Soies sas 

Prev.DoyOpenlnt. 41M1 iip732 
SOYBEAN OIL (CBT) 
eojxn lbs- dollars per la Ms. 

3060 2£95 Mar 2066 28a ai8 38a —.14 

aiD wn MOV 27.45 Z7a 27a 2767 —.11 

loa 2170 JUl 3675 36.W 3462 2663 —a 

27a 22a Aim asa 34a 26a 2467 —.13 

962S 2£a sep 2Sa 26M iSJO &7S —SO 

34a 22a oci 3sa 3sa 2sa 34.05 —6? 

3675 2£» Dec 34a 34a 34a 3460 —.10 

EsL Soles Prev.Soies 11967 

Prev. Dot Open Ini. 41.975 up 755 
OATSICBTI 

5600 bu minimum- dollars per bushel 
1.06% 1.n% Mor 167 169 167 l.a +61% 

1.91 160% May ia% 164% 1.73% 164 +60V 

168M ia% jul 169% 169% la 169% 

1.79 165% SOP 167 167 167 167 

laM la Dec laM 160M 169% 160% 

Eel. Soles Prev.Soies I5l 

Prrv.DayOpenlnt. 1154 off? 


Livestock 


CATTLE (OAE) 

406a lbs.- cents per lb. 

67a 4£a Peb 6sa esa eta mao —iso 

wa 6360 APT 68a eta S7J0 tta -so 

49.15 esa juA eta sea eiis eaa —a 

47a 411S Aue 466S k4a 46a 4667 —a 

esa 4ia oer esa esa eta 44.» —a 

44 - 1 0 eia Dec eea 4£io esjo 6567 —a 

6610 esa Peb eea tkso sea k6a +a 

Esl.Sala 2ia2 Prev. Sales I£002 
Prev.DoyOpenlnt. 50.10 oHi.iM 
FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 

446aibs.-eenlspBrlb. _ 

74JS esa NMr 73.98 73.98 73a 7368 —61 

74a 67a Apr 7365 73a TIN 7195 —SO 

71.90 6605 MOT TIN TIN 71.15 7ia -JO 

72S0 tkM AUB 72a 72a 7115 7135 —37 

7za 47a SOP 72a toso 7ia Tia —a 

7ia 47.10 Oct 7IN TIN 71.10 71.15 —M 

TOSS TON NOV 73a 73a TIOS 7£I0 —65 

Esf.Soles £711 Prev.Sola 1640 
Prev.DoyOpenlnt. 1163* oHM 
HOGS (CME) 

30ao IbA- cents per lb. 

5Ba 47a peb SSSO 5ZSB 50.95 Sia —.78 

5465 45.10 APT 4aa 4aa 47a 47a — 160 

SSN 4IN jun 5103 a03 Sia 5147 —1.40 

5567 iSSS Jill S4a 5465 5U0 5127 —IN 

54a 47a Aue SSN SSN ai5 5217 — la 

5165 4Sa OCI 48.a 48.05 4ea 4i6S — 6S 

sou 44a Dee 4oa 49a 4oa 4ta —ss 

40.70 46a Feb 48a 4sa 48a 48a —a 

47a 4565 Apr 4Aa 44a 44N 4Sa — I.IS 

Est. Solos 10531 Prev. Sola 8.753 
Prev. Bov Open Int. 30652 up619 
PORK BELUES (CME) 

30000 lbs., cents per lb. 

8ia 40K peb 7362 7365 Tia 7167 — Za 

Bia 40.10 Mar 71.n TIN TOM TON — la 

52a 41.15 May 7297 7£07 7ia 7ia —200 

5247 4215 Jill Tib 7112 7162 TIN — la 

aa 4020 Aue 7ia 7ia aa eoa — sa 

75.15 6115 Feb 64a 44a 4402 4430 —a 

73N 64a Mor esa —.45 

Esf.Soles £135 Prev.Soies £002 
Prev. Dot Oeen Inl. 13677 otflOl 


COFFEE C(MYCSCB> 
raOlbA-eenisperib. 

isaa issa mot isi. 9$ i5t.«5 I49 n 149.03 —in 

15Z1M 13201 Mot 149.10 149.10 147a 148.15 — ia 

i49a i3ia jwi 144a t44a i4sa usso — ia 

I47a I27a Sep 141N 14360 14255 14335 — la 

14275 iloa Dec Mia 14165 i4ia i4ia — i.a 

uia i2aa imot Moa i4oa 130.90 i4oa —67 

i38a i3ia Moy i3oa iioa laass isea —57 

Jul i37a —a 

E Sf. Sales 2625 Prav. soles £946 
rev. Dot Open im. 1A147 up97 
SUGARWORLO ll(HYCSCE) 

1TZIB0 IbA- cents per lb. 

IlN 4JD1 AUr 4.13 661 4JI7 4.11 —SB 

lOa 4J4 MOV 464 654 438 462 — Jll 

9.9S 463 JUl 469 4a 466 460 +a 

965 490 Sea SlIO 5.IS 565 £07 -Jll 

OSS £07 OCt SL2S SJ3 567 124 +a 

7a sa Jpn 178 5.70 17D 560 

oa 6jn Mor £18 ass iis li? +a 

7.1S £39 Mot 461 LSD 661 6a +32 

Jul LN +a 

Esf.Soles 12.435 Prev.Soies 1467| 

Prev.OOTOpen Int. 03ai tori. 170 
COCOA (NYCSCE) 

10 metric tofts- Seer len 

357D I9W MPT nss 2285 2231 2264 +21 

2570 SUD MOV ZRIO 2327 S71 2303 +18 

24a 2810 Jul 23M 3305 2258 2293 -fa 

2415 3053 Sop 2240 22M 2250 3252 +27 

3337 1999 Dec 219 2135 3110 3134 +M 

2ia 209 MOr 2116 +24 

3IW 289 MOT 2118 +U 

EsI. Sales Prev.Soies 5.330 

Prev.DavOpenim. 2MS1 oHm 


Metals 


COPPBR(COMEX) 

SSaOlbL-cenlsperlb- 

^ SS ^ 

Apr 612S 4£N 629 ^ 

9£w s«« «« *1“ Hll 5H8 Sis Ha 

sss* S7.a Jul 43N 63a Uu 

ioa Pn hSr <&» ^ Za 

;t28 Sl^ r Sts ^ :J 

70a 429 SfP r* 

eaa eoa Pec «■*» 

Esi. Soles loao Prev.Soies v.lOS 
Prev.DoyOpenlnt. osaz upia7 

SILVER (COMEXI 
Saairayoz.-cemspertroyos. 

706 6145 Feb 430JI 4SU 4^ ^ 

1695 5855 Mor 674il 627J 6195 +£5 

15110 SOM Atav 6310 4505 627.0 ^ 

M4lil 603JI Jul 6420 6456 6^.0 M16 +1 9 

I103JI 41£0 Sep 6SU «5£S 6405 MIJ +1.9 

1330E 4300 Dec 4666 6686 6666 ^5 +15 

I31S6 631JI JOn _ 47£0 +!.» 

11936 6496 Mor 6a&5 4845 6820 +1-9 

10486 4606 MOV gl® ij'J 

9456 4736 Jul 707.7 707.7 7075 7066 +1.9 

9406 UI6 Sep 7206 7706 7306 W.) +1.0 

Oec 7N.7 +1.9 

EsLSales 1269 Prev.Soies ILIS 
Prev.Dov Oeen int. a3N6 6H944 
PLATINUM (NYME) 

SOirevOL-dullarseerireveL n 

30L5D 777a Feb 277a 377a 277a 274a —a 

2S2a 374a Mar 77^ —a 

447a 245a Apr »a soza 377a gaa —a 

449a 2729 Jul 284a 7869 2549 £9 -^9 

3939 TTea Oct 99-40 +9 

373a 3049 Jon 3«LM 3089 29LH 39L2D +9 

EsrSuies IN Prev.Soies 99 

Prev.Dov Open Ini. I&I70 uPlOS 
PALLADIUM (KYME) 

latroyoz-oollarsperoz _ _ 

1259 1259 Feb 1399 1299 1299 130N +49 

163a 107a Mar 120a 1329 I27J5 19.40 

1599 1049 Jun 1369 12955 1269 13W +!» 

1499 10L50 Sep 1259 1219 I2L35 12^ 

1419 I0L7S Dec 125J5 13L5D I3S7S 12175 -139 

1279 1149 Mar 1259 +39 

Esf.Soles 074 Prev.Satos 191 

Prev. Day Open Ini. #91 Qfl93 
GOLD (COMBXJ 

l9lrOTex.-deilarsperlreyaz. 

5229 39L7D Feb 30170 3039 30210 399 — w)0 

3119 2989 Mor 301N 303N 303N 399 —9 

5149 3009 Apr 3069 3079 3049 399 —9 

SlOa 3049 Jun 3109 3119 309N 309N —9 

485.9 3089 Aug 3149 3149 3149 3149 —9 

4939 3149 Oct — -S 

4099 3179 Dec 3W20 33S9 3339 09 —9 

4059 3259 Pea 338.70 —9 

4969 3309 Aar ^10 —9 

43170 3369 Jun 3399 —9 

42BN 34Z9 Aue 347N 347N 347N 3N9 —9 

3959 3429 OCI 3S2I0 —9 

Dec 35830 —SO 

Est.Soles 2369 Prev.Soies 1499 
Prev.DavOpenlnt.133L793 up749 


Finoncial 


US T. BILLS (IMM) 

SI m 1 1 1 tarv p ts of 19 PCt. 

9UI 579 Mar 9162 9167 nJ4 91JS —64 

4161 87.14 Jun 91N fIN 919 9161 —9 

9163 BLM Sep 909 9067 9061 909 — JN 

9190 8SJ7 Dee «09 909 909 9.40 —9 


9055 

9067 

909 

899 

Est. Sales 


8LN Mar 
8761 Jun 
889 Sep 
1969 Dec 

Prev. Sales 9644 


9064 — wlO 
M.74 — wlO 

99 —9 

0930 —SI 


Prev. Oov Open Ini. 40JM3 up 3 
10 YR. TREASURY (CBT) 
snxUNH prln* pts £ 32nds Of 19 Pd 
03 7D-25 Mor 01-17 81-9 81 81-1 —14 

13-3 7Q-9 Jun 8023 BH2 888 089 —13 

81-13 75-18 Sep 9 88-1 7940 79-31 —13 

8822 75-13 Dee 7M —12 

888 7818 Mar 78-19 —10 

79-24 77-22 Jun 785 —9 

Est.Sales PiOT.Solee 1695 

Prev.Dov Open Ini. 42643 up 139 
US TREASURY BONDS (CBT) 

18 Pd-S100608pts 8 33ndSOf 19pd) 

77-15 57-27 Atar 72-27 7245 73-4 —18 

77-15 57-20 Jun 71-27 71-27 71-4 71-5 —14 

76-2 57-10 Sep 71 71 7813 7813 —IS 

76-S S7-8 Dec 7814 7814 925 8825 —IS 

72-30 57-3 Mar 48V 4826 687 88« — M 

7814 54-29 Jun- 4814 4814 4835 4835 —14 

783 54-29 Sep 4827 6827 4813 4813 —13 

6826 S6-2S Dee 4812 6814 482 482 —13 

4812 56-27 Atar 47-24 —13 

482 44-3 Jun 47-1$ —13 

4834 44-21 Sep 47-15 47-lS 472 472 —13 

Esl.Salts Prev.Salesl50.101 

Prev.DOTOpenlnT617a9 up£91< 

GNJWIAICBT) 

SlOOJXn prin- pts 5 3zndS<ri 19 PCI 
7817 57-5 Atar 49-)D 4811 483 49-3 —S 

6927 57-17 Jun 922 6823 4814 4814 —5 

68« 5813 S«0 47-24 —5 

6813 ^584 Oec 47-M 67-14 472 472 — S 

65 *5820 Mar -4824 64-29 44-24 44-» — S 

472 5825 Jun LL-M 64-14 M-9 442 —5 

683 6871 Sea 481 481 4828 aa" —5 

EsLSntos Prev. Sotos ■> 539 

Ptw.DOTOpenlnt 7.074 oHISI 

CERT. DEPOSIT (IMM) 

$1 inlliian-ntsaf iMpct 

91.70 559 Mar 9T64 9166 9164 9)9 —.19 

919 8130 Jun 90J5 9075 9853 9054 ^l| 

90N 859 Sep 90.19 9019 9013 909 —.13 

9017 8564 Dec 89.71 8971 0971 9954 ~,13 

99 BL56 Atar 89.12 -^14 

B9N 8443 Jun 8879 — iW 

0764 8764 S«P 8849 —.15 

EsI. Sales Prev.Soies 476 

Prev.DavOpailnt. 13N7 oflSSO 
EURODOLLARS (IMM) 

SI mllllon-pts of in pcf. 

919 8114 AAor ton 9097 9074 9077 —.11 

909 82N Jun 9043 9044 9061 9061 —.14 

9033 149 Sep 899 899 1964 199 —.14 

8967 849 Dec 199 899 89.19 89.18 —.14 

S9N SLID Mor 8097 88.97 8293 3171 — wIS 

•9.15 BL73 Jun BBN 8857 8843 889 -sU 

8864 879 Sep 889 8033 889 8115 —.14 

8967 87.93 Dec 879 —.14 

EsL Sales Prev.Soies 9565 

Prev.Dov Ooenini.lOL729 upITM 


...« 1.VV :» 

1:^ ® 

Ed Sales 4554 PrOv.SolOO 
Prev.DavOWfilF*- 
CANADIAN DOLLAR (jMM> 

Sperdlr lpoWeeidHttOW 

MSB ?? -yjS 7468 M5S .7460 -1 

^ -JIS M 7449 7449 J449 6447 -3 . . 

^ ;?» IS iiS ^ 7445 ^ ^ 

Eddies 1^* 

Pw^DoyOpeninl. TO627 upS09 

FRENCH ERANCIIMM) , 

*??«"“:)0M"‘W*.10ir.W« .Hn25 .WJI -M 
.'lino .TOin Jun -,'8 k 

.10430 .108M S«p . . 4, 

Est. Sales so Prov. Soles 40 

Pm.DovOpeninl. £1S3 ue40 

GERMAN AAARK (IMM) 

¥¥l’i i i II 

951 6251 Atar _ ^ _ 6225 -U 

ESI. Soles 9640. 

Prev.DavOetft inL 44.519 on bo 
JAPANESE YENCIAMg,^- 

Jun -MMM 9996^ 6m -<0 p- 
Mkiicn MU01S Sflo jmoM «Q03W4 >003522 ifl Mff lS ^7 

Est.Soles DOS Prev. Soles 1273 
Prev. Dot Open Inf. 14.942 0P4l 
SWISS FRANCItMM), 

SperIranc-lPOinleauelsiDimi 

^ 6730 Sep .3W ^ ^ 

AUJi 6775 Dec 6787 6787 6770 67W “2 

Eal Soles IL744 Prev.Soies 15.413 
P?i^!^^lnl. 23674 oHSn 


j indusWois I 

lumber (CME) „ 

1549 1519 ISIN —.70 

IssS 

JSLIg !S5i SS ISS M ^ 

1959 1^ M^ ^BOSO 1609 1109 1819 

Ed Sales £898 Prev. Soles 2.309 
PmTDOTOpenInl. 9782 oH 109 

COTTON 2(NYCE) 

Sl^bL-cenrsperfe *SJ0 6567 4SJ7 459 +.10 

76ta ^ MOT Sa MN 449 4L43 +.15 

na ^ !m ^ 47N «7^ rfi 

779 47JI4 Ocl 679 479 879 479 +9 

739 8769 OeC t7.45 479 47N gN i. 

7475 489 JMor *89 f 

709 69.11 MOT M.ie 

709 • 699 Jul 9»M 

EN.Satas 2.19 Pw-S«'« 

Prev.DovOpmini. 19555 oflllT 

HEATING OIL (NYME) 

4290MlCMtoper^ 739 739 Tga na -.13- 

Sn U9 Jun 489 4LN 47.n 48N 

Nia N9 Jul 619 4865 489 ^ +9 

739 759 Dec, «■"> 

Est.SoJes Prev.Soies L154 

Prv^DOTOpenlnt. 1k943 aH349 

CRUDE OIL(HYIWE) 

l6nbbl.-dolleriperbbl. „„ 

319 34A6 War 369 0.12 2L57 0.12 +64 

SIN 2457 Anr 24N 3673 2465 3473 +9 

309 »9 MOT 3467 3LZI 2567 3L21 +.18 

2165 Sa Jun f**" 2S.9S 2SN 35.95 +.10 

964 349 JUI 2145 2SJS 259 &75 +9 

067 Auo 2555 2554 B53 2554 — JM 

09 M9SW9N2S55214S3145-9 

09 MNOd2SN3S553SLN214S-9 

Eet.SaJes Prev.Soies 12597 

Prev. Dot Open lid. 4L3M offSTS 


j Stock Indexes j 

(Indeaee compiled shortly before morkei cIum) 

5P COMP. INDEX (CME) 
poinisandeeRis 

11270 1539 Atar 1819 1829 180N 19.95 —9 

18565 ISLID Jun I8L30 ISSN 15270 1029 —.15 

1099 1409 Sep I0N 117.70 109 109 +S0 

Eat.Sato8 PTOT.Salee 0518 

Prev.OavOpenlni. 5898 offTOS 

VALUE LINE (KCBT) 
points and cents 

3029 14110 Atar 2009 3019 399 300.95 +65 

3049 1739 Jim 30&IS 30565 2049 3H.W +JS 

Esl.Sale6 Prev.Soies MM 

Prev.DavOpaninl, 7658 off ni 

NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYFE) 
polnleandoefils 

ISS'Sf! 1®®-®® 1®U0 1059 

109 ^ Jun 1069 1070 1D470 1049 +9 

10870 1099 1089 »»9 -9 

1109 1019 Oec 11135 1109 1109 1IA3S — -IS 

EM. Soles , Prev.Solee 1S50 

Prev.DavOpenim. 117N UP199 


L Commoclity Indexes 

Close 

JMoody's;.. 07360 f 

fTwfHnrg , 261&.30 

OJ. Futures N7L 

Com. RosearctiBuiwu. N7L 

AAcKxty's : boselOO : Dec. 31, 193). 
p - preliminary; f - flnal 
Reuters : bose 100 : Sep. 18, 1931. 
Dow Jones : bose 100 ; Dec 31, 1974. 




■■ 

- - 

«•» '■■■ ■ 

■ • 

■ • 

tipf- • 

■ . 

j0ii F'' 
jMiCi-.*’. 

•• • • 

Tt: . 

bwm!- . 


m 


Prevfous 

772.101 

2,028.70 

12C32- 

24760 


I Aterket Guide 

CB'T: Oilcaeo Board ot Trade 

CME; CMapD Mercontlle Exdionae 

liMM: imenMtlonal Atawetery Atarket 

• Of dilcaeo /HercBitlla ExdHnee 

NY^E: New Y^ Cano, Sugar. Cottoa ERChonga 
NYCE. New York CoHon SMhanee 

COM^: Commadltv ESdionee. New York 

NYME: New York AAereanllle Enehanee 

gCBT? Kansas aiv Board el Trade 

MYPE: New York Futures EMChmiee 


London Commodities 

Feb. 6 

Figures in sterling per metric ton. 
GisDil in U.S. dollars per metric ten. 
GoM in U6. doliars per ounce 


i 


Paris Commodities 
Feb. 6 

Sugar in Frencli Francs ner metric toa 
OHnt figures In Froncs per MO kg. 


HM Lew ClPM Prev te e s ZSi 

SUGAR ZjS 

Atar 119N 11520 1159 1149 1)59 Ilia Oct 

MOY 10N 12240 1349 1249 1259 1269 Dec 

Aug 13SN 1319 1010 13240 1349 I34N Mor 

Od 1439 I4B9 INN 1419 141N 1419 E 


1N9 I4B9 140N 1419 141N 1419 I EM.vol.- ITOQIatoal safB«&.pVM 
]fliS ifS-SS Mies: 26l9ioto!oM£ inmssrf'ie.nr 


SUGAR *=*"• 

lor 16M 16N 1642 1653 —9 

lOy I.W 1690 1690 1695 — U 

W 159 1575 1579 159 —16 

Et 1640 1645 1639 1649 —19 

9C N.T. N.T. 1520 1535 -10 

or 1750 1735 1.725 1.735 —32 

EM. f^.: iTQOIafsef SO tare. Pm. actual 


AUr 1649 1419 1619 1629 1629 1839 ea 
AAOT 1879 1479 1479 109 1489 1709 luSf 
2678 tots 6(9 tare ZSL 


GASOIL JIV 

Feb 23175 mX 23175 2319 ««« 

Atar 2239 2219 2319 22365 22Z75 

API 2179 3159 31L25 2149 21475 2)79 
MOV 069 3149 2)49 3149 019 2I17S 
Jun 21475 039 21275 039 049 2149 


COCOA 

lor 260 3645 337S £30 UndL 

toy 3520 £375 2N0 £4U 4^ 

IV N.T. N.T. £370 — +5 

HI 23TS £375 — 2.49 Unch. 

ec N.T. H.T. - 290 —10 

tor KT. N.T. — 2615 — 10 

OT N.T. N.T. — 3610 —IS 

Esi. vel.; fO lots of 10 tons. Prev. oduol 


0475 029 3139 31275 029 049 Ml tots. Open Inleresi; 1611 

N.T, N.T, 2139 2189 2109 019 COFFEE 
N.T. N.T. 029 3259 0(19 209 Mar 269 £59 2661 2J 

N.T. N.T. 029 2289 3)09 2249 May N.T. N.T. £540 £f 


Bhopal Lawsuits 
Are Consolidated 


1544 lots 0(19 tons. Jiv 

SeumsiRMtursanSLamlanPetniewnEx- 
ehanec laosoiO. 

Atar 

E 

Swiss Defeat Bid ^ 
To Oversee Rates 


COFFEE 

Mr 269 £59 2661 2644 -4 

AAov N.T. N.T. 2640 269 — 3 

Jly N.T. M.T. 290 — -5 

Sep IStS 26*5 369 259 UndL 

HOT N.T. NX 2« _ ^*+0 

W: S:T: z J|S 

Saurap.- Goitfse dU ComfiMroi, 


oL/verseenares JndiaGPlPGmwth 

Reuten 

^armurnginYear 


9 16 10 
9 36 II 
19 35 10 


Company Earnings 

RBvenuB and profits, in millions, ore in loco) 
currencies unless otherwise indleoted 


(Other Eamiiigs on Page 15) 

Mqxo Teor 

db QUOT. 1f8« im SfifT™* ,V,-S ii--s 

Revenue 4848 50.9 — IM1? 0L9 

Net Ine. 436 ILO BSi 

Per 8here._ 29 064 'ju r*er aersJtare in- 

Yew 194 1583 ‘^‘^^BirgecfTBeonts. 

Revenue 290. J9£ 

Net IriG — 12U S4.1 Cm. D, 

PerSher«_ 4il 19 aocnVy m 

ifGfnersMdudedMmtaW NhOeor. 


E R V Ein-^VR. parliament, voted Wednesday Rsuim 

C«npMh- Oar Staff FnmDapcidia against puit^ interest rates under BOMBAY— The growth rate oT 

^.^.Of.pnc^ocvo,- 

ter in The Swiss voted in a 1982 refer- row to 45 percent, from 7.6 percent 

federal c^hi Nnv ^ P"” “ * 9834ftte Reserve of 

retod^ m New York, a judiaal paixd said controUer. which wUI shpemse India said in a rqiorL 

n-. I _ k# I.- rv - t • • prices. Banks had spoken out The bank attributed the drao to 

* crt^ws^der the supervision 1984-85.^ agn lure m 

** -lodgc JcAn of the oontToDer. An improvement in power gener- 

T The 15 •5-5. ^ spokesmao for (be Swiss aiion and other infrastructure areas 

1 tc Bankers’ Assodaiion in Basd said will lead to industrial growth in 

he was relieved by the decision, 198«5 of 7 percent iolpeicen“ 

the company and the claims total billicHis of 




Commodilv and UnH 
Cnfteu 4 SnnteB. IK 
PHnleiath 44/n 31 %. vd _ 
Stag) blllats (Pin.). *nn - 

iron 2 Fdry, Philo. Ion 

Stool scrap No I hvv Pin. _ 

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Tin (StroUs). 9 ____ 

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Pallad1iiin,az - 
SMyor N.Y.oi - 
Sourea: AP. 


Dividenck 


Year 
Wed Aga 
1.45 162 

0.0 064 

4739 4539 

3)39 039 

7*-9 96-0 

3G0 34-28 

47-70 4944-70 
55705 L3II4 
053 061 

139-IB 141 

461 99 


Feb. 6 


Gompanv Per Amt Pay Rec . 

USUAL 

Adoms-AAIIIs Q JH U s.yn 

Amdahl Carp Q 9 35 £19 

AgehePeIrNium Q 9 £1 £15 

Bast Products O ju «.i 

CBi ifidubtrtos 0 9 £» £16 

C toifral III Pub Sve Q n £10 2-19 

Cham p Sporfc plug g .}q 3 .J 5 -j. 

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of onafs, and poAi of stiu 9*1 541) 5B£J 


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(3eer Share. 35S 29 

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dmoo of outs miHian from 
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4lh QUOP. 1904 1991 

Revenue 474.9 ten 

Nef Inc. — • 459 3*53 

PerShore— 1.14 . ici 


I on Page 15) doDara. Six lawsuits bav% been Hied in federal 

Yew I9M 1951 ^ Manhattan; four in Cbarieston, West 

SmTIS* — Viraima; four in Connecticut and one each in 

pershere_ w OX KlUaddphia; Brooklim, New York; Gticaeo. 

>903 rear oer shore in- «■/( Mi.+mi ~ 

efuaoseharpeofTOeonts. 300 xyuaiffl. 

More than 2,(XX) people died and tens 
S n qr ^ Roobude thousands of others were mjured when methyl 
r^-L iilSK io3S isocy^aie sas leg^ from Union Carbide’s 
Her Ire — 541) 5B£7 pcstiade plant 12 Bbcmal on DecL 3. 
pershore— 164 15$ ]„ BhooaL a lesideat filed a 53,5 minion 

R4^_ 3a!^ 3sSS w^i^y against the state govern- 

Netire — 1550. 160. mntfer alleged nslieence in the leak, the Pres 

PerShare_ 461 UO T,-.-* ..f i-j:- 

Atoto Aictodv mtos 0/ «£F * 01 Jidia rqxjited. 

is i s. Nayadav accepted the suit 

usfotsmuiieninveors. | iigoLis: the Slate goyeniiiient of Madhya Pra- 
‘ desh. whose capital is Bhopal the PTI said 
TRW The doinestic news agen^ said the knt de- 

'' a tciol of S3.5 million in “interim 

^ i rri'sf ' to be distributed to everyone residing 

Year " jm )w thepestidde planL 

SSiiJir"' ^ 3K7 Judge Nayadav set Feb. 20 for the first hear- 
i^r9hare_ *714 563 iDg IP. (he suit in Bbopal. (UPI,AP} 


The Daily 
Source for 
Intemational 
bivestozs. 


London Metals Feb. 6 
FIgyrre In stwllng per metric hm. 

SMvur in ponen per Iruy ounoo. 


Today fcviiii tf m 
High orodg eapogr colliodgs: 

•ool 16599 16409 16499 16709 
Smantia 16819 16819 1609 16889 
Cgppor Lullwitoi: 

opgl I6SS9 16SS9 1949 1989 
aingnihs I67L9D 16779 16819 16849 
Tin: Spgf 96409 96709 96799 *6859 
, 3 months £9309 9.9319 96319 9 .mlS 
Uoadispot 3379 3309 3479 3489 
Smo^ 3389 3399 3499 35B9 
Zlnc:iPOt 7949 7SB9 7419 7439 

3 months 7569 709 79*9 iiwtivi 
Slluar:iDM 9949 5809 939 5549 
3niafi^ S749 059 509 5729 
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Feb.5 


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SmonOM 46009 46859 46BS9 4909 ”llXCU ID C.aWa*l^ |n Fall 


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Feb. 6 

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PoN . Tml wn. 2539 own to), 3060 
Ssura: CME. 


Reuren 

OTTAWA ^Canada’s index of 

ffldng indicators declined for ihe^ 
month in Oao- 
° ® as nine of 

we 10 c^ponenb of the index fell 
>S«Jonth. Statistics Cana- 
da said Wednesday. 

Bin total output rebounded bv 
I- pereent in November to more 
than recoup the cumulative decline 

Siri; previous 

months, the federal agency 





















































INTERNATIONAL HERAJLD TRIBUNE, THLTtSDAY. FEBRUARY 7, 1985 


Page 13 


BUSINESS ROUNDUP 


Plessey and Thomson Vie for Big U.S. Army Pact Digital Unit 

ToTahePart 
biECProject 


By Paul Lewis 

New York Tunes Semce 

PARIS — The scene is a Europe- 
ao battleTidd sometime in the 
ture; A reconnaissance officer 
sketches enemy positions on his 
map and slips it into a green metal 
box in his jeep. 

V^thin seconds, his drawiim is 



Sit*' 

'‘Si-. 

^ • S 


flashed in code throng a half __ 
en mobile radiotelephone ex* 
changjK and that prtnt^ out on a 
facsi^e madune in the command* 
er's headquarters, miles away. At 
the same time, the exdianges are 
handling thousands of direct-dial 
. calls and telqmnter ine««pf« fioig 
'^oiber cancers, with each ^graded 
according to military priority. 

Vast quantities of battidield in- 


l“8*‘"lechnoio^ Army in West Ceroiany, under a billion annually on U3. weaponry 
oatuefield of the future. There is $7S0-millk» contracL but sell litde to the United Sutes in 

only one pitwlra; No y.S. oompa* Pitt^ agihist Plessey is France’s return. 

ny lias ever binit anything like iL nationalized electronics giant. Now the efttwnttmii-aiinnc cm* 
Two European companieSa bow- Thomson SA, wtneb has joined tract is fairing b(^ in Eurt^ that 
nvr. one British and the other forces with GTZ CoTp.'s Sytvam U.S. altitude may be ghangiwg. 
French, say tb^F bavejnst what the Division in the United States to sell ~ . 

U.S. Army is looking for. the Pentagon a rival cmmnuaica* 

are now vying for what tions netwodt known as lUta, an 

promises to be one of the largest acronym for Xeseau IniepH da 

angle mifitaiy orders the Pealagon Tronmisiais Ataomafi^ Rita is electroiucs companies eager to 


Last year James R. Ambrose, un- 


71k ^uocKuei Press 

BRUSSELS ^ Digital Equip- 
tneni Cbm. said Wednesday that 
its West Gennan subsidiary, D^- 
tal GmbH, will participate with ^ 
Comau ^lA Italy and Rraault 


By Paul Richter 

Lta 4iigefet TanaSertter 
NEW YORK » .American Tele- 
phone & Tel^rapb Ca has indkat* 
ed that it is snking to form a joint 
venture to provide videotex hank- 
ie and other nnandal services na- 
tionally to cmisttmers and small 
businesses. 

AT&T declined Tuesday to iden- 


has ever placed mth a foreigo com- already in service uith sections of build a new communicaiioos sys- Automa^SAofFranceinanve- ttfyoi^pKBblepartiapati^&i 

pany — a S4J-billioc contract to the Frendi and Bdgian armies. - . - _ . . . . — — — .« . .. 

eqiup five Aray corps, totaltiiu2S Plessey demonstrated Piarmi^ 
divisims, wih what the mihtaiy for the UR Army in trials with 
calls Mobile Subscriber Equij^ Britirii fmues last year, and the 
mem, or MSE for short. French plan to show tdf Rita Uus 

Pless^ Co^ a leading ^'tish raring. The Pentagon is expected to 
decironics concern, is mering a choose the winner later year. 
battlefidd-comiannicatiCTis system Mora thujobs and money are at 


lem for the Pentagon. Hiw decided 
it would be quicker and chesqier to 
buy devetoped tecfanolo^ “off the 
sbdT from Europe. 

TUs decirion followed two oth- 
ers — the Marine Corps agreement 
to buy Britain's vmtical-tafceoff 
Harrier filter and the British 


an. v^_.. II _ j • n.,. iviviB uuwjwua iulu luwucT oic oL niimcr iiwicr oiHi uic Dfuua 

“ partner- stake in the competitkm. Tradi- Hawk trainer rather than try to 
and processed in the system, en- sbio with the Collins radio division dmially, UR arms makers and the tAinnM 

kweD International of Pitts- armed forces have worked together 



system, _ 

abUng a commander to Imow at the 
touch of button, for eample, how 

m^ to havt rtarnugan, wmcix is oamed lor out of the United Stales, despite 

IS the land of sophisticated, an Alpine grouse, cost more than pressure to buy more abroad from 
S200 inillion 10 develOT. It is now defense secretaries and from 
netwont mat u.b. commanders say being deployed by Britain's Fust NATO allies. The allies spend 510 


snip with the Collins radio division 
of Rodi 
bur^ 

Ptanzugan, viducb is nanwd for 
an Alpine grouse, cost more than 


to keep foreign militaiy equipment 
01 the United States, aespv 


build such planes. 

The Pentagon may finally real- 
ize it's dieaper to buy sooiebody 
else's wheel than continually ran- 
veni it yourself.” said a senior 
Thomson executive who asked to 
remain anonymous. 


COMPANY NOK 


I'r- 

• i ?r' 

w . A. 

“ Vf!.-- . 

• '•> 'X-l 

■- -'J-l 

^ *1' 
•• “C. a^- 






Beedtan Groiqi PLC and Uai- 
bond Hddii^ PLC said they have 
reached agreemat on terms for 
fieecham's conditional bid which 
places Unibontfs value at about 
F.t3.'74 a^on 1S1S.2S mSUon). 
.'leecham, a British pbarmaceuti- 
i^s and toiletries manufacturer, 
hai; offered 45 of its ordinary shares 
for every 71 of Um*bcNid's, or 225 
pence pa Unibtmd share. 

RobM Bosch GmbH said that its 
Robert Bosch Corp. of the United 
Slates has acquir^ a factory in 
Anderson, South Carolina, where it 
wtU produce compoueats for auto- 
mobile fuel injection systems. 
Bosch gave no financial details or 
xipaci^ plans. 

De Tomaso Imhistiies Inc. of 
Ud Bank. New Jersey, said that it 
tas executed agreements to devd- 
>p and prodnoe a two-seal sport 
XMipe in Italy for sale to Chrysler 
i^bip. No dei^ of the agreements 
vere disclosed. 


Eaton Coqi. said it has entered 
into a license agreentent with Chiu 
that would result in the construc- 
tion of heavy-duw truck transmis- 
rions in Cbiiia. uton said it also 
will provide lechnical assistance in 
China. 

Enka AG. a West Gennan textile 
and sted cord manufacturer, said it 
expects 1984 group profit to in- 
crease 120 percenL to 200 million 
Deutsche marks (5^3 minion) on 
record turnover. Manapng board 
chairman Hans Guenther Zem^ 
lin said that Enka's board wi^d 
declare a dhndend in AprA. 

Genera] Foods Coip. said that its 
board has approv^ the repnrebase 
of as much as 3 ntiUion shares, or 6 
percent of the total outstanding, in 
the (^en maiket. The padcaged 
food manufacuirer. based in White 
Plains, New York, repurchased 4J 
million shares last year. 

Hitadii Ltd said that its West 
Gennan subridiaiy would increase 


monthly production of videotape 
reoorders firom 10,000 lo 30,000 be- 
giniiing in November, pa^y be- 
caose Japan has agreed lo limit 
VTR ei^rts to the European 
Conimumty. 

ILP. Afartin PLC said that talks 
are taking place with onotiier party 
that could lead to an offer 
made for the Londoo-ba^ money 
broker. There were no other details. 

MatSHshita Electric Indnscriai 
Oi. said it will sell YHS-formai 
videocamera recorders to General 
Electric Co., North American Phil- 
ips Corp., Grundig AG and Pbi^ 
Gloeflaiinenfabriekea NV for sale 
under each company’s name. 

lUidnidI iBteniatioad Coip,, the 
Pillsbuigh-based aerospace com- 
pany, said that sales in 1985 were 
expected to increase lo more than 
$11 billion, in pan brause of its 
$1.6S-Iullion acquiriticn of AUen- 
Bradley, an automation equipment 
manufacturer. 


Nixdoif Records 
21%SalesRise 

Reuters 

PADERBORN. West Ger- 
many — Nixdoif Computer 
AC recorded a sales increase of 
21 percent in I984,boos(^bya 
stTODg performance in West 
German and international mar- 
kets. the company announced 
Wednesday. It said the year’s 
net profit should be well above 
I9B3 levels. 

NJxdorrs results showed 
world sales of 3.3 billioo Deut- 
sche marks ($1.02 billion), com- 
pared with 2.7 billion DM in 
1983. The Older backlog rose 21 
percent, to 3 J bflUoo DM. Nix- 
doif attributed the increase in 
sales to strong results in its 
hanlring , retail and smaO- to 
medium-aze corporate sectors. 

Nixdorf gave no profit fig- 
ures for 1984 and did not issue a 
forecast rtM* 1985. 


^ar, S9.S-iiiillion research project 
aimed at making amnmated 
terns more compatible. 

The prcgect was one of 104 cho- 
sen forpanial Rnanring by the Eu- 
ropean Community under its SI- 
Itillion technology research and 
devdt^tmeni program called Es- 
prit. 

Bnim> d’.Avanzo, vice president 
for markeiing in Europe for Digi- 
laL said at a news cmuerence that 
the EC would provide one-quaner 
of the finandog for the joint pro- 
jecL The rest come from the 
three partners. 

The project leader is Fin Comau 
Sp^ a umt of the IHat group and a 
major prodneer of industrial robots 
and other iodustrial-aabomatioa 
products. The French parmer, Re> 
ouult Automation SA, is a unit of 
the Renault groeqt. 

University College of Galway in 
Ireland and Italy’s Turin Folytedt- 
nic al so are involved in the project 
The basic aim of the project is to 
design and devdop a ^siem to 
closely link automated production 
and infoticuuioa technol 
Paolo Caniarella, ntanaging di- 
rector and chief operating officer of 
CtMnau, said the pn^tosed ^em 
would improve productivity in 
Qunufactiuing and ^ve a boost to 
Europe’s drive to catch up with 
U.S. and J^tanese teebndo^. 

It is the only Esprit prqjecl that 
involves Dtgjt^ which is based in 
Maynard, Massachusetts. 

The only other UR conqt^es 
in Esprit are Internatuxial Business 
Machines Coip., American Tele- 
phone A Tel^raph Co. and ITT 
Corp. 


seivrai industry sources said ibai 
the venture as DOW discussed would 
indude AT&T and New Ymk’s 
Chemical Bank as prindpaJ pan- 
nera, with Tune Inc. and Bank of 
America hdding smaller stakes. 

Sneh a venture would link the 
two largest hcKnDctRtqKiter-based 
banking operations. Chemical 
Bank’s Eoine-bankiiig service was 
the first in the United States when 
it was b^un in September 1983: it 
now has 23J)0Q subscribers in 
17,000 households, the bank says. 
Eight other banks operate the 
Cmnmcal system under a license. 


Bdl Canada h to Bt^ 

Cable AWMessUnils 

Xeuten 

LONDON — Cable & Wire- 
less PIX^ said Wednesday that 
it has agreed to sell Cable & 
Wireless U.K. Services. Euro- 
tedi BV. Eurotechnica SA and 
Euroteeb Italia SpA to Bell 
Canada International Ltd. 
Terms of the sgreeineni were 
not detailed. 

U.K. Services is involved in 

maint^anw qT miltioOltipUterS. 

wl^e the other subsidUnes dis- 
tribute coasters. 


Bank of America's home bank- 
ing service was lanncbed in Decem- 
ber 198^ and has l6jQ00 sitit- 
scribers in Califoniia. 

Michael Tarpe, an AT&T 
spokesman, said inat. unlike sever- 


al other videotex sovices now in 
(deration, the venture wtaild not 
offer the news or advertisinfi oon- 
t«tt that he said is generally ^ 
fin^ as “electronic puUishing.** 

For that reason, he said, AT&T 
would not need to seek an amend- 
ment to the federal coun order 
iKat in breaking up the tetephone 
company, barred it from transmit- 
ting su^ iaCormaiion on its own 
lelecomraunicatioiu sysiem. 

New^taper publish^ have been 
nervous about .AT&Tsdeclanni in- 
terest in videotex. 

Spokesmen for Chemical Bonk 
and Hme loc. decUned comxnenL 
A R?nit .America spokesman 
said only tl^ tite bank has “oi^ 
ing HisguRsinng with a lot of compa- 
nies about a lot of Of^xuiunities.” 

Videotex sendees include the 
Gateway system of Tunes Mirror 
Co., parent of the Los Ai^ties 
Tunes, and, in Miami the Viewtron 
system of Viewdata Corp., a unit of 
Knigbi-Ridder newspap e rs. 


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worldwide Fund Ltd; # -5*K,2Se 

nrloB« on Amalerdam Sfodt EKctionoe 



Bid Tests Icahn’s Takeover Skills 


(Gmuiiiiied from II) 
eveatuaUy agreed to be taken over 
Batus lim., Adding Mr. Icahn 
and his investmentpansers a prof- 
it of about $33 miOicin on a four- 
month investmenL Tapoan was 
driven into the hands o| Bectndux 
AB of Sweden. In cne,of his most 
hitler contests, Dan River went pri- 
vate in an eoqtloyee bujfouL 

in his most recent venture, he 
bought ACF Industries, a n^er of 
jailcais and odfieJd equipment, for 
more than $400 ndUiou last sum- 
mer. It was mily the secemd time be 
had actually acquired a ccunpany 
he was pursuing. 

Although takeover spedalists are 
sometimes riewed as bang littie 
more than financial mi^gers, Mr. 
Icahn is r^arded by invesunent 
profesriooals as a master techni- 
cian and lacddan, with an eaced- 
leni for spedti^ undervalued 
stocks. In faoL Richard Tappan, 
wto was rfiairman of the C(H)l]^y 
bearing his family name when Mr. 
iftahn marie hio bid, and who resist- 
ed it, has since beocxne an inyestor 
in Icdin’s transactions. 

Mr. Icahn shaipeoed his hivest- 
ment sUDs in the early 1960’s at 
Oruntal & Qx, a Wall Street bro- 
kerage, where he ran the t^tions 
departmeoL Howard Silverman, a 
former coDeaguc of Mr. Icahn's 
arid now prestdem of GiurnaL re- 
called: “He was ^te bright and 
very ^gressive, miich isn’t a bad 
combination in this business.” 

Mr. Icahn decided to move out 
on hxs own in 1968, and formed 
Icahn & Co. Since tboL his princi- 
pal business has been risk c^trage 


— buying into takeover situations 
started otiters — or insti^tii^ 
his own bids. 

Such a career seemed an unlikdy 
duMoe to some of Mr. Icahn's older 
friends. For example, Dr. Peter S. 
Liebert, a pediatric surgeim who 
was Mr. Icahn's undergraduate 
nximmate at Princeton UniversiQr 
for two years, remembers Mr. 
Icahn as general^ very easygoing. 

"Exc^t when he focused cmq 
sometfaii^ then he could become _ 
totally absorbed,” Dr. liebeit, wbo'-v 
rtanams a good friend, and has par- 
ticipated in smne of Mr. Icitim’s 
transactions, said. "In diess. he 
would analyze very, veiy carefully 
before he moved. There was noth- 
ing reckless.” 

A philosophy m^or in coD^ 
Mr. Icahn attended medical seb^ 
for two years, then dropped ouL 
Dr. Ueb^ said that tte direction 
Mr. Icahn chose surprised him. **l 
would have thought he would have 
grate on to graduate sdiool in phi- 
losophy or economics.” he said. 

Intellect as well as dogged peisis- 
tence are said to distinguish Mr. 
Icahn now. And while in his deal- 
ings Mr. Icahn of ten cloaks himself 
in the itooric itf being a defeoder 
of riiareholder r^hts against an en- 
trenched. inefficient management, 
one acquaintance recallM Mr. 
Icahn saying; ^I'm no Robin 
Hood. Pm out to matte money.” 

Mr. Icahn, nonetheless, feels 
sirondy that he is woridng for all 
sbardMlders when he makes his 
bids, and forces a buyout at a high- 
er price. He says be only pursues 
ccrntpanies vwk nonagement is 


not marimiTing the value of the 
con^an/s sux^ 

hti*. Icahn’s fast-paced dealing 
has led to brushes with n^ulatory 
authorities. 

In late 1981, Mr. Icahn and com- 
panies he coQtrriOed signed a crat- 
seni decree with the Securities and 
Exchange Guninisrion over what 
the SR.C. said were faDures to 
make proper disclosures in his bids 
for Saxon Industries and Hanuner- 
miE Papa Co. 


GOLD, LASSIES and 800% PRORTS 

TTie price of gold has tarnished, aborting the bniaales of gold bugsand their gums, amons them, the Aden 

Sisters - the Sssome lassies who perslstentty purr in their investment service that gold wHI gKaien to $3400 an 
ounce; a pre di ction our analysts have ridiculed. The Adens are sistsrs under the skin to promoters of gold 
seminara, “cutrency experts' who mdie greet gobs ol paper money, debunking 'paper”. The distribution of gold 
ftomHighFMestsofFin8ncetonaiuebeieverstnthepew8hasbeenatticuletedl:vC.GJ).;adiabibution,amadnes8. 
thatwilljolntheranksoftheSouthSeaBubbtofiaBcoasevidenoeofman*sctilp8iNlityandgreed.Thejnsecticideof 
iBtionalty has destroyed gold bugs; stiH, there is tomorrow.For once everyone isconvineed that gold,asubstance 
the Inca'scaled ‘The SH«alaftheSun”.cannotglltteragain,nwaLTb convince the *CrDWir as tottie efficacy ofthe 
law of contrary reason, is as dffiicult as sneeWng sunrise pM a rooster. 

Months ago. our researchers mocked the "consensus”, wrttit^ took for one more sledge hammer blow 
before a sparfding reOy occurs.'The hammer has decimated thousands of drsemers. Money never moves out of 
gold or any other commoetty, it merely changes pockets. Every analyst and aHne attendant has names of gold 
shares that have been pulvartzed; few appear on TMjy Sstsr tor. as aivays. the "Stfeer is seting into vieakness, 
viotattng every shred of fiscal common sensa As conbarfans, we lage investors to stssh awey ASA $47, 
CAMPBBL RBD LAKES $16, HOMESTAKE $21 and WCSTEFIN DEEP LE^.8 S33. emutBfing the pirouettes of 
“PoMier EkSstsT and other perceptive iconoclasts vdto are afasortiing, at wholesale levels, the discards of the 
disenchanted. The scenario in goid is leminlscent of the malaise that infected toe 'Street” inl962, when the DOW 
was mired below 80a At toe depths of despair, our resewchers mused TfC DOW WILL TOUCH Iran BEFORE 
HtTriNG TSfT; a prophecy then WBS suatafaisd. 

And now? Wb befieve the DJI will vault over 1500 and, as a corollaiy, gold wU upswing. Our cunent letter 
deineates why the ‘toerfaarousrelte'viiflt regain its lustre; in addition. aOR. highlights a tow-priced equity that 
could cOlapUK to prominence, dupfictfng toe success of a recently recommended “spec^ situation* that 
spiraBed 800% in im than a year. 

ForyourcompUntwitary copy, pleaae Witte to. or telephone: 

— I 



CAPITAL 

GAINS 


FPS. nnandal Pfanning Senrices bv 
Kalvarslr8att12, 

1012 W Amatardam, The Netherlands 
Phone: (020) -27 SI &1 
Telex18536 


Name: 


1 

1 Address: 


1 


1 Phone: 


L 



I 




Past performance does noLguarantee future results 


Optimism 
Chi Market 

(Gontinued from Page 11) 
yet on Wall Street azoratg Eun^ 
an investors, at least in Smtzerl^ 
and Germany. 

“Fve sees no dramatic buying,” 
he asserted, “and there’s not been 
mud) exdtement so far about Wall 
Street in this part of the world. In 
facL n^ coUeagues seem to be do 
ing more selling than buying. The 
thinking remains ddiensive and 
tbere’s a lot of skeptidsia” 

Mr. Nipp, who admitted that he 
probably was too optimistic in I9M 
toward U.& stodcs, said be sees 
1,300 on the Dow as a p^bologi- 
cal barrier UiaL if surpassed as be 
expects, will persuade Europe 
moDW manage to “start nib- 
bliiu” on Amnicai) equities. 

“January was a terrific mmtb to 
be invested on Wall Street and 
there wili be grctwiitg pressure to 
get in as prices rise ugber,” be 
added. 

De^te his poritive ouilodt, Mr. 
Nipp warned that excessive exu- 
berance toward U.S. slocks cnuld 
be costly. He adrised investineni in 
“medium-size, good-quality" 
stocks, such as Gould Inc. and 
risCorp. 


ADVERTISEMENT 


MmMMiS tNTDUUTIiniAL PJ.C. 

(CDRu) 

TTie undefs^cd odiuhidco that as from 
14lh February, 1985 ai Ii^A^ 
ciatje N.V., Spuisiiaai 172, Amsterdiini. 
div. ep. no. of the CTRs Rotfa- 
mang hnemaikuial P.L4:. 
repr. 100 shares, wiU bepyaUc with 
Dus. 8,57 (iv interim uvidend for 
year Slst March. 198^ 

per sham. Tax cradil £..9428 »■ 
Dfls. 3,76 per CDR. 

Non residenls of the Uiuied Kii^dom 
can only claim this tax credil when the 
rrld'anl Isa ireoly meets ihh Caciliiy. 

AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY N.V. 

Amsierdam. 31s) Januarv. 1985. 


Gold OptitHis 


<pricc» hi S/w.1 


Fla 

fib 


Ayg. 

990 

i44Gi«(n 



300 

&3G 81S 

I7.».)92S 

Jisiva 

3)0 

210. 33$ 

115)130) 

1875303$ 

3B 

(US ITS 

7TS-92S 

ia75-1S25 

330 

Q3S. im 

J«L 41*1 

HUGHS) 

3C 

niK. nv) 

2S0-4ai 

7m 85) 


VUen Wkfte Wdd &A. 

I. QUM' 4ta MIWN Bltaf 
IZtl Gcom 1. S u taw tuM 
TeL ^laZSI - Tdm 21385 


r ^ 


Weekly net asset value 

Tokyo Pacific Holdings N.V. 

on February 4, 1985: U.S. $134.12. 

Listed on the Amsterdam Stock Exchange 

Infonnation; Pierson, Hetdring & Pierson N.V., 

Hraen9aeht214.1016BS Amsterdam. 



T1/V\ESWERE 


MEANT FOR HENT 


The Good Taste from America. 





Page 14 

rOver-the-Coiinter 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1985 


Feb. 6 


NASDAQ Notional Morkot Prices 


Mt 

toif HM Law 3Pjw.ai^ 


naa luaa tew spjH.CMa 


^ u as 

2a 

7B 

m 

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10$ 

JObll 373 
221 

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034 
10M 
3« 
i«e 
SB 

m 

.00 U 1449 
t 14 

.100 J 543 
t 1073 

.2Sr 1.5 S3 
JSr 12 30 

1.40 3.7 401 
322 
4H 
300 

.40 1J 493 
04 12 1035 
UOa 44 1SS 
210 
193 
3003 
oa U 22 
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1 

00 30 200 
904 
373 

00 40 33 

t 2 

lOB 30 n 
00 20 43 

OB 10 3043 
OOb 30 935 
1.12 43 1 

Ok 13 36 

23 
40 
52 

.ISb .9 a 
lOB 30 la 


$ sw + vb 
13W I3« 

MM 26M— fa 
2214 22M 
3314 

34h ID 

21M 2146 
91B 906 
916 912 
24W 34H 
4*6 M— M 
9 91b+ M 

046 9 4> M 

596 M 
4 4—16 

4W 4H— Vb 
10)6 1416 
30)6 31U 
13)6 1416 4- 16 
13 13)6 + )6 

1614 1614 
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3716 3716— U 
am 30). 4- 14 
ova 846— 46 
17)6 1016 4- 16 

21)6 a +16 

2546 2546 + 46 
21)6 21)6— 14 
414 446 
74, 746 + 16 
11411 llfh + 16 
1666 19 
046 9H+ 46 
12 12+16 
1346 1416 + 46 
i3V6 14 +16 

a OM 

I34a 14 +16 

814 014+16 
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1116 1114— Vt 
35)6 35Vh + 1M 

13) 6 13)6 + U 

17)6 1746 + 16 
51* 6)6— 16 
716 7)6— 46 

12 12—14 

Itfa lau — V6 

14) 6 1466— )6 
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6)6 7„ + 14 
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45 

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333 5)6 6)6 616 

53 7 5)6 5)6— 14 

42 13)6 1316 13)6+16 
12 4)6 4V6 416 

81 016 8 016+ 16 

M 716 7)6 7)6— V6 


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157 »I6 31 


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40314 1314 1316— )6 

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2430a76)66 6)6+H 

t IIU 346 3)6 3V6 

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a 1914 TIkt 1914 + 14 

104 u msiia a si +ii6 

379 7 6)6 5)6 

Mb O a I76< 17 1716 + 66 

la 5J M ai6 ai6 am + )6 



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2066 2016— 16 
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5b 6b— 46 
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1196 1366 + b 
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5b Sb— b 
716 7V6 
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ab 30b + b 
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27b 27b + b 
fb 9b + b 
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35b 3M 
17b 11)6+ b 
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im 15b + b 
wb II + b 
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t 155 0 7b 8 + b 

377 9b 0 9b+1b 

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124 52 aab 29b ab 

147 7b 7b 7b 

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244 40 219 53b 43 NUi + 96 

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CotaNtS 04 40 1310 17 16« 17 +b 

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COflMM .16 1.1 754 ISb Mb IS + b 

Co m aot 12$4 4b 4b 4b— b 

cStmtc 110 so wa9)6 30b 39b + b 
cSlSu 02 &l 3$29b38b^+b 
CmBC^ ON U 17 15b 15b Mb- b 
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ComSy s S3 12b 12 12 - b 

Cn^d 7139b 88b- b 

CoraM 4684 Bb Sb Sb- b 

CmpoT 51r 6312b 13 13b 

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CptAirt 292 6M 6b 6b + b 

CmpDI 50 J 121 TZb 11b 12b 
CpIEfit 66 6b m 6b 

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Cnwldn 154 7b 7 7b— b 

CmpLR .12 10 Ml 7b 7 7 

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CmpPd saifb 19b im 

I QnpRs 42 » 3b 3b + b 

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Cmputn IN 8 7b 7b + b 

Cptcft 40 6 6 6 

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CnPOPS ia 13 INN Mb 38b+b 
ConsPd 5 Bb 15 a Sb Sb 5b 

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131 6b Sb 6b + b 
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CWInFr 54 SO 41 27b 77 27b + b 

56 35 75 22b a 7Z — b 

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MorFto 51 79 lOb MM Mb + M 

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M33b 23b 23b + W Mvlons .IM J 1510 Mb 3Ib B +1b 


310 3b 3K 3b- M Muttmd 
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SpecCII 55 4 

Spertio 

Spire 

StarSri 

ShifBId JO 19 
Slnndv# IM 3J 
SMMIc 

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SleSIB 156 11 
StatuG .ISb U 
Steleer 
SlemrL 
SlewStv 

Stwlnt J3 10 
SHfel 
SlockSv 
StnifuB 

StrwC s Mb 15 
Strvker 

StuartH 5S 1.1 
Subaru 140 IJ 
SiibAirl 55 15 


- — a 2b lb 2b + b 

a lb tu ib + b 

““ assist 

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TISTrt aSsiSb 17b 17«-^ 

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USTr IM 35 

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UnvHM N 4b 4tt 4b + U 

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lia 4b 3U 4b++.. 

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6713b 13U 13U 


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USDOOn 
US Enr 
US Hts 

ussnit JMe 14 
USSwr 

USTrfc 1J0 94 
USTr IM 35 
USIdtn s JO 5 
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UVoBs 144 19 

UnvFni 

UnvHIt 

UnvHM 

UFSBk 

ur«eCr 

Uicale JI7e IJ 
VLI 
VLSI 
VMX 
VSE 
VdlMLg 
Vollen 
^IFSL 
VMFre 
VoINtl 

VBILn M IM 
VonDue M 11 
Vonzati 
VectrG 
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VleenF 
Vicorp 
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victraS 
VMeoCp 
VMdeFr 
vikMo 



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6 + M 




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3invk 

73 

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332 an 

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2M49W 

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497 9 

m 

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38 6U 

6U 

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199 7W 

6U 

7U 

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2ms 

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77 SU 

9W 

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95 fW 

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1N16U 

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13 0 

7U 

0 +b 

18 MU 

94 

MU 

WD40 

50 

37 

6036 

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a 7U 

7U 

7)k 

wolbrc 

JO 

J 

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4Sion 

10 

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478 im 

t3n 

im-b 


SubrB 1.a 4J 

Sudbry 

Summo 

SumtBs 56 45 


Oslunn JO 1.1 
OttrTP 176 B5 
OvrExp 

OuwnM J6 ZS 
Oxoco 

PLM .13 25 
PNC 132 45 
PobstB 

Poccor IJta 23 
PoePst 

PcGcR 140b 65 
pQcTel M 54 
PoGoPn 

PoncMx .13 IJ 


PorkCm 

Porkph M 4.1 

Porkwv 

Porltx 

PotnlM 

Pohici 

Potrtpl ajD 68 

PoulHr 

PoulPt 

PevN M 24 
Povchx 
PeekHC 
PeorlH 

PeuGid 56t 15 
Penbep 3M 4J 


PunoEn lOO 74 39 26U W)* MU + U 

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PeODRf 549 U b b 

Pfrceol 1 m m m— b 

P eja^p t 94 low ID 10 

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Piinnef 92 ou a i 

nmki mou low i5u 

Phrmwt 7 ffu m Ib 

PSPS 1482 VU 9Vi 9b 

PMIBI 48r 19 4450 MIb 16U 16ta + b 
PhnxAm 47 3U 3U 3b + b 

Pholpct 2 8 8 0 + U 

PleSdV 1611 24U 23b 24b + b 

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PlonHi 53 1! 4Ma afb a9b 

Plonsis .12 IJ 0 9b 9U 9b 
PcPoih 81 nu Ub 11b— )t 

picvMe 3309b ab a + u 

Porex a24b 34U a4u— u 

Powell 47 2b 2U 3U— U 

Pewrtc 72 wu 19 19 

PwCcnv H 8)* 8 a — b 

PreeCsl .16 5 41 a 34 34b 
PrPdLO a 6U 6b 6U + b 

Preway 277 4b 3U ib— u 

Pnom 601 7U 7 7b— b 

PrtcCfflS 2M16U Mb ISU— U 

PrIcCos 79757b S6b S6b+ U 

PrlRVD 5ta 14 4416 6 SU Sb + U 
Prtronx 1217 16b 16 I6b 

PradOp .16 3J IS 5U S 5 — b 

Proocp .16 4 361 37h 36b 37 

Proerp SS SU 4U 4b— b 


KJO AJt UAntt 


m»ra aouci m mobb. s anaiiBsm 


■50 AM.' mnoti 

SRCUnX BUM (OUDH) 


THE NEW YORK HERALD 

— »4ie6iU™-...WIUiat 


euROPgAIN EDITIOW OF TMe P<EW. YORK HEIEAIJD TRSBVME 


•OP TUX It. bin. 


MMB. anOMT HIT a;iN7. 


, -1 msi MaOIMpiex 


UNDBERGH ARRIVES ON RECORO^EAKING FLIGHT 


FARMERS FLEE Fwandunso Tiaka 

COW^AMSH 


SNiaoBer i kaitb at w p o uB c e r 



SQliOOO Ron Welcome at Field 
As Lone American Lands After 
Ocdftn Dash (rf 33 hr. 30 min 


LDBri* 482 18b lOU 10U 

UN 345 Re m 9))+ b 

LSI LOB ai3 16 ISU 16 + b 

•LTK 259 9 2fb 21b— b 

LaPUtuB . 44318b 17b 18 +b 

LnZBv I JO 35 n4IPA 39b 40 + tt 
UMFm .120 J 154 17b 16b Mb— U 
LflMlw .16 15 93 M I5W ISU + U 

: LamoT M 55 24 15 Mb 14b 

Loncosl M 4.1 a 16b Ub 16b + U 

LndBF M 45 BST 14b M 14b + U 
LontCe 50a IJ a46U 45U 46 +b 
Lonelv JSe 16 9 tu 6 « 7 

LowenB JB 15 a3527b aTb a7b+ u 
LeeOta 359 7U 7b 7b 

Lekwr 69 Mb MU 14b 

Lewisp JOB 10 107 m 9U 9U— U 

Lexicon 299 3U 3H 3b 

LoxMlg 6M 3 2b 2b— U 

LMFPfl Jta 15 79 13b 12b 12b 
Liebrt JI7 J naua a— u 

Ulnvs J4 5 40 43b 43U 49b + U 

UeCwn 86 6b 6b 6U 

Ulv As Ji 15 a 13b 12 13 

LflyTuI 50 14 
UnBnl 

UncTel 250 7.1 
Undbrn .16 25 
I LbCtes 
LocalP 

LonoF ia 55 
Lotus 
Lvndsn 
LVPiMS 


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; M * 16iW9 M MN* MM ekIiA. wta M 


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SunCst 

SwnMed 

SunSL I 

Sunwsl IM 

SupRIe .16 

SupSkv 

Supflex 

SuprEq 

Svkes 

SrmbT 

Syneor 

Syntedi 

Svntrex 

Syscon J4 

SvAsoc 

Systin 

Svsinia 

SysiGn 

Svstmt 54 

TBC 

TCA Cb .12 

TL8 

TSR 

T oeVIv 

Tondetn 

Tendon 

TenCein 

TeCom 

Tdiines 53 

TelcD 

ncmA I 
TeiRui 
Telcrtt 
Toieerd J2 
Teleplci 


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Mb 15 140 a N a + b 
a au 27b au + u 
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55 15 114 5 4 S +TU 

.a 45 n4Sb45 4m+H 

79 Ob Ib au— w 

3IW 4b 4U 4U + to 

56 45 43ab au ab 


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1 9U 9U 9U— b 

40 4b 4b 4b+ M 

43 12U 18b im— b 

401 IU Ib IU 
3ni2U lib 18 
29 6 Sb m— u 

laiiu nu 11H+ b 
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4721b a 21W + u 
36 6b 6W 6b 
101 II Wb lOU 

a m OU BU 

54 5N4au8ma +b 

143 UU 13 13 

,12 .7 aw I7b I7b 

2 6b 6b m 
3«87b a am+ib 

aw 9b 10 

4661 ab 35b 26b + U 
3677 7U 7 1 

W 6b 6b 6b— b 

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53 5 7 6U Sb m— b 

1169 aib a Sib— to 
t ina ssb 3m— u 

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J2 15 I^au ^ ^ 

I0M19U 10)9 im + u 
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la 8 4)k 8 + U 

6 7 6U m— b 


Telabs 

Tolxon 5le 
Temeo 
TemhiB 
TndrLw 

Tsnmnt 50 45 


wshscs 
WsveM) 

Wsbbs 56 28 
WUtatn IM 165 
WeisMB 50 45 
WestFn 

WnCosS 254 44 
WstFSU 
WMIcTe 
WMJer 

WSIUS J4 15 
WtTIAs 

WmorC 40 15 
: WsIwdO .IM 4 
WstwdC 


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jobsj asm 26b awn— u 
a 12b 12U im + u 

.13 J 97 I7b I6b 17 + b 
2N Ob >U Bb 

56 28 am 13 lab 12b— u 

IM 165 8 7b 7b m— U 

50 45 211 11 11 

aaiib IIU Ub 
184 44 aau 65U 65U 

9 9b 9b fb— b 
90 wu 10 IBU 

14 7U 7 7U + U 

54 15 a 15b 13b 13b 

N1IU ITU 1SU+ u 
40 15 7 a 21 31 

.IM 4 a 23b a aSb— u 
2M23b 22U 28b+ tt 


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moot 1904 Sb 4b s + u 

WIdCOtn 1773 8b 7b m + b 

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' .16 17 117 SU Sb SU 




M II 646 Ifb 19 19U 

56 10 aa 27b 21b— u 
.IS0 1.7 2 m m m 

M 25 909 aib aob— u 
9H SU SU SU 
SNim Ub IM— u 
2SM 17b 16 ITU +lb 


10 2U 3U Jb 

aam au au— u 
70 au 7U BU + u 


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Zeotec 

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aaab 

413U 
4N35U 
N 5 
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6234U 
134 SV, 
11 0 
246 I3b 

291 au 

2192 2b 


Floating Rate Notes 


Dollar 


tMutr/MtoeBamoL coupMHsxi BM . 


2SW + U PtCPtTr IM 14 no I4b MU MU 


2M 7.1 11 a 30U 31 +b ProtCPS 

.16 25 a 6b 6b 6b Proicol 

S39 31b au ab Pnivln 

a Mb M 14b + U PbSNC IJ3 75 

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17au au 23U 06*6 

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M Quoisv 



sms TO ttcoiteg — rr T "r aaussrsAr,— qepo 

MUJOWFMM 


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RpAuto 44 45 a 9b 9 9 — b 

RpHIth aOIS 14b MU 

ResExp a a 3 2 

ReofrSv a 14tt 18U 14U + Ik 

Reuteri .ISe I5 4N I4b M Mb + b 
RevurA 144 IIJ 1918b ISU I2U 
R#xan 143 6 Sb SU 

ReyRey 154 11 9640 39 40 + b 

RiMdess M 14 04 14b MU 14b + U 

RlWIm S3513U lib >8 +b 

RtdtEi rnasu a4b a + u 

RH7V6 SS 3b 3U 3b 

Rival M SJ m7 Mb 13U 14 
Roods S 150 II 2S3 38U 31b 37 

Robesn I 6 7b 7 7b + U 

RebNuo 56 4 1977 IS MU IS + U 

RobVBn 79 lOb Wb Wb + U 

Rockor 2MI6b Mb 16b 

RcfcwH 56e 45 W 13 13 13 + V 

RoMSSt Jta l.l 2 Mb a4b Mb 

Ro*eSB jbd 1.1 106 au a a +1 

Roaptdi M 17 a 23b a 22U— b 
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RoweFr .Ita IJ 72 9b fU 9U 

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Reyint l2a3IU am am 

RovIRS IM 6b 6U 6U— b 

RovlAIr 60 WU nt lOU + b 

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RvonFa 4B4au Mb Sfb- U 

SAY Ind 677 IS Mb 15 

SCISv 396 ISb IS 1S)U 

SEI 33a ISU 16b ISU + b 

SPE .wr .9 4a n lOb ii + u 

SPDruD I a 16 Ub ISU 

SRI M 25 337 19 18b IBU + U 

Solecrd 2Ml6b H 16W + b 

Safeco IM 45 lOPN Mb N + b 


M I QuolSv 

~ ' Quonlm 

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8 7 6b 7 + b Quixole 

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JS???**!*., Rp*** -S*' W 

'L S RaSSys 

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1990 Mb 15)6 16b + M Rbdiee 
2M95 siaun aau + b 

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109 Ib IU OU— b Rahiri 150 if 

51e 3N Mb M Mb + b RdintA 

717 13U 12b 13b— b MrrrS^s JO 10 

* “ Raven 3 IJ 

IN 45 »49b 49b ^ Receto _ 

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55. 5 Sb ^ ^ 

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IM II iionb SOb ab+ib Renal 

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1# , Shim? • 

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94 lOU 10 10 RlUlm 

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55 5 9 m0bm+U RI^ 

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151m Mb 16b— b Roods S 150 33 

46 6)6 6U *U ot— I 

a a IfU a — b rSnm 56 a 

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my 6U 7 + b Rockor 

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250 II MMb 31 31 — b Reyinl 

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m 9& 5 SU— U SPDrua I 

SRI 

Sotoerd 
Safeco 


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12 14b MU 14b + to 
IJ3 75 1331b 21b 21b + U 

an Sb m Sb 

40 13 1»I8U 17b 17b— U 
1549 ISb 14b I4U— U 
91 4b 4b 4b— b 
M as 9 13b 13 13b + b 

‘ 55 3U 3 3 - to 

l3N29b 3Sb 39b+ b 
la 4 3b 4 

a 12 11b im— b 

772 10b 10 10 — b 

1S7 9b 9b 9b— U 
56' 35 263 17U 16b 17 + U 

1543 MU 13b Mb + b 
29 9b 9 9U 
faWb tm lOb 
14 10 9b m + u 

774 7b 4b 7to + b 
150 19 407 2SW 2Sb 2SW + b 
a SU Sb SU + b 
JO 10 6532b au 23b+b 

J4 IJ iai9u im 19U— u 

1M23b 22b 22b— U 

3a 7b 7b 7b + b 



a ll Wb 11 
SU m Sb 
INI Mb 3Mk M 


37U M — U 

13U 13U 
MW 2Stt + b 
4b 4b 
12b 12b 
33b 34U + W 
SU 5U— b 
7b 7b— U 
12 I2U— U 
2b XU— Hi 
2U au 


Feb. 6 


Next EH ABU 







M »1 




IH 


t;yj 

195 







r|T| 

384 



64 


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44 

11-7 

& 


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254 



154 

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f4^ 






THE FRONT MGE 1887-1980 

Iniemationiil Herald Tribune, Book Division, 

[81, ovenue Charin-dc-Gaulle, 9252] NeuilJy Cedex. Fiance. 

Please send me copies of The Fnid Phfw a( U.S. S 37 each, 

plus postage; S 2i0 each in Europe - $ 8 each outside EuitHK. 

□ Enclosed is m> payifcnL (Ri)ineni may be made in the comenibie 
European currency oV your choke 4t current exchange tales. ) 

□ Please chdige m> VISA Card number 

Exp. date. — Signature: 

■ Neu'«un (nr VISA Lard puhltt^ni 


Name (in block letters}:. 


Add res:. 


Cuyand Code: 


Counti);. 


COAIPACNIE FINANOERE DE 
credit INDUSTRIELETCOMMERaAL 

GROUPECIC 

On Januaiy 29 and 30, 1965, the Boanb of Direeion of CROUPE DES 
ASSURAfte NATIONALES "GAN", COMPACNIE PlNANa£3tE DE 
OtEorr INDUSTRIEL ET COMBiIQtClAL. and COMPACNIE FINAN- 
CIEkE DESUEZ uproved in principle on inoexee of the Bfaxre eratal of 

COMPACNIE FINANOtRE DE raCSlT lNDU?nUEL ET COHMER. 
OAL 

Thu new capital will be coatribued Iw GAN ihroi^ the subscription of 
two eoaeenitiTe iosuN of pidtend ohana npreoenlk^ FRF 350 million 
eadt 

The Gm imie will be made before June 10, L985, and the second before 
Decemba 3L 19B5. After the subocriptioa of tfaere two b bun GAN wQJ 
hoM 2L87% of tfae capital of COMPACNIE FINANOERE DE OUDIT 
l^anJ5^uEL £T ajKoiii^ 

In addition, it was apeed that GAN will acmiire fiom COMPACNIE 
FINANCIERE DE SUEZ tfae neoeaaiy dwes to doM 34% of ibe cmiul of 
COMPACNIE FINANCIERE DE CREDITINDUSTRIEL ET OOMMER. 
QAL ia the couioe.of tfae next four yean.' 

On rwmpLeinn fd ifae ^xTve tiawarri anx, dw maioDiT of tfae Capital of 
COMP/^NIE HNANCIERE DE CREDIT INDUSTRlEL ET COM^- 
QAL will Still be held by dw Republic of Fiance. 

•■[n 1964 the eonsdidated resoltB of QC Cnup, which has realized an 
important reoi^oiaikn oinoe 1982, will be improved so compared with 





-v-^r1 





rJ. * •! 

Pf ll' 'L^ 















INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1985 


Pa^ 15 



Trade Credits to Poor Nations Fed in ’84 First Half 





• •• ^ 


By Cad GewirC 2 

/nuttuauinal HenUd Tribune 

PARIS — A drop io (rfHcial 
trade credits to devdoping coun- 
tries in the fiist six months of last 
year iDore than wiped out a modest 
inaease in bank lending, reducing 
by some S2 billion the amount or 
total debt ont&tanding fioin the end 
of 1983. 

The data came from a report 
rdeased last Vi-eek ^ the Oi^miza- 
don for Economic Cooperation 
and Devdopment and the B.nntr for 
loiemational Seiilemenis. The 
semi-annual study blends the 
bank-lending siaiisucs compiled by 
the BIS with OECD data on export 
credits granted by govenunents or 
their ogenaes to give a wider pic- 
ture on the debt situation than pro- 
vided l^just the banking figures. 

However, this is still not a total 
view of the situation, because in-mc 
by official multilateral ioslituiions 
such as the World Bank and the 
Intemaiional Monetary Fund were 


not included, nor was lending by 
blanks outside tte BIS rqwrtmg 
area, notably the MWeasL 

Tbe most striking aspect of the 
rqwn was a $14>l-billioD drop 
from the end of 1983 in the amramt 
of non-bank trade-rdat^ credits 
granted under offidal insurance or 
^arantee or extttided diiec^ to 
the foreign buyer by the omdal 
sector of the exporting country. 

The biggicst declines, reflecting 
the recession induced by the drop 
IQ oil prices and tbe lower vdome 
of sales, were recorded in the major 
otl-exponing countries. OfTiedd 
trade credits drrmed $3-3 billion 
to Saudi Arabia, £2 l^on to Alge- 
na,$l.?biUioatolTaq.$LI billm 
to Libya and SI billion to Iran. 

The other big loser in official 
credits was tbe East Uoc. sriih the 
Soviet Unim showing a dedine of 
51.6 bilHoD and Poland Sl.l bil- 
lion. In Latin Amo^ Br^ was 
the cMily country to show a large 
decline, of S1.4 billitxL 


The data also show that while 
bonk lendiu increased by Sill 
bilhon, a fiiu three-quarters <rf this 
was due to a i6-pcfoeni rise in 
loans earring official insurance or 

giMrawtag 

The report also showed that five 
coDtttries more heavily on offi- 
cial trade oracs than buk loans. 
China and Iran at nud-1984 had 
bank loans totaling some S2 billioa 
eadi, compared to non-bank trade 
CKdits of S4 union and S3.4 Ul- 
lion, respectively, fsrad was the 
second biggest user of trade credits, 
totaling $8,9 tnlUon, agai^ bank 
loans of S6 billion. Saudi Arabia 
and Zaire were tbe other (wo coun- 
tries shotting a preference for dC- 

yiftt oe&ts. 

Another six countries — Algeria, 
Egypt, India, Ac Soriel Union, 
Tnrk^ and Zmnbta —made exten- 
sive use of trade credits rdotive to 
bank loans. In the Sov^ Union, 
whidi is the single hugest user of 
offieial credits, non-oank trade 
credits totaled S9.9 billion, com- 


pared to bank loans of SI6.2 bil- 
iksL 

Overall, the East bloc relies most 
heavily on official oediis. Tbqr ac- 
cousiM for 38 percent of the Sovin 
Union's recorded debt, 24 percent 
for Poland, 21 percent for Bulgaria 
and Czechoslovakia, 17 percent for 
Romania. 14 percent Cor East Ger- 
many and 4 percent to Hungary. 


This stands in sharp conuasi to 
the df^ pre^ of the largest ddn- 
ors. In Brazil, official credits 
aiwrttmiari to percent of total 
debt, in Mexico S.3 percent and 
Ai^tina 7.2 percenL 

Fin^, four countries stand out 
as having had the largest amount of 
bank loans guarant^ by OECD 
governments or their aggnriwt- Iq 
B razil. SS J billioa d ^ S614 bil- 
1km worth- bank dtbi was guar- 
anteed. In tiie Sot^ UnioA. S4.6 
billion out of $16.2 billioQ was 
guaranteed; in Algeria, $3.7 billioD 
out (d S7.9 billion, and in Mexico, 
$3.3 billimi out of $65.4 billion. 


Sears ProfUlhappedin44hQuarlery 
But Readied R^rd CherFidl Year 

Vmiai Prta htuntanemd 

CHICAGO — Sears. Roebodc & Co. anncntnfiftrt Wednesday that 
its fouith-quaner earnings bad dre^jped 3.4 per c ent from 1983, 
because of shaip pie-Qittttmas competiuen aaa warm weaifaer. 


Sears said its net income in the final quarter ^qtped to $563.1 
minion, or SI.54 per share, fiom a record SS817 mDlion. or $1.65 per 
share, in 1983. rourtfa-qnaner revenues rose 5.1 percent, to $1137 
bOlioii from 510.82 billim a year aga 

Over the year ended Dec. 3 1, Sears reemded an 8.4-pei^t increase 
in ixteome to a record SI.45 bUlkn, or54i}I a share. This oqnipared 
with the pterions record of $1.34 Iti&ioa. or $3.80 per share, in 1983. 

Revenues in 1984 totaled a record $3833 billioii. an increase of 
S2.9S bilikm, or 8.2 percent, from the previous record of $3538 billion 

b 1983. 

Sears's chairman and duel executive (rffica*. Edward Tdling said 
the fomtit-qaarter decline ^d been caused by “xtat of the most 
competitive Chrisunas shopping m hisuiiy and unseasonably 

wana lenqieratures.** 

Allsute’s Insurance Group income rose 16.7 percent to a record 
S1S9.4 million for the fourth quarter, cooopared with S1363 millian in 
1983. Revenues totaled SZ30 bQlion coaqaxed mth Sll2 a 
year ago. 


Company Earnings 

ReveinM and profits* In milllen&m in tocol orrrancles 
unless etlierwlselndieared 


The Dean Witter Fmandal Services group reported a loss of $3.9 
million for the fourth quarter compared with income dt $83 mfllion 
the previous year and revenues totaled $662.8 mfilian conpared with 
SSS33 atimon b 1983. 


Cemeuia 

Go ns t or 

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Per Ihort... 1.5 053 

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el srn mlHlea. Full name el 
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Cemmuiiiendene. 


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Page 16 


international herald tribune, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1985 


I COULD BE IN 
A NICE UARM 
OPERATING ROOM! 




books 


ASHKENAZY: Bevond Fronden 


By Jasper Parrott with Vladimir 
Ashkena:y. 239pp. $14.95. 
Atheneum, S97 Fifth Avenue, 
New York, N. Y. 10017. 


m 

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Reviewed by Jonathan Yardley 

T his im^iniy but exc^tionally interest- 
ing book is a collaboration bemeen Vladi- 
mir Ashkenazy, the brilliant pianisL and Jas- 
per Parrott, who has been his ^ent for nearly 
two decades. Its nn£ainlines5 is the result of 


awkward stnic lure — pasMg eg written bv P3r~ 

DOM 


ACROSS 


1 Cuts down 
5 Venous fluid of 
; tbegods 
10 Hounds 
1.4 Square’s 
: lengcbtiines 
width 
15 Orifice 
WTVpee” 

;• sequel 

17 Coat 
superficially 

18 Noted Abstract 
Eqiresslaiist 

20 The Vltava, to 
a Berliner 

22 Place apart 

23 liquid used In 
dyes 

25 Divagate 
26Grediseagod 
28 Met mezzo- 
soprano 
32 Furious 
34 Finn 

36 Duarte 

Perdn 

37 Large 

. cantaJners 

38 Baby's 
bellyache 

30 Wax imprint 

40 W. W. If area 

41 Pitcher Ryan 
42Chfiteau- 

Thierry’s river 
43 Agree 

45 pgtaam 

47 Yorkshire 
river 


49 Hung tq> the 
receiver: Brit. 

52 Topple 

56 Mouse, ftnr 
example 

57 Source 

59 precedent 

60 French 
composer 

61 Of musical 
sound Quality 


13 Lone 
19 Uttered 
inanities 


roll alternate unpredictably with extended re- 
marks by AghlfCTifiTy — and of Parrott’s ten- 
dency to swoon over the mdiifold ^fts and 
vinues of his clienL But this is of less Mnse- 
quence than the book’s forthright discussion (A 
many provocative subjects, about all of vdiich 
AshltMiary rcveals himsglf to be wdl-ioformed 
and thov^tfuUy opinimiated. 



v ioAimir Ashkenazy 


A^ei^ is 47 years old; among the pia- 
nists of Elis generation he is in the first rank, ” 


62 Cut 

03 Brings to court 

64 Candidate list 

65 Famous name 
Inmotordom 


21 Light 

24 Antiseptic 
solutlm 

27 Type of energy 

29 Worthless me 

SOKhramazov 

brother 

31 Borecole 

32 With, in Nice 

33 Acronym for a 
defense group 

35 A cosmetic 

38 Debases 


BEETLE BAILEY 


DOWN 


ISourceof 
igneous rock 

2i^llol6lunar 

lander 

3Tbe Iron Duke 

4 They supply 
horsemen 

5 Exempt from 
barm 

6 Cote sound 

7 Hovels 

8 Further 

9 Grandiloquent 


SOANorth 
Atlantic sea 

41 Parisian 
nights 

42 Horace or 
Thomas 

44 Verdi's “Don 


4flGrou[ 
48Hynnoffila)S 

50 Malodorous 

51 CoU^socs. 
smmei 


52Tem^eteam 


10 Uses a divining 
rod 


53 Offspring of a 
vacbe 


11 Buddhist 
sacred 

mniintalti 

12 Olympic top 
avmrd 


54 French 
women’s 
magazine 

55 Jazz singer 
Simone 

58 Cole or Turner 


New York Times, eiBted by Eiigme bfaleska. 


DENNIS THE MENACE 



‘When myDaosa'is he HASioTHiNK'eojrsovETHiNS, 

'•THAT Nm^ HE'S GONNA TAKE A NAP.* 


I THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
by Henri Arnold and Bob Lae 


Unscrambfe these four Jumbtes, 
one letter to each square, to form 
four ordinary words 


BELLI 


■MB 

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BMI 



VALIE 


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VORAYS 


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HOW THAT 
I COMICAL SEWeEAMT I 

STARTED THE DAT 

FOR HI6 TROOPS. 


Now arrange the circled letters to 
term the surpnea answer, as 8ug> 
gestsd by the above cartoon. 


te.rwm." rTTTxi " rTm 


Yestenlay's 


(Answers temoriew) 

Jumbles PRUNE DRONE KISMET ARTFUL 
Answer What a flatterer seldom is— INTERRUPTED 


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Temp, e — 0 <« - SI. LONDON: Rain. Temp. 8— S (M — 41 )• MADRID: 
Tema 1»-« 181-43). NEW YORK: Cieildy. Term O—S (32-18); PARIS: 

U^Temp.9 — 3 (48 - 38). ROME: Ctauey.Tema 17 - 9 163— 48). TNLAVrV: 
Clwdv.THTn IS — 4 (59— 3*>. ZURICH: Fonv. Tei%6 — M43 — 34).;^^ 
KOI? RWBK Temp. 3S— 38 I9S-79). HONe K0N6! Rein. Temp. TB— 17 
(S^eSuSuMILA: i:elr.T«np.3a-3S 190 — 77). SEOUL: F^BBV.Teinpj^-l 


(48— ML SUMAPORE:' Thunderstorms. Temp. 31— M (88 — 77). TOKYO: 
Rein. Temp. Ii— S ISS— 4U. 



not indeed fiist among all. Like mmy other 
rfisiingiiisheri miieidans he is a native Of thC 
Soviet UniOQ and was taught in Its Central 
Music &iiooI and Conservatoire: this educa- 
tion is described in considerable detail, with 
equal emphasis on its strengths (intense in- 
struction. the company cS other ^ted^- 
dents) and faults (narrow curriculum, isolation 
from sodety). To Ashkena^, this establish- 
ment of a musical elite is **006 of the many 
inconsistencies and hypocrisies whidi -peim^ 
ate the whole of Sonet life," though he is 
grateful for the opportunities it afforaed him 
personally. 

The turning point in his career came when, 
at 18, be won the Belgiw Kano Coo^tiUon in 
Brussels. Thou^ a vicioiy in the Toiaikovsky 
Competition soon foUowttl, this first triumph 
spread the word “noi only in Europe but in 
.America that a really major you^ artiri 1^ 
appeared on the scene." If anythi^ winniia 
the Tchaikovsky Competition was a stroke oT 
ironv, for this Russian pianist bad then, and 
has now, little enthusiasm for the music of the 
revered Russian composer for whom the com- 
petition is named. "1 am not a typical product 
of Russia." .Ashkenazy says: 

‘'Something inside me always protested 
against certain things in Rusaa — tne exces- 
sive empharis on the emotional, the refusal to 
think rather ihanjost to fed. In musical terms 
this carries over mto my wx)riL With Mozart, 
for instance, a composn with udNom many 
Russians have a loi m difficuliies, there is hts 
impeccable sense for fonn which one could 
describe as the practical gift of putting your 
material in an ideally communicative shape — 
the very thing whi^ is probably most fords 


UM«r Achkenazv kept his silencc for a long 
iiSS?^oi3ilical asylum in Lpn- 
d^'and he declined to give inicrv-iews cntical 

was tha^AsSSazy “would keep a low prof^ 
and would no anti-Soviet swieinenls m 

renim for his conveniently fSiS 

as a Russian living in the W«t with a 
But wlTen a Russian 

^^Dted 10 use him “as a convenient exmDpk 

enjoy^ by 
Ashkenazy broke his silence: 
dal Soviet ^kesman says that I mow frwy 
between Russia and the west ^ I wA 1 
co^d. it is a gross and unfair distortion of ^ 

truth." Since then he has been oulspokM m hu 

criticism of the ^et system, espcaally as it 
denies individualitv: , . 

“Paradoxically, one could almost say by 
now Soviet Man has become whal be was 
led to be: ‘the freest on earth, acawdiag 
old dicbc. because he is free of ^ 


to 


foretm 

to a cbaodc. Motional Russian. ... I haroly 


played any Mozart ubile 1 was in the Soviet 
L'tuon — maybe at most one or two sonatas — 
and Tm sure that I didn’t onderstand a note of 
whai 1 was playing. Now. of course, Mozart is a 
centrai pan of my repertoire.’’ 

Had .Ashkei^' not immigrated to the Weft, 
bis life in Russia as a performing artist presurn- 
abiy would have been spent playing the musk 
central to the Rusrian tepe^tre; lus lack of 
enihusiaam for that pros^^ undoubtedly fig- 
ured to his e\'eiiaial dedsiGin to leave the coun- 
try. But there were other considerations as 
well, among them the personal (his wife is a 
Id the t 


duties or lesponsibUities to himself as an inA- 
viduaL He does not have to dedde anything for. 
himself, nor to ihint for himself exc^t about 
the most trivial matters. As such, Soviet Mm is 
what he should be; an int^aied element m a 
self-serving system with perpetuated total con- 
trd over the m^vidual. 

Ashkena^ speaks with similar eloquence on 
ot^ political matters; in particular, he makes 
leiiing and amuring points aboul the difficul- 
ties tEe authorities encounter in atteroptii^ to 
determine whether musical compositions are 
politically orthodox. He is rather less forth- 
right on certain mu si cal matters; he politdy 
nfwntnmt on his competitOTS among 
pianists, and has less to say rixTUt oompos- 
ets and tb^ muric than his admirers probably 
would like to hear. 

This no doubt is because he is u much 
gentleman as imiaiaan His interest is not in 
publicity or coDtroverty, but in the cooiinuing 
growth of his an His reperti^ is steadily 
expanding , and ID recent years he has made a 

S uite considerable mark as a conductor, nota- 
ly with the Philhanncaiia Ordiestra. with 
winch he has made a number of distinguisfaed 
recordings. Both as a musidaii and as an artist, 
he takes as his motto these lovdy lines by a 
Rusaan poet named Samud Mardiak: ”1 
for you mrougbout your life that yom heart be 
intelligent and your brain be kind." This book 
is peisuaave testimony that he has succeeded. 


native of Iceland) and the poUticaL On the 


Jonathan Yardley istmthe stidf (^The Wash- 
ington Post 


BRIDGE 


Alan Tmscott 


A SCIENTIFIC bidder 
would perhaps have bid 
four clubs, intendmg a ^lioter 
to agree on spades, suggest a 
slam and indicate shortness in 
clubs. The actual Blackwood 
bid worked fine when South 
showed two aces, but would 
have left North in doubt if (he 
response had been five dia- 
mcKids. 

Against six spades . West led 
his sin^eiCHi club and East's 
queen forced the ace. There 
was DO dear-cut line play for 
South, and be chose to run the 
bean queen. When this won, 
he was stiQ in difficulty, but 
fortunately recalled a play 


made agai^ him the 19S0’s tty 
ite Albert R Moiehead, 


the late 


who wrote tins bridge ctrfunm 
for a quarter of a oentiny. 

In almost iodentical dreum- 
stances. Morehead led a low 
diamond from his ace aiming 
to keep control. South fol- 
lowed bis example now, witii 
good effect When be led bis 
low diamond. West could have 
taken his king and rdumed the 
suit The declarer would then 
have maneuvered to pull two 
rounds of trun^is with the jack 
and queen. Rra-stiit winners 
would (hen have brought him 
to eight tri^ with a cross-ruff 
producing the final four. 

Actually, West ducked the 
diamrad and the jack won 
in dummy. South now threw a 
diamond on the heart ace. led 
to the diamond ace and aided 


with a craiqrlete cross-ruff. 
Tliis gave him all 13 tricis and 
a top score on the deal 


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478DFCHV Fin 
inOFroeer 
IWFrvilMul 
smoendlsA 
10142 Geac Cons 
41885 Gkoerude 
SOOOGIbrailir 
13660 o redeernf 
tflOGeedvesr 
lODGrattG 
700B Grendfnn 

4400Gninduc 
3447 CL Forest 
mctPeelfle 
OTaOGrayhna 
OSOOHCroupA 
M7M Hrdne A f 
ssaSKouAer 
4776Hav«SD 
1433H BOVCO 


8221 

« 22l>a 2216— 

25I45NuWsIspA 

68 

57 

60+3 

«6lh 

ISft 

1S9W- ft 

ftre»W6 6ft»lm 








52516 

79V6 

25)6 


17ft 

17ft— ft 

IK ^tsjsSaUB 

455 

430 

455 +15 




■■ill'' 1 ■ 


S6te 



1 "M 



10 1 

nsft 

IS 

ISft 

mPhonixpii 

STft 

71k 

7ft . 1 


53311 2316 23(6 
SOU. a 30U + 
5321k 33'6 3316— 
SUW 1S4b lS4a+1u 
S61lk 6IVk 6114 
5n46 3116 3116— 4k 
SUM HM 1014 
klTUi 1714 mk + 14 
sure IIM 1114 
571k 716 74* 

SI7l6 1746 1746— 
56te 616 614 + th 

S6V6 614 614 

511*4 1116 1146+ Vk 
430 430 4X 

58*6 Oki 0*6 

253 ISO IJB 

51346 nu 1316+16 
51746 17ft 17ft 
ISO 146 ia 
305 2M 300 -10 
MO 305 « +10 

51416 Wife I4H+ ft 
514 nVk 14 + ft 
SlOft 10ft 101k + 
473 4n 475 +S 
47S 473 475 
350 352 2S3 +3 
S29 3Bft 3846+ 
517% 17ft 1716+ ft 
S14ft 3346 34 + 
440 435 4« +10 
510 10 10+46 

57 64k 816+ 

530ft 30*6 2046+ ft 
n8ft IM ISft+ft 
095 N« 95 + 
OT 265 270 +13 
$2116 2146 31ft + ft 
522 a 32 — 
512 lift 13 
518 .174, 1766— 

SI? 19 19 

»ft 26ft 26>A 
51116 UM 1046-46 
243 2S 30 +30 
SlOft 10*6 10* ,— 16 
soft 5 S — 

sm, 3046 3FIII 
saoft Mft Aft 
47 45 4» +3 

4S 45 45 +2 

196 93 Mft+lft 

S2Bft 28ft 2Sft- ft 
S35ft 35(6 2516+ ft 
2746 7V6 7ft— ft 

ISO 145 14S — S 

S2046 30ft 3066+ Vi 
S344i, »*4 Mft— ft 
SI9ft Mft Mft 


Hleh Low CloM Ch'm 


30654 imosa 
aiOO Indol 
I4B0 inland Cos 
BOTVintwPlM 
SDOIvocoB 
StMJennock 

3100KOISOVH 

2725 Karr Add 

17133 Lobott 
2154 LOO Mnrts 
123isi.OniCafn 
lOOBOLncaiM 

SMLLLOC 
379DLobtowCa 
400MOSHA 
45523 MdonHX 

13331 MsrtandE 

1440 KAolsan A I 

S07SD NoWsoo L 
63777 Nw'AHAf 


5S3Vi 51*4 S3II, + 1 
514 14 14 — ft 

S1S16 15(6 1516 + 16 
53416 34ft 34ft 
S19ft 1946 1946 
SI2ft I2«k 1346- ft 
S38W M 38 

518 1746 1746+ ft 
525*4. 34ft 35ft + 

57746 3746 374^ 46 
542 104, lift + ft 

SlOft 1846 I04ft> ft 
530*6 30ft 30ft + 
530 1946 194ft- 

519 19 19+46 

S2Sft 34ft 25ft+ ft 
445 440 440 —5 

51716 17ft 1714— 
517ft 17ft 17ft— 
soft 30 20 — ft 

03614 36ft 2646+ ft 
53046 3046 2046— 
SI446 1414 14*4— In 
S716 716 7(6— ft 


1080 Plw Point 
1400 Plan GOo 
12400 Ploesr 
3106 Proviga 
lOOQuaSlwrao 


aOORavradcr 

5l87ieodpaih 
I QBOO RdSlonlBA 
87738 RokMield 
aaoORosServF 

40 Mwn PrnA 
24a5R00ersA 
SUM Roman 
46DRBM u non 
83800 Sceptre 
lOMSeensf 
3028 Soars Con 
3530$ SheU Con 
31805 Sherrltt 
SOOSiOAM 
SaOBSIOIerBI 

aressowwim 
430051 Erodes! 
BOSSiStetceA 
UBOStfiFtra 

aonsieeeR 
4Suncarer 
18400 Svdntvo 
77888 TotGOrp 
1100 Toro 
MIOToekCorA 
83697 TadcBf 

5400 Tex Con 
59D8TtaniNA 
103353 Tor Dm Bk 
15336 Torstar El 

13SK Traders A f 

440TriBMt 
amTrInllv Res 
48526 TntAHe IIA 
344i3TrCenPL 

T2S946Tr1inQC 
672S0TrlZ6eAI 
114809 Turbol 
IBOOunleervAl 
solunCorWd 
221756 UEMrefte 
noou Kene 
lOOOVnDer 
6IAM vendi A I 
Mveeturon 
5000 Wow wad 
4500wasiferta 
A4025weNmin 
38MW«slan 
lOTSOWBodwd A 
650 Vk Boor 


$3746 27ft 8746 + 
105 IQS IQS 
S2H 3546 254^ *4 
518 1746 10 +46 

340 340 340 +10 

SSft Sft Sft— 
S74b 746 746— 

533 38ft 3214+ 16 
53146 3Dft 2146+ 46 
SI4ft 14ft 14ft + 4 
172 148 148 —5 

110 105 105 -U 

SBIk Oft Eft 

51346 lift 12 
54314 43ft 43ft+ ft 
S6ft Sft 6*6 + 
519 19 lo- 

ss 746 7ft 
SZ146 3216 33ft + ft 

soft 0 

5116 Sft 
*11 lOft I»+ft 
SSlft SBft SBft 
513 13 12 

SZSft 2346^2346+ 
2SZ 250 252 — S 

w ago 3» +» 

SZSft 33ft 23ft— (6 
Z7ft 37 27 

115 96 195 400 

51946 19 194^ 

512 n 13 + ft 
sraft 12(6 1214+ ft 
05 35 35 + (4 

554 saft 53ft+ ft 
819)4 19ft )9ft+ft 
519ft 19 1914 + ft 

ZZft 23ft + 
5746 746 7ft- ft 

4W 465 470 -20 

Q g ft m 23ft 
$2316 23ft 22ft+ ft 
as 438 4» -S 
824ft 24ft 2<ft 
57 47 54 +0 

$8*4 8ft 8(4+ ft 
51146 lift 114a 




aw” 368" a7r*+a5 

fiift iii?*nft'^'*' 

il” u”V 

SISft 12 13ft + ft 
581 80ft 81 + ft 
51116 lift I1H 
SIM 10ft Mft 4- ft 


Total MM 13.tti6J27aMras 


Amsterdam 


ABN 

ACFHoMlna 

ijss 

Ahold 
AMEV 
AViam Rub 
Amrofaank 
B V6 

Buolmnanft T 
Coland Hide 
EiMvier*NDU 
Pokker 
OM Braendes 
Hobiokan 
Hooeovens 
KLM 


Nodilovd 

OeoVonderG 

PoUioad 

Philips 

BObOGO 


RMMieg 
Rorento 
Royal DuMi 
Unllevar 
VanOmmoron 
VMF stork 

VNU 


CloM Prev. 
395 203 

106 Its 
16D I6Q 
lOtJO 105 
317 217 

218 22050 
I 8 
74 7450 

151 15250 
B6S0 KM 
3350 3320 
111.50 113 

9150 91.70 
1BQ5D 179J0 
IS580 I54J0 
6150 6I.« 
40.30 49.M 
47.00 4740 

28 IJB mso 
161 161 
200 207JB 
67 6150 
60 59.00 
74J0 73J0 
137 136.00 
67J0 67J0 
4350 4350 
19550 10410 
338 33750 
2850 3050 

14340 I4U0 

212 3U 


AHP£BS Oenoral Indox tIOOJO 
re wkiu s inojo 
Source: AFP. 


Brussels 


Arbod 

B oh oo ri 

Cecfcorltl 

EBES 

6B-irma«M 

6BL 

C ewqert 

Hoboken 

Krodlotbank 

Potroflno 

SocGoneralt 

Soflno 

Selvev 

TraaienEtoc 
VIellle ssentnene 


1600 1660 
4840 4000 


3775 2775 

2B80 1030 

MX inwi 
3645 36B 
5078 5180 

7740 7740 

7190 7160 
1005 1530 

7300 7360 

3930 2900 

3010 3910 
5550 5540 


Stock Exeboine ladtx : iNi2B 
PravloBs : IMSJO 
Sauree: AFP. 


Frankfurt 


AE6*Telefunlion 11450 113 

Alllan Vera I843V4 HEM 

8(Bl 181 178 

Baver 19058 18758 

Boyerilvao. 3Z3 321 


Bover.Ver^onk 

BMW 

Conwnor e eonfc 
Conlleuminl 
DalnUor-Benz 
DoeusM 


Clow Prev. 
328 325 

360 350 

165 16558 
122.10 121JD 
62750 623 

351 344 


Douisehe Babcock 165.50 
DeutsdwBonk 

Dreadner Bonk 

OUB-Schuttw 

CHH 


Hoennei 

Hoorem 

Heosoi 

HO Ul I KI I B I 

Horten 

Kdll + Solz 

Korstadt 

KouRiol 

KHD 

KloocknorWorka 

KnippSiohi 

Lh& 

Lirflhansa 

MAN 

Monn es tnonn 

SMiallaosollseliafI 

AluanrtkRuacfc 

Preiisoae 

RuotMraMlorko 

RWE 

Sdiarine 

Siemen s 

Tbmon 

Voria 

vebo 

VEW 

Vetfcsweeonnerk 


164 
400 304 

10850 IS7JD 

2055020550 

1S05D 162 

475 475 

11550 104 

103 103 

701 300 

160 169 

270 266 

210 21050 

3I3J0 31388 
34950 2S05B 
7050 7750 
81 70.10 
397 39450 
IBB50 187 

161 160 

15350 152 

234 231 

1200 1180 
252 24950 
340 334 

IttdD I6I5D 

476 46X50 

533 513 

9650 0350 
176 17550 

16016950 
13350 13350 
19010 I035D 


Gommondbank lodex : 1,14750 

Previoes : M3S50 

Sovree.’AFP. 


Hong Kong 


8k East Asia 
Owuna Kona 
China Lireit 
Cross Harbor 
HenoSenoBonk 
HK Eloerrlc 
HKHolOlS 
HKLond 
HKShonahol 
HK Trtophone 
HK Wharf 
HuichWhompoa 
JardlneMoth 
jardineSac 

NewWbrId 

Show Bras 

SHK PrOM 

OinwOorby 

Slelux 

Sfrire PecIRcA 
WhoolMer 

ovhoelod: 

Winsar 


34 34.10 
13.10 1350 

1450 IA7D 

1040 1050 

66.75 4658 
750 7.7S 

3150 31.75 
4275 44U 
820 850 
6050 6150 

5.75 555 


1050 

OJO 855 
a 850 
S5S 5.50 
350 356 
090 9.10 

A70 650 

157 150 

23.00 2100 
NA — 
4U 4.175 
&05 sm 


Other Markets Feb. 6 


Closing Prices In local currencies 


r^nadian indexes Feb. 6 I 


Noon Prevlan 
Montreal 125.74 124J4 

Tonmlo 2*101 2*OSSO 

Montreal: Stock ExdniBe Industrleris Index. 
Toronto: TSE 308 liriex. 


Montreal 


60008 Bonk Monl 
3S0CIL 
16170 ConBolh 
54666 DomTxtA 
OMIMilTrsI 
160534 NolBkCda 
18528 Power Core 
OOOORellandA 

TOORoliendB 

67reeiloval Bonk 
4010 RoyTnteO 


Tom sain 2537542 shores. 


Mob LOW Close One 

SZTOh 2796 279k— Vk 

S89ft 39V6 39*6- Vi 
SlOft U in6+ 16 
Sink 11(6 lift- 16 
S14ft 14ft 14ft 
81616 16ft 16ft + (6 
$29 28H 2816+ ft 

SITft 17 I7IA+16 

11716 17ft 17*6+ 16 
aift 31 31 - ft 

SlOft 10 10ft + ft 



Close 

Prw. 

world Ini'! 

1J3 

1.94 

Hoop Sene Indm 

: 1433J1 

PrevleiM : MSljf? 


1 Source; APP. 



Il Jc^nnesburg I 

AECI 

715 

715 

Dnilewi 

1000 

90S 

Blwaor 

1600 

1625 

Bvffels 

6776 

6800 

Elands 

1340 

1315 

GFSA 

2000 

2750 

Harmony 

2615 


Ktod 

7000 

7050 

Nedbonk 

900 

975 

PsIStevn 

5750 

5700 

Ruslplat 

1700 

1700 

SA Brews 

638 

6W 

SI llelerm 

saso 

33SD 

Snsol 

570 

570 

Composlle Sfodtlndex :063JI 1 

Prevlon iMldO 



Source: AFP, 



Il London II 

AACorp 

S13ft 

$1116 

Bn 

176 

176 

Anglo Am Gold 

883 

SSlft 

Babcock 

141 

144 

Borclovs 

644 

640 

Boss 

480 

401 

8A.T. 

383 

376 

Beediom 

3a 

350 

BICC 

250 

255 

BL 

37 

37 

BOC Group 

305 

385 

Boots 

175 

174 

Botwoter Indus 

230 


BP 

543 

SSI 

Bril Home SI 

250 

245 

Bril Teloeoffl 

124ft 

125 

BTR 

672 

649 

Burmon 

319 

220 


163 

164 

r Tl (■ 

305 

205 

Coon Felons 

157 

150 

Cons Geld 

497 

497 

Courtoulds 

144 

144 

Doloahr 

485 

478 

Pe Beers 

t44t 

(443 

DMlIlen 

are 

are 

Drlrtanteln 

82416 a41h 

Dunlop 

36 

re 1 

Flsons 

308 

300 i 

FreeSIGed 

222 


GEC 

198 

J04| 


Solution lo Previoiis PuBk 



□□Eanin 


IH A R R Y 


II R A fim 


QDQQaaisQniaciD 

□□SZ] SdEl SQS 
QQULfJ 


A CH 


thane 


L I UHlTilGlNl 


CiniDHClHLilDHDniHHnQ 

man scsoidei 

QI3E3BQS USD 

□□□sianiDDCiQBa 
QEiniiQ qciqii 

urn 

BBQliia 


RAID 


iTlAlRlWETNTbLS, 


3/r/as 



Clew 

PreM 

GKN 

302 

304 

Glaxo 


Grand <Mel 

90 

200 

Guinness 

S7 

337 


711 


Hanson 

220 

314 

Hawker 

425 

420 

ICI 

869 

063 

Imps 

307 

206 

Lloyds Bonk 

504 

587 

Lonrhe 



Lucas 

250 

362 

Marks and Sn 

139 

120 

Nieial Box 

413 

415 

f^ri "i-r ’71 

347 

340 


679 

660 

riiiT ■■ 

313 

303 

PMMV 

173 

170 

Roeal Eleet 

100 


Rondlenleln 

S89 

S86ft 

Rank 



Read Inti 



Reuters 

330 

333 

Rovol Dutchc 


RTZ 



Shell 

761 


STC 

350 


SWChariered 

524 


Tale and Lvie 



Taseo 

3M 


Thera EMI 

457 


T.l.oraup 

214 

220 

TrotataarHse 

367 

364 

THP 

152 


Ultramar 

306 


Unl lower c 

II 20/3311 29/32 




vidmrs 

237 


WJTOSP 

S16ft 

sm 




War Loan 3ftc 

34ft 

34)6 

Wodnorfh 

SOS 

583 

ZCI 

18 

ISM 

F.T.3Dlndn:9lxaa 


Prartoos : ORrii 


Sevfxe.’ AFP. 




LoforaeCoe 

Loerond 

rortal 

Moira 

Mirtwiln 

MMPtnnar 

WeetHsnnessv 

Moulinex 

Nord-Est 

OccWentale 

Famed Ric. 

Pelrolns (Hel 

Peueeat 

Poetain 

Pimiemes 

Rodloteetm 

Redouie 

Rouwel uchil 

Skis Roosignal 

Sour.PerrVer 

Tekemocan 

Thomson CSF 

Volte 


CMC 

40350 

2006 

2384 

1665 

830 

7650 

1975 

10150 

7550 

713 

693 

25550 

277 

5150 

2Q5J0 

26650 

1325 

1509 

2010 

SDO 

2360 

470 

340 


Pra» 

40650 

2010 


1710 

OOi 

72 

1955 


SIcleh 

SoulMond 

Woodstde 

Wurmaia 


10050 


70 


25000 

374 

5150 

108 

267 

1205 

ISOS 

1000 

460 

2310 

468 

36050 


Age W Index : 10150 
Pravleot : I97.n 
CAC Index : 10750 
Pmicas ; ifABO 
Source.* AFP. 


I Singapore 


Bouslead 
Cold Storage 
DBS 

Frost I’Niuiis 
How Par 
inehcooe 
Koppet ShiB 

Mol Banking 

OCBC 

oua 

SombSnipvard 
Stoic Darby 
SStaomahlD 
St Trodlno 
UOB 


1 Milan 1 

BwicaComm 

19150 18900 

Canlrale 

2050 

9940 

ClenholelB 

7010 



ato 

IFr^ 


10500 


Fiei 

3480 

2300 

FlnsWor 

57 

Ss 

Gonoraii 

39490 3na 

IPI 

7V7S 

600$ 


00300 79000 



MonledbM 

MS 

1469 

Othmftt 

6490 

6941 

Ptrelll 

8140 


RAS 

60505 60S« 

RlMSCBnte 

630 

908 

SIP 

2163 

2111 

Sole 

2698 


Stnndo 

0760 

«S10 

AUB lodex :bl77 










OUB.Io dcx:4ll5l 
Previous :4lAio 
Some: AFP. 


154 150 

355 256 

IS tSe 

SJO 550 
220 250 

253 250 

154 fS 
&00 555 

3-W 196 

1-S ^**1 

1.00 1.04 

1.10 1.14 

453 
656 450 


Stockholm 


Paris 





P 1 1 

B'df £ tl 

r//A 1 













i.u 

|1 

■ji/. 


I'i' 




Il<l * 

1 • , ^ 1 



}\[ 




al 

'F/ir* 







. I*,, j 







ADA 

AHoLewoi 

ASCO 

Astro 

Atlas Copco 

Boliden 

Electrolux 

Ertescon 

Esaelle 

Hondol rt ftcn 

Pnorinacia 

Oaob-sconlo 

Sondvlk 

Shan^ 

SKF 

SwodishMaid) 

Volva 


S5 

OT 203 
OT 370 
433 41$ 

!13 

103 ISO 

SI OT 

an 304 
Nil. 325 
181 IB2 
213 224 

M NA. 
Nq. 
9650 06 

1W 193 
£!i 947 

200 3B0 


*Ners»urldeo index leiioa 
Pravleus :4n.io 


Source.' AFP. 


Sydney 


ACI 

ANI 

ANZ 

EHP 

Barol 

Beueolnvliia 

Bramtala 

Coles 

Comolco 

CRA 

CSR 

Dunira 

Elders ivi 

Hooker 

Magellan 

MIM 

Mver 

Oakbrioga 

Poko 

POMldaR 

R6C 

sonio? 


(93 

2S3 

473 


St OT 
OT 333 


410 410 

^ 230 


SS OT 

M2 237 


232 

300 

711 

230 

are 

201 


221 
309 
711 

ai 

365 
105 
c* 63 
*24 420 


770 270 

OT 370 


OT sao 


106 lOS 
23 23 

J6 8* 

335 321 

AnOrdlHOrtos lodes ;77750 
PrevHws :7725i 
Source: Reulers. 


r Tokyo -~| 


Akol 
Asohiowm 
Asohl Class 
Bonk of Tokyo 
Brtdgestm 
Canon 

Ooi Nippon Print 
gelwn House 
Full Bank 
Full PhDiO 
Fylllsu 


r-WIIIXW 

Hitachi 
Hondo 
IHI 
iloh 


Kallmo 
Kao Soap 


MwohM Steel 

Kirin Brewery 

KomntM. 1,1., 


440 446 
m 664 
OSD 8S2 
616 e20 
OT S2D 
lOT 1350 
030 930 
534 535 
>340 

1310 1320 
850 » 
1410 1420 

334337 
^ OTO 

.SI 772 

lOT 1330 
020 res 
16* ^ 
$64 540 

320 329 
<OT 


5"'n Drew* 

asas*”” 

Mtofti; i&iSSL 1OT ISM 

gpi- ■«..a 

Miisimshi Elec 
MJIsuWshl He^ 

M isubHM Cora 

Mitsui ond CO 


miobUf ono 
Mjirakosni 
Mitsumi 


NEC 
NlkkoSec 


nimsm 

NPPOnVusen 


Nissan 
Nomura Sec 


OlympuB 
Ricoh 
Shorn 
Sony 

iwnitarrw Bonk 
Svmliorno Chen, 


.■"»« Cora 
Talsho, Mm-ine 

... 

’a 

440 440 

OT 

lOT 1300 


*80 399 

239 23S 

Si OT 

OT 330 
OT 

M li *1* 
lljg 1160 

60S 405 

is w 

740 342 

M2 S 
1OT |» 
{OT ion 

OT ^ 


Torov US'* 

Teuilbo 
Tovoto 

V^lchisge as -a; 
SOT OTe*: 91103 ^ 

5lkkiSS;.»I7.M 

StAu-ee: APR. 


Zurich 

BonkLou 

£l?9'1^isse 
giggr wwm 
SsSTSflsoier 

O^llhorvB 


^Issolr 360 


?fS 3791 

1OT ISN 
3820 ^ 
2410 

TOT 2^ 

.239 7z 
^ mk 
129 

JOT 16X 
6735 63K 

OTs m 

fOT 88» 
222 772s 
TOT 36S( 
OT 331 
,760 37« 

]!20 1121 




k^' 


% 
h « 
























icr.'. . 


Isr 

V-' 

V>.‘- T 


Ic- 



e!iM 




b-- 


Kir. 




P-::: 


te. 




t ' 


3610 ; 
6325 4 
1*900 II 


Source. AFP 
















































-■ ■ ■ •: ^..•■ ^'••o:?^5ov,e,r ^ 

•• - “ ; ' ‘‘r-ot*" Vr^- 

“■" - -j.- i/ie k. 

- - 

^■•'‘QociJJSl 


INTERNATIONAL HERAIJ> TRIBUTE, TOURSDAY^ FEBRUARY 7, 1985 


Page 17 


SPORTS 


Roffe of U.S. Captures 
Women’s Giant Slalom 


Bossy Hits 40-Cioal Mark Eighth Consecutive Year 


... ' 


CempiUiy Oar Sa0 From Di^mdia 
SANTA CATERINA Italy — 
XXans Ro£fc faced a rfarffig 
run to score a sensadon? vicuvv 
Wednesday in the women's Bam 
rfakwn and gh« the United Stm 
its Cm |pld medal at the weald 
Alpine sb diampionsbips. 

Roffe. 17, was fifth' after her 
firstrrun tinieof 1 9,18seo- 

emds, but clocked a blisteiine 
-A 1 :09J5 in the second for an 8221^ 
gate of 2: 18.53. Elisabeth icir SLr 
of Austria won die alver 
2:19.13. Americans Eva Twaido- 
keos (a 2:19.21) and Debbie Ann- 
stroitt (2:1926) were third and 


^ i$S 

‘ ''Poknjj^' 


■ •• t. -^1 


• V--?«'*>0DUV>S j 


••• •:•“• Ifcfc 


.. ;• -";=ar,.Q 

• - ^iceat- 


" ■--‘^2 PesticideCt 


'•■ -.-rticet. 


■'n' t-TSEi 


: >2' f'l-'pu'ationFi 


Marina Kidd a( West Gennany, 
tiurd after the first run, 

takes on the second and dropped to 

fifth place in final standines with a 
dme of 2:19.60. ^ 

Said Twardokens, 19: “I thinly 
we have a veiy cozemetitive ^ant 
slalom team.” Its le^, 1983 over- 
all Worid don^OD Tamara 
McKinney, nugud^ a ireacha- 
oos junqi-him ano fell five utes 
from the finish of Wednod^s 
first run after clodone the second- 
fastest mtermediate 
d Roffe is sdn a member of the 
7 US. **8” team, her previous best 
having been an eighth place in a 
Worid (Tup giant slalom in Lake 
Pladd, New rode, last year. 

9te dodeed the fastest time in 
the second nm on the Cevedale 


course, beating Kiicfaler by a sub< 
scantiai .77 sec on ds. The secemd 
course; set by an Austrian 
had 48 gales and a vertical drop of 
M3 meieis (1.125 feet). The 48^te 
fust course was set by the ui^S. 
coach. Brad Ghent 
”lt was just a matter of gecti^ in 
there and nailing it,” a ji^wsiL' 

Roffe after the race. "Both counes 
great — they skied really wdL 
On the second inn 1 knew I didn't 
have uyihing to lose, and I just lei 
one i^. Fffl so happy — ] can't 
re^y believe it’s ha]:^iened.’' 

Roffe placed second in the first 
run of a World Cup race on the 
same track before rfiririmae wny 
to drop down in the second leg. *T 
had never got two runs to ge ther 
bdore today, Init 1 knew it was 
only a matter of time,” she saiA 
It was a disastrous day for the 
powerful Swiss team, which had 
won each irf the four previons 
events. The (op finisher was Maria 
WaOisei in eimdi. 1.98 secmids be- 
hind Roffb &ika Hess, who won 
^ combined title ^hMulay, fin- 
ished 11th: Vreni Schneider was 

12th and dow nhill chnni pi ^ 1^. 

chela Figini 15th. (AP, UPI) 
■ (%mle!li to Race 
Marc Girarddli g gnnrf a p lfdgf 
Wednesday promisiog to pursue ef- 
forts to obtain Luxemboure citi- 
zenship and will compete m the 
men’s giant slalom Thursday. Gir- 
ardelii, a 21-year-oId Austrian na- 


. •• -msM 


ifc.- ■/< 




Oisiii Roffe 7 have anyttdng to los^ and I just ktooe i%il’ 


live, has been rad^ for Luxem- 
bou^ for ei^t years. He and 
Piimin ZurtdggiBn of Smtzeriand 
am the favorites in the giaal slalom. 

A statement by (he Inteinafional 
Ski Federation said Girardelli 
signed the pledge in Borntio in the 
presence of a federaiioa offiri«i 

Girarddli has dominated the 
World Cup dalom and gent slalom 
races this season to ooltect 215 
points and build up a 36-point lead 
over Zurbriggen in ovenll stand- 


mgs. Bui Zorbrkgien missed several 
races because ofi knee iiyiiiy. 

Ks four cup wetories diis SQSon 
hicinde a slalom and a gjani d.iinm. 
He has won the men's downlull and 
combbed gold medals at the wi^ 


Girardelli does nol race in down- 
hills awH fwicwl the «v>nihinariftn 

eveoL 

”T am glad he is coming.” said 
Zurbriggen. "Well see vriw is the 
besL” 


Abdulrjabbar Excels in Laker Victory Over Rockets 


The AsMOttied Prtss 
HOUSTON — Kareem Abdul- 
Jabbar, the master, has given Hous- 

in 

power badcetbaH 
Jabbar, 37. turned bade the years 
with a dQi^xnnt, eight-rebound per 

^ NBA FOCUS 

fnrmance Tuesday night to lead 
Los Angdes to a 113-104 Natumal 
Basketball Assodalion victoiy — 
t die Lakers* 12tfa strai ght triumph 
' on the Rodceis’ hi^ court. 

' "Hi^s been doing this on a coik 
« sistent basis,” said Ldter guard 
Magic Johns^ "He xns^' not score 
40 but hen get 28 points and IS 


T^>ounds, which is just as good. 
They have great big men, but that 
iosi biis^ out a classic battle and 
stakes us work harder.” 

The Lakers worked hardest dar- 
ing a surge vriien a 14-0 tear gave 
tbCT 88^ lead going into the 
fourth quarter. The Rockets knot- 
ted the score at 98-98 with 3:43 to 
]riay, bat Jabbai*s basket and free 
throw with 3:07 bailed out Los 
geles for good 

Elsewbm it was New Jersey 1 1 9, 
Detrnt 117; Boston 110, Cmt^ 
106; Kansas CSQr 135, San Antc^ 
116; Dallas 112, Atlanta 103; 
Phoenix lOS, Oeiver 103; PortUmd 
126, Utah 106. and New Yoik 1 10, 
Seattle 108. 

Saiopstm scored 33 points and 


pulled down IS rebounds: Ula- 
jowon’s respective totals were 30 
and 13. 

"OneKm-one down low, th^ are 
dangerous,” Johnson, who 
scoM 18 points and had 19 assists. 
"Wejusl tried to seimir Mense tqi 
and deny their guards tiu in- 
srab passes by blo^j^ the lanes.” 

*Ti was like the nud-TOs, (be ww 
f was sin^eoovered,” Jabbv said 
"For us, it was a good defensive 
situatkKL I don’t know about being 
able to score at will on (hero, bat 
the (NUMm-one atuatioa hdped” 

■ Bachs on the Block 

The ownership of the hOwBukee 
Bu(^ wliidi j^ys in the NiM’s 
smallest noiket aw soonest arena, 


put the team iqs for sale Tuesday, 
United Press Internattorud report- 
ed 


ets and several other Wisoonsin 
teams, hastened the decision to sdL 
The Bucks play in the MQvAukee 
Arena, vdiidi seats oofy 1 1.052 for 
basketball 

Said Jim Fitzgerald who gained 
cratroDing interest of the team in 
1976: "We want very modt fm 
someone in Kfilwaukee to 1^ the 
Bucks, because we fed this is triiere 
they belong.” Any sale of the 16- 

to sqqnoval by the NBA boJ^ of 
governors. 


CompOrdiOFOir&^FnmDapatdiei 

UNIONDALE. New Yack — 
Even before the New Ymk Idand- 
ets lost their straqgjdKdd on the 
National Hodoor Leagse title last 
spriiA there had ben whispm 
The lonr-titne diamftkais were get- 
ting old, had lost their intenstty, 
were no kager hun^. 

At the start of die 1%4-8S sea- 
sm, the team New York dethrosed 
— the PWladdiAia Hyers — tern- 
pmarfly totric me Pa tiidk Divisimi 

NHL FOCUS 

lead and again the tongues were 
waggmg: Toe Flyers are young and 
enthustastic; thqr rally. 

But Tuesday m^t die Islanders’ 
wounded pride and ngary-iiddled 
roster beat the Flyers, 7-5, as hfike 
Bossy sooted his 40tb of the 
year and added four assists. 

Ekewfaere it was Calgary A 
Montreal 2; Warinnmon A Toron- 
to 1, and Los Angelm 7, the New 
YorkRai^CtsS. 

To withstand nictfii Sinisalo’s 
trifjr and' PhOadeipliia's four-goel 
second period rally, the Islandffi 
needed a four-goal period of thdr 
own in the first, a fluke bounce o8 
Kent Sutter's diest for die game- 
winner in the second and SSiusalo’s 
disallowed fourth goal in the third. 

“We survived tonight,'’ smd 
John Tondli who register^ his 
29tii goal and three asasis in the 
sbootouL 

“Not so impressively — we killed 
the big lead — but when the dme 
came to do it, we did it” 

Bossy became the first NHL 
player ever to pul together eight 
consecutive 4(>^oal seasons. But 
what the sharp-shooting ri^t wing 
liked most about the was that 
it came at all 

After a rodeet start this ^fMnn. 
Bossy fdl off his usual pac^ and 
his reactioii to dm record mixioted 
his teammales* feelings about the 
victory — bappy, yes; inqnessed, 
na 

”1 haven’t been scorii^” be said. 
“The goalie’s been nwlang saves or 
I’ve beea hitling the post or gang 
wide.” 

For Bosi^, 40 has always bea , 
just a numbm on the way to Na SO 
and beyond. He has 27 games to , 
make it SO m moie goals in each of 
his eij^t caimtaigps. *T hope 1 can 
do it,” he said. “But Tm supposed 
tobescodnggoais — it'szayjobto 
score goals.” 

And it has been the Islanders’ 
jcdi to win. That hasn't htqjpened 


with regularity yn (tlu;;^ stiB in 
ifaiid place in thiOT diviacn beUnd 
Washington and Hifladdphia), 
th^ also know th^ are late- 
bloomas. 

The Islandrr alann dod: seenu 
penoianently set on Stanly Cup 
Time. “Late February, early 
March” — Tondli figures a surge 
wiD come. “Thai’s iSe way v^ve 
done it fa five, six ytais.” 

Maybe that means noifamg, but 
the stretdi rnn does opiiiddg with 
diees^iected remm of iiyiired pl^ 
ers, pl^Off 

peribnner Km Moscow on de- 
fcaise. 

Tuesday’s was the Islanders’ sec- 
cBid victory in a row soce Coadi Al 
Arbour chewed tbcan out foDowiog 
a 3-2 loss to dm New Jdsey 

Ymk^m^tnire^tibe^^ 


New York scored twice in the first 
lOminiiles. 

Against dm Flyers, th^ sewed 
four tunes in the first period, with 
Bosqr assiaing on three of the 
goals. 

Bos^ gm Nd 40 at 8:26 of the 
second period bdore dm Flyers 
batded back to tie, S-S. 

He fucked up ^ fourth assist 
when Hyer go^e Darren Jdira 
hobbled his slmshot and Brent 
Sutter converted afto* dm pude 
bounced off his diest fw a 6-S lead 
at 15:51. 

A firstperxod (ally brought Den- 
nis Potviirs career total to 250, dm 
second-hi^mst ever fw an NHL 
defenseman. The Bosum Bnmrf 
Bobby Oir had 27a (VPILAT) 



. . tin supposed to be scoring goals — it’s my Job to score ffxds.* 


SCOREBOARD 

Hockey I I 


BasketbaU 


usual NHL Standing Worid QiarapioiishipB NBASlanduigs 

record mixioted wales cohfbremce woMEin buuit slalom ea«tbbu aSn 


WALES COEFBEEHCE 
PDIrldt DMUOD 


WDMEm eiANT SLALOM 
(At smta Catarina Volturva, Hohr) 


EASTERN eONFERENCB 
AtiMtK DhrfdB 



W L 

T 

PA 

GF 

GA 

1. Otorni RoflA UA. 1 MX1M :»a— 2:1833 



w 

L Pet 

GW 

Woshtneton 

a 

13 

1 

74 

29 

19 

X Elsebolh KhWiier, Aictrla 1:0X81- 

Boston 

40 

0 

JI4 


PMIadelphki 

a 

14 

4 

84 

215 

1« 

1:iai2-3:IX1X 

PhOodelPhto 

a 

10 

302 

11k- 

NY istandars 

a 

a 

3 

a 

ao 

280 

1 EvD TwardekorH, U3U 1:901-1:1830- 

Woohinaen 

' 9 

a 

340 

139, 

NY Roaoera 

17 

9 

8 

a 

ie 

215 

2:1931 

NOW Jersey 

a 

a 

380 

17 

PUtotKireh 

18 

a 

5 

41 

ia 

224 

4 Oefabto Arrwlrana U3., 1 :911-1 : IX1S- 

NOW York 

18 

s 

39 

229' 

New Jersey 

18 

a 

8 

a 

ia 

213 

2:l9a 


Coetral OtoIrten 




Adonu NvUlen 



X Marina Ktohc west Germany, DWAX 

MHwoukoo 

a 

15 

304 


fiuifato 

a 

IS 

12 

a 

m 

UO 

1:109—3:1030 

Detroit 

a 

11 

3a 

39 

Montreal 

a 

17 

18 

a 

aa 

174 

ATToudl Haecbor,WMGerniMy.1:W34 

OUaun 

M 

M 

380 

09*- 

Quebec 

a 

21 

7 

87 

287 

ia 

1:1X70-2:914 

AHoTta 

a 

a 

3n 

14 

Boston 

a 

a 

7 

ss 

104 

1M 

X MM EpoIa WM (Sermafiy, l:0X4A 

Indiana 

18 

a 

327 

18 

Hqrtdord 

17 

V 

S 

a 

19 

ns 

V.1QBS-3:2D34 

CMwotond 

IS 

a 

310 

18 


Quiet Yankee Faces a Bri^t Future 

By mcntlis smiy not ^ipear strong, ifis shoulders finishivi second i 

jVfw rerf: 5^nrice Mattingly went 4-for-S OQ the sea- dro(» and are not broad, and he is centage with i37. 


' ■ . JVtwyartTaiKiSimrfce 

::n>jra EVANSVILLE, Intfiaiia—Posi- 

■.;Tr=m3L don your fedfustsapoation your 

r.*: '* jr ■£!: ham^ shoulders, h^ head. Here 

' comes dm baR For a baQplayer, 

' ' Miring a baseball remains an 

'• -f-IiC:;' qdiemera] trinter daydnmm. Let it 

.j? Li ^ ^ ^ 3^*^ 

^ lose souiediuig. 

.'7.’; d^r- 'v* hai±,” said Don Mat- 

.r r.’ ttf^4y *Tiy to «n>pnn all iny 

wei^ oo one fooL And 119 back 
shoaUer, my left shoulder, 1 want 
to keq> it in but I don’t want to 
think abmit it, so 1 let U float so my 
^ swing will be xrico and eaOT. And 

ist; thenwhenlseetheballllecitcoine 

to me. 1 don’t want to break out M 
dm ^tion I’ve set up too sooa 
Wha I see it good and it’s just in 
firm of iny right shoulder, I spring 
niysdf, but the swing has to be lend 
‘ and most of the tiiae nn dunking. 
■ jii8tlntfteb^imlheiniddle.UsD- 

aDy, t^s the nmole idea.” 

. Hone for the winter, Matnngfy 

showed off Us collecdon of 
His Sd-inch, 32-onnce model 
gt^« ammg those of Jim Rice, 
,1'V DaveWmfidd,DanylStsEwbeny; 

' it is ci^ next to Rod Carew’s. 

-7 - During dm seasoni fuun the New 

’’.-J: - Yoik 'Vsnkee dngont, M a ttin g ly 

' watdms other grm hitlers take 

pracdoe, but none more closely 

than Carew. “Ss swing is the same 
- titc rima" said Matting. *T 

' " 'Zri tiOTight about bwn thc last day of 

' .'.'-L dm season.” 


It had bom four mcntlis smiy 
Mattingly went 4-for-S on dm sea- 
son’s mal day to pass 'Vlfinfidd for 
dm American League batting 
Mitttindy’s oonqxisure had sus- 
tained throi^ a season in 
wliidi maty imagj^ an unfricad- 
ly rivaliy Wweoa the two team- 
mates. m he admitted that aD the 
pressures bad got to him in the last 
wedL 

“No cme knew it,” he said “But I 
was bothered a Utile. Just to ^ UQT 
ooocentratioo together, in the last 
week 1 went inio die trainer's room 
just to bealooe. UsuaOyl don’t do 
that And 1 ^dn’t like it so nmdi 
when fans went against Dave in tte 
raccL H^s b% and he’s a complicat- 
ed penoD, and people look for 
what Ins motivatioa is. He was just 
trying to do his best and be was 
hrfifwi me aQ the time.” 

Matting has made no dose 
fiieocls on the Yankxes. but neither 
has he alienated aimme. The popu- 
lar image of the Yankee player is 
arrogant and sbow-biz^, but the 
ones who have thrived are the qin- 
eter, unobtmrive land like Wmie 
Randc^ and Ron Gnidiy. Mat- 
tin^ ats their mold. 

A few days after winning the 
tide; Matting came beck, to his 
boDiBtown. h^ one more news 
oonferenoe and then settled in with 
his wffe. Kiin, and the dog. “hfaybe 
weH liw in New York fun-dine,” 
he said. “No c«e will look at us 
there like we’re something special 
and wen escape easier. But 1 drat 


not ^ipear strong, ifis shoulders 
drCM^ and are not broad, and he is 
not fast. ' Athletes from other 
gaoi^ by then aze and Indk, could 
be picked fiom a crowd; the base^ 
baU player’s most noportant attri- 
bute, Ms eye4iaxid comdi&aticm, is 
hidd^ 

Bdatthigly was not chosen until 
the I9th round of the June 1979 
free-agent draft But he batted bet- 
ter than JQO at every level of Urn 
minor and last year be 

might have bera ite ganm’s most 
consistem player. In addition to Ms 
243 batting average he led 
leuue in Mts with ^ (the most by 
a Yankee since Bob^ Ridiaid- 
son’s 209 in 1962) and in doubles 
with 44 (the most ^ a Yankee smee 
RedRolfe*s46ml l93Sf). He Mt 23 
home runs, drove in 1 10 runs and 


finished second in bugg in g per- 
centage with 237. 

He bad no extended batting 
streaks;, but he had went on (me 13- 
ganm tear, two (mT 10 games, anoth-. 
er of 9 games, anotto of 8 gamc^ 
and thrtt of 7 games, bi one stretch 
be dooUed in six straight games. 
He had 59 inuJtiMt games. Three 
times he had five h^ 

He struck out only 33 times in' 
603 8t-bals. 

Besides whicb. he made only five 
errofs,showedareinsifcableqDick- 
ness on grounders Mt in theMda 
and his .996 fielding averse was 
the best anxnig the league’s first 
basemen. 

Matting iS trying to eajatalm 
on the season pasL Last year he 
made $]30J)00, and is seeing a 
raise of at l^t $200,000. He is nme 


days shmt of havittg play^ two fon 
yeara ud henoe is ineh^Ue for 
^ arfritratiem. He mnst have play^ 
’ ax years to detJare fiee agency. 

Mattingly’s agent and cme Yan- 
kee (tfficul indicate the two parties 
have agreed to use an odd gmddroe 
wfaKfa to arrive at a setflement 
Th^ will wait until the New Yodt 
Mms come to terms whh thdr 
young aoe piteto, Dwi^ (joo- 
den, who is seddng scmmdMro be- 
tween $3004100 and SSOOjOOO for 
1985. Matthuly the Yankees 
wiD use (room’s salaiy as a mqor 
reference point in Ms oontracL 
Of the possfluli^ that more 
money and more fame in- 
trude iqion the seduara he trea 
sures, be said; “More success al- 
lows yem the luxury of creating 
more privacy.” 


CAAIPEELL COHPERBNCE 
NWTte OlvWoa 

St. Loull 23 IV V S$ l«5 IM 

CMCO0O 22 » 3 4T 2DS aos 

Mbmoolo U at 10 42 111 211 

Mrall U 30 I 40 m 344 

TlKOnM 11 34 7 2V 1M 230 

SowIM MwMm 

Eikiiontan 30 V i 07 371 171 

eWBOnr 27 20 7 fl 240 210 

Whmlpw 27 22 i SI 2n 237 

LMAngelH 23 81 V 58 MI 224 

Vamwiw IS 32 7 3T m m 

TVESDAV-S RESULTS 
CnlMnr 2 I S-4 

Voln H il a I ».•« 

Konron) .O), McDunoU % («&, RrinhOrt 
iiVKNiwiundMOi.awiiM (5i.SMsoasaai: 
Cotoory (on Pamy) 04^-43; MontTBot (on 
ijoniaiin) 

nOMMiWIa 1 4 0-8 

NT IMMn 4 8 1-7 

mrmm (iLTHim (2VLFianavnn,vwviR 
(V», BOOBV (40). aSuHor (33), GUewt (»); 
TOedMt (10). StabBlo 3 (23). Zitcl (10). ShpU 
oaoool: PhOoiMphla (on Hnidov) 1.134-31: 
Now Vorfc (on PMIoclolpMn) 13-11.4—301 
WnMIiillw 1 • 3-4 

Toronlo 0 0 I— I 

McEwm ll),Duclwm (13),air1s<lai (IV). 
LmBway (a): innaaili (ISL Sliolo on goal: 
WB N imglw (on Bomhardt) 1343^; To- 
fwilD (on RIoBin) M-IO-ao. 

HV R iMl onfO 3 1 3-8 

AflVRiM R 4 1^9 

Dtomw (32), BodWiond (8). Nrdwils 2 (33), 
LOPOMO U). KMIy (8), lirilriritlWTlll 112): lAT- 
ouWw(IM,SrlMn (81. Plorofc (Vl.S an EM r awi 
(IV), RowlialaliMn (14). SImW on mo): Now 
Y ork (on Eltatl 444-22; LOO AmMm (M 
Honlea) n-U4-3L 


A Mario WoUloor. Swtttorl nr Ml UMLIV- 
1:1033-2:20151 

V.tucweaF WH3M Odwa.SBO>n.1;1EW. 

1:10L40-2:2D:SV 

la Uloo SovIkrvLCamWi, 1 ;0M1-1 :11.1^ 
iiSUf 

11. Erllto Hooi, SwIliMlarM, 1:1X10- 
l;IOAV-2:aOJV 

12. Vml SdWMUir. SMtlttrLand. 1;0V3^ 
1:1130-2^003 

13. Motala Swot, YuoDSiowfcb ItlORL 
1:1033-4 dow 

14. Aldiola Com. Woot Gorreonv. l:0V5V^ 
i:iL33-a:n34 

IE MldMlo Flolnl. SMTUzortamL 1:10:43 
1:1.11>-«:3U» 


Transition 


Skati] 


Sports’ Fattest Cats: Time WiU Tell 





know. One minute we’re leaviu 
here. The next minute weTre not. 

□ 

EvansriDebas been good to Mxil 
H e found Ms love for baseball here, 
be found Ms wife here. He affected 
lives here. 

He was the youngest of five cMW 
dr^ a ^ and four boys, each five 
years epasL FuaSy lore has it that 
udieD he WHS 3, a noghbor gave Mm 
a Yankee cm. When he was 7, he 
played basmaO with a team and 

was the best Wbes be was 8. Quen- 
tin Merkd, the coach fiom Reitz 
Memorial High Scdiool, heard 
abcEit Mm fiom one of the (dder 
brothers. ‘'Even then Ms swing was 
p^ect,” said Merkd, stiD the 
jchooTs coach. 

When Mattingly was 9, be wen 
tire most i^uaiw player award in 
the Little League for ages ^11 
‘^Iliey to(A the award fresn him, 
bis father said, “because they said 
the P-year-dlds didn’t play enou^ 
games, Mit really they tboudt it 
bad for a 9>ye«-old to 

win.” 

At 10, he Jwgg pd foul balls out- 
side (te «*■<*«»"> where the Evans- 
ville Triplets, Deioit’s Triple-A 
dub. pla^ He went to Reitz, 
where he was a basketball guard 
and a football quarterback, where 
he pitched and played base — 

and batted better tium 300. 

“But even then be was the same,” 

said M«akd. ‘He stayed away from 
-Dortefs. He stayed away from 


MTr/MWV**Carti 

Don MhttingKy , 
' . . . Thof ’s the whote idea. 


career. imsi)iuui«ui5K»*~>-.“““* 

mess people BOW talk *oui me M 

giccoach who produced an Amen- 
can League balling champion.” 

At 23. Mattingly is not big. does 


By Ben Walker 

The Aseodaud Pros 

NEW YORK —One iMiig for 
sure about Doug FMtie's $7 mO- 
lioa oontracl with the New Jer- 
sey (Jenerals of the United States 
Football League: HeTI be mak- 
ing more (ban mifiimnm wage. 

Flutie, who agned for five 
yrers, will be paid aromid $1.4 
millioa per seasra. The Cenorals 
will play 18 regular-season 

anH ^arli game 

about three hours to pl^. That 
works rat to about $25,926 per 
hour. 

Of course^ that doesn't take 
into account jpnciice time and 
lo^ hours rhitie will mend 
looki^ over playbooks. not 
does it indude exMbition games 
or time spent making promotion- 
al appearances for the team or a 
few extra minutes he might 
spend pla;^ng overtime. 

But on tbar niwgipntiftc 
fMmula, heU get $25,926 for 
each hour ^ent cn the fidd for 
regular-season competition. 
That’s more than Dave Rfinfidd, 
Lany Krd or Wayne Greriky 
will g^ In fact, FMtie’s hourly 
wage is the higb^ that any ath- 
lete will get over the course of a 
full season. 

Football playi^ whose actual 
playing time during a year is less 
than in other 9«ls, have the 
greatest per-bonr figures. 

Walter Paytoa ot tiie Chica^ 
Bears is r^ortedly the M^esi- 
paid pbyer m the National root- 
baH LcMue at $1 milikm per 
seasra. I^Ms 16gBmes,bevriU 
earn about $20,833perhoiu'. The 
Super Bold ch^pion San Fran- 
cisco 49e2s’ Joe Montana, stm- 
posedly the NFL's highest-paid 
quartoback at $850,000 per sea- 
son, cfaeds tn at $17,708 per 
hour. 

Some basketball players are 
also dmng pretty Moses 
Malrae, fuaying 82 gamgo that 
take two and a halThours lo 
complete, makes alxmt $10,732 
an hour. The Philadelphia 7^ 


star is the highest-paid player in 
the Naticflal Basketb^ Asso^- 
tion with an annual salary esti- 
mated at $2.2 million. Bad, of 
the Boston (Celtics, isn’t far be- 
Mnd. For eadi hour his team 
pl^ be makes $10,439. That 
aids up to $114 minion for a 
seasotL 

Gretaiqr. timNaikmal Hodt^ 
League wimderidnd with the ^ 
moDton CKleis, pl^ 80 pu NS 
that take two and a half to 
play. Rfitb a salary of $1 adUion 
per season, Gretdty pnOs down 
around $5,000 an hour. 

The botiriy wages for basdiall 
players are not so high, mainly 
because they i^y 162 games that 
avenge two and a half hocus. 

The New Yodt Yankee^ Vfm~ 
fidd and GeoigB Foster of the 
New York Mets are basebalTs 
two highestijaid pliers, each 
around the $2 znillion-a-year 
mark. That works out to $4^ 
an hour. 

bCke Schmid of the FhOadd- 
pMa Phillies, Gary Carto' of (he 


Mets, Rkk SatcUffe of the Chi- 
cago Cubs and Rick^ H^er- 
sra of the Yankees are the four 
next Mghest-paid. th^r hourly 
rates rangiiig down to Hender- 
son’s $4,247. 

The athletes who actually have 
the Mgest per-hour rate are bm- 
en, who can cash in with one big 
pjyday. 

When Marvelous Marvin 
Ha^ defends Ms middlewei^ 
crown against Thomas Hearns 
on April 15, each fidiltf is sup- 
posed to receive $5.1 rnfflian. 
Ihe bout is scheduled for 12 
three-minute rounds, with cme- 
minute breaks between rounds. 
If the bout goes the distance, 
each filter would stand b) be 
pMd at a rate of $6,510,638 fot 
an hour of uoik. 








Based on reported 
salaries and average 
elapsed tane per gmne 


—Dave WinfMd 

$4,938 

•Wayna Gratzky 

$5,000 

^Moses Malone 

$10,732 


-Walter Payton 

$20,833 

— Doug Flutio 

$25,926 

The AnBooM 


BUROPUAH CHAMPIONSHIPS 
PAIRS 

1. Elow VWOVR Otao VcnDwv. Sovlot 
Unloa 1,4 PofeafcZ Lorlaa SotBwwa (Mo Mn. 
k>nw,SewlotUnlfla.lLXVflranlcDP4nMna 
Mmt Aldnraw, Sovlot Unioa. 44. 4, Bimt 
LoiwK. Knut Senufaort, EaW (ionnany, SZ & 
Momiola Londornf, taioD Stour, Eool Cormo. 
nv, 73. A Claudia Mosort oanlil* copraiR 
Wdsi C ormnny, 13. 

WOMEN 
SEort ProPTHn 

LKiro IwmovaSovlot UnlaivA4.XOauilla 
LoMnor. Woot cornKny. OX a, SiRMM KecN, 
Eoir Gormonv, U A Kotarlno Wilt Eob) Gor* 
many.)3.AConciancoGMioLEeBtOannii- 
ny, aa. 4k NotoHo LMwdwa SsriB) UnkAi 23. 
OvoioE 

I, Kira tvanDvopSoirlot UnioA lAEKolor. 
Ino Witt Eort Corrnunv. 23 X CMidta 
L:Offlnor,«IM6ormany,lZ4.AimiKewlrB- 
Htovoi Sowtat UMmi 43. 4b Sment Kedt EOW 

Gwfnenv,83.i,ClawnBVUnoor,S«nzvrlond, 

73. 

DiAHCE (AfMr Cnwotwrioo) 

1,HatcavoDiWonlkiiieva,AnafWBuMiLS» 
vM UnleaaSpftKOinontoJbMannolCJImavB, 
So: M l Ro wwiorenlMkSoiMI Unioa I3.XIC» 
ronBaraor,)«cfevSkilv,Br1lMn.l3.4.PWra 
Bom, RWiNT SeMnbont Went Gornwinr, 2A 
S, Watolvn Aiwonhtt Conrlfc): Srilw» K y,Sow|. 
m unioa SA A IsAaHo MieiolL Roborte Po- 
HsBkt Itolv, 33, 


GoM 

PGA Leaders 

SNNIsllcolloodTOOlMPraNnloqolflolP 
ora AMOdoWon Toot tEra u QEWwElnoCraaw 
toonininooii 

EARNIINSS 

t. Lannv wodicina snsssB. 2, Mora 
o*Moara SM43asL a CoMn PooM.»iUi&t 
Craig Sladtar.STUSXECorav PovlaS873U 
4. OoM TtwML S6t31L 7. Lorry Rmkv, 
i9B3r7.ECurtN stranDaS4S7l4.EHal suttoa 
8423811 Ul Lorry Mlia SOTaSL 


SCORIHO 

tLonnvwadMntM3V.XDaaPaalov.Cralg 
lltiltor and Morris HntnltRy 4033. & Com 
PovhkdVJEAGarv Kodt«V317.Ra/ ROVE 
4V34.EEd PUrt4V38LVlJaclC Ronnor,Ml7l. IE 
Lnrry Mbo 4V3I. 

AVNRAee DRIVING DWrAHCB 
l,Andv Bowb2773.E Jim DontaTZILX Prad 
Coupl«t272.1.4,DanPaiiI,2nAS,Joovando- 
lor, 2203. A Ronnlo Btecfc aVRft 7. eroo Nor- 
man a4VL7. E TMOwno awa aVAV. V. Onr- 
eneo Rosa aM.1. 1A Bobby WodUnA 2483. 
DRIVIHO PBRCEHTAOE IN PAIRWAY 
1. Loo EMor. na. a. goiw uttiar. 31a a, 
Dn^ EdMcrtSi 3VI. A MHw RoM, 3SA & 
Colvin Pooto and smy Cataor, JM. 7, Tim 
Homs, JSB. A Oryfll* Moody, 3SA V, Hoi Sut- 
loa JS3. lA Tom Kfta JSA 

aREBNS IN REGULATION 
L Brxieo UoDba. 387. A Com Pavla 37A A 
JaefcNleMaaA.72AAOarv KoettJiV.ADoua 
ToA«IL76AA(jarrvMl>A.7SA7.RannioBledi 
and Mart Lva34A AMIko RolA33V. lAColvIn 
PMta.nA 

AVERAGE PUTTS PER ROUND 
I. Mon-te Hokdilw, SASA A Don PooWV. 
27.01 A CrM SlB«er,aAeA A Lrniv WodUnA 
931 A Rm CoMwoIL aAU 

PERCaHTAOE OF SUB-PAR HOLES 
1, Lannv wodUnAJVr. icrwo Stodler, 382. 
3. Lorry RInkor. 3SA A Tom WolMa 3SA A 
Odo Bock, 347. 

BIRDIES 

I. Lannv WodUnaW. 2. Lorrw Rlnher. 1& 3, 
cnip BocAVV. A Lorrv MUe.vA ACorev Pevin, 
47. 


MINNesoTA-SIwidd MIkt smOtKoa 
MNAtr, to a ao -yoo i comracL 
OAKLAND-Blonod MIkP DovlA avtfMdor. 
to a onpyoar co ntr uu l. 

SEATTL E Aorsodtocontracitor ms iHth 
SMemo Borolas end Davo Board, olldan. 
NWtooW taiddo 

CHiCACo wumoODonaidCGrwiaModo- 
ooiHvo vici preoWoRf In ehoroo 04 buHnosc 

OpWMoftiv 

CINCINNATI -Wonod BIN Hoofldy, ScoH 
TWry. RbD Murphy and Bob BuehonoA onOi- 
era and Pmii 0‘NollL ouHtoldor. 

PHILADELPHIA-SleMd Afoo SoimioL 
socend braomoa Ed OMno and Ed Bov 
draoux. pItelMrA and Sipvon OoAnooliA out- 
floMor. 

POOTBAU. 

ConodHn i^onoU lohoo 
HAMILTO N Ao ra idtetortiGte l lbAIBni. 
na eoaett on 0 towyaar contract 
Nniiemd FootbMI Lonm 
BOPFAi O Aiwouneod tlio rdelotieflon or 
John Boefcor. quortortaoek coach. 

PHILADELPHIA— Nomod Horrv Gmnbio 
gaDCTDl fndnooffTi 

ST. LOUIS-Nomsd Ernlo McMillan ofhn. 
sivo Ibio oBodv 

TAMPA BAY— Nomod Jhnmv RoyooNin- 
•Ivo c ounBnu lor. 

UoHod Slalas Foolbou Uoaoo 
ARIZONA W o l vad EITM Honwa pioco- 
fcldcor.SIgnod Dalton Rood. cornorbocS. too 
ora-wof CTidraO.AnrwuoctolBRro D t o n ra d 
e( Douo Ddontaa nmnino bock. 

BALTIMORG-Boloclod Gono Loka run- 
Tktan tetik. to ttw toagtoiwoidol draft. 

DENVER— Cur Be Ma dn epA nmnino 
bock, and Kovki PerldnA dofonslw bOdL 
Tradad Jobo Araoea dolonMvt bock, to Port- 
land tar a 1488 draH OMieA 
LOS ANGELES— Roloaaed Dorrm UMa 
tipM ondi CoiM Roddar, dolonwvo bodi; 
JofV Kol lor, wido roGolwir ; Oiudc PnoA aflbv 
■Iwa puordi Kowbi Junior, lltiobadur; Josm 
.J ocobA ramlna hock, and Eric Thcmiana 
nuMtort KiOu 

PORTLAND— WWvod AUko 
auartorbocto and Kan Smnti. dilonNvo bock. 
si gned Frank MnpumolovdaUwboraor, aid 
John Arnoud. fret sololv’. 

SAM ANTONIO— Traded Froddio SUib, 
ranninp bock, to Artemn for Tony Sudor, do- 
ftnsivo Itaomoa 


WESTERN eONPBRENCS 
MMi raM Divtalen 

Donvor 30 20 380 — ' 

Houoton 27 ai 30 2 

' Dallas 24 23 331 aw 

SonAntonto 34 25 JRI Sto 

Utah 22 a7 340 7to 

KcntaoCItv 14 32. 39 12' 

POGMc DtoWon 

LA. Udeora 3S 18 384 

PHoonta M as AM 10 

Porttand 21 a 330 » 

Soonio n 20 39 I3to 

LA-aippars 9 9 AOS 14 

OoMM ship 11 » 374 22 

TUESDAYS RESULTS 

NMiJamv asaiwao-no 

DMroN 20 21 N 0-117 

WaitaRis TAM Ml 2X RidKPdnn 1424 M 
ao; Thomas Ml 1»<12 2A Lend 8-10 M as. 
itsliuundi: Non Joropy SO (wnnoms I7L Oo- 
irolt47(Laimbuprm.AwlHrrNowJoraov31 
Itamoy 11), DotraH 11 IThonus 18). 

LOS Aooatos a 27 33 28-113 

HMMtan aS20a2M-l84 

AtMtoktabbor 1420 M 4B Jobraon 5-ia 84 
IAMcGoaM4 04Uj5aineooii 1421 Ml 33, 
Ohriviwm M-IOMSO. RoBeoidt: LosAngoles 
SI (Worthy ML H 0 Mrt onM{SqinPSon151.AA 
sWo: Loo AnaotodS ( JehnRM 10), HousBon ao 

(Ltovd 8). 

Son Anfooto 31 2i ao as— lu 

I Cii m Ohr 9 9 9 44-nS 

EJohnoon n.17 44 30, Tbaui 1M4 44 21: 
MndWII 09 48 22. Gorvin MO M Ik Rv 
beoddo: San Antonio 44 (lovaranl 7). Kncoo 
Cttv 51 (OtoorAta, Tho m p o fla Thorpa 
•tarhunttinr 7), AaMs: Son Antonio 9 
(Mean 7). Konwi CHv 37 (EJohneea TlHw “ 
OL 

Bo w on 9 9 9 S4— 1M 

Ck leaoo 9 31 M ai— 184' 

MeHatoie-14AU20.B(rdAnM9;Jwdn 
142S 13.14 41, Weotrldao 8-14 M 10. Robowita:'* 
Barton 5! (Bird 0). Oilawo 9 (Jorriwi 12), 
Aartrts: Bouton 24 (BM, DJalnoonT).aiIfSi 
oa 9 Uordtoi 7). 

DoNM 9 9 9 31—113 ' 

Ai Lmrtu aiuisas-ua 

VIncoiri 11-14 44 as, Aguirre 1M7 48 9; 
Wllklns I3« MO 3A Wlthnon M4 (HI IX Re- 
bOMdR Colla 42 (PocUraU-Attonta 45 rwit- 
klM 12). AMbds: Dallas 9 (BMcknuui 8), 1 
Altonta a (Oita ID. 

P— upr 9 M 24 9—19.' 

PbMOta at a 9 21-49 

Nancp 11-17 M 24 Ednarta 7-11 47 a; En- 
rtWi 142( 3431 LevurMI 34 19. Bobooata; 
Donvor « (Dunn 7). PhortUx 9 (Luca 18). 
ATiIrtTi Donvora (Natl 4), Ptioonlx9 (MncT , 
7). * I 

Now V«rk ana 24— IW , 

sorti i o a 9 a 20-19 I 

K)na\24flS420.wanMr4D3O1BjSlknie - 
”““—1 *ti — Unr-TTTT TTIT rmnifti-. 
MewVhrk44IKIan).Soattto»(Slkma9): ■ 
Asrtrts; Wow York 31 nwdkar i), SuotNo a * 
(Sobors ID, 

Utob 10 a 9 30-IK * 

Port klp d a a 9 20— 134- 

M.TlMnp0Dn M4 33 21, Bowit 4)2 77 19: 
Doortav 7-11 4M ax Boltov M1V2n.Ro- 
lnadi-UtotidltEBtPnlW.PorttandatBow^ 
to W.Awliti;Uteh 9 (Stockton a),Ftortlart 
9 (Draxtor *). 


Sdected College Resobs, 


EDMONTON— RPtornod Rninta Sum- 
monmuoR wina to Novo Sertto ol the Affiort- 
con Hockey Leoaim. Stgiwd Oiorno Huddy, 
ilHtontinwa to a mulUyoar c nni ra cL 
HARTFORD— RoBdIod Mortv Howe and 
uw Srt w m lsw aairt we raacMid Pool Mno- 
Oermld and Rov r onroi u . tonwniA tram 
BtoetantonPlttiaAinarlcenHockayLaapuA 
MINNESOTA Anneungd dial Crrto 
HartotNira dstonsemaa will mta Did rert o( 
Iho soOHia 

PHILADELPHIA— Aotonod Bob Fraosa 
a eoltondar.toliPi N ioya4ttioAmw4cunHoch. 
•V Lpoaua Reealtod Dorrm Inman goal- 
lender/ from Itor uh ov. 

WiNNlPEC^RefuniM More Botoond, 
dooltondor, to Sharbreohn of Iho Amorieon 
Hockey LoQooA 


Tennis 

Tonr Leaders 


L John McEnna sOAon. a. Stotan Edbora 
88XII4X X kh Fteeh and Robort soousa 
saasia A Ynnnldt Nortb 9139 A Miroslav 
Maelr. 020AOX 7. Jlovny CanoTA 9AB9X X 
Molnx GunniardL 83429. 0, Baton Tor w-t v. 
82X89. 10. Toma SnM. max 
TUor Potols 

1. Joim McEnroA 39 oelnto. Z stotan Ed- 
horaSn.XYomlekNecdbasf.AJliMnvCaA- 
nars and Miroslav Modr. 24X A Ellpl 
Teitselier. iTxr. Soon Davto. lax A Brad Giv 
tort bad Cm Hohms. n. W. Owls LMriA ax 

WOMEN 

Eorntow 

1. Mwtino Novromava Sf7A3). X Cotartm 
UiKtovIsl. S3X2SX X Chris Evert Uovd 
8939. A Bonnie Godunk, saA 47X & Paanut 
Lduta, 8aX44X A Kofhv Jordon. S177DX X ZMQ 
canrisen.Si4i49XManueiaMaieovaSU.l00. 
0. Pam CoulA 134IX IX Terry Hollodov. 
81339. 

lOOAa Tour Sartos Polnto 
i.MariinaNavraNlavaX41XXCttflaE<iort 
Llovd,X79XManuolaMaleeval,43XACIau> 
atoKohd4KI«ach.1JS6.XZinaGarrlMn,lJ00. 
A Hbno MondUkeva 13U. 7. Heism Sukewo. 
1 39 8. Coriing Bossetl. 1.19 9. Wontfy Turn- 
Dull. 1390. IX Svlvlo Henika IJE3, 


Binghamton St. OX Ithaa M 

BboltoM St. 19 W. VlrrtnW SL 07 

Beaton Col. 87. Syracuse 44 

omestan 101. whoeiina S4 . . 

Hsbert 4A Roberto Wsstovon 41 

lena 77. AtanMtton 89 

John Jov 8A Ytok. M.V. 9 • * 

NmorsHi 9. Elmira 51 • * 

New iio mwhi ra 9 Dortmouih 9 

Mew York TeGi 07. Mercer » 

NorWioBa tora OX Canlilus 01 '•*' 

Ploihtoiirah 84 Norwich. 54 

Potodom St. 9. Clarkson 48 u* 

Rec h o si or 7X Alfred 9 vj 

Reoer William 7X Coast Guord 41 

9. JeiM PIsiHr 9 RIT M 

SL Peters B& Holy Cron 9 

Stony Brook 77. OH Wssiburv 88 • » 

UOMta 01, Gtossbere St. 9 OT 

Uttaa ox Hondlton 87 •>. 

Vlllaneva 7X Ctomeelieut 7) 

Worco sto r St 7X E. Caonooieut 87 

SOUTH '-j 

JackoatflUo 9 Ptorfdo A8JH a *.• 

Jama Modlsen 4 a vo. Coi iu n oi tnoa U li SS**. ' 
LMnoshmo MX Blhabrth City SI. 9 ^ ' 

Miitsopo Cot 7A Emery CoL a 
Nprllsik St 9 SL AuousNm 9 ...n 

Oakland City 74 Kontacky St. 80 
SeuHiern U. 9 Aleorn SL 73 
Untaa Ky. 7X Betonenl M 
Vhvlnto Uidon ox St. Pniiy. Vn. a ' t 
MIDWEST 
lit Wsstovon 17. MllllUn 41 
NHcMiirrav 9 Knox tS ■' ’ 

Manchoeter 7X Andoryon 44 
Morouelte 7X Rfdimaiid 47 "* 

MWmL Ohio 7X Bowling Groan a 
Oakland Clhr 74 Konivekv SI. 40 
SI. PronciA Ind. 7A Groce 44 r i 

SOUTHWEST •» • 

Arkansas Tech 74 Cent Arkansas 84 : 

Hsndriu Col, S7. Arkonsos Cot 4) 

Olilenaina Bvtis) 87, ComeiiNi 41 
Tem Tech lA Mktwestorn 74 
Toms WMevm 77. McMurry a 
PAR WEST 

CohDovls 9 SonOfTH St 78 
ctwminads 7X Hawaii Focihe Crtted* 43' 
Gemopo la. B. Woshliwlon a 
Hayward 9. 4A Sen Franciseo a. M 
Mrtie 2t. 4A N. Mex. Htohtondi M 
Poppordiiie 7& U3. Inierngtiaml St 
PI. Loma Neioraie 81, Col-Bopllsf 40 
Seartto 7X w. washlnston 40 -j 

WertmonI Col. I8i Cal-Son Dlaoo 77 
Western Oregon 9 Wllhunstts 44 












£j Page 18 


international herald tribune, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1985 


ART BUCHWALD 


PEOPLE 


py •; 
rp . 


1st Down^ Riggins to Go 


A Writer’s Life of Poverty Becomes Art OgcarNonUmUmis 




W ASHINGTON — TTie 
StOrv in Washmetim last 1 


1^1’ 

'T. ^ 



W stoiy in WashingtoD last week, 
was not the piesitot's bud^ or 
the Ed hfeese hmringy bat the nap 
Jdm took at a Washington 
Ptess CiS) bladt-tie aS^ honor- 
ing new memb^ Confess. 

Hie settled version of ndiat 
happened is that the Redsidn run- 
ning ba^ was tte life (tf the pa^ 
at his table, which indoded Jostice 
Sandra Day 
O’Connor, Vir- 
ania Governor 
Chnek Robb 
and staffers of 
People maga- 
zine. When the 
politicians start- 
ed making 

speeches, Rig- 
gins just 
stretched out on « - 

the floor and BooiwaW 
went to deep, not even waking up 
in time to bear Vice Prestdent 
George Bu^ 

Waiters stepped over him ging^ 
ly as ih^ poured coffee and Justice 
O’Connor excused herself ffom the 
table, CTplaining she had an early 
day at the coorL 

After the ^leeches were conclud- 
ed Rigans woke up, thanked evety^ 
one for the wonderful evenir^ and 
was driven home. 

□ 

The capital's social arUters have 
been inddent ever 

siace. 

Many people have fallen asle^ 
diirii^ ^leomes at large black-tie 
functions in Washn^ton, but this is 
the first time anyone can recall 
someone sad^ out on the floor. 

To put the inadent into perspec- 
tive you have to understand the 
1984 Wadungton Redsidn game 

plan. Ri ggins waS the O&Iy r unning 

back the team had. For 16 games he 
was asked to pidt up four a five 
yards with SOO-pound guards, tack- 
les and linebackers trying to pull 
him down. He did the job manhilly 
and withwt complaint, despite the 


50, StiD Gtring 

Uitiud Pros /fl/wnarToRfi/ 
SALEM, Massacbosetts — Mo- 
Dopobr, the board game of capitalr 
ism, passed its 50tfa anniversary 
Wediiesday with 85 million sets 
sold worldwide by Paricer Others, 
vAo initially rgected the game as 
too lo^ with no dear eDdm^ 


fact that the Redskin offensive line 
wasn’t what it used to be. 

Hierefoie, friends say, Riggins 
came off-tbe season very tired and 
he’s been tiying to caldi iv <Kt his 
deep ever ance. Since the mqoiiQr 
(rf the ptt^e in the ballroom were 
Redsidn fans, they saw nothmg 
wrong with the running back tak- 
ing a rwttmp 

As one rooter put it, '*As 
long as he didnT do it during a 
game-” 

□ 

But tiiere are people in Washiim- 
ton adio stiO have a problem with 
iL 

A senator said, “1 have no quar- 
rel with Riggins’s bdiavior, but he 
may have started a precedent for 
pdjtical dinners that could be very 
dangerous. What h^ipens if every 
guest deddes to sack out on the 
floor when one of us gAs up to 
sp^? We could face a sea <tf enti- 
ty tables.” 

A check with the hotel brought 
this reqxmse: "We have rules about 
people sleqring in the Idiby, but lo 
knowledge we don’t have ai^ 
concerning people sleqiing next to 
tiirir tabW We’D probably have to 
look into it, as we’ve had several 
complaints from the waiters, adw 
claim if s hard enou^ to sezve ev- 
et^xxly when they’re sitting up.” 

Becaose Washmgton is so pioto- 
col-nunded, I called an on 

etiquette to find out Riggms had 
made a boo-boa 

She gave me her ruling. '^ou can 
go to sleq> on the floor dini^ 
dinner if the highest-ranking of& 
dal at the table deddes to do so i 
flrsL Since Justice O'Connor did , 
not stretdi out, Mr. Rigans com- ' 
fflitted a serious fanx pas.” 

"Suppose he was below the 
saltT’ 1 asked. 

”It doesn't matter where be was 
seated,” she said. ”L^Dg down at 
the table after coffee is a no-oo and 
the hostess should have indsted 
that Riggins be placed bade in his 
chair.” 

□ 

"Do you tinnk when the word 
gets out, John may not be invited to 
Washinglmi’s better parties?” 

"Not necessarily. Mi. Riggins is 
still a sodal catdL I know one host- 
ess who is entertaining him next 
week and to make him more com- 
fortable she is putting a sleeping 
bag on the floor, next to his mace 
card.” 


By Dudley Cendinen 
Sm York Thnei Semee 


^ ORHAM, Maine — A little 
\J more than seven years eo— 


vJ more than seven years go— 
s^iarated from a man \riK> had 
made her fed so terriUe about 
faeiself that she ootild no longer 
write stories— Carolyn Chute sat 
down and wrote instead a list (tf 
what she wanted in a maa 
What she pul down, said Mrs. 
Chute, who eventually r^ained 
the sdf-oonfidcDce not omy to 
write stories but to produce a flrst 
novel that has brought her mitical 
and popular arHaim was this: 
"Grra work pants. Black and 
red flannel shirt Green truck 
with fish and game decals. Loves 
mina hut loves animak. FrCHH the 
Corai^ area.” 

The Cornish area of Maine is a 
rugged land of mountains and 
forests, of oKNmtain men. It was 

essentially a mftimtain finm stia 

was demril^g, a strong and geo- 
I tie oae. She even painted his pic- 
! hire: black hair parted in the mid- 
dle. dark, de^-set magnetic 
eyes, stnmg straight nose, beard 
like a blade bib framiog his face. 

Then she went looking for him. 
With her daughter and sometimes 
her grandmother along, she drove 
Che wooded roads of Maine, 
searched the taverns, showed 
people her list "Have you seen 
this man?” she would say. 

"Then I went to a turi^ shoot 
and I couldn’t bdieve my eyes — 
it was Um." He looked exactly 
like her portrait 
9ie was too shy to approach 
him but "about two months later, 

I was in a barroom, and he just 
walked up to me and stood there 
looking at me with a big smile on 
his face.” Mmnenis later, "We 
were off in a comer, talkmg about 
OUT chickens.” 

Cardyn Hawkes, then 30, mar- 
ried Michad Chute, then 2l and 
b^an to write again; and in the 
relentlessly poor but lovmg life 
th^ have nude icuether for the 
last seven years C^iyn Chute 
found the raw material and 
siTBEigtb to produce her first nov- 
d, "The Beans of Egypt, Maine.” 

Published in December by 
Tlcknor & Fields, it is in its third 
printing. Like its auth^, it is a 
bo<^ of original language, force, 
ima^nation and humor, ^id like 
its author, it is a triunqih of art 
out of life, art over life. 

Its mythic principal tribe of 




Dooi J^ranBen/riit Ntw YuV Tn 

Michael and Carolyo Chute. 


— the Beans. an end- 
lessly m^iaring , eocflessiy brBCd- 
iqg anil malignan t family, drawn, 
iiic» William Faulknef s Snopeses 
of Mississippi, out of the cultural 
maannaai poverty of badt- 

woods Maine — are. In effect, 
simply the vision that the Chutes’ 
nei^bors had of them. "They 
bated us we were poor, 

we ^dn't have jobs. Mi- 
diad for a vriiile had lon^h hair, 
so they « bn"g^* we were into 
dru^ and group sex, and Com- 
munism.” 


A large woman with a broad, 

hanriannw, iinpainlwl face and 

mass of tawny hair, she dumps 
about in work boots and layers of 
denim and woolens. 


and Olive, for the donu Their 
are a dog and a caL 

Mrs. Chute quit high school at 
16 for marriage and motheriiood. 
She finished fajgb schooI at night, 
and then took writing courses at 
the University of Maine. 

Sometimes she and her hus- 
band took in her daughter by her 
first marriage, her son-m-law. 
who is often unemployed, and 
tludr baby. Sometimes w five ol 
them were on food stanqis. They 
bathed in a fdt the contempt 
of their neighbors, and .M^ 
Chute, work^ at her book each 
day. turned it all into art. 

"Fve always been writing all 
my life.” she said. "Just m^ing 


the parts she did. and thus con- 
trol the life she had 

^e speaks of her husband. Mi- 
chael, the mountain man who can 
neither read nor w-riie, as her co- 
author. "He kind of wrote it with 
me. He and 1 would talk over 
characters. He would help me 
with trucks, the official 
stuff he knows abouL We were so 
dose. Writing it was part of our 
relationship. Because he was out 
of work. So be was around all the 
time.” 

The sentences in her book, like 
those in her speech, are short. But 
they are alsoltedy milled. "£\'en 
in fiction wTiting. you sbould't 
have anything that isn't neces- 
sary.” Now tlut readers, compar- 
ing her Ragnss to the Snopeses, 
have sent her two of Faulkner^s 
novds. has read him. "His 
sentences run from here back to 
the airporL I couldn’t make a 
sentence that long. I'd forget 
what the first pan of it was.” 

She was thrilled when the pub- 
lisher sent her first cfaecL She has 
bought her husband a used truck. 
And she is thrilled by the lecogni- 
tion. Bui she is worried, as the 
letters from readers pile up, that 
the time spent answering them, 
dealing with so many new people 
she now meets. wiU rob her of the 
lime to savor each experience. 

"It kills me because I can't 
seem to gh'e them all of mysdf 
the way I used to. because now 
there ait dozens of them," die 
said. "Hundreds.” she said, be- 
ginnin g to gig gtg “Thousands.” 


Behind their rough cabin on a 
country road, (be Chutes keep 
four chidtens for the eggs and 
two meatt-tempered geese, Omar 


stories im. Piles and |^es and 
piles of them.” She has done that 


piles of them.” She has done that 
since she realized as a girl of 8 
that if she sat down and wrote her 
stories, she could esc^ the 
of life she didn’t like, embroider 


■ .K Dissmiting View 

The more Chester H. Bean 
read of "The Beans of Egy^t, 
Maine.” the madder he goL Unit- 
ed Press Iniernational reported 
from Winihrop. Maine. The 
Beans that Chester Bean has 
known during his 86 years have 
been sober, h^d-worlung people 
— not at all like the hard-dii^- 
ing, law-breaking Beans that pop- 
ulate C-arolyn Chute's novel 
about a poor rural Maine famfly. 

The book is an insult not just to 
the Beans, Chester Bean said, but 
to the entire state of Maine as 
well "To imply that t^ are 
pockets of such ignorance and 
stujMdity and depravity' that's de- 
scribed in that book — to imp^ 
they''re common aD over the state 
is ridiculous and a scandal (o die 
state," he said. 


"Amadeus.” the drama of rival 
composers Antonio Solieri and 
W<dfguig Anadeas Mozait and 
"A Passage to dte saga d 
natives versus th^ British ruleis in 
the 1920s, scored a front-nmniog 
1 1 nominations apiece Wednesd^ 
for the 57tb Acadenty Awardi 
‘The Kil^ Fields,” the story of 
an American cormpoodent and 
his assistant during the Cam- 
bodian war, and “Places in the 
Heart,” aboot a young widow’s 
Struve to keq) ber farm and fam- 
ily in dqiressicm Tccas, fdlowed in 
the Oscar nominations with seven 
f{»fh AH four films were nomioU- 
ed for best picnire of 1984, along 
with “A Solmer’s Story ” a morder 
mystery aboot bladt sddiers at a 
World War ff Anqy canm. "Ama^ 
dais” cantiibuted two oest-acuv 
aominations — F. Muiiay Ab» 
iiaiH as the viDainoos SaKari and 
Tmd Hirice as the impish MozarL 
Others nominated were Alwrt Fb- 
ney, the burned-out consol of "Un- 
der the Volcano," Sam Watenton, 
the New York Hines reporter of 
“The Killing Fidds" and Jeff 
Bridges, the gentle space rnsitor of 
"Starman." Three adresses, all pre- 
vious Oscar mnners, wim nomina- 
tions for tfadr portrayals of bdea- 
guered farm women: Ssfly FieU, 
"Races in the Heart;” Jessica 
Lai^ “Country:” and Sb? ^n- 
cek, “The River.” Also nmmnated 
were Ju^ Davis, the English trav^ 
der of “A Pass^ to India,” and 
Vanessa Redgisv^ wtepla^ (X- 
ive ChancdloT in Tne Bosto- 
nians.” The winners will be an- 
nounced March 25. 


More than 2,000 years tto the 
Romans overpowered the Cartha- 
gintanK- razed their andent c^itaL 
plowed its ruins into the earth and 
rowed tte sml with salt so nothmg 
could grow again. On Thesday, 
modem Rome and Carth^ finally 

sgned a peace treaty bringing the 
Punic Wars to an end. The treaty 
and an accompanying pact of 
friendship and cooperation were 
signed in a government villa in Tu- 
n5a by Ugo Vetere, the maym* of 
Rome, and CbedS Kffld, mayor of 
modem Carthage, which was re- 
btult over the centuries on the 
mined site in North Africa. Klibl, 
who is secretary-general of the 
Arab T and Vetere said the 
idea of concluding a pew treaty 
between the once warring cities 


dated from the I96(h. Carthaga, - 
now a suburb the ‘Dmi^ c{^ ' 
t^ was founded by Huxoidans 
from Tyre in die 9th oaituiy > 
and beame a powerful trading 
state, canmtiBng nothwest Abia; 
and mncfa of tte Meditenanean,' ; 

Rnne was conquering the ' 

two first clashed over in 264^ ' . 

241 B.C. — the first time Pimic '' 
Wars that pitted the two commety 
dal powers in a battle fortioni ^ 
nance the Mediterranean for 118 -'.: 
years. When the Cartba^niaos nt 
vaded Spain in 219 B.C., Rome -' ' 
dedaied the seomid war, one of 
titanic stiug^ of hist^. Hinri^ 
bd, the ^eat Carthagjman gab- 
led bis troops with d^hants and 'a 

fun siqifriy tram aooss the A^ in ^ 

an attenmt.to conque ltdy, but ' 
was fizia^ defeated in A£ra iaV 
2)2 B. C. Id 157 B. CL, the Romao;' ^ 
senator Cato the Elder dsited Car- 
th^e. windi was ^ a ridi ma-- .- 
cantile power. Retororng to Rome,' 

he ended every ^leech in the Senate-' 
with die phiaro: “Defendb est Cv-- 
thago*' (Carthage must be de- '' 
stnmed). Rome started the TbiidL. 
Puiw War in 149 B. C, aDegh^'i '' 
breach of treaty. After theb.&d' 
victory in 146 B.C., (he RmnanS'^ - 
sold UK S0,(XX) surviving inhabil- - 
ants into daveiy and razed the d^. . 
But on the gnamd wbexe imhing - 
was eva to grow agmn, a Romani 
d^ was buflt a hundred years later^- 
to become m time an AriA ceruerT^ 
Now, Tunisian rrnMfnf flaWb 
seafront pai^ boty!. 
deis mqor archaedk^cal tiles tt': 
ra^agp where teams from niiie - 
natioos, coordinaied by the U, 
EducatKioai, Scientific and Qilinr- 
al Organization are eqikuing the- 
nuns. Bonrguiba. 81, received Ve-i 
tm at (he palace afler ‘Tesday’r' 
tigniiig ceraoony, i^Tig hhn (fas'-" 
peace treaty would out the 
memory of the old Punic Wars }»' ; 
tween Carthage and Rome and 
contribute to reinfordiig the itia- - 

tions of friendship coqieration ^ 

between the two dties.” 

□ 

Readent SiAarto of ~- 

win donate half his salary for the 
next five moudis to a fund to 
store (he 1 Stb-centnry Suhan^ ^ 

ace at Sda vrinch was gotied by 
fire last wedt, published 
said Wednesday. The Indooe^if^t 
Observer said the ptesidentia] dcK- 
natiou would total $9,2^ and die 
public would be invii^.to danan^..-. 
additional funds. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


SEAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


J^SsjESSaSi 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


Place Your aossHwd Ad Quiddy and Ettily 

hiilM 


INTBINATIONAL 


HERALD 

TRIBUNE 


COTE D’AZUR 
ViUffRANCHE SUR MR 

Vfc huiKi n ityte . hoL Bviin room, S 

beifraon^ 3 botfv* entir^y & CDdirious- 


REAL ESTATE 
TORENT/SHARE 


REAL ESTATE 
TORENT/SHARE 


GREAT BRITAIN 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


REAL ESTATE 
TORENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


EMPLOYMENT 


EMPLOYMENT 


EMPLOYMENT 


EXECLTn’ES AVAILABLE I SECSETAAIAL 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


Ijr g^ii p piad li tc l iM + i ndepwriwa 
loM, pod, yWJU r far 2 
oan> swank ariitnu^ IRX) s^jn. gev- 
den mQQw f Kwriy pfanled ft in oranic 
w^uknn vinw an MCLfaang sauCt. 

hin: ruoojno 

L*UNIVGRSB1£ 

6 Aw Gaomes Oemenceau 
OtfOO Mo pranr^ Tak SB 44 n 


As o imu subnribv lolha 
hWin iit i o n d Hw<Al Trfam 
<01 sow up to hdf 
{ho iwntfond priofc dgpnncfaig 
on /Ml'' esunln' of ladwcB. 


SURREY UX SUKRIOR GUAUTY 
haoes to bt. Blonhtin Propartias Tnl 

asMaoi 


HOLLAND 


Embassy Service 


OUTCM HOUSMG ONim EV. 

Odum rermdL Vdenussir. 17A 
Andenfam. 02M21234 v 


I Am. da Ma aw w 
75Q0B tail 
TalBK 23US96 F 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 


F» ddtdi 

on Mb spedd oilFoiJudorY ofFer, 
wrile ttt 



AGENT IN PARIS 



“MIBMATKMAL POSITIONS” 
PAGE 4 


EXECUTIVE 

posmems avahakj: 


Whan in Ranw 

MtAZZOALVBABRO 

Uawy operInitM hauH with fuoHhed 
iid\ maMb far 1 week and man 


Phone: 6794325, 67934S0. 
Write; Via dd 'Mdn 16, 
00186 tana. 


FLATS FOR RM 

PHOIC56»899 

FIATS FOR SALE 

more 563-1640 

OFFICES FOR RM/SAIE 

m08E56»A314 


OMIIIPS HYSOS, Stueta ckn, 
eanfart, anmy. Tab 562 n S. 


2232i3E2jIi25SiS 


MONACO 








I II I M I 


IL ' . ' L . » 


MONTE CARLO 
PrindpoBty oF Monaco 


270 H^iiL pndetgmlen, panor u na c 



AGME 

REAL EST. 

764 



mentlLTel; 504 28 59. 


lAWmWANTD 

leadno muRnaliand comp^ baled 
BnnperocpiireslKHMlaw^torcitet. 
■wtiand oomporv matter!. MiniinuRi 15 
yem •mariance in aitonKiHanal low. 
WtarioQtanguaw 8 Bigfah. Other fan. 
gwqea wry haw^ naoe Btid full 
lawne to Box 1754, Herdd trfauna. 
92521 hteuBy Cedex, Fnra. AD 
ODiiam w3 be hdU in sirid anfidance 



IHT ORCUIATION DmurrMBfT ii 

lodong fiv young btagud Engksh- 
saewtery wth emphoss on 
typing & telex dds in both 
kmguagea. Mrs Sebond 747 12 ^ 
P(X8 ftm 1 J(K3wlbnu (exb 


By nNNMKCdl your lood lu r^ntaniaiive wriEi your Nor.' Ybr. 
%ial be i nt onwad of the coat ina n e Ju te ly , ondonoe pwpoyinedb], 
mado your ad w1 rypnof Wlfnt 48 hewn. 
Cwts'nMboeicroMisSVaOpcr frmpmday + bed kaw. There am 
25 teltan, sigs and spocBS fel the fbs he Old 36 In the blowing inai. 
Mninum tpeen ia 2 Enei Np obbmioliom u ocnpled. 

Credo Cordk Anwiicon Exprate, Diner's Oiii; Eurooid, Meetar 
Cord, Accb* and Vila 


UOCRAL MANACaS, 42,wilhRio- 
'lor US-umpotononktoteror csisgiv 
mant in Ewops. Addtiondly, hss in- 
detitid Idas end marketing 
in soaoakiy dwneds, 


EDUCATKmAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABU: 


HEADOmCE 


EXEOnrVES AVAILABLE 


74 OlAMPSaYSaS 8th 


REAL ESTATE 
WANIED/EXCHANGE 


Uuda 2 or 3waHi oportmeri. 
One modh or mere. 

IE QABBIGE 359 67 97. 


sH View, harbor, 180 iqjil fcring 
WOCB. ertrenee, reeepMon, 3 bed- 
8. 2 fateite 1 tsom far staff 




roeiiB. 2 fateite 1 tsom far oif wMi 
6www, I fully equip p ed mpd am Ute^ 
an wth dniiB dccL PoHnna alaOiic 
fakeds. 


DCUnLY high den 2>n»Hi, on garden, 
bdh.lBtdwi. F6A». Tel 62067& 


KMV SHOET TEEM, sfm 50 





0 phone 


DOMESTIC 
POSlTUmS WAN1ID 


Paris (For dassffied ody): 
7^-4600. 


SHORT IBM in Latin Ouster. 
Neagnrris.Ta6 3293883. 


UMVBSITY FROIBSOR, Aimrksi 
Saab apartment . 3 roona 80 som, 
Par»Sd^7lh. F6000IWL l4yw 
laaea.Tiak3a&37 74FWs. 


HBK NATIVE, 35, ExeeuMw in 
AneiicBi mdtnriond camputer 
coite»ny . nrih sdendw axpenenn 
m Mta esnputer ndurtry, ioiw per. 


SeBmprken^^ 
EXOISIVE AeBMEMBIIBDIA 


RP.54 

MC 9*001 MONACO CBEX 
Tel: 193)50 66 84 
11 jis4M477 


dy Bsi 40337rLH1 
[srion,WC2E9JK 


International Business Message Center 


wtf MnoraoeWon in Graaee.ta 
Bw 4wwi LHT. 63 Am, 


MOVING 


MONTE CARLO 
W ntipc J ly oF Monaco 

Canter iHS Cossk hidi das buidne 




^ p o A ina. 
BCOtSiVE 


XauSIVE ACBKE EOBUBIIA 
RP 54 

MC 90001 MONACO aec 
Tdi mi n 66 M 
no UM77 


PAUSASUBUBBS 




eqteVdeiifpef OaeL, ytavinead 
mMe oeamlaie aid asiff- 
addebERu adidws 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


INVESIMB 4 TS 
SS OUR AD ON 
PAGE 11 EUROPE, 9 ASIA 



BUSINESS 

OPPCHnUNTIlES 


IMMfORATION ID USA 
MADE EASY 

Altamey&RedtarefalBnvBaiftes- 
monM readence: Hafaa to tat up USA 
buaiwaaa & bodes oonena du l Indus. 
Irid & me detei ol red n d nte. nr fien 
brodwe «wite: David ftaon, 1201 




50 AVEFOCH 

sMna nwicnoB ^ i tmoofiB. 
Tbotha.pskina.MGHHBCE. 
mUSVITY; 


NB3B> 


BMBASSYt 562 16 40 



• Srietf land Wotesedy beoied nes 
Oie«ywarid/OrCn£ 

• Optbn to pvrdnse oi wed faefaw 
onranr merhat wdin 

e AddWowl faisvcd pstoan required 
lo fiompbte purdiBe sri tds tilla 
to hi^w wndda land 

• Shsi hddng period befde wry 

pnoEtoble lesM (proja ete d et lOOS 
d^to dtvdcpari a d seP e d in 
fauion^ RdwiiRilmwi ToinR 
oNPQdiovv ihoppi nG C BrtGfe 

• hiw m iim il ranoe USSftOBO Id 
USS2,S0(UI00 


BdtCMIiaCAN 


PARIS fieibortei liilei i i iil i y it >6 

(01) 343 23 64 


•JjJlfiV'l-ii-'a -JiH 



mANKFUK 


Ana b iiente n Mnafce u x en lake 
GopMa Aba ovdbtda bi fteiwn 


(069) 250066 

MUNICH LM,S. 

(089) 142244 

WNDON jnax 

(01) 953 3636 

CABiO ABod Vwi Unec hitl 
(20-2) 712901 

USA AlEed Van Ibwc Ian Carp 
(0101) 312-A81-3100 


ni u e ntoin rwatla: VIbii, Verfabr, Is 
Diabfarete Oideau DDsi nev 
Gdood, Leydn. Chdeb avoi rt b &• 
odani opportiinlM for fare i aiBn. 

(rata sn2uioa 
Ubeid martaofl te ol 6HK etaest. 

ObGKTlANSJL 
Av Men Rapes 24, 1005 lovtonna, 
SwitaerM. TeL 011 22 35 II 
Tdexi 25 18SMBJS Oi 
Ifae Tamew of Oeaeva Ootf oad 


UK & OFFSHORE 

OOMPANSS FROM £78 


Cotfatoy Ad, - Lowly towrinuses 
ovabbla d ettiacriw prices. I 


UX + UeofMan + Angoao 
Gvemtey -f Jersy G fette 
Uhnna + taona + Ddmore 
^ RwdMnode or ie tut 
ra nemnee, ojbvi wtdw e 

and aceeunlmg bodiM) 

bonk mroduebiq 




FINANCIAL 




TMCIUVBIBMDRA^ oeeus- 
tooiad to hmRng mteters in oonlH 
tfam wdta terai dapoaib wKdi 
wodd bear irterart d up to 14% pnr 
ovnen. Eurapaan Oversea Bn 


{Wlj ltd Representaliw Mba Tri: 
tgribn 7% 81 71 . Idex 295555 LSP G 




GENEVA 


5WI1ZBHAND 

fiiH Service 
is our Business 


Ointematiand bwarikne 
• MoDboK, te hpl w n u ond tebx 


o Tfomblian and KOteqrid unrices 
g taigalion, do n adtaiai and 

crirw^afSwbaandfamigr.. GENERAL 

M aw T nfaiKe ml iSw^ aaaind I POSmONS WANTED 



AmrierdooK 2636-11 
AIIhnk 36)4397/36(L342]. 
Btuanele: 343.1899. 
Cnpenhngan: (01)329441 
Franbfint:(069)72A7-51 
lenwtewiet 2»S&94. 

Ihbnn; 67.27-93/66-2S44. 
Undan: (01) 8364802 
MaArid. 455-2091/4553306. 
Ma« |02| 7531441 
Notway i (0^ 845541 
Rems 679.3437. 

Sweden: 08 7569229. 
TeiAvhr: 03455 559. 
Viemw; Contatf Rrankfiirt. 


iBBBiB. 2139608 
BnenM Abws 41 4031' 
Pe(d.312) 

Orator 3314S4 
QuaynqwE. 431 943/431 
UnM:^8S2 
tawnite 6*4372 
SmJeaw 22-1055 
SantlasK6961555 
Snotadw 852 1893 


MDDUEASr 


Bahrain: 246301 
Jerdm: 25214. 
Ibwdb 5614481 
Qedm 416531 
Sowd Ai«eta 
Jedddn 667-1500. 
UAX: Debd 224161. 


HUtCASr 


Hrwehefct 3909657. 
Henn Item 5420906. 
Mai3a;8I70749. 
Seairt:72S8773. 
Shigmere ; 222-2721 
Tdwan: 752 44 25/9. 
Tokyo: S04.1921 




New Yob: {21^ 752-3890. 


Sydney: 929 56 39. 
MebeuiDK 690 8231 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


AVIATION 


COOPER Sr JAMES 

OmCIAL AGENT 
OF BMW (OS) UD 


Wb eon cfe bstlreB BMW» at taurin 
pnoaa. Im or ri^ hmf drne, Amari- 
can tpanseaboiL ful faoory warmy 
and offiod dedar bodHqi. 

Abe fDciaiy.buai buOetfioaf BMMbA 
teterioGd eeaehbulding, ng. 
enbdams, cA tn faae far npart. 
Col tendon (01) 629 6699. 


OWItei H 5P S/I<b 0022 US *9 
tered, ok owoar. faw iVifiAe* eoBr 
Inn, told lin» 980 heux £wry aw 

eaiwbh ndro mdudna linal levMWt 

and GNS 5DD. Spaoenledliar li W - 
Awn fcij b inmadaialy. 

Mm US$l,49SJI0a 


ABOBB4 CdHbnia (41S363|» 
AaOBa4 Lenion 3483 . 


TRANSCAR 

Tta CAB ai mHG 
SfEOAUSIS 


erSpoad 
UNmON HUBCSn iTATIVE 


BUSIPCSS ADVISORY 
SBIVICESS.A. 


7 RM 6^, 1207 GB4EVA 
Tel!36Q540TfloRi23342 


ASTON COMRANY PQRMATiaNS 
Date HI. 

. 8Vidm» 


Poudba. fate of Mat 
TS0634 26S91 
Telex 62791 SPNA G 


ROYAIl MTL IRANSFOET B«C 
ImI. po du np S dwping Hnacte for 
hoiaenda flaodk omoub S art. 
N.Y. pi^ 365^ ta?T969%i 


REAL ESTATE 
TORENT/SHARE 


GREAT BRITAIN 


SB^ COMPANY FORMATIONS 


YO^ SWISS COMPANY wjHae- 
pta mem aeds fbon^ to nlw 
codi problenB. Baa 1761 Tn- 

bone. *3521 NnOy Ced»!^«e 





PAfBs ni sn Gs 04 

nN4KflJBT (OsrS 80 51 

BONN / ^OGNE 
UunGAET 1071)311 B8DB1 

MUMOt (OkTsU 1045 

BBEMBHAVB^ 

HMSION (Tta 931 7605 

m ni Sira 

leew it to IS to brng if to you 


TAX HS CARS 
P.CT. 

Logerd Sh e m o H i A biwnlwi 
Al mefcag, dl modafa, brad new 

Ux 35546 PHCART 8 
Appty far ow cokwr Gddouw 
lnS5 aril 


US$12 PB PStSOIL PB DAT 
bdwd wg breofcfoe. He. 
RO&HBU 
9 Feteou Stv At hen s 
An ribodiw new wU tiBB bHta - 
Atas Mane. Whhm mhwtes.ef M.' . 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


EUROPORT TAX 
FRBCARS 






SORESnCAID BnBUGatr lADY 

wmb in te a tictuu l y jK ii bOm iabwah 


NEWM 

PORSCHR BMW. EXOIK CARS 

STOCK 


Cril or wile for free oDriaa 
Ben 1S01T 




far MMtEDMTFdeivn 

.. ^sorvig^ 

^ iWW iei lL town te bend, 
CMveAea in UXA. 


TOUR WNDON oma 
gosMA M E&SmvE came 

Cmmhenw iww qf nrvns 
_ 150 Eegart Sbaar.lei^ W1. 
Tri: (Olf^ 6288 Ifae 261426 



AVOnURER aerin ponbon. AD seriou 
egfartc mdwed Netai, 25 nn St. 
Mnb^ 27I7Q Beoiitned. ftoice. 


RUIEINC. 

... JounuMtr. a 6000 Fr aAfurt. I 
WGer,^ri |q6M3ffl.lfa 411» ^ PRUGEOT. lari Rawr. taige 
eidy by phane or latex. [ fawr. ToyOte 4»4. cep^ spm 






SEOtETARlAL 
POSmONS AVAILABLE 


OFFICES FOR 


BU-jINESS SERVICES ' '*'AX SERVICES 


Engi^ _ Brigim . Dut^ a Garaian 
Hoetm tewNtedOi of Nandi re- 
tewed, En^indari. Mi^ 

OmCES FOR SALE 


^gJTJgl (near Opera): Cottbus- 
^to 300 cm <wildwi£ . An '5aa. 
^***®wte381 18 01 Pais-Cmtoa 





financial 

INVESTMENTS 


WAU. STRBT: %nhql< nexd GML-lei- 
ter has ihe mw o is SfC '■aetarad 
GMi, CP 54. CM.IOOO loitonne 7 




10 YEARS 

W* Priteer Cora In Me Wfarid 

TKANSCO 

Keapeigocam sigidi of mve riton 

xq brand new cors, 

Mw ebms ewv yw. 
5m for hae mutecobrcqidea 
Trance SA. 95 Noerdabm 

Td 323/542 8 


Bnioa Zombem IL MsssonbfodL 
Holland (0)30445492. 


Cteni Mtei 
■NNENATIONAL 
SEOSTAlUAi. (>OSinONS 

tlksdays 

in the Ml aemiBad Sartiw. 



LIR|MA, e/e MAYO ASSOOAlp 
0. Box 111. CH.12i1 GHOWl. 


AVIATION 









Pr 




tilfe’r:;: 




ttexP- 
TlB.nij::. 
nd&rj: ' ' 

lier 

aiblisi'.!: 1 
tbu liii .w ' 

Anur Kiy*' 
Gvhcs:^ 
Aellsik's'iii 
Bh/cSl'.*- 
naap-i"!’. 
iCiR^r. 


Greece Evhiv- 
futoreXiTV; j