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The Global Newspaper 
Edited in Pam 
Printed Simultaneously 
in Paris, London, Zurich, 
Hong Kong, Singapore, 

The Hague and Marseille 

Deaths data appeab on page i6 

No. 31,716 


INTERNATIONAL 






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I Killers 

j Of Priest jBHfe 

s Are Jailed K %*** ; 

*' Polish Judge 
5 Rejects Death 
t Leade 

[ By Bradley Graham HKl 

HMigiM Pur Smm> ** 

< WARSAW— A Polish court im- ■ 

r posed long prison terms Thursday 

■ on three security police agents 
found guilty erf the kidnapping and 

murder of a pro-Soli darily priest ^ Hk 

j and.on a fourth accused of instigat- 
ing the crime. 

The acknowledged leader of the 
agents who killed the priest, former Up*' ' 

Captain Grzegprz Piotrowski, was *4^’ ‘ 

■ ordered jailed for 25 years. The 

r state prosecutor had asked that the ’ v i& L^V ••• IF 

■ d«3?i sentence be imposed. «£# •; • u^F; 

The court also ordered a 25-year '■ . . \y > 

prison term — the maximum under »■■ V* 

Polish law — for Adam Pietruszka, '"V . . .{' 

a former coland who had insisted ^ V ■ • 1 « 

that he was innocent of charges of % fl 

aiding and abetting the killers '3R8&* -• fl 

• Two forma- lieutenants who par- WL ' - fl 

odpated in the murder of the Rev- ^ 

SS S£t,rS The sentenced security offi, 
Leszek Pekala and 14 years for left, the leader of the group a 
WaidemarOuziidewskiAIitlieof- superior, each 25 years. W; 
Boers were stripped of their rank left. 14 years and Leszek 
when they were charged. _ _ _ 

• As the verdicts were read in a 

crowded courtroom in the northern T TT 'W7' /~r§ 

town of Tonin, Mr. Piotrowski, 33, lit I Jwk I y ff I 

who was cool and confident 

throughout much or the six-week r mi n 

trial, sank his head in his hands. m Mw% m ifrynpgi §4i* 
Mr. Pekala, 32, sobbed, and Mr. "U MMJVU/ i f 
Chmielewski, 29, suffering from a •' 

povoiE disorder since to anest, n„ w- . 
ii3ubled in the dock. Only Mr. Michael Geder 

Pietruszka, 46, showed no outward Fau Sam e 

reaction. LONDON — Libya's release of 

The judgment appeared lenient four imprisoned Britons has 
in the case of Mr. Piotrowski, who touched off ^ unseemly clash be- 
had been widely expected to get the tween the archbishop of Canter- 
death sentence. But lawyers fer Fa- bury and the office of Prime Minisr 
(her Popielnszko’s family had ter Margaret Thatcher over who 
asked that his life be spared, saying initiated the successful diplomacy, 
that the slain priest had opposed At the same time; British ofG- 
capital punishment ciak said the release of the four. 


The sentenced security officers: Grzegorz Piotrowski, top 
left, the leader of the group and Adam Pietruszka, right. Ins 
superior, each 25 years. Waldemar Cbmielewski, Bottom 
left, 14 years and Leszek Pekala, who got 15 years. 

In U.K., Church vs. State 
On Libya Freeing Britons 

By Michael Geder Malcolm Anderson. 27, Alan Rus- 

Waihinpon Past Senicv ^ 48, and Michael Berdinner, 52. 

LONDON— Libya's release of 


^ , ■ f _ „ IT 1 r r ; t rtncK oc «« "V™* ior Britain’s breaking Mr. Reagan said. 

a gp earcd 1 jf m ™ 1 “SJut* Of diplomatic relations and expul- research would be 

- Pioirowsb. who sion of Libyan diplomats in Anri] haps, but it could 


Published ’With The New York Times and The Washington Post 

** PARIS, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1985 


President 

Stresses 

Defense 

Seeks Backing 
For MX Missile 9 
Space Weapons 

By Don Oberdorfcr 

U'arhingum Past Semce 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan’s claim that “we 
have resumed our historic role as a 
leader of the free world" was the 
foreign policy highlight at a State 
of the Union address that empha- 
sized legislative battles on Capitol 
Hill rather than diplomatic and 
military struggles in the rest of the 
world. 

Mr. Reagan’s three priorities in 
Wednesday night’s speech were the 
MX missile program, which is 
threatened in Congress; covert 
U.S. aid to anti-government rebels 
in Nicaragua, which was rqected 
again by Congress in October, and 
the Strategic Defense Initiative, a 
plan for space-based missiles to 
stop incoming enemy missiles. 

The MX program was saved in 
the Senate in June by the tic-break- 
ing vote of Vice President George 
Bush. Wednesday night, Mr. Rea- 
gan called the voting on the issue 
this spring “a critical test of our 
resolve” to back up the U.S. arms 
negotiators who will Soviet coun- 
terparts in Geneva next month. 

The most passionate language of 
the speech was devoted to the Stra- 
tegic Defense Initiative. He called 
the space-defense system “the most 
hopeful possibility of the nuclear 
age,” but said “it is not very well 
understood.” 

“Some say it will bring war to the 
heavens but its purpose is to deter 
war, in the heavens and on Earth," 
Mr. Reagan said. “Some say (he 
research would be expensive. Per- 
haps. but it could save milli ons of 


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Reagan Urges 
'2d Revolution’ 
For U.S. Society 


By Lou Cannon 

Washington Pm Service 


tion. He also spoke of further bua- 
ness deregulation, initiatives to 


^td^Siw-kSeof 

theU man address that celebrated ^biedandima^loyttL 

economic and scientific achieve- ^ .“Sgj* 
meats and made scam mention of P art f“ of “J 

was less combative m many of his 


Hie Democrats responded to 
President Reagan's speech by 
crilicizuig the^dres. P^e 3. 

the financial sacrifices his new bud- 
get asks of a broad spectrum of 
Americans. 


references to the Soviet Union than 
he was in many speeches of his first 
term. But he denounced the leftist 
Sa ndinii t government in Nicara- 
gua and pledged his continued sup- 
port for “freedom fighters” there 
and in Afghanistan. 

The president also called for “the 


“Let us begin by challenging loepnmnemaisorauwior ™ 
conventional wisdom; there arc do ^support of the American 

constraints on the human mind, no P«P !e m the aras-comrol negoti- 


walls around the human spirit, no 
barriers to our progress except 


a tioos with the Soviet Union next 
month. He repeated his call for 


ther Popielnszko’s family had w Margaret Thatcher over who r 

j^ed thtu lris Me be apajed, sayinz miMtod the succorful ^lomaqr. negotiated by 

that the slain pnest had opposed At the same lime, British offi- Teny WaitCi a scnkTdeputy to 
capital pimishment cials said the rel^se of the four, Archbishop Robert Runrie. the 

Artur Kigawa, the hod of the who were freed Tuesday and re- spirit l^dcr of the Church of 
five-member panel of judges, said turned Thursday to Britain, could England. Mr Waite, a deputy for 
the four defendants had ^the objec- lead to some improvement in rda- ^vaseas affairs, is an articulate in- 
tiwof kflhng ; Poptduszko and tfwy. non s between the .two countries. temational mmbleshooter for the 


after a British policewoman was ^* vcs — indeed, humanity itself.” 
lolled by shots fired from inside the Mr. Reagan said the Soviet 
Libyan Embassy. Union is well ahead in strategic 

The release was negotiated by defense. Responding to those who 


gan said in the nationally televised 
speech Wednesday night to a joint 
session o{ Congress. 

Mr. Reagan, who was greeted 
with a long s tanding ovation when 
be entered the House chamber and 
ih, AoootAdP.cn frequently was interrupted by ap- 
Preswlent Ronald Reagan delivering bis State of the Union plause, concluded his speech by in- 
address to a joint session of Congress on Wednesday night. two “heroes" who he 

Vice President George Bosh Issfetog behind the president ££ wto’S'VSSi 

with her family after the fall of 

con trad that U.S. research into an covert program. The adn&nistra- Saigon and is to graduate from 
effective system would take a long tion reportedly is considering alter- West Point in May, and Clara 
time, he said; “Let’s get started.” natives because of assertions by in- Hale, a woman from New York’s 
Mr. Reagan spoke more oblique- fluential Republicans and Harlem neighborhood who cares 
ly than he has in the past of the Democrats in Congress that the aid for the children of heroin addicts, 
covert U5. aid to the Nicaraguan program is dead. While hailing the “new freedom” 

guerrilla^ He did not specifically Mr. Reagan reserved his harshest hc said his administration had 
call for Congress to restore the co- iMguagTfcTthe Nicaraguan gov- brou §ht t0 *e United States, the 
vert aid program, but referred to it enunenT ^ 5 president added, “We are not here 

in saying. “It is essential that Con- c . r . . , to congratulate ourselves on what 

grass continue all facets of our as- «« have done, but to challenge our- 

Mane* to Cn. ml Ammo." solves to finish wh^tTnot ye. 

A senior administration official bloc SU PP°^- "P 1 pwseoites ^ don ^.. 
who briefed reporters at the White £^2^ His list of unfinished domestic 

House on Wednesday night refused "J* P Y S& ’ but an3 ? s 80(1 Pities rang^j f rom ihe passage 


SS i^rc^ed imlitaiy spending. saying 
an ,h~ n „; nn ,n« that “our determmanon to mam- 


Mr. Reagan tesoved bis barsbest “ eonwdi^ta^te ito'JLS 

= for Ute Nicaraguan gov- of nniSoft it* American^ 

to convramlatc ourselves on what P 1 ' b ™SW forth a nanon 


tain a strong defense has influ- 
enced the Soviet Union to return to 
the bargaining table.” 

Mr. Reagan made specific pleas 
for two favorite military projects, 
the MX intercontinental ballistic 
missile and the controversial Stra- 
tegic Defense Initiative plan aimed 
at developing a nonnuclear defense 
in space ^gainst nuclear missiles. 

He made clear that he will resist 
congressional demands for further 
trims in the military budget to re- 
duce the federal deficit. “Spending 
for defense is investing in things 
that are priceless: peace and free- 
dom,” he said. 

Mr. Reagan began his address by 


Mogul president added, “We are not here 

“The Sandinista dictatorship of to OB 1 *“ 

f,,n we have done, but to challenge our- 


renewed — stronger, freer and 


uuj iu^ x j-„ , 0 - . wcmvcuuuc, uui mumiaiixwi- , ^ , : — 

sistance to Central America.” Nicaragua, with full Cuban Soviet- alves to rmish whathaTnot yet more secure ™ before. 

A senior administration official P 100 SU PP < ?’ perserates don ^” “Four years ago, we said we 

who briefed reporters at the White P 60 ? 16 - church and acmes a His list of unfinished domestic invigorate our economy by 

House on Wednesday night refused V** but arms and provides business ranged from the passage ffwng people greater freedom and 
to say whether Mr. Reagan would bases for c otnxn u n ist tcrronsls al ' of tax simplification to the con- incentives to take risks, and letting 
ask for the re-establishment of the (Continued on Page 3, CoL 1) struction of a manned space sta- diem keep morc_of what they 


manned space sta- 


accompBshed iL They were fuBy 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 2) 


V£~MAM3» 


Greece Refuses to Join 
Future NATO Exercises 


irons oeiwera tne wo countries. (cnrational troubleshooter for the 

The men, two teachers and two church who has won praise for this 
engineers, are Robin Hummer, 32. and other missions. 

— — Church sources said they read 

with some annoyance stories in 
X • Wednesday’s newspapers about 

Qpfi m I Alii how Mr. Waite’s mission was un- 
MI J Vlil dertaken at the request of the prime 

_ _ minister. The stories said that Mrs. 


U.S. Stirs Up a Furor at New Zealand 

Aides Say Fear of a r Ptecedent’ Led to Retort on Sup Ban 

Bv Charles Mohr retaliation against New Zealand’s loyalty and friendship. There seems 

New York Time Service ,amb * wo ° l “d gutter exports. to be little possUlity that the pre- 



By Charles Mohr 

New York Time Service 

WASHINGTON — New Zea- 
land’s armed forces have fewer 
than 12,700 men; its navy consists 


The vehemence displayed 
Reagan administration offic: 


sent controversy will threaten the 
continued use of the covert, and 


has directed international attention thus deniable, U.S. use of Austra- 


uuuutw, . uv jluiiw *uu »ua. uiau t£,/uu uigu, 1L5 navy umibU ,l. : c _,_ i; 

Thatcher, after having met with the of four frigates, six patrol boats ^ 1SSUC 35 Rome Minister ban soil 


■:::isas 


the govemmenis of these countries n . 

of anti-Americanism?” ” CT «*»» ““^Y ^ 

such a version but it was to be 
Greece's Socialist government “made available" to any reporter 
has not participated in Aegean who asked and a copy was given to 
NATO exercises since 1982, fol- the church, 
lowing the alliance’s refusal to in- On Wednesday, the church said 
dude Lemnos as a simulated target the archbishop’s first letter to Colo- 


7he Associated Prat Mr. Maroudas said Wednesday. 

ATHENS — Greece wffl no “Does Mi. Weinberger also accuY: 
longer participate in NATO nrili- the governments of the~ ~*»«««~ reiease - 
tazy exercises until the alliance of anti-Americanism?” 
changes its attitude toward the Greece’s Socialist 
country, the government spokes- ^ nol palpated 

man said Thursday. NATO exercises sina 

The dispute stems from the re- lowing the alliance’s re 
luctance of the North Atlantic dudetemnos as a simt 
Treaty Organization to include the in the war games. Hi 


families of the hostages on Oct. 17, 
wrote Archbishop Runcie at their 
suggestion suggesting that Mr. 


and seven helicopters. Moreover, 
the Soviet Union has no vital inter- 
est in the Southwest Pacific and has 


Waite go to Tripoli to plead for the paid little attention of any kind to 
release. the region. 


Yet in the last few days United 
States offitials have treated a refus- 
al by New Zealand's prime minis- 
ter, David Lange, to permit a prat 
visit by a U.S. destroyer as a major 
foreign policy crisis. They see it as a 
matter of “pave concern" and an 


" — Why have U.S. officials made 

NEWS ANALYSIS such an issue of Mr. Lange’s insis- 

tenet that American ships may not 

Bob Hawke of Australia, the third osU in New Zealand unless he is 
partner in what is known as the assured they cany no nuclear 
ANZUS alliance, arrived in Wash- weapons? 



ingtou for a state visit. 


One reason, perhaps the overrid- 


i reaty Organization to include tne ^ jbe war games. However, the nd Moamer Qadhafi, the Libyan event meriting possible economic 

Greek isl and of Lemnos, off Tin-- Greeks took pan in naval maneu- leader, concerning the four detain- 

key’s northwestern coast, in allied vers die Ionian Sea off its west- ees “was written on Aue. 1, 1984. i 1 

KiAiMiMiaM TitrVttir hoc nrnfwrlPn ... « ~ \ I I 


The most noticeable event of the ing one, seems to be that U.S. offi- 
visit was an announcement that the cials drew from private conversa- 
United States would drop a request tioos with New Zealand officials a 
that Australia permit the use of its belief that Mr. Lange would find a 
soil for U.S. aiimft monitoring the way to permit a prat call without 
impact area of MX missile tests in requiring -a certification that the 


■’ - ■ 


maneuvers. Turkey has protested em c o , ^t 
that Lemnos has bera mb mrized ^ for 

m connavention of the 1932 Lau- lhc m jumlion 
sflnne Tr^atv. Greece claims that v. . j /• - 


Treaty- Greece claims that NA7 ^ ^ n0I Greece ” Mr. Mar- 
the 1936 Montreux Agreement 
voided the previous agreement ■ . rrwv , 

Dimitrios Maroudas, the gpvem- . Last .? onth ’ Greece mstrocied 

'ratsSiSrss 

that Greece could not participate in Penned an unaccepiabk class- 
exerSSoneregtoSandnotm room exercise scenana 
others. “We will no lonner take oart The bar attack on Saturday m- 


em coast. From that day onwards, active ne- 

“The responsibility for rectifying gouations were under way to ar- 
the present situation ties with range for Mr. Waite to visit Libya.” 
NATO and not Greece.” Mr. Mar- The church said Mrs. Thatcher’s 


the Tasman Sea. 

The 1951 ANZUS treaty im- 


was nuclear-free. These offi- 
now say they feel betrayed, 


letter only “encouraged an initia- 


others. “We wifl no longer take part The bar attack o 

in exercises anywhere," he said, jured 57 Americans 
“until NATO changes its attitude.” Mr. Weinberger I 
Mr. Maroudas described as “un- Armed Services C 


Last month, Greece instructed live that was already under way." 
three military officers and a diplo- The Waite mission was actually 
mat to leave the NATO Defease instigated by the wife of a hostage, 
College in Rome to protest what it Mr. RusselC who wrote to Arch- 
termed an “unacceptable” class- bishop Rundein July, pointing out 
room exercise scenario. that her husband was an organist in 

The bar attack on Saturday in- the Anglican church in Tripoli 
jured 57 Americans. Throughout the hostage conflict. 


Mr Weinberger told the House Mrs. Thatcher's government has re- 
Anned Services Committee on fused to release four Libyan stu- 


defense secretary, Caspar W.Wein- the things you tend togetw&en mis ™‘““ ,5FO ‘Y 
berger, that a bomb attack on a bar anti-American sentiment is suned began uus week. 

frequented by U.S. servicemen up,” be said. The Libyans a] 


frequented by U.S. servicemen 
mi g ht have partly been the result of 
what he called anti-Americanism. 
“Mr. Weinberger appears to for- 


up be said. The Libyans apparently did bold 

Mr. Maroudas said, “It could up release of the four into Mr. 
weti be that Mr. Weinberger him- Waite's custody for a day because 


“Mr. Weinberger appears to for- self is the one who should be ac- the British government unvefled a 
get that most of the bomb attacks cused of waging an anti-Greek memorial to the slam policewoman 
against U.S. installations have been campaign by attempting to blame last Fnday, just as the release pro- 
carried out in West Germany, Italy, Greece for something for which n is cess in Tripoli was at a crucial 
France a nd even Great Britain,” not responsible. stage. 


INSIDE 

■ The UN refagee agency dis- 
missed Ethiopian charges of fa- 
voritism toward Sudan. Page 2. 

■ Pentagon officials and veter- 

ans groups assailed David A. 
Stockman’s attack on militar y 
pensions. Page 3. 

■ Sooth Korea prepares for 
Kim Dae Jung's return. Page 4. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ PUffins Petroleum Co. reject- 
ed CarTC lcahn’s $8.1 -billion 
takeover bid. Page 9. 

TOMORROW 

The new generation of comput- 
erized airliner can almost fly 
itself, but critics are r aising 
questions of safety. 


poses no legal obligation on New although Mr. Lange campaigned 
Zealand or Australia to permit for his election seven months agp 
American port calls or the use of on a pledge to exclude nuclear de- 
installations. It says only that the vices from New Zealand, 
parties wil^act to m^tlte com- according to a 

mon danger” in case of an attack . tu * 

high official who asked not to be 
on one or more at them. t «* ■ 


w ™T Another reason, according to a 

mon danger^ in case of an attack . Mwiuiug iu * 

riTnfLTAfiw. high official who asked not to be 

on one or more of them. nSed, is a fear that the affair 

G-S- a^aft have often flwn could establish a “precedent” that 

ca. But the Pentagon says (he Unit- - 

ed States has no military installa- t Washington fears that a success- 
ions in that nation. M display of independence by Mr. 

Australia contains valuable in- Unge^ghi encourage some Emo- 
stallarinn^ inrlndint* a prrnmri job. P eans to bar deployment erf Uml«l 


ca. But the Pentagon says (he Unit- - 

ed States has no military installa- Washington fears that a success- 
tions in that nation. ^ display of independence by Mr. 

Australia contains valuable in- Ungemght encourage some Euro- 
stallations, indud ing a ground sta- £ eans deployment of Umiad 
lion near Pine Gap ihathaslmig St ?«s medmm-range mnte.lt 
gathered data from US. satellites ^ft22?2£P!ilSS 
Other sites in Australia i^nde tataportJtotaSraKdSm 

^ carrying. 

post that may permit low-frequen- The same high official also ra- 
cy radio communication with sab- J 3 * New Zealand’s 

merged submarines and an over- adversely affect the 


the-torizon radar post. The nudeax ^ms amttol 

existence of these instaflations, -which begm March 


however, does nol 
treaty but on Ausi 


aid on the 
’s habitual 


12 in Geneva, saying. “Here is a 
(Confirmed on Page 2. CoL 5) 


Konstantin U. Chernenko 

Chernenko 
Attends Meeting 
Of Politburo 

Reuters 

MOSCOW — President 
Konstantin U. Chernenko at- 
tended a meeting of the ruling 
Politburo on Thursday, Tass 
said. It was the first official in- 
dication that the 73-year-old 
leader bad resumed his duties 
after a six-week absence. 

The official Soviet new agen- 
cy said that Mr. Chemeokooad 
addressed the Politburo meet- 
ing on agricultural topics. He 
was last seen in public Dec. 27 
at a medal-awarding ceremony 
in the Kremlin. His absence 
provoked renewed speculation 
about his health. 

Viktor G. Afanasyev, editor i 
of Pravda, said in an I talian 1 
television interview Wednesday 
that Mr. Chernenko was ill Nit 
he did not know how seriously. 

Mr. Afanasyev said that Mr. 
Chernenko was still in charge of 
the Communist Party and the 
country. 


them keep more of what they 
earned.” he said. “We did what we 
promised, and a great industrial 
giant is reborn." 

The president then ticked off a 
series erf statistics demonstrating 
economic growth and wail oa to 
say that .“new freed jei in our lives 
has planted tile rich seeds for future 
success.” 

Defending the income-tax reduc- 
tions he sponsored during his first 
term, Mr. Reagan said they had 
“freed our economy to vault for- 
ward to record growth.” He did not 
link these tax cuts to the rise of the 
federal deficit, as many critics do, 
and instead repeated a familiar 
declaration of his 1984 presidential 
campaign that “the best way to 
reduce deficits is through economic 
growth." 

“More businesses will be started, 
more investments made, more jobs 
created and more-people trill lie on 
payrolls paying taxes." he said. 
“The best way to reduce govern- 
ment spending is to reduce the need 
for spaiding by increasing prosper- 
ity." 

Many of the proposals Mr. Rea- 
gan made were familiar features of 
earlier speec h es. But he gave more 
em phasis than in the past to themes 
of social justice ana to economic 
help for minorities. 

The proposals include enterprise 
zones mat would provide tax incen- 
tives in depressed urban areas, a 
lower minimum wage for teen- 
agers, support of the Job Training 
Partnership Act, tuition tax credits 
and health vouchers and encour- 
agement for low-income public 
housing residents to own and man- 
age their dwellings. 

When Mr. Reagan talked about 
enterprise zones he turned to 
House Speaker Thomas P. O'Neill 
Jr. Democrat of Massachusetts, 
who sat behind him. 

“Now, Mr. Speaker. I know we 
agree that there must be no forgot- 
ten Americans,” Mr. Reagan said. 
“Let us place new dreams in a mil- 
lion hauls and create a new gener- 
ation of entrepreneurs by passing 

(Continued on Page!. CoL 2) 


"r >:a\_ 

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V , 


Sag?# 



For Twins , Auschwitz Still Holds a Special Horror 


,ili 


By Thomas L Friedman 

New York Tima Service 

JERUSALEM — AH of their 
recollections of Auschwitz seemed 
to begin the same way. 

They arrived at the station, the 
train door slid open, and they tum- 
bled out, the voice of a Nazi guard 
shouting above ihe tumult: “Twins, 
twins, are their any twins here?” 

None of the Jewish twins knew 
at the time that by responding to 
this beckoning cal] they would be- 
come guinea pigs in the grotesque 
human experiments of the Nazi SS 
doctor, Josef Mengde. He was 
known as the “Angel of Death” for 
the way he dispatched people to the 
gas chambers with a flick of his 
wrist but often with the softest 
smile on his lips. 

Roughly 100 of those twins, 
dwarfs and others who survived 
Dr. Meneele’s Auschwitz experi- 
... Mncrtwritz. left, and Pena Ovitcn, testified from wneelcaairs at meats garnered in Jerusalem ova 

SiS< ^ JaSal oo^nceirtration camp atrocities committed by Josef Meogele. the last three days for an interna- 


tional bearing. It was part of tire 
worlds ic ceremonies marking tire 
40th anniversary of the liberation 
of tbe death camp and was intend- 
ed to draw attention to the crimes 
of the Nazi doctor, who is stffl at 
large. 

The Nazi-hunter, Simon Wie- 
semhal, who took part in the inqui- 
ry, said be believed Dr. Mengde, 
73. was living “in a closed military 
area in Paraguay.” 

Thirty of the twins and dwarfs 
testified at tbe Yad Vashem memo- 
rial here before a large audience 
and a six-member board of inquiry, 
led by Gideon Hausner, the chief 
prosecutor in the Adolf Fichmann 
trial, and Telford Taylor, chief VS. 
counsel for war crimes al the Nu- 
remberg trials. Many of their sto- 
ries had not been recorded before. 

At tbe conclusion of the session 
on Wednesday, tbe board issued a 
statement saying that “there exists 
a body of evidence justifying the 
committal for (rial of the SS 


Hauptstnrmfflhner Josef Mengde 
for war crimes and crimes against 
humanity,” jnrhirimg “acts of mur- 
der, the causing of grievous bodily 
harm and acts of brutality against 
the bodies and souls of men and 
women.” Tbe pand said it would 
be ready to present its findings to 
any government ready to uy Dr. 
Mengde, whose continued freedom 
“brings shame and dishonor upon 
the free worid.” 

Many broke down in tears as 
they told of body parts being 
packed in boxes and sent off to a 
German university for study, of 
needles bang poked into every cor- 
ner of their bodies, of blood bang 
exchanged between twins and of 

radiation treatment so severe that it 
left a blaek burn. It was part of Dr. 
Mengde’s quest to unlock, through 
studying twins, genetic secrets that 
would help him build a master race: 

Some of the most gripping testi- 
mony was provided by two Roma- 
nian Jewish dwarfs and sisters. 


Elizabeth Moscow tz and Perla 
Ovitch, who came from a circus 
family of seven dwarfs and three 
persons of normal height. 

“The minute Mengde first saw 
us he said, *Now 1 have work for 20 
years,’ ” Ms. Moscowitz recalled. 

At one point, she testified. Dr. 
Mengde forced their entire family 
to ring naked for the entertainment 
of Heinrich Himmler the SS chief, 
and 2,000 Nazi soldiers and offi- 
cials. 

“They prepared a small stage for 
us.” she said. “Mengde stood on 
the stage with us. We were com- 
pletely naked. Himmler sat in the 
from row with a movie camera, 
enjoying the performance." 

One witness was identified only 
by bis initials, O.C., apparently to 
spare him personal embarrassment. 
He testified from behind a blanket 
in front of the audience. 

“They gave me an injection in 
my spine,” he said. “Half an hour 
lata I was in the recuperation 



Josef Mengele, the Nazi 
doctor, as a young man. 

room. There 1 saw the rest of the 
guys that were in thoe and also 
been operated on, and they asked 

(Confirmed on Page 2, CoL 5) 


-i-T,- ... . 




Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1985 


UN Agency 
Dismisses 
Criticism 
By Ethiopia 





U.K. Mine Safety Aides 
Threaten to Join Strike 

Urnied Pros haemaionai mg word from both unions “before 

LONDON — British mine safe- deciding if and how to respond." 
ty supervisors on Thursday threat- The board said that 3,543 miners 
ened to join the 4S-week strike by have returned to work so far this 
miners because of management week. It said that more than 40 


By Iain Guest 

InienxaUtftal Herald Tribune 

GENEVA — Poul Hartiing, the 
UN High Commissiotiex for Refu- 
gees, on Thursday dismissed as. 

“political" charges by Ethiopia that 
his agency has favored Sudan and 
shown bias against Ethiopia in dis- 
tributing refugee assistance. 

“We have heard this before," he 
said at a press conference, in refer- 
ence to charges made Wednesday 
by Ethiopia's ambassador to the 
United Nations in Geneva, Kaffa 
Kebede. that the refugee agency 
had exaggerated estimates of Ethi- 
opian refugees in Sudan and Soma- 
lia and that its aid program in Su- 
dan has “enticed” people out of 
Ethiopia. 

A good part of it is political if a n*r\Tic , nrD r Tvnvo att* nr But the president of the can 

country says yew can t work in an- MINISTER UNDER ATTACK — Foreign Minis te r • Art wj.rScj inn -n aT1 ^ ^ 

other countiy,” Mr. Hartiing said. Lennart Bodstrom of Sweden, s tandin g beside Prime leaderKenSampey 

“We keep to a humanitarian, non- Minister Olof Pahne in Parliament, faces a vole of no mlrsday that the oral km 

politkal role. We shall help where ' confidence Friday for casting doubt on official reports stance had “completely un 

people arc m need. that foreign submarines have violated Swedish waters. mined” the supervisors' agreed 

dav th^TthS* SS^aBmX Mr. ^dstrom is almost certain to retain bis office. The coal board said itwasav 

launching a special appeal for S96.4 

SSTSs Polish Court Jails Priest’s Murderers 

Republic. 

The bulk of the monev he said. (Continued from Plage I) deric’s activities and had provided swered, leaving unsolved who 


which could shut percent of miners are now at work, 
the country’s coal The union disputes those figures. 

The strike began on March 12 



“in transience,” which could shut 
down afl of the country’s coal 

mines 

The supervisors pul aside sharp 
policy differences with the Nation- 
al Union of Mineworkers and 
failed for an immediate resump- 
tion of full negotiations to setdetbe 
dispute. 

British mines can operate only 


Lebanese WORLD BRIEFS t 

Hold Strike Italy ^ Sofia to Extradite Celenk 

Over Israeli 
Occupation 

SIDON. Lebanon -A strike in “JESS! However, they did Dot speedy what duage, 

S atoflsradparalyzedsouthera ^ fact . . . 

anon on Thursday after the “ v rwnankov a Bulgarian Interior Ministry omaai, sma ttatar- 
Shiite Moslem leader, Nabih Bern, “categorical evidence of Agca's gu3t,” bat be aid tfe pa5|c 

urged increased resistance to Isra- Jfrosccutor?cSSwould have the final word on whether hewill be tried. 

a-*—* - 

main dty. were blocked by blazmg Cdenk also has been linked m drag tralMnng anu gim nmumg. 
tires and makeshift barricades. 

Indian Spy Suspect Alleges Torture* 

sources said there were protests in >jxrnrnFT HTHIPn A susoect in the Indian espionage network that 

other Shiite towns and 4ages. jHSctt the SovietUnion, Poland andEm 

The sources said that Christi a n Germany told a judge on Thursday 1 J™}J° 

villages near Sidon joined the strike confess, while government sources said a Soviet diplomat was expdfed 

as the city’s archbishop, Ibrahim and another was under suspicion. . nn.-tnir-fii-ir 

Hdou, and Moslemieaders con- S. Parthasaitbi, 62, a retired Defense Ministry o ff i aal andon cofthe 16 


sore toss oi ju,wj loos. I be umon 
has said that it will allow {tits to 
dose only if they are unsafe or 
exhausted. 

Last week, tire board insisted on 


after legally required exhaustive written guarantees from the union 
safety and engineering checks car- that it wffl discuss closing uneco- 
ried out by members of the Nation- nontic mines as a condition for re- 
al Association of Colliery Over- opening talks. The union has re- 




men. Deputies and Shotfirers. fused. 

Tire supervisors’ union decided Mr. Sampey said, “Because of 
in October not to join the miners' the intransigent attitude" of the 
strike after negotiating a compto- National Coal Board in demanding 
raise with the National Coal Board from the National Union of 
on the planned closure of imeco- Mineworkers “a written undertak- 
nomic mines. ing to discuss this issue, this com- 




„r!i* ' ' 


But the president of the miners' pletely undermines the agreement 
union, Arthur ScargiH and the sn- we reached in October.” 
pemsors’ leader, Kai Sampey, said Mr. ScargiU added, “The two or- 
Thursday that the coal board's ganizations call on the board to 
stance had “completely under- immediately resume full negotia- 
mined” the supervisors' agreement. tions without preconditions and 
The cool beard said it was await- settle the strike.” 


-tfnqr Israeli prsc- airoted Indian members of 


pstraiescourtr'Ttm 
essum.” He withdrew 


tices,” saying that Israel was trying bdng tmtured, harassed and coerced to makea c^e^ODLgw^tw 
to stir up sectarian strife in the his confession offer, saying he was innocent, but did not give details efiflje 


Jr >— 1 

W f£S e ?? ay “i pro i CSlW ^ a i £ of India reported. NewDelhi police, meanwhile, arrested 30 demoostn* 
called hystencal and cmmnal Is- theytriedto march on the embassies of France, Poland and East 

raeli measures around Tyre after 7: , 3 

guerrilla attacks there wounded 16 ^ erman y i 

Hundreds of Isradis entered Pal- 2 Kashmir is Get Life for UJL Mmder 

estmian and Shiite areas pear Tyre BIRMINGHAM. Pnpbmd (AP) — Two Kashmiri separatists wee 
on Wednesday, in an antt-guerrffla xalCDJxA to imprisonment on Thursday for what the prosecution, 
sweep m which Lebanese security , .i__ « m lost vw»r of an Indian 


The bulk of the money, he said, 
would be spent in Sudan, with 
S6&2 milli on being used for Ethio- 
pian refugees in the east of the 
country and $3.7 million for about 

60.000 refugees from Chad. 

UN officials say Ethiopia, with 
about seven million people affected 
by famine, has received $375 mil- 
lion in international aid since No- 
vember, while Sudan, with 4 j mil- 
lion affected people, has received 
$90 million during the same period. 

Mr. Hartiing said that between 

230.000 and 300,000 Ethiopians 
have fled to Sedan since October 
and that the agency’s appeal is 
based on the assumption that the 
figure will rise to 600,000 by the 
middle of this year. 

He said $43.7 milli on will be 


(Continued from Rage I) d eric’s activities and had provided 
aware that they were acting illegal- them with travel documents and a 
ly and violating departmental pro- sp«ial road pass when they set out 
cedures.” on the kidnapping mission in Octo- 

The judge said he had received 

more than 1,000 letters, a number , For the authorities, staging the 
of which supported the prosec- trial was an attempt to mollify out- 
tool's demand that Mr. Piotrowski rag£ over the killing by appearing 
be hanged But he said that Polish to meet demands of full disclosure 
law should not be used for revenge, and justice. ■ _ 

“Punishment is supposed to edu . But the Roman Catholic Church 


swered, leaving unsolved who was 
behind the crime. The defendants 
retracted pretrial statements that 
had implicated superiors in the In- 
terior Ministry. The state prosecu- 
tor concluded that no one else in 
the ministry was involved. 


Reagan Declares 
ANZUS Alliance 
Sound and Solid 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — President 


# u . : - 


guerrilla attacks there wounded 16 

Hundreds of Isradis entered Pal- 2 Kashmiris Get Life for UJL M 

estmian and Shiite areas pear Tyre BIRMINGHAM, England (AP) — Two Kashmiri sept 
on Wednesday mm antt-guerrffla to on Thursday for what the 

sweep m which Lebanese security ^ “cold-blooded execution” last year of an Indian 

sources said dozens ol suspects 

were held Abdul Riga, 28, and Mohammed Riaz. 23, were found m 


Mr. Bern, l«?rtir of the Suite of the unlawful imprisonment and murder of Ravindra 


wrikMiiiiviVii i iboiuuu — 1 — — — x f | • | » ■ ,|| 

Ronald Reagan met Thursday with mfliaa Amal and calmet minister assistant comnnsaong at the Indian consolate nr BmnmgpanL 


cate and deter,"* the judge said. ^ upset about how the case was 
“Only under unique circumstances used to spread allegations that Fa- 
can capital punishment be im- tiler PopieJuszko was a political ex- 
posed It is not necessary to resort tremism and a ll e gati ons against 


to it in this case." 

The most surprising sentence In a letter made public this week, 
was that imposed on Mr. Pie- the church accused the Communist 
truszka, the deputy director of an Party press of biased coverage of 
Interior Ministry department that the trial and warned of damage to 
monitored church activities and the church-state relations. 


other clerics. 

In a letter made 


C^rneT fhat f ^ MhutfoBob Hawke of Aus- for southern Lebanon, pledged Three other Kashmiri separatists were sensed two and 

Bui attorneys ^suggested that the mdia and pronounced the ANZUS guerrilla warfare would be stepped 20 years imprisonment and a fourth man was fined £500 (S560)._A11 four 
instigation forthc ermie may have a ^ ance - Very ^ y^y ^ up to force Israd to fulfill its prom- had pleaded guilty to charges related to Mr. Mhatrtfs abdutoon. T^e 
come from abroad The prosecutor ^ d^ tl . Australia’s refusal to ise to leave all of the south by the Kashmir Liberation Army, seeking independence for the mwtlwii Intfian 
pointed to Western centers of sub- ^ the United States monitor MX! summer. state of Kashmir, claimed responsibility for kidnapping Mr. Mhaue. • 

version; a ropieiuszxo family law- 

iSdalSp^ii!^ the » Buckley (hiillinn Radio Free Europe 

NEW YOIUC (WfT) — toMS L. Buckley, msideot of Radiofixc 

n. ^ a “awrsSLSssssf ^ ^ 


,w , i , He claime d responsibility for a 

fete srnddc car bomb near Tyre on 


IMUaamu IUIUUCU uim. U1C soviet 1 if, ... , Ti., ■ ^ • suiuut vox uuiuu UKU 

security police might have played a Tuesday that he said had caused 

role. Zealand posiuon on our vesels, iqo Israeli casualties. He said he 


The motive, too, remained 


?an said. He was referring ^ to 50 car Europe and Radio Liberty, plans to resign 

ewZroUndgovenuncms ! usuaI j Y kcep my advised the board that things areon ago 

V lat O 1 I V nil in mqUa J I — . — f . — - . ** \ _ D» n lrlm( rrw/i V* 


ggjssf 


^ent on the purduse and distribu- supervisor of the three junior ofC- 
tion of food. He added that there cers 


was an uigent need to get food into 


pervisor of the three junior effi- The proceedings opened a rare 
rs window on the abuse of power. 

Evidence against him consisted ineptitude and arrogance of the 


eastern S udan before June, when hugely of accusations by the other shadowy security apparatus. A c- 
rains are expected to hamper food defendants that he had encouraged cess to the trial, including atten- 
distribution. illegal action to curb ihe outspoken dance by a restricted number of 

— 1 Western correspondents, was un- 

^ — m s precedcntcd in the Soviet bloc, 

HARRY’S NEW YORK BAR ® \ 

Est 191 1 The killing was recounted in ex- 

Jusf tell the taxi driver “sank roo doe noo" yl haustive detail beginning with Fa- 

• 5 Rue Daanou, PARIS JM tiier Popidusdco’s kidnapping on 

• Falkentwrm Str. 9, MUNICH AT Oct 19. His body was recovered 

• M/S ASTOR at sea AT « resavoir 11 days later. 

/w But the hearings seemed to raise 

more questions than they an- 


lega] methods m restraining Father banned the entry into the country 
Popiduako, a supporter of Uk ^ nucicar arms or port calls by 
banned Solidarity umon whose de- nudear-powered shim/ 
fiant sermons attracted large “other than thatT I think our 
crowds at a Warsaw chtnrh. alliance is very sound and very sd- 

Bnt Gram! Zaum Platek, the ^ ^ president ^d. He said he 
sispaided head of the four mens was not concerned about Austra- 
department, tdd the rauxt he was fo's position on the MX missile 
informed in early October by Arch- tests. That stand led the United 


sion Tuesday injured 10 soldiers, headquarters m Munich. _ 

J Radio Free Europe and Radio Liberty, financed by the UiL gpvern- 

■ Airfioer Hdd in Beirut ment, broadcast news and information to the Soviet bloc commies. At 
_ „ . . . one time the stations were affiliated with the Central Intelligence Agency, 

Gtmnxrn at Ben^s anport re- but they are now supervised by an independent federal agency, the Brad 
leased a Cyprus Airway jethna- for International Broadcasting. The two years that Mr. Buckley has beat 
and its nme crew members Tnmi- have not been wiSout controversy, induding charges ^ 

mapprqmate programs oocarionally have been aired ft 

ax hours m an a^empito force the ^ Buckley, 62, said be told the board iriien he took thejobthather®- 
rdrase of two Shute Moslanm- no t intoMi to stay more than two or three years. The former senator from 


“*■ ^ stand led ** United * ° not intend to staymore than two or three years. The fonutt senator from 

JSi States to announce on Wednesday jackers in^nsOT^ aGr^Cyp- New York saysheplans to return to the United States and jomalHwfinn. 
retary of the Polish episcopate, that that it would proceed with the tests not jail The Associated Press re- v 

it had been decided to send Father without Australian hdu ported. -^ T . T n • j 

Fopieiusdro to Rome. The MX issue involves a Penta- “It’s over. There is no one on the NlCaTagUH Increases PnCC of Food 

II this is ttue— church offiaals gon plan to test fire the missile into plane." Bassam Tlais, a negotiator MANAGUA (Reuters) —Nicaragua’s Ministry of Internal Trade has 

have not publicly denied U — then ^ Tasman Sea east of Australia, from the Shiite militia Amal said raised the price of meal and milk about 100 percent, 
jolting the popular pnest would On the eve of Mr. Hawke's meeting by radio from aboard the plane at An announcement Wednesday listed an increase of 1 10 percent for 
have only made sense as a political Wednesday with Secretary of State 9:10 PM. eggs and more than 50 percent for chicken. Offiaals said the priced 

pmrocation, which is what the George P. Shultz, Australia dis- . t l baric grains and sugar, not listed in the announcement, might he 

prosecution m a i nta in s it was. dosed that it would not allow the 11 ™ «*nown what had Imp- the. iimvp KnntHpfilM! em nnmi c timhfci 


The MX issue involves a Penta- “It’s over. There is no one on the uiuwaca j. iiuj ui a.' wu 

gon plan to test fire the missile in to plane," Bassam This, a negotiator MANAGUA (Reuters) — Nicaragua’s Ministry of Internal Trade has 
the Tasman Sea east of Australia, from the Shiite militia Amal, said raised the price of meat and millc about 100 percent. 

On the eve of Mr. Hawke's meeting by radio from aboard the plane at An announcement Wednesday listed an increase of 1 10 percent far 
Wednesday with Secretary of State 9; io PM. eggs and more than 50 percent far chicken. O fficials said the priced 

George P. Shultz, Australia dis- . imknnwn what hart han. hs ^ c P 3 ™ 5 md 1101 announoement, might he 

dosed that it would not allow the ^ n ant« TVvlwi increased later. Diplomats said the move spotlighted economic trtfflbks 

United States to use Australian ter- caused partly by the widening war the N ic aragu an Army is fighting 

ntory to monitor the test. hour ^ cqrirati\m^Fa ?samst insurgent forces armed, trained and financed by the l^W 

Mr. Shultz said he does not be- hour deadline they had set for ne- S *^ s ‘ ... XI . , . . . . e . . . .v i’J: 

lieve the Australian decision is a gotiations to hyn on the release of Meanwhile, Nicaragua ^ vrce president, Sergio Ramirez, visting Lcp- 


Mcanwhile, Nicaragua’s vice preadent, Setgio Ramirez, viritmg Ltn- 
m on Wednesday, asked Britain to urge Washington to exercise its 




jack to U-S. -Australian the two men, the officials reported, don on Wednesday, askal Britain to ingc ) 

influence by reaffirming backing for the Con 

and’ by encouraging the United States to i 
/y/un • I r I. n , 7 Nicaragua it suspended three weeks ago. Mr. i 

Officials F£it Betrayed the British foreign secretary, &r Geoffrey Ho 


Nicaragua it suspended three weeks 
the British foreign secretary, Sr Go 


ijk Washington to exercise its 
Contadora regional peace {Am 
to resume the dialogue with 
Mr. Ramirez met for talks mlh 
y Howe. 


Meet the 
NewEench 
Cal)inel 

Fribraaty 26, 1985, Paris 

Following the success of our 1982 conference, we are pleased to announce a one day briefing session 
focusing on “Modernization: Priority for the French Economy ” 

With the cooperation of the French Government, we have gathered together the key ministers most 
directly involved with policies affecting business activities in Fiance. 

The program will include presentations by: 

Rare Beregowy, Minister of Economy, Finance and Budget 
Edith Cresson, Minister of Industrial Redeployment and Foreign Dade. 

Hobart Omen, Minister of Research and Technology. 

Mkbd Ddehane, Minister of Labour, Employment and Vocational Dading. 

Roland Dumas? Minister of External Relations. 

CUrot hataa v^ ir i prepfe 


(Continued from Page 1) 
small crack appealing in alliance 
solidarity.” 

People outside the administra- 
tion inner circle, however, are baf- 
fled by its behavior. 

Michael MccGwire, a British an- 
alyst of naval affairs at the Brook- 
ings Institution in Washington, 


Lange honored a campaign pledge For the ReCOXtl 
may not be productive. 

One erf the main dangers is that Soviet ground forces c omm a n der. Marshal Vasili L Pctrov. las. 

coercion applied to New 7«iTand bee 0 promoted to the post of first dqmty defense minister, Westai.- 
might have an adverse effect on notary expert s in Moscow said Thursday. (Roden) 

Australian public opinion. A bill transferring Hoag Kong to Ch i n a when Britain's lease on the 

Mr. Hawke is understood to «>hjny expires in 1997 completed its passage through, the British Housed 
have asked to be relieved of the Commons on Thursday. The bill is expected to goto the House of Loris» 
obligation to provide support for upper chamber of Parliament, on Feb. 19. (AP) 

the MX missile tests because of Laws pnfaaHtfng inter-racial sex and mixed marriages will be reviewed 


obligation to provide support for 
the MX missile tests because of 


_ 7 j uuaMic icms oecause or prowwuug uiux-raoni sex ana nnxea mamages win be reviewed 

^ .j todignmion from members of his by a special committee of legislators and could be repealed. South 

ESu So - cai * neL But it is possible that Africa s Internal Affairs Minister, Frederik de Klerk, announced Thno- 

one is what they are doing. the pwt call dispute with New Zea- day in Parliament in Cape Town. «u«iuu«a 


He and other analysts believe land and the way in which Wash- 
that the only real value of ANZUS ington bandied it would have 


is the political support Australia forced cancellation of the Austra- territory in 
and New Zealand have traditional- lian support in any case, arrrw Higg arbitration, 
ly given the United States and that to Mr. MccGwire and other ana- Lee M. 1 
I to poison relations because Mr. lysts. the Enviroz 


. Tbwnas 1 ^P n approval of the Senate on Thursday to head 
the Environ men tal Protection Agency. (AP) 


For Twins, Auschwitz Still Holds a Special Horror 


(Continued from Page I) his own voice was very poor, and A nurse in her backhouse stole 
me: ‘What did they do to you?* I Dr. Mengele wanted to know why some morphine and a syringe and 
said: *1 don't know. I don’t feel ooe “twin" had a beautiful voice told Mrs. EBaz to put her baby out 
anything. I'm still under anestbe- and the other did not. He conduct- of its misery, 
sia.’" ed experiments on their vocal cords “ *You want me to kffl ray own 

The other men then told him that ^ *™? aired _ speech and, child,’ I said. T can’t do it.’ ” 


Addfionol ragffr wl be provided bya 

penri of irtomcriond businessman and 
banke^inducfingiEricBourdcRsdeOiar- 
bonriera, S.VF. and General Manager, 
Morgan Gucrcgi ty Trust Co mpany of New 
York end Ldk Le Hodvftfgen^ Chairmen 
of RhSne-Pbulenc. 

Each presenlalion wfl be folowed by a 
queslkxKnkvB«verperiociaid 5 BTiuila- 
neous FrendvfiigSsh fransktionwil be pro- 
vided at al tines. 



An important aspect of the conference 
wi be the extensive opportunities to engage 
in informal dscussion v#i the current pofcy 
maters and with other business executives 
actively doing business with France. 

OnFebru^27,theh%istiyoflriduflri- 
dRedepbyment and Foreign Trade is orgc> 
nizRrigfuadayvTsrts^exctosivelxfbroonfer-- 

encedtendees, to industrial 

plants 


IheAeraspalicfeplortinTGubus&Fiide- 
foi wi be sent to dl participants registering 
^theconferencaToregslerforthisexcep- 
tiond confisrence, please complete and 
return ttereg fetrotio n form tod a y. 

Hcralb^^^Snbune 




Office -tSlwerkie 
Orfotoc 6i$&5. : :‘r.V 




SURNAME 


WSTNAME 


The other men then told him that 
part of their sexual organs had been 
removed. An hour later, O.C. testi- 
fied, the anesthetic wore off , and he 
was able to feel that a similar oper- 
ation had beat conducted on him. 

One of the most moving mo- 
ments came in the testimony of 
Ephraim Rekhenberg, 58, who had 
had to have his vocal cords re- 
moved because erf injections Dr. 
Mengde gave him in nis neck. He 
gave his testimony through a spe- 
cial microphone placed on his neck 
just below Ms jaw that made his 
voice sound as through it was com- 
ing from a computer. 

Mr. Rdcbenberg was not a twin 
but greatly resembled ins older 
brother. A Jew working for the Na- 
zis came up to them when they got 
off the train at Auschwitz and 
forced item out of the “sdection" 
line, where iL was decided who 
would live and who would die im- 
mediately in the gas chambers. The 
Jewish worker pushed them up to a 
Nazi soldier and said that they 
were twins. He and his brother did 
not object. 


eventnafly created growths that led “We had a big argument, until I 

to the removal of Mr. Rticben- did it," she said, choking back tears 
berg s vocal cords in 1967. as the audience fell completely si- 

^mce 1967 until five months lent “I murdered my own child." 
ago. I could not speak at all" be “The next day Mengde came," 

she xmtinoed. “He couldn’t find 

For the twins who came to Jerusalem, it was a 
cathartic reunion where they could unlock 
memories in the presence of the only other 
people in the world who would really 
understand — their fellow twins. 


“Then I bought this wonderful my baby’s corpse among the h*»n 
device,” he added, pulling the mi- of bodies outside our bloc. He 
crophonc from his neck and hdd- cursed me for cheating him.” 
i« it up. -ms 1 » ™ invented ^ ForthetwinswiwcametoJmi- 

the Germans and that is apity. saton. this was morelto s hS- 

Another survivor, Ruth Eliaz, re- ing; it was a cathartic 40th r euni on 
counted in an almost hypnotic where they could pour ran stories 
monotone how she gave birth while and unlock memories in the pres- 

> .1 .1 V. _r TV. W MM lha Anlu — ■ . ■ . 


>t object under the authority of Dr. Men- the only other people in the 

His brother hid a “beautiful gk fogged that he had not utv "g-toinM-riaW 


OTY/COUNTRY 


rawfONE 


voice and sang once for the Ger- 
mans," Mr. Rochenberg said. But 


&& UNIVERSITY 
W DEGREE 

F«f m«. a WMft bpMtMH 

•Oil rry, uimUv 'O* 

1 ( *«*4.0BSMdSTfB50BpCiClOS«f 
Swkj dwarfed resum* 
to* 8 trje evaluation 
MCmC WESTERN UMVERSTTY 

lUOOMMV'BM HKTi Enema CMttdMUSA 


gde. Angered that he had not no- worid who would really understand 
riewrt her pregnancy beforehand, — th e i r fellow twins, 
which would have prompted him to Zvi Spiegel was 29 when he en- 

send her to the gas chambers. Dr. i^red Ausrawitz with his twin sis- 
Mengele ordered her to give birth ter. He was the oldest of the male 
to the baby. Once it was bom, he twins and helped to save the lives of 


forced her to cover her breasts with 
tape. 

“He wanted to see bow long a 
baby would live without food," 
Mrs. Eliaz said. “The child got 


many erf the youngsters who sur- 
vived to crane to Jerusalem. 

After his stray was told, the in- 
quiiy board asked all those in the 
audience whom he had taken care 


^ “to* written ther 
in black and white in that bode 
gre a tombstone for us," said Mr. 
Sotlon s wife, June. 

. * l ihe only record we have 
had or what happened to her. It was 
•wfo for us to leave that bode, that 
pnmed nnme. It was like leaving 
grave." 


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R( plicar. v 


" Spiegel Bacsi , " or Unde ^ptegriL 
The audience broke into apjMita 

Rene Slo tkin and his twinsisW, 
Irene Hizme, both from the New 
York area, wctc 6 years dd when 
they were brought to Dr. Mengfc 
Since their liberation, they had not 
discussed their imprisonment or 
been in contact with any of the 
other twins. 

At the conclusion of the three- 

day inquiry, Mr. Slotkin sat in bis 
seat, overcome with emotion, his 
cheeks wet with tears. 

“Many of the meat recognized 
toe* *hey remembered me right 
away, he said of the other *nate 
twins. “Just like Auschwitz 
changed me, I am not the same now 
after this meeting. It me 
aware that there are others only' 
, T? e me. This meeting un-" 
locked things that we had been 
Keeping made ouradves. It mil 
“C*P us cope better, even though 
now we are hunmg." 

Mr. Slotkin said he hart gone to a 
kibbutz where the records of the 
Jews of Theresienstadt concentra- 
tion camp were kept. That was the 
camp where he and his twin sister 
iast saw their mother before t hff 
shipped to Auschwitz. Tib* 
day* searching through the records, 
reey discovered their mother’s 
aanjcoo the Nazi list of those who 

been murdered in Theresfcn* 
slant. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 8, J985 


Page 3 


For Democrats 9 Reagan’s Speech Is a Time for Soul Searching and Pledges to ' Change 9 


e _ pr ^ r f m appeared to be working — — 

A- SfASHINCTHM tv!' ' n ^ Waller F. Mondate, his 

'tofic rSrv G ^ 0 !i I ? CTnotrJliL opponent in List foil's 

Esss^**** 

*<**& y£EZ3*tti&£ which has suifere. 

bolitical rp<nL| t0 cam ? aew thv: ^ic deficit," said 3 woman in one , ' 

AmilS „ re5pecl of onstream of ihc four posieleciion “focus genOUft defeat, WC 
■■ n!™ii 1 r groups" that were taped for the 

Nomiidlj. the out-of-power par- broadcast. n*»mrw'rjits rpwvor 


r As a political party 
which has suffered a 


America - ** . ‘ puaicictnun iw» 

■ Kh™„. r groups- that were taped for the 

Normally. the out-of-power par- broadcast. 

ty responds to such presidenUal . Said another: “One thing that 

E^P* people over the edgl peo- 


Democrats recognize 
that we must earn 


aSS ? jS£5 r £an the presi- Mondale came out and said. ‘We’re flnpw tbp nolitxcal 
dent has described. But the Demo- raising taxes.’ And Reagan is say- anew u,e political 

f/®* s * ere ? n *he defensive mg. ‘You’re better off than you ’ . . . 

Wainesday night often turning were four years ago.* Well, 1 think respect of mainstream 
I tear criticism on themselves. I'm better off; I’m definitely not . 
fihej’ almost ignored Mr. Rea- worse orf. I'm definitely going to be Americans, 

.■gan. except to acknowledge his po- worse off if I get more taxes." 

■ Jitical successes, when they went on . The program, aired on most tele- 
ihe air after the president spoke, vision networks, gave little more 


■*TT - r - — UU pif- 

Jiiical I successes, when ihev went on 
ihe air after the president spoke. 

IflCltVaH ■ Itati J . J r • 



“As a political party which has and “knows it has to change-" He The Senate majority leader, 
suffered a serious defeat, we Demo- added (hat “perhaps we have Robert J. Dole, a Republican from 
crats recognize that we must e3m lagged behind in recent sears, but Kansas, said the deficit remains the 
anew the political respect of main- we’re on the move now."' first priority of Congress. “I wish 

stream Americans." said the re- In an attempt to define where the the president had spent a little 

cently elected Democratic Nation- Democratic Party is. Mr. Clinton more time on that tonight” he said, 
al Committee chairman. Paul G. said: “It's good politics and it’s verv 

Kirk Jr., in a statement issued in “America needs this revitalized good policy to attack the deficit.^ 
conjunction with the broadcast. Democratic Party because we will “Realistically, we have to bite 
“Our message today is that we work fora government that will go every bullet in sight. That means 
are listening to America.” he said, beyond the prison of past thinking, defense, that means agriculture, 
“assessing the state of the union a government thjt »iU work in We can't just continue this joy ride 
with open minds, willing to move in partnership with the private sector «F spending any longer." he added, 
new directions." to foster economic growth, a gov- TTk chairman of the House Bud- 

At a pre-broadcast briefing on emmeot lha . 1 °P"aie its own get Committee. Representative 
the Democratic response to Mr, P «* a coranutmeni to Vrdlam H. Gray 3d. a Democrat 


bipartisan tax reform legislation, a 
modified version of the flat tax. 
“Now- that the president will get 
behind it. it at least keeps it alive." 
said Representative Robert T. Ma- 
isui. a Democrat from California. 

“If the president wants to sell 
this, he's going to get it." said Sena- 
tor Bob Packwood. the Republican 
from Oregon who Is chairman Of 
the tax-writing Senate Finance 
Committee. He has long been skep- 
tical about the value of tax reform. 
“It's going to pass this Congress 


chairman of the Democratic Coo- 


Jhstiad, they responded with a than cameo appearances to mast of 
half-hour of soul searching, relying fhe party's present leaders, includ- 
.on Democrats who had voted for ing its 1984 presidential contend- 


Paui G. Kirk Jr. 


■i“"- ^puoucan president to plumb 
•the depths of their party’s plight 
Almost like group therapy in its 


p. - c- — o ?*» party s present leaders, includ- Mario M. Cuomo of New York to mobile" blue-collar as we'il as House, ga i ned seats in the Senate 

■ Tvl iT :nK ?? als who .™ d vo « d for mg us 1984 presidential contend- Mayor Tom Bradley of Los Ange- white-collar supporters of Mr Rea- ^ won three-fourths of the coun- 

.,t|ve Republiran president to plumb ers - les. gao. try's governorships. Mr. Reagan's 

Instead, it save too hillino to Rill Ihf> fnnic un« on SR lin- TV. a .... i .i victorv Iw said, was “a veo rv*r- 


gressional Campaign Commiitee. 

wok an optimistic view. a heart can ignore. 

Mr _j.ii. w, “Our critics have said we want 

l 100 much *«*wnwiem. while thc\ 

in 49 of 50 states last fall the Dero- 

ocrats retained control of the X T..^ a ^ a :. ^ 


to foster economic growth, a gov- The chairman of the House Bud- “« s gotag to pass this Congnss 
emment that will operate its own get Committee. Representative and anyone who thinks that the 
programs with a commitment to William H. Gray 3d. a Democrat bulk of it is not going to pass Jhts 
Reagan’V^spetth! ^^Repraentative ! ace l ,ence and accountability and from Pennsylvania, said tbe speech Congress is fooling themselves, he 
Trinvrvvlhn nf r^iifnrnia a hn k independence [from] narrcnviniCT- seemed to contradict a statement in said. 

v ■ •- - ■ ests. a government that will not the president’s budget submitted _ On foreign, policy. Represema- 

tum away from problems that no to Congress on Monday, that eeo- uve Dame B. FascelL the DemO- 
people with a heart can ignore. nomic growth alone cannoi solve erat from Florida who is chairman 


ests. a government that will not the president’s budget submitted 
turn away from problems that no to Congress on Monday, that evo- 


the deficit problem. 

“He continues to mislead us and 
say we can grow out of these defi- 


WdL we want the government off cits." Mr. Gray said. 


Instead, it gave top billing to Bui the focus was on 58 un- 
tnose described by the narrator, named, rank-and-file Democrats 


The message seemed to be that "*«>'■ said, was "a vwy per- 

. , . . — -i rj — ■ — v_ — — - — _ -j lauiHw. uiujiw. loua-iuui-iui. iaiwubu the Democratic Party iv.u listening sonai one. 

onenal ISJTSS 61 p* "’ ^ P ro £ am Clintmi of Arkansas, who participated, along with select- and learning, benefiting from the Striking a note somewhere in be- 11U11 llUMllllg MIUUIU UJLCTICIC Hllll 

v!uinn« obser- “bold lead»s who are budding cd elected officials, in the election lessons of its defeat. That it was ween, Mr. Clinton, as narrator of their primary pursuit ibis year, def- 

6 ® aa °~ 10 st century. Those postmortems. Many of these peo- down hut by no means out sis it the program, conceded that his par- icit reduction, tbe Los .Angeles 

“8“ s economic people ranged from Governor pie were under 40 and “upwardly attempts to define its role. ty suffered a “resounding defeat" Times reported from Washington. 


to Mr. Reagan's speech, cautioned about Roosevelt." 

that nothing should interfere with Clearly, the speech's most popu- 


of the House Foreign Affairs Com- 
mittee. said that the speech gave 
members of Congress a new under- 
standing of Mr. Reagan's world 
view. "One thing that's new is this 


our backs, too. but we need it bv Said Senator Mark O. Hatfield, a v i® w - "One thing that s new is this 
our side.” " Republican from Oregon: “It was a global vision of American power. 

_ r, r , . _ _ .. great production. I know now how he said. 

■ Congress Em ph a siz es Deficit jh e Democrats must feel, because it But. Mr. Fascell quickly added. 

Members of Congress, reacting was the wav we Republicans felt "I don’t think a single vote has 
to Mr. Reagan's speech, cautioned about Roosevelt." been changed" on pending con- 

that nothing should interfere with Clcarlv. the speech's roost popu- gressional consideration of the MX 
their primary pursuit this y tar. def- lar aspect, for membeis of both missile. US. aid to Nicaraguan re- 
icit reduction, tbe Los .Angeles parties, was the president's pledge bels and Mr. Reagan's space-de- 
Times reported from Washington, to work with Congress to develop fense system. 


global vision of American power, 
he said. 

But. Mr. Fascell quickly added. 


missile. U.S. aid to Nicaraguan re- 
bels and Mr. Reagan's space-de- 
fense system. 


Reagan Says 
U.S. Regains 

leadership 


(Continued from Page 1) 
tacking neighboring states," he 
_said- 

7, The MX program, the Nieara- 
gjuan rebels and the Strategic De- 
fense initiative seem to have been 
given special attention Wednesday 
night because they are among the 
few aspects of Mr. Reagan's global 
policies that are in trouble, or seem 
headed for trouble, in Congress. 

His broader diplomatic and mili- 
tary policies in the world, which 
■seem more conventional and wide- 
ly accepted than they did in his first 
years as president, are enjoying a 
respite from attack at home and 
abroad. 

Mr. Reagan did not cite details 
'to back up his claim that the Unit- 
ed States has "resumed" its historic 
Vadership role. White House aides 
,<3&d the start of a shift in the 
lhilitary balance between the Unit- 
*ed States and Soviet Union, a re- 
surgent U.S. economy and “are- . . r _, . . 

stored foundation of deterrence" Anatoli F. Dobrynin, tbe 1 

against Soviet actions in the Third States, looked over note 

World as tbe basis for the staie- 
‘ment. 

Underlying the president's ebui- Kortfttm TJrfYtX 
lient tone was his landslide election cK 

Victory in November, which creat- u 

ed a strong diplomatic, as well as /If H/iru) gmn 
domestic, position for Mr. Reagan tutu 

'His sweeping victory doubtless ■ 

'pfetyeda , it)Ielii ; ibe ■Soviet Unidn-'s- •• (Conthned from Page 1) « -v 
decision to return lo negotiations enterprise zones this ycar. ^Ai 
cm nuclear aims on something dose Tip, you could make that a bin 
To U.S. terms. -- . day present." 

*’ In the area of trade, Mr. Reagan Mr. ‘Reagan made the speech 

announced that be was calling for a his 74th birthday and the audiea 
‘start in tbe coming year on a new stood at the conclusion and sanj 
round of global trade negotiations, chorus of “Happy Birthday." 

He mentioned the talks in last On economic issues. Mr. Reag 
year's State of the Union address mice again rejected tax increa* 
but bad not said when they should and endorsed a series of prindp! 

beheld. for tax simplification and add 

T ! The president also appealed for that he-hoped Congress would pi 
‘. economic aid to bdp developing a bill this year to simplify taxes, 
-nations. He said that many of the Tbe basic principles that K 
three billion people in Third World Reagan endorsed closely paral 
countries “are victims of dictator- those contained in the tax-si mpli 
ships that impoverish them with cation plan proposed in Decemt 
.taxation and corruption," and he by the Treasury Department, 
.asked U.S. allies to join in “a prac- The points he endorsed Wednt 

deal program Of trade and assis- day night include a top individti 
_ fance that fosters economic devei- rale of no more than 35 percer 
jopment through personal elimination of many deductio 
incentives.'' and tax breaks, but not the mo 



Stockman’s Pension View Draws Angry Response 





By Bill Keller 

.Vrx’ Yifi Time s Senne 

WASHINGTON — An atL.ick 
on the military' pension system by 
David A. Stockman, the budget > li- 
rector, has draw angry responses 
from veterans groups, Pentagon l if- 
ficials and some congressional 
champions of tbe military. 

But some Ley members of Con- 
gress picked up Mr. Stockman's 
call for reform and said Wednesda y 
that this might be the year for .a 
major overhaul of military com- 
pensation. 

“1 would have said it differently., 
but Stockman is right," said Repre- 
sentative Les Aspin. a Democrat of 
Wisconsin who heads the House 
Aimed Services Committee. “Mili- 
tary retirement is too expensive. 
The Pentagon has failed to grapple 
with this issue." 



“We have a military’ pay system. Defenders of the system say the 
totally, that is not geared to the retirement plan is a valuable in- 
modern world. - Mr. Nunn said. Jueemem to men and women who 
Critics hare said that the retire- want to make the military a career, 
mem system is more generous than Lawrence J. Korb, assistant sec- 
necessary to recruit and retain retary of defense for manpower, 
skilled personnel now* that basic said In an interview on Wednesday 
pay has been improved. that if the retirement plan were 

This year, the military pension made less generous, skilled people 
trust fund wall pay benefits to might leave the military before they 
440.000 retired officers, with a typi- served even 10 years. ’ 
cal lieutenant colonel receiving ■“The 20-year retirement says to 
526,028. It will pay 915,000 retired these people, 'If you can hang on 
enlisted men, with a typical retired for 10 more years, well make it up 
master sergeant receiving up lo to you.’ " Mr. Korb said. “We've 


PiageT 


510,716. 


found that a very, vay powerful 




David A Stockman 


Mr. Stockman said T uesday that probably not shared by the presi- under the age of 50. 


Moreover, critics have said the determinant. It buns you with peo- 
system encourages officers and en- pie over 20 years, but in the 10- to 
listed men to retire after 20 years. 20-year group you keep more. Chi 
just as they have mastered the skills balance I think you come out 
that are needed. ahead." 

Ninety percent of the military 

personnel who retired in 1983 were ■ Effects of Freeze Outlined 

Mr. Weinberger told a congres- 




A' :?t" . , v ... 

^ •• F.' .V'* , 


the military retirement system, 
which allows men and women in 
uniform lo retire at half pay after 
20 years' service, was “a scandal" 
and* "an outrage." 


deni." “The most telling statistic is that sional committee Thursday 'that 

Other influential members of the average military retiree serves holding the growth of military 
Congress backed the budget direc- 23 years and collects a pension for spending to the rate of inflation 
lor’s call for change in the pension 32 years." said one congressional would decimate major prog rams to 
program, which is projected to cost aide, who spoke on the condition procure combat planes and heU- 
5 17.8 billion in 1986, compared that he not be named. “There is a copters, would slow or end the pro- 
Witii 57 3 billion in 1976. saying in tbe military that you’re grams for C-5 and C-17 transport 

Senator Sam Nunn of Georgia, dumb to work beyond 20 years, aircraft, would force the elimina- 
the senior Democrat on the Armed because you’re working for half tion of two Trident submarines and 
Services Committee, while deplor- pay." would slow by years pro d ucti o n of 


; Ilia Auocracd Kn 

Anatoli F. Dobrynin, tbe Soviet ambassador to tbe United 
States, looked over notes as President Reagan spoke. 

Reagan Urges '2d Revolution 
Of Hope and Opportunity ’ 


“The institutional forces of the billion in 1986. compared 

military are more concerned about ^ 7 -3 billion in 1976. 


protecting their retirement than swmiot iwn Nunn ot Ucorgia, 
they are about protecting the seen- senior Democrat on the Armed 

rity of the American people," he • Scrv, “ Committee, while deplor- 


told the Senate Budget Committee. "°i Mr. Stockmans language, 
Mr. Stockman's blunt remarks < =*Ued for an overall examination of 
drew a furious response. nulilary pay and benefit saying the 

Wednesday morning, the Senate cwreni system encourages a drain 
Armed Service Committee chair- of needed skills. 



^ man, Barry Gddwater. acknowl- 

, ... , , edging that he himself received al 

- (Continued from Page 1) * .■ gage-interest deduction; lower cor- pc ns jon for his 37 years of active 
enterprise zones this year. "And, porate rates but continued “mcen- reserve duty, said: “I found 
Tip, you could make that a birth- lives for capital formation:” Mr. Stockman’s remarks about as 
day present." elimination of federal income taxes distasteful as anything I’ve heard 

Mr. 'Reagan made the speech on f° r those below the poverty line; coming out of this administration, 
his 74th birthday and the audience and an increase in tbe personal ex- OT an y preceding it." 
stood at the conclusion and sang a emption. Mr. Goldwater. a Republican of 

chorus of “Happy Birthday." On social issues, he called again Arizona, said later. “I’d fire him" if 

On economic issues. Mr. Reagan for constitutional amendments to Mr. Stockman were in his employ, 
once again rejected tax increases permit school prayer and ban abor- He said he was not. however, seek- 
and endorsed a series of principles dons. ... ing the budget director’s resigna- 

for tax . simplification and added “Abortion is either the taking of ti on 

that hchoped Congress would pass human life' or it isn’t," he said. Defense Secretary Caspar W. 
a bill this year to simplify taxes. "And if it is — and medical tech- Weinberger, in a formal statement, 
Tbe basic principles that Mr. nology is increasingly showing that jjhai Stockman had de- 
Reagan endorsed closely parallel is — « must be stopped.” Tamed men and women who “en- 

those contained in the tax-si mpLifi- . He also called for limiting the dure great personal hardships and 
cation plan proposed in December rights of defendants in criminal make many sacrifices for the secu- 
by the Treasury Department. cases, asking rhetorically. n ( y 0 f the United Stales." He 
The points he endorsed Wednes- “Shouldn’t we feel more compos- called the military pension system 
day night include a top individual ^on for victims of crime than for but by no means lavish." 
rate of no more than 35 Dercent: those who commit crime?" 'Tl... A r r •- IU. I 


i Services Committee, while deplor- pay." would slow by years production of 

hng Mr. Stockman’s language. Most retirees find other jobs af- the B-l and Stealth bombers. 

( ailed for an overall examination of ter they leave the service, and some It was the first lime that Mr. 
military pay and benefit saying the put their military experience to Weinberger had spelled out in pub- 
current system encourages a drain work in highly paid jobs with Pen- lie his assessment of the effect of 
of needed skills. tagon contractors. such a spending freeze. 


Gbtii'j match 
in 18 carat gold, 
water -re&inant, 
with extra- flat 
quartz movement. 

Instant itme-zone change. 

* ViaaeU l 

ZMonU-Ctuio so. 
3, avenue des Beaux-Arts 
MONTH-CARLO y 


rale of no more than 35 percent; 
elimination of many deductions 
and tax breaks, but not the mort- 


M The Veterans of Foreign Wars 

increases in the convicuons of drug SLSUSSiw^l. vSKa 


Republican Senators Agree 
To a Social Security Freeze 


dealers and organized crime lead- 
ers. the nation must do more lo 
stop criminals. His list included 
continued use of the death penally 
and passage of legislation that 
would allow the use of evidence 
obtained illegally when it was done 
in good faith by police officers. 

The only passages of the speech 


telegram declaring: “Tbe VFW will 
not be satisfied until the 4-F draft- 
dodging Stockman has been fired 
and you have repudiated his 
views." Mr. Stockman was exempt 
from the military draft during the 
Vietnam War because he was en- 
rolled in divinity school. 

Mr. Stockman's spokesman. Ed- 


United Press international lure Secretary John R. Block oc- Tbe only passages of the speech ., r - Stockman s spokesman. Ed- 

WASHINGTON — Robert J. curred a day after the budget direc- dealing with sacrifice to reduce the * in Jr P/“ e Jr - “«ed a “darifica- 
4>oIe, the Senate majority leader, tor. David A. Stockman, deficit called for reduction or elimi- Hfl’.g.Jv j C j^ even i°S sayuig 
said Thursday that Republican denounced farm subsidies and nation of "cosllv government sub- . 1 focpuoget director in no way 
■senators have Informally agreed to blamed farmers and lenders for ydjes." citing the Affluak passen- 10 '?P u S n the P^ousm 

-f ree?? Social Security cost-of-living creating the credit crisis m major g C r railroad system and farm or devotion of our men and women 
increases as part of their package to fanning areas. subsidies. He also asked Congress ,n ur V^ or ™’ b[Jt wai . expressing per- 

. reduce the (kfkaL The White House spokesman, for a trial use of the line-item veto. iW *^|*« reauc ™JJ c 

<- The Republicans are working oo Larry Speakes, attempting to take which would allow a president to JgJ™; ^ 

an alternative to President Ronald the edge off the criticism of Mr. approve a bill but eliminate some “ 01 Ue ' ensc 10 re ‘ 

..Reagan’s 1986 budget, which Stockman by farm-state legislators. portionsofiL lo ™ 1 - 

would make no reduction in Social said that Mr. Rea g an “is sympa- Referring to the budget cuts he Asked about Mr. Stockman's 

Security benefits. Both the presi- dietic to the difficulties fanners seeks in the government's major testimony, Larry Speakes, the 

dent and the Senate Republicans face in obtaining credit for tbe health-care programs — Medicare. White House spokesman, would 

‘leaders would like to cut 550 billion planting season.” an insurance program for the elder- say only that Mr. Stockman “was 


D 




rrTTiTTni 

A k L A J 

3 3 Vi 3 N 

L*1 f AiM 3 


increases as part or tnetr package to fanning areas. subsidies. He also asked Congress “ ' “r 1 .* • ° j ‘ 

.. reduce the deficiL The White House spokesman, for a trial use of the line-item veto. _ J 

«. The Republicans are working on Larry Speakes, attempting to take which would allow a president to g-"”® * 

an alternative to President Ronald the edge off the criucism of Mr. approve a bill but eliminate some r^T" 

..Reagan's 1986 budget, which Stockman by farm-state legislators, portions of it. 

. would make no reduction in Social said that Mr. Reagan “is sympa- Referring to the budget cuts he 
Security benefits. Both the presi- ihetic to the difficulties fanners seeks in the government's major 
dent and the Senate Republicans face in obtaining credit for the health-care programs — Medicare. 

‘leaders would like to cut 550 billion planting season.” an insurance program for the elder- 

from anticipated deficits but with Under ^ oew prograiB . the gov- 'VJ “ d , disabled, mid Medicaid, a 
--different formulas. * eminent now wUlalfow a bank to ^nil-state health care program 


Under the new program, the gov- 

- -different formulas. - emment now vrilf allow a bank to ; program 

Senator Dole said that the way to interest as wdl as principal [ or P°° r ,. P re f lder ? 1 ^ 

persuade Mr. Reagan to go along ofl farmer - s guaranteed iban; wifl spading be slowed^ 

'-•was with a “bipartisan group wtll- Kuaranl « up to 90 percent of fern bw Protecuons for the ejderiy and 
'ing to make that change." operating loons to fanners previ- need y Wl11 ^ preserved. 


ly and disabled, and Medicaid, a expressing a personal opinion 

federal-state health care program j 

for the poor — the president said 

health spending “will be slowed, WORLD W IDE 

but protections for the elderly and EIV/KRTAEWMENT i 


Revision of Farm Aid 


operating loons to tanners previ- 
ously served by lending institutions 


;; The administration, conceding that have gone broke; will avoid 


- ■(' j chat President Reagan's farai-cred- pressunng 

* ' ■ - • :: ■'jl’idl -. iL ' It aid program has not worked, an- ting on fii 
-*'. r - - 'j jn mmeed Wednesday a revision of ers and sm 




. r 'V m 


■-h.n 7. * 

^ jounced Wednesday a revision of 
the plan aimed at helping thou- 
isands of faltering farmers obtain 


pressuring rural banks into shut- 
ting ofT financially troubled farm- 
ers and small rural businesses that 
need credit, and will send teams of 
lending officers to provide credit 
assistance to farmers in areas where 


rr„ c tnr mrine nlantinfi. The assistance to tarmers in areas wnere 
^ rmm 
- . The announcement by Agricul- 


liquidated. 






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V 






Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY, FEBRU ARY 8, 1985 


South Korea Prepares 
For Dissident’s Return; 
20 Supporters Confined 


Reutm 

SEOUL — Police placed 20 
prominent supporters of Kim Dae 
Jung, a South Korean opposition 
leader, under house arrest Thurs- 
day and built a metal fence around 
Mr. Kim's borne in preparation for 
his return, diplomats and aides 
said. 

The opposition New Korea 
Democratic Party said that the po- 
lice action was designed to hamper 
welcoming ceremonies for Mr. Kim 
who is returning to South Korea 
after two years in the United 
Slates. They urged that his support- 
ers be allowed free movemenL 

The government had no com- 
ment on the reports of bouse arrest. 
It has described similar action In 
the past as "humanitarian preven- 
tive measures." 

A metal fence, of the type used 
for surrounding construction sites, 
was built Thursday around Mr. 
Kim's Seoul home along with nine 
police huts, one of them on the roof 
of a nearby church, aides said. 

They said the fence was aimed at 
seating the bouse ofT from crowds 
expected to converge on the area. 
The op position aides said that 
50,000 people were expected to 
turn out to greet Mr. Kim at Seoul's 
Kimpo airport, but they feared po- 
lice would keep them weD away 
from the arrival area. 

Prominent dissidents, including 
a former opposition leader, Kim 
Young Sam. had police guards put 
on their homes Thursday and were 
told not to leave, aides said. Kim 
Young Sam said he intended to 
defy the police screen. 

Aides said Kim Dae Jung, who 


would be taken from the airport to 
his home in a government vehicle. 

In Tokyo, security was tight for 
Mr. Kim’s arrival Members of an 
American delegation accompany- 
ing him said they spotted security 
men from the United States, Japan 
and both South and North Korea 
on board the aircraft. 

On the flight from Washington, 
Mr. Kim expressed concent over 
bow the South Korean government 
would handle his arrival in Seoul 
He said that he understood the gov- 
ernment intended to smuggle him 
out of the airport and take him in a 
vehicle, possibly an ambulance. 

"I am worried that people might 
become angry if they cannot see me 
and cause some disturbance," he 
said. 

“1 have no intention of making 
any provocative remarks. I have 
not had the chance to meet the 
South Korean people since I was 
arrested in May 1980, and 1 want to 
be able to say “hello" to them and 
tell them I am happy to be home," 
he added. 



Soviet’s Sudden Silence 

On Anti-Satellite Anns 
Tests Is Puzzling to U.S., 


, n; nnic When Mr. Gromyko held his 

By Walter Pmcui. t^hour news conference on Jan. 

Hushmfoii F“f< discuss the resumption of 

WASHINGTON -Soviet lead- X he never riktib«i3 
ers continue to attack fhwtdmt ^ weapons. “That con- 

Ronald Reagan & space-based mis w they ^ made a decision 

sile defense system and esu nr me ^ ■ su ^- flCL - me official 

-demilitarization of space, bu ‘ 


ihev have become suddenly silent 


NIL* I W**- V*"' - f 

on 'their two-vear campaign for a 


moratorium oh testing and deploy- 
ment of anti-satellite weapons, ac- 


said. . , 

Some U.S. officials say they new 
believe that the Russians have de- 
cided to focus their attention im 
space defense research. Others.$ay 




resume ******** 


official who has worked 10 answer 
the Kremlin campaign said 
Wednesday that the sdence is “sig- 
nificant." but "we don’t know what 


its anti-satdlite systems. 

On Capitol Hill one defense 
cialist pointed to a new delay. uatQ 
June, in the first major test of anew 


II means. T n ;,i a - UJS. anti-satellite system and s&- 

Boih the Spa „ Vested “a private deal may have 

tive. popularly know . as smj £ ^ ^op talking 

wars, and the anti-satellite pn> moratorium and We KriS 


^ involve weapons ^ 

The firsL using either land-based or offtestmfr . 


space-based installations, would Too officials m the Paragon 
try to shoot down missiles in flight, and the Arms Control and Dupr- 
The second would in,’ IO destroy mamciH Agency believe. asjfe 


■ OM Dispute in Tokyo " ’ n " Auoocfcd 

John Burgess of The Washington Guardhouses being set up at the Seoul home of Kim Dae Jung; Mr. Kim stopping Thursday in Japan on his way to Seoul. 
Post reporter from Narita, Japan: 


satellites that help target those mis- said, that the Soviet propagandists 
sites and provide spy information “only want to go after the big out" 
and communication. the Space Defense lmtiatrve. 1 . 

Satellites would play a key role Another top official hdwevbr, 
in the Strategic Defense Initiative h e believes the sflenoe nfijfr 


by providing information to help ^tes that the Russians “have de- 
destrov ballistic missiles before ^ded t 0 resume testing therasefos 
they can reach their large ls. so ^ey will have weapons to tfe. 

the Carter administration tried str0 y a future U.S. space-based hal- 
io negotiate an anti-satellite weap- |j sl j c missile defense system." . . 


When Mr. Kim arrived in Japan, 
be briefly re-opened a dispute with 
Japanese authorities over his kid- 
napping in Tokyo by South Korean 
agents 12 years ago. 

Japanese police investigators 
were waiting at Narita airport 
when be landed for a lb-hour stop- 
over to question him on the abduc- 
tion. 

But Mr. Kim said at a press con- 
ference on Thursday that he re- 


Tamil Rebels Say Sri Lankan Arms Blockade Fails 


By William Claiborne 

Washington Past Service 

COLOMBO, Sri Lanka — Tamil 
guerrillas say that despite a block- 
ade by the government of Sri Lan- 
ka intended to cut their key supply 
line from India, the flow of arms 


fused the request- Time was short, men has continued across the 


was - ** *“e s,raiL . 


U.S., Honduras 

Reach an Impasse 


deal with the Japanese govern- 
ment's attitude, whether it really 
wants to find the truth." 


The guerrillas, who are fighting 
for a separate state in northern Sri 
Lanka, rely on shipments from 


Five days after his disappear- guerrilla redoubts on the Indian 
ance from a Tokyo hotel in August c0 ^ftiine. Th** shipments, they 


New York Times Service 
WASHINGTON — Negotia- 
tions between the United States 
and Honduras to establish a re- 
gional military tr aining center in 
that country nave become dead- 
locked. according to U.S. officials. 


1973. Mr. Kim "turned up blind- >n interviews in southern In- 



Sri Lankan officials said the re- which maintains a suem'Ila force in 
bels operate at least half a dozen northern Sri Lanka, said in an in- 

. . ■ > ■_ j* ■ - ‘-Tlirf K.-VL C un* 


secret training camps in India in lerview in Madras: “The boys are 
the jungle along the desolate Tamil noi being trained here. They may 

. . -i ^ .. ° n ■ . i-.i: i J ... ah.-m hiir 


Nadu coastline, from Point Cali- be doing some on their own. but 
mere, which juts into the Indian not with the help of the Indian 


ons treaty with the Soviet Union in 
the late 1970s. At that lime, the 
Russians had a rudimentary system 
and the United States was begin- 
ning to develop a more sophisticat- 
ed weapon. The Reagan adminis- 
tration refused to resume the talks. 


Ocean toward Jaffna Peninsula, to government. 


saying an 
verified. 


used io rauiuc me ium. 

agreement could not be P 


For 10 years, the Russians feve 
had a rudimentary anti-satellite 
weapon that is fired at a satellite. 
After several orbits of its - own. 
guided by the radar it carries, this 
weapon draws near its target and 


Since 1977, the United States has 


Rameswaram. the departure point Mr. Eelaventhan. a former econ- 
for the now-suspended ferry service omisi with the Sri Lankan central 


between the two countries. 

The Indian government has de- 


bank. acknowledged, however, that 
“If Tamil Nadu weren't available 


Soviet leaders, beginning in been working on a system that 
1983 began to campaign for a hall would be earned aloft on a rocket 
in U.S. testing of anti-satellite fired from an F-J5 figbier. Unlike 


nied allegations by the Sri Lankan as a sanctuary, we would have had 
government that it condones or to fight it out in Jaffna and perhaps 
supports Tamil guerrilla training we would have been liquidated. 


weapons. As late as December, the Soviet weapon, that of the 
President Konstantin U. Cher- United States would be aimed ifi- 


nenko called for such a ban. rectly at a satellite and guided di- 


suppons lamu guemtia training 
bases in southern India. It say's it 


Nonetheless, when Foreign Min- rectly into it by a homing device: 


folded and beaten outside his home d* 3 - had been only marginally in- 
in Seoul. He was then put under lei 3HP’ et ^ ... 


house arresL 


‘Before, you could decide to go 


Japanese police in the meantime across at5 o'clock and go at 6 Now 
had discovered fingerprints in Mr. you have to plan ahead a Ultie. 


viewed in Madras, capital of tin: ing in northern Sri Lanka, 
southern Indian stale of Turn The 48 million Tamils 
Nadu, said that such charges wen.* share language and ances 


has only given refuge to about about 10.000 trained fighters in Sri 
40.000 Tamils who have fled fight- Lanka and southern India, but In- 


Separatist leaders claim to have ister Andrei A. Gromyko met in Electronic and mechanical prob- 

' ... . - . • ■ o ~e Umc hiuo Holavcii I *5 t«t cr-htvL 


dian intelligence officials and 


Kim's hotel room and other evi- said Sunder a Sri Lankan Tamil 


dence that implicated officials at referring to the timing of 


_ Negotiations over the training the South Korean Embassy. “ e \ ess ?}? ^ , r ™? t ?r, boats 


exaggerated. but hinted at the exi->- Sri Lanka's 2.6 million Tamils, who 
tence of rebel military activity i.n have been involved in a long-run- 


The 48 million Tamils in India Western diplomats said the figure 
share language and ancestry with was closer to -000. and that many 
*»ri f anka’s 2 /i million Tamils, who °f ‘ hem “able to fight be- 


Geneva with Secretary of Slate lems have delayed U 5. test schtd- 
George P. Shultz on Jan. 7-8, he ules by almost two years. The first 
never mentioned the subject. test, which could have occurred af- 

“We drought it was unbeliev- ter March 1. was postponed on til 
able." one official said. June, according to sources. ■ 


center had been an important part The ensuing diplomatic dispute that make the 18-mile (30 kilome- 
of broader talks over the U.S. rda- was settled when the Seoul apolo- ter '/“ the rebels. 


southern India. ning conflict with the island’s ma- Leaders ot me guemua groups 

A guerrilla who identified him- iority Sinhalese. India is pressing openly discussed training ties to 
self as Skantha said: “We are trai n- the Sinhalese government of Presi- v3n0US . ^ ac i'£ ns , 0 ^ 
ing for a long dmwn-oui struggle dent Junius R. Jayawardene for a Liberation Oiganizauon and poliu- 
like in Nicaragua. The emphasis is political settlement of the Tamils’ ra ! contact with “fnendiy unti-im- 
on training and equipping a pe»> demands for autonomy. peralist groups, such as the Afn- 


cause of a shortage of arms. 
Leaders of the guerrilla groups 


tionship with Honduras, which has gized for the incident, while main- . Tte, agreed to be tnicr- 
recently become the most impor- dining that the kidnappers acted v^wed » they were identified by a 
taut base for U.S. military activities on their own, and agreed not to uomde guerre and if the location of 
in Central America. prosecute Mr. Kim for his political “ e interview were not disclosed. 


on training and equipping a po> 


The Hondurans have said that activities in Japan before the kid- 
they were not happy with the napping. 


amount of aid they were getting 


tivities in Japan before the kid- Expanding guerrilla attacks are 
pping. straining the Sri Lankan Army, and 

Mr. Kira maintains that the Jap- officials here say that Tamil sepa- 


frora the United States. TTiey have anese government should not have ratists are operating training and 
also demanded greater security agreed to this “political settle- logistics camps in southern India, 
guarantees. raent." Separatist political leaders inler- 


ple’s army. We believe when we Appapillai Amirihalingam. sec- “ n INal,onal . congress ana tne 
take the forces on. we must be able ^tanf-general of the mainstream Zimbabwe Afncan People slmon. 
to defend ourselves. S Liberation Front but denied that they were receiving 

“We come to India when things which does noI maintain a military ™ assisumce 

gel hot and also to meet outsiders.” w ; n o said mast of the training ' rorT1 lhe Sc' iel Union. 


Year of Fiscal Austerity 
Pays Off for Venezuela 


aratist political leaders inter- 


get not and also to meet outstaer •>. 
he said. “We can't get imematioual 
attention if we stay only in Jaffn a." 


wmg. said mast of the training 
camps are in Sri Lanka. “Maybe 30 
or 40 boys come and rent a house 
and maybe they are training some," 





he said. “But 1 know the Indian leave for New Delhi on Friday os a 
government is noi training them, special envoy of President 


With the entire population of JaJT- Jayawardene. United Press Inter- 
na behind them, they can have national reported from Colombo 


training camps anywhere there." 
Jaffna's population is almost exclu 
sively Tamil. 


on Thursday. The envoy is to dis- 
cuss with Prime Minister Rajiv 
Gandhi plans for a summit meeting 


*+ . J 


i-r-'.i-:.'-'. 





Another leader, M.K. Eela- between the two leaders on ethnic 
venihan, general secretary of the tensions in Sri Lanka, a govem- 


Tamil Eelam Liberation Front, ment official announced. 


Nicaragua Rebels to Seek 
Funds by Selling Bonds 


Uiuteil Pros imenwtionul N icaraguan Democratic Force, or a 

WASHINGTON — To inves- corporation established by.it. 
tors with ideological faith and a would guarantee the bonds. 


little extra cash. Nicaraguan rebels Jnieresi 
who seek to overthrow their conn- paid with 


Zimbabwe Aincan Peoples union, g y r uan ^ 

but denied that tiiey were receiving Tima Senke 

arms or ireci finanaal assistance CaRaCA S - After a year of 
from the Soviet Union. imposed austerity. President Jaime 

■ Sri Lankan to Visit Gandhi Lusinehi has halted a four-year de- 
Lalith Athulathmudali. Sri Lan- cline in Venezuela’s economy and 
ka s national security minister, will restored the international credit of 
leave for New Delhi on Friday as a his oil-producing countiy. 
special envov of President On weekends, the discothfcqiies 
Javawardene. United Press Inter- in Las Mercedes still are jammed 
national reported from Colombo with dancers. Parking places are 
on Thursday. The envoy is to dis- hard to find around the best resiau- 
cuss with Prime Minister Rajiv rams and boutiques. 

Gandhi plans for a summit meeting But evidence that Venezuelans 

between the two leaders on ethnic still can indulge habits acquired 
tensions in Sri Lanka, a govern- during the oil boom is accompa- 
ment official announced. med by equally clear signs that 

belt-tightening is taking place, pri- 
marily in the government 

I 1 ¥ In facL the government under 

MPwi 0MQ j/) Mr. Lusinehi. who look office in 

Mzutxa IAJ KXXZWh February 1984. saved so much 

-m money last year that it accumulated w 

'mg Bonds 

U' Much of that surplus came from oil 

Nicaraguan Democratic Force. era exports and a 32 percent devalua- American borrowers. Ten of those 
corporation established by.it. lion of the currency, the bolivar, countries will join Venezuela in 
would guarantee the bonds. And. instead of spending this wind- Santo Domingo, Dominican Re- 
Jnteresi on the bonds would be fall on new projects, the money in public; on Thursday to discuss the 

Aiirl iirtvh k> i k r>nrr<KnliArtc Fr,*i«n oie.^iUii.vn umr nwliiDoJ imJ -- .4 aWi 




President Jaime Lusinehi 


contributions from circulation was reduced and some debt situation. 





try’s Marxist-led government plan around the world" by private do- internal debts paid off. 


to offer interest-bearing bonds. 
Leaders of the main rebel group. 


nors. Mr. Malamoros said. The 
bond plan will "indicate our capac- 


The recovery program has been 


“The recovery program has been executed without Venezuela entfir- 


the Nicaraguan Democratic Force, ity of management." 


a success,” said U.S. Ambassador ing into a “stabilization agree- 


V \i_vJ 






which has turned to private donors He said the amounts, maturity mat with expertise in international 
s ‘ nce Congress cut off U.S. aid to and interest rates of the bonds were economics, 
the guerrillas in June, liken the idea still uncertain, but “you can be sure Foreign bankers evidently feel 
, -EwSr.-u. .-r-xftTr.-at; .-a l0 j srae |i bonds sold to American that it’s not an excessive rate." the same. They have agreed to refi- 
Jews and other supporters of Israel. Nor has the group determined nance SJti.'f billion of Venezuela's 
The bonds are not for everybody, how the bond issue, loans or pan- 527 billion in foreign debt, over 12 
said a rebel spokesman. Bosco nerships would be .sold or adver- years and at interest rates lower 


George W. Landau, a career diplo- ment" with the International Mon- 
mat with expertise in international etary Fund, a politically 


to Israeli bonds sold to American 
Jews and other supporters of Israel. 


Foreign bankers evidently feel 
the same. They have agreed to refi- 


v.; 


v^.v- ci: 






W 

I 





Matamoros: “They are for sophis- tised. 

ticated investors.” 

U.S. funding to ail the rebels 

groups come to 524 million in 1984. O /*• O • J _ 

b°F a bwd tc 

Force say they have raised about Si m g-, 

million a month from private M g~k m f)/|YIO‘P i 
sources to cover expenses of about U mAM l&m J 
5600.000. They reportedly also ^ 

have received considerable aid Rew..-n 

from El Salvador. Honduras, where SOFIA — A campaign by Bul- 
thev are based, and Israel. garian authorities to force the 

The Reagan administration has country's ethnic Turks to adopt 


than those offered other Latin 


Sofia Said to Force Turks 
To Change Their Names 


unpalatable arrangement that Mr. 
Lusinehi has rejected With greater 
flexibility in exchange rates and 
price management, Venezuela has 
achieved better results than htw*I 
Latin American countries opet. 
ing under IMF supervision. 

Politically, this reversal of recent 
economic disorder has been man- 
aged without the social and labor 
discord that has buffeted other Lat- 
in American governments. They 
have been forced to reduce wages, 
increase unemployment and elimi- 
nate imports as the price for debt 
relief. 

Venezuela’s inflation was con- 


begun an intense campaign to ptt 1 - Bulgarian first names is almost 
suade Congress to approve S 14 mil- completed, diplomats said. 


lion in new aid set aside in October. Bulgarian officials have denied 




but Congress is expected to deny that such a drive is under way, but 
any more financing through the the diplomats said most of the 


ffruiiTs Kenan Evren of Turkey to appeal Venezuela's inflation was con- 

SOFIA — A campaign by Bui- to the Bulgarian leader. Todor rained at 15 percent last year, ac- 
garian authorities to force the Zhivkov, to ensure the freedom and cording to official figures, but 
country's ethnic Turks to adopt legal rights of the Turkish minority, wages were not increased. The gov- 
Bulgarian first names is almost The only official Bulgarian com- emment decreed a transportation 
completed, diplomats said. mem has come from the deputy bonus for all workers, public and 

Bulgarian officials have denied foreign minister. Ivan Ganev. who private, after fuel prices and fares 
that such a drive is under way, but said last month that there had been were raised. But this was countered 
the diplomats said most of the no disturbances. bv rem.wina «««■ 


Central Intelligence Agency. 


Turkish population had been made 


A Justice Department spokes- to adopt Bulgarian names in a 
man. John RusselL said the bond crash program over the past three 


9 disturbances. by removing subsidies and price 

He said no one could be forced controls on consumer gpods. 
to change his name in Bulgaria. But The flight of private capital, esti- 


issue involved “no violation of the months. 


Neutrality Act," because the act 
“doesn't mention raising money." 
But the rebels may have to register 
as foreign agents to sell the bonds. 
Mr. Matamoros said that “we 


“The process has taken place on 
a massive scale and is now almost 
complete." a diplomat said. “Even 


Bulgarian officials have privately mated to have reached $20 billion, 
acknowledged that a program of has been stemmed. The centre!/ 

^rv Un( ? Cr ,L 3 > . ban,£ announced that inlemationa/ 
Diplomats cue the fact that an reserves had been built up to SIZ? 

of 1984, after a 






Air Transport World, the leading international a« not working on the assump- 

• 1 . -Li 1 i m • 1 . . . tion" that the rebels, now thought 

airline magazine, nas honoured JxLM. with its prestigious 10 number more than 12 , 000 , win 

v* o • a i c overthrow the Sandinist govern- 

rassenger oervice Award. ment. 

i-pi • • 1 t/t tl jn 1 1 . . . “The future government of Nica 

i he jury praised KLMs long tradition in customer ra « ua . i s ?, ot wp®* 1 * {0 [ Ihi t 

. 1 . -ii* . . 1 1 ,, he said. He added that either th 

service, and in particular the innovations mtrodueed to all 

classes in 1984. Do minican Merchants Strike 

We are proud of the honour. But we shall continue 
to serve you even better with more improvement-, in 1985. wSSSqSS 

Test us, trv us, flv us. * iQ a slrike Wednes ^ a y 10 P rotc 

’ • ’I aV&a ortwrnmmi an>in»ntv nr n? ran 


the most remote mountain villages published partly in Turkish has ap- year with a trade surolus of $4 
L ptored entirely m Bulgarian since billion. F 








'W- 


' 1 



have been affected. 


Bulgaria, once part of the Otto- totmonth. 


With this strong internaticmal re- 


— ■ — I . . , TV,. _r -HniUllgUlKIUlSUUlMI I* 

man Empire, has said that it has me name or the ncVtSpapeT serve position, Venezuela has n«o- 

about half a million ethnic Turks. Li&AL ° ow , a PP«an only in tiated, with ihe steering committee 
Turkey puts the number at about Bulgarian and columnists who pre- of about 550 foreian creditor 
900,000. wot® under Turkish nalnes banks, a 12-y^r SSSUSdS?? S* 

Reports from Turkey and diplo- raals “!!jd U &anan lhc d,plo ‘ % 5oc e i Sn debt due between 

matic sources in Bulgaria said that Oninions on the r u P^d nearly 55 

the drive has caused disturbances Jt* ^°. n _ last ^ and in- 


Dominican Merchants Strike 

The Associated Press 
SANTO DOMINGO. Domini- 


Reports from Turkey and diplo- — ulc u,piD '*X e ‘ gn debt coming due between 

matic sources in Bulgaria said that Qnininns nn ik,. r u ^ ! l P^d nearly 55 
the drive has caused disturbances ^ So _ e j; n j a J ^ t /?[■ ?. e ! >l ^ on iast in capital and in- 
in Turkish communities. The ac- Sc^nked to celebrati^'tn^ U lCrCSt ,R aymcnts lfaal WCT e in nr- 
counts, wjuch diploma,* wid. can- “ijT* ^ ft Ondcr tf,« new tom Vchc- 


counts, which diplomats said can- IO ^ IQ0[h / *1" * wnaer me new terms. Veoc- 

;ssS* 




The Reliable Airline KLIVI 


iBE.iHmuiwf't" “ auju it uuiuu uc leiaieu 10 3 llOn there ix nrnwl/f . . . J 

SANTO DOMINGO, Domini- Diplomats said last month that arnsus due in December or to the S8 billion onEhSS 
can Republic — Shopkeepers here police surrounded villages at night Bulgarian Communist Panv con- being paid someinxerey*> 

joined private transport operators and enter^ Turkish homes, de- gr^ early next year. ' The minister of finance M.nuel 

in a strike Wednesday to protest minding that the occupants sign The campaign is said to hare Azpurua An™ 

government austerity programs forms agreeing to rake Bulgarian affected every ethnic Turk irrespec- mem’s conceroT™ 1 , 

and resulting price increases of up names. A diplomat said he had uve of position or status. Diplo- ward achiS 

to 70 percent on fuel, electricity heard a report .of 40 persons being mats report that Bulgarian officials flationarv erowth S 

and basic consumer goods. Ten killed m a clash with security forces who once had Turkish names now stabilization and^ ^inv^r^ MS 

leftist politicians and union leaders near the town of Momchdgrad. introduce themselves wuh Bulgari- dencc. not iusTio Ba ™ SL 
me mesial Tuesday. The tepons promptoi Pres, deni an ones. burn, resume grov,^" hTsnVd 


Rogal Dutch AirUnOS 




or Hij,, ; 


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t*al Austerit. 
>r \ enezuela 





/ 




Feb. 8, 1985 



-flf- |k EVTERN/«TO\4i^ ♦ 4 

HcraUMfe^erUmne 

WEEKEND 


Page 5 


A Playing Card Factory, ” by an unidentified artist, in “Sun King” show. 

The Sun King, Seen Dimly 


. j by John Russell 

W ASHINGTON — Last year’s 
World's Fair in New Orleans 
may have been pretty much of a 
bust, but in the fine-arts field 
.. there were some good ideas that floated free 
.pf the genera] disaster. One of them was the 
. idea of an exhibition about Louis XIV. In 
terms of tailoring, Louis XIV and New Or- 
leans were a perfect fit Louisiana itself was 
. named after Louis XIV, even if its lazy- 
sounding, pleasure-loving syllables do not 
exactly call to min d the nonstop hard worker 
. and nonpareil authoritarian who ruled 
• France for so many years. As for New Or- 
leans, it took its name from Louis XIV’s 
- brother, the Due (fOrifeans, and to this day a 
street in the French Quarter is named after 
■jne of Louis XTV*s illegitimate sons, the Due 
1 w Maine. The name of “New France" was 
long ago dropped from the atlases, but dur- 
ing the latter part of the reign of Louis XTV it 
stood for a. large part of the Mississippi 
Valley. 

It could be argued that this particular 
French connection did little for Louisiana. 
But Louis XTV was nonetheless a command- 
ing Figure in the Europe of Ins day, and there 
was hardly a department of French life that 
did not take a brisk step forward during the 
first part of his long reign- In the 1660s, for 


S 


pye for detail and his implacable win to bear 
'“Bppfc ;tbe pefltraiization. o f the French arts 
and sciences. Not only did he reorganize the 
Acadfauie Frangaise as the arbiter of lan- 
guage and literature, but he set up the Acad- 
emies for dance (1661), science (1666). music 
(1669) and architecture (1771). 

In 1663 the painter Charles Lebrun was 
a in charge of the Gobelins factory in 
?aris, which forthwith became the headquar- 
ters not only of the tapestries that it still 
produces today but of the totality of the 
'. decorative aits. Painters, sculptors, engrav- 
.'{ers, weavers, dyers, embroiderers, gold- 
smiths, woodcarvers, cabinetmakers, work- 
ers in marble and mosaicisis — a!Q worked 
under the general direction of Lebrun in the 
interests of homogeneous and omnidirec- 
tional effort. Bent on changing the Chateau 
de Versailles from a comfortable hunting 
' lodge into a royal residence, a hospitality 
center on the grandest scale and the locus of 
all power and patronage, Louis XIV had 
■ work for everyone, from glazier to hydraulic 
engineer and from legal draftsman to ap~ 
_ prentice chef. 

Louis XTV further distinguished himself 
as a man of war, a collector of antiquities 
. and a patron of the art of landscape garden- 
ing. Though not initially very bright, he 
learned from masters in aD that pertained to 
the management of other human beings. 


Wnh age, he acquired the kind of majesty 
that both awes and intimidates. Though in 
many ways ideally polite — even his mann er 
of raising his hat was calibrated to the tiniest 
fraction of an inch according to the rank of 
the person to be greeted — he was capable of 
historic rages that caused even great officers 
of state to stare at their shoes in silence for a 
full quarter of an hour. Things were done his 
way, when he was around, whether the mat- 
. ter in hand was the new ballet in which he 
proposed to take part or the building of a 
great national monument like the Invalided 
It is dear from all this that the manifold 
activities of Louis XIV could be the subject 
of a fascinating exhibition. “The Eye of 
Jefferson,” put on not so long ago at the 
National Gallery in Washington, showed 
how great is the potential of a visual biogra- 
phy of an exceptional human being who had 
exceptional opportunities and made the 
most of every one of them. It is also relevant 
that the activity of Louis XTV was docu- 
mented, whether directly or indirectly, by 
writers who had in the highest degree the art 
of evocation. In the memoirs of the Due de 
Saint-Simon and the letters of Madame de 
Sfevignfe, Louis XIV is as vivid to us as if be 
bad just stepped into the room; and there are 
many other, less famous men and women 
who did the same kind of thing on a smaller 
scale. 

The New Orleans exhibition had the bless- 
ing in France of Pierre Lemoine, chief cura- 
tor of the Chilean de Versailles and a man 
who knows the history of Louis XIV as well 
as' the rest of us know our own front door. 
Hopes ran high. There was talk of loans that 
bad no precedent, and of a comprehensive 
overview that would give due space to Loui- 
siana and yet rack up the achievements of 
the “Great Century” m France itself. 


us that even in late middle age Louis XIV 
was still vain enough of bis straight and 
strong legs to dress them up in blue silk 
stockings and have Rigaud show almost 
more of them than was seemly. 

Even more famous is the portrait of Moth- 
er Angeiique Amauld, the abbess of Port 
Royal, by Philippe de Champaigne. It stands 
out even in the Louvre as one of the master- 
pieces of French 17th-century painting, and 
in “The Sun King” it seems to come from 
another world — a world in which quality of 
paint is allied to psychological penetration 


N 


OW that “The Sun King” has arrived 
at the Corcoran Gallery here, where 
it can be seen through April 7, it 
turns out to be a large and weU-iniended but 
finally rather insubstantial affair. This may 
be due to difficulties that did not present 
themselves in the case of “The Eye of Jeffer- 
son,” and il may also be due to the fact that 
the T mdsiana State Museum does not have 
the clout of the National Gallery. But, for 
whatever reason, the age of the Sun King 
does not come across in this exhibition as a 
key moment in European civilization. 

One reason among others is that the level 
c*f the portraits on view is really not very 
high. The portrait of Louis XIV by Hys- 
on the Rigaud from Versailles is a celebrated 
image (though the catalog goes rather far in 
saying that it is “as familiar as the Mona 
lisa”) and it undeniably conveys the official 
message, which was that this was the greatest 
king of his day and, indeed, one of the 
greatest kings who ever lived. It also shows 


and an appropriate inwardness of feeling. 
The abbess of Port- Royal was. of course, one 
of the few people who dared to stand up to 
Louis XTV in matters of religion. Not only 
did Philippe de Champaigne give her a di- 
mension of human dignity that is quite lack- 
ing in most of the other portraits in this 
show, but he threw in a portrait of the abbey 
itself that is a model of delicacy and refine- 
ment in an age when French landscape 
painting had mainly a documentary interest. 

It is one of the ironies of “The Sun King” 
that Louis XIV*s foremost woman adversary 
should come off so much better, in terms or 
the painted image, than any of the women he 
loved. The room that includes portraits of 
the Ducbesse de la V alii fere, the Marquise de 
Montespan and the Marquise de Maintenon. 
not to mention others less closely associated 
with the king, might have been devised ex- 
pressly to discredit the women in question. 
No one could possibly infer, for instance, 
from theportrailof Louise de la Vallifere thai 
she was famous for her silvery blonde hair, 
the perfect whiteness of her skin and the 
delicate suffusion of color that came over her 
features at all appropriate times. Nor does 
the daub in question suggest her prodigious 
reserves of character. (After a pregnancy 
that she had done her best to keep secret, she 
got up on the very evening of the day that the 
king’s baby was delivered, came down in a 
ball dress and conducted herself in company 
as if nothing had happened.) 

E VEN so, there are human insights to 
be found here and there — notably in 
the elegant sculpture of Louis XIV in 
his adolescence, trampling down his ene- 
mies. In that little bronze we see him in his 
official capacity, both as people wished him 
to be and as he truly was. But there ought to 
be a way, difficult as it may be, to show him 
in a more private capacity. Few men have 
ever had less time to themselves, but we 
know from what was written down about 
him that be was not always on public exhibi- 
tion, and that sometimes he broke down and 
hummed (out of tune) the passages from the 
operas of the day that were flattering to 
himself. 

As to how he went about his duties, there 

Continued on page 7 


Love, in Search of Aphrodite 


N EW YORK — Other cities have 
pickpockets and petty thieves: In 
New York whole chunks of the 
city disappear. Last month police 
in the Bronx apprehended two men in a bine 
van who were making off with a comer of 
Jerome Avenue and 16 1st Street, or rather 
with the paving stones covering it, while at 


Mary Blvme 


around the same time in the stOl of the night 
unknown persons caused several buildings 
on West 44th Street to vanish into thin air, 
demolition being the quickest way to get rid 
of low-rent tenants. 

And up in Central Park, it seems that 
Frederick Law Olmsted’s original south en- 
trance to the park, including a massive mar- 
ble arch, fountains and gardens, went miss- 
ing some 50 years ago. 

Iris Love, the New York-born classical 
archaeologist who won international fame 
with her excavations in Knidos, on the 
southwest coast of Turkey, where she found 
the long-buried sanctuary of Aphrodite Eu- 
ploia and, possibly, pans of the long-van- 
ished fourth-century B.C. Aphrodite of 
Praxiteles, has been invited to undertake the 
dig for Olmsted’s lost work. 

Miss Love says that Central Park’s mas- 
sive entrance was tom down and buried by 
the Olympian city improver Robert Moses in 
1932. Although she has her eye on a suspi- 
cious bulge between the 66th Street trans- 
verse and Central Park Zoo, she is not yet 
certain where the missing pieces are. 

It is. Miss Love remarks, rather odd that 
she has uncovered ancient ruins and cannot 
find one that is relatively brand-new. How- 
ever, serious research lias not yet began: 
This will happen when necessary funds and 
permits have been obtained. 

Funds and permits are the archaeologist’s 
basic spadework. This month Iris Love is 
making her 1 8th annua] application to the 
Turkish government to dig at Knidos. It will 
be either ignored or refused.' 

Although she worked harmoniously and 
triumphantly at Knidos, which is on a penin- 
sula south of Bodrum, lor 12 years, in 1977 
the area was turned into a military zone and 


further excavation was banned. One of the 
most interesting digs of modem times looks 
as if it will return to dust and the mystery of 
the missing Aphrodite of Praxiteles may re- 
main unsolved. She has offered to dig the 
Turkish soldiers’ trenches for them so that 

her own careful stratifications wfll remain 
undisturbed, but this unmiliury suggestion 
was rejected. 

“Suddenly to have to stop literally in mid- 
stream — 1 fed loss, frustration, nostalgia.” 
she says. “It would have been a lifetime 
project and one that I would have with great 
pleasure and happiness devoted mysdf to in 
every' way. I also fed responsible to those 
who have helped me from a financial and 
academic viewpoint. That’s why 1 fed 
obliged to keep applying for my permit year 
after year.” 

In the meantime. Miss Love, a tall blonde 
who socializes as energetically as she digs 
(her publications include learned articles for 
the American Journal of Archaeology and a 
profile of Franco Zeffirelli for Andy War- 
hol’s Interview and she was nearly the sub- 
ject of a Una Wertmuller film), has not been 
losing time. Convinced that the origins of 
Aphrodite are, contrary to conventional 
opinion, Cretan, she has been working in 
western Crete and she is also preparing to 
dig for a temple of Aphrodite in the center of 
Naples. If hex calculations are correct, the 
temple is somewhere behind the Excelsior 
Hotel and directly beneath three buildings: a 
convent, a private palazzo and the military 
archives bunding, which is at present used 
for interrogations of suspected terrorists. 
Funds and permits are, of course; still lack- 
ing but she is confident that she will get both 
and wifi uncover a temple to Aphrodite of 
the same extremdy rare round shape as in 
Knidos. (The Knidos discovery in 1969 was 
hailed on the front page of The New York 
Tunes with a picture of Miss Love in a 
miniskirt.) 

Her zest for publicity and tire fact that she 
did not complete her PhJ). requirements are 
often held against her. “Archaeologists are. 
which they shouldn’t be because archaeology 
is an international exchange, among the 
most malicious, vicious group of scientists,” 
she says. She and the British Museum We 
not been on speaking terms since 1970. when 



she stated that a neglected object in their 
basement, starkly known as Head 1314. was 
the missing head of the Aphrodite of Praxite- 
les. An international ruexus followed. 

If she had completed her Ph.D. (she 
passed her orals but did not write her disser- 
tation) she would, she says, be accepted as a 
more conventional figure. “It would have 
eliminated a point of criticism for those who 
think three letters make one more intelli- 
gent." 1 

As for her worldliness — her Knidos dig 
was visited by. among others. Rudolf Nure- 
yev. Jacqueline and Aristotle Onasis and 
Mick and Bianca J agger — she says this 
helps win funds and influence people (she is 
hoping right now that her old chum. Jerry 
Zipkin. adjutant of Nancy Reagan, will help 
persuade the Turks to evacuate their army so 
she can get back to the Knidos dig). A lively 
present, she claims, helps clarify the past. 

“As an archaeologist 1 work so often with 
things that are past and people who are dead 
2,000 years that it is fascinating to meet 
people who are architects and artists today. 
As an archaeologist I am possibly putting 
ideas into ancient architects' and artists' 
beads that weren't there. The more 1 learn, 
the more 1 believe people haven't changed 
much." 

I RIS Cornelia Love was supposed to be 
named Audrey Barbara after ber moth- 
er, a member of the Guggenheim family. 
Apparently her father, Cornelius Ruxlon 
Love, a stockbroker and art collector, re- 
named her on the way to her christening but 
she has never got the story quite straight. 

“Isn't it terrible to be an archaeologist 
trying to understand ancient civilizations 
and not even to know how you got your own 
name?" Whatever its origins, it is a name she 
likes: “Iris is Greek, Cornelia is Roman and 
Love is universal" 

Her devotion to Aphrodite began with her 
arrival in Knidos on Aug. 3, 1966, when she 
was on the bowsprit of a fishing boat and 
dolphins guided the craft to the port. Dol- 
phins are sacred to Aphrodite, as are geese 
(Miss Love no longer eats foie gras), bees, 
the color red. the number 5 and apples 
(“Now those I do eat because 1 think they are 
meant to be eaten"). She came to Greek, 
mythology through an English governess. 

“I always loved Athena as the goddess of 
wisdom and warrior. 1 even think I had a 
crush on her. I loved Apollo because he was 
handsome and Hermes because he was so 
quick-witted from the day he was bran. 1 was 


brainwashed by Homer. ! thought Aphr 
was a coquette, very silly, and I didn’t 


Iris Love. 


Midad Omar 


Dhrodile 
have 

respect for her. 

“I didn’t go to Knidos for her, I went 
because its potential hadn't been realized 
and because it was a city that had colonized 
other cities. I thought it would tell us about a 
time we know so little about, the 1 lth to the 
6th century, B.C." 

While at Smith College (class of 1955) Iris 
Love wrote a paper correctly denouncing the 
Metropolitan Museum’s famous terra-cotta 
Etruscan warriors as fakes (they were con- 
signed to the basement after museum offi- 
cials, warned by Miss Love that she planned 
to publish her findings, blandly announced 
that they had known all along that the stat- 
ues were fake). 

Knidos had already been excavated nota- 
bly in the mid- 19th century by Sir Charles 
Newton, who sent 384 crates of objects back 
to the British Museum. Iris Love adored the 
place the moment she saw it — “It’s very 
close to the gods, a place where everything 
meets; the sea and the mountains and the 
sky” — but she thinks she was allowed to dig 
there only because it was assumed to have 
been thoroughly excavated. 

“I think they gave it to me because they 
thought there was nothing there, and it 
turned out to be the religious capital of Asia 
Minor.” Knidos was the prosperous and 
culturally rich religious center of the Dorian 
Hexapohs, a confederation of six cities; 
three sites in Rhodes, the island of Kos and 
Halicarnassus (now Bodrum). In addition to 
important examples of civil and religious 
architecture and objects. Miss Love found 

Continued on page 7 


Work Like a Horse, Eat Like a H ummingb ird 


by Nancy Jenkins 


N EW YORK. — David Yudain, 29. 

a vice president of Sotheby's, 
starts the day with a freshly 
opened can of Nutrament which 
he describes as a “sort of grown-up baby 
formula.” Cheryl Gar nan t. 36. a professional 
masseuse, skips lunch in favor of a late 
breakfast of Chinese takeout food, bought 
the day before. Sam Bemiss, 29, an invest- 
ment banker at Goldman, Sachs & Co., nev- 
L er eats breakfast, tries not 10 eat lunch and 
- exists on nibbles of this and that throughout 
his 12-hour working day. Cherie Tripp, 35. a 
■ self-described entrepreneur, snacks on Lean 
■■Cuisine, often consuming as many as throe 
4^ or four of the frozen, single-portion diet 
' meals in a day. 

- What unites them all is a manner of eating 
■ that is becoming a habit with many New 
“ York professionals, particularly those in 
.heir 20s and 30s. The phenomenon, which 

-STh 

'and caused Chinese takeout restaurants and 
* street-side food vendors alike to flourish. 

" ;■ u is called grazing, snacking, browsing, 
noshing. Some cal! it eating, as oppojd w 
dining. Sidney W. Mimz. an uMM 
. at Johns Hopkins University, describes it as 
“hrier meal-tike iruervenuons throughout 
" the day.” And Graham T.T, Mohtor. the 
president of Public Policy Forecast. ng lnc a 

. private consulting organization in Washmg- 

JLn. refers to it as “eating humrnmgbird- 
g|yje: a tittle bit here, a little bit there. 

■ Although nutritionists say this is not nec- 
essarily J ! unhealthy way to eau some soo- 
-ologisis are concerned about its longterm 

effects. . 

- ■ Whv do people eat like this? The answer 
- from a lotidchonts of voices, is that there is 
no time for anything else. Tm always m a 


burry,” said Yudain, who is in charge of 
corporate relations at Sotheby’s. “Because of 
my schedule. Pm more concerned with get- 
ting enough to eat than getting too much.” 

“My work life is rather erratic, and 1 run 
from one thing to another," said Tripp, echo- 
ing the theme. “When Pm out, I end up 
eating a bowl of noodles from Larmen Do- 

sanko.” 

“Probably 16 out of 20 workdays, I eat 
lunch at my desk," said Peter Kersban, 31, 
an associate with the law fins of Herzfeld & 
Rubin. Unlike his wife, Martha, who is also a 
lawyer. Keishan said he draws the line at 
breakfast and (tinner in the office. “In the 
positions we’re both in now,” be said, “we 
have to concentrate on our jobs. I don’t 
know if it’s the city or our professions — 
probably a combination of the two — but 
our time is really tight these days ” 

“I work for mysdf, and when you do that, 
you’re busy 12 hours a day." said Gamant. 
who has practiced Swedish massage for the 
last 10 years. Often loo busy to stra> for 
lunch, she grabs an apple or a ample of bites 
of peanut butter instead. “I'd love to be able 
to have someone prepare the food and I 
could sit down and eat it." she said. “Some- 
times 1 buy fruit and just let it sit in the 
fridge and rot, but if someone served it to 
me. Pd eat it gladly." 

A CCORDING to Mimz, there is both a 
real shortage of time in the modern 
iX world and what he calls an “artificial 
shortage of time.” 

“This society is more interested in increas- 
ing consumption than in providing the time 
in which consumption can take place." he 
said. In his forthcoming bode, “Sweetness 
and Power.” an analysis of the role of sugar 
in history, to be published in May by Viking 
Penguin, Mintz points out that people lend 
to consume different things simultaneously. 


such as a sandwich and work, or popcorn 
and a movie, or pizza and television. 

Others believe the recent entry of droves 
of women into the work place has contribut- 
ed to this change in eating habits. In 1981. 
according to Molitor. 52 percent of Ameri- 
can women over 16 were working; by 1992, 
he said, the figure may reach 70 percenL 
“The trend is toward dual-income families 
and more disposable income." be said, and 
as a corollary, “time is more precious." Any- 
thing that appears to save time — whether 
fast food, restaurant dining, convenience 
frozen foods or combining eating with other 
activities — will be welcome. 

How this change — in the kind of food 


eaten and the way it is consumed — came 
about is not clear. Most of the people inter- 
viewed said they remember family meals 
taking place with great regularity. They also 
remember a falling away from that pattern. 
Yudain, for example, said he adopted new 
eating habits when he went away to boarding 
school: “The food was really awful We 
tended to skip meals and make do with pizza 
in between." Tripp recalled that her mother 
was interested in nutrition and served well- 
balanced meals, but “If Birds Eye didn’t 
make it, we didn’t eat it,” she said. “When 
the first McDonald's opened in Pittsburgh, I 
used to take 3 bus five miles and back just to 
eat there." 



III 


111 




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Whatever the reasons, the evidence is dear 
that more people, espedally those under 35, 
are eating smaller meals more and more 
frequently throughout the day — mostly on 
the run. more often than not alone. If these 
people are setting the pace for the future, 
fewer meals will be eaten in what we think of 
as traditional family style, gathered around a 
table for a ritual sharing of food and conver- 
sation. Some sociologists are worried about 
the long-term effects of such solitary dining. 

Of course, if a meal is traditionally defined 
as a meat and two vegetables, what is being 
eaten now cannot be called a meal anymore. 
When first questioned, Bemiss, the invest- 
ment banker, said he eats nothing until a late 
dinner of salad or pizza in front of the 
television. Upon further questioning, howev- 
er. he listed a wide range of items he eats 
throughout his day, including a doughnut, a 
cup of coffee with milk and sugar, a sand- 
wich or hot dog, ice cream, yogurt, cookies, a 
glass of juice and. if he plays tennis before 
work, an omelet for breakfast. Dearly Be- 
miss eats; he just doesn’t eat what his moth- 
er. who lives in Richmond. Virginia, would 
call a meal. 


C OMMENTING on this lack of food 
awareness. Dr. Joan Gussow. chair- 
man of nutrition education at Teach- 
ers College. Columbia University, said: 
“People today don’t know where their food 
comes from — they don’t even know that 
they eat A person who doesn’t know that 
he's eating has a magical belief that his body 
will take care of itself. I would argue that 
that is a very scary thing." 

Restaurateurs are monitoring the trend, 
especially since restaurant dining is growing 
nationwide among all social groups. The 
National Restaurant Association in Wash- 
ington reports that food and drink sales in 


eating places are expected to rise by 8.6 
percent in 1985, to $1123 billion, and sales 
in Tast-food restaurants are predicted to rise 
even more, by 9.6 percent, to $47.1 billion. 

Grazing is the restaurateurs' preferred 
term for the new trend in eating “We con- 
nect it with the food courts that have grown 
up in shopping malls," said Jeffrey R. 
Prince, a senior director of the restaurant 
association. Which came fifti, the grazing or 
the places in which to graze, is debatable. 
“Now we find restaurants are doing all sorts 
of things to provide meals on the hoof, hors 
d’oeuvres options, new takeout options,” 
Prince said. 

Grazing is not necessarily detrimental to 
one's nutritional well-being. “There’s no in- 
trinsic virtue in eating moils," Dr. Gussow 
of Teachers College said, “and there’s noth- 
ing more nutritious about three meals a day. 
It is quite possible to eat well, to get through 
the day healthfully, on what you pick up on 
the streets. Our closest ancestors were hunt- 
ers and gatherers who just ate what they 
caught throughout the day. 

“But," she went on, “there’s a symbolic 
meaning 10 food that is very important. 
Breaking bread together has very deep 
meanings. It is very difficult to sit at a table 
together without engaging with each other. 1 
believe the 'coming apartness' of our society 
is related 10 the ‘coming apartness* of our 
food habits." 

“At 6 or 7 o’clock in my neighborhood" 
said Cherie Tripp, who lives near the United 
Nations building, “1 see all these single men 
and women, all nattily clad, loading up on 
salads at the Koreans*. They lake their salads 
and go across the street to pick up their 
nightly movie from the video rental. Then 
they go home, sit down, eat their salad and 
turn on the flick.” ■ 


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INTERNATIONAL HER ALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1985 

TRAVEL 


INTERNATIONAL DATEBOOK 


AUSTRIA 


VIENNA, International Theatre (tel: 
31.62.72). 

THEATER — Feb. 2-13: "OurTown" 
(Wilder). 

•KonzertJbaus([el: 72.12.1 1). 
CONCERTS - Feb. 5: Alban Berg 
Quartet (Mozart, Schubert). 

Feb. 13: ORF Symphony Orchestra, 
Semyon Bychkov conductor (Men- 
delssohn, Mozart). 

RECITALS — Feb. 7: Julia Varadv 
soprano, Makus Palm piano (Prokof- 
iev, Tchaikovsky) 

Feb. 12: Leonid Brum berg piano 
(Brahms. Weber). 

•SiaaiSOperftel: 53240). 

BALLET — Feb. 11: “ Raymonds" 
( Petr pa, Glazunov). 

OPERA — Feb. 9: “Wcuaeck” (Berg). 
Feb. 12 and 15: “Tosca" (Puccini). 
OPERETTA —Feb. 10: “Die Fleder- 
maus”(J. Strauss). 

Feb. 14: “Der Opemball" (Heu- 
berger). 

•Volksoperfid: 53240). 

OPERETTA — Feb. 9-12: “Die Fle- 
dernJaus" (J. Strauss), “The Beggar 
Studen l" i MiBOcker ). 


BELGIUM 


ANTWERP, Royal Flem is h Opera 
(Id: 233.66.85). 

OPERA — Feb. 15: “Eugene Onegin" 
(Tchaikovsky). 

BRUSSELS. Optra National (td: 
217.22.1 1). 

OPERA — Feb. 15: “L'Bisird’Amo- 
re" (Donizetti). 

•Palaisdes Beaux Arts(td: 51 1-29.95). 
CONCERTS — Feb. 10: Belgian Na- 
tional Orchestra. Georges Octors con- 
ductor, Idil Biret piano I Haydn. Ko- 
daly). 


Feb. 14: Belgian National Orchestra. 
Georges Octors conductor, Naraso 
Yepes guitar (Schubert. Wagner). 
LIEGE, TbfiStre Royal de Liege (td: 
23.59.10). 

OPERA — Feb. 10: “Eugene Onegin" 
(Tchaikovsky). 

DENMARK 


COPENHAGEN, Carisberg Museum 
(td: 21.01. 12). 

EXHIBITION — Through February: 
"Paul Gauguin in Copenhagen m 
1884** 

•Nikolaj Gallery (td: 13.1626). 
EXHIBITIONS— To March 3: “Sovi- 
et Revolution Posters," "Aboriginal 
An." 

•Radio House Concert Hall (id: 
35.06.47). 

CONCERT — Feb. 14: Radio Sym- 
phony Orche s t ra . Hans Graf conduc- 
tor (Mozart, Strauss). 

•Tivoli Hall (td: 14.17.65). 

OPERA — Feb. 11: “The Barber of 
Seville” (Rossini). 

Feb. 13: “CavaHeria RuSticana" (Ma- 
scagni). 

ENGLAND 


BIRMINGHAM. Town Hall (td: 
236.15.55). 

CONCERT — Feb. 14: City of Bir- 
mi ogham Symphony Orchestra, Si- 
mon Rattle conductor (Mahler). 
LONDON, Barbican Centre (tel: 
628.87.95). 

Barbican Art Gallery — To March 2: 
“Prin makers at tbe'Royal CoOegc of 
Art." 

Feb. 1 4- April 8: “Munch and the 
Workers," “Tradition and Renewal: 
Contemporary An in the German 
Democratic Republic." 



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Barbican Hall — Feb.12: Royal Phil- 
harcnomcOichcstra, Yehudi M enuhin 
conductor. Ckriin Carr cello (Delhi*. 
Walton). 

Feb. 9: Maxim Shostakovich conduc- 
tor, Vikwria MuHova violin (Shosta- 
kovich. Tchaikovsky). 

Feb. 14: TSmis Vasary conductor- 
/piano (Beethoven). 

R«rh;ra>n Theatre — Royal Shake- 
speare Company — Feb. 9, 11. 12: 
“Mother Courage” (Brecht). 

Feb. 13-15: “Twelfth Night” (Sbake- 

•Brit&i Museum ( td: 636,15-55). 
EXHIBITION —To March 10: The 
Golden Age of Anglo-Saxon Art: 966- 
1066.” 

•Hayward Gallery (id: 928.57.08). 
EXHIBITIONS —To April 30: “Re- 
noir," “John Walken Paintings from 
the Alba and Oceania Series." 
•Royal Academy of Arts (tel: 
. 734.90.52). 

EXHIBITION —To March 3 1 : “Cba- 
galL” 

•Royal Opera (teh 240.10.66). 
BALLET— Feb. 13: “Manon” (Mac- 
Millan, Massenet). 

Feb. 15: “The Steeping Beauty" (Pe- 
tipa, Tchaikovsky). 

OPERA — Feb. 12: “La Traviata" 
(Verdi). 

Feb. 1 1 and 14: “Der Rosenkavalier” 
(R. Strauss). 

•Tate Gallery (td: 82 1 . 1 3. 1 3). 
EXHIBITIONS — To March 31: 
“William James Muller,” “John Walk- 
er Prints 1976-1984.” 

•Victoria and Albert Museum (td: 
589.63.71L 

EXHIBITION — To Feb. 28: “British 
Biscuit Tins.” 

•Wigmore HaD (teh 935.21 .4 1 ). 
CONCERT — Feb. 12: Vienna Mu- 
sikverein Quartet (Beethoven, Schu- 
bert). 

RECITALS — Feb. 10: Sophie Lang- 
don violin, Shdagb Sutherland piano 
(Bartok. JanAcrik). 

Feb. 15 : Julian Byzantine guitar (Bach, 
Weiss). 


NICE, Muste Internationa] d'Art Naif 
(td: 71.78331 

EXHIBITION — To Feb. 15: “Rou- 
seau, Boobios, Bauchant, Scrap hine. 
Vivin." 

PARIS. Centre Georges Pompidou 
(td: 277.1233). 

EXHIBITION— To Feb. 24: “Sharon 
Kivland.” 

•Hotel Burgundy (id: 26034.12). 
EXHIBITION— To March 1 : “Alain 
Mathiot." 

•Le Petit Journal (td: 32628391- 
COUNTRY— Feb. 15: The Western- 
era. 

JAZZ — Feb. 12: Kenny Clarke Quar- 
tet. 

•Mus4e d’Art Moderne (tel: 
723.61.27). 

EXHIBITION— To March3 1 : “Gus- 
tav Mahler." 

•Musoe de la Publiciti (eel: 246. 
13.09). 

EXHIBITION — To April 15: 
“French Film Posters." 

• Musfce du Grand Palais (lei: 
26134.10). 

EXHIBITION — Feb. 9-April 22: 
“Impressiomsmaiid (be Frencn Coun- 
tryside.” 

•Music du Louvre (id: 2603936). 
EXHIBITION —to April 15: “Ho- 
beinai the Louvre." 

•Musfce Rodin (Id: 705.0134). 
EXHIBITIONS— To March 18: “Ro- 
din Drawings." 

To April L5: “Robert Jacobsen.” 

•New Morning (td: 5233639). 

JAZZ — Feb. 9: Art Blakey and the 
Jazz Messengers. 

Feb. 13andl4- Alafia. 

Feb. 15: Jazira Orchestra. 

•Op6ra (td: 742-5730). 

OPERA — Feb.9 and 13: “Tristan and 
Isolde" (Wagner). 

•Salle Cortot (td: 535.9192). 
RECITAL — Feb. 9: Musique 
Oblique (Schoenberg. ZemlinskyL 
•SaBcPleyd (563.0X96). 
CONCERTS — Feb. 13 and 14: Or- 
cbestrc de Paris. Claude Bardon con- 
ductor, I vo Fogoidich piano (Berlioz, 
Tchaikovsky). 

•Thfeflire du Rond-Poiot (tel: 
256.7030). 

CONCERT— Feb. 10: QuatuorFwc 
Arts of Chicago (Beethoven, Haydn). 
•Tb&tire 3 sur4(td: 327m 16). 
RECITAL — Feb. 1 1: Elenalakoubo- 
vitch guitar. Russian ballads, gypsy 
son^s and poetry ( Pushkin, Paster- 


GERMANY 


BERLIN. Deutsche Oper (tel: 
341.44.49). 

OPERA - — Feb. 9: “Tosca" (Puccini). 
Feb. 15: “Carmen” (Bizet). 
•MetropoHteL- 52.40.80). 

ROCK — Feb. IS: Southside Johnny 
and the Jukes. 

•Phflharmome(td: 54880). 
CONCERTS— F«b.l3and 14: Berlin 
Philhar monic Orchestra. Lorin Maa- 
zd conductor (Tchaikovsky). 

FRANKFURT, Alte Oper Frankfurt 
(td: 134X)4J)0). 

OPERA — Feb. 9: “Eugene Onegin" 
(Tchaikovsky). 

Feb. tl: “Lulu" (Berg). 

Feb. 14: “Don Pasquale" (Donizetti). 

HAMBURG. Staatsoper (tel: 
35.1535). 

BALLET — Feb. 11-13, 15: “Swan 
Lake" (Tchaikovsky). 

MUNICH, National Theater (td: 
22.13.16). 

OPERA — Feb. 1 1 and 14: “Eugene 
Onegin" (Tchaikovsky). 

Feb. 12: “Wozzeck" (Berp) 
•Staatstheaier (id: 2603232). 


ingL 

OPERA — Feb. 13: “Don Giovanf* 
(Mozart) 


ATHENS, Nees Morphes (tel: 
361.61.65). 

EXHIBITION —To Feb. 16: “Yior- 
gos Nikoloponlos." 

•Polyplaijo Gallery (td : 3625832) 
EXHIBITION — To Fdk 10: “Fmila 
SakdH" 


ITALY 


BOLOGNA, Galleria d’Ane Mo- 
derna(id: 503839). 
EXHIBITIONS — To Feb. 28: 
“Mario Nanni." “Post War Photogra- 
phy." 

•Teatro Cbmunalc f td: 2229.99). 
CONCERTS — Feb. 12 and 13: Or- 
chestra e Coro dd Teatro Comunale, 


Alain Lombard conductor (Berlioz. 
Debussy), 

OPERA — Feb. 10 and 14; “Atula - 
(Verdi). 

GENOA, Teatro Margherita (tel 
58.93-29). , , 

OPERA— Feb. 10, 12, 15: “Wenher 
(MasseaeO- 

MUAN, Padiglione d’Ane Ccmtem- 
poranea (td: 7?.46^8). 
DCHIBmONS —To Feb. 28: “New 
Topics: Young Italian Artists.” “Tul 
lioPlericdi." 

ROME, Accadnma Nazionaledi San- 
ta Cecilia (td: 679.03.89). 
CONCERTS — Feb. 9: New Japan 
Ph ilh armonic Orchestra. Seiji Ozawa 
conductor (Bartok). 

Feb. 10-12: Orcbesue dcQ'Accademja 
Naziooale de Santa Cecilia, Giuseppe 
Sicopoli conductor, Martha Argeridi 
piano (Mozart, Schubert). 

TURIN, Teatro Rcgio (td: 54,80.00 ) 
OPERA — Feb. 12 and 14: “Man on 
Lescaut" (Puccini). 

VENICE, Palazzo Fortuny (id 
70.99.09). 

EXHIBITION —To April 28: “High 
Fashion: 1950s and ’60s." 

•Teatro La Fenice (tel; 25191). 
BALLET— Feb. 14 and 15: “Le Car- 
naval" (Fokine. Schumann); “Le 
Bourgeois Gentilhomme - ’ (Balan 
chine, R. Strauss). 

OPERA — Feb. 9: “Orpheus in the 
Underworld" (Offenbach). 


JAPAN 


HELSINKI. Finlandia Hal! (tel: 
40241). 

CONCERTS — Feb. 13 and 14: Hel- 
sinki P hilhar monic Orchestra, David 
ShaBorc SNia Marcovid viohn (Berg, 
Rachmanin ov) 

RECITAL — Feb. 1 1: Izumi Tateno 
piano. 


TOKYO, Azabu Museum of Art ( tel 
582.14.10). 

EXHIBITION— To Feb. 24: “Ulriyo- 
E Prints of the Hishikawa School.” 
•Kcrakuen Stadium (td: 8 1 1 2 1 . 1 1 ). 
CIRCUS — To Feb. 17: Korakuen 
Great American Circus. 

•Malsuoka Museum of An (tel 
43727.87). 

EXHIBITION —To Mar. 31: “Mas- 
terpieces of Japanese Pointings and 
Old Potteries." 

•Sun lory Museum (id: 403.08.80). 
EXHIBITION — To Feb. 1 1: “The 
Two Screens of ‘Western Princes on 
Horseback.’ " 

•Yamaiane Museum (td: 669. 40361 
EXHIBITION — To Mar. 24: “Be 
quest,” Japanese paintings and crafts 


MONACO 


MONTE-CARLO. Salle Gamier (tel : 
50.76.54). 

OPERA — Feb. 10 and 12: “Eugene 
Onegin” (Tchaikovsky). 


AMSTERDAM. Prim Gallery (tel: 
22.42.65). 

EXHIBITION — To March 8: “Mi- 
dnaki Sakamo to." 

•Rijksmuseum Vincent Van Gogh 
(td: 76.48.81). 

EXHIBITION— ToApril 15:“Duich 
Identity." 

•Stadsschouwburgdd: 2423.1 1 ). 
BALLET — Feb. 9, 10. 13. 15: “Pe- 
trushka" (Fokine. Stravinsky). 


PORTUGAL 


ESTORIL. Cadnofld: 268.452 1 ). 
EXHIBITION —To Feb. 28: “Maria 
Fernanda Amado." 

LISBON. Caloustc Gulbenkian 
Foundation (733 13 1 ). 

BALLET — Feb. 9: “PulcindJa" 
(Sparcmblek, Stravinsky). “Return to 
a Strange Land” (Kylian, Janacek). 
“Nuaggs” (Kylian, Debussy). 
CONCERTS!: Feb. 14 and 15: Gul- 
benkian Orchestra, Jorge Mesler con- 
ductor. Ingrid Haebler piano (Mo- 
zart). 

RECITAL — Feb. 1 1 and 12: Ingrid 
Haebler piano ( Mozart). 

Feb. 13: Haydn Trio (Mozart. Schu- 
mann). 

•Si. Carlos National Theater (id 
36.84.08). 

OPERA — Feb. 10-12: “Madame But- 
terfly” (Puccini). 

•St. Luis Municipal Theater (td: 
363339). 

BALLET — Feb. 9-15: “Serenade" 

( Balanchine. Tchaikovsky), “Le Sacre 
du P tin temps" (TrinCheiras. Stravin- 
sfcy). 


EDINBURGH, National Gallery (td: 
556.8921). _ _ 

EXHIBITION — - To April 28: “The 
Face of Nature: Landscape drawings 
firm) the permanent collection." 
•Queen’s Hall (td: 66821.17). 

CON ERT — Feb.9: Scottish Chamber 
Orchestra, Trevor Pinnock conductor. 
Gabriele Sima soprano (Bach. Han- 
dd). 


STOCKHOLM. Concert House (td 
22.18.00). 

CONCERTS — Feb. 9: Stockholm 
Philharmonic Orchestra. Hadan Sund 
conductor (Poulenc). 

Feb. 13: Stockholm Chamber Orches- 
tra. Esa-Pekka Salonen conductor, To- 
bias Carron flute (Rameau. Sch6n- 
berg). 

Feb. 14: Stockholm Philharmonic Or- 
chestra, Jacques Merrier conductor, 
Alain Meunier cello (Ravd). 


ZURICH, Town Hall (td: 22122^3). 
CONCERTS — Feb. 10: Zurich 
Chamber Orchestra. Edmond de 
Stoutz conductor, Henryk Szerying vi- 
olin (Bach, Mozart). 

Feb. 13: Town Hall Orchestra. Mello 
Santi conductor. Chris tiane Edinger 
violin (Beethoven. Mozart). 


WNITEU STATU 


NEW YORK. Guggenheim Museum 
(td: 36035,00). 

EXHIBITION —To March 24: “Ra: 
Morton.” 

•Lincoln Center (td: 87039.60). 

New York City Ballet — Feb.9and 10: 
“Hariequinade" (Balanchine. Drigo). 
Fdi. 14: “Eight Lines" (RobSns, 
Reich). 

•Metropolium Museum of Art (td; 
535.77.10). 

EXHIBITIONS —To Feb. 24: “Chi- 
nese Painting and Calligraphy-" 

To Sept. I : “Man and the Hose." 
•Museum of Modern Art 
(tel:708.94.00). 

EXHIBITION — To Feb. 12: “Lee 
Krasner: A Retrospective." 

•Whitney Museum of American An 
(td: 5703633). 

EXHIBITION — To March 3: “The 
Third Dimension: Sculpture of the 
New York School." 


Dining in High Style in London 


€■ 


by RAV. Apple Jr. 


I ONDON — The last quarter century 
has been hard on the grand old 
luxury restaurants of Europe's raa- 

^ jor dues. TbeHosiaria deli Orso in 

Rome. Maxim’s and Lasserre in Paris, the 
Operaltalleren in Stockholm. Sabatini in 
Florence, the Sacfaer in Vienna, Horcher in 
Madrid, Mirabelle in London — nil of them 
still exist, and a few still serve very good 
food, but none of them can any longer be 
considered a pacesetter. 

One need not look far for an explanation. 
The old-fashioned gastronomic palaces were 
owned by businessmen who employed chefs 
to turn out classic dishes and a few unchang- 
ing specialties; roost oF the top tables of 
today are in restaurants owned by chefs who 
put a premium on creativity. Very often their 
places are smalt and some are understaffed, 
as the true grand luxe restaurant never was 
and must never be; many cannot afford, in 
this era of high wages, the whole panoply of 
commis, waiter, captain, maitre d’hotel and 
sommelier. And while well appointed, they 
are seldom opulent in the tradition of I960. 

There are. of course, several exceptions. 
Ta illy vent in Paris, considered by many to be 
the city’s greatest restaurant, is owned by 
Jean-Ciaude Vrinat, a brilliant front-of-the- 
house man. not by the chef. Claude Deligne; 
and the most talked about restaurant on the 
C6te d’Azur, the Chamecler in the Hoiel 
Negresco in Nice, has been restored 10 its 
prewar glory by a hired hand, the young chef 
Jacques Maximin. 

Egon Ronay, the British gastronome and 
guidebook editor, estimates that building, 
outfitting and staffing a truly luxurious res- 
taurant in the Mayfair or Knightsbridge ar- 
eas of central London would cost something 
like S3 million before a meal was served. Not 
surprisingly, not many such places come into 
being these days, in the British capital or 

elsewhere. 

Two of the best luxury restaurants m Lon- 
don. and a couple of others that come dose 
10 the top of the list, are to be found in 
hotels. Anton Mossiman of the Dorchester, a 
Swiss, and Michel Bourdin of the Con- 
naught. a Frenchman, are enabled by the 
resources of their owners to show off their 
talents in sumptuous settings that they' could 
never have afforded by themsdves. For 
whatever reasons — a dislike for manage- 
ment. a preference for big kitchens, inertia 
— Messrs. Deligne. Mossiman. Maximin 
and Bourdin have chosen not to strike out on 
their own, at least for now. 

To my mind, the truly posh establishment 
is best reserved for special occasions — 
birthdays, anniversaries, holidays, the one or 
two splurges of a trip. For most people, 
economics dictate that course; for the resL a 
sense of proportion ought to. Nothing is 
likely to pall faster than a succession of 
meals in luxury restaurants, by which 1 mean 
those that provide sophisticated cooking, 
rich and elaborate and often organized in 
four or five courses; great wines; costly place 
sellings and surroundings, including a pro- 
fusion of flowers; and prompt and polished 
service. 

(t is intriguing in this connection to notice 
the habits of the proprietors of superstar 
restaurants in France. Last summer, in Eu- 
geni e-les- Bains, the night after having served 
a group of us mere mortals the same Rabelai- 
sian feast he was cooking for the president of 
France, Michel Guerard asked us to join him 
for dinner. It could not have been simpler 
no cream, no caviar, no foie gras, no lobster, 
no oysters. Simple foods, simply but beauti- 
fully cooked, with a seraphic chocolate 
mousse at the end. Likewise, on his days off. 
the elegant Vrinat likes to pop into plebeian 
bistros like Chez la Vieille. Adrienne Biasin's 
snuggery on Rue de I'Arbrc-Sec. 

A LL of this is by way of prelude to 
£» answering a question that visitors to 
JTjL. London often ask: Where should we 
go for a really gala evening, no holds barred, 
wear the glad rags, something to remember, 
cost really no object? 

Only three places come instantly to mind; 
the Connaught, the Dorchester and Le Gav- 
roche. At none of the three, in my view, is the 
food as good as at Cbez Nico, in Battersea on 
the “wrong” side of the Thames, or at La 
Tante Qanre in Chelsea. But both of them, 
despite such ravishing dishes as the crab and 
sole mousseline with Sauteroes sauce at the 
former and the rabbit with basil and tarra- 
gon and morels at the latter, would have to 
be classified as comfortable rather than 
swank. Both are too crowded, for one thing. 
That will change if Nico Ladenis finds the 
new premises he is seeking in central Lon- 
don. and Pierre Koffmann of La Tante 
Claire succeeds in taking over the lease of the 
building next door. 

At the Connaught, Michel Bourdin, whose 
grandmother ran a brasserie in Paris, has 
had his flirtations in recent years with nou- 
velie cuisine, but the backbone of the menu 
remains as traditional as the frock coals of 
the captains. Edwardian favorites to match 
the mellow paneling — Irish stew, steak and 
kidney pie, bread and butter pudding — 
coexist happily with elaborate dishes from 
the classical French repertory such as (he 
game Chartreuse. In less attentive hands, 
these things can quickly become routine and 
even drab, but not here. Bourdin has even 
managed to persuade the affluent patrons of 
his regal establishment to order some newer, 
tighter dishes such as his rendezvous de pt- 
cheur, a marriage of the best fish that Bil- 
lingsgate Market has to offer on any given 
dav. 

The grace of Jean- Pierre Chevaliier, who 
manages the restaurant, the sage advice of 
the sommeliers (delivered in vaguely Haps- 
burg accents), the names of favored custom- 
ers of yesteryear still clin g in g to dishes they 
favored (oysters Christian Dior, consomme 
Cole Porter), the elegant dress of one’s fellow 



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diners — all of these elements help create a 
mood of discreet richness that is unmatched 
in London. (16 Carlos Place Wl. tel: 499- 
7070; MasterCard; about £100. or SI 15. for 
two. including tip. lax and a modest bottle of 
wine. But the cosi here, as in olher restau- 
rants mentioned, will be much higher if you 
order classic vintages, as you may be tempt- 
ed to do.) 

Mossiman is up to something completely 
different in the Terrace Restaurant of the 
Dorchester. If the Connaught is Old Money, 
even when the accents at some tables owe 
more to Houston than to Eton, the Terrace is 
New. At a cost that must hare run to around 
a milli on dollars, the Dorchester hired Al- 
bert Pinto to create a Chineso-modem-ro- 
m an tic decor with a dance floor. Mossiman 
has developed dishes of inspired simplicity, 
such as sole grarinee a Tkuile aux heroes and 
medallions «/* agneau aux flours de thvm. Re- 
cently he has been experimenting with what 
be calls cuisine naturelle . using a minim um of 
sugar, butter and cream. As an example of 
pure finesse, it would be hard to match his 
perfectly poached chicken breast, served 
with four or five raw vegetables, cut into 
matchs ticks and marinated in lime juice or 
stock. 

One can also order a menu surprise that 
will bring six undisclosed courses to the 
table, but this can create a problem. It is 


Only three places come 
instantly to mind for 
really gala dining in 
London, no holds 
barred, cost no object, 
but a handful of others 
come close. 


necessary to leave the choice of wines to the 
waiter, and on two occasions, even though I 
had specified that I would like modest ones, 
1 have been served punishingly expensive 
bottles. The same thing has happened to 
friends, so state your wishes firmly. Another 
problem here is inconsistency; the whisper in 
the trade is that Mossiman is peerless as a 
cook (and, indeed, as a teacher of other 
cooks), but that he has his problems in man- 
aging a brigade of the size needed to serve 
not only the Terrace and the excellent Dor- 
chester GrilL which specializes in modern- 
ized English fare, but also room service and 
the private dining rooms. (Park Lane Wl, 
tel; 629-888S; closed Sunday; American Ex- 
press, Diners. Visa. Mastercard; about £80 
for two.) 

Le Gavrocbe is the showplace of the most 
successful chain of haute cuisine restaurants 
in the world — that of the Roux brothers, 
who own or hold part interest in five other 
establishments in London, most of them 
festooned with awards, as well as two in the 
British countryside, one in northern France 
and one in California. Former cooks in aris- 
tocratic private bouses, Albert and Michel 
Roux are technical geniuses; Albert, who 
presides at Le Gavrodhe. starts the careers of 
his young apprentices by painstakingly 
teaching them bow to fry an egg. 

Michelin gives Le Gavroche three stars, an 
accolade awarded to only one other British 
restaurant; the Roux brothers’ own Water- 
side Inn at Bray, near Heathrow Airport, 
where Michel presides. While I think that 
two would be closer to the mark — Le 
Gavrocbe is simply not as good as Girardet 
in Switzerland or Jamin mid Troisgros in 
France — this is without doubt the London 
restaurant fat classic French cookin g and 
service. 

Roux makes very, very few mistakes in the 
kitchen, and the staff in the clublike dining- 
room responds with appropriate pomp and 
panache: Among the dishes that linger in my 
memory are a salad of lobster and wild 
mushrooms, a woodcock of a quality equal 
to those served two decades ago at Lucas- 
Carton in Paris, a braid of red mullet and 
John Dory, the two fishes served with a chive 
sauce and an anise-flavored soufflt Suissesse. 
The cheeses, sent from Boulogne by Philippe 
Olivier and ripened in the restaurant’s lar- 
der, are the best in the city. 

Two minor grumbles: the style verges 
upon excessive richness, and the wine prices 
are truly terrifying (some bottles at more 
than £700). (43 Upper Brook Street, Wl, tel: 
408-0881, closed Saturday, Sunday, major 
holidays and a week at Christmas; American 
Express, Diners, Visa, MasterCard; about 
£120 for two). 


ItehtowYatTm 

- "il 

I N addition to Chez Nico (129 Queens-" 
town Road. London SW8, id: 720- : 
6960; Visa; about £70 for two) and LtH 1 
Tame Claire (68 Royal Hospital Road, SW3£ 
tel: 352-6045; American Express. Diners*/* 
about £100 for two), there are a few other 
contenders that, for one reason or another, f'- 
have excluded from my very short list of>: 
London’s best posh places. Here are brief 1 
notes on a half-dozen of them: - — 

Bombay Brasserie (140 Gloucester Rba v J~- 
SW7, tel: 370-4040; American Express, • 
ers, Visa, MasterCard; about £40 for twoj/- 
This airy restaurant with languidly turning* 
overhead fans and wicker chairs, owned by-, 
the Taj Hotel chain of India, proves once*' 
again that that eating ethnic can be a luxuri- 
ous experience. The leafy, glass-walled corf-i 
servatory (ask for a table there when yotf 1 
reserve) is an especially evocative environ^ 
mem in which to savor the subtlety of the* 
work of the chef, Sandip Chateijee; try. for'] 
example, his sauteed crab Malabar with : 
grated coconut, or the fish (pomfret or gray 
mullet) with fenugreek. The menu includes, 
seafood in the Goan style, spicy Tandooq- 
specialties. Parsec dishes and vegetarian^ 
items from GujaraL 

Capital Hotel (22 Basil Street SW3, te£“ 
589-5171; American Express. Diners, VisaT 
MasterCard about £70 for two). David Lev r . 
in. one of the most skilled of Britain’s yam^ 
ger hoteliers, redid his dining room not tonjr| 
ago. discarding the Bauhaus fittings and sub** 
suturing striped curtains and Louis XT^ 
chairs. The cooking of Brian Turner remain^’ 
as it was — rich and refined with perfcaps.ir 
trifle too much imagination on occasion. His * 
piccata of beef with capers; a marquise tof 
white chocolate and various fish dishes show' 
a sure hand that is also evident in the steaks,’ 
especially (he cotedeboeuf, from his charcoal 
gnlL There is an agreeable lad; of stuffiness^ 
about the place, which probably has someT, 
thing to do with the outgoing personality of 1 
Turner, a Yorks hireman whose father ran a' 
fish-and-chip shop. ,,2 

Chelsea Room (in the Hyatt Carlton Tow-° 
er Hotel, 2 Cadogan Place, SW1, td: 235- 
541 1; American Express^Diners’, 
terCard; about £100 for two): Bernard 
Gaume. the chef, and Jean Quero, the man- 
ager, have slowly and without fanfare built 
this into a restaurant of suprising quality for' 
a chain hold. The rather chilly room has" 
recently been made more intimate and re-- 1 
decorated in pastel tones, and Gaume 
mains a wizard with fish (warm oysters with 
three sauces, turbot and lobster with cucum-^ 
bere). Some of the other dishes are less bril- 
liant. to my taste, which is why the Chelsea > 
Room just misses my main list - 

Roe St Jacques (5 Charlotte Street Wl." 
td: 637-0222; dosed Saturday lunch and/ 
Sunday; American Express, Diners, Visa£ 
MasterCard, about £70 for two). Too small;-’ 
really, to fit into Lhe grand luxe category, this 
new restaurant is nonetheless an elegant set-V 
ting (huge mirrors, pillow-strewn ban- 
quettes) in which to sample the cuisine oP 
Gunther Schlender, the German chef. He 1 
has the ability to achieve depth of flavor 
without heaviness; witness his fabulous veni^ 
son consommd and his ethereal lobster 
mousse flavored with old Armagnac. Vin- 
cent Calcerano. the Belgian maitre d'hdtd, is^ 
ao old pro. 

Scott's (20 Mount Street Wl, td: 629- 1 
5248; closed Sunday lunch and major hob-; 
days; American Express, Diners, Visa, Mas- 
terCard; about £50 for two). Suppose you 
are in a festive mood, but not too hungry 1 /, ;. 
Make for Scou’s — not the respectable but ^ 
unexciting main restaurant but the adjacent 
oyster bar. A glass or two of champagne,! 
some Colchesters or a few slices of irre-^ 
proachable smoked salmon or a grilled sole," 

(or even a couple of spoonfuls of one of the. 
half-dozen caviars on offer, in which case 
double the price estimate above) should.,' 
solve the problem quite uiedy. 

Wilton's (55 Jermyn Street, SW1, td: 629r , 
9955; dosed Saturday, Sunday, major hdi-„ 
days and three weeks in July and August; 
American Express, Diners; about £80 for , 
two). J know, 1 know; the cooking is nothing, 
lo shout from the rooftops about, especially.- 
in the more complex dishes, and the prices* 
are ludicrously nigh for simple fare. Bu(. 
Wilton’s is the last genuinely Edwardian i 
restaurant left in London, and I love it for its' ' 

Art Nouveau glass partitions (unchanged ifl 
the move from Bury Street), for its bossy,; 
waitresses in lab technicians’ smocks, for its!! 
oysters and soles and baby lobsters and; 
roasted game birds, and above all for the.'* 
indomitable, octogenarian Mrs. Marks, who'J “ 
once refused to give me a bill whim my meal ' 
was terminated a few minutes early — tbere^ 
were a few tears or Calvados left in my glass 
— by a small fire in the kitchen. ■ % 

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FOR FUN AND PROFIT 


British Rail Pioneers 
With a New Credit Card 


1WTERISATIOKAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 8^985 

TRAVEL 


Munich: Secret Capital of the Germans 


by James M. Ma rkham 


M UNICH — A. dewy orange 
disk, the sun, was pasted in the 
sky over the white Nymphen- 
buig Palace, which glowed in 
the snow like some Central European Taj 
MohaL Out on the bumpy ice of the canni 
old men hunched over their curling stones — 
with long straight handles adorned with col- 
ored tassels to distinguish the >«»ms — 
grunting and calling oat in Lhe choppy Ba- 
varian idiom as the opposing stones clacked 
off one another, spi nnin g into the snow- 
banks. In the middle distance — the scene 
seemed an updated version of a Brueghel oil 
that might hang in Munich's Alte Pina- 
kotbek — children scampered about with 
hockey sticks, chattering merrily. On a 
stretch of shoveled ice unto herself, a sleek 
woman in a big hat was trying to get the hang 
of a new-looking pair of skates (or was it 
skating itself?), making cautious, mincing 
steps; the seat of her leather pants was dust- 
ed with snow, hinting at setbacks in this 
wobbly enterprise. 

It was a winter snapshot of Munich, one 
that has been taken before and one that will 
be taken again. It was an image of enjoy- 
ment, of pleasure in recurring ritual, which is 
maybe the secret charm of the city called the 
secret capital of Germany, the city that large 
numbers of Germans admit regularly in 
opinion polls is the most sympathetic to 
them and the one where they would like to 
live if they didn’t live at home. For Munich is 
a paradox, at once the most prosperous, go- 
ahead city in West Germany and the most 
hedonistic — not crassly sybaritic in the 
manner of lhe antiseptic sex strips that have 
brought notoriety to quarters of Hamburg or 
Frankfurt, but gently, with tradition, pa- 
nache and class. A Munich gentleman relates 
that an outsider once asked him the purpose 
of his men's social club, founded in 1858. 
“None at all." he answered, mock somber. 
The spirit is called “Liberalitas Bavarica." A 
lay translation: “Live and let live." 

When non-Bavarian Germans come here, 
it is with the aim of relaxing as they perhaps 
never do in Bielefeld, not growing agiiated if 
they are late for appointments or if some- 
body gets their title (Heir Doktor, Herr 
Professor, Herr Oberregierungsdirekior} 
askew. Horst Vetten, a DOsseldorf-bom 
writer transplanted to Bavaria, sums up the 
change: “It is completely ‘out' not to have 
time. The midlife crisis has been out for a 
long lime. Stress is no longer a status symbol 
The new status symbol: One has time:" 

Americans, too, have discovered the city's 
take-it-easy allure, and long ago convened 
the boisterous beer-swilling Oktoberfest. or 
at least comers of it into a Yankified event 
The besotted American in lederbosen is a 
fond autumn clichfc. 

“The image of Munich in America," says a 
tourist official with a frown, “is linked to 
beer and Oktoberfest The city fathers are 
not too happy about this beer image." The 
city fathers are, however, plenty happy that 
strong-dollar Americans are the single larg- 
est contingent of foreign visitors. 

Asked to explain their singularity, the Ba- 
varians tell you that they are really Celts, or 
Celto-Romans, a jollier and more anarchic 1 
lot than the Germanic tribes who picked up ' 
some of the northern pieces of the fallen 
Roman Empire. ‘‘Sharp-eyed essayists, if not 1 
straitlaced historians, have always seen the j 
Celtic streak in the Bavarian character," says j 
Benno Huben Steiner, a professor at Mu- 
nich's stately university. As Celtic traits he 1 
rites “fanrif uJness, thejoy in rich forms, the 1 
joy of going one belter, of quarreling and 1 
brawling, the weakness for noble horses." 1 
As Luther's Reformation swept over Ger- 1 
many, the doughty duchy of Bavaria stood 
firm in its Catholic faith, and its durable ( 
Wittelsbach dynasty went on, with help from ' 

Italian craftsmen, to turn its little capital, \ 
Munich, into a Baroque masterpiece. The 
historian Jacob Burcknardt pronounced the ~ 
sumptuous gardens and theater of the Nym- 1 
phenburg Palace “the most splendid Rococo s 
to be found on earth, and superior in invert- c 
don and elegance to the state rooms of 1 
Versailles." 

The absorption of stoutly Catholic Bavar- ti 
ia into Bismarck’s Protestant-minded Reich d 


by Roger CoBis 

I ONDON — The cavernous Victorian 
headquarters of British Rail at 

v Su i tion m London “ 

rtm _. . sbtmt the last place you would ex- 

Programs to be 

w d w ye l BRs producl devdop- 
£? nt ream has broken new ground with fa 

Sf*® 6 end, wlSch combines 
wporaie discounts Tor travel services with 
trequent-user incentives for individual busi- 

JtSnSS'S*”' U ffenificanl because it 
attempts to reconcile the contentious issue of 
who should benefit from travd incentives, 
the company or the executive, by offering 
something to both. B 

"Travel foy is aimed primarily at small- to 

med'tuu-stzed companies by a'ttempting to 
match the kind of discounts on hotels, res- 
taurants, car rentals and so on that are nor- 
mally available only to large corporations, 
these, in turn, are attracted mainly by a 
first-ever discount on rail travel. 

_ .k* ft® *8 months since it was launched in 
July 1983. 20,000 cards have been sold to 
more than 8.000 companies (10 percent of 
the total in the last two months). And with 
renewals running at 96 percent, it seems set 
■^capture around 10 percent of the British 
c^Jporate charge-card market (estimated at 
300,000 cards) by the end of this year. (The 
market is now dominated by American Ex- 
press, 60 percent; Diners Club, 20 percent 
and Visa/Barclaycard, 10 percent) 
According to Jeffrey Pcrrival, the new 
product development manager at British 
Rad, “We estimate that 10 percent of the £40 
million [S45 million] going through Travel 
Key this year will be new business. This will 
mean a net contribution of about £2 million 
to £3 million at the bottom line.” 

This is not a bad achievement for a stuffy, 
slate-owned railroad wallowing in red »nir 
British Rail expects Travel Key to contribute 
10 percent of the £30 miliu m additional 
revenues targeted for its Intercity (high- 
speed) service, one- third of which is current- 
ly business traveL 

There is interest in the concept across the 
Channel The Belgian railroad is mnwWjng - 


holders are invoiced monthly. Invoices for 
Named Users can be sent either to the com- 
pany or directly to the individual. 

Personal incentives can be claimed as soon 
os one of the six expenditure “bands'* is 
reached during the 1 2-month validity of the 
card. For example, a card holder who has 
spent £300 can other opt for a free first-class 
ticket for two to any mainland train station 
in Britain, or accumulate expenditure to Lhe 
£1,400 leveL This brings a free weekend 
break for two, with boat and hold accom- 
modation, in Amsterdam or Paris. There is 
also a £50 bonus given once a year toward a 
first-class return rail ticket to any destina- 
tion in mainland Britain. 

Travel Key has had its share of hiccups. 
British Rail implicitly acknowledges that the 
Authorized User card was a mistake. They 
are playing it down in their promotion ana 
would like to abandon it allege river. The 
reason is that a large number of companies 
— which tend to be hostile to personal incen- 
tives to executives — had simply bought one 

BR combines 
discounts and 
user incentives 


card and lodged it with their travel agent to 
get the 5 percent discount on rail travel. 

This has meant a loss for British Rail 
which has been unable to persuade these 
companies to take out Named User cards. 
British Rail has compounded the problem by 
reducing the discount on Authorized User 
cards to 23 percent The travel manage r of 
one company said be would retaliate by 
buying one Named User card and using it 
for all members of his company. The Insti- 
tute of Travel Managers in Bri tain (which is 
affiliated with the International Business 
Travel Association) is having a showdown 
with British Rail on Feb. 1 1 in London. 

“We do not like frequent-user programs," 


whether to accept Travel Key and may even says Peter Long, travel manager of Rownlree 
try to coordinate a si mi l ar type of discount Macintosh Ltd “There is 3 temptation for 
£ard throughout the European rail network, individual executives to make unnecessary 

OSrtllM a rMnarVihlo m.u. .... ... : . _ 1 . . , ,/ 


card throughout the European rail network. 
%is would be a re markab le endeavor, given 
the conservatism of national railroads. It was 
only last June that the Belgians accep ted 
charge cards, and then only for international 
iraveL And the West Gennan railroad, the 
DBB, has yet to do so. 

According to Percival British Rail has 
been approached by several of the smaller 
British airlines that would like tojoin Travel 
Key. Talks have been held with Dan-Air, he 
says, but they would first like to link up with 
a carrier the size of British Caledonian or 
British Airways. 

Travel Key is available now only to com- 
panies andindividuals trading as a corporate 
eritity.lt comes with two options: an “Au.-' 
thonzed User” card costing £25 a year in- 
tended to be issued from a central stock 
within the company, and a “Named User” 
card costing £1230 a year and £730 for six 
cards or more. Both types of card cany 
discounts on travel services, but only the 
Named User card entitles the holder to per- 


journeys just to boost their total expendi- 
ture. This is something we don’t need." 

Kathryn Yates, travel manager of York- 
shire Imperial Alloys, another big firm, is 
also irate. “When British Rail introduced 
Travel Key, all our executives got informa- 
tion about it except me." 

This highlights another problem. “There's 
nothing in Travel Key for us." complains a 
leading travel agent in London. “We fed 
that British Rail is undermining our client 
base by getting hold of individual executives’ 
names and using Travel Key as a direct 
marketing tooL" His view is held by several 
of his colleagues. 

But this is precisely what British Rail has 
in mind. Although travel agents get their 
commission, they do cot put a lot of effort 
into promoting travel by rail in Britain. Brit- 
ish Rail seems to be settling on the smaller 


cards or more. Both types of card carry company executive as a core loyalty group, 
discounts on travel services, but only the Percival reports there are plans to extend 
Named User card entitles the holder to per- Travel Key’s range of services (the first air- 
sonal benefits that are clocked up on expen- port-style executive lounge is due to open at 
diture on rail traveL King’s Cross station here this month) and 

Discounts indude 5 percent on rail tickets expects hotel and car rental expenditure to 


-£(the rate for Authorized User cards was 
reduced to 23 percent on Jan. IX 15 percent 
on Godfrey Davis Europcar rental 10 per- 
cent on rooms at 190 hotels in Britain and 10 
percent off in participating restaurants. 

Named User cards also get a 15 percent 
discount cm private health insurance and 
free personal accident insurance. There are 
also discounts on language-learning aids, of- 
fice equipment, translation and secretarial 
services and computer facilities. Card- 


be included in the incentive program — 
although British tax authorities are making 
ominous noises. 

An alternative strategy may be to promote 
TYavel Key directly to individuals instead of 
to their companies. This would mean that 
executives could buy the card themselves 
and use it for company traveL This could 
raise a moral issue: whether or not to pass on 
the discount fra- rail travel to the company 
when submitting expense accounts. ■ 


Aphrodite 


Continued from page 5 


traces of the first Mmoan settlement in Asia 
Minor and, perhaps, the banal place of what 
■ was considered the most beautiful statue of 
antiquity, the nude Aphrodite of Praxiteles, 
nwhicn now exists only in some 50 copies. 

“ Miss Love’s reputation as the appositely 
named apostle of Aphrodite has had its odd 
ride effects. When Revlon opened its new 
complex in New Jersey, they told her they 
looked upon it as a temple of beauty and 
asked her fill a time capsule with suitable 
objects. Her choices ranged from sweet com 
seeds to a B31 Blass cotton shirt (“because 
100 percent cotton is already so rare") to a 
model of Concorde and a swatch of mink (“I 
wanted a nnnlc coat but no one would give 
me one")- She also included bottles of Coca 
Cola and beer “because I’d give anything to 
taste ancient Egyptian beer or Greek or 
Roman wine." 

“The capsule’s supposed to be opened in 
500 years but they’re thinking of checking on 
it in the year 2000," she says. 

Intuitive and unconventional but highly 
professional Iris Love has been called the 
last of the romantic archaeologists. “I be- 
lieve in the seeds of truth, that exist in every 
Greek myth,” she says. “I believe everything 
^is possible, I believe no theory denies anotb- 

^ She describes herself as a pagan and. 


knowing the gods are captious, is careful not 
to offend them. “I have a feeling of respect 
for the powers that exist I would sever wish 
to tempt or go beyond them. 1 am very much 
aware of the Greek word hubris. Hubris will 
be punished by the gods." 

So as not to tempt fate, she never says she 
is going to do something. “Instead, I say 1 
hope to do something, I will do it if it’s 
possible." One must understand that if she 
says “I might go" or “If I go," she is in fact 
saying “I am gong." Her view of life, and of 
grammar, as peculiarly conditional can 
make her hard to follow and sometimes 
impossible to find. She is always late and was 
even bran a month after she was due. “So 
many unexpected things happen,” she ex- 
plains. 

Although she gives lectures and has a non- 
teaching assistant professorship at Long Is- 
land University, she has in a sense been 
marking time since the Knidos excavations 
were interrupted. She has missed a couple of 
deadlines on her autobiography, which was 
to be called “Love Among the Ruins" and 
now is just called “Ruins." 

“I don’t like that title," she says, “because 
they aren't ruins. They are what one learns 
from and grows from. History seems boring ■ 
to people but to me it’s the most exciting i 


word I know.’ 


The Sun King 


is at least one indispensable piece of evi- 
dence in die show. This is the famous tapes- 
try. made from a design by Charles Lebrun, 
that shows Louis XIV making a formal visit 
to the Gobelins factory not long after it had 
been reorganized. Needless to say. the pest 
possible face is put upon the multifarious 
activity that was going on, and we sense that 
the king was really looking each piece over, 
not just going through the motions. 

. , . 

~ yet it has to be said that in the exhibition 
itself we do not gel to see much of what went 
on, either at the Gobelins or elsewhere, as a 
result of the king’s polities. Evenifwe allow 
that much of the silver was melted down at a 
later stage in his reign to beef up the exche- 
j£. ^remains m fhu in the decorative 

its, as in painting, this is not ■ 
guished exhibition. Nor is it an especiauy 


Continued from page 5 


rational one, if we consider the place accord- 
ed to Rouen faience, which Louis XIV never 
showed any signs of liking especially, as 
against the dearth of grander objects. 

Altogether “The Sun King” reminds us 
that an exhibition of ideas is altogether a 
tricky undertaking. It calls nqt only for the 
exercise of a sustained and luminous intelli- 
gence but for a total generosity on the pan of 
essential leaders. Where neither is present, a 
forlorn adventure results. Who would have 
foreseen, for example, that one of the most 
rewarding exhibits in “The Sun Kins" would 
be a little painting by an unidentified artist 
of a Parisian playing-card factory? Great an 
it is not. but it has precisely the immediacy, 
the sense of something seen clearly and set 
down well that is lacking from so mud) else 
in the show. ■ 

The New Ynrk Times 





i ■■ i » 

♦ w. 


Munich's spires: Alter Peter . ; Frauen kirche. Rathaus and Heilige Geist-Kirche. 


is still regarded by local patriots with the 
same sense of betrayal and loss that some 
Alabamans muster for the defeat of the Con- 
federacy. In the 19th century Munich lost 
out to Beilin, and to this day outsiders are 
deprecatingly called “Prussians," fast-talk- 
ing city slickers who think they can pull fast 
ones on the native bumpkins. A lingering 
feeling of inferiority hides behind Bavarian 
resentments of “northerners," and some 
trace it to an inculcated shame about the 
vowel-gulping Bavarian dialect, which 
young Bavarians are taughr in school to 
consider lowlier than High German. Helmut 
Dotierwdch, a courtly Munich author, re- 
counts how at the end of the war a barefoot 
northern German refugee appeared at a Ba- 
varian village. “She was much poorer ihan 
all the farmers, but she immediately 
achieved status because she could talk so fast 
and in High German," he says. 

T HE magic of Munich is that, while 
becoming utterly cosmopolitan, it has 
not yanked up its rustic roots. It re- 
mains a small town, where the Vikuialien- 
markl the lush green vegetable and herb 
market, is a living thing, not sustained artifi- 
caJIyas amusing folklore. “When the women 
of the ViktuaUenmarkl dance- at carnival” 
remarks Mayor Georg Kronawitter, “they 
do it because they like to, not because they 
are paid to do so by city hall. They really like 
it — and those really are the women of the 
Viktualienmarkt who are dancing." The sar- 












IMnRJL Station 


VrharKunst j 












btsmvis--:- ■ 


f. fggfj 






brimmed fedoras — bespeaks, too. the taste 
of a horsy gentry. 

“Munich has never redly become a big 
city," says August Everding, a “Prussian* 
who for two decades has infused his ebul- 
lient spirit into the city’s opera and theater. 
“It does not have the uncharm of the big city 
— and yet in the arts only New York over- 
takes iL And the folklore here does not slide 
so quickly into kitsch, because it is indige- 
nous. Folklore was not discovered in order 
to draw tourists to Munich." 

The Bavarians are nostalgically fond of 
the Wittelsbach dynasty, winch held its king- 
dom together for seven centuries, so after lhe 





monarchy was deposed in 1918 in favor of a 
republican form of government they drew up 
some regulations to make sure the former 
royal family would not tumble altogether 
from the style to which it had become accus- 
tomed. Wittelsbach privileges include a free 
box at the magnificent opera — “and it’s 
never empty," says Everding — and the right 
to throw parties and receptions at Nym- 
phenburg and other former royal palaces. 

These are the peaks of Munich's highly 
eclectic soda! season. Prince Franz of Bavar- 
ia presides over some of these occasions, 
where he is unblushingly addressed as Royal 
Highness. (Only the republican-minded So- 
cial Democrats boycott these events, though 
many confess they would love to come if it 
wouldn’t get them in trouble with the party.) 
There is, however, nothing archaic about the 
prince, a quick-eyed art collector who spends 
a good deal of his time in New .York, where 
he is chairman of the Museum of Modem 
Art’s International Council of patrons. 

Most of the Winds bachs cleave to an 
aristocratic low profile in Munich, but a few 
have broken splashily into the private sector 
— like Prince Luitpold, who sells his Royal 
Bavarian Beer in England. Other uprooted 
nobility from Eastern Europe cultivate a 
more conspicuous social life among Mu- 
nich’s fast-moving “Schickeria" — the “peo- 
ple" section of the tabloid Abendzeitung 
breathlessly follows their doings in the sty’s 
salons and restaurants and on the ski slopes 
erf St- Moritz. 

A republican, though, is the real king of 
the Free State of Bavaria. Franz. Josef 
Strauss. Bavaria’s curmudgeonly minister- 
president, incarnates the “national" charac- 
ter gruff, witty, sly, quick to anger, prone to 
verbal explosions (with no follow-through), 
suspicious of outsiders — in short, what the 
people of Munich call a Growler. 

“The Grander,” Strauss once explained, 
“is really the expression of the ur-Mun- 
chener, but he can easily convert himself into 
a warm conversation partner when he meets 
with an open, heart/eh attitude." Strauss' 
standard posture is that of the outraged 
Bavarian fanner who can’t believe what fool- 
ishness is going on in Bonn ' — and who 
would love to go up there and fix it but has 
too much to do down on the farm. 

But Munich’s -civic fairy tale has a dirty 
little secret — a rarely acknowledged debt to 
Berlin and all those frightful, uptight “Prus- 
sians." The scope of Munich’s postwar boom 
would not have been thinka ble without the 
isolation of West Berlin, girdled by divisions 
of Soviet troops, and the displacement of 
hundreds of thousands of eastern Germans 
to Bavaria. If Munich is now the publishing 
capita] of West Germany, it is because of 
Bolin’s decline and the falling of Leipzig to 


Thi N wm Voft Time* 

roots than flashy, upstart F.C. Bayern — it is 
fashionable to bemoan the de-Bavananiring 
of the city. “One always has the feeling that 
we are bong so Prussianized." says Helmut 
Douerweich. the author, musing that per- 
haps the true, undiluted Bavarian spirit can 
only be found down in Salzburg or in the 
South Tirol, where they talk funny, too. (A 
mourning of bygone ways is an old tradition. 
At the end of World War II, Karl Valentin, a 
Munich cabaret comedian, was wandering 
among the ruins of the city’s shattered vic- 
tory arch. “Hasn’t been much in use latdy, 
has it?" he muttered. 

But creative talent has always lived in 
some tension with its charming, bourgeois 
Munich environment. In this century, Mu- 
nich’s most renowned native novelist, lion 
Feuchtwanger. is a dead prophet without 
honor in the city. His 1930 classic, “Suc- 
cess," is a bitter parody of Munich’s small- 
town mores. He died in Los Angeles in 1958. 

In panegyric writing on the city, it is 
customary to cite the glowing testimonials of 
Thomas Maim, who loved Munich. But by 
1926 Mann sensed another, meaner spirit 
welling up in his adopted town and, m a 
little-remembered and rarely quoted speech, 
denounced the poisoning of its tolerance by 
“anti-Semitic nationalism and God knows 
what sinister stupidities." 


M UNICH, Mann said, had been 
transformed into Germany’s “bas- 
tion of reaction" and had become 
“a stupid, the truly stupid city." JQrgen 
Kolbe, an uprooted Saxon and Munich’s 
culture minister, likes to evoke this bitter 
Mann oration to warn the citizenry against 
smugness. “The biggest danger in Munich is 
the prevailing self-satisfaction with the good 
and agreeable situation here," says Kolbe. 

For some, a monument to these dangers is 
the mammoth, red-brick, almost-finished 
Gasteag. a multipurpose cultural center that 
the city has built above the banks of the Isar 
River. Conceived as a kind of Lincoln-Pom- 
pidou center that would make the world 
notice Munich's cultural pre-eminence in 
West Germany, the Gasteig is just nearing 
completion: its main function will be to 
provide a badly needed concert hall but 
making the whole thing a living institution 
will be a challenge. Some culture critics wor- 
ry that Munich already has a surplus of 
“hardware" — 20,000 high culture seats 
must be filled every night — and not enough 
“software," that is. creative energy going 
into new plays and new ideas. 

It is hard to be troubled by such consider- 


An Oktoberfest scene. 


Hart** Franck, Mopun 


the Red Army; if Siemens, Osram, Allianz 
have their headquarters here it is because 
their industrial captains pulled them out of 
Berlin. The same is true of the film industry, 
which moved from the Reich capital to the 
secret capital after the war. Munich’s univer- 
sity, too. is top-heavy with Prussian profes- 
sors. The city’s star soccer cluh. F.C. 

Among some old Munich families — the 
ones who root for the second-division soccer 
club I860 MOnchen because it has deeper 


and families swaying along with their baby 
carriages. Or sitting in Schumann’s having a 
beer with bright young movie people out to 
conquer the world. Or savoring a meal at 
Aubergine, maybe the best restaurant in 
Germany. Or bang swept up in a 40-minute 
ovation for Pavarotti at die opera. Liberali- 
tas Bavarica. Live and let live. Most cities 
would be overjoyed to be burdened with 
what Munich construes as problems. ■ 

© I9SS The .Ve hr York Tima 


i 




Page 8 


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1985 


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Rerafo 


INTERNATIONAL 



tribune 


PnMabod With The New York Time* and The Washington Post 


A Council in Abeyance 


President Reagan's Council of Economic 
Advisers is teetenng on one leg. Mr. Reagan, 
who is contemptuous of economists, has failed 
to fill two vacancies. The council that issued its 
annual report on Tuesday has only one mem- 
ber left. Whose views does it represent? If Mr. 
Reagan means to have a council, as he says he 
does, then why the delay in having one? 

The report, appended to a briefer statement 
by the president, was signed by two members, 
William Niskanen and William Poole. But that 
was two weeks ago, the day before Mr. Poole 
left office. Predictably, the report justifies the 
spectrum of administration policies. It deals 
inconclusively with sticky problems like the 
foreign trade deficit and the high value of the 
dollar. That is understandable. But the report 
and the presidential statement also wander 
into mysterious territory on two subjects, the 
Federal Reserve Board and the elderly. 

On the Fed, the presidential statement, 
backed by a lecture in the companion report, 
complains about monetary tightness in the 
1981-82 recession and again last summer. It 
asserts that the administration will “cooperate 
closely” with the Fed in defining and carrying 
out monetary policy. That is the broadest hint 
yet that it wants to invade the Fed’s statutory 
independence. The threat is unwarranted, 
coming from a president who will be remem- 


bered for mismanaging fiscal policy and thus 
greatly complicating the Fed’s operations. 

On the elderly, the council undercuts a tenet 
of the new budget: that Social Security is 
untouchable. In a special chapter the council 
says the elderly are no longer a “relatively 
disadvantaged group.” The incomes of elderly 
families are about equal to those of younger 
families, it says, and the poverty rate among 
the elderly is lower than in the population. A 
clear implication is that a one-year freeze in 
Soda! Security cost-of-living increases is not 
as unthinkable as Mr. Reagan maintains- A 
president serious about lough budget cuts 
should have proposed this one. 

Is the administration serious about anv of 
this? Last fall Mr. Reagan thought of abolish- 
ing the council, probably because of the advice 
it kept pressing on him: Take the budget 
defid t seriously; recognize that taxes may 
have to be raised. Martin Feldstein. then chair- 
man, contributed to- national awareness by 
taking his case to the public. That offended ‘a 
White House engrossed in the re-election cam- 
paign. But in the end the president dedded to 
keep the coundL At a time when record budget 
and trade defidts pose huge threats to the 
economy, that is surdy the right decision. 
When will Mr. Reagan act on it? 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Time for Farm Reform 


It comes packaged as a way to reduce feder- 
al spending, but it is really an overdue propos- 
al to reduce the unproductive role of govern- 
ment in America’s most productive industry:' 
agriculture. The cuts in farm subsidies that 
President Reagan seeks would save an estimat- 
ed $16 billion over three years. More impor- 
tant in the long run. they would create a more 
profitable, more competitive farm industry ca- 
pable of feeding the world at lower prices. 

If America's agriculture is so productive, 
why are so many of its farmers hurting badly? 
Here are several reasons: 

Trade distortions. Com soybean and wheat 
farmers depend heavily on sales abroad. But 
the dollar’s high exchange rate has made their 
products about a third more expensive since 
1980 and given a big edge to efficient competi- 
tors in Canada, Brazil, Argentina and Austra- 
lia. Making matters worse are the heavy gov- 
ernment subsidies to inefficient farmers in 
Europe, which create surpluses on a continent 
that should be a major food importer. 

Swollen debts and high interest rates. Many 
fanners borrowed billions to buy land at in- 
flated prices in the 1970s. when crop failures 
created world food shortages. Therefore many 
farms that generate a healthy cash flow even at 
currently depressed world prices are unable to 
cover their monthly mortgage payments. 

Hidden inefficiencies. The 300,000 large, 
mechanized farms that yield about 70 percent 
of America’s farm output are models of effi- 
ciency. But the two million farms producing 
the other 30 percent are too small to stay afloat 
without help. Even with government subsidies, 
these farms taken together yield no net in- 
come. Some have become vacation homes for 
the rich; most are the homesteads of poor 
people who must earn their living elsewhere. 

America’s traditional farm programs, de- 
signed to support a minimum price for farm 


products, help deeply indebted farmers meet 
their monthly bills. But overall the aid does 
more harm than good. The supports set mini- 
mum prices for exports: no farmer would sell 
abroad for a lower price than at home. But at 
current, inflated dollar exchange rates, the 
price support level is well above Lhe cost of 
producing the same crops abroad. As a result, 
other countries have put more land into culti- 
vation, reducing America’s share in world 
markets and making American farmers ever 
more dependent on government help. 

The only argument for price supports is that 
they let struggling small farms stay in business. 
But why should the majority of Americans pay 
billions to support a minority’s 19th-century 
vision of the pastoral life? Even if that were a 
sound objective, the current programs are 
hardly the way to achieve it/Since price sup- 
port subsidies are distributed in proportion 
to output, only a small fraction of the money 
ever reaches small farmers. 

In his first term President Reagan behaved 
like his predecessors, preaching free enterprise 
in Washington but playing sugar daddy on the 
north forty. His response to a collapse in world 
food prices in the early 1980s was to protect 
farmers with a $19 billion subsidy in 1 9&3. the 
costliest support program in history. 

Now the ad minis tration proposes to retreat 
Tram those subsidies over a period of several 
years, eventually leaving supports that would 
be only a temporary cushion against the most 
precipitous decline in farm prices. And, equal- 
ly important, it would limit the amount of 
subsidy going to any single farmer. 

A year ago such a reform seemed politically 
unthinkable. It may still be. But if serious 
reform is ever to occur, the time is now. Farm 
subsidies plainly are not working as intended. 
Even farmers are beginning to see that. 

- THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Shoowops and Doowahs 


Writing in the British weekly New Scientist 
recently. David Osselton debunked the notion 
— “widely believed, even among scientists and 
mathematicians" — that if enough monkeys 
were set to lapping away at enough typewrit- 
ers, they would in time produce ail the works 
of Shakespeare. Mr. Osselton says the num- 
bers involved would be so stupendous that the 
planet probably could not generate enough 
energy for the animals to accomplish this deed. 

In fact just such an endeavor has been 
attempted. “The Shakespeare Project,'’ as it 
was known, was quietly set in motion in the 
early 1950s under the terms of a bequest made 
by an eccentric billionaire. Some 40,000 rhesus 
monkeys were put to work hanging away on 
Remington portables in a converted aircraft 
hangar in southern California. 

The project proceeded as expected for a 
time, and by 1957 the monkeys bad produced 
entire acts from “Henry IV, Part 2” and “Ju- 
lius Caesar,” as well as a scene from “The Two 
Gentlemen of Verona.” Then one day a human 
attendant excitedly yanked from one of the 
typewriters a sheet of paper on which a mon- 
key had typed a single line — “Sha bop sha 
bop sha bang alang ding dong” — and look it 
to a recording studio, where it was incorporat- 


ed into a popular song that sold 2 million 
records. The next day there was a bunch of 
bananas next to every typewriter. So began a 
steady flow of “shoowop shoowops,” “doo- 
wahs" and similar expressions accounting for 
about 15 percent of the lyrics in whaL are now 
considered seminal works in rock music. 

Since then the monkeys have not produced 
another line of Shakespeare, but there have 
poured forth with statistical inevitability doz- 
ens of scripts for movies, situation comedies 
and television dramas filled with treachery, 
lust and greed that have enthralled millions of 
viewers; romantic novels; scenarios for rock 
videos; the text of a S95 coffee-table book on 
the Flemish masters; a financial newsletter, a 
successful syndicated column; and, you may 
by now suspect, an editorial or two. ’ 

Mr. Osselton is right when be says, “Ob- 
viously . . . there is no earthly chance of gen- 
erating a literary work by any such random 
process.” But a work does not have to be 
literary to put bananas on the (able. 

Mr. Osselton is also right when he concludes 
that monkeys certainly could not produce all 
of Shakespeare's works. But then neither could 
Shakespeare, in this market. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


FROM OUR FEB. 8 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Edison Battery Tested in Tram 
NEW YORK — Thomas A. Edison’s new 
storage battery, installed in a tramway car, was 
again officially tested [on Feb. 6] by local 
railway officials. The car ran smoothly from 
59th to 125 th street, climbing several steep 
grades. After the test, Mr. Lynch, manager of 
the Metropolitan Street Railway Company, 
observed; “The problem of the storage battery 
is solved, though several minor improvements 
are necessary.” The battery will be subjected to 
every test, in all kinds of weather, and against 
all difficulties in the course of the next 
month. If these prove satisfactory, batteries 
will be installed in the crosstown tramway 
cars, which — strange relics of the past — are 
drawn by horses and are the object of ridicule 
by visitors to the metropolis. 


1985: Hope for Russo- American Ties 
W ASHINGTON — The present Russo- Amer- 
ican tension is merely a passing phase which 
nil! be followed by a more realistic attitude 
and an eventual solution of the differences, in 
the opinion of neutral diplomatic observers. 
The basic difficulty, apparently, was the recent 
attempt to solve simultaneously the financial 
and commercial problems, whereas the broad 
trend of Russo- American relations will proba- 
bly resemble the long and complex Ru&so- 
British and Russo-French negotiations. The 
current stagnation contrasts with the roseate 
early expectations that hundreds of millions or 
dollars in trade would automatically follow 
recognition, of Russia. American exports to 
Russia in 1934 were only 514,866,000, com- 
pared with $8,743,000 in 1933. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chatman 1958-1982 


KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


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Editor ALAIN LBCOUR Associate Pabbsker 

Deputy Editor RICHA RD H. MORGAN Associate Publisher 

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Yalta Facte 
The Tragedy 
In Context 


By Edwin M. Yoder, Jr. 


W 


Watching as a South Korean Democrat Goes Home 


W ASHINGTON — From time to time an 
individual steps forward and, risking life 
and fate, rivets our attention on the idea of demo- 
cracy. Kim Dae Jung, the brilliant and charismatic 
South Korean leader, has performed that task in 
the past and is in the process of doing it again. 

A year ago Mr. Kim announced his intention to 
end his exile in the United States by returning to 
South Korea. Because President Chun Doo Hwan 
and his murdered predecessor both made efforts to 
end Mr. Kim’s political career by ending his life, 
Mr. Kim’s announcement provoked a long, public, 
international discussion. The discourse has 
reached the moment of denouement; On Wednes- 
day Mr. Kim began his journey home. 

What will become of him? He is a democrat. He 
believes that his country will not be strong or 
stable until its citizens are relieved of government 
repression and are able to choose their own lead- 
ers. Through his oratory and political skills he is 
able to energize people, evoke the vision of a free 
society, outline a program for the future. 

Mr. Chun, using a two-track approach, is uying 
to persuade the world that he has already fulfilled 
those goals. Al home he has stifled dissent, created 
two “opposition” parties that lake orders from the 
government and barred the strongest politicians 
From any political activity. .Internationally he will 
soon be paying a return state visit to America to 


By Patt Derian 


get the American flag of approval wrapped around 
himself again. He is also hosting the Asian summer 
games and the next Summer Olympics, and he 
hopes to begin discussions with North Korea. 

With all that as background, Mr. Chun wanted 
Mr. Kim to stay away. And there is a recent 
ominous precedent for concern. Dictatorships are 
not fastidious when it comes to dealing with demo- 
cratic rivals. The last time that was demonstrated. 
Bemgno S. Aquino Jr. was seen lying in his own 
blood, shot in the back of the head minutes after 
his arrival at Manila airport in the Philippines. 

Mr. Kim puts democracy's question: What is to 
be done, and by whom, to avoid another major 
disaster for democracy? 

There is a companion question that he does not 
ask: What is to be done, and by whom, to prevent 
another disaster Tor Mr. Kim? 

Locked up at home or in prison, he would be. in 
a way. quite similar to Mr. Aquino dead on the 
tarmac: Both countries' citizens would be deprived 
of their strength, skills and leadership. 

Democracy does not need another martyr. At 
the 1 1 th hour the While House bestirred itself. It is 
said to have obtained assurances that Mr. Kim 
would be neither killed nor jailed — at least not 


before Mr. Chun meets Mr. Reagan. The plan 
seems to be to put him on ice by keeping him under 
house arrest and forbidding political activity. 

Until Washington speaks with clarity and con- 
viction about its intention that Mr. Kim should 
live in the same safety and freedom in his home 
country as he did in the United States, both are in 
serious question. .And in a situation such as this, 
American silence is read as assent. 

South Korea’s government could, and may, 
make all the conjecture and concern about Mr. 
Kim’s future disappear in an instant by issuing a 
public statement mat he returns without any threat 
to his liberty and is expected to resume his activi- 
ties in the life of his country. 

But Mr. Kim is in jeopardy because his govern- 
ment seems to be in disarray. Washington speaks 
obliquely for it; it does not speak for itself, and is 
unable to end the criticism implicit in every discus- 
sion of the possibilities. There is menace in weak- 
ness and indecision. The upshot is that Kim Dae 
Jung stands bravely for his principles at the edge of 
the abyss. And democracy stands — for what? 


The writer, who served as assistant secretary of 
state for human rights and humanitarian affairs 
during the Carter administration, is accompanying 
Kim Dae Jung on his return to South Korea. She 
contributed this comment to the Los Angeles Times. 


r ASHINGTON — Trom the. 
firsL there has been cheap po- 
litical profit in the ongoing areument 
about the settlement at the Yalta coo- 
ference (Feb. 4-11. 1945) and it may 
be too much io hope that after 40 
years Yalta the myth might be sepa- 
rated from Yalta the history lesson. 
Still, we ought to try. 

As a political myth, Yalta* — the 
last of World War II’s three major 
meetings between. RoosevelL Chur- 
chill and Stalin — powerfully an. 
bolizes the “betrayal of Eastern Sa- 
rope to Soviet vassalage. So viewed. it 
makes blunderers if not criminals of 
Roosevelt and Churchill, a view as 
unhistorical as it is mean-minded. 

Certainly it was a sad irony that a 
war begun in 1939 over the fate of 
Poland (although having far larger 
and deeper causes) should end with 
the delivery of Poland from Hitler's 
tyranny to Stalin's. 

' Such was the tragedy that Chor- 
chilL in the last volume of his war 
memoirs, coupled with the allied tri- 
umph. But “tragedy" implies,' cor- 
rectly in this instance, an intractable 
fate as well as human migudgnieni. 

At the outset of the conference in 
Crimea in that long-ago February, 
Europe was not a lump of clay ready 
for molding; it was a chaos — a 
“charnel house.” as Churchill tigr 
said — of fleeing refugees. marcSLg 
armies and disintegrating societies. 

In that rained setting, a stricter 
insistence on binding guarantees of 
democracy in Poland and elsewhere 
was of course entirely possible, but 
possibly idle as well. Stalin’s armies 
already occupied Poland, and it was 
remarkable in the circumstances that 
Roosevelt and Churchill expressed as 
much concern as they did about the 
future freedom of Eastern Europe. In 
an important article in Foreign Af- 
fairs. Zbigniew Brzezinski observes 
that, in fact their solicitude for such 
freedom was stronger at Yalta than it 
had been some 15 months earlier at 
the Tehran conference. 

The missing factor, all but ignored 
even by Mr. Brzezinski, was the over- 
riding preoccupation with the war in 
the Pacific. Tne Japanese war had 
been subordinated to the defeat of 
Hitler. Once that was accomplished, 
the Pacific war was expected tedfc 


Something Fishy Is Going On in Pinochet’s Chile 


N EW YORK — There is some- 
thing rotten in Chile. 

On Feb. 2 the country’s militaiy 
rulers renewed the state of siege that 
they had imposed in early Novem- 
ber — the very day Ronald Reagan 
was re-elected. This time they cued 
“domestic commotion.” Before, it 
was terrorists who were threatening 
the country’s order and calm. Force, 
the leadership now declared, must 
be met with force. 

In a stroke, massive repression 
was unleashed. Troops swooped on 
slums in pre-dawn raids, hunting, 
they said, for criminals. Thousands 
of people were rounded up and hun- 
dreds were sent into internal exile. 

Political and human rights offices 
were ransacked and the press was 
silenced: Six of seven opposition 
publications that had become a fo- 
rum for dissen t and a key dement In 
the national protests were instantly 
shuL Radio and even pro-govern- 
ment mainstream newspapers were 
muzzled, forbidden to prim or to 
broadcast political news or any- 
thing that would “create alarm.” 

That terrorism and commotion 
exist is fact and few Chileans doubt 
iL When the anti-terrorist law was 
decreed last June, bombs were set 
off at power stations and outside 
banks in Santiago. Responsibility 


By Barbara Koeppel 


.was claimed by a radical group, the 
Manuel Rodriguez Patriotic Front 
that believes the general and his 
government must be overthrown by 
force and sabotage. 

in a large number of cases, how- 
ever, it is not too clear who are the 
terrorists and who causes Lhe com- 
motion. Consider the following 
cases that occurred last year. 

• In May a couple were picked 
up by police, beaten and tortured 
until unconscious. The husband 
awoke in front of an electrical tower 
just in time to see an ignited fuse. 
He dragged himself away but his 
wife was not so fortunate: The 
bomb exploded, killed her and 
heavily damaged the installation. 
Unaware that the husband had es- 
caped. the authorities announced 
on television that a woman terrorist 
had died while placing explosives. 
Alerted by the husband, the Catho- 
lie Church's human rights office hid 
him, publicized the real story and 
arranged for him to leave Chile. 

• In September a bomb explod- 
ed in a church in the southern city of 
Punta Arenas. Church people en- 
tered soon after the blast and found 
the body of a man whose identity 
cards revealed as a lieutenant in the 


army branch connected with the 
CNI, Chile's intelligence uniL 

• In October police forced a 
nurse midwife, out of her car in 
Santiago and drove it away. Au- 
thorities to whom she complained 
said she would get it back soon. 
After it reappeared a few days later, 
it was destroyed by a bomb police 
claimed was planted by terrorists. 

And in a practice which is by now 
commonplace, police deposit guns, 
ammunition and revolutionan lit- 
erature in someone’s home, usually 
in a slum. Next they call in the state- 
controlled television crews to film 
the cache and announce that terror- 
ists' aims were discovered and the 
guilty have been anested. 

Most Chileans now doubt that 
the bulk of such acts are the work of 
the groups the government calls ter- 
rorists. Moreover, observers say 
that the state of siege was invoked 
to thwart not terrorism but the in- 
creasingly organized and successful 
protests against General Pinochet’s 
regime. “These, and not the terror- 
ists, are (he real threat to their con- 
trol,” said one radio broadcaster. 

Because repression is now ram- 
pant and sophisticated, dissent has 
been squelched. Says one communi- 


ty leaden “The raids, torture, ar- 
rests and imprisonment have nearly 
destroyed our spiriL Before (here 
were protests, now there is terror ” 
The Reagan administration is not 
:.so well informed as the Chileans. In 
late October it was concerned by 
“the steady increase in terrorist 
bombings, efforts by nondemocral- 
ic sectors to foment violence.” • 

In early November, commenting 
on the state of siege, the U.S. State 
Department questioned the heavy- 
handed tactic but nevertheless not- 
ed that “we recognize there is a 
serious terrorist problem in Chile 
that needs to be dealt with.” • • ■ 
Washington gives no bilateral 
aid, since Chile was never certified 
due to its abysmal human rights 
record. But until this week, when 
the United Slates abstained in a 
vote on an Inter-American Devel- 
op men t Bank loan, it has continued 
u> approve aid in the World Bank, 
the IADB and the IMF. Since 1981, 
loans from the first two institutions 
totaled just under SI.6 billion. That 
is the stuff that General Pinochet’s 
order and calm are made of. 


The writer is executive director of the 
Ne H’ York-based Committee to Protect 
Journalists. She contributed this to the 
International Herald Tribune. 


California Is Proof: Activist Government Can Help 


S ANTA BARBARA, California — 
The Easterner traveling in south- 
ern Calif ornia thinks he begins to 
understand Ronald Reagan. This is 
the natural setting for his ideas: the 
optimism, the dislike of government, 
the belief that deficits will go away 
and happiness flourish if only indi- 
viduals are freed from the burdens of 
taxation and regulation. 

Flying into Los Angeles, one sees 
the extraordinary imprint of man’s 
economic ingenuity — the freeways 
and factories and housing tracts built 
up from nothing in a few years. 

Along the coast is a glistening dis- 
play of private affluence. To the east, 
in the valley, thrive crops to feed a 
nation. The sun shines. 

Bui there is a wonderful irony in 
the glories of the Golden State. None 
of them would be os they are if it had 
not been for government action. Cali- 
fornia has great natural advantages, 
but perhaps more than any outer 
state in the Union it has depended on 
public investment. Tax dollars have 
played a large pan in building its 
physical and intellectual capital 
The crops would not grow if the 
government had not spent billions on 
the greatest irrigation works in the 
memory of man. Two activist presi- 
dents who believed in government, 
Theodore and Franklin Roosevelt, 
pushed the cause of reclamation. 
Farmers in the Central Valley still 
benefit from subsidized water. 

The California freeways were not 
built by private enterprise. The ex- 
plosive growth of Los Angeles and 
San Diego and their surrounding 
counties was made possible by that 
tax-paid transportation netwoix 
One of this state’s great assets is 
the University of California, with its 
campuses ranging from urban Berke- 
ley to the tranquillity of the water’s 
edge in Santa Barbara. Activist gov- 
ernors like Earl Warren and Pat 


By Anthony Lewis 


Brown built the system. Ronald Rea- 
gan respected it as governor. 

Hie university has been a key to 
economic growth. The agricultural 
campuses developed the techniques 
used by the big farms. Silicon Valley 
and other high-tech centers are de- 
pendent on the quality of education 
provided by Lhe public system. 

Public recreational facilities are 
another outstanding feature of Cali- 
fornia: state and national parks, 
miles of public beaches. Tax money 
mai n tai ns manicured roadsides. State 
regulation has preserved much visual 
beauty. How easy it is to be against 
government once government has 
built the foundations for private de- 
velopment. culture and contentmenL 

California has indeed been an ex- 
emplar of what private initiative and 
imagination can do. from the days of 


the Gold Rush. It is also proof of the 
value of activist government. 

None of that argues for ignoring 
the problems of big government — 
bureaucracy, rigidities, encrusted ex- 
pectations. Professor Page Smith of 
the University of California at Santa 
Cruz, a leading historian of America, 
says strong governments have been 
essential to move the country ahead, 
but a period of reaction and trim- 
ming has always followed. 

Mr. Reagan is taking steps in his 
budget to remove encrustations. Lib- 
erals have to recognize that federal 
programs are not wise just because 
they have existed for years. 

But the Reagan budget is far more 
radical than that. Its premise really is 
that government spending is bad per 
se — domestic spending, that is. It 
doses its mind, and its heart, to the 


conditions or millions or Americans, 
their reliance on government for the 
infrastructure of existence and for 
their hope of upward mobility. 

The budget dismisses federal sup- 
port for mass transit, saying it "re- 
duces local incentives to make sound 
economic choices.” Only someone 
blithely ignorant of economic reali- 
ties in New York and Chicago and 
Boston, and of the consequences of 
continued mass transit decay, could 
make such a statement Only some- 
one who knows nothing about the 
straggles of the middle class would 
thinktha t a family earning more than 
532.500 a year is too nch to need 
federal college loan assistance. 

Mr. Reagan’s great strengths as a 
politician are the firmness of his be- 
liefs and his geniality. Both depend 
on a degree of blindness to history 
and to human realities. 

The New York Times. 


grievously expensive, m blood and 
money. The Japanese did not part 
easily even with. obscure Pacific 
a tolls. It was almost beyond imagin- 
ing, although not beyond feanng, 
what prodigies of bloodshed might be 
needed to achieve the “unconditional 
surrender" of the home islands. 

If Roosevelt and Churchill were 
overwhelmingly concerned -to pro- 
cure Stalin’s participation in that 
war, who now can blame them? They 
did not, and could not, foresee the 
role of the atomic bomb. Thj sugjcss- 
ful test at Alamogarddj-Ncw Means, 
was stHl six months away. 

Placing Yalta in that context may 
not excuse the miscalculations, if 
such they were, about Poland’s fu- 
ture. But this exercise in mere history 
does render it contemptible if not 
pointless to moralize about the out- 
come as if alternatives were obvious 
and to be easily seized. ! 

What alternatives were there? Per- 
haps to ■‘evoke” 

surrender" call, reaffirmed at Yaltar 
and seek a negotiated peace with Ja- 
pan? That, after Pearl Harbor? 

Or to send General George Patton 
bolting far beyond his supply base to 
Prague, or somewhere else in cental 
Europe? That, after the near fiasco in 
the Ardennes? What would Ameri- 
can opinion have said about send&g 
Americans to do what it seemed Rus- 
sians were doing well enough, andat 
incalculable cost of life, and even 
then perhaps to settle down as occu- 
pation armies in places most Ameri- 
cans had never even heard of? 

Poland, the main “victim” of Y^l- 
ta, has suffered under certain intrac- 
table historical conditions ever since 
Russia and Germany became power- 
ful. unified national states. The gif ted 
and tragic Poles had the geographical 
misfortune to occupy the great 
through which invaders must passun 
either direction, and thus are fated 
for the foreseeable future ahvays'to 
be a subject of more than passing 
political interest-in Moscow, - 

That it was within the power of 
Roosevelt and Churchill to toss aside 
all these sad conditions of history 4 pd 
circumstance is a fantastic theory. 
Besides, as Mr. Brzezinski argues, af- 
ter 40 years it is less essential,to 
debate bow Yalta happened than- to 
think how to begin to escape its dan- 
gerous legacy of European division. 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


Loners intended for pubMcatia\ 
should be addressed “Letters to the 
Editor” and must contain the writ' 
er’s signature, name and fuil ad- 
dress. Loners should be brief and , 
are subject to editing. We cannot .(fa 
be responsible for the return of “V 
unsolicited manuscripts. 


If 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


The Objective in Geneva 

The case of Zbigniew Brzezinski 
Robert Jasirow and Max Kampel- 
man for lhe Strategic Defense Initia- 
tive (Jan. 28) is convincing — except 
that it makes the primary assumption 
that the Russians, given the opportu- 
nity. would strike against the United 
Slates wjth nuclear weapons. Any nu- 
clear strike at whatever target would 
devastate large areas. Would the So- 
viet leaders risk U.S. retaliation? Can 
the world as we know it function if 
areas erf the United States, and the 
Soviet Union are nuclear wastelands? 
The insanity of a nuclear war could 
not benefit the Russian people. 

The major issue of our time is how 
to stop escalation of the nuclear arms 
race before it brings nuclear holo- 


caust. Let us hope the talks in Geneva 
are a first step toward a safer world. 

Yes, the SD1 sounds good. But 
would not some of those billions be 
better spent on helping the starving 
and the poor people of this Earth? 

ANTHONY CAVE. 

Troinex, Switzerland. 


A Prescription for Banks 


Rex Morgan is starting to look tike 
the U.S.-Soviet arms talks. A lot of 
people hover around, make veiled 
hints to each other, sigh a lot and 
then move on to somewhere else. 

Perhaps we should nominate the 
comic strip’s U-yeor-old Kenny as 
the West’s arms negotiator. He seems 
to be the only person in there who 
knows what he wants. 


JOHN PARRY. 
Geneva. 


Mortimer B. Zuckerraan’s opinion 
column ‘There Are Land Mutes Un- 
der America’s Big Banks” (Jan. 15) 
makes sound points about the weak- 
nesses of the banking system but 
stops short of stating tne specific ac- 
tion that would quickly restore banks 
to financial health: reducing or elimi- 
nating dividends to shareholders. ‘ 

In the Continental Illinois example 
that he dies, the board of directors 
had authorized, and the holding com- 
pany had paid, the most recent quar- 
terly dividend on its common stock 
when (he run began, and the Federal 
Deposit Insurance Corporation had 
to make a dividend prohibition a con- 
dition of the rescue package. 

Qiminaung common dividends for 


a period would result in re taine d 
earnings for a bank, and if its asset 

base were held flat over the same 
period would reduce its leverage by 
the same percentage. B ank managers 
who complain that they cannot raise 
new capital because their holding 
companies’ common-stock price ' r is 
below book value have overlooked 
the most obvious wav to raise equity 
retention of earnings. ' 
if bank managers are rductawyfr 
take su<m action (which would put 
pressure on the stock price), the Fed- 
oat Reserve should make elimina tion 
01 common dividends a condition of 
acoeM to the discount window, or 
rDIC should make it a condition jrf 

insurance of deposits. . 

THOMAS A. MeKAY.' 

New York. 



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U.S. Stocks 
Report, M-l, Page 10 



TECHNOLOGY 


Pohl Sees 


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Software W ould 'Remember’ 
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By DAVID E. SANGER 

For* Times Senior 

a ^“nian assistant to prepare a 

STmSL 1 SS^5^ and '^? ances arehcor Se^ouW 

J®®* “ an ? 00 «msa The report would not be sent 

2 5fcS3SS **“* 9^ 


»-« fcfcWTS* ’ifSS 

‘ ■ 'afCdKS?, S f ,£f £*??**? ^pon be amt to the 

b°^ the chamnan of the board and the company president, 

a ^ SOn ^ 9°?P uter *0 do the same job, and it would 
. nc ^j| 1 ® w ®}“* good judgment. The computer would dutifully 
Mkokte aU tire numbers that a is given, but it would not pester 

the Chicago office if its sales ^ 

figures were late. It would 
.make the final product look 
"nice, but it would not mai] u 
. .. out without prompting from a 
..y human. 

A Now, using techniques 
.-..drawn from artificial intelli- 
fee laboratories at a num- 
1 of major research universi- 


The aim is to 
knock some sense 
into otherwise 
mindless computers. 


I., ties, a host of companies are developing a new generation of 
. .personal computer programs, so-called smart software. The aim 
,'i.is to knock sane sense into otherwise mindless computers, 
*• getting them to understand — and perform auto mati cally — the 
’ - -'i?*sks thar individual users struggle each day not to form, 

:r «: *** Already, some of the efforts have attracted a flood of /enture 

• - . capital and, to the minds of some, false hopes for instant 

i -i progress. “Artificial intelligence could become the most abused 
i. industry 1 buzzword in 1985,” said Mitchell D. Knpor, q| 

‘■'-Lotus Development Corp. He spoke at Ed venture Holdings' 
■--<ed prJ TT^ ‘ l ‘r Personal Computer Forum in Phoenix last week. 

•^ccmT* y. h iS eed * ^sighted from the far-out in artificial 


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intelli gence is difficmlL The term embraces a whole range of 
*’ ^programming techniques, from “expert systems" that try to 
?; encode the technical knowledge of doctors or engineers in a 
- /computer program to “natural language interfaces” that *««*•» it 
possible for computer users to give instructions to computers in 
.' pl®in English — or plain French. Some are useful and some are 

I - . . ^experimental, but all try to mimic the human reasoning processes. 
t ] m Not surprisingly, most artificial intelligence efforts have been 

linuted to the university laboratory, using huge mainframes. But 
as personal computer users have become increasingly frustrated 
h-j-with the unwieldy nature of spreadsheets and data soft- 
ware bouses have begun to look for ways to make programs mold 
r ,r themselves to the habits of users. 

MONG the first was Microrim Corp., which last year began 
marketing a personal computer program called Clout that 
added natural language features to a data base 
hn which keeps complex lists. If a data base consists of a 
* i~ the nation’s 500 largest companies, with financial data f 
-m user of Clout could type the command: “Rank the top 
-p* industries by average growth and earnings per'share." 

The program would then b^in to pane die sentence, looking 
in its dictionary to discover that “rank” means “iistin. order” and 

II - ' that the term “average" connotes a specific mathematic al calmla- 

tion. Then it would sort each company by industry, determine the 
average growth and eamings per share for those industries, and 
/ ' produce the requested list 

“It’s just one application at the technique,” said Wayne 1. 
Erickson, Microrim's c hairman who says that Clout has sold “in 
*’•* ' the tens of thousands” of copaes since it was introduced 10 

mouths 3^0, — | | f ' , , -t . j , r „ - lr , 

-°' jrya ^r(intic^'irote tfiat plabeEngjhsh commands, while less in- 
timi dating than computer shorthand, produce a sugar-coated 
program. Tbe underlying software is unchanged: if the user 
; , forgets to issue a command, or does not ask the right question, the 
program wxD be easily led astray. Thus, the task now js to develop 


U.S. Debt 

Dollar Strength 9 
Deficit Blamed 

By Paul Lewis 

New York Times Service 

DAVOS, Switzerland — Kail 
Otto PShl, head of West Germany’s 
central bank, said Thursday that 
the United States faced a self-per- 
petuating crisis in its external fi- 
nances unless the dollar falls soon 
to reduce the huge U. S. trade and 
current-account deficits. 

Because the high dollar attracts 
imports and makes U. S. goods ex- 
pensive to seG overseas, the United 
States faces a record deficit of 
about SI 30 billion on its external 
payments this year, compared with 
5100 billion in 1984, Mr. Pbhl said. 

Mr. Pohl, the president of the 
Bundesbank, said the United 
States would probably have no dif- 
ficulty financing an external deficit 
of this size for a few more years by 
drawing in savings from the rest of 
the world, though it would need to 
keep interest rates high to do so. 

But be said the result would be a 
vast increase in the United States’ s 
foreign debt and in the interest 
payments that the United States 
will have to mak e to foreign holders 
of this debt. 

“The United States could be- 
come a permanent deficit country 
because of its growing debt-service 
burden,” he said at the annual busi- 
ness symposium organized by the 
European Management Forum, a 
Geneva-based business advisory 
group. “The United States might 
need to run a trade surplus of 530 
billion to 540 billion a year just to 
pay interest on its debt." 

Shortly before Mr. Pohl gave his 
warning, the deputy U. S. Treasury 
secretary, Robert T. McNamar, 
predicted (hat the dollar would re- 
main strong even if Congress cut 
the federal budget deficit this year 
and allowed interest rates to fall 

Mr. McNamar argued that the 
dollar was being kept high not by 
U. SL interest rates and the budget 
deficit but by a movement to invest 
in the United Slates that can only 
strengthen if the Reagan adminis- 
tration reduces the deficit. 



AKJubaO Petrochemical Co_, a Sable and Exxon joint 
venture, has produced polyethylene since late 1984. 


MtarltfwM* 
CapccHy 
in masons of 
mslrtctonm 
Total: 47.1 


The Saudi Petrochemical Boom 

Riyadh Moves 
To Ease Fears 
Of Global Glut 

By Danid F. Cuff 

Mew York Times Struct 

NEW YORK — The natural 
.gas that Saudi Arabians once 
wastef Lilly flared off as a byprod- 
uct of oil production now is be- 
ing harnessed and turned into 
petrochemicals. The Saudi 
dream of industrialization is 

coming true. 

But some analysts are suggest- 
ing that the dream may turn into 
a nightmar e for petrochemical 
producers elsewhere — with 
Dow Chemical Co.. Union Car- 
bide Corp., Du Pont Co. and the 
European and Japanese chemi- 
cal giants all feeling the effects. 

In picture-book communities 
and gleaming plant complexes 
that did not exist five years ago, 

Saudi Arabia (his year is starting 
up much of its output of prod- 
ucts with such names as ethanol 
methanol, polyethylene and 
polyvinyl chloride. 

Petrochemical products, made 
from oil as well as natural gas, 
end up as plastics and fibers in 
thousands of industrial and con- 
sumer uses, from do thing to 
antifreeze to plastic bags. New 
plants in Saudi Arabia, as well as 
in Mexico, Kuwait and Canada, 
are adding some 10 percent to 
world capacity. As a result, fears 
are being expressed that many 
existing petrochemical plants 
will not be around in five years as 
the extra output depresses prices. 

The Saudis, kemly aware of 
these fears; are trying to assuage 
them even before production 
starts in full. They are dispatch- 
ing representatives and hiring 
public relations experts to get 
their message out. 

One Saudi official, Abdul Aziz 
al-Jarbou. said: “Our intent is to 
engage in commerce in a profes- 
sional and an orderly, not dis- 
ruptive, manner to compete fair- 
ly, to cooperate and to realize 
profits for our effort" 

The Saudis stress that they are 
developing their petrochemical 
industry on a 50-50 ownership 
basis with such companies as Co- 
lanese Corp.. Exxon Corp., Mo- 
bil Corp„ Shell Chemical Co. 
and Texas Eastern Carp., as well 
as with Japanese and other in ter- 


The Nr- Vork Traci 


Ethylene 
Capacity and 

Demand 

1985 estimates In 
mfflons at metric tons 
(or UWs bufldJnfl block 
of many elastic 
products 


SouKicOMnSyrimitntf 
DaWBt and Company 


h mABonaof 
■natrtettma 
Total: MLS 



UnftedStalBs 






Western 



Europe^ 









-——Saudi—* - ' 

flest of the world 



national companies. And they 
contend that at full capacity they 
will be adding only 5 percent to 
world petrochemical output 

But many Western analysts re- 
main wary. 

“There’s the andem tale about 
the camel out in the cold who put 
his bead in the tent." said John P. 
Henry, a chemical- industry ana- 
lyst for EF. Hutton. “He likes it, 
and eventually the guy inside the 
lent is out in the cold.” 

PCter E Butler, an analyst at 
Paine Webber Inc* thinks that 
many WaD Street analysts who 
were not waned two years ago 
are now more concerned about 
the effect of Saudi capacity on 
companies in the United States. 

“It’s naive to expect that this 
stuff is just going to be sold in 
Japan," he said. “It’s going to 
upset worldwide markets." 

And Ananlha ICS. Raman, an 
industry analyst with his own 
firm in Parsippany, New Jersey, 
said the new Saudi products 


“will create disruptions in the 
marketplace for a couple of years 
without any question.” 

Mr. Raman thinks that the 
Saudis may not succeed in the 
long term. The cost of the new 
plants offsets the Saudi advan- 
tage on Taw materials, he be- 
lieves, and in three to five years 
“they’re going to find out' that 
they are losing money," be said. 
“My forecast is that some of 
there facilities are going to be left 
to bake in the sun.” 

But the U.S. petrochemical 
makers were hurting even before 
the new Saudi production. 

“The U.S. is already going 
through problems because of the 
high value of the dollar, declin- 
ing profit margins and low 
prices," said Joseph H. Posevina, 
a chemicals analyst at McGraw- 
Hill’s Data Resources Inc. 
“There's been a whole shake-up 
over the last two or three years, 
(Continued on Page 11 CoL 1) 


Phillips Rejects 
Icahn Bid, Alters 
Restructure Plan 


The AssaciuinJ Prn> 

NEW YORK — Phillips Petro- 
leum Co. rejecied Thursday the 
58. 1 -billion takeover bid from Carl 
C. Icahn. sweetened the terms of its 
proposed restructuring and pro- 
posed new defenses against hostile 
takeovers. 

Phillips said Thursday that, 
while it was not trying to attract a 
better offer and did not believe it 
could get the best price in a sale in 
the current oil market, it would not 
oppose any offer worth at least S9.6 
billion, or S62 a share in cash (or all 
shareholders. 

Mr. Icahn, a New York finan- 
cier, has offered S55 a share, half in 
cash and half in securities. 

Wednesday, at the deadline Mr. 
Icahn had set for a response to his 
offer, Phillips, based in Bartlesville, 
Oklahoma, announced that it had 
filed suit against Mr. Icahn and his 
Icahn Capital Corp. in U.S. Dis- 
trict Court in Tulsa, alleging viola- 
tions of securities law. 

Mr. Icahn had said he would 
take his offer directly to sharehold- 
ers if Phillips's board turned it 
down. The suit was an attempt to 
block Mr. Icahn from beginning 
such an offer, from soliciting share- 
holder support or from voting his 
7i million shares. 4.85 percent of 
Phillips's outstanding stock. 

Phillips alleged in the suit that 
Mr. Icahn did not file required 
proxy statements with the Securi- 
ties and Exchange Commission in 
connection with his takeover bid 
and in connection with his opposi- 
tion to Phillips's plans for restruc- 
turing. The suit also alleged that 
Mr. Icahn made “numerous false 
and misleading statements in con- 
nection with lhaL solicitation." 

Late Wednesday, U.S. District 
Judge H. Dale Cook issued a tem- 
porary order to block Mr. Icahn 
from taking legal action in the dis- 
pute in any other court. He sched- 
uled a healing For Tuesday. 

Phillips stock rose 25 cents to 
550 Thursday in extremely heavy 
New York Stock Exchange trading! 
More than six million of the com- 
pany's shares changed hands. 

Mr. Icahn is opposing a plan, 
submitted to Phillips shareholders 
for approval at a meeting Feb. 22, 


that calls for the repurchase of 38 
percent of the company's stock for 
securities with a face value or 560 a 
share. In addition, an employee 
stock plan would increase employ- 
ee ownership of Phillips to a con- 
trolling interest in the company. 

Phillips originally promised that 
if the restructuring was approved it 
would spend up to S I billion to buy 
its stock in the open market if the 
price of a share dropped below $50. 
It also promised to sell about 52 
billion worth or assets. 

Phillips said Thursday that it 
would amend its offer Instead of 
buying its stock back in the open 
market, it will offer 550 a share for 
20 million shares if the recapitaliza- 
tion plan is approved. 

It also said it would offer share- 
holders a dividend of one share of a 
new class of preferred stock with a 
face value of S3.32 for each remain- 
ing common share after the restruc- 
turing is approved. Each new share 
of common stock under the restruc- 
turing would be equivalent to 0A2 
■share of pre-restructuring stock. 

Mr. Icahn made his bid as an 
alternative to the original recapital- 
ization proposal which be called 
“grossly inadequate." He asked 
that the shareholder meeting be 
postponed so that stock owners 
could choose between Phillips's 
plan and his offer. 

Phillips's management agreed to 
seek shareholder approval of the 
restructuring as pari of the settle- 
ment it reached in late December to 
end a takeover bid by a group led 
by T. Boone Pickens! chairman of 
Mesa Petroleum Co. 

In an attempt to ward oft further 
takeover attempts, Phillips's board 
said Thursday that on Feb. 18 it 
would issue shareholders a condi- 
tional right to exchange each share 
of common stock for a one-year 
note redeemable at 562 a share and 
bearing 15 percent in interest. That 
option would expire if the restruc- 
turing were approved and would tie 
exercised only if a suitor acquired 
at least 30 percent of Phillips stock. 

A hostile suitor could avert the 
expense of redeeming those share- 
holder rights only by making a cash 
offer equal to or better than the 
terms of the rights, Phillips said. 


(Continued on Page 11, CoL 1) 


1985 Forecasts Mixed 
For Hong Kong Growth 


i 


Currency Rates 




] 


Low interbank nates on Feb.. 7 , exducfing fees. 

Official forings for Amsterdam, Brussels, Frankfurt, Mflon, Paris. New York rotas at 
4 P.M. 


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. 1 SDR 


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20.15 28U3 

USX Until 
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Dollar Values 

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*-'-0.1483 FlnMi meric 
■.. 0 O 0 M Stm* drachma 

gjg-ntt homKmi 

i st«runr.l.l«23 1 risn c 

‘/jn) CdmnMfcMfrnnc (M Amounts mwtaMo buy one pound id Amoonh needed to buv one dollar |-> 
, 'Units of 100 [*} Units of 1X00 (y) Units OMOXOO 
NA: no* ajato; HA.: not avaHabJa- . „ 

-. "sourcaf.- Banaue Hu Benelux (Brussels): Banco CommenAM IfatlanO (Milan); Brnmue 
NattanaM He Port) (Paris); IMP (SDR); Banaue Amt w el Internationale tflnvesttssement 
-i. 'ftflnar, rfyukdirftamj, Other Halo from rtmrterc and AP. 


S 

Boot*. UJJ 

04457 StaMMTOt 22135 

0XU5 S. African rand USB 

010012 S. Karooa woti 83640 
0X056 Sm.MSCfn 778.12 
8.1889 Swed krona 9.U 
MSS TnhmS 39.12 
0036 TMtwM 27771 
07723 UAf-dOtum 3X728 


i 


Interest Rates 


'iEnrocurrency Deposits 


By Dinah Lee 

International Herald Tribune 

HONG KONG — Hong Kong 
financial analysis are producing 
mixed forecasts this year, even 
though 1985 wiD be the colony’s 
first year since 1 980 without politi- 
cal uncertainty. 

Banks and brokers publishing 
their annual forecasts have weighed 
a number of factors, indiidtiig an 
expected slowdown in U.S. con- 
sumption of Hong Kong products, 
the degree to which China and Eu- 
rope can take up the slack, the 
likelihood of a real-estate recovery, 
higher wages and increased domes- 
tic consumption, rising, protection- 
ism and the continuing labor short- 
age. 

The most optimistic of four re- 
cent reports was that of Hongkong 
& Shanghai Banking Corp., which 
predicts that after four years of 
single-digit growth, Hong Kong 
will achieve a growth rale of 10 
percent this year in its gross domes- 
tic product, a measure of total do- 
mestic output of goods and ser- 
vices. 

The bank cited “prospects of a 
steady increase in trade, higher real 
wages, moderate inflation, in- 
creased investment in plant and 
machinery and the tendency of the 
economy to outperform initial 
forecasts." 

The forecast said, “Protection- 
Feb. 7 ism will remain a depressing threat. 


] 


Dollar 


D-Mark 


Swta 

Prone 


Start loo Franc ECU SDR 

14 ■ 14M 10 «k- 10*9 1049' 10*9 8H - 8*0 

1346.1319 I Ok.- UW 1019- 1019 B* - B*9 

1319- 1399 1099- 1099 10 99- 1«9 8V9 - Ctt 

1219- 13 11 - 11*9 10*9- TOW 8*9 ■ 819 

1219-13*9 1119-1119 10 - I0U. * -91 U 

Rates apnOcabte (a Interbank damans at St milium minimum (oroautvaienty rum** 

Sources: Morgan Guaranty ( donor. DM. SF. Pound. FF); Lloyds Bank (ECU), embank 
tSPRK 


w 

•* 

- 899 

6Ui 

- 616 

516 

- 5*1 

2M. 

B* 

- B99 

619 

- 619 

599 

■ 519 

3M. 

81k 

- 9 

M4 

- 6W 

599 

- 519 

—6M. 

9* 

- 916 

419 

■ 619 

514 

- 5* 

IY. 

9W 

- 999 

419 

- 6 99 

SV» 

- 5*9 


. ' -,T 


* . 


Asian Dollar Rates 


Feb. 7 


l mo. 
owi -aw 

Source: Reuter* 


a mo*. 

899 -899 


3 mot 
899 -899 


6 mo*. 
919 -9W 


1 year 
916 -919 


Ttey Money Rates 

United States 

. DEscntmt Roto 
*- Federal Funds 
l-jpnme Rom 
t-Brakor Loon Rate 
Canon. Pager. 30-179 day * 
^'hnonth Traawrv Bills 
> .frfnantti Treasury Bills 
3049 daw 
CD's 60-09 days 

-■ West Germany 

-'Lombord Rate 
tbveraloM Bate 
’One Month Interbank 
y^menth Interbank 
S-T7wrth interbank 

- iFrance 

1 'inter v ent i on Rale 
i-COII Money 
-j (One-month interbank 
, jmvyitft interbank 
‘4-moflfft Inta rbttt k 


Sources: Reuter*. Commerzbank, CfMt Ly- 
onnais. Lloyds Bank, Bank at Tokyo. 


CM* 

Pnw- 

B 

8 

aw 

8 3/16 

KM 

10W 


O-UWi 

135 

ate 

123 

an' 

ate 

ate 

7X5 

7X5 

7X7 

7X7 

6X0 

6X0 

4.10 

4.10 

5X0 

580 

4X5 

6X5 

6X0 

630 

10W 

low 

IBM 

10W 

10W 10 7/16 

18M 

UM 

I0U 

1016 


By! min 

Bonk Base Rate 
Call Money 
91-dav Treasury BUI 
3-nronth interbank 

Japan 

Discount Rote 
Cod Money 
today interbank 


Close Prer. 


M 

14 

13 

13V» 


14 

13*9 

13 

13*9 


5 5 
6 3/16 6 3/16 
6 7/16 619 


Gold Prices 


] 


Hano Km 
UnenMai 
Pari* I12X Utol 
Zurich 
London 
New York 


AJWL 
302X5 
30255 
mi tg 

302X5 

332X0 


PAL 

MWAH 

30134 

301X5 

301X5 

29970 


aroe 

— 0X5 

— 0X0 

+ ox* 

— 1X0 
-170 
-159 


Official firings lor London. Pan* and Luarn- 
tcuro-oorainli cloUnc orlcn tor non© Kano 
ami Zurich. Mew York Come* currant contract 
AU artee* In UXX ner ounce. 

Source: Rooters. 


Dollars Again 
Makes Gains 
AsGoldFaUs 

United Press International 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
rose again on Thursday, and 
dealers said it would lake an 
extensive; concerted effort by 
central banks to push it down. 
Gold felL 

“The market is going to keep 
pushing the dollar up until the 
central banks knock it down,” 
said Eari Johnson, vice presi- 
dent at Chicago's Harris Bank. 

Treasury Secretary lames A. 
Baker, answering questions be- 
fore the House Appropriations 
Committee, said U.S. policy re- 
mains one of intervention only 
when conditions are disorderly, 
consistent with maintaining 
good relations with U-S. trading 
partners. 

In late New York trading, the 
dollar rose to 3243 Deutsche 
marks from 322S5 on Wednes- 
day and rose to 9.909 French 
francs from 9.855 the day be- 
fore. The pound, however, 
strengthened to S1.I125 from 
$UJ22on Wednesday. 


but most knitwear manufacturers 
have bought or are in the progress 
of installing new equipment in their 
Hong Kong factories to cope with 
new certificale-of-origin rules.” 

This week, however, the chief ex- 
ecutive of Laws Fashion Knitters, 
Lawrence Mills, said fewer than 
half a dozen of Hong Kong’s textile 
producers could afford the expen- 
sive, computerized machinery 
needed to replace the estimated 
60,000 workers in China whom 
Hong Kong exporters can no long- 
er use under the U-S. counuy-of- 
origjn rates that went into effect 
last Tall. 

The rules redefine “country of 
origin” to keep textile-producing 
countries from getting around U.S. 
quotas by sending products to be 
finished in third countries. 

Mr. Mills said the future of most 
medium-sized textile companies, 
the backbone of Hong Kong’s larg- 
est industry, binged on the current 
talks in Washington about those 
rules. 

Hongkong & Shanghai also saw 
signs of improvement in the real 
estate market- Its report said the 
supply of residential apartments in 
1985 would be larger than last 
year’s, but added that “this is ex- 
pected to be absorbed without any 
pressure on property prices." 

Wardley Investment Services, 
part of the merchant bank Wardley 
Ltd., was more conservative, pre- 
dicting that real growth in GDP 
wonkf differ little from the rate of 8 
to 9 percent estimated Tor 1984. 
Wardley forecast that higher do- 
mestic demand would partly offset 
an expected loss of momentum in 
exports, particularly to the United 
Suites. The report noted that, onw 
August, China has beat the largest 
market far Hong Kong exports af- 
ter the United Stales. 

Wardley analysts warned that 
“neither China . nor Europe can 
make up for the inevitable slack in 
domestic exports resulting from the 
U.S. slowdown. In tire first 11 
months of 1984, the value of do- 
mestic exports to China rose 78.S 
percent from a year earlier, but 
nonetheless accounted for only 75 
percent of local meaxhandise sales 
abroad, a far cry from the 45.2 
percent represented by domestic 
exports to the U. S." 

Wardley was also less optimistic 
about protectionism. “On tire basis 
of U. S. restrictions on textile im- 
ports announced during the second 
half of 1984, some 5 percent of the 
indue of domestic exports will lace 
additional restraints in 1985,” it 
said. “Negotiations with Washing- 
ton should not raise high hopes for 
a repeal or diminution" of the new 
textile rales. 

Garments and textiles account 
for more than 40 percent of Hong 
Kong manufactured goods, with 

(Continued on Page 15, CoL 5) 



For the man with exceptional goals, 
anew dimension in banking services. 


TTThat makes Trade Develop- 
VYment Bank exceptional ? To 
start with, there is our policy of 
concentrating on things we do 
unusually well. For example, 
trade ana. export financing, 
foreign exchange and banknotes, 
money market transactions and 
precious metals. 

Equally important, we are 
now even better placed to serve 
your needs, wherevej you do 
feusiness. Reason: We have 
recently joined American Express 
International Banking Corpora- 


tion, with its 89 offices in 39 
countries, to bring you a whole 
new dimension in banking ser- 
vices. 

While we move fast in serv- 
ing our clients, we’re distinctly 
traditionalist in our basic poli- 
cies. At the heart of our business 
is the maintenance of a strong 
and diversified deposit base. Our 
portfolio of assets is also well- 
diversified, 2 nd it is a point of 
principle with us to keep a con- 
servative ratio of capital to 
deposits and a high degree of 


liquidity-sensible strategies in 
these uncertain times. 

If TDB sounds like the sort 
of bank you would entrust 
with your business, get in touch 
with us soon. 

TDB banks in Geneva, London, Paris, 
Luxembourg . Chiasso, Monte Carlo, 
Nassau, Zurich. 

TDB is a number of the American 
Express Company, which has assets of 
US$ 62.8 billion and shareholders' 
equity of US$ 44 billion. 



Hade Development Bank 


Shown ar left, the bead office 
of Trade Development Bank, Geneva.' 


An American Express Company 


3ESS 









Pi 

T~ 

IT 

TT 

ST 

ST 


15 

16 

17 

18 

28 

22 

23 

25 

28 

28 

32 

34 

38 

37 

35 

39 

46 

41 

42 

43 
45 

47 


& 

Ui 

or 

io 

c 


L 


YB 


ai< 

Bo 

Be 

Be 

Br 

Be 

Bo 

Co 

Co 

Dt 

EC 

FI. 

Fr 

a* 

Hi 

IH 

La 

U 

La 

M 


HJ 

Ol 

PC 

Pr 

Br 

Ri 

» 

St 

VI 

VI 

w- 

Xu 

N 

At 

at 

Dt 

JO 

Tl 


Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 1 


VbL HM Low Lott Ckag 


PhllPM 

68918 SOM 

49ft 

50M 








98309 21% 

21% 



Kmart 

26030 M 

36% 



AafaiLf 


41 



CIGNA 


47 

47 


Tames 


37ft 

3B% 

+ ft 

MorLvn 

l... 1 i 

35 

35% 

+ ft 

AMR 

12608 37% 

36% 

35ft 

+ ft 

Tandv 

11484 33* 

31% 

3 J* 

+1% 


1 1 ; KPl 

45% 

45% 

+ ft 

LTV 


12* 


+ ft 

Houlnd 

T073B 23% 

22ft 

23% 

+ % 

IBM 

10570 137% 

lMft 

137% 

+1* 

Control 

10438 23ft 

73 

23ft 


I Dow Jones Averages I 

Opea hm Low lot Ctaoo 

Indus tzssx im7jm U79ja man +. ms 
T rans 61B.14 63DJW 6UJB «A2 2+ 9M 
Util MOM 15142 14936 15175+ 077 
Comp 521 33 50737 519X 53479 + 4J3 


NYSE index 


Comooslle 
Industrials 
Tran®. 
..minim 
I JFMance 


HM low Close cove 
10530 104.78 105.1# +C78 
12174 saup ib.m +«“ 

10132 100.W 1Q1X +0.« 
S1S1 5334 53.51 + 846 
110J3 11074 11073 +047 


NYSE Diaries 


Advanced 
Declined 
Undamd 
Total Issuos 

How HUjhs 
New Lows 
Volume up 
V olume dawn 


1119 W4 
5A3 «N 
349 413 

2X7 

» 228 

102415X0 

36J343U 


1 Odd-Lot Trading in N.yTI 


Fee. 6 , 
Fob. 5 
Feb. 4 . 
FctLl . 
Jan. 31 . 


'Included m the rales figures 



12 Month 
High Low Stock 


Sis. c itn e 

Dlv. Yld. PE WBsHhm LowQuot.OiVe 


23% MU AAR 
26 9ft ACS 
12ft AMCA 
17ft 1M AMF 
29U 24% AMR 
20ft 18% AMRpf 218 ltu 
am 27% AMR pf 2.12B SB 


2Sft 29ft ANRpf 
MU. Bft APL 

r 44* A5A 
16 AVX 
48ft 36ft AbtLob 


A 21 II HI 
o m 
IX 04 21 

JO 12 aa 343 
amoa 
40 
23 


3 54 

U0 6J0 SOS 
J2 13 15 *24 
IX 2J 14 2371 


an 


32b 03 12 30 

2.1 1*124 29 

X IS 9 31 

~ M a a?s 

.13 1.1 294 

13 366 
364 64 3424327 
SJTWOd 15 


25ft 16ft AccflWds 44 13 20 
24ft 12ft AcmoC 40 02 
lift 8% AcmaE 
17ft 13 Ada Ex 
lBft lift AdmMl 
19ft 8ft Mhrflvs 
41ft 25ft AMO 
12ft 6ft Advest 
12ft 8ft AnTtax 
42ft 27ft ABtnU 
58* SZH AttLnt 
32ft 15ft Ahmns 
4ft 7ft Aileen 

8 36ft AlrPrd 
13 AlrbFri 
2 ft AIMeas 
31ft 26ft AJaP pfA 352 126 
7ft 6 AtaPArf 67 116 
102 85ft AlaP pf IIjOB 1U 
47ft 57 AtaPpf 8.16 11 7 
13ft 10ft AtoOKfl 32 72 
18ft 9ft AbkAfr .14 
2*ft 15ft AHMTtD 
29ft 22ft AKitsm 


20ft 20ft 2Bft + ft 
16ft 15ft 16 + ft 

15ft 15ft 15ft + ft 
15ft 15ft 15ft 
37ft 36ft 36ft + ft 
20ft 19ft 20ft + U> 
37 36ft 36ft + ft 
25ft 25ft 33ft + ft 
lift lift llft+ ft 
51ft 50ft 50ft— ft 
25ft 24ft 24ft— ft 
47ft 47 47ft- ft 

2Sft 2S 25% 

19 18% 10ft— ft 

10ft 10ft 10ft— ft 

16ft 16ft 16ft 

17ft T7ft + ft 


17ft 1 

12ft 12ft 12ft + ft 
35ft 34ft 34ft + ft 
II 10ft 11 + ft 

15ft 13ft 13ft + ft 
42 41 41ft— ft 

. 55ft 59ft 55ft + ft 
1J2D 4.1 17 709 30 29ft 29ft— % 
31 305 3ft 3ft 3ft + % 

130 2-5 11 2314 4Bft 48ft TO* 

60 26 13 350 23ft 2Z% 23 + ft 

77 91 1ft 1ft 1ft + ft 

7 31% 31ft 31ft + ft 
31 7ft 7ft 7ft 
50z 99ft 99ft 99ft— 1% 
9240T 68% 67ft 68ft + ft 
S 5 12ft 12ft 12ft 
9 1256 18ft I8ft 18ft + ft 
24% 34% 24% — ft 
29% 28% 29%+ % 


64 22 20 17 

X 23 12 1538 


Xft 23% Alcan 130 39 12 1782 31ft 30ft 31 + ft 

35ft 27ft aESw 120 33 12 164 36 Mft 36 + % 

29 17 AlexAlx 160 15 low 29 28ft VPt 

20% 18ft AhMdr 26 M 23% 23ft 23%+ ft 

S% 62% AUoCp 2661 26 9 112 84% «% 83% +1 

26ft 23 AloCppf 266 1L3 3 25ft 25ft 25ft 

Wh TO* AtalS 140 49 30 US W RH TOft + ft 

22ft 15% Alain Pf 219 116 W 19ft 19ft »9%— % 

93ft 81 AlalpfClLM 120 34 94ft 93% 94ft + ft 

30 24ft AllaPw 270 93 8 592 29ft 29 29 

33ft 15ft AHenO 60C32 1II03 « J#5 Jf* * 

29% 28% AJktCps 160 46 9 2818 39ft 38ft 39M + ft 


62ft 53ft AMCPpf 674 116 
110% 99 AMCppfl260 116 
107% TOO* AkfCpf 1249*126 
23% 10% AlWPd 
56% 38 AlldStr 112 46 
1«% 5ft AlllSCh 
39% 24 AHsCpf IS 

26ft 20 ALLTL IJ4 6J 9 2SC 
2S% 20ft AlPhPr 40e 17 19 1 

43 30ft Alcoa 1-20 22 12 2566 

27ft 15% Amax 60 1.1 1002 

48% 32ft Amax pf 360 86 5 

34ft 22ft ArnHes 1.10 39 14 5814 

2ft 1% AmAgr 
19% 14ft ABoKr 
65ft SZft ABrond 
77% 50% ABdCSt 

a 19% ABldM 
17ft ABusPr 

55ft 40ft AmCan _. . .. 

24% 21% ACPI Pf 260 116 

48 36 AConpf 360 66 

109 103 A Conor 13J5 126 

19<ft 16ft ACUpBd Z20 114 

33ft 25ft ACapCv 6564016 
13ft 6% ACanlC 
56% 42% ACyan 
29ft 18ft ADT 
31ft ISft AElPw 
43% 25 Am Exp 
28ft 13ft AFanKl 
30ft 19ft AGnCP 
HM 5ft AGtt wl 
57 51ft AGnlRfA Altai 13 
82% 57% AGnl pfB 5.95* 73 


11 79 

3J0 6.1 9 439 
1 X £4 10 2330 
66 XS 11 32 

.56 24 M 22 
268 56 11 565 
6 
41 
1 ' 
99 
26 

4 244 
36 12 2711 
36 25 611 


L90 

32 


43ft AGnipf 3-25 
39% AGflPfD 264 


LlSSSS 

56ft 46ft AHam* 
38% 25% AHOSP 
80% 6Zft Amrtaft 
7B 50ft AlnGrp 
28ft 18% AMI 


64b 26 12 401 
JO 36 11 5957 
103? 

43 
1692 


56 


2J0 

1.12 


13 
3481 
34 13 6 

18 

SJ 12 M2 
36 10 4415 

76 B 1223 

44 6 17 1824 

- . 72 11 13 3062 

3% AmMoT 1433 

44% 27ft AN1R9 B 262 52 I 900 

399k 22% APreskl 74 1 17 5 3613 

13ft 9 A5LFto 8 96 

18ft 15 ASLFI pf 2.19 111 44 

Id 10 AStifp M S3 16 1406 

35ft 22ft AmSM T60 47 11 633 

23% 15ft ASterll IS 7 

50% 26% AmSIar 64 1 J 10 773 

62 46% AStrptA 468 7.1 II 

53ft 51 ASlTPfB 660 127 43 

22% 14ft AT&T 170 S6 1728337 

37 30% ATfcTpf 364 96 ~ 

37ft 31% ATITpf 374 106 

42% 27% AWatr 260 46 7 

51 35 AWatpf 143 27 

12 io AWaipt 165 mv 

20% Am Hot! 248 96 11 

53% ATrPr 565* S6 

4% ATrflc 

76 58% ATrlln 565* 76 

33% 26ft Amaran 160 57 I 

32ft 17 AflMSOS 70 6 17 

89% 60 Amos Of 562 57 
29% 21ft AmeMc 60 28 15 

29 IBM AmtOC 

17ft 10ft Amine 
38% 26ft AMPS 
24 14% Ampco 

Zlft 12% Amrops 
20% 19 AmSth 
31ft 25ft Amsted 

5ft 1ft Anacmp 

30 19ft Analogs 
31ft 19% Anchor 
36ft 24ft AnOav 
lift 9% AndrtJr 
5% 16% Anpelk 
7*% 53ft Anheus 
57% 44 Anheupf 360 
22ft 13% Antxtr 78 
ISft Bft Anthem 64 
15% 10% Anmny 

9% Apache 


r 


3ft % APChPwt __ 

20% 15ft ApchPun2ffibll6 540 
31ft 27% ApPwuf 4.18 125 2 

29% 26 ApPwpf 360 121 4 

39 17ft ApIDta 1.121 29 21 1252 
21% 8 APPfMO 1.141 87196 421 
a 15ft ArchOn ,14b 7 IS 2058 
22ft 14ft ArtzPS 260 120 7 600 
g% 71 AflP Of HLSlelZO 
29% 33 ArIPp# 251 126 


13ft ArfcBet 
24% M Artda 168 
.Jt ft ArfnRJ 
13% 9ft Armada 
21% 9 Armce 
30% 18 Armcpf 2.10 
23ft 15ft ArmiR S 48 
aft 22% ArmWIn 170 


91 61% 61 61% + % 

52 M5%105%1Q» + ft 
4 104% 104ft 104%+ % 
224 72 21% 22 + ft 

9 134* Sift SM. 53ft + % 
757 9U 8ft Bft— ft 
33ft 31ft 33ft— ft 
27 26% 26%+ % 

23 a a 

37% 37% 37% — ft 
18% 17ft 18 + % 

35 35 35 +1* 

28ft a 28ft 
2ft l*k 3%+ft 
19ft 19% 19ft 
64ft 63% 64% + ft 
67ft 66% 65ft— % 
24ft 24 24ft + % 
23% a 23%+ % 
52% 51% S2 + % 
23% 2Mk 23% + ft 
45% 45ft 45ft + ft 
W 109 109 + ft 
19ft 19ft 19ft + ft 
30% » 3m 
10ft 9ft io% + % 
54ft 51 53ft— IV. 

— 25ft 24ft 25ft + ft 

2660707 6 2315 21ft 21 21% 

178 36 IS 7113 43ft 42ft 43% + ft 
27ft 2Sft 27% +lft 
30% 29ft 30ft— ft 
10ft 10% 10% 

55 54ft 54ft + % 

82% B2 82% — ft 
67 65% 65% — ft 

61 59% 60% — ft 

81ft 31% 31ft— ft 

Oft 9% 9% 

56 55% 55% + % 
31ft 31% 3I%— % 
80ft 79% BOft + ft 
76% 75ft 76 —ft 

a 2i% a + % 

4 3% 3ft— ft 

42ft 42% 43%+ % 
43 40M 42% +2ft 

12% 12 12% + ft 

18ft 17ft IBM— M 
15 14 15 +J 

32ft 32% SZft— ft 
22% 22ft 2ZM 
50 49ft 49ft + % 
61ft 61ft 61% 

37 ft 36ft 37ft + ft 
37ft 37% 37%—% 
42 40% 42 +Tft 

S3 53 +1% 
11 % + % 

:.is 

ns 

90% +1% 
28ft + ft 

2m m 

7 189 15% 14ft 15% + % 
72 341 20 5630 36% 35ft 36% + ft 
JO 17 50 126 17ft J7ft T7ft + % 

- - 15% t5% 15% 

2BM 20% 20ft + % 
37ft 37ft 37ft— % 
3ft 3% 3ft + % 
a 27% a + ft 
H 24ft 24ft 24% 

62 36% 36% 36% 

37 lift lift lift 
20 19 a — % 

75 73ft 73ft— % 
a 54% 54ft + % 
19 lift 19 + % 
16ft 15% M% + ft 
13ft lift 13ft + % 
lift 11^ 11% + % 

IBM 17ft 18% + ft 

29M 29 29 

39% 37ft 3B 
14% 13% 13ft + % 
21% 21% 21%— % 
21ft 21% 21% + % 
13900* 87% 05 87% +1% 

3 28% 28% am— % 



37 

160 47 ■ 90 

160 43 13 157 
5510 
X 217 
56 X 
27 17 
17 X 

26 12 775 

27 10 1489 

64 153 

UO 28 

3 16 484 
6*32 7 72 

26 12 7004 


168 

1J2 

3D 

M 

260 


34 29% ArmWpf375 116 

31% 18ft AroCp IX 31 
XU 13% ArawE 30 12 
22 16 Artra 32 1.1 

29% 14 Arvln s 
54% 34ft Arvln pf 260 3J 
34% 17ft Aeorco 
29% 20ft AbMOU 140 54 
42% 33ft AWUQpf 4J0 186 
*% 31% AlMOpr 375 103 
51% 45% AsdDG 240 44 
25ft 18ft AINenO 148 
25% 19ft AtCvEI 268 
52% 40ft AH Rich 360 
125 97 AMRcpf 260 

20 lift AtlOSCP 
2M 18ft MM f 22 
45ft 29% AutoOl 42 
|B% at AvooCp 
99% 53 AvCO Pf 
a 15ft AVEMC 40 
38ft a Averv 40 
IS 10 AvtaH n 
41 27 Avne* JO 

25ft 19% Avon 260 
39 IS AVdHl 


16 9 IIP 22% 21% 2Z%— ft 

“ 17 *8! *1 

X 12 - “ — 

SIX 
9J 198 

u t a 

32 10 565 


1M 

45 

sta 

a 


12 lift lift— % 
lift 11% 11% + M 
a% a% 22 %+ % 

23% 23ft a + % 
37% 39 37%+% 

20* 34 34 34 

92 31ft 31% 31%+ % 
15% M% 14% — % 
21 X% 20% — % 
22% 21ft 22% + ft 
51% 51% 53% +1W 
430 a 21ft 21ft 

349 » 28ft 20ft— % 

215 41% 41% 41ft— % 

34 3M 30% 38%+ ft 
._ 9 835 57% 57 57% — % 

TO 11 6 a 22ft 22ft— ft 

97 0 79 25% 24ft 25ft + % 

AS 21 4773 46 «% 45 + % 

24 2 109 109 109 + % 

33 14ft M% 14ft + % 
16 15 SX 23 22% 22ft— % 

14X24% 45% 44ft 45 — % 
10 5 49% 49% 49ft— % 

1 90ft 9Rft 9Sft 
14 


24 12 


22ft 22ft 22ft— % 


17 16 366 39% 38% X + ft 
‘ pt% 121b + % 


7 510 
16 17 3173 
02 11 869 
11 121 


12ft „. . _ 

37ft 36% 35% — ft 
2m 22ft a + % 
26ft 26% X% + ft 


B 


10% BMC 
18ft Holmes 
15 BferlnM 
18% Batdor 
ft vIBaldU 
2 BHUpt 
28% BflfKb 
11% Bally Ml 
7% BairvPk 
30% BattSE 
36% Balt PfB 
20ft BncOne 
3ft BwTec 


68 36 15 
JO 16 13 
72 56 16 
65 14 15 


IX 24 12 
X 16175 

19 U 7 
4J0 103 
1.10 17 10 


43 BIlBakPf 5,13* 97 
26% BkNY 264 54 6 
15ft BnkVa s IX 18 9 
14% BnfcAm 1-53 77 10 
40 BKAm Of S31BI26 
66 BKAm Pf 863*126 
11% BkAmpf 268 
22ft BkARIy 260 76 V 
37ft BonkTr 270 42 7 
19% BkTrpf 3-58 HU 
7% Banner 63* J If 
19 Bard 64 16 11 
18 BomCp m 36 7 
32% Bamst 16* 26 V 
33 Band Pf 267* 46 
19% Barvwr 40 21 17 
8ft BASIX 63b 16 12 
17% Bausch 78 26 T7 
lift BaxtTr 63 26 » 
16ft Bay Fin 70* 6 Zl 
19% BaySIG 240 9.1 8 
28ft Bearing IX V 12 
24% BPBtCO 170 57 9 
46% Boat pi 368 66 
- - 160 24 IS 


30% 

34% 

23ft 

,2ft 

€ 

19ft 

41ft 


47% 

i 

r 

32% 

23% 

12 % 

33ft 

34% 

48% 

b 

is 

IS* 

2* 


12 4 

10% 9% Baker ef IX 156 
18% CM BeldnH 60 25 9 

30% 19% BeJBwl X 17 14 

X 19% BelHwPt 47 23 

B3 A* BsflAtl *60 76 B 

38ft 22ft BCE a 26S 

X% 19% Behind X 13 13 

35ft 27% Bel ISO I 2*0 76 8 

. 50% 35ft SetoAH X 16 20 

28% 20% Bombs IX U 11 

X 73 Bndxot 464 45 

37% 2S BerifCP 200 56 10 

35% 30% Benefpt 4X 117 

37% 32 Beaefpf 4jo ns 

28ft 17 Benefof 250 126 .. 

8% 3% BenotB .15* 36 It 

16% 7% BeroEn 10 

6% 3% Bertey 13 

17% 10% BestPd M 16 14 

X* 14% BelMfl 60 1.9 

59% 37% BeHtSfpfJOO m 

X% IBM BethSf pf 2J0 HU 

36ft 19% Beverly 32 3 20 

24% 10% BiOTHr X 34 17 

26ft 17% BlaekD 44 25 13 

29% X BkfcHP IX 57 I 

40 U% BWrJn J5 25 12 

50ft 37 BICUHR 240 46 13 

54% 35% Boeing 160 23 0 

44ft 32% BettoC IX 43 X 

55% 46 BabeCpf560 07 _ 

am ISft B attger m a x 

70% 49ft Bordwi 272 46 JO 

am 16ft BoraWd .92 36 11 

8% 4% Bermns 
35% 24ft BOsEd 364 96 7 

75 53 BosEof OX 120 

(Oft 9 BaiEpr 1.17 11.1 

IS* 10% SasEpr 166 116 

2$% 14ft Bowfrn X 36 9 


i Kft 12%+ % 
34% 34ft + % 
i 17% 17% + U 
i Zlft 22% + ft 
i 1ft 1ft + % 
i t 6% + % 
i 48 ft 4Sft- ft 
l 13ft M — % 
i 10ft 10ft 
i 39ft 39ft + % 

r -OV. 43% 

I 29% Z7%+ % 
r +ft Jft+ % 
i 59ft 50%— M 
i 47 47% — ft 

i 31% 51ft + ft 
i 37ft X — ft 
X 24 V. + % 
i 19% 19ft + % 

I 43% 43%— % 

1S% 15%— % 
I 32% 32% + % 

f as —ft 
34 +1% 
llft+ % 
24% 24% 

23ft 23ft— % 

I 47ft 48% + % 

r 5D +1% 
28% +1% 

> 12% 12ft— % 
27% X + % 

: i«k wft + % 
am am— % 

I 28% 28ft + M 
> 34ft 37%+ % 
28ft 29% + Mr 
53ft 54%+ % 
46 4*4* + ft 

7% 7%— % 
ISft Wft— % 
15% 15ft + ft 
29 29ft + % 
29 XH6+1 

m% 81ft + % 
27% Z7%— ft 
X 24ft + % 
35% 35ft+ ft 
49% 49% — ft 
27ft 27ft 
80% 89% +1% 
37 J7% + % 

35% X + ft 

x at + % 

X 20% 

4% 4% 

W 16% 

4ft 5 + % 
13% 13%+% 
20ft 21 +% 

47% 4714 + % 
23% 23ft + % 
39% 15% + ft 
23% 23% 

25% X +ft 
Z7% 27ft + ft 
21% 22ft + % 
49ft 49% 

51ft 52% +1% 
43ft 44 +1ft 
S% » + H 
29% XM+l 
67 47ft+ ft 

34% 34ft— % 
5% 6% 

35% 35%+ ft 
73% 74 — 1 
W% »%+% 
12ft 17ft- % 
23% 74 +ft 


N. Y. Stocks Sharply Higher 




United Press International 

NEW YORK — Prices} on t be New York 
Stock Exchange swept higher on a ride of heavy 
volume Thursday, with several averages again 
hilling record highs. 

The Dow Jones industrial average jumped 
9.49 to 1,290.08. The Daw Jones transportation 
average rose 9.08 to a record of 626.22. The old 
mark was seL Tuesday. 

Advances outpaced declines by a 2-1 ratio. 
Volume was 151.7 million shares, up from the 
141 milli on traded Wednesday. 

The Dow industrials were just below their 
record high of 1.292.62 set Jan. 29. 

It was the third day in a row that volume has 
exceeded 140 million shar es. Daily volume has 
topped 100 milli on shares for 21 consecutive 
sessions. 

Thomas Ryan of Kidder. Peabody said indi- 
vidual investors and international investors 
have participated in the recent binge on Wall 
Street, swelling the volume and pushing prices 
higher. He noted that individual investors were 
relatively inactive during 1984. 

Mr. Ryan attributed the market's gains to the 
belief by investors “that a lucky combination of 
low inflation and impressive growth" will con- 
tinue in 1985, without putting upward pressure 
on interest rates. He said there were “no sur- 
prises" in President Ronald Reagan's Slate of 
the Union address and the stock market took it 
welL 

The president said he will pursue tax reform 
legislation this year. He said his goal will be tax 
simplification similar to Treasury Department 
proposals announced late last year. 

Peter Fumiss of Shearson Lehman/ Ameri- 


M-l Falls $1.9 billion 

United Press Internationa/ 

NEW YORK — The narrowest measure of 
the UJ5. money supply, known as M-l, fell 51 
billion in the latest week. 

Hie money supply is still above the upper 
limits of the Federal Reserve’s 4-to-7-percent 
growth targets. M-l is a measure of money 
supply that includes currency in circulation, 
travelers checks and checking deposits at finan- 
cial institutions. 


can Express said the stock market had broken 
into a new trading range with 1,240 defining the 
bottom. 

Mr. Fumiss said the new top for the trading 
range probably will be around 1 ,325 on the 
Dow, with institutional investors likely to sell 
when the Dew works itself to that level 

Phillips Petroleum was the most active 
NYSE-listed issue, up V* to 50. Phillips' board 
rejected an offer by Carl C. I calm and an 
nounced some modifications in its recapitalize 
tion plan, designed to make it more attractive to 


stockholders. 

Unocal was second, rising lii to 47%. The 
company has been mentioned as a possible 
takeover candidate. 

AT&T was third among the actives, adding 
to 2114- 

Other oil issues finned with Exxon rising V* to 
4644, Sun Co. Vt to 49%, Ohio Standard % to 
44%, Atlantic Richfield V4 to 46 and Chevron VS 
to 3414. 


17 Month 
HI ji Law 


Modi 


Sis. close 

Dfv. Yld. PE lOOsHlah Law Quo*- orae 


31% 25% 
55% 41 
5% 3% 
X 21% 
15% 9% 
6ft 2ft 
20 14% 

35% X 
23ft T9M 
33% X 
25% 13 
22% 2Zft 
42% 26% 
39% 23ft 
39ft 25% 
17% 12 
22% 13% 
17% 15% 
21% 14% 
32% X 
57% 35 
21% 19 
50ft 44% 
19 12ft 
65% 44% 
20ft 17% 
12 3ft 
15 10% 


BrtBSt M0 S3 
BrtatM M0 37 
BrtTLnd 

BrftPt lXe 73 
BrffToe 


TJ2 66 
112 8 3 
247 10-7 
195 127 
30 7 

1J* 4J 
IX 26 
LOO IS 
M 17 
44 36 
60 4J 
216 12J 

IX 57 
IX 25 
212 107 
S40e1L2 
64 46 
260 47 
J2 26 


Brcfcwv 

BfevUO 

BktIGpf 

BKUGof 

Bwn5t> 

BrwnGa 

BnwiF 

Brnswfc 

BrUiWs 

Bucy£r 

Bundy 

BunkrtH 

Burma 

Bunind 

BrlNth 

BriNpf 

bun of 

Bumdy 

Burrell 
Butlrln 
Buttes 
Bates pf 


210 19.1 


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16 3633 
46 

6 443 
1355 

307 

as H4 

B 32 
3 
115 
8 33 

11 235 
16 982 
f 965 
» IX 
St IX 

7 49 
16 

11 783 

21 1395 

8 1793 

2 

610 

15 349 

12 2390 

IMS 

27 

27 


31 X 
55 54% 

4% 4% 
34% X% 
14 13ft 
4 3ft 
19ft 19% 
35% 36% 

as as 
31% 31 
34ft 34% 
29ft 79 
42% 41% 
39ft 38% 
38% 38% 
14% 14ft 
18 17ft 
17ft 17% 
16% ISft 
28ft 27% 
57% 56% 
20ft 20% 
49ft 49ft 
17ft 17% 
63ft 62% 
30% 19% 
5% 4ft 
11% 10% 


31 + ft 
55 +1 
4ft + % 
24%+ ft 
13%+ % 
3% 

19% — % 
36%+ % 
23 + % 

31%—% 
»%— % 
as —ft 
a + % 
39% +1% 
30%+ % 
14ft— % 
17ft— % 
17% 

16 + % 
X — % 
57%+ % 
30ft + % 
49% 

17%—% 
42ft— ft 
30% + % 
S 
11 


140a 56 11 IX 
360 36 10 1693 
14 X 
260 5J 20213*3 
273 97 


170011.4 X 
SA ID 2607 

Min 

174 37 8 6995 
IX 26 IS 382 
351 
119 


92 


as io 
15 
4 


33% MM CBI In 
87ft 61% CBS 
9ft 4% CCX 
X 27 CIGNA 
39ft 33ft CIGof 
8% 4ft CLC 
40% 21 CNAFn 
MNk 8% CNAI 
41% 34% CPC Ini 370 
19% 14ft CP Nil IX 
27% 10ft CSX 
38% 22 CTS 
12ft 7ft C3lnc 
33ft 22% Cctxti 
13ft 8% Caesar 
20% lift Cal Fed X 17 
47 32ft ColFd Pf 475 171 
24% 73% COHh W TSr M X 
18ft lift Camml .12 7 
30% ISft CRLka AO 
9ft 3ft QnpRo -1« 

14% 12% CaRpfO 2JD 
72% 54% CamSp 15D 37 11 
44% 28% CdPaco IX 
31% 14% CanfE o M 
59% 14% Card R Me 
179% 123% CapCHa 30 
48ft 30% CjopHM 
17ft 10% Cortnoo 

40% 24% Carl 1st* 

25% 13ft Com FI 

26% 19% COTPw __ 

23ft 19ft CarPX 277 114 aa 23ft 23% 23% 

52ft 36ft CorTac 2.10 4A 11 42 45% 44ft 45% + ft 

11% 7% Carrol 77 7 15 X II 10ft 18ft— % 

41ft 30ft CarsPlr IX 37 U 147 4Tft 41% 41% + % 

32% 18% CartHw 172 4J 53 1514x 27ft 27ft 27ft + % 

38ft 19ft CartWl JZ 17 12 662 33ft 30% 33% +2ft 

15% 9% CaacfiG IX 07 7 96 14% 14% 14ft— % 

18ft 9ft CsatlOi . 1721 13ft lift 12ft + ft 

33 15% CstlCPf 117 US 21% 20% 21% + ft 

52ft 38% CatrpT J8 1J 1875 33% 3Z1h 31% + % 

nv, 16 , Coco 7 UH as 22% 72 72 — ft 

91 62ft Cetane 4X 4J 9 364 92ft 50ft 92ft +2% 

40% 14 Cotanpf 4X117 3 3fft Xft 39ft— % 

~ “ 164 8ft Bft eft— % 

IX 41% 41 41%+ ft 

515 26% * X +1% 

7 Has 23ft 22% ZMb + % 

6 173 24% 34% 24ft— % 

■ 53 23% 7S 23% 

1006 42 42 42 +1 


174 

X 

162 


.1 M — 
U 12 1254 
WO 


XU 27ft 27ft— U 
70ft 77ft 78ft +1% 
7ft 7% 7ft 
48 47 47 —1ft 

77 29ft 29% 29%— % 
218 6% 5% 5%— % 

297 37% 37% 37% + ft 
X 10% Wft 10% 

39% 39% 39ft + % 
18ft 10% 10ft + M 
26ft 26ft 26ft + ft 
38ft » 38%+ % 

13% lift lift— ft 
32% 31% 32% — ft 
999 lift lift lift 
704 17% 17% 17ft— % 
79 47% 46ft 47 
121 16% 15ft M — % 
40 14 13ft 13ft— M 
J21 16ft 18 II —ft 

lirrs 

107 21 30ft 20ft— % 
7 14% 14% 14% 

315 172% 170% 171 —2 
4M 46% 40% +2 
11% 11% 11% 


162 16 12 113 40% 39% J9%— % 

AO 14 11 369 25% M% 24H— ft 

240 106 7 2943 25% 25 25% + % 


15 7% Cenovn 61a .1 » 

41ft 30% cental 230 S3 9 
36ft 17 Centex a 
23% 16% censaw 2X 07 
25ft 16% CenHud 164 117 
23% 18% Cenliu 3 32 94 
42 36 Gniupf 4JB 107 

17ft 14 QUIPS IX 94 
23ft 17% OiLaEI IX 9.1 
34% 19% CLaEI Of 4.18 1U 
U% 7ft CeMPw IX 134 
19ft 14 Cnsava 3* 4 a 
18ft 10ft CV1PS IX 104 
15 7ft Gantm 
10% 7ft CntryTI 30 73 

34% 18ft Cerndll 268 1U 

27% 15% Crttaed 30 16 
as 17 CoMAlr X 1.7 
36ft Kft Clmpln AO U 
27% IV Chml pi IX 44 
54 43% ami pf 460 03 

Wft S CtamSp X 43 

12% 1 vicnic 

6% % Viewed 

11% 1% vjChrtpf 

35% 35% Chase IX 67 
44ft 3Mh Chase pf 5-25 11J 
a 4B Ciraepf 4J*ni 

57ft 51 Oiaaepf 9X*174 

2ift 13ft Chetseo M 3.1 * ao 

34ft 24ft Chemed 148 43 u u 

41ft 23% CUNY 5 236 54 6 IBB 

X 23ft ChNYpf 147 43 13 

58% 45 CUNY pf 6-57*117 268 

37ft 31% Chespk IX 36 11 225 


7 

473 

17* 

17* 17*+ M 

4 

458 

21ft 

21% 21 to— M 


22 

35 

34% 34%— % 

4 

192 

Wft 

Wft m%+ % 

n 

994 

19% 

W* 19%+ U 

5 

17 

17* 

17% 17ft + % 


504 

«fc 

9% 9%— % 

9 

in 

10% 

10% 10%— % 

9 

29 

22ft 

22% 22*+ to 

12 

451 

26% 

26% 26%+ ft 

41 

2M 

23% 

23 23%+ * 


2140 

34* 

23* 24% 


W 

24% 

26 26 — % 


90 

54 

53% 53%+ ft 

11 

6J3 

9% 

9ft 9%+ ft 


323 

13 

2 

lft lft 
ft ft— 


44 

2* 

2% 2%— ft 

6 

1101 

55% 

54% 54* + * 


22 

44* 

44% 44ft 






4133c 

52* 

52 52% + % 


39ft 32% ObPii 
40ft 29ft OWVTTI 
37 18ft ernw 
200 99% CMMIw 

75 47% ClHMlPf 

25ft 16 OliPnT 
IS 7% O* Full 

41 24ft ChrlsCr 

lift 5 Christa 
13ft 9ft Chroma 
36% 2Bft Cnrvalr 


62ft M% Chutes 230 14 13 


21 20ft 21 
31% 30ft 31%+ % 
41 XU 40ft + % 
40% 40% 40%+ % 
35% S SS — ft 

__ 36% 35ft 36% + ft 

260 54 13 2903 37% 3£ft 37 — % 

TAB 70 S 4454 34ft 33ft 34% + % 

TO 343 36ft 25ft 26ft + ft 
76 117 180% 174% 174U— 3% 

9 70 67 47 —3% 

9 1138 23ft 23% 23%— M 

J3t 16144 96 8ft Bft 8% 

XT L3 S3 41ft 39ft 41% +1 
76 13 lift 11% 

79 12ft 12% 12% 

IX 36 4 6436 32ft 32% 32ft + % 


14 IV 
76 8 
6 


34ft 31% Church 
45% 35% Cln Ball 
15ft 8ft CtaG£ 

31 24 OrtG Pf 

35 24ft ClnGpf 

66 SO CtnOpf 
S3 39 OnGpf 
65% 40 ClnGpf 
30 20 CtnMB 

36 20ft ClndK 
39% 16ft arClty 
21% 13% Circus 

45% 27ft Cmcrp 

86 68% Chlaipf 863*106 

44% 32 Clfvlnv 100 56 18 
48 49% Ovfnnf SX 36 


3.13 

2.16 144 
4X 137 
4J5 126 
930 14.1 
7+4 144 
9X M6 
72 16 X 
■74 11 15 
X J 18 
14 

1M 45 


399 61ft 61ft 61ft + ft 
140 34% 33ft 31ft— ft 
13 44ft 44% 44ft + % 
817 14ft 14% 14ft + % 
200* 29% 29% 29% —ft 
240z 37 36 37 +2 

TOO* 66 66 66 

40* 51% 51% 51% — 1% 
900z 65% 65 45% — ft 

118 26% 25ft 2Sft— % 
460 35ft 35 35 — ft 

1527 30% 29ft 29ft + % 
157 21% 20% 21 — % 
7 5818 


IX 

IX 

X 


666 


X 45% 45ft + % 
77% 76ft 77% + % 
9Z7 40% 39ft 40 
11 62% 61ft ilft— % 
2ta 24ft 24ft 2*ft 

6ft 6ft 6ft + ft 
31% 30ft 31%+ % 

15% 15ft ISft + % 

31% 31 21 — % 

If lift Mft 
13 12ft 12ft— % 
17% 17% 17% — % 
17% 17ft 17% + % 
30% 29% 2Wk— % 
„ — 16% 17ft 18% + % 

14 9 699 39% 30 29% +1 

to 3 18% 18ft 18% + % 

10 10 111V 30% 19% XU +1 

U 7 815 30ft 30% 30%—% 

276 4J 13 3592 41ft <1% 61% + ft 
0— — 2249 13ft 12ft 13ft + ft 

- . — ... IX 4.1 10 342 29ft 29 2V — % 

26% 30% Colo Pol 1X0 5.1 11 2692 35% 34ft 75 + % 

» CoJoPpf 423 98 200* 43% 43% 43%+ % 

** CojIAQi IX 27 B 370 44 49% 49ft- ft 

-15 A ™ ,K3 20 % 19 % 3o% + % 

M?"! ]x 5j 9 ix a 27% a + u 

<3% 99% Collin) ISO 4a 18 171 XU 59ft 60 — ft 

37% 37 Co4G« 3.18 93 6 2601 32ft 21% 22% ft 

Sa% 40ft CoIGspf 548 107 M sisn+S 

JO ISft OOrt 242 12J 4 19ft mb 19% + % 

W7% 97 CaOrtmS 35 14 3 20*107% 107% 107% + % 

« SS »» 43ft <2% 43% + ft 

35% 25ft CinbEn IX S3 13 1376 35% 34% ISft +1% 
30 1J 13 1006 
M 17 14 59 

4 2955 


25ft 21ft Ctyln Pf 277 1L6 
lift 6% Ocblr 32 I0J 148 
36ft 23ft CtorhE 1.10 U 70 2364 
16 6% CtoyHm 17 St 

23% 17 ChrCH IX 48 9 434 

20U 13ft CtevEI 2J2 134 5 W20 

16ft 10 Clevpk JO 4.7 m 

17% 15ft dvpkpf 733 136 6 

30 IX* CJwfcpf TX HU 13 

31% 22% CtarDK IX 4A 10 

10ft 14ft ChJbMo 

31 22% ChiettP 
19% 14% Cluet pi 
as 13% Cooctan 
X 33% Coastal 
66 X CocoO 
19% 9ft Cofeca 
344* 25% Cotemn 


6 4905 
43 
21 


lift 8 COITKflS 
20% 15% ComMH 
39ft lift Combo 
28ft 21% CmwE 
16ft 13 CwE pf 

17 13% CwEpf 

M CwEpt 11X 1U 

67% 53ft CwEpf 668 12J 

23% 10ft CwEpf 2J7 HU 

25% I4U ComES 2J3 98 

88% 71% COmES PR8G KL9 

31ft 20ft Comsat IX 36 

32ft 16ft CPwe* *‘ 

36% 26 Comaar 

11% li eompse 

xu 29 Cpmn n i47i 

30ft 19ft ConAos X 27 U 707 
22% 13U Conolr JX 1.1 12 in 
lift 12ft ConnEi lx u I to 

26 19% OmNG U li | n 

17ft 10ft Conroe X 27 6 216 

31% 22ft ContEd 240 7.9 7 4895 


IX 106 
IX 117 
-2X 117 


34 


16% 16U 16ft + ft 
lift MU 15% + U 

13 Ilft lift 

2SM aa 2s% + % 

MU M 16 —u 

17 16ft 16%— U 

148* TOO IX 1M —ft 
22% 87% 67 67 — % 

229 23% 22ft Z2ft + ft 
5 73 23ft 23% 29ft + U 

. 4020* 90 90 90 +3 

, 13 1531 32 31ft 32 + % 

3 27 300 33 32% 32ft— U 

U 12 107 JSU 34% 35% + U 

■ 2259 16ft M Mft + ft 

44% 43% 43W— ft 

29% 29ft 29ft + M 

a 22U 22% + % 

17% 17ft 17ft— % 

a 24% 24% — % 

14 13ft 13ft— ft 

30% X 30%+ % 


12 Manta 
High Low Stock 


Sta. dose 

Dlv. yw. PE lmuHioh LowQuoLorae 


43 3S CmEpf4X11J 2220* 41% 41 

44% X ConE pf 570 1IJ . 3 43% Xft 

34ft 25 QraFd 184 A3 IB 1547 34% 

36 M% CraFrtS IX 27 12 338 34% XM 

42M> 31 CnsNG U2 U I W 43% 41% 

12ft 4% ConsPw * 791 6% 6% 

29% 13U CnPpfB 4L50 167 120* 27 26 

48% 23% CnP pfD 7 AS 17.1 1000* 44 43% 

50% 25% CnPpfE 732 IAS 450z 46 X 

SOftS CAP PfG 776 167 3430 1 46 44% 

28% 11% CnPprV 4X 17J 49 25 24% 

23% 9% CnP prU 3J0 17J 27 20% X 

25% 10% CnPpfT 378 178 120 21% 20ft 

51 25% CnP pfH 7 M 17.1 1210* 45 44 

23ft 11% CnPprR 4X 178 1M 22% 21ft 

7t 10ft CAP PfP 378 17J 8 22% 22% 

25% 10% OlPprN 365 177 46 21ft 21ft 

16% 7% CnPprM2J0 M6 1 14ft Mft 
15 7 CnPprL 233 166 W 13U 12ft 

am 11 CnP prs 462 17J 19 22ft 22% 

16% 7% CnP prK 243 17J 7 14% M 

42% 23% CntlCP 2 8 U 6 1497 41 40% 

9% 4% comm 361 9ft 9% 

3% ft Cantll rt 869 3% 3ft 

51% 12 CntlllPt 459 41% «% 

4% ft ClflHdn IJ7T 1% 1ft 

at 18 ContTel IX 7J 910420 23ft 23 

41% 24% CtData 31 17 15 9230 38% 37 

X 33 CnDtpf 450 I1J 280* 39 39 

33ft 22% Conwd IX 15 12 114 29 28ft 

3ft 1 vlCaakU 145 1% .lft 

32ft at COOPT IX 4J IS 869 32ft 32 

35% S3 COOPlpt 270 BJ 274 35% 35% 

27 10% CoopLb 610 3 3 865 16% M 

19ft 12% CaprTr X £0 9 a 19ft 19% 

24ft lift Coopvta X U 17 7896 23% 21ft 

21 lift COPWld At SO 2 14% 14% 

X% 19% Cpwtdpf 248 1U 2 22% 22% 

24 16% Cardura X 36 15 386 22ft 22ft 


14* 10* Core In 

St 37 

13 

497 

14% 

13* 


XM 33 

16 

2HI 

77% 

76% 


IX 14 

31 

83V 

40* 


95* 39ft CcxOn 

34 Jt 

17 

836 

S3 





40 

9% 



140b AA 

11 

AA 

34* 




24 

1918 

76 


28* 16% GrockN 

X 14 


314 

25% 


23 15% CrckNp 

X1S 115 


43 

19 


23% 19% CrmpK 

IX 5.1 

10 

75 

21% 



SO 34% CrwaCfc 14 67 49* 49% 

38% 27% CrWZel 160 36 13 9B3 34 5% 

51% 43 CrZiHpl 463 94 X 48ft XM 

61% 50 CrZei pfC4J0 77 SO W 57 , 

XU 18% CMbra X 24 6 24 25 24% 

30% 12% CMInat ■ 44 2539 30* -30 

88% 61% CumEn 26 U 4 1079 83% 81% 
Wft 8% Currlnc LTO0107 U W% WVk 
47% 30% CurtW 161 U II 44 MU 35% 

X 27% Cyclops 1.18 2J 10 2 47 47 


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43ft — % 
34% +1 
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45 +1U 
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35ft- % 
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13% Dallas X 14 
9% DamonC 30 U 
21% DanoCp IX 43 
5ft Donahr 
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64% DartKr 434 43 
30 DataGfi 
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Bft DtaOM 30 1 J 
13% Dam 34 14 
26% DaylHd 34 20 
lift DavtPL ZOO 127 
45% OPLpf 7 M M2 

45 DPLpf 7J7 136 
28% DeanFa X 17 
20% Deere IX 32 
17% DebnP ix 83 
27 DtataAr X 16 

4% Deltona 
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17% DonMfa IX 43 

am Desoto ix as 
11% Detirf IX M7 
67% DetCpf U AS 
99 DatEpr 9J2 143 
47% DetEpf 7JM 127 

46 DetEpf 745 HI 
19% DEpfF 225 1U 
20 DEpTR 33* 126 
Wft DE ptO 113 136 
19 DEpfP 112 111 
19% DE PfB 735 114 
19% DEpfO 3X111 
19% DE PfM 342 111 
24U DEPTL 480 134 
24% DEPfK 412 m 
13% OefEpr £B 1Z8 
i» Dexter X 15 

9% motor X 41 
21% DtGta pr 235 11 
16% DtamS IX 96 
3£U OtoShPf 400 MJ 
4®% DtabM* IX 14 
77% DHdlal 

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10% Drava 

15% Drssr 
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43ft dvPent — — 
30% duPntnf 150 MM 
39 duPnrpf 4 JO TO A 
2ZU DufceP 248 &3 
64 Dukepf 870 1L5 
59% Dukepf 860 1U 
57 Dukepf 7X 11J 
21ft Dukepf 249 10LS 
38.. Duke Pf 365 11 J 
89% Dukepf 11X MU 
64% Ouk PfM 864 114 
*n* Duke ol 838 11J 
51% DunBrd IX V 
11% DuqLt 266 02 
M Due pfA 118 124 
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«% Duqpf 730 119 
m DvcoPt X 25 
17% DvnAm 30 4 


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IX 42 
JO 11 

IX 40 
X 17 

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2X 112 
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10 123 22% 21% 22 
SS W1 12ft 12% 12%— % 

V 2360 29ft 29% 39% + % 

141 BM 3% 8M + M 
964 13% 11% 12ft— ft 
18 649 80% 87% 87ft 
21 1469 78 73% 74% + ft 

1* 758 21 28% 28% + % 

13 144 11% 11% 11% 

7 81 17 16% 16%—% 

15 19*7 » 37% 37% + ft 

7 2H4 M 75% lift— ft 

4888 S6M SO 54% +4ft 
IWO* 56% 56% 56% 

M 55 18% am 28% + % 
a HM 31% 30% 31 + % 
• 147 a 21% 21% 

7 4748 44% 42% 44 +% 

99 6 5% 6 + % 

16 687 65ft 64% 64U— ft 

12 103 27% 27% 27% 

TO 137 UU 39ft 35ft— ft 

7 1138 ISM 15% 15ft 

1. 95 85 85 — % 

61X73 TO 70 —TV* 
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TOO* 57 57 57 

TO Sfft 36% 24U + M 
45 23% 24% 25% + M 

42 ziu at at 

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16 26% 36 It —1% 

21 sc* 36% am— % 

30 29% 29% 29%+ % 
14 31% 30% 30%— % 

9 17% 17ft 17% + % 

13 131 22% 22% 22% 

9 257 15ft 15% ISM + % 

11 27% 27% 27% 

11 3905 19% TOM 19M 

X 37ft 37% 37%— % 

13 122 3C% 56 56ft + % 
15 533* 125ft IZIft 125% +2% 
39 3315 7J% 74% 75ft + % 

5 8 37% 37 37%+ % 

4 33 4% 4ft 4% 

648 8% BU BU— % 

8 11*8 28% 28% 28% + ft 

9 96 20% 20% 20% + % 
15 637 54% 57% 53% +1% 

12 tO 2m Z7ft 28ft + % 

14 BOO 48ft 39% Wft— ft 

10 Tin soot a 30% 

n BM 47U> 45ft 46% +1% 

87 12% 12 12 

17 1285 21% 20* 21H + ft 

22 18% 17* 17*— M 

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4 33% 33% 31%— % 
99 43H 43 43%— % 

8 4190 30% 29% 30 + % 

520* 76ft 75% 75M— 1 
210* 71 71 71 — % 

25401 67% 67 67ft + % 
2 25% 25ft 25ft + ft 
73 34 31 33%+ % 

TOO* 113% 103% mm— % 
VOIOOz 77% 77% 77%+ ft 
400* 73 73 73 

21 875 70ft 70 70% + % 

7 4863 15% 15M 15ft + % 

MO* 17 MM 17 + ft 

12 16% Mft 16ft + % 
9600* T7ft 17% I7%— % 
2SHK 55% 55% 55% — % 

8 134 lift TO* II + % 

13 26 MU 34% 24% + % 


38* 26% 

30% 21% 
28U 20ft 
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13* 6* 

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18 12% 

78 60% 

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14ft 9 
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35% 22ft 
36* IBM 
29* 17% 
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15 3698 30* 
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151 12 
SO 14M 
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14 1065 32M 
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14% 0* Ertmnt Xe 14 18 
18 12ft EWBsn 79* J 12 
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31* 20ft EefTtae X U 11 
37* a Ethyl X 24 TO 
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41* X ExCMo IX 27 ID 
16% 13* Exeetar 171*113 
48% 36% Exxon 


240 73 


BB 12% 11* 12 

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186 rat 22% 22% — % 
807 3M 36* 35ft + % 
216 4* 4ft 4%— % 

16 7ft 7* 7%+% 
509 41ft 40ft 41ft + ft 

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19* 14ft Fimsn n 
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27 16ft FedPBs 30 S3 8 124 

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IB* 10* FFadAz 955 

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3Dft 21 Plrrtstpf 237 87 177 

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25* 35 25*+ % 

34* 33* 34% + % 
29% 29ft 29ft + U 
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65% 64ft 64ft— 1 

13% IZ* 13% 

8* 8% 8M+ % 

a* a* aft— ft 

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20% 20 20* 

2.1 M 247 28% 26* 20% +1% 

2 a 6 1147 26% a 26% + % 

30% X% 30% + ft 

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54% 53 54% +4% 


29* 15 GAF .159 J 222 
36% W GAF pf IX 34 4 

37% 25ft GAT X IX 3J 15 245 
47% 33% GATXpf 2J0 58 73 


MB 


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64* 48* GEICO 
IBM 4 GEO 
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44% 34* GTE 
39% 31U GTE Pi 
3ft IV* GTE Pt 
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56% 33* Ganett 
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30ft 10% Gecrht 

19% 13* Getao 
68% 53ft GemCa 
39 MU GnCnrp 
17% 14ft GAInv 
XU 29% GflBcsti LOO 
31% M% GdnfflB X 

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34* 34% 34ft— % 
43* 43 43 — 1% 

32% 30% 30*— 1 
63* 63% 63% — U 
5% 5U 5% — M 
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42% 41* 42* + % 

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31% 24* GGta 

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85 61 GMat 570r 63 

65 33 GM E n .IBe J 

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5D* 44% GMotPf 570 107 11 

10% 3* GNC .K 27 16 98 

12% 7% GPU 7 19U 

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12* 5 GflRefr 7 219 

HM Mft GnStam IX 38 M 2199 


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IX 
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28% 19% a + ft 

75* 74% 75U + U 

64% 63% 64* +1% 

20% 20% 20*+ M 

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23 21 6546 21% Wft 21%+)* 

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6 B612x 80ft 79ft 80 +1* 

1941a 65 m* 65 +2* 


37% 27* 37* + ft 
90 50 50 — U 

6 * 6 % 6 %+ % 
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73% 72ft 73% +1 
12% 11% W — % 
50% 49* 50ft + ft 


12% 10 GTFI Pf TX 108 200s 12ft 12% 12% 

Bft 5% Gensco 9 477 6 5% 6 

MU 13* GnRmJ .10 J 27 907 ' " 

23* 15 derate 170 ix 

36 24 GenPte IX 2.9 16 1954 

Mft 18 GoPoc X 31 12 5610 

37% 31 GoPCPf 234 Al II 

28V. 22* GdPwpf 374 127 76 

M 25% GoPwpf 338 127 39 

21% 17U GaPwpl 2J6 127 9 

21 17 GaPwpf 2J2 123 4 

23% 21 ft GaPwpf 275 113 S 

60* a GaPwpf 7X 127 

62 51% GOPWPf 732 06 

29ft 20% GerfaPsxl.16 43 10 
72 12 GerbSt .12 

lift 7* GtentP 
11 5% GtorPn 

M% 16% GlftHHI 

58% 42ft Gillette 

17% im G leasC 
9% 4% GlaUM 


32 
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12% Bft GkfNUB 11 16M 

4% 1% GldNwt IM 

27% II GMWF X J 7 2591 

36ft 2 eft Gdrtch 17 Si 7 18 

83 73% GOncapf 7 MS 93 1009 

29% at Goodyr IX 5J 7 59*3 

19ft 13% GandnJ X 38 9 IM 

32% 19 GOUM X 28 66 10H 

44% 36% Grace 228 67 10 292 

40 47 Grolnor IX 13 15 ~ 

15* 8% GtAFst X 23 9 
TO lift GtAtPc 

45% 27% GILkln 

27% 15% GNlm 

43% 31 GIN Ilk 

67% 51% GtNNfepfA» 

»% 16% GtWPta MB 
19ft 9% GWHsP 
MM lift GMP 
a 18ft Grevh 
5 2% oral tar 

13* 8% GrawGl 
10 6% OnibEi 

29ft 21% Grumn 

26* 24% Grumpf UB 107 
■to 4% Gruntoi .16 23 36 
23* 14% Guard! 

26ft a GuUfrd 

25 25% GHWst 

MU 11% GWfRS 

M 14% GutfRpf IX tO 

14% 18 GtfStUt IX 117 


50* 39 GMSUpf 5XS1I7 
M 74 GlfSU pr 383 138 
33* 27 GlfSUpr AM US 
20% 12* GAere JSo 37 10 
17% 14 Gutter! X 38 TO 


18* 17* 18% — ft 
23* 73 21ft— % 

35* 35 35U— % 

26% 25* M — % 
35* 36* 36*— M 
27* 27% 27ft — ft 
39 29* 29% 29%— ft 
9 20% a% 20% 

4 20% au 20% 

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am 6i% 61% 6i% + % 
218 259k 25* 25* 

J 18 1097 22* Zlft 22*+ * 

59 lift 11 11 

9ft 9ft **— M 

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57% 57 57% + ft 

13* 13ft 13* 

5 4* 4ft— M 

20* 20% 20* 
lift Tl* lift 
3% 3% 3% 

27 a 26* +1 
29% 29 29% — to 

81 81 81 — % 
28ft 28ft aft+ft 

17% 16ft 17% + ft 
26* 25* 26% + ft 
42 41ft 41ft 
140 67* 67% 67* + % 
426 15% IS 15 
9 473 15ft Mft 15 — to 

IX 23 11 513 44% 43ft AA — % 

IJhU2 7 323 18% 16* 18%+lft 

IX 37 9 46S7 40ft 39% 37% + * 

73 137 X 60% X +1% 

33 11 1498 27* 27ft 27% — % 

41 252 17% 17% 17% — % 

4 15* 15* 15ft 
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5% 4ft 5 +* 

13 12ft 13 

W 9ft 9* 

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26% 26ft 26ft 
7* Oft 7ft+M 

23* 23* 23* 

24* 25ft 26* + ft 
32 lift 31ft + ft 
16% 15% 15ft + ft 
21ft 21% 21ft +lft 

14 13ft 13* 

49% 49% 49V, — % 
29* 29ft 29ft 
33% 32% 32% — % 
16* Wft M%— to 
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IX I1J 9 

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23 7 8632 

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27* 19% HallFB LOO 
44 am HaUjtn IX 
lft ft HnUwd OB 
9% 5ft Halwdpr St 
55* 38* Hamrp 2X4 
13ft 11% HonJS 

19ft 15* ManJI 
47 21% HOrtdIM 

20 15% HondH. 

23ft 16* Hanna 
53% 23* HarBrJ 
58ft 32% Htolnd 
12* 7* Homan 
33% 14% HrpRw 
30* 22* Harris 
17* 10ft HarGrn 
28% TO Hareeo 
32ft 23% Marfmx 

16% 13* HattSe 

23* 15ft HawEll IX 72 9 160 
13ft B HavesA ,10e J 10 148 

34* 15* Modem - -- 

12% 9 HazLab 
U* 9ft Hacks 


3L7 IS 
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A 13 19 
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28 18 
25 15 M48 

IX 47 14 St 
IX 48 TO 1234 
IX 11 J II 3 


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27 14ft Keiknci 
23 15* Helltg 

45 32 Heinz 

30 13* HetneC 

25ft 18 HalmP 
5* 3ft HemCn 

37% 27% Hercuta 

28* 13ft HerttC 

IS Iff* HurflC Pf IX 

41% 28% H ereby IX 
Z1M 5% l less toil 

44% 31% HewIPk 

30 17% Mescal 

19% 12 HlShear 
12ft BM HIVoit 

23ft 17% Hlinfard 

60% 45% Hilton 
46% 31 Hitachi 
51% 35% Holiday 
75 49% HollyS 

27ft 12 HameO 
22% lift HfTlFSD 


36 13 48 
J2 2J 23 
X 24 29 ... 

Xe 13 35 426 
ABb IM 10 315 
X 17 12 414 
IX 17 12 1745 
27 34 

34 18 24 2381 
3 

IX 44 TO 13M 

Xe 3 at a 

68 5 

38 73 — 


8 15 5706 
2.1 19 77 
17 a 

13 n 

. 23 12 

IX 30 14 

38e 7 II ... 

70 U 15 MSB 

IX 14 13 


32 

X 

X 

.13 

34 


5ft 5% 5ft+ to 

26* 26ft 36*— % 
3Zto 31ft 31ft + to 
lft 1% lft 
122 9* 9% 9ft + Vb 

646 46% 45 45 — 1% 

70 12% 13* lift 

19* 19% »* + % 
45* 45 4S — ft 
19 18ft 19 + _ 

28* 19ft 20 — to 
53% 53% 53%+ % 
50 57% 57*— % 

12 ft 12% 12* 

31* 31% 21* + U 
35 MU 34ft + * 
17ft Mft 17 + ft 
27ft 27 27%+ % 

BA 31ft J2* + * 
15* 15* 15ft + U 

a* 22 % 22 *+ % 

. 12% U% 13% + to 

102k 28% 27* 28% + ft 
131 13% 12* 13 + % 

189 11% 11% 11% + % 
~ 15* W» Kft— % 
17* 17* lift— % 
31ft 21ft 21% + M 
43% 43 43% 

15* 15% IS* + % 

21% 28* 20*— % 

5* 5% 5* 

35% 36 35% + % 

20ft 38% 28ft + M 
_ 34ft 34* 24*— % 
222 39% HM 3? + ft 

35 8ft 8% 8% 

38ft 37* 30ft + * 
29% 29 29M-M 

19 18ft UK + U 
13 12* 12ft + % 

22* 33 23* 

. 59* 59M 59ft— to 

599 32* 32* 32*— % 

~ SB* 49* SOto— % 
73% 68% 73% +5 


a 

499 

M> 

295 


28 2917 14% 15% 15% 

| TOS3 22% 22 22* + * 

9ft B HmoGPf 1.18 1U 15 M H ft 
35* 20M Mfiatae 30 J » 20S5 23* 9ft 23* + ft 
28 S 41 iSMUUJWifM 
3 10 TOW 0% 54* 5<ft + U 

27 U 3HB 45% «4ft 64*+% 

39 TO M -- - 

44 V 41 

1.1 14 6333 

a 

53 


19M 8* HmstPn 
«% 41% Honda . X 
66ft 46* Harwell 1.90 
27% 19% MaovrU UM 
2Sto 18 Hrmon U2 
» 3ft Horizon • 

43* 35* HdspCP X 

aa Zlft Hatoilfl 280 87 13 

36% 28* HOUOhM X 23 14 


19* 13ft HcuRKl X XI 11 69 

36* 24 Hovel nt 135 47 9 1668 

S 36 Holntnf 270 47 4 

72* 61 Holntnf A25 88 35 

23to 17* Houlnd 2 40 KL7 6M7I7 


58ft 39ft HouNG 
» 9* H0UOR 

23% 13KH0W1CP 

26% 30% Hutted 

13* 9ft Huffy 


XOB 43 11 
XlOelBJ 

x xi a 

230 BJ 12 

X X8 9 


26ft 25* 24ft 
25* 25% 25% 

5M 5M 5%+ to 

46* 45* 46%+ % 

29% 28ft 29%+* 
25ft 25* 35* + * 
TO* IBM Mft 
36* 35ft 25*-* 
53ft 53* S* + ft 
73% 72* 72ft + ft 
.. .. 23% D* 23to + % 
467 46% 46M 44% — to 
61 11% 18* llto + % 
" - TOM 18* 18* . 

a% 25* 25ft- * 

llto 13% 13% + M 


a 

66 

183 


2500 ON THE DOW 


The image of mankind, as thw^ by Freud. suM^ mal -intelUgence is, in 
mentally ill, a dictum that blends with Schopenhauers^™'" jeswer e mirrored by 
some sense, innately bent on self -annihilation ■ T |j®J r ^ U j d i S Embrace; the pnjrient 
AWous Huxley, who wrote- The leech's kiss; thaaquuJ s emorwx. 

ape's defiling touch. And do you like 0w .human i nwj as seen by his 

Huxley's gloom was at vanance wf ^L he H Huxlev mused.. ‘Man alone 

grandfather, T.H. Huxley, a staunch supporter of parvwn.Huiow ^ stands 

possesses the marvelous e^dowrnerrt o^nte jUgtoleand^aitoonaJ feiio^ and 

raised upon it as on a mountain top. far above the a ray from the 

transfigured from his grosser nature Huxle/soptimism 

infinite source of Truth". If may seem sacnlegious to trans^e i^^J« r Svestore 
to such mundane matters as stock markets. His vision was celestial, mosi invesiora 

see no further than the “Tape". . -anti the "brass ring”. 

Mankind's lack of vision is endemic, ° n, y 8 m °!? a I+^ P thP “F’ower Elite w .The 

The rest spin in disarray, on a carousel controlled by mnovators, | j n 

basic premise of our investment philosophy is-contrariOT . 
tomorrow. In dawn, not dusk, the ability to perceive what the “Crowd rarely senses, 

the cerebral guts required to defy orthodoxy. - nrinoinn we 

In 1982, while the DOW was under 800, wMo fheSJ 1 ?** SSoREHiSlNG 
mocked the consensus, predicting THE DJI WILL TOUCH 1,000. BEFO 

This remains a classic time to buy, not to sigh; a th e ^market 
market's last malaise, a malaise that infected thousands of inve^ors. The martet 
subsequently erupted on the upside; itwill erupt again, vaporizing prophets or doom, 

^'our currerrt lettertocuses upon senior securities that appear Poised ^ ( ® 
upswing, in addition, we review a low-priced, emerging stock MW™* ™ 
success of a recently recommended “special situation that spiralled 80(7ib in a bner 
lime-span, after discovering a large oi) and gas field in Texas. 

For your complimentary copy, please write to, or telephone; 



CAPfTAL 

GAINS 


F PA Financial Ptarming Services bv” j 

KahreratraatH2, j 

1012 PK AmstenJam, The Netherlands , 

Phone: (020) -27 51 81 I 

Tetex 18536 1 


Name: 


Address: 


i 


| Phone: mag { 


Past performance does not guarantee future results 


V ■’ 


t- 




> 


A ’• 
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Finn- 


12 Month 
High Low 


Slock 


Sta. Claw 

DIv.YkLPE IQHsHtah Low Quot. OToe 


21* 12% HuahTl 
as 17% HuahSa 
33 71% Human 

26 17% HunfMf 

41% 23* HuttEF 
25* 11% Hyaral 


M 

32 

X 

X 

X 

IX 


917 

59 


XI 

L5 ID 
23 15 ... 
17 16 7 

2X 2D 7162 
73 9 at 


15% ISM 15*+ % 
20ft 20* 20* + M 
30% 29 38% +1 

25* 254% 25*— M 
40* 39ft 40% + % 
a 24* 25 + ft 


35 21 1C Ind s IX X7 12 5760 35% 34% 34ft + to 

104 62* 1C In M X5D 14 49 IDS 1KWfTO4%+% 

19* ISft ICMA 199 18% 18% «%— to 

11* 4* ICN 56 1349 

76 
41 
17 
8309 
1 
47 
12 
2 

24 1341 
7 Z72 

284 118 6 


IX 

338 


11 

70 

B 

7 1 


27ft 22% ICN Of 270 97 
17% M INAin IX 118 
19* 13* IRTPrs IX 83 11 
42% 20* ITT CO IX 
70* 44 ITT OU 4X0 
66* X ITT OfIC 470 

65 44% rrrpto sxo 

52 a ITTufN 235 
7i 42% rrrpfi 430 
23* 15% mint 
40* 30* idaftoP 
74 13% I iMalS 

23* 17* UlPowr _. 

18 U% IIFOwof 2X4 1X5 
34% 27% llPawpf 4.12 1X5 
31% 35 llPawpf 278 118 
51% 48* llPawpf 335 11.1 
45% 37 llPawpf 4849118 
36% 28* IIPOW pf 4X7 1X1 
33% 25% llPawpf 4X0 1X3 
36 21% ITWs At 17 18 

39% 27* ImpChm 2X0 ' 

V% 5ft impICn 
14* 8* INCO 30 18 
17* 14 IndIMpt 115 114 
18% 14* ImflMpf 125 1X5 
28% 23% ImflMpf 381 IXB 
24* 20* ImflMpf 233 113 
at 16* IndIGss IX 73 
15 5% Inrao .14 

24% 13% Infanta 
51% 35% mown 160 
34% 27* IrtaRpf 135 
15% 10* ingrTac M 

30 19* InMStf SO 

48% 38ft InWStpf 435 
20* M Irallco IXb 57 TO 328 
13M 3* I n*P Ri 719 

26* 11* intaRx 7 ass 

31 19 IntaRpf 3X 1X3 199 

54% 42 intaRPf 681*138 518 

37* 25% I nig R of 435 133 AD 


14* 7% IntRFn 
19 15* I ftps® 

65% 55 Intoroo 
15* 9% infrW 
52% 41 Intrtk 
U% Oft Infanad 

24% 14* IntAbJ 

138% 99 IBM 
21ft 13% IntCtrl 

28* 22* Inf Flow 

11* 5* IntHarv 

7* 2* infHrwf 

58 23% IntHpfC 

43 20* IntHpfA 

34% 17* tMHpfD 

44* 32ft IntMta .. 

35* 30% IntMnpf 480 118 

29* 23 IntMatt 136 A3 


10% 9* 10 — % 
27% 25* 27% + % 

16* 16% M%— M 

19% 19% 19%+ % 
32* 21* 32ft + ft 
57% 57% 57%+% 

L is Iks 

BbEI 

16 15* 16 

23% 23 23% 

26581 Wk K* 16*— lft 
8201 33* 33 31 , + % 

650z 32% 32 32% +1* 

250 51* 51% 51ft + ft 
120 39ft 39* 39ft + % 
250* 37 36 37 +1% 

3 32% 32% 32% — % 
16 35% 34* 3S% 

39 38ft 38*— % 

9 8* 8* 

2244k 13* 13* Oft— % 
11 17* 17% 17* + M 
TO 18% TO TO — % 
28% 27* M% + M 

nrtL 4|U i rVm 
xranrM x ■■ ana 

25* 25% 2S* + % 
7* 6* 7*+* 
18* 10ft 18ft + ft 

40 4HA 6 OIL 
34% 34% 34% + % 
13* 13* U* 

25% a 25% + % 
40% 48 48 + % 

20% Wft 28 + % 

5* 5% 5%— M 
18% 17* 17* + * 
34* 24ft 34ft— M 
49* 47 49% + M 

32 31* 33 

12% II* 12% + ft 
18* 18* 18* 

65% 64* 65M+ % 
12% 12M 12% 

STM 52 SZft + * 
18ft 9% 9*— ft 
a*% 21% am— % 

33 1310578 137% 135* 137% +1* 
JO 18 12 101 Zl 28ft 28* + * 
1.13 43 M 926 27* Mft 26* 

5380 10% 9* 10% + M 
871 6M Aft 6M + M 
26 47% 47 47% 

7 37% 37% 37% + * 
IM 31% 38* 31% + * 
2X 68 12 391 40% 48% 48* + % 

1 34% 34% 24ta+!ft 
9 68 28% 27* 27* + % 


52 M 1449 
12 1» 


50 
50 
30 

17 19 165B 
15 10# 

S3 18 543 
tO 12 
37 20 17 

X0 3099 
97 17 


298 

1 Wall-1 22 

3X8 47 12 251 
X 47 7 566 
ZAO 57 8 70 

32 TO57 
32 XI 11 


12 Month 
Htah Low 


Stock 


Sta. fJnw ^ 

Dlv. YW. PE lOOsHlah LOW Quot OiVe 


37 

435 

71 

65 

53 

92 

532 


29ft 15* LacGas L70 7.1 7 
12ft 8M Lafaraa 30 73 
31* 23% Loire Pi 284 98 
16* 12* Lamaur 34 L5 15 
3% Tft Lom3M 
14% 10% Lawtln s J56 4S 14 
25% 13% LaarPt 30 J 14 
20ft 20% LaarPpfXST 107 
51% 27% LaarSo 130 16 TO 
IV* 14 LaaRnis X 17 14 
35* 24% LlWYTr IX AS IT 
33% 20% Laaenf 72 U 16 
14* 9 LaaMaa 30 13 at 
TO* 15% LaaPtot At 73 9 
4% 2ft LafiVal 
MM Mft Latum lXaMX 
UM 9ft Lams- 30 M 21 

34% 16 LaucNt 6 

53* SO Laocd pf A7M1XT 

37M 23 LavtSt ITS 58 

3BU 25* Leatsa 32 19 

X* 38ft LOP IX 17 I « 

79% 62 LOP Pf 475 63 ■ 

'SOM' ■ UfafyCp 32 23 M 137 

74ft S3 UltV 320 43 11 2T70 75ft 

34% 15% LtalRad 34 3 25 4251 35% 34 

43ft 26% UncNtl IX 43 TO 1222 45% 44 


24% 23% 23*+% 
Bft Bft Bft 
26 25% 26 + ft 

16* 16 K* + * 
3M 1 Sto+ » 
12ft 12% 12% + ft 
__ 22* 22% 22*- ft 
M2 36* 26 26%+ % 

82 SOto J® 50 —ft 
W 20* M ZHh+1% 
494 33* 32* 33*+% 
120 33% 33% 33% + % 
254 15 14 IS +1 

72 19% 19% 19% 

363 3% 2% 2ft 
188 15 14* 14* 

% 


"..is I 1 1* 


48* MM 

as +* 

44% + ft 


170. . 114ft LtocN.pf XM 13 J MB . 1B0_ +18. 


22% TOM LIncPI 
80 54% Utton 

49* 30% LOCUM 
42% 38ft Locftta 
131ft 70ft LOOMS 
44% 23ft Loawi wi 
33* 19 Lorn Fin LI 4 38 U 702 
36ft 24* LOmMt 4M011J 18 65 

38* 17* LnStnr IX 78 6 147 


57* 46 ITOPOW 140 45 28 3625 53ft SZft S3*— % 

17* f IntRca 19 649 16 14ft 15% +1% 

42* 32* InfNrth 2X 54 • W69 43to 42* 43 +ft 

87* 82% InfNt pf BAB 93 38z B7* 87ft 07* 

149 126 InttftpfJTOJO 7X Z3 150* 150* 198* +1* 

to* 86% IntNf PtHOJB 107 66 96* 96* 96* + % 

34* 24* Ufa** Op IX 27 12 422 36* 35% 35*— Hi 

17% 10 intSata* 78 KM 171 15*— to 

20 15* IntStPW IX 97 8 23 Wft 19% Wft— ft 

20 Id* InPWPt X2B 118 aoaz 20 19* 28 + % 

19% 14% lawaBI IX lai 0 116 19 18* 18*— ft 

29% 21% low G 274 93 7 20 28% 27* aft + to 

WW 17 [OWlllPf Z31 1Z2 14401 W% 19 TO — ft 

31* 25 lowaRa XOB TOO 7 41 30* 30* 20*— to 

™ 36 Iptfm 2X 87 a 145 33 T2M 32* 

U* V* Iw»C» M 19 II 15V 11* 11* 11* + % 

£ SS 184 S3 7 131 35 36* 34*— U 

34 42* irvSkpf X19al08 TOO 49* 49* 49ft + ft 


27* 20 JWT 4 
3«% 23% jRlvar 
24H 13ft Jorrawy 
14* TO* JoonF 
42* 23* JaffPla 
65% 54% JarCpf 
56 47 JarCpf 

54% 45% JarCpf 

90% 90 JarCpf 1158 137 
14% 12ft JarC pt 118 I3J 
910 5* Jawfcr 
9* 2B Johnjn 
46% 37ft JahnCn 
29* 21* Jaraon IX *1 17 
24* 15* Jastens X 3J 14 
28* 21ft JaviHfa IX 58 14 


1.12 48 II 702 
X 17 * 1417 
.10 8 II M0 

184*128 
1X2 11 11 
936 147 
870 143 
7X 141 


25% 25% 2S%— * 

29* 29 29% + % 

320 24* Zlft 34*+ * 
468 lift 11% II* + ft 
§75 43 42 43% + » 

MOO* 63ft 63ft 63ft 
8302 56 54ft 56 +1% 
200i 54% 53% 53% + ft 
fleff 97 97 —1 

4 Mft 16% 14% + ft 

IX ffft A* 8* to 

IX 11 15 3713 38VS> 37* 38% + * 
1160 Al TO 40 45* 45* 45* 

1 24* 24* 24* + ft 
311 24% 24 24% 

309 25* 25* 25*+ ft 


II 


Wft Aft KDI 
13* V* KLMs 
39ft 33 KMIPf 

4ift 26ft Kmart 

am 24ft KM Eng 

20% lift KatarAi 

2(% M* KataCa 

20ft 15% KotC Pf 

Kft 8* Karan _ 

20* MW KCTYPL 236 118 . 

20 15% KCPLpf 133 123 

54* 16% KCSou 1« |7 II 

18* 12% KanGE X3A 121 6 

HM 28* KanPU 276 83 7 

23 18 KaPLBf 233 TO7 

20* 17% KaPLpf 230 1BJ 
37% 17* Kafyin 
95 49 Katypf 

TO* 10ft KaufBr 
UM II* Kaufpf 
68 Kaufpf 
45ft 27 Kellogg 
3m 21* Kataad 
4ft l Kanal 
28 19ft Kenml 
25* 2D* Kylltn 
17 11 KerrGl ... 

15 26% KarrMc l.W 


■30 15 9 3TOT 
14 1344 
4X 117 2 

L24 33 926030 
17 115 
X 17 197 

30 Ll 103 
1J7 73 K 
- 17 6176 

" 810 
5 
172 
■73 
209 

42 
32 


IX 1J 
X XI 4 
IX 8J 
873 HU 
176 41 13 

IX 11 7 


20 
5 
199 
SS 
1395 
33 19 184 
98 8 AM 
17 

37 13 


27ft 16% Kay Bft IX 47 8 
Aft 2% KayCnn 
19* 14 Kavilnf 88b Z5 20 
35% 26% KWO# IX XI 21 

77% 63 KUpfC AM SA 


Bft 8 8ft+ % 
l» UM U*+ ft 
38* 38* 38* + * 
38 36% 37M-2* 

38% 37% 37*— ft 
16% 16 16% + * 
18% 17ft 17ft— ft 
17ft T7M 17% 

11 TOW 10*— ft 
20* SO 20* 

TB* IS* 18* 

52* 52 32* — M 

18ft 17ft 18ft + % 
34M 33M 34 
21* 21% 21%— M 

28* am 2o*+ % 

MW 19 54% 38 ft +7% 

61 W0 94 99 +7 

124 19 ISft TO* 

" 17ft 17* 17*—* 
87% 87% 87% — to 
42* 63% 43*+% 
32% S 32%+ ft 
1% I* 1% 

25% 24* 24% — iw 
25* 25% 25%— % 
11 * 11 * 11 * 

M Mft 29ft— to 
26* 26M 26* + U 
3% 3% 3M-M 
19% TOM 19% 

32 31* 32 + % 

74 


SOU 39* KMlBCl XM 47 TO MSB 48* 47ft 48* + ft 

34% Z1W KngMRa 76 27 U sw 34ft 33ft 34 +1 

28* 17ft KOOer 2M Zl 177 2 28* 2fft 20ft— ft 

29* MM KOHhar 32 1 J W 607 22ft 21% 22 + ft 

23% 17M Kfttata X 41 7S W89 20 Wft Wft- ft 

35% 30% Kaprpf 4X 113 22Dz 35% 35% 35% + % 
104 M* KOBPrpflOX 98 I 104 IM 104 
M 12ft Korean 204 lift 13 12ft + % 

39ft 29% Kraoar ZX S3 12 226 39% 38ft 38*. 

20 11 KuMfals X 11 11 19 Wft 19 19ft + ft 

67% 44* Kvacara .141 J 27 144 52% 51ft 51ft + * 

13 Knar X 47 6 93 70 19* 19ft— ft 


22ft LN Ho 
IS* 7*LFe 
17M U% LLE Ry X2M13J 
4* 2 1 1 Cfp 

11 8 LLC Pi 

8* LTV 
26% 14 LTV A 
<8 45% LTV Pf 

31 18% LTVpf 

69 50% LTV Pt 

Wft 13 LTVpf 
17 10% UQutnt 


27*1X1 10 36 
60 
534 
96 
14 

11082 
t 

4 


XT 23 


IM 123 
MS 73 
IX AS 


995 

168 


28% » 28% + % 
13% Uft U*+ H 
MM 15* 16% + ft 
7* 2ft 2*+ to 
9* 9% 9* + % 
13% 12* 13% + * 
1* I* 19 
58 60 58 + * 

25ft 34ft 25M+ % 
67% 67 67% +1% 
18% 17* 18% + % 
13% 11* 12%+ * 


51 44 LonaSpf 537 H7 

10* 3* LILCO 
31% 16 LILpfB 
53 21% ULPfJ 

52 23* ULpfK 

as i% uLptx 

23 9 LILpfW 

22* 9% LILPJV 

27* 11% LILPfU 
22% 8* LiLpfT 
65 27% LIL PS 

16ft 6 LILpfP 
T7% 7 LiLpfO 
53* 34 LonoOr 
32* 18% LOTTO 
15 18ft LoGaifl 
36% 22% LoLond 
26* 17 LoPoc 
31% 2M LflPLpf AM 153 
36 ■ Mft LoPLM XM UB 
28% 22ft LouvGa Z44 Zl 
49* 86 LflwilS XOO 42 
29* 16% Lowm X 
24% 18% Lubrzl 1.16 
32 am Lubya ■ aa 
19* 15* LuekyS 1.T6 
15% 18% Lukara X 


Z240HL1 41 22% 21* 22% + % 

ZOO 2J 9 3404 7H6 7L • WB+I 
Xo 13 10 63(5 51% 40ft 5M+1* 
X 13 13 TS 35* 34ft 34* — to 
IX 3 TO 300 12BM1Z7 127%+ W 
9 42* 42* 4Zft 
32* 32* 32* + * 

a-* 


+% 

* 

+% 


37 49* 49* _. 

3 3484 BM 7* • 

TOO* 25 25 25 

MI 42M 42M 4ZM 
180* 41 43 43 *» - 

W* 19* 19*+ 

20% 20M 20ft— ft 


IX 27 15 


AA 

IX 


5 

6 

103 

4 

10 

2 

3 

322 


23* 23% 2Mk+ Jfc 


18* IS* 18*- 
54* 54* J«-% 
14% 14 M 

15% 15* ISft+JS 

y 54 52* 54 +1% 

13 19 1789 32* 32 32*+ U 

«J * 113 12* T2ft 12ft 

2# 11 829 36 35% 36 

33 20 586 24* 24* 24%+M 

19 31% 21ft lift ... 

23 22* 22ft 23*+ ft 

7 378 26* 26% 21* + ft 

6 31 47* 46* 47M+* 

13 16 1801 28 27% 27*- ft 

AA 15 004 25» 23* 25 +1.. 

17 21 121 lift 30* 30*— % 

A3 TO 741 lift 18% 11% „ 

33189 501 15% 34% 15ft + % 


M 


23% 13M WACOM 32 U> 24 4623 22% 21% 21 %— ft 

46* 34* MCA MB 13 33 674 44* 49* 44% — ft 

Mft 16* MCorp 1 X Al 7 177 22* ral OTfc+ ft 
42 34 MCorpf ISO 93 B 37 37 37 — 1 

if* Offif 72 Z3 II 87 14% 13* 13*- % 

40 31ft ME I At 1.1 IS MS 38ft 38% 31ft 

M 9% MGMGr AA 33 34 M 13* uft TOl 

12% 9 MGMGrpU4 37 8 12% im Wft 

« {J© MUO Xe U 26 2760 13ft TO* ™ + ft 

5% 2M MGMuwt 101 3% 2* 3 + ft 

S’* 2?* MCW* ,70a Z7 14 21 22% D H 

52 25 MaanH TX X0 15 655 52* SQVt 51 

a aaaa. “ ,T % s* & s“+&- 
7 2 i^r^f+r 
E $ j aa w-* 

21* 10% MonrCs .14 7 21 1947 21 20% 21 + ft 

40* 22% MfrHon X20 73 A 3169 41% 4D* 41ft + to 
59 41 MfTHPf 4J70TZ4 1228 53% SS nto + * 

37 40 MfrHpt 572alX5 1TO TO SE % 

12M 5% VlMomri S 3930 8 7ft B + * 

MVS. 11* vtMnvtpf 174 21* 21% n*+ M 

^ 2 ’ tx 33 7 MS M 29* »*+* 

a 35% MrthM X40 37 3V 292 MU. SS «%— * 

to* S' 4 iSSZfit IS 15 ^ S *8 S£«8 

33% 22% Maaco J6 liUlB D% 30% 31W-1 

2?* IM t « o’? ,5 13 W* S*— % 

m ™ MraevF ’■ " ” 12 SS m » 

26* 20* MchCp ZX 113 u uSjw U, 

11* 9* maslnc IX I1J 22 11* 11% mb— * 

U* *1% JSSSi E I5p « 3o% I r+ift 
^ sasssffw. niB to* ' i* 

31* id* Matttpf m 32% iS tlS 

12% 9% Moran 7 S TOW rak— '% 

HL. 3S* !JWO« 122 16 10 319 48% 4H% SfH % 

49* 36% Mavta 270a 54 u « 2* 2S 3 

S? SS 77 17 31 % Wft S*ZlS 

BVt 20* McDrpf XdO 113 19 99 S* S* ™ 

31* 23% McOerl IX A2 29 3312 »* § 

PHBHS8 

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BUSINESS ROUNDUP 


INTEKWATIOWAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1985 


Page XI 


« * % 

128? \ 

I | P 

te!^S 


- U.S. Airlines See Surge in Tourism 


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i j. 3., . 


; f? By Agis Salpukas 

Men- York Times Stmnr 

NEW YORK — Fueled by the 
_ eondaued srrengih of the dollar, 
another siuge in American travel to 


that. Mr. Long said. He predicted TWA is sd 
that the rise in overseas travel to Copenhw 
would mean record profits for bay in April. 


TWA is scheduled to add service 
to Copenhagen, Geneva and Bom- 


con tinned strength of the dollar. TWa for the year cn kw™** twav «-rr ,.v- 

Other major carriers, such as Pan pr5SimtoSS«2E SSwSf 
Europe ism the making, and the American World Airways and Bril- E5d3?cinifrB^£ had toS 
major lnternauonaJ airlines are al- ish Airwave ate aim mkimm sbhi uie earner rcccnuy naa 10 ex 
ready adding flights and destina- highSof SfSS I»nd the woriang hours at its na- 
tions for the neak snmnw ii™, n- u DOOWngS lor interna- UO naj tour-reservauon center m 

sons tor the peak summer season, nonal flighu, mostly lor the sum- Philadelphia. The center, which 

HEfc semor ^ v1 “ t° «P“d capacity ^ to Speratc from 9 A.M. to 6 

president for maricenag 31 Trans. Md add routes. p m j b fm™ taU m 


. dons for the peak summer season, itonal flights, mostlylor the sum- 
Stcwart G- Long, senior vice rocr, and plan to expand capacity 
president for marketing 31 Trans, and add routes. 

. World Ahiintt, said in a news con- To accommodate the expected 
; fercTO: Tuesday that so far this exodus, TWA is planningto in- 
. fluaner the earner s bookings for crease by 18 percent the niunber of 


. international flights, including the 
summer period, are up 122 percent 


P.M„ is now open from 7 A.M. to 
10 P.M., he said, but at times it still 
cannot handle all the calls. 
Officials av other major airlines 


.. . . ^ vuivuua av wwm uuiyi uuuuu 

!?4kS^ ff " V wamed * at travelers not taking 


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summer period, are up 122 percent the Atlantic during tSTaimmer 
over the pa«rf laoyear's «roog pcakpSdli^SS 

Jb^wJw^ever seen figures like Capadly 21 P®® 11 rooms al reasoSe rate. 

^ We ^ *“ trgures ““ * the previous summer. yesr ^ 

US. Sets Rules for 2-Enmne Jet flights 

^ Germany airiltaly because most 

. one engine. Three- and four-engine had been booked by the airline and 
. WAbHlNCFrON —The Federal planes can be no farther th.-m two travel agent tour operators. 

^ Itini* . ”^ ia ^ on Admimsuation has draft- hours with one engine inoperative. John W. LampL, manager of pub- 

/S! W: ■ 2.- 10 5f n ? ut new t'vo^ngme The proposal by the FAA would lie relations in New Yolk for Brit- 

ls,i ^ ‘ J .f jners 10 fly /Mg remote routes attend that rule to preraerly modi- ish Airways, said his company was 

^ ^ that now- require three- or four- fied two^tigine jets. planning to increase its capacity by 

t^j,- ’ planes. Trans World Airlines, a 767 cus- 17 percent tins summer. 

1 . ralts become final, tomer and the leading North Allan- As of April i, he said, the carrier 

’ ' v,u n aUo !* Bocm S f s lwo^»giM lie earner, is using a modified 767 will add new service from Kennedy 
'-XT ■ 1110X1 fuel -efficient flights between Boston and Par- International Airport to Manches- 

i N ^3i Atlantic routes. is with a special exemption from ter and stan service twice a week 

/ . }. ibI is the first two-engine the FAA that permits the plane to from Orlando, Florida, to London 
. jetliner to nave Ok range Tor irons- be as far from an airport as 75 and five times a week from Tampa, 
: Atlantic operations, and Boeing minutes' flying time with one en- Florida, to London. 

. has been pressing to get the rules gine inoperative. He said the airline's advance 


He said the airline's advance 


changed. Under current rules, a The rules would apply every- sales for February. Match and 
1 two-engine plane can be no farther where, not just to transoceanic fly- April are up 62 percent over last 
than 60 minutes from an airport on ing. year. 


Ea^em Settles 
WithPUotson 
Pay Concessions 

Unued Press Inientutwnul 

MIAMI — Eastern Air Lines 
readied a tentative settlement 
on Thursday with its pilots' 
union on wage concessions and 
took a break from talks with 
two other unions to brief direc- 
tors oq the company's labor 
problems. 

The settlement with the 
1500-member Air Line Pilots 
Association still must be rati- 
fied by the union membership, 
said Esperison Martinez, a 
union spokesman. He declined 
to give details of tbe agreement, 
but said it would enable Eastern 
to present its lenders with a 
business plan that reflects a 
profit for 1985. 

The plan “generally em- 
braces’' recommendations for 1 
productivity increases, $50 mil- 1 
lion in cost cuts and profit shar- 
ing made by Eastern's labor 
consultant, William J. Usery, 
said Richard McGraw, Eastern 
senior vice president for com- 
munications. 

Eastern has been in technical 
default on some of its $2.5 bil- 
lion in debt since last Friday. It 
was still negotiating with the 
machinists' and flight atten- 
dants' unions. 


Nokia Sees Stronger High-Tech Sales in 1985 


By Juris Kaza 

Ititemunniul HrvaU Tribune 

STOCKHOLM — Ov Nokia 
A B. the electronic industrial chemi- 
cal and forest conglomerate that is 
Finland's largest private corpora- 
tion. has said that soles in its high- 
technology divisions would contin- 
ue to grow strongly in 1985 and 
that earnings “would develop more 
favorably" than in 1984. 

Nokia ’5 preliminary report this 
week did not give specific 1984 
profit figures, but anaivsts in Swe- 
den estimated that die Finnish 
group's net profits probably grew 
by a maximum of 10 percent from 
tbe 1983 level of 104 million mark- 
kas ($15.4 million). 

They said that earnings growth 
was slowed by the poor profitabili- 
ty of Nokia’s cable division and 
higher production costs in its elec- 
tronics divisions as a result of last 
year's worldwide component short- 
age. 

“Although there is nothing on 
earnings in the report, the assump- 
tion of earnings is around 10 per- 
cent, which is bdow expectations," 
one analyst at a Swedish brokerage 
said Thursday. 

He said it appeared that profits 
were lower dun expected in the 
new consumer-electronics division, 
created with Nokia's 1984 acquisi- 
tion of Oy Salora, a Finnish color- 
television company, and Luxor AB, 
a Swedish television, computer and 
electronics group. 


But one London analyst who 
specializes in Scandinavian mar- 
kets. said that Nokia's estimated 
performance was “about in line, 
with expectations." 

The report said that Nokia group 
soles in 1984 climbed 37 percent to 
9.40 billion raarkkaa from 6.97 bil- 
lion markkas in 19S3. and the com- 
pany forecast that sales would grow 
by 15 percent in 1985. 

Nokia's repon stated that sales 
of tbe electronics industrial group 
rose 37 percent in 19S4 to 1.825 


COMPANY NOTES 

British Shipbuilder* has won a 
£32-rnillion (S35-mfllion) contract 
from a group of Cypriot companies 
to build four 1 5.000-ton cargo ships 
that will be chartered to the Cuban 
g overnm ent. 

BTR PLCs bid of about £33 
million ($36 million) for Dunlop 
Holdings PLC will not be referred 
to the British monoplies commis- 
sion. the Trade and Industry De- 
partment has announced. 

Walt Disney Productions has 
reached an agreement with Lucas- 
film Ltd, producer of the “Star 
Wars" films, to develop attractions 
for Disney' theme parks. Disney 
also said it would raise S 100 million 
through a public limited partner- 
ship to finance its film production 
costs. 

Gannett Co. reported fourth- 


billion markkas from 1.329 billion 
markkas in 1983. It predicted that 
sales in this sector, comprising tete- 
comrn uni cations, microcomputers 

and other electronic equipment, 
would rise 50 percent during 1985. 

In 1984. Nokia said the electron- 
ics group's returns on net assets 
improved despite lame in vestments 
in research and development. 

Sales for the Salora/ Luxor 
group, making television equip- 
ment and other consumer electron- 


ics, were 1 .2673 billion markkas, an 
increase of 28 percent over the 
companies' combined 1983 sales of 
UI2 billion markkaa. Nokia said 
that exports and sales by foreign 
subsidiaries comprised 88 percent 
of total sales of the new division. 

Luxor, which Nokia acquired 
from the Swedish sute. “solidified 
its position in the U. S. market for 
satellite-receiving equipment." ac- 
cording to the report. Salora boost- 
ed exports by 40 percent, mainly 
through increased sales to Britain. 


S uarter profit up 23 percent to 
743 million, or 93 cents a share, 
from $60.8 million or 76 cents a 
year earlier, and up 17 percent in 
1984 to $223.9 minion. $2.80 a 
share, from S191.7 million, or $140 
a share, in 1983. 

Hill Samuel Group PLC has re- 
structured its banking interests In 
Australia, pending formal approval 
by the Australian Treasury. Hill 
Samuel's investment in Hill Samuel 
Australia Ltd. will be replaced by a 
substantial minority interest in a 
newly formed Australian trading 
bank, Macquarie Bank. 

Matsushita Electric Industrial 
Co. is negotiating sales of video- 
tape recorder kits to Hungary's 
state-owned Orion Radio & Elec- 
trical Works for assembly in Hun- 


gary at Eastern Europe's first vid- 
eo-recorder assembly plant. 

Orion Royal Bank lid. part of 
RovaJ Bank of Canada, has agreed 
to acquire the 29.9-percem stake in 
the London stock brokerage Kilcat 
& Airfcen held by Charterhouse J. 
Rothschild PLC. No financial de- 
tails were available. 

Porsche AG will propose a divi- 
dend of 8 Deutsche marks ($130) 
for each of tbe nonvoting prefer- 
ence shares it first floated Iasi year, 
and an unchanged 7.5- DM divi- 
dend for ordinary shares, for the 
year that ended July 31. 1984. 

Standard Elektrik Lorenz AG, a 
subsidiary of ITT Corp_ has signed 
a joint venture agreement with Ita- 
ly's state-owned Ristrulturazione 
Elettronica to produce video cas- 
sette recorders. 


; Saudi Petrochemical Boom 
\ Stirs Fears of Global Glut 


(Continued from Page 9) 

" and a lot of high-cosi capacity has 

- already been shut down." 

*- But Mr. Posevina and others 
r think the effect of the Saudi pro- 

■a 

: Firms Study 
: 'Smart’ PCs 

*■ (Continued from Page 9) 
programs that grow as they are 
^■.u-sed. that tan “learn" repetitive 
^office procedures and begin to per- 
form rote tasks themselves. 

Work is now under way at Mi- 
■ crosoft Corp. in Bellevue, Wash- 

- ington, on a system that monitors 
the user's every move, looking to 

l detect patterns In time, the pro- 

- gram would begin to catch on. It 
would suggest short cuts, remind- 
ing the user that the spreadsheet 
program, for example, mrludfs a 

„ feature that copies a column of 
• numbers so that time does not have 
to be wasted typing them in again. 

' Cte it might catch anjnadvertent , 
cftniSaon that deviates from the us- 
; eft ordinary pattern, saving the 
user embarrassment. “Hey, idiot,” 
a particularly caustic program 
^ might type across the screen, 
“don’t you usually send a copy of 
J this report to the dob who sits in 
! tbe next office?" 

Such a program would be a “pas- 
sive learner," and the risk is that it 
. . could pick up bad habits or discov- 
er patterns of activity that lead it 
Z astray. 

Some al the Phoenix conference 
__ suggested, only half in jest that 
T software makers eventually wfll 
package their programs like deter- 
gent: ‘‘New! Improved! With 
‘ A.LT 


ducti on on American producers 
will be “ minimal, '’ except for their 
export markets. 

“We don’t see the Saudi stuff 
directly compering in United States 
markets." Mr. Posevina said. “It 
will be sold mainly in the Pacific 
rim and some will be targeted to- 
ward Western Europe." 

Tbe onset of Saudi petrochemi- 
cal production comes as no sur- 
prise, since it has been eight years 
in the making. Still, some analysts 
compare the American petrochemi- 
cal industry 10 the U. S. steel and 
auto industries just before their 
damaging fights against imports. 

Although the Saudis are trying to 
minimize their impact, they con- 
cede that their presence, along with 
new participants from other ener- 
gy-abundant countries, will alter 
the industry. 

“Commodity petrochemical pro- 
duction is shifting from traditional 
producers to the energy-rich na- 
tions," Mr. al-Jarbou said in New 
York recently. 

“This h a harsh rajlty,” he said. 
“We are pasahg : through the twi- 
light of one industrial era and en- 
tering the dawn of another.” 

Mr. al-Jarbou, who recently 
completed a visit to the United 
States to talk about Saudi produc- 
tion. is director general of the pro- 
jects implementation department 
of Riyadh-based Saudi Basic In- 
dustries Corp., or Sabic. 

Sabic was formed by the state in 
1976 to develop petrochemical, 
metals and fertilizer industries. 
About 30 percent of the company is 
held by private citizens and the 
goal is to make that 75 percent. In 
alL 16 plants wil] be built at Al- 
JubaiJ on the Gulf and Yanbu al 
Bahron tbe Red Sea. 


Company Earnings 

Ravanue and profits. In millions, are In local currencies 
unless otherwise indicated 


Canada 

Husky Oil 

manor. mm tm 

*• Prw«K— -33.1 19.1 

* Per Share — US OJD 

Year 1M xm 

JU Revenue l,m M»- 

!§« OptrNel 99.0 47-6 

y Oow SW®_ l.W (L4S 

, Wesftoasf Trans. 

. 4H>Quar. 1984 WH 

Ow Net 1536 UM 

" Qmt Share— <127 US 
Year 19W INS 

- Revenue—— 1.15ft. l.m 

■ Oon-Net 60J8 KkOT 

Oper Share— Ml 152 

Netherlands 

KLM 

“ 3rd Over. WM 

. Revenue l-5sa 1310- 

^ Profits 19.1 <a)235 

. Per Share 050 — 

9 Months WM IW 

Revenue— 45S0. 1870. 

Preflt 3365 I72J 

Per Snore— SJO 597 
a: Mu. 

«’ Oce VJ). Grinten 

•» Year - ifM wn 

- Revenue 1JWL M«L 

profit* JM 515 

per Share — 25.92 2152 

Nefh. Antilles 

- ScMumbergsr 
Mf- «Hi4uar. *NJ »g 

T-«BE= « 

per Shore — 108 B50 

Year WM IW 

, Revenue MM. 

> Profils 1,1®. 1.m 

^ Per Shore — 4,10 3J3 

United States 

Airborne Froi^rt 
4ft< Qoaf 19M IMS 

- tin »1J 

Nel Inc w 

- per Shore — 05J M6 


Anheuser-Busch 

X |S 

Year tfM 1983 

Revenue 7JSQ. tUgl. 

Net Inc 391-3 34U 

Per Share — 7*0 4JB 


Armstrong Rubber nevmue — 


istQear. 1985 19M 

Revenue-— l«-f l«M 
Oder Net — 7,41 6.19 

Oper Share.. 052 054 

1 985 nef evefude* vataal 
X! J million trim solo ofjtrop- 
erty. Per than results ad- 
lustod tar S-for-t sent In 
March. 

Chubb 

4th Qf»r. WM 
Oder Net — 2« 1*5 

Oner Shore— V» ™ 
Yea- 19M 1983 

oper Net — 

Oper Share— 55 M6 
]9Bj nets include to* beri- 
me, of SUB a dure In veer 

and oT9S cents mworter, 

Columbia Gas Sys. 
4th Quar. WH Ijg 

Revenue i JiO- 1«<J 

Nef Inc 2W 

Per Share — 052 MS 

Year 1984 1MD 

Revenue 

Nef Inc 1SW 1^7 

Per Share — 153 # 

Mefs InctixSB losses et S3S.S 

nmSn^sSsflOOriauormr 

SErSf X*- 9 trillion vs S2J 

tnnaonbtvevjremdb^nbh 

million. 

Ganerd Signal 

Re^n. 2j ^ 

Year Wg -m 

Revenue 32S g* 

Net Inc i°“i *?-!? 

Pm- Share— 1,6 


Year 1984 19(3 

Revenue 1 joo. 1.100. 

Net inc — 1M2 787 

Per Shore — 253 2J12 

Norton 

4lfl Quar. 19M 1982 

Revenue 2997 2B7 J 

Net inc 174 177 

Per share — 1H7 D.93 

Year 1984 190 

Revenue — 1J00. 1.17ft. 

NH IOC. 604 454 

Per Share— 104 24$ 

Nets Utctode trains Of U.I 
million vs S9.7 million In 
auarters and at Sll million vs 
SltS mtttksi In rears tram 
sole ot businesses. 

Phelps Dodge 

4th Qaar. *984 1983 

Revenue 2174 2U3 

Oper loss — 1325 297 

Year 1984 190 

Revenue MQ.I 90.1 

Oaer Loss — 207J 537 

Nets exclude tosses of 040 

v* 9 cents a Share In quarters 
and at SZ46 vs 4 certs to years 
tram discontinued opera- 
lions. 

Rotor 

4» Poor. 1984 19M 

Revenue 1|ft7 1427 

Net Inc — - 1J71 1555 

Per Share — 0L74 0.74 

Year KM IW 

Revenue — . 5221 mj 

Net Inc 44M 42« 

Per Shore— 1M 203 

Safeway Stores 
*» Ouar. l«4 MU 

Revenue — - 6130. 5.780- 

Net Inc — 7W 

Per Shore — '39 170 

Year KM IW 

Revemre : — 1940. iftgo. 

Net Inc IBM Irtg 

per Share — 112 33* 

Sundshaid 


4th Qaar. 
Revenue — 

Net Inc 

PM Shore— . 
Year 

Revenue — 
Net Inc 


ISM 190 

3073 2414 

143 

1.12 037 

I9M 190 
'340. 9093 

664 M2 


ManvBto 


Year 

Revenue — 
Nei inc — 

Per Share. 


1984 190 

4)7.9 3347 

1033 193 

135 130 


Allied Corp. 

iXKJI 

* Year 1984 «W 

’«& 'SS 

Per Shore — 5J3 tLQ9 

'• Anderson, Clayton 

* 2nd Quar. T9Kj 

Revenue 4#£2 f JyS 

Net inc W3 


Her inc. 

Per Share — 0J2 B.» 


- in Half 
, Revenue . 

Net inc - 
' Per Share. 


IPS3 nets restated. 


T985 iff* 
929,9 73W 

1049 

038 235 


4fhOuar. *£% 

Revenue— 17 

Net inc — — 

Per Share — 

Year 1«M '» 

Revenue— jai 

Oper Net _ — rt. 

Oper Share— r | 8 

donut. 

Moore MeCorm. 

BBbs= ^ ^ 

KJfen 1» 

Nets otter preferred! dir#' 
(tends. 

Mew York Tima* 

SET? — 1 


Per Shore — 163 242 

Tesoro Pot. 

JZST- ^ 

Sffe= 8S,,, H 

7RDneffnefMdBSBOlnaf*43 

million. 

Travelers 

4th QUar. 1984 190 


Oner Not l*L7 1077 

Oper Share— 143 178 

Year 19M 190 

RevMwe im 1M«L 

Oper Nel 346.1 3426 

Oper Share— 4.1 1 438 

Nets exclude jwW of *14 
million vs toss or OP million 
to Quarte rs ana aotoo! 07 

million si choree of SSUrriP 
lion. 


4th Qu or. 
Revenue — 
Nel 'nc — 
per Share- 
Year 

Revenue — 
Nel inc — 


Union Electric 

9MT. 1984 1983 

T— ta 

□reZT 042 Ml 
r 1984 1983 

MIC. MOO 

r~ 047 2767 


Per Shore— 284 236 


INTERNATIONAL REAL ESTATE 



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Tetoc 287397 f JJ 


MANHAmN SITE 
FOR SALE 

The Triborough Bridge and Tunnel Authority, on 
behalf of itself and the City of New York, requests 
proposals for the sale and redevelopment of the New 
York Coliseum. 

The Coliseum site which contains 149.350 square feet 
is located between West 58th Street and West 60th 
Street, fronting on the westerly side of Columbus 
Circle in the Borough of Manhattan, in New York City. 
The site is improved with an 825,000 square foot office 
building, a 432,000 square foot exhibition center and 
a 650 car undeiground garage. 

The site is zoned to permit office, residential, hotel 
and retail uses. The zoning allows for more than 2.2 
millidV) square feet of development. Up to an addi- 
tional 448,000 square feet of development may be 
allowed in exchange for making designated improve- 
ments to the adjacent subway station. 

For further information and a copy of the RFP contact: 
Lisa Davis 

Real Estate Department 
Metropolitan Transportation Authority 
347 Madison Avenue 
New York, NY 10017. U.S. A. 

(2121878-7055 


A PRIME BANKING UNIT OF 

SQ.FT 


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Adjacent to the Bank of England and 
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Telephone 01 -283 11 91 • Telex 888655 LOOTING 





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A custom built paiatiolly large 7 bedroom 8iA bath home of exquisite 
detailing and dassicafiy French decor, WHh swimming pool, a vrirx firt B stream 
edging the beautifully landscaped properly. Provisions for guest suites 

mduda second khchan. Exceptional space for entartakiiiYg. In one of our tines) 
residential areas, total privacy, just 5 minutes from the Greenwich fine. 
Handsomely furnished at 51,060,000 or unfurnished at 5995,000, 

John Goman RJL 925 lena Rfcfe* M. Stanfad CT 0M02 Tab (303) 329.8*6] 


Prestige Store For Rent 

FIFTH AVENUE 
50’S EAST SIDE 

New York City 

Between Saks and Tiffany's 

High Quality Tenant Only 
Principals Only 
270-900 square meters 
3,000-10,000 square feet 

Telephone: 212-936-0001, 

Box D-2133, International Herald Tribune, 
92521 Neuilly Cedex, France. 


For buv'"9' 5 “^ E5T AT£ 

COMSUa : 

-Pll 


coMSua = 

agedi 

(j de B«r. Preside"') 
w nid Princes: 


LAUSANNE 

(Switzerland) 

FOR SALE 

Superb estate, comprising 
large 19tti century house-out- 
buildings and garages, linked 
with a project, authorized and 
available, for new buildings. 
Exceptional offer, in green 
landscape and with extensive 
view. 

Write under cipher 22-2004/ T, 
nPnbfioto 1002, Lausaraw/Gis 


4> SWITZERLAND 

FOREIGNERS CAN BUY 

? oTiJD:'0. APARTMENT 
C r CHA_=7 on 

LAKE GENEVA-MONTREUX or 

CRAMS ^MONTANA, 
i-ES D/A8LERETS. VER8IER, ' 
VILLARS, JURA, etc. 


n. de Bee r « Presiden 1 Charlotte 

^ irt rr^^ oNALBEAm 


W7HjQS©DQ 

TORONTO, CANADA 

C$10,500 — A SMALL DOWNPAYMENT 
FOR A BIG INVESTMENT IN 
PRIME LOCATION CONDOMINIUMS 

• only 15% cash downpayment 

• 3 years rental and management guarantee 

• prices: CS62tfXK3S8,000 

• Z 3, 4 bedrooms. multHeve) 

• Apartment sizes: 1 1S8 sq. ft. ft 1 tar)— 2010 sq. ft. (167m 2 ) 

■ Modem conveniences and recreation 1 aciltties 

• Constant appreciation, fully rented, professionally managed 

W1NZEN CORPORATION LIMITED 

Ate Martetfno Managw. 67 Yonpa StreM. Sulla 700 
Toronto, Ontarto, Canada, M5E 1 JB 
Tel:(41B)0BW»71 — Tatar 08324301 

• IN ADDITION WINZEN OFFERS: 

— quality commercial properties & rental apartment buildings 

— comprehensive services to potential immigrating entrepreneurs 


SAN RMNQSC0 KNM5UA 
OCEAN VB¥ ESTATE 
RABU0US LUXURY 


REVAC SA 
H ‘2C2 GENEVA 


24j000 *qA, raddenn just umptateU. 
Wjedrpom tuita of with aoaan view* + 
prhate bate. Every c onoehctte luxury irv 
ductng 9 vAieipocl tubs. 14 firep faj et. 
fadmr Mkndna pool Appre a dmctely S 
Mre* [aikSbani acreage awfofcte). HeS- 
part at frort door, large ben\ Gcroge* & 
wnb oauf hdudad. 

USSTrOOCVOOQ. 

BndneimMh 
MABBKMN. WaDBWUUCR CO. 

344 Koomy Street 
Sen r iDncw o q, CA, 94106 
{415)434-3600 


Between Berkeley Square 
end The Hta. A stunning 
newly modernised top floor 
flat in prestigious blade. 
3 beds, 2 baths. Double 

reception. Krtdrverv. Central 
heating, lift. Porterage. 
• 90 years lease. £249,500- 


MAGNIFICENT NEWLY 
BUILT HOUSE AT 
COOHBE HILL 
SURREY 


Wtw ta o4h o I H)d> IVri Cam, Iordan 

Raagaoui pomai pb ealune pnwre iWt 
fcifKW ti ren n a I Sussex Tui* fom4nuM ffQ 

WUva a few ya«k of Resdart EwrJtwn i 
vmtmeboam and nmediAfy Ioann to got 
cam «4«>0 ha w on honorary nwnber. 

Set n flbraus m*«« grouneb Mrih hgh icnwv 
«B rtotbdmdnm 6 bstSocsn. 3 batniam. 
5 hwg room two with boned tnglenooh 
Eraptoai reetpdon hal wdh gJoed bndng, 
targa w el tent Ufchei wish bteoUass orto. 
uAy/Iamiy room, no cor flarogt. 

ntKE 5500/00 FRE&KHJO 
flarektak wrfh photograph apply 

HAWES + CO. 

6 Ndh Snot, Wmbkdon Cdumov 
imdon SW19 SOX 
Telephone, 01-946 6547 


FOR 5 ALE 
ABSOLUTELY NET 
LAND & BUILDINGS 

* Grocery & Gasoline Chain 
12,500 stores). 

* NY Stock Exchange. Stock 
value $350,000/100. 

* 1 2.25% Average Annual Rent 
- New 15 Year Lease. 

* Two 10- year renewal options. 

* 1 3775% Rent’ml 6th Year (A 
first options is exercised). 

* Rent Increases Each Year in 
Options Periods. 

* tAinlmoTn Purchase - 8 Sunbelt 
Properties. Price approx 
53,000,000. All Cash. (50% 
sell groceries & gasoline). 

William K. Lang fan (Owner) 
6 East 45th Street 

New York, NY 10017 
(U.S.A.) 

Tel.: # 212-661-8100 


. FOR SALE 

FRANCE - COTE D'AZUR 
Magnificent property, in unaO private 
hamtei of 15 ha, connwiauie beentifoi 
principal boildiitgwiu large terrace + 
indoor nrirecung pooL AImj 4 other 
provenrei Cu-mhotnea + lam outdoor 
swimming poo] with pod ooue and 
barbecue. Vine, peach and olive 
groves. Roads throukfa property, water 
rese rvoir. Property 4- buiimnn to per- 
feet condition. Bolt on a hill with 
view of hay of St. Tropet Marvellous 
ptare fur meditation, aarrouiuEii^ full 
of dung, Dover* + peace. 

For information all 

Mme DESMETS, 

Baiflium 3271/341511/504206. 


j'lUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHie 

I ON TWE BEACH 1 
i SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA | 

1 TMs IOlODO sq. ft. AAadlsnanaen Via is = 
J toextad In ScvUn Monica on the latat ond s 



: ooaen, two mvorts room wtth tuB batv J 
' Swannmg peal. Enjoy fiw privacy of s 
i baodiSvmg and fita oontewdancu of bring 5 
I 20 minute* drtvnp tbna to toe Anfloim, 5 
Los Angoiei Aapret or Bavoriy Mb. 5 
Foe mmw btfomation and £ 


I Wffiom 1 KaBy Jr. (213) 826-4521 * 
I 1 1942 Sot VkunteBIwL x 

I ton Aimaiat , CA 90049. | 

mniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiUMHiiiiiiiniiutiiiHiiiiiii0 


Mognifieen* doubt# fronted residanca in 
moil presfigious location off Hyde Pork, 
dare to Knightobridne., There h very 
spa ci o u s a eB onwodettun in kwnaeuiate 
condMon, inducBno Sauna complex, 
2 Terraces and Garden. 

FREEHOLD FOR SALE 

apply 


INTERNATIONAL 
REAL ESTATE 


appears every 

FRIDAY 


To place an odvertoemenl 
contact our office in your country 
(fisted to Classified Section) on 


Max Ferrero, 

181 Aw, CAarkted&Ganfle, 
92321 Neuilly Cedex, France. 
Tel: 747.UL65, Telts; 613595. 


• i 









Tlmarsdays 

MSE 

Closing 


Table* include the nationwide prices 
up to Hw dosing on Wall Street 


tav i *on 
23 im 

34 Ui B*. : 
38% 30V 
KM 71 Vj 
saw, 48Vj 
57% 50 
Si 70% 
mu m 
nt «. 

7PM SOH 


14 1348 53% 
10« Z3 
30 13% 

12 621 3816 
14 4S4 26% 

370 54% 
337 53* 

13 2190 32 

14 109 37% 
SAB 5% 

8 ISP 7HW 


S2% 53V — % 
23 23 + V 

12 12V.— % 

3AM 37 -1% 
26% 26% + % 
54 54% + * 

SlYt 5IM-I 
31 M JIM + M 
36% 37 
4Tb 5%+Vt 
78W 7B% + % 


12 Month 
High Law Stock 


Dty. VOL PE lOteHIgh LawQuat. Ctfue 


SI 404b 
JIM 26 
30% 1AM 
IBM 14% 
9* AM 
51V 34V 
25% IM 
28% 23% 
46V 2B% 
84% 75% 
XV, 26% 
31% 18% 

mv> u 

31M 20 
44% 29% 
24% 15V 
23% 14 
43 26 

38M 23M 
23% 18% 
13% 11 
lt% 9% 


(Continued from Page 10) 


Morans 230 5.1 
MntDU 256 U 
MonPw 200 92 
Mon SI 10001X1 
MOtJY JBD BO 
MoonC 200 19 
MoreM 104 15 
MorM MUD M 
Morgns 12 D 17 
Moron of 707b 90 
AAorKnd 1.40 20 
Morses JB 17 
MtoRtV 1.710 07 
Mortons 04 23 
MotrklB 04 14 
Munfrd JM> 23 
Murtsne 

Murpnc 140 13 
MUfPO 100 14 
MvrrvO 130 50 
MutOm 1440100 
MiwLn 


30 17 
232 70 7 


45% 45% 
31% 99% 
32 21% 

17% 17% 
9% 9 
51% 51 
: 23% 23% 
27 27 

47% 46 
BO 79% 
99% 39 
21% 21% 
19% 19% 


IBM IBM 
42V 42% 
29V 29% 
21% 21% 
12% 13% 
4V 4% 


45%+ % 
21 % + % 
21V +1 
17% 

9M 

SI + % 
23M + M 

<7% +T« 
79M+ % 
39% + % 
21 %+ % 
19V 

23% + % 

K+% 

29M + % 

K 3 


stpD 

■tour 500 110 

Ibrs J4 10 

I lo El 240 13.9 
ME pf 100 130 
ME Pf 400 119 
ME Pf 408 140 
ME Pf 87? 143 
ME Pi 14l 114 
MEtf 103 130 
ME Pf 7JH lfl 
ME Pf 178 U5 

II pf 17.12 1*5 
ME Pf 1575 147 

pf 900 140 
-1 700 143 
172 77 
340 19 
' 08 20 
200 40 
OO 10 
78 0 
132 70 




107% 
ASM 
55 
1B% 
BAM Bfib 
23 24 

49% SO 
2A% 26% 
33 33% 

30% 30% 
19% 19% 
42V 42% 
33 33% 

24% 34% 
41M 42 
83% 82% 
11 % 11 % 
13% 13% 
74V 14% 
13% 13V» 
19% 19% 



OO 27 9 
0% 18 7 



OO 27 II 
04 lO 29 


64 + % 
62V + % 


3SV 27% QuakO s 12 781 38% 38 38% + % 

21% IS QuakSO JO 37262269 2nb2TM3njr+% 

11M 6% Buonex 49 69 Mb 9% 9%-% 

3Z% 23 QuMtar 100 48 10 22S9 33% 31 » +2£ 

24% 14 QkRoll 20c 030 472 24%23V24%+V 



66% 
2V 
2S9% 
22 
46 
38% 
37% 
76V 
26% 
10V 
24% 24% 
34% 34% 
36% 36% 
42% <L 
29% 39% 
54 54 

33% 33 
127 125 

3% 2% 
20 19% 

30% 
27 
3% 
3«V 
43% 
7% 
26% 
21% 
< 1 % 


%. 

13 + M 

29% + % 
3%+ V 
6 % — % 
34% + % 
30 +IM 
6V+ M 
4% + M 
31%+ % 
79% 

48 +1% 

23%+ % 
29V+ Vb 
32V + % 
39 + % 
11 %+ % 
% 
W 
% 
% 
% 


44% 33% Xerox 3-“ 18 “£ « £* + 

Sl% 45% Xerox pf 505 107 404 51% 51 SIM + 

29 19 XTRA 04 20 10 300 28 26% 23 + 


29 24 ZateCp 172 47 9 171 28% Z7V 21 + M' 

24% 14% ZoMH 04 SO 20 633 17 16% 16V + 

H 20% to? Mb 7 16 7SB 57V 56% 57% +1% . 

m% iSb SJmE ■ .045 

27V 18 Zara OO 10 19 5* 15% Bb 25% 

31% 21% ZumJn 172 44 II 710 31 30 30V— V 


Sotos flourw arc unofficial. Yearly htofp «totows SfSHEL 

ttw previous 55 weoks plw ttw currant wek.6olmrtthoKO^ 


10% 

6% RBlnd 

.16 

14 


233 

9% 

9 

9% + % 

40 

28% RCA 

104 

26 

12 464* 

40% 

39% 

39% + % 

34 

29 RCA Of 

150 1X4 


ZTOl 33% 

32 

33% + % 

91% 

67% RCApf 

400 

*3 


78 

92% 

91to 

92% +1% 

31% 

34% RCApf 

212 

60 


486 

31% 

30% 31% + % 

35% 

39% RCApf 

XAS 

MU 


sg 

35% 

35% 

35%+ U 

9% 

6% RLC 

40 

22 

11 

24 

9% 

9U. 

914— 14 

4% 

3 RPCll 




610 

414 

4% 

4% — % 

17% 

12% RTE 

56 

14 

10 

50 

17% 

16% 

16%— % 

36% 

25 RalsPur 

100 

27 

13 

H779 

36% 

36% 

36*+ % 

8% 

5% Hamad 



37 

1847 

7% 

TV, 

7% 

21 

16% Ranco 

JM 

44 

9 

18 

19% 

1914 

1914 + 14 

9to 

4% RanorO 




340 

S% 

5% 

5%— % 

65 

47% Raycm 

44 

4 

19 

159 

63 

61% 63 +1% 

48 

34% Ravthn 

140 

34 

17 

2820 

47% 

46% 

46% +1 

13% 

7% ReadBt 

40 

*0 36 

127 

10% 

10 

10% 

23% 

16% MBatPf 212 104 


50 

20% 

20% 

20% + 14 

16% 

9% RttRH 

IJSe 84 

1? 

94 

16% 

16% 

16%+ % 


U.S. Futures Feb. 7 


V 

Season 

Saason 


High 

Low 

Open High Law Close Cho. 


Grains 


Season 

Season 






High 

Law 

Open 

Hloh 

Law 

Close 

Che. 

2130 

2080 

May 



2125 

+7 

Est. Sales 


Prev.Sales *193 




Prev. Day Open lnt. 2X689 off 242 




ORANGE JUICE (NYCE1 
15000 Ibs^ amts per lb. 





18X53 

11850 

Afar 17*00 

17*10 

17000 

17140 

—240 

18500 

15100 

15500 

May 17X25 

17505 

17240 

17290 —240 
17*10 —260 

18*85 

Jul 17X50 

17X50 

17340 

18X03 

157.75 

Sep 17X10 

17S.10 

17150 

17245 

—3.10 

18100 

15700 

Nov 17345 

17345* 17100 

17145 

—259 

1E0JM 

15X00 

Jan 17X15 

17X15 

17X15 

17045 

—250 

17750 

15X30 

Mar 



17045 

— 25D 

1*250 

16000 

May 



17045 

—250 



Jul 



171175 

—250 

Est. Sales 


Prev.Sales 

4(8 




Prev. Day Open lnt. 7J7D off 93 





Season Season 

Hlsh Law Open Hlptl Low Ossa 

8804 8700 Sep 1878 8870 88.11 8802 

8977 8703 Dec 87.93 8703 87.93 8775 

Est Sales Prev.Sales »483 

Prov. Day Open Int.IOROOS up 1776 

BRITISH POUND (IMM) 

5 per pound- 1 point eauo is MUnoi 
10170 10985 Mar LrtOO U12D 1.1045 1.1066 

17350 liMBO Jun 1.1015 t.1025 10WO 10980 

10450 10785 Sep 10995 10995 1.0975 10940 

17710 10798 Doc 10940 10960 10940 10905 

EsL Sales i860 Prev.Sales 5030 
Prev. Day Oaan Ini. 21,975 off 164 


7465 .7480 
7445 7457 
7436 7440 


Metals 


J4 “ *3 

741B .7428 


CORN (CBTJ 

5000 bu minimum- dollars per bushel 
375% 245 Mar 773 273% 

130 272V MOV 279% 200 

371 276% Jtri 201% 202% 

371% 2.70V Sep 274% 275% 

275 245 Dec 248 270 

X10 274% Mar 277 278 % 

371% 279% May 202 203% 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 21442 

Prev. Day Open lnt,13U90 up 109 
SOYBEANS ICBT1 
5000 bu mini mum- dollars per bushel 
7.90% 549% Mar 5.94 601 

777 501V MOV 609% 4.12V 

779 5.91% Jul 818% 672% 

704 575 Aug 670 673% 

671 575 Sep 6.1* 6.14 

668 577 Nov 6 .6 618 

X79 6.10 Jan »20% 4J0 

762 474 Mar 643 643 

779 645% May 

Est. Sales Prev. Sates 23057 

Prev. Day Open Ini. 71412 off 790 
SOYBEAN MEAL (COT) 

100 Ians- dollars per tan 
2DVJ» 13690 Mar 13608 13800 

2B5JOO 14270 Mov 14110 14400 

19X50 14870 Jul 14800 14970 

18000 15140 Aug 15140 15240 

ljJJO 15400 Sep 15650 15570 

18040 15540 Oct 15640 15770 

18480 16140 Dec 16288 16170 

Est- Soles Prev. Sates 8693 

Prev. Day Open ini. 40460 off 501 
SOYBEAN OIL (CBTJ 
«W00 ms- dollars per 100 lbs. 

3060 2275 Mar 2BJ0 2843 

30.10 2280 May 2745 2760 

3040 2270 Jul 2665 2670 

2773 2150 Auo 2630 2635 

262S 2240 Sep 2580 2585 

2600 2270 Od 2585 2505 

2475 2270 Dec 2440 2450 

E3t. Sates Prev. Sales 11476 

Prev. Dav Open lnt. 41409 off 166 
OATS (CBTJ 

5000 bu mini mum. cm tors per bushel 
1.96% 170% Mar ITS 178% 

171 169% May 1.73% 174% 

171% 168% Jul 168V 168V 

179 165% SOP 166% 166% 

182% 166 Dec 

eh. sales Prev. Sales 588 

Prev. Dav Open lnt 3467 up 11 


272% 272% — 80V 
279% 279% —80% 
201% 282 —MV, 
274% 279% +00% 
168 269% +OOV 

Z76V 278 +00% 

242 203% +00% 


5.95% 579 
607% 611% 
4.18% 631% 

JS iS 

614 615% 


COPPER (COMEX) 
25000 Bn.- cents per I b. 


62.15 61.85 Feb 

KL2D 5440 Mar 6100 6175 

6260 6275 APT 

9250 5620 May 6270 6265 

8875 5780 Jul 6275 6370 

82-10 5740 Sop 6X40 6370 

8475 5X5» Dec 6480 6440 

8620 5940 Jan 

8080 5940 Mar 6680 6570 

7600 61.10 MOV 6540 6540 

7640 6170 Jul 

7090 623 Sep 6645 6680 

685C 6850 Dec 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 8,187 

Prev. Day Open ini. 95003 up 251 
SILVER (COMBX) 

5000 trov BLr cents per troy at 


6105 
6130 61 40 
6145 
62.10 6285 
6340 6245 
6130 6330 


6675 6673 
6540 6575 
6575 
6655 6675 
6700 


FRENCH FRANC (IMM) 

Smci tiwnc-1 point cou aHS aoCO O l 
.11905 .10125 Mar ,10100 .10100 .10100 

.11020 .1010® jun 

.imm .law sep 

Est Sides 4 Prev.Sales 100 

Prev. Day Open lnt. 2353 up 100 

GERMAN MARK II MM) 

S per mark- 1 paint equals S0JM01 
4110 3100 Mar 0105 3107 30M 

3733 J12D Jun 3128 3128 3108 

35*5 3146 SOP 3151 3151 3151 

J3«0 3180 Dec 3182 3182 3182 

3251 3251 Mar 

Est. Sales 19347 Prev. Sates 21441 
Prev. Day Open lnt 4X176 atfl339 


641% 641% 
649% 


13640 137.90 +70 

14240 14X90 +40 

14840 14940 +40 

15170 15240 +80 

15380 15500 +70 

15650 15770 4-100 

16180 16240 +40 


2873 2842 +09 

2730 2745 —82 

2645 2640 —.13 

25.90 2685 —72 

2540 2349 —70 

2*40 3*47 —31 

2X90 2X90 — 40 


177V 178% +00% 
173% 174% +80% 
140V 148V —80% 
146% 146% —80% 
149 —80% 


: ’I 




Industrials 




l ii 











40000 cents per lb. 









6*82 





6900 

6148 


6840 

M.K 

6745 

6742 

—48 

69.15 

&5JQ0 

Jun 

6840 

6800 

6842 

6&A5 


6700 

6115 


6640 

6X90 

6605 

4X73 

+08 

6540 

6140 

Od 

6400 

6X07 

6*75 

6*75 


6X30 

6340 

Dec 

6X50 

6X40 

6X10 


+.15 

6X30 

M4S 

Feb 

6X25 

6X25 

4X25 

6X35 


Est. Sates 13084 Prev.Sales 2X00 
Prev. Dav Open lnt. 58438 affrra 




FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 





44000 Ibsu- cents per lb. 






7445 

6545 

Mar 

7X30 

7X50 

7X13 

7X15 

—.15 

7*05 

4700 


7240 

7300 

7290 

7295 


71.90 

6*95 

May 

7145 

7140 

7103 

7147 




Aura 

7235 

7272 

7200 

7245 

+.10 

7235 

6700 

Sen 

71.90 

7215 

7140 

71.92 

+.12 









7255 

71L40 

Mav 

7200 

7225 

7200 

7225 


Est. Salas 

T415 Prov. Sate; 3,905 




Prev. Day Open lnt. 1146* otf« 





HOGS (CME) 













5940 

4747 

F« 

5145 

5107 

5047 



5*45 

4X10 

Apr 

4746 

4740 

4740 

4707 


5540 

4840 

Jun 

S245 

5295 

5245 

5247 


5547 

4X9S 

JU 

5349 

5340 

53.15 

5X45 

+.18 

5*47 

4700 


5220 

5255 

5229 

5200 

+.13 

5175 

*500 

OCt 

4*40 


4*20 

4H35 

—.10 

5005 

4X30 

Doc 

4845 

4845 

4808 

4840 

—40 

4940 

4X25 

Fab 

4800 

4800 

4800 



4745 

4X75 

An- 

4X90 





EsL Sates 

6468 Prev.Sotes 12073 




Prwv. Day Op*n Inf. 30*379 off 174 




PORK BELLIES (CME) 
3*000 Ibx- cents per lb. 






8105 

6X95 

Feb 

7000 

7X35 

6947 

6907 

-200 

8140 

60.10 

Mar 

6940 

7005 

0907 

6902 

—108 

8200 

61.15 

Mav 

7040 

7100 

7020 

7X47 


8247 

6215 

Jul 

71 A5 

7100 

7005 

7007 

—105 

8005 

dll. 21 


6800 

6940 

6842 

6842 

—08 

75.15 

6X15 

Feb 

6*25 

6540 

6*00 

6*20 


7X40 








EsL Sail iss 

7,102 Prev. Sates 5027 




Prev. Day Open Inf. 1*1(3 up*aa 









I-'~*M'* r iK'» r v*fv; 


Sm I m 


Est. Scries Prev.Sales l ent 

Prev. Dav Open lnt. 134,192 up 399 


Financial 


US T. BILLS (IMM) 

SI million* Pts of IMvcf. 

9221 8739 Mar «»71 9183 

9101 87.14 Jun 9135 9138 

9133 8694 Sep WL86 SfflJftJ 

9050 6577 Dec VlUi 9048 

9E» 8640 Mar 90.11 90.15 

‘S®77 87 ill Jun 

9080 1880 

8143 8939 Dec 8939 8939 

Est Sales Prev. Sates 11,922 

Prev. Dav Open lnt 48464 ua621 
IB YR. TREASURY (CBT1 
SIffiSW Win. pis & 32ms ol 100 Kt 
83 70-25 Mar 81-3 81-11 

82-3 70-9 Jun 80-15 80-17 

81-13 75-18 Sep 79-25 79-28 

Dec 70-29 TWO 

BM 73-18 Mar 

79-26 77-22 Jun 

Eat. Sates Prev.Saleg 13486 

Prev. Dav Open Ini. 41781 off 1082 
If? TREASURY BONDS (CbTI 
(apcf-siOOMDpts & sandsof 100 PCI ) 
77-15 57-27 Mar 1)4 73-13 

77-15 57-20 Jun 7LT0 71-14 

76-2 5710 See 70-14 70-31 

76-5 57-8 DOC 69-39 70-3 

72-JO 57-2 Aftor 49-10 69-15 

»16 56-29 Jun 68-30 69 

TOO 56-29 Sep 68-15 68-15 

49-24 56-25 Dec 68-7 684 

69- 12 56-27 Mpr 67-22 67-22 

5KL S’” *7-17 

68-36 6s- 21 _SOP 67-10 67-10 

EH.Sotes Prev. SatesISDAM 

Prev. Dav Oran Int2254«5 up 7JS36 
GNMA (CBT) 

StMOOB Prtn-Dts R Kndsof 100 pd 

70- 17 g-5 Mar Ad-14 69-11 

*9-27 57-17 Jun 41-15 44-22 

69*. 59-13 5eo 

4J-1 J 59-4 Dec 67.12 67-14 

« 58-20 Mar 

47-0 58-25 Jun 

<7-3 65-21 Sep 

Eat. Sates Prev. Sales 1327 

Prev. Day Open ML 6099 oh 175 
CGRT. DEPOSIT (IMM) 
fi million, pis of roopcf 

My 91.15 91.15 

9130 BSJO Jun 9040 9040 


13QjnObd.rt.-SperlOOObd.ft. 

13930 Mar 15200 15X30 
14740 May 16040 16X40 
15X00 Jul 167.18 14830 
15730 SOP 171JB 17X10 
147-00 Nov 17X58 17X50 
17500 JOH 17740 17740 
17X00 Mar 
Est. Sales 2292 Prev.Sales 3377 
Prev. Day Open lnt 10036 up 254 
COTTON 2(HYCE) 

50000 Iba^ cents per lb. 
njs 6435 Mar 6JL30 (635 

7930 6542 MOV 6635 67JQ 

7905 6635 Jul 6730 6732 

7730 67714 Oct 6740 *740 

6709 Dec 6740 6740 
6835 Mar 
69.11 May 
6900 Jul 

Prev.Sales 1319 
Prev. Dav Open lnt. 19J9I off 64 
HEATING OIL(NYME) 

42000 aa*- cents per pal 
8340 67 M Mar 7X50 7X83 

8275 *5.05 Apr 7050 7135 

8260 6430 May 6935 4930 

THAU 6X50 Jun 6830 6935 

483S 6533 JiU 6930 4930 

7540 7550 Dec 

EH. Sales Prev! Sates 7371 

Prev. Dav Open Hit 17334 up 772 


15030 15030 
19930 15930 
14530 M&30 
16930 16938 
T71JD 17130 
17738 17640 


6433 6*92 
65.97 6635 

6638 66.97 

6735 6730 

6730 6735 

6845 
6938 
6933 


7280 7289 
7025 7034 
6890 6909 
6830 6X47 

6900 6892 

7X90 



p..,r 


NYSE Higbs'Lows 



32% 21% 
22% 5% 
25 14 

5% 2% 
24% 14% 
6 % 2 % 
20 5% 

46% 30% 
13% 9% 
25% 17% 
6% 3% 

1W 8% 
m% 23% 

75% 60% 
79% 67% 
83 68% 

61% 49% 
63% 51% 
24% 14% 
38% 25% 
75 58 


8 811 31% 
6229 9% 

116 19% 
61 2% 
6 142 23% 
82 3% 

4 7% 

15 1698 41% 

10 116 13% 

14 SM 23% 

31 4% 

31 isfe 

15 133 39% 
26120z 75 

20z 74 
32®K 82 
SOz 60% 
2B20z 62% 
14 60 23% 

13 3 35% 

11 134 75% 


31 31%— % 

8% 9%+l% 
19 19%+ % 

7H 2% 

23% 23% + % 
2 % 7 % — % 
7% 7H— % 
40% 41% + % 
13% 13% — % 
24% 25 — % 
4% *%+ % 
10% 10% 

39% 39% + V. 
73% 74%+ % 
74 74 

bo% ao%— % 
60% 60%+ % 
62% 62% 

23% 23%—% 
35% 35% 

74% 75% + % 



62 35% TDK 

31% 24 TECO 
13% 7% TGIF 
15% 11% TNP 


09e J 19 60 43% 43% 43% — % 

220 7J 8 254 30U> 29% 30%- % 

20 1682 12% 11% 12 + % 

105 XI 8 66 15% 16% 15% + Vh 


28 20% WICOR 230 8L3 6 172 27% 27 27%+% 

49 34% WabR pf 490 TOO 6Qz 45 45 45—1 

3*% 20% Wochvs 32 26 11 583 35V.3*%3S%+% 

25% 14% Mtocfcilf 40 10 11 98 19% 19% 19% + to 

9% 6% Walnut 142 68 Mb 1% 8% 

47% 30% WolMrt 01 4 27 3635 46% 45% 46% +1 

53% 2B% Wcrtorn 08 14 19 460 54 53% 53% + % 


21% 15% WKHRaalAO 


London Commodities 

Feb. 7 

Figures jn sterling per metric Ion. 
Gasoil in lii .dollars per metric ton. 
Goto In U-S. dollars per ounce. 




S1-® “KS i"” 2S- 40 

TO40 8500 SCP 89.9* 8996 

9X17 8X34 DM 8909 8909 

Broil 8606 Mar 

»46 8643 Jun 

WOi 8706 Sep 

Est. Sates Prev. Sates *n 

Prev. Day open Inf. 13004 ®H43 

EURODOLLARS I IMM) 
SlmillKKvplboMMpct. 

JJ-2 Mar «03 9003 

82*9 Jun 9008 9X28 
toK 8*53 Sen 09 JO 8900 

8907 8*00 Dec »23 69 04 

So"f2 5**10 Mar 8882 3802 

89.IS 86.73 Jun 8848 8848 


9149 9101 

9105 9L27 

9X75 9007 
9040 9006 
9000 9X00 
8902 
8949 
8909 8909 


BO-26 80-29 
80-1 80-3 

79-11 79- IS 
7*90 78« 
78-15 
75-2 


71-21 71-27 

TO® 70-29 
69-31 705 
49-11 69-17 
68-29 69 
68-15 68-18 
68-3 66-6 

67-25 47-27 
67-17 67-17 
670 67-8 

<7-1 67-1 


68-14 89- 4 
48-12 68-17 
67-29 
47-9 67-11 

64-27 
66-12 
4H1 


9X99 9100 
904* 9043 
89.9* 8909 
8909 8941 
8900 
8X67 
8807 


9X64 9044 
9004 9008 
8949 8M2 
8902 8905 
8809 8805 
6840 8802 


Stock Indexes 


SP COMP. INDEX (CME) 

point* and cents 

18270 15030 Mar IBUO 18X20 

18X95 15X10 Jun 18*40 18640 

19900 1 6000 Sen 18750 W55 

191-50 175.70 Dec 19075 19X00 

Est Safes 1*415 Prev.Sales 45046 
Prev. Day Oewiint. SA463 OH1445 
VALUE UNEtKCBT) 
ptdnls and cents 

20250 14X10 Mar 201.35 2SSJM 

2DX50 17X00 Jun 20571) 20940 

20840 18575 Sea 20975 21140 

Eel. Sates Prev.Salas 1519 

Prev. Day Open lnt xM& off 72 
NYSE COMP. INDEX fHYFE) 
points and cents 

nxn SUO Mar 10*20 18445 

107.90 90JX1 Jun 107.15 10845 

10975 9125 Sea 11X15 11X15 

110-96 10170 Dec 112JI0 11280 

Est. Sates 1X535 Prev. Sates IUC 

Prev. Day open lnt 11430 off 310 


18120 18XW 
18*35 18X30 
18740 18940 
19X75 T9X70 


2D lJS 20*95 
20570 20940 
209 JS 21245 


10X20 10475 
107.15 1DX2S 
11X15 11X10 
11200 111.96 


High Lew cm 
SUGAR 

Mar 11700 11500 11600 
May 12540 123.40 12500 
Auo 134-20 13220 13300 
OCt 14200 14170 14200 
Dec 14700 14700 14740 
Mar 14200 1(200 16240 
Mav N.T. N.T. 1(9,60 
1419 loti of 50 tens. 
COCOA 

Mar 2234 2200 2213 
May 2254 2217 2230 
jly 2232 2.199 2211 
Sep 221* 2181 2191 
Dee 2062 2040 2044 
Mar 20« 2030 2032 
«a* 2035 2035 1.980 

5778 lots oi 10 lens. 
COFFEE 

Mar 2374 2365 2370 
MOV 2395 2382 3J82 
Jlv 2415 2402 2402 
Sec 2427 2418 2420 
Nov 2442 2435 2439 
Jan 2*40 2430 243s 
War N.T. H.T. 2429 
1478 Ian el S fora. 
GASOIL 

Feb 23900 23500 237.75 

Mar 22450 wm ail 


11700 11500 11X20 
12540 12400 12*40 
— 13200 13240 
14240 140.40 14100 
14840 14X00 14900 
14340 16100 16200 
17OJ0 16700 16900 


2715 NA NA 

2232 - - 

2213 - - 

2192 — — 

2047 — — 

2S38 

2030 — — 


2375 NA NA 

2383 — — 

2403 — — 

2421 — — 

2440 — — 

2436 — — 

2430 — — 


23800 23175 231 JO 
976 99 *771 W1 mvt \ 
21 
21 
21 
21 
21 


Commodity Indexes 


Close 

Moody 1 * 969.10 f 

Reuters 101 4 JO 

DJ. Futures- 125.00 

Com. Research Bureau. 245J0 

Moody's : base 100 : Dec 31. 1931. 
p - preliminary; f - final 
Reuters ; base 100 : Sep. 18. 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec. 31. 1974. 


Previous 

973JMf 

Z01&L30 

12559 

246.70 



Asian Commodities 

Feb. 7 


HOKO-KOKG GOLD FUTURES 
U AS per ounce 

aese Previews 
_ HW> Lew Bid Ask BU Ask 
Feb - N.T. N T. 30200 30*00 30200 39400 
Mar _ N.T. N.T. 30X00 38500 30300 305.00 
Apt _ 30X00 30600 30500 30700 30X00 30800 
Jun — N.T. N.T. 31000 31200 31000 31200 
Auo - N.T. N.T. 31400 31600 31*00 31*00 
OCt — N.T. N.T. 31900 32100 31900 32100 
Dec _ 37X00 fljKQO t>jq q w*nn ninn mw 
Volume: 21 lots of 100 az. 

SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES- 
UASneroaace 


Hton Law Settle Settle 

Feb N.T. ' N.T. 31070 30X10 

Mar N.T. N.T. 30X60 30*50 

API 30500 30540 30160 30X50 

Jun N.T. N.T. 30840 309JB 

Volume : 339 lots of 100 02. 

KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Malaysian cents per kilo 

Close Prevtom 

BU Ask Bid ASk i 

Feb 1BX50 187 JO IBXSffl IB7.00 ' 

Mar 19X25 19150 19250 19X00 

APT 19775 177.75 19X75 19700 

Mav 201-50 20250 20000 21000 

Jun 20250 20*50 201-91 20X50 

volume: 11 lots. 

SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Sin ga pore cents per kilo 

Close Provtooi 

Bid Afk Bid Ask 

RSS I Feb- 14540 14X00 10550 16X60 

RSSlMor- 17100 171 JO 17101? 17140 

RSS 2 Fc&_ 15740 15X50 1574S »5S® 

RSS 3 Fab_ 155J50 15X60 15S40 15X50 

RSS 4 Fab- 14840 15840 14XM 150 JO 

RSS 5 Feb- 14050 14240 1*040 14240 

KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 

MfltoysJop 1-imnrtti per 35 tom 

Ckne PravioiK 

Bid AA BU Att 

Fob 1,170 1.195 1.160 1J00 


Paris Commodities 

Feb. 7 

Sugar In Frcndi Fronts per metric ton. 
Other figures bi Fronts nor 100 ks. 


Hlgfi Low Ckne cirge 

SUGAR 

Mar 1460 14*5 1^ 1460 + 16 

Mav 1410 1493 M« 1410 +18 

Auo 1490 1475 1488 1492 +9 

OCt 14*5 vsm 1.557 1460 + 18 

Dec N.T. N.T. 1435 1050 + IS 

Mar 1J*0 1440 1440 1445 +15 

Est. vol.r 1400 lots of 50 tons. Prev. actual 
sates: 1434 lots. Open interest: 204*6 

COCOA 

Mar 2485 2463 2370 2474 —9 

MOV 2*10 2398 2400 2410 Unch. 

Jly N.T. N.T. 2470 — UncflL 

Sep N.T. N.T. 2468 2400 Unch. 

Dec N.T. N.T. — 2220 Unch. 

Mar N.T. N.T. — 2215 Unch. 

Mav N.T. N.T. — 2410 unch. 

Est. val.: 40 lots of 10 tans. Prev. actual 
sales: 142 lots. Open interest: 1038 

COFFEE 

Mar N.T. N.T. 2553 2562 4-2 

MOV N.T. N.T. 2J»0 2475 UnctL 

Jlv - N.T. N.r. 2575 2610 +5 

Sep 2587 2530 2580 — Unch. 

Nov N.T. N.T. 200 . — — 5 

JOB N.T. N.T. Z5BS — Unch. 

Mar N.T. N.T. 2587 — — 1 

Est. val.: 6 lalsaf 5 Ians. Prev. actual sales: 
3 lot* Open Interest: 213 
seurco: Bourse du Commerce. 


Cash Prices Feb. 7 


Commodify and (toll 

CoHee 4 Santas, lb 

Prtnlcfolh 64/30 38 %. yd _ 

3ted billets ( Pitt. 1, Ion 

Iren 2 Fdry. PMia. ton 

Steel scrap No 1 hvy Pitt. _ 

Lead Scot, lb 

Capper elec!- lb . . 

Tin (Strolls), lb , , 

Zinc. E. SI. L_ Basis, lb 

Pallodlum. ot 
Silver N.Y« at — 

Source: AP. 


Dividends Feb. 7 


company Per Amt Pay Ree 

USUAL 

Advost Group a 0a 3.15 2-15 

Besselt Furn. Ind. q 40 X-I 2-19 Mb 

* « 3-15 2-14 f* 

Dtanpy (W) Prod. Q JO 4-5 iw ■ 

ISSv P » r lnd Q 46 M 2-15 

tnerov North q 77 X15 >1 

Federal -Mooul O 48 3-8 2-22 

Gearolo-Poclflc Q so 3.11 3.11 

CaWtti W«| Fin. G 05 ill 2-15 

HmwaMJnteo a .10 X 12 £|S 

Mckaseon Corn o ja 4-1 3-1 

osivt j-i 3-15 
a 0j 4-1 3-« 

MrwmLWaJrt Sd. Q 45 H 2-15 

Stoon HM l Ca S 07 V, 3-1 2-15 

aircalow | n c Q 07 3-B 2-22 

Thomas & Betts q ji . 1 x. 

weal coast Tran* a Ji +1 J-a 


London Metals Feb. 7 
Figures in stoning per metric tax 
Silver in pence per trey wncx 




J1 +1 3-8 
46 3-29 >8 


Market Guide 


ChJaxiG Board of Trade 
Oricaao MaramHte Eschanse 
Intemamnal Monet ar y Market 
Of CNcom Mcrcoollte Exchanoe 
New Yore Cocoa, sugar, Co«ee Emuoimm 
N ew York Cotton E xc hanoe 
Commodity Ex chouse. New York 
New York Marcantlte Exchcnp* 

Kms City Board of Trade 
Mew York Futures Ext 


DM Futures Options 

Feb. 7 

W.GertTmMcrMKfiB mario. cadi per mk 


Strfta Cub-settle PgMWHti 
Wkt M«r Jw sept Mor Sat 
2 — — — 8JD 115 — 

38 MB 147 — 0.16 U7 851 

31 034 8M 148 X44 X79 XVS 

32 007 049 80S 1.15 137 146 

33 001 <U5 M6 209 204 208 

34 1-00 0.12 035 309 . U4 — 

EsflawtM total m. 7474 
Can: ovsd.ni.U39 mo I M.40W5 
Pan : WeX 90). 3^79 open tot. 310U 
Source: oue. 


Fob 1,170 1.11 

Mar 1.1SU 1.11 

API 1,140 t.li 

MOV 1.130 1,11 

Jun 1,130 l.ii 

Jly — 1,110 l.l( 

Sen 1,110 1.U 

Nov 1.100 1.1! 

Jon 1,100 Ui 

Volume: Slots of 25 tons. 
Source - Reuters. 


1.150 l.lto 1.1M 1.190 

1,141 1.180 1,140 1,188 

1,130 1,170 1.130 1.170 

1,130 1.170 1.130 1,170 

1,110 1.160 t.iw 1,1*0 

1,110 1.160 l.MO 1.160 

1.100 1,150 1.100 1,150 

1.100 1J50 l.iao 1.150 


Canada's Trade Gap Shrinks 

Reuters 

OTTAWA — Canada's trade 
surplus narrowed to 1.4 billion dol- 
lars (S1.S6 billion) in December 
From 1.9 billion dollars in Novem- 
ber. compared with a 1.51 -billion 
surplus in December 19S3. 


Today 

High grade copper cathod e s: 
SPOI 105000 105100 

3 months U7MQ U73J0 
Coppot cathodes: 
seal tJHtJK 14*705 

3 months 106400 106S0O 
Tin: SPOf 9.04000 9.95000 ! 

J months 941300 901500 1 
Leadispot 33700 33800 


IJW0O 106000 
>^8100 1081JO 


M-MoatMyj O-docrterty; 5-Sentt- 


S&P 100 Index Options 
Feb. 7 


QUb-Lnst 
Her M i 


Lead:spat 
3 months 
Zinc: spot 
3 months 
Silvenspot 
3 months 
Aluminium: 
spot 


34100 34100 
75300 75*08 
755.00 7S55Q 
55000 55100 
56800 56900 

*7X00 97700 


■2 if. St JJ _ 

UO 19% W, n 22 

w w ifc n _ 

ik S l 1 u 

2 ft i r * 

IS S ri 

W in* h ri »; 


Pub-Lad 

« to W HkJSt 

J® im mi - 
!<T4 l.'ls te - 
'«} ;«» 3^1* to 
111 * to Vt 

7/16 I I h 
». w ir» 

.-a m m i 
*to (to k. 7h 


3 manlhs 100900 >00900 
Nickel :nwl *460.00 447000 
3 months *50700 *51000 
Source: Reuters. 


98900 99100 
<02200 102300 
X5550O *56000 
*58000 *58500 


T^Wcaa rototn* jsivn 

lUgSywfou.daw? 


“i 




































































144 ft 
* 4 

121* SOH 
MMh 

far 

•5 30 
4413 
M 14 
13 IIM 
443 214 
217 • 
155 20 
1477 32 
10 «4 
3* SV4 


1*14 1*44— H 
MU lAk— 14 
KM 1014— 44 
414 7 + 4* 
32 32M + K 

2714 27% 

O 1314 + lb 

MV4 MM— Vk 

* nr+* 

1*5 2M4+ * 

2314 2A4+J4 

4 414 -fft 

1*44 1*44— 14 

WT** 

nt n 

1*M W14— lb 
2144 22 
*lb *V4+lfc 
7* 714— 14 


New York was announced 
W ednesday by the shipping indus- 
try, the longshoremen's union and 
the Port Authority of New York 
and New Jersey. 

Under the agreement, a fee that 
steamship companies pay for each 
container of cargo would be re- 
duced by one-third. The container 
fee is used to finance binge benefits 
for New York dockworkers. 

As a result, cost differentials be- 
tween New York and other cities 
on the U.S. eastern coast would be 
expected to decline for (he steam- 
ship lines. The lines control the 
routing of cargo and are more in- 
dined to call at ports where the 
cargo can be handled less expen- 
sively. 


New Car Sales Fall in Britain 

Jtoun 

LONDON — The number of 
new care sold in Britain fell last 
month by 3.1 percent to 156,823 
from January 1984. the Society of 
Motor Manufacturers and Traders 
said Wednesday. Imported vehicles 
took 56.4 percent of market, up 
slightly from 55.8 percent in Janu- 
ary last year. 


Gold Options (prices iaS/ox.). 


Feb. 

Me* 

UOW550 ' 
d&UO 
259 375 
875- 175 
025- MB 
MB- OSD 

25903150 
1750-1990 
1U5-1325 
750-990 
450 600 
275-425 



M 3J a 24 2314 23*— 1ft 

•4B a 53 2314 231b 2314— 14 

2631214 12 1214— V4 

1M 8.1 2S1M2W m+M 


Gcuanm-a&SD 

VUonWUteWcMSA. 

L Qmi da Mm Mr 
UI1 Gam L. Swteriurt 
T«L 3IU51 - Tdn 2UB5 


BANOUH NATIONALS DE PARIS 

U.S. $400,000,000 floating 
rate notes 1984 due 1995 

The rate of interest applicable to the interest period from 
February 6, 1985 to August 6, 1985 as determined by the 
reference agent is 9,5 per cent per annum namely 

US $477.63888 per bond of US. $10,000. 7 


NOTICE OF EARLY REDEMPTION 


Kingdom of Sweden 


r -Sm# 


?• v» fi*' 

.«• it x 


»■» '< i. 


: % < • f 
■ £ ? , 
' S 

£ h: 1 


Moet-Hennessy 


SALES RISE 28% 

!; . at 1985. the Board of Direct ore decided » 

W ““‘V* «" J SE, otaS (phis tax credit, 4^0 francs. 

declare an mtenm dividend f" J-f .v Ai - A , -ri Mra hle on 
l.- matting a total of 13J50 francs). This mtenm dnndena mil be pxysnie on 

); presentation of coupon No. 4ft 

jl The Board was infonned of the GroWs operations over the past year, 
k figures w«tout to ^ huIIkk. foam*. 

f- n» C,wp bj. tor 

f financial rtaiEments in accordance with Anxsncm stanoaias. 



• would have amaunied to 28-2% 

The Champagne awl Wines 

(up 18ft inrolume terms for Ctamp^- 

« the ««» £■* STS* Which was 9.4ft 

'. . Jm Keonesay & Co. shipped 2. ^ Heonewv shipped more 

L more than for the P revw .'f2^A Lmac in a year. Safes in dua sector were 

* than 2,000.000 cases of bottled cognac .na year 

f up 46u6ft to 2.140 million fnuW*- h, 91 4ft to 

1 The Perfumes and 17 ^‘ 

: Reorganization of Armstrong continued utruugiww 

‘ Final income figures for ihty prerious year- 

f «W i. very distinct nee m ^ r • 


U.S.$ 150,000,000 
Floating Rate Notes Dae 1988 

Notice is hereby given that in accordance with 
Clause 6(a) of die Terms and Conditions' of the 
Notes, the Kingdom will redeem all of the 
outstanding Notes at their principal amount on 
29th March, 1985, when interest on the Notes 
will cease to accrue. 

Repayment of principal will be made upon pre- 
sentation of die Notes with all unmatured 
Coupons attached, at the Offices of any one of 
the Paying Agents mentioned thereon. 

Accrued interest due 29th March, 1985 wOl be 
paid in the normal manner against presentation 
of Coupon No. 9, on or after 29th March, 1 985. 

Bankers Trust Company, London 

Fiscal Agent 

8ih February, 1985 


NI-CAL FINANCE N.V. 

Notice of Meeting of Debenturehokters 

9Si Convertible Redeemable Debentures due August 15. 1fl88 

NOTICE IS hEREBV given that ■ meeting o I the holders of Uie 944 Convertible 
Redeemable Debentures due August 1& 1988 (the - Debentures! o I NlCal Finance N.V 
(the •'Company") issued end outstanding under ettusi indenture made as of August 12. 
1983 between the Company and The National victoria and Grey Trust Company, as 
trustee (the “Trustee - ) (the trust Indenture together with the Indentures of guarantee 
executed in accordance with the terms thereof being herem together caned the “Rust 
Indenture'). wBi be held In the Courtroom o» the Painters Had. 9 Little TOnlty Lane. 
London. England on February 2fc. 1985 at 200 o'clock Hi the afternoon (London lime). 

The meeting i» called pursuant to me provisions or the Rust tndenkae for me 
purpose ot: 

A. Considering and. it thought (1L passing an extra ordinary resokitionorextraonflnaiy 
resolutions purauanr to the provisions of me Trust Indenture for the toaowbig purposes: 

(it To consent to ana approve the debating of .*>* shares of Nt-Cat Developments 
Ltd. r-Nl-Can from the Vancouver Stock Exchange and to waive me 
requirements of the Trust Indenture insofar a» such requirements would prevent 
such delisting, such delisting to occur on or after the effective date of the 
Registration Statement on Form S-1 which NFCal has (Usd with the United 
Slates Securmea and Exchange Commission. 

tin To asseni to any modilleationol. or change in. or addition to. or onnsatanlrom 
the prortstons contained hi the lh/atfndenti«e which shafloe agreed toby me 
Company andtoc NhCal and which may be contemplated by. involved in or 
necessary or desirable to cany out the said extraordinary resolution or 
extraordinary resolutions. 

(lift TbamboraeattochecaiheThrateetoeoncurinandemanafromtlraetoUrw 
deeds supplemental lottie Trust Inoanture, agreements andforother documents 
embodying such approval, nalvec consent, modification, change, addition or 
omission andfor wtuen may be necessary or desirable tor gMng eflea to and 
carrying out the extraordinary resolution or extraordinary re&ohrttons. 
a Taking such lurfher or other action, whether by wey of extraordinary resolution 
pursuant to the provisions of the Trust Indenture or otherwise, as may be considered 
necessary or advisable. 

This notice Is ghen a i ihe Company' * request pursuant to me provisions of the Tiusi 
Indenture to me Went that any extraordinary resolution passed at the atodmeettogorany 
adjournment thereof shall, if passed Hi a c cord a nce with the provisions contained In me 
Trust todemuiehv that benaH.toebtndlng upon alt thehotoereal the Debentures, whether 
present or absent and me Ttustoe and each of the holdera of Debentures and the^ Trustee 
(subject to the provtstona for its Indemnity contained Hi the Tlust indenture) shall be 
bound io give affect thereto accordingly; and to the further Intent that m censldenrtg 
and/or passing any resolution, enraonttiary or otherwise, such meeting may morflfy. 
amend, change, ampftfy. add to or omit any of the matters and things hereinbefore 
specified. H bong stipulated that the foregoing does «* purport to specify the teimsot 
the extra ordinary resolution or e x tr a ordin a ry resolutions to be propoaedat the meeting, 
but only to indicate me general nature of the busman to be transacted merest and In 
general toms (he subject of the extraordinary resolutions lobe submfrtaa thereat. 

Pursuant to the provisions ot the Trnai indenture end regulations made tanadar 
hatters ol Debentures deslrmg to Be present and vote at the meeting without producing 
their Debentures may daposirthe same wfth one ot the dsposttar/a set tonb below or 
with any other bank, trust company. Insurance company or other d e p os it ary previously 
approved of by the Trustee and win receive in exchange voting certificates which wffl 
entitle me hotter named therein to be present and vote at such meeting end at any 
adjournment thereol end to appoint a proxy to represent and vote tor the hotter at such 
meeting and ai any adjournment tnereol In thesame wey as If the persons so present and 
voting, e«her personally or by proxy, were the actual bearers ol me Debentures Hwespect 
■ of wtdcnsuchcertJftemesshafl have been Issued. Debenture# so deposited wB be held 
on deposit unw alter the meeting and any adjournment thereof end wffl than be ratraned 
to the depositor Any bank, oust company, insurance company or other depositary 
approved ol by the Trustee may act es depositary ot Debentures Of which il may be the 
hotter 

Save as aforesaid, the only pemna who ttiaN be reco^dzed at me meeting or any 
adjournment thereof as me holders of any Debentures or emitted to vote or oe present at 
the meet trig or any ad jorenment thereof shaft be persons who pro du ce D eb anturesat the 
meeting or any adjowi u n e nt thereof. 

A proxy need not pe a Deoenturebotter. 

TTU6 noUca. a letter tram the Managing Director of the Company commenting upon 
the mailers to be considered ei the meetaig. me Text of Proposed Extraordinary 
Resolution. Regulations fa the meeting of DebenturettoidBrs madeoy the Tiustee and 
other documents to enable such hoWsreio be present In person or by proxy ana voteet the 
meeting, may be obtained upon request from the offices fix ted below. 

Morgan Guaranty Thief Swiss Bank Corporation 

Company ol New Ybrk Aescnenreratadt I 

Morgan House. 1 Angel Court 4002Basle. 

London EC2HTAE Switzerland 

United Kingdom 

Morgan Guaranty Trust Morgan Guaranty trust 

Company of NawVbrfc Company or New Yort 

35 Avenue dee Arts u Place Vendoms 

Brussels 1040. 75001 Parts 

Belgium France 

II any Pebe m imhcider would prefer to use a depositary other than mow toted 
above suc» hotter should contact Mr Glenn Raven ot The National Victoria and Gray 
Trust Company Vancouver Telephone (804) 68+8*31 or iMe* 0+65229 to make such 
arrangements. 

Dated at Vancouver: Brtiian Columbia, the thefith day of February. 1965. 

THE NATIONAL VICTORIA AND GREY TRUST COMPANY 
TRUSTEE 


NI-CAL FINANCE N.V. 

Notice of Meeting of Wanrantholders 

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a meeting of the hotter* of the Share Purchase 
warrants (the “Warrants") of NiCal Finance N.V. (me “Company! issued and 
outstanding under a warrant indenture nude aa of August 12. 1883 between the 
Company. The National Victoria and Grey^ Dust Company, as trustee (the “Trustee! and 
M-Cel Developments Ltd. rNKJan (the warrant Indenture being herein celled the 
“Warrant Indenture - ), will be hett In the Courtroom of the Painters HaU, 9 Little TMntty 
Lane, London. England on February 26, 1985 at 3ft0 o'clock in the afternoon (London 
Wnsk 

The meeting is cahed pursuant to the provisions of the Warrant indenture lor me 
pixpoaeor: 

A. CoRstteringaMliflhMghtnt.passJnganextmordinaryreaolutionorextraardlfiary 
resolutions pursuant to the provmttns ol me warrant indenture tor the following 
purposes: 

(S lb consent to and approve me defisUng ol the shares ol Nt-CM from tlw 
Vancouver Stock Exchange and to waive the requirements o< me Warrant 
indenture insofar as such requiremen ts would prevent such delisting, such 
deftstlng to occur on oraher the effective date of the Registration Statement on 
Form S-i which Ni^al has filed with iheUnllBd Stales Securities and Exchange 
Commission. 

(H) To assent to any modiKcadon ol. or change Hi. or addition to. or omission from 
the tmiitalcrvs contained in the Warrant Indenture which shat) be agreed to by 
the Company and/or west and which mey be contemptated by. tnvoived In or 
nacossary or desirable to cany out (ho said utraorainaiy resolution or 
ext re on M n a ry resohaona. 

IW) TO authorize and direct the Ttustee to concur hi and execute from time to time 
(beds supplemental to me Warrant indenture, agraamenu and/or other 
doewnents embodying suen approval, waiver, consent, modification, change, 
adcStlon or omission and/or which may be necessary or desirable lor giving 
effect to and carrying out the extraordinary reeokiUon or extraordinary 
resolutions. 

B. Taking such further or other action, whether by way of extraordinary resolution 

purausmuhttpamtaioram the Warrant Indenture or ottiemtoe. as may be ooraldereo 
necessary or edvtsabtt. 

This notice is given at the Company's request pursuant to the provisions ol me 
Warrant indenture to the intent that any extraordinary resolution passed at the said 
meeting or any adjournment thereof shall. II passed in accordance with the provisions 

cruitalned In me Warrant Indenture Hi that behalf, be blndHig iroon aU the hottere ot the 

Wa: rants, whetherpresentor absent and the^ Trustee and each ofthe homers of Wenants 
and the Trustee (aubject to Hie p rovtsto na lor its Indemnity contained Hi the Warrant 
indenture} shall be bound to give effect thereto accordl ngty; and to the further hi tent that 
Hi considwrtng and/or passing any resolution, extraordinary or otherwise, such meeting 
may modify, amend, change, ampilfy, odd to or omit any ol the matters and things 
harelnbetora specified It being stipulated dial the foregoing does not purport to specify 
the terms ot the extraordinary resok/Uon or extraordinary resolutions to be proposed ai 
the meeting, but only to Indicate me general nature ot Hie business to be transacted 

thereat and Ingenml terms the subject ol the extraordinary resolutions to be sitomittsd 
thereat. 

Pursuanl to Hie provtstona ot the Warrant indenture and regulations mode 
Uwwroider hottsrs oi Wenants tissuing to be present and vote j& the meeting wtthout 
producing Itwh Warrants may deposit Hie same wtm one of the deposi tar/s set forth 
below or with any orhar bank, trust company Insurance company or other depositary 
previously approved of by Hie thtstee and wHl receive In exchange voting certificates 
wtitoii will entitle Hie hotter named therein to be present and votes! such meeting and at 
any adjournment thereof and to appoint a proxy to represent and rote tor the holder at 
such meeting and at any adjournment thereol m the same way ss It me pwsons so 
present and voting, ellMr personally or by proxy, were the actual bearers of the Warrants 
In respect ol which soch certificates Shafl have been issued. Wananfs so deposit ed wfil 
be held on deposit WMII otter the mesfing and any adjournment thereof and wffl men be 
retimed to Hie depositor Any bank, trust company. Insurance company or other 
d epos i t ar y approved otPy Hie Trustee may act aa depositary of Wenants of which it may 
bethehcWet 

Save as aforesaid, the only persons who shall be recognizea at the meeting or any 
adjournment thereof as the hottaisof any Wanantaorentitfed to vole or be present at Ihe 
meeting or any adjororanant thereof shall be persons who produce Warrants at the 
meeting or any a^oununem thereof. 

A proxy need not be « Watranuiotoet 

TWs notice, a letter from the Managing Director ol Hie Company commenting upon 
the matters to be considered a! Hie meeting, ms Text of Proposed Extraordinary 
Resolution. Regulations for the meeting of Warranthottere made bylhe trustee and other 
documents to anebie such hotters to be present in person or by proxy and vote at the 
meetkig, may be obtained upon request tram the offices llsud below. 

Morgan Guaranty Trust Swiss Bank Corporation 

Company of New Vbrk Asschenvoratadt I 

Morgan House.! Angel Court 4002 Basle. 

London EC2R7AE Switzerland 

United Kingdom 

Morgan Guaranty trust Morgan Guaranty thiol 

Company ol Now York Company of New Hark 

35 Avenue dea Aits 14 Race Vendor* 

Brussels 1040. 7S0D1 Paris 

Batgkjm Fiance 

M any Wenamhonefvroutt prafei » use a depositary Mtw than ttasa listed Hbcww 
such hotter should contact Me Glam Raven oi The National Victoria and Gray Trust 
Company. Vancouver. TMaphone (804) 88+8*31 or Telex 04-55229 id make such 
arrangements. 

Daiad at Vaneouvec Bruish Columbia H«s me Bth day ol Fehniary. 1965. 

THE RATKWAL VICTORIA AND GREY TWJST COMPANY 
TRUSTEE 


k 




























































Tables Include fee nationwide prices 
up to fee dosing an Wall Street 


HhjnLow stock 


17 Month Sis. 

HWi Low Stock nlv. Yld. PE lOtaHJati Low Quor. aito 


fW-T 


Me n 

Me 7 

JJ 1J IB SB 
J9111.S 
n 12 7 
41 US 
.14 24 
J» 4J 11 


4% 

5% + * 

Bft- 

I2W + * 
3*— to 
33* + % 
38% — lb 
V —lib 
4* 

2M~e 

12K 

6% 

22* 

15%+% 
15* + % 
2B%— % 
1* 

l*fc+ % 
1*ft + * 

an * -mm 
hk— w 
w + K 

17% + * 
9% + % 
26% + % 
4b 
H 
% 
% 
1* 


2 At 13* Cubic 49 U 12 g % g* , „ 

*„ 2, »ass ■ “ • s ^ *ta t a 


18* 

Mft 

9* 

lift 

9 

4% 

4% 

2* 

19ft 

13% 

19* 

9% 

Sft 

4ft 

13ft 

10 

25 

15% 

9% 

7ft 

14* 

9% 

22ft 

13% 

36* 

25% 

6* 

4% 

5* 

2% 

12% 

7% 

11* 

lift 

43* 

6% 

5* 

36 

7% 

U* 

3% 

14% 

33% 

25% 

7* 

lft 

2 

26% 

13* 

4% 

% 

1% 

20% 

9% 

20ft 

9% 

4% 

17ft 

35% 

14% 

6% 

2% 

12% 

19ft 

35% 

19% 

19% 

15 

20* 

14% 

9% 

9% 

21* 

24* 

11% 

16* 






2 % 

2 % — % 

25% 

25%+ % 

5* 

5%+ % 

5* 

5%+ * 

23 

23% + * 

23 

aw + ft 

19 

T9* + ft 

5% 

5%+ ft 

6 % 

<*- % 

6 * 

Mb + * 

31* 

33 +1% 

13% 

14 +M 

3% 

3%+ ft 

5% 

6 %+ * 

0 % 

Mb— * 

15 

15* 

7* 

7ft— ft 

6 % 

Mb— ft 

10 * 

10 * 

2 % 

2 *+ ft 

% 

ft+ ft 

46% 

46ft 

5% 

5% 

7% 

B + ft 

£ 

5f+ft 

29% 

29%+ ft 

11 * 

11 %— ft 

1 * 

l* + ft 

23* 

23%+ * 

*% 

3^+1 

29% 

29ft— ft 

MM 

15% + M 

13* 

13%+ % 

20 * 

30* + * 


Dlv. Yip. PE lWiHMi Low Qual. Otoe 


14ft 10% 
IW 13 
42% 21% 
74b « 

16ft 10% 
14 11* 

11 Sft 
3* 1* 
3ft 2* 
13% 10 
IB 13* 
35 29* 

5% I* 
11% 59b 

14V* 91-5 


NPlnRt ■« *5 
NProc IJOe *4 
NYTlme J2 1J 
NewbE -25c U 

Ncwcor J2 Z1 

NwpEI 1-50 11.1 

Nicnob 

Noellnd 

NoWx 

NordRn 

NoCdOg 

NIPSPt 425 ns 

NuHrzn 

NuelDf 

Numoc 


103 149k 
670 l«b 
1141 40% 
74 59k 

12 IS 
M \ ’ft 
’S . 3 % 

05 151b 
fflfe 33 
29 4% 

3W lift 
4 11M» 



49 41 IS 
J1 LI 9 
17 

II 

6JM212 3 

•12 


140 U S 
13 


JDeUl 

IB 

>40 1J 7 


ThU 1 
SO Z3 
Mo 14 5 
4» 


34 Mb 6* 

25 15% 15% 

530 7 6% 

S3 3 3* 

IS 339b 32% 
894 9% 9% 

II 2% 2% 

5 n 
•fi 5Si5S 
S 4 fc ^ 

15 1 * 

112 164b 141b 

s » m 

24 11 W* 

92 22% 23 
335 4% m 

2 3JV5 32% 

26 19b 8% 


15% 

7 + 4b 

3 + % 
329b + % 
9VS 

2 * — % 
20% + % 

4 + lb 
74b + lb 

12% + n 

^+% 

1 

16 % 

34b + ft 
11 + % 
22%— lb 



24% 16% 
ZZ% 14% 
7* 4 
m 4% 
2Mb 169b 
24% 13% 
7% 31b 
6% 3% 
8 5% 

74k 5% 
4 l 

as 21% 
10% 6% 
II 74b 


OEA 
Oak ml 
Odet An 

oacfBs 

Oltalnd 

Otsfefl 

OOktep 

OpoflAR 

OrialHA 

OrtdHB 

Ormond 

OOuflvn 

OctrdF 

OzarkH 


15 

m SU 
58 

•40 20 IS 

JO 12 16 


23 

JO U 12 

- " 13 
.13 3.1 13 
>421 4J 13 
JO 20 7 


40 23* 
IDS 21% 
23 7% 
7 7VS 
2 20 
112 25% 
25 6% 

30 5* 

7 71b 
3 7% 
19 lft 
12 35 
44 9% 

760 ion 


23ft 23V.- * 
2Mb 21% + 4b 
6% 7 — % 
7ft 7ft— % 
20 20 -Mb 

241b ^ + % 

5% 59k— ft 
5% Sb 
74b 7% 

74b 74b— ft 
l*b I* 

"ft i* 

9% 94b + ft 

10% 10% - % 


4% 

Sft BAT 

-120 2 3 


1464 

4% 

4% 

4*+* 

37 

21ft BDM 

.15 A3* 

74 

37ft 

36% 36%+ * 

3% 

1* BRT 


0 

4B 

7* 

2% 

2%+ % 

5% 

3 

3ft BSN 
ft BTK 


26 

73 

20 

*% 


12* 

7* Badoer 

Mm It 

17 

31 

12* 

12% 

12*+ * 

13* 

7ft Baker 


1A 

12 

11* 


Mb 

7ft BafdwS 

■320 34 


43 

9ft 

9* 

9ft + ft 

6* 

2* BalvMwt 


163 

3% 

Sft 

3%+ft 

25ft 

21 BanFd 

Z0ftr&2 


5x 25* 25% 25* + * 

6% 

4% Banstra 



32 

5% 

5* 

5%+ % 

9% 

Bft BnfcBId 

M A3 27 

» 

ft* 

Aft 

Bft 

4% 

3ft Bara 


39 

10 

3% 

3* 

3%+ft 

4% 

2ft BamEn 



12 

3* 

3* 

3* 

f2* 

7% Bamwl 

JO 24 


45 

Bft 

6 

Bft+ * 




94% JM 
9 446 

5% 2% 
lift 4ft 

ft ft 

3ft 1ft 
35% 25% 
109b 6ft 
23ft lift 
3ft lib 
3ft 21* 
Oft (9b 
9% 5 I 
16 11 
5% 2ft 
2ft 1 
17% Mb 
79b 3ft 
10ft 6ft 
7 1 

2Mb 16% 
35% T7ft 
5ft 3 


■25 J 15 107 

13 53 

4»r 14 9 70 

I 20 71 

.12 24 17 1 

.129 4J 931956 
122 

140 571 

11 112 
JB 7 J 32 7? 

15 2702 
SSI U 6 
40 99 

.771 19 70 5 

J2 S 25 42 

. 632 


94% 92ft 
49b 4% 
3% 3% 
70 9ft 

in k 
2ft 2% 


«3ft— ft 
4% + % 
3ft— ft 


2 

77 

11 19 

15 31 

41B 24 24 67. 


9ft 9ft 
22ft a 
2ft 2ft 
29b 29b 
9ft 9% 
Mb Bft 
14 14 

3ft 3ft 
11b 1ft 
10% 9ft 
4% 4ft 
74b 7ft 
1ft 1ft 
27% 27ft 
32ft 31ft 
3ft 34k 


5 — ft 
2ft + ft 
2* 

35*+ ft 
9ft+ ft 
22 — ft 
2ft 
39k 

9ft+ % 
Bft 
14 

3ft— ft 
lft— ft 
70ft— ft 


7ft + ft 
1ft + ft 
27%+ ft 
32 — 44 
34b + ft 


11% 

3* GNCEn 



6 

4* 

4% 

416 

11% 

3% GlEXPt 


5 

151 

1Mb 

10 

10ft— ft 

9% 

4* GRI 


12 

47 

5% 

Sft 

s% + % 

5ft 

2ft GTI 


34 

2D 

Mb 

3% 

3%+ft 

19ft 

9% GalaxC 


7 

198 

12* 

12 

72*+ ft 

3% 

1% GatxvO 



476 

2* 

2% 

2* + ft 

33 

24% Goran 

1J0 

+1 8 

70 

29% 

29% 29%+ % 

18ft 

10 GfltLIt 

JSe 

A 17 

64 

13% 

12% 

12% 

w% 

7 Gavlrd 


M 

3 

9 

9 

9 —ft 

14% 

9* GeimS 


11 

44 

11* 

11 

n% + * 

5* 

2% Gemco 


97 

2i 

3% 

Mb 

**+ m 

17ft 

12ft GOefns 

Jt 

SJ 9 

M 

I Sft 

ISM 

15*— ft 


17% 11% Jadm Mb 3J 9 II 15 15 15 

9% 5ft -lOCOb* 22 7% 7% 7% 

16 10% Jensen 7 3 15ft 15ft 15% 

5% 2% JbtAffl 6 139 3% 3 3ft + ft 

24b ftJbtAwt 30 ft ft % 

Bft 3% Jbtran 491 60 16 132 Bft 7ft Bft + ft 

5ft 2ft JohnPd 317 5% 4ft 5ft + % 

10% 7% JohnAm Jo u 15 as lew 9ft io% + % 

7% 4ft JmpJkn 6 15 5% 54b 5ft— V. 



{tribune 


f53Tg ; 


l > 


mm 


+M * 




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ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FXJNDS 


Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed 
7 February 19*5 


The net asset value quota! toasthawa Maw am supplied by too Funds listed with IM 
•xccpNou of nine Kmd* wkase Quotes are liasad oa issue prices. Tie fallawles 
morainal symbols Indicate fretmeacy ef qoobrtlocs supplied for tbe IHT: 

(dj -daily; (■) - weekly; (bl »bHneam!y; (rl-repularty; {D-Irreaplarty. 


AL MAL MANAGEMENT 
fwj AMHal Trust, SA — 


BANK JUUUS BAER ft CO. Ud. 

— Id J Baerband 5F 923,30 

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ORANGE NASSAU GROUP 
PB BSSTft T1» Kooue <070) 449670 
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—Id) Crosstow Fund SF1U7 

— id) ITF Fund N.V S 1509 


BANGUE INDOSUEZ 

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—Id ) Indosuer Multibonds A. 
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CAP1TAL INTERNATIONAL 

-lw) Capital inn Fund 

-Iw) Capital ttalio SA 


PA RISBAS— GROUP 

_ ih i t eb mal bpal *9081 

— Iwioau-DM DM1J42.11 

— iw) OBLIGES! ION SF 91j» 

— (»1 OBLI-OOi-LAR S 1.11X33 

— Iw) OfiLFYEN Y 10SJ59JH 

— Iw) OBLFGULOEN FL 105153 

— Id) P4R0IL-FUND S 1BXK2 

— Id ) PARINTER FUND— S1B3J7 

—id | PAR US Treasury Band S10IU2 

ROYAL ft. 

-Hwl RBC 
-+ Iwl RBC 
■+IW) RBC 
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5 KAN 01 FOND INTL FUND i 464-234275) 

— iwllne.: Bid USl Oftar S522 

— IwlAcc.: Bid S4J1 Otfcr *522 

SVENSKA INTERNATIONAL LTD. 

17 Devonshire SaXmdoivO 1-3774046 
— iblSHB Bond Fund ... „ S21J4 

-iw) SUB Inti Growth Fund * 19-40 

SWISS BANK CORP. 

-id) America Valor SF 62140 

—Id ) D-Mark BmdSeibcttan — DM 11171* 

—id | Dollar Band Median S 12X06* 

—id ) Florin Bond Sebdaa FLIlUr 

— M) Mtarrebr SFIMiS 

-id) Japan Portfoflo SF 829-75 

-id )»alM Foreign BmdS«< — SF 1BMT 

—id I Swtevaicr PitwSer. Sf* 0 " 

—Id ) Italy. Band Select SF B4J5 

—id I Utowryai Fund SF 12443 

union bank of Switzerland 

— id) AmeolLS-Stl SF4X75 

— Id j BrnHavut SF67J5 

—Id I Ram Swiss Si SF 131.50 

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-id i Sum Sooth Afr. St SF30040 

-W) Sima Wacft prim) SFWJO 

UNION INVESTMENT Frankfort 

— MlUmrenka DM 42.10 

— id ) UMtOMtS DM 21 JO 

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Other Funds 


FAC MGMT. LTD. INV. ADVISERS 

— iwlFftCEuraem 51 

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London Aaanf 874393013 

—iw) Gold Income SftOf 

— (w> Gold Anpreclatton 143 

— iw) Dollar Income * 84 6 

— lie) Strategic Trmffne SUM 

CEFINOR FUNDS. 

—iwl East Investment Fuod_ <35550 

—twlScontah World Fund 61190389 

— Iw) State St American SI4160 

CeptLGuld Ltd! nnAaenLO 7-491 4230 










JARDINE FLEMING. FOB 10 GFO HO Kg 

—lb I J.P Japan Trust _____ Y 4876 

— ibj J.F South Emr ABla 33053 

— jb ) I f -mean Tecnnotogv Y22SB0 

— lb) J.FPaoflcSecS.IA(E> SL43 

— (b ) J.F Austrcdia iuo 

LLOYDS BANK INTL FOB 43ft Geneva ll 

— Hw> LtaYdj Inn □oilor SIMM 

— Hw) Uoyd* inn Europe — sf 107 JO 
— Hw) Uovdl Inn Growth _ SF 112X00 
— Hw) Uavto inn income SF 315JU 

T^\^ ,anpaan ^- SFULn 

—id ) OauA. 59222 

— iw ) Clam B- US $18543 

— iw > CJai* C - Japon * 77^5 

DM — Deutsche Work; BF — Beta mm Francs: FL — Dutch Florin; LF — 
LuMmbaure Francs: SF — Swiss Francs; a — asked; + — Otter Prices ;b — faW 
change P/v 51 0 Ip si p gr 'unit: NA— Not AvaTtabte; N^.— NatCanununlcatad.-o- 
New; S — susaenaed; S/S — Start Spilt: • — Ex-Dividend; «* — Ex-Rts; — — 
Grass Pertormance Index Oeu • — Reaemp) -Price- Ex-Cnuean; ea _ Formerly 
Worldwide Fu nd LM ; » — Offer Price bid. 3% prtiim, charge; ++ — dally start 
Price os on A ms te rdam Stack Exrtanae 
















36ft 25% 
5ft 1ft 
14ft 10 
15ft 9% 
7% 3 
15% 14% 
5ft 5% 
17% 8 
15 5 

4% 2% 
4ft 31b 
5ft 3% 

& lft 

7ft 2ft 
15 8ft 
14% Eft 
Sift 21 


KnGbpf LS0 127 

KopokC 

KnvCP 30 77 II 

KearNn m 30 I 

Kai oru 19 

Kenwta JOa 47 • 

K«rCo 20 23 
KeyPh 30 1J 18 

KovCa • 

Kktdewt 

KBant 25 

Klnark 21 

Ktrtry 

KUMfp 19 

KloerVs 3Zr A 
Knopo 16 

KnoH 17 

KoaerC 232 83154 


35ft 35% 
2ft 2% 
lift lift 
13ft n% 
4% 4ft 
77 17 

9ft Bft 
lift KM* 
6% Mb 
3% 3% 
4ft 4% 
4ft 4% 
3ft 3ft 
5% 5ft 
3% 31h 
lift 13% 
75% 14% 
26% 36% 


35%+ % 
2ft— ft 
17% + % 
13ft— ft 
4% 

17 

8% 

11% + ft 
6% 

3%+ ft 
4% 

4ft 


X 8% 8% 89b + ft 

S 11% TO* 11 +Vk 

10ft 9ft 9ft + % 

57 10% 1G% + % 

in Sft 8 ? — ft 

JS *1% 

45 Ab 2% 2%+ ft 

S 21% 20% n% -Mb 

7 a% 59 59 

M Jft 5% 5%+ % 

” 16% 16ft 16% + % 

7 2% 2% 8%+ ft 

*50z 125 128ft 129 +2 

M Mb 3% j%+ ft 

“ 30ft 30, 30% 


66 IM 10% 10ft + ft 
w Wb 10ft 10% + % 
w % )K 3%+% 
UU M4 5ft 5% + % 
]4 26ft 36% 26%+,%. 

a io% io% io% -9 

146 6% 5% 6ft IB4 

M 1Mb 17% lWb + % 
1030 5% 5% 5ft +% 

' 27 2ft 2Vb 2ft + ft 
V SJ 4% 4ft + ft 
32Sz 31 30ft 31 
120* 60 ® 60—1 
17 9% 9 9ft + % 

37 io% 10ft 10ft 

® 26% 26ft 24ft + % 
11 10ft W% toft— ft 
133x IB 16% 18 +lfe 
T1 15ft 15ft lift 
5 9% 9ft 9% + % 

M 3% 5% 5%— ft 

56 5ft 5% 5ft— ft 
13 2% 2ft 2%+ ft 

473 1 Sft 14ft 15_ + ft 

10 27% 27% 27% + ft 
53 6% 6 6 -ft 


10% 9% ' 
26ft 15% 
Uft 4% 
5ft 2ft 
27% Mft 
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5ft 5ft 
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7ft 7ft 
4ft 4ft 
17ft 17ft 
59 5Bft 
8% 79k 
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23 +1 
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a 

4ft 

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59 +1 
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5ft- % 
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75ft + ft 
26% — ft 


3 lft 
4ft 2ft 
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1491 119k 
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7% 3% 

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16 10% 
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31% 129b 
10% Oft 


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6% 5% 
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14% 14ft 
17% 17ft 
12% 12 
12ft 12ft 
Bft 7 
50ft 50 
6 % 6 % 
6% 6% 
3 3 

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31% 30ft 
35ft 35% 
Oft 13% 
12ft 11* 
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14* 14* 
32 30ft 
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12ft— % 
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31% +1% 
35ft— % 
Oft + ft 
11%+ ft 
1316 + ft 
14* 

32 +1ft 

9% 


9% S 
5* 3* 
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16% 13% 
20 12ft 
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14ft 10ft 
27* 10% 
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17% 10ft 
47% 27% 
47ft 30ft 
8% 5% 
4ft 3ft 
15 9% 

5% 1* 
IB* 10% 
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24% 11% 
31* 20ft 
7 2 

SH 3% 
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29% 22ft 
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RAJ 351 12 12 

RMS El 

RTC 

Roaon .12 J 24 
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RottlH 

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Rod It* -56a 22 9 
RudrtPl M 22 

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14% 13* 
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7 7 

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42% 41% 
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7 6* 

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179b 179b 
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24* 23* 

26 26 
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14ft 11% 
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9ft 791 
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5% 3 
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25% 

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35 




11% 8% 
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65 53% 

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AMEX Higbfrlaws 


IB 5ft Nonfat 17 110 9 0% 9 + ft 

14 10* NtOoO -4Bb 33 9 4 13* 13% 13*— ft 

27 12ft NtPstnt .10 J II >12 20% 19ft Nft— * 

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10ft 

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15 15* 

11 % 11 % 
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W% 14% 
6 % 6 % 
13% 13% 
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16* T7ft 
15% 15% 
13* 73* 


10* 10* 10* 
9* 9U 9% 
9% 9% 9% 
9* 9* 9*. 

mb 10% 10% 





4% 

13ft 
B* 

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6* 

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12% 12% 12ft- 
20* 20* 20% 
19* 19% 19* 
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7% 7% 7% 
29 28ft » 
5ft Sft 5U 
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Reaching More 

ThanaThirdofa 

Million Readers 
in 164 Countries ** 
Around the World 

JlcralbC^^Sribunc 


Floating Rate Notes 


Feb. 7 


Dollar 


iW 


ii*Sl 








IB* 

9-5 

12W 

M 

27-1 

164 

9% 

56 

11% 

26-3 

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28-7 

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1+2 

ill* 

154 

19b. 

21-6 

lib. 

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304 

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266 

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36 

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196 

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+3 

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95 

72* 

18-3 

10* 

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m 

252 

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28-2 

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17ft 

192 

9* 

57 

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205 

72% 

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■ *uddejj s n 

'■Sate)li te S 


**.- 


Page 15 




jNJP_ERjU.no NA L CLASSIFIED 


% 

' n -:>ur 

Vi| 


HEAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 

SPAIN 


(Continued From Back Page) 


Mr. 

> Sv 












REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 
FBgVCH PROVINCE S 

UNIQUE OFPORTUMTY 
«*uobI3j5Imk 

... O OTEP-Aa w. FRANCE 

Kb 1 10 MCTPB MO. a pQgL lit ^ 0o *? °F»n 

so ,ow ETBIIWS ttSSt's*; S3n 

Peop “ Ibctaoww canfaitoble WteVn ktai 

|oomj«A fcepto 90 

>®B* tor,*e oi Cop, 

Syst’Si'srBrif 


lWTO ._ ABOUT BEHRING 

^ s *S^feK"£TtSi 

rJjotj ip.- We hoy, id. no, on- 
jjrort, via end oportoer*. beccfe 
• ■de.tofaewMrtsxra ««l<* fcogoK. 
- we ore ratfwr B“ «*« 

■ yoo ore toofang far ordrf not well 

- Tfw foot promo tub • 

118 Morbe&Spom. Tit 


REAL ESTATE 
TO rent/share 


SWITZERLAND 


PORTUGAL 


WM PHOPOmS THROUGHOUT 
' Poitupol or* pramoSed intaUwni 

tgrs&Zfg&zzz 

bridge, London SW1. Telephone- 01- 
5897133. Tele* 25480 EQUES G 

SWITZERLAND 


For Ram oh, MONTRBJX 
MANSION on LAKE GENTVA 
• 40 morn i ndinSrg beautiful end 
fargo reception room 
' *“9*, ktoftng pon 
■ wcnderfJ wooded pat 

.riSSPwSg-fiwwNB 

SCHOOL. -HOm,- LUXURY C1WIC 
„ Bert SHO.OOO • to SF25«0 
WQimr our delated information, 
e Ban & Ct SA “ 


De 

Man Repos 14. CHI 


, 20 15 61 
l! Lou tonne 




'hen 

r-fi-i 


’ftl. 


s-rruitfce^ 

. ■ ^Smc\ 

^Sseg 

. ‘"“Hi* 

• lhi W* 

.v.-.'SSt- 

.. -.X"* 'Vs! 

“heOusjj 
‘ . 1, l| n 3 *. 

,y. 

■■J-’fillB, 

• : V-- * 

. J,: - '*ou!jij. 

- - 

ihiinj. 

. ' ' *i-i mein*. 

‘ -V'viir.: 


* 


G STAAD 


VALLEY 

YOUR INVESTMENT IN 
SWITZERLAND 

We ore «Sng wy exArwwe & CSfiv 
fertile horns with 2 no 5 lot ge rooms. 

The co mp fox of 3 chctoK a located 
dne la me heart of lha v3bga with a 
- wew over the tfa dopes & 



kcal Austeii 
for \ enezuel 



ft* wide 

A camprehenme range of services A 
b Carte', nidi os momlcflanae, servt& 
mg, loosing 8 management n avcdeUe. 

r 

> For further information or 
an appabtuient, please contact: 
On SB* : (029)4 52 49 

PLAZA CONSTRUCTIONS 
RUE DU RHONE 100 
04-1204 GOLEVA 

Trt 1 022) 21 60 44. The 42) 12) 


^SWITZERLAND 

FAMOUS RESORT AREA 


DO YOU WISH - 
■ * TO BUY AN APARTMENT 

OR A HOUSB 
' TO SE7WE IN SWTTZEBIAM)? 
. -TO INVEST IN SWITZERLAND 

CONTACT US: 25 YEARS OF BOW 
ENCE IN BUILDING AND SELLING 
RNE SWISS SEAL KTATE. 

SOOiM SA. 

P.O. Bor 6Z 
1884 VSars. Switierfond. 

Tic 456213 GESE CH 


CHOOSE 

SWTTZHUAND 
We hove For foreigners: A very b*o 
choke of beautBu APARTMBfTV 
VILLAS / CHAiHS in the whole 
repon of lake Geneva. Martfrev* 5 a* 
fanout maunhin resorts. Very leaSav 
nblv priced but afaa (he best and most 
eedusive. Price from about US$40,000. 
Mortgage s at 6Vi%. Reese vha us or 
'phone before you make o decision. 
H. SffO L D SA. 

Tour Grbe 6, CH-10Q7 Lausome. 
^ 21/25 36 11 Telex: 24290 SEBO CH 

VALAIS / SWITZERLAND 

GUNS MONTANA 
IHYON, IB COUjONS 
■ ST. LUC VAt VAPNVffiKS 
Ffot&andchc4ftts2SKil5DscHA,1 »5 
room. Gredt 60%. (rtlerea rate 6-75%. 
Duration 15 years. Owners btridert. 

* Sea ude. 

VAL PROMOTION SA 
10 Ave. du Mrf. 0+1950 San. 

Tel : 41-27-23 34 95 . 

THE SWISS 5PEGAUST5 mpi* 
range of propertiet m mer 50 resort! 
m Switzerland, ea Monfreur, Luav 
na, VSa r» etc Hivy Sain Ltd, 422 
’ Uppw Eidmrd Id West, London 

JW74- Jet B1-B6 A555Jlr^27P28 . 

USA GENERAL 


[ aMLCA PBMAT. between Nice 
&*^nooaM^Ke«inew over- 
jWniig htxbor of 3 trami o cr«. fi 
be^r oom. 4 bade Extra bags %ymg. 
*t»ng loom, modern Litcheo. terrace 
& Ivn nwvng pool Maid awaJabte. 

MewNyrewai USSl?jQQQ Augus, 
US5 15.000. Comoct Jacques Frmae 
W54 St. NYC 100?9USA^3j 

GREAT BRITALV 

[^YfXKLmWAPAKIMns: 
JCmghfabudge.'CheW Over ICO 
tuUy wveriMK. 1 & 2 bedroom 

apartments Aflniodevnconvmcvm 
hhntmim stay 22 days Pnc« from 
£>45 per week. Please c ont uu Lor- 
rame Young. NGH Apartments. NeB 

SriT? Ave - London 

SW3 Td ; Ql-569 1105 Tt» 295SI7G. 

RELOCATION WITHOUT Aggravo 
non If you wish to lent or acquee a 
ho«e or apartment uithebestresi- 
denbd districts of London and its cmn- 
rans. your lust port-af-coU drjuU be 
George Krvght & Pormeis Tli Let 
NW 9 Heath Street. London 

NW3.~Tetechon* 01794-1125. TU 
:^?0 EQUES G. 

| LONDON NEAR BUCKINGHAM Pal- 
ace. Lvrory My fivmshed 2 bedoom 
Bat for short term |1 week . 2 month- 
r entaf). BaoLeigs token now lw 
Swing Summer USSSOO week nv 
cu+rrg transcortemon to & from or- 
porrftione Mr C Knghf 0935 74753 
or 0935 862120 

[ OT4TRAI LOTON - txecmrve «i^| 
«e ap®we-.ts m new twi 
can-ifortabW fivrvshed and tuny 
equipped. mr»d leryrce (Moa 
through rti l Ccfev TV . (tune for bro- 
chure (01) 388 1 342 or wnke Preuden- 
hal Estates (Mcyfar) Ltd. I Universrty 
St- London VWnEaJL 

LONDON PIMUCO, SWT, Luxury I 
m awonette. 2 douUe bedrooms, re- 1 
CMtien. kndien & bath. Hobday lets 
orJr. £250 for '• persons. MJO li 


MONTKUX- 2-bertoom duplex, pen- 

■a** ww of Lake Geneva, newly 

decorerod, uwrjD & pool. Ayafabfa 

taffaHa«r r 


SPAIN 


COSTA Da SOC Largo villa between 


. met of 

US$1500 al inducted. r _... 

ovaUUe. Ban 1763, Herofd Triune. 
92521 NewOy Codex, France 


bfa bedrooms. Fix weekly i 

ted. Abo petrify 


LISA 


NVC • 4/rh St Cost 

RIVER PLAZA CORP 

DAG HAMMARSKJOID TOWSt 

Quakty (nveslry -Owned 
Ccwfarnnigm Apartm e nts In 
New FuB Service Buddmg Wflh . 
Swimmer g Pool Health Oub, and 
Housekeeping Services Avcwtte 

fanmeefiate Renfd 

SPECTACULAR 

U L t 4 Betteoem 
Ap rvfaetk from $2420 

Furrvshed Apartments Abo Atofttble 
- Ftewbie Leases - 
For Wo CoS 212-759-8844 
Sat - Sun 1| . 4 ; Mon to Fri 9 - 5 


WOULD YOU (IKE TO UVE m Vupv 
A USA? Gf and opporfunry ID try it 
i. Handsome artv-belb bi«' 


fuss. Handsome cxkvbeib btick 
House on 400 acres avaJabfe for 
months of Apri. Moy Futy staffed, 

E rmd southern cocAmg avehAet, 
etas ID ndr, nab to weft, knaxtrv- 
ktte farm m first order. Pmrato & 
seduded yet 15 mnutes from kwm. 
No problems. New Charfcrttesvde. 
Bax 1659. Herald Tribune, 92S2I 
Neutfy Cedes. France. 


- J for per so 
per week. Bo- 4ta5S. 
Aoe. brim WQ. 


... lot 4 

HI. 63 Long 


NYC refTHOUSC- large canlempa- 
ronr 2 bedroom. ? forth aty view. 
WpQO/rrcrJh Contoct TnCtxxool 
Proper hes. 3050 kutrynn Geiyon W, 
lot Angeles. CA 90M6 213- #47397. 


LUXURY PROVENCAL farmhouse 
neor Nee. 3 double bedrooms, tap- 
ed private pod. available June • Sep- 
tember hom £875 lo C1375 per 
week. let 01-2217550 between 105n 
8 4pm wee kd ays 

LONDON SW15, COMFORTABLY 
fumshed haute, 2 bedrooms, 2 batv- 
rooms, lounge, drier, garage. 13rh 
March - 2WApnL £180 per week.no 
smokers, cfvkken o> anmxrts. TeL 01- 
788 7905 _ _ _ 

LUXURY SERVICED FIATS m Mayfo* 
and henur^on are the oifornabves to 
expensive hotel u cco n e n odnaars. 
Contact Awtfeh & Company. 155-157 
Oxford St. London W 1 Dr phone 01- 
434 1701 The 266746. 

LONDON BAKER ST. Seff-ct*ermg 
hokday flats. Fu8y equpped. color 
TV, tnen. sleeps 1-6 prom. Setf- 
lained from £9Q/w oek. Crawford 
HaGday Flats, 33 Cr a w f ord- St, ton. 
don wf. Tet 01-402 6165. 

BEHR & BUTCHOFF. A tage selection I 
of propertie s in Sl Johns Wood, 
Regents Park, Swiss Cartage, Horn- 
deed & enmoro. 6 mertfa + . led 
01-586 7561. The 883168 ACOG 

CAMDBI LONDON M NEWLY built 
vittoge, 1 bed Rot, fuBy carpeted, 
brand new fomrtura. al fodtesei. 5wt 

£12Q/we^. 0 1-278 7684 pher 8 pm. 


ASFBI COLORADO- Summer or wm- 
ter. Lovely 5 bedroom fanrfy home 
pool AvaiWrte by week 


with indoor , . 

of month. Inqurtes to P.O. Bax 790. 
Aspen, CO IGA 303-925-5295. 


LOFT NEW YORK 2 OX sqA Tnhsca. 
173CC. Tet 654 0097 Rome. 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANCE 


LARGE AMERICAN FAMILY wishes 
to rent vfla n June in southern Frcnce. 
Coast bartfan preferable but not es- 
sential. Same domestic hefo dewed. 
Recta to Robert ft Snyder, 1367 
Brrtfour Ed, Grasse PouUO, Midxgon 
48230 USA 


AUTO RENTALS 


CHAftC IM A CAR. AesMe cm 
fab Sprtit, M m c ede s . Janucr. BMW, 
imoS cars. 46 rue Perre 
_ _ — 500 8 fon. Tet- 720X40. 
Tctex 630797 F CHAH.OC 


AUTO SHIPPING 


HOW TO IMPORT A EUROPEAN 
CAR tNIO THE UAA. 

Dm document exptens Mtv whal one 
must do to brmg a cor «aa the US. 
arttey and legaly. fc includes new & 
used European mrto prices, buying kps, 
DOT & EPA corwernon addresses, cus- 
tom dear once A ihippmg procedures 
as weC cb tagpl pomiv Because ef the 
strong dota. you con I art i*> to 
USS1&000 when buymg a Mercedes, or 
BMW tn Emm & onportmg it to the 
States To reemve the maSjd, send 
LS5I8J0 (odd US I1J0 fo r jMtfage) 
P L Schnvdt, Postfoch 3131 
7000 Stuttgart 1. West Germany 


FRANKFURT/ MAtl-W. Germany. H 
Her m o m Gn*H Tet OfeS-UHSl. 
Pick-up oO over Europe "ro/ro-rtxps. 


TRANSCAR X rue Le Sueur. 75116 
PWA Tet: 500 ID 04. Nice: 83 95 31 
Antwerp: 233 9985. Cannes 39 43 44 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


LMJ.5A 
OmOAL 
ROUS BOYCE 
DEALS FOR BELGKJM 


TAX FRE CARS 

ROILS ROYCE 
BENTLEY 

Worldwide delivery 

r. de Middetbourg 74-82 

1170 BRUSSELS 
TEL: 2-673 33 92 
TLX: 25459 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


TAX FKE CARS: MERCEDES, Batts 
Boyce. Aud. Vcta. Pa-xfos, BMW 
We keep a large stock of fomd new 
and good used can We do the 
D-O.T- and E-PA. an our own pre- 
mrsev Wo also take care of the step 
ptea and boning m USA Contact us 
at 4v» Cnumbmv ML Befoum 
050/715077, tel u5 A. Ul t^oll. 
Hx Betrnun 82709 EUGQAU B tU 
USA *995689 vu US. NV Euro Ae- 
to * Inmii ixjuamj. Kpnnan AantSaan 
47. 9990 Mrt degam. BeSum. 


• TAX FREE NEW MBKB1£S • 
500 5a, SEC. SU Bwnedvste dekvmy 
M er^xrrt service Sow moneyi 
IMtanMe vAehtab prieeil 
Cdt SaECTION toil nw r*xe 
SHJ5CIION knpprhfafort GmbH 
P.O Box \i5j D-2&3 SyVe. 

W. Gerimmy fot P) 4247-e0«5B. 
60459. «M5D Tlx: 74109 


EUROPE A USA SPECS. 

AS makes for worldwide delivery from 
stock. Send for a TAX-FREE estate 
BMW - MERCEDES - POXSoST 
VW ■ SAAB - VOLVO - PEUGEOT 

EUROPE AUTO BROKERS 
FOB 214, 3430 AR Nwmeaem Hofbnd 
Teh ffl 3402-41346 Tlx. ?oDo8 EAB PO. 


TAX FRS AUTO SALES 
Oder yow European - US ■ and UK 
automobi l es 

Cat rental unbilled mteoga. 
Leauno new car I to d months 
Telex 200572. Tel: 651 4342. 
ftaccn, 2 Avw Ported* Start Cfood 
Peril 75016 


For Dima Delivery 


3bo se, sa. 500 se. sa 

380 SL 500 SL, 3SS SK. £00 SEC 

POCGOC 31 i Camera L Turbo 
Autehae^Sued GnftH 

BothurrwrSa 103. 435Q Recilusrfic 

ref 02361 /700«rx8299S7AH5D 


BUY YOUR NEXT CAR 
TAX FREE AND USE OUR 
BUY-BACK PROGRAM 

AND SAVE 

were for nos catalog or 

HUE BUY-4ACX FOLDER TO: 
SHIPSOEiLV.. P.O. Bax 7566, U18ZH 
Arasierdom Arport, The Neftertads. 
(D2]l5M33. Telex- 12568 


stwsnc Uc, 576 RftH Avenue. 
7* Ffaor. New York, NY. 10036 l^A- 
1*17) B6944&4. TetaTSTfe 


5HVSR3E SA, OtauBee de Wavre 
465. 1040 Braaefa, Brigum. 
Phone: 02)6499062. Tetett 63290 


BVCLAM). Fcndy seeks 4 bedraom 
wefl eguypitf house wilfi grauneb to 
rsirt 2 weeks Luky. Neor uirden pre- 
ferred. DeffoscL 71 Sherwood Tenof- 
ly, NJ fl7^0lBA (201) 569%2B. 


ROME - WRITER SEEKS to rent luge 
Rot (4/5 roams] in Rome center. 
Please write Bax 2106, IJLT. Fri*. 
dncfolr. 15, [>6000 Frankfurt/Mfon. 


EVHJ FOR SHORT 1BJA serit apart- 
ment for rtrt Pare. ExaUett none 
So. eta Tet (I | 544 39 40. 


EMPLOYMENT 


EXECUTIVE 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


HAMPSTEAD, modern fomiy home + 
garage. 4 bedrooms, 2 bathroom, j 

'Zr£&rfl80tf& 

8, Beeves Letting 01-4359681 


E HAMPTON, S. HAMPTO N, NY 
PRIME PROPBK1E5 
OGEAPnONT AND PROXIMITY 
Seta - Rmdta - 




^ - \cc- 


h 


IONA 

RUBENSTEIN 

82 Pert PI, t Haoiptan. NY 11937 
(516) 324-MOO 

: tOBO AOSS IB 5UNBB.T Ttaer- 
/ero ps, exaffenf incan-e potenlfaL 
Hurting, fishing, horrebadt nefag. 
5525 per aane. rhta Farm Manage- 
ment, 5050 Ptalcr AvOjJ Bute i jT o, 
AfanpN*. TNSj^Tet *01-767-2236 
Up 0650 533297. 

18,000 ACRES OF M*BtAL rite in 

SE. Color ada, USA of IE$500 oer 
oae. Cash or tents. WB sefl off or 
«iy part. Contort Bud Brixey Rt. 3, 

Bax 78, Hooker, OK 73945. Tel: 

405652-2534 Pay or evtatfl] 

AMZONA-OWNBi UQUHJAT1NG. 

Take over balance due on 60 acres 
beautiful rmchfoni Tefal price US 
U0300. US COO down + $332313 
monthly. No edaercbp lequted. 

_ 4142 Scomdate.AZ 65261 USA. 

WATBLFRONT PROPERTY, 3^ ran 

665 ft. on the water in exdume Ffee- 

quogue. Long Uorid. US$495 iW0J_ 

ro55KALTYlnc fS16t 584^601 499 
Ltao Ave, SL James, NT 11780, USA. 

USA RESIDENTIAL 

NEW YORK OTY CO-OP 
, tflH AVBftJE LOW 70'S 

SB6AD0NAL... 

New duptn fa old btddng. 40 foot 
taig room, 2 be rk oct n s & Htrory, 3 
baths ueth sauna wferlpaaL Pfofc mews 
Iran ewy roam. Mcartenance $1400 
per montfwFor defods 

Mn de Mnm 212^-4192 
Wtafcencb: 212-472-8841 
Doughs Sfcnan &bbons & W 

EASTON OKLAHOMA. BeautW &v 
ghsh Tudor home, 4,600 square feet, 
seduded at ceidde of 240 acres. Lais 
of timber with deer Aqua! i 00 acre 
decred & iafroved, idea for bene 
or a rt de ranch. Aff a roeri ta . gacxl 
roads & schools. City roe» traa & 
oncrl ten than X twnutes. Tet Seal- 
fond, Aberdeen (0224) 647968 for f»c- 
furasAdrtah 

OCMMKOfir ESTATE 
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42 acres, 450 ft. beach frontage, pme 
forest, uriusud cecufor main fwuw, 


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, YOUNG LADY 

PA/Interprelei 4 Tauran Guide 

PARIS 562 0587 


Philips, Kay <md Lewis. Tet London j 
352 61 II. Telex 27846 RESQEG. 

BB4HAM 4 RSVES LETTMG office. I 
Whether lookfag fa a home • a hene 
a property to let in N.W. Usndon. CoR I 
r 1 01-435 9681 1 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


FOR njRNSFO lEirmGS m S.W. 
landarj, Surrey 4 Berkshire. Codncf 
MAV5. Oxshoit |037 284} 38 M UK. 

Teta 8955112. 

ANSGOMBE 4 RMGLAPD with of- 
fices in St Johns Wood 4 Kenangron 
offer the best service in resiefanhd 
letting, Tel: 722 7101 fPljJJC. 

CSURAi. London. Ltrxuryfornahed 
‘ Hats, American kitchens. £280 /weefc- 
4 or £175/week - stem 2. Tet 
341?flJ 


BJROPEAN CORRESPONDENT for 
taenenn ne wspaper seeks ntrttve En- 
gfolnperJi*rs m tnoior Ewopeon 
*s to serve as hnMcrs during 
porta's pmorfc vrdts for stones. 
Should be Ruert in local long 
same knowledge of joumclam 
foL Work d part-time, ideal fa stu- 
denu, heefanee writers, etc. Cortart 
Bax 1732, Ha old Tribune. 92521 
NeuJy Cedex, France. 


oS8/ 


22W a 01-486 ! 


><mq 


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houses to leL Blenheim Properties Tel 
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OVERSEAS POSITIONS. Hundreds of 
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of Mount Royal, Quebec, Canada 
H3P3C7. 


GREECE 


SPETSAL GRSCE. Isncunous w«a, sep- 
arate floors. Sleeps 9 & 4. 5 berths, 
padens. Close sea Superb view. 
AvaWrte May to August Box 40355, 
Haakf , f AL 63 Long Acre. London, 
WC2E9JH. _____ 


JOURNALIST US- mothar tongue for 
pat-tene job in trade reporting from 
Benelux To ha paid w USS. Write 
Bax 1756, Herald Tribune, 92521 
NeuJIy Codex. France 


SECURITY PROFESSIONALS. May 
ogemert, ocerrtiad and tednad 
in Afnca & Mddle East. Tel 
115, Albert, Greece 


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I EXECU1TVE STEWARDESS SffiG po- 
sition on pnvtrte VIP arcreft. Box 
40340. IH.T, 63 long Acre. London. 
WC2E9JR 


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POSmONS AVAILABLE 


italv 


btaown guest cortope, dtff hanging 
bndi house. S2S niton. Cartop ypa 
broker sredp) 683-1556, 682-4542, 
682-2845. 

CARMa HGHLANDS, CAUF. Dis- 
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' SU^WSiffEE 

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WATBBRONTPBOPOTY. N«r W8- 
. fanoburg, VAi 20 dots for 5 oces 
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ment across from wider. Excellent 
C Dover- 

_ 

j^A 23185 BM 253-1816. 

NYC LOW 80‘S, tat Side. ! bedroom 

takorterre wife Nrrace avettpetag 

:jhe river. Safe quart reader * olarea 
Offers arart privacy. Price K95,000 
cash. ■& 212662-1134 « 

" Ladner, 330 W. 108 St., NY. NY 

, 10025 USA. 

DAM 04, CXJNNKTlCUT.BacuMB- 
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^5aL ESTATE. Tel 203 6557724, 

USA 

■ COMAffiRCtAL 
& INDUSTRIAL 

»UM BEACH - One of lf» l“B« 

hUancd oommerac i buMny on 
War* Avenue 4 Ot» omt 45 yta 

■Ktsaas 

{30^ 655-5710. . 


ftAVEUO - Fa Rent-1 bedroom, fo»y 
famshed apartment. 500 ft. above 
the AittoWiDnve wah forge terra* 
overlooking the Merit erranecn Sea 
Private beach. By thewta ormonth. 
Tefc NY 212-909-0357 J. Btaho 367 
Wert 19 St. NY. NY 10011 USA. 
ROME. 3 beriaans. 2 baths, wrooes, 
mew of Si. Peter *-. June^ugust 
$1,200/ month. Co8 654 0097 Bane. 

MILAN RlfiMSWD 

let S9Q0 monthly. London 870 051Z 

PARIS AJRJEA FL1RN1SHED 
16 th FEAR BOIS 

Sumptuous reception + 2 berioonu, 


PRODEST ett 

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727 61 6Y 


8TH . 

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2 bams, shat term. 

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BENTIEY 

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BUSINESS PEOPLE 


Kansallis-Osake-Pankki 
To Open a Branch in N.Y. 


By Brenda Hageny 

Ini'erruaiarat Hemid Tribune 

LONDON — Kansallis-Osahe- 
Pankkj. Finland’s largest commer- 
cial hank, said it plans to open a 
branch in New York later this year. 
The branch will be beaded by Peter 
Fagcmas, currently deputy general 
manager of KOFs London branch. 

The move is a further step in the 
expansion of the Helsinki-based 
bank’s international operations 
and marks the first time that a 
Finnish bank has opened a branch 
in the United States. 

Since 1 979, KOP has held a stake 
in Nordic American Banking 
Coip.. a New York-based consor- 
tium. It now has indicated its inten- 
sion to divest itself of that holding. 
The sate will mark the second time 
in as many years that KOP has 
opted out of its stake in a consor- 
tium bank. In raid-1983 it sold its 
25- percent share in Nordic Bank 
PLC. a London-based consortium 
with a Singapore branch and a 
Hong Kong finance company. 

Jaakko I -a gain Kansailis’s 
general manager, said, “It is in the 
interest both of our customers and 
of (he bank itself that we have de- 
cided to pursue our own indepen- 
dent policy in the rapidly growing 
international financial-services 
markets.” 

Following the sale of its holding 
in Nordic Bank. KOP opened in 
April 1 984 a branch in London, the 
first branch anywhere outside of 
Finland for a Finnish bank, and in 
November set up a subsidiary in 
Singapore. 

In other moves in its internation- 
al expansion, KOP acquired in 
March a majority shareholding in 
Nordflnanz-Bank Zurich and in 
September announced plans to 
opened a representative office in 
Stockholm. 

Mellon Bank has appointed 
Dennis S. Maliszewski, vice presi- 
dent for global cash management, 
to head its newly reorganized cash- 
management effort in Europe, Af- 


rica and the Middle East Mr. Ma- 
liszewski, who moves to London 
from Mellon’s headquarters in 
Pittsburgh, said This location will 
better enable Mellon to offer non- 
credit products to financial institd- 


responsible for the omporate fi- 
nance department, the assignment 
of Mr. Benedict to Tokyo is the 
result of increased activity in the 
Japanese capital markets. 

Morgan Guaranty Thsf Co. of 
New York said Michael Fisher has 
become general manager of Mor- 
gan Guaranty (Switzerland) Lti. 
its Swiss underwriting unit. Mr. 
Fisher along with Martin Klaus, 
who formerly was with the Swiss 
National Bank, will be responsible 
for corporate finance; Hans- Ulrich 
Hugli, wfll head trading and distri- 
bution; Nicolas de Meyeres will 
follow trading, and Georg Scburr 
will cover research. 

Citibank has named Antoine 
Botistany country corporate officer 
in Lebanon, based in Beirat. Previ- 
ously. be was the New York-based 
bank’s senior operations officer for 
Lebanon. 

United Gtdf Bank has appointed 
Roger A. Lawson senior vice presi- 
dent and treasurer. He joins the 
Bahrain- based bank from the Lon- 
don branch of Continental Illinois 
National Bank & Trust Cb. of Chi- 
cago. 

Dow Banking Corpi said lucre 
Conzcn has become a member of 
its executive management He is 
responsible for the Zurich-based 
bank's investment- policy and - 
analysis department 

Co mm er cia l Bank of Kuwait has 
appointed Denis N olan assistant 
genera} manager, with responsibil- 
ity for its treasury functions. He 
moves to Kuwait from London, 
where he was associate director, 
head of treasury. At Allied Irish 
In ves tment Bank. 

GTE Corp. said R. Barry Leach 
was named to the new post of vice 
president, marketing and b usiness 
development, for its GTE Lighting 
Products group. GTE is a ’U.S.- 
based provider of t rfraannii mira - 
rions products and services, light- 
ing products and precision 
materials. Mr. Leach formerly was 
executive vice president and a di- 
rector of Verenugte Papierwerke 
Schickendanz A Co. of Nurem- 
ben, West Germany. 

Trans World Airlines has named 
Stephen A. Heckscfaer manager of 
corporate communications for its 
international division. Based in 


lions, corporations and govern- 

ments within the territory. The london, Mr. Hcckscfaer is respon- 
placement of cash-management sible for the U.S--based carrier’s 


specialists outside the U.S. under- 
scores Mellon Bank's commitment 
to be a premier provider of finan- 
cial service worldwide.” 

NaJco Chemical Co. said Shige- 
mitsu Mori la has become presidait 
of its new Tokyo-based subsidiary, 
Nalco Japan Co. He formerly was a 
director and senior counsel to Dai- 
cd Chemical Industries LuL, a Jap- 
anese chemicals group. Nalco, a 
U.S.-based maker of specialty 
chemicals, formed Nalco Japan in 
mid-J984 following its derision to 
end its relationship with a Japanese 
affiliate, Nalco Hake to Chemical 
Co. 

Sakwwo Brothers Inc, the New 
York-based investment banking, 
market malting and research firm, 
has appointed Neil Benedict direc- 
tor of corporate finance in Tokyo. 
He joined Salomon in 1976 and 
established its currency-swap unit 


press and pobtic-irialions activities 
in the countries in Europe and the 
Middle East it serves. Most recent- 
ly, be was in Paris with Hill and 
Knowlton — France. 

British Criedomai Airways has 
appointed Jack Roach to its board 
as personnel director, fining a va- 
cancy. For the past six months, Mr. 
Roach has served as special direc- 
tor in charge of personnel and in- 
dustrial relations. 

Parker Hannifin Coin, has 
named Brian Watts its UX man- 
aging director, succeeding Cliff 
Ackerman, who retired. Mr. Walts 
will continue as vice president of 
the European trading subsidiaries 
of Parker Hannifin, a CTevdand- 
based maker of fluidpciwer compo- 
nents and systems for the aero- 
space, automotive and industrial 
industries. 

ABC Video Enterprises Inc. has 



taMdta 

Stephen Wozmak, right, last April announcing the new 
Apple lie computer. He was joined by Steven Jobs, left, 
Apple's chairman, and John Sculley, president. 

WozniaklsLeavingPosition 
As Apple's Chief Engineer 

Los Angeles Times Sen-ire 

LOS ANGELES — Stephen Wozniak. who as ■-■o-founder of Apple 
Computer Inc helped launch the age of penonal computers, is 
leaving his day-io-dav duties at the company lo start a home-video 
business that be savs'~will have nothing to do with computers." 

Apple confirmed Wednesday that Mr. Wozniak, 33. will give up his 
role as a principal engineer at the company, which is based in 
Cupertino. California, but will remain on its payroll as a consultanL 
He will take with him another key Apple engineer, Joe Ennis. Apple 
said. 

Mr. Wozniak’s departure was announced 10 Apple employees 
Tuesday in a company newsletter. 

Mr. Wozniak is widely considered to be an engineering genius, and 
his entrepreneurial philosophy of high technology and togetherness 
helped create Silicon Valley’s iconoclastic corporate culture. 

Mr. Wozniak declined to give details about his newest project 
except to say it will be based around the use of video in the living room 
and will not replace anything that exists. He said lhat he plans to 
finance the project Himself and 10 have a product for sale next fall. 

Mr. Wozniak has made an estimated $ 100 million as co-founder of 
the company that gave birth to the desk-top computer industry and is 
International Business Machines Corp.’s biggest competitor in lhat 
market. 

Along with the Apple chairman, Steven Jobs, 29. Mr. Wozniak 
founded the company in a garage in Los Altos. California, in 1976. 
The company's sales grew to S387 million by 1981, when Mr. 
Wozniak. who is credited with developing Apple’s' first major success, 
the Apple H computer, left the company to bankroll another brain- 
child: two rock 'n roll concerts called US Festivals lhat eventually ran 
several million dollars in the red. He also earned a degree in computer 
science from the University of California at Berkeley. 

By the time Mr. Wozniak returned to the company in 1983. Mr. 
Jobs and Apple’s president, John Sculley. had expanded annual sales 
to $1 bOlioR. 

An Apple spokeswoman said Wednesday that, throughout the 
company's history. Mr. Wozniak has been more interested in engi- 
neering problems and Mr. Jobs has been more concerned with 
marketing and sales. 

Mr. Wozniak “told me he’s been thinkin g of leaving for over a 
year,” the spokeswoman said. “He said the video venture ’will have 
nothing to do with computers.' ” 

She said that his departure will not affect the company: “We feel we 
have our strategies and technologies in place. Our concentration now 
is on sales and marketing.*’ 


are ABCs investment in Screen Fidelity Bank has named An- 
Sport, a pay-cable sports network toine Paseau a vice president He is 
in Britain, and ABCs consultancy based in the Philadephia-based 
arrangement with NHK in Japan, bank's London branch, where he 
ABC Video is a unit of American serves as bead of the trade-finance 


Broadcasting Companies. New 
York. 

British Telecommunications 
PLC said Colin Browne has been 
appointed chief executive-desig- 
nate of British Telecom Broadband 
Services, the division responsible 
for developing its interests in cable 
television and associated services. 


in New York. Since June 1984, he named Phil Boyer vice president. For (he past four years, Mr. 
has been responsible for its Asian international development. He sue- Browne has been the director of the 
corporate-finance activities. Ac- ceeds James T. Shaw, who retired, office of the chairman of British 
cording to Richard Schmedk, exec- Among the projects currently ban- Telecom. He will succeed Donald 
utive director of Salomon Brothers died by international development Wray, who retires in ApriL 


division. 

McDonald’s Hamburgers Lt(L 
the British unit of the U.S. ham- 
burger chain. McDonald’s Corp- 
said Robert E. Rhea has been 
named to the new post of chair- 
man. Mr. Rhea, who continues as 
chief executive, is succeeded as 
president by Paul Presion. Mr. 
Preston, who previously was chief 
operations officer of the British 
unit, has also been appointed to the 
new post of chief operating officer. 


Analysts are Divided on Growth Prospects for Hong Kong 

f Continued from Page 9) ment from the previous year," the country, finished in Hong Kong Vickers da Costa sees GDP 

the United States the largest cos- report said. “The concern, is whetb- and exported to third countries) reaching 7 percent in 1985. com- 
* er current market sentiment is pre- would remain buoyant, it expects pared with tnc brokerage’s estimate 


SOUTH OF FRANCE Young lofy/mde 
• Id: ra 85 T9 90. 


HAMBURG - YOUNG LADY ewifxav 
■on, nrtlitoataL T«l- 27 04 570. 


FRANKFURT. Y< 
Free lo IravaL 


conpoxon. 
‘ 75. 


IOM3ON-YoungCafebeanLrtdy01. 
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tenner. 

Wardley warned that Hong 
Kong’s booming stock market, 
whose Hang Seng index has risen 
from a July low of 746 to 1 .33331 
Thursday, may expect a consolida- 
tion, wiih some 1984 annual re- 
sults, coming in March and April, 
dampening die euphoria. 

“Currenl estimates do not sug- 
gest in general substantial improve- 


pared for a number of unexpected 
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Even more conservative esti- 
mates came from Standard Char- 
tered Bank and the British stock- 
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Standard Chartered predicted an 
increase of 8 percent in GD? for 
1985. While the bank said that re- 
exports (goods imported from one 


domestic exports to ease off. De- 
clining inflation and higher wages 
will help boost domestic consump- 
tion, the bank added. 

Its report was less sanguine 
about the property sector. “Over 
the next couple of years, supply is 
more than copious to meet demand 
in such categories of property as 
office and small flats,” it said. 


for 1984 of 9.4 percent. It said the 
export outlook was dimmed by a 
drop in business with the United 
Slates and the reduced competi- 
tiveness of the Hong Kong dollar. 

Vickers da Costa also Doled that 
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nor only on consumer demand in 
foreign markets but on access ic 
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Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1985 




ACROSS 

1 St. Peter has 
one at St. 
Peter’s 

5 Domesticates 
10 Ashen 

14 Indigo 

15 Endure 

16 African river 

17 Item in a 
corset or a 
collar 

18 Oregon or 
Santa Fe 

19 G.I.'s ration In 

.w.w. n 

29 Short wave? 

21 Actress Anouk 

22 Ornamental 
pattern, in art 

23 An appetizer 
26 Distillates of 

turpentine 
29 Regimen 
SOAJia. 

31 Rio de la 

33 Form of com- 
munication? 
36 An entree 

39 Haw’s partner 

40 Aerial 
maneuvers 

41 Kind of tube or 
sanctum 

42 Stimulates, 
with , ‘up"- 

43 Staid 

44 A dessert 


49 Homer's 
"Odyssey,” 
e-g- 

50" war": 

F.D.R. 

51 Spar 

55 Enjoy the 
warmth 

56 Stendhal hero 

57 Pizarro victim 

58 Comer 

59 Type of sodium 
carbonate 

69 Glacial ridges 

91 Rumpus 

62 Mexican 
gentleman 

63 Zola ‘5 
courtesan 

DOWN 

1 Metal fastener 

2 Stake 

3 Ananias, e.g. 

4 Greek god 

5 A Turkic- 
speaking 
people 

6 Shelters, in 
Savoie 

7 City in Dade 
County 

8 Widow of 
Ernie Kovacs 

9 Variety of 

gypsum 

19 Tailor’s 
insertedpiece 

11 Drive off 


2 /a/Bfl 


12 Tex. shrine 

13 Middle 
Eastern 
republic 

24 Stores grain 

25 More crumbly 
or powdery 

26 Reckless 

27 Ancient 
leather flask 

28 Thailand, 
formerly 

31 Morning star 

32 Prune 

S3 Alcohol burner 

34 Printer’s mark 

35 Marquette was 
one 

37 Specious 
reasoners 

38 Poem by Keats 

42 Harvester of a 
kind 

43 Like a stone 
pillar 

44 I.o.u/s 

45 Separated 

46 Japanese- 
Am erf can 

47 Older brother 
of Moses 

48 Mem. of a pool 

52 Handle for 
Hadrian 

53 Scrutinize 

54 Scarlett's 
home 


■© ]Smo York Tones, edited by Eugene Maleska. 

DENNIS THE MENACE 



* Mom, . win lOu be sorry when through 

BEINGAKlOr 


s 

Unscramble these four Jumbles, 
one letter to each square, to tarn 
tom ordinary words. 


I THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
u by Henri AmoW and Bob Lee 


GOUCH 





ORFUR 1 


u 



HUMILS 



■ 

■ 


YATAPH 



■ 

■ 



Now arrange the circled letters to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the shove cartoon. 


Yesterday’s 


□ itv-w -w-'Y ^i» 

L A X X J 

(Answers tomorrow) 

I Jumbles; LIBEL ALIVE SAVORY CLOUDY 
Answer. How that comical sergeant started the day 
lor his troops — WITH ""DROLL” CALL 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


HIGH 
C F 


LOW 
C F 


Algarve 

17 

63 

13 

55 

sh 


l 

34 

-3 

26 

cl 


13 

SS 

9 

48 

a 


14 

57 

s 



Belgrade 

5 

41 

1 

34 

r 


-1 

30 





3 

38 

a 

32 

ei 


2 

36 

-5 

23 

a 

Bedapost 

4 

39 

2 

36 

fr 

Gepenboeea 

*6 

21 

-8 

IB 

fr 

Casts Del Sol 

17 

63 

7 

45 

a 


7 

65 

7 

46 

r 


4 

39 

2 

J6 

O 


12 

54 

8 

46 

O 

Frankfort 

3 

38 

2 

36 


Geneva 

4 

39 

a 

32 

to 

Helsinki 

-17 

1 

21 

-6 

O 

litanbel 

IS 

54 

7 

45 

tr 


22 

72 

17 

63 

»r 

f Ip him 

15 

59 

VI 

55 

r 


5 

41 

5 

41 

r 

Madrid 

13 

55 

4 

39 

0 

MBan 

1 

34 

-4 

2S 

to 

Moscow 

-12 

10 

-12 

10 

S>v 

Munfdl 

2 

38 

2 

36 

SW 

Nice 

13 

ta 

i 

43 

fr 

Otto 

-9 

16 

-16 

3 

fr 

parts 

• 

46 

7 

45 

0 


- 1 

30 

-2 

28 

h- 

fteyktavto 

2 

36 

0 

32 

O 

Rome 

14 

57 

3 

38 

ci 

StacWwhn 

-11 

12 

-13 

10 

a 

Strtaionro 

5 

41 

5 

41 

0 

Venice 

6 

43 

0 

32 

fr 


2 

36 

2 

36 

sw 

Warsaw 

-10 

14 

-12 

10 

fr 

Zurich 

8 

46 

9 

16 

0 


ASIA 


Bangkok 
Beilina 
mas Kong 
Moat la 
New Demi 


HIGH 

c 


Shanghai 

Sing ap ore 

Totpd 

Tokyo 

AFRICA 

Alston 

Cairo 

Cape Town 
GasaManca 
Harare 

Logoi 


LOW 
_ F C F 

32 90 23 73 d 

-1 38 -4 25 o 

19 66 17 a r 

32 90 27 81 d 

25 77 I 40 fr 

8 46 -1 30 fr 

8 46 6 43 r 

30 86 24 7S o 

22 72 16 41 Cl 

13 55 8 46 d 


24 73 T *5 
2T 78 7 45 

22 72 16 61 
21 70 16 61 
20 68 17 63 
30 86 27 Bl 
18 64 13 S 
Tonis W 66 6 46 

LATIN AMERICA 

Booms Aires 30 86 22 72 

Lima 28 B2 19 46 

Mexico CHt 25 77 2 34 

Rio de Janeiro 29 84 24 75 


I Paula 

NORTH AMERICA 


d 
fr 
fr 

— — — — no 


Anchorage 
Atlanta 
Boston 
Chisago 
Dewar 
Detroit 


12 54 0 32 d Nassau 


MIDDLE EA5T 

Ankara l 34 -2 2B sw 

Bdrat 4 14 41 4 ° J! 

Damtwuf \ — — ™ 

Jerusalem 

Tel Aviv 
OCEANIA 

- lrlimrt W 72 IS » 

** C * ICa Ml . 2S* 72 20 68 
Sydney 

doudv; wW' 


Houston 
Los Angeles 
Miami 
Mtnneapafts 

Montreal 


\ 12 54 g b a 

\ 17 63 6 43 d 


Hew York 
San Francisco 
Seattle 
Toronto 

/IrJalri’wiaii; iXHWt aval table; o-overcaxt; uc-oarttv 
phots; sw-snow; sl-starmv. 


-7 W -15 5 Ir 
f 48 -1 V PC 
■ 7 19-11 12 fr 
-9 14-21 -4 PC 
-J 30-18 0 fr 

.7 19-15 5 d 

26 79 21 » pc 

8 46 2 34 PC 

17 63 6 a tr 

27 81 19 66 PC 

-IS 5-20 -4 fr 

-11 12-18 0 SW 

28 82 20 48 PC 

-3 26-10 14 Cl 
11 52 8 46 r 

3 31 -6 21 sw 

-6 21 -12 10 SW 

4 39-10 14 PC 



PEANUTS 



BOOKS 


JBBtPgSt? 



. SQMEPB3PLE! FANCY 

OWING ALLTHBWAV 
ON THOR BIKESAT - 

THEIR 


c ISIS am, Huiw New »p « J CT- LM 

Dai by Main AawHes eyndwu* 




WIZARD of ID 



THE SURVIVAL OF 
CHARLES DARWIN: 

A Biographv of a Man and an Idea 

By Ronald W. Clark. 449pp. $19.95. 
Random House, 201 East 50th Street* 

New York, N. Y. 10022. 

Reviewed by Edwin M. Yoder Jr. 

R ONALD CLARK has had the bright idea 
. of treating Charles Darwin as if the great 

naturalist (and his natural selection theory) 

were themselves engaged in ihe great “s&ug&e 
for existence” which he identified in 1859 as 
the shaper of life forms. . 

It is a brilliant literaiy conceit, offering 
dark a handy framework for a fascinating 
study in intellectual history — 1101 merely the 
genesis of Darwinism but the c h allenges set in 
its way from Darwin's day to our own. 

If you're one of the millions wh o’ ve .imag- 
ined that Darwinism, because problematical 
and still disputed, has been on that account 
invalidated, this is probably your book. 

Clark ultimately concludes that Darwin and 
his theory have indeed survived, despite haz- 
ards that might have relegated a shakier, less 
useful theory to the scientific dustbin. Such 
loss or overthrow occurs often enough in the 
history of science. When Darwinism was 
young, struggling for a foothold in mid-Vic- 
lorian timesTlt was believed that the propaga- 
tion of light required a medium, the so-called 
“ether.” The ether, thanks to Ihe relativity 
revolution, is no more. Darwinism, in trans- 
mogrified form to be sure, stands. 

So many obstacles lay before Darwin that 
near misses constitute a fascinating, aspect of 
the storv. Among the many what-iis: What if 
Darwin’ had not been sickened by medical 
studies, and had not become a naturalist? 
What if he had not signed on as the naturalist 
or HMS Beagle, the oceanographic surveying 
ship: or if the Beagle had not visited the Gala- 
pagos Islands? 

What if the distinguished ornithologist John 
Gould had not called Darwin's attention, soon 
after his return from the five-year voyage, to 
the curiosities of the mockingbirds and finches 
he'd brought back? That there were three spe- 
cies of the former. and 13 of the latter? What if, 
somewhat later, the sudden appearance of Al- 
fred Wallace’s competing evolutionary theory 
had not spurred the dawdling Darwin to com- 
mit “The Origin of Species” to print? What if 
the reviewer for The Tunes of London had 
been one of the many hostile ones, not “Dar- 
win’s bulldog." Thomas Henry Huxley? What 
if Darwin's always touchy health had broken 
down? 

To be sure. Darwin might have vaulted all 
these hurdles. Nonetheless, all things consid- 
ered, Darwin’s success and “survival” illus- 
trates the chanciness of scientific history — at 
least as much as the 40-year obscurity into 
which Mendel’s contemporaneous genetic ex- 
periments fell 

.And of course, as Darwin explicitly recog- 
nized. he had challenged the cosmology of his 
age quite as severely as Copernicus had the age 
for which the sun moved about the earth. 

Even with the resurgence in the past 20 years 
of “creationism” as an allegedly “scientific” 
rival of evolution, it is hard for us to grasp the 


. chnrt rhat swept the Victorian worg. 


sense 
Darwin's 

implication “jj bditf in a spdK 

Sisk'S™ 

Sally arose by a blmd, g r opsfr. 
^STrfSnpe/rioa, struggle aud adapt* 

“There were some who sought, imnedute® 


both .sides, though 


SOUgUl UtS 

^seutssss^ 

Fallacies of Darwinism." ' ■ ■; 



then stabiuzea unu new ^ 

mechanism? There was.mndiPW^J* 
alleys until in succession, the redireovayjtf 

IfflSSKKSEf-aS 

code finSymivefled the secrets of henxfita^ 

transmission. . „ , ~ - 

However formidably challenged, garmu 
survived: and that for good reasons. He was 

the most careful patient and astfhwns of 
observers. The poor man, exclaimed Ins g*r - 
dener, aught “moon” over a mere flow er^^ 
minutes at a time. His kindness and mteflecffial 
honesty were legendary. He strove to mmo- 
pate difficulties and objections and face them 
candidly. When puzzled he admitted it, as m 
his famous remark that the oorrolaaty of the 
human eye made him “shudder. Hehad, saifl 

Ms son Fimids years later, “thepKrwer of never 

letting exceptions pass unnoticed. 

Today, the overwhelm? : 

gists argue over how, not v , 

variation occurs. And while the recent 
seems to have set in against “neo^Darwimsm, 
and indeed to some degree against “natu ral 
selection” itself as the sovereign mec h a nism qf 
change there is no serious question of Dar- 
win’s permanence. Darwinism, a powerfid; 
comprehensive and adaptable theory, has m# 
the test of survival of die fittest. _ — 

Gaik's is a fascinating, if at times fomndf- 

bty technical study of one of the great episodes 

in the history of science^ ancient or modem, 
covering the 'whole story from the meubatiqn 
of Darwin’s earliest doubts about the perma- 
nence of species to the latest quarrels o«v 
taxonomy. "Ihe Survival of Charles Darwm' 
is, in short, an important contribution to toe 
understanding of a much misunderstood sub- 
ject, and deserves a survival of its own. 

Edwin M. Yoder Jr.,a syndicated Washington 
columnist , wrote this review, which appeared St 
The Washington Post 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscorr 

H ANDS that appear in the 
middle of the nighr are 
subject to two general rules. 
They do not have 13 cards , 
and they have vanished before 
daybreak. The South hand 
shown in the diagram, howev- 
er. was an exception ou both 
counts. 

Playing with a strange part- 
ner — very strange, as it turned 
oul — South took a direct shot 
at six hearts in response to one 
no-trump. He had no idea 
what responding methods the 
partnership was using after 
one no-trump. He also had no 
idea that bis partner had taken 
advantage of the favorable vul- 
nerability to make a psychic 
bid that has much higher suc- 
cess rate in dreams than in real 
life. 


North astonished to bear his 
partner bid hearts, of all 
things, and South was aston- 
ished by the appearacne of 
dummy. He was also delighted 
to be able to ruff the opening 
dub lead and work on spades. 
Once both opponents followed 
twice he was sure of making at 
least 12 tricks, and was so ex- 
cited that he left the game and 
returned- to consdousness. He 
thus missed a lively post-mor- 
tem on the astral plane. 

East: “Why didn't you lead 
a diamond?” 

West: “Why didn't you bid 
them?” 

East: “Why didn’t you bid 
semi dubs. You’d have made 
thaL" 

North: *Td have bid seven 
hearts." 


West: "That goes dowa” ‘ 
North: “Anyway, TdT^ve 
led a spade against seven 
dubs.” 

“Oh no, you wouldn’t,” 
screamed two disembodied 
voices smultaneously. 


NORTH (D) 

A 24 

VQ 19 7532 
O MB 


WEST 
GQ0 73 
V — 
«X4 


-r r » * : 

EAST fr- 

A 86 

O — 

9 A J 8 7 8 1 1 
SAX 109652 ♦ Q 84 3 * 

SOOTH 
4AK1S51 
V A K 10 8 64 
O QS 

Bait and Wot wars vriaeraidp- 
Tho bidding: 

North Hurt Soak 

1 N.T. P*n 8 V 

Phi Pm 
W eot tad d» dob king. 


Ca n adian Stock Markets Feb:' 7 

Prices In Canadian cents unless marked S 


Toronto 


4220 AMI Prce 
1500 Aortlco E 
1500 Agra Ind A 
76579 Alt Energy 
1900 Alta Not 
IS AlaoCenl 
9143 Atogmo 51 
200 Asbestos 
2406 AtCQ I 4 
421 BP Canada 
69959 Bank BC 
134485 Bank NS 
16700 Barrie* o 
BOO Baton At 
10S75 Bonanza R 
3X70BrakKito 

7546 BramaJea 

400 Bnnda M 
230053 BCFP 
197790 BC Res 
100033 BC Phone 
2058 Brunswfc 
31700 Budd Can 
SM30CAE 
6700 CDIslb Q 1 
9341 Cad Fry 
63100 C Nor West 
400C Pockro 
SOS Cm Trust 
■ 1140 C Tung 
34083CI BkCom 
liaoo can wot rh 
ezoiOCTlroAf 

1772 C Util B 

wcara 

OSOCttaneH! 

600 CetOfl 1730 
laOOCDMbA 

6700 COISttl B f 

B30Q CTL Bonk 
IDOOCanwost A 

49425 Caaetui R 

180 Conran A 
4500 Crown* 
I42B0Czar Ros 
6B25B Daan D*v 

12400 DeaiienA 

39800 DordionBt 

ISSDODmlcon 
72S7Dk*mnAi 
57 Dkknsn B 
2700 DotnanA 
122739 DatoSCOA 
9600 Du Pont A 

3185 Dy lee A 
3600 Elctnom X 
1300 Emca 
MUEauUvSw 
2800 FCA Inti 
12100 C Falcon C 

44(5 Fknbntoe 

23100 Fad Ind A 

2600 F City Fin 

1911 ProMT 
1140 Fruehauf 
3467CendtsA 
8300 Geae Come 
22574 Geocmde 

17500 Glbrollor 
14300 Go kleorpt 
64 Goodyear 
2000 Grandma 
nooGntndwe 
13SGL Forest 
SDGtPocMe 
5700 Hrdbtg At 
450QHOwfc*r 
4474 Haves D 
3016 H Bay Co 
BUSliWMco 
69SDindal 
7s0 inland Cos 
22SS Inti Thom 

3485 In tor Pipe 

unogivaeoB 

5500 Jannock 
100 Kam Kotta 
2340 Kerr Add 
18251 Laban 
13890 Lac Mnrts 


High LovCtaseCboa 

534 U> 331* 3331 + 
Sim 13 13 — 

S64e 63t 6Xh— ’« 
SKHu TOVi WVi- 
515HI 1546 1534 4- 
«0 M 20 
S2» 2316 23*6— 

S » su su— 

S9 8H. 14 

S26* 2697 2646- tfc 
S6 5W 6 +M 
81414 irn 14 
140 IS 140+4 
SI 7V. 17 V, I7U. 

425 420 420 

SSV> 5Vh 5V. + 
S18V4 1716 1756— V 
S1IFU. HP* 1014— 14 

si2 mg 17 + ’4 

263 255 262 + 7 

S22H OTi 27V? 

515*4 lfftt 15^— 'e 
S20?4 20Mi 20U. + 16 
51755 17 1714— 

1616 614 666 

SI5U 15V. 1516 
S23U 2399 23 Va 
saw* 301i 3016— 
Suit 33V. 33'4 
SI 696 169. 16'6 + lb 
531W 3116 311^- ’« 
32 33 32 +1 

SIQto UR4 I0V6 
Sint 1716 1714 + 
SI136 11 11 — 

*716 7h« 74.+ 

SI8 18 18 + 

S6Va 6 V. 6Vz + 14 
S6to 6V. M 
Sllto 1116 1114 

ssvi 8to Bi«+ag 

265 258 262 + 8 

Sim im 12to— 
S17VS 1 1714— H 

153 ISO 153 + 1 
305 MO 305 tS 
115 1416 1414 + 14 

S14H 1311 UVa + '4 
SUM 1014 UP6 + 
SS 490 5 

480 480 4M -20 

255 2S2 255 + 3 

S28Vj 2714 2714 — Ik 
SIBVk 171* 18 
S34 33V. 3: a 

S6 495 5 +15 

S18I6 IK 1814 + 
S736 7 7 — 

S20V6 2Dfe 2014 
siffto IBtt 18'/: + 'It 
19414 941/. 94'A— Ik 
CT16 3UY 2I1*» 

S17 12 

*18 17V, 

sim ms .. . 

S26% 261b 2616+ V* 
S101+ 9 91k— to 

251 2M 242 —13 
IWt lDto 1016 
S516 516 5V» — to 

S40 39 39 - 

45 44 46 -1 

43 43 43 —2 

S93 92 92 — 1 

S28V6 2»6 281* 

145 Ml 141 — 4 
S2lto 2116 21% + 
S3416 34V* 24'A 
51914 |9 19 — to 

S53 524b 53 + 

Slito 14 14 

SISto 15V, 1 5ft + to 
S9to 9 9 — to 

S3A6 34to 3416— to 
ram 2ff’j + 

S12to 12*6 13V. + 

103 103 103 -1 
S17V, ir.i 1714— to 
S25to 2S 25to + to 
S28to 271i 27V, 


12 

18 + to 

IF'i 


1747 LOnl Cam 
4460 Locono 
903 LL Lac 
38090 Lobktw CO 
500 MDS H A 

f-OO M1CC 
2S5G4 Melon MX 
100 McGrow H 

S271 Merland E 
17631 MabanAI 
25ifl' Malson B 

1200 Murphy 
3200 Nabisco L 
93495 Norondo 

20064 Norcm 
156630 Nwa A11AI 
I514NOWSO0W 
41237 NuWilsoA 
1571 Oak wood! 
MJWOshawo Af 
5550 Pamour 
1847 PanCon P 
500 Pembina 
1000 Phonl* Oil 
6104 Pine Paint 
2900 PkxtGOa 
23758 Floor 

850 Provlao 
2300 Quo Sturao 
300 Ram Pet 
7200 Ravrackt 
932S Redoath 
125875 Rd SlentK A 

36373 Rddmold 

5500 Res Servl 
1760 Revn Pro A 
S5M RoeersA 
7*50 Roman 
ISORathman 
4407 Scent re 
500 SCOttS f 
32891 Sears Can 
21519 Shell Can 

34575 Slwrrlti 
4700 Slat erBI 
3633Souttwi 
2 0776 5te tat A 

2900 Sul Ptro 

3100 Stoop R 

10337 Sydney o 

19300 Talcoro 
too Tara 
2550 Teck cor A 
9949 Tedc B t 

200 Teledyne 
4847 Te« Can 
1850 Ttram N A 
45455 Tar Dm Bk 
11575 Torstor B I 
51810 Traders A 1 
220 Tins Ml 
4(00 Trinity Res 
128958 TmAltaUA 
32024 TrCan PL 
39030 Trlmoc 
4600 TrbccAf 
48900 Turbot 
6579 unicorn A f 
300 ila Curb Id 
338170 VI Entorloe 
1268 U Kmw 
lOOOUStoeoe 
230VanO«r 
56600 Vcrstl A f 
(OOVwtgran 

400 WeWund 
229«Woshnlr* 
BTOWaston 
4l062WaodwdA 
23440 Yk Bear 


High Law Clew Urge 
si 1 «• Uto llto 
sii into ioto 
UOto 30 30to + to 

STOVn 19to 20to + to 

S19to 19 'A 199. + 
140 240 740 — 5 

S2tVj 25to 2ito+ to 
S22to 22to 22V. + 
435 430 435 — 5 

S1716 16to 16ft + 
S17U 17to 17i« 


S2Q 

1991. 

20 

S26'4 

26 

26ft 

S31ft 

20% 

21ft + ft 

S14V. 

14 

14 

S7Vi 7Vd 7 V* — 

*20 

20 

30 + to 

57 

SS 

55 — 2 

*85 

485 

485 -5 

S25ft 25to 25’-- 


465 *55 460 

SZ8to 27to 2SVJ+ to 
SIBVi 139. 1IV6 + 
STto 746 Tto 
I28to 23 28ta + 
120 110 170 +11 

S25H 2Sto 25to— 16 
SIB 18 18 

370 340 345 —5 

ssto 5*. 5to+ to 
57ft 7to 716+ to 
S3 1 to 3R» 31 to + to 
5229. 21ft 22V6 + to 
SI41: 14to 1446— to 
170 170 170 

115 107 115 +14 

s&v, m an. + ft 

S12to lift 12ft + to 
S42to *2to 42H + 
Sftto 6V6 6 to — to 

51* 19 19 — to 

S8 7to Tto 
S74 23ft 23ft + to 
50ft 72k 716— to 

510ft 10ft 10ft— ft 
SSBft 58to SBft— ft 
52316 23ft 23ft + 
255 257 255 +3 

m 290 290 

29 27ft 29 — 1 
110 105 105 —5 

S19to 199. 19to 
812 lift 72 
S12ft 1T9 12ft 
Slito lift l)to+ to 
535ft 34 Vj 34ft— 1 
154 V: 54 54 — ft 

S19ft 1FA 19 to ' 

51 9ft 19 19 — ft 

523ft 22ft 22ft + to 
S7ft 7ft 7ft 
465 460 445 

5234b 23ft 33ft 
SZ3'9 22ft 23 - ft 
435 425 43S +15 
S24ft 24ft 24ft- to 


55 

52 

53+3 

58ft 

8 

8ft + to 

Slito 

llto 

llto + ft 

5134s 12% 12ft + 

Wto 

9ft 

9ft 

170 

I2S 

120 

270 

370 

278 MO 

*7%. 

74h 

7%.+ to 


Sllft lift llft + 
517 17 17 — ft 

112ft 12ft 12ft + ft 
sm. OOli 80to+to 
Sllft 1116 lift - 
slito 11 iito+ ft 


Total sales 1233S441 snares 


TOR THE LATEST WORD ON 

eurobonds 

reaSSSgKEh 

eachmondwintheht 


Amsterdam 



Close 

Pftv. 


396 

395 


199 

196 


159-00 

140 


10420 

10450 

AhoSd 

21680 



216 

21B 


L10 

8 


74.70 

74 

BVG 

151 

151 


8750 

8650 

Catena Hide 

3350 

3350 

Eisevler-NDU 

113 

11150 




Ghl Braeodes 

18220 

18050 


15750 

15550 


6120 

6150 

KLM 

49-80 

4920 

Noarden 

4750 

4/90 

Mat Redder 

281 

28150 

Nedlloyd 

160 

161 

Oce Vander G 

3D1 

298 


66.90 

67 

PhllUn 

*03 0 

661 


7420 

7420 

P.odamco 

13720 

137 

Rollnco 

6750 

6750 

Rorenta 

43.70 

4350 

Raval Dutch 

19650 

19520 

Unilever 

33950 

338 


2820 

2828 

f 1 1 ■■ 

14250 

14250 

VNU 

212 

212 


AKP.CBS General Index :199 j 4C 
Previous : 19150 

Source: AFP. 


Brussels 


Arbed 

Bekoart 

CackerlH 

EBE5 

GB-limpBM 

GBL 

Gevaert 

HoOafean 

Kredlalbank 

Patrol Ina 

Soc Genarale 

So>lna 

Salvov 

Traction Elec 

Vieilie Mantogna 


1690 1680 
4900 4040 
367 266 

2775 2775 
2850 B® 
2030 2025 
3655 3645 
5950 5970 

7740 7740 

7180 7190 
1805 1805 
7300 7300 
3980 3930 

3910 3910 

5550 530 


Stock Exchange index : 189035 
Previous ; M8U8 

source! AFP. 


Frankfurt 


AEG-Tetahmken 1181UW 

Allien* Vers 1 JL 0 5 ro< 3U} 

BaSf I83JB 181 

Bavor !SS"^ 


Barer Jftpo. 


335M 


Close Pr*». 



338 


363 

360 

■ •'"•Tl ill I.H* * VI 

170 

168 


12350 12110 

Daimler-Benz 

633 62750 


365 

351 


166 16550 



400 


190.70 1B8J0 

1 »]i) 

205 205-30 


16350 15950 


473 

475 


18950 18520 


10850 

103 

Halzmann 

396 



171 

■El 


272 

Ej 

Karstaat 

210 

210 



KHO 

348 24V -50 

iIAU W'j 

82.10 

7850 


84 

81 

Unde 

400 

397 

Lultharua 

188 18850 

MAN 



I l.J 1 - . 

15515320 

f- i-j'-I 

234 


1210 

1200 

Piwssob 

25650 

2S? 

Ruetaers-werke 

343 

340 

RWE 

16250 16250 

Schcr leg 

483 

476 




Thyssen 

9950 

9650 

Varta 



Vetja 

169 JO 

169 

VEW 





Previews : 1,14720 
Source: AFP. 



i Hong Kong ] 

Bk East Ada 

2190 

24 


1220 

1110 

China Ught 

1450 

14-60 

Cross Harbor 






HK Electric 

730 


HK Hotels 

3125 

3150 


420 

4275 


855 

0./D 

HK Telephone 

59 

6050 

HK Wharf 

5.75 

575 


1920 



820 

BJO 


750 

8 

Monv World 

525 

SM 





020 

8«0 


670 

6 M 

Stoftik 

158 

147 

Swire Pacific A 

2350 

2190 

wtieel S/iar 

NA. 

— 




wlnsor 

450 



Other Markets Feb - 7 

Closing Prices In local currencies 


I Conodion Indexes Feb. 7 


Close Previa** 

Montreal law 

Toronto Z62JL60 2A14J0 

Montreal: Slock Exchange Industrials Index. 
Toronto: TSE 30B Index. 


Montreal 


High LOwCtaUCbtt 


3S993 Bank Mont 
5040 ConBatti 
*0*4 DamTxtA 
3400 MntTrst 
360467 NatflkCda 
Power Cora 
547oO RaltondA 
41500 Royal Bank 
3200 RovTrstco 

Zeflera 


S27ft 
SIBft 
Slito 
SMft 
sim 
S29to 
S18*» 
*31 to 
Sl*ft 
WO 


Total Softs 1706J47 shores. 


27ft 27V6— ft 
18V. 18ft 
lift 119. 

14ft 14ft + to 
16to 17 + to 
29 to 

18ft 18ft + 9. 
30*6 31ft+ to 
19 19 - Vi 

00 00 




Close 

*ni. 

World InH 

iifl 

173 

Hang Seng Index 

: 1212.91 

Previous : 1333-31 


Source: AFP. 



] Johannesburg £ 

AECI 

720 

715 

Barlows 

990 

vqao 

Btyvnor 

1550 

1600 


6650 

S775 

E kmds 

1320 

1340 

GFSA 

2750 

2800 

Harmony 

2500 

2615 


MM 



995 

990 


5550 

5750 

RvsteSat 

1675 

1700 

SA Brews 

6S0 

620 

St Helena 

3200 

335D 

Sasol 

570 

570 


Previous :9615S 



Source: AFP. 



1 London !! 

AA Core 

SI 2ft 

S12ft 

Allied-Lvons 

178 

176 




Babcock 

142 

141 



644 

Boss 

507 

489 

B-A.T. 

381 

383 

Efeechom 

360 

358 

BICC 

253 

250 

BL 

38 

37 

BOC Group 

29* 

28S 

Boats 

175 

175 





546 

543 



250 

BrltTelecain 

I2S 

124ft 

BTR 

669 

672 

Burmah 

218 

219 

Cadburv 5ctnv 

163 

163 

Charter Cana 

2D3 

205 

Coats Patens 

157 

157 


an 

497 




Dataetv 

488 

4B5 


(460 

<448 

Dfsllllers 

305 

302 

Drbjtanteln 

KSft 

suit 

Dunlap 

38 

36 


310 

308 




GEC 

!«8 

190 


.Solution to Previous Puzzle 


EBC3S namaD aaao 
□eqo naann aasa 
□nan] □□□□□□aaiaa 
□EHEnni aaaasnaa 
Qciounaa inHCja 
fviQoiQaa Daf3C3n[3 
ncHiaa aaana aaa 
qdqq HaaoH aaaa 
BGH □□[!□□ □□□□Q 
HEE1001i] □Q0QQE1 
Dnma ciDasaQQ 
EcasanEata EadLaaiD 
□EHaaaaociE oaaa 
□QBE naODB QHDQ 
EEBE EaaaB QBQQ 


S/B/SB 


GKN 

Ginas 

Grand Met 

Guinness 

GUS 

Henson 

Hawker 

1CI 

Imps 

Uovds Hank 

Umrlw 

Lucas 

Works aid Sp 

Metal Bax 

MkHandBank 

Nat West Bank 

PlUctaaton 

Piessev 

Rocoi Elect 

R ond lo n l e ln 

Rank 

Reed Inti 


C*n> Prev. 
202 202 
It 61/641161/64 
306 298 


239 

727 

230 

431 

867 

216 

602 

182 

258 

129 

415 

344 

679 

323 

172 

IM 

S91ft 

348 

568 

331 


237 

711 

220 

425 

869 

207 

594 

181 

259 

129 

413 

347 

679 

313 

172 

196 

SB9 

338 

S7D 

330 


previous : MAM 

Source: AFP. 


! Milan 1 

Banco Comm 

19630 19150 

Cent rale 

2722 

2950 





2298 

Q40 

Farmltalla 

10699 10500 

Flat 

2495 

2489 

Flrakler 

57 

51 

Generali 

3*950 39490 

IFI 

7450 


iteicamentl 

Booio Baaao 



MantadlMP 

1515 

1483 

Olhwtfl 

6485 

6490 

piralN 

2359 

2349 

RA5 

69500 49595 

Rlnasonta 

629 JO 

630 

SIP 

2163 

2163 


2720 

29W» 

Staddo 

10400 

9760 

nub tadax :UM 



Pravtavs :1,177 



Source: AFP. 



1 Paris 


AfrUuutee 

602 

600 


227 

22770 

AvDaesauH 

903 

UN 

Boned re 

611 

610 

BIC 

571 

S94 


745 

758 

BSM-OD 

2370 

7370 

Carretoir 

1930 

1935 

ChibStad 

1225 

1213 

Cafimea 

76L5D 

247 


690 


Eil-AauJiaine 

233 

233 

Europe 1 

104S 

1068 


666 

570 


1900 

1900 

■metal 

8ZS0 

mu 

LotaraeCoa 

410.90 

403JD 


Learand 
I’Oreal 
Atatra 
MktwUn 

mm r 
Meet Hannessv 
Moulinex 
ManJ-Eit 
Ocddufitale 
Pernod Rlc. 
Petra left (teal 
Peugeot 
PodaJn 
Prtntgmas 
RadiotedHt 
Redouto 
Raussai Udaf 
Skts RassionaJ 
Sour -Perrier 
relemecon 
Thomson C5F 
Valeo 


Ctese Pre» 
1998 2006 
Z313 2284 

1610 1665 

841 838 

7S40 74f0 
1984 1975 

10130 leijns 
77 75-30 
728 713 

678 M2 
257 JO 25530 
280 277 

5S-S0 51 JO 
203 20580 
265 266-50 
1330 1335 

1610 19(9 

2070 2010 

501 500 

2340 2360 

489 470 

239.50 249 


Agefl index ; tmo 
Previous : 19BJ9 
cac iimax ; nuo 
PrevtaM : 197 jo 
S ource. AFP. 


Singapore 



481/3348 21/64 

Bouslead 

iji 

1A4 


662 

647 

GaktStoraae 

157 

2A5 


756 

761 

DBS 

5.9S 

185 




FratwtKovD 




S24 

524 

Haw Par 



Tate and Lvie 

452 

653 

Indtcape 

IM 

7-53 


24 T 

239 

Keppel Ship 

1.71 

1.64 


449 

457 

Mai Bonking 

5.90 



228 

. 214 

OCBC 

9.15 

935 


370 

367 


IM 


THF 

154 

152 

Semb Shipyard 

m 


Ultramar 

205 

206 

SI me Dvbv 

1J1 


81771-77-1^™ 

1139/321129/32 

S Steamship 




201 

19? 



ASl 



227 

UOB 

4-50 

AM 

11' 1 

1^1 

S36ft 

S2BU. 

OUB Index : 411 .98 



34ft 

34ta 




1 ^ 

613 

sos 

Source: AFP. 



F.T. 38 Index : for JO 


1 Stockriolm I 


AGA 

Alta Laval 

Asea 

Astra 

Atlas Caaca 

Baiidon 

Electrolux 

Ericsson 

Esso no 

Handol sbken 

Pharmacia 

Soat> Scania 

Sandvlk 

Skanska 

SKF 

SwodishMotch 

Volvo 


770 370 

199 302 

375 370 

420 423 

a 

25 31 

NO. “ 

450 460 

385 39S 

.J 4 

ITS 

Ml 246 

zn 280 


AWoramnaon Index ‘.40LN 
Pravloos I411JM 
Source: AFP. 


Sydney 


ACI 

ANI 

ANZ 

BHP 

Bonn 

Bougainville 

Brambles 

Coles 

Comolao 

CSR 

Dunlap 

Ekler5l«; 

Hooker 

Magellan 

M1M 

Mver 

Oakbrktao 

Poko 

Poseidon 

RGC 

Santas 

Stolgh 


192 

252 

474 

526 

335 

in 

370 

405 

S8 

392 

215 

306 

2)1 

230 

200 

64 

430 

265 

370 

538 

196 


192 

2S2 

472 

526 

335 

196 

370 

410 

340 

538 

3A2 

222 

309 

211 

228 

3M 

201 

64 

424 

270 

378 

328 

196 


Southland 

Woodslde 

Wormnld 


Close Pr** 

2 2 

340 335 


All Ordinaries Index :77U8 
Prnvtoas : 777 JO 

Source: Reuters. 


Tokyo 


1- 


Ak at 

Asahl Chem 
Asahi Glass 
Bank at Tokyo 
Brktgoshmo 

Canon 

Dal Nluuan Print 
Dafwa House 
Full Bank 
Pull Photo 
Fulllw 
Hitachi 
Honda 
IHI 
lloh 

Japan Ah- Lines 
Kallma 
Kansal Power 
Kao Soap 
Kamsakl Steel 

Kirin Brewery 

Komatsu ltd 
Kubota 

Matsu Elec. I nets 
Matsu Elec. Works 
Mitsubishi Bank 
Mitsubishi chem 
Mitsubishi Elec 

Mitsubishi Heavy 

Mitsubishi Corn 

Mitsui and co 
MitsukosM 

Ml I sum I 

NEC 

Nlkkosec 
Nippon Steel 
Nippon Yusen 
Nissan 
Nomura Soc 
Olympus 
Ricoh 
Sharp 
Sony 

Sumitomo Bank 
Sumitomo Chem 

Sum homo Metal 
Tabm Core 
ToUha. Marino 
Takeda Chem 
Tallin 

Tokyo Elec. P ower 
Tokvo Murine 
Torav ind 
Toshiba 
Toyota 

YamalcM Sec - 

New index: RU4 
Previous: 91K93 

Dow Jones/Nndtel Index.' JS** 
Prwlow: 11M7.I7 

Source: AFP. 


440 4 if - y 

671 Jbf- 
860 M 

ss ss 

523 HJ 
1370 1B0 

925 990 

567 534 

)m- Hj 
iS m 

1430 14« 

iS ™ 

333 334 

5330 ^ 
270 -jm 
150 150 
8 22 B2D 
145 141 

560 m 
455 4g 

330 

1570 1530 
^ ' 646 
IM WOO 
416 408 

396 4* 

340 s? 

522 S 

% £ 

"a 'a 

s i 

688 m 

ns 898 
1270 

900 JSl 
1088 

a 1 

s 5 

s * 

* s 

iSS i| 

ea 412 
1M0 T» 
580 ® 


Zurich 


Bonk Leu 
Brown BomhI 

Oho Geigv 

■Credit Suisse 
ftoctrowatt 
9«ra Fishier 
Jacob Suchard 
J el moll 

K? Gyr 

OeHikan-B 
Roche Baby 
Sundae 
Sehindior 
Suiter 
SBC 
Swtosalr 
Swiss Voifcsboflk 
Union Bank 

Winterthur 

Zurich ins 

SBC Index : *29.60 

PravtawzffljB 

Source; AFP. . __ 

toft: not Quoted; NAi.” 
oval table; xd: «»dMtMoA 



iSoiw 


i 


















































%S§ 


.^.a&S 




SSS 


~ 4 ** 48>8 
*fS££ss 




jiefort.K. 

.- *v./.*. Q ^ahinijj 

..-• ■■ ■*-*$ Erne 

' •^■carofanTJ 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 8, 1985 

SPORTS 

A Question of Too Many Generals: 

Flutie Reports to Camp, Sipe Departs 


Page 17 


- &ro£Ss 


Doug Flutie throws a pass during his first workout 

* SCOREBOARD 


Untied Pr**s InienwMtttd 

JACKSONVILLE. Florida — 
On the day that Doug Flutie re- 
ported for his first workout with his 
new team, the New Jersey Generals 
traded their veteran quarterback, 
Brian Sipe. to the Jacksonville 
Bulls. 

The Bulls announced that in ex- 
change for Sp& a 36-year-old en- 
tering his 12th year in pro football, 
the Generals received a high draft 
pick and other considerations in 
the agreement between U.S. Foot- 
ball League dobs. 

With Flutie canting more than 
$1 million & year and Spe receiving 
an estimated $700,000, New Jer- 
sey’s coach, Walt Michaels, was 
faced with the prospect of having 
to bench one star. 

The team's owner, Donald 
Trump, who formally signed Flutie 
Tuesday in a ceremony in New 
York, knew the Heismaa Tropbv 
winner from Boston College would 
have to play in order to sell tickets 
and increase television ratings, 
making his am tract worthwhile to 
the dub. 

Sipe reported to camp, amid ru- 
mors of Flutie’ s signing, wdl-rcsted 
and in good shape. He had main- 


n 


There was going to be an awk- 
ward situation in New Jersey." Sipe 
said at an evening news conference. 
This is one solution. I prepared 
myself all the way up until about 
three hours ago to be battling Dow 
Fla tie. I would not call this a relief 
I would call this a great opportuni- 
ty." 

He said he was looking forward 
to playing for Undy Infante, the 
Bulls' coach, who has a reputation 
as a passing roach. 

“I’m the type of quarterback 
who tikes to throw the ball.” Sipe 
said. “For professional reasons, 
I’m very happy to be down here 
with Undy and his type of foot- 
balL" 

Sipe is not expected to play in 
Saturday's exhibition game against 
Orlando because he is unfamiliar 
with the Bulls* offense. However, 

D . he figures to start when the season 

tSnan bipe • opens Feb. 24 against the defend- 

ing champion Baltimore Stan. 

tamed that Flutie would have to T do expect it to be a delicate 
win the starting quarterback job situation," Sipe said. “And I am 
from him. going to try to be as sensitive as 

&pe's best pro season came in possible. I think it is unfortunate 
1980 when he led the National m >' appearance may cost somebody 
Football League in pausing throw- c ^se his job." 
ing for 4,132 yards and 30 touch- Fkfc who said his only real 



stipes best pro season came in p u =» ! ‘* d,c - » umu> » waommaa: 
1980 when he led the National my appearance may cost somebody 
Football League in pausing throw- job." 

ing for 4,132 yards and 30 touch- Fkfc who said his only real 
downs. He was named AFC Player concent was the ’'reaction of the 


***** 

The Aouioand Aw 

Markus Wasmaier of West Germany hit a gate and lost his hat during the second run. 

Wasmaier Wins Giant Slalom Title, 
Upsetting Zurbriggen, Girardelli 


The Auamted Pm s 


course with 30 gates and a vertical “In the second run. I hit a gate 


of the Year that season. 


players on the team," was intro- 


BORMlOllialv -Markus Was- 6t V. et jP5.13 ea L _ with my head. I lost my hat and I 

m-tier rS Wki rirrmnv wr*** ii«» Girardelli, 21. who was entered thought it was all over, he said, 
heavy favorites. Pinnm^*-^ in ^““Pionships at the last “Then I told myself. ‘All or noth- 


He joins a crowded quarterback of Switzerland and Marc GirS mjn«tc after be appli^l for Luxem- in^' sol really wnu for it. 

ore in Jacksonville The Rnlk pac .i lcc at Orlando, Honda. Luxembourg on TWdav to bourg citizenship, had a total time Zurbriggen sard he was 


Basketball 


11 W IU 14 U a viunutu UUOIKIWlg nnw»li^ -»v i-» - i 

scene in Jacksonville. The Bulls *“5? ^onda. 

now have five passers, including n?™ 1 tat on my 

'he farmer n,*; n,„rZrh„i- nJ cqteae carta and my .contract. 


of Luxembourg, on Thursday to 
win the men’s giant slalom title at 


“ L(Ll2 PPiagMt^ 


U.S. College Basketball Leaders 

- .HCAAI Ct ittoge nnikgttu ll traders ttinmeti SooralaMn. 


^RadioFreefifc 

■’St-SSSS 


TEAM OFFENSE 
G IW-U 


‘ V*. : ' r ~«s in Ifets* 

.."I.. ocant 

' ~ '• bidipiwL 

_ 1 - -"- 1 ‘ Mr. BucHn^ 

J ■ * " j ^ “3&Saf ^ 

7 ’ " 

• • -r-fcdssd! ait; 

Price of Fool 

- V :: !mm!Te 

• :cr :ci 

-- ~ r.rs«scf!IDBr 

aaidtie- 

i:jrsa* 

: .- : T '‘-.fcl'.si KC2JBEE 

. = . V sr„z -r tost 


Oklahoma 21 n 

Alcorn State 17 U 

Utah State 19 n 

Southern IS 13 

Tain 20 17 

Lorrta (IILI 20 U 

WeVrLas Vegas 19 i; 

Virginia Tech 20 vs 

Barter 19 t 

Indiana SL 19 II 

KUdttoan 19 16 

South Alabama 20 12 

Cleveland State 20 M 

Bute 19 16 

Nort lto ra ta ni IB 10 

TEAM DEFENSE 
G IW-L.) 


Bradley, USF 
Battle, Ru>«rs 

Pt& Avf. Stevens. lawaSt 
l 1914 911 Robots. UC-lrv 


21 T7-4 1934 92.1 Robots. UC-lrv 
17 1*4 1519 89,4 CoiYaMna- Hrvrd 

19 11-8 1683 HLA Troesdole. Qtodi 

IS 12-6 1569 OS walker. Kv 

20 17-3 1702 85.1 Pass. Menmm 
20 is-s 1609 845 WDsmngten.umsi 

19 17-2 15M KU Lee. Mem Sr 

20 1S-5 V699 92JD Moore. Crvhl 

19 Ml 1576 829 KrymtowtofcJrtnt 
19 11-8 1561 KL2 Klein*. Ark 

19 16-3 1SS9 82J Person. AwtMim 

20 12-0 1640 010 Vincent. MichSt 
20 144 1634 8U Tovtor. BwlGm 
19 160 1541 Bl.l Hinton. Boot 
IB 10-8 14S5 SOS Winters, amity 


Ewlna. Gloom 
Mopoon, Neb 

9r 21 176 UB 482 230 222lMrf!l2L 
sr T9 165 105 435 21* 

SR IS 160 92 412 219 

S* 22 202 94 4M 216 SSSJ. 

JR 22 193 109 495 215 
SR 14 114 06 314 TLA 
SR20J74 96 444 222 r ^ 

JR 19 149 123 421 212 
V 18 163 72 396 22.1 p^taeTvhlo 
SR 19 151 116 41B 210 
SR 10 149 93 5*1 212 


Coteate 

Fresno state 

qghcMon 

agfootawn 

loom 

Gonzago 

Oregon Slate 

remote 

linnots 

Marouetto 

Murray SL 

Va. Military 

Virginia 

Houston Baptist 

San Diego 


PotomMzfaBallSl 
McOanteL wdisr 
williams, imfl St 
Cattedoe, USA 
MitcteriL Meranr 
Tisdale. Okie 
Huotns. Lxiy-41 
Smith, Lov-Co 
Oilman. McNess 
Harper. MJa O 
Gervfan, Tex SA 
Happen. Neb 


-ENSE Burden, SI L 

IW-L1 Pts. Av*. Stokes, Iowa 

18 5-13 970 519 Hall Conte 

19 1*4 1029 U2 Grier. KeatSi 
15 5-10 825 S5J) Harris. Norta 

21 19-2 1193 S6S Battle, No III 

22 1*4 1256 57.1 Grant. UtahSt 

19 1*6 1005 57.1 Tuner, Suiter 

20 164 1143 572 McCoffry. HCns 
» 15-3 10*6 S&.1 CeTteW. E MJch 

23 1*5 1339 582 Battle. Lay II 
IS 11-7 1050 58J Scurry. LIU 

20 174 1179 «U RBI 

IS 11-7 1064 59.1 

21 11-10 1242 59.1 Beniamin, Crgtil 
20 155 11B3 592 McDaniel. WicfiSI 
20 1*8 1193 592 Sorry. LIU 


_ _ . MWW, LOY-CO 

r .r.jrs-.taE.* Oiimars. McNem 

. E Harper. Mia O 

Hsciise Genrtn,Tex*A 

r -jC" Hoppen. Neb 

' - - - — Ce— Harris. Tulsa 

*•:: v -.- 'f n* ?.TCf Tates. GMason 

, Reblnson, Noyy 

Cnnens, Army 
Beard. Samtrd 
Lewis. Neasfn 
Beniamin. Crght 


SCORING Senders. MisVat 

Cl a FG FT PteAvg. Towns. MONMTH 
JR 19 209 132 536 282 NeaL Fuirtn 
SR 20 223 104 550 272 SUvrlm. Cola 
JR T9 199 97 495 26.1 CatlecTM. USA 
sr 30 206 109 521 26.1 PatomblzfaBolU 
SR 20 201 m 519 2AO Harper. Mia O 
. JR 21 209 U7 S3S 2SS Brown, GWOSh 
SR 19 204 72 480 2SJ Kona*. SMU 
JR 28 206 86 496 342 Rebineon. Navy 
SR 18 149 144 40 246 Vbnos. SCIara 
|r 19 193 76 482 242 Moore. Loy-II 
ir 18 164 IDS 436 242 Ttedote, Okla 
JR 19 »8 104 440 242 Johnson. MkTiSi 
SR 20 178 121 477 23.9 Porson, SC St 
SR 19 IS* 131 449 23L6 Lee. Mem St 
SO 19 173 MB 449 23a Grant. UtahSI 
5R 18 142 139 423 215 FIELD Q 

SR 22 223 68 514 236 
SO IS 163 93 419 313 WOJker, Uttoo 
JR 23 197 Ml S3S 21* Moore. CraM 


KancoX. SMU 
Rebineon. Navy 
Vbnos. SCIara 
Moore. Loy-ll 


SR 19 151 116 418 ZL0 
SR IS 149 93 391 21 J 

SR 23 193 112 J98 217 buSS..^JL b , 

JR 21 155 143 453 216 
SR 73 190 114 494 2L5 
JR 19 179 48 406 216 
SR 19 140 110 406 2U 
SR 19 167 69 403 21J W 

SO 20 169 05 423 212 
SR 19 168 63 399 712 
sr 19 168 61 397 20.9 
SR 22 190 79 499 *9 
SR 19 134 128 3*6 20J W 

SR 19 158 « 3M 202 
SR 22 168 122 450 202 
FR 19 141 110 392 206 .T^* 5 

JR W 160 72 392 206 . 

SO 18 155 60 370 202 
JR 20 150 108 408 204 
SR 19 164 57 385 203 
SR 19 168 48 3M 202 

j r *£ m4e41u 

NaAve. 

C _ N °V A I ^ Suiter, Duqn* 

JR 23 339 UJ Be|U 1 _n I Clt 

SR 20 290 K5 
tr 20 278 119 

SR 15 1*7 til S!**, 


REBOUNDING 


sr 18 ZD 1X6 


SR ” “ ™ Johnson, Rictund 
JR 19 m u O^kstra. w III 

"5SSS 

SO 19 210 11.1 rim frit inw ri 
SR 21 229 109 

SO 15 142 108 5 ' L 

JR 21 224 IOJ 

sr is 191 106 jf 

SR 15 156 102 LoUege K 
SR 18 IP 104 
JR 1* 197 104 _ . 


l. Gtewn SR 2D m IP 472 

m. Neb JR 19 178 266 669 

L Sewtttn JR 17 ICQ 154 66.9 

GoTech JR 20 12S 1M 465 

K. Cenrtv JR 21 155 239 64.9 

ten. Navy SO 19 173 274 611 

min. Crahi JR 23 197 315 625 

m. Carnll SR IS 93 149 62 A 

i. Duke JR 19 128 206 62.1 

u Ark SR 23 190 306 611 

. Harvrd SR M P 141 412 

nev. Villa SR 19 104 l«f 615 

k. SMU sr 2D MI 230 41 J 

l LSU so 19 »t 714 412 

L Purdue SR 19 115 IP 60S 

n. Monts l SR 20 HU IP 60 5 

tnwtOtLMont JR 21 155 257 603 

r. Mercer SR 20 148 279 602 

veil. Flo SR 19 110 196 602 

NewMex SR 11 m 196 603 

ch. S+ono SR 19 130 216 602 

. Conte SR 17 104 T73 601 

Mr, HOUStn 50 21 129 215 600 

FREE THROW PERCENTAGE 

Cl G FT FT A Pel. 
i. PemSt SR 18 41 64 952 

. Youngs Ir 21 57 40 9SJ 

Ind 50 18 46 70 943 

. Weber SR 21 68 73 912 

. TrxAAM Ir 20 70 74 911 

tetanJJtahSI SR 19 116 129 899 

TenTcii 5R 19 S 59 8*5 

1 So III SR 30 41 41 P.7 

irn, Harvrd SR 14 86 96 PA 

IL W III SR 15 84 94 89J 

Duqn* JR 19 fl 103 PJ 

l, LSU |r 19 P SS P.1 

Tutea SR 30 131 136 P5 

Wta JR If 48 54 885 

i. Beemu sr 18 61 49 HU 

, TeiUl SR 22 97 118 182 

Depart SR 19 51 58 P9 

IL Rictund 5R 17 51 58 P.9 

t, W 111 SR 1571 It F4 

rtl. Fordh SR 21 85 97 PA 

Lettish SO 21 84 96 OS 

i. Armv SR 18 IP IP P A 

m«Rt SR 19 83 9S PA 

Ind SI SR 19 S5 63 PJ 

■ St L tr 19 41 70 P.l 


bourg citizenship, had a total time Zurbriggen said he was disap- 
of 2:29.22. pointed at missing his third gold 

the former Duke quarterback Ben t ? ra ? n a ? a tnycoam ^ ^pinc ski champion- f ESrinffinofW«tGennany wm medal “and by only five bun- 

Rmnwi RonnAtt .n Ms rtret nm Flutie. Brian made me feel .Ljo, l--^ y v fourth in 2:3035. Hin was seventh dredths or a second. But 1 did not 

^ good. As for any quarterback j fastest in the first run in 1:10.16. really lose. It was Wasmaier who 

oassinB leader until Fhnie hmke duel between us, that’s up to Coach , Wasmaier, -1. clocked a total Hans Enn of Austria, only Hlh did extremely well and won the 

Michaels to decide. ume for the two beats of 2 minutes, after the fiist run. made a' strong race." 

nisrecoroior career yaroage. ^ don * t ^ Tru|n 28.90 seconds down the icy Stelvio comeback to take fifth place over- Girardelli who has been skiing 

The Bulls last week signed the intends for me to sit on the bench trac ^- all, in 2:30.36. for Luxembourg after a dispute 


1983 Heisman Trophy winner, 
Mike Rosier. The running back bo- 


oty entire career, but 1 don't think 
he wants Brian there, either." 


all. in 2:30.36. 


Girardelli who has been skiing 
for Luxembourg after a dispute 


came a free agent when the Pius- "The man conducted himself as fiv^ 


Zurbriggen, 22, who had won the ,ta, y* s Robert Erlacher. in with Austrian ski officials, said he 
world downhffl and combined ti- J 30 * 5 ?* Yugoslavia’s Rok was happy with his third place and 


Petrovic for sixth place. Peirovic the bronze medal. 


docked 2:31.03. The Yugoslav vet- “In the past, the favorites t 
1984 season. passing game." Michaels said after Ausirian^horn eran Bojan Krizaj. fourth after the. failed to win the world title." he 

After 10 years with the NFL s Flutie s morning workout. “Of drill who races for Luxmhnur? first run. dropped to eighth overall said. “I made some minor mistakes 

Clevdaud Browns. Sipe signed a course, we had to kind of hand feed finkhed ihird ^ in 2:3126. Oswald Toelsch ofllaly in both runs and they cost me a 

three-year contract with the Gener- him. And Tm not going to rush him placed ninth in 2.-31.40. ahead of better place" 

als in 1984 worth an estimated S2.1 into anything too fasL" Wasmaier, whose previous best Switzerland’s Max Julen. the IngemarStenmark,asi]vermed- 

million. He led New Jersey to a 14- Michaels said that it was unlikely performance in the international Olympic giant slalom champion, alist m the 1982 world giant slalom 

4 finish and a playoFf berth last Fhitie would play the exhibition ski circuit was second place in a 10th in 2:31.71. race, missed a gate and dropped 

year. He threw for 17 touchdowns game against Tampa Bay Saturday, World Cup giant slalom in Decern- Wasmaier, who likes mountain out in the second run. The 28-year- 

and his 82.1 efficiency rating but that he planned to use Flutie ber. gave West Germany its first climbing and ski jumping, looksev- old veteran, who is given better 

placed him sixth among U.S. Foot- for a half against Orlando on Feb. gold here by taking several risks in era! gambles in the first ran, going chances in Sunday’s special slalom, 

ball League passers. 15. both beats on a difficult, bard for the fastest lime. had been Ifith afim- ifv fir« h«i 


“In the past the favorites often 
[led to win the world title." he 


als in 1984 worth an estimated SL1 
million. He led New Jersey to a 14- 
4 finish and a playoff berth last 


in 2:31.26. Oswald Toelsch of Italy in both runs and they cost me a 
placed ninth in 2:31.40. ahead of better place." 

Switzerland’s Max Julen. the Ingemar Sienmark, a silver med- 


ball League passers. 


Jth m 2:31.71. race, missed a gate and dropped 

Wasmaier. who likes mountain out in the second run. The 28-year- 
imbing and ski jumping, looksev- old veteran, who is given better 
al gambles in the first ran, going chances in Sunday’s special slalom, 
>r the fastest time: had been 1 6th afier uie first heaL 


FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE 

Cl G FG FGA Pet 
VMker, Uttoo SR 21 122 174 7U.I 

Moor*. CraM SR 23 193 279 »S 


r.^ NHL Standings 

- ;; WALES CONFER 


Hockey 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick Ohrbtoa 


rtmson. MknSt SR 18 191 1BA 

■own. SC St SR 15 156 1IU Loilege fiesults 

Lfte. Mem St SR 18 IP 18A 

Grant. UtahSI JR It 197 IDA _ . E * 5T 

FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE "f 0 " u - 

Cl G FG FGA Pet P«l«— 1FB BR JUder 5* 
talker, Uttoo SR 21 122 174 TUI Graraetovm 71. Fla. Southern 39 

mare. CraM SR 23 193 279 <92 ^? hna Sworthntora 73 

Navy 95. FalrHekl 82 

NYU SA vossor 57 

Plttsburah 48. ProvUancB 55 
an VMI 50. William & Mary 48 

U J SOUTH 

— - I Auburn *1, FVorlflo 78 

WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS FteflOo SI. 74. Trtane SI 

ateory 2 2 S— 7 Geonila 74, AWnmo TD 

larttord S I 8—4 Gecrslo TecJ> 81. Dufc* 71 

N Kaon 3 (281. Loah2 (25), Boiek (7), Baxter LBublano 51. Mis&teippi St. 65 


WEDNESDAYS RESULTS 
Cnteory 1 1 s— 7 

Morttord ] 1 8-4 



It’s Losipeg No Longer: 
Jets Finally Defeat Oilers 

Coef Uedty (hr Staff From Dupaichts 61 points, are seventh in the overall 
WINNIPEG, Manitoba— Four standings. 


seasons ago, when the Winnipeg 
Jets had the worst record in Na- 
tional Hockey League history, 
some people said the team hailed 
from Losipeg. 

That joke is heard no more. In 

NHL FOCUS 


• "SE5-" 



w 

t L 

T 

Pts 

GF 

GA 

WraWns/ton 

33 

13 

8 

74 

227 

157 

PMtodotPNa 

29 

16 

6 

64 

215 

168 

N.Y. INOlHtera 28 

22 

3 

59 

242 

189 

H.Y. Rangers 

17 

27 

s 

42 

182 

215 

Pittsburgh 

18 

26 

5 

41 

779 

224 

New Jeraer 

74 

29 

6 

38 

ITS 

213 


Adam DtvMoa 



BuHrto 

3* 

15 

73 

64 

196 

1ST 

Montreal 

26 

17 

18 

62 

205 

174 

Quebec 

25 

21 

7 

57 

287 

188 

Boston 

24 

22 

7 

55 

194 

1M 

Hartford 

17 

28 

5 

29 

169 

222 

CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 



mrrta 

DfvMoa 




SL LouH 

24 

19 

9 

57 

199 

194 

Chicago 

21 

28 

3 

49 

208 

287 

Minnesota 

14 

27 

10 

42 

182 

214 

-ipt 

16 

11 

30 

35 

8 

7 

40 

29 

193 

142 

3 U 
233 


StaVOte Division 



Edmonton 

38 

18 

6 

82 

272 

177 

Catoary 

28 

20 

7 

43 

2SS 

214 

Wtantoefl 

28 

22 

5 

61 

238 

239 

U» Angetes 

23 

31 

9 

35 

Ml 

2M 

Vaiaiunr 

15 

33 

7 

37 

184 

283 


(Si; NeuteU ftel.MocDennkt (II, Samuels- M«YlwW 64. Wbke Forest 62 
Is GF GA son (D.TunNon I13). Shots on «oai: CaJaary NImIwIppI 58. Teanesoa* 57 

74 227 157 (on Weeks) 1*11-9— 33; Hortterfl (on Lenw- SL W-Qrtfpn 57 

64 215 140 IM1 12-11-6-W. *■ »««4sstool 77, S. Carolina 66 

99 242 209 Vie w er 8 8 M MIDWEST 

42 182 215 St. L4MU 1 3 8-4 A1 *rtwiry 71 Otter I In 69 

41 179 224 ReeOs (SI.Barr (UUMulten l241.Pash»n*U AuBura tl. Florida 7*. QT 

M 175 213 (Ul. Shots oa Boat: Vancouver (anLlut) 1*11- Dayton 47. DePort 43 

11 — 35; St. Louis (on Brodwr) 11-7-12-30. lowa », *Mnn»a>ta 65 
44 194 1S1 Edmonton 0 l V- 3 K “™ QS ** OMohomo i St. 72 

62 206 174 WknipH ■ 3 J— 4 MlMurl 54. Kansas SI. 47 

57 207 188 Turnbull 2 (161. Mill (2). Am lei 07). MO- J* 1 ™ ^ *«“• * 

55 194 184 dAont30>.Babvdi(7);Hata«hBlclt5>.MosB- Onto u. 56, Ont. MMNmn. O 
39 169 222 ter (10). Shots aa boo): Edmonton (on Hov- SOUTHWEST 

ward) 7-19*9—25; WTnnlpeo (on moob) **■ 4»elhodIst 66 

eHCE 11-1*10—34 HrtiOon 94 Tesas 80 

BuHato 1 1 1—2 Illinois SL 7X Tulsa TL 20T 

57 199 194 Minnesota 8 0 1-1 !^L \ 

a W Mmm 151 Oaute 1121. McKenna dill Texas ABM 7B. Baylor 74 


Iowa 70. Minnesota 65 
Kansas 84 Oklahoma St. 72 
Missouri 54 Kansas SI. 47 
Noire Dame 71. La Salto 58 


fact, under Barry Long, the Jets 
have become a respected team. 
Only Edmonton had not recog- 
nized the Jets* respectability. 

At long last, the Jets have cleared 
that hurdle, too. Wednesday night 
at Winnipeg, with Peny Turnbull 
scoring twice, the Jets beat the 
Stanle y GfP champions, 6-2. It was 
rta-vrUr. the first time in 21 meetings bc- 
(umuMiteitemteid tween the teams that the Jets were 
Jeff Malone of the Bullets outreacbes the Sixers' Jufius Erring to keep control of the ball, victorious. 

“It may be a law of averages." 
said Turnbull who has scored five 

76 ers Come Back to Down Bullets sW— sfifc 

were eventually going to beat the 

The Asaedaied Press Cleveland Cavaliers, enabled the to play, Jones scored a pair of bas- dub*as ti^y^re” 25 3 

PHILADELPHIA — The name 76ers to remain 1 J* games behind kets and Threatt hit two free Elsewhere in the NHL Wednes- 


wnrdl 7-19-9—25; WlnnloM (on IMoodl 
11-1*10-34 

BuHato 1 1 1-2 

Minnesota 8 8 1—1 

Ramsey (51. Davis (12). McKenna (11); 


is Sedate Threatt — pronounced 
ibreet. He hasn’t, however, been 


the Celtics in the National Basket- throws to seal Phikielphia's fifth day j t ^ Calgary 7, Hartford 4; 


ball Association's Atlantic Divi- victory in its last six games. 


much of a scoring threat — pro- 510 “- 


BuffaJo 3, Minnesota 1; Chicago 3, 


Moses Malone led the Sixers Toronto 2, and St Louis 4, Van- 


_ “ W r* W P| . ■ . .... .. | •raw.iw 4M4 644AW60 6 W4W«abW A 

Dounced threat — averaging just m a * N *& N S ™ Jer * with 27 points and 20 rebounds, couver 0. 

( 1 nniAlc g A.m> Im tl. UILJ.! SPV 1 IlH XtHwaiirW DptlVAf .ji.j r_ I- 


Toronto I 1 •— » 

Mcobd I 2 «-3 

Sovord (29), S. Lormer (22). DuPont (2); 


NBA S tanding s 


S_2 points a game for the Philadd- se y Milwaukee 93; Denver 
phia 76ers. ■ — ■ — — ■ — ■ 

The second-' vear cnarri from NBA FOCUS 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
AUartto Dhrteioa 

W L Pet. GB 


Transition 


-1.j 




— ■ -C P V; 


:■ &- 


-» - • ‘ 

- } r.> 

' v-v. y. 


BASEBALL SAN DIEGO— Annouaeed tftev hove oareed 

AontIchh Leaguo to terms wtfft Crate UHtertL Pftcftvr. on oh%<K 

-CALIFORNIA— SlOftad Dow Corttetl and year contract. 


BoD Ktoaer, Ritetara; Jorry Narron, catcher, 
and Mark MeLemora, second bastmon. 

" CHICAGO— Slansd BoD Jamw-rrltef pi tdv 
or. to a otto-mar cont ra ct 
NEW YORK ( tea cited o co n tract oeree- 
mont wMi MUw Arm s f rana. pUeher. 

- CINCINNATI— Stoned Ted Power, pflefter. 
MONTREAL— -SlOttod MtetxH Olloito. out- 
Mder, to o cm yaor contract 
•PHILADELPHIA— Stoned Ozrto VlrsIL 
cototwr. 


| Skiing 

World Oiamp ioitahlpfi 


BASKETBALL 

Not Mart BaNtetboB AMKlatftM 
ATLANTA— Slaned Cnartle Crlss. auard. 

FOOTBALL 

common FootoaK Loom 

SASKATCHEWAN— Named Oeorae Bixm- 

coto assfsfanl coach. 

National r aatoo H League 
BUFFALO— Announced (ftat Andy moc- 
□anaid. runnlnB aoefc coacft. nod restoned to 
accept a lab with the Minnesota Vlkfttos. 

CLEVELAND— Named Joe Penary, otferv 
stve coordinator, and Stove Crosby, atelstant 
head coach 


Boston 

41 9 

•B3D 

_ 

Philadelphia 

39 10 

-796 

He 

Washington 

27 34 

539 

14t* 

New Jersey 

24 36 

ABO 

17 

New York 

18 32 

M0 

23 


Central DMsien 



Milwaukee 

34 16 

M0 



Detroit 

30 18 

JOS 

3 

Chicago 

34 24 

500 

9 

Atlanta 

20 29 

-toe 

131* 

Indiana 

16 33 

527 

17Vj 

Cleveland 

15 33 

J13 

18 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 



Midwest Division 



Denver 

31 20 

508 



Houston 

27 21 

563 

2to 

Dal Ida 

27 23 

540 

31* 

Son Antonio 

24 25 

590 

6 

Utoft 

22 27 

AM 

8 

Kansas Cttv 

16 32 

533 

131* 


Pacific Division 



LJL Later* 

IS 16 

586 

_ 

Phoenix 

24 25 

.490 

10 

Portland 

21 28 

AS9 

13 

Seattle 

21 30 

512 

14 

LA. Clippers 

» 29 

.403 

14 

Goman state 

11 37 

529 

221* 


The second-year guard from ixpa. tUUia 

West Virginia Tech scored 10 of his 

16 pointsin the final quarto 120, Seattle 101, and Dallas 129. 
Wednesday night as the 76ers ral- Golden Stale 103. 
lied from an 82-77 deficit after Besides Threau's contributions, 
three periods and beat the Wash- the 76ers got help from another 
ijigtoa Bullets, 1 16-1 1 1. substitute, forward Bobby Jones, 

“I’m getting more playing firm- who scored eight of his 16 points in 
and that's helped me,” said fourth quarter. Jones, an 11- 


while Maurice Cheeks added 25 In ending the Oilers' unbeaten 
points and Julius Erving 21. Greg streak at 11 games, the Jets im- 


NdA. FUt_.Ua Ballard had 28 points, Jeff Malone proved their record to 28-22-5. 

27 and Tom McMilien 20 for During the 1980-81 season, they 
120, Seattle 101. and Dallas 129. Washington, which lost its fourth had a 9-57-14 record, the worst in 
Golden Slate 103. in a row. the league. The current Jets, with 

Besides Threau's contributions, — 

the 76ers got help from another 

substitute, forward Bobby Jones, C IP • Dili. 


The first move the Jets made 
after the dismal 1980-81 season was 
to make Dale Hawerchuk the first 
pick in the draft- The team’s for- 
tunes began an upswing immedi- 
ately. and Hawerchuk has become, 
in his fourth season, the leader. 

Hawerchuk assisted on two goals 
and shadowed Wayne Gretzky 
throughout the night, holding the 
magnificent scoring machine to a 
angle assist. Hawerchuk, with 88 
points, is the No. 4 scorer in the 
league: 

The Jets, before this season, 
traded a No. 1 draft choice for 
Pittsburgh defenseman Randy Car- 
lyle. Carlyle has been a positive 
influence on the defense. 

With Hawerchuk and Carlyle as 
the leaders, the Jets have won eight 
more games than they won in the 
first 55 games last season. 

“Maybe they thought this was 
the end, enough is enough or some- 
thing," Jets Coach Barry Long said 
of his club, which is 7-2-1 in its last 
10 games. “I could feel it in the 
dressing room that if there was go- 
ing to be a time, it would be to- 
night." 

“We’re for real." Carlyle said. 
“This is a good hockey team that 
will get even better.” 

The Oilers, who eliminated the 
Jets from the playoffs in the first 
round in each of the last two sea- 
sons, can finally be counted among 
the believers. (LA T. AP) 


Threatt, who shot seven for 10 and >'* 
also Had three rebounds and three tea, 
assists. “I’ve always been a confi- * a 
dent player and I’ve always been a *** 
good distance shooter." — 

The victory, coupled with Bos- re h 
ton’s 113-108 triumph over the 1 


year veteran rated one of the 
league's premier defensive players, 
was perfect from both the floor — 
six of six — and the ‘free throw line 


Sports-Franchise Bills Are Debated 


By Denis Collins !y. the Philadelphia Eagles," said that the NFL has been lax in pro- 

HWitopim Pan Service Senator J. Strom Thurmond, Re- leering rite rights of host cities. 

WASHINGTON — Howard publican of South Carolina, the Three witnesses and one com- 


— four of four— while adding five CosdI was « his bombastic best chairman of the Judiciary Com- miuee member said they do not 
rebounds and three assists. Wednesday, lecturing a Senate Ju- mitttee. In Baltimore, to the con- support any of the bills being con- 

l^adinc lftt-107 with 56 seconds friary Committee on the history sterna lion of outraged fans and city sideretL Gene Upshaw, the execu- 

Leading iu»-iu7 witn 5o seconds an(J of Bul officials, the Colts assets were re- rive director of the NFL Players 

CoseU, who had been invited to moved in the middle of the night!" Association, and Doue Allen, exec- 


testify about two sport-franchise 


ovea in tne middle or tne night! Association, and Doug Allen, exec- 
Jay Moyer, counsel to the com- utive director of the USFL Players 


and dtrador o4 operations. ««BO*Y. *«UHI 

INDIANAPOLIS— Named John Becker, r*^— 1 ** „ * ” 

CMp Mvera, Billie MoWhena. KeHh Row 
and Sieve Skftertl, oMtetant coaches. 

N.V. GIANTS Named Fred Hooaltn often- 


f : 
: % 
% 


bills, began to instruct the Senate miss) oner of the National Football Association, said all of the legisla- 
lawyers on the fine points of law. League, told committee members tion would increase the power of 
their patience wore thin. the NFL is powerless to stop i«im owners at the expense of the play- 

“It is not for you to come here owners from moving at will as a ers. 


“It is not for you to come here owners from moving a 
d give us a law-school lecture,” result of a S49-miUio; 


MEN'S GIANT SLAUOM Uve Une ojoeft. 

(At Bormto. Italy) ST. LOUIS— Norm 

L Markus Wasmaier. Wesf Germany, tensive coordinator. 
' llQBWaMI-MMO WASHINGTON— S 

2. PtrrMnStertrlBPefLStolDertanit 1:09-17- she taefcfe. to a sari 
'«:1M*-*2MS _ •• 

X Marc GkrardeW. Lwemboura, 1:09X1- NOftoaal i 

ltlfJBT — 2:2922 EDMONTON— Cte 


51 t 808 ^ till Barton 56 (Bird. Porfch 11). 
Si CT.*LOUl*— N«n*«* Lonee Von Zandt de- MyCtovelrtH) 23 1 Boater 16): Barton 22 


WASHINGTON— Slaned Marie May. etfen- 
sha taefcfe. to a series of one-yopr centrocts. 
HOCKEY 

Noftoaat Hockey Laaewe 
EDMONTON— crafmed Dave Lumley, 


Hfrt, West Germany/ 1 : 10 . 1 *- right wH*. *mlwere. 


1:20.19-2^035 

6. Hans Em, Austria. 1 


A 




•2-J436. - - 

. L RdbertEriactter. Italy. l:n9B*l:2BJ»— 
W6L53 

B- 7 . Rok PetravK. YuBOSta.ta. 1 : 1054 - 

ian47-2sun ■ 

X Balsa Krbol, Yapaslavia, 1:09J7- 
laimh-QMM 

- 9. OnvaM Titeiscft, Italy. l:iaJ*iaiJ»— 
2S3IA8 

^to.MOk Julen, Switzerland. I:WL3M:21^0- 
'• tl. Jure Franka. Yugas/ovto. 1:11-2* 

ioR5*-aaus 

.* tt OteWftn Gaidet. France. l:lWi- 
,h2iai-3-JLM 

-'IX Richard Promotion/ Italy. ):3tt1*- 

-U. Martin Hanot. Svdtaerlond. 1 : 1 W 6 - 

15. TBomas Bueraier. art tear rand, 1 :1U- 
lmAX-4:32JV 

. . .Ik Franck Piccard. Frawfc 1:112* 
W153-W225 


PITTSBURGH — Announced the retirement 
: 103 * 1 : 2 MI — of Bruce Crowder, rloftl nHnp. 


COLLEGE 

ARIZONA STATE— N anted R«* Norris In- 
terim football coach- 


Figure Skating 

EUROPEAN CHAMPIONSHIPS 
(Al Goteboro, Sweden) 

MEN 

Short Program 

. mu sabavdk. CzechosJovoktoL 1 A 
1 Vladimir Ketta. Sovie t Unto n. 12 
1 Fernand Fedronfc. France, 14 
4 Grown FUtportM. Pol®*!- <*. 

5 . Heiko Fischer. Wesl Germany. SJL 

6. Lora Akesson. Sweden, ond 
Vlkiar Pe*renkiv Soviet UnlaA. fcfl. 

8 . Falfco Klrttaa 6 o*t G«mony. 7 A 
9 Richard Zander. Wesl Germany. 72 . 
jfc p«ir Banvv czerJwslovrtdo, lOfl. 


Mlhearttee 32 24 2 S 39 — 92 

NSW Jersey 30 21 24 n-lN 

Richardson 11-18 1-2 25 . Blrfltaano 10-25 46 
24 ; Pressev *9 *9 14 Cum ml nos *12 7 - 10 17 . 
Rebounds: Mlhraukae 53 ICuitMtitoas 13 ): 
New Jersey 59 l Williams U). Assists: Mil- 
waukee 16 (Hodges. Pressev 4 ): New Jersey 
35 (Birdsong 6 ). 

waxfilnetofl 37 28 27 29-111 

PMtadMPMa 29 21 U 39-114 

MJMoIone 920 9)0 27 . Cheeks 913 7-7 25 ; 
Ballard 11-17 *« 2 & JAAatone 11-19 S-S 27 . Re- 
bousds: Wbshlnaton fl (Maftorn 12 ): Pftilo- 
delphto 46 (MAtaiane 20 ). Assists: Washing- 
ton 24 (Gun Williams 8 ): Ptlllgdelphto 74 
ITeneV 41 . 

Gatdea State 22 21 38 23—108 

DO Has 28 28 38 25—129 

Blackman 11-14 *7 27 . Aguirre 10-14 *4 25 ; 
Smith S -10 *3 IB Fiord 8 - 18 1 - 2 17 . Refteendi: 
Golden Stole 39 1 3 ml hi 10 ); Dallas 41 {Nlm- 
ptWus 41 . Assists: Golden State 19 (Conner 6 ) ; 
Danas 32 (DovK. Harper 8 ). 

Seattle 21 24 30 38-101 

Denver 31 31 30 28-128 

English 1*20 5-5 SSL Issei *0 7 - 10 17 : Clum- 
bers 0-14 6-6 33. H enderson 7-12 4-4 IX Re- 
baaads: Seattle si l Chambers. Slkma 101 : 
Denver 50 (lsuiS).Asslsh: Seattle 23 (Own- 
DHI 6 I; Denver 22 lEnallsh. NoH. Evans. Le- 
ver 4 ). 




and give us a law-school lecture,” 
said Senator Dennis DeConcuu, 
Democrat of Arizona, interrupting 
CoseU in midseatence. 

CoseU was one of five sports fig- 
ures, including Donald Trump, the 
owner of the U.S. Football 
League’s New Jersey Generals, 
who testified Wednesday on the 
worth and worthlessness of two 
bills designed to keep professional 
teams from jumping cities. 

The two bins, one sponsored by 
DeConrini and the other by Sena- 
tor Aden Specter. Republican of 


the NFL is powerless to stop team owners al the expense of the play- 
owners from moving at will as a ers. 

result of a $49-miIiion antitrust Trump was equally opposed to 
judgment against the league for uy- giving the NFL any more of an 
ing to keep the Raiders from mov- advantage than it already has over 
ing from Oakland to Los Angeles, the struggling USFL 

That ruling “imperiled the rela- “The NFL must be subject to 
nonship between teams in p roles- antitrust, just as any other busi- 
rionaJ sports and their communi- ness ” said Trump 


ties,’* said Moyer, who urged 
passage of DeCondni's bill to 


broaden his league’s antitrust ex- 
emption and restore “team-com- 
munity stability." 

Cosell argued that DeCondni's 
bffl, by giving the NFL “blanket 


Most vociferous in his opposi- 
tion to the current spate of bills was 
Senator Howard Metzenbaum. 
Democrat of Ohio. 

“This nation faces serious prob- 
lems,” he said. “Our deficit ap- 
proaches $200 billion. We are in the 


vent owners of professional sports " e v °? c f a . 

teams from abandoning home- Specters bill which B fflore nar- 

lowns for other cities with better establishing spe- 


finandal offers. On Monday, an- 
other Senate committee heard testi- 
mony from the chief executives of 


. an . dfic guidelines for the approval of 
Jjjjj. franchise moves. 


“I think it's time to put a stop to 


debating sports. Why? Having cre- 
ated the monopoly. Congress inev- 
itably must deal with its evils. I say 
it’s time to get Congress out of the 
business of regulating." 

“We should let these 1 leagues 


five professional sports on two rim- the kind of wrongdoing the NFL fight it out." he said. 

iliPhn. L!ll. T I m :J /- n l. 1 11 ■ . 


ilar sport-franchise bills. has been guilty of," said CoseU baseball exemption and require the 

“These hearings are generated by who died the moves of the New National and American leagues to 
the public outcry Following reloca- York Giants to New Jersey’s really compete with each other. Re- 


baseball exemption and require the 


The Aaaootarf Ptbh 

Jerome Whitehead of the Warriors has the Mavericks’ 
Sam Perkins dapped as they both go for a loose ball 


pons and proposed moves invoiv- Meadowlands and the Los Angeles 
ing several teams, including the Rams to Anah eim, California, “the 
Oakland Raiders and. most recent- city built by a mouse," as evidence 


peal the 1966 merger legislation, 
and let the NFL, AFL ami USFL 


and let the NFL, 
fight it oul” 





Page 18 


* 


OBSERVER 


The Processing Process 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — For a long 
time after going into the writ- 
ing business, I wrote. It was hand to 
do. That was before the word pro- 
cessor was invented. Whenever all 
the writers got together, it was 
whine, whine, whine. How hard 
writing was. How they wished they 
had gone into dry cleaning, stone- 
cutting, anything less toilsome than 
writing. 

Then the word processor was in- 
vented, and a few pioneers 
switched from writing to process- 
ing words. They came bade from 
the electronic frontier with glowing 
reports: “Have seen the future and 
it works." That sort of thing. 

I lack the pioneer's courage. It 
does not run in my family, a family 
that arrived on the Atlantic beach 
300 years ago, moved 50 yards in- 
land for security against hijgh tides, 
and has scarcely moved since, ex- 
cept to go to the drugstore. 

Still, one cannot hold ofT forever. 
My family bad given up saddle and 
sdrrups for the automobile, hadn't 
it? L, in fact, used the light bulb 
without the slightest sense or be- 
traying the solid old American val- 
ues. 

□ 


Thus the once happy cigarette ad- 
dict is bullied out of his habit by 
abuse from health fanatics. 

My hesitation about processing 
words was bang noticed by aggres- 
sive young persons who had pro- 
cessed words from their cradles and 
thought the spectacle of someone 
writing was as quaint as a four- 
child family. I hated beingquainL I 
switched to processing words, and 
— man alive! Talk about easy! 


My trade was writing, not pro- 
cessing words. I feared or detested 
almost all thin gs that had “process- 
ing," “process" or "processed” at- 
tached to them. Announcements by 
airplane personnel that I was in a 
mac hine engaged in “final landing 
process" made my blood run cold. 
Processed words. I feared, would 
be as bland as processed cheese. 

So l resisted, continued to write, 
played the old fuddy-duddy pro- 
gress hater when urged to take the 
easy way and switch to processing 
words. 

When former writers who had 
turned to processing words spoke 
of their marvelous new lives, it was 
the ease they always emphasized 

The processing process made life 
so easy (this was what they always 
said) — so infinitely easier than 
writing Only an idiot — and here I 
caught glances fraught with mean- 
ing — only an idiot would continue 
to suffer the toll of writing 


To shorten a tedious story. I ca- 
pitulated. Why are we moved to act 
against our best judgment? Because 
we fear public abuse and ridicule. 


It is so easy, not to mention so 
much fun — listen, folks. I have 
just switched right here at the start 
of this very paragraph you are read- 
ing — right there 1 switched from 
the old typewriter (talk about 
goose-quill pen days!) to my word 
processor, which is now clicking 
away so quietly and ca u si n g; me so 
little effort that I don't think HI 
ever want to stop this sentence be- 
cause — wed why should you want 
to stop a sentence when you're real- 
ly well launched into the thing — 
the sentence, I mean — and it’s so 
easy just to keep her rolling right 
along and never slop since, any- 
how. once you do stop, you are 
going to have to start another sen- 
tence, right? — which means com- 
ing up with another idea. 

What the great thing — really 
great thing — really and truly great 
thing is about processing words like 
this, which 1 am now doing, is that 
at the end, when you are finally 
finished, with Lhe piece ter mina ted 
and concluded, not to say ended, 
done and thoroughly completed to 
your own personal, idiosyncratic, 
individual, one-of-a-kind, distinc- 
tive taste which is unique to you as 
a h uman person, male or female, 
adult or child, regardless of race, 
creed or color — at the end which 1 
am now approaching on account of 
exhausting available paper space 
the processing has been so easy that 
I am not feeling the least, slightest, 
smallest or even somewhat minus- 
cule sensation of tired fatigue ex- 
haustion, as was always felt in the 
old days of writing when the me- 
chanical machines, not to mention 
goose-quill pens, were so cumber- 
somely difficult and hard to work 
that people were constantly forever 
earing off on them, thus being 
trapped into the time-wasting 
thinkin g process, which just about 
does it this week, spacewise, folks. 

Ne* York Tima Serstce 



J. A. Jo«e , Rfltrong 5hps 

Ship political officer led the 1975 mutiny on the Storozhevoy and its unsuccessful dash for Swedish haven. 


The Mutiny on the Storozhevoy 


By Norman Black 

The Associated Press 

W ’ASHINGTON — In the pre-dawn 
darkness or Nov. 8, 1975. the Soviet 
missile destroyer Storozhevoy quietly slipped 
its lines and beaded out to sea from ine Soviet 
port of Riga. For hours, according to research 
by a U. S. naval officer, no one in the Soviet 
navy knew the ship was gone. 

So began an extraordinary, although ulti- 
mately unsuccessful, mutiny. New details of 
the incident have just been published. Before 
the incident was over, this account sta t es, the 
Storozhevoy would move well out into the 
Baltic Sea on a dash toward Sweden and the 
West, only to be turned back by attacking 
Soviet planes and other ships. 

At least a dozen sailors were killed during 
the incident, the summary adds, and the lead- 
er of the mutiny was later tried and shot 
After a final cruise in the Baltic, the Slorozhe- 
vqy was transferred to the Soviet Pacific 
Fleet. 

The attempted flight of the Storozhevoy 
has been reported by U. S. and European 
newspapers, but never acknowledged by the 
Soviet Union. Now. however, a more detailed 
account has emerged. 

An investigation by the American officer 
paints a picture of harsh living conditions on 
board the ship: of a young, misted political 
officer and an unusual series of events that 
allowed the officer to take charge of a front- 
line warship — with most of its crew ashore 
— in a port close to international waters and 
the West. 

The detective work was performed by 
Lieutenant Commander Gregory D. Young, 
who earned a master's degree from the Naval 
Postgraduate School in 1982 by devoting his 
thesis to the Storozhevoy incident- His find- 
ings attracted little interest, however, until 
they were summarized this month in the mag- 
azine Sea Power. The U.S. Navy refuses to 
comment on Young's research, although 
sources say it has been accepted as the most 
definitive account available. 

Now an instructor of naval officers at the 
University of Colorado, Young said recently 
he had received access to some classified 
materials on the mutiny, but he said he pieced 
together most of the information from other 


sources, including Russian immigrants who 
were in Riga and intercepted radio messagn, 

“There is no doubt the incident occurred." 
Young said. “There are still questions a bom 
the details and about what prompted it. But it 
definitely happened and there is no other 
incidem like this that I can find" in the 
history of the Soviet navy. 

According to Young, the mutiny on board 
the Storozhevoy was led by the ship's zampo- 
lit, or political deputy, an officer placed 


Reseacher pieces together an 
unusual combination of events 
that allowed a polical officer to 
try to flee with ship in 1975 


aboard every Soviet ship to maintain the 
ideological purity of the crew. The zampolit 
on the Storozehvoy. a modern 3, 800- ton war- 
ship that was only three years old in 1975. 
was Captain Valery Mikhaylovich Sablin. 

Young describes Sablin as an unusual po- 
litical officer, willing to listen u> crew com- 
plaints during his lectures on Marxist thought 
without spouting the standard party line. 
Young says Sablin had been criticized in 1974 
in the Soviet military newspaper Red Star for 
not running his political education meetings 
properly. 

Sablin ddivered his last such lecture on the 
afternoon of Nov. 7. 1975, when many of the 
ship's officers and crew were on leave in Riga 
commemorating the October Revolution. 

That night, according to Young’s research, 
Sablin, another officer named Markov, and a 
dozen or so petty officers locked the ship's 
captain in his cabin, tied up some other 
officers and ordered “a skeleon crew of un- 
wary 18- and 19-year-old conscripted sailors" 
to take the Storozhevoy to sea. 

As the ship moved out of port, one sailor 
jumped over the ride, apparently unknown to 
Sablin, and managed to reach shore, Young 
said, citing secondhand accounts from a bus 
driver It took the exhausted sailor more than 
two hours to reach naval headquarters in 
Riga and convince a duty officer thaL some- 
thing was wrong ou the Storozhevoy. 


Even then, it was only after one of the 
officers on board the ship managed to untie 
himself and reach a radio to broadcast an 
emergency message that Soviet authorities 
realized what was happening. By then, the 
ship was steaming across the Baltic for the 
Swedish island of Gotland. 

The 320-kilometer 1 200-mile) voyage from 
Riga to Gotland would have taken less than 
seven hours. Young added. But the com- 
mander of the Soviet Navy ordered the Stor- 
ozhevoy stopped 

The remainder of the story was pieced 
together primarily through accounts provid- 
ed Swedish journalists by Swedish military 
officials. Young said .Astonished radio oper- 
ators in Sweden found themselves listening to 
transmissions between the mutineers and So- 
viet bombers sent to stop the ship. 

The Storozhevoy refused the pleas of the 
pilots to heave to. Young said and Lhe planes 
eventually opened fire. 

“Evidence of the utter chaos and disarray 
is dear," Young wrote, saving the Soviet 
bombers caused more damage to a pursuing 
ship than to the Storozhevoy. 

The Storozhevoy took evasive maneuvers, 
but never returned fire. Young said. “The 


Swedish intercepts indicate that the ship was 

i Nov. 8. 


finally recaptured around S A.M." on 
1975, only about 48 kilometers (30 miles) 
from Gotland, he said The incident lasted 
about six hours: the mutineers apparently 
surrendered without resistance. 

Sablin and a number of enlisted members 
of the crew eventually were executed Young 
concluded Sablin after a three-day trial be- 
fore the Military Division of the Supreme 
Court of the Soviet Union. 

“What is so fascinating, and what I spent a 
lot of time focusing on. were the possible 
causes," Yount* added. “And what I found 
were a lot of different thing s that all probably 
contributed — a lot of discontent on board 
bad living and working conditions, ethnic 
frictions, alcoholism. 

“And there were also the unusual circum- 
stances of a misled political officer on board 
a ship, without much of its crew, and located 
close to the West. I think it all contributed to 
this occurring this one time.” 


PEOPLE 


Jackson Hospitalized 


Doctors said Jesse Jackson is in 
Eood condition after being hospi- 
talized with a partially collapsed 
lung caused by a severe ease of 
bronchitis and pneumonia- A 
spokesman from Howard Universi- 
tv Hospital in Washington, where 
Jackson will be staying for four to 
seven davs. said Wednesday that 
the 43-year-old civil rights leader 
was resting comfortably. Jackson 
was admitted Tuesday. 

□ 

Buckingham Palace is to review 
its practice of appointing royal cig- 
arette manufacturers following last 
month’s lung operation on Princess 
Margaret, an ami-smoking law- 
maker said Wednesday. Labor Par- 
ty lawmaker Ernie Roberts intro- 
duced a parliamentary resolution 
against putting the royal seal on 
cigarette packs after doctors re- 
moved non -cancerous tissue from 
the lungs of Princess Margaret, 
who is the queen's sister and a 
heavy smoker. Roberts said the 
Lord Chamberlain, the Earl of Air- 
lie, who supervises the naming of 
royal suppliers, wrote to him say- 
ing: “It is only for the supply of 
cigarettes to official guests at royal 
residences that the grants of war- 
rants of appointments to trades- 
men have been given. This policy is 
under review, and 1 am grateful to 
your bringing to our attention the 
concern of members of Parlia- 
ment." 

□ 

Following in the footsteps of 
leading British and American pop 
figures, some of Canada's top stars, 
are to make a record in aid of 
Ethiopian famine victims. “Tears 
Are Not Enough" was written by 
rock singer Bryan Adams. He will 
be joined for Sunday's recording of 
the song by Anne Murray, Paid 
Anka. Nefl Young, Gordon Light- 
foot and a host of other Canadian 
performers. An Italian group also 
is making a famine-relief record. A 
spokesman for the producers said 
singers including Lucio Dalla and 
Vasco Rossi had recorded “Vo- 
lareT one of Italy's most popular 
songs, and the record would go on 
sale in Lhe next few days. 


enclosed a picture of herself [ 
in a leotard. “We're not stuck nr a 
1950s Donna Reed time warp," she 
wrote. “There are congressional 
wives who aren't dqying Barbie 
Dolls swathed in Ultrasuede." 


James B. Shenrood, president of 
the Sea Containers group. Tuesday 
announced the purchase of a vener- 
able British magazine that . recent# 
called him “a quiet American mil- 
lionaire." Sherwood and an Ameri- 
can associate paid $1.68 million foe 
the 143-year-old Illustrated. L ot* 
don News, whose fairly small cmn> 
iation has subscribers in 160 cram- 
tries. including 10,000 in t 
United States. 

□ 


Leonardo Boff, a Brazilian advo- 
cate of the so-calied “liberation 
theology" denounced by the Vati- 
can. has become the first winner of 
an award created by a “Foundation 
for Freedom in the Church." Hoc 
belt Haag, the initiator of the foun- 
dation. said Boff was presented 
with the 5.000-Swiss franc (51.830} 
award at a ceremony ai T&bingen, 
West Germany. Tuesday. -Bo#, a 
Franciscan monk, immediately 
turned over the prize money to 
charity. 


Jazz trumpeter Thad Jones takes 
over leadership of the Coma Basie 
Band when it begins a U. S. tour - 
Sunday, a spokesman for C 
Basie Enterprises Inc. said. Jones 
has lived in Denmark for the last 
seven years, since the Thad Jones- 
Mel Lewis band dissolved after 13 


vears together. He has been leading 
"■ lira. He 


the Danish Radio Orchestra. ... 
was with the Basie band from 1954 
to 1963, composing and arranging 
as well as playing in the trumpet 
section. 


Marty Davis, 36, is out to smash 
Lhe stereotypes. In a letter to the 
Washington Dossier magazine pro- 
test! — r J:j 

sion 

Representative Robert 


The crew of the U. S. space shut- 
tle Discovery received the thanks of 
Lloyd's of London for rescuing two 
communications satellites from 
faulty orbits last November. Astro- 
nauts Anna Fisher. Frederick 
Hanck, Dale Gardner, Joseph Afien 
and David Walker are in Bntain for 
10 days at the invitation of Uoyif s 
chairman Peter Miller. Lloyd's ear- 


— , — her gave each Discovery erri- 
ng a feature it did on congres- member its silver medal for men 
al wives, the wife of Michigan's nous services for recovering me 
“ W. Davis heavily insured satellites. 


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h. Pom: 634S965. Getwva- 
9286. Rome 39 48 93. 


LONDON, ENGLAM3. Dme privately 
aboard historic Safina ship to Gteen- 
wicK Reservritons. TeL 01 - 480 7295. 


MOVING 


ALLIED 


VAN LINES INTI 

OVa 1,000 AGENTS 
in U.SJL. - CANADA 
350 WORLD-WIDE 
&B ESTIMATE 

PARIS rVuti cr rir Intern al. 


no! 


(01) 343 23 64 

FRANKFURT 

[069) 250066 

MUNICH uu. 

(089) 142244 

LONDON JTSSS 

(01) 953 3636 

BRUSSELS: sjv. 

(02) 425 66 14 

<W*VA 

(0221 32 64 40 

CAIRO aom Vcti Lines hil 
(20-2) 712901 

USA Allied Van Lines bill Carp 
(OIOI) 312-681-8100 


ROY ALE MTL TRANSPORT BMC 

InTL podona & shqopng services for 
houmhalcf goods, antiques & <* 1 . 
N.Y. pi 2) 362-9M); Pans 3-969-0225. 


CONTWEX (twee Opera): Costbus- 
ters to 300 at>» woridwids • Air/Sea 
Oil Charge 281 1881 ftvis -Cars too 


REAL ESTATE 
CONSULTANTS 


PALM BEACH 
FLORIDA 


RESIDENTIAL 
COMMERCIAL 
RAW LAND SALES 


W*an E. Hutton IB 
Real Estate 
177 Seaview Ara 

WB-WTTON 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FOR MORE REAL ESTATE 
OPPORTUNITIES SEE 
PAGE 11 


ARGENTINA 


RETIRE ON $250 a month m Argenti- 
na. Buy a house, ap art ment or rarm 


Far S8AOO. Report S9J0 (Cheek US 

. .. . - • -- -Jg sib* 


honk). Jute Ben*. CC 1 
Ahngtoag, Cordoba, Argentina 


BELGIUM 


COMMBOAL PROPERTIES. 3200 
sqm, renter diy Brussels in a shop- 
png or BQ, gnwifn uuxjtufriiK, 
ownw 



SI 10514 Tie 61344 
pater ie de la Reme, 
Brig urn 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


BELGIUM 


HISTORICAL OPPORTUNITY 
Beet laerition uptown Brawls 

avenue Louse, 7600 sq.m. Palace Ho- 
tel 1900 style to be renovated + shop- 
png center/gafery + offices, etc. 

Indication pro US$5.5 nuBon. 
Info: Dykman S. Tel. {2) 5110514. Tb 
613448 ext. 250. Gaktne de fa Rene 28, 
1000 Brussels, Belgium 


CANADA 


CANADA 
QUBNB. B.C. 

Spaa fas with view, natural trees, 12 
minutes west af ofy on pavement. 
Priaed to m3 at Canadian 512,000. 


Write-. A ,F. PWey, 462 Bm St, Quesnel, 
B.C. V2J 3W9 Canada or phone 


604-747-1834. 


FOR SALE - EXCEliENT 400 one 
Form, fodities ooun & pigs- Invest- 
ment or work. Canada 80 miles north 
Ottawa Wiliam Breen, Rural 
Raitte 4. Cobden, Ontario. 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


COTE D'AZUR 

Near the Son at 
GOLF JUAN 

Most attractive vito in first dass carefi- 
l»n overlooking mo £ G*> d'Antfces. 
Very fage living room & terrace, ideal 
for receptions. 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, 2 
servants rooms & caretdcei'i house. 
Beautiful sheltered garden for someone 


who enjoys Ihs hobby. 
F2.9fiO.Mtt Ref: 286. Apply 
JOW9 TAYLOR SJT 


55 to Crabette 
06400 Cannes 
Teh (93) 38 00 66 Tlx 470921 


COTE D'AZUR 

ST. PAUL DE VENCE 
Exceptional one level stone mas, 
65sqm reception 3 bedrooms, 3 baths, 
W acre Hat garden, panoramic view. 
Price F=23ia000. 

Apply: JOHN TAYLOR S JL 
Route de Si. Paul. 

06480 La Cole Sur Loup. 

(93) 32 83 40 


95 KMS PARIS. MAINTBMN re- 


port, Edge of Forest. Distinctive resi- 

dence in 


& 


13700 sqm. (neaped 

. 300 sqm. living space, 
round floor: Eying, (fining, law 
wrote oct den, bedroom, both, tuflv 
equipped kitchen. 1st floor: 4 bed- 
room:, 2 baths, bind roam. 2nd 
floor-, habitable. Spacious basement, 
3-oar OCT Ops + house comprising 2 
stcfalm & ap a rt m en t. Phone otter 8 


tins & apartment, n 

37-51 -6645. Frendi speakers or 


pm 37-51-6643 Frenoi spurn 
37-46-91-18 Erfakh speakers. 


BOURGOGNE 

MOST £fcAUDRfl. PROPERTY 

nwnad image in Wme 

1900 style, 11 rooms. 


"ssii sar 


SANT ANDREA - FRANCE 
28 Av enue Hwfa 
75008 Porn- Teh 561 - 90 91 


A MUST FOR THE DBCERW63 in- 
vestor, private hofctoy paodse m 
6000 °qi"i enarded by woodland 
fa knurs of nature. Dre«n stone atf 
mas, 350 sqjn, double reception 
ream with firopfnc*. (titling room, hr* 
ury Sped kaehen. Master bedroom & 

bathroom mute, 2 guest bedroom 

& brihroams, nanny s Rat, swimmng 
POOL under value. SSI, 4> la Cre- 
sette. 06400 CANNE5. (93} 38 19 19 


COTE D'AZUR, FOR SA1E by owner. 

3bn*oam apartment, furnished or 
unhitrtofad, mowe-ai cond i tion, north, 
south new of sea & mountain, pool, 

m mgh starring ratxon aea at race. 
PleQsecolhiai(93)B1.974}l,(9^86- 

35-82. or contact owners: Assatounan 

Properties, 94&fi WfchHB EBvd. 57724. 
Bytertyrth. CA. 90212 USA. Tele* 
1WW5ASTBLNBVHL 


CAP HB8AT 

Magnfieent vila Edwardian era style. 
pCTWCTnk vmvi 12 roam. 4 baths with 
extenaon posubSty. 7,800 tam. park, 
tenna Cveefaer s house. FIO.OQOJXJO. 
AG&4CE BOYIS 

BP. 63 • 06310 BEAULIEU 5U8 MB 
(93)0IJ&36 


CAPf&tRAT 

Vary beautiful apartment, high dew. 
pontxanwcvjew, 200 sq.m. kvwig space, 
60 yam. terrace, Mgcndtnoes. 

2 garages. F3JMO.O0O. 
AGEmCE bovk 

8.P. 63 - 06310 BEAUUHJ SUR MB 
(93) 01.0036 


A N1ILE FROM THE BEACH, 10 nJ» 

' a *ho{ St-Trcpto, newwBaon 1700 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


HYSBS, MW FRENCH RIY1BA. 1 
hoir by car From hkoe & Mcrsafo 
Unique & beauiifully located 5-bed- 

roam house, 3Vi baths. Seduded & 

overlooking the sea 270 sq.ro. Suing 
area Consols of lounge/ surien kving 
room with fireplace, kitchen & pool 

Garage, basement. 5,000 sam. lot, no 

other ^ bulking construction. Best oner. 
Please coteact (94) 57 35 20. 


19th CENTURY MANOR HOU%450 
ornsj. ceflors, 


sqm. Trying mace fl6 rooms), 
antes, auKxitdings. fuel centra} heat- 
ing, in mag ni ficent landscaped fenced 
park with spring and stone bridges on 
3 ha 13 km from Satafa Airport (East 
of Lyon), acc es s 143, Write-. Charles 
Choui oqur, 5 4 Av. FNu Fours . 69003 
Lyon, Prance. 


HAPPY COMPROMISE between 


apartment and Wla m 25 ocre^pari^ 


lovely new home, stone wdk, 
sqan. fining roam, 2 bedrooms, 2 
bathrooms, 1 10 sqm. garden, barbe- 


cue area terrace. 


ns, lea 


06400 


F2 400,000. SSI, 47 La CraiseMe, 

I aiWES. TeL- (93) 38 19 19. 


ST. 


roitvtes ham lawn 


\wwSt6000 KjJt^ kaid- 


5300 000. CoS: Lon- 
don 01-588 7595 weekdays or 01 -584 
8989 


ARORIGCTS LUXURY APAHTAWT 

cti French Bviara 70 sqm. surface 
oca + 22 sun. balcony with pan- 
oramic view*. 10 minutes drive from 
Coma. Prior 5100,000. Negotiobfo, 


mtaive of funetura ft fifhngs. Far 
jl360UK or 


deftft tel-. Bwnett 07373 51 

the 2341 0/DOVEOO G. 


MEGEVE MONT BLANC, FRANCE: 
To buy an apartment, or a dedal in 
Mont BIctic area aWDCt Mont Bfanc 
hUxtol, BP 114, 74120 Mageve. Tdfc 
33-50/il 02 82Tfc 3W30T 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


CANNES. For FI ,600,000 only, rf very 
quid sate. Penthouse 100 iqjn. + 
102 sqm. terrace. Beautiful view on 
sea S nils. Large kving roam, 2 bed- 
room. Cellar, 3-car garage. Agence 
Latour, 20 rue Lotour Mntiowg. 
06400 CANNB Tel: [93) 94 40 51 


OWNER 5H15 attractive 18th century 

house with lower, mode: need, mme- 

ckate entry, 2 firetfoces. faoe Irving. 5 

bedrooms, 4 bafaoams, cloakroom, 

etc. 2 ha fields & woods, magnificent 

view. Wee FI. 100,000. Giroraiant. 

Cinou Mac 46300 tokb 165) 31 11 25 


FOR SALE OR RENT, muhvownerJvp 


2101 after 7 
9 pm. 


or (1)321 -6693 after 


COTE D’AZUR, MINTON. 10 minutes 

omter of town, 20 m. from seo, 3- 
room Hot, 78 iqm, 2 terraces with 
seo 6 n m u roo m views. Equipped letch- 
en. cellar, gwoge. F950j»fffo: Pans 
871 35 61 after 7 pm. 


FRENCH RIVERA 20 nia from Nee 
Airport. Exceptional property: 10,000 
sqm. grouKk iron house: 650 sam., 
pool beautiful trees. For mfomCTionc 
MAJ-U. BJ>. 114. 74210 MEGEVE. 
TeL 33-50/21 02 82. Us 309302. 


YOUR CONTACT M PROVENCE. 

Houses wdh character. 


... Char long 

grapertfa. ^ Estntes. _EmJe GARQN, 


VENCE 


SSL 13532 ST-REMY-DE-PSO- 
I tedex. TeL (90) 9Z01-58 + 


CANNES. GORGEOUS H» sqm. 2- 

room, h eeity ap artment^ fa 
terrace, gaiden & pool FI, 

Cabinet teluc |93| 9411 


GREAT BRITAIN 


5UPBS FREEHOLD. 4 bedroamed 
household in fined bastio n of old 
Chtfcea, London. US$380,000. TeL 
London 352 1550 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


GREAT BRITAIN 


Cs = $’* 

INVEST *« BRITAIN NOW 


Large ultra modem apartment in halor- 
ic bukknq just off London's Hyde Parte, 
Tor side by owner. 


> 3 bedrooms . 2 baths + 

' Master suite w4h private bath. 

kitchen covering one floor 
' Floor for e nt ei ton ing 
i All floors weed fa sound, vateo, 
security S computer control 
Luxury Irving, income, or both 
Complete control of adding 
management if required. 


Pace USS375JD00 or £375,000. 
Cal London (414] 937-0019 


Mgh Qan Hhtraied Victorian 
ftw p artfc Adjacent la Hyde Path 

2 minute* from Flarrads 4 Harvey Nich- 
ols, 24 hour fcji searity & porterage 
+ Eft. This newly decorated 1st 


floor ffa hen 2 bedraunn with gedgriet. 
magnificent reception room troth face 
balcony, s n od ous metored dining haL 
AM rooms have hgh caefinas with beou- 
bfa cornice & decor wane D a lle u orn 
with jocucB & stem cabinet, separate 
* wash room & fully fitted kitchen, 
has an over at artistic Aar as s 
owned by alifl. About 125 
97 yea 1 lease. Woe 


quest- TeL 


ofa photos avatebe an i 
London 581 4500 anytime 


GK0SVENOR SOU ARE MEWS. A 

modem Act m immaculate order et a 
private, quiet mews in lhe heart of 
Mayfair - adjacent Oaridges. Own 
garden, private garaging and perk- 
ing ExceSert security, large recep- 


tion with dhunaarea Bedroom, knu- 
niorbie orthroom. Designer 


in. oo veer M 
I 28946 (UK) 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


GREAT BRITAIN 


HYDE PARK. Magnificent house. 

bedrooms, swimn sn a pool. 

sauna PUTNEY BBDGE. i 
flat, lounge, 2 double b 

£56,000. raiBUH, Ireland. 


5299. Thu 27646 


20 t 20' dnngrpar 

eption d0«: 


with reception , 


room, 90 yam. 
ends 580 4941. 


Tel: 


tiny room, 3 large bed r ooms. I 
den, central tone' 
rear lease. £12 


seduded garden, 'central London 
minutes. 161 yea 


(eveneigs only) 


et London (01) 262 3023. 


private e 
London. I 


prang double garage i 
t&Sjm TeL 01-720 


weekends 


International Business Message Center 


AimmoN fXEajmrB 


farm. whmamanfimaM 
of a mWfan readme waid- 
wrddm, matt ef v * fan arm In 


mad ». Ja*t tefar ut (Pmb 

6J359S) fatkme ID am, en- 

suring that mm amt i*i*x you 

back, and 


ms » w n m w qge im 

wfadn 4Sham Tbm 

A ILS.S9.80 or load 

ffmefatferfa You out 

mdmdm toare M m m 

tddm bdBng a ddon . 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


WtTHW 30 DAYS - OR LESS 
You can have your awn business^. 

podeet mare money in a day 
than mod people earn in o vroek. Hmf 
Easy. It's not herd at aH when you mum 
a Kama Computer l\j>iiuit Syiten. 

A sure winner that combines 3 of to- 


day's hottest trends- video, cmn g rters 


rvd instant pictures- plus 
how mid guCTqntee of Texas Instru- 
ments, Panosonic end Kano. An aH cash 
busmess. Customers came to you. No 
setting. No stress. It's not a franchisa Afl 
the monay and the profits ere 1001b 
yowl. Ideal fa fortifies, inriSwdw* or 
absentee owners. Part-time, full-time or 
weekends. There's no need to leave 
your pesent ph. Wrththe Ketna system 
you take som eorg'i p ic ture with a T.V. 
camera oruj instantly print it with a 
c o mputer. It's so pushJxiticm ample, a 
eMd ccti run it. Bur the profih aren't kid 
stuff The Kama system a portable, sen 
up m 30 mimes or less, anytime, any- 
where. The worid s your territory. 
There twe thouswds of watfions wad- 
ing to be filed...- plus tremendous mai 
roder mt e oeon. System pneas start at 
$9,500 and® 

Kema. Dept. F34. Beeihovenstr. 9 6000 
Frankfurt l W. Gernary, Tel- 0fl9 < 
747808 Tk 412713 KEMA 


HDUOARY BAM0NO on large cdL 
faerabed loans. The only ccraner- 
od bank with a r^resentotne office 
in London spedofisna m this servtce. 
Art* Oweas Ban* ft Trust (W.Ll 
Ltd, 28 Back Pmce Rd.. London SE1. 
Tel 735 8171 


TAX HAVEN BASH) BANK, oca* 

lomed to handing matters m confi- 

dence seeks term de pouts whrfi 
would buCT interest of up to 14% per 
<**n*n- European Oversees Bank 


[Wll Lfo RweMniotive Office. TeL 
LaroJon 3050171. Telex 295555 ISP G 


BUSINE SS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


NEW BUSGNE55 DEMROPMENT 
DIVISION 

We are a wtM known Swiss company 

active m a variety of poducf areas end 

markets. 

Our htew Business D e vetopmert Dm- 
sion has reoerriy been estabfahed to 
assist new & existing clients to expand 
(heir m an ufacturing and marketing ac 


trvitieSi inia North America, the key mar 

Asa. and lhe People's 


Lets ol Southeast Asa. 

Republic of China. If you would Hie to 
know how we an help you expend 

your products or services into these 

markets, please write to: Bar 1766, Her- 
ald Tribune, 9252! NeuJly Cede*. 
France. AS enquries will be tteded in 
stna co n fidenc e 


HOTH FOR SALE 

This 100-room FIRST CLASS well 
equpped hotel with exdusrve bars and 
re stu M CTrts a situated ot the southwest 
coast of betoncL Nets mrport, b ea ch 
and world -unowned gc*f course. Uun- 
nm Amenc*r contracJs, good mama 
ono profit pasabldres. 

Haase wnte Box 1741, Herald Tribune, 
92521 Newly Codex. France 


IMMIGRATION TO USA 
MADE EASY 

Attorney 6 Realtor obtains ws® A per- 
manent resdence. Helps to set up USA 
biunessa ft tocates axnnerad. ndut- 

tnd & restoenhal real estate. For free 
brodwre wnat David Hrson. 1201 


Dare St, 5» 600, Newport Beodi. CA 
92660 USA. (Tlil 752 0966. 


SETTLING IN CANADA 

Investment and 


_ I wd nungrahon 
Contact DART WVHT 
1981 McGJ Colli 
Montreal H3A 2W9 
Tel: (514) 281 1981 
Tete* 556)023 


25% PA USA offshorre b u rin ng. 

‘ Double 


Compounded set»icmnua!ty. — «« 
apiral m3:6 years, Inple m 5. In USS 
Need — * *' " 

Sort. . 

Norway. 


GENEVA — EXPERIENCE) muMrv 

gual Sums woman (offices at her fa- 

powft owan offers fa representa- 

tion or portnenivps Please wra fa 
Gpher 16>U 501 6, Piciotas, Qi-l 21 1 
Genera 3 


BUSINE SS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


UJ5. PUBUC COMPANY 
seeks agent or may consider joint ven- 
ture to market $4,000 homesite vi edab- 
ilhhed US ccvnmurxty. S6QM said to 
date, firsf bare offered outside US. Us- 
fimited income pctenfaL Hx; B6384 ML 
RDOFL or cel 857-5-741556 


FUBUSfd, previous e xperience with 
i mp or tan t authors, both in New York 
aid Paris, seeks partner with cmild. 
Bank refer rwM dearaNe. Please 
write Box 1750, Herald Tribune. 
92521 Neufiy Cedex. France 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


INTL 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

UM1MITED INC. 
UJJk. 8 WORLDWIDE 


A complete toad & busmess service 
provrfng a uriqm cailecnan of 

tale n ted, venaUe & njUlngual 
mdviduob far 


Foshiorv Ga n u ne rd ol-Prinr-Promoiions 
Gxiueruson-Trode ShowvPress Parties 
Speed Eram-knage Maken-PITs 
Social Hosts-Hastesset-Emertomn 
Social Gompanans-Tour guides, etc. 


212-765-7793 

212-765-7794 
330 W. 56th St.. N Y.C 1001? 
Service Re 
Needed 


E XPORT MARKETING- Amman 
marketing consultant can inc re a se ef- 

tatiiveiteB ef exitMg export market. 

ng pragnm. help launch new ones & 
ngpl ra proaems. hnpartant world- 
wide contadt far cansumor & mdutfn* 


East r|- J r 
masons dso aarnecTout m target 
markon. Contact 1 David 1 Rnterv 

house. Gortensrasse 5. 6700 Kus> 

naeht, Switter fc w d . 


FRWCH HIGH fASHON MOOB, 

27, PR>PA experience, Hlrtory of Art 

2 pjn, 9 pm. 01-225 


COMPUTRAC. The leader m Stock aid 

Ccxtenotfify Analysis. WM PC ' XT 

/AT new version now cvatistole. Com- 
guttode, POBox S66. 121 1 Gemvcl 


0331 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


gages, YOU hold tin land in 

name, not jut an encumbrance), i 


Tei 


IEI7B1 OF CREDIT: You need l/Cs fa 

impart - expcrtl We ccti issue fa 
from moior American banks. Ti 
241176^WMOCaHa 


DIAMONDS 


DIAMONDS 


Your best buy.. 

Fine rhamoich in any price raige 
at lowest whatesrie prices 
efired from Antwerp 
center of the diamond world. 
Fufl guaran te e. 

Far free pnee kst write 
Joadtim GeMeeetein 


nJMr. 


EflabSsheeMWe 

1)8 . 

234 07 51 


Peikoaratrant 62, B-2018 Antwerp 
• TeL 02 


syl b. At lhe 


OFFICE SERVICES 


KJRO BUSINESS CB41ER 

Rate 


Femeria two 
99 Keaersaradtt, 1015 CH Amtfad 
TeL 31 JDS 57 49. latex 161 
Wcrid-WkJe Businas Centers 


YOUR HAMBURG OFFICE, telephone 


cetera renge or omee lervwet 

quefity busmen consuhanon and 

best business aukte m Han 

COMM^C GmbH, Esplanade ft 2C 

Hamburg 36. Id: 040353084 

353085 -353086 Tlx 2165358 COX 


yow 


YOUR LONDON OFFICE 

CHESHAM EXECUTIVE CENTRE 

I5U dfreel, London Wl. 
TeL (Ol) 439 62U The 261426 


PAMS ADOBESS 

SmeelW^^'ovxfamaH; 

telex, meeting ra .7 . 

7500ft TeL 35? 47 04. Hx.- 642504. 



Cd: (41/22) 

Imprime par Offprint, 73 rue de VEvanple, 75018 Pais. 


REAL ESTATE 

FOR SALE 

GREAT BRITAPN 

er- lOVaY LONDON APARTMENT Se- 
ns, duded. quel in toneless ScckieGth 
00. near Greenwich Park. 16 mm ute war 
8 w Oty. 3 bedraoms. 2 baths, study, 
ris, utikty room. Merxfion crosses 37 h>at 
ive filling room! Full/ eztxpoed Jjs zc- 
m. rage- S149.00C U 01-318 2701 

iiiiy 



i GERMAN! 

D 

} REAL ESTATE INVEST MH4T 

j NEXT TO COLOGNE/ BONN 

_ WeB done coratrudm, apCTtment 
ry home with 24 units - 1 to 3 bedrooms - 
ly encdent location, sales price DM5.98 
hi mJSan, FuSy rented, rental income p.a 
■St DhOSOJXtt For Further details, please 
n, conlact- 

ig ujaam i duwe kg 

0. Dodtenhudaner Sh. 30 

D-2000 Hamburg 55 
x Tel: Wert Germany 

* 10) 4086 36 27 

" Telex 2173509 LUP D 

3 

|| GREECE | 



fc—BHrl 1 iB (,'■ ■■owd 


-| ITALY _ | 

y 

j||§§l 

NEAR COMO - WGANO, attraefoe 
new ttoartments 110 tqir.. 2 bed- 
rooms. 2 bathroomL colon, central 
heating, garages, m boariiful ullage 
setting I hour Man. 5 mnutes 
Ouoaa Amiable now fa seta or 
rent. TeL MJai 02 / 707761 1 


MONACO K 

PRINOPAUTY OF 1 

MONACO » 

MQ5T EXCEPTIONAL 
fa* new penthouse with breathtaking 
sea B. mountam mew, large solan, iving 
+ (finmg room. 5 bedrcorra, 5 baths, 2 
guests toilets, fully equipped kitrfm 
very large gcrden/lerracE. 3 poring 
spaces. 7 ceflan. In condemnum: ten- - 
ttoosurt, heated pool and dddrens * 
ptawound. 

JOHN TAYLOR 6 SON 

20. Bd. dei Mou&m 
! MONTE CARLO. 

Tel: (93) SO 30 70 

Tbq 469180 MC 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


MONACO 


MONTE CARLO 
Prinapalify of Monaco 


SQ1ING VHIY EXCOTIONAL 
APARTMS4T 


sea wew. harbor, 180 sqnt 
spaa, entrance, reception. 3 


blinds. 


Selling price F5J0OJXXL 
USVfc Ad 


B.P. S4 
MC 98001 MONACO CHXX 


Teh (93) 50 66 84 
ll*j 469477 


MONTE CARLO 

SUPERB 3/4 ROOM APARTMBfT 


ecst. located on an up 


equipped kitchen. 2 parking spaas. 
EXCUJSIVE SALE: 


AGQ)I 

26 bis, Bd Princesse Gnlotte 

MONltCAHLO - MC 98000 


MONACO TeL (93) 50 66 00 
a 479 417 MC 


Telex: 


MONTE CARLO 
Principality of Monaco 

enter near Cauna, teah dass 
sffinq lovelv 2 -room, 110 sqjn 


XCUJS1VE AGENCE WTBMEDIA 
B.P.54 

MC 98001 MONACO CBSX 


Tel: i|Mh° 66 84 


469477 


I FUJiiww iiMvwn 

regubriyi Whv not invest ma modem 
fiAy equipped studio hi lhe 


heCTt of 

aty. Make the best of your money 
today Le Martagne - located juw 2 
nxm. away ham the casino afters 
good opportunities. Le Montague, 
SlC 98000 ■ Monte Carta. Tetfcfl 
50.63X17. Tlx 470 02Z 


REAL ESTATE 

FOR SALE 

MOROCCO 

MOROCCO 

Tmgiere 

Beautiful vAa on 3000 sqm. 
Spectacular views. Lamfcoaped gar- 
dens Great value at $185,000. Write 
RAP, 99 Plain Ave., New EodwBe, 
NY 10801 or phone (914) 576401 f. 

PARIS & SUBURBS 

SACRE COEUR 

Burltfing - dl comfatv 

Siucto & renovried 2-rooms. 

TeL 704 38 91 





NHJ 1 LLY, VICTOR HUGO. Charming, 
modem 60 sqm, solan, 1 betfioom, 
bosh & kitchen, cupboards, balcony 
on garden. TeL 647 45 18. 




SPAIN 


NEW ZEALAND 


Matu Boa Island US$50JDOO. Write: 
Mr. BJ. Bolt. Sdxxiwweg 107, 2243 
BP Wassenar ! Netherlands 


TK OFF FROM YOUR FRONT - or 
kitchen doort in Guodo l mma Golf 
Mortoefla, we have fa rent or trie. 
v#a incomparably nice Hat* town ■ & 
penthouses with ocean view, rote sur ■ 
raundngs ft international residents 
aoun d. happjy Irving lhe easy Guo- 
da™>o-way-of-lite. Infamatxin: 
fROMOTl* - Apartado 118 - Mar- 
brfa ■ Sptsn Tfo 77610 OTlIfl F."The 
BEST Propery People" 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SPAIN 


BCA ESTATE 
Lrnury villa/ ranch, vriley setaug - ann- 
ate privacy, 40-acre property mduda 
_ maurtani, pine foreds. mognScen 
views, 5.400 jqit. man house, teepboe 
in every room, 4^00 iqft. Oependerv 


c«m, centfa heormfl. m<6ndtan- 


ed, teletjhtxie. 60 x 3T It. swa — ira 
pool bathhouse, sun terraces, 6500 h. 
of terraced stor»<etaniiig weft, 10- 
ocre flat land in perfect aiSvaliav Erri 
orchards, gadens + axoeswriyafaun- 
cfae water, at new construction. Pace 


USSVSQjObO Contact J : G. 


120. Madrid 


greden. 18- roam, mahic Boors, + 
mast 


t3*h century historic castle, goodsnv 
dmon, with guard-house & stdUes. + 
292 acres or first ckas irrigated tad. 
Double river floatage. ™ located S 
miles inland from world famous Costa 
Brava, with airport 8 yacht harbort- 
nearby. Estate located m vofey, abeo^ ' 

Lite privacy. Brochure upon request. 

dews From owner. 04 34-72-56to9, 
Mr. James. Box 280, Herald Tnbun^ 

P. Terora 8-6D, Modnd 


COSTA Da SOI INVESTMENT 
6 ACRES, 500 FT BEACH 


nniiniurv|AJIi U lina. *YUW i MB. 

rridty retwby Hotei/DevtJopwn* 
S30WM0. K. Kantgesser . Pain de Stoe 


06800 Gagnes sur Ate, France: 
TeL P3) 


: (93) 22 9 98 


17lh century house fu#y restored, ter- 


USS 190000. Write AfcGtae 44. Eue 
du Rtx de Siale. 75004 Pari, or ad (1) 
278 2936 


hrttahed house, 7 bedrooms, 3 batie, 

2 -car garage, bori garage, i*ed ac- 

cess to sea, large terraces over me 
sea. 3 rivs ble parks. S420.000. Bax 
1757, Herald Tribune, 92521 NmSly 

Ci-drx, Ft CTree. i 

ITl ITM &1 Unll A mil lUtBQ'te 


25 acres of lard with 
and mount on view. 


'-tot 


grojeri^xce^ted. FI, 300 ,000- Ti 


PAGE 15 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


HOLIDAYS and TRAVEL 


LOW COST FLIGHTS 


USA 


Anywhere to a ny where 
in USA on BRAMHF £95 


£119 

£160 

£ 2)2 

£195 


NEW YORK 


FI 990 ONE WAY 


rdam fa NYC, Cheapo. LA. 
H STOUR - Tel.- 260 40 MTfcw) 


West Coast 


Y SI 50. Everyday N.Y. - 

$139. Para 22 93 9a 


HOUDAYS & TRAVEL 




lor foe* 268991 fa 


!, London SW3, UK. 

oei of b creb ouB fa 
wfing 


HOUDAYS & TRAVEL 


CHAJTns A YACHT M GREECE Dr- 

led hom owner of Ictqbi fleet. 
Ameneon rrtanoaemorV Excehni 


21-2000. USA offices: Rr Road, Am- 
' — &41 1624. 


bier. PA 19002. TeL 215 641 


HUNT SPAIN! 
CAZATUR 

„ CONTACT: MR. CARRION 
Ta 2759699 TUI 27802 (Madrid) 


naVAlE WATWGBFSONT, old atav 
tatan hojaes m quel southeast fishing 
viBagejTwo to twelve guests $1,295 
to $4 200 per week. A corned UnwBr- 
j*y Hotel Management Coop faftly. 
tos & Ataneure, Boa Afley. Afonm- 
dna, yirgnm 22314. 


VIST PARIS 6 SURROUNDING court- 

•rysxfc a special way, in comfal uU e 
»■. chouflwjr guide, speaks 
Engfah. SparisK French. Ongmd rtirv 
eranes. al day. FI. 200. 3 pemte mn- 
""um. Judy & EduCTda UP 9187. 


For 


HOLIDAY 6 TRAVEL ADS 


PLEASE TURN TO 
PAGE 6W 
M THE WSCBft) SECTION 


ENGLAND-5US5EX 6 KENT, private 
hmties, bttt/breakfiast. snfal hoseb. 
A* erranaemen ts mcd*. Call Diana 
(0)580 200624 


SOU7HWKT IRBAND, becgtiful 
Gwygan House, grounds to wo, resi- 
rtx*. many amewtiec, sa^nq 

eta. TeL 03&77 693 (UK) 


boar etc.' 


BROOME PARK GOLF COUNTRY 

Qub CaitebCTy 2 weeks time shexe 
srie/renl. ieL (&« 561763 eras. UK 


HHIAS YACHTING. Yacht Onters. 

Aeodemws 28, Alhas 10671, Greece. 


HOTELS 


FRANCE 


PAMS - Plaza Mtaftetw **'NN. 10 

Ara. E. Zola. 1-2-3 room flats, baih, 
krtchw. fndge. Tel: 577 72 DO. 


GREAT BRITAIN 


BW PLAZA HOTEL LONDON - 
Kerwn^on; fast uruabon far buskin 1 ,. ~J 
and pleasure. Al rooms bath f da* 
er / TV / telephone / radio / hair 
dryer, etc. Restaurant / far / sauna j 
manage. Singles £30. dourim Wl 
mdusive English breakfast, service 8 
jw- *8 Queen's Gate. London SW7. 

TeL 01-3706111. TT»: 916228. 


DWSCOli HOUSE. 200 single roams. 

TeL 01 703 4175. 


J ' ■ 
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GREECE 


USJ12 FBI PStSQN, FBI DAT 


«***"^fa^br egfiref. eta 


„ HERA 

9 FaLrau Athens 
An anrodiwB new ackfitton to the 
Athens Kene Witten ivxnuies of the 
't Fu9y ou conditioned 
1 5T1M GH TeL 9236682 


HOLLAND 


SAVEHOTH-erpemes. Rent g defa 
ntf. 5130/wFC«i. Komoy Aparmef& 
NZ Voorburcpral 63. 1017® Anniet' 

dam, Tel: B5l3)iaurn 2&-2&593Q 


U&A. 


BEDFORD HOTa New York Cry 118 

fte 40 Si„ N.Y. 10016 (Between Pa* 

& tongtan Aves.) A small hotel ri a" 
weal location., featuring hfit 
egapaed fatcheneties. Smgie SW 



■i '•••.'