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The Global Newspaper 
Edited in Paris 
Printed Simultaneously 
in Paris, London, Zorich, 
Hong Kong, Singapore, 

The Hague and Matsetile 

WEATHER DATA APPEAR ON PAGE U 

No. 31,719 ~~ 


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INTERNATIONAL 




Published With The New York Tones and The Washington Post 

~ ZURICH, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1983 


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French- U.K, Dispute 
Imperils New Fighter 


By Axel Krause 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — A deadlock between 


that were stoned at a meeting of 
defense ministers From the five gov- 
ernments in Madrid in July. 

“We are still stuck on fundameo- 


French and British aerospace com- ^ issues . Hard ban-amine lies 
paiues threatens to block plans for during the n«Tseveral 


wilding a I newEuropean combat said i senior French de- 

plane in the 1990s, West Europe’s feose p i„ n ,>mp official. 

ZLZ???^/; 8b,er ' bUildiDS “This pr^t is a major and new 

SssfSfess 53SSS 

ship * finanong and production. ^S'^^^questions.^ 
In an effon to nsolve the dts- ±c West German diplomat said, 
agreements, which have emerged “Right now ii looks very difficult." 
during the last several months of ^ ^ mmW Madrid 
fttsibihty studies senior defense ^dng did resolve several dis- 
of finals from the participating puICSi Sich as the need to equip the 
governments, Frano^Bmam, West fighter with a new engine, and it set 
Germany, Italy and Spai* plan to ^ wdghl of ^ ai abool 95 

mat in Pans on March 11 metric Sos (about 10J short tons). 


plane in the 1990s, West Europe's 
most ambitious fighter-building 
program in IS years. 

The dispute includes the sharing 
of responsibility for design leader- 
ship, financing and production. 

In an effon to resolve the dis- 


mal in Paris on March 11 


n» AnbooM Fiat 


The U.S. secretary of defense, Caspar W. Weinberger, left, and the West German defense 
minister, Manfred Womer, inspected a surface-to-air missile in Giessen on Monday. 

U.S. Missile Plan Aims to Penetrate 
Any Defenses Moscow Gin Devise 


By Bill Keller 

wASHTNGTOfT 1 -?whii c the Wemberger Tries 

To Allay Bonn’s 

clear rmssBa impotenL a smaU Air rr rrr 

Force program is trying to assure ffiflTS 011 1 TOOUS 

that U.S. nuclear missiles never , 

meet the same fate. Umud Pren 

The project, called the Advanced GIESSEN, West Germany 
Strategic Missile Systems program, — Sf*nse Secretary Caspar 
would get a sharp increase in funds w - Weinberger countered En- 
in President Ronald Reagan’s bud- ropean fears Monday that an 
gPL The money would be used to cx P eosive space-based defense 
design and test advanced decoys. wouW forcc **» United 

zig-zagging warheads, and other States to cut its conventional 
devices designed to sneak past any foros abroad. . 

defense the Soviet Union can de- Weinberger said after 

ve ]op conferring with the West Ger- 

Tb some scientists and defense “ dcfense Man&ed 

analysts outside the government, W&ner, that the anti-missile 
the work of this office weakens the defense system could be fi- , 

case for Mr. Reagan’s proposed oanced witboit saving money 

space-based missile defense pro- by ratting U A troop strength, 

gram, called the Strategic Defease The defense secretary, who is : 
Initiative on a European trip to rally sup- 

The adminis tration says it hopes f «* “ e btitiative, 

that with the development of iS- “d there would be no reduc- 
able anti-missile defenses, both H 0 ?., 10 ^ troo P 5 

rides would agree to reduce their - West Gennany. 

arsenals of offensive missiles: ’ " 

But critics of the space-defense 

proposal point to measures already at Norton Air Force Base, in Cali- 


was established by Britain, West 
Germany and Italy in 1969. The 
_ ■ _ - ■ _ new project involves building a 

| XP minimum of 1,000 planes that 

could generate about S30 billion in 
s orders for the European industry. 

y| I The first deliveries are planned for 

The total cost of developing the 
is berause most of the money for ^ plane b estimated by aero- 
the missile systems project is sprat ipae e industry sources at $2 bihion 
trying to defeat techniques the t £s3 billion. 

Russians are known to have devel- ^ disagreements over the 
oped that theynught put m place in pj^ primarily between Avions 

? e ^ to ® Dassault-Bn®iei Aviation 

based drfense, on the other hand, is and British Aerospaa PLC. both 
a -S we T 1 ? 1 ® project to develop pos- s iaie-coniroDed companies, have 
sible defenses well into the neat reduced the chances of the project's 

ce lj!J 1I Y- . , success, industry and government 

The missile systems program de- somces have said in recent inler- 
signs and tests devices for the air The sourcts declined to be 

force, army, and navy, and then identified 
passes them aiong to the individual The reason for reluctance of 


The Europran Fighter Aireraft ^ earlier mating, ihe air forces 
piqject would be die largest Euro- ^ ^ five governments agreed that 
pean aen^ace venture srna the Ac fi& h ler Should be a Sgle-seat, 
Tornado fighter-bomber pnp twin-ragine. short takeoff and 



the fighter should be a single- seat, 
twin-engine, short takeoff and 
landing plane designed for aerial 
combat as well as bitting targets on ^ A *“ x * ed ^ 

the ground. PresMent Reagan and King Fahd at WMte House ceremony. 

The Netherlands said last fall 
that it was planning to join the 

project with the intention of replac- T) p If Tl 1 f 

ing its General Dynamics F-16s nfi flDRH t 1 fTI rAllfl 

with about 230 of the new fighters 1 ' jauo vu 411111 

in the late 1990s. But Dutch offi- m . -- 

To Bring Arabs to Talks 

month’s mating before making a ^ 

commitment. The Associated Press King Fahd said he welcomed the 

According to current plans, WASHINGTON — President opportunity to meet with Mr. Rea- 
some 800 of the new European Ronald Reagan challenged King gan and to have a discussion that 


President Reagan and Kong Fahd at White House ceremony. 

Reagan Gills On Fahd 
To Bring Arabs to Talks 


The Associated Press King Fahd said he welcomed the 

WASHINGTON — President opportunity to meet with Mr. Rea- 


Dollar 
Hits New 
Records 

Pound at $1.09; 
2,000 Barrier 
Broken in Milan 


The Associated Press 

LONDON — The UA dollar 
continued breaking records Mon- 
day. reaching new highs against the 
British, French and Italian curren- 
cies. The pound fell below $1-10 for 
the first time on London markets, 
dipping more than a cent to SI. 096 
in late trading. 

Foreign exchange dealers attrib- 
uted the dollar’s continued rise to 
political stability and robust eco- 
nomic activity in the United States, 
and to a lack of alternatives to Lhe 
U.S. currency. 

“Undoubtedly, the dollar re- 
mains the favorite investment cur- 
rency,” said a dealer in Frankfurt. 

The pound, regarded as a petro- 
currency because of Britain’s 
North Sea reserves, stabilized 
somewhat last wok as the oQ mar- 
ket solidified, but it sank Friday to 
a record low of 51.1105 and kepi 
dropping Monday. 

In late trading in Milan, the dol- 
lar broke 2,000 lire Monday for the 
first time, reaching 2,003.80 at the 
fixing, compared with 1,995 Fri- 


oviuw TOW UI un, LUIUUUil ivuiiuiu nwgoii uuiuuiruj IUUK ^ mil , , n-- . 

fighters would replace McDonnell Fahd of Saudi Arabia on Monday “will bring benefit to the Middle fh* dollar was fixed 

Douglas F-4 Phantoms in West to use his “considerable influence” East and to all our mutual inter- al , fT®?™ "? nc * , fc 


Germany and Spain, British- in the Moslem world to get direct ests.' 
French Jaguars in those two corn- negotiations started between Israel M 
tries, Dassault-Breguet Super Eten- and its Arab neighbors. brinj 


early New York trading the dollar 


Mr. Reagan told King Fahd that bitched to 10-franc barrier. 


dards and Mirage fighters in But King Fahd, re 
France and Lockheed 104s in Italy, bic in ceremonies at 


in Ara- 


b ringing about peace in the Middle 
East “wflJ require courage, inlegri- 


passes tnera along to tne inaivjduai -rh* f«r t h«. rMiu-mw rt r Li , 'T a 1U IUU >- DIC m ceremonies at me start or a V*®! wisdom.” The president said . _ M . ^ 

services for to costlier business of JS^SrtKfTSh- SS iiSSli! n^«»t,raidi. ^np .0 to 


The U.S. currency was at its 
highest in at least 13 years against 
the Deutsche mark, reaching 


engineering and adapting them for will probably take a mating of the 
particular missiles. ministers themselves to break the 

Almost everything that the mis- ^nirv-v which is embarrassing, 
sile systems program and its dvil- and until they start talking openly; 
ran contractors do is htghlydasa- no one wants to be out front, at 


SprobabNtoLea^thmSr^ compete in export markets United States to lend its efi 
SSK teJSSSHL 1 !*! 8 -PP^oftbePalestinians. 


efforts in shown such traits. 


fighters being developed by the support of the Palestinians, whom “Together our considerable in- 
United Stales, which could gener- he called “victims of uniust aaares- 311(1 raoral suasion can de- 

. 1 . .km.) inn .Jdihi...! f.. ■ M J nwrnllulhmf nfnMr-lir Dax>_ 


fied, but some details were 
provided by air force officials and 
outsiders familiar until the pro- 
gram. 

.Most of the increase proposed 


least not for attribution,” a senior 
West German diplomat said. 

A failure by ministry officials to 
agree on the plan would represent a 
major setback to Europe's growing 


ate about 200 additional orders for rion.” crease the threat of war,” Mr. Rea- 

Greeting the king on the South .. . , . 

The new fighters would be “the Lawn of the White House. Mr. If the Saudi and Amencan gov- 
latest example of Europe going it Reagan said, “The security of Isra- er Pf^ n | s focus Uie V' ener f ies ’ hc 
alone. It is a definite challenge to el and other nations of the region “jj < ^. be T de, . CS Ef 

U.S. leadership in a critical area of and the legitimate rights of the Pal- aa ^ “ lni SP n,1 g djsp utc 
high technology,” said a senior ex- estinian people can and should be tw ®® n fj® 


seven-year high against the Swiss 
franc, at 2.7883 in late trading 
Monday, a g ainst 2.766 late Friday. 

Tokyo financial markets were 
dosed for a national holiday. The 
dollar was quoted in Europe at 
260.70 yen. compared with 26030 
yen late Friday in Tokyo. 


high technology,” said a senior ex- 


for the 1986 fiscal year, air force ( Jg rls ^ establish aerospace nrc£ ecutivc °f 3 leading U.S. aerospaa addressed in direct negotiations, 
officials said, would pay for re- mme ^ «i». - company. It is involved in devdop- frtIA thu Irina that “if !e tir 


officials said, would pay for re- 
search into advanced “pmetration 
aids” to help U.S. missiles reach 
their targets. 


ams in competition Vrith the * company- U ^yotved m cfenrelop- 
n : IM i c,„,^ tng a*i advanced tactical fighter for 

Copies of successful toV-S^r Force, riso foe to IsLc 


A senior U3. official said before 
the talks that the Saudi Arabians 


ventures include the deciMcfi*- 


auw nuwu hj i w i uw . uitu I - . - , -n__— : i-.j f i r : • " *"*■■**—•' ■uwoivuj. 

arsenals of offensive missiles: ' 1 T^^sei^iude etouds ioiwire rats, onade last month by the European 

But critics of the space-defense - caU “. d ^ rr ; 33(1 ^i-rdlaung Space Agcnc y 10 expand its 

proposal point to measures already at Norton Air Force Base, in Cali- aeTOSO j 331 SP, 1156 611 sen ~ manned spaa program and agree- 
devised by the missile systems pro- fornia, is to rise to $174 million in JP? tnma nsachcd earlier this month 

gram as evidence that, as defensive the fiscal year starting Ocl 1 and to r t “ e Pf' s a baj'hng m >duplic- by ^^3] member countries of the 


tiw v.'-S. Ar Force, also for the late 1 5 1 L ^ ? fM>re , a S Bre ^ vcposture . ^ in getting 

I.99G-.; “Pic chances of collaborai- JyjS 10 a KW , and happ,CT 


ing with our European NATO al' 


Palestinians now that the U.S. elec. 


lies again, as we did on the F-16, .. rg* rluSi" 
are about nil al least for right j? 31 

now " he jwMpd Reagan s call for talks with Israel. 


gram as evidence that, as defensive the fiscal year starting Ocl 1 audio 
systems are developed, offensive |2 16 million in the following fiscal 
systems win be developed to dr- year from $98 million this year, 
cum vent them. Thai is a small amount com- 


now," be added. 

Failure to resolve the deadlock 


ity of targets; and “defense sup- 
pression systems” that home in on 


North Atlantic Treaty Organiza- 
tion for joint construction of a new 


SiUmmSE reedy jo to Oval Office to begin Arabrito" 


five-nation group trying to < 


their discussions. 


XSSti henT * TThTSliKih Whiioddawytaio SSutapiff- the new fighter, US. and Europ 

Accottfing to the proposed mib- pared with the S3.7 billion aHocai- S. The deadlock over the new fight- SSSlIf 3"^ 

tary budget, the missile systems ed next year for research on the ®° e ^ 111051 a< * ance(1 ^ er results from disagreements that bnghten prospats of a oollabt 

program, whose headquarters are space-based defenses. In part that (Continued on Page 2, CoL 6) emerged during feasibility studies (Continued on Page 2, CoL 5) 


A^uToffidi SdWore ■ Uttie Intervention Detected 
the talks that the Saudi Arabians No major antral bank activity 
would like Mr. Reagan “to take a in foreign exchange markets was 
more aggressive posture" in getting detected Monday, Reuters report- 
Israel to make concessions to the ed from London, quoting Europe- 
Palestinians now that the U.S. elec . an traders, 
tion is over. Traders were awaiting reports 

“That’s all well and good," the from the monthly mating of cen- 
official said. "But the key to it is to tral bankers Monday at the Bank 
have someone to talk to on the for International Settlements in 
Arab side.” Switzerland, where the dollar’s 

However, another U3. official strength was expected to be high on 
said that there was virtually no the agenda. The bankers apparent- 
hope that King Hussein of Jordan ly took no action, however, 
or Yasser Arafat, the leader of the The Bank of England $old“mod- 
Palestine Liberation Organization, crate" amounts of dollars to sup- 
would agree on a way to negotiate port the pound, a dealer said, but 


King Fahd gave no indication tion is over, 
rat Saudi Arabia would heed Mr. “That’s all well and good,” the 
leagan’s call for talks with Israel, official said. "But the key to it is to 
The two leaders then went di- have someone to talk to on the 


However, another U3. official 


the new fighter. U.S. arid European “TJe main thing we seek jis] to said that there was virtually no 

industry executives said thaicould b°Pf ^ ^ Hi^sdn of Jonhm 

hri«.hii»n nmsnerK of a mlhhora- * nendstu P . ror cacb other, Mr. <* Yasser Arafat, the leader of the 
ngn prospa Reagan said at the news confer- Palestine Liberation Organization, 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 5) ence. “I am very optimistic” would agree on a way to negotiate 


Curricula in 'Disarray , 9 
U.S. College Group Says 


INSIDE 


Bv Edward B Fiskc day annual mating in Washington 
Sew York Times ' Service on Sunday, represents 560 public 

.and private research universities, 

NEW YORK — Colleges and liberal arts colleges and other insti- 
univ era ties have allowed their cur- muons with an interest in cunicu- 
ricula to slip into a state of “disar- | ura issues, 
ray” and "mcdicrencc," putting in Hie report was based on a three- 


question the quality of what US. year analysis of college curriculums 
college studraits leant, a_ major around the country. It is the latest 
higher education oiganizanon has fu a series of national reports rais- 
all^ed. ing questions about undergraduate 

In a 47-page report called Tn- education in (be country’s 3,000 
tegrity in the College Curriculum.” colleges and universties. 
the Association of American Col- In October, T.H. Bell, then secre- 
leges said Sunday that while the tary of education, made public a 
institutions seemed confident that study sponsored by the National 
a college education should take Institute of Education, the research 
four years, they were less sure arm of the Department of Educa- 
about “its content and purpose.” lion, citing “warning signals” 
The association's report reflects about the quality of higher educa- 
mounting national concern about . x , . , _ 

the quality of undergraduate edu- A month later the National En- 
catiM. It faulted faculty members dowment for the Humanities re- 
in o-hhisrtv nv leased a report saying that Amen- 



6 Israelis Meet Secretly With Arafat 


cation. It faulted faculty members “w™ 1 101 nuuHuuu** «c- 
more interested in scholarly re- lea** 1 f report saying that Amen- 
searcb than in teaching and college can colleges were failing to give 
administrators who have adopted snidents “an adequate education m 
what it called a “misguided market- the, culture and civilization of 
place philosophy” lo compete for S? 


able students. 


ihor, W illiam J. Bennett, the chair- 


“Ii is a supermarket where sm- man of the endowment, last week 
dents are shoppers and professors succeeded Mr. Bell as secretary of 

are merchants of learning,” the as- education* 

sodation said. “Fads and fashions, 

the demands of popularity and sue- graduate education comes at a time 

rc^^TacTM 

The riocunS^wed. by a 


■ Crossword fanatics play to 
win in U.S. contest P5«e3. 

■ Privately ran prisons are be- 

coming more common in the 
United Slates. Piage 4. 

ARTS/LEISURE 

■ Sauk Centre's "Main Street” 

celebrates Sinclair Lewis's 
100th birthday. Page 7. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ The British government 
blocked a 525- billion plan to 
import Norwegian gas. Page 9. 

SPORTS 

■ The Western Conference 

won over the East in the Na- 
tional Basketball Association’s 
all-star game. Page 15. 


By Dan Fisher 

Lot Angela Tima Serrice 

JERUSALEM — Six Israeli Ar- 
abs and Jews, including two mem- 
ben of parliament, have said they 
held seven hours of secret matings 
last week with Yasser Arafat, the 
leader of the Palestine Liberation 
Oiganizatioa. 

Members of the group, repre- 
senting the Progressive List for 
Peace political party, said on their 
return Sunday to Israel that Mr. 
Arafat had agreed to take up with 
the PLO executive committee their 
proposal for a "mutual cessation of 
violence” in return for U.S. and 
Israeli agreement to a United Na- 
lions-sponsored international con- 
ference on the Middle East. 

The Reagan administration and 



with Israel at least until the spring, other traders saw the hank’s action 

The official said that King Hus- 33 tnaady a smoothing operation in 
WTTn m 1 A p _ sein is determined to proceed, but a market. 

|V ITfl Al*5lTflT ‘bat Mr. Arafat is not convinced , ‘The feting is that the Fed has 

H luiiuiuai that negotiations with Israel are the hadly let down the other central 

only way to help Palestinians living banks,” said a dealer at a major 
Avneri, one of the six. Mr. Avneri, under Arab control. U.S. bank in London. He was refer- 

a magazine publisher, is co-chair- Secretary of State Georae P 10 3 va S ue statement last 

man of the Progressive List for Shultz said in a television interview month by the finance ministers of 
’ Monday that the discussions with *e United States. Jamn. Bntain, 
The delegation s meetings with - - - - - - ~~ — ^ 


nng to a vague statement last 
month by the finance minis ters of 


statement last 


, . . . ' Monday that the discussions with U ^ ted s '* v *' 

The delegation s meetings with King Fahd would cover “the whole West . Gennan y 33(1 France sup- 
Mr. Arafat are expated to create a strategic situation in the Mideast P ortm 8 concerted intervention 
political stir m Israel which does ^ certainly about the peace pro- where necessar Y 03 foreign ex- 


Britain, 


not recognize him or his organiza- 
tion as a legitimate negotiating 
partner. 

“Nobody is going to like it.” said 


cess. 

Asked how long the United 
States could “sit on the sidelines” 
in the Mideasi peace process. Mr. 


a source dose 10 Prune Minister Shultz said: “We're not on the side- 
Shimon Peres. _ _ lines by any means. We're very ac- 

JA Justice Ministry spokesman rive _ buDdiqg the Modes that are 
said that Israd’s altornqr general necessary to put in place for an 
has ordered an investigation to de- active negotiation to tafrt* place, 
tennine whether the group could be whether that be in Israd or whether 
prosecuted for meeting with Mr. j t be in the Arab states. After all, 
Arafat, Reuters report&i from Td [jfj wc ' re going to get someplace in 
Aw. Israeli law forbids contact the peace process, an Arab negotia- 
with foreign agents and provides tor has to sit down with an Israeli 
for a maximum penalty of 15 years negotiator.” 


imprisonment. 


Mr. Shultz also described Ihe 


region, the Slate Department had Uri Avneri 

tionVrep^ SUndfly ° nlheddeSa them within the next few days in- *** °° derstan *^SS-" 

The group, including Maiityahu formation on four Israeli soldiers U1, ^J-P King Fahd arrived in Washing- 

Peled and Mohammed Miari who missing in action in Lebanon. ™,T t lon 011 Sunday. He was scheduled 

are members of the Knesset, or “We hope that within one week iESL2?S?iLI* 10 meel wilh ^ Rea S an ' Mr - 

parliament, said that Mr. Arafat we shall submit this information m believed to be me largest trom isra- and Secretary erf Defense 

promised to make available to the government of Israel,” said Uri (Continued on Page 2, CoL 7) Caspar W. Weinberger. 


[The spokesman raid the six coming U.S. -Soviet talks on the 
could be prosecuted “unless there Mideast as being designed to share 
is a reasonable explanation for the information and to “avoid misun- 
conduci or proof that there was no ders landings.” 
intrat to ham security/'] King Fahd arrived in Washing- 


changes. 

The deala said a debate was go- 
ing on within the Federal Reserve 
Board in the United States over 
whether to allow the dollar to re- 
main high to finance the huge U.S. 
budget deficit, or to intervene to 
help European partners. 

Lack of commitment by central 
banks has encouraged speculation 
on a higher dollar, dealers said. 

“There’s absolutely no chance of 
a cut in UJC. base rates until at 
least next month," a dealer said. 
The base lending rates were in- 
creased 4h points, to 14 percent, 
last month in an effort to support 
the British currency. 

Some dealers said the British 
government’s intention to go ahead 
with tax cuts in its budget next 
month was seen as bad news by 
some foreign investors, who would 
prefer tighter British monetary po- 
licy. 


40 Years Later, Many Poles Remain Bitter About Yalta Poet 

By Bradley Graham “ to create democratic institutions of their must be "above suspicion, just as things tion in the accords or accompanying notes the matter, since the Red Army occupied 

r- own choice.” were with Caesar’s wife." Replied the Sovi- of the establishment of Communist and the entire country. 


the participants, and that reverberates loudest way Caesar’s wife 

S/ C S „ d ? fea ^ to this day, was what to do about Poland, reality even she w 

Warsaw’s national theater is featuring a tk m it « o— w. n «si 


wasn’t without sins.” chill secured from Stalin a promise to bold n .®* borders were drawn. The eastern fron 


riT J-.LI-.1 ~~ r n t , arai t Hu o schools. In two to three years, most Rv Rradlrv Graham 10 create democratic institutions of their must be "above suspicion, just as thing! 9 on m the accords or accompanying notes 

m s^lcgaimresliavcc^mdbUU owachoio.” with CWs wife.” RqjlirithcSog of He Btablita™ ofCommunia ^6 

panel of IS etfuratore, ranging from stiffer requirements n/ADCAW . fnr But the issue that most absorbed the el chief, also with a smile: “That’s the only non-Communist spheres of influence. 

for hi^ school graduation to merit t u^i^ A a ^ ca a ri reverberates loudret way Caesar’s wife was spoken about, but in To the contrary. Roosevelt and Chur- 

pay^Sns for teachers. ifLnir^fa to this day, was what to do about Poland, reality even she wasn’t without mtT chiti soured from Stalin a promise to bold 

as well as in “integrity in the CoU^e Currie- iSffSL* 111616 ^ a Franklin D - Roosevelt, Most Poles sail feel embittered about in Poland "free and unfettered elections as 

1.1 j iroi - uhun rt said that improvement of two months before his death, rurmnating in what came out of Yalta. Even four decades soon as possible on the baas of universal 

Stion«*eSentaryand 3 ^«oia about how the Polish issue has later, Westeruera often are scolded by Po- suffrage ™ secret balloL" 

Jmumum ^mredcrarwalim ^ was w M^da^rea of Eastern Europe to been “giving the world headaches for the lish friends for what is remembered here as tj T Out Western Dowers aareed to 

Ser^ndanls at the college lev- Soviet htsemony. past five centuries.” a senoui ^ the United Slates and Britain %mSSwSSff£ 

^ arts and prefoaorud d.Tte report said, “In the end, the The play’s dialogue is authentic, drawn There is a rotund and hearty Winston to the Soviet Union. This resentment runs SjSSd m^SemiOi^reidme Installed 

Ifidr* ’ quality ^American life is at stake, from Russian, British and U.S. accounts of Churchill, whiskey glass in hand, dung as a kind of countercurrent to the dotni- ^ ^ Unicmm^W^Lh was to 

Ste ^demand humanity of our the we^-longCr^su^tcq^er. Britain’s decision to go to war against Hit- nant pr^Westera sentiments among the g bSSbytiie Xttoo^r Sh 
00U s anoflS teadere, our ability as dtizens to ence, which ended Feb. II, 1945 .Aarnst a ler after the attack on Poland and masting people of this Commimist-managed stale, “democratic leaders” from made Poland 
democratic Ci tiz e ns . I ■ ■ ■* J IwMmn nf mnfffMce nhfllnt Fl.l!ihMl nn rhai ns n rvwrl nf hnnnr Piilanrl h#» m»Hf> n.i-i .1 ■ • • 


the entire country. 

Also upsetting for Poles, then and now, 
was the manner in which their country’s 


al arts and proessionauOTjKow d. The report said, “In the end, the The play’s dialogue is authentic, drawn There is a rotund and hearty Winston to the Soviet Union. This resentment nms £ the DUDDei regime installed it was agreed thM the Poles would be 

ktIt* quality crfAmerican life is at stake, from Russian, British and U.S. accounts of Churchill, whiskey glass in hand, dong as a kind of countercurrent to the donri- bv the Soviet Unionrn 1944wLh was to “’“P 61153161 * ^ Gentian lands for the 

mnmg tneu promise ^ ^^dom and humanity of our the week-long Crimean summit confer- Britain’s decision to go to war against Hit- nant pro-Western sentiments among the hmadened bv the addition or Polish l£ITll0T,es lost to the Russians. But unable 

j humans and th«r obligations leaders, our ability as dtizens to erwe, which ended Feb. H, 1945. Against a ler after the attack on Poland and insisting people of this Communist-managed stale, “d-mneratic leaders" Trom made Poland 10 03 ww western and northern b<»-- 

that the aake informed choices, and the backdrop of conferena photos flashed on that as a pomt of honor, Poland be made The Polish authorities, in contrast to the M d abroad. for ^ T^ee postponed 

*5? “^1 air dedication with which we exhibit the stage, the reenacted conversations pro- “free and independent." But he acknowl- pop^ mood, applaud the Yalta accords „ theissue umii the Poisdam Conferena five 

humane and democratic values as vide poignant images of the Big Three edg« the Soviet interest in having a War- ^exSiKeroower cooperation Bin as wtspn^S^ should my. mtmthslau r. 


study” were literacy, which com- 
prises writing, reading, speaking, 
and lis tening ; understanding nu- 
merical data; historical conscious- 
ness; science; values; art; interna- 
tional and multicultural 


ic and democratic values as woe potgnam images 01 me mg 1 nree euges me soviet interest in navmg a war- 35 ^ example of superpower cooperation * Z u*>au*uua. 

about our daily lives.” deli berating over the fate or Europe. saw government that would not conspire servine trace in Fnmnp “ ave P 601 131611 31 WOI(L . &awet it an haj^xaied over our heads,” said 

— .... . .. . ■ C»*ninhl ffflTK ClWI HfOJin nrrKtlflfr Arid Tamr Vruumixlrt rllfantAP « 


concerned about mounting evt- binding postwar Europe were set at tne the virtues of cooperation among the su- against German expansionism, m line wild . 

dence that undergraduate pro- Soviet Black Sea resort, including an agree- perpowers and chides "ctrtain small coun- a propaganda campaign being waged by 

grams in American colleges and menl on German reparations, plans for tries” liberated by the Russians for com- the Soviet bloc against West Germany to ^ 


January 


Krystzna Kersten, a historical rsearcher 


grams in American colleges 'and ment on German reparations, 'plans for tries" liberated by the Russians for com- the Soviet bloc agalnsl West Germany to at .® I ^j sil t J ^ dem y ^ Spences institute. 

ISKSin* » nnm nr /W^nlines- universities were afflicted by sen- control of a soon-to-be-defeated Germany, plaining that their interests were not being coincide with the 40th anniversary on May IJJJJj JJjJL. ^ Democratic aid; Most ftite wodd 12b to bdi 

Oils weaknesses.” . . a role for France in occupied Germany, a laken Sto account. 7 of the Third Reich’s surrender. Bloc a ironed 80 P««t. top** and Ouirchin could hat 

^1 snntvsK The evidence included declining voting formula for a new United Nations In one prescient exchange. Roosevelt, Actually, the West never agreed at Yalta The Western powers had left organiza- at Yalta. 

ttSa 08 AmmSn enroUments in fordgn languages organization and a pledge from the confer- discussing die prospat of elections in Po- to Soviet 'control of Poland or any other tion of the elections op to the Soviet Union, feel those two sold out," 1 

Cofieges[wK 1 ^ opened^ itsfour- (Coetimied on Page 3, CoL 2) ees to help the liberated European states land, tells Stalin with a smile that the vote pan of Eastern Europe. There is no men- although they may have had little choice in (Continued on Page % CoL 2) 


discussing ibe prospat 


J 





Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1985 


Papal Trip: No Miracles to Resolve Theological Differences 


WORLD BRIEFS 


By E.J Dionne Jr. people in Venezuela. Ecuador, Pent, and 

A'**' York Times Service Trinidad and Tobago. 

ROME — Among the burdens that Pope As the head of a church that is governed 

John Paul 11 bore during the visit to South from Europe, the pontiff oversees an orga- 
America that ended last week were those “nation that is strongest in the Third 
laid upon him by Luis Ortiz, a saksmari World and, by the year 2000, will have a 
and Maria Hernandez Soliz, a housewife, majority of its membership fa Latin Ameri- 
Others expected thoughtful or inspiring ca - 


News Aiiah 


words from John Paul during a stop in El 


Moreover, it is in Latin America where, 
from the Vatican's point of view, some of 
the most troublesome movements within 
Catholicism have taken root Most notable 


said, contains many currents. It not simply 
an intellectual movement. It is a social and 
political force that is seeking to change 
both Latin American society and the 
church itself. 

The pope spoke most clearly on the 
structure or the church. He reaffirmed that 
Roman Catholicism is a hierarchical orga- 
nization and that bishops, as be told a 
group of prelates in Venezuela, had an 


that one of the mosi disturbing aspects of V ct John Paul was just as clear in oppos- 


ite teachings of the Reverend Leonardo ing the materialism of Marxist than? ^ 
Boff, the Brazilian liberation theologian in resolutely opposing violence and “class 

H i t- i... L!. cimnnla" i., i.'Kiwp cnpinl rh-jnoe All thit 


India and Sri Lanka Discuss Tamils 


called to Rome last year to explain his 
views, is his critique of the church’s hierar- 
chy. 


struggle'* to achieve social change. All this 
can be read as an implicit criticism of the 
Sandinists in Nicaragua and the presence 


For both Father Boff and libcrationists of priests in their government. 


seen as more orthodox, such as the Rever- 
end Gustavo Gutierrez of Peru, learning 
from “the people" is one of the church's 


A difficulty is that the w ell-off insist that 
they. too. favor the poor; capitalism, they 
say. is an engine for growth. And leftist 


obligation to correct those who “proclaim essential tasks. And it is becoming facreas- Christians deny they are Marxists, espe- 


not the truth of Christ but their own theo- 


Guasmo a shamvtown slum on theatoi* nf among these is the theology of Gberatxm, 

it,* Mwmyiowii sium on tne eoge ol «neciat resoonsibilitv for the For anyone accustomed to the Roman 

the Ecuadorian city of Guayaquil But Mr. v"™. s P ec ?f I nsponsiomry tor tne . . Church before the Second Vati- 
Ortiz and Mrs Heman.-W V**rwv>nvi nn»h_ church to lift up the poor, and often advo- t-nurcn , oaore tne accona vau 

tag shmrf^rUradt ^ ^ oust radical politics as the way to do it C 0 ^ 01 - » “f"" 1 »°“. ld 

v c - unexceptionable: Bui the change in sprnt 

Things change in every country he vis- Yet at the end of the pope s 12-day tnp. fostered by the council — thegrowth in the 
its. Mr. Ortiz said with conviction, adding many questions remained unanswered, idea of the church as “the people of God" 
that no one could ignore the pope s appeals The complexities are such that, in the end, _ CTealed a strong movement toward 
on behalf of the poor. Mrs. Hernandez was though everyone will listen to the pope, as ^ sterna! freedom from the tradi- 


sure of change 
him.” 


'because I have faith in 


fagly dear that one of John Paul's goals in 
calling a bishops' synod this November to 
examine the results of the Vatican Council 
is to question just such a populist view of 
the church. 

On the subject of social action itself, 
however, the pope's words are subject to a 
much wider range of in terp relations. 

There can be no doubt that he favors far 
greater economic equality and much more 


Such was the responsibility that John 


Mr. Ortiz said, different audiences may tj ODa j hierarchical structures. attention to the poor and sees the wealthier 

choose to hear different things. in liberation theology, this is expressed countries of the North as at least partly 

The situation owes in pan to the theol- as the view of the church “from the bottom responsible for the plight of “the poor 


cialiy if being “Marxist - means accepting 
atheism. 

What remains open to question after the 
pope's visit is just what son of social action 
is permissible in the pope’s eyes and what is 
not 

He has clearly ruled out communism 
and pure Free-raarket capitalism. He thinks 
the church should side with the poor, but 


NEW DELHI (AP) — Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi met over the 
weekend with Sri Lanka’s minister for national security to discuss Sn 
Lanka’s continuing difficulties with Tamil guerrilla separatists. 

Several newspapers called the 'visit by Sri Lanka’s national security 
minister. Lalith W. Athulathmudali, “futile" and “unproductive. But 
the minister- before returning Sunday to Sri Lanka, said the talks had 
been constructive. The minister arrival in New Delhi on Saturday after 
being encouraged by the United States to seek India’s help in solving Sri 
Lanka's ethnic problem, which involves the demand for a separate nation 
by ihe minority Tamils. 

Mr. Athula thmudali said that Mr. Gandhi “well understands” Sri 
Lanka's concern and the two men had agreed to maintain “dose contact 
between our two countries at an appropriate high level” Relations 
between India and Sri Lanka have been strained by Sri Lankan assertions 
Lhat India shelters, trains and arms TamH guerrillas. India has repealed ly 
denied the allegations. 


attention to the poor and sees the wealthier does not want it to turn against the rich, 
countries of the North as at least oardv This is what he meant when he said the 


U.K. Aide Acquitted in Falklands Leak 


Paul carried as he addressed milli ons of ogy of liberation itself, which, as the pope up.” It is widely believed in the Vatican South." 


church's “preferential option for c he poor" 
should not be “exclusive or excluding." 


Egypt Falls 
Behind in 
Paying U.S. 
For Arms 


By Judith Miller 

.VfH York Times Service 

CAIRO — Egypt has fallen seri- 
ously behind in making, payments 
on its $4.5-biUion military debt to 
the United States and owes be- 
tween S2S0 and $300 million in 
interest, financial sources said 
Monday. 

The sources declined to say how 
many payments, or portions of 


they added. 
Both Eey 


Both Egyptians and Americans 
are said to be concerned that 
Egypt's delay in meeting its debt 
obligation, if protracted, could 
damage the country's credit rating 
and lead to political difficulties 
with Congress. 

“We're definitely heading for a 
major crunch." said a financial 
source who follows the debt issue 
closely. 

“Egypt’s interest payments on 
military debt almost equal its eco- 
nomic aid from the United States." 
he said. “That is clearly untenable 
for Egypt." 

Since 1978, the United States has 
committed $4.5 billion to Egypt in 
military grants, which do not have 
to be repaid, and loans, which are 
paid back at slightly below market 
interest rates. As of the end of 1984. 
S3 .7 billion of the funds were dis- 
persed. 

Most of the money the United 
Stales has provided has been in the 
form of loans, not grants. Washing- 
ton has permitted Egypt to pay 
only interest, not principal, for ibe 
the first 10 years of the loans. 
Hence, payments on principal are 
not scheduled to begin until 1989. 
At the end of the last fiscal year in 
September, Egypt's debt service on 
the loans was projected at 5375 
million to $400 million. 

This fiscal year, which began in 
October, Egypt will owe the United 
Slates an estimated $450 million in 
interest alone. 


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British-French Dispute 
Threatens New Fighter 


LONDON (UP1) — A court acquitted a senior Defense Ministry 
official Monday on charges of breaking the Official Secrets Act by 
l eakin g documents to an opposition member of Parliament about the 
sinking of an Argentine cruiser. General Belgrano, during the Falkland 
islands war. 

The jury found Clive Ponting. 38, not guilty of breaching the 1911 act, 
which forbids transmitting government information to unauthorized 


persons. Mr. Ponting headed the Defense Ministry branch directly 
concerned with naval operations and was a key adviser to Defense 
Secretary Michael HeseJtine. The verdict was unexpected. 

Mr. Pon ling's defense was that the recipient of the documents, Tam 
DalyelL a Labor member of Parliament, was an “authorized” person to 
receive the information and that it was in the interest of pie state to hand 
it over to him. Mr. Dalyell had alleged that Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher ordered the cruiser's destruction in order to derail a peace plan 
that was bring pul forward by Peru. The ship was sunk May 2, 1982. 


r * w 

7<f £ ' - - - - ' 


1 f-w- p aot > it Dacca,, it reneatedlv has insisted 11 ° ver 10 ““»• uaiyeu nan auegpa mai mme mmisier Maigare 

(Continued from Page 1) Thatcher ordered the cruiser's destruction in order to derail a peacerihu 

uve development project with the iteu among the paruapaung com The ship was sunk MavllXz. 

United Stales or it could lead to the panics, u alone is quahfied to direct 5 F " y F y ** 

outright purchase of a U.S.-made development of the new plane be- ~ , 

fighter, even though France would cause of its experience m making fcjlVOY tO rT3IlC6 Stepp ing U<yWH 

oppose such plans. and exporting its Mirage combat J MT a O 

Although industry and govern- aircraft throughout the world. PARIS (AP) — The U S. ambassador to France, Evan G. Galbraith 


and exporting its Mirage coi _ 

aircraft throughout the world. PARIS lAP) — The U.S. ambassador to France, Evan G. Galbraith, 

Dassault executives confirmed said Monday that he would leave his post in July after nearly four years in 
that the company still plans to test Paris. No replacement was announced. 

fly a demonstrator model in 1986 “It has been a unique experience, and I am grateful to Presdent 
known as the ACX. which could be Reagan for having allowed me to serve," he said in a statement released 


V/^. •’ ** . J "' . '' • 

-r : : ' 




TV* too opted Rich 


payments. Egypt had missed. But 
they said that tne pattern of arrear- 


ihey said that the pattern of arrear- 
ages became persistent about the 
middle of 1984. 

Neither Egyptian nor American 
government officials here would 
comment on the debt problem. But 
Egypt's military debt was said to be 
high on the list of Issues that Presi- 
dent Hosni Mubarak is scheduled 
to discuss with President Ronald 
Reagan and other American offi- 
cials when be visits Washington 
early next month. 

Egypt was also behind in making 
interest payments on military debt 
to France. Britain and to Spain, the 
sources said. Egyptian officials qui- 
etly re-scheduled interest payments 
on the country’s military debt to 
China during a recent visit there. 


From left, Andreas Papandreou, Nikolai A. Tikhonov and Andrei A, Gromyko. 


Papandreou Might Meet With Chernenko 


Rearers 

MOSCOW — Prime Minister Andreas Papan- 
dreou of Greece began a three-day visit to Moscow 
on Monday and Western diplomatic sources said 
that it was possible that President Konstantin U. 
Chernenko might make his firsL appearance in 
public for six weeks to meet him 

They said that Kremlin aides had said that Mr. 
Chernenko would hold talks with Mr. Papandreou, 
whose visit was expected to consolidate the warm 
relationship between Greece's Socialist govern- 
ment and Moscow. 

Mr. Chernenko, 73, last appeared in public on 
Dec. 27 and officials have acknowledged that he 
was in poor health. The meeting with Mr. Papan- 
dreou was scheduled for Tuesday afternoon. 

[A Greek Embassy spokesman' said that it might 
be early Tuesday before it was clear if a meeting 
would be held. United Press international report- 
ed!. 


Prime Minister Nikolai A. Tikhonov and For- 


eign Minister Andrei A. Gromyko greeted Mr. 
Papandreou at the airport. It was his first visit here 
since he took office in October 1981. 


Mr. Papandreou s government has distanced 
Greece from the positions of tbe North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization, to which it belongs. Greece 
did not support the deployment in Europe of U.S. 
cruise and Perahing-2 missiles and is committed to 
removing U.S. nuclear weapons and military bases 
from its soil as well as eventually pulling out of 
NATO. Mr. Papandreou angered Washington by 
failing to condemn the imposition of martial law in 
Poland and the Soviet intervention in Afghanistan. 


His endorsement of Moscow's explanation that 
the South Korean airliner shot down in 1983 by 
Soviet fighters was on a spying mission and his 
statements critical of U.S. policies have prompted 
charges that he is anti-American. 


meat officials rate the chances of a 
trans-Atlantic project at dose to 
zero. Northrop Corp. of the United 
States and Dontier GmbH, a West 
German aerospace company, have 
been studying join t development of 
a tactical fighter for German v in 
the 1990s. called the ND-IQ2. Simi- 
larly. other leading U.S. aerospace 
companies have had regular con- 
tacts with their counterparts in 
Britain, Italy and Spain. 

“We have proven with our earlier 
projects, such as the Airbus. 
Ariane. new jointly built helicop- 
ters. weapons systems and our new 
space program that European co- 
operation is the best solution." said 
an official of a West German aero- 
space company, “so these meetings 
must make progress, or European 
cooperation will be dealt a severe 
Wow." 

Although the basic conflict over 
the new European fighter is be- 
tween DassauU and British Aero- 
space. other manufacturers were 
described by industry sources as 
being "somewhere in between" the 
French and British positions: these 
are West Germany's Messer- 
schmiti-Bdlkow-Blohm. a privately 
owned company. Italy’s Aeritalia 
and Spain's Construcciones Aeron- 
auticas SA. also state-controlled. 


Many Poles Still Bitter About Yalta Agreement 


(Continued from Page 1) wes 
adding that she personally doubted “P; 
that the Western leaders could have * 
done anything differently. 5^ 


western borders would not bold 


Fearing attempts by West Ger- “The division of Europe is not Ms. Kersten said that it would 
many to reclaim territory ceded to the result of Yalta but of the Cold make more sense for the West to 
Poland after World War II, the War and break in cooperation be- remind the Soviet Union of the 
press agency commentary added: tween the superpowers," said Jan- provisions of Yalta — the call for 


President Ronald Reagan has agency commentary added: tween the superpowers," said Jan- provisions of Yalta — the call for 
again made Yalta a subject or inteT- “This is why Poles, in their best us Symonides, director of Po- free elections in Poland and for 
national political debate by telling conceived national interest, should 


a group of Potish-Americans last be most ardently opposed to any 
August: “We reject any interpreta- sort of revision of Yalta and Pots- 


Tbe reasons for the delay in full 
payment are not clear. Egypt has 
recorded a balance of payments 
surplus since the 1981-82 fiscal 
year. A U.S. Embassy report issued 
in October concluded that al- 
though Egypt faced “a number of 
serious economic problems, there is 
no impending economic crisis." 

But a major source of revenue — 
money sent borne by up to four 
million Egyptians working abroad 
— is believed to have peaked. Oil 
revenues have been hurt by the 
worldwide decline in oD prices. 
Suez Canal revenues, another ma- 
jor income producer, were slightly 
depressed last year by the spate of 
minin g incidents in the Red Sea 
near the canal, financial sources 
said. 


August: “We reject any inierpreta- son of revision of 
tion of the Yalta agreement that dam.” 

suggests American consent for the if balance of power in Eu- 

di vision of Europe into spheres of rope j s ever to chan 

influence.' cal experts argue t] 

But while the West tends to take 
a negative view of Yalta, seeing in • ~~ — 

its legacy the unintended division 
of Europe, the Communist East 
lakes a positive view, bolding Yalta 
up as a lesson in international co- 
operation. 

In Poland. Yalta's 40th anniver- 
sary has brought with it a flood of 
articles in the official press accus- 
ing the West of trying to distort the 
significance of the Crimean confer- 
ence. Those in tbe West now trying 
to distance themselves from the 
agreement are said to be undermin- 
ing peace and security in Europe. 

“That the Yalta and Potsdam 
agreements are permanent is best 
shown by the 40 years of peace in 
Europe, the longest such period in 
modern history of this continent, 
which distinguishes Europe from 
the rest of the world," Jerzy Urban, 
the Polish government spokesman, Sta 

said last week. 

Polish officials contend that '*7' J# ‘ 

West Germany stands to gain the X tUttl J 

roost if the present European order 
were to be undone. As a frequent n 

victim of German aggression in the WASHINGT 
past, Poland is acutely sensitive to heads of staU . ol 
any move that might boost German p Roosevelt, W 

P owcr - — met at Yalta 

“If die present political map of 1945. 

Europe were to be annulled,” said a ^ ^ 

was about to Is 

last week, then Poland, obviously Germany, press 
under a different social system, IuUy ^ £ n* 
would be seriously reduced in transferring troc 
terms of territory and would turn S talin conSrmei 
into a truncated state, since her , fl _ rrt _ 


iterest, should land's Institute of International democratic institutions throughout 
•posed to any Affairs. “Who was responsible for Europe — than to renounce the 
alta and Pots- that is another question." agreement. 

“I agree (hat Europe should be "Tfie slogan should not be: *Do 
power in Eu- more united,” he added, “but lhat awaV with Yalta,' " she said. “The 
Polish politi- is a long process, and this process, slogan should be: 'Live up to Yai- 
t it cannot be in order to take place, cannot be ta.' " 




Stalin 


Roosevelt 


Churchill 


Yalta Focused on Politics, Not War 


EXECUTIVE OFFICES, 
LONDON WI 


Fully furnished air-condi- 
tioned Executive offices at 
prestige Wl address avail- 
able immediately for peri- 
ods from one month. 


Services include: 

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* A/V Presentation Studio 

* Conference Rooms 

* Secre tarial Services 
(WP) 

* Photocopying 

Abase contact: 

Pam Farrow 
Network 
vi/l'ke 


Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — With victory near, the 
heads of state of the Big Three Allies — Franklin 
D. Roosevelt, Winston Churchill and Josef Stalin 
— met at Yalta on the Blade Sea coast Feb. 4-1 1, 
1945. 

On the military front, the Soviet Union, which 
was about to launch its final offensive against 
Germany, pressed for U 5. -British advances in 
Italy and in the west to keep the Germans from 
transferring troops to the eastern front In return, 
Stalin confirmed his pledge to declare war on 
Japan after Germany’s defeat 

Political considerations, however, took center 
stage, particularly the questions of policy toward 
Poland and the rest of Eastern Europe and what to 
do with a defeated Germany. 

It had been decided earlier that Germany would 
be divided into occupation zones. The Soviet zone 
would be east of a line 200 miles (324 idlomeiers) 
west of Berlin: the American would be in southern 
Germany: and the British would be in the north- 
west This was confirmed at Yalta, and it was 
agreed that a portion of the U.S. zone would be 
carved out for the French. 

Roosevelt and Churchill were able to elicit from 
Stalin the Declaration on liberated Europe, a 
document that affirmed “the right of all peoples to 
choose the form of government under which they 


will live." In Poland, specifically, the Allies agreed 
to “free and unfettered elections as soon as possi- 
ble on the basis of universal suffrage and secret 
balloL" 

In a secret protocol on the Far East, the three 
agreed that the independence of Outer Mongolia 
would be recognized and that the Soviet Union 
would regain southern Sakhalin Island, a leased 
naval base at Port Arthur (now Lushun, China), 
rights u> an international port at Dairen (now 
Luta, China), and participation in running the 
Southern Manchurian and Chinese Eastern rail- 
ways. all of which they bad lost in tbe Russian- 
Japanese war of 1904-05. Further, Japan was to 
cede the Kuril Islands to the Soviet Union. 

Also discussed was the United Nations Charter, 
and a compromise was reached on voting in the 
Security CounctL Stalin dropped his insistence 
that all 16 Soviet republics be granted seats in the 
General Assembly; Roosevelt and Churchill 
agreed to two in addition to the Soviet Union 
iisdf: Bdorussia and the Ukraine. 

Most of the conference protocols were not re- 
vealed until 1946. When they became public they 
drew an outcry in the United Stales from support- 
ers of Poland, Nationalist China and Germany. 

The Republican Party platform of 1952 called 
for repudiation of all commitments resulting from 


the conference. The State Department pi 
the minutes of tbe conference in the mid- 


ublisbed 



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3 Swiss Soldiers Die in Crash 


fly a demonstrator model in 1986 
known as the ACX. which could be 


a forerunner of the new fighter and bv the U.S. Embassy. Mr. Galbraith, 56. a former investment banker. 


is being financed b> France. 


British Aerospace has dismissed in conservative politics. 


would not disclose his plans, but he said he expected to play an active rote 


D assaul t’s arguments about design Mr. Galbraith has been called in three times by the French government 
leadership. “The mass ive invest- and asked to explain statements he had made. A year ago, he was taken to 
raent in the Tornado program task for saying in a radio interview that French Communists could not be 
makes it sensible for the partners to trusted because of their ties to Moscow, 
stick together, preferablv under 

JE£££SS£?3d a ££ Glemp Vows to Defend Polish Priests 

m -5, n ^ lhe tornado ts estimated at WARSAW ( Reuters) — Cardinal Jozef Glemp accused Poland’s Com- 

S20 billion through 1989. munisi authorities Monday of waging an ideological struggle against the 

The British compaov wants to Catholic Church and pledged he would defend priests threatened with 
establish what the execuuve de- imprisonment. 

scribed as a “slimmed down ver- Cardinal Glemp, the Polish primate, was sharply critical of the conduct 
sion of Panaria, the Briush-Ger- $ jj, e ^ c / security police officers imprisoned for the murder of 
man- Italian consortium that is j efZ y Popieluszko. a priest who was a strong supporter of the banned 
responsible for marketing the Tor- Solidarity labor movement. “There was an attempt to hold a trial of 
nado fighter. Father Popiduszko. not in a formal manner, but for the benefit of the 

British Aerospace and Messer- propaganda media," he said. 


scribed as a “slimmed down" ver- 
sion of Panaria, the Briush-Ger- 
man-Italian consortium that is 
responsible for marketing the Tor- 
nado fighter. 

British Aerospace and Messer- 
schmitt of Germany each hold a 


Bnush Aerospace and Messer- propaganda media, he said, 
schmitt of Germany each hold a The cardinal said a recent wave of anti-church statements in the state- 

42. 5 -percent interest in Panaria, controlled press and on television “are local pinpricks rather than a 
and Aeritalia holds the remaining frontal attack but they do point to ideological struggle." 

15 percent. “Given the French alii- The primate's rare meeting with journalists followed expressions of 
tude it is difficult to imagine how anger by tbe church over Polish press coverage of the murder trial, which 
they can be brought in. considering ended Iasi week, and a warning by the religious affairs minister, Adam 
that Dassault is saving it wants Lopatka. that the authorities would imprison radical priests in the future, 
leadership and a 46-perceni share 

SvfaddS”; Atas: British Railmen Back Striking Miners 

lem — how to make the French LONDON (AP) — Train drivers in London called a one-day walkout 


done in a climate of anti-Soviet used by one superpower against the 
propaganda generated by the West, other." 


lem — how to make the French , nNnnN / AP , 
more cooperative." MoSSd^te ti 

Company officials said lhat Brit- 49-week-old strike 
ain was preparing to test fly its The walkout wa 
demonstrator model, known as the England on behalf 
EAP. also in 1986. plans by the Natio 

British industry sources said that The Times of L 
if France did not agree to a “fair" Union Congress v 


Monday, despite the opposition of their union leaders, in support of the 
49-week-old strike by British coal miners. 

•_11 I -f _ -J... .r . 


The walkout was part of- a “day of .action" protest called in southeast 
lgland on behalf of the miners, who went on strike last March 12 over 


EAP. also in 1986. plans by the National Coal Board to dose 20 money-losing mines. 

British industry sources said that The Times of London reported that the coal board and the Trades 
if France did not agree to a “fair" Union Congress were devising a “formulation of words" to break a 
collaborative approach soon, Brit- deadlock in talks with the National Union of Mineworkers. The general 
ain might proceed on its own with secretary of the miners union, Peter Heathfidd, said Sunday night tint 
West Germany. Italy. Spain and. new talks could be started if “an acceptable form of words” on lte mme- 
possibly, the Netherlands. Fokker, closure issue could be found, 
the Netherlands' leading aerospace 

company, has expressed interest in n n • ni i_ • itc 

participating in the European DalloOIliSt DieS 111 rUme UaSfl 111 U.O. 

Sfnra ALBUQUERQUE. New Mexico (AP) — Ben Abnizzo. 55, who rode 

anv of the feasihilitv studies “We m lhe fiisl baUooas 10 *te Atlantic and Pacific oceans, was killed 
are waiting on the governments.” a Monday along with his wifeand four other people when their twin-engine 

company spokesman said. P ane crash J® . . . . , , . ^ 

y y * In August 1978, Mr. Abruzzo, Maxie Anderson and Larry Newman 

crossed toe Atlantic Ocean in a balloon named the Double Eagle-2. The 

helium-filled craft landed at Evreux, France, after a five-and-half-day 

U p flight of about 3.000 miles (4,848 kilometers) from Presque Isle, Maine. 

V Pfpcfipfi Id November 1981, Mr. Abnizzo was captain of die helium-filled 

Double Eagle-5 when he, Mr. Newman and two other men made the first 
«-■ -rw| balloon crossing of the Pacific Ocean, flying from Nagasbima, Japan, to 

IflUn northern California in four days. 


U.S. Presses 
Missile Plan 


(Continued from Page i) Israelis Bomb Bekaa Valley for 2d Day 

coys, developed by Lincoln Lab- , ... J , , , V 

oratories, which is affiliated with BEIRUT (UPI) —Israeli warplanes Monday pounded what the Israeli 

Massachusetts Institute of Tech- m *^ t3r y said was a Palestinian base in the Syrian-controlled sector of 
nology is said to be capable of east®™ Lebanon’s Bekaa Valley in the second air strike in 24 hours, 
reading the signals from enemy ra- The ; Israeli Army said the aircraft scored hits on a base of a Palestinian 

dar or mf Hired sensors and instant- i e3dcr - Abu Mousa, near the village of Taalabaya, the site of 


BEIRUT (UPI) — Israeli warplanes Monday pounded what the Israeli 
military said was a Palestinian base in the Syrian-controlled sector of 
eastern Lebanon’s Bekaa Valley in the second air strike in 24 hours. 


ly devising a counter-signal to fool Sunday’s raid, about 22 miles (35 kilometers) southeast of Beirut. 


ihe defenders into thinking the de- 
coy is a real warhead. 

Another lop priority of tbe re- 
search office is a new, maneuver- 
able re-entry vehicle that would be 
added to the MX missile or fitted 
onto an as-yet-undeveloped small 
U.S. missile called Midgetman. 

Major Larry E. Skapin, an air 
force missile engineer, who repre- 
sents the program in the Pentagon, 
said the program's researchers plan 
to be studying advanced missile 
guidance systems this year Lhat 
could be used against “relocatable 
targets." 


There were no immediate reports of casualties from the air strike 
because of con tinuing explosions. The strike followed the killing lastweek 
of three Israeli soldiers in southern Lebanon. 


For the Record 


President Hafez al- Assad of S; 
re-election to a third term with 9 
announced Monday. 


running as the only candidate, wan 
percent of ihe vote, ihe government 


6 Israelis Meet With Arafat 


(Continued from Page 1) 


Missiles with these precision e l ever to meet with Mr. Arafat, 
guidance systems would receive in- meetings between Israeli officials 


flight signals from spy satellites and the PLO leader are not unprec- 
and adjust course to chase down edented. A source close to Prime 
mobile enemy missile launchers. Minis ter Shimon Pens recalled 


The R uss i an s have hundreds of thai, in previous instances, “there 
movable SS-20 launchers Capable have never been any steps taken" 


of directing missiles at European against the Israelis involved, 
targets, and both sides are develop- 
ing mobile missiles of interconti- At the airport where members of 
nenlal range. the delegation tried to hold a press 


While decoys and maneuvering conference, demonstrators shouted 
re-entry vehicles are designed to insults at them, and at least one 


overwhelm defenses at the middle party supporter was roughed up. 


or final stages of a missile's uajee- Mr. Avneri said in a telephone 


toor. the missile systems program interview that the delegation had 
office is also beginning to study agreed not to reveal where the 


otter measures, including some in- meetings took place. However, he 
tended to protect missiles in the said there had been several meet* 


early boosting phase. mgs, lasting a total of about seven 

■ — - hours over four days. The group 

relumed to Israel on a flight from 

U&0ffidalVish5 Sofia, 

Mr. Avnen said their discussions 
Calls For Improved 1 les ranged over the “Whole Middle 

0^171 A Bsatich iM. Proposal for what he termed an 

27 Tte Bnush foreign am^ce fa connection with an in- 
secretary, Sir Geoffrey Howe, ar- jgmadonal peace conference, 
nved Sunday in Bulgaria on an . ..... D .. . 


The Avhxuuol Press official visit, and said that he hoped 

BERN — Three Swiss soldiers the visit would help to improve 


ILK. Offidai Vishs Sofia, 
GaOs For Improved Ties 


The Associated Press 


letxfpg wtody bool' publuher leeks monu- 
wipre of ol types, fiction, iw-Sdijn, poel:>, 
luwenU tchob'l) jnd 'di^Oui •?-< TV:* 

nuThdi St-cd fj t e? OOC-ale! H 3 

V-.wiog® P-rts W l«ib Z< ‘A?» Vo i, f 4 Y 
KHBI II S A 


were killed Monday and eight were Easi-West relations. 


■ New lnjtiafire Possible 
A Palestine Liberation Organi- 
zation official raised the possibility 


injured, some of them seriously. Sir Geoffrev said his visit reflect- Monday that the PLO would join 
then a military truck skidded on t -d Britain's wish to improve ties by Jordan and Eg\pt to reactivate 


muim on >i highway and hit an on- enhancing dialogue, the official peace talks wiih Israel. The Ammvi- 


ci ' firing civilian truck 


new> agency BTA reported. 


died Pros reported from Cairo. 


King Hussein of Jordan and the 
PLO agreed on “a framework for 
common action" to deal with the 
Palestinian problem, according to a 
Jordanian government stataneut 
issued in the Jordanian, capital of 
Amman. 

King Hussein and Mr. Arafat 
met Monday in Amman, but Pales- 
tinian sources had said they were 
far apart in their positions. The 
announcement gave no details of 
the new joint strategy. 

Sayed Kamal, a member of the 
Palestine National Council who is 
known to be dose to Mr. Arafat 
said in Cairo lhat a three-way ini- 
tiative, should it materialize, would 
be supported by Saudi Arabia and 
some otter Arab countries. 

“There is a possibility for a Jor - 
danian-Egyptian-Palestmian move 
supported by Saudi Arabia, Iraq 
and Algeria, and this support could 
extend to other Arab countries, not 
excluding Syria.” Mr. Kamal said. 

At a rao: ting of the Palestine 
National Council, the PLO's par- 
liament in Amman in November, 
the king proposed a strategy based 
on UN Security Council Resolu- 
tion 242, aimed at trading territory 
for peace in future negotiations 
with Israel. 

The PLO has rejected the resolu- 
tion because it does not specifically 
call liire»tiihli>hmem of a Palestin- 
ian .>tate. 


fhey 

Doth Do’ 


, ij.rnxu 



w & 


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l( Vc ^ pa ^ e fro 


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COrn pr; 

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^tc-riai^ rea( ^'ng 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1985 


Page 3 





r 1 N 'r"- tSbi^C: 


They Play for Keeps, 
Both Down and Across 

In U.S., Crossword Puzzle Fanatics 
Compete Bendy in r Mental Athletics’ 


V-or rw_ H? 

w_: i'faiSN 

■•Sit; 




i£r£?*« 

5t« 

■ c. ?.* , 

;.... 

'•'■»* St 

• . *, i r ’ ’ 

■■“ — *-sr 

:'fl Polish Piji 

••■-ix-' 

" - 

■ -T ! 


1: ■'» 


str iking Vi 


By Steven R. Churm 

Im Angela Tuan Sen nr 

LOS ANGELES — If s not like- 
ly that Stanley Neuman, a short, 
brainy bond analyst from New 
York, will ever rank alongside such 
sports idols as Joe Montana or 
Steve Garvey. But be was chatter- 
ing like a champion moments after 
he had scored a major victory in his 
own field of play — crossword puz- 
zles. 

“It was exhilarating. I was so 
pumped up as i filled m those last 
couple of boxes. People had been 
talking about me as a has-been, so I 
wanted this — badly," Mr. New- 
man said Sunday after defeating 
two challengers in the final round 
of the Greater Western Crossword 
Puzzle Tournament here. 

Mr. Newman was the winner of 
the first U.S. Open Crossword 
Championship in 1980. 

On Sunday, he finished the com- 
plex puzzle in seven and a half 
minutes, answering correctly all 64 

r s lions almost twice as fast as 
other two finalists, a New York 
statistician and a Northern Califor- 
nia corporate strategist. 

Mr. Newman talks like a high- 
priced athlete because he is among 
the elite of a small but growing 
collection of U.S. puzzle-solvers, 
who have come out of kitchens, 
lunchrooms, corporate offices and 
anywhere else “crossword fanatics" 
closet themselves with pencil and 
puzzle. They view themselves as 
"mental athletes," who experience 
the same rush of emotions while 
competing as football or baseball 
players. 

"Ask almost anyone here why 
they came, and they'll probably teU 
you they wanted to see just bow 
good they really are," said Larry 
Ash, a professor at the University 
of California at Los Angeles, one of 
SO entrants in the Los Angeles 
tournament. 

"When you've been doing puz- 
zles for 30 or 40 years, and you can 
solve them in 13 or 20 minutes, you 
start to fed your oats. You want to 
test your talent,” said Mr. Ash, who 
like the other entrants paid $20 to 
spend two days trying lo solve sev- 
en puzzles. 

"But after two days here. I've 
been humbled,” he «rid, laughing 
To be lough enough to a tourna- 
ment, Mr. Newman said, a puzzle- 
solver needs the obvious skills: a 
strong vocabulary, a penchant for 
trivia and a broad knowledge of 
current events. 

"As you're filling in the answer," 
Mr. Newman said, "your eyes must 
be scanning the next question.’* 
That was evident in Sunday’s 


championship, when Mr. Newman 
and the other two finalists — Ellen 
Ripstdn, 32, a New York life insur- 
ance statistician, and Richard Goo- 
1 dale, 34. a Northern California cor- 
porate strategist — matched wits 
for the $500 first prize. 

Mr. Newman finished first, to- 
lowed by Ms. Ripstein, then Mr. 
Goodale, each of whom had one 
mistake. Mr. Newman's puzzle was 
perfect. 



The Rev. Jesse L. Jackson 


Curricula in 'Disarray , 9 
College Group Alleges 


(Co n tin ue d from Page 1) 
and other areas of the humanities, a 
lack of science education for non- 
scientists, fuzzy curriculum re- 
quirements and lack of a coherent 
rationale for degree requirements. 

The Project on Redefining the 
Meaning and Purpose of Baccalau- 
reate Degrees was organized under 
a committee of IS prominent edu- 
cators. Among them were Ernest L 
Boyer, president of the Carnegie 
Foundation; Richard Kuhns, pro- 
fessor of philosophy at Columbia 
University: and Frederick Ru- 
dolph, professor emeritus of histo- 
ry at Williams College, who be- 
came the principal author of the 
report. The project was supported 
by the Pew Memorial Trust and 
four other foundations. 

The panel analyzed the academic 
programs of 11 institutions and 
held several conferences. 

The investigators said: “Evi- 
dence of decline and devaluation in 
college curriculums is everywhere.” 

“The business community com- 
plains of difficulty in recruiting lit- 
erate college graduates," it said. 
“Remedial programs, designed to 
compensate to lack of skill in us- 
ing the En glish lan guage abound 
in the colleges and in the corporate 
world. Writing as an undergradu- 
ate experience, as an exploration of 
both communication and style, is 
widely neglected.” 

"Foreign language incompe- 
tence is now not orny a national 
embarrassment,” the report said, 
"but in a rapidly chang in g world it 
threatens to be an enfeebling disad- 
vantage in the conduct of business 
and diplomacy.” 

• The failure of college curricu- 
lums to keep pace with scientific 
and technological change, it con- 
tinued, means that “we have be- 
come a people unable' to compre- 


hend the technology that we 
invent." 

While many colleges require stu- 
dents to take a “general education* 1 
program for broad knowledge and 
thinking skills, it said, these pro- 
grams are often little more than 
"disiribution requirements," to 
example, two courses each in the 
humanities, social sciences and sci- 
ences. that reflect political divi- 
sions in the faculty. 

Similarly, in most colleges the 
"major" or “concentration” pro- 
gram was described as "little more 
than a gathering of courses taken in 
one department." Today’s majors, 
it said, are not so much “experi- 
ences in depth" as they are "bu- 
reaucratic conveniences." 

The association cited numerous 
causes of “unhappy disarray” in 
undergraduate curriculums, in- 
cluding an unwillingness of faculty 
members to uphold academic stan- 
dards in the face of student de- 
mands.' 

"Today's student populations 
are less well- prepared, more voca- 
tionally oriented and apparently 
more materialistic than their imme- 
diate predecessors," the study de- 
clared. 

Another factor, it continued, is 
the academic “value system" that 
"puts little emphasis on good 
twu4wng_ counseling of students, 
and working with secondary 
schools." The report said that most 
young faculty members entered the 
classroom haring had no formal 
instruction in bow to teach, and 
they soon learned that “research, 
not teaching, pays off." 

The panel said that “the enemy 
of good teaching is not research, 
but rather the spirit that says that 
this is the only worthy or legitimate 
task to faculty members.” 


Jackson Urges Blacks to Reassess 
Their Loyalty to Democratic Party 


By Juan Williams 

Weshingiat Pan Service 

WASHINGTON —The Rcver- 
end Jesse L Jackson, saying that 
Democratic Party leaders are try- 
ing io attract white male voters by 
"proving they can be lough on 
blacks,” has advised binds to reas- 
sess their loyalty to the party. 

Mr. Jackson said Sunday >h at 
Democratic leaders, rebuilding af- 
ter President Ronald Reagan's 
landslide election victory over Wal- 
ter F. Mondale, are wigiging in 
“self-deception” by failing to un- 
derstand the reasons to their de- 
feat and failing to recognize that 
blacks, the young, women, Hispan- 
ics, Asians and the poor are the 
future of the party. 

The black leader had harsh 
words to party leaders, including 
iis new chairman. Paul G. Kirk Jr„ 
who he said “inherited Mondale's 
legacy." 

"He won on the muscle of orga- 
nized labor,” Mr. Jackson said. 

He said Mr. Kirk's election was 
without support from New York, 
California, the southern slates or 
blacks and is a continuation of the 
Mondale-labor coalition that lost 
the election. 

He also made it dear that he will 
not recognize the election of Ro- 
land W. Burris, the black Illinois 
state comptroller who defeated the 
mayor of Gary, In diana, Richard 
G. Hatcher, to the rice chairman- 
ship. Mr. Hatcher was the choice of 
the party's black caucus and was. 


U.S. Cabinet Aide 
Defends Han to > 
Curb Student Aid 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Education 
Secretary William J. Bennett de- 
fended Monday the Reagan ad- 
ministration's plan to cut aid to 
college students and said the move 
would force some students to give 
up their stereos, cars and beach 
vacations. 

Mr. Reagan asked Congress last 
week to deny guaranteed student 
loans to all students from famili es 
with adjusted gross incomes above 
532^00; lo elimina te grants, work- 
study jobs and other aid for those 
with 'incomes above $25,000; and 
to limit to $4,000 a year the maxi- 
mum U.S. help any student can 
draw. 

Mr. Bennett, who joined the 
Reagan cabinet Wednesday, said 
the proposed cutoff of loans and 
grants to more than a milli on stu- 
dents was justified because of the 
high U.S. deficit. 


Mr. Jackson's campaign chairman 
“1 assume Roland has his own 
constituency since he went outside 
of the Mack people in the party,” 
Mr. Jackson said. “I will not affirm 
the product of the violation" of the 
black caucus, he said. 

He also accused Mr. Kirk of at- 
tempting to "gain in stature at the 
expense of blacks" by opposing the 
M ack caucus n omin ee. Mr. Hatch. 
er’s defeat was viewed by some par- 
ty leaders as a rebuke for Mr. Jack- 
son. 

Mr. Jackson, 43, was speaking in 
a hospital room here where he is 
recuperating from pneumonia and 
a partly collapsed lung. 

“There is a scheme to have the 
party to prove its manhood to 
whites by Slowing its capacity to be 
unkind to blacks,” he said. 

He said he was advising black 
Democrats to “reassess their rela- 
tionship with the party.” 

“The political growth industry in 
this nation is in the poor, females, 
young people, blacks, Hispanics, 
Asians,” Mr. Jackson said. 

"To uy to read into Reagan's 
victory white male dominance is 
wrong,” he added. 

“One candidate said he would 
raise taxes if he won, an idea so 
unpopular he couldn't coerce some 
Democratic leaders to get on the 
stage with him,” Mr. Jackson con- 
tinued. “Democratic candidates 
were running for office and saying 
T am not a Mondale Democrat.' 

He said many prominent Demo- 
crats deserted Mr. Mondale, in- 
cluding Senator Albert A. Gore Jr. 
of Tennessee, Senator Howell T. 
Heflin of Alabama, Senator Carl 
Levin of Michigan. Representative 
Paul M. Simon of Illinois, and the 
former governor of North Caroli- 
na, James B. Hum, who lost his 
attempt to capture the Senate seat 
of Jesse Helms, a Republican. 

Mr. Jackson said the record 
blade voter turnout — about 10 
percent of the national turnout and 
higher in several large states — al- 
most all went for Democratic can- 
didates and “should be seen as a 
party asset and not a liability." 

While the Mack vote could not- 
stop the Reagan landslide, Mr. 
Jackson said, it “cut his coattails” 
by helping Senators Gore, Heflin 
and Levin to win Senate seats and 
carrying Democratic candidates 
for state office to victory despite 
Mr. Reagan's triumph. 

Mr. Jackson said black voters are 
already becoming independents 
and shifting from party politics to 
voting rights enforcement and vot- 
er registration. 

“Both parties reject power for 
minorities," he said. “So wewil] get 
a new lever mi power and win with- 
out the parties.” 

He contended that the party’s 
movement away from blacks is part 


of a national wave against fair 
treatment to blacks. 

“The dimale in ibe country is 
edd to black people,” Mr. Jack- 
son said. “It amounts to a cultural 
conspiracy.” 

“People are starting to look at 
blacks tike maybe something is 
wrong with these people,” he con- 
tinued. 

“There is nothing wrong with 
b lades demanding a human e for- 
eign policy or sensible defense 
spending or protesting budget cuts 
that leave them unprotected or ask- 
ing for a good education. We will 
not back down." 


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Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1985 


Kim Remains Under House Arrest; 
Some U.S. Supporters Leave Seoul 


By John Burgess Mr. Kim spcnl another day con- security police at Kimpo Interna- 

n'asimgm Pan Senna fined lo his house by police Mon- tional Airport when toey arrived 
SEOUL — Some of the Ameri- 10 2 telephone interview, he Friday and had pressed for an 
cans who accompanied the opposi- ^ he was waiting for the govern- apology from the South Korean 
tion leader Kim Dae Jung home to respond tohis request Sun- government 
from exile left Seoul on Monday day t0 hft the house arrest on the Mr. Walker has lodged an offi- 
without an apology from the South Sf^und that it was illegal cjal written protest with the For- 

Korean govenunent over a scuffle Mr. Kim said that he did not fed Ministry in Seoul. An embassy 


with police at Seoul's airport last 
week. 


Mr. Kim said that he did not fed dgn Ministry in Seoul. An embassy 
his situation had been rh*ngfrf fc Y spokeanan said that the govera- 


r Their departure came as South 
Koreans prepared to elect a new 
Nations] Assembly on Tuesday, 
following a 20-day campaign in 
which opposition candidates re- 
peatedly have invoked Mr. Kim’s 
name. 


the departure of the Americans. “I menj has said it was investigating 
must manage my problems by my- ,, c ^ would respond to 

self," he sad- Mr. Walker’s note. 


Representative Edward F. But other South Koran govem- 


Feigban, Democrat of Ohio and “ cnl spokesmen have denied that 
one of Mr. Kim’s American sup- 

nnrf^rc nvi blamed the incident on the refusal 


porters, met Monday morning with me inatmni on me renisai 

the U.S. ambassador to South Ko- °T Mr. Kun and his US. entourage 
rea, Richard L Walker, to discuss to follow police directions. 


250 Reported Abducted 
From Ethiopian Lamp 


the group’s three days in Seoul. 


Govenunent offi cials prepared 



Old Laws, Paperwork 
Drive Peruvians Into an 
Economic Underground 


\W ft s 

L-arW. r ar 


pup"-. 


By William D. Moncalbano 

Lx Angeles Times Service 
LIMA — Eduardo Pena sells T- 
shirts from a collapsible wooden 
tray in the shadow of Peru’s presi- 
dential palace. Low prices, no tax- 


es. no receipt. Caveat emptor. 

“It's not much," Mr. Pena said. 


costume jewelry and smuggled em- 
eralds, all with equal aplomb. 

In Buenos Aires, where strict 
safety rules govern public trans- 
port, an Argentine housewife 
moonlights as owner-driver of an 
unauthorized school bus, piling as 
many as a dozen children from 


. , / . . ' ballot boxes Monday for elections 

Mr. Walker said Sunday that the a 


, to select a new National Assembly Election workers prepare ballot boxes for South Korea's National Assembly elections, 
deliberately ^ -yi* i, ■ 


P™** K? 1 ?# 0fcttdhereilBi75pnc a .totS<iuih 

Korea's 24 million eligible voters 


Untied Pass international refusing to separate from Mr. Kim, Korea's 24 million eligible vo 
GENEVA -Tbe International as they had earlier agreed. Group WOQ jd go to the polk 
munittee of the Red Cross re- members deoied that and acotsed 6 7 

irted Monday that armed men M*- WaJker of fading to perform ■ Group Appeals to Reagan 


Committee of the Red Cross re- 
ported Monday that armed men 
kidnapped about 230 people last 
Tuesday from 2 relief center in the 


his duties following the incident. The congressmen. Mr. While 


Defector Describes KGB Action in U.S. 


But an embassy spokesman said and others in the American group 


northern Ethiopian province of Ti- Monday’s meeting was cordial. Mr. asked President Ronald F 
gre. Feigban left the country later in the Sunday to postpone a 

Relief activity had to be sus- day. US.-South Korean sumi 


He Says It Controls About 700 Russians in New York 

The Associated Press “heard them express, with cynical 


summit meet- 


pended for that day after "armed Other members of the group, a ing. The Associated Press repeated 


elements" stopped the distribution former assistant secretary of state from Seoul 


NEW YORK — A Soviet defec- jokes, their willingness to suppress 
tor, Arkady N. Shevchenko, says in freedom among their allies." 


“but it’s a living." 

Another entrepreneur, Her- 
nando de Sota stuck strictly to the 
law when he registered his new 
clothing factory here. In a U S. city, 
the procedure would probably have 
taken about 10 hours. In Luna, it 
look him 289 days and 24 bribes to 
complete the 310 required steps. 
The paperwork involved, pasted 
end to end. would stretch 100 feet 
(30 meters). 

The difference between Mr. 
Pena's approach to doing business 
and Mr. De Soto's helps to explain 
the growing chasm between the 
laws that have been enacted in 
many Latin American countries 
and the reality of daily life. 

In one country after another, 
desperate people find ingenious 


nursery school into the family se- 
dan. Three-year-olds are taught to 


dan. Three-year-olds are taught to 
drop below window level if a po- 
liceman is spotted. 

Breakdowns of traditional 
norms on permits are widespread 
in Latin America. In large measure, 
it is a result of quick, chaotic ur- 
banization and of the accompany- 
ing population boom. 

the process has been aggravat- 
ed, particularly in Peru, by the fail- 
ure of successive governments to 
adapt old laws to the new reality. 

It has not been long since old, 
elegant Lima took pride in itself as 
"the city of kings." Now, people 

foilr qWui! vie “L aloiittn-MAliMk ** 


talk about its M C&lcutta-izaUon.* 
In a generation, since 1958, the 
city’s population has grown from 
one million to more than five tnil- 


of supplies ana took away about for human rights, Patricia Derian, Administration officials in 
250 men from the camp, a Red and a former US. ambassador to Washington said the incident 
Cross statement said, ft was not H Salvador, Robert E White, also would not cause Mr. Reagan to 
clear, the statement said, whether left Monday. caned his invitation to President 


his memoirs that most of the ap- 
proximately 700 Soviet dozens in 


"I witnessed their duplicity with 
ose who follow the Soviet line in 


ways to get around rigid rules. As a lion. Today, more than 300,000 


New York City are full-time spies 
or are under orders from the KGB. 


caned his invitation to President 


those who follow the Soviet line in 
the West or in the Third World, 
extending even to participation in 


result, the authority of the govern- 
ments, and their ability to control 
events, is undermined. 


ople eke out a living as street 
odors, or ambuiantes. 

For each beggar on the streets, 


the intruders were rebels or govern- 
ment forces. 


Members of the group said they Chun Doo Hwan to visit Washing- 
were assaulted by South Korean ton in April. 


Mr. Shevchenko, a former diplo- conspiracies to kill 'unsuitable' po- 
mat who defected in 1978, says in (ilical figures of other countries. 


excerpts of the memoirs published 
i Sunday in the current issue of Time 
(magazine that one agent was fasri- 


“They avidly sought hegemonv 
and were infected with the imperi- 
alistic sickness of which they ac- 


r* 


jnated with the possibility of de- cused others." he said. 


Where to go for the finest 
Polynesian cuisine 


straying New York's electrical sys- 
tems. 

He quoted the agent, who was 


Mr. Shevchenko said the Soviet 
leaders are “building military 
strength far beyond the needs of 


people who have managed to tap Guillermo Noiazco, 29, a Man- 


the utilities even though they can ist city councilman who is himself 


not afford them. 


expelled from the United States in defense and security as the ex- 
1969, as saying of the buddings in of ^ Soviet deople." 
Manhattan: “they look so strong. ~ 


In Santiago, Chilean street ven- no question of eradicating the am- 
dors without licenses or overhead bulantes, but rather of organizing 


they’re just a house 3 Shevchenko's wife was re- 

«wtr A w in riu* rivhi w committed suicide 


undersell established shops, with 
one eye on the customer and the 



cards. A few explosions in the right P™ “ L ™ 

2m. V*w3E!r ^ ,9 , 7 * "ft? 0 - H r rver - 

P He said, ^The U.S.SJL contin- he beb .?' es l she was 

murdered by the secret police. 


other watching for the neighbor- tity’s^supply of goods and ser- 


The Ledra Marriott- Athens. 


T he Ledra Marriott Hotel Athens, offers a 
variety of first class cuisines. The Ledra 
Grill serves European and local gourmet 
specialities. And there is Athens’onfy'Kon Kai’ 
restaurant specialising in Polynesian and 
Cantonese delicacies, as well as Japanese 
TeppenyakL prepared at the table. 

You have all the facilities you need to make 
Ledra Marriott your business centre in Greece. 

For your relaxation, there are in-house TV 
movies and a roof-top swimming pool and 
whirlpool with a view- of the Acropolis and the 
sea. Service is on call 24 hours a dav. 


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Lies training terrorists within and 
beyond its borders lo subvert stable 
nations and particularly to feed 
upon unrest in the Third World." 

The Kremlin also must use spies 
"to obtain military secrets and ad- 
vanced technology it cannot devel- 
op efficiently at home." 

At home, the Soviet leadership 
uses security police and spies “to 
control a population it can no long- 
er inspire," he said. 

"I never underestimate its reach 
i or its savagery." he said, 
i As the personal political adviser 
to Foreign Minister Andrei A. Gro- 
myko, Mr. Shevchenko said be saw 
the "hypocrisy and corruption" of 
the Kremlin leaden. He said he 


Arkady N. Shevchenko 


hood policeman- 
in Bogolk, itinerant Colombians 


Privately Run Prisons Grow in U.S., 
And Critics Fear Erosion of Rights 


By Martin Tolchin 

New York Times Serrice 

NEW YORK — The bleak land- 
scape of correctional institutions in 
the United States is increasingly 


repression would be unthinkable, 
even if it were possible. What is left 
is persuasion. 

“We have been able to persuade 
some ambuiantes to move off the 
streets into special areas set aside 
for them," said Elsa Guerrero, a 
city hall specialist on the ambu- 
iantes. "But if we do not make it 


rections Corp. ot America, Cased in 
Nashville. Tennessee. 

But critics question the concept 


becoming the province of private of m a k i ng a profit on incarceration 
companies and a few nonprofit and ask whether it is compatible 


is sometimes spotty. 

Incarceration is a growth indus- 
try. The prison population, consist- 


HOTEL ATHENS 


Belgians Hunt fra 1 Explosives 

Renters 


groups. 

About 24 major correction facili- 
ties are owned or operated by pri- 
vate groups, according lo the 
American Correctional Associa- 


and ask whether it is compatible ing of convicted felons, has dou- 
with the administration of justice, bled, to 439,000, in the last decade, 


They fear an assault on the prison- 
ers' constitutional right to due pro- 


according to the Justice Depart- 
ment. There are 224,000 more peo- 


cess of law and raise questions of pie in jails, convicted of mtsde- 


AMMA.V AMSTERDAM ■ ATHENS CAIRO - JEDDAH • KUWAIT LONDON ■ PARIS RIYADH - VIENNA 


1 tion, which predicts that the num- 
BRUESELS — A minesweeper ber will double in the next 18 


accountability. 

The private takeover of cottcc- 


meanors or await 
say 60 percent of 


trial Experts 
: correctional 


routes so that people can get there, 
they will not stay. What can also 
happen is that new ambuiantes 
move into the same streets to re- 
place the (Hies we have relocated, 
who in turn insist that we remove 
the newcomers who are bad for 
their business." 

The flood of immigrants to 
Lima, nearly all of them desperate- 


was searching off the coast Mon- 
day for a container of explosives 
dropped by a navy tug Thursday. 


non, which predicts that the num- . * uc pnvaic ut — Tr ly poor Indians and mestizos, peo- 

ber will double in the next 18 non operations is represenlalive. of the Umt^ State me 

months. These are in addition to a fundamental change m the work- ^ highlands, has radically changed 
several hundred adult halfway mgs of government. This treni ^ ovaCTmwing and other mhu- SSs culture and txmpositL. 
bouses and juvenile centers that ^nsoH^twith^rdrat^Ronald mane coodi turn* Audit long ago overXSmed the 

; plight of the prisons has led ability of Peruvian governments to 
cml rights supporters to wel- structure growth in the city, leaving 


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INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 

(Continued From Back Page) 


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private groups began operating in 

the 1970S. - , t j . . - ,1 . , — * - . » 0HiHAuihjLiimKuui uiwuiltiwnuA 

The trend toward private correc- whs and a desire to reduce the size come almost any innovation. But ^ immigrants to create thnr own 

lion operations was bora of over- “d scope or governmenL Lonse- others are fearful of private take- pn ra iM society, which is both utih- 

crowded and antiquated institu- quently, local officials are turning overs. tarian and profitable; 

tions, as well as of the more and .more to the private sector “Everybody wants a Band-Aid National attention has been fo- 

entrepreneurial spirit. While Texas w own, lease and manage hospi- solution," said Norman Carlson, cu^ on ihe "informal economy r 

and New Mexico have approved fire and samtation depart- director of the Federal Bureau of by a two-year study by Mr. De Solo 
legislation to authorize the private 111(1 schools. Prisons, three of whose facilities and his free market research center, 

operation of correctional fatalities. 


consonant with President Ronald mane conditions. 
Reagan's philosophy, has been fu- The plight of t] 
eled by soaring costs, taxpayer re- some civil rights s 


ments and schools. 


Supporters say private business- are run by private corporations. 


concept has generated wide- es and nonprofit agencies do a bet- He added: "A number of politi- 


IO USA ROM £119 m way. 
NATC London 01-734 8100. 


spread debate. 


ter job because they are insulated dans may use privatization to 


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greater vitality, flexibility and a re- from political interference, patron- ferns, ft's not going to solve our 
duction in costs. “Our basic mis- age obligations and the high sab- problems. But we ought to go 
sion is to provide correctional ser- ties and pensions of public employ- ahead and lot* at it.” 
vices to government in an efficient, ees. They note that the private Privately run prisons have had 
sector often offers a vitality that is their share of problems, gmilar io 


the Institute for Liberty and De- 
mocracy. 

According to the study, more 
than 60 percent of Peru's workers 


ferns, ft’s not going to solve our earn their living today in an eco- 


oblems. But we ought to go nomic underground that functions 
ead and look at it.” outside government regulation. 

Privately run prisons have had That includes 95 percent of Lima's 


Atlanta Leaders 


PRIVATE WATBWONT, old ptarta 

Assad TV Movie 
On Child Killings 

BIAS YACHTM& Yacht Chart**. The Associated Pass 


sector often offers a vitality that is their share of problems, similar to public transportation. 90 percent 
sometimes lacking in dvfl servants, those at public institutions, and of the do thing industry — 8.000 
Supporters also contend that critics attribute some of them to an factories — and 60 percent of the 
government has lost any claim to effort to save money. construction industry. 


US IMMIGRATION vscb, Altyi. Sp4oi 
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quahty correction work. At one Houston facility, a pri- 

“The work done in the public vate guard shot to death an alien 


■ Monqjfe. Bo 
Vginio 22314. 


Boa Alley, Ataxv 


effort to save money. construction industry. 

At one Houston facility, a p ft- More than half of Lima’s five 
vate guard shot to death an alien million people live in houses built 
trying to escape and wounded an- without regard for building codes 


683J79. Exbcu-I HEUA5 YACHIMG. Yacht Charters. 


sector in the last 30 years has been a trying to escape and wounded an- without regard for building codes 
dismal failure," said Ted Nissen, other. A depressed 1 7-year-old Sal- or zoning ordinances. The over- 
president of Behavior Systems vadoran alien was removed from whelming majority of householders 


Acadenas 38, Alhera 1 0671 , Greaca. 


Southwest, which runs both federal another detention center in Hous- in new, poor parts of the city have 


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01-87 mornmg 


ATLANTA —Community lead- local facilities. “We have a na- ton last November in a catatonic 
ers here have attacked a CBS tclcvi- uonaJ recidivism rate of 50 percent, state. Friends said they had spent 

ci nn nrnnra m anniif ■’hilfl i _ re _ . _ p .1 . ■ ■ . ■* _ * . 


tl title to the land on which 
ve invested most of their life 


sion program about 29 child I offer to forfeit mv contracts if the six weeks urginR that she receive savings. Getting title lo land can 

clmnnrtc in Allan? o ac an /infra- • ■ »■ " .1 . . . . . 0 . . ■ 


slayings in Atlanta as an outra- recividism rate is more than 40 per- psychiatric help. 

oenuc rtistoriinn — . •* r ■>» * — 


take years. 

"In Pent today, workers in inlor- 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 1 ESCORTS & GUIDES | ESCORTS & GUIDES :| ESCORTS & GUIDES | ESCORTS & GUIDES 


geous dtstoruoa ceuL" Charles Fenton, who with his "In Peru today, workers in inlor- 

Tbe first part of "The Atlanta But critics contend that correc- brother Joseph formed a corpora- mal industries assemble cars and 
Child Murders” was broadcast tion officers are an integral part of tion, Buckingham Security Ltd., make motors and bicydes," Mr. De 


Child Murders” was broadcast tion officers are an integral part of tion, Buckingham Security Ltd., make motors and biq 

ESCORTS & GUIDES Sunday night after web of criti- the criminal justice system and per- that is building a 520- million, 715- Soto said. "They can process food, 

ranxrjrt - rertA Escort & Trovoi cistn from local officials. The con- form a quasi-judicial function, cell maximum security penitentiary build power lines, make furniture, 

|BBfc Tel 069 / 68 J4 05 elusion of the five-hour, two-part They enforce discipline, judge north of Pittsburgh, was warden of lighting equipment, ovens and 

tC*®GNNIA_ CARBBEAN Ew*t movie is scheduled Tnes*1»v niphi whether infractions have occurred the rutniientiarv nt t«wisht«ra stoves. Thev even make orecision 


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“It’s totally disHusiinp” said and impose punishmems. They Pennsylvania. In that capacity, he instruments and tools for the arr 
Carolvn Lone Ranks a memher nf a,s0 advise parole boards on was found by a federal jury in 1980 force.” 
the city counciL “I’ve seen it two w ^ e ^ ier should be re- to have been among a group of In the city, there are 1,450 mu- 


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"absolute lies," she said. represents coordinators and plan- ages on the officials, who said they completing awernmeat-demanded 

___ ... . ners of large urban criminal justice had merely protected themselves paperwork. The outlaw entrepre- 

■Z3' t i j defended the systems, said: “We're talking about from vicious prisoners who bad neurswhoi 
qect as balanced, met aty rq>re- taking away people's liberties, and tried to escape. do not do a 

atauves and agreed to broadcast i have real questions about the pro- For many years, private groups legally, thq 
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ihaL" adult halfway houses. Now, howev- 

Supporters of the trend say that er, they are supervising adults and 
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erarnem guidelines. ous crimes. 

T. Don Hutto, executive vice Private e 
president of the Corrections Cor- contracts 
poration of America, said, "Private correction 


enile centers and In Mr. De Soto’s view, the tnlor- 
ses. Now, howev- mal economy is not the problem 
rising adults and but the solution. The problem, he 
: committed sen- says, is tbe government. 

In an average year, the Peruvian 
win government legislature issues almost 20,000 

sing io operate laws, decrees and edicts. Almost all 
es for far less are ignored by people who do not 


raged community leaders. Prosecu- management of a facility is under money than the federal or local have the time, the money, or ut 


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The Bean Save, distorted picture of the case. 


the control of govenunan, which- governments have been spending, many cases the ability to comply, 
sets the polity.” They have greater flexibility in “If the Legal system continues W 

But correction officers acknowl- both operating and building pris- push the majority of the people 

— — ■ ons, which they construct la six outside the law, there can be no end 

months, as against four or five *o Peru’s current soda] unrest and 
years with govenunent contracting, violence,” Mr. De Soto said. 


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an ambulame, said: “There can be 


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them as a necessary pan of the 


vices. 

In Peru, where the national gov- 


hawk toothpaste and coca paste, eminent is centrist and the Lima 
- dty government is Marxist, major 






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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12* 1985 


Page 5 


Mozambique’s Struggle: 
Now It’s lor Survival 




Drought, War Push Maputo to Suspend 
Socialist Crusade and Seek Western Aid 






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. C -- 


By Glenn Frankel 

li'osAMprcn Post Saner 

MAPUTO. Mozambique — It 
has been 10 yean since the Portu- 
guese colonists who dung to this 
long, narrow Indian Ocean coast- 

. line for five centuries left and revo- 
lutionaries who had spent a decade 
in the bush took power, launching a 
crusade to create Marxism’s “new 
man” in Africa. 

The sign greeting arrivals at Ma- 
puto's airport still reads, “Welcome 
to Mozambique: a Liberated Zone 
of Humanity.” But the search for 
the “new man” and the socialist 
ideal he embodied has been sus- 
pended, if not scrapped, as Mo- 
zambique struggles to survive. 

Ten years of war. misg uided pol- 
icies. cruel weather and hostile 
neighbors have combined to 
smother dreams and render ideolo- 
gy an unaffordable luxury. 

The country is locked in a civil 
war with the well-equipped and of- 
ten well-trained rebels of the Mo- 
zambique National Resistance, 
whose lifelines extend abroad. 
Drought has helped destroy Mo- 
zambique's farms, killed IOQ.OQQ of 
its peasants and displaced hun- 
dreds of thousands of others. 

This once-beautiful seaport capi- 
tal has become a city of empty 
shelves, worthless currency and de- 
serted cafes, where people line up 
for hours for a rationed quantity of 
life's bare essentials. Even among 
the intellectuals who once celebrat- 
ed Mozambique's revolution as the 
birth of a new age, there is a grow- 
ing sense of pessimism and disillu- 
sion, fueled by the daily grind of 
shortages, declric power cuts and 
the search for enough to ear. 

Still although wounded, Mo- 
zambique still has life. Its leaders 
are pursuing the road to pragma- 
tism with the same fervor that once 
infused their search for the classless 
society. 

In the past year, Mozambique 
has signed a nonaggression pact 
with neighboring South Africa, its 
former implacable foe; promoted 
“privatization” in its farms and 
factories; joined the World Bank; 
submitted its books to the Interna- 
tional Monetary Fond, and al- 
lowed Western relief agencies to 
play an increasing role in its emer- 
gency aid programs in drought- 
stricken areas. 

In return. Western bankers have 
rescheduled $300 million in debt 
payments, and Western nations, 
led by the United Stales, have in- 
creased contributions of food and 
other aid dramatically. 

The gamble has yet to pay off. In 
the past year there has been further 
deterioration of security and a de- 
cline in the economy. 

When 200,000 Portuguese colo- 
nists fled Mozambique in 1975, 
they took their money, possessions 
and expertise. What they could not 
carry, they destroyed: Industrial 
equipment was sabotaged, tele- 
phones ripped out, tractors driven 
mto the sea, light bulbs smashed. 
They left behind 12 university 
graduates in a nation of more than 
10 million people. 

Faced with (his barren inheri- 
tance, the leaders of Frdimo, the 
Front for the Liberation of Mo- 
zambique, embarked on a vast pro- 
ject to create a modem industrial 


economy where only a feudal 
brand of colonialism had existed. 

They built hundreds of schools 
and clinics. They trial to take eco- 
nomic shortcuts, using an Eastern 






European blueprint: large state- 
run factories and farms ooerated 


run lactones and farms operated 
on production schedules dictated 
by a centralized authority. But in 
Mozambique, with its acute lack oT 
trained managers and adequate re- 
sources, this approach failed. 

Industrial production, which had 
collapsed during the last two years 
of the independence war, began a 
slow climb back in the years up to 
1981. Bui then, damaged by war 
and world recession, it fell 4 per- 
cent in one year. 

The most negative impact of 
state control occurred in toe coun- 
tryside, where 85 percent of Mo- 
zambique's population lives. 
Forced movement into tillages tore 
many from their land. State-run 
farms soaked up virtually all gov- 
ernment investment in agriculture. 

Food prices were kept artificially 
low, providing a disincentive to 
Tanners to produce. Those who did 
found that the money they were 
paid was worthless and that there 
was nothing to buy in traders' 
shops taken over by the state. 

Food began to disappear. Some 
of it wen t across porous borders to 
more profitable markets, some 
went into the growing domestic 
black market, and some was left to 
rot on the ground. Growth in offi- 
cial food production, which had 
increased during the late 1970s but 
not enough to match population 
growth, fell between 1981 and 
1983. 

The collapse of the rural econo- 
my left the country vulnerable to 
drought and provided fertile 
ground among disaffected peasants 
for the growth of the Mozambique 
National Resistance, founded by 
the former Rhodesian intelligence 
service and later adopted by South 
African military intelligence. 

The result of all these elements is 
visible in northwestern Tete prov- 
ince, scene of starvation last year. 
Fanners in the province's northern 
Angonia area were producing food 
surpluses even while their neigh- 
bras south of the Zambezi river 
were dying of hunger. But the food 
went to nearby Malawi because re- 
bels had choked off the roads lead- 
ing to the south, and also because 
farmers got better prices and were 
able to barter for consumer goods 
there. 

Against bread lines and short- 
ages, Western economic ideas are 
beginning to make an impact inside 
Mozambique. Americans and Eu- 
ropeans are searching for oil and 
natural gas off the coast. 

How long can Mozambique sur- 
vive? Part of the answer lies with 
President Samora M. Machel. 
Trim, purposeful charismatic and 
endlessly optimistic, he in many 
ways personifies the spirit of Mo- 
zambique. 

A fanner’s son, Mr. Machel led 
Frdimo in its 10-year bush war, 
and he then set the country firmly 
an the socialist road. But he is no 
ideologue. The opening to the West 
and the signing of the Nkomati 
Accord with South Africa were Ins 
initiatives. If they fail the failure 
will be his. 



Th» Nm York Tm 

TV sets tuned to cable channels received in West Germany. 


Membership in Unions 
Drops to 18 . 8 % in U.S. 


By Peter Perl 

H adungtun Post Service 

WASHINGTON - Union 
membership declined from 23 per- 
cent of the U.S. work force in 1980 
to 18.8 percent in 1984, the lowest 
level in recent years, according to a 
study by the Bureau of Labor Sta- 
tistics. 

The study documents the decline 
in union membership brought on 
by automation, by huge layoffs in 
heavily unionized industries such 
os automobile and sled, by the in- 
creasing success of employers' ami- 
union efforts, and by the sharp 
growth in service industries that 
unions have had little success in 
Organizing, according to labor ex- 
perts. 

While losing members through 
plant closings and layoffs, unions 
have been largely unsuccessful in 
organizing many of the new, small- 
er enterprises in health care, high 
technology and education. 

Although the wages of union 
members are about 33 percent 
higher than those of other workers, 
according to the survey, the loss of 
membership has also meant shrink- 
ing treasuries. This has left unions 
unable to devote more money to 
organizing drives, which have be- 
come increasingly expensive as em- 
ployers have fought more legal bat- 
tles to thwart unions. 

“There’s no surprise in these sta- 
tistics,” said an AFL-CIO labor 
economist, John Zalusky. “If 
there's any surprise at aQ, it's that 
we were afraid the figures had fall- 
en even further.” 

The AFL-CIO, a federation of 
96 labor groups, has about 13.5 
million members but does not keep 
data on membership of other 

un ions, 

The most surprising finding was 
that union membership declined al- 
though the economy has created 
five million new service- sector jobs 
once 1980, a Bureau of Labor Sta- 
tistics economist said. 

The data, based on a monthly 
survey of 60,000 households, is the 
first bureau estimate of union 
membership made since 1980, 
when R suspended its count of 
union members to save money in 
the first year of the Reagan admin- 
istration. 

Mr. Zalusky said that the AFL- 
CIO thought (hat the data was mis- 


sors ineligible to join unions. The 
A FL -CIO’s data is based on the 


A FL -CIO's data is based on the 
“organizable” work force, which 
the federation estimates is 26 per- 
cent unionized. 


The study showed a decline in 
union membership of 2.7 million 


people. The number of union mem- 
bers dropped from 20.1 million to 
17.4 million since L980. according 
to the study, a loss of 13 percent, 
while the civilian work force ex- 
panded almost 5 percent. Although 
membership was pegged at 17.4 
million, union contracts covered 
19.9 million workers. 


Union membership among non- 
agricultura! workers reached a high 
of 35 percent in 1945. 

The household survey showed 
that the median weekly' wage for 
nonunion workers was $303; for 
union workers it was 33 percent 
higher. $405. In 1983, the median 
union wage was 35 percent higher 
than that of other workers. 

The wage advantage of union 
membership varied markedly, how- 
ever, for women and minorities. 
Unionized women earned a median 
weekly wage of $326 compared 
with $251 for nonunion women. 
Black union members earned $357 
while other blacks earned $236. 
Hispanic union members earned 
$351 compared with $238 for non- 
union. 

The steepest decline in onion 
membership came in the goods- 
producing sector of the work force, 
which was 30 percent unionized in 
1980 but slipped to 24 percent in 
1984. The service sector, which was 

13.5 percent unionized, declined to 

10.5 percent. 

Only the public sector remained 
relatively stable in union member- 
ship during the five-year period, 
declining from 35.9 percent to 35.7 
percent. 


leading rat the percentage of the 
work force belonging to unions be- 


work force belonging to unions be- 
cause many workers are self-em- 
ployed, unemployed or are supervi- 




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West Germany Tunes In to Cable TV 


End of State Monopoly Causes Debate on 010101^’ Potititxd, Cultural Impact 


By James M. Markham 

.Vn* Yuri Times Semer 

HAMBURG — Consolidating 
his grasp on the German nation. 
Hitler revolutionized politics 
through his discovery of the power 
of the spoken voice carried by ra- 
dio. 

In do little measure because of 
Hiller's exploitation of the air- 
waves, the lone of voice on radio 
and tekvisirai in postwar West 
Germany is self-consciously calm, 
flax and unemotionaL The coun- 
try's two big semiautonranous pub- 
lic television stations are earnestly 
didactic, highbrow and dull. 


Because of the experience of Hit- 
ler’s abuse of a centralized radio 


network, the postwar occupying 
powers bequeathed to West Ger- 
many a tradition, enshrined in its 
constitution, that gives centred over 
program content to the 10 states 
and West Berlin. 

This has meant that States gov- 
erned by the Social Democrats, like 


Hesse, North Rhine-Westphalia 
and Bremen, have been able to 


But in January, opening to the 
strains of Dvorak's “New World” 


symphony, a privately owned ca- 
ble- television station broke West 
Germany's public television mo- 
nopoly. its offerings include an an- 
nouncer who reads Lhe news with a 
black cat on his lap. “The Wal- 
tons,” “Love Boat” and a thick diet 
of U.S. and Italian films. 

Conservatives hail the advent of 
private television as a West Ger- 
man communications revolution 
that will weaken the sway of public 
television's left-leaning correspon- 
dents and commentators and cre- 
ate lively alternatives to the sopo- 
rific. bookish diet now beamed to 
the nation. 

In the opposition Social Demo- 
cratic and Green parties, voices 
warn of the spread of an American- 
ized “mass-idiot culture.” and of a 
political coup by rightist publish- 
ers. 

Although West German legisla- 
tors have tried to insulate television 
from oven bias, it remains imense- 


and Bremen, have been able to 
block the spread of private televi- 
sion to their areas. 

In North Rhine-Westphalia. a 
pro-SoriaJ Democratic newspaper 
chain is negotiating with a regional 
public station to nuke its own ca- 
ble program. Only in Hesse, where 
a Soda! Democratic minority gov- 
ernment is dependent on tolerance 


by the Greens, who oppose the ca- 
ble, is a last-ditch battle likely. 

“We made the mistake of simply 
saying *no."’ said Peter Paterna, 
the Social Democrats’ press expert 
and a deputy from Hamburg, look- 
ing back on the last decade. “If we 
bad been more forthcoming, we 
might have been able to put our 
imprint on the overall national pat- 
tern." 


champs, a publisher of the conser- 
vative Frankfurter Allgemeine Zei- 
tung, which now produces a weekly 
feature and current events show for 


SAT-1, the pioneer private channel 
that opened Jan. 1. 


The advent of private television 
has spawned a gold-rush atmo- 
sphere among West Germany's 
newspaper and magazine publish- 
ers. who fear that advertising reve- 
nues will slip out of their controL 

“Nobody sees profits in sight, 
but everybody thinks it's going to 
be a gold mine.” stud Bruno Des- 


Tbe giant Axd Springer publish- 
ing concern owns 35 percent of 
SAT-1 and has put out the word 
that it will be happy 10 buy the 
shares of any dropouts from the 
enterprise. 


The prospect that Mr. Springer, 
an ami- Communist rightist, might 
end up controlling SAT-1 is a 
nightmare for the Social Demo- 
crats. But Mr. Springer's represen- 
tatives on SAT-l's centerpiece 
news program. “Blick.” have 
stayed in the background. 


ly political. “Media politics are 
power politics.” said Dieter Weir- 


power politics.” said Dieter Weir- 
ich, a member of the Bundestag 
who is the governing Christian 
Democrats’ expert on radio and 
television. 

Cable television has come late to 
West Germany because of the op- 
position of the left-of-center Social 
Democrats, who were toppled from 
office in late 1982. The Social Dem- 
ocrats felt comfortable with their 
light rein over public television, 
and Helmut Schmidt who detrac- 
tors saw as a haughtily intellectual 
chancellor, warned that private 
television posed dangers “far more 
acme than nuclear energy.” 

One of the firmest promises of 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl's center- 
right coalition was to bring West 
German television into the cable 
age- Mr. Kohl’s minister of posts 
and tdecomnmmcatioas. Christian 
Schwaiz-SchiOtng, staked his repu- 
tation on a costly crash program of 
wiring the country with broad- 
band copper cable, which some ex- 
perts say will soon be obsolete. 

Mr, ^chwaiz-SchSGng's enthusi- 
asm has collided with a formidable 
obstacle: West German federalism. 


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Page 6 


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1985 


* 


itcralb 


INTERNATIONAL 



(tribune 


Pabinbed With He Ne»» York Tima wd The WMluegun P«i 


Seoul Challenges Reagan 


Preadem Reagan had some stirring words 

to say about freedom in his Stale of the Union 
address last Wednesday, words that went well 
beyond his familiar commitment, which he 
repeated, to keep faith with those struggling in 
Afg han istan and Nicaragua “to defy Soviet- 
supported aggression.” Declared the presi- 
dent: “Freedom is not the sole prerogative of a 
chosen few; it is the universal right of all God’s 
children ... Our mission is to nourish and 
defend freedom and democracy a nd to com- 
municate these ideals everywhere we can." 

At this moment when the Reagan adminis- 
tration is rededi eating itself to this goal, it is 
sobering to see the events that unfolded in 
South Korea in connection with the return of 
the opposition politician Kim Dae Jung. 
Americans have expended much blood and 
treasure to build freedom and democracy in 
Korea during the last 30-plus years. Yet what 
has been an view in Seoul in recent days is a 
stark picture of a police-run society that uses 
force and deception to keep an opposition 
figure from tatting up an orderly and peaceful 
role in the public life of his country. 

In addition, Americans accompanying Mr. 
Kim were, evidently on official orders, physi- 
cally abused — an action for which their 
political tactics provided not the slightest jus- 
tification. The US. Embassy, which thought 
it had worked out foolproof arran gemen t'; for 
a role of its own in the return proceedings, 
found itself helpless on the outside, duped by 


the very people in whom it had reposed trust 

A brisk debate is under way over what were 
the elements of the arrival plan and who was 
responsible for its breakdown. The four major 
parties — Mr. Kim, his American escorts, the 
South Korean government and the U.S. gov- 
ernment — have all contributed to it. 

It is important to learn just what happened, 
but it is also important to keep in central focus 
the question of why it is that freedom and 
democracy are in such apparent short supply 
in South Korea and what the United States 
ought to be doing in South Korea, as President 
Reagan put it. “to nourish and defend freedom 
and democracy and to communicate these 
ideals everywhere we can.” 

If this is a legitimate goal of U.S. policy, and 
we believe it is, then the implications for (he 
United States in South Korea are very clear. 
Kim Dae Jung left borne as a political exile in 
1981. The South Korean government has 
greeted him by in effect restoring his condition 
as a political prisoner, immediately putting 
him back under bouse arrest. To fence off Mr. 
Kim and other opposition figures by “sedi- 
tion” charges and police guards is a direct and, 
one must assume, deliberate affront to the 
policy freshly enunciated by Mr. Reagan. It is 
not the American escorts who are most chal- 
lenged here; they are few and they are remote 
from the levers of official power, ft is Ronald 
Reagan. What is he going to do about it? 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Communists in the Cold 


The French Communist Party’s denuncia- 
tion of the Socialists and its abandonment of 
the union rtf the left are acts of desperation. 
The party feared being eaten alive, ft under- 
stands perfectly dearly that its allian ce with 
the Socialists was its only hope of power. But 
after three years in a subordinate role in a 
government run by the Socialists, the Commu- 
nists dropped out last summer. At its congress 
last week it went further and denounced the 
whole concept of the alliance. With that, it 
consigned itself to a future of perpetual oppo- 
sition. Inflexible in doctrine and psychology, 
the party knew no other way to survive. 

In the 1970s. the Socialists substantially 
increased their strength while the Co mmunis ts 
remained at one-fifth of the French vote. Then 
in the 1980s the Communists' following began 
to decline. The most recent demonstration was 
the election of the European Parliament last 
June in which they got 11 percent of the vote. 
That apparently was the final blow, the culmi- 
nation erf a long history of disputes and initar 
dons, that led the Communists to give up their 
four seats in a cabinet d ominate d by Socialists. 
They had good reason to think that if they 
stayed they would shortly be a barely visible 
appendage to a Socialist Party that, the polls 
suggest, is going to have a difficult time in next 
year's elections. The Communists want to de- 


tach themselves as distinctly as possible from 
the So cialis ts before the campaign begins. 

In the same European election last year in 
which the French Communists suffered their 
severe losses, the Italian Communists did spec- 
tacularly well For the first time they won more 
votes than any other Italian party, and they 
did it by expanding their base among a grow- 
ing middle class. Since the late 1940s the Ital- 
ian Communists have shown a degree of inde- 
pendence from the Soviets that the French 
party has never attempted. In Italy the party 
has been sufficiently flexible in its ideology to 
be able to seize the kinds of advantages that 
the French party has left to the Socialists. 

It is extraordinary that in France, where so 
much has changed in the past generation, one 
major political party has changed so little. The 
Communists emerged freon World War II with 
two great sources of support. Ihe French work- 
er’s deep distrust of the boss and the immense 
prestige that Communists had won is the resis- 
tance against the German occupation. Cur- 
rently, for many French workers, the govern- 
ment is the boss; and memories of the war are 
slowly fading. The deep changes in French life 
— the sustained rise in standards of living and 
education — work against an authoritarian 
Marxist party with a fixed view of the world. 

— 77f£ WASHINGTON POST. 


Fickle Help to Jamaicans 


Even very young Jamaicans can remember 
the bad old days of 1980. The nation was rife 
with violence and at times seemed to be bn the 
verge of complete civil disorder. By compari- 
son, the disturbances last month, after the 
government raised fuel prices 20 percent, 
seemed mild, even if seven lives were last and 
Kingston was essentially shut down for two 
days. Unfortunately, much more threatens to 
shut down. Prime Minister Edward Seaga said 
last week that daily earnings from tourism had 
been halved since the disturbances on Jan. IS 
and 16. Another round of unrest, he said, and 
“we can write off the tourist industry.” 

Now a spokesman says that the prime minis- 
ter spoke too soon, that losses were not so 
severe and that a strong recovery is under way. 
That is a result to cheer for, since only a rerival 
of tourism can ensure a revival of Jamaica. 

The evens of the last month demonstrate 
the fragility of the economic recovery that Mr. 
Seaga is trying to engineer. Tourism, one of the 


most fickle enterprises known, is the country’s 
second industry. It had become virtually mori- 
bund by the end of Michael Manley’sadnums- 
tration four years ago, but last year it earned 
$435 milli on in hard currency. A nation that 
owes almost $3 billion desperately needed it. 

The tourist revival, like Jamaica’s growing 
appeal to foreign investors, arises mainly from 
currency devaluations and other austerity 
measures adopted by Mr. Seaga. But those 
steps have made the poorest Jamaicans fed 
that the rug has been pulled out from under 
lhgfn_ Unemployment remains above 25 per- 
cent and even people with jobs find that their 
pay is worth less. The benefits of the govern- 
ment's policies are not so politically obvious as 
the immediate pain. Mr. Seaga has some politi- 
cal room Tor maneuver, haring won a fresh 
five-year mandate last year in an election boy- 
cotted by the opposition. He must now try to 
ease the poorest Jamaicans’ pain. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


A Thai-Vietnamese Shoot-Out? 

What makes the current [Vietnamese] offen- 
sive particularly disturbing is the apparent 
determination of Hanoi to finally wipe mu the 
three major Khmer rebel groups. A clear indi- 
cation of ihis objective is Vietnam's unprece- 
dented use of heavy armor, helicopter gun- 
ships and jet fighters, which in previous drives 


had not been deployed in such great number. 
Alongside Thailand's consistently tough 
stance against Vietnamese incursions into its 
territory and its well known sympathy for the 
Khmer guerrillas, this new development makes 
it eves more likely that those border skir- 
mishes will soon turn into a full-blown shoot- 
ing match between the Thais and Vietnam. 

— The Times Journal (Manila). 


FROM OUR FEB. 12 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


191(h Surgery for Quid Delinquents 
NEW YORK — Confirmation that Mrs. Wil- 
liam K. Vanderbilt’s visits to the Children’s 
Court were to make observations preliminary 
to establishing a place where juvenile delin- 
quents showing criminal tendencies may be 
examined came [an Jan. 31] from the Society 
for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children. An 
agreement was reached between Mr. John D. 
Lindsay, president of the society, Judge Deuel 
of tbe Children's Court, and Dr. M.G. 
Schlapp, of the Cornell University Medical 
School. Part erf the society's announcement 
follows: “Tbe number of cases calling for op- 
erations probably will not be Urge, but, as has 
often been proved in the Children’s Court, a 
child suffering from swollen thyroid glands, 
adenoids or other growths has not been men- 
tally responsible for his presence in the court." 


1935: Treasury Averted Dollar Crisis 
WASHINGTON — Secretary of the Treasury 
Henry Morgen than Jr. disclosed [on Feb. 11] 
that a foreign exchange crisis bad been averted 
within the past mouth through tbe use of the 
two-billion -dollar stabilization fund, but he 
gave assurance to business that the dollar had 
been held at the desired level and said the 
country could proceed about its business with 
tbe assurance there would be no fluctuation. 
He revealed that, for the first time since the 
fund came into existence about a year ago, it 
bad been used to purchase foreign currency 
against dollars on January 14, the date that the 
dollar started to rise an foreign exchanges and 
reached the highest point against gold-backed 
currencies it has attained since revaluation. Up 
to that date the fund had been used solely to 
purchase gold and silver in the world markets. 


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G 1983, International HenudTnhme. All rights reserved 



Help Is Good When It Helps 
Africans to Help Themselves 


By Stephen 

W ASHINGTON —The truth is, many of us 
have had several reasons — beyond the 
honor — for not wanting to see television pic- 
tures of children starving in Africa. We have 
squirmed a bit and written the obtigatoiy check, 
as individuals and as a nation. But it is hard to 
look at black Africa without feeling that some- 
thing has gpne terribly wrong. 

It is not just the spectacle of the suffering that 
troubles us. It is the sense that we — we of 
America and the West who thought we knew bow 
to help these people — did not know well 
enough, although we acted as if we did. 

Money aid is not the centerpiece here. We have 
never provided enough to meet our share of the 
dear human needs and, given Africa's relatively 
low political and strategic ranking, no more than 
marginal improvement can be expected, at best 
What 1 am talking about is the quality of our 
advice. It is now broadly recognized, not simply 
among critics but in the establishment circles 
that provide funds and wield power, that our 
advice has been deeply flawed. 

In my mind I set an imaginary scene: 

A meeting is being held in rather posh sur- 
roundings. Three men are at the table. One. with 
slicked- back dark hair that makes him look sus- 
piciously like Robert McNamara, former presi- 
dent of the World Bank, represents enlightened 
public finance. A second — who could be mis- 
taken for Darid Rockefeller, former chairman of 
Chase Manhattan Bank — is speaking for en- 


5. Rosenfeld 

tightened private capital Tbe third man is black, 
carrying a scepter and wearing a faint smile; 
could it be President Mobutu Sese Seko of Zaire? 

In this imag inar y scene, “McNamara’' and 
“Rockefeller” are saying: Sir, allow us to lend 
you 10 billion easy dollars to build up your 
country and improve the life of your people. 

Replies “Moouiu": Gentlemen, it is strange 
that you put such confidence in a mere former 
army sergeant. But you possess the best financial 
and economic brains in the world, and you have 
the money. Who am I to say no? 

It is wrong to pile all the blame on individuals, 
and many factors were at work, and it did not 
happen this way everywhere in Africa, el cetera. 
SttiL. in tbe hopeful glow cast by black Africa's 
passage to independence in the last generation, 
many of us thought that Western goodwill and 
know-how would help do the development trick. 

In other parts of the world a contribution was 
made. But much of Africa, lacking the structures 
to make policy, and the resources to cushion 
mistakes and misfortunes, has been different It 
is the single region going backward, especially in 
food. Op timis ts, scanning for a turnaround, peer 
deep into the 1990s and draw their breath. 

In these circumstances it is natural and right 
that the quality of Western advice should come 
under scrutiny, as it is. At the World Bank, in the 
United Stales government and elsewhere there is 
a certain refreshing readiness to concede publicly 
that major errors have been made. 



The Correspondent Will Need to Be Less Foreign 


I S the West, or the East, ready 
to understand that many Af- 
ricans truly wish both super- 
powers would just go away and 
take any trace of the Cold War 
with than? If you write that, 
does your story have as much 
impact on readers as a rival sto- 
ry, written not from the African 
but from tbe foreign point of 
view, that begins: “The United 
States moved today to counter 
Soviet influence in Eastern Af- 
rica by sending in ... "7 
And how are any of ns to 
describe more than superficial- 


ly the great tragedy that is over- 
taking Africa? Political inde- 
pendence. Africans once be- 
lieved, would soon produce 
economic power. Africa today 
is less able to feed itself than 
ever before, less able to make 
the goods it needs. Africans are 
beginning to admit that some- 
thing has gone seriously wrong, 
and their self-criticism sounds a 
lot like criticism from Western- 
ers that is so unwelcome. What 
is emerging is the picture erf a 
continent in the grip of a vast 
and deepening crisis. Reporters 


are going to need all their pro- 
fessional skills to tell this story. 

It seems to me that these re- 
porters are going to need a kind 
of comrmixnem to Africa, a spe- 
cial kind of unspoken sympathy 
and receptivity. This commit- 
ment need not impair objectiv- 
ity. It involves simply an effort 
to overcome the barriers to un- 
derstanding that, after all make 
us correspondents so foreign. 

Andrew Torchia, writing in the 
Columbia Journalism Review, 
quoted by The Washington Post. 


Says the World Bank's senior rice president, 
Ernest Stern: “We . . . have failed in Africa, 
along with everybody else. We have not fully 
understood their problems. We have not identi- 
fied the priorities. We have not always designed 
our projects to fit” Says the head of the State 
Department’s Bureau of African Affairs, Chester 
Crocker; “Donors have insisted on imposing 
their own requirements on recipients which, 
however well intentional, cause major problems 
of absorption and efficient administration-” 

The private banks have their stockholders to 
enforce simil ar self-examination. 

A new consensus is taking shape. To give it a 
name that many donors or lenders, not to speak 
of recipients, are not particularly eager to accept, 
it is the Reagan revolution. If the idea of the 
1960s and 70s was that the big public and 
private lending institutions knew best, the idea of 
the 1980s is that individual people trying to make 
a profit know besL Aid donors are focusing on 
indudne local governments to adopt policies to 
spur individual producers, especially in agricul- 
ture. Unsung, the United Nations International 
Fund for Agricultural Development has been 
promoting iust that course. 

One is obliged to ask whether the new policy 
emphasis will work better than the old. Some of 
those who are asking appear to be mainly inter- 
ested in doing ideological battle for or against 
Mr. Reagan's belief in the “magic of the market- 
place.” lam in another group that notes that 
there need be no contradiction between encour- 
aging Tree enterprise and providing aid, if the aid 
is used effectively and if it continues at anything 
near the necessary levels. Unfortunately, the 
Reagan administration's distaste for multilateral 
lending leaves this in doubt. 

The Washington Past. 


Still Too Few Africans at Schweitzer’s Lunch Table 


L OS ANGELES — Scarlet hibis- 
/ cus 'and yellow and purple 
trumpet flowers from the jungle 
hung in a simple garland over the 
mildewed cross in Lambarfaifc, Ga- 
bon. that marks the burial place of 
Albert Schweitzer. “Today is his 
birthday,” Maria Lagendyk ex- 
plained on Jan. 14, looking back at 
the burial plot from the porch of the 
Long, low, screened building that 
was his home and office. 

The simple bed where be died in 
1965, mosquito netting still in place, 
stood freshly made as if at any mo- 
ment he might return and brush 
past the desk with its oD lamp and 
his gold-rimmed spectacles, to sit at 
the upright piano in the next room 
and till tbe African air with the 
music of Johann Sebastian Bach. 

Three pirogues lay at the muddy 
bank of the Oggout, 100 meters 
from the grave. Swallows dipped in 
endless pursuit of insects. A flock of 
egrets fed at a clinic door. Ante- 
lopes, symbols of Dr. Schweitzer’s 
reverence for all life, munched 
kitchen scraps in a fenced area just 
beyond the building. The forest 
crowded the warn wooden com- 
pound with its patched corrugated 
melal roofs. Only the lunch bell 
broke the midday quiet. 


By Louis B. Fleming 


Albert Schweitzer was 90 when 
he died. He is buried near the river 
next to his wife, n£e H&ene Bress- 
lan, who died right years before him 
aged 78. Theologian, philosopher, 
musicologist, he took a degree in 
medicine at 38, the better to serve 
the people in this place. She, too, 
gave op a career as a scholar, learn- 
ing nursing to work beside him. 

“We are having a celebration to- 
jojgBC Miss Lagendyk said. It was 
the-HOth anniversary of his birth. 

Sb£knew Mm welL She had come 
here from Holland 47 years ago 
with graduate training as a nurse 
specialist in anesthesia, intensive 
care, midwifery and pharmacology. 
Now, almost 80, she still moves 
gracefully along tbe rough paths 
that join the buildings of the old 
hospital near tbe riverbank and tbe 
new hospital on tbe hill above. 

Some things have changed. A 

garden where the doctor tned to 
duplicate, here almost on the Equa- 
tor, tbe gardens of his birthplace in 
Alsace. “He grew tomatoes as big as 
this,” Miss Lagendyk said, forming 
a big sphere with her hands. 

The new operating theater is air- 


conditioned. Tbe controversial au- 
tocratic rule of an individualistic 
genius has given way to institution- 
alized administration with support 
from foreign doaors and the gov- 
ernment erf Gabon. His skepticism 
about the competence of Africans 
to be doctors has been replaced by 
an open door to Gabonese doaors. 
although few come. 

The sometimes primitive medi- 
cine he practiced has been modern- 
i -1. with special studies for West- 
c< u medical students and a research 
program coordinated with three Eu- 
ropean tropical medicine centers. 
And transport is by air, or on roads, 
no longer on the river boats that 
first brought the Schweitzers here. 

But each patient's family still 
cooks individually for the sick rela- 
tive and provides bedside care. Old 
wards, replaced by new. have been 
converted to care for the mentally Bl 
and the homeless aged, services that 
are rare in West Africa. Beyond the 
main hospital facilities, a treatment 
center for lepers continues Dr. 
Schweitzer's pioneering work. 

Progress is slow. Life expectancy 
for those born in Gabon today, 72 
years after the Schweitzers came, is 


still only 49 years. Life for those in 
the bush has hardly been touched 
by Gabon’s petroleum wealth. 

Dr. Schweitzer won the Nobel 
Peace Prize in 1952 for what he 
taught of the brotherhood of na- 
tions, and that lesson goes on here, 
with doaors from a variety of Euro- 
pean nations gathered at lunch. Bat 
there was no African doctor at tbe 
table. “We try to get them here and 
sometimes they come,” a staff sur- 
geon said. Most Gabonese doctors 
practice in tbe capital, Libreville. 
Those who go into, the bush go to 
state facilities, including a govern- 
ment hospital in Lambarenfc. 

Lunch in the doctors’ mess was 
cut short to prepare for the evening 
birthday party. The old wooden ta- 
bles, arranged separately around 
the room, were painstakingly 
moved into a single long row, “the 
way it was when Schweitzer was 
here.” One staff member found the 
oil lamps that lit tbe room before 
electric generators were installed. 
Another pushed an upright piano 
into position so that Bach, too, 
could be part of the celebration. 

Mr. Fleming a Los Angeles Tones 
editorial writer and farmer foreign cor- 
respondent, recently visited Canon. 


Why Americans Remember Lincoln 


W ASHINGTON — Why do 
Americans — in the North, at 
least — celebrate Abraham Lincoln's 
birthday every Feb. 12? Why do ihey 
put him on the penny and the $5 bill 
erect monuments, listen to political 
orators quote his words? What was so 
special about Lincoln? 

He freed the slaves, you say. True; 
but if he had not, some other presi- 
dent, ex' Congress, would have, what 
is the made by Lincoln, and 

the course followed, whose absence 
would have changed the nature of the 
nation? He preserved the Union. 

That is easy to say. “Preserving the 
Union” sounds like the only thing to 
do. Yet at the time it seemed to a 
great many (he wrong thing to do. 

Lincoln claimed he had an oath 
registered in Heaven to preserve the 
Union, and that the choice of peace 
or war was in the hands of the South, 
and not in his. But his oath was to 
preserve tbe constitution, not the 
Union, and the constitution was si- 
lent about secession. 

The Southern leaders sought 
peaceful separation. They made a 
good case: that the interests of the 
agrarian, slave- labor South were dif- 
ferent from those of the industrial, 
immigrant- labor North, and that 
Tears of abolitionist agitation were 
driving the sections further apart 
Wfaen the people of a region find 
themselves profoundly different from 
their neighbors, they — like (he 
American colonials — have a right to 
become free and independent. 

In the North, the slogan “Erring 
asters, depart in - peace" gained cur- 
rency. Not even all abolitionists, 
themselves a minority, wanted to 
wage war to prevent secession. In the 
bonier states, Senator John Breckin- 
ridge of Kentucky, whose candidacy 
had split tbe Democratic vote and 
made possible Lincoln's election, ar- 
gued that any attempt to subjugate 
the South would lead to a century of 
hostility, while peaceful separation 
could one day lead to reconciliation. 

Most of Lincoln's cabinet, which 
included his major rivals for the 
nomination, advised against forcing a 
war. His general in chief, Winfield 
Scott, the most respected military fig- 
ure since Washington, advised that 
an invasion of the South would fail. 

“Presenting the Union" sounds to 
the modem ear like a great rallying 


By William S afire 


cry, but at that time, when travel was 
difficult and national government 
weak, it was abstract. Even now, if 
Puerto Rico, an associated common- 
wealth, were to choose independence, 
would the United States objea? If the 
people of Alaska voted to secede, and 
prepared to fight, would a president 
be inclined to obliterate their cities? 

Lincoln chose war. Here was a 
president, elected by 4Q percent of 
the people, who had opposed the war 
with Mexico, was not a bellicose na- 
tionalist, was new to the job, had no 
ready army and was counseled by the 
wisest heads in the nation to (remit 
peaceful secession- Here was Lincoln 
deciding to phmge into the bloodiest 
conflict the continent has suffered. 

Why? Not to stop slavery. He had 
repeatedly promised not to interfere 
with the institution where it already 
existed. He did not produce the 
Emancipation Proclamation for 18 
months — until the war-weary North 
needed a moral cause more pro- 


foundly inspiring than Union-saving. 

The reason he chose war was his 
central idea that democracy in the 
world was on trial in America, and 
that the essence of democracy was 
majority rule. If the losers in an elec- 
tion could pull out and set up shop 
for themselves, the result would not 
be independence and freedom but a 
never-ending cycle of subdivision. 

As a result of Lincoln's decision 
and the ensuing war, majority rule 
makes America the most stable polity 
in the world. After the closest, most 
bitterly divisive ejections, power 
passes majestically and peacefully as 
if there were no other way. 

One stubborn visionary with an 
abstract political theory prevented 
peaceful separation. Because he said 
no, and was willing to pat America 
through the brutality of the first total 
war, the nation became “indivisible.” 

Some people think oaly that Lin- 
coln’s decision made America a su- 
perpower by holding tbe two ele- 
ments together so that they could act 
as a continental nation. That misses 
the poinL Tbe United States is a 



superpower today not because it is 50 
states but because it is a democracy. 
Ii is a democracy, and the last best 
hope of Earth, because it has en- 
shrined majority rule. That is the dif- 
ference Lincoln made. 

The New York Times. 


A New Way 
To Disarm 
Unilaterally 

By Philip Geyelin 

W ashington — “Unilateral 
disarmame nt” — that IS the 
warning you hear from people at the 
various headquarters of the Atlantic 
alliance. By the very process of re- 
armament with super-smart weapons 
to offset the numerical superiority of 
the Soviet Union and the Warsaw 
Pact, their argument goes, the allies 
are pricing their collective defense 
beyond the reach of necessary politi- 
cal support to provide the resources. 

Tbe problem is that after 35 years 
the Western alliance still has not got 
around to organizing a common arms 
market for the common defense. Too 
often, research and development and 
production proceed independently. 
Technology is closely held. Protec- 
tionism gets in the way of the most 
economical procurement. 

The consequence is described wefl 
by Thomas Callaghan Jtv a defense 
consultant admired by alliance strat- 
egists as the high priest of . the doc- 
trine of “structural disarmament.” In 
a treatise published by tbe NATO 
information service recently, Mr. 


disarmament [is] what 
happens when a nation's defense 
budget, plus exports, provide too 
small a market to bring armament 
development and production costs 
down to a politically affordable level. 
Even when governments are spend- 
ing more money to rearm, disarma- 
ment occurs. As unit costs go up, 
fewer and fewer weapons can be pro- 
cured. [This] unflateraJ disarmament 
will continue until NATO govern- 
ments establish an intercontinental 
market structure for the production 
and exchange of armaments." 

That warning is not new. Tbe Car- 
ter administration was pushing for 
more of a “two-way street” between 
the United States and Europe in arms 
procurement back in tbe late 70s. 

And nobody is saying tbe process 
is irreversible. On the contrary, there 
is a developing crusade in Brussels in 
pursuit of what the US. ambassador 
to NATO, David Abshire, calls a “re- 
sources strategy” designed to make 
the most of Western economic and 
technological advantages. Lord Car- 
rington, the new NATO secretary- 
general, is a true believer. So is Gen- 
eral Bernard Rogers, the supreme 
commander of allied forces. 

Two things have to happen. Gener- 
al Rogers has told me, “unless na- 
tions on both sides of tbe Atlantic are 
going to have to unilaterally disarm." 
One is the organization in some fash- 
ion of a West European “defense in- 
dustrial base which can compete col- 
lectively with a defense industrial 
base in the United States.” Some of 
this is happening in collaboration be- 
tween the French and the West Ger- 
mans and sonK other NATO mem- 
bers. But parochialism dies band — 
on both sides of the Atlantic. 

That is the general's second point: 
The “buy American” instincts of the 
UJS. armed services work against Eu- 
ropean weapons systems whose stan- 
dard use throughout the alliance 
would save money on spare parts and 
maintenance. General Rogers esti- 
mates that because of duplicating ef- 
forts “We waste billions of dollars 
every year in this alliance in just re- 
search and development atone.” 

Now that is an argument worth 
taking into account by a UJL Con- 
gress looking for deficit-cutting eco- 
nomies, and oy Europeans complain- 
ing about the nigh cost of defense. 

Another argument goes to strategy. 
NATO’s “flexible response” deter- 
rent is based on having enough con- 
ventional power to blunt a Soviet 
attack and force tbe Soviets to choose 
between backing off or being the fust 
to use nuclear fences. Weakened 
Weston conventional ferns could 
encourage the Soviets to believe they 
could get away with a conventional 
attack because the West would flinch 
from first use of nuclear weapons. 
Given the quantitative conventional 
superiority of the Warsaw Pact, the 
West relies on qualitative superiority. 

But the pressure for higher tech- 
nology gives the Pentagon’s designers 
an incentive to press for new wrin- 
kles, even in the development and 
production stage. Specification 
changes, in turn, add to costs and 
dday delivery — meaning fewer 
weapons systems in place. The result- 
ing quantitative shortfall fuels (he 
drive for stiD higher-tech weapons 
systems, at increasingly prohibitive 
cost If budget-cutters protest and 
funds are not forthcoming, you have 
“structural disarmament." 

The question is not whether (hoe 
is a way out. Ambassador Abshnt 
thinks there is adequate machinery in 
place. The question has to do with 
political will As Mr. Abshire puts it, 
“We have not given the machinery 
enough electricity.” 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Terror Can’t Be Pacifist 

Regarding the editorial “ Pacifist 
Terrorism Again ” (Feb. 4): 

The term “pacifist terrorism,” de- 
fined in this editorial as “violence by 
people who loll to protest weapons,” 
is a terrifying example of newspeak. 
“Pacifism” is adequately defined in 
Webster’s as “opposition to war or 
violence as a means erf settling dis- 
putes.” To label the murders and oth- 
er violent acts of the Red Army Fac- 
tion or other terrorist groups as 
“pacifist terrorism’* is to disseminate 
a misnomer of the kind that helps 
foster the mental confusion that leads 
to terrorist acts. How are people to 
reason with language devoid of any- 
thing but ad hoc meaning? 

RICHARD G LEDES. 

Paris. 

Only After the Disaster? 

Regarding “ Bhopal : High-Tech 
Risks for Third World " (Feb. 4); 

3s ?i only after the gas leak at Bho- 


pal that tbe multinationals operating 
in developing countries realized that 
those countries lack skilled labor, 
education has not yet reached a vast 
section of their society and technical 
infrastructure is absent? 

The report refers to these matters 
as problems confronting the multi- 
nationals, whereas the companies re- 
gard them as incentives that reduce 
production costs and boost profits. 
Host governments pressured by eco- 
nomic strains and unemployment are 
unable to regulate the multinationals. 

Developing countries may be hefl 
for their residents, bat they can be 
heaven for the multinationals. 

PRAMOD KARHADKAR. 

Le V&anet, France. 

Nasser’s Three Circles’ 

Regarding the report ” In a Vacuum 
of Arab Power, Egypt Gropes to Re- 
gain Its Political Might" (Feb 2): 

Either the reporter or Butros Ghali 

g it it wrong. The “three circles” that 
amal Abdel Nasser mentioned in 


Ms “Philosophy of the Revolution.” 
at the center of which he thought 
Egypt should be, were the Arab cir- 
cle, the African drdc and the Islamic 
circle, in that order. He never men- 
tioned a “nonaligned aide." 

ZALMAN SHOVAL 
Tel Aviv.* 

The Middle East at Arms 

Gideon Rafael, in “Outsiders Can 
Restrain tbe Middle East Anns 
Race" (Jan. 29), states thai “Israel 
has not been a lonely runner, but it 
has, been a lonely voice" in seeking to 
“end the mad race.” Mr. Rafael ne- 
glects to recall that Israel has pre- 
vented tranquillity in the region by 
repeated recourse to war. On the 
same page, David Lamb, in “Middle 
East Anns: Swelling Armies Lead the 
World in Weapons Imports.” states 
that the Arabs “want to maintain 
some sort of military parity with Isra- 
el. Thus it is U.S. arms shipments to 
Israel that in many ways set the pace 
of arrrtb sales in (lie Middle East." 


It is high time to be realistic. The 
world needs a U.S. president deter- 
mined to seek international peace 
rather than merely collect votes: 

ISMAIL HAMMAD. 

Geneva. 

Why Bull) New Zealand? 

The editorial “Zeal in New Zea- 
land" (Jan. 25) is patronizing. To 
imply that New Zealand is remt* 6 
from nuclear threat is to forget the 
systematic misuse of the Paanc for 
nuclear testing. And the Slide com- 
meats about Prime Minister David 
Lange are uncalled for. 

As for ANZUS. what use would R 
be in the few minutes of a holocaust; 

Finally, why bully the world’s mo? 1 
pro-American country into an afl°' 
American stance? Why confuse 
dear sanity with anti-Americawsrn- 
Prove that ships are nuclear-free, 

U.S. sailors will receive the friendly 
welcome they have always had. 

iaN POOL 
Paris. 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBl’NE, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1985 


Page 


ARTS /LEISURE 


f Main Street 9 Celebrates 
Sinclair Lewis 9 s Birthday 


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By Andrew H. Malcolm 

/Vew Fort Tima Service 
Q AUK CENTRE, Minnesota — 
Phyllis Olson played the piano. 
Kathy Ueser baked a cake. Joe 
Kiselewski couldn't make it be- 
cause of a bad cold. But Mary Han- 
son came out, even with all the 
sidewalk ice. The postmaster was 
there, and Jeanine Wolbeck. And 
Al Tingley and Dave Jacobson 
seemed to get along for once. 

At one point everybody is the 
hotel here sang “Happy Birthday" 
to Harry Lewis, who wasn’t there. 
Lewis, Red to his friends, is better 
known to the world as Sinclair 
Lewis, the writer. And Sauk Centre 
is better known as Gopher Prairie, 


the not really Actional setting of 
veL “Main 


-•■■-CilLra; A, 

f ; 5; 

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! 'J*! IS: 


Lewis’s most famous novel. 
Street," written in 1920. 

Harry Sinclair Lewis, who died 
in Italy in 1951 at the age of 65 and 
had his ashes sent back home, was 
not the first Middle 'Western youth 
to forsake his small town for the 


bright lights of the big city. Nor, 
of older 




f attt 

r'r*- 7 ? !cr ibi 

■ * tl 


according to a number 
parents here, was he anywhere near 
the last 

But Harry, or HaL as he is mostly 
remembered in this place where no 
one is called Mister, was the first 
American to win the Nobel Prize 
for Literature, in 1930. 

To some here, he might have 
seemed to be putting on airs, using 
his middle name and all, marry ing 


and divorcing two dmes. turning 









down the Pulitzer Prize in a mlfc 
And for a while a lot of the old- 
timers, who have dial since too, 
resented his biting portrayal of 
American small-town, middle-class 
life, especially if they ever got 
around to reading the books and 
saw parts of themselves in “Main 
Street" and other best sellers like 
“Babbitt,” “Elmer Gantry" and 
“Arrowsmith." 


"r. »*’)» 


But in the past week a goodly 
number of Sauk Centre’s 3,370 resi- 
dents turned out for a flurry of 
affairs to mark tbe 100th birthday 
of the most famous person ever to 
leave here. “If Red was here," said 
Al Tingley, handing out cake in his 
old hotel the Palmer House, “he’d 
write about this. Red’s roots are 
here." 


that she forgot Friday was tbe 
fourth anniversary of her hus- 
band’s death. According to the 
schedule, the center is open from 10 
A.M. until 2 PM. weekdays. But 
Mrs. Lyng regularly stays until 
4:30 in case someone sums by and 
wants to leant about Sinclair Lewis 
and chat with her. “I live alone,” 
she explained. 

Her four children have all left 
Sauk Centre for lives elsewhere as a 
dentist, a tea c h e r, a nurse and a 
student. So MrsJLyng concentrates 
her attention on the deceased au- 
thor whose precise descriptions of 
small-town stereotypes turned a 
harsh but best-sdimg mirror on 
American society. “Look at those 
eyes of his," she observed, “He was 
a lonely guy. No wonder he was a 
writer.” 

“He deserves more attention 
than he gets now," said Professor 
Michael Connaughton, who ran a 
Lewis conference at nearby St 
Ootid State University. “His ex- 
amination of change in women’s 
roles and society’s eagerness to 
conform are very timely today.” 

Tbe author’s literary standing 
has dwindled somewiftL He is seen 
now as less of a stylistic experi- 
menter and more of a realistic 
chronicler. “He was an American 
Dickens," said Connaughton. “Sin- 
clair Lewis’s pool was very deep 
but a fairly small one." 

Locally, Lewis books do not ex- 
cite students in the video genera- 
tion. “They are turned off by the 
thin plots,* said Mary K_ Maya, a 
who has taught about the books in 
high school for many years. “They 
don’t have TV plots and action so 
the kids get bored." 

Sometimes the books are not 
even taught here. "Sinclair Lewis 
lives on in a group of people for 
whom he is a very real and a very 
living person." she said. “But for 
most people in town, Sinclair Lewis 
is from the past as part of our 
tourist attraction." 




The fifth -graders had colored 
paper place mats for Thursday 
night’s birthday dinner. Sank Cen- 
tre’s girts had entered a Sinclair 
■ . Lewis cake-baking contest (Patty 

■ l* ; lii:: Neal won). Mary Hanson was busy 
. . . showing people through the re- 

c l- stored Lewis home across the street 

. . zl--’ from ha place. 

. • -* ;L*r >'■ Birthday signs were all ova, and 
• .. books about Red by local people. 

.. ~ Also Sinclair Lewis centennial T- 

--- „ shins, mugs, crystal bells and base- 

ball caps. And even a new 14-ceni 
x - • -v.r ol Sinclair Lewis postage stamp, al- 

. -. -.V.-ct though its first use had to be post- 

poned until next month because of 
' ' ’ .'rj- the printing crush for the new 22- 

cent stamps. 

V. Joyce Lyng was so busy out at 

' ; ” the Lewis visitors’ center by 1-94 


She thought, too. that the town 
— any small Middle Western town, 
really — had changed ova the 
years. They still retain a sense of 
comprehensible community, with 
all its joys and pettiness, too, she 
said. Bui the isolation and pro via 
of the early 1900s, when a 
dictatorial father and teasing 
schoolmates mercilessly chided an 
awkward Red Lewis, has dissolved 
in the glare of technology. Sauk 
Centre's 72-page telephone book, 
for example, has only 19 pages of 
□umbers: the rest are instructions 
and advatisements. 


Residents are but a two-hour 
drive from the attractions of Mm- 
neapolis-SL Paid, or just a flick of 
the wrist away from the world. In 


deed, Thursday night, as Leon 
jy Krick 


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Schmitz and Denny Krick scooped 
sour cream on their baked pota- 
toes, they watched news of terror- 
ism half a world away and dis- 
cussed Lebanon briefly. 

Then when the slate news came 
on the big screen in the hotel they 
turned up the volume for the filmed 
interviews of themselves that were 
transmitted to the Twin Cities from 
a truck outside the from door. 

Denny Krick thought nothing of 
thaL He owns the Audio Hut and 
has sold 30 television satellite dish- 
es recently to farm families, mostly 
elderly, who can now tune in 106 
channels from Central America to 
the North Pole. A nearby school 
uses a Mexico City channel Tor 
Spanish practice. 

After dinner, everyone ad- 
journed to City Hall for tbe Lewis 
bust unvdhng, the cake-baking 
prizes, a talk by Postmaster Gary 
Hjermstad on commemorative 
stamps, Ida Compton’s reminis- 
cences on ha friend Red and an- 
nouncement of a $1,000 short story 
writing contest by the Snclair Lew- 
is Foundation. 

Asa remit of the evening gatha- 
ing, business was off a little at the 
Main Street Theater showing “Pin- 
occhio" at 7:30 and “The Termina- 
tor" at 9:30. All the stores on the 
main street were closed — Evelyn’s 
Beauty Salon, Strauss Clothing, 
Al’s Baiba Shop and Waldocfa's 
Jewelry, which doesn't need to 
ity its display windows each 
iL 

the edge of town al tbe end of 
Sinclair Lewis Avenue, a full moon 


'Dynasty 9 Dolls Wear 
Real Minks, Diamonds 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK —The 82d annual 
American Internationa) Toy Fair 
opened Monday, featuring a Bar- 
bie doll in a business suit designed 
Ity Oscar de la Renta and — at 
$10,000 each — doO characters 
from the “Dynasty" television se- 
ries in real mink coats and dia- 
monds. 

The Cabbage Patch twins at $80 
a pair are also featured. Coleco 
Industries Inn, which makes the 
dolls, also plans a raft of accesso- 
ries including Cabbag e Patch pets. 
Cabbage Patch accounted for $500 
minion of Coieco sales last year. 




The Home as a 'Theater of Hospitality’ 


N 


By John Russell 

New York Times Service 
EW YORK— 1 have at borne a new book 
that is shaping up as the ammy of sociabil- 


ity. It is not that it preaches rudeness, or parri- 
othorse 


mony. or tbe use of horse fat in toasted sand- 
wiches. If anything, it speaks up for flawless 
housekeeping and an atmosphere of nonstop 
happiness. But what happens is this. People 
come into the house, they see this book on the 
table, they open it at the Am of its 408 heavily 
illustrated pages, and for the rest of the day 
neither meat, nor drink nor sensational news 
can reclaim their attention. They arc lost to us. 
the way Lewis Canon's Alice was lost when she 
stepped through the looking-glass. 


the Dutch 17th-ceniuiy painter Emanuel de 
Witte, tbe American 19th-cemuiy painter East- 
man Johnson and Eduard Gaeruer, the incom- 
parable portraitist of 19th-century Berlin. There 
are major architects, too, and a long roster of 
minor bat hugely gifted practitioners such as 
Georges Lepape. the anatomist of French fash- 
ions who knew how to distill the eternal from 
the transitory in Paris before 1914. togrtherwith 
many indiv idual designers who excelled in the 
collective activity of making a living space that 
as near as passible touched perfection. 

But this is not “an ait book.” in which the 
quality of painting and drawing is paramount. 
Fundamentally it is a record, a documentation. 


what Sir Henry Wolton wrote in 1624 in his 
“Elements of Architecture.” (Thornton uses the 
passage as the epigraph.) Every’s man . bouse, 
as“thetii 


Wotton said, was “the theater of his hospitality. 


the seat of self-fruition, the comfortablcst part 

i’s infieri- 


The book is “Authentic Decor. The Domestic 
Interior 1620-1920." Its author is Peter Thorn- 
ton, who is in his 20th year as keeper of the 
Victoria and Albert Museum's Department of 
Furniture and Woodwork. If that suggests to 
you a life spent authenticating deep-buttoned 
sofas, on the one hand, and single-handedly 
fighting the death watch beetle, on the other, 
your vision of Thornton is correct, but incom- 
plete. He does indeed know all that there is to 
know about valance and firedog, daybed and 
dado. But he is above all a student of the human 
comedy who knows that every interior is a 
portrait of its owner — and a more truthful one. 
as often as not, than is usually set down either 
on canvas or in print. 


a history, in which amateur artists, careful jour- 

- all ha’ 


ve 


neymen and tradesmen on the make 
something to contribute. In the illustrations, as 
in Thornton's consistently amusing and instruc- 
tive text, there is set before us a world in which 
people had time to live, and space to live in. and 
the opportunity to express themselves complete- 
ly in their houses. 

Some of the interiors had all the luxury that 
money could buy. The interiors of Lancut, the 
forma country palace of tbe Lubomirski family 
in Poland, are not pretentious, but they speak 
for private fortunes on a scale that would be 
very hard to parallel today. The same is true of 
the Stxoganoff palace in Sl Petersburg as it is 
shown in this book. (The year was 1793.) Like- 


of his own life, the noblest of his son’: 
lance, a kind of private princedom, and an 
epitome of the whole world." Thornton m a k es 
that point in relation to a Philadelphia bishop, a 
Odd-marshal living in retirement in Silesia, the 
diarist Samuel Pepys in his library in London, a 
Parisian drawing-room in which science was all 
tbe rage in the 1690s, a “ruin room" designed by 
thcpaimaJ. LOferisscau in Rome in the 1760s, 
a naval drawing office in Copenhagen, tbe 
bouse of a customs official in Hamlet's Elsinore, 
a linen cupboard in Danzig, the house of Edith 
Wharton's mother in late 19th-century New 
York, and the apparition of Viennese “modem 
style" in Bucharest in 1913. 


at 


Sinclair Lewis 


Published in the United States by V 
$125 and in Britain by Weidenfeld and Ni 
son at £50, his book is not cheap. But with its 


wise the picture gallery in the castle in Prague in 
1702 has an undeniably imperial look. 


shone on the frozen, white land- 
scape. The Greenwood Cemetery 


gates were partly dosed. And a dry 
red all 


snow covered all the graves. 

On the third row in, the sixth 
grave from the road was a little 
headstone laid flush with tbe hard 


ground. The simple stone had been 
covered with snow. too. until that 
morning. But the television crews 
brushed it off to get a bet ter picture 
to send to the world on the satellite 
from the big truck parked on the 
original Main SueeL 


532 precisely annotated tUustraiions, most of 
ticharcina 


which are in color, it is not expensive, eitba. It is 
the result of many years of research in F-n glanri , 
France, tbe Netherlands, Germany, Italy and 
tbe Scandinavian countries. Thornton has been 
everywhere, looked at everything and talked to 
everyone. Among the artists represented, some 
are in the standard histories of art — the French 
17th-century painter Simon Voueu for m<ianr» 


But this is not primarily a book about the rich 
and the grand. Some of those who woe both 
rich and grand are, in fact, shown very much in 
their old-shoe moments. Queen Victoria was 


If the nouveau riche, tbe high Bohemian and 
tbe interior decorator until his reputation to 
make begin to crowd in emus as Thormon nears 
his terminal date, every reader will have his 
favorite earlier period to which to turn for rest, 
refreshment and uncluttered spaces. To this 
enthusiast, it seems mere and more as if the 
domestic arrangements that prevailed in the 
1820s ands 1830s were just about ideaL The 
spaces were right, the color was inventive and 
vivacious, the furniture never glowered, and 
there was in every least detail a sense of ease and 
proportion. 


never exactly in flight from ha creditors, but 
Scotianc 


when she wait to Scotland in the days of ha 
brief and blissful marriage she lived no betia 
than many thousands of her subjects — and less 
well, quite certainly, than many of the prospa- 
ous tradespeople and minor officials whose inte- 
riors find a place in “Authentic Decor." 

Among the plates are many that bear out 


City dwellers who live in tortured spaces and 
have to contend with maintenance that doesn’t 
maintain and facilities that rarely facilitate may 
well be fascinated, as they invariably are, by this 
book. For what is it if not a time machine that 
makes every local stop and never makes us wish 
that it would go faster! And somewhere along 
the line we are likely to decide that in the matter 
of the space in which perhaps half of our life is 
spoil, history has not treated us right and Wot- 
ton 's “theater of hospitality” has gone dark. 



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Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 


VoL HMt Low Lot Ctag 


Unocal 

IBM 

EsKsd 

AT&T 

PhilPet 

Kmart 

SonyCp 

GMat 

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Exxon 

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I Dow Jones Averages | 

Qpaa Htgk Low Lad Chao 


NYSE index 


Indus 1287 ,9V 1291 J4 1360X6 1278.16— 1U1 

Trans 628.99 630J0 61631 62124- U5 

Util 149.93 15845 MOJO 149.31 — 149 

Coma 52653 S6X6 51634 520.11— 539 


Composlts 

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PrevMti Today 
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MJ3 OJ0 S153 5333 

11022 110.44 11041 W93S 


NYSE Diaries 


Osh Put. 


Advanced 
Declined 
unchanged 
Total Issuos 
Now htata 
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60S 928 

1025 70S 

409 411 

2042 2045 

131 207 

2 2 


Feb. 8 , 
Fflb.7, 
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Feb. 5 
Feb. 4 , 


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224,948 531,101 1907 

217399 547,798 
207307 541330 
238313 384768 1 
229,969 554312 


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NASDAQ Index 


Week Year 

Close Noon A«o Aao 
? «■« 2S7.98 27843 H2-14 
31243 311.92 29937 »U9 
333.37 — 32235 30156* 

32QJ4 - 311.12 20140 

27183 — 34268 245ig 

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7**M — 363.99 24447 


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industrials 


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73379 

71.18 

7651 


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7405 

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12ft 6ft 
14ft 8ft 
42ft 27ft 
Soft SZft 
33ft 15ft 
4ft 2ft 
50 Mft 
24ft 13 
2 ft 
311a 26ft 
7ft 6 
102 85ft 
78 63ft 
66 96 

15ft 10ft 
19ft 9ft 
24ft 15ft 
29ft 22ft 
35ft 23ft 
36 Z7ft 

29 17 
28ft 19ft 
89ft 62ft 
26ft 23 
28ft 18ft 
22ft 15ft 
94ft 01 

30 24ft 
23% 19ft 
39ft 26*4 
62ft Sft 

107 99 

107ft 100ft 
23ft 10ft 
56ft 38 
14ft 5ft 
37ft 24 

27 20 

43 38%. 

27ft 15ft 
34ft 22ft 
144 98ft 
2ft 1ft 
19ft 14ft 
65ft 52ft 
27ft 24ft 
66 93 

77ft SHS 
25ft 19ft 
23ft 18ft 
55ft 40V. 
24ft 21ft 
48 36 

109ft 103 
mb 16ft 
33ft 25V. 
13ft 6ft 
56ft 42ft 
29ft IBft 
21ft >5ft 


AAR 

ACS 

AMCA 

AMF 

AMR 


1X0 

JO 


24 16 
12 

66 

3.1 89 

8 


157 

187 

5 

151 


AMR pf 3.16 11X 

AMR of 2.12a 18 
AMR of 347 107 
ANRnf 2.12 185 
APL 

ASA 3X0 5.9 
AVX J2 14 
AtHLob U 0 24 
AcceWds 44 1J 
AanaC 40 2.1 


20% 20ft 20ft + ft 
16 15ft 15ft— ft 
15ft 15 15ft— ft 

16ft 15ft 16 — ft 
37ft 36ft 36ft— ft 
20ft 19ft 19ft 
36ft 36 Vi 36ft— ft 
IS 25 25 — ft 


3.11012* 
22 17 


.12 1* 


AemeE 
Ado Ex 
AdmMI 
Advin 
AMO 
Advest 
Aerftex 
AatnU 
AafLpf 
Aftmna 
A Been 
Air Pro 
AlrbFrt 
AlMoas 
AklP pfA 3.92 124 
AtePdaf 47 114 
AJaPot 11X0 iu 
AtaPpf 944 12.1 


244 65 
SJOalOA 


170 

40 


3 

45 

11* 

u% 

11%— ft 


TOM 

51* 

49 

Sift +2 

14 

1564 

23% 

22% 

23% — * 

14 

2574 

47% 

46% 

46ft— * 

20 

119 

25% 

25ft 25ft 


277 

19 

18* 

18* 

u 

41 

IBft 

9% 

9ft— ft 


to 

16* 


16%— ft 

10 

115 

19% 

19ft 

Wft + ft 

20 

165 

13 

12% 

12% — * 

14 

2132 

35* 

34% 

34* + ft 


576 

11% 

11* 

lift 

14 

469 

14* 

Uft 

14ft— ft 

34 

9U 

41% 

SS 

40% 

40ft— * 
55ft 

17 

1230 

29 

29ft 

31 

43 

3* 

3 

Sft 

11 

sm 

3% 

4m 

«%— ft 

13 

73 

77* 

22*- ft 

73 

120 

i% 

1* 

1% + ft 


21 


AlaPpf 

A tame a 

AtafcAlr 

Alberta 

AIMsns 

Alcan 

Akastd 

AlexAlX 

Atadr 

AltaCP 


628 125 
SI 12 


.14 

54 

48 

US 

IJ2D 

1X0 


34 


2X6f 27 

AtaCo pt 2X6 117 
Atalnt 140 5L0 
Alain Pi 2.19 11 J 
AI0IPK1175 117 
AllaPw 270 9X . 
AllanC 400X1 11 
AIUICPS 1X0 47 
AldCppf 674 1IX 
AJdCppftZXO 117 
AldCaf 12490117 
AlkJPO 

2.12 4X 9 


31ft 31ft 31ft 
33 7ft 7ft 7ft + Hi 
10Z 99ft 99ft 99ft 
mat 78 78 78 + ft 

BOX 66 66 66 

12ft 13ft 12ft + ft 
IXft 18ft TB% + ft 
23ft 23ft— ft 
28ft 20ft- ft 
30ft 30ft 
34ft 35ft + ft 
27ft 28 — ft 
23ft 21ft 
76ft 77ft— 1ft 


s 

9 

1107 

12% 

10% 

19 

6 

24 

» 

114 

29 

12 

22D2x 30% 

12 

165x 35ft 
896 20% 

26 


23* 

0 

326 

2 

79ft 

25ft 

29 

110 

19 

17 

29* 

19* 

94% 

8 

475 

27ft 

11 

103 

19ft 

8 

1671 

SO 

39ft 

61% 


28 — ft 


AltaStr 

AlffsOi 

AllsCDt 

ALLTL 

Alcoa 

Amu 


1X4 

1X0 

70 


AfflHTO 1.10 
AHWpf 350 
AmAor 

ABakr 11 

ABrand 3.90 61 9 
ABrdol 275 107 
ABrdPl 247 61 
ABdcst 140 
ABWM Zb 
ABusPr JS6 
AmCan 190 _ 
ACan Pi 2X0 117 
A Can pi 8X0 67 


5 106* 106 WM + ft 
72 IM* 104* 104% 

87 22 71ft 21ft— ft 
727 53ft 52ft 52ft— ft 
IZT 6ft 8ft Bft 
7 33ft 33 33 — ft 

69 9 124 26ft 26ft 26ft + ft 
XI 12 3393 38% 38 38ft + ft 
1.1 665 18 17ft 17ft- ft 


19 14 1209 28ft JBft 28ft 
27 1 122 122 122 

274 2 1ft 2 

19ft 18ft 18ft— ft 
64ft 63ft 64ft— ft 
27V. 27 27 — ft 

64ft 64ft 64ft— ft 
40ft 67 47ft— 1ft 

24ft 24 24ft + ft 
23ft 23ft 23ft + ft 
51ft SBft 50ft— ft 
23ft 23ft 23ft+ ft 
44ft 44ft 44ft— ft 


124 
396 
20 

£4 W K38 
35 11 49 

24 14 6 

57 II 1396 
8 
a 


ACOnrt 1 335 123 4 II 0 110 .Iff. ' + ft 


ACroBd 270 1U 
ACapCv 6560215 
ACentC 




10ft 5ft 
57 51ft 


AC van 
ADT 
AElPw 
Am Exp 
AFamll 
ACnCp 
AGnlwt 
AGnl pfA 6310115 
AGnlelBSSSa 77 
AGnlPf 375 61 
AGnpfO 2*4 
AHertt 1X8 
AHofst 
AHome 190 
A Hasp 1.13 
Ajmrteti 600 
AinGro M 
AIGppf SX5 
AMI 72 
Am Mol 
AMIRs 5 222 


84 
45 

4 139 
1.90 XS 12 1598 
72 X6 25 392 
1260108 I 3541 
178 3X 15 4496 
A4b 14 12 1109 
1X0 37 V 


% 

495 

21* 

391 


i APresM 74t IX 
ASILPSa 8 

ASLF1 pt X19 127 

ASJlIO JO 64 16 

i AmStd 1*8 AS 13 

■ Am Star m 13 10 

AStr PfA 438 77 365 

AStrpfB 680 127 35 

AT6T 170 67 1719638 

i AT&T pf X64 97 15 

i AT&T Pf 374 97 9 

AWWr 2X0 47 7 117 

AW05Pt 175 114 Sltt 

AmHotl 248 93 11 

I ATrPr 6350 77 
i ATrSc 

i ATrUn 5750 47 
i Amomn 140 61 
AitmhDs 70 
JO 


19ft 1916 1916— 16 

30ft 30ft 30ft 

10ft 10<6 1016— ft 

54|* 53ft 54ft + ft 

26ft 2514 25ft— 16 

21ft 20ft 21 — ft 

43 41ft 42ft— ft 

... 27ft 2616 2Sft + ft 

121931 30ft 27ft 30 — ft 

111 10ft 10ft 10ft— ft 

557 54ft 54ft 54ft 

34 83 XT ft 51ft— 1ft 

lx 64 64 64 — ft 

129 61ft MM— 1 

1 31ft lift 31ft— ft 

5 9ft 9ft 9ft— ft 

57 12 1568 56 55ft Sift— ft 

X6 10 7147 31ft 30ft 31 — ft 

75 8 1038 81 79ft 80ft 4- ft 

4 M 477 75ft 74ft 75 
4* 21 130 128 121 — 2 

37 13 1887 21 22ft 22ft— ft 

MS 4 3ft 3ft— ft 

433 4316 41ft 4296 — ft 
820 43 41ft 42 — ft 

12ft 17ft 12V,— 'A 

18 18 18 — ft 

14ft 14W 14ft + ft 

32ft 3BW 32V,— ft 

49ft 49 4916— ft 


64 13 


57 




236 


44^ 

* 77ft 

* iS » 


36ft 
37ft 
4*16 42V, 
11 11 


11 — ft 


ss 



7 16 192 31ft 
2* 15 425 29ft 


+ ft 
+ ft 

+ ft 

31ft 31ft 
30ft 30ft— lft 
-- 28ft 2BW— Vi 

am am am + ft 

16 15ft 


lift 15^ 


1X8 58 
1-32 X6 
20 IX 
56 27 

IBS 72 

AnltaUPfX40 6* 
I Anlxtr at 1* 
Aftsa Wfe 
Anthem X4 7 
i Antony -44B 13 
Apadia 78 


20 

2041 

37ft 

36ft 

34% 

— 

% 

49 

5 

IB 

17* 

17* 

— 

ft 

7 

56 

15% 

15 

IS 

— 

* 

8 

150 

30* 

27* 

a 

— 

* 

13 

115 

30* 

30* 

39% 

— 

ft 


lias 

Mb 

3* 

3* 

— 

ft 

21 

799 

30* 

29 

29% + 

% 

21 

/Ub 

25* 

as* 

25% 

+ 

* 

19 

17 

37 

36* 

36* 



25 

145 

11* 

11% 

11% 

— 

* 

12 

20/ 

20ft 

19% 

20% 

+ 

* 

10 

635 

73ft 

73 

73% 

— 

ft 


ft 

Mft 

54* 

64% 

+ 


21 

619 

itm 

17* 

18 

— 

* 


24 

IS 

14* 

15 

+ 

« 

16 

820 

16* 

16 

16* 



/ 

10 

13% 

Uft 

13% 

— 

* 

11 

317 

11* 

10% 

If 

— 

% 


ApcbPwt^^^H 
AocbP W12X0O11X 


>72 


14 


lft 1 1ft + ft 
17ft 17ft 17ft 
25ft 25 25ft + ft 
31M 31 31ft + ft 
29ft 29 29ft + ft 
38ft 37ft 38 — ft 
... 13ft 13ft 13ft— ft 
,14b J IS MW 21ft 20ft »ft- ft 
2*0 12* 7 967 


ApPwaf 2*5 105 
ApPwPt 4.16 1X4 
ApPwpf 3X0 12X 
AptDta 1.12t 2 S 23 
AnriMg 1.141 *5191 
ArcfiDn ‘ 

ArtxPS 

AriP pt 358 125 
Ark Bat 40 IX 9 
Arkla lx* 

ArinRt 
Anon 
Armcpf 210 
AnnsRs 48 
Arm Win 170 
ArmWpf 375 10.9 
AroCp 170 3* I 
ArowE 78 17 S 
Artro 72 IX 
Arvtns . 9 

Arvlnpf 200 37 


206 

346 


» 

. 315 

AS 17 66*3 
170 
1137 
95 12 

21 0 151 
37 » 548 


22ft 21ft 21ft— ft 
2Bft 28ft 2846 + ft 


22ft 2I_ — ft 


22ft 21ft 21J6 

lift 11 lift— ft 
22ft 22ft 22ft— ft 
22ft 22ft 22ft 
37ft 36ft 37 - ft 


40Z 34Vi 34ft 34ft 


M 

200 

178 

262 

1 


33ft 32ft 33ft + ft 
\SH Wft 16ft 

r 2Ift 21ft — lft 

22ft 22ft— 16 
S3ft 53ft 53ft + ft 

433 2214 21ft 22 

Audi Oil 1*0 5* 432 28ft 28ft 28ft + ft 

> AoWOpf 450 108 S 41ft 41ft 41ft— ft 

AanroS X9* in| 24 soft 37ft 37ft- ft 

ASdDG 2X0 4* 9 HN6 5MJ »ft 5ft- * 

AadOnf 475 57 5 70V, W 9? — T 

i AfCVEl 248 9.9 B 48 2Sft 34fc M 

AtlRlCt, 3X0 6* 20 3619 45ft *5W 

All RCPt 3X0 IX 
AtlRcpt 2*8 1* I 

AttasC a 47 15ft 14ft lSVi + ft 

AuSol 72 17 16 921 25U 34ft 25 +lft 

AutaOl 62 14 20 XO 4SW 44ft 4m- ft 

AvcoCp 10 20 49ft 49ft 49ft + ft 

i AVEMC *0 2* 12 15 fflb 23ft 23ft + 16 

Awrr *0 U 16 348 3816 3Bft 38ft 

Avlalln 7 345 13ft l2ft l|ft + «■ 

Avnet 50 17 T7 1463 37ft 36ft 57ft 
Avon 2X0 8* 11 3786* 2Zft 22ft + ft 

A yd In 11 83 atft 26ft 2Bft— ft 


X8 15 
15 13 
57 » 
14 15 


10ft BMC 48 
18ft Bulmcj 50 
15 Bfcrimi 72 
18ft Boktar 76 
ft viBokfU 
28K, BallCp 178 
lift BallYMt 70 
7ft BollVPk 
30ft BattGE 370 ... 
36Vi BaltPfB 4JSB 1X6 

LIP 3* 10 


U 12 
15172 
12 
75 7 



1J 12 
U 5 


L18 

240 _ 

_ .pfXUeiaa 
26ft BkNY 2X4 54 6 
ft 15ft BnkVaa ixo ix 9 
ft MVS BnkAm 152 87 9 
Vi 40 BkAmpt 5.190127 
Hi lift BkAmpt 2X8 
ft 22ft BkARly 240 7* 9 
37ft BankTr 270 .fl 7 
ft 19ft BkTro# ia 104 
Hi 7ft Banner JOo 2 18 
ft 19 Bond 44 IX 11 

ft 18 BamGP JO 34 7 

ft 32ft Barnet IX U 9 
Ik 19ft BaryWr M 23 16 

8ft BASIX .12b 5 13 

ft T7VS BausCft 28 2* 17 

lift BaxtTr 73 27 70 

ft 16ft Bov Fin J W 
19ft BOVSIG 2X0 9.1 8 
ft 28ft Beortnp 1X0 26 12 
24ft BOOtCo 170 55 9 

ft 44 Vr Soot Pf *38 83 
30ft BectnD 178 27 14 
AM BokOf _ „ 

ft 9ft Bokerpt 170 *■? 

ft 12% BokfeiH 48 2X 0 

ft 1W6 BelHwl 56 IX 10 

im BafHWfrf XJ 13 
66 BOllAH 640 7* B 

K 22ft BCE e 278 

A 19ft Boll Hid 72 U 13 

27ft BellSos 2*0 77 0 

I A 35ft BOteAH fl U20 

ft Bern Is * 1X0 3* It 

6 T3 end* i pt GJ U s 

* » PwrtCP. “J W * 

A 32 Bonefpf 450 123 

AWft aerwtpj XM U 
ft 17 BWnetpf 250 12* 

6 3ft OerartB -IJo U U 
h 7ft BotvEn 

h 3ft Bertuyy 

6 im BestPd 
ft 14ft 
6 37ft 
ft IM 


132 

1323 

11 

164 

370 

6182 

50 

M7 

36 

737 

1 


344 

92 


50 

255 

651 

3921 

12 

31 

99 

1498 

3 

200 

207 

7 

7 



19ft Beveriv 71 S if 
10ft BloTtir XO 35 17 
17ft BlockD M IS 13 
20 BIckHP 1-92 8.9 8 
14ft BtatrJn 50 *4 13 
£ BIcfcHR 240 45 13 
Kft Boeing 140 27 8 
m Bobec 170 44 19 
46 Bo***C Pt&OO 8.9 
15ft BoitBer .10 4 80 

4996 Borden 272 4.1 9 
10ft Borowa 
4Vk Bormns 
2m BasEd —• ... 

63 BOSE Pt 8X8 11 J 
9 BaxEar Ll7 11.1 
lOW SnCpf 14* 1IJ 
ua Bowtrn 73 XO 9 
sn ariosi ixo SJ 9 
BrlSlM 1X0 27 16 


.92 19 IB 


374 9.1 7 


41 


911 12ft 12ft 12ft + ft 
449 34ft 34 34 — ft 

851 17ft 17ft 17ft— ft 
71 22V, 22ft 32ft + ft 
301 lft 1ft m 
242 47ft 47 47ft— ft 

414 13ft 13ft 13ft 

49 10ft Wft 10ft + ft 
501 40ft 39ft 40ft + ft 

lOz 42ft 42ft 42ft— 1 
445 2916 38ft 2*ft— ft 
SBO 5ft 516 5ft 

6816 59ft 68 + ft 
45ft 44ft 45ft— lft 
5116 50V, SOft— 1 
■ft 37ft 37ft— ft 
26ft 26ft 26ft — ft 
18ft 18ft 18ft— ft 

4216 4216 4216 

15ft Wft 15 — 16 
32V6 31ft 31ft— ft 
45ft 65 4516— ft 

34 34 34 — ft 

1116 lift 11(6 
33ft 23 25 

24 23ft 231k + ft 
W« 48ft 49+16 

27ft am am— ft 

12ft 12ft 12ft + ft 
20ft 27ft a 
14ft 14ft Wft 

25 24ft am— ft 
am am 20%- ft 

■ 37V) 37ft + ft 

29ft 28ft 20ft— ft 
54ft 53ft 54ft + ft 
45ft 45 45 — ft 

7ft 714 7ft— ft 
im Wft Wfc+ft 
15ft Wft ISft— ft 
3998 2916 29ft 29ft + Hi 
STx 29V, 2916 29M 
668 82ft 12 82ft + ft 
27ft 27ft 27ft- ft 
24VS 34ft 24(6— ft 

■ft am s»+ ft 
49ft 49 49ft + ft 
27ft 27ft 27ft + ft 
nan — iu> 

3714 3*46 36ft— 16 
lOz 34 V. 36ft 36ft 
50Z164VI 164% 164%— 1 
ISOz 19% 19% 19% 

794 5ft 5 5% + ft 

1614 15ft 15% — ft 
5ft 5ft 5ft + ft 

13ft 13ft 13ft 
28% 20ft 2016— ft 
47ft 47V, 47% — (6 
23% 2316 ZJ%— ft 
36 34ft 34ft— ft 
23ft 33 27ft — 16 

26 25ft 25ft— ft 
27ft 27ft 27ft + ft 
23ft 21% 23ft— ft 
SO 49ft 49ft 
63ft 4Mk 63ft 
43ft 43ft 43ft— 1 

__ 56% 56 56 — ft 

m 27ft 36ft 2716 + ft 
4M 67ft **ft 67ft— % 
793 24ft 23% 29ft- ft 
2* 6ft 6% 6ft- ft 

389 25ft 3» JSft 
400Z 75 74 75 +1 

19 10ft 19ft 10ft 4- ft 
31 12ft 13ft 13ft— ft 
603 £3ft 23ft 23ft 

50 30ft 30ft 30ft— ft 
339 54ft 54% 54ft— ft 


154 

30 

4093 

59 


10 

453 


101 

1021 

1234 

■ 

55 

1417 

1M6 

1698 

63 

1118 

162 

7181 

1X14 

17 


Market Hit By Profit-Taking 


United Press fmenwitomd 

NEW YORK — Prices on the New York 
Stock Exchange were sharply lower in active 
t rading late Monday as profit-takers moved in 
after five weeks of gains. 

The Dow Jones industrial average was down 
1524 to 1,274.73 an hour before the dose. The 
Dow gained 12-25 last week. 

Declines led advances by a 2-1 ratio. The five- 


Eppd said some investors may have been 
concerned by reports that interest rates could be 
about to rise after trending downward for sever- 
al months. 


Although prices in tobies on these pages are 
from the 4 P.M. close in New York, for time 
reasons this article is based on the market at 3 
P.M. 


hour turnover was 87.1 million shares, com- 
pared with 98.1 milli on in the corresponding 
period Friday. 

Hugh Johnson of First Albany Corp. in Alba- 
ny, New York, said the market advance had 
become “labored'’ in the past week and finally 
buckled. 

He said concern over the possibility or inter- 
est rates heading higher had re-emerged. 

“Federal Reserve Chairman Paul Volcker has 
been sending loud and clear signals that exces- 
sive growth m the money supply is not going to 
be tolerated,*' Mr. Johnson said. 

He said investors had to ponder the possibili- 
ty of a slower economy with pressure on corpo- 
rate profits in the second and third quarters. 

Dudley Eppel of Donaldson, Lufkin & Jen- 
rette said the sell-off was “not violent” and did 
not reflect any. changes in fundamentals. He 
said the profit-taking was healthy for the mar- 
ket and not likely to last more than a session or 
two. 


On the floor, Unocal was near the top of the 
active list and higher. The stock has fluctuated 
in recent weeks with gains coming on takeover 
rumors. 

IBM was sharply lower on heavy volume. 
Some Wall Street analysts said they were look- 
ing for Brst-quarter results to be about even 
with the 1984 first quarter. 

Eastman Kodak was sharply lower at midday 
after reporting fourth-quarter net of SI J2 per 
share vs. 70 cents in the like period a year 
earlier. The company said earnings will not 
grow as fast in 1985. 

General Motors, Ford and Chrysler all lost 
ground. A newspaper artide said some analysts 
believe it is possible that import restrictions on 
Japanese cars, due to expire March 31, could be 
relaxed. Also, a Federal agency has urged GM 
to recall about l.S million cats to check for 
brake problems. 

Oil issues declined,, with Exxon, Mobil, Phil- 
lips, Sun Co. and Texaco all lower at midday. 

Rockwell International was off a fraction on 
heavy volume. The company announced an 
agreement for its printing presses to be manu- 
factured and distributed in C hina. A block of 
300,000 Rode well shares crossed the tape at 
35^. 


12 Mon Hi 
HRjnLo* Stack 


Div. m PE 


Sfc. Cl«* 

ins H«n low Oooi. on* 



U5. Gypsum and National Gypsum were 
lower at midsession.. A magazine article dis- 
cussed legal problems the companies might face 
because of asbestos building products. 


12 Manta 
Wahlnt Stack 


Dtv. Ykt PE 


Sis. 

mu KM LOW 


Qoso 

Quot.Ch-oo 


5 

30 

15ft 

6ft 

an 

36ft 

33ft 

32% 

25% 

XZft 

42ft 

39ft 

39ft 

17ft 

22ft 

17ft 

21% 

32Mi 

57ft 

7ft 

71(6 

soft 

18% 

65% 

20ft 

12 

15 


3ft BrULnd 
21ft BrltPt 
9% BrllTpp 
2H Brock 
14ft Brdcwv 
20 BkvUG 
19% BkUGpf 
29 BkUGpf 
13 HwnSJi 
22ft BnimGa 
26% ftrmmF 
23ft Bmmtk 
25% BrstIWs 
12 BucyEr 
13ft Bundy 
15% Bunk/tt 
14% Burma 
27 Burling 
35 BrtNtti 
6ft BrtHOPt 
19 BrlNpl 
44% BrtN Pt 

lift tJumcJY 
44ft BwtWi 
12% Btdlrln 
3ft Butin 
10% Buies pf 


5 

6 1138 
1290 


1X2 45 
3.12 85 
2X7 HL7 
195 12L7 
20 X 
1X6 4X 
1X8 2* 
1X0 15 
*8 15 
M 3X 


2.M 115 


1X4 SS 
1X0 25 
53 8.1 
2.12 HU 
5X0*115 
J4 49 
240 45 
52 2X 


1% 19J 


25 34 

8 52 

8 
45 
• IBS 

11 230 

16 709 
V 230 

17 206 
36 20 

7 23 

50 

12 363 

27 461 

0 1387 
9 
4 
500 
16 45 

11 23M 
26 
23 
44 


25 24% 

14% 13% 
4 3ft 
19ft 19ft 
36% 36ft 


s s 


24ft 

29% V% 
41* 41% 
39% 39% 
38ft 37% 
15 14* 

18 17* 

17ft 17% 
17% 16* 
2016 38 
57% 35* 
6ft 6ft 
21 SOft 
49% 49* 
17% 16% 
67ft 41% 
20% 19% 
5 4% 

11 W* 


24% 

14%+ (A 
3% 

19% 

36*+ % 

23 

31 

34% +1% 
28% — 1 

41ft 

39*— * 


14% 

18 + % 
17% — % 
17% +1 
30 —ft 
$*%— 4% 
6* 

20%+% 
49* — % 
17 

41ft— f 
19ft — % 
5 

10ft 


33% 24% CBI In 
87* 63 CBS 
0% 4% CCX 
10% 1% CCX Of 
49 27 CIGNA 


1X00 51 11 . 156x 27% 27% 27% + % 


300 


”7% *»*** 


X0% ,21ft CNAFn 
M% 8% CNAI 
41% 34% CPC lid 
19% Mft CPNfl 
Z7ft 10ft CSX 
38% 22 CTS 
12% 7ft Caine 


35 M 7551 
15 218 
1J5 115 ir 
2X9 U 
235 92 


15 

1-3DOI1X 21 
230 55 10 1163 
1X0 73 9 133 
IM 4.1 8 6283 
1X0 2* 16 237 



80% 70% 79% 

8 7ft 7% 

W 10 W —% 
47% 46ft 46ft— ft 
29% 29% 29ft— M 
Sft 5ft Sft f % 

fo%3SSft-* 

40% 40 4816 + % 

S*’SSiS 


SSi 

30* 38ft 39 + * 
12ft lift 12 — % 


33* 22ft Cabot 52 29 10 49 31% 31* 31*— ft 
13ft 8% Caesar 15 1797 11* 11% 11* + * 

19 lift Cnl Fed 52 15 6 772 17* 16% 17%-* 


47ft 32* CriFdpf AW 103 _ 
24% 13% Caflhn 3Sr 15 92 
18* lift Comm I .12 5 

30ft 15* CRUc 0 X0 
9% Sft CmoR a .161 
14% 12% CpRpf 0 250 
72% 54* CamSn 250 19 11 
44% 28* CdPacu 1X0 
21* 14* CaiPEa 50 
179% 123% Croats JO .1 16 
40ft 30% CroHta 154 33 II 
17 % jo® cad no P XS 
40% 2<W CarUsta MB 2X 11 
23% 13% COSFI X0 IX 12 
26* 19* CarPw 2X0 103 7 
23* 19ft QrPpf 357 115 .. 
49% 36ft CarTec 2.10 4X II 
11% 7ft Carrol 47 7 IS 

41* 30ft CnPlr IJO If 19 
32* 18* CartHW 132 AS » 
34(6 19ft CaiWI S2 IX 12 
15* 9* CascNG 130 IX 7 
18ft 9* CastICk 
33 15* CsttC pt 11 J 

Site 7 Sft CatrpT 50 75 
23* 16 Coca 28 23 10 
92* 62* Cetanoe 4X0 45 8 
15 7ft Crony n ji« .1 » 
41* 30ft Cental 230 55 9 
26* 17 Centex n 
23% 16% CHlMW 2X2 9.1 
25% 16* CenHad 2X4 115 
26* 20* CHud Pt 292B123 
23ft 18% CenllLt 232 95 
17% M CnllPS 1X0 93 
23ft 17ft CnLOEJ 156 9X 
35 29ft CLaEIPf All 12X 
14* 7% CeMPw 1X0 135 4 
19* 14 CnSaya 44 43 11 
IB* 10% CVTPS 150 1BJ 5 
14* 7* Central 
10% 7* Cntry T1 
zs% 10ft CanvIH 
27ft Mft Crt-taed 
Mft 17 QsnAIr 
26* 16% Cfwnpln XO 
07ft 19 Own I of 130 
43% cnmi pf A60 


179 

1 

227 


JB 7J I 
2X0 UX 9 
30 27 12 
XO 17 40 
~ 13 


54 

10* 

12* 

6* 

11* 

55% 


0 CbamSP 

1 vlChrtC 
% vldifHt, 

1% vlChrtpr 


X0 


44 II 1549 
948 
490 
291 

2X0 7J 6 T773 

44ft 34ft cnasepf SL25 11 J 29 
58 48 ChoMPt 657*117 72 

57% X> Chase pf 9.38*17.? 86 

21% Uft Chelsea 56 33 9 42 

34% 24ft dunned 152 49 13 91 

41* 23% CftNYs 236 SB 6 1011 
41ft 2Tft CUNY Of 1X7 46 4 

58% 48 OlNYpf 457elU 86 
56ft 46 CTlNYpr 559*11.1 .. 2 

37% 31% Chespk 134 3X 11 41 


46 46 46 + % 

16% 15% 16% + % 
14 14 14 

1* 17* 19 +% 

5% 4% 5ft + ft 
12% 12% 12% + * 
64ft 64% 64*— * 
404 44* 44 44 

58 23* 20% 20ft— M 
37 173 171 171*— 1 
TOO 48* 47* 47ft— % 
105 lift 11 11 — * 

140 am am am — % 

113 25% 25* 25% + * 
893 25ft 29ft 25% + * 
21 23* 23% 23* + * 
42 45% 45* 45% 

164 11 10% Wft— % 

TO 42% 42 42 + % 

271 27% 26% 26% — ft 
420 33ft 32* 32*— * 
66 14V* 14% 14*— M 
775 12% 12% 12%— * 
15 22 21* 21*- % 

22BS 34% 33% 33*— * 
12 22% 22% 22* 

690 92* 91ft 91*— % 
644 9* 9 9* + M 

554 41% 40* 40ft— % 
24 36 25% 21 

6 1513 22% 22ft 22% — % 
5 149 Mft 23* 21 — U 

2 22* 23* 23*— * 
0 131 23* 23 23* + * 

7 lM9x 17% 17% 17ft 

4 1755 Z1* 21% 21* + ft 
“ 33* 32% 33% 

10% 10* 10% 

IB* 18% W*— % 
17* 17% 17% + ft 
10ft 9* 10* + % 

is* io 10* 

23 22* 22* 

699 26ft 25% 25V,— * 
172 24* 23ft 23ft— ft 
2014 23* 23* 23ft— ft 
20 25% 23 25 — ft 

30 5Z% 52ft SZ%— ft 


13 

273 

410 

46 

032 

131 


9* 

2% 


9 

2% 


158 


39% 321% awPn 
40% 29% Chevm 
36% 10* CNWSt 
200 we* CMMiw 
75 53% CMMJPt 

25% 14 CNPnT 

15 7ft CMkFufl 

41% Mft atrbCr 
10 5 Chrtain 

13% 9ft amma 
54 42 Chrmpt 

36* 20ft Cbrvilr 
62% 34% Chubb 3 2X0 
34% 31ft Clwnta JO 
45% >5* Cla SwH 
15% 0% ClnOC 
37 24ft OnO pt 
66% 50 CMP * 

66 40 CtaGpl 

60 50 CtaGpl . 

70 SB* CtaGPt HU0 U2 
20% 20 OnMIl J2 2J 39 
36 21* ardK 

30* M* ClrCIfy 
21% 13% Circus 
46% 27ft Cltterp 
M 68% CHICPPf feJleiiX 

99* 73% CHcp pfA USell J .. 

44% 32 Cttvln* 2X0 5X 10 

as 49% cfrtauf zm u 

25% 21* Cfylnpf 2X7 11X 
11* 6* anbtr 32 IS 

36ft 23% CWkE 1.10 35 19 

16 6* ClavHm 16 

22* 17 dvat 1X0 A7 0 
20* 73* CtovEl 251 104 
16% 10 ae<n* XO A7 
20 16* ClYPfcpf 1X4 HJ5 

31* ZBft Clenn 1 JB A0 10 
10% 14* CtebMn 
11 33% OueltP 

79% Mft Cluffaf 
22% 12* Caadm 
30* 23% Coastal 
36% 24* CtfiPf 
66 49% Cocoa 

19% 9% Coloco 

34 23* CMmtn 


9* — * 

3% 3 3 + ft 

55* 44 54ft— * 

44ft 44* 44ft 
55ft 55* 55* 

33ft 52 52 — * 

a m 20% 2o* — % 

31% 30% 30* — % 
41ft 40% 40*— % 
40% 40% 40%— * 
55% 55% 55ft— ft 
£» 41* 53ft— Hr 
. 36ft 36% 36%+ % 
5 X 13 1361 37ft 16% 36ft 
7.1 0 1931 14% 31ft 34 — * 

9 1317 25 M M — 1 

65 297 150 144 148 —1* 
45 67 65 65 — U 

9 52 23* 22* 23ft 

JBt 3X144 07 Sft Bft 5ft+% 

XW 15 69 41% 41 41 

31 11% lift lift— % 

114 12ft 12 n — * 

13 52 51 SI 

1X0 3XS 7517 3M32%33 — ft 
17 14 245 60% SOft M 
„ 25 U 1312 33* 31* 32*— 1 

3.12 60 8 12 45 45 45 

2.16 MX 6 1351 14* 14% IS + % 

A75 115 550z 15* 34% 35* 

950 I4X Kb 64* 46 46* 

MB 1A1 HOC 46 66 46 

952 14.1 40Z 67% 67% 67% +1 

30z 77% 77* 77% +2 
79 25* 25% 25% 

54 35 34ft 34%+ ft 
190 Wft 29% 29*— ft 
612 22* 21% 21ft— ft 
7 3485 45ft 44% 44ft— 1ft 
203 TS* 75 75* +1* 

4 90ft 98* 90*+ ft 
419 39% am 39% 

4 61% 61% 61% 

299 24* 24* 24*— % 
120 7ft 7% 7* 

5T0X 31 30% 31 + * 

60 15% 15 IS — ft 

5 21% 21% 21%— * 

19 10ft 109b— % 
12* 12ft 12%—% 

19 17% I7ft 17% 

306 29% 29% 29*+ % 
747 19 10% 18% + ft 

441 29* 28* 29 + % 

5 lift 10ft Wft + * 

871 20% 20% 20% — ft 

61 30* 29% 30 

2 33* K* 33* 

61ft 61 61ft- ft 

16ft 14 76ft 

20 27ft 20 


2X6 


2.1 IS 
J 17 
M 
4X 


S 4851 
31 


1X0 

7X0 

XO 


IX 10 
15 _ 

20 12 
15 7 
35 

45 13 2045 
1653 

1X0 43 tO 215 


1.19 

2J6 


26% SB% Colo Pal Mfb 12 10 2455 25% 24% 24ft- ft 


JO 

■36 


IJ 13 
2J 18 

4 


9X0 106 
1X0 111 
2X0 115 


45* 27% CoilAtk 1J1 19 
20% 9% CMFdss .16 J IS 
31% 20% Cal Pen 1X0 SX 9 
63% 39ft CuHlMl 250 A3 W 
37% 27 Cot Gas Ilf 9X 9 
107% 96 CSOpfoUtt MX 
43ft 27ft Comb In 2X8 49 It 
35% 29* CrnbEn 1X4 11 13 
16% 8 ComcHe 
20* 1S% ComMtl 
39% 11% Comdre 
28% 21% CfnwC 
16% 13 CwEta 

17 13* ONE pt 

101 « CwEpf 11 JO UX 

67% Sft C«Epf BL3B 124 
22* 10% CWEpf 
24* 20% CwEpf 
67 54% CwEpf 

59 46, CwC Pf 

23% 16* CemES 
32% 20* Comsat 
33 16% CPms 

36% 26 Cenipgr 
17* 11 ComcSc 
46* 29 Culm 
30% 19% CcnAsi 
23 Uft Conalr 
18% 12% Coant ■ 152 
26 19* CnnNG 2X0 


423 

129 


417 


985 
16 
. S979 
4 5405 

28 


31 


40 44* 44*— % 

20* 19% 19*— % 
28% 27% 27% - * 
60% 59% 59% — * 
33% 32% 3316 + % 
40zM6ft 106* 106*— I* 
334 42% 41% Cft 
684 36% 35ft 35%+% 
16* 16* 14% + % 

18* 10* 10*— * 

13* 12% 13* + * 

20% 28* SB* t 

16 15* 15*— Hi 

17 16ft 16% 

n0zW2ftlKftM2ft+2ft 

lOOz 57ft 67% 57% +1 
137 105 n 22ft 22% 22ft— 

2X7 1L7 10 24% 24% 34% — « 

0X0 12J 10Qz 66 66 66 — ’ 

72* 12J J3Bz 59 59 59 

232 VJ S 98 M 23% 23%- * 

130 35 12 463 32% 31 31*— ft 

24 3 26 542 32ft 31% 32ft- % 

XO IX 12 69 34ft 33* 34ft- ft 

8 997 Mft Mft 16ft- ft 
36 2504 42% 41 41% -1 

J7 3X14 2M 29% 20% 29 —ft 

.MB 7.0 n 137 23 22% 23 + * 

50 7 4 17ft 17 V. 17*— * 

•4 I 17 25 24* 25 t In 


17% 10% Conroe xo 2.9 6 156 13% 13% 1J% + * 


12 Month 
HW Low Stack 


Dl«. YkL PE 


MB High Low 


Clue 

QuaLOfM 


31* 22% 
42 35 

44ft 38 
34% 23 
36 20* 

42% 31 
12* 4ft 
29* 13* 
48* 23* 
50% 25* 
49ft 25 
28% 17ft 
2Z% 9* 
25* 10* 
49ft 25* 
25ft 11* 
25ft 10% 

sm io* 

M% 7* 
14* 7 

25* 11 
16ft 7* 
42* 23ft 
9% 4% 
3ft % 

”4%”% 
26 10 
40* 34* 
40 33 

3Mb 22% 
3% 1 
32% 26 
35ft 30 
27 10% 

19% 13% 
26% 11% 
21ft 11% 
27ft 19* 
M 16ft 
Mft 10% 
70 J9ft 
99* 29* 
42ft 22% 
55ft 39* 
9ft 4* 
40ft 27 
70ft 38ft 
28* 16* 
23 15* 

23* 19* 
50* 34* 
38ft 27* 
51* 43 
63* SO 
26* 18* 
31% 12ft 
88* 61* 
10% 8* 
45* 30* 
48 27ft 


ConsEd 2X0 KX 7 
c«lt: pf 4X5 115 
CoriE pf 3X0 UX 
GoraFd 1X4 A2 10 
CmPris 1X0 10 12 
Cm NG 233 SX 8 


CnP pfB 450 17X 
CnP pfO 7X5 17X 
CnP ptE 732 T7J 
CaPpfG 7J6 165 
CUP mV AM 17J 
CnPprtJ 3X0 17X 
CnP pTT 2J8 175 
CnPpfH 7X0 MX 
CnP prR 4X0 17.1 
CnPprP 3J8 173 
CnPprN 3X5 17.1 
CnPprMZSO MX 


CnPprL 253 165 


CnPprS 4X2 
CnP arK 2X3 172 
CirtlCp 1X0 67 


ContIO 
Conti Id 


1577 30% 
» 41* 
12 41% 
1178 34% 
971 M 
173 47U 
767 6* 

420, 27 
Rt 43* 
2431b 45 
300, 46 
49 25* 
74 21 
33 22 
52% 45% 

20 23* 
130 23* 

10 22ft 
10 15* 

21 13ft 
27 23* 
14 14ft 

39% 


CntlUel 
Han 


Ct1ll._ 
ContTH 

a Data 

CnDipf 

Crowd 

vICaokU 

Conor 


L72 7X 9 
31 15 14 
450 1U 
1X0 34 12 


... 3* 

20 42ft 
1030 lft 
2110 23ft 
1946 30* 
30r 40 
83 29* 


37 15 
3X 13 
X4 16 


25 32 
3 M 


152 47 IS 

Cnoel Pf 250 U 
Cewut XOe J 3 
CoprTr- 41 14 » 
Cerovb XO 15 17 
COPwtd -X4 3.1 
CpwMpf 2X8 115 
Cardura X4 
Coral n 56 

CamG 256 
ConiGwl 
CorBJk 1X0 
CexCm 54 
Crate 
Owe 1X0, 46 11 
CruyRs 24 

CruekN XO IX 
CrckN Pf LIB 115 
CrmpK 150 5.1 10 
CrwnOi M 

CrwZd 1X0 IX 13 
CTZelpf 4X3 95 
CrZelpfCASO 7.9 
Cuftro 40 24 < 
Culbwts 45 

CumEn 250 2J 4 
currinc i.waiao 
Curnw 150 JX 10 
Cyclops 1.10 23 10 


Ml 1% 
634 32% 


B2 35* 
489 W* 


190 19% 
AST 32 


35 Mft 
3 22 
35 22* 
IS 


30ft 3DW— * 
40ft 40ft— 1 
43* 43% + * 
34% 34%+ ft 
33% 33% — * 
42ft 42% 

6* 6* 

26ft 26* + ft 
43* 43*— 1* 
44* 43 —1 
45* 46 +1 

25 25ft 
20* 20*— ft 
21 * 22 + * 
45ft 45% + ft 
23% 23*+ ft 
ZZ% 23 + ft 
22* 22ft + % 
15 15* + * 

13* 13ft + ft 
22 % 22 %—% 
Mft 14ft— * 
38% 39 — 1% 
9* 9%+ * 
3% 3%+ ft 
41 42ft + ft 
1% 1%— ft 
22% 23ft— ft 
37* 37ft— % 
40 40 +1 

% ’KtE 
1 SS* 

!* lists- 

21ft 22 +% 

14* 14*— * 
22 22 


403 


182 77* 
0 39* 


22ft 


621 4d% 48 


282 53ft 
138 0ft 


47 34* 
1063 74 


14% 14*+ 

76 76*— lft 

30% am— % 

40 40 

50* soft— 1% 
— * 


471 25* 
19 19ft 


34ft 34ft- ft 


23% 
183 SOft 


19 19 — ft 


1762 33% 
16 48* 


18 57% 
6 34% 
1375 31ft 


267 83* 
23 U* 


32 


36* 

47 


49* 30 — * 
33* 33*— % 
48% 40ft+ ft 
56% 56% — ft 
24% 34% — ft 
?M 30*— * 
82ft 82*— % 
1®"* 10ft 
35* 35*— ft 
47 47 


22ft 

19ft 

30ft 

lft 

13 


74 

25* 

12% 

► 

Mft 

35% 

»% 

45* 

8% 

65% 

78 

36* 

IS}* 

*7* 

72ft 

61ft 

59 

60 
24ft 
26* 


24ft 

M 

27% 

27* 

30% 

31* 

W 

23% 

IS* 

28% 

22% 

38% 

59 

125% 

74ft 


40 


16% 

MW 

21ft 

54% 

30ft 

41 

X5M 

as 

T 

48% 

54% 

Mft 

36% 

76% 

72* 

69 

25* 

34 

73 

73 

M% 

IBft 

24% 


13% Dallas 
9* DCPnanC 
21ft DonaCp 
5% Danror 

0% Daniel 
60 DartKr 
39ft DafaGn 

13ft Datum 

8% DtaDso 
12% Da> cn 
26ft DavtHd 

11% DaytPL 

45 DPLPl 
20* DeanFs 
24% Deere 
17% MmP 

27 DeltaAr 
4* Deltona 

35% DlxO* 
17* DenMf s 
Mft DeSota 
lift DetEd 
67* DaiEPt 
59 DetEPf 
47ft DetEpt 

46 DetEPf 
45ft DetEPf 
19% DEpfP 
2D DEnrR 
19% DEpfO 
19 DEpfP 
19* DEptB 
19% DEpfO 
19ft DEptM 
24* DEprL 

24ft OEpfK 
13* DetEpr 
17* Dexter 

2^6 DIGtaPf 
16* D IcanS 
34* DtaShpt 
43ft Dlebtat 
77* Dteltal 
45* Dftner 
30 D%l 
3% Dfvnln 
6% Domev 

20% DOmRS 

16 Donald 
32 Droter 
23* DanEV 

2Bft Dover 

25* DawCJl 
35% DawJn 
10% Drew 

15* Drew- 

14* OrexS 
23* Dreyfus 
42* duPonl 
30% duPntpt 
39 duPnfpf 
22* DufceP 
M Dufcenf 
59ft Dukept 
57 Du kept 
21% DUtaPf 

28 Duke pf 
60ft Duke el 
47* Dunam 
lift OuaU 

Oft OvcoPt 
17ft DynAffl 


JO IX 
JO 15 
1J0 A3 


-lBh ix 
AM 48 


JO 13 
J4 IX 
34 20 


“ 133 


7 J0 ... 
XO IJ 
1X0 32 
1.92 83 
JO IJ 


1J6 20 
IJO 4 X 
1X0 35 
1X0 UJ 
V50 65 
9J2 133 
758 12X 
7XS 131 
7J6 127 
2J5 UJ 
324 UX 
3.13 1X0 
212 121 
275 115 
3M 120 
X42 1X0 
4X0 1X4 
A12 133 
221 12J 
XO 25 
X4 A2 
225 21 
IJ* 9J 
ADO HU 
1X0 IX 


0M 

8 722. 

7 1429 
132 
M 22S 
12 82 
HI 3« 
7 1163 
1 


.12 

2J2 95 
56 23 
1.16 U 
IJO 4J 
JO. 21 
1X0 21 
38 17 
50 21 
JB0 26 
2X0 UJ 
50e IX 
3X0 5J 
250 10X 
AS0 105 
2X0 85 
5J0 117 
UD 11X 
7X0 117 
259 100 
285 12X 
8J0 117 
IJ8 27 
2X6 112 
JS 24 
JO X 


10 157 22 21* 21% 

40 5W 13* 12% 13* 

9 296 29% 29% 27% 
282 S% Oft BH 

172 12% 12 12% 

10 B5-U 07% 06* 17% 

21 1762 74 72 72% 

19 2074 21 20% 21 

12 104 11% lift 11% 
7 194 17 M* 16% 

14 699 37* 37* 37* 

7 376 16 15ft 15% 

200, 57ft 57ft 57ft 

M 99 20% 27* 38 

31ft 30% 51 

22 21* 22 

44% 43ft 43* 

6ft 6 Oft 

64% 64 64 

27% 27* 27* 

36 35% 36 

15ft ISft 15* 

05 05 85 

530, 72 70 70* 

14800z 61 41 61 

100z 56* 56* 56* 

ISOUz 58 57% 50 

3 34* 34* 24* 

6 34% 34* 24% 

3B 34ft 23% M 

2 23% 23* 23% 

2 23* 23* 23* 

129 Mft 2f Mft 

64 26% 26 26* 

12 30 29% 29% 

21 31ft 30* 31 

21 17% 17% 17% 

13 52 22% 2Zft 22* 

23 199 15ft lift ISft 

1 27* 27* 27* 

11 2532 19% 19ft 19% 

62 37* 36* 37* 

13 607* 57 56ft 57 

15 3111 123*121*121% 
39 W79 75% 74ft 75* 

5 13 37V, 37* 37* 

4 100 4% 4* 4* 

B65 Bft B Bft 

8 1822 29 2B 

9 70 20* 20ft 20ft 

15 323 53% 53 53* 

13 164 20 27% 27* 

14 366 40ft 39ft 39ft 

10 4411 30 29% 29* 

23 322 47 45ft 46* 

g l2* lift 12* 
21ft 20ft 
n 17* 17ft 17% 

M 750 48* 47ft 48ft 

9 441 lx 52* Sift 52* 

20 33% 33% 33% 

0 43* 43* 41% 

7 4206 29* IBft 29* 
3SOz 75 74ft 74ft 

1S0Z 6fft 69ft 69ft 

Sb 65* 65* 65* 

1 24% 24% 24% 

11 32ft 32 32ft 

388, 69ft 69ft 69ft 

21 2DW TDft 4M 79* 
7 893 15* 15ft 13% 
10 92 12 It* lift 

13 43 Mft 24 24* 


— * 
+ * 
— ft 


+ * 
+ * 
—lft 


— ft 
+ ft 

— ft 


— ft 

— ft 
+ * 

— % 
+ ft 
— * 

— ft 


+i 

— * 
+i* 

7# 
— * 
— * 


— ft 
+ ft 


— * 
— % 

— u 

— * 
+ % 

— % 


+ * 

— ft 

— % 
— * 
— % 
— * 

ft 

— * 
+ ft 

+ % 

+ £ 

+i% 
+ * 


=,S 
— * 


+ 

+ * 


26ft EGG 
21* ESnt 
20% EaaleP 
12 Ew 


M 

50 

1X4 


10% 

14* 

23% 

28ft 

Mft 

M* 

7* 

Bft 

10* 

27* 

18ft 

17* 

H** 

20% 

12ft 

20* 

\ 

35ft 

J6* 

8* 

107 

J* 

21* 

20 

31% 

37ft 

.5% 

17ft 

41* 

14% 


1J0 SJ 
1.94 11X 
U0a 44 
1J0 11 
36 2X 
1X0 3.1 
1X0 44 
J4 U 
58 U 


1% EALWtO 
ft EALwtA 
6% EsAh-pf 
6* EAlrofB 
9* EAlrPfC 
19* EastGF 
12ft EastOM 
60* bleed 
37* Eaton 
20* Edilta 
20* EtScerd 
32ft EalsSr 
13 EDO 

Uft Edward ... ... 
19* EPGCtaf 238 WX 

zn epgpt 
9 errano 
tft Elcar J6 XS 
2% EtecAs 
4% EMM 

7* EMM pf 1X0 HL1 
13% EldSPS XS 3 
11* Elgin JO SJ 
5% Etadnl ^ _ 

SB Mi EmnEI 3X0 3X 
5% Em Rad .94* 7.1 
11* EmrvA 
24ft Emhort 
16* EmpDs 
4 Emppf 
% CnExc 
22%' Enel Cp 72 24 
18* EnisBu 56 IX 
17ft Enaerd, 1X0 u 
51ft EnschPl 67S#I17 
91% Enoch Pfll J3ell J 
1% Entree 
9ft Entero 

16% EntaEn USe 6.7 
16 Entaxin IJO 6J 
23* Equifax 1.70 4X 
3 Eaulmk 
lift Emrrtpf 2J1 155 
211ft Eqt Res 1.74 42 
Oft EqulIC n .12 IX 


20 576 38% 
15 1360 31* 
9 36 26% 

S91 18* 

6217 Sft 
509 2ft 
393 


287 12* 
404 14ft 


37% 30 — ft 

30ft 38%-% 
26% 26* 

18ft 18% 

4% Sft + ft 


11 * 12ft +lft 


.. . 13* Mft+IL 
156 17* 16 M*+l% 
"" 23 24* 24%— % 


562 


195 17ft 17 17 


69* 49% -3% 
sv 30 58ft— * 

20% 28ft 20% 

32 31% 31*— 16 

37 3tft 36* 

13 653 M* 17% 10 — * 
21 1565 32% 31* 32 -IM 


1420165 
7 750 
13 641 
M 926 
0 165 


50 45 
IXOb 44 

176 07 
50 103 



4 

22% 

22% 

22% 




9 

27* 

27% 

27ft 

— 

* 

IS 

382 

14* 

Mft 

Mft 

— 

ft 


16 

10* 

9* 

10% 

+ 

* 


103 

4% 

4* 

4* 



16 

62 

5% 

5* 

W 


■ft 


7 

9% 

Mi 

9% 



31 

MS 

27 

36* 

V 

+ 

ft 

M 

92 

16 

10% 

16 

+ 

% 

37 

434 

9% 

m 

Bft 


% 

M 

414 

7AH 

7| 

Wf 6 

— 

% 

16 

1152 

13* 

124* 

U* 

hp 


» 

ZW 

20* 


20% 

+ 

ft 

10 

183 

32* 

32 

32 


% 

7 

21 

20ft 

at* 

20ft 




100, 

510 

4% 

4 fi 

4% 

+ 

% 


17 323 29% 
14 114 37H 
16 2139 27 
200z SM 

151 108ft 
21 170 2% 

764 10* 
59 19 
7 710 21% 
M 11 37 

152 4% 
5 

6 


14% 


403 41* 
TO II* 


29* 29% 

36 36 - * 

»ft 36%— % 
Sift 53ft—* 
99% 99% — % 
m Tie— * 
10* 10* + % 
10* IB* — * 
28% 29ft— % 
36* 37 — % 
4ft 4% + ft 
M% 14% + ft 
39* 40ft— ft 
11* lift— % 


9% 6* FH tad 
67ft 41* FMC 
22* 17% FPL Gp 
13% 9% FabCtr 
14ft 9ft Facet 
20% 15 Fterchd 


220 15 


172 


9% 

66* 


9U 9ft + ft 
63 63 —2% 


J8 2J 15 


9 1107 22 U, 21* 21%— ft 


5 

40 9 


1X4 45 7 26 


_ . X0 AX 11 

am 37% Fat re of am 93 

16* 9% Fall-Id .18 IJ 10 

33 M* FamDlr 
19% 14ft Fanstfn 

33% Z7% FrWstF 

2 BUi 14* Farah 
>3 B* FmDn 
7 4* Fedors 

37% 29% Fed IO> 

45 % 27* FedEx* 

39 29% FdMOO 

19* 10% FodNM 
27 16% FedPBs 70 12 

23 16 FedRIl 

18* 13% FdSanl ... 

56* 42% FedDSf 2X0 43 

31% 22* Ferro 
37 25% Ftdcst 

21% 4 FtaCpA __ _ 

47* 14(6 FtaCPPt 6740185 


_. 12* 
16 13* 
382 20* 


22 J 2S 248 32% 
XOe 35 13 1 17% 


15 

361 


JO IX 19 207 17ft 
11 157 6% 


12% 12% — ft 
13 13% + % 

19ft 19%-% 
42 39% 3B% 39 — % 

72 ISft IS ISft 

' ~ ' 31ft 31* 

T7% 17% + % 

29 29 39 - ft 

22 21% 21* + ft 

12 12% — ft 

_ 6 6ft— ft 
37 36* 36*— % 

23 3857 37% 36% Mft— % 
152 AD 11 72 38% 37ft 38% + ft 

6772 IBft 17% 17%— ft 

360 22 21% 21ft— ft 

1X4 6X 16 121 22ft 22V, 2ft— ft 

JO 44 M 73 18W 17% IBft + % 

198 55% 55 55* + % 

~ 27* 26% 27* +1* 
30ft 30ft 30* 

9% 9*— ft 
36* 36*— U 
4 3% 4 

19 18ft 10ft— ft 
25% 25* + % 
34 34ft— % 


IJO 43 11 
ZOO 6X 10 
70 21 


Jt 
6226 10 
46 37 
32 


9ft 2ft FnSBar 

19% 15* FTrestn 50 4J 10 1131 

26% 19 FtAtlln 81 U 1 

38 31ft FBkSVS IJ 43 1 . . 

33 Mft PBkFta 1JD AD 10 10 30 29* 29* 

68% im FBasf XOa S 11 386 67* 67ft 47ft— % 

27 IB* FstChlc 1J2 5.1 22 1225 26% 26 


28 25* 
098 34* 


71 13% FIBTex 1J0 73 

56 ■« FfBTx Pt 5X70127 

71 11* Fiatv 

IBft 10* FFodA, 

48% 30% Flntsftr 234 SX 
30 U n Flnfsfpt 237 BJ 
12% 7ft FtMISS 
49 31ft PNStB 


26ft 


B 281 16% 16% Mft + ft 


II 


45ft 45 45ft +1 
9 4430 15* 11* 11*— 4 
6 538 18ft 17% 17*— ft 

8 453 47ft 47% 47ft— ft 

_. _ 107 29ft 29 29 — % 

2A 2X 9 3190 10ft 9% 10 + ft 

2X8 57 7 73 49 40ft 48ft— % 

— Tft 

29ft— % 


7% 4ft FtrtPa 



9 

879 

7% 

7% 

30* 20* FatPapi 

2X2 

9X 


230 


29 


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60 

15 

131 



L.'.'i 1 -* 1 

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41 

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07 


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123 


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467 


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123 

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40 

72 

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235 

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XO 

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220 

AJ 

10 

20 




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51% 33 FondM 
12ft 10ft 

66% 47ft 

14% 10 
11 6% 

35ft 26 
11% Sft 
25* 13ft 
34% 2D* 

28* 19 
32* 25 
35% » 

54 ft 35 


2X0 44 311795 45ft 44% 45ft— ft 


FIDaar 136 117 

FtHowd 1X4 2X 15 170 63% 

FostWh X4 3X 13 961 12ft 

F 0*3 IP XO 6.9 15 

Faxbra 1X4 37 54 4 13 26ft 
FMOG 2.130237 363 9ft 

FrpfMc X0 3X 15 IB56 20ft 

Frlutrn X0 2J 15 94 28 

Fruefif b X0-2J 6 451 36% 
FruWPf J» U 23 30ft 

Fuaua X0 t.t 10 204 35* 

FuTOPf 1J5 23 5 55 


12% 12 12ft 

62% 62*— ft 
. 12ft 12*— ft 
9ft 9% 9ft+ ft 
26% 26%+ ft 
■ft 9 

20ft 20ft— ft 
27ft 77ft— ft 
25* 25ft— ft 
30% 30* 

35* 35ft 
55 55 + * 


29ft 15ft GAF 
36% 20 GAF pf 
37ft 2S* GAT X 
34% 19ft GCA 
64% 48ft QEICO 
IBft 4 GEO 
13ft Sft GF Cp 
44% 34ft GTE 
39ft 31ft GTE Pt 
26% 21ft GTE pf 
23ft 19% GTE pf 
10 Aft GalHeu 
56ft 33% Ganett 
23% 17ft GapSfr 
30% 10ft Goartrt 
19ft 13% Goto, 
69ft 53% Gemca 
39ft 30% GnCorp 
17ft 14% GAInv 
46* 29* GnScsfi 
.33 16% GCInme 

Gift 16* GCnpfs 
21 12ft GnOats 
70* xa GnDyn 

65% 48% Gen El 
SMh- 45% GnFch 
31ft 24ft GGTh 
23 12% GnHot 

18% Bft GnHow 
31% 15ft Gnlnst 
60 
85 


.15# J 329 20ft 

1J0 ax 2 35% 

170 37 M 272 34% 

15 1362 31% 

XB IX 11 195 65% 

362 
105 

3X0 73 g 6S» 


270 

2X0 


6 X 


2X0 10. 


li 


1 

13 

31 

1173 

770 

<39 

137 

125 

* 


6% 

7ft 

42% 

37% 

26% 

22ft 

7ft 

a 

M 

13 

10ft 

69ft 


1X8 27 19 

-SB 11 13 

XO 21 15 

M 3X 16 

136 . .... 

170 3X120 2272 40% 
1X3# 9A 43 17 
1X0 ZJ 9 60 

j50 1 J 11 428 

X6 17 2M 
22 564 
1X0 IJ 10 933 
23 15 11 4407 
Z5D AM 10 1906* 57% 
XO 17115 429 31ft 
X0 20 3 109 2Qft 

J4 2.1 34 89 11* 

70 2J 31 1620 23ft 

44% GnMJIb 2J4 37 14 1061 57ft 

61 GMof iXOr 63 6 14152 79% 


45% 

32% 

31 

20% 

77ft 

63ft 


66* 33 GM En .180 J 807 66* 

30% 33* GMotpf 375 9X 6 30% 

50% 44% GMOtPf 3X0 97 7 50* 

10% Tft GNC .16 27 17 164 Tft 
12% 7% GPU 6 1281 13ft 

74 40% GenRP 1X4 2X 25 721 7f* 

12ft S GnRofr 7 m 11* 

53ft 39% GnStonl IJO 3X 13 285 51% 
12ft 18 GTFlPf IJO UX 300z lift 
8ft 5% Gonsco 9 334 6 

30% 13ft GnRod .10 X 26 1305 

Zta 15 Gensfa TXO 199 

36 M GenPtl 1X2 28 17 330 

26% 18 GaPoc JO 11 27 2197 


37M 33 GaPCPt 2J4 6.1 
36* 32% GaP PfB 274 6.1 
28% 23ft GaPw pf 3X4 123 
30 25ft GaPwpf 3.76 127 
21 17% GaPwpf 254 12X 

21 17 GoPwpl 252 127 

25ft 21% GaPwpf 275 11J 
66ft 52 GaPwpf 7 JO 12X 
62 51% GaPwpf 772 1ZX 

mb 20ft GerfcPc 
n% II GorbSS 
11% 7ft GlantP 
11 5* GlbrFn 

26% 16* GMIHUI 
Mft 42% Glftatte 
17* lift G tease 
|9% <ft GloMM _ 

» 17* GlobM pf 150 17.1 

12 ft Sft GMNug 
4% 1* GldN wt 

27% li GtdWP 
MU 34ft Gdrfcfi 
39ft 23 Goodvr 

19 13* GanhJ 
32% 19 Gould 
44% 36ft Grace ... . 

Mft 47 Gralnor 174 IJ 15 
15* Bft GtAFtH AO 27 0 
18 11* GtAtPc 

45% 27% GtLkJn 
21ft ISft GNIrtl 

43% 31 GINNk 

67ft 51% GINNk pt475 
20ft 16% GtWFln 50 
19* 9% GWMSP 
16ft lift GMP 

20 18ft Grryh 
Sft 2* G roller 

13ft Bft GrawGs 
10ft 6* GrubEI 

ztft 21* Gnimn 

Mft 24ft Grumpf 2J0 I8X 
8ft 4% Grunted .16 12 34 


17* 
23 
35ft 
26 
13 17 
1 36* 
35 28 
16 29% 
11 20ft 
& 20% 
49 24ft 
13900, 63ft 

iaib 6i% 


1.16 45 W 367k 33ft 
.12 5 18 657 23% 

36 11% 
5 1060 9% 

52 2.1 M 155 24% 

2X8 AX II 439 57ft 

69 13% 
J4 5J IBM 4ft 

63 20% 
13 1108 12ft 

361 Sft 
70 J 7 1693 26ft 

156 S3 7 341 29% 

15 U 7 B5B4x 28* 

52 XO 9 74 17ft 

X8 2X 65 305 26% 

2X0 65 10 2973 41% 

179 68ft 
394 Uft 

a 018 Mft 

1X0 IX 11 699 

1X5O10L0 7 50 

152 A0 ■ 2116 

77 7 

X3 >0 1047 
41 737 

172 11.1 9 22 

IJO 43 11 1699 

0 1619 5* 

JO 2X 17 190 12ft 

XS J 14 943 10ft 

1X0 .35 8 832 2Bft 

2 26ft 
' 7% 


43% 

10ft 

38ft 

61% 

27ft 

17% 

15% 

28% 


24 Mft Guardi J2 IJ 13 21 23ft 

36* 20 Gullfra X8 27 9 45 26 

35 25% GHWst 70 27 9 970 32% 

34% lift GUNRS 23 7 252 16ft 

14% 10 GlfSIUt 1X4 12X 6 4717x 13% 

30 24 GHSUpr 3X5 1X3 32X 29% 

33* 27 GHSUpr 4X0 13X 50x 32ft 

20% 12ft GAera 55e &4 10 M6 Mft 

17% 14 Sultan X0 35 13 267 17% 


20 29ft— ft 
35% 35% — % 
33% 34%—* 
27ft 30% — ft 
64ft 64* + ft 

5* 6 + % 
7% 7% 

<2% 42ft + % 
37% 37%— % 
26% 26% + % 
22 % 22*+ ft 
7 7ft + ft 
54 S4 - ft 
23ft Z3ft— ft 
13ft U + ft 
18 IBft + ft 
67ft 69ft— ft 
39* 39*+ ft 
16* 17 
44 44(6—1 

31* 22 
31 31 

19ft 19ft— ft 
76 77ft +1ft 
63 63% — 1 

56ft 57% +1 
30% 31ft + ft 
20ft 20% — ft 
10* Mft + ft 

21 21ft— ft 

56 51%+Ift 

70 78*— I 

63ft 63%— 2% 
38% 38%+ % 
30 50% + ft 

7ft 7ft 
11* 12 — ft 
69% 7tM —7* 
11 lift— ft 
50ft SOft— ft 
11 % 11%— % 
Sft 5% 

17 17ft + % 
22 * 22* — ft 
35% 3Sft+ ft 
25* 36 
36% 37 + % 
36* 36* + ft 
27ft 28 + ft 
27ft 29ft— ft 
SOft 20ft— ft 
20 ft 20ft— % 
Mft 24ft + ft 
63ft 63ft + % 
61ft 61ft + ft 
25ft 2Sft+ % 
22ft 23ft— ft 
10* 11% + % 
9ft Oft— % 
Mft M%— ft 
56* 57 —ft 
ISM 13ft + ft 
4ft 4ft— ft. 
20 % 20ft + % 
Uft 12 — % 
3% 3ft— ft 
25* 2S*— * 
2096 29* + ft 
2 B% 28ft + % 
17* 17ft— ft 
25ft 20 
40 40ft— * 

Wft 66ft + ft 
15 U 
14% 14ft— % 
42% 42%— 1ft 
IBft 18% + ft 
38% 38%— ft 
40ft 60%— % 
26% 26*— * 
16% 17ft + % 
15ft 15ft 
27ft 20M+ ft 
4ft 3 — ft 
12 % 12* 
t0 10ft + * 
20 ft 28ft + ft 
Mft Mft + % 
7% 7ft— % 
Bft 23ft 
25H 25ft— ft 
31% 31%— ft 
15* 15*— ft 
13% 13%— % 
28* 29 + * 

31ft 31ft— ft 
Mft 16% + % 
17 17% 


H 


X6 


lXTalTX ■ 

1X40 97 

.92 10 16 
35 19 
2X 28 
1.9 15 
2X 19 
9 

2L5 18 
25 15 


1X0 


47 14 
A2 9 


J6 IJ 47 
2 US 
J8 2J 30 
JOo IJ 35 

48b 23 1ft 

J6 IX n 
1X0 3X 12 


J4 17 24 


1X0 A4 10 
JSo J 35 


7 4% HRTn 

27ft 19% HallFB 1X0 19 
41 ^ 26% Hofbfn 1X0 57 11 
lft ft Hoiked XB S3 
10 3* Hdlwdef 56 5X 

33* 30* HamrP 2X4 45 
13% lift HanJS 
19ft 15% HanJl 
47 31% Hondlm 

20 I Sft HandH 
2 lft 16* Hanna 
51* 23ft HorOrJ 

SSft 32ft Hartnd ■ 1.12 
12* 7% Harman 
33ft Mft HrpRw X0 
Xtft 22* Harris XB 
17% M* HorGr n 
28% 19 H orace us 
3Zft 23ft Hortmx 128 
16% 13ft Home 1X0 UX io 
23ft 15% HowEls 1X4 7X 9 
13% B Moves* ,10 b 7 10 
34% 15* Hozlotn 
Uft 9 Haring 
13* 9ft Hocks 
23ft 13% HedaM 
22 M* HeHnei 

22 15% Htllta 

45 32 Heinz 

30 12* HalneC 

25ft » HeimP 

6 Sft Hem Co 
37% 37% Harcuta 
20 ft 13ft Home 
29% 19 H ome pf 150 6J0 
41* 28* Hersftv 1X0 XX 12 
18% 5% I H titan 

18ft V Hosnpf 
44* 31ft HewIPk 
3D J7» HMtfl 
19* 12 H15H00T 
13 8% HIV 0ft 

23% 17ft HHflhfd 
60ft 45ft Ml (tan 
44ft 31 Hitachi 
Site 35% Henduv 
76ft 49ft HallvS 
27ft U HomaO 

23 lift HtaFSD 
Oft 8 HnwGpf 1.10 m 

36* 20% HTOtko JO J 31 
17ft f* HimfFn XO 24 5 
60% 4i% Honda xoe 7 io 
66 ft 46% H cnwel l 150 XO 12 
27* 1*ft HoovrU 1X6 A1 9 
26ft 18 HrmBn l.i2 4 A f 
26 20 HrtBfl Pf £98*117 
M Sft Horton 
40* 35* HospCp 50 1.1 14 
Sft 21ft Holelln 2X0 M 13 
34* 20* HauohM 56 24 15 
19* 13% HauFab XO 22 U 
36* » Houalnt 175 A* 5 

73ft 61 Holntpf 6J5 04 

23ft 17ft Houlnd 2X8 IU 6 
Mft 39% HauNG 
20 9* HouOR 

23% lift HowiCp 
26% »ft HuBOnJ 
12* 9% Huffy 
21* 12% HuanTt 

23 iru HuahSa 


J2 

X0 

JO 

.15 

J4 

1X0 


A 15 
2.1 17 
27 26 

XI M 

S 11 

SO IJ 15 
IJO U 13 
29 
7 


2X0 AJ U 
2.10019.1 
XO 2.1 25 
OX 12 
29 9 
XI 

15 10 


220 

X0 

.48 

77 


3 Eft 
139 26* 
1590 31ft 
1113 lft 
247 WM 
1S3 45* 
165 13ft 
56 19% 
121 45ft 
104 10 
UK 19ft 
190 52% 

69 57% 
229 12ft 

16 31* 
1621 S3* 
393 17 
315 27% 
1547 31ft 

31 Mft 
156 22% 
173 Uft 
79 28ft 

32 12* 
673 12 
695 16 
273 17ft 
153 22 

1713 44* 
167 17ft 
173 30* 
10 Sft 
449 36* 

4 s r 

283 39* 
SO (ft 
T 12* 
3936 38* 

16 a m 

70 10% 
384 12ft 
195 21ft 
390 S9% 
63 Bft 

701 5) 

90 75% 
667 16 
KM 22% 
B 9 
I7M 24% 
49 Id 
2143 Sft 
056 64 
2713 26% 
S 25% 
2 25 
34 Sft 
1525 45ft 
216 30 
20 36* 
10 18ft 
05 36* 
37 72* 
4665 22* 
198 47ft 
26 lift 
7 19ft 
30 25% 
154 13% 
657 15* 
449 J|% 


5ft 5ft— ft 
25% 25%— * 
31% 31* + % 
1% lft 
9% TO 

45ft 45% — % 
13% 13%+ ft 
19 10 

45 45 — % 

W% IBft— ft 
19% It*— ft 
Sift Sift— 1% 
56* 56ft— ft 
11% 12 - ft 
31% 31*— % 
32% im— ft 
Mft Mft— * 
27* 27* 

30* 30*— 1 
Mft 15ft 
22 ft 22%— ft 
13* 13* + % 
27ft 20 — % 
Uft 12ft—* 
lift 12 + % 
15ft 15ft + % 
17ft 17*— % 
Mft Mft— ft 
43* 44% + % 
16ft lift + % 
28% 20*— ft 
5ft 5ft— ft 
35% 36% 

20ft Sift— ft 

38% §*-l* 

T2* 4*7 ft 

37% 37% — ft 
28% 2B%— % 
18% 1064— ft 
12 T2%- % 

32ft 23ft — ft 
50% Soft— ft 
32% 32*— ft 
50% 3D»— ft 
74 74ft— 1% 
15% 16 
71* 2l%— * 
Bft 9 + ft 
23ft 34% + * 
15ft lift— % 
54ft $5 
62ft 63ft— 1% 
28 ISft— lft 
Sft Sft 
S » +1 
5 Sft + ft 
45% 45* 

29% 29% — % 
36ft 36*— ft 
10* 18* — ft 
as* 36% + % 
72% 72* + ft 
22* 21*— % 
46* 47ft+ ft 
10* 11 + % 
19% |9ft_ ft 
25% 55ft 
12% 13% — ft 
15 15% 

21% 21% + ft 


12 Month 
Hhm Lew Stack 


Div. YW. PE 


Sb. 

(OOsHMLM 


dose 

QUOLOrtK 


33 21ft Human 
26% 17ft HunlMf 
41 Ve 23% MuttEF 
25* 18% Hvdrai 


X0 2J 14 3456 25* 29ft 29% — ft 
JO TJ n 12 16* 2Mfc 26*+,% 
X0 2.1 19 3466 39* 38* 39 — 1 
132 7J 8 11 24* Mft «*+ % 


35* 21 
105 62* 

19* 17* 
11* 4* 
27* 22ft 
17% 14 
19% 13* 
43% 20* 
73% 46 
66% 40 
65 44ft 
51ft 78 
71 42ft 

21* 15% 
40ft 3GU. 
24 13ft 
23* 17% 
19ft Mft 
19 Uft 
19 15 

34ft 27% 
32ft 23 
49 45* 

37 20* 

33ft 25ft 
36 21% 

39% Z7te 
0ft 5% 
M% B% 
56% 45 
132ft 91ft 
17% 14 
10% 74% 
28ft 23* 
27% 16% 
15 5% 

21% 13% 
50ft 35ft 
34* 27* 
15ft 10% 
29 19% 

48ft 38% 
30% M 
12 3% 

26* 11% 
31 19 

S4% 43 


37% 25% 
14* 7% 


iCInds 1J0 3X 
1C in Pi X» 14 
ICMn 
ICN 

1 04 Pt 2.70 103 
JNAtn 1.92 11 J 
IRTPrelXO BX 
ITT CP 1X0 XO 
ITTptH A00 0.1 
ITT pfK ADO 63 
ITT PfO 5X0 BJ 
ITT PIN 2J5 XI 
ITTpfl A50 7X 
IU im 1 JQ 6.9 
lOaftoP 3J9 BJ 
ICtoalB 

IllPowr 2X4 1IJ 
UPowPf 2.10 UX 
llPowpf 2.13 113 
IlPon Pf 231 11 J 
IIPow Pf 4.12 IZJ 
llPowpf 3J8 IZJ 
IIPow Pt SJO iu 
IIPOW Pf 4X7 IZJ 
llPowpf ABO IZJ 
ITWS X4 1.9 
Imoatm 2X0 S3 
imjrfCp 

INCO 30 IX 
indiMpt 7X8 1X1 
indiMPfizoo IZJ 
IndIMpf X15 IZ5 
IndiMpf 223 115 
IndIMPf 3X3 13X 
indiGss 1X8 60 
Inexco .M IX 
Ihtmlc 

InaorR 2X0 SJ 
InpRpt 235 6Z 
insrToc X4 X9 
InidSrt JO 20 
■mast of A35 10X 
insJico IXOb 40 
inspRs 
infaRsc 

InigRpf 3X3 125 
infgRpf 6XielA7 
IntaRpt 433 1X3 
IMRFfi 


12 1752 35ft 34ft 34ft— 1% 
9V 105ft 10Z 103 —2 


1001 

324 

45 

35 
59 

5999 

I 

36 
5 

29 

24 


19 15% ItcpSO 2.10a! IX 


65V. 55 


3XH 

AB 

mo m 

Inter Pf 

7 35 

SS 

15* 9% Intrfst 

M 

A 8 

52% 41 

imrlk 

2X0 

SO 

16% B* Intmad 
24% 14* InfAhl 

32 

u 

138* 99 

IBM 

A40 

3J 

21% 13% 

InfCtrl 

M 

IX 

20% 22* IntFlav 

1.12 

AD 


2X0 6J 
1J6 6X 

65 


11% 5ft intHorv 
7% 2ft Ini Hr wt 
50 Z3ft IntH pfC 
42% 20* IntH PfA 
3<% IT* InfH pfO 
44* 32% intMln 
29ft 23 IntMult 
57% 46 IntPapr 2X0 
17% 9 IntRcS 
44* 32* IntNrlh 2X8 5.7 
ISt 126 tfltNtpLflDJO 65 
36% 24% IntobGP 1X0 29 12 
17% ID InfBakr 
20 ISft Intel Pw 190 9J 8 
20 16* InPwpf Z3B UX 

19% 14% lowaEI 190 1X1 “ 
29% 21ft lawllG 234 10L1 
19% 17 lawlllpf ZJ1 I1X 
31% 25 lowoRs 3X8 10X 
33* 26 lealca X92 &9 
13% 9* l patCnt M 18 
35 Z3ft IrvBki 1X4 SJ 
54 47* IrvBk pf iWoJOX 


17ft 17% 17*— % 
10 9* 10 + * 

26ft 26* 26%— * 
16* 16* 16*+ % 
20 19ft 20 +* 
33ft 33% 32ft — * 
66 66 66 +7% 

59* 59 59ft— U 

59* 59 » — ft 

44ft Mft 44ft + ft 
_. 60ft 58% Mfc+ U 
865 k 17ft 17% 17ft + ft 
248 39* 39% 39ft+ * 
T774 16% 15% 15ft 
1958 23ft ZJ% 23ft 
m 18% 18% 18% 
sens, 19 19 19 +2 

me is* 18% 10% 

2001 30* 35* 3» + * 
500z 31 30* *»- % 

2 50 50 10 +1 

900z 36% 36% 36% — * 

23 32% 32% 32*+ ft 
156 33 34ft Mft— * 
426 30% 37* 37ft— ft 

56 9 8* Bft— % 

2169 13% 13% 13% + ft 
TOO, 54 54 54 - 

TOz TO 90 98 

8 17% 17ft 17% 

10 17* 10 

27% 27* 27% 

20% 27 27% + % 

7* 7* 7%— ft 
18% 17* 11 — % 
49* 40ft 48*— * 
34* 34* 34* 

14 14 M + ft 

25% 25 25% 

47ft <7* 47% — % 
20 * 20 * 20 *+ % 
Sft 5% 5% — ft 

IB 17ft 17% — * 
24ft 24% 24%— % 
45 45 45 + ft 

32% 32 32 + ft 

12 % lift 12 — % 
18% 179k 18ft— % 
64ft 64% 64% — ft 

3 M0 Kff 140 

7 1220 12ft Uft 12*+ ft 

8 71 52% 52% 52ft + ft 

32 442 10* 9* 9* — % 

10 64 22* 22% 22%— % 

1225126 137% 132* 133% —4 
12 W 3HI3M 20*+ % 

28 27% 28 + ft 

10ft 10% 10% — ft 
6 * 6* 6* 

47V. 47 47% + % 

Mft 89 39 

32ft JT* 32 — % 
41ft 41 41%— % 

27% 27ft 27*— ft 
53% 57* 53 — ft 
IS* 15% 15* + ft 
44 43% 43%— * 

W 154 104 154 +2 
173 35* 34* 35 —A 

24 Mft 15% 16 

8 168 19% 19ft 19% + ft 

amte 28 20 20 

0 246 19 18ft 18*- ft 

7 202 27% 27 27 — * 

16400Z 19ft 19% 19ft + % 

7 132 31ft 20ft 30ft— ft 

8 230 32% 32% 32* 

11 226 12% 12 Uft— * 

7 826 34% 33% 33%— 1% 

70 50 SO SO + ft 


IO 

7 

7 253 
20 747 
14 54 

10 713 
M 

20 1 
144 
3 

IT 312 
186 
7 302 
14 


16 

127 

37 

188 


IS 542 
SOM 
211 
266 
14 
44 

12 >42 
9 36 

28 3693 
20 395 
■ 307 


27* 20 
Mft 23ft 
24% 12ft 
14* 10% 
43 24% 

56* 46ft 
56 47 

Mft 12* 
9% 5* 
39% 20 
46% 37ft 
29% 21* 
34* 15* 
28% 21* 


JWT 5 
jRlvttr 
JtmSrfY 

JdpnF 

JotfPre 

JerCnf 

Jercpt 

JerCpf 

jowter 

JotmJn 

JolmCn 

Jorum 

JMtans 

JoyMta 


1.12 AS 11 
X IJ I 
.10 X II 
!X4ol2J 
1J2 XI 11 
X12 IA2 
8X0 MX 
2.18 115 

21 

UO XI IS 
1X60 4.1 10 
1X0 A! 17 
XO 

ixo 


SV* 


699 24* 
679 29 
203 23* 
249 11* 
75 42* 
3S» 57 
1110, 56 
33 16* 

u m 

2212 38* 
059 45* 
26 24* 
269 M* 
277 26ft 


21% 24% 

20 20*— % 
22* 23% — * 
11% 11* 

4W 42*— ft 
55ft 57 +1% 

55 Vi 55ft + % 
16% 16% — ft 
3ft Bft 
30 38% — ft 

45* 45*—* 
34ft 24ft—* 
M% 24% — * 
26ft 26% + ft 


K 


JO 


a 


xo 

JO 

IJ7 

.48 


10% 6* KDI 
13% 9* KLMs 
39% 33 KMIpf 
41ft 26* Kmart 
39% 24* ICN era 
20% 12* KalsrAl 
23ft 14% KataCe 
20* 15% KalCpI 
Mft 0% Kaneb 
20% M% XCfyPL 236 
Mft 29% KCPLPf A90 
54% Uft KCSau 1X0 
14ft 10% KCSanf 1X0 
18% Uft KanGE 236 
35% 20% KOnPLt 196 
21* 18 KoPLpf 232 
38% 17% KdPLpf 233 
39ft 17* Katvln 
101% 49 KOtVPf 
19% 10* KaufBr 
18ft 12% Kautpf 
08 68 Kaufpt 

45ft 27% KellMO 
32ft 21% Kflltwri 
4ft 1 Kenal 


23 10 416 
11 1092 
IU 1 
03 914610 
17 10 

109 
16 
4 

, 1545 
5 295 


20 
1.1 
II 
3X 
1L5 
129 
1.9 11 
7X 

112 6 
00 7 
105 
10X 


1X6 


1X0 

075 

136 

1X0 


102 
AX U 
X0 7 


9ft 0* 8% — ft 
13* 13* Uft 
39% 39% 39%+ ft 
37* 36% 37* + * 
30 37* 37%— ft 

16% 15% I5%— ft 
17% 17* 17% 

17% 17 17 — * 

n -iw? a n 

20* 20ft 30ft— ft 
SOB, 35* 34% 34%— ft 
269 53% SJ* 52% + ft 
600, 13ft 13% U%— % 
490 10ft 17% 17% — % 
33% 33ft 33*— % 
22 22 22 + M 

2D* 20% 20% — % 
30 37% 37%—% 

97% 96 97% —2% 

18* 18 II — * 
17ft 17 17 — * 

87 86 86 —1ft 

A ate 43ft 43ft— * 
33ft 32% 33ft + * 
1ft 1* 1ft 


194 

J 

•8 

796 

43 

453 

7 

3 

521 

198 

186 



JO 

34 

19 38 

Mft 

24ft 

24% 

25* 20% KvUtll 

2X4 

96 

0 507 

2b* 

25* 

25% — ft 

16* 11 KerrGl 

« 

3 J 

1022 

U% 

13 

im+ % 

26% im KerGPf 

1J0 

IM 

12 

21* 

20% 

21* +1* 

35 26* KorrMC 

1.10 

ii 

M 2483 

31% 

30* 

31* 

27* 16% KorBk 

IJO 

Ml 

0 53 

26% 

ISft 

25ft— % 


6* 2ft KerCn n 
19% 14 Kevalnt 
35% 26% Klddo 
77% 61* KldprB 
77% 62 KM PfC 
50% 39* Kim DCs 220 
34ft 21% KngtilRd 36 
~ 17* Kotter 230 


1J0 

4X0 

ADO 


29* 

23% 

104 

16 

19* 

20ft 

67ft 

20ft 


Mft Koimsr 33 
17ft Kopers xo 
96* KopprpfWXO 
12* Korean 
29ft Krooor 2X0 
11 KuMms X0 
44% Kvacars .141 
13 Kvsor XO 


2X 28 
SL7 21 
5X 
SX 

AS 10 
23 16 
03173 
IX 15 
40 26 
9.9 


4 

55 

132 

1 

l 


SJ 11 
3X 11 
J 27 
17 7 


3ft 3 3 — ft 

19ft Mft 18*—% 
32ft 32 32ft 
74* 74* 74* + % 
74* 74* 74* 

48* 40ft 48* + ft 
34* 33% 3**+ ft 
20% 27* 27*— % 
21* 2Tft 21*- ft 
20% 20 28%+ % 
1 101ft 101ft 101ft 
56 13* Uft 13% 

287 3*% 3Bft 38* + % 
07 20 19% 20 

46 51* 51% 5>%— ft 
353 21ft 30% 21ft +1 


435 

22 

77 

251 


2X4010.1 10 


3X6 I2X 
5J5 79 
US 69 

15 

IJO 7.1 7 
.20 23 


20% 22% LN Ho 
15* 7* LFE 
10 6% LFE Pf fl U 

17ft 12% LLE Ry 2J2S13X 
4ft 7 LLCCp 
10% B LLC pt 
17% 0% LTV 
5BVi 45ft LTV pi 
31 10% LTV pf 

*9 50ft LTV of 
10% 12 LTV Pf 
17 10ft LjQulnl 
29% 15* LoeG*9 
12* Bft Lafarge 
31% 23* LQfrgpf 2X4 95 
16* 12* Lamavr 24 15 15 
3* 1* LamSes 
Mft 10ft Lawllns 56 A3 14 
25ft 13ft LoarPI JO 9 13 
20* 20ft LerP pf 2X7 lOX 
JIM 37ft LrarSff IM X6 W 
124 95 Laws Pi 235 IX 

20% 14 LeaRnll X0 XI 15 
39* Mft LswyTr 150 45 II 
33* Mft LeeEnt 
ISA 9 LeuMm 
rv% lift loop fat 
4% 3ft LahVal 
16% 13ft Letemn 
ISft 9% Lennar 
34% 16 LXUCNI 
37ft 21 LevIS f 
Uft 25* Levftz 
50% 38* LOF 
79ft 62 l_OF Pt 
30% 21 UMvCp 
75* S3 Ullv 
Uft 15% Limited 
45% 26% LlncNt! 

22% 18ft LIOCPl 
•0 56% Litton 

Si* 30ft Locknd 
42% 30% Lnctfta 
131ft 70ft Loews 9 
44% 23ft Loews wl 
33ft 1? LomFIn LM 16 13 
36* 34% LamMf A0M11X 10 
28% 17% LnStv 1.90 7X 6 
53 44 LoneSpf 5J7 IU 


11 

101 

6 

321 

1 

19 

3563 

5 

621 

10 

414 


56 

32k 


92 18 M 
JO IX 25 
XB 25 9 


15M1U 
JO IX 21 

1J5 17 30 
.72 15 9 
132 U 1 
475 &J 
J2 25 16 
X20 4X 11 
34 2 26 

1X4 A] TO 
2340103 
100 20 10 
60e IJ 10 
JO 2X 12 
1X0 X TO 


8* 3* LILCo 
31 16 LIL PfB 

27ft 14ft LfLPfE 
49ft 21ft LILPU 
son 23* LIL PfK 
Zl* Bft LIL PlX 
9 LILpfW 
9ft LILPfV 
11% LIL Pfll 
0% LILpfT 
27% LILpfS 

6 LILpfP 

7 LtLPfO 

55 34 LonaDr 

33ft IBft LP rdl 
15 10% LaGetd 

Uft 22% LoLpnd 
25% 17 LaPae 


20% 27* 38 

14 13% 13% + ft 

9* 9* 9*+ ft 

16* 16ft 16*— ft 

2* 2* 2* 

9% 9% 9ft + ft 
Uft Uft 12ft 
49ft 49ft 49ft— ft 
24* 24% 34*— * 
66ft 66ft '66ft— lft 
Wft 17% 18ft 
12% 12ft Uft— Vi 
24* 23% 24 — ft 
Bft S%+ ft 
38x 25* 25* 25*+ * 
26 Mft 16% 16* 

81 3ft 3 3 

110 12ft 12% Uft + % 
114 22ft zi* 21*— % 
99 26* 26% 26* + % 
193 am 30ft 50%+ ft 
7 123ft 123ft 123ft— ft 
155 3D% 19 19% —1% 

33% 33% 33ft + ft 
33 32ft 32ft— ft 

15 14ft 14*— % 
19ft 19 If — ft 

3ft 2ft 3ft— ft 
15 14% 14% 

IXft Mft Mft + ft 
34% Mft Mft— % 
359 33ft 32% 32ft— % 
121 38 33 30 

«7» 40ft 40% 48% + % 
3* 75 75 75 

IM 29% 28* 28* 

666 73% 72ft 73 + % 
699 Mft 35* 36ft— ft 
1783 46 44ft 45 + % 

39 22* 22 22 — ft 

413 72ft 71ft 72ft + * 
3233 51% 50* 50*— 1 
185 34% 32* 33% — * 
266 120% 127 127%— 1% 
29 42% 42% 42%— * 
35 32* 27% 32*— ft 
60 15* 35% 35* + ft 
99 25% 34* 25 + ft 

199 SO 49% 49ft + ft 


65 

59 

95 

56 

129 

210 

117 

7 


3 1134 0 
100, 26 


7* 7*— ft 
26 26 +1 


21* 

21* 

27 

20ft 

60 

15% 

17ft 


9% 22* LwvGt 
49* 3* Lnwetm 
29* 16% Lowae 
25% 18% Lubrzl 
32 23% Luby68 

19% 15ft LuckvS 
15% Wft Lukens 




TO, 

22% 

22% 

22% — I 



Mfc 

42% 

42% 

42% 




670] 

43 


43 




43 

19% 

19ft 

19ft— % 



9 

19% 

19% 

19%— ft 



27 

19* 

19 

» -4 



57 

23 

22A 

21 




18 

18% 

18* 

IB*— ft 



S 

54* 

54* 

54*— % 



9 

14* 

13% 

13ft— * 



2 

15ft 

Uft 

)5%- 

-* 

IJB 25 

14 

U1 

51% 

53% 

SB*— * 

XB IX 


0M 

32% 

31* 

31*— ft 




12% 




1X0 2J 

11 

1724 

35* 

34* 

35 — % 

JOb 34 

20 

284 

24% 

Mft 

24*—% 

AM 15X 


U 

31ft 

31 

31ft 

■ ft 

X16 117 


M 

23 

22% 

23 

■ * 

2X4 92 

7 

204 

26* 

26ft 

26% 







46*- 








U4 4X 

IS 

277 

25% 

Mft 

35ft- 

-* 

Si IJ 

20 

178 

30 

29% 

29ft— ft 

I.M AX 

to 

627 

10% 

18ft 

1*- 

ft 

M 11191 

297 

15ft 

15ft 

ISft + ft 


23ft 

13ft WACOM 

23 

LI 

22 

2289 

20ft 

20 

20* 

41* 

M% MCA 

08 

19 

22 

1124 

fl}? 

46% 

46*— lft 

26ft 

16% MCorp 

1X0 

5J 

7 

2343 

34* 

zn. 

at —ft 

42 

34 MCorpf 

350 

9J 


1 

38* 

am 

am+ ft 

14% 

7% MDC 

37 

u 

11 

SB 

13% 

13ft 

u%-% 

40 

33ft MEI 

M 

1.1 

15 

019 

am 

38ft 

31ft — % 

M 

9* MGMGT 

M 

12 

as 

08 

Mft 

13% 

13ft— ft 

12* 

9 MGMGT P4X4 

36 


2 

12* 

12* 

12ft + ft 

16% 

» MGMUa 

30* IX 

» 

586 

Uft 

m 

Oft— * 

5* 

,2ft MGMuwt 



03 

J3b 

2% 

2%+ ft 

25* 

17% MGMHa 

XOa 2J 

13 

203 

21ft 

21* 

si*— * 

26 

17ft MB LID 

3* 



4z 20 

20 

TO 

52% 

Uft Moan if 

1X8 

20 

M 

106 

51ft 

69ft 

49ft — lft 

an 

30% Mocv 

1J4 

2J 

11 

2124 

45 

44% 

44% + * 

im 

Uft Mod Res 




146 

13* 

IS 

Uft + 4k 

39% 

74 MooKf 

JO 

2.1 

7 

222 

39* 

38% 

3? -ft 

ttVi 

20* Mel Alt ' 

HWOc 



43 

31ft 

Zlft 

21ft 

23ft 

12% Mcnftln 

JOb 20 

4 

182 

IS 

M% 

Mft— ft 

19 

lift ManhNI 

J2 

IX 

17 

162 

16 

17ft 

10 +% 

22 

10% MenrCi 

.16 

3 

72 

S82 

23 

22 

22%+ % 

41% 

22% MfrHan 

120 

AJ 

6 

in? 

«ft 

am 

40 —lft 

59 

41 MfrHpt 

4J7al2X 


110 

S3 

53ft 

52%— ft 

57 

40 MfrHOf 

5.92*124 


IS 

48 

47% 

47%+ ft 

11* 

5% viMonvl 



4 

1443 

e* 

7% 

0ft 

a* 

10* vIMnvipf 



139 

22ft 

22ft 

22ft— ft 

a* 

31 MAPCO 

1X0 

13 

7 

100 

30% 

29ft 

30 

w 

3 Marnti 




04 

3ft 

3* 

3* 

2% 

% marcde 




231 

ft 

% 

ft 

W. 

19* MarMMi 

1.60 

AJ 

8 

572 

35* 

34% 

34 V. 


COLLECTOR’S 

ITEM 



ENGUSH CLASSIC; 

PRESTIGIOUS; EACH A SIGNATURE PIECE 


17 Month 
High Low Stack 


Dn. YkL PE 


Sis. 

lOBgHWiLnw 


aoK 

Cuot- arm 


51ft 4B* MarM pt 5J20UJ 2 48ft 48ft 4B» + % 

54ft 27% Morton M IM » 2M 

120 72 43 16* 16* 16*— % 

54 6 M 515 B4* 83% 04 — * 

2X0 X9 38 613 63 62% SPA — 1 

144 U 1330 52% 51 51 — ft 

A3 349 79ft 70 71— ft 

S 17 953 12* Uft 12ft— ft 
46 IX 16 753 

JO IX 15 564 

IJO 9J U 134 

2JB 11J SB 

142 11J 06 

XSr 3 10 820 

1366 
3M 
23 
7 461 

1J2 X7 18 654 

2X00 X4 10 59 

32 
8 


13% 

19 


9* MorkC 
14* Mark pf 
05 SOft Mamat 
65 35* MrshM 

52ft 30% Marti* 

80% 55 MrtMPt 4X7 
14% 8* MoryK .12 
33ft 22ft Nteaea 
13% 7% MOSSMT 
28 IS* MasM 
3ft 2% MaaeyF 
26ft 20% MaeCp 
lift 9ft Mas Inc 
8Bft 51* MatauE 
14 6ft Mattel 
iota 4% Motel wt 
32% 16% Math pt 
15ft 9% Maxan 
49 30% MavD» 

49% 36% Martu 

3Zft 25% McDrpf 240 74 
23% 20% McDrpf 2X0 114 


6X 10 1502 
37 

24 21 55 

IX -16 2139 
2 X 10 1047 
A9 14 101 
II 16 330 


"B 


31* 23ft McDert 1J0 
13 6% McDrl wf 

10ft 6 ft McDId JO 
61* 40* McDnl 9 42 
70ft 47* McDnD 1J4 
42 31% McGEd 2X0 

48* 34 McGrtf 1X0 
33* 19* Mclnt a 
40% 32* McKern 2X0 
15ft 10 MCLoan 
6ft 2% McLxawt 
26* 19* McNeil .90 
41% 27ft Mood 
23ft iz* Ntearnx 
36ft 2<ft Medtm 
49* 33ft Medan ^ 

27 22* Malian pfUO 104 

45ft 30* Melvin 1X4 U 12 
61% 40% Merest ' “ 

97% 78% Merck 
40* 39ft MenJtti 
36ft 22 MerLvn 
Sft 2 ManOf 
13% iMaaaPf 
24% MasaR 


31* 30* 31 — ft 
12* 12ft 12ft— % 
18ft 18* lift- ft 
2% 2* Z%— ft 
26 25ft 25*— ft 
lift 11% 11%— ft 
61* 60% 60% — I 
13% 13 13ft—* 

9* 9% 9*—* 

31% 31ft 31ft— % 
13ft 13% 13% 

46% 45ft 46 — ft 
48* 41 48% 

29% 29% 29ft + % 
22 22 22 


20* 27* 20%— ft 


IJO 

34 

36 

2X8 


X4 6 
m 9 
IJ 17 
23 9 
SX 9 


B* 8ft Bft- 
10 9* 9ft— ft 

41 60* 60ft- ft 

79 77* 71 —ft 

41% 41V* 41ft— % 
45* 44% 45 — % 
31* 31* 31*— ft 
39% 39 3916+ • 

Mft Mft 

“ TS 


4 5* ’SSZ 


26% ■ 


1JD 2X 10 30 

13 U U 1341 


22 
76 
85 

170 . 

624 * 40ft 39* 40 — ft 
49% 49% 49%+ % 

JSftS'SfttK 


1200 


X0 L2 15 144 
JO 23 33 6157 


bm 


5ft MOTOh 


I32e SX 
30eMJ 


46 M^pSr 8.12 1A5 
47% MtE pU BJ2 IU. . 
45ft MIEpH 8.12 1A6 
40% MtEpfH 032 143 
Z% MexFd .17a 65 
19% 17 MhCnnf 2X5 HU 
26 22% MhCn Pf 119 12X 

16% 12 MchER 138 6X TO 
6* 4ft Mfcddha 


44* 32% Mldbon 
MUSUt 



14% 9% 


35 33* 31%—* 

2% 2* 2*—* 
18 % 10 % 10 % — * 

3* _3* 3*- ft 

*+ % 

M « 

.... 56% 56%—% 
2* 2% 2%-% 
19% 19% 19%+% 
25* 25* 25* 

16 14 M 

«ft 6* 4% 

43* 43* 43*+ ft 
14M 14 - 


J4 IX 12 
236 SX 8 

__ _ IJO 124 s 2295 
25* 17% MURW 1X0 SJ 19 983 19% 10% «*— * 

28% 22 MWE 2X0 10J 7 Ml 26* 26* 26*— % 

17% 11% MlltllR XO 27 IS 44 14% M* 14* + % 

'' 3X0 40 M 1524 05* 04% 04*—* 

236 9.1 7 199 


132b 63 7 


86 69* MMM 

31* 23* MtnPL 
31* 7ft MtentTW 
Sfflft 15 MoPSv 

21 17* MoPSpf 2X4 11.9 

22% 10* MoPSpr 2X1 IU 
Mft 20* MoPSpf 412 125 
11* 4 Mitel 
32ft 23ft Motel 

4 % viMobtH 

9* 5% ModCpt 
25* 16* Maltose X0 
IS 0% MPtlkOt 

22 14* Monrch JO 

SI 40% Morans 230 

n% 26 MfltDU 256 


279 

66x 


V* B* Eft- * 


220 7.9 


»% WM+ * 

1* 20% 20% 20% + % 
2k 21* 21* 21*+% 
21x31 32% 32* + * 

EJB1 7% 7% 7%— ft 

9 6363 28ft 27% 37*-% 
329 * % % 

57 8% 7% 7ft — % 

IX 11 426 25% W* 25% + % 

IBS 11* lift U* . 

43 20 J3x 10% 10% Uft- * 


5.1 

BJ 


1216 

106 


29 16% MonPw 

10ft 14% MonSf 1X001 0J 
9* 6* MO NY JO BJ 0 

51* 34* MooreC 2X0 40 13 

25* 18% MareM 1X4 43 13 

OTh 22% MOTMpf 250 9J 

47* 20% MOTWll 2JD 47 • 

84* 75* Moron Pf 7370 94 
39% 26* MorKnd 1X0 3X 10 
31* Uft MareaS fl U f 
20% H MtuRty 1.71a U 11 
31% 20 Mortons 44 23 12 405 
44* 29* Molrtas 44 IJ 11 069 
24% 15* Muntrd X4b 23 12 21 

4J 26 MurphC 1X0 33 16 91 

36% 23% MurpO 1X0 3X 11 TO 

23* 10% MurrvO 1 JO 5L5 11 63 

----- 79 

S3 


45* 44* 45ft— % 
31 3S* 30ft— * 


2X0 9X TO 1147 21% Zl* 21* 


17% 17* 17%— % 
154 9ft Bft tft + Ml 
114 51 50% sa%— % 

IBS Mft 23ft 24 + * 

27 27 27 

47ft 46 46%—* 

00ft ® Bfftt + % 

39% V 29 

21% ait 

19* 


509 

7076 

161 

41 

7 

310 


21ft 21ft lt 
19* 19%— ft 

28ft am— % 


13* 11 MutOm lX4alVX 
It* 3% MvarLn 


37% 36% 37ft+ ft 
22% 23% 23%— % 
42* 42 47*— % 

27ft 29* 29* + * 
22 21% 22 + % 
13* 13% 13ft— ft 


23* 16 NAFCO 
60ft 39% NBO 
24% 14% NBf 
21% 16% NCH 
39* 23 NCNB 
30% 20% NCR# 
71ft 13 Nllnd 
10ft NLind 


2^6 NUI 


JOb AX IB 
2X0 A0 8 
12 

32 3X M 
132 27 9 
fl U 1 
9 

JO IX 
232 rj 7 


21 

120 

% 

224 


NVF 

46% 33% NWA 

54% 38% NabscB 

28* 21 Nalai 

29% 20 Nashua 

37ft JOte NotCon 

10ft Uft NtCnvs . 

28ft 22* NalD 1st 2J0 BX 17 

19% 16* NDtstpr 1J5 10L0 


20 11* Niedua 

29ft 17% NatFGa 
22 19% NFGpf 

44* 37 NatGvp 
♦* 2% NtHam 
33* 23ft NH 
69 56 Nil pf 

28ft 17% NModE 
10* 6* NMJneS 
29 30* NtPrest 1X0 

16* 9% NtSeml 


229 
1477 
» 
582 

JO 2.1 10 270 
2X8 5.1 11 3503 
1J0 A6 14 3067 

8 an 
1X0 23 a lKt 
26 2.1 17 732 

M 
112 


11 1028 
1X8 7.2 7 45 

730 JOO J 
176 A2 7 1190 

J5 J 21 317 
SX0 7X 8 

X2 IJ 14 1577 
17 

37 13 17 

14 5528 


29* 21% NtSvcIn LOO 35 11 
17 li* N Stand M ir, v 

13 10 Nora n XBa 3X 7 

29* 21* NevPw 276 99 6 
14* lift NavPPf 1X0 11X 
» 14% NevPpf 174 0J 

20% 19 NavPpt 230 UX 
16% 14ft NavPpI U5 UJ 
M* 8% NevSvL fl U 7 
39% 38% NEnpEt 3X0 9X 6 
26* 31* HEnPpflM 112 
2Mfe 20% NJRsC 2X4 7J 10 
22ft 14* NYSEG 2X4 107 6 
10 13% NY0 Pi Z12 II J 

38 24 MYSpfD 375 127 

Uft 13% Hawaii XD 27 II 
44* 2 9 H owhat 
M* 11 NawMI 
TO* 7% NwtllRf 
54* si Nawmt 
Sft 1% Nwpark 
17* 12 NIOMP 2X0 1IJ 
28% 22% NtaMpf 3X0 12X 
32% 24% NteMpf 3.90 I3X 
34 26 NteMpf AW 125 

38 30* NlQMpf 4JS 131 

41% 34 NlQMpf 528 12 3 
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44* 43% 43ft— 1 
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21* 21* II* . 
43* 41% 42 — 3_ 
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24% 34% Mft 
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MOB 29 29 29 +1 

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13002 Mft 32% 32ft 
57Qz 37ft 37. 37 

TOQz 41% 41ft 41ft 42% 
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28: 31% 31% 31ft „ 
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(Continued on Page 10) 








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NYSE btflterioM P.» umna rote p. 9 
ComSofl Stoda P.M MarMmnmrv P. I 
curacy ram p. 9 Ottffam p.ia 

GOTMHWW P.10 OTCMBeh P.12 

DMdttta P.M anar morkafi p.m 


By HJ. MAIDEN BERG 

New York Tunes Service 

T HERE arc options on futures, options tha t are settled in 
cash when they expire, but will options on options be 
the next wave of financial products to confuse traders 
and brokers? 

Perhaps, according to Terry Mayer, marketing director of 
Mocalta Corp., the financial-services arm of the big precious- 
metals trading house. “We have already bandied SI billion of 
options on Ginnie Mae options in the past 12 months,*' be 
“so perhaps there is also a mark® for options on all kinds of other 
financial options.** 

An option, of course, is a unilateral contract that affords the 


buyer the right, without any - 

obligation, to buy (call) or sell « ^ , , . 

(put) the underlying commod- iuOCaua 8 device lets 

ity or financial instrument at a 1 

fixed price within a specified mortgage lenders buy 

period off tune. The option's ^ option to bllV an 
cost is called the premium. * * 

But why the need for op- Option On an option. 

tions on Ginnie Mae options, f. 

especially when the Chicago 

Board of Trade will soon be introduc ing an option on its Ginnie 
Mae futures? 

“Because interest-rate volatility in recent years has played 
havoc with mortgage lenders, investors and those who package 
Ginnie Maes,** said Melvin R_ Mullin, manager of financial- 
ins trument trading at Mocatta. “The same volatility has discour- 
aged many in the industry from using futures for hedging 
exposure, a situation that is unlikely to change after the introduc- 
tion of options chi Ginnie Mae futures.** 

The reason, Mr. Mullin said, lies in the peculiar nature or the 
mortgage-packaging industry. What happens in this business is 
that mortgage lenders put together packages of mortgages in 
amounts from S 100,000 and up and exchange them for Govern- 
ment National Mortgage Association certificates. The resulting 
Ginnie Maes, which are fully backed by the government, are then 
sold to investors. 

The result is that the banks that originate the mortgages need 
not hold them, although most continue to service, for a fee, the 
monthly payments made by homeowners. This makes the banks, 
which traditionally borrow short-term funds from depositors in 
order to make long-term loans, more willing to make mortgage 
loans, despite the uncertainty of interest rates. 


W ~ HEN the government sells these pools of mortgages to 
investors through brokers and other financial institu- 
tions, the funds received enable it to buy more mortgages 
from the batiks. 

“But it oftentakes months to package mortgages, which may 
carry various interest rates, at a time when the whole rate 
structure may be rising or falling," Mr. M ullin noted. “Many 
mortgage packagers try to avoid this problem by in effect buying 
pul options from financial institutions who offer custom-tailored 
options in what has become a large informal market created for 
this purpose.” 

By buying a put, the packager can protect his mortgages 
against a drop in their value should interest rates rise. But the 
premium on these options can be expensive and eat into the slim 
profit margins of the packager, he continued, “particularly when 
the risk being thus insured does not materialize.” 

This is where Mocatta’s “installment option** comes in. It 
offers packagers and others in the high-stakes mortgage industry 
an option to buy a Ginnie Mae option on an option “at a fraction 

(Continued on Page 13, CoL 8) 


Currency Rates 


lot* rntorbank rates on Feb. 1 1 . exdudmg fees. 

Official fixings for Amsterdaii, Brusseh, Frankfurt, Milan, Ports. New Yorlc rotes at 
2 P.M. 


1 c 

Aoutantam Uf 4IBJ 
BrasHbla) 4&347S 712D 

FlHkhrl 33573 

Lawton ») 1JM 

MUM UniO 231130 

New York (d 1-DM7 

Porta VMS IBM 

Tokyo Closed 

Zorich £7883 3J8S91 

1 ECU &4837 04185 

1 SDR 0J6444 0-87343 


Eta**. USA 

07443 AmtraBan I UB 

0008 AmMoikUUM TUB 
O0153 Belgian flo. franc 4538 
OMW Conflnl UJBI 

MBS’ DadtttooM 1 1-447 
014ST Finnish nwrtta ATS 
00874 cnefcdradnan I3U3 
EtHI HomKomS 7M45 


OJA. FJ=. ILL GMr. B-F. SJ=. Yen 

113-175 ■ 373165 • 01841 SJ. 49» 13Z»*14M0r 

3&0S1 057 13S15- I7JI1 2X445 25JM9 ■ 

32775* 1433 X 80375 • 4.W1 • 117JH • 17495 * 

15718 M.M2 2JD3JD 4S05B 71.9? 31)058 380575 

01475 291 .3S 54321 30008 71820 7M 

3271 92? 200000 170 0080 27905 201 JO 

20514 49455 > 24775 V5-Z35 • 3570538135* 

85285* 27-775* 0.139 75JS* 42995* 12093* 

2227 07905 120087 25204 444591 12830 178288 

114147 92738 Nil 15508 610237 20855 N.Q. 

Dollar Values 

Emiv. c * rr ** ar UJ4 Enolv. USJ 

89411 Irish € 12405 0J417 Swoport* 2344 

BOBU tamo ihefeel 70250 0531 XAfrkaernid USB 

32440 KawaifKfiffir 03082 OBOU XKflmWM 83725 

029D Mntoy.rlnMR 25955 00050 5*wu peseta 17875 

0.1048 Norw. krone 92445 0.1084 SnwL krona 9227 

OOB3 PUL pan 18047 00254 Taiwan* 39.11 

aims ParLamda MIOfl 00SS9 Tlulbahl 27JM5 

02791 SowHrtyol 15825 0270 UA£.Mtaa XS7» 


CStarttan: 1.1533 fiMC 

lot CwnmcKM franc (h) Amauna mwobH ta tniv ana pewnd lei Amourts neecmt la buv one Mlar l*» 

Units of 101 (el Unta of 1208 IVMJnHs of 10000 

NiL: no* ouafed; NA^; not avcAMe. 

Sourcas; Bonque du Benelux (Brussels): Banco Camnerdale itallana (Milan); aiemkxrt 
Bane (New York)/ Banoue Natbnato He Ports (Parts); IMF (SDR): Bantwe Ara be el 
Intenxjtkmaie tnnvmHssement (Ulnar, rtva t dlrtiam). other data from Reuters ond AP. 


Interest Rates 


Eurocurrency Deposits 


DeBw n AOnrtr Franc StarUna Franc ECU 5Dft 

m_ IK - an, on. -0^ sw - 5* Mtt- 1« loih- io» nm- rath m - bh 

2NL Kh - 9 4th-4ta5n-5ta V3ta - VOk 109b- ID* 109k- 10M 

3M. 9 -M 4K -M 5Vi - M 135b- 1316 10 9b- 10 V. 109b- 1010 80h - 09* 

CM. fta - Ota 4Vb - 61b 5» - SSk 12 9b- 13 b. 111b - 111b 109b- 109b 816 - 9 

TY.- 99b.10K.4ta.-4ta 5V. - 5% 121* - 12* 111* - 119b 10«i - 10 ta 91b - Mb 

RatetcmpDcabia to MertXMik deposits a) SJ million minimum (or om/S valent). 

Soorc am tarn Guanmtv (dollar. DM. SF, Pound. FF): Lloyds Bank (ECU): Cltfbonk 
ISDR I. 


Asian Dollar Rates 


Key Money Rates 

United States a 


Feb. 11 


Amos. 
?»b -9fb 


Britain 


Hctali>5aSteribuiic 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1985 

fUTWlES AND OPTIONS 

Mocatta’s New Instrument: 
Option on an Option-Option 


Pickens 

Assails 

Phillips 

Group Opposes 
Rights Offering 

Return 

AMARILLO, Texas — T. Boone 
Pickens's investment group, Mesa 
Partners, announced Monday that 
it opposes the rights offering that 
Phillips Petroleum Co. plans in an 
attempt to fight off hostile take- 
overs. 

Mesa Partners, comprising affili- 
ates of Mesa Petroleum Co. and of 
Wagner & Brown, ended its offer 
for Phillips stock late last year after 
the larger ofl company agreed to a 
recapitalization package that is 
scheduled to be voted on by share- 
holders Feb. 21 The rights offering 
w3s a response to a subsequent 
takeover bid, by the New York in- 
vestor Carl C. Icahn. 

Mr. Pickens, who is Mesa Petro- 
leum's president, said the rights of- 
fering was designed to entrench ex- 
isting Phillips management and to 
block the Icahn lender offer. 

“Mesa Partners regrets that Phil- 
lips's board has complicated the 
issues to be voted upon at the Feb. 
22 special meeting by adopting a 
poison pill, which continues in ef- 
fect if the shareholders do not ap- 
prove the recapitalization plan,” 
Mr. Pickens said. 

After Icahn Capital Corp. of- 
fered earlier this month to pay 
$27 JO in cash and S27J0 in subor- 
dinated notes for each Phillips 
share, the company's board said it 
would distribute note-purchase 
rights Feb. 18 entitling a Phillips 
shareholder to exchange one com- 
mon share for a one-year note re- 
deemable at S62 a share and bear- 
ing 15-percent interest 
The rights could uol be exer- 
cised, however, unless an outsider 
acquired 30 percent of Phillips's 
slock, nor if the 30-percenl holder 
acquired the remaining shares for 
at least $62 a share. 

Following Phillips's announce- 
ment of the rights offering last 
week, Mr. Icahn withdrew his offer 
for all of Phillips's stock and said 
he would make a conditional offer 
of $57 a share for 25 percent of the 
stock, which would bring Mr. 
Icahn's bedding in Phillips in about 
30 percent 

It is widely assumed that he is 
trying to test ' Pfaillrps's .so-called 
“poison pilT defense. 


Thrtn Key Arm to Which a Master Mariortw Has Stumbled 

« wbi«t*dwlthBid:<rfaglft ^ ^ 


LuundryOutorBunt* 

Proctor 

/IGnM 

■ta Tta.CMr.Ban 


Toothpastes 


Praetor 

* Gambia -50% 
CnwtGtam 



‘SO *81 ‘04 



Procter & Gamble: A Giant Wakes 

New Products, Tactics ” 

Are Praised by Analysts gj|3 c --‘ v * — * 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 8. 

Page 9 

Britain Blocks 
Plan to Import 
Norwegian Gas 

Rsiarrs the plan was that the British gov- 

LONDON — The British gov- ernmeni would not earn tax reve- 
eramem blocked on Monday a nues from Sleipner gas as it does 
S25-billion pl?n to import Norwe- from Britain's North Sea oil and 
gjan gas, saying the country's needs gas. 

could be met from its own North Mr. Walker told Parliament bis 
Sea reserves well into the next dc> decision was based on new fore- 
cade. casts of British supplies from cur- 

The plan to buy gas from the rent fields and others expected to 
Sleipner field on the Norwegian come on stream in the future, 
side of the North Sea was proposed These showed an increase of 10 
two years ago by the stale-owned percent on previous estimates, indi- 
British Gas Corp., which argued eating that Britain was likely to be 
that Britain would be short of sup- self-atfficieni well into the 1990s. 


By Steven Greenhouse 

New York Times Service 

CINCINNATI — Procter & Gamble, it is often 
said, resembles the long-slumbering giant of leg- 
end who wakes to discover the world has changed. 

The 1 48-ycar-old consumer goods giam was first 
to market with a synthetic detergent (Tide), with a 
disposable diaper (Pampers), with a toothpaste 
approved by the American Dental Association 
(Crest). But a few years back, analysts say, the 
Colossus of Cincinnati became tired and flabby. 

“In the past, Procter lived off cadi cows like 
Tide and Pampers,*' said Robert W. Back, an 
analyst with Chicago-based Rodman & Renshaw 
Inc. “People couldn't touch them because they had 
such market dominance. As a result, they lay back 
on their laurels. Eventually, Pttrter got blindsided 
in 100 different ways." 

Competitors armed with fresh technologies and 
sophisticated marketing techniques began eating 
away at P&G’s share of such lucrative markets as 
detergents and disposable diapers. To make mat- 
ters worse, these markets, and others (hat P&G 
invented, have matured to the point where growth 
is barely perceptible: 

P&G, which had revenue of $13 billion in its 
most recent fiscal year, is still the undisputed 
leader in most of its markets. But its growth has 
been braked in the very product lines that tradi- 
tionally yielded the company’s fattest profit mar- 
gins. Sales in its vital laundry and cleaning prod- 
ucts division, which represents almost two-fifths of 
its revenue, have grown only 1 percent a year since 
1981. 

The numbers finally shook P&G out of its slum- 
ber. A tittle over a year ago the company launched 
a promotional campaign, estimated at $400 mil- 
lion, to introduce six major products: Liquid Tide 
detergent. Citrus HQ] orange juice, Daman Hines 
cookies. Ivory shampoo and conditioner. Always 
sanitary napkins, and Encaprin, a coated, time- 
release aspirin for arthritics. 

P&G rolled out several of these products nation- 
wide in a matter of months, eschewing the leisufdy 
test-marketing it once considered de rigueur. 
Though a few have run into trouble; others, espe- 
cially Liquid Tide, lot* promisirig. ' 

P&G is also promoting some of its older prod- 


that Britain would be short of sup- self-aifficieni well into the 1990s. 
plies by the early 1990s. Apart from disappointing Nor- 

Peter Walker, the energy secre- way, the decision may have wider 
tary. told Parliament that the plan implications as government 
was unnecessary because Latest sources in Norway have suggested 
forecasts showed that new gas that U.S. President Ronald Reagan 
fields opening up in British waters favored the plan. He feared that 






would be able to bridge any short- 
age. 


Britain ran the risk of bemj 
to rdy cm Soviet gas suppl 


Tha Now Yorfc Tines 

A potpourri of P&G products. 

uc is. The company announced last month that it 
would invest more than $500 million to produce an 
improved Pampers in its dud with Kimberly-Clark 
Corp. in the highly profitable disposable diaper 
market 

“We are interested in getting results on a more 
rapid timetable in response to more aggressive 
competition,” said Thomas Laco, a vice chairman 
of P&G. “I think we’re moving a little faster.” 

Some analysts apparently tntnk so, too. 

“What they’ve dime in the last two years in 
terms of introducing new products has beep ex- 
traordinary and exemplary,” said Hercules A. Se- 
galas, a former P&G executive who now is a vice 
president with Drexd Burnham Lambert Inc. 

John G. Smale, 57, the chief executive officer 
who spearheaded much of the company’s new 
approach to product introductions, declined to be 
interviewed. But Mr. Laco and other company 
officials insist that P&G is operating from a posi- 
tion of strength, not weakness. Otherwise, they say. 


In Oslo, Prime Minister Kaarc did not buy from Norway, they 
WOloch of Norway called the rejec- said. 

lion “extremely regrettable.” The British rejection will have a 

He said in an interview that the considerable impact on Norwegian 
British government had taken oil and gas development, according 
“longer than anyone should have to to energy analysts in Oslo. They 
wait” before reaching a decision on said Norway hid pinned its future, 
the plan, which would have been gas-marketing policy on the sale of 
the largest overseas contract for Sleipner gas to Britain, with the 


both nations. 

Talks between teams for British 
Gas and a group of oil com panies 
operating in Norway lasted for al- 


subsequeni development of nearby 
gas fields. 

Officials in the Petroleum and 
Energy Ministry in Oslo said Nor- 


most two years and agreement had way would now bring forward de- 
been reached last year. velopment of the second phase of 

Mr. Wffloch said the rejection the Gullfaks oil and gas field in the 
would have a serious effect on the North Sea, although this would not 


weights as Unilever, Coca-Cola, Nabisco ami 
Johnson & Johnson. 

Still, the flurry of new products comes at a high 
price. Late last month P&G reported one of its 
worst quarters in years. Its earnings dropped 36 
percent to $136 raUtion, from $214 million a year 
earlier. Next summer the company is expected to 
(Continued on Page 11, CoL 1) 


Norwegian economy, which relies 
heavily on income from offshore oil 
and gas fields. 

If the plan had been approved, 
Norway would have exported 
about 180 billion cubic meters 
(6,357 billion cubic feet) of gas to 
Britain. 

British opponents had argued 
that it would snuff out efforts to 
tap smaller gas fields in the British 
sector of the North Sea. 

They also said the plan, intended 
to cover about 20 percent of Brit- 
ain’s gas needs, would be expen- 
sive. The agreed price, based on 
forecasts of energy market levels 
several years away, was high and 
could be pushed higher by ex- 
change fluctuations, they said. 

The intended suppliers were Ex- 
xon Corp., Norsk Hydro AJ5. and 
the Norwegian state oil company 
StatoS, which operates the field. 

A further factor weighing against 


New Emergency Measures Presage More Austerity in Mexico 


By Richard J. Meislin 

New York Times Service 


presi deni’s office said lhe govern- 
ment would also “selectively but 


and a drop in lhe price of oQ, which The public-sector deficit was re- aggravate Mexico’s already serious 


MEXICO CITY — Mexico, quickly*' loosen nstrictions on cer- 
sensing “negative tendencies" in its ^ imports used m Mexican prod- 
financial situation, is taking a series m 4,1 ° to lower domestic 
of emergency measures to kem the costs, and would announce within 
hard-fought gftins of its economic- nex * month a new plan to in- 
recovery program from unraveling, erase non-petroleum exports. 

.Theactionsareviewedbyeconc 

mists here as an encouraging sign ^ ^ pricing and production 
that PnesidmtMigud de la hudnd poudes of P £e^nkation of 
Hurtado hopes to withstand the JZ 

poBdaOpr^etlhalMlrire- ^ 

amt predecessors to b®n loosen- ^ y-P TcthnuK crude, 

mg theet^creinsmjeir third ^ ^ ^bShinS 

year of office. Bui the actions also by 0PEC ^ yeax 

raise the specter of sjow® - ec ®j l0 F*' in the hope of winning new sales, 
icret^a^contmuedaimenty particu i£[ y ^ France, 
for the Mexican people, who are ^ 

weary and inoeasm^y angy ^Ssalescouldbeoomeincreas- 

fi^ , h. l t d, !? inllVm?S ^ aniS ingly necessary if thelLs! govera- 
broughi by the econormc crisis. n proposed - m pjeadent 

“Three years in the life of a coun- Ronald Reagan's budget, quits 
try is a short time," Francisco La- purchasing 50,000 bands of oil a 
bastida Ochoa, the secretary of en- day from Mexico for the Strategic 
ergy, mines and parastatal Petroleum Reserve, 
industries, said of the continuing To offset the price cut, Mexico 
austerity program. “It is painful plans to gradually restore a produo- 
and tetter while you are living it, non cm of 100,000 bands a day 
but it is much more grave not to (hat it had mark* las t year in accord 
correct it," with OPECs desire to stabilize 

Faced with a softening market prices by reducing supply. Al- 
for oil and the prospect of higher though the Sl-25-a-barra price cut 


provides nearly 75 percent of ex- duced from 17.6 


port earnings and half the govern- 
ment's revenues. 

But the new actions indkaie a 
belief that conditions could bc- 


oss domestic 


percent of the employment problem, 
inct in 1982 to rtD _ c 

". This feD short °2L5“! 


Mi chnrt Mexico owns more than 900 
»*«.?««« companies, ranging from tortilla 
''rf makers to Petrrileos Mexicanos, the 


belief that conditions coujd to- still an advance. Gro^^tic 

come worse than originally pr^uct is a measureof the total ^d that ubpriorhy 

thought, widening the federal defi- value of a nation s goods and ser- be sold, but it has 

ot and spurring a new round or vices, excluding income from for- ^ yet said which Others would bei 
... - Thai announcement is expected in 


inflation. eign investments. 

Although the government has Some of the government's moves ( ^ wce w 
been unable to meet its goals, it has are bound to provoke heated de- 
nude considerable progress in re- bate, particularly the disposal of 


sal of The 
coun- alion 1 


iveromeni said the relax- 
import strictures was in- 


ducing Mexico’s inflation rate, state-owned companies. The coun- alion of import strictures was in- 
From nearly 100 percent a year at try’s largest union, tin Mexican tended to “avoid internal abuses 
the peak of the economic crisis in Workers Confederation, has al- from the overpro lection existing in 
1 982, inflation slowed to 82 percent ready offered to buy 20 of them, some economic sectors." This is 
in 1983 and 60 percent last year. But officials acknowledged that likely to stir opposition from pri- 
The target for this year is 35 per- many of the state-owned compa- vale companies in Medea Some 
cent, although many private econo- tries are running enormous losses products offer a combination of 
mists express doubt that it can be and are unlikely to find buyers and price and quality that could survive 
achieved. may be forced 10 dose. Thai could only in the absence of competition. 


bring as much investment as 
Siapner. 

Norway currently supplies one- 
third of Britain’s gas from the Frigg 
field in the North Sea. Production 
from Frigg will begin to fall away 
at the endof the 1990s. 


People Express 
Reports Loss 
In 4ih Quarter 

The Associated Press 

NEWARK, New Jersey — 
People Express Airlines, con- 
sidered the successful prototype 
of the new, unregulated airline, 
said Monday that it had a loss 
of S8.9 milnoD in the fourth 
quarter, largely because of the 
cost of expanding to new cities. 
A year earlier, the company 
earned S 1J million, or 7 cents a 
share. 

Revenue in the quarter nearly 
doubled, to $168.4 milium from 
$88.8 million a year earlier, the 
Newark-based earner said in a 
statement For the full year. 
People said its profit fell 83.7 
percent to $1.7 million from 
$10.4 million in 1983. 

On a per-share basis, after a 
provision for preferred divi- 
dends, the company had a loss 
of 18 cents for the year, com- 
pared with earnings per share of 
57 cents last year. 

Revenue rose to $586.8 mil- 
lion in 1984 from $286.6 million 
last year. 

Donald G Burr, chairman 
and chief executive officer, said 
the airline's “disappointing re- 
sults were due to the cumulative 
effects of the investments in 10 
new dries since June of 1984.” 


All of these securities having been sold, thid announcement appears as a matter of record only. 


New Issue / February, 1985 


interest rates on Mexico's foreign will cost J 
debt later this year, Mr. de la Ma- million di 
drid's administration has ordered additional 
$465 million in additional federal nearly $1 1 
budget cuts through a reduction in close to las 
subsidies and investments, along Moticai 


though the Sl-25-a-barrel pace cut 
will cost Mexico more than $300 
million during the next year, the 


»e to last year’s 5 1 5- billion level. 
Mexican officials said the gov- 


with the sale, transfer or liquids- eminent's new budget had already 
tion of 236 slate-run companies taken into account the possibility 
and a partial freeze on new hiring, of some rise in interest rates on 
An announcement from the Mexico's 59 5-billion foreign debt 


A 


3,600,000 Shares 

Echo Bay Mines Ltd. 


Notice To Commodity Investors: 



Rudolf Wolff has developed considerable 
expertise in money management, and is 
able to offer proven programs for qualified 
investors who do not have the time or 
expertise to manage their own investments. 


Nfinlmum initial Investment $100,000. 


Rudolf WfaHf, BBtabbhod In 18B6, Is a marabw of Uie Noranda group of 
KKiipantes, a mining and issourca croup witti * neJ wolh o4 $2.7 DIBoa 


Markets Closed ! 

Becaiueof apanial bank holiday in lhe Uniied State, there will be no ■ 


Rud 

Wbl 


Please send 
a detailed 
Rudoll WolH 
Information KU. 


lolf Rudolf Wolff Futures I 


285 Madison Avenue. New Ybric, NY 10017 USA. 
Phone (212) 5734440 Telex FTT 423840 
Attn: William Rafter 


Common Shares 

(without nominal or par value) 


Of the 3,600,000 shares, 2,400,000 shares are being offered initially by U.S. Underwriters 
and 1 ,200,000 shares are being offered Initially by Canadian Underwriters. 


Salomon Brothers Inc 


Goldman, Sachs & Co. 

Burns Fry and Timmins Inc. 

Wood Gundy Corp. 











Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1985 


SltfE* 5 


U.S. Futures Feb. 11 


Season Season 
High Low 


Open High Law cm— Cha 


Season Season 
High Low 


Open Utah Low don die. 


Season Season 

High Low 


ZU5 2020 Mar 2040 X60 2040 20SD -49 

„rao XBO MOV 2060 XU XU 2830 -SB 

EsI.Srtes Prev.Sete Z72A 
Prav.DavopMini. 25478 oHX2 


Base B7JB Sw «» »» ao Ml 

89 32 B7J93 Dec 87 JB 877B 8778 B774 — JB 

I Est. Solas 38479 Prew. Sales SU05 
Prey. Dev Open In}. 1O5022 6B6T4 


Mondays 


1: Venn 
Ht#~ Lb* S' PC* 


S(L ting * 

Di#. y:c. pe MfaHWilnw (toof-Orco 


Often Htoi Low Clou On. 


Grains 


wheat (can 

MM bu mini mum- dollars per bushel 
4£ U7« Mar UK UK Uw 

JS Mw 547 >•<?*> UM 

1» 127* Jul 007* 140 3J7U 

U3A $37* Doc 348 349 147% 

X7<* la Mar 153 X53Vb in 

Esi.Sam Prev. Soles 1226 


Esi. Sates Prev. Soles 62 

Prev. Dav Open ini. 31019 up 151 


SOW +jQ 2 
349* +01% 
Uftt +0T 
139 +08* 

149 +00% 

UM +J01* 


MYCE) 

lb* 

MOT 17175 17405 171.10 17178 
May 1764 17625 1714 17105 
J«M 1767S T77.2S 17500 17320 
Sea 17500 77505 17350 17150 
NOv 17400 17120 1724 T7240 
Jan I71J0 

Mar 17100 

Mar 17100 

Jul moo 

Ext Sales 609 Prev. Sale* 750 
Pm. Dav Open int. 7261 



10B5O 10*30 
1074 10825 
10730 T07SD 
10705 10766 


msi; 


dosing 


CANADIAN DOLLAR (IMM) 
tear dir - 1 pelntequalsSajm 


20ft 6 
law 6ft 

n a 

20V, 12ft 

34* 24 
l«b B* 
54W <v« 
stVb 32ft 
76 13 

X 

Z»ft 17ft 
57 38ft 
26 ft 12Vs 
17* SV, 


0£e 5 25 
44 11 IV 


04 15 9 
1.13 O 13 
58 0127 

257b U 5 
04 17 IB 
17 

74 O * 
150 19 15 
10BBZ0 ID 
4 U 17 
5 


458 316 
3657 12* 

x n 
ar* jo* 

133 27% 
1066 10* 
2020 54* 
1BI 49% 
192 25* 
41 1716 

mi am 

1013 54% 
501 2646 
51 14* 


me me— * 
11% 12% + 06 
2% are 
m ia% 

3 26V. — % 

10 10%+ % 
59% 5346— % 
48* **— % 
24% 24*— 1% 
17% )7%— % 
25% 25*— % 
53* 53*-* 
X 26*— * 
14* 14* 


CORN (CRT) 

SOOO bu minimum- c&ti let-* per bushel 

X25W 245 Mar 271* 271* 

24 273* May 278* 278* 

131 276* Jul aOT* 201% 

121* 270* Sep 375% 275* 

2.95 245 Dec 209% 209% 

110 274* Mar 278 278 

J71* 279* May 203* 203* 

gP»-5qles Pm. Sates 14074 

Prov. Dav Open tnt.134098 off 719 


Metals 


0098 

7446 

Mar 

7466 

7467 

7453 

7465 

—15 

-7835 

7585 

7440 

7436 

Jun 

Sep 

7441 

7443 

7429 

7443 

7425 

—15 

—16 

7566 

7431 

Dec 

7419 

7419 


7<I6 

—17 

7304 

7418 

Mar 

7400 

7400 

7400 

7485 

-23 


Tobias indiKfe ffw nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall street 


Eai.tetea 2075 Pm . Sates 2384 
Prev. Dav Open mt. 11776 up <7 


12 Martin 
HWfU.tr* ST»* 


SIS. Close 

WSHfflflLa* Caof.Otflr 


270* — Ol* 
278 -Ol* 
201* -09* 
274* -Ol 
248* -Ol* 
277 -Ol* 
203 -Ol 


SOT8EANS cam 

■ SMObu minimum, dot la re par bushel 
77?* U9* Mar 592 571* 


7.9 7 SOI* MOV 604* 6J36 

7.W 501% J„l 6.14 6.15% 

J5S S.95 Aug 6.14* 6.15 

fH f?5 3eo 6.16 6.10 

MB 5.97 Hew 6.12* 6.12* 

679 MO Jan 673 671* 

7U 674 Mar ATT* 677* 


779 US* MOV 
EsLSala Prev. Sates 19017 

Prev. Dav Open inL 71755 up 39 


506 509* —07 

578* 602* -07 

679* 6.12* —06* 
A10* 6.14 —06* 

MB M7* -04* 
607* 6-10 -04* 

671* 672* -74* 
674 60S* —OS 

604 -04* 


COPPER (COMBO 
25X00 Itj*/- cents per lb. 

62.13 6173 Feb 

9128 5500 Mar 6100 *270 6170 

6240 6275 APT 

9200 5670 MOV 6200 6305 42.10 

BUS 5700 Jul 6295 6X65 6200 

82.10 5700 Sep 6155 6470 6145 

8475 53. 50 Dec MJO 65.10 6470 

8470 5960 Jan __ 

SHOO 5940 Mar 6578 <570 6S70 

7 LOO 61.10 MOV 

74-40 6170 Jul 6640 6660 6665 

7090 6130 SOP 

6050 6850 DOC 

Esr. Sales 9500 Prev. Sates 10475 
Pm. Oav Open Int. 95719 oH7 


FRENCH FRANC (I MM] 

Sper franc- 1 Mint equate 5000881 
.11905 .10060 Mtn- .10030 .10030 

.11020 .10100 Jim .10000 .10000 

.10430 , .100* Sap MX 49W0 

Est. Sales 144 Pm- Salas 50 

Pm. Day Open Ini. 2707 up 50 


(Continued from Page 8) 


GERMAN MARK tIMMJ 


per mark- 1 aatnt aauats 100001 
0110 0075 Mor 0078 

0079 

0054 

0070 

—10 

7733 

JB 97 

jun 

0101 

0W1 

JOT 

0993 

—10 

0545 

7127 

Sep 

0119 

0120 

0104 

01 IB 

—9 

0610 

0143 

Dec 

0190 

0150 

0128 

0147 

—10 

7251 

7251 

Mar 

0201 

0201 

0S1 

0198 

—11 


E xt. So t os 20777 Prev. Sales 19762 
Prev. Dav Open int. 42.985 up89s 


SOYBEAN MEAL (CRT) 

100 fonte dollars par tan 
209.00 13640 Mar 13S0O 13600 

MS0O 14230 May 14170 14200 

19650 14650 Jul 14740 149 JO 

18070 15170 Aua 15100 15IJ0B 

17VJ0 15370 SOP 15370 ISXSD 

18050 15550 Oct 15600 15600 

«** J D«c 16150 16150 

16100 16200 Jan 

20650 16700 Mar 16600 16500 

Esl. Sales Prev.Sahm 4706 

Prev. Dav Open Int 40756 oft 414 
SOYBEAN OIL (CBT) 

60000 tbs- dollars per 100 lbs. 

3040 2293 MW 2758 2807 

30-10 2280 May 27.18 27.10 

3070 2270 Jul 2670 2675 

2770 2250 AIM 2570 2678 

2625 2250 SOP 2570 2570 

2600 2290 Oct 2660 2660 

2675 2190 Dec 2290 2440 

Jan 2795 2295 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 11535 

Pm. Day Open Int. 40483 off 492 


13580 —150 
14170 —140 
15770 +61 D 
15050 —178 
15250 — 150 
15450 —200 
16070 -150 
16250 —50 

14500 —800 


SILVER (COMEXJ 

5000 Trav or- cents portray a*. 

7235 6165 Feo 6095 6095 6095 

| 16207 5055 Mar 6127 6347 6097 

Apr 

MOV 6227 6460 6187 

Jut 6297 6527 6287 

Sep 6415 6617 6417 

DOC 6567 6777 6560 

Jan 6527 6525 6627 

Mar 6767 6807 6747 


JAPANESE YEN (MUM 
S per van- 1 paint eauafs 30700001 
804695 703*41 MW 703346 783847 703826 703839 

004450 703868 Jun 70367 3 70387 5 703854 703868 

004150 703910 Sec 70390S 703905 703897 003900 

004393 707948 Dec 703932 703932 7B3933 703985 

Eat. Sates LI 17 Pm. Sates 9757 
Pm. Day Open frit. 19716 off 414 


Jul 

Sop 

Dtic 

Prev. Sales 207*4 
Int 84584 up 84 


SWISS FRANC (IMM) 

S per fr anc- 1 point equate 307001 
5035 5611 Mar 5605 5619 5584 5615 

4900 5646 Jun 04© -3655 -3677 7650 

5830 5677 Sep 5661 5678 56SS 5677 

.4340 5700 Dec 5715 571 5 J7U 5718 

Ett. Sales 17592 Prev. Safes 15522 
Prev. Day Open Int 29.929 uplJU 


2751 2752 —54 

2673 2693 — JS 

26.10 2652 —53 

2555 2S52 — JB 

23.10 2558 —32 

2450 2435 —50 

2350 2392 —73 

2390 2393 


PLATINUM 4MYME) 

, 50 tray ex.- del lars per troy at 
30650 377J30 Feb Z7370 

28270 27670 Mor 27690 

44750 26550 Apr 274.10 27970 27T0O 27820 

44950 27270 Jul 27950 2BS0O 27H70 28380 

39UJ0 27650 Oct 28670 29870 28670 28950 

37150 28470 Jan 29650 

Est.Selm Prev. Softs 910 

Prev. Oay Open int. 15722 up 141 


Industrials 


OATS (CBT7 

5700 Bu minimum- dollars par bubal 
196* 1J0* Mar 107% 157+fc 

151 179* Mav 153* 153* 

158* 178* Jul 177* 178 


159 ITS* Sep 176 176 

172* 178 DOC 178* 178* 

EsL Safes Prev. Sates 167 

Pm. Day Open int. 3764 sp 47 


155* 156 —72* 

151* 152* —72 

177* 177* —71 

155* ITS* —71 
178% 170* —70* 



12670 13150 12550 131.10 
12375 15970 12350 1X75 
1ZL2J W59 127-25 12675 
12150 12250 12150 12555 
11979 11970 11970 12575 



14670 14690 —3.10 
15550 15670 —278 
16270 16370 —170 
16550 16670 —350 
16670 16770 —3.10 
17250 17250 —270 
17650 17670 —LIU 


: OcdPpf 270 11.9 
i OCCiPpt 653 127 
i OcdPpf 1570 UJ3 
OcdPf W72 117 
OcdPpf M70 110 
ODECO 170 37 17 
I Ogden 170 67 15 
iDadnet 177 25 
i OfUoSd 771 IZ9 6 
OtiEdpt 390 111 
i Oh Ed pt 470 137 
OhEdpf 754 147 
on Ed pf 776 137 
OtlEdpt 820 142 
i OhEdpf 1N> 57 
OflEdpf ISO 137 
OhEdpr 192 14.1 
i OhEdpf 170 116 
OhEdpf 9.12 14.1 
i OhEdpf B74 147 
OftE Bt 1078 125 
DtMoH M 27 10 
OflP ot 8M 137 
OhPBfC 770 129 
QhPWG 257 125 
i OkfoGE 270 95 | 
i CHtn 170 45 9 
i Qm ncr, 33 

Onefdo 70 44 TO 
ONEOIC 276 79 10 
OranRk 2JH 81 9 

Orange 531 57 12 
□none 56 37285 
i OrianP X 

Orion pf 70 57 
Orion pf 2 55 95 
: Outturns 74 25 9 
OvrnTr 74 27 U 
OvShlg 50 27 10 
I Owenc 1.40 19 9 
Owen ill 17» 45 B 
i Oxford 74 35 10 


T9* 19% 
50% 50%- 
Tia*rra%. 
106*106% 
in 101 - 

27 27* • 

X - 
85* 25*- 
14* 

29* 29*- 
32 X ■ 
50* 50*- 
53* Bfi 
57% 5716- 
29% 29% ■ 
25% Z5%- 

27* 271, - 
14* 14% 
64* 64*- 
60* MW 
85 86 • 

16% 16% 
61 611* - 
59 59 • 

IS* IB* 
21* 21V- 
35* 35%- 


43 V; 33+1 
12% 7H 
X 1991 
X 15 
23 16 

17* 11% 

10 5-7 
2% % 

32* 19W 
31W 21% 
35* 25 
SO* 15% 
10% 9 

11 

34* 

53% 

23% 

10% 

51 

24W 
30* 

34% 

17* 

19* 

11 * 

0* 

11 * 

23* 


16* Id* 
32* 32*- 
25% 25% - 
V* 9%- 
25* 25*- 
11 % 11 *- 
8* 8* 
29* 29*- 
2S* 28*- 
31 31*- 

17* 17% - 
X 36*- 
39* 39*- 
13* 13*- 


■Ivestock 


CATTLE (CME) 

40700 On.- cents per lb. 

6770 6270 Feb 6475 6492 

69.00 6140 APT 6810 6810 

69-15 6570 Jim 6872 6OJ0 

6770 6115 Aug 6600 6770 

65JC AIM Oct 4477 ASM 

6670 6370 Dec 6825 6640 

6870 6825 Feb 6670 66J0 

Ext Sates 10790 Prev. Safes HLS15 
Pm. Dav Open Int. S67U offi797 


6435 4477 
6770 <772 
6850 6877 

6677 6697 
7470 45. 10 
6625 6670 

6670 66J5 


! GOLD (COM EX] 

160 troy ol- dollars per troy ez. 

52270 296JD Fab 29970 30570 29970 

31170 298H NW 

51470 30070 Apr 30270 30830 307-20 

51800 30470 JUP 306J» 21370 30670 

48100 30870 Aug 31830 31670 31030 

49370 31400 Oct 31170 31870 31170 

40910 31700 Dec 321.00 33770 32870 

485m 32570 Feb m00 33670 32680 

49600 33010 Apr 

43170 33670 Jun 

42840 •usnn Aue 

39870 34200 Od 35170 35400 3Sim 

Dec 

Eat. Sales 26500 Prev. Sates 28S0 
Prev. Day Open lnt.137043 up 1731 


4XTTTON 2CNYCEI 
58000 Rs. - cents per a. 

79 03 6425 Mar 4570 6570 

7920 6142 May 4620 66.70 

7905 6615 Jut 6710 6710 

7710 4774 Od 47m 6 715 

7370 <779 Dec 6710 4710 

7675 6835 Mar 

7670 69.11 MOV 

7075 69m Jul 

Est.Sotes 1500 Prev. Sates 3008 
Prev. Day Open Int 17226 off 2.159 


482] 6501 
660] 6671 

47.10 4708 

4705 6706 

<705 <705 


1 HEATING OIL (NYME) 

42700 aa L cents per go< 

B370 4700 Mar 7490 

8205 6575 APT 7170 

8260 6470 May 69.90 

7870 6310 Jun 6900 

6970 6505 Jul 6970 

7170 7825 Sep 7170 

Ed. Sates Prev. Soles 4 Jt 

Prev. Day Open Int. 16134 up84 


7435 7475 
7100 7175 
49JE 7815 
6910 6910 
4940 *970 

7170 7170 


FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 

44700 tbs.- ce n t s pe r Ih. 

7403 65.75 Mar 7313 1 

7475 6770 Apr 7110 I 

71.90 6495 May 7175 I 

7200 6470 Allft 7215 

7205 6770 Sep 7275 

7100 47.10 Od 7110 

7254 7840 NOV 7205 I 

Est.Sotes 1022 Prev. Sates \X 
Pm. Day Oeen int. 11035 atfSD 


Financial 


7120 7370 
7170 7130 

7170 7102 

724S 7262 

7190 7190 
7105 7105 

72.10 7210 


HOGS (CME) 

30789 tbs.- cents per lb. 

5830 4717 Feb 5110 SIS 0 

5445 45.10 APT 4775 4700 


5540 4840 JWI 5297 5805 

5507 4895 Jul 5375 5300 

5407 4710 Aua 5270 5297 

5105 4500 Oct 4850 4875 

5005 4600 DOC 4870 4873 

4900 4605 Feb 4830 4870 

4715 4550 APT 

Esl. Sales 5039 Prev. Sales 40N 
Pm. Dav Open InL 29174 off 86 

FORK BELLIES (CMS) 

38000 Bk.- cents per lb. 

8105 4095 Feb 70.12 7050 

aua 4aw Mar 4795 7070 

82JI0 61.15 May 7000 7110 

82.47 62.15 Jut 7L10 7176 

8075 6000 Aag 69JW 49m 

7515 43-15 Feb 6510 66JM 

7140 6400 Mar 


5100 51277 
4700 4707 

5272 5205 

550 5375 

nn aw 


IIS T. BILLS (IMM) 

SI million- ptsof TOO pet. 

9101 B709 Mar 9103 9108 

9101 S7.14 Jun 9111 9109 

9103 8494 Sep 9002 9009 

9890 8507 Dec 9041 9044 

90S 1670 Mar 

9007 S7A1 Jun 8908 1908 

9800 1800 Sea 8951 8951 

8953 8909 Dec 

ESL Sates 18539 Prev. Sates 17015 
Prev. Dav Open Int 47074 uoB 


CRUDE OIL (NYME) 

1000 bbt- dollars per 6PL 
3100 2476 Mar 2700 2806 

3175 2477 APT 27.15 Z774 

3008 240B Mav 2666 2788 

2953 2400 Jun 26.45 2670 

2954 24.16 Jul 2600 2670 

2957 2405 Aug 2600 2600 

2950 24JJ8 Sep 26.16 26.16 

2950 2475 Od 26.16 ^.16 

2950 24.48 Nov 2600 2605 

2*50 2X90 Dec 2605 2650 

EaL Safes Prev. Sate* 15099 

Prev. Day Open im. 61183 off 271* 


2675 2804 
27AS 27 AS 
266b 2*05 

3670 2*70 

2619 S4 9i 
2610 26J0 
26.16 26.16 
2L16 26.14 


4840 4870 
4830 4870 


10 YR. TREASURY (CBT) 

S1OO0OO art n- at* A 32nds of W0 pet 
83 7045 Mar 8V9 81-17 

82-3 707 Jun 10-14 10-22 

I 81-13 75-18 Sap 79-39 79-29 

80-22 75-13 Doc 

BM 75-18 Mar 

79-36 77-22 Jun 

Est.Sotes Prev. Soles 12174 

Prev. Dav Open InL 44071 up 1749 


Stack Indexes 


Eat. Sales 4005 Prev. Sates 5722 
Prev. Day Open Int. 14098 up 90 


4878 4845 
4810 4817 
4885 69JE 
6900 6910 
4705 6700 

6500 6505 

075 


US TREASURY BONDS (CBT) 
»Pd*loan»FM & 32nd*o» in Pd) 
77-15 57-27 Mar 72-7 72-1B 

77-15 57-20 Jun 71-7 71-14 

76-2 57-10 Sep 70-14 70-22 

76-5 57-8 Dee 49-24 70-3 

72-30 57-2 Mar 69-8 69-14 


70-16 56-2? Jun 40-27 66-30 

70-3 56-29 Sep 48-7 66-7 

49-26 56-25 Dec 

49-12 56-27 Mar 67-38 67-30 

69-2 641 Jun 67% 67-7 

68-26 64-21 Sep 

Est- Sales Prev.SideiHll 11T 

Prev. Day Open Inf 027,4*0 up 1470 


(Indexes ccttiplted shortly beta 
SP COMP. INDEX (CME) 
paints and cento 

I83A0 15330 Mar 18300 18145 

1SA90 156.10 Jun 18670 18670 

18905 16000 Sep 18970 18970 

19200 17508 Dec 191.10 191.10 

Est.Sotes Prev. Sates 56*55 

Prev. Day Open Int. 57782 up 1797 
VALUE UK EtKCBTI 
potnto and cents 

205.15 148.10 Mar 20500 20505 

20970 17X80 Jun 209-16 209.10 

ESL Sates Prev. Sates 8924 

Prev. Day Open InL 7733 aH 319 


market claael 


1*850 rtlAS —115 
18340 184.15 — 200 
18700 18700 — 200 
19050 19050 — 115 


wm BUS —130 
20690 20970 —375 


COFFER CUIYCSCE) 

37700 IDS.- centa per lb. 

15370 12X50 Mar 14570 14600 

15200 12201 MOV 14370 14S2S 

14900 12100 Jul 14200 MX40 

14700 12700 Sep 14850 U2JW 

14205 12905 Dec 13975 14070 

14100 12850 Mar U850 M80O 

13900 1X100 May 1370S 13705 

Jul 13650 13650 
Est.Sotes 1875 Prev. 5a tea 4018 
Prev. Day Open InL 11922 attM 
SUGARWORLD 11 (NY CSCE I 

112000 lbs.- cents per lb. 


14600 14509 
14X10 14451 
14100 14X90 
14000 14105 
13976 14818 
12850 13870 
12705 13707 
12650 13600 


GNMA (CBT) 

Sioaooa prtrv pte A 32ndsat 100 pd 
70-17 57-8 Mar 49-15 49-19 

4«7 57-17 Jun 48-26 4809 

694 59-13 Sen 

48-73 59-4 Dec 

68 58-29 Mor 

670 58-25 Jun 

47-3 45-21 Sen 

Ert sates Prev. Sates 942 

Prev. Day Onen int 4707 off 11] 


Prev. Day Open Int 7733 off 319 

mrse comp. iKoexfNYFiu 

points and cents 

10605 B80O Mar 18670 10475 

1OB0D 9000 Jun 18875 188m 

11005 9105 SeP 11005 11005 

11200 10100 Dec 11101 111J0 

Eif .Sates Prey. Sates ELSOO 

Prev. Dav Open int. I1.M8 off 309 


104A5 10500 —100 
10400 HJ7.10 —100 
16860 KB 60 —175 
11108 11100 —00 


18 PHH 01 XI 
24* PPG 170 4J 
15 PSA 70 20 
>3% PSA dp# 100 104 
11* PBCAS L50 110 
12* PocGE 102 10J 
30* PaCLtp 302 87 
20* PCLum 100 44 
5% PocRas 05r 0 
13* PPCRsptaoO 110 
11* PocSct AD IA 
S3* PocTote 570 77 
9% POCTID .40 29 
21 Padltp 222 80 
27* POdlpf 40 7 730 
23* PrfnWb 70 7 J 
26* PsInWpf 205 7.1 
24% PO((Ti SC 100 XZ 
20% PanABk 00 27 
4 PanAm 
1* PcnAwf 
13* Panddtn 00 10 
31 PttehEC 200 60 
3 PwitPr 
12 Pdtecfl 00 53 
10% Parti vii 
12* PorttEs 
5* PwkDrl .14 U 
25% ParkK 1.12 X9 
12* PcrkPn 02 30 
7* FatPtrl 
14 PaVlNW 04 U 
11* POVNP 70 4J 
13* PavCsfi .16 J 
6% Peafcdv 00 27 
Penuo 
PenCen 

Penney 2J6 69 
PaPL 278 1X1 
PaPLpf 470 127 
PaPL Pf 400 120 
PaPLpf 870 130 
PaPLdprX42 120 
PnPLdpr290 120 
PaPLdPrX2S 120 
PaPL dnrX75 120 
PaPL or I LOO 110 
PaPLPrlXOO 130 
PaPLpr 800 nj 
Penwlt 200 57 
Fenwpf 170 67 
Penraoi 200 50 
PeopEn 100 77 
PeuBov 06 10 
Pet^ICa 178 37 
PedtEI 06 20 
Prmten l05elX9 
PervDr 08 10 
Petrie 170 17 
PetRs X72el40 
PetRspf 107 90 
Ptrtnv 1038210 
Pfizer 176 10 
prwtpO 

ssr *33 

FtSlw oSto7 

PIXIE pi 670 1X8 
PIXIE pf 700 115 


12 161 28% 
9 714k 38* 
65 24* 
IS 19 
45 13 

6 2590 17 
11 925 39* 
14 140 27* 

Ot 7% 
27 15% 
14 ITT 17* 
B 561 71* 
8 10% 

7 307 24* 

2D 32W 
48 1441 41* 
476 321*3 
ro 464 18 
9 as 27% 
1724 4* 

491 2* 


28*— * 
38* 

24 — % 

18% — a 


16%— % 


39% — % 
27 — * 
4*— * 
15%+ * 
J7 + * 
71*+ * 
10% + % 
34* 

31*— * 
39*— I* 
31*— * 
3771— 16 
27 + * 

4% 

2 


19 519 20* 19* 

19ft— % 

10 4089 37% 37% 

37% — 2 

14 1474 4* 4% 

4%— % 

13 142 ISA M* 

15*— * 

54 1126 16* 15ft 

76% 

11 81 16 15* 

IS*— ft 

299 7 6ft 

7 

12 445 39 38ft 

33ft— ft 

77 124 16* 16 

lb — +1 

259 2* 2 

2 — ft 

IB 200 36ft 26ft 

26ft 



17 23oa jo im 

19*— % 


200 4.1 13 454 *9 48 48U— * 

00b 10 10 6 10* 18* 10* 

00 20 M 63 28* a* S* + * 

JM 0 23 132 17* 17* 17*— % 

20DeU7 123 IB 17* IB + » 
04 17 17 238 17 16* 14* 

72 120 6ft 6* 6* 

49 1* 1* 1ft— Mi 

70 10 22 166 31 30% 30* — * 

170 83 10 3318 31* 30* 30ft— * 

02 10 12 1718 30 29% 09*— * 

102 85 7 12 20* 20% 20% 

100 117 93 10* 10% 10*- * 

40 7% 7 7% + ft 

.16 7 M 1896 28* Z7* 27*— * 

403e 70 400 52* 52* 52*— * 

XI D 9.1 8 9437 23* 23* 23*— * 

02* 90 j; 288 9 8* 8ft— * 

04 10 15 2381 38* 37ft 37ft— * 

104 81 14 34 l«* 34 24 — * 

100 X6 11 1838 28% 27* 28 — * 

170 47 15 21 31* 31 31* + * 

00 U 43 10 in IA 16%— % 

170 85 7 116 IB* 18* 18ft 

108 117 6 11 11 11 + % 

120 6* 5ft 6* 

150 14.1 5 10* 10* IB* + * 

X16 97 8 282 22% 22ft 23 

178 40 11 17B2 39ft 39 »%— * 

100 19 IB 4530 41* <1% 41*—* 

.IS .9 73 476 12* >2* 12* + % 

06 20 12 IS 27 26* 26ft + * 

10 66 59 58% SB*— * 

1.12 « 10 1424 38* 38* 38*— * 
52 37 |1 103 15% 75* 15*—* 

10 U IS 57 41* 41* 41* 

72 1.1 7 265 39 88% 39+* 

176 I Id 34 If* II* lift + * | 

2.10 1X7 14 15* 15% 15% + * 

110 1X8 30 15% IS 15% 

78 17 1514k 27% 25 56 — % 

-Ik Ok Ok 

00 10 10 452 42* 41* 42% — * 

19 47 17* 17* 17% 

70 15 15 105 26% 26% 26* + * I 

100 10 9 181 31% 30* 31*+* 
52 0 IB 3318 57% 56% 57% 

106 50 9 7109 35% 3*% 34ft— % 
6789 65 22 102ft 102% HD* — * 

679 29* 29* 29*— % 
27 13% 13* 13% + % , 
70 10 18 86 34* 34* 3C%— * 


Protect your short-term 
gains with the long-term 
security of gold. 

The spectacular rise of Ihe dollar and 
of many paper investments has brought 
substantial profits. 

The wi&st investors now convert part 
of their wins into Krugerrands 

Why? 

Krugerrands are legal Lender gold 
bullion coins. The most widely 
circulated — and widdy recognized — g old 
coins in the world. And because they 
contain 1 oz, 1/2 oz, 1/4 oz and I/IOoz 
of pure gold— with just a touch of . . 

hardening alloy— you can be certain that 
in the long run. they will secure the value 
of your investment profits. 

Ask vnnr bank or broker today or 


palge*? 
Rose 6' 


write for your free copy of the “Enrof 
Guide to Gold and Krugerrands” to: 


International Gold Corporation 

1, rue de la ROtisserie 

CH- 1204 Geneva - Switzerland 


- il\ P l \ 

1 V- ( t;~* 

<* ■- M.-f 

Sp* 4 * t r " ^ 

' Tr.i -- ir 'V. . J 

i’f 'A' C 

'■■-‘7 y- 






w.-r 

■. j ■*— 






krugerrand 

Money you cantrust 






IVei c omc *ki Lnicraeoanal Cold Corponaioa Toes 
oat provide a baying or setting service. 


China Approi 
\j-ab Bank 1 1 


aSyiN*- 1 T l, ‘‘. 


02 40 33 342 15% 15% 15% + * 

70 25 8 as 24* 24% -34* + M 

200 37 IS S3 56% »% 54 + % 

112» 67 5 1851 33% 33% 3I%— * 

00 20 71234 29* 28% 29% + % 

300 X0 4 |07 100*100* -M* 

06 20 12 218 35% 34* 34%— % 
10 382 7 4* 8* 

14 19 14* 14* 14*— % 

9 104 15* 15* 15% + * 

13 1501k 34 33% 33*+ * 

10 59 58* 58*— % 

K 533 35% 35* 35* + * 

X50 110 18 21% 31 31 

78 20 23 1774 17 16* 16*+ * 

02 20 25 992 14% 10% 14 + % 

250 40 10 1448- 59* 58* 59% + % 

0* 10 14 753 52% S3 + % 

14 420 39% 39% 39% + % 

7 1261 37% 35* 36 + * 

1314612 16% 16% 16% 

13 204 29* *% 28%— ft 


12 Month 
HteftLoW Sturt 


Dlv. YM. PE into HIM Lite Ouot arte 


PI 307 15.1 
pi 200 140 
pi 450 150 
pf 100 M7 
nd £2h 20 

106 40 


61 38% 37ft 37ft— % 

26 21% 21* 21% + % 

10 38 27ft 27* 27* 

17 57 75% 45% 45%+% 

9 365 JO* 29% 2»%— % 

25 26 8 7ft 8 + * 

7 5959 22* 22V. 22*—* 
6 4927 18ft 18* 18% + % 


PMIE Pf 875 140 
PhllEpf 171 U7 
PMIE Pf 103 137 
PMIE Pf 7SS 14.1 
PhllEpf 1JB 1X7 
87 PMIEpflSXS 14.1 
55 PhllEP* 9S2 1X7 
51 PMIE pl 9 JO 140 
44 PMIE Pf 700 142 
48* PMIE Pf 705 147 
15% PtillSob 102 70 


Commodity Indexes 


CERT. DEPOSIT (IMM) 
SI motion- ptoof TOO pet 


1X60 

305 


191 

197 

187 

192 

+01 

9170 

8503 

1000 

4.17 

May 

473 

470 

470 

4 a 

+JB 

9100 

BSJB 

905 

403 

Jut 

409 

446 

407 

463 

9060 

8500 

975 

as 

Sap 

490 

492 

4JS 

4.94 

+04 


8504 

905 

775 

501 

505 

Oct 

500 

5.11 

504 

X10 

557 

+02 

8978 

89-46 

8606 

8603 

903 

S9S 


602 

608 

601 

607 

+05 

8706 

■706 

7.15 

670 

MWWMY 

Jm 

678 

609 

608 

605 

6J8 

+07 

+JB7 

; Eat. Salas 5H 

I Prev. Day Open I 


Close 

Moody's 97370 f 

Reuters 101970 

DJ. Futures _____ NA 

Com. Research Bureau _ NA 

Moody's : base 100 : Dec. 31. 1931. 

P- preliminary; l-Hnal 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. 18. 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 ; Dec. 31. 1974. 


Previous 
970 JO-' 
Z020.0C 
1257)1 
24570 


42* PNIMr 370 30 
10* Phllpin 78 20 
me PMIPof 079 <8 
14* PMtVH 70 L5 
27 % PledAvt 08 J 
23% PteNG 202 73 

14 Pier 1 

33 Pllecry 106 35 
21% Pioneer 104 XI 
17 PlanrEI .ITT 0 
26* Pltnvfi 104 27 
53% Pftnflpf 212 27 
9* PWtstn 

8* PlanRs 00 10 
12* Pkmtm .16 1.1 
7% Playoor 
19* Plesev 75e 30 
is* PoaoPd jo 13 
24% Poiarfd 100 X9 
11* Porter* to 0 

15 PanTal 00 41 
13% Portec 70 20 
72% Portrpf SJO 77 
13 PortGE 102 ltt4 
90 PoGpf 11J0 110 
17* PorfJ pf 2J0 121 
28% PorGPf 470 1U 
28% PorGPf 432 1X1 
25% FeWcb 106 47 
19* Putin El 216 80 
56% Pot El p# 274 XI 
36 PotElpt 450 110 
J1 PotEI pf 404 11.1 
16% Pr*ml» 

24* Prlmrk 200 50 
— Pr/meC 

PrlmM .12 7 

ProctG 270 46 
PrdRsh 08 20 
Prater 170 XI 
PSvOH 102 90 
PSCol Pf 2W 11 J 
PSlnd 100 110 
PSInpf 1A4 130 
PSln pi 7.15 150 
PSInpf 974 150 
PSln PI 806 16.1 
PSwMH 
PSNHPt 
PNHpfB 
PNH ptC 
PNHpfD 
PNH PIE 
5% PNH PlF 
7* FNHpfG 
T9% P9VNM 208 110 
20% PSvEG 202 100 
10% PSEGpf 170 110 
2M PSEG Pf 4.18 117 
29* PSEGpf 4J0 117 
K* PSEGpf S3* lie 
15 PSEGpf 217 110 
46* PSEGof 608 110 
16* PSEGpf 243 110 
53 PSEC Pf 700 120 
55 PSEGpf 700 11.9 
S3 PSEG pf 808 127 
51* PSEGpf 702 110 
51 PSEGPf 77B t|0 
65* PSEGPl 972 110 
2* PubJWt 
7% Puebla .16 10 
8* PRCem 
»% PuqatP 106 120 
18* PiuteHm .12 7 

23% Purafal >08 40 
5* Pyro 


Market Guide 


Ear. Sates HU3S Prev. Sates 29766 
Prev. Day Open Int. 91057 off 418 


■UHODOUJUn (IMM) 


COCOA (NYCSCE) 

10 metric tea*- 5 «or ton 

2273 


2147 

2164 — 1U 

81 million PteoMOOpcL 
91-38 85.14 Mar 

9808 8209 Jun 

9Q7B 

vans 

9080 

9002 

S3 

9063 

9002 

—a 

— wll 


aa 


3315 

SIS 

2222 

2222 —88 

9003 

6453 


8958 

8965 

8941 

8946 

-oo 

2400 

2049 

Jul 

2380 


3317 

2277 —88 

8907 

8400 

Dec 

89.11 

89.14 

8900 

6879 

-JB 

3415 

3053 

Seo 

2270 

2270 

2189 

2189 -a 

8948 

8610 

Mar 

8873 

8673 

8863 

8861 

— 06 

2337 

1999 

OK 

21» 

2120 

a43 

2057 —47 

89.15 

8673 

Jun 

8808 

8808 

8808 

8809 

—04 


NYCSCE: 

NYCR: 

COMEX: 

NYME: 

KCBT: 

NYFE: 


Chicago Board of Trade 
CMcaoo Mer ca ntile Exchonga 
Intemattonol Morrrttk^r Market 
Of CMcoao Mercantile Ej oJ kkipc 
now York Cocoa. Sugar. Caffe* Exchange 
New York Cotton Exchange 
Commodity Exchange, New York 
New York M ercan tile Exchange 
Kansas QTv Board of T raise 
New Y<rt Futures Exdaioe 


Asian Commodities 

Feb. 11 


London Commodities 


Feb. 11 


Paris Commodities 

Feb. 11 


Cash Prices Feb. 11 


HONG- KONG GOLD FUTURES 
UAS per ounce 

Close 

Hiah LOW BM Ask 
Feb _ HA 6LA. 29900 30100 
MW - — — 29900 30100 


Jun _ — 

Aug. — 
Od — — 
Dec - — 


— 30100 30300 

— 30600 30BJ10 

— 21000 JJ20O 

— 31500 31700 

— 32000 32200 


Prevkws 
BM Ask 
30000 30200 
00 30X00 


Figures In sterling per metric tea 
Gasoil in U.S. dollars nr metric ton. 
Gold in U5. dollars per ounce. 


Sugar to French Francs per metric tea. 
Other figures in Francs per lOO kg. 


Volume: 25 lots of 100 oz. 
SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
ILSAperouKX 


■.00 3W0O 
31200 31400 
31600 31800 
32100 32X00 


High Lew settle Settle 

Feb N.T. N.T. 30000 30070 

Mar N.T. N.T. 30100 301JM 

AM ■ - 30X50 30270 30300 30300 

N.T. N.T. 30600 30680 

Volume: 391 lots of WO w. 

KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
MOHmim cents ter kite 

Chw* Pr**too» 

BM A«6 BM Ask 

Mar 19525 195.50 196JM 19650 

APT 20X50 22X00 20150 20200 

May — 20550 20650 20450 20550 

Jun 207 JO 20650 20600 20800 

volume: 48 lots. 

SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Singapore can* per kilo 

Cftkse Previous 


High Law CM 
SUGAR 

Mar 11X20 11170 11200 
MOV 12170 119X0 12070 
Aua 13000 12850 12900 
Oct 13X20 13400 13770 
Doc N.T. N.T. 14400 
Mar 15970 >5900 >5900 
MOV - N.T. N.T. 16570 


High Low Close Chtee 

SUGAR 

Mar U62 1045 1050 IJ60 —20 

MOV 1712 1090 1J95 1098 —20 


X193 lots of 50 tons. 


11240 11200 
12070 12070 
12X20 12M0 
13770 13X80 
145JB 14400 
15*00 U9JD 
16700 16670 


mav I. ijtv i^n — 4M 

AIM 1795 1780 1770 1785 —30 

Oct 1.550 1550 1035 1X50 —25 

Dec N.T. N.T. 1715 1735 — 15 

Mar 1.73D 1.730 1.720 ' 1J3S —25 

Est. voL: 1760 loto of so tons. Prev. actual 


sales: 1039 'lots Oaen interest: 2X770 
COCOA 


Coin modify and Unit 
Coffee 4 Sonias. lb 
Prlnlcloth M/J0 38 %. vd 

Steel billets IPlH.l.ton 

Iron 2 Fdry. PM la. Ion — 
Steel scran No 1 hvy Pitt. _ 

Lead Spat, lb 

Copper elect, lb 

Tin (Srraftol. lb 

Zinc. E, St. (— Basis, lb 

Palladfu>n.m 

Silver N.Y. sc 

Source: AP. 


2257 X15B 2162 
2279 X167 2172 
2252 2143 2U5 

X23B 2.116 X122 
2061 1.985 10BB 
2043 2024 1.975 
1080 1.976 1065 


6098 tots of 10 tons. 


2165 2235 2237 
2174 2256 2257 
2150 22Z7 2230 
2124 2003 2208 
1.992 2038 2040 
1.980 2018 2025 
1.976 2000 2015 


Mar 

2415 

2020 

2037 2355 

-53 

MOV 

JlV 

V?. 

2078 

N.T. 

2016 2090 

2055 — 

— 24 

— 35 

Sew 

N.T. 

N.T. 

— 2000 

— S 

Dec 

N.T. 

N.T. 

— 2000 

— 40 

Mar 

N.T. 

N.T. 

— 2200 

— 30 

MOV 

N.T. 

N.T. 

- 22C0 

-25 


; S&P 100 Index Options 
Feb. 8 


Est. vol.; 296 tots at 10 tons. Prev. actual 
sales: 105 lots. Ooen interest: 1081 
COFFEE 

Mar N.T. N.T. 2541 2560 — 4 

May N.T. N.T. 2547 2S7S —9 

JlV N.T. N.T. 2560 — —10. 


Cftkse Previous 

BM Aik BM Ask 

RSS 1 Mar- 17300 17X50 17275 17X25 

R55 1 Apr— 17425 17675 New — 

RSS 2 Mor _ 161 JO 16250 New — 

RSS 3 tor. 159-50 760.50 New — 

RSS * Mar— 15250 15450 New — 

RSS 5 Mar- 14400 14600 New — 

KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
Matovslan rtegoRs Mr 25 tons 

Close Previous 

BM Ask BM Ask 


COFFEE 

Mor 2386 2345 2086 

May 2400 2356 209S 

JlV 2424 2365 2421 

Sea 24*3 2405 2*39 

Nov 2462 2427 2*40 

Jan 2766 2765 2460 

Mar N.T. N.T. 2440 

1084 lots of S tens. 


2389 X3S0 2354 
2397 2363 2365 
vjTi 7 , ‘XQ 2J85 
2*40 2*05 2410 
2462 2425 2429 
2473 2420 2428 
2465 2410 2430 


Sep 2570 2570 2578 2594 —10 

Nov N.T. N.T. 2575 2710 +5 

Jan N.T. N.T. 2069 — — 1 

Mar N.T. N.T. 2072 — +2 

Es>. vol.: 3 tors of 5 tons. Prev. actual sales: 


12 lots.’ Ooen Interest : 196 

Source: Bourse du Commerce. 


ttrhe Cm-Lad PateLmt 

150 30 — - — - int - - 

155 74ft 3 - - 1/1* 1/1* % - 

16P S* 21 - - J/U 1/1 I'll 1 

IB IS « 17* 18% 1/1* 3/16 * * 

IN 18% II* 131- 14% 1/14 « ft ll/M 

TO K 71 IW Wi ti V* 2 79/U 

R r* a n n M i » fn 

185 % 2 J* A ilk Vk A I 

TO 1/16 ft 7 3/16 3ft 


London Metals Feb. 11 


Feb 1.175 1.195 1,170 1,185 

Mor 1.150 1000 1,140 1.180 

AM 1.140 1,180 1.135 1.175 

MOT — - 1.130 1,170 I.I» 7.MJ 

Jun 1.110 1,160 1,110 1J40 

JlV 1.108 1.150 1.100 1.150 

Sea 1.100 1.150 1,100 1.150 

NOV 1090 1.140 1090 1,140 

Jan 1090 1.140 1090 1.140 

Volume: 0 lots of 25 tons. 

Source; Reuters. 


1.100 1.150 1.100 1.150 
1090 1,140 1090 1.140 


GASOIL 

Feb 25300 249.25 24900 34905 34400 2*500 

Mar rasa 23408 22500 735.73 29.75 2M0O 

API 22800 22130 22425 22*00 22050 Z20JS 

MOV 22105 21800 21705 21900 71700 21705 

Jun 22100 21700 21700 21705 21500 21700 

JlV 7LT. N.T. 21500 21 7.00 21100 21600 

Alia N.T. ■ NT. 21600 22100 21100 22100 

Sea N.T. N.T. 21500 22X00 21100 22500 

Od N.T. N.T. 21600 22800 21100 22800 

. 1565 Mto of 100 tons 
GOLD 

AM 30100 30300 NA NA NA NA 

100 Mto of 100 fray as 

Sources: Haulers and London Petroleum Ex- 
change (gasoil). 


Figures in sterling per metric tan. 
Silver tn pence per troy ounce. 


Told cod velum* TOW 
Total aiO open M.62SJB4 
Totaled votuaw nil* 
Tdoteof won In*. 585639 


HlehUOte low 179*2 CmeHUS+OM 
Source: CBOE. 


£ It 

12 676 S3ft 

7 1986 48* 

8 1766 Xfft 

life 35 
into 37 
201 66 
U 27ft 
10 2*% 
18 36* 
13 29* 

20r 92Va 

ItolDO 
5fe 63 

12 415 39% 

U 23% 
20 1092 44* 

7 206 16* 

16 173 37* 
71 4765 47 
16 1271 27* 

8 305 9* 

15 136 21% 

16 an 38 

43 26* 
53 16* 
109 4% 

13 3178 40% 

’«? ISS 

3fe 31V, 
4501 32 
5fe 51% 
10701 62 
64 TO* 
75 7ft 

110*188 
14to 75* 
TQ70z 66ft 
40fe 55 
2 to 5* 

11 32 18% 

12 2407 87* 

13 192 34% 
TO 10907 50% 

9 45 26* 

8 537 3P6 

a 32 31% 
13 318 19* 

10 1643 4*% 

7 744 33% 

43 247 23% 

11 2W0 *1% 


“ft-* 

52% — 1 

4734 — % 

24*— * 
35 — * 
34 + % 

46 
27ft 

24*— * 
2S*+ * 
»%— * 
92* 

’£ +i 
39%+ * 
23% + % 
44% * * 
15ft— * 
36ft- % 
46*— * 
Z7%+ % 

20ft- * 

2?*-* 
16*+ % 
«%-«-% 
40%—* 
17 — * 
44%— % 
39*— 1% 
15*— * 
31* +* 
n +t 
51% + * 
41%—! 

1 g? +Vfc 

55% 


10* + % 
75 -4 

66ft— * 

i*:s 

FES 
26 -% 


7 8 34 33% 33ft+ * 

9 2S7 35ft 35* 35* — * 

S 35* as 35% 

200z 44% 44* 44* + * 

30 24 23% 23% 

17 119 27ft 27% 27ft + H 

9 572 31* 31 31* + * 

11 253 13% 13* 13*— * 

4 1530 7* 7% 7* 

1 50* 50* 50*— M 

IS 1570 25ft 25* 25*—* 

IS 112 15% 14ft 14% — ■ % 

104 84 13 192 14* 14* 14* + * 

500 70 8 592 73* 72* 73 +* 


500 70 8 592 73* 72% 
02 21 17 99 24% 34ft 

>00 90 8 434 SB* 20* 
02 17 47 70 14% 14 

2B 105 22* 22 


24% 24ft 24% 

30* 20* 2D* + * 


47 70 14% 14 14 — * 

2B 105 22* 22 22% — % 

10 2307 48% 47 47ft— ft 

9 53 36* 36* 36* 

11 419 42* 41* 42 — % 

14 1998 52* 51ft Sift— ft 

18 1T0 22* 21* 22* + ft 

12 363 20* 20ft 20*+ ft 

9 285 16 15ft 16 + ft 

■ 2M7 59ft 99ft 59% 

7 5B79 45% 44* 44%— ft 

lfe 74% 74% 74% 

9 162 24% 24% 34% — ft 


.. 22 
SB* 49% 
149*115% 

20 22ft 
40% 31% 
72* 55% 
12ft 5% 
43% 28* 
ft 27% 

21 17ft 

17ft 12 
33* 22 
21% >4% 
36* IB* 
22% 15% 
49% 30 
75 45 

39 23* 

37 25 

9ft 0ft 
25* 20ft 
25% 21ft 
25ft 21ft 
21* 17* 
18% 15ft 


08 L9 
08 30 
UN 30 
4MO90 
120S 90 
225 70 
104 19 
500 70 


ftft-ft 

MU- M 
68 — * 
4ft + % 
15%+ * 
13*— % 
34* + ft 
29%+ * 
16% — * 
26ft + % 
15 —1 
26ft— % 
13 + * 
22 *— % 


SjJ- ,-=* 

v-E-rr-V/'c Mu-ni-iV . 


B--. ' •;-*/= 41 

rvii ;vr " 


^ ^ /'. V *”v, - .-U 


21 253 

U 83 
15 99 

a zn 

1238163 
13 331 
II <9 
42 
47 

10 475 

5 

20 25% 
11 21 * 

6 18% 


36*—* 
14ft— ft 
2*— % 
37ft- ft 
a +* 
41ft— * 
88ft— ft 

77% — % 

53ft— * 
132*— * 
28*— % 
37*+% 
72ft— ft 
13*+ ft 
42 —1% 
37*— * 
29*— ft 
T7 

30ft + ft 
1B%+ * 
23* 

21 —ft 
49* +1 
73% — ft 
37*—* 
36 — % 
**+ * 
29 —ft 
Mft— * 


STid -•-* ""*■ ' 

5- ; - V s - 




ffei 

.> • ;• - - 1 


'r?:r T r. 'ry % 

Zi: Ai. - • • " 

ic-- 


; z , -zL - Chira. 

■■ - --c<r.* - ' 


,21ft— ft 
M% + U 


II 662 M* 14% 1**— * 
11 385 29% 2B* 29 — ft 


31* 32 + % 


14 10% 10% 10% + * 
06 2D* 20 20*- % 


1106 2D* 20 
213 3ft 3ft 
9 1916 15% 
41 11 raft 

Zl«l 12* N* 


s* 


32* 21% 
20 5ft 
25 14 

5* 2% 
24* M* 
6ft 2% ' 
46* 30% 
13% 9* 
25ft 17% 
6ft 3ft 
10 * 8 % 
39% 23% ' 
43 36* ' 


678 30* 
2597 18ft 
111 28ft 


-24 0 15 

40 30 10 
08 10 IS 


43 2ft 

44 24% 
44 SM 

736 42* 


111 13* 
41] VPk 


29ft 29% + ft 
11 * 12 + % 
44 44% + ft 

31* 32 —ft 
41ft 41ft— 1 

’3* W + * 


83 68* 

66* 52* 
21* l«ft 
25* 
75% SB ' 


luuo* la 

XI 1.1 15 

12 2? 


702 110 
1RR 70 IS 
73 

200 30 11 


50 4% 

19 ID* 
5B7 39* 
SB! 41* 
3S0z 73% 
3001 82 
SOz 66 
336 24ft 
35 35ft 
3(8 74% 


29ft 29ft— 1ft 
9ft 10 — % 
20 30% + ft 

2ft SM 
24 3f 
2ft 3 
41ft 4IW— 1 
13% 13%—% 
24 34 —1 


Procter 


•Ccr.Sr.vuti imot 


•TV..--'- 


4ft 4ft + ft 

10% Wft+ft 


38% 39% 

41* 41*— * 
73% 73% —1* 
82 83 +1* 

46 66 — % 

24% 24ft. + ft 
34ft 34ft— ft 
74% 74% — * 


Mc:i?.r v: .k . ir.c: zz 
— rc-e "sr.se ru: 45 
E.'..-r-.r •> 
Mr 


98 21 2D% 

JO 49 33 WO 76* 14% 
83 6% 6 


iR— » 


100 17 11 334 32* 


L30 44 11 1100 50ft 49M 


rEs 


125 13 7 

100 30 13 346 
13 511 
08 21 11 2502 


6 6% + % 

32% 32ft+ ft 
10 W 

■ft 8ft + ft 

31% 31ft— 1ft 


02 1.1 15 342 37ft 36% 36% —1 

00 50 10 15 16* 16* MM + * 

U» 50 T* 47 20% 20* 20% + % 

200 7.1 5 xm 37* 33% + ft 

22 746 15 14* 1+%—% 

1.92 X7 13 496 52% 58* 52% 

06 10 16 99 35* 35* 35% 




15 82 
136 11% 


12 217 13% 13ft 
15 64 14% 14% 

4 471 Uft 10% 
9 53 30V, 20 

37 46 18* M% 

30 599 26* 25* 
8 200 14* 13ft 
20 19ft 19* 
48 12 18% 18 

lfe 74% 74% 
4 977 17% 17* 
5to 9B 97* 
14 21* 

E 33% 

6 33 

12 32 34% 

8 4166 ft% 

3 78* 
lBfe 40V, 
safe 36ft 
17 130 24% 

4 1188 34 
15 3593 T9% 

22 IE 31% 

12 2174 56 
25 139 14 
10 85 45ft 

8 433 19% 19% 
5 lift 18ft 
8 2S1 8* Bft 

27Bfe 7* 7% 

3fe 45 41 

49Sfe 40 59% 

4Qz 55% 55% 


31ft— 2% 
«%— ft 
79% -3% 
11%-* 
13*- * 
14*— * 
73* 

20 — % 
18% + * 
25%— * 
14*+ ft 
19* 

18%+ % 
74% — ft 
IT*— % 
97*— * 
21*— ft 
33ft— ft 

33 + ft 
33ft — % 
26*— % 
78* +3 
«%+ % 
34* +1W 

a**— ft 

34 + % 
lf*+ * 
30%—% 
$6 —ft 
13ft + ft 
45*+ % 
19% 

18%— ft 




2 948 5 4% 

236fe 1>% 10* 
«e n% iih 

26 14* 16ft 
17 14% 14* 
■7 15% l*% 
6 12% 12* 
45 13* 

8 SM 2S* «ft 
7 SM 26* 25ft 

6 12% 12% 
Mto 36 36 

2000to 36* 36* 
llSfe 45* 44 
341 18% 18* 
IMM* 57* 57* 
778 28ft 19ft 
lOfe 64 <4 

Sfe *S* 65* 
lOfe 65 64* 

10908k 63* 62* 
] 1300, *2* 67 
180* 81* 81* 
79 3 2ft 

9 194 12 

5 19 7% 

9 577 13ft 

30 1C2B 2CV. 

13 299 tote 
9 800 9ft 


7* 

45 ! 

99ft— ft 
55% 

4ft— ft 
II + lb , 
11% + % 
16* + % 
14% + % , 
IS* + % 
12%+ ft 
13* + ft 
JS* | 
36 + ft 

12% 


36 +1* 

36%+ * 


18% 

57ft + ft 
20% + % 

64 — ft 
65V,— % 

65 + % 
63V* + % 
*2* 

81* +1% 
2ft— ft 
12 + ft 
7% + * 
13% 

19*— % 
26* + * 
9* + % 


Today 

High grade capper cathodes: 
soot 107100 107X50 ) 
Smenms L3K0D 709600 1 
Cooper cathodal: 


Dividends Feb. 11 


Spat 107100 107400 

3 month* 109000 109X00 
Tin: spot 9.92500 9.93000 
3 months 9.94000 9.95000 
Lead-.Spof 34X50 34280 


.Per Amt Pay Rec 
USUAL 


39% 37% QuakOs 104 32 II 646 39* 30ft 38% — % 

71% 15 OuakSO 00 17 26 543 21% Zl% 21*— % 

lift « * Guarwx 57 749 10 9ft 9%— * | 

33ft Z> Quottar 1J0 U II M0 32% 31% 32% — ft ! 

24ft 14 QkRefl 0Oe 020 425 34% 23* 34 — % 


TIm five-day way to learn the Meres Markets! 


. Commodities Educational Institute (CE(), a division 
of FVIVIIES Magazine, is holding its third intensive 
commodities school in London beginning March 25th. 

CE/ is the world's oldest and largest commodities school. 

This one-week school utilizes U.S. commodity market 
experts as tutors. The course is designed for brokers, 
speculators, and traders. If is excellent preparation for 
the U.S. futures exom. 

Only a limited number of openings are available for 
this one-week school. Send the coupon by HIM for 
information pack to Brian Reidy & Associates, Suite 
144, 7th floor. Plantation House. Fenchurch Street, 
London EC3. Or phone 01-283 3617 


Ukid-.Spof 341 JO 34209 
3 months 34800 3A50 

21nc:spal 76900 77100 
3 months 77200 77250 
Sllvoriml 55500 55600 
3 months 57100 57X50 
Aluminium: 

spot 102050 1021 JO 
3 months 105500 105X50 
Nickel: spu 40SS0O 406000 
3 month s 409700 40990Q 
Source: Heaters 


99500 99600 
102700 1027 JO 
ivnivi 

J aw Off 3 ok an 


ABS Industries 
Am Hospital supply 
Badger Mater 
Cabot Corp 
Coach men Indus. 
Del LaoocatorUn 
Guff Canada 
McNeil Con, 
Philips- Van Heusea 
Puulasfea Furniture 
ScattYs 

Southmark Carp 
Union Electric 
Valiev Bancorp 
Victor ten Bnkshrs 


0 .10 Ml 3-15 

O 3B 3-31 3-|.| 

Q .10 3-15 3-1 

Q 23 3-11 3-71 

Q .10 3-15 3-22 

□ 13 1-77 3-22 

Q .13 4-1 2-28 

O 02 ft XI 3.19 

Q .10 3-11 2-20 

a .15 3-7 2-31 

Q .13 S-l 4-12 

Q 05 3-15 2-20 

O A3 X39 X7 

D 23 3-1 2-Z7 

a 05 MS 30 


A -Annual; m Monte tv; Q-Ouarterir; S-Semi- 
AnauaL 


DM Futures Options 
Feb. 8 

W. German Mart. 125,000 merto. certs pet mart 


Strike eofeMtle 
Prim Mar jus seal 

JT — — — 

30 092 105 — 

31 0JB 888 107 

37 007 050 805 

XI am 825 057 

st 100 an aJ3 


Puto-Satite 
Mar Jm Sect 
803 128 - 

0.U 844 063 

049 U7 100 
101 1.45 LSI 

220 111 213 

10 IE - 


China Is Seeking Help 
Of Expert in Singapore 


Estimated total voL 12637 , 
Gath: Item. voL 4010 open l 
Pan : Turn. vM. 4036 6PH t 


Source: CME. 


Pfaosa and — h fanwrttai afld awritahUty on th» Comnodity 
Brok«n r Sdwe) intaadn 5-day Fstaras IRariwt Cosih. 


urenmmaRsw 

HOUSTON, TO ASeIMJL 


Name _ 
Address 


For laforruaioa tenXraX 


Hard I- WHS jios Bealnre 

629 FM I960 Wok Suite 21 


5629 FH I960 West, Suite 210 
Haunters, Tz. 77069. 

T«L: (713) 5860399.Tlii 387356 


Reuters 

SINGAPORE — China is seek- 
ing ihe services of Gob Krag Save, 
a major architect of Singapore’s 
economic success, to play a key role 
in its modernization program, offi- 
cial sources said Monday. 

Mr. Goh. who retired from poli- 
tics two raoaihs ago after holding ] 
various important cabinet posi- 
tions for 25 years, has yetlo make a 
decision on whether he would ac- 
cept the job as adviser lo China's 
Special Economic Zones, they said 
Mr. Goh is cuirentiy managing di- 
rector of the Monetary Authority 
of Singapore. 


Ma \A 
06 20 
104 40 
212 100 
212 121 
4476 63 
104 SLI 
xn 73 
5310 U 
33 10 
00 19 


104 9ft 9ft 9%+% 

12 29T2 *1* 46* 48ft— ft 

121 (to 34 34 34 +1* 

341 31ft 30% 31 — % 
436 35% JSft Bft 

11 43 9% 9ft 9% 

221 4ft 4% 4%— ft 

10 138 17ft 17 17 + ft 

13 469 37 35% 36ft— % 

38 1899 7* 7ft 7*— ft 

10 70 28 19* If* 

205 5% 5ft 5% 

If 120 <3% 62ft OH— lft 

43 13% 13% l3ft+ % 

77 3300 47ft 45* 44ft— ft 

36 *29 10ft 91b 10ft— ft 

II 21% 21 21 

28 21* 21 21 —1 

12 80 16% 16* lift — ft 

17 663 lift 15ft li 

22 650 lift lift lift + % 
1* 7 Bft Bft Bft 

242 71b 1 I — ft 

10 Itt 3ift 36* 36* + Ml 

6 491 5ft 5% 5% 

54 1ft 1ft 1ft 

11 273 «ft 41ft 41ft 

9 47 20ft IM 7FR— ft 

• 8 41ft 41ft 41ft— * 

1 28* 20* 30*- % 

22 36 25% 25ft— * 

31 51* SI* El* 

7 748 32* 31ft 32 

182 27ft 27* 27% + % 

33 93 93 93 + ft 

25 91 18 17ft 18 + % 

12 887 27ft 37ft 27ft + * 

346 12 13ft 13 + ft 

11 HN 34ft 34% 34*— % 

1 22 22 22 + % 

12 31 28% 30 28 — * 

11 57S 14% 14% 14% +% 

10 1529 77% Tift Tift— ft 

65 49 48* 48ft— ft 

17 187 106* 707 + * 

6 657 41% 40% 40ft— ft 

9 77 29% 39ft 29* 

34 21% 21* 37* 

17 loss 39* a* am— ft 

17 Bit /ft 6% 7 — * 

7 786 34 32% 33 — 1 

15 58 39% 38* 38*— * 

16 854 22 21ft 21% — % 
5 ZU 19ft 19* 19% + * 

9 40 34* 34 34*- ft 

10 8S49x 35% 35% 35ft— * 

10 620 «9* 88% 68ft— % 
10 74 54 S3* S3*— * 

31 333 21* Zl* 21*— % 


04 1 3 
293 13 
1100 110 


42% 42% — * 
39% 29*— * 
11* 11%— % 
15ft 15% + * 
24ft 24ft— ft 
79* 80 —1ft 
4% 4%— % 
57ft 57*— % 
U* 15ft— % 
S7ft 48% + * 
31% 31*— % 
14 14* + * 

65* 66*— lft 
2% 2ft— * 
260 360%-Gft 
20 * 20 % — 1 % 

46 46% — 4* 

37* 37ft— ft 
37% 37ft— % 
99 100 +1 
» 28* + ft 

II 11 — * 
34* 24* + % 
34% 34* 

37* 37%— % 
42* 42*— ft 
29 39 — * 

30% 31 —1* 

1*4 125% +1* 
2ft 3ft + % 
19% !0% + % 
31* 31*+ * 
27* 27% + * 
3* 3% 

40 40*— * 

43% 43% 

35* 35*— % 
7% 7* + * 
24% 24% 

21ft + * 
40ft— 1* 
17ft— ft 
1«* 

27%— * 
«*+ * 
100*— * 

8 

51* 

91*— % 
22ft 22ft + ft 

47 41% + % 
49% 49% — ft 
36% 36ft + % 
am 38%— h> 

18% — * 
36*+ * 
26% 

24% + % 
29*— * 
17% 

1S%— % 
51% — * 
27 

41 +1* 

16ft— ft 
1% 

15 — * 
8* 8% B%— * 
31* 30* 31*— % 

33 31* 32 + % 

12 11% lift— ft 

14* 13% U + ft 
23* 22ft 23*+ * 

29 28* »%— * 

19% 19* 19% + * 
12% 12% 12%— % 
52% 51% 52 — % 
99% 58% 38% — 1% 
24ft 34 34 — % 

12* 13 12 — * 

: 86% 86% 84% + » 
V 24 24 

11* 

25% — % 
as%— % 
18ft— * 
31 + % 

17* + % 
41ft— % 
24* 

23*+ * 
5%—* 
16%— % 
am +2 

36% — ft 
4* 

7%— ft 
IS*— * 
15* 

10*+* 
35*+ % 
13*—* , 
18%—* 
39*— * 

34 — * 


AS 70 19 

ia 13 a 
100 11.1 
108 IS 
08 40 W 


108 40 13 
IN 12 I 
108 48 14 
208 121 8 
00 10 18 
JJ 1.1 12 
JO 10 11 


-20b .9 15 
00 20 13 
216 40 8 

200 ia0 a 

it IJ 14 
04 23 11 
208 50 6 
104 


100 12 10 
1J2 13 9 
1 JO 40 21 
288 60 
400 90 


LOO 160 
500 170 
100 42 9 
1J0 *8 9 
XBO 70 

10 

00 27 8 
40 


27% 27*— * 
?9ft 2F*+% 

4&i3: +tt 

'gfciss 

19ft 19% — ft 
36% 36%—% 
36 36*+ % 

9 9+% 

48 48 +* 

20 % 20 %-* 
34% 3**— % 
36ft 37 —* 
18% 19 + ft 
36% 36* 

20% 2B* + ft 

49* 49ft— ft 

a 38*-* 

10ft 10%—* 
9* 9* + % 
21ft 22* + * 
35 35 —ft 

53* 53*+ ft 
36* a 
19 19% . 

» 28%+% 
39* 39*—% 
11 * 11 %—% 
5ft 5*— * 
1ft 1%— ft 
15* 15* _ 

16ft 16ft— % 
4% 4ft— ft 
49ft a + * 
111%- % 
9%+% 
31 —ft 
4ft+ ft 
B%+ ft 
RJ —ft 

5*=S 

50 -ft 
ISft— ft 
36% +1 


U ^\ : v \z 

’ j, . *7. 


tomp 


z-- 3 *r 3 Ji] 


:: : - - * Pr 1 


Csflcdo 

C™- Pacific 


Du Fonl C c - io ** 

- • ." ^5 - “BvBi 

: .. 73f' 


Jwr ' ‘ ' 

85%— 


S5-* 






afc=a 

j*£— % 

jS-% 

79%+ » 

»*— ft 

r:& 

41*—% 

shi + ft 

4%— % 

15%— Jt 

Zlft + ft 


LTC 






45 32% Xerox X00 60 77 3B7V 

51* *5% Xerox pl 505 ML7 5 

79 19 XTRA 44 20 10 123 


44* 43* 44 — * 
51* 51* SI* 

38% a a — * 


79 24 ZotoCp 103 40 9 48 

24* 14* Zapata 04 5.1 20 367 

57% 30 zavra 00b 3 IS M3 

31% IB* ZenlthE 8 1311 

27% IS Zero 00 14 19 23 

31% 31* Zorn In 102 40 11 192 


28% 38ft 58* + % 
16* M* Mft— » 
5*% 55% S5%— % 
34% 23* * 

25ft 25* 25*- ft 
30% 2«6 29*— % 


, Shor * ^ cl a: •> 

Jos C.-: 

fc*- 1*5? 

: 5 _: 5=~ _ •» 

^^putorvision 

iSr^ Vn - 

te $ % , !l - 

sic rr.~.~ e 'nt 
^ n, ni;( r<T . w ri _4th 


i>0fc? Opef Tire 


•kJOftr , ‘ ir e 

Sfc; r 


NYSEHigb-Ltme 


Feb. 11 




MEW HMH9 131 


a% a 

32% 24 
15% 7* 
25% 16* 
33* 19* 
II* 3 
14 10 

a 17% 
78* 45 
63 49* 

79 13ft 
18* f3% 
56* 45 
94% 75 
41% 30* 
SBft 33% 
7% 4* 
X* W 
39* 24* 
61* 48* 
34* 18* 
17* 13* 

a* in 

61 45 


UAL Xe \J 7 

UAL pf 200 73 
UCCEL 36 

ugi 20t aa li 

UGlpf 2J5 110 
UNCRn 

URS 00b 29 19 

USFGl 208 6J3B6 
USG 500 47 6 
USGbf 180 13 
UrtDvn 00 21 15 
UnlFirsf JO U U 
Unltvr 2S4« 30 9 
Uni MV 4J0e 44 » 
UCompkl04 40 IS 
UnCorb 100 89 8 
UntonC 

UnEtec 1J2 1B3 6 
UnElPteMOD 120 

UEiptL an 130 

UnElpf 2ft 120 
UnElPt 213 123 
UnCIH 273 ID 
UnEtPl 704 129 


84 45* 44* 44*- % 
111 31% 31 31% — % 

309 14* 14* 14%— * 

313 a* a a%— * 

I30z 23* ZW 23*+ * 
247 9* 9% 9% 

27 13ft 13% 13* 

10 W 31% a 30* + * 
1647 64% 61* O*— % 
3 57 57 57 -3 

W 29* 38* 29*+ % 
B 10% 18* ISft— * 
1 54% 54% 54% — % 



lit 


117 93* 91* 92 —ft 


716 30% 36* 37% — 1% 
31* 38* 37% 38% + ft 
1» 5* 5% S%— % 

595 16* 16* 16*— % 
41 38% 30* 30% + ft 
2S0x 68 S9 59 -1 
35 » 33* 34 

7 17* 17* 17ft + % 
S 23% 23% 23%— % 
lOfe 57% ST* 57*— 1* 


In 


ff YOU GET A KICK OUT Of SOCCR, 
REA 0 

ROB HUGHES 

WEDNESDAYS IN THE 1HT 






















INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1985 


Page 11 


■ '^3eh 


■*•»• ’.<t n>.-:‘ v 
r -- U aL 


K&\Md 


-r :- i: -le* 

'"■d ’4V*- 

” a T, * i 

. *. • ,-. ■ * P*£> 

:£ 

li; i. • ^ i: £? 
-■” *: 

: , ; 2 

••• r - il^ 
v4* 

. si Eg 

: *: ■- ' V ■»:. 

? '' : * C- r : 

■_ .. i- “v 

■ " „ ., ; ■»> r. 4 

.." :* “ 4- ^ -/■' 

: : : i “5 


"*■£ i'n 

\ m 

•: «Vi 
• -i =: r ;.' 


BUSINESS ROUNDUP 


Dalgety Reports Profit 
Rose 6% in First Half 


LONDON — Dalgety PLC, re- 
porting first-half pretax profit up 6 
percent, said Monday that despite 
political and economic uncertain- 
ties, particularly with the European 
Community agricultural policy, it 
remained confident of a good year 
in fiscal 1985, which aids June 30. 

The agribusiness and lumber 
company said its «iming< in the six 
months through Dec. 31 rose lo 
£33.2 million (536 million), com- 
pared with £31 J million in the cor- 
responding half of the previous 
year, on sales of £2.03 billion, up 16 
percent from the £1.75 billion in 
sales a year earlier. 

The company reported trading 
profit of £47.9 million, up from 
£44.8 million a year earlier, includ- 
ing £24.9 million in Britain, against 
£24 million the previous year, and 
£10.1 million in Australia, almost 

China Approves 
Arab Bank Unit 

The Associated Press 

BEIJING — The Arab Bank 
Ltd., Jordan’s largest commercial 
bank, has received permission to 
open a branch in one of China’s 
coastal economic zones, the China 
Daily reported Monday. 

Arab Bank is one of six. foreign 
banks expected to be allowed to 
open branches in the special trad- 
ing zones this year, the report said, 
ft did not name the others. Abdul- 

majid SHnman, the chairman of 

Arab Bank, will visit ffrina later 
this year to conclude arrangements, 
the English-language newspaper 
said. 

Forty of (he world's SO largest 
banks have representative offices in 
China, Only four foreign banks op- 
erate brandies — all in Shanghai. 
The newspaper said that the Peo- 
ple’s Bank of China, the nation’s 
central bank, has authorized the 
establishment of 122 representative 
financ ial offices in China, includ- 
ing 69 banks and 10 insurance com- 
panies. They represent 18 coun- 
tries. 


double from £5.6 miHkm a year 
earlier. 

The United States contributed 
£9.2 million, compared with £6.8 
million, and Canada £3.7 million, 
down slightly from the year-ear- 
lier’s £42 milli on. 

New Zealand, which in the first 
half of the previous year accounted 
for £4.2 million, contributed noth- 
ing in the latest period af ter the sale 
of local interests. Dalgety said. 

Stock-exchange dealers, saying 
the results were in line with market 
expectations, reported that Dalgety 
shares woe trading late Monday at 
485 pence, down Spence from late 
Friday. 

Dalgety said that during the first 
half in Britain the milling division 
did wdl beca u s e of a recent invest- 
ment program and favorable wheat 
prices. 

The agriculture division matched 
last year’s result and profits have 
begun moving upward again, Dal- 
gety said. 

The malt division operated in a 
de p r es sed market with low mar- 
gins, it said. Grocery products ex- 
perienced increased demand, sup- 
ported by brand and product 
development, the company said. 

Dalgety said exports of technical 
products benefited from the strong 
U.S. dollar. 

U. S. subsidiaries, such as Mod- 
ern Maid Food Products Inc., Mar- 
tin Brower Co. and Pig Improve- 
ment Co., also produced a material 
increase in profits, the company 
said. 

Canadian lumber profits were 
adversely affected by static U.S. 
demand, while the strong Canadian 
dollar hampered exports to Eu- 
rope, Dalgety said. 

It said lumber markets showed 
some improvement toward the end 
of December with lower U. S. in- 
terest rates. 

Dalgety’s Canadian subsidiaries 
include Balfour Forest Products 
Ltd. 

In Australia, Dalgety Farmers 
Ltd. was helped by favorable 
weather, while the benefits of re- 
cent rationalization measures con- 
tinued to be fell, the company said. 


AT&T to Offer 
Discount Plan on 
Long-Distance 


WASHINGTON — Ameri- 
can Telephone & Telegraph Co. 
said Monday that it planned to 
offer a 15-percent discount on 
interstate long-distance calls 
for frequent callers in return for 
a S25 monthly fee. 

AT&T said the new plan, to 
be called AT&T Pro America, 
would prove especially AT- 
ftTraclive to customers with 
long-distance bills of 5167 a 
month or more. 

An AT&T vice president, 
John Smart, said at a news con- 
ference that the new discount 
was aimed at what are estimat- 
ed to be 1 million business cus- 
tomers using long distance 15 to 
50 hours a month. The 15 per- 
cent discount would apply re- 
gardless of time of day or day of 
the week and would be in addi- 
tion u> normal discounts for 
evening, nighttime and week- 
end calls. 

AT&T plans to file with the 
Federal Communications Com- 
mission for approval to begin 
the plan March 29. The in- 
creased usage of long-distance 
calls stimulated by the discount 
will make the plan profitable 
for AT&T, Mr. Smart said. 


AGA’s Pretax Earnings 
Increased 23% in 1984 


Proposal to Acquire ConraUMay Give 
Norfolk Dominance in the Northeast 


Procter & Gamble: A Giant Wakes 


(Continued from Page 9) 

report its first annual earning s de- 
cline in more than 30 years. 

Moreover, not all the new prod- 
ucts have started out as rousing 
successes. “Eocaprin is a total 
bomb,” said Mr. Segalas of Drcxd 
Burnham. “It was yesterday’s tech- 
nology to begin with. In some ways 
it violates P&G’s own standards by 
not having a major point of differ- 
entiation &om other products.” 


The Duncan Hines codries have 
also fallal short of expectations. 
Some analysts said the cookies 
were not different enough from 
other brands, while P&G officials 
say the product got off to a fast 
start but was slowed by a rash of 
similar entries from Nabisco, 
Keebler and Frito-Lay. 

Analysts also say Citrus Hill has 
not wowed consnmeis. It has faced 
a g gressive discounting and other 
tactics from Beatrice Companies, 


Company Earnings 

Revenue and profit*. In mUlta n&.an> in local currencies 
unless otherwise Indicated 


Britain 

Ddgafy 

lit Hat! ms UN 

Pretax NK_ 3X3 31 J 

Per Slur* _ 0351 0336 

Canada 

Can. Pac i fic 
v«or vm im 

Prom 375JJ 1414 

Per Share 531 l.W 

Du Pant Cm. 
atar, hjn ™ 

Revenue ta »Z5 

Prams 5.11 1U 

Per Share 0J3 OJv 

Year HM .HM 

Revenue 1.170. 1.120. 

Pram 41-18 3531 

itar Shore 7M 232 

MocMifian Bloedel 
4 Hi awr. 1«M 

Revenue 57X5 521-4 

Oper Net 117 US 

Oder Share 0JS IU8 

Year WM MW 

Revenue 1130. 7SM. 

Oper Net — IM U 

United States 
C ha mpion Spark 

4tti our. i»m ina 

Revenue — 2iiu 210J 

Net Inc MB 12JJ 

Per Shore 131 031 

Yew 1IH MB 

Revenue BUS 7413 

Net Inc 27J 27J1 

Per Share— 071 DTD 

ComputwvKion 

4th Quar. TfM MB 

Revenue HU II W 

Net Inc 1472 SWM 

Per Share — 053 0T3 

Year WN 235*2 

Revenue 5563 4800 

net Inc 4144 35J4 

Per Share — 144 154 

7*4 nets tociudo oqtoofSU 
mtUion from sale ofMerest 
and toss of IW million tram 
so tltome nt of eWn 

Cooper lira 

4lti dear. WM 1JW 

Revenue 122.7 ilM 

Net Inc 454 475 

Per Shore Dl46 040 

Yew HM HM 

Revenue s&4 4575 

Net Inc 244 21-4 

Per Share— 144 115 


C c nI n K Bi Kodak 

4MOUW. HM IBB 

Revenue Z750 Z570. 

Net Inc 20&a m.0 

Per Shore — U2 070 
Yew MM MB 

Revenue 106ML iiU78l 

Net Inc *225 5455 

Per Shore— 5T1 241 

FMC 

eta ROW. mj WW 

Revenue BMJ WIT 

Oner Net — «4 sas 

Oper Share— 157 151 

Yew i m jm 

Revenue — laa m 

Oper Net 225-9 IBM 

oper Shore— 752 552 

Grainger (W.W.) 
«t> Qaw. HM 1M2 

Revenue 2*11 2325 

Net Inc 1054 1551 

Per Share — ITS 157 
Yew in* ms 

Revenue— ms Mil 

Nel Inc 4BJM 5174 

Per Share — 474 138 

Kerr-McGoo 

4th Qaw. mj MW 

Revenue 1*45 *235 

Net Inc (a>255 175 

Per Shore — IL32 

Yew MM MO 

Revenue iSffl- 15m 

Net inc 4S5 1185 

per Share — 122 274 

a: toss. 


Nash finch 


UQpr. in* mw 

Revenue 304.1 2705 

Net Inc M3 in 

Per Shore — 071 UTS 

Yew in* ins 

Revenue l J*a W«L 

Net Inc 117 11.1 

Per Shore 270 IIS 

Hols include c harass of 
USOJU VS sxa&ssein auar- 
tort and ot *25 million va SU 

million to years. 

Ohio Edison 
ethOuw. IM MW 

Revenue *087 HU 

Net Inc — 7H.9 7sa 

Per Shore — 054 040 

Yew IfM IMS 

Revenue 1 44CL 1 jm 

Net Inc 3397 2724 

Per Shore — 250 252 

Pobst Brewing 


4ttl QUW. 
Revenue — 
NX Inc 


IM* INS 

1557 1459 

155 (0)257 


Per Shore— 035 — 

Yew HM IMS 

Revenue — 7S24 boob 

Net inc 153 351 

Per Share 526 031 

Ryder Systems 
410 Cluar. IfM 1*83 

Revenue 4«3 S54J 

Oper Net 303 27.* 

Oner Share- 154 1.li 

Yew HM IMS 

Revenue 2480. 2mo 

Oper NX — 1175 M5 

Oper Stare— 4.95 *51 

Hots exclude loss of SUMO 
to NO quarter and Optra of 
SlSJmHUon vs SZ2 million to 
years from dtoconHmxd op- 
erations. NBJ nets restated. 
Per share results restated tor 
3** stock dividend. 

Southern Co. 

4th Qaw. HM ,Hta 

Revenue 1450 1530 

Net Inc 1555 42 5 

Per Shore— 052 871 

Yew HM |]B 

Revenue 4.120. S420. 

Net Inc 71*7 5903 

Per Share — 250 270 

IPtJ year nel Includes onto 
of SAM million and choree of 
Sir. I million. 

Tramco Energy 

4th Quw. 19M 1*83 

Revenue *044 

Net Inc 32.14 3545 

Per Share 152 156 

Year 1994 IMS 

Revenue 1650- M5D. 

NX Inc — 1385 1335 

Per Share — 027 S.10 

United Brands 

«hQew. 19*4 »n 
Revenue — 800L9 7V5J 

Net Inc 1^ 853 

Per Share (159 057 

Yew HM IMS 

Revenue 2420 3540. 

Net inc 114 454 

Per Share — 078 353 

Wafiams 

4tH Quar. 19M WB 

Revenue 8419 898.9 

Net Inc 165 355 

Per Share 049 1.15 

Yew HM 1*83 

Revenue 3580. 1710 

Net Inc 14*5 545 

Per Share— 456 1-79 

Hols Include earns a! 57.7 
mHlkm irs a million In auar- 
mn and of SS mltllai vs UP 
mlHton to years from dOcon- 
nmmdaearaUaas. ttasvilsjn- 
etude Nartto e mst Energy Co. 


The Daily 

Source, for ^ 
International 
Investors. 




By Juris Kara 

International Herald Tribune 

STOCKHOLM — AGA AB’s 
1984 earnings before taxes rose 23 
percent to 720 million kronor 
($78.36 million) from 585 million 
kronor in 1983, the Swedish indus- 
trial and gas-refrigeration group re- 
ported Monday. 

In a preliminary annual report, 
AGA said that it had obtained per- 
mission from Sweden’s Bank In- 
spection Board to increase its 1984 
dividend to 1 1 kronor, from 10 kro- 
nor m 1983. There is a temporary 
freeze on corporate dividends. 

Sales last year. AGA reprated, 
rose 5.7 percent to 5.63 billion kro- 
nor from 5323 billion kronor in 
1983. 

Sales of the largest division, in- 
dustrial gases, rose 18 percent to 
429 billion kronor from 3.59 bil- 
lion kronor in 1983. Operating 
earnings of the division increased 
17 percent to 680 million kronor 
from 582 million kronor. 

Earnings per share of the AGA 
group were 33.50 kronor, up from 
30 kronor in 1983. 

Frigo Scania, AGA's refrigera- 
tion subsidiary, reported operating 
earnings up 30 percent to 13! mil- 
lion kronor from 101 milli on kro- 
nor in 1983. Sales were up 17 per- 
cent to 1.407 billion kronor from 
1.204 billion kronor. 

Brian Knox, a specialist in Scan- 


dinavian shares at the London bro- 
kerage Grieveson Grant & Co., 
called AGA’s 1984 results “a satis- 
factory performance.” 

While the company did not make 
any 1985 forecasts in its prelimi- 
nary report, Mr. Knox said he was 
expecting earnings per share to rise 
to between 37JS0 kronor and 38.50 
kronor. 

AGA's preliminary earnings 
were somewhat higher than the 665 
million kronor forecast b a news- 
letter last October by Richard 
H5ggktf Fondkomissxon, a major 
Stockholm brokerage. 

Mr. Knox said he was reserving 
judgment on AGA until a more 
detailed annual report is presented 
in late March. 

That’s where you will see how 
they did on foreign exchange gains 
and loses,” he said. “For a compa- 
ny like them, that’s where the traps 
are.” 

AGA has industrial-gas opera- 
tions in 22 countries. According to 
1983 figures, 80 percent of its sales 
were outside Sweden. 

AGA’s preliminary 1984 report 
also said management was propos- 
ing a l-for-1 stock split and a 1-for- 
2 slock dividend that would essen- 
tially result in three new shares for 
each old AGA share. 

The nominal value of the shares 
would be reduced to 25 kronor 
from 50 kronor, AGA said. 


COMPANY NOTES 


LDital SA said consolidated 
group net for 1984 should rise 
about 10 percent from 1983’s 
663.30 million francs (S66.8 mil- 
lion), on consolidated sales up 16.9 
percent to 15.8 billion francs. Prof- 
its were affected by the group’s 
heavy spending on developing new 
cosmetics markets, on restructur- 
ing its biomedical activities and on 
pharmaceuticals research, it said. 

Komatsu lid-, the Japanese man- 
ufacturer of earth-moving and in- 
dustrial equipment, announced it 
would open a plant in the United 



which owns Tropicana, and Coca- 
Cola, which owns Minute Maid. 

But Ivory shampoo and condi- 
tioner are expected to bolster 
P&G’s sales by about $80 millio n 
this year. And Always has captured 
almost 20 percent of the market for 
feminin e napkins — showing that 
its performance was not weighed 
down by memories of P&G’s Rely 
tampons, which were taken' off the 
market after being linked to toxic- 
shock syndrome. 

Mr. Segalas estimated that the 
new products will add $2 billion in 
annual sales for P&G by 1987. Jay 
H. Freedman, an analyst with Kid- 
der, Peabody & Co., forecast that 
P&G’s revenue would jump 10 per- 
cent, to S15.4 billion, in fiscal 1986, 
and that earnings would be $940 
milli on in fiscal 1986, up from $800 
ntillion in fiscal 1985 and $890 mil- 
lion in fiscal 1984. 

Liquid Tide is the new product 
for which P&G seems to bold out 
the most hope. This month the de- 
tergent is the focus of a $50- million 
promotional campaign P&G is try- 
ing to bump Unilever’s Wisk from 
the No. 2 spot — after Tide powder 
— m the 52.7-billion laundry deter- 
gent market. 

P&G is in a world quite different 
from the one that existed when 
William Procter and James Galway 
founded the company in 1837 to 
make candles in a backyard fac- 
tory. One of its first big hits was 
Ivory soap, introduced in 1879. 

Other standbys include Crisco 
vegetable shortening, introduced in 
191 1; Camay soap, 1 926, and Oxy- 
dol soap powder. 1927. By advertis- 
ing heavily during radio melodra- 
mas in the 1930s, P&G helped coin 
the term “soap opera." 

The company’s advertising bud- 
get has swelled a good deal since 
then — to about $1 billion this 
year. But P&G has learned that it 
lakes more than big ad budgets to 
succeed. 

For example, the company used 
to test products in regional markets 
for as much as three or four years. 
But while it tested Crest as a gel in 
Maine, Colgate-Palmolive rushed 
to test a gel in California and took 
it nationwide while P&G was still 
evaluating its Maine data. 

P&G took Liquid Tide national 
in December after only nine 
months of test marketing. And it 
rushed Citrus Hill to the national 
market even though technology it 
had developed to improve flavor 
and to create low-calorie juice by 
using artificial sweetener was not in 
place for national distribution. The 
tactic worked; Citrus Hill has 
about 7 percent of the frozen con- 
centrate market, making it a distant 
second to Minute Maid, and about 
12 percent of the chilled market, 
putting it second to Tropicana. 

Supermarkets and pharmacies, 
tired of what many critics called 
P&G’s arrogance, also laugh i the 
company some lessons. For de- 
cades P&G had a reputation for 
telling stores how it wanted its 
wares displayed and for limiting 
the availability of discounted items 
to stores that did not do what it 
wished. As a result, many super- 
markets preferred dealing with 
P&G’s competitors, and gave their 
products better display. 

P&G officials say they are trying 
to change the company’s highhand- 
ed reputation. They meet regularly 
with supermarket officials, and of- 
ten assist supermarkets with so- 
phisticated studies on what items 
produce the most sales per square 
foot of shelf space. 


States and was completing negotia- 
tions for the purchase of a factory 
building in Chattanooga, Tennes- 
see. 

AEG-Telef raked AG’s losses on 
a contract in Saudi Arabia do not 
mean the company must chang e its 
forecast of making a slight operat- 
ing profit for 1984. the company 
said. A spokesman said a figure for 
losses of 180 million Deutsche 
marks ($55.4 million) died in the 
ma gazine. Der Spiegel was far too 
high. The coniraci had a value of a 
little under 90 million DM. 

Falcon Resources PLC said the 
vendors of 2J8 million Falcon 
shares have now decided against 
selling the shares to Pahang Invest- 
ments, -which had announced 


agreement to buy them last No- 
vember. 

Texas Instruments Inc. said it 
started volume production of its 
25 6K dynamic random-access- 
memory chip. 

Honda Motor Co. plans to pro- 
duce wn ginws, and latw anlnittuv 
biles, in Britain in order to gain 
unrestricted access to the EC, the 
Financial Times reported. It said 
Honda would start work next year 
at an undeveloped rite that it 
bought last year at Swindon, in the 
Midlands. 

General Motors Corp. said it will 
consolidate its service parts distri- 
bution network with a three-year, 
$ 150-million project that win in- 
clude the renovation of four facili- 


By Agis Salpukas 

New York Tima Sernee 

NEW YORK — For years, Rob- 
ert Claylor. the chairman and chief 

executive of Norfolk Southern 
Corp, has been seeking ways to 
keep pace with his major rival, CSX 
Corp. 

Now, with the announcement 
last Friday that Norfolk Southern 
has been selected by the secretary 
of transportation, Elizabeth Han- 
ford Dole, as the successful bidder 
for Coorail, Mr. Claylor has an 
opportunity not only to keeppace 
nit also to move ahead of CSX. 

Mr. Claytor has long watched his 
rival gain ground on him- After the 


Pabst Board Supports 
$ 10-Per-Share Offer 

Reuters 

MILWAUKEE — Pabst Brew- 
ing Co. said Monday that its board 
“strongly supports” the SlO-per- 
share offer for aD shares of Pabst 
made by S&P Co. 

Pabst said the board made its 
decision to support the S&P offer 
following the withdrawal Friday by 
G. HeUeman Brewing Co. of its 
$11 -per-share bid for PabsL Pabst 
said that it supports the S&P offer 
as bang “financially fair” and 
urged stockholders to' tender their 
shares “promptly" to S&P. 


ties and the closure of seven in 
Baltimore; Buffalo and Bethpage, 
New York; Newark and New 
Brunswick, New Jersey; and Pitts- 
burgh. 

Swiss VoBcshank expects its bal- 
ance sheet total to rise by nine or 10 
percent in 1985 and earnings to 
increase again, it said. The bank 
has reported 1984 net of 75.0 mil- 
lion Swiss francs ($27.1 million), up 
from 612 million in 1983. Its bal- 
ance riieet rose to 225 billion Swiss 
francs from 20.6 bfflion. 

Wafe Disney Productions and 
Gibson Greetings Inc, said they 
reached agreement concerning the 
termination of their proposed 
merger. For exercising its right to 


merger of Seaboard Coast Line 
with Chesrie System in November 
1980, the larger CSX system began 
to cut deeply into some of Nor- 
folk's freight business. The merger 
gave the new railroad better access 
to new markets and enabled it to 
operate faster and more direct 
trains. 

Even after Mr. Claytor brought 
about the merger of Norfolk & 
Western Railway and Southern 
Railway in the summer of 1982, 
creating a system of 18 JX)0 miles of 
track and 38,000 employees, CSX, 
with 27,000 miles and 53,000 work- 
ers, was still able to gain traffic at 
Lhe expense of its rival. 

If Mr. Claytor and bis staff can 
get congressional approval of the 
takeover of Conrad, u will be CSX 
that may have to play catch-up. 

“One' reason we want Coorail is 
that we want to be able to compete 
with CSX in the Northeast,” Mr. 
Claytor said. “We can't now be- 
cause rair lines do not get into the 
Northeast. They don't go past Buf- 
falo and Pittsburgh.” 

Conrad's 13,500 miles of track, 
and 39,000 employees, some ana- 
lysts believe, would give Norfolk 
Southern more than just the ability 
to compete, it would give it the 
chance lo dominate in the North- 
east. 

“They could have control of the 
Eastern market,” Mary De Sapio. a 
railroad analyst at Cardinal Capi- 


end the merger, Disney wdl pay 
Gibson $7.5 million and other re- 
lated expenses. The merger con- 
tract was signed in June 1984b 

Megatest Corp. said it has start- 
ed shipping its Megaone VLSI test 
system, which took 54 months and 
$20 minion to develop. It would 
not disclose the identity of its first 
customer. 

Sandra AG said it signed an 
agreement in principle to take over 
Martin Marietta Corp.’s subsidiary 
Master Builders, based in Cleve- 
land. Sandra said Master Builders 
bad 1984 sales of around SI 50 mil- 
lion. Sandra disclosed no financial 
details, but said a final contract 
would be signed in around 60 days. 


tal Transportation Imu said in on 
interview. “Also the connections to 
the Midwest would be overwhelm- 
ing/ 1 

The Staggers Act of 1980, which 
deregulated the railroads, promises 
additional help for the new combi- 
nation. The act freed the carriers 
from many of the restrictions of the 
Inters tale Commerce Commission 
and has given them greater free- 
dom to set prices, bargain for long- 
term contracts with shippers ana 
cut prices. 

Australia Business Poll 
Foresees Steady Growth 

Return 

MELBOURNE — Australia's 
business outlook is for steady but 
restrained growth in the current 
quarter, according to the quarterly 
business survey by National Aus- 
tralia Bank Ltd. and the Australian 
Chamber of Commerce, released 
Monday. 

Respondents said they expected 
weak demand, labor costs and 
competitive pricing to restrain 
growth in the first quarter of 1985 
after strong increases in sales and 
profits in the fourth quarter of 
1984. The proportion expecting to 
increase capital spending in 1985 
declined slightly but investment in- 
tentions were still well above the 
low of 1982-83, the survey said. 


STOCK BIO ASK 

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The Group members and the banking 
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LONDON — British producer 
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International Herald IVibune, Book Division, 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1985 



Japanese Banks and Securities Firms Are Locked in Battle 


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By Susan Chira 

iVfH York Tima Struct 

TOKYO —Japanese banks and 
securities houses, with deregulation 
toppling the barriers that once 
stood between them, are locked in a 
battle Tor turf. 

One of their fiercest fights in* 
wives investment management, a 
fast-growing business that seeks as 
its eventual prize the faster-grow- 
ing pool of Japanese pension funds. 
Securities houses have already es- 
tablished several such firms, and 
Japanese banks arc trying to get 
permission to do so. 

Meanwhile, foreign firms are 
dose behind. Last month, Merrill 
Lynch & Co. became the first for- 
eign brokerage to establish a sepa- 
rate investment-advisory subsid- 
iary and JardJne Fleming Securities 
Lid. signed a joint-venture agree- 
ment io operate such a firm with 
Yasuda Trust, a Japanese trust 
bank. 

The new foreign firms join 13 
oiher in vestment- man age mem 
arms of Japan's major securities 
companies — and hundreds of oth- 
er, smaller and. often less scrupu- 
lous agencies that have sprung up 
to satisfy an increasingly interest- 
conscious clientele. 

The Japanese were once content 
to deposit their savings in low-in- 
terest deposits that, in turn, fi- 


nanced Japan’s industrial growth, 
but now they are seeking higher 
returns. One measure of their new 
concern for returns was an autumn 
scandal here, in which as many as 
20,000 investors lost about $125 
million by placing their money with 
a small investors service called the 
ToshijoumaL 

Japanese banks are eager to tap 
this enthusiasm. Now barred from 
establishing investment-manage- 
ment firms by an informal ruling of 
the Finance Ministry, they are lob- 
bying for change. A government 
committee is studying the issue, 
and indications are that the minis- 
try win relent. 

Dai-lchi Kangyo Bank and Su- 
mitomo Bank are bui two of the 
large city banks that are looking 
into the investment-management 
business. Some banks are sending 
employees abroad to gain expertise 
in a new field here, that of sophisti- 
cated assets management 

Behind the jockeying lie broad 
economic and demographic 
changes — the aging of Japanese 
society, the slowing of industrial 
growth and the increase in private 
wealth, according to Shigeyoshi 
Genjida, director of the securities 
companies division of the Finance 
Mims try. 

Perhaps the most important is 

the increase in elderly population. 


which has created a pension fund 
of more than $50 billion, expected 
to exceed $300 billion by the 1990s. 
Bonkers and brokers alike name 
pensions as the driving force be- 
hind their expansion into the in- 
vestment-advisory business. 

Pension management is now lim- 
ited to a small number of trust 
banks, which are separate from Ja- 
pan's large city banks. In the 
spring, however, eight foreign 
banks will be allowed to enter the 
Japanese trust-banking business, 
even though most Japanese bank- 
ers and brokers cannoL In the last 
two months, several major foreign 
banks, including Manufacturers 
Hanover Trust, have discussed 
trust banking joint ventures with 
Japanese banks. 

Pressure is therefore building to 
open the door to brokers and n en- 
trust bankers. The current invest- 
ment-management firms are, in es- 
sence, training a new breed of 
financial manager to be ready when 
that time comes. 

The field is relatively new in Ja- 
pan — the first securities company 
to establish an investment firm, 
Daiwa Securities, did so 13 years 
ago. And because Japanese cheats 
have generally preferred conserva- 
tive investments, for example in 
government securities, money 
managers have not generally been 


exposed io the range of sophisticat- 
ed investment strategies used in the 
United States. 

“Few people understand the re- 
lationship betweeen high risk and 
high returns,'' said an economist 
for one large diy bank who asked 
to remain unidentified “Most peo- 
ple think — no risk, high returns." 

That attitude complicates the en- 
try of bankers into the field because 
banks here have billed themselves 
as trustworthy guardians of peo- 
ple’s money, he said, and a loss for 
a client could shatter that relation- 
ship. 

But banks are persevering, none- 
theless. Yutaka NorisugL deputy 
general manager of the Dai-lchi 
Kangyo Bank’s Treasury and Secu- 
rities division, said the bank was 
considering several wajs to enter 
the investment-management busi- 
ness. 

“We arc Japan's biggest institu- 
tional investor, with 100 years' ex- 
perience," he said. “But we don't 
have experience managing our cus- 
tomers' assets, so we're irying to set 
up that system in another area." 
The bank is planning to buy out 
Bank of America's share in a joint 
venture called Tokyo Investment 
Service as one possible vehicle. 

And securities films, allowed to 
set up investment- management 
firms, are also tiying to take a share 
of the pension-fund business. Mer- 


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J» 4 19 
19 

411 33 10 
4 

.10 J 23 
30 94 15 


32 2* 

25 12 
53 llto 
19 4* 

IB 15* 
4 Mh 
MOV 11* 
39 6* 

122 Jft 
2 41b 
7 4* 

2B2 3* 

1 5* 

m 3^ 
79 13ft 
55 Mft 
94 26* 


a lft 

16 3 

I 6 

92 31* 
9 14ft 

26 17* 

52 IZto 

6 12* 

1 4* 

720 Oft 

M SUM 

18 61b 

2S6 7 

39 3* 

19 2* 
M8 34 
628 37* 
229 151b 
140 12ft 

66 13* 

27 14* 
344 33 

80 18V> 


9* 51b 

14 10* 
27 12ft 

3* 1 

88 2SM 
19* lift 

15 ID* 
IV* 13 
42* 22ft 

7* 4* 
161b IB* 
M 11* 
3 ft 
lift SVh 
3ft lft 
3ft 3* 
13ft ID 
11 13* 

35 29ft 
Sft 2ft 
11* 5ft 
141b 9ft 


36* 16* 
22ft MVb 
7ft 4 

7ft 4ft 
25ft ISft 
7Vb 31b 
6* Jft 
8 5* 

7ft 5* 

4 1 

35 21* 

10ft 6to 
11 7* 


16 

40b X9 9 

.» J 11 


J9t 4J 17 
St 64 15 
120a AA 9 
42 14 16 
25043 5 
42 24 M 
140 114 1 


13 

48b A 14 

a 

a 

J0 14 16 


OrtolHA 40 64 12 
OriolHB 40 XI 12 
Ormond IS 

OSuBvn .72 XI IS 
OxftdF -42T 44 12 
OzorfcH JO 1.9 8 


117 a* 

4 13* 
451 19* 
41 lft 

4 51 lb 
25 19 

IE 15 
17H 18ft 
510 40 
17 5* 

3 15* 
2 13* 
12 IK 
Ml 11 

5 2* 
70 Zft 

208 12* 
73 16* 
MOt 33 
29 4 

39 11* 

21 II* 


23 22to 

7 21K 

8 7* 
I 7to 

99 35 
ID 6 
11 Sto 
1 7* 

4 7* 

86 I* 
32 34ft 
17 VU 
274 I Oft 


2* 2*— to 
lift lift- to 
13* 131b + to 
4to 4K+ M 
15 15*+* 

Mb 8* 
lift llto 
<* 6ft+ * 
3Vb J* + Vb 
4Vb 4Vb 
4to 4ft 
3ft 3ft— Vb 
5to 5* 

Sto 3* + Vb 
13U 131b— ft 
14 M — lb 
26* 261b 


T* 1*— U 
2* 3 + lb 
6 6 — to 

30ft 31* +1 
Mft 14ft 
17 171b— lb 

11* 12 
12to 12ft + Mi 
4ft 4ft 
7* 7ft— ft 
stm so* 

61b 6ft — Vb 

6* 6* 

3* Sft + Vb 
2ft 2ft 
32ft 34 +1* 
36* 36*— ft 
14* 14ft + to 
121b 12* 

13 13 — to 

Mft 14ft— ft 
37* 33 +* 
9* 9ft 


13*+ to 
2ft + ft 
•ft— * 

lift 

3* -to 
13ft—* 
1*+-* 
16 — ' 
9* + ,ft 
23*— ft 
5*—* 
Sto 

21ft— ft 
24ft— * 
Mft— ft 
15* 

7to 

21* — * 
171b— 1 
28*+* 
15 

36to— lb 

Vft 

6 — ft 
2*— lb 
TUto + * 
75ft— to 
17*— to 
28*— * 
8 — * 
13 

17ft— ft 
2**— * 
7ft— * 
lift— ft 
Tito— ft 
9 + ft 
17ft— 1b 
45ft— * 
10ft— ft 
ISft— * 
Mft— ft 
3*+ ft 
IB*— to 
lft— ft 
12* 

5Vh — to 

mb-* 

5* 

4ft— to 
Sft + to 
* 
lift 


Bft Bto 
ISft 12ft 
MU IVto— to 
lft 1ft 
50* 51 
IBto Mto— * 
14ft Mft— Vb 
IBto IBM 
39 S9ft— * 
5* 5* — * 
15to 15* 

13* 13*— to 
1* IK— to 
TOVj 1Mb— * 
ZU 2*+ to 
2ft 2ft— to" 
12ft 121b— ft 
16 M 
S3 33 
Sft 3ft— ft 
11 lift— ft 
11 11 — ft 


21*— I* 
21* + * 
7Vb + to 
Tto— Vb 
24*— * 
6 + to 

Sto 

7* 

7*+ * 

lft 

3414— lb 
rib— * 
IBto + ft 


13 18ft 
121b Bft 
11 Bto 
IB* B* 
10ft Bto 
10V!i B 

31 28ft 

32* 26ft 
27 21 to 

21to 171b 
19ft 15* 
21* 17 
21* 17* 

Vft 7* 
19ft ISto 
1BK 13ft 
17 IS* 
Mto ISto 
181b 14* 
I7to 13* 
19* 15 
9* 7* 
24* 141b 
37* 30 

2* "lb 

39 27* 

Bft 51b 
9* 31b 
23* 15* 
17ft lOto 
5* 2to 
13* 7* 
II Ito 
42H 32* 
24 15ft 
3* lft 
34to 26 

’"ft 

32ft 23 
14* 10* 
lift 9ft 
7ft J 
I* ft 
IBto bft 
1316 7ft 
19* 12* 
3* 1* 
10« Sto 

6 2to 

11 5 

7 4ft 
16ft 11 
Tito 57 
T2ft 6* 
a* is* 

ISto Tto 
31b 2* 
3to 216 

32 21to 


PGEPfA 

PGEpfB 

PGEpfC 

PGEpTD 

PGEpf E 

PGEpfG 

PGEWF 

PGEOfZ 

PGEpfY 

PGEPfW 

PGEOfV 

PGEnfT 

PGEpfS 

PGEofH 

PCEpIR 

PGEOfP 

PGEofO 

PGEpfM 

PGEpfL 

PSEPfK 

PGEPfJ 

PGEPtl 

PGTm 

PocLTpI 

Peeupf 

Poses 

P ol Ito 

Puniest 

PoroPfc 

PoricCi 

POlTril 

PuyFon 

PEC 1st 

PaerTu 

Pen EM 

PonTr 

PE Cp 

PanRE 

Penrll 

Panfrn v 

PirlnlC 

Pcrlnln 

parlnl m 

PaiLw 

PvlUwi, 

Pet Lent 

Petto of 

Pritopf 

PMILD 

PiaPd 

Pieyi wt 

PlqnrSv 

Pltwva 

Pit DM 

PUTwoy 

PLccaln 

Plcroa 

PlyCmi 

PiyRA 

PIvRB 

PneuSc 

Papvviv 

Ports vs 


40 1.1 21 
14 
11 

40a 27 9 

22 

4»t 74 *J 
40b 19 16 
1J0O24 ID 
140 64 10 
45T167 9 
240 74 ID 
40 14 10 


2 

43 

46 104 10 
40 XI 
140 24 11 
40 4 9 
JO 

13 


28 12ft 
M 12 
2 10* 
6 IBto 
U U* 

3 10 

24 33to 
56 Sift 
72 2616 
16 21* 

6 19 

31 21 

15 21* 
1 9* 

65 19ft 
9 17 
5 lift 
27 16ft 

4 7 Bft 
a 16ft 

5 If* 
4 Vft 

307 24ft 
400z 27* 
460c 37ft 
1996 ft 
110 37 
56 lft 
4 Sto 
10 22* 

25 12ft 
7V Sto 

SSfa llto 
13 1|* 
19 42to 
39 19* 
67 1* 

52 34* 

103 13* 
51 1* 

35 27ft 

32 13ft 
50 llto 

490 3ft 
172 * 

3 7ft 

11 9* 

36 13* 
«l 21b 
309 5ft 

30 4ft 

53 6 

8 5* 
1 13 

17 70* 
269 Vft 

3 19 
65 16 

18 3 

12 2* 

7 24* 

462 6* 

1B0 10* 


12to 121b + to 
lift 12 + to 
HI* 10ft 
10ft IBM + ft 

ins io* + to 

U 18 
33* 31to+ to 
31* 31*— ft 
25* 26ft— ft 
20ft Zl*+ ft 
19 19 — ft 

21 21 

21ft 21ft— ft 
9* 9H+ ft 
Wft IVft + ft 
17 17 

M* M* 

15ft Mft + tt 

18ft 18ft— * 

16* ISft . 
19ft 19* + * 

9 9ft 
23ft 23ft— ft 
36ft 37* +2* 

"fc’W 

36* 36*- to 
7ft 7ft 
B* Ito 
22lb 22* 
lift 12 
Sft 5* . 

IBto 11 — * 

10 10* + * 

42 42to+ to 

19 19* 

I* Ito 
341b 34* ♦ ft 
13* 13*+ ft 

1 I 
271b 27* 

12ft 12ft- ft 
lift Ulb + * 
Sft 3* 

* * 

7* 7*+ Vh 
V* 9* + to 
13* 13ft 

2 Sto 

4* 4*— Vb 
4 4 

5* 6 

5* S!b+ to 
13 13 + lb 

70* 70* 

9* 9ft+ * 
IB* 19 
151b 15*+ Vh 

3 3 + * 
2* 2* 

23* 24 41 
6 6 * + * 
10th 10*- to 


rill Lynch formed iLs new subsid- 
iary, in pan, “to let the Japanese 
government know that Wall Street 
investment banking firms should 
not be precluded from this poten- 
tially lucrative business.” said Tet- 
sundo Iwakuni. chairman of Mer- 
rill Lynch Capital Markets in 
Japan. 

Barred at presell from pension 
funds, however, investment-man- 
agement firms are going after the 
assets created by other changes — 
the idle funds of corporations and 
the growing pool of rich individ- 
uals. 


Iran Ib ^lcipg to Link 

Imports to Oil Purchases 

Rcuscn 

TEHRAN — Iran has set up a 
commit tee to work out a plan un- 
der which imports from many 
commies would be limited to half 
the value of oil they buy from Iran, 
informed Iranian sources said 
Monday. 

The plan, proposed by the Oil 
Ministry, aims among otner things 
to recapture some of the share of 
the oil market Iran has lost during 
its war with Iraq, they said. The 
principle has been applied to trade 
with Japan since late last year, they 
noted. 


(7. S.-Chinese Trade Grew 
To $6 Billion-Plus in ’84 

L'nted Pros Imenuurnui 

BELTING — Trade between China and the United States grew 37 
ptfcent last year to exceed $6 billion for the first time. U. S. officials 
said Monday. 

China has said that it had a SI .5-billion trade deficit with the 
United States in 1984, but U.S. figures showed the balance in 
Beijing's favor by S6Q.5 million. 

A U. S. Embassy statement called 1984 a “banner year" for U. S.- 
Chinese trade, unlike 1983. when a textile dispute resulted in a 
Chinese embargo on U. S. wheat, cotton and synthetic fibers. 

“Bdaleral trade rase from a dismal four-year low [of $4.4 billion] in 
1983 to . . .nearly $6.1 billion in 1984,” the embassy statement said. 
“U. S. exports during December were at their highest level since 
December of 1980. and two-way trade readied $613 million during 
December 1984. the first time U. S.-China trade has topped the S600- 
million marie in a single month.” 

The embassy said the United States exported S3. 004 billion in 
goods to China last year and inmorted S3.064 billion worth of Chinese 
goods. A diplomat described China’s daim of a deficit as M a game 
they're playing” in an attempt to win trade concessions. 

The Chinese statistics omitted major trade categories and included 
f reigjht and insurance costs for imports from the United States but not 
for exports. 

The U. S. figures showed a continued shift in the composition of 
U. S. exports, with agricultural products fating their dominance. 

“Unlike 1980-82, when sales of agricultural goods accounted for 
over SO percent of U. S. exports to China, 80 percent of U. S. exports 
in 1984 were non-agri oil rural goods" the embassy said. “As a result, 
U.S. export performance in 1984 became much more broadly based 
than it had ever been before.” 

Petroleum products valued at $374 million remained the single 
largest category of Chinese exports to the United Slates, followed by 
crude petroleum valued at $234.7 million. 


Mocatta’s 
New Option 

(Continued from Page 9) 
of the premium usually charged for 
an option," Mr. Mullin noted. 

For example, suppose a bank is 
in the process of originating mort- 
gages that it has committed to pool 


gages that it has committed to pool 
mto Gin nie Mae securities in three 
months. The bank believes interest 
rates will fall in that time and does 
not want to sell the package for- 
ward in the cash market But, given 
the volatility of interest rates, the 
bank would like some insurance in 
the form of a stand-by or put op- 
tion. 

Assume further, Mr. Muilin 
went on, that Ginnie Maes are 
trading at 95 points, or cents on the 
dollar, and the premium on a three- 
month 94 option in the money mar- 
ket is I l A points. In this case, insur- 
ance against the price of the Ginnie 
Mae falling below 94 really means 
taking a loss down to 927* (94 mi- 
nus the 1 V4 premium). 

This could be costly insurance if 
interest rates did not fall within the 
three-month life of the option. 
What Mocatta's 45-day option on 
an option offers in this case is in 
effect the same commitment — in- 
surance against a price decline be- 
low 94 — but for a premium of 
perhaps three-quarters of a point. 


l2Monm 
MWtUn Hock 


SH Close I r? Monti 

Pro. VB. PE 100s Hlqn Low QUOtOlVB I HlehLoaf Stock 


SH. Close 17 Month 

pn». VM.PE WOs High Low QuolOi' 9* Hleh Low Slock 


17to 12 
31to 17* 
7* 4* 

24* llto 
Bft 6Vb 
7ft 6* 
Ito to 
Vto 6to 
6 3 * 

2DKt 15* 
26* Uta 
19 14* 

33 25* 

9* 4ft 


PostlPr M 

PoworT ,16b J 59 
ProIrO s 

Pram. 71 19 I 
Pratt Rrf 20 24117 
PratftPf 46 9.1 
PramRi 

PmRB 40 88 4 
Preafd 11 

PrpCTs 11 

PravEn 244 73 T 
PtllpfC Z34 1X4 
PBtPtE 447 134 
PunMG 


M* 16*— to 
31* 31* + * 
6* iVj— * 
23ft 23ft + * 
7 7 — * 

VU 7* 
i i*+ to 
9 Vto + to 

Sft Sft 
20* 20* 

2t* 26ft + * 
18ft Uft— * 
31* Sift— to 
7* 7*— * 


221b 23* 23* — * 


V* 5 
5* 3ft 
9* 3* 
14 ft 1 3ft 
20 12to 
4* * 

14* Wto 
3* 1* 

17* into 
47* 27* 
47* SDto 
B* 5* 
4ft 3* 
» 9* 

Vto 6 
IB* 10* 
25ft lift 
31* 20to 
7 2 

5* 3* 
29* 2D 
7* Sft 
16* 11* 
20* 10* 


J5I 

U 12 

53 

6to 

6* 

6* + to 



7 

4* 

4 

4to 



1 

3* 

3* 

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.12 

J 23 

15 

Mto 

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32 

19 

67 

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2 

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lft— to 

A2 

29 9 

27 

14to 

Mto 




142 

3 

2% 

2* 

40b 4J 11 

17 

15 

15 

15 + ft 


20 

5V4 

44 

43ft 43ft +1* 


21 

SODee 46 

46 

46 + ft 


10 

12 

7* 

7 

7* 


ID 

10 

4* 

4* 

4* + lb 


JO U 7 
Z79t XV 11 
13 
25 


16 

10 

JO 25 32 


6 

8 

44 XI 16 
48 25 14 
44b 17 12 

JMe J 12 
41 24 TO 
M 


35 XI 
42 Z1 21 
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460 XI 9 
8 

40 14 11 
40 24 11 


140 114 
944 125 
247 117 
445 123 
248114 
240 54 1 
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4 U I 

-56 25 12 
48 34 9 
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41 ,4» 

4D 15 6 


A4 XI 18 

r 

421 74 7 
.12 3 11 

IJBa 84 5 

.16b 14 65 
40 28 II 

JO 30 K 

JO 14 13 


159 13* lift 12*— to 

1 71b 7V, 71b— * 

25 17* 171b 17to— ft 

167 25ft 25 25 — ft 

18 30to 38Jto SDto— ft 
159 4% 4to 4ft 

20 4* 4* 4* 

2 26* 86* 26* + * 

61 Tto 7 7 — * 

70 15* 15to ISto— * 

250 21* 30* 21* + * 


1 Sto 
61 4 

4 3* 

1 E 

5 Ito 

5 Bto 

MSS 79 
4 21* 
23 3 Sft 
7 23 


«to- to 
36to— to 
22ft 
53to+l 
5*+ to 


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50 

2* 

6to + * 
MU— W 
Sto— U 
lft— U 
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4* 4* 

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IS* 6to 
10ft 6ft 
3D* 15to 
6to 3to 
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4* 2* 

HAb 4* 

3* ito 
34* IS* 

71V, 53 
11* 8U 
IV 11* 

12 * 6 * 

10* Mft 
Sto 4* 

3* I* 

23 6to 
9ft 5* 

4 1ft 
B* 5* 

Mft 6* 
llto 5 
11 Sft 
17* llto SunJ 
27* 16* Saar: 
3* to 
13U 6to 
15* 10* 

6* 3ft 
9* 3 
Zto Ito 
20* 19ft 
M 4* 

20* V* 


Bto T Bar 411X7 
7to TEC 46e 4 
Sto TIE 
6* Til 

13 TabPUs JO 12 
6* TandBr 
2ft Team 
lft TcftArn 
13* TctiSvm 
33* TtcbOa 
3* TnchTp 
7to Teditrl JB 14 
76 TefonR J0e 2 
2 Tetocan 
21* Teffiax 44 M 
0* TetDta 46a 34 
7to Talicl 
ZU Tel— e h 
Sto TonnoYS 
5 Tensor 
Mto TocCdB 140 
5* TaxAIr 
51b TrxAE 49f 64 
161b TexAEpf 
3U Txscan 
2 TharEn 
Ito Tkteatl 
23 TatEdMI «2S 1X7 
56 TotEdpnXM US 
4ft TorM 
7ft TotIPts 44 
16 TotPt wt 
23 TotPt pf 2 J 8 112 
5* TrraL* .IDb 12 
11* TrmTec 46 XI 
UU Tranroa AC 24 
7ft TrBM 40 b 42 
3ft Trldax 
2to TubMex 
9* Tultcx 44 32 


M 7 6* 7 + to 

I 7* 7ft 7ft+ U 

109 29* Mto 28ft— * 

SO 6U Sft 6 + to 

17 11 IB* 10ft— * 
55 4* 4U 4* 

17 6* Bto 6*+ to 

20 lft lft lft + to 

2M 23* 22% 22%— * 
5 Tito 7lto Tito 
I Bto BU 8*— to , 

445 20* 1VU 20 +1 

23 9to 9U VU— to 

3 17U 17* 17* 

5 5* Sto 5to 

16 2to 2to 2to— * 

119 IB* 11 10*+ to 

9V Sto 7* B + * 

10 2* 3* 2* 

6B 6* 5ft 6 

126 10U •* Mb— 1* 

4 6* Bto 6*— U , 

■ 76 7 7*— to 

I 14M 13* 13ft— * , 
80 86* 36to 26*+ * 
164 1* 1* Hh— to 


TV 

11* 

11 

11 — 

to 

46 

15* 

Mft 

Mft— 

to 

V3 

6ft 

Bft 

6ft + 

to 

10 

Sto 

Sft 

3ft— 

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5 

1ft 

1ft 

lft— 

to 

38 

26 

25ft 

25ft— 

Hi 

25 

<nb 

4* 

5 — 

to 

219 

21* 

2D* 

20*— 

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28 196 Vto 8* 9 — to 

21 15 Wft 10* TOto— to 

M 3290 10 Wl V*— to 
47 92 10H, ID* 1«— * 

11 32 17* Mft 17to + to 

2 7ft 7ft 7ft 

49 4 3ft 3ft— * 

1555 2ft 2to Mb 

18 285 21ft ZT* 21*— to 
M 4 5Mb SBto 53 V* — to 
9 VB 6 5* 5* 

10 48 16* 16* 16* + to 

93 5ozi28*iamiam— ito , 

93 4to 4 4to+ to 1 

15 23 31ft 30ft 30ft— * j 

10 144 WMi 10 10 — * 

64 26 Mft TOU 18U— * I 

1944 4ft 4U 4to 

16 120 6 5ft 6 I 

2 Sto 5* 5V. 1 

2 S* 25* 25* — * 

4 306 10ft 10* ID*—* 

5 54 6* Bto 6to 

5 IB* 1Mb Mto + ft 
W 007 7W 6to 6H+ U 

24 9 2to 2to 2to— to 

11 4* 4to 4* 

500z 31 31 31 

lOQz 69 69 69 

12 66 9* 8* 9* + * 

82 10U MM 10* 

21 ft ft * ! 

3 2SH 25* 25to— to 

9 M Vto Vft Vft— ft 

M 270 llto T7to lB* + to 

8 1 IM IM 15*— U 

9 V* Vto fto— * 

IB Sft 5* 5* + to 

13 62 Sft 2* 2ft 

13 23 Mto 13ft T3ft— to 

9 • 27* 27* 27* — ft 

Iff M M Sto— to 


26* ISto 
ISto 4ft ' 
Sto 2* 
23* 14* 
f 3* ' 
1* to ' 
15* 11* ' 

a* sto ' 

IDto IM ' 
V* Sto ’ 
7* 2ft ' 
llto 10* ' 
59* 45* ' 
Bto Bto < 
12 * 8 ' 
IB* 13*1 


Bft 6U WTC 
27 17* Walter 

15 10* Walco 

31* 23 WanoB 
32 u. 22ft wanoc 
Sto ft WrnCwt 
Vto 3* WttiH S 
92to 60* WdiPst 
26 17 WRIT 

101k 6* WatxA 
llto BftWatscB 
Mh 2toWmM 
7* lft WBbcor 
5* 3to Wedco 
17ft n* WMtcn 
Sto Sto tollman 
12to Bft w a u t m 
7* 4ft walks 
Sto 2U WalCrd 
24to 16* Warn 
8 * Wtmcp 

IS* 7ft WstBrC 
ISto 8* Wstbro 
14 Sto WDIoltl 
16U 7U WtHItb n 
18* Mto WIRET 
» 16 WBtnSL 

22* Vto WhEnts 
6to 7to WMdta 
11*. 7* WINcxG 
Sft 1 WHmB 
23* IV* WMfln 
40* 25* WlsPpt 
18 * ■ Wdatrm 
ISto ll Wkwaar 
Mb 2ft WwdaE 
17U t2to wwoapf 
34 27ft lltarthn 
IVto 12 Wrath! 
7to Sto WratHo 


is 5* YankGo 
5* 4 Yarttty 


Six CJae 

Dlv. VM PE 1005 HWi LOW Quit. Cht* 


■44 17 13 38 25to 2Sto 25to 

835 5* 5* 5to + to 

15 V 3to 3ft Sto + * 
48b 14 10 14 22ft 22 2Zto— to 

74 5ft 5ft 5to— .* 


20 14 10 38 13ft 13 ISto— to 

.10 IJ 9 Sto 5ft Sto— * 
11 Vto Vft Vto + ft 

13 40 B 7ft 7to— to 

2 4to 4* 4to— * 

Mr 2 9 9 IBto Ulb 18* 

9 59* 59 59to 

20 34 12 58 ■ 8 + Vk 

36 34 12 165 ID 9* Vto— to 

40a 12 10 12 18* llto llto— * 




21 

AO 14 14 
M 2S B 
.16 4 17 

.T1 A 17 

7 

J96 1.1 14 
140 64 17 
31 M I 
.16 14 4 


42b .1 15 
.12 25 17 
14 


14 

JO 12 

22 

15 

T40a 73 15 
143a44 22 
23 


7 7V, 

61 25* 
60 13* 
2124 29to 
7 2? 
134 1* 

99 9* 

277 80* 
32 25* 
4 iau 
6 11* 
37 Sto 
42 2ft 
70 3ft 
23 16* 
23 5 

64 12* 
1 Bft 
49 3 

13k 24* 
224 2 
U ISto 
42 10* 
1299 14 
234 16 
32 19 
136 28* 
W 22ft 

m ii 
m 1* 
21 23 
2Bz 40* 

1 9 

34 15 
SOI 4* 
11 ISto 
SB Slto 
248 19* 
91 Sto 


7ft Th 
25 25*— 1 

TSto 13* 

20to 2Mb— 1 
28 2B — ft 
I* 1U— to 
M B*~ U 
Kto B6ft— BU 
25* 25*— -U 
wu iou— to 
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5 5 — to 

3* 2ft 
Sto Sto 
Ifto IBto— M 
4ft 4ft— to 
12to 1212 
6ft 6ft— ft 
2* 3 

24* 24* + * 
lft 1* + * 
IS 15 
ID* IS*— to 
13 13*— to 

IS* 15* + * 
Ulb 10*+ to 
27* Mto + ft 
22 22ft + to 
3 3 

18% Tffito 

Ito 1* 

22* 23 +* 

m « + u 

9 9 —to 

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4M 4*— U 
14ft 14ft— to 

2 -ft n + * 

19* 19* 

4ft Sto + U 


10 79 7to 7to 7U + U 

15 n 13 5ft Sft Sft 


.10 14 M 60 Bto Bft Bto 


AMEX Highs*Low8 


a*— to 
Mft— to 
«ft + * 
ISto— ft 
Sto 

3N+ to 
17* 

16 

M + U 
Sto— to 
Wft+ to 
9*— to 
•to 
9* 

Iflto — % 

12* 

3SB, 

19ft— U 
64Vb+ U 


7 1 

M* s* 
* to 
ISft llto 
iito >ft 
19» 14* 
37* 33U 
3* Ito 
3ft 1* 
15 lOto 
22* Wto 
8% A* 
13* 7% 
lOto 5* 
15ft vto 


USRInd 

UUmta 

Unteom 

UMCPOf J5 12 

Unborn J9a X3 
UAb-Pd 3* ZS 
UnCoiP IJMbXS 
UFoodA .10 53 
U FoodB 

UtMad JSt 5A 

USASwt 

unjinv 44M44 

llnvCm 

UnltfRa 

UnvPol 


Mto Mto 
9to 9* 
19ft IVto 
40 V. 38ft 
2 1ft 
Ito 1* 
IT* llto 
21* Mto 
Sft Bto 
12 * 12 
Bto BVh 
15ft Mto 


3to + to, 

1T ft-* . 
Mto— to | 
Vto— * 
19* + to I 
40U +2M 1 

2 I 

Ito + to I 

llto+ * , 

21 to — ft | 
6V, — to 
n — to 


Aenpnfmt ActamRunl Aiomtfon 

MKfclton, Cotprop CantantOrv 

OorlMadB OMtoni CoinFdawti 

DnloElac Damson 3 75p DalLitu 

ekpISuiw FaotMllGa PrlacteRct i 

GrandAun Hteno f ortf HaaitriClun 

lCHCorp Lnalcon Lvndi CSvb 

BBafrtaa Mrfrooor* Midland Co 

PGE2 32pU PanEnMf PtvGams 

PrwMEniiv Rovanlnd Radcowuvi 

SanJnaW SchoR, E«1 SaaUrdOo 

TaMiax TraraTacti 

WMdtran WIRET n 


Feb. 11 


BoncrftFndl 
ChartMriA 
Crist Foam I 

DkmuicIBatM 

GrahamCoM 

Hbrfmnla, ■ 
MaMndSan 
PCE 257ptW 
PoymjTwt 
Rykolf ■ 
StnrrttHou] 
UnAIrPrd ■ 
WhariuaEnt ■ 


1BU Vto VST n . 

21* 15* VallrR 1.92 X3 


32 MU lOto 10* + Vb 
1 23* 23* 23* 


NOTICE TO HOLDERS OP 


Options (price* in Woo.). J IT0-Y0KAD0 CO., LTD. 



fob 

My 

300 

4SX 600 

1500-1652 

3W 

10V 235 

W00-115) 

320 

MX IJS 

575- 735 

XD 

n» on 

33S *75 

m 

(HU- 050 

175 300 


Gofcb 30000- 3XL50 


Vilean White WcMSlA. 

t, Quri da Moo+BtaK 

1211 Geacva I. Steo at aik t I 

TeL 3101251 ■ Telex 38309 


FOREIGN & COLONIAL 
RESERVE ASSET FUND 

PRJCBAT42K 
A, US DOLLA8 CASH 5iat7 

B: WJmaJ5B«rCASH $9jSt 

C: DaiARBOMX $1064 

D: MXIiajaeNCY BOOS $1000 

E= STBUNG AS5CT5 £1022 

FCSSGN& CGtOMAL 
MANAGEAfi*JT (ERSEV) UMftH) 

14 MUCASTB! SneTJTiHBJHJBSEY.a 
TEL: 05342^51 THEt 4192063 

FOR OTHER FA CRJFR3S.SS 
RsmERNATfONAt FUNDS UST 


531% Conrerttble Debentnrea 
Due August 31. 1993 
•5%* Convertible Debenture* 

Due Auguat 31. 1996 

Poraunt to Section 345 of rhL Compao/a Indfet- 
nrca dated a of Jab 1. 1978 ud Job 1. 1881. 
rajpoethreb'./vftiinffMtlieabowinemioaatDa- 
bteLuies. oalice i» hereby gntn w toOowt: 

1. On Pebniary & IDHSrtu Baird of Dirw 
un of the Company rootled lo make a free 
darrfbucion of abares of ill Common Slock to 
share holdera of record as of Fobmary SBL,1985 in 
Japan. U the raze of 1 new share for each 10 
■hares held. 

2. AccordfnriK the conwsjeo prkos at 
which (ha ahore-niinitxBied Dobeotnna ouv be 
converted into shares of Common Slock at the 
Companj will beadjiMtedetieelivf asoTUareli L 
1885, Japan Thne. The enreeivlOA prices in dfoct 
before such adjnsunent are Yea CC640 for (he 
G*{b> Convertible Driwnnrw Due Auewl 31. 
1993 and Yon 91X80 for the 5^1% Convertible 
DebenlnnaDneAiisiatSl. 1995. and tbeadptsted 
eonverthm priea will be Yea 75040 for (heSVt 
Convertible Debenrare* Due A uatw 81, 1999 and 
Yen 83X90 for the 5Wb Convertible Debentona 
Due Annual 8L 1896. 

ITD-YOIUDO ax, LTD. 
By; The Bank of Tbkyo 
Trust Company 
aalhHtee 

Dated: Febnuiy IS. UB5 


MONTGOMERY FINANCIAL FUND LTD. 

NOTICE TO ALL SHAREHOLDERS OF 
BEARER SH ARES IN SU BJECT FUND 

The dined or? of Montgomery Financial Fund UA, have declared an interim 
dividend of L’-S. S0.146S355 net (gras* figure- (he same) per preferred share and 
U.S. SI 6.920666 net (cross fleuir the same) per class A cwunon share pavabk 
to hulders or record as of Jane 30. 1964. Accrued (merest at US. S0.005S613 
per prrfcmsd share and US SO. 676666 per cbm A share will also be paid. 
Bearer shareholders should deliver coupon No. 2 to Banatie C&n&raie do 
Luxemboure SLA.. 14 Rue Aldringen. Luxrmbouig as tram February 44b, 1985 
together with appropriate pii-nKni ustructiona: 

Dated Fcbruarv 4. 1965 R, jmU, of th* board 


INCREASE 

YOUR 

WORKING 

CAPnAL 

100 % 


RECEIVE 
EARNINGS OF, 

280 % I 

ON CASH 
INVESTED I 


By order of th t board 
Cayman Corporate Services Lid. 

Secretary 


AMERICAN VALUES N.Y 

(Incorporated under the laws of the Netherlands Antilles). 

The Directors have declared a dividend of U.S. $3.00 per 
preferred share, the record date of which is November 30th 
1984, payable December 10th 1984. 

Holders of bearer shares are reminded that in order to 
acquire proceed,, they should present coupon number S at 
The Bermuda Commercial Bank, Barclay's International 
Building, P.O. Box 1748, Hamilton S, Bermuda. 

C.T. Collis 

Secretary , 

Hamilton, Bermuda rlQBlltV 

.Internamnal. 




# Containers are high earning, 
fully insured, tangible assets 
with a 15 year working life. 

$ The Transco Group is the 
world's leader in producing the 
highest annual rental return 
with the lowest commercial risk. 
4 2000 serious investors have 
already purchased containers 
worth over US$35 million 
which are managed by the 
Transco Group. 

# These serious investors 
enjoy a secure US DOLLAR 
income from participation in 
international trade. 

*DO NOT MISS THIS 
EXCEPTIONAL OPPORTUNITY 
TO ADD CONTAINERS TO 
YOUR INVESTMENT 
PORTFOLIO. 

# For full details, without 
obligation, fill in our coupon 
today. 

TRANS 
CONTAINER 
MARKETING AG 

GeHertstrasse 18, 

0+4052 Basel, Switzerland. 
TeL (061) 42^3.77 
Telex: 64446 taco ch 
MINIMUM US$12,000 INVESTMENT 



RETURN OF 
CASH 
INVESTED 

100 % 


( To; Trans Container Marketing AG 

Geilertstrasse 18, CH-4052 Basel, Switzerland. 

I Please send me full details without obligation. 

I NAME: 

(BLOCK CAPTULS) “ 

ADDRESS: _ , 















Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE* TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1985 



PEANUTS 



ABSOLUTELY.^ 1 
I'LL PROVE 
IT TO YOU 

-v/ 




'•>2 - 'Wt-'yi.K- i 



A LITTLE REAMNCER 
Of A L05T LOE 
If 



BLONDIE 


ACROSS 
ISolo 
6 As well 
10 Enjoy a quid 

14 Distributed 

15 Perches 
18 Pedro's 

"Ahoy!” 

17‘‘Festina 

leme" 

20 Here, in Paris 

21 Watery fluids 

22 Zones 

23 Eliot work 

27 Director 
Howard 

28 Squatter 
32 Dali's 

homeland 
35 Bank 
transaction 

38 Site of the Tell 
legend 

39 Saw 

43 Berenson's 
subject 

44 Pot Item 

45 Obliterate 

46 Sly 

49 Theater sign 
50Commeal 
mush 

57 What a bigwig 

carries 
80 Part 

61 Nothing 

62 Saw- 

66 Make eyes at 

67 Brainstorm 


68 Violinist Isaac 

69 Brassie, e.g. 
79 Cabbage; 

bread 

71 Hewrote"Too 
Late the 
Phalarope" 

DOWN 

1 Come clean 

2 Cause filtering 

3 Jack of old 
films 

4 Mets’ div. 

5 Air. country 

6 Pecuniary 
resource 

7 British 
measure 

8 Swipe 

9 W.w. II Govt. 


10 Combinations 
of tones 

11 Inventor Elias 
Z2 Singer 

Fitzgerald 
13 What E. B. 
Browning 
counted 

18 Org. 

19 "Daily 
Planet” 
employee 

24 Formal order 


25 Tops 

26 O'Neill's 
Christie” 


2/ 12/88 


29 Popular 
sandwich filler 

30 Aphrodite’s 
son 

31 Liturgy 

32 Hit a gnat 

33 Young salmon 

34 Italian wine 
city 

35 Chaney 

36 Teammate of 
BUI Terry 

37 Veneration 

40 Negatives 

41 A jerk 

42 Trampled 

47 Conveyed (Si a 
flume 

48 Petnichio’a 
wife 

49 Takes to court 

51 Commerce 

52 Hayseed 

53 Skirt part 

54 Atlas feature 

55 Explosive, for 
short 

56 First orbiting 
American 

57 Vittles 

58 Como, to Carlos 
or Carlo 

WFrogner 
Park’s locale 

63 U.S.S.R. plane 

64 0. Henry's 
monogram 

65 One timw 


1 65 One timw WIZARD of ID 


"€> New York Times, edited by Molesko. 



Unscramble these four Jumbles, 
one loner to each square, to form 
four onSnary words. 


KROO 

Bl 





a KU ft-a* 1 1,r ' 

HAMER 

■ 




DYGOTS 


ID 



ACEPIE 


nnij 



FULL OF BSAhWi 


Now a rrange the circled letters to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


Yesterdays 


Print answer bore: jTl f X Xl 

(Answers tomorrow) 

Jumbles: NOISE LOUSY AMBUSH SHOULD 


Answer Was L ._ . .. . 

-MUSSEL" BOUf 


' this?— 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


Algarve 

Amsterdam 

Alberti 

Barcelona 

Belorodv 

Berlin 

Bniuett 


Bmlapnf 


Coala M Sal 

OaHlM 

EcMwtob 

Florence 

F ran kf ort 

Geneva 

Hetstekl 

Istanbul 

LatPOfmas 


HIGH LOW 
C F C F 

17 63 16 61 o 

-3 26 -8 72 fr 

17 63 12 54 d 

12 54 10 50 cl 

-7 19 4 IS W 

-11 19 -14 7 tr 

-5 23 -10 14 fr 

•7 1* 4 IS M 

-6 21 -IS M sw 

-8 IB -14 7 ft 

22 72 13 55 Sh 

1 34 -2 2B d 

1 34 -2 2B fr 

8 46 8 46 r 

■a 18 -M 7 fr 

-2 2B -3 26 o 

■14 7 -24 -11 Mi 

IS S» 1» 52, 8 

23 73 IS Wl fr 

18 64 15 SO' o 

-2 28 -5 33 lr 

IB -64 8 46 fr 

2 36 1 34 o 

.19 -7 -26 -IS d 

.10 14 -IS S fr 

H 55 6 43 d 

-14 7-21 4 W 

0 32 -5 23 fr 

-13 > -I* -2 fr 

4 39 2 36 o 

15 St 9 48 Cl 

-13 9 -24 -If Cl 

-6 21 -It 12 fr 

2 36 0 32 O 

-I® M »f4 7 tr 

-18 0 -22-8 fr 
-o 21 -» « * 


ASIA 


Mqine 
Horn Kona 
Manila 
NewDefei 
Seoul 


S ln goaere 

Taipei 

Tokyo 

AFRICA 

Mgier* 
Cairo 
Cape Town 


HIGH LOW 
C F C F 

33 91 24 75 ft 

7 45 -4 25 an 

16 61 14 57 r 

32 90 24 75 fr 

21 70 8 46 fr 

4 39 0 32 O 

10 SO 3 38 0 

33 91 24 75 0 

17 61 14 57 r 

12 54 6 43 fr 


LeMMi 
Madrid 
Milan 
Moscow 
JHVBJO 
Nice 
Ode 
Fart* 

Praflaa 
BeyRfavfk 
Home 
StockMfm 
Strasbourg 
Venice 
VkaM 
wmaw 

Znddi 

MIDDLE EAST 

Atoun 13 55 l 34 

Beirut 19 66 11 52 

Daoutof 
jenaatom 
TetAvf* 

OCEANIA 

n prtW f-i 71 TO 16 61 d 

25 77 16 61 ef 


Nairobi 

Tool* 


18 64 13 55 

24 75 13 55 
31 a IS 59 

19 46 14 57 
23 73 17 63 
8 90 24 75 

25 71 13 SS 
19 <6 11 52 


LATIN AMERICA 

Bueno* Aire* — — — — ■ na 

LtoUS 27 81 19 66 d 

Mexico City 25 77 8 46 PC 

Mode Janeiro 8 90 24 75 ir 

SaoPaWf — — no 

NORTH AMERICA 


AadMraoa -10 14-22-8 fr 

Aflonffi 9 48 2 36 f 

Bottoa 6 43 -3 26 fr 

Chicago -1 30 -5 23 wr 

Denver 5 46 -11 12 fr 

Deiron -!•» -7 19 sw 

Honolulu 26 79 19 66 It 

NmM 17 52 4 39 K 

Las Angelo* 8 72 7 45 fr 

Miami 25 77 17 63 DC 

IMmMpdtt -6 71 -14 7 DC 

Montreal -7 19 -12 10 fr 

Nassau 21 70 10 50 pc 

Now Tom 2 36 -2 28 d 

Sim Fraadscs 14 57 t 43 k 

Seattle 12 54 4 39 r 

Toronto -2 28 -15 5 PC 

a ,, io o Washington 4 43 -1 8 pc 

to-taggy; fr-Wr: Mail; o-ovuraaf; pcnorttv dowfv: r-mlnj 
Shstowen; o-starmv 


11 55 0 32 
17 63 3 38 
20 « 6 43 


ESS TBfflD. 34 — 2i 193 — 771. HONG KOMG: CKUdV. T*IW. 18 — 15 (64 — 591. 
I- mTT«Sl 8— w 191 — 751. SEOUL: Snow. Temp. 4— -1 139 — 30). 

Tow 31-25 «8~77>. TOKYO: Ctairfr. 

Temp. 11 —s iS2— * 11 . 


Wrkl Stock Markets 

Via Agence France-Presse Feb. 11 

Closing prices in local currencies unless otherwise indicated. 


) AoMerdam 


OM0 

Free. 

ABN 

397 JO 

396 

ACF Holding 

192 

197 JO 

Aeeon 




I04J0 

10420 


27SLSD 

2I7J0 

AMEV 

71S 

216 

AtJam Rub 

8 

805 


74 M 

7+50 

BVG 

14 9 

1* 

BuOirmonr T 

8+20 

8S5D 


33.98 

3320 

Elsevler+IDU 

11+80 

114 


92J0 

9350 


10X20 

18080 

Heine ken 

158.10 

157 JD 

HooBowms 

61JO 

61.90 

KLM 

49 J8 

4930 


4820 

482U 

Nat Ncdder 
NedMard 

27980 

I62JB 

28050 

16055 


30650 

304 


6730 

6750 

Ptiinre 

6030 

6030 


7+80 

7+20 

Rodamca 

137a 

137 X 

Roltnco 

6040 

«U0 


4070 

43.70 

Roral Dutch 

199 M 

19620 

Unilever 



VanOmnww 

2+40 

2830 

VMF Start. 

148 

14S 

VNU 

21 U0 

nuo 

ANP.CBS General Index -JSMt 

Previous : 199.46 



I Bnan Is I 

ArtRsj 

HxZT 

■J! 

Bekaerl 



Cockertll 



EBES 



GB>lnmpBM 

~" Vr 

mV r J 

GBL 

2020 

2025 

Gevoert 



Hoboken 


1^‘J 

Kredteitxxft 


7740 

Petrofina 


| 

SacGarterato 



Safina 


B/ 1 

Sotvav 


y 1 

TrooJenEtee 


K'/'J 

Vftfile Montagna 


tlj 

Stock Exanaae Immx : LUU2 

Frenaas: l^vur 



1 Brayfcftat ) 


AEG-T efefgnken 
Allianz Vers 
Ba*r 
Bow 

BayarJfypa. 

Bt7vw.Ver.Bcnk 

BMW 

Commercbank 

ContiBUtTiml 

Dabitfer-Beiu 

□eauEia 

Deutsche B<X>coc fc 

Deul&ehe Bank 

DrewnerBrnifc 

DUB-Sehuflw 

GHH 

Hadittef 

Hoedw f 

I loculi 

HoJzmonn 

Horton 

Kali ♦ Salz 

Karxtadt 

Kaumof 

KHD 


HMD 11630 
1044 lisa 
1844018440 
19S30 19870 
319 322 

327 87 

358 361 

167 167J0 
12020 122 
632 at 
368 369. 

14*40 148 

0430 402JB 
18840 10910 
206 204 

162-50 16150 
478 4N 
18940 190 

103.70 10870 
39139940 
167 168 

27170 27140 
209 206 

707 211 

251 251-50 


j Clear Pr«v. 

Kioecfcner Werke 

82 

0150 

Kruno Stahl 

83 

12 

Unde 

«H 

4BS 


199 

>87 

MAN 

15750 

150 

1 MstedteasaUMhatt 23&.90 23+80 

MueneftRueefc 

use 

1718 


255 

2S5 


355 

356 

KWE 

16230 16250 


477 

481 


5415054+50 


97 JO 

90 

Varta 

ISO 

184 

veba 

1678D 16860 

VEW 

123 12250 

Vaficcftagemverk 

191J0 

195 

( Canmentiaak Index : 1.141+0 I 

Prwwv* : UOtf 



11 II 

Bk East Asia 

2+40 

2+40 

Chou no Kong 

1320 

133) 

China Light 

1+30 

1+80 

Cross Harbor 

950 

10 

Hang Seim Bank 

47 

4+Z 

HK Electric 

755 

730 







HKShenabal 

855 

865 


6050 


HK Whorl 

+10 

+10 

Hulcb wtwmpoa 

2030 

1950 

MrtSina Moth 

830 

850 

JartUneSec 

820 

810 

New World 

iS 

550 

Shaw Bras 




9.15 


5hne DarbY 

+70 

+70 

Stelux 



Swire Pacific A 

2+40 

3+30 

Wheel Mar 

ILA. 


WhceJocfc 

+65 

+5S 

Wlmar 

+80 


World Inn 

1.96 

U96 

Hang sene Index : 

145754 

Prrrtee* : tJ4788 





AECI 

715 

715 

Bortaws 

975 

no 

Blwoor 

1450 


Butteb 


6450 

Elands 


1280 

GFSA 


7700 

Hantjany 


2460 

Ktoat 


6750 

Hecksank 


995 

PsrSnmr 

K 'i • M 

5400 

Rystntal 

1560 

16W 

SA Brews 



51 Helena 

B l 

31 M 

Sen) 

u 

570 

CixspaUo Stock Index : 924.10 

| prffvtooi .fujp 




: 


A,. Carp 112ft SIZVj 

Atitod-Lvons 175 176 

Aimto Am Gold 580 03 

Obbcadt 1*5 139 

Barclays 632 447 

Bass 514 317 

B-A.T. 381 3Kj 

^ § 

BL » 79 

BOCGraw 298 293 



CMM 

Prev. 

SIP 

2172 

9180 




Standa 

10950 

10780 

MIB Index ;W*7 


Prevkw* 

l,l» 


II Pmrb I 


Boats 175 175 

Bowater Indus 234 233 

BP 561 543 

Brit Home 51 25 i 2SS 

Brit Telecom ijsvj 126 

BTR 667 *67 

Burmch ZM ItS 

Qx®vrr Scfrw 163 164 

Chcrtnr Com 205 

Coats Potons 160 165 

Con* Gold 494 499 

CourtoukJs 147 147 

Dafoehr 483 490 

Do Beers 
Dimmers 
Driefonleln 
Dun km 

F Isons 
Free SI Gad 
GEC 
GKN 
Glaxo l 
Grand MH 
Guinness 
GUS 


Hawker 

ICI 

Imp* 

Lloyd* Bank 

Lenrtto 

Lucas 

Maries and Sa 
Metal Box 
Midland Bank 
Net West Bank 
Plftljwtnn 
Pleasev 

Road Eled 
Rarettenteln 
Rank 
Rood mil 
Reuters 


299 303 

«4ft 

46 421b 

305 303 

*501* 527 

na ne 

197 196 

11 61/64 11*. 

303 30fl 

144 24S 

717 724 

219 217 

435 427 

867 861 

219 215 

6W 612 

1B0 1ST 

258 7SB 

126 128 

420 413 

342 347 

692 609 

316 323 

172 170 

195 194 

S89W S92VJ 

Mfl MO 

562 564 

J3S 336 


Royal Dutch I 495/64 4® 5/64 


RTZ 


687 

756 


672 

746 


234 244 

ariored 5CO su 

ad Lrto 463 460 

ToSCO 240 242 

Thorn EMI 447 454 

hip 250 ZW 

wr Hm 384 376 

151 1S6 

tor 203 200 

art 1129/321129/32 
United BISCUIT* 200 200 

ft 237 227 

3 S34* 536 V; 

Him S2 bvi sau> 

tonSHrC 34H 349* 

trill 603 608 

17Vl 17H 


MDn 


Fennllalto 

Flat 

F Insider 
Ganerofl 
IF1 

Ifaleonwfitt 

Mediobanca 

M onti d h on 

on von i 

Pirelli 

RA5 

Rlnascente 


11700 19150 
2304 2715 
67S3 U10 
2249 2279 
10775 10/35 

2549 2S0 
57 57 

41300 40000 
7700 7470 

snao 88300 

84990 85000 
1506 1510 
6650 4650 
2330 2317 
6S5H 68300, 
619.75 624£) I 


Air Ltauhte 
A Whom AH. 
Av Dassault 
Banco Ire 
BIC 

Bouvmes 

B5N-GD 

Carrefour 

Club Med 

Cottmey 

Dwnoz 

Ell-Auultolne 

Elk-op* I 

Gen Ettux 

H a c h otte 

I met at 

LataruoGop 


rorval 
MOtra 
Michelfn 
MMPmar 
Meet Hennessv 
Moulinex 

NordEil 
OccMantale 
Pernod Rlc. 

Pctnrtw (Iso) 
Peuaeat 
Poclaln 
Pr In terrwn 
Rodlotodtn 
Redouts 
RsvnriUcM 
Skis Rasslanol 
SourJ*errler 
Te46»Tecnn 
Thomson CSF 
Valeo 

Agefl Index : 19171 
PrwtaiiBUl 
CAC index : 199J 


620 615 

223 226.90 
935 918 

613 617 

550 544 

759 759 

2400 7400 

1950 1961 

1255 1241 

245J0 265.10 
689 685 

236 235 

906 1028 

561 562 

1895 1900 

81.10 B2.90 
4IZ50 417J0 
2065 7020 

2216 2290 

1600 1565 

822 845 

73 75.10 
1950 1969 

10U0 1 02.50 
76-50 7750 
746 740 

678 665 

757.90 15933 
2RL50 3680 
S3 5050 
20250 204 

245.70 24750 
12JO 1252 
1565 TWO 
2060 3090 

505 506 

2255 2310 

495 493 

247 23950 


Bouslead 

1.70 

131 

Cold Storage 

258 

251 


890 

+95 

FrraerNoave 

530 

uo 

Haw Par 

236 

232 

Inchcape 

251 

256 

Keane! Ship 

159 

13) 


+94 

6 

OCBC 

930 

935 

oue 

356 

+9* 


735 

IJ 9 


1.90 

1.94 


1.13 

1.15 

SI Trading 

454 

*58 

UOB 

+46 

+58 

OUB Index .-40832 



Prevkxn :41U2 



| SuwkMa \ 

4GA 

373 

172 

Alla Laval 

200 

198 


BOOKS 


«SM 

Astra 
AMcOf.-. 
Bajldan 
Electrolux 
Ericsson 
Esse He 
Ha ndel 3b ken 
Pharmocta 
5oob-Scun*o 
Sondvik 
Skansko 
5KF 

SwodiaiMatch 

Volvo 


378 
424 420 

118 111 
NA 111 
317 339 

293 302 

325 NA 
179 179 

712 217 

445 450 

390 348 

97 96 

199 rtf 
243 243 

276 270 


Affarevartdes index ;409J8 
Previous :4895a 


g-r J— 


ACI 

AN! 

ANZ 
BHP 
Bar of 

Bauoalnvllle 


191 190 
252 260 
461 473 
514 518 
337 338 
180 IBS 



IF TOMORROW COMES 

By Sidney Sheldon. 416 pp. $17.95. 
Morrow, 105 Madison Avenue, 

New York, N. Y. 10016. 

Reviewed by Michele Slung 

S IDNEY SHELDON is urn one to ignore 
the vicissitudes of everyday life. Lefs say, 
for erample, that you're a bright and beautiful 
voung wo man, engaged to many the scion of 
an old Philadelphia family when, suddenly, 
vour widowed mother, whom you adore, coin- 
mils suicide. It isn’t, one supposes, beyond the 
realm of probability that, a few days lata, you 
might be gang-raped in the prison cell where 
you’re serving a i5-yeai sentence for armed 
robbery. Fate is funny, after all, and, in more 
ways than one, i(‘s at its funniest in the genre of 
fiction to which “If Tomorrow Comes" be- 
longs. 

What Sheldon has given us, then, is a lead- 
znd-nasie cream-putt that’s somehow st23 di- 
gestible, a melodrama that nuns an avenging 
angel into a master criminal and doesn't pause 
for plausibility. There's a direct line here, one 
senses, going back to Dumas pere and “The 
Count of Monte Cristo"; and Tracy Whitney, 
our ravishing (and ravished) heroine, is simply 
Edm ond Dante’s in drag. Yet that’s comfort- 
ing. really: isn't it nice to know that even in 
schlocky potboilers there's a tradition one can 
hold on to? 

Tracy Whitney, the “she" in question, has 
every reason to be angry, for, practically sec- 
onds after the story opens and she's pro- 


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she’s on her way to helL Trying to strike back 
at the men responsible for her mother's death, 
she’s been outsmarted. Framed and sau to a 
women’s penitentiary where even tbe tough 
kowtow, Tracy find despairs, then decid es to 
turn herself into an instrument of revenge. 
Since this is a novel, however, a special pardon 
to her turns up in just a few chaptavand, 
from that moment on, Tracy’s sot a victim 
anymore. 

The lurid even overly groteswue scenes set in 

the lfflii .riaw* prison where Tracy loses her 
naivet& in a hurry give Sheldon a c hanc e to 

show off his research into jailhouse dang, con- 
vict routines and the sexual pathology of fe- 
male in pistt* Laid on p with a shovel as ihis 
data seems, it also represents “reality" as ap- 
posed to romance and. thus appears even . 
stranger. One doesn’t doubt that Sheldon is 
truing it l£ke it is, only in this context the 
awfulness serves merely to emphasize Tracy’s 
defeat and degradation so that her reemer- 
gence is more dramatic, more of a relief to the 
reader. And, of course, more of a spur to 
revenge. So wfe«i the jail door does get thrown 
open, it’s Never-Never Land outride. 

Fully two-thirds of the novel is left at this 
point, plenty of time for Tracy to metamor- 
phose into a queen of thieves who rf aretes 
fellow con artists and insurance investigators 
alike. Cunning caper follows cunning caper, 
after she’s taken care of her old. enemies and 
decided she likes “living on the culling edge of 
danger.” To malcg things a bit more exciting 
two new nemeses turn up — one, a charmer 
who woos her with his wits, the other, an nr- 
nerd who might have strayed from a slasher 
movie. But both, in different ways, are eventu- 
ally bested. 

Sheldon obviously bad a good time planning 
the jobs Tracy pulls off, whether if s stealing a 
Goya from the Prado or a priceless diamond 
from an Amsterdam display. For reasons less 
pertinent to the plot, though, he also tosses in a 
brief Jello orgy the silliness of which casts a 
rainbow glow over the book’s more “serious" 
love scenes. Does it matter, though? Not at all, 
because is the ways that count at the cash 
register, Sidney Sheldon's imagination is 
knock-proof. 

When, not if. tomorrow comes, his seventh 
novel win be a best seller. 

Michele Shag is on the staff of The Washing- 
ton Post. 


CHESS 


By Robert Byrne 

ANATOLY KARPOV 
T\ sleepwalked his way to a 
loss in the 47th game of his 
world chess championship 
match in Moscow. The 33-old 
title holder saw his lead in the 
series cut back to 5-2. 

Tbe opening play of this 47ib 
encounter featured two unher- 
alded twists. Whereas Karpov 
had used the solid 5 P-K3 in the 
29th and 33d encounters — as 
he has throughout his career — 
he shifted here to tbe agressive 
Anti-Meran Gambit with B- 
N5. 

And it all went for naught — 
Kasparov slyly steered the 
game into the Cambridge 
Springs defense with 6...Q- 
R4. Such a turn roust have 
come as an enormous surprise 
to Karpov; not only had Ka- 
sparov never shown any inter- 
est in this defense, he demol- 
ished it several times in his final 
candidates match with Vasily 
Smyslov in Vilnius, in the Sovi- 
et Lithuanian Republic, last 
April. 

Of courseSmyriov had relied 
on 8 . . . B-N5?! instead of the 
superior8 . . . N/2-N3 that Ka- 
sparov used in this game. Kar- 
pov seemed to have been total- 
ly unprepared for it, for 
otherwise it would be difficult 
to account for his timid 9NxN, 
QxQcb; 10 NxQ, which indi- 
cated that be did not care Tor 
tire way things were going and 
intended to take the day off. 


Playing 12 P-QR4?! meant 
White would never be able to 
set in motion tbe minority at- 
tack that required, albeit after 
long preparation, P-QR3, P- 
QN4. and P-QN5. Besides — 
and much more serious — the 
move left weak squares in tbe 
while queenside. 

After 18 . . . KR-K1, the 
white king was placed where it 
could easily be molested, and 
the white knight was ineffectu- 
al and difficult to relocate. 

Kasparov's opening of the 
center 19...P-QB4! brought 
White's suffering to lighL This 
was not a true pawn sacrifice 
since 20 PxP, N-Q2; 21 P-B6,. 
PxP, N-Q2; 21 P-B6, PxP. 22 
RxP? is refuted fay 22. ..N- 
K4ch. 

Karpov made sure, with 22 
P-B6. PxP. to dose the QB file 
so he could use his king to de- 
fend his QNP after 23 KR-Q1, 
N-B4ch; 24 K-Bl 

Perhaps Karpov should have 
tried 27 R-Q3 io meet 27 ... P- 
QB4 by 28 R/l-Ql. 

• Afier 27 . P-QB4 tbe 
champion should have tried to 
sap some Io the strength of the 
black center by 28 P-K4. In- 
stead, be played 28 N-Q2?! as 
though unaware of the danger. 

Kasparov's breakthrough 
with 28 . . . PB5!; 29 Pxp, NB4! 
caught the white pieces awk- 
wardly situated, karpov could 
not capture with 30 PxP? be- 
cause of 30 . . . N-K5ch. 

Had he played 30 N-NI — 
which might have been his best 


kASPMOVrHLMSt 



nam/iMit 
Final pbb M op 

— then30...PxP; 31 RxRcfa, 
RxR; 32 R-QL RxR; 33 KxK, 
NxP thrusts white into a pawn- 
down ending. 

However, his 30 P-K4?! let 
Kasparov use his QP for attack 
with 30 . . . P-Q5! Now Karpov 
had to try 31 R-QRI, but . he 
blundered with 31 N-Nl? and 
after 31 ...P-Q6ch; 32K-N2, 
PQ7! discovered that be had to 
drop a rook. For example, 33 
R-B3 (or 33 R-B2, N-Q6ch; 34 
K-N3, NxB), NxPcfa; 34K-N3, 
NxR; 35 NxN, R-Q6. Tbe 
Champion gave up. 

QUEEN'S GAMUT OECLMEJt 


1*7Z5b3 NJCK* 

2 P-B4 P-D 

3 P-Q4 FOI 

« tin p4n 

a MB QIWJZ 

• PJO o-M 

7 PXP NxP 

I QG2 K/JW 



21 PXP 

22 P-M 


£95! 


ILBft* 

P-BJ 

HJD 


Cicte 

Pr*». 

Brwnblos 

371 

371 

Coles 

403 

60S 

Comalca 

iu 

240 

522 

CSR 

268 

300 


231 

218 

Elders U1 

305 

304 


311 

Ih'l 

Magellan 

»0 

o 


2S5 


190 

195 


62 

62 





Z68 

■l.fi 


664 

■ ,11 


526 

536 

Sleloh 

193 

195 

Southland 

19 

23 

Woods! Qa 

84 

86 

Wormold 

330 

330 

All OnUnarfes laden 


Prevtoae : 77250 
Source: Reuters. 



| Zurich || 


Toronto 


Feb. a 


Cmodicn stocks liu AP 


Bonk Leu 3750 3790 

Brown Bovarl 1575 1570 

Ciba Geiev 2865 ■ ~ 

Credit Suisse 2420 

EJeCtrawaH 2720 2710 

Gears FUCtwr 725 740 

Joeob Sucturd 6375 6350 

JelmoH 1950 1900 

umdlsGvr 1670 1660 

Nestle 6360 6445 

Oortlkon-B 1480 15W 

Roche Baby 8658 8625 

SantiM B1M 8T00 

5cJilrnllw 3675 3700 

5ulnr 3*6 343 

SBC 371 372 

SwissoJr 1100 1090 

SwtssVelksbank 1505 ISO 

Union BanH 3660 3680 

Wintentnir 4270 <300 

Zurich ins 20250 20200 

SBC index : 420J9 
Previous : 43158 

HA; na* oueAd; XAi aH 1 
avaUacia: «J: omSvWsvxL 


Manila and Banks to Sign Pact Feb. 26 


Return 

MANILA —* The Philippines 
and its creditor banks will sign an 
agreement for $925 million in new 
loans and $3 billion in trade credits 
Feb. 26, Prime Minister Cesar Vir- 
ata said Monday. Tbe agreement is 
part of a SlO-biflion package put 
together by the banks. 

Mr. Virata, who is also finance 
minister, said the first installment 


of the new facility will be available 
after the International Monetary 
Fund has completed the review of 
the country’s first-quarter perfor- 
mance next montb- 
The IMF and tbe Philippines 
agreed in December on a standby 
credit of $615 million in Special 
Drawing Rights, which led to a 
pact with the commercial banks on 
rescheduling part of the country’s 
$25-biilion foreign debL 


SATIRE IN WORDS AND PICTURES 

DOONESBURY 

DAILY IN THE IHT 


6800 Abu Prw 
1500 AcMonds 
IBOQAsniceC 
1000 Asjra | na A 
9775 All E no rev 
800 Alla Hal 
l25AI«oCmi 
3975 Aleomo SI 
86380 Atacen 
64288 Arms Cor 
7065a Altai I 
2705 BP Canada 
53795 Book SC 

OCX Bank NS 
28752 Barrick a 
1400 Baton At 
6075 Bonanza R 
16100 Bralame 
6414 Bramaloa 
500 Brenda M 
17090 BCFP 
50650 BC Res 
12593 BC Phene 
1812 Brunsvrk 
4165 Budd Can 
33429 CAE 
5Q8CCL A 
9300 cots* a B f 
20600 Cad Frv 
2800 C Nor West 
1410C Pockrs 
5032 Can Trust 
3100 C Time 
15259 Cl BL Com 
1200 Can Ual Res 
46133 CTIrvAf 
500 C Util B 
1800 Cara 
3573 Geianex 
250 Colon 175P 
100 CHUM 
5900C CXstbA 
9300 CDIuHj B f 
6570 CTL Bank 
1100 Cofwentrs 
200Co>nvesl A 
27900 CosekaR 
540 Conran A 
496 Crown* 
22100 Czar Res 
1CD163 Doan Dev 
400 OoonA 
31427 Denison A 
553*2 Denison B I 

6500 Deveicqn 

3250 Dkknsn A I 

12100 OleknsnB 

302 Domcn A 
E351 OafcacoA 
4400 Du Pom A 
7700 Dvlex A 
36675 EJcttWHX 
400 Emoo 
1900 Eaultr Svr 
lOMFCAlnll 
ZXMCFoFconC 
8510 Flcnbrdge 
200 Fordv Ros 
10975 Fed I no A 
9662 F Cl It Fin 
no Fraser 
100 Fruehouf 
SHGendisA 
8960 Gene Comp 
13033 Geocrude 
2000 Gibraltar 
42110 Gddcarvt 
60S Goodyear 
16050 Grandma 
26SGL Fonsst 
100GI Pacific 
Tnoreylmd 
idooh Group A 
16300 Hrdlna A t 
um Hawker 
mi Haras □ 

1606 H Bar Co 
33525 imasea 
MDOIndol 

3122 inland Gas 
21300 Inti Thom 
4231 Inlpr Ploo 
4580 1 vocoB 
Z40B Jonnedt 
1500 Kam Kalla 

5297 Kerr Add 
16251 Laban 
8418 Lac Marls 


S35VS 34 25U1-HL. 

S179* 17V* 17V»— 
S13S. 13 13W+«k 

S6*9 6** 6W+ V. 

S20>« 201*2 S1W 
9151* 75’i >5V.~ 

4191k 19%. 193L— 
S23W J2V» SM— IV* 
417U. 17 17 — H 

51M» IIH ll’A— (* 
ravj BW 8H— 16 
S26W 26'A 26-rt 
56 5to 6 
814 139k IPfc— 'U 

140 135 140 

516%. lttk 1 Mi- 
415 4)5 415 - J 

W4 5V. SU 

517%. I TVS 17VJ— 
SIIHk lOVj KB4 
512 IHfc 1126— V6 
365 255 261 —1 

S2ZH 21 Vs 22 Vs— 

SIFli 15 Vs 15VJ— 
SZOLi J0V4 2«6+y; 

117V. 17 mi 
S26% 26VS 26L. 

*6 IS 61S 61S + Mi 

4ISVJ 15k. 1SV. — (k 
szn 23H 2396+ W 
*30* MW 30 W U. 
533** 33l5i 33W— Vi 
S16Vj 16W lew 
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S17W 16*6 16*6— 
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274 265 2*9 +7 

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SI TV; 17V, 17V. 

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305 305 300 —5 

275 275 775 -20 

81516 149* 15V. + W 

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2S5 2S5 255 

838 273* 2736 

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STB* FSVj 189* + 
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26S 265 265 —10 

571** 3M6 21K 
512 11U, 13 

SIB IB 18 

sa 20 20 + 

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59 (* Me 9<* 

240 238 238 -4 
810% »l* 101*— lb 
85'6 5 SVa 

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817 1646 17 — 4k 

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836 LL Loc 
3120 LObiow Co 
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37M0 Melon H X 
1479 After land E 
16650Mal9onAI 
386 MO) son B 
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7H72 Moreen 
133612 Mvn AHA I 
127600 NOWSOO W 
14107 NuWst SP A 
2290 Oak wood 
JQOO OshaartJ A l 
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7400 Pine Ptrinl 
975 Place GO a 
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51 00 Qua Stura e 
10200 Ram Pet 
1700 Rav rock t 
6522B RMsath 
30300 RO SlenhsA 
S7290 RokJihola 
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2236 Revn Pm A 
Z3700 Rogers A 
5800 Roman 
3881 Sceptre 
700 scorn i 
17150 Sears Con 
68S53 Shell Can 
21815 Sherrin 
200 Slater B 1 
18007 SaultHTi 
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9779 Sulpt ro 
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22900 Svpnev e 
27700 Ted corn 
51100 Tara 
67179 TeekBt 
5170 Tax Can 
9175 Thom N A 
38374 Tor Dm 5k 
21 10 Tamar Bl 
16770 Traders A I 
3375 T mi Ml 

1100 Trinliv Res 
40693 TmAIIO UA 
123367 TrCan PL 
34965 Trlmoc 
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29800 Turbo 1 
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3M50 Weslmln 
5800 Weston 
1302SWeodwd A 
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*20 an 20 

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485 485 485 

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460 460 460 

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*2916 JBH M +to 
IIS 107 US — 5 
125ft 25ft, JSto- 
81816 18 J0V»+ to 

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55ft 516 5V1- to 

571% 7H n*-« 

53716 31ft 22to+to 

*22 21« ?1 to— JJ 

814H 1A* Kft + to 

173 169 ,tp + 3 

119 110 110 — * 

19 ■* ’ t 

sim jaw i»+ 
86 U> 6ft 6(6+ to 
*19 19 W 

523ft J» 53+jj* 

510ft 10ft 15to+J+ 
S58to 57 S7ft— 
S1» im Tito + to 
5239s 23ft 
254 250 

280 200 
523* ZJft 
31 27 

tOS 188 l— 

819 19 19 -to 

813to lift li ' — ** 
S3« 36 1« - 

554 S3* 53ft- to 

S1PH If , Jfj II 
518ft 18* Tito- " 
*22ft 22ft 22* 

57ft 7ft 7ft 

<45 mo “ 

KOft OT* CT6- * 
sa 22ft 22ft— to 
440 430 440 +5 

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+ 2 


Total saha lM39.3«*ions 

Qua pitdUff 

TSE 300 index: 1jau * 


aiB WtTCMl 


HftB 

64331 Bonk Mori 827ft 

4SQOConB0tb 118ft 

15784 DsttlTxIA 1111* 

. 7900MntTnl SKI* 

188480 NalBkCda 817 

Z4477FawBrC0ra I3W 

4300 RonendA 518ft 

400 RanondB 519 

50809 Royal Bonk 53116 

Total Sales 3,144880 Shares. 


Law daw OO* 

V 27ft ,, 

14** 14ft ♦ * 

nr+to. 

■9 m 31 ; —-to 


industnalc Index: 


IBM 


■ IHJ» 












INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1985 


Page 15 


* * i 


SPORTS 


1 


Sampson Leads KB A Western All-Stars to Victory 



Compiled br Our Staff Frm Dupardies The East Started well OUtrtin- 

INDIANAPOLIS — Julius Er- ning the West in the first six min- 
ving electrified the crowd with a utes while taking a six-point lead- 
cradle dunk. Earvin (Magic) John- Bui the East shot poorly after that, 
son mated a seemingly impossible finishing with a percentage of .408 


There was another injury, minor 
perhaps, but it hurt the East’s cause 
at a crucial point. With about 8 
minutes r emainin g in the game and 
the East trying to mount a come- 


pass and George Gervin hit a 15- after making only 49 of 120 field- back. Larey Bird of the Boston 
foot jumper from the hip. goal attempts. The West hit 56 of Celtics fouled Adrian Dantley of 

There were 21 other players 96 shots for a .583 percentage. the Utah Jazz. As be fell to the 

looking for playing time and mak- The West never trailed after tak- floor, Dantley hit Bird across the 

ing moves usually reserved for the ing a 34-33 lead late in the first bridge of the nose. His nose bleed- 
playgrounds, moves some coaches quarter, although the East man- ing profusely. Bird was taken out of 
might frown on in a game that aged five ties thereafter. The final the game. He returned with 4:35 


mg proi usely, Bird was taken out or. 
the game. He returned with 4:35 
counted. And in the endTlhe West- deadlock was 70-70, but Larry left and the West went ahead. 124- 
em Conference beat the East, 140- Nance of the Phoenix Swib started 1 18. Bird did not score again. 

129, in the National Basketball As- a 24-13 streak with two straight Did the injuries hurt the East's 
sociation’s 35th annual all-star baskets. chances? 

game here Sunday. Sampson completed the run with “1 think Isiah being bun had a 

It was the West's first victory a lay-up for a 94-83 lead with 2:20 tremendous effect on the game," 
after five consecutive losses, and it left in the third period. The closest said Bernard King, the New York 
caroc before the largest NBA crowd the East came after that was 97-93 Knick forward, who scored 13 
ever, 43,146, at the Hoosier Dome, io the first minute of the final quar- points. “I noticed he was very ten- 
Ralph Sampson, Houston’s 7-foot- ter, but Sampson scored the next ladve and be wasn’L putting us fall 
4 (223-meter) center, was crowned two baskets and the East never sen- weight on bis thighs, particularly in 
the star of stars: He scored 24 ously threatened again the fourth quarter." 

points, had 10 rebounds and was □ Pat Riley of the Los A n g el es 

named the game's most valuable Amid all the sensational moves. Lakers, who gained his first victory 
player. there were some anxious moments, in three attempts as the West coa- 

“It was playground gamp, a fun In the second quarter, Isiah Thom- ch, said: “1 think we had the game 
game and I enjoyed playing in it," as, the playmaker for the Detroit pretty much under control in the 
said Sampson, who iut 10 of his 15 Pistons who was having a speciacu- last quaner. Ralph took care of 


left in the third period. The closest said Bernard King, the New York 
the East came after that was 97-93 Knick forward, who scored 13 



the star of stars: He scored 24 
points, had 10 rebounds and was 
named the game's most valuable 
player. 

"It was playground gamp , a fun 
game and I enjoyed playing in it," 
said Sampson, who nit 10 of his 15 


shots from the field. "What I en- lar game, caught a knee to his left 
joyed most was playing with Mag- thigh. 

ic. He has great court awareness." The injury to Thomas, who was 


Sampson, who started at power 
forward and played center for a 
jf while, received 47 votes from the 


making a strong case for being 
named the game's MVp for the 
second year in a row, happened 


last quaner. Ralph took care of 
that with his three or four dunks, 
but I guess any time a coach 
doesn't have Isiah or Bird avail- 
able, you have to say it hurt 
"I know one thing.” Riley added. 
“ICC. was coaching more than I 


press. Johnson, who had 15 assists with about three minutes left be- was down the stretch. He was mak- ^ ^ second consecutive Profes- 


§§§!%, 


and 21 points, received 38 votes. 

The previous high attendance for 
any NBA event was 41, 163 on Feb. 


fore halftime when he intercepted a 
pass from Johnson intended for 
Gervin. Thomas, who scored 17 of 


The Aeoadsd haa 

Mark O'Meara: 1 was determined not to let tins tournament get away from me.* 

O’Meara Wins 2d Straight PGA Event 

Compiled by Our Staff Fran Dispatches “Gosh but he’s playing well.** the 15th and eight feet on the 16th. 
HONOLULU— Marie O’Meara O’Meara, the winner of last week’s But after Siadlers round-closing 
wem his second consecutive Profes- Bing Crosby National Pro-Am, be- birdie, O’Meara ran in his long putt 


ing changes, looking for quick- sional Golfers Association tour vie- came the firet man to win consecu- on the 17th and had the lead for 
ness -' tory Sunday, a one-shot triumph in dve tour titles since GO Morgan good. He played the 18th in routine 

Jones said: “The game was one ^ Hawaiian Open, when his deci- woa the first two events of 1983. par. 


dome. The previous all-time hig h 
for an all-star game was 31,745 m 
_ . , 0 1979 at the SOverdome in Pontiac. 

Rstyh Sampson: 24 ponds, 10 rebounds and *a Ml day’s work. Michigan. 

Leafs Post a Rare Home-Ice Triumph 


4. 1969, for a regular-season dou- his 22 pain is in the first half, kept of those situations where you can jjve pressure putt an the 17th bole • O’Meara won this one with a 69 WiUl O’Meara homing a four- 

ble-header at the Houston Astro- playing and hit a 3-point shot that do a halfway job on Kareem Abd- pm end to Craig Stadler's come- over the final 18 holes and a 267 sh°l lead at the start of play, only 

dome. The previous all-time high lied the score at halftime. ul-Jabbar, and that’s a maybe. You back bid. total 21 under nar The virroru Stadler was able to mount a chal- 


The Associated Press goal of the game came 3:38 into Only four of Montreal’s 76 shots 

TORONTO — The Toronto overtime. “We were on a three- during the weekend eluded him 
Maple Leafs solved one of the big- game losing streak c omin g into this He was tested 19 times in Sunday 


link of any bigger lift for us." 
tional Hockey League overtime vie- Elsewhere it was Vancouver 5 ■« xiet 
toty. ’ “Hie : 

The victoiy wasn’t that surpris- acknow 

ing since the Leafs had beaten ' NHL FOCUS made hit 

Montreal 6-4 on Nov. 19 and 6-2i improve 

Saturday night, but it happened on Winnipeg 3; Ptriaddphia 3. the “They k 
the ice that has been a burial New Yon Rangers 2; Los Angeles waves. . 
ground this season for the Norris 4, Pittsbugh 3; Chicago 4, Boston 3, to two.” 
Division club. and Quebec 10, Hartford 4. Berah 


were lied 2-2 after 40 minutes. 
“Die second period was tough.* 


tied tne score at tiau time. uwanoar, ana mat s a mayoe. you back bid. total 21 under par. The victory was Stadler was able to mourn a chal- 

But he was bmptng badly at the ran doahatfwayjob on Magic, and -.™ dealatenish _ a Hitleton worth S90.000 from a total purse of l«ge. Ed fiori, with a par-72 and 

start of the third quarter and thats another maybe. But when . . vSrS.* ,?• attic too , ... n -viJL Larry Mize (a dosing 69) shared 

played only sparingly in the second you get a Ralph Sampson playing iheseason’s money-winning lead al third at 272 five shois off the lead, 

half. K.C. Jones, the East coach, the way he did and a hoi shooting $SSSaSSST^SXS^i Buddy Gardner was next al 

replaced hrmfor good with Sidney George Gervin. that's a bit too had* £> Mnfes andmN 72/273. At 274 were Andy North (a 

Moncnef with 6:38 lefimihe game much to contend with. w? one boeev * 68 ). Dan PohJ (67) and Jim Simons 

and the West ahead by 118-107. Gervin. the San Antonio guard, und« par, ^it O Meant sora re- oneoogr* ' 

“Iaah wanted to stay out there,” missed only twice in 12 attempts speeded with his winning 30-foot Stadler was six strokes behind O’Meara, 28, is a former national 
said Jones, who lost Tor the first from the field and had 23 points. tardie P utL O Meara going into Sunday s play u^^ur champion and was the 

time in three appearances as an all- But the victory belonged primar- “I knew Craig was coming at me. but made a gallant bid, starting his pq A tour’s rookie of the year in 

siar, “bull thought it would be best fly to Sampson. I knew he was making the putts and final _ round eagje-btrdie-birdie and j 981. The following season he hit a 

if be sat down. Why take a chance “He did a full day’s work," said when he gets it going ne can make a finishing birdie-bixdi e-birdie. His s him p but last year won his first 

that he may hurt himself more?" Jones. “He came down on the fast lot of putts," O’Meara said. 20-under 268 total made him the _ ro wa5 jgcond five times, had 

In the dressing room after the break and hit the boards." “I was determined not to let this runner ‘ u P for the second time this {5 finish es in the top 10 and was 

game, Thomas, waiting for the “He was head and shoulders tournament get away from me. On season - only to Tom Watson on the 

trainer to remove his bandage, above most of the players when the the 17th. I was determined I wasn’t As Stadler was playing the 18th, earnings list with $465,873. 


Stadler was six suokes behind O’Meara, 28, is a former national 
O Meara going into Sunday s play ^ champion and was the 
but made a gallant bid, starting his pq A tour * s ^ of the year in 


But the victory belonged primar- “I knew Craig was coming at me. but made a gallant bid, starting his pq A tour » s r0 okie of the year in 
MO Sampson. I knew he was making the putts and final^roundeagje-birdje-birdie and ] 98 1 . The following season he hit a 

“He did a Tun day’s work,” said when he gets it going be can make a finishing binhe-bixdi e-birdie. His sJumPi but last year won his first 
•nes. “He came down on the fast lot of putts." O’Meara said. 20-under 268 total made him the ^ was five times, had 
eak and hit the boards." “I was determined not to let this n^mer-up for the second time this [5 finish es in the top 10 and was 

“He was head and shoulders tournament get away from roe. On season - second only to Tom Watson on the 


_____ rA/tf r A UWIUUIUUb, UV LU }JUjr T UUl Lilt Wd 

NHL FOCI'S made his 14th consecutive start and made the right dec 

unproved his record to 7-5-2. cared enough ab< 
Winnipeg 3; Ptriaddphia 3. the “They kept coining and coming in have hurt it more. 
New York Rangers 2; Los Angeles waves. . . . The key was keeping it 


trainer to remove his bandage, above most of the players when the the 17th, I was determined I wasn’t As Stadler was playing the 18th, earnings list with $465,873. 

said: “K.C. sat me down. 1 wanted game was on the line," said Riley going to let that putt be short. I was O’Meara, on the par- 3 191-yard “There’s always a little bit of 

10 play, but the way it feels now, he after Sampson scored 1 1 of his 24 goin g to be sure to get it to the No. 17, had been giving every indi- luck involved," he said. “Last year, 

made the right decision. I'm glad he points in the fourth quarter. “He’s hole" be said He got Uto the hole, cation of crumbling. He had some of those seconds could have 

cared enough about me. I could' a great young player and will get and in iL opened the door to Stadler’s bid by been wins. This year, the luck is on 

have hurt it more." nothing but better." (NYT, A?) “Mark's on a roll” Stadler said, missing birdie putts of three feet on my side." (AP. UPI) 


Division club. and Quebec 10, Hartford 4. Bernhardt and Montreal goal- SCUKEdOAKD 

rrSagCTM 5^fi — 

MyC.si'.l.ford^ National Hockey Leagne Standby 


SCOREBOARD 

Hockey 


over the Canadians was Toronto's fmm the slot by Guy Cartonnem. 

second mils last 10ganu»al Maple - ^ attack. tf “ 1 Vaive for ihe wn- 

Leaf Gardens and only its sixth m 6 ner. 

28 outings this season. Since fillin g in for Rick Sri Croix, The victory moved Toronto to 

“We had to get something going, who was injured Jan. 9. Bernhardt within eight points of fourth-place 
we had to turn it around," said has given Toronto solid and some- Detroit for the final division play- 
captain Rick Vaive, whose second times spectacular goaltending, off spoL 


Basketball 

NBA All-Star Box Score Selected U.S. College Conference Standings 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick DivWcn 


Mancini: Still Life, Still Questions 



w 

1 L 

T 

PIS 

GF 

GA 

Washington 

34 

14 

• 

» 

237 

163 

Philadelphia 

31 

16 

7 

69 

227 

170 

N.Y. Islanders 

X 

22 

3 

63 

253 

215 

N.Y. Ranger* 

17 

29 

9 

43 

191 

225 

Pltlshurgn 

18 

29 

5 

41 

186 

238 

New Jersey 

17 29 7 41 

Adam (Nvistoa 

183 

211 

Buffalo 

27 

15 

12 

66 

202 

152 

Montreal 

27 

19 

ID 

64 

214 

117 

Queoec 

26 

23 

8 

60 

2Z3 

199 

Baslon 

25 

24 

7 

57 

209 

199 

Hartford 

17 

30 

6 

40 

110 

241 


By Michael Katz 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Life goes on, 
although sometimes, Ray Man- 
cini thinks, life should have inri- 
taied art and he should have quit 
after winning the title. At least, it 
would have saved him hundreds 
of punches, long weeks away 
from his family and the an guish 
over killing a man in the ring. 

On Saturday. 16 days before 
his 24th birthday, Mancini will 
defy his critics and try to win 
back the title from Livings lone 
Bramble, who brutally captured 
it last June with a 14th- round 
knockout. 

“He doesn’t need this any- 
more," warned Bob Arum, who 
until now had promoted all of 
Mancini ’s tide bouts. “He’s tak- 
en too many punches." 

Mancini wonders if be really 
needed it after winning the title 
in the first place, certainly after 
insuring that his family would 
live comfortably ever after. 

There’s enough of the poet in 
the fighter to appreciate that no 
matter how dramatic his career 
has been, everything since win- 
ning the title is somehow anucli- 
mactic. Hollywood sees it that 
way, too. 

The Hollywood ending of 
Mandni’s boxing career came in 
ibe middle, when he won the 
World Boxing Association light- 
weight title in celebration of his 
father, Lenny. 

The original Boom Boom 
Mancini had been a No. 1 con- 
tender, but World War II came 
along and he never got ihe title 


shot Ray Mancmi dedicated his Alexis Aiguello such a good fight 
career to winning that title, and for the WBC title. 


CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 
Harris Division 


that’s where the television story 
of his career ends. The movie, 
named “1 Walk in His Shadow,” 


After becoming champ, Man- 
cini looked good against only Er- 
nesto Espafia of Venezuela, a 


after the poem the 14-year-old worn out former champion, and 
youngster wrote about his father, Bobby Chacon, a faded frather- 
is planned by CBS for airing on weight Although such mediocri- 
June 16, Father’s Day. ties as Kim and Orlando Romero 


By that time, Mancini may were rated No. 1 by the WBA, 
well have written another ending Mancini was carefully steered 
to his boxing career. “Win, lose dear of the lightweight divirion's 
or anything," he said the other better fighters. 


SI. Louis 

25 

19 

10 

60 

2 D3 

201 

Chicago 

25 

2* 

3 

53 

211 

115 

Minnesota 

16 

29 

10 

42 

187 

223 

Detroit 

16 

31 

9 

<1 

203 

255 

Toronto 

13 25 7 

Smvthe Division 

33 

171 

237 

Edmonton 

40 

10 

4 

8a 

283 

185 

Calgary 

28 

21 


63 

256 

220 

Winnipeg 

28 

23 

6 

62 

246 

249 

Los Angeles 

24 

22 

10 

58 

2SD 

237 

Vancouver 

16 

33 

8 

40 

194 

291 


SUNDAY'S RESULTS 

2 4 4— H 


Dhieenjmi.Tlppori |4l. Fenton 11). Sluts on 
goal; Quebec ton Millen 1 9-10-9 — 28; Hartford 
-ton Sevtgny) $-12-6—24. PC 

Boston . . ... I I 1— J Oanttev 

Chicago 2 1 i—« Sampson 

Fraser (jpt. Frawley (21, Lormor 1341, Lv- Aixtut-Jbbr 
sJak IT2I; Crowder 123], Middleton (If». EJotmson 
Lufeowtcti (7>. Shots on goal: Boston ton Ban- Gervin 
nermann) 1-1H3— 77; Chicago (on Keans! 13- Enoltah 
6-11—30. Nixon 

Vancouver 2 I 2— S Nonce 

Winnipeg 3 9 •— I Blackmon 

LUOUI HOI. Lemov 117). Tanll I2S). Grodln 
CTO), K Irian (101; Mullen 2 (23). Steen (251. '* att 
Shots oa goal: Vancouver (on Hayward) 109- otaluwun 
V— 20; Winnipeg (an Brodeur) 21 -IB- IS— 5L Tom Rfandi 
UY. Rangers 0 I 1—2 Totals 

PBUadelubla 1 1 1—3 

Mark Howe (WLToeeftet (111. Smith (TO); 

Simddram 112). Ruatiolalnsn (16). 5hats en FG 

goal; New York (on Undberon) S-U-13— 34; Ervlng 
PNkxMptila (on Vanblesbrouck) 9-11-13—32. Bird 
Montreal 0 2 0 0—2 Molone 

Tortola 2 0 0 1-3 Thomas 

Vaive 2 (27). Anderson (15) .-Tremblay (20). Jordan 
McPnee (101. Shots on goal; Montreal (on Rlcfurdson 
Bern ho ran H 1-130—0; Toronto (on Pen- Parish 
nev) 8-2-60 — 1*. King 

Los Aeoetts 2 0 3-4 Moncriel 

PHtsbwgb 1 2 0-3 Cummings 

N Mulls 2 137), Dionne (331. Tavlor (7)j D-iohnson 


{AT INDIANAPOLIS) 


Tern Rbnds 
Totals 


WEST 
FT FTA 

R 

A PF PTS 


Conference All Gomes 
W L Pel. W L Pd. 

2 

6 

6 

A 

2 

1 

4 

10 

5t. John's 

11 

0 

1JXXJ 

19 

1 

.950 

10 

15 

4 

6 

10 

1 

5 

24 

Georgetown 

8 

2 

-800 

21 

2 

.913 

5 

10 

1 

2 

6 

1 

5 

11 

Vilkmova 

7 

4 

-636 

15 

6 

714 

7 

14 

7 

0 

5 15 

2 

21 

Syracuse 

6 

4 

ADO 

16 

4 

JM 

10 

12 

3 

4 

3 

1 

2 

23 

Pittsburgh 


5 

-500 

14 

7 

-667 

0 

3 

0 

0 

2 

1 

1 

0 

Boston CoiL 

5 

6 

ASS 

16 

6 

.727 

5 

7 

1 

2 

2 

0 

0 

11 

Connecticut 

4 

7 

JA4 

9 

11 

450 

7 

a 

2 

2 

5 

0 

s 

16 

Providence 

2 

9 

.182 

9 

15 

J75 

7 

14 

1 

2 

3 

2 

1 

15 

Selon Hall 

0 

11 

-000 

9 

12 

-409 


W. Kentucky 
N.C Charlotte 


SMU 

Texas asm 


n 21 41 52 32 a 140 


EAST 

FG PGA FT FTA R A PF PTS 

5 15 2 2 4 3 3 12 

6 16 S 4 8 2 3 21 

2 10 3 4 12 1 4 7 

i 2 14 1 1 2 5 2 22 

2 234 424 7 

Ison 2 8 1 2 2 1 3 5 

2 5 0 0 6 1 0 4 

4 10 1 2 7 1 5 13 


SOUTHEASTERN R| a 

Conference All Games Bovlor 
W L PCI. W L PCI. 

Florida I 4 Ml 14 5 JO 

Georgia 8 4 ia 16 5 .762 

Kentucky 8 4 467 13 8 A19 Temple 

L5U ISJUHTifl w . Virginia 

Mbs. SI. 7 S 50 11 10 SU 5 L Joseph’s. 

Alabama 4 6 J0 D 14 7 jJ 47 Geo. Woshngtn 

Auburn 6 6 J00 14 7 467 Massachusetts 

Tennessee 6 6 .500 15 9 .625 Rutgers 

Mississippi 3 10 231 9 12 .429 St. Bonovenhir 

Vanderbilt 1 11 -M3 B U J81 pem St. 


3 7 J00 12 11 J22 

0 II jm 4 20 .147 

SOUTHWEST 

Centercnce All Games 
WL Pel. W L Pel. 

8 ) NO It 4 411 

7 3 JOB 15 06 .714 

7 4 434 16 09 *40 

4 S 445 14 9 408 

6 4 400 14 07 Jib 

S 6 .456 13 09 J91 

5 6 .454 12 09 StO 

2 9 .180 09 12 ATS 

1 8 .111 08 12 .400 

ATLANTIC 10 

Conference All Gomes 
WL Pet. W L Pci. 
11 I .917 17 3 JS0 

10 2 J33 14 7 MJ 

8 4 447 12 I 400 

7 5 -583 12 9 -571 

7 5 -583 11 10 J24 

4 6 J00 11 10 524 


2 ■ 3—4 Moncriel 
1 3 g 3 Cummings 


5 4 1 IB 
7 0 1 17 


day from Reno, where he will 
face Bramble, “this could be it I 
may peak out after this fight or I 


It didn’t matter. The sweetness 
of what the TV boys call his 
“storyline" and his bqy-nexx- 


a 4 4—18 Nkholls 2 IJ7), Dionne (331. Taylor (7); D-lohnson 

Hartford 13 0—4 Young 2 131). Kelly (6). Shots aa goal: Las Loimbeer 

Ashton 2 120), Maxwell 15). Goulet 2 131). Anoeles (on Romano) 7-4-13—21; Pittsburgh Tern Rbnas 

Hunter (M). A. Stostnv 2 (31), A. Cote 2 (lOJi (an Eliot) f-10-7— 36. Totals 


may not The bottom line is door earnestness, combined with 

whether I want to dedicate my- bong an aggressive crowd-pleas- 
self anymore to boxing. My forte er in the ring, made Mancini one 
is my intensity and my desire, of boxing’s biggest stars. Then 
Without it. I'm mediocre at best- came Bramble, an unorthodox 
HI be the first to admit that,” counterpuneber who has feasted 
He said he wonders whether on fighters with Manoni’s style, 
the intensity and the desire a bat- “Bramble had a man in front 

ed after winning the title in May of him who couldn’t have been 



. C-' -r.T i 


1982. “Sure," he concluded. “Ev- 
erything else was anticlimactic." 


better for Mm had he drawn him 
on a designing board." said Mort 


If you put it on a scale, that shartrik, the CBA adviser who 
i 150 percent," he said, “al- was instrumental in making 


was 150 percent," he said, “al- 
though I think I was at least 100 
percent for my other fights. 


was instrumental in making 
Mancini a television attraction. 
Mancini said he would not 



Mancini, taking it on the nose from Bramble last June. 


“There was always something change his style. He said he was 
to be up for." And down. Life “weak" for the first fight because 
goes on, but not always happily, he had overtrained. Chuck Fa- 
Six months after the TV mov- gan, an old friend who is also his 
ie’s happy ending, in his second assistant trainer, said Mancini 
defease, Mancini administered was “mentally lackadaisical." 
fatal blows to Duk Koo Kim of Bui Fagan said “the old fire is 
South Korea. He said be had back for this fight He wants this 
overcome that trauma, but his guy and he wants his title bade." 
boxing performances since win- Lou Duva, Bramble's manag- 
nin g the title tacked his earlier er, has publicly warned his man 
intensity, when he defeated Jos£ that Manani will be “fighting for 
Luis Ramirez of Mexico, now the his life as a fighter." 

World Boxing _ Council tight- “That’s not tnie,” said Man- 
weight champion, and gave cini. “Whatever I’ve accom- 
plished is history. They can’t 
take that away. We’re going to 
brat this kid. I feel the enthusi- 
asm back, but this isn't as big a 
.fight as when I won the tide from 
Art Frias. 

“When I fought Frias, I felt 
that if I didn’t win the title then. 
I’d never gel another chance. 
That was a do-or-die fight- This 
isn’t. But it’s easy to get up for 
redemption. The last eight 
months. I’ve had io live with the 
hurt, the disappointment.'' 

Mancini could be fighting Tor 
a sequel. Sylvester Stallone 
bought the movie rights to his 
life after the Frias fight A vic- 
tory Saturday, Mancini said, 
“could be the end of Pan II." 

Boxing, movies, it’s the same. 
Mancini said. 

“Frankie Avalon's a friend of 
mine," he said, “He told me that 
when you do movies, you leave a 
chunk of your lire behind. And 
it’s the same thing with fighters. 
See. if f beat this guy, ihe ques- 
tion is. am I willing to pay the 
n> Aoocucd Am dues again. This is what I don't 
se from Bramble last June, know nght now ." 


Hunter (14). A. stostnv 2 I31LA. Cote 2 (10): (on Eliot) 9-10-7-36. Totals 49 128 38 37 73 34 29 129 

wed 48 28 29 43— MB 

Eat 35 33 34 37—129 

Tttree-palnt goals; Thomas 3. 

Tcdnlcds — None. 

Attendance— 43,146. 

ALL-STAR GAME RESULTS 

1951— EOSl 111, Wes) 94 

1952— East H8. West 91 

1953— West 79, East 75 

1954— East 98. West 93. OT 

1955— East loo. West 91 

1956— West 106. East «4 

1957— Cost 109, West 97 

1958— Eos* 130. West 118 

1959— Wnsl 124. East 108 
1WO— East 125, WkbI 115 
1961 we st 153. East 131 
1963-West 150, Eos) 130 

1963— East IIS, Wes) 108 

1964— EOS) 111. West 107 

1965— East 124, Wes) 123 
1964— East 137, west 94 
1967 — West 13L East 120 

1966— East 144 west 124 
1969— Eos) m west 112 
1976— East 142. west 135 
1971— west TO East 107 

1973 — Weal 112, East 110 

* 1973— East 104 west 84 

1974— wm 134 Eon 123 

1975— East TO West 102 

1976— East 123, west 109 

1977— West 125, East 124 
1976-East 133, West T2S 
1979— West 134 East 129 
>980— East 144 west 136. OT 
1981— East 123. West 120 
1983-East 12 a West 1)8 

Th.AmnMdFVw IW-EOSl TO West 123 

Brent Ashton, here musding past defenseman Ulf Samuels- to eS m OT 

son (5) and putting the puck past goalie Greg MBlen, scored 

twice Sunday night in Quebec's 10-4 thrashing of Hartford. College Top-20 Results 

Hew The Associated Press t*o-x college 

— tsAdMI teams fared last week: 

If No. 1 SL Jobn'i (19-1) del. Selon Hall 87-76; 

LrOll dot- Villa nevo 7668. 

• - - Ns. 1 Georgia an (21.21 det. Florida Samtv- 

■, n .. . ‘N OPEN Joy DelskTO. J13JM0 6969-7166—275 "’ll. 36tef£titeSt! (S-^MiSto Karwai7S71. 

Toe finishers and sanies la tba Hawaiian Fred Couglss. S13JM0 67-716966— 275 Me. 4 souttwm Mefbodlst (164) last to Ar- 


VanderWIt 1 11 XB3 8 13 J81 Perm St. 

ATLANTIC COAST Duaucsns 

Conference All Games Rhode island 
W L Pd. W L Pet 
Georgia Tech 7 3 J08 18 4 <18 

N. Carolina 5 3 .625 18 S 783 

Maryland 5 3 625 19 7 .731 otHSwma 

Duke 6 4 600 17 4 410 Kansas 

N. Carol bio SL 5 4 -554 14 7 .667 Iowa St. 


5 -583 11 10 J24 

6 J00 11 10 524 

8 133 10 11 AM 

9 JSO 7 13 JS> 

9 350 7 14 333 

1 X83 7 14 333 


3 1 JM 7 13 JS> 

3 9 350 7 14 J33 

1 11 XB3 7 14 333 

BIG EIGHT 

Conference All Games 
w L Pci. W L Pet. 
8 0 1X00 19 4 X26 

7 1 X75 20 4 X33 


Wake Forest 

Oemson 

Virginia 


Michigan 

lowa 

Illinois 

Michigan SL 

Purdue 

Ohio St. 

Indiana 

Minnesota 

Wisconsin 

Northwestern 


4 5 .444 13 8 .619 Nebrasko 

3 6 333 13 8 j 619 Missouri 

I 8 .111 12 11 SO Oklahoma St. 

BIG TEN Colorado 

Conference All Games Kansas St. 


W L Pd. W 
9 2 X18 18 3 457 

8 2 X00 19 4 326 

6 5 545 18 

6 5 545 15 

6 5 345 15 

6 5 345 U 


4 4 300 14 7 .667 

4 4 300 14 9 Mt 

2 6 350 II 10 324 

2 6 .250 B 13 381 

1 7 .125 10 II .476 

MID-AMERICAN 

Conference All Gomes 


5 545 18 7 J2B Ohio U. 

5 545 15 6 J14 Miami, ONo 

5 JS45 15 6 JI4 Toledo 

5 345 U 6 300 Kent St. 

5 -545 14 7 467 E. Michigan 

6 400 11 9 350 w. Michigan 

9 .182 11 10 524 Boll SI. 


2 9 .182 II 10 524 

1 10 X91 5 16 338 


1 10 X91 5 16 338 N . Illinois 

:iFlC 18. Bowl Ino Green 

Conference All Games cent. MJchign 


-Pel. W L Pd. 

Southern Cal 9 2 713 IS 5 JV3 

Arizona 8 3 327 17 6 739 

Oregon St. 7 3 700 17 4 310 Tulsa 

Washington 7 4 336 16 7 696 Wichita Si. 

Arizona St. 6 5 345 11 18 524 Creighton 

UCLA 6 5 545 9 II 450 Illinois St. 

Oregon 3 7 300 10 13 435 Bradley 

Californio 3 8 373 11 ID 524 Indiana SI. 

Washington SI. 3 8 373 11 10 5Z4 Drake 

Stanford 2 9 .182 10 11 476 S. Illinois 

METRO ATHLETIC W. Texas SI. 

Conference All Games ___ 


W L Pet. 

11 1 517 

9 3 .750 

■ 4 367 

7 5 583 

6 6 500 

6 6 300 

S 7 417 
4 B 333 
2 10 .167 
2 10 .167 


1 .917 17 4 X10 

3 .750 14 7 467 

4 467 13 8 4)9 

5 583 12 9 571 

6 500 12 9 571 

6 300 11 10 524 

7 417 9 12 429 


MISSOURI VALLEY 

Conference All Games 


W L Pd. W 
9 2 418 IB 

9 2 410 13 

8 3 327 19 

7 3 .700 17 

5 5 300 12 

4 7 364 11 

3 B 373 11 11 500 

2 9 .182 10 12 455 

2 ID .167 9 13 409 





Mem oh Is Si. 
Virginia Tech 

Cincinnati 
S. Carolina 
Tulane 
S. Mississippi 

Louisville 

Florida St. 


Aki.-Birm, 
vcl Common. 
Old Dominion 
Jacksonville 
S. Florida 
S. Alabama 


w L Pet. W 
7 1 575 17 

7 2 378 16 

6 3 467 13 » Sn 

4 4 500 12 8 400 


PACIFIC COAST ATHLETIC 

Conference All Gomes 


9 jfj Nev- Las Vegas 

a _yjQ Fresno Si. 

9 jn Fullerton Sf. 

is jii Cat-Santa Brh 

.. m Utah Si. 


4 5 444 12 9 571 , r " T 

3 6 333 7 15 318 “™* a 

2 6 350 11 It 300 Jf™ *!• 

1 7 .125 8 12 400 Cnt-I rw Ine- 


SUM BELT 

Conference AM Games f° 7 . 


N. Mexico SI. 
Lang Bed) SI. 


HAWAIIN OPEN 

Ten finishers and earnigs In Ike Hawaiian 
Open golf toomoment, which ended Sunday 
on me tn4*ord. par-72 woialae Country 
CUM course le Honolulu; 

Mark O'Meara. *90000 67 46 6509-107 

Crolg Stadler. SS4400 68-70-6644— 2&S 

Ed FlorL *39 mo 68-6867-69—272 

Lorry Mize. 529400 67-67-69-69-272 

Buddy Gardner, *20000 69-70-65-69—773 

Dan Pohl. *16550 6268-72-67—274 

Andy North. *16550 6667-73-48—274 

Jim Simons. *16.750 68-666872—274 


Jov Del Una. iiioao 
Fred Couples. *13500 
Sasft Simpson, 513400 
Larry Nelson. *11000 
Howard Twtfty, SI 0500 
George Burns, *8-750 
Lon Hinkle. SL750 
Ron Slrecfc. S8JS0 
Mike Smith. *8750 
Hal Sutton, *4500 
Andv Bean. SUN 
Brett Upper, *4500 
J.C. Snead. *4500 


69-49-71-44 — 275 
67-716861— 275 


66687871-275 kansas 6866; lost to North Carolina SI. 82-78 American International 70. Bryan! 6* 
OT. Bentley 69. Assumption 64 


w l Pd. w L Pa. . 

9 1 .900 21 5 400 LBno St ' 

8 2 400 18 4 318 WE! 

8 3 .727 14 B 436 

5 6 455 13 10 565 

5 444 14 7 467 Texos El Paso 

6 400 12 10 545 San Diego St. 

New Mexico 
Brieham Yono 
Wyoming 

mege Scores fiS 0 * *’■ 

EAST Hawaii 

mat 70. Brvanl as Air Force 


W L Pet. ' 
11 1 517 

9 2 JIB 

I 4 467 
7 S 383 
6 6 300 

6 A 300 
6 7 462 

3 9 350 
3 9 350 

1 II 483 


1 517 18 3 J57 

2 J18 14 6 J00 

4 467 12 9 571 

5 383 11 10 524 

6 300 13 9 591 

A 300 11 12 478 

7 462 11 11 300 

9 350 7 14 J33 


WESTERN ATHLETIC 

Conference All Games 


W L Pet. 

10 2 -833 18 < .750 

9 3 550 18 5 JB3 

B 4 467 IS 8 .652 

7 5 383 13 10 365 

6 6 300 13 10 365 

4 A 400 >2 10 545 

5 7 417 ID 14 417 

3 9 -250 7 IS JIB 

0 10 mo 5 IS 350 

IVY LEAGUE 

C o n f erence All Games 


Selected College Scores 


N°.S (Mke 117-4) del. Harvard 1251; lost to Hamilton 66. Lehman 63 
P«°n»lQ Tech 81-7!; deL MarySOOd 7062. st. John Ftaher S3. Adolph) 63 

4 syrnewo (164) last to Boston College Mom, ^ willtan* Bi 


t**9-7£4S—Zn £7-66; def. Notre Dame 6562. 
6769-70-71—277 m. 7 Oklahoma 11861 def. Nebraska 83-74; 

66-71-7368—278 M Kamos SI. 81-75. 


Utica SL 99. Skidmore 77 
SOUTH 

Georgia Tech 91 Wake Fores! 75 


Na.lMlddg«i (18-3) def. Purdue 95-84; def. North Carallno 7*. Louisiana St. 70 
72-70 68 68 —37 8 Illinois 57-45. SOUTHWEST 

7168-7167— 278 Ho. » ItHne H 1 18-7) tot lo Michigan St. 64-56; Texas 66. Rice 66 


Tennis 

International Players Championships 


(At Delrov Beodk Florida) 


Third Round 

Jan Gmtnarteon, Sweden, def. Jonathon 
Canter, 26. 6-3, 6-4; Brad Dyke, Austral la. def. 
Tim Wilkfson. 7-5. 7-5: Mats WHonder (2). 
Sweden, do). Bob Gram. 61 46. 66: Tank 
Benhamies. France, def. Marian Valda 
Czechoslovak in. 5-7.6J.6I: Hm Mayotte det. 
Marl* Da vi* 66.66; Mike Leach del. Jimmy , 
Ar^s 1101.76 (0-71. 63. Vita* Geiulalhs ( 12} 
del. .van Miicnrii. 64. t J. c-ree Holmes oei 
Aaron Kncisiein iSi. 7-fr lB6i 7-t I’ 'i 


WOMEN 
Third Round 

Kathy RinoWI del. Zina Garrison (81,7-5,6 


lost to Mlchtgon 5765, 

No. « Georgia Tech (186) det. Duke 81-71; 
def. Wake Forest 84-75. 

No. II Nevada-Lax Vegas (163) det. Pacific 
P7-72; last to Fresno St. 6352. 

No. 12 lewd (196) def. Minnesota 786& 
No. 18 Kadsai (2(M) def. Coloraito 8869; def. 
Oklahoma SL 8473; det. Memphis St. 75-71. 

No. W Loots ta no Tech (20-21 dot. Northeast 
Louisiana 7363: del. TeKS-Arllngton 8661; 
def. North Texas Sf. 90-72. 


Texas Tech 91. Houston 80 


Harvard 

Pennsvlvanla 

Cornell 

Columbia 

Brown 

Princeton 

Yale 

Dartmouth 


2 467 10 8 356 

3 300 7 10 412 

4 429 7 13 558 


INDEPENDENTS 


Transition 


HOCKEY 

Notfoaoi Hockey League 
BUFFALO— Annouiced that Mike Rom- 
sev. defenseman, will replace Bill Hall, de- 


li Andrea Temesvori 1 13I, Hungary, det- Lea 73; del. Louisiana St. 75-70. 


Ha. IS North CmdEea I IBS) del. Virginia 82- fenseman. In me NHL oll-sier game. 


Anlonoplls, 62. 7-5. 

Fourth Round 

Barbara Palter (12) def. Lilian Dresdier. 


No. M Or e go n St (176) lost to Southern Cali- 
fornio 60-58; def. O r ego n 53-51. 

No. T7 Tubs (1061 last le Illinois ». 73-72. 


SwluertarxL2-6.6l.6-0: Chris Even Llovd (2) 20T; def. Wlchllo St. 07-75. 


del. Kotny Jordan (91.64.66; Carling Bassett 
doi. Canada, def. Gonrleta Satwimi. Ar genii - 
no. 60. 66; Betrlno Bunge. West Germany. 


Hartford— R ecalled Paul Fenton, tor- 
from Binghamton of the Americui 
Hockey Leoeue. 

MINNESOTA— Announced that Sieve 
Pavne. left whig, will rftMace Tony McKeg- 


Na.U Do Pout (154) lost to Dayton 67-63; nov. forward, in the ollslar game. 


del. Peoeerdine 90-65. 

No. if VHIoaeva ( 1561 def. Connecticul 79- 


dei Pam CaSOle (Ui. 62. 2-6. f-S; Morllna 71: lost W SI. John s 7066. 
Navrotllovo (1) del. Colarino LindaviS) US). No. 29 Maryland (19-71 del.i 
Sweden. 6*. 3-6. 64. 75 : def. Woke Forest 64-62 . k 


COLLEGE 

VANDERBILT— Named Ro* Gregory de- 
fensive line coach. 


No. 29 Maryland 110-71 del. Old Dominion 47- WEST GEORGIA— Nomed Frank vonun 

75 : def. Woke Forest 64-62 . fast io Duke 70-62. laofbaii coach. V0Bun 



w 

L 

Pel. 

Davton 

16 

5 

.762 

DePaul 

IS 

6 

JU 

Noire Dome 

13 

6 

A84 

Marquette 

11 

7 

650 

SW Louisiana 

)6 

9 

640 

Radford 

14 

8 

636 

TenBS-San Antnio 

12 

8 

600 

UHco 

13 

9 

J91 

Chicago SI. 

12 

10 

-545 

Pan American 

10 

10 

.500 

Brooklyn 

10 

11 

676 

Stetson 

10 

12 

655 

E. Washington 

9 

14 

391 

Boon*) 

8 

>3 

-381 

New Orleans 

8 

16 

333 

Cent. Florida 

7 

15 

J>8 

Tennessee SI. 

7 

15 

J18 

Florida A&.Vt 

6 

ta 

273 

Augusta 

5 

17 

727 

Campbell 

3 

18 

Ui 










Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1985 


ART BUCHWATX) 

Flushing Out an Overrun 


St. Patrick’s March; A Woman Marshal? 


W ASHINGTON — It’s amaz- 
ing. but all the cost overrun 


VV mg. but all the cost overrun 
scandalsat the Pentagon have to do 
with small items, ana not big ones. 
First it was the 5400 hammer, then 
the S7.900 coffeemaker, followed 
by the S 16.400 refrigerator — and 
last week, the S640 flying toilet 
seat. 

That's what Lockheed Aircraft 
charged the F 


encounter. We tested it in two crash 
landings and it didn’t have a crack 
in it” 


By William E Gdsr 

Hem York Tuna Scrvicr 


PEOPLE 

Lefty Bags $136,700 


N EW YORK — Mrs. Cudahy’s teacups 
are delicate, fine bone china in a dainty 


U.S. Navy for ? 
each one it in- 
stalled in its P3 
Orion subma- 
rine-hunting air- 
plane. The press 
instantly 
dubbed ii “Toi- 
let gate.” and the 
revelation 
couldn't have 
come at a worse 



“That's not the point If you 
overcharge us for a BiNuptial 
cruise dictator no one is going to 
question it If you bun a few thou- 
sand bucks in the Gaffney flick 
switch, or a Dalmane synthesizer, 
Congress mil never find iL And if 
you want to up the price on a flan- 
gje Dip thong Upsurge, well look 
the other way. But the American 
taxpayer knows what toilet covers 
cost. Besides, the reason ibis whole 
thing broke is a small contractor 
claims he could make the same seat 
for £200.” 


Bndnrald 


tune. When the seat was displayed 
by Senator W illiam V. Roth Jr. of 
Delaware, all hell broke loose in the 


Defense Department Cap Wein- 
berger was having enough trouble 


berger was having enough trouble 
defending his budget on The Hill, 
and he was in no mood to justify 
the cost of plumbing fixtures on a 
Navy aircrafL 


“They all say that until they try 
to buQd one. It’s not jost the seat 
but the research and development 
that went into it We had to build a 
special simulator to make sure it 
would hold up at 40,000 feet" 
“Why didn’t you add those costs 
on to the Septum Firth chronome- 
ter? We could have absorbed them 
there." 

"Because $640 is peanuts in a 


floral pattern —a lot more durable than they 
look, die noted, and just as Irish as could be, 
made in Ireland and spotting a pattern called 
"All the Flowers That Bloom in Ireland.” 

Dorothy Hayden Cudahy is a soft-spoken 
Irish grandmother from Queens who wants to 
be grand marshal of the St Patrick’s Day 
Parade, and she wants to be the grand mar- 
shal of the parade now. 

Mis. Cudahy would be the fust female 
marshal in the 223-year history of the parade, 
and she is meeting great resistance. 

“She can’t do it" the parade chairman, 
Frank Beirne, stated flatly. “Under the rules, 
only a man can lead the parade." 

He mid that marshals frnn to be members 
of the Ancient Order of Hibernians and that 
Mis. Cudahy was only in the Ladies’ Auxilia- 
ry. The choice will be made this week. 

Borne said he thought that Mrs. Cudahy 
should o»1m down, take it easy and wait until 
next year, when, he said , the rules might be 


mtii tirmUirtn-AnUsrr airplane. Sup- 
pose we reduce the pace to $50u? 


Two minutes after the list price 
for the seat surfaced, “general 
quarters" was sounded at the Pen- 
tagon, and everyone grabbed a 
phone. 

Weinberger called the secretary 
of the navy, who called the chief of 
naval operations, who called the 
admiral in charge of aircraft pro- 
curement, who called the captain 
who heads the P3 submarine-hunt- 
er program, who called Lockheed 
Aircraft for an explanation. 

“What the hell are you guys do- 
ing charging us $640 for a toilet 
seat?" he yelled into the phone. 

“We made a slight mistake," the 
Lockheed commode chief said. 
“We should have only billed you 
$554 for each one. We’ll send you a 
rebate in the morning." 


pose we reduce the price to $500? 
well eat the difference.” 

“It's too late. The Navy is think- 
ing of canceling the order for (he 
rest of the planes. If you don't 
come down on those seats, you can 
start closing the assembly line." 


“Okay, give us a figure we can 
ve with." 


live with." 

“We're not going to pay more 
than $100 a seat" 


“You have to be kidding. We 
gave you the plane at cost, but our 
understanding was we could charge 
anything we wanted for (he option- 
al equipment” 


“Our agreement didn't indude 
coffee pots and commodes. One 
hundred dollars or we take the 
whole program over to Grumman 
Aircraft." 


What is the rush, be reasons. Men have 
lead the parade for the last 223 years. 

“Exactly," said Mrs. Cudahy, pleasantly. 

She literally squirms in her dining-room 
chair at the mention of such terms as “ sex- 
ism," “chauvinism” and “feminism." 

“f don't think these men are chauvinists," 
she said. 'They’re just old Irishmen set in 
their ways. 

“I wouldn't call myself a feminist I just 
think the most qualified person should get the 
job. These men are being silly. Come to think 
of it I gpess I am getting annoyed. 

“I do not want to be pushy, but there is no 
reason to wait It seems to me one of our best 
traits as Irish people is speaking up forceful- 
ly." 

“Leading the parade is (be greatest honor 
that could be bestowed on any Irish person." 
said Beirne. 

Mrs. Cudahy imagines it to be a heavenly 
experience. “People who hare done it" she 
said, dreamy-eyea, “say that is is like walking 
on air." 

But she has found that all is not bagpipes, 
bands and balloons in the realm of the St 



Owner ttggn k./Tim Hr* Vcri Tmn 

Dorothy Hayden Cudahy wants to be grand marshal this year. 


Patrick’s Day Parade, which is frequently 
called the largest parade in the United States, 


“Do you know what's going on 

" nr n v A— : 


here in Washington? You ve jeop- 
ardized the entire 5313-billion de~ 


ardized the entire 5313-billion de- 
fense budget You guys must be 
crazy." 

“Now wait a minute. That seat is 
made of fiberglass and plastic and 
will withstand any combat situa- 
tion that the P3 hunter is bound to 


“You have us over a barrel Well 
give it to you at that price but it will 
wipe out our entire profit margin. 
We only make $540 on each plane.’ 


The captain said, “That's your 
problem. I want a telegram on my 
desk about the price redaction by 
this afternoon. If it isn’t here, 
you're going to get a Dear John’ 
letter from me in the morning." 


with 120,000 marchers. 

“Selection of a grand marshal" a parade 
official said, “has become political hardbalL 
This is the essence of the old Boy network. 
The man selected to lead gains celebrity, 
status and power in the Irish community of 
New York and beyond." 

The selection of the grand marshal 
rhanyH from an appointment to an dectioa 
three years ago. Those wishing to be selected 
run advertisements in Irish publications, hold 
fund-raising parties, send out mailings to 


delegates and contact them by telephone, as 
well as seek the endorsements of influential 
Irish people. 

One parade official said he had heard 
someone suggest that “the candidates debate, 
for God’s sake." 

“This is democracy." Beirne said, “The 
American way. But it is pelting carried away. 
Candidates are starting to spend a lot of 
money." 

“I won’t run ads." Mrs. Cudahy said. 
"These people who are delegates know me by 
now. I think the grand marshal should be 
very, very knowledgeable in Irish music, 
sports, dance and literature. She should be 
very knowledgeable about the political situa- 
tion in Ireland and be able to speak up on it 
That's me." 

John Thornton, editor of the Irish Echo 
newspaper, treats Mrs. Cudahy as a legiti- 
mate candidate in his coverage of the race for 
grand marshal for the parade, which will be 
oo March 16 this year, March 17 being a 
Sunday. 

“I don’t see anything in the rules to stop 
her," he said “I fed she should be allowed to 
run." 

Even her opponents seem to agree that 
other than her failure to be a man, her creden- 
tials for grand marshal are impeccable. Last 
year. Mis. Cudahy, 62, became the first fe- 
male presdent of the County Kilkenny Asso- 
ciation and was named Irish Woman of the 
Year by the Emerald Society. 


Mis. Cudahy is called “The First Lady of 
sh Radio," for being the host of a Sunday- 


Irish Radio," for being the host of a Sunday- 
night radio program an WEVD, “Irish Mem- 
ories,” for 41 years. “I'm an Irish disk jock- 
ey." she said 

Everything in her brick row bouse in Mid- 
dle Village is as Irish as could be, she said 

She pointed proudly to her vast record 
collection — the Irish Warpipe Band of the 
city’s transit police and the like — that she 
uses on the radio program, to thepainling of 
the cliffs of Moher in County Clare, to the 
photographs of her daughter-in-law, Kath- 
leen. and her granddaughter, Mary Kate, to 
the end table with the books and magazines 
on Ireland to the china daset containing all 
of the Irish teacups. 

At Bridie's, a neighborhood bar with “Irish 
Eyes" playing on the jukebox, men discussed 
the impending election. 

“This is an unlikely neighborhood to find a 
militant feminist," said one at the bar. 

“It's a fine idea for a woman to one day be 
grand marshal" said an elderly man, but not 
this year, not yet." 

“Ah, wed" said De nnis O'Connell the 
bartender,“a woman leading our parade. 
Why not? They seem to be everywhere you 
look nowadays — up in outer space and even 
in the Fire Department." 

“She's a grandmother," said another man, 
“but they say she's a lot tougher than she 
looks. A fighter. If you're true Irish, you’re 
got to like that.” 


A confrontation between a left- 
handed checkout clerk and a food 
store chain’s right-handed work 
rules has resulted in a jury’s judg- 
ment of SI 36,700 in favor of the 
clerk. “It didn’t make sense. It was 
discrimination against left- 
handers,” said Crystal Sagen, 24, of 
the requirement by the Jewel Food 
Stores chain that she check out gro- 
ceries with her right hand. She says 
that until the store where she 
worked in Naperville, Illinois, 
switched to computerized checkout 
scanners in 1981. she was one of the 
company's fastest clerks. After the 
scanners were installed, Sagen said 
she was told company policy was 

that all checkers had to check right- 

handed, and she was forced to sign 
a form that she would always check 
right-handed "because I needed the 
job." But she soon returned to 
checking left-handed because it 
was easier and she was faster as a 
lefty, she said. Sagen, who now 
lives in a Chicago suburb, quit 
after 1 % years at the store and sued 
Jewel A Du Page County Circuit 
Court jury, all right-handers, found 
in her favor. “The Jewel attorney 
dismissed the only left-handed ju- 
ror," she said. Sagen now delivers 
newspapers, but said she would like 
to work for another supermarket. 

□ 

Joanna Carson, estranged wife of 
“Tonight Show" host Johnny Car- 
son, must continue to live on 
$44,600 a month in temporary sup- 
port, a Los Angeles Superior Court 
judge decided, denying her request 
for a $6,000 monthly increase. She 
had claimed tbai she was forced to 
sell slocks and bonds in order to 
meet her monthly expenses: 

□ 

A disgruntled art collector is su- 
ing the Whitney Museum of Ameri- 
can Art in New York City, alleging 
breach of contract and demanding 
the return of works he donated in 


1978. Heury M. Reed, a New Jersey 
insurance broker, filed suit in fed- 


eral court in Manhattan charging 
the Whitney Museum with failing 
to fulfill its promise of a timely 
exhibit and catalog for his collec- 
tion. Thai coQection consists of an 
estimated 200 paintings, notebooks 
and letters of American avant- 
garde painter Morgan RnsselL 
Lawyers for (be Whitney say 
Reed's gift was made uncondition- 
ally. The museum is p lanning a 
Russell exhibition in 1987, they 


add. but it is under ho legal obliga- 
tion to show the works. Morgan 
Russell (1886-1953) was one. of the 
central figures in the devriopnrat 
of a pre-Worid War I style of paint- 
ing known as Synchronism, which 
art histo rians consider an impor- 
tant, if short-lived, antecedent to 
Abstract Expressionism. Lawyers 
for both sides put the value ot-ihe 
collection at several hundred thou- 
sand dollars. 

D 

Muds Hassanri BaBdah, the sul- 
tan of oil-rich Brunei has donated 
the equivalent of $392,000 U> Brit- 
ain's National Army Museum and 
$280,000 to the Imperial War Mu- 
seum, the British Ministry of De- 
fense announced. The former Brit: 
ish colony on the northwest coast 
of Borneo stiS has dose links with 
the British army. Much trains sol- 
diers on its tropical terrain. Last 
month, the Sultan bought the Dor- 
chester Hotel in London's Mayfair 
section for $48 million, and said he 
plans to spend $22 million to refur- 
bish iL 

□ 

A Maine millionaire has donated 
his 14th-century castle — complete 
with moat — to a charity that owns 
more than 200 of Britain’s stately 
homes and much of its countryside. 
Charles Henry Robinson of Cape 
Elizabeth, Maine is 93 and an inva- 
lid. He first saw Ightham- (pro- 
nounced “item") Mote in the 
1920s, when he screeched his bicy- 
cle to a halt as it came into view 18 
utiles southeast of London. He 
bought it in 1953. 

D 

Basque artist Eduardo Chffida, 
60. was named as recipient of the 
5100,000 Wolf Foundation sculp- 
ture prize. It was the first time toe 
Israel-based international founda- 
tion has made an award for sculp- 
ture, although it has givenprizes in 
painting, music and architecture 
since its inception in 1981. 

□ 

His books are well-known for 
their tales of suspense and intrigue. 
But now another kind of Stephen 
King mystery has been solved. Five 
books published since 1977 under 
the name Richard Bachman were 
actually written by King, who pub- 
lished the novels under a pseud- 
onym because there is “too much 
stuff” written under his own name 
on the market according to the 
Bangor Daily News. 


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BUSINESS 




Embassy Service 


8 Awe. de M satins 
75008 Pirn 
Telex 231696 F 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 


THIS WEEK 


February 18th 


AGENT IN PARIS 


BATS FOR SALE 

PHONE 562-1640 

RATS FOR RENT . 

PHONE 562-7899 

OFFICES FOR RENT/ SALE 

PHONE 563-6214 


BUSINESS WEEK 


INTRNATIONAL 




OFFICE SERVICES 


- Flexible hours 

- luncheon vouchers or firms 
nsftwwf 



Send C.V. tnd jcfcxy requirements toe 


Mme Met 

Tour A A sn h attan Cedex 21 
92195 Ptxo la Defame 2 


ROLLS-ROYCE 

BENTLEY 

BRITISH MOTORS 
WRIGHT BROTHERS 

MOMTCMLO 


HEAD OfflCE 

in 1 ■» 


Bogota 212-9608 

Pane: (Far datafied orfy): 

Beenoe Airae: 41 40 31 

747-4660. 

r^^.^454 

KlfitOPE .. 

Ganyaeud: 431 943/431 
lima: 417852 

Itaiwna. 644372 


5ta JOMK 22-10S 

Antttenfcn: 2636-15. 

Sanfiago: 6961 555 

AihM; 361-8357/360-2421. 

Sao Paulo: 852 1893 

Bruaeki 343-1899. 

JWDMEEAST 

Cnyeidu^en PI) 32944a 

Wwtdn: 246303. 

MM: J069) 72-67-55. 

Jordan: 25214. 

Lavmnc 29-58-94. 

Kawsrit: 5614485. 

Oata- 416535. 

Liebon: 67-27-93/66-25^4. 


London: (01) 836-4802. 

JedrUr: A67-150a 

UAL: Dated 224161. 

Madrid: 455-2891/455-3306. 


MBk (02) 7531445. 

MR EAST 

Norwayi (0^845545. 

Ban^nte 390-96-57. 

Kamt: 6793437. 

Hong Kong: 5-420906. 

Manfla: 817 07 49. 

Sweden: 0G 7569229. 

Sam* 725 87 71 

Tel Aviv: 03455 559. 

Sngtaora: 222-2725. 

Tdwtat 752 44 25/9. 

Vienna: Contact Frankfurt. 

Tokyo: 504-1925. 

1 1 

AUSTRALIA 

New Yurie (212) 752-3890. 

Sydney: 929 56 39. 

Melbourne: 690 £031 


AUTOS TAX FREE J AUTOS TAX FREE 


Tel: 01/ 214 6 


BU5MESS CENTRES 


PARIS 

CHAMPS ELYSEES 


AGENTS WANTED 

Ugh cormsoon paid latest Pat e^sf- 
thfral seairity produdv __ 

• Mght vamn TO YEARS 

n We DeRmer Cm le Ore World 

.. . transco 

Protected area ovofldtle to quemed 
agents who wnh to read* exdusw 
product Sne of world famous security 
systems. Contact M Hem 

CCS m Para, 297 5600. 


COOPS ST JAMB 


TAX FRE CARS 
P.CT. . 


TRANSCO 


300 braid new oars. 


lagatf Showroom t lawtay 

Al mates, al models, brand new 


S a gfoon 1, 2008 Atewara, Baipui 
Tel: 3/231 » 00 


Tel: 3/231 59 00 
Thr 3554J PHGtfTfl 
Apply far our colour ra t efe g ^ 
USS5 cash 


GENERAL 

positions wanted 


YOUR OFFICE 

wife afl fa c BM e s 


LE SATELLITE, 8 rue Cbpernc 
75116 117271539. 

Telex: le «*al 620 183F. 



BAOPORT TAX CARS 

Call lor free catdoa. 

Box 12011, BoKerdm AjrpoaHafland. 
Tel: 010643077. U*. 25071 ETCAR NL 


ASTON COMPANY FORMATIONS 
Dept Hi, 

BMdorio $5 


• IBM: More World: To 


XVIITH AVENUE NIEL 


VAN UNE5 1NTL 

ova 100Q AGENTS 
Bt IIS A - CANADA 
350 WCBiD-VIH* 
ESTIMATES 

PARIS Dtebanhs Hitomafknctf 

{°TJ 343 23 64 

FRANKFURT 

{069)950066 

MUNICH ms. 

(089) 142244 . 

LOtffiCN hfras 

(01) 955 3636 

CAIRO Alfad Vat Unas fartY 
(20-2) 712901 

USA ASted Vat Urat btfl Carp 
(OIOT I 312 - 681-8100 



• Europe's Currency Orris Weal 
OuR. 


1 France M ay Pry Up Au An Oarii 


INVESTMENTS 
SEE OUR AD ON 
PAGE 13 

TRANS CONTAINER 

MARKETNG AG 


Daygfcn feb of Man. 

TS1624 26S91 
Telex 627691 SP1VA G 


• Earepe Ucec U5. Regseswf Bada. 

NOW ON SALE 


AGENCE DE L'ETOILE 

REM STATE AGENT 

380 26 08 


AT ALL INTERNATIONAL 


NEWSSTANDS. 


3 bedrooms. 


ESESBSfl 


G8CVA - FOR SALE 
9 EXCEPTIONAL 

ADJACENT 






SOMtSTKATB) WIHUGWT uun 

mete 1 1 uriteJ urfy stimulating tab witF 
travel, based in USA or IX Tri 



Umdon (01) 352 2125 


International Secretarial Positions 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 



DOMESTIC 

positions wanted 


TOUR LONDON OfflCE 

CWSHAM EXECUTIVE CENTRE 
Cbmprahrave range of services 
ISO Recent Sheet. London Wl. 
Tefc ( 01)439 6288 The 261426 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 



DIAMONDS 


far TOP-GRADE shoot or otto 
SF4QM00 each, 750 fKD both. 
Lana term tew. Wn» tor 
Mn. BurUiarcH 39 Moee-ttebode, 
Potrt-Saconne,. CH-1209 Geneva. 


ROUdARY RAMONG an lerga cd- 
tafar d med ten. The only ccmter- 
bed bark wish e represeNatm office 
in London speo rfa no m ihs service 
Arab Overseas B art t Trust |W.I | 
Let, 28 Btack Frmce Rd. Louder £1 
Tri 735 8171 


COMPANY M PARS would Ike to 
buy i M IBM BC/TX Interested pd- 
ha * <eew Forward pmtiaiari to nT 
Bax 1774. Herald Tribune. 92521 
Neuriy Cedex, France. . 


BUSINESS SERVICES 



PRODEST etf 

2-mcrth amtaad Baris fth 

SECRETARY 

wanMvoassox 

Enriith molher tongue, prawn SM 
vSoiBtT experSra. URGB4T 



AGftdOE K MANNEQUMS, racher- 

che secrttarManjSaUe 6 nwents, 
raprtefiMfi, bilmgue angkat-franraii 
par ccnjptes anmequiiB ef amtod* 


mannegun. Envayer photo rt CV. 
Box ITS, Herdd Tribune, 92S2I 


JOTEaT expenence. UBjtNT w w(g, n man it 

Teh 265.1662 / 335.1433 | NeuBy Gedw. France. 


OFFICE SERVICES 


AUTOMOBILES 


English mother tongue 


IMPETUS • ZURKH • 252 76 21 
Phone rt<*lbc». 




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