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Caused Chernenko 




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New York Timer Service 

■ »— : v . ■ -<2^ MOSCOW — A planned meet- 
i? r.^.V^ ^ rag between Konstantin U. Cher- 
■— - -omko and the viating prime nrinis- 

ter. of Greece was called off 
Tuesday because of the Soviet lead- 
ers health, a Greek gover nm e n t 


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The announcement followed ip- 
from Greek diplomais that 
Ministra -Andreas Papas- 
dreou, who arrived Monday on an 


official visit to die Soviet Union, 
bad been, advised' tihat he could 
meet Mr. Chernenko bn Tuesday 
afternoon. 

J There was no confirmation from 
Soviet officials that a meeting had 


's address three or four days 
the balloting. Thus Mr. 
Chernenko would be expected to 
appear abont Feb. 21. 

Speculation has focused an Mr. 
Chernenko's heart as the source of 
ids current problems, fife is pre- 
sumed, from Ins behavior at public 
appearances, to suffer from pulmo- 
nary emphysema. a long aftmebt 
that can tax the heart In August, 
he was absent far several weeks, 
reportedly with a heart problem. 

with Soviet and Greek officials 
seemed miffed that the issue of Mr. 
Chernenko's health had overshad- 
owed the Papandieon visit 
- Mr. Papandreou’s spokesman 
said that over two [days cfmeetings 


been planned. A spokesman for the with Pnme Minister Nikolai A 
c iJ ” r - — Tflchanov and other Soviet offi- 

cials, the Greek leader explored 
ts for a Sl^-bShon gas 
to bring Soviet gas to 




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no meeting would be held and that 
Mr. Chernenko was out of town. 

At a press briefing later in the 
day,1Mr. Papandr eon’s spakesnan, 
Dmitries Maroudas, said that the 
Grades were informed Dxsday 
Aar “the meeting could not take. 
pl ace d ire to Ac heal th of the gfro r- 
al secretary.” 

Most diplm i ifl ts had cnxctcd 

Mr OmiiiimIm in mnlw a lyfaiij f m) 

qjpearance before the first amri - 
yersary of his coming to 
Much is Wednesday. Mr. 
dreou’s visit seemed perfectly 
rimed. 

• Instead, Soviet television led its 
evening newsprogramwilh the an- 
nonscement of the publication of 
Mr. Chernenko’s pronouncements 
pvec the past year. Such announce- 
ments have bee n made in the past 
to keep a Soviet leader's Image 
prosmnent daring a long absence.. 

■ Diere were tmcoafinned reports 
that the Grade visitors were told 
that Mr. Chernenko’s health had 
deteriorated overnight Monday, 
farcing canceHatiaa of the project- 
ed meeting. . 

: A meeting" with 'Mr. Chernenko 
was not included in Mr. Papan- 
dreou’s formal schedule,, although . 
time had been left oporfor that 
possibility on Tuesday. Hut Greek 
sources maantamedthat after Mr. 
Papandreou’s arrivalon Monday, 
and as of Mpnday rm^t,, Sowet' 
officials ^ad adyisaL than that V 
meeting' was <hl - 


Greece, as wdl as Soviet assistance 
in budding a subway for Athens, 

Greek help in b uilding hnfri* in the 

Soviet Union, and more Soviet 
business for Greek shipyards. 

Mr. Papandrcou has irked Wash- 
ington by his maverick stands on 
various NATO and East-West is- 
sues. But daring Ms visit to Mos- 
cow, he has avoided any mtiriwn 
of the United States or any com- 
parison of Soviet and American 
policies. 



Reagan Calls Arms Talks, 
Space Defense Unrelated 


Dollar Breaks 10 Francs, Reaches Other Highs 

,;A broker at die Bourse in Paris wrote the fixing for the U.S. dollar on Tuesday, when the currency 
broke the 10-franc mark for the first time with a prating of 10.023 to the dollar. The drJW set 
records against the British pound, the I talian lira, die Dutch guilder , the Spanish peseta and 

Scandinav ian nimndK A* central Kan W ran tinned tn rfwrKrw* f<i frn'»T»'rnr t the rirtflar PHTh-rifl 

13-year high against the Deutsche mark and a 10-year peak against the Swiss franc. Page 9. 


Egyptian Says Arafat, Hussein Agree 
On Agenda for Mideast Peace Talks 


By Judith Miller 

New York Times Service 
, CAIRO — President Hosm Mu- 
barak’s saner fareignpolicy advis- 
er said Tuesday that Yasser Arafat, 
chairman of . the Palestine Libera- 
tion Or ganization ; and King Hus-, 
semof Iordan had readied agree- 
ment /oo a framework for peace 
that was a “significant break- 


. East peace talks, 
jfirrttime, the PEG has 
. . .. , . .. unet^rvocally and irrevocably afe- 
There was no rntfipaian of the cepted the premise of a peaceful 


seriousness of Mr. Cheriteako’s 
condi tion.He dropped franpuMic 
view in late December, and several 
Soviet officials have openly ao- 
3 m rmij ' kaowtedged that hewas ailing. - 
r* * • fo Ac past two wedts, however 

Foreign Minify spokesmenhave 
. Mr. Chernenko is on va- 



Hsue 


r -i 


settlement to the Arab-Israeli con- 
flict, the adviser, Osama el-Baz, 
said m an interview. 

He called on the United States to 
reward whal he called Mr. Arafat's 
“courageous step” by showing “a 
willingness and the ability to come 
to tenns with a joint Arab move.” 
cation outside Moscow, and not ** The ball is now squardy in the 
seriously 3L On iThnzsday, the u.SL coanT ML Baz said, 
newspaper Pravda reported that he {The'UmtedStatesgave the talks 

made an appearance at a regular cautious approval Tuesday, The 
semon of mriFoEtijura - Associated fiess- reported from 
The next event at vton Mr- -Washizigton. Larry Speakes, the 
Qtemenko is ejected to ^pcar is White House spokesman, said. 


' of UN Security Council Resolution 
242.” be said. 

[“If the discussions in Amman 
hdp move the parties toward nego- 
tiations then it’s a welcome devel- 
opment,” Mr. Speakes added.] 

Mr. Baz returned from Jordan 
late Monday night after monitor- 
ing the two- days of talks between 
'Mr. Arafat anti King Hussein that 
led to Monday’s agreement. 

Jri a report on the meeting, the 
Jordanian news agency Petra said 
only that the two sides had dis- 
cussed “the reality of the Palestin- 
ian issue In the occupied territory 
and in the international arena.” 

.Mr. Baz declined to provide de- 
tails of the pact. “But the details are 
secondary, he said. “What counts 
is that there has been a decision by 

thp Trv rHgninng and the Pales tinians 

to take a risk Entry into negotia- 
tions involves a ride, especially giv- 
en recent statements issued by 
members of the Israeli govern- 
ment.” 

Efforts to revive peace talks have 


it 


Reagan, Fahd 
End Warm, 
And Friendly *' 


United Pros Ihtenaaonai 

WASHINGTON President 
Ronald Reagan and King Fahd of 
Saudi Arabia concluded talks on 
the Middle East on Tuesday, dis- 
cussing the new peace initiative by 
Jordan and. the Palestine Libera- 
tion 


,az a**-'-: 

nr) r 




JL meeting of Ms “constituency” in 
advance of one-caiulidaredectioiiis 

tratfj^Jte speeches of all Pofit- 
buro members are reported in as- 
cending order, ending with' the 
Communist Party general sccre- 


Anyded£5 ^totopurme . been staDedsinre April .190 when 
a peaceful s^tlemcm of the MickSe Mr. Arafat Med to wm the sap- 


East conflict would be a construc- 
tive step.”] 

[“It is crucial, however, that the 
settlement be pursued at the table 
in direct negotiations on the basis. 



Ttt®/ 


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- 


When 4~Year-Olds 



By,MauieaiT)awd . 

- : New York Tbnes Service: 

NEW YORK — Regina 

rmrmatly a calm wom- 
an, js in a state of tendon, 

tinsvreek She is awaiting letters 
fran^ private schools in the city 

that w3I detanme wheflur her 
4-yea^-ddsou wCD be admitted. 

Serenity may_be better but, 
parents ^rt£jt is amarinqx»- 
ahility (fcrmg this “week of 

tTflrinre^ ** acrtwnfitMmrymoth- 

er ofied iLFcgna RA. a to Feb. 
15, Nfew Yak City's private 
schoMs. send . pul acceptance 
imd rgecrion notices for kin- 
derg ar t e n and first grade. On 
Feb. 15 v letters for- the nursery 
levdbegintdgoout..-.. 

It is the cuhramatibn of , the 
conqjetitirai for the prestigious 
private sdiools that,- manypar- 
esWK believe, arethe first st q> cm 
the road to Ivy League mtiversi- 
bevtmd. More 


edai 


ti« and beytmd. . _ , 

i»ae are^apfi^ing to private, 
dun' ewer before, ac- 

mistress of the Town School, on 



At rKnner partKS. at news- 
stands, wherever parents of 
young cfa3then gather, there is & 
boazt>t“HaM yoa heard?* -- • 
. A West . $oe~ mother de- 

uoffl^ ti^ wotk as “a woe, 


vffA-sta- 

tis&s,” sasdL “900 ^3ph- 
camsfdrewry^ac^ and every- 
oneimlswgtt mio TnniQr or 

V:' 

calltti 
their poh-. 
Que hStedd' 


babysitter to pick up her child 
from -* West Side nursery 
sekeed eviny day so rite would 
not have, to cope with the em- 
barrassment of facing the other 
' mothers if rite received a reject 
tionC 

Some parents have become 
. so distressed bythe competition 
that they are opting for public 
schools. But most are wilting to 
suffer to get.tbdr child “seL” 
Indeed, school rfficials note 
with dismay, parents are 
launching theu youngsters into 
the process at youx^er and 
younger ages. 

A woman who recently start- 
playgroop for toddlers at. 
an East Sde church fold par- 
ents stdemoify, “Whet they in- 
terview at nursery schools in a 
couple of years, the schocd offi- 
cials will want to know where 
your children prepped.” . 

A good gan^s of the frenzy is 
the brisk business of a public 
school kindergarten teacher, 
Maxme Levy, who offera 
vale at- her -East l 

apartment for 4-year-dds and 
5-year-olds who are going to 
take the smndardized test given 
by the Educational Records Bu- 
reau, required for admission to 
most private schools. 

She coaches 
suchkey skills as. 
pegs into pegboards 
shoelaces. 

School officials - 
gprfi c oaching and try to 
parents' fears by pomting out 
that the nnoos about applica- 
tion numbers are greatly exag- 
gerated. In addition, they note 
that, with mate than lOO private 
ffriy yilc in the city, there are 
plenty of places for all the chil- 
dren. 


m 
to put 
to tie 


port of radicals within his divided 
organization for letting Hussein 
a joint Jcrdaman-Palestmian 
negotiating team into UK-sponr 
smed peace talks. 

Last November, the radicals and 
the mainstream PLO factions for- 
mally split into separate organiza- 
tions after Mr. Arafat was reject- 
ed as chairman at a Palestinian 
congress in Amman. 

In December, Egypt and Jordan 


Palestinian state and becanse 
mentioned them only as refugees, y^, # 

Mr. Baz declined to say whether f JjfR/ a IfS6f/17) 8 
Mr. Arafat had now accepted the 
Egyptian- Jordanian formula^ «nH' 
hence. Resolution 242, as part of 
his agreement with Hussein. But 
Tahir al-Masri. Jordan's foreign 
-minister, reiterated Jordan's view 
Monday that any solution to the 
conflict had to be based on Resdu- 
tion 242. 

. • . Mr- Baz said that Mr, Arafat had 
not directly accepted Israel's right 
to exist. But he called ' the new 
agreement “a step towards such 
recognition.” 

The United State has refused to 
negotiate directly with the PLO un- 
til it accepts Resolution 242 and 
Israel's right to erisL 
Hussein left Jordan for Algeria 
on Tuesday and offered no elabo- 
ration of his agreement with Mr. 

Arafat, who returned to Tunis to 
discuss the accord with senior PLO 
officials. 

■ Peres Tenns Pact Undear 

Prime Minister Shimon Peres of 

Israel said Tuesday that it was un- 
dear whether the agreement was a 
move toward peace with Israel, 

Renters reported from Td Aviv. 

“first weT see what they agreed 
upon between them,” Mr. Peres 
said. “Did they agree to make 
peace between them or are they 
offering peace to Israd? It’s still 
not clear what they did in Am- 
man.” 

■ Arab Moderates Offer Praise 
Arab moderates in the occupied 

West Bank said Tuesday that die 


By Bernard Wemranb 

New York Titties Service 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan says that evro if an 
agreement were reached to dnjri- 
nate wndww weapons, the United 
States will want to develop a space- 
based Htfanw system of- 

fensive weapons. 

The president he intended 
to proceed with research on the 
defense system that has come to he 
known as “star wars,” independent 
of whatever a g reeme n t might be 
reached with the Soviet Union on 
reducing offensive midcar wrap- 
cats. 

“The only weapon we have is 
MAD — Mutual Assured Destruc- 
tion,” the president said. “Why 
don’t we have MAS instead — Mu- 
tual Assured Security?” 

Mr. Reagan, who mnUe tH< com- 
ments in an interview with The 
New York Times published Tues- 
day, responded to questions about 
a wide range of issues, most of 
which, dealt with foreign polity. 

Mr. Reagan, seated in a white 
upholstered aim chair in the Oval 
Office, seemed relaxed and in good 
spirits daring Ms interview with 
four Times reporters on Monday. 
At times he spoke in a hoarse, dry 
voice, and at the end of the inter- 
view be talked about allogy prob- 
lems that he bad begun treating, 
under the (nodding of Ms wife, 
Nancy, when he was governor of 

flfllifnmin 

Mr. Reagan’s co mments about 
Ms space-cased defense system, 
more formally called a Strategic 
Defense Initiative, were Ms most 
emphatic so far in two respects. 

bust, while he had previously 
said a space-based defense would 
hot be a bargaining chip in talks 
with the Soviet Union, this was the 
first time he had said explicitly that 
he would not limit the research on 
the program even if Moscow met 
his aemands on reducing offensive 
missiles. . 

Second, this was the .first time; 
Mr. Reagan had made it plain that 
be believed such defenses would be 
needed even if nuclear powers 
agreed to abolish all nodear weap- 
ons. 


Other Points 

Of Interview 

• President Reagan said the 
UnSed States mU develop a 
space-based missile defense re- 
gardless of progress in arms ne- 
gotiations. 

• He called new covert aid to 
Nicaraguan insurgent forces 
“necessary.” 

• Of tie conviction of four 
state policemen is Poland for 
the murder of a pro-Solidarity 
priest: “I honestly don’t think it 
reflects any change.” 

• He is “not greatly optimis- 
tic” about the sincerity of Cu- 
baa desire to improve relations . 
with the United States. 

• He said “there was bad 
judgment on both sides” daring 
the ream home of the exited 
South Korean opposition lead- 
er Kim Dae Jung. 


MAS instead — Mutual Assured 
Security?” 

that we were so suc- 
at the arms talks that we all 
agreed to do away with them, just 


Mr. Reagan replied. ‘That’s right.” 

He mid, “I would want to pro* 
ceed with what we’re doing, which 
is research to discover whether 
there is such a weapon and whether 

it is practical, feasible. 

“And then I mysdl said that my 
own view would be that if that is 
determined and we can produce 
such a weapon, that then before 
deployment Fd be willing to sit 
down, and in a sense int ernational 
ize — in other words, to negotiate 
then before there would be any 
deployment or anything, to make 
sure mat they understood that we 
weren’t trying to create the ability 
of a first strike ourselves, that out 
goal was still the elimination of 
nudear weapons.” 

Mr. Reagan said, “That would 
ehminate any of the protests that 
some of the people on the Soviet 
side have made that we’re seeking a 
first-strike capability. I don't think 
anyone could honestly believe that 
the United States is interested in 
such a thing or ever would put itself 
in that position.” 

tn response to another question, 
Mr. Reagan said the United States 
was entering aims control talks 
with the Sowet Union from a rela- 
tive position of inferiority. During 
the presidential campaign, Mr. 


ion Oiganfaatidh. . . At the same time, the president ■/- 

Thcrfraai breakfast session atibe-'^ reSf ; a - riT j amrtio n -b e t w een, re- 


in a time of stress, somebody is 
gong to say, just as they have in 
recent years, maybe it would be 
handy for us to produce a few of 
these [offensive nuclear weapons). 
And you wouldn’t be able to tell if 
they had or noL 

“But at least your security would 
be your own kind of gas marie,” Mr. 
Reagan anntiniiari, “ that if some- 
body does cheat after you've tried 
to eliminate them, and COtnes up 

with those; you’d have a weapon in 
which you could knock them down, 
just as today, you could put on the 
gas mask if somebody cheats and 
decides to use poison gas.” 

“So 1 think it would be well 
worth haying,” he said. 

Asked if the United States would 
proceed with a strategic defense 
independent of whatever arms con- 
trol agreement might be readied. 


re-established military balance 
with the Soviet Union. 

“Obviously we have not com- 
pletely canght up,” he said Mon-; 
day. ’Tor examine, we have in uni-t 
form 17 divisions. Well, they’ve got 
mare than that on the Chinese bor- 
der” 

Mr. Reagan added, however, 
that the Sonet Union now knew 
there had been a “change of atti- 
tude!” by the United States on mili- 
tary matters. “They know what 
we've been able to achieve when wc 
set our minds to h,” he said. “So 
they know that there’s been a 
change.of attitude, that we are not 
canceling weapons systems without 
getting anything in return.” 

“Our whole altitude is different 
now and they can look down the 
road and see that there’s a point at 

(Coatimed on Page 2, CoL 3) 


White HOuse between President 
Reagan and Fahd was “warm and 
friendly,” according to Larry 
Speakes, the White House spokes- 
man. He said it provided the lead- 
ers with “a personal understanding 
of each other's point of view.” 

Mr. Speakes took note of reports 
on the agreement between King 
Hussein of Jordan and Yasser Ara- 
fat, chairman of the Palestine Lib- 
eration Organization, for reviving 
peace talks in the Middle East 

He backed “any declared inten- 
tion” to pursue a peaceful settle- 
ment of the Middle East conflict 
but said it must be “pursued at the 
table in direct negotiations on the 
baas of UN Security Council Res- 
olution 242.” 

The resolution asserts that both 
Israd and the Arab states have the 
right lo exist 

King Hussein and Mr. Arafat 
met in Amman, Jordan, on Mon- 
day and agreed on a peace plan 
calling for the Reagan administra- 
tion to recognize the rights of the 
Palestinian people. 

Mr. Speakes said that in their 
discussions neither President Rear 


search sod deployment of a defense 
system. He said the United States 
would conduct research even if the 
Soviet Union agreed to deep cuts in 
offensive weapons. 

If the research demonstrated 
that such a system could be built, 
then before deploying it, the presi- 
dent said, he would be willing to 
negotiate with the Russians on 
whether it would be possible to 
“internationalize” such defense - 
systems. 

Mr. Reagan said, T want a de- 
fense that simply says that if some- 
body starts pushing the button on 
those weapons, we’ve got a good 
chance of keeping all or at least die 
bulk of them from getting to the 
target,” 

At one point, Mr. Reagan com- 
pared the space-based defense — 
for which the government wants to 
spend $26 button in exploratory 
research — with the use of the gas 
mask by the military. 

In World War L the president 
said, “poison gas came into bring 
for the first time, and it was horri- 
ble. ” 

“In 1925 all the nations of the 


Reports on Salvador Aid 
Misleading, Critics Say 


. By John M. Goshko 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — Three con- 
gressional critics of President Ron- 
ald Reagan’s Central America poli- 
cies alleged Tuesday that most of 
the $1.7 billion in UJS. aid to B 


* « - -TT - f_ vui wire auwiWT ujhi uiv r LX 1. J L j .1 ■ *14 OH UAX- HUUWto UL Ulk 

agrced Priestinian-Jordaman initiative at- gan nor Fahdhadcfaanged thar met in Geneva and rated out 

peace talks based upon the pnna- r-jt-. raneA rtniwrf positions, but that they had a better 


peace oasea upon tne prma 
pics embodied in United Nations 
Resolution 242, winch calls for 
peace in exchange for the return of 
occupied Arab lands, coupled with 
the “Palestinian people’s right to 
sdf-detennination.” 

The plea for Palestinian self-de- 
termination was intended to make 
the f ormula more attractive to the 
PLO. The group had always rgect- 
ed the UN resolution because h 
failed to caD for the creation of a 


fered hope for their cause; United 
Press International reported from 
Jerusalem- 

But other Arabs in the West 
Bank sharply criticized Mr. Arafat 
for joining with Hussein. 

^We have waited a tong time for 
this agreement,” said Bethlehem’s 
mayor, Elias M. Frrij, a moderate. 
“We consider it essential and hope 
that some political moves will oe 
generated, because the present situ- 
ation is deadly for oar cause.” 


positions, but that they had a better 
understanding and that the presi- 
dent had- the benefit of FahcTs 
views as a result of Ms talks with 
Mideast leaders. 

Mr. Speakes declined to discuss 
the UK-Soviet conference an the 
Middle East that is expected to be 
hdd at the end of February in Vi- 
enna. 

Earlier, King Fahd arid Presi- 
dent Reagan agreed that the search 

(Confirmed cm Page 2, CoL 8) 


poison gas in future war,” he con- 
tinued. “But by that time the gas 
mask had been developed, and gas 
masks have been standard soldier 
equipment in just about every army 
in the world, ever since 1925. 

“We haven’t thrown the masks 
away. But now we’re talking about 
a weapon that has been developed 
for which there is no defense what- 
soever. The only program we have 
is MAD — Mutual Assured De- 
struction. And why don’t we have 


Kinnock Says Thatcher Lied on Leak 

Opposition Demands Removal of Defease Secretary, Aide 


Reuters 

LONDON — The British oppo- 
sition leader, Ne3 Kinnock, as- 
sailed ■ Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher in Parliament an Tuesday 
over her role in the prosecution of a 
top drfrrm» official acquitted of 
breaking secrecy laws. 

Dedaring that the secrets about 
the Falklands war leaked by the 
had no bearing cm national 
security, Mr. Kinnock demanded 
to know whether Mis. Thatcher or- 
dered the prosecution for political 
reasons. 

The prime minister denied any 
role in the case. But Mr. Kinnock, 
shouting over the cheers of his La- 
bor. Party supporters, refused to 
accept her wonL “Frankly, I do not 

believe you,” he said. 

Challenged twice by Mrs. 
•Thatcher to take her word, Mr. 
Kinnock said, “The very domineer- 


nents have expressed over the trial 
of Clive Pommg, who was acquit- 
ted Monday of breaking the law 
although he admitted leaking docu- 
ments. 

They have demanded the resig- 
nations of the defense secretary, 
Michael Hesdtinc, and the minis- 
ter erf state for the aimed fences, 
John Stanley, following charges by 
Mr. Prating that the two officials 
were involved in. an attempt to con- 
ceal facts about the May 1982 stok- 
ing of an Argentine cruiser, the 
General Bdgrano. 

But an aide to Mrs. Thatcher 
said, “No ministers are at risk.” 

The prime iniiww lat^r a 
letter to Mr. Kinnock demanding 
an immediate apology. 

Mis. Thatcher said Ms statement 
that he did not bdieve her Is as 
serious a charge as could be made.” 


Mr. Pontmg’s acquittal, after a 
two-week trial, stunned Ms sup- 
porters and surprised lawyers. The 
judge had instructed the jmy that 

hit main d rfwise, fa arg irmwit fhnr 

he had a higher duty to the pnhBc 
than to the government, was not 
valid in law. 

The papers he leaked contradict' 
ed the government’s claim that the 
General Bdgrano was torpedoed 
because it was dosing oh the Brit- 
ish fleet. The cruiser was steaming 
for home at the time. 

The Social Democratic leader, 

David Owen, said Mr. Prating had 
best confronted by “a consistent 
attempt not to tell the truth.” 

“Why did the government and 

the whole wei^tcJ the government 

consistently Be to the ■ House of ^ divert the criticism, “ifs 
Commons?” he asked. die law officers who jwjrig -whether 

Mrs. Thatcher also faced criti- 



has been used to pursue a military 
solution to the Salvadoran civil war 
rather than fra “economic and so- 
cial development,” as the adminis- 
tration claims. 

Hie administration has used “in- 
sufficient, misleading and in some 
cases falselnfonnattou” to disguise 
the fact that only 15 percent of U.S. 
aid has been used for “reform and 
development,” the three legislators 
said. The critics assert that the rest 
has been (firett mflitary aid or war- 
related aid applied to “a step-by- 
step escalation of a strategy for a 
militar y victory.” 

A State Depar tment spokesman 
denied the allegations. 

The charges are contained in a 
by Senator Mark O. Hai- 
of Oregon; Rep- 
resentative Em Leach, Republicra 
of Iowa, and Representative 
George Milter, a California Demo- 
crat, to the congressional Arms 
Control and Foreign Policy Cau- 
cus, a 130-member bipartisan 
group. 

It was distributed to members of 
the caucus an Monday, bat was 
prepared by the three lawmakers 
and tbrir aides and does not seek to 
reflect the views of the member- 


armed forces. Only $267 onOton 
went to genuine development work 
such as ref ram of agriculture and 
the judiciary. 

At the State Department a 
Bernard Kalb, said 
y, “We categraicaDy 
the assertion that 
been deceived by the 
tton.” He said that the 
“has consulted fully with 
on all programs in effect in 
vador. 

According to the 
ways in winch aid have 
phed show a “low 
form. “Our ori ginal a 
pand and upgrade the 
Army has broadened, resulting in a 
counterinsurgency strategy, remi- 
niscent <rf Vietnam, which has 
heightened the casualties among 
the czvBian population,” it says. 

The report also dies as examples 
irf the admini st r a tion giving false 
or misleading information to Com 


Sal- 

the 
ap- 
ty” forre- 
t toex- 


Fafiing to inform all relevant - 
congressional committees of plans 
to build an air base in eastern El 
Salvador mi Hi after Congress h»H 
voted on Salvadoran aid requests.' 

• Hiding from “virtually all 
members of Congress” plans to 
supply El Salvador with tour AC- 
47 gimships and then downgrading 
the plan to one mmship after Con- 
gress learned about the original 
four-plane plan through press dis- 
closures. 

Asking fra $93 million in sup- 


Mr pfemental military aid for BSalva- 

is ouunmm at the S™* Sm m> yon igo on Ihe jromdi 

priations Committee; which mug 


approve foreign aid requests; 
Leach is chapman of the cau 


Cfive Pouting 
(tiser ptine, of authority, of discoor- 


Mr. 
caucus, 

and Mr.MBIer is chairman of its El 
Salvador task farce. 

The report challenges adminis- 
tration assertions that it consistent- 
ly has allocated aid to Salvadoran 
economic and social development 
rather than to military activities 
“by a 3-to-l margin." Die report 
says that analysis shows this claim 
to be “flawed becanse it describes 
aid simply by which U.SL agency 
administers it — rather than what 
the aid is actually used fra.” 

The report describes “indirect, 
war-related aid” as including cash 
transfers to oKtain the Salvadoran 
government and economy in the 
face at war-induced economic col- 
lapse, aid to persons displaced fay 


that “a dire emergency existed in 
the supplies available to the Salva- 
doran Army, when, to fact, the Pen- 
tagon’s own management data 
show that this claim was false.” ■ 



asm from supporters about the de- 
Mr. 


. “Your charge is utterly untrue,” . . 

jpg $tvfe of the right honorable lauy she wrote. “If you cannot subs tan- tasion to press charts 
forbids belief that she was not in- date it — and yra cannot -*?-* I must Pooling rather than fire 

demand you withdraw h and apol- . The pro-Thatcher Daily Mail 
ogize unreservedly and immediate- questioned nra judgment. «im 
’soppo- ly.” the prime minister irs a matter of 


vohraL* 

The heated exchange reflected 
Thatcher’: 


the outrage Mrs. 


to prosecute. 

There was also concern 
Conservatives that the trial 
shattered Britain’s tight official se- 
crecy laws and had broken a tradi- 
tional bond of trust between mmis- 
ters and thor dvil service advisers. 


of aid has accounted fra 5767 ; 
Hon or 44 percent of the total U.S. 
program. 


report says another 5523 

milllfin nf mn» r»T) 

was devoted to direct, war-related 
assistance such as expantfin& train- 
ing and equipping the Salvadoran 


INSIDE 

■ braeB officials said that at 
least 30 L ebanese and Palestin- 4 
tons working for them in south- 
ern Lebanon have been assassi- 
nated recently. Page 2. 

■ A UNESCO board started, 
meeting to assess the effects of 
the U.S. withdrawal Page 5. 

■ ASEAN has raged more for- - 
dgn aims aid for Cambodian 
gnemDa groups. Paged. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE ■ 

■The United States and the 
European Community warned 
Japan lo open its mafl^ jq 
foreign products. Page 9, 

■West Gennany camut take 

the tead rote in world economic - 

recovery, die economic minister 









r 


Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1985 


Israel Says Agents in South Lebanon 
Are Targets of Assassination Squads 


By Thomas L Friedman 

iView York Times Service 

JERUSALEM — Ai least 30 
Lebanese and Palestinians working 
for Israel in southern Lebanon 


have been assassinated by uniden- 
tified gunmen over the fast seven 


weeks, according to Israeli defense 
officials and independent security 
sources in the region. 

The assassinations are pan of a 
dramatic increase in attacks on Is- 
raeli troops and their allies in 
southern Lebanon. In the last 10 
days, there have been 51 attacks on 
Israeli troops, with four soldiers 
killed and 18 wounded. Israel’s ca- 
sualties since it invaded Lebanon 
on June 6. 1981 are 614 dead and 
3.675 wounded. 

Almost all of the attacks — 


WORLDWIDE 

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fGUERJ»E 


CABARET 

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LOEWS MONTE-CARLO 

presents 




mostly ambushes and roadside 
bombs — have taken place in zones 
south of the Litani River populated 
by Shiite Moslems. This is the area 
that Israeli forces win continue to 
occupy after Feb. IS. when the first 
stage of their withdrawal from the 
greater Si don area is to be complet- 
ed. 

The wave of murders of agents, 
informers and local militiamen 
who bave cooperated with the Isr 
raeli occupation force has bun the 
Israeli Army's intelligence-gather- 
ing activities, according to Israeli 
defense analysts, and added to the 
vulnerability of their anny units. 

While a few of the pro-Israeli 
elements assassinated since late 
December were members of the 
South Lebanon Army, which is 
backed by the Israelis, the vast ma- 
jority were local residents of Shiite 
and Christian villages or residents 
of the Palestinian refugee camps 
around Sidon, according to the 
sources in southern Lebanon. 

Most of those (rilled are assumed 
by Israeli officials to have been 
slain by the same underground Shi- 
ite and Palestinian resistance orga- 
nizations that bave been attacking 
Israeli troops. These groups, aware 
that the Israelis are preoccupied 
with the mechanics of the with- 
drawal and Lheir own security, ap- 
parently feel much bolder about 
coming out in the open to deal with 


O ■*'*- ** 


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U.S. Transportation Depart- 
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for rocketing cremated human 
remains into space in late 1986 
or early 1987. 


12. av. gooigcr V lfl.7Zl.31. 12 

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those identified as collaborators 
before they can flee. 

Id addition, at least some of the 
assassination work, which is usual- 
ly accomplished by gunshots at 
dose range while the victim is at 
home or driving a car, was carried 
out by persons wbo had cooperated 
with the Israelis but now want to 
change sides, the Israeli defense 
sources said. 

“WhaL happens is that someone 
who has been working for us de- 
cides he wants to go over to the 
other side," said an Israeli defense 
source. “They cell him that in order 
to do so he fust has to prove him- 
self by killing someone else wbo 
has worked with us.” 

Besides the local pro-Israeli 
agents who have bees assassinated, 
there have many smaller incidents 
in which people have had their 
shops or cars blown up as warnings 
to either stop dealing with Israeli 
forces or to get out of town. 

“We are now taking measures to 
defend the lives of those people 
who have been associated with Is- 
rael," said an Israeli defense offi- 
cial. He declined to elaborate. 

The assassinations have appar- 
ently damaged Israel's intelligence- 
gathering in southern Lebanon, 
which some Israeli analysts say was 
not very good to begin with. Israeli 
experts who have worked in the 
area say that once- friendly Leba- 
nese sources now tell them not to 
contact them. Ten days ago, lists 
handwritten in Arabic were pasted 
on walls in Tyre with the names of 
60 alleged “collaborators," most of 
whom were understood to have al- 
ready fled Lebanon. 

Another reason for the recent 
increase in attacks on the Israeli 
forces, defease analysts said, was 
because the Israelis are using the 
roads more with slow-moving vehi- 
cles, hauling heavy equipment and 
men southward in prraaration for 
the first stage of the Israeli troop 
withdrawal. As a result, they have 
become easier targets. 

This situation has made Israeli 
troops extremely cautious. They 
have recently adopted the practice 
of firing in the air as they drive 
their convoys through potentially 
hostile villages, according to inde- 
pendent security sources in south- 
ern Lebanon. 





Votes being counted Tuesday in Seoul daring the election for National Assembly seals. 


New Party Does Well in Seoul Y oting 

In Early Returns Kim Group Makes a Strong Shouting 


The Associated Press 

SEOUL — Candidates from a 
new opposition party calling for 
democratic reform in South Korea 
made a strong showing in early 
returns from National Assembly 
elections held Tuesday. 

The ruling Democratic Justice 
Party of President Chun Doo 
Hwan was expected to retain con- 
trol of the 276-seat assembly by a 
sizable margin, but the early show- 
ing of the opposition was stronger 
that predicted. 

With 16.5 percent of the vote 
counted, the Central Section Man- 
agement Committee said that rul- 
ing party candidates were running 
first or second in 89 of 92 two-seat 
districts. The New Korea Demo- 
cratic Party, which since its forma- 
tion last month has outspokenly 
questioned Mr. Chun's commit- 
ment to democratic change, had 49 
candidates leading. The Democrat- 
ic Korea Party and the Korea Na- 
tional Party Had 25 and 18 candi- 
dates leading, respectively. The 
other three leaders were from 
smaller parties. 

Many of the early returns were 
from urban districts! where the op- 
position to Mr. Chun is strongest 

Turnout was heavy, with 84_2 
percent of the nation's 24 million 
eligible voters casting ballots. That 


compared with 78.4 percent in the 
Iasi National Assembly election in 


March 1981. 

One disLricl where the New Ko- 
rea Democratic Party candidate 
took an early lead was Mokpo. at 
the southern end of the country. It 
is the birthplace of Kim Dae Jung, 
one of South Korea's best-known 
dissidents and a central backer of 
the new party. 

He and Kim Young Sam, anoth- 
er former presidential hopeful and 
supporter of the New Korea Dem- 
ocratic Party, are under bouse ar- 
rest and are among 14 former poli- 
ticians still banned from 
participating in politics until 1988. 

The election is regarded as the 
first real test for the ruling party. It 
was formed in late 1980. shortly 
after former General Chun engi- 
neered a military coup amid the 
political turmoil following the 1979 
assassination of President Park 
Chung Hee. 

In 1980, Mr. Chun dismantled 
all political parties and blacklisted 
more than 500 politicians, includ- 
ing the two Kims. As a conse- 
quence, there was little organized 
opposition in the 1981 election. 

The New Korea Democratic Par- 
ty, formed just before this election 
campaign began, in late January, 


Reporter Decries Aeroflot’s Unfriendly Skies 


By Seth Mydans 

New York Tunes Service 

MOSCOW — A night on a wooden chair 
in a strange airport, followed by a morning in 
which the passengers themselves had to push 
the ramp up to th«r plane, has drawn a ciy of 
protest from a Pravda reporter. 

His litany of complaints in a recent issue of 
Pravda, the Communist Party daily, about 
bad treatment and bad service echoed criti- 
cism often heard from Western travelers. 

•“Speed and comfort,'" the reporter, Yuri 
Kirinitsiyanov, wrote huffily, repeating 
Aeroflot's motto. “I am off to the railroad 
station." 

Some of the complaints were acknowl- 
edged a year ago by Civil Aviation Minister 
Boris P. Bugayev, who announced a person- 
nel shake-up and new regulations designed to 
combat what he called corruption and mis- 
management, among other problems. 

He also referred to damage done to the 
airline's reputation by crashes, a subject rare- 
ly mentioned publicly unless foreigners are 
involved. 


Aeroflot reported carrying 1 12 million pas- 
sengers last year and more than three million 
tons of freighL 

No figures are published for the size of its 
fleet, which is considered a military secreL 
But ii is estimated to have about 2,000 planes, 
making approximately 4.000 scheduled 
flights a day. 

This vast nation, with its many barren 
regions and poor network of roads, is Jinked 


through the night waiting for possible an- 
nouncements. 


At Soviet air terminals, hundreds or 
stranded passengers often sit squeezed to- 
gether on their suitcases through the night 
This was the situation that faced the 


Pravda reporter, whose flight from Aktyu- 
binsk to Moscow was diverted to the Volga 


by Aeroflot For many isolated communities, 
the local airport is the only connection to the 
outside world. 

The airline also carries out extensive addi- 
tional tasks, from crop dusting to monitoring 
fish shoals. 

Among its many functions, comfort and 
service on domestic flights are not a high 
priority. 

Fora Soviet traveler. 3 flight begins with a 
wait in line at a ticket counter, which in most 
cases is not linked to a central computer. 
Flights are often overbooked and seals are 
not assigned, so boarding involves a battle at 
the ramp. 

Food is not served on flights of under three 
hours. Alcohol and smoking are forbidden. 
There are no in-flight movies or headsets. 

When flights are diverted or delayed, pas- 
sengers are rarely given updated flight infor- 
mation, and are sometimes kept awake 


The Pravda reporter, in relating his experi- 
nces, wrote: “It did not matter that there 


ences, wrote: “It did not matter that there 
was nowhere to sit or put your bag in the 
airport, or that the buffet had nothing more 
than a muddy drink called ‘coffee.’ Our air 
travelers are the most hardened in the world." 


binsk to Moscow was diverted to the Volga 
dly of Ulyanovsk because of weather, and 
who said lie found a chair for the night only 
by pleading with a “tenderhearted charwom- 
an." 

Once the passengers had finally reboarded 
their Ilyushin 62 in the morning," they sat for 
two more hours in the plane without an 
explanation until a baritone voice came over 
the loudspeaker. 

“This is your captain speaking," the voice 
said “I am not going to apologize to you. We 
pilots are not to blame. We are still here 
because of the negligence of the airport work- 
ers. The weather is fine, and the plane is ready 
to take off." 

The plane, it seemed, had not been fueled 
or supplied with water, and now there was no 
tow truck to pull the plane onto the runway. 

The last straw, once the plane had finally 
taken off. was the soft voice of a flight atten- 
dant on the public address system, apologiz- 
ing for “a slight delay due to weather condi- 
tions in Moscow.'* 


Reagan Gills Arms Pact, Space Defense Unrelated 


(Continued bum Page 1) 
which they won't have a margin of 
superiority.” 

On other issues in the interview, 
the president said: 

• A new infusion of covert aid to 
the insurgent Nicaraguan forces 
known as the “contras” was “nec- 
essary” and “desirable." Contend- 
ing that “the Sandimsta govern- 
ment seized power out of the barrel 
of a gun." he said, “1 think there's 
every reason for the contras to be 
representing those who continue to 
strive for the democracy they 
fought a revolution to get.” 

•That revolution was supposed 
to result in democracy." Mr. Rea- 
gan said. “The assurances were giv- 
en by the people fighting the revo- 


lution — leading it. Then the 
Sandimstas did what Castro before 
them had done in Cuba. Once the 
revolution was successful, they 
misled From the government — or 
any participation in the govern- 
ment — all the other factions that 
were dedicated to democracy — 
and have instituted a totalitarian 
regime. And what the Nicaraguan 
people want is the revolution they 
fought for. And I think they are 
entitled to have it” 


isiration there were signals sent of 
this kind, and we took them up on 
it. And we tried to have some meet- 
ings with them, and nothing came 
of it Their words are never backed 
by deeds.” 


• On Cuba itself, Mr. Reagan 
said he was “not areally optimistic" 
about President Fidel Castro’s re- 
cent comments indicating a desire 
to improve relations with the Unit- 
ed States. “We’ve heard this be- 
fore," he said. “Early in my admin- 


• On the controversy in South 
Korea over the airport melee dur- 
ing the return home of the exiled 
opposition leader Kim Dae Jung, 
Mr. Reagan said “there was bad 
judgment on both sides." The refer- 
ence was to the Americans who 
accompanied the oppostion figure 
and to the Korean authorities. 

• On the Middle East, Mr. Rea- 


gan, who met King Fahd of Saudi 
Arabia earlier in the day, said he 
was firmly committed to his peace 
initiative of SepL 1. 1982. He add- 




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ed, “I don't believe it can be 
achieved without King Hussein of 
Jordan and with, or at least with 
the permission of, the Palestinians 
representing them in direct negoti- 
ations with the Israelis." Mr. Rea- 
gan said moderate Arab nations 
were “entitled" to defensive weap- 
ons from the United States, partly 
because of the threat of Soviet “ex- 
pansionism." 

Asked whether he puts any limit 
on who can represent the Palestin- 
ians, the president replied, “It's 
more or less has to be worked out 
between them and King Hussein, 
as to whether they would permit 
him, or whether they will want di- 
rect representation, and then I 
think with the Israelis the issue 
comes up, then — will whoever 
represents the Palestinians be will- 
ing to say that they recognize the 
right of Israel to exist as a nation? 
This is a great sticking point. It’s 
why we cannot enter into any nego- 
tiations with the Palestinians —the 
PLO — as long as they say that. 

• Asked if the trial and convic- 
tion of four state security police- 
men in Poland for the murder of a 
pro-Solidarity priest would result 
in a relaxation of relations between 
the United Slates and Poland, Mr. 
Reagan said: “I honestly don't 
think it reflects any change. I think 
it reflects something that went 
wrong. And the government 
doesn't mind throwing somebody 
to the wolves in order keep the 
sleigh going ahead of the wolf 
pack." 

• As “titular head of the party," 
Mr. Reagan said be could not now 


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WORLD BRIEFS 


Goldwater Proposes Cuts in Defense 


WASHINGTON ( AP) — Senator Barry Goldwater, chairman of the- 
Senate Armed Services Committee, has proposed trimming President 1 
Ronald Reagan’s defense buildup by S33 billion over the next three yean,' 
as part of an overall Republican plan to reduce federal deficits, Cangns-: 
sional sources said Tuesday. \ 

Officials said that Mr. Goldwater proposed allowing defease spending, 
authority to rise by 4 percent a year for each of the next three yean after 
allowing for inflation, in contrast to the president’s proposed increases of| 
5.9 percent in 1986. 8.2 percent in 1987 and 8.8 percent in 1988. , 

Mr. Goldwater, a Republican of Arizona, made his recommendation 1 
privately to the Senate majority leader, Robert J. Dole of Kansas. He] 
stressed that it was contingent on a proposal of a series of cuts in domestic) 
programs to round out the deficit-cutting plan, said the sources. 1 


In dian Charge Probed, Jarazdski Says; 


has called the government a “mili- 
tary dictatorship” and claims that 
Mr. Chun is not committed to dem- 
ocratic reform. 

The New Korea Democratic Par- 
ty has joined other opposition 
groups in saying that winning a 
sizable share of the assembly seats 
is essential to ensure that Mr. 
Chon, who has said that he will step 
down when his seven-year tens 
ends in 1988. carries out a peaceful 
transition of power as promised. 

The Democratic Justice Party, 
which won 152 seats in the last 
election, had urged voters to choose 
the stability ana economic growth 
it said it guarantees, rather than the 
political confusion that it says an 
opposition victory would bring. 

Also vying for seats are the two 


NEW DELHI (WF) — Poland’s leader, General Wtjjdech Janndsti,] 
said Tuesday his government was investigating allegations that a Polish- 
diplomat was involved in India's espionage scandal, but he dented that 1 
Poland was interested in obtaining any state secrets. ] 

General Jaiuzelsld, at a press conference following two days of talks' 
with Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi and other Indian leaders, sod that' 
“anythingof interest to ns in India can be acquired by us legally" and that! 
“we have no no need to resort to other methods or ways of collection." ■ 
The Polish leader, annoyed by reprated questions about the spy case,| 
said, “I'm very sorry bat f cannot satisfy any demands for sensational-, 
i CTTv "Thm» were unconfirmed reports last week that a Polish d iplom at, as; 
well as a Soviet citizen and an East German diplomat, had been expelled' 
by India in connection with its investigation of a spy ring. > 


Poland Dismisses Police General 


WARSAW (UPI) — The Polish government said Tuesday that h had] 
dismissed a senior Interior Ministry official who was the hmncdiatci 


ior of the four former secret police officers convicted in the] 
kidnapping and murder of a pro-Solidarity priest , 

The government spokesman, Jozy Urban, said that General Zeaon- 
Platek, 58, had been removed from his police post following the convic-; 
tion on Thursday of his subordinates in the murder of the Reverend Jerzy, 
Popiehiszko. Mr. Urban said a secret police colonel had been suspended 1 
from duty but was not dismissed. \ 

General Platek, the director of an Interior Ministry department re- 
sponsible for monitoring church affairs, was suspended man doty for 
“inadequate supervision" of his department following Father Popicinsz- 
ko’s murder. General Platek maintained that he had not been involved in> 
the crime. 

Mr. Urban, who indicated that a purge of the Interior Ministry was 
under way, said Colonel Leszefc Wolski of the Warsaw dty police had 
been suspended from duty. Colonel Wolski was present when the plan to 
abduct the priest was discussed, Mr. Urban said. But he added lhk “the . 


more moderate opposition groups, 
the Democratic Korea Party and 
the Korea National Party, and in- 
dependent candidates. The Demo- 
cratic Korea Party won 81 seals in 
1981 and could be the big loser if 
the New Korea Democratic Party 
does well. 

A total of 439 candidates are 
running for 184 direct-vote seats 
from 92 districts. The r emaining 92 
seats will be distributed propor- 
tionally, with the party winning the 
most seats in direct balloting 
awarded 61 of those seats. 


trial did no t produce any evidence to indicate that anyone else was * 
involved in the murder other than the four who were convicted.” “ 


U.S. Urges Progress on Chemical Bail 


GENEVA (AP) — The top U.S. arms control official asked the 4iK 
Nation Geneva Disarmament Conference on Tuesday to reach agreed 
meat this year on a treaty banning all chemic al weapons. 

Kenneth L Addman, director of the UiL Arms Control and Disarma- 
ment Agency, said such a ban should have tap priority because “the . 
dangers of chemical weapons proliferation are increasng." 

Mr. Adelman urged the Soviet Union to “engage in serious negotia- 
tions on every element" of the U.S. draft for a ban cm chemical weapons] 
proposed in April by Vice President George Bush. The conference, the. 
world's only multilateral disarmamen t forum, has been deadlocked for 
more than a decade on the question of a ban on chemical weapons' 
because of disputes on verification and enforcement. 


For the Record 


A poop tied to Senator Jesse Heims, the conservative Republican from- 
North Carolina, has told the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commisaoa' 
that it may ask stockholders of CBS, the broadcasting company, to 
approve resolutions aimed at influencing CBS management and opera-' 
tions. Fairness in Media said Monday it will ask the stockholders to vote- 
ourthecompany's present board ot directors at their annual meeting od 
April 17. (Reuters) 

Assemblyman Herman D. Faired Jr. of New York Gty announced 
Monday his candidacy for mayor. He will c h allenge Mayor Edward L 
Koch in September's Democratic primary. Mr. FarreO is the highest- 
ranking blade Democratic Party leader in the stale. (NYT) 

Cathy Evelyn Smith withdrew from a plea bargain agreement on 
Monday and instead trill face charges that she murdered John Bdushi, 
the comedian, with a drug overdose. ( AP) 

The West German aims group Kraoss-Maffei said Tuesday it had 
halted development of the thud generation of the country's mam battle 
tank, the Leopard- Company sources said the Defense Ministry withdrew 
its backing. (Reuters) 


President Augnsto Pinochet of CfaOe dismissed Tuesday two cabinet 
embers who had urged him not to renew the state of siege be has used to 


members who had urged him not to renew the state of siege be has used to 
crack down on the political opposition. The two were Interior Minister 
Sergio Onofre Jarpa Reyes ana Finance Minister Luis Escobar. (AP) 

Three braefis and a Nigerian dploraat were sentenced to prison terms 
Tuesday in London for the attempted kidnapping in July of an exiled 
Nigerian politician. Umaru Dikfco, who was found drugged in aerate at 
Stanstead airport. (UPI) 


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Reagan, Fahd 
End Talks 


Ronald Reagan 


endorse Vice President George 
Bush for the 1988 Republican pres- 
idential nomination. But he spoke 
glowingly of Mr. Bush, and when 
asked 5 the vice president was his 
logical successor, Mr. Reagan said. 
“If anyone was a voter, in consider- 
ing, they would have to recognize 
who’s had the most contact with 
what's going on." 


U.S. Asks Soviet Leaders 


To Join in TV Programs 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The direc- 
tor of the U.S. Information Agency 
said Tuesday that he had invited 
Soviet leaders to participate in tele- 
vised worldwide news conferences 
stand by his agency. 

Charles Z. Wick released a letter 
he salt Jan. 25 to Leonid M. Za- 
myatin, chief of the international 
information department of the So- 
viet Communist Party, suggesting a 
“one- to two-hour satellite televi- 
sion dialogue” in which Soviet 
journalists interview senior U3. of- 
ficials “on issues of mutual con- 
cern." “At the same time, yon 
should plan with U.S. media a simi- 
lar program in which American 
journalists freely and spontaneous- 
ly question senior Soviet officials, M 
be wrote. 


(Continued from Page l) 
must go on for a Middle East peace 
but differed on which issue must be 
resolved first: Israeli secarity or the 
Palestinians’ demand for a homer 
land. ' 

On Monday, President Reagan 
deflected FahcTs request that the 
United Slates take a more dua$ 
role in the Middle East. Eaittvtfi 
his toast at a state dinner in Faw| 
honor, Mr. Reagan said he had lam 
oar a peace plan in September l98Z 
that could move the parties “to? 
ward a fair settlement.” V- - * 
Mr. Reagan said tod many pco. 
pie “look with despair at the coov 
plenties of the Middle East and ask 
themselves, ‘How can we ever find 
a solution?* 

“I prefer to look at those com- 
plexities with hope and ask the par- 
ties in the region, ‘When can we get 
on with it?* ” the president said- 
Fahd spoke of the “warm ties of 
friendship” between the two coun- 
tries and said, “We want for every- 
one to live in peace." 

He invited President and Mis. 
Reagan “to come and visit my 
country at any time they may 
wish.” 

A senior administration official 
said there had been “no disagree- 
ment" that the interests of the Pal- 
estinians must be represented m 
any peace negotiations, or any 
change in President Reagan’s pos- 
tion rhat Fahd and other Arab 
leaders could do more to create a 
climate favorable for such talks. 


Canada Defense Grief Quits 
OTTAWA (API - Defense 
Minister Robert Coates resig^ 
Tuesday from the Canadian cabt* 
net. He did so while denying a. 
newspaper report that he amt"° m 
aides, during a trip to North Au® 1 . 
tic Treaty Organization countries 
visited a West Gennan mgWdnfr; 
that featured nude dances ana., 
prostitutes. 




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INTERNATIONAL 


TRJBVNJE^WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY IS,! 1985 


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Social Security B&tef&jS— Issue Dwides ISoung and Old in U,S. 



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tYmhhigioa PicarSerrt^F ' • 

‘ DELRAY BEACH, FKaida — 
hr this . retirement town, where 
more than a thirdbf the population 
is. over 65, the issue of Social Secu- 
rity is not an abstract debate, over 
policy but an argument among gen- 
erations. 

Mexiie Zuckor,20, a teller alXt- 
lantic Federal Savings and Loan, 
■pays the Social Security tax. *T 
can’t believe how much Social Se- 
curity takes every week,” she said. 
”1 don’t make that mudfct; Fm try- 
ing to make a start in life and the 
retired people just take their chunk 
of ray cheti.” 

“Fm not going to see. one cent of 
that money wten I get old. There 
won't be any Social Security” she 
said..‘Tm jut giving this, money 
away.” ■ 1 

TTie dderiy take a different view. 

“For 40 years I was paying Social 
Security,” said Gene Alpert, 63, of 
Boca Raton, who is retired “I 
didn’t complain. No. greed And I 
had no opporamity to sock away 
money” in Individual Retirement 
Accounts' and the Keogh tax-de- 
ferred retirement funds for the self- 
employed 

“Whra we paid Social Security, a 
dollar meant more in relative value, 
in terms cif our earning capacity, 
than the money being earii Vd to- 
day. So don’t tefl me we didn't put 
in enough. We put in our share. 
They can put in their share now.” 

These are the poles in the issue 
that politicians probably fear more 
than any other this year: whether, 
as part of the deficit-reduction 


> plans now binWin g in Congress, to 
freeze Social Security benefits' by ; 
delaying the cost-of-lmng adjust- 
ment, or COLA/ dial otherwise, 
would lake effect Jan. f, 1986. . 

President Ronald Reagan has 
said he wiD approve a freeze only if 
a bipartisan majority in Congress 
does so first 

The Senate majority leader ,v 
Robert J. Dole, a Republican from- 
Kansq$ has said that Senate Re- 
publicans have agreed, tentatively,? 
to snp&brt a freeze. Those senators’ 
have taken the lead in budget ddfib^ ' 
era tides. 

Social Security makes up about a. 
fifth of the budget and the argu- 
ment is that seiu or citizens should. 
. do their share to retire the deficit. A 
12-month deferral of the cost-of- 
living adjustment would saveabom 
$6 billion in fiscal 1986 and S22.I-; 
bOfion over three years. . 

Part of the issue is equity. The 
budget-cotters already are going 
after cosi-of^Bving adjustments in 
other benefit programs. “If we do 
nothing” on Social Security, “then 
why should we treat the next group 
differently?" Mr. Dole said m an 
interview. 

But the issue of Social Security is 
sensitive because of its reach and. 
its nature. 

Benefits go to one-seventh of the 
population. Far 65 percent of the 
elderly, Social Security is their larg- 
est source of income. As benefits 
have risen, the percentage of elder- 
ly people below the federal poverty 
line has declined. 

By the same token, almost all 
wage earners pay the tax. Many, 


'especially the working poor and 
^noddle-income. two-earner fam- 
'ities, pay more in Social Security 
."taxes than in federal income taxes. 

;-f®The tax burden may intensify as 


cate fcurjbose 62 and older from 
133 percent to 15- percent, or for 
553 J42 people. 


--World War II moves into retire- 
,'ment and the ratio of workers to 
, 5 o£ial Security recipients dedmesj 
.. .The burden also has been exacer- 
bated in recent years by high infia- 
:-'&bo. In several years SocaTSecuri- 
benefits have increased faster 
-pSiaB. the wages taxed to pay them. 

“It’s amatter of mtargenentiion- 
m transfer” said John'Maldn, di- 
rector of fiscal studies of the Amer- 
Scan Enterprise Institute, a research 
. institute m Washing ton- “We're 

still in the stage where the benefits 

"Social Security beneficiaries are re- 
ceiving is far more than the money 

; they paid into the system. -Current 
workers are subsidizing them.” 

The 4.1 jpemeat cost-of-living ad- 
justment m the president’s budget 
would raise the average annual re- 
tirement benefit by 5228, to SS, 532, 
according to the' Social Security 
Ariminre tT ati oo ‘ 

For middle-class retirees, failing 
to receive an increase would make 
little difference. But one-fourth of 
Social Security’s beneficiaries rely 
on it for 90 percent of their income. 
Fifty-five percent have incomes be- 
low 310,000, 73 percent below 
SI 5,000 and 90 percent below 
525,000. 

According to the results of a 
study by the a one-year freeze in 
the cost-of-lrving adjustment in 
1986 would increase the poverty 


. . Laurie A. Fiori. a Social Security 
analyst for the AmericanjAssoda- 
tion of - Retired Persons, notes that 
the one-year freeze would affect 
future Social Security payments by 
lowering the base -for future cost- 
of-hving adjustments. In five years, 
. she estimated, the one-year freeze 
would cost an individual 51,284, 
and a couple 52,160. 

In Delray Beach, where numer- 
ous middlfrctass retirees have come 
smith, to live in modest coodanrim- 
ums near the affluent rctirenvyu 
estates and country chibs m Boca 
Raton and Palm Beach, the young 
are very aware of who is paying for 
the Social Security clucks that 
flood into banks during the first 
week ofevery month. 

A1 Rantd, a talk show host for. 
WNWS radio, -asked listeners two 
weeks ago : “Should social pro- 
grams be cut to balance the federal 
budget?” 

People older than 55 were not 
allowed to participate because 
“they couldn t be objective with 
Social Security patting dollars in 
their pockets.” The response: near- 
ly 75 percent favored cuts. 

“Most of them volunteered that 
Social Security has got to be cut,” 
Mr. Rantd said. “My show gets a 
lot of people in their 30s and 40s. 
And they said they’re putting moth 
ey out for old people, and they’ll 
never get a dime back. One guy put 
it real wdL He said the old people 
are ripping us off.” 


According to polls, the doubts of 
theyoimg are hardening into a con- 
viction that, despite their contribu- 
tions, they win not receive SodaT. 
Security benefits when they retire. . 

A Washington Post-ABC News ' 
poll in January showed Americans 
evenly divided on whether Social 
.Security will exist .when they reach 
retirement age. According to the 
poll, 47 percent said they think it 
wiB ' exist and 47 percent said it 
would noL Of people aged 1 8 to 30; 
two-thirds doubt duu the system 
wffl be tfaefe when they need il ' 

far Boca Raton, a 69-year-old . 
man who heard the WNWS broad- 
cast anrilerf when asked about the 
resentment of workers whose pay- 
checks are taxed to support Social 
Security. 

“I wen ton a panel at college, and 
the kids kept 'saying they don't like 
Social Security,” said the retiree; 
who asked not to be identified. 
“They said why should they sup- 
port the people who are sitting on 
the bead retired? They see us liv- 
ing down here, and they think 
somebody’s rich. WeQ, I told them. 

I said, ‘You know what would hap- 
pen if you didn’t pay Social Securi- 
ty?. Mom and Pop would come 
back home, they’d be asking you to 


send them a check!' 


“You could see those college Iridi. 
suck in the air,” be said. “One giri 
said, *Oh, Gcd.’ ” 

The prospect of losing an aver- 
age of 5228 because of a one-year 
freeze of the cost-of-living adjust-; 
jnent prompts the elderly here tot 
condemn the younger generation's^ 
“greed.” ;•* 

“They are chipping away at the; 
system,” said Florence Gddmamv> 
73, acting bead of the local chapter* 
of Senior Pac, a Washington-based 
lobbying group for the dderiy.o 
“We’ve had a six-month COLA? 
freeze in 1983 when they said wee 
had to do it to save the [Sociah 
Security]- system. Now they say! 
they warn a one-year freeze.” * 

She also pointed out that there is* 
a tax on the Social Security benefits- 
of those who have incomes of more- 
than 325,000 for a single person 
and $32,000 for a couple. 

“They are chipping away at it,-; 
and pretty soon rt won't be an end- ■ 
Ueroeot pro g r am .” she said. “It will ‘ 
be welfare. They want to say, Tf ’ 
you are not poor you don’t need it-» 
darting,' HeO. no. Why is iu when it* 
comes to older people, they all£ 
warn to know how poor you are? 1 1 
don’t know why old people have to£ 
be poor” » 






As Malpractice Suits Multiply in U.S., Doctors Are Quitting Obstetrics 


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By Arvdtew H. Malcolm. . 

_ - " ~NeW York Tutta Service 

'.NEW YORK — Faced with a growing number of 
malpractice claims anji the Sang expectations of par 
tifchts, -a 1 significant nnniber:of the nation's doctois 
hare dthd - abandoned the practice of obstetrics or are 
seriously conadering iL 

.According lo several experts, the care of wtanen in 
pregnancy, childbirth^ and thd period immedtaidy 
aftoward has become too risky financially and too 
droning emotionally for hundreds of specialists 
across the country, particularly in such stales as New 
York, Fh>rida, and Califomia where malpractice suits 
are most frequent and jury awards are most gerferoos. 

“AtotofobsumiciansareJeaving^spedahtyaQd' 
concentrating instead an gynecology,*’ said Wfltiam 
Roily of New Jersmr Medical Underwriters. “Opting, 
out of ddSveting braes is one way to protect yoorsdf 
against the malpractice epidemic " ■ 

' Obstetricians, along with neurosurgeons and ortho- 
pedists, are prime targets for lawsuits. Americans are 
fifing nearly three times ^ as many medical malpractice 
claims as they filed adccade ago, according to arecent 
report by the American Medical Association, and they 
are winning record settlements, especially. when the 
cases mvolre babies.- 

•: Doctors," “msorers, and the American College of 

nKcfA^rifyftnc anti nyri#onIfigktg«iid that they hid HO 


firm figures on hotv many of the nation's 2SJOOO 
obstetrics-gynecology specialists were giving op 
obstetrics. 

However, Doaglass'M. FhiTHps, executive vice pres- 
kfasat of die Medical Mutual Insurance" Co. of North 
Carolina, estimated that as many as 10 percent of such 
specialists in his area wo? doing so. Othcts put the 


Althou^i medical experts cite no effect as yet on the 
availability of care- for pregnant women and their 
babies, they fear the eventual impact if doctors contin- 
ue to turn away from obstetrics. Those who tod to 
abandon the odd, they $ay, are usually older and 
amongthernost experienced, leaving the same number 
of patients to be cared far by fewer, less experienced 
doctors or by midwives. 

“HI tefl you why I quh aftex 10 years of delivering 

bahies,” sard Dt David A. Ronk, of Norman, Oklaho- rw. i - a. 

ma_“It just got to be too much hassle for the return. 

If s notjust me-disnrption of your life24 houis a day. 
Ifsav^eatmcspl^trfaxirontalionnawbetweffl 
doctors and patients. We believe someone most al- 
ways be at fault. We're suing car makers. Why not 
baby makers?" 

Other doctors fisted a variety of reasons for giving 
up obstetrics, but all agreed that the decline in the 
number of births in the United States in recent years 


has not been a factor. They said there was a reasonable 
balance now between doctors and patients. - 
Medical experts acknowledge" that some doctors 
make mistakes that they should be held accountable 
for. " "• . ' ■ 

Lawyers who represent malpractice claimants say 
the rise in claims results from sloppy and negligent 
medical practices, combined with the public's in- 
creased awareness of the right .to sue. And juiy awards 
of millions of dollars, they say, are a recognition of the 
lifetime financial impact of severe health problems. 

. But few dispute that the American malpractice 
situation, in obstetrics and in medicine as a whole, is in 
some cases corroding the doctor-patient relationship 
and is pushing op the nation's health care biH 
American doctors pay more than 52 union far 
insurance against malpractice suits, a cost passed 
along to patients in the form of higher fees. * 

On Long Island, where medical malpractice insur- 
ance is the most expensive in the nation, obstetricians 
pay about 555,000 a year for 51 million worth of 
coverage; a similar policy far neurosurgeons costs 
5101,000. 

Nationally, doctors and insurance executives said, 
the incidence of malpractice suits had risen in 1983 to 
16 suits for every 100 obstetricians, up from five suits 
in 1975. 

Thai compares with eight malpractice suits in 1983 


per 100 doctors overall, an increase from 33 suits 
before 1978. 

In obstetrics, “there’s an attitude that says, ‘We're 
going to have fewer babies so we want a perfect, 
baby,’” said Dr, Maurice N. Courie, in Raleigh, 
North Carolina, who quit the practice this winter after 
19 years when his malpractice insurance, 54300 for 
1983, jumped to 513,000 for 1985. 

Two decades of medical advances have also condir 
turned parents to expect that any problem can be 
solved with the right machine, technique or doctor. 
The rate of women's deaths in childbirth, for instance, 
has fallen to less than seven per 100,000 births today 
from 83 per 100,000 in 1951. In the same time, infant 
deaths fell to 1 1 per 1,000 live births from 29per 1.000. 

“When you deliver a baby today," said Dr. Theo- 
dore Loring , whose practice debvering bahies has 
spanned precisely that period, “parents expect it to 
come out perfectly. Unfortunatdy, it doesn't always 
turn out that way. Twenty years ago, it was considered 
an act of God.. Today, there are no more acts of God. 
They expect you should have been aide to do 
something." 

“Today," the 67-year-dd obstetrician said, “our 
technology can take a baby weighing 13 pounds [.7 
kilograms] and we can keep it alrve. God only knows 
what that baby will turn out to be. And if there is 
something wrong, even 18 years down the road, they 
can sue you for milEons." 


Baume & Mercier 

GENEVE A 
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V 1 Philips is proud to be.extensively involved in Singapore’s prestigious 
. Raffles City project; which includes die worlds tallest hotel, the 73-storey 
WestmStmnford,Gpe 1986. 


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ifiSMili 


Time for a Middle Way 


Has the world been concentrating too 
much on slopping inflauonand not enough 
on social problems? Industrialized countries 
have certainly pursued a rigorous course to 
slow down price increases. Poorer ones have 
done the same to control their foreign debt. 
For want of a 'better way, most governments 
hare relied mainly on putting people out of 
work. The social cost has been great. 

Francis Blanchard, director-general of the 
International Labor Organization, argues 
flHT, Feb. 6) that policies have been lopsid- 
ed, giving excessive weight to the narrowly 
economic side of problems and forgetting 
the human dimension. To redress the bal- 
ance, he wants ministers responsible for 
both sides — the economic and the social — 
to meet down under the aegis of the ILO and 
try to work out a middle way. 

Certainly, you have to look at the two 
dimensions simultaneously: Action in nei- 
ther can work alone. Unless you damp down 
inflation you will not get the justice and 
progress for which society cries out. because, 
as millions of Latin Americans can testify, 
nothing is so socially unjust as hyperinfla- 
tion. But without sufficient attention to jus- 
tice. economic policy will not restore order 
and stability — or not for long — because 
continuous unfair distribution of sacrifice 
brings (he population into the streets and, 
too often, the military into government 

So we can go a long way in supporting the 
Blanchard thesis that policies designed by 
finance ministers cannot be divorced from 
the aims of the ministries concerned with 
labor and social affairs — and, indeed, with 
education and the environment Just to take 


Taiwan Strains a Bond 


Taiwan calls itself Free China and asks 
Americans to believe that it is not a police 
state. That asks a lot Despite limited freedoms 
and a nourishing free market, Taiwan is a 
republic only in name. One family, one party 
and one cause permeate its politics. Its aging 
leaders cling to views hardened since their 
flight from the mainland in 1949 and have 
ruled with martial law ever since. 

All this is now under American scrutiny 
because Taiwan is implicated in a blatant act 
of terrorism — the gunning dawn in a San 
Francisco suburb last October of Henry Liu, a 
Chinese- American who wrote a muckraking 
book about the Chiang dynasty. The murder 
is said to have been the work of a Taiwan- 
ese criminal syndicate called die Bamboo 
Union. Taiwan holds two suspects and has 
fired three intelligence officials. It vigorously 
denies any high-level involvement. 

In doing that much, Taiwan shames another 
“friendly" dictatorship, in Chile, which has yet 
to answer for its part in the Washington mur- 
der of Oriando Letelier in 1976. In both cases, 
solid FBI work established the foreign link, 
but the effect has been more devastating in 
Taiwan. Its economy and armed forces are 
more directly lied to the United States. 

Congress had Taiwan in mind when it voted 


to bar arm sales to countries found guilty of 
harassing people in America. What prompted 
that amendment was the unexplained “sui- 
cide'' of a Chinese- American scholar, Cben 
Wen-cheng, after questioning in 1981 by the 
Taipei police. There is enough smoke tojustify 
a current House study of Taiwanese harassing 
and spying among Chinese- Americans. 

Nor is it hostile to wonder when Taiwan will 
outgrow its closed political system. Native 
Taiwanese, who are 85 percent of the island’s 
18.5 million inhabitants, can vole only for 
“supplementaiy" seats in the national legis- 
lature, whose majority consists of lifetime 
members elected on the mainland in 1947. 

The repression tightened Iasi summer, when 
Beijing promised Hong Kong a capitalist au- 
tonomy and offered a similar deal to Taiwan. 
The mainlanders' Olympic feats were stonily 
ignored by Taiwan, which closed down the 
American edition of The China Tunes after it 
fully reported the games. Somehow in this 
panic over losing hearts and minds, someone 
picked up the signal that Henry Liu had to die. 

Taiwan can begin to deaase this stain by 
releasing suspects for trial in the United States. 
It could begin to atone for the crime by prac- 
ticing the freedom it preaches. 

- THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Drifting Toward Trouble 


Do big budget deficits make any difference? 
The Congressional Budget Office provides a 
dear and balanced answer in its annual assess- 
ment of the outlook for the next five years. 

President Reagan, in bis State of the Union 
message, once again said, “The best way to 
reduce deficits is through economic growth." 
The CBO. also once again, warns that growth 
will not do it. It calculates that, even with 
rather optimistic economic assumptions, pre- 
sent policy’ will push defidts from $214 billion 
this year to 5296 billion by 1990. 

Americans do not seem inclined to do much 
about it Mr. Reagan will not hear of tax 
increases or significant cuts in defease. With- 
out cuts in defense. Congress will not do much 
cutting anywhere else. In the voting public at 
large, people agree, with a yawn, that deficits 
are terrible, and also that things seem to be 
doing pretty well in spite of them — and turn 
the conversation to more rewarding subjects. 

Even very large deficits, the CBO says, are 
unlikely to generate a sudden economic crisis. 
It could be a long time before even very large 
defidts start to result in stagnating standards 
of living, or in reduced defense capabilities. 
But although it happens slowly, it will happen. 
And as the damage accumulates the process 
will be increasingly difficult to reverse. 


High defidts can lead to low capital forma- 
tion, since the government is soaking up mon- 
ey that would otherwise go into productive 
investment. Lower investment means lower 
productivity and. in turn, lower economic 
growth. Perhaps the present stream of foreign 
capital will keep pouring into America. It does 
not seem likdy to continue at the present rate, 
year after year. If it should dry up, interest 
rates would jump and threaten what the CBO 
terms an explosion of federal debt — a vicious 
circle in which high interest rates begin com- 
pounding a rapidly rising debt Along with all 
of these possibilities there is the reality that. 
whether the rise in debt is fast or skrw, the 
pressures for inflation will rise with it 
In the politics of the federal deficit, the 
optimists are the people who hope for a finan- 
cial crisis — sharp but manageable — this 
year. Without some son of crisis, they argue, 
there will never be a sufficiently strong sense 
of urgency in the government or in the country 
u> force an end to the present drift. But the 
CBO is delivering the somber message that 

there is no reason necessarily to expect a criss. 
The real cost may be, instead, a steady erosion 
of American prosperity and economic power 
that does not become apparent until the 1990s. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


FROM OUR FEB. 13 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Modern Liners Are Not Secure 
PARIS —The wreck of the General Chanzy 
on the coast of Minorca [on Feb. 10] excites 
the sympathy of the world. It is not only the 
list of the more than 150 dead which makes the 
impression, it is the contrast offered by a great 
steamship, fighting her way, apparently un- 
conquerable, through a storm-ridden ocean, 
and the same vessel on a lee shore being 
reduced to matchwood by the very sea it 
seemed to defy. Kipling's lines: "Saw a liner’s 
■lights go past / Like a damned hotel" stun up 
the feeling felt by those on less privileged 
ships, who see the modem palace steamship in 
mid-ocean. The apparent security of the mod- 
em liner gives the full measure of the possible 
catastrophe. The great vessel driving full speed 
on a rock-bound coast, her passengers sleeping 
calmly in their cabins, calls up a scene of 
horror before the dullest imagination. 


1935: Italy Readies Troops for Africa 
PARIS — On the beds of an Italian official 
communique announcing another das h be- 
tween Italians and Abyssinian tribesmen on 
tbe border of Abyssinia there were reports that 
two Italian divisions and the mechanized sec- 
tions of three conscript classes — almost 
35,000 men in all — were getting ready to 
embark for Italian Somaliland. The Abyssin- 
ian Legation in Rome issued a statement that 
it had no knowledge of the incident, and made 
the countercharge that Italian troops were on 
Abyssinian territory. Tbe mobilization was de- 
scribed in Italian dispatches as a “precaution- 
ary measure." This explanation will hardly 
satisfy that growing mass of world opinion 
which looks to the League for the pacific 
settlement of international disputes. Both Italy 
and Abyssinia are members of the League, and 
the quarrel is over a strip of territory. 


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Editor 
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© 1985. bvemauonal Herdd Trxbum. All rights reserved. ESSai 


ex. 'xas**fsttit?h- 




% i S* 




m ill! 
fern 


By Isabel V. Sawhill 


one example, better training and retraining 
facilities are needed in this era of rapid 
technological change if workers are to es- 
cape the slag heap and governments are to 
escape social explosion. 

Whether some new international meeting 
trill get us far is uncertain. The argument is 
that, inside each country, economic and so- 
cial policies are developed in isolation from 
each other, because of the specialization of 
adminis trative functions. This is reflected at 
world level by too narrow a distribution of 
responsibilities between international insti- 
tutions. The IMF and GATT concentrate on 
high finance and trade, the ILO on social 
problems, and never the twain shall meet. 

That is not entirely true. The OECD, for 
example, prides itself on bridging the vari- 
ous concerns that the national machinery of 
government keeps apart, and so does the 
European Community. They confront the 
adversarial ministers, who end by conceding 
that the economic and the social must go 
hand-in-hand, just as they would profess 
that sin is bad and motherhood is good. 
Back home, however, little changes. 

To be more than mere preaching, social 
policy must cost money. At present, heads of 
government listen more to finance ministers, 
who want to save it. than to their soda! 
colleagues, who want to spend it But this is 
not to say there is no room for advance along 
the social road, and both Mr. Reagan and 
Mrs. Thatcher have hinted at it. Social 
spending can be redesigned to great advan- 
tage, with less For the middle classes and 
more for those most in need. 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. 


iff r. * ? VM 


■■ *+ . y ft s'; s- ? 


W ASHINGTON— A&KBldaijy- 

we hear that defidts are a car 


• te «"*****> 

M MM 












;$!? mmmm. 


more production and more jobs." 
While the resulting high interest rates 
curtail some types of speaefing, tfaSs . 
rarely if ever offsets the oripnalstim-; 
uhis from deficit spending. 

Deficits need not be inflationary. 
As long as the Federal Reserve does 
not permit the money supply to grow 
too quickly, inflati on can be avoided. 
Of course, if ibe Fed overreacts to the 
threat of inflation it may came a 
recession. But this is a tightrope that 
tbe monetary authorities have to 
walk in every recovery period. .. 

If deficits are not necessarily going 
to cause a financial crisis, a recession 
or inflation, why ail the fuss? 

The damage is mostly long-term 
and comes in three forms. 

• First, high interest rates will ; 
curb investment spending and lead 
over a number of years to less capital t 
formation, and to slower economic ' 
growth. A reasonable estimate, given 
all the uncertainties, is lhat continu- 
ing deficits in the neighborhood of 
$200 billion a year wul reduce the 
annual growth rate by 0.2 percentage ' 
points over the next decade. Thus, if 
the growth rate of inflation-adjusted 
GNP is projected to be 3.5 percent in -, 
the absence of the deficits, it woold ' 
be 33 percent with them. 

Most of the adverse effects would 
not show up until later in this decade 
and into the next- And most people 
would hardly notice tbe difference, 
especially since they would have no 
basis for comparing actual expert- ; 
ence to what might' have happened -' 
under an alternative fiscal policy. 

• A second problem associated 
with deficits is the soaring cost of 
servicing the national debt Since die' 
debt expands by about $200 billion a 
year, tbe cost df financing it rises by 
about $20 billion a year (at an inter- 
est rate of 10 percent), a cost that 
then threatens to push the next year’s 
deficit still higher. Without strong 
economic growth, reduced spending 
or higher taxes, deficits automatically 
grow larger by the amount of each 
year’s additional interest outlays in 
a self-propelling spiral 

• Third, deficits push up the value 
of the dollar and reshuffle the growth 
of jobs and output away from indus- 
tries that compete in international 
markets and toward services and oth- 
er trade-protected sectors. These 
short-run effects have been widely 
noted, but the real concern should w 
with tbe likelihood of a long-term 
competitive disadvantage for Ameri- 
can businesses. Once lost, strategic 
opportunities to enter new markets 
or to expand market share are hard 
to regain, and improvements in (he 
American standard of living conkl 
be steadily undermined by an erosion 
of its ability to trade with other 
nations on favorable terms. 

These three problems — less capi- 
tal formation, exploding interest 
costs and a possible loss of strategic 
advantage in world markets — are 
both real and serious. But none has 
any very immediate or risible impact 
on the average citizen and none will 
necessarily prevent the economy 
from performing adequately or weu 
over the remainder of this decade. 

Hyping (he deficit problem in the 
interest of spurring leaders to act b 
understandable, but crying wolf is, as 
always, a risky strategy. Should a 
political stalemate occur but the 
economy sail through the next few 
years in good health, then the supply- 
sidere who now argue that deficits are 
unimportant will appear to be vindi- 
cated and will gpin new converts 
among the public. At that point, who 
will be left to protect our children 
from the real woll at their door? 


jKUIH 


W* fOSNHfi* fbsrmms 


Israel: After This Lull, a Stormy Switch to Sharon? 

T el AVIV — “We’re living in Bv Joyce R. Starr ^ tbe stability of the south wou 

a world of cotton candy," warns } J *n ih* siwneih 


an American wbo immigrated to Isra- 
el more than a decade ago. 

“It’s worse than a lull before the 
storm, because it’s an artificially cre- 
ated lull. Beneath the surface, the 
people are angry and violent." 

“Shimon Peres is our national Va- 
lium," a senior Labor Party official 
observed. “He speaks in a calm, re- 
laxed manner, which contradicts the 

style of Begin and Shamir. The peo- 
ple like it, and the country was look- 
ing for a change. But the test will 
come with the first crisis." 

Thar first crisis could be as close as 
Feb. 18, the day when the first phase 
of Israel's withdrawal from Lebanon 
is to be completed. For (he first time 
since 1948, Israel faces more ques- 
tions on her northern border than 
answers. The situation is so uncer- 
tain. so fluid, that few Israelis — 
experts and politicians included — 
will hazard a guess as to what the 
near future might bring. 

“We're gping into a situation we 
never experienced before," said a se- 
nior miutaiy analyst “Tbe main 
question marks are the role of the 
Shiites, the success or the PLO in re- 
entering the south and the survivabil- 
ity of the South Lebanon Army." 

Prime Minister Peres earns praise 
even among opposition leaders for 


stubborn optimism and a low-key tal- 
ent for compromise that proved cru- 
cial in forging the Lebanon with- 
drawal plan, as well as the two 
economic package agreements. But 
some Israelis think that heavier doses 
of raw bad news might be in order. 

“Tbe people must be told the long 
and hard truth," insists a cabinet offi- 
rial “If not, in three or four months' 
time when the standard of living 
drops, unemployment becomes se- 
vere and our troops are still under 
attack in Lebanon, the people will 
say, ‘But the prime minister promised 
that everything would be OK.’ Most 
Israelis think the most difficult steps 
on both Lebanon and the economy 
have already been taken.” 

In a recent interview. Mr. Peres 
said fears concerning future terrorist 
actions by Shiite or PLO factions in 
Lebanon were exaggerated. He sug- 

S sied that for tbe time being one of 
e most pressing Lebanese concerns 
would be antagonism between the 
Syrians and the PLO. 

Israeli military analysis are less 
sanguine. While the Shiite communi- 
ty m general and Amai, the Shiite 
militia, in particular are expected to 
turn their energies away from guerril- 
la activities to more pressing matters 
of survival serious trouble is expect- 


ed from radical Shiite dements — in 
probable alliance with pro- Arafat 
PLO elements that will again manage 
to penetrate the camps of the 100,000 
Palestinians still Uring in the south. 

As for the South Lebanon Army, a 
□umber of senior Israeli military offi- 
cers are known to doubt privately 


iha t the stability of the south would 
henceforth depend on the strength of 
the regular Lebanese army. 

On tbe economic front. Gad Y aa- 
cobu the minis ter for the economy, 
says Israel is just at the start of a very 
difficult period, requiring at least a 
year and a half of “sacrifice and 


$ 


whether General Antoine Lahad’s 
forces wffl hold together after Feb. 
18. More than 40 percent of General 
Lahad's men live in the first area to 
be evacuated, where they are already 


brave decisions” to turn the economy 
around. “If anyone thinks the second 
package agreement is a solution to 
Israel's economic problems, I feel 
very sorry for him,” be said. 

Rumblings over unemployment 
and salary erosion are likdy to reach 
critical proportions in the coming 
five or six months, just when Israeli 
troops still remaining in Lebanon are 
most exposed (along with Israel's 
northern border and settlements), 
with casualty figures possibly rising. 

“This is when the people wall start 
clamoring for a father figure to come 
and take over," confides a worried 
Israeli businessman. 

“Now they idl outsiders what a 
fine job Peres is doing. But behind 
dosed doors the name you hear most, 
among those who love him and those 
who hate fcdm, is Arik Sharon." 


targets of assassination attempts. 
Interviewed briefly less than 


Interviewed briefly less than a 
week after tbe Israeli announcement 
of the withdrawal. General Lahad 
was nervous, refused to answer most 
questions and declared repeatedly 


77u? writer directs the Near East 
program of the Center for Strategic 
and International Studies at George- 
town University. She contributed this 
to the International Herald Tribune. 


Lebanon: The Goal Is Strong Central Government 


W ASHINGTON — A myth sur- 
rounds the Israeli presence in. 


W rounds the Israeli presence in, 
and Lebanon’s policies toward, occu- 


By Abdallah Bonhabib 


pied souLbem Lebanon. Contrary to 
01-intended rumors, Lebanon seeks 


The writer is Lebanon's ambassador to the United States. 


ill-intended rumors, Lebanon seeks 
the complete withdrawal of Israeli 
foroes from all occupied territories. 
Lebanon wants a coordinated and 
orderly withdrawal with UN assis- 
tance. Only a strong Lebanese central 
government and army can ensure law 
and order in southern Lebanon. 

There is perhaps no issue that so 
unifies the Lebanese as the Israeli 
withdrawal Tbe Lebanese — the 
president, the national unity govern- 
ment. the parliament and afi other 
political figures, as well as the people 
— seek immediate and total with- 
drawal It is Lebanese resistance that 
has persuaded Israel to begin its with- 
drawal after all and the acts of the 
resistance have been mounted as a 
result of its popular support 


forces from Lebanese territory sug- 
gests that the so-called “first phase" 
may also be its last phase. That is, it 
may be a ruse to reduce the cost of 
occupation. Israeli Defense Minister 



Israel's refusal to present a pro- 
gram for the withdrawal of all its 


Yitzhak Rabin himself has called this 
a “redeployment" and said that Is- 
raeli forces may stay indefinitely. 
The Lebanese government insists 


on a complete timetable for total 
withdrawal in order to judge the na- 
ture of Israeli plans, and to ensure an 
orderly extension of government au- 
thority to the liberated territory. The 
“first phase.” like ibe Israeli with- 
drawal from theChuf in 1983, maybe 
planned quite specifically to impede 
the imposition of greater Lebanese 
government control and to sustain 
local groups in league with Israel that 
will resist real Lebanese authority. 

Moreover, Lebanon continues to 
request UN forces to facilitate a 
speedy and complete Israeli with- 
drawal and to help extend the Leba- 
nese government control over areas 
when Israeli forces withdraw. 

What we do not want — and what 
the United Nations does not want — 
is ihat UN forces be used as a shield 
after a partial Israeli withdrawal so 


Update the Pentagon , Not Just Arms 


P ARIS — Now that President 
Reawn has delivered the orc- 


l Reagan has delivered the pre- 
game pep talk for his second ad- 


By Flora Lewis 


ministration, serious play begins. It 
has been widely admitted that there 
is no feasible way to reduce the 
skyrocketing deficit except by an 
onerous tax rise that would take the 
lift out of the economy, or by a 
sizable cut in military spending. 

Neither one, says the president 
Congress must End something else. 

Along comes Edward Lactwak, a 
hard-line, gung-ho defense special- 
ist, and he has an idea. It is not 
really a new idea, any more than tax 
reform is a new idea, but it is valid 
and the time has come. 

Echoing General David C. Jones, 
retired chairman of the Joint Chiefs 
of Staff, Mr. Luttwak calls for far- 
reaching reform of the military 
structure. It is necessary, he says in 
his new book, “The Pentagon and 
the Art of War," not only to save 
money but to repair grave hidden 
flaws in America's mtiiiary estab- 
lishment that undermine security. 

Mr. Luttwak does not want to 
scrimp on defense. In fact he argues 
that “fraud, waste and mismanage- 
ment," so often cited as the villains 
that shrink tire defense yield on 
those many billions of dollars, are 
not only unavoidable but desirable 
in certain dreu instances. The Pen- 
tagon is not a business and its lest 
of effectiveness cannot be tire same 
as commercial efficiency. 

But neither is its budget a mea- 
sure of its success in providing mili- 
tary strength, as status in the For- 
tune 500 measures commercial 
success. Like many analysis before 
him, Mr. Luttwak shows convinc- 
ingly that America is not getting its 
defense money’s worth. Piling on 
more dollars will not improve 
things- It would only aggravate ayd 
perpetuate tbe failures of 


uon that make for poor operation. 
He gives many examples, not 


He gives many examples, not 
only obvious and glaring disasters 
like the marines in Lebanon and the 
aborted attempt to resale hostages 
in Iran. Even the invasion of Gre- 
nada, presented to the public as a 
triumph of U.S. aims, was dread- 


fully and needlessly botched. 
The fault is not due to la 


The fault is not due to lack of 
intelligent, dedicated and brave 


Evm the invasion 
of Grenada, presented 
to the public as a 
triumph of US. arms, 
i casbadfy botched. 


commanders, Mr. Lutrwafc says, ft 
is the command system itself, which 
defeats the best men and rewards 
bad buying habits and over-elabo- 
rate, under-functional desi g n. Gen- 
eral Jones has been saying lire same 

a far a long time, but with more 
or his comrades-in-arms than 
the blunt Mr. Luttwak. 

Both insist that the command 
system must be fundamentally 
overhauled and integrated into a 
single, professional general staff. 
Only that would it be possible to 
develop a coherent national strate- 
gy, which does not now exist, and 
spend the money wisely on the right 
weapons to do the job- 

As the Peuugon runs now, based 

on reforms imposed in the immedi- 
ate aftermath of World War U and 
addressed to defense conditions of 
two generations ago, practically ev- 
erything is decided on the baas of 


interservice rivalry. Decisions are 
not made in terms of the best plan 
but of competition among array, 
navy, air force and marines; or, 
when they can agree, on the basis of 
doling out “fair” shares. 

The argument against an inte- 
grated general staff is the old (ear 
that it would put too much power in 
uniformed hands, and circumvent 
civilian control The example usual- 
ly cited is the traditional prewar 
German general staff. But military 
arrogance is not the problem in 
modem American government. 

On tbe contrary, where there are 
brash, belligerent, imprudent urges 
in the U.S. defense establishment 
now, they almost always come from 
civilians. The men in uniform tend 
to calculate tbe risks with caution. 

Former Defense Secretary James 
R. Schleanger told a Senate com- 
mittee last week that it simply was 
not realistic to expea either Ameri- 
ca's global commitments to be re- 
duced or its forces to be increased 
enough to meet them without wor- 
ry, “We shall have to bear continu- 
ously a degree of risk that is unwel- 
come.” he said glumly but honestly. 

That is all the more reason why il 
is time to slop the corrosive game of 
budget-bucking and to modernize 
the Pentagon, instead of just its 
fabulously costly hardware. 

In aD other generation or two. 
new adjustments may be required 
in the military command. Needs 
change; no prescription stays best 
forever. But it is highly likdy that a 
reform of the whole staff system 
uow, eliminating silly purchases 
like $7,000 coffee pots, would cut 


that the rest of Israel’s forces can 
remain in Lebanon. Not will we ac- 
cept a LIN force that separates the 
parts or people of Lebanon. United 
Nations forces should speed with- 
drawal not prevent it. 

We are deeply worried about the 
maintenance of security in areas lib- 
erated from Israeli occupation. Our 
principal concern is for the protec- 
tion of our citizens, but we are not 
unaware of the possibility that Israel 
may use the pretext of “absence of 
law' and order" to intervene again 

Israeli occupation has not ensured 
law and order. Many acts of resis- 
tance have taken place during the 
Israeli occupation, after all Any 
threat to local populations can best 
be reduced by the extension of gov- 
ernment authority to the south. No 
major attacks of this son have taken 
place where the government has exer- 
cised effective control. 

Since its invasion in 1982, Israel 
has weakened both the government 
and the army by trying to arrive at 
special arrangements with individual 
groups, intimately, only the central 
government of Lebanon can provide 
what is required in the south. 

This is not Sinai or the Golan 
Heights; it is a heavily populated area 
needing the social economic and ad- 
ministrative services only a strong 
government can provide. Neither the 
Israeli array nor certainly the small 
(2,000-member) illegal local militia it 
supports has been able to protea 
Israel's interests or those of the local 
citizens. The idea of a 25-mile (40- 
kilometer) security bell never made 
mi/icaiy sense. Jf there is no strong 
government on our side of the border, 
there will also be no limit to the 
weapons that might be used against 
Israel and some of those could have 
ranges of 50 to 100 miles or more. 

Israel has found that stable and 
responsible, albeit unfriendly, rela- 
tions sucb as exist on its borders with 
Egypt. Jordan and even Syria are 
most likely when the territory across 

tbe border is governed by a strong 
central government. Thus il is as 
much in Israel's interest as in Leba- 
non’s to have a strong rather than a 
weak Lebanese central government. 

The Washington Post. 


The k niter is an economist at die Ur- 
ban Institute and co-audwrcf "The Rea- 
gan Record" and " Economic PoBty in 
the Reagan Years.” She contributed dus 
comment to The New York Times 


Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed “Letters to the 
Editor ” and must contain die writ- 
er's signature, name and fuB ad- 
dress. Leuers should be brief and 
are subject to editing We cannot 
be responsible for the return -of 
unsolicited manuscripts. 


LETTER TO THE EDITOR 

A Matter of Priorities Campaign for the Horn 


In response to “ On a New York 
Block, Homeless ‘ Neighbors’ Per Res- 
idents" (Insights, Feb. 6); 


Cam p ai g n for the Homeless esti- 
mates that 20,000 live rough. -• 
Yet the president of the 
Stales puts forward a budget increas- 
ing mili tary spending by i4 percent. 


William L Geisi's report depicting while cutting public welfare benefits, 
the plight of New York’s homeless The British government feekitnecef 


scans of billions of unproductive 
spending. And it should certainly 
improve the quality of defense. 
America cannot afford to put it off, 
for security as well as for savings. 

The New York Times 


people was excellent. Last summer, in 
Los Angeles, I was shocked to see 
hundreds of homeless men and wom- 
en sleeping in and around refrigera- 
tor boxes in the streets surrounding 
the “Midnight Mission." This Christ- 
mas. in Paris for the holidays, my 
wife and 1 were appalled by the large 
number of homeless men and wotn- 


5ary to cut the tales of local authon* 
ties to stem them from “overspend- 
ing" on things like public bousing 


and shelter accommodation for the 
homeless. Socialist France continues 
to spend billions on an independent 
nuclear deterrent. Meanwhile 
lions starve in the Sabd and 
West's streets are filled ^ with tawd** 5 


cn. many of than quite young, living people with tittle or no prospects. 


on the streets and in the metro. Here 
in London, the Shelter National 



MR. KATZ. 
.London. 


e tiV . < St' 






yv we hear that defidts are a ca- 
lamity for America. While they are a. 
serious mattei; we' should not over- - 
state their adverse consequences for 
the .economy. If the (fire conse-.. 
quences that some predtctfaiil to ma- 
terialize, public complacency about; 
die real dangers could easily follow.' ' 
Contrary to the popular opinion,' 
disaster is not imminen t- True, a sad-' 
den withdrawal of foreign capital or! 
the failure of a major bank .or corpo- ' 
ration could trigger ac^lcrisismatj 
would put the American economy ini 
a tail s pin But the probabilities of this 
occurring are rather small 
Moreover, defidts do not cause re- 
cession. They mean ihat tbe govern!- . 
mentis putting nxire money mtodti-. 
zoos' hands than it is taking away in 
taxes: and as they spend, tbe rasakir 


i*- 







. u Htliijr \rR 


CSESCO 








fc_: ■; •• : 


...... 














INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1985 


- A - -1- 





El Salvador Queried on Disappearances 


Amadou Mahtar M’Bow, i 
- seated with his assistant, J 


The AbxkAkMVhs 


t die head of UNESCO, 
i Knapp. The seats for the 


U.S. delegation were empdy as a special session of the body 
began on Tuesday in Paris to discuss the U.S. withdrawal. 


UNESCO Begins Debate on Effects of U,S. Pullout 


By Paul Lewis 

New York Tima Service 

PARIS — The United States was 
reduced to a spectator on Tuesday 
as UNESCO’s 50- member execu- 
tive board opened a politically 
charged debate on the conse- 
’ guences of the UJL withdrawal 
from the world body. 

However, although officially ab- 
sent, the United States dominated 
the discussion and (he political 
maneoverings on the first day of 
the five-day session. 

The U.S. withdrawal has cut the 
UN Educational. Scientific and 
Cultural Organization's budget 
overnight by a quarter, confronting 
it with the urgent need to mak e 
drastic spending reductions. 

Western member nations are 
hoping to use UNESCO's cash cri- 
sis to eliminate many of the politi- 
cally controversial programs that 
the agency has developed under its 
director-general. Amadou Mahtar 
MTJow. 

Those programs, including stud- 
ies and conferences critical erf press 
freedom and individual human 
rights and efforts to promote a 
Marxist view of disarmament, fi- 
nally led the United States to pull 
out of the organization at the be- 
ginning of this yiar. 


Unless UNESCO makes adjust- 
ments. Britain and Singapore have 
said that they also will pull out at 
the end of this year. And several 
European countries, including 
West Germany, Belgium, the Neth- 
erlands and Denmark, p lan to re- 
consider their membership if there 
are no further reforms. 

But Soviet bloc and some Third 
World members are fighting to re- 
tain those UNESCO activities the 
Western members dislike, hoping 
to find extra funds for them from 
other sources or at least to spread 
cats lightly across all of UNES- 
CO’s budget. 

Political tension ran so high 
among the various groups as they 
squared off for this battle over bud- 
get cuts that the executive board's 
chairman, Patrick Seddoh of Gha- 
na, called on members on Tuesday 
“to resist feelings of resentment 
and frustration, however justified 
they may seen" when discussing 
the consequences of the UJS. with- 
drawal. 

Some of the issues raised were so 
sensitive, Mr. Seddoh said, that 
(hey were best kept out of the pub- 
lic debate altogether and resolved 
in private corridor baigainihg. 

“We must not let passions run 
wild," he said. 


In particular, be banned public 
discussion of Mr. IVEBow's contro- 
versial contention that the United 
States must pay its full share of this 
year's UNESCO biannual budget 
or face prosecution before the In- 
ternational Court of Justice in The 
Hague. He also told members to 
avoid taking sides publicly in the 
dispute over whether to accept the 
observer mission that the United 
Stales has sent to maintain contact 
with UNESCO 

But on balance, the first day did 
not go well for Western UNESCO 
members, many of their delegates 
said afterward. Mr. M'Bow intro- 
duced his report on the impact of 
U.S. withdrawal which suggested 
that the United States should be 
taken to the World Court and 
raised doubts about accrediting the 
U.S. observer mission. 

He also said that some member 
countries were prepared to help fill 
UNESCO's budget gap with volun- 
tary contributions, but he did not 
give any details. 

Chair man Seddoh rejected an at- 
tempt by Scandinavian members to 
debate a specific list of money-sav- 
ing cuts in UNESCO’s activities 
which they have prepared and 
which eliminates many controver- 
sial items. 


The West German delegate, Karl 
Moersch, said the only solution to 
UNESCO's budget crisis was to 
reduce expenditures by making se- 
lective cuts in activities that did not 
command widespread support. He 
also called for the abolition of un- 
filled secretarial posts and cuts in 
administrative expenses. 

But (he delegate for the United 
Arab Emirates, Saeed Abdullah 
Salman, proposed setting up a spe- 
cial agency to seek private contri- 
butions to meet UNESCO's budget 
gap. 

He also suggested using unspent 
money in a special UNESCO fund 
for offsetting the effect of currency 
fluctuations cm its budget. 

Western governments are al- 
ready concerned by Mr. M’ Bow’s 
decision to withhold $10 million 
from the surplus that built up in 
this fund between 1981 and 1983 
instead of returning it to member 
states as UNESCO regulations re- 
quire. 

They fear that this will create a 
precedent allowing Mr. M'Bow to 
withhold Washington’s $42-million 
budget contribution for this year 
from the big new surplus now accu- 
mulating in this fund as a result of 
the dollars continued strength. 


By Iain Gucsr 

International Herald Tribune 

GENEVA — A special UN pan- 
el has asked the government of B 
Salvador to explain the disappear- 
ances of 218 people who were alleg- 
edly abducted by government secu- 
rity officials. 

According to a United Nations 
report released here Tuesday. 138 
of the cases were treated by the UN 
pand as a matter of urgency. 

Sources close to the UN said that 
about 30 of the disappearances 
were reported to have occurred 
since Jasfc Napoleon Duarte was 
elected president June 1. In his 
campaign, Mr. Duarte pledged to 
improve human rights and eradi- 
cate the rightist death squads that 
have been blamed for lens of thou- 
sands of killing s. 

The UN report described disap- 
pearances as “the most comprehen- 
sive denial of human rights of our 
time, bringing boundless agony to 
the victims, ruinous consequence to 
the families, both socially and psy- 
chologically, and moral havoc to 
the societies in which they occur." 

It comes aLa time when the Rea- 
gan administration is saying ihat 
the h uman rights situation in El 

Salvador, Guatemala and Hondu- 
ras is improving while the govern- 
ment of Nicaragua is drifting into 
totalitarianism. The a dminis tration 
has asserted that the UN Perma- 
nent Commission on Human 
Rights has shown “selectivity" by 
repeatedly criticizing B Salvador. 

According to the report, the UN 
panel has transmitted reports of 
2,000 alleged disappearances to the 
Salvadoran government since 1980. 
The government has provided suf- 
ficient information to clarify the 
cases of 273 people. Of them, 161 
are in prison, 110 areal liberty and 
four are reported dead. 

The report said that each case 
sent to the government contained 
details about the abductors, who 
were said to have included “mem- 
bers of the armed forces, civil de- 
fense. the national guard, the na- 
tional police, the treasury police, 
the combined security forces, or 
simply armed men in plain 

dothes:” 

According to the report — the 
panel's fifth — the pand reviewed 
2,900 alleged cases of disappear- 
ances last year and transmitted 
1 ,800 to 29 governments for expla- 
nation. The reports were received 
from human rights groups. 

Fourteen governments are listed 
as having been responsible for 20 
or more disappearances either last 
year or in the past, with the greatest 
number of new cases occurring in 
Peru, Guatemala and El Salvador. 

The other II governments are 
Argentina, Bolivia, Cyprus, Hon- 
duras. Indonesia, Iran, Lebanon, 
Nicaragua. Paraguay, the Philip- 
pines and Uruguay. 


According to the report, the larg- 
est number of new disappearances 
Iasi year occurred in Peru, where 
the government was asked to ac- 
count for 236 cases. An annex to 
the report is expected shortly, con- 
taining details of more than 130 
Peruvian additional cases that have 
been reported to the UN panel 
since its last meeting in December. 

Most of the disappearances oc- 
curred in the province of Ayacu- 
cho, where government forces are 
fighting the Shirting Path guerrilla 
group. 

Elsewhere m Central America, 
Guatemala was asked about 289 
disappearances, 143 of which re- 
portedly occurred in 1984. Hondu- 
ras was asked to explain 18 new 
cases, bringing to 87 the total seat 
to the government by the pand. 

In addition, 60 new cases were 
sent to the government of Nicara- 
gua for an explanation. Of these, 27 
were said to have occurred in 1983 
and one last year. 

One diplomat pointed out that 


Legal Aid Fund 
In Watergate Case 
Is Closing Doum 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The fund 
that helped pay the legal bills of , 
un convicted officials of Richard 
M. Nixon’s 1972 re-dection com- 1 
mi t tee is going out of business 12fc 
years after Watergate, having spent 
nearly S4 million. 

Lawyers for the former attorney 
general. John N. MrtcfaeU. chair- 
man of the committee, got $681579 
at the end of last year on bills 
stemming from a trial in which he 
and Maurice Stans were acquitted. 
Mr. Stans, a former commerce sec- 1 
rotary who was chairman of the I 
committee's finance arm. got 
$117,043. 

A total of $588,877 was paid out 
in December, according to reports 
filed with the Federal Election 
Commission, leaving the “1972 
Campaign Liquidation Trust” with 
$19,938. That money will be turned 
over to the Republican National 
Committee. Guilford Dudley, 
chairman of the trust, said Tues- 
day. 

The fund, the survivor of a Nix- 
on campaign organization that col- 
lected more than $60 million for his 
re-election, once contained about 
$4 million. 

The biggest final payment, 
$275,299, went to lawyers for Rob- 
ert Mardian. whose conviction in 
the cover-up trial was overturned 
on appeal. Kenneth W. Parkinson, 
who was acquitted in that trial, 
received $38,758. 


tbe number of cases reviewed by 
the UN pand and transmitted to 
governments was almost certainly 
considerably less thm the actual 
number of people wbo have disap- 
peared. 

He added that much of the effec- 
tiveness of tbe panel depended on 
the ability and efficiency of human 
rights groups. This, he said, was 
partly responsible for the heavy 
preponderance of cases from Cen- 


tral South America, where hu- 
man rights groups are active, and 
the relative lack of cases Cram Afri- 
ca and Asia. 

Thcrfive- member UN pand was 
established in 1980 to investigate 
siippuiwm of disappearances by 
government security forces. It has 
been renewed annually, and the- 
UN rights commission, which is 
currently meeting in Geneva, is to, 
vote shortly on a further extension. 


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Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1985 


Reprisals Would Hurt 
Military Cooperation 
With U.S., Lange Says 



By Steve Lohr 

.Yen York Times Serna 

WELLINGTON. New Zealand 
— Prime Minister David Lange 
says that American economic repri- 
sals for his anti-nuclear policy 
would only make New Zealand less 
likely to cooperate militarily in the 
future. 

** Anything that cuts us back in 
the U.S. market cuts back our pos- 
sibility of taking our pan in region- 
al cooperation.” Mr. Lange said in 
an interview on Monday. 

Last week. New Zealand said it 
would not permit an American 
warship to make a port call unless 
the government was assured that 
the vessel carried no nuclear weap- 
ons. The United States, as a matter 
of policy, refuses to give such assur- 
ances. 


Mr. Lange, who has described 
himself as a middle-of-the-road so- 
cialist. said that New Zealand still 
considered itself a firm ally of the 
Americans, referring to them in the 
vernacular as “males." 

But he noted that New Zealand 
was highly dependent on foreign 
trade and' that the United States 
was a vital market for its products. 

“We are therefore absolutely vul- 
nerable in the event that we are cut 
off from that economic lifeblood,” 
Mr. Lange said. “And if we are. 
well, then we don't relate so well 
with our mates.” 

The refusal to allow the pen call 
was viewed in the United States as 
undermining the 34-year-old AN- 
ZUS alliance, which includes Aus- 
tralia. New Zealand and the United 
Slates. 


Subcommittee on Asian and Pacif- 
ic Affairs, said he would call hear- 
ings on the ANZUS treaty because 
New Zealand's actions “raise the 
gravest questions about the future 
of the alliance.'' 

In the face of these moves. Mr. 
Lange said: 

“This government is committed 
to an alliance with the United 
States. We have no intention of 
withdrawing from it. There need be 
no comfort given to the Soviet 
Union in thinking we have with- 
drawn. We have not. The United 
States is our mate. The Soviet 
Union is noL It is a respectful ac- 
quaintance. not a male." 

Early last week, UJS. officials 
said they were studying retaliation, 
such as an end to preferential treat- 
ment for imports of lamb and wool 
from New Zealand and the release 
of surplus American butter and 
other dairy products, which would 
hurt New' Zealand's sale of those 
products on world markets. 

Later, the United States appar- 
ently softened its position. An offi- 
cial said that the White House was 
not planning any sanctions, but he 
said it would no longer argue on 
New Zealand's behalf for trade 
benefits in Congress. 



-W-4- • . v _ Zi 

*ri 

■ ■t. 



Z ‘ 



ASEAN Urges Increase 
In Foreign Arms Aid for 
Cambodian Resistance 


David Lange 


U.S. Wants 


Afghanistan 


On Agenda 


Washington Post Sert-icc 


WASHINGTON — The United 
Slates hopes to resume high-level 
talks on Af ghanistan with the Sovi- 
et Union this month. State Depart- 
ment officials say. but it is uncer- 
tain whether the Russians will 
agree. 


In the U.S. Congress. Senator 
William S. Cohen, Republican of 
Maine, introduced a resolution 
calling for trade and military sanc- 
tions. 

Representative Stephen J. So- 
larz. Democrat of New York, chair- 
man of the House Foreign Affairs 


■ Warning on Trade Benefits 

The Slate Department reiterated 
Monday that the United States will 
withdraw a special trade benefit 
from New Zealand products unless 
the country ended its export subsi- 
dies by March 31, Agence France- 
Presse reported from Washington. 

Thomas O'Herron, a State De- 
partment trade official, said that 
New Zealand promised three years 
ago to drop its trade subsidies by 
March 31, 1985. New Zealand has 
said that it mil not meet that dead- 
line. As a result, Washington is 


The Reagan administration has 
told Soviet officials that Afghani- 
stan is among the topics that Rich- 
ard W. Murphy, the assistant secre- 
tary of state for Near Eastern and 
South Asian Affairs, intends to 
bring up in discussions on the Mid- 
dle East. Those talks are to take 
place later this month in Vienna. 


Last month, U.S. officials listed 
Afghanistan as a likely topic, along 
with the Arab- Israeli conflict, Leb- 
anon, the Iran- Iraq war, and Soviet 
military support for Syria and Lib- 
ya. The Russians have not yet 
agreed to the full agenda, officials 
said Monday. 


expected to place a duty on New 
Zealand products. 


BROADCASTING TO CABLE COMMNIES 
IN EUROPE & THE UK VIA SATELLITE 


CHANNEL 


■ Envoys Discount Rumors 
Western diplomats reported 
Tuesday that Soviet sources had 
hinted that Afghanistan's presi- 
dent, Babrak Karmal, ought be re- 
placed and the country's capital 
transferred further north, Reuters 
reported from Pakistan. 


PROGRAM. WEDNESDAY 13th FEBRUARY 


UK TIMES 13.35 THE FUQHT TO SURVIVAL 
14.05 A VILLAGE SCRAPBOOK 

14.30 NEW ANIMAL WORLD 
15.00 SKY TRAX 1 

15.45 SKY TRAX 2 

16.30 SKY TRAX 3 

17- 30 THE BRADY BUNCH 

18- 30 MAUREEN MCGOVERN AT SYMPHONY HALL 
20.15 TREASURE OF RUBY HILLS 

21-35 INTERNATIONAL MOTOR SPORTS 
2235 SKY TRAX 


CONTACT SKY CHANNEL. SATHUTE TELEVISION PIC FOR FURTHER INFORMATION 
TELEPHONE LONDON (01) 636 4077 TH£X 266943 


The diplomats discounted both 
rumors as unlikely. But they said 
they were intrigued that Soviet 
sources were involved in the ru- 
mors because they could only un- 
I dermine the authority of the Af- 
ghan government. 

If true, the rumors would also 
| imply important shifts in Moscow's 
| -approach to Afghanistan, where it 
has 115,000 troops defending the 
Communist government against 
: Moslem insurgents. 


By William Branigin 

Washington Past Senke 

BANGKOK —Southeast Asia's 
noncommimisl nations have ap- 
pealed to foreign powers to step up 
military aid to Cambodian guerril- 
la groups fighting the Vietnamese 
occupation of their country be- 
cause of Hanoi's current successful 
offensive along the Thai-Carabodi- 
an border. 

In a joint communique issued 
Monday after talks on the situation 
in Cambodia, or Kampuchea, the 
foreign ministers of the Association 
of South-East Asian Nations, 
which includes Thailand, Indone- 
sia, Malaysia, Singapore, the Phil- 
ippines and Brunei, called on “the 
international community to in- 
crease support and assistance to the 
Kampuchean people in their politi- 
cal and military struggle to liberate 
their homeland from foreign occu- 
pation." 

The communique marked (he 
first time that ASEAN as a group 
has called for direct foreign mili- 
tary aid to the Cambodian resis- 
tance. Diplomats said the appeal 
was directed primarily at the Unit- 
ed States. 

Asked in a press conference if 
this meant that Lhe group was seek- 
ing direct foreign military aid for 
the guerrilla groups, the Thai for- 
eign minister, Siddhi SavetsDa, re- 
plied. “yes." 

He said it was common knowl- 
edge that Afghan guerrillas were 
receiving considerable help from 
abroad and that Cambodian guer- 
rillas also were "entitled to fight for 
zhdr independence.” 

“They can't fight with their bare 
hands,” he said. “As long as the 
Soviet Union keeps sending tanks, 
artillery and all sorts of weapons, 
how do you expect these Kampu- 
cheans to survive if they have noth- 
ing?” 

ASEAN diplomats said after- 
ward that the appeal represented a 
tougher position and a desire to 
increase military pressure on Viet- 
nam in the face of its current dry- 
season offensive. 

Since the drive began in Novem- 
ber, Vietnamese troops have over- 
run every major noDcomrounist 
guerrilla base and now are bearing 
down on strongholds of the more 
powerful Communist Khmer 
Rouge guerrillas. 

The diplomats said that, al- 


rillas. principally the Khmer 
Rouge. Thailand and Singapore are 
known (o aid the noncommunists 
militarily. 

One diplomat said: “Before, we 
hedged on the military aid ques- 
tion, but now in the face of the 
Vietnamese offensive we couldn't 
be seeq to be wavering." 

He said ASEAN “hopes that giv- 
en the new military situation on the 
ground, Lhe Reagan administration 
will focus” on the issue. 


■ Vietnamese Attack Camp 

Vietnamese forces firing thou- 
sands of artillery and mortar shells 
launched a two-pronged attack on 
Khmer Rouge positions in western 
Cambodia on Tuesday, forcing 
about 20,000 Cambodian villagers 
into Thai territory, Thai military 
sources told The Associated Press 
in Aranyaprathet. 

The sources said Vietnamese 
forces driving northward may have 
seized and burned the Khmer 
Rouge-controlled civilian camp at 
Khao Din. about 20 miles (32 kilo- 
meters) south of Aranyaprathet. 



l ‘-\- EC »1 


Thai villagers took cover Tuesday from VvetnanKSe shelling in tile town of IGoa 
as Hanoi's occupation troops attacked resistance groups across the border in 




Inquiry Asked on South Africa Polity 


rtSeF" , 


■LsC* - *’ - " i., 
-- ■— ■ 


■ Vietnam to Return Bodies 

Vietnam has agreed to turn over 
the remains of five more -Americans 
killed during the Vietnam War. the 
U.S. Embassy in Bangkok an- 
nounced Tuesday. 

The embassy said talks in Hanoi 
last week between the United 
States and Vietnam bad resulted in 
new information on several cases 
involving American soldiers Who 
had been listed as missing in action 
during the Vietnam War. 

In Laos, a U.S. -Laotian team 
continued Tuesday to search for 
the remains of at least 13 .'yneri- 
cans who were aboard a military 
transport plane shot down over 
Laos in 1971 


White Legislators Gte Official Violence Against Blacks 




and loose, he was not able to get 
over. The next thing I saw whs 


rica — South Africa's official white birdshot, he said: “We release this 
opposition parrv is planning to afi to the pr«s day to day. We are 
r , - - nano Winichfir pvcrv dav'in this 


Thozi falling down. I heard the 
report of a rote. I could not see the 


Bv Alan Cowell Asked about statements in the and loose, he was not able to get 

v*V York Times Semce affidavits that police had opened over. The next tiring I aw wfc 

pi-tot fu 7 a fifth Smith Af- fire with shotguns loaded with Thozi falling down- I heard the 
ril-LS^c^fi^wWre birdshot, he sail: “We ireteare this report ofa% I could not reette 
opposition partv is planning lo ah .to the press day to <hy. We are tnanshoott^ . - * 

seek a judicial inquiry into police budshot every day in tbs I 

activity in this region after reports 

of unprovoked police violence in John Mai col mess, a Port Eliza- started^ walking, but he^ was sway 






<• 51 * ■-■*■ 


black townships, legislators here beth parliamentary deputy from 


The accusations of violence were 


the same party, said he planned to 
present some of lhe affidavits to 
Parliament in Cape Town on Tues- 


rnade in a series of sworn affidavits M£ j ^ ^ establishment 

collected in _ recent weeks bv two of ajudicia] wquiry _ 


white political activists. Molly 
Blackburn and EH Bishop. They are 


a judicial inquiry. 

In the purported incidents in 


SSrfltaSKTC Cradock.a city grippe<i bj a school 
gressive Federal Pa?fy of to 


legislature. whose age was not given — said 


The bulk of the affidavits con- that a 15-year-old was shot as he 
cem purported irregular behavior ran from police. 


U.S. and Soviet Doctors by police officers in a township ^ ^ affidavit of Feb. 5. Mr. 

. ' I . Y !■ « H PIL. _ _ * 


Urge Weapons Freeze 


outside Uiienhage, near Port Eli 2 a- Jacobs said: “I do not know the 
beth, on Jan. 1 1 and at a township name of the wounded bey, but his 


CHICAGO — A group of Soviet 
and American doctors, saying they 
represented 120.000 of their col- 
leagues worldwide, have called for 
an immediate freeze on nudear- 
w capons testing as a first step to- 


rn Cradock. 120 miles 093 kilome- blood is still on the wall of my 
ters) north of here, on Feb. 3. pie house, and his hat is in my posses- 


activisis say the affidavitschronide sioo. There are two holes on one 
incidents in which the police are side of the hat and a big hole on lhe 


mg and staggering. He was holding 
on to the fence for support." t 
It concluded: “/ know that my 
friend Thozi has died. I have noth- 
ing more to say.” ■ 

The affidavits concerning Uites- 
bage relate mainly to events on Jan. 
II, but include a statement said to 
have been made on Feb. 2 by Wiilel 
Zinto. who said that her 12-yeqr- 
old son, Thulani. was shot in a 
front yard on Jan. 29 by the police, 
who passed her house in a bus. ” 
The boy was taken to a doctors 
office, Mrs. Zinto said, but the po- 
lice arrived there and and drove 
him to a hospital in the back of a 
van. . ’ 

“He told me that when he h$d 
been taken from” the doctor's of- 


stf s*-'*' 


S3£iHi?.- V 


zi’r. :f L"i 
sssxii 
7 s rtf--'- 

RSIS* — 1 * 


said to have opened fire on chil- ol h er ] think he was dead when 
dren. raided homes and beaten sus- ( hey dragged him away.” 


free “and put into the police van tije 
police had placed their spare wheel 
on top of him, ” she said. “I did n^i 
question exactly how this wj*s 
placed, as he was crying.” 

■ Youth Dies of Injuries, n 
A 17-year-old black youth died 


pects in police custody. 


Mabhutiso Mboniswa said in an 


ward to a general halt to produc- 
tion and deployment of such weap- 
ons. 

The statement was endorsed by 
Physicians for Social Responsibil- 
ity, the Soviet Committee of Physi- 
cians for the Prevention of Nuclear 
War and the International Physi- 
cians for the Prevention of Nuclear 
War. 


though the appeal was directed pri- 
marily at Washington, there was no 


manly at Washington, there was no 
sign that Washington was willing to 
change its policy of providing only 
humanitarian and diplomatic sup- 
port to the guerrillas. 

Currently, China provides the 
bulk of the miliiaiy aid to the guer- 


A police spokesman in Port Eliz- jjHWf* 1 *?“ e ** *■* J* 

abeth said there had been no for- had ,***? or . 


mal complaint “lo mv knowledge" y< ? udls : T* 102 * 

about police behavior on the two when the pobce man armored 
days mentioned in the affidavits. & opened fire as they ran. 


davs mentioned in the affidavits. ^opened fire as they ran. „ 
- “Thozi ran toward the toilet, 

“If anybody feds that lhe police the affidavit said, chronicling the 
did not behave properly," he said, boys’ flighL “T saw him try to jump 
"then they can come to us any time over the fence into the third yard. 


Tuesday of iquries sustained whgn 
pobce fired rubber bullets and tear 


"then they can come to 
and we will investigate. 


But because the fencing was high 


pobce fired rubber bullets and tear 
gas to break up rioting on Monday 
by more than 3,000 buck students, 
United Press International report- 
ed from Johannesburg, quoting' a 
police spokesman: * 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1985 


Page 7 


In a Schnitzler Revival 


By Michael Billing 

international Herald Trii 


T ONDON — The Old Vic, bought by millionaire Ed Mirvish 

jLr in 1983, soldiers on mysteriously alternating the rood and tbe bad. 
Last month they gave os. a. dreary adaptation of Dickens’s "Great 
Expectations." Now they redeem themselves with a first-rate revival of 
Arthur Schniizla^s buried 1904inasteiiaece > “llieLoiidy Hoad,” which 
brings Anfoony Hopkins back to the London stage after a 10-year 
absence in Hollywood. Schnitzler’s play is a haunting piece of work; one 
that describes, with antobiographical intensity, the high price paid for a 
fife devoted to sexual pleasure and personal freedom. 

■ Schnittke, best known as the author of “La Ronde," once described 
bimsdf as “a virtuoso of solitude,” and tins play is about lonely people. 
The key. figure. Mian Fkhtoex, is agk^trotting painter driven back to 
Vienna ’by the overpowering deans to see bis 2>year-ald son, Fcfix, 
whom he has sired with hisfbest friend’s wife. But Felix, unaware of his 
’real father's identity, has been brought up in a busy, bourgeois household 
dedicated to idf-ndfiBiheaL The irony is' that Felix wants the same 
freedom his father once, enjoyed, - and so, rejecting Johan’s paternal 
longings, he joins a dying writer named von Safctom an obviously doomed 
expedition '.to explore a buried Afghan city. 

Echoes of Chekhov and Ibsen abound. What makes Schnitzler differ- 
ent is his ability to create a Viennese bourgeois world in which everyone is 

THE LONDON STAGE 

rn the grip of illusion.. Julian fives on the {Busan that patwriity mi plies 
possession. The equally solitary, von Bala believes that expknrarioa of 
some Asian city will give meaning to his barren fife. Felix’s tragically 
frustrated aster dreams endlessly of dries filled with symbofic towers and 

i iu-.ii — c.i.v t~. — 



ARTS /LEISURE _ 


Dee Dee Bridgewater: f Stand-Up’ Singer 


By Michael Zwcrin 

International Herald TrOeme 


to be a 

rather 1 


statemen t of intent 
: chat. “On the pe- 


E ) ARIS — Dee Dee Bridge*®- f 

tec’s mother told her shesans movenent m the eaxty 1970s, she 
before she spoke, which she took as *pq« a lot of tme mconmoom 
— -• and was horrified witnessing Tnad- 



Dee Dee Bridgewater: “The future looks good.* 


• ' Many female entertainers avoid 
■child-bearing in favor of conccn- 
- hated career moves whDe they are 
frill young. Bridgewater believes 
that “if you have talent it wfll speak 
for itself and will not leave you if' 
yon have kids.” And she feds “so 
gorgeous when Fm pregnant” 

. Perhaps she would be more mc- 
cessfulin the business by .now with- 
out having taken the rime out to 
have two danghtfTs but she does 
not necessarily agree with the the 
"majority defini tion of “success." 
And. the considerable recognition 
she's earned fr o m it notwithstand- 
ing, her career mi ght not be for her 
forcvo’. 

Coming from her, “I’ve got a 
pretty, good woriemg mind and Td 
like to use it” sounds Kke a state- 
ment of fact, net a brag. And *Td 
Eke to smdy criminal law" appears 


tamed to 10 years for. stealing a 


However, *Td Eke to stand 19 
for penile" cannot he separated 
from “I have problems with keep- 
ing my mouth shut" as insights intn 
tbe wwipljqiifH fTwh n ^icm that 
makes Dee Dee Bridgewater tick! 
Then throw this into the mix: "The 

man is supposed to be the bead of 
the household, the woman is snp- 
posed to be behind the man. Tins 
relationship can produce a wonder- 
fully ordered family life. But some- 
where along tbe fine something 
went wrong because we’re getting 
divorced.” 

Her father, a trumpet player, was 
also the teacher of Charles Lloyd, 
Booker Little, George Coleman, 
and other future jazz giants to 
come out of Memphis, where she 
grew up. By the age of 16, she had 
her own weal tno, & la the So- 


' proxies. She wait out an weekends 
singing with jazz bands led by 
■friends of her father. She built the 
reputation erf being one of the f e- 
male singers who could hold her 
ownwith male masters Eke Tbad 


Clarke, A1 Jarreau, B.B. King, 
Grover Washington Jr. and Dizzy 
Gillespie. 

She recorded 21 albums, four un- 
der her own name. Down Beat 
magazine codes twice named ber 
vocalist of the year, and she placed 
in the top five in Playboy, Record 
World and Billboard magazine 
polls. 

She talked with Mike Douglas, 
Merv Griffin and Johnny Canon 
on television, won a Tony award 
for her performance of Ghnda the 
witch in "ThcWs," played a torch 
ringer in “1940s Radio Hour.” co- 
starred in films called “Tbe Fish 
That Saved Pittsburgh” and “The 
Brother From Another Planet" and 
starred in TV soaps and commer- 
cials (baby powder, hamburgers). 
But she refused a starring role in 
the original Broadway company of 
“Sophisticated Ladktf* because she 


of Drams” was published in Vienna in 1 900. Schnitzler, himself a doctor, 
shows Freudian ideas at work in the everyday world. 

< This is what makes It a great play. It shows that sdfhood leads to 
.unhappiness. But it . also shows bourgeois-respectable people destroyed 
by their fantasies. Christopher Fettes takes this literacy by setting tbe 
arrinn kada a psychiatric hospital and by treating the maranen as case 
histories retamady observed by a frodc-aated Viennese doctor. At first, 
-the device seems merely nritating .Bm ft pays increariiig jyriA dividends 
prince it allows us to view tbe characters critically rather than identity with 
'them emotionally. It also leads to one superb visual coup when we see 
Felix's suicidal sister trapped inside these institutional walls during a 
rinwidwfitn rm like a fly buzzing around under a bell jar. 

But perhaps the greatest pleasure lies in watching Hopkins back an the 
stage. He plays tire painter like a nm aching for human commi tment: in 
one unforgettable scene he stands downstage, eyes steady moistening, as 
Jus son gazes at a portrait of his mother and begins to understand his 
origins. Hankins, playing with mature qtrietuess, has the naked-soukd 
quality of the real acton Gafin Firth lends iris son a brusque determina- 
tion, Samantha Eggar plays the painter’s ex-mistress, with the jeweled 
glamor of one of Gustav Klimt’s painted Art-Nouveau women, and Alan 
Dobie as die solitary writer tarns himself into an animated death’s-head. 
The production is open, to debate; I have no doubts, however, about 

saying that foe Old Vic has wiped foe dust off a theatrical landmark. 

' 

Death and sofitnde also figure strongly In Nigel Wffliams’s wryly 
entertaining new play, “My Brother’s Keeper,” at the Greenwich theater. 
‘ Williams made ms name with “Class Enemy” arid rimflar studies of foe 
angry, dispossessed wodring-dass. This new play is his first about the 
-middle classes whence lie derives. It is, in fact, a sketetons-m-thocloaet 
Tamfly drama (wiib strong echoes of Eugene CFNcffl) set around the 
hospital bedside of a dying 74-year-old actor and showing his two sons 
locked in bitter conflict as foe old ™n tries to die peacefully. ' 

Williams's point is that~oafy at moments .of terminal crisis do. foe 
middle classes come dean and speak foe direct truth. But his play draws 
,niost of its considerable energy from Tony, the dying man's radicah 
( playwright son, who is one. of those . sdf-Ioathing jokers familiar in 
-modem British drama from Jimmy Tarter onwards. What is good is that 
Williams relishes TonyY witwmle demolishing his daim to have a 
monopoly of vhtuelmd wisdom. John McEnoy plays, him superbly as a 
1 bilious, scrawny figmerarang on about his love for bis father without 
Rowing Mm to foe with di gnity ! WHfiams writes about foe working 
"classes lure arepaEter; here he writes about foe nriddledasseslikea mefal 
insider. 


Unpublished Author Writes 60-Second 'Novels 9 on Demand 


By Frederick M. Winship 

United Press International 

N EW YORK — Dan Hurley is 
an unusual kind erf author. He 
writes 60-second “novels" on or- 
der, for a small fee. So far he has 
written 3,000 of them 
Hurley’s next project is to write 
his 60-second novels from foe top 
of a Manhattan skyscraper. 

“It’s under consideration for a 
$3,000 grant from the- Public An 
Fund of New York," said Hurley, 
who describes hinwrif as a former 
Yuppie arid looked like one when 
lie appeared for an interview in a 
tweed jacket, gabardine slacks, 
shirt, and tie. Inc shirt had a but- 
ton-down collar, of course. 

He said there would be a two- 
way audio-video hookup so he can 
speak to people on tbe street from 
foe top erf foe building just as he 
does when be works on foe side- 
walk. 

Hurley, 27, began working on 
foe sidewalks almost two years ago 
in Chicago, where he was an editor 
for American Bar Association pub- 
lications. For a fee of 52, he would 
type out a minute-long “novel” in 
foe form of a romance, mystery, 
biography, essay or any other liter- 
ary form his passerby clients re- 
quested after a brief conversation. 

The conversation, with Hurley 
often asking questions, gives him 
an insight into the character and 
lives of his subjects on which he can 


base a meaningful composition. He 
says be tries “to find something 
people really value and pot it into 
the story. 

“You only need a typewriter and 
a chair . I had no intention of mak- 
ing money. It was going to be just 
fun." 

Said Hurley, “It worked. People 
related to me. They poured out 
their hearts to me, told me their 
hopes, their problems. I felt like an 
ancient Greek oracle, like a cross 
between a psychologist and a 
priest. And I earned as much as 
$100 a day." 

DOONESBURY 

Samoa, arbw con- 
C ’BtN&WTtOUHSHr Arjr 
GETNmtWOFW ' /tv 

1 AFTat.ALl,8ZCaN6 \ 

l thb sauous move? 



■ Hurley has since given up his 
ABA job, moved to Brooklyn and 
upped his fee to $5. He has written 
novels for former Chicago Mayor 
Jane Byrne, entertainers Alice Coo- 
per and . Whoopi Goldberg. 
“M*A*S*H” producer Larry Gd- 
bait, and Mike Love of tbe Beach 
Boys. 

His own first novel, a full length 
one tilled “Johnny Hero: A Comic 
Book Trfegedy ” remains unpub- 
lished. 

He has written 60-second novds 
in a window of foe Carson Fine 
Scou department store in Chicago. 


H irjuymbwtd 
puuMfOVNtem: 
mtwfitoBem 
— 't‘TWm?TDPBlFORM 
\&Bi'mM05TBfl5dC 
Mo x HpBsaw9ts 

'sMCm *■*> 


In New York he has appeared in 
Many’s basement and at B. Alt- 
man’s department stare and enter- 
tained at parties at Regine’s, 
Danceteria and foe Tavern 00 the 
Green. 

Here is an example of a Hurley 
novel, written for Alice Coopen 

“Once upon a time, there was a 
man who was an utter failure at 
everything because he kept trying 
to succeed. He was not at heart a 
success. At heart, he was a failure, 
and because he kept trying to suc- 
ceed, he kept failing worse and 
worse. 


isczmi, 

THANK W 

sarnm. ‘ 

s 

NOT 

. AT ALL. 

\ 


“Finally he gave up and derided 
to express his sense of failure and 
outrage at foe world. He opened up 
a bar called ‘Warm Beer and Lousy 
Food.’ The public flipped out. 
They loved the audaciousness of it. 
the sheer absurdity and straight- 
forwardness of it. Plus It was so 
damn different. So damn unique. 

They realized it was foe perfect 
expression of one man. Yes, fafo 
one man had finally done h. He 
had finally expressed perfectly his 
sense of failure. 

“And as a failure; he became a 
great success.” 


WRFWiWE* 

em. Am/ 

AWMM&KJH BOX 





pref err ed the role as wife at the 
time, and later turned down- foe 
same role in the Las Vegas compa- 
ny of foe revue because, “I don’t 
like Vegas.” 

*Tve been known to be some- 


Shehas not made any records since 
1981 because executives insisted 
she sing mnsc she did not Eke with 
musicians she did not know ar- 
ranged by people who did not un- 
derstand her voice: Tve compro- 
mised and I’ve been burned. I did 
material foe record company want- 
ed me to do in the style they wanted 
me to ring in and when foe record 
did not sdl I bore foe brunt of that. 
From now on, if Tm going to go 
down it wiD be fighting for some- 
thing I believe in. I can be really 
stubborn, I guess.” 

Sac was “deeply involved” with 
Catholicism until foe age of 16, 
when she says she began to be 
aware of hypocrisy all around her. 
On the honor roll and debating 
team of her Catholic high school, 
she found herself taking the oppos- 
ing point of view during iheologica] 
debates with Protestant school 
teams : “They said I was causing 
loo much commotion. They asked 
me to leave.” 

Now a “nnn-denn mi na tional 

Protestant,” she. “believes in God, 
in Jesus, in the Bible and 1 uy to 
apply these principles to my daily 
life.’’ She bore children and played 
the supporting matrimonial r rilw 
she figured the Bible calls for. It 
seemed to work well enough until 
her husband, a film director, was 
out of work and she went back to 
entertaining to support foe family. 
He could not handle it when she 
wanted to continue after he found 
work. 

In the process of divorce, with- 
out a permanent home, her chil- 
dren with her parents in Flint, 
Michigan, Bridgewater has been 
“at a low ebb" for the past year, 
ever since she derided to be based 
in Europe after finally accepting a 
role with the international compa- 
ny of “Sophisticated Ladies.” 

“I’ve bad a Mercedes, a gorgeous 
house with a pool and all of that 
sh— , sony.” She grimaced, amazed 
that such a word could come so 
dose to her lips: “That stuff. I’ve 
lived that life. It no longer tempts 
me. Some French friends invited 
me to- dinner in their home (he 
other day and I found out they 
lived in a castle. I didn't even know 
they were wealthy. I love that about 
Europe. People rdate to you as who 
you are, not what you own. ] want 

to live and work here. The future 
lodes good. I’m an artist.” 

Dee Dee Bridgewater. Widder 
Bar, Widderg/isse 6, Zurich, Feb. 
18-24; Meridien Hotel, Paris, 
March 5-17. 










**5*^ • • " ~ j ■ 

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Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13. 1985 


Envoy to U.S.: 
Calm Defense 


Of Apartheid 


Protests at Embassy 
Put Him at Eye of Storm 


By Donnie Radcliffe 


TT7 ASHINGTON — From his second- 

mil/ floor office ai the embassy, the South 

T Y African ambassador. Bemardus G. 
Fourie. looks past the open curtains to Massa- 
chusetts Avenue. Through the bare branches of 
a tree, beyond an occasion ai pedestrian bundled 
up against the cold, he has a perfect view of the 
statue of Winston Churchill outside the British 
Embassy across the street. 

Mr. Fourie has no view at all of the anti- 
apartheid demonstrators who are starting to 
assemble at the corner. A District of Columbia 
law requiring 500 feet (about 152 meters) be- 
tween demonstrators, and the embassy spares 
him thaL 

The are out of sight, but not out of mind. 

Every day, the demonstrators gather. Every 
day. a predetermined number routinely ap- 
proach the front door of the chancery', ask to 
speak to the ambassador and. just as routinely, 
are removed by the police. 

“They demonstrate between 4 and 6 P.NL my 
working hours" Brand Fourie said. “I never go 
home before then. While they demonstrate: I 
work. It's their business and it’s my business." 

For all his seeming indifference. Mr. Fourie's 
life has changed dramatically since Nov. 21 
when three leaders of the Free South Africa 
Movement refused to leave his ofGce, an action 
that signaled the start of the demonstrations. 

U has made him. simultaneously, a pariah in 
the eyes of the demonstrators, a defender of the 
sanctity of diplomatic missions in the eyes of his 
peers and a new media personality. Where he 
once averaged one or two interviews a week, the 
embassy says he now averages that many each 
day. 

And while the arrests have triggered a wave of 
negative public relations against the South Afri- 
can government that even its organizers had not 
anticipated, they also have opened a forum for 
Mr. Fourie to state South Africa's side. 

Tm a little fellow, quiet by narure. who loves 
puttering in the garden and talking to my house 
plants," Mr. Fourie said. But he has not missed 
the opportunity to put forth his country's case in 
the best light. 

He said it is not difficult to represent a coun- 
try whose policies are under attack. “The trage- 
dy." he said, “is that the type of policy that's 
called ‘South African policy' — and 1 say it very 
often — is a caricature of the real policy." 

To Mr. Fourie: **](*$ like putting up a dummy 
and shooting it down and then thinking, well 
you've dealt with apartheid. The type of apart- 
heid that's often portrayed in the press we don't 
like ourselves." 


Washington Post Serein: 



Bemardus G. Fourie 


H E prefers to portray apartheid in the 
sense of gains made rather than inequi- 
ties still to be rectified. “South Africa, 
of course, is basically no longer a white govern- 
ment," be said. “It’s now a government of 
whites, coloreds and Indians." 

Although the signs are subtle, Mr. Fourie’s 
social and business relationships with his Em- 
bassy Row peer group are unavoidably influ- 
enced by Smith Africa's apartheid policy. 

“It is an extremely unpopular policy ” said a 
West European diplomat “If you have a nice 
party, you don't think of the South African 
ambassador — any more than yon think of the 
Bulgarian, the Czechoslovakian or the Chilean 
ambassadors — as brin ging a lot of fun to iL For 
one thing , it ought turn your party into a polem- 
ical debate." 

Imperturbable on the subject Mr. Fourie said 
he has never felt ostracized in Washington, 
either before or after the demonstrations, nor 
has he ever been aware at any time that his 
presence has been an embarrassment either to a 
host or to colleagues. 

“Oh, there might be people who resent us, but 
so many are friendly. There are so many pres- 
sure groups, 1 ’ he said “I don’t want to bring the 
word ‘raaaT into it because TU be accused the 
next day of saying this country is racialislic, and 
I'm not saying thaL" 

A courtly man known to like American foot- 
ball and cookouls, Mr. Fourie is also a devoted 


family man who prizes his private life with his 
wife. Daphne, whom he married when he was a 


member of the South African delegation to the 
United Nations in 1962. Their two children, 
Gerhard and Nicolette, are university students 
in South Africa. 

“I’ve got one philosophy,’’ he said. “When 
you go home at night, then you're at borne with 
your family. You can’t be in your office 24 hours 
a day. If you are, you won’t last" 

Seat to Washington in June 1982 at a time in 
life when other people usually retire, Mr. 
Fourie, now 68, was bailed by officials in both 
countries. Washington expected him to be a 
decision-maker as well as an ambassador. South 
Africa, which viewed his 16 years as foreign 
secretary as an advantage with the fledgling 
Reagan administration, saw him playing a dou- 
ble role as Pretoria’s negotiator on South-West 
Africa, or Namibia. 

Highly respected at home, where be was re- 
garded as the man who kept South Africa's 


Foreign Service together, he was known as the 
“consummate" diplomat the negotiator’s nego 


“consummate" diplomat the negotiator’s nego- 
tiator and “Mr. Namibia." 

“He worked hard on Namibian independence 
negotiations," said a friend. “The world's agen- 
da for South Africa in the late 1970s and 1980s 
was peace with Mozambique and Angola, inde- 
pendence for Namibia and an adjustment of 
domestic reforms away from apartheid. They 
ware Brand's principal activities so be stayed on, 
and became here because they wens getting very 
dose [to fulfillment]." 

A farmer LIS. delegate to the United Na- 
tions, Donald F. McHenry, who was chief US. 
negotiator on Namibia during the Carter ad- 
ministration, remembers Mr. Fourie, then South 
Africa's secretary for foreign affairs, as “a real 
professional who is honest aboveboard, knowl- 
edgeable and never played games." 

Mr. McHenry’s disagreements with the ram- 
bunctious and volatile R.F. Botha, South Afri- 
ca's foreign minister, were as well known in 
Pretoria as they were in Washington. 

“Fourie was the peacemaker," said Mr. Mc- 
Henry, who is credited with setting in motion 
the UN-supervised plan for Namibian indepen- 
dence. “I always found it better to deal with him 
than with the foreign minister. When an impasse 
took place, it was to Brand’s house we went had 
coffee and worked it out — frequently to the 
limit of his authority." 


T HE police removed the three from the 
embassy. Arrested and charged with 
demonstrating within 500 feet of an em- 
bassy, a misdemeanor, theyspent the night in 
jail and became the first of 792 to be arrested as 
of Monday. 

“He thought that to have someone in the 
embassy asserting an illegal presence was not a 
good precedent said a Washington attorney 
who sees Mr. Fourie often. “The government 
felt it was an intolerable situation because two 
people could become 2,000, encouraging even 
more harmful trespassing.” 

Mr. Fourie scoffs at the notion that the dem- 
onstrations have had any significant impact on 
South African policy. “But what I find new is 
the strange phenomena with the people who 
demonstrate,” he said. “The people who fed so 
strongly about South Africa are vary silent when 
it comes to Afghanistan, Cambodia and Cuba. 
One doesn't see any protests from their side. 
Another aspect I felt puzzled about is there are 
many countries in Africa where h uman rights 
are nonexistent and they’re silent about that." 

Mr. Fourie said be believes that the Reagan 
administration policy of “constructive engage- 
ment" using diplomatic channels and not eco- 
nomic sancuons to deal with South Africa, “is 
pretty much alive and, what’s more, is proving 
successful" 

A friend of Mr. Fourie said that the ambassa- 
dor was “not so much resentful of the demon- 
strations as he was disappointed in a situation 
whereby the South African government was 
unable to describe the nature of their problem 
and challenge and what they are Hying to do 
about it” 

“Naturally the friend said, "they won't 
want to say they are influenced by the demon- 
strations or by what President Reagan is now 
saying.” 

In December, Mr. Fourie watched impassive- 
ly as the winner of the NobeJ Peace Prize, 
Bishop Desmond M. Tutu, a black and one of 
South Africa’s leading critics of the government 
came- to Washington. Mr. Fourie said he made 
no effort to communicate with him. 


Mr. McHenry said his impression is that Mr. 
Fourie is a pragmatist “who tried to work 


“ir he came to the embassy I certainly would 
have received him," said Mr. Fourie. although 
he added that he would “not necessarily” have 
entertained the bishop. “If I said I would, he 
might turn around and say he wouldn’t come. 
So I’m not sticking my neck tan unnecessarily." 


INSIGHTS 


Clarify ing the European View of America 




By Peter J. Parish 


I ONDON — The European view of the 
United States suffers chronically from 
i double vision. The perception of the 


J— i double vision. The perception of the 
American present is dear and vivid, if sddom 


free from distortion. In striking contrast the 


through problems and had a sense of what 
couldn't be done now." 

“ He was totally dedicated to the polides of 
the South African government” Mr. McHenry 
said. “You wanted to believe that he would be 
working for what could be in the future." 

“Unf orturn teJy, " said a source, “the Ameri- 
can government has found he's not always in the 
know about what is going on in South Africa. 
When Herman Toivo ja Toivo, secretary-gener- 
al of South-West Africa Peoples Organization, 
was released from prison after 16 years, the first 
Fourie heard about it was from a South African 
journalist" 


B RAND Fourie was a protege of Jan 
Christiaan Smuts, South Africa’s inter- 
national statesman and one of South 
Africa's more enlightened politicians, who 
worked closely with Woodrow Wilson on the 
League of Nations. Mr. Fourie ssid his love of 
the United States goes back to 1945. when he 
was a young diplomat accompanying Smuts to 
San Francisco for the organization of the Unit- 
ed Nations. Only after Smuts was defeated as 
prime minister in 1 948 did the government dras- 
tically begin to cany out its policy of apartheid. 

“I do not draw a line between a black Ameri- 
can and a white American," Mr. Fourie said. “I 
find it useful to talk to any American who's 
prepared to talk to me constructively. I don’t 
put on my glasses to see whether he’s black or 
white. I've got nothing against black people or 
black Americans, as a person, none whatso- 


image of the American past — if it registers ai 
all in the minds of most Europeans — is blurred 
and indistinct 

On the one hand, the senses (not to mention 
the sensibilities) or Europeans are constantly 
assailed by the sights and sounds and tastes of a 
whole range of contemporary American phe- 
nomena — from cruise missiles, high interesi 
rates and apparently nonstop electioneering to 
Michael Jackson. Billy Graham. J.R. Ewing. 
McDonald’s hamburgers and Coca-Cola. The 
impact of American power. American products 
and American popular culture is an everyday 
fact of life for West Europeans. 

On the other hand, for the great majority of 
those same Europeans, awareness of the Ameri- 
can past is minimal. There is some vague recol- 
lection of dramatic events, such as the American 
Revolution or the Civil War. although the ten- 
dency to confuse or conflate the two events 
lingers. There is a more vivid picture of the 
American frontier, built up by prolonged expo- 
sure to Western films, but that picture is ab- 
stract and almost timeless, and largely unhistor- 
icaL 

It is in the context of this popular vision, or 
lack of vision, that one has to regard the remark- 
able growth of teaching, study and writing 
about the American past In the countries of 
Western Europe during the last 40 years. It has 
often been an uphill struggle. 

Not surprisingly, history syllabuses in British 
schools and universities — and no doubt in 
Continental European countries, too — remain 
essentially Europe-centered. But American his- 
tory does now appear, at least as an option, in 
most university history syllabuses and is fea- 
tured more and more in history leaching in the 
secondary schools. Particularly in Britain, 
American history also is prominent in multidis- 
ciplinary American studies programs that flour- 
ish in a number of universities. 

Even among those who should know better, 
however, various arguments still are articulated 
— or, more likely tnan not implied — to justify' 
or explain away European ignorance of the 
American past S*ome well-worn cliches still sur- 
vive. The most outworn of all is that the United 
States is a young country with no history' of any 
real significance. Nothing could, of course, be 
further from the truth, and many an ancient 
European country might well envy the continu- 
ity over two centuries of the history of the 
American republic. 


O NE of the many strengths of a recent 
superb study of contemporary America. 
“The American Condition." by two 
journalists. Edmund Fawcett and Tony Thom- 
as. is that it begins with the proposition that 
Americans live in “a mature country, a mature 
economy, a mature society, with all the 
strengths and weaknesses the word ‘maturity' 
implies." 

Americans struck Mr. Fawcett and Mr. 
Thomas as “heirs more than pioneers" — an 
bright that belies another common justification 
sometimes offered from European indifference 
to American history, namely, that the United 
States is a future-oriented society without a 
strong historical tradition. or. indeed, with a 
strong anti-historical tradition. 

Again, the truth is precisely the opposite. The 
determbation of Americans to cherish a “us- 
able” past has been observed by a British schol- 
ar. Jack Pole, as well as by numerous American 
historians. Where, for example, in Western Eu- 
rope are the 18th- and 19th-century national 
heroes to be compared with the great secular 
trinity of the American national faith, George 
Washington, Thomas Jefferson and Abraham 
Lincoln? 

For those wise enough to have abandoned the 
notion of a father-son relationship between Eu- 
rope and America, or the illusion that Western 
Europe could play the role of the civilizing 
Greek b the American Roman empire, there 
remains a more subtle defense of European 
unconcern with the American past The world 
has changed so much b the last half-century, so 
the argument runs, that it has made all earlier 
American history irrelevant 
The formative influences and distinguishing 
marks of the first century and a half of the 
history of the United States — the frontier, mass 
immigration from Europe, relative political iso- 
lation and cost-free security, absorption b in- 
ternal development — have vanished from the 
late 20tb-cemury world of superpower politics, 
the proliferation of endear weapons, dwindling 
natural resources, dependence on imported oil 
and the intractable problems of mass urban 
society. 

But to use this dramatic change as an excuse 
for neglecting American history is to miss the 
point entirely, to overlook the immense and' 
enduring power of memory and nostalgia in any 
society, and particularly b the United States. If 
non-Americans are to understand contempo- 
rary American attitudes and preoccupations, 
they must understand the historical forces that 
have shaped them. 


In November, he held a meeting in his office 
that signaled the start of the demonstrations. 
His session, with the District of Columbia dele- 
gate, Walter E Fauntroy; the co-chairman of 
the Free South Africa Movement Randall Rob- 
inson; and the U.S. civil rights commissioner. 
Mary Frances Berry, had hd been postponed 
twee before, first because of the Reverend Mar- 
tin Luther King Sr.'s funeral and then because 
of a business trip Mr. Fourie made to South 
Africa. 

On television, Mr. Fourie and Mr. Robinson 
bad previously debated South Africa’s polides 
of racial separation. The ambassador said he 
looked upon the embassy meeting as “a continu- 
ation" of their debate b which he tried to point 
up positive efforts his government was making 
toward a solution. 

“At the point when Congressman Fauntroy 
was saying. ‘If what you’re telling us is true, then 
the press has been presenting a rather amazing 
image of South Africa,’ I had the message from 
the press waiting outside asking if 1 knew it was 
a sit-in and wanting a comment" Mr. Fourie 
recalled. 

“I said, ‘Well, Congressman, I’ve got some- 
thing here now that the press says that will really 
make you laugh-' ” 

Mr. Robinson told him that a sit-in was 
exactly why he, Mr. Fauntroy and Mrs. Berry 
were there. Mr. Fourie continued. 

“And I said 'Well in those circumstances, 
there’s no use continuing our discussion because 
I thought it was a serious discussio n . ’ They said 
they didn't intend to leave and finally we asked 
[the State Department) that they be removed — 
we didn’t ask that they be arrested or anything 
like that” 


They must appreciate, for example, why the 
two most recent U.S. presidents, on their wav to 


two most recent U.S. presidents, on their way to 
the leadership of the most complex technologi- 
cal and urbanized society b the world, should 
choose to project themselves as. in Jimmy Car- 
ter’s case, the farm boy cherishing his native 
soiL And, b Ronald Reagan’s case, the cowboy 
symbolizing the simpler values of a bygone age. 

One basic theme of American history is the 
constant wrestling with the dilemma between a 
hankering for be past and loyalty to the ideals 
with which a small agrarian republic of Tour 
million souls began in the 18th century, and, on 
the other hand, an exuberant belief b progress, 
and a reaching out for the material rewards of 
American abundance. 

European historians of America must explain 
to their public that be characteristic American 
view looks backward as well as forward, and 
that the American tradition mixes devotion to 
old ideals and pursuit of the fruits of abundance 
b a particularly heady brew. Much European 
distortion or misconception of the American 
scene may be explained by a tendency to look at 
only one half of this compound — to observe 
through one eye when binocular vision is re- 
quired. 


A RE there any indications from recent Hu- 
lk ropean work in American history that a 
-L jL start, however modest has been made 
toward conveying these explanations? At this 
point a sharp distinction must be drawn be- 
tween the British and the Continental European 
approach to the study of the United States. 


In Britain, history has been the discipline that 
s provided the foundation for serious aca- 


ha$ provided the foundation for serious aca- 
demic study of America, while American litera- 
ture has had a long struggle against the en- 
trenched assumption that it could be treated as a 
subdivision of modern English literature. To- 



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day. American studies programs b British uni- 
versities rest on the twin pillars of history and 
literature. 

In France. Germany and Italy, however, the 
initial approach to the subject has been through 
learning a language, and the language has in- 
creasingly been American English. Study of the 
language led naturally to the study of literature, 
and literature thus established itself as the cen- 
tral discipline of American studies in most Con- 
tinental countries. 

For all that there is a growing body of serious 
historical work emanating from these countries. 
French. German. Italian and Dutch historians 
of America have established themselves as au- 
thorities in their fields. In 1982. La Revue Fran- 
qalse d‘ Etudes Americaines devoted a special 
number to American history in France. The 
editor heralded the dawn of a new configuration 
of intellectual interests, b which the United 
States was finding a significant place. 

Other contributors paid tribute to the work of 
major figures such as Jean-Bap tisie Duroselle 
and Claude Fohlen. but Mr. Fohlen himself 
confessed that the French contribution to 
American history was still marginaL The edi- 
tor's protestation that the growth of French 
interest b the subject was demonstrated by the 
need for editorial selection, rather than the 
inclusion of everyone and everything b this 
special issue, may strike the reader as not entire- 
ly convbcbg or even comforting. 

Among contemporary German historians, the 
work of Willi-Paul Adams, for example, shows 
all the virtues of orthodox historical scholar- 
ship. While many others have concerned them- 


shrewdly observed that the “middling disposi- 
tion" of British historians of America may stem 
historically from the fact that American studies 
in Britain developed at a lime — after World 
War II — when neither academic traditionalists 
nor political radicals were much interested in 
the subject 

Very properly, one of the early concerns of 
British historians of the United States was to 
introduce the subject to a British student audi- 
ence. Harry Allen. William Brock, and, perhaps 
most successfully. Frank Thistlethwaite, in his 
remarkably durable book “The Great Experi- 
ment" were among those who published broad 
surveys or interpretative essays with this pur- 
pose in mind. The tradition lives on and has 
recently been raised to a new level b Maldwyn 
Jones’s" “The Limits of Liberty," a textbook of 
.American history' by a British historian. At a 
time when textbook writing in the United Stales 
has increasingly become a team activity for 
syndicates of six or right historians, Mr. Jones's 
sbgle-handed effort is a prodigious achieve- 
ment 

The next stage of British writing on American 
history came mainly b works of synthesis and 
interpretation, drawing chiefly on secondary 
sources and the most familiar primary sources, 
and dealing with particular aspects or problems 
or crises b the American past. Maldwyn Jones 
and Philip Taylor have become established au- 
thorities on American immigration. 


many of whom have contributed enormously to 
the development erf their subject in Europe, now 
are more than willing to look at the work of 
European scholars on demerits. 

The days are passing yrben reviews of such 
work b American historical journals combined 
the heritable reference to thenaiionalityof the 
author with at least a touch of condescension fn 
the criticism. It is ahealthy sign of the times that 
the American Historical Association has helped 
to sponsor, and the National Endowment for 
the H umani ties to finance, the preparation dfa 
“Guide to the Study of United States History 
Outride the United Slates, 1945-1980." This 
major reference work, edited by Lewis Hanke, is 
due for publication this year. ' 


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UT there is a larger issue involved in the 

|-C European contribution to American his- 
JLf tory. and a larger role that European 
historians might seek to perform. The task 
might be described somewhat grandiosely as 
saving American history from itself. Modern 
American historiography has shown a tendency 
to violent fluctuations, not altercations, be- 
tween two extremes. 

The mainstream tradition of American his- 
torical writing, dating back to George Bancroft 
if not earlier, has been essentially tnumphahsb 
presenting a unique national success story. Tha£ 
' tradition always has faced challenges, but nevetf 
has it been so buffeted as in the last 20 year*;' 
During this period, an alternative verson of 
American history has been expounded, empha- 
sizing national sms rather than national virtues, 
and telling a stray replete with injustices, is-, 
equalities, barbarities, cruelty and exploitation-: 

This violent contrast, or confrontation, be-i 
tween two versions erf the American past ^ 
national self-glorification or self-abasement, 
wrapping one's history in the Stars and Striper 
or clothing it in sackdoth and ashes — is n<rf 
conducive to the ultimate good health of Amerv* 
can historiography. 

To proclaim, as the mam lesson of American 
history, that if the United Slates is notthe best 
country b the world it must certainly be the: 
worst is a peculiarly perverted and sdf-indul^ 
gent argument for American exceptionafism, F<j£ 
the uniqueness of the American experience. Etw 
ropean historians may help to mitigate the worst' 
excesses of this kind of adversarial history, wit& 


selves mainly with European- American topics, 
he has shown b his recent work on “The First 


W; 


r ILL LAM BROCK's study of recon- 
struction. “An American Crisis," pub- 


he has shown b his recent work on “The Fust 
American Constitutions'' a mastery of a wholly 
American topic, and has made a notable contri- 
bution to the continuing debate on the ideologi- 
cal and institutional beginnings of the American 
Republic. The revolutionary era has attracted a 
good deal of attention from German historians, 
as. for example, b Horst Dippel’s work, “Ger- 
many and Lhe American Revolution." and nota- 
bly, in the important work of Dirk Hoerder on 
social forces particularly the role of the crowd, 
in the American Revolution. 

Italian historians, bcluding Giorgio Spini, 
Francesco Cerase and Valeria Gennaro Lerda. 
have made wide-ranging contributions to Amer- 
ican history. Perhaps the best-known recent 
Italian historian of the United States is Rai- 


YT lisbed in 1963, is often regarded as 
something of a breakthrough because of its 
im ag in ative reworking of familiar sources. Mr. 
Brock's writings and mbe on the Qvfl War era, 
Esmond Wright on the American Revolution, 
and — to cite a scholar from a younger genera- 
tion — Michael Heale's recent books, “The 
Making of American Politics 1750-1850” and 
“The Presidential Quest 1787-1852,” offer fur- 
ther examples of work of this land. 

Quite outstanding because of the range and 


variety of his work on George Washington, on 
the American military tradition and on the 
presidency, as well as on American literature, is 
Marcus Cunliffe, the most authentic and most 
creative scholar of American studies yet to ap- 
pear on the British academic scene. 

What emerges from all this work is a variety 
of non-American perceptions of the American 


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role that European Hi ; truck csl is 

perform. . The task zzz i;_: rS.i tzs . fa 
fhai grandiosely, as {— ± j 




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its all-or-nothing oversimplifications. They 
could and should Bern a portion to contribute a. 




There are indications from recent European works that a 
start, however modest, has been made toward understanding 
contemporary American attitudes and preoccupations, and 
explaining the historical forces that have shaped them. 


mondo Luraghl w ho followed his work on the 
Civil War with a highly contentious interpreta- 
tion of “The Rise and Fall of the Plantation 
South.” Like Mr. Hoerder and others b West 
Germany, and like some French historians, Mr. 
Luraghi is close to the Marxist tradition in 
Continental scholarship and his sympathetic 
view of the Old South, as an American alterna- 


past but not a single British (or bdeed Europe- 
an) school of American history with its own 
clearly defined, coherent point of view. There 
may be particular virtues m the style and pre- 


sentation of many British authors, and there is 
certainly a predilection for synoptic, reflective 
and interpretative studies of the American past 


more balanced view, a sense of proportion an#' 
of context that is often more easily achieved by 
the outside observer. . £ 

Non-American historians always have been 
very suspicious of the case for the uniqueness of' 
the American historical experience, cfnefly bo- 
cause the claim to be unique, or at least except 
tionaL often has seemed to cany with it mg 
assumption of moral superiority. At the samp 
time, it has to be said ibat BritishTustorians and 
their students often have been fascinated, above 
all, by events such as the Civil War, orphenome- 
oa such as slavery or westward expansion, which 
have no direct parallel in modem Europeaft 
history. They are attracted by what is excqrfioo- 
al b the American past but wary of theories of 
exceptionalism. 


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live to liberal capitalism, finds obvious parallels 
b the work of an American historian like Eu- 


re the work of an American historian 
gene Genovese. 


P REDICTABLY, a good deal of the work 
of European historians of the United 
States has concerned itself with the Euro- 
pean-American connection — in the Colonial 
and Revolutionary eras, in the mass migration 
of the 19th century and in the diplomatic rela- 
tionship between the United States and Europe- 
an nations. A prime example b this last fidd is 
the work of the outstanding Dutch historian. 


J.W. Schulte Nordholdt. on John Adams’s dip- 
lomatic mission to Holland, and on other as- 
pects of Dutch- American relations. 

The much stronger British tradition of his- 
torical writing about America shares some but 
not all of the characteristics of Continental 
historiography, it, too, has been preoccupied 
with the European- or, more specifically, the 
British- American connection, and some of its 
most distinguished practitioners have been jeal- 
ous guardians or the much-battered faith in a 
“special relationship." Indeed, most of the his- 
torians among the founding fathers of the Brit- 
ish Association for American Studies b the 
1950s were essentially historians of the British- 
American relationship, for example, Frank 
Thistlethwaite. Harry Allen. Herbert Nicholas 
and Esmond WrighL 

On the other hand, British historians general- 
ly have been less committed than their Europe- 
an contemporaries to any dearly defined ideo- 
logical position. Whether this simply reflects a 
typically British caution and pragmatism may 
be debated. One young British historian has 


But on balance, one surely must be grateful for 
the absence of a self -conscious, deliberate, cal- 
culated “British” view of American history. 

What impact might European historians of 
America hope to have, both re their own coun- 
tries and in the United Stales, beyond their 
immediate academic audiences? It would be 
unreasonable to expect too much of them in this 
wider public role and certainly undesirable to 
ask for historical writing consciously directed 
toward the creation of a cozier European- Amer- 
ican relationship. In addressing their own do- 
mestic audiences, however, European historians 
of America may do something to correct some 
of the popular misconceptions, half-truths and 
oversimplifications that abound. 

The task of putting the American past 2 nd its 
relationship to the present into proper perspec- 
tive is all the more important when, at times, tire 
“European idea” threatens to become an anti- 
American idea. The temptation to prove that 
one is a good European by being anti-American 
is one that many, even in high places, find hard 
to resisL 

There is a strange historical irony here. In the 
first century or so of its independent existence, 
the United States defined its own identity part- 
ly, sometimes mainly, by affirming that it was a 
non-Europe, In the jargon of our own times, 
Europe was a negative reference point of Ameri- 
cans, There is some danger, in the 1980s, that 
America may be cast in the role of a negative 
reference point for the European identity. 

Within the United Slates, British and Europe- 
an historians may aspire to achieve some specif- 
ically academic goals. Breaking the U.S. monop- 
oly of American historiography is a worthwhile 
achievement in itself. American historians. 


• , 4i * £t - ** ■ *■- 

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11 V in-. . - ■ >’t a, . c 


comparative history. What is distinctive or ex- 
ceptional can be identified only through com- 
parison or contrast with the history of other 
societies, even if that comparison often- is im- 
plied rather than staled. European historians 
surely have an opportunity to make the compar- 
ative study of American history more expaiar 
and more rewarding. There is little to be gained 
from comparison either between things that 
have tittle or nothing in common, or between 
thugs that are almost identical. '? 

The historical experiences of Western Europe 
and the United States over the last 200 years 
have enough in common to provide a basis of 
comparison, but also an abundance of differ- 
ences and divergences — in potitical develop 
meat, dass structure, ethnic mixture and eco- 
nomic growth — that make comparison fruitful 
and exciting. . — 

In the last quarter <rf the 20th century, as non-; 
Western nations tike Japan and- China hare, 
gamed greater prominence, and as U.S. powa 
productivity and affluence no longff outshine" 
that of the rest of the world so dazdingly. u& 
United States and Europe once again may *r 
impressed by what they share. It lakes a 
kind of Gallic confidence to assert, in . the word*- 
of one French historian, that t are A/r&^ 

mine s'ewvpamlse." . ; > ' ' 

But this may be the time to flake adaim tMJ 
the European study of American history hJJ 
come of age. The American contribution to. J®. 
study of the European past has "been rich be- 
yond measure; now welrvem an era of two-w# 
trans-Atlantic traffic in historical scholarship- 


-I 


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Peter J. Parish is the directa 
lhe United States at the Uruver 
wrote this article fair The New 


"London. 

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WEDNESDAY. FEBRUARY 13, 198S - 


IMTERHATIONAI MANAGER 

Heinz’s O’Reilly Gets 
Thrills in Outside Roles 

By SHERRY BUCHANAN 

, International Herald Tribane 

-TT" EW YORK — Many executives dream of leaving the 
fV I .corporate fqld,-‘to_ lead the adventurous life of an 
' 1 entrepreneur. Few ever dream that they could have 
r both — the security and leverage afforded by a high- 
paying corporate job as well as the thrills and big money (your 
yesy own) associated with being a successful e nt rep re ne ur. 

• Anthony J. F. O’Rrijly, 48, president and chief executive of 
■H. J. Heinz Qx, has it alL Besides being chief executive, of the 
73.74-billion U. S. fodd company and chairma n of two Irish 
companies he started, he is also part owner of an Irish newspaper 
-chain. Independent Newspapers Ltd. - 
) By the time he- was .30, Mr. O’Reilly had already gone through 


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Japanese 
Get Trade 


■at least two incarnations — ■ - • : - 

;the first as an Irish rugby star, _ : 1 

.the second as one of the youn- ^ Started With 

gust chief executives, at 26, of T . 

.the Irish Daily Board, a gov- $32,000; I didn’t 

have a diver spoon In 

;ed to take .the -top job at T~ 

-Heinz’s British subsidiary wv ^ftad of becoming Irish minister of 
‘agriculture.' 

• “1 could have easily gone with. Irish politics, a British company 
■or a straightforward entrepreneurial role,” he said. “I didn’t 
consciously say to mysdf, it’s. GEO or bust” After heading the 
-British subsidiary of Heinz and workin g as senior vice pres dent 
tor North America and the Pacific, Mr. O’Reilly became pres- 
ident of Heinz in 1973 and chief executive in 1979. . 

■ While he was at Heinz U JL, Mr. O’Reilly and a couple of 
! partners started- Fitzwilton, an investment firm. In 1973, he 
•gained control of Independent Newspapers. In 1981, he started 
‘Atlantic Resources Ltd., a company exploring for oil off the Irish 
coast - 

“I started with 532,000; I didn’t have a silver spoon in my 
hand,” he said. His holdings in all three ventures are now 
estimated at $10 milli on. He owns a large house in Ireland and a 
[working stnd farm on The Curragh, a plain in Kildare. 

M R. O’Reilly owes a lot of Ms corporate-com-cntrepre- 
ncurial career to R. Burt Gookm, chief executive of 
Heinz when. .O’Reilly joined the company. Mr. Gookm 
-decided that entreprenenrial endeavors far Mr. O’Reilly were the 
Same as golf to other executives. ; 

‘'Maybe I have sufficient experience in the world of the 
[entrepreneur not to think that the grass is greener cm the other 
‘ride,” Mr. O’Reilly said. *Tve been an both sides of the septic 
tank." 

* The skills needed to be successful in a top corporate job often 
are not considered the rig ht skills far a successful entrepreneur, 
and vice versa. As chief executive of Heinz, Mr. O^Rafiy has ' 
stuck to a rather conv entional corporate strategy, confining any 

in eKpatinn for rink-taking tn hie Tnch ventnrwi - 

Fitzwilton, the investment company, has had ups and downs. 
The oil-exploration business, by Mr. O’Reilly’s own account, is 
[speculative. He struck oil in 1983, but the appraisal well came up 
ary and he is still waiting for another striked His stud farm onTbe 
Curragh, southwest of Dublin, is another risky business:, expen- 
; rive if you are luckless, but with high gains if yon come up with a 
winner. - - - • - • - • 

Judging by Heines performance m the past few years, Mr. 
(Contimed on Page 17, Cot 1) 


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Open Up or Eke 9 
U.S. 9 Europe Say 

- Compiled bj Our Staff From Dispatches 

TOKYO — The United States 
and the European Community 
urged Japan on Tuesday toopor its 
markets to foreign products or [see 
the prospect of trade barriers to 
block Japanese exports. 

William Brock, the U.S. trade 
representative, told Prune Minister 
Yasuhiro Nakasone that (he Rea- 
gan adnonistration was nn^er in- 
tense pressure to counter a lopsided 
trade balance in Japan’s favor, a 
foreign ministry, spok esman said 

The ECs external affairs com- 
missioner, Willy de Oercq, said he 
tried to explain to Mr. Nakasone 
that the community’s S 10. 1 -billion 
trade deficit with Japan last year 
was as serious a problem to the 
Europeans as the U.S. deficit. 

The United States had a 334- 
billion deficit with Japan last year, 
and the deficit was expected to in- 
crease this year, 

Mr. Brock was quoted by Japa- 
nese officials as telling Toshio Ko- 
moto, the minister in charge of ex- 
ternal economic affairs, that 
protectionist sentiment was greater 
than he had ever known. 

“Brock told Komoto there is a 
move in some quarters to impose 
import surcharges,” one official 
said. 

Mr. Brock said Japan must sub- 
stantially open its markets to im- 
ports of forestry products, telecom- 
munications equipment, 
electronics goods, drugs and medi- 
cal equipment 

Earlier in the day, speaking at a 
breakfast meeting before 300 peo- 
ple, Mr. Brock said Japan’s trade 
relations with the world were “seri- 
ous and rapidly worsening" and 
warned that its surplus “threatens 
to destabilize” the world trading 
system. 

Mr. Brock also predicted that 
Japanese auto exports to the Unit- 
ed States would increase “immedi- 
ately" should the two rides agree to 
lift the voluntary restraints on them 
scheduled to expire in March. 

He noted that Japan’s total cur- 
rent-account surplus could, reach 
$400 billion worldwide from 1983 
to 1990, roughly equal to the 1974- 
4981smplus attained by the Orga- .. 
iiizatibn of Petroleum Exporting 
Countries. 

As Mr. Brock was meeting with 
Mr. Nakasone, the Finance Minis- 
try reported Tuesday the country 
chalked up the first trade surplus 
for a January in 36 years. 

Ptefiurinary data released by the 
Finance Ministry showed that ex- 
ports on the customs-clearance ba- 
sis rose 8.2 percent over a year ago 
to $1 1.035 JnDion while imports de- 
creased 42 percent to $1057 bB- 
fion. The trade surplus with the 
United States hit a high for January 
of $1,899 billion. 

(AP, UPI, Reuters) 


China, Allowing limited Stock Sale Dollar S Climb 
As Capitalists Emerge From Disgrace Ig Unabated in 

t»i t* 1 — — V _ 

Light Trading 


By John F. Bums 

Afev York Tima Service 

SHANGHAI — As the line 
began fanning an a misty room- 
ing in mid-January, the survivals, 
of this city's old capitalist class 
could have been forgiven for 
thinking they were dreaming the 
entire scene. 

. Beginning at 3:30 A5C, hun- 
dreds of Shanghai residents 
gathered outride a red-brick 
building to sign up for the first 
stock offering here since 1949. 

By 2 PJvL, three hours before 

meat omP million yuan ($1.79 
million), had been sold to indi- 
vidual investors and to others 
buying on behalf of state-owned 
and collective institutions. 

The stock offering by Yanz- 
hong Industrial Corp. represent- 
ed a cautious step forward into a 
new era of corporate fund-rais- 
ing mandated by reform-minded 



Tbt Nm YqHt Tnas 

Zhou Xntyong of Yanzhong Industrial Corp. 


Communist leaders in Btiging. 
But it also constituted a step 
back toward the old ways erf do- 
ing business in what been 
China’s largest commercial ceo- 


35 Years After Closing It, China 
May Open Shanghai Stock Market 


SHANGHAI — China's Communist rulers are actively consid- 
ering opening a stock market in Shanghai and one could be 
established within two years, a senior financial official «nd Mon- 
day. 

ment aiuT'^^ ^inghaf authorities. %any details have^tc^be 
worked out, bat I would say we could have a stock market in 
Shanghai within two years,’ said Sheng Baizhagft rioep raririr n* of 
Shanghai Investment & Trust Corp. 

“We have to train people and establish the legal framework. 
This will take time,” he added. 

Because Shanghai was China’s financial center before the 1949 
Communist takeover, the city was the obvious first choke for a 
stock market, he said. The exchmige was do6ed hr 19S0. 

Foreign bankers attending an international conference on Chi- 
na's petroleum industry said Bank of China was also enmadaring 
stock markets in the southern special economic zones of Shenzhen 
and Thnhai. 

Ming Zhicheng. deputy director of the Shanghai municipaj 
economic commission, also said the proposal^ was under study. But 
he declined to say when an exchange could be opened. 


ter before the Comnronists 
seized power 33 years ago. 

Some of the pensioners who 
lined up outside the Yanzhong 
office at 45 Ningjiang Road had 
been playing the market in 1950 
when Communist troops threw a 
cordon around the old stock ex-. 

change and made wholesale ar- 
rests of people inride. Some 
threwfiles out windows, and oth- 
ers set their offices cm fire. Many 
were given nominal trials far 
“exploitation” and shipped away 
to spend years in distant labor 
camps. 

Under the leadership of Deng 

tobSd^ose waundsl^^capi- 
talists” are being rehabilitated, 
and some in shanghai and Beij- 
ing are even getting their man- 
sions bade. Party leaders are con- 
sulting them on ways to propel 
the nation's economy, and they 
are being encouraged to lend any 
help they can in stirring back to 
life the embers of entrepreneur- 


in the charter for urban eco- 
nomic reform laid down by the 
Communist Party in October, 
the emphasis was on shifting 
from a situation, in which aU 

(Combined on Page 13, CoL 5) 


Rmrm 

LONDON — The U.S. dollar 

climbed to new highs once again in 
rhin trading ou European foreign- 
exchange markets, as central banks 
continued to abstain from any at- 
tempt to stop the dollar’s rise. 

Dealers said the dollar hit anoth- 
er 13-year high against the Deut- 
sche marie and a 10-year peak 
against the Swiss franc. It also 
broke records against the British 
pound, the French franc, the Ital- 
ian lira, the Dutch guilder, the 
Spanish peseta and Scandinavian 
currencies. 

Volumes were low, since New 
York banks and many other U. S. 
banks were dosed for Lincoln’s 
Birthday, but in late- afternoon Eu- 
ropean trading Chicago banks 
played a big role in pushing up the 
dollar. 

In Fr ankfu rt, the dollar was 
fixed at 32782 DM, compared with 
32373 at Monday’s fixing. It was 
the dollar's fourth consecutive high 
against the mark, and some dealers 
in London said they believed a cor- 
rection would have to come soon. 

“1 do feel a correction is due,” 
said one dealer, “but my worry is 
that the market is not that long in 
dollars so the correction does not 
need to be that large, and I can’t see 
what is going to spark it off. Who's 
going to be the first man to step 
forward and sell dollars? 

“ Fundamental anal ysis has gone 

out of the window,” tac dealer said, 
echoing a general feeling that the 
dollar is vastly overvalued on fun- 
damental grounds but backed by 
sentiment. 

The pound was trading late 
Tuesday at $1.0898, down almost 
another cent from Monday's 
51.096. The key three-month ster- 
ling interbank rate rose 1/8 pdnt 
to dose at 14 1/16 percent, eroding 
hopes that British bank-lending 


Bonn Cannot Play Lead Economic Role, Aide Says 


By Warren Getlcr no mi c s u mmi t here in May is laying of these export-restraint agree- Tuesday at the F rankf urt fixing, 
international HenM Tribune the groundwodc far a new GATT meats, because, despite their being posed a threat to price stability m 
BONN — West Germany can- round,” he said, referring to the called voluntary self-restraint West Germany, although he added 
not assume the role of locomotive General Agreement on Tariffs and agreements, they actually come that consumer prices had yet to be 


for the world economic recovery if Trade. 


the U.S. economy should .weaken, 
Martin Bangemaim, the West Ger- 
man economic minister, said in an 
interview Tuesday. 

“The West German economy is 


Trade. down to a form of protectionism much affected by higher dollar- 

Mr. Bangemann said the UjS. for U. S. industries,” ne said. based prices., 

budget deficit would be a topic of Though he said he saw little: Mr. Ran gmumn however, 

discussion at the seven-nation sum- chance of a trade war developing that he saw “no pressing need” for 
miL He said the deficit was con- between the United States and the Bundesbank to lift its key Lom- 

tinuing to influence international Western Europe, he warned: *Tm bard interest rate further as a 


tinnism pin ch affe cted by higher dnllnr- 

d. based prices., 
w little: Mr. Bangemann w' d , however. 


too dependent on exports and our capital Dows, the Ievd of interest quite sure a growing wave of pro* means of slowing the dollar. On 
d omestic nn»r fot wm> email for ns tn rates in the West and the ability of tectionist measures — on either Feb. 1 the Bundesbank lifted the 


play the locomotive rede,” Mr. Ban- 
gemann -trid. 

He said that West Germany, 


Third World debtor nations to ser- sidertf the Atlantic —could lead to Lombard one-half pant, to 6 per- 
vice their debts. a deterioration of the txdhica] relfl- ' cenL reoortedlv for technical rea- 


Hc said that West Germany, Reports this week that the Unit- between the 

with exports accounting for half ed States is seeking to curtail im- “*• 
the nation’s industrial production, ports of European semifinished • Despite the sahxtai 
could play a decisive role in pro- steel products through a loosely en- strong U.S. dollar has 


a deterioration of the political rda- .cent, reportedly for technical rea- 
tionship” between the Western al- sans related to the money market. 


The center-right government is 
effect the banking cm strong expats and in- 
d on West cxeased capital investments to gen- 
Mgemaim exate at least 2J-oercent growth in 


moling free-trade principles at a forced export-restraint agreement German exports, Mr. Bangemann exate at least 2J-percent growth in 
time when protectionist pressures signed in 1982 are “a deariy bad said he would prefcr the dollar to West Germany’s gross national 
are on the roe. development,” Mr. Bangemann decline, though gradually. He said product in 1985 and to contribute 


rates would soon fall'from the cur- 
rent 14 percent. The rise in the 
three-mouth rate even fueled some 
speculation that a further increase 
would be needed if the government 
wants to defend the pound. 

The French franc was fixed in 
Paris at 10.023 to the dollar Tues- 
day, breaking the 10 -franc level for 
the first lime. Tbc dollar was worth 
9.946S francs at the Paris fixing 
Monday. 

The lira also continued retreat- 
ing against the dollar’s strength af- 
ter hitting more than 2,000 against 
the dollar Monday for the first 
time; at the Milan fixing Tuesday 
the dollar was worth 2,015.80 lire, 
against 2,003.80 Monday. And the 
Dutch guilder fell to 3.7175 Tues- 
day at the Amsterdam fixing, com- 
pared with 3.69 against the dollar 
Monday. 

Corporate demand fa the dollar 
was noted, and one dealer said the 
U. S. currency might have gained 
slightly oi news that the Soviet 
leader, Konstantin U. Chernenko, 
was too iD to meet the visiting 
Greek prime minis ter, Andreas Pa- 
pandreou. 


CondeNast 
Offers to Buy 
The New Yorker 

United Pro* International 

WASHINGTON — Condi 
Nast, the publisher of Vogue 
and Glamour ma gazine s, is of- 
fering to buy The New Yorker 
magazine fa as much as $124 
million, the Securities «nd Ex- 
change Commission said Tues- 
day. 

Board members at New 
Yorker immediately went into a 
meeting after learning that Ad- 
vance Publications Inc. filed the 
required 13-D form announc- 
ing the takeover attempt. Ad- 
vance is offering $180 a share 
for the magazine’s 690,000 
shares outstanding. 

Samuel Newhouse Jr., who 
owns Advance, acquired 17.1 
percent of the magazine early 
this year, and a. New Yorker 
spokeswoman said, “It is no 
I surprise" that Mr. Newhouse is 
interested in the rest 

The New Yorker, a showcase 
fa writers for decades and one 
of the most successful general- 
interest maga Tines in the Unit- 
ed States, owns mqarity shares 
in The Cook’s magazine and 
Horticnltore magazine. 

Condi Nast publishes some 
of the leading leisure and fash- 


“The best results we could 
achieve at the upcoming world eco- 


“Frankly, I'm not in favor of any rose to 


th of the dollar, which to a reduction in unemployment by 
2782 Deutsche marks about 100,000 workers. 


tty Fair and Gourmet. 


IBM Introduces Its New Mainframe Computer 




The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — International 
Business Machines Corp. unveiled 
Tuesday the first two models of its 
much-awaited new generation of 
mainframe computers. 

IBM, winch already dominates 
the worldwide market fa large- 
scale data processors, said it also 
cm prices on selected versions of its 
current top-of-the-line computers, 
the 308X series, by an average of 5 
percent 

The new generation of main- 
frames is called the 3090 series, and 
its first two models are the 200 and 
400. 

I The 3090 model 200 has 64 mil- 
lion characters of main storage, 
and employs two central proces- 
sors, which boost the computer's 
ability to process information. 

The model 200 ranges in price 
from $5 million to $6.09 million, 
and will be available in November. 
IBM said. 

The model 400 is available only 
as an upgrade from a model 200, 
IBM said. The 400 employs four 
central processors, and has 128 mfl- 
lioQ characters of central storage. 

Shipments of the model 400 are 
scheduled to start in the second 


THE 1985 
INTERNATIONAL 
GUIDE TO 
CONFIDENTIAL 
BAJSfKING 


quarter of 1987, and the upgrade 
costs $43 minion, IBM said 
Given IBM’s dominant position 
in the mainframe market, which 
some industry trackers estimate at 
about 75 percent, the 3090 comput- 
ers are expected to put additional 
pressure on companies that make 


IBM's products. 

Those companies include the 
UJS. companies Amdahl Cop. and 
National Semiconductor Corp.’s 
National Advanced Systems unit, 
and the Japanese computer giants 
Hitachi Ltd. and Fujitsu Ltd. 

Hitachi manufactures the com- 
puters sold by National Advanced 
Systems, and Fujitsu mates many 
of the products sold by Amdahl 

The 3090 computers, by intro- 
ducing advanced performance and 
pricing standards into the marke t 

couid^m^r sales ^c^^nmat- 
ible mainframes built by suchU.S. 


JtfaTAPMAN 

I MANAGED 
COMMODITY ACCOUNTS. 


PERFORMANCE 
RESULTS FOR 
COMPTRENDH 

BEGINNING EQUITIES 
OF $100,000 
ON JANUARY 1 
OF EACH YEAR 


companies as Burroughs Corp., 
Speny Carp., Control Data Cap. 
and Honeywell Inc. 

■ New Honeywell link 

Honeywell Inc. introduced Tues- 
day a romputer-systems “architeo 
mre^deagned to link and serve a 

eratiom/Snited Press 


al reported from New York. 
The so-called integrated 


lecture is a 


ated archi- 
f a finking 


all the computer functions of man- 
ufacturers, from manufacturing 

planning to material-handlin g Sys- 
tems. 

Edson Spencer, chairman and 
chief executive officer of the Minr 
neapdis-based company, said the 
new systems win enable the compa- 
ny to take advantage future tech- 
nofogy, providing an assurance 
that systems can be upgraded. 

“Weexpecttobeaneafthelead- 

(Cootimed on Page 13, CoL 7) 


ABtOLEASBW GENEVA 




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to professionalism and rebablftty In business aviation 
Our own fleet of 10 modem Jets Is ready to serve you anytime, 
anywhere. AH Dassault Falcon and Learjet models available. 

For further detail*, please call: Zurich Ph (1)8143700 Tlx 56192 

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259 3224 Hx 44192 


MerchantsBank of Boston 

is pleased to announce the merger of 

€ 4 €&te& 'IC 

with its wholly-owned subsidiary 

McKinley Square Securities Corp. 









Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13. 1983 



Dow Jones Averages 


NYSE Index 


Open High Low L n* cm 


Indus 1271.20 128113 1S4J4 12765T + OSS 

Trans 12102 **S* 41657 42SS + *0? 

um mrsi iauv i48js utst + U6 

Cam> 51114 52376 51574 52QJ9 + LZ7 


Composite 

industrials 

Trqiwn. 

Utilities 

Finance 


HU Lnr Ctese Oitao 
10453 1MJJQ 10457 +057 
12059 119.99 12050 +052 


10159 18)54 101 JO +0.94 
5334 M3D SU4 +05B 
109 109.1B 10954 +031 


Tuesdays 

Oosr^r 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ index 


Advaneed 
Declined 
UncfOTced 
Total Issues 
New Highs 
New Lows 
Volume up 
V olume down 


Composite 

industrials 

Finance 

Insurance 

utilities 

Banks 

T rarest. 


Week Tear 
Close Ofae Ago Aeo 
28657 — 054 282.72 25S5* 
3I0J3 — 156 30554 271.42 
32950 —(U2 32533 39344 
318.94 — 0.72 31658 3284 
26SJ8 — 225 26454 24953 
25038—058 24955 23427 
26194— &I7 24490 24795 


NYSE Diaries 


Advanced 
Declined 
Uncftanaefl 
Total 1 sluts 
New HlDhs 
New Lows 
volume un 

volume down 


daw 

739 

447 

2013 

90 

msl 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


Bn Sates •Sta’rt 
Feb. 11 .... 220399 S&JBJ IJ34 

F«tt.O 234.948 531.101 2907 

Feh.7 217599 547798 &443 

Feta. 6 207507 540338 NA 

Feb- 5 238513 B4J68 11387 

‘included In the sales flaurss 


1 

VolmoPM 

JTUJMW 



Pro* coKoUdated dose 

124737,530 


Standard & Poor’s Index 



Tomes indode the nationwide prices 
tip to the dosing an Wall Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


Industrials 

Trans* 1 . 

Utilities 

Finance 

Composite 


Hieo low Close ctroe 

2)1.99 2XW9 201.72 — 0.13 
160.13 15». «7 I5M2 

78.13 77*1 78.10+131 

21.13 20.94 2159 tOJJI 
10075 17955 16056 +005 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


AMEX Stock index 


Bands 

Utilities 

Industrials 


HNh uw 0 ». ' ctrtw v 

22MB 22859 SM8 —U3 




ar 











pf 27*11.3 
(HA 192 12 3 
dPt 57 114 
Pf 8.16 12 2 

Ji 7 j i 
M J 9 
M U 20 
58 23 12 
130 2* 12 
130 35 12 
150 34 

24 
27 8 
52 28 
113 
135 115 
171 U I 
Mb 11 II 
150 4J a 
474 115 
250 113 
2790117 


N.Y. Stocks Post a Small Gain 


United Press Internal tonal 

NEW YORK — The stock market managed 
to post a small gain Tuesday despite sharp 
declines in some computer issues. 

The Dow Jones industrial average, which fell 
13.9! Monday, gained 035 to 1,276.61. 

The New York Stock Exchange index rose 
0.07 to 10437 and the price of an average share 
increased 2 cents. Standard & Poor's SOO-stock 
index gained 0.0S to 180.56. Advances and 
declines were trading at about a l- 1 ratio among 
the 2,006 issues traded at 4 P-M. 

Big Board volume was 1 1 1.12 million shares, 
up from 104 million traded Monday. 

Trade Latimer of Evans & Co. said some of 
the pressure on computer issues dried up late in 
the session, and other than the technology 
group it was a quiet session. Government bond 
markets and some banks were closed for Lin- 
coln’s Birthday. 

IBM said it will be difficult to show earnings 
growth in the firs! quarter of 1985. The compa- 
ny earned S1.97 per share in the like period of 
1984. 


in the issues. “The market is taking everything 
pretty well,” he said. 

He added that some of the faminy forecasts 


in the computer industry reflected the effects of 
the strong U.S. dollar on certain companies. 


the strong U.S. dollar on certain companies. 

Harry VjJJec of Sutra & Co., Palo Alto. Cali- 
fornia, said the stock market had encountered a 
‘Temporary setback” on its way to U00 and 
higher on the Dow Jones industrial average. 

He said Monday's pullback was a normal 
reaction and the market is poised to go higher. 

On the floor. Data General was the most 
active NYSE- listed issue, plun ging 1 4ft to 58to. 

Unocal was second, falling 2 to 47 to. Uno- 
cal's chairman said the company is “not for 
sale.'’ The stock has been active recently on 
takeover rumors. 


Another company. Data General, said sec- 
ond-quarter net may be down from the 55 cents 
per share reported in the year-earlier period. 
Some analysts had been expecting a subs tantial 
increase. 


Stephen Smith, a computer analyst at Paine 
Webber, said in the case of Data General, the 


company’s announcement was a reminder that 
its sales are “quite sensitive* to chang es the 
economy." 

Jerry Hinkle of Sanford C. Bernstein Co. said 
weakness was concentrated in a few issues, 
similar to Monday’s session except for a change 


Phillips Petroleum was third on the active list, 
unchanged at 50. Investor Carl C. Icahn said be 
will offer $60 per share in cash for 70 million 
shares. There were several conditions attached 
to the offer. 

IBM, which lost 3% Monday, shed 114 to 
13214. IBM introduced some enhancements for 
its larger computers and new processors. 

Digital Equipment fell 4% toll 7. The com- 
pany said Monday it has stopped production of ■ 
the Rainbow personal computer although pro- 
duction could resume in the future. 

Hewlett Packard lost 1 to 36%, Texas Instru- 
ments 3% to 121% and National Semiconductor 
to to 13 ft. Motorola added to to 374. 

Amos firmed with General Motors gaining 1 
to 79%. Ford % to 45% and Chrysler ft to 33ft. 

Elsewhere in the oil group. Mobil advanced ft 
to 28%. Exxon % to 47to, Atlantic Richfield to to 
46 and Chevron to to 34%. 


30 

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Introducing more leg room, wide 


It’s all yours at the new AT&T International Calling 
Center in the International Arrivals Building at JFK Interna- 
tional Airport in New York. 

The AT&T International Calling Center is a spacious 


room filled with AT&T Public Phones. It features the AT&T, 

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iing Center also gives yowaccess to two important 
forces An attendant to answer your questions and assist 


cash-paying travelers, and a library of phone directories from 
major cities in the IIS., Europe and Asia. 

The AT&T International Calling Center. All the advan- 
tages of AT&T technology in a sleek, comfortable environment 


The New AT&T International Calling Centos 






•• r 


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‘VI few key words to help you get a conversation 
started on earth'' 



For our 1984 Annual Report, write: 
Grow Group, Inc. Fan Am Building, 
5' 200 Park Avenue, NY 10166 Dept-G 

Grow Group 

Awlgrip. Devoe. Amerftone, three of our well-known I bre 


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31* IBM ZentttiB, 8 1168 2» 23* 23*— S 

27U 18 Zero 1 -40 15 tt 27 24* 34* Mttw* 

31* 71* Zurnln 142 4-4 11 379 29* 29* 29*—.* 


NYSE Highs-Lows 


Feb, 



32* 21* 
X 5* 1 
25 14 

5* 2* ’ 

24V. 14* ■ 
6* 2V. ' 

19* 5* ’ 

46* XU 
13* 9* ’ 
25* 17* 
6* 3*' 
10 * 8 * ' 
39* 23* ' 
75* 40* ' 
S3 68* ' 
66* 52* ’ 
24* 14* ’ 
38* 29* ' 
75* SB ' 


X 29* 
10 9U 
2GU 19* 
3 2* 

24* 23* 
3 3 

7V. 7* 

41 40* 

13* 13* 
24 23* 

4* 4* 
10* 10V. 
39 37* 

73* 73* 
03 S3 
66 6 6 
24* 24* 
35* 35* 
75 74* 


30 + * 

9l< — 'i« 
!9!b— * 
2* 

24* + * 

3 

7*+ * 
40*— V. 

13* + 
23V— 

4V+ * 
10 * 

37V— 1* 
73* U 
83 +1 

46 

24V— * 
35* + * 
74* + * 


Solas Hsvrrs are unofficial. Yeolv Mohs and laws reflect 
the previous 52 weeks dui me current week, but notttw latest 
, trading day. Where a split or slock dividend amou nting to 25 
oorcent or more has been paid, the years hisn-low range ana 
dividend ore shown for the now slock only, unless otherwise 
noted, ratos of dividends ore annual disbursements based an 
ine latex) declaration. 

c —dividend aha extra Is), b — annual rate ol dividend plus 
slack dividend, c — liquidating dividend, dd — caned, d — 
new yearly law. *— dividend declared or paid In orecedlna 12 
months, g — dividend In Canadian funds, sun led la 15% 
nen- residence tan. I— dividend declared otter spttt-up or 
stock dividend. I — dividend paid this yeor.cmatea deferred, 
or no action taken at latest dividend meeting, k — dividend 
declared or paid nils war, an accurrmtalive issue wMh dWt- 

dends in arrears, n — new issue m the nost 52 weeks. The high- 

, low range begins wtm the start at irading. nd — next das 
delivery. P/E— prlce-eornfngs rofio. r — dividend declared 
ornald in meceding 12 months, ohn stack dlvktend-B— stock 
split. Dividend begins with dote ol »i 1 1. sis — sales, t — divi- 
dend paid In stock hi preceding 12 months, estimated cash 
value an ex-dividend or ex -distribution date, u — new voarty 
nian. v— trading hatted. W— In bankruptcy Or receivership 
or being reorganized under the Bankivetcv Aa.or securities 
assumed by such companies, wd — when distributed, wt — 
when issued, ww— wHh warrants, x — ex-dlvtdend or ex- 
rlgnrs. xdtt — ex-dLstrlbutton. ny — without warrants y — 
ex-dlvldand and sales In tuiL yld — yield, z — sales in fulL 


AMEX High**Lows Feb. 12 


Floating Rate Notes 


Feb. 12 


Dollar 


issuer/MJa axi/Mtri. Coupon Next 


Crta Nail Stlg S'v-00 
AUled lrisn 5Vi-9S Wy 

Allied lrtshS'.,42 II* 

Allied Irish P*-*! Pv 

Allied Irish -perp KK, 

Arab Bkg Carp 5V-K IT. 
Atlantic Fin Int-U HFt 

Bca Comm. Itgikmia SU-W 9* 
Bon Naz LCMmiSVfl IDx. 
Banco Ol Rama -91 9* 

Banco SloSoirllo5 1/441 W. 
Banco PIM04V45 U* 

Bk Of Graeco -91/94 Px 
Bk Of Greece -97 
BkOI Ireland 5W89 f* 
Bk Of Ireland 5V-92 I 
B1 Montreal 5 1 - » 9?. 

Bk Of Montreal 5 -M P 1 : 
Bk Of Montreal 5'i-9l W!e 
BkOt New York -94 8* 

BtotNom Scot* m't 

Bk Of Nova Scotia 5^44 9* 

Bk Of Tokyo 5*43 11 

Bk Of Tokyo S’ vOT 87. 
Bk Of Takvo -87 B* 

Bk Of Tokyo 5'+taM8^1 
Bk Of Tokyo 5*-OKffl/91 9% 
Bk Americo 5Vr44 8V 

Barkers Trust 5* 44 5V 
Bonkers Trust 514-96 9* 

BO Arobe InvesJ 5*87/91 12 



Bo indoauez 5.112 bn 41/16 157 
BO IndoSuex S'v-99 12N 

BO L'Unkm Eur 5 , «-89 8V 

Bfc*5V47 8* 

Blce5*-actn UK* 

Bfce SVi-ioTi® 9* 

Bice 5164? 12k. 

Bno5*4S 9* 

BRP5WTO 111* 

Bno5t6-8S/n 8V. 

Bnp7VH»«4 9* 

Br»59>49 9* 

BnoS'«^9 IfiLBO 

Brio 48/91 12* 

Blip 51*44 Pi 

Bo Paribas -pen) 9* 

Bo Wormy 5V-89/94 9* 

Barclays Overseas 5-45 9M. 

B»t3civ» Overseas 5-90 9*6 

Borders Overseas S-oirp KFl 
B araavs Ovwsoass -Ot Un. 

Bergen Bk 49.41 ?* 

Bergen Bk 5*48/91 I* 

King Beig 5tlg doc49/W ?v 

Kins Beig SUb od-W/04 11V 

King Bstglum 5 iao44/Di P- 

Klng a*hl 5Hg -pero 9* 

Cccn-OS 

C«»5V?a _ 9Vj 

Cncn 5V.40/97 12V, 

GK0 5U4B/9S 

005*40 111* 

0451441 IS* 

ObelWMy 1 516-90 «W 

CBxSU-W 9is 

Curtate} S+L 5W-W 9* 

Oiom Mrmholton 5V.-43 W. 

Choso 511-09 9tw 

Chemical Bk5>6-H 8* 

Chentlcoi iwrnv) sl.44 n* 

cnristkHUaBk5V*4i 9* 

OirtsflonkJ-* IZk. 

CinconilVrtlYl Aug 5*44 8* 
auenm Sep) 5U4* 9* 

011009444 8h 

CltlcofOA-N 9* 

oncor»-UiMofBtf- 8)* 

atlC0rTi47 8»- 

Commerzt)onk5V89 9* 

CanunetTbonfc nov49 10* 

Comm Urt) Montreal 5*41 IT* 
CcfSM -86/98 12 

Ccfni40/9S IMO 

CcfS’vUUM 12* 

Cepme Si« -87/92 ICT-i. 

Ccome W48 9* 

Credit Du Nord 51449/92 9* 

Credit Fonder $*-81/93 12 

aodfl Far Export 5*42 9* 

Cr Lyon 5*41/96 11* 

CrwBf Lyon 5*47 IS* 

Crodlllyan 5*40/97 12 

Credit Lyon 5U-89/W 9% 

Credit Lvan 5*41/95 9* 

Credit Lvoncre-99 9* 

Crodll Lyon 5*-<arP2/96 9 

Credfl Lyon SWf un9!/M TO 

Cred Matt Stlg 5Vr8B 9 

Oed Naff Sffo F*-WW 12* 

CrefflhnMolt-4f 9. - 

Cnxflianstall 5*41/97 9V. 

Credlfanxlofl58M4 IS* 

Dai Ids Kama M44 Wk 

Oaroke OJte 5*49 IK. 

DonNonke-neWQ 9V. 

OenNerske-ditfO 9* 

Denmark 5V.+jn«f10 9* 

Denmark Slk-octtl/va 11* 

OemnarkSkk-M «* 

Denmark 516-aerp 9* 

Dfa Ergt Oext 5*4|/94 «k 

Drasdner Bank S 1 *-?] UW 

Drexdner Bank 5*49 TO. 

Ormbyer Bonk 5W42 12* 

Ektarndolhicter5*49 l»v 

Edf 5*-99 12* 

Ed! 5*45 9* 

Eab-43 TO* 

Enb5*-W m* 

EecS-H/yg 9* 

Exterior inn-* W 

Fsrnwlii 516-99 12* 

FbmtPi Paper -95 
Fim Boston me 5*41/94 9* s 

Pint Qikooa 5*44 10 3 

FimarvTej«sv9S R* 3 

FlrdltdaMatt5*4S 9N t 

Full -44/96 8* I 

OerttmraSV.47 11 ] 

GenfMancs 5*49/92 9* 2 

Genflngnce 5 41/94 9* 2 

G*biJM? TO J 

Gib 5* 43 91/131 

Gzb-Pcn 18* 1 

SaS*-M P* 2 

Giro S* 41 9. 3 

Gr1n«ov*Slv4S 1J 3 

Grin8avs5*-94 87/821 


luuer/Mhi csn/Mct Caupaa Neel Bk) Askd 

Great .vestem FuiT^-* 13. 314 

Hill Samuel Pm-Ss 12 r. 52 

Hill Samuel 5‘j-oera f '» 28-5 

Hliaana Americano 5* «4S 11* 244 

Htdra Quebec ?x-?4 9* 227 

ic industries -41 «v. 1S-7 

Indonesia 48,9] n «-4 

UK S :-85 ID 54 

Ibi 5*-noyfH liPa 20-5 

ireionc S' v.*/*? 12* 14-3 

Pea. I rekuw - 4< r, 

Ihl5— 85 10* 

Italy f SeouDlicj S*-99 (2* 

C.lloh 5.1.4 c-lll-B 21-1 

iiaty 4*'W TO. 

JJ‘.f«rsanrv-97 TO. 

Koo--feu92 IF* 

kopi":-mori>2 ifl'-* 

Kleimnrt Benson 5*41 ID* 

KiMnwortBemonS’.-* T2* 

rUirroDTOBi 7134»_ 10 

Korea Eiannge 7.248 12 

LinaKn 5VJ 99 9V. 

UtVdS S-y+3 1DW. 

LtovdS5 ! i,42 9V. 

uo*as--« ii« 

Ud)5 u 3-iu0t9 9'k 

LicbS-k-ns 10* 

LfC8S’>fim89 If 

Lh*Vi-8» 9* 

LKbS*93 9* 

MOIrawaSsi+r/W Wfc 

Matavsk) 5*-aaM'^ 12 

AtokTvsM 5*-dedF>92 10 

MnlcvsiO ^48.91 1IN 

Man Han a Seas 5'x44 94,4 

Mar Han (Wklv) 5’»-H «* 

Marine Midlands*-* TO, 

Morins Midland 5 1 v-9i 9». 

Marine Midland -09 9». 

Mellon Bk 5*44 «* 

Midland S' 2-91 « 

MidlandS49 9* 

Midumd S’. 42 Fi 

M/dtarJ94i 11 

Midland 5-99 17* 

Mitsui Finr.46 12* 

Maroon Grenlcil 544 9. 

Morgan Don5 ! «40/91 12w 

MertgpgeDei5'A42 99W 

Nat Bk Oetroll 5 T «4o TO. 

Nai Cam Sdi Arabia 5.44 9* 

NcflWestmin5’i41 9* 

Nan v/eslmin5V*-9g 9* 

Natl Weshnln 5*44 11V, 

Natl Weshntn 5*-92 10* 

Nall Westmln -oerp 12*. • 

NesW0r5’*-»4 12* 

New Zeotold 5*47 11* 

New Zealand Steel 5*42 TO 

Nippon CnjdM Hk y--w P* 

Ninoon Credit Bk 5*45 9* 

Nippon Credit Bk 4*44 Ok 

Nord* In) Fin 5W41 10* 

OkbS'i-84 10* 

0*bS’-4* 10* 

Ott ■ -95/99 11% 

Oltstwre NUnlns S*41 9* 

Offshore Mining- -84 7* 

Pirelli 5*41/94 12* 

Pk ban ken 5 48/91 9* 

Queensfand S*4i 10* 

Ron* 5*-9i 12* 

Parol Bk Scotland 5*44/948% 

Solramo S’i.41/93 TO 

5onwalnt.nn51*48 IT* 

SonM -W/20D4 8* 

Sanwa Ini. Fin 5*42 12* 

ScawBnavIcn Fin 5Wapr9] IT* 

Scandinavian Fins'— deceit* 

Scotland Int Fin 5*43 11* 

Snd5*4* 8* 

Seat 5*40/93 f* 

S.F.E.S*4» TO 

S.F.E.4I 9% 

5adete Generate 5* 40/95 l2Vi +2 

5ocMe Genera* 5VJ0 I0l» 9-5 

Soc Generate Mar 5U44 13* 113 

Sodeie Generate S*moy04 10* 7 5 

Sncb-91 10% 284 

Spain i hbiedoai) 5*43/97 13* 25-3 

kingdom Of Spain 5*43 13* 262 

Spain -9? 9* 28-S 

Stood Chart SW-90 12V: 19-2 

Stand Churl 5*44 9"A 84 

Stand anrl 5*41 ID* 38-5 

Stand Chart 5*-mar90 17* IW 

Slang Chart -para w* 7-5 

5mte0kO/lrXba4*47 n 21-5 

Sumitomo Trwt 5*43/94 9* 124 

Sweden 941 8% 244 

Sweden 5*47/89 11* 382 

Sweden SU-93/U 10* 20-5 

Sweden -49/94/99 9* 

Sweden perp- 9* 9/7 

Sweden 40/05 8* 10-7 

Taira Kobe S*-72/04 H* 30-5 

Takuafn S’^-ez/94 12* 182 

To*ci Asia Ltd 5*44/99 9V. 134 

Toronto Oomkikxi 51%-P? 12* H-7 

Toro Trust 5*41/99 9% 144 

T vo FA- 14/04 9* 7-3. 

Union Bk Norway Fa-99 12* 21-2 

l/nlied Orsem Bk 4 49 9* 394 

Web Fra 47 

wit norm ecfvM S*4t 17* 111 

Wbrtd Bonk -44 Ut 38-2 

Yokuhama F a-91 /94 II* 24 

Zero rokraxjrtasse 5*41 9* 15-7 


Non Dollar 



ADVERTISEMENT 


brand names. 


MANTA ELECTRIC WORKS, LID. 

(CDRa) 

The Board of Directors of Makiln Elec* 
trie Vorka, Lid., has announced dial 
shareholders, who will be registered in 
the books of the Company on Febru- 
urSOth. 1985 (Tokyo time) will 
be entitled to reccire i 10% ml tiw 
distribatioa of new shares. Conse- 
quently the undersigned designated div. 
cp. no. 84 of the CDRs for ibis pur- 
pode. 

In Japan the shares are- traded cs-bonus 
as from Febnaiy 16th, 1985. 

AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY N.V. 
Amsterdam. Febnmrv 4th, 1985. 


luner/Mm om/Mot, coupon Next BU Askd | 

Am47 ID* 1+2 

Bk Montreal 5*44 1118 27-1 

BkTokvo 48/99 TO 214 

BalndosuRF+41 TO 21 -2 

Citicorp Si I /iett-tt PCt 15-3 

Cnon»i5*44 ID* 31-3 

Credit Fancier 5U49 10* «4 

Cred Non SIS 517-91 795 91k 183 

Denmark 93/98-10 net 233 

1. 1.1.544 17* 154 

Kingdom Betdfem 544 ID* 104 

Lords 5 -RJ TO »2 

5ncl 5*40/93 13* 244 

Yorkailrg 5*41/94 IMS 274 

MM! - 

Source : Credit Suisse- First Boston Ltd. I 
London l 


ADVERTISEMENT 

CASIO COMPUTER CO.. LID. 

(CDRs) 

'Die Board ol Directors ol Casio Com- 
puter Co., LtcL, has announced that 
nbarehtilders, who will be neutered in 
the books of the Company on 
March 20th. 1985 (Tolwo time) 
will he entitled ro imti ve a 10% eratk 
distribution of new shares. Conse- 
quently the undersigned designated div. 
i cp. no. 21 of (he CDRs fur this pur- 

pOBtf. 

In Japan the stares are traded ex-bonus 

as front March 16th, 1985. 

AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY N.V. 
Amsterdam. February Ut. 1985. 


INTERNATIONAL 

Quotations Supplied by Fu 

12 February 1985 [ ’ ' .T. 

The net asset value Quotations shown below are SuppiiedbftM Funds I] Pod with fee- 
•xeeption of Mine fundi whose quotes are bond on is be prices. TIM funowfag 
margluot symbols indlcofe frequency of quotottons applied for flit iht: 
td] -daily; (w) - weekly; tb) -M-montltly; (r) - regukriy; a) - hrmutarty. . 


I B 


vs. 

• -V 


AL MALMANAGEMENT 
(w) At-Mcl Trust. S A 

BANK JULIUS BAER 4 CO. Ltd. 


S149A1 ORANGE NASSAIOROUP 
*'«A1 reOSSm The HooklOTl 46*670 
—id ) Bever BPratyen 1 1 


—td) Baprbond PARISBAS-GHOU 

-- .IT — - S « — W > Corhnco irterattonol SyU2 - 

— (d 1 Equltxwr America — - S 1177 JM _i»i ruu iji m am n« n - 

— <«l ! fautboer Foctllc -Hwl OBLI-DOLUVI XUUU3 . 

— w J Crabqr Sf.Vl'i* — twl obluven — 1 -11 v n&TsuS 

— <tf f SMcfcbor SF 17194X7* — )„{ oBLi-GULDE t ; _ fluhi.w ' 

— (d 1 CSF Fund SF 2155 — ’• PARO'L-FUNtL 1 10129 ■- 

E ^wi SF1151 -miPARINTERFLBJ J1B3J4 - 

z}d l 1 TFfS 3 M V - : . liAm -td 1 PAR US Tram* Band 110L12 * 

BANQUEtNDOSUEZ „ ”gfefe 9E 

— td ) Allot Growth Fund — _ — *1059 111! <!om 

— (w) FIF— Pocfftc IT5L36 |S2 

— <d ) indomiozNlwItlbandsA SBVJIS $tg 

-Id! Indosuex MulfttondsB St4*il SKANDlFWfO INTL FNO (464-ZK27D1 ' 

BRITANN I AJ>OB271, St. Hfler. -h-JMV ZU) A^j: BkCrr;|\ ^ITTaS ' 

SUV* SVENSKA INTERNATWAL LTU 

10.974 17Derajv^Sojjnd^^ . 

11.191 — 1 fb > SUB Bnivf Fu-irf - e^ieo 

*0460 -1*1 SUB Infl Growth Fyd 1 19.96 

*W4£ SWISS BANK CORP. 

CJSJ4 —Id J Ameriail/0)ar- SF 43475 

*#•*}$ -<d I CFMerii Bom Setecao DM 11117- ’ 

*M13 —<d l Doilar Band Selactfi S132.M- . 

S n'SiT “ i9 ! Florin Bond Selects. FL11BJ3* - 

SQJI7 — (d)lonrvalar 8F92J5 . 

CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL Z(dt ep'iSSv 

daa Big w s™ 

— iwi Lonrai innto sa * -fd t Univ. Bond Selea SF8SSB _ 

CREDIT SUISSE [ISSUE PRICES) -fd > Universe! Fund SF 126*9 

5 «u}r£ UNION BANK OF SWITZEUND ’ 

-td lAiyicnUA.sk. SF445D ’ 

-jd 1 Bond-l mmst _ SF 67.75 

(d) Bond Voter Yen Yenl0«7j» ~~ 

H/riJ S«wSrf VdJw u^DOlTar 5 S ift^s -id 1 Sofll South Afr.Sk.. SF 49130 

^5 , ift2JSl VWW US-DOLLAR.^SIHAS _(dl Slmo (Sfock prfCBl SF 1*430 

-re 1 C5Fun^=tan*i Z. SF 7*35 UMOW, INVESTMENT FlWFbrt ^ ^ 

-id i cs Fonds-inri sf 11030 -J2JH.2E2S 2*5-2 

— fd I CS Money Morkdt Fund _ S1BI9JB -<dl unWonds^ — DM21JB - 

—fd j CS Money Moricef Fund DM 1Q2UB —fd) Unlink ■ ■ . DM7740 r . 

—Id 1 Enerole— Valor 5F 17258 Other FtlUS 

S sVS twl Actlbandl In 
SF 17130 (wi Actives! intt 

DIT I N VESTMENT FFM jlT.’ fillfS \]u^attanal Put 

— Md ) Concentre DM2433 M ^ FlnoJSlF ^ 

—fid ) Infl Rantantand DM *645 j 

Dunn & HoratK 6 Uoyd George. Brussels <*! Tnjstar jrrtT Fa ( 


— td 1 CSF Fwid SF 2535 -td J paroil+unl. 

3siSTO£fc==_ sp ,l llM'ifSH 

^=1 S i IS tjS! rbc !Sn C ° p “" 

— fd j Indomiez Multibands A 5HVJ1S 

— (d I Indosuex Mutftbands B S 14431 SJWNDIFONO INTL F 

BRitannia-pOB 271, St. HeOer. Jersey Zj"!xS : - q2i ~ ~ 

-fwl Bril jm lor Income — — snow 

—twl BrllS MennaCurr 
—Id I Brit. IntU ManasMrif 
—Id I Biif. intLEManaaPortt 
— (wl Brit.UnWersm Growth 
—fwl Brit£oid Fund 
— fw) BrltA/CTiaoXurrgncy 
— <d I Bril. Japtm Dir Perf. Fd 
—fwl Brlt-teroey Gilt Fund. 

— fd 1 Brit. World Lais. Fund 

— Id 1 Brit, world Tarim. Fund 

CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL ”H J s35TiS25S » 

—fwl Capital Infl Fund I JUS 

-fwl Cartful Italia SA * 1M* ={S| 8SrEK$R! 

CREDIT SUISSE flSSUE PRICES) 

=fljEȣr 

-(d) Bond voter Yon-; Yon 10tt7j» jSp^mvSt_ 

-<*\ a"?5!2 VJSE SF . 9?^9 I s^iSto 


Occidental 


— fd 1 Energie— Valor 

— fd I Ussec 

— fd > Europo— Volor 
— fd I Podflc— Volar 

DIT INVESTMENT FFM fwl A^fSVnfcwrtfanal i 

— Md ) Concantra DM2433 

—fid I inf I Rantantand DM *635 LF 

Dunn & Morrill 6 Uoyd George. Brussels {y! l2 , . s, SrJ5C l Ftl - * 

— fm) D&H Commodify PooL. S 2*4.19 — W | BBL TON PS— — 

— I ml Currency A Gold Peal . — * 18277 — fwl BwPlnterbond Fund 
— f ml Winch. Life Fuf. Pool— S5B3J7— fwl Bondseto-lss ue Pf- 
— fm) Trans world Fuf. PooL. 1952.12 — (ml Canada Gtd-Morigog 


FAC MGMT. LTD. INV. ADVISERS 
1, Laurence Pauntv MilL EC4. 01-6Z34480 

—twlFXCAttanttc. 1 12 


(wl Bonchelex-issue Pr 

(ml Canada Gtd-Marfgaga F_ . 
fd ) Cartful Pruerv. Fd. 1ntU_ *11.13 
fwl Clfodof Fund — -■ *1JH 


—fwl F8.C Euraueun. 
—fwl F&C Orientals. 




ivf-r 

' * 

& 




■ ji -i 

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;!-rJ 

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FIDELITY POB 670. Hanllton Bermuda 
—f ml American Values Common, *7837 
—(ml Anter Values Cum-Pr«_— S 10030 


MUNIT. Li U. [NV. MUVISERS Iwl THniM kuM .«!» 

Hnl - EC4, 01+TM6W Id I CJ.R. Australia *?S • 

— twl F£C AtbMltt e . ..... . — , I 1234 fd J r t a. Japan Food *9329 

— ‘wl EK I”™**?" -*?-*■ fm) Cleveland Offshore Fd._ S2A7371 . 

—fwl F4C Oriental S 2542 fwl Columbia Securities FL 11825 

FIDELITY POB 67IL Hamilton Bermuda {5 ! r °£? E J5 l ■ “ **irSm - 

— fml American values Common. S7S37 jl] SSfJrS? STatwC - * 

-(ml Ajmer Values Cum-Prel S 10030 S' ^ ' 

— fd 1 Fidelity Anrar. Assets *67.15 "{ ^ ,nn B C * <+1 — - 

-fd 1 Fidelity Australia Fund S 736* == - . 

— (tf FWeiliv (Mr, SvBSkfr— 5 12QJL5 W J O. witter wid Wkk W TU w 59 JM 

=fS ) fSSK pi Er^F^ZZ. STV3J » Drokj,^ Invesl Fd/HJ N.V- S9M38 

— Id ) Firteiity jnfL Fund S5A35 (° 1 Dreyfus Fund infl — . 1 36.15 

—re l Fkwuv Orient Fund *2439 {" S tvS 

—id i Fidailty Frontier Fund S 1232 2*®**?ff = 

— Id I Fidelity PacHic Fund— 5 13239- td ) Eurace util loaf Ions. . tFfl.92 

— (d I FlcMIltv Sari EJaB tlin fw) Firs! Eoglo Fund 1129633 [ 

-BMM6 

- » 1 H/7? 

FORBES PO BISTaRAND CAYMAN fw] FodHtax IMUO Pr. =«■ 

London Agent 01-039-3313 fwl Forexfund 

—fwl Gold Income 5 SJM* (w) Formula Selection Fd. 

— |W) Gold Appreciatlan * 428 (d ) FondHoHa ... 

—fwl Dollar Income. — *eaa fd) Govern™. Sec. Fund*. 

—fm) Strategic Trading— J1J10 Id > Frank! -Trust Inlerahti 

GEFiNOR funds. y^wnannHWos. N.V. 

—fwl Eo9> Investment Fund *34630 mSSLT 

-fwl ScnrtU/t world Fund C 1213388 b ILR raf l 

—fw) Mate 51. American _____ S 15133 rS I imer'hmd^A 
Captl .GutaUd. LonAsentA I -4914230 ,'flSSSriSf Pun d 

GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT CORP. {«) JnTl Currency Fund 
PS 119, *| Peter Port. Guernsey, 0481-28715 [ r _ ? >nM Secyrfttos Fund 

(ml FuturGAM S A. . s 12134 W > Invoita DWS 

112IJ5 fr 1 Invest Atkmi: . 


■■OS v.r^F* 

^baCi'T - 

'c.' 

■HH-ihct •• - - 

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jiltw 
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' 4 - mill;. - 




■ ■ earn 

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— fd 1 Fidelity InfL Fund 

—re l Fidelity Orlenl Fund— 
—id > Fidelity Frontier Fund 
— fd I Fidelity Pacific Fund- 
— fd > Fidelity Sect. Growth R 
— fd I Fidelity world Fund—. 


*mp 


< Fidelity Pacific Fund 513237* l" { 

) Fidelity Seel. Growth Fd. S14A2 h c IS 

. Fidelity wand Fund S3U 9* 


***• Z C'r 


(ml GAM Arbitrage inc 
fw) GAMerica Inc— 
fwl ISAM Boston ine 
fwl gam Ermilase 
fw) GAM Fronc-vol 

fd 1 GAM International I 

twl CAM North America Inc 


W ) Invoata DWS 
!r ■ Invest Atkmi 


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7JEW YORK — CBS Inc. re- 
oorted Tuesday that it had 1984 
operating earnings of $212.4 mil- 
lion, up almost 14 percent from 
r JL983’s S 187.2 m flllon, on sales of 
44.92 billion, a 12-percent gain 
•from $4.4 bUEon. Also Tuesday, 
'American - Broadcasting Cos. re-' 
.Muted higher fourth-quarter earn- 
'Jogs- 

n . CBS's . anneal ' earnings ' were 
37-15 per share in 1984, compared 
with $6 JT in 1983. - 

CBS said its 1984 earnings were 
substantially affected by the sale of 
Sts miiacal-mstruxnents division, 
which resulted in non-operating 
losses of $6 million from the sale 
and $43.1 million from the disposal 
of the division. It noted that this 


was partly offset by a non-operat- 
mggain of $16.6 mulion from sales 
of land. 

CBS said its broadcast group re- 
ported a 40-percent profit increase 
and a 14-percent rain in revenue. It 
said revenue and profit from the 
.CBS television, stations division 
also rose, while CBS radio-division 
revenues rose but profits declined 
because of a nemreenmng gain on 
the sale of a radio station is 1983. 

Ibe company noted that for the 
fourth quarter broadcast-group 
profits increased IS percent and 
revenue 8 percent from the 1983 
fourth quarter. 

CBS said profits for its records 
group rose 13 percent in 1984 and 
revenue increased 9 percent. Al- 
though revenue for CBS Records 


r Earnings 

InternationaLrose modestly, prof- 
its declined, parity because of the 
strong dollar, the company said. 


For the fourth quarter, the re- 
cords group's profit and revenue 
declined. CBS said this reflected a 


■Sit Sights Issue to Raise £168 MUUon 


( v Reuters 

5 LONDON -- Standard Tde- 
( p&iones & Cables PLC said Tues- 
{ day that it plans Jo raise about £1 68 
; million ($184 uuHion) through an 
i underwritten one-for-five rights is- 
sue of about 91 million new ordi- 
nary shares at 190 pence each. 

ITT United Kingdom Lt d , the 
ITT subsidiary which holds a 24- 
^ percent stake m STC, will take up 
the rights it is entitled to, the state- 
ment said. 

• 'STC estimates its 1984 pretax 
(troGt at £140 motion compared 
with £139 million in 1983. Profits 
= from ICL, taken over by STC Iasi 
5 year, will be included for the foil 12 
l months. 

! The. 1984 profit estimate allows 
•; fpr £15 iriilK nn to str eamline ICL 
' add exceptional {credits of £6 mil- 
lion at STC. 


The profit forecast consists of 
£100 million from operations at 
STC, £43 million from ICL, minus 
£3 million in interest costs connect- 
ed with the merger. 

STC plans to declare a final divi- 
dend for 1984 of 5.75 pence per 
share for a total of nine pence for 
the year. 20 percent more than 
1983, the statement 

The STC board regards 1985 asa 
year of consolidation for the en- 
larged group because of the high 
level of its investment program and 
the unsettled economic climate. 

Commenting on the rights 
STC said its board believes the 
group 's capital base should now be 
strengthened to improve the debt 
to equity ratio and provide more 
scope for r emaining at the fore- 
front of technological advances. 


difficult comparison with the ex- 
tremely strong results of the 1983 
fourth quarter, which included very 
high sales- for Michael Jackson's 
“ThriUer’" album. 

CBS said its CBS publishing 
group reported a 7-pcrcent increase 
in profit and a 5-percem increase in 
revenue in 1984. 

Meanwhile, ABC reported 
fourth-quarter net of $52.4 twilling 
or $1.80 a share, compared with 
S49.6 million or $1.69 a share in the 
1983 fourth quarter — a 6-percent 
gain. The company said cost-con- 
tainment programs significantly re- 
duced the effect of a period of low- 
' er-than-expected television 
viewing. V 

For the full year, ABC said its 
net was $195.3 million or $6.71 a 
share, up more than 22 percent 
from I983’s 159.8 million or $5.45 a 
. share, on revenue of S3.71 billion, 
up almost 27 percent from $195 
button In 1983. 

ABC said fourth-quarter revenue 
in its broadcasting division in- 
creased 5 percent to $816.6 million 
while profit for the quarter, at 
$108.8 million, was about equal to 
that of the previous year’s quarter. 

For the year, broadcasting reve- 
nue rose 26 percent to $3 JO billion 
and profit 17 percent to a record 
$427.8 million. 

Publishing revenue in the quar- 
ter rose 5 percent to $83.9 million 
while profit rose 3 percent to a 
-record $10.7 million, ABC said 
Full-year revenue rose 13 percent 
to $316.2 milli on and profit 17 per- 
cent to $34.2 rmlHn n 


Republic Air 
Reports Loss 
bi 4th Quarter 

The Associated Press . 

MINNEAPOLIS — Repub- 
lic Airlines Inc. said Tuesday 
that it had a kiss of $10 milli on 
in the fourth quarter, compared 
with earnings of S4 million a 
year earlier. 

But Republic earned a record 
$29.5 million far all oT 1984,' 
rebounding from a loss of Sill 
million in 1983. 

It also was Republic's first 
full-year profit since 1979, 
when the company was formed 
through the merger of North 
Central Airlines and Southern 
Airways. Republic also ac- 
: quired Hughes Airwest in 1980, 
and between 1980 and 1983, 
Republic last $222 rnDBoa. 

the fourth-quarter loss came 
on revenue of $357.6 million. A 
year ago. Republic earned 10 
cents a share on revenue of 
S348J million. For 1984, net 
income was 75 cents a share. 
Annual revenue climbed to 
$1 JS5 billion from $L5l billion. 

Republic said its loss in the 
latest quarter reflated one- 
time expenses and an interim 
decline in traffic associated 
with a restructuring of its 
routes. Stephen M. Wolf, presi- 
dent and chief operating offi- 
cer, said in a statement that the 
1984 profit “reflects Republic’s 
emphasis on route realignment, 
lowered operating costs and 
employee co mmitmen t to the 
company’s Partnership Plan, 
which saves the company $100 
million annually through 
1986." 


Komatsu Move Seen Causing Industry Shakeout 


Icahn Offer 
~. v}v | Put at $4 J2 Billion 

1 The Associated Frets 
‘ ■ -• -"5 ! NEW YORK — Carl C Icahn 
bade a new bid Tuesday for Phil- 
lips Petroleum Co. stock, offering 
560 a share for 70 million shares, or 
V 1 . $4.2 billion in cash.The New York 

. financier already owns 7_5 million 
'•* '4 shares of Phillips stock and the 
jukfitionalpurchase would raise his 
stake to shghtty more than 50 per- 
~ X tent ...... 

" > Mr. Icahn said that, if the first 
.'impart of his plan succeeded, he 
j — would acquire the r emaining 77.1 
' . pT tnillion shares for securities with a 
CZ. free value of _$50 a share, or $3,855 
• . r —.hfflir»n in his initial bid for Fh3~ 

. .] ~bps, Mr. Icahn said last week that 

wmM trv fA «yniin> tlw mnrns. 


COMPANY NOTES 


mmj IHnfWAV M»V Wl lipi 

j-ny for $55 a shared naif in cash and 
: ’-s'Tlhalf in securities. r ... . 

• Hie latest.offi^fike the first, is 
3 ? ^conditioned on' Phillrps’s stock- 
.-. ’ "holders rejecting.the company’s re- 
: - -^tractnring plan at a Feb. -22 meet-: 

• >'Mng. That plan. was developed to 

• settle an earlier takeover bid by a 
group of investor* led by T. Boone 

i -iT Pickens, chairman of Mesa Petro- 
; -^rleumCo. 


Alcan Australia Ltd, which is 70- 
percent owned by Alcan Alumin- 
ium Ltd. of Canada, reported that 
it earned 15.5 nriffion Aust ralian 
dollars (SlU million) last year, in 
contrast to a loss of 21.2 million 
dollars a year earlier. 

Applied Biosystems said its 
-boarddedareda2rfor-1 stock split, 
payable to stock of record March 6. 

Deere ft Co. said it expects to 
report a loss in the. first quarter 
ended Jan. 31. A year earlier, the 
fann-eqmpmem and ccnstraction- 
. machmcry maker earned $2 mil- 
lion. _ 

Electronic Data Systems Corp. is 
to operate a digital network for 
General Motors Corp- which ac- 
quired EDS for an estimated $25 
billion last year. GM ofiirials also . 
said that the network initially 
would, connect IS GM sites with 
'fiber optic cable.. . 

Granrai Coorp. said it signed a 
memo with the U.S. National 
Aeronautics arid Spaa Adminis- 
tration outlining experiments for 
making semx»nductors in space. 
The research is expected to lead to 
materials-processing experiments 
aboard the shuttle, Grumman said. 


Habftasd Financial Group has 
asked BrariTs central bank to take 
control of it because of liquidity 
problems, the bank said. The bank 
added (hat the problems were pro- 
voked by the SulbrasQdro Banking 
Group, also undo- central bank su- 
pervision, with which Habitasnl 
had dose links. 

Mdrffle Corp., which operates 
footWear and clothing stores, said it 
agreed definitely to sell its Fox- 
moor division to B.R. Investors 
Inc, a privately held company that 
owns Brooks Fashion Stores Inc. 
Melville said the price would be 
determined March 29. 


Ok Ted Mating Ltd. stopped 
mining operations Sunday as 
scheduled, Papua New Guinea’s 
minister for minerals and energy, 
Francis PusaL said. He added that 
die company has approval to pro- 
cess gold ore already mined. The 
ate is due to be dosed Feb. 28, 
because of a dispute between the 
government, which owns 20 per- 
cent of Ok Tcdi, and the private 
partners. 

Pennsylvania Power ft Light Co. 
saidits 90-percent owned Susque- 


hanna steam electric station near 
Berwick, Pennsylvania, went into 
commercial operation Tuesday. 
The unclear unit, in twttfng since 
May 1 984, joined its twin 1,050,000 
kilowatt Unit 1. The remaining 10 
percent is owned by Allegheny 
Electric Cooperative Inc. 

AJL Staley Mamtiadnring Co. 
stockholders have approved a 
change in the company’s name to 
Staley Continental . Inc. Staley ac- 
quired CFS Continental in Novem- 
ber for $360 million and is chang- 
ing its foens from soybean 
processing to food services. 

Xebec reported that profit in the 
first quarter, ended Dec. 31. 
plunged 97 percent to $80,000. 
Sales for the maker of computer 
disk drives rose 27 percent to $415 
million. The company said it ex- 
pats earnings for the half to be 
hart by plant and product expan- 
sions. 

Xerox Corp. said h is introduc- 
ing a copier priced at $85,000. The 
company said the new copier, 1090 
Marathon, operates at a speed of 92 
copies per minute. Xerox said it 
would begin taking orders for the 
machine March 1. 


Occidental Net Off 25% in 4th Quarter; Year Flat 


• -r-.i . The Associated Press 

i-LOS ANGELES — Occidental 
Petroleum Corp. reported Tuesday 
-v^fcal its earnings fdl 25J percent in 
. 'zs* die fourth quarter of 1984 from the 
• ^sirrespondmg quarter a year earii- 
_ Vr while profit for all of last year 

-./it: For the final three months of 
:_-r^984. Occidental said it earned 
• million, or $1.16 a share, on 

rifles of $4 billion, compared with 
j r.^Jarirmgs of £246 million, or $1.74 a 


share, on sales of $4.7 bilHoa a year 
earlier. . 

For the entire year, earnings 
were $568.7 million, or $3.05 a 
share, ori sales of $15.6 billion, up 
just shghtty from $566.7 rmUion, or 
$203 a share, on sales of $19.1 
billion in 1983. 

The 5 1-percent spurt in earnings 
per share from 1983 to 1984 pri- 
marily reflected the company's re- 
purchase of preferred slock last 
year, which reduced by more than 


$100 million the amount it had to 
pay in preferred dividends. 

Pe ri d ent al also annoimopd that 
it had entirety repaid the $4 billion 
in debt it incurred with the pur- 
chase of Cities Service Co. in 1 982 
The company reported that it end- 
ed 1984 with $1 bilHan in working 
capital, compared with $76 million 
a year earlier. 

Occidental has 52 billion in 
available credit, but the company 
declined to say if it was contem- 


plating acquiring another oil com- 
pany after calling off a $33-bfllion 
merger- last mouth with Diamond 
Shamrock Corp. of Dallas. 

Occidental's chairman, Armand 
Hammer, has said he feds it is 
cheaper to buy oil reserves on Wall 
Street than to discover them. - 

Only Occidental’s chemical divi- 
sion posted improved earnings for 
the quarter, turning in a profit of 
$17.6 mEti on, against a loss of $15 
million a year earlier. 


Company Earnings 


Rovmuit and profits, in 


irofitfc in millions, are in local currencies 
unless ottwwis® Indicated 


Japan 


j . . Kajima. 

rrmac '. . net. ms 

'Mon 1JU5T UOTT 

: United States 

i AKaghony Infl 
rraoair. nto ms 

wn»_ 907 5W-B 

Mr. Nat 217 35J 

MTSbor&_ 1J9 Zlf 


Yaw hm ms 

■ftawnua VUL ,MSL 

Nat Inc. IKU 3 

Par Sim — 431 SM 

Full name of comurny Is 
American Broadcasting 

com. 


AMF . 

manor. Hto »« 

RMM 3*U« 2K.TB 

Ketlnc. 9M 274 

Par Shora — 033 . 0 . 1 Y 


mm mo. ztea. 

oar net iXMoriu 

aaraunc. in — 


- manor. me MB 

.nanoa «3 if -SHJ 

Nine 5ZW S9S7 

erSttare— ■ 1J0 UP 


Year- UM IMS 

Reveaoe Vl% 

Narine. uta (alls 

Par Stnra— RAS — 

a: lass. 


Brunswick 


OfeOaor. IHJ MS 

Bwatw *— * 30U 

Net Inc — - 1J7? IJW 

Par Shora — . M .074 

Year 

Par Shora — eja. ZM 


CBS 

IttQnr. Hto . MB 

Revanoo uaa ipm. 

Net Inc 36.1 77J 

Per Share 122 Z4T 

Year Nto TO 

Revenue 4WU 

Nat inc iOA 1H7J 

Per Sh ort--. 7.15 4 3T 

* " WW nala Include leases el 
snaooo m auarter and Of U 
million In year from tSscon- 
Timed operations. 

Cincinnati MIL 

JltSSL L 0 i’S 
oM □ X 

raw - Wto TO 

Revenue tofS S59J 

Net Inc 1BJ lollOJ 

Par Share— 0J0 — 


Combosfion Eng. 
W Quor. lfM TO 

panue 90U 887J) 

r Nal 2U U 

r Share- Ui 0.17 


Year IMI m3 

Revenue 1060. 10*0. 

OPOTNeJ OA 745 

Oner Shane— Z03 UV 

Nets exetude Hot credit of 
SdZJtnimon vschoroeofSWB 
million. Results Include 
Jamestrurr Corn and Inwell 
Comacautredln ml 


naming Cm 

4tt Qoor. TM4 TO 

Revenue IJ3L W8®. 

Net Inc. SOM IX» 

Par Shora— 078 071 


Year IN* TO 

Revenue £510. 4900 

Nal Inc 4957 4171 

Per Shora 270 Z34 


4 th Qoor. WM TO 

Revenue 1*43 1477 

Opar Nal 9 M toltoS 

Opar Shore— 041 • — 

Year HM TO 

Revanue — 731 J ®M 

O oar Nat 4U15 (0)297 

Opar Shore— 242 — 

attest. 


LHw r ty Coqz 

oh Qoor. to TO 

Revenue — «S7 77J 

Opar Net 45 455 

OperShnra- 044 0*5 


Year TO TO 

Revanoe 3IU 294J 

Opar Net — 21.1 saj 

OperShnra- 108 273 

Nets exclude losses of 34 
cents a snare vs 38 cents in 
auartert and a! 35 cents vs 2 t 
centfs to rears from Invest- 
ment t osses. 

NaficHMd Gypsum 

4th quor. TO TO 

Revenue 4297 309.4 

Nat Inc. 257 185 

Par Shorn — U2 1.11 

Yeer TO TO 

RMwnua T72C. 1,130. 

Nat Inc 1040 535 

Per Stare — 4U 379 

1983 veer n et Includes gain 
of Hants a share from debt- 

equity smoo. 

Ocddantal Pat. 

_ 4K Quor. TO TO 

Revenue— 4.71X1. 

Net Inc 1847 2440 

Par Shore U6 174 

Year TM4 TO 

Revenue 15500. 19 . 1 m. 

Net Inc 5407 5647 

Par Shorn IBS 203 

Ropubfic Airfinai 

4th Quor. TO TO 

Rnvnnue 3575 38M 

Nat Inc ( 0)100 40 

Per Shore— — 410 

Yew in* TO 

Revenue 155a 1510. 

Netlnc 290<a)1110 

Par Shore D74 — 


Shenmn-WSUniw - 

4H» Qoor. TO TO 

■Revenue 5015 46 BA 

Net Inc WO 7J1 

Par Shore — 440 431 

_ Yeor TO TO 

Revenue 2D8CL 1,970. 

Netlnc. 4501 K4I 

Per Shorn — 204 132 

Nets tndvde gains of UJ 
misnan from Inventory ad- 
(vstment vs S2J mdllan from 
discontinued operations. 

Starling Drug 
4 hQor. TO TO 

Rcvnnun — 4575 4455 

Opar Net — 3424 3447 

Opar Share- 050 057 

Year me TO 

Revenue 1034 1050. 

Onor Net 1449 1345 

Opnr Shorn— 20V 270 

Nets exclude gains of 3 
cants a shore vs I cent m 
auartersand lassof3ants vs 
goto of 4 cents In soars from 
dtsanttnusd operations. Re- 
sults restated. 

Timas Mirror 
4th Quor. TO TO 

Revenue 7487 <942 

Net Inc B37 817 

Per Shore 171 U9 

Year 1MM TO 

Revenue— 2004 2494 
Net Inc — 2127 1995 

PerSharn — 230 Z90 

Nets Include gains of S37A 
million vs S3L8 million from 
pile of assets. If * f nets obo 

Include charge of SUmttnon. 


By Steven Greenhouse 

Nep York Tima Service 

• CHICAGO — - Komatsu Ltd-’s 
announcement Monday that it 

would begin sgamhlnig construc- 
tion equipment in the United 
Slates is likely to produce a major 
■ shakeout in the intensely competi- 
tive industry, according to several 
analysts. 

However, Komatsu, which is the 
world’s second-largest construc- 
tion-equipment maker, after Cater- 
pilar Tractor Co., is likely to 
threaten Caterpillar less than 
smaller com pany the analysts 
said. 

The companies most threatened 
are Dresser Industries Jno, JJ. 
Case, Fiai-ADis and dark Equip- 
ment Co„ the analysts said. 

Analysts said Komatsu, which 
has about 7 J percent of the UJJ. 
market , is expected to build even 
more plants in theUnited States as 
the company tries to meet its goal 
of caponing 20 percent of the mar- 
ket 

‘They’re trying to convince deal- 


ers thal they arc making more of a 
commitment to theUnited Stales,” 
said Andrew Silver, an analyst with 
the Donaldson, Lufltin ft Janette 
Securities Corp. They want to 
show that they will be dose to the 
market and wfll be ready to re- 
spond to it" 

They’re also doing this to bdp 
avoid any protectionist develop- 
ments that might occur,” he added. 
Analysts that by b uilding a 
plant in the United States Komatsu 
would sacrifice some of the cost 
advantages' it is gaming from' the 
dollar’s strength in foreign-ex- 
change markets. 

“Cat has the presence and finan- 
cial strength to compete,’’ said Eli 
S. Lustgarlen, an analyst with 
Paine Webber Inc. “That’s why 
Komatsu’s share will come out of 
other people’s hides.” 

Alexander Blanton, an analyst 
with Merrill Lynch, Fierce, Fenner 
ft Smith, said that «mcc Komatsu 
concentrates cat the small to medi- 
um market in the United Stales, 
smaller companies, such as JJ. 


Case, would be hurt the most by the 
co mpe tition. 

The smaller the equipment is, 
the more price-sensitive the max- 
ketr” Mr. Bbunou said. There will 
be some casualties in the price- 
sensitive end of the market. 

Mr. Blanton said Caterpillar was 
not as vulnerable to Komatsu's 
move because Caterpillar was in 
the heavy end of the market, where 
ite reputation for service and the 
male value of its products often 
outweigh other factors. . 

T tfenV Cat will benefit from 
Komatsu’s expansion,” Mr. Silver 
said. “Komatsu's expansion will 
precipitate an industrywide shake- 
out and consolidation that will re- 
sult in a more profitable, down- 
sized industry.” He estimated that 
Komatsu’s U.S. market share 
would jump to IS percent by 1990. 

: Hal Kennedy, a spokesman for 
Komatsu, said that by late Febru- 
ary, the company hemes to finish 
negotiations to buy a dosed factory 
■bffijfSng in Chattanooga, Tennes- 
see. The bmldiiig is owned by 
AMCA International, an industrial 


products company. Mr. Kennedy 
estimated that the number of jots 
created would be in the “low hun- 
dreds." 

Officials dose to the negotiar 
dons said Komatsu would spend 
more than $35 milli on to buy aod 
renovate the plant, which it hopes 
to begin operating early next year. 

In the first six months of 1984, 
Komatsu, which also makes robot- 
ics and engineering systems, had 


from about $1 2. billion a year earli- 
er. Analysts attributed the drop to 
a plunge in sales in the Middle East 
and in Africa. Analysts estimated 
that Komatsu’s sales in the United 
States were less than $300 million 
last year. 

For the first half of last year, 
which is the most recent period for 
which the company has reported 
earnings, Komatsu’s profit fell 6:1 
percent to 13.86 billion yen ($57.6 
million) from a year earlier on a 
8 -2-percent revenue decline to 
352.72 billion yen. 


China Allows Firm to Sell Shares to the Public 


(Continued from Page 9) 
important matters were (tedded by 
central planners, toward one in 
which the marketplace plays a deci- 
sive role. - 

Since Jan. 1, managers at eveiy 
level have been required to make 
decisions on investment and pro- 
duction, procurement and sales, 
manpower and wages decisions 
that were previously dictated to 
them. 

The chang es an distur bing to 
some people, exciting to others. 
Among officials who see their pre- 
rogatives being undermined mid 
those who regard themselves as 
guardians of the country’s Marxist 
ideology, opposition has centered 
on the charge that Mr. Deng is 
leading the country back to capital- 
ism. He has rejected the charge by 
saying that "some capitalism” will 
do no harm as long as public own- 
ership r emains the gui d ing princi- 
ple. 

The Yanzbong stock offering 
suggests something of what is hap- 
pening at (he local level Zhou Xin- 
yong, 56, the company's general 
manager, is a model of the new 
entrepreneurial class, a former dis- 
trict official who turned a neigh- 
borhood sewing and electrical-re- 
pair workshop into a diversified 
company with 12 plants. 2,500 em- 

S ees and earnings of about L5 
on yuan in 1984. 

. Much of Yanzhong’s growth, 
now 30 to 40 percent a year, has 
come since Mr. Deng returned to 
prominence in Beijing in 1979 and 
agnated thar.the profit motiw was 
acceptable again. Like Mr. Deng. 


Mr. Zhou was persecuted during 
the Cultural Revolution. He was 
forced to wear a dunce cap and 
repent publidy for the profits made 
by Yauzhong. 

Fran buttons and radios, the 
.company expanded into making 
photocopiers, duplicators and gen- 
erators, along with sidelines in 
dothing and plastics. More than 
200 service centos for the copying 
machines were opened across the 
country. Mr. Zhou was cited as a 
model manager but still had his 
“hands tied,” in his words, by the 
requirement to remit aD profits to 
the state and to adhere to official 
decisions on most managerial mat- 
ters. 

of the shift towartf autonomy 
sought by Mr. Deng. Under Beij- 
ing’s new rules, companies will pay 
taxes oq their profits but will keep 
the resL Instead of getting -invest- 
ment allocations from the state, 
they will finance growth from re- 
tained earnings, bank loans and 
other financial instruments, includ- 
ing selling stock. 

However, the new freedoms are 
hedged with qualifications. For ex- 
ample. in Yanzbong's.stock offer- 
ing, only the equivalent of about 
90,000 yuan of it was allocated for 
individuals, with the remaining 4.9 
million yuan designated for collec- 
tives and oLher enterprises under 
state control. These include the 
Shanghai branch of Bank of China, 
which more or less has replaced 
government planners in overseeing 
Yanzhong’s operations. 

The stock certificates, with a face 


value of 50 yuan (about $18) each, 
can be sold only to Yanzhong or to 
Bank of China and at par. Their 
attraction lies in the dividend. Ini- 
tially it will be 13 percent annually, 
more than twice the bank interest 
rate of 5.76 percent. An additional 
2 percent will be set aside for an 
animal lottery in which sharehold- 
ers wfll have a chance to win color 
television sets, tape recorders and 
cameras. 

Officiate hope that the Yanzhong 
stock sale, and others like it that 
have been tried in recent months in 
Foshan County, outside Guangz- 
hou, wfll be an effective way of 
redirecting large sums of savings 
that until now have had nowhere to 
go but into the bank. 

At the cod of 1984, individuals’ 
savings at Bank of China totaled 
more than 121 billion yuan. Re- 
forms that have doubled incomes 


among the country's 800 million 
peasants since 1978 expanded the 


bank’s coffers by about 32 billion 
yuan in the course of the year, with 
4J billion yuan of that in the 
Shanghai area. 

Just how eager some savers have 
been- for a better return on their 
money was demonstrated by the 
Yanzhong stock sale. 

Among those who lined up in the 
predawn hours were an elderly cou- 
ple, described by Mr. Zhou as pre- 
1949 ’’capitalists.” Both the hus- 
band and wife bought nearly 
20,000 yuan of shares. 

Others in the line, Mr. Zhou said, 
included blind people in wheel- 
chairs and newlyweds. 

Mr. Zhou sees the stock issue as 
an initial step that could lead to 
similar offerings by other compa- 
nies and even to a revival of the 
Shanghai stock market. 


WM Introduces Mainframe Computer 


(Comuned from Page 9) 
ing suppliers of integrated informa- 
tion ana control systems for manu- 
facturing automation by the end of 
this decade,” he said. 

The company said the manufac- 
turing automation market, now $25 
billion, is projected to reach $50 
billion by 1990. 

New products supporting the ar- 
chitecture are the Plant Manage- 
ment System, a system designed to 
improve production management, 
energy consumption, product qual- 


ity and product yield, with the abil- 
ity to perform on-rite functions. 

The minicomputers in the Plant 
Management Systeni can also be 
linked to corporate computer sys- 
tems, whether or not the main- 
frames are made by Honeywell. 

The Model WCC 1250 supervi- 
sory work center, made by Hon- 
eywell's Digital Datacom subsid- 
iary, provides data processing and 
reporting on quality control, work- 
in-process status, maintenance 
scheduling and testing informa- 
tion. 









* 






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invites you to 


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Street Address 


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to; BusinessWbekg2 

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Page 14 . 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1985 


U.S. Futures fa . 12 


From the world, 
to you, at home or 

in your office 

And at a 
bargain price! 


1 Season Season 
High Leu. 


Ohs HI oh Low Close Cho. 

Grains 


WHEAT (CBT) 

MOO Du minimum- dollars per bushel 
404 3J7V, Mar 150** 15V 

<05 3J3V* Me* H9'<* 14VA 

3.00 XZ7VS JuJ 135 U9Yi 


i <05 3J2W Me* Uf't. 3 

190 IZTVj JuJ 135 3 

3J£rt 1M See 135 1 

343M 3J7V! Dec K9 3 

3J41* 30 Mar 

Esi.5aJes Prev. Sates £W5 

Prev. Day 0P9« int. 37*83 off 336 
CORN ICBT) 

5*00 bu minimum 
13SM> US 

130 7JT* 

131 UK* 

13114 17175k 

23S Z65 

110 17«U 

121 Vi TJT/i 


3M* 1574s -JO? 
146U 3*8 —01 Vs 

3JB 335 —OH. 
X37W 338 — 01 

147VJ 3*8 —01 

1S7V, -01 


130 177% 

131 Ull* 

13114 17175k 

23S 2*5 

110 17«U 

121 Vi 17414 

Est Soles 
Prev. Dav Open In 
SOYBEANS (can 

SOM fw mlitliMum- defbn per twsfwf 
7.9014 U9V4 Mar SOe SOB 

7.W £01% MOV WM £01 

735 5.51V4 Jul <10 6.11 

i 7J6 1*3 Auh 6.10 6.12W 

£71 S9S SM £06 Vj £0B 

£48 597 Nov <0914 6.11 

£75 £10 Jon £2DVi £20 V, 

7*3 £24 Mur 630 630V4 

7-75 £4514 MOV 

Est. Safes Prev. Sales 38125 

Prev. Dav Oeen Kit. 71987 bp ZB 
SOYBEAN MEAL ICBT) 

1 00 toco- del ton per ton 
20930 13530 Mar 135*0 135*0 

205JM 14130 MOV 14050 14030 

15£50 147*0 Jul 147.00 14730 

13030 15030 Au« 14930 145*0 

179*0 152*0 Sea 15130 152*0 

180*0 15450 Od 15430 15430 

1B430 15930 Dec 159*0 16030 

16130 16330 Jan 16130 I61JD 

20£50 16530 Mar 

Est. Sales Prev. Soles £793 

Prev. Dav Open Hit 39,922 off 234 
SOYBEAN OIL(CBT) 

60*oa lbs- dollars per lOOKs- 


2*9 U 95k -v08% 
177 17754 —30’* 

2*1 2*1*4 

2J3W ZJ4U. 

237 U6V. -*0*i 
176% 176% —30% 
221V: 182 —ill 


Season season 
High Low 


2145 2020 Mor 2030 2034 

2130 2060 MOV 2M2U0 

Est. Soles Prev. Soles UW 

Prev. Dav Oeen InL #5.111 off 367 
ORANGE JUICE (NYCE) 

153000a.- cents oer lb. _ 

11830 Mar 1713 17UQ 

15130 MOV 17330 17330 
15530 Jul 17430 174J0 
15775 SeP 17190 17X00 
15730 Nov 171*0 171*0 
15600 Jon 17030 17U30 
730 1500 Mar 

230 16000 MOV 

Jul _ 

Est. Seles 1J0Q Prev. Sales 792 

Prev.DavOaenlnt. 7,119 off 642 


COPPER (COMEX1 
25300 tbs.- cents cer lb. 


Open Hloh Low Close Che. 


Season Season 
High Law 


Open. High Low CI4W dig. 


2026 an 

2035 2070 


16820 14970 
17L10 17130 
17130 17165 
17000 17120 
17930 171.15 
17030 17010 
170.10 
I701D 
170.10 


57&V4 577 -.12% 

5*9 5*9% —.13 

639 £01% — .IT*. 

£02 633 -.11 

S9S 5St —Jim 
£0114 £03 —37 

£16 £16 —36V* 

£27 £29 — 36V* 

£37 —37 


13260 13330 
138*0 19930 
14470 14530 
14770 147.90 
150*0 ISO60 
1S130 153.10 
15830 15X20 
161*0 161-50 
16530 


62.15 

<125 

Feb 



9320 

S*D 

Mnr 

4774 

62*0 

62*0 

6X25 

Apr 



92*0 

5620 

May 

63*5 

63*0 

BS25 

57*0 

JUl 

»7H9 

6420 

52.10 

57 JD 

See 

64*5 

MBS 

8425 

50*0 

Dec 

<5*0 

6525 

8420 

59*0 

Jan 



80*0 

59*0 

Mar 

66*0 

6105 

74*0 

61.10 

Mav 

<725 

67*0 

7A40 

0IJ0 

Jul 

68.U 

<8.10 

7090 

62*0 

Sep 



68L5D 

6&S0 

Dec 




-'.&V ' ", 
fi& \ -£ -- 




3(140 

2X95 


27*0 

2790 

27*0 

27*4 

— *8 

30.10 

22*0 


26*3 

27*5 

2431 

36*0 


3QJ0 

22.70 

Jul 

2A2S 

26J8 

25*0 

25*8 

—5* 

27 JO 

22 9 

Aua 

2522 

25*2 

25.15 

2525 

— J7 

26JS 

22*0 


25.10 

25.15 

24*5 

2455 


2600 

22 90 

Oct 

24*0 

24*0 

24J0 

24*2 

+.17 

24*5 

2290 

Dec 

24*0 

2415 

2380 

21*6 

— *6 

2X95 

2X90 


24.10 

2410 

2180 

21*7 


E3L Sotos 


Prev.Sales 11*50 





Prev. Dav Open InL 9**34 off 649 
DAYS (CBT) 

5300 bu minimum- dollars per bushel 


IJBlh 

1*016 


1*614 

)*8te 

1*6 

1*<W 

+*015 

1.91 

1-6916 


1*3 

1*316 

1*1 

1*216 

+* 0W 

l*HVi 

1*715 

Jul 

1*744 

l*0to 

l*7fe 

1*7V 

+*0V4 






1*5 



1J2V3 

1*8 





TABVj 


Est. Sales 


Prev. Soto* 

<99 





Prev. Dav Open Int. 1867 up 3 


Livestock 




CATTLE (CMS) 

«3W msr conts oer lb. 

67*0 6260 F«b 6475 6575 6440 

6930 6140 Apr 6320 6877 6770 

69.15 65.00 Jun 69.15 69*0 68.17 

6730 6115 Aug «7*D 67*7 66*5 

4527 6160 OO 65*0 65*0 6532 

6660 6360 Dec 67*5 67*5 6£50 

6679 6525 Feb 6765 6765 *725 

Est. Sales 21719 Prev. Sales 11*0 
Prev. Dav Open I nt. 56627 off 61 
FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 


65.17 4-70 

i&m +jd 
6922 +65 

6772 +75 

6565 +35 

6720 +30 

*765 +70 


Est. Sates 11000 Prev. Sotos 9649 
Prov.OayOoenlnt. 95*58 unl31 
SILVER (COMSX) 

5*00 Troy az.- cents ser tray oz. 

7233 *09* Feb *243 *343 82*3 

1*203 5835 Mar *293 *29* *203 

Apt 

1513* 595* MOV *37* *383 <293 

14613 6013 Jul 6453 6473 640* 

11813 6143 Sec 6553 4S4J 6515 

12303 6303 Dec *743 <7X0 64&B 

12153 6333 Jan 6773 677* 677* 

11933 649* Mar 6885 603* *883 

HJ4L0 660* May 7013 703* 7030 

9453 6710 Jul 

9403 6813 Sep 

7453 7403 Dec 

Est. Sales 24*00 Prev. Sales 7XSO 
Prev. Oov Open Hit. 85*57 up 473 
PLATINUM (NYME) 

50 trov oz.- do I tors per trov az. 

30650 27730 Feb 

28230 27630 Mar 

447 JO 26550 Apr 276*0 Z7£7C 273J0 

449 JO 27230 Jul 28230 28230 27970 

29100 27650 Oct 2B830 28830 28650 

J73J0 28430 Jan 29150 29450 29330 

Est Sales ITS) Prev. Sales 1J>9* 

Prev. Dav Open mt. 14.942 aft 80 

PALLADIUM (NYME) 

100 trov at- dollars per oz 
1*130 107 JO Mar >30125 UR25 729-50 

159 JO 10650 Jun 12SJ0 128J0 12730 

14930 10650 Sep 12630 12625 12475 

141 JQ 10675 Dec 12630 12830 125*0 

1Z7JQ 114*0 Atar 

Est. Solas 407 Prev. Safes 537 
Prav. Day Open int. £6*0 up 48 

GOLD (COMEX) 

100 trov cc-- dollars per trov at. 

52230 2967Q Feb J0X50 30350 301 JO 

31130 298*0 Mar 3C3J0 3KL50 302.90 

514J0 30030 APT 305 JO 30630 30430 

5103a 30230 Jun 310*0 310*0 300*0 

48530 30050 Aug 31450 315*0 31330 

47330 31430 Oct 

489 JO 377*0 Dec 32530 22530 22220 

48530 X2S30 Feb 33130 371*0 329 JO 

496*0 330 JO Apr 33450 334JQ 33430 

43570 336*0 Jun 

14130 Auo 

395J0 3*300 Oct 35530 25530 25103 

Dec 

Est. Sales 27JD0 Prev. Sales 3M<? 

Prev. Dav open Int. 135246 off 1*97 


BRITISH 

» a h m w m 3 

U71D 1*785 DOC L0*» LOW 1 -BUB 1*655 -WB 
Est, Sales 11*10 Pw-Ww KWO 
Prev: Day Open Int. 22*78 offM 
CANADIAN MLLAROMMJ 

I mjnm'hi 

T&& 2429 Jufl 3*33 34M .7419 *430 — tj 

™ *434 Sep *414 *414 7403 *4)0 — U 

J3H Dec 7*15 J4W .7411 TIM 
I JSD4 7400 Mar JUS — M 

EH. Sates 1743 Pnv.Met 2*74 

Prev. DOV Open Hit. DATS W» 

FRENCH FRANC (I MM) . 

Sperfmnc-1 poIb< QMMid ■ 

.11905 *9995 M or EES *9955 *9985 - *9925 —75 

11020 39930 Jun JTCNI —50 

1000 *9905 SOP *1915 39915 399H JM48 -« 

£st.5aies 74 Prav.Sates 136 
Prey. Day Open W. 2*22 opTIS 

GERMAN MARKCUWU ^ 

Spermortt-l point oauots«Mpl 

*110 J054 Mar XBl W JB TOO -38 

J733 T079 Jun JO IS TTOS J060 J063 -i« 

ml, JIM sop Jioo *no job jen —£ 

J410 7128 Dec J1Z9 J129 J115 J222 —25 

7251 7201 Mot JM2 -00 

esLSotes 15*62 Prev. Soles 2B*B2 
W. Day Open Int. 41991 off 84 
JAPANESE YEN (I MM) 

IpervetH l rwkrt eauahW J OWip) „ 

004693 *0383 6 -31 

004450 *03054 JlM *82840*83840*03836* 03837 —31 

nuiat 003897 Sep *03879 - ‘ v 

nasg DacJosmwnsTsansjinw 

Eat. Sales £585 prev.Sales £987 

MDW(M lSlU95 OHO 

SWISS FRANC UMMI 

Spot franc- 1 point eouols 50*001 ■ 

mi 73S4 Mar -3592 JW 7577 SSD -i£2 

7617 Jim 3*35 J6U Jill '7615 -33 

mg JOS S«P TOO *470 7650 7653 -01 

So jm JW JH J|» MU 

Est. Sates 15737 Ptw. Sates T7J15 

Prev. Day Open InL 25764 off STS 




Financial 


44*00 lbs.-Cteite perlh. 
7475 65*5 Mar 

7*30 

7450 

7X75 

7X90 

74*5 

<7*0 

Am- 

7420 

7420 

7135 

7X55 

7190 

6495 

May 

7X20 

72*5 

71*0 

7X52 

7Z80 

66*0 

Aug 

7X30 

73*0 

7X50 

7160 

7X35 

67*0 

See 

7X50 

7100 

7X10 

72*7 

7130 

67.10 

OCT 

7230 

7232 

7U0 

72.77 

7Z55 

7040 

NOV 

7X90 

73*0 

7250 

73.10 


US T. BILLS (IMM) 


EsL5aKs 1*23 Prev. Sales 1*22 
Prev. Dov Open InL 11*08 up 273 
HOGS (CMC) 




3UM toe.- cents Perth. 
5BJ0 4737 Feb 

51 JO 

5125 

50*5 

51*2 

— *5 

54*5 

45.10 

Am 

47*5 

4X07 

4722 

47.92 

+35 

55*0 

4X40 

Jun 

5X95 

53*7 

5237 

5X40 

+55 

55*7 

4X95 

JUI 

5X85 

5420 

53*0 

54.12 

+*7 


47 JO 

Aua 

5X05 

5128 

5X65 

5X10 

+35 

45*0 

Oa 

4X65 

4890 

48*5 

4890 

+28 

5X85 

4£20 

Dec 

<880 

4895 

4X65 

4X92 

+J2 

49*0 

4425 

Feb 

48*0 

4895 

48*0 

4890 

+20 

47 JS 

4550 

Asr 




46*5 

K2S 


51 million- ptS Of 100 PCX 

91*8 

*1*8 

91*4 

91*8 

-A3 





*125 

*1.19 

7122 

—OS 

9123 

8£94 

Sep 

90*2 

9X73 

90*0 

9X71 

— *6 

9090 

85*7 

Dec 

9032 

*022 

9022 

9021 

— *5 

9035 

u*a 

Mar 

■999 

S3 

8999 

8995 

—at 

9027 

87*1 

Jun 

R9*6 

B9*6 

89*6 

— <06 

90*0 

88*0 

Sep 

09*2 

09*2 

09*2 

09*2 

—JD 

8933 

B9J9 

Dec 

09.19 

89.19 

09.19 

09.19 

— *7 

Eel. Sales Prav. Sates 1X716 

Prav. Day Open InL 47277 01(497 





1 Industrials 

14828 14570 14678 

iSm ST iS3 ieS 1UT0 

3 157 JD Sep 16590 167*0 16530 M7J0 

iJD lt<J)0 NOV M8J0 U5M WJ0 

*0 17150 Jan 171 JO 171 JO T71J0 17258 

,._*0 17650 Mar 175*0 T7M0 175*0 17650 

Est. Sales 4.134 Prev.Srf« V22 
Prev. Day Open InL 10*01 off 222 

COTTON 3 (NYCE) 

SOMlb^cannper^ jjjq &S43 MJB 6117 
7970 45*2 MOV 6634 6654 6608 66J0 

79*5 4655 Jul 67.10 6770 66J3 67.15 

77 JO <7*4 Oct 67 JO 6770 <7*5 6777 

73*0 67*9 Dec 6775 67 JO 67J5 67T0 

7675 68T5 Mm M48 

70*0 69.11 Mav 69 JS 

70*5 <9*0 Jul • 09*0 49 JO <050 <975 

Est. Sates Prev.Sales MBS 

Prev. Day Often Int. 19,141 ofl<s 

HEATING OIL (NYME) 

43*00901- cents par aal 

sue 67*0 MOT 7370 7V0 7LH 7TM 

mw 65*5 Apr 7875 7B/B 69*3 <9*3 

S3 m£ sEv <9*0 »* «» 

78*0 63J0 Jun 6BJ0 6870 <7*1 <7*1 

69*0 65T5 Jill 88*5 6820 <7*6 67*6 

7IJW 6tJto Mug £JJ. 

71*0 7025 Sep »*B 

75JD 75JD Doc 73*0 

Estates Prev.Sales 7,165 

Prev. Day Oeen Int. 14J49 unis 

CRUDE (ML (NYME) 

27*5 27*5' 2772 27 JS 
31.45 24*7 Apr 27.15 27.17 2642 2691 

3078 2438 MOV 2655 2465 2585 259? 

29J5 2478 Jun 2675 3637- 25*0 2579 

29J4 24.10 Jut 2625 2625 2550 • 25*5 

79.57 2475 AuO 2605 26*5 25*5 2545 

29 JO 24*1 Sep 26*5 3S,0E 2571 2571 

39 JD 24.4# Nov 25J0 25t» 25*0 29*0 

29J0 2190 Dec 2614 2614 2614 2614 

Est. Sates Prev.Sales 22JB2 

Prev. Day Open InL 9**54 off 1*27 


TVS 71*1 —US 
49*2 69*3 —200 
<8*9 68*9 —0*0 

<7*3 <7*1 — 2*0 
<7*6 67*6 -2*0 

6775 —171 

<M0 -1M 

7X80 — 1J6 


2732 27 JS —JU 
25*2 2£9i -M 

25*5 259? — AJ 

25*0 2579 

2SJ0 - 25*5 — J3 

25*5 25*5 - —1*5 
2571 2571 -+5# 

35*0 29*0 t>P 
2614 2614 _S 


18 YR. TREASURY (CBT1 
sioo*oocrm-ptsAa2ndsafieopct 


Ext. Safes &02T Prev. Sates 3*55 
Prev. Dav Open int. 29714 up 140 
PORK BELLI ES(CME) 


83 

70-25 

Mar 

80-29 

81-3 

0847 

0V3 

87-3 

70+ 

Jun 

804 

00+ 

800 

BO-8 

81-13 

75-10 

Sea 

79-20 

79-22 

79-20 

79-21 

BO-22 

75-13 





7*4 

B5-8 

75-18 

Mar 




70-21 

79-26 

77-22 





7B8 

ESL Soles 


Prev.Sales 9244 




Indexes 


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3BHB0 toe.- cents per tb. 
01*5 <095 Feb 

6920 

70*5 

4&2D 

70*5 

+2*0 

8120 

60.10 

Mar 

60*5 

6995 

6725 

<922 

+135 

1X00 

<1-15 


6*20 

70*5 


70*7 


02*7 

6X15 

Jul 

69*0 

70.95 

4890 

70*2 

00*5 

6038 

Aug 

6X05 

6925 

6735 

6855 

+125 

7X15 

6X15 

Ft* 

65*5 

6729 

ASM 

<725 

+2*0 

73*0 

64*0 

Mar 




6525 

+2*0 


Prw. Day Open Int. 4X194 off 1*84 
US TREASURY BONDS (CBT) 

(B Pd-Sl DO*0D-pfs & 32ncts of iDOpcf) 

77-15 57-27 Mar 7V23 71-37 71-20 71-28 

77-16 57-23" JWI 70-27 70-26 70- Iff 7B-2S 

76-2 57-10 Sep 69-25 70 69-25 78 


Est. Sales 8*81 Prev.Sales 7*92 
Prev. OavOnen Int. 14.141 etfl57 


COFFEE C(NYCSCE) 

37*00 Oho- cents per (b. 

15370 12358 Mar 14575 14660 

152*0 122*1 May 144*5 145*0 

149 .2D 121*0 JUI 143*0 14X95 

147 JO 127*0 S«p 14135 14275 

U2J5 72975 Dec 14075 J407S 

141*0 12850 Mar 13695 13895 

139*0 131*0 May 138*5 m*5 

13650 13650 Jul 

Eat Sates 3*00 Prev. Sales X1M 
Prev. DOV Open tnL u 77? off 157 
SODA EWORLD 11 1 NY CSCE) 


76-5 57-fl Dec 69-1 69-12 

72-30 57-2 Mar 68-18 60-26 

70-16 56-29 Jun <8-2 68-11 

70-3 56-29 Sen 47-71 <7-30 

69-26 56-25 D0C 

69-12 56-27 Mar 

<9-7 64-3 Jun 

68-2* 6+21 Sap 66-19 66-25 

Esi Sales Prev. Sales 143*85 

Prev. Day Open lnL22£984 off 2*41 
GNMA (CBT) 

5100*00 prtn-pts £32mfS of 100 pet 


££ Z 25 

<9.1 69-12 

<8-18 48-25 
<8-2 M-TI 
<7-27 67-38 
<7-19 
<7-f 
<7 

<4-19 66-25 


SP COMP. INDEX (CME) 

points end cents • . . - . - 

183*0 15X30 Mar KOTO 181*8 188*0 WLS5 +M 

18690 15610 Jun 18375 784*5 18345 18470 +M 

1B9J5 UO*B Sep 184*5 H&90 18655. 187*5 +M. 

192*0 T7S70 Dec 191*0 +*T 

Esf. Sates <1*48 Prev.Sales <9*38 

Prev. Day Open InL 5X919 off 5.163 ' j 

VALUE LINE UCCBT) 

points and ants , 

203.15 16610 Mar 281.10 382*8 28075 292T0 +1*0. 

209*0 173*0 Jun 2B573 287.10 285*0 206*5 +175' 

211*0 18573 Sep 21618 21610 21610 20990 +7.35' 

Est Sate* Prev.Sales 5*57 

Prev. Day Open InL 7*87 off M4. “ J 

NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYFE) - 

points ond cents 


106*5 

0020 

Mar 

10SA5 

10X70 

104*5 

105*5 

+25 

10880 

90*0 

Jun 

106*8 

187 JD 

MMJD 

70725 

-R30 

I IMS 

91 JS 

Sap 

108*0 

109 JS 

10848 

10920 

+25- 

11X20 

10120 

Dec 

muo 

118*0 

1MU0 

111*5 

+*0 


14450 144*1 
14355 14375 
142.10 14279 
14070 ML90 
129*0 729.92 
12695 13631 
13795 13475 
11613 


70-17 

57-5 

Mar 

69-14 

49-24 

69-13 

023 

69-27 

57-17 

Jun 

026 

69-2 

026 

02 


50-13 


68-8 

014 

08 

014 

60-13 

594 

Dec 

67-22 

<7-28 

67-22 

67-28 

<B 

50-20 

Mar 

67+ 

<7-12 

<7-8 

67-12 

<7-0 

58-25 

Jun 

<4-26 

029 

44-25 

46-29 

<7-3 

45-21 

Sep 




46-14 

Est. Sales 


Prev.Sales 

500 




11 2*00 lbs.- cents per re. 





1160 

185 

Mar 

190 

391 

3*0 

3*4 

1R50 

£17 


425 

425 

£14 

£17 

*95 

433 

JlH 

4*0 

4*0 

4*8 

431 


4*5 

sop 

490 

490 

4*5 

4*3 

9*1 

5*1 

Od 

5*7 

5*8 

494 

5*0 

735 - 

535 


534 

534 

534 

SJ1 

9J3 

S.9S 

Mar 

£02 

4*4 

5.92 

59S 

7.15 

620 

May 

Jul 

6J0 

£30 

620 

424 

657 


Prev. Dav Opmi Int. £327 off 306 
CERT. DEPOSIT (IMM) 

SI million- pis of 100 pet 
9170 85*3 Mar 9694 96*7 

91-20 8530 Jim 9030 9032 

50*0 8530 Sep 89*0 89*2 

90-77 5534 Dec 0930 09TO 

8978 <654 Mar 8683 <693 

09*6 86*3 Jun 

■7*6 87*< Sap 

Est. Sales Prev. Sole* 408 

Prev. Dav Open Kit. 13*56 affll 
EURODOLLARS (IMM) 


9089 9697 
9038 9032 
89*0 89*0 
89 JO B9T3 



off the 

newsstand price! 


Special Intzodocfeiiy Rates. 

For new subscribers only. 

(Rates valid through April 30, 1985.) • 

Country Cunency| lyear| 6mos. 3 mos. 

Austria A Sch. 3,220 1.610 890 

Belgium R Ft 7,300 3,650 2,000 

Denmark D. K z 1,500 750 410 

Finland F.M 1,120 560 308 

Dance KE- 1,000 500 280 

Germany D.M. 412 206 115 

Great Britain £ 82 41 23 

Greece Dr. 12,400 6,200 a450 

Ireland £ Id. 104 52 29 

Baly Lire 216,000 " 108,000 59,000 

Luxembourg L Ft 7,300 3,650 2.CXX3 

Netherlands FL 450 225 124 

Norway NKr 1,160 580 ^0 

ftatugal Esc 11,200 5,600 8080 

Spain Ptas 17,400 8,700 4,800 

Sweden S.Kz 1,160 580 320 

Switzerland & Ft. 372 186 102 

The rest of Europe, lforth Africa, former FYench 
Africa U.S. A, French Polynesia, Middle East 

1 $1 284] 142 1 78 

Rest of Africa Canada Latin America Gulf States 
Asia: ) Sj 396i 198} 109 


To: Subscription Manages International 
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| j Amount and currency 

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□ My payment is enclosed (Check <h 

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i 

n 


Est. som 12*53 Prer.Sctet faaa 
Ptm.DavOpanlnL 90468 ofli*89 
COCOA (WYCSCE) 


0 metric tons- * per ten 



5% 

198 • 

Mar 

2145 

2172 

& 

May 

7190 

2719 

2400 

Jul 

7175 

32D4 

3M5 

2053 

S*p 

2145 

2190 

7333 

1999 

Dec 

2040 

2D90 


2135 2199 
2T75 2203 
7165 2196 
7148 2195 
2815 200 


SI ml U ton-pta of WO PCL 
91JB 8514 Mar 

9057 

90*2 

9035 

98*1 

— *2 

90*8 

8X49 

Jun 

■995 

0939 

•992 

89*6 

— *6 

9023 

8433 

Sep 

8936 

89*3 

89 J6 

89*1 

— *5 

89*7 

MAO 

Dec 

8891 

<896 

8892 

8X94 

—35 

89*8 

8X10 

Mar 

8X55 

8X55 

B8J5 

8X54 

^05 

89.15 

84*3 

Jun 

8123 

0X2S 

0X23 

OLM 

-AS 

8X84 

07 JB 

Sop 

0795 

8795 

8*95 

0796 

—.05 

89*7 

Est. Sates 

87*8 

Dec 

Prav. Sales 33*07 


87*8 

— *4 


Prsv. Day Op«n int.106459 off 463 


I EsL Sates 1X005 Prav.Sates 14*79 
Prav. Day Often InL 11,140 


| Commodify Indexes 

Close 

Moody's 971.90 f 

Reuters ZO26J0 

DJ. Futures 125*4 

Com. Research Bureau. • 24X50 

Moody's : base 100 : Dec 31. 1931. 
p - preliminary; I - final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. 18, 1931. 
Daw Jones ; base 100 : Dec 31, 1974. 


Market Guide 

Chicago Boon! el Trade 
Chicago Mer can tile Exdnw 
International Monetary Market 
Of Chicago Mercantile Exchange 
New York Cocoa Sugar, Coffee Ei 
New York Cotton Exchange 
Commodity Ezdnm, New York 
New York Mercmtte Exchange 
Kaaaas City Board of Trade 
New York Futures Exchange 


Prevktos 
97X404 
2J319AO * 
12X42 
244.90. 


NY CSCE: 
NYCE: 


London Metals Feb. 12 

Figures In sterling per metric ton. 
Sliver in pence per trov ounce. 



Hien grade asoper czjthgdei: 
■Dot 1.26630 1-28530 

3 months 1*1658 1*17*0 
Copper cathodes: 
mat 1*0530 1*87*0 

] months 1*18*0 1*12*0 
Tin: SPOT XOKLOO 10*15*0 
3 months 10*00*010*05*0 
Lead: spot 34030 34130 

3 months 349*0 35030 
Zlnc:spat 77X50 77450 
3 months 775*0 77430 
Sflver: tool 56600 549*0 

3 II Mirths 587*0 S860O 
AturrVirttifn: 

vet 1*2330 1*22*0 

2 months 1*5680 1AS650 
Nickel: spot 4 * 30*0 4440*0 

3 months 4*6500 4*7600 
Source: Reuters. 


1*71 JO 1*7258 
1*95*0 1*96*0 


Asian Commodities 
Feb. 12 


HONG-KONG GOLD FUTURES 
UA* per ounce 

Close Previses 
High ' Lew Bid Ask Bid Ask 
Feb - N.T. N.T. 303*0 306*0 299*0 301*0 
MOT „ N.T. N.T. 303*0 305*0 299*0 301*0 
API- N.T. N.T. 306*0 308*0 301 *0 303*0 
Jun _ 311*0 311*0 310*0 312*0 306*0 30030 
Aug _ N.T. N.T. 315*0 317*0 310*0 312*0 
Od — N.T. N.T. J19J30 321*0 315*0 317*0 
Dec - 325*0 32500 325*0 327*0 32600 322*0 
Volume: 26 tots of lOOot- 
SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
UAS per eepce 


London Commodities 
Feb. 12 

Figures in sterling per metric ton. 
Gasoil in U.S- dollars per metric fan. 
Gold In U£dol Kirs per ounce. 


Cash Prices Feb. 12 


High 

SUGAR 


11180 110*0 11050 111*0 
May 12IJ0 11640 11660 11850 

AUO 130*0 126*0 177*0 127 JO 

Od 13040 13540 13540 133*0 

Dec 144*0 144*0 141*0 742*0 

Mar 158*0 158*0 157*0 157*0 

May N.T. N.T. 143*0 164*0 

1342 lute of SO tans. 


112*0 11240 
120*0 120*0 
129*0 12920 
137*0 137*0 
144*0 745*0 ; 
159*0 199*0 
145*0 157*0 


CarmnadJty and Unit 

Coffee 4 SanlDA lb 

Prlntdoth 64/30 30 te, yd _ 

Steel Mllete (PltfJ. ton 

Iran 2 Fdry. Phlkz. fen _ 
Steel scrap No 1 hvv PUL . 

Lead Spot, 10 

Cooper Heel., lb 

Tin (SlraKsI, lb 

gnCjE. St. l_ Basis, lb 

Palladium, oz - - 

Sliver N.Y* az 

Source: AP. 


Y nr 
Tee Ago 

1*5 LB 

0-71 AW 

471*0 451*8 

213*0 21300 
79-00 97-N 

. 19-21 3*a 

57-70 «9tejf 

5L6IZ2 £C79 
0*3 651 

127-134 lB-lg 
£22 8*85 


1*3650 1*21 JO 
1*55*0 1*5550 
45S*a 4560*0 
4597*0 4599*0 



High 

Lew 

Settle 

Seth* 

Fteb 



3B3J0 

300*1 

Mar 

N-T. 

N.T. 

30520 

30 UK 

Ad 

304*0 

30130 

304*8 

30X01 

Jun 

N.T. 

N-T. 

311*0 

304*0 



(O 


l S&P 100 Index Options 

Feb. 12 


MlMOrM MernSMarApr 

m - vt» - - - - un 


ONBSOUB 

NTBNAnONAL 




39V) 



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lfU 


22 

73* 

— 

— 

1/lt 

1/16 

to 

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17* 

» 

20 


1716 

1/16 

to 

16 

17* 

ON 

Btk 



1/16 


tk 

k 


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IIN 

D 

1/16 


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1% 


SB 

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VU 

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7* 

4* 

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IB 

4B 

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1/14 

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716 

m 

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me 

— 

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lte 

Sk 

— 

CL 

— 

teW 

— 

Mi 

Mi 

IU 

— 

— 

— 

— 


volume: 453 lots of 100 ox 

KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Meleysten cents per Ule 

Ctese Previous 

Slii Ask SM 4* 

Mar 19X25 1«*0 19525 195J0 

Apr 20675 10125 2O2J0 201*0 

May 20650 206J0 205J0 206J0 

Jim 20650 20750 20750 20850 

Volume; 43 late. 

SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Sleoopsra Bints bp kite 

Clpee ^ Pr ev to e s 
BU AA Bid Ask 

RSS 1 Mar_ 171 JO 172*0 17X00 173J0 

RSSlApf— 175*0 1 7550 1762S 176-75 

RSS 2 Mar_ 1662S 16125 16150 16250 

RSS 3 Mar, 15425 19725 159J0 160JQ 

RSS4MOr_ 15125 15125 15250 154J0 

RSS5Mor_ I432S 14525 144J0 14450 

KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL j 

Metmrsteh » tepoW s per 2S toks 


Please charge my: 

D Access □ Eurocard 

□ American Express 0 Mastercard 
0 Diners Club 0 Visa 
Card account number: 


Total CkA MSB M. 6(2277 
tekdpet «Umin IMM 
MhI oeateLULHd 

«0k I7U0 LOP 17636 CkBel77*(— 0*6 
Seerce: C TOE. 


1 DM Futures Options 
Feb. 12 

W. Gemon Mnt-1 23*00 neb. on* per imi 


snue coOs-Seffle 


Bid Ask 

Feb 1,170 U95 

Mar 1-140 1.190 

API 1,130 1,180 

Alley 1.130 1.160 

Jim 1,110 i.i» 

Jlv 1.160 1.150 

Sep 1.180 1-1 SO 

NOV 1*90 1,140 

Jan 1*90 1.140 

volume: 0 lets of 25 tans. 
Source: Reuters. 


Prevtoes 
Bid Ask 

1,175 1.195 

1.150 1200 

1,140 1,190 

1.130 1,170 

1.1K) 1,160 

1,100 1.158 

1,100 USB 
1*90 1,140 


Mar LI7S 2.142 2.165 
May 1190 X1S9 XI 85 
Jlv 2,174 2.1*0 2.173 
Sep 2.160 X1D 1153 
Dee 2*21 1,987 2*20 
war 1*96 1.97B 1000- 
Mav 1*80 1.970 1*96 
£383 late of ID tans. 
COFFEE 

Mar 2402 2384 2387 
way 2*12 L395 2*02 
Jty 2*35 2*22 2*24 
Sea 2*58 2*42 2*44 
Nov 2*78 2*62 2*67 
Jan Z*70 2 *M 2*77 
Mar N.T. N.T. 2*35 
2J18 tote of 5 tans. 
GASOIL 

Pah 24690 241*Q 240*0 
Mar 23SJ0 22BJ» 22625 
Apt 22350 219*0 219.25 
May 219*0 21SJ0 215*0 
Jun 21550 214*0 212J5 
Jhr 215*0 714*0 212*0 
Aug N.T. N.T. 212*0 
Sep N.T. N.T. 212*0 
Oct N.T. N.T. 21X00 

X128 tots at 180 tans. 


2.166 Xl<2 
Z1M 2.172 
X174 Z14S 
Z154 112! 
2*21 1,988 
ZOOS 1*75 
2*05 1,965 


1390 ZJK 2339 
2*03 2*95 Z397 
2*28 2*71 2*23 
2*50 2*39 2*40 
2*70 2*60 2*62 
Z*fi0 Z460 2*75 
2*70 2*4Q 2*65 


242*0 249*0 249 35 
228J0 235-50 23SJ5 
2W-50 22425 22450 
21X25 219,25 21950 
2)450 217*0 71725 
71450 215*0 217*0 
00*0 21600 221*0 
m00 215*0 22X00 
29X00 214*0 228*0 


GOLD 

Apj ip-10 N.Q. N.Q. N-Q. N.a 

105 lot* Ot KM tray oz. 

Sources: Reuters and Lanton Petroleum Ev 
enanpe (bosom. 


Dividends Feb. 12 


Card expiry date 


Signature 


My name 


Price 

Mar 

Jen 

Seat 

Mar 

JU 

Seat 


— 




a u 

42 9 



a 

0*3 

122 


tm 

059 

a» 

31 

XU 

873 

LIS 

8 H 

197 

L» 

12 

084 

0*1 

0*5 

1+1 

1*4 

1.79 

33 

081 

078 

9J0 

LSI 

232 

2JZ 

34 

0*1 

8U 

132 

3L5I 

3M 



Address 


Tfel N° 


13-2-85 


id 


Estfraeted total veL 11416 
I Cm: Mob WL 10N epw toL 4JJJ0 
I Puts :Moa *0L 2*N open ML 2LSD5 
Source: CME. 


Israeli Debt at $245 BOlion 

The Associated Pros 1 

TEL AVIV — IsraeTs foreign 
debt grew by S2 billion last year to 
stand at a record $24.5 billion, the | 
Centra] Bureau of Statistics an- 
nounced Monday. Israel radio 
quoted Finance Minister Yitzhak 
Modal as saying Israd would seek 
increased economic aid from 
abroad to help stabilize the econo- 
my during austerity measures im- 
plemented earlier (his month. 


Paris Commodities 

Feb. 12 

Sugar hi French Francs perntfrtc ton. 
Offer flow?* hi Frano per OD Kg. 


Ktoh Law Close 

SUGAR 

Mar U70 U40 ]J« 1JM 

MOV 1*15 1-36 1J08 1J90 

Auo 1J00 1*80 1*70 l*7e 

Od USB 1*40 1A0 1*40 

Dec N.T. N.T. 1*05 1*20 

Mar L735 IJ30 IJM 1 J18 

Est. vbL: 640 Ws ot 50 Rnx Pnw. i 
sales: 1345 lots. Ooen Interest: 20344 
COCOA 

Mar 2J20 Z3O0 2J10 231' 

r w. ss iss 

S£ SS K: IS S3 

Wtar N.T. N.T. — 2,140 

MOV N.T. JLT _ - 2.1*0 

Est. vgL: 223 lets at 10 tons. Frev. i 
sales: 333 tots. Often interest: 1 SSB 
COFFEE 

Mar 2*60 2*68 ZM5 2*68 

May 2*75 2*75 ISH 

Jly N.T. N.T. 2*75 2JJQ 

Sap 2*95 2*95 ZSBS 2*00 

Nttu I4T. N.T. LS8S 2*15 

Jan N.T. N.T. 2*W 2*20 

Mar N.T. N.T 2*65 2*12 

Est. vol.: 14 lots at 5 tens. Prav. ( 
sales: 3 tots. Open Interest : IS 
tons; Bourse do Commerce. 


SfflRE WORDS AND PICTURES 
DOOWSBUKY 
DAILY IN 7H6HT 


Company Par Anrt 

INCREASED 

Bandao Inc Q JO 

Citizens UIIL Co _ *9 

Qorastato Mie O 20 

Meredith Carp q 25 

Minn WUnine a *7 Vs 

Snerwin-wiilkams Co Q 23 

Slh Boston Svne Q .10 

INITIAL 

CMcogo Penumatlc 

Tl Q .10 

STOCK SPLITS 
AMted Blesystaim, — 2-tor-) 

La Polite Academy — 4-for-3 
Slh Boston Savvies — 3-tar-3 


4-22 3-22 
3-11 2-22 
3-15 2-28 
3-15 2 27 
3-12 2-22 
3-iB y 
Ml 2-28 


Amer Braadaesflhg 
BardonCarp 
Cascade Cora 
Cincinnati Mitoaun 
Camman-Ritv Tr 
Dover Carp 
Hanunermlll Ppr Co 
mil Flav & Frag 
Inti Paper Co 
Jadrn Inc 
Motorola 
Murray Ohio Mfg 
Rpvco D. S. tnc 
Robert ton & Co 
RTE Corn 
Safety- K loan 
SeooramCo 
Sears Roebuck & Co 
Southern Baneora 
Southern Union 
Slater Continental 
Triangle Radik 
Tyco Labs Inc 
Uhl Teteaxrmun. 
uSACates 
UJ- Surgical Carp 
walca National 


. *0 3- IS Z-2S 

Q JS 3-15 XI 

a JS >15 M2 

Q .10 3-12 >22 

O • .10 4-15 >15 

OJOft US 2-28 
Q 34 3-15 3-6 

O JS 4-10 >26 

0 M >15 >25 

Q .12 M 5-15 4-15 

a .i< >n >20 

Q JO 4-1 >14 

a JO >18 >4 

a J0 >18 >22 

Q .14 630 331 

O .18 >28 >14 

Q 20 >15 2-27 

0 M >1 >20 

Q 22 44 >29 

O *3 >15 >1 

q 20 >11 2-25 

O JS >15 2- ZD 

Q JO 4-1 >1 

a *8 >29 2-27 

Q J7 >11 J-4 

Q .10 >22 M 

Q .10 >25 2-25 


California Harvested ? 

12 % More Grapes in ’84 4 

United Press Intern at i on al ^ 

SACRAMENTO, California r- T l4 . 
California’s harvest of wine, raisin J J ^ . 
and table grapes rose by 12 percent ^ ~ 

last year to Z57 millio n tons, but j* ^ 
was 17 percent below the record " . 

crush of 1982, according to thd ^ ■ 
state Department of Food and Ag- * 'u 

riculture. > l ® *■ 

The departmenl’s Crop and 
livestock Reporting Sen&e re- s, m: JJ 
ported Monday that the weighted r > * •* - 

price of aD grapes purchased for > „ ( 
wine and other beverages was 
516 634 a ion, a decline of 13 V°" a 
cent from the 1983 price of 5190.97. > 

The total crush of all varietiesxtf J} j. 
wine grapes last year was 15 n)3r ^ 
lion tons. Thai was aa increase of 2 M ^ 

percent over 1983, but down O ^ M Sjj ' 

perrem from 1982. j ' -:i: 


Australia Cots Deficit : . 
In Balance of Payments 

Reuters ■ .J 

CANBERRA. Australia— A«- 
iralia’s bahnee-of-psyaeats doH 
dt, as measured by n« oCGaai 
monetary movements, narrowed 10 
T4d mifiion Australian dallatr 

(SI 12 million) in Jammy from n°_ 
million dollars in December, 
government statistics bureau tff* 
ported Tuesday. Ibis compare; 
with a 163-miEion-dollar ddieU 
January 1984. 

The bureau said the reduced del-- 
icii reflected an inoreaseianet csfr 
ita( inflow from 741 milliOBdataa. 
in December to 990 million in J«£ 


5 1?:: 


} - 1 . 


>» * 14 




i£.B 

£ 

$ 18 if 


:r- j K:i 

is-. 

U j $T 


,;•> U : ; . 


us LFWUilUU Hi 77U l||ll|W“ -V - 

uaiy. This inflow more than 

a rise in January’s current-acaw f>N^ti(>n.7^ aaiEa 
d^icit to 1*14 billion ddlars, - • 

from 917 million in DecahoCf- •“ - — 


A - Annu m,- RMMHtttri GOaartarlr.'S-SemF 

Arawffl, 


WHAT WOUU) IffE BE U® % 

wnHourn?, .- v^. 

WfflCH® * 

EACH nODAY IN TlfWI- - 


S 1 ? i 

:X ; .j-.Mta 




SSB 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1985 


Oyer-the-Counter 


Feb. 12 


NASDAQ Notional Market Prices 


Sales In OM 

lees him taw 3PJM.CHV9 


*»*«•" Net 

«•» HIM Low IPMOltt 



3* 


m 
nb 

5% 6% + U> 
s% mu— % 
im + <4 

im+ii 
i% + n. 
m— % 
s%— % 


• % 
20 19% 

20Vj- 19% 
4V." 3% 
Ilk 
12 
21 ta 



M 
2 ® 

5% 

MV. 

24 24% + % 

8% . BVi 

an w» + % 
44% 44% 

4% 4% 

4% &Vi— % 
23 23%— 1 

14% 14% — 14 
8% 9 + % 


14715 M% 15 + % 
23 4% 4% 4% 

39 Ufa 2% 3 — J4 
37420% 20 20% + U 

103 4 3% 3%— % 

512 11% 12 + % 

3093 11% 11 1714 + % 






m 


S3 


{M. 








558 IBM 27 2014 + % 

05 4% 414 4% 
2212% 12% 12% 

3 3414 3414 3414— % 
54 5% 5 5—14 

■kifcirif 

2% 2% 214- % 


add 


rf# 


2S4 

7% 

7% 

7% 


14 

10% 

10 

10 


104 40% 

39% 

39%— 

1 

20 

2% 

3% 

2% 


434 

9% 

9% 

9%— 

' % 

442 

5% 

5% 

5% + 

% 

51 

» 

9% 

9% + 

% 

81 

4 

3% 

4 

87 

2% 

2% 

3% 


12 

4% 

4% 

4%— 

% 

4538 

37% 

37% — 

% 

101 

34% 

34 

34% 


447 1 
27 

40% 

5% 

39% 

5% 

1% + 

% 

221: 

32 

31% 

32 +1 

433 

23% 

22% 

22% — 

% 

49 

8% 

7% 

0% + 

% 

140 21% 

20% 

21 


2177 

9% 

8% 

9% + 

% 

201 

14% 

14 

14 


310 

4% 

4% 

4%— 

% 

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23% 

22% 

23% 


7191: 

31% 

30% 

31 


1052 

8% 

0% 

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% 

170 

3% 

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2% — 

H 

120 

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15 

15% + 

% 

3410% 

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10%— 

% 

184 

13 

T24fa 

13% + 

% 

102 

8% 

B% 

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% 

4781 i 

18 

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295 

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544 20% 

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% 

109 

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7% 

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1 

11% 

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M 

65 

8% 

8% 

8% 


221 

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% 

415 

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320' 

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14% 

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% 

78 

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411 

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98 20 

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475 

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101 

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1145 11% 

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3435 

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JBftKrt 

24 

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822 19% 

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Jackpot 

i 


414 5% 

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JadcUt 



14237% 

37 

37 

JamWtr 



720 

19% 

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JoffBsti 

140 

44 

85 35 

34% 

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40a 14 

258 23% 

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-JofMart 



218 7% 

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Jorlcn 

.12 

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773 19 

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Jlfv* 



1199 % 

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55 38% 

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Justins 

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KLAs 



554 22% 

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KMWSV 



26 11% 

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KTnon 



17 5% 

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lfrtrrwfiTO 


24 

369 28% 

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Karen r 



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Kflvdon 

KatyJn 



3 S » SPa?" 



140 

34 

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: 

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* -* 

Kulcfce 

.14 

4 

020 28% 

27% 

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•- 


WE RE CELEBRATING 
100,000 SUBSCRIBERS IN JUST 
TWO BIRTHDAYS. 


t t 







LDBrnk 



45310 

9% 


1—1N 



241 10% 

10 

10%+ M 

LSI Los 



1728 17% 

17 

17 |* 

LTX 



208 22% 

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34 

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48 

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45« 15 

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Lowsn s 

4 

14 

10 28 

27% 

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A 

- 


We are pleased to announce 
the appointment of 

Jacques Tawil 

as Vice Chairman of 

REPUBLIC NATIONAL BANK OF NEW YORK 




221 

qi 


Options tj^toes fai S/olW 


hb " | Hat t ** 




REPUBLIC NEW YORK CORPORATION 
452 Fifth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10018 


JANUARY. 1985 


rim 


More circulation in more major cities in more 


major countries. That’s what it takes to be the leading 
U.S. business publication in Europe and Asia. And 
we accomplished it in such a short time 

Outside our North American home, FORTUNE 


International’s circulation is larger than that of The 
Will Street Journal and Business Week. We also lead 


in sales outside the U.S. and home country, with more 
circulation than Germany’s Capital France’s Nouvel 
Economiste, the United Kingdom’s Financial Times 


and Hong Kong’s Far Eastern Ecortbmic Review. 

Our prestigious, influential subscribers are your 


prime prospects for business advertising and con 


sumer products and services. Fifty-three percent are at 
top-level management positions; 19% have interna 
donal business dealings. 

Do business with FORTUNE and you will have 
something to celebrate, too. 

In Europe, contact Charles E. Florman, Euro- 
pean Director, at 499-4080 in London. Tfelex: 22557. 


□nnninmn 


INTERNATIONAL 






















































Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13. 1985 


'fiiesda)& 


H Month 
High Law Stod. 


Sis. 0«H 

loos Hist! Lew Ouat. ChUe 


17 Month 
High Low Koch 


Sis. CKC 

Dtv 7M. PE lttXMpntow Buot.Ql^C 


12Mofttti 
High Low Stock 


Sis. 

13ft High Lon 


Clew 

Ousi.Ch'et 



IS 

s 

158 109 8 
M 15 a 


MU 4 

X 13 12 


VoLot4PJA._ 
Prey. « P.M. yoL 


. 10490508 

-iiuaaatt 


Tables include the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing on Wall street 
and da not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


10 

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4M154 4 
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220a 8.9 


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Signor D'Annunzio 
Extols America in 
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February 26 , Paris 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1985 


Page 17 


World Bank’s EFC Affiliate 
Names Alejo Vice President 


By Brenda Hagerty 

7 lafemattonal Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Francisco Javier 
."AJejo. currently economic adviser 
•‘to Mexico's finance minister, was 
named vice president of the Inter- 
: national Finance Corp., responsi- 
ble for corporate affairs and devei- 
iqpmenL 

■ Sir William Ryric, executive vice 
■president of the World Bank affili- 
ate, said of the appointment, “Mar- 
; lieting of IFC and our dose ties 
-.with the financial community are 
mportaxu- We must let more peo- 
ple and institutions know what IFC 
an and does offer." Among the 
'■esponsibilities of Mr. Alejo’s new 
Mst will be heading the IFC mar- 
keting activities and public rela- 
tions. 

.. Mr. Algo, a former diplomat 
jod member of the Mexican cabi- 
'ict, will be filling one of the new 
FC vice presidencies created by 
■Ar W illiam in a recent reorganiza- 
ion of this senior staff, 
i ITT Africa and the Middle 
.i Brussels-based division of ITT 
Zofp-, has named James F. Reddy 
ind Paul R. Michaud vice presi- 
lents. Mr. Reddy continues as the 
li vision's director, Nigeria support 
■joup, and Mr. Michaud as mar- 
eting director, defense, avionics 
nd construction. 

Hongkong Land Co. said David 
rawler will join the company as 
' eneral manager, treasury and cor- 
orate finance, March 14. Mr. 
iawier, who currently is treasurer 
.f Burmah (Ml PLC will succeed 
fl] Wavish. Mr. Wavish is leaving 
loogkong Land to join Industrial 
quity Ltd. of Sydney as group 
perations manager. 

Lloyds Bank International Ltd. of 
ondon said JA. (Tony) Davies 
iQ become a director and chief 


executive of its Lloyds Internation- 
al Ltd. subsidiary, which provides 
merchant-banking sendees in Aus- 
tralia. Mr. Da vies, who takes up his 
post in April and succeeds John A. 
Mitchell, will be based in Sydney. 
Mr. Davies will continue as a mem- 
ber of the board of Lloyds Bank 
International and thus will be the 
bank’s first resident director in 
Australia. Mr. Mitchell will be re- 
turning to Britain to take up a post 
in Lloyds's newly formed mer- 
chant-banking group. 

Mitsubishi Aircraft International 
Inc. said William P. Phyall has tak- 
en over the new post of coordinat- 
ing its sales and marketing activi- 
ties in Southern Europe, Africa and 
the Middle EasL Mr. Phyall, who is 
based in Brussels, previously was 
manager of sales engineering for 
the London liaison office of DHC 
International (Middle East) Ltd. 
DHC provides sales and marketing 
support for all products and ser- 
vices of De Havilland Aircraft of 
Canada Ltd. through a distributor 
network in the Middle East and 
North Africa. In addition, Mitsubi- 
shi Aircraft International, a subsid- 
iary of Mitsubishi Heavy Indus- 
tries of Tokyo, has appointed 
Hartwig A. Baier to the new post of 
director of operations for Europe, 
Africa and the Middle East He is 
also based in Brussels. 

Banco tfi SttiEa has opened a 
branch in Paris and named Anton- 
ino Lagumina branch manager. 

Nike Int, the U.S.-based maker 
of athletic footwear and apparel, 
said Brendan Foster, who is in 
charge of its British operations, has 
been named head of its internation- 
al operations. He succeeds Harry 
Carah, who was appointed general 
manager of its footwear division. 

Banca ddb Svizzera Itafiana of 
Iji gann has name d Roland Staehli 


Midway Airlines President 
Resigns, After Chairman 


The Associated Press 


CHICAGO — The president of Midway Airlines has fallowed the 
chairman and resigned, completing the departure of the management 
team that developed the Midway Metrolink service and bought a 


bankrupt Florida airline. 

Neal F. Meehan, who had beat president since October 1982, told 
the airline Monday that be would resign effective Friday, when the 
airline’s chairman, Arthur C. Bass, also is leaving. Mr. Bass an- 
nounced his resignation Jan. 18. 

In announcing Mr. Median's resignation, the airline offered no 
explanation otto than to say he would “pursue other business 
interests.” No replacement was announced. 

Mr. Median, 43, was president and chief executive of New York 
Air before joining Midway. 

Mr. Bass is to be replaced 
was among the founders of the airline 
stepped in as acting chairman before Mr. Bass joined the airline in 
August 1982. 

Under Mr. Bass, the airline initiated its Midway Metrolink service 
appealing to the business traveler, and had expanded into the leisure 
travel market by acquiring the assets of bankrupt Air Florida. 

Airline stock analysis said the departure of Mr. Meehan and Mr. 
Bass may have been prompted by pressure from the airline’s board 
because of poor results over tbe past two years. The company had a 
loss of SIS milli on in 1983 and a loss of S7 miQion in tbe first nine 
months of 1984. 


as chairman by David Hinson. 31, who 
: in 1978. Mr. Hinson also bad 


head of its new London representa- 
tive office. Mr. Staehli joined the 
bank from Swiss Volksbank, where 
he most recently was in charge of a 
department within tbe internation- 
al division in the Berne head office. 

Nako Chemical Co. has appoint- 
ed W. Steven Weeber vice presi- 
dent. marketing. Previously, he was 
vice president of tbe Nako Europe 
division. Nako, a specialty-chemi- 
cals concern, is based in Oak 
Brook, Illinois. 

Occidental International 03 Inc. 

of London has named Jerry Wil- 
liams senior vice president, explo- 
ration. In this post his responsibil- 
ities include the company’s 
exploration activities in 
and Africa. 


Rant Sw)ifaini hay set up a 
treasury department within its in- 
ternational division in a move de- 
signed to gain corporate forrigp- 
exebange business. The main 
business-getting aspect of the new 
department is centered in London 
under the charge of Douglas An- 
derson. chief manager, and Jim 
Craig, foreign-exchange manager. 

Barclays Bank PLC has appoint- 
ed John Quinton a deputy chair- 
man of the bank and ritairman of 
its Barclays Bank U-K. subsidiary. 
He succeeds Henry Lambert, who 
retires March 8. In addition, An- 
drew Buxton, a vice chairman of 
Barclays Bank and Barclays Inter- 
national, will also become a vice 
chairman of Barclays Bank UJC. 


Bankruptcies Set 
German Record 

Reuters 

WIESBADEN, West Germa- 
ny — West German bankrupt- 
cies readied a record level last 
year, with official figures show- 
ing 16,760 insolvencies, the 
Federal Statistics Office said 
Tuesday. 

It said that the figures show 
an increase of 4 percent, or 646 
bankruptcies, from 1983. 

There were no spectacular 
collapses of major companies 
last year; the office said, al- 
though the number of bank- 
ruptcies involving over 1 mil- 
lion Deutsche marks (about 
5307,000 at current exchange 
rates) rose 7.8 percent. The 
aurober of companies in the 
troubled building industry that 
jedared themselves insolvent 
ncreased by 12 percent 


Investor Group Charged With Fraud 


By Fred R_ Bleak! ey 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — The Securities 
and Fxehany C ommissi on has 
charged a group of investors with 
participating in a scheme to de- 
fraud some of the largest U.S. bro- 
kerage firms, including EF. Hut- 
ton & Co., Dean Witter Reynolds 
Inc. and Prodential-Bache Securi- 
ties Inc. In its civil lawsuit, the SEC 
said tbe five investors in tbe group 
bought $10 million of securities 
without intending to mat e pay- 
ment. 

Those charged with fraud by 
means erf the illegal practice erf 
“free riding” were Thomas W. 
Reid, a Texas businessman; Ar- 
mood Zaocaria,a Manhasset, New 
York, restaurateur and horse 
breeder; Maurice Rind, a Sherman 
Oaks, California, investor, Michael 


Joe Rogers, a Grandview, Texas, 
lawyer, and Peter Vito, of Corona, 
New York, who is believed to be 
self-employed in tbe construction 
industry. 

The SEC said Monday that the 
five investors had caused several of 
the nine brokerage firms involved 
in the trading to lose a total of more 
than $500,000. 

The SEC lawsuit seeks a perma- 
nent injunction to prevent further 
violations of anti-fraud and margin 
requirements. It also seeks a freeze 
on all of the defendants’ assets 
pending the outcome of the case. 

In free riding, an investor could 
sell a security before payment was 
required in five business days, 
pocketing the difference if there 
was a gain. Bui if the security de- 


clined before settlement was due, 
the investor might walk away from 
the trade, forcing the broker to ab- 
sorb the loss. 

In response to the SECs request, 
the U.S. District Court in Manhat- 
tan issued a temporary restraining 
order Monday to stop the group 
from purchasing more of the secu- 
rities of First City Properties, a Los 
Angeles- based real estate and con- 
struction company whose shares 
are 30 percent owned by the public 
and 70 percent by the Betzberg 
family of Canada. 

The SEC said tbe stock rose from 
the $4-a-sharc range in January 
1984 toa range of $17 to $24 by the 
end of the year. Monday, it 
plunged S3.62S. to S12.I2S. on the 
New York Stock Exchange. 


apanese Are Said to Reduce 
foie of Consensus in Firms 


Las Angeles Times Service 

TOKYO — Students of Japa- 
se business management may 
m ha ve to revise their textbooks, 
cording to two leading Japanese 
rinessmen, consensus is no long- 
he prune mover in the making of 
porate decisions, as it was in the 
days of boom growth. 

Cenichi Yamamoto, the new 
sklent of Mazda, the Hiroshi- 


I’Reilly Has 
loth Worlds 

(Continued from Page 9) 
ally has been a solid corporate 
ager. In 1984, Heinz earned 
f .5 million on sales of $3.74 
on with a 21-percent return on 

ty- 

fhe management style at Heinz 
in and to the point," said Wfl- 
F. Maguire, food analyst at 
rill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & 
h Inc. "It’s hard-nosed, strong 
.be marketing side and strong 
le effort to be a low-cost pro- 
r.” 

anz’s solid performance over 
ast five years can be attributed 
tick- to-what-you-know acqxri- 
i policy in tbe United Stales 
Europe. Successful acqirisi- 
indude Weight Watchers In- 
ttional Inc. and Star-Kist 
- Agribusiness groups that di- 
Ted outside then main fine of 
less have run into problems 
ome are now divesting. 

leinz has always been a great 
any if a dull company,” said 
rfaguire. “Tie attrition of oth- 
id companies has highlighted 
■'t’s performance.” 

. O’Reilly believes that re- 
's are the best way to motivate 
e both in and out of the car- 
s world. “At Heinz, we have 
large performance-related 
msarioa. Only about one- 
rf compensation is salary,” he 
‘Everybody on the executive 
it lee is a potential millionaire 
h his snares. Nothing con- 
ies the min d like hanging, 
all hanging together.” 
it about the tyrannies assoti- 
ith corporate life? “Suboon- 
y, me of the great aitrac- 

0 me as a non-American is 
ratimity to work on the big 

1 can’t' believe I'd to as 
on by the laid-back charm 
don or the small-town atmo- 
of Dublin,” he said. 


ma-hased auto company, says that 
his company plans to add a U.S.- 
style “top-down" derision-making 
style to the old Japanese-styie “bot- 
tom-up” structure of management. 

“In the days of high growth, 
when all yon had to do to ran a 
successful' company was to lower 
production costs and improve 
quality, the bottom-up manage- 
ment structure was all right,” Mr. 
Yamamoto said at a recent recep- 
tion. “But in times like the present, 
with slower growth and when you 
don’t know what the future wOl 
bring, the bottom-up structure is 
not enough- You have to have a 
top-down structure to get derisions 
made. 

“The rank and file know bow to 
improve production techniques 
and cut costs. They know tactics 
wdL But they don’t know anything 
about strategy. That has to be de- 
cided at the top.” 

Japanese companies win have to 
take more risks to remain competi- 
tive, he said, and that means less 
waiting far decisions to rise from 
below through consensus. 



DIVIDENDS EACH YEAR 
SINCE 1912 


The Board of Directors of ENSERCH 
Corporation on January 31, 1985, de- 
clared a regular quarterly dividend of 
40 cents per share of common stock, 
payable March 4, 1985, to share- 
holders of record February 15, 1985. 


For additional information, please write 
to Benjamin A. Brown, Wee President, 
Financial Relations, Dept M, ENSERCH 
Center, Box 999, Dallas, Texas 75221. 


CORPORATION 


VAN NELLE HOLDING N.V. 

has purchased 
from Nabisco lac. 
all outstanding shares in 

DE ERVEN DE WED. J. VAN NELLE B. V. 

advisor to the purchaser: 

PIERSON, HELDRING & PIERSON N.V. 


equity financing arranged by: 

PIERSON, HELDRING & PIERSON N.V. 

ALGEMENE BANK NEDERLAND N.V. 

debt financing provided by: 

ALGEMENE BANK NEDERLAND N.V. 

COOPERATIEVE CENTRALE 
RAIFFEISEN-BOERENLEENBANK B.A. 

DE NATIONALE INVESTERINGSBANK N.V. 

January 1985 


EMPLOYMENT 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


AGENTS WANTED 

Hgh co wn na aoii paid. Lata* nan of- 

• Sirwaow 

• Ataj-tarrorism 

• Cbuntar-ifitaBgance 

• Many, many male. 

Piateetad areas available to qudUtad 
agenb who wish to rap der exclusive 
product fa* of world famous security 
system Canted M. Heivi 

CCS in Port 297 MOO. 


PARS OCGAfIZATlON soaks experi- 
enced interpreter /translator. Format 
quafifiedsons to bo nosed, service 
boc ta round ai edvOTt o ge. Sdorv 
F9600 per north x 11 Wrowrrti C.V. 
»d photo to: Personal Sedton 4 rue 
Jean Ray, 75724 Paris Cedes 15, bo- 
faro 21 February 1985 


MARKETING TEAMl 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


GERMAN LADY 

47 yean, good famfly.' flue* in 4 
languages, mnm& otfne pubic rela- 
tion esgtenenee, wry refaflfe, dynomfe 
rad (roe Id travel, seels ii to nn^ ic n ct 
position Utah responsWry 


■ wart}- Please reply; To whom 
1 raoy concern, 3 Lrarxro, 06360 Ese / 
Mer, France 


YOUNG WOMAN (Biology & Mede- 
dne), flue* Frendt/Englah. Experi- 
ence soertific techn ical, regjl ctfory & 
genond Dpsrotiond business ratters 
& industry, a d heteonsA & interna- 
tional argsizidiore, seeks p os ition 
{ prefera bly internabond) with mutti- 
i w e iiii ml or stfemationel ■yyesfiiMn l 
bend in Paris or Brussels. Write Bax 
1776, Herald Tribune, 92521 NtuBy 
Codex. France. 


EGYPTIAN 3D, MBA, feet* Arabic, 
English, French & some German. 
Hokler of Sveta wart permit. 7 years 
it*l experience wth Swiss rfunanum 
company & mcior Ameriam fratdxs- 
ng compfxry, seeks tfwfceginq & fi- 
nonaaty reworrinp poubar. Wi 
la travel. Detoxed CV. avail 
upon reateft Her al d Tribune. Ed. G, 
nndcxoci 26, 10673 Alliens, dream. 


RBKHMAN 26, US & French Bu* 
trSngjd 


iiXoreaOoncd bank. 


KM (BHWBtel G 

Pori* 6D3-34-91 


SECRETARIAL 
POSmONS AVAILABLE 


Dent mno 
MTGBNAnaNAL 
SECRETARIAL POSTONS 

TUESDAYS 

i the HT 


BIT OROJIAnON DEPARTMENT is 
looking far young bSngpd Engfah- 
/Frenoi mc r esory with emphasa an 
typing & telex sktt m both 
bgages Mrs fcfamd 747 12 65 
Pfcws from IJMiSOpnt |exfe <3031 


SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 


GR-THECREMEDElACREMEtanv 
porcry help people recruit bfingud ar 
nkri malnar tongue seere ta ie s . 
ftre758 B23Q. 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 


EX 


&LLENT COOK, 38, French / Ub> 
ese molting, chauffeur, free now. 
good presenftteon, seeks position in 
private home. Tel (94) 77 64 71 Or 
write Gregoire, la limousine, 83340 
Le Thaont Franca. 


ALWAYS AVAlAHf - AU PAIRS, 
chicken s nanny, mum's helpers & ea 
branches of 1st dess Bve-rn domesti c 
help worldwide. Cel Soane Bureau, 
London 730 8122/5142 (24 hours) U- 
CEMPAGY. fix B950670SLOAhC G. 


ALWAYS A VAUAMR LONDON only 
bafajmnidersi 1st doss dJy maids. 
Cal Soane Bureau, London: 730 
8122/5141 UCEMP. AGY. 


ENGLISH NANMB & Mather's Helps 
free now. hkzh Agency, 53 Church 
Road. Hovw. UK. TeT(Q#3] 29044/5 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Back Page) 


AUTOMOBILES 


URL RHD. MRENL JAG, I 
Tet 205 6WA T«tateaS586 (Uq 


LB- 


AUTO RENTALS 


CHAflC RENT A CAR. PMu or 1 
■ Rah Spirit. Mertedm, Jodw. mMT. 
EnouteteLsmaB as 46 rue Pierre 
IQwrron, 750 06 Paris. Tek 720.3040.1 
Telest S3B/97 F OiAROC H 


AUTO SHIPPING 


HOWTO IMPORT A EUROPEAN 
CAR MTO tIC ILSJL 

This doc u ment eatpfami fa8y whet one 
mua do to bran a ear mto the US. 
raid tag aty. b indudei new & 


boyng tips, 
ajs- 


t ab 

ased &iropeari auto . 

DOT & EPA oarwerswn 
tom U e rau c e & shipping pi 
a wo) as legal paints. Baaua of the 
Strong dole, yea can save up to 
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SteteL To receive rha manual, send 
ussma WdUSSlJD for pasted 
PL ScWt, Pbstfach 3131^ 
7D00 Stuttgart 1. Wed Germany 


Diremly in die seaports - feet 6r532 
ful documentation 
TRANSSHIP GMBH 

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Tek 0421/14a6< Tfe. 246584 


SWPMG CARS WDRtDWBTE 
We Stripped 29,750 Tourist Cm 
NttOm Venek to 1983 

CAU. MATINA AT 

h (3) 234 36 68 


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VIA ANIWBtP AND SAVE, free ho- 
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AMBCO, Krfebedrote 2, Antwerp. 
Belgun tek 231 42 39. fk 7T46P, 


HtANKFURT/ MAM-W. Germraty. K 
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AUTOS TAX FREE 


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BRITANNIC 

TAX RS CARS 

ROLLS ROYCE 
BENTLEY 

JAGUAR 

ROVER 

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European & Worldwide 
delivery 

21 Ave Kleber 

75116 PARIS 

T1:(l )757 50 80 
Telex: 620 420 


TAX Free can. at mdfes & models. 
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Irasao. H 

TBA5G 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


excaubur 

AUTOMOBilB 


S&^Mfari98S 

ed to the Eurapeai and 
moricet 

New far 1985 (for 
Generef 


special I 
one proauang auu nr. ■ 
farm ar 425 HP. when u 
Prices l«65^00-BSD007 
an egufmnfc 
8 ' 


live rtariuScri: 

EXCAUBUS MOTOR CAR 
DtSTRBUTORS 

Ptek Palace, Are de la Cashs 


Tab 33 - 93 - 25 63 91 
Idee 469 17 0 MCS 


NEW MERCEDES 

PORSCHE, BMW, EXOTIC CARS 

FROM STOCK 

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BEST SERVICE 

For thinn i ng . Ins ura n ce , hotel 
coSwenrion in USLA. 

RUTEINC 

Tounumtr. 52, 6000 Fronkfwt, 


10 YEARS 

We DeJraer Cars to Rio Worid 

TRANSCO 

sspng o constant itui tfi move Ao 
3Q0 hrcnJ new cart, 

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2030 Anton ‘ ' ' 

Td 323/542 62 40, ' 


TAX FES CARS 
P.C.T. 


A Inventory 

em makes, dl modeh, brand new 
Ipmtaan 1, 2008 Antwerp. Botgiun 
Tek 3mi 59 Off 
Ik 35546 PHCART B 
Apfriy far our colour analogue 
US$5 adt 


DAWAJI TRADE 
H4TL DBJVBtY 

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Tek 02/648 55 13 
Tcto 65658 
42 rue Lens, 

1050 back 


TAX TBS CARS: 

Royca, AuL Volvo, ft w dte. 

We keep o largo dock of brand new 
end good mea are. We da the 
D.O.T. and EPA an our awn pre- 
mnas. W6 afao krite am of Us axp- 


Ik Betoura 8220? EUROAU B. tk 
USAW56B9 vei US. NVEuroAa- 


47.99901 


Ids htamteand, Kacanain Ast 
~ Mtddeggn. Ba^um. 


A aridtaan 


■ TAX FRK WW MBCSXES • 
500 SB. SEC, SL.itaBwk* defrvory 
ful export service. Save moneyi 

11 ‘ 14a wfialetefa 


Colt SafCTION • cnl experience! 

SHECHON Im po r t Expert GmbH 


AUTOS TAX FREE 

HIROPORT TAX 
FREE CARS 

< Cai or write far free eotabg. 

1 Rose 1201 1 

0 RoHerdom Airport, Hotoid 

TeLfflJlrf62SI77 

Q Tate* 2507T EPCAR NL 

j Far Dhed DeBaery 

380 se, sa 

e 380 SL, 500 SL 380 SEC. 500 SEC 

. FOITOC 911 Graven A Tuibe 

h BochuntefSir 103,4330 Raddmghcumi 
Tel 02361/7D04 Tx (299S7AHS D 

MBtCHXS 380 SE 

lops Blue 10/80 My boded. DOT 

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Kcoerweg 97. 1 171XC Badhoevendoip 
Tel (0J 2M&2I67 Ik 18099 DOETS PI 

m 



AVUTION 1 


\ LEGAL SERVICES 



SERVICES 

YOUNG LADY 

PA/Intarpreter & Tourim Guide 

PARIS 562 0587 

VIP LADY GUIDE 

Young, educated, elegant & triEn^id 
far days, evenings & irervei. 
FVUb 533 80 26 

YOUNG BEGAN? LADY 

MUUHJNGUAL PARIS.- 52S «1 01 

AMSI9DAM 182197 

TRUSTHR. LADY COMMMON 

PARIS 557 56 09 > 

SaphtaMedtodycempcmion 

PARIS VB> BEGANT. uiret, saphsti- 
anted ft educated young lady asm- , 
panion, far tench, days, ajmen. me- 
nings, weekends & hokdoys. Can - 
traveL 277 0169. 

PARIS: 520 97 95 

BIR4GUAL YOUNG LADY 

PARS 704 SO 27 
VIP PA YOUNG LADY » 

MthinguaL 

VJA YOUNG LADY 
SofrintiaXad Eduaped, MuWngucri. 
WUBS 6TRAVHS: 553 62 62 _ 


P.O. Bear 1327. D-2B06 Syke. • 
W. Germany. Tet Q 4242-60458, 
60459, 60450. It 24109. 


PAHS INTI YOUNG LADY GUIDE. 
Begari, eduorXed, muk&igiid, for 
days & efinmn & travels pos ab le. 
Paris A Airports. 527 90 95. 


SERVICES 


MTBMATIONAL BB»yTIIUL|Boale 
U6L1D. USA & WORLDWIDE. Tek 
2127657793 / 7657794 


PAB5 527 OI 93 WL YCXMG IA0Y 
Why not aanrauncote mBi mm3 
tonguoBes oven if t howe to tiwwf 


Man & women g^dos, security 4 rert- 
irg cor seraiote, 8 am - 12 pm. 


757 62 48. Trustful ViP. lady, travel 


■zMtrtflir ’ if 1 1 mm 

SINGAPORE INTL GUIDES. Coir Sto- 
gapare 734 96 28. 

YOUNG LADY COKPAMOH Un- 
den/Haediraw. Tet 244 7671 

LONDON / HEATWOW OATWKX 
Ereut Service Tek 727 9858 

HONG KONG 3-471267 yourg bdy 
(Orienferi/Euraaea^ companion. 

SOUTH OF ISANCE Young bdy/mofa 
etenpraioni. Tet 193} 8519 90. 


NUNGUAL ASSISTANT to bums 
raeaaivet Porik 500 58 1 7 

TOKYO 645 2741. Tourtag & vhop- 
pwa grades interpretarv ate. 

fCW YORK EUROPEAN LADY 

cocnpraaoiL Tek (212] 679-5172 

QA mufetn^jd hcotasMs/guidet. Peril 
226 32 48TCre* enrdi amSed. 

HONG KONG Mi>3) 683379. Bau- 
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HONG KONG (K-3). 723-12-37. 
Young wTriferiaried catpraxon. 

Bflussas YOUNG LADY VJP. 
Companion Tek 344 08 90 

LONDON: FfBMOi LADY V* Osa- 
ka*. TcL- IK 01-723 0272 

BAVARIAN LADY, BILINGUAL PA 
Munch 089-3598914 

HAMBURG -YOUNG LADY compan- 
ion, muttXnguol. Tek 27 04 ML 

PARIS YOUNG LADY, tourist gukto. 
Tel: Pars BQ7 84 9S. 

747 59 SB TOUBST GUIDE. Aiipsrtt. 
7 am7 midnight IrtUraveL 

PARIS YOUNG LADY 341 21 71. 
VIP PA & bfaguoi interpreter. 

ATHB45. Lody oompenon and person- 
al acsstont Tek 8066194 

LOW COST FLIGHTS 

> i , /A i- f *. v J » 

TO USA FROM £119 one way. 
NATC London 01-734 8100. 

HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 

ALL-IN-ONE (with guidonce]. Burgrav- 
dy, Oxxnpqgne, le de France: Fufly 
eqrapped service flat* in a turd sotting 
to let by the week or month. Write 
YETABO DOMAIht Paly, 991 40 Part- 
nr-Yonne, France. 

HOTELS 

FRANCE 


„ 1 31). A trodteonal 19 

. renovtUed hotel in heart of Para. 


restaurant. 

75006. Tel (1) 544 38 10 


PRECIOUSSTONES 


ARTS 


BOOKS 


wnte or {tone: BOOK CALL, do 
New Carm Bookshop. 99 Bns St„ 
New Cirerei CT OWtt USA. 203- 
966-5470. Ma4 orders wekxxne. 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 

ESCORTS A GUIDES 

ESCORTS* GUIDES 

ESCORTS A GUIDES 

ESCORTS & GUIDES 

INTERNATIONAL 

LONDON 

ZURICH 

MBS SCANDINAVIA 

D06W4A JADE GBCVA Escort Ser- 
vice. Tek 022 / 31 26 71 

Copenhagen Escort Serviat 
Tek 01-5417 06, aedt rads 


ESCORT 

BQGRAVIA 

AIBQS ESCORT SBVKZ 

Engfah Esaxt Service toll/38 31 41. 

TEL 01/47 SS 82. 


MUMOL PRIVATE Escort Service. 
Tek 918132 ar 912314. 

SERVICE 

Td: 736 5877. 



USA & WORLDWIDE 

MADRID APPLE 

ESCORT SBVKS 
TH: 2503496. CRBXT CADS. 

AMSTBDAM JASMWE 

VMiA-DeSBH ESCORT Service. 
Tek 52-90355. 

Head office in New York 
330 W. 56tfi St, PLYX. 10019 USA 

212-765-7896 

212-765-7754 

MAJOR CREDIT CARDS AND 

LONDON 


CAROUNE ESCORT SBtVKE Tek 


Bneeek Befahim 322^67 45 29 

Portimm Escort Agency 


HANWURT SONIA BCORT Ser- 
vice. Tek 06968 34 42 

67 CWtani Rnrt, 
Leaden W1 

★ MADRID ★ 


FRANKFURT - GEM’S ESCORT Ser- 
vice 069/55 88 26. 

CHKXS ACCB’IED 

A 1 major era* artb accepted 

BRU55HS. CHANTAi ESCORT Ser- 

Private Mamfawrtiyr AvoUtle 


TASTE ESCORT SBVICE 


vice: Tek 02/520 23 65. 


Tek 411 72 57 

DOMMA. AMSTHDAM ESCORT 

been hotorad at Die top A mart 
mertodve Eisert Stmt fry 

LONDON 


Grade Service. Tek (020) 762842 

★ ZURICH* 

GMGSTS ESCORT SBtVKE. 
TH: 01/363 08 64 


ItMGWIRrSTAr BCORT Senico. 
Tek 069 / 2881-03. 

faduikiy radio and IV. 

BEST ESCORT SOVICE 
TH: 200 8585 

r-.: 

KAREN- FRANKFURT ESCORT Ser- 
vice. Tek 069/88 62 88 



MADRID. MARILYN Escort Service. 
Credit cards. Tek 4564187. 

REGENCY 



1 057/33 1874c 11=30 an-t pm & 6 pm 

LONDON 

SHF- AMSTERDAM 
Escort Service. 227837 


AMSTERDAM: CLASS Esasrt Service. 
Tek m 20-198758 

WORIDWDE MUU1UNGUAL 
ESCORT sraVKE 

NEW YORK OFHCE 

Tab 212-838-8027 
A 212-753-1864 

KH4SINGTON 


FRANKFURT ‘TOP TW Escort Ser- 
vice. 069/59-6052 

TO KB4SLNGTON CHURCH ST W8 
TH: 9379136 OR 937 9133 
AI mafor ae* are fa accepted. 

ROME CLUB EURON: ESCORT 
& Guide ServieeJek 06/589 2604-589 
1146 (from 4 pm to 10 pmj 


FRANKFURT AMNY ESCORT + trav- 
el service. Tek 069/5572-10 


LONDON LUCY ESCORT & Guide 
Service. Tek 01-373 am 

AR1STOCATS 

MIAMI, R. USA 
EXQUSTVE ESCORT SStVJCE 
Bat 520554 Mian. R. 331S2 


MUNICH tsars Escort + Glide 
Service. Tek 089/4486038 




MUMOf - NTHBMATK3NAL Sodrty 
Escort Service. 22 48 71 or 22 48 19 

* USA t TRANSWORLD 

128 Wgmore SL London W.l. 
AI moior Credtf Cards Accepted 
Tfi 437 47 41 / 4742 
12 noon - mi dnight 

CHaSEA ESCORT SBtVKE. 

51 Beouchanp Plane, London SVV3. 
Tek 01 584 6513/3’49 (4-12 pn^ 

RtANKFUlT AREA. SHERAZADPS 
Escort & Travel Service. 62 84 32 

RITA - FRAMOWtr Escort Service. 
Tek 069/560 12 29 

A-AMERICAN 

ESCORT SERVICE. 
EVBWWHKE YOU ARE OS GOL. 

1-813-921-7946 

Call free from U-5 j 1-800-237-0892 
Ccd Free From Florida 1-BD0-282089Z 
loweil Frntam wckarnes you bodd 


AMSTBDAM XANET Escort Service 



Tek (020) 326420 or 3401 10. 

LA VENTURA 

NEW YORK ESCORT SBIVICE 

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vre (0)20-255191 

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’j' 1 * JgggjiB 

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Service. 069/386441 & 089/3518226 

212-888-1666 

CHARLBE GBCVA 


MONTREAL CANADA. Enrts & 
Guides Service. Tek 514-934-0775. 



■ • if®' • r- k • TJ-.J- 

CAPRICE 
ESCORT SERVICE 

ZURICH 

CAROIME ESCOir SBmCE 
Tek 01/252 61 74 

Guide Sarvice. Tel: 283-397- 

r-l'vMnJmie 

NEW YORK OTY, MONWUEOrkli. 
■n. Beth Escort Service. 212897-1756. 

GBCVA -BBT 
ESCORT SBtVJCT 
TH: 022/29.13^4 

1 

?! 

I 

StOOOKXM Escort & Guide Service. 
Tek 683468 


MADR87 IMPACT ESCORT & Guide 

IN NEW YORK 


(i’Y r>77.1 RraMIBIBllBHl 

Service. MMngud. 26) 41 42 

ZURICH 

GBCVA - WELCOME 
MuHeniM Eicort-Goide 
Tek ST 35 93 68 


HOUAND-JB BCORT SBtVKE. 020- 
222785, 030-944530, 02997-3685. 

TEL 212-737 3291. 

Samantha'c &eort A Guide Service 
Tek 01/56 96 92 


LONDON TRUCK ESCORT Servico. 
Tek 01-373 8849. 

G8EVA - HBB4E ESCORT SSCYKB 
Tab 36 29 32 

flUUKFlIRr + SURROUNDINGS. 
GaroKne'i Escort & travel service. En- 
German spoken. TeL 

GBCVA HKST ESCORT SBtVKE 
Reeervafrom TRAVB/WSCBO 
4 SKI STATIONS. TH: 31 49 87 

lONDON ZOE WEST bcorr Agency | 
Tot 01-579 7556 1 

LOMTON GENE BCORT Service. 
Tek 370 7151. 

It" 

VIBMA VP ESCORT SBtVICE. Tek 
(V*nn^65 41 SB 


The Global Newspaper. 






















































Page 18 


a 


8 

B 

10 

ts 















24 

25 

26 


1 

30 



137 138 (39 


52 




1 

57~ 



■ 

58 

h“ 




83 

65 




w" 


ACROSS 


1 Cinches 
6 Rainwater 
pipe 

11 Almost a 


knight: Abbr. 
14 Soda pop in 


Boston 

15 One of the 
Keys 

16 Trifle 

17 De Sica’s 

“Yesterday, 
Today " 

19 Celestial 
dessert? 

20 Actor Turhan 


53 Take the 

lain 

54 Goal 

57 Outer: Comb, 
form 

58 Dali’s" of 

Memory’ ' 

02 Fire: Fr. 

63 Basilica area 

64 A de Mille 

65 Football pis. 

66 Cotton thread 

67 Good earth 


26 Kind of party 

27 Seats for tbe 
faithful 

28 Guidry stats. 

29 Carousing 
noisily 

32 C-l'-O.’s 
partner 


21 Domino or 
Waller 

22" Well...” 

23 Proust's 
"Remem- 
brance ” 

27 Scrutinizes 

30 Like some 
cookies 

31 Cupid 

32 Indian city 

33 "Honest” one 
36 Beckett classic 
4J Draft letters 

42 Young horse 

43 BartOk or 
Lugosi 

44 Kind of 
inflection 

46 Halts 

49 Dylan’s" 

Are 

A-Changin' " 
52 Achilles or 
Ajax 


DOWN 

1 Pierce 

2 "And Then 

There 
Were " 

3 Warhol or 
Williams 

4 Pendulum’s 
partner 

5 Routs 

0 Lazy arboreal 
dingers 

7 Iranian dialect 

8 Hockey great 

9 Actor Tognazri 

10 Haul 

11 Shore-front 
walkways 

12 Stains 

13 Pursuit 

18 The end, in 
chess 

22 Copy 

23 Eject 

24 NASA's "not 
ready” 

25 Ten of 
"Tootsie” 


34 Nut’s 
complement 

35 Airport abbrs. 
37 Province 

ceded to 
Morocco 


38 Linguist 
Chomsky 

39 Strang wind 


40” thy 

heart”: 
Emerson 
45 Ear: Comb. 
form 

48 Raiment 
47 Pi-sigma 
connectors 


48 Kind of library 

49 “Property is 


Proudhon 

50 Jinxed 

51 Rope fiber 

54 Henry VHTf 
second 

55 Some desserts 

56 Gob's meal 

58 Chum 

59 Yalie 

60 Wall St. abbr. 

61 Kind of trip 


© New York Times, edited, by Eugene Malabo. 

DENNIS THE MENACE 



‘OltJ txi MOTCEWVVE QOT BLESSED 
AFm THE 1306 WO THE CAT?' 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
by Henri Arnold and Bob Lee 


Unscramble these four Jumbles, 
one letter lo each square, to form 
four ordinary words. 


SUMIC 



TEABA 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1985 


PEANUTS 


^ i 




' l HAVeN" 
THOUGHT 0? 
FlFi IN 

v ieAE5 , 






i J&k 


BLONDIE 


WHYD vou 
CX2AG ft& -r 
IN HB3E ? ) 


‘ iT‘S AAV 

BB3UUM3 

3 U*CH 
A SPOT 


THIS IS SO WRE u * 
MV BOSS T WHY HE KES^S 
GETTING V 
Hr ( MCW3ESTOM ) 


I AT JO lOU'RE WHY 
HE GETS THOSE w- 
h-7 HEAQ60-GS } 


, LOOKS UKE THE 
> START OP A f— - 
| BBAUTIPUL J 

; FOIENOSHID \ . . 




V, 




r mi 





BEETLE BAILEY 


beetle! 

I TMOU6MT 
VOU WERE 
ON 

BIVOUAC £ 


Ml, BUNNY/ 

BARGE SENT 
ME TO TOWN 
FOR SUPPLIES 


x'll be With you in a \ 

FEW MINUTES. REMEMBER-] 
I PROMISED TO WRITE dfl 
YOU EVERY DAY 
YOU'RE ON BIYOUAC Sr * 





ANDY CAPP 


ASTOAN 


WHAT SHE THOUGHT 
HEf? HUSBAND'S 
CREDIT CARD WAS. 


MOYPLE 

E 

n iiFV V V” 

LXXJ 


Now arrange tire circled letters la 
form the surprise answer, bs sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


Yesterday’s 


{Answers tomorrow 

Jumbles: BROOK HAREM STODGY APIECE 
Answer Full of beans!— A POD 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 

HI 

c 

OH L 
F C 

ow 

F 


ASIA 

HU 

C 

CM 

F 

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c 

on 

P 





61 


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35 

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75 



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32 

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tl 13 

55 


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l« 

64 

14 

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0 



59 11 

52 

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ManHa 

35 

95 


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12 <13 

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0 

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22 

72 

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46 



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38 

■1 

30 

sw 


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Singapore 

29 

82 

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17 

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57 

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11 




fr 

Cojto Od Sol 
Dublin 

22 

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72 13 
36 -2 

55 

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cf 

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1 

34 4 

21 

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Algiers 

20 

68 

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Florence 


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77 

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Frankfurt 

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59 

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19 

66 

11 

52 

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London 

Madrid 

17 

63 S 

46 

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LATIN AMERICA 



Milan 

MOSCOW 

Munich 

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3 

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38 -1 
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16 -16 

30 

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sw 

Ir 

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Mexico cm 

27 

38 

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82 

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20 

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33 

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NORTH AMERICA 



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cl 

OCEANIA 





San Praadscg 
56alfle 

16 

61 

46 

8 

3 

46 

38 

PC 

PC 


77 

72 17 

63 

d 

Toronto 

0 

32 

■7 

19 

d 



n is 

64 

Cl 

VKoMogtaa 

B 

46 

•4 

71 

r 

m - cloudy, fglaguv; fr loir; ibhaii; 

D-avcrcml; pc parllv cloudy; 

r>rahi; 

ch-chawers; vi-snnw; M Mormy. 








FORECAST — 

CHANNEL: Sltohl. 

FRANKFURT: 

Fair 


31. LONDON: Fair. Temp 0 — - 

6 132 

-21) MADRID: 


-10 164 - 

-501. NEW YORK: Rain. Temp. 2— -2 136- 

-78). 


-6134-711. ROME: 

Overcast Ttma. 14— B 


. Temp. 22 — 9172 — 4Bt. ZURICH: Cloudy. Twrin. 


BANGKOK 

1: Feaav. Temo. 34 — 25 (93 — 77). HONG KONG: 



16 (64 — 521. 

MANILA: Fair. Temp. 32- 

23 

(90- 

-731. 



- 321 


Thwidorslai-rm. Trmo 

n r, in* - 7/1 

TOKYO-. Fouar. 







WHAT’S SHE 
LIKE, ANDY? 


DONTBEUKFTHAT. 
RUBE -HE'S JUST 
GOING OFF TO PLAY 
«■ SNOOKER... m 


I'LL FOP \ _ 
IN ON J z 

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SHFS EXTRBMEDY U7YALTO 
ME- BUT IT NEVB2 EXTENDS 
— r TOTRUSTINGf+Z , 


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WIZARD of ID 


this- m* wfe cft&L to m Kfee ! 





WHAT 

WOV& 

no? 


He twe him! 




REX MORGAN 


J vy^LL \ 

'{ THANKS AGAIN, MISS \ SEE / 
GALE' I'LL BE HERE VOU L 
\\ TOMORROW AT TWO? I THEN, MR. 


BISHOP.' 


I'M SORRY BUT 
MR. VON DALE IS 
NOT AT HOME' 
MAY I TAKE A 
MESSAGE? J 


NO, I 
GUESS 
NOT—, 


psmi 




m 


GARFIELD 


YOU'RC SHEPPIN& AGAIN. 
WHAT AM I SUPPOSED TO DO 
WITH ALL THIS CAT HAIR? > 


y KNIT THE U 
fwtlRLPS LARGEST! *} 
jL HAIRBALL jf \ n 


TRAPE IT WITH 
YOUR FRIENDS* 
START A v 
-T MUSTACHE J 
OS FACTORY / 


rHI5 IS GOING 
NOWHERE > 


INSULATE S 
VOOR HOUSE// 
FILTER VOOR ) 
„ COFFEE! r/ 




W>Hd Stock Markets 


Via Agence France-Presse* Feb. 12 

* Closing prices in local currencies unless otherwise indicated. 



Krupp Stahl 
Unde 
Lufthansa 
MAN 

Mtarmesmann 
Me ta neeseUschofl 
Muenc^Ruecfc 


RuatgerXWerte 

RWE 

Sehertop 

Siemens 

Thvwen 

Vorta 

Vubo 

VEW 

VMtmoMniMit 


m i» 

1SA10 157 SB 
7STJP 15* 
mseiasjo 
1170 1 ISO 
25120 255 

34*50 3S5 

16150 16130 
4*7 477 

SJTS4UD 
900 77 JO 
174 IN 

166 16760 

12170 123 

167 I9TJB 


C o n im onbanfc tett 
Previous : lliLM 


AEG-Telelurrten 

Allianz Von 

Bay 

Bayer 

Barer. Hv ob 

Barer. Ver Bank 

BMW 

Commerzticvdt 

Canliovmml 

Daimler-Benz 

Denussa 

Deutsche Babcock 

Deutsche Bonk 

Dresaier Bank 

DUB-Sctiulhe 

OHM 

Hochilel 

Hoechsi 

Koesdi 

Hoi imam 


Kali + Smz 
Kaniadl 

KOWhoZ 

KHD 

KUtckiw Werke 


109 JO 111 JO 
1025 1044 
Utt-W WJO 
WHO wuo 

314 317 

351 327 

155 358 

164 167 

117,69 13050 
67650 633 

363 US 
167 16950 
39650 404J0 
185JD 18850 
3O7J0 706 

15V IAZ50 
470 470 

186 189 JO 
10650 HUM 

an 391 

163 167 

369 37U0 
206 W 
30650 707 

730 351 

7a n 



Bk East Asia 
Cheung Kang 

. 24.10 
* 1170 

24i40 

1370 

China Light 



Cross Harbor 



Hang Seng Bar* 

<6.75 

41 

HK Electric 

7J0 

ITS 

HK Hotels 



HK Land 



HK Shanghai 

175 

M0 







Hutch Whampoa 

2030 

70 70 

Jgrdtne Main 

020 


-lor dine Sec 

8J25 


New World 

Si5 

555 

Show Bros 



SHK Prow 



51m* Darby 

6.90 

670 

Siefux 



Swire Pacific A 



Wheel Mar 



Wheeloc* 



Wlrnor 



World Inti 

1.98 

176 

Hong Sang index 
Previous : URN 

L3B37 




m\ 

AECI 

715 

715 

Barlows 

980 

975 

aiyvoor 

MTS 

MM 

BuHeh 

6300 

6300 

Elands 

1360 

1245 

GFSA 

2550 

2300 

Harmony 

2400 

2375 

KbiaS 


«7B 

Hefltxink 

975 


Psl Slcvn 

5150 

MOO 

Rusipiot 

1550 

1560 

SA Brews 

600 

595 


3000 

3000 

Satal 

575 

579 

Composite stock Index :9294fl 

Previous : *24.19 


AA Coro 

Aiiied-Lvom 

Amlp Am Cold 

Babcock 

bare tars 

Bow 

BAT. 

Bcccham 

BICC 

BL 

BOC Oroup 
Bool-. 

Bawdier IMn 
BP 


5I3VJ SIP-? 
174 175 


Mi no 

143 165 


619 637 

509 514 


375 381 

353 356 


77i 734 

555 541 


WO 198 

192 
114811 
79S 
240 
699 

427 435 

215 *W 

597 609 

177 U0 

254 258 

121 126 

413 470 

337 343 

679 697 

308 3(6 

140 175 

1« T9S 

19V. z S89Vj 

342 340 

554 562 

335 338 

37/64 49 5/64 
664 *47 

Z5 S* 

200 214 

513 S87 

460 463 

238 240 

439 449 

736 SO 

373 384 

144 


BOOKS 


DUNN'S CONUNDRUM 

By Sian Lee 338 pp. SI 5. 95. 

Harper & Row , 10 Easi 53d Street, 
iVen- York, .V. Y 10022. 

Reviewed by Les Whitten 

A T least since God in Genesis said he in- 
tended to blot out man and every creeping 
thing with a flood, the prospect of the apoca- 
lypse has thrilled and frightened us. 

Lately, the threat of Soviet- American or 
terrorist madness or catastrophic scientific 
blunder has spawned so many fictional finales 
for mankind dial a World’s End Literary Guild 
seems inevitable. 

“D un n’s Conundrum" would be a worthy 
first selecion for such a dub (one-year sub- 
scriptions only). It is plausibly backgrounded, 
suspenseful. swiftly plotted (in its last 100 
pages), tastefully erotic, pleasantly zany — a 
good, solid “what iT novel about nuclear ex- 
tinction. 

Whether these modest merits make it worthy 
of its selection by the Book-of-the-Montn 


It is no great revelation that men are cop 
rupted morally in direct proportion to their osfi 
of bad means to justify good ends. In Iherataft- 
Macbeth becomes Macbeth; in life, tin civi- 
lized leaders of 1914 became the disposers of 
phosgene and mustard gas. 

But author Stan Lee does a good job of 
reminding us. For Coohdge, the path ahm^ 
Washington’s Reflecting Pool is his toad tp‘ 
Damascus. He forsakes the Library, airf so&i'j 
its entire operation is dedicated to tmdingan/r- 
murdering him. Coolidge flees; m scenes with 
real snap, through Georgetown alleys, alcns 
Meirobus lines, on the Batway. „ 

And here, at last, “Dunn's Commdntm” . 
earns part of its keep. There is no putting ft 
down until we find oat exactly bow. the Gart»T. 
geman trashes the nudear button-pushers. " 


•• ' 


Les Whitten, author of U A 'Killing Pace,* 
wrote this review for The Washington Post 


dub, however, or its 60,000-copy first print- 
ing, 575,000 ad campaign and S25o,000 paper- 
back floor is debatable. 


BEST SELLERS 


The Hem l'oftTtms 


back floor is debatable. 

Many readers may leave it as I did. with the 
feeling that they had undergone this particular 
end of tbe world before: For all its intense 
doomsaying, it has no slicking power: One 
feels the world may yet have a season or two 
before the end. 

The Harry Dunn of the title is the head of 
The library, an American intelligence agency 
that gets information from everywhere — the 
CIA, FBL NSA, even the KGB, the whole 
alphabet soup of snoopery, plus its own effi- 
cient electronic surveillances. 

It can tone in on Washington's bars, file 
cabinets, parks, even on the bedrooms of the 
Libra rians, as the officials of the agency are 
called. Tbe library forgives all transgressions 
(and it spots somedoozies in the boudoirs of its 
own officials) except for disloyalty. 

Using this total information web, Dunn con- 
cludes that the United States can win a nuclear 
war with “only" 20 minion American dead. We 
may even get out scot-free if the Soviets realize 
they cannot win and buckle. 

Enter the hero, Walter Coobdge. one of the 
Librarians, a brilliant, somewhat daffy expert 
on garhagp analysis, for each Librarian has one 
preeminent intelligence skill. Coohdge, called 
the Garbageman by his colleagues, is assigned 
by Dunn to find a traitor in the Library. 

Coolidge discovers not only the mole but 
also that some political, shortsighted, stubborn 
and powerful men are probably going to de- 
stroy m ankin d. 


Thi* list is based on reports from sore ihu2Jjmbodk3toAir 
thmigbooi the Umied Sum. Week* on fist uenof neoSwfi^ 

«wwnirivE — 



IF TOMORROW COMES, by Sidney “V 

Sheldon — I ■< ’l 

THE SICILIAN, by Mario Pmo- 'j 2 2* 

THE TALISMAN, by Stephen King and V ' -W 

Peter Stianb /a . ' .-.- -J-.- lfr 

SO LONG. AND THANKS FOR ALL';? -. r 


i ~&sEr 


THE FISH, by Douglas Adams ' — .r/ "4 !> 

THE UFE AND HARD TIMES OF HEI- - : : 


DIABROMOWnz. by loan Rives . 
ILLUSIONS OF LOVt by Cynthia Free-' ' r *; . A 

man - — ' -Lii : k 

L OVE A ND WAR. bv John Jakes 

gi f t L t i pi ir. DCnnlina k., Tmm tr«ii' , 'j 


8 JITTERBUG PERFUME, by TamJW : .. . _ ^ 

bins i — : — U &. - *^i >•>' 

<J THE FOURTH PROTOCOL, by Freda- . if .=? ' 

ick Forsvtb —i ' V SStegK) 

»Klr» t iruvc nc t he n im >» ■ : -w - 



ick Forsvtb — -i—t - — » 

"... AND LADIES OF THE CLUB, by 

Helen Hamm Santmyer 

LIFE ITS OWN SELF, by Dan Jenlrint — 


II LIFE ITS OWNSELF. by Dan 
L! MOSCOW RULES, bv Robot 
13 STRONG MEDICINE bv An! 


i2 1 “ 

-*\W 


NONFICTION 


IACOCCA: An Auiobiomphy. by Lee In* 
cocca with William Novak . 


cocca with WtHiam Novak . 

LOVING EACH OTHER, by Leo Bnrag- 

ha 


CITIZEN HUGHES, by hfidud Orman 
THE BRIDGE ACROSS FOREVER, by 




r pi- 


Richard Bacfa 


5 “THE GOOD WAR." by Studs Teritd 

6 SON OF THE MORNING STAR, by 


Evan S. CooneD 

DR. BURNS' PRESCRIPTION FOR 


HAPPINESS, bv George Bums 

* PIECES OF MV MIND, by Andrew A. 


Solution to Previous Puzzle 


□E3QC1S OHE30 BE1QCJ 
edqdo □□□□ naan 
□naQaaGiaaoaQaaa 
dbd sea □□ naano 

DCQcaQaaBoaa 

□□□ □□□□□□ 
iBGana aana ana 
EDooaaaacifaaaaHa 
pda nnaa aanoa 
□EHDBQQ oaa 

ciaoaaaHaaaaa 
BOHnia aaaa nnH 
pGaDanaaaaaaaaa 
[hbhq naaa aaana 
□BH0 aaaa □□□□□ 


9 MOSS THE KITTEN, bv James Heniot 

10 A LIGHT IN THE ATTIC, by Shel Silvef- 

sicin — 

1 1 HEY. WAIT A MINUTE. I WROTE A 

BOOK, try John Madde n wfth Dave Ander- 
son 

12 ELVIS IS DEAD AND I DON'T FEEL 
SO WELL MYSELF, by Lewis Grizzani 

13 THE BRAIN, bv Richard M.^ ^ Resale __ 


3 2Z ... . . . ' *-• 

8 fl 6 ^ OTh -* 1 ^ *’ sn 


14 HERITAGE, by Abba Ebon 

15 ONE WRITER'S BEGINNING, by En- 


dora Weliy 15 

ADVICE, HOW-TO AND MISCELLANEOUS 
WOMEN COMMING OF AGE by Jane 


Fonda with Micnon McCarthy 
NOTHING DOWN, by Robert < 


_ . by Robert G ADen 

WHAT THEY DON'T TEACH YOU AT 
HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL by 

Mart H. McCormack 

THE ONE MINUTE SALESPERSON, by 
Spencer Johnson and Larry Wilson _ — 
WEIGHT WATCHERS QUICK START 
PROGRAM, by Jean Nidetch 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 


O N the diagramed deal the 
North-South team gained 


North-South team gained 
a slam swing. The opening no- 
trump was the weak variety, 
and South's two diamonds was 
a “forcing S layman." Two no- 
trump was a reauest for more 
information, and the later four 
diamond bid showed a spade 
fit and maximum values. 

The declarer had no trouble 
after the lead of the diamond 
jack. He took the king and the 
ace. then ruffed 3 diamond 
with the spade eight. He sur- 
rendered a club, and could not 
be prevented from ruffing bis 
last diamond with the spade 


king and drawing trumps to 
make the slam. 

The post-mortem focused 
on this question: Would the 
slam have been beaten if West 
had led his singleton trump? 
This would certainly have 
made it harder to maneuver 
cwo diamond ruffs, and if 
South had attempted that he 
would eventually have been 
able to ruff a heart. 

But North might well have 


NORTH CD) 
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WEST 

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HAST - 
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won in dummy and led a club. 
This would allow East to win 


SOUTH 
* AQJlIt 
9Q87 
6 61016 
*8 


and play a second tramp, but it 
would leave the declarer with 
many chances. As the cards lie. 
be would have taken one dia- 
mond ruff and eventually 
squeezed West in die red suits. 


Netthar ante waa vmmbta. Hr 
bkkfimn . -* 

North Bart Ml Vtrt : 

IN.T. 3 9 Part -C 

3 o Pa m 3 N.T. Fa «. .. 

8 * Pm 3 * 

4 9 pm 14 

Pm Pm 



BcosJnod 
Cow Sterooe 

oas 

Fn»rtNoove 
How Par 
Inchcope 
Knwel Ship 
Mol Bonking 
OCBC 
POS . 

StfflbShlPvard 
Skne Dorrjy 
S Steam »Wp 
S t Treaino 
UOB 


Sfr kholm 


AGA 

Alfa Laval 

Asco 

A5lra 

Allas Copco 
nalbSen 


Aka) 

455 

470 



689 




Bonk ol Tokyo 

610 

610 

Brklgeslone 

S29 

5S 

Canon 

1370 

1380 

Oai Nippon PrW 

931 

Ml 

Dahua House 

54Q 

535 

Full Bank 

1330 

1330 







HltoqW 

851 

lit 

Honao 

1440 

1410 

1HI 

145 

147 

Ugh 

329 

335 

Jacen Air Lines 

5206 

51W 


270 

270 


1270 

1290 


825 

BIS 

Kawasaki Steel 

145 

145 

Kirin Brewery 


VM 



Lloyd’s Reprimands an Underwriter 


Hasten 

LONDON — Lloyd s of London 
has reprimanded an underwriter. 
Ian Piisgatc and his deputy. Mark 
Den by. after a disciplinary com- 
mittee found them guilty of gross 
negligence, Lloyd's chief executive. 
Ian Davison, announced Tuesday. 

In a statement Issued by Lloyd's. 
Mr. Davison said the two men aet- 



aonk Leu 
Brown Bovorl 
ClbQ C*iov 
Credit Suisse 
Eloctrowott 
Gears Etsrtw 
Jacob Suchard 

J nmol I 

Landis Gvr 

NMIIO 

Ocrllkon-B 

Rocf wflabv 

Sondaz 

Schindler 

Sulur 

SBC 

Swtssolr 
Swiss VoUubonk 
Union Bank 
wlntipihur 
Zurich ins 


SBC Index : 42610 
Prevtom : 4Ji» 


HA: net quoted; IJA: W 
available; «; m*-OI eldeiM. 


ed wrongfully and improperly. 

The disciplinary hearing cen- 
tered on irregularities in transac- 
tions between insurance syndicates 
(hat Mr. Progate headed at Alexan- 
der Howden Lld„ now owned by 
Alexander & Alexander Services 
Ltd. of the United States, and those 
managed by his own company. 
Posgaic & EVnhv Agencies Lid. 


























■. I . 







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- TT '" 


v?J 7'^^" -*" 1 


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>rz .■; |*a I*®*- 

’ r - , ;■ For Q^O«j ^ hatrnOBonal Herald Trtbnke 

-V ' u.^seiSk s?DNiX)N — SoccexVindiffer- 
r; _'■>!' p to the world in which it rightly 

-ns C4~^a^Mh.m to be the most widespread 
-r~ ^a^^rtixig phenomenon was spelled 
C'J^- G&lL^/for me last weekend in capital 




‘/ter reading in 


jj -_ _ CI^%wi^Elbw|»am from Sunday’s 
. /•"ft. nar game in Indianapolis, I 

‘ ’ v *-a» > f “$ .id FlFA'teadquaitere in Zurich 
rf "5bSsk what plans soccer’s ruling 



CVTERNATTONAJL HERALD TRBOTJNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 198% 

SPORTS - 


- r ~ ^sebio: Atfstingmsbedsoii 
-;-.rp FIFA’s ‘football family.* 


body had to support African fam- 
ine relief. 

Two days later came the stark 
telexed reply from Scpp Blatter, the 
genera) secretary: “NO PLANS. IT 
IS NOT FIFA’S DUTY TO EN- 
TER THIS MATTER." 

Duty? Of course there's, no duty 
— except insofar as Alex English, 
the Denver forward who organized 

Rqb Hughes 

basketball’s donation, felt that 
sport has some land oTa duty with- 
in the human race. 

English, being blade and able to 
recall days m South Carolina when 
his belly was raidy full possibly 
sees humanity in a different light 
from Blatter, whose Swiss training 
in business administration and eco- 
nomics doubtless helps FIFA effi- 
ciently marshal its mulrimfllion 
dollar annual turnover. 

Even so, given BUttsYs diploma 
from the Swiss Society of Public 
Relations, his dismissive attempt to 
shrug off the most emotive honor 
of the television age is alarming If 
US. professional basketball, with 
no obvious African connection, 
and if Band Aid and other rode 
performers see h as their business 
to do something, why should FIFA 
be so unfedingj? 

Africa, after all, is a member of 
FIFA’s “football family." The con- 
tinent produced Eusebio, one of 
the spoils most electrifying talents 
who, as “The Blade Panther,'* was 
plucked out of poverty miourenco 
Marques, then in Portuguese East 
Africa, to enhance Portugal's na- 
tional ride in the 1960s. 

Between Eusebio and English 
there are high-boned facial resem- 
blances: Between Eusebio's Afri- 
can brethren and FIFA there are 42 
of the sport's 151 member nations 
and - some half-million registered 
players, some of whom just might 
be among 140 million people in 20 
countries suffering drought on that 
- continent. - 

Hurd World votes put Matter's 
boss, the Brazilian lawyer Jofio Ha- 
vclange, into power as FIFA presi- 
dent, die wood's morn, influential 
single-sport office. 


Havdange never forgets it No 
statesman ever touched so many 
Third World capitals as ha He re- 
pays them by enlarging the World 
Cup to acc omm odate more final , 
ists and, via FIFA/ Grca-Ctda, cru- 
sades to develop soccer among the 


For 10 years, his speeches have' 
repeated the message that soccer 
“is more than just a game. It forms 
an important part of our socie- 
ty. . . a universal language 
the peoples in order to calm spirits , 
and for the weU-bdng of mankind. " 

One foe all and all for one.” 

We are listening, Mr. President. 
We read you wdL 

What puzzled our Third World 
sporting brothers was FIFA’s sus- 
pension (for nonpayment of sub- 
scriptions) of fivenard-pressed na- 
tional associations — those of 
Afghanistan, the Central African 
Republic,' the Dominican Repub- 
lic, Niger and Sierra Leone —at a 
time when their finangal priorities 
could not be more obvious. 

Painful, too, may. be your boast, 
in the same FIFA News, issued last 
week, of what super salesmen you 
are for Coke. “FIFA Partner Coca- 
Cola Starting Sales in the Soviet 
Union,” reads your official head- 
line. 

“The Coca-Cola company's 
partnership with FIFA has this 
year opened them one of the 
world's greatest markets. Due to 
the transfer of the staging of the 
FIFA/ Coca-Cola Cup— World 
Youth Championship to the Soviet 
Union, the company’s represen ta- 
tives and the competent Soviet au- 
thorities have reached agreement 
on the sale of the world’s most 



Jo3o Havdange, president of FIFA 


papular soft drink." 
The taps will ope 


The taps will open to the Soviet 
Union's 275 rafllton inhabitants as 
of Day 1 of the tournament next 
August 

What with that championship 
and the new under- 16 world tour- 
nament in fTii»i*i also in August 
and the World Cup in Mexico a 
year away, FIFA's administrative 
hands certainly are as full these 
days as African stomachs are emp- 

ty- 

There isn't time to speculate 


what a tiny percenias: of FIFA's 
television fees for those tourna- 
ments could do in Sudan mid Ethi- 
opia. And I hesitate to suggest what 
a dollar-a-head levy among FIFA's 
40 million registered players might 
bring in. 

Bat given the will with which 
FIFA used to support UNICEF 
games, a mini bn could promptly be 
raised. Take, say. five venues — 
Naples, Mexico City, Rio de Janei- 
ro, Paris and Manchester, and take 
a sprinkling of modem stars 
against recently retired (for exam- 
ples. Eusebio, Bobby Chariton, 
Pelt, Franz Beckenbauer, Paul 
Breitner, Kerin Keegan, all of 
whom contributed to FIFA's 80th 
birthday celebration last year) — 
you’d hit the jackpot 

Ta ke N ew York, where the last 
UNICEF match in 1982 packed in 
77,000 customers. Take Japan, 
headquarters to five of FIFA's pri- 
mary eight sponsors, and profit is 
assured. Or take Italy alone. A 
cheeky suggestion to bring Turin's 


Lewis Weathering Grind of Stardom 


house down is to pit an all-star 
team selected by film director 
Franco Zefftrdli against the Juven- 
ilis he so passionately loves and 
hates. 

More likely, to wring manna 
from international TV, why not 
Italian-based Brazilians against the 
rest in Italian exile? Zico, Socrates, 
Fakao, Junior & Co. against Diego 
Maradona, Tony Hateley, Iiam 
Brady, Kari-Hemz Rummenigge. 
eta, - on one of those weekends 
when league soccer in Italy stops 
while the national Azzuri warms up 
for a friendly? 

Setting the ball rolling requires 
less a sense oT duty than an applica- 
tion of wilL 

Alex English put it In poetry: 

Third World people must be given 
thar chance 

Third World people need our help- 
ing hand 

Third World people are God’s 
children too 

So ha’kjobi hands with them and 
start anew. . 


By Frank Li tsky 
Hew York Tima St nf re 

EAST RUTHERFORD, New 
Jersey — It's not always easy being 
Cad Lewis. When yew wm four 
cold medals in one Olympic 
Gaines, the money is rood, the rec- 
ognition is great and die honors 

flow. Celebrity has advantages; tts 

^Witness Lewis^raent schedule: 

Saturday, Feb. 2 — Wins the 60- 
yard dash ax an indoor meet in 
Dallas in 6.10 seconds. Sunday, 
Feb. 3 — Flies home to Houston to 
train. Monday, Feb. 4 ■ — Flies to 
Portland, Oregon, to. receive the 
Prefontaine Award as America’s 
outstanding trade and fidd athlete 
or 1984. Tuesday, Feb. 5 — Flies 
home to Houston to train. Wetfaes- 
day,Feh,6 — Flies to New Yoik to 
receive dm Jesse Owens Interna- 
tional Amateur Athlete Award. 

Thursday, Feb. 7— Flies to Los 
Angeles, arriving at 5 AM. Friday, 
Feb. 8 — Wins me longjump at 27 
feet 1% inches (8.27 meters) at The 
Los Angeles Times meet Saturday, 
Feb. 9 — Fins to New York, arriv- 
ing at 5:45 PM. Wins the 55-meter 
dash in 6.1S seconds at the Ui 
Olympic Invitational in East Ruth- 
erford 1 Sunday, Feb. 10 — Sleeps 
late. Monday, Feb. 11 — Flies to 
Buffalo to receive the Dunlop 
Award. 

And on and on. 

At 23, Lewis is young enough to 
endure the travel and the demands 
on his time. He is also young 
enough to enjoy it aH 

There was plenty to enjoy Satur- 
day night at Byrne Meadowlands 
Arena. Within 22 minutes, he won 
his race, received the Vitalis Award 
for Spans Excellence and sang the 
national anthem over the public- 
address system. 

“I haven’t won a sprint in New 
Jersey before," said the native of 
Wiilingboro, New Jersey, “so that 
was good. The award is important 
because alot is involved. And I fed 
good about the national anthem 
because it is something I like to do. 
It's the first rim* I’ve done that” 

Lewis has taken acting and ring- 
ing lessons, and he made a record 


last year. He said be learned 10 
seconds before he sang the national 
anthem that there would be no mu- 
sk to accompany him. His voice 
was pleasant and every note 
seemed on key. 

There are many stories erf singers 
who have forgotten the words to 
the national anthem. He said he 
was a fittie nervous before sin g in g , 
but more nervous before his race. 

“I thought I ran a technically 
good race," said Lewis. “I was real- 
ly pleased with the indoor season. 
It’s the first rime I’ve gone unde- 
feated indoors.*' The abbreviated 
season consisted of four meets — 
sprints here and in Dallas and long 
jumps at die Wanamaker MQlrose 
Games and in Los Angdes. Now 
Lewis faces six weeks of training 
before he starts his outdoor season 
with April meets in Phoenix; El 
Paso and Walnut, California. 


Hi s outdoor gfwl 8 are to improve 
career, bests in his three individual 
events — the 100- and 200-meter 
dashes arid the long jump. He is 
history’s Second-longest in the Jong, 
jump, second-fastest at 200 meters 
end fourthrfastest at 100. 

. For years, be has threatened Bob 
Beamon’s hallowed long jump re- 
cord of 29 feet 2 15 inches. He has 
jumped 28-1054. 

“It doesn't bother me that I don't, 
have the world record,” he said. “1 
think that if die record is to come, it 
will come: I just want to set a per- 
sonal record this year, and 1 know 
that this year won’t be as hectic as 
lastyear. 

Things are looking up for Lewis. 
Sin g in g the national anthem before 
14,833 spectators was a break- 
through of sorts. “1 didn't ring in 
high school,” he said. “I was too 
shy. I was scared. Not anymore." 


Olympic Officials Displeased 
At USOCs Vetoing Rebates 


Lee Angela Times Service 
LOS ANGELES — Los Angeles 
Olympic Organizing Committee 
President Peter Ueberroth and In- 
ternational Olympic Committee 
President Juan Antonio Samar- 
anch expressed displeasure Mar- 
day at the U.S. Olympic Commit- 
tee’s veto of their proposal to use S7 
mjlfion in surplus Qlynqac funds to 
foreign Olympic com- 
mittees for their housing costs at 
the 1984 Games. 

Before an LAOOC executive 

ject, c^roum^^^ffren said 
that the unanimous USOC veto 
had effectively killed the proposed 
cash reimbursements. 

Ueberroth, now baseball com- 
missxoner but still retaining his title 
as president of the LAOOC, said 
from New Yak, *Tm just disap- 
pointed. I wanted each conn try to 
be able to say it was our guest at the 
Games. They helped us so much in 
our time of crisis [with the Soviet 
boycott] that to refund their pay- 


ments to us would be the right 
thing to da... I still fed this is 
right very strongly. But it's up to 
the LAOOC and USOC boards.” ' 

Samaranch, in Lausanne, Swit- 
zerland, dismissed as unsatisfac- 
tory the USOCs proposed alterna- 
tive of a “friendship" program of 
exchanges and assistance for US. 
and foreign athletes. 

The IOC president also took ex- 
ception to suggestions at Sunday’s 
USOC debate that the rrimbune- 
ments would have mainly consti- 
tuted a giveaway to rich Olympic 
committees. One speaker had not- * 
ed that S55&JXX) of tbe $7 million 
would have gone to West Germany 
and 5458,000 to Canada. 

“I can assure you that the na- 
tional Olympic committee in West 
Germany is not very rich," Samar- 
anch declared, “and that many oth- 
ers are not very rich. It’s very dear 
that the IOC wanted this money to 
go to the national Olympic com- ' 
mittecs. If the USOC thinks that’s 
wrong, well, that’s up to them.” 


: . V '-':X 


fUL AVrStar Game Showcases Youth 




- — 1 By Robert Fachet 

«!£££, . .-^ashingion Pptit Service 

r : : i ALGAR.Y, Alberta — Tuesday 
- -ht’s 37th National Hockey 

. . ,■ .' . 1 l-~- Tgue aft-star game was to offer 
■ : :* ■-.i.fjl.ber evidence' thpt hockey is a 
--- - -xl for young legs. _ • 

; ' ' . 2 -lately two of the game's 40 play- 
• ' ^-.^rMaroipionrieofl^AMdes 
-- -i Anders Hedberg of die New 

* Raneerfr meoper than 28- 

ee men — Buffalo goaltenoer 
L n Barrasso, Pittsburgh center . 

Ij rio Lemieux and New Jersey . 

terKhk Muller— arel9. Kevin 

sore, the eldest of eight Edmonton 


!j*resentatrves, is 


- :“X remember the guys I played 
with' my first year and now they’re 
all different guys,” said Gretzky, 
who recently turned 24. “I remem- 
ber being 19 and playing with guys 
28 and 29/ Now there are other 
•grrys 18 and 19 : here, but there 
aren’t many 28 and 29.” • 

'• Grettky was to be the game’s 
focal print His four goals m one 
period in 1983 rank as the top. 
■ HLiu e vtairenriii all-sbu liistuiy a nd" 
keyed ope of -only twovictones by. 
the Campbell Conference in nine 
games turner the current format. 

- “We want to win, of course,” 
Gretzky sard. “We have a lot of 


■v. h his fifth all-star appearance, 
*- r i Langway, 27, ‘is one of tbe 
sr statesmen: The other Wash- 
Ion repre se nta ti ves are Mike 
.Ytner, 25, who played in the 1981 ■ 
and first-time all-stars Bob 
penter, 21; and Scott Stevens, 

c. 

•firt was to be Waybe Grwzky’s 
. J;± NHL aDkstar game (after one 
ii jearance in the cad World Hock- 
jAssodation contestX and the 
k "Wnton center noted the change 
maud;' 


pride arid we warn to do om best 
But we also want to, enjoy it and 
have fun. Ibat’s ridrat it’s all about. 


We do tryafew mare fancy things 
than in a regular game. That comes 
from no body contact,” 

For a defensive specialist like 
LaPgway, the idea is to keep from 
making adaring mistake. 

’ “An all-star game is a relaxed 
type of feeKng.” he said. “You try 
not to be embarrassed. You make 
the easy play and give the puck to 


players who are more adept at that 
style. If I were playing with 


Gretzky Fd give it to him 80 per- 
cent of the rime, " 

Any adjustment would be diffi- 
cult for Stevens, whose natural in- 
stinct is to hammer whatever puck 
carrier heads his way. “I can’t 
change my style,” Stevens said. “If 
I tried, Fdjust get bunted. FU still 
take tbe body and play aggressive- 
ly. But I certainly won’t try to run 
at anyb ody. _ 

“I couldn't do that here anyway. 
There are so many good guys that if 
you took a run at them, you’d look 
riBy. Try to run Gretzky — hell 
stop and start and wave goodbye” 

Providing a showcase for swift, 
high-scoring forwards, the game 
promised a difficult time for goal- 
tenders. Philadelphia’s Pdle Lind- 
bergh, back fa a second try after 
being blitzed by Gretzky in 1983, 
had a tough time the rest of that 
season. 

“It's offense-oriented, of 
couree,” Barrasso said. “There axe 
enough quality defensemen that if 
the game had a team meaning, it 
wouldn’t be any problem. But a 
defenseman doesn’t want to go out 
and block a shot and get hurt,” 


Hockey 


NHL Leaders 


National Hockey Lamm toadtri ttmMvft 

Fob.*: 

OFFENSE 
■ OwaH 



5 


.fSP* 4 

'.wSgl 


sei\ST‘ 

Sgfr 

m 



-;w, -- '•"■--ftr 


■ 

■ 








^riilfaffi^delenseiiian Scott Stereos warmed op for Ms first all-star game (1 can’t change 
stffl take tbe body and play aggressively’) with a typically busy weekend. A 
^tg^wdiby Gri Mofcosak of Los Angdes decked bum Friday night (above), but 24 hours 
riiiisdef^i daeck left Ptifladelphia’s Dave Brown mmas footing, helmet and one glove. 


•-=f ■ r > ‘ 



Gmtztcv. Edmonton 
Kurrt, Edmonton 
Bossy. N.YJ. 

Hmmrchuk. Winnipeg 
Dioan#, Ln» Angelas 
ajsutter, M.V.I. 

MocLaan. V Wn n l pee - - 
NkNoU% Lot Angeles 
Nilsson. Cotgmy 
CoHev, Edm ont o n 
Gortner. wasMnaSon 
SovonL Chicago 
Tanein. nlyx 
Federtco. srjLouis 
Kerr. PWtodrtphla 
Coraanter, Wh it Un gl on 
OgnuWck. Detroit 
Krwtetwskl. Ednanton 
PJlwnr. OaatMC 
Taylor, Las A n oe l en 
Fax. Lot Angeles 


OAF Mm Me 

« Komgpu 

52 si IBS 23 (taw j, 

« * ” ” JOOTCVk 

36 51 M TO EiW 

33 55 » 34 

M W B » Birnmarc 

31 4» BO 35-r 'fester 

»■«!!« SL Croix 


Metaman 

Sonde 

Mtae et e t n (4) 

Hanlon 

vonMesbraack 
N.V. Rangers (4) 
Low 
Resell 
Kotnppurl 
Mew Jersey CO 
Janecvk 
Eliot 

Las Angeles (41 
Bernh ar dt 


Basketball 

o National Basketball Association Leaders 


M5S 222 1 3J7 
isn ill oiw 
MB0 112 1 4X0 
1357 227 I 4J4 
*53 SB I 165 
14K5 120 0 IBB 
412 37 0 539 
3321 «« 1 4J4 

Tim 139 1 3J4 


N ot iona l BaakettaH Anedatioa leader s New Jersey 
meugh FaA. W: Phoenix 

TEAM OFFENSE Bosfcm 


37 40 77 45 
21 4B 74 12 

21 55 76 » 
35 » 74 45 
29 45 74 34 
29 45 74 71 

22 52 74 21 
43 29 72 31 
41 : 31 71 61 
3* ' 35 '71 16 
34 33 49 52 

23 46 49 19 
31 37 *1 IM 
23 45 41 ID 


Wreggett 
Toronto (SI 
Hayward 
Holden 
BeArend 
Ma im (a 
Mio 
Slrtan 
Mlcolef 
; Detroit (41' 
StaniowsM 
Milton 
Weeks 
Hartford (1) 
Romano 
Dion 


M21 237 1 4.14 

U54 71 0 339 
03 43 1 4JN 

« 0 454 gig - 

»»*» >«i 

Z221 151 0 4.1* ^on 

1JU1 77 I 449 
1442 249 1 432 

376 27 0 4J 1 
1500 HD D 432 



G 

PL 

Avg 

New York 

51 

5481 

Denver 

SI 

6047 

11X6 

Chicago 

49 

SHI 

Detroit 

49 

5711 

1164 

Atlanta 

58 

5429 

San Antonio 

58 

5775 

115* 

LA. Lakers 

51 

5555 

Boston 

50 

5742 

114* 

la. CUppers 

58 

5650 

Portland 

58 

5738 

114* 

Utah 

SB 

ym 

LA. Lidiers 

SI 

5836 

1M4 

Ctavetond 

49 

5462 

Kansas Cbv 

49 

5541 

11X5 

Portland 

50 

562) 

PMtodatohla 

• • 49— 

-*4W— 

~m*— Patraw . 

*•- 49 

5514 


COALTENDING Romano 

(EmoHMiet goats hi parentheses) Dton 

MP CA SO Avg Herron 
Barrasso 2343 97 4 248 Wtlsle 

Sauve 195 47 0 XU BfWMw 

Clovtier 65 4 0 359 Loprlcc 

Buffalo (<) X383 152 4 174 Garrett 

RlBBln 2441 111 2173 . VOnoN 

* 441 31 1 251 ’ 

n 301 14 0 XU 

iMnetaa (5> 3487 US 11*7 I 

e 484 17 0 X11 I 

erWJ 7J35 143 T XU I 

n 60 7 0 7*0 

ddMohta O) 3379 178 1 331 

1*37 77 1 X81 
1*54 106 1 341 


2411 2S 1 449 
20 1 0 3*0 

2*3* 181 1 4» 
670 50 0 £19 
MM Ml 1 U 
1*25 84 1 411 


W a shington 
UA. Cl loners 
New York 
Seatiie 


1094 Indiana 
10X7 San Antonio 
10X1 GoWen State 
10X0 Denver 
107* Kansas CHy 
1074 — 

1074 
107* 

104* KtaXIXY. 

106.1 Short. G*. 
10U English. Den. 
105* Jordan, QiL 


SOORJMO 

G FG FT PIS Avg 
35 420 2S1 W91 313 

47 498 2*1 1305 Z7J 

51 574 3*7 1400 27* 

49 497 347 1345 274 


TEAM DEFENSE 


s ss U.S. College Scores 


Freese 

Lindbergh 


553 43 

0 447 


• G 

NO. 

Avg 

EAST 

1*73 10B 

0472 

Milwaukee 

51 

5185 

1B1J 

Allred 74. Butfato 69 

8151 SJI 

1 4*1 

Seattle 

51 

5271 

104 

Conlslus 9a Maine 71 

XM8 1S9 

0 45) 

WuNilngten 

52 

5446 

1047 

Chevmry 98 Lincoln 62 

MB 85 

B5*a 

Houston 

49 

5715 

1064 

Concord 86, W. virglnto St SX OT 

407 44 

8 6*1 

Dallas 

» 

5333 

1067 

Drexel 78 Hofetra 66 

3*71 291 

8 5*2 

. PhJkXtotohk. 

49 

5233 

106* 

Fairmont SL 78 W. Virginia Tech 62 


Fuhr and Moan shared shutout Jan. X 


Edmonton (2) 
Penney 
Soefocrt 
Montreal (41 
Bouchard 
GtnsdKi 
Sevtany 
Quebec O) 
Peelers 
Syhfestrt 
Koons 
Dasfcatakls 
Boston CB 
Hehu 
WamsHV 
■Jut 

SL LOaiS ai 
SkorodensU 
Bamernusi 
Chicago 14) 

Hrudev 
Smith 
Mela n son 
N.Y. Monde rs 
Lomenn 


3*91 IE 33*7 
2*79 120- 1 Xli 
1.145 63 0 X30 
34M 187 >121 

1490 02 0 338 
1 JS5 82 0 X63 
S59 34 1 345 
3412 199 1 XM 

3*48 123 0 3*8 
102 6 0 3*3 
891 S3 0 3*7 
144 14 0 5.12 
MS 19* • 3*1 

TO 3 0 257 
1*32 88 0 X45 
1409 107 1X00 
3*91 2 91 1 364 

m 50 1 X30 
2493 161 0 3*7 
3*n ns 1 3*2 
L7tJ 98 3 X43 
1,194 82 0 *X2 
425 35 0 4*1 
3*12 715 2X87 

2192 ns 9 3*3 
1*10 w 0 441 
2*1298 8 XM 

1*12 76 0 370 
1*65 82 1 3*9 


Geneva 46. Houghton 6* 

Georg et own 57. vtUanava 58 
Hortwtck 37, union 54 

TrQltflltlATI Hunter 55. MisMittGnvIlle 51 

J. J, OIIBIWUU Kean 87, w. Connecticut 76 

* — ■ ■ l n. OaraOna AXT 57. Md-E*lwre 5X OT 

BASEBALL ner and Dewavne Walker, defensive backs: New England CnL 6X Hawttwrne 62 

Ameriaoi League Mlkn CUartano and Oliver WUNams. wide Niagara 10. Vermont 48 

BALTIMORE— Signed Mike Baddlcfcer, reaeWeiSi Mike Morris, offered v» Board! Jlra N.Y. Tedi 84, ConconSn, N.Y. 63 
Storm Davis, Bill Swoggerfy and Knn Dixon. Porteoe.center; John Barnett rusmtaw bodu ■ X CnraHnq 5L 5*. Howard 53 
P( Idlers, and Larry Sheets, oulfleider. MHeo Saxon, Purrier; Ken Olson, kicker, and X Connecticut 49, New Haven 46 
CLEVELAND— Signed Mike FHctHln, Bill Myait, cmartartioch. , Scranton 64. East Strewfebura 55 

pHdwr. la a one-year contract. DENVER— Cut Jan Pools, pksCekicker; Spring Garden 76. Swarthmare 74 

MINNESOTA — Signed Kent Hrbak. Erst Lorrv Jones, wide receiver. Jeff Harper aid Slevons Tech 82, Pratt 60 
basamon, to a five year contract and Frank Deem Moore. Knobockars; Grgo Horton. Towson St. 7L Rider 77 
Viola. PlKhor, la a one-year .contract. . guard; Mike wnitamAslotaacfc. ond Anthony Utloa 7L Monmouth, N_J, 77 


BASEBALL 
AmeriOM League 


Pilchers, and Larry Sheets, oulfleider. 

CLEVELAND — Signed Mike FHd 
pitcher, to a arm-year contract 


Vtaia. Pi ichor, to a one- ye ar. contra ct . . guard; Mil* Wll|lara*itotftacfc. ond Anttw 

NEW YORK^-Staned Andre Robertson. Alton and Terry Lave, defensive bocks. 


Waynesboro 99, Davis & Elkins 81 


shortstop; KeHb Smith, MMder, and Dan LOS ANGELES— Placed Malcolm Moore, west Liberty 7L Salem 70 
Pasnua and Matt Winters, autfletden. «We receiver; Terry Crouch, offensive SOUTH 

SEATTLE— Signed Ed VtnxJe Berg, pitch- guard, and Ivan Lesnik and Jeff ChaHtn.d^ Alabama A&M 7X Savannah St. 77 . 
er. tensive Unemerv on watoerg. Ateom St IX Grambilna 8L 47 

TORONTO— Signed Roy Lee Jodcsoa John NEW JERSEY— Waived Bab Gnwv PunN American 79, East Ccratlna 62 
CeruttL Stan Clarke, Boa Musselman and or; Kim White, wide receiver; Harper Howell, Apaaiadhicn SI. 74 TarChattanoooa 40 
Matt Williams, pitchers; Roily Gruber, In- tight end: Bob Krmrion, linebacker; Brent Columbus 79, Morris Brawn 72 
flelder.and Ron Shepherd and MHdi Webster. ZtoWer ond Chet Winters, running bodes; Bill E. Tenraasae St 6X DovMson 67, QT . 
outfielders, to one r oo r oontmax. Cesare. Heyward Golden and Derrick Hat- Florida St 91, X Mlsstosippl 79 

Natleasl League chetLde f enstve backs, and Greg Boyd. Greg George Mason 11X Morgan SL 72 


TORONTO — Signed Ray Lee Jackson, John 


outfielders, to one y ea r controax. Cesare. Heyward Golden end Derrick Hat- Florida St 91, X Mississippi 79 

No Hoped Lcaene chett de f ensive backs, and Greg Boyd. Greg George Mason 11X Morgan SL 7 

LOS ANGELES— Signed Bobby Graft! to. Martha Craig Dana and Raidy Van Dtaten, Jackson St. 71, Prairie view 65 


Pitcher, to a one-year contract 


offensive lineman. Announced the retirement Lrmolr-Rtiyne 49, Wingate 56 
NEW YORK— Signed Rafael Santana of Erato Hughes, confer. LoukjviHr TO, Virginia Tech 45 

Shortstop. OAKLAND— Waived Mark Reed Quarter- Middle Term. 6& Murray St. 59 

PITTSBURGH— Agreed la terms with Mike beck; Alvin Baker, comertnck; Bab Stan- Stanford 78. Florida AIM 56 
BtotecM aid Chris Greea pitchers, on one- dHer and Darnel Wall. defenstveends.'AIHIlL South Alabama 40. South Florida 39 
year u o nhuCto . wide receiver; Mike Datterer. Mike Jones. South Carolina 7X Tutane 65 

SAN DIEGO— Stoned Alcio wigeins, second Darren wtlson and dee Miller running backs, Tennessee SL is, Augusta 49 


baseman, to o four-year contract. 

BASKETBALL 

National .BasMltMdl Assadattaa 


and Whilom Burse, lin eb acker. Announced Tennessee Tech 87, Austin Peay 65 
the retlramentof Tom Ptotto, center. Traded west Georgia la MisslsNPai CeL 40 
Jim Merrftts. nest tackle, to Memphis tor a MIDWEST 


DENVE R W aiv ed Russoil Crass, forward, future draft choice. 


MIDWEST 

Ahron'SL Ma reh eed SL 53 


Tennis 


INTERNATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS 
(At Delray B each, Florida) 

MEN 

Feartti Round 

Tomas Smkt Czechoelovia dei Anders 
ryd, Sweden. 6-L 6-4; Scott Davis art. More 
Ftur, 6-4. 6-2; Jan Gunnarsak Sweeten, del 
Brad Dyke. Australka.6-X *6, 6-3; Mike Leech 
del Mots Wflondor, Sweden. 7-5. 6-2: Vitos 
GeraiatttsdM.Tartk Benhoblles. France. »X 
7-5. 

WOMEN 
Foertb Reand 


LA. LAKERS— PkicedJamoai Wilkes, tar- PORTLAND— Cat Steve BaUardritefentlvg Butter 64. SL Loub 61 

ward, on the inlured Ust. and; Jim Boautraw and Fred worthy, flaw Chicago SL 7X B r o o klyn CoL 69 

MILWAUKEE— Placed Mike- Duotoaw, ends; Marlon Brown, wide receiver; Rich Ctavetond SL 9X ilLOtfeogo 72 
auanLonttie Inlured Itot. Signed David Third- Burtnese, guard; Dario Casorino. punter; Defiance 107. Wilmington 96 
kin. forward, to a 19-day contract. Garrett Chase, defensive back: Richard Illinois Tech 85, Conconflo, IIL 72 

FOOTBALL Crump, running back, and Bill Gampt line- V alparais o 66, WisrGraen Bay 5S 

Cn e rtatan Football League backer. Xavier, Ohio 8X Evansville 63 

WINNIPE G Dd eiid e d Hie contract of NOCKRY Youngstown SL 41, E. Kentucky 6 


kin. forward, to a 19-day contract. 

FOOTBALL 

ComIoIpq Fouffiufl Lcopvm 
WINNIPE G D t t ehd e d Hie contract of 
Tom dements, nuorleraock. through the 1987 


Xavier, Ohio 8X Evansville 63 
Yourastown St 41, E. Kentucky 40. OT 
SOUTHWEST 


NMtonai FoatbaB League . 
DENVER -Signed Wade Maimlna, defen- 
sive back. 

INDIANAPOLIS— Shined Nesby Glasgow, 
safety, la a series affeur one-ygor contracts. 
N.Y. giants— N aHfed MBie Sweamion as- 


LEAGUE— Suspended Kaltv KWto. Detroit ^ ^ 

Red Wing center, for five games In connection „ „ 

wttti a hJgh-ettcking Incident Feb. 2 aaalnsi „ 


Cameron BX P u n handle SL 72 
Henderson SL 64, Arkansas Tech 44 
Now Orleans 9X Pan American 74 
Oral Roberts ST. Oklahoma Cty 61 


IONA— Named Harold Crocker assistant Texas-tai Antonio 97. N. Texas SL 49 


Andrea Temesvari. Hungary, dot. Wendy slim line coach. 


■Mont special teams coach and defensive (bewail coach ond defensive coordinator. FAR WEST 

assistant. SOUTHERN CONNECTICUT— Announced E. Montana 61, WMtwerth 55 

PITTSBURGH— Named Hal Hunter often- that Kevin Gabriele, football coach, has re- E. Washington 64. Goraaga 63 


Turnbull. Australia, 6-4. 6X; Steffi Graf, West 
Germany, def. Kathy Rinaldi, 6-1, 1-0 (ret. tog 
Hilary t. 


Untied States Football League 
ARIZONA— Released Wally Kereten end 


signed to become an assistant coach tor Otto- Fresno SL 52, CoHreine 40 


WO Of me Canadian Football League. 
Wl SCONSI N-WH ITEWATER— Named 


Leroy Rotxl nsoa. offensive tackles; Bon ii Ban- Bab Bera i ow We football coach. 


Fullerton SL 84. POCtflC 64 
&. Utah St. 77. CotariMioe* 6L OT 
Washington 81, Arizona St. A3 


Danttoy. Utah .38 3d 317 1043 27* 
Bird, Bos. . • 50 5M 271 1346 2X3 

Wilkins. Aft, ' 50 530 307 1359 27* 
Malone, PWL 49 395 448 1238 2X3 

Aguirre, DalL 49 444 249 1193 343 

Cummings. MIL 50 489 229 T2B7 34.1 

Johnson, K.C 49 449 215 TUV 227 

WDolridoe, ChL 44 393 227 1013 23* 

Nan, Den. 49 427 273 1127 ZU 

MoncrfeL MIL 45 349 2K 1036 2X8' 

Abduktabbr, LAL 51 476 192 1144 224 

Griffith. Utah 50 458 04 11U 22* 

FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE 
... . . FG. FGA .Pci 


Donaldson, LAC 
Gilmore. XA. 
Banks. BA. 

Nonce, Phoe. 
Abdut-Jabbar, LAL 
Worthy, LAL 
Cheeks. PWL 
Tlwrpe. ICC 
-Rulandr.WBsh. 


Malone, PhlL 
Lnimbeer, Del. 
Otalvwon, Hau. 
WHUarns, N_i. 
Eaton, Utah 
SBcma, Sea. 
Gilmore. XA. 
Smith. GwS. 


Thomas, Def. 
Johnson. LAL 
Moore. BA. 
Theus. ICC 
Nixon, LAC 

Green, Utah 
Bog ley, Ctov. 
Valentine, Port 


C 212 318 447 

3» 511 *32 
185 299 *19 
427 707 *04 
LAL 474 810 *88 

387 446 *81 
255 441 *71 
211 XTO *70 
250 439 *69 
REBOUNDING 

. G OH Def Tat Avg 
49 230 391 821 1X7 

49 164 434 518 122 

- 49 260 314 574 IT* 

50 192 392 S84 11.7 

50 121 438 569 11* 

51 1M 429 565 1L1 

. . 90 U4 Wl 548 11* 

49 239 293 532 10* 

ASSISTS 

G Na Avg. 

49 652 13* 

48 590 123 

50 518 104 

49 403 8* 

49 40S 82 

44 371 XI 
49 389 7* 

i- 49 389 7* 


College Top-20 Ratings 

Tbe tap-ro teams in the Associated Press' 
celleo* baefc e tban paU (Href-place vales In 
pom theses; total peters based on 20-1948, 


Record Pis Pvs 


1. SL John’s (63) 

181 

1279 


X Georgetown (l) 

21-2 

1217 


X Michigan 

183 

1044 


X Oklahoma 

19-4 

997 


X Memphis SL 

17-2 

982 


6. Georgia Tech 

184 

929 

10 

7. Duke 

17-4 

920 


X Syracuse 

184 

8U 


9. So. Methods! 

184 

741 


IX Kansan 

284 

707 

13 

11. Iowa* 

19-4 

693 

12 

TX Louisiana Tech 

20* 

534 

M 

IX North Carolina 

185 

511 

U 

14 NevvLos Vegas 

183 

am 

11 

15. Tulsa 

184 

251 

17 

16 Vnianova 

U4 

243 

W 

it. lionets 

187 

236 

9 

IX Oregon St. 

174 

182 

u 

1*. ARl~ B irmingham 

21-5 

129 

— 

2X Maryland 

19-7 

121 

20 


The Untied Press htfernatteaoi boo 
coaches tap*! cal tore baripetbaU ra 
Olnhpfaco votes and records through r 
el Feb:3 to Paredltwses; total petals Has 
15 pouts fer tint ptacw M for second. I 
L St. John’s (39) 118-1) 

X Georgetown OJ (21-3) 

X Memphis SL 07-2) 

4. Duke (T7-5V 

& (tie) Oklahoma (19*) 

5. (He) GcanSa Tech (184) 

7. Michigan 084) 

X Syracuse (164) 

9. So. Mefhodbt (18*) 

IX Kansas (284) 

11. Iowa 084) 

IX North Carolina (185) 

TS. Louisiana Tech (20-21 

14. Tufea (184) 

15. Illinois (187) 

IX Nev^Las Vegas (183) 

17. Oregon SI. (17-4) 

IX VUkuwva (154) 

19. Maryland 119-7) 

SX Deere* (1541 








Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1985 


OBSERVER 


Puttin’ Of f the Rite 


Alan Parker 


The Most Distinquishing Feature of Any of HU Films 
Is His Consistently Excellent Work With Actors 


PEOPLE 


Bv Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — I was alone at 
home the other night when 


President Reagan's State of the 
Union speech took place, so no- 
body would have known had I de- 


cided to pass up the president and 
stick with “Youne Frankenstein” 


stick with “Youne Frankenstein" 
to ibe end. 

I knew this was the smart thing 
to do. In fact throughout dinner I 
had planned to stick with “Young 
Frankenstein,’' though 1 had seen it 
before. The scene near the end in 
which Peter Boyle, as Young Fran- 
kenstein's monster, appears in for- 
mal dress to sing “Puttin' On the 
Rita” would be far more interest- 
ing, I knew, than the spectacle of 
the president’s Cabinet shambling 
into the House of Representatives. 

As for watching the entrances of 
the Supreme Court justices and the 
diplomatic corps, give me a mon- 
ster doing the old soft-shoe any day 
and you can have all the writs of 
certiorari and diplomatic immunity 
in Washington. 

And so while eating my lonely 
meal (two boiled potatoes, a half- 
can of creamed com. the right half 
of the roasted chicken whose left 
half I had eaten the previous oigbu 
three tinned pear halves, a glass of 
suspiciously cheap Beaujolais and 
two cups of coffee). 1 tickled my 
fancy with the thought that soon 
when most of the united States 


charm, geniality, and good fellow- 
ship making Americans fed good 
So I told myself, "I have switched 
off ‘Young Frankenstein* so that 
the president's charm, geniality, 
and good fellowship may make me 
feel good.” 

Yet President Reagan has never 
made me feel good I would worry 
about myself if any president could 
make me feel good. While it is nor- 
mal to fed good about watching a 
monster sing “Puttin’ On the Ritz,” 
feeling good about presidents can 
be done only by someone whose 
life is utterly empty. 

Still, there 1 was, missing 
“Young Frankenstein" and snug- 
gling to stay awake while the presi- 
dent talked of making revolution. 
And as 1 passed in and out of 
stupor, I found myself wondering 
how a president talking of making 
revolution could produce no re- 
sponse but stupefaction. 


By Vincent Canby 

New York Tuna Service 


N EW YORK — In all the 
rush of movie openings at 


would be snoring at turgid oratory 
from dimmest Washington, l 
should be enjoying the sublime 
nonsense of Frankenstein's mon- 
ster dancing in white lie and tails. 

a 


Why, then, promptly at 9 P. M„ 
did I switch my dial to the drab 
scene in the House of Representa- 
tives? The explanation is patrio- 
tism. There is some nationalistic 
urge within us that will not let us sit 
idly by savoring life’s joys when our 
country calls upon us to participate 
even in its most sterile exercises. 
And can any be more sterile than 
the State of the Union Message? 
Well, the congressional leadership 
joining the White House staff for a 
prayer breakfast, perhaps. 

Having switched from “Young 
Frankenstein," I tried to rational- 
ize the decision, to assure myself it 
had been based on something more 
than coarse patriotic emotion. 
Since his huge victory in Novem- 
ber, 1 had been reading a great deal 
about the president’s irresistible 


Well, of course the president was 
playing a game with words. Some- 
body, a speech writer no doubt, had 
persuaded him that because of the 
good old American Revolution, 
Americans ought to pay lip service 
to revolution, and the president 
was doing so. He is most charming 
and ge nial when he is talking non- 
sense like this, for then it is most 
clear that he is a man of pictures, 
not ideas, and that his is a govern- 
ment in which a tingle idea would 
be worth a cnillioa pictures. 

But it is not available, that single 
idea, so they fit him out with words 
to emit while he creates ihe pictures 
so suavely. Words like “revolu- 
tion." He talks of “a second Ameri- 


can Revolution of hope and oppor- 
tunity,” and so on. Some 


Robespierre! Ima gin e him working 
the guillotine? He is about as revo- 
lutionary as the Duke of Welling- 
ton. His dream is to bury the Penta- 
gon under money and shut down 
the railroads. That is a program of 
sons, but calling it a “revolution” is 
turning language upside down. 

When a president who doesn’t 
make you feel bad insults your in- 
telligence, the natural thing, I sup- 


INrush of movie openings at 
the year's end. and with all of the 
publicity about the staggering 
popularity of “Beverly Hills 
Cop” and the possible financial 
disasters of “Cotton Chib” and 
“Dune;” some interesting films 
have been in danger of being 
overlooked. One is “Birdy.” the 
screen adaptation of William the 
fine, eccentric 1979 novel by Wil- 
liam Wharton, the pseudonym of 
an American painter tiring in 
Paris. 

Directed by Alan Parker from 
a screenplay by Sandy Kroopf 
and Jack fiefar, the film is so good 
and intelligent and moving that it 
may be time for an upward re- 
evaluation of all the wort by this 
idiosyncratic, not conventionally 
likable English film director. 

Like “Birdy," the book as well 
as the film, Parker is not easily 
pigeonholed, which tends to put 
off critics who feel most comfort- 
able attaching labels to directors 
and making them stick. So far, 
each of Parker's movies has been 
so different from the one preced- 
ing it that any such labeling has 
bees difficult indeed. 

After a successful career in 
television commercials in En- 
gland, Parker made his theatrical 
Film debut nine years ago with the 
improbably funny and stylish 
“Bugsy Malone," an ebullient 
satire of 1920s gangster movies 
played by a cast of precocious 
children, including the 14-year- 
old Jodie Foster. 

By some sleight-of-hand, with 
his own mysterious talent and 
with lots of help from his asso- 
ciates, including Paul W illiam.*, 
who wrote the movie's excellent 
score, Parker palled it off. “Bugsy 
Malone” was an unexpected lark, 
played not exactly straight but 
with the understated, mock gravi- 
ty that made the stage version of 
Sandy Wilson’s “The Boy 
Friend" so much fun. 

Having established himself as a 
satirist — Parker wrote the 
screenplay for “Bugsy" as well as 



**> . ' tv 




2 

Director Parker The breathtaking quality of a dream. 


pose, is simply to fall asleep. When 
I awoke. “Young Frankenstein,” 
alas, was off, and something — 
boiled potatoes, pear halves, Beau- 
jolais, or the second American Rev- 
olution — was disagreeing with me. 


directing it — he pulled a fast one 
on all of us by making “Midnight 
Express” (1978), the brutally 


by making” 
11978), ihe 


“Midnight 


New York rimes Service 


hair-raising stoiy of a young 
American drug smuggler in a 
Turkish prison. The movie, a 
popular success, was expertly act- 


ed by Brad Davis, Bo Hopkins. 
Randy Quaid and John Hurt but 
one couldn’t help feeling that 
there was something profoundly, 
gratuitously nasty about its sen- 
sationalism. The very stickness of 
the melodrama, which had the 
effect of reinforcing the brutality, 
obscured the director's technical 
virtuosity. 

The following year. Parker 
moved in another direction en- 
tirely with “Fame;" a " Chorus 
line” -like musical about stu- 
dents at New York's High School 
for the Performing Arts and a 
movie that appeared to have no 
relation to either of his earlier 
films except in its stylishness, 
which is not necessarily a nice 
word. After “Fame" there were, 
in quick succession. “Shoot the 
Moon” and “Pink Floyd: the 
Wall,” both released in 1982. 

I never did see “The Wall.” a 
rock musical, but with “Shoot the 
Moon” it was apparent that 
Parker must have something 
more going for him than the kind 
of brisk modishness we often mis- 
trust for its associations to televi- 
sion hucksterism at its best. 
“Shoot the Moon," with a good 
script by Bo Goldman, is a small 
domestic drama about ihe bitter 


end of a marriage, in which the 
husband and wife alternately re- 
fuse to acknowledge the painful 
facts of their lives. 

The moods of Parker films may 
vary wildly, but there's seldom 
any doubt that a Parker film is 
the vision of the person in control 
or the production, that is, the di- 
rector. This statement might 
amuse the director who. in an 
interview a few yean ago. spoke 
somewhat acidly of the auteur 
theory and of critics who auto- 
matically credit the director with 
having done everything in a mov- 
ie, good and bad. as if assuming 
that the production of any film is 
not the complicated collaborative 
process it actually is. Up to a 
point, he is right to be skejpticaL 

The most distinguishing fea- 
ture of any Parker film is his 
consistently excellent work with 
actors, which involves initial cast- 
ing choices as well as obtaining 
performances from those actors 
when they're on the set. "Shoot 
the Moon” remains memorable 
not only for the performances of 
Diane Keaton and Albert Finney 
in the central roles, but also for 
those of Peter Weller, Karen Al- 
len and an extremely young ac- 
tress named Dana Hill as the 


child most damaged by the sepa- 
ration of her parents. 

"Birdy" is similarly distin- 
guished b\ the leading perfor- 
mances of Matthew Module, as 
the catatonic Vietnam veteran 
who w ants to escape an irrational 
world by becoming a bird, an 
oddball who is as tough and de- 
termined as be is sw eet- natural 
and Nicolas Cage, as Birdy 's bat- 
tle-scarred childhood friend. AL 
It’s Al who attempts to bring 
Birdy back to reality, to save him- 
self as well as Birdy. As fine as 
both Mediae and Cage are, how- 
ever. their work does not exist in a 
vacuum. It's supported by a stun- 
ning cast of actors including John 
Harkins as Birdy’s army psychia- 
trist. Sandy Baron as Al’s father, 
George Buck as Birdy’s father, 
Karen Young as Birdy’s nurse in 
the psychiatric hospital and Do- 
lores Sage, a non-professional as 
Birdy' ‘s mother. 

What, exactly, is “Birdy” 
about? I'm still not sure and I've 
now seen it twice, appreciating it 
even more the second time than 
the first. It is — I think — about 
growing up. It describes the un- 
speakable, unrecognized terrors 
of coming of age. of arriving at 
that point in awareness when one 
accepts irrationality' as the uni- 
versal governing system. 

Parker and the screenwriters 
have done a remarkable job in 
fitting the source material to the 
screen, makin g cinematic what, in 
the original, is a series of interior 


A Mantegna to Be Sold 




Spencer Douglas David Comp- 
ton. 7th Marquess of Northamp- 
ton. one of England's richest and 
more eccentric lords, is selling An- 
drea Mantegna’s “Adoration of the 
Magi" at a Christie's auction in 
London April 19. The painting, 
dating from about 1500 and one of 
the few Mantegnas remaining in 
private hands, almost certainly will 
bring £5 million ($5.5 million), said 
Christie’s director Patrick Landsay. 
The marquess, 38, owns two stately 
homes — Castle Ashby and Comp- 
ton Wynyates. Sometimes called 
“the mystic marquess" for his pen- 
chant for spiritualism and “mysti- 
cal places around the world, he 
married for the fourth time a 
mouth ago. He Is selling the Mante- 
gna “purely for the money” needed 
to keep up his residences, a Chris- 
tie's spokesman saiti 
□ 

The Harlem Globetrotters drib- 
bled into the Smithsonian Institu- 
tion Monday to make a contribu- 
tion to the National Museum of 
American History. The basketball 
tricksters donated uniforms, warm- 
up suits, books, posters and pic- 
tures to the museum's “Constella- 
tion of Black Stars” exhibit, which 
also includes Roberto Clemente's 
batting helmet, Jim Brown’s foot- 
ball jersey and George Foreman's 
boxing gloves. The Globetrotters 
also announced they would go coed 


plifled telephone. “I thank you .- t ^£1 
with all ray grateful heart," said the 
veteran director of “The Maltese 
Falcon," “The Treasure of the Sier- 
ra Madre" and “The African - 

o •: 


Crown Prince Ak2ato erf Japan 
and his wife. Princess MkHko, win A 
visit Spain beginning Feb. 26, then | ^ 
go to Ireland, government officials ">*- 
said Tuesday. The trip would reap- ' 
locate for the state visits paid to 
Japan by Spain’s King Juan Catos « '7 
ana his wife in 1980 and by Irish J. w>' 
President Patrick Hfflery and his 
wife in 1983. the officials said. Be- „ - 
fore their visit to Spain. Akihito ■ 1 
and Michiko will make a three-day 
unofficial visit to Portugal for a 
meeting with President Antonio . ' 

Ramalho Eaues. After a weekkag 
trip to Ireland, they will make an ‘‘ 
overnight stop in Britain for a re- r* -* 
union with tbeir son. Prince Him, a C- • 
student at Oxford. 


£ 

i> if. m. 


f 


next year. Applications already 
have poured in from more than 100 
women who want to join the team. 
Five or six finalists mil be selected 
before next summer's training 
camp. 

□ 


monologues alternating between 
Birdv and AL The film, which 


opens and closes in Birdy’ s hospi- 
tal is seen through interlocking 
flashbacks. 

When Birdy. at last, achieves 
his release and “flies," the se- 
quence has the breathtaking qual- 
ity of a dream one doesn't want to 
end. 


The National Aeronautics and ‘ \ 
Space Administration has refused 
to rescind its award of a Distin- 7 - ... 
guisbed Service- Medal to Artfaff ~ 
Rudolph, who gave op American ' 
citizenship and returned to West 
Gennany last year rather than face 7 " 

mis ir ea^^slave^lato^^ 5 u Gar- 
many during World War II Ru- /f " 
dolph has denied from his home in >''' ' 
Hamburg that he was involved in ^ 
any brutality. A NASA spokesman ' -- : 
said that the medal had been given -- 
because of Rudolph's servhx w the 
United States and “has nothing in v. 


[“Birdy" is being released 
across the United States this 


month, the Associated Press re- 
ported. It opened in New York 
and briefly in Toronto and Los 


The U. S. National Board of Re- 
view of Motion Pictures gave out 
its sixth annual D. W. Griffith 
Awards, but the only honoree to 
make the star-studded ceremonies 
was actor Victor Banerjee, and the 
absentees included ailing director 
John Huston. Banerjee, named best 
actor of 1984, hailed the occasion 
al the Plavers Gub in New York 


common with the allegation 
against him." ft was awarded for 


his part in developing the Saturn V 
rocket that sent U. Sl astronauts to 
the moon. 


Angeles during the holidays to 
qualify for the Academy Awards, 


qualify for the Academy Awards, 
but rebelled no nominations. 

[“The vanity of the Academy 
Awards is irresistible, and 1 was 
pan of it.” remarked Parker, 41. 
“ ‘Birdy 1 shouldn't have come out 
with all the C hristmas attrac- 
tions. It's a strange kind of films 
that requires a delicate release."] 


Monday night as “a great day" for 
himself and his fellow Indians. He 


himself and his fellow Indians. He 
was honored for his performance in 
“A Passage to India," which was 
named best film and also garnered 
awards for David Lean as best di- 
rector and Dame Peggy Ashcroft as 
best actress. Huston. 78, won the 
D.W. Griffith Career Achieve- 
ment Award. Under doctors' or- 
ders to stay in Los Angela, he 


“Relax,” the smash hit by pop . - 
group Frankie Goes to Hoflpjwd t. 
which was banned by the British - . 
Broadcasting Corp., was named 
Monday as the bat British single .. - 
of 1984 by the British Phonograph- 
ie Industry. The song reached the ' 

top in Britain despite being banned Z ~ 
from BBC radio and television star -"V- . __ 
tions on the grounds that its lyrics . - : 
contained sexual innuendo that 
could offend the public. The pie- r j 
sentntion was marie at the British . 

Phonographic Industry’s annual 
music awards ceremony. - '’'.L. .. . 


’if r. wv, 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


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5don du Veto finer 6e Collection. 
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agents. All enquiries to 01-493 718). 


AGENCE DE L'ETOILE 

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764 03 17 


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DOWT FOKU VAl^WNFS DAT. USSiSC 

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ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS in 
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HISTORICAL OPPORTUNITY 
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61344B esd. 250 l Gdene de to Rome 28, 
1000 Brussels, Belgium. 


sr detail please catacfi 

AGED! 

26 bis, Bd. Prwssse C hatow e 
MONTE -CARLO. MC 98000 
MONACO. Tel: 193) 50 66 00 
(ext. 155. 479417 MC a 

AGENCE ST. ROCH 

1 rue Sort Rods 06500 
MENTON. Tet [93] 57 0B 05 


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3626064 - 3234038. 


8 Ave. de M P ai ne 
75008 Poto 
Tele* 231696 F 


125 sqjru. sutmy, upper float, 
lenc 6 d reception +■ 2 be d r o oms. 


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2 both* porting MGH PRICE. 
aOUSVlTY: 
EMBASSY: 562 16 40 


MARNE ARCH, LONDON Wl. 

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F79QQ, Tefc72m95 __ 

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[ uaarve. Pnce from about US$40.000. 1 


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MONTE CARLO 
Principality of Monaco 


RATS FOR SALE 

PHOF* 562-1640 

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PHONE 562-7899 


PI VICTOR HUGO (near) *? > * o r 

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589 8223. 


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departure abroed 
SStGE KAY5Bb[l) 329 60 60 


Very high dnn stufio. 

n.lOtfinl Telr 380 2a 00 
AGENCE DE LtTOOE 


16* htW. MGH CLASS sunn,. 85 
sqm + terrace oO sqm, luxurious 
fittings equipped bitten, 504 81 47 


GENEVA - FOR SALE 

2 EXtBTlONAL 

AD J A C E N T 

Commend pr erases, trdusivefy 
* TOP-GRADE ^iop* or offices. 
SF400j300 each, 750.000 both 
tang term lease. Write to: 

Mrs. Burkhcrdt 39 Mars»Uubouto, 

Petil-Soeonneji, CH-1209 Geneva 


ST. JEAN CAP HKRAT. between hkee 
& Monaco, linuious modern vifa. 
Jdy & August, cfcea access to sec. 
pod. 5-rooms + service. 2 krtchera. 
dr-and (toned, hi TV dorm, cere- 
taker an premises, tfced from owner. 
Tet (3) 951 6477. 


HOLLAND 


sbdks& 2 rooms, decorated Contact 
Sordini: 80 rue Unhersto, Para 7th. ; 
Tet (1) 544 39 40. 


na Wifi pay many mama • 
ce. Paris: 2nP 34 72 Mr teas 

EMPLOYMENT 


Renthouse International 
020-448751 (4 lines) 

Amsterdcm. Bofesiein 41 


RE ST. LOUS. Maptficert dupier on 
5eme, grand set on, 2 bednooms, 2 . 
baths, beoutifuBy furmhed, vwy sun- : 
ny. P2SJ0g Tel: 720 37 99 1 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


- -- . 


GREAT BRITAIN 


MUETTC FACING bos. High den 
buicing, lovely 80 sqm. up ortme n t. 
recention, 1 bedroom, dl comforts. 
FTOjSoa Tet 577 9(W. 


G»«ALMANAGBL 42. vdh mqor 
US. corporation loala fw new assov 
ment. Write WemdS, P.a Box 1362 
D-7750 KonPanz, WeD Germaiy. . 


" * 

■'.-•ic i 


MAYFAIR. LONDON Wl . Lurury fur- PRIVATE VILLAS/ APARTMB41^ for 


nished apwimenf. partly serviced, 2 
beds, bedi/ drawer, fitted krtchm. re- 
ception S <6*na oraa S350 per weelt. 
SffDiner & Co. 01491 3154 


vacation througboul Italy. Brochure / 
rafofc Vilas Ita&a GFfTj 93 Regart 
Street, London Wl.Tet fol) 439 8547 
or Tefcu 896453 


FELRLLY. Very chcjniing tying, efin 
2 bedrooms, 2 bdhs. AmenavK 

Sass*' tata,, - F,,j 


SHCWT 1BIM in Late) Quarter. 
No agents. Tet 329 38 83. 


PAGE 17 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 




AT7ENTJON EXECUTIVES 

Pvbfrsh jrourbirdrtejameMrtae ! 

in Ae MsmaSanal HtsrtM Tn- 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


International Business Message Center 


DIAMONDS 


OFFICE SERVICES 


fenq uAMnurelkaioAM 
of a mWon naders war W- 
mds m eet of whom one ht 
h uh — and industry, wB 
mod H. Just telex us (Pail 
613595) before IOojil, en- 
suring mat we can Mur yea 
liach and yaur message vriK 
qymr within hours. Thu 
mtois US. $9.30 or toad 
equivalent per Bno. You aunt 
include ean utoto and verffi- 
cmhbttmgaddtan. 


LIQUID GOLD 

JOJOBA 


BUSINESS 

OPPORnrUNTTIES 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS SERVICES 




Jamba, The mirade bean grown in the .. 

USAhcis a nceurd He toon of 100 - US$ 8 SWISS FRANCS 

200 yean. Unc: Lebriccman amat- a a ° PE ^ * ** 

kn, phfimmrtlcdi, food, menu- fiar vn£fc projeeb. buone» loom, cot ° J 

factoHng. Dr. D. Yeimonoicd«orreci torerd loons. m qrto uu e facSriej etc. In- 
Umverslv, Voted, "No other ptevit ter— equal to mwbate lowed rate. t jT? 


FUNDS AVAILABLE M 
USS 8 SWISS FRANCS 


THE FMANQAL TIMES 
EUROPFS BUSJNBS NEWSPAPH 

now upenJes o r oom in g d pufafiertron 
deirvenr service to «*Bcriber* Wing m 


YOUK OWN COMPANY M 

SWITZERLAND 

ZURICH - ZUG -UJZERN 


COLLATERAL 


WILL ASK5T TO MARKET your aod 
nets m the UiA Conrod M.ER.G. 
Tte 506088 Gd ED FSa 


FRB4CH HIGH FASHK3N MODB. 

27. T9/PA espemoce, Ffafory of Art 


77. n/PA espemoce. History of Art 
practoate, free to travel, tSngual, 
knAs for London based ooermas. Tet 


Urwenity, sated, "inq other plant te r — equrt to my I 
product in tte world s capable of ie- Brokers protected, 
ptoong petroleum based (ubricartT. 


Jttfoflowinq areos: _ From SF500 per annum • up. 

Paris - Lyon - hfice • Comes - Monaco. Cortidesa. Bora a-*. 36. CH630Q 


We con provide pryne bonk nobfiertia'j 
of coBaterd For arfainoge tramaaiom 


—torn or in- Send deScs h of reaarements to tcencad I ° , 

Fntira ra tmu f tf I Tumi hni*t fimiTt m * itfiluri iiiiuiiIi 1 


For a free bid and Further details, 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


twbueil in feet ye—. Entire mount Swrts trust fund's accredited agents. 
| relumed by 6 th wear. Protor&orts show 

[ anx* income ttereaffe/ of 33%. Burefacnk Ho Mn m Lid. Bank Hour 
E nantos from i wrat o n aid Mundfom RoadT Loddon, NorfaA, 
broker* wdcttne. P4114 6^8 England. 

For complete detah cortfad.- AUOBA 


Cotmdesa. BaaroTlr. 36, CK630Q Zuq 
Tel: £041 4221 32 88. 7bt 86 49 12 

A Present for Your Son 


Beasancfcle fees. Prmrax service. 
Umdcm based. Tete* 895T622. Tet 01 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


3855492/ OI-KW 8926 / 01-244 9592 


Burebm* fl o fctn ra Lid. Bank House, 
from i nvto a n atd Mundham Road] Loddon, NorfcA. 
km F«14 6^8 England, 

rdetorb cortroch AUOBA 

Box 1777, Herald Tribune, TaL [4q 506 20279. Tbc 975449 B8H G 


WITHIN 30 DAYS - OR LESS 

You can have your awn hurinem , 


Ben Hughes - F T. Pens 
Tefc 01^0797 0630 

No FT no coranert 


92S21 Neuly Cedex. France. 


raid pedal me re m o ney in a day) 
than most people earn m a wfeefc. Hwr? | 


Easy. It's not hard at all when you own 
a Kema Computer Portrart System. 

A sure earner ftat combrnes 3 of to- 


day's hottest trends-, video, co mp uter s 
and initert pedures... plus the know- 
how and guarantees of Texts Instru- 
ments, Panaumc and Kemo. An dl cosh 
feteness. Customers come to you. No 
seKng. No stress. It's no! □ frandtofc AU 


For Srfo 

SURPLUS PLANTS 
OXYGEN-NTOOGEN- 
ARGON 


IMPORTANT KXUTT n USA based 
company owaktaia. USS5C0 niSton 
dotring compomr with inti ficmdto 
has graited woddwtde license to aur 
efients to macufodure/rrxrte fro- 


grance/perfume/casmetiqs Sne infer 
the n irade ncmie. Qynts w ek feirop e- 
an yto Tui pi l*wi 4- assistance 
in contracting manufacturing end 
sourcing of araparants/premotiond 
items. American tfenbutar wtfh 3#» 
outlets worts to jxrdxse teemed 
goods for Fatt 1985 mtroductvsa Ras- 
ing o dtfetond S75OJ00 in aipiid + 
borrowing to complete prefect. Corv 


1 Ton Per Day (30 J 
5 Tons Per Day (150 Meter) 
25 Tons Per Day P50 Meter) 
75 Torn ftr Day 0250 Meter) 
Modem Lrquid 
fe r al >n t Coreifion 

LOW PRICES 


Ihe money and the profits are 100% 
yours. Ideal far fannies, indnnduats or 


isaTR-rsfafeK fssrsss 

your prraentiobL With ihe Xemo jysim LOW PRICES 

2^S’S^rt^a-q FINANCING AVAILABLE 

hficolai Jaffe Cora, 9171 WSstee 

ttVTJZii 3S£% B^^-CT^O Tbc 67^638 

B05WE5S PARTNBIS NffllB). W 
been thrauafi HrtraarenHKT. Our oro- 


MT 8 MATIONAI offshore 
COMPANY WCQSPORA1X3N5 
FROM £110 

Compreherewe Admrismshari 
Nonsnee services. Powers a# Attorney. 
Re gi s te red offices. Telex, tel ephone, 
mol forward in g. 

Iritud Rnaarces 
Bdtocumi Hous*.- 
SimmerhS. 

Wo d Mon. 

Tet (0624) 2802D-2D2-«l-28933 

i5m7628352 Hand G. 


BUSINESS MIGRATION 

, TO AUSTRALIA Dept. HT. World Irt en to Stond Man- 

Ecamaic cartaiftmfc offer Ml services txjemenl Corp. P.O. Box 610201, D- 
mefoang evdeohon of eigibAy. Bus- 7000 Stuttrejn 6l. Wea Germany, 
ness fevestmert advee assettmee with Tet (71 1) 325572. Ti* 7256679. 

subants, GJ’.O. Bob 653. Brisbane. tegh < y»Wy ? »3olty stanlws raek- 
Queeraiand. 4001 AustroGa we. Severd^trroSable vnth 3. 


MCSEASB1 PRQHTS, reduction of 
tax es 8 prote ction o f asse ts. Conqa 
ny formation & totol back Hip services 


«n 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 


feds for London based opemgs. Tet 
3 pm. 9 pm. 01-225 

YOUR OFHCE M NBN YORX. Fifth 
Ave. address ad / or phones at yaur 
USA office. Mod. phone coils recenad 
A brnu ded New York Mai Service, 
210 fifth Ave, NYC 10010. 


Your bat buy. 

fine dmmonds m any price range 
at towed whotesde pnees 
drect from Antwerp 
center of the d io m ond world. 
Full guarantee. 

For free price list write 

Joach im GaMsnsfein 


GENEVA 

SWITZERLAND 

Puli Service 
is our Business 


in every courtry of the free world. 
Dept. HT. Wcxto I rte ma l i u ir J Mon- 


imumneD inc 

USA A WORLDWIDE 


A complete load & busmeas service , 
providng a udgue coHecfion of 
talerted, versons & muttSngual 1 
ndhriduah for: j 


Artvrap • fasema&onof law (tod tax» 

HONG KONG, YOUR TAX Shdfer. H * jrt °* Antwerp Diamond industry •Trasrafotioo and.seaettmolw™*^ 
re-mvoiona ce nte r, trade reo. bridae •fixmutioq, domdohen ml § 

tor China martceti. Ncr m mu a> room ncrrrv mnn/va u d mi rotr u tfon of Swiss 0*1 ttWto" 

923, Slcr House Til. Hong Kora. OFFICE SERVICES compance 

Tlfc 39644 QSMGT Tet 3^211833 — Ful conhdonoe and dsorewn as** 


: ' v 

M ~* 

^ hir ' :: 

^ioi ... • • 

’•DwtrTJ:.:'- i.-r I 

“■•fcrinS 

. «Mr.O 

^ Rad -.v“. “ ■ ■ - - 


OFFICE SERVICES 


• Mdfaooc. tetephone ad tele* C : Ipiorr. 

tarv * CBS . . - liChif- !" T T I’rt*, 

• Trreddioo and secrettmd serveel — r. ^ 

• fiornwtioq, dontdtzhon ana - ■~ u - Ji ^ ... r • • -.•.‘V 


FashforvGonmimodJVirpF'rcimotemi 


TRANSLATION AIL LANGUAGES 
Commerdd, legd, technical, Sterory, 
patents, spedficabons, TRAN5COM. 

Bfanq«i( 75013 Bens. 
Tet 1} 33789 89 


WORU>-WlDE 
BUS1NKS CENTRB 


SARDR41A: The beamy of untouched 
nature has na pnce. Buy yaur own 
privacy in the wonderfu I tondseope of 


pnvaeyinltiewe 

Pbrio w«ioo fi 


Neuitty Cedex. France. 


Ca mpaniore-Tour guides, ■ 


FvmWnd Euaithre OffkM 
Conjplet* with SeaataUL Tsfex 
MptaiMhw Co r ponrtn 
R e imten f aW on t Ofew Mfc 


udtniiistrulfon of Swiss (tad fortiQn -lif 
Ful^cwrhdtmce cmd efaerehon cawed lad f , _ 

BUSINESS ADVISORY ^ — 

SERVICES 5 A 

7 Rue M wy, 1207 G»«VA. 1, 0 
Tel: 36 OS 40 Telasu 23142 * I ?- r . n— 


^ fi t _ • : ^ '-i cn 

-• - :,x 


-eddenee. ft anebp SUPBt PftOfTT POTB4TIAL Be the I 


^ YOUR AGBIT M TW UK. 

WVBmnfttn - ' Our contpcmy, oto estckjlished 1883, A- 


Y OUR AGBIT M THE LUC 


be an mveetment providng up to 13%. 
Comoct us as soon as passibte: Deut- 
sche Geselsdt. Fir OfTSore Invest, 
ltd.. German Brandi, Mr A Gennari, 
Resident Vice Presided. Sadengufaer 
39, 7900 ULM/Doroj, W. Germaiy. 
Tel 0731 men. Tb 712520 DIGOS D 


ted in your country to soN equranert 
for BreoUonce. the No. 1 dance 
cross s wee p ing die works Contact: 

Saar-Americdi AS., Mandabtf. 6 - 8 , 
0190 Odo 1, Norway. Tm7jM 7970|J 
The 74401 Irvrt-N 


212-765-7793 
212-765-7794 
330 W. 56lh St, N.Y.C 10019 
Service Rroresentrtivto 
Needed Woridwxfo 


BKOSOilStSSlt 

TjMffl 2Z7035. Teteta 16183 




TAX SERVICES 


Beverly Hfe, CA I 


UMVBtSAL CONTA1NBS LTD. 
High interwf fococne Pkm 

17%% P/A 


, - - estccwBied 1883, N IN U.S. - FOR MULTINATIONALS 

1 fmrod staxteig offers to act as CM RRM 

wcgwdarypwteuitdtt^cemUX M'f & U5. ttt fkreing, aaDurtmg, 
to nnd comp#wru« and mow nurcas finonod & bubne^ sarvicp - r^d cs- 
msupptesortonwIeeiywprodidL trte. nwestments, operating oampaies. 
Na fees, arty comnmsm an resua. HAROLD GOLDSTBn A CO, 


SWISS OffoORTUCTY. Reoertty es. 
tahWmd Ms rtgh Teehaotogy 
Coitoiv with marker tested products 1 
seeb >200X00 or LIBOR Merest rates \ 
and possible cnwersion to equity 


ORSHORE 
LUWTHJ COMPANIES 
BANKS 

M5URANCE COMPAMES 


OVBtSEAS r AX SERVICE: US expo 
triate&cflfietd specialists, 785 Berke- 
ley Ave- NW, Artanto, Gecrgia 
3031 B TS 404^1-7296 


AT1-B4S Executive Services. Athens 
Tower B. Sure 506. Athens 610. 
Tet GO j) 7796 232. Tefec 216343 


WOULD Y OU UM E TO JCRN Off ■ *-!. 
MIY BMOVEO C WOf MT U: ^ 
Dt THE HEART OF v ; 


ZURICH 


r: Rohejo Chambers, 213 
Nariman Pant, Bombay 400 021. 
Tefc 244949. Telex: 01U897. 
KUSBS: 4 Cue da lo Prose 
1000 Brmsek Trt: 2l7 83 60 
' Telex: 25327 

DUBAb P.O. Bax 1515. DNATA 
Airfine Centre Cuba. IfAf. 

Tefc 214565 Telex; 4fell 
LONDON: H0 The Strand. 


mdl order apptetan. System pn an 
start at USS9500 to U5S26.50Q. 

747906 Yfces 4I2?T3 kSw ^impSS 

inert pracestt t^jer-effodivB air fit- 
ters for LC engine*; outomolivi pd- 
_ used, by mojpr manufacturer* 

INVESTMENT PARTNBIS 

fWB> i trade. We Wn'i prosper if you don't 


in US$ 


been ifrough ertrroreneun. Our pro- , 
ducss/prajeeb me nigh quality &mn- 
mum 5 year market aoven. Same 



tbc 291112 AB/BXTRAD G or write: 

: Baxhor Tracing Ltd. PO Best 134. 
17/19 Redcrass Way, London 5E1 1TB 
Enghtod. Teh 01-403 5566 


* Sefed land sttateperfy batted near £ , ^PsTKrtdi' ArtTw^twy 
currart make! value 

* AddltanolfinarKal partners returned . ^ _ 

S UK & OFFSHORE 

* SiaSfEian.'ffl* company from £90 

ptoi) to developers interested in U.R. + hte of Mat + AnguSo 

bmking m tar nonond tounsr Guernsey + Jersey + Gforafcrr 


ode, we «m » prosper if you don r 
rite or the today far Ml derails, 
chord J. Snow, Dr., Sngsr Prtxtods 
Co,, Inc, 875 Merridt Ava, Westburv, 
NY im. Ti: 2290M. 


CASLSBOG 

One of CbEforno's mas/ suoobbM Red 
Estate c um iaies has a sdectmn of 
laid pcrceh crtsAHc for in to rnai o nal 
investor. Tim pro p erties, kxofed 


SPAM IS WOKUrS No. 1 tourist 
country. Idnetg BC m I5Q6 mate 
future sSl bngraer. Unique opportwv- 
ly for buwtefi investor speculators, 
wiring owner scfc now o pwatn g 
hotel & luxury residency on sea. In 
center fomow Mint resort m Coda 
Brava mot Fr ernes. Freeway, im po rt , 
hmfaor, etc Tearfy name + high 
appredahon eweded. Write Sox 
1651, Herald Triune. 92521 Neuty 
S Cedex. Frme 


1 225 W. Fartk NT 10122. TEXAS: UDO ACRE RANCH near 

Td: 212-594-3771. Data twth afrm beodi on 35 rale 

ten taka, wmo/wofer perm i ts. Re- 

&SS&S/& «« 


Worldwide 

Nora n ees-Adnen a trobon 
Beat R aton u nom 


COMMERCIAL 

PREMISES 




LOMH3N RB9SSB4TATTVE 


PANAMA CO MP^e ^ngmme. 

dragon aid confi dent S wra 7 Porv aeb/twm. 2164940911 4512 
Frinortog Gortand. TX 75042. 

raxjy-iTxxkt WTTVwnr wws -- — 

wTwd.fcr? OOO.OMftdttGffwdi muMiiv m dam KU ^ 
moved into &rooir>wyMiH deposit 

uiiurts wM. t« ram irteram Old PW «d PC/TX. taterestHl par- 


i amounts with tax free' irterest'etod £ Sr’ 

guo rort eH cr orTytixty for depository. 

terra,. 10 Ui fhB, STW*. toJ^ Herald TriunB. 9252! 

London 5W1A HT. Tefc 01-406 2gP. Jfov*yj>dw. Rtmee. 

UNQUE BUSR65 OPPORTUWIY 


ASTON COMPANY FORMATIONS 
Dept HI, 

B Vtoorio SI 
Doygta We of Msm. 

Tel 0624 26591 
Tela 627691 SPIVA G 


FORRBff 

Charies de GauQe Airport 

7ECHWCAL ZONE 
Office* (ran 250-1000 «pn. 
WmbasMOu from 800-2000 sqm. 


London WC2R CAA, 

Tefc Dt] 836 8918. Tbc 24973 


MASMOP , C/O r area hf 6M. 

Madrid 28020. Td 270 56 do a 
270 66 04. Tetec 46642 
HBANi Vta Boqbcoo 2. 

20123 Mkn Td 86 75 69/80 S9 279 
Tetoc 320343 


filly equipped 
adnxresrratian 

XBS.SBedi 
TeL (22) 86 ' 


720 Modaon Awctu 


FORMS EXECUTIVE 
MUIMATiONAL COMPANY 


Oecame our food Mies refraemrtive 
m your te«6 and sel the best fumi- 
tore, fornahra aid decotenq prod- 
uds made in hbfy. We after: Oyeatse 


Gafifomia Red Estate 


services m USA, Bramgus erttfo and 

embryos. Gmtoct Bar W. Route!. Bax ... ... , 

146, Geneva Afobamo 36340. Tek fTw* *• » taeoA. 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


HI# A Mpw^iiAnr mveson. mo propereo*, we wee uunrwii mw w, over tanm, 

^^. OF L SH ? RE 

COMPANIES FROM £90 With terms. For ei yiraton cfoeut fee aveAfele fw coradtongr in fee Md of pwinwluri) arfti 7^58 CONS CH 


ptoi) to developers interested in 
bwang m tem otional tounsr 


company, fhmr kadi record end the corporate domicile. 
{Voperkes, contact: Ko mono gwnent, I 


SSS _SW8A93B L te’^^^bewarid- 

irmrtemg. enormaw product te. BRITISH BUSWKJ WOMAN JhW K 

*4es know hew, over s!W0 wprfcars, kng to SoudArteo often o w£ngto |«« aoofeitoorL ' 

(Swittwlwfo) arn» 73758 CONS CH 92521 NeuHy Cedes. Fran. an> “ 


TAX HAVE N HASP BAhK, OCCUS' 
tamed to hander matters m enfe- 
dftna laefa term departs which 


PARES; BOS, 15 Avenue Vidor Hugo 
75116 Paris, Tel; 502 18 00 

Telex: 620673F. 

0 

North Bridge Rd ^ 
^ll-W/05 Pefenvfo fiazq. STcre r«fc 



YOUR LONDON OflFKE 

«tf the _ _ 


Vc 3 c.TV '^PUor, 
t ’>•» ’*en 

: Sfe r fe- b ^!r 

' v : r , i- kiubw a> 


mum. 6 «> peon Oversea Bank ^ 8001 Z »* 

twit IM nffn Tat- 01/714 61 H 


IW1] Ltd Recrasertotn* Office. Tel 
t^refon 735 m>T. Telex 295555 LSP G | 


Tdoa 81 2556/812981. 


YOUR OFFICE W.MACTW 
eater with meefing rortA 


omm «W ram YOUNG SWBS COMPANY witfoe- 

\so monogwtert ta voblm jft- EAB4 25% - 35%. invest fi_W - OT -.w inrarne teds finafona to sate 


ottracno ra , hoteh, shopping curter. 
Investment range U5$25,0O0 to 


• Investment range 
USSJ^OOflOO 


aflKWVMBBCAN 
WVE5TMB1T CORPORATION 
100 N. 8 >«ayn« Ate 

Site 1209. Miora, FL 33132 
Tef- 358-6097 
Tte- 803237 EURO MlA. 


Ifoeria + Panrena + Delaware 
Ready-made or to Hrt 
Full nominee, odiranipratne 
and accounting back-up indwkng 
bank rntrodurtons 


CARISBStG LAND COB> 

PO Bax 412 
Uxrian NW3 4PF 

Tefc 936 9119. Tte: 268048 att3D13 


shore companes. trouble sicsteib. 
Flecw axeSe SOCOGBi PO Box », 
6977 Rurigliona, S wit rafon d 


day negotiable cormeml _paper 
natek Wnfe AIM Ud, FOB 422, 
Harraonburg, Virgraa 22801, UAA. 


SBECT COMPANT FORMATIONS 5PAW, COSTA DEL SQ^iwypto. 
Mt Pleasant. Ooucta, Ue of Mm Corararad. prarases. fraaho^ best 

HSSJSS^dS3tSiH 

712206 


PRIVATE DETECTTVESCANDffiiAVTA 
& Finfond, eo4 Norwcr: 34 hexjra 02- 
42 72 14. Tk 18949 Agent. Morngar 
G. (fefcfev, former peSes/amy mi- 
at. cantons worldwide. Write fora- 
barietorger 4, N-0154Odol Norway 


FO* LLS. TRADE A5SISTXIKE in 


YOUNG SWISS COMPANY wiffee- .tB Bed Eslate Investment lym 

gulw income web financing to sate ^*£mmfopmen» Shwh ht ghn 
cosh probfana. Ban 1761 .Her aid Tri- 500 Oteshcn Horn. IS Regsrt St Cm 
feme, 9Z521 Neirify Cede*. Franca tejrian Wtff* Geo 

SBC REPRE04TATtVE5 for Califor- Tefc 01734 5354 

rw&Haite6#fetanB»mg^/oqo. COMFREHENSVE SERVKH, fern- WILL 

- cd md Rnandal gadem imurniee *5 


85% (AFffi MORE) prtmxtod ■ 
on ii n r esr m en t in mraue faw-ritk 


r, with aeeteig rort* y's v 

for buanessam v ^ . 


lid. 28 Blade Prince Rd. London SE1, 
Tel 735 8171 


food and comnxxSiies cnrtact Fadco. 
USA Tte 755425. 


and mfo w rane ft 


quwrrtwd by Arab gavemmerts or 
OPK csurttfeL We have logo 
amwnh Ug.Tefe 361 6500 ZuriA 


72{SW!S5 IM WSWANCE. fiweba 


r. de l^ieanne, CPJ2S81, 1311 Gene- afenpemy, tags bonus. W. SSlfS, 
va 2, Swraerkmd | Cefigto dt-lOW PUU.Y. 


MU5SB5 ADDRESS. Mad offices, 
ffwiei, tec secretarial serricB. 
Lanfotf: Mon Buainesi Confor, Tot 
5179311 (13 Ira* Tfe. 613U B 


BUS«5SMANsteM*»S^!r 

atSEiBSBC'-S 


Sijg M r 


Imprime par Offprint, 73 rue de VEvan&k, 750J8 Fans.