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The Global Newspaper 
Edited in Paris 
Primed Simulfcmeo 
in Paris, London, 

Hone Kong, Si 
TTie Hague and 

W1ATHS BATA APPEAR ON PAGE 14 



INTERNATIONAL 




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No. 31,721 


ZURICH, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1985 


ESTABLISHED 1887 


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New Party Emerges 
As Chief Opposition 
To Chun Regime 


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Mr. Kim, wbo has been confined 
10 his house since returning, was 
not allowed to vote because he is 
under a suspended sentence for a 
conviction on sedition charges. An- 
other leading opposition figure, 
Kim Young Sam. also declined to 
vote, although he was permitted to 
do so. 

[After the results were an- 
nounced, Kim Dae Jung hailed the 
opposition party’s success as u a 
victory for democratic forces,” 
Reuters rawned Wednesday from 
Seoul “This election dearly re- 
flects the aspirations of our people 
for democracy." he said.] 

Nothing in the voting results sig- 
nificantly affects Mr. Chon’s grip 
on power, which is total and is not 
due to end until 1988. However, it 
was the only voter test of any kind 
before 1988, and the South Korean 
president hoped it would demon 
s irate basic support for his leader' 
ship since he seized control 
military coup five years ago. 

The new opposition party made 
an especially strong showing in the 
tug dues of Seoul and Pusan, in 
many cases running ahead of Dem- 
ocratic Justice Party candidates 
who had finished first in the last 
election. In one of the more closely 
watched races, a powerful ruling 
party official Lee Jong chan, ran 
barely ahead of the new party’s 
chairman, Lee Min Woo, in a cen- 
tral Seoul district. 

The new party drew its strength 
largely at the expense of a more- 
established, and many people be- 

leading dissident pobtirian, said ***** *“*• 0 P^ Uan 

group called the Democratic Korea 

* politics he would seek a merger of w v ‘ 
rival opposition groups into z uni- 
fied and -government camp. 

They wold operate, he said, un- 
der tire banner of the New Korea 
Democratic Party. 

The new opposition party’s 
showing created a possibility that 
the National Assembly, a funda- 


By Clyde Habcrman 

Ntw York Tima Service 

SEOUL — A new party of anti- 
gpvemment politicians picked tip 
surprisingly strong support and 
emerged Wednesday from general 
elections as South Korea’s leading 
opposition group. 

The ruling Democratic Justice 
Parly of President Chun Doo 
Hwan retained its majority in the 
National Assembly. But the most 
significant result of Tuesday’s leg- 
islative elections was the success of 
the New Korea Democratic Party, 
formed by opposition figures, who 
only three months ago woe banned 
from political life by Mr. Chun. 

[With final results in, Korean 
news organizations and the bead- 
'■*3uartCTs of various parties said the 
'Democratic Justice Party had won 
87 seats in 92, two-seat constituen- 
cies, and the New Korean Demo- 
cratic Party took 50 seats. The As- 
sociated Press reported from Seoul. 

[With 92 other seats in the 276- 
member assembly divided on a pro- 
portional basis, the ruling party 
took another 61, giving ir a 148-seax 
total. It won 152 m the last election 
in 1 98 1. The new opposition gidned 
17 more in the proportional distri- 
bution for a total of 67. The re- 
maining seats were shared by splin- 
ter parties and independent 
candidates.] 

Opposition leaders were jubilant 
over their singe. They said Wednes- 
day that they would try to form a 
broad legislative coalition against 
Mr. Chun's government 
Kim Dae Jung, South Korea's 



U.S. Upset Allies 
With Secret Plan 
To Place N-Am 
On Their Soil 


Members of South Korea’s opposition New Korea Demo- 
cratic Party in Seoul celebrated their strong showing in 


Tuesday’s national election. Lee Min Woo, center, presi- 
dent of the party, joins in the mansei. a traditional cheer. 


F; Substance of New Arab Peace Moves Vietnamese 
Clouded b\ r Host of Unknown Factors Encircling 

^ w /y 1 l# 

By John Kifncr known. No details of their agree- wants a Jordanian team with Pales- 1 J^TTI 

Yew York 71 


known. No details of their agree- 

New York Timex Semte m «? t ^ ^ P^. 

lion -MohSuaited Nations Se- 
bokiermg the JoraauanrEgypup airily Council as the hasis for oe- 


Hussem 

estinian 


mentally weak legislature, could 
become a more vigorous political 
foram. 

The election also acquired added 
interest after the rr"cii-berajded re- 
turn of Kim Dae Jung to SeouL 


It was almost impossible for the 
governing party to lose under the 
electoral rules. Two assembly 
members were selected from each 
of 92 districts, for a total of 184 
seats. Whh the opposition split, it 
was unlikely that the Democratic 
Justice candidate in each district 
would finish lower than second. 

Mr. Gran and his advisers bad 
created the system to aD but guar- 
antee that they would command 
ah«n 55 percent, or 152, of Ihe 
legislative seats. 


peace initiative has been under 
way, including a meeting here 
Monday between 
and Yasser Arafat, 
leader. 

The moves coincide with an ap- 
peal by King Fahd of Saudi Arabia 
for the United States to resume 
peace efforts is the Middle EasL 
The maneoverings also come as 
President Hosm Mubarak of Egypt 
is preparing to visit the United 
Slates early next month. 

The key to all these moves is the 
tenuous relationship worked out 
between Mr. Arafat and King Hus- 
sein last fall Mien Mr. Arafat was 
permitted to hold a meeting of his 
Palestine National Council here to 
affirm Us leadership in the Pales- 
tine Liberation Organization. 

Whether Mr. Arafat committed 
himself at that time- to Hussein's 
present negotiating posture is not 


gotiations. The resolution calls on 
Israel to return Arab lands seized 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

in the 1967 war in return for recog- 
nition by the Arabs of Israel’s sov- 
ereignty and borders. 

^Hussein, in addressing the Pales- 
tine National Council in Novem- 
ber, surprised the assembly by call- 
ing (or a decrease in polemics and 
an acceptance of the resohttim. 

The UN document is opposed by 
tire Palestinians because it treats 


wants a Jordanian team with Pales- 
tinian representation, contending 
that this would be more acceptable 
to tire United States. 

In the long run, the maneuvering 
looks forward to the pnmosal by 
Jordan for UN-sponsored talks in 
which Egypt would be brought 
back into the Arab fold as a coun- 
terweiRhi to Syria and its more rad- 
ical allies. 

Even if the Arabs were to recon- 
cile their internal differences, die 
1 United States, burned by its experi- 
ence in Lebanon, appears hesitant 
M3 get involved a gam. Moreover. 
’* Israel has displayed le« imrlinwtinn 
for negotiations. 

~ It was against this background, 
and amid reports that a PLO execu- 
tive committee meeting in T onis 


i^amDooian e&sss 

_ _ to the Pentagon 

Strongholds 

approval by the otl 


them as refugees and does not call -had decided to keep its position 
for establishment of a Palestinian ■; hazy, that Hussein and Mr Arafal 
state. • tiieL 

** qg;* The word from Jordan was that 
to^ The f ^ was going to try to pin 
Palestinians would prefer either a w r 


pan-Arab delegation or a separate i 
Palestinian delegation. Jordan 


« down Mr. Arafat and -force him to 
{Continued on Page 2, CoL 2) 


The Associated Press 

ARANYAPRATHET. Thailand 
— Vietnamese troops reported to 
total more than 10,000 had ad- 
vanced Wednesday to within six 
kilometers (3 JS miles) of Khmer 
Rouge guerrilla strongholds in 
mountainous western Cambodia, 
Thai military officers said. 

An estimated 2,000 Vietnamese 
troops woe moving on Phnom Ma- 
Iai from three directions in an at- 
tempt to pin the Communist guer- 
rillas into a wedge against the 
border with Thailand, the officers 
said. They added that more than 
10.000 troops from the 7th, 8th and 
59th divisions now surrounded the 
strongholds of Phnom Malai and 
Khao Din. 

According to the Thai officers, 
the goemuas beam a 12-hour 


By Leslie H. Gelb 

New York Tuna Service 

Washington —T he United 

States has contingency plans to de- 
ploy nuclear weapons in Canada, 
Iceland. Bermuda and Puerto Rico, 
according to Reagan administra- 
tion officials and a government 
document outlining the plans. 

Recent press reports abroad that 
such plans exist nave caused em- 
barrassment in Washington be- 
cause U.S. officials had not in- 
formed the governments involved. 
The existence of the plans, some of 
which have been in effect as long as 
a decade, was confirmed to the for- 
eign governments only after the re- 
ports appeared, Reagan adminis- 
tration officials said. 

Officials stressed in response to 
inquiries that these were “contin- 
gency” plans, that Mr. Reagan had 
not delegated authority in advance 
to the Pentagon to deploy the 
weapons and that, in any event, 
actual deployment would require 
approval by the other governments. 

Nonetheless, the disclosures in 
recent weeks in Canada, Iceland, 
Bermuda and Puerto Rico prompt- 
ed wide-ran ging public debate and 
criticism, particularly in Canada 
and Iceland. 

Administration officials ex- 
pressed concern that further disclo- 
sures would contribute to what 
they caQed a growing “nodear al- 
lergy” around the world —recently 
evidenced in New Zealand and 
Western Europe — to any land of 
involvement with nuclear weapons. 

Unde the contin gency p lans, the 
only weapons that would be -de- 
ployed in the four places are nucle- 
ar depth charges called B-57 
bombs. Each has about 10 kflotons 
of explosive power, or the equiva- 
lent of 10,000 tons of TNT. slightly 
less than the Hiroshima bomb. 


were still in cffecL The 
patently were distributed by 
(iam M. Aritin. a nuclear wear 
expert at the Washingto 
suture for Policy Studies. 

A 1975 document entitled “Nu- 
clear Weapons Deployment Plan” 
was made available by Mr. Aritin 
to The New Yoik Times. The docu- 
ment appeared to be the same as 
the one aisiribuied abroad, accord- 
ing to Reagan administration offi- 
cials. The officials expressed strong 
displeasure about Mr. Arkra's ac- 
tivities and raised the question 
whether he may have violated laws 
prohibiting disclosure of such in- 
formation. 

The contingency plans would be 
put into effect in emergency situa- 
tions, according to the document, 
but it does not spell out what kind 
of emergency would trigger a re- 
quest for deployment. 

Contingency plans are drawn up 
under the nuclear plan drafted an- 
nually by the Joint Chiefs of Staff. 
The nudear plan is “coordinated 
with” — meaning shown to but noi 
approved by — the State Depart- 
ment. it is then sent by the secre- 
tary of defease to the president for 
approval One part authorizes actu- 
al deployments around the world; a 
second part establishes contingen- 
cy deployments. 

These were once called “condi- 
tional” deployments, in which, 
once the prescribed conditions 
were met, the military could con- 
tact the government involved and, 
whh its approval deploy the weap- 
ons. 

But administration officials said 
the authority was no longer dele- 
gated in advance for the military to 
approach the host government; 
white House authorization would 
have to be sought by the military if 
and when an emergency arose. 

Offidals.said that when. Canada 


Galbraith Derides U.S. Career Diplomats as Timid 


i uesday evening! It asked recently ifihe plans were siiB 

an unu sually fierce m3- a j Icra | l ^ destroy su bmarines or to “ force, a senior Reagan adminis- 





*’ - «aT* 

; 


ft-VX"- 



By John Vmocur 

New York Tima Stake 

PARIS — When the US- ambas- 
sador, Evan G. Galbraith, who has 
worn his conservative ideology in 
Socialist France like a top hat and 
striped pants, leaves his post in 
July, be will take back home with 
him about as much discomfort with 
his own State Department as with 
French industrial na ti/wa fTra tinyn 
or pipehne deals with the Soviet 
Union. 

After announcing this week that 
be intended to return to (he United 
States : — no successor has been 
named — the. 56-year-old invest- 
ment banker from Connecticut 
paused to look back over his four 
years in Puis. 

There was mention of diplomatic 
goals set and achieved. But what he 
mainly had to say contained an 
unusual degree of scorn for the 
State Department and Foreign Say 
•{Vice name* 1 officials. 

? “I have a feeling,” said Mr. Gal- 
braith, who was a political appoin- 
tee, and not a career diplomat, 
“that the State Department desper- 
ately needs to be vigorously har- 
nessed. It has loo big a rale to play 
in the formulation of foreign po- 
licy, and foreign policy is too im- 


portant to be left up to Foreign 
Service officers.” 

Then, plunging into a Jong-run- 
ning dispute between State Depart- 
ment professionals and While 
House political operatives, he am- 
vended that the United Stales was 
full of competent people — - doc- 
tors, lawyers and businessmen — 
who, if appointed as ambassadors, 
would serve with more vigor and 
determination dura Foreign Ser- 
vice professionals. 

“It’s like the line about war being 
too important to leave up to the 
generals,” Mr. Galbraith contin- 
ued. “Weil the Foreign Sendee of- 
ficer is like a military person. To 
move up, be has to avoid trouble. 
He learns in time to have a honor 
of confrontation. 

“The result is that the dominant 
operations are make-work ‘cover 1 
operations that are not only useless 
biu rmslead people. It’s just waves 
sloshing about without anybody 
really wanting to do something. 
There’s something about the For- 
eign Service that takes the guts out 
oT people. The tendency is to avoid 
confronting an issue.” 

At the time of the U.S. invasion 
of Grenada in October 1983, Mr. 
Galbraith said, as an example. 


“there was an immediate tendency 
among Foreign Service officers not 
to do anything,” 

“In troth,” he said, “it was feared 
by the Foreign Service people that 
the U.S. had not done the right 
thing” 

The day of the invasion, French 
television officials proposed that 
the ambassador debate a leading 
leftist editor on an evening news 
program. 

“I was advised by the Foreign 
Service types not to go on," Mr. 
Galbraith said. In retrospect, he 
looked back at his appearance as 
an unqualified success. “1 was at 
the Elys6e, doing something the 
next day" and President Francois 
Mitterrand's special adviser “came 
over and said, ‘Hat’s off.’ ” 

Now, according to Mr. Gal- 
braith, a number of Foreign Service 
people persist in regarding Presi- 
dent Remold Reagan s proposal fra 
a space-based defense against mi- 
clear weapons, the Strategic De- 
fense Initiative, as a bargaining 
tool for nuclear arms talks with 
Moscow — and this despite White 
House insistence that it is not 

“But there is a continual effort in 
the other direction,” he said, “and 
if it were left up to the State De- 


partment. that's the way things 
would come out” 

Mr. Galbraith described the ma- 
jority of Foreign Service people as 
“liberals,” most of whom, he as- 
sumes, voted for Walter F. Mon- 
dale in the presidential election last 
fafl. 

“Most of them are conscientious 
guys who cany out policy,” he as- 
serted. “But there's a difference be- 
tween carrying it out mechanically, 
ritualistically, and really pushing 
the president’s policies. There’s all 
the difference in the world.” 

This, he insisted, is the best argu- 
ment he can think of in favor of 
placing political appointees in im- 
portant ambassadorial posts. 

“1 fed ambassadors should be 
out there running an offensive 
game," Mr. Galbraith said. “The 
real role in a major embassy is to be 
an effective spokesman for the 
president's views. 

“I got along weD with the gov- 
ernment here, people who know l 
don’t approve of Socialism,” he 
said. “If there were complaints 
about me saying negative things 
about the Communists while they 
still were in the government. WeD, I 

(Contain ed oa Page 2, CoL 6) 



Evan G. Galbraith 


T-Shirts , Song, Book, Comics Exploit N.Y.’s f Subway Vigilante’ 


By Elizabeth Mehren 

Los Angefcs TUnes Service 

NEW YORK — Bernhard H. 
Goetz, who has been nickn^oed 
the “subway vigilante" and is By aB 
accounts the most reluctant of ce- 
lebrities, has become the object of 
an overnight industry. 

Even before tire electronics eugi- 
nFneer, 37, was indicted Jan. 25 on 
v charges of -owning illegal weapons, 
' ; T-shirts bearing such inscriptions 
as “Acquit Bernhard Goetz” or 
“Goetz Four. Crooks Zero” were 
in Manhattan specialty 

S ired by Mr. 
sc. 22 of four 
y ouths aboard aHew York subway 
car soon appeared in. the. cartoon 
strips Doonesbury and Bloom 
County. A new musical videotape, 
“The Subway Vigilante,” which is 
set to a rock' rhythm, offered this 
advice: • 

- “He’s the subway vigilante, he s 

tired of being had. Don't bother 
frith him, brother, he'll ffz you if 
bu’rebad.” „ . . : 

His lawyer, Joseph Kelner. said 
’ Mr. Goetz was stunned that any- 
one would want to buy a T-shirt 

_with his Mine or a representation 
- :of hhn opcfflih” 

But the .lawyer also said Mr. 
'Goetz been “bombarded by 
your movie producers,” as wdl as 
writers, mafigrines and television 
shows. 


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Bembard H. Goetz, right, and a version of his subway story 
told by Garry Trudeau in his cartoon strip, “Doonesbury 


Canty, has filed a 550- million law- 
suit against Mr. Goetz, who con- 
fessed to the shootings but said the 
youths had surrounded him on the 
subway and demanded money. An- 
other youth, Dared Cabey, remains 
hospitalized, paralyzed from the 
waist down. 

Mr. Kelner said his diem bad 
issued a “blanket order” to refuse 
refusing to lake even transporta- book offers. Still said the lawyer, 
tion money from a defense fund “a Ira” of inquiries on the subject 


“I can show you a sheaf of letters 
this thick,” Mr. Kelner said, hold- 
ing up a thumb and forefinger a 
good inch apart, “from the lop tele- 
vision shows and magazines, beg- 
ging fra interviews." 

Mr. Goetz has made “not a dol- 
lar" from the commercialization of 
bis name, Mr. Kelner said, adding 
that his dieni pays his own carfare. 


supporters have set up to cover the 
legal costs Mr. Goetz has incurred 
and is expected to face. 

One of the youths he shot. Troy- 


had been received. 

In a hotel in Toronto last month, 
surrounded by news dips, an ad- 
vertising copyrighier and first-time 


author, Alvin Frost, 38, was asked 
to write the first “instant book” on 
Mr. Goetz. 

The “one hundred and twenty- 
right skimpy tittle pages.” as its 
publisher. Bill Katz, described tbe 
book, were completed just six 
hours after Mr. Goetz’s indictment. 
Within a week, nearly a million 
copies of tbe $3.95 paperback vol- 
ume were in bookstores from Man- 
hattan to Melbourne. Tbe title of 
the book is “Bernhard Goetz: Vigi- 
lante or Victim?” 

The book appears to have be- 
come part of the public debate over 
whether he is a saint or a sociopath. 

“This thing is selling in a really 
strange and bizarre manner,” Mr. 
Katz said “Those people who have 
it on sale can't keep it in stock and 
others won’t take it” became they 
say it’s “instant, exploitative.” 

“f had an order from England on 
Tuesday. We’ve had ordras from 
Hawaii where I'd say the biggest 
problem with the subway is fmdmg 
iL We gpt a call from the University 
of Chicago, wanting 100 books for 
use in their criminology courses or 
something." 

Mr. Katz, head of the Toronto- 
based Little Ones Books, usually 
prints religiously oriented chil- 
dren’s books. Hjs largest selling 
book to dale was a workbook with 
parables from (he Bible called 


“How to Protect Your Child From 
Sexual Abuse.” 

Mr. Frost did not receive an ad- 
vance payment for his efforts. 

“We locked him in a hotel 
room,” Mr. Katz said, “threw him 
raw meat every few hours and told 
him that if be was a good boy and 
kept typing, we'd let him out." 

But, said Mr. Katz, “who knows, 
he may own an island in tbe South 
Pacific by the end of the week.” 
Mr. Frost was on his way to Holly- 
wood recently, reportedly to dis- 
cuss the possibility of a television 
movie about Mr. Goetz. 

Tbe cover of New York maga- 
zine trumpets a piece called “My 
Neighbor, Bernie Goetz,” by a 
writer, Myra Friedman, and a New 
York literary agent. Jay Acton, said 
be had received “an offer of six 
figures” for an “extended version" 
of the article, to be told in book 
form. 

Mr. Acton would not name the 
publisher who made the offer, but 
he predicted the book woald offer 
“a sense of texture” about Mr. 
Goetz. 

Ms. Friedman is the author of a 
1973 biography of Janis Joplin 
called “Buried Alive.” 

At Avon Books, tbe executive 
editor. Roger Straus, enlis ted a 
Berkeley. California, psychologist- 
sociologist, Lillian Rubin, to pro- 
duce a psychoanalytical approach 
to the Goetz siorv. 


lay and mortar barrage by the 
Vietnamese that cleared some 
Khmer Rougs outposts and forced 
the guerrillas to disperse onto near- 
by hiDtops. At least 8.000 civilians 
were resorted to have fled into 
Thailand to escape the fighting. 

Casualty reports were not avail- 
able. 

Officers of the Thai eastern bor- 
der field force; baaed at the frontier 
town of Aranyaprathet. estimated 
that 4.000 guerrillas were defend- 
ing Phnom Malai. a complex of 
bares the Khmer Rouge have held 
since 1981 and successfully de- 
fended against previous offensives 
by the Vietnamese. 

The Phnom Malai area is about 
32 kilometers south of Aranya- 
praihet-The Vietnamese objective 
is to seal off the Phnom Malai 
headquarters," said a military 
source, who asked not lobe named. 

The Vietnamese invaded Cam- 
bodia in late 1978. During their 
three-month offensive this dry sea- 
son, they have captured camps of 
another guerrilla group, the Khmer 
People’s National Liberation 
Front In the past month, the Viet- 
namese have started attacking the 
Khmer Ronge, a more formidable 
opponent fielding as many as 
30,000 veteran fighters who are 
protected by heavily mined, jan- 
gled mountains 

An officer of the eastern field 
force said Vietnamese artillery 
shells wounded some Thai villagers 
late Tuesday when (he rounds land- 
ed on Khao Sarapee, southwest of 
Aranyaprathet. 

A spokesman for Thailand’s 
Foreign Ministry, Prachyadavi Ta- 
vedikul said Wednesday his coun- 
try was preparing a note to tbe 
secretary-general 5 the United Na- 
tions to protest the Vietnamese 
shelling. 

■ Beijing Appeals to Moscow 

China appealed Wednesday to 
the Soviet union to slop support- 
ing Vietnamese aggresaon, espe- 
cially in Cambodia, where Viet- 
nam’s poops pose a “grave threat” 
to Thailand, united Press Interna- 
tional reported from Beijing. 

A commentary by the press 
agency Xinhua described as “en- 
tirely fair and reasonable" a de- 
mand tins week by members of tbe 
non-Commumst Association of 
Southeast Asian Nations that Mos- 
cow cease backing Hanoi's military 
occupation of Cambodia, where ft 
has 180,000 troops. 

The six nations of ASEAN are 
Brunei Thailand, Malaysia, Singa- 
pore. the Philippines and Indone- 
sia. 

The commentary said Vietnam- 
ese troops in Cambodia had intrud- 
ed repeatedly over the past ax 
years mto Thai territory and posed 
a “grave threat” to Thailand. 

“Meanwhile, Vietnamese 
deployed along the Chinese 
carnal out reckless armed provo- 
cations against Chinese border ar- 
eas and aggravated tension in the 
Chinese-Viemamese border re- 
gions." Xinhua said. 


block underwater passages for sub- 
marines. P-3s are present virtually 
all year in aD four areas for anti- 
submarine warfare, but technically 
only on a temporary-duty bams. 

The contingency plans were first 
brought to light in Canada, Ice- 
land, Bermuda and Puerto Rico 
when the authorities there were giv- 
en copies erf a document classified 
top secret and dated 1 975 that dealt 
with tbe possible deployments. The 
officials were told that tbe plans 


(ration official told than that they 
were not. With that assurance, 
Robert C. Coates, then the Canadi- 
an defense minister, stated in Ihe 
House of Commons ou Jan. 21 that 
“there are no such plans.” Mr. 
Coates resigned from the Canadian 
cabinet this week. 

With regard to Puerto Rico, a 
commonwealth under U.S. protec- 
tion, all nations with nudear weap- 
ons, including the llnned States, 

(Costumed on Page 3, CoL 1) 


Soviet Says U.S. Project 
Jeopardizes Arms Talks 


United Press international 

MOSCOW — The Soviet Union 
has accused President Ronald Rea- 
gan of pursuing his space defense 
program desphe posable jeopardy 
to the Soviet- American talks sched- 
uled for next month. 

Tass cm Tuesday repeated Soviet 
demands that space weapons be 
tied directly to the forthcoming 
talks on intermediate and strategic 
nuclear arms. 

The press agency said Mr. Rea- 
gan, in an interview with The New 
York limes, stated categorically 
“that research in tbe sphere of the 
so-called Strategic Defense Initia- 
tive will be continued in the United 
Slates even if the two powers 
should agree to limit their nuclear 
weapons” 

Plans to militarize space, Tass 
said, was an effort in futility. 

“Neither the question of strate- 
gic aims, nor the question of medi- 
um-range nuclear arms can be con- 
sidered without the question of 
preventing the arms race in space,” 
Tass said. “No talks can lead to 
success without this.” 

In the inteiyiew, Mr. Reagan 
said the space initiative would not 
be used as a bargaining point in die 
upcoming talks and research would 
continue regardless of any agree- 
ment readied in Geneva. 

Tass said: “This shows that the 
White House is so far not ready to 
follow at the coming talks ihe 
agreement reached at toe meeting” 
between Foreign Minister Andrea 
A. Gromyko and Secretary of State 
George P. Shultz and “to adhere to 
it in aD its part.” 

■ United Aunt Urged 

A senior U.S. official said 
Wednesday the NATO allies recog- 
nized the need to present a united, 
front to the Soviet Union over Mr. 
Reagan’s space-based missile de- 
fense, Reuters reported from Brus- 
sels. 

The assistant secretary of state 
for European affairs, Richard R. 
Burt, was speaking at a news Con- 
ference after .chairing a special con- 
sultative group of NATO experts 
on medium-range missiles about 
next month’s U.S.- Soviet talks on 
nudear and space weapons. 

“There is a very strong under- 


standing of the need as we eater 
these negotiations to present a unit- 
ed front in dealings with toe Soviet 
Union and that includes the ques- 
tion of the Strategic Defense Initia- 
tive.” he said. 

Bui he admitted: “It is no secret 
that there are different views on 
many of the details and even on the 
concept and this is why we are 
working so hard to consult closely 
with our allies.” 

Mr. Burt warned that the Soviet 
Union would seek to exploit any 
differences between tbe allies on 
arms control issues. 

“We’re all determined and dedi- 
cated to block any So via wedge- 
driving campaign.” he added. 

■ United Front Planned 

Tbe assistant secretary of slate 
for European affairs, Richard R. 
Burt, said Wednesday the NATO 
allies recognized the need to pre- 
sent a united front on Mr. Reagan's 
missile defense. Reuters reported 
from Brussels. 


INSIDE 

■ Htman rights improvements 
in Latin America were cited by 
tbe State Department injur an- 
nual report. 


■ New Zealand is reported to 
have stopped receiving top-lev- 
el U.S. intelligence on the Sovi- 
et Union. 


■ The Soviet Embassy is 
Washington is to move to a 
prime espionage ate. Plage 5. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ US. retail sales managed an 

increase of 0.7 percent in Janu- 
ary. Page 9. 

■ China plans to permit credit 

sales for toe first lime since 
1949. Page 9. 

TOMORROW 

New Jersey has apparently de- 
cided to stop playing second 
banana to the Big Apple, Maty 
Blume reports, fo weekend. 


F' 




Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1985 


Lebanese and Israelis 
Have Tense Encounter 
In Southern Lebanon 


Reiners 

AWaLI RIVER, Lebanon — 
Lebanese soldiers advancing on Is- 
rael's front lines in south Lebanon 
came face-to-face Wednesday with 
Israeli troops and then withdrew 
after both sides trained guns on 
each other for a tense five minutes. 

There was no shooting, but the 
Lebanese Army appeared to have 
got off to a false start in its first 
tentative move to position itself for 
the takeover of Sidon from the de- 
parting Israelis. 

Israeli troops are to leave the 
Sidon area by Monday in the first 
of a three-stage pullout from south 
Lebanon, which they continued to 
occupy after leaving other areas 
taken in the 1982 invasion. 

Meanwhile. Sidon policemen 
took over the port customs office 
and patrolled the streets for the 
first time since Israeli troops 
stormed the city during the inva- 
sion. 

“We fed like prisoners who are 
being set free,” a Sidon man said in 
a typical comment welcoming the 
impending end of the Israeli occu- 
pation. 

Streets w ere crowded and busy 
with traffic and shops began re- 
opening as tension eased after inti- 


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dents in which there was sporadic 
shooting by Israeli and militiamen 
and attacks on them by masked 

gunmen. 

But the confrontation at the 
A wall River crossing with the Is- 
raeli patrol revealed the difficulties 
the Lebanese Army faces in assert- 
ing its authority in the area. 

Twenty-five men of Lebanon's 
12th Bngade bolding the aban- 
doned AJman Bridge cm Israel’s 
front line were stunned when two 
Israeli armored vehicles roared up 
in late morning and trained their 
ffins on f fre m- 

The Lebanese, who quietly took 
over the bridge Tuesday night 
when pro- Israeli militiamen left, 
ran into buildings, aimed their ri- 
fles at the armored vehicles and 
consulted over field telephones as 
the Israelis waited. 

After five minutes the Lebanese 
withdrew. “We are leaving because 
the Israeli Army is still here,’' their 
commander said. 

Two Israeli-made tanks later 
look up position ai the bridge, dos- 
ing (be gap in the lines caused by 
tbe departure of the mxlitiainea. 

In Beirut, the government was 
preparing for a major test of its 
authority as Israel starts its with- 
drawal ft faced a new challenge 
Wednesday as two key Moslem 
leaders boycotted a cabinet meet- 
ing. 

Sources dose to Shiite Modem 
leader, Nabih Beni said he was 
staying away because of dissatis- 
faction with the pace of govern- 
ment action, but would attend 
when it worked “seriously." 

Also absent was Walid Jumblat, 
head of the mainly Druze 
ave Socialist Party, who has 
cotted the cabinet for months, say- 
ing he cannot work with Mr. 
GemayeL 


\..l 

-***• 



BOMBING OF DRESDEN REMEMBERED — A delegation from Coventry, En- 
gland, pays tribute to tbe victims of an Allied bombing raid that destroyed tbe German, 
city of Dresden on Feb. 13-14, 1945. Estimates of the number killed range from 35,000 
to 150,000. The city of Coventry was badly damaged by German bombs in 1940. 


Soviet Publishes Chernenko Messages 


The Associated Press 

MOSCOW — The Tass news 
agency published two messages 
from President Konstantin U. 
Chernenko on Wednesday in an 
apparent effort to dampen specula- 
tion about his health. 

Wednesday was the first anni- 
versary of his appointment after 
the death of Yuri V. Andropov. 

The messages, to Nordic and Ar- 
gentine peace groups, were the lat- 
est in a series of statements issued 
in Mr. Chernenko's name during 
seven weeks in which he has not 
been seen by outsiders. 

Western diplomats see the state- 
ments as an effort to keep Mr. 
Chernenko's name before the Sovi- 


et and foreign public during a peri- 
od of uncertainty about his health. 

On Tuesday, the Greek govern- 
ment spokesman, Dimitri os Mar- 
oudas, said that a planned meeting 
between Mr. Chernenko and Prime 
Minister Andreas Papandreou had 
been canceled because the 73-year- 
old Soviet leader was ilL 

Soviet Foreign Ministry spokes- 
men have told Western reporters 
that Mr. Chernenko is on vacation 
outside Moscow. This appears to 
conflict with a Tass report last 
week saying that the party chief 
bad addressed a meeting of the rul- 
ing Politburo. 

Mr. Chernenko has not been 
seen in public since Dec. 27, when 


be attended an awards ceremony. 
Since then, there have been contra- 
dictory official explanations for his 
absence. 

His messages were addressed to 
the Nordic group “Treaty Now,'* 
and to the Argentine group “Move- 
mem of the 100 in the Name of 
Life." 

■ Papandreou Ends Tafts 

Mr. Papandreou flew to Lenin- 
grad on Wednesday after a final 
meeting with Foreign Minister An- 
drei A. Gromyko. Reuters reported 
from Moscow. 

A joint communique was expect- 
ed after Mr. Phpandreou's depar- 
ture cm Thursday after three days 
of talks in Moscow. 


Series of Arab Peace Initiatives Is Under Way 


(Continued from Page I) 
commit hims elf to a course of ac- 
tion. 

Once before, in 1983, Mr. Hus- 
sein sought to mediate a peace plan 
along lines suggested by President 
Ronald Reagan, only to be thwart- 
ed by Palestinian equivocation. 

This time there were few clues to 
the outcome of the meeting. 

Petra, the Jordanian press agen- 


Mubarak to Visit Mitterrand 

Agence France- Presse 

PARIS — President Hosni Mu- 
barak of Egypt plans to visit 
France on March 8 for talks with 
President Francois Mitterrand, the 
French government announced 
Wednesday. 


cy. said the king and Mr. Arafat 
had agreed on an unspecified 
course of action to resolve the Pal- 
estinian problem. 

Palestinians and Western diplo- 
mats said tbe announcement might 
indicate that the two men had 
agreed to keep the Jordanian initia- 
tive afloat and see what would hap- 
pen next. 

At the airport Monday night.. 
Mr. Arafat, who was going to Tu- 
nis, was asked what he and the 
Hussein had agreed on. “To follow 
up together. Jordan and tbe Pales- 
tinians, io find a joint solution to 
the Middle East crisis.” he said. 

Had Mr. Arafat agreed to the 
king’s position on Resolution 242? 

“What I have mentioned is 
enough.” he said. 


H ossein left Tuesday for a visit 
to Algeria. One line of speculation 
among diplomats was that Algeria 
could serve as a mediator in any 
possible warming of relations with 
Syria, since it has managed to keep 
its ties open in the Arab world. 

Concerning the results of the 
meeting between Hussdn and Mr. 
Arafat, a Western diplomat said 
much depended on the reaction of 
Al Fatah Mr. Arafat's core group 
within the PLO. 

“What is important now,” the 
diplomat said, 'is what mil happen 
within Al Fatah within the next 48 
hours when he brings back to Tunis 
whatever they discussed here. We 
could be in for an exact repeal of 
’83." 

In Egypt, a top adviser to Mr. 


Mubarak called the Amman talks a 
"significant breakthrough.” The 
adviser. Osama el-Baz, said Tues- 
day it was the first time the PLO 
had “unequivocally and irrevoca- 
bly accepted tbe premise of a 
peaceful settlement” to tbe Middle 
East conflict- 


10 Die in Czech Avalanches 

Untied Pros International 

PRAGUE — At least 10 people, 
some of them tourists from other 
East European countries, have died 
in a series of avalanches in Czecho- 
slovakia's High Tatra mountain 
range near the Polish border, a res- 
cue worker in the northeastern 
town of Tatranska Lomnica said 
Tuesday. 



Don’t cut the cord. 


It's a shame when distance cuts you off from the folks you were 
once close to. But it doesn’t have to. A simple phone call to the folks 
you miss in the States helps keep you close. Surprisingly close, even 
though you're far apart. 





EC Considers 
Joint Action 
To Combat 
Terrorism 


By RJ. Dionne Jr. 

New York Times Senice 

ROME — Leaders of the Euro- 
pean Community have taken tenta- 
tive steps toward joint action 
against terrorism, and France and 
Italy have rased their sharp dispute 
over purported terrorists who have 
taken refuge in France. 

The foreign ministers of the 10 
EC countries agreed Tuesday to 
hold talks among the interior and 
justice officials to coordinate ac- 
tion against terrorism. 

The meeting here was held after 
I talian officials sharply criticized 
the French government for refusing 
to extradite I talians charged by the 
Rome government with involve- 
ment in terrorism. 

In a speech Thursday to the Ital- 
ian parliament. Prime Minister 
Beltino Craxi noted that Italy had 
made 120 extradition requests to 
France. He linked the suspected 
I talian terrorists to the new wave of 
attacks by far-leftist groups against 
North Atlantic Treaty Organiza- 
tion targets around Europe. 

French officials, in turn, justified 
their response through criticism or 
the I talian criminal justice system. 

The ministers also issued state- 
ments welcoming the resumption 
of U.S. -Soviet arms talks and urg- 
ing “reasonable security arrange- 
ments’* in Lebanon following Isra- 
el’s withdrawal, to “prevent new 
acts oT violence.” 

Foreign Minister Guitio An- 
dreotti of Italy met Tuesday with 
Roland Dumas, France's minister 
for external relations, to discuss 
terrorism. Afterward, Mr. An- 
dreotii said the “bilateral polem- 
ics’’ bed diminished. 

“The situation has improved: we 
have established rather closer con- 
tacts than before." he said “We 
have moved from a brilliant but 
nonconstructive phase to a con- 
structive phase.” 

Mr. Andreotti and other Italian 
officials were particularly pleased 
with the arrest Friday by French 
authorities of Massimo Sjnndrani. 
24, who is wanted for the murder of 
a police officer in Milan in 1977. 

The arrest, which came only a 
day after Mr. Craxi's speech to par- 
liament. was seen here as a positive 
French response to Italy's expres- 
sions of concern. 

The agreement of the 10 coun- 
tries on the Italian proposal for a 
meeting to discuss terrorism was 
vague and the group issued no 
statement on il 

Mr. Andreotti said thaL the meet- 
ing would involve appropriate cab- 
inet ministers, but be could not say 
yet when or where it would be held 

In addition to calling for ade- 
quate security measures in Leba- 
non. the ministers' statement wel- 
comed Israel's decision to begin a 
withdrawal. Mr. Andreotti said 
that a complete withdrawal from 
Lebanon by Syria, which now oc- 
cupies about half the country, also 
would be welcomed 


U.S. Envoy 
Gtes Timidity 

(Continued from Page 1) 
think I did the Communists a sub- 
stantial disservice and I'm glad ” 
As for his future, he said: “I 
think I’D go back to the private 
sector. There are only one or two 
things in government that would be 
interesting to me, and I doubt 
they’d be open." 

Those things are thought by 
some of his staff to have been the 
posts of secretary of Treasury or 
Commerce. But, he said, “I never 
sought those jobs, and I never 
looked on them as a possibility." 

Galbraith Disputes Article 

Mr. Galbraith issued the following 
statement Wednesday to die Inter- 
national Herald Tribune, regarding 
Mr. Vinocur's article: 

“The New York Times article of 
Feb, 13 badly distorts ray view of 
the Foreign Service. I do not hold 
career officers with scorn. To the 
contrary, they are highly dedicated 
competent and often courageous. 
What I said was that in my opinion 
political ambassadors are better 
positioned than career officers to 
plead the president's case.” 


Solidarity Leaders Arrested at Meeting 

WARSAW (UPl) - ^ 

= “ “The P°>“* «« 

polite but they told us ^[^^^^^^Wladyslaw Frasyniuk, the 

an uFknowa do**-.' Mr. 

WaJesasmd. «>tirt sentenced an imprisoned leader of the 

S'SSS’i t KS pan L a p* 
Solidarity demonstration in Gdansk. 

Time-Out Is Ordered in Chess Match 

MOSCOW (AP) — The head of the world chess federation ordered a 
time-out fa Wednesday's scheduled 49th game of dm championship 
match, but he refused to confirm rumors that a deal was being SOUghlto 
end tile marathon between the defending champion. AnatQb Karpov, and 

‘fflToSSffi- of *■ nuau- 

arrived in Moscow amid rumors that aides to Mr. Karpov had ap- 
proached Mr. Kasparov's team seeking a way to end the match and replay 
i t in September. Mr. Karpov. 33. has not won a game since November and 
reportedly is near exhaustion. Mr. Kasparov has won three straight games 
to cut the champion's lead to 5-3. ■ _ ... 

Asked to explain why he ordered a time-out, Mr. Campomanes replied, 
“That is my prerogative." He said the 49th game was to be played Friday 
Asked about reports that a way was being sought to end the five-month 
match, he said: “We have talked of the unusual duration of the match. I 
said the FIDE regulations are the regulations. Of course, there are alwa 1 _ 
loopholes.” -ir- ' 

Iraqi Jets Attack Site of Nuclear Plant 

VIENNA (AP) —Iraqi planes attacked an Iranian nuclear power plant 
site with rockets, killing one man and injuring several others, an Iranian 
Embassy spokesman said Wednesday. 

The pjant at Bushehr was still under construction, the spokesman said. 

He said the attack took place Tuesday, and at least three rockets hit the 
plant. He said he had no details on the number of injured or damage to 
the installation. 

There was no danger of a nuclear explosion at the rite, which had been 
attacked previously by Iraqi planes March 24, according to a spokesman 
for the International Atomic Energy Agency, which has its head q u arters 
in Vienna. He said tbe Ir anians had notified the agency of the latest 
attack. 

U.S.-Soviet Talks Reportedly Are Set 

WASHINGTON (AP) —The United States and Soviet Union plan to 
hold talks in Vi enna be ginning Tuesday on the Arab- Israeli conflict and 
other issues, a Reagan administration source said Wednesday. 

.Also on the agenda is the war between Iran and Iraq and the presence 
of more than 100,000 Soviet troops in Af ghanistan. Richard W. Murphy, • . 
assistant secretary of state for Near Eastern and South Arian affairs, is in- 
expert ed to brad'the UJS. delegation. 

The talks are part of a Reagan adminis tration effort to work out a 
better relationship with Moscow, as pledged by tbe president in a speech 
at the United Nations in September. Partly to ease Israeli concerns, U2L 
officials have emphasized there is no plan to call a conference on the 
Middle East and give the Soviet Union a major role in seeking an overall 
settlement. 



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Reagan Lauds Hussein-ArafatTalks 

WASHINGTON (AP) - President Ronald Reagan said Wednesday he 
is optimistic about prospects for a Middle East peace settlement 
Mr. Reagan was asked about a report that King Hussein of Jordan and 
Yasser Arafat, the chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization, 
had reached agreement on “a framework for cqmmon action" to deal ' 
with the Palestinian problem. 

“Tbe little we know about, it seems as if some progress has been made,” 
he said. Mr. Reagan also said his meetings with King Fahd of Saudia 
Arabia, which ended Tuesday, were “a very worthwhile visit for both 
countries and both heads of state.” But he said, “We are very definitely 
not in support of a great international conference on the Middle East” 

Bonn Says No Research Offer Made 

BONN (AP) — The West German government said Wednesday that it j 
had not been formally invited by the United States to participate in space 1 
weapons research. 

U-S- Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger said in London on 
Friday that the United States was attempting to enlist its friends and 
allies in space weapons research. In Giessen, West Germany, on Monday* 
Mr. Weinberger said that Washington specifically was interested in 
assistance from Bonn. 

“There is no concrete American offer to the alfa'es on the table,” the 
West German government spokesman, Peter Boenisch. said Wednesday. 

He was referring to the Strategic Defense Initiative, the U.S. research 
program that is popularly known as “star wars." 

UNESCO Urged to Dismiss Americans 

PARIS (Reuters) —The Soviet Union urged UNESCO on Wednesday 
to stop employing Americans since the United States has withdrawn from 
the agency. 

The Soviet delegate. Dmitri V. Ennolenko, told a meeting of the 
executive board of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and 
Cdtural Organization that the 143 Americans employed by tbe secretari- 
at should be replaced by people from member nations. He said the United * 
State had automatically lost its right to a quota of UNESCO staff by 
leaving the organization at the end of 1984. 

In a report to the board session, called to debate the financial crisis 
caused by the U.S. withdrawal, the director-general. Amadou Mahtar 
ATBow, said that American employees were international civil servants 
and tbnrjohs were not at risk. New staff members who were not citizens 
ScEd* StatCS C ° UW 0Tjy h® recruilcd m exceptional circumstances, he 

For the Record 

Spain's public health senice doctors began a ihree-day strike Wednes- ■ 

r 5t orras ’ but **■ Chornies ordered many of 
them to stay at work to handle emergencies. (Reuters) 

fa southwestern Wand,, bus crashed through a railroad barrier 

“ >— - 

00 DCW »“Pons would be 

‘ (Reuters) 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1985 


Page 3 


U.S. Report on Human Rights 
Cites Latin American Progress 


By John M. Gosh ko 

Wattuagfoa Puu Seme* 

WASHINGTON — Latin 
America, showed “a very strong and 
impressive trend" toward democra- 
cy and human rights improvements 
during 1984 but elsewhere there 
was little change from the 
picture of past years, the State De- 
partment said Wednesday in its an- 
nual report mi international hu man 
rights. 

“Continued improvement in the 
Western Hemisphere was the only 
significant overall trend," said El- 
liott Abrams, assistant secretary of 
state for human rights. 

The report to Congress on 164 
countries, which has teen for 
nine years, frequently causes con- 
troversy about whether it is loo 
harsh or too lenient in its treatment 
of individual countries. That was 
underscored Wednesday when Mr. 
Abrams was asked whether he 
agreed with the report’s finding of 
improvements in South Korea in 
light of events there this month. 

He replied that, “if we were do- 
ing the reports today." the depart- 
ment would have paid major atten- 
tion to Tuesday’s parliamentary 
elections in which a new party op- 
posed to President Chun Doo 
H wan’s military government matte 
■ major gains. 

Mr. Abrams added that the re- 
port would also have cited the scuf- 
fle at the Seoul airport last week 
during the return of a dissident 
leader, Kim Dae Jung. Several 
prominent Americans accompany- 
ing Mr. Kim, including two mein- 
bers of Congress, said they were 
beaten, kicked and knocked down. 

"In relative toms, the impor- 
tance of the election was infinitely 
greater than the scuffle at the air- 
port which, in my view, was a triv- 
ial event," Mr. Abrams said. 

Secretary of State George P. 
Shultz said Monday that the air- 
port incident was due to a "misun- 
derstanding" and argued that it 


should not be allowed 10 distract 
attention from **thc main point” of 
Sooth Korea's progress toward "a 
more open, a more democratic soci- 
ety." - 

In terms of the global human 
rights situation, Mr. Abrams said 
that Latin America showed “a very 
strong and impressive trend" to- 


Thai was denied by Mr. Abrams, 
who insisted that each report was 
made in an evenhanded manner 
based on the best available evi- 
dence. He added: 

‘This institutionalization has the 
double benefit of allowing the 
United States to conduct ongoing 
conversations with countries about 


Cabinet Shift 
By Pinochet 
CaBedEndof 
Liberalization 


ward democracy and human rights which we have serious human 
improvements during 1984. But he rights concerns without necessarily 
here there 


said that elsewhere Acre was little 
change. 

He cited the recent return 10 ci- 
vilian government in Brazil, the im- 
pending inauguration neat month 
of an dected civilian president in 
Uruguay, the free elections in Gre- 
nada, the promise of elections for a 
civilian government in Guatemala 
this year "and a really significant 
downturn in death squad killing s 
and disappearances" tn 0 Salva- 
dor. 

He cited Chile as “the greatest 
disappointment" in the hemisphere 
because the military government 
there has baited "the move toward 
a return to democratic govern- 
ment" and increased "the degree of 
political repression." 

Mr. Abrams also expressed con- 
cent about the continued instabil- 
ities stemming from the rivil war in 
El Salvador, and he acknowledged 
that the level of violence in Guate- 
mala remained high. 

Nevertheless, he said, “in the last 
five yean, nine countries of the 
hemisphere have moved to democ- 
racy from dictatorship and zero 
countries have gone from democra- 
cy to dictatorship." 

The human rights reports invari- 
ably cause controversy about 
whether the findings, compiled by 
U.S. embassies around the world, 
are too harsh or too lenient in re- 
spect to individual countries. Crit- 
ics of the Reagan administration 
have also said that military-domi- 
nated countries allied to the United 
States are given relatively easy 
treatment, while the Soviet Union 
and other East bloc countries are 
described in tough terms. 


our trilateral relations 
is drastically 


SOI 

that our 
reduced.” 

The report’s findings in 
to countries that have figured tn 
human rights controversies includ- 
ed the tallowing: 

• Although Israel is an "open 

democracy^ with "strong respect 
for civil nghts," its military occu- 
pation of the West Bank and Gaza 
Strip continues to cause strains in 
relations with the Palestinian in- 
habitants of these territories. 

"These problems were exacer- 
bated as a consequence of the activ- 
ities of Jewish settlers in those ar- 
eas," the report said. "Israeli 
leaders expressed concern over the 
potential growth of extreme views 
and violent actions and their effects 
on Israeli society." 

• “Despite the gradualist reform 
process seen in recent years,” the 
black majority in South Africa con- 
tinues to be denied the basic rights 
of citizenship and blacks are still 
subjected to a variety of arbitrary 
detention measures and other rules 
severely limiting their political, so- 
cial and economic development. 

■ Despite President Ferdinand 
E Marcos’s promise of "appropri- 
ate prosecution in a civilian court" 
of military leaders implicated in the 
1983 murder of a Philippine oppo- 
sition leader, Bervi goo S. Aquino 
Jr, political polarization and a 
growing leftist insurgency maintain 
a climate of continued violence, po- 
litical killings, disappearances and 
frequent rights abuses by authori- 
ties. 


Allies Upset Over U.S . Nuclear Plan S5a«SS 


1 ~ (Continued bom Page 1) 
are prohibited by treaty from de- 
ploying the weapons there. 

Nonetheless, administration of- 
ficials acknowledged this week that 
nuclear weapons storage facilities 
and a specially trained team nf mil- 
itary experts woe in place in Puer- 
to Rico to receive the weapons. 
They also said in response to a 
question that the classified docu- 
ment governing the current contin- 
gency deployments noted that the 
treaty would have to be "abrogat- 
ed" before nuclear weapons could' 
be seat there. 

In early January, Mr. Aririn visit- 
ed Canada and news articles ap- 
peared describing the nuclear con- 
tingency plans. On Jan. 10, Mr. 
Coates said he was unaware of any 
such plans. 

On the same day, a State 
meat spokesman, Alan D. 
berg, said that it was “strict NATO 
. and United States policy neither to 
* confirm nor deny the authenticity 
of any alleged US. or NATO clas- 
sified documents." 

He added the assurance that no 
weapons would be deployed in 
Canada or elsewhere “without 
strict conformity with appropriate 
NATO plans and procedures and 
the prior agreement of the host gov- 
ernment" 

On Jan. 1 1, General Gferard GE 
Theriault, the chief of the Canadi- 
an defense staff, said bis aides bad 
cemfinned the plans in ccnverea- 
tions with VS. military officials 
the day before. Until then, be said, 
be bad not known of their exis- 
tence. 

Admiral Robert Falls, a former 
chief 'of Canada’s defense staff, 
.then told Maclean's magazine: 
VrThe United States has a moral 
obligation to consult us when using 
our territory for something as emo- 
tional as midear weapons. It is an 
immoral attitude to make plans 
without consulting the countries in- 
volved." 

Soon after, as the issue drew at- 
tention in the Canadian press and 
Parliament, a senior Defense De- 
partment official told the Canadian 
authorities that the plan was not 
“current." 

In the House of Commons, Mr. 
Coates said it was "an old docu- 
ment," and that any such future 
plans would involve consultations 
with Canada. Pressed further, be 
stared, ‘These are no such plans." 

Earlier revelations apparently 
made by Mr. Aririn touched off 
public debate in Bermuda and roe- 
land. 

Bermuda is a British crown colo- 
*' ny, and Britain is responsible Cor its 
defense. 

When a news report appeared in 
Bermuda in early January, Premier 


John W.D. Swan said he was un- 
aware of any such plans and de- 
manded an explanation from 
Washington. He, too, received UJS. 
assuranoes that no deployments 
would be made without permission 
from the proper authorities. 

In early December 1984, Mr.Ar- 
kin reportedly turned over the top- 
secret 1975 deployment document 
to Iceland’s prime minister, Steio- 
grimur Hermanasson, who public- 
ly demanded an explanation from 
Washington. . . 

On Dec. 7, Geir HaJlgrimsson, 
Iceland's foreign minister, said that 
if a US. president had given per- 
mission for such deployments, 
"this is a clear breach of the defense 
treaty” between the two countries. 

He was referring to the 195 1 Kef- 
lavik base agreement, which reads 
in part: "The national composition 
offeree 


in America, also known as the Tla- 
teloco Treaty, came into force and 
was signed by the United States. In 
later years, the other nuclear pow- 
ers agreed to treat the area as free ■ 
of nuclear weapons. In 1977 a pro- 
tocol was added undo - which the 
United States agreed that the pro- 
hibitions would apply to Puerto 
Rica That year, Reagan adminis- 
tration offiaals stated, the United 
States removed nuclear weapons 
previously stored there. 

Washington unilaterally stated. 

at the time that the ban did not 
apply to transit. But last August, in 
response to the Puerto Rico Bar 
Association report, the Stale De- 
partment declared that transit 
meant overflight and landing fay 
aircraft solely for transit. 

A major portion of the Bar Asso- 
’ a report was based on the 
of Mr. A 


aaticra 

work 


Arkin. 


forces, and the conditions under 

winch they may enter upon and 

make use of facilities in Iceland _ . 

pursuant to tins agreement, shall be If 1X1118 to Be VaCCDUtCd 
determined in agreement with Ice- 
land.” 


Administration officials said 
that they were uncertain now about 
Icdand’s policy toward the possi- 
ble deployment of tbe weapons, but 
that they believed the Icelandic 
government now was reassured 

In Puerto Rico, the issue of pre- 
paredness to receive nuclear weap- 
ons arose last August in a study 
published by the Puerto Rico Bar 
Association. The study did not spe- 
cifically mention the UE contin- 
gency plans, bat it cited activities 
dealing with the possibility of de- 
ploying nuclear weapons there. 

In 1967. tbe Treaty far the Prohi- 
bition of Nuclear Weapons in Lat- 


For New Form of Polio 

Semen 

HELSINKI — Finland is vacci- 
nating its entire papulation against 
polio after the discovery that about 
200,000 Runs could be camera of a 
new strain of the disease, known as 
polio-3. 

An official of the national medi- 
cal board said that the estimate of 
victims — one in 2D people — was 
based on tbe unusually high occur- 
rence of tbe virus in sewage 
throughout Finland Medical ex- 
perts said that most of those carry- 
ing tbe virus might be unaware of 
the disease. A 17-year-old youth 
has died from polio-3. 


bum 

SANTIAGO — President Au- 
gusto Pinochet has replaced a key 
cabinet official. Interior Minister 
Sergio Onofrc Jaipa Reyes, with a 
political nonce in a move that dip- 
lomats my ends Genera! Pinochet's 
experiment with political liberal- 
ization. 

General Pinochet also replaced 
Finance Munster Luis Escobar, 
who had been chosen by Mr. Jaipa, 
with an economist. Herein Badri. 

The new interior minster, Ricar- 
do Garda, 54, a lawyer and busi- 
nessman from the port city of Val- 
paraiso, has no known political 
affiliation and no experience in 
public office. 

"He looks like a man who is 
going to take orders," a diplomat 
said. 

Mr. Jaxpa had no words of criti- 
cism for General Pinochet after the 
cabinet shuffle. 

He apparently forced General 
Pinochet to replace him on learning 
that Mr. Escobar was (0 be dis- 
missed in March. 

Mr. Jaipa’s position in the gov- 
ernment bad looked increasingly 
untenable since General Pinochet 
imposed a state of siege to curb 
political unrest in November. 

A veteran rightist politician. Mr. 
Jaipa was associated with concilia- 
tory efforts to reach an agreement 
with opponents of the 11-year mili- 
tary government. He was appoint- 
ed 18 months ago at the height of 
anti-Pinochet protests. 

Mr, Jaipa had brought Mr. Esco- 
bar into the cabinet to bolster his 
attempts at political liberalization. 

Diplomats said that with the 
changes, the cabinet no longer had 
independent officials of suture 
likely to challenge the president's 

1 inenmpirwm«ing q flin ide toward 

dissent 

The broad-based Democratic 
Alliance of imposition political 
parties, which held abortive 
with Mr. Jaipa soon after his 
pointnm, 
had been used only to present a 
false image of political liberaliza- 
tion while the true intention was to 
maintain autocratic government 

“The words spoken at tbe swear- 
ing-in of the new ministers confirm 
our conviction that the government 
has no desire whatsoever to move 
toward democracy," tbe group 
said. 

In a speech at the inauguration 
ceremony Tuesday night. General 
Pinochet said the state of siege had 
been necessary to curb violence 
and that tbe Chilean public was 
grateful for it 

The measures have included the 
dosing of the opposition press, 
strict censorship of political news 
in all other media, the dispatch of 
hundreds of opponents to internal 
exile and curbs on almost all politi- 
cal activity. 

Journalists from opposition 
magazines that were closed down 
in November began a hunger strike 
Tuesday night to mark: tbe annual 
Press Day, which commemorates 
the founding of the first newspaper 
in Chile in 1812. 

It appeared that strains were 
likely to develop between Mr. Bu- 
chi, the new fin»iwy minister, and 
Modesto Collados, economics min- 
ister, who leads the government's 
economic team 

Mr. Buchi is associated with a 
of adherents of Milton L 
the University of Chica- 
go economist. The group’s free- 
market, monetarist policies are 
praised by some for Chile’s boom 
between 1979 and 1982 and blamed 
by others for the crash that has 
followed. 



U.S. Drug Agent, Pilot 
Still Missing in Mexico 

Gang Suspected of Abducting Pair; 
17-SL Ambassador Tightens Security 


Bosh Names New Assistant 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Vice Presi- 
dent George Bush announced 
Wednesday that Craig L. Fuller. 
assistant to Resident Ronald Rea- 
gan for cabinet affairs. wiB become 
his chief erf staff on April 1, suc- 
ceeding retired Admiral Daniel J. 
Murphy- 




The Global 
Newspaper. 




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President Augusto Pinochet right talks with bis new 
interior minister, Ricardo Garda, after swearing him in. 

Uruguay Military Rule Ends; 
Army Issues Coup Warning 


Roam 

MONTEVIDEO — Uruguay’s 
armed forces have formally 
stepped down after 1 1 years in gov- 
ernment but have threatened to 
seize power again if the country 
slips into chaos. 

"We are not thinking about a 
coup, nor do we wish to stage a 
coup, but if we are forced ana the 
same causes arise as in 1973, we 
will not hesitate to do so." General 
Hugo Medina, head of the Uru- 
guayan Army, said Tuesday. 

General Medina's warning was 
issued shortly after the Cocmdl of 
State, the mQitaiy government's 
legislative body, accepted (he resig- 
nations of President Gregorio Al- 
varez Armellino and his cabinet. 

The council appointed Rafael 
Adieggo, president of the supreme 
court, as interim president until 
March 1, when Julio M. Sanguin- 
ed! is to be sworn in as president. 
The moderate Colorado Party can- 
didate was elected Nov. 25. 

Tbe 35-member council did not 


immediately name an interim cabi- 
net. 

General Medina criticized politi- 
cians’ demands for amnesty for the 
country’s more than 300 political 
prisoners. Human rights groups 
have said that, muter ite military 
regime, prisoners were routinely 
tortured and rhai some disap- 
peared. 

"If there is gang to be an amnes- 
ty and prisoners with nine or 10 
«te?ith< on their hands are going to 
be set free, I cannot see why mem- 
bers of the armed forces who com- 
mitted excesses should be tried," he 
said. 

Political sources said General 
Medina's waning of a new coup 

cerrfover the p^^flity ^an in- 
vestigation of administration. 

Hie military seized power in 
1973 after crushing tbe leftist Tn- 
pamaro guerrillas, saying this small 
Latin American country was sink- 
ing into political and economic 
chaos. 


By Richard J. Mrislin 
Herr Y ork Ti mes Sendee 

MEXICO CITY — An agent of 
the UJS. Drug Enforcement Ad- 
ministration and a Mexican pilot 
associated with the agency were 
kidnapped in Guadalajara, Mexi- 
co, last week and neither has been 
beard from auce, according to the 
ILSl Embassy here. 

The agent, Enrique Camarena 
Salazar, was kidnapped Thursday, 
an embassy spokesman said Tues- 
day. The pilot, Alfredo Zavala Ave- 
lar, a friend of Mr. Salazar who 
flew missions for the ageray in 
Mexico, was abducted a few bouts 
later. 

John Gavin, the U.S. ambassa- 
dor, said there bad been no com- 
munication with the mm or their 
abductors. 

Mr. Gavin said be had ordered, 
increased protection of American' 
officials and their families in Mexi- 
co. 

Speaking of Mr. Salazar’s abduc- 
tion, he said: "We have witnesses 
to this effect; He was taken away in 
Guadalajara by armed men. We 
have not seen him or beard of him 
since." 

The embassy spokesman said 
that later Thursday, a car in which 
Mr. Aveiar was a passenger was 
forced off the road as he returned 
from tbe Guadalajara airport and 
that the pilot had been removed 
from tbe vehicle by two men with 
warVine pntt 

The head of the U.S. drug agen- 
cy, Francis M. Mullen Jr., said 
Tuesday that he had ordered his 
agents m the United Slates to expe- 
dite investigations of drug traffick- 
ers with ties to Mexico and that 
"early indictments wQl be sought 
wherever posable." « 

Mr. Gavin said the embassy was 
increasing security measures, “par- 
ticularly for those individuals, offi- 
cials and their families who might 
be targets" of drog traffickers. 

The two officials appeared at a 
press conference before meeting 
with Mexican officials about the 
kidnappings. 

Additional UR. agents have 
been flown into Mexico to help 


with (he investigation, an embassy 
spokesman sat d- 
Mr. M alien said that Guadalaja- 
ra, in the western state of Jalisco, 
bad become "the major center at 
this time" for what he said were 75 
major drug traffickers and 18 ma- 
now working in Mexico. 


tbe Mexican gangs had 
links with traffickers m South 
America and the United States. 

Union Chiefs 
Accused of 
BreakingLaw 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Tbe presi- 
dents of the three largest U.S. fed- 
eral and postal labor unions will be 
prosecuted for illegally engaging in 
political activities on behalf of 
Walter F. Mondale unless they re- 
sign their federal jobs or retire by 
Feb. 26. according to a government 
agency. 

“We have concluded that during 
1983 and 1984 you engaged in cam- 
paign activity' in support of tbe 
presidential candidacy of Demo- 
crat Walter Mondale and against 
the re-election of Republican Ron- 
ald Reagan." the Office of Special 
Counsel, an arm of the Merit Sys- 
tem Protection Board, said in let-' 
ters to the three union officials re- 
leased Tuesday. 

The 1939 Hatch Act prohibits 
federal workers from campaigning, 
fund-raising, distributing literature 
or seeking office. 

The three labor officials. Ken- 
neth T. Blaylock of the American 
Federation of Government Em- 
ployees, Moe Biller of the Ameri- 
can Postal Workers Union and 
Vincent R_ Sombrotto erf the Na- 
tional Association of Letter Cam- 
era, whose unions represent 1 3 mil- 
lion employees, have been 
outspoken critics of the Reagan ad- 
ministration. 


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Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1985 


Colonel Asserts Westmoreland 
Set 'Dishonest’ Enemy Ceiling 


By M.A. Farber 

New York Times Senior 

NEW YORK — A retired U-S.' 
Army colonel who was in charge of 
estimating enemy strength in South 
Vietnam in 1967 has testified that 

General William C. Westmoreland 
imposed a “dishonest" ceding on 
reports of that strength because 
higher figures were “politically un- 
acceptable.” 

Colonel Gains B. Hawkins testi- 
fied Tuesday that the “command 
position” was that the estimates of 
enemy strength “would not ex- 
ceed" 300,000, about 200,000 be- 
low the figure supported by the 
colonel He appeared in U.S’ Dis- 
trict Court in Manhattan as Lbe 
16th witness for CBS in the gener- 
al's $120- million libel suit against 
the television network. 

General Westmoreland, who 
commanded U.S. forces in Viet- 
nam from 1964 to 1968, denied in 
his own testimony in November 
that he had placed a ceiling on 
estimates of enemy strength. He 
said he was concerned about the 
“public relations" impact of releas- 
ing new data without “explana- 
tion” but was guided by his own 
views of enemy capabilities and 
what he believed to be the best 
intelligence available to him. 

Colonel Hawkins. 65, was chief 
of the “order of battle” section for 
General Westmoreland's com- 
mand from February 1966 to Sep- 
tember 1967. 


He testified that he had first 
briefed General Westmoreland in 
May 1967 on much increased fig- 
ures for the Vietcong's irregular 
forces and political cadre. His star 
tistical methods, the colonel told 
David Boies, a CBS lawyer, were 
not questioned, but his figures were 
'‘not accepted L" 

’ Q. Colonel Hawkins, I want you 
to tell me in words to the extent you 
can, and in substance to the extent 
that you recall, what General West- 
moreland said to you at that brief- 
ing. 

A. I will have to tell you in sub- 
stance because I cannot remember 
the precise words. But the sub- 
stance of General Westmoreland’s 
statement was that these high fig- 
ures were politically unacceptable. 
The sum and substance of his state- 
ment included statements like 
“What win I tell the president? 
What will I tdl the Congress? What 
will be the reaction of the press to 
these high figures?" 

“We'd better take another look 
qt these figures," Colonel Hawkins 
recalled the general saying The 
colonel said that, in the following 
months, at least partly on the or- 
ders of another colonel who was his 
immediate superior, he reduced the 
estimates. He made no mention of 
a direct order from General West- 
moreland to cut the figures. 

Coload Hawkins testified that 
14 years later he had discussed the 
May 1967 briefing with George 


why have n't you > 

i GOT TELEFAX W / 

„ YOUR BUSINESS -> 
t s ERvice LOUNGES ? 


O 


(<! \\/ J/ 


Crile, a defendant and the producer 
of the CBS documentary of 1982 
that prompted General Westmore- 
lands lawsuit 

Q. Did you discuss with Mr. 
Crile in 1981 who was responsible 
for the dishonesty of MACV (Gen- 
eral Westmoreland’s command] en- 
emy strength figures? 

A. I told him it went back to 
General Westmoreland himself. 

Q. Did you discuss with Crile 
why you believed it went back to 
Genoal Westmoreland himself? 

A Because General Westmore- 
land had established a ceiling and 
no competent intelligence analyst 
can function under the ceiling that 
had beat established. 

The CBS documentary entitled, 
“The Uncounted Enemy: A Viet- 
nam Deception," alleged that Gen- 
eral Westmoreland’s command in 
Saigon had engaged in a “conspira- 
cy” in 1967 to show progress in the 
war by understating the size and 
nature of Communist forces, main- 
ly by deleting the Vietcong's self- 
defense units from the official list- 
ing of enemy strength known as the 
order of battle. 

The documentary specifically ac- 
cused the general of setting the ced- 
ing of 300,000 on reports of enemy 
strength. 

Union Carbide 
Plans to Reopen 
Factory in U.S. 

New York Tunes Service 

NEW YORK —The Union Car- 
bide Covp. said Tuesday that by 
April I it hopes to reopen a West 
Virginia plant that produces meth- 
yl isocyanate, the pesticide ingredi- 
ent that killed more than 2,000 peo- 
ple when it leaked into the air at a 
similar plant in Bhopal, India. 

Union Carbide said the plant at 
Institute, West Virginia, which has 
been dosed since the gas leak Dec. 
3 in India, would reopen with at 
least one major safety improve- 
ment: a computer system to track 
chemical leaks. 

The company also said it was 
considering the elimination of 
commercial shipments of the chem- 
ical, commonly known as MIC, 
smaller inventories and procedural 
revisions. 


ReportSays 
U.S. Refuses 
Intelligence to 
New Zealand 

The Associated Press • 

LONDON —The United States 


has stopped supplying New Zea- 
land with top-level intelligence on 
the Soviet Union because of the 


New Zealand government's refusal 
to allow a U5. destroyer to make a 
port call, Jane's Defense Weekly 
reported. * 

The article in the weekly, pub- 
lished Tuesday, quoted “reliable 
sources" in Canberra, the Austra- 
lian capital 

The reported move would repre- 
sent the most serious U.S. action 
against New Zealand, a member of 
the 1951 defense alliance known as 
ANZUS, involving Australia, New 
Zealand and the United States. 

fin New Zealand on Wednesday, 
Agence France-Presse quoted 
Prone Minister David Lange as 
saying that New Zealand bad ob- 
served “no change” in the flow of 
routine U3. intelligence.] 

In Washington, several Reagan 
administration officials declined 
comment on the Jane’s report, say- 
ing they were prohibited from dis- 
cussing intelligence matters. But 
one official who insisted on ano- 
nymity, said be understood that the 
administration was “ malting thing s 
tough" for New Zealand in a num- 
ber of ways. 

The report said that New Zea- 
land was ordered cut from Lhe list 
of recipients of intercepted radio 
communications on Feb. 4, when 
Mr. Lange said for the second time 
that the destroyer could not dock 
unless Washington guaranteed that 
the ship was not carrying nuclear 
weapons. 

The intelligence is gathered un- 
der a 1947 treaty for monitoring 
Soviet military and diplomatic ra- 
dio traffic in the Pacific. Members 
of the treaty are the United Slates, 
Britain, Australia, Canada and 
New Zealand. 

New Zealan d was routinely re- 
sponsible for intercepting radio 
communications in the southeast 
Padfic.but its participation had be- 
come “more token than real" in 
recent years because of satellites 
and high-technology equipment, 
Jane's said. New Zealand has a 
small navy and no 


Ibur wish is our command. 

Some of our passengers asked us why we didn't 
have a telefax in our Business Service Lounges. 

The truth was it hadn't ready occurred to us. 

Not until our passengers brought it iqi. Now we do. 
Service is like that. You have to listen. 

During the past few years, listening to our 
passengers has helped us develop a whole range 
of new services. 

And we're reminded every day just how many 
small details can stand improvement. 

So if you want to travel better, fly an airline that 
listens. 


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Police in Japan checking store she ties for poisoned candy on Wednesday following the 
latest in a series of extortion threats, which were timed to coincide with Valentine’s Day. 

Japanese Find More Poisoned Candy 


The Associate ti Press 

TOKYO — Extortionists have 
placed chocolate bars laced with 
cyanide in stores in Tokyo and the 
central dty of Nagoya in an at- 
tempt to harass candy makers pre- 
paringfor increased sales on Valen- 
tine’s Day, police said Wednesday. 

A police official said that mem- 
bos of a gang calling itself “The 
Man with 21 Faces." a name taken 
from a popular novel had poisoned 
the packages of chocolates. The 
group also labeled several packages 
“not poisoned." the official said. 

The gang, which has demanded 
milli ons of dollars and threatened 
at least 30 food companies since 
last March, warned in a letter to 
Fujiya Co. in December that “there 
also' is Valentine’s Day" to carry 
out its threats. Millions of Japanese 


buy chocolates to give as gifts on 
Feb. 14. 

Last October, the gan g left 17 
cyanide-laced packages of candy in 
stores in western Japan, triggering 
a bouse- to-house search and pa- 
trols of stores. No deaths have been 
attributed to the poisoned candy, 
police said. 

On Tuesday in Tokyo, a choco- 
late bar with a note saying “Dan- 
ger, contains poison, you’ll die if 
you eat this" was found outside a 
restaurant, police said. 

Mail sorters at a post office also 
found a chocolate bar with a simi- 
lar note on Tuesday. Later, two 
other packages of chocolates found 
in central Tokyo turned out to be 
laced with cyanide, police said. 

A spokesman for the Nagoya po- 


lice said that mail sorters at the 
Nagoya Central Post Office found 
a chocolate bar with a similar note. 

Chocolates from the Megi Seika 
and Lotte companies were among 
those involved in the latest inci- 
dents. They previously had not 
been threatened by the gang, which 
has directed most of its threats at 
Fujiya and Morinaga & Co. 

None of the companies bas paid 
extortion money, police said. 

Meanwhile, the gang sent letters 
io two newspapers in Nagoya, indi- 
cating they planned to distribute 
more poisoned chocolates. 

“There wasn’t Valentine’s Day 
when we were young," the letter 
said. “We’ve never been riven 
chocolate. Wonder wbo made up 
such a stupid thing." 


Fire Sweeps 

Manila Hotels 

Killing 24 
Guests , Staff 

The Associated Pros 

MANILA — Fire that spread 
quickly through one of Manilas 
luxury hotels early Wednesday 
frnifrt at least 24 guests and em- 
ployees, firemen said. Many of the 
dead were foreigners, according to 
the authorities. 

Sixteen bodies were recovered, 
and a police corporal Mario Pan- 
ganiban, said that firemen had 
caved eight more. The fire was still - 
burning through parts of the 11- 
story Regent of Manila Hotel 14 
hours after it broke ouL 

Mr. Panganiban, an arson inves- 
tigator, said that of the 370 people 
registered at the hotel, 160 had 
been transferred to the nearby Hy- 
att. He said that three were bong 
treated at a nearby hospital. 

He said be did not know the 
wbereabouts.of the others or how 
many might have been trapped m 
LheRegenL 

It was the sixth hold fire in the 
Philippines in four months. Police 
blamed three of the previous fires, 
which killed a total of 40 people, on 
arsonists, possibly Communist 
guerrillas, although no group bas 
claimed responsibility for than. 

A suspect with alleged rebel tk^L:/ 
escaped last week from police cus- 
tody. He was being held for trial for 

an October fire that killed 23 peo- 
ple at the Pines Hotel in the north- 
ern dty of Baguio. 

A group of American guests who 
work for the Internal Revenue Ser- 
vice said one of their party had 
been failed. 

The U.S. Embassy declined to 
identify any American dead until 
relatives had been notified. 

“I was screaming." said Ann 
Douglas of Washington, one of 14 
IRS officials attending a weddong 
meeting at the hotel “I tried to 
block the smoke with wet towels 
and then went running down the 

hall " 

“It was the smoke that was most 
deadly,” said Colonel Rolando S- 
quijor, the area police chief. 

Fire officials said it could take ,, _ 
several days to determine the caused 
of the hotel fire. 


Publishing Thrives in Poland , But Underground 


By Michael T. Kaufman 

iVe»- York Times Semce 

WARSAW — So many Poles 
spend so much of their lime waiting 
for a “kolporter" that one might 
conclude that there is a revivalist 
cult of the American songwriter 
here. 

But the word that sounds like 
Cole Porter actually refers to some- 
thing clandestine. 

The word is a perfectly fine Po- 
lish one. imported from the French, 
that literally means a door-to-door 
salesman, but refers these days to 
bootleggers of materials published 
underground and connected with 
the outlawed Solidarity trade union 
movement. 

. There are an estimated 20,000 
men and women who work as Im- 
porters, taking orders, delivering 
materials, collecting payments and 
turning funds over to organizations 
affiliated with Solidarity. 

Judging from the books, maga- 
zines. leaflets, tapes, cards and 
badges that they handle, the clan- 
destine publishing effort is huge. 
As an industry it is said to involve 
tens of thousands, and some 
sources say hundreds of thousands, 
of mostly pan-time volunteers. 

In numbers of publications, lhe 
illicit press in Poland rivals and 
may even overwhelm the state-run 
publishing houses. 

A list of underground books re- 
cently distributed included such 
works as translations into Polish of 
works by Raymond Aron, the 
French commentator, Milan Kun- 
dera. the Czechoslovak writer, and 
a work titled “Political Psychiatry 
in the Soviet Union" by Robert van 
Vooreu, a Dutch writer. 

Recently, a hard-cover comic 
book was distributed, a black and 
white album telling about the rise 
of Solidarity. 

A major recent literary event was. 
the issuing by the nonofficial press 


of a new novel by Tadeusz Kon- 
wicki, generally regarded as Po- 
land's most highly esteemed au- 
thor. The book, “Underground 
River." was brought out by Krag, 
one of the dozens of underground 
publishing bouses to have arisen 
during the growth of Solidarity. 

In an interview. Mr. Konwidti 
said that his last four books ap- 
peared first under the imprimatur 
of such illicit publishers before be- 
ing translated and published 
abroad. 

“I really don’t know how it hap- 
pens and I don’t want to know very 
much." said the author of such 
works as “The Polish Complex" 
and “A Small Apocalypse." 

In Poland, there is an official 
culture where manuscripts are as- 
signed and then examined for ideo- 
logical purity, a process that can 
lake anywhere f rom two years to 25 
years, as in the case of “The Upris- 
ing of the Polish Nation in 1831,” a 
150-year-old anti-Russian classic 
that appeared officially last sum- 
mer after first being proposed in 
1958. 

But there is an unofficial culture 
that responds almost instantly to 
current events. 

The police in Poland are efficient 
and both paper supplies and access 
to printing equipment are limited 
Thus many people h/.ve asked how 
and why this underground culture 
has been allowed to flourish while 
the labor unions and political dis- 
cussion groups that sprouted dur- 
ing the reign of the now-banned 
Solidarity organization have been 
suppressed. 

In fact, some kolponers and 
clandestine editors have been ar- 
rested and sentenced to prison 
terms of up to two years. 

StiU, police raids appear to be 
perfunctory and there is an impres- 
sion that some of the authorities 
are turning a relatively blind eye to 


some of the publishing activity. 

“The existence of 500 under- 
ground journals is the real miracle 
of the Solidarity period," said 
Adam Michnik, the formerly im- 
prisoned Solidarity adviser. 


& Herald 


> Opening for Talk* 
■ USi«i» Ho 


| Ip pPS 


Said Mr. Konwidti: “Perhaps 
the authorities have different priv- 
ities. Perhaps it flatters their sense 
of Poland as a Western cultural 
nation with broad, if clandestine, 
cultural expression." 


m™*mt 


mnril Leaden Vow to Ptisb jp 
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k Henry R:: 
M 


Bishop’s Views on Christ 
Debated by Anglican Leaders 


The Associated Press 

LONDON — Spurred by a bish- 
op’s doubts over Jesus Christ’s res- 
urrection and the Virgin Birth, 
leaders of the Church erf England 
on Wednesday debated some of 
their most basic beliefs. 

Church House in Westminster 
was packed Tor the debate by the 
General Synod, a 560-member 
leadership council of bishops, dcr- 
gy and laity. 

Among them was the Bishop of 
Durham, David Jenkins, who 
touched off the controversy by 
questioning the Virgin Birth and 
the biblical account of the Resur- 
rection. 

Bishop Jenkins described the 
Virgin Birth as “a story told after 
the event in order to express and 
symbolize a faith that this Jesus 
was a unique event from God." The 
doctrine of the Virgin Birth holds 
that Jesus was miraculously begot- 
ten of God and bom to a virgin 
mother. 

The bishop said he believed in 
Jesus’s resurrection but not that he 
physically rose from the tomb, an 
account he likened to a “conjuring 
trick with bones." 

The Most Reverend Robert 


Runde, the archbishop of Canter- 
bury and spiritual leader of 65 mil- 
lion Anglicans worldwide, said he 
welcomed the debate. But he as- 
sured his flock: “The doctrines of 
the Incarnation and the Resurrec- 
tion are not in doubt among your 
bishops." 

The attack on Bishop Jenkins’s 
opinions was launched by Bishop 
John Taylor of Winchester. 

“In the past decade, in all walks 
of life, I have watched the broad 

middle ground being! eliminated," 
be said. “Hie extremists occupy the 
field. Compromise is a term of 
abuse and confrontation is the or- 
der of the day. Anyone can see that 
it is a recipe for self-destruction.” 

PhiUip Lovegrovc, a business- 
man, complained that Bishop Jot- 
kins had “dammed the members of 
the Church of England in the pews 
and damaged the faith." 

Archdeacon Michael Perry of 
Durham defended him. saying that 
news accounts had distorted his re- 
marks. He said the bishop's faith 
was firm. “Hands off the Bishop of 
Durham,” he demanded. 

The debate concluded with on 
instruction to bishops to consider 
the subject again when they meet in 
July. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBI NE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14 * 1985 


Page 5 



Kill S 

U€ ^ 

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•: , „ 

v-\wi5s$s 


Soviet Gets a Hill With a View for Embassy in U.S, 


L\TEMATI«m POSITION 




5 




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• IV."'? 31 ® 


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is 


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OR 


.*> Ar * l Tim*f Semre 

Washington — i n intciii- 

SSS2*. **“ site Of the new 
soviet Embassy in Washington is 
considered the biggest giveaway 

m 16-6 for the equivalent of $24. 
.^earihemiereeciioa of Wiscon- 
and Massachusetts Avenues 
here upper Georgetown and’ 

Steffi"* creM 31 top of a hill 

called Mount Alto. 350 feet (100 

nwiersj above sea level, the site has 
a commanding view of the entire 
Washington area. 

In the arcane world of electronic 
site is described as an 
ideal place to monitor govrramenl. 
commeraal and private communi- 
cations flowing into, out oT and 
over Washington. “From an eaves- 
cropping standpoint, that’s one of 
the most magnificent vantage 
paitus in Washington,** a senior 
U.5. intelligence official said. 

By contrast, intelligence officials 
say. the new U.S. Embassy in Mos- 
cow is being built in the middle of 
ute city where surrounding buDd- 
mgs wul limit the ability to monitor 
Soviet communications. 

How the Soviet Union obtained 
Mount Alio site remains the 
subject of considerable debate 16 
years after Washington and Mos- 
cow reached agreement on the con- 
struction of new embassies. That 
agreement, six years in the making 


Provided new sites forboth cuun- 

bnng in its own construction crews ^ " 
to work on the interior of its new 
chanceries, to prevent the insinua- 
tion of electronic eavesdropping 
devices. 

The main reason the Russians 
got such a favorable spot, accord- 
ing to intelligence and State De- 
portment offidals, was that bug- 
ging was relatively primitive at the 
time and U.S. officials were not 
aware of the site's potential advan- 
tages. 

The United States and the Soviet 
Union have invested billions of 
dollars in dying to intercept each 
other’s communications. Much of 


m uMin. iivui quanta, ju auur 

tjon, the United States and its al- 
lies, particularly Britain, m?iimn in 
ground stations in Europe and Asia 
to track Soviet communications. 

The Soviet Union, in turn, oper- r 

2S " n,e Soviet Union ’ s embassy in Washington, now under construction on Momrt AJto. 

able to monitor almost all domestic 
communications, including tele- 
phone and television, relayed to fense Department, Commerce De- When completed in several 
and from the East Coast by satel- partment and several important years, the 10-acre (four-hectare) 
tile- toram compounds, including the Soviet compound wiU have a nioe- 

Eleclromc spying is considered British, West German and French cm™ imtmnml tviilHinu a email 




Electronic spying is considered 



monitoring the electronic data, te- electronic view. __ . .... , , , , 

lone try. that are transmitted by Further, the site offers a largely a P a J txncm budding and school ai- 
missiles and re-entry vehicles in unobstructed view of several key rea “3 r *** occupied, 
tests. microwave relay towers that serve Antennas and dish-shaped re- 

Tht tracking of missiles as they as the conduit for most telephone ceivers will be tucked away m these 
fly down range is carried out by and data-transmission comiminica- buildings, according lo UiL intelli- 
sateDiles. ground stations and spe- lions from Washington to other gence officials. They said that some 
daily-equipped aircraft and ships. East Coast cities. already were in operation. 


When completed in several To counter Soviet spying from 
years, the 10-acre (four-hectare) (be new rite as well as from other 
Soviet compound will have a nine- Soviet installations in the Washing- 
story apartment building, a small ion area, not to mention satellites 
school, a gymnasium, an eight-sto- and ships off shore, the govero- 
ry administration building and a menu working with the telephone 
residence for the ambassador. The company, has tried to route nearlv 


all sensitive calls in the area on 
underground cables. 

in addition, the government has 
invested heavily in the develop- 
ment and installation of secure 
telephones. Government messages 
to posts abroad are encoded. 


cially-equipped aircraft and ships. East Coast cities. already were in operation. to posts abroad are encoded. 

This kind of monitoring has played - — — — — 

a key role in the ability of both a 

m^S^SaS COTip,iancc wi,h Canadian Provincial Premier Denies Drugs Allegation 


aims agreements. 

Soviet eavesdropping in Wash-, 
ington is designed to pluck off any' 
stray unsecured government com- 


7* e AaociuCat Pku jjjd he thouj 

FREDERICTON, New Bruns- that be said t 


n the same people ering fili 


planted drugs in 


g filing a suit for defamation 
would stay in office. Mr. Hat- 


rauni cations as wdJ as those in- wic1t — Wchaid Haifidd, the pre- his luggage were orchestrating oth- field has won four consecutive dec- 
volvine commerria] transactions. mier Ncw B run $ w * c k, °n er rumors and allegations lo drive tionssince 1970. making him Cana- 

Wednesday denied accusations him from office. da’s senior provincial leader and 

■*» •<<• ^ 

lions. inldliMTifip nffiriak civ t, cocaine to a group of students at Bnraswick s history. 


Saga Petroleum is one of three Norwegian oil companies engaged as operators on Norway's 
continental shelf . The company participates in 21 concessions and is operator for 9 of rrtese. 

Outside of Norway Saga ’s subsidiary, $aga Petroleum Beninas, is engaged in the development 
and exploration of the S6me oil field off the coast of Benin in West -Africa. The field came on 
stream during November 1382. There are 40 expatriates working on the project m Cotonou, the 
principal town of Benin. 

For our project in Cotonou, we have a vacancy for 

Chief Mechanical Engineer 

on onshore and offshore installations. 

Functions will include: 

- Preventive maintenance of all mechanical and rotating equipment, such as 
diesel and gas engines, pumps, compressors etc. 

- Supervision and follow-up of daily maintenance and repairs. 

- Ordering and follow-up of supply and storage of spare parts for all 
mechanical equipment. 

- Training of Beninian personnel. 

The position reports to the Production Superintendent. 

Required background as engineer or as chief engineer from the merchant marine 
and 5-7 years relevant experience, preferably from offshore activities. 

Proficiency in English is required. Working knowledge of French is desirable. 
We offer a two years contract subject to extension upon mutual agreement. 
Place of work is Cotonou, but stays offshore must be expected. 

Additional information can be provided by Kjell Aalandsfid, telephone 2-23 50 50 
or Olav Mofjeil, telephone 2-12 01 11 . 

Application with resume and references, marked SPB 2/85, to be sent within 
February 28th to 


Saga Petroleum a.s. 


Maries vet 20, P.O. Box 9, 
1322 Hovik, Norway 


lions, mieDigeoce officials say. The 10 genu al 

United Statestries to do lire same | ushon ?5 ,J1 19 £J and ,n5isicd ^ 


W«w«vu ULUIU Uiu IV UV U1L pdlllC I. If • 

in Moscow. For a brief period in wou d no1 resEn ' 
the 1970s, according to intelligence Mr. Hatfield, 53, 
officials, the United States was able last month on dr 
to monitor the radio telephone con- charges stemming fn 
versations of Soviet leaders as they ay of marijuana ii 
drove around Moscow. ~ 


suisrsfissta °' wsv n,^ fzrVrT- 

hc would noi resign. ihat they mtl Mr. HattieU a 

a Fredericton restaurant in 1981, 
Mr. Hatfield, 53, was acquitted gave him a ride home, were invited 
last month on drug possession in and offered c ocain e and man- 
charges stemming from ifie discov- juana. One said he saw the premier 
cry of marijuana in his suitcase using cocaine. The reports led to 

j : /-i ci: i .l «i>. . r .. . 


Heary Hathaway “STKESJtatafc 

* J 1 - iL . 1 ... - • L3Q(]Q3 Ifl Remember. hrtn nnli tinon r fnr Mr UotfiaM'i- 


* Henry Hathaway, 
Movie Director, 
Dies in U.S. at 86 

New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — Henry Hatha- 
way, 86, a Hollywood film director 
with a reputation for tur ning out 
such solid, well -crafted movies as 
“Lives of a Bengal Lancer.” “Rom- 
mel, Desert Fox” and “True Grit." 
died Monday in Los Angeles. 

Mr. Hathaway had been admit- 
ted to a hospital two weeks ago 
after suffering a heart attack. 

His more than 60 films included 
“The Real Glory,” a 1939 drama 
about the Philippine uprising that 
is regarded as a minor classic; 
“Brigham Young,” the 1940 exami- 
nation of the Mormon movement 
that includes a memorable segment 
in which a grasshopper plague is 
1 ended by an invasion of seagulls; 
and “Kiss of Death," the 1947 film 
in which Richard Widmarlc became 
a star because of a harrowing scene 
in which the actor, playing a hired 
killer, pushes an old woman in a 
wheelchair down a flight of stairs. 

Mr. Hathaway enjoyed great 
rapport with prop men, electri- 
cians, carpenters, cameramen, 
grips and other technician, because 
they considered him one of their 
own. He had worked his way up in 
the film business, moving from ac- 
tor to prop boy at the age of 14. 

Born Henri Leopold de Fiennes 
in Sacramento, California, Mr. 
Hathaway was the son of a stage 

actress^ whose surname he later 
adopted He started acting when be 
■; was 10, in short one-reel westerns 
directed by Allan Dwan. 

His breakthrough high- budget 
film, released in 1935, was “Lives 
of a Bengal Lancer,” with Gary 
Cooper and Franehat Tone. 

Among Ins other films were 
“Home in Indiana,” “13 Rue Ma- 
deleine,'’ “Call Northade 777,” 
“Down to the Sea ifl Ships,” “Four- 
teen Hours," “Twenty-Three Paces 
to Baker Street,” “The Sons of Ka- 
tie Elder” and “Nevada Smith.” 
“True Grit,” which he directed in 
1969, brought John Wayne his only 
Academy Award 


bassy, the officials say, provides a 
dear fine of sight to the State De- 
partment, the White House, De- 


Canada in September. 

Reading a statement in New 
Brunswick’s provincial capital be 


tion politicians for Mr. Hatfield's 
resignation. 

The premier said he was consid- 



INTERNATIONAL POSITIONS 


Saga Petroleum Is one of three Norwegian oil companies engaged as operators on Norway’s 
continental shelf . The company participates in 21 concessions and is operator for 9 of these. 

Outside of Norway Saga's subsidiary. Saga Petroleum Beninas, is engaged in the development 
and exploration of the Semd oil field off the coast of Benin in West-Afhca. The field came on 
stream dunngNovember 1982. There am 40 expatriates working on the project in Cotonou: the 
principal town of Benin. 

For our project in Cotonou, we have a vacancy for 

Workover & completion supervisor 

with responsibility for ail coordination, installation and ordering of relevant 
equipment and services. 

Applicants should have experience from: 

- Electicai submersible pump installations. 

- Completion equipment. 

- Wireline operations. 

Assigned responsibilities will also include training of Beninian employees. 

The position reports to the Production Manager. 

Required background as engineer and minimum 5 years relevant experience. 
Proficiency in English is required. Working knowledge of french is desirable. 

We offer a two years contract subject to extension upon mutual agreement 
Place of work is Cotonou. 

Additional information can be provided by Hugo Sandal or Halh/ard HaydaJsvik, 
telephone 2-12 01 11. 

Application with resume and references, marked SPB 3/85, to be sent within 
February 28th to 

Saga Petroleum a.s. 9 


_ ■ SINGAPORE AIRUNE5 " 

Invites cqipfieaticxis from suiftfcly quofiftad eamfidnto* for 
employment in Sngapore oe 

11747 COMMAIVDEBS 

■ns? ATTL^wepuibie to licensing authorities is Sinppore with 
endorsement for B747 aircraft and current ix«rumenl ralrag. 
Minimum 1000 flying hours in command including at least 500 
hours is command on the B747. 

2 yean with poaaUuiity of extension. Applicants should 
be aged 57 years or below. 

CROSS SALARY (S.S PER MONTH) , 

Include expatriation allowance, annnd wage supplement, monthly 
company contribution to Provident Fond, school fees 4 raald 

Approximately 10.000; 

Married: Approximately 11,000. 

SERVICE BENEFITS; _ _ . , c . 

* Monthly company contributions to Provident Fund. 

* School fees and rental subsidies: . 

right-stop ^ P roductivit 7 aUow “« s whJe 00 

* Transport allowance payable on a round trip baas 

* F^lSical and denti *«««»*» JfSSfewW. ^ 


AREA MANAGER 
SOUTH AMERICA 

One of West Germany’s most reputable 
pharmaceutical firms seeks an experienced 
Marketing/ Operations Manager to aired the 
ethical pharmaceutical affairs of its 
subsidiaries in South America from its 
headquarters. Practical, successful 
management experience in pharmaceutical 
disciplines in this area is necessary along with 
fluency in German, Spanish English. 
Knowledge of Portuguese would be 
advantageous. Compensation and perquisites 
are negotiable based on experience. Send 




ABU DHABI NATIONAL OIL COMPANY 

AHiOC is one of the major oil companies in tie Middle East controlling 
the Exploration, ‘Production and Processing of Oil, Gas and Associated 
Products in Abu Dhabi. 

The Company wishes to appoint a number of experienced professionals in 
its Exploration $ Production Directorate as follows : 

SENIOR GEOLOGIST 

Responsible for the preparation of all kinds of sub-surface geological maps on local and 
regional scales. Prepares evaluation reports on prospective exploratory areas by using all 
available geological and geophysical data He should also be able to prepare and evaluate 
exploration and development programmes and prepare technical reports on the proposed 
locations. 

The candidate should have a B£c. In Geology with a minimum of 8 years experience in 
Petroleum Geology and Log interpretation. Knowledge of Computer applications in 
Petroleum Geology is preferable 

SENIOR GEOPHYSICIST 

Responsible for Interpreting seismic information, preparing technical reports and providing 
recommendations. He will also be responsible for establishing the parameters for field data 
acquisition (Land and Marine). 

The candidate should have a BSc. in Geology and Geophysics with a minimum of 8 years 
experience in the field of seismic prospecting. 

GEOPHYSICIST 

Assists in interpreting seismic results and controlling field data acquisition (Land and 
Marine). 

The candidate should have a BSc. In Geology and Geophysics with a minimum of 5 years 
experience with Companies active In the field of seismic prospecting. 

SURVEYOR 

Assists In general surveying and control on surveying jobs conducted by Contractors. He 
should be able to use modem surveying instruments (theodolites, levelling instruments, 
etc.), and: 

★ Assist in establishing permanent geodetic control in remote areas. 

★ Assist in programming and computing triangulation points and general geodetic data 

★ Plan well locations and indicate some of old drilled well locations. 

The candidate should have High School education and a Diploma In Surveying (at least one 
year duration) from a recognized Institute plus a minimum of 5 years experience with 
Companies active in the field of oil prospecting. 

Good knowledge of English and Arabic is required, for these Jobs. 

These appointments are based in Abu Dhabi city, working on an off-shore concession areas. 

ADNOC benefits include a competitive tax-free remuneration, good career prospects, free medical 
cans, free family accommodation, furniture allowance, paid home leave for the family and 
educational assistance for eligible children. 

Interested candidates are invited to forward their detailed applications, together with photocopies of 
their education and experience certificates, within three weeks from the date hereof to: 

EMPLOYMENT DIVISION MANAGER 
PERSONNEL DIRECTORATE 
ADNOC 
P.O. BOX 896 
ABU DHABI — UJLE. ‘ 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


* Fm medical ana arniai , , 

* Free 3 insurance scheme for eligible depeudanu iri 

* 6 weeks' annual leave with provision of air travel for employ* 

flpd fpamfy. 


I 


APPLICATION: 


Manager Pbnonitel Services 
Singapore Airlines Limited 

P.O. Box 501, 

Airmen! Transit Centre, 
Singapore 9181. 


resume lo: 

WAYNE GROUP + • 

Human Resource Consultants 

19 Roe d' Anjou, W9^& 

75008 PAWS. 

Sou franco - London - Melbourne - Los Angeles - 
New York - Caracas - Athens 


— INTERNATIONAL MANAGER = 

Swiss/ frondi arizen, 40, U.S.*Swiss education, 
law, economics, U.S. MBA. 

Fluent: English, French, German, Hafian, Spanish, Portuguese. Knowl- 
edge of Oriental lan g uag es . 

Career: IS years experience in rtift sales end marketing at highest level 
Elaboration of m arke ti n g strategies and implantation of products (ser- 
vices and consumer, pharmaceuticals, luxury and crihers). Strong person- 
ality, highly versatile, quick decision maker, good at resolving delicate 
matters, trouble shooter if necessary. Tap business contacts in the 
Western worid. Presently running heavy modti n ery uritin Northern Italy. 
Looking for a chritangmg porifioD with tops. Con travel and eventually 
relocate. 

Writer Box D-2136, Inte rna tio n al Horrid Tribune. 

92521 Neriffy Codex, francs. 




L’Agsscs M a liuuuis Pa ir Kmi i l o l 

AGENCE SPfiOAUSM DE5 MG&0SJRS ET CADRES 

12 Rue Blanche. 75436 Ports CH5EX 09 
Td. : 28061.4*. Ext 71.- 28M440. Ext 4Z 


• F8BSCH SPECIALIST M EXPORT AND 
SMPPMG, 55, E.S.G, fluent Eng&h, 
Sparads, Gemon, Arabic. 3i yens expert' 
erica (NAMQ.Y AFBtCA and MJDOLE-EAST). 

in o leading dsenecrigregp (wS^UxSJ 
Sending JOB with raspanridity France fn 
abroad in O coropany involved in g&odi or 
services keen to sian/expand its expocto- 
tton *fepc=tR»m. Set, 40±FA*tS C*OKES 
t/Cff. 


e FRENCH MECHANICAL ENOINEB 

(AJA.L 54, b« EngBsh, German, Span- 
ish. fr* co mman d in {A aspect of a major 
mdwMof turn key preiact (jflannteg, tedml- 
eri md financial management, negodatina. 

ooordnafion, Md operation UwL ..). Used 

to team wort with for-e^p, engineers. SEBCS 
teehnied and managering respandbTrttet in 
France or abroad, available, accepts punc- 
tual missions, fief..- 403-PAOS CACHES 

trjCB. 







Page 6 


THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1985 


Reralfc 


INTERNATIONAL 



Published With Tbe Nfy York Time* amd Hm* ffgiiiagloa Pod 


A Middle Way in Nicaragua 


StibuttC Tide of Pacifism Puts Pressure on Affiances 

By Drew Middleton 


Presidem Ronald Reagan has given inter- 
viewers Train The New York Times a dear, 
concise statement of his attitude toward the 
Sandinist rulers of Nicaragua. They betrayed 
the revolution that Americans cheered for its 
promise of democracy, he said. They have 
become pro-Soviet, chased democrats into ex- 
ile and refused to subject their power to the 
consent rtf the Nicaraguan people. The exile 
army of “contras,’' therefore, has every reason 
to fight for democracy. The United States has 
ample reason to help them. 

The president's premises are admirable and 
accurate. But his attitude is not a policy. 
Americans are also displeased by betrayals of 
democracy in South Korea and Haiti, Cuba 
and Poland, but do not make war on account 
of such displeasure. Why not 1 ? 

First, because the costs of exporting democ- 
racy by war are usually too high. Even direct 
invasion of nearby countries would plunge 
them into endless civil war. We could capture 
Managua or Havana but we could not clear the 
hills of the guerrillas tims created. 

A second reason is that we are rotten at 
making intrusive war. overtly or covertly. The 
Sandinisis and Fidel Castro are good examples 
of bow rotten. Their regimes result directly 
from dictatorships sponsored by America's 
marines or meddling diplomats. The Central 
Intelligence Agency’s overthrow of pro-Co m- 
munists in Guatemala 30 years ago delivered 
that country to rightist totalitarians. 

A third reason is mare abstract but no less 
compelling. Americans do not want to live in a 
world where nations feel free to impose their 
political doctrines on others by force. War 
should be a last resort, to defend vital national 
interests. To act otherwise is to stimulate ag- 
gression throughout the world. 

When a president declares war on a country. 


be needs a better reason than distaste for its 
regime. Even when he has one, he needs to be 
sure that his goals are attainable with the force 
he is prepared to expend. Only with sudi 
calculation does an attitude become a policy. 

The Ame rican-sponsored contra army is 
simply too weak to overthrow the Sandimsis. 
Its hit-and-run assaults can damage their econ- 
omy and punish their hostility. But such war- 
fare also invites either unthinkable escalation 
or the ultimate humiliation of failing to 
achieve our stated purpose. Meanwhile, the 
combat cruelly exploits Nicar ag u an patriots 
whose goal we know to be unattainable. In the 
end, they will be twice betrayed. 

Still, surely the contra army hurt the Sandin- 
ist5 enough to make them willing to deal? 
Perhaps, if the price were clear to them, and 
tolerable. As the president recognizes, the San- 
dhtisis cannot be forced out of power. What 
they might do under pressure is agree to bar 
Soviet and Cuban military bases and to let an 
inter-American force guard against the ship- 
ment of arms to El Salvador. 

What then of the political, religious and 
labor freedoms that Lhe president and all 
Americans want to see in Nicaragua? As in 
dealing with other countries, these could be 
made the price of real friendship, of aid and a 
variety of trade concessions. 

The policy choices in Nicaragua are not 
between blind force and abject acquiescence. 
Geography and circumstance create an Ameri- 
can interest in Nicaragua’s future, and oppor- 
tunities to influence it. Surely judicious pres- 
sures for negotiable ends promise a belter 
result than aimless combat. At worst, the Nica- 
raguan people would be left in a grim peace. At 
best, they would have America to thank Tor a 
gradual improvement in their condition. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Undiplomatic Diplomats 


Look, at it from the point of view of our 
ambassador to South Korea, Richard L. “Dix- 
ie" Walker. Or is it Senator Jesse Helms's 
ambassador to South Korea? Dixie Walker 
was one of a score of officials who, in a 
memorable act of diplomatic indiscretion, in- 
terrupted their representation of President 
Ronald Reagan last fall to call for the reelec- 
tion of the senator from North Carolina. 

But never mind. Here was former professor 
Dixie Walker, in Seoul, faced with the most 
important assignment of his ambassadorial 
career: to see to the safe and uneventful return 
of the political exile, Kim Dae Jung. Given the 
Korean government's evident fear and loath- 
ing of Mr. Kim. and Mr. Kim’s popular stand- 
ing and his escort of several dozen ornery 
American human-rights activists, it was bound 
to be a tough assignment As it happened, 
moreover, .Ambassador Walker blew it No- 
body got badly hurt but there was a scuffle at 
the airport and Mr. Kim was taken out of 
circulation in a way that made Korea look ugly 
and the United Slates look foolish. No wonder 
Ambassador Walker lost his cooL 
That at any rate, is the most charitable 
explanation for his outburst against the Amer- 
icans who escorted Mr. Kim home. He said 
they, or some of them, had “reneged" on the 
homecoming agreement and provoked the air- 
port fracas. He did find room to say that the 
Koreans were at fault too, but the overall 
effect was to remove the principal onus from 
the perpetrators of the violence and place it on 


a few Ameri cans who were among its victims. 
There was no mention of his own contribution, 
whatever it was, to the collapse of the home- 
coming accord. All but lost in the shuffle was 
what good diplomacy would have kept at cen- 
ter stage: the future of Kim Dae Jung and 
democracy in a state with strong-man rule and 
plenty of American interests. 

In recent days, an intriguing new theme has 
been heard coming quietly from top American 
officials. It is lime, they say, for the United 
States to put behind its “Vietnam syndrome," 
its reluctance to take the hard cases — time to 
become more vigorous in support of embattled 
democrats abroad. Surely, there is an implica- 
tion here for American human rights policy. 
For to be plausible and persuasive in its call to 
greater risk-t aking abroad in behalf of democ- 
racy, the administration must also show its 
w illingness to face up to repressors like the 
Chun government. As the Korean case demon- 
strates, however, parts of the administration 
have their own reluctance. They are full of 
ardor for the liberation of countries that are in, 
or falling in. the Soviet orbit — Nicaragua and 
Afghanistan. If the U.S. government means to 
ratchet up American support for strengthening 
the enterprise of freedom, however, the place 
to build the necessary momentum and credi- 
bility is precisely in the countries that are 
already in the American orbit South Korea is 
Exhibit A. What does the administration plan 
to do to redeem its policy there? 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 



The South African government is bargain- 
ing with Nelson Mandela, the blade South 
African who has been a political prisoner for 
21 years, over the terms of his release. It is a 
development with historic potential: if the 
government frees Mr. Mandela, the way will 
be open for blacks to join whiles in an unprec- 
edented search for a political society accept- 
able to them both. It could mean the b eginnin g 
of the end of the system of apartheid. 

Mr. Mandela is no ordinary prisoner. He is 
the leader of the outlawed African National 
Congress, the main black underground group 
and a likely candidate to become, again, if it is 
legalized, a major national political organiza- 
tion. He has been in prison longer than most 
South African blacks have been alive, and be is 
a legend in his own time. This is due to the 
principled constancy of his anti-apartheid 
stand, and to the courage of his wife and, now, 
his daughter in projecting his voice: he and 
they have never stopped insisting that, despite 
the immense personal hardship, he will not 
accept release unless he is permitted to take up 
a full political role. His stature both allows him 


to drive a bard bargain with the government 
now, and makes it worth the government’s 
while to engage him as an interlocutor. 

President P.W. Botha at first offered to let 
Mr. Mandela go, as a private citizen, to a black 
“homeland." He refused. Then Mr. Botha of- 
fered release in return for a pledge to “uncon- 
ditionally rqect violence as a political instru- 
ment.” At the same time, Mr. Botha allowed 
Mr. Mandela two unusual forums: last month, 
an interview in a London newspaper and, last 
Sunday, a rally addressed by his daughter. 

It is up to Mr. Botha, an Afrikaner carrying 
the burden of his people's lonely and insup- 
portable racial inheritance. As he hesitantly 
opens the door to minimal reform, others reek 
to pry it open wider. By moving toward a 
dialogue with blacks he risks shredding his 
white constituency. He and his fellow Afrika- 
ners, to escape an ever harshening racial con- 
frontation must take a chance on racial part- 
nership. No one can assure them that taking 
the chance will produce a good result. They 
can only be assured that there is no alternative. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


FROM OUR FER. 14 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: A Not So Righteous Treasurer 

ELS AH, Illinois — Elsah, the “Arcadia of 
America.” where every man, woman and child 
goes to church; where there are neither doctors 
nor drug stores, jails nor criminals, and where 
one who dies before eighty is “cut off in his 
youth,” is stunned. Edward P. Neyion. village 
treasurer, school trustee, pillar of the church 
and leader of his people was arrested [on Feb. 
1] on a charge of converting to his own use 
$650 belonging to the Chicago, Peoria and Sl 
L ouis Railroad and $380 entrusted to him by 
the unsophisticated citizens of Elsah. Neylon 
was taken by constables to Jerseyville, where 
he admitted his guilt. The citizens of Elsah 
assembled in the church and with bowed heads 
discussed in whispers the plight of Neylon. No 
one was able to give a satisfactory explanation 
of what he had done with the money taken 
from the villagers and the Bluff Line. 


1935: U.S. Airship Crashes in Padfic 
SAN FRANCISCO — The United States 
Navy lost its second giant airship in two years 
[on Feb. 12] when the Macon, largest tighter- 
than-air craft in the world and sister ship to the 
ill-fated Akron, plunged to its doom in the 
Pacific 110 miles south of San Francisco while 
riding out a squall, with a loss of two lives oat 
of a crew of rwenty officers and sixty- three 
men. Admiral Courtney, commander of the 
battle fleet said he was convinced that a mys- 
terious explosion — not gas — had caused the 
stem of the airship to be blown away. Admiral 
Thomas Seen, commanding the Twelfth Naval 
District was inclined to believe that the acci- 
dent could have been caused by any of a score 
of things, while Lieutenant Commander Scott 
Peck, a staff officer aboard the ship, declared a 
heavy squall had ripped off an upper fin, 
leaving the airship out of control. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 
JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chairman 1958-1982 

KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Otai rm ai 


LEE W. HUEBNER. Fubtuher 
Execute Editor RENfiBQNDY 

Editor ALAIN LECOUR Axsodeu Pibtubtr 

Deputy Editor RICHA RD H. MORGAN Associate Pubteher 

Dqjuiy Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Director tdOprrmrm 

Associate EUtor FRANCOIS DESMAISON’S Director of Gradation 

ROLF D. KRANEPUHL D&tcttr gf Afrenautg Saks 

JC 181 Avenue Charles-de-Ganlk, 92200 NemUy-sar-Stine, 

France. Telephone: 747-1265. Tdec 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Paris. 

Diredeur de la publication: Walter H. Thayer. 

Asia Headquarters. 24-34 Hennesty Rd., Hoot Kong. TeL 5-285618. Telex 61170. 
Mtnugingar. U.ti: Rohm MadQdwm, 63 Lang Acre. Ionian WCL TeL 836-4801 Telex 2620D9. 

S.A. an capital de IJ00.CKV F. RCS Nanterre B 73202! 126. CamrnBton Parittnre No. 61337. 

U.S. subscription: $ 284 Yearly. Seamd-ctau postage paid at Long Island City. N. Y. I HOI. 

*■ /So£ international Herald Tribune. All rigfus reserved 


PHILIP M. FOISIE 
WALTER WELLS 
ROBERT K McCABE 
SAMUEL AFT 
CARL GEWTRTZ 

International Herald Trib 



YORK — Alliances can 
and do stand the hard pounding 
of war. But as events since Feb. 4 
have shown, they are susceptible to 
more insidious pressures. 

The ANZUS (Australia, New Zea- 
land, United States) alliance that has 
flourished since 1951, when the pact 
was signed, has been seriously weak- 
ened in more recent days by discard 
over nuclear weapons. And NATO, 
the linchpin of U.S. policy in Europe, 
suffers from what Eurcraeans consid- 
er an overdose of U.S. leadership, 
and the steady development of anti- 
NATO and anti-nuclear opinion. 

Relations with South Korea, the 
sole American military outpost on 
the East Asian mainland, have been 
strained by Seoul’s mishandling and 
manhandling of ihe opposition lead- 
er, Kim Dae Jung, ana bis accompa- 
nying party upon his return from self- 
imposed exile in the United States. 
Thai incident seems to stress the wis- 
dom of Demosthenes’s axiom: 
“Close alliances with despots are nev- 
er safe for free states.” 

Do these incidents foreshadow a 
breakdown of the alliance system, 
with all that would entail in the rear- 
rangement of American military de- 
ployments? 1 think noL What the 
incidents do require, however, is 
more informed diplomatic reporting 
on the tides of public opinion that 
influence allied governments. 

Since At 
has been I 
in the southwest Pacific. Article 4 
says; “Each party recognizes that an 
armed attack in the Pacific area on 
any of the parties would be danger- 
ous to its own peace and safety and 
declares that it would act to meet the 
common danger in accordance with 
its constitutional processes.” 

At the same moment when, in light 
or events of the last several days, 
American leaders were re-evaluating 
the willingness of the other two signa- 
tories to implement this provision, 
the U.S. 7th Fleet warned interested 
countries in the area about Soviet 
work at Cam Ranh Bay, the old 
American base in Vietnam. After two 
years of work, the Russians have re- 
built and expanded the base for the 
use by their Pacific fleet, headquar- 
tered in Vladivostok in Siberia. 

Warnings such as these are unlike- 
ly to alter the large body of anti- 
nuclear public opinion in Doth New 
Zealand and Australia. The Welling- 
ton government, with wide popular 
support, refuses to allow any Ameri- 
can Navy vessel carrying nuclear 
weapons to enter its territorial wa- 
ters. Australia has refused lo assist in 
the test of the U.S. MX missile. 

No immediate damage was inflict- 
ed on the American strategic position 
by these actions. The long-term ques- 
tion is how far the United Stales 
could rely on Australia and New Zea- 


land in the event of a serious situa- 
tion arising in the ANZUS region, 
even if conventional weapons were 
the only ones likely to be used. 

Would the two governments, 
goaded by anti-nuclear forces, reject 
in a time of peril the help or an 
American carrier, which, almost inev- 
itably, would carry nuclear weapons 
of some type? On the record of the 
last week, it seems likely. This senti- 
ment contrasts with the welcome the 
two countries gave American troops. 


reap a dividend of anti-Americanism. 

Halfway around the world the twin 
viruses of anti-nuclearism and paci- 
fism evident “down under" are af- 
fecting the North Atlantic Treaty Or- 
ganization. which must be considered 
the most important U.S. alliance. 

Lord Carrington, who presides 
over NATO's political organization, 
recently pointed out one reason why 
anti-nuclear and pacifist groups 
nourish in alliance countries. Young 
and middle-aged Europeans, he not- 


for 



Rethinking 
Mideast 
Anns Sales 


By Mel Levine 

W ashington —The Reagan 
administration had planned to 




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cover organizations like 
Federation of Trade Unions- 
Sheer cost also saps NATO sup- 
port. The economies of NATO Eu- 
rope cannot now support the in- 

SU To «|£5k«i by Hk MM 

doso i incvitaWy^woSd cul into funds Saudi Arabia 

earmarked for welfare and provide on an arms dwL Ttaephra iwac 
the growing anti-NATO, anti-nuclear changed, apparently m Traction to a 
forces with more ammunition. negative response in ■ 

Finally, of course, there is the Rea- The administrate fau decided to 
ran administration’s Strategic De- postpone any armsrsale decisions 
to* Initiative, commonly called pending the results of mi ass^smem - 
“star wars." NATO opposition to of the regional samrity aniation m 
SsSta three mato points: u« Middle East- White (jut u a wt 

- 1 — s tep for the administration w lake,*’*- 


One. it will not work, or, if it does, 
it will cover the United States and not 
Europe. U.S. spokesmen have told 
NATO that SDI will protect Europe 
from the Soviet SS-2G missiles now 
aimed at it as much as it will protecL 
America from the SS- 19s. 

Two, the American investment m 
SDI will be so huge that it wOi starve 
U.S. and allied forces of the conven- 
tional weapons needed to meet a 
Russian invasion of Western Europe. 

Three, the United States is plung- 
ing into the program wiLhout taking 
into account that the Soviet Union is 
likely to respond by building more 
land- and sea-based intercontinental 
ballistic missiles than SDI could 
shoot down, thus increasing the dan- 
ger of a Soviet preemptive strike. 

Governments in NATO Europe, 
on the whole, support (he alliance. 
But NATO is made up of democra- 
cies where the tide of anti-nuclear 
and anti-NATO sentiment is rising. 
General Bernard Rogers, the su- 


the idea of an arms sale at this time 
should not even have arisen. 

Supporters of arms sales to Arab 
nations argue that such sales are in. 
the interest of U.S. national security 
because they further our goals m the 
region, help induce Arab countries to 
join the peace process and are an 
instrument of leverage that the ad- 
ministration can use to moderate and 
affect Arab foreign policy. 

In 1981 the administration, after a 
heated and protracted debate, sold 
five Airborne Warning and Control 
Systems (AWACS) radar planes and 
other arms lo Saudi Arabia. Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan assured Con- 
gress that the Saudis would provide 
“substantial assistance” lo the Unit- 
ed Slates in promoting Middle East 
peace. In addition, the president sab. . - 
that he would cancel the sale if “the?f 
Saiidis adopt policies which are dis- 
ruptive to prospects for stability of 
the retdon and detrimental to U.S. 


the region 

prone allied commander in Europe, national interests.” 
is extremely concerned with this tide. Since then the Saudis have: 

He pointed out recently that sen- • Continued to oppose Camp Da- 
is people, and not just fanatics, in- vid, central to U.S. 


Tf you caieh cold, don't blame me. ’ 


ships and planes early in 1942, when 
the Japanese were on the march. 

President Ronald Reagan emerged 
from his talks with Prime Minister 
Bob Hawke of Australia proclaiming 
that the ANZUS alliance “is veiy 
sound and very solid.” This is the 
comment of an invincible optimist on 
an international situation that wor- 
ries even the mildly pessimistic. 

Yet, American pressure on New 
Zealand in the form of economic 
sanctions, no matter how mild, would 
probably backfire. Anti-nudearism 
and pacifism are well advanced there 
and such pressure would probably 


ed, find it difficult to take the alliance 
seriously, because they did not expe- 
rience World War II or the first des- 
perate years of the Cold War that 
included the Berlin blockade. 

“They simply see the long years of 
peace.” Lord Carrington said, “and 
then ask whether NATO is really nec- 
essary, despite the fact that NATO 
has guaranteed that peace.” 

Other elements also contribute to 
the present erosion of support for 
NATO in European countries. The 
most obvious is that the alliance is 
seen as an instrument for, if need be. 
nuclear warfare, and that repels the 


ous . 

creaaingly think in toms of padfism, 
neutralism and accommodation with 
the East. It is the entrance of such 
people into the anti-NATO, anti-nu- 
clear group that makes the movement 
so dangerous to governments depen- 
dent on popular support 
Is there a wav out? General Rogers 
thinks that showing aerial photo- 
; from U.S. spy satellites to the 
jpean public would do much 
" . These show Soviet and Warsaw 
fact military moves that can only be 
interpreted as having offensive aims. 

The photos conceivably might an- 
swer those Europeans who doubt the 
value of the alliance and those Amer- 
icans who urge the withdrawal of 
U.S. forces from Europe. Unfortu- 
nately. the Reagan administration 
believes the use of these photos 
would give the Soviets information 
about CIS. spying capacity — infor- 
mation that they already have. 

S 1985 Drew Middleton. 


Why U.S. Aid to Rebels in Nicaragua Must Stop 


W ASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan’s State of the 
Union address presented an image of 
Nicaragua that does not correspond 
to the real situation there. 

“The Sandinist dictatorship of 
Nicaragua." Mr. Reagan said, "with 
full Cuban, Soviet-bloc support, not 
only persecutes its people, the 
church, and denies a free press, but 
arms and provides bases for Commu- 
nist terrorists attacking neighboring 
stales. Support for freedom fighters is 
self-defense, and totally consistent 
with the OAS and UN charters." 

There is only one terrorism in Nic- 
aragua: the criminal actions of the 
“contra" mercenary forces, who ev- 
ery day murder innocent civilians, 
including mothers and their children. 

For inat reason, the government of 
Nicaragua has armed us people as a 
legitimate defense against an aggres- 
sion that is promoted and supported 
from outside its national territory. 

The assertion that assistance to the 
mercenaries is a form of self-defense 
is a complete distortion of this princi- 
ple as defined in Article 51 of Lhe UN 
charter. Any honest application of 
this article to the problem that exists 
between Nicaragua and the United 


By Carlos Tunnenuaii Bernheim 

The writer is Nicaragua's ambassador to the United States. 


States would establish that Nicara- 
gua is the victim of aggression and 
not a perpetrator of criminal attacks. 

TTie U.S. policy of aggression 
against Nicaragua violates the char- 
ters of both the Organization of 
American States and the United Na- 
tions. Moreover, it profoundly disre- 


spects the rule of law, as evidenced in 
the decision to boycott the Worid 
Court in the case brought by Nicara- 
gua against America over the CLA 
mining of its harbors. 

More serious is the Reagan admin- 
istration's insistence on additional 
congressional funding for the contra 



Botha Plays for Time Over Namibia 


L ONDON — President P.W. Bo- 
/ tha appears intent on stepping 
up a pace of reform inside South 
Africa. His proposals for blacks to 
own freehold property in white 
Sooth Africa combined with his de- 
cision to allow a British newspaper 
to interview Nelson Mandela, the 
imprisoned African National Con- 
gress leader, all suggest that moves 
of some magnitude are under way. 

Paradoxically, the decision to lib- 
eralize at home means that Mr. Bo- 
tha is likely to dig his heds further 
in Namibia (South-West Africa), 
the adjacent country, which South 
Africa has ruled under a disputed 
League of Nations mandate since it 
forcibly look it off the Germans 
during World War L 
In Namibia, the war continues 
between the South Africans and the 
guerrilla forces of SWAPO, the 
South-West Africa People's Orga- 
nization, with SWAPO’s host, An- 
gola, and 20,000 Cuban troops resi- 
dent there, just out of contact But 
the small-scale guerrilla war could 
become a messy conflict with East- 
West ovenones. 

It is now six years since South 
Africa informed the United Na- 
tions secretary-general, Kan Wald- 
heim, that it agreed to the settle- 
ment plan proposed by five 
Western negotiating partners — the 
United States, Britain, France, 
West Germany and Canada ft then 
took two years to get all the antago- 
nists to agree to the details of mili- 
tary disengagement. Finally they 
did and in November 1980, South 
Africa said it would agree to start 
implementing the settlement on 
March 1, 1981. if Untied Nations 
impaniality could be assured. 

Many observers though! that the 
South Africans could have been 


By Jonathan Power 


persuaded on this last point fairly 
swiftly if the incoming Reagan ad- 
ministration had shown a little 
muscle. Instead the only noise 
made was the secretary of state at 
the time, Alexander M. Haig, ob- 
serving in his Senate confirmation 
bearing that America should not 
“put in jeopardy the in [errs is of 
those who share our values ... 
above all our interests in a strategic 
sense.” South African momentum 


new UJ5. administration be- 
gan its own southern Africa diplo- 
macy, Before very loag it appeared 
that there was a new stumbling 
block for the South Africans — the 
Cuban troops in Angola. The new 
U.S. administration raised the Cu- 
ban issue, but South African would 
have probably got round to this 
point without U-S. encouragement. 

Rationally, the Cubans are not a 
reasonable issue. The Cubans only 
became involved in Angola after 
South African troops moved into 
Angola to help Jonas Savimbfs Na- 
tional Union for the Total Indepen- 
dence of Angola (UNITA) in the 
civil war. The South Africans ar- 
rived in June; 1975. The Cubans did 
not arrive until September. Over 
time the Angolan government has 
become dependent on the Cubans 
to protect itself from UNITA, in- 
creasingly beefed up by South Afri- 
ca. However, the Cubans play little 
role in SWAPO’s cause. 

Nevertheless, the Cuban troops 
have become a larger-than-life is- 
sue. This cuts iwo ways. On the one 
hand it seems an iniringemem of 
Angolan sovereignty to discuss An- 
golan internal arrangements that 


have nothing to do with Namibia. 
On the olher, if the Ango lans 
agreed to South Africa’s demand 
the South Africans would find it 
difficult io raise any more stum- 
bling blocks. South Africa has 
played the Cuban card so strongly 
that it is now tied toil. The United 
States regards this as the one re- 
maining unresolved issue and if the 
Angolans did ask the Cubans to 
leave, the Uni led States would lean 
heavily on South Africa to keep its 
side of the bargain. 

Until now the Angolans and the 
front-line African countries have 
shied away from confronting the 
Cuban issue. The Angolans say if 
real progress were made on the Na- 
mibia negotiations, together with a 
reduction in the South African 
threat to themselves, they would 
agree to a gradual withdrawal of 
Cuban troops. The Cuban position 
is identical with Angola's. 

South Africa is in no huny. Mili- 
tarily it is in a practically unassail- 
able position. If SWAPO and (he 
Angolans are to win at the negotiat- 
ing table what they cannot win on 

the battlefield, they must do some- 
thing that the South African leader- 
ship finds palatable to its white 
electorate. The only sweetener to a 
deal that would put Namibia in 
black hands is tire immediate re- 
moval of Cuban troops from Ango- 
la. This fact, anathema to (he Ango- 
lans, SWAPO and the front-line 
African states, becomes increasing- 
ly inescapable. UNITA mil always 
remain a threat but if the South 
Africans are out of Namibia that 
threat will be much reduced. With- 
out such a compromise, there is no 
chance or Namibia's independence 
in the foreseeable future. 

I ilWriitil i>n till ih raid f nbllliC. 


Continued to finance the 
tine liberation Organization, whose 
main aim is the destruction of Israel 

• Continued to boycott Egypt and 
work lo ensure its isolation. 1 

• Threatened King Hussein of 
Jordan with economic sanctions if he 
negotiates with Israel. 

• Refused to use its leverage with 
Syria to persuade it to leave Lebanon. 

• Continued to subsidize massive 
Soviet arms purchases for Damascus. 

• Tried to offer Oman a deal to 
induce cancellation of a strategically 
important base accord with Arnaica. 

Clearly the sale of the AWACS has 
failed on all counts to further U.S. . 
goals in the area or to induce Saadi 
Arabia to join the peace process. It 
has compromised, not enhanced, our 
interests in the region. If the past is 
any indication, there is little reason to 
think that new arms sales will gam 
the United Stales anything new. 

Unfortunately, the a dministration 
views arms transfers as an indispens- 
able component of its foreign poky. 
In the absence of a coherent, consis- 
tent Middle East policy the adminis- 
tration has increasingly substituted 
arms sales for diplomacy. Instead of 
encouraging legitimate parties to ne- 
gotiate with each other, it has opted 
for uying to exert its influence’ by 
controlling the arms flow. Thus the 
sale of arms is the Reagan adminis- 
tration's Mideast policy, yet it has 
not contributed to reaching the ever- 
elusive goal erf peace in the region. 

Instead, we should return to the 
principles that have guided our Mid- 
dle East policy in the past. To hdp 
protect our own national security in- 
terests we must again ask bow our 
decisions affect both regional stabil- 
ity and the security of land, the only 
democracy and our strongest and 
most dependable ally in the region. 

Arms sales to Arab nations would 
exacerbate Israel's severe economic 
problems, which are created in large 
part by its heavy defense burden. 
And if arms sales are made to Arab 
countries at this crucial time for Isra- 
el, it would be forced to continue to 
divert an even more significant share 
of its fragile budget to defense. 

That undermines our own policy 
and interests in the Middle East: We 
profess to be committed to Israel's 
security, but at (he same time we 
undermine that security with burden- 
some arms sales to Arab nations. 

Before the administration consid- 
ers further arms sales to Saudi Arabia , 
— _ or to any other country in the 
Middle East, for that matter — it 
needs to rethink its approach to the 
fundamental problems in the region. 
Fawning over Saudi Arabia has got 
us no closer to resolving complex and 
vitally important Mideast questions, 
uor has it brought peace any closer. 

This administration must learn 
that a weapons sale is not a policy. It 
must ask in what way U.S. arms sales 
to Saudi Arabia, or any other coun- 
try, would help to achieve a solution 
to the problem in the region. The 
Saudi arms sale is a bad idea because 
it substitutes a fragmentary action 
for an overall policy. Before the Unit- 
ed States considers any further sales 
it must, develop a comprehensive po- 
licy with clear goals and reasonable, 
constructive means to achieve them. 

It has a long way to go. 

The writer is ,a Democratic Con - | 
CaI ifomia and a math 

^SSOSSSSSi 

the Los Angeles Times. 


mercenaries, who are guilty of the 
most atrocious crimes against the 
people of Nicaragua. 

The core leaders of those so-called 
“freedom fighters" are in fact rem- 
nants of the National Guard of the 
deposed dictator Auasiasio Somoza. 

They have victimized more than 
7,000 Nicaraguans over the past four 
years, including innocent civilians 
living in isolated rural areas. The con- 
tras are not an indigenous rebel 
group. They concentrate on civilian 
targets, and they retreat across the 
borders when pursued. They are 
armed, financed, supplied and direct- 
ed by foreigners: the CIA. 

The central problem is and will 
remain the military aggression 
against Nicaragua and the lack of a 
negotiated peace. The miracle is that 
in November Nicaragua did bold free 
elections, observed as such by many 
international witnesses. The Latin 
American Studies Association of Lhe 
United States sent a team of observ- 
ers who concluded that “no party was 
prevented from carrying out an active 
campaign" and "the opposition 
could, and did. get its message out.” 

The aggression against Nicaragua 
explains why temporary restrictions 
on certain civil liberties, including 
press freedom, have been imposed by 
ray government. This has been done 
reluctantly and as a di reel response to 
the war that the CIA and its contras 
have been waging against us. 

No restrictions on these civil liber- 
ties were imposed by my government 
during its first two and a half years — 
that is, before the CIA war began in 
December 1981. The restrictions 
were not established until March 
1982, when the war look on major 
proportions. Press censorship and 
other restrictions were lifted during 
the elections. The opposition cam- 
paigns, including Arturo Jos£ Cruz’s 
unofficial one, received full and 
prominent press coverage. 

If the U.S. government and the 
CIA really want to see democracy 
flourish in Nicaragua, let them stop 
supporting the war against us. 

Numerous delegations from all 
over the world have visited Nicara- 
gua, including representatives of Am- 
nesty International Americas Watch 
and the National Council of 
Churches. None of those delegations 
has found any evidence of persecu- 
tion <rf the Nicaraguan people or (he 
church by the government In fact 

they have stated categorically that no — — 

such persecution exists. T,fT T r l < L , |» 

Honesty leads to productive nego- ™ 

[muons. That is the spirit that undlr- Toward NucW 

ties Nicaragua s participation in the ut,ear Sanity? 

Contadora peace initiative and the To “** nuclear weapons would be 
bdatend tails dial America suspend- 

“* in Maran.llo, Moira. A similar f™ "-Itai brimdT «, 
approach tar America would hdp re- toburaon and Ihgciv &HtiM C 

***** “t? 1 w ^ s 10 '"** 

thanks of 2011015 deserves the 
thwefbn* imnn' “ M ^cmplary. and 
dy in the a!f K ^ nan J’ Slep loward san- 
Uius 

I*™. W 'KSf,°'. her 

other bui r vino ,heec onomicand 

n & tactics of superpowers. 

IAN SHARPE. 
Graz. Austria. 


Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed " Letters to the 
Editor" and must contain the writ- 
er’s signature, name and full ad- 
dress. Letters should be brief and 
are subject to editing. We cannot 
he responsible for the return of 
unsolicited manuscripts. 




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IN BRIEF 

Tampons Exonerated in Toxic Shock 

(U^Q — -The doctor who discovered unic shock syndrome 
said there is do evidence the disease was caused by tampons, asevtier 
a^Mcd m a number of fawsrits against the company that mimifaenired 

Toxic shock syndrome is caused by poisons produced by the saphylo- 
ooccib aureus bactena, winch eater toe bloodstream and result ina fever, 
wamusa, a rash, red eyes and peeling fingertips, li is fatal in one case out 

K. Todd. Sector of the infectious disease section of 
Children s Hospital, said Tuesday that while toxic y ho rk continues to 
stnlretaenstroati^wom^^isdcarthatitwam’iBrflnipflii 
u the m le ctio n that is criiicaL It appears that the organism, under the 
^conditioQ of menstruation, and perhaps under the confines of a t am pon 
' or anything rise, could be important. We haven't worked out the details. ” 

In 1980, however, the syndrome was linked by scow researchers to Rely 
super absor bant tampons, manufactured by the Procter ft Gamble Co., 
wuch were taken off the market. The company settled out of court with 
several hundred women who sued after develo ping s bo Hk svnd P Mtu ! 
while using Rely tampons. 

TV in 3-D W ithout Special Glasses 

TOKYO (AP) — A television system that appears as thrce- dimenminal 
without the use of special glasses has been developed by a major 
electronics manufacturer. 

Matsus hit a Electric Industrial said the 14-inch (36-centimeter) 
Pf^uces threc-dimensoaa] vision by synthesiziDg pictures recorded at 
different angles by five separate cameras. The footage is that praected 
through special Lenses to provide a 3-D effect. 

At presait the final! screen can accommodate only two viewers, and it 
will be several years before the company expects to perfect the system, a 
spokesman said. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBR UARY 14, 1985 

SPENCE 

Scientists in Peru Reconstruct 
The Murder of Pizarro in 1541 


By William D. Montalbano 

Laa Angela TunaSenuw 

L IMA — The pugnacious life and 
/ bloody death of Francisco Pi- 
zarro are wdl documented. The 
mystery did not begin until after 

W* »«ii BiiMrinw | hirt it wfihir fj tpf 

four centuries. 

Now, scientific detectives say 
they have finally solved The Caw 
of the Conquistador's Bones. 

Unmasking an impostor mom- 
my along the way, the investigators 
say they have positively identified 
Pizarros remains, mahiing th^m to 
reconstruct a 444-year-okl murder 
in startling detail 
To culminate the scientific ad- 
venture, Pizarro’ s bones finally 



Francisco Pizarro 


of St James and buried it that same 
afternoon behind the dnHCh. 

After bis suppo rters stand a 
ocamtcaxOTOiiniop, Pizarro's body 
was ea h ucae d an Jan. 21, 1544 and 
re-interred with honor under the 
main alts 1 of the church. The body 
stayed there in a wooden coffin for 
about 85 yean, according to a duo- 
pology assembled by Ludeoa. 

Pizarro’s remains were started 
around repeatedly afterward as the 
church was expanded into one of 
the New World's most beautiful 
cathedrals but Dell victim to such 
vexations as 

Iu 1661 came a watershed exhu- 
mation, according to an old cathe- 
dral document, nzano's skull was 


were laid to rest here in Janpxy in lances ami crossbows, about a dem- placed made a lead box. His skrie- 


iMMRBni mSSHSK: WO “ C ° “ Jota Everett MBhis’s painting, “Ptono Seizing tbe Inca of Patn” (1846). 

wilL cured as a conspirator the year Toe document attestin g to that . , . . 

Francisco Pizarro enured the before, bum into the bovse as Pi- transfer did not turn up until 1935, ^tor acan onstn aing saen- theskuS of Francisco Pizarro. Next sward thrust. There’s not 

of history as an illiterate zano was finishing lunch. and by dm the cathedral had an- bfxallythutheimmuqrwasPizar- re the lead box lay a wooden crate have Francisco Rjzaxra 7 ’ 


todor en assassins led by Diego de Alma- 
1537 gro, whose father ftzarro had fixe- 


ton went into a wooden box 
wrapped m velvet 



the skull of Francisco Pizarro, Next sward thrust There's t» doubt. We 
re the lead box lay a wooden crate have Francisco ftzamx” 


swineherd and hat them half a cen- r _ other Pizarro on display, a wdl- A _ . 

* “frV* 01 preserved mammy in * gtaMided 

BtaSKSs iS 9 inches (1.75 my* ^ — V '* P“^ & 

meters) felt wiry, scarred, jin- a fonagnere ^ P^ alike. No P*3£ . . . . . 

iawed. heavilv muscled and 63 warding Off the Wow Of an ax. A ^ The unpOSlOT would be there 


Physical Activity Reduces Bone Loss S5S?!£SS5K^ 

CHAPEL HILL, North Carolina fNYT) — Physical activity can SsJu&ilfSJlL! killed him, as a procession ofriS- of what tire p^es «fl«i 


“ •‘^Shs* 

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r -‘ ’•“!« /afli 

- _• -yea 
• - -'*is::ycs i 

- • 'Si 

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significantly reduce the loss of bone that commonly afflicts women as J? 0 ™ “* ““P ?° “W* Jw ? 
thery age, a newly published study has shown. ^ *** victim of Hispam 

In the study, conducted among more than 300 women aged 18 to 75 by America s first recorded cou] 

resean&ers al the University of North Candma at Chape! Hffl, athletic 6 ^ _ ... , . .. «, -- 

women of all ages had denser bones than those who were inactive. Bone p^Mamtoa^tn^mapar sever Pizarro's head and u 
density in active women aged 55 to 75 was 15 to 20 percent greater in the und Garaa. nlic fatal on a post m the plaza (as 

forearm and 12 percent greater in the spine than in sedentary women of ,. ow ??? ■ , OT f ord lil ^, ™ 
the same age dipped his right jaw, probably cu 

Since fewer than 20 percent of the postmenopausal active women took ^fj. ugu ^ vdn the carotj 
estrogen supplements, a treatment that is known to slow bone loss, the arter ^ l , scve f wl j 115 ^P 10 ^ 
researchers said that hormone treatment could not account for the was paralyzed when dead 
differences tlKy observed. came. 

The study revealed tbe special value of exercise that involves gravid . 
uonal stress. Thus, walking, cycling and tennis were more likely to result j cag Hf s “P a J 01 “ ““P f”®? 11 
in dense bones than swimming. The researchers noted, however, that ^ \? ro F™- ** 

swimming tad otta- bemfili <iaeolog.su, Mthropologms. pa 

thologists, radiologists, chemists 

Tests Developed to Detect Dementia SStaStetoaSS'SS 

NEW YORK (UPI) — Three easily administered tests for memory, hospitals, art museums and uni 
orientation and learning have been developed to' distinguish mental - verities all contributed to soMnj 
decline due to disease from age-related changes in older people. the mystery. 

In addition to detecting people with Alzheimer’s disease, Paul J. “Once the Pizarro bug bit, it be 
iJEslmg^ of the University of Iowa said, the tests will be used to hdp find came a passion for a lot of exciter 
people who have treatable dementia. people,' 5 said Hugo Ludena, an ar 

Because an estimated 20 to 40 percent of all dementias are reversible chaeoiogist-hi stonan who directed 
with t reatment, it i ; rnipnr tanr tn dgtor miTw» diwxw-frinipd yyr^nc my rma\ the quest for Pizarro as head Of 1 
chang M in brain function. Dr- Fj flhiyr mu'H Peruvian government agency thal 

t m • safeguards historic treasures. 

Miracle Plant Provides Food, Fuel m story has two beginnings, 

PEORIA, IHmois (NYTJ— -Leucaeoa is a “nurade" riant thal thrives Imui k i«mi 

in drought, provides fad, fodder, and both nitrogen enrichment and ^ ---g fricnds 

woston prototion for depleted [ tropiral soDs, and though il i contami t a _ SKoui on the PlazadeA^ 




her Pizarro on dtroLsy, a weQ- ro. _ of bones wrapped in velvet. There was a lot cf corroboration 

eserved mummy in a glass-sided Whra me lizna City Council de- Too many bones, alas — almost to do, though, and no money to do 
rcophagus. aded to henor PizaiTO on the 350lh four complete skridmis. With the it with. It took seven years for Ln- 

Fbr nearly a century, the mum- anniversary ( rf his death in 1891, up aid of American researchers, the den* to assemble an inte rn a t io n al 
y held im»wKn g farcmatioa for ” ucne ** nmnmiy for public dis- Peruvians eventually sorted them covey of scientific volunteers to 
reiguens aod Peruvians alike. No . out: one man, one vetydd woman corroborate the findings, 

ur of Peru was cmnplete without . u^postor would be there and two young children. In their investigations, they de- 

Stintpseof what tteniides called ^ *L except for four workmen Investigators think the children tennined that the bones were from 
izmro's anihwirir- shriveled re- w ° ose > c fP T ^ ce f” 18, 1977, may have been Pizarro’s. The worn- the right century, and the man was 
tins in a cofTm.” opened (he modem Pirarro saga. an may have been a niece of the Pizarro’s age wren he died. Thw 


The impostor would be there 
still except for four workmen 
whose caprice on June 18, ]977, 
opened the modem Pizarro 


ssaZuld bt£r W “Kano’s authentic Sniveled re- *^T nc *°° 1B * wri 

majn^in a glass ctrffm." op«llte 

Some people suTOectcd that the They were sent into the cathe 
Fearing that Us kilters would ’mummy, which had hem carefoBy dial crypt to do some remodeling,' 
ver Pizarro’s head and impale it salted m a half-successful attempt Ludena recalled. “Just foolmj 


1 children. In their investigations, they do- 

i think the children tennined that tbe bones were from 
Pizarro’s. The worn- the right century, and the man was 
xen a niece of the Pizarro’s age wren be died. They 


>eiied (he modem Pizarro saga- an may have been a niece or the Pizarro’s age when be died. They 
They were sent into the cathe- conquistador who died around detected traces of lead on the skull, 
al crypt to do scane remodeling,’’ 1590. They are sure the man is suggesting it had indeed been long 


Ludena recalled. “Just footing Pizarro himself. 


at preservation, was not Pizarro. around, they opened up an adjoin- 


xn tbe box. X-rays that highlighted 


blow was a sword thrust that regularly did to his enemies), But in tbe absence of any evidence ing wall thal they weren’t supposed 
dipped his right jaw, probably cut Mends spirited his body away, to back up tbe 1661 document, no- to touch.” 


The gkiiii was the key mere. It *** f alal thrust and more than a 
‘locked on* to the male skeleton dozen other wounds were the 


the jugular vein and the carotid they dressed Pizarro in a white body could prove the mummy was 
artery and severed his spine. He habit with a distinctive red cross of a fraud. In 1945, in fact, a Peruvian 


touch.” exactly right,” said Garcia. The dmcher. 

Beytmd the waR lay a niche and a physical evidence entirely supports The II 
id box with a rough inscription tire historical record You can not reconstructed 


sty of f 
Ptzairo’: 


’s face with 


was likely paralyzed when death the Military Order of tire Knights doctor won the national prize for cm the lid saying that it contained only see, but almost fed, tire fatal techniques used to help identify 


came. 

i£^i£f5i ! S 'k° 8t City’ of Andes Is Old Stuff in Tourist Guidebooks 

chaeologists, anthropologists, pa- _ „ .. „ _ 

thologists, radiologists, chemists, . By Boyce Rensbergcr gave^credit to a Peruvian expedi- 

his torians unrf nfbitr vnhmfnw Washinprm Post Service tion" in the 1960s. But the XU 

lectives from institutions as divose nn HE expedition to a “lost city" soggested that tbe siu 

as hos p itals , art mncwimc and imi— X in the Peruvian Andes that b 34 * faded into obscurity after thal 
verities all contributed to solving University of Colorado arch&eolo- . expedition completed a brief viaL 


By Boyce Rensbernei gave credit to “a Peruvian expedi- Peruvian highlands are filled with Although, officially, l 
Washtnpmi Post Service tion" in the 1960s. But the an- ruins.” ” iards conquered the tora 

rp he expedition to a “lost city” n“»cemem suggested that tbe site Savoy, who said he found 39 oth- olopsts have, suspected 
1 in tire Peruvian Andes that had faded into obscurity after that er ruined aties in the GnmPqalen empire was in dedmeam 

■ •- .MI I , .. , MfnuIitiMi rrainn IwilinrPc that all wm nart nF .L_ 4_-_ > 


the mystery. gists recently announced with great t . . . . . . . . 

“Once the Hzarro bug bit, it be- fanfare involved well-known ruins “'“Utebea the subjected 
came a passion for a lot of excited that are even described in tourist «?zens of books, magazme and 
people/ said Hugo Ludena, an ar- guidebooks as a place to visit. nnwpaperwticles,aridevetial970 
who directed 4l . „ Ande- 


gists recently announced with great 


expedition completed a brief viaL region, believes that all were part of before tire conquistadors arrived. 

a civilization, the Chachapoyas. How else, they ask, could Francisco 
In fact, it has been Lhe subject of conquered by the Incas. Pizarro and a few hundred soldiers 

dozens of books, magazine and “I don’t deny anything Gene Sa- have destroyed a once militarily 
newspaper articles, and even a 1970 voy says,” Lennon said, “but I do strong empire of 6 nriffion people? 
CBS News documentary on Ande- take exception to the. idea that 

an archaeology. Many of the re- there’s nothing left to do al Gran Various factors have been sug- 
pons were by Douglas Eugene Pagaten because he did it an Gore gested. Shortly before lhe Span- 
(Gene) Savoy, an Amancan explor- discovered the site. What we want iards* arrival the Incas suffered a 


th» rmr«tfr>r Unarm u h M a of a At a Jan. 31 news conference, the an archaeology. Many of the re- there’s nothing left to do at Gran Various factors have been sue 

Cokrodo ardiaeologists descitired ports were g Douglas Eugene Platen beamse.he did iialL Gene gest^. Shorty before the 

safesnarrkbT<noric tr»Kiiret the site as a Tostaty^ and issued a (Gene) Savoy, an American explor- discovered the site. What we want mrds^ arrival the Incas suffered i 


news release headlined “Pre-Incan er who discovered the site in a to do is study it in a lot more devastating 
Find May Rival Machu Picchu,” . 1964-65 expedition and namryl the scientific detail than has been done evidence th 
the renomred mountaintop ruins of duster of 18 buildings Gran Paja- so far.” He said there had been no . pox, in trod 
an Incan city in southern Peru. ten. exaggeration nor intent to deceive on a prevk 

- in his announcement aboot the site, swept into 

1 ne site, I nomas Lennon, a **i don't understand why they 4n«»i»r imw An WlnKh itowa r ahnrl nf *1 


modem accident victims. 

, ^ 1 _ When the truth was discovered, 

IflPnAAlrfi “there was some local hostility at 

LUvUUUAO first People liked their mummy,” 

said Ludma. “Bui I knew we would 
Although, officially, the Span- win. After tbe lead box was found, 
iards conquered the Incas, arenae- priests cm their rounds of the catho- 
igists nave.snroected that the dial with incense stopped blessing ' 
tpire was in decline and disarray tbe mummy.” 
fore the conquistadors arrived. In January, the Limn City Conn- ' 
w else, they ask, could Francisco c3 bowed to science and ordered 
tamo and a few hundred soldiers tire bones of the real Pizarro moved 
ve destroyed a once militarily to his public crypt in the cathedral 
ong empire of 6 nnllion people? here as the conquistador die- 
, , , . - tated iu his wifl. He was placed . 

Various factors have been sug- there Jan. 10. 

st«L Shortly before lhe Span- with the mystery concluded to . 
ds* amval the Incas atffered a everyone’s satisfaction, there re- 


Although, officially, the Span- 
iards conquered the In cas , archae- 
ologists lave. suspected that the 
empire was in decline and disarray 
before the conquistadors arrived. 
How else, they ask, could Francisco 
Hzarro and a few hundred soldiers 


iting civil war, and there is mains the masquerading mu mmy . 

e that epidemics of small- Who is he? 

traduced by the Spaniards “Slice the mummy is sot Pizar- 


3# cf 

Peoria, Iffinois, rqiorted that when the leaves were fed to Australian ^ ^ thebegumingaf thSStiiry if not c C - D f 1 ?!!? 1 ° gy J-Tv 

cattl^the animalslost hA-«id. d^doped grater cancerrffae Snuthsomanlnsumuim, sank The 

oophagus: The necasaiybis^na havenowbeen ttanrohmled from thepte^ from the tS&entca. quest" in the 16th ' F f. =: 

«— *i— p-w-f — ’-SLfi THF RF^ 


readily availaUe bacteria. . 

.The U. S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal Disease Centex -in 








:3S- 


exaggeration nor intern to deceive on a previous visit to Peru, had ro, tire dmrdi is a bit reticent about 
in his announcement about the sate, swept into the Inca hi ghland^ lAMmp us (men him up," Garda 
Another issue On which deeper ahead of the conquistadors. Ho- said-^Supctfidal examination sag- ’ 
study of the site may shed light is man remains, which Lennon be- nests that he died of natural causes 
the demise of the Inca empire, Beves are inside sealed tombs at m his 50s — maybe as much as a 
which Lennoir believes conquered.. Gran Pajaien, may ^how evidence century after Pizarro. I bet he was 
ihe people of .(Spin Pajaten. . of smallpox: • ’ just some bareaucrat” 


just same bureaucraL* 


— . „.fr . 

- i' = - 


. V. \ 'T 






• ,;._ f ^ 

• *cC- 

. it ^ V 


■M 


Hawaiian goats, enabling Australian cattle to digest the . 

Leucaena has bees tested in South America,- Africa, Southeast Asia 
and the South Pacific island* Some varieties of the plant grow 50 feet tag 
in six years, providing a rich source of firewood in regions where fuel is - 
scared 

Excess Water Held Risky in Epilepsy 

PALO ALTO, California (NYT) — As an item of diet, water is vital 
and has no calories. Bui a physician at Stanford University reports that 
■i> loo much water intake can be dangerous to people who have epilepsy. 

A weight-loss organization that boasts more than 650 centers has 
published a booklet advocating the drinking of eight to 12 rigbt-otmee . 
(about a quarter of a liter) glass® of water a dmr, according to Dr. James 
G White of Stanford Univasity’s School of Medicine. 

He said that in a recent five-month period he has seen three patients 
with previously wdl-controUed epilepsy who had grand mal seizures. All 
three were following Lhe diet Excessive water intake is one of the oldest 
mechanisms known to induce seizures. Dr. White said. 

Silkworms Join War Against Cancer 

TOKYO (Reuters) — Japanese scientists are working on getting (he 
silkworm to produce the protein interferon, a prime candidate for a 
cancer cure. 

Daiichi Sdyaku, a Japanese drug company, has introduced a new 
biotechnology method n sm g silkworms to produce alpha-interferon ap- 
parently j Arrival to that in humans. Alpha-interferon is one of several 
forms of the protein which is produced naturally in human cells as a 
defense me chanism against infection. 

The Japanese process rdies on a virus that commonly attacks the 
Sl> sflkworm and infects its cells, Dr. MiLsuru Furusawa of Daiidri Setyaku 
said. Once in a ceD, the virus naturally produces large amounts of protein 
within, the silkworm. “It’s still baric research," Dr. Furusawa said, “but 
by isolatin g th*- pun of the vims gene that controls the protein prod u cti o n 
»inri re placing it with the h uman gene that makes interferon, interferon 
may be produced instead.” 

Scientists Work on Horse Fever Test 

WASHINGTON (AP) — Potomac horse fever, a disease responsible 
for the deaths of many valuable horses in the eastern United States, is 
showing up in other areas of the country even as scientists who recently 
isolate the suspected cause woik to develop a lest far early diagnosis of 
tfae malady. 

Researdiens ai the Univerritv of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana isolat- 


Lennon’s announcement, iraort- 
ed in the IHT Feb.2-3, did not 
daim the discovery of the rite— he 


Open February 1985 : 

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homes by nVfca- The organism is a rickettria, a type of geim thal 
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The home fever rickettria inhabits and kills white blood cells called 
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Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1985 





’■Trrl 


NYSE index 



Opw HM 

Lew 

Lasf Cbm , 

>ndvs 

B77J3 

1306*4 127451 129772 + 21 J1 

Tnms 

62456 

639.17 

82179 

63452 + 

9.19 

Util 

149 JB 

15172 

149X2 

15LT6 + 

1X9 

Comp 

52U9 

53173 

519X4 

S287S + 

7J» 


NYSE Diaries 




Pravlw Todpr 
HU in Claw 7 PM- 

romntlti HU] 10UH 1045} 10554 

“ iSE « M B 

BE AS AS AS * 


Odd-Lot Trading In N.Y. 


Buy Sales *savt 

Feb. TS 197.173 40015 1,314 

Feb.ll 28L393 559503 1734 

Feb. 8 224.918 531,101 2.907 

Feb. 7 217599 547790 1443 

Feb. 4 WM? 5*0330 NJV. 

•Included in me sales hours* 



AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ index 


Advanced 

Declined 
Un changed 
Total Issue* 
New h bolts 
New Lows 


993 274 

192 299 

236 ZJ4 

023 799 

a 39 


Com Doolie 

industrials 

Finance 

insurance 

Utilities 

BaiU 

Transt*. 


SS£ NM A90 AOO 

20457 29442 m72 

HH2 ^ 3B 3£ 
^ = SSB 
B- S*H 


Tables include Hie nationwiife prices 
up to the dosing on wall street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


Standard & Poor's Index 


Prevtem Today 
men low Close 3 p.m. 
Intustrlaks 201.99 2004* 201.72 20366 

Troiw. 160.13 157.77 15952 16157 

utilities Tara 7741 Tara 19.94 

Finance 21.13 SOBS 31JJP 2133 

Comaaslte 18035 17955 18056 18255 




N.Y. Market Stages Advance 


ft 


+F -X 


* "X 



yfU 


United Press International 

NEW YORK — The stock market staged a 
sharp advance late Wednesday with investors 
turning their attention from computer issues to 
oil stocks. 

The Dow Jones industrial average, which 
gained 0-55 Tuesday, was up 1181 to 1,289,42 
about an hour before the close. 

Advances led declines by a 5-2 ratio among 
the 1.966 issues crossing the New York Stock 

Exchange tape. 

The five-hour Big Board volume amounted to 

Although prices in rabies on these poses are 
from the 4 P.M. dose in New York, for time 
reasons this article is based on the market at 3 
P.M. 

about 107 million shares, compared with 94.91 
million in the like period Tuesday. 

. Before the stock market opened, the Com- 
merce Department reported retail sales in- 
creased 0.7 percent in January to SI 10.7 billion. 

Some analysts blamed a dip in the stock 
market earlier in the week on fears that interest 
rates might head higher. 

Gary Gminero of Reel National Bank, Prov-- 
idence. Rhode Island, said the Federal Reserve 
apparently has stopped easing die monetary 
reins. 

He pointed to recent increases in some short- 
term interest rates. Although he doesn't expect 
the Fed to lighten, Mr. Gminero believes “they 
don’t want to loosen up much more" at this 
point. 

Mr. Gminero said after many corporations 


reported profits on the low side during the last 
quarter of 1 984, the outlook is for improvement 
in 1985. He said that should contribute to a 
rising stock market 

On the floor, Unocal was near the lop of the 
active list and higher. Tuesday, the company 
said it wasn't for sale. The stock has fluctuated 
recently on takeover rumors. 

Texas Oil & Gas was higher at midday on 
heavy volume. 

Phillips Petroleum was off a fraction. Phillips 
is trying to turn back an effort by the Investor 
Can G Icahn to get control of the company. 

Oil issues moved higher on new reports of a 
firming of the world oil price Among the gain- 
era at midday were Indiana Standard, Atlantic 
Richfield, Texaco, Royal Dutch, Chevron and 
Exxon. 

Actively traded AT&T was fractionally high- 
er at mid-session. 

Consolidated Edison was up a fraction on 
heavy volume. 

Data General, which fell 14ft Tuesday, was 
lower at midday. Digital Equipment and Ad- 
vanced Micro Devices also tost ground. IBM, 
which lost more than 5 points in the first two 
sessions this week, was gaining at midday. 

Tonka Corp. was sharply higher. The compa- 
ny said orders for the first two months of the 
year were running well ahead of last year’s pace. 
The company also said its products were well 
received at the toy fair in New York. 

General Motors, Ford and Chrysler at frac- 
tional gains at midday. Chrysler was up ft to 
33ft. General Motors class E was lower. GM 
filed a registration statement for the public 
offering of 3 million class E common shares. 


2246 15% EsaoxC 60b 17 11 
31ft 20b EBtfflM 73 12 11 

373k 28 Ettiyi 55 2X 10 

79k 3 EvonP 
10 «k Evan pf 1.40 175 
14* 10% Evanpf 2.10 175 

41*6 30 ExCoio 141 If W 

1446 in Excntsr 1510115 


50b 35 11 43 30*6 201k 20b + 4k 

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55 04 10 224 35% 35% 35% — % 

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40 If H) 51 4IVb 41 41 -—Ik 

510115 17 15% 15Vk 15*6— b 


12 Month 
HlBhl-OW SlOC*. 

214fc 12% HugtiTl 
25 17b HuoftSe 

S3 21 Vj Human 
274k I71b Hunt Ml 
4!Vk 23% HuttCF 
25% 18V* Hrfrol 


515. Close 

L PE lOQsHtahLnwQuOt.Ql^ 

1883 15*6 IS 15% + J6 
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15 3454 2*?fc 28% + £ 

T6 75 27V! 24 26 

=S ^ SJ5 SS «« 


48% 361b Exxon 350 7.1 7 0628 48 471k 47*6 + % 


5 


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24% 18% I 
25ft 17% I 

20 % an i 

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64% 35% I 
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115 
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m 


i 



Growing with oil 
and gas exploration . 

Unmanned work 
submarines from 
Ametek’s Straza 
Division are 
exploring most of the world’s 
deep ocean oil fields. 

Write for latest reports to: 


k A 


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410 Pork Avenue, 21 st Floor, 
New York. NY 10022. 








Cft! 


27% 20 
34% 23% 
24% T2% 
14% 10% 
43 34% 

29% 24% 
57 46% . 

56V. 47 . 

16% 12% . 
9% 5% 

37b 28 . 

46b 37% 

27% 21%. 
24% 15% 
28b 21% 


11 437 27 
8 524 28% 
11 254 24 
256 12 
7 687 43 
40z 27 
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1107 5&b 
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16 4687 37% 

io a a 

17 13 36% 

IS 125 24% 
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23V. 26% +146 
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114k 12 + b 
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n u —i 

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16% 16% 

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10% 634 KDI 79 U 10 128 8% 8% 8% 

13% 9% KLMs 1210164 Mb 134k 14% +1 

39b 33 KMI Pf 4J50 11 S 639 39 37— % 

41% 2644 Kmart L24 34 9 7064 37b 364k 37b + b 


39% 24% KN Ena 17 

20b 17% KalsrAl jSO 47 
23% 14% KalsCe 59 1.1 
2046 15b KalCpf 147 74 
16% 8% Kaneb A0 37 
20% 14b KCfyPL 276 117 5 
34% 29 KCPLnf 445 134 
36% 29b KCf»L Pf 440 124 
2D 15% KCPLpf 243 124 


37 37b 36% 3646— b 
919 16U 15% Mb + W 
79 18% 17% 18 
9 17% 174k 17% + % 
926 11 10% 10%— % 

291 21b 20% 21%+ b 
1 Mx 33 33 33 — % 

60z 34% 34% 34% 

1 18% IBM 184k+ % 


Ik S3 

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26 72V, 

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329 34k 

iBAB 264k 
567 27% 
393 28% 
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178 26% 
634 
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14% 10b KC5apf UI0 74 SOz 13b 13b 13K 
18% 12% KaoGE 236 110 6 3283 H% 17% 15% + % 

35% 28% KmiPLf 246 06 7 335 34b 33% 34b + % 

II* 5°? I" . 7SS 3746 38% 37% + % 

101% 47 Kafypf Ut M IT 102 10146 101% +146 
19% 1«6 KoufBr A0 22 6 730 18b 18% 18b 

1.0% 12% KaufPf 140 86 72 17% 16% 17%+ % 

45% 27b KeUaas 136 40 13 578 44% 43 44% +1 

33% Z14k Kailwd 140 29 8 432 3446 33% 34% +1% 


7SS 3746 36% 37%+ % 
It W2 1014610146+146 
730 18b 18% 18b 
72 17% 1*46 17% + % 


4% I Kenaf 
30 1946 PCornnt 

25b 204k KvUtll 
14% 11 KerrCf 


JO 32 19 
M 73 I 
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26% 184k KortSpf 170 8.1 


634 1% 14k 1M + % 

24 2446 34% 2446 + % 
75 25% 25% 2546+ b 
57 134k 13 13% + % 


26b KorrMc 1.10 33 27 5308 32% 32% 33 + 4k 


27% 16% KevBk 1J0 5J0 8 
19M 14 Keyslnt Xflb 25 20 


111 »% 2S4k 24% + % 
33 19% IBM 19 +% 


gb 26b KkWe 13) 37 21. 537 32b 31% 32b + b 


77b 614k KJd PI’S +00 57 
514k 42b KlOaopf 1*4 33 


75 74% 75 + b 

50b 50*4 50b 


K£ £""££• 2J0 *3 II 677 51% 49% 51 
344k 21b KflShiRa M 23 16 222 34% 33% 34% + M 

gM 17% Koaer 270 8XT73 27 Z7M 2746 27% — b 

ISH* IS ° lmor -5 UB 154 20% 20% 20% + % 

»b 17% Kapurs JO +1 25 731 20b 19M 1946— M 

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Statistics Index 


AMEX orton P.12 Eomhun reports P .13 
AMEX MoMflsvnP.12 Frtna rot* nates P .13 
nysE pncB P. a Goto mortars P. * 
kys£ Motw/iM P.n MMmi roi« p. 9 

CopUnn track* P.u Mortal summary P. 9 
Cononcv rates P. • Oattons P.U 

Camnwctftlas P.TO OTC stock P.U 

ptwWFW* <*-»> Other martlets P.u 


-THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1985 


Brr.ili>3SSribunt 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 


U.S. Slocks 
Report, Page 8 

Page 9 











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WALL STREET WATCH 

The Wave of the Future: 
Super Bear or Super Bull? 

By EDWARD ROHRBACH 

Unemotional Herald Tribune 

R OBERT R. Prccbter Jr. saj-s in his Eliiott Wave Theorist 
ihai stocks are enjoying a super bull market in which the 
Dow-Jones average wffl soar above 3,000 by 1987. 
“DonaldJ. Hoppe, m his own market-advisory letter that 
uses the same Elliott wave theory, contends that stocks are 
groped m a super bear market that will plunge the Dow below 
600. perhaps 500, within the same period. 

Asked to explain the discrepancy, Mr. Hoppe replied: “One of 
us is going to be wrong.” 

So far. it looks as if Mr. Hoppe is the one who has been reading 
his charts — or “waves” of stock-market averages the theory 

traces — upside down. 

However, Joseph Granville, « .. 

whose own market timing has Un reading the charts 
been noteworthy in the past P n:.„ 

year, declared this week that ®* fcillOtt wave 
be differs with Elliott wave th^nrv* f fW S G 
“super bull” projections for e01 7 : Ot US IS 

Wall Street in the late 1980s. going to be wrong * 

He maintains that he has dis- ° ° q* 

covered that an early practi- 
tioner of the theory let his ruler slip and mis- measured one of the 
waves. Correcting for the error, Mr. Granville adds, indicates that 
the super-cycle wave is cresting now in 1985, and long-term bulls 
* like Mr. Prechier “may look right for a few months ... but the 
end could come anytime.” 

“A blow-off rise to any series of new highs would simply 
exacerbate the decline that follows ” he asserts. “In other words, 
the bigger the top, the bigger the flop.” 

_ Mr. Prechier, however, is riding an amazingly accurate predic- 
tion himself. After Wall Street opened the year with three straight 
declining sessions, pushing the Dow down to 1.182, he wrote Jon. 
7 from Gainesville, Georgia, to his subscribers: “The sideways 
correction in the stock market should end this week as the 23- 
week cycle bottoms. Wave [3] should then carry the market to 
new all-time highs in a surge of record volume and super 
breadth.” 

The profile he sees for the market in February is up to a mid- 
month peak, then down for the second two weeks to a low around 
Feb. 28, “providing the first minor correction of the year ” 

T HIS “third wave” which has lifted Wall Street out of the 
doldrums, Mr. Prechier said, is the phase during which 
investors find “new reasons” to buy stocks as fundamen- 
tals improve almost daily. 

Francis HLM. Kelly, chairman of the investment-policy com- 
mittee at Oppenhdmer & Co_ maintains the reason for the stock 
, market’s surge lux not been “the perception of something dra- 
matically new about to occur, but something d rama tically old 
which had been largely ignored.” He refers to the decline in short- 
term interest rates. 

“Ironically, the stock-market advance began after the huge 
decline in short rales was completed,” he studT “With so much 
money created in the face of weak growth in business-loan 
demand, the equity market found its perfect excuse.” 

What is wrong with Wall Street now after its “breathless 
advance” in January, he said, is the “highest level of euphoria 
since 1978.” Markets embarking on sustained advances “usually 
climb the proverbial wall of worry, which keeps popular opti- 
mism in check.” he added. “The 1985 market has moved from 
opening pessimism to euphoria without this intervening phase of 
skepticism.” 

In the next month or two, he predicts an “intermission” on 
Wall Street “in which individual equities or laggard groups will 
prosper, but the almost random gains are behind us.” 
Oppenhdmer, noting that oil-service stocks have been the 
second worst-performing group in the market in the past 30 
weeks, believes this “market rotation” will focus on them. Reo- 
(CootBBied on Page 11, CoL 2) 


Currency Rates 


late interbank rate on Feb. 13 , excluding fees. 

Offiad fixings for Amsterdam. Brussels, Frankfurt, Mian, Paris. New York rate at 
2 PM 


Amsterdam 3J33 4A5B 

BnKulsCa) MAH 7i as 

Frankfort 12994 1504 

London f» 7967 — — 

Ml ton 2JBSJ0 U0U5 

MoWYarktc) iflH 

Part* UUS55 109# 

TOkVO 26250 28729 

zorku 26039 10512 

1 ecu OJS75S 04201 

I SDR ILM0I9S 0J81 965 


* lv Oman 

l_QUlY. 

0l 743 AtatraffmiS 
0JM3S Austrian KkiUtna 
B91S2 Befetai fin. franc 
U«i Candida C 
06849 Doabh Krone 
8.1471 Finish markka 
OATH Stye* drachma 
0.1282 HeogKoaoS 


DA. 

FP. 

If.L. 

Gtdr. 

BJF. 

S.F. reo 

11129 ■ 

3709 • 

0.1B44 

— 

5AM* 

13X17 *14200 

28.865 

65685 

12605 * 

1721 75 

— 

2X578 25.14 

— — 

3275- 

1.626* 

B8J9- 

4J85- 

117.46 *12525 

15888 

10.9545 

2206.13 

djfefis 

77JJ2 

3J1555 285775 

61520 

201.44 

- 

543J30 

30667 

72135 7714 

3JO 

i auras 

2JS30BO 

U» 

66.45 

1BOTS 26130 

10535 

— 

4.9635* 

Z6K6 

15J18* 

150938795 

79 JS 

2623 

1X06- 

7039 

398J8* 

9480. 

85L09- 

77 M • 

0.1383 

75414* 

42425* 

18674 

32M* 

6.794 

U60JS 

15207 

444379 

18939 177.457 

X15W7 

965574 

N.a 

15835 

6X4449 

Z6W2 252215 

Dollar Values 





_ , Cunreacr 

finely. 

0.953 Irish S 
00014 Israeli shekel 
32331 KmeoilldlBBr 
02fu Mom. rumen 
O105B None, krone 
O0S54 POM. peso 
00056 Part, escudo 
02792 Samfl rival 


_ * Carrancv 
Eooiv. 

04427 Singapore S 
0531 S. African rand 
60012 5. Korean m | 
OflOSS Spaa, peseta 
01073 SwatL krona 
06255 TohmaiS 
00356 Thai bate 
02723 UA-E-CIrhatn : 


C5iarlIaD:lJ52 Irish I 

(a) Cornmerdol tninc (b) Amounts needed *o buy one pound (cl Amwms needed la buy one aoflw »•» 
Units of HU [*J Units Of 1200 (V) Units Of 10200 
NjQi om quoted: (LA.: rat available. 

Sources: Banana du Benelux (Brussels l ; Banco Commerckrta itallano (Milan); Chemical 
Bank (Now York); Bonnua National ‘a da Paris l Paris); IMF iSDR); Bonoue Arotv at 
Int e rnationale eTInvcstlssement (dinar, rival, dirham). Otltar data trom Reuters and AP. 


Interest Rates 


Eurocurrency Deposits 


Feb 13 


Swiss French 

Donor D-Mark Franc SferTInb Franc ECU SDR 

IM. 8W-BW6 -«b SVx ■ SHS 14».-14fWl0»W-H»al0W.I0w8A.-8afa 
36A. t* -9 6 -6to 59W"5 1 h. 14W - MW IBlt- 1DW !0*w- 10te 8W - B« 

3M. Ih -rt ih lh Slh SK M - I4W I0«fa- loifa low. 10ft. «i -9 

6M.9W.9Sh ih -4* 5* -5* !3 W- 131* 11% • IMh IW - 10 *. 8^ ^ - 8 W 

TV. Wh-lOW 6h ■ tK 5te • 6 ll*r 12M1H- llh 10 ifc- 10 W 0 *W ■ 9 *■ 

Rates applicable to interbank daoostts of SI million minimum itvamhiotontl. 

Sources: Mown Guaranty (dollar. DM. SF. Pound. FF); Lloyds Bank (ECUI. embank 
ISDR). 


k . ii’ 1 

^ Asian Dollar Rates 


Feb 13 


l ms. 

IK -8<h 
Source: Reuters. 


Sms*. 
9H. -9W 


lvrar 
10 ft - 10 w 


Key Money Rates 

United States cuu pre*. 


Discount Rote 
Federal Funds 
Prime Rote 
Bnihar Loan Roto 
Comm. Paper. 38-179 days 
Maonlh Treasury Bins 
6-inonth Treasury BDis 
CDd 9069 days 
CD*! 4M9 days 


Vldtombani Rare 
^OvarateM Rah 


wa n ite m Rate 
One Month interbank 
3-monjti Intorttonk 
frmonrti interttaik 


interventton Rot* 
Can Mararv 
OnoHmemti interbank 
S^nontb interbank 
mxmti interbank 


BV> 8 5716 
10te 109S 
MIA 

050 BAS 
020 8.19 

025 029 

020 794 

025 996 


4JJ6 ADO 
5.90 6JO 
065 525 

625 835 

*m 645 


HJVj lOlfti 
10 9/UI0 17/32 
I0W 10V» 
IMh lOte 
10«t 10 7/14 


Britain 

Bonk Base Role 
Con Money 
Vl-dov Troo*ury BUI 
j^nontti Interbank 

Japan 

Dhcouni Rato 
Coil Money 

MHtov Interbank 


14 14 

14 14 

13te 13V, 

1416 UVt 


5 5 

6 3/16 616 

6 7/16 6 7/16 


Retail 
Sales Rise 

InU.S. 

Autos Contribute 
To 0.7% Growth 

The AuuaaieJ Press 

WASHINGTON — Retail sales, 
held back by record cold weather in 
much of the United Slates, stiU 
managed an increase of 0.7 percent 
in January despite sharp declines at 
department and clothing stores, the 
government reported Wednesday. 

The U.S. Commerce Depart- 
ment said sales climbed to a sea- 
sonally adjusted total of SI 10.7 bil- 
lion last month after a 0.5- percent 
drop in December. 

Much of the gain was attributed 
to a strong increase in auto sales, 
which rose 4 percent in January. It 
was the fourth month in the past 
five in which auto sales have ad- 
vanced. Auto sales in January were 

7.1 percent higher than a year ago. 
But sales at clothing stores 

dropped S.l percent in January, the 
biggest decline since October 1 967. 
Sales at larger department stores 
were also off S percent. The report 
said both declines may hare been 
caused by “the record cold during 
the month.” 

Commerce Secretary Malcolm 
BaJdrige. in a statement issued af- 
ter the report on retail sales, said 
consumer purchases are on an up- 
ward trend that should support 
continuing growth in domestic pro- 
duction and help create new jobs. 

The weakness at apparel and de- 
partment stores contributed to a 
OJZ-pereent decline in sales of all 
nondurable goods, which are items 
not expected to last at least ihree 
years. 

Sales of durable goods, led by the 
surge in auto purchases, were up 
23 percent in January over the De- 
cember level. 

Sales of building materials rose 

1.1 percent in January, and sales at 
furniture and home-furnishing 
stores were up 0.4 percent in Janu- 
ary, and 10.4 percent above sales a 
year ago. 

In tne nondurable category, sales 
ai grocery stores were up 3 percent 
and service stations pasted a 1.1- 
percent rise: However, sales at res- 
taurants and bars dropped 1.2 per- ' 
cent j 

The 0.7-percent overall gain was , 
in line with expectations. Most pri- 
vate analysts were looking for a 
recovery after disappointing De- 1 
cember sales. i 

Retail sales had jumped U per- : 
cent in November and were a key : 
factor to a surge in economic activi- ' 
ty after four months of sluggish- I 
ness. 


The New Face, New Style of Atari 

Tramid Turns 
His Talents to 
A Comeback 

By Andrew Pollack 

New York Tuna Semcc 

SUNNYVALE, California — 

When Atari Corp. opened its 
booth at last month’s Consumer 
Electronics Shaw in Las Vegas, 
its refreshments — champagne 
and hot dogs — were more of a 
message than a meal. “A cham- 
pagne party on a hot-dog bud- 
get," one executive billed it — 
and the message was dean Jack 
TramieL, a man with a cost-cut- 
ter’s eye and a showman’s flair, 
was back in business. 

Pizzazz and penny-pinching 
have long been Mr. TnuniePs 
trademarks. In an industry 
known for its California techno- 
whiz kids. Tramiel, 56. has 
turned bis mix of hustle, hard- 

nosed bargaining and aggressive- n, r« 

ness into an art. Jack Tramid 

It served him well m the 25 

years during which he built some believe that saving Atari, during a spurt of sales for i 
Commodore International from which he bought from Warner In January, the cotnpan 
a Bronx typewriter repair shop Communications last My, could traduced new computers 
into a leader in the home-com- be his greatest business cbal- promise to be extremely pi 
puter market And now, a year leuge. ful and inexpensive — and i 

after he resigned from Comoro- “The guy’s got to be another Tramiel bos his way, lucrs 
dore in a dispute with its chair- Leelacocca (opuS this off,” said He hopes they will bring A 
man and largest shareholder, he a former Atari executive who revenues to SI billion in 
is putting his style to the test scoffs at that likelihood. turning a profit for the com 

again, this time at Atari. Mr. Tramiel, however, is off to and pulling it out of the re 

In his drive to revive the com- a fast start He has enliqral his that has engulfed it for the 
pany that he helped crush during three sons and drawn upon much two years, 
his days at Commodore, he is of his personal fortune to gel the He is already talking 2 
uying to prove that his success venture under way. He has pared building an assembly phi 
there was not a fluke, and, some expenses by dismissing most Nevada and of buying a « 
suggest to get back at his old Atari employees and trying to conductor comp any to give, 
company. cancel previous contracts. Just the vertical integration lha 

In his younger days, he sur- before the crucial Christmas sell- a major reason for Commod 
vived a major Canadian financial ing season, he slashed the price success, 
scandal and the calculator wars of the Atari 800XL computer. Now, regardless of what 
of the 1970s that almost drove from SI 80 to $120, catching think of Mr. T rami rl persm 
Commodore lo bankruptcy. But Commodore napping and pro- (Continued on Race 13, Co 



China to Permit 
Buying on Credit 
To Boost Sales 


Thi ftew Tort Tin 


some believe that saving Atari, 
which he bought from Warner 
Communications last My, could 
be his greatest business chal- 
lenge. 

“The guy’s got to be another 
Lee Jacocca to pull this off,” said 
a former Atari executive who 
scoffs at that likelihood. 

Mr. Tramiel, however, is off to 
a fast start He has wiiiqral his 
three sons and drawn upon much 
of his personal fortune to gel the 
venture under way. He has pared 
expenses by dismissing most 
Atari employees and trying to 
cancel previous contracts. Just 
before the crucial Christmas sell- 
ing season, he slashed the price 
of the Atari 800XL computer, 
from S180 to $120, catching 
Commodore napping and pro- 


ducing a spurt of sales for Atari. 

In January, the company in- 
troduced new computers that 
promise to be extremely power- 
ful and inexpensive — and if Mr. 
Tramiel has his way, lucrative: 
He hopes they will bring Atari’s 
revenues to SI billion in 1985, 
turning a profit for the company 
and pulling it out of the red ink 
that has engulfed it for the past 
two years. 

He is already talkin g about 
building an assembly plant in 
Nevada and of buying a semi- 
conductor company to give Atari 
the vertical integration that was 
a major reason for Commodore's 
success. 

Now, regardless of what they 
think of Mr. Tramiel personally, 
(Continued os Rage 13, CoL 2) 


Compiled by Our Stajf trom Dispatches 

BEIJING — For the first time 
since the Communist takeover in 
1949, the Chinese government 
plans to permit credit sales to en- 
courage turnover of consumer 
goods, the official China Daily re- 
ported Wednesday. 

Installment buying was once 
common in pre-revolutionary Chi- 
na and many people became beau- 
ty indebted. 

But Mao Zedong gave low prior- 
ity to the consumer sector and 
credit sales far major items were 
unknown. Some shopkeepers, how- 
ever. have extended small amounts 
of credit to regular customers. 

As part of current leader Deng 
Xiaoping’s drive to invigorate the 
Chinese economy by using market 
forces, the consumer and service 
industries are being promoted en- 
ergetically. 

The government announced 
Sunday that it had leased nearly 
70,000 state-run enterprises to indi- 
viduals or collectives in an effort to 
make them profitable, and revealed 
that it was “experimenting” with a 
plan to sell state-owned businesses 
to individuals. 

The English-language China 
Daily quota! a report by the Minis- 
try of Commerce that said the gov- 
ernment now wants to tap China's 
record bank savings to spur con- 
sumption, and therefore produc- 
tion. 

China’s one billion people kept 
an average of 117 yuan ($42) m the 
bank last year, a record total of 
121.47 billion yuan ($43 billion). 

“More flexible ways of selling 



ContpdeJby Our Staff From Dispatches 

LONDON — The dollar contin- 
ued to set record highs against Eu- 
ropean currencies Wednesday in 
nervous and often active trading. 

The upward march continued 
despite some dealers* reports of 
limited central-bank intervention 
Tuesday night in Japan and 
Wednesday in West Germany. 

Currency dealers said the dollar 
lost ground during early European 
trading following reports of dollar 
sales by the Bank of Japan and 
rumors of intervention by the West 
German central bank, ins Bundes- 
bank. 

The dollar dropped earlier on 


rumors of Bundesbank sales. But it 
bounced back, and in late after- 
noon trading surged to a 13-year 
dosing high of 32894 Deutsche 
marks, compared with Tuesday's 
32782 finish. 

During the dollar's morning fall, 
trading rooms of several large West 
German banks were swamped by 
rails from corporate treasurers 
wanting to know whether the dip 
signaled a turnaround for the US. 
currency, the dealers said. 

“The higher the dollar rises, the 
more apprehension of a turn- 
around is growing,” a trader in 
Frankfurt said- 

But a trader in Paris was optimUr 


tic. “There's a lot oT money to be 
made in this market if you've got 
the guts to go long dollars,” he said. 

In London, the pound dosed at 
$1,087, compared with SI. 0898 
Tuesday. 

The French franc dropped to a 
record low of 10.0555 to the dollar, 
compared with 10.023 Tuesday. 
The Swiss franc was at 2.8038, 
down from 2.7978. 

In Tokyo, the yen dosed at 
262.50, compared with 261.80 
Tuesday. Dealers in Tokyo earlier 
Wednesday reported heavy selling 
of dollars by the Bank of Japan, 
possibly on behalf of the United 
States. 


The U.S. Treasury bad no com- 
ment Wednesday on rumors that 
the United States was selling dol- 
lars on foreign-exchange markets 
to slow the currency's nse. 

A spokesman said there would 
be no comment on speculation 
among currency traders in Aria 
and Europe that the United States 
had intervened. 

Dealers disagreed over whether 
the Bundesbank did actually inter- 
vene in the morning. 

But if it did, its sales were inef- 
fectual and may have encouraged 
U.S. banks to bid the dollar higher, 
■they added. (Rotters, A?) 


Deng Xiaoping 


goods will be adopted, such as al- 
lowing sales on credit or by install- 
ment payments and encouraging 
advance orders for durable goods 
including color television sets, re- 
frigerators, washing machines, 
cameras and motorcycles," the re- 
port said. 

Since January, customers in ma- 
jor cities have been able to order 
color televisions and other durable 
goods by paying cash six months in 
advance. 

Caiering, repair shops, tourist at- 
tractions, beauty parlors, gymnasi- 
ums and other recreational facili- 
ties also will be expanded to 
generate more consumer spending, 
said the report 

However, Prime Minis ter Zhao 
Ziyang said China will allow pri- 
vate businesses to flourish as pan 
of its “capitalist component” but 
will never allow them to control the 
nation's economy, the official 
Communist Party newspaper Ren- 
min Ribao reported Wednesday. 

“China is noL going lo adopt any 
policies to nationalize its individ- 
ually owned economy or private 
businesses,” Mr. Zhao told a Bel- 
gian business delegation Tuesday, 
according to Remain Ribao. 

“The development erf private 
business, to some extent, is condu- 
cive to our national economy,” Mr. 

Mr. Zhao said that while he an- 
ticipates an expansion of privately 
owned businesses during the next 
Tew years, the Chinese economy 
would remain predominantly un- 
der state or collective ownership. 

He said rather than resorting to 
nationalization, the stale would use 
taxation policies to restrict inordi- 
nate growth of the private sector. 

(AP. UP1) 


U.K. Production 
Rose Slightly 
InDecember 

Reuters 

LONDON — British indus- 
trial production rose a provi- 
sional Q. I percent in December, 
after a November rise of 0.4 
percent, the government report- 
ed Wednesday. 

Provisional figures had indi- 
cated that November’s output 
had dropped by 02 percent 
The index of industrial output 
was set at a seasonally adjusted 
103.4 in December, 12 percent 
lower than a year earlier. 

Manufacturing output was 
unchanged in December, after 
November’s rise was revised to 
0.7 percent. December's index 
was 101 2, up 1.6 percent from a 
year earlier. 

Industrial production rose by 
1 percent in 1984, following 
growth of 3.5 percent in 1983, 
the office said. The dispute in 
the coal industry is estimated to 
have reduced output last year 
by 2 J to 3 percent. 

Manufacturing output rose 
3 J percent in 1984, after 1983's 
25-percent rise. i 


BIS Finds Fewer Short-Term Loans 


By Carl Gcwirt 2 

Intenuuionai Herald Tribune 

PARIS — The maturity profile 
of the international bank debt of 
developing countries and smaller 
industrialized nations shows much 
less concentration of short-term 
loans and more longer-term loans 
than previously estimated, the 
Bank fra- International Settlements 
reported Wednesday. 

The BIS, which monitors inter- 
national bank lending, said its 
study shows “a significant length- 
ening of the maturity structure," 
with short- and long-term debt now 
about evenly balanced. 

For countries, as with individ- 
uals, a bunching of short-term debt 
is considered unhealthy, as it leaves 
borrowers with little room for ma- 
neuver in manag ing their debt. 

The main reason far the altered 
shape of the maturity profile is a 
change in the way the BIS measures 
and collects its data. 

The new series includes the 
worldwide consolidated lending of 
banks in Britain, Canada, Den- 
mark, France, Ireland, Italy, Lux- 
embourg, Sweden, the United 
Slates and West Germany. Until 
now, only the reports from U.S. 


banks were on a consolidated basis. 
Data from banks in Austria, Bel- 
gium. Japan, the Netherlands and 
Switzerland are still op an uncon- 
solidated basis. 

The new consolidation reduces 
the gross numbers in part because 
the figures oo longer include claims 
of these banks on their offices in 
countries outside the reporting 
area. For U.S. banks alone, these 
uner-office positions, which are 
predominantly short-term, are esti- 
mated to have totaled $15 billion at 
the end of 1983. 

At the same time, Lhe new report- 
ing procedures augment the cover- 
age, in that the coverage now in- 
cludes foreign-currency lending to 
local residents by affiliates of the 
banks outside the reporting area. 

As a result of these changes, 
short-term debt at the mid- 1984 
cutoff date for this semiannual re- 
port is estimated at 42 percent. This 
compares with figures at the end of 
1983 of 46 percent reported under 
the old system, or 443 percent as 
revised by the new data. 

The shift away from a prepon- 
derance of short-term debt also re- 
flects the debt rescheduling in Lat- 
in America. Mexico’s short-term 


debt was cut to 26 2 percent of the 
total at mid- 1984, from a revised 
figure of 424 percent at the end of 
1983. 

At the same time, Mexico's long- 
term debt rose to 583 percent, 
from a revised 45.1 percent at the 
end of 1983. 

Latin American countries now 
have the lowest concentration of 
short-term debt of any of the 
groups of countries monitored by 
the BIS. Short-term debt amounts 
to 32 3 percent of the total and 
long-term debt 52 2 percent (Inter- 
mediate debt amounts to 7.8 per- 
cent and debt unallocated by matu- 
rity to 7.7 percent.) 

For all erf the countries tracked 
by the BIS, long-term debt, defined 
as loans with maturities of two 
years or more, accounts for 41 per- 
cent, up from a revised figure of 
39.4 percent at the end of 1983. 

The new reporting system also 
shows that uncus bursed credit com- 
mitments, Loans that have been ar- 
ranged but not yet drawn, are larg- 
er than previously assumed: S98.1 
billion at the end of 1983, instead 
or $93.4 billion. 

In the following six months, this 
(Continued on Page 11, CoL 1) 


Panel Urges Steps to Improve 
U.S. Competitiveness Abroad 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON —US. indus- 
try’s ability to compete in world 
markets has declined over the past 
20 years, but the trend can be re- 
versed if government and business 
work together, according to a re- 
port issued Wednesday by a presi- 
dential commission. 

The President’s Commission on 
Industrial Competitiveness, a vol- 
untary group that ceased operating 
last September, also urged creation 
of several cabinet-level depart- 
ments and a reduction in the feder- 
al defid L 

“There is no quick fix for the 
challenge of competition from 
abroad,” said John A. Young, 
chair man of the commission. Mr. 
Young is also president of Hewlett- 
Packard Co. 

“What we’re asking for is a new 
vision and a new resolve among aH 
Americans,” said Mr. Young, 
whose panel consisted primarily of 
leaders from industry. 

Among the recommendations 
wore the creation of cabinet-level 
departments of science and tech- 
nology and of trade: an increase in 


tax incentives for research and de- 
velopment; a strengthening erf laws 
protecting intellectual property 
rights, and a reduction of the feder- 
al deficit. 

Economists say the deficit con- 
tributes to a U3. lack of competi- 
tiveness abroad by strengthening 
the dollar. The government, forced 
to borrow for funds to cover the 
deficit, thereby drives up interest 
rates. These raves attract foreign 
investment capital into the United 
States, and thus increase demand 
for the dollar. 

By reducing the deficit, econo- 
mists say, the process conld be re- 
versed. U3 products, priced more 
cheaply abroad because of a weak- 
er dollar, could compete more ef- 
fectively. 

The commission concluded that 

U-S. ability to compete has eroded 
over the past two decades, despite 
some signs of renewal over the past 
few years. 

Competition was defined as the 
degree to which a country can, un- 
der free and fair market conditions, 
produce goods and services that 
can be competitive on international 
markets. 


Analysts Skeptical About Icahn’s Bid for Phillips 


Gold Prices 


HOC* 

lukMrifcairo 
Ports I1U fcltol 
Zurich 
Landen 
ton* vert 


*A 

PA 

ChVe 

30X05 

30X80 

— 180 

30X10 

— 

-M0 

I 302.73 

30188 

— (L68 

30X55 

30380 

+ 025 

30X60 

30320 

+ an 


30280 

+ 180 

lor London. PwH ood Lurem- 


Sources: Reuters, Commendank. Credit Lv- 
onnou, Uonts Bank. Bank of Tokyo. 


l^ra.OBW’Irwand CkBlna ommr^a^m 
Zurich, new vert Came* cunefll conlrad. 
Ail orteM to U- 5 -* B " f ounce ' 
guuree: Reuters. 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — WaB Street ana- 
lysts say they are becoming more 
skeptical about Car] C. Icahn’s at- 
tempt to acquire Phillips Petroleum 
Co. 

On Tuesday, Mr. Icahn unveiled 
his third plan m eight days for 
buying the company. 

More roadblocks surfaced Tues- 
day as two state judges in Oklaho- 
ma issued separate temporary or- 
ders to block Mr. Icahn from 
proceeding with his offer pending 
hearings next week. 

In his latest plan. Mr. Icahn said 
he was prepared to offer $60 a 
share in cash to buy 70 million 
shares of the company’s stock, 
which would be enough to increase 
his stake in Phillips to just over 50 
percent If that S42-billion offer 
succeeds, Mr. Icahn said he then 
would acquire the remaining 77.1- 
million shares for securities with a 
value of $50 a share. 

The two-step S8.06 billion take- 
over offer is conditioned on arrang- 
ing financing, a defusing of Phil- 
lips's new takeover defense and 
shareholders rgeciing Phillips’s 
own restructuring plan at a meeting 
Feb. 22. 


“This is the third offer this gin 
has come up with. It’s fraught with 


‘ifs’ and ‘subject tos* and maybe its 
wearing thin” on investors, said 
Warren Shimmeriik, an oil-indus- 
try analyst at Merrill Lynch, Pierce, 
Fenner & Smith Inc. in New York. 
“It doesn’t look like a meaningful 
additional value to shareowners.” 

In heavy trading Tuesday, Phil- 
lips stock finishing unchanged at 
$50 a share. 

“In the absence of having a 
good-sized corporate partner, ! 
wonder if it’s do- able,” said Rosa- 


rio llacqua, an oil-industry analyst 
for the New York securities firm 
LF. Rothschild, Umerberg, Tow- 
bm. No such partner for Mr. Icahn 
has yet emerged. 

Mr. Icahn already owns 73-mil- 
lion shares of Phillips stock, or 435 
percent of the shares outstanding. 

A week ago, he announced an 
offer of 555 a share, evenly divided 
between cash and securities, for the 
remaining stock. 

On Friday he said he would offer 
$57 a share for about 39 million 
shares, enough to give him 30 per- 


cent of the company’s stock. That | 
bid was abandoned after Mi. Icahn 1 
examined Phillips's latest defensive 
strategy, known as a “poison pQL" 
In that tactic, Phillips sought to I 
make a hostile takeover probibi - 1 
lively expensive. i 

Phillips's own restructuring plan, I 
subject io shareholder approval , 


HARRY WINSTON 


Present 
during the 
month of February 


next week, would require the com- j 
pany to repurchase 38 percent of its 


pany to repurchase: 
slock for securities 
share, sell a contra 
its employees and 
billion in assets. 


:daiS60a 
interest to 
about S2 


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New York Geneve Paris Monte-Carlo 






Wfednesdayfe 


Dlw, Yld, PE Iffla High Low Quof.Olte* 


53 ID 11 « 1» 13K> T3H + V6 

JO MH S II 17* 18 

jo mm 974 m aw m+h 

73 27 9 138 34% 34 34 — U 


U.S. Futures *<*.13 


Season 

Season 


HlOtl 

Low 

Open Hloti Low Class Cho. 


HIM Low Open Utah Low CM* C* 1 ®- 

2143 aao Mor 20« 20*5 305* HIM -jj 

2130 SOS Mny “ 

EsLSatn Prev.Sota 7457 

P*W. Dor Opon Ini, 2477S off 333 

ORANGE JUICE (NYCE) 

15*1X1 lbs.- cents per lb. „ < -m 

Mar 167.10 17030 16870 VMt It? 


Grains 


Tates tad ode me nationwide prices 
uo to the dosing on Well street 
and do oat reflect late trades elsewhere. 


WHEAT (CBT) 

5*00 bo mlrti mom- « too pgr bushel 
4JU 137% Mar 355 357 

4*5 132% May 3L46% 347V? 

150 um Jul 3J7% 138 Vj 

376% 378% Sep 137% 130 

U3% 137% DM 147 148 

374% 341 Mar 150 151)0 

Est Sales Pnv.Sohts 7408 

Pm. Pay Open Int. 38*82 up 397 
CORN (CBT) 

3*00bu minimum- dot kin» per bushel 


325% 255 

138 272% 

131 27*6 

131 Vj UA 

US US 

110 274% 

i2iu it m 

EsL Sates 


245 Mar 2*9% 170% 
173% MOV 277% 178 
2 7M Jul 181 Ml % 
230% San 2JX% 174 W 
US Dec 157% 150% 
274% Mar 276% 277 
17 9% May 282 102 

Pnev.Sote* 24.994 


Prev. Day Open lnf.l34JES3 up 1,424 
SOYBEANS (CBT) 

5*00 bo m brimum- OoUors por bushel 
7.70% 5*9% Mar STB 5JU6 

7.77 5J1% May 170% 173% 

777 171% JU Ml 104 

7.56 195 AIM &S4 &JM 

*71 IBS Sop 5J9W 6*1% 

150 197 NOV *04% 6*6 

579 110 Jan 117% 117% 

7*2 *24 Mar *27% 130 

777 *49% May 

EsL Scries Prw.Solo* 31431 

Prav.DayOpen InL 72JS3 tie 866 


151 151% -04% 

344% 145% -JQ% 
135% 136% -02% 
375% 136% —01% 

149 145% -02% 

150 150% — 02 


209% 249% —00% 
277 277% —00% 

280% 281 — 80% 
233% 274 — J»<6 

247% 247% —00% 
276% 276% 

251% 282 


S79% +02% 
171% +02% 
*02% +81% 
&G5 +02 

100% +02% 
*04% +81% 
117 +01 

*30 -EM 

*38 +81 










M 









Livestock 


CATTLE (CMG) 

40800 ibs.- cents oer Ml 
67 JO 6180 Fab 65.15 65L27 

WOO 6340 Apr 6775 6880 

6950 65i® Jim 6902 69.15 

£787 AXIS Auo 67.10 6730 

6190 6140 OC1 6133 *150 

5709 6140 Doc 6685 67.15 

£745 6125 Fab 6745 6775 

EsLSatU 9,106 Pm. Salas 2B862 
Pm. Day Open InL 57406 up 859 

FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 

44S30 Ibt- cents per lb. 

7475 6575 Mar 7405 7405 

7*70 6740 Apr 7345 734fi 

7275 ««S MOV 7245 T2AB 

737D MM Auo 7140 7340 

7300 6780 Sap 72J5 7275 

7132 67.10 Oct 72.15 7125 

7330 7B40 Nov 7300 7380 

EsL Sales I860 Pm. Sates 1877 
Pm. DavOpan InL 11,771 up 363 

HOGS (CME) 

30800 Ibs^ cants per lb. 

5800 47.57 Feb 5080 51.15 

5445 4510 APT 4777 4785 

55.40 4840 Jun 5115 5335 

5577 4175 Jul 5185 5197 

5430 4740 AUO 5382 512S 

5195 4580 Ocl 4ttJ«J 4030 

5085 4130 Dec 4&8Q 4895 

47-70 4123 Fab 4885 4885 

47.35 4150 'Apr 

EsL Salas 1256 Prav. Solos 8851 
Pm. Day Opon Int. 30092 up 378 

PORK BELUES(CME) 

38800 lbs.- cants per lb. __ 

8185 £9.95 Fob 7040 7180 

bijo *-.'‘.io Mat mas 7042 

8280 61.15 May 7090 71.15 

8247 6215 Jul 7075 7175 

8045 6070 Aim 6875 69J0 

7115 63.15 Fab 6885 6975 

7140 6480 Mar 6775 6775 

Est.Salai 6791 Prev. Salas 10894 
Prev. Day Open Int. 14855 up 214 


COFFBE C (NYCSCE) 

37800 lbs.- cents par lb. 

15170 12340 Mar 14385 14480 

15280 12281 May 14285 14340 

T 49.20 T2UOO Jut 14140 14280 

14780 • 12780 Sep Mfl.10 14049 

14275 T2975 DOC 13981 13980 

14180 12B80 MOT 13880 13050 

13980 13180 Mav 13780 13780 

13480 13*50 Jul 

EsLSalas Pm.Sotas 1113 
Pm.DayOoanlni. 13747 oft 2* 

SUGARVTORLD 11 (NYCSCE) 

1 1ZOOO lbs.-canti per lb- 
1340 189 Mar 385 33S 

1080 4.14 MOV 470 *23 

9.95 448 Jul *83 485 

975 475 SOP 4JO 483 

985 *94 Oct 5*1 5*3 

775 154 Jan 

9J3 592 Mar 595 598 

7.15 620 May 

Jul 

Est Sates 71236 Prev. Sates 12863 
Pm. Day Open rnL 89711 off 1857 

COCOA (NYCSCE) 

10 metric tuns- Spar Ian 

2570 1788 Mar 2152 2183 

2570 2020 May 2500 2233 

2400 2049 Jul 2192 2220 

2415 2053 SOP 2180 2205 

2337 1979 DOC 2068 2004 


London Metals Feb. 13 

Figures in derling per metric ton. 
Silver In Knee per troy ounce. 


US T. BILLS (IMM1 
Si mill Ion- Pf* of too pet. 

9221 8789 Mar 9187 9173 

9181 87.14 Jun 7123 91.28 

9173 8194 Sep 5071 9079 

W9D 85-77 Dec 9039 9039 

9055 B6_40 Mar 8996 8996 

9027 8781 Jun 8974 0974 

9080 mm Sep 

B983 89.19 Dec 

EsL Sates Pm.Sales 1334 

Prev. Dev Open Int. 46812 oft 765 

16 YSL TREASURY (CBT) 

5100000 or tn-nfs &32nds of 100 pet 
B3 70-25 Mar 81 81-8 

82-3 70-9 Jun BO-9 SW-14 

81-13 75-18 Sop 77-20 79-26 

B0-22 75-13 Dec 

80-8 75-11 Mar 78-18 7B-2S 

79-26 77-22 Jun 

Est. Sales Pm.Sales 1*» 
Prsrv. Day Open int. 42849 off 345 

US TREASURY BONDS (CBT) 
lapcf-SlOOJWFats 8. 32nOsot lag pet) 
77-15 57-27 Mar 7V73 72-3 

17-15 57-29 Jun 70-24 71-3 

76-2 57-10 Sea 70 70-9 

76-5 57-8 Dec 69-12 69-23 

72-30 57-2 Altar 68-26 694 

70-16 56-29 Jun 68-11 68-21 

70-3 56-29 SOP 67-SS 6 M 

69-26 56-25 Dk 67-19 67-29 

69-12 56-27 Mar 67-14 67-15 

69-2 6+3 Jun 67 67-ID 

68-26 6+21 Sep 66-25 67-3 

EsL Sales Pm.Sales 2*236 

Prwv.DavOoen Int724276 off 708 


56-29 Jun 68-11 68-21 

56-29 Sep 67-30 688 

56-25 Dec 67-19 67-29 

56-27 Mar 67-14 67-15 

6+3 Jun 67 67-10 

64-21 SOP 6625 67-3 


143.10 14X36 
1*250 14280 
14140 14186 
14000 14041 
13900 13900 
13700 130.13 
13700 13700 
135*3 


Today Prevtaas 

Hteb wade capper cathodes : 

SPOl 180380 180400 100600 UB&.00 

3 months 183180 183200 181680 181700 

Capper cathodes: 

soot 1899*0 1801*0 188500 1887.00 

3 months 182*08 1J2BJB0 181000 181208 

Tin: spot 9.9900010*000010010001001500 
3 months 1001500100200010000001000500 
Lead ;spot 34300 34400 34000 34100 

3 months 35300 35*00 34900 35000 

One Spot 78000 7B1O0 77380 77480 

3 months 779 JO 780*0 77550 776*0 

Silver: spat 575*0 57*00 56000 56900 

3 manna 59*50 59500 587*0 580*0 

Aluminium: 

SPOl 1021 JO 102280 102200 102300 

3 months 105*50 1*9900 105800 1OSB80 
Nickel: spot *670*0 488000 483000 484000 
3 months 4870*0 4875*0 4*65*0 4870*0 
Sourer: Routers. 


S&P 100 Index Options 

Feb. 12 


S+a> GNU** 
Rto Feb Iter M May 
IS _ 29% - - 

8 a n- — 

10 IT* 19 20 — 

us m u* m — 

179 7* F* II* n 

ns i n at n 

NO 5/16 N A t 

H5 1/M 16 M I* 

!» - ft IB M 

195 - 1/14 1/1* 1* 



1 88 I H H 

SO 7 464 33 32 

*9 52 29 28 

18 27 431 19% 19% 
28- 12 1090 37% mi, 
38 73% 13% 
1*4 53 11 1636 3S 34% 

4 ZM *Zt1 

70 34 11 II 28% 20, 

44 8.1 T1 UU W% M% 

148 48 10 2886 78% 77 

LW 88 9 48% 48% 

iW 106% 1 
JO 28 6 429 40% 40% 

148 5.1 9 104 29% 29 

JO U 12 21% 21% 

JO 10 19 1419 28% 2796 

17 126 7% 7% 

.12 34 • 132 38% 33% 

80 4.1 19 HMm 
74 U 15 1488 71% m 
128 11-1 5 187 19% 19% 

% U i! S5 

--a & 
s^s 

m 30 19 sn 12% 12% 
57 3 2% 

84 34 9 34 W% 18% 

.12 4.1 13 219 27% 27% 
JB 7136 7140s 1M W% 
Jffw 58 17® SWJ 53% 
u [ill 135 *9% 49% 
17 l£ 2«% 94 
76 48 9 22 17% 17% 

08 37 15 157 2S% 25% 
*Sb ” 10 lffl 55* ^ 


Rea(WMore 
IhanaTnndora 
Million Readers 
in 164 Countries 
Around the World. 

itcraliClSZSnbuiic 


Total pet mm 10.61*165 
[•tax: 

NttTBJB Lew 17636 
Oeeree; cooe. 


DM Futures Options 

Feb. 13 

RGaitaiModr4ZUIiialsogBitParaioi2 


SMka cuMdito Poh-SetHe 

prim Mar Jun Seta Mm- Jm seta 
9 140 - — WM HO - 

X m 1.19 US 022 062 #79 

31 0.U 872 1.11 BJB 1.12 186 

32 tUM 041 076 187 179 IJ5 

33 Ul 13 tn W 19 UD 

31 1*8 an 0LX2 3*4 346 — 

C elliiMte d tot® ¥01.8587 
Com; Tim. veL 10597 ophW. 5083 
Ms ; Tie 96L vm opea W. 22.1U 
Source: CME. 


Israel Hikes Departure Tax 

Reuters 

JERUSALEM — A parliamen- 
tary committee Wednesday ap- 
proved a government request to 
raise the tax that Israelis pay to 
leave the country Lo $150 dollars 
from SI 00 dollars, committee offi- 
cials said- The new rale cakes effect 
Sunday. Another government pro- 
posed 10 impose a 20- percent levy 
on air tickets still needs purliamen- 
I lory approval. 



GNAAA (CBT) 

noo*00 nr In- ot»3,32nde of MO act 


57-5 Mar 69-24 69-29 69-19 69-23 

57- 17 Jun 69-4 69-8 69 69-2 

59-13 Sop 68-J4 

59-4 DOC g-» 

£3-23 Alter 67-12 

58- 25 Jun 67-1 67-1 66-29 66-29 

65-71 San 66-17 6*-19 66-15 66-15 

Pm. Salas 264 


70-17 57-5 Alter 

69-Z7 57-17 Jun 

69-4 59-13 5*o 

£8-13 594 DOC 

SB £3-23 Alter 

67-8 58-25 Jun 

67-3 65-71 Sop 

Eta. Salas _ Pm.: 


Pm.DayOaanlnl, 6896 off 25 

CERT. DEPOSIT (IMM3 
Si million- ots of U0 pet 
9170 85*3 Mar 9094 

9170 85230 Jun 9084 

90*0 8500 S*P 8979 

9517 8584 Doc 

8978 8686 Mar 

8946 8*43 Jun 

8784 87 JA SOP 

Est. Sales Prav. Sates 

Pm. DavOpan int. 13JI5 off 41 
EURODOLLARS (I MM) 

SI milllsn-ots of 100 pet 
9TJB 85.14 Alter 90*1 

9QS0 82.49 Jun 8998 1 

9033 8*53 Sap 8940 I 

B9J7 8*80 DOC 8895 I 

BME BC.1B A Iter 8857 I 

89.15 8*73 Jun 8874 | 


9055 9063 
8992 90*0 

8940 8946 
88.95 89*0 

8857 88*2 

8872 8851 


London Commodities 

Feb. 13 

Roures in sterling per melrlc Ian. 
Gasoil in UJ. dollars per met rlctoa 
Gold in U J. dollars per ounce. 


Hteh Low Close Prev ton 

SUGAR 

Alter 112*0 109*0 10940 1B9J0 110*0 111*0 
May 119*0 117*0 117*0 117*0 118*0 118*0 
Auo 128*0 1 2580 12670 13U8 OTJ0 12770 
Oct 134*0 135*0 134*0 13£00 US40 135*0 
DOC 142*0 142*0 139*0 141*0 141*B 
AAar N.T. N.T. 156*0 15740 157*0 157*0 

M«nr NT. N.T. 16370 16440 163*0 164*0 

2J42 loin of 50 Ions. 

COCOA 

Mar 2704 2.169 2.199 2700 2.165 2.16 b 
M ay 2722 2.188 2715 2716 1185 2,186 
Jly 2703 1174 1198 1199 1173 1174 
Son 11B4 1155 1178 1179 1153 1154 
Dec 2*48 1020 2*40 2*45 1020 2*21 
Mar 10H 1018 2*21 2*25 2*00 1005 
.NT... N.T. 1.996 1015 1996 1005 
3726 lots of 10 tons. 

COFFEE 

Mar Z3JS 2768 2J71 2787 2790 
“or 2*5 1400 zmn 7 - 402 2403 

JW XKO 2799 2426 2427 2426 1428 
Sep 2450 2430 1450 2451 2466 2450 
1409 1474 1446 2470 1478 2467 1470 

Jan N.T. N.T. 2430 2490 2471 2480 
2465 2490 1435 2470 

1145 lots of 5 Ion 
GASOIL 

Feb 246*0 239*0 244*0 245*0 240*0 242*0 
Alter 22975 226*0 229*0 22975 2287S 72L50 

iEL ™-3! VIS 2 9 5 2,, - sn 71 ’- 25 2I9J0 

MOV 715.25 213*0 21475 21450 215*8 21575 
Jun 213*0 210*0 31050 7M75 21175 21450 
JIV N.T. N.T. 21050 211*0 71Z£® 21450 
Auo N.T. N.T. 210*8 216*0 HUH Tgiffl 
S2 "-T. N.T. 210*0 220*0 212*0 225*0 
,"-T. ,N-T 210*0 224*0 212*0 230*0 
1650 lofs aflOO tans. 

GOLD 

AP Lm N Q - N -°- NJ1 

KXJ lots of 100 (ray ax. 

Sources : Reuters and London PotraJovm Ex- 
cnonatf foosoft). 


Paris Commodities 

Feb. 13 

5ogor In Frendi Francs per metric Iwv 
Other fioures in francs per 100 ka. 


Pratt, Samsung to Form 
Aerospace Com pan y 

Reuters 

WEST PALM BEACH, Florida 
— United Technologies Corp. said 
Wednesday ihai its Prait & Whit- 
ney’s govenimem -products divi- 
sion agreed with Mniiqin g Pteci- ' 
sion Industries Co., South Korea, 
10 establish a joint company. Unit- 
ed Aerospace, which will be based 
in Korea. 

It said the company will over- 
haul and repair Pratt & Whitney 
FI00 engines, which power U.S. 
Air Force F-15 Eagle and F-16 Fal- 
con aircraft 


Quna Trebles Tourist Areas 

Reuters 

BEIJING — China is trebling 
the number of cities and rural 
counties that foreigners can visit 
without special police permits and 
opening R7 new areas to tourists 
with permils. the Foreign Ministry 
said Wednesdav. 


Fmandere Credit Suisse 
Says Profit Rose 21% 

International Herald Tribune 
ZUG, Switzerland — Financiers 
Credit Suisse-First Boston 
Wednesday said that earnings rose 
21 percent in 1984 to 140.1 million 
Swiss francs ($50 million) from 
1 16.2 million francs a year earlier. 
Revenue rose 27 percent to 298 
million from 234 million in 1983. 
The company’s board also ap- 
proved a nse in the dividend to 1 10 
francs a share from 100 francs a 
share. 

John M. Hennessy, president 
and group executive officer, said 
the 1984 results reflected an in- 
crease in all the major activities of 
the international financial-services 

group. 

First Diamond Market 

To Open in Hong Ko ng 

Reuters 

HONG KONG-- Hotl g Kong’s 

first diamond maricet will start 
trading March 8, the chairman of 
Hong Kong Diamond Bourse Ltd.. 
Leung Sik Wah, announced. 

The market will mainly serve lo- 
cal diamond merchants, but over- 

Cfac nnrtirlnnnfr --II L ■ . 


attend trading when introduced bv 
voting members. The market has 
now more than 100 ordinary mem- 
bers and 14 [ voting members. Mr. 
Leung said Wednesday 


Dividends 


Per Amt 
USUAL 

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BUSINESS ROUNDUP 

Atlas Copco’s Ea rnings 
Rose 144% Last Year 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1985 


Continental Told Hong Kong’s Excelsior Hotel No Longer lor Sale 


By Juris Kaza 

International Herald Tribune 

STOCKHOLM — Atlas Copco 
AB, the Swedish air-compression, 
mining and tool group, reported 
Wednesday that its 1984 pretax 
earnings amounted to 573 million 
kronor (562.1 million) in 1984, a 
144-pexcem increase over the 1983 
Ggure of 235 million kronor. 

In a preliminary report, Allas 
Copco’s management said it was 
proposing raising the 1984 divi- 
dend to 4 JO kronor from 3 kronor 

1983. Last year, the company cut 
its dividend from 6 kronor in 1982. 

Atlas Copco’s 1984 sales rose 12 
percent to 9.1 billion kronor, from 
8.093 bullion kronor in 1983. Sales 
outside Sweden accounted for 92 
percent of the total. 

Looking to 1985, the company 
said it expected a continuing im- 
provement in sales. Ian Jacobson, 
an analyst at £3. Savory Milln in 
London, said 1984 results meant 
that bis forecast of 1985 earnings of 
750 million kronor was “conserva- 
tive.” 

Atlas Copco’s president, Tom 
Wachimdster, said be expected an 
increase in order volume from Eu- 


ropean customers in 1985. The vol- 
ume of orders was virtually un- 
changed in 1984. 

Eu rope accounts for about 50 
percent erf Adas Copco's total busi- 
ness. 

Mr. Wadtimeister also noted 
weak growth in the volume erf or- 
ders in Australia, South Africa and 
Canada, three major markets for 
turning equipment. “There will be 
volume growth there in 1985 and a 
return to an acceptable profit lev- 
el," he said. 

Mr. Wacbtmdsiersaid that some 
of the strongest order growth was 
m North America, where the Unit- 
ed States is Atlas Copco's largest 
market, and in Asia. North Ameri- 
can orders totaled 1.313 billion 
kronor, and were up 25 percent in 
volume terms. Asian orders 
amounted to 882 million kronor, 
up 30 percent. 

TTie rise in Asia largely reflected 
200 million kronor in order book- 
ings from China, Mr. Wachimeis- 
ter said, adding that they would be 
recorded as safe s and would bring 
profits in 1985 and afterward. The 
orders from China also represented 
an important breakthrough in that 
market, he said. 


To Stop Buying 
Air Micronesia 

United Pros Intematwnal 

HOUSTON— A US. bank- 
ruptcy judge has ordered Conti- 
nental Airlines to stop buying 
stock in Air Micronesia and has 
baited litigation between the 
carriers in court in Saipan. 

Attorneys for both airlines 
said Tuesday that the action by 
| US. Bankruptcy Judge Clover 
Roberts signaled that he want- 
I ed the parties to negotiate an 
out-of-court settlement. 

Judge Roberts last year gave 
Continental the go-ahead for a 
52.5-miflion plan to buy shares 
of United Micronesian Devel- 
opment Association, which 
owns 60 parent of Air Micro- 
nesia. Continental owns 30 per- 
cent oF the carrier, which has 
services from Hawaii to Guam, 
Manila, Saipan and Tokyo. 

A group of UMDA share- 
holders rough t Continental's 
takeover attempt by fifing a 
doss-action suit in Saipan. Sai- 
pan is part of the Marianas, a 
Trust Territory of the Pacific , 
Islands, which is administered 
by the United States. 


* Porsche Reports Profit Rose 
By 32.7% in Fiscal 1984 




By Warren Getler 

International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — Porsche AG, 
the West German automaker >ha» 
sdls nearly half its sleek sports cars 
in the United Stales, said its net 
increased 317 percent in the 1984 
fiscal year, ended July 31, to 914 
million Deutsche marks (S28 mil , 
lion) from 69.6 million DM in the 
year-earlier period. 

Sales in the first five months erf 
fiscal 1985 grew 8.4 percent to 1.1 
billion DM, indicating that 
Porsche could well top the previous 
year’s earnings, said Heinz Bran- 
itzki, finance chief, from company 
headquarters in Stuttgart. 

.. According to commonly used 
lowest German acco unting metho ds, 
the earnings per share rose to 1 10 
DM from 90 DM. 

News of Porsche’s strong in- 
crease in earnings and its healthy 
prospects for the current year 
pushed Porsche's shares up 43 DM 
an the Frankfurt stock exchange 
Wednesday to 1,160 DM. 

A company spokesman said 
Porsche has been relatively un- 
scathed by domestic consumer un- 
certainty over new emission-con- 
trol regulations. He said Porsche 
has about 10 years of experience in 


equipping its models with catalytic 
converters for sale in the United 
States and Japan and thus has had 
no trouble in quickly outfitting all 
its models for sale in the domestic 
market with the pollution-control 
devices. 

The spokesman said Porsche's 
main problem is delivery delays for 
some models of up to a year or 
more. He said that lo meet heavy 
demand, particularly from the UJL 
market, Porsche will be investing 
nearly 100 million DM toward the 
construction of new paint shops 
and the extension of other assem- 
bly plants. Total investment, be 
said, will be more than 300 million 
DM this year, up from 255 million 
DM last year. 

Porsche expects to sell at least 

50.000 cars this year, exceeding 3 
billion DM, after posting sales of 
2.49 billion DM on 44,800 can, the 

produce and^market 

48.000 cars in the last fiscal year 
but was kept from that goal by the 
seven-week metalworkers strike in 
May and June. 

Six hundred new workers are ex- 
pected to be hired this year, after 
the creation of 600 new positions 
last year, the spokesman said. 


By Dinah Lee 

tntemantmal Herald Tribune 


Whereas it was previously estimai- in the British colony. Ho 
ed to peak between this year and Land has dominaied Hong 


rale subsidiaries related toho- 
property and food-retaihng- 


rtoud’s major assets, the Excelsior “*'=***« «.< uuuun. more man o rauwn oouars to meei nouncea reo. 6 tnai u naa cnangeo 

Hotel, from the ornnertv market Now our borrowing requirement debts incurred during Hong its name from Mandarin Interaa- 
off-rc did the SUUMis around 11.8 billion. In Kong's property boom in Use late txonal Hotels Ltd. to Mandarin 

oom^yVSLS fc^Siir^ short, the sale of Electric enabled 1970s and early 1980s. Oriental Hotel Groun. combining 


1970s and early 1980s. 


Oriental Hold Group, combining 


Diirid rhsw i •mii'c manamnn “s to »ot sdl the Excdsior. Sudden- The company has also under- the names of the o 
dirK^r^nTjhSLrSf^hl *22 J? ”* a f0rced * E? £“^££3® res^turing fbgship holds, flu: 


“ “““ cnainnan or me anythin*," 
ups holds subsidiary, had said ^Ttefailure to find a 
1 3J ^? n 8 die desired price is not a 


for the 951-room hot^when tbe 

Excdswr was first offered last Oc- a cash cow jtemxatin* operating 


. , , cash flow net of tax 

He said Wednesday that after ^ year " 

Hongkong Land’s sale Jan. 22 of its Mkahd Holtmwnr 


Micahd HoDington. a partner at 


cqpiroflmg stake in the leading lo- 

o L.^SLi Jr )nJp r n 2’ ry Consultants & Valuers, com- 

Electric Holdings Ltd, to the nvd m„r«i the *«««, in with. 


ry Consultants & Valuers, com- 
j- .. men led on the decision to with- 

P rt >P* rl ? “ d wading group draw lhe Excels [rom lhe 
f or - market: "We’ve just earned out a 
bilhoa dollars^ the dispel cmc- smdy on holds in Hong Kong. We 
imfor the Excelsior bad shar- esOriated that the avaage take-up 


in 1984 was just under 85 percent 


Sources said that the cash relief and that in 1985, this will 
provided by the sale of Hongkong to 89 percent. If these figures are 
Electric pushed the desired price correct, it is goin g to place upward 


AMAX IuCm the mining group 
based in Greenwich, Connecticut, 
said it has found a gold deposit in 
northwestern Nevada that can 
probably be mined at low cost. 
AMAX also said it was poised for a 
strong recovery, after being hurt by 
poor mining markets. 

American Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co. and National Data Corp. 
have introduced a new charge-card 
processor that allows consumers to 
make calls using several types of 
credit cards. 

Bausdi & Lotrib Inc. has sold its 
Semco scanning- dec iron -micro- 
scope business, located in Ottawa, 
Canada, to Vickers Instruments 
Canada Inc., a unit of Vickers PLC 
of Britain, Bauscb & Lomb said. 
Terms were not disclosed. 

Braaiff Inc* which is based in 
Dallas, plans to open a new, small- 
er hub next month and fly up to 
five of its 15 planes from the loca- 
tion, the airline said. It said it was 
considering two or three cities, but 
did not name them. 

Chapman Energy Inc said it has 
discovered an oil field in Jefferson 
County, Oklahoma, that produced 
1,600 barrels in 16 hours. 

Eastman Kodak Co-'s Kodak 
Canada Inc unit has agreed to be- 
come an official sponsor of the 


electric pusneo uie desired price correct, it is goi ng to place upward 
closer to 900 million to 1 billion pressure on hotel room rates, and 
dollars. thus it would prudent to hold 

A second spokesman for Land on to a hotel investment." 
said Wednesday, ’The sale of Elec- The Excdsior bad an occupancy 
trie reduced our group borrowing rate of about 90 percent in 19847 
requirement by some 20 percent. As the hugest property company 


1 988 Winter Olympics in Calgary, ecu Live after the annual meeting on 
Alberta, Kodak announced. April 30. Mr. Silas will succeed 

Emperor Mines Ltd. of Australia William C. Douce, who will retire, 
said it plans to increase ore capaci- Source Perrier SA will launch 
ty next year at the Vatukoula gold lemon, lime and orange drinks on 
mine in Fiji to 500,000 metric tons April 15, in an effort to double US. 
(550,000 short tons) a year from revenue, sources said at the compa- 
350,000 metric tons. ny headquarters near Nfmes, 

lnfocode Inc. has formed a Brit- France, 
ish subsidiary, lnfocode UK Ltd. Texaco Inc. said its Texaco Fe- 
to market and distribute computer- troicnm Co. subsidiary has reached 
security products in Europe, the an agreement with CorporariAn Es- 
company announced. The compa- tatal Petrolera Ecuatonana, the Ec- 
ny also said that it has moved to uadorian stale oil company, to con- 
larger quarters in New York. tinue as operator of a joint 


company announced. The conma- tatal Petrolera Ecuatonana, the Ec- 
ny also said that it has moved to uadorian stale oil company, to con- 
larger quarters in New York. tinue as operator of a joint 
May Department Stores Co. of exploration venture in the Ecua- 
Sl Louis said it has agreed in prin- dorian Amazon basin, 
ciple to acquire Metropolitan Life Ward White (Soup PLC said it is 


Insurance Ca.’s 50-perceal interest offering five new shares for every 
in Paiklabrea Associates, a real- six shares of Foster Brothers Goih- 
estate partnership of May and Met- ing PLC, in a bid that values Foster 
ropolitaiL May said it will pay 510 at £93.7 million (J102.1 million), 
million in cash and will issue to ~ 


r. eu5r nT ■ lo Western Antilles expects to re- 
M^ropohtanSlOO mflhon in a new pon an operating profitk the first 
voting preferred stock. quarter, company officials in 

Midwav Airlines Inc- announced asking [he Securities and Exchange 
that it will suspend nonstop service Commission to authorize an issue 
Friday between Detroit and Wash- of 530 million in notes. They did 
inglon and between Chicago and not estimate an amount. Western 
White Plains, New York. It also recorded an operating loss of 512.9 
trill end service to Newark, New million in the first quarter of 1984. 
I*™?’ lfoasas, and MO- Westland PLC said the British 

waukee, Wisconsin. government has placed a £30-m0- 

FMEf® Petroleum Co. has an- Son (532.7-million) order for nine 
nounced that CJ. Silas, its presi- : Westland Sea King helicopters for 
dent and chief operating officer, die British Royal Navy, for ddiv- 
will become chairmah ana chief ex- cry in 1986 and 1987. 


since Mr. Davies's arrival in hue Hi 
1983. He has broken the group into & 


and the Oriental in 


Page U 


GM Plans Offering 
Of Us Class E Shares 

Reuters 

NEW YORK — General 
Motors Coip. said it plans a 
public offering of about three 
mitiinn shares erf its Class E 
common stock. 

About 13.6 million shares of 
Class E were issued in 1984 as 
ran of GM*s acquisition of 
Electronic Data Systems Crap. 


US. expatriate 
needing tax advice? 

GetinTouche 


When you're working abroad, 
chances are you're out of touch with the 
tax laws back home. 

What’s more, being on foreign as- 
signment you will also be subject to local 
taxes. And when you change residence 
from one country 'to another, your tax 
Situation changes as well. 

So you need help with your tax 
planning and its filings. You need a 
leading firm of accountants who know ail 
the rufos. You need Touche Ross. 

Our li.f. Expatriate Tax Service 
Center in London is in a unique position 
to assist Americans in the U.KL. and 
Continental Europe. 

We offer you the personal services 


of a fully-qualified tax consultant Some- 
one who is as familiar with local tax in 
Europe as US. tax. Someone who, through 
our network of offices, has access to tool 
tax information and assistance in every 
European country. Someone who can 
guide you through the rules and advise 
you on the planning. Someone who 
knows how to keep up with the changes 
in your tax position to keep that tax 
down. 

So wherever you are in Europe, 
just contact Don Hausman, our U.S. tax 
partner in London, on 553 8011 or 
return the coupon fora copy of our com- 
prehensive guide ‘U.S. Taxpayers Living 
Abroad’. 


Touche Ross & Co 

The Business Partners 

Hill House, 1 Little New Street, London EC4A 3TR. 
Telephone 01-353 8011 


lb: llnnaltl I. Hiuaman. Tbucftg ROM * Col. Hill Hmotr. 
I Uutr New Street. Umdon ECU JTR 
Tel: 01 - V >5 HOII. 

Ptea.se .semi me a copy of yuur comprehensive guide 
•US. Taxpayers Living Ahmad! 


Company— 

AtldrcM In Europe. 

rrkphonc No.__ 


6 


BIS Issues Wave of the Future: Bull or Bear? 

Loan Study (Continued from Plage 9) companies whose shares are traded Companies combio 


(Cootinaed from P^e 9) 

£ increased further to 598^ billion. 

•' The gain was concentrated in de- 
veloped countries outside the BIS 
reporting area, such as Australia. 
Norway, Portugal and Spain, and 
the non-oil producing countries of 
Asia. 

In the developed countries that 
are not monitored by tbe BIS, the 
gain in undrawn commitments was 
S3. 4 billion to 5313 billion. In tbe 
Asian non-ad countries, it was up 
52 billion to 520.2 billion. 

Undrawn commitments fell 53.8 
billion to 515.1 billion in Latin 
America and by SI 3 bdBon to $5.6 
billion in Eastern Europe. 

Turning Vo developments in indi- 
vidual countries, the rqwrt notes 
that there was a drop of $1 3 billion 
. in Joans to Poland. It says this was 
V, due in pan to translating the fig- 
‘ ures (substantial Deutsche mane 
loans) into dollars, “but probably 
also by banks' debt write-offs and 
transfers of to export credit 
guarantee agencies.” 

It also notes substantial in- 
creases in short-term debt in Aus- 
tralia, Finland, Norway. South Af- 
rica and China. 


(C o n tin u e d from Page 9) 
ommended are Smith Internation- 
al, Geariiean Industries, Baker In- 
ternational and Hughes Tod. 

Drexel Burnham Lambert is also 
advising investors to concentrate 
on “relative laggards" in its roster 
of so-called Acorn stocks, smaller 
issues that have enjoyed a sharp 
rise this year already. Cited are 
Optical Coating Laboratory, 
Kinder- Care Learning Centers, 
Sensonnatic Electronics, Knoll In- 
ternational, Materials Research 
and Safeguard Business Systems. 

Butcher A Singer, whose advice 
to investors is “if you've been sil- 
ting on tbe sidelines waiting far tbe 
market’s mood to change, jump 
in," offers these news recommen- 
dations: Amelek, GTE, Harvey 
HubbeD, QMS. Singer, Snyder Oil 
Partners and United Jersey Banks. 

Value Line also declares, “This is 
a time to be fully invested in 
stocks," adding, “the chief risk now 
is being out of (he stock market.’* 
I is newest recommendation is 
Manor Care. 

John Westergaard, president of 
Equity Research Associates and 
mErw ffsr of his own Westergaard 
Fund, is high on several Israeli 


companies whose shares are traded 
on Wall Street. 

Tbe thesis is that Israel being a 
military sociely, is by necessity a 
technological society and that out 
of this technological society will 
emerge over the next decade a 
number of multinational high-tech 
companies," he said. 

Mr. Westergaard, who recenLiy 
visited the country, commented 
that Israeli stocks today remind 
him of Japanese slocks in the early 
1960s. 


Companies combine research 
and development projects with uni- 
versities, giving the ‘Ted of Boston 
Route 128," he said. And “driving 
from Td Aviv to Haifa with the 
ocean on the left and the agricul- 
tural and burgeoning industrial 
parks along the way one could just 
as easily be on the road from Mon- 
terey to Palo Alto" in California’s 
Silicon Valley. 

Electronics Corp. of Israel is his 
favorite stock, followed by Elron 
Electronics Industries, Laser In- 
dustries, Optra tech and Sdtex. 


CAISSE mmi DE COOPERATION ECONOHHWE • E.C.C.L 

U.S. $50,000,000 - Variable rate - 1978/1998 
UncondilloiuJDy guaranteed by 
the French Slate 

W« hereby inform lhe bond-boUere that the applicable rale for the 
fourteenth interest period has been fixed at 90%. 

Coupon n* 14 will be payable from August 12th, 1965 at ibe price of 
UJS. S48.03 representing the interest of 946%, calrulaied on tbe oasis of 
182/360lh, and covering the period from February 11th 1965 through 
August 11th. 1985 inclusive. 

CB£DIT LYONNAIS LUXEMBOURG 
Agent 




» -*t 1 ■ *• ■ t I 


..w^c^owtw - ■w wir.nn ras t*w nguuAaaaatMMMav 


Wfe are pleased 
to announce the 
opening of our 
Representative Office 
in London. 


Iff# „ 

V***' J? 


National Westminster Finance B.V. 

ffoc&ptvttied in The Netlu riands uith limited HuhUitt/J 

U.S. $500,000,000 

Junior Guaranteed Floating Rate Notes 

Unconditionally and irrevocably guaranteed on a junior subordinated basis as to payment of principal and interest by 

A National Westminster Bank PLC 

t htcorporated in England with Hnriled liability J 

In aroortfance with the Trust Deed dated 10th as operator of the Euro-clear System ("Euro-clear") 
iQftif-thpTnist Deed*) made t-etween National in Brussels, the formfs) of the relevant 

F^nceRV Cthe Company”), certificates) to be completed stating that such 

PLC and The Law Notes are beneficially owned by persons(a) who 
p.I.c. f constituting are not U& persons (as defined in the TVust 
t^n^t^miX hereby gives notice that Deed) or (b) who are US. bank branches (as 
rf ^eTSfbution of the Notes took defined in the TYust Deed) or sophisticated 

^3nn b ?mhDecemto 1984 and that accordingly institutional investors in the United States. 
?&^Kndetem^ed as the Completed certificates should be delivered to 
21 stMarciU^ 51 ^wenue Deed) . the office of Cedel & A. in Luxembourg, or to the 

Exchange d ^ very ofany 0 f the office of Euro-clear in Brussels for forwarding to 

Nntf^^niriinslv advisedl to obtain from the Cedel SA, within the 15 days prior to, on or after 

Notes are - fhe paying Agents, the the Exchange Date. Definitive Notes with Coupons 

^1 iLemSrg onhe office will be available on and after the Exchange Date 

*«*■«*“ 


Bremerr^ 

Landesbank 

- Representative Office - 

Sydney Haywood (Senior Representative) 
Udo Ziegenhom (Representative) 

20 Ironmonger Lane, London EC2V 8BQ 
Tel.: (01) 600 59 81, Telex: 8811 626 gzhbuk 






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J/.S. Reports 

JFewer Visitors 

From Abroad 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TR IBUNE, THURSDA Y. FEBRUARY 

Tramieb New Face , New Style of Atari 


14* 1985 


d£K ^ s* 6 **■ Hawkins, a around the worfd. he dcddedHwas 
Sf* “ More than Mr. Tramid’speisoa- ** ktowork - 

7W s™ 1 ™ Tf2^ c J„^ body can do it. Jack the remains of the home-computer 10 ^ Atari for 

i YORK — TTie strong dol- “AIotrfnconleMv.wi^. •.» mdusuy. For wo years or so the J^40 million m promissory notes. 

^^ isfudinganttK Messiah ca^£rT^ Hi <* Providing games and He Wed on a plane and arrived 

growth in foreign travel by/w? indusi™ "Sd cducaUonal software for home a .t Alan headquarters in California 
cans, hdped cause the numhS^rf idem ffBaSniSf*? "*“% pres " coin P atCTS Proved. But now, with ** “« rooming, a Monday. By 
foragnvStors to the UniuSsSt^ ooopuyin Wednesday, virtually the min 

i^^L&SS .iS^Sasss sasiMs?"- 

=^^ officu£ m ‘ mE ed - a cmcc. you 

r?ffiK55BE& 4 ffi3B5S5JI5ttr€ 5WJS?5»rS 

widened the diK^ ^lof^eyandSSiSS SStSK'SS^HS 

^.between money spent abroad by 5*?°° ^ ^ 800 computer, rid itsdfof *e ^ y ' n & a * ^ al- 

Arocncans and monev soent ;» ,vi? which have fallen since Chm ilLc they affected (he parent carman?! you “V wrong, even 

Pron^Uhg Atari to ent the pS5 SSS^ ^ yS ^ ^ anny you wSi^ot be 
^ week to 599.^ In 1^, SthTLidfuJ of otcep- aWeloseU ‘ 1 - 

HiOi. • ./—*•, uj&wunsi offfiu^StSSfS^SJtSI? ^ Ittecontpames that ^Se paly a sbeli of the -anny" re- 

^Jajgap .is expected to sh<J^ of K and ^ ucat, P flal software for “^Joday- The American staff 

a^ifiMni moease. when the r«- sonneL iS^mSf^L 01 1081 raoac y and numbers 250. down from 1.300 em- 

- - -yggj, Mr Tramid arrived. 

many of the survivors are engi- r 
neers, just as in the old days befwe L 

trw >n, . . ““ marke,cre gained predomi- " 

JtCTS, IBM The dtanging market might be “ 

*? 1 prod- wo much even for Mr. Tramid to 


in* nu 

Mvnw 37A4 391.7 

NM Inc. 103 253 

Ptrlmra 031 033 

TIM IMS 

Revomw ijsn. 1JSL 

N«t IRC. 7SJ 49J 

Pwt Share 033 UI 

Its* y*ar am! Inclutfts 
caoram afSJ.) mUtton. 


I money mem in this 
countiy by foreign tournts. 

B«ause American travel to Eu- 

J3E? 1 S?? d ^ t .3«r- ■k “»™ 

nv a 

ims are im The deficiT' w^S54 
^ggl" 1 M3 » “P from 53.4 bilion 

TiS Unitcd S <a“5 

T™ v “. and Tounsm Administia- 
vm this week was hying to enlist 
the private sector, states and local 
gtwenunentsin a campaign to lore 

“JKiMfca 

gasnifyyrsi 

budget is JI2 

Administrations have tried to 
Twi im nate the office since it was 
created in 1961. But Congress, 
mindful of lourum's importance to 
many states and cities, has always 
supported the agency and is expect- 
ed to do so a gain this year. 

Senator Daniel 1C Inouye, a 
Democrat of Hawaii, a state that 



Upfohn 


in* itn 

BIWIU S2L6 5053 

Mt IDC 3U 337 

Pw Share 1.11 i.ii 

YMr HM m3 

Ravmrn 2.1BO 1ML 

Net Inc. 1733 1503 

Per Shore _ 537 531 


»«l H«m Law 3PJM.OTM 

(Co ntin ued from Pay 12 ) 


nance. 


giants in: 

aad Appt 

* Mr ^ ra - wilh - Consumers arcmov- 

Wm. Sl^KJO or so, the domain of Ibm 

Atari, which once occupied more 


Staffing now is so skimpy that 
the company’s main telephone 


RAX 

RPM* 

RodSvs 

Rootnr 

Rome* 

Roman 

Room 

Rohrs 


re- 1 


im 4 0 


n r on £« ■ *to and Apple _ a pricT^e 
tn tactics, for which be was Atan plans to undercutwth its 

retailers and software compa- lar power. Both larger companies 

S mSTrSS J “^aong A tan and machines that have tons 
wun ffea.t fanfare new Gsnmo- of software available for them. 


Round* 

RovEn 

g*odnn 

KVCDfn 

SMuL 

Raw** 

Rocyei 

Refill* 

Rrtk* 

Renal 

RnfCnfr 

RpAuto 


■ — — - — ■* w -* a ni iAr* 

dore products that never made tu a l , 
their way to market and for chant- T J® ? ft? 1 ® 1 001 Mr. 

tng distribution channels abruptly. 1 “ J BScd !° thal kind °f 

this timearomid^ pubbdy^S Street .^y^btStii?^m he J ** ^’ s past creeps | gj^i 

that Atari will ship fire miS Mth ^ dd “mpany." “ ~ d ^5 ew , ST computers will 1 ^ 
computers in 1985 « n .. n iT£! Heaii« ca w*K« comewith Breakout, a classic Atari 


than 40 buildings around Silicon! 

Valley, now occupies five. 

The new Atari is Spartan, with ™, 0 
none of the swimming pools, beer Sty" 
bashes or other amenities that are 

considered pan of Silicon Valley’s %' 

corporate culture. 

Although an occasional remind- SSSSIi 
of Atari's illustrious past creeps 1 
in — the new ST computers will RhrSf 


29 

13 


■U* 13 

■Ota a 

\M 113 


1 A 


Roods* 



toon to read numbers. Tourism is 
one of the top three money-makers 
for 40 states, and if it weren’t for 
tourism, our trade imbalance 
would be much worse." 


“We believe they're for real.’ 
said Norman Ricken, preadcnl of 
Toys R Us, a leading vendor of 




j Floating Bate Notes 


Feb. 13 


Dollar 


advertisement- 


international funds 

Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed 
13 February 1985 


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33082594 251* 2596 + 9% 
173212 1196 1196 

4* 79% 79% 79% 
SUM 34 3*1% + 9 % 

*319 189* 18 +16 


VU 

VLSI 

VMX 

VaHdLa 

Voflan 

VqlFSL 

VWFra 

VaINti 

VaJLn 

VbnDim 

VonMti 

VtctrG 

VMoBd 

Vamrux 

1/gta 

WeonF 

Vkwp 

VldroS 

VQctno 

vimssfe 

VhTach 

Vodavl 

vwrint 

VWva 

VOrtoc 

Vyquut 


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120 


s,r a «± a 

61714 17 m* 
■W}% 9R 88% — 9h 
30 71% J 79b — 1 % 
*8 318% 319% 318%+ 96 
B»% 2816 2 m 
418 I3M 13 13 

■ 1S16 13 IM + 
280 1 
4817 


J 


-Ba 4 


.13r M 


Greece, Soviet Union 
To Discuss Gas Pipeline 

X enters 

MOSCOW — Greece and the 
Soviet Union are to start talks on 
the possibility of building a pipe- 
line through Bulgaria to bring nat- 
ural-gas from Sofia to Athens, a 
spokesman for the Greek govern- 
ment said. 

The SI -5- billion project, which 
would supply about four billion cu- 
bic meters (140 billion cubic feet) 
■“ *" Greece, will begin 

in 1986 if talks are successful, Di- 
is* + 16 P^roos Maroudas said. The 750- 
mSi^Z'S Wometer (465-mile) pipeline was 
S ft ft 5 %^ one of a number of joint projects 

“aft nft week durmg ialks 

442ii% 7116 7iv*- 1 % between Pnme Minister /Sidreas 

P^dreou of Greece and Soviet 
ntme Minister Nikolai A. Tik- 
honov. 


144211% 211* 211%— |% 
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23 J*9* 139b 1JM 
418 18 18 

W IN 19% IM— 9% 
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1-68 


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18227 2 > 2*9% + M 

303 121* 1196 1196— Vb 
It g* 2086 + 9b 

32 888 anb 171% 288% +19% 

-17 2 ftlft 

ir* ,^- 9 % 


Reuters 


WIESBADEN, West Germany 
— Wholesale prices in West Ger- 
many rose 0.6 percent in January to 

cariie^ theFSri^Sstics oSe 

said Wednesday. 


-85/88 

DWwr* Mining Slb-91 
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— <w) End imasfRnm Fund >34050 k 

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t-Iw) State St American «.«+. !" 


Franld-Trust lidamn>_ 

HovNmom HWpx. N.V 

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Horlun Fund 


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| m 1 >C^Art J «roBe | nc. 

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tad GAM ErnrfkmtJ 

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Id) GAM Intsr aMl onoi Inc. 

J«r) GAM North Anwrlco Inc. 

jwi GAM N. Awftc o Ua/t Trust. 
(w) gam Padflc inc^^^^te 


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Japan Setection Fund 
Japan Padflc FundH 




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— Iwl Barry Pac. Fd. LkL. 


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— W ) G.T. Europe Fund. 


— Iwl G.T. Eura. Small Cos. Fund. 

—Id 1 G.T. Doflar Fond 

—Id > G.T, Band Fund 


— Id I GT. Glabal Ttcftntov Fd. 
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_ >926 
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Id 7 La team Fund . > 1,1270* 

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UauBXMr__ >127300 

w) LiDvds inlL Smaller I UOl 

w) Luxftmd >7 )jS7 

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Ma dl al en um SaL I 

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■ Navotec Invoshnant Fund S 8828 

... . NJLALF >14077 

ml MSP F.l.T >15531 

m) Opportunity Investors Lid— > 31*7 

w) PANCURRI Inc 1 14.12 


— fd ) G.T. Japan Small CaJ=und_ 

— W)GT. Ttdwdooy Fund 53255 

—Id ) G.T. South China Fund >1429* 


t ) Parian Sw. R Est Geneva SF 128720 

r ) PamM Valua Fond N.V >121125 

lb ) Ptetades S 120XAS 

[wi PSCO Fundi N.V. S104M 

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M2J9* IW) Quantum Fund N.V. 

Id) Renta Fund 

Id) R en t lnvasl. 


ssxtamKUP 

TRADED CURRENCY FUND. , 

0(d) I no: BM SOSS Offer 28JM6 

Midi Can.: BM >10.15 OMor *10464 

INTERNATIONAL INCOAIE FUND 
— fd 1 Short Term 'A' (Accwn) — 5L4473 
—Id j Short Term 'A' jDistr) — - SJJBM* 
— fd I Short Torm "B* (Aocum) — * 12884 

— Id » Short Term -8* (DMr) S0JKW* 

— fw> Lana Term ■ S FJP 


. *320530 
LF 182000 

^ LFLQS55S 

d Rooervo Insured Deposits- SU58JB 

0 Sale Trust Fund. 56.13 

w Samurai PartfollD SF 11008 

d SCI/Tech. SA Lwwmbaurfi— > 1012 
(w Slate St. Bank Eaulty KdnNV >0*7 
(w Stratasy invKtmant Fund — >2015 

td Syntax Lfd.'(Clnas AT SOSO 

w) Toctmo Gruwtti Fund SF 102-46 

Tokyo Poc. HeML ISee) sou* 

Tokyo Poe. HOM-H.V. S 13224* 

Transpacific Fund- >8151 

Turauaise Fund >8728 


JARDINE FLEMING. POB 7BCP0 HO Ko 

—lb ) jj= Japan Trust Y4780 

— «*> J.F South East AsJo 52844 

— <b)JJ= Japan Tachnatofly. — Y2K74 
— fbl Jf Padflc SacS-IACO— SSM 

—lb lie a.—— >422 

LLOYDS BANK INTL- POB 430 Geneva 11 
— Hwl uovds ln« Dollar— . *10470 


— Vj w) Uovds InH Europe .SF.Wj! 

=H?J Uanli inH Podfta— 


Lloyds W1 Growth — SF 1148^0 
Uoydslnn income — SF 31600 (mi 


SF U250 


— fw| CtesoB 


SJr^TSBfaJTBteiryF^X. 


Cd59b-8t/8B 

Cct 516-90/95 

Cd51GMM 
(-rom* 516-87/82 
QnnSMI 
PwBI Du Nwd 59608/82 
cswm Foadw sinem 
Cram Far Export 51641 
Cr Lyon 516-93/96 
CrsdttLMM 516-57 
Crafll Lyqb 516-80/8? 
CrBatLymp*«/« 
Crate uwn $16-81/85 
CwB Lyon 0*41 
QBdH Lyaa S'Ujartnn* 

CrMHTLlW59b-EBi*2/86 

Cnw Noil Site 51688 

Crad Nall Site 51*-«VM 
Cradllnrahte-H 
CnaOtem tell S1%-81/87 
Owfltoistaft 55M8 
Del lew Kanon 516-N 
DambuODa 516-88 
Dan Narska-nov89 
Don Norsks -etadH 
Dotunork 51b-(ante/90 
Dasnart:516-adS/18 
Damnort 516-84 
Denmark SUhpwt 
H a Ent Oal 516-82/84 
OnadmrBank5l6-8J 
DrnliMr Bank 516-08 
Ortsdnar Bank 59642 
B^teNucteW* 

Edl 59645 

Eah-43 

EabJu-te 

EK54BA8 

Exterior mn -41 

FarrariaJ1648 

Ftentei Paper 45 

FW Boston Inc 591-91 AH 

FNst Bosk Systems 4* 

First Chaw -87 

First CNam 51644 

Flrd CUV Texas 59645 

FN Interstate 54*45 

Falr--M/W 

GanUnonceSlb-® 

GooHnancs 516-18/82 

Gandnwics542/W 

CzO 59549 

Gd, 51442 

Gzb-pwp 

GlbSUrM 

Giro 51641 

Grlndtevs 51641 

GrtedtoysSW-M 

CraafMtestem Fin Sta-M 

HWSamiMl 51646 

M8 Samuel Pare 5 1 b j am 

Hhnano Amaicann $9945 

Hydro CknbBc5Ur84 

1c Industries- 41 

Ukbneslu 48/83 

a Steal 
StenovOI 
Ireland $9646/98 


Bill ... 

IWvfRspuMkl 51648 


1240 8-1 nusHOM 

Sf S! 2 SS 52 

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& ft Si 

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tw 74 nuiiaug 
S* IM 8825 HUB 
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WS 27+ 88 JJ 108.10 

nik 40 maiBinua 


KJooOsm Oi 5eata 51643 
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Staid Owl 51941 
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stand chart -oern 
Halo Bk Of Indo 69647 
Swnltatn Trust 51642/84 
5+erten 1-81 
Swede n $16-67/88 

Sumten Sbr-83/n 
Sweden 48/84/88 


Santen+SAE 
TalyoKebe51b41R4 
TOfcuBle 59642/M 
Tokal AM LMSW44/99 
Toroate Dominion ji%42 
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saBsss’*" 

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8% 214 8*36 UBOi 
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«»• U-2 8831 18085 
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UK 270 8835 9*35 

■■ CndHSmoae-Flrst Button Ltd. 


[Gold Options 


(prices In S/oz.). 


| ftio m 

W» 

May 


VO 

300 

3W 

320 

330 

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550-700 
130- 275 
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400 150 
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UN ICO Fund 

UNI Band Fund 

UNI Land of Fund. 


S2A5ZB1 
57+8488 
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>831.71 

>106088 

United Can. invt. Fund LhL — SL2B 

wwtae Europ e. .SLV — S4JJS 

Wed at Jdte N.V. *8175 

Wedge Padflc N.V SSU2 

Vlfnrlne 111 >5047 

Winchester Financial Ltd— S8M 

Winchester Dlwarstfleda»_ S22JO* 
. World Fund SA— ■ -■■ -■■■■ JWSj 
19222 fwj Wertdwfde Saaattles S/339% . S43B7 




Weekly net asset vafife 


worldwide Special S/S 2V%. >ia*83* 
Francs; FL — Dutch Florin; LF — 



Worldwide Fund Ltd; © - Otter Pries tod- 3% prelim, charge; 
wlc* as on Amsterdam Wot* EMham* 


Tokyo Pacific Holdings N.V. 

^ on February 1 1 , 1985 : U.S. $ 132 . 74 . 

Listed on the Amsterdam Stock Exchange 

Information: Pferson, HeMring & Pferson N.VL, 

Herangracht 214, 1016 BS Amsterdam. 






















Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1985 



1 Roscoe 

Egger's org. 

4 Ottoman 
Empire 
founder 
9 Kind of pipe 

14 Detective 
Archer of 
fiction 

15 Complete 

16 Calm 

17 Attend 
■18 Congreve 

comedy: 1695 
20 Citrus coolers 

22 Sabres' Selling 

23 Midshipman 

24 Savor 

28 What sachets 
impart 

27 Carpenter's 
friend 

29 Hush! 

30 Any bird 

31 Kirghizian 
peaks 

33 Ontario TV 
network 

38 Ravel ballet: 
1912 

39 Heir pursuer 

40 Entertainer 
Gillette 

41 Forward 

42 Electric-pen 
lnv. 

43 Siesta 

44 Actress Gless 

48 Misbehave 

49 Wbata steed 

has 


50 Trevino won 
this tour- 
nament in '84 

51 Event at 
Hialeah 

54 Consider 
seriously 

57 Piper's son 

58 Dancer Castle 

59 Mrs. Kramden 

80 N.T. book 

61 Relaxes 

62 "The Screens" 
playwright 

63 Alias, for short 


DOWN 


1 Ingrid’s 
“Casablanca" 
role 

2 Panpipe item 

3 JayeP. 
Morgan hit: 
1956 

4 Night person 
5Netman's 

apparel 

6 "Kiss Me 
Quick” was 
one: 1969 

7 Pianist 
Templeton 

8 Shi{vshaped 
clock 

9 Cole Porter 
tune: 1929 
I 0 "-L- Bayne, “ 
Foster song 

11 High up 

12 Tourist 
attractions 
near Carlsbad 

Q New York Tana, edited bv . 


13 Sidewalk 
superintendent 

19 Source of 
vanilla 

21 Conductor 
Caldwell 

25 Koran 
supplement 

26 Na. 

musical group 

27 Boggs of the 
Red Sox 

28 Gardner 

- namesakes 

29 It gets chalked 

31 Pakistani, e.g. 

32 Inadequate 

33 Caesarion's 
mother 

34 Ruth's 
husband 

35 Relinquish 

37 Altogether 

38 Attack time 

43 Like the nene 

44 Frugal 

45 Backpacks 

46 11 Ww 

All?," 1929 

song 

47 Formal 
customs 

48 "There, I’ve 

Said It /’ 

1941 song 

49 Tumult 

50 MaunaLoa 
goddess 

52 Short-order 
man 

53 Lady Hamilton 

55 Termagant 

56 Hanoi festival 

1 Maleska. 


BEETLE BAILEY 


OOW, LOOK AT THE 
NICE, HEW TANK. JTfe A 
SlG, 0 l© 7 -AHK/ aHP LOOK 
WHAT IT COST. LOTS 
A HP LOTS ANG> LOTS. . . 



SARSE, PDM'T 
REAP OUT LOUP 
TO yOURSELF 


I'M HOT REAPING 
TO MVSELF 


Hop: 

l&m 



ANDY CAPP 


HEALW 4*5 LAVS HIS 
CARDS ON THE TABLE, 
BUT HE HAS ANOTHBZ 
DECK UP H(S SLEEVE 



WIZARD of ID 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


l*Kcrambte those four Jumbles, 
one letter to each square, to kxm 
four ordinary words. 


HICED 


jq 



GINOW 


_n 



SISALA 

I y 

_Q_ 

bL 


TANFIN 



□ 

JJ 


PEOPLE <30 
TO SRE AT”LEN©THS"| 
TO REPUCE THIS. 


Now arrange the circled tetters to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


Print answer hers: £ X I X X X J 


Yesterday's 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Jumbles: MUSIC ABATE SONATA EMPLOY 


Answer: What she thought her husband's credit card ■ 
was -A ■BUY' , PASS 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


Algarve 

Amstertb 

Athens 


CMiMU 


Frankfurt 


Helsinki 
Istanbul 
Las Palmas 


Madrid 

Milan 

MOSCOW 

Munich 

Nice 

Olto 

Parts 

Prague 

RnrVlavtt 


HIGH LOW 
C F C F 
17 43 14 57 
-3 at -10 14 
15 59 12 54 

19 46 7 45 

-10 14-19 -a 

-5 23-15 5 

-5 23 -12 10 
-10 14 -14 7 
-7 19-19 -2 
-4 25 -13 9 

31 70 14 S7 

I 34 -1 30 

3 38 -6 21 

6 43 - 3 26 
-A 21 -14 7 

-1 30 - 4 25 
-13 9-18 0 

1 34 - 5 23 

20 AB 14 57 
15 59 II 52 

-7 19 
* 43 
-2 20 
.. 9-25-13 

-7 19-18 0 

4 43 5 41 

-8 10-17 1 

3 38 -5 23 

-10 14-21 -4 


ASIA 


HIGH LOW 


-1 .. 
14 41 
3 
-13 


Stockholm 

Strasbourg 

Vertcu 

Vienna 


3 
& 43 
-9 14 


-1 38 
-I 30 
-9 14 


Zorich 


-7 19-12 10 

0 33 -7 19 
-9 14-14 3 

- 10 U-20 


-8 18-10 14 sw 


MIDDLE EAST 


Ankara 
Beirut 
Doumkoh 
jermtem 
Tel Aviv 

OCEANIA 

Aadttoad 

SYdaev . . 


I 44 5 II m 
ei 
fr 
fr 
h- 


21 711 12 54 
12 54 0 32 

21 70 4 43 

23 73 It 52 


20 48 14 57 
29 84 30 48 



c 

F 

C 

F 


Bangkok 

33 

91 

24 

75 

Cl 

oelilno 

a 

32 

-9 

16 

d 

Nona Koao 

IS 

9f 

13 

55 

cl 


32 

90 

25 

77 

fr 

HewtMB .1 

24 

75 

7 

45 

fr 

Seoul 

-2 

28 

-3 

26 

Ir 

S-mshat 

B 

46 

5 

41 

Ir 

Sfnesswe 

31 

88 

23 

73 

r 

Taloel 

17 

63 

15 

59 


Tokyo 

13 

55 

6 

43 

Stl 

AFRICA 






Ala lan 

20 

48 

14 

57 

fr 

Cairo 

24 

79 

18 

64 

h- 

Caps Town 

25 

77 

17 

43 

fr 

CasaMatKa 

20 

48 

17 

54 

IT 

Harare 

24 

« 

15 

at 

Cl 

Lagoa 

29 

144 

24 

79 


Nairobi 

24 

74 

14 

57 

d 

Tunis 

14 

61 

12 

54 

O 

LATIN AMERICA 



BoemAlm 

25 

77 

15 

59 

fr 

Limn 

24 

79 

18 

M 


Mexico Cltv 

20 

68 

3 

38 

d 

Rio da Janeiro 

32 

n 


79 


Sao Pouto 

— 

— 


— 

na 

NORTH AMERICA 



ABdwnige 

-12 

10 

-23 

-10 

ir 

A Stella 

4 

39 

- 1 U 

14 

d 

miSim 

4 

39 

4 

39 

r 

Ch tango 

-5 

23 - 

•11 

12 

d 

Denver 

3 

38 

-5 

23 


Detroit 

-2 

28 

-4 

2 S 

tw 


24 

79 

18 

64 


Hauilan 

IS 

59 

0 

.17 

tr 

LotAnaetes 

28 

B 2 

11 

57 

Ir 

Miami 

15 

X 

4 

39 

fr 

MiBoeafialis 

-4 

31 - 

•16 

3 

d 

Montreal 

5 

41 

-7 

19 

d 

Naxsaa 

25 

77 

a 

68 

d 

Hew York 

2 

34 

0 

37 


Sao Fraoasca 

21 

70 

8 

46 

ir 

Seattle 

8 

46 

Q 

33 

d 

Toronto 

3 

38 

0 

32 

d 

Wostilogton 

4 

39- 

10 

M 

d 


ci-chiuui, „r,mr, — 

Hvsnowan; sw-snaw; st-ygr my. 

THURSDAY'S FORECAST — CHANNEL; SltabttY choocv. FRANKFURT: 
ram -S — -T5 (S3--SL LONDONS Cloudy. Temp. 0 — 5 (32— 231. MA- 
nsiii' owml Temp. 14 — 8 (57 — 441. NEW YORK: CTnudv. Temp, 1 — 4 
HJ PARIS' Overtax! Temp. 4 — 4 (39— 25). ROME: Overcast. Temp. 
PtS 1 - l^IV- R ritATemp. 19-10 (44-50). ZURICH: Fair. Temp. 

7 W « 1 _,57 B^KOK; FtWW Temp. 34 — 24 (93 — 791. HONG KONO: 
iw rimp W-14 (SE-SH MANILA: -23 (B8 -73L SEOUL: 

» TBM l-S m-m SINGAPORE: Thunderstorms. Temp. Jl—25 
[« - T«mi9 13 - 3 (55 - 381. 


Wirld Stock Markets 


Via Agence France- Presse Feb. 13 

Gating prices in local currencies unless otherwise indicated. 


ABN . 

AKZO 
AheM 
AMEV 
ABom Rub 


BVG 
BuehrmotmT 
Cokjnd Hldg 
Etsevier-MDU 
Fokker 
dst Brocades 
Helnefcen 
H oo n ove ns 
KLM 
mnniai 
NatNedder 
Nediiord 
OcnVanderG 
Pakhned 
PWIIps 


Rodamce 
Rnlhiao 
Raranta 
Rural Dutch 
Unilever 
VanOrnmeren 
VMF Stark 
VNU 


CtaMt 

ffllf. 



190 

19030 

160 

158 

10430 

HM 

218 

215 

21330 

213 

8 




160 

MV 

BA58 

84 

34 

33JO 

110 

111 

9450 

9330 

18030 

18730 

15630 

15660 

5930 


90.10 

6180 

47.60 

48 

273 

27430 

164 

16130 

304 

30430 

64.10 

6430 

59 

59.10 



13730 

137 

6140 

6830 



199 

197.10 

33730 

33730 

2730 

2150 


144 148*| 

MB Ql 


Arbed 
Bekaert 
Cocker 111 
EBES 

GB-lnna-BM 

GBL 

Gevaen 

Hoboken 

Krodtottxmk 

Petrefina 

Sec Generate 

Softna 

satuuv 

Traction Elec 
Vlellle Marrtopne 


1705 1725 
5050 5050 
243 242 

2780 2780 
2900 2845 
1995 2808 
3700 3450 
5930 5940 
7780 7750 
4670 6940 
18» 1825 
7300 mo 
4010 3998 
3903 3930 
5490 5480 


MQAE iaftanw lndta : M99JB 
Pnrftou* : L8H41 


iVontfarl 1 


AEG-Tetotunken 

Allianz Vers 

Bast 

Bower 

BaverJtypa 
Bay er.Ver .Bank 
BMW 

Commerzbank 

Conlloiimml 

DabTHer-Bmz 

Desusso 

DMitaen* Babcock 

Deutsche Bank 

Dngdner Bank 

DUB-Sdiuthe 

GHH 

Hochtief 

Hoechst 

Hmdi 

Hoiimann 

Horten 

Kell 4- salt 

Karstodt 

Kaufiwt 

KHD 

Kloeckner Work* 


in jo imao 

1030 1025 
16430 TfiW 
17150 19250 

™ 316 

323 321 
35850 3S5 

147J0 164 

118 117.60 
428 43(50 
M 343 
170 147 

4015039650 
19150 18530 
215 20750 
141 199 

448 470 

187 184 

107 10450 
390 380 
147 143 

249 269 

210 204 
210 30550 
254 250 
7780 74 


Cieie Free. 

Kruno Stahl 83 81 

undo 417 

Lufthansa 1S8 189 

MAN ISAM 156.10 

Monnesmanti 153 15180 

Metallausaibehafl uu mso 

Muencn-Rueck 117# rm 

P' - Busses 254 25220 

Ruetacrs-Werke 341 34980 

BWE 141 14I8D 

Scherhta 47380 

Stamens 538 531 

-pnrwen 97 94J0 

Varta 178 174 

Veba 167 164 

VEW 12280 122JD 

Volkswoeettwerk 192 189 


Catnincntiaak index : 1,15488 
Prevtoat : 1.15388 


F mrn^Hrnm, 


Bk East Asia 
Cheung Kona 
China LJaht 
erase Harbor 
Hnna Sane Bank 
HK Electric 
HK HOWS 

HK Land 
HK Shanghai 
HK Tafephone 
HK Wharf 
Hutch Whampoa 

jartflne Mam 

j artH tie Sec 
NOW World 
Show Bras 
SHK Props 
Si me Darby 
Slefuk 

Swire Pad He a 
W heel Mar 
Wheeleck 
Wtnsor 
world inn 


Previous : UB732 


2330 

24.10 

1130 

1330 

1160 

1430 

9« 

9.95 

65.75 

4635 

7J5 

730 

3130 

31 

430 

400 

B30 

835 

41 

61 

6 

ITS 

20 

2030 

105 

12D 

8 

125 

530 

535 

NA 


9 

938 

430 

450 

135 

108 

2110 

MOO 

NA 


SOS 

4.975 

400 

405 

1-95 

138 

: TfWT* 


Joto 


ahwrg 


AECr 
Barlows 
Blwoor 
Buff a Is 

Elands 

GFSA 

Harmony 

Kloof 

Nedbank 

PstStevn 

Ruetplal 

5A Brews 

Sf Hetena 


715 715 
.975 9B0 

1475 1475 

4200 am 

1250 1240 
2525 2550 
24£ 2400 
4575 4440 
970 975 

S20D 5150 
1530 1550 
405 tOO 
3080 3000 
575 575 




AACorp 

AllltiS-Lyons 

ArK a Am Gold 
Bo* ax* 

Br "days 

Buss 

BJLT- 

Beechom 

BICC 

3L 

BOC Gratia 

Boots 

Bowater Indus 
BP 

Bril Honest 


Brtt Totacom 

BTR 

Burmah 

Cadbury Schw 

Charter Cons 

Coats Patans 

Cons Gold 

Court au Ids 

Dalaefv 

De Bears < 

Distillers 

Drlefortetn 

Dunlap 

Ftsons 

FreeStGed 

GEC 

GKN 

Gtaiot 

Grand Met 

Guinness 

GU5 

Hanson 

Hawker 

ICi 

Imps 

Lloyds Bank 

Unrtia 

Lucas 

Marks and Se 
Metal Bax 
Midland Bank 
Ndl West Batk 
Pilkbigfan 
Plessev 
Racal Elect 
W ana ton taln 


12 e’b 

464 

213 

167 

203 

153 

494 

143 

458 

475 

293 


45 

295 

wn. 

196 

194 

1151/64 

294 


704 

211 

433 

844 

215 

594 

177 

251 

125 

418 

339 

479 

313 

lea 

194 


Read Inti 
Reuters 

Royal Dutch ( ‘ 

P-TZ 

Shell 

ETC 

Std Chartered 
Tate and Lyle 
Tosco 
Thorn EMI 
T.l.aroup 
Trafalgar Hse 
THF 
Ultramar 
Unilever C l 

United Biscuits 
Vickers 

WJDeep 

WJ-kM flings 
War Loan 3 tot 
wool worth 
ZCI 


344 

554 

335 


474 

748 

190 

509 

468 

237 

439 

244 

372 

145 

198 


344* 

580 

17 % 


17%. 


FT.Hledex; W7J8 
Prevtoat : 970.10 


( 

cio»* 


II »-rt. 1 

Air LtauUe 

616 

411 

Alsthom Atl. 

223 

222 




Bancolre 

611 

oil 

BIC 

570 

554 


750 

744 

BSN-GO 

2395 

2390 

Carrtffour 

1920 

1920 

Club Mod 

1220 

1239 

Coflmee 

244 24530 


23700 


i ElfAnultoSne 

235 

2 Europe I 

95* 

774 

Gan Eoux 

565 

561 

HcKhatte 

IBM 

1880 

Imetol 

8035 

m 

Lafarge Cop 

410 

41130 

Leo rand 

2068 

2068 

. ronai 

2290 

2265 

Matra 


1628 


B28 



njQ 

72 

Most Heooosoy 

195 $ 

1910 

- Moulinex 

107 50 

10230 

Nord-Est 


7SM 

OccWcfstale 

7® 


482 

671 


789*3 

253 

Peuoeot 

207 

Pacta In 

5330 

53 

Prlntemps 

2D1 AC 

200 

Ramotectm 

290 

248 

Pedouto 

HR 

1270 

Roussel Urtaf 

1574 

Skta Rosatenol 

2040 

2041 

Sour^errlor 

509 

503 




Thomson CSF 

409 

Valeo 

245.10 

248 

Aaefl Index : 19834 


PravloK : 19737 



ICAC Index: 19850 


Prawns : 19730 

>1 



II SlngnjlBn u I] 

Baustead 

138 

138 

CddStoraae 

236 

236 

DBS 

53S 

530 

FnuerNcuve 

SLID 

*.15 

Haw Par 

235 

226 

Inehcapo 
Kocael 9ila 

237 

134 

NA 

US 

| MoS Banhlno 

550 

530 


935 

925 

OUB 

a 

336 

Semb Shipyard 

125 

SI me Darby 

133 

1.90 

S Steamship 

1.14 

1.12 

Sf Trading 

436 

430 

UOB 

140 

446 

OUB man : 48638 
Prevtoat -.41434 


J 

) Stockholm || 

AGA 



Alta Laval 

195 

199 

Asea 

379 

375 


MDna 


Banco Comm 
Central# 
Ouohofels 
Cred itoi 
FarmltaUa 
Flat 

FlnUder 


18200 1RS0Q 
2795 2759 
7115 4940 
2210 2210 
18720 10490. 
2535 2502 
54 54 


S12Vj 

S12V3 

Generali 

62200 

40800 

174 

174 

IFI 

7460 

7W1 

582 

sn 

llakWTKtfitl 

80900 

80380 

143 

10 

Mediobanca 

82530 

B30D0 

622 

619 

Mnntedlasn 

1505 


509 

509 

Olivetti 

6719 


3» 

375 

PlreVH 



341 

353 

RAS 


A8P00 

250 

250 

RSnaseawio 

438J5 

425 

38 

39 

SIP 

2190 

9185 

304 

292 

SnLa 

2801 

271S 

174 

725 

563 

24V 

171 

277 

555 

7® 

5tanda 

MIS Index :U94 
Previous : «*191 

11300 

11340 


Astra 

Atlas Copco 

Balloon 

Elect rohn 

Ericsson 

Estette , 

Handetsbken 

Phormocla 

Soob- Scania 

Sandvlk 

Skanska 

SKF 

SwrdhshMatch 

Volvo 



Afforsyortden index : 48179 
Provtoas -.40538 


Sydaey 


ACI 

AN! 

ANZ 

8HP 

Baral 

Bougainville 

Brambles 

Coko 

Comalco 

CRA 

CSR 

Dunlop 

Elders Ixl 

Hooker 

Magellan 

MIM 

Mver 

Oakbrtdoa 


193 


255 


BOOKS 


THE TRlfE CONFESSIONS OF AN 
ALBINO TERRORIST 

By Breyten Breytenbach 3% pp- SI 8.95. 
Farrar Straus Giroux, 

19 Union Square West, 

New York, N. Y. 10003. 



Reviewed by John Gross 

T HE South African poet and painter Brcv- 
ten Breytenbach. who is widely regarded os 
ihe foremost Afrikaans poet of his generation, 
went into self-imposed exile in 1960 and settled 
in France. Five years later he returned to South 
Africa For a short visiL traveling on a forged 
passport. His mission was twofold — to recruit 
a pair of trade unionists to help promote Ihe 
□ascent black unions in South Africa from an 
office m Europe, and to discuss future policy 
with underground members of Okhela, a group 
of white militants, dedicated to the overthrow 
of the apartheid regime, which he had helped 
to founa with some fellow exiles in 1972. 

From the outset, however, he was shadowed 
by the security police, who arrested him at the 
airport just as he was boarding a plane to 
return to Paris. Charged with terrorist activi- 
ties, he was sentenced to nine years’ imprison- 
ment, and spent nearly two years in complete 
isolation in the maximum-security prison in 
Pretoria (known to its inmates as “Beverly 
huis”). 

While he was in prison he managed to write 
the semi -fictional pieces subsequently pub- 
lished under the title “Mouroir, but on his 
release he still felt impelled to write a more 
direct account of his experiences. The la n g u age 
he used .was English, having decided that it 
suits his present sense of bis literary role better 
than Afrikaans. 

Much of the book's force nonetheless comes 
from Breylenbach's knowledge of Afrikaans 
culture. He understands intimately what it is 
be is rejecting, and his indictment has the edge 
of a family quarrel — literally so, in some ways, 
since his family was. and is, deeply committed 
to the existing system. Not long before his 
arrest, when he slipped into a cinema to get 
away from someone he thought might be tail- 
ing him, he had the eerie experience of finding 
himself watching a documentary about his 
eldest brother, who is commander of the coun- 
try's crack anti-guerrilla uniL Another brother, 
a reporter, he describes as having “decidedly 
fascist sympathies." 

Given the ordeal it chronicles, “The Confes- 
sions of an Albino Terrorist” could hardly fail 
to make a powerful impression, but it cfisplays 
considerable artistry as well. The writing is 
sharp, restless, often raspingly sarcastic; a little 



r^ (1 " 


fr? 


Breyten Breytenbach 


mannered here and there, perhaps, but no 
matter — Breytenbach succeeds brilliantly m 
depicting the horror and squalor and near- 
madness (and sometimes the sheer madness) of 
the prison world into which he was thrust 
A world where cement flows have to be 
polished until they shine like minors — bu t he 
manages to convey its tedium without growing 
tedious himse lf. X world where life goes on in 
ihe midst of death, where a prisoner who is doe v 
to be execut ed in a few days’ lime can start ^ 
weeping and screaming because be has been 
given the wrong books instead of the Lotus 
L’ Amour westerns he asked for. 


ur-y 

ass?:’ 




Hi: 




The jailers and security men Breytenbach 
describes furnish him with an unforgettable 


gallery of grotesques. There is the swaggering 
interrogator whom he nicknamed (with a nod 
lan Fleming, and to the language of Afri- 


[0 


Solution to Previous Puzzle 



fcaans insult) “Jiems KLont”; the fanatical Mas- 
ter Basie, “the big boss of the prison shrinks”; 
Major Schorff with his scissors and “his hogs- 
head of angry purple blood," snipping the 
extra words off letters from prisoners’ families 
that exceeded the permitted length, by however 
little, and flying into a rage d he thought a 
prisoner showed signs of behaving like a “mis- 
ter,” a self-respecting human being, rather 
than a “bandieL" 

And how is the system to be brought to an 
end — the prison system, and the wider evil erf 
apartheid that it exists to serve? Ultimately, 
Breytenbach believes, majority rule is inevita- 
ble; but if be is a long-term optimist he is a 
short-term pessimisL and a medium-term pes- 
simist, too. He cannot see the whites in South * 
Africa voluntarily yielding ground, or the 
Western powers using their leverage to face 
them to; at the same time he has come to 
regard the African National Congress as free 
and democratic only “in the double-speak, 
Orwellian sense,"and he does not think there is 
any chance of it transforming itself. A bleak 
prospecL if he is right — though I should add 
that some of his political arguments strike me 
as rather muddled What he does do, however, 
is to show us the current Sooth African regime 
for what it is, and to leave ns without any 
excuse for averting our eyes. 


SCORiSOA* 


■f i 




NalionalH-.v* 


2/H/aa 


John Grass is on the staff of The staff of The 
New York Tunes. 


BRIDGE 


Bv Alan Tmscorr 


O N Lhe diagramed deal 
W : est put pressure on the 
opposition by jumping to four 
spades over one club. 

In such positions four no- 
trump is not used as Black- 
wood. It simply asks the open- 
ing bidder to choose a suit at 
the level of five. So South land- 
ed. as shown, in five clubs. 

West led the spade ace and 
shifted smoothly to the heart 
deuce. To South this looked 
veiy much like a singleton, and 
he thought he could rely on the 
diamonds. He put up the heart 
ace and took the diamond fi- 
nesse. So far, so good. 


Bui when he then led to ihe 
club ace, the bad Lmmp split 
was devastating. He now had 
only one tramp entry to the 
dummy when he expected two, 
and he could not use the dia- 
monds for a heart discard. 


tramps, and eventually lose a. 
trick in each major suit. 


West eventually made two 
heart tricks for down one. He 
bad made it very difficult for 
South to find the winning play, 
for the second choice was 
probably low at the second' 
trick rather than the jack. 


NORTH 

*5 

? A J85 
> Q J ID 6 A 
♦ KBS 

WEST 

♦ AQ 9 876 3 2 

7KQ2 


•2 S3 

♦ - 



In the replay the bidding 
was the same, but West led ihe 
heart king. It was then an easy 
matter for South to win, draw 


SOUTH 

♦ K 

O 763 
$ A8 

♦ AQJ7642 

Neither side was nbrnble. The 
bitting: 

Soutti Wen North East 

1 ♦ 4 4 4 N.T. Pua 

5 * Pass Pan pass 


Wen tod be spade bob. 


518 

334 

190 

377 


408 405 

342 


Pontoon 

RGC 

San.Ua 

Sleigh 

Southland 

Woodside 

Wormald 


526 

277 

330 

301 

213 

220 

256 

195 

63 

425 

265 


375 345 

550 S4Q 


187 

21 

84 


AH Qrdtnortei irt 
Previous nan 
Source: Reuters. 


Ttofcy 





ksahl Chem 

68S 


43ahl Gknt 

844 

H6I 

lank at Tokyo 

615 

lira 

Jrlitetstaaio 

520 

529 

^>non 

1380 

17X1 

Utah 

339 

XS 

Sal Nippon Print 

945 

931 


541 


Full Bonk 

1330 

1320 

Full Photo 

1780 

1690 

FuJItSU 

1330 

1330 

-lllodtl 

IKS 

851 


1430 

1440 

HI 

MS 

145 


5100 

5200 

UHlmo 

269 

370 

Konsoi Power 

1250 

1270 



Clow 

Prt*. 

KooSoao 

821 

825 

Kawasaki Steel 

143 

145 

Kirin Brewery 

595 

569 

Komalsu ltd 

450 

450 

Kubola 

321 

321 

Matsu Etac-lnds 

1550 


Matsu Elec. Work: 

640 

641 

Mitsubishi Bank 

13W 


MltsublstU ciwm 

445 


Mitsubishi Elec 

397 

395 

Mitsubishi Heaw 

243 

240 

Miisubfshl Cora 

520 

571 

Mllsul and 00 

326 


MHaikastil 



Mitsumi 

1110 


NEC 



NlkkoSec 



Nippon Steel 

147 

145 

Nippon Yusen 

240 

245 

Nissan 

405 


Nomura Sac 

894 


Olympus 

1280 





Slurp 


1DU 

Sony 



Sumitomo Ban*. 



Sumitomo Chsm 

212 

210 

Sumitomo M ai 

145 

145 

Toisei Cora 

200 

19B 

Tokstio* Marine 

345 

3*5 

Takeda cn»im 




439 


Tokyo Etac. Power 

1440 


Tokyo Marine 

700 

70* 

Toray Ind 

<34 

440 

Toshiba 

420 


Toyota 

1290 

1300 

Yamakhl Sac 

590 

592 




Prevtaus : 9» J4 



NlkJcef-IU. Index : 

1Z02SJ1 

Prevtaue : rsjtnjo 



It 11 


1675 

3700 




OBaGctov 

2810 

3815 

Credit Subs# 

2380 

2375 


2700 

2675 


727 

715 

Jacob Suchard 

4375 

6325 

Jolmoll 

1938 

1940 


1640 

1450 

Nestle 

4270 

4240 





8600 

8680 

Sandoz 

7950 

8®a 

Schindler 

3450 

3450 


349 

347 

SBC 

348 

348 

Swissair 

1095 

tan 


iSM 





Winterthur 

4250 

4270 

Zurich ins 

20250 20250 1 

SBC lattx :4BSM 



Prtvtoas : 426.M 




na: 

TtoT 

ovaHabto; xd: esdJvktend. j 


Dresdner Raises Dividend by 25% 


Imematmul Herald Tribune 


FRANKFURT - Dresdner 
Bank AG, West Germany’s sec-’ 
ond-largest commercial bank, re- 
ported Wednesday a 25-percent in- 
crease in ii$ dividend to 7.50 
Deutsche marks ($129) a share 
from 6 DM, and also announced a 
one- for- seven rights issue priced at 
155 DM a shore. 


The dividend increase, following 
an increase the previous year from 
4 DM, was larger than expected, 
industry sources said. 

Dresdner said it would raise 465 
million DM through its rights issue 
and. through allocating more than 
300 million DM of that amount to 
reserves, will be in a better position 
to meet new capital-ratio regula- 
tions effective since Jan. 1. 


Feb. 12 


Canadian stoda na AP 


2501 AMI Prcc 
3425 ACklonds 
4M»AonlcOE 
lisa Aora lad A 
4732S Alt E/ierav 
875 Alto Nat 
432AIOO Cent 
19AJaamcSI 
WOAndrsWAl 
12314 Araeeti 
4200 Arms C or 
4QQA&tesM* 
6200 AlCo 1 1 
521 BP Canada 
24575 Ban* BC 
34747B Bank N S 
19340 Barrie* O 
710 Baton Af 
159B1B Bonanza R 
1200 Bralarno 
650 Bramolra 
39423 BCFP 
33875 BC RM 
9440 SC Phono 
381 Brunswk 
172B0 Budd Can 
■354 CAE 
23990 CDM&Bt 
3650 Cad Frv 
4142SC Nor West 
100DC Pockrs 
5294 Can Trust 


mah LowCtoM'Ch^e 


S37V2 34 37Vj 

17 — to 
I3H— to 

4V>— Vg 

' + 'A 


j - H 

BY: 


3208 C Tuna 

Bk Com 


29147 Cl Bk 

UOOOCdn Not Ras 
20431 CTIre A f 

986 C Util B 

5300 Cara 
l<7B Celanej* 

3IO Colon 175 p 
2450 C Dtstb A 
25100 CDIstb B I 
4400 CTL Bank 
wacunwntn 
1200 Conwest A 
SSOOCOMkaR 
10300 Cromu 
BOEfflOar Roe 


IBM Door A 
52950 Don) son A 
90800 Denison Bf 


* 5475 DovteOn* 
4300 DIcknOT A 
2102 Daman A , 
18575 DofOSCO A 


740 Du Pont A 
4732 Dytex A 
4000Elcthom X 
400 Ema> 

1700 Equity 5vr 

SMO FCA Inti 

2D400C FalconC 
14840 Flcnbrtfe* 
720 FardvRn 
2235 Fad IndA 
4800 Fed Plan 
4400 F City Fin 
MOFruetnuf 
746Gendh A 
1M22 Gcac Comp 
5000 Geoerud* 
5740 Gib ral tor 
IMBGoWcorof 

2580 Grandma 
_ 435 GL Forest 
1 7170 H Group A 
10Z75 Hrdlng A 1 


1880 Hawker 
1729 Haves D 
M4SH Bay Ca 
53750 tmaacn 

3375 1 total 
2730 Inland Gas 
1 9900 Inti Thwn 
7070 Intpr Pipe 
2*» Jannoc* 
MgKam Kolia 
MOKetuvH 
500 Kerr Add 
5350 Lottotl 

'WOLOnlCem 
fiMtOLacana 
5014 Lablaw Co 
500 MDS H fl 
7500 Melon H X 


*17V> 17 
5134* 13(6 
S4V» bVi _ 

S20V* 19H 20 
515 15 15 

*19»k 19** 191* + V* 
23 2714 23 — u 

X24M 24ta 24%. — 
«71u 144* I7W + *9 
5114* Ilk, 11 U 
17 7 

raw Bu. ... 

524% HM, 2676+ V* 
« 57* 6 

5134* 13V. 134* 

138 135 136 —2 

*17*. 17 17'i+ to 

410 410 410 — 5 

m » 9. 

517% 17% 17%— lb 

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Page 15' 


SPORTS 


Wales Conference Scores 6-4 NHL A ll-Suir Triumph 

Ca^ar’T AnLCfT Dl9 w^Z Campbd] stars to Said Gretzky: “I thought it was 15-root backhander that eluded were replaced at the nridwav poii 

’.(u.'jAtt » , moerta — Wayne within 5-4. Then CVrr^Vu <»v>Vi na * i h., 4 *h~ »u» rf-ht iw> «.iu * r.. n— «-..i_ _ • 


CALGARY, Alberta — Wayne 
Gretzky with bis arms raised in the 
air is how most everyone expected 
Tuesday evening to end, and that's 
just about how it did end. There it 


the Campbell stars to 
in 5-4. Then Gretzky, seeking a 
fmal chance, roamed behind Lind- 
oergh. 

Gretzky came out in front on the 

left side of the crease; standing 


Said Gretzky: "I thought it was 
in. I bad the whole net right there." 

Midway through the second pe- 
riod. Gretzky had lifted the puck 
from Washington defenseman 
Scott Stevens and skated in on a 


15-foot backhander that eluded 
Edmonton goalie Andy Moog and 
Philadelphia's Tim Kerr raising it 
to 2-0 at 5:31 by tacking the puck 
between Moog and the post. 

The Campbell team halved the 


_ a — » . . r — — — « v-ow, any uuuL I Ttcvbua auu Mtiiau ui wi a a mv Muupucu team muvcu tuc uti£ , 

ihouriir S fe ) uS? 1 lhrae l** lbe B 03 ** ** breakawy — which Lindbergh margin 62 seconds later when 17:47. 
thought be had scored the tying took a pass from Wumioes’s Date ihnmrtMl ninnn^ Arin+A * r i — -v.. 


were replaced at the midway point 
— Moog by Grant Fuhr and Bar- 
rassoby Lindbergh. 

The Wales team qt 
2 advantage, on goals 
berg at 13:46 and Lemieux at 


i quickly took a 4- 
goaJs from Hed- 


tying 

goal — tail the puck got caught 
somewhere beneath goalie Pelle 
Lindbergh's body. 

Thus the National Hockey 
Lea g u e bad found a couple of fresh 
heroes. 

Mario Lemieux, the I9-year-old 
V/obkie of the Pittsburg Penguins, 
bod two goals and an assist, and the 
Wales Conference scored a 6-4 vic- 
tory over the Campbell Conference 


pass from Winnipeg's Dale 
Hawdchuk and Tired toward 
half-open net. 

But a sprawling Find 

just enough of the puck 

out. and Gretzky had to lower*his 
arms. 

“I knew he was around the back 
of the net," said Lindbergh. “But 
then l lost him. Somebody hit me 
and I fell in the net — f didn’t 
r«l]y know where the puck was. I 


thwarted. Dionne drilled a 25-foot slapshot 

“That was nice, to come hack .**“• hit defenseman Mike Ramsey 



happens; 

nervous, but not like last time.' 

“Last lime*’ was the 1983 all-star 
game, when Gretzky scored four 
third-period goals against Lind- 
bergh. 

The winners 


the score on a 25-foot wrist shot 
that went through Barrasso's legs at 

Krushdayski started the play off 
a 3-on-2 break. 


Goalies Moog and Barrasso ex- 

jt, vwr v -nit, , ■ ~ — •■■■*-*• ««- ««■ i **ic wiiukii gut off to a quick celled over the first 10 minutes of 

8ain f' 5^ 10 bu, *«fly as much as possi- start, Hartford's Ron Francis scor- the second period, making key 
rnost^ v aluab le pla^r* ^ s ^ C lo COver ^ mg at 1:40 of the first period on a saves to preserve the 2-2 tie. Both 

“Before 1 came into the league,” 
said Lemieux, “all I thought was 
Gretzky, what it would be like to 
play against him. I never thought it 
would come to this.” 

Lemieux scored the fourth Wales 
goal near the end of the second 
period; then, after the Campbell 


Hedberg, at 33 the oldest player 
in the game, broke down die mid- 
dle of the ice and was about 10 feci 
from Fuhr When l-gmirary, skatin g 

down the left lane, put a pinpoint 
pass mi his stick. 

On the prettiest play of the ni g ht , 
showing rare coordination between 
players on an all-star squad, Bour- 
que skated down the left side and 
passed cross-ice to Muller, who pul 
it back into the middle to lemiww 


, V 1 4 i«.j J 

V-i-ssaafci 
’"risfc 

• --TiiiaAfci 

- ;; :r»sa4 r 
: r recess in i$g 
ri-^ftnacL 

- - - 

r.'.'-^acc 


-rir,* Arafat Tafts 

. . . '■ :._i 

• -.•iliiSiaaL 

• 

■ . : _ :iV_;c Ose 

hi 

. .-Lri Fihicik. 
.• .."'..-if riuSri 
\ ; Ji ,?l at 

■ .":L: 

t jsA Offer Made 

. . .• ••- iirjfis 


• " ltS* 1 

' 3J ZiSZ 
. r 


1 


/ >cs^ ; 

.. n- ^ 

- '-rr.fjtf.- 


npl 

team drew to within 4-3 midway 
through the third on Gretzky's only 
goal of the night, he scored A g ain' 

"Kids like him are the future of 
the league.” said Gretzky, who is 
‘ 24. 

Lindbergh aside, Lemieux was 
'Jlot the only star, but it seemed that 
the Wales team's other main con- 
tributors revolved around him Ray 
Bourque, a Bostoa defenseman, set 
an all-star record by assisting on 
four goals, including both of Le- 
mieux's. New Jersey's Kirk Muller, 
also 19, had an assist on Lemieux’s 
first tally. For the Campbell teawi L 
Edmonton’s Mike Krushelnyski 
had three assists. 

And there were sentimental he- 
rds. New York Ranger Anders 
Hedberg, playing in his first all-star 
game in what he has said will be his 
last season, had a goal; and Marcel 
Dionne, the league's third leading 
scorer, tallied for the Campbells. It 
was the Los Angeles forward's goal 
in eight all-star appearances. 

But with all of those compelling 
personaHties. the game was largely 
lacking in dramatics — until 
, Gretzky appeared in front of the 
?yaie$ neL 

Randy Carlyle of Winnipeg had 
scored with 2:5 1 remaining to play, 



— who beat Fuhr with a low wrist 
shot. 

The late tension lasted until 
there were nine seconds remaining 


and Mike Gartner from Washing- 
ton scored into an empty net. 
Lemieux was 


SCOREBOARD 


Hockey 


Basketball 


National Hockey League All-Star Summaries National Basketball Association Standings 


(At OH«sr#. Alberta) 
WMmCwiAvwkm 2 3 3—* 

C am pH H C — tlr M M 1 ( M 

first P«1«l — I, Woles. Froncis {Kerri. 
1 S40.1 Woles. Kerr (Goulet. Bourque), j;3l. 3, 
Campbell, Dionne (OsraUnlck. MoclnnW. 
C33.4. Campbell. Frycnr ( KmstwJnvskl. Cor- 
Met. ^'-55. Penalty — Muller. Woles ttrtp- 
Pino), 14:20. 

SeceM Period — 5. Wnlev Hednerq (Le- 
mieuK. Lanewav). >3:44. i, Woles. Lamteux 
(Muller. Bourque), 17:47. Penalties — None. 

TWrd Period — 7, Catruibeli.Gretifcr (Kru- 
ihelnyiki}, 10:09. B. Wales. Lemieux (Bour- 
que). 11:09. 9, CtnrobeK, Carlyle (KrusIM- 
nvskll, 17:09. 10. Wolaa. Gartner (Bouraue), 
19:51 («motv net). Penalty— Dionne, Comp. 
Ml (ho Id fata). 4:44. 

1 Stef* oo boo! — Wales U- 10-12-36. Coma- 
bet! 7-10-9 — 34, 

Gaaflas — Wales. Barrasso (U Shota- II 
mee); Undbcrult 110:49 second, 1>U). 
Cam obeli. Moo* 07.15); Fuhr (10:49 second. 
W-15). 

Attendance — 1A0KL 

Referee — Andy Van HeUemend. 


ALL-STAR MMI RESULTS 
1965 — Woles A Campbell 4 
1964 wales 7. COmpbell 4 
IK3— Comebell 9. Wales 3 
190— Woles A Campbell 2 
19il— Camnbetl 4, Wain I 
N80— Woles 6, Corn obeli 1 
177 b — wales x Campbell 2 
1977— Wales A Campbell 3 
im- Wales 7, Campbell 5 
19JS— WMet 7, Campbell ) 

1974— West a East 4 
1973-Co*t 5> West A 
1973-East X West % 

Wl— West Z East 7 
W70-eo9» 4. West 1 
1949— East X West 3 
IMS— Taranto A All-Stan i 
1947— Montreal X All-Stars 0 
: 1145— All-Stars 5. Montreal 3 
Jc “- A— All-Star » X Toronto 2 
-AMlon X Toronto 3 
6i <- roranto A. Ail-Siars 1 


1941— Alt-Store X Chleoso 1 
1940-AjJ-Store X Montreal I . . 

1959— Montreal X AU-siare l 

1956— Montreal A Alf-Skart 3 

1957— All-Stars S, Montreal 3 1 

1954— All-Stars t, DetraH 1 

1955 — Dot rod X All-Stars 1 
1954— All-Store x Delroll 3 
7953 — All- Stars X Manireal 1 
I9S3— First Team I. Second Team I 
1951— First Team X Second Team 2 
1950— Detroit 7, All-Stars I 

IW9 — AU-Stort X Toronto 1 
1948— All-Store X Toronto 1 
1947 — All-Stare X Toronto 3 
(Nolo: Naafhctar some In 1944; In IW9,tfie 
Otallenae Cup series between the Soviet 
union and Team NHL nwlaced (he all-star 

OOme). 

ALL-STAR MVPi 
IMS— EMIb shock. Toronto 
>943— Frank Mobovllch. Montreal 
7944— Joan Bebveau. Montreal 
1945— Gordie How*. Detroit 
1907— Henri Richard. Montreal 
1906— Bruce Gamble. Toronto 
iw»9— Frank Mono*! left, Montreal 
1976— Bobtor Hull, Chicago 
1971 — Bobby Hull, Chicoeo 
7973— Bobby Orr, Boston 

1973— Grea Palls* M.v. Raneers 

1974— Garrv Unger, 51. Louts 

1975— Sri apos Jr. Pittsburgh 
1974— Peter McAovHch. Montreal 
■1977— Hie Martin. Buffalo 

1976— Billy Smith, N.Y. IstonderS 

1960— Resale Loocft, Philadelphia 
1981— Mike Llut. St. LwU 
1983— Mike Bossy. N.Y. Islanders 

1963— wayne Gretzkv. Edmonton 

1964— Don Maloney. N.Y. Ronoers 

1965— Mario Lemieux. Pittsburgh 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic DtvMoa 



W 

L Pet 

GB 

Boston 

41 U 

JM 

_ 

PMtotMpnta 

40 10 

M0 

to 

WmMnoton 

36 35 

536 

14 

New Joraov 

24 77 

-47T 

17 

NM» Yortl 

11 33 
Central Division 

353 

23 

MUaoutaa 

35 17 

473 

_ 

Detroit 

30 21 

400 

4 

Chicago 

25 25 

500 

* 

Atlanta 

21 30 

413 

13to 

Ctovefand 

14 it 

J30 

10 

Indiana 

14 35 

Jit 

16to 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 
•HEWS* DfvbUM 


Donygr 

32 30 

415 



Houston 

29 21 

5*0 

1 

Polios 

20 23 

549 

Jto 

Son Antonto 

36 35 

510 

5ta 

Utah 

94 27 

471 

7*5 

Kansas City 

16 34 
Pact He DtvUton 

JOB 

15 

UA. Lakers 

34 16 

jm 



PtaMitK 

35 34 

a m 

into 

Pomona 

23 20 

451 

mo 

SsaWe 

23 30 

4 a 

14 

LA. Clippers 

30 31 

J92 

isto 

Gotam State 

11 39 

220 

34 


Boxing 


WBC Ratings 


Tennis 


IHTERHATIOIUU. CHAMPIONSHIPS 
(At Defray Beach, Florida) 

MEN 

Foortti Round 

Stefan Edtergn3l.Sweden.def. Ivan Lendl 
(1), CeOCnoslovaUa. 6-4. 7-4. 

Yannick Nocdi (9). Franco, def. Sammy 
Glwnmawa. 4-3. 64. 

Tim Mayotte deL Greo Holme*. 6X7-4 (64J. 
WOMEN 
Quarterfinals 

Steffi Bred. West Germany, def. Andrea 
Taicnad (13), Hungary, 6-X 4-1. 

Chris Everiuovd (2) def. Brntaora Potter *■ 
A 4-4, 4-1. 

Mart l no NawaHhiva (1 ) def. Bettina Bunae, 
West Germany. 64. 4A. 





BASEBALL 


CHICAGO— StatadGem NeKOn. pltctier. to 
a one-vear eoniruc i . 

CLEVELAND— Stoned Orris Banda artetv 

er. to a one-year contract 
MINNESOTA— Stoned Ed Hodge. Pilcher, 
and AUke 5 te aho u se, outfielder. 

National League 

NEW YORK— Stoned Tim MeCoruer. Steve 
Zabrisfcto and Bob Murphy, announcers, to 
mum year contracts. 

BASKVTBALL 

NaHonai BadurtteK Assodettoe 
MILWAUKEE— Acquired Paul Thompson. 

euard-toneanLfnMnCievetondtartneCaw- 

Uere'aaconoraund draft nhde In the 1965 draff 
and on undisc l o se d selection to IRC. 

WASHI NGTOft— Placed Frank Jotenon, 
want «•» the (nlured reserve list. 

FOOTBALL 

National Foot&aU League 
BUFFALO— Named Kav Dalton quarter- 
back coach. 

CLEVELAND— Named Grea Landry auor- 
axicti and Rkftard Mann receiver 


TAMPA BAY— Named Dk* Roach deten- 
stve backReld coach. 

Ifgftod stare* Football Leasee 

LOS ANGELES— Placed Rirtwlc* Atkins, 
attansive tackle, an the Mured waiver (let. 

PORTLAND— SlanM Molt Robtoson-aunr- 
tenweft, to a Wvear contract T raded torri- 
torMI rtotHs ot Ron Holmes, defensive Itoe- 

moa end Thn Uteamter, llneOocfcer. to 
Bottimare brine rights to Kenny Nleb defen- 
sive told. 

COLLEGE 

CENTRAL MICHIGAN— Announced tool 
Dick pqrtitt. baeketoctii coactt, whi resign at 
me end ot me season. 


HEAVYWEIGHT: ChanuNoa — PltMea 
Thomas. 1. Mike Weaver. X Dovev Bey. X Tim 
Wimereneon. < Michael Danes. S. Mltcneii 
Green. 

cruiser weight: Champion — Carlos 
do Lena. Puerto Rico. 1. AJfbiuo RalllK. X 
orient Muhcmmad OowL X Anthony Davis 
A. Basniru AIL Nigeria. 5. Oevaldo OcaUS 
Puerto Rico. 

LIGHT HEAVYWEIGHT: Champion— MF 
choel SplnfcS. t, Eddie Davis X Marvin John- 
son. X Willie Edwards 4, Prince AWmo Mu- 
ham mod, Ghana. 5. LOftfe Mwale. Zambia. 

MIDDLEWEIGHT: Champion — Marvel- 
ous Marvin Hauler. 1. James Shiner. X James 
KUNften. X Dwtohl Dovhon. 4, Don Lee. S 
Tony Stoson, EnoUnd. 

SUPER WELTERWEIGHT: ChempHm — 
Thomas Hearns 1. John MugauL Udands X 
David Braxhvt X Julian Jackson, Virgin ts- 
larxis A Busier Drarton. X Fred Hutchings 

WELTERWEIGHT: Champion — Milton 

McCrary. (. Pedro VI tolls 2. Tommy Ayers X 
Horace ShuHord. 4. Elio DIOL Veneuxria X 
Colin janes. Wales 

SUPER LIGHTWEIGHT: ttampkM— BUI 
Cosfelto. 1. Lerer Holey. X Hugo Hernandez. 
Araentina. X Poirtzlo Oliva I to Tv, 4. Rene 
Arredondo. Mexico. X Ronnie SlUehtS 
LIGHTWEIGHT: Champion — Jose Luts 
Ramirez. Mexico. 1. Edwin Rasorta. Puerto 
Rica X Jimmy Paul- X Hector Camacho. 
Puerto Rica < Tyrone Crawley. & Howard 
Davis. 

SUPER FEATHERWEIGHT: CtamPlea— 
Julio Cesar Clkn<sz.Mexlcal. Ruben Casttlta. 

X Rafael Solis. Puerto RleaX Kamel BouAll. 
Tunisia. A Juan La Porte. Puerto Rica. X 
Mart a Martinez, Medico. 

FEATHERWEIGHT: Champion — Aw- 
Utah Netsoa. Ghana I, Moiras Vlltosarn, 
Mexico. X Wllfredo Gomez, Puerto Rico. X 
jackto Beard, A Barry McGulaan. Britain. X 
Bernard Taylor. 

SUPER BANTAMWEIGHT: CMnptaa — 
jean Meza,' Mexico. T, Jaime Garza, x Mike 
Avola. X Settoo Hoon Lea. South Korea. A 
Julian Sail a Puerto Rica. X Guadoluoe Pin tor. 
Mexico. 

BANTAMWEIGHT: CUmpMa — Alberto 
□pylla. 1 . Freddie Jackson. X Gdbv Canlzales. 
X Daniel Zaragoza, Mexico, a Miguel tore. 
Colombia X Enrique Scnchei. Dominican Re- 
public. 

SUPER FLYWEIGHT: Clmmeloa — JW 
vscdaitob*. Jaeox. l.GIWerto Roman. Mexico. 

% Ratoei Oram. Venezuela X Beals Rates 
Colombia. A Julio Solo Solano. Dominican Re- 
puPik* X Pavoo ppaltarai. Thailand. 

FLYWEIGHT: Chomp km — sot cwtojodo, 
Tballaad. I, Gabriel Bernal. Mexico. X Fred- 
die Castillo. Mexico. X Candida Tellez, Mexi- 
co. A Antoine Meniere- France. & Alonzo 

Stronebow. 

UGHT FLYWEIGHT: Champion — Jong, 
kaa Chattel Sowtn Korea. 1, German Torres, 
Mexico Joey OHvo- X Istdro Perez. Mexico. 
a jose oe Jesus Puerto Rico 5. Fra«i5o 
MMtitoi, Mexico 


TUESDAY’S RESULTS 
DaltoS 31 3) 42 27—111 

Ctovefaod 24 34 32 36-112 

Blackmon U-20 7-7 3 X Attolrre 1X23 3-3 30J 
Frea 10-19 5-7 34, Hubbard 612 5-5 77. Re- 
teands: oa(.48 (Aoukra KlmpWusTl. cie.4) 
1 Paquette 61. Assists: DaL 28 IBJfeub 16), 
CK. 31 UJDavts 10). 

PIM Uriel pMo 30 27 34 21—1X1 

Indiana 38 35 22 31—114 

Taney 8-14 11.14 29. E rvteg 7-14 4-7 36. Barlt- 
lev 10-170-220; HWllltann 15-2} 33 3X Flem- 
ing 5-11 7-7 17. Rebounds: PWLS9 (Malone 141, 
Ind. 51 (H. Williams 12). Assists: Phil. 21 (Er- 
ytou. Cheeks «>,ind. X (Thomas, Slchllnp 4). 
New jersey 25 21 24 29—163 

MBwnuhee 11 M M 15—111 

Moncrtof 11-20 16-13 32. Cuminlnos 9-19 7-1 
25; Williams ID-19 M 22, BhTbanO 6-74 ^2 l& 
Rebounds: N-1.44 [Williams 15), MIL 41 (List- 
er 20J. Assists: NJ. 30 (Birdsong, Richardson 
n. MIL & (Pressev Ml. 

Selected College Results 

EAST 

BatKOfi 41 E. Connecticut 59 
Boston CaL 101, Seton Hall 63 
Boston U. 4 a New Hampshire 51 
Brldoetwaier 51. 77, Fltcftbura SI. 75 
Buffalo 51. 91. Brock port 51. 04. OT 
Casttoton 62. Plymouth SI. 57 
ConnecHcut CaL 75. Rhode Island CaL SB 
Elmira 71. Roberts WeUevan 45 
Fairfield 67. Aimv to. 07 
Fordtwm 6A SI. Petert 40 
Franklin Pierce 8L Keene St. 55 
Iona 00, Hotv Cross 50 
John Jay 85. CCNY 40 
La Salto 65. Manhattan 44 
Mozaretn BX CtorUon 9 
Nichols 64. Anno Marta e9 
Norwich SX 51. Michaels » 

Old Westtourv 7X Dominican. N.Y. 55 
Richmond IA Loreto, Md. 52 
Rochester 79. Hobart 7X DT 
Siena 7A Catoeta 54 
SL John’s 48. Columbia 49 
SL Rose 01. Green Mountain 73 
Syracuse SX Providence 76 
wesleyan 59. Coast Guard 37 
Western. Ma BX Juniata tf> 

Worcester SI. 7A W. New Enakmd 45 
SOUTH 

Alabama ABJA >7. Benedict 73 
Albany. Go. 7A Morehouse 63 
Catawba &A Pem br oke St. 59 
Citadel 4A vmi 41. OT 
Hampton U. B0. Norfolk 5t. U 
Lvnchbura 97. Hompden-5ydnev 84 
Mary Washington BA Vlralnto Westoran 77 
McNaesa SL 67. SW Louisiana 64 
Rollins 76. Florida Tech 73 
Saufiwrn. NO M. Loulsleno CoL U 
wash. A Lee 9A E. Menmntfo 45 
MIDWEST 

AuBustana, liL SX MIIHkln S3 
Concordia Seminary BX Webster 53 
Dakota Was lev art 7 a Huron 70 
Loyola, HL 78. DePoul 71 
Miami, onto TIL Toledo 49 
Missouri 42 Kansas 55 
N. Dakota st. 72. X Dakota St. 43 
Pittsburg St. 6& Benedictine 4X OT 
S. Dakota TKft Bl, Block Him SI. 57 
SIOUX Foils HA Dakota SI. 64 
Si. Cloud si. 72 x Dakota sa 
SOUTHWEST 

central St- Okie. SA Oklahoma Bonus! a 
teuas Weslevan 92 T ortolan 49 
FAR WEST 

Bftoham Yning-HawaU 91. Hawaii Leo to 
Brliith Cc tam bio 7x W. Wdshinoion 43 
Cent. Washington I6X LewIvCIork 51, 41 
Reeky Mountain «7. w. Montana <7 
San Oleoo 51 64. Lone BcaOl Si tfl 
Seattle 74. SeoMto Pocriic 71 
S Colorado 61. Denver 44 


Phoenix 25 21 33 35-114 

Hoostaa 41 19 19 27-121 

Sampson 11-18 5-W 27, Otaluwon 0-14 B-1 1 24; 
Nance 13-23 34 29. Humphries 11-17 4-4 26. 
Rebounds: Pluc. 39 (Name 0). Hou. 55 
(OkHimanHH.AMMv. Ptat.34 (DaulsVl.Hau. 
36 (Hollins 6). 

Detroit 1) 36 37 35 3—12* 

CTUcoeo 41 24 26 30 14-139 

Jordan 1631 1 1-1349, Wooirtagel1-309-ID3l ; 
V Johnson 12-16 3J 28. Lolmbeer 7-l« M 19. 
Reteends: Drrt.46 (Benson l3).ChL57 (Green. 
Jordan lSl.Aseferts: DeL26(Theinas9).CM.3S 
[Jordan. Mottnews, Dal toy 5). 

Attenta 36 37 2D 36—197 

Denver 36 37 24 3*-tn 

Now 12-175629. EnalWt6-l57-7Z3; Wilkins 
515 66 IX WHIN 7-13 *6 IX Rebounds: All. 53 
IWillb 111, Den. 52 (Cooper 0). Assists: AM. 14 
Uohnoan 41, Den. 33 (Lower 7). 

Kansas CHv 25 22 2 s 37 — m 

San Antaato M 31 32 36—127 

Moore 11-16 1-2 2X MhctHdl 10-18 2-3 22: 
TUeus 9-76 XA 21. Woodson 6-14 64 IX Re- 
bouads: K.C 39 (Tbarm 61. SA. 44 (lovaranl 
III. Assists: K.C 25 (Drew 81. XC 32 (Moore 
111 . 

UL cuppers 1» 37 31 33— in 

LA Lakers 39 34 34 23-421 

Scott 10-1964 2& EJohnson 9-125521: BrU- 
eeman 9-1460 IX Smith 7-17 3-t 17. Rebaoads: 
ULC 40 (Donaldson 12). UU-SS (McAdoo 
61. Asilets: LAC 22 (Nixon ID). LAX. 31 
(EJohnson 121. 

Washington 21 26 22 31— 94 

Seattle 26 38 2* 25—109 

Chambers 1 1-19 13-14 3A Henderson 9-140-0 
16: Ballard 615 1-2 IX Robinson 616 67 IX 
Rebounds: wash, 55 (RoMnson 10). Sea 54 
(Wood it). Assists: Wash. 25 IGus Williams 
15). Sea 29 (Henderson 61. 

21 25 35 23-163 
31 H M 21—111 
Valentine 7-13 611 23. Dr ex tor 1614 1-2 2L 
Ptuewn 10-14 1-1 21; BlnJ9-2B662J, Porlshll- 
193-33A Reteends; Bos. 42 (Bird IJ). Port 44 
(Bowie 13). AssisK: Bos. 13 (Alnge, Jotetscm 
9). Port. 32 (Drexler 0). 

Utah 63 25 34 26-123 

GOMen State M 20 11 2S— 1W 

Dantlev 14437-7 35. Grfffllti 6176330; Start 
6256425. Floyd 615610 21. Rotaaods: Utah 
57 (Eaton IS). GJL 57 (Plummer 10).. 

Utah 31 (Green in. GS. 20 (Start 4). 


player on the ice, after 
Mailer, who is 18. Pittsbingh, New 
Jersey and (he Rangers are in- 
vdved in the only real playoff fight 
at the moment, but Lenucox said 
that be, Muller and Hedberg did 
not discuss the race before Tues- 
day’s game. 

“We ju&i Diked about what we 
had to do," Lemieux said. “I was 
nervous and I didn’t know what to 
expea in my first all-star game, bin 
Ray Bourque told me just to go out 
there and play and it would be all 
right. 

“It’s a big feeling to win (he 
MVP when you play against 
Gretzky and you play with Mike 
Bossy. You expea those guys to 
win iL You can’t really explain the 
feeling. Maybe tomorrow I’ll un- 
derstand what happened on the 
ice." 

Lemieux also said of the award: 
That was for him." He was refer- 
ring to Don Cherry, the former 
Boston coach and now a television 
broadcaster, who recently called 
Lemieux “the biggest floater in 
hockey." 

“It’s his opinion, but you can’t 
say he's right. The Penguins asked 
me to play offense." said Lemieux, 
who has 22 goals and 45 assists in 
38 games for Pittsburgh. “They 
don't care about my defensive 
play.” (NYT, WP, UPI) 


Jordan Excels 
As Bulls Win 
In Overtime 

United Press Iniemaiiartal 

CHICAGO — Instead of getting 
mad, Michael Jordan decided he’d 
get even. 

Published reports following Sun- 
day’s all-star game said some Na- 
tional Basketball Association vet- 
erans were not impressed with 
Jordan and considered bis attitude 
a bit arrogant. One article said 
there was a movement afoot to 
“freeze out" Chicago's sensational 
rookie. 

Slung by accounts that he had 
tried to show up other members of 
the Eastern Conference squad, Jor- 
dan was all business Tuesday night, 
scoring a career-high 49 points, in- 


VANTAGE POINT/ Thomas Boswell 


Storm Clouds on Baseball Horizon 


Washvtgua Pun Service 

WASHINGTON — Put a bil- 
lion dollars cm the table and it 
gets people's attention. Put it up 
for grabs and you never know 
what wifi happen. Maybe even 
baseball strike. 

Yes. it’s that lime again. 
Spring training starts next week. 
Opening Day is just S3 roomings 
away. 

And the Basic Agreement's 
run oul Just what we an wanted 
to hear. 

Nothing makes your day like 
studying the negotiations be- 
tween a union whose employees 
make an average of S330.000 a 
year and a group of owners 
whose clubs are worth 530 mil- 
lion co S60 million or more. 

Nothing prompts your sympa- 
thy tike wondering how these 
simple folk will divvy up that 
billion dollars, which arrived in 
the six-year network television 
deals that Bowie Kuhn, the for- 
mer commissioner, left as a lega- 

The good news in 1985 is that, 
on both sides of the table, base- 
ball has its best available minds 
— and sanest temperaments — 
working on the problem. 

Owner's man Lee MacPhail is 
mild and condliatosry compared 
to Ray Grebey, who was hired 
specifically as a tough guy in 
1981. Union representative Don 
Fefar is os smart and Lan as his 
mentor, Marvin Miller, but 
doesn't cany the deep pereonal 
bruises that the owners inflicted 
on Miller. 

A wild-card player is the new 
commissioner. Peter Ueberroth, 
who says hell keep his hands off. 
But last time push came to shove, 
he served as an arbitrator in the 
umpire's strike in October. 

“I’m not going to tell you that 
everything is hunky-dory,’* said 
Fehr of the union. “Bui there is 
an absence of the kind of bostsl- 
negotia- 
te likely 
we'll find our way our of this 
morass." 

The bad news — and unfortu- 
nately the only substantive news 
— is that little, if any, progress 
has been made. 

In fact, because of injudicious 
words and acts by two owners, 
John McMullen of Houston and 
Peter O’Malley of Los Angeles, 
everything's behind schedule. 
More on mat later. 

Both MacPhail and Fefar had 
hoped for a new agreement be- 
fore spring training. Now, it 
seems unlikely that a deal can be 
struck by Openhig Day. 

T don’t want to make artifi- 
cial d e a dl i nes and threats,” said 
Fefar. “I don’t care whether we 
get it done in March, April or 
May. iosi as long as it gets dime. 
We always have time to fight if 
we have to fight.” 


ity that marked other 
lions. That makes it more likely 


June is probably the player’s 
month of choice if they decide to 
strike, just as it was in the 60-day 
war of 1981. 

Underneath their mandatory 
outward optimism, both Mac- 
Phafl and Fefar are starting to 
worry. Two old familiar key is- 
sues and one nagging new prob- 
lem are at the conflict's core: 

Most important is that billion. 

Since the 1960s, the players 
have received one-third of base- 
ball's network TV money for 
their pension plan. “Where that 

'I don't care whether 
we get it done in 
March, April or 
May. . . . We always 
have time to fight if 
we have to fight.' 

one-third figure came from, no 
one knows,” MacPhail said. 
“The two sides have argued 
about it for IS years and finally 
agreed to disagree. 

“The players say that one- 
third of any new TV revenue is 
automatically theirs. The own- 
ers’ answer is. That’s ridiculous.’ 
The owners fed that their only 
obligation is to produce a first- 
rate pension plan. They don’t 
think this one- third exists.” 

“The owners claim it was just 
a series of 'coindidencss' that in 
each new contract we always got 
one-third,’’ Fehr said. “We say 
one-third was what we negotiat- 
ed for and they can’t take it back 
now.” 

In its last TV contract, base-’ 
ball hit a bonanza, quadrupling 
its income from the networks — 
SI billion for six years through 
1989. 

The players are saying, “We’ll 
take our usual third of that — 
SS5 million a year." Owners say, 
“No you won’t. You got $15 


give it to them and win. But 
that’s not our goaL We don’t 
want war. We want solutions 
both sides can live with." 

The issue that makes owners 
almost comparably upset is sala- 
ry arbitration. 

“The clubs fed whipsawed be- 
tween free agency and arbitra- 
tion,'* MacPhail said. “If a rich 
big-city team gives a player a 
million dollars a year, then a 
player from a poor small-town 
team can go to arbitration and 
get his case decided, in part, on 
salary standards set by the 


“The owners know they can’t 
eliminate or eamscnlaxe arbitra- 
tion," said MacPhail “But we 
want to see more than procedur- 
al changes." 

“In salary arbitration, the two 
sides are going in opposite direc- 
tions,” Fehr said.- “1 hope they 
aren't serious about some of 
their ideas because if (hey are, 
then down the road, that has a 
lot of problems a Hatched to iL" 

One reason so little progress 
has been made on these two big 
issues, let alone a dozen others, is 
that McMullen and O’Malley 
made serious missteps. 

Both are members of a four- 
man committee of owners who 
are supposed to be the innermost 
circle of the dub's negotiating 
team. Yet both have embar- 
rassed MacPhail and needlessly 
stirred up the union. 

McMullen popped off about 
how much money baseball was 
losing. That necessitated an egg- 
in-the-facc letter to Fehr reiterat- 
ing that management was not 
claiming any finanriat hardships 
in its arguments. 

O'Malley included drug-test- 
ing clauses in the contracts of 
some young Dodger players; 
that, according to Fefar, upset 
“an unbelievable number of 
players.” MacPhail has since had 
to reiterate that drug-testing is 
not an active issue in the contract 
talks. 

“If that stuff with McMullen 
and O’Mafli 


Kona year under ihTlast Basic “d was just ermnea. 

Agreement and that’s the start- <»c thmg,” Fehr 

ing point for any new talks." makes you wonder. 


“We want one-third. We ex- 
pect it. And, in the end, I thinV 
well get it,” Fehr said- “If they 
insist on backing off one-third, 
it’s a guaranteed confrontation. 

“The only way well come off 
one-third is to gp up — - way up 
— In our demands. Sure, this is 
the key issue: That’s where the 
money is. It’s like Willie Sutton 
and the bank. Yon find them 
together. 

“I hope there aren’t people [in 
ownership! expecting con cron ra- 
tion. because that tends to be a 
self-fulfilling prophecy,” Fehr 
said. “If they insist on it, well 


‘Who is it Lee talks forT 

“If two owners on Lee’s com- 
mittee can't get their si gnals 
straight, that creates an enor- 
mous problem. If you’re negoti- 
ating with someone who doesn’t 
have authority, you can never 
turn your hole cards over. 

"I know what (the union's 
membership] will really take in a 
crunch. Odor team has the flexi- 
bility to make decisions. Does 
Lee really know what his owners 
want and what they’ll settle for? 
If you don’t think that keeps me 
up at night worrying, you’re 
wrong.” 


British Track to Stiffen Drug Testing 


NBA FOCUS 


The Associated Prat 

LONDON — The British Ama- 
teur Athletic Board hopes to put 
into place a strict anti-drug policy 
that would call for random tests for 
track and field athletes and could 
prevent anyone from representing 
Britain if they refused to take them. 

More than 20 spons in Britain 
are currently subject to year-round 
testing, but checks in track and 
field have been restricted to com- 
petitive events. That meant athletes 
who used drugs out of season or in 
naming could theoretically avoid 
detection. 

Under (he new policy, British 
aibleies who wanted to compete 
internationally, including at Oiym- 


ain in our sport," Nefl Cooper, the I do not foresee any problems," he 
™ said. 


board’s secretary. Tu 
“We would like to drink Britain 
is taking a fresh lead in the field of 
drug abuse and that other nations 
will follow suit," Cooper said. “If 
they do not, our athletes could be at 
a disadvantage.” 

Hie U.S. Olympic Committee re- 
quires anyone representing the 
United Stales in the Olympics, the 
Pan American Games or the World 
University Gaines pass a manda- 
tory drug test. Some of the coun- 
try’s federations require drug test- 
ing of athletes at national 
championships, but U.S. athletes 
know when the blood samples wiQ 
be taken, and by whom. 



eluding six in overtime, to pace the 
Bulk to a 139-126 victory over the 
Detroit Pistons. 

“I came out with a serious atti- 
tude,” said Jordan after bitting 19 
of 31 from the field, 11 of 13 from 
the free- throw line and pulling 
down IS rebounds. The stories 
“made me focus on relaxing, and I 
got it out of my system. 1 wasn’t 
trying to steal the show. 1 had a lot 
of scoring opportunities and took 
advantage of them.” 

The Bulls, who held the Pistons 
u> three points in overtime, ended a 
four-game losing streak. 

“We've had four overtimes in the 
last five games," said Detroit's coa- 
ch, Chuck Daly. “We have to learn 
to win those. We didn’t execute 
wdi and missed easy shots." 

Elsewhere it was Philadelphia 
124, Indiana 116; Dallas 131, 

Cleveland 112; Milwaukee 111, 

New Jersey 103; San Antonio 127. 

Kansas City 109; Denver 131, At- 
lanta 107; Utah 122, Golden State 

1 10; Portland 1 11, Boston 103; the BAD KLEIN KIRCHHEIM, Austria (Reuters) — Swiss skier Pinnin at any time of the year and hasl 
Los Angeles Lakers 121, the Los Zurbriggen, seeking to add the World Cup title to his world champion- pleased to note that both the Brit- 
Angdes Coppers 1 10; Seattle 109, ship successes in Italy last week, set Wednesday’s fastest training lime for ish Olympic Association and the 
Washington 94, and Houston 126, Thursday's dowrririlL ' ~ - - 

1 u-i - The 1984 overall cup champion negotiated the hard-packed 3,250- 

Jordan tat a free throw to give meter (10,662-foot) course with a drop of 850 meters in one minute, 58.18 
Chicago a l24- 123 lead starang the seconds. He was followed tar fellow Swiss Karl Ahriger (in 1:58.23) and 
extra period, but Kent Benson Peter Muller (1:58 J6). 

countered with a thr^poinr play The stage is set for another duel between Zurbriggen and Austrian 

Helmut HOfiebner, winner of the last two cup dow nhills bat seventh in 
the world championship. Hsflehner, fastest in training Tuesday, leads the 
downhill standings with 107 points, 48 ahead of Zurbriggen. Zurbiggen 
trails Marc Girsrddh of Luxembourg in the overall cup standings by 36 


me and world championships, will The new proposals, the result of 
be asked to sign a special register a lengthy BAAB study, must be 
pledging their willingness to be ratified by the board's finance 
tested for drags at any time of the committee next month. Cooper 
year- said. “But they already have the 

“If they do not sign, then they approval of our executive commit- 
wffl not be invited to represent Brit- tee, which is higher than finance, so 

SPORTS BRIEFS 

Zurbriggen Paces Downhill Training 


Cooper, who first disclosed plans 
for random tests in Britain two 
weeks ago, said be hoped they 
could be introduced by late sum- 
mer, at a cost of about $22jQ00. 

But be said the project would not 
be ready in time for this year's 
inaugural grand prix track season 
beginning in May. For the first 
time, athletes officially will be al- 
lowed to compete tor substantial 
prize money. 

“There is a lot to do, selecting 
staff, printing documents and 
sending oul pamphlets,’’ said Coo- 
per. “I doubt it can aD be done m 
time." 

Under the new procedures, a 
medical team will be setup to lake 
urine samples at a West London 
drug control center. If an athlete on 
the register is unable to provide a 
sample after repeated requests, his 
or her case will be considered by a 
board tribunal that will decide 
whether to impose a baa. 

In a statement, the board said: 
“We have led British sport in the 
testing for prohibitive drags over 
the last 10 years. 

“For some time, the BAAB has 


points. Giiardclli will miss Thursday’s race to concentrate on a slalom 
and giant slalom in Kranjska Gora, Yugoslavia, Friday and Saturday. 


with 4:14 to go. giving Detroit a 
126-124 edge. Sidney Green tied 
the game at 126, and Jordan pat 
Chicago ahead for good with 3:23 
left on a basket and free throw after 
bring fouled by Vraaie Johnson, 
la the fourth period, Isiah 

°L Decker Out With a Tom Calf Muscle 

Detroit the lad, 123-121. Jordan EUGENE. Orison (UPI) — Middle-distance runner Mary Decker will 

iMn missed a l*.-foot shot from the be sidelined for three to six weeks because of a muscle tear in ha 1 right 
left corner, but Green got the of- calf. nr*vwtin E to her 

tensive rebound and was fouled by with two laps to go in the 1.500-meter race Saturday the U.S. 

Brook Steppe with ,18 seconds to Invitational track and field meet in East Rutherford, New Jersey, f5ec 
gp. Green, making his first start of pulled up with what at first was thought to be a cramp in he right leg.^ “But 
tne sea&m, tat both free throw. she tore some muscle fibers in the lower part of hsr calf,” said her coach, 

Af uar Detroit called time, Thom- Dick Brown. “It’s not a very serious injury. . . . She will get her rest and 
as controlled tne nobble and drove plans on running the »iw outdoor as she had." 

for the basket — but lost the ball as 
time ran out. “We were looking for 
a screen and roll" said Dal; 

*** LEXINGTON, Kentucky (AP) — The Breeders’ Cup races will return Dickenson welcomed the BAAB 

we got no shot and the rest was to South era California in 1986 and wffl be held in Kentucky and Florida announcement. “The 1 AC has been 
Waller Berry (with bafl, above) tasioiy. we gave them too many the following two years, ii was announced Tuesday. The multimillion- concerned for some time by the 

doUar, seven-race card, held at Hollywood Park last fall, is slated for New unknown extent of drug abuse in 


Minister lor Sport [Nigri MacFar- 
lanej have joined us in seeking a 
broader scheme for the random 
samp Bug of sports persons.” 

Last month. The Sunday "nines 
quoted a leading track and field 
administrator, Paul Dickenson, as 
saying that up to 60 percent of 
Britain’s in t eoiational -class ath- 
letes had used drugs. 

Dickenson, chairman of the In- 
ternational Athletes Club and a 
former Olympic hammer thrower, 
later accused the newspaper of mis- 
representation. “All I said was that 
I believed that 60 percent of the full 
range of international athletic) 
events was likely to include some 
competitors who had taken drags." 

Tbe same article quoted runner 
Sebastian Coe, who won gold and 
silver medals at the Los Angeles 
Olympics, as saying drag abuse in 
sport was “aproblem which aH the 


sophisticated countries of the 


. . . J-k a # | A auiiuullMIHl uwuum Ol tut 

dySflS regions Designated for Breeder s Cup ««!? “f te from, including Bru- 

tits balk LEXINGTON. Kentucky f A Pi — The Rreeders' Pun ranee anil return Dieknrtsnn welmmeri the A A A I 


had 14 points in helping top- 
ranked St Joinfs (20-1 ) extend 
its winning streak to IS gune* 
with a 6SM9 victory over Co- 
lumbia Tuesday in New York, 


story. Give the Bull defense credit.’’ 
Orlando Woolridge added 31 
points for the winners and Quimin 
Dailey had 21. Johnson hit a sea- 
son-high 28 points iu pace Detroit. 


York's Aqueduct in November, 

The committee set no deadline for choosing specific tracks. In Ken- 
tucky. the decision will rest on crowd control and on whether Churchill 
Downs installs j grass course. Keendand in Lexington has u newlv 
installed grass course but has ne\cr handled a crowd bigger than 27.8-5. 


athletics. We know that problems 
will arise from this scheme, but we 
believe we are uit working toward 
an athletics future in this country 
where drags play no pan.” 


T 





. I & 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1985 


ART BUCHWALD 


A Time of Good Feeling Tom Oanc y, a Double A gent of Sorts 2 SayV = aMP^ 

» ^ By Peter Masley 1970s," Clancy says. “In most any thriller In the whitest ° r popularized French cooking in the 

- _ WiztHinetan Pear Service fiction. the hero is an unmarried auv in his an American couple nas ctaiMc. But the benefit din- 


W ASHINGTON — The secret 
of President Reagan’s popu- 


larity is that he has the ability to 
moke us all feel good, when we 
know we should feel bad. 

Last week's State of the Union 
speech was another triumph for the 
Gipper. 

1 have do idea how it played in 
Peoria, but from what I could tell it 
wait over quite 
well in Washing- 
ton. 

“What did 
you think of the 
president's 
speech?" I asked 
a secretary in my 

building. 

“I thought it 
was wonderful." 

she said. “He , . . 

leveled with the “uctrvrald 



American people." 

“When did he do that?" 

"When he asked the lady cadet 
from West Point to lake a bow 
from the balcony." 

“You felt that was the highlight 
erf - his address?" I inquired. 

“Thai and when be asked the 
lady from Harlem to also take a 
bow, because of what she had done 
for little babies.” 

“Yes. but what about the fact 
that the president glossed over the 
budget deficit and indicated that he 


Burma Displays 
33-Ton Jade Rock 

United Press International 

R angoon — a 33-ton jade 

rock, reputed to be the 
world's biggest, is on display Ran- 
goon's 10-day Union Day exhibi- 
tion. 

Discovered in July 1982 in the 
jade-producing area of Kannaing 
in the northern Burmese state of 
Kachin, the giant stone was 
brought uncut to Rangoon by road 
and rail under heavy guard in Janu- 
ary, 1983. 

Estimated to be worth several 
milli on dollars, the boulder of jade 
sits majestically in the Mining Min- 
istry's pavilion. 1 l could pass as a 
common rock but for a few patches 
of emerald green showing through 
where the surface crust has been 
scraped off. The exhibition will run 
until Feb. 20. 


wanted to proceed with the MX 
missile and ‘Star Wars? Did you 
have any feelings on that?” 

"Not really. I just thought Nancy 
looked beautiful in her red dress,' 
□ 

A young man working as an in- 
tern on my floor said, "I thought it 
was a good speech and ii was about 
time someone came out for the 
poor people and the farmers and 
the urDan centers and deregulation 
of the airlines and the Peace 
Corps." 

“Then you didn't gel the impres- 
sion that the president was avoid- 
ing ihe issue of how he expected to 
reduce the budget deficit without 
raising taxes?" 

“Frankly, I wasn't listening that 
closely. All I know is what he told 
us. The country’s in excellent shape 
now, and it's going to get even 
better if Congress passes an of Mr. 
Reagan's programs." 

"That's a big ‘if.' " 

“Well, they sang Happy Birth- 
day to him." 

“Was there anything about the 
speech you didn’t like? 14 

“I was very annoyed when 
George Bush and Tip O’Neill kept 
talking while the president was 
speaking. They shouldn't have 
done that." 

“Perhaps they weren’t paying at- 
tention because the president had 
given the same speech before." I 
suggested. 

“It doesn’t matter if they heard it 
before. They should have pretend- 
ed they didn't." 

□ 

My third survey victim told me 
the thing she liked about the speech 
was the president's tie. 

“Is there anything else you re- 
member about it besides the presi- 
dent's lie?" 

"No." she said. “Was I supposed 

tor 

“Foiget the president's speech 
for a moment. What did you think 
of the Democratic reply?" 

“What reply?” 

“They put on their own reply to 
the president's State of the Union 
speech." 

“I didn’t hear it I was watching 
‘Dynasty.’ " 

“Don't tell me you'd rather 
watch 'Dynasty' than hear the 
Democrats defend their party." 

She said in disbelief. “Now 
you're putting me on." 


By Peter Masley 

Washington Past Service 

B ALTIMORE — Thomas L Clancy Jr., 
37, who uses the sobriquet “Tom 
Clancy," started writing "The Hunt for Red 
October" in July. 1982 “from the beginning, 
not knowing how it was going to end. It really 
was a lot more fun doing that way. If you plan 
things ahead of lime you lose spont aneit y.^ 
He created a story based on the attempted 
defection to Sweden in 1975 of a Soviet 
destroyer crew (1HT, Feb. 8). From that 
event, and a few others, Clancy crafted a fast- 
paced, strongly plotted and technically scud 
account of a half-Lithuanian “sub (driver" 
defecting to the West with the Red October, 
the Soviet Union’s newest, stealthiest and 
most powerful nuclear missile submarine. 

“I knew 1 could look up the facts, Clancy 
says. “What 1 didn’t know was what kind of 
people go to sea in ships that are designed to 
sink." He found out by interviewing subman- 
ners and technical experts. 

Since publication by the Naval Institute 
Press in Annapolis last October, “The Hunt 
for Red October" has had four press runs and 
has hit the best-seller lists. The Naval Insti- 
tute Press is preparing a fifth edition of 
25,000 copies. , , 

Because “Red October" has sold 45,000 
copies, publishing experts call it a stunning 
success. (Most first novels by unknown writ- 
ers sell 3,500 to 5,000 copies.) Considering 
the additional barriers Oancy faced — no 
literary agent, and a nonfiction publisher that 
had never before produced a novel and 
lacked the sales and distribution machinery 
of the New York houses — “Red October' 
also could be called a breakthrough. 

Word of mouth and more than a dozen 
reviews, some enthusiastic, propelled sales. 
Paperback rights went to Berkley Publishing 
Group for $49,500 and United Kingdom 
rights wen l for around SI 5.000. The Naval 
Institute Press has sold foreign language 
rights for Dutch, West German, Japanese 
and South American editions. 

“We don’t have any pretensions that this is 
great literature." says Naval Institute Press 
marketing director Jim Sutton. “It is just a 
hell of a good read." 

Clancy works as an insurance broker in 
Owings. Maryland. “When did you last have 
a policy with us?" he asks a caller. “What is 
your name? How old are you?" 

Oancy and his wife, Wanda, who operate 
the agency, have 1,000 clients in Southern 
Maryland. 

“When you're your own boss," Clancy 
says, “you can budget your time.” If writing 
weren’t fun, Oancy says. “I wouldn’t do iL I 
don’t need the money. This business supports 
me rather well." 

Among Clancy's insurance clients are peo- 
ple he cans “nucs” —pronounced “nukes" — 



M Mrftanret/Tha W nri B m wn Prat 

Oancy: “I handle technology wefl.” 

former Navy nuclear engineers who operate 
the Baltimore Gas & Electric Co.’s Calvert 
Cliffs Nuclear Power Station on Chesapeake 
Bay, 20 miles (32 kilometers) south of his 
insurance agency. Clancy mined them for 
technical information about the nuclear and 
naval aspects of “Red October." 

Oancy is well read in his genre of thriller 
novels. He says Frederick Forsyth “is, at his 
best, probably the best in the business. Rich- 
ard Cox, he hasn’t done much work but what 
I’ve seen I really like. Jack Higgins, at his 
best, he's awfully, awfully good. A. J. Quin- 
neil [a pseudonym], the new guy, nobody 
even knows who be is. There's a number of 
good writers out there; fortunately or unfor- 
tunately. most of them are Brits and I figured 
it's about time an American did it." 

The central character and hero of “The 
Hunt for Red October" is CIA analyst and 
historian Jack Ryan. Ryan, a clean-cut all- 
American, “started to take form in the late 


1970s," Clancy says. “In most any thriller 
fiction, the hero is an unmarried guy in his 
30s who likes to drink and smoke and run 
around. What's wrong with a hero who’s 
married, loves his wife and plays with his 
kids? That’s what most people" are. - ’ says 
Oancy. 

Like Clancy, Ryan was bom in Baltimore, 
but here creator and creates diverge. 

Clancy, who got an English degree at Loy- 
ola College in Baltimore, had returned to his 
alma mater to give a lecture. Ryan, Oancy 
explains, “got a degree at Boston College in 
economics and went into the Marine Corps, 
was injured and retired on a medical dis- 
charge. Along the way he was accredited as a 
CPA, wem to work for a stock brokerage 
firm, made hims elf a lot of money, married a 
doctor, an eyecutter — Kathy "Ryan is an 
ophthalmic surgeon — and then he decided 
he was just going to leave the brokerage 
business and got hims elf a doctorate in histo- 
ry and through a circuitous route he found 
himself being invited to join the CLA." 

There is no room, in Jack Ryan's world, for 
doubters and second guessers. Ryan himself 
is a self-assured man of mental and physical 
action. Jack Ryan’s activist CLA, in contrast 
with portrayals by some other espionage writ- 
ers, is not immobilized by fear of Soviet 
moles. It's the reverse; Ryan's CIA runs the 
United States’s mole in the Kremlin. 

“When America deals with other parts of 
the world," Clancy says, “we should concern 
ourselves less with what we’re against as op- 
posed to what we’re for. Too often, conserva- 
tives, you always hear what they're against 
and there’s a reverse side to that.' We are for 
freedom, we are for justice, and the reason 
that we and the Communists can’t get along 
is that they are not for freedom and they are 
not for justice. They are the negative guvs and' 
we are not." 

For his next work. Clancy has teamed up 
with a naval analyst. Larry Bond, to write a 
book tentatively called “Sunset," 

“It has a naval subject matter and its quite 
a bit more complicated than ‘Red October.' " 
Clancy says. His plans after “Sunset" call for 
three more Jack Ryan thrillers. The first of 
them is called “Patriot Games." Clancy says, 
and deals with terrorism and the period of 
Ryan's life that preceded the events in “Red 
October." Oancy may have been an untested 
novelist when he wrote “Red October." but 
he still had the good sense to lav the ground- 
work for a sequel 

“I'm not that good a writer." he says. 
“Maybe I will be some day but that day is not 
yet in sight. I do a good action scene. I handle 
technology weBL I like to thmk that 1 do a fair 
— fairer — job of representing the kind of 
people we have in the Navy, portraying them 
the way they really are. Beyond that I’ll uy to 
listen to my critics and improve what needs 
improving." 


In the whitest of white weddings, 
an American couple has b«n mar- 
ried at the South Pole. The U. b. 
Operation Deep 

program announced a Ne» Zea- 
land Wednesday that Randall 


“I do" in an outdoor ceremony at 
the United States's Ajaundsen- 
Scott polar station on Monday at 
minus 45 centigrade t nun us 49 
Fahrenheit). Officials believe itwas 
the first wedding at the pole. They 
met while working as heavy equip- 
ment operators at the U S base at 

McMurdo sound 1.550 miles 
(about 2,500 kilometers) from tne 
pole. 

□ 

Composer Yiannis Xenakises 
“Polvtope," a spectacular muac 
and laser-beam show that was to 
open Athens's six months as cultur- 
al capital of the European Commu- 
nity. has been canceled, the Greek 
culture ministry announced 
Wednesday. The Paris-based 
Greek composer had proposed a 
giant 60-minute spectacle that 
could be seen and heard all over 
Athens, with fireworks, laser beams 
and electronic music. Last month. 
Xenakis went to Athens to seek the 
Greek armed forces’ cooperation in 
providing helicopters and warships 
to take pan in the show. He said 
the multi-media sound and light 
show, culminating with the release 
of hundreds of carrier pigeons, 
would be “a festival of peace.” But 
the plan ran into vociferous opposi- 
tion from archaeologists who 
feared the city's ancient monu- 
ments could be damaged by the 
“Polytope." Xenakis has success- 
fully’ staged "pqlytopes" elsewhere 
in Greece and in France, Canada 
and Iran. . . . The American 
composer Richard Adler, known 
for his Broadway musicals “The 
Pajama Game" and “Damn Yan- 
kees," has written a symphonic 
work in honor of the Statue of 
Liberty’s 100th birthday in 1986, 
“The Lady Remembers,” it was an- 
nounced Tuesday by the Statue of 
Liberty-Ellis Island Foundation. 
The suite will previewed March 9 at 
Salt Lake Gty by the Mormon 
Tabernade Choir and receive its 
world premiere at Lincoln Center 
in New York on April 1 1. 

□ 

Five of the greatest chefs of 
France flew to New York to create 
the ultimate meal in honor of 


Pienc Franey, one of the men who 
popularized French cooking in the 
United States. But the benefit din- 
ner organized to raise S 300.000 for 
the March of Dimes came close to - 
culinary disaster when pastry chef 
Gaston Lendtne's plane — and his 
dessert — was delayed by bad 
weather for 14 hours. It was not 
until the 500 paying guests had 
sampled the sweetbreads with truf- 
fles, the frog’s legs soup and the 
lobster dumplings with zoedrini 
blossoms that Lendtxtfs plane 
landed from Paris. Two station 
wagons whisked the chef and Ms 
confection from the airport to the.-, 
diners as they sampled lamb mtfr 
carrot, spinach and mushroom pu- 
ree. Lendtre arrived just in time to 
serve an original creation called 
“Pleasure," fea Luring Grand Mar- 
nier custard and chocolate mousse, 
Franey is the author of the syndi- . . 
caied New York Tunes newspaper 
column “The 60- Minute Gourmet’’ ' 
and two cookbooks with the same 
name. The four main dishes woe 
created by Paid Bocnse, Roger 
Vergfe, Alain Chapel and Jacques 
Maxinrin, who ail run three-star 
restaurants. 

□ 

A mockup of architect L M. • . 
Pefs plans for a glass pyramid and 
new entrance to the Louvre was - : 
unveiled Tuesday in Paris. The As- . " 
sedation for the Renewal of t* 
Louvre, a recently formed grouty 
headed by Mkbel Gay, culture 
minister under former Presided* ._ 
Valery Giscard d’Estaing, r *£" _ 
Pei's pyramid “an assault on the' 
building and the site ” Pei’s design, 
Guy claims, will “turn the Louvre '■ 
away from its vocation as a muse-, 
urn" and make it into a “commer- 
cial complex and cultural drugstore - 
that looks like an airport." 

Peter King, the Nassau County, 
comptroller, was elected Tuesday - 
as grand marshal of this year’s St 
Patrick's Day Parade in New York . 
City, ending the bid of Dorothy . 
Hayden Cudahy to become the first _ 
female grand marshal in the 224- 
year histonr of the dty parade, at 
least for this year. Earlier, Frank 
Beirae, chairman of the parade 
committee, ruled that a woman ; 
could not be grand marshal thK>.-; 
year, although he held out the pas~*: v 
ability that the rules could be . 
changed next year to permit a . 
woman to lead the march. 


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