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;;;• JvTake Stro 

SSiOf Khmei 

••■i. ^ 1 By William Branigin 

:r .- Waskm&oa P<xtt Service 

"“v BANGKOK — Vietnamese 
'-forces virtually overran the last ma- 
- tCf 1 ^ jor guerrilla stronghold in western 
; - :* V".* / '‘^Xambodia on Thursday, according 
■' ^‘.^i .-toThai military and Western relief 

cr^t, The tank -ted Vietnamese ad- 

‘-'-i=i^.^yvahce into the Phnom Malai area 
£ -Mqng' bdd by Communist Khmer 
'* Rouge guerrillas sent the last of the 
i , Z rones nearly 40,000 civilians flee- 
, >.ing across the border into That- 
;, 7 - •-t ; i^iaad, the officials said . 

!' - 2 ~-: They said the Cfaincse-backed 

. ! .^Khmer Rouge, considered sane of 

the toughest guerrilla fighters in the 
' - ^-.Syorid, were forced to cede their 

Vu^. 1 'camps under intense artillery bar* 
■’ -ir stages and break up into smaller 
y:!^- ^'■groaps. Some of the guerrillas evi- 
■* ‘■'c.. - ."‘sleijtfy gave up their weapons and 
/^joined the refugees who fled to two 
-• ■ -evacuation sites in Thailand, wit- 

"Z.: : -Msaraisaid. 

~ * Because *of the Vietnamese of- 

. . - .T'.rr- fensive, relief officials said, almost 
‘'■•--.dl of the 250,000 Cambodian civil- 
" -~ ians who had been living in settle- 
Z meats on the Cambodian ride of 
£ r , lire border when the fighting began 
Sh November are now in makeshift 

_ . ~ '*■ ramps hi T hailand 

.. " - ~ i 'In the Phnom Malai area, “all of 
V ,‘~ r tbe camps are now occupied. by the 
: : r Vietnamese," an international re- 


* -- attacking the area are now within 
; - - ' hundreds of carters bf rifce Thai bor- 

-rier, the official said. 

■ A Western military attache said 

- - the "Phnom Malai area was “baa- 

• r~;cally overran." The Vietnamese 

-drive is thelaggest dry-season of- 

- -Vfenrive in six years of fighting 

against Cambodian resistance 
-^r^raups. 

_ _ The commander of Thailand’s 

... —mtem. border task fence, Major 


General Sant Sriphen, said Thnrs- 
daythat about 20JOOO Vietnamese 
soldiery from four divisions and 20 
Soviet-supplied T-54 tanks werein- 
vdved in the operation. He said 
these forces were divided between 
the two prongs of a pincer move- 
meat attacking from the east and 
south. 

Casualties in the fighting were 
not known. The International 
Committee of the Red Cross re- 
ported having treated 23 evacnees 
m the past two days, of whom only 
right were suffering from war 
wounds. However, the Khmer 
Rouge usually insists on treating its 
casualties itself. 

Relief officials said about 15,000 
Cambodians bad gathered at an 
evacuation site near the Thai bor- 
der village of Ban Nong Pm just 
across the border from the de facto 
Khmer Rouge capital of Pfaum 
Thmey, a model guerrilla -village 
regularly used to host resistance 
ceremonies. 

Nearly 25,000 more Cambodians 
have fled across the border about 
sevem miles (11 kilometers) sooth at 
Kbao Din in the past few days, the 

nfljriakatM 

The Vietnamese drive appears to 
have dealt a severe psychological 
blow to the Cambodian resistance 
in general and the Khmer Rome in 
particular by erasing the last “liber- 
ated ztme” of gnerrmas battling the 
Vietnamese occupation of Cambo- 
dia. . - .... 

Only Saturday, the leader of a 
three-party resistance coalition. 


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By Leslie H Gelb American embassies Tuesday in re- 
Ve* York Times San ce gionse to reports that the United 




:Mftesaire 


IW Norodom Sihanouk, wd- aud State Department offidals say 

corned four ambassadors to his they aietiymg to form a policy to Canada ^ icdand. withouthm? 
United Narions-recognized gov- deal vnth what they say seems to be in- to id them about the plans. 
■mat * to receive a sprealing avenaon to almost any At the same time, the officials 
thou credential Khnw Rouge kind of involvement with nudear the administration would con- 
tete expressed craMnice that wra^anwogtiteWoteni allies, ^uc to be tough in. demanding 
^ forihem “We are conoemed ; about an un. that allies not distance themsebts 

^ thm the V^nam^e were being ravdrng here, a h^i athnnustra- from American and allied nudear 
bdd off and suffering heavy casuaf non official said Wednesday. operations. Tins stance was refiect- 
. z- , To deal with it, the officials said, pd in the adganistra tiofTs ihiwiutn 

While the^ Vietnamese offensive they are putting together a policy to reassess economic and other ties to 
has di splaced m e resistance groups, reassure die allies about their par- New Zealand in response to that 
it has a pparcxni yjeft them largely tidpation in nudear issues and at country's unwillingness to allow 
mtect, however. Tnai officials and the same time to be tough in bold- American nudear-powered or nu- 
resistancelCTdmrcmain confident mg them to existing conmutmeDts dear-armed shins to visit its ports, 
that the resistance- wiD -be able to covering nudear operations and 
r*»h\ lostgroiugl wfea the moo- deployments. ■ 


But other nudear experts, such Endangers 

as John Stembrunner. director oT O 

foreign policy studies at the Brook- . A rri ~n 

in^ Institution, ar^oe that the ad- /% IflffiS 


ministration’s potiaes are as much 
die cause as the potential cure of 7 

the phenomenon, which some offi- a A-. amrma 

ads called a -nudear alla&r.” 

“The base reason for the allergy continued UA research on a space- 
is that people we protect fear that based defense system would “cer- 
the Reagan administration does uinly toTpedo" anns control ne«>- 
not sufficiently af^redate the dan- ^tiona 


gers of nudear weapons,' 1 


Henry K&ntn * 

' Nor York Times Service 

j*- -.■••• 

ATHENS— Prune Minister An- 
;t ^ : dreas Papandreoo has saidthai ihc 
^^- ^*vcry bad chmate” between Greece 
and the United States could be 
J^neatly improved if the United 
“Zj&ates persuaded ^Tbritey to meet 
^5Greefc demands. 
cke -“For us there is really no other 
mechanism but that," Mr. Papao- 
^- dreou said in an interview last 
^-weekend. “We are not in a positipn 
ri; todoiL” •; 

'^2 Mr. Papandrara said U.S. infiii- 
j-^- .ence was needed on two issues — a 
-at-** solution for the Cyprus problem 
^ r-and the removal of what Greece 
amaders a Turkish threat to the 
■r« -.'Greek islands in the Aegean. 

1- " The tehriOT ariang from these 
j-^ssues has caused Greece to refuse 
-^almost all participation in the mfli- 
:<r : uuy activines of me Narh Atfantic 
***•"' Treaty Oigamzathm, 10 whidi both . 
^ ✓cooniries belong. 

So far this year. Athens has^said 
^^^that it will not participate in 
.-•/NATO m an e u vers and has wiih- 
J^>drawn instruettws and students 
^ 5 from rite NATO Defense College in 
Rome. 

- -... -In the Sodafist prime minister’s 
* view, “tins is a ccarvictmn that car- 
7 - " lies through whether you’re on the" 
. right, left or carter." he srid, add* 
t .^ing.4h«.U» Turkish “thread is en- 
;4 V ;hmiced by U A “favoritism" to An- 
. . ; kara. It is a iesnh, berakh of a U.S. " 


SUlXy mg loero 10 eusung conmnuncms dar-arnttd ships to visit its ports. 

v . mat theresista^^JK awe to covering. ^ nudear operations and. . Pentagon and State Department 
’t,-.. 1 depk^meols- *; • officials generally attributed the 

Jy lO " Tlwofrtiaa^swi iheywtare vy- anti -ftoclearsenli idem \6 a‘coml»- 

J . ;. J • ^ w me yiet n ani es e ) n g to reassure the allies that they nation of factors: enrirombenta]- 

. .. • '■ wraiki have full knowkdgc of jiu- isis who fear all nuclear power. 

TfeVirtiiaiDese military has in- clear dedrioasaffecting:hrirccun- people who think their countries 
dicated lhai dus time it intends to tries and would be involved in cm have American military protec- 
remain in place along the Thai- those decisions. tion and escape the nuclear conse- 


remain. in place along the Thai- 
Gambodian ■' border to prevent 
guerrilla infiltration. 


This was embodied, administra- quences, and promptings from the 
tion officials said, in a telegram to Soviet Union. 



the administration bad coutingen- to construct such weapons in outer 
cy plans to deplty nudear depth he said. ^If the plans and 




?”S » hi Canada, ledand and program are formed and inq>le- 
Bennuna. Based on previous reve- njented. I have no doubt the negoti- 
larions and news accounts m these arions wfl] blow up.” 
places, it was also reported Uat Discussing a possible chemical 
those govonn^ts said they had l^bradian said 

no knowledge of the plans. that a recent speech by Kenneth L. 

Officials said Wednesday that Adelman, director of t£e. U^. 
this guidance was seat to US. cm- Arms Control and Disarmament 
basses: Agency, exhibited a “tough, chal- 

“As we have publicly and repeat- JogWR fine ^ am in no way 
edly stated, ui ^nunoitpo- hdp the n^otiations." 
licy on the deployment of nudear Mr. Adelman addressed the Ge- 


weapons overseas remains folly in neva conference Tuesday and 
accord with existing bilateral urged the Soviet Union to “engage 
agreements and with the derision in serious negotiati o ns on eveiyde- 


• ;V’ Aria played in the past by pre- 
vrewdutiaaaiy Iran. 

- .“Tbere is no question that this is 
the priority, a voy high-priarity " 
rli^ - Mr. Papandreou said, referring to 
. : tapes with PehtagoriZ officials who 
. visited Athens. *^We don’t have any 
^-^o^ectktd to thai,. except that Tpr- 
is considered^ ^a threat”. 

He ss&d that Greece wasfi^himg 
•’ a conthnring battle against admih- 
. ^istration atiempts to increase the 
’i' gristing rarin nf 7-tO-10 ni Ameri- 
... '.can arms aid to Greece and Tbrkey 
’ in Turkey's favor. - 
■■■’. ..“Thank God ftw the C^eek lob* 
i by!” be ?aid in acknowkdgiii^ con- 
sesaraml actions to muinmm the 
•ratio. ' 

j.k '. Mr. P apandre ou said.ihe Greek 
■ji'refusal to jran in NATO exercises 
stemmed from a view that the affi- 
ance aefyp tffd the Tur kish view on 
rights m & Aegpan Sea in assign- 
y,\ing military responsibilities and 
* plaunmg maneuvers. 

.. AsarimipRfflUse,theprimeniin- 

. .v‘ said he would propose to the 
'•“V tdKaryy tfwit it suspend all maneu- 
^ /'vers in, the A^san. In that case, be 
,j '" said, Greece is ready to resume 
partidpatioir in maneuvers any- 
wtere eise. .. 1 . - . 

Mr. Papandreou listed four is- 
:Sm of tfisewd in the Aegean. The 
ri'mbsi irnpomnU he Said, was the: 

(Gxrtmped onPbgei, CoL 6) 

T- _■ .1. ■ . 

• '* :*-T : :• *. •;.. 


Th» Aaodotrd Pr«ss 

An estimated 200,000 took part in a rally on Dresden’s Theaferplatz on Wednesday, the 
40th anniv ersary of tite fndwmbing of the city by the British and American air forces. 

Dresden Reopens Its Opera House 

Gala First Night Coincides With RaidAimiversary 

By David Stevens **y. Warsaw, Rotterdam, Hiroshima, Nagasaki 

imemadonai Herald Tribune and the Nazi conomiratioa camps, the East Ger- 

DRESDEN -This dty has festively opened its man eader stressed this ^tiiemes of peace and the 
reSTSemper opera house, 40 yeara to Ae day {*** f e , uu ^f 

Sto* American aSdBritisb bombers destroyed a J ? 4 *"• ^ “ 

major part of this metropolis, famous for its art pealed for 15 minutes in mourning. 

Mjme^ilsarcliiiecture and its long and rich 

HcmSer, the East German leader, head- ^ilatives from ithe riti«i of Coventry, Rpttadamj 

to of primmmt persons m poBrical ai,d Ss‘^t c ^^^ r ° d2W m Potold ^ 
artistic fife who marked the day Wednesday with Ostrava, CroAoslovalusL 
conmamoratiocts of the air raidsof Feb. 13 aid 14, Among those from the muncal worid were 

1945 and attended a gala performance in the Wolfgang Waguer.grandson of the OTmposerand 

evenin^S Karl Maria ron wSer-s “Der Fra> d ^ or fo ^J^.^ u f J 
fhflhi " an ooera that parti cular significance nHHn ’ former director of the Pans opera, Hans- 
1031 ^ Jfirgen von Weber, a descendant of the composer 

In the morning there was an official ceremony at Per Froschutz; and several singers pronunenx 

L iJtil brnltby the IM 

then£ of ^baroque Frauenkirefae. wfaichhas P®’ « 811 

been lrft in its devastated condition as a reminder, strucuon and artistic rebirth of Dresden. 

Mr. Honeeker spoke in the afternoon from the The aty s continuous operatic history goes back 

steps of the opera house to a crowd that over- nxme than three centuries when the Saxon court 
/lowed the Tbeaieiplatz, the square aidosed by theater was an important center of Baroque opera, 
the baroque Zwinger complex, the ruins of the and Heinrich Schflc was the first in a long line of 
former royal palace, and the rebuflt Hofldrche. Dresden’s muse directors. Another was Weber, 
Linking the name of Dresden to those of Coven- (Continued on Page 2, CoL 1) 


taken by the NATO heads of gov- mem" of the U.SL draft proposal 
eminent in 1957 in Paris, in which for a chemical weapons ban. 
it was agreed that ‘deployment of ^ Washington, the State Do- 
these stocks and missil e s , and ar- partment, reacting to a newspaper 
is for to use. wiB ac- ^pon, said Thursday that there 
■ t be deeded m coofonmiy were no plans for a meeting be- 
with NATO defense plans and m tween Mr. Sbnitz and Mr. Gxonry- 
agreement with tbe states directly ^ ^ Vienna on May 15. The 
concerned.’ " Washington Post, quoting adminis- 


A bj gb administration official tratirat officials, had said the two 
said, “Tins was meant to reassure officials might meet on the occa- 
the governments that- we did not sion of the 30th anniversaiy of the 
have covert plans on nudear weap- Austrian State Treaty, 
ons that concern them directly that a State Department spokesman 

ride roughshod over agreed and s^d tbe level of U.S. participation 


known plans." 

The report Tuesday also stated 
that adminis tration officials con- 
firmed contingency plans to deploy 
the nudear depth charges in Puerto 


at the ceremony was still under 
cnn-ciriwa rinn- 

■ Research Partners Sought 

Joseph FUchen of the Imemation- 


Rico, a commonwealth under ^ Herald Tribune reported from 

American protection, which would Brussels: 

violate a protocol agned ^ by the ^ Bm „„ administrato 

rrar^njMhfi 3 Pmhibitioa of { °okmg ^ * nKchanian” for Eu- 
1967 Tnaty for the ftotabidon ot countries to participate in 

Nuclear Weapons m Latm Amen- ^ ^ ^ 

State and Defense Department senior U A trials said 

^ ZrtTS While echoing Defense Secretary 

Wednesday on the report 00 the w Weinberger’s state- 


&M232JS 

er comments on such nuclear mat- effort to explore defensive missile 


ler *\ ... . .. . technology, the U£. officials indi- 

Mean while, the Washington- r yifd timt the poDcy ramifications 
based Institute for PbBcy Studies ^ -pne^ details still must be 

issued a report Wednesday that ^ 0 , 1 ^ out in Washington, 
stated that contingency plans ear- “European involvement is highly 
marked nudear weapons for the desirable, but there are impedJ- 
Azores Islands of Portugal in the ^ an q fffcjfli, citing the 

Atlantic, the PhiBppmes. Spam sensitivity of technology 10 be de- 
and the Bnbsh island of Diego vdoped and Ac prohibition in tbe 
Garcia in the Indian Ocean. anti- ballistic missile treaty against 

Administration officials transferring US. components of 
Wednesday confirmed these ar- missile-defense weapons to alSe& 
rangements as welL It could not be None of tbe officials could be 
learned whether these governments identified under tbe ground rules 
had been told of the mans. set for to meeting with reporters. 


Jordan and PLO 
Said to Agree on 
Joint Negotiators 


border about Two KImier Rouge guerrillas carry a Cambottinn dvfiian wounded by Vietnamese shelling near Aranyajprathet, Thailand 
eters) sooth at _ 

few days, tbe 

^^3 U.S. Officials Searching for Antidote Soviet Official 
§££ ^ Allies Develop 'Nuclear Allergy’ Says Research 


Horten 

TUNIS — Jordan and the Pales- 
tine Liberation Organization have 
agreed to send a joint negotiating 
team to a future international 
peace conference on the Middle 
East, Prime Minister Ahmad Obei- 
dat of Jordan said Thursday. 

His statement confirmed reports 
from Palestinian sou r ces that under 
a PLO- Jordanian formula worked 
out Monday with King Hussein of 
Jordan in Amman, Yasser Arafat, 
the PLO leader, had dropped a de- 
mand to send an independent team 
10 any peace talks. 

Mr. Obeidal, whose comments 
were reported by the official Tuni- 
sian press agency, TAP, spoke on 
arrival from Algiers at the bead of a 
minis terial team to brief T unisian 

officials on the accord. 

The primp, minis ter said that the 
agreement envisaged the establish- 
ment of an “Arab confederation" 
as soon as conditions allowed, but 
he did not elaborate. 

PLO sources said that the accord 
envisaged less than a fully indepen- 
dent state for Pales tinians living in 

territories occupied by Israd &nce 
1967, a long-term demand of the 

Palestinian group. 

A source said the text called only 
for “sdf-detennination within dte 
framework of a Jordanian-Pales- 
tmian confederation." 

The statement on the pact indi : 
cated that the PLO had gone some 
way toward meeting a major condi- 
tion set by the United States for 
Middle East peace talks that in- 
cludes Israel 

Under President Ronald Rea- 
gan's peace plan of September 
1982, the Palestinians were to be 
involved as part of a Jordanian 
delegation. 


Mr. Obeidal did not refer 10 Pal- 
estinian s tatehood, but said tbe ac- 
cord covered the Palestinians’ right 
to self-detennmation “within the 
framework of the harmonious and 
privileged relations between tbe 
Jordanian mid Palestinian peo- 
ples.” 

His arrival in Tunis coincided 
with the first criticism of the accord 
from Mr. Arafat's hard-line col- 
leagues in the PLO leadership. 

in separate statements, Farouk 
Kaddomm, the PUTs equivalent 
of foreign minis ter, and Salah Khat- 
laf , thft second-ranking in 

Mr. Arafat’s d-Fatah faction, in- 
sisted that the PLO set up its own 
independent state and have the sole 
right to represent Palestinians at 
peace talks. 

The statements were issued after 
Mr. Arafat left Ms Tunis headquar- 
ters on Thursday for Romania, 
which often has saved as a channel 
of communication between the Ar- 
abs and IsraeL 

Mr. Arafat has been under pres- 
sure to abandon tire PLO's demand 
to represent the Palestinians, as 
both Israel and the United States 
refuse to deal officially with the 
organization. 

However, hard-linen have al- 
ways insisted that any dilution of 
the PLO’s right to represent the 
Palestinians would amount to Ii- 

^Mr .^^jeidat^d 7 tiie > PLO-Jor- 
danian accord called for an inter- 
national conference chi the Middle 
East attended by all parties to the 
conflict and the five permanent 
members of tbe UN Security Coun- 
cil 

“Tbe PLO will participate in this 
conference in the framework of a 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 4) 


“If the Americans press us to 


Stembrunner said. “Thus, they are negotiate and go ahead with re- 
increasingly reluctant to partici- elaboration on the so- 

pate in American military opera- wars, h would certainly 

lions.” torpedo Lhe negotiations,” said 

Nudear weapons, as present and Viktor L Isradian, the chief Soviet 
past administration offidals ac- delegate to the 40-nation Geneva 
knowledge, play a central rote in disarmament .conference. 

American m ditary planning For rfe- . Mr. Jsraefian also said that there 
terrence and for defense should de- “won’t be any chemical weapons 
lerrence fail . agreement in 1985 - "* if the United 

if -the'anU-nudenr^attiuKk waSy : States stuck 10 * draft treaty ’ pro- 
allowed to deveio£ unCI American posed in April by Vies President 
nuclear weapons were removed George Bush, 
from some countries or could not He said that the U.S. proposal 
be sent therein a crisis, tbe heart of which stressed the importance of 
US. military capadty would be re- verifying compliance, “broadened 
duced. the gap” in positions. 

“Unless we hold our allies’ feet . D^usnng the Reagan’s admin- 
to the fire over ship visits and nu- ***“»» Strategic Defense Initta- 
dear deployments, one will run tive. which is often called stars war 
away and then the next," a senior lsrato aud that Secretory of 
administration official said. “We State George P. Shuite and Foreign 
will not be put in a position where Mmister Andrei A. Gromyko had 
they want our protection but with- «reed in January that one goal of 
out the necessary weapons in place ^ upcoming talks would be to 
to do the job." avoid M *** in space. 

On Tuesday, it wu reported that tia to" SlSSKh 



Agra fnm-ftVM 

Jeremy Levin, a kidnapped American joinnalist, shown 
Thursday morning in a Syrian intelligence office in Baal- 
bek, Lebanon, after die end of 11 months of ca p ti vity . On 
die wad is a photo of President Hafez al-Assad of Syria. 

U.S. Reporter, Captured 
In Lebanon, Is Free 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — Jeremy 
Levin, a reporter who was one of 
five Americans held by abductors 
in Lebanon, was freed Thursday 
after 1 1 months in captivity and 
was being cared for in Damascus, 
U.S. and Syrian authorities said. 

Ambassador Rafic Jougati of 
Syria said Ms government had se- 
cured Mr. Levm’s release and that 
be had been examined at a medical 
center in the Syrian capita] and 
found to be in good heal th . 

There woe conflicting versions 
on how Mr. Levin gained Ms free- 
dom. Agence France- Pr esse quoted 
Mir. Levin as saying that he had 
escaped. 

“He looks beautiful” his wife, 
LndDe, said in Washington after 
sbe was shown a sews photograph 
of Mr. Levin, 51, with a beard and 
rumpled hair. 

Mr. Levin, the Beirut bureau 
chief for Cable News Network, dis- 
appeared March 7. 


INSIDE 


■ Obesity is a lriDing disease 

and should be treated like other 
health risks, a US. pand has 
reprated. Page 2. 

■ A major branch of Conserva- 

tive Judaism has voted to admit 
women rabbis. Page 5L 

WEEKEND 

■ Alban Bog, who was bom 

200 years ago, has taken Ms 
place in musical history, but re- 
searchers are still mining secrets 
in his work. Page 7. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ France's gross domestic 
product expanded at 0.7 per- 
cent in the last quarter. Page 1L 


The White House spokesman, 
Larry Speakes, said in Santa Bar- 
bara, Cafifomia, whore President 
Ronald Reagan is vacationing, that 
the U.SL Embassy in Damascus had 
bran informed by the Syrian gov- 
ernment that Mr. Levin “is m Syri- 
an hands and is safe in Damascus." 

“We are certainly pleased that he 
has been released,” Mr. Speakes 
said. 

He said there was no word about 
the other four Americans who have 
disappeared or been kidnapped in 
the Moslem sector of Beirut in the 
last year. 

Those still nesting are W illiam 
Buckley, a U.S. Embassy political 
officer who was kidnapped last 
March 16; the Reverend Benjamin 
Weir, a Presbyterian minister, who 
was kidnapped May 8; Peter KD- 
burn, a librarian at the American 
University of Beirut, who disap- 
peared Dec. 3; and the Reverend 
Lawrence Jenco, a Roman Catholic 
priest and head of the Catholic Re-, 
lief Sendees Office in Beirut, who 
was kidnapped Jan. 8. 

The Beaut office of' the French 
news agency, Agence France- 
Presse, said an AFP correspondent 
in Baalbek had seen Mr. Levin, and 
that he appeared to be in good 
health, but was tired. 

Pictures of Mr. Levin ^ which AFP 
said were taken Thursday mnmmg 
in a Syrian intelligence office in 
Baalbek, showed him looking tired, 
with Ms hair in disarray. 

AFP quoted Mr. Levin as saying 
he was abducted by a singlr gun- 
man but he could not identify who 
held him. y 

“I fled toward midnight from the 
two-story villa where I was being 
bdd," he was quoted as sayingTji 
walked fra two hoars before hear- 
ing a dog and human voices. 

“Z thought my kidnappers were 
at my heels so I hid under a truck,” 
he said. “But when I saw it was 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 4) 


- - 









Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1985 


** 


More Care Urged for the Obese 

Panel Finds Greater Risks for Those Who Are Overweight 


By Jane E Brody 

New York Times Ser.ice 

BETHESDA, Maryland — Obe- 
sity is a killing disease that should 
receive the same medical attention 
as high blood pressure, smoking 
and other factors that cause serious 
illness and premature death, a fed- 
eral panel has concluded. 

The panel defined obesity as be- 
ing 20 percent above the desirable 
weight set by life insurance tables. 

Any level of obesity increases 
health risks, the panel said 


Wednesday, but it singled out the 
20 - percent level as the point at 


which doctors should treat an oth- 
erwise healthy adult. 

For those who have other health 
problems, such as diabetes or high 
blood pressure, or a family history 
of such problems, treatment of 
overweight should be started even 
sooner, the panel said. 

The 14-member panel, com- 
posed of health officials from a 


related to appearance than to 
health." 

Dr. Hirsch. an obesity researcher 
at the Rockefeller University in. 
New York, said at a news confer- 
ence, “We have found that there 
are multiple biological hazards at 
what are surprisingly low levels of 
obesity" Even at 5 to 10 pounds 
(about two to four kilograms) 
above desirable weight, Dr. Hirsch 
said, there were risks to health. 

The panel arrived at its consen- 
sus after listening to often-conflict- 
ing presentations by experts in the 
field. The panel concluded from 
these presentations that insuffi- 
cient research attention had been 
paid to obesity as a risk to mental 
and physical health. 


seated here by researchers from the 
34-year-old Framingham Heart 
Study, a smaller degree of over-’ 
weight, 10 percent or less, can im- 
pair health. 

Among the risks from obesity 
cited by the panel were high blood 
pressure, high blood cholesterol 
adult-onset diabetes, several types 
of cancer, heart disease, gall blad- 


In defining obesity, the panel re- 
lied on the highly controversial 


1983 Metropolitan Life Insurance 
ay Table, which set higher 


variety of disciplines, was con- 
vened by the National Institutes of 


Health to try to arrive at a consen- 
sus on current knowledge about the 
dangers to health of various levels 
of obesity. 

Until now, according to the pan- 
el's chairman. Dr. Jules Hirsch, 
“there has been a great deal of 
confusion as to whether obesity is a 
biological disorder or a state more 


Company 
levels for desirable weight than the 
company’s 1959 table. This table is 
based on the weights at which 
death rates are lowest among peo- 
ple with life insurance policies. 

Using this table, an adult woman 
who is 5 feet 4 indies tall (1.62 
meters) and 20 percent overweight 
would weigh 160 pounds (7Z5 kilo- 
grams); a man who is 5 feet 10 
inches tall and 20 percent over- 
weight would weigh 192 pounds. 

However, according to dat a pre- 


mier disease, menstrual 
ties, respiratory problems and ar- 
thritis. Also cited was the 
"enormous psychological burden," 
which the panel said “may be the 
greatest adverse effect of obesity.” 

The panel was unable to deter- 
mine on the basis of existing evi- 
dence whether overweight per se, or 
just excess body fat was a health 
problem. Some data suggest that 
overweight may increase health 
risks even when it is the result of 
musde development 

Approximately 34 million Amer- 
icans weigh 20 percent or more 
above the desirable weight for their 
height the panel said. Of these, 
more than I I million are severely 
oboe. 

Despite the plethora of diets and 
weight-loss gimmicks, the panel 
said that more Americans woe 
overweight today than a generation 
ago. Particularly alarming, tbepan- 
d said, is the increasing number of 
children and adolescents who are 
overweight 


Opera House 
Is Reopened 
In Dresden 


(Contiuned from Page 1) 

who held the post from 1816 until 
his death in 1826, during which 
time he composed Der Freischutz, 
although the work had its first per- 
formance in Berlin. 

The newly reopened theater is 
being referred to as the third Sem- 
per opera house. The first was 
opened in 1841, a graceful building 
with a semicircular facade. 

This was the house in which 
Richard Wagner was music direc- 
tor and in which three of his operas 
had their first performances — 
“Rienri.” “The Flying Dutchman,” 
“TannMuser.” Both Semper and 
Wagner were banished from Saxo- 


ny for their activities during the 
ie arcnit 


1848-49 revolution; the architect 
for giving advice on how to buDd 
strong barricades, the composer for 


hisgenerally incendiary behavior. 
This theater burned down in 


1868 and Semper supervised the 
construction of its successor, which 
be modified substantially in several 
ways architecturally. 

In this budding, the long regime 
of Ernst von Schuch, music direc- 
tor from its opening until World 
War I, was distinguished by his 
championing of Richard Strauss. 
Nine of Strauss's operas had their 
world premieres in Dresden under 
Schuch, Fritz Busch in the 1920s, 
and Karl B 6 hm in the 1930s. and 
between the wars the Dresden com- 
pany was famous for the strength 
of its roster of singers. 


Reagan Will Address 
Y-E Day Session in France 


Washington Pan Service 

PARIS — The European Parliament moved Thursday to resolve 
the problem of how to marie the 40th anniversary of the end of World 
War II by voting to host a co mm emorative ceremony attended by 
President Ronald Reagan. 

U.S. and West German officials said Mr. Reagan would curtail a 
state visit to West Germany to address the European Parliament in 
Strasbourg, France, on May 8 , the date on which the Nazi surrender is 
commemorated. 

Observers said the change in plans was designed to avoid potential 
embarrassment that might have stemmed from turning the ceremo- 
nies into a solely U-S^West German event. Associating the European 
Community with the anniversary would make it easier to promote the 
theme of peace and reconciliation in Europe, they said. 

Officials at the European Parliament, a congress of elected repre- 
sentatives from the 10 European Community countries, said it had 
still not been decided whether other Western leaders would be invited 
to the May 8 session. 

Leaders of the major non-Communist industrialized nations are 
scheduled to meet in Boon from May 2 to May 4 for their annual 
economic summit meeting. Mr. Reagan was to have stayed in West 
Germany through May 8 , but will now leave May 6 . 

European Parliament officials said the suggestion to invite Mr. 
Reagan to address the assembly came from Washington. Observers 
said the address would give Mr. Reagan an opportunity to call for 
cooperation between the United States and Western Europe, as well 
as a chance to endorse the principle of European unity. 


The last performance in this the- 
ater was of Der Freischutz, on Au- 


gust 31, 1944, after which all the- 
aters in Germany were dosed as 
part of the war effort. The theater 
was one of the many landmark 
buildings to be destroyed in the 
February 1945 raid. 

In rebuilding the theater the ex- 
terior was kept substantially the 
same and the interior rebuilt in the 
spirit of Semper, rather than as an 
exact replica. The auditorium was 
reduced from 1,600 seats to about 
1,300 and its aghtlines improved. 

But painstaking efforts were 
made to restore the elaborate stuc- 
co decorations and the paintings by 
using the method of Semper s day, 
which meant the relearning of a 


number of long forgotten skills and 
crafts. 

The choice of Der Freischutz for 
opening night was a natural one, if 
not the only passible one. Not only 
was Weber musical director here, 
but this opera is an important one 
in musical history, the first real 
German Romantic opera. The per- 
formance Wednesday was official- 
ly its 1,240th in Dresden since it 
was first beard here in 1821 

It is a work impregnated with a 
specifically German atmosphere 
and a Romantic feeling, with its 
evocation of forest, hunters, 
bullets and other superstitions, 
composer might have been sur- 
prised to find that in 1985, Der 
FreischOtz could also be enlisted to 
underline the class struggle, the 
honors of war, and the virtues of 
peace. 

But in Joachim Hera's produc- 
tion something like that occurs. 
The period of the opera set just 
after the Thirty Years War makes a 
handy parallel for the post-Wodd 
War LI period that has been evoked 
so often in Dresden this week. 
Bernhard SchrOter’s fragmentary 
set cuts two ways, suggesting the 
period of the opera's setting but 
also acting as a reminder that just 


Remains of U.S. Servicemen 
Believed to Be Found in Laos 


By William Branigin 

Washington Post Service 

BANGKOK — A U.S.-Laotian 
search ream excavating the site of a 
1972 American military plane 
crash in southern Laos has found 
remains believed to be those of 


Thirteen of the original 16 crew- 
men aboard the AC-130 gunship 
have been unaccounted for since it 
crashed in rugged terrain about 24 
miles (38 kilometers) northeast of 
Pakse in southern Laos on Dec. 21, 
1971 Two crewmen parachuted to 


outside the theater are fragments of 
real building not yet rebuilt. 

In general the sets and costumes 
of this production are serenely tra- 
ditional, but the cadavers and 
wreckage of war are still in sight 
and they have come to life as Ka- 
spar and Max traffic with evil spir- 
its. In the finale the peasants rally 
in support of the Hermit's judg- 
ment, gi ving the prince no choice in 
softening his p unishmen t of Max. 

The performance was more than 
honorable, cast mainly from the 
Dresden company. Ekkehard 
Wlaschiha was particularly impres- 
sive as a demonic Kaspar, the tenor 
Klaus Kdoig sang strongly as Max 
and Theo Adam — although well- 
known in world opera centers, a 
Dresdener — made a key appear- 
ance in the brief but important role 
of the Hermit who sets everything 
straight at the end. Wolf Dieter 
Hauschild conducted a well- 
I but not especially eloquent 
romance. 

The best news is that the acous- 
tics of the reconstructed boose 
seemed marvelous, at least from the 
from of the third balcony, captur- 
ing the tidiness of this tradition- 
laden orchestra's sound yet letting 
the voices come through clearly. 

Second night honors, an Thurs- 
day, went to Strauss's “Der Rosen- 
kavalier," which had its world pre- 
miere in Samp er’s second house in 
I9II. It was (tone in a new produc- 
tion originally planned IS years 
ago for the Pans opera, by Herz 
and his designer Rudolf Heinrich, 
but never staged. Other perfor- 
mances in the first week are two 
new works by Dresden composers, 
a ballet by Udo Zhame nnann, and 
an opera by Sigfried Matthos. 



Heart Expert 
Cancels U.S. 
Visit, Returns 
To Russia 


WORLD BRIEFS 


Kabul Admits Border Posts Besieged 



NEW DELHI (AP) — The Soviet-installed regime in Afghanistan has 
conceded that three strategic military posts were under rdxi aege. It also 
accusal Pakistan of providing asastance to the guerrillas. 

Many people, including children, Isave been killed and considerable' 
rfatiMBP ransed in the Pakistan-supported attacks on the border posts of 
Barikot, Bangash and Chamkani, Afghan government radio said 
Wednesday night. 

Western diplomatic sources in New Delhi earlier sad mat Soviet 
airborne assaults on Chamkani and Barikot had failed to free the Afghan 
troops The Chamkani siege reportedly began nearly two months ago. 
Soviet and Afghan military reinforcements were rushed last , wed; fo 
Chamkani and Bangash, in Paktya province, and Kunar province’s 
Barikot, the sources quoted reports from Kabul as saying. 


Hit Asuemed taw 


Dr. Yevgeny L Cbazov, a Soviet heart specialist. 


Jordan, PLDAre Said 
To Agree on Negotiators 


(Contained from Page 1) 

joint Jordanian-Paiestinian delega- 
tion.'' the Tunisian press agency 
quoted him as saying, “that is to 
say, on an equal footing with Jor- 
dan." 

The prime minister also said the 
accord envisaged joint action to 
reach a just and peaceful solution 
to the Palestinian problem, as well 
as the liberation of Israeli-occupied 
territories. 

■ U.S. Sees "Some Progress' 


Dor Obcrdorfer of The Washing- 
Tajfl- 


ton Post reported earlier from Wt 
ington: 

Mr. Reagan said Wednesday 
that “it seems as if some progress 
has been made” in the agreement of 
King Hussein and Mr. Arafat, and 
others in the Reagan administra- 
tion were increasingly hopeful 
about the latest Middle East diplo- 
matic development. 

Mr. Reagan's comment came in 
a brief exchange with reporters as 
be boarded his helicopter for a five- 
day California vacation. Several 
hours later the White House re- 
leased a communique on Mr. Rea- 
gan's meetings M coday and Tues- 
day with tong Fahd of Saudi 
Arabia, in which the president "re- 


Mugu, California, where Mr. Rea- 
gan's plane landed, referred to the 
“framework" agreement as “a mile- 
stone” but also termed it “one step 
in a long road.” 

“Before,” said the official who 
asked not to be identified, “there 
had never been a Palestinian com- 
mitment to the peaceful resolution 
of the problem. Now there is.” 

The official avoided placing the 
acceptance directly within the 
“framework” of Resolution 242 of 
the UN Security Council which the 
administration has singled out as 
an essential foundation for Arab- 
Israeli talks. 

Diplomatic sources and press re- 
ports from the -Middle East said 
that the principle of trading territo- 
ry for peace, which is the basic 
bargain envisioned in Resolution 
242, is endorsed in the “frame- 
work” agreement, but the resolu- 
tion is not mentioned by name. 

The senior official who briefed 
the press said Lhe agreement, as he 
understands it. “implies the accep- 
tance of the major principle of Res- 
olution 242." 


The Associated Press 

CLEVELAND — A prominent 
Soviet heart specialist has cut short 
his visit to tiie United Slates to 
return home amid reports that 
President Konstantin U. Cher- 
nenko is ailing. 

Dr. Yevgeny I. Cbazov, director- 
general of the Soviet Cardiology n wr TT*L * rr 

Research Center and deputy tmnis- (xT 66 C 6 K.CI1CWS V ClO 1 IlfftSSi tO HiLi 
ter of public health, canceled a A -THENS(AP)— Greece renewed Thursday a threat to veto the entry 

of Spain and Portugal into the European Community if the 10-nati oq 
body fails to approve a large cash infusion for its poorer Mediterranean 
regi ons. . " 

“If the cost of enlargement is not met by those who benefit from it, that 
it will not happen,” said Theodores Pangaios, Greece’s deputy foreign 
minister forEC affairs. He was referring to a proposal Wednesday by 
Jacques Delon, president of the European Commission, that the planned 
Integrated Mediterranean Programs be replaced by grants and loans 
from existing EC funds. 

Greece wants more than $1 billion from 1985-91 under the programs, 
intended to mndemi 7 e agriculture and industry in the commaiuty’s 
backward regions. The Iberian nations are due to enter the EC on Jan.*!, 
1986, but there are doubts that details of their accession can be waked 
out in time. 


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speech at Case' Weston Reserve 
University to leave Cleveland on 
Wednesday, without going on 
scheduled trips to Boston and Phil- 
adelphia. 

[However, United Press Interna- 
tional reported that a VS. spokes- 
man for the participants in the tour 
said that Dr. Chazov’s departure 
had been planned in advance. “We 
knew weeks ago that he would not 
be completing this tour. It was 
planned ahead that he would not 
go to the Philadelphia or Boston 
stops. ”] 

Dr. Chazov had been in the 
United States as a 
Physicians for Social 

a 30,000- member group that 



S' . — 


tajteptod 


gaest of the Members Forgo UNESCO Refunds 

PARIS (AP) — France, the Soviet Union and other nations say 
r tiiat will give up about $8 milli on in refunds from a special UNESCO fu 

.ease the financial loss caused by the pullout of the United States, i — 
had provided one-quarter of the agency’s budget. 

edlyaboui the h^thofMn UNESCO's host country, announced Wednesday that it would 

ae^o, 73,%ho hasnot appeared m a 5 *^ 3 ] payment of S2 million. The agency lost an annual 


public since Dec. 27. 

“He is working, and if he's work- 
ing, that means he’s not dying,” Dr. 
Chazov said Saturday. 

■ Brezhnev Relative Demoted 
The son-in-law of Leonid L 
Brezhnev, the late Soviet leader, 
has been removed from his job as 
first deputy interim’ minister. Reu- 
ters reported Thursday from Mos- 
cow. 


A spokesman at the minis try said 
Yuri tho: 


lurbanov, 48, was removed 
in December and replaced by a 
senior Communist Party official, 
Vasili T mfihin, a close associate of 
Viktor V. Grishin, a member of the 
ruling Politburo. 


Greece Urges 


State Department officials said 
that it seemed significant that the 
Hussetn-Arafat agreement was 
newed his pledge” to support his reached while the Saudi king was in TT C A srf-isvnc 
1982 peace plan “in direct negotia- Washington, in time for the Arab U #k% iVLllUIIo 
' ' the parties most leader to discuss the accord with 
Mr. Reagan. 

King Fahd is the principal au- 
thor of the SeptembCT 1982 Fez 
declaration of the Arab League, 
which is the most recent unified 
position of the Arab states on the 
conflict with Israd. 


lions involving 
concerned.” 

“We're being optimistic about 
it,” Mr. Reagan said in reference to 
the Hussein- Arafat “framework for 
common action.” 

A senior Reagan administration 
official said at a briefing in Point 


U.S. Reporter, Captured 
In Lebanon, Is Free 


(OotHned from Page 1) 
Syrian soldiers. I gave myself up.” 
Mr. Levin told AFP he was kept 
in a room alone and that he knew 
nothing of the fate of the other four 
Americans. 


from Beirut. The 
caused several deaths.] 

■ Israelis, Guerrillas Gash 
Edward Walsh of The Washing- 
ton Post reported from Jerusalem: 
Israeli soldiers killed 1 1 guerril- 
las and captured nine others who 
had infiltrated south of the Awali 
River on Thursday in one of the 
largest armed clashes in southern 

lj - 1 1 „ Lebanon in more than a year, the 

“ y cL ' Israeli military command an- 
nounced. 


1 as saying 

that he had been tied to a radiator 
during his detention. He added that 
his jailers blindfolded him every 
time he was taken out of his room. 


of detention four times,” he said 
Although the Syrian ambassador 
in Washington said the reporter 
bad been freed after negotiations, a 
Syrian source in Beirut said Mr. 
Levin had escaped and found his 
way to a Syrian military post in 
eastern Lebanon. 

The Chriitiaa-nm Voice of Leb- 
anon radio in Beirut also reported 
his freedom as an escape. 

However, a man claiming to rep- 
resent Islamic Jihad, an extremist 


group, said in a telephone call to a 
Wester 


Western news agency in Beirut that 
Mr. Levin had not escaped but had 
been released after the organiza- 
tion determined that he was not 
“involved in espionage." 

[Western intelligence circles in 
Beirut have speculated that the 
Americans may have been held as 
hostages to exchange for some or 
all of the 17 Shiite militants con- 
victed in Kuwait for the December 
.12, 1983, suicide truck bombings of 
the U.S. and French embassies 
there, The New York Times report- 


Tbe announcement did not iden- 
tify the exact location of the clash 
or the nationality of the guerrillas, 
and a military spokesman said no 
other information was available. 
There were no Israeli casualties in 
the fighting, the Israelis said. 

The encounter with a guerrilla 
force of at least 20 men was a 
strong indication that various 
armed groups were moving south 
in Lebanon in preparation for 
Monday's scheduled first stage of 
Israel’s withdrawal from southern 
Lebanon. 

In another incident Thursday in 
Lebanon, Israeli military units 
swept through a Moslem Shiite vil- 
lage northeast of Tyre and arrested 
about 60 people. While 


(Continued from Page 1) 
restoration of Greek air-defense re- 
sponsibility for the Aegean under 
the alliance, which lapsed when 
Greece withdrew from NATO’s 
military activities after Turkey's in- 
vasion of Cyprus in 1974. Since 
Greece relumed to full member- 
ship in 1980. a dispute has broken 
out over a Turkish claim to respon- 
sibility over half the Aegean. 

“This would mean that the is- 
lands of the eastern Aegean would 
all come under air protection of the 
Turkish Air Force.” Mr. Papan- 
bombings dreou said. “Its absolutely para- 
doxical to imagine that the Greek 
government would tell Turkey. 
‘O.K.. here is Lesbos. Samos; it's 
for you to defend them.’ Greece in 
that case would be opening the way 
to saying these islands really are 
pan of the Turkish state.” 

The second point at issue, the 
prime minister said, was a defini- 
tion of Greek airspace in the Aege- 
an. Greece has fixed the line at 10 
miles (16 kilometers). NATO, ac- 
cording to Mr. Papandreou, plans 
its exercises on the six-mile limit 
that is favored by Turkey. 

A third issue is Lemnos, a Greek 
island near the Dardanelles. Tur- 
key contends it should be demilita- 
rized under a 1923 treaty, while 
Greece holds that a 1936 treaty 
removed that restriction. Mr. Pa- 
pandreou said that Greece made a 
point of including Lemnos in 
NATO maneuvers, while the allied 
command, to avoid offending Tur- 
key, refused to do so. 

The fourth controversy, accord- 
ing to the prime minister, was re- 
fusal by Turkey to give notice of 
military flights in the Aegean to the 
Athens Flight Information Region, 

* searching which has responsibility for coordi- 


Iraq Says It Attacked 2 Ships in Gulf _ 1 

BAGHDAD (AP) — Iraq said its jet fighters raided two unidentified 
ships Thursday near Iran's Kharg Island oil terminal in the Gulf. 

Shipping sources in Bahrain and Dubai confirmed that a Liberian-, 
registered tanker, the 57,357-ton, Greek-owned Neptunia, was “in trou- 
ble" close to the Iranian port of Bushehr. The sources had few details and 
could not confirm that a second vessel had been attacked. 

A military spokesman said on Radio Baghdad that the attacks took 
place at 2 P! M. and that the raiders “scored direct and effective hits cm the 
two large naval targets and returned safely.” In Iraqi militafy parlance, 


“large naval target” usually refers to an oil tanker. 

Wick Is Geared of 'Malicious Intent' 

WASHINGTON (WP) — A presidential commission on the UJS, 


Information Agency says that controversies over Charles Z. Wick’s 
recording of telephone conversations and the. “blacklisting” of potential 
USIA speakers were the result “not of malicious intent," but of “enagy, 
dedication and commitment” in accomplishing the agency's mission. ■ 
The U.S. Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy, addressing the 
strong criticism of Mr. Wick, the agency director, and the USIA last year, 
agreed in its 1985 annual report issued Wednesday that 'blacklists are 
wrong” and said that Mr. Wick’s unauthorized taping of calls “clearly 
was wrong and not a wise choice of managerial tools.' But it added: 
“Vigorous debate among public diplomacy professionals on methods 
and priorities is not new, and in the commission’s view it is a sign of a 
healthy organization. We are convinced that recent headquarters contro- 
versies at USIA are a result, not of malicious intent, bat of the enagy, 
dedication and commitment both career and noncareer officers bring (0 
accomplishing the agency’s mission.” 


For lhe Record 


President LJ Xuumian of Qwim will visit the United Slates this summer 
and may seek to resolve a dispute over the stalled U S.- Thna midear 
cooperation agreement, U-S. and Chinese sources said Thursday. (AP) 
Angolan rebels said Thursday that 22 American, British and Filipino 
hostages captured Dec. 29 would be freed unconditionally after talks with 
the International Committee of the Red Cross. (AP) 

Prime Minister P.W. Botha of Sooth Africa said Thursday that Ndson 
Mandela, leader of the African National Ctongress, who has been jailed 
for 21 years, would remain in prison because he rejected the conditions 
for a government offer of freedom. (NYT) 

Thirty-four passengers on an Indian luxury arise ship were killed in^a 
fire that may have been caused by illegal cooking stoves, a government 


shipping spokesman said Thursday. The M.V. Chidambaram was carry- 
ing 702 passengers and 1 86 crew members when it caught fire Tuesday m 


the village the Israelis dashed nating civil aviation over the inter- 
briefly with French officers of a national airspace in the Ae gean. 
United Nations force in the area Disagreement over the Aegean 
who attempted to prevent the de- has left NATO this year without 
SUUCtion Of houses there, according militar y con tingen ts from it< imith. 

to Timur Goksel the UN spokes- eastern wing specifically assigned 
man in southern Lebanon. [0 the allied command. 


the Bay of Bengal the Sopping Ministry said. (AP) 

The European Partiament demanded Thursday an investigation into 
allegations that the Italian Mafia fraudulently obtained nwiKnns of 
dollars in European Community funds intoided for Sidlian taniBis. 

(AP) 

The East Side Airitoes Terminal, the first stop in Manhattan for 
millions of travelers for more than 30 years, was sold for S90.6 uriUkm to 
developers who plan to buM a 50-stoiy, 850-unit luxury apartment 
building on the site. Officials of the Metropolitan Transportation Au- 
thority said the proceeds would be used for capital projects to improve its 
subways, buses and commuter rail lines. (NTT) 


missing U.S. servicemen, according safety, and the remains of another 


to a U-S. military official here. 

The discovery was made soon 
after the excavation work began 
Monday, the official said. But U.S. 
authorities will not know how 
many sets of remains there are and 
to whom they belong until they are 
taken to Honolulu for identifica- 
tion after completion of the work 
Feb. 21, he said. 


FOR THE LATEST WORD ON 
EUROBOWS 
READ CARL GEWKTZ 
EACHMOMWNT>€IHT 



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tbumayoMMylff 
B*ChClORS MASTER'S OHpOC I OUAIE 


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tor a fipe evaluation 

MCIRC WESTERN UNWERSTY 

U20Q Sd PplZ^. Emu CAI9U36 l£A 


were picked up the next day by a 
rescue helicopter. 

The 13 crewmen are among 576 
Americans listed as missing in Laos 
since the war in Indochina. A total 
of 2,483 Americans, including 42 
civilians, are still unaccounted for 
in Vietnam, Cambodia and Lars. 
All but one of them, an air force 
pQot who went down in Laos in 
1 965, are classified officially as pre- 
sumed dead. 

The excavation of the Pakse site 
represents the first time that uij. 
specialists have been allowed to 
search for remains of Americans 
missing in action during the war in 
Indochina since it ended in 1975. 

U.S. officials hope that the Com- 
munist governments of Laos and 
Vietnam will allow further such 
projects, but Hanot has made it 
dear it wants Ui. agreement to 
open diplomatic relations as a pre- 
requisite. 


Maine’s French-Americans: A Quiet Minority Group Seeks Recognition 


JSaruupii Miftyfik ® 


Est. 1911 

Just rcll the taxi driver "sank roo doe noo” 

• 5 Rue Daunou. PARIS 

• Falkencurm Scr. 9. MUNICH 

• M/S A5TOR at sea 


Ely Charles Hillinger 

Las Angela Tima Service 

LEWISTON, Maine — Among 
American minority groups, they 
nay be the least visible, the most 
geographically isolated, the quiet- 
est in the face of discrimination. 

They are the French-Americans 
of Maine, who make up one-third 
of the papulation of 1,125,000. As 
such, it is one of the largest minor- 
ity groups in any stale. 

Yet Mains has never had a 
French- American governor or any 
other statewide elected official, u 
has never had a French- American 
bishop, despite the fact that 
French-Americans are overwhelm- 
ingly fhurchgning Ro man Catho- 
lics. 

“Franco-Americans find it hard 
to get ahead in Maine,” said Robert 
Courturier, 44, a former mayor of 
Lewiston. “Subtle discrimination is 
still tune,” he said, noting hiring 
patterns in both state government 
and industry that do not My rep- 
resent the proportion of French- 
Americans in the population. 

Physically, French- Americans — 
Franco-Americans, as they call 
themselves — appear no different 
from the majority of the residents 
of Maine, which borders French- 
speaking Quebec. 


But “we speak with an accent,” 
said Claire Bolduc, 38, who heads a 
legal aid group in Bangor. “We're 
put down, considered backward 
because of it.” 

Despite the discrimination, there 
is no Frencb-American protest 
movement No French- American 
murals adorn the walls in Lewiston, 
which is often called the French 
capital of Maine because 70 per- 
cent of the 40,000 residents are of 
French extraction. 

Nor are there murals, French- 
American graffiti or “French Pow- 
er” slogans scrawled on sidewalks, 
structures and fences in Augusta, 
Madawaska, Biddeford, French- 
vifleand other large French- Ameri- 
can centers. 

Instead, these descendants of 
some of the first settlers in North 
America have created their own in- 
stitutions where they have been de- 
nied access to existing ones, and 
have quietly strengthened their 
own communities. In the process, 
they have avoided conflict and 
formed a flourishing enclave of 

French language an d nistn nm 

“We would rather fade'hito the 
wallpaper,” said Mr. Courturier, 
now an attorney for the Insurance 
Society Association Canado- Amer- 
ican e. “As a group, we don’t want 
to make loo much noise. We are 


good citizens who go to church reg- 
ularly and raise our families as best 

we can. We try to blend into the 
great American mosaic without 
making waves.” 

There were no French-Ameri- 
cans employed in Lewiston banks 
until after World War II. Catholic 
members of the community turned 
their surplus money over to their 
church pastor for safekeeping. 

That system gave birth to credit 
unions in Maine’s French- Ameri- 
can Catholic Churches, where pa- 
rishioner banked money and made 
loans. The system continues to this 
day. The largest Catholic credit 
union in the state is at Sl Peter and 
Paul’s in Lewiston. 

Lewiston's mayor, Alfred A 
Plourde, 48, recalled that service 
dubs in Maine, such as the Rotary 
and Lions, refused membership to 
French-Americans until World 
Warll. 

"So, we have our own dubs like 
the Richelieu Club, a fraternity of 
French-speaking men,” he said. 
“Our meetings are conducted en- 
tirely in French. It is a French ver- 
sion of the typical service dub, rais- 
ing funds for youth groups, etc. 
Every town with a large French 
population in Maine has numerous 
Franco- American dubs and cultur- 
al organizations." 


Mr. Plourde mentioned the Ra- 

a uetteurs social chibs and women’s 
lubs such as La Survivance Fran- 
faise, which is dedicated to the sur- 
vival of French culture. 

Bui the institution that has 
served Freuds Americans in Maine 
best has been the Roman Catholic 
Church- 

Two of Lewiston's landmarks 
are towering Gothic churches of 
Maine granite, Sl Mary’s and SL 
Peter and Paul’s, where French- 
language Masses are always 
jammed to capacity on Sundays. 

The Reverend Hcrvfc Francois 
Drouin, 83, pastor emeritus of SL 
Peter and Paul’s, recalled that 
“when I came here from Canada in 
1940, the Franco-Americans were 
just coming out of the ghetto.” 
Tranco- American kids would 
finish ei gh th grade and be pushed 
into the mills to work,” he said. 
“That was the extent of their edu- 
cation.” 

When min workers began a bit- 
la strike in 1941 ova wages, Fa- 
ther Drouin supported it, “I was 
called a communist and a lot of 
other things,” he said. “But it was 
necessary, just and long overdue.” 
In one form or another, the 
church has also educated most 
French-Americans. Most of the 


schools were established in the late 
1 800s by French priests and French 
and Canadian mms.. Many of the 
schools built by the church were 
then presented to communities to 
be used as public schools. Until 
recent years, priests and turns were 
the sole teachers and administra- 
tors of many public schools in 
French- American communities. 

Although English has become 
the predominant language in the 
schools, French continues to be 
spoken throughout much of Maine, 
as it has been for decades. The 
Maine Legislature is even a mem- 
ber of the Association Internation- 
ale Pariementaire de Langue Fran- 
the International Association 
of French-Speaking Parliaments, 
which includes legislators from 
France, Belgium, Haiti, Frendb- 
African countries and 


The first French settlers arrived 
in 1785, when they were driven out 
of Nova Scotia into the northern- 
most stretdi of Maine along the Sl 
J ohn River, the boundary between 
Maine and New Brunswick. The 
exodus from the old French colony 
of Acadia drove settlers at the same 
time to I-mthnanfl and Haiti. 

In 1842, the Webs ter- Ashborton 
Treaty split the Acadians of the Sl 
J ohn River Valley under two Hags, 


the Cjmsuiion and the American. 
Now, about 30,000 live in small 
towns on the Canadian side of the 
river, and 30,000 in small towns 
along the American side. 

From tee 1880s through World 
War I, tntioloads of French Cana- 
dians left Quebec [or I^wistqn, 
Augusta, Biodeford mid other at- 
ies and towns to work in textile 
ntiDs and shoe factories. 

Despite that heritage, however* 

the identity of French-Americans 

in the state is almost a blur, even 

among the French-Americans 
themselves. 

“Franco-American kids have an 
image problem,” said Yvon Labbfc, 
46, director of Le Cent re Fra nco 
Amfcricain on the University of 
Maine campus at Orono. “They 
don’t know trim they are.” ; 

“You check .bookstores,” Mr. 
Labto said. “Yon won't find 
Franco-Ainerican books. Franco 1 
Americans played an important 
partin the history of this state. ^ Yet 
nothing is taught about Franco- 
Americans in Maine schools. , 

“Here at the university, the jam- 
tens and secretaries are Franco- 
Americans. Very few of tee faculty 
are. We needed a French professor 
to head our F rench department 
We sent to California for him. We 
have a lade of trust m oaradves. 


Defectors I 

Refueii 


(ana ®* 0 


= . M**B 

■ . .. ' V-rsid* 


ymeni of S2 nni»on. lhe agency 
3 milli on when the United States withdrew at the end 


contribution of ! 
of last year. 

The Soviet Union and several countries in Latin America, Africa and 
Asia said Thursday they would help meet the cash shortage by foregoing 
refunds totaling about $6 million due them from a cmrenqr fluctuation 
fund. Director-General Amadou Mahtnr M’Bow said UNESCO must 
mak e-, np a 178-million deficit because of tee American withdrawal Libya 
has offered Sl million spread over two years. . 



Kremlin Proposes Europe Troop Cut 

MOSCOW (Reuters) —The Soviet Union proposed Thursday that tee 
United States join it in withdrawing 33,000 troops from Central Europe 
as a sum toward breaking tee deadlock in East-West talks on lettering 
armed forces. — . 

The Foreign Ministry spokesman, Vladimir BL Ltnnoko, said that die; 
proposal had been made at the Vienna talks where Eastern and Western 
alliances have been discussing for 1 1 years ways of mutually reducing 
their faces. He said Washington had been asked to reduce land forces by 
13,000, while Soviet troops would be reduced by 20,000. 

Western diplomats said that there appeared to be little new in tee 
proposal the latest mi dative from Moscow in tee month before talks 
between the two superpowers on curbing nudear and space weapons. 


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INTERNATIONAL HEKAED TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 19SS 



■*)**> s* 


as 




■. Bp An E GoIdraan 

Apr IM Tones Sorrier 

NEW YORK —tt After yens oC. 
-Ai %T- tfrfrrtc. woddv^8»wxnwg 
- ■ -• A fexEjrof Cteocnutive Jnfcro. Ac 

^ Rabbinical AssemMy.has decided 

■ Nr* r^.. . tp^inrt women as rafobit 
* Siricj^stu ' «Tte accep tan ce afwomen was 


;■■■; PrSS^siS *““*&? 




Tuesday m * coatrovetsal sn3 
biffloi with 636- votes for the 
and 267 against. The 
sadeupof mace than 

--v. -iif l ' I0B ndtearomdlhevKKML 
"'TSSatV*^./ -TTie vote demenst n ttes that we 
accept the notion faywtn 

_„. 

■ ■■-£■.?-_ .-„. ^ God ant fine an apt ngpt to 

ach me wcnl of 
■ sod Rabbi Meander M. 


Z£* 2 £t$ 


i^xabbaoied group. 



.-. *• -.^The deCasksa is expected to 
' ^ |^^mteaami6l«we&fte<joo- 
scjyatwe fnd Orthodox; stow- 
meats. Orthodox Jews ate staemeb- 


jy opposed to women seraag as. 
nHa^dfehawfadnofUfr 
fak or Jewish fanr. Rdora nd 
R cffl u rtr a rti o ani JodaSsut hne 
beta o admqg rata for mare 
Sam a decade. *d there arc more 
. -An 80 women rabbis. 

The fira Coo sa v ii i w. ra b bin ic el 
fuMnc, Am B&og, 30l.of 
Manhatta n , waf be —*»»■»<< v*Tt«. 

l a j h M mtal .a gmg a aion wto fid! 
lights to function as a rabbi when 
sfceis oedaiaed is Maj. 

n^admgtn at the J ewi s h 
Tlmlopca h* 

tan. as weBas those emitted m die 
Artm^ wg ■iTaniok nBy become 
memb e r? of tfcltahbiaicd Assem- 
bly upon oedhration. 

Thearxeptaacccf woraea as rab- 
bis has ben debated for many 
yens within due Conservative 
movement, which believes that 
Jewish fow can change to meet 
modem tines. 

Jibe decasna was a personal vie- 
wy fir Dt Gasan D. Mw, 


chaneBor of the Manhattan semi- 

te^Nmen's cause. 

Cobea te d a suecesste ramnai g B to 

m An ai t w n n^ n mfr\ t?» pwitminl 

prog ram at toe semonoy even 
though the Rabbinical Assembly 
bad not approved the idea. 

One ordained. the women vfi 
have the fu5 preroffBives of bbb- 
beq of the assembly ad wB be 
ablq to perform 48 fn ctiansof a 

p rfjn_ i w t A i p Mi Wn ^ t mll rfln. . 

vaajiOBstoJM lwni , . 

Opposition to women as rabbis 
ta the: Conservative movement has 
bees Jed bgr a jpinp caBed the 
Union for Ttw&oona! Conserva- 
tive Judaism. A spokesman for the 
group. Rabbi David Nowak, oM 
toe AwAw “cont rar y to Jewish 
SaaT rad warned it wodd divide 
the Conservative mowesxxKL 

Mr. Novak also criticiz ed the 
way in women were a dmi tted by 
the Rabbancal Assembly. 'The 

procedure was a total subterfuge," 
he said- “Had this been done at the 


con v en ti on, the i rao b nj p o would 
have bees defeated.** 

. Under the change made in Ac 
Rabbinical AssemWyV cansriig- 
das. the graduating das of the 
seatinafy wS asfi^kic^y'be ac- 
cepted as members ofttoe body. 
Pnoc to the amendment; votes ost 

it mil tiaa tlw enAmw halt fobe 

taken at the oegamzation’s moral 
convemtaos. 

Supporters of ovrfi&atknt for 

T onrp^n riq f gw ! ifvat dK OOBSthl- 

fionrf- amenmeni p roced ure wa$ ; 
used to avoid a fight owerTite issae 
at tbeBcaicoBVca»tt,<aifiasaira 
March. Al toe .last two conven- 
tions. the adtmvvibti of ^ female 
rabbi fefi short of the thcee-qn&r- 
oasmqoiity needed in a ftoor vote 
Under Uie constiratio&al- 
a mmdnwnt nrocofare, orfy a two- 
tbirds majority was newfcd The 
mail ballot showed 70 pesceat of 
those voting approval the chMy, 
which was enough to pass me 
amendment bet apt enough to «d- 
erit women an thecoBvenhoa-Door 
vote. 


lk-fectors Put Hopes on the f Gander Connection * 


. .. ^ ^ CaDadiaii Bdhdw Stop 


Lr.kl) It . ir» 


By Douglas Martin -•• 

New York Timex S&nae 

T:L’ : ~^S Wt ^ '^GANDER. Newfbhndland — 
£- The kddby of the mtencitimHil atr- 

here has a big clock teffinv the 


Cuba, via Gander, are easier to 


cstem cotm- 


? -~I_~ s ir^ Eakqxan dgareoes rad b«« be- three times. as 
’ ^ome a maorjimpiBfroff pointier acconfiEg toiz 

V scomg to flee to im WesL in Gantjer- Of 
" ‘ V-TTie reason for this rxxxtlanlv is wereSaLaxda 


ss>C ^tat here 1 

tfihe in Moscow; srodb of 


. ~ -■ VJlte reason far this i 

: ; :■ r % oppommtyi 

■— - n - ^ has come to be In 


to Canada or 
tries. 

Last you; 96 peodb abandoned 
GjamraBrist-bfoc ffipm more than 
three times. as marry as m 1983, 
i im iiijinitHM nftViflk 

Gamto. Of those, they said, 34 
is were Sri Lankan, 26 were Caban, 
by what 20iwreliaman,8 , wereEastGer* 
Tiat rfnrtf* Ttl bf; Invu appi yf man, 4 WCXC Pt^CS, 3.WCR Roma- 

r jwr connectio n ** Pwb w*k phtwt manamdl wasBnkariML 

* riirnnoT *hn C o anroanrs t- Moc flwfm»ge 1 i». Suce January, tbe offidats said, 

upe Xjgp (joiS^g the Soviet Aeroflot, the six have sooght refuge in Gander. 
•--■ -rrrr^v-jBW f>T TTrat i -T« iv*flMg 1 amd tfb- Jn cliidreg Eva Rbeinbold, the 
‘ ' f» hqpa, make 23 or so stops hereto drafter of a member of the East 

i .: refiid on tripe from Moscow Md German Commnnhft Party’s cea- 

Europe to Ifa wM traf committee. 

. . tnck. The akfines bring not Local hw grtmts all those seek- 

people from rn mi n nnk t rrmiwW mg asyhnH an mwnwTiate private 
bfe also others fleeing m nnerriew. Ultimaidy, almost all of 

Adi countries as Iran and. Sri I 


a Refage for East Bloc Air Passengers 





them are admitted to Canada. 

Asa iesnh, refugees say Gander 
is becotxang one of the best-known 
Canadian towns among people of 
Communist and authoritarian 
ootntizies.' Although other places 
even in Cmada, have more would- 
be refugees from Eastern Europe, 
experts say Gander-may be the best 
bet in tbe-wadd for those without 
appeopoa te entry papers. .. 

By <xnmarisan, the report in 
Shannon, Ireland, that is dso a 
brief stopover far such aniines as 
Adofk)C,hBsfew defedovs,^ accord- 
n^tohmofficials. Canadian offi- 
dafa say tins is apparently because 
of stricter Irish processing prooe- 

<haw 

Once someone receives asylum, 
iraoHgrarim officials said, he or die 
Bm smce Gander ej as dh- oft" 1 ra wwwninrt w 

. . , «3jofadpd ^ep, no papas are "so- fm^a^.hdendibwk hoiD^ 

. “ ^ , --'t^fecdL HHWqjttffi u wf 'news, They said, is tta spreadby 

tnemioce^ iodxad]iSoe;'eriBcvel vncml 


.r- J'Whfle in Gander, passe^ess are 

- •/ - r - T. 7 ' = :allpwed into a special area to 
. ! V ~ ^^isttWti their legs, wiflioat tte sort 
irf* docomaitation reqmrcd .iTor 
, longer stopovers at other reports. 

vHi 2 Nhm; w( The passengers can sy a beer and 
visit tbe*HTh£ 


*Hy-&eeAop — or 
• - -^^{Koacba Moreiie, amentitorofthe 
. •'• R&yal Canadian Moohted Poficc, 
■ . : r tc.~ and ask to.be admitted to Canada 

; -i-^-^v^eaS'arefhgeeL "*• 

"■: .‘Otheohitfennderdiertansprm 

---- -r^r the wasinocm, to. be tSscowred 

• ‘ • ->.only after thar^anfrfeaves. 

* : . ~'.z:;'c* -® nc ® 1978, passengers have 

* !■ ceded falter docnowatatiop for 
Mbdiag at other Canadian . 
if passengers do ndthavei 

f llalicioiEfeSS^ 0 ”- ^ **“■ ^ — 


tf s gtnuvrf bnmdrran and rotorne.'*’ 

It has c bm et i meit lnwi less TOQ- 
tme. In October 1 980, Maria E^ier- 
enza,aCnbias doctor, was the ob- 
ject of a spirited tng-of-war 
between fellow passengers and 
Mounties after she told tte lawmen 
she wanted asylum. 

When her dothes began to rip, 
the Mounties let go, but aiiport 
officials refused to let the mane 


leave unt3 sbe was granted a pri- 
vate interview. After six hoots or . 

negotiations in. which scores of po- have lived safely and legally in 
ficemen woe mobilized and toe third countries through which they 


from such «>pit»te as Berlin; 
Moscow. In recent years, the fines* 
desire to col costs 
fori has also afft 

The effect has been to restore 
Gander, a bleak town of prefabri- 
cated b uilding s where the airport 
accounts for^ 70 percent of tfaeeooo- 
omy, to same shadow of its former 
importance. Bade in the days of 
propeller-driven aircraft, it was the 
principal stopping point on toe 
great drde route between Gander 
and Goose Bay, Labrador, and 
I/mdon. But now, non-Communist 
jet aircraft have enough fnd to fly 
directly across the Atlantic. 

For dtfwitfwtt from Conunmnst 

come e^ol^^hqj^re now ap- 
proved automatically- witlnn 72 
hours. But for asyhnri-seekers from 
Sri i-anlra and Iran, the standards 
of proof are tougher. 

In a process that might mlm as 
long as two years, they must prove 
that they are genuine refugees who 

returned 

most also prove that they coaid not 



TRICKY TREAT — President Ropafajt Reagan carried 
a Valentine’s Day box of chocolates as he arrived in 
California on Thursday to begra a ffve-day vacation. The 
box opened as Mr. Reagan descended the stairs of his 
plane and he had to push the chocolates back inside. 


CBS Defense Focuses 


* . 


■Ms 


On Intelligence Experts 


Central America Peace Talks 
Canceled in Diplomatic Fend 


^rj^indre acoes&bfc for arizms of 


7T ;"^lC&mmmiig oonatries; forSriLan- 
- V z "^.kans and 'others; - treevd visas to 

•• ' j : : 


er af tfie report, sreh “This isn 
reafly a James Bond'Jtiang. To os. 


was Mocked from taking off, 
Esperenza got off the plane and 
said rim wanted to stay in Canada. 
. On. another occasion, an fat 
German tom' leader jumped down 
the steps cf the plane and ran, 
jum p ing over a fence into the for- 
est, immigr ation officials Said. 

For the most part, things are 
calmer lately, the officials say. 
Aeroflot’s representative is said to 
joke about defections with aiiport 
managers, though not to, reporters, 

vtitbwhotnhe does hot speak at alL 
The Gander connection became 
significant when Eastern-bloc air- 
lines increased their flights across 
the Atlantic, mainly to Havana 


might have passed. 

A group of Iranians tell of kmg 

horseback tides across mountains 
to escape into Turkey, with one 
ending up spending $30,000 for his 
guide, false passport red papers 
and an East G erman plane ticket. 

At Gander's Airport Inn, where 
refugees are lodged, a group of ax 
Sri Lanka refugees sat on two sin- 
gle beds. With the beat turned tip as 
far as it would go, a blizzard raging 
and a frayed rag with tbepictureof 
a polar bear on the wall, thdr tropi- 
cal island seemed light years away. 

“We are afraid,” one said. 

“Bui it is LOGO times better,” 
another added. 


By Richard J. Mrislin 
New Yak Times Senate 

MEXICO CITY — The latest 
effort by the Contadoni Group to 
negotiate a peace treaty for Central 
America has collapsed in a diplo- 
matic dispute between Costa Rica 
anfi Nicaragua. 

Representatives of toe five Cen- 
tral American nations and the Con- 
tadora Group — Colombia, Mexi- 
co, Panama and Venezuela — were 
to have mu in Panama bn Thurs- 
day and Friday. Their plan was to 
work out a new section on verifica- 
tion and control of the arms reduc- 
tion plans included in the treaty. 

* But President Luis Alberto 
Mange of Costa Rica renounced 
Tuesday night that Ins country 
would “remain outride” toe Conta- 
dora negotiations ogtil its dispute 
with Nicaragua was resolved. The 
meeting was canceled W e dnesday. 

Officials of B Salvador and 
Hondnns have indicated in recent 


days that they would also boycott 
the metting if Costa Rka decided 
to do so. 

The foreign ministers of the Cod- 
tadora Group countries announced 
Wednesday night that future meet- 
ings would be delayed mdefirntriy, 
until “more propitious conditions 
can be procured that would permit 
the reaching of political under- 
standings.” 

Members of the Contadora 
group have made several unsuc- 
cessful efforts to negotiate a solu- 
tion of the impasse between Costa 
Rica ami Nicaragua. It involves a 
Nicaraguan refugee who had 
sought asylum in the Costa Rican 
Embassy in Managua last August 
and was arrested in December by 
Nicaraguan police. 

Mr. Monge has made the return 
of toe refugee, Jos6 Manud Urbina 
Lara, a condition for his country’s 
further participation in the peace 


Abramson 

tatil yto Time* Serein 

NEW YORK —Colonel Gains 
Bs Hawkins tins week became toe 
third farmer UB. mrdBaence ex- 
pat BHerviewcd oa a CBS-TV doc- 
mneiitary oa the Vietnam War to 
come into court and teQ a stronger 
story than he had urid on camera in 
the January 1982 telecast. 

The CBS documentary that 
brought the retired U.S. Army cd- 
aod toNew York from West Point. 

in 1981 was “The Un- 
A Vietnam De- 
ception/* 

It brought him back this wed: 
aad into the witness chair in federal 
conn as a defense witness in the 
SU&reiBkm lawsuit filed against 
the network by General Wifiram C. 
Westmoreland, who commanded 
UA 
Vietnam 

On the evening in 1981 after CBS 
had taped its interview with Cato- 
nel Hawkins, the network sent him 
and his wife tickets for a Broadway 
production of “Ain't Misbeha- 

■ _ ■» vi 

vm. 

Colonel Hawkins told the jury 
titisweek that he found more than a 
little humor in the selection, for he 
had spent the afternoon rfi«n«tng 
what ne considered top-level “mis- 
behavin' ” in army mteUigence dur- 
ing the Vietnam War. 

In 1981. however. Colonel Haw- 
kins declined the tickets with 
thanks because, as be recalled this 
week, “I- was mentally and emo- 
tionally exhausted” after the inter- 
view. He had not only made serious 
a c cusations against others, he had 
rmpUaUcd himself in the produc- 
tion of intelligence reports that he 
considered “exap.” 

In testimony this week. Colonel 
Hawkins retold and went beyond 
toe story he had told before CBS 
cameras, supporting the program’s 
contention that General West- 
moreland purposely decayed his 
; and President Lyndon B. 
on the size of toe enemy 
force faced by U.S. combats troops 
in 1967. 

Earlier, George W. Allen, a re- 
tired CIA analyst, had stiffened the 
CBS defense by going beyond any- 
thing be had said before. And so 
had retired Major General Joseph 
A. McChristian. who once had 
been General Westmorland's top 
intelligence officer. 

In the broadcast. General 
McOmstian said that in 1967, he 
had gotten “the definite impres- 
sion” that General Westmoreland 
felt it would “create a political 
bombshdl” in W ashing ton if he 
forwarded suddenly increased esti- 
mates of enemy strength. 

But on the witness stand, he flat- 
ly contradicted General Westmore- 


land's account of a key meeting 
between them. General McCbris- 
tian said that toe precise words of 
his former commander and fellow 
West Point cadet had been: “ST I 
send that cable to Wastungtoo/U 
wffl create a political bo mb sh fft . * * - 

Mr. Alien, who was toe Canal 
Intelligence Agency's Na 2 expert 

on Vietnam, acknowledged totpe ■ 
jury that in his cram off-canma 
interviews with the program's pire^ 
ducer. he had been far more candS$._ 
than he had been before the cam? ‘ 
eras. 

He said that be had been less 
Th ?i « forthcoming when be hot ap- 
peared before a Rouse mieffigeoce 
committee investigating the issue 
of the enemy troop count. 

The testimony of Mr. Allen, 
General McChristian and Colonel 
Hawkins is the foundation of CBS' 
defense. Colonel Hawfcms and Mr. 
Allen also were important to de- . 
fense efforts to show that the pro- 
duction bore no malice toward 
General Westmoreland. 








LeRot 

. -SlL 

bv Bauul i IA »:it * 



A 


/"* watch, 
ultra-thin, 

quaru. water -<«istant. 
Mat biach treated ned 
and gold plated. 


r 


The Jeweler 
you should not miss.. 

EDWARD 

JEWELS 

Via V. Veneto 187 
Tel. 49 38 09 
Roma 




Children Testify on Sex Abuse in Nursery School 


. . - - V-, i By Robccc lixxlscy 

. 3^- . Nor fat Tima Sendee j 

:*:"■■ ANCLES- — Each wcek- 
-»5day for .more- tom- six months, a 
aroocsritnafhasbemoccgrriBgm 
a courthouse here 
A white-haired, feaHpaking 77- 
year-dd woman is nutoedtorwn a 
. -_^ : f follway in a whedqiair; leadmg a 

.. . .J_ 7 . i-ffoccssion qf five otna women. 

3 . J -Each time thecrirtegeapproach-: 
or. teams ,-r coortroom on toe 
- '.“L.jg/Sieteritfc floor, brififiant B^ns flato 

i®. .... 

" ‘ - ; V- '^Tdevisiou crews, lying in want 
^ _ ^rfiEctamters, tenge forward and aim 

.-• - ■ ~ : ^^;j^iteiaKit ttegraqiL ■ 

• — 11 ' And, jnst as mstincthn 

^sefems, the woman in toe 
&*£ k*-jr draubr, Virgima McMartin, hrmches 
. - - - .^^forwant folds her head into her lap 
• damps both hands aratmd her 

-r • 1 — ** face, hiding frpm the cameras. 

• - • ■ ^'McanwlSe, in toe cou r tro om, 

. . ■- Tesames about whmprosecn- 

. tras say were 4 %atamc rilmils” and 

■ ’ about alkgarions tort a . brown 

was sfaratotaed to intimadate 


into sHrare »hmt sexual 


ai^ - 


to deter- 



..i-. ''.ttouse. 

'• ter, Peggy McMartin 

-* two ha grattodiidnn, 

■'Ann Buckey, 28, mid Raymond 
Bpckey, 26, rimgwito fliree other 
i^^eachersitt h eraow K ldteici private 
ilfjibnrseiy school ra atoarhaa Man- 
hftttan Beach' shotid stand trial on 
L™ cointe Of cfi2fl ahore is an its 

■j '.jfewntoraanto. • 

- - -"^T \ ' ; :^I%etesxertayertagoa>dpro^ 

•• * 1 / .ytentora’ alfeeations tort as many as 
' cMdren were molested al toe 
McMartin: Preschool m 
fast decade touched off-a na- 
, luffll surge of concem ower dfid 
m j ■ :im "aarseiy 

'i v The iaseose mtoficity abo set off 
J i.'.- *■ i/po tmteu eaction . Some hnvyas 

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-* : owaiy zeakies prose- 

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toart&nts and toepeofde cohvict- 
cd in Sakra of bemg.whches are 
Bmocex^tridims falsely accused an 
the bass of testimony by youths 

and riwMren- 

The hearing already has cost Los 
Angdes-Coimty taxpayers more 
than $1 ndBkm and is expected to 
last atledst six more months before 
the case is transferred, as both sdcs 
esmect, to the Si^rerior Court for 
tnaL - 5 . 

Prosecutors say they inten d to 
present as witnesses 44 ' former pn- 
ptQs of toe school, almost till of 
whom, physicians testified at tie 
hearing, showed physical evidence 
of bavmgbetn sexually abused. 

The second of toe drikfrea to 
testify at the hearing, a 10-year-old 
boy who artentoal toe McMartin 
Preschool almost five years ago, as 
of Wednesday, had been on the 
witness stand for 10 days, including 
nine 'days under intense cross-ex- 
ammatioc by defense lawyers try- 
ing to told inconsistencies in his 
story. 

So far. often under rapid-fire 
questioning that might wither some 
adult witnesses, toe child has stock 
to hr* story with only minor coatra- 
cBctiona. 

He described being sodomized 
or otherwise semafly molested by. 
all seven of the defendants and as- 
serted tort children hadbeen made 
to pose for pornographic pictures. 

- The boy repeated under cross- 
examination an account of how he 
and other children were taken to a 
dhrirch where be said aflrihs wear- 
ing Trasks and black robes danced 
and ' moaned white Mr. Bnckey 
want to the altar and kilted pet 
rabbits, turtles and birds and 
threatened to ldB the children’s 
parents toe same way if toe chil- 
dren toH of toe alleged abuse. 

On a trip to a farm, the boy said. 


Mr. Bnckey “chopped” to death a 
pony with along knife. 

During the boy's testimony, toe 
defendants sit nearby under orders 
from Judge Aviva K. Bobb not to 
glare or otherwise visually intimi -- 
daiehim. 

Each defense lawyer makes the 
10-year-old boy go over his story 
a g ain |m d ? gain in great detail, 
bringing angry protests from toe 
prosecutors, who say the defense 
attorneys are “badgering” the boy, 
and, occasionally, from Judge 
Bobh, who asks the defense law- 
yers, usually without success, to 
avoid repetitious questioning. 

Noting rbat the children's testi- 
mony is being videotaped forpossi- 
bte use at a later trial, and that they 
may have no otter chance to cross- 
examine the children, the defense 
lawyers press oil 

. • Meanwhile, Minnesota’s, attor- 
ney general announced Tuesday 
that the state would not refile crim- 
inal charg es ogams! 21 adults OOCe 
accused of sexually abusing chil- 
dren. 

He called the original investiga- 
tion “a tragedy,” saying it had beai 


le decision ended a four- 
moo th review of the criminal inves- 
tigation, toe subsequent 
and their rticmiagal Of the 27 
dren removed from their homes 
when toe charges were filed, 11 
have been returned home by Fam- 
ily Court judges and the other cases 
arc pending. 

In a 29-page repeat. Attorney 
General Hubert H. Humphrey 3d 
and 12 investigators from toe Fed- 
eral Bureau of Investigation and 
toe Mhmesota Bureau of Crimmal 
Apprehension criticized the sexual 
abuse investigation conducted in 
Jordan, about 35 mites (56 kilome- 
ters) southwest of Sl Paul 


The Scott County attorney, R. 
Kathleen Morris, had drawn con- 
aderaMe puWkdly for ho- prosecu- 
tion of adults charged with sexually 
abusing children. Beginning with 
the 1983 arrest of James J. Rud, 
Miss Morris filed a series of 
charges a gainst 23 gdnltt, accusing 
them of bong part of a ring of 
adults who a bnre d their own chil- 
dren and others’. 

Mr. Rud pleaded gudry to sexual 
abuse of children, bat the only con- 
pie brought to trial was acquitted in 
September. 

Miss Moms dismissed the 
ch ar gee a gainst the retaining de- 
fendants on Oct. 15, saying that, 
among other reasons, site did not 
want to submit the children to the 
emotional stress of testifying in the 
remaining trials. 

Investigators said they were un- 
abte to find any evidence that could 
corroborate the children's testimo- 
ny of sexual abuse. 

The report also questioned the 
techniques used by Miss Morris 
and others in fining up testimony 
from the children. Many children 
were removed from their homes 
and subjected to repeated question- 
ing and discussions about sexual 
almse, which the report said could 
confuse children and even suggest 
abuse. 


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'Page 4 


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1985 


Iteralb 


DVrERiVATIONAL 



The New York Tinwaad The Washington Post 


Exploring the Resurgence of Terrorism in Germany f 


With the argument hotting up about bow 
America's budget deficit should be cut. it is 
salutary to examine why a cut is needed —or 
"whether in fact it is. Recent articles on this 
.-.page have expounded different opinions, 
t which need to be put into perspective. 

. One strand of thought is that it is all much 
■ado about nothing. The deficit spurs eco- 
nomic growth, and when this has continued 
•long enough the deficit will vanish. At worst 
the deficit is only mildly and temporarily 
injurious. Better to live with it than butcher 
the welfare programs built up since the New 
DeaL The argument is discomfoningly redo- 
lent of economic policy under France's 
Fourth Republic or Britain's Conservative 
government in the earlier 1 960s: both failed. 

Another view is that the deficit is, indeed, 
a menace, but only to future generations. 

! Interest on the bonds the government is 
selling to finance present deficits can only be 
.financed from future taxes — a burden on 
our successors and a deadweight on their 
governments. This interest burden bas al- 
ready quadrupled since President Jimmy 
| Carter’s last year, and soon it will absorb at 
‘least 15 percent of the federal taxes Ameri- 
'cans pay — to the detriment of welfare (or 


■’defense). This is what the New Yorker mag- 


'azine in 1935 called “charging it to posterity. 
; which is not old enough to vote." The obser- 
vation is at least as relevant today. 

It is not even as if all this interest will be 
‘paid by some Americans to other Ameri- 
cans. A lot of it will go abroad, because, that 
is whence nearly a quarter of America's need 
;for savings is now coming. Undoubtedly, 
rising foreign debt puls future living stan- 
dards in pawn to the rest of the world. 

• A third view is that the deficit is not 
simply a future danger, but probably an 


Secrets and Civil Servants 


One of the finest features of the British legal 
system to be adopted in the United States is 
trial byjuiy. And one of the most valued rights 
protected in this country, but not specifically 
in Britain, is freedom of information. This 
week, both were the subject of debate in En- 
gland, where a jury acquitted a British civil 
servant who had been prosecuted for violating 
the Official Secrets Acl The case could not 
have been brought here, and the ruling is likdy 
to spur reconsideration of the wisdom of such 
prosecutions in Britain, too. 

The case arose when Clive Panting, a senior 
ctvO servant at the Defense Ministry, learned 
in the course of his work that a cabinet mem- 
ber had given inaccurate information to Par- 
liament, and had refused to correct iu in order 
to conceal the events surrounding the sinking 
of an Argentine ship, the General Belgrano, 
during the 1982 Falkland^ war. Mr. Panting 
sent two government papers to an opposition 
Labor member of Parliament that showed the 
original information to be deceptive. 

Specifically, the documents showed that the 
Belgrano, rather than sailing toward the Brit- 
ish South Atlantic Task Force as the govern- 
ment had said, actually had been sailing away 
from it for 1 1 hours, and that the ship had been 
spotted a day earlier than the official explana- 


tion had stated. The torpedoing took 368 Ar- 
gentine lives and. arguably, removed what 
prospects of negotiation remained at that time. 

Mr. Poniing was indicted under the 191 1 
Official Secrets Act, a sweeping measure that 
makes it a crime for a government worker to 
discuss or pass information of any kind to any 
unauthorized person, even if the information 
has nothing to do with national security. The 
statute is broad enough to be used against 
whistle-blowers disclosing procurement frauds 
and against government employees such as 
Mr. Pbntiflg who reveal information that is 
politically damaging to the party in power. 

While this country has no Official Secrets 
Acl it makes much use of the stamps that 
classify documents and keep them in locked 
files. General William Westmoreland’s current 
suit ^gainst CBS. for instance, is providing 
Americans with much new information about 
the internal disputes in the command of an 
American war that ended a dozen years ago. 
The British Jury’s verdict is a victory for the 
principle that the legal protection of military 
secrets should not outlive the military emer- 
gency that justified the secrecy. It is a principle 
that might usefully be applied more widely in 
this country, as well as Britain. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST 


The Strategic Black Hole 


President Reagan's "star wars’* strategic de- 
fense program bas an unpretentious little 
brother. It is the Advanced Strategic Missile 
Systems program, which aims to insure that 
American missiles could penetrate any future 
defense system set up by the Soviet Union. 
Research for “star wars” will cosr $3.7 billion 
next year, but little brother's only S174 mil- 
lion. That fairly reflects the comparative costs 
of strategic defense and offense. It mirrors 
something else too: what the Russians will 
surely be doing as their fust line or response to 
the threat of the “star wars" system. 

Surely the superpowers came this way be- 
fore? Yes, in the 1960s, when the Soviet Union 
developed its Galosh defense system around 
Moscow. That provoked American strategists 
to pul multiple warheads on each missile. Far 
from leaving the Soviet Union better off. Ga- 
losh only provoked a more terrible threat. 

But the multiple-warhead missile also left its 
American inventors worse off once the coun- 
termeasure was completed. Soviet rockets had 
always carried much heavier warheads to com- 
pensate for their relatively lesser accuracy. But 
as the Russians gained in accuracy and applied 
the multiple- warhead technique to their much 


larger rockets, they created a potentially 
threatening advantage in land-basal weapons 
— the theoretical chance lo lob two or more 
warheads at every American missile before it 
had time to leave the ground. 

Now the multi-headed SS-18 in turn is 
about to leave the Soviet Union worse off than 
before. It provoked the American MX, a direct 
counterpart, and revived the American interest 
in missile defense. The pattern has been con- 
stant. Every step forward compels the adver- 
sary to respond. And the response, by decreas- 
ing security and stability, leaves both sides 
worse off than before. The vicious circle can- 
not be broken because the advantage at hand 
always seems more compelling than the adver- 
sary's possible countermeasure that may come 
to light in the distant future. 

So as both sides move toward vast new 
missile defenses, they will strive to make their 
offenses more terrible and more certain of 
penetrating the defense. That little S174-mil- 
lion item in the Pentagon’s budget is a remind- 
er of what will happen if the prohibition on 
defenses is shattered: full-scale devdopment 
of strategic weapons in every form. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


FROM OUR FEB. 15 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Tail Holds Talks on Warplanes 
WASHINGTON — Mr. Cortlandt Field Bish- 
op, president of the Aero Gub of America, 
called on President W.H. Taft [on Feb. 14], to 
interest him in appropriations for aero cups 
for the army and the navy. Accompanying him 
were General Nelson A. Miles and delegations 
from Washington and Baltimore. Regarding 
appropriations for aeroplanes for war pur- 
poses, the president said that he had found it 
impossible to have any appropriations made at 
this short session of Congress. When General 
MUes said that in future generals of command- 
ing armies would go in aeroplanes themselves 
in actual war, the President said that he did not 
think that any aeroplane constructed would 
cany either him or General Miles. He referred 
Mr. Bishop and General Miles to the Secretary 
of War for a fuller talk on die question. 


1935: Undbeigh Baby Trial Ends 
FLEMINGTON, New Jersey — “Bruno Rich- 
ard Hauptmann, you must suffer the penally 
of death." With these words, spoken in a voice 
that rang clearly through the tense Hunterdon 
County courtroom [on Feb. 13], Justice W. 
Trenchant passed sentence on the unemotion- 
al German carpenter for the kidnapping and 
murder of Charles Augustus Lindbergh Jr. the 
night of March 1. 1932, and brought to a dose 
one of the most sensational trials in tbe history 
of American c riminal law. Hauptmann, who 
bad stood with drawn and pasty face a few 
minutes before to bear the twdve jurors repeat 
one after another, "Guilty of murder in the 
first degree" in answer to the poll demanded 
by his lawyer following the reading of the 
verdict by the foreman, stared unflinchingly 
at the judge as be beard bis doom. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Omrmtm 1958-1982 


Katharine graham, wiluam s. paley, arthur ochs Sulzberger 

Co-Ourimen 


P ARIS — The recrudescence of 
terrorism in West Germany 


imminent one. At 5 to 6 percent of GNP, 
government borrowing absorbs too much of 
the savings available. The government, al- 
ways a privileged borrower, risks crowding 
the private borrower out of the market Pro- 
ductive business investment is thus re- 
strained by high interest rates. Restrained 
investment, depresses living standards later. 
Bui this can also result in recession reason- 
ably early in the game. 

Opponents of this view deny that interest 
rates are kept high by the budget deficit: 
They have been falling while the defuat has 
soared. But what counts is the relation be- 
tween the interest rate and the price rise. An 
interest rate which is only 2 or 3 percent 
above inflation makes borrowing for pro- 
ductive investment attractive. But the pre- 
sent gap in America [the “real" interest rate) 
is nearer 8 percent, and it would be even 
higher if foreigners were not pouring in 
capital and American business were not 
bringing home its own funds from abroad. 
And all the time U.S. producers are becom- 
ing less competitive, because the capital in- 
flow forces up the dollar. How long can this 
keep going on? Not long, according to Paul 
A. Volcker, diairman of tire Federal Re- 
serve. Unless the deficit and the need to 
borrow abroad are both reduced substan- 
tially, a loss of confidence in the currency 
threatens to bring in higher interest rates, a 
rise in inflation and another recession. 

America is wealthy because it is a risk- 
taking economy. But prolonging the present 
budget deficit is a risk that should not be 
run. It would certainly damage (he economy 
some years hence. But the damage could 
well be felt quite soon, both in the United 
States and in foreign countries. 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 


Dmrny Pytbk r 

AsndotPMAtr 


LEE W. HUEBNER, PobBsAer 
PHILIP M. FOISEE ExeadmLiMr RENEBONDY 

WALTER WELLS EM* ALAIN LECOUR _ 

ROBERT K. McCABE Dtpuy Mux RICH ARD H. MORGAN 

SAMUEL AST Deputy Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Uncur if QptnOtm 

CARLGEWIRTZ Associate EiBur FRaNOJIS DESMAISONS Dktaar Oradatk* 

ROLFD. KRANEPUHL 

latanalioaa} Herald Tribune. 181 Avenue Quxks-de-GsuDc, 92200 NeuTBy-siir -Seine, 

Franct Telephone 747-1265. Telex: 612718 (Herald). Cobles Herald P»i«. 

Diredeur de lq pub/kittlon: Walter N. Thayer. 

Asia Headquarters, 24-34 Hemesn Rd. Hong Kong. TeL 5-285613. Telex 61170. !guH 
tfnMfajtt. UJLRobta Hod&tm, \ S3 MtgAo^LendmWQ. TeL 3364832 Tries 262D09. 

SjLm coital de 1JOO.OOO F. RCS Naracnt B 732021126. CorattM Partudn No. 61327. * amt * 
U.S. atscrfrton: S2S4 yearly. Second-dan postaxe pad at Long Island City, N.Y. 11101, 

® 1985, International Hoad Tribune. All rights reserved. KS3S1 


IT terrorism in West Germany 
comes at the same time that Ger- 
mans once again are qitestioning the 
frontiers of the German nation and 
worrying the unification issue. 
These might seem separate matters, 
and indeed they are entirely sepa- 
rate in every practical respect. If, 
however, one considers “the spiritu- 
al situation of our limes” — to use a 
phrase to be heard in Germany — a 
different conclusion is possible. 

“Euroterrorism." as today rein- 
vigorated and regrouped, seems to 
be essentially German, so far as it is 
serious. The identities of the people 
who have been leaving bombs at 
addresses in Belgium associated 
with the North Atlantic Treaty Or- 
ganization, and those who fired 
some rockets at NATO targets in 
Portugal, remain unknown, of 
course. Until now, neither country 
has experienced anything more than 
incidental terrorism. 

The French Direct Action group, 
which has now embarked on the 
coarse of murder, has dearly been 
taken over by Germans, even to 
writing its declarations now in bro- 
ken French. This band began by 
romantically assisting anti-Franco 
Spaniards in the 1 960s. later drifting 
into episodic bomb-planting in its 


Bv W’filiam Pfaff 


own country. The French police 
rounded its members up — there are 
only a few of them — but the new 
Socialist government in 1981 turned 
them loose in the belief dial they 
were harmless, and would be con- 
tent with the left in power in Paris. 
The fact that they could have been 
treated in so patronizing and casual 
a wav is evidence of how unimpor- 


pathy and a certain complicity in a 
much larger pan of the nonriolem 
but anti-establishment left. 

It is difficult not to see in this an 
influence of a larger West German 
refusal to live within the moral and 
political realities of the present day. 
Germans notoriously have warned 


a wav is evidence of how imimpor- . » »* j 

lant they were, and how slight thrir there i$ Q real refusal 


roots in French society. 

West Germany and Italy have 
been the two European countries 
where terrorism counted, and in 
both places one can see why. In 
Italy, it was an insurrection against 
what seemed a corrupt and totally 
i ne f or m able government and politi- 
cal elass, and in some larger sense a 
rebellion against the experience of 
Italy in modern times as a kind of 
museum for the rest of the world — 
and mausoleum for Italians. 

In Germany the sources of terror- 
ism were less simple. The moral ex- 
perience of the war certainly had 
something do with the defection of a 
part of the war-born generation 
from a complacent and materialistic 
postwar society. The development 
of the terrorist left enjoyed, and to 
an unclear extent still enjoys, sym- 


to think through things 
being done and said . 


more from history than it is accus- 
tomed to provide. They have 
searched for universal in a world of 
unsatisfactory particulars. They 
have, historically, always wanted 
quests, and have found both good 
and bad ones. The filmmaker Hans- 
Jurgen Syberberg remarks that 
“without a vision. Ger man y is noth- 
ing." an opinion that has often been 
heard in past years. 

Since 1945. there has been reluc- 
tance to accept the notion or West 
Germany as just one more stable, 
prosperous, highly successful de- 
mocracy. in a lucky community of 
democracies. living better than any- 


one else on Earth. Germans have 
said that the Federal Republic is 
“provisional" and unsatisfactory. 
Only a united Germany would not 
be provisional. But muted within 
what borders? Germany's bordera 
have never been that certain. 

The government dourly reiterates 
the fan that the nation’s frontiers 
remain legally unresolved and that 
the Willy Brandt government’s rec- 
ognition of the Oder-Neisse border 
with Poland binds only Bonn — a 
reunified Germany would have to 
reconsider. This obviously is not 
meant to be threatening: Bonn con- 
stantly says that present borders 
could only change by peaceful 
agreements, in a Europe itself unit- 
ed and, it seems, in a giving mood — 
but this is sentimental nonsense and 
an evasion of the political facts cre- 
ated by Hitler's war and Hiller's 
defeat/ The organizations of those 
deported 40 years ago from Silesia 
and East Prussia meanwhile go on 
holding meetings under provocative 
and politically nonsensical banners, 
and young nationalists write silly 
articles about German armies once 
again marching into the East. 

It is a troubling situation, which 
reflects a real refusal to think 


through things bang Ganeasd -said. 
One understands toe □notions- of; 
postwar deportation victims, the ties 
of divided families, fee desire of *■ 
Germans to see their country pm 
back the way it briefly was between. 
1870 and 1945, and tte vulnerability 
of poh'tidans jo pressure , groups. 
But the harping on how' i ptvnaoor.. i 
a T everything is feeds, that political^ 

romanticism and lack of realism — T . 

a strong factor in the Goman past ' 
It surely is romanticism which jj 
drives the terrorists --ihesc dreanh^ 
ers with bombs and gun^ makhg a~ 
better world by destroying lhe.cme ., 
they have. One'woahfake so tautfi 
to see West Germans less discontent . " J 
with what is. and less concerned^, 
with what might be — or migh t hot '. 
One wishes Germans ware more 
willing to defend the Federal-Re-:', 
public, its avalization, its acconri ' 
plishments, its frontiers, and fewer , 
were trilling to dismiss aQ ihai as 1 
“provisional” One wishes raore at- 1 
tendon were paid to what a very , 
sensible and distinguished historian ' 
of modern Europe, Aster Gay. him- J 
self born in Germany, has pat nr lire'* 1 
following way: that even SdriHer 
and Goethe, “in calling for sOmC- J 
thing higher than politics, helped to 1 ' 
pave the way for something lower." 

© 1985 William Pfaff . . ’ . './I 


Zia Works a Little Miracle on Pakistan’s Economy Capitalism^ 


By Jonathan Power 


L ONDON — As President Zia ul~ 
* Haq moves toward his stage- 


these days is steady and continuous. 
Pakistan is self-sufficient in food and 


managed elections on Feb. 25 there is 
a danger that the story’ of Pakistan's 
modern-day economic success will go 
untold. While General Zia runs a 
tight ship on the political front, eco- 
nomically he is presiding over one of 
the world's most interesting efforts at 
combining economic growth with se- 
rial redistribution. While unmistak- 
ably capitalist in its essentials. Paki- 
stan could certainly not be called a 
“trickle-down" economy. 

The president's economic team is 
not waiting for the undisturbed capi- 
talist m echanisms to work the na- 
tion’s wealth slowly down to the 
poorest. They are targeting those in 
the backwaters and makin g sure that 
health care, electricity, water and ag- 
ricultural advice are pushed out into 
the far readies of the country. 

During the recent years of the great 
recession in the West, Pakistan has 
been averaging a remarkable annual 
rate of growth of 5 percen c a year. Yet 
at the time of independence from 
Britain in 1947, it was widely regard- 
ed as an economic wasteland. 

After independence Pakistan 
struggled to keep pace with its popu- 
lation increase ana barely succeeded. 
Then in the 1960s, under its first 
military government, it averaged a 
high growth rate of over 7 percent a 
year. There followed a disastrous pe- 
riod when the military withdrew and 
the charismatic but chaotic populist 
Zulfikar Ali Bhutto became presi- 
dent He initiated a policy of wide- 
spread nationalization, more a quest 
for vengeance against the private sec- 
tor than a policy of national recon- 
struction. Little regard was given to 
the administrative and managerial 
capacity of the public sector. 


its balance of payments position 
manageable, despite the toll of the 
West’s recession and the drying up of 
remittances from migrants working 
in the Gulf countries who have been 
badly hurt by the fall in oil prices. 

Interesting now is the debate going 
on within the corridors of power on 
where to go next. This is not a 
straightforward military regime with 
ironclad discipline and a paucity of 
intellectual thought. One senior gov- 
ernment minister told me the story of 
two dogs who met on the Pakisian- 
Indian border. The Indian dog was 
heading up to Pakistan and the Paki- 
stan dog down to India. “Why are 
■you going north?" the Pakistan dog 
inquired of the Indian dog. “Because 
I'm hungry." he replied. “Why are 
you going to India?” “Because I need 
to bark," answered the other. 

The fact that a minister can tell this 
story to a visiting journalist perhaps 
serves to illustrate the intellectual cli- 
mate that exists at the top of General 
Zia's political establishment. General 
Zia does get given opinions other 
than his own. Although he is not 
going to copy Indian practices of de- 
mocracy. he does not create a climate 
of fear in which jokes cannot be told, 
contrary opinion cannot be hdd and 
people look over their shoulders in 
restaurants before opening an honest 
conversation. And he does encourage 
a sharp debate on economic policy. 

For those ministers like MahbuduJ 



Poverty and 
The Pope - 


By William F. Buckley 


N EW YORK — Almost immedi- 
ately after Pope John Paol lFs 


Haq, the planning minister and Sar- 
taj Aziz, the agriculture minister, it is 
a demanding fight. General Zia's 
power base is unmistakably conser- 
vative — the army, the clergy and the 
landlords. Nevertheless, these two 
have won important bailies and are 
being allowed lo push policies which 
will Have the effect of giving priority 
to the smallest farmer, providing so- 
cial services on a wide scale and redis- 
tributing income. Mr. Haq is quite 
explicit about what he is attempting 
to do: “Unless and until an allocative 
mechanism exists to ensure a just and 
widespread distribution, powerful 
dynamic forces tend to perpetuate 
the low standards of living of a signif- 
icant proportion erf the population." 


The reaction to the oil price hike in 
1974 exacerbated the problems. With 


the bdp of relatively short-term bor- 
rowing from (he Organization of Pe- 
troleum Exporting Countries there 
was a massive increase in public-sec- 
tor investment in large, highly visible 
projects, many of which were never 
completed. Inflation soared and eco- 
nomic growth fell to 4 percent a year. 

After General Zia's coup d'etat in 
1977 the economy stabilized. Growth 


If the proposals succeed. Pakistan 
could berame the model developing 
country, with growth and with 
equity. The battle is far from bring 
won. Often reformers’ ideas are ac- 
cepted by the cabinet but frustrated 
by provincial governors, who are 
more associated with tough landlords 
and rural power brokets. 

The reformers are up against not 
just the bias of the political structure 
but the highest rate of population 
growth in South Asia, a skewed dis- 
tribution of ownership that is even 
more severe than India's and a tradi- 
tion of an intensive use of capital 
rather than labor in industry. On the 
other hand, there is flexibility in the 
system because of the high ’rate of 
growth of food grain production, the 
leveling effect of remittances from 
workers abroad and the emphasis 
given -by General Zia in the last three 
years to a new Islamic tax called 
Zakai to be spent on widows, or- 
phans and the poor, establishing the 
principal of a social safely net. 

Some of the problems cannot be 
tackled head on. Mr. Haq argues. 
There is no question or a serious land 
reform. But there are other ways of 
helping the poorest farmers. Over the 
next five years most villages wifi be 


electrified. The network of farm to 
market roads wfll be increased eight- 
fold. The percentage of villages with 
clean drinking water wfll climb to 45 
percent from 22 percent, and the 
number of rural primary school age 
children will grow to 70 percent from 
the present 50 percent. 

Many five year plans in developing 
countries are exercises in rhetoric. 
But Pakistan, in an administrative 
sense, is well ran and appears capa- 
ble. judging from the results of the 
Iasi five years, of jputting into effect 
fairly ambitious plans. 

Perhaps this should not come as a 
great surprise. Taiwan and South Ko- 
rea have also shown it is possible to 
combine intense capitalist endeavor 
with social reforms that produce in- 
fant mortality rates and distribution 
of income figures that are be ginning 
lo rival those of Scandinavia. 

Benign military dictatorship can 
produce economic and social mir- 
acles. Nevertheless, at some point 
people need lo bark and enough of 
them will trade wealth and well bring 
for this to happen. This General Zia 
has not cotne to terms with. At some 
point, however — but not at this 
“election" — be will be compelled to. 

International Herald Tribune. 


Reagan Should Take Up Castro’s Conciliatory Offer 


speeches in Latin America — a mind . 
dazzling 45 in 12 days — itchy listen- 
ers remarked that be had laid out no 
economic program to mitigate die 
poverty against which he railed. / 
This' is both true and fortuaat^: 
fortunate because the pope does npt 
wish to associate Christianity with 
any single economic system, even 
though the only economic systqm 
that will do an ything significant- lo 
help the poor in Latin America 4$ 
capitalism, and capitalism is some- 
thing of a swearword among, the 
masses in many Latin American 
countries because it has been given a 
bad name by capitalists. Or motfe 
correctly, so-called capitalists. 1 

In Venezuela, the pope spoke 
about the “horrifying" gap betweep 
rich and poor, and m Ecuador he 
spoke of me “intolerable abyss" be- 
tween the wealthy and the impover- 
ished. By saying this, is proauctiye 
thought on [be question of what to db 
about poverty advanced? ’ 

Michael Potanyi, the late Hangar- 
ian-Briti&h scientist and philosopher, 
is quoted as remarking that average 
per capita income had not changed 
significantly between the time that 
Christ lived and the time that George 
Washington lived. One hundred 
years after Washington, real income 
had doubled — in that part of the 
world that experienced the Industrial 
Revolution. Now, is ft useful lo de- 
plore the difference in the splendor of 
life at the time of Augustes Caesar 
and the life of the poor m Rome? One 
can deplore poverty without any ana- 
lytical need to describe the luxury of 
the court. What was objectionable 
about the life of the rich at the time of 
Christ was equally objectionable in 
the poor, never mmd the lack of op- 
portunity among the poor to practice 
as frequently some 01 the sins of the 
rich, primarily greed. AH 10 Com- 
mandments were violated by rich and 
poor alike in Rome, and arc today. 

There is a rhetorical compulsion to 
speak in pairs, and then to see a 
relationship between them. It is not 


W ASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reason would make a 


▼V Ronald Reagan would make a 
serious mistake if he rejected the con- 
ciliatory offer made by President Fi- 
del Castro of Cuba this month. 

Mr. Castro's message is clear: He 
wants to lessen tensions between 
Cuba and the United States. This, he 
hopes, will give Cuba access to Unit- 
ed States markets and improve the 
prospect that entrepreneurs mil take 
advantage of Cuba's new law permit- 
ting foreign investment. In exchange, 
Mr. Castro seems willing to cooper- 
ate in the search for a political solu- 
tion lo present problems in Central 
America and in Africa. 


By William V. Alexander Jr. 


be repaid, Cuba's foreign debt is said 
to range between $10 billion and $12 
billion — more than its estimated 
gross national product 
The Cuban leader’s proposed solu- 
tion is a 20-percenl increase in ex- 
ports to Western nations that pay in 
hard currency. Cuba is also interested 
in joint ventures that would yield 


My recent trips 10 Cuba, in August 
and January, convince me that Mr. 
Castro means business. For all his 
Communist ideology, he is a shrewd 
observer of international economic 
trends and he looks with some envy 
on the developing relationship be- 
tween the United States and the Peo- 
ple's Republic of China. 

Economically, things are not going 
well for Cuba. At present, the Soviet 
Union is subsidizing the Cuban econ- 
omy at the rate of some $4 billion to 
$4.5 billion annually. Yet Moscow is 
apparently reluctant to increase its 
aid, and Mr. Castro fears that the 
help may eventually slop altogether. 
Even with that help, which need not 



manufactured products for export. 

For 25 years, Mr. Castro has 
pushed the Cuban economy toward 
industrialization, with limited suc- 
cess. Agricultural exports dominate, 
as they did before the revolution. 
Food 'and consumer goods are ra- 
tioned. Low productivity remains a 
problem despite measures to encour- 
age decentralized managemenL 


The country's economic problems 
are also compounded by politics. The 
new generation — more than half the 
population — was born after Mr. 
Castro came to power and is particu- 
larly impatient for signs of economic 
progress. The new law allowing Cu- 
bans to own their own homes, and the 
appearance of supermarkets stocked 
with scarce consumer goods, were un- 
doubtedly designed to satisfy t his 
generation while spurring increased 
productivity among all workers. The 


tressed ships and disputes over com- 
mon fishing grounds. The United 
States has an interest in making pro- 
gress on all four issues, whether or 
not such negotiations lead to some- 
thing more significant. 

If. however, the talks did go well, 
we should be encouraged 10 take up 
Mr. Castro's offer to work together to 
find a peaceful resolution to tensions 
in Central America and Africa. 

Mr. Casiro says he would agree in 
advance to the concept of third party 
“verification" of compliance with 
any Central American treaty negoti- 
ated by the Contadora Group. This 
would be a significant step toward 
peace, for the absence 0/ a verifica- 
tion provision was the stated reason 
why America rejected the first treaty 
proposal by the Contadora grouping. 

Surely it is in the interest of the 
United States to pursue this offer. 
Both Cuba and the Soviet Union con- 


yet contended that daylight caused 
darkness or health, sickness, but we 


learned at the knee erf our first cliche 
that things are not black and while, 
but gray. And unhappily we are so 
accustomed to bearing about wealth 
and poverty that we are subtly en- 
couraged to assume that the former 
gives rise to the latter. 

Many rich people in Latin America 
have accumulated their wealth by 
means we can legitimately call sinful 
Many are rich through graft — which 
is sutfuL Many are rich because they 
preside over monopolies that extort 
higfi prices where demand is inflexi- 
ble.- That is sinful, and about (he only 
theological remains of a sin that used 
to go by the name of usury, until it 
was defined out of existence. If the 
pope bad been decrying the sins of 
some wealthy Latin Americans, be 
shou ld have specified what they were 

It is useful, every now and again, to 
remind ourselves that in America, the 
richest country in the world, if we 


resumption of economic relations 
with the United States would be the 


with the United States would be the 
next logical step in this direction. 

We might begin to move toward a 
thaw by opening talks on several im- 
mediate points of tension. In particu- 
lar, Mr. Casiro is willing to discuss 
aircraft hijacking, radio interference 
caused by overlapping broadcast fre- 
quencies, mutual assistance for dis- 


UTTERS TO THE EDITOR 


til now, Washington has seen this as 
something necessarily threa tening It 
need not be. Would 11 not after aft be 
in our interest to lessen tensions with 
the only country in the hemisphere 
with a military facility at the disposal 
of the Soviet Union? What is more, if 
we can negotiate with the Russians, 
surely we can talk with the Cubans. 
What do we have to lose? 

Lessening tensions between our 


have raised enough money to pay 
government expenses for a w eek. 

On the day the pope returned to 
Rome, a feature sponswriter for The 
Associated Press filed a story, 
“Sports’ Fattest Cats: Time Will 
Tell." He figured out that Dong Flu- 
tic, a football player who has just 
signed a 57-miDion contract with the 
New Jersey Generals of the United 
Slates Football League, will be cotn- 


Iraq’s Aims Misjudged 


Regarding Drew Middleton's 
opinion column, “Internal Unrest 
Adds to Warring Iran's Misaks" 
(Feb. 41, on the Gull war between 
Iraq and Iran, I wish to point out that 
be completely migudges Iraq's aims. 

Mr. Middleton c laims mat the 
Iraqi air force is inefficient and that 
the “Kharg Island [oil terminal] 
stands as a monument to the failure 
of the Iraqi air force." Nonsense. 

The Kharg Island offshore loading 
terminal is an easy target for the 
sophisticated and highly trained Iraqi 
stir force. Furthermore, the subma- 
rine pipelines running from Bushins 


on the mainland directly to Khaig, or producing country would gain by 
via the coral islet of Khargu, could display of the total vulnerability of it 
easily be destroyed by demolition export facilities. 


two countries through cultural ex- peosated at the rate of $25,926 for 
changes and, eventually, trade, could every hour he enga^s in football. 


crews; they span shallow waters and 
are poorly anchored. 

Iraq's aim is to discourage interna- 
tional oil companies from shipping 
oat Iranian crude, to weaken Inin’s 
war effort through an attrition of oil 
exports. Were the Kharg terminal to 
be attacked directly, Iran could and 
would retaliate against similar port 
facilities in not oiuy Iraq, but also in 
Kuwait, Bahrain, the United Arab 
Emirates and possibly even in Saudi 
Arabian terremtory. 

Remember that both Iran and Iraq 
ore members of OPEC, and no oil 


ANDREW L LORA NT. 

Paris. 


Back on Coarse 


In the travel feature “Seeking a 
Travel Menl in a Buyer’s Market" 
f Weekend, Feb. J), Roger Collis erred 
in suggesting that passengers could 
fly on Air Egypt — presumably he 
meant EgyptAir — between London 
and Rome. The Egyptian airline does 
not fly this route. 

ANTHONY VANDYK. 

Geneva. 


also strengthen the bonds created by 
our common cultural heritage. In the 
long ran. such exchanges ought even 
be an opportunity to export Ameri- 
can political ideals to Cuba. Our na- 
tion has 200 years of experience in 
making the American Revolution 
work — and we should he willing to 
share the wisdom of this experience. 

Let us be big enough, as a nation, to 
invite Mr. Castro and the Cuban peo- 
ple to the conference table. 


The writer is a Democratic Can - 


Ethical question: Is that sinful? 
Could Mr. Flutie's compensation be 
called an act of social aggression? 

I suppose the owner accumulates 
money by putting his team on televi- 
sion, and that Mr. Fluti^s drawing 
power will hugely increase the team's 
audience: The principal beaefiasnes 
of all of this are the televiaon watch- 
ers, who need only turn on the set w 
get, free of charge, their version of 
wha t Caesar gave the mobs, the pub* 

Latin Americavras to l m^^^ ! 


gressmen from Arkansas and chief need to dftafttgmsh the C hrg tian jtffc 
deputy majority whip in the House of from die political or ideological life. 
Representatives. He contributed this A bad time to blur distinctions. 
comment to The New York Times. Umvasal Press Syndicate. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, - FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15,1985 




Sweden Hans 
More Limits 
On Trade 

" " ^ With Pretoria 

-■ Ratten r 

’ STOCKHOLM — Sweden’s So- 
cial DemocraficgovmBBent plans 
to tighten its laws limhing invest- 
ment in' Sooth Attica by Swedish 
congMinotofartiKxaqpressitsab- 
•hoic^ of Pretoria’s racial poE- 
'des. " 

AWU to be debated!™ the legis- 
lature Wednesday would, make it 
Illegal to sell vehicles and dectron- 
ks to the Sooth African police and 
‘military. It would also forbid grant- 
■ing loans to Sooth Africa. Aims 
|aws to Pretoria previously had 
'been banned. 

The govranmeot expects that the 
bill, which is assured of easy pas* 


1 *S§SS 8 S 

SSQM 


ft 


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there with total assets of 1 

lion rand ($88 million) - . 

. Spokesmen for some: of the '11 
companies involved say the hew 
restrictions would further impede 
their activities inSoolh Africa but 
would not. face fliwri oat of busi- 
ness there. 

' Some business executives say 
'dial existing regulations have suc- 
ceeded only in damag in g Swedish 

"; But Sweden wants to set an ex- 

anyle to other nation*. Ibis tegfc. 

latum is an expression of Sweden's 
abhorrence of the apartheid re- 
gime,” Foreign Trade Minister 
Mats Hellstram said. 

*The aunof the 1979 law .was to 
change apartheid and to ffi. other 
Countries to follow suit/* said 
Thomas Ha gdal of the Federation 
of Swedish Industries. “None of 
‘that happened so the Jaw his only 
been detzhnehtal to. Sw edish busi- 
ness.” ■ 



Africa's priw. minister, 
P.W. Botha, in anirizing Ameri- 
cans who advocate thaTu.& busi- 
nesses wfthdiaw investments in his 

COUDtiy, hfl-S said that any snch 
pullout would lead to a bloodbath, 
m South Africa. . • 

Sweden has been in. the vanguard 
of international .moves to isolate 
Pretoria's apartheid government by 
euconraguig disinvestment. A 1979 
law bans new direct Swedish in- 
vestment in South Africa and in 
Sooth-West Africa, also is known 
as Namibia. 

„ The new measure would, forbid 
Qpmpanies from leasing plant, 
equipment and vehicles. South- 
west Africa is administered by 
South Africa in defiance of a Unit- 
ed Nations resolution. 

Swedish business interests in 
South Africa are small ccmpamd 
with those of the United States. 
About 350 American companies 
*. .g Sogth Africa; in 1983, 
had ratify 11 


aSSwQSe- ?. .'■■■ ■ * « >.* * >: v - 

Peasants scavenging through die nibble left by a 1976 earthquake In Tangshan, a once 

Chinese City Struggles to Recover From ’76 Quake 


TVs Vert Tin 

populated area. 


By John F. Bums 

New York Timet Service 

TANGSHAN, China — At 
dawn each day, bands of peasants 
fan out across the acres of rubble 
that scar tbe heart of this city. . 

Although right and a half yean 
. have passed since one of the centu- 
ty*s most devastating earthquakes 
struck the city, scavenging contin- 
ues in what were once Tangshan’s 
most densely populated zones. For 
a few cents a pound, teams of men 
and leen-age beys scour the cram- 
bled brick for twisted bicydes, 
enamdware hmann and lead pipes. 

. Using donkey carts, the peasants 
contribute to an enterprise in urban - 
recovery that matches the bombed 
cities of postwar Europe and Ja- 
pan. After five years of reconstruc- 
tion. that has cost the equivalent of 
S1.4 balltan, according to dty offi- 
cials, Tangshan is a bigger, more 


industrialized dly than it was when 
the upheaval struck. 

At 3:42 AM on July 28, 1976, 
the dty virtually ceased to exist In 
23 seconds of terror, the earth- 
quake devastated 90 percent of tbe 
city's bad dings and hundreds of 
square mQes beyond. At lean a 
quarter of a minion people died, 
dty officials say. 

While tbe authorities in Beijing 
'str ugg led to cope with a catastro- 
phe for which ovA-emergency pro- 
cedures left them largely unpre- 
pared, the world was left to 
speculate about what had hap- 
pened to Tan gshan Years passed 
before any foreigner was allowed to 
visit the dty, and then rally when 
the worst ra the devastation had 
been cleared. ' ■ 

These days, there are guided 
tours. At 13 million, the popula- 
tion of the dty and the surrounding 



Newspaper Says 'Only Quid' Policy 
In China Produces Unruly Quldren 

■ United Press International 

BEIJING — China’s population pcAicy of KmHmg couples to one 
child has resulted in. a gpneratinn of children whose parents require 
special dasses to learn to control them, a newspaper reported Thurs- 
day. ' ■ ' •*•*..- 

Hie Fn gb'sh-langnag* Chma Daily said that mace than 10,000 

yrymgpBTfaitam northern 1 iafwifng pirrvin “attending sriinnk 

to learn bow to cape with an only quid." 

More than 90 percent of the province’s youngsters under the age of 
6 have no brothers or asters, the newspaper said. Hie figure is 
evidence of the success of the government's policy, which is aimed at 
controlling population growth in the nation of more than one MQian 

PC ^fflny are better fed and clothed, but poorly brought up,” the 
newspaper o»id of the children. “Kindergartens and schools find it 
hard to control them: ” • 


countryside is nearly 300,000 more 
than it was at the tin*? of the earth- 
quake, and industrial output is said 
to have risen more than 50 percent. 
About 185,000 of the 220,000 fam- 
ilies who were sheltered for years in 
temporary homes have moved into 
new apartment blocks, and dozens 
of factories are being rebuilt. 

Tangshan, onoe a of nar- 
row streets and mud-brick homes 
centered around the century-old 
Kailuan coal min^ is dominated 
by a march of apartment blocks 
standing four to six stories high. 
Wide boulevards sweep to the hori- 
zon. bordered here and there by 
new hospitals, factories and holds. 

Tbe most visible mack of the 
earthquake is tlie rubble, hundreds 
of acres stretching on other side of 
tbe trunk railroad line that con- 
nects Beijing, 100 mQes (161 kilo- 
meters) to the west, with the north- 
eastern industrial dty of Shenyang, 
When the earthquake hit with a 
force of 7.8 on the open-ended 
Richter scale, tbe upheaval did its 
greatest damag e here. 

Within two weeks, the army had 
sent 100,000 troops. About 30,000 
medical personnel were brought m. 


An Air of Intrigue in Honduras 

Nicaragua,^ Neighbor Sees Sidesm Role as Hast to War 


James LeMbync 

Jew York Timer Service 

TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras — 
Tbe slanted streets of Traudj 


along with 30,000 construction 
workers. Many of the 80,000 peo- 
ple who were seriously injured were 
evacuated in a round-the-clock air- 
lift. A brief outbreak of looting was 
stemmed when the culprits were 
summarily shot. 

Even now, there is confusion as 
to how many people died. Official 
documents printed in recent 
months say 242B00 people were 
killed, 148,000 of them in Tang- 
shan. But earlier figures provided 
by official -ynkemwn in Tangshan 
pnt the toll m the dty at more than 
300,000, and some city dwellers say 
they have heard that the total toO 
was closer to half anriffion. 

For nearly three years, the city’s 
future was under debate. Some 
people in the central government 
cautioned against rebuilding the 
dty on a site that has had serious 
earth tremors on an average of ev- 
ery 12 years. But in the end, consid- 
erations of prestige, and of the val- 
ue of coal and other resources, 
prevailed. 

By 1979, Beijing had settled on a 
plan under winch the dty has been 
rebuilt in three parts, each 15 miles 
from the other. To the south is the 
old dty center, deared of many of 
the rad factories and designed 
mainly as an administrative, resi- 
dential and cultural center. To the 
east is the mining district, and to 
the north, in what used to be open 
fields, is a new industrial section. 

According to Mr. Thang, engi- 
neers were instructed to design tbe 
new buildings to resist a mar nm i m 
shock of 63 on the Richter scale. 

Now, whOe a handful of braid- 
ings rise as high as 14 stories, most 
are six stories or less. Wide maces 
have been left between buddings, 
and most s tru ct ur es have a variety 
of ground-level exits. 


Leave a viator wondering aow snch 
a tranquil collection of adobe 
homes perched on the sides of 'a 
steep mountain, valley could be Ac 
scene of so much plotting, schem- 
zn&wheeting raid deaHng *“ ’ 

The Honduran capital* is a pro- 
vincial little dty that just happens 
to sit on the edge of the covert war 
in Nicaragua. 

There is in Tegucigalpa’* quiet 
streets an aftertaste of the violence 
just over. the border. Hondurans 
themselves seem to have a new 
awareness of the risks of playing 
host to a war. Government offi- 
cials, army officers and party lead- 
ers openly wonder how a- small, 
impoverished country can protect 
its interests without becoming ei- 
ther a pawn of the United States or 
a victim of Nicaragua. 

The not-^veiy-secret conflict has 
attracted a cast of suitably seedy 
characters •nd has markedly shar- 
pened the Hondurans’ own consid- 
erable talent for political intrigwe 

In one sleepy residential neigh- 
borhood, Nicaraguan anti-govern- 
ment guerrilla officials keep in 
touch with their UB. Central lntd- 
Hgcnce Agency contacts and dream 
of overthrowing Nicaragua's San- 
dmist government They speak of 
military triumphs at obscure rites 
deep inside "Nicaragua and worry 
about American support fra their 
cause. 

On the same day, not many 
blocks away, the personal represen- 
tative of Pies doit Daniel Ortega 
Saavedra, of Nicaragua can be 
found lobbying for an end to the 
guerrilla war. the envoy is Hafima 
LApo, who grew up with Mr. One- 
ga. She speaks to Honduran and 
American officials of the Sandin- 
ists* desire for peace: The diplo- 
mats seem to liken with one ear- 
while ■olftntly raUmlating thr proh- 
ability of victory or defeat fra die 
rebels. 

Friday night at the Totem Bar 

brings athlef y; Amwirum mV 

questions but answer few. Two 
have biceps like Vhgmia hams. No- 
body mentions the CIA or the mer- 
cenaries who come to train or fight 
with the Nicaraguan exile army. 

At the nearby Hotel Maya, 
American GI*s~in camouflage uni- 
forms and dusty boots take week- 
end leave from the latest military 
mmenvers 

An hour later they sip Port Royal 
beer and seek the attention of 
women whose language they do not 
speak, mnflh as American MjMiar 
have been doing since World War 
I, when they discovered that Cham- 
pagne was a region as well as a 
drink.. 

Scheming is nothing new to 


Hondurans, participants in well, 
ova- a hundred years of 
door govenuneatfinitiated or 
ed by militarycoups and backroom 
m an e u vers. The current jockeying 
is' over the fate of President Ro- 
berto Suazo Cfrdova, who is wide- 
ty bdiewed to be angling fra a long- 
er stay^ in office than his 
constitutionally mandated four 
years, which end this year. 

Speculation grew when Mr. 
Snazo invited a fortune-teller to die 
presidential palace recently. The 
seer looked at tbe stars, considered 
the winds of fate and announced to 
a wondering public that the presir 
. dent was unquestionably destined 
to rule for four more years. 

Hie fortune-tenet's message did 
not a growing scramble for 
Mr. Suazo’s office. In a brad where 
politics is still about personality 
rather than ideology, thetwomrgor 
parties already have split into at 
least eight factions, each with its 
own favored candidate for presi- 
dent 

Rumors of coops are almost as 
frequent as assurances from the 
UB. Embassy that Honduran de- 
mocracy is alive and wdL even if a 
little boisterous and unpredictable. 
Honduran veterans of past political 
fights are less encouraged. They ay 
that only pressure from the embas- 
sy and the army keeps the experi- 
ment in democracy going. 

“Tbe electoral process has be- 
come a grotesque carnival,” said 
Manuel Acosta Branlla, a leading 
political infighter for the opposi- 
tion National Party. 

■ E xchange nf Uhma m ms 

Doyle McManus of the Los Ange- 
les Times reported from Washing- 
ton : 

Honduras and the United Sta tes, 

ihar allian ce app earing inrarwiiring - 

ty testy, have exchanged ultima- 
tums over UB. aid to the Nicara- 
guan rebels and a regional militaiy 
training center, U.S. nffiriala said 


administration told 


the Honduran government Tuesr 
day that it has until .March l tg . 
admit soldiers from El Salvador w 
a UB.-faumced training center or 
lose the school’s funding, die offi- 
cials said. 

That ultimatum followed a de- 
mand from Tegucigalpa that the 
United States move die more than 
10,000 Nicaraguan rebels out of 
Honduras. UB. officials confirmed 
that the Hondurans officially deliv- 
ered such a demand last week but 
said that they considered it largely 
a tactic to pressure the administra- 
tion into earing their worries about 
tbe rebels’ presence. 

“We’ve had some pretty stiff ex- 
changes over the past couple of 
weeks,” a Department of Defense 
official said. ’‘Officially, well tell 
you it’s all veiy cordial, but it 
isn’t.” 

In an attempt to ease the atmo- 
sphere and get the alliance back on 
track. Vice President George Bush 
plans to visit Honduras next month 
and Mr. Suazo is being invited to 
Washington, an official sahL 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1985 


** 


f NYSE Most Actives ~1 



VoL 

Htok 

UW 

Last 

AT&T 


319* 

21% 

21ft 

Unocal 





SanvCP 

En 

17 

144b 

14% 

Dtalfat 

PMIPet 

m 

117% 

47% 

110% 

47 

170% 

47 

A« Rich 

f.yyj 

50% 

479b 

49ft 

Wendy* 


21ft 

20% 

20% 

Gaodyr 


27% 

28% 

28% 

IBM 


134% 

132 

132ft 

FardM 


449* 

45% 

45% 

GMot 

r 1 * 

80% 

78% 

78% 

dvPant 


54% 

53% 

53% 

Sears 


35% 

34% 

34% 

DHioGn 

ITa*T 

58% 

Mft 

57% 

PhlbrS 


41 

38% 

3896 


1 Dow Jones Averages j 

Open hm Law Lnr On 

mow 130107 UB7J3 13SWC 1B7X8 — KUM 
, Trans aua Mias aaai oqjs— 154 
I Util ISOM UTJ7 147JB 150X0 — 8X4 
camp nous 333.10 sojj 5250 t — 337 


NYSE Index 


High low Cum argo 

Comooslhj 100X3 !«.» I0f70 -008 

industrials 122X5 171.72 121.72 — 053 

Trtvn. 10148 10237 10237—031 

Utmites 5415 5175 SMS -ass 

RnanS ! (200 III M HI M *0.74 


NYSE Diaries 



Cle** 

Prav. 

Advanced 

£ 

1230 

Declined 

403 

Unchanged 

407 

400 

Total Issues 

3D47 

2033 

New HUB 

09 

217 

New Lows 

3 


Vafumeup 

S5J47JM) 


volume dawn 

48X67030 



i Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


Fob. 13. 
ft*. 13 
Feb II . 
Fob# 

Fob. 7 . 


Buy Soles 
211.732 533347 
107.175 433405 
22BJ92 559,503 
274,948 531,101 
217X99 547,798 


■Included In Hm sales Haures 


■StiTt 

1036 

U14 

1734 

2,907 

5443 


lliursdayl 

M3E 

dosing 


VoLoUP.Nl 

mnurn 

Prev.4PM.rol- 

142X00X08 

Prev consolidated dose 

169,974328 


Tables include Itie nationwide prices 
up to the cfosins on Wall street and 

da not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


AMEX Diaries 


Advanced 
□echoed 
unchanged 
Total issues 
Haw Highs 
Now Laws 
Volume uo 
volume down 


don Prav. 



284 376 



294 192 


Composite 

266 233 


lnc33irio!5 

824 823 


Finance 



insurance 

+161570 


UflllflCS 

1B63.H0 


Trorero. 


1 Standard & Poor’s Index 


High Lew daw Cute 
Industrials 705 JO 201*2 30X3-1.14 

Transu 143 B 161415 IklJS — 179 

UlllBtas 79 J9 78.97 78.99 - 377 

Fincmeo 21X1 3148 2149 -am 

Composite 187.95 18279 18241— 0.94 



r AMEX Most AcHvro 


VOL 

Mob 

Law 

1mA 

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6720 

7% 

29b 

2ft 

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1714 

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Wt 

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3737 

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4ft 

4ft 

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T07 

18% 

17% 

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2820 

7743 

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7131 

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1809 

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AMEX 5fock Index! 


LOW 

231417 


close amt' 

min J 


17Morth 
Hum Low suck 


Sis 

100$ H km Law 


C4nse_ 

CMaLOltB 


ZMk 16% AAR 
24 Vk ms AGS 
18% 120k AMCA 
1790 13ft AMF 
39% 21% AMR 
20V. 18ft AMR Erf 2.18 107 
25% 229k ANRpt 247 107 
23 19 AMR pf 2.12 10J 

Ml* 8% APL 
67* 440* ASA 
27 16 AVX 


489* 36% AM Lab 1J2 2 L5 15 4970 
25% 16% AccoWefs 44 14 If 199 
24Vk 12% Acmec 40 2.1 134 

42b 12 12 


2J TO 259 21% 21 21%+% 

12 38 16% 15% 15% — JA 

1949 14% 12% 12% — 29k 

11 36 810 li% 16% 14% + % 

9 6677 39% 38% 3198 . 

12 20% 19% 2D + % 

7 25 25 25 

11 20 % 20 % 20 % + % 

3 9 11% 11% 11%+ % 

200 441 642 51% 50% SOH— % 

JS 14 14 249 24 23% 23%— ft 


11% 8ft AaneE 
17% 15 Ado Ex 
19% 11% AdmMI 
19% BH AdvSvS 
41% 25% AMO 
12% 6% Advesf 
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42% 27ft AetnU 
58% 52% AatLpf 
32% 15% Ahmm 


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2118120 152 

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14 69 

244 62 35 6145 
5070104 405 

1.20 40 17 2497 

30 X 


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35% 34% 34% —1% 
12% 11% !1%— % 
14% 13% 14% 

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13 AlrbFrt 

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545 

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20 ALLTL 

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43 

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100 

£1 

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279* 

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BX 


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1.10 

17 

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144 

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350 

23 



2751 

331 

29 

38 

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5091 

1637 

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277 


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19% 14% ABdcr tl 

65% S25h ABrand 300 60 9 
27% 24% ABrd P» 275 10.1 1 

66 53 ABrd Ot 2X7 4.1 1 

77% SOU, ABdCSl 140 24 10 2950 
35% 19% ABMM 06 IS 12 29 

23% 18% ABusPr M ZB 13 31 

55% 40% Am Con 250 SO 11 1399 
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48 36 AConaf aoo 60 54 

19% 16% ACOPBd 120 11J 63 

33% 25% ACopCv 6X6821X 97 


13% 6% A ConlC 14 118 

MU 42% ACvon I JO 30 12 1744 

29% 18% ADT 02 17 27 779 

21% 15% AElPw 

43% 25 AltlExn 

28%. 13% AFomll 

30% 19% AGnCo 

10% 5% AGnlWt 
57 51% A Gal pf A 4 l20s11<4 

3 57% A Gal pfB 5J0e 7.1 


36 104% 104% 104%— % 
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8% 8% B%— % 
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wfL m i> mw. 

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46 45 45%+ U 

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108 30 15 5168 43% 42% 42%-J 


t*R Amrtdi 


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IOO 3J 9 3361 30% 30% 30% + b 

478 11% 10% 11%+ % 

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116 B3b 82% 83b + % 

1129 61% 60% 61b + % 

137 9% 9 9% + W 

5.1 12 2314 57% 56% 57% — b 
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02 30 14 3919 24b 23% 24 + b 
3b AmMof 853 4% 3% 4 

27b AJNtRss 222 40 9 2412 46b45%45%+% 
22% Apreski J4t 10 5 527 43% 42% 43% + b 

9 ASLFIa 8 151 12% 12% 12b 

18% 15 ASLF1 pf 219 123 79 18 17% 17% 

16 10 ASIdp OO 50 16 195 14% 14% 14% + % 

35% 22% AmStd 100 42 13 387 34% 33b 33%— % 

50% 26% AmSIor 04 12 10 1182 51% 50% 5Tb +1% 

62 46% ASIrpfA 4J8 7.1 26 

53b 51 AStrplB 600 120 43 

22% 14% AT8.T 100 50 1725531 


_ 39% AGn PfD 264 

13% 7% AHofat 
57% 46b AHome 200 
26% AHOSP 1.12 
600 

AlftGTP 

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28% 11% AMI 
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S* 

13 


37% 30% AT AT pf 164 9.9 

28 31% AT&T pf 174 9 J 

44b 27% AWofr 200 44 7 

55 3S AWatpf LO 20 

12 10 AWatpf 105 180 

27% 20b AmHMI 208 91 11 

67b 53b ATrPT 505* 70 

11b 4% ATrSc 
77b SBb ATrUn U5e 66 

32b 26% Ameran TOO 5.1 8 

33% 17 AmnDl 00 O 18 

92 60 Amespf 532 

29% 21% Ametah 60 

21b 18% AmfOc 

17% 10% Amfeec 

38% 26% AMPS 72 

24 14% Ampco JO 

21% 12% Ainraps 

It AmSIti 


39 


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6% 1% Aiwcrnp 
30b 19% Airatoos 
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37% 24% An day 
11% 9% AndrGr 
23% 16b Arawdc 
78b sib Anhaus 


IOO 

1J2 

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137 

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48 

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86 

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40 

13 

253 

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2056 

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22 

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XS 

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50 

641 


57b 44 Anfwupf 140 
22% 13b Anlxtr JB 
16b 8% Anthem 04. 

14% 

3 


16 25 

17 12 

27 10 2270 
4J5 24 

IJ 22 
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13 7 
2JS 12 


8% Anthem 
10% Anttmv M 
9b Apache js 
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19% 15% ApchP un20Ool 1 J 
66 55% ApPwpf 113 119 

60 SB ApPwpf 7.4 115 

25b 21 ApPwpf 245 186 

31% 27b ApPwpf 416 115 

29b 26 ApPwpf 360 112 

39% 17b ApIDtO 1.123 2.9 23 
21b I AppIMa 1.141 8JZ75 
21b 15% ArchDn .14b 7 M 6451 
22% 14% ArtzPS 240 126 7 491 
91% 71 ArIPpf MJlOllJ 5000 __ __ 

29% 23 ArIPpf 3J6 1£5 16 28% 28% 28% — ft 

95% 79 ArIPpf 1170 122 100* 88 88 88 +1% 

23 13% ArkBst OO 16 9 446 23% 22 V. 22b + b 

21% 14 ArUa 1X8 5.1 17 1883 21% 20b 21 — % 

% b ArlnRt 30. % % %— It 

21% 9 Armen 1063 n% Tib n% 

30b 18 Armcpf 2.10 90 12 22% 22% 23% + b 

33b 15% ArmsRS A 11 I ID Zl 22% 22%— b 

37% 27% ArmWIn 1 JO 16 10 2599 X 37% 37b + M 


^ &r»$8 

60ix 54% 54b 54b— b 
lOOOX lib 11% lib + b 
119 27% 26% 27 — % 
33 68 67% 67% 

587 11% 11 11b + % 

78% 77% 78% + % 

£% £ sata 
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13* 13% — 2% 
35b 35b— % 
17% 17b + b 
15% 15% + b 


3% J%— % 
29% 29% 


11% 11% 11%— % 
21 % 20 % 20 % — % 
76 74% 74% + % 

55% 55% 55% + % 
18% 17% 11% + % 
15% 15% 15%— % 
12% 13% 13% — b 
11% lib 1l%— % 
lb lb lb 
17% 17% T7%— b 
63 63 63 -2% 

30b 59 99 59 

3 24% 24% 24%— % 
13 31 SRI 3T 
2 29 28% 28%—% 

914 39% 37% 38%+ % 
305 13% 13% 13% 

20% X 20%—% 
22 21% 21% — b 

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188 

7 

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140 


34% 29% ArmWpf 305 116 
33% 18% ATOCp 1 JO 34 
26% 13% ArawE JO 1J 
22% % Arfra -22 1.1 
23% 14 Arvlns 
54b 34% Antal Pf 2X0 17 
34 V* 17% Anarco 
29b 20b AshKJH 160 56 
42% XU* AahlOOf 4 60 MLB 
39% 31% AshlOpf 196 MU 
61% 45% AedDG 260 45 
90 73 AedOpf 435 

25% 10% Afti lone 160 
25b 19% AfCvEI 268 
B7b 47 A MCE Pf 5X7 
32% 40% All Rich 100 
347V 284 At IRC pf 3X0 
125 97 AflRcpf 180 

20 11% AfkwCP 

34% 1B% Alwat 
45% 29% AlltaDt 
50% 34 AVCOCB 
23% 15% AVEMC 
39% 23 Averv 
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41 27 Avnet 

25% 19b Avan 
36% 18 Avdin 


J2 

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260 


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9 45 33V* 33% 33b + b 

B 148 16% 16% 16b— % 

47 20% 20% 2B%— b 

9 436 23b 22% 23 + % 

1 54% 54% 54% + % 

458 22 21b 21b— % 

258 29% 29 29b + b 

10 41% 41b 41b— % 

21 38% X 38%+ % 

9 1388 a 57% 57% — b 

5.1 153 92% 92% 92% + % 

73 H 12 22b 22 D%— b 

96 8 71 2Sb 25 25b + % 

47 1 88 88 88 + % 

41 2214921 50% 47% 49b +1% 

3 2 330% 330% 330% -rt% 

26 4 119 119 119 +5 

33 15% 15b 15b— b 

1.1 X 1340 28b 27% X + % 

16 X 1488 46% 45 45 — % 

10 103 49b 49b 49b 

25 12 Bt 24 23% 23b— % 

16 16 WO 39 38% 38%— % 

7 357 14% 14 14% + % 

13 17 184* 37b 37 37% + % 

86 11 3240 23 22% 22% + % 

11 226 26% 26 28 + % 


IX 

X 


330 

1.10 


27 12 
16 ITS 


73 7 
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20% 10b BMC 68 33 16 
35b 18% Berimes 50 16 13 
23% 15 Bkrtntf .92 5.1 17 
23% 18% Bakkir J6 15 16 

2% % vIBofcfll 

9 2 BUU Pf 

50 28% BatlCp 

23% 11% BallvMf 
15% 7% BallyPk 
41% 30b BaHGE 
29b 20b BncOne 
11% 8% BncCtrn 
5M 3b BanTex 
60% 38 Bandog 1JB 26 13 
47% X BkBM 260 S3 5 
53% 43 BfcBaspf 5.13e106 
38% 26b BkNY 2X4 S3 4 
U% 15% BnkVae 1X0 36 9 
21b 14% BnkAm 162 76 11 
53% 40 BkAjn pf iltalTJ 
■6 66 BkAm pf 8J8s12X 

10% lib BKAfflPf 268 
32% 22% BkARty 260 76 B 
66 37% BanRTr 170 4.1 7 

24b 19b BkTrpf 250 105 
39 35 BkTrpf 432 11.1 

12% 7% Banner XSe J 


718 13b 
256 35% 
1378 18% 
94 34% 


781 

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117 48 
1203 14% 


126 29 
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1234 5b 
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716 45b 
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49% 32% Banket 
33% 19% BarvWr 
13 B% BASIX 
28b 17% BawKh 
21 lib BaxtTr 
25% 16% BOV Fin 

X in BaySIG _ 

38b 28% Bearing 7X0 26 12 
36 24% BestCO 1 JO 56 9 

65% 46% BeotPf 3J8 « 

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18% m Bi tarot 1J0 166 

18% 12% BeldnH 60 26 ■ 
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N.Y. Prices Fall After Brief Rally 


The Assoaaud Pros 

NEW YORK — Prices on the New York 
Stock Exchange fell in Thursday after making a 
brief run past the 1.300 level on the Dow Jones 
industrial average for the second straight sea- 
son. 

Computer and technology issues, under pres- 
sure since early in the week, recorded some of 
the day’s most notable losses. 

The Dow, up more than 5 points early in the 
day to about 1,303, wound up with a 10.04 loss 
at 1 287.88. Declining issues held a slim edge on 
advances. 

Volume was 139.73 million shares, against 
142.46 milli on Wednesday. 

Analysts said enthusiasm remained high 
abouL the economic outlook and the stock mar- 
ket's rousing start on 19SS. But they said it was 
evident that some traders were using the 1,300 
mark in the Dow as a cue to take profits. 

Some market watchers say that figure is less 
significant than it may appear, since other mea- 
sures of market trends nave regularly been set- 
ting new highs. Still, it seemed to stand as a 
psychological obstacle. 

Another source of caution Thursday was the 
Federal Reserve’s weekly report on the money 
supply, which came out after the dosing. 

The central bank's relalivdy s timul ative 
credit policy has played a major role in setting 
the recent ebullient mood on Wall Street. 

The SI. 4-billion increase in the M-l measure 
seemed to cause no great stir in the credit 
markets. 

Technology issues continued the rocky ride 
that began two days earlier when Data General 


M-l Rises $1.4 Billion 

United Preu International 

NEW YORK — The money supply measure 
known as M-l rose $1.4 billion in the latest 
week, a lower number than previously predicted 
because of two major adjustments made every 
year by the Federal Resene. Economists had 
predicted a $5-bEllion increase before these ad- 
justments. 

The M-l figure, which includes currency in 
circulation, travelers checks and checking de- 
posits at finan cial institutions, was a seasonally 
adjusted average of S56S billion in the week 
ended Feb. 4 compared with S563.6 billion the 
previous week. 

The data reflects two major revisions made 
once a year: an adjustment to reflect seasonal 
variations for such factors as holidays and 
weather, and the so-called benchmark revision 
to reflect data from smaller banks and savings 
and loan associations that do not report weekly. 


said its earnings for the quarter ending March 
31 would come in sharply below expectations. 

Data General shares, down more than 16 
points Tuesday and Wednesday, recovered IVb 
to 57 7 /». 

But Digital Equipment fell 6ft to HOft; IBM 
was off 1 ft at 132ft and Texas Instruments lost 
2ft to 119ft. 

Some financial-services stocks also were 
weak. Merrill Lynch gave, up 1ft to 35, Phibro- 
Salomon 2ft to 38ft, PaineWebber I ft to 40ft 
and E. F. Hutton ft to 40. 


12 Mon Ml 
HtetLw Start 


Ptr. VIA PE 


SB. 

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115% 115% 115% 42% 
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30% 30% 30% 

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18% 18% 18% + % 
17% 17% 17% + % 
17% 17% 17%+% 
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339k 24% CBI In IXOd 5J M 94 

87% 62 CBS 3X0 3J 12 2261 

8% 4% CCX 15 196 

49 27 CIGNA 240 *5 X 3015 

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7% 4% CLC 54 

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10% 0% CNA I UOollJ V 

41% 34% CPC Inf 2X 54 10 1275 

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27% 10% CSX 1X4 <1 811052 

39% 22 CTS 1X0 25 14 83 

12% 7%C3tnc 38 882 

33% 22% CatWt 32 23 18 

13% 6U. Caomr 14 

19 11% CalFad 32 IX * 1498 


27% 2Mk 344k— % 
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26% 25% 25%—% 
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2009 

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11% 7% COmtl X7 X 14 
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22% 18% CarlHw 1J2 4X 51 
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15% 9% COSCNG UO 04 “ 

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25% 16% Canted 234 ifx 
23% 18% CanliU L22 9 A 
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7 1078 25% 25% 25%— % 
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1806 
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JB 77 9 
2X0 UA 9 
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34% 33% 329b— % 
14% 14 14% 

12 % 12 12 — % 
X 20% 28% — 1 
32% 32% 32 Vk— % 
27% 25 27% +2% 

93 92% 92%+ % 

40% 40% 40% 

9% 9% 9% + % 
41% 41% 41%— % 
269b 26% 26% + % 
23% 22% 21 + % 
24% 24% 24% + % 
23% 23% 23% 
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22 % 21 % 22 % + % 

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18% 10% 10% + % 

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179k 17% 17% — % 

HHk 9% 9%— % 
10 % 10 % 10 % — % 
23 22% 22% 

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3025 23% 2J% 23% 

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12% 1 vlChrlC 814 3% S 3%— % 

6% % VlOtf Wt 149 1% 1% 1%— % 

11% lVkvtChrtPf _ 104 3% 3% 3% + % 

55% 39% Clnsp 3X0 7X 6 1426 55% 56% Sffb— % 

44% 3*% awiapf 575 11X X 45 44 44%+% 

58 48 Chasapf 6X7alL9 4 55V. 55% 55% 

571k 51 cnooapf 9JOB177 X 53% SS% 6ZM 

21% 13% Ctelaao 72 ax 9 12 20% 20% 20% 

34% 24% Charm! 1X2 U 13 308k 38% 30% 30% + I* 

41% 23% CUNY* 234 U 7 2334 41 41% 42% +1% 

41% 23% CbNYpf 1X7 *5 15 41% 41% 41% + « 

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38% 31% Cheopfc U4 12 12 369 39% 38% 38% + % 

399k 32% anapn 2JM S4 12 m 38% 37 37 — » 

40% 29% Chavm 2X0 7X 8 413S 35 34% 34%— % 

' ■ 9 70 22% 22% 23 

65 64 151 M9% 14994— % 

IB 7$¥s 69% 69%— % 
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J3J 37 142 M 89* 8% 8%— % 


34% 18% CNWsf 
200 108% CMMhr 
75 53% OdMIPf 

25% 16 OilPnT 

15 7% a* Full 

41% 24% ChrtoCr 
12 5 ChrWn 

13% 9% Chroma 

54 42 Chrmpf 

36% 20% CUrVBjr 1X0 
62% 349k OMttl 128 
34% 21% Church 30 
45% 3SVb CIn Ball 
15% 89k OnGE 
31 74 atiGnf 

6m. SO CfeiGpf 
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66% 48 OnGPf 
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28% X C1RM1I 
36 21% ClrdK 

38% 16% Oraty 

22% 13% arcus 

45% 27% CSS fop _ 

86 68% CW cp pf BJJell.l 

99% 75% CHtBRf A 9759109 

*4% 22 Cllyinv 

68 49% CTvlRPf -300 13 

25% 21% Ctylnpf 2X7 UX 
n% 6% Ctabtr 72 9J 
36% 33% CtarUB 1.10 X6 19 334 

16 6% ClayHm 17 155 


UN 
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20% 13% CtovEI 2X2 TJX 3 
59 47 GTvElPf 7X6 127 

16% TO davpk XO 4X 
17% 15% OvpfEpf 123 T3X 
10 14% Ctvpkpf 1X4 HX 

31% 22% OttOX UN S 
19% 14% ClutaMn 
31 22% ChiettP 

19% 14% OutfPf 
32% 12% cooefam 
38% 23% Coastal 
36% 24% CsHpf 
39 24% Carr pf 

66 49% Cocoa 

19% 9% Galea 
34 25% Ctriemn 

26% 20% QrioPal 
45% 27% CatUUk 
20% 9% Col Pda i 
31% 20% Col Pan 
43% 399k Cottind 
37% 27 ColGos 
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43% 27% Cambio 2H 4X 11 


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14 1299 60% 59% 60 +% 
19 2935 25% 34 349k +1 

8 66 44 45% 46 +1 

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TO8X 30% 30% X% +1% 

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2Hz S3 S3 53 

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72 LB 32 1190 259k 2S% 25%— % 

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10 672 39% M 39% 

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3898 30% 30% - % 

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2X6 41 


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17% 8 Comdb 
28% 15% CemMlt 
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239k 21% CmwE 
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16% 13 CarEpf 
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67% 53% CwE Pf 
22% 16% CwE pf 
67 54% CwE Pi 

99 46 CWE Pf 

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32% 20% Cannot 
33 169b CPB9C9 

36% 26 Compor 


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1X8 SS 2 33% 33% 33% + % 

276 <5 U 4886 61% 61% 61% + % 

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I] Month 
HfebLsw Stock 


Drv. VU. PE 


£& 

1001 Htofl Low 


Oust 

OooLQfoe 


17% II ComoSC B 443 16% 

46U 29 CPtvsn 31 1899 41% 

38% 1*9* ConAos X7 3X 14 419 29% 

239* 13V, Cortalr Xta IX 12 2S6 239* 

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17% TO9* Conroe XO 73 8 141 14 

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48% 23% CnP PfD 7X5 16X 330z 45% 

50% 259* CnP pfE 772 16X 330Z 46% 

49% 25 CnPpfG 738 W TJOOz 46 
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25% 10% CnP prT STB 17X 80 22% 

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14% 7 CnPprL 273 142 

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997 18% 
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60z 569k 5696 56%— % 
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3714 37 37% + % 

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Emchpnusaiu 
Entree 21 


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569 30% 30% 30%+ % 
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739 18% W% 18% 

4236 5% 5% S%+ % 

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14 17 17 17 

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34*6 19% GCA 15 1925 

65V* 48% GEICO X8 IX IT 41 

10% 4 GEO 256 

13% 5V. GFCo 116 

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36*6 21% GTE at 2X0 77 4 

23'4 19*6 GTEpI 2M 117 30 

10 4% GolHou 79 

56% 33*6 Graft 1X8 2X 20 3303 

25*b 17% GOPStr X0 20 14 

30*6 10% Gaarfit X0 29 16 

19% 13*6 Getco X6 11 15 

6«% 53*6 Gem Co 137 

40*6 30% GnCorw 1X0 3X121 

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21 \TH GfiDot s 23 483 

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12% 10 GTFlpf 
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30% 11% Go Rod .10 X 25 615 

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34% 31% 33%—% 
321* 32V. 32 1* + % 
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63% 62% 62% — % 
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!0Oz 12*4 12% 1214+1 


2500 ON THE DOW 
and 

800% PROFITS 

the surge in stock prices, pariahs of pessimism continue to expoundupon negativis* 
themes. They exist in a subterranean world, where fantasies, 
churned out by charlatans. In times of stress, their world 

suddenly fascinates and dominates multitudes of responsible people. CHi--need . 
only to allude the hordes of scared speculators who were cajoled into :• 

stocks when the DOW dipped under 800. enchanted by the illusory gfittCTrtgoldat - 
5820 an ounce, chasing silver up to £44. Our researchers recall a S undayedrtiona a. 
N-.Y.C. newspaper, which featured 20 advertisements extoWng me virtues of the 
■barbarous relic", when gold was glistening. Now. with gold around S300, advertise- 
ments or articles heralding gold, are rarer than Freemasons in J"C>sctw- . - .- 

Which is precisely the reason why we are, atthis level, dedicated gold bugs, subs- 
cribing to the law of contrary reason. As mavericks we urge reader to buy fofor - 
weakness to sell into strength .mocking the manic-depressive nature oftne^tneeT.^ 
It may be illuminating to note that when the Crowd was cringing, when the DOW was . 1 
under 800, CGR rallied its clients, prognosticating that the 'American market will 
thrust upwards on record volume as funds flow into dollars, that the DJI will touch 
1,000 before hitting 750'. Ouroptimism wassustained. In June1984, while the marie#, 
was comatose, our analysts flashed a buy signal, musing... “the market will erupt on 
the upside, vaporizing prophets of doom". 

Within five trading sessions, the DOW soared 77 points. And now? 

CGR's forthcoming letter delineates why the DOW will, in our opinion, catapultto 
1500, with a longer term target above 2500. In addition, we focus upon two emerging' - 
corporations, with the dynamics to vault, as did a recently recommended ‘special . 
situation', that spiralled BOOft in a brief time-span. 

For your complimentary copy, please telephone or write to._ 



CAPITAL 

GAINS 


n 


F.P.S. Financial Planning Services bv 
KatverstraatH2, J 

1012 PK Amsterdam, The Netherlands J 
Phone: (020) “27 SI 81 \ 

Telex 18536 , 


Name: 


1 Address: 

r 

j Phone: mris /2 -fr j 

Past performance does not guarantee future results 


CMcnm 
H'raflLow Stock 


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29% 29% 29% 

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Feb. 15> 1985 


WEEKEND 


Plage 7 


Dance in Hollywood 
And Its Demise 


by Anna Kisseigoff 


N EW YORK. — So modi has been 
written about the demise of the 
Hollywood musical that the 
chronicling itself is turning into a 
minor art form. The latest entries are an 
anthology of film clips called “That’s Danc- 
ing!” and a book with the same title by Tony 
Thomas limed to coincide with the release of 
the film. The book, published in New York 
by Harry N. Abrams, indudes an inside look 
at the the assembling of the movie, which 
was modeled after “That's Entertainment," 
but it stands on its own as a study of dancing 
in film musicals. 

Thomas gives a brief photographic survey 
of many dancers and various films, in addi- 
tion to the customary remarks about who 
killed the Hollywood musical (television, the 
end of the studio system, overwhelming 
costs, lack of certain talent). But he Focuses 
primarily on individuals, offering a series or 
chapter-long portraits rather than an ex- 
haustive reference volume. For the latter, 
one can recommend Clive Hirschbom's 
"The Hollywood Musical; Every Hollywood 
Musical From 1927 to the Present Day” 
(Crown Publishers). Hirschhom is also the 
author of a biography of Gene Kdlv (Sl 
M artin's Press). 

Fred Astaire, Busby Berkeley, Ray Bolger, 
Cyd Charisse, Ruby Keeler, Gene Kelly, 
Ann Miller, Gene Nelson, Donald O’Con- 
nor and Eleanor Powdl are discussed in 
detail, and in his introduction, Thomas does 
the unheard of and names the choreogra- 
phers who choreographed (the word is used 
advisedly) the dances which the film public 
saw. Superstars such as Astaire and Kelly 
often choreographed their own work, but 
they would be the Cist to acknowledge that 
much of their dancing was co-choreo- 
graphed or that entire fflms had an overall 
choreographer. Journalism has, however, 
relegated these creative artists to a nameless 
limbo, as “dance arrangers” or “dance direc- 
tors.” One recent review of a book on Astaire 
insisted on calling Hermes Pan, one of the 
most creative choreographers in the history 
of film, a dance arranger! 

Among those choreographers Thomas 
goes out of his way to name (just so that we 
don’t think their dances sprang full-blown 
out of the camera) are Robert Alton, Rod 
Alexander, David Could, Bobby Connolly, 
Jade Cole, Seymour Felix, Charles Walters, 
Eugene Loring, LeRoy Prinz (for James Cag- 
ney in “Yankee Doodle Dandy”), Michael 
Kidd and Pan. Special mention is made of 
Jerome Robbins for one film, “West Side 
Story,” whose choreography, Thomas says, 
allows “Same understanding of what soch a 
man can do with the marriage of dance and 
film.” 

The point that should be picked oat here, 
it seems, is the role of the individual. Holly- 
wood used to be considered a system rather 
than a place, and the Hollywood musical has 
usually been considered the product of a 
system. Yet by focusing on key figures (as 
the film, 7 “That’s Dancing!” dob not), 
Thomas shifts the emphasis to a forgotten 
area. 


I DO not believe, as some do, that rock 
and roll is another factor in the demise 
of the Hollywood musical. It is easy to 
say thgr rock and roQ — in its harshness and 
occasionally unpalatable social message — 
does not lead itself to (he format of what is 
called a film musical. It is much harder to 
admi t that the kind of talent that coincided 
with (be heyday of the musical from the 
1930s through the 1950s, simply no longer 
exists. 

Most writing about the Hollywood musi- 
cal takes an ardtaeotaacal tack. Even the 
anthology film, by definition, suggests an 
attitude of dKnibl examination — alook at a 


way of life that no longer holds true. Jack 
Haley Jr. and David Niven Jr. with Gone 
Kelly, the co-producers and executive pro- 
ducer respectively, of “That’s Dancing!" 
cast their film in the guise of a historical 
survey. There is some confusion as to wheth- 
er the film purports to be a selective history 
of 20th-century dance or a survey of dance 
on film: Hence the exclusion of modern 
dance except for dips of Loie Fuller and 
what znay or may cot be Isadora Duncan at a 
Jen party. When Haley produced “That’s 
ltertainment,” and its sequel, “That's En- 
tertainment, Pan n,” the popularity was put 
down to nostalgia for the oldtime musical. 

Yet, as Haley makes dear to Thomas, it 
was the dancing rather than the singing in 
these dips that proved most popular with 
audiences throughout the world. He leUs the 
author why he made a film compiled of 
dance dips: “What made me resolve one day 
to do it was the audience reaction to the 
original "That’s Entertainment.’. . . It was the 
dancing that really turned people on." 

One of the best parts of the film are the 
mass dances devised by Busby Berkeley. A 
Berkeley sequence is always an ode to the 
camera, rather than to Terpsichore. But what 
really turned people on were dancers of 
caliber. Great dancers or exceptional danc- 
ers on film have rarely been given Lheir due: 
Just as it has been assumed that anyone 
could be taught to sing within the studio 
system, so supposedly anyone could be 
taught to dance. Doris Day was taught, Deb- 
bie Reynolds was taught. 

Granted, the difference between non- 
dancers taught to dance and real dancers is 
apparent — Doris Day was not Eleanor 
Powell. But to appreciate the distinction, one 
has only 
in a musical 
not until recently. 


But to appreciate the distinction, one 
> to recall that you could dub singing 
deal — but not dancing. Or at least 


T HERE is no greater evidence of the 
decline of the old musical, or the inad- 
equacy of the so-called new musical, 
than the fact that the herione of “Flash- 
dance” had to have her dancing executed by 
a double. Marine Jahan. Did a double do 
Fred Astaire’s dancing? 

To. consider “Flashdance” a new kind of 
musical is laughable. Thomas wisely limits 

hinwlf LO e xamining the exponents of the 

Hollywood musical in its conventional form, 
usually known as the integrated musical, in 
which the dancing advanced the plot Haley 
tries to stretch things a bit and by suggesting 
there is still life in the corpse, devotes the 
final section of his film to “the future.” with 
flashes from specially staged break dancing 
demonstrations, “Saturday Night Fever” 
and “Flashdance." ■: ■ 

In the latter film, the liberated heroine 
dances in a new wave floorshow in a bar but 
yearns to join a ballet company. There is no 
song and dance dialogue between the char- 
acters to advance the plot, but dance is 
relevant because the heroine likes to dance. 
There is a point in common here with the 
traditional musical Fred Astaire often por- 
trayed a dancer, and more than half of the 
traditional musicals concerned backstage 
life. John Travolta has also been cast as a 
dancer, if only in a disco. 

Are we that just dealing with evolution of 
a form, a change in conventions? Is the old 
musical in which the characters burst into 
song or wowed us with a dance number no 
longer credible? Is the unpersuasive realism 
of “Flashdance" more suited to our time? 
Obviously, dancers today have fantastic 
technique. But when everybody’s technique 
is fantastic, the only way to stand out is with 
the special artistry the oldtimers exhibited. 

Anyone who saw Gene Nelson live, late in 
his career, in the Broadway musical “Fol- 
lies" in 1971, had confirmation that his su- 
perb dancing was not dependent on camera 
tricks. Great dancers made great musi cals.! 

© 1985 The New York runes 


Developments in Hoboken: 
The Gold Coast of New Jersey 


N EW YORK — Jn a television 
commercial, the Broadway 
smoothie Ben Vereen confides to 
the camera — “Perfect together 
New Jersey and you.” And in an ad in die 
Sunday New York Tunes, an unidentified 
householder crows, “I was loo late for Soho, 
too late for Tribeca. Damned if I'm going to 
be too late for Hoboken.” 

To be too late for Hoboken is all that most 
New Yorkers ever wished: to residents of 
Manhattan, New Jersey and its mai n dues 
have long been as pictured on Saul Stein- 


Mary Blume 


million square feet (IS milli on square me- 
ters) of office apace, 30,000 residential units, 
and up to 2^00 bold rooms, all surrounded 


by marinaS' restaurants awH, presumably, 
placid fishin g grounds (developers have 
spent a good deal of time convincing envi- 
ronmentalists that the Hudson’s striped 
bass, whose existence in the river’s turgid 
waters few people had even suspected, will 
lead healthier lives in a highly developed 
New Jersey). 

The prospect of so much wealth across the 
river has aroused New York’s Daily News to 
publish a thundering editorial calling dty 
officials to action. “<?eariy. New Jersey is no 
longer content to play second banana to the 
Big Apple," the editorial wants. “Let our 
neighbor’s ambition trigger a similar burst of 
building an New York’s shores." 

The most arresting of the new “gold 
coast” projects is one that hopes not to (haw 
on browbeaten New York office workers buL 
on a luxury trade that will nestle at the edge 
of Jersey Gty of their own volition in a 
marine village called Port Libertfe. which will 
offer 1676 residential units, a great deal o f 
office and commercial space. 740 boat slips, 
an ecumenical church, rapid access to New- 
ark International Airport and Wall Street, a 
view of the side and back of tbe Statue of 
Liberty and, of course, ecologically sound 
striped bass fishing from Caven Point. 

| HE architect for Pori libertfe is Fran- 
cois Spocrry, the majestic 72-year-old 
creator of what he calls the cite la- 
custre or lagoon city patterned, he says, on 
Venice. Prat Libertfe will be a New Jersey 
adaptation of his Port Grimaud, begun some 
20 years ago outside Sl Tropez, with boat 
slips adjoining homes. The Hudson may not 
be the Mediterranean and Jersey Gty may 
lack, among other things, the Caffe Sfenfequier 
and Brigitte Bardot, but there is good sailing 
nearby in the Atlantic and Long Island 
Sound. When be built Port Grimaud in 
France, Spoerry says, he was warned that 
there weren't enough sailors around and no 
one would buy. 

“But people became sailors because they 
bad the moorings,” be says, “You’ll see, all 
New York bay will be covered with boats.” 

Spoerry is also involved in building en- 


berg’s famous drawing of the New Yorker's 
view west — a noxious and negligible strip 
interrupting the view towards golden Cali- 
fornia. 

Now all has chan ged. Fueled by high taxes 
and space shortages in Manhattan, New Jer- 
sey is in tbe midst of a $6-bQlion develop- 
ment scheme of its Hudson River waterfront 
from opposite the Battery to the George 
Washington Bridge. 

The redevelopment, said to be the largest 
of its kind in the United States, so far in- 
volves 22 individual developments ranging 
from great office towers to a 600-seat restau- 
rant on a pier in Weehawken belonging to 
the birdseed manufacturers Hartz Moun- 
tain. 

Even the beady and invisible financier 
Daniel Ludwig is said to be in on the act, 
which, it is daimeri, will turn New Jersey’s 
Hudson waterfront into a “gold coast" of 20 


claves in New Orleans, Baja, California and 
an artificial island off Jakarta. 

“Francois Spoerry could become tbe Cal- 
vin Klein of residential communities,” says 
Paul Bucha, president of the Spoerry group, 
which is building the Port Liberie project. As 
a Frenchman, Spoerry cannot practice archi- 
tecture in the United States; he listed as 
urban planner with Ehrenkrantz & Ehrenk- 
ranrz as the working architects. 

Bucha, 41, is a West Pointer who received 
the Congressional Medal of Honor in the 
Vietnam War and worked for six years in 
Tehran and Paris for H. Ross Perot. Other 
directors are the Swiss property developer 
Pierre Barrier Labouchfere and Prince Ferdi- 
nand von Bismarck, who has helped develop 
Marbelia and Monte Carlo. 

“They are truly expert marketers of quali- 
ty projects,” Bucha says. “They come with 
excellent financial connections. Their con- 
tacts allowed us credibility to go to U-S. 
financial sources." The project, privately fi- 
nanced by a consortium of New Jersey thrift 
institutions, is expected to cost $392 million 
in 1984 dollars and to be ready to receive its 
first occupants in time for the celebration of 
the Statue of Liberty’s centenary in 1986. 

The public relations man and, as he refers 
to himself, “Catalyst on a Hot Tin Roof" of 
the project is John Reagan (“Tex”) 
McCrary, 74, famous for the “Tex and Jinx" 
radio and TV show and latterly an interna- 
tional fixer, owner of a Hong Kong newspa- 
per and chairman of the board of a West 
German company that is making multi-fla- 
vored tofu that whl have a nine-month shelf 
life without refrigeration. He has also been 
involved in many real estate projects, and it 
was be who persuaded Bucha, who had pro- 
spected sites across the United States, to put 
Port Libertfe smack in New York harbor. 

When they started visiting New Jersey 
sites, Spoerry and Bucha knew McCrary was 
right “If you go to New Jersey, an asset is 
your view of the New York skyline,” Bucha 
says. "Tm not sure you’d pay to live in New 
York and look at Weehawken.” 


T HE partners seem to disagree about 
who will inhabit the cond ominiums 
and townhouses, which will average 
about $280, 000 in price (building is expected 
to start in May). Barrier and Bismarck be- 
lieve they will sell one-third of the property 
to Europeans “as a pied & terra in the coun- 
tryside but close to New York.” Bucha 
thinks that lonely Europeans who now live in 
the Galleria and Trump Tower might want 
to leave gilded isolation in Manhattan and 
mess about in boats in Jersey. McCrary says 
that any European who lives in Trump Tow- 
er does so because he wants to and that the 
market is in the American MidwesL 
“WeTl get all the young hot shots wbo’ve 
built a company from Texas to Minnesota 
and sell this whole bloody place out as cor- 
porate homes,” McCrary says. He used to be 
involved in marketing executive jets. 
“There’s a whole group or people — they buy 
a jet and they buy a boat later, they always 
do.” By boat, McCrary means a proper sail- 
ing vessel, not a “stinkpot,” as he calls motor 
boats, 

Francois Spoerry cruises the Mediterra- 
nean each August in a 47-foot Benfeteau 
schooner and has sailed all his life. If his Part 
Grimaud philosophy cf. family life led on the 
water is the base of Port Libertfe, there have 
been adaptations for American tastes. “I had 
to come along and say how much will it cost 
and is it truly American,” Bucha soys. “If it 
were only American it wouldn't have charm. 
If it were only European, well Americans 
want to have their kitchens equipped, not 
bare, and roost American bedrooms are big- 
ger than Europeans with kingsize beds and 
sitting areas and even wet bars. They have 
become parental retreats.” 

“Americans are more collectivity-minded 


than tbe French,” Spoerry says, “which is 
easier to work with. Here people want con- 
tact they want neighbors, though they don't 
want to suffer from them. At Port Grimaud 
we can’t ever find people to take charge of 
the saitingp club. Here, everyone will want 
to.” 

The point of Port libertfe, Spoerry says, is 
to make the Hudson alive as it was before 
bridges and nmnels replaced boats. The style 
of his buildings will be Dutch- Victorian. 
With projects that range from adobe to Pro- 
vencal, Spoerry can be said to lack a person- 
al style. He does not disagree. 

“All architects copy each other and always 
have. We can’t invent It is like a language — 
it already exists and each person tries to 
express himself in it his own way. 

“I don’t say I want to create my own 
architecture because no one has ever done 
so. it is wrong to say you are creating your 
style. My way of being original is, for exam- 
ple. to create a 19th-century Mexican town 
in California because no one else is doing it 1 
choose some words, other architects choose 
other words." 

Architects are not usually afflicted by hu- 
mility and Spoerry, a handsome, leonine 
man, is no exception. He does, unusually, see 
limits. “Architecture is a necessary evil. It’s 
not always a good thing. The Great Architect 
has sometimes done better. When you inter- 
fere with a landscape, you should be care- 
ful.” 

As a student, Spoerry admired Wright, 
Eiffel, Gabriel and tbe classical architects. 
He loathed what he calls tbe bnitalism of Le 
Corbusier: “1 thought man had enough trou- 
ble without being oppressed by architects. 

“I wouldn't destroy the land as Le Corbu- 
sier so willingly did. One must try, especially 
in a holiday resort, to reassure people that 
tbe world hasn't changed as much as they 
think. You must make them see that you can 


keep the old values. Tbe shape of a town is 
more important than its architecture. The 
architect should be modest: all my genera- 
tion were geniuses." 


I N a new village, be it Port Grimaud or 
Port libertfe, the important thing is to 
create meeting points — the modem 
equivalent of the parish pump. “We are 
creating an artificial community, we must 
try to give it the chance to become natural.” 
Spoerry says. “We have studied the growth 
of small villages in the south of France and 
discovered certain basic rules about the im- 
portance of meeting places, about the dis- 
tancing of things from each other, about the 
relations of height and width, just as when 
you build a fire the logs must be placed in 
such a way that the air passes through and 
fans the flames." 

An artificial community can be quickly 
constructed but takes about 25 to 30 years 
really to settle, Spoerry says. The second 
generation of Port Grimaud dwellers, he 
says, went through a sort of revolution 
against their fathers. Now that the commu- 
nity is in its third generation, in terms of 
lifestyle if not lifespan, it has settled down 
nicely. 

Equally, Port Libertfe may be built quickly 
but it will lake a while before it assumes a life 
of its own. 

“For the first inhabitants, we will have to 
give them pointers to help them create a 
community,” be says. “The first inhabitants 
are working with you and deserve the best 
treatment. They are pioneers, but they 
shouldn't have to lead the life of pioneers.” 
If they are Midwestern jet owners with a 
newly acquired Alden ketch and a taste for 
bass fishing within view of Manhattan 
towers, they shouldn’t have a worry in tbe 
world. ■ 



P 


Franqois Spoerry , left , and Paul Bucha, with a maquette of Port Liberie. 


- . L 

1 m / 


!.*■ 


.... « 


% 


r - , 
r’i 



Unlocking the Secret Numbers of Alban Berg 


by Donal H enflhan 




Alban Berg in 1910, by Arnold Schoenberg (deta,l). 


N EW YORK — In a season when the 300th birthdays of 
both Bach and Handel are being celebrated, Alban Berg’s 
mere 100th might easily be brushed over. That would be 
too bad. Every season, after all, is a Bach and Handel 
season, so that there is a ceremonial air about the special attention 
being paid to tbe Baroque giants this year. Clouds of incense rise, 
familiar eulogies are recited, floral tributes are placed. The congrega- 
tion, meanwhile, dozes fitfully, confident that nothing that is said or 
done could change anyone's opinion of the deceased. 

Berg’s position in history, however, is still not settled. Bom on 
Feb. 9, 1885, he has been dead only 50 years and is very much a man 
of our time, perhaps even a pivotal one. In certain ways he seems 
more alive and pertinent today than his close colleagues Schoenberg 
and Webern, both of whom enjoyed higher standing in academic 
circles until recent years. Not that Berg's music is simpler than theirs 
in design or layout: in fact, rarely has any successful composer tied 
his works so tightly into formal straitjackeis. Still, no matter how 
involuted the formal scheme, Berg's style does not choke off expres- 
sion. The music exudes a fetid sensuality, evident in the early songs 
and never quite lost in the later, more sophisticated works. In fact, on 
one level his opera “Lulu” is about nothing much more than animal 
sensuality and the grip that it fastens around everyone who slips into 
its magnetic field. 

So, yes, there is always the mood of Alte Wien ripeness or 
overripeness in Berg. Sentiment and nostalgia figure greatly in his 
works, just as in Mahler’s. Berg's craft rarely obscures his expressive 
impulse, or attempts to subsntute for iL We always hear a human 
pulse beating and a tone of genuine regret for decaying tradition. We 
hear him tom between making love to yesterday and trying to make 
peace with tomorrow, again Eke Mahler. Listeners who profess to 
hear nothing but noise in most 20th-century music can find them- 
selves swept up in the humid Romanticism of the Violin Concerto, 
with its quotation from a Bach chorale and its dedication to a dead 
young woman (Manon Gropius, daughter of Alma Mahler). 

The operas “Wozzeck” and “Lulu" both exercise Berg’s appeal in 
different ways. But half a century after his death both continue to 
fascinate us with their characteristically Viennese blend of softness 
and brutality, carnality and tenderness. Both are unmistakable 
products of a post-imperial culture in which love and hate, sadism 
and masochism, cruelty and sentimentality and all other known 
types of ambiguity were loose and running wQd. We inhabit that 
same world today, enlarged many times, and can recognize the map 
that Berg drew for us. 

Tbe structural niceties and intricacies of his first opera, the mostly 
atonal but not 1 2-tone “Wozzeck,” are so famous that every program 
annotator feds free to repeat them automatically, and rightly so. 


Even the musically unlearned operagoer must take pleasure in 
knowing that an orderly plan underlies a work of art, even, if that 
H reign is not clearly evident It is intellectually satisfying to realize 
that the Doctor, with his pseudoscientific obsessions, is re presented 
by a passacaglia, a strict form in which an entire movement may be 
built on one repetitive idea. The arithmetical neatness of the three 
acts in five scenes each appeals to ns. So does the realization that the 
maddest in the entire opera, the one in which the Doctor and 
the Captain sadistically torment Wozzeck, is cast in the shape of a 
three-part fugue. Psychiatry, which blossomed in Vienna during 
Berg’s lifetime, had taken over the word fugue to describe a flight 
from reality, a fact that most have struck Bog’s fancy. 


B ERG’S concern with design, however, went beyond superfi- 
cial orderliness and clever eactramusical allusions. He was 
compulsively interested in numbers, to an extent that only 
recently has been fully appreciated, and relished what he regarded as 
lheir mystical relationship with his music. Scholars long ago realized 
that his “Lyric Suite” was constructed according to some hidden 
code centering around the seemingly inexplicable numbers 10 and 
23. It was known, too, that Berg took interest in the numerological 
theories of WOhelm Fliess, a Beilin biologist who was an early friend 
of Freud. 

Then, about eight years ago, the musicologists George Perie and 
Douglas M. Green, working independently, uncovered the secret 
program on which the “Lyric Suite” was based, and all Berg 
scholarship had to be reassessed. The 12-tone, purely instrumental 
piece, perhaps the most passionate thing Berg ever wrote, turned out 
to be a rapturous but despairing love-offering to Hanna Fuchs- 
Robettin, a married woman and sister of the writer Franz WerfeL 
The quotations in the “Lyric Stale” from “Tristan und Isolde,” once 
p ulling , suddenly made complete sense. Berg, it developed, was the 
perfect 10 and Hanna was the 23. For some undisclosed reason, 
perhaps connected with momentous dates in their lives, those were 
“their numbers.” The Illicit lovers were caught in exactly the kind of 
romantic triangle (quadrangle, in tins instance) that Wagner ideal- 
ized in "Tristan.” 

Women, in fact, seem to have been both the bane and delight of 
Berg's life. Early on, he found himself so attracted to a servant girl in 
the family household, “MtzzT by nickname, that an illegitimate 
daughter was the outcome. She; like Hanna, is immortalized in the 
"Lyric Suite," whose original text alludes to a Carinihian folksong in 
which the singer tells of an affair with one “Mjzzl” Is it any wonder 
tha t an artist with such a rich bat frustrating sexual history had to 
write "Lulu”? 

The composer's wife Helene knew of Berg's attraction to “Mo- 
pink a,” as Hanna was called, but he seems to have kept the exact 


depth of his involvement secret, revealing it only in a highly personal 
annotated score of the “Lyric Suite” that he gave to Hanna, who died 
in 1964. Perie, a veritable Hercule Poirot of musicology, learned that 
it had passed into the hands of her daughter Dorothea and tracked it 
down. The other sleuth. Green, discovered that the final movement 
of the suite, the Largo Desolato, had a suppressed vocal part for 
female voice consisting of the sonnet “De Profundis Clamavi” from 
Baudelaire’s “Fleurs du Mai,” in Stefan George’s German transla- 
tion. 

What happened between Berg and Hanna we can only surmise. 
And how much did Helene Berg really know? The recently published 
second volume in Perle’s exhaustive analysis of the operas, this one 
focusing on “Lulu" (University of California Press, $28.50). clearly 
indicates that she knew everything there was to know and probably 
suspected even more. As she does not try to disguise in letters to her 
friend Alma Mahler, Helene resented the other woman intensely, 
and yet Berg continued to write to his beloved Hanna until the end. 
Although the score of “Lulu" is formally dedicated to his teacher 
Schoenberg. Berg covertly dedicated the work to Hanna by code in 
tbe Prologue ana closing bars, and wrote to tell her so. Perie also 
mentions a 23-page letter that he has not been able to examine as yet 
but which he believes “may include a description of the secret 

E rogram of the Violin Concerto." In any event, the widow clamped a 
d on her husband’s papers after his death and did everything she 
could to promote the myth of her idyllic marriage until her death in 
1976 at age 91. Hanna’s name does not appear in the authorized Borg 
biography — authorized by the widow, that is — that his onetime 
student WDli Reich published in Vienna in 2937. A rewritten version, 
published in 1964, again fails to mention Hanna. 

All this has led Berg admirers to wonder if scholars might someday 
uncover similar programmatic insights into “Lain.” Long believed to 
have been left without a final act at Berg’s death, the opera was often 
performed in various torso versions until after tbe death of the 
composer’s widow, who had refused to release a great deal of 
unpublished material. These suppressed papers turned oat to include 
the entire last act in unorchestrated form. Actually, the score had 
been worked on and completed by Friedrich Cerha with the publish- 
er's permission but without the widow’s knowledge while the widow 
was alive, a bit of scholarly skulduggery quite in tune with the dark 
history of this score. At any rate, the complete “Lulu" was finally 
performed al the Paris Opera on Feb. 24, 1979, 44 years after Berg’s 
death, closing the door on one aspect of the case 

“Lulu,” however, is an earth spirit not so easily {tinned down. Now 
that Pandora’s boxjhas been opened, cryptographers with perie’s 
new book in hand will probably set to work in earnest on “Lulu.” At 
age 100, Alban Berg still has ms secrets. . g 

® 1985 The New York Times 




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Page 8 


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INTERNATIONAL DATEBOOK 




ENGLAND 


VIENNA, HlstorUches Museum (tel: 
42804). 

EXHIBITION — To Feb. 26: “Rich- 
aid Gere tl." 

•Kcuxzerthaus(td: 72.12.(1). 

Feb. 2t: Vienna Youth Choir/Vi enna 
Sympboniker, Gianandrea Gavazzeni 
conductor, Cristina Ortiz piano (Che- 
rubini. Franck). 

•Staalsoper(td: 53240). 

BALLET — Feb. 16: “Raymonds” 
(Petipa. Glazunov). 

OPERA — Feb. 1 7: “Manon" (Masse- 
net). 

Feb. 18 and 21: “Tosca” (Puccini) 
Feb. 19: “Falstaff* (Verdi). 

Feb. 20: “Simon Boccanegra” (Verdi). 
Feb. 22: “Tannhiuser” (Wagner). 


Feb. 22: “Mother Courage” (Brecht). 

Htd: 636.15.55). 


BELGIUM 


ANTWERP, Bisabeihzaal (td: 237. 
22.47). 

CONCERTS — Feb. 16: Flanders 
Philharmonic Orchestra, Owe Mund 
conductor, William Forman trumpet 
(Beethoven, Wagner). 

•Royal Flemish Opera (tel: 
233.66.85). 

OPERA— Feb. 17: “Eugene Onegin” 
(Tchaikovsky). 


BRUSSELS, Opera National (td: 
217J22.il). 

OPERA — Feb. 17 and 21: “L’Ehsir 
d’ Amo re” (Donizetti). 

•PalaisdesBeaaxArts(td:5] 129.95). 
CONCERTS — Feb. 20: Gabridli 
String Quartet (Brahms. Mozart) 

Feb. 22: Belgian National Orchestra, 
Heinz Wallbeig conductor, Luc Devos 
piano (Chop in, Schubert). 


DENMARK 


COPENHAGEN, Carisberg Museum 
(td: 21 . 01 . 12 ). 

EXHIBITION —Through February: 
“Paul Gauguin in Copenhagen m 
1884." 

•NikoUy Gallery {td: I3J6J26). 

EXHIBITIONS— To March 3: "Sovi- 
et Revolution Posters," “Aboriginal 
Art.” 

•Radio House Concert Hall (td: 
35-06-47). 

CONCERT — Feb. 20: Radio Sym- 
phony Orchestra. Gimnar Tagmose 
conductor (Gade, Schubert). 




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LONDON, Barbican Centre (tel: 
628.87.95). 

Barbican An Gallery — To March 2: 
“Prin t mak ers at the Royal College of 
Art." 

To April 8 : “Munch and the Workers,” 
“Tradition and Renewal: Contempo- 
rary Art in the German Democratic 
Republic.’' 


•Hotel Burgundy (tel: 26034.12). 
EXHIBITION — To March 1 : “Alain 
MalhioL" 

•L' Athletic Cafi Theatre (tel: 
624.03.83). 

MIME — To Feb. 23: Jonathon Lam- 
bert. 

•Le Petit Journal (Id: 326.28.59). 
JAZZ — Feb. 22: Cvril Jazz Band. 
•Mus£e d'An 'Mod erne (tel: 


723.61.27). 

EXHIBITION— To Marcfa31: “Gus- 


Barbican Hall — London Symphony 
lard Hickox 


Orchestra — Feb. 17: Ricbara ! 
conductor, Eiddwea Harrhy soprano 
(Mendelssohn). 

Feb. 21: Richard Hickox conductor, 
Mavumi Fujikawa violin (Brahms). 
Barbican Theatre — Royal Shake- 
speare Company — Feb. 16-19: 
“Twelfth Night” (Shakespeare). 


lav Mahler.’' 

•Mus£e de la Publicity (td: 246. 
13.09). 

EXHIBITION — To April 15: 
“French Film Posters.” 

•Musee des Arts D&orarifs (td: 


28032.14) 

EXHIBITION — To April I: “Char- 


British Museum (td: 

EXHIBITION —To March 10: “The 
Golden Age of Anglo-Saxon Ail: 966- 
1066." 

•Hayward Gallery (td: 928.57.08). 
EXHIBITIONS —To April 30: “Re- 
noir.” “John Walker: Paintings from 
the Alba and Oceania Series.” 
•Royal Academy of Arts (tel: 
734 90.52) 

EXHIBITION —To March 31: “Cha- 
galL” 

•Roval Opera (id: 240.10.66). 
BALLET — Feb. 19 and 22: “The 
Sleeping Beauty” (Petipa, Tcbaikov- 


loue Peniand.” 

•Musfce du Grand Palais (lei: 
26134.10). 

EXHIBITIONS — To April 15: 
"Edouard Pignon.” 

To April 22: “Impressionism and the 
French Countryside." 


MILAN. Padiglione d’Arte Contem- 
poranea (tel: 78.46.88). 
EXHIBITIONS —To Feb. 28: “New 
Topics: Young Italian Artis ls," “Tul- 
lio Pericoli.” 

•Tea tro alia Scala(td: 80.70.42). 
BALLET — Feb. 17; “Swan Lake 
(Tchaikovsky). 

OPERA — Feb. 20: “The Barber of 
Seville" (Rosani) 

ROME, Accademia Naaonale di San- 
ta Cecilia (td: 679.03.89). 
CONCERTS — Orcfaestre delTAcca- 
demia Naziooale de Santa Cedlia — 
Feb. 17-19: Norbert Balatsch conduc- 
tor (Bruckner). 

TURIN, Tea tro Regio(td: 543Q.00) 
OPERA — Feb. 17 and 20: “Manon 
Lescaut"(Pua5nil. 

VENICE. Palazzo Fortuny (tel: 


70.99.09). 

irnoN— 


•Mus£e du Louvre (id: 260.39.26). 
EXHIBITIONS— To April 15: “Hol- 


bein at the Louvre.” 


EXHIBITION —To April 28: "High 
Fashion: ’50s and ’60s. 

•Tea tro La Fenice (td: 25 191 ) 
B Af.f.F T — Feb. 1 7. 1 9, 20: “Le Car- 
naval” (Fokine, Schumann), “Le 
Bourgeois Gentilhonune” (Balan- 
chine, R. Strauss). 


To May 6 : “French Engravers from the 
18th Centu 


•Musee pSi (td: 705.01 34). 
EXHIBITIONS— To March 18: “Ro- 


JAPAN 


din Drawings." 

To April 15: "Robert Jacobsen." 
•New Morning (td: 52356 39) 
JAZZ — Feb. 16: Jazira Orchestra. 


OPERA — Feb. 16: “U Traviata" 
(Verdi). 

Feb. IB and 21: “Der RosenkavalieT 
fR. Strauss) 

Feb. 20: “Samson" (Handel }. 

•Tale Gallery (id: 821.13.13). 
EXHIBITIONS — To March 31: 
“W illiam James Muller,” “John Walk- 
er Prints 1976-1984." 

•Victoria and Albert Museum (td: 


•Opera(td: 7423730). 


589.63.71). 

EXHIBITION— To Feb. 28: “British 


Biscuit Tins.' 

•Wigmore Hall (td: 93531.41) 
CONCERT — Feb. 16: Md os Quartet 
of Stuttgart (Beethoven, Schumann). 
RECITALS— Feb. 18: Leonora Car- 
ney piano (Schumann). 


Feb. 16 and 19: “Tristan 
and Isolde" (Wagner). 

Feb. 20 and 22: “Doctor Faustus” 
(Boehmer). 

•Salle Plevd (563.07.96). 
CONCERTS — Orcfaestre de Paris — 
Feb. 20 and 21 : Alain Lombard con- 
ductor, Dmitry Sitkovetsky violin 
(Mendelssohn. Roussel). 

•Thfidtre du Rood-Point (tel: 
256.70.80). 

CONCERTS — Feb. 17:QuatuorMu- 
sikverem of Vienna (Beethoven, Mo- 
zart). 

•Thfcfttre Musical de Paris (tel: 
23344 44V. 

OPERA — Feb. 19 and 21: “La Tra- 
viata” (Verdi). 


TOKYO, Azabu Museum of Art (td: 
581 14.10). 

EXHIBITION — To Feb. 24: “Ukiyo- 
E Prints of the Hishikawa School." 
•Matsuoka Museum of Art (td: 
437.27.87). 

EXHIBmON — To March 31 : “Mas- 
terpieces of Japanese Paintings and 
Old Potteries." 

•Okura Hotel (td: 582.01.11) 
EXHIBITION — To Feb. 24: “Noh 
Masks and Costumes." 

•Yamalane Museum (td: 669. 40.56). 
EXHIBITION — To March 24: “Be- 
quest," Japanese paintings and crafts. 


NORWAY 


OSLO. Concert Hall (id: 20.9333) 
CONCERTS— Feb. 17; Ivan Rcbroff 


GEBMANY 


PARIS. American Center (tel; 


335.21.50). 

JAZZ —Jazz cm a Sunday Afternoon. 


•Centre Georges Pompidou (td: 
277.1233). 

EXHIBITION— To Feb. 24: “Sharon 
Kivland." 


The International HerakiTribune 
Bringing the World’s Most 
Important News to the World's 
Most Imwmnt Audience. 


BERLIN, Deutsche Oper (tel: 
341.44.49). 

OPERA — Feb. 1 9: “Carmen" ( Bizet). 
Feb. 2 1: “Lu lu" (Berg). 

OPERETTA —Feb. 22: “Die Fteder- 
maus”(J. Strauss). 
■Nationalgalcrie(td: 266-6). 
EXHIBITION — To Feb. 27: 
“Adolph Menzel: Drawings and 
Graphics." 

•Philharmonic (td: 54880). 
CONCERT — Feb. 18: Berlin Radio 
Symphony Orchestra, Riccardo ChaO- 
ly conductor (Rachmaninoff). 
FRANKFURT, AJte Oper Frankfun 
(td: 134.0400) 

CONCERT— Feb. 21: Robert Schu- 
mann Chamber Ensemble (Mozart). 
•Cafi Theater (tel: 77.74.66). 
THEATER — To Feb. 28: The 
Mousetrap" (Christie). 
HAMBURG, Staatsoper (tel: 
35.153k 

BALLET— Feb. 18 and21 : “Gisdle" 
(CoraHi/Perroi, Adam). 

MUNICH, National Theater (td: 
2113.16) 

OPERA — Feb. 1 8: “Eugene Onegin” 


and his Ralaika Ensemble. 

Feb. 21 and 22; Oslo Philhamonic Or- 
chestra. Marc Elder conductor. 
Gyorgy Pauk violin (Brahms, Dvo- 
rak). 

•Drammen Hall (td: 4223.74). 
ROCK — Feb. 21 : Tina Turner. 


PORTUGAL 


ESTORIL. Casino (td: 268.45.21) 
i: “Marii 


EXHIBITION —To Feb. 28 
Fernanda Amado. 

LISBON, Calouste Gulbenkian 
Foundation (733 13,1) 

BALLET— Feb. 21 and 22: “Puldn- 
ella" (Sparemblek, Stravinsky), “Re- 
turn to a Strange Land" (Kytian, Jan fl- 
eck), “Nuages (Kylian, Debussy). 
CONCERTS— Feb. 20: Gulbenkian 
String Quartet (Rossini). 

Feb. 22: Gulbenkian Orchestra, Luca 
PTaff conductor, Sigune von Os ten so- 
prano (Berg, Scdzi) 


•Sc Roque Church (td: 36.03.61) 
CONCERT — Collegium VocaJe of 


Cologne (Bach, Monteverdi) 


SCOTLAND 


Feb. 20 and XL “Wozzeck” (Bentf. 

Euridice” 


Feb. 21: “Orpheus and 


(Gluck) 

OPERE 


PERETTA — Feb. 17 and 19: “Die 
Fledennaus" (J. Strauss) 
•Staatstbeaier(td: 2603132). 
OPERA — Feb. 20 and 22: “La Bo- 
heme" (Puccini). 


EDINBURGH, National Gallery (td: 
556.89-21) 

EXHIBITION — To April 28: “The 
Face of Nature: Landscape drawings 
from the permanent collectioa" 
•Queen's Hall (tel: 668.21.17) 
CONERTS — Feb. 17: Scottish Sinfo- 
nia. NeO Mantle conductor (Brahms, 
Mozart) 

Feb. 21: Edinburgh Quartet, John 
McCabe piano (Shostakovich). 
GLASGOW, Theatre Royal (tel: 
331.1234) 

OPERA — Feb. 20 and 22: “The Bar- 
tered Bride” (Smetana) 


ATHENS, Athens Art Gallery (td: 


721.3938) 

EXHIBITION — Through February: 


•AIN 


“Ononis 
•Center for Fi 
(td: 3243937). 

EXHIBITION —To May: “Folk Art 


Art and Tradition BARCELONA, Centre tTEstodios 


ainl Tradition of Thrace.' 

•Jill Yakas Gallery (tei: 80137.73) 
EXHIBITION —To March 2: “Hi- 


if ArtContemporam(tei: 329.19.08) 
news — To March Hk 


“Iro 


Kanakani.' 


EXHIBIT! 

“Joan Mixd," “Richard Hamilton's 
‘Image and Process.* ” 

•Gran Teatre del Liceu (tel: 
318.9277) 

OPERA— Feb. 18 and 21 : “ Romeo et 
Juliette” (Gounod ). 


DUBLIN, Abbey Theatre (tel: 


74.45.05) 

a Ter — 


THEATER — Through February: 
“Long Day’s Journey Into Night” 
(O’Neill) 

•National Concert Hall (tei: 


71.1838) 

CONCERTS — Feb. 16: BBC 


UO- 


phony Orchestra, Mark Eider 
tor. Peter Donohue piano. 

Feb- 22: RTE Symphony Orchestra, 
Bryden Thomson conductor, Dimitri 

Alexeev piano. 

•Olympia Theatre (77.89.62) 

THEATER — Feb. 18-March: “Un- 
do- Milk Wood” (Thomas). 

•Peacock Theatre (tel: 74.45.05) 
EXHIBITION —Through February: 
Brenda Foreman's Posters. 


BERN, Museum of Art (id:22.09.44) 
EXHIBITION —To March 3: “Picas- 
so: The Bine Period.” 

GENEVA, Grand Th 68 tre (tel: 
2133.18) 

OPERA — Feb. 19 and 23: “Tristan 
und Isolde" (Wagner) 

•Mns£e de rAtttnfe (td: 29.75.66). 
EXHIBITION — To March 5: “Bali 
Paintings" 

ZURICH. Opemhaua (td: 25 1 .69.20) 
OPERA — reb. 17: “Mitridale, Ri di 
Porno” (Mozart), “FideHo” (Beetho- 
ven). 

Feb. 20: “Rigdeno" (Verdi). 


•Town HaQ (td: 22122.83) 
CONCERTS — Feb. 17: Zurich 


Chamber Orchestra, Edmond de 
S to o tz c onductor. (Mozart, Rameau). 

atiLJiijj Tc Air Cinnip/ini- 7 i nyn RECITAL— Feb. 20, Daind Baren- 

boim piano (Bcrthown, Lint). 


“Joe 


Royal Dumin Sodc 
RECITAL — Feb. ' 18; 

(TGrady violin, Philip Martin piano. 


UNITH> STATES 


ITALY 


BOLOGNA, Galleria d'Arte Mo- 
dcma(td: 50_2S_59). 
EXHIBITIONS — To Feb. 28: 
Mario Nanni.” “Post War Photogra- 
phy . 1 


NEW YORK. Guggenheim Museum 

EXHSmoSs— ^ ToMarch24: “Ree 
Morton." 

To April 14: “Kandinsky in Paris: 
1934-1944." 

•Lincoln Center (td: 87039.60). 


•Teatro Comunale (td: 2239.99). 
OPERA — Feb. 17 and 20: “Attila' 


(Verdi) 

GENOA, Teatro Margherita (tel: 
583339). 

OPERA— Feb. 17: “Wertfaer” (Mas- 
senet) 


vinsky), “Andantino" (Robbins, 
Tchaikovsky). 

•Metropolitan Museum of Art (id: 
535.77.10) 

EXHIBITIONS —To Feb. 24: “dn- 
nese Patntmg and CaDrerrohy." 
ToSqju 1 : “Man and the Horae." 




In Ireland, Twilight of the Spuds 


by Fred Ferretti 


B 


ALLYMONEY. Northern Ireland 


— For many, the potato is synony- 
mous with Ireland, south and 


Champ and boxty even have rhymes dedi- 
cated to them. According to Theodora Fitz- 
gibbon. the author of several works on tradi- 
tional Irish cookery, the rhyme about champ 
goes this way. 


north, which is not surprising since 
most Irish regard the potato warmly, as 
somewhat of a national vegetable. 

The Irish absolutely dote on new potatoes, 
that medium-sized round sort with the tis- 
sue-thin skins that boQ up so nicely, and il is 
a common custom, whether you are in the 
Republic of Ireland or in Northern Ireland, 
to have as many as four different potato 
preparations — boiled with butter, roasted, 
fried and baked — piled together on your 
plate as accompaniments to die roast beef 
and the boiled peas with scallions. 

So it's not surprising that the vegetable is 
cooked in a variety of imaginative ways: 
creamed with cooked turnips, or combined 
with cabbage, leeks and parsley for col can- 
non, which, with thick slices of boiled ham, is 
a traditional dish of the feast of Sl Patrick. 

Mashed and shaped into nests into which 
eggs are dropped and then are baked, they 
are called Peggy's eggs in a nest, a dish often 
served as part of high tea. 

Christmas geese are stuffed with a mixture 
of potatoes, scallions and raisins, and pota- 
toes appear in stews and in shepherd s pie 
mixed together with ground beef, vegetables 
and such herbs as sage, thyme and parsley. 

By fax the most widespread of Ireland's 
potato dishes, however, are those that are 
known by the delightful names of champ, 
boxty ana fadge. 

To make champ, a dish quite widespread 
throughout Northern Ireland, potatoes are 
boiled and then mashed. At the same time, 
scallions, or spring onions, are chopped and 
cooked in mifk. They are then added to the 
potatoes and mashed together, and some of 
the milk is added to make the mixture 
creamy. The potatoes are mounded on 
plates, and wells are made in their centers 


There was an aid woman 
Who lived in a lamp 
She had no room 
To beetle her champ. 
She's up with her beetle 
And broke the lamp. 

And then she had room 
To beetle her champ. 


the day after Christmas. The latter dhaa£ 
stance is often thought to be responsible for 
its name, according to Nigd. Jess, an expert 
in Irish language for the Northern Ireland* 
Tourist Board, who quotes the dictionary of 
John Pepper, “A pan of boxty at night deesa 
body a power of good.” ^ 

Boxty in the pan is a mixture of cooked, 
mashed potatoes, grated raw potatoes, ilodr 
and melted butter, kneaded together into * 1 
dough, shaped into a circular loaf and bakec£ 
in the oven. It is served hot, cut into quartan 
with butter. 


The beetle referred to is a wooden pestle, 
once used in earlier times to mash vats of 
mashed potatoes. Champ, of course, is what 
she was beetling. 

If you travel about Ireland staying in 
farmhouses yon will more than likely be 


saved champ at the evening meal, occasion- 
bits of r 


parsley, usually 


ally sprinkled with 

accompanied by grilled pork sausages, occa- 
sionally chopped leeks will be added instead 
of scallions or spring onions; in the country 
of Fermanagh even fresh, young nettles are 
chopped up and mixed into champ. I have 
had champ (really a cham p-colcann on com- 
bination of potatoes mixed with scallions 
and cabbage) while listening to the Irish 
cabaret at the Burlington Hold in Dublin 
and hot, with sausages, at the Crown Pub, a 
historic National Trust structure across from 
the Opera House on Great Victoria Street in 
Belfast It never costs more than about an 
Irish pound or two (SI or $2). 

Boxty is a traditional recipe in the coun- 
ties of Donegal. Leitrim and Cavan, accord- 
ing to Mary Kinsella, an authority on Irish 
farmhouse cookery, and it too has its own 
rhyme: 


Boxty on the piddle, 
Boxty in the pan. 

If you don't eat boxty 
You’ll never get a man. 


Boxty on the griddle is prepared with the 
same ingredients, but with baking soda add 
milk added to give the mixture the consisten- 
cy of a batter. It is dropped by spoonfetg' 
onto a griddle and cooked on both.ade£‘ 
When made, they resemble griddle cakes and 1 
are served with butter. Occasionally they art' 
sprinkled with sugar as wdL 

virtually every small restaurant, faun-: 
house, or bed-and-breakfast outpost in Ire- 
land has a version of boxty, either as a pah' 
bread or a griddle cake. ,c’ 

Fadge has a bit of champ to it, and atatotl 
boxty as well, as Lhe Irish might say, said ijt 
best described as a way of using leftover] 
mashed potatoes. Often referred to as “pota-i 
to cakes,” these are mixed with flour, sal; 
and melted butter and kneaded into a dougk' 
which is rolled into a circle about M-indji 
thick. Then, like a pizza, it is cut into ogfc- 
pieces. These are fried on a griddle seasoned 
with melted butter and are usually served, as 
2 had them, as part of a so-called “Ulster fry^ 
breakfast made by Annie Fenton in up, 
small Northern Ireland town of Baflymoney r 

Mrs. Fenton called them “Annie’s fadgeSi 
and served them with fried eggs, bacoar 
sausages, a baked tomato, 


and soda bread on a huge plate that rim- 
swore “would bold you *uZ the evening.” If 


into which melted butter is poured. The idea 
from the side, dip 


is to take a fork of potatoes I 
it into the butter and bring it into one's 
mouth. And that is champ. 


Boxty on the griddle is like a pancake; in 
the pan it resembles a bread. Both kinds are 
usually served on All Hallows* Eve, the day 
before AU Saints’ Day, and on Boring Day, 


did. I have also had fadge with tea. AH aL 
which simply demonstrates that there is ce& 
tainly more to potatoes, mashed potatoes aL 
that, than one suspects. ■< 


C 1985 The New Tort Tunes 


In Search of Glamour on the Sea 


•r 


by Enid Neray 


N EW YORK — Somewhere, in 
that section of my mind that 
stores glamorous images, there 
are countless ships. These ships 
are aQ the product of movies seen in my 
youth. They have suites rather than state- 
rooms. none smaller than the size of most 
present-day New York apartments, and all 
with flower-rilled living rooms. The bed- 
rooms are invariably furnished with satin- 
covered double beds and the dressing tables 
are always laden with crystal perfume ato- 
mizers and silver- topped brushes and bot- 
tles. 

My images are never static. They are 
crowded with people — suave types engag- 
ing in rapier-like repartee, sophisticates lift- 
voyage parties 
on diamonds. 



they go to dinner, me men wear 
blazers during the day and blade tie at night, 
and the women they make unhappy (tempo- 
rarily, of course) always prepare themselves 
for a good cry by first kicking off sandals 
with five-inch heels and then, with an air of 
casual disdain, flinging aside white fox boas 
that wrap around the neck three ot four 
times and sull reach the floor. 

In the nearer recesses of my mind, there is, 
of course, “The Love Boat” a television 
program that I watched and watch religious- 
ly, and just as religiously denigrate when I 
am discussing “the vast wasteland” with 
intellectual friends. But the fact is that I am 
mesmerized by the goings-on, not only of the 
passengers but also of the crew who, each 
and every week, manage to become involved 
in the most intimate details in the lives of 
their charges. All this with no sign of bore- 
dom, with not even a twitch that would 
semaphore such thoughts as “Am I being 
paid enough to put up with this garbage?” or 
“Why in the heck don’t they solve their 
problems cm shore?” 

Thus it was that when I took my First and 
only cruise — a two-week float around the 
Mediterranean — I knew what was expected 
of me. and I was fully prepared. I carried 
aboard the most exotic clothes that I owned 
or could borrow, and a few problems that I 
figured the captain, cruise airector, purser, 
doctor and bartender could, between them, 
easily solve during the fortnight I was to be 
with them. The plan was to dump my trou- 
bles in their laps and then spend my days in 
elegant idleness. At night, my plan called for 
dressing up and, with my husband, joining a 
table of blade ties and fox boas for spirited 
conversation and daridng till dawn. 

I was also not averse to a bit of a flirt with 
some movie star or millionaire, bavins 
learned from the tube that such action would 



Ifca nutiun by Fwmsido KroAj} 


the foyer (salon, I think they called it) was a 
bevy of ship’s personnel waiting to greet us 
and direct us to our cabin. 


T HE first shock was the cabin, winch 
was a bed-sitting room with two sin- 
gle beds, neither of them covered in 
satin. This, I discovered, was because my 
husband had selfishly refused to part with a 
year’s salary for a suite on the promenade 
deck. The luxury was around; it jusl wasn’t 
in my immediate vicinity. The space for 
silver brushes and atomizers was also hunt- 
ed; there were very few inches left after the 
books had been freed and lined up like 
soldiers on parade. StiH it was attractive and 
functional and only an ungrateful wretch 
could find cause to complain, which I natu- 


proceeded to do, stumbling a bit due to iny 
pitch-dark glasses but still manag in g to keep 
a keen lookout for ship's personnel million- 
aires and movie stars. . 

The purser and cruise director were the 
first targets to come into view, smiling; 
broadly and looking, I thought as though 
they would be receptive to passengers' prob- 
lems. No such thing. They smile d their way 
through my recital wished me the best of 


luck, a happy trip, a great future and took 
off. From that moment on. 


rally proceeded to do immediately — to no 
avail The bodes stayed where they were and 


I got the distinct impression, from various 
small remarks, that if anything was going to 
go it was going to be me. 


We unpacked and made ready to leave our 
quarters, my husband in a casual outfit that 
would have looked perfectly fine gardening 
in Connecticut, and I in a spiffy nautical 
outfit, borrowed from a friend who spends 
half her life on cruises and the other half 
shopping for them. Off we went to explore, 


eventually register on my husband and per- 
haps provoke in him a fit of jealousy. My 


husband was a man much given to 
and to trusting me implicitly, neither 
healthy sta 


which I considered a healthy state of affairs. 

So it can well be imagined with what 
anticipation I walked up the gangp lank, 
bowed down, as was he, with a case ofbooks, 
a treasure he would not entrust to any of the 
minions hired to carry such thing s. And sure 
enough, just like “The Love Boat,” there, in 


through vast numbers of rooms wit 
tables and comfortable club chairs when 
suddenly 1 realized that I was alone. My 
husband was getting his sea legs curled up in 
upholstery, rereading Joseph Conrad, with a 
side order of GS. Forester. 


This situation might well have been dis- 
turbing had it not been expected. It had 
come about a few hoars earlier than I 
thought it might, but no matter. There was 
nothing to do but continue on alone, which I 


communi- 
cated through my husband, who was not 
given to unnecessary words, and who was 
always easy to find, glued as he was to that 
dub chair. So much for the Ann Landers 
crew on “The Love Boat." 

Suffice it to say that, from that moment, 
everything went downhill or aft or fore. -If 
there was a movie star on board, he wds 
traveling loo incognito for my vision, still 
severely limited by dark glasses. As for mil- 
lionaires, they were there all right, beigg 
dung to by wives who had obviously had 
experience with predatory types like me, or 
by young blondes who, quite rightly, but to 
my chagrin, didn't even consider me compel 
tition 

By the third day out, I was resigned to my 
fate. The only thing left was to eat, read, 
walk around the deck, see the occasional 
movie and lake naps. There wasn’t a fox boa 

in sight and, although we did see the nightly 
floor shows, the only dancing we did was 
waltzing bade to the cabin to jean Conrad, 
Barbara Tuchman and other literary types; 

Looking back, I still don’t understand why 
I hated to leave that ship when it returned to 
Athens. I couldn’t possibly have had a good 
time. As for taking another cruise — aft# 
my experience, a person would have to be 
crazy to even think about it. 1 can’t wait. ■ 



C 1985 The New York Times 




Culinary and Literary Lapses, a la Carte 


1.3 


by Marian Buffos 


N EW YORK —The French gov- 
ernment, in a never-ending effort 
to keep the language pure, has 
outlawed the use of 127 foreign 
words, including le hot dog, I wonder what 
the French would think of some of .tbemenu 
entries that have come across my desk since I 
wrote about odd translations last summer. 


A number of correspondents were happy 
to help decipher " cane dagneau au dun 
frats." One suggested that pvfaaps the res- 
taurant had meant “thon” instead of “thin.” 
Than is Lima in French. The writer said he 
had never heard of lamb with tuna sauce but 
then, he added, Tve only been interested in 
serious cooking since 1953.” Another sug- 
gested that if, indeed, thin should have been 


than, “perhaps Proven 9 a! cooking had gone 
the way of surf and ton.” 

Others wrote in to suggest that thin should 
have been thym and that the lamb was 
cooked with thyme. This makes perfect 
sense, but an even newer menu from the 
same restaurant continues to spell thyme 
“thin." 

Another observant mam reader offered 
several charming goofs from his own collec- 
tion to add to mine. Among them were 
“asperges avec sauce hoflandaise," already 
not mute French, translated as asparagus 
with Dutch gravy, and the notation an the 
New Haven Lawn Club menu that said: “All 
entrees served with starch du jour." 

“Every Wednesday,” wrote a former sol- 
dier stationed in Baghdad, “in a garden 
overlooking the Tigris, the menu featured 
•_i — y sheep bones.’ " But he said he was 
19 years old and did not have the nerve 


to uy iu To this day, he does not know what 
ilwas. r; 

The writer who observed the following 
sign in the window of a restaurant in Texas, 
“Ho-Made Fie,” suggested it might have 
been the work of a Vietnamese baker. 

For sheer volume of amusing mistransla- 
tions, the menu from a Greek restaurant $ 
Athens was the winner. In addition to “rice^ 
pud dink” and four lands of “bomelettes.* 
with ham, potatoes, chose or sausages, there 
was “chicken smashed pot,” “utmost of 
chicken as Hungarian” and “bowel of ori : 
gau." And everywhere there were “macaro- 
nis”: with sauce, with cream, with ma. 
though Tm not sure what ma is. r 

My favorite from the menu, however, was 
an item listed under vegetables. It was called 
“blight” ■ 


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01985 The New York Times 


SsS^ 









INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY IS, 1985 


Page 9 


FOR FUN AND PROFIT 


Accords Nudge Europe 

Toward Deregulation 


' i. 


by Roger CoQis 


0 





DEREGULATION it is not. But a 
new air travel agreement between 
Britain and West Germany an- 
nounced recently, which will 
bring about lower fare options for travelers 
between the two countries, may prove to 
have a domino effect in Europe by persuad- 
ing airlines and governments to modify anti- 
Upst practices in terms of fares and revenue 
and capacity pooling arrangements. 

“It follows dose on the heels of a similar 
agreement between Britain and the Nether- 
lands last July, which triggered some fare 
■reductions to West Germany, Switzerland 
anid France. Sabena recently cut its round- 
trip Brussels- London fare, and we can ex- 
pea to see far-reaching changes on other 
routes. ' „ , 

-The significance of the agreements is that 
they set a precedent in Europe for what is 
known in airline jargon as “country-of -ori- 
gin” rules. What (his means is that each 
country can set its own fares without the 
approval of the other, provided the fares are 
cost -r dated. So far, all bilateral agreements 
have worked on the “double approval” prin- 
ciple, whereby no fare can be marketed un- 
less the governments and airlines of both 
countries agree. This has made it easy for 
governments to protea their state-owned 
•jurhnes from real competition. 

‘ Alan DeDer, marketing director of British 
Caledonian, an airline that has been vigor- 
ously campaigning for lower fares and a 
simpler fare structure, expects the dominoes 
tb fall very fast. “In two or three years, we 
will have coun try-of-origm regimes, with 
more liberal fares, in virtually every Europe- 
an country,” he said. 

■ I The Gennan-British a g r e ement is for an 
tixperimental period of two years. It enables 
airlines to operate as many flights as they 
like from any airport in Britain to any point 
iff West Germany, and vice versa. On routes 
with light traffic, they will be allowed to 
combine services to a second point in the 
s3me country or in another European coun- 
try. Airlines are now free to introduce special 
round-trip fares (with a minimum stay of 
one night) up to 70 percent cheaper than the 
regular fully flexible economy- and busi- 
ness-class fares, which will not be affected. 
The agreement between Britain and the 
gave rise to two types of super- 
fare, first quoted at £49 (or about $54) 
compared with an £89 restricted PEX 
between London and Amsterdam. But 


last February, is slowly working its way 
through the high-level working groups. In its 
present form it contains a proposal for fore 
zones that would set minimum and maxi- 
mum fares on routes that would leave the 
airlines to fight it out within those terms. 

It comes out weakly against revenue- and 
capacity-sharing cartels, and allows for freer 
entry only for smaller aircraft services. 
(Most European governments restrict entry 
to the flag nirHneg of the two countries con- 
cerned, and frequently to only one design 
ed carrier.) A source dose to Britain's Civil 
Aviation Authority says that Memorandum 
2 wiQ be snick for at least two years, and will 
probably be watered down further. 

European airlines tend to rationalize the 
dra m atically lower air fares within the Unit- 
ed States by caring higher operating costs in 
Europe (According to an IATA report re- 
leased last September, these costs are 67 
percent higher). It is true that airlines most 


Pacts may herald 
a more liberal 
fare structure 



are hedged with restrictions. One by 
^British Airways and KLM is a type of stand- 
fare that can only be booked the day 



Jaejfore departure. British Caledonian offers a 
anteed seat in advance and no minimum 
iy, but only an-one off-pea): flight a day in 
direction. This became so popular that 
inhere was a six-week waiting list British 
Airways claims that 75 percent of people 
* jrig the cheapest fare would not otherwise 
ive traveled. 

super-competitive (£25 one way) Vir- 
Atlantic service between London and 
isirijcbt in sou than Holland i 
fowler ior its trans- Atlantic flic 


s)~tApda 

%jttchrhent area for central Europe of seven 
milli on people compared with two million 
for the airport of Schipol in Amsterdam. 
This could start siphoning off traffic from 
naghboring countries unless those countries 
start dunking along more liberal lines. 
»-The Dutch is more liberal than the West 
tjexman agreement in one important re- 
spect It allows cross-border sdhng rights to 
bath countries tor long-haul services. This 
means KLM tickets can be bought in say 
Manchester, for flights to the Far East or 
South Africa that do not pass through Lou- 
don. This so-called “sixth freedom” concept 
is-a powerful catalyst for tree-market compe- 
tition between airlines in Europe. The pros- 
pect of selling long-haul fares over another 
aSriine’s home base is highly attractive for 
countries with efficient airlines, like the 
Netherlands and Britain. This may weD have 
influenced Lufthansa, which has traditional- 
ly taken a hard line on the liberalization of 
fares, in the recent agreement with Britain. 

Meanwhile, at the European Community, 
4 'deregulation formula known as Memoran- 
dum 2, an initiative of the EC Commission 


reckon with more costly fuel and higher 
navigation and landing fees. But lower staff 
productivity and high salary levels are a 
major factor. For example, on the Atlantic, 
British Airways’ labor costs have been esti- 
mated at 27 percent of turnover, compared 
with about 13 percent for major U.S. carri- 
ers. (People Express’ labor costs are a daunt- 
ing 5 percent). 

Deregulation U.S. style is unlikely to hap- 
pen in Europe because, being made up of 
sovereign states, it is not a homogeneous 
potiticalentity. Another reason is the huge 
differences in airline costs between Europe- 
an carriers. This partly reflects the tradition 
of subsidies to stale airlines. But efficient 
carriers, like Lufthansa and Swissair, have 
salary levels three to tour times higher than 
the British. 

Application of country-of-origin rules 
would allow carriers to gear fares to operat- 
ing costs. These should be forced down to 
competitive levels under free-markei forces, 
especially with the added stimulus of “sixth 
freedom* long-haul market opportunities. 

British Airways doesn’t go along with this. 
It is skeptical that country-of-origin rules 
would encourage reciprocity of prices 
through free-maiket forces, and could freeze 
carriers from making foreign market initia- 
tives. What they propose instead is a “double 
disapproval” This would mean that an air- 
line could set its own prices without prior 
approvaL Only if both governments were 
subsequently to disapprove it could it be 
thwarted. .. . .. 

Sa^l^Mirddld general manager pric- 
ing at British Airways, “Once you've estab- 
lished freedom of an entry on a route; the 
justification for regulation tends to disap- 
After deregulation in the United 
ates, the Civil Aviation Board got out of 
the pricing art altogether. They didn’t ap- 
prove or disapprove prices.” 

So faiy the cheaper fares have been aimed 
at the leisure traveler. Many of them are no 
more than gimmicks because they are limit- 
ed to as few as 30 seats on any flight And 
there are no cheaper fares in sight for the 
business traveler, who invariably needs a 
ticket he can change at the last minute. One 
answer is a cheaper economy fare on off- 
peak flights and one-way APEX fares. Brit- 
ish Caledonian is one airline that is thinking 
along these hues. 

Insiders say that Switzerland and Scandi- 
navia may he the next markets to agree to 
country-of-origin rules. Britain will start a 
two-year experiment next April to deregu- 
late its domestic routes, with the exception of 
the two London airports. 

We’ve a long way to go yet, but a start has 
been made. ■ 


Boasting Oysters 
Into the Space Age 


by Angus Phillips 



ct 


ASHINGTON — “*Twas a 
'brave man who first ate an oys- 
ter” the old saying goes. So what 
about the first brave soul to stick 
ijne in a microwave? 

►, It’s like tossing a shotgun shell m the 
woodstove: Nothing good could come of it, 
sg'why tempt fare? 

Jt“WeQ, I heard it works,” said Kenny, of 
£Bicotl City, Maryland. So while his guests 
cpwered in a comer, he stuck a live, mud- 
go crusted bivalve in the atomic cooker, 
gjmehed the starter and sent the rays flying. 

u Poik!” said the oyster, loud and clear, as 
its shell split almost mstantiy. 

« -’Kenny, beaming, removed the oyster and 
popped it fully open with his thumbs, reveal- 
ing a plump gray morsel that had been roast- 
ed to perfection in about five_ seconds. 

It was another adaptive triumph for the 
oyster of Chesapeake Bay, the largest, pro- 
ducer of wild oysters in the United States. 
: -In Maryland, the first thing archaeologists 
look for to identify prehistoric communities 
is not pottery or bones but piles of discarded 
oyster sheds, which mark the places where 
FhHians enjoyed the first oyster roasts. 

The oyster has progressed from Indian 
staple to hardship food for colonial settlers 
tofts current status as a luxury item. But why 
if s ft special-occasion food today * a mys- 
teW, since besides being deHdous the oyster 
is probably the easiest food on Earth to 
Prepare, once it's oat of the shelL Oyster lore 
remains fraught with misinformation: 
^Oysters vs. other shellfish: There have 

been accusations that such mollnrits as cam 

and scallops are juicier than oysters. These 
were definitively refuted by the poet Ogden 
Nash, who dedared: “Nothing’s menster 
than an oyster.” 

To chew or not to chew: A raw oyster is 


chewed. Swallowing one whole is like chug- 


unul 


a-luggtng French — 

How long do they last? Fresh oysters in 
the shell last several weeks if kept in a damp, 
cool place and covered with a wet towel or 
wet newspapers. But don’t wash the mud off 
1 you’re ready to ear them. That’s what 
j live on. 

.low to cook oysters: The best way to 
cook shucked oysters is to fry them. But only 
large oysters, called selects or counts in the 
United States, should be fried. Dip them in a 
milk- and-egg solution, coat with commeal 
and flour or a commercial pancake mix and 
fry in butter or oil until brown. They are 
sweet as cashews. 

Smaller ones (standards) should be 
stewed. Sautfrs a tablespoon of chopped on- 
ion in about M pound (100 grams) of melted 
butter, add two cops of nmk and 1 or IK 
pints (about half a liter) of oysters with juice, 
and heat until the edges of the oysters curl, 
which means they’re done. Add salt, pepper 
and parsley. 

Roasted oysters: a delicacy long over- 
looked by Marylanders. Put a bunch of oys- 
ters in the shell on a cookie sheet and stick 
them in a medium oven until they go “Poik!” 
Serve hot. 

Other openings: There are two ways to 
open raw oysters — with an oyster knife or 
by carrying them aloft in an ultralight air- 
craft and dropping them on a rock. 

Using a knife, you can tackle the oyster 
from its paper-thin outer edge, digging until 
you force entry, or from the hinge end, 

prying until it pops open. Neva, never use a 

folding knife. 

The traditional tactic is to try the thin edge 
first and go to the hinged end as a last resort, 
because you can break your knife there. 

“Daddy always said" try the front door 
fust,” said a veteran professional shucker, 
“and if it’s painted shut, go around back”! 

© 1965 The Washington Post 


TRAVEL 


Of Men and Mountains, in the Andes 


by William D. Montalbano 


UENTE DEL INCA, Argentina — 
Back home in Monterrey, Mexico, 
ho is fa 


T> 

> I Gonzalo AJvarcz, who is fal and 50, 
-M- is a no-nonsense chemical engineer. 
Here in the high Andes, astride a sturdy 
pony, Alvarez is more poet than chemist. 

“A mountain respects a man in the same 
measure that the man respects the moun- 
tain,” Alvarez said “Mountains are some- 
times conquered, but never defeated. Every- 
one has his own particular personality. Hus 
mountain, she is the most mountain of them 
aff” 

Before Alvarez lay the snow-mantled 
slopes of ML Aconcagua, queen of the An- 
des. These are boom times for Aconcagua. 

At 22,834 feet (6,938 meters). Aconcagua 
is not only the Western Hemisphere’s tallest 
peak but, in these bright days of summer in 
the Southern Hemisphere, it is an irresistible 
magnet for the international fraternity of 
climbers. A record number of them on Acon- 
cagua this season have brought with them 
elaborate gear and a contagious internation- 
al esprit de corps — and have left behind 
tons of litter. 

\\ T HILE (he climber seeks to conquer 
%>/ihe mountain, the Argentines who 
V ▼ live with Aconcagua are belatedly 
discovering the need to preserve it from its 
popularity. 

Like the continent-cleaving range that it 
dominates, Aconcagua is beautiful and ca- 
pricious. It is cruel or kind — or both — to 
those who come to prod its shanks and taste 
its majesty. 

It is easy to climb — but also can be hard 
to climb, depending on the route and the 
winds and snows. 

And Aconcagua hides secrets: Not long 
ago. Argentine climbers reported finding a 
frozen, partly mu mmifi ed body in what ap- 
peared to be an Inca shrine near the summi t. 

“The mountain" Felix FeDinger, presi- 
dent of an Argentine climbing club, said 
recently, “is fuff of bodies — Incas, missing 
climbers, old-time gold hunters, modern-day 
herders. They are afl up there.” 

Counting an Austrian and an Argentine 
who died last year, Aconcagua has claimed 
42 climbers since 1926, when an Austrian, 
Juan Stepan eck, died on its northern slope. 
Most, like Stepaneck and Newell Bent, who 
in 1936 became Aconcagua's first American 
victim, succumbed to oxygen starvation and 
exposure. 

Stepaneck’s body was not recovered for 20 
years. Now, he. Bent and about two dozen 
other victims of Aconcagua rest at a climb- 
ers’ cemetery here. 

After all its slumbering centuries — it was 
not scaled until 1907 — Aconcagua is pa; 

‘ ! prio 

tbout 

continents are defiling their temple. 

By summer’s end in March, about 600 
climbers will have accepted the mountain's 
challenge this season. The 1983-84 season 
saw what was then a record 92 expeditions 
and 350 climbers, according to Diego Do- 
minguez, who issues the tiunbing permits. 
About 90 percent of the climbers areforeign- 



On the lower slopes of Mt. Aconcagua, Argentina. 


the price of discovery. It is getting 
Without meaning to, climbers from four 


ers, principally Americans. Japanese, Ital- 
ians, Germans, French and British. 

Dominguez estimates that perhaps 60 per- 
cent of this year’s climbers will make the 
summit, particularly those who choose the 
northern route, which involves gritty, lung- 
searing, high-altitude climbing. At the peak, 
if conditions are right, they may see the 
Pacific s himm ering off to the west — or they 
may see nothing at all for their pains. 

Ulises Vitale, 48, an Argentine who has 
been climbing mountains since he was in Ids 
teens, from the Andes to the Himalayas, 
reached the peak of Aconcagua in January in 
his fourth successful assault. 

There was a terrible snowstorm.” he said. 
“Li ghtning broke all around. I could taste 
the ozone and feel the electricity in my 
alpenstock. We could see nothing.” 

En route to the summit, Vitale recalled 
with distaste, he saw far too much at Plaza de 
Mulas, a base camp at 13,000 feet About 25 
miles (40 kilometers) by horseback from this 
precarious Andean village, the camp is the 
gateway to Aconcagua. 

“Most expeditions acclimate at Plaza de 
Mulas,” Vitale said. “Between those going 
up and those going down, I guess about 100 
people sleep there in tents every night Their 
garbage and that which has been accumulat- 
ing ova the years just lies there. There must 
be tons of it. I came away embittered.” 

In the city of Mendoza in the Andean 
foothills southeast of the mountain, provin- 
cial authorities with responsibility for Acon- 
cagua share the concern of Vitale and other 
local climbers who have known the moun- 
tain in its more pristine state. 

“We are doing what we can but, as usual, 
there is no money,” said the province’s eco- 
nomics minister, Luis Horado Bobillo, 


whose portfolio indudes environmental af- 
fairs. 

Recent legislation establishes a schedule 
of fees for support services to climbers on 
Aconcagua, the keystone of the new provin- 
cial park system. “We hope,” Bobillo said, 
“to build a ranger station at Puente del Inca, 
to staff it, and to find a way to burn the 
refuse or carry it down on mules. We're 
looking for the money." 

Here at Puente dd Inca, one veteran Ar- 
gentine climber, Fernando G raj ales, 60. 
rents pack mules and horses to climbers at 
the equivalent of $18 a day. He also super- 
vises horseback trips around Aconcagua’s 
base for out-of-shape, would-be climbers 
like the Mexican engineer Alvarez. 

“There's a mountain of garbage up there ” 
G raj ales complained. “It is disgraceful Peo- 
ple who come from all over the world to 
climb here are not poor. Why can’t we 
charge them a fee to help us maintain the 
mountain?” 


k LTITUDE sickness, called puna here 
and soroche to the north of here, is a 
climber's worst enemy on Aconca- 
gua. It leaves the climber disoriented and 
lethargic: It is often a prelude to frostbite, 
physical collapse and death. 

A mild dose of puna can be helpful, 
though, in encounters with Aconcagua’s resi- 
dent spirit Surprisingly, be is not an Inca, 
but an Ichabod Crane-like En glishman 
known as El Futre, which in Chilean slan g 
means an elegant dresser. 

It seems that when the British were build- 
ing the trans- Andean railroad from Mendo- 
za to Santiago, Chile, in the early days of the 
century, their paymaster was a tall, thin 


Magnum 


Englishman who wore a black hat, bbek 
suit, black shoes and a black tie on a gleam- 
ing white shin, no matter what the altitude 
or the weather. 

The Chilean workers who built the rail- 
road were always glad to see El Futre, be- 
cause he paid cash on the barrelhead. One 
night, bandits murdered El Futre in his bed- 
roll And ever since, it is said, mi nights when 
the moon is just so, El Futre, his suit neatly 
pressed, his eyes burning like coals, has ac- 
costed mountain travelers with a mixture of 
broken Spanish and impeccable English to 
demand return of the stolen payroll. 

More verifiable, but already on their way 
to legend, are Aconcagua’s canine climbers. 
Fifi, breed unrecorded, accompanied three 
Germans and the French mistress of one of 
them to the summit in 1944. All four humans 
died on Lhe way down and are burial here. 
The mountain still holds Fifi’s frozen body. 

Siegfried von Columbia and Prince. Ger- 
man Shepherds, won great respect as sum- 
mit-makers in the 1960s. Their spiritual heir 
is a dog of monumental un distinction adopt- 
ed by some Basque climbers a couple of 
seasons ago and named “Belche” — Blacky. 
Belche went to the summit with the Basques 
and made friends with the mountain. She has 
been back four times since as mascot toother 
expeditions. 

Now Belche watches the Aconcagua moon 
from her post at the entrance of the only 
hotel in Puente dd Inca. She is not climbing 
this season, preferring instead to nurse a 
litter of puppies. 

In the rush to Puente dd Inca to stalk the 
Andean queen, Belche alone seems content 
to be earthbound this summer. ■ 

© 1985 Los Angeles Tima 


A Carver of Names in a Beijing Backwater 


by Christopher S. Wren 


B ELTING — Many Westerners have 
never heard of a chop. Many Chi- 
nese couldn't think of doing with- 
out one. The luzhang, as the chop is 
also known, is one of the most distinctive 
innovations to come out of China, the coun- 
try that was the first to invent paper and 
movable type. 

Put prosaically, a chop is a square seal 
with which the Chinese emperors, and later 
commoners too, signed their documents and 
leuers. Pressed first into ink, which was 
often bright red, the chop leaves an identify- 
ing imprint, originally in wax dr clay but 
now on paper. This definition does not con- 
vey the traditions that have grown around 
the chop since it first appeared in (he Shang 
Dynasty over 3,000 years ago. Over the cen- 
turies. chops were embellished with charac- 
ters and elegantly mounted on handles 
carved from jade or some other stone: 

Shi Huangdi. the emperor who unified 
China in the Qin Dynasty 2J00 years ago, 
introduced jade chops to symbolize his au- 
thority. Stone chops, which are easier to 
carve, were made popular early in the Ming 
masty ( 1368-1 M4) by the 14th-century 
artist Wang Mian. It is not unusual on classi- 
cal Chinese paintings to see the stamped seal 
of not qfrJy the artist bur also its owners. 

Today, chops remain popular in Asia with 
the Chinese and Japanese. For tourists, they 
become a personal and surprisingly inexpen- 
sive gift to take home. Unlike other souve- 
nirs sold in China, chops have not been 
duplicated successfully by machines, be- 


cause of the clarity of outline required in a 
very confined space. 

The secret of a good chop lies with the 
master who carves it In Beijing, the best 
artisans are generally acknowledged to work 
at Cuiwenge, an oid calligraphy shop on 
Liulichang, a street in the southernpart of 
the city that is being restored to its Mmg and 
Qtng Dynasty heyday. It was to Cuiwenge 
that I went one chilly day to have a chop 
carved for an artist friend in New York 
named Mahoney, who wanted to identify her 
calligraphy with something more unique 
than a signature. 

Liulichang, whose commercial origins 
date back to the 15th century, is a neighbor- 
hood of old-fashioned shops faced in gray 
brick, with curved tile roofs, overhanging 
second floors and signs etched with gold 
paint. Cuiwenge has split into two branches 
for the time being because of the street’s 
renovation, but the better one is at 60 East 
Liulichang, 

The Chinese flatter Westerners by choos- 
ing for them Chinese names that convey 
some compliment while mimicking the origi- 
nal sound. My own chop bears the name Ren 
Keshi, which translates roughly as “a scholar 
of scrupulous responsibility.” 

So what to make of Mahoney? I put the 
estion to the saleswomen in the small 
iop, who consulted a thick book used to 
approximate the sound of foreign names. We 
settled upon Ma Huoni. Ma is a surname 
common among Chinese Moslems and 
Huoni. while it didn’t actually mean any- 
thing, was formed from distinctly feminine 

names 

Having solved the transliteration, we 

turned to the chop itself. Because the artist 


would sign her work with it, 1 wanted a chop 
that was slightly larger than normal for per- 
sonal correspondence. One distinctive white 
stone carved with a benign coiled dragon 
caught my fancy. And ft only cost 10 yuan — 
less than $4. 

The task was not over, for we had to agree 
upon the style of calligraphy to be carved 
into the seal The blocky script most often 
used on official chops is called zkrnn. But 
there is also /( an ancient style popular in the 
Han Dynasty 22 centuries ago, as weH as 
then, used in current Chinese calligraphy 
and the more informal cursive xing and coo, 
or grass-writing. 

We settled upon zhuan, with four charac- 
ters running top to bottom from right to left. 


X 



An artist's chop: Chinese approxi- 
mation of the surname Mahoney. 


To Ma Huoni we added the traditional word 
yin, which means printing. The carving cost a 
little more than $1 a character. 

One of the women went upstairs to fetch 
Zhang Yingtang a bespectacled, scholarly- 
looking artist who carved his chops under 
the working name of Yan Bo. Zhang, who 
looked younger than his 50 years, said that 
he began as an apprentice carver when he 
was 18, and had been carving on his own 
now for 30 years. 

“Among ordinary people, the chop is 
made a symbol of trust,” Zh ang explained. 
“It is commonly used by ordinary people 
because of the tradition.” 

Zhang said that although stone was the 
best to work with for artistic effect, he had 
also carved on ivory, cowbom and coraJL He 
was skilled enough to produce five or six 
a day, sitting at a small table with a 
life that be had to sharpen several times. 

The work began with lhe conception, 
Zhang explained. “You have to start from an 
artistic point of view, what characters they 
have and how to lay them out.” 

The shop employs a half-dozen carvers, 
who spend an average of three years master- 
ing the skiff The shop wanted more young 
Chinese to learn the carver's art. Zhang said, 
but it was difficult to persuade them to sit 
down and invest Lhe time. 

Though Cuiwenge is best known for its 
chops, the shop also offers small porcelain 
ink pots, brushes and calligraphy, which is 
usually drawn from classical Chinese poetry. 

Less than three days later, my chop was 
ready. The cost: less than $9 for a handmade 
gift with the ultimate personal touch. ■ 

© 1985 The New York Times 


Monuments of the World: A Quick Wrap-Up 


by Gregory Jensen 


I ON DON — Any. traveler setting out 
this year to see famous landmarks 
and monuments may wind up 
•at thinking the whole world is cov- 
ered in scaffolding. 

Planning to photograph London's Big 
Ben? Forget iL The Parthenon of Athens? 
Can't see it for steel tubes. 

From the Statue of Liberty to the Sistine 
Chapel from the Kremlin to the U.S. Capi- 
tol and the Great Wall of China, a remark- 
able cluster of monuments are under repair 
all at once. 

The courtyard of the Louvre in Paris is 
fenced in tv a wall of graffiti-covered wood. 
In Rome, the Forum is a forest of scaffold- 
ing. In London, Big Ben is cloaked to its very 
tip, with only the clock faces showing, and 
will stay that way for another year. 

The Parthenon, in Athens, is entirely en- 
folded with scaffolding, and mil be until at 
least 1991. Another sled shroud wraps the 
Erecbiheum. and the 2,400-year-old marble 
maidens on its famous porch have been 
moved indoors and replaced by replicas to 
preserve them from pollution. 

In New York, the Statue of Liberty is 
encased in more than 300 Lons of scaffolding 


as pan of a yearlong renovation. Inside a 
screen of thin metal slats, workmen are re- 
placing 1,600 rusted braces holding Miss 
Liberty’s paper-thick copper skin in place. 

The Louvre is expanding into new under- 
ground galleries ana a wing now occupied by 
the Ministry of Finance, a two-year project 
that will indude the building of I.M. Pei's 
controversial glass pyramid. The museum 
will stay open throughout. 

Some landmarks spend tracts of time un- 
der wraps: the great Church of Our Lady in 
Prague, for example, which has been covered 
by scaffolding for 14 years and will stay that 
way until at least 1990. 

In the Vatican, the upper walls of the 
Sistine Chapel were hidden for four years to 
dean and restore Mjchaelangelo’s frescoes. 
For the next four years, a view-blocking 
cradle will cover half of Michadangelo's 
“Creation” ceiling. Four years will be then 
spent on “The Last Judgment” behind the 
high altar. 

Among the monuments currently being 
restored at the heart of ancient Rome are 
Trajan’s Column and the column of Marcus 
Aurelius, the Arch of Constantine and the 
Arch of Septimus Severus, as well as assorted 
temples and columns in the Forum. 


Here is a checklist of other famous sites 
under repair 

Italy: In addition to the scaffolding in 
Rome, an ugly barrier screens the central 
portico of Sl Mark’s Cathedral in Venice. Its 
mosaic interior ran be seen, but the view of 
its facade from the glorious piazza will be 
flawed until at least next year. 

England: The statue of Eros in Piccadilly 
Circus, has disappeared, and a circle of wood 
walls surrounds die empty space. It is being 
restored while Piccadilly Circus is rebuilt to 
form a pedestrian peninsula and a new traf- 
fic pattern is mapped oul 

The great Gothic church of York Minster 
in York, England, is still crippled by the fire 
that destroyed its south transept last sum- 
mer. Estate owners have donated mature oak 
trees to replace roof beams, but repairing the 
cathedral's mutilated wing and its 16th-cen- 
tury rose window could take five years. 

United Stales: The west central front of 
the UJS. Capitol building in Washington is 
concealed by scaffolding until 1988. lhe 
349-mfllion project is to restore the only 
external wall remaining from the original 
1793 building 

China: A 450-yard (410-meter) section of 
the Great Wall of China in the tourist area 
near Beijing is closed for repairs. 


Soviet Union: Moscow's State Armory in 
the Kremlin, including its collection of Fa- 
bergi eggs, state jewels, Peter the Great’s 
jewel- studded throne, arms and armor, is 
dosed for repairs until 1986. 

The huge five-domed Smolensky cathe- 


dral at the Novodevichy convent in Moscow, 
dating from 1525, is also dosed. 

Austria: Vienna’s Royal Treasury in the 
Hofburg Palace is closed for renovation and 
expansion. Its renowned crowns, jewels and 
relics of the Holy Roman Empire have been 
crammed into the Art History museum until 
1986. 

There is, however, some good news. 

The Ca’ d’Oro, one of the most beautiful 
palaces in Venice, is open again after years of 
renovation. Repairs to the Church of the 
Holy Sepulcher in Jerusalem are finisher! 
The stained glass of Sainte Chapelle in Paris 
can be seen again after a 10-year restoration. 
And following 15 years of work, so can 
Sweden’s parliament building in Stockholm. 

A bonus for tourists in London: Scaffold- 
ing now surrounding the Albert Memorial, 
thar quintessence of high Victoriana in Ken- 
sington Gardens, is temporary. It will come 
down for the summer tourist season, then go 
up again next year for perhaps two years. ■ 

o 1985 United Pms International 





Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1985 


**■ 


Thursdays 

MSE 

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Tables include the nationwide prices 
up to the closing on wall street 
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(Continued from Page 6) 


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28* 21 otl Ed BT 392 139 
14* Iff* OhEd of 150 123 
43* 47* OhEdpf 054 143 
87* 74 OhEPf 1040 124 
91 77 OhEPf 1076 122 

17V* 12* OtiMotr 50 24 19 
61* SI* OhPpfB 750 131 
42 52 OH PofC 750 125 

19* 15 OhPpfG 227 125 
33* 19* OktaGE 250 9.1 9 

34* 25* Olln 150 43 9 
28* 5* Omnere 37 

31 74 Onetao M 45 10 

33* 24* ONEOK 254 79 10 
25* 19* OronRk 204 #5 9 
13* s* orange 03t SX 12 

27* 19* OrtanC 96 38278 

13* ■* OrionP 41 

10* 6* Orion pf 50 55 

31* 24 Orhm pf 275 89 
31* IS* OutbM ■ 54 23 10 

32* 17 OvrnTr 
X 13 OvSfllp 
34* 25* OwanC 
46* 3144 Owwilfl 


5 
1059 

54 20 14 um 
50 28 10 520 
150 35 9 614 

158b 4.1 9 2181 
9 118 


410 2* 2* 214 

1 33V. 23 U. 23* + 16 

10 33* 33* X*— * 
1324 S3* X 28 — * 
4* 11% 11* 11* 

10 21 * 21 * 21 * 

83 17* 17* 17* + * 
3 79* 19* 19* 

21 50* 50* 50* 

66 110*110*110* 

62 107 106*507 + 16 

200x10016 108 108 

71 27* 27 71 — * 

270 30* 30* 30*— * 
1212 14* 1416 14* 

121581 29 27 27 —l 

I00z 33* 33* 33*— * 
20ta 51* 51* 51*+ M 
39Qz 53* 53* 53* + * 
27 25* 2S* 25* — * 

22 28* 27* 28* 

17 14* 14* 14*+* 
lOOz 61 41 41 + * 

20z 84* 84* 84*— 1* 
152Qz 88* 88 88 + * 

285 14* 14* 16* + M 
52901 60* X 58 —1* 
50c 59* 59* 99* +1* 
17 18* 18* 18* — * 
426 a 21* 22 + * 

382 36* 35* 35*— * 
1480 f* 9* 9* + * 

34 14* MU 14*— to 
220 3216 31* 3216 

141 25* 25* 25* + 16 

61 9* 9* 9* + Vk 

X 2516 X 35 — * 
12* 1316 13*— >6 
916 9* 9* 


31% 

31 

31 


% 

X 

29 

29 


% 


ril’l 

32% 

+ 

% 



18 




36% 

34% 




40% 

Xto 

+ 

to 

13% 

13 

13* 

+ 

to 


12 1649 
9 1744 

482 
XI 
129 
7 1343 
U 474 
14 72 

89 
X 

13 84 
9 (®4 

8 

7 514 

22 

70 2412 
m 
10 264 
9 131 
7M3 
244 
X 504 
10 3413 

14 6BS 
14 IX 
57 1384 
12 226 

444 
12 744 
28 343 
351 
18 11 
12 334 
17 1430 
91 
434 
12 390 

8 4983 
8 77S 

4Qz 

350z 


2916 X* 
37* 3716 
34* 24 
19* IS* 

13 m 

17* 17 
41* 40* 

at* 24* 

7 6* 

U 15% 
14* 16* 
73 72* 

10* 18* 
Z7W 26* 
3316 32* 
42* 40* 
33* 22 
38 37* 

27* 26* 
4* 416 
216 2* 
20* 20 
37* 37* 
4* 416 

14* 14 
17* 16* 
17 14* 

7* 716 
39* 39 
Mto 14* 
2* 2* 
27 at* 

14 13* 
20te 19* 

U “B 

53* S3* 
50* 49* 
24* 24* 

36 38 

37 38 


28*+ * 
37*— * 
24*— M 
18* — * 
12*— * 
T7W + * 
41 + * 
24*— * 
4*— * 
14 + * 

14*— * 
72*— * 
10*+ * 
27*+ * 
3Z* + to 
40*— 1* 
32 — 1* 
X + * 
27* + * 
416— M 
2* 

2D* + * 
37*— * 
4* 

16* + * 
17 + * 
16* 

7*— * 
39*— * 
16*— * 
2M— * 
24* 

1X6— * 
19* 

53*— * 
49* + * 
X*— * 
38 + * 
36 — * 


Z7* 

24% 

44% 

24* 

29% 

63 

39% 

74 

44* 

BS 

14* 

X 

48* 
30* 
10* 
K 
38% 
32* 
17* 
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42* 
27* 
48% 
41* 
16* 
29* 
32* 
3 4 
IS* 
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55* 
10 

120* 
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X 
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32* 
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45% 

34 

27* 

43* 

84 

15* 

15* 

19% 

13* 

3516 

22% 

X 

22* 

22% 

19* 

18 

98* 

21* 

33* 

33V. 

3516 

27 

37* 

25 

35% 

2016 


23* POFL Opt-3.42 124 
20 PcPL.dprt.ro 11 3 
58Vi PnPLnr 840 119 
22* PaPLdnrtJS 115 
2516 PoPLOpriTS 118 
54* popl nr am 117 
31* Penwfi 120 54 12 
79 Ponwpf 140 
30% Pennzot 120 
72 PcnzpfBUM 


24 27* 2716 27* + * 

37 34* 24* 24*+ * 

4202 45* 45 45 — 16 

52 24% 24 St - * 
27 29* 3916 2916 
1001 43 43 43 
288 39% 28% X — % 

38 24% 23% 24% + % 

+8 a 1045 44% 45* 45*— * 
9 A Xz S3* 53* 83*— 1* 


44 


9* Fggp&n 

I® 

7X 

7 

481 

UW 

15% 

15*— 

to 

8* 

5to 

23* PepBey 

06 

10 

17 

58 

37* 

37 

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21 

16% 

34% PepsiCo 

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35 

Zl 

2974 

48* 

47* 

47*- 

to 

9to 

4* 

1774 Perk El 

54 

20 

16 

1761 

27* 

THk 

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to 

65 

47% 

7* Prmlon 

105*130 

8 

268 

9to 

9 

9% 


17% 

8% 

12% PervDr 

38 

u 

16 

we 

?1* 

21 

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48* 

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27 Petrie 

1X0 

£7 

16 

430 

78 

37* 

37*- 

to 

17to 

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072B14X 


S3 

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25* 

25% 

23% 

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14 PetRs of 

157 

9J 


33 

16* 

16 

16* + 

% 

X 

ro 

4 Ptrlnv 

1030220 


19 

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4% 

4% 


16* 

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29% Pfizer 

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17 

13 

8095 

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39% 

39* — 

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17* 

9 

12to PtieloO 




1548 

19* 

19to 

19% + 

to 

14 

8 

34 Ptwippr 

500 

100 


500 

46% 

45% 


to 



20* PMbrS 

54 

IX 

1211382 

41 

38* 

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2to 

to 

V PMlaEi 

208 

115 

6 

1625 

16* 

15* 

16* 


37* 

23 


22 PtiilEnf 180 111 
24 PMlEpf +30 1U 
25* Phi IE pf 468 118 
9* PftflE pf Ml 116 
6* PnllEpf M3 J3L5 

43 PNIE Df 78 S 14.1 
6% PNIE pf MS 115 

97 PNIpf 17.12 1+J 
51 PNIEnf 9 JO 14.1 

44 PMIEPf 7 JO 119 
1516 PNISub If 72 
42* PhHMr 340 
10* PMIpIn A 

26 Phlilnpf 100 


II 
3J 12 
15 14 
17 


33% PtrilPc, 

£40 

4.9 

917665 

16* PhllVH 

An 

10 

9 

1R4 

27% PiedAvt 

20 

0 

8 

80 

23* PleNG 

£32 

70 

7 

44 

14 pierl 



LI 

431 

33 Plhbry 

1® 

IX 

11 

1206 

21* Pioneer 

L24 

30 

7 

1238 

17 PianrEI 

■17r 

3 



26% PltnyB 

1® 

28 



53* PttnBpf 

£12 

TLA 



Fto PltWn 




932 

Bto PianRa 

20 

10 

13 

37 

I2to Ptantra 

.16 

10 

17 

98 

7% playboy 



4 

389 

19% Ptesev 

AS* 

12 

9 

5 

15% PoooPd 

® 

30 

36 

59 


1® 

10 

31 

*m> 


XO 

0 

8 

304 

15 PopTal 

® 

4.1 


77 

13* Portae 

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22 

a 

54 

13 PartGE 

1® 

100 

6 

301 


90 PoGl Of 11J0 119 
17* PorGpf 2J0 12.1 
28% PorGpf 440 133 
28V6 PorGpf +32 133 
25% Pottfch 134 45 12 
19* Pohn El 2.14 El 
37 PotBlOf 4M 112 


200 

.12 


16* Premls 
X* Primrk 
11% PflmcC 
X 16 PrlmM 
fra, 45* ProdG 
14 7% PrdRxh 

47V. 31 Prokxr 

19% 16* PSvGo, -_ 

61* 51% PSCol Pf 7.15 II J 
1916 14% P5Cof Pf 2.10 II.I 
9* 6* PSlnd 1JD0 123 

25 1916 PSIn Pf 150 1ST 

8 6* PSInpf 108 144 

43 49* PSIn Pi 9X4 16JD 

54* 44* PSInpf 8-57 143 
X <3 PSInpf 030 161 


17 51 

U 7 121 
15 4155 
A 23 354 
248 44 12 4181 
37 24 X 
1 ® 21 10 
192 U 


SSte at 29 29 +1* 

30z 31% 31% 31% 

470z X 33* X + * 
215 10* 10* 10* 

113 9* 9% 9* 

2S0Z 55* 55 55* 

131 9% mt 9* 

life 170 118*120 

2D0z 47* 67* 47*— % 
61001 55 55* 55 +1* 

84 18* 18 18% 

233? Wto 88% 89*—* 
999 25 X* 24% + * 
5 40% m 6016+1% 
49* 49* 49% — * 
24% 38 26% + % 

35% 34* 24% 

30% 30* 30% + % 
19% 19% 19% + * 


24 23% X +1 

41% 40* 40*— * 
81% 81* Bl%— 1* 
11 % 11 % 11 *— % 
13* 13% 13*— * 
16 15* 15* 

13* U% 13* + * 
20 * 20 * 20 *+ % 
18* 18 18*— * 
X 25* 26 + % 

13* 13* 13* + % 
19% 19* 19% + M 
18% 18 18 — % 
17* 17* 17% + % 
BDz 97 97 97 — % 

19 Zl* 21* 21* 

25 33* 33 33*+ * 

31 33 32* 32*—* 

120 35% X* 3436— * 
8 1101 36* 24* X* + * 
220c 36 35 36 — % 


25 24% 24% 

34% 34* 34* 

19% 18* 18*— * 
31% 30* 30*— % 
. 57* 54% 54* 

92 14 13* 13*— * 

X 45% 45% 45% 

630 19% 19* 19% 

200z 50* 40* 40* +2% 

38 19 18% 19 + % 

657 8% 8 8% 

3O0Z 23 22% 23 +1 

13901 7% 7* 7* + % 

330z 59* 59% 59* + W 
701 52% 57% 52*— 1 
lDOz 52 52 52 


44* 

M% PSInpf 9® 150 

Ufa 

62 

62 

62 — % 

57% 

46* PSIn rt £96 16.1 

15ta 

55% 

55% 

55% 

17% 

3% PSvNH 

2 884 

5 

4* 

4*— M 

17* 

6 PSNHM 





10* 

6% PNHpfB 





26% 

8% PNH pfC 


17V, 



23* 

7 PNH PB3 

13 

14* 

Mto 

14% — to 

23* 

7 PNH pfE 

5 

15% 

15 

15* 

20% 

5* PNHpfF 


13 

12to 

13 

21* 

7% PNHpfG 

8 

13* 

13% 

Uto 

25* 

19% PSvNM Z® 110 

B 704 

25 

24% 

24% — * 

27% 

Xto PSvEG £72 100 

7 7418 

3H* 

26* 

26% — to 

13* 

10% PSEGpf 1® 100 

5 

12% 

12* 

12% + * 


28 PSEG Pf 4® EU 

U6ta 

33% 

.17% 

33to— % 


29% PSEGpf 4® 110 

6S70z 

36ta 

36% 

36% 

42% 

33% PSEGbf 505 120 

iota 

41 

41 

41 — 1% 

103% 

92 PSEGnm® 110 

103 

at 

03 + * 

18% 

IS PSEGpf £17 110 

31 

18* 

18 

18*— to 

20* 

16% PSEGPf 2X3 11.9 

7 

20% 

20* 

20% + to 

103% 

96 PSEGrttaMiio 

9tal03 

03 

03 +1 

66% 

S3 PSEG pf 7 JO 111 

30z 63% 

63% 

63% — % 

65 

51 PSEG of 7 X0 ill 

MlOQz 62% 

61 

41 —1 


4* 

13* 

9* 

15 

21% 

42% 

9* 


2* Fustic* 

7% Piwbto .14 M 
4* PR Cam 
916 PiigetP 1.76 12X 
10* Pvltettm .12 J 
ZHh Purokrt MB 4A 
5% Pvra 


11 

9 107 
6 38 

9 13X 
X 327 
14 441 
9 1853 


2 * 2 * 7 * 

12% 12 T2%— % 

7% 7* 7* + % 

14* 14% 14% — 16 
38 19* 19*+ % 

38 27% 28 +1 

10% 9% 10 + * 


39% 27% GudkO a IX 12 12 
98 90% G O Of 9J6 10-1 

21% 15 QuakSO JO 18 28 

11% 6* Qvonex 53 

X* 23 Quastar 140 U f 

24* 14 Ok Roll -2AO 1.1 TO 


895 39% 38% 3916 + % 
200z 95 94* 95 + % 

321 21* 21% 21%— * 
776 10* 10 10* + % 

582 33% 32% X + * 
495 24* 21* 24* — * 


18% 416 RBInd .15 U 


101 9% 9% 9% + % 


U.S. Futures Feb. 14 


Season Season 
Utah Lew 


Open High Law Oase Oa 


Grains 


WHEAT (CBTl 
5J00 bu mini imiRi- dollars per biMhel 


404 

307* 

Mar 

301% 

302 

3X5* 

1X5* — 07% 

405 

102% 

Mav 3X2* 

1X3 

108% 

308* 

—06* 

—04* 

090 




134* 

301% 

302% 

£74% 



104* 

101% 

302% —03* 

3X3% 

£37% 


3X3* 

1X4 

3X1% 

3X2% 

—03 

£74% 

3X3 

Mar 

3X7* 

1X8% 

1X7 

£47% 

—03 


Esi. Salta 


Prav.5aies 11.777 


Prow. Day Open Inf. 37,162 off 920 

corn ican 


£25% 



2X9% 

£69* 

£68% 

£49 

—00% 

IX 

£72* 


£77* 

£76* 

£74* —00* 

£01 


J«3 

201 

201% 

£79% 

2® 


001% 

£70* 


£74 

£74 

£72% 

£73 

—01 

£95 

£65 


£67* 

2® 

£64% 

2X7* 


£10 

£74* 


£76* 

£74% 

£75* 

£76* 


301* 

£79% 

May 

£82 

£82 

£81* 

£82 



Prav. sales 11717 
Prev.Oovopenlnt.131143 off Mia 
SOYBEANS (CBTl 
SJOO bu mtolmum- dal lars per bwhel 


700% 


Mar 

577 

501* 

£71% 

573% —05* 

707 

501* 


500% 

504 

504 

505% —06* 

709 

501% 

Jul 

602 

604 

5.95 

505* —07 

7 06 

5.95 


603% 

606 

507% 

£99* -05* 

671 

505 


601 

+03 

505% 

507* —03* 

6X8 

5.97 

Nov 

6® 

607% 

6 80 

+01% —03* 
+13% —01% 

679 

+10 


+17 

+18% 

+13 

7X2 



+31 

+32 

+34 

+26 —04 

779 

6X5% 

(way 




+34 —04 


Est Sales Prev. Sales 21,531 

Prov.On'Openfnt. 73/80 up 4Z7 
SOYBEAN MEAL (Can 
100 tone- dollara per ion 


209® 

132X0 

Mar 

13200 

131® 

132® 

13240 

20+00 

13870 

Mav 

139® 

139X0 

138® 

138X0 

196® 

14470 

Jul 

145® 

145® 

144® 

144® 

160® 

147® 

Aua 

14800 

148.10 

U7® 

147.10 

179® 

ISO® 

Sap 

150® 

151® 

149® 

149® 

180® 

152® 

Oct 

152® 

153® 

152® 

15220 

104® 

157® 

Dec 

157® 

158® 

157® 

157® 

163® 

160® 

Jan 

16070 

141® 

160® 

140® 

206® 

165® 

Mar 




14+50 


Prav.Sahei 6834 
Prev. Day Oaen Ink 41.293 u«S83 
SOYBEAN OILtCBTJ 


60000 lbs- dot tare per 100 lbs. 



27.18 

-J7 

30X0 

2205 

Mar 

27X5 

27 SB 

26.95 

3010 

22® 

MOV 

2+73 

2+95 

26® 

26X4 

—37 

30® 


Jul 

2+10 

26® 

25® 

25® 


27® 



25® 

25X5 

25® 

25® 


2+25 



25-10 

25.15 

3+95 

2400 


24® 



24® 

3470 

24® 

24® 


2475 

2190 

Dec 

24® 

2+12 

71 

2373 

—27 

24.10 

23® 


23® 

2305 

2160 

23® 

— i2S 

Est. Scire 


Prev.Sales 10834 





Prev. Oav Open Inf. 40.982 up 1,147 
OATS f CBTl 

&000 bu minimum- CM tors per bwtwl 
1.94* 1J0% Mar 1J5* 1J6* 

1J1 M9% May 1.72% M2* 

MB* 1J5* Jul 1J6 U4% 

1J9 1A5 Sep 1 j65 145 

M2* \M Dec M7M 1J7% 

ESI. Sales Prev. Scries 280 

Prev. Dav Open Inf. L773 upB6 


M4% M4* — J1% 
uo UO% —-02% 
164W M4% — l 02* 
1J4 143% — Jl% 

IJ7 1J7 — sOl* 


Livestock 


6485 65.10 

4725 4722 


4420 4695 

4655 4665 


72.10 7227 

72.10 7237 

71 JO 71.72 
7230 7245 
71 JO 72J0 
71.35 7140 


7255 7250 —JO 


CATTLE (CME1 
4QJ00 lbs.- cents per lb. 

47 J0 4280 Feb 45.15 6522 

69M 4140 Apt 4745 67J5 

4950 mm Jun 6BJS 48JO 

*747 6115 Aue 4630 4690 

*5-«0 6140 Oct 43.15 6S25 

47J5 6340 Dec 4670 66JD 

4745 65.25 Feb 47J2 67J5 4692 47JS 

Est.Salee 10,199 Prev.Sales 11870 
Prev. Dav Open inf. 57470 off 16 
FEEDER CATTLE (CMfl) 

44400 ibL- centsver lb. 

74-75 6175 Mar 7197 7105 

7420 4740 APT 7290 7290 

7175 4699 May 71 -TO 72M 

7373 4640 Aug 7197 7100 

7200 67 JO SbP 7235 7240 

7232 67.10 Oct 7145 7147 

7370 7043 NOV 7170 7270 

Est. Sales IJ93 Prev.Sales MW 
Prev. Dav Open int 11747 off 224 
HOGS(CME) 

30000 lbs.- cents per lb. 
am 47-57 Feb 51 JO 5175 

5445 45.10 Apr 47 JO 4740 

5540 4840 Jun 5X80 51Z7 

55.77 48.95 Jul 5375 54M 

5437 47 JO Aug 5380 SU0 

5175 45-00 Oct 4145 4B75 

5045 4630 Dec 4840 48J9 

4VJO 4675 Fob 4BJ0 4890 

47J5 4550 APT 

Est. Sales 6045 Prev.Sales 6175 
Prev. Day Open Int. 30J14 up 422 
PORK BELLIES (CME) 

S&OOOitMb- cents Per lb. 

8145 60.95 Feb 7040 TUBS 

8 MB 60l 10 Mm- 7040 7Q47 

8240 6L15 May 7025 7147 

8247 6215 Jtil 70JS 7145 

8045 4040 Aug 40J0 4975 

75.15 6115 Feb 49 JS 7175 

7140 4440 Mar 4975 UJ 5 

Est. Sates 6141 Prev.Sales 8M8 
Prev.Day Open Inf. 14400 upXS 


—.12 
— 45 


.18 

S3 

■45 

—.45 


5030 51J7 
4742 4747 

5280 5117 

5146 5397 

5295 5115 

4845 4875 

4840 4870 
4890 4870 


+J5 

+.17 

+.10 

+47 

+.10 


+43 

+48 

+45 


7040 7040 

69 JO 70.15 

7030 7075 
7830 71-05 . 

6870 49.17 +vB 
4970 7075 +U0 
4975 49 JJ +1J0 


Food 


TEE CtNTCSCE) 

JOttB.- cents per lb. 

70 123J0 MPT 14Ug ]4jL79 

JO 12201 May !«J0 WO 

70 12140 Jul Ul-M 1«J0 

JO 12740 Sep 14030 14U0 

75 12975 DOC 1»« «»75 

40 12850 Mar 158® 138® 

40 131® May 

.50 134® Jul , 

Sales 2530 Prev.Sales 3410 
vlbav Open Int. 11531 OH226 
MRWORLD H f NYCSCHI 
HO Itau cents per lb. 

140 378 Mar 376 191 

JO 613 May fE 

45 645 Jul 4® 6S 

75 473 Sep <77 4JJ 

45 4J4 Oct 697 343 

7S US Jon 13 

J3 574 Mar 5-90 597 

.15 615 Mav 621 622 

Jul 

SaMs 13758 Prev.Sales I0JW 
v.Day Open Int. 87X26 off 1J85 

iOA(NYCSCE) 
wtrictons-lpertm 
570 1988 Mar 21M Jl£l 

570 2^0 May a« 2X0 

400 20*9 Jul 21* B1§S 

415 3053 SOP 3145 TV* 

^8 1W9 Dec 2055 2053 

145 7070 Mar 30*0 3040 


14345 
16240 
141® 
14075 
IX. 10 
138® 


14470 

14378 

14210 


13975 
13845 
13776 
1 3551 


376 

612 

448 

477 

474 

147 

5.90 

631 


7136 

7U4 

2121 

2815 

2015 


345 

61* 

649 

6® 

697 

547 

SL91 

617 


2110 

2151 

213* 

J1X 

2040 


+J4 

+78 

+J4 

+75 

+A5 

+73 

+76 

—ill 


+46 

+43 

+43 

+44 

+42 

+43 


—72 

-75 


Season Season 
High Law 


2130 2035 Mav 

Est. Solos Prev.Sales 7,924 

Prev. Oav Open Int. 24414 oH464 
ORANGE JUICE (NY CE] 


Open Htoh Low Close dig. 

2030 — X 


150® lbs. 

cents wet lb. 




,es® 

1>8® 

Mar 

16040 

149® 

167.10 

10500 


May 

171® 

17175 

169® 

10405 

155M 

Jul 

172® 

172® 

171.10 

10200 

15735 

Sew 

170® 

171.10 

14978 

181® 

157® 

Nov 

170® 

170® 

,68X0 

ISO®} 

154® 

Jan 

169® 

169® 

169® 

177® 

154® 

Mar 




142® 

160® 

Mav 




EsL Sain 

J®0 

Prev.Sales 

968 



167X0 
167.40 —240 
147® —240 


Prev. Dav Open Int. 7757 up 94 


Metals 


COPPER (COME XI 


MM lbs.- cenis per 1* 
62® 6175 Feb 

91® 55® Mar 

A£AS 

61X 

6£10 

6£10 

62® 

-.15 

-® 

62X0 

92® 

6225 

5620 

Awr 

63® 

64® 

A1Q5 

6275 

6115 

— ® 
—25 

8825 

57® 

Jul 

6+65 

6470 

43® 

61X5 

— X5 

SLID 

57® 


4575 


64® 

6+15 

—M 

8+25 

58® 

Dec 

6+25 

4+25 

4+90 

6+90 

— M 

84® 

50® 

59® 

59® 

Jan 

67.10 

67.10 

64® 

65.15 

45® 

—-85 

—100 

74® 

61.10 


&7M 

67® 

47® 

44® 


7+40 

61® 

Jul 

48® 

68® 

48® 

6+70 

70.90 

62JD 


49® 

69® 

68® 

67® 

— 1® 

68® 

68® 

Dec 

70® 

70® 

70® 

67.95 

-1® 


Est. Sales 144® Prev.Sales 13725 
Prev.Day Open int. 96474 up 351 
SILVER (COMEX1 
54® irw oc.- cents Per t 


7230 

4090 

Feb 

6312 

433L2 

6332 

623X 

—ax 

14200 

5850 

Mar 

6360 

4380 

6224) 

62+5 

—30 



Apr 




4290 

—ax 

15130 

wM 

May 

6470 

6470 

6380 

6343 

—33 

14610 

Jul 

65+5 

6570 

6480 

6*4.1 

—29 

11830 

6140 

Sep 

6640 

6650 

6530 

654 X 

— +2 

12300 

63+0 

Dec 

4850 

4850 

6700 

671.3 

—47 

13150 

6330 


6870 

4070 

6770 

4770 

— 4.7 

11930 

4490 


4900 

4900 

4900 

4880 

S3 

10400 

6400 


7110 

7110 

7110 

7010 

-60 

9450 

4730 

Jul 




7130 

—58 

9400 

6810 

Sep 




7773 

— 6.1 

7450 

7400 

Dec 

7650 

7650 

7500 

74+1 

-+i 


Est. Sales 244® Prev.Sales 24437 
Prev. Dav Open Inf. 05422 up 409 
PLATINUM (NYME) 

X Iroy OWtor* per fray oz. 


304® 

272® 

Feb 




273® 

+® 

23200 

27+00 





27+10 

+® 

447® 

215® 

Aor 

276® 

279® 

Z75® 

27+30 

+J0 

449® 

272® 

Jul 

28+00 

284® 

282® 

282® 

+JD 

393® 

27+50 

Oct 

2M-10 

290.10 

289® 

288X0 

+X0 

373® 

284® 

Jon 

296® 

298® 

29+00 

295X0 

+X0 


Est. Sales 1.199 Prev.Sales 1444 
Prev. Day Open Int. 14483 oft 283 
PALLADIUM (NYME) 

1® trey az- dollars per az 
143® 107® Mar 13075 131® 

159® W6® Jun 12825 129JB3 

14940 msjSJ Sap 1 2675 124® 

141® 10675 Dec 12575 12440 

127® 11440 Mar 12540 12340 

Est. Salas 327 Prev. Salon 321 

Prev. Dav Open Ini 64® off 50 
GOLD (COM EX) 

I® troy at- dollars per troy az. 

522J30 29670 Feb 304® 304® 

311® 298® MOT 304.90 305® 

514® 30040 Apr 3)670 307® 

5HU» 30239 Jun 31140 31830 

4BS4B 308® Aua 31430 314® 

49340 314® OC> 321® 321® 

489® 317® DM 324® 324® 

485® 325® Feb 

494® 330® APT 

43570 336® Jun 

431® 342® Aug 

39970 342® Oct 

Dec 

Est. Sales 3UW Prev.Sales 24448 
Prav.OavOeenlnt.IS2.159 up 191 


128® 12815 
12S® 125.90 
12675 12340 
12575 132.90 
US® 122X0 


303® sns so 
304.90 30340 
305® 3Q5.90 
310® 310® 
314® 31690 
321® 319® 
32470 32470 
3311® 
335® 
XI® 
347® 
35370 
340® 


— 1J5 
—1-55 
—I SS 
— 1® 
— 1® 


+® 

+20 

+20 

+.10 


Financial 


US T. BILLS (IMM) 

“fiff-WW 9172 9,41 
9L8I 87.14 Jun 91® 91® 

91® 8674 Sep 9041 9049 

9070 B577 Dec 90X2 90X2 

90J5 8440 Mo r 90.10 90.19 

9077 8741 Jun 

90® 8040 See WM 09 M 

89® (9.19 Dec 

Est. Sales 14437 Prev.Sales 11491 
Prev. Dav Open Int 462H off 214 

H YR. TREASURY (CBTl 
sioaom prim PtB & 32ndsafl® PCt 
83 70-25 Mar r-1® 81-22 

EM 70-9 Jun 10-16 00-28 

81-13 75-18 SOD 79-28 80-7 

00-23 75-13 DOC 

BO-4 7S-1B Mar 79-5 79-8 

79-06 77-02 Jun 

Est- Sales Prev.Sales 8411 

Prev. Day Open Int. 42JB2 off 267 

US TREASURY BONDS CCBTl 
<8pcf>nouiao«ti&32ndsefinpcn 
77-15 57-27 Mar 7M 72-18 

77-15 57® Jun 71-7 71-18 

76-2 57- ID See 70-13 ®-2S 

7+5 57-0 Dec 69-25 Tb-2 

72® 57-2 Mar 69-7 49-16 

70-16 56-29 Jun 68-24 49-1 

70-3 5+29 Sep 48-10 48-21 

69-26 5+25 Dec 663 68-10 

49-12 5+27 Mar 48 4+1 

49-2 6+3 Jun 67-18 67-25 

68- 26 6+21 Sap 67-10 67-78 

Est Sates Prev. Sah»lM577 

prev. Day Open inL224845 up 589 

GNMA (CBTl 

51MM0prht-pb& UmhoflOOPCt 
J0-17 57-5 NOT 4+27 70-2 

69- 27 57-17 Jun 693 49*14 

4M 5+T3 Sep 

4+13 594 Dee 

48 58-50 Mar 

673 5+25 Jun 

673 6+21 San 

Est Sales Prev.Sales U59 

Prev. Day Open InL S9Rofl3H 
CERT. DEPOSIT (IMW 
» mill larv tris of 100 pet 
91® 8U3 Mar 9IJU 91® 

91® 85® Jun 90X6 90J8 

9060 H5JM Sop 0982 0986 

90.17 85® DOC 89X7 89X7 

89® 86J6 MOT 89.14 89.16 

89X4 8+43 Jun 

87J4 87® Sep 

Est. Sates SO, Prev. Sates 385 

Prev. Dor Open Int. 13429 off 184 
EURODOLLARS (IMM) 

SI mlllton-pfsai 101 pcL 
91® 85. U Mar 9&7I 9042 

90J8 82X9 Jun 90.18 9021 

9033 84J3 See 99J7 WJ* 

89® B4J0 Dec 89.13 89-19 

89® 86.10 Mar B076 8842 

89.15 8643 Jun 8040 88X4 

BU 87® SOP 88.1* 88.19 

»27 87 88 Dec 

Est. Sales Prev.Sales sww 

Prev.Day Open Inti 04744 up 413 


91® 91® 

91® 9U7 

90® 9089 
90X2 90® 

9010 9017 
Ml 
89® 89® 

89X2 


81-9 81-18 

80-16 BO-25 
79-38 80-3 
79-20 

79-4 TVS 
7+24 


723 72-16 

713 71-15 

70-11 70-22 

69-22 7+2 

4+5 6+16 

4+23 6+1 
6+18 6+21 
68 6+10 

68 4+1 

47-15 67-25 
67-18 67-U 


6+23 7+2 
4+2 4+13 

4+25 
4+7 
47-S 
67-8 
6+26 


91J4 91.18 
90X4 9057 

89® 90® 
89X7 89® 
89.16 89J9 


88*1 


90*7 nun 

9004 9017 
89® 89*3 
89.10 89.18 

8075 BBJ1 
88X0 88® 
88.19 BOX 
87® 


+.11 

+.14 

+.14 

+.14 

+.16 

+.15 

+.17 

+.17 


+14 

+17 

+17 

+17 

+17 

+17 


+21 

+20 

-HO 

+20 

+» 

+18 

+18 

+18 

+18 

+18 

+18 


+1L 

+11 

+11 

+11 

+11 

+11 

+11 


+20 

+.» 

+.16 

+.18 

+39 

+39 

+n 


+.18 

+.17 

+.17 

+.18 

+.19 

+.19 

+.19 

+.19 


Season Season 
High Law 


Open Htoh Low Close Cho. 


BRITISH POUND (IMM) 

% Per pound- 1 point equals 300001 
1J179 10783 Mar 100® 10940 10650 10910 

10356 10675 Jun 10780 10845 10760 10820 

1.44® 104X SOP 10756 10765 107® 107BS 

1-2710 1.06® Dec 10740 107® 107® 10775 

Est. Sales 4041 Prev.Sales 7X84 
Prev. Dav Open int 23094 off 44 
CANADIAN DOLLAR (IMM) 
s per dir- 1 point equals SO0OO1 


0396 


J05» 

7442 

Mar 

7458 

7460 

7422 

.7835 

.7419 

Jun 

7435 

7435 

.7585 

.7403 

Sea 

.7410 

7410 

7401 

.7588 

.7390 

Dec 




.7504 

7390 

Mar 

73® 

73® 

73® 

Est. Sates 

1057 Prev.Sales 1X47 



+65 

+95 


-2 
— 1 
+1 
+2 


Prev. Day Open int. 11.914 up95 
FRENCH FRANC (IMM) 

Seer franc -1 poin t equals 3800001 
.11905 J9095 Mar 

.1102D .89020 - Jun 

.10430 09905 Sep 

Est. Sates 1 Prev.Sales 181 

Prev. Day Open Inf. 2S43 uoB2 

GERMAN MARK (IMM) 

S par mark- 1 pokn equals 300001 


09890 09890 09090 098® +20 


XI 10 

7030 

Mar 

7051 

7066 

7041 

7043 

+7 

7733 

7054 

Jun 

JD75 

7078 

7065 

7065 

+6 

7545 

707* 

Sew 

7097 

7102 

70® 

7090 

+5 

7410 

7251 

7115 

7201 

Dec 

Mar 

7133 

7133 

7124 

7118 

7154 

+2 


Est. Sates 20223 Prev. Sates 23*49 
Prev. Day Open int. 49014 up +901 
JAPANESE YEN (IMM) 

Spot ven-1 paint equals SUH0001 
004495 003805 Mar 003847 003854 JH38X 0038® 
004450 00383 4 Jun 083874 003885 003846 003074 

0041® 003876 Sep 0Q39OS 003909 003902 003910 
KJOSO 003915 Doc 003947 0O39S5 003907 00945 
Est.Salee 5Jos Prev.Sales 7.705 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 18265 off 271 
SWISS FRANC (IMM) 

Spy franc- IPOtof equals SMOOT 


0035 

7564 

Mar 

7583 

7595 

7574 

7577 

+8 

X900 

7597 

Jun 

7616 

7625 

76® 

7606 

+5 

X830 

7638 

Sew 

7646 

7657 

7644 

7442 

■M 

X3A0 

2685 

Dec 

7490 

7490 

7690 

7677 



Eat- Sates 14,112 Prev.Sales 1B027 
Prev. Day Open Int. 24X72 up 1022 


Industrials 


LUMBER (CME) 

1X000 bd.tt^- S pot 10® bd. ft. 

220X0 129 JO Mar 150® 151 JO 

22500 147® May 146® 14120 

230® 153® Jul 148® 169® 

197® 157® 500 170.90 172® 

>86.10 1*5® NOV 171® 17320 

187® 171® Jan 177® 177^0 

195® 175® Mar 

Est. Sales 22® Prev.Sales 2X04 
Prev. Dav Open int 9008 Oft 189 
COTTON 2 (NYCE) 

900® tau- cents Per lb. 


149® 
140® 
167 JO 
170® 
171® 
177® 


150.10 

140® 

147® 

171® 

172® 

174® 

110® 


+1® 

+2® 

+1® 

+1® 

+L70 

+1® 

+Z10 


7975 

6425 


4+97 

6+98 

6476 

8432 

— X6 


66X2 


6603 

6+05 

65X7 

46X7 






4+90 




77® 

67® 

Oct 

67® 

67® 

6602 

4+77 

—79 

73® 

47® 


67® 

47® 

64X4 

4+Mt 


7+76 

6835 


68® 

68® 

4805 

48® 

—JO 

70® 

69.11 

May 




68X5 

—77 

70® 

69® 

Jul 




69X5 

—JO 


Est. Sales 40® Prev.Sales 1J29 
Prev. Day Open Int. 19033 off IN 
HEATING OIL (NYME] 

420®paF cents uer gal 

83® 67® Mar 73® 73J3 

02.75 4505 APT 70® 7095 

82® 44® MOV 69J-" 49® 

78X0 43® Jun 48® 48® 

69® 6525 Jul 4895 49® 

71® 69® Aug 

71® 7025 Sep 

75® 7SJ0 Dee 

EsL Sales Prev. Sola 10X22 

Prev. Dav Open im. 16236 up 343 
CRUDE OIL (NYME) 

1000 hbi.- Collars Mr bbl. 

3128 74*4 Mar 27® .28® 

31® 24X7 APT 27.15 Z7® 

3008 24JB Mav MAS Z7J4 

29® 24® Jun 26® 26® 

29*4 2410 Jul 2601 2405 

29J7 2425 Aug 25® 25*0 

29 J0 24® Sep 2SL50 25-50 

29 JO 24X0 Nov 2500 25® 

29 JO 23® Dec 25® 25® 

EsL Sales Prev.Sales 2SJ60 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 57J11 off 1.159 


73.10 

49® 

68JQ 

4800 

48.95 


27X7 

2603 

2604 
2505 
29JS 
25® 
25J0 
25*0 


7374 

7044 

69® 

48® 


27® 

27.10 

2*45 

26.15 

2675 

23® 

25J0 

25® 

25® 


+.13 

+05 


—.10 
— 20 


+82 

+04 

+01 


—01 
— 25 
—85 


Stock Indexes 


SP COMP. INDEX (CMC) 
potntswid c en ts 

IB5J5 15X30 Mar 18430 1*470 

18875 15410 Jun 187® IBS® 

191® 160® Sep 19099 19095 

19490 17570 Dec ,94® W4M 

Est. Sates 40095 Prev.Sales 75810 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 56X87 up 1*73 
VALUE LINE (KCBT) 
points and cents 

204® 148.10 Mar 205X0 20L5D 

210® 173® Jun 2U® 219® 

21200 18575 Sea 21518 212.10 

Est. Sales Prev.Sales 6024 

Prev. Dav Open Ini. 0057 up 522 
NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYFE) 

POtots Ofld cents 

10000 08® Mar 107® 107® 

109-95 90® Jun 109® 109® 

11100 9105 See I110S 111® 

112® 101® Dec 1 1275 11275 

Est. Sates 12019 Prev.Sales 15071 
Prev. Dav Open int. 10863 up 44 


18X71 1 8285 
1*9® 18400 
189® 189.10 
19220 192® 


203.10 mss 
207® 207® 
211® 211® 


106® 106® 
108.15 108.15 
11450 1U4B 
112.95 111® 


— 1® 
—I® 
— 1® 
—LTD 


-1JS 
—170 
— 1® 


—80 


Commodity Indexes 


Moody’s. 

Reuters. 


D.J. Futures. 


Close Previous 

968 JO I 969 JO f 

202220 Z024J» 

12<L85 125.18 

Com. Research Bureau. 263.10 244.00 

Moody's : base too : Dec. 31. 1931. 
i» - preliminary; I • final 
Reuters : base too : Sep. 18, 1931. 

Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec 31. 1974. 


Market Guide 


CBT: aucaoe Beard of Trade 

CME: CNcmo McrconJUe Exchange 

IMM: International Monetary Martlet 

Of OUeOBe Mercantile Exchange 
NY CSCE: New York Cocao, Sugar, coffee E xc hange 

NYCE: New York Cotton Exchange 

COM EX: Commodity Exchange. New York 

NYME: New York Mercantile e x change 

KCBT: Konees City Board of Trade 

NYFE: New York Futons E xc han ge 


41* 28% 
34 29 

93 67% 

31* 24* 
35% 29% 
9% 6% 
4* 3 
17* 12% 
37% 25 


104 2* 12 
U0 184 
4® 43 
2.12 67 
165 100 
® 20 10 


£6 


RCA 
RCA pf 
RCA Pf 
RCA Pf 
RCA Pf 
RLC 
RPC rt 
RTE 

Roll Pur )J» 

Ramad 
Ronco 04 
RnnprO 
Rovem M 
Ravmk 
Ravthn 1® 

ReadBt M 
RdBatpf 2.12 
RdBatpt 30<el60 
ftltRef 105e 8.1 13 
17 

® 20 71 
13 


33 10 
18 13 
37 
42 10 


4935 4]% 40% 40%— 
3002 32% 32% 32* 

14 94* 93% 94* +21^J 
1219 31% 30% 30% — 

273 15* 35* i5* 

133 9* 8% 8% 

280 4% a’g 4% 

261 177k 17* 17% + % 
1999 36* 34 34 - % 

2191 7* 7* 7*— % 

55 20% » 20 — % 

451 5* 5 i 


719 ,43 63*63 43%+% 


30 18 
40 36 
9.9 


® 2.1 10 
II 


ReenEq 
Redmn 
R eece 
Regal 
RelzhC 
6% 3% RenAJr 

2 1* RepAwt 

42% 25* RepCp X0o IX 11 
21% 9* RepGyp J6 20 9 

43% 31 Vb Rep NY 104 JJ B 

22 171* RNYpf 2.12 10X 

26* 20% RNYpfC 3.12 120 

58* 52 RNY pfA 509 90 
52% « RNY pfB 4X7e 87 
33 21% RepBk I® 50 7 

29 20% RepBk Pf 2.12 70 


II 13* 13% 13% — 

4417 40% 48% 48% + % 

]50 10* 10% 10% — % 

21% 21% 71%+ % 

21 20% 20%— % 

16* 14* 16* , 

17 14% 14*— % 

11 10% 10*— u 

9% 9% 9W-% 

1% 1 1 
37% 36* 37% + U 
6'i 5* 6 

I* 1* 1*+% 


14 

RatiCal 

32 

IX 

77 

22% 


® 

£9 

12 

9* 

vIRevar 




28to 

Revlon 

1® 

SX 

11 

17* 

Rexhm 

71) 

50 

12 

11* 

Rexnrd 


£1 

11 

52* 

Revnln 

£40 

+3 

10 

46 

Revinpf 

+10 

ax 



I® 

JO 

1.12 

1® 

76 


49 

107% 100% Ravin pf 
41% 26 RcvMtl 1® 
87 SB* ReyMof +50 
30% 24% RdiVcfc 1® 
34* 10% RJegelT 
aa 17% RttoAid 
7* 5% RvrOfcn 
34* 25 Robsilw 
48% 35% Robtxn 
24* 12 Robins 
19* 12% RoChG 
35 27% RochTl 

36* 23 Rockwl 
70V. 48* RonmH 
54* 27% Rohrln 
21% 10* RolCmn 
20% 6 RotlnE s 

13% 6* Rollins 
4* 2% Room 

20* 12* Roper 
34% 34 Rarer 
14* 8% Rowan 
54* 4IU RoyfD 
49* 32* Rubrmd 
26 13 RunB n 

20 15* RusToa 

2 9V. 17* RvanH 
57 38% RyderS 

24% 12% Rvland 
17% 8% Rvmers 


23 
50 

5.1 9 
80 

L7 17 
18 
3X 8 

4.1 19 
3X 15 

2® 11.1 5 

2X4 70 9 
1 ® 20 10 
2® 


15 
6 

35 

1300 

5W 

17 

44 

68 

2049 

01 

146 

29 

1*0 

4 

993 

401 

161 

28 

834 

2445 

90 

1431 

98 

1127 

2643 

46 

12 

6 1494 


43 

42% 

42* 


19* 

19*— 

44 

43V* 

43* + to 

20% 

row 

20%+ * 

26 

» 

26 + % 

56* 

56% 

56* 


51* 

si*— to 

33% 

33* 

33 

29 

28* 

28*— to 

19* 

19% 

19to+ to 

27* 

27% 

27% 

13* 

13% 

13* + * 

35 

34* 

34*— W 

70* 

20% 

20*— % 

14V. 

Mto 

Mto— to 

7t 

7B* 

78* + to 

48* 

48* 

48*+ * 

107* 107% 107* + * 

40* 

39* 

« — % 


. 87 87 87 

251 29* 28* 28*— % 

25 21% 21* 71* + % 

2539 29% ffl 1 * 2B% + % 

237 7* 7% 7% + % 
289 33* 3316 33*— % 

72 39 38% 39 

1234 21% 21 21% + % 

437 19* 19* 19* 

1® 34% 33* 3+% 

25® 34* 34 % 36 'U — * 

Z9 10 238 69* 68% 69% + % 

10 653 55% 54% 55% + * 
J0e IX 3D 135 71% 21 21 

056 0 25 1814 20% 19% 20* + « 
0 11 1, 2087 12* 12 12% 

35 3 7U 2%— W 

04 3X 9 107 19 18% IB* _ 

1.12 4.1 13 255 28 27* 27* + * 

® JIM 2992 11 10* 16*— % 

2X7o 53 5 8512 «%»%»£ + % 
04 17 10 98 49* 49% 49* + W 

17 111 24* 24* 24* + % 

O f 44 17* 17% 17% 

30 15 173 24* 25% 25% 

10 10 772 56% 55* 5Wi + % 

20 17 152 28 25% 25* + * 

5 23 15 14% 14% 


J6 

1® 

10B 

® 


132 

49% 

15* 

34% 

32% 

17% 

22% 

36% 

15% 

56 

38* 


70% SurXpf 
J4% Sundstr 
tj SunMn 
23% SuptVI 
19U SuPMXt 
14 Swank 
16% Svbran 
3% Svbmpf 2X0 
10 SvmsCn 
37% Syirtex 102 
25% Sysco 06 


2® 

1® 

® 

XL 

.90 

1® 


22 

15 13 
14 

2.1 11 

1.1 15 
SX 10 
50 12 

7.1 

22 
20 14 
10 16 


3 105 
492 48 
467 9% 

1504 32* 
227 37% 
18 16* 
1448 20* 
11 34 
236 14* 
1963 54* 
637 36 


1D3*103%— * 
47% 47% — U. 

B* 9*+ Vk 
31% 32 
37 37*+ V4 

14% 16* 

20* 20% + * 
33% 34 +% 
13% 14% + % 
54* 54% +1* 
35* 35%+ % 


62 35* 

31* 24 
W* 7T, 
15* 11* 
27* 17 
Bl% SB* 
IS* 3 '*j 
70 49% 

16% 9* 
10% 13% 
70% 44* 
36* 23% 
15* 11* 
66’+ 51* 
3* 2* 

302*147% 
22% 13% 
48% 10* 
37% 25* 
44% 32* 
101% 07% 
79 65 

35* 21* 
20* 9* 
36% 20* 
48* 31% 
42* 33* 
48% 36% 
35% 26% 
35% 25 
W9%ni% 
3* 1 

27* It* 
39 28% 

28% 20% 
7* 7 
43% 25* 
47% 28% 
38 23% 

9* 5* 

22% 13% 
42% 28% 
18* 12* 
26% 13* 
22* 11% 
29% 17% 
103% 99% 
9 4* 


39t X 
2® 70 


TDK 
TECO 
TGIF 

TNP 105 8.1 

TRE 1® 4.1 

TRW 300 30 

TocBaot 

TaftBrd 1.12 10 
Tolley 

Tot toy Pf 1® 50 
Tombrd 3® 4X 
Tandy 


TlKtYCft 
Tekfrnx I® 
Tetoom 
TeJflm 
Tel rate 
Telex 
Temnin 
Tenncx) 

Tenc pr 11® 108 
Tencpr 7® 90 
Tcrdvn 

Tnara AO 30 

TeSOTPf 2.14 9.1 

Texaco 3® ox 


10 


02 10 


X4 10 
202 7A 


TxABc 
Tex Cm 


102 4 3 
106 34 


xEsf* 2® 70 
Taxlnd 00b is 
Texlnst 2® 10 
Tee Int 
TexOGs 
TxPoc 


.18 

X0 


Tex Util 234 80 
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74 

74% +lto 




20 

II 

542 

39 

3Ato 

37*— 1 

32 

30* USLFpf 

303 107 


1 

31* 

31* 

21*+ % 

37 

25 USLFpf £25 

+3 


24 

36 

38 

36 — % 

9* 

Bto UllteFd 

104010-9 


62 

9% 

9* 

9%+ % 


08 40 10 1106 20 * 20 * 20 % 

..... 3353 25 24 % 24 *- » 

37 * 28 * WOTnrL 1 ® 40 13 1017 37 * 36 * 3 M- * 

W* 14 * WbShGE 1 X 6 80 8 m » Wk Wfc V 

27% IS* WWiNrt 1 ® 30 IS MB M% 27 * OTfc_ - 

20 * M WWlWf 2 M 73 A • 308 »* 30 % 2 Bh— % 
50 * 27 * Waste xo unim Mi » 50 * + * 

28 * IS* WatkJrt 02 10 12 122 28 2 » 17 * 

13 % 8 * WovGcs JO « II 

27 * 20 * WQyGpf 1 ® 70 

10 4 WeanU 

23 * 12 % WebOD J 0 e 0 IS 
37 * 29 % WWsMH 08 10 13 
54 * 3 D* WetbF Lit « 8 

50 40 WMF pf 503 d OX 
28 * 22 * WeiFM Z« 10 X 12 


2 

1 

236 

392 

21 


106 


10* W* H* 

22 22 22 
9% m 9*—* 
22 % 21* 21*— % 
35% 35 35* + % 

53* n« SM^l 
47* 47% 47%—% 
27% 26*. 26*— % 


S% 13% Wtady * 39 10 1714ia 21* 3ttk ®6+l 

36% 14* WestCo A4 £1 11 55 28* ®to 20%— % 


43 34 WPWlPpfLSO 100 

46% 34* WstPtP 200 i5 
5* 2* WnAlrL 

1* * WtAIrwt 

IS 8* WAIT pt 2® 1L0 
17* 8* WAIT pi £14 111 

11% 4 WCNA 
S3* 47 WCNA Pf 705 UX 
112 81 WPoel 

31 5* W lia ton 

75% 24* WnUn pf 
9% 2* WnUpfS 
15% 4* WnUPfE 

30 5% WUTIPtA 


901 « 42 42 

6 693 48% 39* 39*—*- 
417S 5* 5% 5*+* 

382 1% 1% 1* ■ 

247 17* 16* 17%+* 
1» 18 17% 17* + * 

373 S* 5% J%— S 
2 49% 49% 49*—% 
4 IS 111%111W111W 
1483 0* 9* 9*—* 

2 30% SB% 30% +1 
34 4* 4* 4K— % 

55 7* 7* 1*— * 

14 10* Wto »%+ % 


32* 19* WstgES 1® 11 II <58$ 3Z% 32 B*— % 

£ \M 40 21 20TO 

*S* 34* Wevrpf 200 44 g « ™ ft** 

20* W '90 90 +1 

450 14% 1M 14%+* 

300* 36% 36* 34* 

4ttr 29% 29 29 — * 

9 1209 40 47% 47*—. to 

9 357 31* 30* 21 — % 

2 47% 47* 47*- % 

2 39* 39* 39* 

11 22* 28% 28% M% + % 

7 418 22% 22% 22%—* 

58 18% 10 Wto— to 

235 14* n% 14 

6 2227 28 27* 27*— * 

267 3% 3% 3*—* 

.10 IX » 77 7 6* 7 + to 

1® 5.1 H 142 34 33to 33* •» 

.10* 0 19 I860 20% 20% 20% ' 

16 250 8 7* 7* + % 

« 4* 4* 4% 

7 4® 31* 3Hfe 31* + to 
20r 7P» 7H, 79*— U 


51* 43* Wevrpr 4® 80 
92 74* WheiLE 505 4X 

33% 12% WBWPW _ 

43 31% WtlPItPf 400 14X 

» 25 WhPTI Pf 3® 170 

49% 36% Wtltrtpl £00 40 
37% 24% WWtC 100 40 
49 47% WN1CPU30O 40 

45% 36* White Pf CU» 70 
32 17* WMMll 

Mto 14% WMttak 

12* 6* WtaNdt 
14% 8 WOfrdn 
31% 22* Wfflkxn 
4* 2 WtbnEI 
10 4% WOatwO 

35 2536 wmoix 

20% TV. Wlnrtoa 
13% 5% Winner 
8* 336 WteterJ 

33* 25* WHcEP £28 70 
80 48* WISE Pf 8® 110 


® £7 
40 


1® 5.1 


31 25% Wt$cPL £64 

33 24* WHCPS £56 

40% 27* Wttca 1® 

17* 9% WtafvrW 04 
27% 18% WaodPt M 

43% 29% WMwfh 1® 

61 42% Wotw pf 2® 30 

5* Z% WrWAr 
61 45 Wrfgtv 109a 30 11 

6* 3% Wurttzr 

18% 10* WWeUf 03 £1 10 

21* 14% Wynne ® 20 8 

45% 33* Xerox 3® 64 18 6946 

51* 45* Xerox pf 5® 106 6 

29 19 XTRA X4 20 II 282 

24 zaleCp 102 


29 

24* 14% Zapata 
57* 30 Zavre 
31* 18% ZenttfiE 
27* 18 Zero 
31* 21% Zurnln 


... 8 90 38% 29* N + * 

70 8 3333*32*32 +* 

30 9 451 39* 38* 38*— % 

20 17 153? 12% 17% 12 +,» 

30 16 236 23% 22% Zl + % 

40 TO BOB 42% 41% 41%—-* 

30 1 59% 99% 59%—** 

4 » M M ■ 

97 60 59* 60 +* 

30 4* 4* 4* 

125 15* 15% 15* + 14 

74 21* 21 21%—% 

44* 45 45* + * 

51* 51 51* + .* ' 

28% 27% 28% + * 

9 92 38% 28* 28* + % 


® 

102 


5.1 19 222 
1 J 15 286 
8 2864 
IX 19 216 
44 11 447 


14tt 16* 16*— * 
57 54* 54% 44 

25 Mto 24%+ % 
25% 34* 25% +1 
30* 29* 30 




AdamMUUi 

Am Brands 

Am Nat Res 3 

AmertcSa’ 

AndrsCtay 

Arvtnlnds 

AVEMCO 

BanfcNY 

BlkHlIlPw 

HrisSMypf 

CT SCorp 

Cecolnd 

ansMnblOS 

OirchFChfc 

OrcuHOty 

CHwfPeapf 

Cooper In 

CutHnefe 

OeftncChecA 

DoverCp 

EnntoBF 

FtAtkm 

Fleet FnGrps 

GenCInm i 

Giant PCam 

Handfanan 

HemlspCap 

HHtonHfl 

l no Rand Pf 

JahmJn 

Katvlnd PfB 

Lear Stapler 

LouUieeil 

Lubrtzol 

ME I Carp 

MarahMd 

Mcdonlds 

Maamrex 

MMSauUt 

NCH Cara 

NIM3 6Qpf 

NYNEX 

PanASnk 

Phi la Elec 

PvroEngy 

RPCEnen 

RppNY 

Rpynln pfB 

SfPdBuobi 

SoaLandn 

SmlthBectc 

S lurch t Bra 

5unBkalnc 

TbnesMlr 

Tronswtd 
UnEI both 
USW eet 
VanOmi 
Wend v* Inti 

Winnebago 


NEW .HIGHS am 


AtrProd 

AmGeniCprrt AmGeni PfB 
AmPrWd Am Stcrw 
AmertcUn 
Arkam Best 
AstUandOfl 
Bafmcoi 
BamlsCae 
BoiseCpf 


AUdSfri 


AmesDepti 
Armwin 
AMatyEl pf 
BaktorEtec 
Beaef45tk>f 

BottBemk 

BwnSharae Bnrawk* 
CaroFraht CaraPh- 


AmerlcPrm 
AmasOS 53ip 
Aral 


cetanree 

ChamNYi 

Cbm Bell 

CWcora 

CeillnFdii 

Coaptncvpf 

DoytenHud 

DeSotelnc 

EckerdJk 


Cenfet 
CtwnNYpf 

ctiGoaopf 

ChbMedn 

CemblnlnH 

CorngGl * 

DeanFdsi 
DetE 550pf 
Emerwm El 


1 Inc 

BeraEnt 
BaStanEd. 
CP Non 
Carter Wall 
Centex n 


EsMtteBmn FH Ind 
FstBafan FtFWArb 


Ftenrina 

GnCbipfs 

GtDetteCo 

HartancLHi 


FTowerindi 
GPU Cp 
Gs viler a 
HetlteMyr 


HerftowCcxn KarltCnmpf 
Holiday Inn Hobday In A 


Intrlalce Inc 
Jasfemi 

KentchyUt 
LeorStaapf 
LaeweCPi 
Lucky Sir 
ManorCres 
MartMor 
McOanaDe 
Merck Co 


IntContral 

KLMAbls 

KnleMRU 

LeagPiaft - 

LaeweCnwl 

LMtemlnc 

MAPCO 

MartnMar pf 

McGrow Ed 

Mfcfctbrys 


MaraanJPe MarKnud. 
NUI Cp NDiat4 25pf 


INomorBCP 
Onmoe Rk ■ 


KoAm PMIs 
OvernTr 


PgPL290pr PoPLlSpr 
Pttfflplnd PMflndpf 


RCA 
RTE Coro 
RapBankCp 
Rohr Ind 
ScteAfl 
Seaaromi 
SncmChiTapi 
SfgneWab 
SunChem 
Torchmrk s 


RCACvripf 
Reich Chem 
RnsarcbCH 

ROYPiDufCh 
Scott Fetzar 
Sears odl pf 
Sauffkfwn 
SturorBrrfs 
Syntax 
Tracer 


Tronswtd wtA Travelers 
UnPocCp unlraval pf 
UnRTechs UnTch 255Pf 
VaEP9Wpf WHcrHRefg 
WtiAlrLbi WnAlr 2 14pf 
WIsPubSv Xerox Cp 


CMS V30pf 

duett Pea ' 

CambEag 

Cm Com 

DeftaAIrl 

DbneyW. . 

EmersRod 

FedarDStr- 

FamSTBoc 

GamMCoa 

GaPocpfB . 

Guttanlnd 

Heinz 

HHenbrand 

Hauslnt62S 

IntFknf Fr 

Katvlnd ■ 

Lnmour 

Levftz 

LouLndExp 

MCA Inc 

Marrigft 

MayDSts 

McNeil Cp 

Mldcon 

Munfard ' 

NatMedEn 

Mm u II uw s 

PacMfCoro 

Pmritl 40pf 

Pottakh - 

RCA213evpl 

RePUbHcCp 

ReynMind 

SCM Cera 

Scott Paper 

SecPacCps 

Starrett 

StratMtO 

Tenncnpr 

Transom Cp 

TuaaiEP 

UeafrGa 

Uptah nCo . 

Wadi Null 

WlHredAEn 


Wk 20* UtoPL 203 90 ID 504 

25* 21* UtPLpf 2® 110 2 

25% 21* UtPLpf 2® 110 16 

21* 17* UtPLpf 304 110 34 

18* 15* UIPLPf £04 110 8 


23% 23* 23% + * 
34% 34* 24% 

25* 25* 25*— to 
21* 21% 21%— to 
18* 18* IB* + to 


to* 21* VF Cara L12 3J 8 1134 

m 5% Votero 1549 

25 14 Voter pf 3X4 145 85 

5% 2* Valeyin 26 

26* 14* VonDrs .92 3X 7 84 

4% 2* wen 41 

44% 30* Vartan 26 x 15 3J7i 

13* 9% Varo ® 30 10 115 

25% 17* Veeca AO ix 14 444 


30* 29* 30% + % 
9* 9* 9%— to 
30% 20% 20%+ to 
3 2% »— % 

26% 25* 23*— % 
3% 3 3 — % 

41% 40% 41 + % 

13% 13% 13% — to 
24* 24* 24* 


NEW LOWS 3 

AMCAlnt Korea Pd n MyersLEn 


j AMEX Higfa&-Lows 


Feb. 14 


NEW HKHfS 71 


am inti 

AmFrucfB 

BlgVSup 

ChartMedB 

Damson 3 75p 

Fla Rock in 

FootniitGp 

Gauldinvpf 

Hasbras 

HormalG 

Lynch CSv* 

Midland Co 

Newcar 

PrasRealB 

SDteSaapf 

To ten Rnch 

UaotrGpBTwt 

WMBrdgC 


ATTFdn 

Amlarae, 

Cotton wl 

aorostut 

Dei Labs 

Foodroma 

FerastOvA 

Grant Ind 

Haebropf 

HuballA 

MadndSan 

Mite Cara 

OSulIfvan 

Radlawind 

SanJeeeW 

Trans Tech 

VlrceMt 

WttnHIttin 


AcHonlnd 

Andal 

CastleAMi 

OoPoyCorp 

DvnatectCp 

Foote Mini 

Frantz Mfg 

Grant hid w t 

iteuiiiiMor 

KeyCa 

Matrix s 

MteeGtfiln 

PennoRE 

RyfcoH 

SyefEno 

UnAIrPrd 

Valntl 


AmFruct A 
Baker Midi! 
Chart MedA 
ComtedSvn . 
FstFSLnn 
FooteMbipf 
Gay Id Nat 
Gr —u na n i 
Hlptroirica 
Lartmar 


NewPfanRt 
PowerTesT 
SD4e72Qpf 
TechSym - 
UnCadFbi . 


NEW LOWS 8 


London Commodities 

Feb. 14 

Figures In sterling per metric tan. 
Gasoil tn UX. dollars per metric Ian. 
Gold In UX. dollars per ounce. 


HM Law Close Previous 
SUGAR 

Mar 112® 109® 109® 110® 109® 109® 
119® 116® 117® 117® 117® 117® 
127® 125® 124® 126® 126® I2L40 
134® 134® 134® 134® 134® 115® 
142X0 141® U0® 141® 139® 141® 
154® 155® 155® 156® 156® 157® 
N.T. N.T. 160® 14100 16120 144® 
2X70 late of 50 tom. 

COCOA 

Mar 2010 £1® £1® £142 £199 £200 
£225 £155 £157 £159 £215 2016 
2008 £137 £139 £1® £198 £199 
£187 £122 £124 £125 £178 £179 
1C3I WOT MI £002 2M0 1045 
2013 1.990 1,991 £000 £021 £025 
1.990 1.990 1.990 £000 1.994 2015 
4X44 late of 10 tom 
COFFER 

Mar £365 U45 £355 £357 £368 2071 
2XDD 2085 £387 £392 2X00 £402 
2X30 2X18 £424 2X25 2X26 2X27 
£458 £440 2X® 2X50 2X50 2X51 
£478 £442 2X68 £470 2X70 £428 
£474 2X43 £445 £470 2X70 2X90 
N.T. N.T. 2X50 2X70 2X45 £490 
£794 lets of 5 tans. 

GASOIL 

Feb 251® 247® 247® 248® 244® 245® 
2XLZS Ml® 231® 231® 229® 229® 
22Z® 22005 220® 221® 219® 219® 
21705 21 £83 215® 21400 21L2S Z14J0 
214® 21 4® 71 ISO 213® 210® 21005 
N.T. N.T. 209® 214® 210® 211® 
N-T. N.T. 209® 210® 210® 21600 
N.T. N.T. 209® 222® 210® 220® 

N.T. N.T. 209® 224® 210® 224® 

2071 lots OMNfOftS. 

GOLD 

API 306® 306.00 N.Q. N.Q. N.Q. NA 

lOOlotsotlOOtrevaz. 

Sourcet: Reuter* and London Pttmteom en- 
chant* foasatU. 


May 

Aua 

Oct 

Dec 

Mar 

MOV 


May 

Jlv 

Sep 

Dee 

Mar 

Mav 


MOV 

JIV 

Sea 

Nov 

Jan 

Mar 


Mar 

API 

May 

Jun 

Jlv 

Aua 

See 

Oct 


Washington Seeks Bids 
On Telephone System 

Agave Framv-Prase 
WASHINGTON — The UA 
government called Thursday for 
bids on a contract of about 4J2 
biilion dollars to supply a long-dis- 
tance telephone system for die gov- 
ernment's I J million employees. 

The contract will be awarded in 
1986 to a single company to supply 
phone service for 10 years start®* 
m 1989. 


Asian Commodities 

Feb. M 


HONG- KONG GOLD FUTURES 
UJJrawra 

cipm Preview 
Htoh Low BW Ask BM Ask 
Feb _ N.T. N.T. 333® 305® 30200 mm 
Mar _ N.T. N.T. 304® 306,88 20300 30MB 
API _ N.T. N.T. 306® 30SS9 305® 3D7® 
Jun — 310® 310® 310® 312® 389® 311® 
Aua _ 314® 314® 315® 317® 31J® 316® 
Oct — N.T. N.T. 320® 322® 319® 321® 
Dee _ N-T. N.T. 325® 327® 324® 326® 
Volume: 27 lots of UN oz. 

SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
U5J par ounce 


High Lew 

Feb NT. N.T. 

Mgr NT. N.T. 

API 306® 305® 

Jlta — N.T. N.T. 

Volume: 411 tots at IODoe 
KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Mataysian cents per kilo 
Close 
BM 

Mar !»® 190® 

APT 196® 19705 

May 200® 201® 

Jun 202® 204® 


Volume: 27 late. 
SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Singapore cento par idle 
Ctose 
BM Ask 
RSS 1 Mar_ 1 07® 16905 

RSSlAPl— 17X50 174® 

RSS 2 Mar- 15SL50 159® 

RSS 3 Mar- 154® 157® 
RSS 4 Mar- 149® 151® 

RSS 5 Mar- 141® 143® 

KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
MaKnrsMP ringgits per 2S tens 
dose 


Settle Settle 
303J9 3CQ® 
304® 30450 

306.10 306® 

31000 311® 


Prev leas 
BM Ask 
191® 14105 

197® 198® 
.7KUJO 
204® 


Fab. 
Mar 
Art . 


Mav . 
Jun- 
Jlv- 
Seo - 
now . 
Jan. 


Bid 

1.170 

1,140 

1,130 

1,120 

1,110 

l.ioa 

1.100 

10TO 

1090 


Ask 

1000 

1,190 

1.180 

1.1® 

1,160 

1.150 

1,1® 

1,140 

1,140 


Prevkoac 
BM Ask 
16905 17005 

17405 174.75 
15905 16O0S 

15705 1580S 
15005 15X35 
14205 1440S 


Prev tees 

Bid Ask 


Volume: 0 lots of 3 tens. 
Source. 1 Reuters. 


1,170 

1,140 

1,1® 

1.120 

1,110 

1.100 

1.1® 

1090 

1090 


1,190 

MOD 

1,170 

MSO 

I.'50 

1.140 

!.)« 

M30 

UM 


DM Futures Options 
Feb. 14 

H. tamm Mtrt-BIHirartscEnls per atrt 


StrBac Cote-Soltle Puts-Saffle 

Price Mar Am See! Mar Am Seel 


29 ix4 — — aja 007 

to 8X1 1® 1X2 £10 9® 

31 0.13 006 1.17 071 107 

32 004 044 U2 1® 174 

33 001 0® 1154 257 151 

34 801 0.11 003 3X7 3X0 

Estimated fetal vbL 6X6) 
gnu; wed. vec S02< epeg ul 5U40 
PUIS ; WWL ML 4,175 oeen ML 21 J87 
Sew'd*: CMC. 


077 

103 

178 

254 


Paris Commodities 

Feb. 14 

Sugar in French Francs per metric ton. 
Other flows in Francs per in kg. 


High Law Close Ctraa 

SUGAR 

Mar 1070 1031 1055 10S5 +15 

MOV 1X00 1076 1090 1094 +2 

Aua 1X80 1X80 1X70 1X80 —2 

Oct 1J45 1.538 1J3* 1.548 —2 

DOC N.T. NT. lx® 1X20 —5 

Mar 1030 1015 1010 1020 —5 

Est. voi.: l.Tfi late of so tons. Prev. actual 
sales: 3026 late. Open Interest: 19089 
COCOA 

Mar £360 2005 2007 2010 —40 

May £385 £330 £337 2038 —37 

JIV N.T. N.T. £315 — —40 

seo N.T. N.T. £325 — — 15 

Doc NT. N.T. — £170 —35 

Mar N.T. NT, — £160 —25 

MOV N-T. N.T. — £1*8 —25 

Est. voL: 1® late of 10 tans. Prev. actual 
sales: 239 late Open Interest: 960 
COFFEE 

Mar N.T. N.T. 2X25 £548 — 20 

Mav 2Sfi £570 £560 £575 UnctV 

Jlv N.T. N.T. £570 £S»5 Uncn. 

Sea £595 £593 2X90 2X05 +10 

Nov N.T. N.T. 2JB0 2A3g — 8 

Jan NT. N.T. £%'■ £420 Unch. 

Mar N.T. N.T. 2X90 £65S Unch. 

Est. val.: 4 latsol 5 tans. Prev. actual sales : 
9 lots. Open Interest: IB 
Source: Bourse du Commerce 


Dividends Feb. 14 




Company Per Amt Par Ree 

INCREASED 

Lamaur me a JU 3-20 w 

STOCK SPLIT 
Lamaur Inc— *• for -3 

USUAL 


AmerTrusi Cora 
Anthem Electronics 
Beneficial Cora 
BowneBiCoInc 
Colt Indus 
Cons* Waled Prod. 
CSX Cara 
Cubic Cora 
Eastern Co 
EnergasCo 
Evans ine 
Firs, America Bk 
Fort Howard Ppr Co 
Goodyear Canada 
Hershey Foods 
KulU man Carp 
Kullcke £ Soffa ind. 
McGraw-Edteon 
Mat-Pro Carp 
Raven industries 
Roadway Services 
Safeway Stares 
Science Mngmenl 
Sealed Air Carp 
Shoo & Go Inc - 
SaoUne 

Westtwroe Inti ind. 
Auksnoaf ; M. Mo n t hl y; 
Anoua,. 

Source; UPl. 


Q .77 3X 2-22 

S m 3-J4 3-15 

Q ® 3-31 

O .11 3-22 

0 X3% 301 

‘ " 4-1 


04 


3-1 

3-8 

3-15 

3*4 


S 

Q 06 3-15 2-28 
5 79% 3-29 3-15 
^ 3-15 2-28 

XO 3-12 £27 
.15 3-1 B 3-4 
JO 4-26 +5 

XI +26 4-8 

JS 349 34 

05 3-15 £25 
.15 +18 3-11 
04 4-8 3-15 

® 3-12 5-28 
.15 5-10 +26 


0.10% +15 3-22 
Q 05 5-T +15 


Q .40 3.29 
Q 02 % 3-15 
O 

Q 
O 
Q 


3-1 

_ 3-1 

.18 3-15 3-1 

05 3-15 3-28 

X +30 4-4 

05 +1 34 


Q-Quui Ih lv; S-Seml- 


Cash Prices Feb. 14 


Commodify and Unit 
Coffee 4 Santos, lb. 


Yeor 


Thu 

.. = 1X5 1X2 

Prtatctatt, 64/30 38 %.vd CUD 084 

Steel billets (PHT.I.len 473® 453® 

iron 2 Fdry. Philo- ton 211® JH® 

Steel scrap No 1 hvy PUT. _ 7+iSB 97-^3 

Lead Snot. H> 18-21 2+28 

Cooper elect, fb 47-7U 671+71 

Tin (Straits), lb 56099 *0865 

Zinc. E. St. L- Basis, lb 0X3 OJT 

Pol lad him. oz 127-134 159-162 

Silver NY-oz 9.125 

Source: AP. 


London Metals Feb. 14 
Figures In sterling Per metric ton. 
Sliver in pence per troy ounce. 


Today Previaai 

High grade capper cathodes: 
seat UOOXO 1001X0 1X03® 10OIU 

3 months 1026® I0Z7® 1031® >032® 

Copper cathodes: 

SPOf 1097® 1099® 1099® 10OI0C 

3 months 1021® 1024® 1026® 10280C 

Tin: soot 10X150010025® 9,990® 10000® 
3 months 10022® 10023® 1001 5® 10020® 
L0Od:»at 33350 339® 343® 344® 

3 months 348® 349® 353® 354® 

Zinc; snot 7hL00 778® 780® 7B1® 

3 months 776® 776® 779® 780® 

Silver: spot 576® 577® 575® 576® 

3 months 59550 597® 59450 595® 

Aluminium: , 

seal 1009® 1010® 1021® L022® 

3 months 1046® 1047® 1058® 10S*>® 

Nickel: spot 4X30® 4X3500 4X70® 4X80® 

3 months 4X15® 4X2500 4X70® 4X7500 

Source: Reuters. 


SAP 100 Index Options 
Feb. 14 


Strike CoftHjBI 
Price Feb mar an 


158 

IB 

148 

*5 
.110 
T7S 
110 
W 
I W0 
US 


31 — — — 
Mh 25* b’„ - 
« I He 21M 21V, 

14 146, We 17k, 

I R II IH 
4 5* 8% Wi 

2% Sk. 4* 
1/16 1* M 4* 

- * 1+ 7% 

- i/H k n 


Pvb-Lat 

Feb um Art Her 

m m i no - - 

- l/« 1/16 % , 

l/U i/u ina * 
1/1$ lfli sn* 9.T* 

- S/16 *» in 

1/14 Ilk 7% 7» . 

1 * n ft J - 
i « n 

- Rki 12J4 - 1 

- HR 


TeMCBitTOkm BUS 
Total caV spcn-M. MISS 
TUdpat votame ,11 JU 
TebflpstMKokiteiMFj 
loots: 

HMeMl® Leer 17908 CteK 17918-144 
Source: CBOG. 






Statistics Index 


AMEXurtcM P.u -Earring* room p-.is 
441EX WotartwtP.W Ftt* rrtt oMa P.72 
NYSE MW P. 5 GoM mortal* All 
KYS£ fitofa/ttM PM Inter**} earn PJJ 
ConodkM Mtaflta M* warhri Mowy p. 6 
dtrancy-ioM* Ml OpHm P.W 

CdmnMdRM P.W OTC dock PJ2 
pivteiWP P.10 Other marturti PJ4 


Hcralh^^Srlbunc 



U.S. Stocks 

Report, M-l; Page 6 


FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1985 


** 


Page 11 



.■vSH 


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BeD Labs is donating 
an aged copper roof 
in return for a chance 
to study corrosion. 


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technology 

Statue of Liberty Project 

Offers Possible Spin-Offs 

j;- . . By STUAHT DIAMOND . 

New York Times Service ' 

EW YORK — Electric power was new and computers 
nonexistent when the Statue, of Liberty was dedicated 
in 1886. A century later ihe repair of tlie statue is being 
accomplished with electricity, computers and other 
innovations developed while the copper lady weathered the 
storms of tune. And the restoration is leading to new research. 

- “There will be fallout through all of industry from this pro- 
ject.” said Lawrence BcUante, a partner of GSGSB, a New York 
architect-engineering firm aiding in the restoration. 

*■ The varied corrosion in the statue's copper skin is bang studied 

by scientists from Bd] Lab- ' 

oratories, Texas Instruments 
the. and Du Font. Interior 
pkint has been stripped with 
Jiquid nitrogen — a novel pro- 
cess that statue contractors 
say could be used to inexpen- 
sively restore delicate parts of 
did buddings. 

. The Statue of Liberty's . 

stress points have been pinpointed by computer-aided design 
Special paint developed by the National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration is being used to coat the skeleton. 

It is considered a unique project by the National Park Service, 
{he Interior Department agency that manag e what is probably 
the Largest copper statue ever restored Much of the work is being 
done in a confined space. The IS major contractors have devel- 
oped a blend of old and new technology to make repairs while 
keeping the lady’s green hue. 

" “It is very difficult and very challenging, because we have no 
direct experience with many of the things that need to be done,*’ 
said Philip Kleiner, vice president of I^shren/McGovem Inc. of 
New York, the construction manager. 

Over the years, water collected in the folds of the statue's robe, 
the curls of the hair and other areas, sometimes corroding all the 
Way through. About 2 percent of the skin must be replaced, said 
Thomas E. Graedel, a chemist for Bell Laboratories. But, using 
new copper, it would take years for the green patina to form. 
Artificially creating a patina with acid solutions might form 
^buctural weak points, Mr. Graedel added. .. 

S O Befl Labs is donating a large gr ee n copper roof from its 
laboratories in Murray HiH New Jersey, m return for the 
chance to study, with electron microscopes, parts of the 
skin that have corroded naturally at different rates under various 
weather conditions. 

The seven-fooi-high copper, flame, has been illuminated since 
1916 through 600 glassed-in openings cut out of the copper, 
there was leakage and corrosion, so a new flame is being 
fashioned without glass windows. It will be plated with nickel and 
[hem with gold, which will reflect outside spotlights' . _ 

One major challenge, statue restorers said, was removing coal 
tar and seven layers of paint from inside the skin, for esthetic 
reasons and to' check the copper’s condition. Chemical stripping 
pbsed hraltb hazMds in the confined space, and sand blasting 
could have removed copper. Park Service experts suggested 
freezing the paint with liquid nitrogen- ’ • 
j “It peeled ‘right off,” Mr. Bdlante said. The coal tar was 
removed by gentle blasting, using baiting soda instead of sand, he 
added: Mr. Kleiner said the nitrogen system was being consid- 
ered to remove paint from windows of oldbirildmgs- 
The nitrogen did not work an the iron skdetal system, howev- 
er. J^StranssInc- a puntiMpontracto^ .adapted £ 1 } .existing 
system 1£> enal^tSb paiS^fb^bc Wa^^off and the particles r 
immediately vacuumed up. The iron is being repanted with 
water-based inorganiezme paint dewdopqJ by NASA, that is far 
less toxic than solvent-based paints. ... . 

". The new flame, however, is bring hammered by hand,-jo5t as it 
was a cenriny ago./nie work is being done by Les MfitalHere 
(Jhairipenois of Rdms, France. . . 


Currency Sates 


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(dollar. DM. SF. Pound. FF); Lknrt, Bank (FOJ): Citibank 

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Feb. 14 


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antra: Reuters. 
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Source: Reuters. 


Big Three’s Net 
Near $10 BWion 

The Associated Press 

HIGHLAND PARK. Michigan 
. — Chrysler Carp, announced Its 
second consecutive year of record 
earnings Thursday, a S2J8-bflKon 
profit that was more than triple the 
1983 result of S700.9 unflion — 
itself a fourfold gain on 1982. 

The Chrysler report put the Big 
Three automakers’ total 1984 net at 
ahnost $10 billion, compared with 
Sfi.15 bilUoD in 1983. 

General Motors Core, said last 
wedc it earned $4.5 binmain 1984, 
an industry record, and Ford Mo- 
tor Co. reported Wednesday a 
profit of more than $2.9 Hflion. 

‘These profits wifl just add fuel 
to the fire for removing Japan’s 
volum&ry restraints” on car ship- 
ments to the United States, said 
John Hammond, who researches 
the auto industry for Data Re- 
sources Inc. of Lexington, Massa- 
chusetts. 

Ford, Chrysler, and the United 
Auto Workers anion want the Rea- 
gan administration to pressure Ja- 


when it expires March 31. GM, 
however, has said that it would im- 
port more than 200.000 Japanese 
cars if the quotas were lifted. 

Ford said Wednesday that it 
needed continued protection to 
proceed with ambitions retooling 
plans. 

[Chrysler’s chairman, Lee A. la- 
cocca, said Chrysler would begin 
moving production overseas if the 
Japanese quota agreement were not 
extended, Reuters repeated Thurs- 
day from Detroit.] 

For the year, Chrysler earned 
SI8.88 a share, compared with 
S5.79 a share, or $701 million, in 
1983. Sales in 1984 for Chrysler 
were put at $19.6 bflErai compared 
with $133 bflHon a year earlier. 

Chrysler’s earnings for the 
fourth quarter came to $609.7 mil- 
lion, or $431 a share, compared 
with 91 cents a share or $1183 
minion a year ago. Sales were SS3 
billion, a gain*? $3.8 bflltan in the 
1983 fourth quarter. 


B-l or Stealth: Ik^dsion This Year 



; By Wayne Biddle . 

(Jew York Tima Service ■ 

WASHINGTON — The fate 
of one of the Air Force’s most 
cherished weapons, the manned' 
strategic bomber, has reached a 
pivotal point: Congress must de- 
cide this year whether to exteruT 
production of the B-l bomber or 
forge ahead with a radically new 
design, the Stealth bomber. 

The choice involves some of 
the nation's most lightly guarded 
military secrets, namely how to 
build aircraft that can evade So- 
viet radar. Fitted against this 
technology's promise is perhaps 
the most tenacious political net- 
work in Pentagon history, one 
. that enabled the B-l program to 
survive a decade of controversy, 
inciii5i«fl cancellation by Presi- ■ 
dent Jimmy Carta: in 1977. 

The choice will affect, more- 
over, the long-term future of two 
of the hugest American military 
contractors — RockweD Interna- 
tional Corp. and Ni 
— which together have 
of dollars at stake in strategic- 
bomber programs at their south- 
on California plants. 

In the Pentagon’s budget for 
the fiscal year 1986, President 
Ronald Reagan has requested fi- 
nancing of the final 48 B-l 
bombers in a planned fleet of 
WO. The first prodiKtioo-modd 
B-l, valued at more than $200 
million, rolled off the Rockwell 



TteNowYoATn 

The B-l bomber, a bove , for 
which the prime contractor is 
Rockwell International Corp. 
Rendering, right, of Nor- 
throp’s Stealth bomber. 


assembly line at Palmdale. Cali- 
fornia, last September. 

But the administration has 
told Senator Pete Wilson, Cali- 
fornia Republican, that no mon- 
ey will be sought to build more 
rtwn 100 of the B-l s. “I don’t see 
any evidence for going beyond 
100,” Mr. Wilson said in a recent 
interview. 


During testimony before the 
Senate Armed Services Commit- 
tee last week, the Secretary of the 
Air Force, Verne Orr, said there 
were “no internal plans whatso- 
ever to buy the 101st B-l.” 

With no allocation this year or 
next of 'Tong-lead” funds for a 
101st B-l, production work is 
(Cootmoed on Page 13, CoL 1) 


France’s GDP 
Rose 2 % in ’84, 
0.7% in Quarter 


77ir Assoctased Press 

PARIS — France’s gross domes- 
tic product expanded at an infla- 
tiott-adjusted rate of 2 percent in 
1984, compared with a 0.6-peramt 
rise for 1983, the national statistics 
institute said Thursday. 

It said the GDP rose 0.7 percent 
in the fourth quarter, compared 
with a 1.1 -percent rise in the third 
quarter. 

The institute, known as INSEE, 
said the third-quarter figure was 
revised upward from a previously 
estimated increase of 0.8 percent. 
French GDP rose 03 percent in the 
fourth quarter of 1983. Gross do- 
mestic product is the total value of 
a nation’s goods and services ex- 
cluding income from foreign in- 
vestments. 

The state-run institute's January 
projections forecast increases of 03 
percent in GDP in the first and 
second quarters of this year — not 
enough t o ste m rising unemploy- 
ment INSEE predicted that the 
number of job seekers would rise to 
a postwar record of 23 milli on by 
mid-year. 

Unemployment is a major issue 
in France. The high rate of jobless- 
ness is one reason many observers 
expect the Socialists to lose control 


of the National Assembly in the 
1986 legislative elections if the eco- 
nomic picture does riot improve 
markedly in the meantime. 

- Economics Minister Pierre Biri- 
opvoy said earlier Thursday that 
France's 1985 economic ffowth 
would not be far behind that of 
West Germany, which initially an- 
ticipated a 23-percent rate mix is 
now expected to achieve a growth 
rate of- closer to 3 percent. 

Some economists fear the French 
government may be tempted for 
political reasons to stimulate the 
economy before the 1986 elections. 
Prime Minister Laurent Fabius has 
pledged not to do that, bpl the 
government has announced mea- 
sures to aid the ailing construction 
industry. 

■ Nommlnstrial Activity Cited 

INSEE attributed the fourth- 
quarter GDP rise to strona activity 
in nonindustriaJ sectors out said 
imports rose 3.6 percent from the 
third quarter, bringing their share 
of GDP to 293 percent from 28.6 
percent, Reuters reported from 
Paris. 

Domestic demand rose 3.1 bil- 
lion francs ($308 million) at 1970 
prices, with increases in all its com- 
ponents except home purchases. 


A Retired Teller Ties Organized Crime to Bank of Boston 

For Years, He Says, the Bank Deposited Unreported Bags of Cash FwmlheAngiulos Family 


Fox Butterfield 

. lew York Times Service 

BOSTON — The Bank of Bos- 
ton for years accepted paper bags 
filled with cash from a family idenr 
tified by federal authorities hoe as 
leaders of organized crime without 
reporting the transactions, accord- 
ing to the former head teller of one 
of thebank’s branches. 

The transactions went unreport- 
ed because the bank had puaced 
two b usinesses owned hy the fam- 

Dy, the Anginlbs, on aspedal list of 
customers whose large cash depos- 
its were exempt from federal-re- 
porting practices, according to the 


retired employee, Howard .K. 
Matheson 

Normally, banks arc required by 
law to report all cash transactions 
over SlQjQOO to the Internal Reve- 
nue Service, but certain retail busi- 
nesses, such as supermarkets and 
restaurants 'that generate lane 
amounts of cash, may be exempted. 

A spokesman for the Baltic of 
Boston said he would not co nfirm 
whether the Anginlo concerns were 
customers of the bank or, if they 
were, whether the bank exempted 
cash transactious. 

The Angiolo concerns, the Hun- 
tington Realty Co. and Federal In- 


vestment ln&, were real-estate 
companies, according to court 
pers and the U.S. Attorney’s 
hens. 

John M. Walker Jr., assistant 
secretary of the Treasury for en- 
forcement and operations, said be 
could not c ommen t specifically on 

the Bank of Boston’s relations with 
the Angjulos because both were 
now the subject of a federal grand 
jury investigation Into money laun- 
dering in Boston. But, he added, 
“b anks amply cannot mm a blind 
eye to this kind of activity.” 

Wayne Taylor, the spokesman 
for the Bank of Boston, said he 


would not comment cm whether the 
Angjulos had been customers of 
the bank or had been placed on the 
exempt list “We do not talk about 
who may or may not be our cus- 
tomers,” he added. 

He did say, however, that any 
decision to put a customer on the 
exempt fist would be by the 
executive responsible for r unning 
all erf the bank's branches, rather 
than by the manager of an individ- 
ual branch. Mr. Taylor declined to 
give any names. ■ 

Last week, the bank pleaded 
guilty to “Imowingly and willfully” 
faffing to report $132 billion in 


cash transfers with Swiss ban, land 
was fined £500,000, the largest wer 
for such an infraction- The ba. Vs 
chairman, William L Brown, L s 
contended that the failure to repot 
was merely a “systems failure’ 
caused by a misreading of federal 
regulations and was not connected 
to any illegal activity. 

Five members of the Angmlo 
family are scheduled to go on trial 
in federal district court here next 
month on racketeering charges 
growing out of accusations of mur- 
der, gambling and loan sharking . 

The leader of the Anginlo group 

(Con ti nued on Page IS, CoL 5) 


Bundesbank Leaves 
Key Rates Unchanged 


By Warren Gctler 

International Herald Tribute 

FRANKFURT — The Bundes- 
bank, apparently little intimidated 
by the current doUax-cxchange rale 
of about 338 Deutsche marks, left 
its key interest rates unchanged af- 
ter its council meeting Thursday. 

A spokesman said the bank fdt jt 
was not necessary to change credit 
policy now because, “with the 
Lombard rate now at 6 percent and 
the discount rate at 43 percent, 
we’ve achieved our goal of pushing 
money-market raxes between Lom- 
bard and discount, currently ax S.7 
or 53 percent.” 

The Lombard rate is the rate at 
which the Bundesbank, West Ger- 
many’s central bank, supplies cred- 
it overnight to commercial banks 
that have pledged securities as ati- 
lateral The discount rate is the rate 
at which banks borrow for the me- 
dium tom from the Bundesbank 
Twmg treasury hills as collateral. 

The spokesman said the Bundes- 
bank has never had “an exchange- 
raie-orienied monetary policy” and 
repeated the Bundesbank’s state- 
ment of two weeks ago that the 
half-point rise in the Lombard on 
Feb- 1 was for purely technical rea- 
sons related to the domestic money 
mark et. 

The Bundesbank in the past has 
expressed concern that a rising dol- 
lar is dangerous to West Germany 
because it can stimulate capital 
outflows from West Germany and 
import inflation, because most raw 
nmrgriflTk are priced in dollars on 
the world market. However, the 
central bank was well aware that a 
further interest-rate hike could 
brake the economic recovery un- 
derway here by raising companies* 
borrowing costs. 

Bundesbank officials, as well as 
analysts at the Organization far 
Economic Cooperation and Devel- 
opment in Paris, are saying that 
Bonn should consider relaxing its 
tight fiscal policy if it wants to 
generate enough growth to reduce 
the country's high unemployment, 
which rose to a post-war record of 
10.6 percent in January. 

The economy is projected to 
grow an inflation-adjusted 23 per- 
cent this year, from 2.6 percent in 
1984, according to the Economics 
Miniroy. 

The economics minister, Martin 
Bangemann, said in an interview 
earlier this week that he sees no 
chance of Bonn taking reflationaiy 
measures this year, including mov- 
ing forward a major tax cuL . 

“We have plans to enact a tax cut 
of 10 billion DM in 1986, Mowed 
by another 10 billion DM cut in 
] 9 gg — and we're sticking to that 
schedule,” he said. 

In a separate development, the 
Bundesbank on Wednesday took a 
step toward its goal of increasing 


Dollar Off Slightly 

uc umimuaicu y »r w /n jo 

-exchange rate I. LrauOlg 

che marks, left , . y 

United Press International 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
paused Thursday after a record- 
breaking rise and finished sfigjhtly 
lower. But dealers said fundamen- 
tals still favored the UK currency. 

“The market was extremdy ner- 
vous,” a Paris dealer said. “Dealers 
were waiting for central-bank in- 
tervention but so far it still hasn’t 
come. .. .The feding is still that the 
dollar will continue to daub.” 

The British pound rose to 
51.095S in late New York trading, 
from SI. 0905 late Wednesday. Oth- 
er late New York rates, the dollar 
traded at 33865 Deutsche marks 
(down from 3301 Wednesday); at 
ncs (down man 


10.06 French francs 
10.08), and at 2797 
(down from 23 115). 


francs 


access to West Germany’s capital 
markets. 

At a meeting of the Capital Mar- 
kets Subcommittee meeting, where 
representatives from six major 
West German enmmwrial banks 
'and the Bundesbank set the calen- 
dar tor new maxk^enommated Eu- 
robonds, the Bundesbank pro- 
posed that all resident West 
German hank* — including West 
German subsidiaries of foreign, 
hanks — be permitted toJead-man- 
age DM-denammated Eurobonds. 


has been the preserve of West Ger- 
man banks winter tw«w of a tacit 
agreement between them and the 
Bundesbank signed in the late 
1960s and revised in 1980. The rea- 
son fer this exclusive right has bean 
to protect the market from undue 
volatility. West German bankers 
say. 

Lead management by foreign 
banks, however, would be condi- 
tional on achieving “reciprocity” in 
other countries for West German 
banks’ lead-management rights, 
banking sources said. 

It is understood the Bundesbank 
would like to reach an agreement 
with the six banks on the commit- 
tee by April but most banking 
sources agree that a concrew settle- 
ment can be reached by summer at 
zbe eariiesL 

Meanwhile, the banks on the 
subcommittee called for a suspen- 
sion of new DM-Eurobond issues 
until the next meeting of the group 
cm March 6. Banking sources dose 
to the meeting said the parricipat- 
icg representatives determined that 
the DM-Eurobond market was al- 
most saturated and thought it best 
to wait until more promising condi- 
tions surfaced. 



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Trade Development Bank 


Shown ar left, tbc bead office 
of Trade Development Bank, Geneva. 


An American Express Company 











Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1985 




Over-the-Counter 


Feb. 14 


NASDAQ National Market Prices 


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f%+ % 

AdVT«I 



<1 6% 

6W 

6%+ W 

Acqutni 



117 SU. 

5 

5 — V 

AflBstl 

a 

U 

33 14% 

14ft 

14%+ % 

AacvRt 

t 


231% 

31 

31%+ % 

AlrMd 

,10b 

0 

33513% 

17% 

13 — % 

AlrWIsc 

t 


1671 I* 

13ft 

13ft— ft 

AtSkMI 

05r 

15 

9717V 

16% 

17 + % 

AiskPc 

JOa 

10 

30 25% 

25% 

25% 

AJexB -. 

100 

30 

457 38% 

3B*k 

38% — W 

Alfln 



245 22 

21% 

a + % 




180 8% 

Bft 

8% 

AleoWI 



224 19V 

U 

IS —IV 

AltaoBv 

JB 

10 

362 22% 

23V 

22W + % 

AlldBn 

JU 

3+ 

1234 26% 

25ft 

26 

AlMCap 

100 a 4JS 

17 32 

21ft 

a + v 

Alter? 



147 4ft 

4% 

4% 

AlpMIC 



25A 8% 

7ft 


Allas 




12ft 

12% + ft 


00 

30 

218 

18 

18 + % 

AWAhi 



199 9 

Bft 

a%— % 




2243 10% 

10% 

10% 



35 

151 14% 

14% 

14ft— % 



18713% 

13% 

T3% 




137 Bft 

av 


AFdSLO 

00 

43 

838 14% 




1 


14 B 


8 




68 43 

42% 

42% — V 


X 

25 

1211V 

Uft 

T1W + V 


08 


110 36 V 

35% 

35% — ft 


0Oe XT 

413 14% 

13% 

13V + ft 



6 6% 

6% 





81 11% 

11V 





90 31% 

20% 




39 15% 

15V 

15% 



35 

167 33V 

a 

33 — % 

APTryG 



136 7% 
181 1 



ua 


114 20 

19% 

X 




236 20 

19% 

19% — V 




580 4% 

nt 

4% — ft 







us 

40 

493 61 

63% 

62% + V 




374 21% 

21 

21% 




142 6% 

5V 

SV— V 


.72 

30 

153 30% 

19ft 

a — ft 


40 

20 

10 20V 

30V 

20W + % 




17 7% 

7% 

7ft + ft 

AlllOOlC 



94215ft 

14ft 

15ft + % 




51 8% 












84538 

37% 

37% — V 




99 6% 

6% 

6% + % 


.13 

10 

133 10% 

9% 

9% — V 




4621 30 

a 




17458 28ft 

37% 

27ft— % 




357 39% 

38% 

39V + V 




49218% 

1716 

17% — % 




817 34 

» 





63 8% 

BV 


ApIS wt 



6 % 

V 

W— V 




745 tft 

6ft 

6% + % 




156 22V 21% 

22 + V 

mrmm 

00b 30 

35524% 24 

24%+ % 

Artel 



91 6% 

fft 

6ft 




370 9V 

9 





33 12V 



AstreM 



41 8ft 

8% 

Sft + ft 




63 5% 

4fk 

4A— V 


.10 

10 

410% 

10V 

10W + V 




222 8% 

7% 

7% 


00 

U 

» 18 

U 

18 


00b 4.1 

13 19% 

19% 

19% + V 

AttGsLt 

252 

82 

156 29V 

28% 

a%— v 



10 18% 





11 

20029ft 28% 

29%+ ft 




44710% 

Tft 

10 + % 




Z711 

11 

11 




72 37V 

36% 

37W+ ft 

AtSaArs 



239319V 

18ft 

18% 

Austrun 



478 4% 
2618% 
61 12% 

4% 

18% 

18ft— ft 

Aut+rt 



12 

12V + V 




164 12% 

12 





230 7 

6% 

7 + ft 




'SB 

7 

7 + V 




T 

9ft + ft 




8318% 

in 

18% + ft 




737 24 

3* 

17V 

23% 

Avatar 



253 17V 
36617% 

17 

17V 


08 

42 

61 5 

4ft 

5 

Aztch 



2 2% 

2% 

2%— V 

B J 


BBDO 2JB0 19 
BFI On 
BGS 
BPI Sr 
BRCom 
BalrcJC 
Baltaks 
BaltBep 

Bancokl 00 45 
BcpHw 1 M AS 
Banctac 


» 


273 51V 50% S1W + Ml 
10S3 2W 1% 2% + V 

31 9 M I 

433 mt 2 m+% 

«1» 12V. 1214 
241 ■ 7% 7ft — 14 

11 W 914 9% + V 
168 21% 2114 2114+ Ml 
8020% 20 20 >14 

1238% 2B% 2834— V 
253 B14 7% 73ft— V 



00 

1X0 

239 8 

79k 

a 


.33 

10 

123ft 

a% 

23% +2 


204 

40 

a 67% 

6/ 

61ft + ft 

BkSou 

08b 30 

25 23ft 

a 

23 — V 


100 

U 

a 12 

11V 

lift . 




a lift 

lift 

nv— w 


.72 

20 

32234 

av 

33V— ft 




BO 9% 

9% 

9% + ft 




32 3% 

3% 

3% 




111 9 

m 

8%— V 




47 9V 

v% 

9% 


000 20 

06 37V 

36 

36 -IV 

BoyBks 

220 

64 

50 48 

47% 

47% — % 


Bavly 
BlFusas 
Bel INI 
BellW 
BncnCf 

Ben ban 

Benhn wt 

Berkley 

BerfcCb 

BH1CP 

BetzLb 

BevMS 

BAH 

BigBlte 

Big Bear 

Bllllnga 

Blndlv 

B la Res 

B logon 

Blomet 

Blosrc 

BloteR 

B Inline 

BIshGr 

Blaslus 

BlbSAT 

BootSn 

Boeewn 

BoItTc 

BstnOls 

BstnFC 

BraaCP 

BmehC 

Bremen 

BrwTocn 

Bruno 

Buffton 

BulidTr 

Brntim 

BurrBr 

BMA 

Buslnkl 

ButlrJ 

ButlrMf 


2.1 

9.1 


150 13 


Soles in Me ’ 

loot HWi low JP.M.Ck’oe 
.12 u n J%— ft 

8412% 12ft 12ft 
27 4% Mi Mi— ft 
.10b 15 I0S 8% B 814- 14 
48 8% 8 8ft + ft 
1729 19ft 18% I« + ft 

2B5I5V S2 1514 + % 

A**** 32 ** 

VS 37 35%36*b+ft 

42 7 4% 4% 

248 IB* 14% 15*4+ % 

4 1* 1% 1%— V4 

3513*4 12% 12% 

135 3% Wt 3*+ £ 
3434 25% 26 + % 

420 54 514 53ft — 14 
95 7% 7*4 714 „ 

126 Ml* 14% 14*4— *4 

5 4% 4% 4% 

150 1014 4% 10 ^ ^ 
171 9 8% 9 +14 

16 7 64ft 6*4 
4 6% 6*4 
245 % 14 

75 31*4 31V 2114— V 
398 19*4 19 1914 

21 n » H 

12 8*4 Vi 0 

14 1616 KU 16% 

763 14 1314 1314— V4 

15 2914 29*4 2914— 14 

87 6% fft «%+ ft 
151 3% 314 394+ 14 
265 26V. 2B* 26+14 
384 In 1*4 1% 
4042514 34VS 25 + 14 

36 20V 19% 19ft— V 
B220I4 20 20 

X7 1 263 56*4 52*. 52% + 14 
502 6% 694 M4 + *4 
Me 5 21 18*4 17% 17% + 14 

152 55 10 2614 26V 2614— *4 


> 


%+ft* 


U 

14 

10 


50o 4 

150 6.1 
54 30 
t 

58 1.1 


50 15 


1.94 


25 


.16 15 
50 25 


52* .1 


150 45 


C COR 
CP Rhb 
CBTBC 56 
CBT 150 
CML 
CPI 
CPT 

CSP 
CoMTV 
Cache 
CACI 
OarySc 
CalAnw 
CaIMJc 
CalSWg 
CalkmP 
Calnv 
CanonG 
ConFSL 
CapCrb 
CanJCHs 
Cardlas 
CnrnUn 
Canon 
Caseys 
Ccncor 
CntrBc 
Centcar 
CemBcp 255b 65 
CnBsftS 152 65 
CFdBfc 1.12 35 
Centrtm 50 15 
Centwi 
Geravn 

CorbrA .12 15 

Cermlk 

Cetus 

OktotTi 

CfimpPt .10 1J 
OmcCo 

QwpEn 

ChrmS 6 .18 .9 

Cmrvaz 
ChkPnt 
ChhTdi 

OiLwn 58 15 

Qmnex 

OiFrab 

ChrvE -T2B S 

CM Chi 

ChlPac 

aum 

Quarter 
Chronrh 


68 ■ 7*4 8 

767 10W 10 10—14 

2028*4 26*4 20*4 +3 
6261*4 60% 6114+ H 
40 1014 10 10 — % 

99218*4 17% 1814 + 16 
697 714 7Ua 716— 14 

49 9% 9 9 

76 4 4 4 — 16 

300 314 3% 3% 

336 414 5% Sft— 14 
780 1*64 19 1914 + *4 

72 4% 4 616 + th 

57910*% 1014 1014— *4 
108 3% 314 314+14 
163 41* 4 4 — 14 

70712 11% 11% 

040 23% 22% 23*4 + 1* 
167 10 94ft 10 
S16 21* 214 216 

55 18 IB 18 + I* 


Satciln Mt 

nes MM Low 3 P.M. O'* 


Cnmatr 

Contests 

Comma 

Camdtal 

Comere 

CmceU 

CmBCal 

CnidBn 

CmlShr 

CwtttlF 

CmwTI 

ComAm 

Comlnd 

ComS vs 

CmpCrd 

Compaq 

CompC 

Cm per* 

C octpc h 

Campus 

CCTC 

CmpAs 

CptAut 

CmnDt 

CptEnt 

CmstH 

Cmpldn 

CmpLR 

CmptM 

CmpNet 

CmpPd 

CmpRs 

CmTask 

vteptus 

Cmputn 

Cptett 

Cmsnm 

Cantshr 

Cmpshp 

Comte h 

Concntl 

Conffrs 

ConnWt 

CnCnp 

CCopR 

CCapS 

ConFbr 

CnPwi 

Cans Pd 

Consul 


.12 5 

.16 1.1 

1H) S3 
S3 11 
5#> 14 
350 5.1 
500 19 
1540149 
140 44 

J6 14 


00 U 


.13 15 


55 5 


1.48 95 
1360135 
1580 95 
136 145 

158 U 
58a 15 


137 ... 

53111 10% 11 + Vk 

26 1694 1614 16*4— *4 
3822% 2014 21 +1 

10829*6 29 27V4— V4 

449 14% 14 U — 14 
IV 42*4 42 4ZV4 + % 
527% 27 27% — 16 

2529% 29% 29%+ % 
141 37 36*4 36% u 

2671 114 1% 1%— Hi 
71 17% 1294 1Z% 

82 8% 7% 8*6 + % 
42 4*4 4% 4% 

409 13% 12% 1244— % 
130 1% 1% 194+14 
II 714 7% 7*4+16 
58 6% 6% 696 + *6 
621 5% 5% 5%+ % 
240 19% 19% 1V%— % 
70 14% 14% 14% + *4 
343 T7% 17*4 17% 

7 (94 8% 8% 

37 29% 29% 29*4+ 16 
244 7V4 694 694— % 
212 7% 6% 7% + *4 

27 13*6 U 13—1* 
294512% 1214 1294 
OTOQVj 77% 80*6+ % 
79 2494 24% 24*6— *4 
104 23% 21 2316 

64 9 8% »*6 — % 

ChrDwl 58 26 TOW IS 14% 1491—14 
a,vn.. ,io 5 

3829% 29*4 29%+ 14 
122932*4 31% 32% 

34 11% 11% 11%— % 
176 7 6% 6% 

61341* 33% 14 
751 ZJ% 22% 2294 
20 27% 2714 27%+ 14 
63 30% 29% 29% — *4 
1430% 59% 29%— 1 
58513% U 13 — % 
123 24% 24 24 

1031 19 IBM 18% 
11328% 27% 281* 

S 18 17% 18 + % 

164 20% 1094 19% — *4 
47 13 1! 

431 16 L 

'“av » 


ClmPtn 248 2.9 
Ontas 514 5 
Opfur 

asrlcn t 
arena 

CtzSou 158 35 
CtzSGa 56 35 
CtzFIds 154 35 
Ctzllt A 1.76 66 
CMJtB 150 6.1 
CMyPad 5Sa 19 
CtyNCn 58b 37 
OalrSM .10 5 

ClarkJ 58 XI 
doarCh 

OevtRt 152 75 

SET 




CntlBcp 

omit* 

arnttc 

Cntlato 

ctLaor 

Convst 

Comma 

OoprBla 

204b 50 
t 

CaersB 

COPVta 

Garcom 

Cordis 

00 

20 

CoraS* 

Corvua 

208 

40 


02 

10 

CrkSri 

Cromer 

CnactEd 

.14 

10 

CrasTr 

CwnBk 

00 

20 

crump 

04 

10 

CuikiFr 

.94 

30 

Cultum 

Cycara 

06 

20 

CvptSv 

00a 14 


129 16*4 
21223 
102715*6 
366 4% 
2740% 
1729*4 
1416 
1239*6 
46 12% 
20 9 
1029% 
103 6 
1147 22% 
312 9% 
12932 
4709 9% 
535299k 

43 4*4 
31413% 
425 23 
61 8% 

27 13% 

183 7% 
86 M 

184 7% 
212 7% 
489 6% 

U 8% 
90719% 
19 4*4 
13019*4 
398 2 
107 8 
7 594 
83 3% 
12 8 
82 m 

481 2% 

59 B% 

28 23% 
615% 

74824*4 
25 17*4 
449 24M 
5 8% 
2240*4 
23 3% 
129 6% 
9 35 
143 14% 
48 5 
306 9*4 
166 8 
773011*4 
126728*4 
431 5*4 
4(417% 
6124 
71 8*4 
1903 9% 
26347% 
681 49* 
447 6% 
167 22% 
4314% 
4 89* 
7720% 
67814*4 
479 2994 
88 1394 
a znft 

60 28*4 
6923 
16 22% 

12913% 


16 16M + V* 

24 29 +1 

IS 15 

4*4 414— *4 
40 40 — M 

29*k 29% — % 
15% 15%+ 14 
39% 39% — % 
12*4 12% 

9 9 + M 

29 29%+ % 

3% 39*+ *4 
21% 22 + % 
9% 9*4 + 14 
31M 31% 

9% 9*4 + M 
2994 2994+ Vft 
714 8 

114 114— ft 
» 394 
1294 1294 — 94 
23*4 24% +1 
794 794— 14 
12% 13% + % 
7% 7%— % 
8% 8% 

7% 7% + % 
694 6%— *4 
5*4 514— *4 
894 8% 

19*4 19%+ *6 
4(4 4*4 
19% 19%— % 
1% 2 +94 
7% B + *4 
594 594-% 
3*4 394 
8 I — % 

% fck* 

8% 8*4+ % 
23*4 23% + 14 
15% 13%+ % 
24% 24% 

1696 17*4 + % 
24 24 

8% B%+ % 
39% 39%— *4 
514 514— U 
5% 6*4— 14 
34*4 35 
14 14 

4% 414— 14 
8% Wk— % 
794 796+ 14 
11*4 1114— % 
20 2014 + M 

47* 4%— W 
16% 169* — *ft 
23 to 23%+ % 
■ 0 — M 

9% 79ft— 14 
47*4 4794 + 94 
4M 4*4— % 
694 694— M 
22% 22*4— % 
14% 14% — *4 
8% Wk— *4 
17*4 20% + % 
14*4 M% 

28% 28% — % 
13*6 1394+ 14 
23% 23% 

28*6 2B94+ *4 
22% 2214 
22 22 — % 
13*4 13*4 


1 P —il 

DBA 



5414% 

14 

14V + V 

DEP 



44 TV 

9 

9V + V 




33611V 

11 





HUft 

IO 

Wft 




181836 

35% 

35% — V 

DakuF 



534 29% 

77% 

29V +1% 




162 7W 

7 


DartGp 

.13 

1 

24100 

99 TOO +1 


06 

"S 

1966 24ft a 

33% + % 




39913% 

13% 

12% —1 




558 9 

Oft 

0% 




5 4% 

4% 





917% 

17 

17 — % 

DtasHt 



IM 4A 

4V 

4V— ft 




144 7V 

6A 

7 + % 




70 7 

6A 

7 + % 

DabSti 

00 a 10 

184 20V 

a 

av+ v 

DacbO 



176918% 

17% 

18 — V 

DektbA 

02 

XI 

414123% 23% 

33% 


08 

14 

114 18V 

17% 





11 1% 



DflltNG 

106 

T4 

17 11 V 

11 

11 — % 




179 2ft 

1% 

IV— V 




273 6 

Sft 

Sft— V 

ll- "! 



358 av 

7% 

7%— V 




35 7% 

7V 

7% — V 

DatecEl 



13 49b 

4% 

4% 




14 6% 

6 

4 




7 4% 

4 

4% + V 




5411% 

10ft 

10% + V 




4364 5% 

4% 

3 — % 




35013% 

13V 

13ft + ft 




91 nv 

12% 

12ft— % 

Dlatoo 



1« 6% 

6% 

fft + ft 




279 25% 

24V 

av— i 




E if - T 'i J 

27%— 2ft 

Irtl- 




32% 

1 ■ 



18 7% 

7% 

7% 

Dvfood 

04 

34 

3275 9% 

9ft 

fft— % 




104 4 

3% 

4 + ft 

DtrGnl 

00 

7 

239 27V 

r_3 

27%+ ft 


108 

40 

1 29 29 

5 "1 

2B%+ V 


70 

1.1 

26 18ft 

low 

lift 

DayIDB 

08 

40 

350 20 % a 

2BV— V 


.ISn 10 

4211% 
402 1% 

11 

11% .. 




1ft. 

1%— V 




259 13V 

12% 

12% 




4917V 

18% 

18V— V 


02 

10 

1140 I7V 

19% 

19V 

DunkD 

02 

10 

192 27% 27% 27%- V j 


46 

40 

3402% 

11% 

11%- % 

DurFIl 

.16 

1.1 

112 IS 

WV 

14% 


t 

83 5% 

5% 

5%+ ft 

DyntcCs 

pysan 


10926% 

133614% 

26 

11% 

26 + V 

13ft— ft 

E 1 




640 3V 

9% 

2%— ft 


.12 

0 

210 14% 

IM 

UlS— % 



110 4 

28* 

Sft 

EZEM 



1310 
2140 V 

H TM 

Ecg/TT 



14M 49b 

4% 

ift + ft 


EoaTwIA 
Earl Cal 

EasMvr 400 15 
EatnF 

EconLb 154 35 
EdSauit 1560105 
EdCtnp .12 15 
Educom M 25 
E Bronx 
EK3UC 

ElPae 146 10.1 
Elan 57* 5 
ElMTg 

EJtion .16b 5 
EMrM 

ElecBlo 
ElCath s 
EleNud 
EleRnt 
ElModl 
ECpIsrs 
EktMIS 
EIQWW 250 
ElruoEl 
Emcar 
Em p Air 
Emu be s 
EncBa 
Endvco 
EndoLs 
EnsCnv 
EnFad 
EnaOlls 
EngRsv 
Enonhs 
EntPub 

Envrdn 
EnvSys 
EnzoBI 
Eauaf 
EalOil 
ErtcTI 
EvnSut 
Exavlr 


safes id Net 

NOs HW low 3PJH.arge 

4 6 3% 4 + % 

41 6% 5% 6% 

2026% 24M 26% +2*4 
67 10% 10% 1096 + *4 
1652994 2996 29% 

5 U U 13—1 

11310 7% 994 

2 4 4 4 

4 13 13 13 + % 

73 VM 9 9 

6291494 14% MM 

160 7% 8% 9 — % 

41 12*4 1194 1194— *4 
266 18% 17% 17% — % 
32 6% 614 6*6 + M 

901 894 IM 8% 

m 28% 27 27% 

631 14% 14%—% 

89 1794 I7M 17M— *4 

169 18*4 18 18 — % 

3917% 16% 1696+% 
52 5M 6% 5M+% 
17 30% 30% 30%+ M 
38513 12% 13 +Vft 

90 1 9* 9*— *4 

156 10*4 994 10 — ** 
958 12% 11*4 11*4— M 

43 7*4 7 7 — 14 

657 7Mj 
130713 
10830 
29010 
484 694 
219 94 
5 13 




32 

713% 

13V 

13% + ft 




58 10% 

inw 

10%+ ft 




407 9 

8% 

BV+% 

;raptu 



111 1TV 

n 

11 — V 




2094 5ft 

s% 

5W— ft 




T6 11 

11 

11 + V 

StLkFd 



156 10 

Oft 

9% 

3WFSB 

008 24 

101 18% 

18ft 

18ft 

SBOvCa 



74 14% 

14V 

14% + V 

StWuh 

sot 70 

2 6% 

6% 

6% 




16421 

19V 

21 +lft 

SwttFd 



26 5ft 

Sft 

5ft 

Etedt 



28314V 

14% 

14 V + ft 

SulHfd 



2418% 

18 

18 




1362 14V 

14% 

Mft 

SHNue 



32 2% 

2 

2 — ft 

GuU 

45e 

0 

7612 

11% 

nv— v 


85 


. 7%+ 9ft 
12% 1294+ 14 

9 » — % 

TM 9%— *4 
5% 6%+l% 
% 94 

12*4 13 + % 

48 16M 15*4 16% + 96 
307 3% 2*4 3% 

65 21% 17% 20 + % 
47121% 20% 20% — V* 
274 1994 17% 19M— % 
_ _ 36 7% 7*4 79ft— M 

JHo 17 3717 3Hft 31% 32 + M 

275 15% 14% 15 + Vt 

25711% 11% 11% — *ft 


1 H Z1 

HBOs 

.» 

s 

447 21ft 21% 

21ft- ft 

HCC 

(Me 

4 

110ft 

10ft 

10ft + v 

HCW 

.10 

22 

125 5 

4% 

4ft— ft 

HMD Am 



37814V 

13 

13V— % 




101 18% 

18% 





69 5ft 

5ft 

5ft 

Hudson 



69 2% 

2% 

2ft+ ft 

HcleSv 



565 7% 

6ft 





4942 2ft 

TV 

2ft— V 



0 

181 15V 

15% 



04 

.9 


37% 

37V— V 

1 i ja» it 



10129% 29% 


Hothwv 

00 

10 

45 12ft 

12 

12 + V 


JB L7 


30 26 


1 * 1 




40 8% 1% 

8% 


JJ 2 r 

J 

126 6W 6% 

6V 

FctrLn 

.16 

24 

£ ft «S ffi+ft 




63ZM 27ft 

27%+ ft 


t 


76 21% av 

av— % 




161 4% 4W 

4% 

FnnG 

106 

34 

18459% 58% 

59%+ ft 




1088 av 29% 30V + % 




0B 6% 6% 

6ft + ft 




2616% un 

16%+ V 




r i 

50ft— ft 





44%+ % 




76 30% 30V 

30% 




19617 UV 

16% 


00 

20 

4718 17% 

17%+ V 


00 

40 

a 4ft 4% 

4ft + ft 


0 Da 20 

1 7 7 





131 7 Oft 

fi%— ft 




15611ft 10ft 

10%— ft 


1.12 

44 

300 24ft 24V 

24% 


02 

20 

ITS 32 31 




44 

100 27% 27% 

27% 


200 

XI 

a5S 53V 

55 +1 


100 

40 

6K 24% 





70124V 23% 

24 +1 


108 

40 

1032ft 31% 

32% +1% 




275314% 14% 

14ft— V 




137 W% 10% 

10ft + ft 




4218% Tfi 

18%+ % 


00c 14 

Oil 28% 



00 

XI 

L. J 

19%— IV 




■ ) I 71 

20% 


00 

10 

4923% 23ft 23%+ % 



40 

11S0V 2BV 

20V— V 


1 


111V 11V 



100 

50 

3037V 31% 32 






1.60 

40 

7 32% 32% 

32ft— V 

FIMtdG 

100 

60 

a 19% 19 




1352 a 


FNtSuP 

07n 

.1 

3615V 14% 

15V + % 



20 

46533V a 



00b 10 

5121% 21V 





mw 9% 





712 25% 25% 

25% 


140 

40 

849 35% 35% 

3SW 



20 

41839% 39V 

39%+ V 


108a 40 

63 26 25% 

26 + % 




1229 8% 7% 

8V + ft 



23 

204 14% 14V 

14%+ V 


00a 14 

51719% 18% 

19ft + % 


02 

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25934% 33% 

34 + % 




109 18% 18% 




14 







5 + % 


87 

0 

w t rrlgTI 

16ft— V 


49 

4 

■ 'i C * ,v ■ ,1 

15W+ V 



30 

427 31% 38% 

31%+ % 




no 19V 19 

19% — ft 




1064 18 17% 

17%+ V 




359 2% 24* 

2ft 


46 

A 

1950 10 9% 

Vfk 


.10 

10 

902 6% 6W 

6% 






08 

10 

3666 24% 24ft 24ft + % 




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10ft 

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00 

10 


16 





59511% 

10% 

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28010 
375 2ft 

fft 

TV 

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407 53% 

9 

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0 

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a + % 



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521 8% 

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a 




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0 

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7 



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133415ft 

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* ' . . • '* * , 
■ V. i 1 , "v * '• • 


• "T i* ; .. -.»»_** , r; . '5 .• **t *«.-4 • *' 


'.r*- 


, - a.u ■ ‘ . ■ 


Mm the 
NewBendi 
Ghiiiet 

Fdtaiiaiy 26 , 1985 , Paris 

Following the success of our 1982 conference, we ore pleased to announce a one day briefing session 
focusing on * Modernization : Priority for the French Economy”. 

With the cooperation of the French Government, we have gathered together the key ministers most 
directly involved with policies affecting business activities in France. 

The program will include presentations by: 

Pfcnt Beregovoy, Minister of Economy, Finance and Budget 
Edith Oesson, Minister of Industrial Redeployment and Foreign Trade. 

Hubert Curies, Minister of Research and Technology. 

Mfcfad Delebarre, Minister of Labor, Employment and Vocational Training. 

Boland Dumas,* Minister of External Relations. 

^Mr.DnnmhncsnBfJBdinjxiiLfjlB: 

AddWond insiglTts will be provided bya feflowedbya quesforKj^^ Toreg^fortteeaepfor^ 


paidofinfemtaHondbusinessirienand 


bankers, inclutingrErfcBourdaisdeGxir- wi be provided at d limes. 


cixJ si ni ut taneousFrerich-Eng^tnan sk j^ ence, please co mp^e and return the regs- 


bonraere, S.VJ 5 . end Generai Manager, 


AnimporkTTtcspedofthecorrfererice 


treien form today. 


MorgwGoorwtyTrustGompwiyafN^ wi be the extmavec3ppcx1ijrafe to engage 1ttfyal N!!3SZ! S?rihintl> 

V — L IuhImhOmub r^anmvJ A6nrwv ina Ji uiiirjrtftOiaariri wA h the arrant Bofip/ 

U9H -iix- ■ . L— 


Yoi^JecffiJ^x^Gass^, Generai Mcrog- ininformdcbcusskxiv^theai^ 

er,Seedrin,fiiatetfAppte(fo^ makers and wifliofoer business executives 


LdkLeFfodvPrfoent,ChdrmciiofRh6ne^ adiwly doing business witoFTCEice. 
Poulenc and Henri Monod, Chairman of 
the Boc*d,Sod&te Firiigbee Hoechst. 

Each presentation %iB 

;r. -;’*•■ , Ibe <tohfe«K?s.w^ b^b^iqfc ‘ ■ *• ,= t_ “ = 


^BfoA<^!obi(Ktwsbe^.i^ 



/ftt V,", 



■ Com i X ai fo s. L ; • x ; 



^oiror bi^ape fabruary T5. Gatodc^ofti 


SURNAME 


REST NAME 


POSITION 


COMPANY 


ADDRESS 


OTY/CDUNTHY 


TOffHONI 


met 


15-2-85 


Sales la Net 

IMS HMi Low 3 P-M.CH '9* 


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134 20*4 20 V. 20V. — % 
61 17% 18% IVVft 
2 7 7 7 

780 3% 3% 3%+ % 
115 25 34% 24% — % 

178 26*4 26 26*4+ % 

106 8% 8% 8%— *k 
243 34% 34% 34% 

70 44% 44% 44% 

65 5% S% 5% 

10 23% 23% 23% — M 
1913*6 12% 13 
575 7% 7Vt 7% — % 
40Z3V4 23 23 

202 27M 29 29M + M 

34 15*4 15 IS 
1224 11*4 11% 1V4— % 
887 8*4 8 814 + % 

477 26% 23V: 26% +2«ft 
95 18% 17*4 18% + % 
1466 36% 36% 36% + % 
7030 29% 27% — *4 

37 5% 5% S%— % 
10017% 179ft 179ft— % 
54 4% 49ft «% + % 
5013 27% 2614 26% +1*4 
4911% 10% 11*6+ 14 
20 38 37% 38 + % 

138 5 4% 5 + *4 

3817% 17 17 - % 

124 59ft 5M 5% — V6 
217 7% 7V. 7% + *6 


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McCrm 
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Me Fori 
Medex 
McdCra 

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MrdB Dt 

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MenrLd 

Motrbfl 

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Micro 

MicrMk 

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MIllHr 

Mllllcm 

Ml III or 

Mlnlfsor 

Mlnstr 5 

MGask 

MabICA 

MoblCB 

Modi rtc 

Moleetr 

Molex 

MonCa 

Moncar 

ManfCI 

MonAnt 

Monollt 

ManuC 

Mor Flo 

MorKg 

Morrm 

Moialev 

Miian 

Mullmd 
Mylan s 


68 25 


55 5 


IIS 

ICC 

IMS lift 

IPLSy 

ISC 

loot 

Invjnax 

Imuno 

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50 5 


IndBcp 

IndpHtt 

IndlN 

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infoRsc 


Iramtw 


IntaDv 

intgGcn 

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Intel 

IntiSv 

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Intrnd 

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intrfFIr 

Intrfac 


.16 15 


Irrtrmgn 

Intmec 


IBkWBA 

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Intain 

I Game 

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IT Cora 

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Invcro 

invstSL 

Iomega 


ltd 

IM Pf 


138 714 
1310*4 
21340 
30 29fc 
511 10 
S3S 5% 
134 7% 
21 4 
M 2% 
10 696 
138 

73 24V. 
23741% 

33 5% 
231% 
54 22% 
58121% 
1432 9% 
697 1 4V. 
24 4% 
170 2296 
927531*6 
200 8 % 

74 3*4 
17315 
14011 
71312% 
115 8% 

2321 67% 
120 8*4 
185 201ft 
80 7% 
2 8% 
17 3% 
27214% 
41 16% 
819% 
367UV4 
381 7% 
161 1*6 
W120 
394 8 
287 514 
159 6 
2279 12*4 
7 13V6 
1541 7% 
1427*4 


7% 7V.— Vft 

10 10 — % 
37% 37% — *4 
2M 29ft + *ft 
9% 7%— (4 

5% S%— % 
7% 714 
4 4 + *4 

2% 2%— *4 

6VX 6% 

38 38 + 14 

34*4 24*4 
41*4 41*6 + *4 
5% 5%— Vft 
31% 31% — *4 
22% 22% 

21% 21*6— *4 
7*4 7V4 — % 
13*4 13% — *4 
4% 49ft 
22% 22*4 + V, 
30 30*6— % 

a 8*4— 14 
3*ft+ *4 
13% 14*4 
10% 10% + 14 
12*6 12*4+ *4 
8*6 8*6 
68% 69 + *4 
0% 8*6— *4 
20% 2D% + *4 
7% 7%+ % 
Sift B%— % 

3*4 3%+ % 
14*4 1494— 14 
16*4 16V4 
17Y4 19%+ V. 
15% 16*4 + *4 

ft ftr** 

17*4 19*4 
714 7%— *4 
514 514+16 
5% 6 + *ft 

11% 12*4 + 9fc 
12% 12% — Vft 
794 7% 

27*6 2714+ *6 


JBIMSt 

Jocknot 

JockLfa 

JamWlr 

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JefSmrf 

JefMarl 

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JHV » 

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44 15 
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140 45 
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.12 5 


JW 15 


7821794 
35 5 
7237% 
5120 
12 35*4 
SB 23*4 
300 8*6 
MM 1914 
342 96 
15 8% 
235 5% 
249 514 
170 10*ft 
1229 
2071716 


1796 19*6 + *4 
5 S - % 
37% 3714 
17*4 19% + 14 
34% 35*4+1 
22% 2316 
0 8*6+16 
17*6 + 9ft 
9ft 

8 —94 
Sift + *4 
41k 

10-14 
2814 27 
18% 17*6 + *4 


’ft 

8 

5% 

4% 

10 


KLAa 



28523% 

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13712 

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KTron 



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54 6% 

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20 

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27% 

Karctir 



41718% 

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Kaelar 

M 

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21715 

14% 

Kavdan 



14718 

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KalvJn 



1225 1ft 

1 

Kemp 

100 

30 

83351% 

52ft 

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00 

XO 

11039ft 

39ft 

Kavax 



147 Bft 

8 

KayTrn 



71 11 

10ft 

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04 

u 

19 n% 

32% 

Ktmbrk 



5 6V 

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KlranM 



60 9% 

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06 

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149917ft 

17% 

vIKoss 



30 1ft 

1ft 

Kray 

06 

0 

1324 18% 

9% 

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02 

X3 

48314ft 

14% 

Kuicke 

.16 

4 

989 27% 

24% 


2296+ % 
12 +1 
5*6 

51ft— Vft 
2B% + % 
1816 
14%— *6 
714 +14 
IN— Hi 

S3*4+% 
3714 + *ft 
8 —94 
1014+ % 
3314+ % 
616 
7% + *6 
171ft + 94 
196+ *4 
10—«6 
1414+ *ft 
26*4— % 


LDBrnk 

UN 

LSI Loo 

LTX 

La Pates 

LoZBv 

LodFra 

LokMw 

LotnaT 

Lancast 

LndBF 

LdmkS 

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LeaDfa 

LaMar 

LnwlsP 

Laxtcon 

Laxldla 

LbtFPh 

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Lily As 

UlyTuI 

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Uncial 

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Local F 

LandnH 

LanaF 


250 

.16 


Lyndon 

Lyphos 


537 796 
336 1094 
6371696 
710 22 
70817 

IS 46 41% 
J 635 17 

15 3315% 

57 614*4 

45 125 16*4 
35 1821 M94 

62 7*4 

16 118 47 

37 6 7 

15 4528 

176 794 
137 1314 
51 M4 
474 396 
100 2% 
1213 
167 23% 
7 43*4 
110 6V4 
16314% 
955 1494 
1128361ft 
78 3114 
1 514 
1046 31V4 
4115 
27 7 
254 2496 
331230% 
823% 
2151814 


i 27 


1J 

3 

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27 
1 A 

75 

27 

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714 7% + *4 
«k 714-94 
16*4 1614— % 
21% 22 +16 
18% 18% 

41 4196+96 

1694 16% + 14 
15% 1596+ 94 
14 14 

16% 16% 

151k 16 — *ft 
7% 714 + % 
48*4 48% — % 
696 6%— % 
27% 28 + *4 

7% 79ft 
13% 139k 

ft 3U 

294 29ft— % 
1214 13 +96 

23% 2396 + 14 
43 439ft— *4 

6% 69ft 
13% M — % 
149ft 1414— (ft 
2694 26% 

» 3096 
5*4 5*4—96 
30% 31 + % 

*4% 14% 

7 7 — % 

24 24*4+ % 

27*4 2796 
23% ZJ96 + 96 
1714 1714— *4 


M 


MCI 
MIW 
MPSIl 
MTS 8 
MTV 


MachTc 

MoOkTr 

MadGE 

mooch 

MoIRt 

Manna 

Motsd 

Monttw 
MartfH • 
MfrsN 


54 15 


510 
50 XS 


10ft 

10% 



7% 

TV 

+ 

% 

6 

6 

+ 

% 

20% 

2D% 

— 

% 

a 

23V 

+ 

% 

14V 

14V 

— 

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8ft 

+ 

% 

14% 

U 

M. 

V 

23% 

23% 



13% 

13% 

♦ 

V 


714 

6 


61 8% 8*4 8*4 
3614)4 14% 14*4+ % 
33413*4 13% 13*6—% 
19 22 21% 21% 

38114% *3% 14% +1 
1tS1% SOW 51+16 
2 19% 15% 15% 

8% 0*4 _ 


Manat jDSe S 
Merest 

Mr UN 160 XI 
Mscoln 


Maxwoi 

MavPt 

MavnOl 


67 7 
571 Wj W 

861216 119ft 
114 5196 51*4 
4740 37*4 

3693 694 614 
10713% 13 
11 3B*4 28% 
376545% 26 
201114 11 
371 59ft 59ft 
414 414 4 


Hk + tft 
10*4+ 9ft 
11*— 94 
51%+ % 
3714— 14 
4*6— *4 
13 + % 

28*4 + 14 
26% + % 
1114 
59fc— Vft 
4 


I Gold Options (prices is S/ 0 *.) 


Ack 

Ml 

May 

** 

290 

300 

310 

SO 

330 

340 

1400-1550 
575- 70S 
105-29 
025 100 
Dfll- 09 
001-09 


lasuaoo 

1375-1525 
KUXMI50 
675- 60S 

1650-1800 

11051275 

700-850 

425-575 

200-250 


Grid 3025-30375 

IValears White WeM SLA. 

1 1, Qai da Maat-Btrac 
Ull Genera I. Su i n et fn J 
Td. 310251 ■ Tda 28 3S5 


STOCK 

DeVoe-Hdbein 
Itrternational hv 
City -dock 
Interna tioml nv 


BID 

uss 


2K 


ASK 

uss 


3 Vft 


'Quotes as of*. Feb. 14, 1985 


Investors seeking above average 
capital gains in global slock 
markets can simply write us a 
note and the weekly 
INVESTORS ALERT newsletter 
will be sent free and without 
obligation. 


First Commerce Securities bv 
Herengracht483 
1017 BT Amsterdam 
The Netherlands 
T elephonr. (0)31 20 260901 
Telex: 14507 firco nl 


5-5 

3J 

13 

54 

85 


Sales in 

I DCs Hl?n Law 3P-M.CH 
4 11 10% 10% 

12J3SW 34'6 35 + *4 

31 1154 IP* 11*1— % 
161 13 7 4 13*ft 13*4 
56 9*3 9 7% 

129 7?4 7*« 73ft 

6 17 lift 17 

102 6 5% 5% 

26 21V. nvi 21*4 

132 Sy-4 2J'4 20% + % 
247 714 79ft 7H + % 
308 I*— 16Va 16% 

27 2B9ft 274 Z7% + *ft 
73 35 3i% 35 

2 4S% 4T.6 45% 

15 17 16*4 17 

3127% 27 27 - % 

43 43% 43 43Vi— *4 

1631% 11% 31% 

38 15*6 15 15% 

58 13 12*4 13 + V4 

8516 15*4 15*4— % 

1 11 II 11 
50109ft 109ft 109ft 

66317% 18% 17% +114 
M1Z*4 139ft 1214 
535 34*4 34 34 —% 

67 Pa 5*1 S 4 
137 tOtk 10*4 10H— % 
758 6% 5% 6 + *4 

5641 21*4 16% 1K4— *% 
458 8% 816 89ft — % 

328 7 6% 7 + 9ft 

33 5 4% «% 

7 I? 19 17 

95 30*4 30*. 30% — *4 

374 3% 3% 39ft— *4 

44 3 2% 3 + <6 

224 40% 39% 40 — 1ft 

25 3% 3% 3% 

17635% 37V 38%+ 14 
2063 4% 4*3 414 

304 20% 20*4 2014 
41315 14V 14% 

45 9*4 7% 9*4 + *4 

303 TV 9% 9% 

70 46% 46% 4694+% 
16010% 7% 7% 

37 38% 37*4 37% 
25650% 50 50 — 

146 3% 3% 3% — 

2 18 IB 18 — 

2 10V 10 1(2% 

157816% 15*4 IMi — 
505 31% 30% 31 + 

13219% W* 19% + 
15614 13*4 14 + 

621 17% 1H% 17% + 
2747 794 7 7% 

14 14V 14% 14% 

985 48% « 48% + 

1478 35% 35 35% + 


t 


A0 4J 


JU 10 


M XI 
1.12 0-7 


M 10 
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01 


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samra 

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20 


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01 

.I2e 0 
48 2-5 

X 1A 
M 10 
-IM J 


N 


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NMS 

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NtlCtv 

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NCmNJ 

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14 Data 

NHIftlC 

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NMIcrn 

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Nous Wt 

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Nelson 

NwkSec 

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Netrtra s 

N BrunS 

NEBus 

NHmpB 

NJNat l 

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NwldBk 

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Noretan 

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06a 43 
04 30 
100 40 
300 70 
200a 45 
04 10 
04 40 
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52 U 
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104 80 

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136 33 

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01 

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8 7 

111 4% 
144 11% 
122 % 
210 22 % 
950 41V 
48 47 
33 53 
68 25% 
504 11% 
4567% 
166 7% 
777 5% 
38 4 
36 5% 
286 6 
2 1 % 
19 7% 
274 TV 
583 7 
1588 27% 
171 6% 
1571 
159 10 
733 31 
10 249ft 
40 23% 
76 5% 
2 % 
6511% 
222 289k 
670 69ft 

147 4(4 
2 % 

1580 794 
10 6 % 
10 23% 
2201? 

148 37% 
621 44% 
314 8 
155 7% 
207 TVS 

56 BV 
102 16% 
6 6% 
22 4294 
1090 3494 
82 22% 
56 794 
132 5% 
277 18% 
62 39ft 
17046111 
134 6*4 
17 8% 
178 8 
231296 


8% 894 
39ft 4%+ *4 
10V 10%— % 
22 % 22 % — % 
22 % 22 % 

41% 41*8 + 14 
47 47 + % 

52 53 +1% 

24% 2496 + % 
10% 1094— % 
27% 27% — H 
7 7 — %, 

5% S%— 94 

3% 3% 

5% S%— (ft 1 
59ft 6 + 14 

1% 1% 

7 7%— *4 

9 T%— % 

8% BV 
28% 2B%— V 
6% 6% 

21 21 
7% TV— % 
30 30% + tt 

24% 34%— % 
23V 2394 
5V 5V— % 
U % 

11 11 — % 
27V 28% + *4 
6% 694 
3V 4 
94 94 

79ft 9% 

6% 6*4 
23% 23%— % 
18% IBM— % 
36V 37 +% 
43% 4494+ % 
7% 8 + % 
9 7% 

BV 894— V 
8% 89ft + % 
16% 16% 

5V 6*4+ V 
42% 429ft + % 
3496 3496+ % 
22 % 22 % 

7 7*4— tft 

5% 5% — % 

18 18 - M 

3% 3% 

46% 4614— % 
6 6 — % 
8V 894+ % 
7% 7% — Vb 
12 % 12 % 


OCGTc 



485 Sft 

2% 

3 

— V 




13 4% 

4% 






43 3% 

3 

3 

— H 




54 4 

Sft 






150816V 

15% 

15V 

-ft 




85 3 

2ft 

3 

+ Vk 


108 

76 

1783 42% 

40V 

43 

+1% 



&5 

23149 

48% 






50 35% 

HW 

2SW 



M 

25 

162 36% 

35% 

35% 

— V 


X60 120 

i aft 

21ft 

aft 



.13* 

0 

225 17V 

16ft 

T7V + w 




34 7V 

6% 

6% 

— Vi 




138 2ft 

2% 

2% 





65517 

16% 

16% 


OptkR 



51BU 

36% 

37V + % 


Ortxmc 

Orbit 

OrfoCo 

OrtcnR 

Odunn 

OttrTP 

OvrExp 

OwonM 

Oxoco 




a 15% 

15 



638 8ft 

7ft 



233 5% 

5 



3219% 

19 

00 

1.1 

571? 

18% 

27A 

90 

60 28% 

38% 



9615 

>4% 

JU 

25 

34514% 

13% 


198 4 

Sft 


8 

17 — % 
17 + % 
28% 

15 + % 
14% + % 
4 — % 


PLM 

PNC 

Patera 

Pqccot 

PoeFst 

PcGaR 

PaCTai 

PacoPt) 

PoncMx 

Pansph 

Pari son 

Park Cm 

Park Oh 

Parian 

PaTntM 

Potrfcl 

Patriot 

Pntrtpt 

Paul Hr 

PaulPt 

PayN 

Pevetrx 

PcakHC 

PaarIH 

Pea GW 

Ponbcp 

PenaEn 

P a nt ar 

Panwst 

PaapEx 

PaapRt 


48 6*4 6 6%+% 

736 52 SI *4 Sl*+ V> 
194 10 *14 7% 

409 50% 50% 50% + % 
168 7% » TVft 
48 34% 24 24 

12714% 14 14 

280 12% 12 12 
.13 1.7 12 7 6% 6V 


.12 20 

2J2 45 


10OB 24 


100b 50 
00 SJ 




6820% 

»V 

20V 



39 12% 

12 

12 — % 





32% — 1% 

00 

41 

12 15 

C3 

14% — V 



366 15 

14ft 

14% 




fft 

fft— % 



aa 8% 

7ft 

BV + % 

100 

30 

15 25% 

a 

25% — % 

200 

7.1 

10 31 

'id 

31 



16 17V 


T7Vb — ft 



41512 

im 

nv— ft 

00 

20 

106 22ft 

22% 

22% 



583 12% 

12V 

12V— V 




15% 

ISA— ft 



14327% 

2/ft 

27% 


S 

620 6ft 

6A 

6%+ ft 

200 


12 43V 

42V 

41V + V 

xoo 

40 

72 29% 

29 

29 

04 

X8 

253 30 

29% 

29% — ft 



60HV 

Wft 

11V 


PeraA 
PereCm 

Petrtte 1.12 30 

Ptirmct 

Ptirmkl 

PSF5 

PWIGI 08r 30 
PhnnAin 
PhatoCt 
PlcSav 
PICCOV 
PtanHl 
PtonSts 
PBFolk 
PicvMs 


00 27 
02 Xf 
.12 14 


Priam 
PrieCms 
PrieCos 

PiinvD .16 20 
Prfmn* 

Prodap .16 30 
ProaCp .16 4 

Proara 

PfOPtTr 100 80 
ProtCas 52 20 


Pawrtc 

PwConv 

PracCst 

PtpdLg 


P ravin 
PbSNC 
Pul IT m 
PurtBn 00 20 


102 80 


3158 7% 
3166 Hi 
27 10 
26614% 
14710% 
444 29% 
101 8 
140 10% 
>249 796 
2178 16*4 
42 4 
16 0% 
181824% 
78 2296 
118731% 
2 ? 
77211*4 
40634V 
16924% 
71 2% 
146 17'A 
113 794 
77 36 
50 6% 
36 4% 
441 7% 
735 12% 
106957*4 
3435 514 
39817% 
270 5% 
63 3694 
36 5% 
m isv 
29 23V 
33 TV 
1515 
10 21 % 
662 5% 
618% 


8V Bfr + % 
94 

9% 10 + V 

1414 1494— % 
1®% 109ft 
28% 29*4 + % 
7% 794 
ID 10% 

9% 9%— tft 

15% 15% — % 
3V 4 + % 

8*6 0*4+ % 
2*94 24V+ *4 
22*4 22% 

30% 31% +1 
896 BV— % 
11% 11*4 + V 
34% 34% — % 
23% 34 +94 

2V 294+ % 
1894 19% + % 
9% 9% 

3594 3SV— % 
5V 4*4+ % 

4 4 

4V 7 — 
1296 12% + % 
57 57%+ % 

S% 514+ 9ft 
16V 17 
5*4 5% + % 
35 38V+ % 

5 5% 

14% 15 — % 
OK. 23*4 

2% 2%— % 
14% 14% 

21% 21% 

47ft 5% 

18% 18% + % 


QMS S 

Quadra 

Quoted 

QoalSy 

Quantm 

QvastM 

Quixote 

Quolm 


112615% 14V 1514 .+ % 
S3 49fe 4*4 #%+ % 
15113% 12V 13V 
M3 2V 3 + % 

92030% 29% 30 
138 4 3% 3V— % 

5212 11V 12 +% 

4299 12% 11% 1114— % 


RAX 
RPMs 
Rods vs 
RodtnT 
Rad Ice 
Rodion 


Rolnr J 
RamMc 
Ray mis 
RovEn 
Roadna 

Recoin 

RedknL 

Reeves 

- II 


00 20 

04 1J 


00 30 
07 0 


4710 9% 9%— % 

2D4 17 16V 16% — % 

492 16 15% 15% - % 

43511V 10V 11V + V 
123 109ft 10% 10% + % 
37 M 9% 9% + 14 
2B3 7% 6% 7 — tft 
407 25 24% 24% 

299 6% 6*4 6% — Vft 
7025*4 94V 34V— % 
397 19% 19 19 — % 

8522% 22 22 — % 

21 8 79ft ■ 

13 35% 34V 34V— % 
982 BV 814 8V+14 
575 7% 6% 6V— % 
6M% 14% 14% 





3 4% 

3% 

4ft + ft 

RntCntr 



7919% 

19 

I9%— ft 

RpAutO 

04 

40 

111 9% 

9% 

9%- ft 

RpHlttl 



88915ft 

15% 

15ft+ ft 

RasEtaa 



56 1% 

1% 

1%— ft 










i 



09a 

0 

no aft 


2Bh+ % 


104 

10 

25 12% 


12W— W 




550 7% 


Tft + ft 

ReyRay 

104 

20 

»142% 


4ZU + ft 


00 

U 

2215ft 


15ft + ft 

RtblBen 



87712% 

im 

12 




5526% 


26% 




66 3ft 

3V 

3% + V 


00 

XS 

40414ft 

MV 

14% 


100 

12 S22 31% 

31 

31ft + ft 


t 


312 7% 

7% 

Tft 

RobNuo 

06 

0 

r-nsa 

15 

15 




16911ft 

lift 

11V- ft 




no isv 

15 

IS -ft 

RefcwH 

06» 

45 

1012% 

ZU\ 

12%— V 


08o 

10 

1723% 


21ft + % 

Moose 

080 

10 

161 27V 

—L4- 

27V + V 


00 

27 

131 a 

4ft 

21ft + ft 


02 

XI 

394 44% 

I> 

44 — V 


.120 

1.1 

201 11 

t^v 

10%+ V 

RovBGP 



21 2A 

2ft 

2ft— ft 




64 22 

21% 

22 




6 9 

8% 

Sft— V 




129 6% 

6W 

fft 

RertAIr 



101 10% 

■ ' 71 

10%+ ft 




a 14% 

pa 

14% 

RronFo 



26326 

LdJ 

SFV 

1 s J 

SAY Inti 



127 1SW 

14ft 

15 

SCI Sr 



37715 

16ft 

14ft 

SEI 



136917ft 

17ft 

17% + V 

SFE 

.TOr 

10 

82 19 

9% 

10 + V 

SP Drug 

t 


124 18 

17V 

17V— V 


08 

15 

222219ft 

18% 

19%+ % 




39018% 

18ft 

18% + ft 

Safeco 

150 

40 

709 36 

35ft 

36 + % 


300 50 

05r 0 

00b 20 

.12 10 
100a 40 
04 20 


02 

00 


SvcMer 
Svmast 
Service 
SvcFret 
SevOafc 
Snriwad 
Snwmts 
Shelby 
Shetdi a 
Snoneys 
ShonSos 
Shpsmt 
Silicon 
Silicons 
SlllcVal 
Slllaix 
Slltec 
Slmpln 
. in 
StaCa 
Staler 
Sklppar 
Steen Tc 
SmlthL 
Sodetv 
SoctySv 
Softool 
SoftwA 


SanrFd 
SaBaat 
SeHasp 
SthdFn 
Sautrst 
S ovran 
Savnai 
SocMIc 
SponA 
Speedy 
Spctran 
SpecCtl 
Sport ID 
Srtrc 
StorSrs 
SlafBId 
Standys 
SMMJc 
SMRaa 
Standun 
Stanhos 
StaSIB 
SfofstG 
SMaer 
SlamrL 
S taws tv 
Slwlnf 
Sfffef 
StodiSv 
Stratus 
StrwCB 
Stryker 
StuartH 
Subaru 
SubAlrl 
5ubrB 
Sftdbry 
Summa 
SumtBs 
SumtHl 
SunCst 
SunMad 
3unSL 
SupRta 
Suprtex 
SuprEa 
Sykes 
SymbT 
Svncor 
Syntach 
Syntrex 
Syscon 
SyAsoc 
Systln 
Syslnfa 
SvsIGn 
Systmt 
. .C 
TCACb 
TLS 
TSR 
TdcVIv 
T andotn 
Tendon 
TcftCotn 
TcCom 
chines 
Tetaa 
TlcmA 
ToiPlu* 
Tekrft 
Talocrd 
Talepta 
Tehrfd 
Tdabs 
Tetam 
Temco 


08 30 


05 40 
,10b 0 

00 XI 


t 

.16 10 
08 10 
108 50 
.16 7 


,10a 10 


00 40 


06 


100 40 


IJDa 20 

.15a 0 
00 1J 

02 10 
100 4.1 
.10 10 
108 40 


36 7% 
30 BV 
SO 5% 
11 « 
1118 5% 


442 18% T7V 18% + % 
14610% 10% 10%—% 
83* 96% 56% 5Mk+ % 
158 4% 3% 3% — % 
154 8% 7V 8%+l 

2 8% 814 Wl— % 

8 25 25 . H„+l 

20 9ft 'H' ^+V8 

120 aw nk 8*4 + v 
34 34% 34 —Vt 

28310V 10% 10V + H 
87 13% 13% 13}%— % 
42* 11 % 11 % im— * 
S 1BV 18% 1|^— V 

72 9 8% l%— H 

125 9% 7% 914+ % 

7% 7% 

av m— 1% 

if% in5— % 

'iia^ tS i»-J 

48 7 6% 6V + % 

617 T7 17 
3415% 14% 15% +1 

35 3V 3% 3V+ Mi 

336 6 5% 5%— % 

303 26 25 2SV +1 

2011% 11% 1P4— **4 
24 7% 9% 9% 

3 SJEifviSiSS-ift 

,.12 « 6gB% X* K^+W 

,£S lffi-% 

914 33% MV 

73 33V 33% 33% 
1W22V 22% m+ % 
17V 13 Wt 17%+ % 

1007 27% 27 27 — % 

50015% 15% 15% 

5 6% 6 6%+% 

234 TV 7% TV— % 
57716% 16% !*£+ ft. 
1309% 19V 17V— % 
ItSaO 19V 20 + % 

189 10% TV 9V— % 
7W 17% 17% T7% — % 
149 1BV 1894 ’SJ*— S 
33 5% 5 5U + % 

7*9®% 17% 17V+ftk 
77 12 11V 11V 

105 7% 7% TVft— *4 
237 3% JV 
227 43% 42% 42V + V 
168512% 12% 12% — % 
52 TV 9% 9% — V 
198 21V 21 21%— % 

30 46V *6% *6% 

2218 17% T7%— % 

441 30V 29V 291ft— % 
77S 6 5% 6 +% 

66 29 2BV 28% 

119 25*4 24% 24%— % 
57 8% 8% 89ft + % 
744 42% 40% 41V +1% 
11 2V 2% 2% — % 
7 6 5% 5V— % 

»15 U% 14%— % 
4013V 13% 13%— % 
8% I 8% 

_ 3 2% 3 

3 14V 14V 14V— % 
11710V 10% 10% 

104 7V 7% 7% 

65 28% 27% 28% +1 

628 21V 21V 21%— % 
81 54% 53V 54% + % 
3 5ft R* 5V— *4 
18 23% 23% 23% 

75 53V 53% 53% + V 
7 6V 6V— M 
7% 7% 

t i 

49 15V 15% 15V + % 
71 24% 2* 24% + % 

229 8 7V 8 + % 

737 11% 18% 11% + V 
164115V 15*6 15% 
1552% 5TV 52 + V 

214 29% 29 29 — % 

251 4% 4% 4V — % 
9039% 136 136 —3% 

36 6 5% 5%— % 

2445V 45% 45% — % 
9710*4 914 10%+ % 

2Z2 4V 4% 4*ft— % 
22 21V 22 


05 0 II 


00 

100 


1.16 xr 

100 XI 
106 20 
.15b 12 


n xo 


JMb 

05 U 
108 10 
05 0 

102 43 


14 


276 . 
193 7% 
122 6% 


06 40 
07a J 


.16 0 


30 18% 10 10% 

202 TV 79ft 9% 
1717% 1SV 10V 
351 4% 4% 4% 

4813% 12V 12% — *4 


344 1ft 

1ft 

1ft— ft 

26413ft 

17% 

13%— ft 

110 5% 

5% 

Sft— ft 

60 11% 

11 

11% 

306 5V 
5616ft 

5 

16% 

lf%+ ft 


TannDt 

Toxott 

Textne 

TJieriPr 


04 1 


m 0 


JB 10 


01 a 


0. t 30 


05a 10 


21922% Zl% 22% +1 
118 6% 6% «%— % 
3211V 11% 11%— % 
104 8% 8 8% + % 

178 38% a a — % 
21713 12V 12V— % 

659 MV 17V 1B14 + 94 
139 7V 6V 6V- V 
11034 32V 33 — % 

28811% 10% 11 + % 
485036% 38% 28% + % 
4674 7 6% 6%— V 

7 8V BV 8V+ % 

1 m IM BV+% 

V50TV2TVS 19% 19V— IV 
1538 25V 25% 25%+% 
143812% 11% 11%— % 
213 8% 7% 8 +% 
40331% 23% 23% —1 
44120% 17V 17%—% 
918 3% 3% Wft 
n 17% 19 19% + % 

221 19% If 19 

2 5% 5% 5%+ % 
42 23% 23% 23%— % 

153 8% 8 S% + % 
12 1 % 1 % 1 %— % 
40 15% 14% 14% 
8313% 12% 12%— % 


Thnnds 

Ttsetfd 

ThdNl 

Thorln 

Ttartec 

TlteuT 8 

3Com 

TbneEs 

TmirRb 

Tlprary 

Tofu* 

TottSya 

TrtkAu 

Tranlnd 

Tran La 

Tenant 

TrtpdSy 

TrIMJc 

TrlbCm 

TraaJo 

TBkGa 

TudcDr 

TwnCty 

TvsanF 

USUCO 

UTL 

UltrBcp 

UHny 

Unamn 

unlfl 

UnPkrfr 

UtlTTBe 

UACmn 

UBAlsk 

UBOol 

UnDom 

UnEdS 

UFnGrp 

UFsrPd 

UGrtJn 

UnNMx 

UPrasd 

US Aid 

USBcp 

US Cap 

USDsan 

US Err 

USHtS 

USSMt 

USSwr 

USTrk 

USTr 

UStatns 

UnTalev 

UVoBS 

UnvFm 

UnvHIt 

UnwHM 

UFSBk 

UrgaCr 

Uscoh 

VLI 

VLSI 

VMX 

VSE 

ValMLfl 

Vattan 

ValFSL 

ValFra 

valNtt 

vaiLn 

vanOtn 

VOnzetl 

vactrG 

veioBd 

Ventral 

Vela 

VlconF 

Vlcorp 

VlctBn 

Vidros 

VledeFr 

VUdna 

Vl ratrk 

VtaTech 

VOdavl 

Vottlnf 

*MM 

Vartae 

VyqilSl 

WO 40 

WdbrC 

VWkTTer 

WstlE 

WFSLS 

WMSB 


108 XS 


101 60 


06 10 
100 30 


08 0 
100 30 


108 43 
06a J 


140 40 
.12 0 
JOB 10 
108 45 
04 60 


11 


100 30 


2/13 TfflrL., 

75 TV -9% 7V. + J 
21837% 35V 37 +%. 
nwk li n%+% 

63313% 13% 12% — V 
37517% 12 17— Vt. 

199912% 12 12 +J» 

332 MV 14% Wk-% 

of u io* n- +.% 

384 1% 1% 1% 

381 m 14% 14%— % 
1917% 17% 17% 
3615% 10V MM— % 
H 4% . 4% 4%-% 
IS 18V 18% W%+% 
173 1% 3% 3% . 
100612*4 11% 12 +’*ft 
145 6% 6ft— Ml 

10 H » » - 
»» 27% 27% -HW 

7833% 33ft 33%—% 
2S 6% «% i% - . 
-66 1%.-1M !%■- 
maB% 3 m 8/%-, J* 
1(031% 81 3t%'+-|*r 

675 B 31% 23 41ft- 
129V 09V sags.,-- * 
408 8% 1% BK 
762 a 31% 21V— AC 

320 n% itift nv— % 

40*17% 19 19% + % 

25* 56 54 ■ . 

9531 38% 31 + U 

1810 -tv a 

14325 M 24 — f. 

377 13 nv nv +ih. 
17 394 3 3 —ft 

W «4 9% m-% 
25715% 14% 15. . 

161 U* 18V IBM + % 

a n*. in* nv— 

4611% n ^|| . H-W 
119 3% 3% M 
33723% 259ft 25% 

69 4% 4 . 414+ tft 
422 4% 4% 

458 7V 4% 


08a 10 
.We J 
108 10 
108 30 
X 0 

10* XI 


782929% 28*4 38*+% 
17 5 4% 5 +1fc 

435 71% »V 3i 
78 UV 13% 13ft + V 
503 45 44V 44%— % 

1352*% 23V 24 — % 
•5518% » ; 18 
279 38% 37V 3B4+V 
IM 20% a 20%+ w 
MV— % 


201715% MU ... .. 

15 4% 4% 4Vft— Vft 

a 10 % a 18 % + •% 
968 694 6% ' C%— ft 
.148 30 323* 4V 4% 4V + % 
372 BV 0ft 8ft— % 
87911 WV 11 + % 

102911 W*4 Wtft • 

25Um TV TO +04 
SAB 30V 20% 20%— % 
10 17% 17 17ft . 
a 18 9% 10 + ft 

... ... 10 7% 7ft Tft ' . 

100 07 1826 32% 31% 32% +1- 
00 10 317 28% 27V 27V— V 
9613% 13 13 

18115% 15 15 r. 

712 1 .ft ft— ft 

muv 16 % uv 

254 4% 4V 4V 
91 ft Ik ft -• 
a 3% 3% 3*4— ft 
249 21ft 21 27ft tft 
424 24 24 

497 4ft -SV 2ft-r% 
10513 12V 13 - 

7113V 13% 13% — % 
115% 15 18% 

SI 1ft 1ft IV 
560 » 7% «%— % 

14821 28% 20%—% 

801 31% 30V 30ft ' 
II 9 BA *ft+_tft 
20 7% 7*4 7V 
6 24% 2* 

10*27% am. 27% 6* *jt 


.15* 1J 


.10 10 


00 XI 


, 12 a 0 

100 40 


10 


,13r 10 


30 

0 


108 


VTcvottc 

Wabbs 


WoatFn 

WnCaxS 

WMF5L 

WMIcTc 

WMIcr 

WSH-f s 

WtTlA > 

WmarC 

WitwdO 

a#-* 

rmwui. 


.12 0 

06 20 
100 150 
JO 40 

204 40 


04 20 


00 10 
.Me 0 


Wleat 

WkScom 

WIHrat 

WIIIWW 

WUIAL 

WllHnl 


30 


t 


00 


vnionF 
WttanH 
WHton 
Wlndmr 
WbmEn 
WtatO 08 
WaMm .16 
WoodD 


Writer 

.11. - - — - 

innnman 

Xebec 

Xtar 

Xktac 

YlowFt 

YarkFd 

ZanUbB 

Zantac 


ZJonUt 

23M 

Zlrad 

Zondvn 

Zymos 

ZVtrax 


14412ft lift 12 
XI 33871% 20% 30V - 

XI 18328V 38% 2BH 

55T 13% 13% 13ft— "ft 
0 401* 18% T9 + V 

124 9% 7% Tft— ft 
25013% BV 13 —ft 
S3 7* 7% 7ft + ft 
6412 11 11%+-% 

5771% lift lift— ft 
6065ft 65% 65% 
29510% 10% W% - 
209 10 7% TV -Pit 

SB 8ft TV 8 — % 
114 14 14 

2*5 30 19ft 17*+ ft 
721V 21 21 

100 34% 24% 24% +. 
8023% a a —i 
31726ft 26% 26%-. ft 
65B 5% 5 5 . — ft 

235 7ft 7ft Tft "• 

30 48942% 40V 42. +1 

X2 7WV WV HV+ft 

431210% 9% 10ft +. ft 
94 8*6 8*8 B% + % 
2314% 13ft 14% -■ 
432 9% 9W 7%— ft 

1J 148413ft 12ft 13V+IM 

4 4V 4% 4V 

334 7*4 tft 6ft—- % 

*^2» H% av+^f 

267 6ft 6 6ft + ft 
27718% 17% 17% — 1% 
169 27ft 27H 27ft * 

1 8V BV 8V— .ft 
a2Bft 28% 30%+'% 
641 6 Mb 5V— ft 
75311 12ft 12ft- % 
155716ft T3V 15ft— ft 
100 20 104337ft 36ft 37ft + ft 

00 20 113% 13% 13%—% 

47329% 29% 29%+.% 
42 4V 4% 4*4— % 
000 20 MU 12% U +% 
104 20 14 36% 36% 36*4 — ft 

27 5% 5 5 

87 I 7V 8 -+% 
06 30 30811% MV 10ft— ft 
IIS 2ft 2V 2ft+% 
465 2ft 2% 2ft 


07 10 

30 
20 
_ XS 
04 13 
■15a 10 
00 20 


Floating Rate Notes 


Feb. 14 


Dollar 


r/Mto cpn/Mat Coanoa tteri BM Add 


Allied lrWi5%05 
AlBed irtdiSV+n 
AIBed lrWi5*M7 
AlOed IrWupem 
Arab Bko Cera 5%ft 
Atlantic Flnmt M 


fft 106 T9J6 10U6 
lift 17+ 180051 8055 
TV +7 100.1810028 
1BU 2M M25 «J5 
13% 183 97J8W08 
18*4 38-3 MQ.HI1 0035 
Bca Comm. Itatania5%-M 9* 66 0705 tag 
Bon Noz Lovara flk-71 % % 

TV 396 9938 0708 
H* 306 »05 10825 
7W 184 7850 9805 
134 9058 9805 
»2 100051 0020 
257 9775 WB25 
206 MO011O871 
. . 374 10X1810020 
fflk IM 10X7310003 
■ft 154 9700 9930 


9V 

*% 

9 

8ft 


Dl Roma -71 
_ 5toSalrlta5%0I 
Banco PtnlD&VAS 
BkOfGraece-TIfM 
BfcOtGraKZ+7 
BkOrirmnd5%-89 
BkOtiraknd5Vr*2 
Bl Montreal 5*M0 
Sk Of Montreal 5-48 
Bk Oi Montreal 5%-TI 

BkWNW^SdiaM-WWm* 384 WXglOW 
»0t Nava Scotia 5%M 9ft U-7 MO0iaX^ 
Bk CM Tokyo Sto-a 
Bk Ol Tokyo 5%-89 
BkOt Tokyo -87 
Bk« Tokyo 8%4MU9I 
Bk Of Tofcvu5WdK8B/71 

Bk AmertcnSV+M 

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S*«f By Dinah lee 

S tJyV ' JnurmBtamal RcruU Tnhune 

ll^ HONG KONG — A leafing 
Singaporean property magnate, 
^]**<hoo Teck Pu«, offered 1.9 billion 
fj^-Haag Kong dollars (5243 mOBcn) 
jffcn Thoraday for control of Whee- 
Sj jock Maiden Co„ one of Hong 
fe Kong's oldest trading and shipping 


5X548,730 T onSaay shares pended from ti ming it***™ 
<p.7 peroeat cf lbe **B” onfinaiy- to p r ope rty devSqpmenl, Snano- 
snare c apiiri ) from the froaly in- ia^ insurance and broking, 
ucsts of the drainnan of Whee- WBeeiock; assets ornStW a- 
lock Maiden, John L. Maiden. dudean 18-pereem faffing atlre 


_ Falwyn is offering renaming Cross Harbour Tumid. 31 percent 
darehoUeis 6 d dnte every in a department store company. 


ToyotaNet 
Rose25.7% 
In First Half 


Imperial’s Profit Rose 16% in 1984 


LONDON — 
Pf.C reported Tin 


Chi Mother matter, Mr. Kent . profit 12 penest to £80 miWion, 
. . ' said m response to questions that indoding £125 nnffioo from tbe 

hearty buying of Imperial Ames by sale of tafipg outlets, 
tnaiitsm- u.S. investors a the past three rri -- Y =-* T - J — =* 


for M -Tf ^n=Cnrfori,™l3S 

for every B" onfinay share. The the realty company, Hannan 
offer oT 6 dollars represents a 22 Holdings Ud. Howver, the profits 
peretti premium wttWhadodgs from tEese activities to wex- 
pendiare nA aMjsfam of 490 shadowed by the substantial sh*- 


; &$£ Mr. Shoo used die Hons Kong 

^ aStovestmeo! co mpan y of Fahvya 

^ . ^Ca for the lad, according to Nid. dollars. Trading in WhedockMer- ping losses nsiriaed by th< 
%Sltothschild & Sons, winch is acting den “A" shares wassuspended in As rival groups a the 
2 £is his adviser. Hong Kong Thursday afternoon ai cdooy were stmmSzanx 

Ak* j, &' Mr. Khoo is the fotmder of Me- . 5.80 dollars, np front 5.05 dribs tions to recover from the i 
- "I'jbyan Banking BJkL, and a major Wednesday. of Hong Kcng*s property m 

^shareholder in the National Bank A director of Sino Land C&, 1981, Whedoek Marden \ 


I percent CmtfUBdbOwSKtfOmi C e vmJmt ' 

naptny, TOKYO - — Toyota Motor Co. 

15 percenf of said Thursday as earnags in fie 
Hanisaan first haff of its aareat fiscal yea 


after taxes was 


Tobacco Ltd. trail 


£151 ($165.4nriIEoo), up ™fcf tapo£ft e^kT 

more thaa 16 perat from £13ai 


weeks had acooimted for abort 2 improved 1984 operating profit 13 
percent of lapcrisTs emay. The percent to £108.9 naiHftn, the par- 


Mesa Group Bm 
Stake in Unocal 

Roam 

AMARILLO, Texas — T. 
Boone Pickens’s Mesa Partners, 


:y company, Harnsaan nrsi nan or ns cmreaz us cm yea 
Lid. However, the profits rose 25.7 percent on die strength of 
se activities were over- a 17.6-paceDt increase ia export 


As rival groups m the 


Brand. He is also chairman of Robert Ng, said,"! see il as a very 
4|: ;ie Goodwood Hotel in Singapore, timely move for Mr. Khoo. To offer 


reputed to be one of the richest 
a?<pcB in therepubfia 


& JB60UUI& 

shows that J 


Mr. Khoo was in Hong Kong generally tmdervalaed. 


„ , _ of Hong Kong’s property market ia 

no Land Gk, 1981, Whedoek Maiden was ex- 
voy posed to dumps ta both the local 
Khoo. To offer property market the interne- 
tor Whedock tkmal shipping market, 
ong shares are Whetkxas after-tax net profits 
ed.” Mr. Ng’s fdl & percent from a year earlier, 
petty interests to 5Z5 miTH™ doBais, in 1984's 


The company, Japan’s largest ~. r rnmilm 
automaker, reported profit of 
126.13 bfflion yen ($480SmBlh») 
for the six months ended Dec. 31. I985 ’ Qctot ” 
1984, compa red with profit of ** x r,~ m pa ra t> 
100 J billion yen a year earfier. odlastyear. 

RevomerQse9JperoeBtto259 , TMannpaiiy 
triffioo yen in the Gist haff, from fiat its bowl is 
2.629 triHion yen ' a year ^ conroany*s_ 


QU , ■ rent n w nft w of a potential bid for 

The company also reported that i**™ » 

SgS S 

tk« fa Howad Jotooc OTO- ifae 


foyota smd its domestic 


the company’s Howard Johnson 
Co. unit and intends to «*«*<> a 
decision on fie U.S. snbskfiaiy’s 


car- on gmm smd, noting rtm* miwtrt 
[for share inRritaan hadbeen broadly 
maintained since January 1984. 
Imperi a l Foo ds Ltd. raised its 

“““ ™° S<«faHowKdJotaw>Q«1£ 

fiscal fituher. Imperial said some pr^^ ^^^wESStH? TO 13 PCM? 
1985, Octob er throa^i December, iagdevrfomnentsinHowmd Jola- 6001 ^ Wednesday, 
yrerecrmgjaxable with fie Eke peri- son's hold and retanrat opaa- Mr. Kent, coonmcntiiK on the 
od last year. tions were bang porsued. Stock purchases by U. S. mvestrxs. 

The conpany also said Thmsday In fiscal 1984, operating profit at said fiat the buying was wide^r 
fiat its board is considering sdlmg Ijkward Johnson fdl 41 pereem in spread through investment banks 
the company’s Hbvrardfoihnson stsrtmg teens, to£11.4m^on.Im- ®°d fiat the iiltimare purchasers 


Petroleum and Wag ner A 
Brown, has bought for invest- 
ment purposes 13,780,400 
shares erf Unocal Cop, or 13 
percent of th e c ompany ’s shares 


rose 33 percent in fie first haff fstmc as soon as possible. 


penal attributed fie drop lazgciy to had not been identifie d. He said 
poor restaurant hwimw, say ing Imperial had established a panel to 


Howard Johnson hods had in- develop defensive strategies should 


enter the H ong Kong and Chma Brokets in Hong Kong said time International and 33 perces- percent to 1A balboa yen. 
.]? u mafi ets. - Tbarsday that the trffer was attrac- t-owned Beanforte Headings. The automaker said it sc 

< NAt RothaMfi five, particalariy m the light of Before Thursday’s announce-. 1.7 ndfion cars, trucks and 

L ' h« already ar»uired- Wbe^xk*s recent troubled history, mem, brokers were estimating that the first halLun 3.7 oereet 

l«»icaH rfthc voting rights m - Tracing its roots bade to two foil 1984 resides were 90 
nL Whedock Marden as part of ms trading companies, Lane Crawford doUan, down 48 p e r ce n t Iran 
for at last 51 poML Holdings Ltd, founded in Ham 1983*5 169 nriffion. They also esti- 

■v* 4 He has bought 21/335,157 A Kong m 1833, and Whedock & matedanincrearemcxtraorfinaxy 
, '?;«finaiytauH» (6.7 percent of tbe Co, founded in Shanghai m 1857, losses from 1983’a 57 mfflicn, to 
e-V“A” ordinary-share capital^ and Whedock Marden gradually ex- ISOrmHkm. 

|___ 

: ^Billions Ride on Bomber Decision 


first half. Tins reflected fay from a year earlier, to 1.5 trillion fruperiaTs chairman, Geoffrey creased occupancy foflowing recoil a takeover bid materiali ze. 
50-pcreent-awned W lmdod t Man- yen. It nod exports climbed 17-6 said at a news co nfe rence renovations. Market rumors have suggested 

' - - after tbe restdts were reported that In other areas, tbe company said that Hanson Trust PLC, Northern 


Tt» ntnmaWr ft ^ the investment bankets Goldman a strike al its Tadcaster teewwy in Foods PLC aid other compan ie s, 
1 7 mSBon can, trucks and buses in SacJls * C°- had pyen cwnfidmtial Britain had ated effect on Navem- mdrafing U. S. interests, might be 
fie fiisthalL up 3.7 percent from a ^.oaHowarf Johnson to 23 po- ber profits, hnt fa fiscal 1984 the crasidennganoffer;partiaiSLriyif 
year earlier Spons rose 11 per- *®?“ buyers but that no sale no- Imperial Brewmg & Leisure Ltd. Imperial sells Howard Johnson for 
.. wihatM" s- — ■ increased operating a large amonntm cash. 


amt to 915,949 units, while domes- 
tic sales fell 4 percent, to 771,9]] 
units. 

Toyota sad in a statement that it 
expects to sdl about 3.47 million 


gonations were in progress . 


expects to sell about 3.47 milhon Atfa-Layai, the Swedish industri- Booker McConnel PLC said hs tendered, and accepted, about 15.7 
vehid« in the year ending June 30 jj concern, las been awarded a board has rejected a renewed take- million shares of Fay Less Drug 
against 337miUiaa in the 1983-84 contract valued at 200 mfliirm kro- ewar offer valued at D38 nnffioa Stores Northwest Ina, or about 87 


■?:,[ . (Confinedfrm Fage n) 

*[: ^scheduled to end at Rockwefl in 
l^taid-1988 after a government ex- 
" * ^penditure of $205 btUkra for fie 
jj 3; wfcofc pr og ca m (measured in 1981 
£ ° J-'dtrflars). At^ that pant anew bomb- 
■* 3 ‘ c ^ex- must he in fie final stages of 
£;iManratiofi if h is to meet fie Air 


the most secretive military re- Nort 
WCU in search-and-devclq>mcnt progiams ward full-scale devt 
tent efr since the Manhattan Project creat- Stealth bomber. Wi 
for fie ed the fost uudear weapons' 40 apparently going 
years ago. roof,” said Paul Nil 

Ndfier fie Air Force nor Nor- who follows Northi 
TFT*., firop, which was chncwi as prime tial-Bache Sccnniit 
~~ • devdopment contractor in 1981, estimated that thee 


is far along fie path to- 
scale development of fie 


fiscal year. Export safes are expect- 
ed to rise to 1.84 milfion vehicles 
from 1.71 million, it said. 

“Although a gradual expansion 


ner (521 .5 mflhon) to supply equip- (5365 mfflwn) from Dee Coro. P««nt of tbe total outstanfing, 
meat for a daily com^Z PLC Booker shareholders to ^ S27 ^‘ sh?irc 

construction near Moscow. urged to take no action. aoqmsncmcner. . 


tZ ■ development contractor m 1981, esumatea turn me cramanys xcw- 

a for ces o bjective of readiness for ^ ^ pnject, other mies from Stealth wore excee de d ___ w> 

^ ^ sfaw, than to acknowledge its existence. 51 billion last year. In 1983, by Japan’s vehide exports are esti- American Tekphone & Tde- DG Bask oE Frankfurt, the cen- rairawred wifi a undisdised price as part ol 

^ “Stealth is healthy and wffl be cxanparisrai, the total value rf aD mat^to have risen 4 percmt to gnpb Co. said it wfflroBrit bids for teal clearing bank of tbe West Gcr- toss of $9.4 nriffion in 1983. After gram to buy kdc 20 nriffion 

a . fie^e ^tot avaHabfe,” said Mt.WUsot. who pnmc mffitaiycOTteKte at Not- 502,t»0in Jammy fan aycar es* fie sale and leaseback of the nan- man cooperative banking system, deducting for dividends cm its cu- Trkeatrol PLC said it is 

_ _ giTjf has visited Steal th fibrin- test roera- firop was just $846.6 nriffion. her, but fdl from 515,800 m 1^- sponders on ns Tektar 303 commn- sad it is considering paying share- mSve^refened stock, PSA re- about £45 J nriffion ($48 J i 

- ^ any puctear pomps. tions at Edwaids Air Farce Base in “It is interesting to note.” Mr. cumber, according to industry mcations satellite, scheduled for headers a boons dividend for 1984 ported a loss-oer-share of 90 cents, throueh a ridits issue of 


want fnll-scaie devek^ment of the AMCA fotenatiomd, Toronto- Club MfrStmȤe said h made 

Stealth bomber.^Woix orders are g based htriding company, said it will an extraordinary profit of 1212 

^MraUygom|*roagl the mIomolfre ,-„A^ry a oot onit ils Math quarterly fividml miaiou F rmdi franca {S12.1 mD- 

Snrfrtdy favoiabte^cxrmpa- ol 25 cenu to consurvu cash. Hr Boo) by spinning od in Ntalh ^ . 

iat.SSSZ 

catenated to faerrnan teys^ .J^vdido Export* Up "■ ■ pSPEfScfiSlri », 


ged to take no action- “S^Sadna* M™, a 

Qub MhStararie said it made subsidiary of the Swiss watch 
extraatfinary profit cf 1212 group Asnag-SSIH, said VLSI 
ffion F re nch fraacs ($121 m2- Technology, of San Jose, Calif or- 
al) by ^tuning off its North has agreed to provide it with 


nriOion in 1983: 
American T« 


& Tele- 


added to reserves. 

DG Bank of Frankfurt, the oea- 


Tbmsday to tire Securities and. 
Exchange CommissioiL 
Tfae filing said fie partner- 
ship intends to acquire addi- 
tional Unocal shares on the 
open maito or m privately ne- 
gotiated transactions. The part- 
ners said they had agreed to 
spend up to $12 billion, of 
which about 5584 nriffion had ' 
already beat spent. Mesa Part- 
ners sffld it did not now intend ; 
to gain control of UnoeaL 
Unocal shares closed Thurs- 
day cm the New Yak Stock 
Exchange at $4850. up 50 
rente The company has been | 
the subject of takeover rumors 
recently. 


ganizatio n. may sen or lease as 
much as 25 percent of its aircraft 
Deet,OT as many as 30 aircraft, later 
this year, its new owner, Hugh Gd- 
verhouse, said. 

Sikorsky HeEcopter, a . unit of 
United Technologies Cap, said it 
wiQ set up a plant in Belgium and 
create 600 jobs if it is awarded a 
pending Bdgian Anny contract to 
build 46 nrawfliinc s, Soc co mp a ni es 
are bidding far tbe contract. 

Tandy Corp. said h has rtpor- 

/-liaawit J7J tniffirun of its nimiTWl 


gkmal airltne, said it earned $27. shares in the last 12 months at an 
millkm in 1984 ccmpared with a undisclosed price as part of a pro- 


'■Wju .» ..... 1 i * aranouK, sun mi. nrusm, who . — j — — — - - j « iu. uou- «»umub jjjiwu, ucuucumi iut uivuieaua uu us cu- 

-z ■ hasvisited Steal (hlH^it-test opera- firop was just $846.6 nriffion. her, bat fdl fran 515,800 m Dc- s^teonifrTdstar303conmm- sad it is considering paying share- mulative-prefened stock, PSA re- about £45 J nriffion ($4R9 m2 

- }■ tions at Edwajds Air Farce Base in “It is interesting to note.” Mr. ce mber , ^ acco rdi ng to m dustry mcahoos satdhte, sdiednled for headers a bonus ffividead fa 1984 ported a loss-per-share of 90 cents, through a rights issoe of 11 

rhw C a Kfora ia ’ s Mojave desert He dc- Nisbet added, “that the Stealth rc P° rtcd Thure_ laanA Kfay 30. AT&T said Sak>- to mart its 90th anniversary. - Provincetown-Boston Airline, cent,convertiblc-nnsecured 

^ hrission. rrfviw as it c ^^ ^^ esc ^he v htrfhehadseen subetmteactra network is very sisri- day firnn Tokyo. mon Brothers is agent. K mart Coip. said it had been which is undergoing a major reor- stock datrid 1995/2005. 

•> • ^ # " u fiwMi ‘twrt Aw hnrM ovwf Mefnnf m Inv tn llral til# H_t ** TTra mr! I 


fioe, bDt Air Force and Defense iar to that of the B-l." He said. 
Department officials have said the “Economic dislocations that aright 
ittm^raaar.^ . . Saahh bomber is not a “paper air- be caused by a transition from tbe 


ig snare- mnlati ve-prel erred stock, rhA re- 
fer 1984 ported a loss-per-share of 90 cents. 


*■ j i^iJaang. Nuclear-tipped anise rms- 
*; tiles launched from outride Soviet 
^ . . * ^borders were judged tobe ftOTjida- 

* S MHVlgb . 

car In 19W the Carter adnrimstra- 
i^tien (fisdored that the Pentagon 
■* u -w&s nowfideB s sedtiqg a sncces- 

* |i jor to fie B-I. Known offidaDy as 
~ ; 3 ffie Advanced TechnotogyBonber, 

^^xATB, fie Stealth has been rare erf 


sahh bomber is «H a “paper air- be caused by a trantiticn from the 
in^ n implying that at least coin-- B-l to the Stealth are being mnri- 
nents of a flyable aircraft are on nrized.” 

' For example. General Electric 
Mr. Oit tdd fie Senate Aimed Co. will simply the Stealth bomb- 


IWKA Dividend to Be Its First in 11 Years 


Services Committee last week that er’sjet engines, as it does for the B- — Industrie-Werke Karlsruhe Exchange, did not give fie size of 


Semen most heavily traded 

KARLSRUHE, West Germany ogy stocks on fie Fi 
- Industrie-Werke Karlsruhe Exchange, did not g 
uesburg AG said Thursday in a the dividend 


technol- 
rl Stock 


although the new bomber was on I, and Boring Co. wfl] provide dec- Augsburg AG said Thursday in a fie dividend 
schedul^ “ire haven't btrilt the first ironic equipment The Vought- letter to shareholders that it wiB Industry somces said earlier this 
one yet,” Mr..W380n i^Bed, “Tm division of LTV Corp.. which pay a dividend on results for 1984 week that it was likely to be about 3 
wen aware of that” builds tire B-l’s fuselage, is be- after omitting a payout for 11 Deutsche marks. Stock dealers also 

From a strictly economic per- lieved to be studying fie use of years. 


The letter said parent company 
relax profit in 1984 was slightly 
isfrer than the previous year’s 182 


cchange, did not give the size of iogher tlian the previous year’s 182 
e dividend nation DM (about $5 5 million al 

Industry sources said eaifer this current exchange rates), 
rek that it was likely to be about 3 Group sales rose 7.6 percent in 

aitsche marks. Stock dealers also 1984 to 7432 m2Hon DM, incom- 


ADVERnSEMJJST 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 

Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed 
14 February 1985 




spective, there is a consensus radar-absorbent structural materi- 
among WaD Street analysts that als for tire Stealth. 


The robot maker and high-tech- tbe object of takeover talks in re- 
nology group, which is one of fie cent months. 


Deutsche marks. Stock dealers also 1984 to 7432 million DM, incom- 
said they believe IWKA has been mg orders 10.9 percent to 824.6 
tbe object of takeover talks in re- nriUioo DM and orders on hand 


AL MAL MANAGEMENT 
<«) AVMOl TnHL &A 


SXWXI ORANGE NASSAU GfiOUP 
* p B jKg^rh^Ha^ raw) *bsk 


192 percent to 504.7 million DM . 


INTERNATIONAL 


ll »Ti 


ESTATE 


Own a home 
in the sun 
with 1400 acres 

to play with 


Think of fl_ A private.holifiiy para^ein Southern Spain. 
I400acres tocaBycRmown,mKrirded&y hills, lemon 


^.Ti r e 1 1 »’JO iw-i m 


courses, 2-beaches w^h stroeri) water sports, the David 
Lloyd Racquet Centre, 3 s w immin g pods and a wide 
tfiokje of restatmants arid bars. You can even go zufing 
throu^ the MBs wifiort leaving yoor own grounds. 

That’s La Manga Chib for yon. 

Beautiful, tranquil and exclusive 

And ddy La Manga Club gives you such a choice of 
hofiday homes from a defightfol stndid apartment at 
£18,400 to a luxurious villa from £85, 000 to £160,000. 

What’s more, as La Manga Chib is owned and ran by a 

British, pubfic cmap^y* Europesm Ferries Group pic, 
you can be atre your investment is thoroughly safe and 


TORONTO, CANADA 

C$10500 — A SMALL DOWNPAYMENT 
FOR A BIG INVESTMENT IN 
PRIME LOCATION CONDOMINIUMS 

• only 15% cash dow n pa yment 

• 3 years rental and management guarantee 

• prices Cf 6 %OI»C 88 ROOO 

• 2, 3, 4 bedrooms, muto-tevei 

• Apartment sizes: 1 198 sq. ft (11 inp— 2010 sq. ft. (Wmr) 

• Modern convera'en<»s and recreation facilities 

• Constant appreciation, fully rented, professionally managed 

WINZEN CORPORATION LIMITED 

AU: Marketing Msn*gar, 67 YongaStroat. Softs TOO 

Toronto, Ontario, Canada, M5E 1J8 
TofcfttQBKTOOn - Taiwc06S24301 

• IN ADDITION WMZEN OFFERS: 

— quality commercial properties & rental apartment buildings 

— comprehensive services to potential immigrating entrepreneurs 


SENSATIONAL N.Y.C SUMMER 1985 
Mon. July 1st till Sot. Aug. 31st 
CONDOMINIUM POTHOUSE A& B-6tfi FLOOR 

tlralralK 


Down — * D adr o orr u -Soono. 4 Bolts. joamL 
- Middle— EntranOLDMno Roofn.KMdian.lM 
Butdwr Block. 


Room. KMdian. Micra,D(NnmBt|ar. Laundry. Drvar, 


• Uo— Modam Uirtno Roam, wnaxirnond Tarraoa. SurtxrtWnB. Barbocsa. Dta- 
Ina Set. Grcenhaasn. Playroom, Movie Sciatn. T.V. Conv-aota Poaidar Room. 
Included: Towel*. Shaate DUhart. SttW. 

Fin: Can Edison. Cable. Garooa. SacurTty Man. 

Loc o H o p: 45Mi Sheaf; ft Mock from CENTRAL PARK, Tavern an the Green. 
■ffvw e ap a nr a Thaohe. Poo Concwte. RMMa.-Pteco Woner M a Mf . Tannh. VOQay- 
oolL 

Noxt: To 371Ti floor View Moahnnon Saibnmlna A Cvm. COLUMBUS AWE. Bed 
BooBnua*. Redocronts. . 

For Hire: Our Hoiae k eep w Sa c aR aal Cook, Clatmar. Grotarv Sl iocI nB. 


For people with a taste for luxury and a distaste for 
crowds, • 

- La Manga Club is a revelation. 

Send for the hrodhiire. 

A wonderful discovery awaits you. 

La Manga Club Ltd. 

_ S2verCity House - . 

\ -. : 62 Brampton Road 

■ London SW3 1BW ■ 

I Telephone: 01-2250411 


Please send me tbe 
La Manga Ckrfi brochure wifi 

prices; pfais rod detafe of the 


m 

m 


1 




INDUSTTOAL OBJECT IN GROSS -ZBiftlERN 
IN THE CENTRE OF THE 
RHINE -MAIN -NECKAR AREA 

Due to restructure! measures of a big Western European enter- 
prise their sales centre In GroS-Zhnmem, West Germany, be- 
comes vacant The object can be rented respectively financed 
under extremely reasonab l e condBbns. 

I mportant data In detail : 

Estate: 10 000 square metres 

Area built-up: 4800 square metres 

1 Warehouse built in 1976, 

7 metres high, 2 300 square metres 

1 Warehouse built in 1965, 

4 metres high, 1 558 square metres 

1 0ffice block (two floors) 
built in 1976, 

- ground floor 650 square metres 

-first floor 250 square metres 

Other: 4 truck loading ramps, 1 truck drive way on gromd level, 
independent energy -system, eodal rooms; instafled Sprinkler - 
and alarm system. 

Telephone: 061 30/233 

ruinrfaiMB Tetex: __ 4187663 

FrfedhofsiraBe 33 - Post Box 1 00 
■ D-6501 Stadecken-Bshebn- West Germany 
‘Realization and auction of enterprises, assets and Industrial estates. 


10000 square metres 
4800 square metres 

2 300 square metres 

1 558 square metres 


650 square metres 
250 square metres 



381 4396ZotU. Swrbafkmd or writ* ki any longnogn loc 
Optwr 44 - 130ut45. PotSchx. P.O. BaK CH - S021 Zorf*. MtnrinL 



Hampton & Sons 


A dunning 4tfi loor panSwan «Sh bcA- 
oony eoonanefing nn e aSent vtews aw 
Sw Sqocn gor d nn k> wUdi wUiiA 
havn acoML My rafnttM to h&md 
■fandanfa, Sm nparSMnr provkfe* a m- 
phMoatod hom idhal far botfi formal 
a nd irfe nnd artart ri ni ng . 2 badmo ra , 
baJteoo®, good do c Ar oony 2 raca pS on 
iwm», ldtdnn/Vr«cUad room, kngc 
bafcony. CH A CHW. UR. Pnrtar. Burgicr 
criann. R^piuabnd end wwrlrad Rani 
89,100 per anm. Loom 1(M yaar 
apprcoL Price EU^OOOl JaM Sole 
Agente; George TnaBopa & Sons - 
01-2358099. 


Telephone 


• ’.For Sale . 

Near Lake of Geneva 

IESIDENTIAL MANSION 


baft* am be ofrtttinsd. 
Frfodridttfr. U. 6000 w * Oenwmy 



6 Affingten SkfN, London SWIA SSL 
TwLz 01-493 8222. Tatae 25341. 


COAL PROPERTY 

IN UJLA. 

34 million tons with- 
kxicfing facility on to Ohio 
River in heart of heavy 
industrialised area. 

Owner will consider joint 
venture proposal or sale. 

foqaMw to 1 4 LowndM Street, 
London SWIX 9ET, Engfond 


+ SWITZERLAND 

FOREIGNERS CAN BU'r 


Befwssn Borieby. Square 

and. The Ktz. A stunning 
newly modernised lop floor 
flat m prestigious block. 
3 beck, 2 baths. Double 
reception. Kitchen. Central 
heating. Lift. Porterage. 
90 yarn lease. €249,500. 


584 6221 


Lot Aug** CA 90049. | 

natfiHHiftunnmimnmiinnintenmDT 


EVTKfOiATIONAL 
REAL ESTATE 

appears every FRIDAY 

To place an advert isem ent contact our office 
in your country (Ksfed in Classified Secfion) on 

Mn r er r sr e, Intaniaripna l l la m l d TiBkbi^ 
181 An. diaries ds O— Be, 92521 NaaOyCedi 
tarn. TeU 747.12^5. Telex: 613595. 



LAKE GENE VA M O NTREU X 

CRANS- MONTANA. 

LES 0!ASLERE T S. VER5IEF. 
VILLARS. JURA. 


















r. r 


Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY, FESRl A?Y :5. 1985 


.** 



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-QNFERENCE 

Schedule 

1985 


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MEET THE NEW FRENCH CABINET 

February 26, Paris 


I W 

3' 1 
3ft 
79 h 


THE INVESTMENT CLIMATE AND INCENTIVES IN EUROPE 

Cosponsored with Plant Location International 

April 25-26, Brussels 


TRADE AND INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES IN HUNGARY 

June 13-14, Budapest 


THE INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS OUTLOOK 

Cosponsored with Oxford Analytica 

September 19-21, Oxford 


OIL AND MONEY IN THE EIGHTIES 
Cosponsored with The Oil Daily 


October 24-25, London 


\ 

— a 


For details on any of these conferences, please complete the form below and mail it to Interna- 
tional Herald Tribune Conference Office, 18 1 Avenue Charles-de-Gaulle, 92521 Neuiily Cedex, 
France; or call Susan Lubomirski, our Conference Manager, in Paris on 747 1265 . 


Please tide a p p ro p riate box(es) 
□ French Ad mini s tra t i on 


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[“] Investment 
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Con^any 


Trade and 

Investment in Hungary 


□ 

□ 

□ Oil and Money 


Address 


International 

BusinessOutlook 


City/country 


Telephone 


Telex 


Company activity 


L“ IT- 


15-2-85 


sjo u. xotom 


TODATm ISSUE; n M092 3 


U9 AX. ULM 


3^^ THE NEW YORK HERALD 

EUROPEAN CPITIOW OF TW£ HEW YORK HEBAil) TBIBIWE 


•Q tux S4.fa«rr. 


Hn KOCDAX. HAT XL UB7. 


LINDBERGH ARRIVES ON RECORD-BREAKING FLIGHT 


farmers flee 

COUPEE PARISH 


FraneAsm Takm 
Lmad,TwotaQtm,\ 
In Triads Teamtj\ 


aiJkWafaM. 


J CooHdgr’r Mrssagr Cr rw f r tjn dtngk 





sms TO KECOVBt 
BLUORS FROM 05. 


[50,000 Roar Welcome at Field 
As Lone American Lands After 
Ocean Dash of 33hr. 30min 



\Lindbergh Teils of His Flight , ; 
'Not Realty Sleepy,* He Says; 
Was Within Ten Feet of Sea 


1>B Wl f.64— **^* ^ 


THE FRONT PAGE 1887-1980 

International Herald Tribune, Book Division, 

181, avenue Charfes-de-GouIIe, 92521 Neuiily Codex, France. 

Ptami chock method of payment: 

Enclosed is my payment. (Payment can be made in any 
convertible European currency at ament exchange rotes). 
Please charge to my 

cnrd - raw BP “ 

nmmm omm nsssz* 


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$8 each outside Europe. 


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Signature 


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V 






INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1985 


Page is 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Back Page) 




flTTTrTiT^H! 


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YOUNG IADY 

PA/tntarprrter & Tourism Guide 

PARIS 562 0587 



Harald to Head Union Bank Branch 


By Brenda Hagerty 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Two foreign banks 
have upgraded their London repre- 
sentative offices to branches. 

Union Bank of Finland Ltd., 
which established its London rep- 
resentative office last April has 
opened a London brand: and ap- 
pointed Bo Harald general manag- 
er. Formerly, he was in the bank’s 
headquarters in Helsinki. 

The bank called the upgrading 
“an important step forward in the 
expansion of the bank’s participa- 
tion in the international fiiwncial 

markets," 

Kredietbank NV has also up- 
graded its London office. The 
Brussels-based bank said initial ac- 
tivities at the new branch in Lon- 
don would cover corporate bank- 
ing and finance, including 
Eurocapital markets, as weO as for- 
eign exchange and money-market 
transactions. ^ ^ 

dietbank's^ndonbra^h was Eu- 
geen QeempuL He was previously 
manager of the foreign division in 
Brussels. 

Valentin Succeeds 
CelerieratTechnip 

Pierre-Marie Valentin has been 
named president and chief execu- 
tive of the French engineering com- 
pany Technip SA, succeeding Jac- 
ques Celerier, who is leaving the 
company. 

Mr. uslerier, president and chief 
executive of Technip since 1971, 
joined the company when h was 
founded in 1958. Mr. Valentin was 
formerly director of finance and 
planning of Elf Aquitaine’s chemi- 


cal division and president of CECA 
SA, an Elf phwriicals subsidiary. 

Die Erste fistenekhisebe Spar- 
Casse has opened a representative 
office in Sydney ana appointed 
John Holmes, former Australian 
senior trade commissioDer in Vien- 
na, as representative. 

Gtrif Bank of Kuwait says Yousef 
A. al-Awadi has been appointed 
the bank’s chief general manager 
and chief executive, succeeding 
Richard Cusac, who the bank said 
was “moving onto new opportuni- 
ties abroad." Mr. Cusac could not 
be reached for comment. Mr. 
A wadi was formerly deputy chief 
general manager aim chief finan- 
cial officer of the bank 

Manufacturers Hanover Basque 
NanSqne of Paris has appointed 
Everett Young general manager, 
succeeding Robert Beaumont, who 
retired. Mr. Young was previously 
general manager of the Taipei 
branch of Manuf acturers Hanover. 

Glaxo Hohfings PLC says Sir 
Alistair Frame, deputy chairman 
and chief executive of Rio Tmto- 
Zinc Corp., will join Glaxo's board 
March 1 as a non-executive direc- 
tor of the British-based maker of 
phamwrgnricfllg, baby and health 
foods and surgical products. 

Ricoh Cot has named T. Kokushi 
general manager, overseas market- 
ing division. Mr. Kokushi was 
based in Amsterdam as president 
of Ricoh’s European operations 
from July 1981 to August 1983 and 
most recently was general manager 
of the stalT office in Japan for the 
Tokyo-based maker of copiers and 
other office equipment 

Bom ADcb A HamBton Inc. has 
named Norman P. Bernard a vice 
president He is based in London 
and focuses on the financial-ser- 


vices industry. Mr. Bernard joins 
the New York-based management- 
and- technology consulting firm 
from Gticorp, where he saved as- 
fhyipnan and chief executive of its 
Lloyds insurance-brokering sub- 
sidiary. 

Regis McKenna Inc, a Califor- 
nia-based maiketing- and-co mm u- 
nications agency that specializes in 
representing high-technology com- 
panies, has opened an office in 
London. Michael Orme, formerly 
editor of New Technology Maga- 
zine, has been appointed to head 
the London office 

John Hancock Mutual life In- 
surance Co. of Boston has named 
Stephen F. Kraysler president and 
chief executive of the John Han- 
cock Property & Casualty Insur- 
ance Cos. subsidiary. He takes up 
the post March 1, succeeding Phyl- 
lis A. Celia, who will retire. Mr. 
Kraysler is executive vice president 
of the property and casualty uniL 
In his new post he will be responsi- 
ble for the direction of all member 
companies, including Hanseco 
(U. K.) Insurance Co. of London. 

Tidewater Inc^ a New Orleans- 
based supplier of marine equip- 
ment and services to the oil indus- 
try, has named Raul J. Angelic a 
vice president. He is regional rice 
president for the North Sea, West 
Africa, Egypt and Italy for Tide- 
water Marine Soviet Inc., a sub- 
sidiary. 

Merrefl Dow Research Institute 
in Cincinnati hay Robert EL 
Ireland director of its research cen- 
ter in Strasbourg, succeeding Peter 
Lewis. The institute, a subsidiary of 
Dow Chemical Co. of Midland, 
Michigan, operates five research 
centers worldwide. The Strasbourg 
center conducts research for phar- 


Myron A. Roofer has been ap- 
pointed president of Seagram 

Iranfnnm Jr^soo o?&e Cana- 
' (San-based distfkr’s chairman. 
Mr. Roeder, based in Lwdrai, 
was previously in New Yor k as 
Seagram's nift 1 ?*^ 11 ^ director 
for the Far East. Mr. Bronfman 
has become president of US. 


marentiral products. Mr. ligand, 
who will assume the post in April, 
is a professor of organic chemistry 
and executive officer for chemistry 
at the California Institute of Tech- 
nology. 

Bunnah Oil PLCs lubricants 
subsidiary, Casirol Ltd, has set up 
a branch in South Korea. The 
branch, based in Seoul and headed 
by Moo Hun Ohm, previously tech- 
nical director of Houghton Korea, 
wfll be responsible for developing 
CastroFs metalworking and indus- 
trial-lubricants business in the 
South Korean market. 


Retired Teller Ties the Mob to Bank of Boston 


HOW TO IMPORT A EUROPEAN 
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TT« document explains hJy whet ana 
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safety and legally, k indudn raw & 
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DOT & BPA anwnai addresses, cus- 
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BMW in Europe & mportng it to the 
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7000 Stuttgart 1, West Gammy 


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(Continued from Page 11) 
has been Gexmaro J. Angiulo, ac- 
cording to documents filed in fed- 
eral court in conjunction with their 
indictment. The documents de- 
scribed one brother, Vittore Nicolo 
Angiulo, as the group's counselor, 
or key adviser, and two other 
brothers as lieutenants. 

But because Gennaro Angiulo 
hong kong 3 - 671 267 young lody jhas been in jail since September 

1983 awaiting trial, there has been 

a shake-up in the command, ac- 
cording to a more recent court doc- 
ument A man who answered the 
phone at the Angiulo headquarters 
Wednesday afternoon declined to 
answer questions and hung up. 

An affidavit filed by an agent of 
the Federal Bureau of Investigation 
in connection with the Angiulo tri- 
new YORK European IADY lal reported that, in 1982 alone, the 
nxnpamon. Tet 1212} 679-5172. 1 * “■ ■ * -• — - 


BHMGUAl ASSISTANT to business 
executives. Part 500 58 17 


lr r 1 - ! 


CIA muHSngud twlesies/guktet Paa 
226 32 48. Cecil oar* accepted 



Angiulos purchased more than $1.7 
million in cashier's checks from the 
Bank of Boston. 

Mr. Matheson; lhe former idler, 
worked Tor 39 years in the bank's 
branch in the North End, a pre- 
dominantly Italian-American sec- 
tion. of the city. A polite, ileshy, 
gray-haired man who retired last 
month, he spoke of the Angiulos as 


old and valuable customers of the 
bank. “I have been doing business 
with the Angiulos for 36 years,” he 
said. 

Mr. Matheson, who spoke in an- 
guished tones, said the Angiulos 
came in periodically “and some- 
times they would give the money to 
me in a paper bag.” Often the mon- 
ey was then converted to cashier’s 
checks, he reported The Angiulos 
also had accounts with the bank, 
according to the FBI affidavit 

The first report erf the practices 
at the North End branch, on Hano- 
ver Street three blocks from the 
Angiulo office, appeared in The 
Boston Globe Wednesday morning 
and Mr. Matheson spoke about the 
matter Wednesday afternoon only 
to emphasize that he had not 
sought to cause the bank trouble. 
Mr. Matheson was quoted in The 
Globe’s article. 

“All T did was to verify certain 
information that the reporter al- 
ready had," he said “f love the 
bank." 

Mr. Matheson conceded that he 
had been called to testify before the 
grand jury investigating the bank in 


1983, but he declined to say what 
kid been discussed 

It remained unclear whether 
there was any connection between 
the Bank of Boston’s treatment erf 
the Angiulos, letting them ex- 
change cash without reporting it to 
the government, and the bank’s 
failure to report the $122 billion in 
cash transfers with the Swiss banks. 

The regulation allowing banks to 
exempt certain retail businesses 
from reporting became effective in 
1980, but it provided for review of 
the exempted companies by the 
Comptroller of the Currency. The 
Comptroller can order a company 
removed from the exempt list if it 
does not meet Lhe criteria, a mem- 
ber of the U5. Attorney’s office 
here said. " 

A spokesman for the Comptrol- 
ler’s office said Wednesday (hat all 
officials knowledgeable about the 
situation were on -an airplane on 
their way to a meeting and could 
not he reached 
■ Towns Review Deposits 

Several area municipalities are 
considering pulling their deposits 
out of the Bank of Boston m lhe 


Eam/ngg 
In mHonsof data 




S % { Vo ESS o 


AsmIi 

st year end. 

In bWonaol dollars 


'90 "DA 


Tha Yu»* Tmm 


wake of Wednesday's report in the 
Boston Globe, the Associated Press 
reported Thursday from Boston. 

The Medford City Council has 
voted 6-0 in favor of a resolution 
supporting removal of the city's 
$54,000 from -the bank, and the 
Mayor of Malden. Thomas Fallen, 
said he plans to follow suit 


HONG KONG K- 3-632826 Young 


Company Earnings 

Revenue and profits, In millions, are In local currencies 
unless otherwise Indicated 


Continental Corp. Johnson Johnson 


YOUR MAN IN ITALY. Rated Aneri- 
con dplomoi in Italy con hands jw 
nmdj with producen. Matter, Via 
Adige 8, 00198 Rome. 


TRASCO 

THE MERCEDES SPECIALISTS 

Tom Free LHD. Al raodeii indiKfing 1 000 
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EP A/DOT c e rtrficntioo & shipping by 
tin exports. 

DtHCT FROM SOURCE 

Tnaco London Ud. 

11 Hawarden hQUorrion FMW2 7BR. 
Tet OU08 0007. 

Talax 8956022 TEAS G. 



Britain 


Imperial Group 

Year 19S4 iwi 

Rouentia— U90. UW. 
Pretax Net™ 2M-6 1KJ 
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'th . i * L y hV/ . 'i M i tf.yy, 


Canada 


FOR SALE & WANTED 


RETURMNG US, wS furniture, appS- 
ancet & 19B4 Vote 760 Tirta, sport 
plates, equipped. Paris 722 01 35. 


HOLLAND 


DUTCH HOUSING CBITfE LV. 
Define renlak Vcfenuntr. 174, 
Amsterdam. 020621234 or 623222. 


PETS BRUM MAKGLAABOU 
Inti Hoaxing Savitt*^ 
Aoteerten. TfOKh768G22. 


ITALY 


74 CHAMPS-aYS® 8th 

StutSo, 2 or 3-roorn opartiwnf. 
One month or more. 

LE GLAMDGE 359 67 97. 



Philippines 

Benguat 

4th Ow. INI INI 

Revenue . S1J.1 8705 

Pruni (0)125 1K4 

Per Share — — Ml 

Year 1N« 190 

Revenue W 

Profits ML6 29M 

per Share — 149 *-9* 

a; Ate 

United States 
Campbefl Soup 

2M>Qtw. INS 19M 

Revenue Mm vm 

Met Inc 602 56J) 

Per Snare U7 124 

lit Halt 19H 19M 

Revenue TJBto. ijao. 

Met Inc. lOifl 1025 

Per Share™ Ml 119 


^^“9 4toS. lnd ^» 1 

xs SHE E TI 


Mobon Cos 

3rd Qoer. 1«S 1984 

Revtate— - *90 *30 

Profit 741 1*21 

Per Share _ 027 047 

9 uanttii 19U ,m* 

Revenue—™ 1450. MIO 

Prom 5L25 t&JT 

Per snare — 149 


Malaysia 


Year IW 1983 

Revenue 96025 905.4 

Net Inc. 3jUj* 44.11 

Per Share — 2J» M3 

i AM rear net Inclines 
go! not 17 cents a there 6pm 
change In accoutring 1994re- 
suits Include Uoukl CarttHc 
Conx. acquired Aug. ItfM 

Chrysler 

«(h Quar. I9M WW 
Revenue— MOIL 2886 
Net Inc _ 6092 1182 

Per Share 421 (LSI 

Year 19M 1983 

Revenue 19400. 13200- 

Net Inc. 2280. 700.9 

Per Shore 1U8 S29 

1903 Quarter net includes 
charge of SZ222 million. 

Cora. Nat. Gas 

4th Qaar. IN* 1983 

Revenue 9MJ 122? 

Not Inc. 5127 533 

Per Snare 125 128 

Year 1984 1983 

Revenue 1S7Q. U41 

Net Inc »n 19SM 

Per snare — 507 474 


4th Osar. 1984 1983 

Net Inc (a)344 05 

Year 1984 INI 

Net Inc 3842 U3A 

Per Snore — 600 2.73 

a: Ate Nets include In- 
come of si 68.4 million vs 
Sin J million In Quarters and 
of I65B minion vs SS53S mil- 
lion in rears. 

Dresser bid. 
lit Quar. 1985 198* 

Revenue «D2 795.1 

Net Inc 153 94 

Per Snare 028 013 


Ford Motor 

4th Quar. IfM 1988 

Revenue 11400 12400 

Net Inc 721.0 7H1-0 

Per Share 3J9 429 

Yecr 1984 mi 

Revenue 52270. 44450 

Net Inc 2.900. IJDffi. 

Per Share™ 1579 1029 

Grand Unfon 

3rd Quar. NS 19M 

Revenue 5HA6 8WJ 

Net Inc 173 (0)602 

9 Months 1985 WB4 

Revenue » MOO 

Net Inc 439(0)1063' 

a: toss. 1984 nets include tar 
credit at «2 million In auar- 
ter and of Sid million In 9 
months. 


4th Quar. *984 1«U 

Revenue \gD- 1A«. 

Net Inc 6M 

Per Share — 059 024 

Yetr 1984 1983 

Revenue M70. 

Nel Inc 5145 4892 

Per Snare™ 27S 157 

Iff3 nets Includ e charges ol 
S3$ million In Quarter and ol 
330 million In rear. 

Mattel 

«ttl Quar. NM 1983 

Revenue 2(8.9 1364 

□par Net 12.1 (0)104 

Oner Share— 019 — 

Year 1*5* 1981 

Revenue 8809 63U 

Oner Net — 44J 172 

Oper Share— 1.17 037 

a.- Ate 

Mefvdle 

4tta Qaar. 1984 IWI 

Revenue 1440 rJia 

Net me 1112 1044 

Per Share™ ill 13* 

Year 1*84 1NJ 

Revenue 4420. 3520. 

Net Inc 1W4 1762 

Per Share — 340 336 

Puget Sound Pwr 

4th Quar. 1N4 MO 

Revenue 1964 171-0 


Reynolds (RJ) bid. 

4th Quar. 1984 1983 

Revenue 31530 3joo. 

Oper Net — 2592 2000 

Oper Share— 223 143 

Year 1*84 1*83 

Revenue 12270 12210 

oper Net — mid 70?jo 

Oaer Share- 730 546 

Tidewater 

3rd Quar. 1985 19M 

Revenue 792 84,9 

Net Inc lallOO 347 

Per Share — — 021 

9 Months ms mi 

Revenue 2392 25*2 

Net Inc (01113 1323 

Per Share™ — 039 

Warner Comm. 

4HI Qaar. 1*8* 1*83 

Revenue 5H4 499.4 

Net Inc (0)2017 646 

Per Share™ — 8.10 

Year 19M 1983 

Revenue — 1020 131®. 

Net Lou 586.1 4173 

a: toss. 7984 quarter net In- 
chides oroilt of 331 j million. 


Wrigkty (WM) 


IfM 

HU 

4th Qaar. 

1th 

im 

1964 

373 

0L65 

171 J) 
384 
076 

Revenue™. 

Nel Inc 

Per Share — 

736.9 

649 

096 

1374 

198* 

m 

Year 

HM 

£5 

6573 

5184 

Revenue 

5905 

95.1 

102JJ 

Net Inc 

393 

393 

143 

1.93 

Per Share- — 

540 

5.13 


ESCORTS & 


INTERNATIONAL 

ESCORT 


Hoad ofhea in Now Yarlf 
330 W. 5 fth Sr, MY.C 10019 USA 

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MAJOE CBBXT CABPS AW) 
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Private Mendaetfiip* AvaEaUe 

Ties award vrinneig service bos 
been fettered as the tap A mast 


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Lcmel Eastern welcomes you bad! 


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Tel; 736 5877. 


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LONDON 

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Tet 01 584 6513/749 [4-12 on) 


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Service. * 


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■SCS : 


LONDON GENS ESCORT Service. 
Tet 370 7151. 




































































































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3 

4 

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6 

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10 

11 

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21 



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27 

28 



20 

30 

31 






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33 





34 








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1 

40 




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49 




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ACROSS 
- 1 Retirement 

accts. 

. 5 Missile 
<. acronym 
* 9 Mitigate 
. 13 Hebrew bee 
; 14 Asian capital 

15 Checkup 
_ feature 

16 Treaty org. 

17 Preminger and 
Kruger 

18 Garden 
“snake" 

19 Avine 
collective 

22 High, craggy 
hill 


47 Emulate 
Howard 

48 Ursine 
collective 

55 Elevator man 

56 step, in 

dancing 

57 Cloth measure 

59 Marino-to- 
Duperplay 

60 Swinburne's 

“ the 

Microscope" 

61 Den 

62 Cafeteria need 

63 Landlocked 
land 

64 Poet Lazarus 


23 Propel a 
wherry 

24 West Pointers 
27 Command to a 

tailor 

32 Yoga posture 

33 Flag 

34 Victorian or 
Edwardian 

35 Feline 
collective 

39 Summertime 
in N.Y.C. 


40 November 
tally 

41 Ignited anew 

42 **. . . and 

in his tongue”: 
Shak. 

45 Actress Ruth 

46 Jimmy’s 
successor 


X Saud 

2 Widen a hole 

3 Aleutian island 

4 of the 

stick 

5 Mother: 

Comb, form 

6 Division word 

7Thismaybe 

over your head 

8 Memorable 
Italian director 

9 Incite by 
argument 

10 “ . . . Indians, 

all in " 

11 Up 

12 Give the once- 
over 

14 Peasants, 
sometimes 

20 Of a hope chest 


Z/15.B5 

21 Scandal sheet 

24 Encrusted 

25 Stage whisper 

26 Alighieri 

27 These raise 
Londoners 

28 Berlin’s 
Sommer 

29 Soles’ chasers 

30 Banks on 
whom the Cubs 
banked 

31 Weatherman's 
adjective 

33 Presses a suit 

30 Momentous 

37 Armistice 

38 Qualified to 

make a will 

43 Ornate 

44Tellegenot 

silents 

45 Nobel ist in 
Chemistry: 
1918 

48 “Bright" 
Inspiration for 
Keats 

49 Actress 
Eilbacher 

50 Tennis’s 
Mandlikova 

51 Word on a 
dollar bill ■ 

52 Z. Taylor and 
Tecumseh 

53 Range 

54 Pickings or 
Pickens 
preceder 

55 Select 

58 Between, in 
Bari 


. V«tr York Tana, edited by Eugene Male. ska, 

DENNIS TOEMEN ACE 


tea. 


: : ■ ' ■' 



l\ o< 

o 


2-*5 


‘Were ydu pretty when you were a little girl, or 

01U YOU JUST 6ET THAT VWLY WHEN TOU GCfr OLT) 2/ 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
9 by Henri Arnold and Bob Lee 


Unscramble these tour Jumbles, \ ^ i 

one letter u> each square, to form I .1" 
(our ordinary words. , J ' 


LAIDY 


MOBUX 


REESIO 


BENTON 


WHAT PEOPLE WITH 
TIRELESS ENERGY” 
I OFTEN BECOME. 


Now arrange the circled letters to 
form l he surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


rTTTTXIXJ 

(Answers tomorrow) 

Yesterday's I Jumbles:CHIDE OWING ASSAIL INFANT 

| Answer. People go to great "lengths" ro reduce 
this— WIDTHS 


WEATHER 


5 If ROPE 


Algarva 

Amsterdam 

Aitwns 


HIGH LOW 
C F C F 
16 61 IS 59 


-1 30 -12 10 d Benin 

11 S3 6 43 el Hong Kona 


Belgrade 

Berlin 

Bmnb 
Buena rest 
Budapest 
Copea Hagen 


14 61 IS 54 el Mealla 

■O T< -30 -4 fr NNDdM 


-4 95 -13 10 fr Seoul 

-3 26 -10 H fr Shanghai 


-7 IP -24 -II to Sim ion 

-7 IP -18 0 Ir tolpei 


-6 91 -IT 12 cl Tokyo 


Com Deism IP 66 9 48 fr 


HIGH LOW 
C F C F 

33 91 25 77 d 

-2 38 -7 IP fr 

16 61 14 57 o 

31 B 34 75 d 

ZS 77 8 46 fr 

1 34 -7 19 fr 

11 53 3 36 tr 

29 W 25 77 e 

18 64 15 59 O 

7 45 5 41 fr 


Dublin 

Edinburgh 

Florence 

P nn fct er t 

Geneva 

Helsinki 

Istanbul 

Las Palmas 

Lisbon 

London 

Madrid 

Milan 

Moscow 

Munich 

Nice 

Oslo 

Parts 

Prague 

ftevftfovflc 

Rome 

Stockholm 

Strasbourg 

Venic* 

Vienna 

Warsaw 

Zorich 


ill is d AFRICA 


3 

a 0 

32 

SW 

Atom-* 

23 









Cairo 

22 

73 


63 






Cape Town 

2A 

79 

16 

61 

fr 

7 




Caeabtanca 

16 

61 

12 

54 


•IS 

3 -27 


d 

Harare 

24 

75 

15 

59 

a 


S -4 



UNO! 

31 

88 

36 

79 

d 





Nairobi 

24 

75 

13 

55 

el 

2 

15 

36 .7 
59 9 
a -3 

-4 -23 

19 

48 

X 

■10 

tr 

cl 

Tunis 19 66 9 

LATIN AMERICA 

4B 

tr 

.2d 

et 

BagnH Aires 

25 

77 

29 

« 

tr 

0 

32 -12 

10 


Lima 

25 

77 

1/ 

63 

a 



19 


Mexico CUT 

23 

73 

2 

36 

PC 


16 -14 

7 

tr 

fUa de Janeiro 

32 

90 

25 

77 

d 


5 41 1 34 cl SaoPauto 


■8 18 -19 -2 fr MOB . 

J 38 -1 30 tr 5 UI L 

7 45 l 34 o Auchan 

-» « -31 -6 *w 

? £ *>? if .* Boston 


NORTH AMERICi 


1 34 -5 23 fr 
-10 14-14 7 fr 


•« 1 « t K Detroit 


MIDDLE EAST 


AftttKI 

Brtrrt 

(MOKKCOS 

Jerusalem 

Tef A vie 

OCEANIA 
Auckland 
Sydney . . 


4 ■** -s “ r Hemtoto 

1ST Houston 

_ LOS Angeles 

9 40 0 33 g Miami 

19 66 10 » o MfaaeouoHs 

M St 3 38 cl Montreal 


16 61 8 46 


17 63 9 48 r New York 


Seattle 

23 73 17 63 et Taranto 


« TO IP 6* o Washington 


AKheragg -to i< -17 l d 

AJtaoto 8 46 -5 23 oc 

Boston 1- 34 -l 3fl pc 

Chicago -7 19 -IS 5 PC 

Dearer 10 50 -6 21 pc 

Detroit -6 21 4 1( nr 

Hemtoto U 79 19 66 PC 

Houston 16 61 5 41 pc 

Los Angeles 29 84 IS St fr 

Miami 20 68 4 39 fr 

MtaacoPoHl -8 18 -17 1 pc 

Montreal 5 41 I 34 d 

Nassao to 68 14 57 PC 

Now rot* 0 B -5 23 d- 

Sun Froueho* 31 » 9 48 tr 

Seattle 10 50 3 38 r 

Taranto 1 34 -I 30 sw 

Washington 6 43 -5 23 fi- 


d-cloudy; to-foggy; fr-tolr: Mail; chjvwbdI; oc-partty cloudy; r-rain; 
sh-dwwers.' s*kbow; a -stormy. 


Cloudy. Temp. 18—10 164—501. NEW YORK: Cloudy. Temp. 4—7 (38—19). 
PARIS: DvereoHL Temp. 3—1 08—34). ROME: Hnfn. Tgmpj— 3 146—38). 
TEL AVIV: Cloudy. Terns. 20— 10 168 —50l.ru RICH: Ovorcafl, Tbttic. -1 --4 
(30 — 251. BANGKOK: Foggy. Temo. 33 — 26 (91—79). HONG KONG: Cloudy. 


Temp. 17— 14 (63 -57). MANILA: Fqlr.TCfflp.31 — 34 1«- 75). SEOUL: Rato. 
Tom P.3— -8(36— II). SINGAPORE: Thunderstorm 1. Temp, 29 — 34 (M — 75). 


TOKYO: Fair. TefflR 8 — 4 (46— 39). 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY. FEBRUARY 15. 1985 


PEANUTS 


WHAT PiD YOU FUT TRUE SIR [ TRUE BLUE f JWKS TKl‘c THAN LOVE 

POUJN FOR NUMBER THREE, AS TRUE A5 I LIVE ! TO A\E ! OH. ‘ T!5 TRUE 

MAKCIE .TRUE OR FALSE 7 TRUE AS STARS ABOVE! ‘TI5 TRUE! TEMPER 


anp true: 


f \ 

I think i’ll \ 

Ekif that ohe J 


BOOKS 









a Sun to match his moun- 
tains: Bacbhah Khan. Nonviolent 
Soldier of Islam 


iWJE 


By Eknath Easwaran. 240pp. Paper SMS. 
Random House. 20! East 50ih Streep 
Sew York N. Y. 10022. 

Reviewed bv Colman McCarthy 


BLOND IE 


DO VOU L. ( VES, I DO J I'/ASEftUNG... 


NO!! 


I t NEVER EVEN SOT < 
TO THE FOONT DOOR 


NO W THAT'S ) 

SJE^JECTiQfJ 


B ADSHAH KHAN — Badshah means 
chief of chiefs — is the 95-vear-old Islamic 



X aL) *.1i 1 V 


chief of chiefs — is the 95-year-old Islamic 
leader who organized nonviolent communities 
in the 1930s among the Pathans of the Khyber 
Pass in northwest India. The Pathans. a uibai 
society Ihing in the valleys and mountains of 
the borderlands of what is now Pakistan and 
Afghanistan, were one of the earth's most vio- 
lent people when Khan had the Improbable 
idea that they were fit for a conversion. 

For slt centuries, the)’ were fierce wielders of 
the sword — against each other in tribal 
grudges that could span generations and 


„ _ J 

nonviolent coalition against British edam sl- 
um}. Khan recalled that Gandhi s ideas of non- 
violence — of satyagraha, sod force — 
-changed mv life forever-” - 

Like Gandhi Khan saw the moral *Tong- 
ness of the British presence in India. Also lie 
Gandhi, he was jailed reptaredly for otgarnz- 
ing his Pathan followers and calling for mde- 
nendence. A third of Khan’s long life has been 
bent in prisons. The British put tan a sohap 
confinement — and manacles --becauM he 
opened unauthorized schools. The Indians 
jaUed him for speecbmalring. Under Pakistan 
he was imprisoned for 15 of the country s first 

* _ V. . « . 3 A •AAHiwtoti Intarna. 


)8 years of independence. Amnesty Interna- 
tional selected Khan •‘Prisoner of the Year in 
1962. He was to bejailed stUl again —at age 85 
— in 1975 and again at 93 under the dictator- 
ship of Pakistan’s President Mohammed Zia 

^ said of all this: "I wonder what would 
have happened to me ifl had had an easy life 
and had not had the privilege of tasting the joys 
of jail and all that it means.” . ‘ 

In his work for peace and justice tn the 
Northwest Frontier. Khan was never to win 
full political rights for the Pathans. He op- 
posed the partition of India, as be surely op- 
poses the violence that now' subjugates Paki- 
stan and Afghanistan. In the history of 




against such invading armies as the British, 
who wanted ihe Northwest Frontier as the 


BEETLE BAILEY 


remember when \ wen men don't ? thank goodness ^ things Jo/ i/JK ROC* 

EVER/DNe THOUGHT STARTED SBS IT THAT l ARE GETTING BACK / f Zs-iAfr FZT 
THE BEATLES' HAIR / GROWING l ONfi AhIVMORP l TO kJORaaai S\ C'Csn'l'f~r* > 


who wanted the Northwest Frontier as the 
gateway from centra] .Asia to India. Khan was 
the youngest sou of a wealthy village chieftain 
in die Northwest Frontier Province, a rare 
Pathan who believed in love and forgiveness. 


THE BEATLES' HAIR /GROWING LONG ANYMORE M TO NORMAL 

vVAS TOO LONS? / HAIR TO k _ Jf 


His personal devoutness and his public gener- 
osity to strangers who came to tne door were 
absorbed by the soul of the son. 

In 1910. when he was 20. Khan began his 
first Islamic school. "1 was well aware." he 
wrote in his autobiography “My Life and 
Struggle," “that the illiteracy and the igno- 
rance of my people could only lead them to 
ruin and destruction. Therefore my first task, 
as I saw it, would be to try to elumnaie Qtitera- 


THEIR 

WAISTS/ 


T \ 

= >WosT 
% WAl 



nonviolence — deeper mid broader than most 
people realize — Khan is revered for organiz- 
ing the Khudai Khidmatgars, “the Servants of 
God.” These were Pathans who took an oath of 
nonviolence. They would eventually number 
100,000. ' 
“There is nothing surprising in a Muslim or 
a Pathan like me subscribing to the creed of 
nonviolence,” Khan wrote. “It is not a new 
creed. It was followed 1.400 years ago by the 

Prophet all the time be wasm Mecca, and it has 

since been followed by ail those who wanted ro 
throw off an oppressor’s yoke. But we had so 
far forgotten it that when Ghandyi placed -ft 
before us, we thought be was sponsoring a 
novel creed.” In time, Khan's successful resis- 
tance against the British led to his being called 
“the Frontier Gandhi.” 

Eknath Haswaran’s great achievement is tell- 1 
ing an international audience about an Zslannc 
practitioner of pacifism at a moment when few 
m the West understand its effectiveness and 
fewer still associate it with anything Islamic. 
Easwaran, now in his mid-seventies and a 
teacher since 1960 at the Blue Mountain Cen- 
ter of Meditation in Berkeley, Cali/., writes 
that Khan has endured as an effective teacher 
of his own and Gandhi’s belie/ that nonvio- 
lence, if properly organized, is an effective 
spiritual and political force. “Were his example 
better known, the Western world as well as 
Moslems caught in the web of violence all over 
the Middle East, might come to recognize that 
the highest rdigious values of Islam are deeply 
compatible with a nonviolence that has the 
power to resolve meat conflicts.” 

At last report, Khan is alive in an Afghan 
village. At 95, he is no longer a political activ- 
isL Yet with a superb biography like this, he 
could become a global force, the kind that na 
armies or prisons can stop. 


ANDY CAPP 


j 


f lUSOa-lrUinofMrmtpipm.Lta 
D*ii Bf W o n Ammea SnMM 


PM ONIX) n* 
■ HUMAN, 




HE EX PECTS A R E FE R EE 
TO BE PERFECT AN& AT 
S- THE SAViE TIME c==T 

1 UNOS3SZAND WHY] 

ACL— //£-isntY 


By 1918. Easwaran reports, Khan had visit- 
ed all 500 villages of the Frontier Province: 
"He sat with the men m the guest houses and 
spoke of sacrifice and work and forgiveness, 
and in the evenings he laughed with their 
children around the cooking fires. The villagers 
loved but did not quite understand this gentle 
giant of a man.” 


Khan did not have a full understanding of 
mself. Then, in 19 19. he met Mohandas Gan- 


himself . Then, in 19 19. he met Mohandas Gan- 
dhi. Their resulting mutual commitment lasted 
until Gandhi's death in 1948. The Hindu paci- 
fist. who was 21 years older than Khan, had 
recently returned from South Africa to begin 
his life' s work of organizing India’s poor into a 


WIZARD of ID 


Solution to Previous Puzzle 


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REX MORGAN 


uum aaunn aansa 

HJBC3 C3Ciai3Q EU9QDD 
bob BHaaoEEHaana 
deod ana asaaaa 
□□□□a oHataaQ 
acaaaa ana 
□□□□a anana aaa 
aaamaaaaEaaaEa 
bbo □□aaa □□□□□ 
aaa oaasaa 
BaDaaa QEaaa 
rmn nnn aao aaaa 
nnaBaHaanaa a an 
mnaaa aaasa aaa 
□bbdb aaaaa □□□ 


Caiman McCarthy, a Washington cobamst, 
wrote this review which appeared in The Wash- 
ington Post 


* Urouo Ofcc m° me. Ittt 


ARE YOU AND MY 
MOM GOING TO ' 
COME HERE TO 
THE HOUSE AFTER 
you PICK HER <■ 
^■UP, KEITH? 


YES— BLIT FIRST I WANT 

TO talk alone with 
HER FOR A WHILE ' > 


Mf WERE THERE 


ANY CALLS 
FOR ME? 


VM 


JUST ONE. MR. VON PALE 
—BUT HE DIDN'T 
LEAVE A MESSASE, NOR 
GIVE HJS NAMEf IT a 
|( SOUNDED LIKE A VSl 

X young soy { 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscoet 


3WL£»j 

sTwrtXrd 


O NE significant difference 
between poker and bridge 




GARFIELD 


WELL. I'VE SWEPT ONPER THE 
FURNITURE, VACOUMEP MM 
CHAIR AND SHAKEN THE RUGS. 
I'M FINAIXV RIP OF 
ALL MOOR CAT HAIR X \ 


FORTON ATELV. I KEEP AN 
EMERGENCM 50PPLV IN 
THE BACK OF MM 0ED r 


V_/ between poker and bridge 
is that the poker player may, if 
he chooses, put on an act, sim- 
ulating happiness or gloom by 
gestures or facial expression. 
For the bridge player to do any 
such thing is improper. How- 
ever. there is nothing to stop 
him from giving a false impres- 
sion of his mood in a technical 
way, by the cards he plays. 


JBM | t0 1985 United P. 



w ‘.a 


Stntrate ter 


On ihe digramed deal west 
found a technical way to imply 
gloom and embarrassment He 
had overcalled the one dia- 
mond opening with one spade, 
and beard a double on his left. 
This was a negative double, 
suggesting length in the heart 
suit and North- South subse- 
quently pushed to game in a 
no-trump. North’s final jump 
to game was based on the 


thought that his dub suit had 
considerable potentiaL 

West naturally led the made 
queen. South ought well have 
held up his ace fora round, but 
he chose to take it immediately 
and run all his heart winners. 
On the fourth round, rather to 
his surprise. West threw a 
spade. 

The routine play for West 
was to discard a diamond, but 
be was trying to show embar- 
rassment ana succeeded bril- 
liantly. South concluded that 
west must be trying to keep 
some protection in both suits. 
No doubt, reasoned declarer. 
West held both minor suit 
queens since be bad felt 
obliged to part with a potential 
winner in the spade suiL 

With this in mind. South 
cashed the ace and the king of 
clubs, expecting the queen to 
fall. When this failed , he knew 


his cause was lost. He led the 
spade nine, hoping to saw 
something from the wreckage 
by forcing West into the lead. 
But West played tow. and East 
was able to win with ten. TTie 
diamond queen was led and 
the defense made the of the 
iricks. 


north 

A 753 
O AK64 
09 

* A 10943 

WEST EAST 

as"* :a 

OA5« 1,11,111 oqj«7 

SOUTHS (D) 

*AB 
<?QJ2 
OK 1863 
4.KJ73 

Both aides ware mnemfala Ifta 
bidding: «. 

Saab West Norik Em . 

I* 1 • DM. Pass'. 

IN.T. Pan 3N.T. Pass’ 


West led tin spade king. 


WjrM Stock Markets 


Via Agence France-Presse Feb. 14 

Closing prices in local aurendes unless otherwise indicated 


ABN 

ACF Hotting 

Aegon 

AKZO 

AlUM 

AMEV 

At>Ofn Rut) 

Amrotoonk 

BVG 

Bma wnaim T 

Catand Hkfg 

Ebevtor-NDU 

Fokkgr 

Gist Brocades 

Heinetan 

Hoooavera 

KLM 

Naarden 

NQ» Nodder 

Nediiova 

Oce Vandai* G 

Pofchoed 

Philips 

Robeco 

Radamco 

ROilrvcn 

Rw ento 

Rgyal Dvtdi 

UlUIever 

VonOmmaren 

VfflFShrt 

VNU 


Clo»* Prgy. 
Ktoecknerwerka 7750 7730 

Ktupp Slahl 83 83 

Undo 423 417 

Uutttxmsa 184 188 

MAN 15V 15AVC 

Mamasmonn 154 153 

MetaUg«ellscbott 245 240 

AVjendLRwec* 1200 1170 

Ptwsks 2SB 251 

RuetoersWerfca 345 34) 

RWE 16IJ0 162 

Scnarlng _ 478 47150 

Siemena 5<3jo 538 

Thyssan 98J0 97 

Varta 181S3 178 

Vote 167 167 

VEW 122J0 122J0 


Valkswogenawrtc )M30 192 


CemmarzMtk Index : 1,14636 
Prevtoua : l.is&ra 


ANPXBS (toagrtil (MMX : 281X8 
Previous ’.198X8 


Arbwd 

Bakoerl 
CocXert 1 1 
EBES 

OB-lnno-BM 

CBL 

Gevaen 

Hoboken 

Kredletbank 

Pgtrofido 

SacCoRarala 

Safina 

Solway 

Traction Elec 
Vtoflto Montagne 


Bk East Asia 
Cheung Kang 
China Light 
Cross Hartxjr 
Hong Seng Bank 
HK Electric 
HK Hotels 
HK Land 
HK Shanghai 
HK Telephone 
HK Wharf 
Hutch Whampoa 
Janflne Math 
Jordltve sec 
New WorW 
Shaw Bros 
SHK Proas 
5Jnw Derby 
I Sl*tox 

Swire Pacific A 
, wheel Mar 
Wheettck 
Wlnsar 
World mn 


U 23X0 
1150 1130 
14-40 1446 

10 

46.75 45-75 
745 7S 

31.75 31 50 

025 430 

845 640 

63 61 

A15 6 

2wc » 

8-35 BBS 

no b 

SJ0 540 
NA NA 
9.15 9 

(SO too 
1X9 IAS 
24.10 24.10 
NA NA 
MO SJJ5 
4775 4X0 

1.97 US 


BP 

Bril Home St 

Silt Telecom 
BTR 
Burrnah 
Cadbury Schw 
Charter Cera 
coots Pahms 
Cons Gold 
Court oulds 
OalgetY 
De Beers* 
□Hflllers 
DrletonTeln 
Dunlop 

FI Sony 

Free SI Ged 
DEC 
GKN 
Giaxac 

Grand Met 

Guinnew 

GUS 

Hanson 

Hawker 

IC1 

Imps 

Lloyds Bank 
Lonmo 


Hang tow lad** : 1.354JI 
Preview : 1X3632 


Stodi Exchange index : 1118X4 
Previous : 109921 


Fraabhot 


AEG-Telohiflkgn 
Anton ven 

Bait 

Bayer 

ScyerXypo. 
Sever. Ver-Bank 
BMW 

Comma ntxink 


, Conttoumml 
OalmterBoiu 
Dcgtnsa 

Deutsche Bobeoefe 
Deutsche Bon* 
Dresctoer Bonk 
DUBSchotne 

GHH 

Hocntiet 

Hoecner 

Haesdi 

Hoffmann 

Horton 
Kail + Soli 
Karsiwn 
Kauflnt 
KHD 


113 11IJO 
1033 IBM 
IBSSO 184JO 
19540 19150 
316 316 

324 321 

3485015850 
146 167 JO 1 
119 ir 
634 tin I 
360 3*0 

173 178 


AECI 

Bartons 

Blrvoor 

Buffets 

Elands 

GFSA 

Hormativ 

KJaof 

Hedbank 


Pst Stevn 
Rustplot 
SA Brews 
St Helena 
Steal 


715 71S 

995 975 

1500 1475 
6325 6200 
1270 1250 | 
2575 2S25 
2465 2635 
6550 6575 
975 970 

5300 5M0 
1560 1530 
600 605 

3150 3000 
575 575 


marks and So 
Metal Box 
Midland Bank 
Nat West Bank 
Plikfngton 
Phrssoy 
Rocql El ect 
Randfontoto 

Rank 

Reed tttl 

Reuters 

Royal Dutch c 

RTZ 

Shell 

STC 

Std Chartered 
Tote and Lvte 
Tesco 
Thorn EMI 
T.i. grow 
Trafalgar H» 
THF 

Ultramar 
Unilever t 
United Biscuits 
Vickers 
w Steen 
W. Holdings 
Wor Loon 3Vit 
Woo Incrth 
ZCI 


Clete Prtv 

573 563 

247 249 

127 1269: 

664 6S4 

214 213 

176 167 

205 ao 
156 153 

511 494 

143 143 

498 4M 
48S 47S 

294 293 
124k S34H 

45VU 45 

295 29S 

*27*. 522% 

194 194 

196 194 

11W11 51/64 
303 296 

235 23S 

707 704 

215 211 

437 433 

661 844 

202 715 

589 594 

176 177 

2S5 2S1 

12S 125 

418 418 

337 339 

477 439 

ail 313 

774 168 

196 196 

S72VJ mVt 

346 344 

560 556 

36) 335 

49 63/644847/64 
677 474 

783 M 

194 190 

502 509 

470 460 

237 237 

442 439 

242 244 

374 373 

140 145 

m in 

11 27/3211 57/m 
217 198 

236 233 

£34 Sin* I 

BT*> S» ! 

3436 344* 

588 J9Q 

17Vj 17*. 


Air UquMe 
WdtomAll. 
Av OoasouH 
Banco! rg 
BIC 

Bouvgues 

BSN-GD 

Carrefour 

Out Med 

Coflmeg 

Duma 

Elf-Aqultatoe 

Europe 1 

Gen Eaux 

Hochc tte 

imohii 

Lataroe Coo 

LegrtMjd 

rorael 

Moira 

MKfieito 


Astra 

ah cq cooco 

Boltten 

Electrolux 

Ericsson 

Esseite 

Hondelshken 

Pharmacia 

Soab-Scoma 

Samlvfk 

Skonsko 

SUP 

Swedish Match 
Votvo 


Clow Prrv, Ctow Pit*. 

4to 420 Komatsu ltd 411 450 

114 113 Kubota 325 321 

™ ^5 Motsu Elec.lrKK 1580 1550 | 

310 M5 Matsu Etocworta 640 640 

2W 284 Mitsubishi Bank 1410 1380 

SJ? 340 Mitsubishi Chem 435 445 

US i?? Mitsubishi Elec 399 397 

,3P 211 Mitsubishi Heavy 247 2*1 

^ Mitsubishi Cora S1& 520 

. W? Mitsui and co SS 1» 

N.Q. 97 Mltwfcoshl 439 <39 


19$ 1*6 Mitsumi 

30 236 WEC 


A H arpf wi den Index : «BX0 
Previous : 4*1 jb 


Sydkaey 


232 266 NlkkaSee 

Nippon Steel 
9OJX0 Nlopar Yusen 
Nissan 

I Nomura Sec 

I Olympus 
1 Ricoh 


MaetHarmesey 

Moulinex 

Nord-Est 

OccWentalg 

Penrod Rlc. 

Petrwes Itoe) 

Peuoeot 

RodTotectm 
Redoule 
Roussel Uclaf 
Skis Rassfgnal 
, S dUfJerrle r 
Telemecon 
I Thomson CSF 
Valeo 


Aged Index : 199JM 
I Prertooi: 19856 
CAC Indei : mb 
1 Previous : 19850 


ACt 

AMI 

ANZ 

BHP 

Bora; 

Bwoalrrvme 

BromBfes 

Coles 

Comalco 

CRA 

CSR 

, Durlop 
Elders Ixl 
Hooker 
Mood ton 
MIM 
Mver 
Oakbrkfsre 
Peko 
Poseidon 
RGC 
Santos 

5letgti 

Sauttiiana 

WoodsMe 

wormakl 


435 445 
399 397 
247 20 
516 520 
325 326 
439 <39 
1150 1116 
1190 1)60 
600 600 
146 1X7 
241 240 

ms as 

1340 1280 
899 BB5 
1070 1050 
4400 4270 
1690 1650 
2T2 212 
145 145 
19« 200 
365 365 


194 1*3 Sony 4400 <270 

2M 255 Sumitomo Bank 16$ IUI 

Swnltomo Chetn 212 212 

SM 518 Suml tamo Metal 145 145 

S * 40 Tobol Cora 198 260 

190 Tobho, Ntortne 365 365 

377 Tnveda Own B*8 905 

2— SS Tallin 435 439 

M Tokyo Elec Power 1470 1440 

£2 Si rokyoMorlne Tut 700 

VI Toravlnd 432 436 

226 220 Toshiba 430 420 

395 Toyota 1320 1290 

212 ££ rumotchi Sec 5*9 $90 

<20 720 

742 195 MWOto t-DJI, ludex: 12M149 

67 63 Preview: rzajsn 

OO <12 index: 931X8 
275 . 265 Prev too*: 924.12 


2790 Abfl Pros 
TSSOAgntcoE 
9805 Alt Energy 

2100 AftoNot 
32235 Atgomo St 
91BArgcan 
1*7 Argus C pr 
8200 Aloo 1 1 
621 Bp Canada 
25278 Bank BC 
77944 Bank H S 
S239SBarrtCko 
_ 300 BotonA f 
22003 Sonar pj R 
HiSBraJame 
6161 Bramalea 
1467 Brenda M 
38484 BCFP 
23120 BC Res 
17417 BC Phone 
1218 Brunswk 
43100 Budd Con 
>2774 CAE 
19600 CO btoBf 
11495 Cad Fr. 
14710 C Nor Wes) 
996 C Poetry 

1850 Can Trust 


zKBNorcen 
49404 MvoAltAf 
ziooNowseew 


27 27 — to 15745NuWstipA 

5*9 6 | 71930c* wood 


100 c Tung 
34487 Cl nil Com 
XSOCdnNatRas 


MW j-eo.44 1 2400 MDS H A 

„ „ — ; — 1 600 MICC 

Canadian stock vsa AP “IS M i 

100 McGrow H 

High LowCtoseChac 7oao Mericem e 

54712 40(4 47 15450 MotSOfl At 

513to 13’A 13 to lOOMolsmiB 

S2014 20 20 iiBOMurahy 

515 *4 15*4 + 9* 19900 NnbbODl. 

S27*ft 22*4 22 'A — 9| 537B2 Noronda 

517*6 17*6 int— to ZimNorcen 

STlto II to Tito <9604 Mwa AftA f 

9* Bto BW-f-to 2100 NnwscoW 

S27 27 27 — to 15745~NuWs> ip A 

86 S*k 6 7193 Oc* wood 

81418 13% i< + to 68000showoAI 

141 131 137 — 1 OOOPamour 

16to 14to- to 1235 PanCan P 

4ta 400 405 TOO Pembina 

,J6*4 5to 5to 2500 PltonU DU 

515.. ™ 1™*+ to 40199 Pine Point 
lllto llto llto+to 10220 PlocaCOo 
*72 11*6 llto- 1% 8385Pta»r 

268 260 265 + 9 I42DProvtoo 

21ft 21ft 1308 One Shirgo 

515*8 IB* 15to 200 RomPnt 

531*4 30*8 21*6+1 2000 Roy rock/ 

ilTto lift 17 — to 2890 Radpath 

.S'" .St 33575 Rd stonhs A 

515ft is lSto saws Reiehhow 

K4to 3414 2446+ to 2D60C Res S«rv f 
530 30 30 1145 RevnPraA 

*33 32ft 32to+ to 5340 Rogers A 

*16Vj lfito I6to 1700 Roman 

531ft 31*8 31*4 900 Rothman 


55299 C Tire A I 
10500 C UII1 B 
1150 Caro 
1500 Cetanes* 
100 CHUM 


31ft 31*8 31*4 900 Rothman 

29to 2WJ 29to+2to 18659 SCflPtre 


395 275 

578 550 

IBS 187 
20 21 
O S4 
343 335 


I2500CCH£» A 
19600 CD 1st b B f 


300 CTL Bank 
m Canvontrs 


AD Ordinaries Index :7BSJ9 
Previous :773JG 
Source; Reuters. 


Baustead 
CoW Storooe 

Frtwr»«vo 
Ha w Par 
Incficapg 
KePpcIShto 
MM Barking 
oese 

OUB 

Semb Shipyard 
5ime Darfey 
5 Steamship 
St Trading 
U0B 


Bonk Leu 
Brown Boverl 
CtoaGeigy 
Credit Smsse 


148 148 

IS 

5.10 5.10 

70S Z2S 
242 157 

143 141 
5X0 5-90 
9.25 MS 
3.96 3M 
1J6 145 

1,91 1» 

1.15 1.14 

446 4X6 
4X2 4X0 




Akal 

Asahl CTiem 

AsahlGkBS 

Bonk of Tokvo 

Bridgestone 

canon 

C-itoh 

□ol Nippon Print 


I Jacob Soehard 
“ ~T J el mall 

LOndksGvr 

SS “wn» 

864 Orilkoive 


SI » Roche Baby 
336 530 SprtdW 

*SS ’SS ScWndter 


OdlwD House 
Full Bonk 
Full Photo 
FuMfW 
Hllochl 

rrUJKHJ 

INI 

Japan Air Linus 
Kaiima 
Kmol P ow e r 
Km Saw 
Kawasaki Steel 
Kirin Brewery 


OUB index : 485.17 
Pravfen : 40444 


F.T. 18 index: 98170 
Previous: VT7J0 


AGA 

Alfa Laval 
Am 


370 375 
196 19S 
380 379 


m 3 s tsr s s 

iSn Swfaaotr 1)20 1095 

* a Swiss Volkebcmk 1495 1500 

iwS 22 Union Bank 3670 36S0 

d« WWerfhur <2 tO 423} 

Zuridi Its 20350 30250 

146 145 

S3BD 5100 SBC lades : 4394a 
,771 W Previous ; 4848 
1260 12a 

145 143 not waM; NJ8.; W 

fMdkriUe- mA! tululiM 


3750 3675 
1575 1560 

2835 2110 
2390 2380 
2690 2700 
7W 737 
U00 6375 
IMS 1930 
1650 1640 

6340 6270 
1500 MSS 
WO 1600 
7975 7950 , 
3700 3sSD 
350 399 

369 368 , 

1120 1095 
1495 1500 
3670 3620 
<260 423} j 
20350 20250 


3C45Cranra 
<735a Czar Res 


510*8 10*8 10*8 2600 Scott* t 

517 16ft 77 + to 5579 Seer* Can 

511*4 llto llto <0130 Shell Can 

57*4 7*8 7*4+ to 2*8*8 Shorrltt 

539*4 39*6 39*4 — to 500 Sigma 

56*4 6to 6*8+ to 1800 Slater B 

S6to 414 688 IBOSauthm 

*Uto 1114 118t+to 700 St BrOdc 

475 <70 <70 400 484BT StMCOA 

8Bto 8to *to+to 1900 sui otnj 

73* 265 265 —10 3SOOSteepR 

S17K 12*8 12to+to WOSuncWB 


High LowctoMCaeg 

2400 MMH * *21 ft 21 21 + V 

630 M1CC 220 220 220 +)0 

14101 MdanHX *26*4 26to 26*6+ V. 

100 McGrow H *22 22 23 — to 

7000 Merlcnd E 430 <20 <20 . *. 

15450 Motaon At SMto 7684 1686- W 

100 Moisofl B *16*6 16*6 16*6— to 

IiBOMurahy *11*6 2114 21*4+, VI 

19900 NntmcoL 526 26 26 

57782 Noronda *20*8 19ft 1988— >6 

ZimNorcen si<*8 uft M*8+ ft 

<960< Nwa AftA f 5716 718 714 

ZJOONuwseoW 571*4 2m Tito + ft 

1574fNuWstipA 53 SO 53 

7l930akwood S5 48S -495 

68000showaAf S2S*i 2S>4 2514 ~ 

P amour „ 475 . 475 475 . 

imPonCanP *28*8 2B14 28*8 +’to 

J^PhSSTSil *CT4 “ 'nT* 

wrapiaceCOo ^1^1^’ 
8»PlOOBr *2Sto 25to 2Sto-'14 

i-mprovfoo SIBVj 1B14 ISto • 

1300 One Shirao 355 350 355 +-5 

^RomPnt 55V, 5ft 5ft 

3J MRoyrodi/ MV . 8 SU. 

2BW ReOcoth *32*8 32*8 32*4 + -to 

0575 Rd Stantis A SZlft 71ft 21*8 

OTlXSRekJhold 514ft Mft lflS+.ft 

20600 Res Sent m 177 ISO , 

IU5 RevnPraA 1M 105 105 ' 

IS ^ ™ «« 


68000shawaAf 
4100 Pamour 
1235 PanCan P 
KW Pembina 
2500 PHonlx Oil 


8385PIOCM- 
I42B ProvtOQ 
1300 Que Stlirg O 
200 Rom Pet 
2D00 Ro yro ck / 
2W?R“tooth 


5anS 23*6 23*4— ;-H 
SSft Bto 8 ft- U. 
S8Vj Bft Bft ' 
Clift 10*8 llto + to 


S8tB5tMrrm 

500 Sigma 

1800 staler Bf 
IBOSauthm 
700 si Breocst 


555ft Hft 55ft — 18 
S17V4 1214 12to 
SZ3S6 22*6 2T78— "to 


3M0SH«,R 

lOOSuncoror 


smu 1716 17ft— ft [716280 Sydney o 


15B6Z7 Doon Dev 
S500Daon A 
16005 Denteen A 
5*075 Denison B 1 


jSSSSS"., 


10100 Dlckrtsn B 
21270omanA 
7805 Dofosco A 
258 Du Pont A 
31202 Dvlex A 
<300 Elcthom X 
400 Emco 
S4000 EtwHv Svr 
4470 FCA inti 
7950 C Falcon C 
4235 hlaibrdge 
29 Forty Rss 
BIOS Fed I nd A 

wogo F Cffr FJn 

220 Fraser 
1100 Fraehauf 
2113 Cendb A 
12131 GaacQxna 
36690 Goocrude 
1 430 Gibraltar 
3BI60 GoMcorp I 

tWO Goody ear 

siSss 


500 59$ oral table ; nd: tx-dlvtdend. 


MDan 


CooipgsHg Slock Index :98U0 
nttlM : 778.10 


40250 40)50 

AA Cora 

51 2ft 

19150 191 JO 

Aiiied-Lvtrs 

174 

222. 

715 

Anglo Am Gold 

582 

16650 

16) 

Babcock 

147 

466 

<m 

Barclays 

619 

18&20 

187 


512 

105X0 

10/ 

BAT. 

385 

390 

S« 


363 

165 

167 

BICC 

250 

*71 JO 
21) JO 

269 

710 

BL 

BOC Group 

38 

308 

217 

210 


174 

26ZJ0 

256 

Bowater Indus 

230 


Banco Comm 

Centrale 

Cioahotels 

Crod Hal 

FarmilaHa 

Flat 

nnsider 

Generali 

IF1 

itakemsnti 

Mediobanca 

Montedison 

Olivetti 

Pirelli 

RAS 

RtoUcanTe 

SIP 

Snlo 

Stondo 


18260 18200 
2755 2795 
7289 7115 
2171 Z210 
10880 1072}' 
2SBS 2535 
55 56 

42780 42200 
773) 764Q 
90760 99 ?* 
83999 82559 
1535 1505 
6718 6719 
2335 2315 
70*90 68000 
6*0 63175 
2190 2190 
29» 2801 
1)800 11300 


Ford to Move Tractor Operations 

United Pna International three-cylinder tractors at Kouko, 


S19V8 1914 1914 . 
519ft 1914 19ft + ft 
SDft 22*8 m 
*7% 7ft 7*8 ■ 

S24 tPi 23*8+ ft 


MIB index ;U18 
Prey lev* :l^M 


United Pros International 

DEARBORN, Michigan — 
Ford Motor Co. said Thursday that 
ii plans to transfer production of its 
four- and six-cylinder agricultural 
tractors from its Romeo, Michigan, 
plant to England and Belgium dur- 
ing the next IS mouths, affecting 
230 American workers. 

The automaker said ibai it would 
continue to make its best-selling 


.iSgM* 

6300HrtflnoAf 
2600 Hawker 
11B33 Hoy** □ 
2921 H Bav Co 
2S148 ItniBCa 
1170* Indoi 
AM Inland Gas 
S5700 MM Thom 
3600 Inter Ptoe 
rtOlvacoB 
400 jonnoefc 
2400 Kam Kalla 

100 Kataev H 

4819 K«T Add 
M227 LaOOtt 
28810 LaeMnris 
2900 LOnlCem 
5138 Lacuna 

600 LL Lac 
700 LobktwCa 


where 8S0 workers are currently 
employed. 

Bill CarrolL a spokesman for 
Ford’s tractor operations, said the 
Romeo plant, opened 10 years ago, 
has been working at 50-percent ca- 
pacity because of the depressed 
farm-equipment market that has 
affected all equipment producers 
for the last ax years. 


12 170 170 11050 TotaBfp 77 77 

220 292 310 +18 300 Toro Slfftt u 

30Q 300 300 -25 IWCTwkCorA 512 11 

S15J4 15*8 15to— to 9432 Tack Bf *12 n 

ft SWTotedyno «1 It 

10 10 •— Vfc 109DTtxC(tft im 23 

J5to J 5>» 347 TftomKA ^ 53 

SV% 5to 106633 To r Dm Bk - SITft 19 

Slu.^2 +,? 31M Torstor B I *19ft 19 

Y&y a » 22470 TraewsAf S22ft 22 

*17to 254 17ft + to 2800 Tins Ml *7ft 7 

^4* ^6 *1 t 1 S iwStSSEpl* S g 

*5? ’S 1- ** 8**8TrfmOc 445 435 

7ft 7ft 5U7Trt»c Af *2514 2S 

521ft 21 21 21200 Turbot 53 J1 

l g OnCOfW Sllto 11 

2S6 2H — 4 118926 UBfflprise Sllto 12 

Sift P WSSStf siii6 1 ? 

Ba h t -gwa 3 

ffiXiis+r sffisssr g % 

nw 19V* 10ft + ft 3907 WSodMf A SJlto H! 

« 5ft-. to lOOOYkBrar siift Its 

2P*> S t? 4 Total soles 12X94409 PM 
J 5 II g +J CM 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1985 


Page 17 


SPORTS 


Rice Tops Salary List 
In Pact With Red Sox 


By Murray Chass 

i '■ New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — The Boston 
•'fted S<JX voluntarily sent Jim Rice 
-J\q the top of baseball’s salary list 
' Wednesday with a four-year con- 
tract extension, but they involun- 
■1 iarfly helped Wade Boggs maidi a 
Salary arbitration record. 

■ Boggs, a third baseman who has 
\<atted 325 or better in earfa of his 
hree mayor league seasons, won his 

Arbitration case with the Red Sox, 
. pining a Sl-miIHon salary for 
>i985TThat matdies the SI milling 
■■•Jiat Fernando Valenzuela, die Los 
iingdes Dodgers’ pitcher, won in 
S-rtitralion. 

‘ »’ The Red Sox had offered Boggs 
>675,000. 

Leon Durham of the rhicagp 
'3 fobs (Sl.l million), 71m Raines of 
ijontreal ($12 million) and Bill 
> laudfll of Toronto ($1.3 million) 
£ 'fluid exceed both players if they 
' •’in their cases. 

Almost immediately after leam- 
. jg that they had lost to Boggs, the 
• : £a Sox announced contract ex- 
clusions for Rice, their offensive 
. 'ad ex, and Bob Stanley, their bull- 
i ;m leader. 

^Stanley’s four-year extension, 
iihich takes effect in 1986, was 
f ’ear-cut — four years at a total of 
million. The agreement with 
, ice was not so easy to relate. 

- The Red Sox, who announced no 
Vfms, said privately that the four- 
{'■ar extension that takes effect in 
"j'86 was worth a total of $8.6 nril- 
Vjn. George Kalafatis, Rice’s 

■ ent, said the total value was ap- 
orimately $10 mfllicm. The de- 


ference apparently stemmed from 
the way the money will be paid out. 

According to a baseball official 
familiar with terms of the contract, 
which calls for an option year in 
1990, it would be worth $9.8 mil- 
lion, using Kalafatis 's fi guring. 

Based on existing contracts, 
George Foster of the New York 

player at an annual guarantcetFav- 
erage of S2.04 million. Whether f ig - 
ured ax $8.6 nriffion ($2. 1 5 miffion a 
year) or at $10 million ($15 million 
a year). Rice’s new contract would 
put him ahead of Foster. 

Rice, 31, is a .303 career hitler 
who leads the major leagues in total 
bases and RBIs over the last nine 
years. He slumped in 1984 to 280, 
fads major league low. 

Figuring the value of Rice’s ex- 
tension is complicated fay the inclu- 
sion of money that will be deferred 
without interest. 

The agreement includes a signing 
bonus that was said to be more 
than $3.5 million, with just under 
$2 million of (hat deferred. With 
the remainder added to Rice’s 1985 
salary under his old contract of 
$640000. the left fielder will be one 
of the highest-paid players this 
year. 

Lou Gorman, the dub’s vice 
president for baseball operations, 
acknowledged that however the 
contract was computed, it was a lot 
of money. Howwer, he added. 
Rice’s contract and Stanley’s, the 
two biggest the dub has ever agreed 
to, should silence the critics in Bos- 
ton who say the Red Sox never 



Jim Rice 

want to spend money to keep or 
acquire top players. 

For the past two seasons, the 
Red Sox have ranked 16th among 
the 26 teams, with an average sala- 
ry of $297078 last season. 

Their salary structure was one of 
the arguments the Red Sox used in 
the anritration case against Boggs. 
“We didn’t have anyone at a mil- 
lion dollars a year,” Gorman said. 





■•merit* 


*ete Rose marks the date in September — no, August — when he thinks hell pass Cobb. 

lose Has His Eye on Cobb , Then . . . 


_ United Prat International 

iEW YORK. —Pete Rose, get- 
ready to start his first full sea- 
as manager-player with the 
rinnati Reds,' is playing a little 
-e with everyone. With Trimseff, 
■ It has to do with Ty Cobb's 
rd, the one he’s set to break this 

■obb collected 4*191 hits in his 
ear career and that record has 
standing now for 57 years. 

: has 4,097 hits. He needs 94 
> to catch Cobb and 95 to pass 

Rose's mind, he already has 
en Cobb’s record. 
yt that he’s becoming overcon- 
it, but he knows be can wipe 
he record. On Wednesday, he 
predicted the day he will do it, 
ogAng. 26 when the Reds wfll 
' • home for a night game with 
■L Louis Car dinals. 
se did all this ai a news con- 
.ce. His agents had put up a 
calendar with the month of 
mber showing on the assump- 
hat Rose would sdeci a day in 
' nonth for his record-breaker. 

e crossed out the word “Sep- 
’ sr“ and wrote in “Aug." and 
jarded the 26th. 
thinlf I can get 125-150 hits 
• ear,” said Rase, who got 107 
. year when he batted 286. 

- n I'm hitting well. I'll play; 

' Tm not hitting wdL I won’t 


but all are in the pitcher category. 

Minnie Minoso was a pinch hit- 
ter for the White Sox when he was 
54* but really qiritplaying regularly 
when he was 41 . Two similar cases 
were Deacon McGuire and Arlie 
Latham, both of whom started 
their careers in the late 1800s. 
McGuire played his last game in 
the big leagues when he was 49, 
although he never appeared in 
more man one game a season after 


he was 43. Latham was active until 
he was 50 but really quit at 36. 

So Cap Anson is the one Pete 
Rose has his eye on after Cobb. 

“I want to be the oldest player,’’ 
he said. “Not counting the pitchers. 
I want to be the oldest nonpilcher 
player in basebalL” 

Rose will have to keep playing 
this season, and two more. As soon 
as he does that, he’ll think of some- 
thing else. 


Tall Story, 

Evenfor 

Basketball 


The Associated Press 

BRIDGEPORT, Connecticut 
— All bat cme of the University 
of Bridgeport's fust 21 basket- 
ball games were sold out. People 
come not so much to root for 
their teams, but to see what the 
fans are calling “Basket-BoL” 
The “BoT refers to Manure 
Bd, 21, a native of southern Su- 
dan’s Dinka tribe, who at 7-foot- 
6 (229 centimeters) is the tallest 
basketball player in the United 
Stales — if not the world. 

“When I first came here they 
looked at me funny.” Bol said of 
his classmates and fans, “but 
now they don't care.” 

Bol came to the United States 
from the Sudan national team 
Before that, be lived with his 
family, part of the traditionally 
tall Dinka tribe. Bruce Webster, 
the coach at Bridgeport, said the 
Dinkas are a nomadic people 
who raise cattle and travel to 
wherever they can find water. 

Don Feriey. a former coach at 
Fairieigh Dickinson, noticed Bol 
while be was louring Sudan. He 
brought him and another player, 
Bol’s roommate and friend, 
Deng Nhial, to the United States 
to play. 

“To some degree we’re proba- 
bly using or getting the benefits 
of Manure, "Webster conceded, 
“but at the same time we’re mak- 
ing a very legitimate effort to 
give him a solid education and to 
Americanize him and make hrm 
independent in this country.” 

Bol attends a special English 
course for three hours every day 
and has not missed a class at tire 
university. But be isn't as good 
about his weight-training pro- 
gram or his special diet. Bol 
weighs about 195 pounds (88.5 
kilos). 

His problem is that he can’t 
seem to eat enough to gain the 
weight he needs to mix it up with 
the bigger centers of college bas- 
ketball. 

“I don’t like a lot of the food 
here," Bol said. “The food is the 
same, but they way they cook it is 
different.” 

“He only likes steak, ham- 
burgers, spaghetti and chicken,” 
Webster said. “We tried giving 
him this special diet with differ- 
ent sorts of vegetables to balance 
it out. and giving him 5,000 calo- 
ries a day and be won’t eat iL He 
eats small amounts of food three 
or four times aday and he proba- 
bly should be eating five or six 

times a day”- 

“He’s a great player, but he 
doesn’t have the abihty to with- 
stand punishment. He can be 
knock til out of position by even 
Division II phrotmen.” Webster 
said. “U he weighed 40 more 
pounds, he wouldn't be here — 
he’d be a pro." 

Bruce Webster’s life has 
changed for better and worse 
since Bol came on the scene. As 
well as being Bridgeport’s coach, 
he also is Bol’s surrogate father, 
friend and publicist. 

“The difficult part of it for me 
is handling his daily schedules so 
we both can Uve,” Webster said. 
“Constantly gening him to the 
dentist, getting him to the foot 



Alpiger Scores Upset 
In Men’s Downhill Race 


Defense, by Manote Bol of Bridgeport 


doctor, getting him to the ortho- 
pedic doctor, making sore that 
he eats well, making sure that be 
goes to the weight program, 
making sure that Ire gets his visa 
cleared. 


’People ask me how big he is. I opposing 
r , ‘7-toot-6, with sneakers 7-7, not to sh 


say. 

the length of his leg is 48 inches, 
his arm is 44 inches, his waist is 
32 inches, he’s missing 15 »w*th, 
he was bora Ocl 16. f%3.’ 

“I've got three kids of my own 
and I couldn't teO you any of 
those things about them.” 

Of course, none of Webster's 
children is able to do the 
that Bol does on a basketbs 
court. 

“I couldn’t believe he blocked 
my shot from the foul line," is 
the way Central -Connecticut 
Stare University guard Tony Lit- 
tle summed- up the feelings - of' 
many of BoPs opponents this 
season. In the game against Cen- 
tral last week, Bol scored 28 
points, grabbed 15 rebounds and 
blocked eight shots. 

It was a typical performance. 
With Bol averaging 23 points, 
14 rebounds and right blocked 
shots per game. Bridgeport is 19- 
4 this season and is on top of the 
Division II New England Colle- 
giate Conference at 9-1. 

“1 like to play every day," said 
BoL who began playing basket- 
ball just five years ago. “I can 
play two times a day. Fm not 
thinking about the pros right 


now — I just play and concen- 
trate on what rtn doing in col- 
lege.” 

Opposing teams cannot figure 
out bow to guard him or how to 
shoot over mm. Webster said one 
coach ordered his team 
ooi to shoot within 15 feet (4.5 
meters) of the basket. He said 
one of the coaches at New 
Hampshire College stood in the 
key and swatted back, his players’ 
shots with a broom to prepare 
them for a game with Bridgeport. 

“C.W. Post practiced with 
what they called a *B61 stick.’ 
They measured a player who was 
6-5 and gave him a stick with a 
big hand oo it to make up the 
difference to 7-6 ” Webster said. 
“WdL Manure blocked 12 Post 
shots and I think • five New 
Hampshire shots." 

Bol believes, however, that 
players are able to take advan- 
tage of him because of his size. 
“Sometimes the referees do not 
caB the fouls and I get mad.” he 
said. “But that makes me play 
better. Like when I play against 
somebody and he pushes me and 
they don't call a foul. I don’t 
have to hit him, 1 play harder ” 

Because of his height, Bol re- 
quires special attention off the 
court, too. ‘The school bousing 
department bought an extra- 
long queen-size bed," Webster 
said. “It’s 84 inches long and he’s 
90 inches long, so if he sleeps on 
a diagonal hes all right.” 


The Associated Press 

bad kleinkirchheim. 

Austria — Karl Alpiger. a member 
of Switzerland's B Team, scored an 
upset victory Thursdav in a men's 
World Cup downhill ski race. 

Alpiger was limed in 1 minute. 
56.04 seconds in winning the first 
race of his career. 

Peter M Oiler, also of Switzer- 
land. a downhill silver medalist in 
the world Alpine ski champion- 
ships completed last weekend, fol- 
lowed Alpiger, and Austria's Stefan 
Niederseer was third. Muller, a 
two-time World Cnp downhill 
champion, completed his run in 
1:56.43. and Niederseer was 
docked at 1:57.01. 

Despite his B-Team status. Al- 
piger has been a consistent scorer 
throughout the season, placing in 
the top 15 in each of the previous 
six downhills, with a fourth and a 
fifth his best efforts. He was 10th in 
the season standings for that disci- 
pline. 

Still, the Swiss ream was so deep 
that Alpiger. 23, was unable to 
make the four-man squad, which 
competed in the world champion- 
ships at Borraio. Italy. 

“It’s a crazy feeling." Alpiger 
said of his victory. “I just hope it 
keeps going like this. I really 
didn’t make any big mistakes — 
maybe two or three small ones, like 
every racer makes — but otherwise, 

I had a very good race. I’m really 
happy.” 

Anton Steiner of Austria fin- 
ished fourth in 1:57.19, and Daniel 
Mahrer was fifth with a lime of 
1:57 JO. He was followed by three 
more Swiss skiers. Franz Heinzer. 
Bruno Kernen and Pirmin Zurbrig- 
gen, the downhill winner at the 
world championships. 

Italy's Michael Mair and Franz 
Klammer of Austria rounded out 
the top 10. 

Zurbriggen. the defending 
World Cup overall champi on ana 
second this season, earned right 
points for his race to bring his sea- 
son total to 187 points, 28 less than 
Luxembourg’s Marc Girardelli. 

Alpiger and other skiers de- 
scribed the 3250-meter course as 
difficult, with bumps and rocks 
that threw several raceis off bal- 
ance. 

Peter Luescher of Switzerland, 
the 1979 overall champion who in 
recent years has been dogged by 
injuries and bad luck. Fell near the 
of the course and had to be 
iken by helicopter to a hospital 
His condition was not immediately 
known. 

Muller also lost his balance and 
had to open his stance near the top, 
but made up for the lost time on the 
bottom of the course, which had a 
vertical drop of 840 meters. 

Zurbriggen was another victim 
of the tricky run. He lost a pole and 
hit the snow with his right hand 



Karl Alpiger 


top 

take 


and was clutching his arm after 
crossing the finish line. Less than a 
month ago, Zurbriggen underwent 
surgery after injuring his left knee. 

The race was the last of the sea- 
son in Europe. The tour now moves 
to Japan before dosing with several 
events in Canada and the United 
States. 


76ers Edge 

Past Knicks 

United Press International 

PHILADELPHIA — With 7- 
foot-I centers Marvin Webster and 
Bill Cartwright lost to the New 
York Knicks for the season, 6-foot- 
10 Pat Cummings has been forced 
to fill in both as a shot-blocking 
and shot-making center. 

Wednesday night's 131-129 loss 
to the Philadelphia 76erc was an- 

NBA FOCUS 

other painful reminder that you 
can't expect miracles. 

With the Knicks clinging to a 
one-point lead in the final minute, 
the Sneers exploited New York's 
shortcomings to rally lor a victory 
that tied them with Boston for the 
Atlantic Division lead. 

First, Charles Barkley drove 
down the left side of the lane to put 
Philadelphia ahead for good, 128- 
127. Without Webster, the IGiicks 
lacked an intimidator to Slop the 
Sixers' dynamic rookie. 

With Bernard King, who scored 
46 points, out of the picture with 
six fouls, New York went to Cum- 
mings. His shot was blocked and 
Moses Malone fed Barkley on a 
fast break. 

Barkley slammed and was 
fouled, and his free throw gave the 
Sixers all the cushion they would 
need. Barkley finished with 20 
points, five in the final 41 seconds. 

The Knicks* coach, Hubie 
Brown, used five defenders against 
Malone, but nothing worked, as the 
76ers* center scored 37 points. 

King's 46 points tied Bob Mc- 
Adoo’s Spectrum record for a visit- 
ing player, but the Knicks lost for 
the 17th time in their last 18 road 
games. 

Elsewhere in the NBA Wednes- 
day, it was Detroit 124, Dallas 1 19; 
New Jersey 1 12, Cleveland 105; At- 
lanta 94, Utah 88. and the Los 
Angeles Clippers 108, Golden State 
105. 


SPORTS BRIEFS 


SCOREBOARD 


Basketball 


Transition 


NBA Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic DMsttO 



W L 

Pet 

GB 

Boston 

41 

10 

.004 

— 

Philadelphia 

41 

10 

JIM 

— 

WoahttBton 

28 

25 

J2S 

14 

New Jgraev 

25 

V 

481 

i£te 

New York 

18 34 
Central Di* felon 

346 

23V5 

Milwaukee 

as 

17 

473 

— 

Detroit 

.. 31 

20 

JOB 

315 

Gtikoeo 

25 

25 

500 

9 

Alton to 

22 

X 

423 

T3 

Cleveland 

16 

X 

JI4 

W* 

Indiana 

16 

35 

514 

18V, 


ople 

able 


)Ie keep asking me whether 
' i]e to manage and go after 
: rord at the same time. Believe 
iot, I can keep toy mind on 
• liffercnl things. My mam 
‘ will be the team winning." 

■1 means Cobb’s record is sec- 
y, but what happens after he 
. rare of that? 

i not gonna retire the day 
. ' break the record,” said Rose. 

iH be 44 in April and sounds 
< i’ll play as much first base for 
ds as anyone dse. “Fll retire 
: ill player when I'm not hav- 
i and nouwodneing.” 
when will that be? 

Rose is thin 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Mi dwest Division 

Denver 32 20 AW — 

Houston 29 21 -MO 2 

Daring 28 24 SX 4 

San Antonio 26 25 -510 SVs 

Utah 24 28 M2 B 

Kamos City It 14 J20 U 

pacific DtvUkw 

LA. Loiters So 14 M2 — 

Phoenix 25 28 -490 I0rt 

Portland 23 28 AS! 12t* 

Seattle 22 38 .423 14 

LA. Clippers 11 31 AW 15 

Gotten Slate It 40 .216 24V, 

WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS 
Dallas 29 IS S* 38— m 

Detroit U 29 77 34-124 

Trier 11-19 >4 25. Thomas 10-18 34 23; 
Aguirre 17-27 6-6 401 Blackmon 7-lS 9-10 24. 
Rebounds: Dallas 55 (Vincent 17); Detroit 61 
(Trior 1J>. Assists: Dallas J* (Blackman aj; 
Detroit 35 (Thomas 25). 

30 30 27 IS— 185 
SMS 25— Ul 
Birdsong 13-23 5-4 31. GatinNcI *4 1T-I1 19; 
Free 11-31 10-18 34. Hubbard 7-15 MO 21 Ra- 
il Cleveland 60 (Hinson 15); New Jer- 


PlttSburoh 78. Connecticut 71 
W. Virginia SI. 12T. B rue field St. 98 
SOUTH 

Clenuon 80. Wake Forest 45 

Duke 94. stelson 51 

Florida 51. 88. Jacksonville 72 

Kentucky 51. Alabama 48 

Kentucky SI. 49. N. Ken lucky 47 

Middle Tenn. 7a Tennessee St. 45 

Mississippi 54, Florida 54 

Mississippi SL 82. Auburn 45 

N. Carolina 4a Maryland 54 

N. Carolina SI. 9a McL-E. Shore 51 

Univ. of the South 62, Oalelhorpe 54 

Va. Commonwealth 47, AlcL-BIrmlnoham S3 

Vanderbilt 49. Georgia 48 

MIDWEST 
Detroit 68, Dayton 47 
Kant St. 84. W. Mich food 49 
Marquette 71, Xavier. Ohio 53 
Memphis SI. 48. Cincinnati 55 
Minnesota 73, Michigan St. 44 
Notre Dame 79. New Orleans 54 
Ohio U. 71. E. Michigan *1 
Oklahoma 104, Iowa St. 74 
Oklahoma St. 81. Kansas SI. 77 
SOUTHWEST 

&. Methodist 81. Texas A&M 79 
Texas Christian st. Baylor 79 
Texas Tech 41. Rice 60 

FAR WEST 

CotorodD 64. Nebraska 61 
Ktaho 78, E. Washington 75 
San Jose 51. 57. Caf-Sarrto Barbara 54 
w. Montano 76. Rocky Mountain SB 


BASEBALL 
American League 

BOSTON— Signed Jim Rice, out fJetter. and 
Bob Stanley, pitcher, to l un g t erm contract 
extensions, and Wade Boggs, third basemen. 

CLEVELAND— Signed Mike Jett coat and 
Jose No man, pitchers, to one-rear contracts. 

TEXAS — Purchased Greg Harris, pitcher. 
Irom San Diego. 

TORONTO— Skmed George Bell, outfield- 
er; Jimmy Key. Pilcher, and Fred McGrlff, 
first basem an , lo one-year contracts. 
National League 

MONTREAL— Signed Joe Hesfceih and 
Otck OroMnmn. ollchere. to one- year con- 
tracts. Named Ron Plche ttekel sales Promo- 
tion manager. 

NEW YORK— Named Buzz Copra pitching 
coach of the cJutrt Little Falls of filiate In the 
New York -Penn League. Named Bob Sikes 
assistant trainer and Letand 8 lack field. Jose 
Figueroa Carlos Taeta and sal Morgaallone 
scouts. 

PITTSBURGH— Signed Marvell Wynne 
and Joe Onulafc. outfielders, and Bab walk, 
pitcher, to ono-vear contracts. 


SAN Di EGO— Reached on ogroement wllh 
Andy Hawkins, pitcher, on o two-year con- 
tract. 

FOOTBALL 

National Football League 
NEW ENGLAND— Named LesSleckel and 
Harold Jackson, assistant coaches. 

Untied States Football League 
LEAGUE— Named William J. McSherrv jr. 
executive director, 

A R I ZONA OUTLAWS— Traded Terry Bee- 
son, linebacker, to Jacksonville In exchange 
for undisclosed draft picks. 
JACKSONVILLE— Wotved Terry LeCeunb 


OAKLAND— Waived Mltchel Montgomery, 
tight end. Signed Doug Corea light end. 
HOCKEY 

NatioMl Hockey League 
BOSTON— Announced the resignation of 


font coach. Named Harry Sinden interim 
head cooch. 

MONTREAL— Aeaulrod Gaston Ghtgra& 
dolonsemaatromToranlotor Larry London, 


Wales-England Rugby Postponed 

CARDIFF (UPI) — Snow and continuing low temperatures have 
forced the postponement of the five Nations Rugby match between 
Wales and England, scheduled for Saturday. 

Despite efforts by the ground staff, the Cardiff Anns Park will not be 
in fit condition for the game to take place. Announcing the postpone- 
ment, Ray Williams, secretary of the Welsh Rugby Union, said Thursday, 
“We were going to make a decision tomorrow, but (here is no sign of any 
relenting of the severe weather and conditions will be exactly the same 
tomorrow.” 

Tbe Welsh match against France Jan. 19 had to be called off because of 
a frozen field. That game was rescheduled for March 30, when England 
will also play its postponed game with Ireland in Dublin. 

Jets Defeat Capitals in NHL Came 

WINNIPEG. Manitoba (AP) — Doug Small's second goal, early in the 
third period, snapped a 2-2 tie and sparked the Winnipeg Jets to a 5-3 
victory over the Washington Capitals in the only National Hockey 
League game Wednesday night. 

Smail’s first goal at 6:39 of the second period triggered Winnipeg’s 

_ ~ _ 71 comeback from a 2-0 first-period deficit, and the Jets climbed one point 

W orld Clip Sk iin g ahead of the Calgary Flames into second place in the Smyibe Division. 

f- — s2J Small also bad an assisL 


right wing. Assigned Gh-iOrr. to Sherbrooke at 
the American Hockev League. 

TORONTO — Returned Bill Root, Oetensa- 
man. and Wes Jarvta, center, la St. Catharines 
of the American Hockev Leogue. Returned 
Todd GIIL detenaemon. to Windsor of Ihe On- 
lorio Hockey Looguo, and Jeff Jackson, left 
wins, to Hamilton of the OHL. 

COLLEGE 

ILLINOIS STATE— Namod Dr. Bab Fred- 
erick athletic director. 

MISSISSIPPI — Suspended Eric Laird, 
guard, from the basketball team tor the re- 
mainder at the season. 

SACRAMENTO STATE— Named Bill 
Brown basketball coocdiettectlveattheendot 
the i 


MENS DOWNHILL 
I At Bad Klefaiklrcfthehn. Austria) 

1. Karl Al bluer. Switzerland, t minute, SUM 


Hockey 


NHL S tandings 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick Division 


yoae else again. He’s already 
ig about Cap Anson. 

3n, one of the outstanding 
asemen at the turn of the 
/, was a player-manager like 
hit he spent his entire career 
■ m Chicago Cubs and was 
‘ to the Hail of Fame in 1939. 

- apt playing until he was 46 
i far as anyone can deter- 
f&s the oldest player, outside 
-' Mrs, to perform in the ma- 

a 

“ Satchel Paige pitched 
ues when be was 59. 
and Jack Quinn 
ntil they were 49 and Phi] 
still is taking his torn at 46, 


sey 61 tGnrimki 13). AssUs: Cleveland 17 


W L 

T 

Pts 

GF 

GA 

(Baa lev 8); New Jersey 27 (Richardson 9). 

Washington 

34 

15 

a 

76 

340 

168 

New York 33 24 tt 33-129 

Philadelphia 

31 

1* 

7 

69 

227 

im 

pMiwU.nmw 19 M 37 31—131 

N.Y. Islanders 

30 

22 

3 

43 

253 

215 

Malone 0-14 21-23 37, Toney 9-17 4-4 23; Kins 

N.Y. Rangers 

17 

29 

9 

43 

191 

227 

16-27 14-23 46. Walker 11-18 9-0 22. Rebouttt: 

Pittsburgh 

18 

29 

5 

41 

186 

238 

New York 41 (Kina 101 : PWladetoWo 40 (Er- 

New Jersey 

17 

79 

7 

41 

183 

218 

vins. MoMae W). Anisic: New York 33 (Soar- 


Adams DW felon 




raw 11); Phi lade tahta 47 (Cheeks 10). 

Buffalo 

27 

15 

12 

64 

202 

152 

Alta-tt 38 18 M 32—94 

Montreal 

77 

1* 

10 

44 

214 

187 

UftA 24 32 20 11—88 

Quebec 

2ft 

2? 

8 

60 

223 

199 

D. Wilkins 11-22 *4 24. Willis 9-14 3-4 21; 

Boston 

25 

24 

7 

57 

309 

199 

Bailey 9-18 25 2a GrlHltfi 223 M M. Re- 

Hartford 

17 

30 

A 

40 

ISO 

241 


bound*: Atlanta 56 ID. Wilkins. Levlnuston. 
WfHlt9>; Utah 50 ( Eaton 121. Assists: AMonfo 
2* (Johnson 10); UMl 2D IGrean 0). 

Gotten state If 28 » 29— ttl 

l_A- Cttooors 29 19 IS 

Nixon 13-194432. Smith 8- 16 2-6 18; Short 10- 
25 M 2fl, Fiord 8-202-3 19. Retwondi: Golden 
Statu 54 (Ml. Johnson HI: Los Anodes S 
IDanoldsai 10). Assists: Gotten 5 rare 22 
(Short 6); Las Angela* 20 (Nixon 101. 


CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 
Norris Division 


ters, to perform m the toa- _ _ . 

a regular basis in the history U.S. College KesnltS 
-half Satchel Paige pitched 


EAST 
Bwcfcnetl 85, Rider 72 
Cornoole-Mclton SB, John Carroll 54 
DorTmoutn 47. Vermont 62 
Delaware 55, Lehigh 52 
Plefcbnon 45. Moravian 48 


SI. LOUIS 

25 

19 

10 

60 

208 

201 

Chi cogs 

25 

28 

3 

53 

218 

215 

Minnesota 

16 

29 

10 

42 

187 

222 

Detroit 

16 

31 

9 

41 

2D3 

255 

Toronto 

13 

35 

7 

33 

171 

7J7 


SMytbe Division 




Edmonton 

40 

10 

6 

84 

233 

185 

Winnipeg 

29 

23 

6 

64 

251 

252 

Coleary 

28 

21 

7 

43 

254 

220 

Los Angeles 

24 

22 

10 

58 

250 

237 

Vancouver 

16 

33 

s 

SO 

194 

791 

WEDNESDAY'S RESULT 


wasbinefoo 




3 

8 

1-3 

Winnipeg 




0 

2 

3-5 



2. Paler Muller, Swttzertand. 1:5443 
X Sietan Niederseer, Austria 1:57 ji 

4. Anton Steiner, Austria 1:57.19 

5. Daniel Mahrer. Switzerland, 1:57,50 
A Franz Heinzer. Switzerland. 1:57.49 
7. Bruno Kemen. Switzer km a 1:5848 

X Pirmin Zurb riggen. Switzerland, 1 :S889 
9. Michael MaJr, Holy, 1:58.12 

IX Franz Klemmer. Austria 1 : 58.13 

11. Giacomo Ertacher, Holy. 1:58.17 

12. Moure Camaz, Italy, 1:5838 

11 Helmut Hoeflolmer, Austria t:58J0 
U. Alberto GMaonl. Italy. 1:5834 
IS Can rod In Cathomen. Switzerland. t;HA3 
MEN'S OVERALL STANDINGS 

1. Marc Girardelli. Luxembourg. 21 5 Points 

2. Zurbriggen, 187 

X Andreas Wenzel. Liechtenstein. 172 
4. Heinzer. 132 

& Mueller, 128 

6. HaefWMT. 113 

7. Peter Wirnsberger. Austria 111 

8. Thomas Bueroler. Switzerland, 107 

9. Martin Hangl, Switzerland. 93 
IX Pelor Luescher, Switzerland, 92 
11. inuemar S ten mark, S w e de n. 91 
IX Baton Kriw). Yugoslavia, 90 

rx I tied I Max Julen. Switzerland. B2 

and Oswald Toisch. Italy, B2 

IS. Markus Wosmoler, West Germany. 74 


Tennis 


Small 2 ( 191, Steen (23). Bosch mon (30). NIII 
(31 ; Carpenter 142), Adams (3), Laughlln [121. 
Shots on goal: Washingion (on Hayward) fr-4- 
7—17: Win nines (on Riggm) 7-MI— 17. 


Tomas Smid of Czechoslovakia upset the ninth-seeded 
Yannick Noah of France, 6-3, 6-3, 7-5, In their quarterfi- 
nals match in a tournament in Delray Beach, Florida. 


INTERNATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS 
(AI Delray Beach. Florida! 

MSN 

OunrtLi nuo H 

Tomas 5m id (II ). Czechoslovak la del. Yan- 
nlCfc Noah (9). France, fr-X *4 7-5. 

Scott Davis, U.X. dot. S re fan Edberg (131. 
Sweden. 4-1. 4-4. 7-4 

Tim Mayotte. US.def. Mike LMdLU .5. 6-2, 
t-3. 6-1 

J ™i Gunnorssen, Sweden, def. Vitas Gera- 
loitii (13), U .5. 2-4. 6-1 64, 6-2. 

WOMEN 

Quarterfinals 

Cerllne Bassett doi, Canada def. Hone 
Mandllkava (7). Czechoslovakia, 7-5, 6-1 


Cheevers Resigns as Bruins 9 Coach 

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Gerry Cheevers resigned as coach of the 
Boston Bruins of the National Hockey League and was replaced by Harry 
Sinden, the general manager, for the rest of the 1984-85 season, the Bruins 
announced Wednesday. 

Cheevers, 44. stepped down as coach after four and a half years. He had 
a 16-year playing career as a goalkeeper with Boston in lie NHL and 
Cleveland in the World Hockey Association. Cheevers’s overall Boston 
record was 204 victories, 126 losses and 46 ties. The team’s recent record 
was cited as a reason for the coaching change. The Bruins are in fourth 
place in the five-team Adams Division with a record 25 victories, 24 losses 
and seven ties. 

Sinden coached the Bruins from 1966 to 1970, directing the team lo a 
Stanley Cup victory in the 1969-70 season. He coached the team the last 
month of the 1979-80 season, replacing Fred Creighton. 

Ramirez to Defend Lightweight Tide 

MEXICO CITY (AP) — Jose Luis Ramirez of Mexico, the World 
Boxing Council's lightweight champion, will defend his title June 6 
against Hector Camacho of tbe United States, the WBC announced 
Wednesday. 

The council said in a statement that the site has yet to be determined. 
The bout will be Ramirez’s first defense of ihe title since winning it Nov. 3 
in San Juan by stopping Edwin Rosario of Puerto Rico in four rounds. 

Russian Wins Gold in Biathlon Event 

RUHPOLDING, West Germany (AP) — Yuri Kasetakarov of the 
Soviet Union shot perfectly to win the gold medal in tbe men's 20- 
kilometer race Thursday, the opening event of the World Biathlon 
Championships. 

Kaschkarov was timed in 57 minutes, 50J seconds and had a perfect 
shooting score, hitting the tar|et 20 of 20 times. Frank-Peter Roetsch, 20, 
of East Germany, won the silver medal in 59: 18.6. after receiving two 
penalty minutes for shooting wide twice. Tapio Piipponen erf Finland 
won the braize with a time of 59:45.0 and a perfect shooting score. 

It was the tint time in a world championship that all tfir 
raced the 20 kilometers (32 miles) in less Utah one hour. 








t (. 

V 


Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1985 


fju 1 - , , f 


OBSERVER 


-Some Like It Frosty 


By Russell Baker 
"NT EW YORK — It was clear by 
“ 9 A M. of the dav the tem- 


the day the tem- 
peraiure went down to 2 degrees 
beJow zero Fahrenheit (minus 19 
centigrade) that my enemy had 
done his work well. 

Precisely at that hour. Archer 
Miles, whom 1 know scarcely at all. 


nally be almost cold enough even 
forme—" 

“If I ever catch you hitting the 
office boy's whiskey bottle again. 


aissey I 

you’re through.” she said with a 
offic 


smiled at me as I stepped into the 
elevator and asiy^ 40 - =• -- ,J 


. Is it cold 

enough for you?" 

Instead of yielding to my im- 
pulse to seize turn by the throat and 
squeeze until he divulged the iden- 
tity of my enemy, I ignored Archer 
Miles with a frigid qnifo 
Don't think I wasn’t shaking like 
a leaf in a gale when I got up to my 
office and shut the door, though. 
Fortunately the boss hadn’t come 
in yet. I wouldn’t want her to see 
me in that condition, so to raim my 
nerves I phoned the office boy, 
meaning to ask him for a steadying 
shot of the cheap rye he took to 
survive the tedium of his work, but 
when r identified myself, he said, 
“Hi, is it cold enough for you?" 

I dropped the phone like it was a 
puff adder. 

□ 


“Good morning’." 

It was the boss. Apparently 
cheerful Probably planned to fire a 
vice president or two at lunch. I 
said, “Good morning." 


“Cold enough for you?" she 
asked. 

“Who told you I have an insatia- 
ble appetite for coldness?" 

1 was astonished to hear these 
words issuing from my lips, for I 
had never before dared ask her a 
question. “You’re on the payroll 
until you start asking questions 
about things that don't concern 
you, got it?" she had said at the 
hiring ceremony. Now I had bro- 
ken the rules. 

“Are you trying to be a wise guy 
with me?" she replied. 

“Certainly not, chief." 

“Then if it’s cold enough for you, 
say so. and get to work." she said. 

Gripped by some impulse to- 
ward poverty, I heard myself say- 
ing. “To tell you the truth, chief, it’s 
nowhere near cold enough for me, 
because when you’re as big a glut- 
ton for coldness as I am, you look 
forward all year to the time when 
the temperature is going to go 
down to 40 or 50 degrees below 
zero, and you think, then, in that 
great freezin’-up morning, it’ll fi- 


slam of her office door. 

□ 

Whoever was out to destroy me 
had almost succeeded. I could 
imagine him whispering about me 
to the woman in the small shop 
where I buy my paper each morn- 
ing: “They say he once stood in a 
Yukon blizzard crying. ‘Call this 
frigidity? Send me more ice!' " 

This doubtless explained why 
this morning, when I entered look- 
ing icy blue she bad smiled and 
said. “Is it cold enough for you?" 

The dose call with my boss was 
ill uminating. My enemy’s plan was 
now clear. He intended fust to 
make me absurd by falsifying my 
reputation so the world would 
think of me as an eccentric craver 
of chilblain. Then, by letting me 
know that my reputation was bang 
destroyed, he hoped to tempt me to 
some rash destructive act such as 
asking the boss a question. 

He had even got to the bus driver 
on my regular route. That ex- 
plained why the bus driver this 
morning, wearing that look in his 
eye which said, “What an idiot this 
nut must be." had said out loud to 
me, “Is it cold enough for you this 
morning?" 

I had handled' that badly. It was 
a mistake saying, “Look, no matter 
what you’ve heard about me want- 
ing to lap up all the iciness in the 
great Siberian cold-air masses. I’m 
really just a moderate-temperature 
guy who gets goose pimples if the 
thermometer goes under 72." 

1 knew it was a mistake when the 
bus driver said, “Yeah, right, man. 
everybody’s got the right to be nuts 
his own personal way. so you want 
to move hack in the bus please?" 
□ 

My enemy had to be sought out 
and destroyed before the next cold 
snap.. I made an appointment that 
very afternoon with Sam Marlowe, 
private investigator. 

Climbing the walk-up to his din- 
gy office, 1 could tell business was 
bad. The landlord had turned off 
the heat Behind his desk Marlowe 
was wearing overcoat, scarf, gloves 
and eannuffs. “Hi," he said. “Cold 
enough for you?" 

jV«t»- York Tuna Service 


By Christine Chapman 

International Herald Tribune 


Y OKYO — “I'm no longer so 


exotic as 1 once was," said 
Donald Keene, the American 
scholar whose monumental study 
of modem Japanese literature, 
“Dawn to the West," was named 
one of the 15 best books of 1984 
by The New York Times Book 
Review. 

“There is no comparable one- 
man treatment of Japanese litera- 
ture in any language." The Tunes 
said of the two-volume, 2,000- 
page literary history, published 
by Holt. Rinehart & Winston last 
spring. 

Keene, 62, New York-born 
professor of Japanese literature at 
Columbia University and a re- 
nowned translator, has devoted 
his life to understanding the lan- 
guage and the culture of Japan. 

"People still always ask me, 
‘How in the world did you ever 
get interested in ihatT " he said, 
laughing. In his Tokyo apart- 
ment, which overlooks Furukawa 
Garden, once the Western-style 
estate of a Meiji Era industrialist, 
he recalled the bemused reactions 
of Westerners and Japanese, who 
urged him to abandon “exotic tri- 
fles and apply myself to a man's 
work." 

“Dawn to the West," the dos- 
ing two volumes of an intended 
four-volume opus, took Keene 15 
years to write and 43 years to 
prepare for. The second book in 
the series chronologically was 
published earlier and he is work- 
ing on the opening volume. He 
began studying Japanese in the 
summer of 1941, rather casually, 
with two friends and a Japanese 
tutor in the mountains of North 
Carolina. 

After completing his under- 
graduate wont at Columbia in 
1942, he entered the U. S. Navy 
Japanese r -raping.- School for 1 1 
months of intensive training. 
Commissioned as an ensign, he 
W3S sent to Pearl Harbor in 1943 
to translate captured Japanese 
documents and interrogate pris- 
oners. 

Spe cializing in handwritten pa- 
pers, such as the diaries and let- 
ters of soldiers, Keene was look- 
ing for an “idea of what the 
morale was like and of damage 
done that we hadn't realized." 

“They were moving, as human 
documents," he recalled. “At 
first, when the men were still in 
Japan, they were full of patriotic 
sen time nts. Later, in the Pacific, a 


Donald Keene: Bow to the East 

Tm Trying to Make the Whole Landscape \ isible 


more attractive picture of them 
emerges. There was a pathetic ac- 
count of a group of soldiers cut 
off from their unit at New Year's. 
There were seven people, with 
only 13 beans among them to 
eaL” 

Empathy for the writer and the 
excitement of discovering some- 
thing new have marked Keene's 
work throughout his career, 
whether in his translations of Jap- 
anese novelists, playwrights, dia- 
rists, or iu his histories of the 
literature. t 

Through Keene's enthusiasm 
for a body of literature largely 
unknown and unappreciated in 
the West, the reader is led to share 
his “excitement of discovery," as 
be called it in 1968 in his book 


“Landscape and Portraits.' 
When he 


was a graduate stu- 
dent at Columbia, he stood dis- 
couraged in the stacks of the for- 
bidding Japanese collection. He 
picked a book at random and dis- 
covered he could read it It was by 
the 19th-century philosopher Hir- 

ata Alsu lane. 

“He was easy to read," Keene 
smiled. “If I'd found another, 
harder one, I might not have con- 
tinued." 

He did continue his graduate 
studies in Japanese literature, tak- 
ing his doctorate at Columbia. Iu 
(948 he became assistant lecturer 
in Japanese at Cambridge Uni- 
versity in England and taught 
there for five years. From 1953 to 
1955 he studied at Kyoto Univer- 
sity, then returned to Columbia, 
where he teaches three courses in 
Japanese literature during the 
spring semester. 

From June through January be 
lives in Tokyo; the remaining four- 
months of the year he spends in 
New York while the winter tenant 
of the Tokyo apartment, Edward 
Stidenstickcr, translator and pro- 
fessor of Japanese at Columbia, 
returns to Japan. 

Keene says in the preface to 
“Dawn to the West"; "The Japa- 
nese literature written in the cen- 
tury or so since 1868 exceeds in 
volume all the Japanese literature 
that survives from the preceding 
millenni um. No one could read it 
afl, and no one wants to." 



tar* As=o ke/Hdt. farhri & Wirwon 

Donald Keene: The “excitement of discovery ." 


Tbe title "Dawn to the West" 
refers, in Keene's words, “to the 
awakening on the pan of Japan to 
the literature of the West.” 
“Before the middie of tbe 19th 
century," be said, “Japanese liter- 
ature was in a grim situation." 


of literary innovation anywhere in 
the world." 


But after that period. Europear, 
literary developments, such ?s 


naturalism and romanticism, in- 
fluenced Japanese writers so 
strongly that these movements 
“were introduced and adopted 
within a single decade." 

Then, however, as the literary 
critic Jay Rubin has put it by the 
second decade of the 20th century 
“Japanese novelists had virtually 
bypassed 19th-century European 


realism and were producing, shat- 
tering images of contemporary 
tife that puL them in the forefront 


“Dawn to the West" describes 
this metamorphosis with anec- 
dotes and gossip, plot summaries 
and quotations. Individual writ- 
ers — there are only a few women 
— are thoroughly scrutinized in 
relation to contemporary events 
and fellow authors. 

Chronologically. Keene’s 1976 
“World Within Walls: Japanese 
Literature of the Pre-Modem Era, 
1600-1867." also published by 
HoIl Rinehart & Winston, is the 
second volume of the four-part 
history. He is working on the first 
volume, a study of Japanese liter- 
ature from the' eighth century up 
to 1600. which be hopes to finish 
within five years. 

This time he is using a word 


processor. “Everything always 
takes longer than one expects. 
The way I write is to force out a 
first draft so I have something to 
improve. I typed ‘Dawn to the 
West.' but, although I'm very un- 
mechanical. with the word pro- 
cessor there's tbe possibility of 
making constant changes." 

“I suppose J could be called a 
literary critic." he said, “bni it 
tends to associate one with liter- 
ary fashions. I’m trying to do 
something that people were doing 
50 years ago. but it's new because 
I’m applying it to a new field. Tm 
laying the groundwork and show- 
ing the scope of Japanese litera- 
ture and its special qualities. I’m 
trying to make the whole land- 
scape visible. 

“ ‘Dawn to the West’ is my fa- 
vorite book." he added. “Every- 
one likes to think he’s getting bet- 
ter all the time. It’s expressed 
about as well as I can express 
anything." 

Before Keene began dedicating 
himself to works such as “The 
Japanese Discovery of Europe," 
“Landscapes and Portraits,” 
“Some Japanese Portraits" and 
the short, popular “Japanese Lit- 
erature: An Introduction for 
Western Readers,” be translated 
such writers as the novelists Yu- 
kio Mishima. Osamu Dazai and 
Kobo Abe, the playwright Chika- 
matsu and the 14th-century es- 
sayist K enko, a Buddhist priest 
Kenko's “Essays in Idleness,” a 
charming collection of short 
pieces, is Keene's favorite among 
his translations. 

“1 could almost identify with 
die 14th-century author," he said. 
“Kenko inspired me. almost tell- 
ing me what words to choose. 
Twice 1 had the experience in 
translating as if I were (he au- 
thor.” 

Keene has received several 
awards for Ms work from the Jap- 
anese, including the Third Class 
Order of the Rising Sun, Osaka 
prefecture's Yamagata Banto 
prize and an award from the Ja- 
pan Foundation of Tokyo. But 
perhaps a more lasting recogni- 
tion of his work is its translation 
into Japanese. Parts of “Dawn to 
the West" were published by 
Chuo Koron Co. last spring. 

“Bong a Japanese scholar has 
become more acceptable than it 
was 20 years ago, Keene said, 
“probably because of the rise of 
Japan as an economic power." 


PEOPLE 


Judge Gits $10GjQQ0 
From Redgrave Award 


U. S. District Court Jodge Rob- 
at Keeton ruled that the actress 
Vanessa Redgrave is Only entitled 
to $27,500 in her lawsuit against 
the Boston Symphony Orchestra, 
which fired her as narrator of a 
1982 performance of Igor Stravin- 
sky's “Oedipus Rex," ditmnat&g 
an additional $100,000 in damages 
awarded her by a jury in Noycm-- 
ber. Redgrave originally had 
sought dearly $12 million. Keeton 
agreed with the jury’s .derision re- - 
jeering Redgrave's claim that the 
orchestra had blacklisted her . be- 
cause of her support for the Pales- 
tine Liberation Organization, vio- 
lating her civil rights. 



□ 


Margaret Heckler, 5J, U.S. 
health and human services secre- 
tary, and her estranged husband, 
John, 57, reached an out-of-court 
no-fault divorce settlement, ending 
a month-long trial in Dedham, 
Massachusetts, and a 32-year mar- 
riage. The divorce decree becomes 
final in ning months. Details of (he 
40-page agreement were withheld. 
The Hecklers have three grown 
children. - 7 

□ 







Actor James Stewart, 76, wi» 
won an Academy Award for-lThc 
Philadelphia Story" in 1940 and 
was nominated four other times, 
will receive a special Oscar fbr-fafe 
50-year career that has included 
more than 70 films. The award vriQ. 
be presented March 25 at the 57lh 
annual Academy Awards in Los 
Angeles. . . . Actress-singer 

Cher, who's known for her etude 
clothes, found herself upstged by 
dozens of male students parading 
in drag as she accepted the ‘Wom- 
an of the Year" award from Har- 


rs^ 




.-h-r-3 


vard University's Hasty Pudding 
Theatricals Gub Wednatday,- - 


□ 

Princess Diana and President 
Ronald Reagan have taken tap hon- 
ors on the 1984-85 International 
Best Dressed List, along with actor 
Tom Sefleck, novelist Tom Wofe 
and five rock stars. The best 
dressed list by a committee of fash- 
ion editors and style experts led by 
fashion guru Eleanor Lambert also 
included rockers Michael Jadboa, 
Grace Jones, Madonna, Princfrand 
Tina Turner, British actor Jeremy 
Irons, ABC News aocborroaiLpeter 
Jennings and retired boxer Sags' 
Ray Leonard. 


Lcd'k i v.in i-Titin 
biO-tro. JcTt'rtty, j 


U,S. Hep 

n 


t jQ. 5 




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DS5730tX)0. Net vtaome U%. TeL p] 
5110514 Th 61344 B atm Dyking S 
Goforie de ta Heine. 28, 1000 Brussels, 
Belgium 

CANADA 

FOR SALE - EXaUSXT 400 ocre 
form, fixities caws & P^- Invest- 
ment or work. Gsnoda 80 ttnles north 
of Ottawa. Wiftam Breen. Rural 
Route 4, Cobden. Ontarta. 

CORSICA 

CORSICA 29 KM D’AiACOO, on 
arrfront BeauftfaBy fitoisW vna, ri 
cotriorts, 3000 m. of land with pom 
trees, lemon tree & many flowers, 
rSrccl access to sea through the gar- 
den. Price: FI .200.000. Yel pW) 
424 56 68. Mme Guyomord7 Sorts 
du Pone Noisy sur tide, 77123 U 
Vondoue Frdnca. 

FRENCH PROVINCES 

COTE D’AZUR 

MOUGM5 VILLAGE 
Lovely 6t«e house, a real fetau, 2 recep- 
bon rooms, 2 bedrooms. 2 bathrooms. 
Beoutfutfy tkcoraiocL Snfflfi gatfea 

Euwderfview. Rtf 160. 

Apply: JOHN TAYLOR SA 
55LoCranette 
06400 Games 

Fri (93) 38 00 66. n« 4709ZI. 

KBB 

CAP FBUtAT 

Magnificent vSa, Sfiwrefian era style, 
rxmorOTlic vfew: 12 rooms, 4 botfo with 
extension poritAy. 7800 sqm. park, 
term. Caretaker's house. nWm 
AGS4CE BOVtS 

fij». 63 - 06310 BEAUUEU SUR MR 
P3) 01JXL36 

■ CAP FE8RAT 

Very beautiful apartmant, high dm, 
panor cniic view. 200 sqm. kviog space, 
60 sqm. tenaaej tosndanos, 

ft?. 63 - 06310 BEAUUEU SUR MR 
(93) 01.00.36 

Hi 

cenhot healing. Fl^OO^IOO. Phone- 
office hours: (9^ 60 SO 84 except 
Wednmday. 


BURGUNDY, FRANCE. 1 hour Flora 
by TGV. R o mantic 1 Bih Century Farm- 
house, faBy restored, ch utmin g court, 
yard, endased by stone *4 sepa- 
rate guest house: 4 fireplaces, modern 
central heotma sofcf ook s v ocdw ui , 
cathedra* ewkngi. F650J00. Phorta 
owner days: New YorCpi^ 975 
4954, Paris 256 34 92. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


26 KM MONACO 


l&reora home. 550 sqjn. 

6 brtta, new, entirely «W*d. 25 ha. 




50 cubic meter/hour. . 

TeL Mr. Rngon Paris 23372 30. 


191H CENTURY MANOR HOUSE 
450 K^n. Swing sace, (16 roams), 
cellars, attics & ourtJuWngs, Fi*l cen- 
tred heating in a magnificent endased 
ark, spring 6 stone 
hectares. 13 Imt from 
Airport (Eat at Lynn) on the 
M3. Write ta Oxrtas Oiuroqu, 54 
owe Fefct faure, 69003 Lyon, 


ST. 1ROKZ. 8 ROOM VUA. 4 bed 
roams. 2 bathroo m^ Saor g orgge 
with 3-room staff apartment. Out- 
standing locrfion. minutes from town 
& sea. Superb vi ews, 6 000 sail land- 
scaped gardens. $300,000. Coft. Lon- 
don 01 -5B8 7595 weekdays or 01-584 
8989 weekends. 


LOT: OM9B SSiS attnxtae Ifth 
century house with l o wer in S.W. 
Fnnce. I n r n e taile occupancy, fully 
modernized, 2 fireplaces, targe hving. 
5 bedrooms. 4 b atfroom.dockraom, 
ek. 2 ha fields & woods, mognficeri 


w. FUOOJMQ. Guermoal, Gexx 
. 46300 (jourdtyi. Tetj651 31 11 


Very tagh 

dass 1 62 sr^ra. apartment + cflsqjti. 
terrace, mod's room, 2-car garage, in 
beautiful pari^ sea & reountan mews. 
Magnificent iwencr decoration, well 
prniecSed w4h andan F4 .500,000, 
negotiable- 193)3151 17. 


URGENT. Because of F nonod derails 


seta near Pont du Gard, superb vfllo 
325 s qm, ot (found level, r* 


, . .nice pork of 

5700 sqjit. Swimming poo LVrfue : 
FldOODOQ. Sacrifice <0 F"l ,200,000. 
TeCofficehours [73)9242 04/ Home: 
73) 69 35 63 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


CANNES (Near). Builder sells [n ol 

property), ha»+bcr -restaurant, (2 
stars) 50 roans, 5 ninutos from ihe 
tea. fV&DJJOO. Tel 49 97 73 or write 
Doldosii P.O. Ban 4. 06210 La No- 
poute, France. 


YOUK COM ACT M P ROVBIO. 
Houses with character. Owning 
properties. EsWes. Emile GAXOH 
B> 15. 13532 ST-REMY-QtrtO- 
VSMCE Cedoc Tek (90) 92P1 J8 +. 


AUVERGNE Owner sells fewld cha- 
teau, to be restored. 90 sqm. Svmg 
space. At comforts, on 2500 s q.m 
land. F400j000. TeL (71) 76 B1 82 


GERMANY 


FRANKFURT — IANG84 For sde 
taurious Rat 98 «yn.. skycraper. 12th 
floor, 14 km to Frankfurt Certer, 10 


tins fo apart, 5 tanufes drive to forest 
+ h*e. DM 146JCB. Dr. Lamp edit. 


Prof. MtrtmJr. 16, 3205 Bodsenem 1, 
W. Germany. 


GREAT BRITAIN 


Ktfi Oam HWorkid Victoria! 




2 mm. Hcvrafe & Harvey 
hour top security 8> prxtsroge service 
+ fift. The newly decorated 1st floor 
Bar has 2 bedrooms with (jdtefw. mag- 
mficert r ec a ption with tage tidcony, 
spacious mwrered dining he*. AU rooms 


Idnmg hew. A 

Kove high ceiinqs wrth oeauSM cornice 
& decor work. Bathroom with jacuzd & 
Stoam cabinet, separate Quest wash 
room & hAy fmnd ifdrran. Has on pver- 
aB ertstic flair os 6 Currently owned by 
artist. About 125 sqjn. Lena 97 yecr 
Price reduced from £225 JX# to 


£199.000. Gslorgho^ available on re- 


quest. London 581 4500 anytime 


DEMiAM VILLAGE [Easy for M25 & 
Hectfhr ow). P en pd^ cottage, 3-4 
loams, kitchen & bathroom. For sale. 
Ideal as, UK piedotene - . Tel: Mrv 
Heah|CV53) 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


GREAT BRITAEN 


FACING OVB SLOANE SQUARE 

3300 s^ft. not kved «i, over £1 50.000 
speni m rerxjvanan, unable lor emer- 
tomment, large entrance hoA. fund 


20 x 20' tSrwiqroom cammuraaeinr 
eption 30 x 20j dottaooni. 4 


with reception . „ , , 

double, I angle bed, 5 ensuite both- 
rooms, complete new designer krtefien 
IB * 14'. Septrate loundry end utiity 
room. 90 yeces. E550LXJ0. Tel: »*ek- 
ends 580 4941~weekdoys 493 9941. 


BtACKHEATH, LOMX3N. Pidabd 
opartmetit in Victorian luted brddng 
on frrvote estate, drawing room, do- 
ing room, btchen, bathroom, dock .* 
i«l» room, 3 targe bedrooms large 
seduded garden, central London JO 
mnutes. tal year lease. £125,000. 
Mr. J B K WKams. 9 Pond Rd. Back- 
heath, London SI TeL- 01-853 2ol8 
jeverangs only] 


MARBLE ARCH/HYDE PARK. A very 
desirable modem townhause. newly 
utfenor decorated. 3 beta with beta 
en sum, modem Idtdwrw'tveddnst 
area, lounge, separote dnng room, 


studo room with prfa Orer 

Lease 60 years. £400, 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


GREAT BRIT AES 


LONDON PROratTY HNDBS. Fu« 

praFasjionol service lor real estate 
location. TeL 01-239 0740. Teles: 
8950117 


FOR SAIE/RBCT, MEWS house in 
tataooabte mea new Hanota no 
ogerta All engutaes to 01-493 7tBl. 


LUXEMBOURG 


GRAND DUCHY OF LUXEMBOURG. 
Uxge viUo tar sale m Tunlmge (20 
minute dmre to town), 6 rooms [5 with 
bathroonuL 3 bathrooms, sepmate 
shower + WC Living room with 
fireplace, large terrace, fitted kitchen. 


storage room. Large, ceDar Garage 


far 


cars. Garten 1500 sc^rn, Pnce 
4a. Suitofcfe 
(More ground 


LF8, 800.000 negetodnia. Suitable 
639128.0* 


.Tel: (352) 

posstale] 


MONACO 


‘et London (PI) 4 02 5666 


LOVH.'Y LONDON APAKTMB4T. Se- 

duded. quiet in tsneless Btadtheath 
near Greemnch Pork. 14 minute Iran 
to Gty. 3 beta o orK. 2 berths, study, 
utiity room. Mendion crosses 3? foot 


Irving roomi Fdhr equipped otas go 
. SI4 9/m. fetOi-318 7701 


JEBZJ 


LONDON KB49NGTON, COUNTRY 

house in Centrd London, 6/7 bed- 
rooms, 4 brtfis, 2/3 reception rooms, 
kitchen, btdnsl room, stotao room. 


urtly ioom,. rqoHegaaJ grg e g- 


den. Freehold £4«5iX)0. 
mm 6 Co. Tek 01-581 3661. 


LONDON KENSMGTON. 300 yards 
Pori, superb condrtion, freehold 3 
floored house, 4 bedrooms, (3 dou- 


ble), 2 bc4hs, (1 ensurteL 2 intercom 
‘ a D19.I 


ends 01 


.000 

4703 weekdays 499 9981 


International Business Message Center 


ATTENTION EXECUTIVE 


,wt* 


i a AM 


of a irriEen imaden wertd- 
•mta moat of w tan orm m 
bnwisem and krdastry, wS 
rood 2. Jn at takur at (Pori* 


6f3S9SJ befaw IOoa, mr- 


natwem Mr you 
grfywr wwa e wff 
nriftio 43hourt. 


The 

ULS. $9.90 or toed 

•q ui t id o n * per fine. You mat 
itdudt tt up tak and verffi- 
rfili fiiT^ r rlrirm. 


BUSINE SS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


FINCA NEAR 
M ARBELLA 


An avocado lA mtafi on as 
a retreat in SptRL BeaurifU locution, 
excell en t ocportumtws far any sports, 
such as go*, harsebad-ric&ig. so&ift 
etc. etc. fleoK ask far hronti a lion. 


HUSSt TRUST CO. INC 
F-Oiai 222, CH4027 Zoridi 


Teh 01/202 ?1 77 
lb 56431 HTAG CH 


CHBOKM5 

P ARTEN AIRE 

Inbjreai A investr 

dans une waM Suisse - txfrrite: sec 
tours mmobiSer, m qtloi ta lion de safes 
de ^«tades, resmrarts. 


{owe sous chtffie H 18-1 18467, 
Pufafidtos, CH-1211 Gertare 1 


SETTLING IN CANADA 


I n vrtm wJ and^rtaggon 


Contort- DART . 

1981 McGd Coleae 
Vantred H3A 2W9 - Ccrada 
Teh 1514) 281 19BI 
Tnsu 5561023 


BUStCSS ASSOCIATE, deeding in 
knpart/ Export, real estoto, firemang, 
PH rertawurfs, enwronmem taokmg 
tor further corrects. Kurt Kraegri, or 


tor further corrects. Kurt Kraagd, or. 
nokWWSrr ia 3000 Hombwg 20. 
Teh Germaiy (Q)4(M87275 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


MBEAUTtmaAKE TAHOE, Caftfbr- 

ma, French/ Continental restaurant 

far sale, located within 300 meters of 
l uk es h o ra on neatly 1 acre Icmd (aid 
established lestautam dose to numer- 
ous ski areas) indudes luxurious mar* 
□gar accommodations & cfea 2 bed- 
room oot ta gM & 1 studio. For further 
detods write to jonnetaof oriy a 
Aprrteent 1411, T177 ca&fomn 
Son Francisco, CA. 94106. USA. 


St. 


WANTED, WSTH8UTORS hr Kern- 
bak Suntan Ofl in Greece, Italy 
Fnmce& Span. It is a pure coconut aa 
perf um ed vrith flowers 8 mode in flefi, 
mdaneaa 


For further infontirtton 


contort 1*4 46fi 42389 JGil Tehsr 
739651 G Atm. Robert Indian. 


RDUOAXY BANKING on krge ai- 
kfetdaal loons. The only conw- 
ad bank with a representative office 
m London speddrang in this service, 
Arab Overseas Bant & Trust ( W.l. f 
lid, 28 Btodk Prince Sd- London 5EI. 
Tel 735 B171 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


Ml 

BEAUTBUL PEOPLE 

UMlM/TS INC. 
UJJL 8 WOUDWIIS 


com p l ehi scad & business service 
provkfing a unique collection of 
toientad, versc^^& muUngud 


indvidgois far: 


muMngud 


FasfeoriGomnmrcdAeA fV omctBt B 
Convenhoo-Trode Sham-Press Panes 
Spebd EvenMinage Mders-Pffj 
Sodcd HasfvHosieseefrfirtBritaiBrs 
Scad G eirponiruB-Tour gmdes, eto. 


212-765*7793 
212-765-7794 
330 W. 56th St., N.Y.C 10019 


Service Representrtives 
ed Weridwide. 


Pteded 


FR94CH HIGH FASHION MOOS. 
27, PR/ PA experience, Hstory of Art 
aaduafe, free ta towel, txlngud. 
Soaks far London based costings. Tek 
3 pm. 9 pm. 01-225 


HAVE OFFICE, TH. TSHX, Secretory, 
m Pars awating your ideas ft aapos- 
ah. Write Bax 1787, Hedd friuno, 
92521 Neufiy Cadet. France: 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


AMMATION HIM PRODUCTION. 

Unique opport u nity far private inves- 
tors to invest with wed tatobfah ed ft 
rapirfiy groueng tvghfy commefod 
prodwAun Wt OTtcorsderingrtxve 
participation in amounts not les than 
523.000 Reply to Marketing Consult 
Hdrfina SA Case Pastofe 65, CH- 
1211 draera 17. 


TAX HAV94 BASED BAMC, qociB - 
tomed to handing mtfiers in confi- 
dence mete term deposits wtich 
would bee* Merest of up to 14% per 
amum. European Overseas Bank 
jWI^Ud, RepreserftPive Office. Tel: 


735 8171. Telex 295555 L5PG 


20-22% ON PRIME COSTA IBCA 
land conRaffi (bettor than mort- 


gage^- YOU heM the land ei vaur 
' lencumbrOTceJ-Afeo, 


name, not |up an 
oermtones offered at below whale-, 
sale. Bar 279, Herald Tribune Pedro 
Teorar o B-60. 28020 Madrid. Span. 


Will PURCHASE NOTE awed 


OFFICE SERVICES 


EUROBUSM8S CBflB 
Bel a n di n n a eii etOTCe 
faranfa too 

99 Kenrsgradtf, TOTS CH Armenian 
TeL 31.2026 57 49 Telex 16183. 
WarU-Vfida Business Careers 


YOUR HAMXJRG OfflCE, telephone 


a ns w erin g, telex, meeting rooms, ex 
■ of office services, nigh 


cefciff 


COMMEX 


353065- 


36. 


1« 

_ . Hcrixxa 
E splana de 6> 2 0K> 
Tel: 040-353064 - 
Tj 21 65358 COX D. 


YOUR LONDON OfflCE 
rt the 

[EXECUTIVE CBflffi 


renge of ssvias 
cat, London Wl. 


150 Regent Street, .... 

Tet (01) 439 6288 1W 261426 


PARIS ADDBS, 

Snce 1957 liP. pmkies airi. 

neetma reams. 5 n» a Artois, 
Td:W 47 04. Itt 642S04. 


YOUR OFRCE N PARSt TEEX. 
ANSWWNG SHMCE tooetory. 
«TOTcb, mcrlbcx, Sve 24H/ijy. 
TeL PAt 609 WM. 


MONTI CARLO 
Prindpafity of Monaco 

Far sole m luxurious modem tesdence, 
oyeeable 2 rooms with taggxt. view on 
sea equipped kHefwi, bSa, W.C s, 

aUwTjSW n 600.000 

EXaiisVE AGB4CE WTHUAHXA 
B.P. 54 

MC 98001 MONACO CEOEX 
Td:^93) 50 66 84 


469477 


MOROCCO 


MOROCCO 

Tan^vi 

BeaufiM via on 3000 sqm 
‘aaiior mews. Lcrrcbcreied gar- 

Greal value rt S1B500TJ. Write. 

RAP. SP Plan Ave, Ne» Rodwk, 
NY iOBOl or phone |9!4] S76o0ll. 


PARIS & SUBURBS 


BELL 

GROUP B4TBKNATIONAL 
- LE LYS CHANTILLY 


25 mi nutes from Pons, JO from 


magnificent, forts, golf, onelevel 
«q.m. house, 6 berfroon*. 3 bafts, dirv. 
in^ double fivmg, terroce, 320 sqm. 

basement, pa-fc. termn. 


-CH9CV|BtE5 

20 mnutes from Pans, superb view on 
cti Pots. Very high a ass townhause, 
reaefXfont, tenders. 7 bedrooms, 
baths, cmdar l house, 2 ha. park. 
TH£X 472906 
TH. 727 34 65. 


BOi 


GROUP INTERNATIONAL 

• ETOUE. super view, 2 flats on sane 

Boar. 250 rqjn. each. 

• FOOL Superb stuefio, 55 sqm. 3rd 

Floor, hwh doss, am. free iw. 

• FOCR WcA detoj 50 sqm double 

living, 3 betfrooms. 2 brtfa, 

• H^S^SaRUN. Modern, hgh dess. 


612906 
TEL 727 84 65. 


50 AVEFOCH 




EMBASSY: 562 16 40 


OWNER SHIS EMPTY BUHDINGl 
B rccepbond focotion (dose Twferw] 


IlSOjqm., 6 floo rs^ su itable for a 


nixed use j 


. s craect [officei, ftors, hotel, 
etd. For farmer mfotmotion ptecw 
wrSe: Bov 1791. Herald. Tnbuno. 
92521 hbuBy Cedmr, Fnmce 


RUE DE LA MIX 
Owner sell 80 tqm flat, living, bed- 
room. rtix^itdien, 4th floor, a*ti. 


265 28 85 


1Sm-RE5CS4TlALAR£A, knirious 
111 sqm. flat, 24th tear, view an 
SM Tawer/Srine, 3 bedroom 
equipped ttchaiv parking. 579 32 7! 

from noon to 4 pm. ■ 


3RD MACAO, near Ptaoe d» Vows, 

pmoie owner sob uuiryl -room flat, 

fe sqjn- Fnapm. w «1 27 m for 
appomheent after 7 pm. 


pm. 


UJXEMBCXRG, {near Observasore) 


NEAR BUTTE MONTMARTE. 3 rooms 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


PORTUGAL 


PRIME PROPHme THROUGHOUT 

Portugal ae prasstas m Ae llrafed 
Kmgdom erdusively ihrouch George 
Knght - Oveisens. 155-157 Knigfus- 
brntae. London SW1. Tefophc^: 01- 


589 2133. Telex 25*0 


prone: I 

EQUESG 


VBY EXCLUSIVE VILLA on the mast, 
formerly a rcyd domar- L‘S5^tiXKJ. 
Write; C Von Evn^k. lepsreer 32. 
304 AT Meuweaem- Holland. 


SPAIN 


MHJTTBWANEAN COAST Property- 
West IBIZA Islond, 25 caes wnhm 
developed taunst t»ea, I at extends 
ham mountain oeak to shore, famous 
oaves bound each side of laid (Cda 
TtrtdoCda Me S) pme iurest'/vgm- 


non. water, eleoriaiy, tolepnone n 
highway. 20 


place. access to modern 
minutes from international arport. op- 


tion far currently 


sede dev-tepment. . 

owner. Write RraeSo. Bax 312, 5cm 
Afliano. bza or TeL (34.1) 474 5249. 


THNKMG ABOUT RETIRING in 

Spam 5 Splenddidea if you ree head- 
«ig tar Marbe#a ■ Costa del Sol! 
Contact us.- We buy. sel. rent, con- 
struct. villas and Apartments, beach- 
tide, in the mourtans and on the ijalf. 
We are rather sure to have gat what 
you are loobng for rmd rf nor well 
produce it for youl PROMOTUR 


Aportado 118. Mcrbelks. Spaa Tlx: 

77610 or ‘ 


People’ 


OTUR E The BBT Piaperty 


TH Off FROM YOUR FRONT . or 
kitchen doon ei Guadolmino Gdf 
Marbefla, we have for rent or sale, 
vile, incomparably mceflofs, town -ft 
penthouses with ocean view, n*e sir 
round ngs ft vnernahemd resdenfs 
cvoind, Imppily l'V«g the easy Gu» 
dakrorv>wav-or 41 e. Information: 

PSOMOTUS • Aprrtado 118 - Mar- 
beta • Span. Th. 77610 OTLR E.’1he 
BEST Prepery Peoyfe ". 


MALLORCA. Preserved area, bemXihi 
furtvshed house. 7 bedrooms. 3 baths. 
2<ar garage, boat garage. d>ea ac- 
cess to sea. targe terraces a*er the 
sea, 3 MOarate quertarv 5420500. 
Box 1757, Herdo Tnbune. 9221 
Nerxfa Cfdfcr,, France. 


MAR8B1A Puebla Properties speo- 

fcre in luxury ap art m ents , lownhouses 

and vrltos in and around Mcrbefla. 
From £25,000 Phone now or «vnw for 
free Ml cobr catalog to: Puetfo Prop- 
erties, Park West, frfartle Arcfa Lon- 
don. W2. Tel: 432 2113 


MINORCAN FARMHOUSE- Chain- 
ing, located m rural cammmty. 4 
nAon pesetas. Box 17^0. Herdd Tri- 
bune, 92521 NeuflyCedax. France 


SWITZERLAND 


G S T A A D 

VALLEY 


YOUR INVESTMENT M 
SWITZERLAND 


We ere selng very exduave & com- 
fortable homes with 2 to 5 krge roams. 


The complex of 3 diafets b fooatad 
dose to me heart c i the vikge with a 


bn 
die wide 


view aver the da slop* & 


A comprehe nsiv e range of services 'A 
la Cate', such os mtmtenonoe, serve 
mg, leasing & management is avafabis. 


For further information or 

contort: 


TiSi5frs?ir 


PLAZA C0N5HUCT10N5 
RUE DU SHONE 100 
CH-1204 GENEVA 
Tab (022) 21 60 44. Use 421121 


SWITZERLAND 

FAMOUS RESORT AREA 


DO YOU WISH - 
TO BUY AN APARTMENT 
OR A HOUSE? _ 

1 TO RETIRE IN SWITZERLAND? 
' TO INVEST IN 5WIFZHIAAO? 


CONTACT USi 25 YEARS OF EXPS5- 
6NCE IN BLADING AND SHiMG 
FINE SWISS REAL STATE 


SQCHM5A. 

P.O Bax 62, 

1884 VBn Switzerland 
The 456213 GESE CH 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


CHOOSE 

SWIIZBOAM) 


We have for hjr e yi iafc A very big 
berarifaT APART MOTTS/ 


choice of 

VB1AS / CHALETS in the whole 
region of Lake Genera, Montreux & al 
famous mountien resorts. Very reasan- 


abtv priced but tdso the bed and mod 
exclusive. Pi 


Pnce from about U5S40JOOO. 
at 6W%. PSecue vis n us o r 
ndfl a dfidoa tt. 
SA. 

Tour Gree 6, 0+1007 Lausrmne. 
Tel. 21 .'2526 11 Telex: 24298 SBO CH 


Mortgages at 6w%. TO 
phane Defioee you rmd 

H, SSOLD ! 


VALAIS / SWITZERLAND 

CRAMS MONTANA 


THYON, LES COLIONS 
ST. LUC, VAL D’ANNIViaS 


Rob and chcfets 25 to 150 sqJh.l to 5 
rooms. Credit 60%. Interest rate 675%. 
Duration 15 y ews. Owners kxAlers. 
Dned sale. 

VA1 PROMOTION SA 
10 Ave. du Mid, 0+1950 Sion. 
Tel: 41 27-23 34 95 


APARTMENTS - CHALETS 

Aw M fc for h xdwM fay 

Prices from ^SSM™Mortgages at 
6)6% trteresl. Write: 

GLOBE PLAN S-A. 

Av. MonRepos 24 
CH-1005 Lausorme, Switzerland 
Tel- (021)22 35 12 TK:25185MBL1S CH. 


Tl* SWISS SPECIALISTS complete 


SB5. 


4. Tefc 01-876 6555. Tht 927028 


USA GENERAL. 


E HAMPTON. S. HAMPTON, NY 
PRIME r 


PWU FMtnES 

OCEANFRONT AND PROXIMITY 
Side* - balds - tav et m en b 


LONA 

RUBENSTEIN 


82 PcrV PL. E Hampton. NY 11937 
(516) 324-8200 


SMALL HOR&PARMm genteel coun- 
try near Crsnden, South Carolina 
Home of in te rnal cord horse races. 
Modem 3 bedroom borne on 23 
acres, pond end creek, fcfcxd retreat. 
S125,000! OWT®? MARY FAYE 
CRAFT. Bar 296ft Sprmrfdd. VA 
22152. Phone 703-569-25Sr Spring- 
field. VA USA. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


USA GENERAL 


18,000 ACRES OF MINBtAl rites in 
Si Colorado, USA at USSS# per 
acre. Cash or term. WS seB afi cr 
any part Contort Bud Brixey, ft 3. 
Bov 78, Hooker, OK 73941 T«h 
405-652-2534 (Day or Evening) 


AKZONA-OMMB UOUBWWa 
Take over bcdance due an 80 acres 
beautiful randfend. Total price. US 
$20,300. US S300 down + S33Z03 
monthly. No cfeenshto requred Box 
4142 Saoltsdrfe. AZ ffi261 USA. 


WATBURCNT PROFStTY. 3Maer« 
655 ft. on the water m ewtaM iNtae-, 

SSetALT? 

LdreAve. St. James, NY 11780. U 


YOUR BEST ADDRESS in USA. Notetv 


widn. Please Contact: Rerma* lid, 
Laura BeaS, 2429 North Harrison St. 


Arfngtar, Vn 22207. (703) 522 1940. 


USA RESIDENTIAL 


N.Y.C. CO-OP 
5TH AVB^UE LOW 70S 


SENSATIONAL.. 

NEW DUPLEX IN OLD BUILDING 40 


foot Wing room. 2 beefroons r«l k- 
farary, 3 redhs with soma wforipoai. 


Park vfowofiom every raotn. M a n te- 


per month — For defc* 

Walter G. Surovy 212-832-5528 
Douglas 06 man Gibbon ft hres 


RELOCATING NYC B4VBtONS 


Our Rdocalion Drector. Mrs. 
will be in ZermaH, Switzerittad a) 
Tonne from February 15 to 22 Con tort 
her for infarmofonal pockets at (0281 
67 16 01. Or wnie 

WILD & ASSOCIATES 
400 Dortoury fid. WBtan. CT 06897 


EASTERN OKLAHOMA. BeautifiH En- 
gfoh Tudor home, 4.600 squrn feet, 
seduded in neddfe of 240 acres, lots 
of tenber with deer ft quaiL 100 acres 
dened ft unproved, idea for hone 


or cattle ranch. Al amentias, good 
tradeft 


roods ft schools. Gty rote 
cirport less ihon X mmuies. Teh Scot- 
land. Aberdeen (0234) 647968 for pc 
wras & detais 


OCEANFRONT ESTATE 
SANTA BARBARA, CALIFORNIA 
4 2 acres, 450 ft. beach fr on tage, pro 
forest, unusud circular man house. 2 


bedroom guest c ottage, dtff hanging 
ice. £2.9 n«Ih'.n. Conrad vow 
brater or cal I8Q5) 683-1556. 682-4542. 


beach horse, 
btakerarc 
682-284 5 l 


WATBEHtONTPROPStTY. Near Wl 
Iramsbura VA: 20 acres [or 5 acres 
up) on James River. Spectacular home 
see, eoceBent irnmstmert. SISSjOOOL 
DefarvOe. VA: Near home for relire- 
mere across from water. Exeefem 
boatmg, fisHna 549,500. C- Dover 
^sfce. Redtor. Box 620 W3fiamdmr& 
VA231B5IRW 253-1816. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


•.Tn 


USA RESIDENTIAL - 


COLORADO MOUNTAINS GMfe 


mai l ranch. 17 acres. Lawnoas 4 
bedroom, hanckrotied Eurapom 
moOTtari lodge. Hone bam. Trees 
views, sedusan, water. Near worn 
famous Aspen and Von resorts.*: 
saooroo. Write Ownor, ftxrtrro 
RonS, Bon 2042. Avon, CO 8 1625 
U&A or fbore France Pfl 056098- 


li. 


I Ull- 
. v ■ , 

■ft 


EASTS DE PENTHOUSE CONDO- 
- ft to 
Ufflsqni 
sauna, un- 
floor; N»efy 


River views, r . . 
Wdk-up indoor 


decks, rack bar. 
jeted luxury 


constructed 
2 Tudor 
York, N.Y. 


i- 


ESi. • ; 


tod luxury buiUna Ms. Saba 1 - _ 
rQrfl Surte 4CS(vNra !-- 
I.Y. 10017. Tek 212-687-3711 J }.■ 




GRfflWKH, CONPffiCnaff 
2 or 4 acre wooded h omes rt s 


Private, country stftmg 
Presh^ous area, converter* ta 


NYC 


Prmapals contort owner 201 3652322 
» 11307 


«A. * ’ l;., 

F" “* 

tic: h. • 


Box 11307 Greenwich. CT M83P IC4 


BRONXVILLE, NY __ 
sq. rale. 28 mev. Ram NYC 
sdrool K-12. Gradaus homes 
apartments. WritE for bradwra. Offia 
Real Biota. 120 Kraft Ave. Brarevfe, 
NY 10708. (914) 337-0900. 

retacabon rpedokBt. 


-- 




We or Si \;,-- 


ARIZONA COUNTRY ODB H0<M 

on qcdf cotn^ 2 mater safes + m 
bedroom, 12m Swna kmtjsdag. 
12m (40Wj»ol on IfflOsqm. BegX. 
private 5179000 Phoerw. Anpta 
U-. (41 3Sj IN 15 S Fardi H«*ta 
Hosta.lB54LeyBn.SuBM>. 




F-UT 1 i 
OR.-.; hi • • 

VrL- 

1h_ 

Jv:'-.: 

- 

*: 'he 

* 4 ;:- 

t io nwtae connectiom. Gcb TWp 1 - l^( 

9aiicV 


59TH ST. ft PARK AVE Uwta»nw 
27,000 sq.fr axtdommun, 3df 

K e view, 29th floor. Sira mem- 
ory. 2 bedrooms wjfi nwr Sr both 
room, formed ertry. S2JXXUJ00. M. 
Laghcm on 212-682 4567 USA _ 


— UOi 

: _r. 


DAR0i COM^nOJT.Exeam*; 

forrart + jdalVaart 


REAL ESTATE. Teh 203 6557724, 


POT LANDMARK 1WM«DS^ -*»- . 

60s. Nwb renowted Si ■** - - 

each. 212-/ 564538. ^U^r- : ]' t : 

— '' - 

REAL ESTATE 

TO RENT/SHARE _ iiak? m '. t lC -. 


w: 


CORSICA 




CORSICA -3 bedrooms, 7 WM** ^"War.C 
mfctA^Sa^SdO/cfajsWGm"- Pn >}, e ,, . 

— Z__ - — 



PAGE 15 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 





HOLIDAYS and TRAVEL 


LOW COST FUGHTS 


USA 


Frem 

London 


EAST COAST ROM 
MID WEST FROM 
WEST COAST ROM 
SOUTH EAST ROM 


£119 
£160 
£212 
£195 

Anywhere to anywhere 
in USA On BRANtffi £95 

NATC London 734 8100 


NEW YORK 

FI 990 ONEWAY 


+ Amsterdan ta NYC, Qvano. LA 
M5TOLR - Tek 260 40 23 [Pi 




NY ONE WAY V 5a 
West Coast SI 


N.Y.. 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


ROUffi) THE WORLD 


FROM £769 

Autfiafia return from £499, New ZM- 
bnd return from K79. Detods from 
DepT BfT. TrgB-Ccntwentei Travel Crt. 
62 Trafalgar Square, Larslgn WC2, IX 
Tel- 01-ra0 4751 (24 hours) 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


BOAT EXCHANGE - Owners vmh to 
exch an ge 86 ft. Burger-rant contfi- 
lion, aew of 3. daeps 6 in owners 
quarters-far comparable boat m Ihe 
Me dit er r anean Jvne-jvfyAug. AvoJ- 
tw Corfobeai. Bahamas or East 
Coast USA. Flexible. BtT. Bar 394 
Club, Key largo, FI 


SAA TURKEY OR GREECE with miy of 
Yachtaura fleet af 51 motor & senng 


boats breed Badrun - from an amaz- 
S® fiS vsn for two weeks. 

0l-22TlSB or telex 268991 for 
braenre. Tachtaurs. 309 Brcenpton 
W, Kmgtebridpe, London 5W3. UK. 
Twkey ingest fleet of brreboah far 
fere or floftlosribiB 


OURTBt A YACHT IN GREECE. Di- 
rect from owner of Imgort fleet. 
An mum manoDB nre i l . Excefent 
crews, govt, bonded. Vcfef Yodus 
Afar Tfe rta ftjk fe o ta 22C Piraeus, 
Greece. Tet 4529571. 4529486. The 
21-2000. USA office?- fir Rood. Am- 
■ Mar, PA 19QQZTet 215 641 1624. 


HUNT SPAIN! 

CAZATUR 
CONTACT: MR. CARBON 
Ta 2759699 TiX 27802 (MeM) 


for more HODAY AIXAVEL ADS 
PLEASE TURN TO 
PAGE 8W 

IN IHE WEEKEND SECTION 


tBLAS YACHnNG. Yurt* Charters. 
Academes 28, Athens 10671. Grew. 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


-?ish 

He Tall 


BROOME PARK GOtf . 

Orb Gaiterfaure 2 weeta \woJK 
sde/rent. Tel: K48 5617fflpgJ& 


HOTELS 


— \\ 


FRANCE _ . 

PAHS - Plaza Mirdzeaa *' ' 

AvfL E. Zola, 1-2-3 wre f» bm 


-lii Ov, 


latchen, (ndgft. Tek 577 72®- 


B*N PtAZA 

Kerangfort best., 

and pleasure. Al roo» 
er / IV / teMone it* 
dryer, etc. Eestnurant/ b» 



GREAT BRITAIN ^ 




.WBS 


g£sW: 


TriPl -37116111 

DHSCOIL HCUSB. 2t» <*“* 

£55 per amtk nreftd boat 




Mr. 


172 New Kent .. 
TriOl 7034175. 


pi. 

. O'. -- 11“®* 



NEW YOfKCSY 

HCflB. GRAND 

34 E 32 St. Between »*■*» 

btg ftfiafor W. Aaeepr NCJV . 


! (,- ha- u e fur 

" u ' , ^ r stai 

3rr-u'. , 'P ro ' na Wv 


the s-^ ^ BU< 
In a tP^based 

iL ‘ h is- A a.c,. su > on ffii-jj 




Imprime par Offprint, 73 rue de FEvanple. 75018 Paris. 




-V-* -