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The Global Newspaper 

Edited in Paris ■ 
Printed SmnhaneouslT . 


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INTERNATIWAL 


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ON PAGE U 


Published With The 


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FEBRUARY 16 - 17 , 190 $ 




Challenger Disputes Decision 


By Serge Schmertann 

Van York Tima Stance 

MOSCOW — The president of 
the World Chess Federation 
abruptly halted the m&rathon 
championship dud between Ana- 
toli Karpov and .Gary Kanatov on 
Friday, despite protestations by. 
both that they wanted to continue. 

At a stoany news conference dis- 
rupted by the surprise entry of the 
reigning champion, Mr. Karpov, 

. heated accusations from Mr. Ka- 
sparov and a 90-minute backroom 
conference, Fforeado Campo- 
manes of the FhHippanes, the feder- 
ation's president, the fivo- 

montb match and ordered a new 
erne for September. That match will 
start at 0-0. 

Mr. Csmpomanes said his ded- 
son was prompted by the fact that 
the match, winch after five months 
and 48 games had broken existing 
records for the ancient game, “has 
exhausted, the physical if not the 


into jeering laughter was of propriety, compared to 

bah came as the 21-ycar-old craft controversies and disputes that 
leaner had won two straight games : >had become a mainstay of chanmi- 
and reports were rife that Mr. Kfff- ;-=gwhip matches since Bobby FI- 
pov, 33, was suffering £n»i ^Japhor of the United States squared 

non. ' ^against Boris Spassky in Iceland 

“Fm-not «kty g n> buhwim hfcY.'^r ^^72. 
cause I thhylc rd win easily* or be- Vet . the jtnnriouds had been 
cause the world champion is ill," gathering for some tune. 

Mir. Kasparov said. -. At the beginning of the match 

“He can play, everybody cam see Mr. Kasparov, a brash young chess 
this.. It's simply rhat for the ^prodigy ircmi Arerba^an, had faH- 
time in five mnmh fl j have some ® f® 5- behind the comer, more ex- 
chance. And now they're trying to pcrwaced champion. ■ 
tflVf: this away from me with end- . Mr. Karpov won four of the Gist 
less delays." nine games, and another in late 

He adrift: "The matc h November to take a 5-0 lead, one 

continue." point from victory. 

In the tumult that fallowed, Mr. Under the rules adopted for this . 


less delays." 

He "The matc h most 

continue." 

In the tumult that followed, Mr. 


Camnnnumwt raliwi for a private ®®tch, no limit was placed on 

* ... . . ... _ ... mmH ik. U 


the participants but all those con- 
nected- with the match." 

What provoked Mr. Kasparov’s 
finy ana the incredulity -ra many 
chess experts who sometimes broke 


meeting with the players. Later he 
emerged to announce: 

“The world champion accepts 
the decision of the president and 
the challenger abides by the deci- 
sion of the president." 

He said details of the September 
match woold be set by a federation 
congress in August, but later be 
said it would be a 24-game match. 

The expletive finale conchided a 
match that up to ihen had seemed a 


games and the winner would be the 
first to win six. Mr. Karpov seemed 
on the verge of a stunning shutout. 
Then, in December, Mr. Ka- 


30, another. After the endless 
draws the match took on new inter- 
est and a new shape. 

It was then that o rganizer s decid- 
ed to transfer the match from the 
prestigious Hall of Columns in cen- 
(Goutfaiiied on Page 2, GoL 1) 



tha Anodatod ftm* 

Gary Kasparov at the news conference Friday in Moscow 
at which die cancellation of the world chess championship 
was announced. Hie decision, angered Mr. . Kasparov. 


I - -v Lucille Levin arrivi 
hmh&mL Jeremy, 


Botha Treading a Fine Line in an Effort to Ease Apartheid 


Tha Asockried Proa 

m Frankfort on Friday to meet her 
ter be -escaped from Ids captors. 


By Alan Orwell Since the mid- to late-197Qs,Mr. 

Nor York Times Serna Botha’s supporters say, the hard- 
JOHANNESBURG —.By the 
standards of his white foidbears, 

President PirterW. Botha of Sooth 
^ica recently came dose to her- 

Ik * nuraa muUnkaUe to 

apartheid’s nripti«l thmmtidang, BlalMn *■* pemmg more rapidly 

he has reversed policy by acknowi- ■ ■ ■ ^ ' — 

edging the permanence of black NEWS ANALYSIS 

people in “write” South Africa. — 

BoorePariiameutlast month,he th^ n that of its ruling white minor- 
spoke of unprecedented, and as yet ity.all seemed to dictatesome form 
undefined, poli tical and land rights of appeasement, 
for some uiban black people in Moreover, as liberal gcadimics 


- - 
- 


U.S. Reporter Describes 
His Escape in Lebanon 


• ' - ' , _ 

TSe Associated Pros cr people there. “My coDclntian Before Parliament last month 

— ■ k'r Ip.ct. DAMASCUS — Jeremy Levin, was they were probably Amen- spoke of unprecedented, and as 

v an Ammcanreporter who was can,”he said, but addedil was “just undefined, . poli tical and land rig 

-.«■ Jjjidd hostage in Lebanon, left Da- a guess."] 

- Hrmascus an' Friday after.descrilxng - • poor other Americans have dis- 
he feaapeti fmm 1 1 month* in appeared at were kidnapped in the 
_ ^j^shains and sofitatyomfinemratty MMlan sector of Beumm the past 


l^itiaring what has already hap- ties. So the question arises: Who Last Friday, the authorities an- 
ptiud." wiD Mr. Botha talk to and on what nounced plans tqjoosen the regula- 


For the Afrikaners, the 2.8 mil, terms. 


change. lion-member group that has gov- Mr. Botha also faces a tactical business areas designated as white. 
976. the emed this country since 1948, the problem. To avoid a white hack- ^I?t)posals,notyetlaw,madeit 
pronouncements represented more lash, Afrikaner academics say. he uchmcally easier for nonwhites to 
than thecosmetic changes that they cannot be too precise about what, trade in 44 existing “free trade ar- 

UIW tf m Wu k1»4- . 1 !„■ . , . 1 ■ , HI " Rllf KV. v ' tk. I WIH 


tions governing nanwhite access to 


“free trade ar- 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


gliding downaropeof Wankets. year-They are WnUamBuckley r a 

v -■ He flew from Damascus to U^ Bnbas^ptrfiiical tificer; the 
^ jFrankfiirt where hu wife was wait- Reverend Bagariun Weora Pre^ 
^ ;ting to greet him. ... ■ byterianimnister;' Peter KB^^ 

-■"» “I can’t wait to be batik an Amer- • Hbrarian at ihJtAmerican Umvecsi- 


rnidcfined, pnK tiral and land rights of appeasement, 
for some uiban black people in Moreover, as liberal ge»Hi»mies 
South Africa, Those people, by such as Herman Gdiomee, an Afri- 
aparthdd’s initial blueprint, were kaner, We. argued, economic 
destined to become nonpexsons in growth; began to be seen as the 
“whi^ land^iueM for labor but solution for South Africa’s corn- 
relegated othowise-to tribal home- ploc racial woes. That inndied a 
lands. stable Mack labor elite in “white” 


were dismissed as by black activ- n) rim»f^ y tv-hocin n^ for hi^ir eas.” But, like many of the recent 
ists. people. But unless he sets out a suggestions of change, there woe 

“What it is about, ultimately, is dear agenda for change, many ccmditioiis and hedges, 

the survival of the Afrikaners,” said Wade leaders xvfll not trust his mp- ~ . _ ■ rlfnr thnt 

an Afrikaans journalist who is re- tives and will shy from new discus- 

garded a HbenL skms. his planned changes <to not aHe« 

. Mr. Botha's supporters say that The ambivalence about what is 
he has learned from last year’s elec- billed in Sooth Africa as ref mm has 

tions for Indians and people of been apparent over the last week, fj* ^ 

■' '■ ~ -Unties said last week that thenohonof edmiotv" hv whrnh 


such as Herman Giliomee, anAfri- .mixed racial heritage, referred to The authorities said last week that 
kaner, have argued, economic here as coloreds. Those elections a committee would be fanned to 


such keystones of apartheid as the 
homelands to which black people 
are consigned according to tribe, 
the notion of “etimitit/* by winch 
the whites have sought taditional- 


— i •• leant wan to ceoac* on /uner- 
: *--_jcan spO,” hes^atancrooririiial 
- r-i ^ws ounfeiaaoc, . ~ ■ 

j^anstaetted 1 owio Ambassai, 
W&tE^an trf da United ■ 
T , jStatat;|| tialPOTQigb Ministry by. 
^ ^‘Forei^n Minister Farouk- al- 

r^---- Rhar»a 

The television correspondent for 


Reverend Bergamot Warra Pres- lands. stable Wack Zahar dite in white” 

byterianimnister, Peter KiH>um,a Mr. Botha even offered a highly ■ South Africa whose new-found 
librarian at the Americm Umveoi- conditional itiease to Ndson Man- wealth would draw it into aoqmes- 
U ofBcirut; and '.the Reverend dels, leader of the outlawed Afri- cence> Mr. Botha’s battle try to the 
£a»4WicrTei^D, a Rjanantathdic can National <ini^e?s. Mr. B< 4 ha . whiter became “ad^jl ar.ttit” ■ 
pdwt'-=--- " .v ;■ -- Mari dd a . Whoiras hMartiia . reaEty" aoTAfifltfaiy.cenK- 

' ■ Mr. LevSnlo^red tiiaken vriten jgfor gwitwd ^ ecad^, cdtfd go mcataiorsaid, “behasbeen caidi- 
heamved at the Foreign Mimstry ^ ^1? wrtjHnd.atao* 

and aroeared not to know exactly Mr. Manddarqected the offer., edging .them. We seem to be 
where he was. ’ . 


wm mated by maffi abs tealjons. re p^l hetow tto 

Mr. Bothas supporters say he proWbit sex between Wades and »*&*&*** 

wishes to considt with black leaders whites. Some people thought that cancanan. 

an a “constitutional fonrmk” rath- signaled a change. But, it was not- When black activists talk of 


on a “constitutional fonrmla” rath- signaled a change. But, it was not- When black activists talk of 

cr than present an immutable blue- ed, a similar committee had been change, they mean the end of such 
print .. formed before and did not produce indig nities Whm Afrikaner s who 

.'-Yetstkh-&^ recommendations. For ccmserva- are considered liberals talk of 

tffity.haween the government and tivewfci^t^ dumgp, Iwjwever^-.they speak, m 


edging them. We seem to be 


' ~ The television conespondent for He was dressed in gray^ trousers, 
Table Ne ws j^ ctwork, who disap- ^ tdoe sweatshirt and bnght white 
^peared Matin. 7 in Borut, said at tennis, sboti^ which one of his eS- 
.: -the Foreign Ministry that be es- ooits said were purchased in the 
. __ .aqped his haidaatified captors by ‘ east Lebanese town of Chtaura on 
.--^tymg three Wankets .together, so- Thursday because he arrived at the 
■ - curing them to a balcony, s lidin g Syrian Anty position barefooted 


U.S. 


^Tdown firoma second fiocu window r aodiu 
*^fand fleting down a mountain to a ' He t 


By John M. Goshko 

Washington Pa K Semite 


facilities for the UJS. 6th Fleet, and 
two air bases, which are osed for 


amas. . WASHINGTON — The Penta- and recouimissanee 

not show any signs of gon, concerned by critidsm from ndss»»? ^ Middle East and 


^■ Syrian Arnw camp in eastern Lcba- physical torture, but Foreign. Min- prime Minister Andreas Pat 
“ j.' non whoe Syrian soldiers took him istryofficialsardexed reporters out dreoo, is mulnpg contingency p 

- "in- - of the room before they could ask to remove UJSLmDitmybj^from sources > 106 state LKpanment oe- 

He said he timid not identify his him how he had been treated.' Greece in 1988. Administ ration Kcwesfr would bewisa to keep any 
i£>-captors nor did he know why he After the news conference, Mr. sources say that the Defense and plannmg an the bases’ future on 
;5-' was kidnapped. The extremist .Levin was taken to the ambassa- state departments disagree about ^bat a source called “a low-lcvd, 
■-. group Itiannc Jihad claimed re- dot's residence. An embassy offi- how far to push UA disputes with k»&range and quiet contmgwcy 
' sponsibihty fQT the abduction. aal said Mr. Levin was examined Mr. Papandrcou. basis.” 

Lii “I've been in sohtaiy confine- by a nurse and found to be in The sources said Thursday that % contrast, the sources said, De- 


the Soviet bloc 


-- 


According to the administration Wembowxdidissucawaininfrbe 
sources, the State Dquotment be- probably would say ihat tbe ad- 


frightening prospect of “grvs ar- structures. that wiB,Q(rihMabalaiice 
ties Anyst automatically lose fhrir eas” in South Africa’s mwKXkro- Wack numbers to preserve white 
credibility in their own constituea- matic heritage. identity and power. 

an to Move Greek Bases U.S. Cautious 

people, among them 57 Amermans, edly that he regards the agreement OnPIXfPact 

at a bar near the US. Air Force as a timetable for dosing the bases 

installations at HeUemkon, south in 1988.1ni tally, VS. tiEfidals ||/'xL 
of Athens. tended to discount such statements rr lul JO/llUfl 

The sources said that if Mr. as intend ed for domestic Grade 
Weinberger did issue a warning, be consumption. By Bernard G w ertzman 

probably would say that the ad- More recently, however, the ad- New York Tima Semin 

mirristratipn must reconsider mixristraticm has become disnmyed WASHINGTON — Senior Rea- 


tended to discount such statements 
as intended for domestic Greek 


Mr. Papmidrcou. ^ 

The sources said Thursday that By contrast, the sources said, De- 

thece was general agreement within ® BOSe Secretary Caspar W. Wein- 

.i i ■ -TT ■ , hmior and PmliDnn nlannm an. 


: ’ -sponsibflity fQr the abduction.- aal said Mr. Levin was examined Mr. Papandrcou. baas.” 

-Vi “I’ve beax in sohtaiy confine- by a muse and found to be in The sources said Thursday that By contrast, the sources said, De- 
^inent far the -whole time chained to “good condition.” there was general agreement within fease Secretary Caspar W. Wdn- 

-_.tiw wall or a radiator” he said, •_ • . the admiimtration that it would be berger and Pentagon planners ap- 

- '.“The faces of the Syrian soldiers ■ UJS. ThasiS Syria prudent to be prepared to pull out P* 31 10 favor a high-level public 

V -were the firiaTTawT saw since The U.Si aovenunait Friday of Greece if Mr. Papandrcou won a statement of U^detenmnanon to 
jf^Mardi 7. of last year” . thanked the .Syrian government for new four-year term tins year- and reasess the relationship if the Par 

-j& - [Asked if anyone else was .de- its xxjle in helping Mr. Levin, Rea- adhered to his stance that the four ^udremi gpvanmentctmtmnes to 
■= .‘lamed with him, Reuters reported ters reported from Washington. UJS. bases in Greece were to be be .hostile. 

.i/thal he said: “I believe that there “We are very appreciative of the dosed in 1988. Elections are sched- Specifically, the sources said, 
:>-wia£fom other people in the apart- Syrian government's rok in Ibis tried for October. Pentagon officials are debating 

joment where I ^was. My room, where matter,” said Edward Djcrejiao, a If the bases are dosed, the Unit- whether Mr. Wemberger should do 
. 'I. was kept, was next to the bath- State Department spokesman. The ed States would have problems in that when he testifies Thursday be- 


the administration that it would be bager and Pen t a g on planners ap- 
prudent to be prepared to poll out pear to favor a high-levd pnbhc 
of Greece if Mr. Papandrcou won a statement of U.S. determination to 
new four-year torn tins vear and reassess .the relationship if the Pa- 


5. bases in Greece were to be be hostile. 

>sed in 1988. Elections are sched- Specifically, the sources said, 

ed for October. Pentagon officials are debating 

If the bases are dosed, the Unit- whether Mr. Wemberger should do 
States would have problems in that when he testifies Thursday be- 
a in t urning its strategic posture in fore the House Foreign Affairs 


probably would say that the ad- More recently, however, the ad- New York Tima Semin 

mimstration must reconsider ministration has become dismayed WASHINGTON — Senior Rea- 

whethcr Mr. Papandreou’s inter- by Mr. Papandccou’s piu^uit of ma administ ration officials say 
pretation of the 1983 base renewal agreements with Albania, Bulgaria ^ Unj^d States intends to 
agreement meant that toe United and Yugoslavia, his three Conmm- ^ Arab leaders whether the 
States must think seriously about nist neighbors, without consulting ftamewo^ agreement worked out 
moving the bases, NATO; his courting of Cokmd by King Hussein of Ionian and 

The sources were. unable to say MoamerQadhafi, tiw Libyan lead- Passer Arafat, the Palestine Liber- 
how specific Mr. Weinberger might ^ “d hu jnoreased muca^ m at j(m Organization leader, could 
be in speffing out plans for sucha theUtntid States, induing theaj- Icad to Middle East peace nr^otia- 


be in spelling out plans for such a me urmea oiaK^ mauamg me ai- Jcad ^ pc^ n^oda- 

move. But they said that an option leganra that the South Korean air- tions. 

would be to seek a base agreement }m^ shot “ownlnr soviet aircraft Because of discussions with Jor- 
with Turkey, which the Papan- m J was 1X1 a banian, Egyptian and other Arab 

dreou government’s defense policy s Py in 8 mission. leaders in recent days,, the Reagan 

has identified as Greece’s most j n addition to the air base at admimstrafionhas learned that the 
likely potential memv. . Hrffenlfrrwi the most hnnortant in- framework accord is limited to 


room and they would blindfold me Syrians had played a positive role, maintaining its strategic posture in fore the House Foreign 
totakeme totittbathroom- Whenl be said but declined to giro det^ the southern Mediterranean. C om m i ttee. 


<^totakeme toihebatlnoom. WhenI be said bul dedmed to give details, 
.^-wanted to leave. I would knock on A senior State Department offi- 
>the door and they would come and dal said there might be some indi- 


dreou government’s defense policy spying rmsaon. 
has identified as Greece’s most j n addition to the air base 
likely potential enemy. Heflenikon, the mostimpoxtant 

The 1983 agreement extended stallatioo is tbe Souda Bay na 
UB. base rights for five years. The complex on the island of Crete. 
English text states that other party There is also an air base at Go 


naval broad 


- j-khe door arid they would come and dal said there mi 

-*vV^ J^en -the door.” -cation Mr. Levin 

n-.. ■ ■ u'mi iiiii «ui u m i ih b' K . 1 tn wsm “If hi 


Greece is viewed as an anchor for On Feb. 5, Mr. Weinberger told 


some imfi- the North Atlantic Treaty Organi- the House Armed Services Cam- 


broad negotiating principles and is 
regarded by Hussein as only a first 

English locTstates that other party There is also an air base at Gour- many < * cta ^ s to ^ 

may sutemt written notice to termi- nies, which monitors Soviet activity ^ . 

nate the accordfive- months before in the eastern Medherranean, a Sf 

its expiration. In the absence of base at.Nea Makri, north of Ath- 

such notice, the agreement would ens, which is part of the US.' global ^ °* “ e wot “ m 

continue to nm inde&nilety. communications network, and 
Mr. Papandrcou has said repeat- (Gmtiroedon Page& CbLti) so many open questions that it 


^0 [Fwty momrng Mid evam^ he' to eseme. “If he was ; allowed to 
--’-said, he heard four other knocks escape,- be.said, *Td tend to tbink 
vind figured there must be four oth- the groans, played a positive role.” 


been allowed zation in the region. 


ntittee that anti-American senti- 


e. “If he was allowed to In addition, the United States ment aroused by Mr; Papandrcou 
be.said, *Td tend to think has two naval bases in Greece^ was parity reqxraaHc for a Feb. 2 
ms played a positive role.” winch provide port and anchorage bombing that injured more than 70 


CHS, WU1CU IS KUt U1 UK V.O. glUIAU ~ 

communications network, .and 


The Unshakable Reagan: Body Language Conveys His D 

Wli«»w Tl<» Talirs nf Space Defense, a Hand Gesture Can Be a Show of Force 

■n„ Cmii-h comfortably, his blue suit and wavy brown hair especially to top offici a ls within his adxmoistra- 


: 


r ji £ - . By Hedrick Smith 

l , Neat York Tima Service 

/ : WASHINGTON. — When President Ronald 

' . Reagan sits down face-to-face with four r^evtas 

*■ ' by a roaring fire" in his Oval Office, as he did for a 

. • . -recent interview, he seems more unshakable _on 

f--j '■ certain pet ideas tty*" he does on tite^tefcyisian 
■ / ' screen or in print Theforce of Ms position cmnes. 

” ^ across as much in his body language es in what he 

'i' \ iFroan afar, many people are tenqited to assume 

* •%- - that some dungs ”jy pissdent says are for effect 

y and. may represent posturing, perhaps at the start 

- of coaipxpated n^bfisdoos with Congress or - 

” Moscow. . . J : 

• But from dose up, Mr. Reaga n commumcaies 
1 - - ' not only his iaynfl on prdicy matters but also the 
hierarchy of hi* priorities. He conveys a dear 
drriacm bttweeu the issues f raxed on Mm by 
.circumstance or the bureaucracy and those on 
* whkii hehas deeppasonal fedings. , 

: p' '■ Jx is to such intimate sdtings dial congressional ■ 

• -.i - ^ teadereatKltimadvisas take^ Ms measureand then 
; j v conclude that rt is prtdiabty useless urtry to dian^. 

/ . Msimndonthorel^issiMt " r : 

% • 'Ctmadcr the Strai^fe Ddoxse. loitiative, hs: 

* ■ prpposalfor a apace-bascd defense aguns t 

- . iwcih*- to a ^ 

y qptstioiis, mostly on: foreign pofirt, ;it was d«r 

ft that ihk tttesthkiganc that moved BUB ittost.deepty, 

‘ t bn Iwd thft^ ^StTOBgCSt COaWHMOPS. ■ 


comfortably, Ms blue suit and wavy brown hair 
framed by the pattered design of a wing-backed 
chair. At ease and affable, be listened to the 
questions, responding to the first ones briefly. 

' Then, as he wanned to the give-and-take, Ms 
responses came punctuated with a little shake of 
the head, a anile, a sign cf emphasis here or there, 
or a hand reached out in gesture. 

Just before the interview began, Mr. Reagan had 
run through a 20-minute “prep,” as they rail it in 
the WMte House, with Lany Speakes, the White 
House spokesman, and two deputy press secretar- 
ies, Martin Firewater and Robert B. Sims, on the 
topics they expected to arise. 

It was obvious that they bad rehearsed him well 
on the political fracas that ensued in South Korea 
over the return of the exiled exposition leader Kim 
Dae Jung and on the latest developments in Cen- 
tral America, as well as on the subjects of budget 
Anri taxes. 

For tiie vial of King Fahd of Saudi Arabia, he. 
already had been thoroughly brief ed an the admuir 
istration’s diplomacy in the Middle East, and he 
dealt with those issues handily. - 

.BuHvfaen the issue of stratemc defense came up, 
Ms ' personal chenristiy and Ms body lang ua ge 
ehsHig aL He became totally engaged. He leaned 
Ms botty into 'the dStou^m, moving forward in the 
chair and taking the conversational offensive. 
Words flowed with little prompting. 

It (happened more than once, each answer on 


fof the -time Mf ..Reagan settkri-back < that topic reinforcing the impresaon that to others. 


and conviction that little room was left fear serious 
debate on that issue. 

“You're right,” sad a senior WMte House offi- 
cial. “He does feel strongly on that one. Of course, 
1 don’t think anybody in a senior position in. the 
administration disagrees with him.” 

There may indeed be unanimity at top levels 
now. But just six or eight weeks ago, senior State 
Depar tment officials wire talking about using the 
A merican mish on strategic defenses as a bargain- 
ing chip if Moscow ^ would agree to the deep reduc- 
tions m its offensive nuclear arsenal that Mr. 
Reagan has sought far two years. 

On Monday, more dearly than ever before, the 
president induaied that was not his intention. 

On other aims control issues, such as how Soviet 
violations of past agreements nrighi affect Ms wflk 
bigness to sign a new accord, hebegged off a direct 
answer so as not to affect the fort hc o ming talks. 

With Ms batik straight against his chair, he 
parried: “Now, we are getting into the area of 
actual negotiating and I don' t think we should be 

ifinraiwng that" 

Bw on the Strategic Defense Initiative, popular- 
ly referred to as the “star wars” program, he 
showed no such hesitancy, ' 

One sure sign that the president has deep feel- 
ings on an issue and will stick to Ms gnus, aides say, 
is when he utils anecdotes or dies historical evi- 

(Couthmed on Page 2, CoL 4) 



President Ronald Reagan 


so many open questions that it 
would be premature to be optimis- 
tic about the immediate prospects. 
Among the questions were whether 
direct Arab-Israeli talks would re- 
sult car whether the PLQ would now 
accept UN Security Council Reso- 
lutions 242 and 338 on bringing 
about a peace settlement * 

Resolutions 242 and 338 call on 
Israel to withdraw from occupied 
Arab temtoxy and inplidtty recog- 
nize Israel’s right to exist within 
internationally recognized secure 
borders. 

The administration officials said 
it was i mpor t a nt that the Arabs had 
described the" understanding to 
them as “a framework agreement,” 
and tin t as a detailed accord. 

“It is obviously less than-a full - 
agreement,” a State Deputment 
official said. “It is realty, just a 
number of generalities, and that is 
why pur response is in the farm of 
questions. If it means that there is 
an Arab party ready to negotiate 
directly with Israel, then it u posi- 
tive. If it means acceptance erf Res- 
olution 242, then it is good. We 
don’t have the answers now.” 

Secretary of State George P. 
Shultz, when asked about the un- 
published understanding between 
King Hussein and Mr. Arafat, an- 
nounced Mondw in Amman, said : 
Thursday that </ our knowledge is 
kind <rf fimy.’* 

“We.don’t knqw exactly whai ls ' 
coming out of this discussion and I 
suppose it will sort, of evolve 
along” he said in an mtervLew.oyer 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 3) . 


rf.i ;> 9 a :7>T] 


Drug Crop 
Up in 
U.S. Finds 

Under New Lour, 
Some Nations 
Could Lose Aid 

By Joel BrinJdey 

Neu- York Than Sarin 

WASHINGTON — The State 
Department's annual report on 
worldwide narcotics production 
shows that in most of the major 
drug-producing countries, marijua- 
na, coca and opium-poppy crops 
were larger in 1984 than in’ 1983. 

The report, issued Thursday, will 
have greater impact this year be- 
came of a new law that says Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan must cut off 
foreign aid to countries that in his 
view have notmade adequate pro- 
gress in reducing narcotic crops. 

The United States has diplomat- 
ic relations with nine of the 12 
known major drug-producing 
countries — Belize, Bolivia, Burma, 
Colombia, Jamaica, Mexico, Paki- 
stan, Pert! and Thailan d 
In seven of these; all except Co- 
lombia and Pakistan, narcotic 
crops increased in the last year. The 
seven all receive U.S. aid. ; 

A senior WMte House official 
said it was unlikely that the admin- 
istration would propose eliminat- 
ing aid. Bat he also said, “If after 
careful consideration it was consid- 
ered advisable for a given country, 
you would have support for it 
here.” 

The production of coca, a leaf 
used to make cocaine, grew by 
more than one- third overall in the 
three traditional coca-growing 
counties: Bolivia, Peru and Colom- 
bia. In addition, the State Depart- 
ment said it had discovered that 
Ecuador has become a major coca- 
producing cram cry. 

Worldwide production of opium 
— used to make heroin — and 

m a ri j u ana derimed slightly, the XO* 

port said, even though most coun- 
tries producing those drugs had 
crops as large or larger than in 
1983. 

The world’s opium crop dropped 
by about 11- percent because of 
poor weather m Afghanistan that 
severely reduced theiiarvest. ~ 

. The worldwide marijuana, crop 
also fell by about U percent as a 
result of what the report called the 
most significant achievement in 
drug enforcement last year, Cotam- 
bia’s war on drug trafficking. 

Colombia, the largest producer 
of marijuana for export to the 
United States, eradicated as much 
as one-third erf its known marijua- 
na crop last year, the report said. 
At the same time, its coca crop 
increased slightty. 

In last yam’s report, the first un- 
der the new law, the State Depart- 
ment set reduction goals for six 
countries — Belize, Bolivia, Cd- 
lomhifl, Pakistan, Peru and Thai- 
land — as the law requires. Only 
Thailand met its goal, this year’s 
report indicated, while Colombia 
met the taiget for one crop but not 
for the otto’. The new report sets 
goals far aD the countries. 

Senator Paula Hawkins, a Re- 
publican of Florida, who was (he 
principal sponsor of the new law, 
said Thursday, “I am going lo put a 
bold on the ad to aD the countries 
that have not madeprogress.” 
Representative Charles B. Ran- 
gel, a New York Democrat who 
sponsored the bill in the House, 
called the report “blatantly honest” 
and urged President Reagan “to 
take a leadership position” on the 
foreign aid question. 

The government’s praise for Co- 
lombia in the new report was in 
marked contrast to the descriptions 
(Continued on Page 2, Cot. 4) 


INSIDE 


■ An aide to Lech Walesa, the 
fdhnder of Solidarity, said he 
had been summoned by prose- 
cutors for questioning. Pfcge 2. 1 

■ The Reagan administration 
has a list of changes it would 
accept in its budget plan. Sena- 
tor Robert Dole said. Page 3. 

■ The Emit on V-S. nolhaiy ad- 

visers in El Salvador does not 
include tenmocary personnel, a 
U.1L official says. Page! 

■ A-US. veteran says he saw a 

man. identified as Dr. Josef 
Mengde at an American POW 
camp, in 1945. Page SL 


Americans in Brussels has 
spread to the schools. Page 5. 

ARTS/I£ZSUSE 

■ An exhibition in Lausanne 
celebrates artists as they saw 

themselves. Paged. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ 1J.S. wholesale prices showed 

no change in January oyer De- 
cember. Page 7. 

■The United States has inter' 
vened tin forrign-carrency mar- 
kets 'several tunes since catty 
Febriiaiy. Page 7. 








/ 

' ■ 


Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAV. FEBRUARY 16 17. 1985 




Walesa Summoned 


By Prosecutors; 

3 Activists Charged 


Reuters 

WARSAW — An aide to Lech 
Walesa said Friday that Mr. Wa- 
lesa has been summoned by prose- 
cutors for questioning in connec- 
tion with charges filed earlier in the 
day against three other leading ac- 
tivists that they were p lanning na- 
tional strike. 

The aide said that the public 
prosecutor in Gdansk had asked 
Mr. Walesa to see him Saturday “as 
a suspect'’ on the same charges 
brought against Adam Mtchrnk. 
Bogdan Lis and Wladyslaw Fra- 
synhik, who have been detained. 

The four, who were leaders of the 
Solidarity trade union before it was 
banned by the authorities, were at- 
tending a clandestine meeting 
Wednesday in Gdansk that was 
raided by the secret police. Mr. 
Walesa, who lives nearby, was al- 
lowed to go free. The other three 
men were among seven detained 

The official PAP news agency 
said that Mr. Michnik, Mr. Lis and 
Mr. Frasyniuk, who all were re- 
leased from jail last year under a 
government amnesty program, 
were accused Friday of fomenting 
unrest and illegal protests. 

The charges carry maximum 
prison sentences of three years, the 
Justice Ministry said 

The charges refer to Solidarity’s 
call for a 15-minute nationwide 
strike on Feb. 28 against govern- 
ment food price increases that are 
planned for March. 

The strike proposal came from 
the underground Solidarity Tem- 
porary Coordinating Co mmissi on, 
known by the initials TKK, and 
was the banned union's first call for 
industrial action in 18 months. 

PAP made no mention of four 
other activists detained in Wednes- 
day’s raid: Janusz Palubicki, Mar 
rasz Wilk. Jacek Merkel and Stanis- 


law Henzlik. The authorities have 
48 hours to either release or file 
charges against detained suspects 
and that time period expired Fri- 
day. 

Mr. Michnik and Mr. Lis were 
under investigation previously be- 
cause they attended a Jan. 2 1 meet- 
ing of the temporary council. The 
decision to call the strike was made 
at the meeting. 

The Justice Ministry said that 
their amnesties could be revoked if 
they are convicted under the 
charges filed Friday, but only after 
all appeals procedures had been 
exhausted. 

They are the first prisoners re- 
leased under the amnesty program 
to be arrested on counts that could 
affect the clemency measure. 

Mr. Michnik, who was released 
from prison in August, served two 
and a half years on charges of pre- 
paring to overthrow the system. 
Mr. Us served six months and was 
freed in early December after the 
government dropped treason 
charges against him for lack of evi- 
dence. 

Mr. Frasyniuk, the Wroclaw re- 
gional leader of Solidarity, served a 
two-month sentence last autumn 
for disturbing public order. 

Mr. Michnik, a leading adviser 
to Solidarity, has been in and out of 
jail since the mid-1960s for bis op- 
position to the government. He was 
a co-founder of the banned Work- 
ers Committee for Social Self-De- 
fense, known as KOR. 

The press agency said the three 
were guilty of repealed law-break- 
ing. 

It accused them of “an ostenta- 
tiously disrespectful attitude to the 
requirements of the legal order" 
ana said they tried persistently to 
“interfere with the processes of sta- 
bilizing public life in Poland." 


U.S. Legislators’ Guides 
Are Beaten in Ethiopia 


By Gifford D. May 

New York Times Service 

GONDAR, Ethiopia — Two 
Ethiopians who had escorted three 
American legislators on a tour of 
Jewish villages were attacked and 
beaten by men later identified as 
government authorities. 

Senator Paul S. Trible Jr„ Re- 
publican of Virginia, described the 
incident as “a clear message by a 
very repressive regime that did not 
appreciate our going to Gondar or 
. visiting" the Ethiopian Jews. 

Representattve Gary Ackerman, 
Democrat of New York, said it was 
“reprehensible” that two Ethiopi- 
ans would be “brutalized" while 
“accompanying a U.S. congressio- 
nal delegation’s humanitarian mis- 
sion.” 

“It’s very clear from what hap- 
pened that this government rules 
by force and fear.” said Senator 
Dennis DeConcini, Democrat of 
Arizona. “Our visit underscores the 


harsh reality of Ethiopia and the 
lion” fc 


threatening situation” for Ethiopi- 
an Jews, many of whom have been 
seeking to migrate to Israel. 

One of the Ethiopians was an 
employee of the U.S. Embassy, and 
the other was a guide for Ethiopia’s 
Relief and Rehabilitation Commis- 
sion. Neither is Jewish. 

The relief commission guide was 
reported to have been beaten in 
Gondar. 


The U.S. Embassy employee was 
said to have been forced into a car 
and taken to a root near Wolleka. a 
village that the legislators had visit- 
ed earlier in the day. There, he was 
said to have been attacked as well. 

Their assailants were subse- 
quently identified as a major and 
four outer officials of the Ministry 
of Public and National Security. 

The two men. both of whom 
asked not to be named, said they 
were first insulted, abused and 
threatened. They said the security 
officials demanded. “Why are you 
helping these people? 

Both were said to have been 
punched and kicked repeatedly in 
the face and on the body by the five 
officials when they attempted to 
reply to the interrogation. Al- 
though bruised and cut, neither of 
the men appeared Thursday to be 
seriously injured. 

It is estimated that there are now 
only about 7,000 Jews still in Ethio- 
pia. 

In Washington, the State De- 
partment said Friday that it was 
issuing a protest in the “strongest 
terms- to the Ethiopian govern- 
ment, The Associated Press report- 
ed. 

“The United Stales is indignant 
about the brutality of the Ethiopi- 
an officials involved in this inci- 
dent,” said Edward Djengian, a 
State Department spokesman. 


World Chess Championship 
In Moscow Is Ruled Ended 


(Continued from Page 1) 

tral Moscow to the Hotel Sport on 
the outskirts, a move that Mr. Kar- 
pov reportedly resented. 

Games were postponed three 
times, and reports began to spread 
-that Mr. Karpov was exhausted. 

Then, on Feb. 9, Mr. Kasparov 
won the 4Sdi game. Suddenly the 
! score was 5-3. Then Mr. Campo 
manes arrived and two games were 
canceled as rumors whined that the 
Soviet authorities were seeking a 
way to end the match. 

As president of the world federa- 
- lion, Mr. Campomanes had virtual- 


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Sulpice. Sunday worship in English 9.45 
am, Rev. A. Sommervittt. TH.; 607.67 .02. 


EURO* 

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activities in Europe. Gontad EUU, Sieve 
Dick, Seringifrooi 20, 1271 NCHuaen,ThB 
Netherlands. Tel.: (+31) (0) 2152 55073. 


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FHerxfly Christian hflowshlp. Sunday 11 -00. 
Tel.: (08)316051,151225. 


To place an adncttUement 
in this section 


please contact: 

Ms Elizabeth HERWOOD 
181 Are. Ch.-de-G»ulIe* 
92521 Neuilly Ccdu, France. 
Tel.! 747.12.65. 


ly unlimited authority over the 
match, and he insisted that he took 
the decision to annul the match 
himself. 

He even claimed that he was un- 
sure of what he would do until he 
stood at the podium. Unknown to 
him, the official Tass press agency 
was already reporting his decision. 

The match, he said, “has been an 
unusual competition, which creat- 
ed unusual problems demanding 
special solutions.” He said that his 
“very good friend," Mr. Karpov, 
bad asked to continue, and that he 
was “certain" that Mr. Kasparov 
was not happy with his decision. 

He said 48 games was a good 
point to end the match because 
previous matches had been limited 
to 24 games, and 48 was twice 24. 

It was when Mr. Campomanes 
was being grilled by reporters on 
Mr. Karpov’s condition that the 
champion hims elf walked into the 
auditorium. Slight at the best of 
limes, he seemed even thinner and 
his eyes were rimmed with red. 

“The reports of my death are 
exaggerated,” he said. Then he 
said: “I believe we can and should 
continue." 

Mr. Kasparov had been sitting in 
the back of the large auditorium 
from (he start of (he news confer- 
ence. Spectators began clamoring 
for him to speak, and he rose and 
strode to the podium. 

“I want to ask the president, why 
this spectacle?” he said. 

“It’s Mr. President’s profession 
to talk, mine is to play chess, so I 
don’t want to compete on his 
ground.” Mr. Kasparov said. “I 
want to say what 1 think.” 

After it was over and Mr. Cam- 
pomanes had reaffirmed his deci- 
sion, Mr, Kasparov again vented 
his outrage to reporters in the hall- 
way outside. 



TbeAuooondPrm 

An Israeli military vehicle boms after it hit a mine near Sidon in southern Lebanon. 


Pro-Israeli Militia in Lebanon Is Said 
To Have Lost Almost Half Its Fighters 


Reuters 


SIDON, Lebanon — About 800 
men belonging to an Israeli-backed 
militia in southern Lebanon have 
deserted, surrendered or been cap- 
tured in the past two weeks, securi- 
ty sources said Friday. 

In the past few months, the 
sources said, the size of the force 
has been almost halved. 

According to the sources, the mi- 
litia, the South Lebanese Army, 
□ow has about 1.200 men, com- 
pared with 2JS00 late last year. 

General Ori Orr, the commander 
of Israeli troops in Lebanon, said 
earlier in the week that up to one- 
third of the militia's soldiers had 
left the force. 

Last year, the Israelis expressed 
hope that the militia would act as a 
security force in southern Lebanon 
after they lefL 

Sources in AmaJ, the main Shiite 
Moslem group in the region, said 
that 100 members of the militia had 
surrendered or had been captured 
recently by Amal. The chief of 
Amai for Sidon. Khalil Harridan, 
said they were undergoing “politi- 
cal re-education." 

The South Lebanese Army evac- 
uated Sidon on Tuesday and 
moved southward, just behind the 


Israeli front line at the Awali River. 
The Israelis are due to evacuate 
that position by Monday. 

Of those remaining in the South 
Lebanon Army, according to the 
security sources, 18 percent-are Shi- 
ites near the Israeli border and 10 
percent are Dnize Moslems in the 
eastern sector of southern Leba- 
non. 

The rest are Christians living in 
the border area or near the Jezzine 
area, behind the new front line that 
Israel will set up after it completes 
the first stage of its evacuation of 
southern Lebanon on Monday. 


■ Network Protest to Israel 

The Associated Press reported 
from New York: 

The presidents of NBC and CBS 
News have sent letters of protest to 
the Israeli government over reports 
that Israeli soldiers had fired a rifle 
less than a foot (30 centimeters) 
from the face of an NBC corre- 
spondent in southern Lebanon. 

The NBC News presidenL Law- 
rence K. Grossman, said Thursday 
in a letter to Prime Minister Shi- 
mon Peres that on Wednesday, the 
soldiers confronted the NBC corre- 
spondent, Bonnie Anderson, and a 
captain demanded a videotape (hai 


Tense Force captain is outrageous 
ensihle a 


and indefensible and he should be 
severely reprimanded. 


U.S. Cautious 
Chi PLO Pact 
With Jordan 


U.S. Study Reports Rise 
In Illicit Drug Crops 


(Continued from Page 1) 


(Continued from Page 1) 
the Voice of America. “But if there 
is movement, it helps, even though 
tire specific plan is something that 
is not operable." 

According to administration of- 
ficials, the United States has not 
received a text of the agreement, 
but has been told that the frame- 
work accord consists of numerous 
principles. They are said to include 
these points: 

• A desire by Jordan and the 
PLO to work out an accord involv- 
ing the return of tbe lands occupied 
by Israel in exchange for peace. 

• Acceptance of previous UN 
resolutions on the Palestinian issue 
and Middle East diplomacy, but 
not a specific acceptance of Reso- 
lution 242 of 1967 and Resolution 
338 of 1973. 

• A call for an international con- 
ference to decide on Middle East 
issues, although at the moment 
Washington does not know how 
many governments Jordan and the 
PLO nave in mind. Tbe United 
States opposes any such conference 
that goes beyond the Middle East 
participants and tbe United Stales. 

Prime Minister Ahmad Obeidal 
of Jordan said Thursday that the 
peace conference envisaged by Jor- 
dan and the PLO would include aJJ 
parties to the conflict and all per- 
manent members of the Security 
Council. “ 

• Establishment of a delegation 
of Jordanians and Pales tinians, al- 


of the year's drug-enforcement ef- 
Mhi 


though it is not dear now whether 
PLO is insisting that the Pales- 


the 


tinians be subject to PLO disci- 
pline, or could be drawn from other 
Palestinian groups more acceptable 
to Israel 

• Insistence that the rights of 
self-determination of the Palestin- 


ians be accepted. In the jargon of 
idle East, this i 


(he Middle East, this usually means 
acceptance of a Palestinian state, to 
be established in territory now oc- 
cupied by Israel on the West Bank 
of the Jordan. This is opposed by 
the United States and Israel. 

• Some kind of eventual “con- 
federation" between this Palestin- 
ian state and Jordan. The United 
States favors an association bo- 
tweed a Palestinian autonomous 
area on the West Bank and Jordan, 
but opposes setting up a Palestin- 
ian state fiist- 

VS. officials said they were 
aware of reports in the Arab press 
that purport to contain full texts of 
the Jordanian-PLO agreement, but 
they said that they have not been 
presented with such a text 

It is not expected that there will 
be any firm conclusions drawn un- 
til President Hoard Mubarak of 
Egypt visits Washington on March 
1 1, the officials said. 

A senior administration official 
said that Jordan and Egypt had 
asked the United States not to be 
quick to criticize the framework 
accord because it is only a prelimi- 
nary set of agreements. 


forts in most other major drug- 
producing nations, where the ap- 
praisals ranged from neutral to 
condemnation. 

Bolivia, the second-largest pro- 
ducer of coca leaf, came in for the 
harshest criticism. Thai country’s 
failure to eradicate any coca plants, 
despite large-scale assistance from 
the United Slates, was “a major 
disappointment.” the report said. 

in Jamaica, the third -largest 
known marijuana producer, the 
crop remained stable and the Ja- 
maican government failed to offer 
any assurance that it would be re- 
duced in the year ahead. The report 
said Jamaica “must soon undertake 
a more vigorous campaign.” 

Senator Hawkins said Bolivia 
and Jamaica topped her list of 
countries whose aid she said would 
urge be reduced or eliminated if 
significant progress is not made be- 
fore the new foreign aid legislation 
is approved, later this year. 

Representative Dante B. FasceU, 
a Democrat of Florida who is 
chairman of the Foreign Affairs 
Committee, which has jurisdiction 
over foreign aid legislation, said 
after reviewing the report Thurs- 
day: “Tbe trend is dearly up on 
cocaine and at best we are holding 
our own on marijuana. The bottom 
line is that, despite some encourag- 
ing developments, particularly in 
Colombia, the war is being lost.” 

He did not offer an opinion on 
bow foreign aid requests would fare 
in his committee. 

The report also does not offer 
any recommendations on the aid 
question, but it did say that eco- 
nomic and oiler assistance “does 
affect positively each recipient's 
disposition to cooperate with the 
United States in achieving signifi- 
cant pr o gre s s in illicit drug con- 
trol." 

To Senator Hawkins, the biggest 


surprise in the report was Ecuador. 
Last years report said: “There is 
no evidence of significant coca or 
cannabis cultivation within the 
country." Bui in the last year, the 
new report said, Ecuadoran offi- 
cials had found 2J*0Q to 7.500 acres 
(1.009 to 3.030 hectares) of coca 
bushes. 

Some of the bushes are 12 feel 
(3.6 meters) tall, three times as tali 
as the average coca bush in other 
countries. Although the’ estimates 
are “extremely tentative” the re- 
port said, Ecuador could be pro- 
ducing as much as 15.000 tons of 
coca leaf annually. That would 
make it the world's third-largesl 
producer. A more thorough assess- 
ment is expected soon, a State De- 
partment official said. 

The discovery in Ecuador under- 
scores a problem with this report 
and others: Since drug production 
is an illegal, clandestine enterprise, 
it is exceedingly difficult to mea- 
sure. The new report, like the earli- 
er one, says “much of the produc- 
tion data in this report should be 
considered preliminary, some even 
speculative, especially the esti- 
mates of coca production. 

In Peru, for example, even 
though the State Department set- 
tled on a figure, the report ac- 
knowledges that estimates of acres 
under coca cultivation range from 
125.000 to 450,000. 

Many other countries not dealt 
with in detail in the report are be- 
lieved to be major drug producers. 
Most have never been surveyed by 
the United States. 

In Brazil Tor example, “marijua- 
na cultivation is relatively wide- 
spread” and coca has become “a 
new cash crop,” the report said. 

Significant marijuana cultiva- 
tion nas also been found in Costa 
Rica, Panama, Indonesia, Laos, the 
Philippines, India, Morocco, Leba- 
non and Nigeria. 


China, Citing WORLD BRIEFS 


Provocations, 
Attacks Hanoi 
Border Units 


Compiled by Ow Staff Frmr. Dispatches 

BEUING — China said Friday 
that intensified military provoca- 
tions by Vietnam along their com- 
mon border were causing heavy ri- 
vilian losses and had forced 
Chinese troops to counterattack io 
give “a due lesson” to Viemam. 

The Chinese statement came as 
Vie tnames e troops in Cambodia 


Spain Expels 2 Diplomats From U.S. 

MADRID (AP) — Prime Minister Felipe GonzSez said Friday that 
Spain had expired two Americans with diplomatic pas^wrts, the nation- 
al news agency EFE reported. 

The U.S. Embassy had no comment on earlier press reports that ; the 
U.S. citizens were expelled for photographing sensitive communicator 
installations. An independent Madrid daily, El Pals, said that both 
Americans carried diplomatic passports. It said one, whose name was 
given only as McMahan, worked at the embassy. It Mid the other, ,w» 
identified, was a civilian employee at the ILS.-leased Torrgon de Ante 
air base outside Madrid. , 

The Foreign Ministry's protocol office said a Den^&JrtMtaMo 


took up duties as second secretary at tbe U.S. Embassy in Fcbnrary 1984. 

(in the embassy's political section said that Mr. McMahan 
. • ■ .i i - - _ - j i A Luh. tn »H*"TTnii 


A secretary in the embassy’s political section said mat Mr. Mcraamm no 
longer worked ifl the embassy and had been evacuated to the United 
States for medical reasons three weeks ago. 


captured the last major base of tbe 
Beijing-backed Khmer Rouge 


the cameraman. Gary F airman, 
had taken of the Awali River 
bridge. 

Mr. Grossman said the officer 
then “tried to wrest the equipment 
from the neck” of a sound man, 
Jonathan Callery. 

“An Israeli soldier, in view of the 
captain, then placed an M-I6 rifle 
to the head of the cameraman and 
when Miss Anderson told him to 
point the rifle to the sky. he fired it 
less than a foot away from her face 
and over the bead of Mr. Fainnan." 
Mr. Grossman said. 

Mr. Grossman said that the sol- 
diers had also seized a cassette 
from the crew Wednesday. 

An Israeli military spokesman 
said the army was investigating the 
incident. 

The president of CBS News. Ed- 
ward M. Joyce, said in a telex to 
Mr. Peres and Defense Minister 
Yitzhuk Rabin, that the behavior of 
the unit “damages the good name 
of your country and its relations 
with the United States " 

In his letter. Mr. Grossman said: 
“Such conduct bv an Israeli De- 


guerrillas along the Thai border. 

“Recently, the military provoca- 
tions and harassment^ by the Viet- 
namese authorities against the Chi- 1 
nese border areas in Yunnan and 
Guangxi provinces are intensifying 
daily, causing heavy losses to the 
lives and property of the Chinese 
border inhabitants," a Foreign 
Ministry spokesman said. 

“The Chinese frontier forces 
were driven beyond forbearance 
and were forced' to counterattack, 
repulsing the enemy and giving a 
due lesson to the Vietnamese ag- 
gressors,” he said. 

No casualty figures or dates for 
the fighting were given. 

Analysts said that the Chinese 
statement was reminiscent of Beij- 
ing's claim that it would teach Viet- 
nam a lesson during a brief border 
war in 1979 after Hanoi's invasion 
of Cambodia 

The spokesman warned that Chi- 
na “will give a due lesson when 
necessary,” and said that Chinese 
troops were exercising their “sa- 
cred” right of self-defense. 

Some Western diplomats say it 
appears China is stepping up ten- 
sions along its southern border 
with Vietnam as a pressure tactic in 
response to Hanoi's dry-season of- 
fensive in Cambodia. 

China is the main antis supplier 
to the Cambodian guerrilla forces 
who are battling about 160,000 
Vietnamese occupation troops. 

Analysis in Washington said, 
however, that both sides appeared 
to be exaggerating the level of mili- 
tary activity. Each side, they said, 
wants to ponray the other as an 
aggressor. 

They added that China is 'also 
interested in showing other South- 
east Asian nations, concerned 
about the intensified Vietnamese 
attacks in Cambodia, that China 
has the strength to retaliate against 
the Vietnamese. 

But, a State Department official 
said this week, “The level of rheto- 
ric at limes Tar exceeds the level of 
artillery shells." 

“Any attempt by the Chinese to 
invade’ Vietnam would prove “very 
difficult.” he said. 

Analysts in Washington see no 
evidence that China's attacks on 
Vietnamese border forces exceed 
those that occurred in (he spring of 
last year. Nor is there any evidence 
that China has built up its border 
forces to the degree that would be 
required to launch a major invasion 
of Vieinam. f UPLWP ) 


M’Bow Sees U.S. Attack on UN System 


PARIS (Reuters) — UNESCO’s director-general, Amadou Mahtar 
M’Bow, on Friday' characterized the withdrawal by the United Stales 
from his agency as part of a general U.S. a trade agains t the United 
Nations system. . . . 

Add ressin g an extraordinary meeting of the 51-nation executive board 
of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, 


Mr. M’Bow said the U.S. decision to leave the agency last December was 
a political one. The move, which deprives UNESCO of a quarter of its 


U pVUUVOI *IAi U4VTWI " — — A 

budget, followed U.S. and Western complaints that the agency was 
mismanaged and politicized under Mr. Meow’s leadership. 

“The real stakes are political, " Mr. M’Bow said. “Certain aides 
apparently want to call into question tbe whole foundation of the 
international system set up in the aftermath at World War IL” His 
comments came cm tbe fourth day of a meeting called to detennme how 
to make up tbe $43 million budget deficit caused by the U.S. withdrawal 

Prostitutes Adopt Charter on Rights 

AMSTERDAM (AFj — About 150 prostitutes and supporters from 
Western Europe and North America adopted a charte r on prostitutes’ 
rights Friday after they organized an international com m ittee to lobby 
for their interests. 

One of the organizers of an international conference on prostitutes' 
rights, Margo St James of San Frandsco, said at a press conference after 
the meeting that the committee would be based in the Netherlands, where 
prostitution is legal, and that it would seek tax-exempt status as a 
foundation. 

She alcn outlined the provisions of the char ter, which seeks decriminal- 
ization of “all aspects of adult prostitution resulting from individual 
decision,” and equal enforcement of crimes to which she said prostitutes 
are prey, such as fraud, rape and other sexual abuse. The charter also 
seeks guarantees of human rights and civil liberties. 


Harvard Sells South Africa Investment 


CAMBRIDGE, Massachusetts (AP) — Harvard University has an- 
nounced that it has sold stock valued at SI million in Baker Internati o nal 
Corp„ because the company did not adhere to reasonable standards to 
improve the welfare of its non white employees in South Africa. 

It was the first time that the university has sold holdings from its S1-&- 
billion stock portfolio under its policies governing investment in compa- 
nies doing business in South Africa. Toe move came two days after 
Stanford university in California voted to sell its stock in Motorola Inc. if 
the company made any further sale of communications equipment to the 
South African military or police. 

Harvard will continue investing In companies that are actively trying to 
improve conditions for their South African black employees, but is 
closely scrutinizing companies that do not appear to meet ethical stan- 
dards. President Derek Bok said in a statement 


U.S. Jews Urge Vatican-Israeli Ties 

VATICAN CITY (UPI1 — Leaders of the American Jewish Commit- 
tee have urged Pope John Paid II to establish relations between the 
Vatican and Israel to “help create a sense of reality that is indispensable 


to 


pea 
tn a 


ice. 


an address Thursday to the delegation, the pope made no direct 


reference to Israel or to the possibility of d^lomatic^mions. But he said 
that “relationships between Jews and Christians have radically improved 
in recent years.” The delegation’s visit came after a trip to Israel and talks 
with Italian officials in Rome. 

The 12-member delegation's chairman, Howard Friedman, said in an 
address to Ihe pope: “Our visit la Israel has reinforced our conviction 
that the primary obstacle to peace in the Middle East is the ongoing 
illusion of most of Israel’s neighbors that somehow, without formal 
recognition" from other stales, “Israel's continued existence can be 
undermined.” 


■ Vietnamese Rout Guerrillas 

Vietnamese troops, backed by 
tanks and artillery barrages, scored 
a major victory in th six-year Cam- 
bodian war Friday, routing Khmer 
Rouge guerrillas defending their 
jungle bases in western Cambodia. 
The Associated Press reported 
from Nong Pro. Thailand. 

The fall of Phnom Malai on 
Thursday and the Khmer Rouge 
fortress of Phum Thmei on Friday 
came after a monthlong Vietnam- 
ese drive against a complex of hill- 
top strongholds, civilian camps and 
logistics bases south of the Thai 
frontier town of Aranyaprathet. 

Major General Sant Sripben, 
commander of Thailand's eastern 
border task force, said elements of 
several Vietnamese divisions con- 
verged on the last Khmer Rouge 
bases from the south and east com- 
pleting a pincer movement that had 
been evolving for several weeks. 

No reliable casualty figures have 
emerged from tbe battlefields, to 
which reporters have had no access. 

General Sant said about 15,000 
Thai villagers, mostly women and 
children, bad been evacuated from 
their homes along the border south 
of Aranyaprathet. Radio Thailand 
announced Friday that the Bang- 
kok government had lodged a pro- 
test note with the United Nations. 


Bangladesh Parlies Threaten Boycott 

DHAKA. Bangladesh (UPI) — Major opposition parties said Friday 


that they would refuse to take pan in April 6 national elections unless the 
martial law rulers first step down and hand power over to a caretaker 


government. 

The announcement was made as the mainstream opposition forces 


opened a 10-day campaign, beginning with a six-hour general strike 
n democracy in the nation of 100 milli on 


Friday, to demand a return to 
people. 

A declaration read by Begum Khaleda Zia Rahman and Sheikh Hanna 

that the martial law°^wmiment of PreadmT^ohaminB^Hussam 
Ershad was “resorting to various tactics to consolidate its illegal power." 


Portuguese Cabinet is Reshuffled 


LISBON (Reuters) — The ruling Socialist and Social Democratic 
parties reshuffled their coalition cabinet on Friday following a change of 
leadership in the Social Democratic Party. 

Tbe changes were agreed to this week in meetings between Prime 
Minister Mario Soares, a Socialist, and Rui Machete, who replaced 
Carlos Moia Pinto as head of the Social Democrats last Sunday in a 
dispute over strategy. 

Mr. Machete, who had been minister of justice, was sworn in as deputy 
prime minister and minister of defense, replacing Mr. Mota Pinto. MArio 
Raposo was sworn in as minister of justice and Jo2o de Deus Pinherio 
became minister of education. Both men are Social Democrats. 


UJL Mine Leaders Urge Talks on Plan 


Plan to Move 
Greek Bases 


LONDON (UPI) —1 

to new propolis to settle Britain's 1 1 -month coal strike and ! 
for the immediate resumption of negotiations with employers. 

Ted Willis, general secretary of the Trades Union Congress, explained 
the proposals to the board of the National Union of Mmeworkers. He 
drew up the plan in sessions with Ian MacGregor, chairman of me state- 
run National Coal Board. No details were made public. 

British Television and press reports said the proposals included a 
compromise about closing20 unprofitable mines, the issue over which the 
strike started in March. The compromise reportedly included a conces- 
sion by the coal board not to press its demands that the miners' union 
agree to discuss dosing mines on economic grounds as a condition for 
reopening talks. 


Reagan’s Body Language: 
Conveying His Convictions 


(Continued from Page 1) 

dence. True to form, on the missile 
defense issue he has an analogy to 
history. 

Poison gas, he recalled, had been' 
invented and was used in World 
War 1. then was outlawed several 
yearn after the war. Even so, to this 
day many nations equip their ar- 
mies with gas masks as a precau- 
tion against a violation of toe ban. 
Similarly, Mr. Reagan argued, stra- 
tegic defenses would be needed as a 
precaution even if offensive nucle- 
ar weapons are banned. 

People who meet with him regu- 
larly Find it diaracieristic of him to 
convey firmness in face-to-face en- 
counters. 


“You’re seeing what we’ve seen,” 
said Alan K. Simpson of Wyoming, 
the assistant majority leader of 
Senate Republicans. 


(Con tin ued from Page 1) 
about 29 smaller installations scat- 
tered through the country. 

About 4,000 members of the 
UJ5. military and 4,000 dependents 
are at these installations. 

■ Greek-Soviet Agreement 
Greece and the Soviet Union 
agree over nuclear issues, although 
they respect each other's right to 
belong to different military blocs, 
Mr. Papandreou said after visiting 
Moscow. 


U.S. Seizes Gdombian Jet in Drug Case 


“Sometimes someone will say, 
‘Mr. President, we’re not going to 
support you on some issue, we’re 
going to go to the mat,’ and some- 
times he’ll give a whimsical half- 
smile and nod, which is to say, ‘Go 
ahead and try,’ ” Mr. Simpson said, 

“Other times. like on a tax in- 
crease, he’ll say. ‘Keep talking, call 
it what you will, revenue enhance- 
ment or whatever, but it won't selL 
Over my dead body.’ ” Mr. Simp- 
son said. "He really does lay it 
down.” 


He made the statement in re- 
marks to Greek reporters in Lenin- 
grad, Reuters reported Friday from 
Athens. In the remarks, which the 
government released Thursday, 
Mr. Papandreou called his four- 
day Soviet trip one of the most 
successful he had made since he 
came to power in 1981. 


MIAMI (AP) — A Colombian cargo jet that had been used to snuggle 
□early 2,500 pounds (1.134 kilograms) of cocaine amid a shipment of 
flowers was seized by customs agents Friday, authorities said. It was the 
third largest drug seizure in U.S. history. 

Agents confiscated the Avianca Boeing 747 cargo plane, valued at 5119 
million, three hours after it landed after a flight from Colombia. The jet 
was seized “on the basis of Avianca having the knowledge" of the cocaine 
being aboard, said a U.S. Customs spokesman. Cliff Stallings. 

He said it would cost Avianca “a very substantial penalty, well over a 
million dollars I would guess” to retrieve the jet. None of the crew was 
taken into custody, but Robert Battard, regional customs commisrioner, 
said arrests were pending. Tbe cocaine's destination was Montreal, 
according to a spokesman for the vice president’s task force on dregs- 


For the Record 


The Imeriwtiooal Court of Justice has elected Judge Na«odraSmgfatf 

’ : Lacharriere of France 8S 


“With regard to nuclear weap- 
ons, it is clear that our positions 
coincide," he said. These positions, 
he said, include “a halt to nuclear 
tests, the nonmilitarization of space 
and a moratorium on deploying 
new missiles of any kind anywhere 
in the world." 


India as its president and Judge Guy Ladreit de 

vice president, the court said Friday in The Hague. (Reuters.) 

The special French envoy in New Caledonia, Edgand Pisani, on Friday 
cut two hours from an overnight curfew imposed on the island after 
violence between white settlers and Melanesians. (Reuters) 

Zimbabwe's first general election since independence in 1980 may not 
beheld in March as planned. Prime Minister Robert Mugabe said Friday 
in Harare. (UPI) 

A bomb explosion Friday in West Berlin dragged the home of tbe city’s 
security chief, Manfred Ganschow. There were no injuries. ‘JMr. Gans- 
chow said tite bombing “must be seen in connection with awApirs by tbe 
Red Army Faction.” a leftist guerrilla group. *J (AP) 


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INTERNATIONAL 


Reagan Said to Plan Budget Concessions 



Bag Fafad with Vice President George Bush at the 
dfamer the long gave for politicians and diplomats. 




‘Africa!®^ 


— -k;*. 


edly cost the Saudi 
$500 per person. 


Aspin Plans Offensive 
On Militaiy Spending 

Representative Les Aspin, 
Democrat of Wisconsin, a long- 
time gadfly to the military es- 
tablishment and now the chair- 
man of the House Armed 
Services Committee, said in a 
recent open tetter to Defense 
Secretary Caspar W. Weinber- 
ger, “In the boldest terms, what 
we must tdl the Defense Do- 
paranent is, ‘Before we give you 
billions more, we want to know 
what you've done with the tril- 
lion you’ve got’ 

The New YoA Times reports 
that Me. Aspin, 46, says that for 
too long the Armed Services 
Committee has beat carrying 
on like the Public Works Com- 
mittee, playing pork barrel poli- 
tics by dispensing bases and 
contracts to favored districts.* 

Mr. Aspin says that in addi- 
tion to the parade of imlitaiy 
brass that testifies about mih - 
tary needs on Capitol KEI1 every 
year, he will call on indepen- 
dent critics of the Pentagon. 
“We’re gong to have fun,” he 
said. 


•u:; Short Takes 

For the fist tine since the 
, w -. J 9th century, the navy is about 
,^T. to have fewer U.S. Naval Acad- 

.• any graduates . than nonaca- 


demygrafiiates among its com- 
modores and admires. At fie 
moment, 137 line officers wifi 
one to four stars axe Annapolis 
alumni and 136 came horn vari- 
ous training programs or are 
“mustangs” up from the ranks. 
The trend is toward a nonaca- 
demy majority. As recently as 
1977, 22 of the 28 admirals se- 
lected for fie year bad gone to 
Annapolis. The army and air 
force nave tang had a majority 
of generals who did not gradu- 
ate from the army or air farce 

xcarh-mipy . 

Many streets oa New York’s 
decrepit waterfront were paved 
with granite Nocks that served 
as ballast for sailing vessels 
fixun Europe in fi& 1 9fi centu- 
ry. Today, thieves aresdKng 
than at 31 to S3 each to con- 
tractors for building patios, 
lawn edging or stone fences. 
The city catches the thieves 
when it inn, but repairs fie 
damage wifi asphalt, not fie 
pudamed stones. “If we pat 
them back,” says Charles Foti 
of fie. city’s .streets bureau, 
“somebody else will take 
them.” 

Add ram is H wronging sugar 
mwpte trees, according to the 
University of VennonLlt said 
.that sugar maples growing 
around Duxbury showed a 19 
percent decline m numbers and 
growth rates during, the past 20 
years, . and samples of both 
wood and the sap used to make 
maple synipshowed increasing- 
ly high concentrations of de- 
ments traced to smokestack 
emissions and h unting fad oQ, 
both of which have been 
blamed for add rain. 


Moose once ranged all across 
. Michigan's Upper Peninsula, 
but by the 1940s, lumbering. 


ante had almost wiped them 
ouL But ihe mating call of the 
bull moose will echo again in 
the north woods. Michigan is 
trading ISO of its wild turkeys 
to the neighboring P*n«di«n 
province of Ontario in return 
for 30 adult moose. The moose 
are shot wifi tranquOizing darts 
and taken by helicopter and 
truck to their new hone: 

A committee of fie Maryland . 
legislature has a bill that 
would have allowed filrngoers 
to bring their own popcorn, 
candy and soda. Theater own- 
era said fie loss of concession 
revenues would have forced 
ticket prices up and mad* for 
messier movie houses. 

Shorter Takes: A fraternity 
at fie University of Rochester, 
New York, was reprimanded by 
fie Inter-Fraternity Council for 
putting up posters reading, 
“For fie price of feeding an 

Ffhinpiim village, yOU can go tO 

a party at Sigma Chi.” ... 
Trustees of Rent State Univer- 
sity in Ohio will build a memo- 
rial to the four students who 
were shot and killed by Nation- 
al Guard troops during an anti- 
war demonstration May 4, 
1970. . . .Forty percent of the 97 
mflbn n people who pay income 
tax in fie United States hired 
professional tax consultants in 
1984. ...The Boy Scouts of 
America are observing their 
75 ih anniversary this year. 

. — Compiled by 

ARTHUR HIGBEE 


United Press international 

' WASHINGTON— -The Reagan 
administration does^no* expect aB 
its proposed budges cuts to be ap- 
proved fay CongresJ and has pro-, 
pared alia of programs on which it 
is prepared to conmramise, accord- 
ing to Robert J. Dole, fie Senate 
mmarity leader. , : - 

TNe seen a list in addition to fie 
one .fiat's officially up herein 
which fie fimks 

they are not going to achieve wlALS- 
in their bod^Mr. Dole, Rq%- ; 
Scan of Kansas, said in an inter- 
view Thursday. 

. He said the White House work- 
ing paper had been given to a few 
Senate Republican leaders. 

Mr. Dole said fiat tbe adminis- 
tration might accept changes m 
farm programs, student loans ted 
subsidies for the Amende passenger 
rail system. 

He said fie purpose of fie White 
House's proposed drastic cuts 
might have been to maV* Co ng ress 
“focus on some of these very ex- 
pensive programs,” and not neces- 
sarily to kill them outright. 

As an example, Mr. Dole died 
the federal revenue-sharing pro- 
gram. He said that fie White 
House had included in its budget a 
plan to ettmmate the p ro gram just 
to make tbe budget cots total $50 
billion. 

“I ihinfc the sent 

it up here for their own purposes, a 
gimmick," he said. “My own view 
is that it was just in there to pick op 
S4 billion. That’s smoke and mir- 
rors.” 

“It’s not any secret. You can go 
through that budget and say they 
are not going to get all of tins and 
they won't get all of fiat," he said. 

The White House denied Friday 
that a list such as fie one Mr. Dole 
described existed. 

President - Ronald . Reagan is 
“mindful fiat all legislation is the 
mpducto f negotiation,” Lacy 


Peakes, a spokesman. But, he said, 
“There’s no alternative list of bud- 
get cuts fiat r ep re se n ts a White 
House fallback position. It does 
not exisL" 

Before Mr. Reagan proposed bis 
$973.7-bQlion budget for fiscal 
1986 on Feb. 4, members of fie 
Senate Republican leadership 
said they would offer an alternative 
budget with greater cuts than the 
r oug hly S34 ballioa fie administra- 
tion was then discussing. 

But that deadline passed, and 
now Mr. Dole and others plan to 
change Mr. Reagan’s budget as 


Woman Killed in Vatican Fall 

The Associated Press 

VATICAN CITY —A woman 
Fell to her death Friday from fie 
roof of St Peter's Basilica in what 
Vatican officials said appeared to 
be a suicide. The woman was not 
immediately identified. 


part of Con g re ss ’ wymat budget 
process rather than start from a 


separate document. 

Mr. Reagan’s proposed budget, 
which projects a deficit of $180 

'faflKoP, tnr*nd«5 an f*l mil* , 

tary spending of nearly 6 percent 
after inflation. 

However, Mr. Dole wriri the 
White House list “was btaakT when 
it came to militaiy spending. Mr , 
Dole has said repeatedly that Con- 
gress would not accept Mr. Rea- 
gan’s proposed increase in Penta- 
gon spending, and he yid he 
believed the increase would be 
more like 3 percent. 

“My own view is fiat we will 
make some changes in fie presi- 
dent's budget for defense," he said, 
“bnt wc?re not gomg to cat H to fie 
extent that we (kart have to mate 
cuts elsewhere.” 

. Mr. Dote said fiat Mr. Reagan's 
proposed cuts in student toms, lim- 
iting each student to a maximum of 
$4,000 annually, was “another one 
that’s to be modified.” 

He said White House officials 
were also considering accepting 
changes in their recommended S16 
biQjon in farm price support reduc- 
tions ova the next three years.- 
“There are going to be savings in 
agriculture, but not to tbe extent of 
$16 billion,” be said. 

■ Admonition From Mother 
David A. Stockman's mocha, 
Carol, who raised her son on the 


• Do-It-Yourself Prison, in the Comfort of Home 

For a Fee, Florida Offenders Avoid Jail try Strapping on Electronic Monitors 


By Jon Nordhdmcr 

n : New York Times Service 

Tare® WEST PALM beach; Florida 
_ . — In a coma near Jay Match’s 
' ‘ : ^7-- tdephenreats a black box about the 
. .. * size of te attacb6 cast Tbe boot is 

. ' Mr. Match’s jailer. 

_,-* About two weeks ago, Mr. 
« Match was placed under three- 
. - ‘ 'J? month' house confinement by a 

vri.* county judge. He spends his seo- 

. . lent* confined to his hone, wifi 
_ - time off during fie, day to go to his 

:• " *i place of- employment. 

: < A three-ounce (85-gram) trans- 

„ . v-*-^- ’ imttcr strapped to his \cg above the 

„ ankle emits a radio' agnal every 35 
. 4 B iJrf ' seconds. The electronic innards of 
fl L* the black box in the ccmermoriitor 

j. > the signals and report Mr. Match’s 
"■ i c movements ova the telephone to a 

~.V ' computer mites away in the offices 

- of Pride Inc. 

‘ ■ .- 1 The company charges chronic 

-j-jju- misdemeanor defendants Hire Mb*. 

/■ Match a substantial fee for the 
. right to be supervised at home. 

' It is posable to remove the tnrns- 


mitta and its plastic strap, but it is 
not possibte to replace it without 
de t ection, a violation of probation 
fiat would land him in j wfl , if fie 
black box is unplugged tbe com- 
puter records the violation and 
prints out a report to Pride Inc. 
probation officers. 

Tbe monitor in Mr. Match’s 
bouse picks up signals from fie 
ankle transmitter at a range of 75 
feet (about 23 meters) made a 
structure. If a person moves outside 
fiat range, tbe monitor reports fie 
infraction to fie computer. 

“Tf man jtijilre^ ran def e at 

it,” Tom Moody, , inventor of the 
monitoring system, saysof his cre- 
ation. “But no cate has figured out a 
way yet” 

Electronically monitored in- 
house confinement as an alterna- 
tive to jail has been the subject of 
brief experiments elsewhere. Its use 
is raising questions on how the 
methods developed in Florida 
might be applied to mac serious 
offenses. 

“As long as it doesn’t take on Big 


i rs^ - U.S. Troop Limit Is Called 
flexible in El Salvador 


: By James LeMbyne 

' ~ New York Times Service 

;X. \ . SAN SALVADOR — The 55- 
•\ >> “ person limit on U.S. military advis- 
;: v .; ers in El Salvador does not inchide 
: ;‘v , military personnel sent for less 
*■- : than iwo weeks of temporary duty, 
- ' . according to a U.S. Embassy offi- 
- ' rial here. 

Memberebf the U.S. nriKtary as- 
r signed to El Salvador fa* less than 
two weeks have eanmoed new air- 


. Air Force, the embassy official said 
" 1 Thursday. 

* - The use (rf such temporary per- 

- v*. sonnel would appear to let ihe 
• “V United States have a larger military 

presence in El Salvador fian would 
>/ be indicated by the total numbatrf 
-* f US. military personnel normally 

* considered to re in the country. 
\ . •\ tl r Tbe number of Ui soldiers here 

.. - has been a continuing source of 
• - " / . debate between fie Congress and 
fie administration. 

. ' • A report this week to the Con^ 

' gresskmal Arms Contrcd and For- 

• eign Policy Caucus secured fie 
y . Reagan administratton of “insuflt- 

. • dent, misleading and in some cases 

i false- infonnatifln” about UA aid 

'v ' ; ; to El Salvador. Tbe report dted tbe 

-^ 3 ,-.. : * use of mili tary personnel oh tempo- 
; ; . • raiy.duty as an cianipte.of efforts 

t - .?■ <; , to decrive Cangress: ; 

> ; Th e u,S. Embassy official 

. *.'* . stroogjy denied that Congress had. 

- * ' / . been m^mf cased abort fie use of 


U^. militaiy personnel on tonpo- 
faiydntyhaeL 

“If they’re hoe for less fian two 
weeks, they’re not counted,” the 
official said. “It’s the policy, so 
argue it. with the policy people." 

Under the redes, an embassy 
spokesman said, fie United States 
can have more than 100 soldiers in 
El Salvador in several categories: 

• Fifty^Bve trainers, who direct- 
ly- instruct Salvadoran soldiers in 
military tactics. 

• Thirteen members of the mili- 
tary group on permanent assign-, 
meat to fie U.S. Embassy, who 
monitor the use of U.S. mifitaiy 
»cBcmn« and consult wifi Salva- 
doran officers. Until 1984 they 
woe indi^ in fie 55-person Om- 
it on 'trainers. Their exclusion from 
rhm limi t allowed an increase in the 
number of trainers. 

• Between four and six “commu- 
nicators,” who operate the embas- 
sy’s communications network. 

•Between 20 and 26 military 

medical specialists, who work in 
what fie embassy calls “humani- 
tarian assistance," training Salva- 
doran military personnel who tend 
sick and wounded soldiers. 

• Five defense attaches, who 
send military intelligence to the 
Defense Department. 

. •Between 17 and 20 marine 
guards assigned to protea fie em- 


Brother aspects," said Fred R. Ras- 
mussen, Pride IncJs executive di- 
rector, “fie ^ llllim are qnite high 
we’ll see this type of equipment 
move into ofia areas of the correc- 
tions system." 

Sheriff Richar d WiBe of Palm 
Beach County said, "There is all 
VinH of potential help this technol- 
ogy can give us in corrections. Whh 
40 new units we fed we can put 40 
people who are already incarcerat- 
ed but of fie county stockade and 
free the space for fdons.” 

' He has ordered 40 more dec- 
trouta units to depand the custody 
program beyond fie six used in a 
trial period that began Dec. 1. 

Pride Inc. is a nonprofit private 
concern that in a few yens has 
pioneered private supervising of 
traffic and misdemeanor probation 
cases. 

Law-enforcement officials else- 
where m tbe United Staes are mon- 
itoring the Florida company to see 
how well it manages a program that 
allows chronic misdemeanor and 
traffic offenders to stay oat af jafl. 

Most of fie probationers, of 
whom there were max than 9,000 
last year, are required to report in 
person to Pride Inc.'s offices on a 
regular basis for conferences wifi 
fie company's coimsekns. In the 
past, these duties were adminis- 
tered by local or state agencies. 

It is Pride lna, and not fie 


courts, that has tbe last word on 
who joins the proyam. It screens 
offenders who are given a choice of 
jail or hone confinement, and from 
among them selects candidates 
least likely to violate probation. 

“Down the line this program will 
probably start accepting sub- 
stance-aonse problem cases," said 
Mr. Rasmussen, fie company di- 
rector, using law-enforcement idi- 
om for cases related to drugs and 
alcohol 

Mr. Match traces his troubles to 
ignoring traffic court summonses 
fiat led to suspension of his driv- 
er’s license. 

He said in an- interview that ad- 
justment to nighttime and weekend 
confinement had not been as easy 
as he had thought il would be. By 
fie end of fie fust week, he said, be 
was studying ways to dismantle the 
monitoring equipment without be- 
ing caught 

The puzzle sometimes keeps Mr. 
Match awake late at night when his 
jailer automatically dims the com- 
puter, making soft clicks and whirs 
in the blade box. 

“I hear that box kick in and I fed 
Hke tearing it from the wall,” Ik 
said wifi a faint anile, newly mind- 
ful fiat iron bars do not a prison 
make. He is paying Pride Inc. S410 
to monitor him for three months, a 
sum that wiD be forfeited if be 
violates probation. 


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AMA Preparing 
Pkm to Combat 
Malpractice 'Crisis' 

New Yak Tima Service 
CHICAGO — The American 
Medical Association, has proposed 
legislative and policy actions for. 
itself, for individual doctors and 
their insurance companies and for 
the state and federal governments 1 
to combat what it calls a national 
med»ca l malpractice problem of 
“crisis proportions.” 

The third and final report by the 
organization’s Special Task Force 
on Professional Liability and In- 
surance, released Thursday, said: 
“It makes no sense for a renowned 
surgeon in New York to have to 
pay an S80,000-a-year insurance 
premium to practice medicine. It 
makes no sense for insurance com- 
panies to pay more money to law- 
yers than to injured persons.” 

The previous reports noted that 
Americans were filing three times 
as many 'medical malpractice 
claims as they did 10 years ago and 
were winning record settlements. 

The proposals include public 
education programs, tougher legal 
defense strategies, financial penal- 
ties for “nuisance suits,” and limits 
oii damage awards and legal fees. 



Senator Robert J. Dole 

family farm in St Joseph. Michi- 
gan, says he is wrong to. think 
American fanners only warn a fed- 
eral bail-put. United ness Interna- 
tional reported from Washington. 

Mrs. Stockman told an Iowa ra- 
dio station Thursday that her son’s 
comments do not “set too well wifi 
roe.” 

Mr. Stockman, fie (Erector of 
fie Office of Management and 
Budget in the White House, stud 
Wednesday that many farmers 
would be Corned out of business 
because “that is the way a dynamic 
economy works.” 


Giving more federal help,, he 
said.^ would be a “very bad signal to 
all the other groups who have had 
cither a current or past mips for 
their program.” 

Last week, in congressional testi- 
mony, Mr. Stockman said he “can’t 
figure out why the t&xpxyczs of tins 
country haw the res ponsibili ty to 
refinance tbe bad debts wiUmriy 
incurred by co nsenting aHutrg 
went out and bought farm land 
when the price was going up be- 
cause they could get neb.” 

Mrs. Stockman said her son did 
not seem to realize fiat fewer 
young people were choosing ca- 
reers as^ farmers because they could 
not afford iL 

“Maybe we’re firing in an era 
where tire family farm is not useful 
any more,” tire said. “I hope not 
because I don’t warn to think fiat’s 
true." 

The Sto ckmans have about 45 
acres (18 hectares) of^ vineyards and 
150 acres of com and soybeans on 
their farm along T-ake Michigan 
near the Indiana border. 

She said her husband has 
thrmghr about quitting fanning. 

“We’ve had an abundance of 
crops and wefre just not getting any 
mttoey at all for our crops," she 
stud. “When I looked at our books 
last week and found out how much 
money we lost, I was awed. But, 
you know, we've chosen tins kind 
of a life.” 


Doctors Choose 
3dRedpientof 
Artificial Heart 

The Associated Pros 

LOUISVILLE Kentucky — 
A 58-year-old man with conges- 
tive heart disease will become 
tire thud artificial heart recipi- 
ent Sunday, at fie hospital 
where the last artificial heart 
patient, William J. Schroeder, 
underwent his operation in No- 
vember. 

The new patient is Murray P. 
Haydon, a retired Louisville as- 
sembly line worker, who has 
had heait trouble since 1981. 
Dr. Wiliam C DeVries, who 
wiH lead the operating 
said Friday that the drags Mr. 
Haydon had been receiving are 
now ineffective. 

The plastic and ' metal heart 
to be implanted in Mr. Haydon 
is a Jarvak-7, the model that was 
implanted in Mr. Schroeder on 
Nov. 25 at Humana Hospital 
Audnbon. Mr. Schroeder, who 
celebrated his 53d birthday 
Thursday, is stiB at the hospital. 

The first artificial heart recip- 
ient, Dr. Barney B. Gaik, re- 
ceived a Jarvik-7 heart on Ike. 
2, 1982, at the Univeraty of 
Utah. He lived for 112 days 
with the devioe and died on 
March 23, 1983. 


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INTERMnONAL 



Justice by Rank in Navy? 


Jke nasty specter of justice by rank has been 
rased m the case of the Navy vice admiral, 
Joseph Metcalf III, who led the invasion of 
Grenada in 1983. For bringing back Soviet 
|uns as souvenirs, he was given only a letter of 
“caution. Meanwhile, lower- ranking Marines 
and soldiers were court-martialed, final im- 
prisoned and drummed out of the service for 
what looks like the same offense. 

The Navy responds by saying it was not the 
same offense: More than 300 Marines who 
also tried to bring home captured Soviet-made 
weapons were also not punished, but were, ■ 
rather, given amnesty for turning the weapons 
in. Only four Marines, who ignored the amnes- 
ty offer and tried to smuggle and sell the 
captured arms, were charged, the Navy says. - 

This defease, however, ignores several con- 
siderations. The public is being asked to be*- 
Heve of Admiral Metcalf that he and his staff " 
were unaware of the efforts being made by 
Marine officers under his command to retrieve 
captured weapons from their men; that none 
of them was aware of the military regulations 
controlling war trophies; and that, further- 
more, none of them was aware of the law 
banning the importation of automatic weap- 


The Elections in Korea 


; A chilling police rush to “protect” a return- 
ing opposition figure brought the government 
of South Korea deservedly harsh condemna- 
tion just last weekend. On Tuesday, however, 
an election was held that produced a rather 
contrary reaction. The party of Kim Dae Jung, 
the returning exile, ran directly against the 
“military dictatorship” of Chun Doo Hwan 
and took 30 seats. The result is being read as a 
favorable comment on President Chun’s loos- 
ening of the political process in the last year. ' 

Did some of us perhaps give too much 
importance to the well-publicized drama of 
'Kim Dae Jung’s return? "The ima ge of him as 
■an abused politician seems not to square with 
Uhe reality of the leeway offered his party in the 
campaign and with its success at the polls. But 
there is a reasonable explanation for it. 

President Chon has the police on tap. He 
•wanted to demonstrate his control of the turf 
[when Mr. Kim returned, and he did, in a 
, heavy-handed way. It remains, however, that 
■President Chun, partly in response to Ameri- 
can “quiet diplomacy,” has been opening up 
the system somewhat: releasing prisoners, re- 


admitting banned people to academic and po- 
enl Chi 


liticaj life. President Chun fit Mr. Kim into 
this pattern, letting him bade in time to resume 
a shadow political role and to give his party a 
■home stretch boost — a kind of advertisement 
for President Chun too. There is no contradic- 
tion between the airport rough stuff and an 
electoral process giving the opposition wider' 


play: both reflect Mr. Chun's derisions. And 
both leave Mr. Chun firmly in control. This is 
the point The military dominates politics, 
justifying it by the evident aggressiveness of 
communist North Korea. Mr. Chun, a retired 
general, represents the rinhtary dass. More- 
over. Korea's is a presidential system: the 
, national assembly has no real power and the 
constitution gives the president’s party a lock 
mz it The opposition will have mme of a forum 
-now. This could produce street and student 
actions of a sort that have traditionally led 
Korean presidents to show muscle- Stilt the 
opposition has qo ready way to reach power. 

How is change to come about in a place like 
South Korea, with an increasingly middle- 
class sodetyeaga for democracy and an ambi- 
tious officer dass bent on power? Internal 
forces will supply most of the answer. As 
South Korea’s defender, patron and well-wish- 
er, however, Washington cannot stop presting 
for change. It must do all it can to guide the 
Koreans institutionally and to school than 
against abuses of police power. Otherwise; the 
cause of democracy is undermined there; and 
support for Korea is undermined here. 

Something da*- is undermined, too. If the 
American government does not work effec- 
tively fra freedom in friendly states, it dimin- 
ishes its claim to be truly interested in working 
for freedom in unfriendly states. Korea is 
testing American good faith. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Laundering Dirty Money 


; Why should bank officers and employees be 
exempt from the duty to report possible evi- 
dence of crime? They claim that privilege, in 
effect, when they resist federal pressure to 
report suspiciously large cash deposits. Wash- 
ington is right to keep up the pressure. 

Congressional investigators and the presi- 
dent’s Commission on Organized Crime are 
convinced that too many financial institutions 
■look the other way when customers haul in 
bags or suitcases of small bills. Too often, the 
deposit is “street money” from illegal drag 
sales that needs to be laundered — made to 
appear legitimate by disguising its origin. 

• “We’re not in the law-enforcement- busi- 
ness." a Bank of Boston spokesman said de- 
fending its lack of interest in the origins of 
small bills shipped to Boston by Swiss banks in 
exchange for bricks of new $100 bills. 

• Banks are not supposed to spy on their 
customers, but neither are they pledged to 
keep their suspicions to themselves. In fact, the. 
Boston tank committed a crime. To help fed- 
eral investigators pursue drug traders, the law 
requires reports of every cash transaction with 
foreign banks exceeding $10,000. The Bank of 


Boston failed to report $1.22 tnfiion in cash 
swaps with Swiss banks, and has been ordered 
to pay a fine of $300,000. 

The bank pleaded guilty to “willfully and 
knowingly” committing a felony, but contends 
that it was merely negligent. That inconsisten- 
cy strains the bank's credit with the public — 
no matter what becomes of the further reports 
about cash transactions with a leading mem- 
ber of the underworld in Boston. 

More experience with the disclosure law 
may persuade Congress to make money-laun- 
dering itself a crime. And to encourage report- 
ing of suspicious transactions. Congress might 
also consider protecting bank employees 
against lawsuits in case their suspicions turn 
out to be completely unfounded. 

Meanwhile, banks had better look to their 
reputations by policing themselves against 
drag money. And gambling casinos, too. The 
Treasury commeadably. extended the report- 
ing requirement to casinos, where money is 
easily laundered by buying and again cashing 
chips. In that respect, the Treasury explained, 
casinos behave like banks. 


— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


Deception in die Kremlin 

The attention given to President Chernen- 
ko's state of health might well be criticized as 
excessive. Certainly, as leader of a superpower, 
lie deserves tanner headlines if he did indeed 
suffer a stroke and was brought tack to life. 
But why should such speculation be necessary? 
The answer is that learning the truth from 
Soviet sources is as difficult as finding pearls 
In oysters. The Kremlin has so much to hide 


that deception has become second nature to 
most Soviet officials. We now know that state- 


ments about President Andropov’s state of 
dons for his succes- 


health were false. Explanations i 
sot’s absence are more imaginative, but proba- 
bly no more, trustworthy, they may make most 
sense when regarded is terms of the power 
struggle for the succession, about wind! the 
"Soviet population will not be consulted. 


— The Times {London). 


FROM OUR FEB. 16 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


4910: Martians Build a New Canal • 

fclEW YORK — The London “Daily Mail” 
reports: “Professor Perrival Lowell, the direc- 
tor of the Flagstaff Observatory, in Arizona, 
•announced the completion of a new gigantic 
engineering enterprise by the people of Mars. 
‘He says the Martians have constructed a canal 
.-a thousand miles long. Professor Lowell suc- 
•ceeded in photographing the canal just after it 
[had sprung into being. He says that water has 1 " 
•been turned into it and between May and , 
‘September vegetation appeared in a hitherto 
1 uninhab itable part of the ‘great desert.' which 
spreads over the greater part of the planet's - 
surface. Professor Lowell says that photo- 
graphs of the new canal prove that it is artifi- 
cial and that Mars is inhabited.” 


1935: RepaMican Assails Relief BH 
WASHINGTON — The Republican on- 
slaught against President FJD. Roosevelt’s 
$4,880,000,000 relief work bill was taken up by 
Senator Arthur H. Vandenberg, who referred 
to the measurc in a fiery speech [on Feb. 15] as 
“a'blank check for the biggest sum ever passed 
in a single transaction.” The measure, passed 
by the House and now submitted to tin; Sen- 
ate,, gives the President blanket authority to 
. spend the sum as be sees fit to take 3,500,000 
persons off the dole and give, them relief by 
providing employment on public works pro- 
jects. Senator-Yandenburg called the bill “the 
most amazing legislative proposal in the histo- 
ry of this or any other democracy.” “Its only 
merit,” he shouted, “is a pious, puzzling hope.” 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chotmum 1959-1910 


KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM & PALSY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHZLZPM. FOISIE 
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ROBERTS. McCABE 
SAMUEL ABT 
CARL GEWIRTZ 


LEE W. H0EBNER, JWbfer 
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Editor 
Dtpxy Ediur 
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FRANCOIS DESMAISONS Dtreaer of Gmdatk* 
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Dattiar of A Jrwmag Sda 

latenwnunl Herald Tribune. 181 Avenue Oaries-dfrOanDe, 92200 Norilly-sur-Sdne, 

France. Telq>haaeTO-1265. Tekse 612718 (Herald). Cable Herald Pais. 

Dirtaeur tie b pubikation: Water N. ZTwjw, 

Asia Headquarters. 24-34 Bemessy Rd., Hong Kong. TeL 5-285618. Telex 61170. 
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_ * - /(J lights moved. 



SATURDAY-SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16-17. 1983 


Nakasone Ventures Out on a Limb in U.S. Trade Issues 


T OKYO — A few years ago, it 
was fashionable among U.S. 
trade negotiators to say that it really 
made no difference who was prime 
minister of Japan. A prisoner of the 
bureaucracy and ins party's business 
interests, he could make no holes — 


By William Chapman 


ons. This last is important: The weapons 
. seized from the admiral and his staff by U.S. 
Customs were AK-47s — 24 of them. These 
are not among the kinds of weapons — rifles 
and pistols — that, after being removed from 
the Marines and rendered inoperable, were 
returned to them as permissible “war tro- 
phies.” The AK-47 is an automatic weapon, a 
machine gun, regarded as especially dangerous 
and often associated with criminal activity, 
and it may not be brought into the country 
except under specific, statutory conditions. 

The Navy has announced it is reviewing the 
sentences handed down to the Marines con- 
victed in the related cases. Some soldiers were 
also convicted, and we trust the Army is re- 
■ viewing those cases. That is the least the ser- 
'vices can do to lift the corrosive suspicion that 
Admiral Metcalfs look-ma-no-bands perfor- 
‘ mance, and the Navy’s apparent old-boy treat- 
__ meat of him, have created in this case. 

It is disappointing and — within some parts 
of the Navy, it is reported — demoralizing that 
the Navy and Admiral Metcalf should choose 
to do the least This is responsibility? This is 
leadership? This is our Navy? 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


even if he wanted to. which he proba- 
bly did not —in the bride wall erect- 


ed against imports from abroad. 

Contrast that view with the remark 
attributed to a senior U.S. official 
summing up the results of the Jan. 2 
conference of President Ronald Rea- 
gan and Prime Minister Yasuhiro 
Nakasone in Los Angeles: “When 
we’ve gotten commitments at this lev- 
el from this man {Mr. Nakasone], 
they’ve been carried out” 

The exuberant official may merely 


have been applying some gloss to an 
dull luncheon encounter. 


otherwise di 
Indeed, Japanese familiar with the 
Los Angeles meeting say no commit- 
ments were made, that Mr. Nakasone 
merely “heard” Mr. Reagan's la Lest 
pleas. Still. the change in American 
attitudes is striking. 

How successful is Mr. Nakascme’s 
trade record in attacking the barriers 
U.S. businessmen say they find here? 
The statistical surface provides limit- 
ed grounds for the Reagan adminis- 
tration’s optimism. After all the year 
in which he took office Japan ran a 
trade surplus of about S 15 billion 
with the United States. Last year it 


reached S33 billion, and this year it 
could climb to S50 billion. Market- 
opening measures have reduced some 
tariff rates, but not many on products 
profitable to U.S. industries. 

Mr. Nakasone has shown he can 
manage his own government on some 
issues, given a half-free hand. The 
laborious task of rewriting certifica- 
tions and standards has shown some 
quickening of pace in the last two 
years, although the record of actual 
business sales does not reflect it. Per- 
haps the most risible achievement 
was last spring’s agreement to begin 
opening up Japanese financial mar- 
kets. The prime minister intervened 
relentlessly in that encounter with the 
U.S. Treasury, summoning his fi- 
nance minister to make greater con- 
cessions and to work more swiftly. 
But in that case he had some latitude. 
Thp Japanese financial community 
was itself divided on liberalization. 

The statistical trade record of his 
tenure is not all bleak, either. U.S. 
imports here are growing, although 
not spectacularly, and are doing so in 
the face of the irrationally strong dol- 
lar that makes them more expensive. 
It is the wildly growing exports borne 
in the other direction by that same 
dollar that is pressuring Japan. 

Japan can argue with much justifi- 
cation that a more reasonable ex- 


change rate would fix things econom- 
ically. but it would not work 
politically. The real rub these days is 
that the seemingly endless trade" dis- 
putes have boiled down to big-ticket 
items. Mr. Reagan, in Los Angeles, 
listed four — telecommunications, 
forest product*, computers and drugs 
and medical equipment. 

They are the sort of stuff on which 
real money rides — hence the power- 
ful pressures from U.S. industry — 
and they are the ones on which Mr. 
Nakasone is going to be tested as the 
Japanese prime minister who makes 
any significant difference. 

The levers be has to use are some- 
what the same as an American presi- 
dent's. Fust he can muscle the bu- 
reaucracy into compliance, 
compelling it to make the dozens of 
minor changes in bidding rules, qual- 
ity standard* and safety regulations 
-— the core of trade disputes here. 

Second. Mr. Nakasone must go to 
the mat with some hostile and suspi- 
cious members of his own Liberal 
Democratic Party, particularly those 
in the rise of agricultural interests 
that are the party's conservative an- 
chor. They do not much like Mr. 
Nakasone anyway and, markets 
aside, would relish a chance to tar- 
nish his image as an international 
statesman. He has just lost a bout 


over tariffs on. of all things, boned 
chicken, which is important to South- 
east Asians. The official word is al- 
ready out that the U.S. plea for more 
wood imports is doomed to the shelf. 

What can one make of a prime 
minister who cannot cut a deal with 
his own k ind on boned chicken and 
plywood? The perception is emerging 
that Japanese protectionists are wea- 
rying noijusi of the incessant Ameri- 
can demands but of Mr. Nakasone' s 
positive responses to them. A curious 
cyde has set in. The prime minister is 
popular with the public, and a large 
pan of that popularity rests on his 
frequent appearances on the world 


stage with Mr. Reagan. He is unpop- 
e those 


ular with his party because 
same performances result in yet more 
de mands that offend the main con- 
stituents of the party. 

As one Japanese economic official 
noted recently, powerful Diet mem- 
bers are asking each other, “Why 
should we suffer so much to make 
Mr. Nakasone look so good?” 

Two decades of trade disputes, be- 
ginning with textiles and coursing on 
through autos, steel and color TV 
sets, have followed a pattern. Sound 
and fury are followed by smiles and 
agreements, which last until new em- 
bitterments arise. Cooler heads and 
Japanese concessions prevail, so far. 

But the Nakasone era is a bit dif- 
ferent. He, unlike his predecessors. 



has put himself far and visibly 
front. Past settlements with, the 


our 


Americans bubbled up from the bu- 
reaucracy or were craned 


by nonpo- 
litical but respected ad hoc ministers. 
Other leaders found it wise not to 
venture out on the kind oflimb where 
Mr. Nakasone is. and there are those 
eager to see that limb lopped off. 


The writer war formerly The Wash-, 
ingtan Past's Tokyo correspondent. 



Tetchiest: 


This may shock you. Corporal, but over at the 
Admirals' Club , tee think of you as a very sore loser . ' 


Independent Envoys 
Pose Problems for U.S. 


By Flora Lewis 


P ARIS — Evan G. Galbraith. US. 

a mbassado r to France, has put it 
on the record. Shortly after announc- 
ing that he will return to private life 
next July, he lei out a blast at all those 


treating thing to have an American 
ambassador assault our Foreign Ser- 
vice people’ who are sitting in the 
front lines to defend our country . . . 
So 1 think when he says *it takes the 


other people he consider* inferior guts out of people,' somebody aught 

r ■ r f; i 7. r 


forei: 


. i policy makers, 
le State Department desperate- 
ly needs to be rigorously harnessed,” 
he said. “It has too big a role to play 
in foreign policy, and foreign policy 
is too important to be lot up to 
Foreign Service officers . . . There’s 
something about the Foreign Service 
that takes the guts out of people.” He 
said, some time later, he meant the 
gnts to contradict superiors. 

Naturally, that has gotten him in 
trouble, with the embassy staff, who 
delivered a strong protest, and Secre- 
tary of State George P. Shultz. 

Mr. Shultz said: “It’s a very dis- 


God Was Not Really Dead in Sweden, Just Sleeping 

By Carl Rudbeck 


ITOCKHOLM — For the last 


S couple of winters. Swedes have 
spent their Sundays under the spell of hobby-horse in Sweden is alcohoL) 
Ingemar Stenmark. In the mornings Tax evasion could be a sin, the 


the streets were abandoned as we 
huddled in from of the TV watching 
the first leg of his slalom runs. After 


UTTER FROM STOCKHOLM 


hrnch we rushed out for the tradition- 
al walk in the nearest available forest, 
making sure to return home in time 
for Stannaries second run. 

This winter, with no World Cup 
victories. Stenmark is the God that 
failed. So instead of spending week- 
ends analyzing how Stenmark won 
bis 80th victory, Swedish people have 
turned to discussing God. 

Astonishing as it seems, this most 
secularized of countries can still be 
stirred by religious controversy. It all 
started with a sermon by Stockholm’s 
newly appointed bishop, Krister 
StendahL recently returned to Swe- 
den after many years at Harvard 
School of Divinity. 

The bishop did not unleash the 
controversy with some new version of 
the ontological proof of God’s exis- 
tence, but by riding one of Sweden’s 
two hobby-horses: taxes. (The other 


bishop declared. He did not mean 
only outright cheating on lax returns 
but also legal emigration with all 
one’s belongings in order to enjoy a 
milder climate and less punitive taxes 
in Switzerland, Spain or England. 

Those Swedes who emigrate are 
ref using to bear their social burden, 
the bishop maintained In placing 
their own interest* and those of their 
family before society’s, they are ego- 
ists or, in short, sinners. He called on 
Christians to condemn this perfectly 
legal behavior of their brethren. 

The bishop's sermon predictably 
delighted the Social Democrats while 
the imposition, just as predictably, 
raised hell about religious functionar- 
ies meddling in politics. 

The former Conservative Party 
leader, G&ta Bohman bad. a few 
days before, fulminated against what 
be termed a politicized church. He 
demanded that the church respect 
Swedish law and abstain from en- 
couraging, for example, the refusal to 
carry arms. The Swedish church, Mr. 
Bohman complained, weakens the 
national will to resist a possible fu- 


ture aggressor and went on: “Is it 
asking too much when I want the 
right not to have to see in my church 
posters with communist slogans 


painted by children? 
Since then 


the theological discus- 
sion has been in foil swing in both 


daily papas and prime time radio 
and telerisic 


revision. Some accuse the bish- 
op of bad theology and careless read- 
ing of the Bible. 

Jesus did not condemn the Prodi- 
gal Son for leaving home with all his 
worldly goods. Nowhere in the Gos- 
pels does Jesus brand the transfer of 
funds across borders a sin. One con- 
servative bishop even contended that 
present taxation levels are against the 
will of God. 

The Archbishop of Sweden, Bend 
Werkstrihn, jumped into the mdee 
by saying “GOsta Bohman challenges 
the entire Christian community in 
Sweden” and that he wished to cen- 
sor the clergy’s right of free speech. 

What the discussion comes down 
to is what role the state church should 
play in Sweden. Should it merely, as 
the conservative critics wish, tend to 
the spiritual needs of its members, or 
should it, as the more radical mem- 


bers want, also take an active politi- 
cal stance in questions sud) as aid to 
the Third world and the nuclear 
freeze? Does the fact that Sweden has 
a stale church — the priests and the 
bishops are all paid by the govern- 
ment — in any way curtail what can 
be said in the pulpit? 

The radical priests like to compare 
themselves to their activist colleagues 
in Latin America and Poland; their 
critics point out that they want to 
both have their cake and eat it? You 
can’t be in opposition to the govern- 
ment that is giving you your daily 
bread. But the conservatives’ paint of 
view is most un-Swedish. 

In Sweden, even artists and writers 
whose main program is the overthrow 
of what they call our bourgeois capi- 
talist state are handsomely rewarded 
with state- stipends and grants.! 

No resolution to the dilanma is in 


to tie ins tongue for him.' 

But Mr. Galbraith, a banker, does 
not really seem to consider Mr. 
Shultz his boss. He stresses that an 
ambassador is the personal envoy of 
the president, which is formally true. 
Butne goes beyond that. He told his 
staff soon after be arrived that be was 
fully confident he understood the ba- 
sic thrust of President Ronald Rea- 
gan's policy, and therefore did not 
need to chedc with Washington when 
he wanted to speak up. 

On his own, hewen ton French TV 
to mW Communis ts then in the gov- 
ernment “poor Frenchmen who have 
gone astray ” Last July, he called a 
press conference to say it was absurd 
to complain about the U.S. budget 
deficit because there is not one over 
afl. Recently, amid a French political 
flap about New Caledonia, he said 
pubfidy, “the French must stay.” 
Paris had to check around to find 
our what Washington’s policy really 
was Mr.- Galbraith boasted that be 
hadS taken the initiative because lie 
„ dithuirheliejein dd-fashioned 
nonsense about not interfering , in 
otherpouiUries' .politics.” 
ffis,idea of diplomacy, be has said, 

] “is-reafly pushing the. president’s pd- 
ides,” which, he presumes to know 
’ better than anybody, including Mr. 
Reagan. In what he called “the defin- 
itive argument for the Strategic De- 
fense Jartative,’’ Mr. Galbraith pub- 
lished in The Wag. Street Journal this 
week a fanciful account pretending to 
look bade from they ear 2045. It tells 
abouta crisis in 2000 when, thanks to 
“ster.jwars” weapons, war was avert- 
ed! The Soviet union had been back- 
ing down since, .abandoning Cuba. 
That proved, he said, “that both the 
strategic defease and the nuclear de- 


eagiSMw- - assayas: 

integral aspect of a U.S. deterrent 


proves 

in Swiss rather than in 
banks. What is dear is that God is far 
from dead iu Sweden where a superfi- 
cial glance might have led an outride 
observer to think that He bad been 
replaced by an ombudsman. 
International Herald Tribune. 


A Case of Lost Innocence in Foreign Policy Arena 


N EW YORK — In 1867. a 
young American named Qem- 


By Richard Reeves 


ens traveled through Europe and 
the Middle East, sending back long 
letters to a San Francisco newspa- 


They are clever cynics in the 
White House, calculating that per- 


jxr/The letters were published in a 


; apd mad e the name he signed 
famous — Mark Twain. 

The book was called “The Inno- 
cents Abroad.” The title was pur- 
loined and perverted on Feb. o by 
President Ronald Reagan in his 
State of the Union Address: “We 
cannot play innocents abroad in a 
world that is not innocent,” the 
president asserted. 

Certainly our president protected 
no innocence in fus own world view. 
What he called “the new freedom” 
in the speech often sounded much 
more like “the new cynicism.” 
There was nothing innocent, for 
instance, in equating the Soviet in- 
vasion of Afghanistan with the San- 
dinist revolution in Nicaragua. Both 
represent such evil, such original 
sin, that, under the doctrines of the 
new cynicism, the United States is 
morally justified in financially sup- 
porting resistance to either. 


baps the public and Congress might 
support the < 


overthrow of the San- 
dinists in the name of killing Rus- 
sians in Afghanistan. The idea is to 
link the two in both the innocent 
minds of the public and the not-so- 
innocenl covert appropriations ap- 
proved by Congress, 

Ah, innocence! Remember when 
the same people were idling us that 
the covert anti-Sandinist activity 
was purely to stop the “flow of 
aims* to Salvadoran guerrillas? 

Ah, cynicism! They have lied to 
us from the very beginning, and 
they will be tying to us on the day 
we pay for another invasion of Nic- 
aragua — in the tradition of the four 
by the U.& Marines since 1909. 

Ah, history! There was no Soviet 
Union, much less a “Soviet threat,” 
■ when we started invading Nicara- 
gua because we didn't like local gov- 
ernments. Mark Twain was one of 
the people opposed to that first in- 
vasion, writing in those days of 


Manifest Destiny: “Extending the 
Blessings of Civilization to our 
Brother who Sits in Darkness has 
been good trade and has paid well, 
on the whole; and there is money in 
it yet if carefully worked — but not 
enough to make any considerable 
risk advisable.” 

Now “civilization" is defined as 
anti-communism, and the people of 
Nicaragua, it seems, are still silting 
in darkness waiting for the Marines 
to bring the American tight of “the 
new freedom.” The point here is not 


Twain was trying to warn us about 
i and ouii 


ourselves and our growing power in 
“The Innocents Abroad. 9 The title 
was both true and ironic. We were 
powerful enough to be truly inno- 
cent, which I would define as truly 
American, and to look for good 
rather titan tad in brothers daring 
to be different from us. 

“We always took care to make it 
understood that we were Americans 
— Americans!” Twain wrote in 
“The Innocents Abroad.” “When 
we found that a good many foreign- 
ers had hardly ever heard of Ameri- 
ca, and that a good many more 


that the Sandinists are good people, knew it only as a barbarous prov- 



Tbey are not nice at afl. President 
Daniel Ortega Saavedra and bis 
comrades, aim I certainly would not 
want them around ray bouse. But it 
is not my house, it is theirs. 

It might be well to remember 
that, innocently, now that we are 
again poised for greatness on the 
borders of Nicaragua. It might also 
be well to remember ihat Mark 


World . . . The people of those for- 
eign countries are . . . ignorant. 


“The people stared at us every- 


where, and we stared at »hem_ 
generally made them feel rather 
small, too. before we got done with 
th em , because we bore down on 
them with America’s greatness until 
we crashed them.” 

Universal Press Syndicate. 


At just that time. Mr. Reagan was 
telling The New York Times that he 
wants research to see if the defense 
“is practical and feasible.” Then, “be- 
fore deployment. I'd be willing to sit 
down and, in a sense, mtematiopaf- 
ize, to negotiate” to make sure the 
Russians knew “oui goal was still the 
elimination of nuclear weapons.” 

There is a contradiction. Mr. Gal- 
braith says missiles must be kept at a 
substantial level no matter what, and 
calls arms control “illusory.” Scone in 
the administration agree with him. It 
is not the president's stated view. 

The issue is not just whether the 
United States is better served by 

or by prudent, e^ricn<xd^profes- 
sionals. The diplomats know the 
United States is not alone in Ae 



Conservatism in die U.S. 


UTTERS TO THE EDITOR 

Call forMideast Peace 


Regarding the opinion column U A 
Look at the Wrongs of America's Po- 
litical Ritfil" (Feb. 5): 

W illiam PfafFS dUCDSSiOO of the 
“second-rate” quality of American 
conservatism is a weak effort at his- 
torical analysis. It is incorrect to con- 
sider the current attempt at paring 
down government excess ana pro- 
moting entrepreneurial activity 
through deregulation as intellectually 

n rAnrnar.il M ndiot"? 


“second-rate." Compared to what? 
Does he consider the social polices of 
the 1960s and *70s financial burdens 


which stagnated growth and faded 
inflation to everyone’s detriment as 
intellectually credible and therefore 
valuable to policy decisions of the 
1980s? Does an attempt to let private 
enterprise take over areas where the 
government has failed or proven it- 
self ineffective signal the silent onset 
of another 1929 through historical 
ignorance? Mr. Pfaff could make 
himself useful, as a champion of an 
“ixuellecniar tradition in American 
politics, by proposing some solutions 
of his own. 


The Arab peoples are aware of 
President Reagan’s concern in inter- 
national events. We also believe the 
president shares our sincere desire for 
a resolution of world problems. De- 
spite this conviction, it appears that 
the Reagan administration has 
scarcely made an attempt to find a 
solution to Middle East problems. 


No other country uses amateurs to 
represent it to the extent the United 
States does, and Mr. Reagan has 
named an unprecedented number of 
nonprofessional ambassadors.- The 
question is whether qualifications for 
ambassadors go beyond handsome 
contributions to a campaign fund 
and an ideological affuuty. 

Tbe recent outburst from Richard 
L. (Dixie) Walker. U.S. ambassador 
to South Korea, blaming Americans 
for getting beat 19 trying to accom- 
pany Kim Dae Jung is another case 
of undiplomatic sounding off. Both 
Mr. Galbraith and Mr. Walker saw 
fit to ex p ress US. foreign policy by 
endorsing Senator Jesse Helms’s (Re- 
publican of North Carotins) re-elec- 
tion during last falL 
The United Stales is not a pip- 
squeak country. These who speak for 
it are heard. It cannot have as many 
foreign policies as it has cocky am- 
bassadors. Mr. Shultz deserves sup- 
ra his effort to make deaf that 
lomacy requires 


The New . York Times. 


Many Arab people hope the U.S. 

1 will find a solution 


CHARLES REED. 

Paris.' 


administration 
soon winch will be morally and politi- 
cally fair to the warring parties. Our 
hope is that the problems of the Mid- 


dle East, after so many years of fana- 

tism and terror, are soon to end now _ r 

that Mr. Reagan has been re-elected m^it and expertise, and to make 
president of America — the country appointments accordingly. 
that most respects freedom, justice 
and equality. 

Anm nations share so many ideals 
with (be American people. We be- 
lieve in freedom and peace: 

I have lost most of my family in the 
Lebanese war, a reman which has in 
the {last contributed to enriching civi- 
lization. 1 know what war and vio- 
lence really mean. 

REDWANMOUSSA. 

Fans. 


1 Letters intended for publication 
should be addressee "Letters to the 
lEdkor" and must contain the wit - . 
'eris signature, name and fidf ad- 
dress. Letters should be brief and 
are subject to editing. We cannot 
be responsible for the return of 
. unsolicited man u scr ip ts. -,- r - - 





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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNPAY, FEBRUARY 16-17, 1985 


P*g*J 


*« 







American 
Says He Saw 
Mengele as 
U.S. Prisoner 

By Jay Mathews 

Washington Port Service 

LOS ANGELES' — A former 
U-S. soldier has said ihat he saw a 
mao identified as Dr. Josef Meo- 
gele at an American prisoner-of- 
war camp mGennany w 1945, the 
first witness to suggest that the 
Nazi war drinrinal once was in U.S. 
hands. . 

Two U-S. senators who beard 
Thursday's account by Walter 
Kcmptbocoe, a retired aerospace 
engineer, said they would insist 
that the UJS. government deter- 
mine whether Dr. Mengde was m 
American custody and if so, how he 
could have escaped ft. 

Dr. Mengde, who would be 73 if 
alive, was a major in the Nazi SS 
and a physician at the Auschwitz- 
Birkenau camp, where as many as 
four million prisoners were gassed 
and cremated. Survivors have de- 
scribed his painful and s om e tim es 
crippling medical exp e rim ents on 
them. 

Considered the most notorious 
Nazi war criminal stQl at large, Dr. 
Mengde is wanted in West Germa- 
ny on murder charges and is 


“I think Mengele is alive," said 
Senator Alfonse M. D* Amato, Re- 
publican erf New York. “I think the 

noose is tightening.*' 

Mr. Kempthome, 59, erf River- 
side, California, said he wrote to 
Rabbi Marvin Hier, dean of the 
Simon Wiesenthal Center for Ho- 
locaust Studies, after reading about 
the center's earlier disclosure that a 
US. intdligence officer thought 
Dr. Mengde had beat briefly in 
US. custody in 1947. The Lx* An- 
geles-based cento- documents Nazi 
crimes and is named for a Nazi- 
hunter. 

Cdond^m^h^cNab, said that 
Mr. Kempthome’s report “is brand 
new information which we wel- 
come.” He said the army would 
work with the center and other offi- 





, — «-*. ’ '^'V, 

v* HW '-a- 

J,. 

a, _ :'*■> r-.? 

* & iS 

. * 

► , * 


MAFIA UNDERGROUND — Police inspecting one of 
several caves discovered in Palermo, Sicily, beneath the 
viDa of Michele Greco, who police say is a top Mafia 



From His Guarded House in Seoul, 
Kim Watches for a Political Chance 


By John Burgess National Assembly. The parry won rure,” he said Friday at party head- 

washington Post Service 50 seats, and thereby became the quarters. 

SEOUL— Since his tinnuftnoos lamest opposition force. In the meantime, there have been 

return a week ago. Kim Dae Jung, Some Western diplomats in tentative signs of conciliation 

the dissident leader, has settled into Seoulhave expressed concern that ^ government, which will 

a routine in bis modest bride home the Chun government will feel continue mcontrol the assembly, 
in western Seoul — one of watching threatened by the new party, orga- ’■’i 


and waiting. nized only one month before the Prosecuiois have been quoted^ 

m khald- jackets stand dections, and crack down rather saying that they will use restraint^ 
aiftno than «ewvimvwtn t? il pursuing daims of election law vior 

SSwntlMiTS^ aretiweto But an offidalin the ruling Dent- lations, most of which were lod^d 

ocratic Justice Party gave a differ- against opposition candidates. Ai$ 


make sure that Mr. Kim never ocrai ? c n 
comes out and that only foreign 
reporters and members of. his im- "f npeople w 
meddle family go in. *5 "Tfc 

Viators pass a sign dedarin^tire 
area off limits for reasons of na- . .. 

tional security ”aiad they must sign 
in at a special police booth. Chm . 9* 


ocratic Justice Party gave a differ- against opposition candidates. A 
eat view Friday. The vote showed tiregoveramem party has agreed ,10 
that “people want stability, but tneet with opposition leaders o& 
they at frp want liberalization,’’ he f°re the convening of the assembly 
said. “We will have to accommo- in late March or early ApriL u 
date those two desires.” But there are signs that ibp 

Another ruling party member, government is worried. On Thu£S- 


I security,” and they must sign maai S’ Bovotudcdi is women. un i»wr 

a special police booth. Cbm Yam* Choul an assembly day. authonhes were reponol « 

^ caiA rKIl « rvniTH oi A haw cm mI nff iKa romniieM nF Iran 



, V*Tr\FTT T. r member, said the results could aid 

Inside, Mr. Knn keeps abreast of s^bility. “People who have been 
hues through newspapers, tdwi- noisy outside the National Assem- 
>n and iclq^hones matihe police Hy foe now been taken into the 
e presumed to have lapped. official framework of the legisla- 


Iha AaoetaadPico 

leader. Pofice said the caves and a network of tunnels, 
some linked to the homes of Mafia leaders, were used 
for secret meetings and as hideouts by Mafia members. 


U.S. Pupils in Brussels Get Anti-Terrorism Advice 


By Steven J. Dry den dozens of American multinational Egbers, but “otherwise, we fed recently” by requests for help to He also said that he has asked 

Washington Post Serna companies that have offices here, kmd of helpless.” improve security. the government to end his confine- 

BRUSSELS — Efforts by Amer- Their concerns surfaced last fall. The bombings have led to a large Mr. Franks said that he was of- meni, which keeps him from meet- 

icans in Belgium to tighten security after a new group, the Fighting increase in requests for belp from ten asked at his presentations, “Am ing with his former political allies, 

after a series of anti-NATO bomb- Communist Cells, claimed respon- the embassy itself. Mr. Franks, the 1 a target?” He said he coaid assure “If house arrest is not lifted, I 

ings have been extended todemea- ability for several attacks on inkal- embassy security officer, said that most people that they did not have must take other measures to com- 

tary school children, who are re- lotions with links to the United in the past Americans had “found to worry because they were not municate with them,” be said. He 

rri wn g ins truction to protea them Stales and NATO. excuses” not to come to his presen- senior diplomats or business execu- did not elaborate, 

from terrorist attacks. For the Americans living hoe, unions. lives. Mr. Kim's hand has been 

A psychologist employed bv the two of the attacks woe particularly “Obviously now with the in- Nevertheless, he said, he had strengthened by the performance 

ns disturbing. crease in action they are willing to told everyone to vary their routes to of the New Korea Democratic Par- 


Egbers, but “otherwise, we fed 

kind erf helpless.” 

The bombings have led to a large 


recently” by requests for help to 
improve security. 


politics through newspapers, televi- 
sion and telephones that the police 
are presumed to have tapped. 

In an interview Friday, a week 
after be returned from two years of 
self-imposed exile in the United 
States, Mr. Kim said he had not 
decided on his next move. “I am 
watching the government’s atti- 
tude,” be said. 

He said be still expects to have 
the meeting that he has requested 
with President Chun Doo Hwan, 
and that he now hoped the opposi- 
tion would follow a moderate 
course to facQiiate such a muring 

He also said that he has asked 
the government to end his confine- 


have sealed off the campuses of twq 
Seoul universities, largely vacapt 
because of winter vacation, out -of 
concern that demonstrators would 
gather there. , r . 


.-ass®** 






Their concerns surfaced last fall. The bombings have led to a large Mr. Franks said that he was of- meni, which keeps him from meet- 
after a new group, the Fighting increase in requests for belp from ten asked at his presentations, “Am ing with his former political allies. 
Communist Cells, claimed respon- the embassy itself. Mr. Franks, the la target?” He said he could assure “If house arrest is not lifted, I 


TY 1 




coving instruction to protea them States and NATO, 
from terrorist attacks. For the Americans living hoe, 

A psychologist employed by the two of theattacks were particularly 
VS. Embassy hasvisiled kinder- disturbing. . 


lives. 

Nevertheless, he said, he had 
cold everyone to vary their routes to 


garten and first and second grade 
classes at the International School 


The first was the bombing in 
October of an office of Honeywell 


CTnnes ana is namea tor a nazi- gy security officer has met with 
nun ter. parents to offer advice on safety. 

An army spok esm an, Lieutenant The psychologist. Beth Hny 
Colonel Qmg MacNab, said that said she had encouraged the chil- 
Mr. Kempthorae’s report “is brand dren to “play it safe with strang- 
new information wbch we wd- era.” She said die did not use the 
come.” He said the army would word “terrorist” in her presenta- 
woTfc with the center and other offi- tions, although some of the cfail- 
tials to pursue it, but cited a large dren were deariy aware (rftbewor- 
nnmber of records that aflhave to nes of adnlts. 


Of Brussels, where half the 1100 Inc-, a contractor for the US. mili- 
students are American. Anemias- tary-Thc second was a car bomb 


bejone thro ugh by h and. * ^ “Whai the school ittp, up stai- 

Jhe mny recently las rd e^d nhr. lh«, UJ 
other documents, one erf wmen sag- 

mb Dr. Mengde once lived m ^ ^husy security officer, 
t nnarta . ..... Robert Franks, has met with par- 

Mr. Kempthrane. said that he mts . at ^ Brussels American 
was sezvmg is a perimeter maid at School The 300 students at that 
an army Counter-Intefiipeiice school, vdrich is run by the Defense. 
^,K-, at L d “^f )b T5^- 30 Department, are American. In ad- 


>. - - -m v dm* a^vuui i i um iij uiw nii».i H 4 iii mx a nu at 

miles (49 kilome ters) east erf Trier ^ition, it contains a NATO dime Same of the women’s husbands 
m southwestern Germany, when he and recreation fadhty used by miH- received roedal safety instractxai 
CToomitered the man Kientified as taiy personnel. after the Honeywdl bombing, such 

Dr. Mengde. One of die entrances to the as changing the routes they took to 

A friend who often traded favors school grounds has b e e n closed off work, she said, 
with other soldiers invited Mr. with a parked van, and the other The American Chamber of Com- 


with other soldiers invited Mr. with a parked van, and the other 
K&Upthorne tolu^> ddiver some entniiyy i« gnaid ffrf 'jy .JJ g jql* 


nging the routes they took i 
she said. 


bmjor'or cigarettes to-^a guard'll' 
ade the post. 

There, Mr. Kemplbame said he 
saw what apposed to be a German 
prisoner s tandi n g “at rigid atten- 
tion.” The man “had a fixed look 
on his face,” Ml Kempthome said. 
“He was breathing heavily and was 
red-faced.” 

In a letter to Rabbi Hier released 


mace of Belgium held an informal 
meeting erf representatives from 


The precautions at the schools UE. companies to discuss methods 
were among several taken recently of improving security. Same obvi- 


to reassure the Americans in Brus- 


suchas 


sels, who include Noth Atlantic company plaiting lots, were sug- 
Treaty Organization diplomats, gested, according to the Chamber j 


militar y 


and executives of- of Commerce president, John 


In a letter to Rabbi Hier rdeased or ■ TF7 - T T 

KMS Spain Was Unaware 

are you trying tod^to S' Of U.S. Nuclear Plan 

He's mdv fn fall nver” • 


two U.S. guards: '■ 

Mr. KanpthOTne: “Geez, what 
are you guys trying to do to him? 
He’s ready to fall over.” 

One of the guards: “We’re get- 
ting hfm in shape to get hong. This 
here is Mengde. The bastard that 
sterilized 3,000 women at Ausch- 
witz.” Then, turning to the prison- 
er, the guard said, “Cmon, boy, 
you're good for another 100.” 

On his guard’s command, -the 
prisoner dropped to the ground to 
do morepnsiHip5, but was too ex- 
hausted and was led away, Mr. 
Kempthome said, 

Rabbi Hier said that Mx. 
Kempthcune’s general description 
erf tire man nearly matches that of 
Dr. Mengde, but the fact that the 
retired soldier does not remember 
the prisoner’s face could make 
identification from old photo- 
graphs rirffifirift. 


By Edward Schumacher 

Nat York Times Service 

MADRID — Spam’s deputy 
prime rtnmster said tmu his govern- 
ment was unaware of US. contin- 

on^i^ Spain "and that^^^e 
dcpl^mcni would never be al- 

Alfonso Guerra said Thursday 
- that Spain world not permit its 
soveragnly “to be violated by any 
secret plan of whatever country.” 

IBs reaction was similar to that 
from other nations in response to 
revelatkais that the United States 
had contingency plans to store nu- 
clear depth charges in Spain and in 
seven other countries. 


According to tire reports, con- 
firmed by the U.S. government, 32 
depth charges would be stored in 
Spain for use in banting subma- 
rines or blocking strategic straits. 
Spain borders on the Strait of Gi- 
braltar, the entrance to the Medi- 
terranean Sea. 

The UJS. Embassy said in a state- 
ment that the United States would 
not deploy nuclear arms “without 


Member of Soviet Politburo 
Will Visit U.S. Next Month 


emmem. Il also said that, in keep- 
ing with US. policy, it would not 
confirm or dmy the presence of 
nuclear weapons in Spain. 

The United States maintains 
four bases in Spain, including a 6th 
Feet base at Rota. A Spani&h- 
American accord providing for tire 
use of tire bases bans nuclear weap- 
ons from Spain. The lower house of 
the Cortes, or par liamen t, is unani- 
mously on record against the em- 
placement of nuclear weapons in 


New York Tbues Service Presidium, 

WASHINGTON — The Soviet presidency. 
Union’s Ukrainian leader, Vladi- Mir. Shch 
tnfr v_ Shdrerbiiaty , who is a mem- gmeerbytr 
ber erf tire ruling Politburo, will old Sunday. 


L 1 6X1 t 1Q11T.I1 The disclosure comes at an inop- 

portune time for Prime Minister 
K ... „ . Felipe GonzMez. He favors keep- 

Preadtum, the nations collective jn g Spain in the North Atlantic 


Mr, Shcherbitsky, a rfumriral en- 


Treaty Organization, but the issue 
is contested and a referendum is 


gimw-by training, will be 67 years planned for 1986. Opponents say 
old Sunday. He is one of tire Soviet that continued membership will 


visit the United States next month, leaders who rose to high position tg tire plac ema n of nuclear 
it was anno unced here Thursday, during the Brezhnev era. He has weapons in Spain. 


it was announced here Thursday. 

Mr. Shcherbitsky will be the 
highest-ranking Soviet official to 
visit Washington since Foreign 
Minister Andrei A. Gromyko’s top 
in September and, before that, Leo- 
nid L Brezhnev’s' visit in 1973. Mr. 
Brezhnev was then Communist 
Fatly general secretary. 

Mr. Shcherbitsky will lead a dd- 
egation of the Supreme Soviet, the 
nominal natirnal le gislatur e. 

State Department officials said 
that while he is in* Washington,, 
from March 4 to 7, he will be re- 
ceived by President Ronald Rea- 
gan and Secretary of State George 
P. Shultz. 

The announcement of the visit' 
was made by Representative 
Thomas P. O'Neal Jn, tire speaker 
of the House. The Sovia group wiB 

be returning a visit made by a 
House to the Soviet 

Union in 1983. 

In addition to being a Politburo 
member and tire Communist leader 
of the Ukraine, which is the sec - 
ond-ranlrimj Soviet republic in im- 
penance, far. Shchobitsky is a 
member of the Supreme Soviet's 


been the leader of the Ukraine Spokesm 
since 1972 and a full member of the ance, the r 
Politburo since 1971. they would 


weapons m bpain. 

Spokesmen for the Popular Alli- 
ance, the rightist opposition, said 
they would demand u parliament 


After its stay in Washington, the that the government say whether it 
Soviet group will visit Texas, Cali- knew of the U-S. plans, 
forma, and New York from, March A Communist spokesman 

8 to 13, Mr. O'Neill said. quot ed by tire Spanish news agency 

Tbe visit will come shortly before EFE said, “The United States 
U.S.-Soviet arms control talks are treats Spain like a peripheral co un- 
to resume in Geneva and after next try of limited sovereignty subject to 
week’s bilateral discussions in Vi- the demands of United States for- 


enna on tire Middle EasL 




cagn policy.'' 


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crease in action they are willing to told everyone to vary their routes to 
listen,” be said, adding that tire work and to be alert to surveillance 
embassy “has beat rather strapped by strangers. 


did not elaborate. 

Mr. Kim's hand has been 
strengthened by the performance 
of the New Korea Democratic Par- 
ty, which is dominated by his fol- 
lowers, in elections Tuesday for the 


■ woct'*®’’ 


** ■ i 


attack Jan. 15 (a a U-S. military 
administrative headquarters in a 
Brussels suburb. A U-S. Army 
guard was slightly injured in that 
attack. 

After the second attack, the 
group said il had demonstrated it 
could kill “Yankee soldiers” and 
warned that il did not hold human 
life “sacred.” 

After the Honeywdl bombing, 
“there was quite a lot of anguish 
among wives of top executives,” 
said Kathy Webster, a director of 
the American Women’s Qub in 
Brussels. The fear was especially 
pronounced if their husbands’ 
companies were attached to tire 
military. 

Same of the women’s husbands 


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Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURPAY-SUNP AY, FEBRUARY 16-17. 1985 


ARTS /LEISURE 


Modem-Furniture Race Is On 


The I’s Have It in Lausanne 


haenmwtal Herald Tribune 


L ONDON —The raw for 2Qth- 

i centnrv fumiriin* ic nn ir\A t Un 


ccntuiy furniture is on and the 
Victoria and Albert Museum is 
running fast. 


This is possibly because it made 
a late start. Until 1979, decorative 


an after 1900 was simply not con* 
sdered. In the last six years, the 
London museum, probably the 
richest in the world m outstanding 
objets d’an from every culture, has 
been steadily building up a coDec- 


SOUREN MeuKIAN 


don of furniture and furnishings 
covering Britain, Europe and the 
United States. 

Britain does not come out partic- 
ularly well despite the fanfare that 
surrounded the opening of the Brit- 
ish Gallery in 1983. Tins is chiefly 
because the British contribution to 
the 20th-century decorative art is 
modest in the extreme. Few pieces 
in the British Gallery bear compar- 
ison with those from France, Ger- 
many, Austria or the United States 
and nearly all of those that do pre- 
date World War I. Much to its 
credit, the museum did manage to 
make one or two discoveries. 

Few have heard of Jack Pritch- 
ard. He was a lonesome creator of 
the 1920s who experimented in a 
style that borrows its shapes and 
proportions from a distant past 
and handles them in the stream- 
lined mannw of industrial design. 

Zh 1929, ire produced a cabinet of 
Far Easton starkness. It is a rect- 
angular chest opening with two 
doors devoid of any ornament and 
rests on four tubular tegs. The ma- 
terial, called plymax, is a British 
invention which was first used in 
furniture by Pritchard. It consists 
of copperfaced plywood, used for 
the doors, and zincfaced plywood 
which appears on the top. It has a 
smoothness and subdued sheen 
reminiscent of some Far Eastern 
lacquer. 

Clive Wainwright, a m useum re- 
search assistant and a leading spe- 
cialist in 19th- and 20th-century 
furniture, notes with regret that the 
prototype interested no one at the 
time. It remained with the designer, 
now 86, who recently approached 
the museum which was only too 
glad to accept the gift 

Such failures were not unusual 
between two world wars. The 
bolder and more sophisticated fur- 
niture designed in the early '30s by 
Denham Madaren fared no better. 
A desk with a rectangular top of 
macassar ebony and ingeniously 
pivoting drawers on one side is as 
good as anything done in continen- 
tal Europe under the influence of 
the Bauhaus movement. 

Yet, the public ignored it com- 


pletely, and the prototype, once 
agai n , remained with the artist. It 
was he who approached the muse' 
um in 197? "hen the Department 
of Furniture and Woodwork start- 1 
ed buying 20th-century pieces. 

Where decorative art is con- 
cerned, modernity was restricted to 
fringe groups in Britain between 
the two world wars. This, as much 
as the international tradition of the 
institution, induced the Victoria 
and Albert Museum to give consid- 
erable attention to the great cre- 
ations from Europe and the United 
States. 

The museum made its first real 
coup in 1982 when it acquired a 
large group of Viennese furniture 
and other objects. These include 
some early 20th-century pieces that 
were not to be seen outside Austria. 
A superb example is the book- 
shelves that form part of the furni- 
ture designed by Otto Wagner for 
the Postal Savings Bank. 

The shelves of stained beech 
made for the director's office were 
thrown out in the late '40s when the 
office was bring redecorated and 
rescued by a Viennese collector — 
the source of the museum's massive 
purchase in 1982. 

Another rarity, more interesting 
for its historical significance than 
hs aesthetic value, is the Sitz- 
machine or “sitting device," which 
is in effect an armchair, designed in 
1905 by Josef Hoffmann. 

The next catch was a writing cab- 
inet by Koloman Moser. The calx- 
net is a quin tessen tial product of 
the Secession movement, which 
was at its height when it was de- 
signed in 1904. Professional 
sources estimate that the price paid 
by the museum was £58,000. 


In 1982 this was a large figure for 
a piece of 20th-centuiy furniture. It 
reportedly raised some questions in 
the minds of decision makers ax the 
top of the institution. When a relat- 
ed piece done by Moser in 1902 was 
sold by Sotheby’s at Montecarlo in 
April 1982 for 1,650.000 francs — 
dose to £150,000 at the time — a 
moment of quiet triumph is said to 
have been enjoyed in the Furniture 
and Woodwork Department 

A few months later, the museum 
had a lucky fluke. This time the 
subject was German furniture. Two 
pieces were submitted by a London 
dealer with good connections 
among sellers who specialize in 
house clearances. They came from 
a house in Hampstead, an upper 
class residential suburb on the edge 
of North London, which had beat 
the home of two German refugees. 

One was a sideboard in elm 
wood with detached ebonized pil- 
lars supporting a heavy cornice. It 
looked like a Biedermeyer updated 
by an architect of the early 20th 
century. The other piece was a 


INTERNATIONAL 
ART EXHIBITIONS 


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PRE-COLUMBIAN ART 


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appear 
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modem version of the “gentle- 
man's wardrobe,” with two doors 
opening the upper part and three 
drawers at the bottom. There was 
ribbing on the sides and ribs and 
grooves on the broadly rounded 
comers. It was afl highly unusual 

Fortunately a German shipping 
label of June 1939, still pasted on 
the back of the sideboard, put the 
dealer on the track. Going through 
illustrated magazines of the early 
years of this century, he found a 
photograph showing the sideboard 
in situ — a house built outside 
Munich by the architect Emanuel 
von Seidl who had also designed 
the furniture. 

The gentleman's wardrobe was 
even more sensational. A photo- 
graph of a matching cabinet repro- 
duced in a monograph on Walter 
Gropius gave the due: it had been 
designed by the architect in 1913, 
long before he became one of the 
key figures of the Bauhaus. The 
Victoria and Albert bought the two 
pieces together for £23,000. 

As word got around that the mu- 
seum was on the lookout for signifi- 
cant pieces of 20th-century furni- 
ture, private owners started 
contacting the museum. 

Give Wainwright got a letter 
from a woman from East Berlin 
who lived in Glasgow. She had 
brought to England a cabinet de- 
signed by Richard Riemerschmied 
in 1 906. A glance at the photograph 
convinced Simon Jervis, the deputy 
keeper, and Wainwright of the im- 
portance of the piece. 

It is an austere affair without any 
ornament; its decorative effect 
rests entirely on the architectural 
lines and use of the grain of the 
mahogany. The department decid- 
ed to buy the cabinet on the 
strength of a photograph. 

Acquisitions are not so easy 
when it comes to American fumi- 


Bv Mavis Guinard 

/flfenw.TGM/ Herdd Tribune 


H undreds of eyes are 

watchint vou at Lausanne’s 


IS 


imm.iinn 

of the Kunsthaus in Zurich, she 

Rijksmuseum to Honor Painters and Ptou&apher$“ in 

J 1977. 

fTi ■§ tv • . TR/f - Painters such as Eugene Dela- 

borly Drypoint Master -SS 

and Egon Schiele readily reached 
By Pamela Williams ly collection, according to a state- for ± c camera. In the'mid-20th 
The Associated Prea ie eni from the museum. century. Andy Warhol was as ready 

A MSTERDAM — Art histori- At different times, scholars have to use a Polaroid as paint for a 
ans have gleaned much of assi&ned the anonymous arust medi um 
what thev know about urmer-class Dutch, German and Flemish na- Both in the exhibit and the 512- 


H Sdomon's Idolatry,” by tbe unknown Dutch master. 


Rijksmuseum to Honor 
Early Drypoint Master 


By Pamela Williams 

The Associated Press 


ly collection.” according to a state- 
ment from the museum. 



what they know about upper-class 


life 500 years ago from the work of tionahty. 

one artist, whose detailed depiction _ ~“k e worked m Germany, 

r _ • j <it _ _ ■ ■■ V. ■ Pilwlt llTnb C4irl u in«I I ihmlr Ini 


of the period will be exhibited at 
the Rijksmuseum March 14 to June 
9. 

The experts do not know who the 
artist was. Labeled “The Master of 
the Print Room” or the “Master of 
the Housebook." he or she is be- 
lieved responsible for about 120 
prints and p ainting s dating from 


Dutch, German and flemish na- Both in the exhibit and the 512- 
lionahty. ^ page catalog, Biheter has brought 

“1 dunk he worked in Germany,” out common denominators in the 
Filedi Kok said, “and I think too arti s ts' themes: working tools, roie- 


Self-portrait of Imogen Cunningham (about 1913). 


that he could have come from the 
Netherlands." 

The artist's primary technique, 
drypoint, involves engraving im- 
ages in metal and leaving a metal 


playing, relationship with others 
and, above all quizzical looks at 
themselves. 

Camera in hand, Robert Capa 
snapped himself in battle dress and 


keep a diary. In Seattle, Imogen postcards pinned above a cluttered 
Cunningham took her picture as a shelf. Were they for instant inspira- 


wide-eyed student in 1910 and con- tionH There are views of Canoes 
turned to do so until she was 94, the and reproductions from the Im- 


eyes still questioning. 


residue, or burr, that gives the lines more recently, Marc Riboud 
of the image a velvety effect, Filedi caught fa reflection in somebody 


Some try to show the pain be- 
hind the eyes, as did Paul Gauguin, 
or. Munch in “Sleepwalker. 


ture because of distance. Few about 1470 to 1500. 


pieces were shipped to Europe. 
They have to be bought on the spot. 


Kok explained. 

Only a limited number of dry- 


pnessiomsts. 

Bonnard, who began to paint at 
the height of the Impressonist 
movement, acknowledged an ex- 


cise's sunglasses. 

They cast themselves in many 


Artiong these, Frida Kahlo, the dent debt to Pierre Auguste Renoir, 
wife of Diego Rivera, tried again Degas, Claude Monet and the 


Jervis and Wain 
use what rare tr 


many’s 


t to have worked in Ger- 
hineland, the artist did 


point impressions can be made be- with disguises and props. The 30(1 a S ai f 1 to express the suffering Fauves. He was long reubbed for 


tin wright have had to not sign or initial the works that 
traveling opportune survive. They are recognized as be- 


fore the burr wears away, account- yoimg Gustave Courbet envisioned of heT crippled body. 


never veering from this influence. 


ing for their rarity. 

The mas ter was the only artist 


himself as a traveler, as a wounded 
soldier and even took a last gjiim 


Unfortunately Vincent van striving to capture tight through the 
Gogh is not represented in this ex- use of ever stronger but always bar- 


tics comeih^waT^'ihcTC is knoymto use the technique during fook at himself aT Sie. Pebgie, Motion, In painting aflCTpamtiM 

i ? 3^ ^ ^Unites W Style, Subject 3nd Hfna f>r D iunlu in fliA n#li ■ ■ t * ^ n riwn>ralriv tnM T.-I inuhrae him. 


ploratory purposes. 

Wainwright, whose wife, Jane, is 


technique, according to J. P. Filedt 
Kok of the Rijksmuseum, who is 


time of Rembrandt in the 17th cen- activities in behalf of the Paris desperately tried to analyze him- 


tury did it surface again. 


Baltimore; has better organizing the exhibit 


lines of communication than otb- Working mostly in drypoint, the 


Of the 90 
that survive 


Commune of 1871. 


self. He wrote to his sister, “It is not 


ers. When a Chicago dealer ao- artist depicted hunting parties, re- 
quired a group of metal furniture man tic interludes and elegant so- 


diypoint imprtssions Man Ray photographed himself 
by the master, 70 are over a period of 50 years, striking 


hims rif easy to paint oneself." Both pho- 


moniotis color. 

In his diary, he noted the weath- 
er (fine, cloudy, windy), sketches of 
work in progress and cryptic obser- 
vations on painting, like, “It’s a 


the only copies known, according m a Basque beret or with a 10 a « ree - 


tosraphers and painters here seem choice, one can sworn in chocolate 

* : U - 1.5, I--. 


designed in 1904 by Frank Lloyd dal gatherings, as well as biblical 
Wright for the Larkin Building in allegories. 


Buffalo, New York, Wainwright What makes the mystery mas- 


was among the first to hear about ter's works unusual is the way 
iL The Metropolitan Museum women are portrayed. The artist 


to Filedt Kok. starfish pinned to his turban. Ga- “L A utoponrau d rAge de la Pho- 

“The arust offers a fascinating spar-Felix Nadar, the pioneering tographie" Lausanne. Music Can- 
*5“* CX ^v. at J? French photographer, flexed his total des Beaux Arts. Place de la 

Middle Ages, he said. As the cep- muscles m the regalia of an Indian Rmonne 6. Lausanne, until March 
tunes go by, whohe was is soil the chief. With modem lenses came 24; Wurtimberg^cher Kunstverein. 


spar-Felix Nadar, the pioneering togpaphie , Lausanne. Music Can- 
Frencfa photographer, flexed his tonal des Beaux Arts. Place de la 


tunes go by, who he was is still the 
biggest mystery of all" 


bought one armchair and the Vic- showed women dominating men by 
toria and Albert got another — being coyly mani pulative, a more 


distortions, polarization or man- Schlossplatz , Stuttgart, April //- 
tages to further change or conceal. June 9. 


which was acquired with a 1938 complex view of relations between 
chair, also by Wright, for a price the sexes than was usually recorded 


reported to be £11^00. 

While the rarer pieces in tbe new- 


in the art of the lime, 

“Early in the 16th century, there 


National Gallery Plans 

]y recorded n j i ci» • T A family, whether Ferdinand Hodler To see the self-portraits of Bon- later ones, when Bonnard gave in 

nflnoei aHOW HI London and his wife Valentine, or Mare nard. one must go to Zurich where altogether to Mediterranean light, 

miry, there The Associated Pnu Chagall towing his wife Beliaas she the K un stha u s is showing a retro- one can also plunge into laige-an- 

thepartof LONDON An exhibition floats through the air. At the turn spective of 160 of his paintings gted landscapes of luxuriant gar- 

which is about the composer George Fred- of the century, a Geneva photogra- gathered from the United States, dens or enter the intimacy of sun- 
tent of the erick Handel open at London’s P^- Fred Boissanas, noted each; Russia, Australia, and Europe. The drenched rooms. 
l He holds National Portrait Gallery in No- fanifl y e* 6111 from, honeymooo-'to show is an expanded vttaoti of “Trying to show what one sees at 

in is at the vember to mark this year’s 300th every additional chikL • Bonnard exhbution in Paris last a glance;" Bonnard let tight play on 


tages to further change or conceal. 

A painter’s frequent choice is a 
view of the artist with friends or 
family, whether Ferdinand Hodler 


or in azure blue." Fittingly, his last 
work, “L'Amandier en Fleur," was 
an explosion of white blossoms 
against a vivid blue sky. 

In his early paintings, done in 
Paris, many in the style of fashion- 
able Japanese prints, Bonnard ad- 
mined color in the flash of a red 
garter, tbe yellow spokes of a 
wheel, a skater’s swirling dress. In 


ly formed 20th-century furniture was a big movement on the part of 
collection date back to tbe 1900- women to gain power, which is 


The .Associated Press 


1930, a large part of the acquisi- made clear by the content of the 
tions concern the art of the ’50s. A prints," said Filedt Kok. He holds 
bureau bookcase designed by Gio the title Keeper of Prints at the 


oureau DooKcase uoagneu ay wio me one Keeper or wints at the 
Pond and decorated by Piero For- Rijksprentenkabinet (National 
nasetti in 1950 was acquired last Print Room), which contains the 
year. An American Windsor chair largest collection of the master's 
— a traditional model with spin- work. 


National Portrait Gallery in No- ‘®nuy eve 
vember to mark this year’s 300th a ““ 1 

anniversary of his birth. Many s< 

The exhibition. Nov. 8 to Feb. end with a 


show is an expanded vtrsioti of 
Bonnard exhbution in Paris last 


Many self-portraits b 
d with a sdf -admiring 


and J®- 


23, 1986. “will be the most compre- youthful good looks. Some teD of a mirror, tbe 
hensivc ever mounted on a British mistaken: calling: Jacques- Henri remote, sai 
musician,” spokeswoman Jean Lid- Lartigue photographed himself as a glasses thal 


in the London trade not long ago. majL ^ King Solo- Germany m 1685 but became a others can be ruthless, a record 
All ttm European and American mOTis shown praying ro a forbid- naturalized citizen of Eng l an d He of passages, crises and aging. KUthe 


woman is seen buying the love of a diard said. Handel was born in painter, never with a camera. 


Germany in 1685 but became a Others can be ruthless, a record 


pieces of some ransequence are due 

he HivninvMt kTaiw-flitol Cnn- *n idol to gam the love of one of 


to be displayed in a so-called Con- 1UU * ~ “ _* uve “ ' * 

linentalG^y. The museum is ^concubine. In yet Motirer, De- 

mrrpnttv Intdeiio fnr finufc to in- ^ jgNfr . “*» 00 Sam»ns 


died in London in 1759. 


Kollwitz painted herself as others Conner. One focuses on a group of 


landed versaoti of “Trying to show what one sees at 

don in Paris last a glance,” Bonnard let ligh t play on 
a constant nude, his wife Marthe, . 
As hf» g | nnfw! into hut b athroom standing before the;' 

‘ ter fixed the same dressing table. In “La Grand Baig- 
ik behind owlish noire” the light reverberates so 
; caught by Henri from tiles and water that the model 
s p holographs in seems almost to dissolve, 
ese show Bonnard “Pierre Bonnard,” Kunsthaus, 

: his home at Le Heimplatz /, Zurich , until March 
uses on a group of 10. 


that was caught by Henri 
Bresson’s photographs in 


Cartier-Bresson’s photographs in 
1945. Most of these show Bonnard 
in his atelier or his home at Le 


currently kx>kirig for funds to in- 

«,U i. the. imnart on ^ whiIe “ deeps. 


stall iL When it does, the impact on 

the 20th-century market should be Because of the strong roles worn- 


The Clinical Eye and Sarcastic Humor of Otto Dix 


promptly fdL The new display will en were given in the prints, they 
be tantamount to official recogni- have become a focus of study by 


tion from the most important mu- women's 
seum in decorative art m the world. Filedt Kol 


m recent years. 


By Edirh Schloss 

(nt emotional Herald Tribune 


The “Master of the Print Room" 


R OME — Ouo Dix, just out of 
art school, found hunself pro- 
pelled as a soldier into the atght- 


p Blows, mysterious chimneys and cu raven ts the contemporary issue 
the upward tangle of a burning of flatness versus perspective by 
bush here or there are brushed on putting rare tissue of paintstrokes 
in a thick steady rain of slanting upon another and that upon sn- 
slrokes, falling thick and fast It is other. 


Eros Statue Restored 


The Associated Press 


is also known as “Master of the Parish trench warfare of the first “ if a benevolent force of namre The symbols could mean eyes, 
Housebook” because pen drawings World War when practically still a ^ ^ “P ^ una 8 cs m bright stars, arrows, crosses, arabesques 

...^1 I .1 . . . * _ < . kin/' iwlnrr (Iota am nwl nF liahfninn fimim and litflp 


LONDON — The restored staue tained in a collection of drawings 
of Eros was unveiled in the foyer of by several late- medieval artists, 
the Royal Festival Hall Thursday. t® ^rt historians as “The 

It will be on display for about a Housebook.” 
year until it is returned to its base Those drawings are being lent to 
in the fountain at Piccadilly Circus, ihe exhibit from a “German prince- 


attributed to the artist are con- bov. This experience and his in- h***® 00, .° re ' ^ black ’ wd, of lightning, stick figures and little 

_ - tl j ■ r - _ maiii nrlwta imd fuimnmfv kina .Inmad (lAnrar knff mafI nflAft n«« 


voivement with social revolt after w * rir f acd heavenly blue. domed bouses, but most often an 


the war left its mark on bis outlook, Her industrial faby-tale land- odd winged oeature or missile 
though it never tempered his appe- scape and the painnng which bufli travds across the canvas, tying ev- 
titefor close observation and ll t never, change rhythm and are erything together, givmg a fine 
tsdnstak™ workmanshin cktsely. mtcrtwmotL Coexistence sense to the composition, k u Par- 


painstalting workmanship. 


inij j jj- T , beween paint fabric and ihe artist's res’s interpretation of a sputnik sal- 
Ilalf-d^d sd diers, brawls m silhouettes, contours and shapes dlite which cauriit tris imagination 
beer cedars, the f nghiful ^ the real sulgea matter ofSese when voungTasitdid thatbfevery 

of undernourished and abused and epai pictures. little boyl the time. (He is now 


AUCTION T^:^7^orza. coi- 

II of modish frumps .and ate Mhe ^ L ’ Arie ie, Via Giufo 140, until matron point, absurd and benign. 


EDVARD 

MUNCH 

GIRLS ON 
THE BRIDGE 


Woodcut in 
colours (Sch 488) 



intelligent complex faces of Dix’s Feb 2 g 
I friends were examined with a re- 
lentlessly dinical eye. 


whizzing over a manifold world 
which he celebrates by the act of 


jwmwaijf umiwii tji. , D , painting. 

His approach is above al paint- ? *•, Sf tuI S: Alberto Pares, GaHeris Soligo. 

eriy. Though for him truthfulness Fia del Babuino 5. until Mar£T. 

was imperative, he was quite aware, ® wusp mppea in 

like Goya, that art has to be made Symbcds^ on top of □ 

up and is after all invention. Still he IHuStift? Nona Hershey, an American liv- 

came as dose as he could allow ^ ‘^BBrepatches. The jungle of : no ; n ^ ^ outstandine 

himself to the horror and ugliness She has alwayfbwu 

of his reality, with gnarled outline, **** W** “ a many-faceted v 3 

slashing marks, broomstick-like ^ sen ^ lS ‘ 

swipes and biting color. He also, DOONESBURY 

shows sarcastic humor and Joviality “owiy. Thougbswaimmg with un- - ; 

and much hidden sentiment. ' ‘ I -MJTHOSBAf!ETH£&U& 

This <mtinv.nl iw. 85 aosrracuons, and ne cleverly or- 1 ctnua/VERim \Dnunumm 


Nona Hershey, an American liv- 
ing in Rome, is an outstanding 
printmaker. She has always been 


fascinated by the intense contrasts 
of light and shadow, the outdoor 
sun and secretive indoor Hark of 
the South, and the way tbe inter- 
mingling of both happens in win-, 
dows and their reflecting panes, 
making cross-bands and patterns 
and glittering labyrinths. 

In her new etchings she has 
reached a new and ampler stage. 
Everything is grandly simplified.' 
Wide sweeping white planes meet 
the deepest of deep blacks at unex- 
pected angles. The contrasts and 
the perspective r unning in startling 
diagonals are daring. At times 
white bare walls are accented by 
the occasional flourish of a washing 
line, a hook or a pipe casting an , 
elongated shadow. From the reality 
of a merciless sunlight on worn. 
walls and forgotten interstices, 
Nona Hershey has created an in-', 
ingoing array of shapes and pat- 
terns in her etchings. Herwaleroof- 
ots, large and bold too, are tinted 
rather than painted. 

Nona Hershey. Galleria II Ponte. . 
Via S. Ignazio 6. until Feb. 28. 


To be auctioned on February 26th together with other 
Norwegian paintings Le. Frits Thaulow and Christian Krohg 
For information. catalogue, purchase order and seat 
reservation phone: ( 02)41 2631 


shows sarcastic humor and joviality sww \ 1 lnougn swaimiqg wim un 
and much hidden sentiment. ages they could also be considers 
This smtinmt sad Dix's un- “ md he cleverly di 

adorned rough angular line, bor- 
rowed from the vigor of German 0 t 

folk art and naive peasant painting, Cillna GetS SeOUel 
is best seen here m The Young * 

Girl", “The Witch", “Self in Pro- Tn flaaelr* IVovpI 
file” and “The Baby”. There arc I^UiISSILlWyCI 

SO me exceptional oils and watered- The Associated Press 


DOONESBURY 


-amp iHosefiKETm&uer 

5tOMG£BPi5. VO YOU HAVE 

msptaALmmtmz, 
\ SENffm? 


ft/tcrvvv<*V'U,'t 


the whole show, as well as many 
fine drawings and prims. 


B EUING — China will print a • 

million copies of a newly- writ- 
ten sequel to the 1 8th century clas- 


KUNSTHANDEL A/S 
Tordenskiolds gt. 5, N-Q160 Oslo 1, Norway 
Tel. (02J 412631 


Otto Dix, Galleria Giulia, Via sic novel, M A Dream of Red Man- 
Giutia 148, until March 2. sions,” the official Xinhua News 

Agency has reported. 

- . - n Described as a “continuation” of • 

Tlte paintmgs of Pnmarosa Ce- ft j»ok revered % the late Chinese' 
Mnm Soiza are study and poar leader, Mao Zedong, as a cultural - 



no. xooNfrmfno 

BeTFEOIEPAMDIF- 

FwemvmmREsr 

OFTHBkCN. !5Tffl!T 
Ftx.nm* 




Me Christian DELORME 

Auctioneer 

14.ov.de Messirw 75008 PARIS - Tel.: 562.31 .19 


uve. Tb^fudeio landscape dx treasure, the new wSk was penned 
way a child would like to but ts byZhangZhiof Henan Prorata, a 
newr able to. sdKdar on “Red Mansions ,“ Xin- 

Fat woolly mountains, houses hua said Wednesday, 
cuddling between them as if against _■ 


HOTEL DROUOT PARIS 


Friday, March 1st, 1985 at 2fi0p.m. — Roam 5 


CdUeeter’s Guide 


OLD MASTER PAINTINGS 
FURNITURE AND OBJETS D’ART 

mainly of the XVIIIth century 


Experts, Messre. KANTOR AND LACOSTE 


LEADING LIKNBH UT BEALOS 

fq ut u pointing* by 
CONSTABLE end BONINGTON 

Ompkte<$scr*t*yi<Bssixed 

PtMM rmflf Box N6. 034788. 
(HT, 63 Lons An. ImnIm WC2 


The original work, a tale of the 
downfall of a Chinese noble fnmffy , 
was written by Cao Qoeqm in the 
mid 1700s. Cao, himself bom to a 
noble house of the ruling Manchu- 
rian Dynasty, diedia poverty after 
writing 80 chapters. 

Zhang's continuation “is regard- 
ed by experts as faithful to the 
classical noyeT unlike other sequel 


GOOD. WHAT 
VMBlSUFr- 
0FF?imn 
06ENSGT 

fa"" 


'iBS.SR. 

7:02. 


THAfcA 
UTttB&WX 
amtBmh 
_ IT9&HR10* 


attempts, Xinhua said. Zhang re- 
ceived a UJOO-yuan. award (about 


ceivcd a 1 .000-yuan award (about 
S357) award for his work. 


UlM 




InM 




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Syrfptw* p - 8 Gats marten p. j 
"yjE oipBS/tam P.10 interest rotes p. 7 
^ndlpnaHXtu P.14 Market swninwy p. g 
ruirci^y to*®* P. 7 Oellons p.jj 

^nmasilles P.ij OTC stock p. n 
Dividend* P.13 Other markets p^ 4 


itcralbSIfflribunc 


BUSINESS /FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report; Page 8 


S ATURD A Y-SUNP A Y , FEBRUARY 1 a_i 7 iqq. 


** 


Page 


ge7'[ 


ECONOMIC scene 

Reagan Interview Leaves 
The Tax Issue in Tatters 

By Leonard silk 

N — ^ v _. York Times Service 

^ . *ORK — Is there or isn’t there go ing to be a 
major overhaul of the federal tax system this year? 
2JJ? T 5f re i*. what sort of overiiaul will it be? 
a «a» r nrea<lent Ronald Reagan has thrown the tax issue into 
““®T ^nfuaon by saying, in an interview with The Wall 
£?2 na *-!&’ ^ misgivings about increasing corporate 

raxes as part of his administration’s tax proposal In his State of 
Message last week, he had just urged Congress to 
aoopt tus tax plan as “a historic reform of tax simplification for 
fairness and arrauth ** 


interview, Mr. Reagan said be was unaware of the 
treasury’s proposal to in- 
crease Corporate taxes. “I 

*avenT even made an attempt 


Reagan, apparently, 
is unconvinced 
of the need to 


raise 


■ £ study that bill in detail that 

■ touch to know that, " he said. 

T assume that would mean 
things that would be taken 

“ away from them that are pre- 
: seat deductions. I would have 
to be convinced of the need to 
j that because I*m a believer that one day we must recognize 
: that only people pay taxes.” 

• It is not easy to parse that statement, but it is reasonably dear 
that the president is still not convinced of the need to raise 
business taxes. His interview statement produced a great round of 
expressions of relief and joy from the business lobbyists in 
Washington. However, it raised doubts that any tax-simplifica- 
tion plan that did not shift taxes toward business could achieve 
broad enough support in Congress to be enacted this year. 

Representative Jack Kemp, the Republican supply-si der who 
is seen as a possible candidate to succeed Mr. Reagan as presi- 
dent, said that, “if it looks like the White House has sold out to 
corporate America, they’ll lose too many Democrats to make this 
thing viable." 

It is posable that too much importance is being attached to the 
president’s off-tho-cuff response to an interview question. He has 
never been known as a “detail” man. But it is nevertheless 
remarkable that, having committed himself so heavily to a major 
effort at tax simplification this year, he does not appear to know 
what is in the adminis tration’s plan, worked out under the 
supervision of Donald T. Regan, who has now moved over from 
the Treasury Department to become the White House chief of 
staff. 

N OR is this issue of the impact of the tax-revision bill on 
business a matter of mere detail. It has received heavy 
attention not only from the business lobbyists but already 
in Congress and in the press. It is a crucial element in the 
administration’s tax proposal that would eliminate the hugr- 
distortions that now exist in the taxation of business income — 
which result in some profit-making companies paying no taxes at 
all or even enjoying a “negative income tax.” that is, getting tax 
refunds from the government — while other companies pay taxes 
close to the top-bracket rate of 46 percent. 

The Treasury proposal would still allow companies to make 
depreciation deductions, but only to the extent they would 
approximate the actual decline in the useful economic life of 
capital goods, rather than allowing the accelerated depredation 
of the present law. The proposal would also eliminate the invest- 
ment-tax credit But it would lower the corporate tax rate to 33 
percent from the present 46 percent, and it would also adjust 
depreciation allowances for inflation and permit corporations to 
(Continued on Page 9, CoL 1) 


Currency Rates 


] 


Lata interbank rata* on Feb. 15 , excluding fee*. 

Official fixings for Amsterdam. Brussels, Frankfurt, Milan, Paris. New York rotas at 
4 PM. 



s 

1 

OAU 

FJF. 

IUL 

QMr. 

■3=. 

W. TO* 

Amsterdam 

147SS 

4381 

11334' 

3437' 

0.1832 

— 

533* 

13131 *14X92 » 

BniMali(a) 

4530 

7155 

20.100 

4346 

1351* 

17.7585 

— 

33365 2535* 

Prarkturl 

1263 

3305 

— 

31445 * 

1317* 

88315 • 

4.774* 

11738*13715* 

Lao/ on CM 

1.1025 

— 

1M1 

11333 

2331J5 

43778 

7135 

33623 282275 

Mllati 

233030 

2J3030 

41035 

mo2 

— 

54630 

30.774 

72000 7357 

NawYorktc] 

___ 

1.100 

126 

7.77 

231930 

339 

6532 

2J71J 253.75 

Parts 

1030 

11317 

10624 

— — 

4.9465* 

2JM4 1*201* 

33005X8715* 

Tokyo 

237325 

20477 

7730 

25.73 

1238- 

6037 

3*4.16* 

7X13 

Zartck 

17005 

33473 

85305* 

2733* 

0.1375 

753*5* 

43330’ 

■ 13842* 

1 ECU 

0L4M5 

03172 

Z3234 

63051 

137537 

23102 

463091 

13910 176973 

1 SDR 

0.945609 

037409 

3.15271 

735609 

NjQ. 

33713 

433312 

23796 250.742 




Dollar Values 




_ . CurranCT 

MWY. 

Per 

UJ3 

s 

OWN. 

c ™ «£* Carrmcy 


0741 Australian s 
00434 Austrian KtaSHlM 
ams Beteim Hu. franc 
0.7445 Conation S 
00054 DanbbkrMe 
0.1457 RfmtA markka 
00075 Break drachma 

01783 HansKsMS 


130 

2334 

44.45 

14195 

11.713 

4345 

13130 

7.778 


0*471 Irish C 
03011 Irani the** 
33383 Kmrettf dinar 
03*33 Matov. rtnnN 
0.1044 Hone, krone 
03544 FtlLwo 
03054 Porteseado 
077*1 Saudi rival 


13557 04451 Unaware I U43 

70150 OS33S 5. African read 13744 

03000 03012 S. Korean Me 837 JS 

1543 03655 Saaa.MMtn 181.75 

7J8S am SwmLInm 7.2579 

18342 00255 Taiwan I 3731 

17730 08351 Thtibtat 27.745 

15*2 03733 UJULdMnm 34728 


Interest Rates 


Eurocurrency Deposits 


Feb. 15 


Swiss FranCh 

Dollar D-Mark Franc siarthta Franc ECU SDR 

1M. B-k - 8*5. 5 ■*. - S’*. 5*. ■ Slk 14 fc- 141k 10*. Iff* 10 - 10* OH - M 

1M. 8* • I'b 6 - 6* 5 * - i W. I38i ■ 13* 10 *- 1W4 10 W- 1014 8*t - S*k 

JM. 8*. 9 4h.4*S*-P4 I3H-13U 10 *• 10 10W - 10 * 8* - Hk 

DM. HI .*1 M -IVi » -SH 1274.12* 11* -11* 10*- 10*1 8* -7 

•V. 9*. . I0* 4* - 4* 5* ■ 52V 13*- 12* HU- II* lOVfc-10* * - 7* 

Rates oocllcablg to infer Bonk donas la at 51 million minimum lorravtvottnll. 

Score**: <Wq roan Guarani (dollar. DM. SF. Pound. FFi; Uovds Btmtk (ECU/; crttBan* 
ISDRI. 


Asian Dollar Rates 


Feb. 15 


I nto. 
-aii 

So. #: Reut< 


1 mo*. 
014 -8* 


lines. 
8* -» 


4 mas. 
9<4 -9* 


l rear 
9* -10 


Key Money Rates 

United States 

Discount Rate 
Federol Funds 
Prime Rale 
Broker Loan Raid 
C omm. Paoer. 30-179 oar. 
Month Treasure Bills 
*- month Trmiurv Bills 
CD s 30-5* (Km 
CD's 40-8* mm 

West Cgggam 

Lomtnrd Rata 
Ovarmant Rate 
One Month Interbank 
J- month interbank 
6- month interbank 

Fiance 

intervention Pole 
Coil Mono* 

ODMiunlti Inleroank 

3- manin interbank 

4- month interbank 


Sources: Reuters. CcmmenbanS. Credit Lv 
onaais. UarOi Bank, Bank el TMre. 


Close 

Pew. 

8 

8 

■'•a 


W.=i 


w. 

9-Pl* 

830 

060 

8.14 

016 

834 

X23 

830 

830 

822 

LIS 

430 

630 

5.70 

5JU 

5« 

5A5 

6-13 

6JB 

6« 

630 


lIWi 

IIHfalO 11714 

lOSt 


ion, 

lost 

10 9714 

10VJ 


Britain 


close 

Prev. 

Bonk Bose Rote 


14 

14 

Cell Money 


14 

1336 

91-4UV Treasury Bill 

13W 

13V> 

3-month Interbank 


1346 

UV* 

Japan 




Discount Rote 


5 

9 

Call Moray 


6U. 

616 

60-dav Interbank 


6H 

6 7/16 

j Gold Prices 


AM. 

PAL 

Oil* 

HOffe KOTO 

30335 

304.70 

+ 120 

lurnrftoura 

30530 

— 

+ 135 

Paris (123 kllal 

30438 

304.10 

+ 0.72 

Zurich 

30430 

mis 

unen. 

London 

30630 


— 0.15 

Now York 


30430 

+ 1.10 


Otadal ihlim tar London. Paris and Luxem- 
awra, oaenino and claslna prices lor Hone Kant 
and Zurich. New Yore Comer arrem contract. 
Ah fried in UiS per ounce. 

Source: Reuters. 


Markets Closed 

U.S. stock and commodity exchanges will be dosed Monday in 
observance 0 f Washington’s Birthday. Banks also will be closed. 


U.S. Sold 

Dollars 

Recently 

Baker Says Bid 
Was Little Help 

By Jane Seabcrty 

Washington Pest Service 

WASHINGTON — Treasury 
Secretary James A. Baker 3d said 
Friday that the United Slates in the 
past few weeks had taken the un- 
usual step of intervening in foreign- 
exchange markets to slow the rise 
of the dollar. 

The currency fell Friday in Eu- 
rope and New York for the second 
consecutive day, after almost two 
weeks of record-breaking trading. 

A senior Reagan administration 
official said the govorunent had 
modified its position and inter- 
vened in cases other than when 
markets are “disorderly,” a rigid 
f nee-market principle criticized by 
Western European governments 
whose currencies have fallen 
steadily against the dollar. 

In late New York trading Friday, 
the dollar was at 3.26 Deutsche 
marks, down from 3.2865 late 
Thursday; 9.99 French francs, 
against 10.06; and 2.7715 Swiss 
francs, compared with 2797. The 
British pound was trading in New 
York at $1,108, up from $1.0955 
late Thursday. 

The senior official would not 
elaborate on the new conditions 
under which intervention would 
take place. Mr. Baker would not 
say vmea or bow many limes the 
government had intervened. 

Mr. Baker was asked whether the 
interventions had been successful 
“I think that there was some effect, 
so I suppose you’d have to say to 
that extent they were effective.* be 
said. “But the dollar continued to 
rise notwithstanding those inter- 
ventions. What I can't teQ you is 
how much more it would have risen 
if we had not intervened.” 

In intervening, a central bank 
buys its currency when it is going 
down or sells in an effort to bring a 
rapidly rising currency's value 
down or keep speculators off bal- 
ance. The Federal Reserve Board 
could also ask foreign governments 
to act in its behalf, financial ana- 
lysts said. 

Some foreign-exchange analysts 
said Friday that they had not no- 
ticed any disorderliness in the for- 
eign-exchange markets and that if 
the government had intervened it 
was in small doses. 

Mr. Baker said the decision to 
intervene came out of a meeting 
Jan. 17 between his predecessor, 
Donald T. Regan, and the finance 
ministers of Britain, France, West 
Germany and Japan. 

“I think the position is basically 
that it’s our view that it’s best done 
and more properly done only in the 
case of disorderly markets," Mr. 
Baker said. “There were discus- 
sons at the last’’ finance ministers' 
meeting “wherein we agreed to take 
a look at it, when to do so would be 
helpful 

“That’s a rather vague standard. 
We have done that since then. 
Without getting into more detail, 
we have intervened and we have in 
fact done so since I’ve been here." 
Mr. Baker took over as Treasury 
Secretary on Feb. 3. 


Modified Japanese Management 
Works for Kyocera’s U.S. Plant 


By Mark Potts 

Washington Post Service 

SAN DIEGO — The sun is 
rising over distant mountains to 
the east as several hundred work- 
ers straggle into the yard behind 
Kyocera International Inc.'s 
main U. S. plant. 

They stand in orderly rows, 
each person's place marked by a 
yellow circle painted on the as- 
phalt. Many wear light-blue 
Kyocera jackets, a uniform they 
wfll keep on after they are out of 
the early morning chflL Led by a 
Kyocera executive on a platform 
at the front of the group, the 
workers do ample calisthenics, 
with varying degrees of enthusi- 
asm. It is 7 A.M. 

Each shift at the Japanese ce- 
ramics-maker's San Diego plant 
begins this way. Occasionally, 
the routine is varied by awards 
ceremonies honoring years of 
service with the company. As the 
honored employees go to the 
platform to receive service med- 
als and flowers, they are ap- 
plauded by their fellow enrnloy- 
ees. Every day, a Kyocera off iciaJ 
gives a pep talk to the assembled 
employees, who then go to their 
work areas for another pep talk 
from their immediate supervi- 
sors. 

This is business, Japanese 
style — practically a clicnfi, but 
not often seen in the United 
Slates, Along with other tech- 
niques, including an “open-of- 
fice” system and a no-layoff po- 
licy. Kyocera officials say it has 
been a success with their Ameri- 
can workers, resulting in high 
rates of productivity and low em- 
ployee turnover. 

“If somebody comes in with 
an open mind, they can adapt 
very well to Kyocera,” said Mike 
Lashford, Kyocera's vice presi- 
dent of sales and marketing — 
and the receiver of a six-year pin 



Iho WorifeekM tal 

Kyocera ceramics, in a variety of shapes and forms. 


at that morning's employee 
meeting. 

W illiam L Everitu Kyocera’s 
vice president for corporate com- 
munications, said that die tech- 
niques used with American 
workers were not exactly the 
same as those used in Kyocera's 
Japanese plants, but that the ef- 
fect is similar . 

“You can't simply transplant 
what's been done in Japan to the 
United States,” Mr. Everill said. 
“We've transplanted the philoso- 
phy.” The adaptation may be 
aided by the nigh number of 
Kyocera workers who have Ori- 
ental backgrounds and thus 


some cultural experience with 
Eastern managerial styles. More 
than half of the company’s 1,600 
San Diego employees are Orien- 
tal chiefly Filipino women. 

Officials of the Kyoto-based 
producer of technical ceramics 
say the system of calisthenics, 
awards ceremonies, morning 
meetings and the like was put in 
place from Kyocera's beginning 
in the United States 15 years ago 
and then nurtured to create a 
distinctive corporate culture for 
the company. 

Forcing such a culture on em- 
ployees in midstream would have 
(Continued on Plage 9, CoL 3) 


January Prices « 
At Wholesale 'i 
Held Flat in U.S. 


,'Cl 

do 

*1 


The Associated Pros 

WASHINGTON — UJ5. whole- 
sale prices, beginning the year on 
an encoura g in g note, held flat in 

January, the government said Fri- 
day. 

It was the third time in the last 
five mouths that the wholesale 
price index showed no increase 
over the previous month. 

Energy prices posted their steep- 
est drop in almost two years while 
food costs also dedin ed sharply. 

While most economists foresee a 
price rise of 2 percent for all of 
1985, one said that, over the next 
few months, “it is hard to believe 
that we will see any significant in- 
crease." 

Thai optimism is based on sag- 
ging worldwide oil prices and the 
continued strength of the dollar, 
which hit new highs against foreign 
currencies again this week. 

In other U.S. economic news Fri- 
day, the government said produc- 
tion at the nation's factories, mines 
and utilities rose a healthy 0.4 per- 
cent in January. 

The production report by the 
Federal Reserve Board said the in- 
crease matched the November gain 
and was only slightly Iowa than 
the 0.5 percent December advance. 

The Increase was attributed to 
strong gains in production of auto- 
mobiles, defease equipment and 
energy materials. 

The wholesale price report for 
January said that energy prices fell 
24 percent, the biggest decline 


now 6.7 percent cheaper than it was __ 
just a year ago. •, 

Food prices fell 0.6 percent in " 
January, their best performance j 
since a 0.8-percem decline last 1 
May. That drop was largely tire , 
product of a 2 1J -percent fall in egg ' J 
prices, the steepest decline for anyjjj 
category in the index.. Analysis \ 
credit that drop to higher produo-, 
tion at a time of weak demand. ' 
Fresh-fririt prices rose 3.7 pa- 
cent, the biggest increase for any. 


food 


category. Experts — 

February rise would likdy be even 
higher as the January price survry'^T 
was done before the devastating ' 
freeze hit Florida's rilras-growing'^ 
areas. ” 

The good news on energy and 
food prices was tempered some- ' 
what by higher prices for new cars \ 
and trucks. Both posted price hikes" 
of 2J! percent. ' £ 

In releasing Friday’s report, the ^ 
Labor Department said that if"" 
prices held steady for a full year at 
January's level wholesale costs * 
would actually fall 0.4 percent, a* 
That figure is based on a more 
precise calculation of monihlyf , 
prices than the figure made public. ’^: 

IMF Blocks * 
Brazil Credit, 
Cites Inflation * 

By James L Howe Jr. J ; 

Washington Peal Service S 

WASHINGTON — The Inta- :,i 
national Monetary Fund, epsper-' r 
aled by Brazil's yearlong failure to? 
control its monetary policy and in- " 
flation. will not lend any more . 
money to the developing "world's 
biggest debtor until Brazil agrees to , 
a new economic program for 1985. ? 
sources say. . 

The IMF decision is a setback 
for Brazil — considered one or the? 
success stories of the Latin Amen-. 1 *? 
can debt crisis — and its bank lend- 
ers. The banks had almost complet- r. 
ed negotiations on an agreement"' 
that would have permitted Brazil to 
repay $45 billion of debts, matur-- 
ing hetweun 1985 and 1991, over a-; 
16-year period. I 

The banks and Brazil adjourned [ 
negotiations Wednesday until iheJ 
country come* to terms with the 
IMF. Banks generally decline to 
make new agreements with debtor - ! 
nations that are out of compliance | 
with their IMF programs. , » 

The setback comes as a civilian 
government prepares to take over 
from the militaiy March 15. Presi- 
dent-elect Tancredo Neves thus has^ 
an immediate, major financial" 
problem. 

A top U. S. official said the im- 
passe, however, is not a major cri- 
sis. Id many respects the military 
government exceeded its economic 
targets — building up a huge trade 
surplus, cutting the budget deficit'* 1 
and bringing internal prices morea 
in line with reality. I 

“But they were unable to stop 9 
the printing presses.” the official 
(Cootinoed oo Page 13, CoL 5) 


said the 


since a 3-percent drop in March 
1983. Gasoline prices fell 2.7 pa- 
eon while home-heating oil prices 
were off 23 percent Both declines 
were the steepest since August. 

At the wholesale level gasoline is 


.1 


Icahn Launches $4.5-BilIion Takeover Package 


By Carl Gcwirtz 

Inicntuiumul llcrultf Tribune 
PARIS— “Can Carl Icahn real- 
ly finance his proposed first step 
partial tender offer for Phillips? 
Can be borrow $42 billion? We 
don't think so.” Phillips Petroleum 
said in full-page advertisements in 


to consummate his group's tender 
offer for Phillips. Reuters reported 
from New York. 

(The financier also was quoted as 
saying that he is considering wheth- 
iha 


^-percent commitment fee. to he 
paid whether the tender offer is 
consummated and the loan drawn 
or whether the attempt is ultimate- 
ly abandoned. 

This also is more generous than 
the '-4-penxn t-o r- less cancellation 
fee that typically accompanies 


er to have Drexd Burnham obtain 
further commitments next week or 

. _ to await the outcome of the share- ... ., r „ r 

several U.S. newspapers Friday. holder vote on the Phillips reeapi- takeover financings that mav never 
But hardly had the ink on those • ulization plan. he used. 

(Mr. Icahn said that if the reeapi- These senior notes will he se- 
talizution plan is defeated he will cured by the 77.5 million Phillips 
instruct Drcxel to move ahead as shares that (he icahn group aims to 
expeditiously us possible to obtain buy to win control of the company, 
the remaining financing.! The borrowing entity is the new- 

Why the transaction is consid- ■ ly created Icahn Group Iiul, which 
ered appealing is best shown by the is to be merged with Phillips if the 
tarns offered on the $1.98 billion 


ads dried when Mr. Icahn launched 
a four-part package of floating-rate 
notes, senior-subordinated deben- 
tures. and preferred and common 
stock totaling $4 J billion. 

The specifics of the transaction 
are “not cast in concrete.” said a 
spokesman for lead manager 
Drcxel Burnham Lambert, and 
many details remain to be spelled 
out — such as the issuing schedule 
for the floating-rate notes, which 
will be sold to finance the purchase 
of shares as they are offered. 

At first glance, bankers in Eu- 
rope said the terms of the package 
were “intriguing, not to say appeal- 
ing.” 

And Drexd officials said the ini- 
tial response was “extremely favor- 
able,” although they refused to di- 
vulge any specific details. 

[Mr. Icahn said Friday that he 
has accepted firm commitments for 
$1.5 biH on of the fin an ring needed 


of five-year floating-rute notes. 

Interest for the first three 
months would be set at 15 percent 
— at a time when three-month Eu- 
rodollars can be borrowed for a 
cost of 9 1/16 percent. 

Subsequently, note holders can 
opt for any of four different pric- 
ings: 216 points ova the three- 
month London intabank rate; 1% 
points ova the prime rate of U.S. 
banks; 314 points over the three- 
month Treasury bill rate, or 118 
percent ova the rate on five-year 
Treasury notes. 

This is further sweetened with a 


takeover is successful. 

Phillips currently is a double-A 
rated borrower, but bankers say 
this rating will no doubt be reduced 
to singlc-A or triple-B as a result of 
the greatly increased debt burden if 
the takeover succeeds. 

A further 52 billion is to be 
raised through the sale of eight- 
year senior subordinated deben- 
tures carrying a coupon of 16 per- 
cent. An existing Phillips 
Eurobond is yielding 12% percent 
to its maturity in 1989. 

This domestic bond, which tike 
the floating-rate notes is being mar- 
keted internationally, win be non- 


callaMe for three years and then at 
a penalty premium beginning at 
MO percent of par value and de- 
clining to par alter five years. 

A sinking fund, operating afta 
the end of the third year, will retire 
75 percent of the papa before find 
maturity. 

The preferred and common 
shares of the Icahn Group are be- 
ing sold as a package of one pre- 
ferred share pneed at $100 and half 
a common share priced at $50 — 
raising in all $600 million. 

The preferred stock is to carry an 
annual dividend of 15 percent, pay- 
able quarterly. Starting in the sev- 
enth year, 25 percent of these 
shares will he redeemed annually. 

Competitors refer to Drexel 
Burnham Lambert as "the king oT 
the junk-bond market" because it 
has made a specialty out of market- 
ing high-coupon, high-risk bonds. 

Despite the derision — and fol- 
lowing studies showing that so- 
called junk bonds have. provided 
investors with consistently high 
yields with little risk — an increas- 
ing number of main-tine Wall 
Street investment banks such as 
Morgan Stanley and Salomon 
Brothers are beginning to enter 
that market 


C SMrtIno: 1.1585 Irlai I 

(el Commercial franc (M AmounH«w<S*aio Hot ow sound tc> AmcwmnwM to iMVom dollar (*) 
umu of 100 U) umn of 1300 Iv) Units of 10300 
N3: noi auotfd. HA.: not awlNXile. 

Sources; Ban one du Benetwt iBntataisI; Banco Commercial* rtollana (Milan): Banova 
Noffonofe do Ports (Parts); IMF (SDR); Bonou* Arab* si MMnwftonofe mnvosttsmmont 
i dinar . rival, dlrtiom). Other data from Rmitan and AP. 


Pan Am Posts Loss of $92.3 Million 


By Agis Saipukas 

New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — Pan Am Corp. 
reported substantially wider losses 
in the fourth quarter and all of 
1984, but said that it expects im- 
proved results this year. 

But a number of analysts warned 
that the company, the parent of 
Pan American world Airways, 
faced tongh negotiations with the 
airline's five unions. 

In the fourth quarter, the parent 
corporation postal a loss of S92J 
miiYmn compared frith a loss of 
$58.6 million in the 1983 quarter, 
the company reported Thunday. 

For the year. Pan Ain’s net loss 
was $206.8 milli on. That compare] 
with a deficit of $51 million in 
1 983. which was afta an extraordi- 
nary credit of 58.9 minion and a 

gain of $31.1 milli on from the re- 
versal of reserves on aircraft sales. 

The company’s revenues fell 4 
percent in the quarter, to $8922 
million, from $929.5 million in 
1983. 

For all of 1984, revenues totaled 
$3.68 billion, down 29 percent 
from $3.79 billion in 1983, 

Despite the large losses, Gerald 
L Gitner, the vice chairman of Pan 
Am, said in an interview that the 
company was now weQ positioned 
to snow better results in the coming 
year. He declined to be more spe- 
cific. 

“Our cash is in excellent shape,” 
be said. Though he would not dis- 
close the amount, a company 
source said that Pan Am had about 
$400 million in cash, compared 


with about 5370 million at this time 
last year. 

Mr. Gitner also said that last 
year the airline ran into shortages 
of capacity because it was selling 
some planes to simplify its fleet 

But this year, he said, the carrier 
win have five more Boeing 747s 
during the peak summer season 
and it will also have leased 16 Air- 
bus jets. Pan Am took delivery of 
the first four Airbus planes in De- 
cember. 

Those additions will enable the 
carrier to start new routes at the 
bright of the tourist season, which 
this year promises to be even better 
than last, when Americans flocked 
to Europe to take advantage of the 
strength of the dollar. 

“Our bookings look better than 
last year,” Mr. Gitner added. He 
said that Pan Am plans to capital- 
ize on the rush to Europe by start- 
ing direct sovice to Hamburg, Nice 
and Vienna, He also said tut Pan 
Am was starting service to East 
European cities, including Warsaw 
and Bucharest. 

Andrew B. Kim, the airline ana- 
lyst for F. Ebostadt & Co., said 
that among the uncertainties facing 
the carrier are whether its unions 
frill strike, whether it can get the 
productivity gains it seeks and 
whether it can reduce its labor 
costs. 

Die Transport Workers Union, 


which represents mostly 
workers, has set a Feb. 2T strike 
deadline. The other four unions 
said that they would honor the 
TWLTs picket lines. 

Mr. Kim said that the carrier 
could be profitable “provided they 
reach some kind of arrangement 
with labor to come back with pro- 
ductivity gains and wage conces- 
sions.” 

The carrier said that its labor 
costs last year increased by $61 2 
million, or 5.7 percent, from 1983. 


R= CHARTER =il 

M/Y “AEGEAN CHALLENGE” 

IK Ft 12 reran* go snywhere. 

Wc arc die best in Greek Islands. 

tviedterrauean Cruses Ltd. 

3 StadBou St, Athens. 

Tel.: 3236494. Tbt: 222288. 


Options tries la s/az.1 


IQ 

Fab. 

Mar 


30 

300 

1SSW675 
6m 730 



rFiTfl 

25253675 

3JO 

1 35. 250 

iiTmi 

issoauo 

SB 

025 130 

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xn 

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RESERVE 

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An Account fee the Cautious Investor 
to Prated aid Increase Captri 


US. DoBar Denominat e d 
Inured by US. Govt- Entities 
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Custocftan 

CAYMAN NATIONAL SANK 
AND TRUST 
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RE5 IN DEP 

Case Postale 93 

1211 Geneva 25, Switzerland 


Please send 
account 


uid 


Name. 


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Nor owUeb uafei *■ USA 


OPPENHEIMER 
OFFERS TOUR IRA AN 
ALTERNATIVE 
TO GUARANTEED 
LOW RATES. * * 


F or IRA investors seeking the 
assurance of a fixed rate, we 
suggest a bank.* 

For those investors more 
concerned with how high the 
rate of return is, than with how 
fixed, we suggest another route. 
The Oppenheimer Special Fund. 

Because over its life, the 
Special Fund has the best perfor- 
mance Yecord of all 361 mutual 
funds that have been inexistence 
that long— an astonishing total 
return of 940%.** 


So if you had been able to 
put $2,000 a year into a Special 
Fund IRA since the Fund’s 
Inception, your IRA would have 
been worth $10^570*** as of 
December 31, 1984. That’s an 
average annual return of 21.5%. 

The Special Fund provides 
an IRA investment based on the 
philosophy that the 
opportunity for a 
higher return is pref- 
erable to the certain- 
ty of a lower one. 



IHTKV3/88 


^To M. Tucker Smith 

l Oppenheimer & Gi. 62-64 Cannon St. London EC4N 6AE England 
I Telephone 01-2 36 6578 

[ Please send mean IRA application and a Special Fund prospectus i»ith more complete informs. 

| cion, including all cHaryeaandexpcnsc4.nl read it carefully before I invest or tend money, 
j □ 18 like CO Op™ ”> IRA □IBliRe to switch my IRA 

I 

I ■ 


| N*nw 


j Addreu 
1 G* 


Sene 


|_W 


Fhooe 


THE OFTEN H El M ER SPECIAL FU NT). 


ffl 1985 Oppenheimer Investor Services, Inc. 'Bank IRA’s ore insured and generally have lined i merest 
rales. ihe Fund > nei asset value fluctuate* and may be mjJjjcci to foss. *°Mjreh 15, |4 ?Z-Dkh vber 

31 1981 L*po« Analytical Services, Inc. "”Aa*uminp a S2i)00 investment on Match 15. 1973 (inception 
of nnun and S2JXX} annual investments on first business day of each year thereafter wirh all dividends and 
dmnbuticms reinvested, fat* performance is not an Indication ot furore results. In the period shown, 
stock prices fluctuated severely and were generally higher at the end than at the beginning. 


I 


* I 
















Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURD AY-SUN DAY , FEBRUARY 16-17. 1985 




i- NYSE Most Actives 


VoL High Low um cars 


Pempr 

PW!P*t 

VtXKM 

AT&T 

FordM 

MtScml 

IBM 

AllRIctl 

Mcnsns 

PanAm 

Senrco 

Oiryiir 

GMot 

MerLyn 

Am Era 


2uie 5 

nm am 

3131X7 49 
1303 314% 

i Ten «« 
H4» uva 
10637 132% 
1031S 49% 

JSi *** 
no a* 

17V. 
5S? 31% 

#» S 7916 
WM 35% 
7175 «n* 


4% 

48ft 


21 

454% 

124% 

130% 

471* 

45% 

4% 

17 

3216 

774% 

34V* 

42ft 


S + ft 
45ft — 1% 
46% — 1% 
21ft 

45ft - % 
12ft 

131ft - ft 
47% — m 
45ft —ft 
4ft + ft 
1716+4% 
321% —1 
7n% —ft 
34ft — 1% 
42ft - ft 


i Dow Jones Averages I 


Open HIM Low Lost am 


Indus 128920 129627 127527 128232- 506 
Trans 63020 63524 62S06 62921 - 127 
UtU 15029 15122 14907 15085 + 005 

Como wim vmas — 174 


NYSE Index 


Cetnposiie 
industrials 
Tran so, 
umittes 
Finance 


him Low Cnse cum 

105.77 105.19 10527-043 

171.77 12123 12129-063 
10227 10145 10245-012 
53.94 5926 53.93 -002 
111.72 110.99 11121 -023 


NYSE Diaries 


Advanced 
Dedhftd 
unehonoad 
Total Issues 
Now H lefts 
New Laws 
Volume us 
Volume down 


Clan Prev. 
681 809 

913 831 

420 409 

2014 2049 

120 339 

2 3 

39.700620 
56019,320 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


Feb. 14 
Feta. 13 
Feta. 12 
Feb. II 
Feta. B 


But 5al« 
220798 609249 
211232 53X647 
197,175 481035 
220392 559 JOS 
224.948 531.101 


included In the sales 1 to urea 


•am 

10334 

1236 

1214 

1234 

1907 


Fridays 


MSE 


dosing 


VM nt 4 P M 

106570000 

PrtY.4PJH.woI 

139J3MOO 

Prev cHuolidoted dose 

16M4M30 


Tables Include the nationwide prices 
bp to the dosina on Wall Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


AMEX Diaries 


Advanced 

Declined 

Unchanged 

Total issues 
New High* 
New urns 

volume up 
volume down 


2S« 284 

to 3E 

272 247 

809 826 

45 72 


1577 463 

ZMJA* 


NASDAQ Index 


Composite 

Industrials 

Finance 

insurance 

utilities 

Banks 

Transa. 


Close 

287.72 

3KL53 

332.41 

327.03 

36000 

250.95 

26039 


Week 

aiTW ABO 

— 063 28035 

— 120 31243 

+0.15 mo? 

+ 1JH 338.74 
+ 012 27183 
-073 25214 
— 039 26600 


rear 

Age 

25123 
wpss 
269.92 
247 AS 
22035 
20122 
24118 


AMEX Most Actives ]■) 


DomeF 
KeyPti 
Wang a 
AM inti 

TIE 

EdwBg 


2071 


standard & Poor's Index 


industrials 

Trenso. 

Utilities 

Finance 

Composite 


him Low Close Ch'gs 
sms ac.17 n-ni* _ 1 07 
16I.9Q 169.66 161-04 — 021 
79 j 0< 7183 7179 UnCft. 
21 j7 2U3 71.42 —007 
'.B2AS 181-24 18183—081 


Sawn* 

Amdahl 

xastrs 

Holxor 

Varbtm 


HWl 

LOW 

brat 

cara 

2% 

a* 

2% 

+«. 

lift 

70% 

w% 

.—ft 

27% 

26ft 

27 

,+ £ 

5ft 

Sft 

5% 

+ % 

m 

Sft 

9 

— % 

Uft 

9ft 

Mft +% 

19% 

Uft 

19ft 

— % 

17% 

17% 

. 17ft 

+ ft 

17% 

17% 

17ft 

-% 

a 

V 

39 

— ft 

2ft 

2ft 

2ft 

+ ft 

5ft 

Sft 

5% 

-ft 


1 Dow Jones Bond Averages] 


Bands 

Utilities 

Industrials 


dew aroe 

7114 —Oil 

71.16 —027 

77.13 +006 


AMEX Stock Index [ 


Kfcrti 

29135 


Law 

23073 


■ ariw 

23097 —014 





'7 Venn 
HiCDLOw Stock 


Dl*. YU. PE 


Sta. On 

UPsHlBiLaw Cuatane 


jsa ii 


23V* Mft AAR 
24Vk 9ft AGS 
18% 12ft AMCA 
17*% 13ft AMF 
39ft 24'+ AMR 
20% 10% AMR pf 2.18 1U 

25ft 25ft ANRpf 287 107 

23 19 ANRpf 112 1U 

14% 8ft APL 
69ft 4CW ASA 100 4J> 

27 16 AVX J2 IJ 15 ZIO 

484% 36ft AbTLab 1J0 28 15 200S 

25ft 16ft AccsWda M 18 19 154 

24ft 12ft AaneC m 12 


23 » 3772 
12 48 

1088 
36 402 
9 5853 
17 
3 
1 

3 26 

441 


-321) £2 12 20 

£11*T£7 73 

.32 1.7 B 99 
■Sit 64 20 123 

u mss 

.12 U 264 
14 101 
£64 60 35 4432 
507*100 100 

120 32 IS 2721 
31 24 

120 14 11 413 

40 24 13 533 
27 137 

224*112 


100 

18 

36 


lift BU AcmeE 
17ft IS Ada Ex 
19ft lift AdmMl 
19ft 8ft AdvSvs 
41ft 2Sft AMO 
12ft 6ft Advert 
14ft 8ft Aerflex 
eft 27V. AetnLf 
58ft 57ft AatLPf 
32ft isft Aiunns 
<ft 2ft Aiieen 
soft 36ft AlrPrd 

24ft 13 AlrbFrl 

2 ft AJMoas 

27ft 21 AkiPpf 

32 26*% AlaP ptA 322 122 

7Y* 6 AlaP dpf Ml 110 

73 61V* AlaP Pf 920 122 

ira asu AioPpf 7 i-oo nj 

79ft 63V* AldP pf 9X4 HI 

M 56 AMP pf 

13ft 10ft A kn3C I 

19ft 9ft AtokAlr 
2**4 15ft Alberta 

30V. 22V* ARrtsns 

35ft 23ft Alcan 

36 27ft AlcoSM 

29 17 AlexAlx 120 

28ft 19ft AJemfr 

09ft 62ft AliaCP 2261 17 

2Bft lBft Alalnt 1A0 5.1 H 

22ft 15V. Alglnpf Z19 ll.l I 

94*% Si Algl ofClUS 112 16 

28 74ft AltoPw 170 92 I 342 

23ft 15ft AllmG 40b U 11 41 

39ft 28 U AlidCP S IM 40 ■ 1458 

42ft 53ft AldCppf 674 WB 60 

107 99 AldCPPfllOO >10 

107ft 100ft AMCpf 1 2J9el10 


an* 

Zl 

XU + % 

15U 

15% 

15%— 

% 

13% 

12% 

13ft + % 

16% 

16% 

16% 


39% 

38% 

39% + % 

a 

19% 

19%- 

ft 

25 

35 

25 


20% 

20% 

20% 


11% 

11% 

11% 


51% 

50% 

5D% — 

ft 

34% 

23% 

34% + % 

48% 

48ft 

48% 


25 

24% 

24% — 

W 

18% 

18% 

18%— 

% 

TIM 

W 

10 — 

% 

17 

16% 

16% 


19% 

19% 

191*— 


12% 

12% 

HU — 

% 

34% 

32% 

XU— 

ft 

12 

11% 

11% + % 

1416 

14 

14% + ft 

43 

41% 

41% — 

% 

55% 

55% 

55U — 

ft 

X 

30% 

30% + % 

3% 

3 

3% + V* 

51 

50% 

5014+ % 

23% 

2244 

23%+ % 


N.Y. Prices Off for 2 d Session 


114 
22 7.1 


.14 

24 


130 

1-20 


23V* 10W AlldPd 
56ft 38 AlktStr 112 32 
14ft 5ft AHIsCh 
371% 24 AllsCpf 
27 20 ALL.TL 

25ft 20ft AtphPr 
43 30ft Alcoa 
27ft 15ft Afnax 

34ft 22ft ArtiHta 

144 98ft AHespf uo 
2ft lft AmAor 140 

196% 14ft ABakr 11 51 

65ft 523% ABrand 190 60 9 377 
27ft 24ft ABrd pf £7S 10.1 2 

77ft 50ft ABdCSt 1-60 2 A ID 2109 

25ft 19V* ABldM -86 34 17 5B 

23ft 181* ABusPr 44 U U 26 

55% 40 V% AmCan Z.90 54 11 1907 


1ft 11% 1ft + Vk 
26ft 26ft 26ft + ft 

32 31V* 32 + ft 

7ft 7ft 7ft 
1260Z 73V* 73 731* + V* 

3Dz 991% 99ft 99ft 

Mlta 78ft 78 78ft + ft 

1002 67 67 sr +1 

22 12ft 12ft 12ft— ft 

J V 742 18ft 181* 1 

23 20 Z1 24 23Vi 24 + ft 

23 13 324 30 29ft 30 + V* 

4J0 12 2204 30ft 30V. 30ft— V* 

3.4 12 162 35ft 35 35ft— ft 

86 647 28U 28 2Bft 

25 2S4 23ft 23ft 23ft— ft 

' 77V* 76 77 — 1* 

27ft 27V. 27V. 

19ft 19ft 19ft 

94ft 94 94ft + ft 

29ft 29V% 29ft + ft 

19ft 191* 19ft + ft 

39 381* 38ft— I* 

. 62 V, 62 62ft + ft 

9 105 1041*105 +1 

1 104ft 104ft 1041%+ V% 


8 540 


26 

9 1447 
365 
17 

104 65 9 ICO 
00% 35 19 8 

100 3.1 12 1357 
JO 1.1 400 

1.10 19 14 2929 
2.9 


22V* 22ft 22ft— V* 
561% 54V* 55 — ft 

321% 31V* 31ft— ft 
2fift 26V* 26ft— ft 
23ft 231% 23ft 
38ft 38 33ft— ft 

18ft 18ft IBM + ft 
_ 28ft 27% 2BV* + ft 
13 122ft 121 122ft +lft 
2 1ft 2 
19 lBft lift— M 
65ft 64ft MV» + ft 
27V. 27ft Z7V. + ft 
66ft 65ft 66 — ft 
25 24V* 2S + ft 

23ft 23ft 23ft 
52ft 52 52ft + ft 


24% 

21% ACattpf 

200 

17 


17 

74 

73ft 

24 





— 

— 

— 




19% 








6ft 

2ft 

Brock 






3ft 

Sft— VI 

3X4 








a 

14% 

Brckwv 

102 

60 

26 2589 

X% 

19% 

a +ft 

13% 

6% ACoifC 






10ft 

WM— % 

36% 

M 

BkvUG 

£12 

£5 

B 

S3 

36% 

Xft 

36ft- % 

SAW 









23% 

19ft 







XU 


39% 

18% ADT 





25% 25 

25%+ ft 

32ft 

29 

BfcUGPi 

£95 120 



309b 

30% 

38% 

21% 

15% AElPw 





70% 

21 

26% 

13 

BwrtSh 


0 

11 

75 

26ft 

25% 

MU— U 

CP. 






43% 

47ft 

42%— ft 

32ft 

22% 

BrwnGp 

106 

40 

11 

937 

29% 

29ft 

29%+ U 

Ml* 

13% A Fanil 



480 

MU 

27% 

28% + ft 

42% 

Mft 

BrwnF 

108 

£5 

16 

600 

43 

47ft 

42%+ U 

30% 






30% 

3M4 

30ft + ft 

40ft 

73% 

Bmswk 

100 

£5 

9 

973 

40% 

40 

40ft + 16 










39% 

25V* 

BrstlWs 

08 

12 

18 

431 

38ft 

38% 

3B%— M 

83% 






83%+ ft 

17% 

17 

BucvEr 

04 

£9 

37 

96 

15% 

15 

15 









22% 

13% 

Bandy 

00 

40 


7 

18ft 

Uft 

18ft 

fM 







31ft 

31ft— U 

17% 

15ft 

BunkrH 

£16 12 2 


43 

171* 

17ft 

T7ft+ U 

13% 

7% AHafcf 




153 

9% 

V46 

9% + ft 

aft 

14% 

BurlnCf 



13 

180 

17ft 

17% 

17%+ ft 

57% 

46% A Home 



12 

3775 

57% 

56% 

57 — ft 

32ft 

23 

Burl [nd 

104 

60 

71 

466 

27% 

26% 

27V* 

a 

26% A Hasp 




7019 

33% X 

XU +1% 

a% 

35 

BrtNth 

100 

£5 

8 

B23 

56 

Mft 

55%— M 

81% 






82% fQ 

82V4 

21% 

19 

BrtN pf 

£12 

9.9 



21ft 

21% 

21ft + U 

78 






76% 

75ft 

75% — ft 

50% 

44ft 

BrtNat 

500*112 


3SB 

50 

49% 

49% 











1214 

Burndy 






14ft 

17% 










65V* 

44% 

Burrgh 

£60 

40 

ii 

2755 

62 ft 

59% 

60ft— 146 












Butlrln 





19ft 


43% 

22ft APrwld 

741 

17 

5 

444 

<1% 

42V* 4246— ft 

12 

3ft 

Buttes 




112 

Sft 

5 

5ft 

13% 

9 ASLFIa 



8 

81 

12% 

12% 

TT% 



Butnpf 








IBM 15 ASLFI pf 2.19 1X2 
14 10 AShlp 


3Sft ZZlk AmStd 100 


151 

52 17 391 
AJ 13 138 
IJ 11 1079 

7.0 5 

120 19 


9.9 


26ft ArnStor M 
62 46ft AStr pf A 408 
53ft 51 AStrpfB 600 
22ft 14ft AT&T 1 JO 
37ft 30ft AT&T pf 304 ... 

38 31ft AT&T pf 3J74 100 
44 ft Z7ft AWatr 200 40 
21ft 13ft AWOtrwl 
12 10 A Wot pf US 109 

27ft 20ft AmHaff 208 9.1 II 
- 53ft ATrPr SJ5* 80 


18 18 IB + ft 

15V. 1«ft 15ft + ft 

34 33ft 34 +ft 

52 51 52 +ft 

63 62ft 63 +1 

53 52ft 53 


54 1713459 21ft 21 21ft— ft 


lift 4ftATrSc 


58ft ATrUn SJSe 40 
32ft 26ft A moron 140 
339% 17 AltmDS J0 
93 60 Amespf 503 




1 

5.1 8 54 

0 18 1008 


»ft 2lft Ameiefc 


59 
29 14 


100 

100 


5 

20 19 
12 48 
7 

5.1 8 
42 13 


BU 18ft Amfac 
17ft 10ft Amfnc 
38ft 26ft AMPS 
24 141* Air pea 

lift 1 2ft Amraps 
28ft 19 AmSth 
38ft 25ft Amstid 
6ft 1ft Anacmp 
30ft 19ft Anotoas 
31 19ft Anchor 
38V. 24ft AnClav 
lift 9ft AndrGr 
23ft 16ft Angelic 
78ft 53ft Anheus 
57ft 44 Anheupf 300 

22ft 13ft AnUchr J8 

16ft 89% Anthem 04 

lift 9ft Apache 28 

3 ft ApchPwt 
19V* ISft AnctiP un20Oell J 
31ft 27ft ApPwpf 4.1B 115 
29ft 26 ApPwpf UO U2 
39M 17ft ApIDta 1.121 29 23 

21ft 8 AppiMs 1.141 84273 

* “ "14 


21 

108 4.1 
122 30 20 
10 24 
20 12 
2-7 10 T 


6 369% 36ft 34ft + V% 
29 Wft Wft 37ft- ft 
44 43M 43ft 43M + ft 
2 22 22 22 
620x 111* 111* lift— ft 
49 27ft 26ft 2716 + ft 
67U 67ft 67ft— V* 
lift 11 lift 
78ft 781% 78M— ft 
31ft 311* 31ft 
33ft 32ft 32ft— ft 
93 93 93 +1 

2BVI 2B 28 
251% 25M 25ft + ft 
129% 12ft 12ft— 9% 
35V* 3SV% 35ft- ft 
17ft 171% 179% + ft 
ISM 15ft 15ft— ft 
27ft 27ft 27ft- ft 
38ft 38% 38ft + ft 
39% 3ft 39% 


JO 

06 

24)0 




40 
10 22 
J 16 
2-5 11 


24ft 341* 

38ft 37ft 38V* — V* 
I1M lift lift— V% 

S I* 19M 20ft— % 
ft lift 75 + ft 
55ft 55ft 55V* 

I8M 18ft ISM 
15ft 15% 15V*— M 
11% 11 lift— ft 
lft 1% lft— M 
171% 17V* 17ft + ft 
31 “ 


sjhs 


2116 

15% ArehDn 

.14b J 

22ft 

Mft ArtzPS 

200 

110 

29ft 

23 AHPpt 

3JS 

120 

95V* 

79 ArtPpt 

HUD 

110 

23% 

13V6 ArkBst 

00 

10 

24ft 

16 Arkta 

108 

5.1 

* 

% ArtnRt 



21ft 

9 Armco 



SOU 

18 Armcpf 

£W 

90 

23% 

15% ArmsRt 

08 

22 

X 

ZZU ArmWIn 1J0 

32 

Xft 

10% ATOCP 

100 

30 

26ft 

13U ArnwE 

20 

10 

a* 

16 Artra 

23 

l.l 

au 

14 Arvlns 



54% 

34% Arvlnpf £00 

37 

34ft 

17ft Aanrco 



29ft 

20% AsfiKMI 

100 

SS 


33ft AjhtOpt 400 

100 

39% 

Xft AjhlOpf £M 

100 

61ft 

45V* AidDG 

200 

44 

VO 

73 AsdDpf 

47* 

50 

2S(4 

19% AfCvEI 

£48 

9.9 

MU 

67 AtICE pt 507 

67 

5&ft 

40ft All Rich 

300 

60 


32V* Aii Rent 

£75 

92 


97 AH Re Pt 


20 

» 91 

11% Attoscp 



34% 

1B% Auool 

33 

12 

461* 

29ft AutoOt 

02 

10 

aw 

24 AvcoCP 



24 

15% AVEMC 

00 

£5 

39% 

23 Avery 

00 

10 

15 

10 Avtall n 



41 

77 Avnet 



25ft 

19U Avan 

200 

80 



36% 18 Avdln 


M M M 
119% 11% 11%— ft 
22 % 221 % 22 % 

22% 22 22ft— % 

37% 37 371%—% 

33ft 33ft 33ft 
16ft 16V* 16ft 
20ft 20ft 20% 

23ft 22% 23 
5416 5416 5416 + ft 
33 2Tft 22 + ft 

29% 28ft 29 — ft 
41ft 41ft 41ft 
38M 38 38 — % 

579% 57ft 57ft— M 
92 91% 92 — ft 

25V* 25 25 - 16 

87 87 87 —1 

49ft 47M 47% — 1M 

SDx 38 37V* 38 40 

4 117M1T7M1 1716—19% 
18 15% 15ft 15ft 
» 1421 28% 27ft 271* —ft 
4SV* 44ft 431% + 1% 
50 49ft 50 + ft 
23% 23V* 239% + M 
38ft 37% 38%— % 
14% 14 lift — M 

37% 369% 37 — % 

23 22% 22ft— ft 

259* 25% 259k— Vk 


225 
442 
17 
39 
666 
11 
277 
6 ' 
190 
1 

491 

223 

70 

17 

482 

19 

08 

1 


10 


35 
2 9 

6 235 

7 1185 


10 20 


B 


08 30 
00 1.4 
S3 S3 
J6 10 


1J8 

JO 


120 70 


20% 10ft BMC 
35V* 18% BaVmci 
23*5 15 BJuIntl 
34% 18% Balder 
29% % vIBaldU 

9 2 BKJU p« 

50 20M BallCP 

23% 111% BoilvMf 
15% 7% Belly Pic 

41% 30ft BalfGE 

44 36V* BaltptB 400 100 

29ft 2Dft BncOm 1.10 30 
54* 3ft BanTex 
60V* 38 Banoaa 1J0 20 
47V* 29 BkBas 200 50 
53% 43 BkBas pf 5.13eHLl 
39% 26ft BkNY 1M 32 
264% 15% BnkVas 100 30 
21ft 14V* BnkAm 102 70 
52V* 40 BkAmpf 5.1M1L9 
86 66 BkAm pf L38el20 

18ft lift BkAm pf 208 
32% 2rn BkARtv 200 70 
66 37ft BonkTr 2J0 4J 
24ft 19ft BkTrpf 2J0 1U 
12% 7% Banner JOs J 
33% 19 Bard 04 1-7 
24% 18 BamGp 00 U 
49% 32V* Barnet 106 20 
U 


15 450 
13 206 

16 964 

16 65 

289 
to 

12 110 
1133 
12 229 
7 1999 
2 fa 43 
" 29 


10 

783 
13 51 

5 2774 

52 

6 244 
9 120 
II 4775 

451 

140 



19ft BaryWr 


13 

8% BASIX 

.1211 


17ft Bausch 

20 

21 

11% BaxfTr 

03 

25ft 

16% Bay Fin 

20* 

X 

19% BayStG 

208 

38% 

Xft Bearing 

100 

36 

24% Beaten 

170 

65ft 

46ft Beats* 

138 

47 

30ft BCCtnD 


12 

4% Better 


10ft 

9% Better pf 170 


18% 12M BoMnH 00 20 
30V* 19ft BelHwl 08 1.9 
X 19% BelHwpf 07 12 
84% 66 BOH AH 600 70 
28ft 22% BCE B 2.33 
27u 19% Betllnd 02 IJ 
37ft 27ft BellSos 160 7J 
50ft 3Sft BelBAH 00 10 
2916 20% BamlSl 100 30 
37V, 23 BentCP 200 50 


36 30ft Benefpf 4J0 120 
X 32 Benefpf 400 110 
166ft 104V* Benefpf 500 3J 
20% 17 Benef pf UO 130 
Bft 3ft BenatB J22r <1 13 
17% 7% BergEn 10 

6% 3% Berftey 15 

17ft 10% BestPd 04 10 13 
28% lift BeftiStl 00 20 
58ft 37ft Bemsi Of 500 100 
28% 18% BettlSiPfUD 100 


02 

00 


30 
20 
1.92 60 
06 U 


36% 19ft Beverly 
249* 18ft BloTTlr 
26% 17ft BlackD 
30ft 20 BMkHP 
40 14ft BkJlrJn __ _ 
50% 37 BlCfcHR 200 40 
66 V* 35% Boeing 100 2.1 
44% 32V* Bote»C 1.90 4L5 
57 46 BobeCpfSilO 

28ft 15% BOIIBer .18 
70ft 49% Borden 
24% 16% BorgWo 
B% 4ft Bonn ns 
36V* 24% BosEd 
75 63 BosEPf 808 120 

10% 9 BosEpr (.17 1U 
12% 10V* BosE pr 106 11J 

25% 149% Bowtr A 71 U 
31% 251* BrtoSf 
95% 41 BrlstM 
30 71% BrltPT 

15% 9V* BrltTpp 


2-72 

.92 


U4 80 • 


13% « 12%—% 

35ft 34% 35 + ft 

18 17% 1796 — 46 

24ft 2«% 24% 

2 !%!%+% 
4% 4% 64* + % 

47ft 47 47 — ft 

14 13% 13ft— ft 

lift 10ft 11%+ ft 
4116 40% 41% — 16 
41 43 + ft 

28ft 20ft— % 
59% 5% 5W + % 

419% 60 61% + 91 

44ft 419* 43ft— 1% 
51 51 51 — % 

39V* SOft 39ft 
25ft 25% 25ft+ 16 
2096 19ft 199k— ft 
44V* 419% 43V*— ft 

69ft 69ft 49ft 
14ft 141* lift— % 
309* 309* 209%— ft 
65% 61 65 —9% 

24V* 34% 24ft + % 
TIM 17% 11% 

2596 24% 259%+ 9% 
23 23 23 — % 

246 49% 49 49ft + % 
408 27% 26ft 27%+ ft 

1ZM 17% 12% — ft 
27ft 27ft 27ft— 9% 
14% 14 lift — ft 
24% 34% MM- ft 

29 2BM 2BM— % 
38ft X 35ft— Vk 
30% 30ft 30% 

56% 56M 56%—% 
46ft 46% 46% — ft 

69% 6M 69%+ % 
10ft HR* 10% 

15ft IS 15ft 
29% 20% 291%-% 
29ft 2916 29ft— ft 
84ft 83M 841% + % 
27% 2796 2796 . 

29ft 2Sft 2S96 + V* 
369% 85% KM— M 
49ft 49ft 49U + ft 
29% 26ft 29% + ft 
37ft 37 37M- % 
35ft 35ft 35ft- ft 
601 38 38 38 , 

130Z165 165 161 + M 
lOBt 20ft 20ft 20ft 
341 M » M 
189 17 16M 16% 

53 5% 5% 5ft— ft 

214 13% 13 13%— ft 

14W 20% WM 194%— ft 
14 48% 47ft 47ft— M 
86 24 23% 23ft— % 

448 35ft 35ft 35ft + % 
23% 2JM 23M— J* 
26 2596 25% — ft 

30 2FV6 30 

24% 23ft 26%+ V* 
501% 49% «%- ft 
65ft 651% ASM— % 
43% «Z% 42ft— % 
57 56 56ft- V% 

2896 28 28%+ M 

68 V* 67W 48M + % 
2496 *W 2fl6+ % 

696 6V6 6ft + V% 
361* 36% 34%— M 


8 74 

7 844 
114 

10 38 

11 982 

9 
9 

16 

12 45 

16 B05 
68 7004 
22 36 

8 411 
12 20 

9 1727 

39 

15 101 
349 
18 
8 31 

10 1532 
1 


944 

787 

123 


14 

63 

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II 


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13 191 

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19 233 
202 
32 566 
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II 679 


12 

205 


22lta 74 74 74 + V* 


UO SJ 
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\jem 60 


11 

10 

B65 

177 


16 2007 

- 


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12ft Uft 12% 

24M 23ft 24 - V% 
31 30ft 30ft- ft 
54% 5496 5496— U, 
259% 25V* 25ft + Vk 
1296 13ft 13ft— V% 


United Pros International 

NEW YORK — Prices on the New York 
Stock Exchange sagged in moderately active 
trading Friday, failing again to break through 
the barrier of 1 .300 on the Dot- Jones industrial 
average. 

Several technology issues had moderate 
losses, but otherwise the trading was dull in the 
session before a three-day weekend. 

The Dow Jones industrial average fell 5.86 to 
1 . 282 . 02 , its second consecutive loss after hit- 
ting a record high of 1 .297.92. For the week, the 
Dow lost 7.95. 

Declines led advances by a 9-io-7 ratio. Vol- 
ume totaled 106.5 million shares, down from 
139.7 million Thursday. 

Alan Ackerman of Herzfeld & Stern said the 
decline was “moderate and not unexpected" in 
view of the big rise in the stock market over the 
previous six weeks. 

Mr. Ackerman said the market was buoyed 
by “positive psychology” resulting from “less 
fear of interest climbing out of control and the 
end of recession fears." 

Ricky Harrington of Interstate Securities in 
Charlotte, North Carolina, said the stock mar- 
ket had been trading in a range between 1 2260 
and 1,300 on the Dow for two and a half weeks 
and would probably be confined to that range 
for another two weeks or so. 

He said the basic trend of the market was still 
upward. The longer it takes to break through 
1,300, he said, “the more dramatic and powerful 
the move will be when it takes place." 

John Smith of Fahnestock & Co. said that “it 
wouldn't take much” to put the Dow over 1,300. 
“There isn't much interest in selling the market 
down.” he said, adding that there were ample 


bids at prices just under the market. He said 
foreign investors had added fuel to the advance. 

Pantry Pride was the most active NYSE- 
listed issue, gaining \h to 4%. Two blocks of 
more than a million shares each crossed near the 
close. The Florida- based supermarket chain re- 
cently won a proxy fight with a dissident share- 
holder group. 

Phillips Petroleum was second, off % to 48W. 
P hilli ps officials questioned whether Carl C. 
Icahn could secure financing for his bid for 70 
million shares at S60 a share. 

Unocal was third, off 1W to 46%. T. Boone 
Pickens partners, who last year made a bid 
for Phillips, have acquired 7.9 percent of Uno- 
cal’s stock. The stock had risen recently in 
response to takeover rumors, but Mr. Pickens 
said his group was not planning a takeover. 

Other oil issues weakened, with Exxon drop- 
ping h to 47%, Mobil Vi to 273%, Indiana Stan- 
dard 1 to 60, Chevron % to 334 and Atlantic 
Richfield 14 to 47^. 

Pan American Corp.. which reported a 
fourth-quarter loss of S923 million compared 
with a loss of S58.6 million a year earlier, rose \ 
10 4*. 

General Motors lost X to 784, Ford 'A to 45% 
and Chrysler Ji to 324. 

IBM lost 4 to 131% and Cray Research 
dropped 2% to 70. 

Digital Equipment added IVi to 111% and 
Data General advanced % to 58*4. But else- 
where in the technology group. Advanced Mi- 
cro Devices lost 1 Y* to 33W, Texas Instruments 
^ to 118(6, Computervision 2 to 38V4, Bur- 
roughs VA to 60(4 and Hewlett Packard Vi to 
36 W. 


Sty 


33% 249% CBI In 
87ft 62 CBS 
8M 4ft CCX 


I0Oo5J 10 27 

300 30 12 1269 
IS 122 


27 

7996 

8 


ftft 3696 + V* 
7%9% 799%+ M 


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10ft 

8U 

CCX of 

125 

120 


ax 

10 

10 

ID 

+ 

ft 

49 

27 

CIGNA 

£60 

50 

21 

3670 

48 

47 

47% 

+ 

% 

30 

23% 

CIGpf 

£75 

90 


46 

29% 

29ft 

29ft 

— 

U 

7% 

4% 

etc 




a 

6ft 

55* 

5% 

— 

ft 

4086 

2146 

CNAFn 



IS 

10 

37ft 

37ft 

37ft 



u 

10% 

8% 

CNAI 

12Oull0 


73 

10ft 

10% 

10% 

+ 

ft 

41% 

34% 

CPC Inf 

£20 

55 

TO 

Sit 

40ft 

39% 

40 

— 

ft 

20% 

141* 

CP Nil 

100 

67 

9 

151 


I 

21 

+1 

27% 

18% 

CSX 

104 

40 

8 

4011 

MM 


25% 

+ 

ft 

39ft 

22 

CT5 

100 

24 

16 

121 

39% 

FTajI 

39ft 


% 

12% 

7% 

C3 Inc 



39 

174 

11% 

11U 

11U 

— 

ft 

X% 

22% 

Otoat 

.92 

£9 

10 

116 

33 

31ft 

31% 

— 

% 

13% 

8% 




15 

1443 

lift 

11% 

lift 

+ 

ft 

19 

lift 

Cal Fed 

02 

10 

7 

938 

17% 

17 

17ft 

+ 

ft 


47V* 32ft COlFdOf 405 104 
24V% 13V* COUlm JSr 10 91 


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3J 11 


240 1DJ 
247 110 
210 40 12 
07 0 15 

UO 20 19 
1J2 44 50 
02 14 12 
80 7 


193 

669 

18 

1934 

243 

773 

10 


305 


1896 119% Cammi .17 
30ft 15ft CRLkO 00 
9% 39%CmpR0 .161 
MM 12V. CaRpfO £50 
72V* 541% CnmSp 200 19 11 
44ft 28% CdPacg 100 
179M123M CooCtta JO 
«!% 30% CwiHM 104 
179* 10W Coring a 08 
40ft 24% Connie 102 24 II 
25ft 13% CaraFI 00 
26% 19V. CarPw 
23ft 19ft CarP Of 
49M 369% CarTec 
TIM 7V% corral 
44 309% CarsPIr 

32ft IBM Carl Hi* 

34% 199* CarfWl 
15% 7M CtracNG UO 
18ft 9% CasffCJc 
33 15ft CstIC of 12J 
52ft 28ft CatrpT 08 14 

27% 16 Cccn 06 £9 12 

93 62ft Cetera. 400 40 9 

40V* 34 Cdanpf 4J0 112 

13 7M Cenovn 0ie .1 21 1102 
41% 30% Cental 2J8 54 9 206 

26% 17 Canteen 
23% 16% CcnSoW 242 80 

25% 16% CenHud 204 110 

26% 23ft CHudPf 202*110 
2396 IBM GenlILf 222 94 

17% M QUIPS 140 94 

23ft 179* CnLOEl 706 80 

35 29% CLoEl pf 4.18 123 

14% 7% CeMPw 100 132 
19ft 14 CnSava 
18ft 10% CVTP5 
Mft 7ft CentrDt 
lov* 7ft CntrvTI 
23% 189% Cenvfli 
27M 15% Crt-teed 
3496 17 ceaeAhr 
26ft 16% Chmpln 
27ft 19 Chmlpf 1-20 44 Z 

54 43ft dim I pf 440 80 17 

10ft 8 OiamSP 00 44 12 112 

12% 1 vIChrtC 555 

6% ft vtCM wt >29 

11% 1% vIChrtpf 26 

55ft 35ft ansa 300 74 6 615 

«S 36ft CHasB pf 525 110 3 

58 48 Chase pf 607*110 42 

57% 51 Chase pt 9309174 57 

21% 139% Chelsea 02 30 9 38 

34ft 24ft Chanted 152 54 13 198 

4J 23V* CUNY 5 308 60 * 766 

41% 2M> CUNY pf 147 45 11 

58ft 48 CUNY pf 4579114 154 

an* sift cneepk 1 J4 is is ids 

39% 32% CtwsPn 200 50 12 531 

40ft 29ft Chewrn 208 72 7 4240 


45V* 45 45V* +1 

16ft 15ft 16% +9* 

149% 14% 14% — ft 

18% MV* 18M — % 

5 4% 4%— % 

12V* m* 12ft— % 

64% 64ft 6496+ ft 

_ 44M 44% 44ft + % 

294 172 169 170ft +19% 

697 48 47% 479*— 9* 

167 10% 10% NH*— V* 

39ft 38V* 38V*— 96 


14 12 1742 25V* 25ft 25ft— % 


4 

40 13 
100 110 5 


08 74 9 
£40 112 9 

00 U 12 
00 14 39 
‘ 10 


520 

B 

182 

317 

37 

145 

66 

32 

297 

315 


.We 0 9 
331 30144 
08t U 


100 


36V* lffft CNWst 
200 10896 OvIMIw 
75 531* CNMIPf 

23ft 14 OlIPnT 

15 7ft ChkFull 
41% 24% ChrlsCr 
12 5 Christn 

13% 9ft Chroma 
56 42 avmpf 

36% 20ft ChrvMr 
62ft 34% Chubb] 220 
33ft Sift Church 
46 35% anBell X12 60 

15% 8% OnGE 2.16 142 i 
33 39 ClnGpf 704 144 

6796 48 anG pf 928 130 

88 66 OnGpf 1252 130 

28% 30 ClnMIl 02 24 32 

36 21W ClrdK 04 £3 14 

on* 1696 aratv 08 3 17 

22V* 13% arcus 15 

47% 279% Cllisxp 206 44 

9996 75% CltEPPf A 905*100 


44% 33 OtYIrtv 10 

68 49V* Ctvlnpt 200 33 

25M 27ft CtVlnpf 247 114 
lift 6M OaWr 02 90 
36% 239% OarkE 1.10 34 19 
16 6% CK fHra 17 

22ft 17 ctvat 100 45 10 

30ft 1396 ClevEI 352 132 5 

58% 46% CtvEIPf 700 132 

59 47 CIvEI P» 706 120 

16% 10 Cfevpk 40 42 

17% 15ft CNPhPf £33 133 
2D Wft Ctvpfcpf 144 100 
31ft 22% Ctenx 
20% 14% CkJbMn 
31ft 22M CluettP 
19ft 149% duet pt 
22ft 12ft Cpachm 
38ft 23% Coastal 
66 49% Cocoa 

19% 9% Cotooo 
34 25ft CMfWI 


1649 25ft 25ft 25% + % 
10 23% 23% 23M + ft 
685 48 47 47% + ft 

145 10% 109% 10ft— ta 
40x 43ft 43% 43% 

381 3*9* 36ft 26 v. — % 
257 339* 33ft 33ft- % 
14% 13ft 13ft— ft 
12 lift 12 
2096 204% MS* + ft 
3» 31% 32 — ft 
27ft 24W 26ft— 1% 
94M 92% 94ft +19% 
40W 40% 40%— % 
99% *ft 9% + % 
41% 41% 41% — % 
26% 26ft 26ft— M 
B6 23ft 22% 23ft + ft 
20 2496 24% 2496 
2 24% 24ft 24% +1M 
Six 239% 22% zm— ft 
210 17 1696 16ft— % 

23 22% 23 + ft 

34 33% 34 

im w% urn 
19 18% 19 +% 

17M 17M 17ft— ft 
10 9ft 10 + M 
10W 9% 10 — % 
23 23 21 + M 

25% 25ft 25ft— V. 
23% ZPW 229*— 9% 
23ft 23W 23% — % 
25ft 25M 2516+ % 
53% S3 53ft + ft 
9 Oft Bft 
3% 2% 2%— ft 
lft 1% lft 
3% 3ft 3ft— ft 
54ft 54 54ft— ft 

44V* 44ft 44ft— % 

55% 55% 55% + ft 
53 52% 52% + ft 

21 W 20V* 21 + M 

30ft 30 30ft— ft 

42% 41ft 419k— ft 
42% 41ft 41ft— ft 
56% 55% 55% + ft 
38% 38% 3896 
37% 37 37ft + ft 
34% 33ft 33ft— 1 
23V. 23 23V* + M 

54 151W15D 150% + ft 

B 69 68M 6896—1 

701 23% 23V6 23 Li— ft 
as aw aw 8ft + % 
12S 41 40ft ft 

15 11% 11% 11% 

115 12M 12 12% — % 

9 51 51 51 

3.1 3 8472 33ft 32M 32ft— 1 
30 15 £242 62 61 61% +1% 

23 19 924 35% 3496 34ft— % 
IS 45ft 45% 45% — % 
376 15M 15 1516 

sraz 54 53 53 

lSQz 67% 66% 67% — 16 
1 90 *0 90 +2% 

130X 2596 2Sft 25% + % 

S 2% S* 8*I?8 

902 229* lift 22% + 96 
4W 46 44% 44ft— 1W 

10 91W 71W 91W 


401 


39ft 399* 399* 

7 61% 61% 61% 

246 24% 24ft 24ft 
12 7W 7% TV. 

394 30% 30% 30 W— W 

37 15ft 1596 15ft— W 

413 22M 22 22 — V6 

1206 19ft 19 19% + % 

20QZ 56M S6V6 56V6 

500z 58% 57 

148 13 14ft +1% 

1 16% 16% 16% — W 

11 17ft 17% 17ft + M 

120 30 11 3765 32ft 31 32M +IW 

.10* S 18 426 S3W 19% 20% + ft 
100 3J 18 489 30% 30% 30% — M 
100 53 22 19% 19V6 19W— % 

00 20 12 341 X 2096 20% 20ft— W 
00a 12 7 66 3096 30W 30ft— ft 

£76 40 13 3542 62% 61% 6191 + M 

540 13% UV* 13% + V* 

130 43 13 367 JW*2W»39ft + ft 

26% 20% ColBPal 128b 52 10 6429 25% 24 24ft— ft 

49% 39 CoteP pf 425 90 630Z 41% 42V* 43% + % 

45W 27% CoHAHi 138 30 8 121 44 43W 43ft— ft 

21 9% GoJFdsa .16 0 17 1527 22% 21ft 21% + ft 

31ft 20ft Col Pen 100 40 10 900 29 30ft 29 + % 

63% 39% Cot tlnd 150 41 10 ” 

37% 27 CMGaa 118 94 9 
52% 48ft CoKSapf 500 110 
M7M 96 CSOpf 01525 144 
108 97 CSOpf n 1525 W 2 

43% 27W Comb In £08 40 II 
37ft 2596 CmbEn 101 40 12 


26 20 13 

4 

300 100 6 
1.90 110 
200 110 


17W 8 Camdb 
SOW 15% CamMtl 
39ft lift Comdra 
28% 21% CmwE 
16ft 13 CwE pf 
17 13W CwE Pf . 

H2% 80 CwE pf 1100 110 
67% 53% CwE Pf 8-38 12-5 
22ft 18ft CwE Pf £37 100 
24% 20ft CWE Pf 2J7 110 
59 46 CwEpf 724 123 

25% 16W ComES 232 90 
32% 23ft Conwal 100 " 

33 16% OPrres m 

36% 24 Com pgr 
I7W ll CompSc 
4614 29 QXVKI 
389* 1996 CanAPB 
21ft 13W Conair 
10% 12ft Conti Es 102 |4 
26 19% CnnNG 200 90 


214 

2037 

1758 

43 

13 


174 61ft 60% 61ft + ft 
445 33ft 33 33% — ft 

1 SO 50 50 + ft 
202106M 106W106W 
100x107 107 107 +1 

995 44W 43W 43ft + ft 
635 37% 37 17V. + M 

2D 10 12 1686 17% 15% 15ft— 1W 
18ft 17% 18%— ft 
13% 13ft 13%+ ft 
28ft 28% 2Sft+ ft 
16 15% 16 + % 

16ft 16ft 16ft + ft 
50x101 100 TOO —2% 
BIQx 67 67 67 — % 

8 22% 22V* 22% 

18 24% 24% 24ft— ft 
2801 58ft 58ft 5896 + 96 

19 23ft 23ft 23ft — % 
647 32ft 31 31 —ft 
214 32ft 31ft 31% — ft 

21 34% 34% 34% + ft 
389 16M 16% 16% — ft 
39 3006 39% 38% Mi— 3 
07 10 14 2M 29ft 29 29 — % 
24b 10 12 59 22% 22% 22%— M 

9 8 18 18 18 + ft 

9 14 24% 24% 24% 


00 


30 12 
0 26 
10 T2 

8 


17ft 10ft Conroe M 30 6 154* lift 13% I3%— ft 

31ft 22ft Cora Ed 200 70 74895 30% 30ft 30% + ft 

43 35 COrtEPf 406 11.1 10b 4196 41% 41K + ft 

44ft 38 CttlEpf 500 110 5 44 44 44 

3Sft 25 ConsFd 104 4.1 10 873 35 34ft 34% 

36 20% CraFrJ ] 100 30 12 379 33% 32ft 31% + % 


12 Month 
High low Slock 


On. YkL PE 


Sis. 

100s High Low 


Ook 

Quot-OToe 


4U 

51 

4% 

34 


» 


X 


202 

52 

9 

329 

Mft 

43% 





5 

1229 

K.l 

6U 

I3U 

1*© 1 

400 

147 


5401 28V* 

27 








CnPprV 400 

170 


112 

fr. 'T 

25% 

9% 

CnPprU £60 

170 


X 

1 1 r I 

20% 

10U 

CnPwT 3.78 

140 


197 


21ft 

25% 


708 

170 



44ft 


CnPprR 400 

170 


117 


XU 

10% 

CnPprP xn 

171 


» 


23% 


CnPprN 305 

17.1 


96 

fz- ^ j 

23 

7% 

CnPprM 250 

147 


9 

1 rai 

15 


CnPPrt. £23 

159 


U 


13% 

11 

CnPprS 

402 

172 


117 


33% 

7% 

CnPnrK 203 

172 


57 

■ 

14ft 

73ft 

CnftCP 

200 

67 

6 

1385 


41ft 

59% 

CMC ptA 

ISO 

73 


1 

92 

92 

61 

r-icu 

250 

73 





4% 

i-mwTiii 




344 

y% 







7783 

4ft 

3% 






39 


41U 

% 

CMIHdn 




1958 

tiz 

1% 


ContTH 

1.72 

7A 

9 

1765 


23% 

90% 

CtDatn 

73 

20 

44 

3460 


35ft 

77% 


100 

30 

12 

96 

Vi,' 

29ft 






149 

IC 

1% 

76 

Coopr 

102 

44 

16 

an 


Xft 

a 

Coopl Pt 

200 

£1 


329 


36% 

10% 

CeepLb 

03o 2 

J 

US 


15% 

17ft 

CoprTr 

00 

£0 

B 



11% 

I~1 

40 

1.9 

16 

4083 


a 

lift 

ivT'B 

04 

£1 


7 

M 

13% 

1VU 

Cpwfdpf 248 110 


7 

33 

22 

Uft 

Cardura 

04 

30 

16 

333 

24 

23ft 

19% 

Corwin 

J6 

£9 

13 

IX 

14% 

14 

SS 


128 

30 

14 

696 

J1I4 

38% 


'jS 

£5 

31 

175 

40 

39% 

39ft 

I , -'A d llB 

0 

10 

478 

66% 

56% 

4U 





99 

BU 

8ft 

27 


100b 40 

11 

S 

34% 

34ft 

38ft 




73 

1185 

K t ’T 

ittW 

16U 

CrockN 

M 

10 


939 


25V* 


CrctcN pf £18 110 


3 


19ft 

T9U 

CrmpK 

320 

£1 

10 

2 


23% 

34% 




M 

3V 


49% 

27% 

CrwZel 

100 

30 

13 

639 


33ft 

43 

CrZrtpt 

403 

90 


7 


48% 

50 

CrZnt PfC40D 

79 


7 


i/ft 

1BU 

Cuftra 

00 

£4 

6 

39 


23% 

12ft 

Call nets 



47 

aiv 


32 

6IU 

CtanEn 

220 

£7 

4 

XU 


SOU 

8U 


1.1IMHL7 


33 


10ft 



120 

£4 

ra 

* 


36% 

27ft 

Cyclops 

l.W 

20 

VO 

■JO 


47V* 


22% + ft 
15 


92 46ft 
92 +VU 


20ft— 1ft 


22 + ft 


14ft— % 


22ft 

13% Dote 

00 

10 

18 

131 

21% 

21% 

21% — 

ft 

19ft 

9% DomonC 

00 

10 61 

86 

13% 

13 

13% + % 

Xft 

21ft DanoCp 

128 

43 

9 2158 

X 

29ft 

29« — 

u 






299 

8% 

7% 

7%— 

ft 



,I8b 10 


3/4 

13% 

12% 

13U + U 

Wft 

45 DortKr 

424 

47 

10 

599 

91 

90ft 

90%+ % 

76 

39ft DatuGn 



16 3673 

519% 

6/ft 

5BU + % 

25ft 

13ft Datont 



19 

761 

20% 

aft 

20% — 

ft 

I2U 

8% DtaDra 

30 

17 

12 

51 

11% 

lift 

11% 


18ft 


24 

10 

7 

206 

I7U 

17 

17 — 

ft 

XU 

26ft DaytHd 

J4 

10 

15 XX 

3?U 

38V* 

» — 

u 

Mft 

11% DavtPL 

200 127 

7 

177 

tit* 

16% 

15% — 

ft 

Mft 


700 137 


1001 54ft 

541* 

54ft — 

ft 

59% 


7JD 1£5 


50z 57 

1/ 

57 


a 

a% DeanF l 

.48 

10 

17 

173 

30% 

a 

30ft + % 

36% 

24% Deere 

108 

30 

a 

1307 

30ft 

30% 

30ft + % 

22% 

17ft DdmP 

102 

87 

a 

3605 

22% 

ZIft 

73 — 

ft 

46ft 

V DelfaAr 

00 

10 

7 

1Z76 

45% 

Mft 

45 



8% 

67ft 
28 
37W 
16ft 
72% 

61% 

59 
40 
34% 

26V. 20 DE prR 
259* 19ft DEpfQ 
341* 19 DE P#P 
27% “ 

Z7W 
30% 

31ft 
18 


4% Deltona 




35V 

6% 

6ft 

6% 

+ % 


35ft DlxCtlk 

176 

£6 

17 

339 

i/ft 

66% 

66% 

— 1 

58% 


129 

44 

n 

06 

27ft 

Mft 

2/W 



Mft DeSoto 

100 

37 

II 

51 

37ft 

3/U 

37ft 

+ % 

941 

lift DatEd 

108 

107 

7 

503 

15% 

15% 

15% 


26 

59 DefEpf 

902 

130 


2Vtt 

71ft 

n 

71ft 

+Ift 

12ft 

47ft DefEpf 

748 

124 


41 

61 

61 

61 


4% 

46 DetEpi 

/AS 

120 


ion 

68 

68 

.9 



45ft DefEpf 

706 

127 


12 Ms 

57% 

57% 

57% 

+ ft 


191* DEpfF 

275 

112 


7 

24ft 

Mft 

34ft 

+ % 

b 


324 13.1 
£13 110 
£13 1£4 


35 2+U 24ft + % 

34 33% 34 + ft 

23ft 23V. 23W— W 


15ft 


22ft 

38% 

59 

12Sft 

79ft 

40 

6% 

16% 

30ft 

21% 

54% 

38% 

42% 

33V* 

51% 

14% 

33% 

l* 

4916 

54% 

34% 

44% 

30ft 

69 

25ft 

34 

73 

14ft 

U 

15ft 

17 

1694 

17ft 

10ft 

24% 


19% OEpfO 

300 111 


4 

26 

25% 

25% 


69 

47 Oral nor 

19ft DEpfM 

302 130 


13 

MU 

25% 

MU — 

ft 

15% 

Bft GtAFst 

24% DEort. 

400 130 


12 

Mft 

30 

Mft + ft 

18 

11% GtAIPc 

24% DEPfK 

4« 130 


9 

31 

30% 

30% 

.. 

■ ly 

27ft GfCk In 

13U DotEpr 

228 111 


18 

17% 

17ft 

17% + U 

V 1 Lj 

15ft GNlm 

17% Dexter 

00 

30 

12 

313 

23 

21% 

32 — 


H “ l" 

7 1 GINNk 

9% Dldor 

04 

40 a 

8* 

15ft 

14% 

IS 


V" 

Uft GnWFbl 

21% DIGtopf 

22* 

8.1 


3 

Z7% 

27% 

Z7% — 

U 

■ r ' 



176 

92 

11 

3742 

IVU 

18% 

19ft + ft 

BtF 1 

11% GMP 

34% DlaShpt 

400 11.1 


54 

36ft 

36% 

36 



18% Greyti 

43ft Dieblds 

100 

10 

13 

XI 

56% 

56% 

56% — 

ft 

6% 

2% Graller 

77% Die Hal 



14 <970 

113 

10ft 112% +1% 

13% 


45% Disney 

100 

10 <1 

2895 

Blft 

77% 

78ft — 

% 

11% 

6% Grub El 


240 

69 

5 

13 

X 

371* 

37ft— 

% 



3% Dlvrstn 



4 

40 


4M> 

4% 





.12 



1098 

0% 

8% 

8%— 

ft 


4% Gruntol 

20% DomRj 

272 

90 

a 

499 

28% 

20ft 

2B%+ U 


14ft Guardi 


16 Donate 
32 Donley 
23% Dorsey 
28% Dover 
25ft DowCh 
35V* DowJn 
10% Draw 
15% Drew 
14ft DrexB 
23ft Dreyfus 

42ft duPont 

30ft duPnt pf 300 106 
29 duPntpf 400 ML5 


22% DukeP 301 84 
57 Dufeepf 700 1U 
31ft Dtrtutpf 209 105 
% Ounce pf £05 111 
51% DunBrd 108 20 21 
11% DuqLf 206 119 7 
14 DuqptA 3M 125 
1Z% Oua pf 200 1X3 
12% Doqpf 207 120 
11 DvepfG £W 730 
13% Puopr 201 13-3 
8% OwoPt 
17% DvnAm 


06 32 9 26 20% 30% 27% 

1.16 £1 16 220 54ft 53ft 54% + % 

120 42 13 22 Z7% 27% Z7ft + % 

02 20 15 405 42 41% 41ft— V6 

150 02 10 4734 29% 29 29% — % 

01 10 23 2» 44% 45ft 45ft— ft 

50 4.1 233 13ft 12V* 12V*— % 

08 42 15 3453 20% TV 19%— 1% 

200 110 . 12 17% 17% 17% 

50a Ll 13 196 47ft 46ft 46ft— 1 

300 50 9 3600 5496 53% Sift 

7 33 33 33 — % 

43ft 43 


Z1 


43 — % 


7 4078 29ft 29% 2996— % 
1008 66 66 66 + ft 

449 35ft 3S% 2S%+ ft 
27 31ft 31ft 31ft + ft 
770 72% 71% 71%— % 
389 16 15ft 16 
Mb lift 16ft 16ft— ft 
2802 15 15 15 

100e 16 16 16 +1 

1500 16% 1* 14% +1% 

5Mb 17% 17ft 17ft + V* 
16% 14ft 15ft +2% 
34ft 34% 24% — % 


38ft 

31ft 

38% 

19ft 


3% 

lft 

13% 

15% 

17% 

289* 

II 

78 

60% 

30ft 

32ft 

39ft 

18% 

34% 

21% 

29% 

28% 

14ft 

14% 

7% 

8% 

10% 


26% EGG 08 12 

21ft E Syst 00 10 

20% EostoP 104 £8 

13 Eases 04 22 

3% EattAh- 
lft EALwtO 
% EALwtA 
6% ESAIrpf 
Bft EAlrpfB 
9ft EAlrpfC 
19% EastGF 120 £1 
12% EMfUft 104 112 


6178 5ft 


18% 

17ft 

78% 

14ft 

20% 

32% 

20% 

\ 

35% 

37% 

29% 


W7 

3% 

71ft 

20 

21ft 

37% 


17% 

41ft 

14ft 

14% 

20% 

22ft 

31% 

37ft 

7% 

W 


87ft Eaton 120 £1 
20% Echlln 0* 20 
20% Edema 100 £1 
32% Etflsflr 100 40 
13 EDO 24 10 
18% Edward 00 25 
WU EPGdpf £35 1(U 
25V* EPOpf 305 130 
23ft EPGPT 
9 Error* 

8% Clear 06 35 
2ft ElecAs 
4ft EMM 

7ft EMMpt 108 100 
13ft Elctsps 08 2 

11% Elgin 00 52 
5% sum 

58% EmrsEI 208 30 
5ft Em Rad -94f 60 
lift EmryA 50 £5 
24% Emhart 100b 45 
Mft EflWDs 106 90 
4 Emu pf 00 100 
% CnExc 

22% Engicp 02 20 
18% EnttBu 56 15 
17% Eramdi 100 50 
51% ElBdlpf 625*110 
91% Eiudipfl 123*110 
lft Enrae 
9% Entera 

16% EntxE n 125* 60 
U Entoxlo 120 60 
23% Equifax 100 40 
3 Ewlmfc _ 

11% EamkPf £31 150 
28% EalR« 102 42 
9% Eautten 
Bft Erbmnt 
12ft Essfi&n 
15ft EarakC 
20% Estrlne 
30 Ethyl 
3 EvianF 
6% Cvanpf 100 172 


28 272 38% 37ft 38%+ % 

15 2021 30ft 30% 30% 

9 27 27% 27% 27% + % 

" 19 10ft If + % 

5H 594 + 96 
3ft 3% 244+ V* 
2Z3 1 ft I + ft 

42 13% 12ft 13% + 96 

2Z1 15% 14ft 15% + ft 

ITS 18% 17% 18 +1 

33 1565 25ft 24% 25ft+ft 

6 411 17% 17% 17ft — % 

12 35*9 78 69% 49V* — V* 

7 044 589* 5794 68% + M 

13 TO 28ft 28% 28% — % 

14 1466 3294 ZZft 32% 

9X 36ft 36% 36% + % 


13 1346 17% 16ft 17% 

22 490 33% 32% 32% — % 
1 22% 22% 22% 

14 2 S 4 * 28 V* 2 B 4 * + % 

11 27% 27% 27%+ % 
15 125 14% 14% 14%— % 

40 10% 10% 10% — % 
5% 5ft 5ft- ft 
6ft 6 6 -ft 

3x 9% Oft Bft + ft 
36 27% 25ft 27% — ft 


1D6 

180 


6 

15% 

15% 

15% 

175 

8% 

Bft 

Bft 

639 

97% 

77 


749 

Mft 

13% 

13% 

445 

38% 

19% 

a 

129 

31% 

31 

31 

12 

20ft 

a 

a 

540z 

* 

4ft 

5 


.13 1.1 
20* 15 
A A 
00b 20 
02 . £1 
05 20 


. . + % 

1897 ft + 

16 650 28% 27ft 28 — ft 

15 30 3794 37 3794 +1 

16 WJ8 27% 9494 27V*— % 

noraz 5294 SH6 5394— % 

418 98% 98% 98 VS — 194 

21 65 2ft 2ft 2ft 
79 18% 10% 1896 + ft 
72 18ft 17ft 18% + ft 
9 I68X 20 19ft 19ft— % 

14 Hu 31ft 36% 3696 + ft 
51 A A 4ft + ft 
11 U 14ft 15 + ft 
6 111 48 39ft 39ft— ft 

8 221 lift 11 % lift- ft 

18 218 14 I3ft 1394—% 

W 965 21% 19ft 21% +1 

11 X 20ft 20% 30% 

11 349 23 22% 23 + ft 

lft 111 35% 36 36% + % 

127 4% 4% 4%— % 

41 8% 7ft 8% + % 


12 Month 
High Low Stodc 


Div YU PE 


SI 4 . 

lacs HlghLow 


One 

Qua. Circe 


14% TO 1 * Evan Pf £10 170 10 

41ft 30 ExCeta 100 £9 10 288 

lift 13ft EKcdw 101*110 5 

48V* 36V* Emm 300 72 7 *164 


13% 12% 12% + % 
41% 41 41 

157* 15% 15%— % 
47% 47% 47ft— ft 


10% 

67% 

23ft 

13% 

14% 

20% 

39ft 

16ft 

33 

22 

19% 

33% 

28% 

13 

7 

37% 

45% 

48% 

39 

19 % 

27 

23 

18ft 

57ft 

31ft 

37 

21% 

5% 

47ft 

9% 

19% 

27% 

57% 

35 

33 

71V* 

27 

2® 

56 

21 

19% 

48% 

30% 

12% 

50% 

794 

30% 

30ft 

20% 

28% 

52 

54ft 

12% 

34% 


6% FHInd 3 249 11 

41ft FMC 200 30 56 518 47V. 

17% FPLGp 108 84 9 3528 22% 

9% FabCtr 28 22 IS ID T2ft 

9% Facet 43 1 3% 

IS Folrchd 00 4.1 II 224 19ft 

33ft Folrcpf 3 00 90 15 39 

9% Fairfd .18 10 10 220 15% 

22 0 25 171 31ft 

7 21ft 

00* 30 13 74 17 

5 13 29 

08 40 9 325 22% 

20 10 18 244 12 

11 92 6V4 

104 40 7 14 37% 

23 2238 37V* 

1 39 


16% FamDlr 
8«ft FamDwt 
14% Faratln 
27% FrWstF 
14% Farati 
Bft FovDrg 
4ft Factors 
29% FedlC* 
27ft Fed Exp 
39ft FdHtnpf 


29ft FdMag 
10ft FadNM 
l*% FedPBl 
lft FeaRll 

13% FdSpnl 
43 % FMD 5 I 
22ft Ferro 
25ft FWCSt 
4 FlnCnA 


3ft FlnCsipf 

00 112 


14% FlnCppf 674*180 


2ft FnSBar 
15% Flrsstn 

00 

43 

10 

19 FtAttln 

08 

£2 

8 

MU FIAttpf 

62Oell0 


21% FBkSvS 

148 

40 

S 


1.20 

40 

10 


00a 

.9 

n 

18% FstCWc 

102 

52 

32 

13% FIB Tex 

100 

70 

9 

40 FIBTx Pt 507*127 



1-52 £1 10 33x 37ft 

.16 .9 3*41 19ft 

00 £1 8 231 " 

104 *0 1* 35 

00 40 14 32 

200 42 9 1106 

120 42 II 123 

200 60 10 46 

20 20 1756 

I 
24 


37 V 

150 


lift FfCIty 
10ft FFedAz 
30ft Finfsfe 204 
31 FlnM pf 207 
7ft Ft Miss 24 
31% FNStB £88 
4% Fat Pa 
20% Fit Pa Pf 202 
20ft FtUnR! 104 
T4ft FtVaBk 04 
16 FtWlK 120 


583 
13 
545 
1460 
309 
51 

9 208 
7 679 
4.9 B 743 
£0 203 

20 9 856 
50 7 46 

9 987 
£8 334 

6.1 15 Ifi 

4.1 6 34 

£5 8 S 


23 

22% 
l Bft 
S7V* 
28 V* 
30ft 
10% 
5V* 
37V* 
4V* 
18% 
27% 
SO 
33% 
30 
69% 
36 
17% 
46% 
13 

19% 

47% 

29ft 

10ft 

3% 

7ft 

29% 

30ft 

20ft 

26Vi 


10V] 
66% 
22% 
12% 
12% 
19% 
38% 
15 
31% 
21ft 
16ft 
29 
22% 
11% 
6% 
37 
3*% 
39 
371* 
18ft 
22V* 
22 V* 
18% 
56ft 
38% 
30% 
9% 
5% 
37ft 


37% 

33% 

12ft 

37% 

31% 

40 

25% 

20% 


20% 

23% 

54% 

51ft 

12ft 

46% 

14% 

lift 

35% 

T146 

25ft 

34% 

28ft 


jr-JT 

60S 

170 


IDQz 

IM 

r W 

100 

27 

34 

13 

9 


Mi 

0 


78 

AM 

y. 

102 

£9 

9 

677 



06 

10 

11 

1339 

-* y 

r'k ’*^8 . || li | 

08 

20 

14 

3071 


y» ^TVk'J 

00 

7.4 

13 

4 


1 1'P'™- ^ "'ll 

101 

120 


24 

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30 

0 

72 

933 

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17 

390 


n r ji 

.16a 

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12 

S3 

■s 


7.16 

80 

f 

375 


11% FlaStl 

00 

£0 

13 

113 

16% 








00 

£1 

19 

219 

19% 

irr.fiT— ora 

00 

£1875 

1162 

1B% 


£20 

42 

ID 

71 

57ft 


200 

40 

311870 

46 


18% 

27 

55 

33 
29ft 
68ft 
25% 
17 
45% 
12% 
19% 
46% 
29% 

9% 

49ft 

71* 

29% 

30 

20% 

26V* 

51 

36ft 

10% 

34 


10% Ft Dear 126 110 


.... .... 28k 11% 

47% FtHawd 104 20 16 2DD 47ft 

10 FostWtl 04 13 14 1722 13% 

08 62 17 187 11 

104 38 56 

£13*230 
00 11 15 

M 22 16 

JSC 13 6 


36% 

56% 


6% FokSTP 
2* Foxbro 

5% FMOG 
13% FrptMc 
20% Frtgtrri 
19 FrueW* .. 

25 Fruhtpf £00 60 

28 Fuqua 00 12 ID 

35 Fuaapt 125 £3 


245 27% 
224 9% 

711 19% 
53 27% 
328 25% 
261 30% 
472 35% 
20 55ft 


371* 

32ft 

12% 

36ft 

29% 

38% 

24% 

16 

6% 

19% 

18ft 

51ft 

45ft 

11% 

*5 

13% 

10% 

27% 

9 

19% 

27ft 

2SVi 

30 

34% 

54 


10!* + % 
47% + ft 
22ft 

12% — % 
13% + % 
19V) — ft 
38% — ft 
!5ft+ % 
31% — Vt 
7TU 

16%+ % 

29 — % 
22ft + % 
11%— ft 

6ft + ft 
37 — % 
37 

39 — ft 
37%— ft 
IBM— % 
22% — ft 
22V* 

18ft + % 
5*ft— % 
S'* 

30ft— % 
10 
5 ft 
37ft 

4 ft + % 
10% — % 
27V* + ft 
55 +t 

33 —ft 

30 

68% — 14* 
25% — ft 
17% 

46 ft + % 
13 — ft 
19%+ % 
47%— ft 
29%+ ft 
10ft— % 
SO 

7ft— ft 
29%+ ft 
30ft— ft 
20% 

26% 

ST 

36ft— ft 
10ft 

34 — % 
28%— % 
37ft + % 
32ft 
12% 

37 + % 

30 — V* 
38% — % 
25% + % 
16 — % 
6% 

19% — ft 
18ft 

52% + % 
45 ft— % 
lift + % 
67ft +2% 
13ft— % 
10%+ % 
27V* 

9 — % 
19ft 

27ft— % 
25ft— % 
30%— U 
34% — 1% 
54 — lft 


30ft 15% 
36 20 

37% 23ft 
34ft 19% 
65% 48% 
10% 4 
13ft 5% 
44% 34ft 
26ft 21% 
23% 19ft 
10 4ft 
5*% 33ft 
25ft 17% 
30% 10% 
19% 13ft 
69ft 53ft 


GAF 

GAFpf 

GAT X 

GCA 

GdCO 

GEO 

GFCP 

GTE 

GTE pf 

GTEPI 

GelHau 

Garre It 

GapSfr 

Gearht 

Golca 

Gem Co 

Genii IC 

Gamut 

GoCora 

GAInv 

GaBab 

Gemma 

GCnPfs 

GnDals 

GaOvn 

Gen El 

GnFds 

GGth 

GnHeat 

GnHous 

Gnin-J 


.15* J 11 
120 3J 
120 £5 14 
14 

08 10 11 


572 29ft 
38 36ft 
74 34% 
4475 31% 


308 72 
200 70 
208 11J 


89 

127 

37 


64 

5ft 

8 


2472 42ft 
2 26 


108 

JO 

.40 

56 


20 20 
20 13 
30 16 
30 14 
136 


150 30121 
103*13 
100 22 9 
00 12 12 
06 10 

21 

12 10 
35 13 
42 10 
L9 

20 3 
20 37 
£4 20 

30 14 


40ft 30% 

17% 14ft 
46% 2 9ft 
34% 16ft 
32V, 16ft 
21 12 % 

84 42 

tf% 48% 

59ft 45% 

31% 34ft 
22 12 % 

18% Bft 
31% 15% 

60 4«ft 

as si 

66ft 33 
39 33ft 
50ft 44% 

10% 3ft 
13 7% 

74 4*% 

12% 5 

53ft 39% 

12% 10 
B% 5% 

30% 13ft 
23ft 15 Genstg 
22 lAte Got of 

36 24 Gen PI i 
27% 19 GaPoc 
37% 33 GaPcpf £24 

37 32% GaPpfB 224 £1 

28% 22ft GaPw pf 304 125 
30 25% GaPwef 306 120 

21 17M GaPwpt 256 125 

21 17 GaPw pf £52 120 

25% 21% GaPwpt 205 11J - 
62% 51% GaPwpf 702 1£5 
29% 20% GerbP a 1.16 £3 10 
23% 12 GerbSi .12 0 17 

12% 7ft GlantP 
11 5ft GJbrFn 

GtffHIII 
Gillette 
CMC 
GiobiM 


100 
220 
250 
00 
00 
24 
50 

GnMIll] 224 
GMot 50Or 64 5 
GMEn .18* J 
GMot pf £75 90 
GMatpf 500 
GNC .16 
GPU 

GenRe 156 
GaRefr 
GnSIgnt 100 
GTFIpf 
Gmsco 
GnRad 


18 22% 
2 7% 

546 56% 
170 24ft 
12* 13ft 
18ft 
69% 
10% 
11 

368 40V* 
23 17% 
73 45ft 
640 34ft 
UO 33 
460 19% 
604 81% 


217 

2 

IS 

1043 


4301 63ft 
1305 59% 


16 31% 
51 20ft 
167 12V* 


1521 21ft 
2887 59 


0095 79% 
1711 63ft 


95 

ZO 19 
6 

£1 21 
7 

30 13 
IS 114 

9 

0 25 


38% 
5 50ft 
BOO 8% 
3517 13% 


807 73ft 
195 12% 


.10 


100 

108 

102 

00 


74 

£9 1* 
30 27 
60 


892 51 
SIDE 11% 
90 6 
1265 17% 
31 22ft 
16 £2% 
2229 35% 
2351 26ft 
11 37% 

6 36ft 
S 27% 

7 29 ft 
3 20ft 
7 20ft 

31 24ft 
39201 62 
475 27 


53 

200 


5 

20 S 
45 11 


3318 71 
38 12 
1218 10% 


3082 26% 
615 5Bft 


24 40 


17ft GtobMPf 350 160 


GMNUP 
GMNwt 
GHJWF 
Gdrlcb 
_.. Goadvr 
19 13ft GardnJ 
32% 19 Gould 
44% 36% GTOC* 


13 


45 

1238 5% 

122 20ft 


20 0 7 

1J6 5L3 7 
140 54 7 
52 £1 9 

48 24 65 
£80 4.9 10 
124 15 14 
00 20 9 
9 

100 20 11 
105*90 7 

152 3.9 a 
08 12 11 
40 

102 108 10 
IS 42 11 
9 

30 14 16 
08 0 13 

100 15 8 


554 lift 
143 3ft 


3744 27% 
3119 29ft 


6969 28ft 
37 17 


545 26% 
1033 


200 68 % 
786 15% 


252 15ft 
39 4Zft 


18ft 
38% 
4798 27ft 


17% 

15ft 

1259 28% 


2407 5ft 
60 121* 


665 11% 
411 


.16 £2 

.... J2 12 13 
26ft S GtiUfrd 08 20 8 
35 25% GtfWW 00 20 10 

65 S6 GlfWpf 505 90 
24% 11% GutfRft 13 7 

14% 18 GtfStUt 104 120 6 
36% 30% GlfSUpf 400 119 
30 84 GHSU PT £85 114 

33ft 27 GlfSU PT 400 119 


26% 

7ft 

34 

25% 


2296 33% 
1 64 


181 15ft 


20% 12ft GAero 
19ft 14 Gutter 


£4 10 
32 15 


827 13ft 
2O0 t 3£ 

12 28ft 
24 32 
X 16ft 
S3 19 


29% 29% — ft 
36% 36%—% 
34% 34% — ft 
X 30% — ft 

63 63% — ft 
5ft 5ft — % 
7ft 7ft— % 

42ft 42ft+ % 

36 26 

33 32 —Vt 
7% 7% — V* 

55ft S*ft+ % 
24% 24ft— % 
Uft 13ft— ft 
18% 18% + ft 
69% 69%— % 
10 W 
10 Idft 
39ft 40 
17ft 17% 

44ft 45*+)ft 
33% 34ft +1% 
32% X + ft 
18% 18ft— 1ft 
90 X — 1% 
62% 63% — % 
59 59%+ % 

31 31% 

20V* 20% — % 
lift t2V*— ft 
21% 21% — % 
57% 58V* — ft 
77ft 78% — ft 
62% 43ft+ % 
38% 38W — % 
50% 50V* + % 

7ft 7ft— ft 
12ft 13% + % 
72% 73% + ft 
121* 12% — ft 
50% 5D%— ft 
lift lift— ft 
5ft 6 

37 17 — % 

22ft 22ft— % 
22 22%+ ft 

34ft 35 — Im 
26% 26ft— ft 
37% 37% + % 
36ft 36ft— % 
27% 27% + V* 
29% 29ft 
20 % 20 % — % 
70 V* 20% 

24ft 24ft— ft 
59ft 62 +1 

26% 26ft + W 
19% 20ft + % 
lift lift— % 

9ft 9ft + % 
25ft 25% — ft 
9% 5H%— ft 
13% 13% + % 
5% 5% — % 
TDft 20ft + % 
lift lift 
3% 3% — % 
26ft 26ft— % 
29% 29V*— % 
28ft 28% — ft 
16ft 17 
X 26 — % 
40% 40%— % 
67 67 —1% 

15 15% + % 

15% 15% + ft 
42 4ZV4— ft 

18ft 18ft 
X 38% + ft 
24ft 27ft + % 
17 17 — % 

15ft 15ft 
27ft 28%+ ft 
5 5% — % 

12% 12ft— % 
10% low— ft 
28ft 28ft— % 
26% 26% + 1* 
7ft 7ft 
23ft ZIft 
25 33 — % 

32 32% — ft 

64 64 + % 
15% 15ft + % 
13V* 13V* — % 

34 34 +1% 

28% 28ft + ft 
31ft 31ft— % 
l&ft 16ft— ft 
18% 19 


IS £9 
IS 52 
0a 50 
06 £1 
204 40 
107 oll.l 
1040 90 
S3 10 
04 30 
00 20 
100 10 
1.12 10 


7 4% HRTn 

27ft 19% HoUFB 
44 26% HoltJfn 

1% ft HoUwd 
10% 5% HahHdpt 

55ft 38ft HamrP 
Uft lift HonJS 
19ft 1546 HanJt 
SDft 21% Handtm 
X 15ft HcawlH 
23% 16ft Hanna 
Sift 23ft HarBrJ 
59% 32V* Morbid 
12ft 7ft Hamlsh 
33% 14% HroRw 
34 V* 22ft Han-1* 

17ft 10ft HarGrn 
28% 19 

32ft XV* Hartira 
16% 13ft Halts* .... 

23ft Uft HOWEIS 104 70 
13ft 8 HOYMA .19* 0 
34ft 15ft HadMn 
13% 9 HazLab 
13ft 9ft Hecks 

23% 13% HecfaM 


IX 5ft 5ft 


A 2J 
08 20 


Horace IS 40 


11 179 
1307 
178 

8 29 
94 
66 

18 563 

19 212 
X 163 
15 IX 
X 170 

9 144 

18 9 

15 1563 

■ 349 
14 1421 
TO 385 


26 25% 

31ft 30% 
1% 1% 
9ft 9% 
45% 45 
13% 13% 
19% 18ft 
51ft 49ft 
19% 19 
20ft X 
58 » 

60% 59 
12 lift 
31ft 31ft 
33ft 33% 
17 Uft 


5ft 

25V* — % 
X%— ft 
!%— % 
9% — % 
45 — % 
13% 

1886— M 
50ft + ft 
19 ft + % 
X 

52 V*— ft 
60 + ft 

12 

31ft— Vk 
33% — % 
16% 


100 110 

■' 9 178 

..... 9 191 

06 10 16 213 
02 £5 32 59 

j® 22 33 548 
20* 12 37 80S 


27 

14% HeHMiV 

48b £8 

10 

324 

IB 

23% 

15% HsflKo 

06 

10 

13 

225 

23% 


m- ■ 













■25% 

U HetmP 

04 

14 

25 

873 

Xft 

6U 

3% HemCa 




IB 

6% 

12% 

lift ftomlnc 

00*74 


21 

11% 

XU 

27% Horcuts 

140 

40 

10 

MJ/4 

36% 

21ft 

13% HerftC 

J Me 

2 

36 

110 

Xft 
















lift HewIPk 

33 

4 

14 

4962 

37% 

a 

17ft Hexe s' 

40 

£1 

17 

HI 

29ft 

19% 

12 HlShaar 

00 

20 

a 

35 

17ft 


33% 32% 
Uft 15% 
13 2146 

13% 12ft 
28 27ft 
12ft 12ft 
13% 12ft 
16ft 16 
16% 


13 B% HTVolt 
34% 17% HIHTtard 
60ft 45% Hilton 
44% 31 Hitachi 
35% HeUttoy 


76 % 
27* 
23 
9% 
Sift 
17ft 
60% 
6616 
27% 
2686 
26 
10 
48ft 
30% 
37% 
19ft 
36ft 
75 % 
23% 
54% 
X 
23% 
36 V* 

lift 

21% 

33 

3) 

37% 


49% Honrs 
12 HmimO 
lift KmFSD 
S HmcGpf 
SIM Hmsflve 
8ft HmstFh 
41% Honda 


.15 IJ 10 130 
04 22 W 282 
100 20 14 433 
28* 0 12 1535 
00 10 14 721 

100 10 13 «£■ 

X 23*9 
7 807 


19% HeavrU 
it Him Bn 
» HftBnpf 
346 Horizon 
35% hobpCp 
21% Hotel in 
20ft HaugtiM 
UN HouFab 
24 KOUShlt 
61 Hpifrtnt 
T746 Hwlnd 
3946 HouNG 
9ft HauOR 
13ft HOoMCP 
3W* Hutabrd 
9% Huffy 
12% HaghTI 
17% KuohSP 
91% Humm 
17% HuntMf 


1.10 120 
20 0 
00 20 
0Oo J 
100 U 
104 40 
1.12 40 
£90*11.9 


00 LI 
300 &0 
Si 20 
00 £1 
105 40 
625 80 
£48 110 
200 £3 
£10*140 
00 £1 
220 85 
00 30 
08 30 
02 15 
08 92 
00 10 


13 
31 £27 

5 113 
10 2257 
12 2910 

10 275 

9 44 

1 

56 

14 2207 

14 15 

15 2 
12 228 
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34 MCorpf 350 90 
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13 Month 
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(Gootimied oo Page 10) 










INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY -SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16-17, 1985 


Page 9 


** 


BUSftESS ROUNDUP 


Warner Reports Losses 
uarter, Year 



| Kathryn Harris 

ti.lngcfes Times Senior 
LOSj^NGELES — Warner 
Comxn&cauons Inc. has reported 
a net Id of 5203.7 million for the 
fourth ianer of 1984 and a loss of 
S586.1 trillion for all of 1984, 
; blamin' most of the red ink on 
? Atari iterations that it sold last 
? June Ipack Tramiel. 

?]'■ Thelosses compared with a 
$6.8f^ilUon profit for the like 
■’ ? ■■ quart/ a year earlier and a loss of 
\ <: 5417Jmmion for all of 1983. 

*• *-j ‘ Fffth quarter revenue rose 12 
pewit to 5535.37 million from 
r 5499 million. Revenue for the 
■ •>) yeaiose 17.4 percent to 52.02 bil- 
' liorpom $1.72 billion. 

Vt,j Vnter said Thursday that it 
n b t oo$223 milli on in fourth-quarter 
•>; wi^-downs and reserves for dis- 
.• V coinued operations, offset by in- 
^ j- coe from continuing operations. 

he company disclosed that it 
« «ald no longer attach any bal- 
?’ ae-sheet value to the 5240 mil- 
^ lit in long- term notes that Mr. 
Hraiel issued to acquire the Atari 
f. v- line-computer and video- j»am£ 
*• is in ess, because of “significant 

• /Terences" between Warner and 
v.' ; ‘ Ir. Tramiel arising from the Atari 

ale and the recent softness in the 
- ■; ome-computer market. 

■_ J; Mr. Tramiel's notes were initial- 
•- y carried at 5180 million on the 
r .- Warner balance sheet last year. The 
- rompany reduced the amount to 
>150 milli on in the third quarter, 

•: tnd said Thursday that it had re- 
: .’ noved the sum altogether and in- 
; ended to recognize any interest 
r tnd principal payments from Atari 
~ . rorp. as income. 

_ Warner also disclosed that it had 

* - treated a $75-mfllion reserve for 


discontinued operations. Although 
it refused to specify which opera- 
tions were involved, the Los Ange- 
les Times learned that reserves 
were established for Warner's 41- 
percent stake in the Atari corn- 
opera ted video-game business, the 
Gadgets restaurant chain, the East- 
ern Moun tain Sports retail chain, 
an office complex in San Jose, Cali- 
fornia, and Warner’s 48-percent 
Slake in the Pittsburgh Pirates 
baseball team. 

A Warner vice president. Geof- 
frey W. Holmes, would confirm 
only reserves for Gadgets and the 
Atari coin-operated business 

Two of Warner’s three remaining 
businesses posted strong g^ini for 
the fourth quarter and for the year. 

The filmed entertainment unit, 
which includes the Warner Bros, 
studio, reported operating income 
of $27.28 milli on, more than dou- 
ble the 5] 2J9 million a year earlier. 
For the year, the unit posted oper- 
ating income of 5150.38 million, up 
from 5109.32 million in 1983. 

The recorded music division re- 
ported operating income of $32.22 
million for the fourth quarter, up 
from 524.75 million a year earlier. 
For the year, the division had oper- 
ating income of S89.6 million, up 
from 560.72 million. 

Fourth-quarter operating in- 
come for the publishing and distri- 
bution division declined to 53.01 
million, down from 53.67 million a 
year earlier. For the year, the unit 
reported operating income of 516 
million, up from 514.27 milli on. 

Warner reported that its invest- 
ments in cable TV and broadcast- 
ing showed some improvement, 
with fourth-quarter operating 
losses dec lining to 55 milli on from 
519.45 million in 1983. 


Senate Unit 
To Investigate 
Boston Bank 

United Press International 

BOSTON — A Senate subcom- 
mittee will investigate the Bank of 
Boston for failing to report more 
than SI billion in currency ship- 
ments to foreign bonks and for do- 
ing business with two films owned 
by a reputed underworld boss, it 
was reported Friday. 

Senators William V. Roth, Re- 
publican or Delaware, and Warren 
Rudman. Republican of New 
Hampshire, told the Boston Globe 
that the Senate Permanent Sub- 
committee on Investigations will 
send investigators to Boston to 
look into the charges. The two 
ranking members of the panel also 
said they plan to call bank execu- 
tives to testify. 

Mr. Rudman said the recent dis- 
closures “raise very serious ques- 
tions in my mind. It's hard to un- 
derstand how a financial 
institution as large as the Bank of 
Boston could get into this kind of 
trouble." he told the Globe. 

Meanwhile, Boston's mayor, 
Raymond Flynn, and the city's 
treasurer, George Russell, met with 
top bank officials Thursday night 
to discuss the charges. The bank 
holds $45 million in city accounts. 

Mr. Russell, speaking Tor Mr. 
Flynn, said after the meeting that 
the mayor had not yet decided 
whether to remove any city funds 
that are on deposit at the bank. 

But, be said, the mayor “told 
bank officials he would not tolerate 
any institution or individual who 
deliberately or inadvertently makes 
it easier for organized crime to do 
business in this city." 


Grumman Will Restructure Its Aerospace Unit 


The Axs>vmted Press 

BETH PAGE, New York — 
Grumman Ccrp. said it is breaking 


poraic-resiructunng pi 
cutting costs and more effectively 
competing for contracts. 

John Bierwirth. the chairman, 
said Thursday that Grumman, a 
holding company with diversified 
manufacturing and service opera- 
tions. will create seven divisions 
aimed at specific markets, each 
headed by a division president. 

Mr. Bierwirth said Grumman, 
one of the Navy's prime aircraft 
contractors, is taking these and 
other steps to “reduce our costs so 
that we are more competitive in our 
increasingly tough business envi- 
ronment. 

Mr. Bierwirth said George 


Skurla. 63. former chairman and 
president of Grumman Aerospace, 
will succeed Joseph Gavin Jr. as 
president and chief operating offi- 
cer of Gr umman Corp. 

Grumman Aerospace will con- 
tinue to exist as a subsidiary until 
its present contracts are met. Mi- 
chael Drake, a Grumman spokes- 
man, said. 

But as new contracts come in, 
they will be assigned to appropriate 
divisions that are being broken out 
from the subsidiary, he said. 

Mr. Drake said there will be sep- 
arate divisions to handle aircraft 
production; subcontracting work 
for other manufacturers; produc- 
tion of automated test equipment; 
work with the space shuttle, and 
revamping existing aircraft and 
bring them up to date. 

Two other divisions will handle 


Grum man's manufacturing of alu- 
minum canoes, fire trucks and oth- 
er boats and vehicles, and to pro- 
duce computer software and 
provide computer maimananof ser- 


Ford’s Tractor Proposal 
AssadedbyAuto Workers 

The Associated Press 

DETROIT — Tbe United Auto 
Workers union has condemned 
Ford Motor Co.'s move to ship 
tractor business to Europe as a vio- 
lation of its 1984 labor pacL 

Ford announced Thursday that 
it would move a large portion of its 
U.S. tractor operations to England 
and Belgium, displacing 230 work- 
ers in Romeo, Michigan. 


Mr. Drake said the new divisions 
will allow Grumman “to use a rifle 
rather than a shotgun approach 
when we go after new contracts." 

He said that if Gr umman suc- 
ceeds in winning contracts for 
working on the National Aeronau- 
tics and Space Administration 
planned maimed space station or 
cm the governments planned mili- 
tary missile-guidance system, the 
company would set up sqsarate di- 
visions to handle those operations. 

Gr umman earlier reported 1984 
earnings of 5108.4 million, or 53.62 
per share, a 2-percent drop from 
1983 earnings oi SI 10.7 million, or 
53.82 per share. Revenue was 52.6 
billion, a 153-percent rise over 
1983 revenue of $225 billion. 

Grumman dosed at $28.75 on 
the New York Stock Exchange 
Thursday, down 373 cents. 


Citicorp Disputes 
Moody's Review 

Reuters 

NEW YORK — Citicorp 
said Friday that it disagreed 
with a decision by Moody r s In- 
vestors Service to place S18.9 
billion of its debt under review 
for a possible downgrading. 

Moody's dted changes in Ci- 
ticorp's capital structure, which 
have led to a decrease in the 
assets of the lead bank. Citi- 
bank NA. as a percentage of 
consolidated assets. 

But Gticorp called [be diver- 
sification a source or strength 
and stability. “This shift is a 
direct result of a strategic plan 
to diversify our funding 
sources, increase direct access 
to consumer funds, and region- 
alize our activities,” it said. 


Whedock Holders company notes 
Asked Not to Sell 

Reuters 

HONG KONG — Whedock 
Marden Co. said Friday that it was 
asking shareholder, not to act on a 
general offer for its shares made 
Thursday by Falwyn Co., an in- 
vestment vehicle for the Singapore 
investor Khoo Teck Puau 

Whedock appointed East Asia 
Warburg Ltd. as financial adviser 
on the bid. Falwyn is offering six 
Hong Kong dollars (77 cents) for 
each Whedock “A” share and 60 
Hong Kong cents for each “B" 
share, for a total of about 1.9 bil- 
lion dollars for the shares Falwyn 
does not already hold. 

Whedock “A” shares closed at 
6.40 dollars Friday after heaving 
trading, up from 5.80 dollars 
Wednesday; trading was suspend- 
ed Thursday afternoon after the 
bid was announced. 


Abitibi-Price Inc. said it will ac- 
quire CIP Daxion, a paper supplier 
and a subsidiary of CIP Inc., on 
undisclosed terms. The acquisition 
is expected to become effective 
Feb. 28, it said. 

AJEed Products Corp. said it sold 
its Pbeoll manufacturing division 
to employees of the unit. Terms 
were not disclosed. 

American information Technol- 
ogies Inc- holding company for 
five former Bell units, said it has 
developed a new mechanism to al- 
low customers to dial-up several 
new information services. 

Brunswick Corp. said it is dis- 
cussing the acquisition of ICO Inc. 
of Fort Worth. Texas, for about 
540.4 million. ICO, an oil-field ser- 
vice firm, had 1984 net income of 
S29 milli on. 

Colgate-Pahnofive Co. has re- 
ceived clearance from the govern- 


ment of Taiwan to farm a 50-50 
joint venture with a local partner to 
produce household products in 
Taiwan. 

Continental Airlines said an ad- 
ministrative law judge has recom- 
mended that.it be awarded the 
Houston- £o- London route. Conti- 
nental said it plans to begin the 
service on April I. 

Dee Corp. PLC said a govern- 
ment takeover panel has ruled that 
its bid for Booker McConnell PLC 
can only be increased from the pre- 
sent £328 million (53573 million) 
in exceptional drcumstances. The 
Dee statement did not -indicate 
what exceptional drcumstances 
might arise. 

Dennison Manufacturing Co. 
said it made an investment in 
Geha-Werke GMbH, an office- 
supply manufacturer located in 


Hann over. Terms were not dis- 
closed. 

Digital Equipment Corp., re- 
sponding to speculation that it 
would end production of Rainbow 
personal computers, said it will an- 
nounce significant improvements 
in the line next month. 

Fujitsu Lid. said it won a con- 
tract to supply more than 30 digital 
telephone-switching systems to 
China's Ministry of PosLs and Tele- 
communications. Terms were not 
disclosed. 

General Motors Corp. said it will 
spend 51 12 minion on a three-year 

modernization program for its Alli- 
son Gas Turbine Division. 

Handy & Hannan said it expects 
1985 earnings and revenues to 
show a “meaningful increase" over 
1984. barring a major economic 
slowdown. The company reported 


1984 net of $ 1 42 million on sales of 
56193 million. 

Hong Kong and China Gas Co. 
said it plans to raise about 347 
million Hong Kong dollars (5443 
million) through a one-far-faur 
rights issue. 

International Business Machines 
Corp: said it has fabricated an ex- 
tremely small and fast 1 million-bit 
computer-memory chip. A spokes- 
man said the company is trying to 
produce them quickly far use in 
IBM products. 

Toyota Motor Corp. said it will 
raise capital spending to 250 billion 
yen (59524 million) in 1985 from 
205.60 billion a year earlier. Of the 
total, 105 billion will be spent on 
research and development. 59 bil- 
lion on improvements and 40 bil- 
lion on facilities and new factories. 


Tax Issue Is Left in Tatters Kyocera Uses Japanese Techniques at U. S. Plant 


(Costumed from Page 7) 

leduct half of the dividend pay- 
-Tients they make from their in- 
come. 

. Nevertheless, it would, while re- 
luring the wide differences in the 
troportion of incomes companies 
~>ay in taxes, substantially raise the 
~tet taxes collected from the busi- 
ness sector. The Treasury proposal 
vould, by 1990, raise corporate 
axes by 37 percent, while reducing 
iverage individual income taxes by 
t5 percent. However, corporate 
ues have been shrinking for some 
fcne as a share both of federal tax 
rcripts and of gross national prod- 
ul Corporate income taxes de- 
fied to 83 percent of total federal 
reeipts in the fiscal year 1984 from 


13.9 percent in 1976. And, as a 
share of GNP, corporate income 
taxes feO to 13 percent in 1984 
from 24 percent in 1976. 

If the president washes to stick to 
his proposal for a “revenue-neu- 
tral" tax revision — one that would 
neither raise nor lower the net fed- 
eral tax burden — it may be impos- 
sible far him to get tbe reductions 
in marginal tax rates for both indi- 
viduals and businesses that he 
seeks. The president has also com- 
mitted himself to eliminating feder- 
al income taxes on those dose to or 
below the poverty line. 

The heat is on the administration 
to make dear the specifics of what crease production, increase output, 
kind of tax overhaul it does want and reduce the cost.*" Mr. Ha- 


(Con tinned from Page 7) 

been unthinkable. "If the company 
wanted to establish this kind of 
relationship now. it would be im- 
possible," said Krisuke Hasegawa, 
president of the U. S. operation. 

Kyocera's U. S. division borrows 
another concept from its Japanese 
cousins, using an “amoeba' man- 
agement set-up developed by Kyo- 
cera's founder and president. Ka- 
zuo Inamon. and similar to other 
decentralized management 
schemes. Each amoeba is a self- 
contained unit setting goals far 
productivity, cost control, and the 
like. 

“Managers think, i have to in- 


segawa said. Rodney N. Lanth- 
ome, the company's vice president 
far finance, said: “If you have ev- 
ery one of your profit centers or 
amoebas turning a profit then you 
can't help but show a profit" 

Kyocera has carved out 70 per- 
cent of the fastest-growing part of 
the technical ceramics market the 
manufacture of wafer-like ceramic 
packages used to hold high-quality 
electronic chips. And it is taking 
huge portions of what may ulti- 
mately be a more lucrative market: 
the use of "structural” ceramics for 
such diverse products as scissors, 
artificial human joints and auto- 
mobile engines. 

While Kyocera's management 
style is quite Japanese, the compa- 


ny's financial background is dis- 
tinctively American. Stockholder 
equity is equal to 77 percent of 
assets, a reversal of tbe Japanese 
norm, in which companies rely 
more on bank debt than stock sales 
for funds; the- average equity in 
Japanese companies is about 20 
percent. 

Kyocera's long-term debt is neg- 
ligible. Rather than borrow money 
to expand the company, as is typi- 
cal in Japan, Kyocera has done 
what U.S. companies do: issued 
stock to raise funds. 

It may be unusual for Japan, but 


it works. Last year, the company 
was named the most financially 
sound company in Japan in a sur- 
vey by the Japanese business publi- 
cation Nihon Krizai. Kyocera ex- 
ecutives say such stability is 
important to good management 
"Money doesn't come from 
heaven," Mr. Hasegawa said. And 
if management can keep the com- 
pany financially stable, employees 
will benefit, he raid, quoting one of 
Mr. Inamori’s major philosophies: 
“Top management has to have the 
responsibility to employee happi- 
ness. material and spiritual." 



BNP opens a subsidiary 
in NORWAY 


BANQUE NATIONALE DE PARIS, the leading French book which has 
held a representative office ill Norway since 1 976. has obtained the approval 
from the Norwegian authorities to open a hank in association with FOHRET- 
NINGSBANKFJV fifth rtimmenrial bank in thl* country. 

The capita! of the BANQUE NATION ALF. DE PARIS NORCE A/S, which 
regiitti-nii office is in Oslo, wilt be JO million Norwegian kroner. 75% of 
which will U'ltiup to RNP anil 25% t„ Ft >R RKTNI NGSBANKF.N. 

BANQUE NATIONALE DE PARIS NORGE A/S 
Haakon VII's Gale 6 
OSLO. NORWA\. 

General Manager M: Pan 1-Franco is GAUVIN. 




" ’'tv 




m 


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Y 


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suammnaum 


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COUNTRY 


Austria. 


Belgium.. 


D enmar k . 
Finland .... 

France. 

Germany. 


.. A.Sch. 

RFr. 

- D-Kr. 
..... F.M. 
F.F. 


Great Bri tain. 
Greece. 


D.M. 

‘ £ 


Ireland. 


Italy 

Luxembourg-.^.. 

Netherlands... 


— Dr. 

HrL 

Urn 


LJt. 

Norway NKr. 

Portugal 


Esc. 
__ Ptas. 
_ S.Kr. 
S.Fr. 


Spain- — ■ — — 

Sweden..— — 

Swiaerl.iiMt, — . 

Rest of Europe, North Afnra, former 
French Atria. U French 

Polynesia, Middle East.— 

Rest of Africa, Canada, Latm 
America, Gulf States. Aaa. 


— 1 


1 year 


3,220 

7300 

1300 

1,120 

1.000 

412 

82 

12.400 
104 

216,000 

7300 

450 

1,160 

11300 

17.400 
1,160 

372 


284 

3% 


6 months 


1.610 

3,650 

750 

560 

500 

206 

41 

6300 

52 

108.000 

3,650 

225 

580 

5,600 

8.700 

580 

186 


142 

198 


3 HMlrtll 


890 

2j000 

410 

308 

280 

115 

23 

3.450 

29 

59.000 

2JXX) 

124 

320 

3jD80 

4,800 

320 

102 


78 


109 



Card account number 


Card expiry date 


Signature 


My name 


Address 


□tv 


Job /Profession 


NationaEiv 


Company activity 


16-2-85 


INTERNATIONAL POSITIONS 


Groupe fau^ala en expansion et develop- 
pant une activity Internationale dans plusieurs 
secteurs de production pour (Industrie, 5600 
personates en France. Pour sa fifiale en 
GRECE (600 person nes) 

Directeur 

financier athenes 

Rattache au P.D.G. de cette sod£t£, il aura 
Tenttihe responsabilite de la fonetkm Bnan- 
dere (elaboration des budgets, consolidation, 
analyse des hearts, comptabilit£ gMrale 
pour les 2 unites de production, gestion de tre- 
sorerie, reporting A la maJson-m&re, etc...). 

Experience r6ussie de 5 arts minimum dans 
une fonction similaire et dans une soettte 
indostrielle pertbrmanfe. Bonnes connaissan- 
ces du tissu Industrie! grec. 

Formation supArieure finance/co mptabilltt. 
Iris bonne maJtrise du franyais ou de Tangiais 
et du grec indispensable. 

De 35 a ns minimum le candxdat dolt Sire un 
excellent coord inateur, organist; et pers6v6- 
rant. Les conditions offertes sont en rapport 
avec le poste et la localisation. 

Ecrire avec C.V. d£taill€, photo, pretentions, 
telephone privg (enveloppe pour r£ponse plus 
fapide), sous reference 25001 H 


IWRI 


consell 


Daniele Chapins 

13. rue Madeleine Michelis, 92522 Neuilly 


EAP, European School of Management St u dies , is a European 
■'Grande 1 Ecole" for bustness studies. It offers a three-year mana- 
gement programme which covers a year's study in Pans (first year). 
Oxford (second year) and Berlin (third year), in the language of each 
country. The level of study attained at the end of the programme is 
comparable to the finat stage of higher education before commencing a 
doctorate. 

Students at EAP are recruited from all EEC member countries. They 
are required to pass national entrance examinations which are open 
to students who have successfully completed a mintmun of two 
years' university study or equivalent education in their own country. 
CAMng to the departure of the present holder of the post applications 
are invited for the position of : 

Head of European Promotion 
and Recruitment 

The successful candidate, working in conjunction with the European 
Director of the School will be responsible for organising and 
carrying out the EAP's promotion campaign as well as recruiting 
students from the seven EEC member countries other than France. 
Great Britain and West Germany. The person appointed will also be 
responsible for extending the system of grants already in existence 
aid negotiating to obtain recognition of the EAP diploma in 
accordance with the national higher education qualifications in the 
^ibove mentioned countries. This post is based in Paris. 

Applicants for the post should be : 

• graduates In Business Studies and have at last three years' 
experience of working in a company: 

■ bilingual in English and French: an adequate command 
of German and/or Spanish would be an advantage-. 

• able to communicate easily and have good organisational and 
negotiating abilities,- 

• capable of working autonomously and willing to travel extensively 
in Europe: 

• preferably holders of an EEC passport 

Applications should be sent with a CV, and photo to : 

Monsieur Bruno LEBLANC - European Director 
EAP • Ecole Europeenne des Affaires 
108. Bd Malesherbes 75017 PARIS - FRANCE 


RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS 

35 Naw Broad Street, London EC2M 1NH 
Tel: 01-5BS 35BB or 01-5BB 3576 
Telex No. 837374 Fax INJo.01-B3S 9216 


O pp ortunity, in 3-5 years, for a more senior U.S. based trading appo in tment or for advancement bi either Merchant Banking or speciaBst 

Capital Markets activities in fha country or elsewhere. 

VICE PRESIDENT - 

HEAD OF SECURITIES TRADING 

LONDON - WEST END £45,000 - £65,000 + CAR 

U.K. INSTITUTIONAL ASSETS MANAGEMENT ORGANISATION WITH INTERNATIONAL CLIENTS' FUNDS 
IN EXCESS OF £4 BILLION. SUBSIDIARY OF MAJOR U3. FINANCIAL HOUSE. 

For this appointment, we seek applicants of flroduote coflbre, aged 35-40, with a rninenum of 1 2 years' jn in ternatv yicJ equities and fix ed intere st trading 
and assocrafed odmtn a t rq t i orL This experience wiH have been gained in significant financial organisations noted for tnetr investment performance and 
must indude not less than 5 years in the tenor management of an effective securities truefing gra^j. Key to the sucaas of Hus appointment are a fi-st 




subsidy, non contributory pension, free Ir 
T 4314/IHT to the Monoging Director: 


HST < 


CJA. (MANAGEMENT RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS LTD.) 35 New Broad Street, LONDON EC2M INK 
Telephone: 01-588 3588 or 01-588 3576. Tefax: 887374. Fax: 01 -638 9216. 


OVERSEAS ASSIGNMENTS 


Contract positions are available for qualified pro fe ssio nal s and 
leri miwawq jjj Asia, the. Pacific Basin and the Middk; Esst. 
Candidates must have a minim urn of 5+ years experience and 
appro pr i a te training or e*ti rational background in Construction, 

Petrochemical, Communications, Lo B^ries and most Medical and 
Engineering disciplines. Housing, Travel, Medical Insurance and 
excellent salaries are available. Some positions are tax exempt 

For consideration forward rcsume/GV. to: 


TANTALUS INTERNATIONAL 

THE TANTALUS C-ROUF 


' 3 Floor OTB Tower, 
e Queens Rosa Centroi 
Hc>ng Kong 
=,.214446 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


JBTC 


K? 


Poor rEnmloi 

i DES MGEMEUKS CADRES 

12 Rue Blanche, 75436 Paris CEDEX 09. 

TeL * 280-61.46. Ext. 71 - 285^40. Ext. 42. 


• TUUNGtIAL FRENCHMAN, 25. En- 
gfidi, German. Marten dejym in law, ragti- 
torod Marprefar-trandotar, with experience 
in Beaming, trade maria, i ntern a tional 
a greement*, marketing md export. SEEKS 
cholWgng i nternational position, free to 
travel Ref.: 400PAOS CASHES l/JCB. 


• TOP HUNCH EXECUTIVE, 50, fluenl in 
English and German, expert In international 

trade and finance k leaking fo- targe indus- 
trial or benldng groups in Franca or abroad 
«n11m to taka advantage of hh experlenca. 
Ref., 4Q2-PAHS CADRES l/JCB. 















i 


i 




Tables include the nationwide prices 
up to the closing on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


a 7 * purow us « i4 
10% SVi Pvro 9 


S91X 30 29 +l*k 

265 10% 9% **>— Va 


3Wi 37'- QuohOi 1.24 U 11 

21ft IS OuekSO JO 3J 24 

11% 6% Ouane* 51 

3S% a OunJor 160 45 9 

24% 14 Ok Rail J6* 1.1 19 


970 39% 38% 38V}- ft 

343 21 'u 3W 21 — I* 

44 10% ?ft 99k— % 

221x Kft 35 335k— % 

104 3« 335k 235k— % 


ft 


HE 






.12 J 
„ 260 46 

Rsh 32 25 
T40 21 
1J1 93 
f 210 1TJ 
IjOO 125 
250 14J 
UK 124 
1M 142 
3.15 15.7 
9M 14l0 
852 154 
856 162 


4* 


ft* 7? 




56 

1.4 

1.94 

83 

IJO 

14 

IJ0 

4J 

JO 

IJ 

IJO 

86 

IJ8 

11J 




160 

10.1 

1.00 

L0 

4.T2 

6.9 

3.00 

30 

10 

J 

350 

11.3 

M 

3JI 

32 

2 A 

LB0 

46 

96 

IJ 

1.16 

LB 

IJ5 

SO 

.169 

9 

1J0 

4 A 

.130 

86 

240 

114 

L44 

M 

1J0 

LI 

1J0 

4.1 

16SI19.1 

7JU 

9.1 

l.« 

10J 

268 

76 

272 

74 

3J2 

107 

260 

10J 

1.72 

6J 

1JI0 

13 

JR 

4 

m 

3.7 

.13 

5 






+4* 


44 


63% aw 
34% 14 
44> 18% 
low 9% 
45i 1 
23 1159 

15*4 g% 

as% 2244 

335* 18% 

135k 75k 

14% 115k 
J4 16% 

30% an k 

20 1654 

155k ItTV 

551 k 34 Va 
60 42% 

2554 19 

13% 4% 

89 77 

3i% a 
115k 4% 
36W a 
37 235k 

1954 9% 

31 22% 

179k I45*i 
44 25% 

34ft 1956 
65k 5 
31% 205> 
39V3 24 

65k 4 

9% 55k 

22 13% 

iVk 11% 
UVk Bft 
37 28% 

15 1056 

aa% 16 

41 a 
345* aw 


Tonkc 40 3 

Toolftol 48 16 
Trchms UH 22 
TcroCc 40 25 


Tosco 

Towle ol .44 52 


135 61 
ID 105 291; 
14 733 44 Ik 
1 1 276 16*1 

1362 2% 
63 !4-i 


TOYRUS 

Trocar 54 15 


TWA 

TWA Of 225 162 
TWA pfB 73$ 9m 
Tronsm 154 54 
Tromnc 222 1U 
TARltv VOOo U 
Tronacs 2.16 4.1 
Tmscof 3J7 65 
TronE* 220 9.1 
Transen 

TrCPpt 854 105 
TrGPpt 250 105 
TmaOti 

Trnnwy 150 5J 
Tmwtd 40 1.1 
TwWwfA 
TvakicH 100 u 


Twldpf I JO 11 B 
Trnvler 204 47 


TrICon L53el4J 
TrlSoin 


TrloPc UH 3J 
Tribune 54 22 


Tricntr 3 m 7j 

Trlco .16 L3 


True no . 10 b 4 
TrllE of 1.10 I0J 
TuesEP 200 U 
TulljM 52 29 
TwInDs JO 44 
TrcoLta JO 21 
TrUrr 75 22 


24 1467 30% 
16 319 3Tk 
71 2263 12% 
in Uft 
427 ZT% 
13 3004 30ft 
74 19% 

8 it ir-k 

IQ 229 52% 
70 59% 
137 245k 
6 107 life 
50a 86% 
4 3% 

11 46 ll*k 

10 91 36% 

12 3786 37% 

350 20% 
7 31% 
U 17% 
10 1260 43% 
582 2 4ft 
6 74 5% 

9 583 309k 
15 618 38% 

9 6 446 

18 46 7 

427 16% 
20 278 17 
<1 11 
a 314 37 

10 13 13% 

io 9 aw 
10 459 39 
9 1436 35 


eQ' 1 61 ■ 

22% + H I 

44% *4% t 

15% 15%—% I 

2’.fc 2% i 

14% 14%— I 

8% Z%— '-* 
29% 30% — % 
B% 3Ti t ft 
12 12 — % 
13*1 13=a-* i 
23** Zrt— ’•* 
29% 30% - % I 
19ft V»1 
12% 12% 

Sfft £2%— '•# 

59** 5*ft— ■» 
24 24ft— % 

12% 12% - % 
86% 86% — % 
23ft 23% — % 
11 11 

36 36ft + ik 

37 37ft + ft 
ms a% t % 

31% 31% + ft 

ir« 17% 

<2** 43%— % 
24ft 24ft * ft 

s* s**— % 

33*1 30*k— % 

38 38ft + ft 
4% 4*4 + ft 
6*1 7 + % 
IS*. 16 — ‘.I 
1644 16*4— >4 
10% 11 + % 
36 Ik 36*k 
13% 13"4 

18 IB 
38ft 39 
34% 3446 + Vs 


72 JrWtrde 
14*4 Unlvor 
IS - * UnivFd 
156 Ur.Leol 
a Unocal 
45 Uriah* 
23% USLIFE 
33% USt-Fof 
7S USLFri 
B=» UsJteFO 
20»k U1DPL 
21*6 UtPLof 
21=k UIPLpf 
17*1 UIPLpf 
15*k UIPLpf 


31 *k 30% 
T9*k 1916 
25** 25% 

21% m 

49 45% 

76% 7444 
38% 37% 

32 31K 
36% 35% 
9% 944 
23% 234k 
24% 34 
25% 25% 
21% 31% 
18% 17% 


31% + % 
19% — 4k 
25% + % 
a 4k— 4k 
44%— 1% 
75 + % 
38 +% 
32 +% 
36*4 + 46 
9% 

r-% 

n% + % 
u% + % 


32% 21% 
20 5% 

a i< 

5% 2% 
26': 14% 
6% 2% 
19% Pi 
46% 3UCa 
13% 9V= 

25% 17% 
6% 3% 
10 % 8 % 
39*k 234k 
43 36% 

66 54 

77% 674m 
79% 674k 
83% 68% 
66% 52% 
61 Tk 49% 
24ft 14%' 
384k 2S*k 
75*. 58 


8 58 30% 

1146 9% 

54 20% 
6 2 % 
7 155 25% 
61 3% 

20 m 

15 1722 411k 

10 97 13U 

16 m awn 

37 5 
46 10U. 

17 502 394k 
■soffit 41% 
lOOz 66 

73 

60s 76 
20Qz 82 
73001 664k 
WOr 601k 
14 77 34% 


13 31 35% 


X 30%+ 44 
914 94k— % 
20% 20% 
m 3% 

24% 24%— 46 
3 3 

7% 7% 

40% 40%- Vk 
U 13 — % 
24% 24% + Vi 
4% 4%— % 

10% low— % 

38 38%+ % 

41% 41% 

66 66 + 1 % 
a 73 
76 76 +1 

81 82 +1 
64Vb 6414—144 
60% 6014 
23% 24 
35% 3514 
7414 74% + % 




IJ 


as 


Fr idays 

AMIA 

Closing; 


VoL ot 4 PM. 

Pnv.4PJM.yoL. 


.8J4MM 
. IDiMOaOOO 


Tables Include the nationwide prices 
up to the clasine on Wall Street 
and do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


34% 18W Buell JO U i 2 2H>%2S%284fc4-Ui 


1] Month 
moh Low Slock 


□Iv. Yll PE KM Hlon Low Ouaf. Oioo 


28% 13% 

isv<wm 


Wi 




zi 
179 

24 15% 

956 1144 
406 1% 

■W BVb 

25 ■% 


ii 




J4r 3J) 2 
J60 4J 
.ISO 1 J 11 
1J2 44 15 
1J10 3J 8 


914 

6% + % 
15% + % 
11 % 

Ilk— % 
BVb 

Hft— % 
10% + Vk 

16V?— % 
9% 

ff% + 4k 
184k + 9k 
7%— Va 
3Vk 

Wk+ % 
■n. 

9%+ Ik 
11% 

2S*k 
% 

3% 

■k 


17 

J If 1 
3 


1% +Jk 
12 +14 

29 ft + % 
31% +1% 
11%+ % 
9+14 
614 

14ft— Vk 
l*b 


2214 + % 
2S*k — % 
2 %+ % 


4*k 9% 
37% Bft 
3% 1*4 

5*k 3% 

3 % 

13% 7*4 
17% 7% 
9% 7% 
6 % 2 % 
25*4 21 
6% 4ft 
9% 6% 
4% 3% 

4*k 2% 
12% 7% 
6% 4 
15% 10% 
9% 4*4 
4ft 1*6 
22% 111k 
Eft 3% 
50 32 

38% 19 
5ft 314 
30*4 14% 
12*4 914 
4*4 4% 
24 19% 

16ft 14 
17 14% 

30% 17ft 
3% *4 

19*4 
19% 

35% 

20*4 
10 % 




f4> 


M 


»r| 


5ft 
2ft 

17% e*t 
11% eu 

10% 651 

6U. 1 

28% 16ft 
3514 17ft 
5% 3 

17ft 11% 
7% 5% 
5ft 254 
2% % 
B% 3% 
5ft 2ft 
10% 7% 
7% 4% 
HIM 21ft 


Sft 

4% 3 
Sft 3% 

3ft 2% 

15 8% 

15% 8% 

27% 21 
3 1% LSB 

4% 2% Ln& 
7ft 2ft LOPi 
41% 23% Lafci 
14% 11% Lndl 
17ft II 
17% 9% 

13 8*4 
6% 4% 

.9% 2% 

54ft 2514 

& ? 

s s 

37% 70 
71ft 31% 

16% Sft 
U14 6% 

J6 10ft 
l«k 9% 

33% 12ft 
10ft Bft 
M% lift 
34k 14k 
9% 7ft 
2% 1 
IBVj y% 

Sft 3 
17ft ■% 

2ft ft 
2514 12 
15% 9 
35 14% 

9*4 4% 

Sft 34k 
22% 21ft 
28ft left 
17% 6ft 
15ft 8% 

8% 5 
22% 12% 

19% Bft 
29% IB 
17ft 12% 

40% 13ft 
lift B 
Sft 4% 

3*6 2% 

4% 2ft 
11% 7ft 
76*4 52 
16ft 124k 
10% 5ft 
13% 74k 

70 11% 

24ft 14% 

8% 44k 
11 % 8 % 

73 13ft 
9% 7% 

34% 14% 

47% 33 

38 33 

17 10% 

17 10% 

3% 314 

12ft lift 
9% 2% 

7ft 4ft 
5ft 3 

« * 

11% 7% 

9ft 5% " 

27 12% 

2 % 1 
SB 25% 

19ft 11% 

16% 10% 

19% 13 
42ft 22ft 
.7% 4ft 

17 10ft 

14 lift 
3 ft 

11% 5% 

3% 1ft 
3% 74 
13% 10 

18 134k 

Sft 2% N 
1% *4 N 

11% 5% N 
14% 9% M 
24ft 16ft 
22% 14% 

7% 4 

7ft 4% 

18% 9 
25% 13ft 
7% 3% 

6ft Sft 

3 Sft 
7% 5% 

36ft 71k 

raw. «k 
11 7% 
u 10% 

13% 8% 

10% B*k 
10*4 Sft 
1D» 8 

21 

3214 26*4 
27 7% 

21% 17% 

IE* 15% 

21% T7 
2144 -17% 

9ft 7ft 
19% 15*4 
1014 13*4 
77 1314 

16% 13ft 
18% 14% 

’2? ’2? 

9% 7ft 
9414 MM 
37ft 31 
X 31% 

43*4 94 


0* 


m 






i* o £, 


39 27% 

*% 5% 
9% 3% 
23*4 15ft 
17ft 10(4 




20% W1COR 2J0 
20ft Wochvs 91 
16% WacWit M 
6% WBlffflC 
30% WclMrt 31 
23ft walom JO 
15ft WkHRsolAO 
23ft WCriCSv MS 
72 WattJ 9 I JO 
2«% WolfJpf 1JO 
17ft women J8 


14 27ft S 27 — ft 
267 33ft 33% 33%—% 
164 2« 29ft + *4 
93 8% 8ft 8% 

1043 47% 4644 46% — *4 
231 54 53% 53*4— ft 

62 am 20% 20ft— % 
11 36% 3614 36*4— ft 
266 36ft 35% 35ft- ft 
3 48 48 48 — % 

449 20* 20% 20ft 


Courail, Its 10 Unions 
Reach Wage Accord 








228 

7J 

850 I1J 

264 

85 

256 

7J 

1JS 

3J 

J4 

20 

JO 

25 

uo 

45 

L20 

3J 


United Press International 

PHILADELPHIA — Conrail has reached an 
agreement with !0 unions representing 23,000 
of its 35.1)00 union employees to raise their 
wages io the level earned by workers on other 
major U.S. railroads. 

Employees of the Philadelphia-based freight 
railroad took wage cuts averaging 12 percent in 
19S1 when ConraH was losing milli ons of dol- 
lars. Conrail is now profitable. 

The agreement Thursday to restore wages 
came one week after Elizabeth H. Dole, the U.S. 
transportation secretary, chose to sell the gov- 
ernment's S 3-percent ownership in Conran to 
Norfolk Southern Corp. of Norfolk, Virginia, 
for SI- billion. 

That proposal, which must be approved by 
Congress, is opposed by ConraH management 
and by some members of Congress. Manage- 
ment would like to see the government return 
Conrail to the private sector by selling its stock, 
15 percent of which is owned by Conrail's 
unions, to the public. 

Conrail was created by Congress in 1976 
from the remains of the Penn Central and five 
other bankrupt Northeast railroads. 

In addition to boosting wages, the new agree- 
ment calls for Conrail to join with the National 
Railway Labor Conference, which represents 
management of U.S. railroads, to enter national 
bargaining with rail labor for wage increases 
and fringe benefits to be negotiated under a new 
naiionafcontracL 

U.S. railroad workers currently are working 
under terms of a contract that expired lost July 


46ft 3314 Xerox 3JOO 66 18 2299 45%45%45*4-ft 

5114 45ft X8HM Of 545 HL6 8 5H4 51ft 51* 

79 19 XTRA 64 U H 54 28% 27% 28-% 


79 24 Zofaa* 1.32 46 9 124 2* 

24% 14% Zvuta J4 5.1 19 167 W% 16% 16* 

57ft X Imre Mb J 15 508 57 * 56% 56% ft 

31ft 18% ZandtiE 8 1034 24” " 

27ft U Zero JO U H 31 29 
21ft 14% Zarowi 3 2K 

31% 21% Zumln 1J2 44 11 259 3D! 


8 1034 24% 24 2414 U 

JO U H 31 29% 25% 25% % 
3 20% 20% 20% 

132 64 11 359 30% 3D 39%% 


Another portion of the new agreement pro- 
hibits union workers from going on strike over 
leva! issues not dealt with in the national rail 
contract. 

Conrail said the wage increase will take effect 
as soon as each union gives final approval to the 
agreement. Some unions require ratification by 
members for the agreement to lake effect; for 



others, approval by union leaders atone is suffi- 
cient to approve the pact, a Conrail spokesman 


cient to approve the pact, a Conrail spokesman 
said. 


Ain I wool 
Buddwnpf 
CbartModB 
Cnnvtey Mil 
Front* Mb 
H onmriG 
KavCa 
Midland Co 
Pawn RE 
SotmdrSy B 
VottayRas 
W MB nlliQ 


Barry RG 
CaraffEout 


Clonwfot 

DynaMctCo 

OnOamCP 

iCHCorp 

KaaarGa 


BkwUnas 

CaaSacur 

ChMOvCara 

FstPSLnn 


BockBony 
OmrtMeA 
Goto Rb its 


mmCnrnTTi 

SaundrSyA 

VlrcnMf 


Jalmaan Ptf 

AtarttnProe 

OSuUlvm 

PflSPLDfD. 

3CE 75Hpt 

WORmt 


FootaMW 
Hlpbonlf 
Jupflar IQ 
Madlq 3 
PonEnM 
SO%7» 
Tvtar Wt- 


H 


5% + % 
10 — % 


m 

36 + % 

18%— % 

m2 w 
lift— % 


3% % 

13ft 6% 
15% ,189k 
69b 3% 
9ft 3 

9ft 3 
28ft 19% 
8% 49k 
23 9% 


79k + Vk 
99k 
14 

1%— Ik 
49k— % 
49k + 9k 
6 % 

5% + Jk 
13%+ ft 
% 




24 10 Quobos JB 


2 23% 23% 23% 





52 LI XI 
.12 A IS 


56a LI 9 

JO IS II 
JQ L3 13 


51 7% 

22 5% 

51 18% 

2 139k 

357 4% 

13 15ft 
460 43% 
11 7ft 

40 12% 

3 1% 

20 7% 

25 1ft 
2B 249k 

7 SOU 

41 4ft 

34 4% 

M 27 

3 79k 

165 M% 
402 229k 


7 7 — % 

5 5 

18% lBft + % 
139k 13% 

3% 4 — % 
TSft 15*6 + % 
41% 42ft +1 
7ft 7ft— ft 
12 12 — % 
1% 19k 
7% 7% 

1 % 1 % 

24ft 249k 
30% 30% 

49k 4ft + % 
4% 4%— % 
36ft 27 + ft 

79k 79k 
15% 15% 

22% 22%—% 


6ft 4ft 
6ft Sft 
6 3% 

14 7 
lift 7% 
3% 9k 
8% 7ft 

59% 49 
38% 31% 
23ft 18% 
M 33ft 
36 23% 

5% 3% 
flb 4% 
6ft 4ft 
22ft 14 
3% 1ft 
Bft Sft 
35 22ft 
39 30 

15ft 11 
51% 34 
2ft 1% 
15% 10% 
6% 2% 
9% ft 
7% 3% 

18% 7ft 
14% 8% 

3 1ft 

14% 9V9 

15% 10% 
8 5ft 
13ft B 

L 

. 5 % 2 % 
18ft 10% 
16ft 9% 
16 12ft 
8% 5% 
2% 9k 
99k 7ft 

10 7ft 
10% 7ft 
13ft 10% 
21ft 16ft 
20% 16 
65ft 53% 
74% 61 
15% 6% 
10% 6ft 
30% 15% 

6% 3% 

15 9% 
4ft 2ft 
10% 4% 
24% 13% 
20ft 119k 
189k 14% 
St t 4% 
Sft 1ft 

23 6% 

9% Sft 

4 1ft 
■ft Sft 

15% 11% 
Wft 6% 

11 5ft 
17% 11% 
27% 16% 



TOW. 9ft ' 
23ft 15% ' 
27% 15% ’ 
139k 4ft ' 
5% 2ft ' 
23% 14% ' 
9 3% ' 

1% ft ’ 
15% 11% ' 

A S?: 

9ft 5% ' 
7% 2ft 1 
18ft 10% * 
60% 45% * 
12% 8 I 
18% 12% * 


64 10% Hf% 18% 
1.92 BJ e 8 24 Bft 34 W 
J4 IJ 14 38 27%27ft2T%!: 

1241 Sft sva 5V. M 

13 42 3% 3 3%-ft 

■ JOB 1.9 10 7 21% 21 21ft 

ns * 

J0 IJ 10 22 13 12% 12% -la 

.TO IJ 12 6 5ft 6 * 

2 9% 9% 9%-% 

14 57 9 89k Bft* 

11 4%- 4% 4%-* 

JQ4T J 10 21 18% 1IS4 18ft 

I 60 60 40 v 

J6 3J 13 79 10U 10 10 -k 
Aba 2J 10 7 18% Uft 18%-k. 


I 60 60 

J6 3J 13 Z9 10U 10 




•38- -W6; 7ft »ft- *§ 




I Hi 
% 




































































































TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16-17, 1985 


Page 11 


PHILLIPS 



The Phillips Independent Directors 

Ask You to Vote 
“ FOR ” The Recapitalization 

This statement has been prepared by the independent, outside directors of Phillips Petroleum 
Company, comprising over two-thirds of the members of the Phillips board. 

We wish to express our unanimous judgment that the Recapitalization recommended by the board 
to the shareholders, to be voted on February 22nd, is clearly in the best interests of all the shareholders. 


> As independent, outside directors, we are 
required to exercise our best business judg- 
ment in evaluating proposals to acquire 
Phillips. We have a unique position from which 
to do this. We are neither employees of the 
Company— nor dependent upon our directors’ 
fees for our standard of living. Therefore, we 
have no particular bias in making a business 
judgment on what is the best way to maximize 
shareholder value for all Phillips shareholders. 

* Our assessment of Phillips value is quite 
different from that being put forth by stock 
market traders. We believe that the prices at 
which these people are willing now to buy and 
sell Phillips shares are based upon short-term, 
quick-buck considerations. 

Our sole interest is in maximizing share- 
holder value for all Phillips shareholders. 


i We reviewed and evaluated the Mesa 
proposal and the Icahn proposals announced 
on February 4, February 8 and February 12 
and concluded that none of these proposals 
met that critical test. 

* We do not believe that the Note Purchase 
Rights Plan that we have adopted is a “poison 
pilT These “Fair Value” Rights guarantee that 
our shareholders are treated fairly and equally 
and cannot be forced to accept less than $62 
in cash for their shares. 

We have had and continue to have an open 
mind with respect to reviewing and evaluating 
any offers that would help maximize share- 
holder value for all Phillips shareholders. We 
have no reason to oppose, and are not opposed 
to, any fair offer which would accomplish this. 
To date, none has been forthcoming. 


We believe Phillips is capable of great future financial jxjrformance for the shareholders and hence, 
in our judgment, represents values substantially in excess of current offers. The proposed recapitalization 
permits all shareholders to share in that future. At the same time, it provides enhanced present 
value for all shareholders. The recapitalization is an alternative to an ill-timed sale of the Company at 
this period of uncertainty in the oil business. We urge all shareholders to support the plan. 


The Outside Directors of Phillips Petroleum Company 


George R. BeitzeL, 

Senior Vice President and Director of 
International Business Machines Corporation 








Michael N. Chetkovich, 

Director of External Affairs, School of 

Business Administration, University of California; 

Formerly managing partner, Deloitte, Haskins and Sells 


'James B. Edwards, _ ^ .. 

President of the Medical University of South Carolina; 
Former U.S. Secretary of Energy 

Robert F. Froehlke, 

Chairman of the Board of Directors of The Equitable 
Life Assurance Society of the United States 


E. Douglas Kenna, 

Partner of G. L. Ohistruni 6c Company 




W. Clarke Wescoe, 

Chairman of the Board of Directors and 
Chief Executive Officer of Sterling Drug Inc. 


Melvin R. Laird. 

Senior Counselor for National and International 

Affairs for The Reader’s Digest Association, Inc.; — ^ _ i _ _ ~ iv\v & 

Former U.S. Congressman and Secretary of Defense ^ ® 

>, Dolores D. Wharton, 


Carol C. Laise, 

Retired Director General of the U.S. Foreign 
Service in the State Department 


President of Hie Fund for Corporate Interns, Inc. 




David B. Meeker, 

Retired Chairman of the Board of Directors of 
Hobart Corporation 


Francis M. Wheat, 

Senior Partner in the law firm of Gibson, 
Dunn & Crutcher; Former Commissioner, 
U.S. Securities & Exchange Commission 



Please sign, date and mail the WHITE proxy card. If you need further information on voting, including instructions on voting by 
Toll-Free Datagram, call Phillips Toll-Free at 800-431-2624. You may also call D. F. King & Co., collect at (212) 269-5550 
in New York, (312) 236-5881 in Chicago, (415) 788-1119 in San Francisco, or (213) 215-3860 in Los Angeles. 




Over-the-Counter 


Feb. 15 


NASDAQ Notional Market Prices 


Sole* in Net 

lflSi High Low 3 P jut Ch'ae 




XJ.S. Futures F«b. 15 


Season Season 
High Low 


Oasn Hlsti Low 


Season Season 
High Low 


Opan Utah Low Close CHo. 


IMS 3015 Mar 3040 2040 2SJ0 

ZUO 2035 May 

Est. Soles Prgv.Scdes 6J06 

Pros. Day Open lnt. 33088 off 426 


’SET S TSS B OPW, Htah LOW a— a* 


Prey. Day Open lnt. 33MB o«426 

ORANGE JUICE (NY OF) 

UNO lbs- cants per lb. 

DUD 11050 Mar 1 <700 147.10 16500 

185JW J 31.00 May 16*20 1*9.75 U7J0 

1840S 155110 Jut 17073 17100 M9J0 

18250 IS7J5 SOP 16940 1*950 HUD 

181-00 15750 NOV 16B50 1«L00 16750 

18050 15650 Jan 16750 167 JO 16650 

17750 15630 Mar 16650 16650 16650 

16250 16050 May 

Jul 

Eat Sates MB Prev.Sato* ’50 

Prev. Day Open lnt. 7 JO* off 51 


BRITISH POUND (IMM) 

S per pound- 1 Point equals 105001 
15170 15785 Mar 15985 1.1045 

1J35D 15675 Jan 15905 15*55 

14450 15650 Sep 15060 15935 

1. 2710 15640 DSC 15835 >5835 

Est. Sales *511 Prov. Sales 7514 
Pro*. Day Open lnt 22564 OM430 


15960 1.K30 
15870 15935 
15860 15*05 
15845 15890 


Metals 


COPPER (COM EX) 

25500 Dm.- cents Per Hi. 

6220 6I2S F«t> 

raao SSJD Mar 4250 IBM 

6240 6225 Apr 

9250 5620 May <345 6X55 

8825 5758 Jul 6X90 6455 

8210 57 JO Sm MM <440 

842S 5850 Dec 6340 6540 

8420 5940 Jan 

8050 5940 Mar 46M 6630 

7450 61.10 Mar 6620 6620 

7440 61 JO Jul 6630 <750 

7&*0 6230 Sep 6750 <7 30 

7030 6850 Dec 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 12371 


6120 
6140 4120 
*235 
<230 4025 
6220 6X35 
6X70 6155 

6430 *420 
64*5 
6340 6530 

6620 6410 


CANADIAN DOLLAR tIMM) 

Spot dir- 1 paint eauateEUMOi 
•SffiSJ 2442 Mar -M63 2464 

2035 2419 Jim 2438 2440 

2585 2401 SOP 24M5 2410 

2566 2398 Dec 2399 2399 

2304 2380 Mar 

Est. Sates 1.957 Prev. Sales 1440 
Prev. Day Open InL 11486 oH22i 

FRENCH FRANC (IMM) 

S per franc- 1 point equals 580000 1 
.11905 ftms Mar 

.11820 39820 Jim 59935 59935 

.10*30 59985 Sea 59900 59900 

Est. Sales 4 Prev. Sales 1 
Prev. Day Open lnt. 2344 up l 


244* 2450 
2424 2415 
2401 2405 
2398 2394 
.7385 


355 758 7% 788+ Vi 

31113V; 13% 13%— U 


3% — vs 
780 — V8 

6 — Vs 

7 — VS 
12V0— % 

TVS + VS 

33 

1940+40 
11% — VS 
17% + 40 

e 1 w 

1548 ISIS 
1346 13% + 16 


551 15% 15 15% + Ml 

67 480 4VS 458 
44 13% 13 13 + IS 

52 3 240 3 

2si am a a — 1% 

136 4 m 4 
01 1146 11 1190— IS 

114911% 11% Ills— vs 


.10000 
59920 59980 
59980 5*900 


GERMAN MARK(IMM) 

X per mark- 1 point muds 305001 
4110 2030 Mar 20*8 2075 

2733 2034 Jun J0J1 J099 

2545 2079 Sep 211* 3122 

261D 2115 Dec 

2251 2201 Mor „ . „ 

Est. Sates 204*3 Pnrv.SaleS 21.168 
Prev. Day Open lnt. «Jlt oft *5 


205* 2073 
■3082 20*7 
2110 2123 
2153 
2188 


Prev. Day Open lnt. 96228 up 52 


SILVER (COMRX) 

3500 tray olt cents oer fray az. 


CATTLE (CME) 

40500 IbSr cents per Bl _ 

67-50 6250 Fed 6455 6522 

6950 6X40 APT <720 6745 

*9-50 <550 Jim 6840 6820 

6757 611S Aim 6650 4755 

6590 61-60 OCt 6550 6550 

6755 AMS Dec 6655 *625 

6755 6525. Feb 6727 6720 

Est. Soles 9550 prev. Sales 11257 
Prev. Dav Open InL 58,103 up633 


Industrials 


JBRest 

04 

10 

t) 19b 

1910 

19%~ % 

Jockpat 

t 


9 5% 

5 

5% + % 

Jock ue 



11538% 

37V: 

37%+ % 

JamWtr 



26 20 

19% 

19% 

JoffBsn 

140 

45 

S3Wj 

Wi 

35% 

JeKmrf 

40a 10 

1662314 

22% 22% 

-Human 



340 0% 

8 

•te + % 1 

J«1co 

.12 

0 

828 19% 

18% 

io% — te 

JHVs 



222 % 

% 

% 

JhasiE 



9 8% 

B 

e%- ta 

Janlcbl 
Janel A 

t 


5) 5% 

516 

5 % 

t 


94 5% 

5 

5te+ Vh 

Javtisn 



117 10 

9% 

9«i— M 

June 



153* 

28% 

39 

Justin s 

001 

14 

60 19% 

19 

1* 


Financial 


FEEDER CATTLE (CMR) 

44500 Bn.- cents per lb. 

7425 6525 Mar 7227 7225 

7620 <750 Apr 7220 7255 

7325 <425 May 7170 7JJ5 

7320 <650 Aim 7240 7255 

7X00 <750 SOP 7250 7225 

7232 <7.10 Oct 71-50 7125 

7320 7040 Nov 7159 7277 

Est. Sates 1531 Prev. Sates 1996 
prev. Dav Open inL 115*3 up 96 


HOGS (CME) 

30500 Itrv- cwttt per lb. 

3830 47-57 Feb 5155 5122 

5645 45.10 Apr 4700 47.85 

55.40 4840 Jun 5X17 5X17 

5527 48.95 Jut 5X95 5X95 

5437 4750 AIM 5XJS 5325 

5125 4500 Oct 43JSS «3»,40 

5005 4630 Dec MSS «BS 

4920 4635 Ptt 4890 *190 

4735 45JB Apr 4608 46JOO 

Est Solo &M9 Prev. Sales UN 
Frey. Dpy Open lnt. 30669 up IS 


Stock Indexes 


Asian Commodities 

Feb. 15 


SP COMP. INDEX (CME) 
paints old cents 

18535 153J0 MOT 18X05 18X65 18100 18)15 

18825 156.10 Jun 18628 18610 18640 18SJQQ 

.17 | 19U0 16810 54P 18935 18940 10910 1BU3 

47 1*690 17X70 Dec 191 J5 W135 19030 19145 

■17 I Est. Sates 61198 Prev. Sales 71.«! 

I Prev. Dav Open InL 54,186 0(1X971 


VALUE UNE(KCST) 

points and cents 

20610 M8L10 Mar 2B30S 20430 20130 20125 

71940 17X00 Jim 30750 30815 20545 20530 

21230 18575 Sea , 90*30 

Est. Sates Pm. Sates 5462 

Prev. Day Open InL 731* of1138 


London Commodities 


Feb. 15 

Figures in sterling per metric ton. 
Gasoil in US. dollars per metric tor. 
Gold In U.X dollars per Dunce. 


27% 
lSVh 
6% 

7Vt 

m 
16% 16% 
20 m& 

19% 


floating Rate 


418 5% 5% »*-» 
382 22% U* Wfr ■ ■ 
72315% 15% H* *% 


ZenLbB 398M 28% 39%^% 

Zbntoc I8S 4% 4% 4Vl— Hi 

zwolcr 48a XS 212% 12% 12%— % 
annul 134 14 2236% 36% 16%", ' 

Zltel 28 5% 5 


7% 7%— % 


3011 Mb K£rJ? 
S9 ih 9% «HS. 
300 2% 2» » -*■» 


Cash 'Prices 


Commodity and Unit 

Coffee 4 Santee, U 

Prlntelatti 64/30 38 %. va _ 

Steel Mltafs (Pllf J. fan 

Iron 2 Fdry. Ptilta-tan 

Sled scrap Na 1 hw PUL . 

Lead Spot, lb 

Capper elect, lb 

Tin (Straits), lb 

Zinc. E. st. L. Basis, lb . 

Palladium, oz , 

Silver N.Y.oz 

Source-- AP. 


prl Ms 

47350 

2i3jB lute 

tun 1MI 

18-21 

67-70 IWM7 V 

*« Si 

,2 ti£ "tig 


London Metals Feb. is 


Figures In sterling per metric ton. 
Silver In pence per troy ounce. 


Paris Commodities 

Feb. 15 


HJoh Lew Close Previous 
SUGAR 

Mar 11630 11040 11640 11638 10*30 11820 
MOV 12420 11740 12430 12*30 11740 11740 
AIM 13230 136 30 13230 13240 726.(0 12640 
Oct 14030 13530 14030 14040 13430 13440 
Dec 14130 14130 14630 14730 14030 14140 


Mar 15830 15730 IM 16140 15S30 15630 
MOV N.T. M.T. 16640 16830 16030 16330 


NYSE COMP. INDEX (HYPE) 
aoinfs and cants 

10800 8830 MOT 106.15 10878 10530 10X55 

1D9JS S® Jun 18835 18855 H7.15 1B7JD 

11130 9135 Sep 11020 11020 11030 1S3 

1129S 10130 Dec _ 11138 

Est Sales Prw, sale* 13319 

Prew.DavOaen InL 10511 oft 352 


in-pfxoa 

57-5 , 

57-17 
59-13 ! 

99-4 I 


Commodity Indexes 


65-71 ! 

Open InL 

iposrrd 

Pis of NO 
8863 , 

BSJQ . 
85J00 1 

8534 I 
86JA I 
8643 , 
8736 7 
551 P 

Open lnt. 


Moody’s 

Reuters- 

DJ. Futures 

Com. Research Bureau _ 


Close 
971 JO f 
2017.90 
125.15 
244.70 


Previous 
96&J0 f 
102230 
124.85 

243.10 


Moody’s : base 100 : Dec 31. 1931. 
p ■ preliminary; f . final 
Reuters : base 100 : Scp. 18, 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 ; Dec. 31, 1974. 


Market Guide 


MOV N.T. N.T. 16640 16800 16000 16330 
248* latsal 50 km*. 

COCOA 

Mar 2,130 2.112 2.115 ills i1«0 2.142 

Atov 2.1*8 Z125 2,13* 2.135 2,157 1159 

JtV 3,135 1115 1116 1)1P 1139 1)40 

Sep 1120 1100 1103 1104 1124 1125 

Dec 1.9*5 1.976 1F78 1.90* 1001 7JX33 

Mar 1.906 L967 1.97S 1.97* 1.991 iOOC 

MOV. N.T. N.T. 1.960 1,975 1.990 1000 

4J47 lots of ID tom. 

COFFEE 

M«r 1347 1330 1330 1332 1355 1357 

Mav 1380 1368 1368 1369 1387 2JH 

JtV 1411 1399 1401 2404 2424 1425 

S4P 13*5 1425 1342 2J45 1448 1450 

NOV 245* 2440 1446 2455 2460 2470 

te) 24*5 2438 1440 2442 1465 1470 

Mar N.T. N.T. 2425 2438 2450 1470 

1224 lots at S Ians. 

GASOIL 

Fab 230L5D 24800 25025 25075 3*7.50 24800 
Mar 23150 231.50 23125 23150 23125 23150 
Apl 221 JO 52050 22U5 221 JD 22050 27) BO 

MOV 21625 21525 21600 216-25 215-50 21600 
Jun 2UM 21X00 21X50 31X00 21150 31X50 
Jlv 21X00 21X00 2I2B0 21400 20900 21400 
Aug N.T. N.T.211J0 3IU0 20900 21800 
Sen N.T. N.T. 21100 22000 20900 22200 

Od N.T. N.T. 71200 22300 20900 22600 

1039 tots of 100 tens. 

GOLD 

, Art 307 JO 387 JO N33. N O. N.O. Njl 

■jSj j 100 lots al 100 fray ox. 
ju I Sources: Bmitarnana London Petrofaim Ea- 
,1*0 I ctwmw (maoiii. 


Today Prev taut 
High grade capper cathodes: 
spat 1,27800 107900 lJOOJO U01J0 
3 months 100200 100240 1J265Q 102700 
Capper cathodes: 

opal 107400 107700 109700 109900 

3 months 109700 109900 102100 102400 
Tin; spat M0)R001Q0200O1O0 1500 1002500 
3 months 1002500100300010022001802800 
Lean: spot 33500 33600 33850 31900 
3 months 34300 343J0 34808 34900 
Ztacrsoot 76000 78100 77808 77150 

3 months 77L0O 77600 77600 77640 

Silver: spot 56600 56000 57600 57700 
3 months 58500 58600 59X50 59708 
Aluminium: 

Slot 100259 100X50 100*00 101000 
3 months 103750 103850 10460Q 10(700 
Nickel: soot 440000 *01000 403008 *43500 
3 month* 400000 401000 401500 442S0O 
Source; Reuters. 


S&P 100 Index Options 
Feb. 15 


PHUOP 

ra w u wi 


is 23 21V9 - - 1/16 1/16 1/16 — 

Man KVa - — i/i« ta u 

HS 13 19A IS — — 1/M VI* H 

29 n*n> HHknva - N isn*n 

ns 2 

m WMJi ft IVi 1/1* 17/1* ZA 

2 S Mi P* * » 3 i/i*i* e» s» 

w i/m N 2 J/U3% n » I M 

15 W» % 15/163% - Dtt » . 

m - 1/11 f/M im - - mm - 


MORE NEWS IN LESS TIME 

THE WOULD IN 16 PAGES 

DAILY IN THE IHT 


TsMcoDvotum UUK 
t«m oil open laLMMfl 
Total pal mhnns 1TU3S 
ToM pul opcp bit.flWS 
inlm: 

HWD1/94J Lmrrnji oarPZtS— US 
Source: CBOE. 


DM Futures Options 
Feb. IS 

W.t^rragnMoit-t^marneettRrBili 



































































































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16-17, 198S 


Page 13 



|Hub Med Tries to Shed Its Bikini-ond-Si^ IMF Halts Loans to Brazil, 

iong cl Marketer of 'Uncivilized 9 Vacations, Bids for U.S. Family Trade CtlHsfoT New BcOttOWllC Pldfl 


Company Earnings 

Revenue and profits. In millions, an In local currencies 
unless otherwise indicated 


i Nev iurK Timn smiee “North America is a big pan of as they have manned, as they’ve be informal: simply furnished (Continued from Page 7) and re_ 

£ ?NEW YORK — The image of our future," said Serge Trigano. the grown older arid had children. We rooms, communal meals and casual said- Brazilian inflation, targeted at pnymenis tnmi tnen- 

; -unity dad vacationers frolicking 39-year-old president and dtief ex- have gone through a gradual evolu- dress. There are no television sets 50 percent in 1984, was 223 per- Brad 1 ailed to meet i is ini lauon 

j ? secluded beaches in exotic Id- ecu live of Club Med Inc. and the lion, and what we need to do now is or private telephones. cent. In December, the money sup- lai !§ ets Uirou & n 311 “ 1 DU , was 


*’’les has become almost synony- 
"'jus with Club Mediterranee, the 


— i ii^rnu. km giuwu mvia Uiiu iiou i.iuiuibu. tvs iia u i w , wii iii i u im i iimua mtu ww* - ^i wnni i nuuauuii, ai 

39-year-old president and dtief ex- have gone through a gradual evolu- dress. There are no television sets SO percent in 1984, was 223 per- 

ecutive of Club Med Inc. and the lion, and what we need to do now is or private telephones. cent. In December, the money sup- 


with Club Mediterranee, the 
,c ris- based company that has be- 


'* son of Club Mfediicrrante’s chair- not so much change our image as 


man. Gilbert Trigano. 

“The number of Neath Ameri- 


^ -.’•me the 1 1 th- largest hotel chain in can visitors we have now is relalrve- 
world. ly small compared to the total for 

7; But the company, which bills it- the rest of our operations," he said 
* as “an antidote for civiliza- in an interview at the company's 
-.in," now wants to move a little Manhattan headquarters on 57th 


erase the 
terexplai 

Jeffrey 


Triv^tdMi^ targets through all of 1984, but was 

Indeed, in its marketing, the ply jumped 30 percent. In January 

rnoanv stresses the “Outa emeri* alone inflation was more than 7 raeiMroccause ine agency waivcci 

aMggtasj bEsZT*—* SSSSS3^ 

bones to persuade visitors to 20 The official said it was not snr- ol j |er 6 B y 

The country is in the middle of a 


Hong Kong 

H.K. China Gas 
Year WM im 

Revenue 874.0 7?ix 

Profits 146X 106X 

Japan 

Pioneer Bee. 


4th Qoar. 

Revenue 

Oner Net 

Oner Share— 


Year 
Revenue. 
MU Nel Inc. - 


lfM l« 
4.W. ana 
296J6 7*32} 

3J5 2X0 


ly small compared to the total for rector at Le hman Brothers, the in- it hopes to persuade visitors to go The official said it was not sur- 

the rest of our operations," he said vestment house that helped take to other villages if their fust choice prising that the IMF took action 

in an interview at the company's the company public, agrees that is filled. now. “Hie outgoing government 

Manhattan headquarters on 57th Club Med's image as a singles re- The Q ub Med conceD1 jj 3S has lost some credibility” he said. 


ltfOaor. 

Revenue 

Profit 

Per Shore 

a: loss. 


ins in* 

B4X2D. BSWO. 

(aim XI 40. 

— 2423 


Oner Share— 036 136 

Year »M 1K3 — , __ 19M 

Revenue 14J80. 12360. c ” Br - -iTSI J?5 

Net Ine. 385 4«x g*”™* ‘SS? «« 

Per Share — 0.11 S36 — ’£§? ‘HS 

IOH per snore results after ^ 

pref e rred dividends. „. Yter _ 

Revenue 2310. 2X5ft 

— , . _ O per Net 79.14 723 

Colgate-Palmolive Oner snare— 330 XI S 
4th Qoar. 1964 iwj I9B3 year net Includes toss 

Revenue l.lBQ. 1,1M. of n«4 million from fllseon- 

Nei inc. (o)fl.l 30.75 'tnued operations. 


ls,Uica - ^ W i ■ ** three-year IMF pact signed in Feb- 

The Club Med concept has Jjj ^ niary 1983. Almost immediately af- 

evolved over the last 30 years. Gub program will include ^ -J ^ j^a! agreement 

M£ditfirran£e_thpnarwil mmninv the 3SSent of the new government. ,, n iL„ mumm- fall ami 


South Africa Po ^jj re — “ 

Darling ft Hodgson gST™* — ttjb iron 

-car 1964 1963 Per Share 036 232 

venue 77X02 76335 a; f r f t i 


f - With its traditional European looking for lo fund our growth." ay’s clientele is married. 


M6diterran£e, the parent company, 
was founded in 1950 as a French 


te assent or the new government. 
In December the military gov- 


Marketplace becoming saturated. 


• . .j . . j -j_i j Always skillful at arranging fi- ^ * -- -- .-. . ~ - manumu iun seven yean later, ana — - — — — r— 

, ub Med has decided to expand nanang — its resort in Haiti was ““y ** hard 10 dumnilc. “There went public in 1965* gram. 

h North American interests, financed, in part, by a bond offer- «™Sh dubs that cater to Fara- ^ . The IMF director, Jacques de 

1 ^ FOr jUSt 18 ***' ing and Gub Med Inc. was taken ^ ,“l d ^ K c fc£ffalLU riJSd Larosiere. said in a four-page cable 

^ v.u of ns 800.000 visitors a year, public last fall to raise capital — «« ot 5 K S ”° r!d T£ vd Cons ^: to Brazil's key bank lenders Thurs- 

- domgso, it expects to rap a the company docs not Consider rants m Manhattan, but some suQ day morning that while Brazil, 

•^irket of 5 nuUion to 8 rmlhon raising money for the expansion a have that swmgrng repuiabon. its oa^ L P whose foreign debts are about S100 

■ms is in_ Canada, the United orobWn. The Gub Med group offers aD- Md , ^ - 11 ? , club . M .“ s wilion. h«T «m- 


□ooproGt q^orts association. It was eran3l ” t “d the staff of the 


two years ago. the country fell out 
of compliance. The IMF and the 
banks cut Brazil off until a new 


Revenue- 

Profile—— 

Per Shore 


1966 1963 

77X02 76335 
30.73 34J2 

080 1JS 


P.'ll ,1— _ _.|., ; uuuuivw auuiu mMuuvii. u wjj . , - — . n anus call oniZU Dll UTlllI a new 

ss? M a 1985 ~ pr " s p ^wr w3sasra:d,oi,, 

Who, Qob Med Inc. went pni> . T^JMF director. J^quot^ Th It however. Brazil war 


United States 

Aetna Lfte Cas. 


Larosiere. said in a rour-page cable broke and almost daily had to 
to Brazil’s key bank lenders Thurs- scrape up the cash it needed lo buy 


3 Lites and Japan and substantially 


problem. 

It does recognize, however, that 


stock, which is traded on the New bOhon, had made substantial pro- 


imports and pay a minimal amount 
of interest to its bank lenders. Now, 
mainly because of a 513-billion 


SSTSIS “ 


r Tease its North American reve- uuww, ^ in self-contained tots btocic tzebange, was offered traoe surplus last year, me country 

obstacle to winning a broader ai 517 a share, hdosed Thursday «tUng_subsidie* and encouraging ^ about S8 billion in foreign cur- 

.^w^ch now exceed SJXJmO- ba*. in North America may be its beach or mountim areas. Prices al j I9 875 U pj 7 j«au. * domestic savings, lack of progress ^ocy reserves. 

^aycar. _ reputation as a raecca for smgles. vary from resort to resort, and by aiaiv.eo up jo cents. on innation and the monev sunolv 


4111 Qoar. 19M 1983 year 

Revenue *000. X5KL 

operNet 3X0 69D 

Doer Share— X27 033 gSSSrSH 

Year 1984 1963 a; una. m 

Revenue i5^a i*jfflx atone otsn 

Oper Nel 18X0 32X0 

Opw Share— 139 3X6 

Nets exclude reollxed caul- Mospna 

tal earns of S4J million vs SIJ eitaOtair 

million In auarters and COPi- rreunnua " 
tel lass at ssS million vs ooU i 


Goodrich (BF) 

«n Qoar. 1984 19B1 

Revenue 82X2 8064 

Net inc <a|7a 6X 

»er Shore — 034 

Year WM 1K3 

Revenue X4oa 3J0X 

Net Inc. 60S 1X4 

Per Share 232 X68 


, .WM a: toss. 19*4 nets Include Per Share — 

’5400- 1440ft atone ot 312 million. Id Half 


ms Pan Am 

Vh?,- 4th Qoar. 1964 1983 

Revenue 8922 9293 

M Net Loss 922 SX6 

Year I9M 1983 

Revenue 338ft X79a 

-1 Net Laos 28X8 SIX 

van t9C3 results Indude oatn of 
■iiwj 9 cents a share In Quarter ard 

&£ at 10 cents In year. 

°*d Merchants 

32DX 2nd Qua-. 198S 19M 

1X4 Revenue 227.7 14X7 

038 Net inc. XII 336 

chide Per Share X24 X40 

IN Half 1965 1984 

Revenue 396.1 2623 

Net inc. 936 SX6 

ler - Per Shore 1X9 X58 

1983 Nets Include ooins el 
960 S64ZOOO vs S7SL006 in auor- 
5588 tors one of 320 million vs SI A 
X64 million In itcorz. 


Hospital Cp Amer. pSJs&JZ: 


J;The company’s Western Hemi- 
, here and Pacific Basin opera- 


season. A vacationer traveling from 


Gub Med insists that its swing- New York Gty to the Caribbean. — fen- the six months ended April Brazil. 


.on inflation and the money supply 
Gub Med s most recent results required him to seek another ac- 


Dividends 


Feb. IS 


-Lns have been consolidated in a ing-singles reputation is unde- for example, could expect to pay 30,1984 — show that earnings rose 
■■ ihsidiary. Club Med In<x, and servfti between $799 and $1,420 for a one- 10.6 percent, to $115 million, or 


?ins are under consideration to 


between $799 and SMlOfor a one- 10.6 percent, to $115 million, or 
“We offer a concept: We have week sray. depending on destina- a i share, from .SI 1-3 million, Thwd^ita a BrazBian' team 

ir flnm cnprtol nniliMYtnnu uikiph tiAn an A coocnn AT \1 1 It O chan* in th/» IQfil iwtaH . . 


i . j;eu new “villages" — as its resorts our own special philosophy, which tion and season. 

* •• known — in the United States, you like or you don’t like,” Mr. There is one class of 

:'.ssibly in southern California, Trigano said. “We started out with dationsand a range of lei 

* ■ r-izona. Florida and Hawaii young singles, but we have matured ities. The atmosphere is i 


>n and seastin. or $1.10 a share, in the 1983 period. ,o wU hin 

There is one class of accommo- Sales for ihe six months rose 11.4 win^taitc nn nan Hp 
itions and a range of leisure activ- percent, to $138 million, from fnLSSLIi® 

•e is intended to $123.8 million. 


Mexican Tourism Drop Could Threaten Recovery ttsttrAA 

: JT J their differences next month. Unadjusted. December orders 

'■ By Mark J. Kurlanskv life,” said an undersecretary of government priority because of its 'lies- They took the maid. Thev Meanwhile, banks have renewed all were up 28.4 percent from a year 

'■ international Herald Tribune tourism, Guillermo A. Grim. foreign -exchange earning poten- took the nurse.” he recalled. ’ lending agreemen is until May 31 earlier. 

But the decline in the number of tial. . . „ ... i ^ mmmmmm 

tourists is a setback for the govern- In 1933 tourism brought in a , j rn “ l . i ^ AUTOS TAX FREE rTYTT'lT’U'IVF A TrT/YlXJ / 

mcm, whose projection of steadily balance of JU bUBon.^* io- INTERNATIONA 


cord with Brazil. T .. , . « , 

Brazil’s debt negotiator, Jos* Japan Madune Orders 

Carlos Madeira Serrano, said Dropped in December 
Thursday that a Brazilian team 
would fly to Washington next week Reuters 

to begin talks on a new pact He TOKYO — Japan’s private-sec- 

said he felt Brazilian officials could tor machinery orders, excluding 
satisfy IMF objections quickly. ships, fell in December to a season- 

Bankers said privately that the ally adjusted 585.57 billion yen 
earliest the two sides could reach a ($2.25 billion) from 661.32 billion 
long-term agreement was late April in November, the government said 
or May, and only if they resolve Friday, 
their differences next month. Unadjusted. December orders 


I MEXICO CITY — Growing evi- 
;r» ce that Mexicans are being 
,-ced out of Mexico is casting a 


Company 

Per 

Amt 

Pay 

Rec 

Dallas Corn 
Flnalco Group 

Q 

a 

.IS 

xs 

S3 

4-2 

>30 

>22 

INCREASED 



Fsl City Bee Tex 

O 32 Vi 

>U 

>5 

BuskiesiMens Ass 
Olsten Carp 

Q 

.52 

X6 

3-5 

3-15 

2-25 

>1 

Fsi Nall 51 Bcp 
F sl Natl State Bob 
F orest Oil Corp 

a 

Q 

72 

33 

-25 

4-1 

4-1 

>11 

>7 

3-7 

2-26 

SPECIAL 




Frozen Food Ex 

Q 

X7 

>12 

>25 

Safety Roll Svc 

_ 

.13 

>12 

>28 

Grattan Group 
Guardsman Chem 

O .16 
O .12 to 

>15 

>26 

>1 

>12 

STOCK SPLIT 



KOI Coro 

a 

ss 

>21 

3-4 

Olsten Core — 3-for-2 





Kerr Glass Mto 

o 

.11 

>15 

>1 





Kiddeinc 

0 

30 

3-31 

>15 





Manhattan Ind 

O X7to 

4-1 

>14 






Maytag Co 

O 

AS 

>15 

>1 

Ape crie Core 

a 

X7 

4-30 

>29 

Mercantile Bcp 

Q 

38 

4-1 

>11 

ArV ta inc 

□ 

37 

>15 

>2S 

Monarch Coo Coro 

Q 

35 

4-1 

>18 

Arrow Elect 

Q 

X5 

4-15 

>27 

National State Bk 

a 

38 

>15 

2-28 

Barnwell Ind 

a 

X5 

>28 

>14 

Pork -Ohio Indus 

Q 

.15 

>15 

>1 

biw Coble Systems 

Q X2to 

4-1 

>28 

Stanodvne Inc 

Q 

35 

4-1 

>15 

Carpenter Tech 

oxw 

>7 

>26 

Standard Broadcast 

O .12 to 

4-15 

>25 

Coco-Cola Bile 

a 

.14 

>15 

>1 

Stop ft Shapes 

O 

35 

4-1 

>1 

Consolidated Papers 

a 

J3 

3-9 

>25 

Sunshine-Jr SI 

O 

.12 

>22 

2-27 

Continuum Co 

Q 

X 3 

4-15 

>31 

Sysco Coro 

Q 

.10 

5-17 

4-26 

Crown Zellerbach 

0 

3S 

AI 

>11 

Wisconsin Public 

0 

M 

>20 

>28 

Curtiu-Wrlgtil 

o 

30 

4-30 

44 

Source: upi. 






AUTOS TAX FREE 


- HibUne shadow on the country's leasing tourism was a part of the creased earnings of 1984 are ex- 
: irism industry, which is constd- economic recovery program. pected to be virtually negated by ^ cSw "SnS chain wWdi 

--ri vital to economic recovery and The increase in spending by the increase in spending abroad. 


•-J vital to economic recovery and _ _ 

velopmenL tourists is largely a reflection of When Oscar Acevedo, director 

i Further, the cheap-peso boom 1984 inflation, which, according to of tourism for the Mexico Gty 
; ' it caused bargam^vuniing Amer- official figures, was 592 percent Chamber of Commerce, was in 
‘ ns to flock to Mexico in 1983 is instead of a projected 40 percent. Vail. Colorado, in December he 
: arly over, and worried prompt- Pan of the return to normality is was shocked to see how many Mex- 
are anxiously looking to Europe dial Mexicans are once again start- icans were there. “I saw whole fam- 

: replace their lost customers. ing to travel abroad, especially to 

'?reliminary figures for 1984 the United States, where prices a™/*™ 


has invested heavily on the beaches 
and inland. 

A favored solution is European 
tourists, who, it is thought, could be 
drawn inland to colonial cities and 
ancient ruins. 


. replace their lost customers. 
Preliminary figures for 1984 


. m the Ministry of Tourism show look good in spite of a high dollar- 
vi there was a 49,000- visitor drop to-peso exchange rate; U. S. infia- 


^.m the year before, to 4.7 million 
’tors. 

: rhe year was not all bad news, 
-x tourist spending increased 30 
cent, investment money is siart- 
•- to come in again and newlarge- 
1e construction is about to begin 
• the first time since Mexico's 


tion has remained less than 4 per- 
cent during the past two years. 

In 1984 there was an estimated 
30-percent increase in the number 
of Mexicans traveling abroad. The 
Ministry of Tourism calculates that 
this year more than 15 million 
Mexicans will travel abroad and 


ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 

Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed 
15 February 1985 

Tha ocf ascot «aiU6 notaNam down below ara supplied by ttie Food* IlftMl artm 18 b 
arcopKon of some funds whose quotes are based on but prices. The fallowing 
marginal symbols Indicate frequency of Quotations supplied tor toe IHT: 

Id! -dally; (w) - weekly; ft) W-montoty; tr) - regaktrly; 0) - irregiHarty. 


ROM STOCK 
tCH 85 MOOBS 

500 SL Bfack/Potomno 
500 St Sad Mel/ Efaet 
500 Sa Mid Hue/Creon 
500 sa Arfr/PcAxnino 
raRAJB TBTA ROSSA 
oko Range Rover, Porsche. 
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Ter Swaene, I Bexstroat, 2018 Amwerg 
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A LT1QS TAX FREE 

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Mercedes, BMW, Porschi, offer fuB 
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Motors, Tsnteegonttr. 6, 4 DucsseJ- 
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Car Traders; Now ft Second Hand 

Ful service; rauaice, 
shmpriD ft conversio n 
BMS Dr GoudUni. ?232 ScWde, Artl- 
emrp. Belgium 323/a5B 12 60, lb321 27 


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VIP PA YOUNG LADY 
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Pms A Airports. 527 90 95. 


PARIS WSOPI«STICATED& elegant 
young lady cornporion for days, din- 
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HOTELS 

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WE CAN HOP YOU whatever your 
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tel 326-3884, 77 rue Si. Lous en Tile, 
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COLLECTORS 


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- I Yount’ Jot of the Swat mny 
fwraomd properly, best condieoa 

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TRANSCO ^ 


: mcial crisis began at the end of spend more than $700 million 


ALMAL MANAGEMENT 
(w> At- Mol Trust.. 5 A 


1 140 at ORANGE NASSAU GROUP 

PBBS57I, The Hopue 10701 4696J6 


• We are getting lo the point 
: sre we are living a more normal 


(151.9 billion pesos). 

This is troubling news for an 
industry that has become a high 


BANK JULIUS BAER ft CO. Lid. —Id I never O cMBOUwnl I 534X3 

— Id I Borrbond SF 028X5 

—Id | conbor 5F 1192X0 

— (a I EooJOoer Amerlco S117400 

-Id I Equtboer Europe SF 1191X0 

— Id ) Eoulbaer PacHIc SF 1180X0 

— (d I Grobar SF 1117X0 

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Floating Bate Notes 


300 brand new cm. 
making 5000 hc^py ctens every year. 
Sand far free mdnoDioraBttog. 
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Tel 323/542 62 40. it SVWMS B 


TAX FRS CARS 
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toyed Showroen ft Inve n to r y 

AI makes, el models, brand new 


seboan, B-2241 Zoersd, Antwerp. Tel; 
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node Marcadet, BMW, ASO. 
MBCBS, PORSCHE. New/Used. 


212-7657793 / 765-7794 

PARIS 527 01 93 PA^ YOUNG LADY 
Why nol comraurinde with me si 3 
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stud ex. Fu4y equipped btchen, 
dab n»i servica. 
Weekly aid monthly rdes. 
ExceSent locstooa 



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Goitdi y 623U092. 1^464986. WPS 0NC8 offers a vnde sefedion of Brtnh / 

kxZv,^ nl 757 62 48. TmitfdV.LP.bdy. Havel RETURMNG US, «Jhjrmt»e. Arnenoan boob (also cWdren'jL Brit. 


TAX Fiee can, ol mdas ft medek aanxnav 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16- 17, 1985 


.>•*1 


Page 14 


ACROSS 


ACROSS 


ACROSS 


1 Maid of 

tf Mites 

11 Walkway of a 
sort 

15 Mosel feeder 
1* Cottonwood 

20 Largest of the 
Admiralties 

21 Use steel wool 

22 Clam type 

23 District 
attorney? 

25Nifia,toSanta 

Maria? 

27 Vilification 

28 Mulligrubs 

29 Company lover 
SO "Granada" 

songwriter 

33 Japanese 
vegetables 

34 Amaryllis 
relative 

35 Balderdash 

37 “Sail 

Union": 

Longfellow 

38 Add-on for hip 

or tip 

39 Broken 
transom's 
results? 


54 Fettucdne, 
e.g. 

55 "Lucky Jim" 
author 

56 meson flora 

57 Lorca play 
division 

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•1 Fail suddenly, 

with "ont" 

62 Group founded 
In 1908 

64 Tinstones 

65 Architecture 


erof 


41 Angel’s pet 
letters 

44 Separated 

46 Deadlocks 

47 Yves's weapon 

48 Academic 
orgs. 

49 Blackjack 
croupier 

50 Sanctions 

51 Baptismal acts 

53 Kind of service 


68A1 
Dada 

69 Bread: Comb, 
form 

70 Mansarrat’s 

“The Sea" 

72 Bend; arch 

73 Cry of 
repugnance 

74 Driver's 
cousin 

76 Non- 
professional 

77 Anatomical 
branch 

79 Aslan 
apparition 

80 In the 
Immediate 
neighborhood? 

83 Swizzle 

84 To love, tn 
Lyon 

86 gras 

(goose liver) 

87 Bathsheba’s 
first spouse 

88 Cause for 
R.E.L. 


89 Bias 

92 Jazz solo 
cadenza 

93 Lines on a map 

96 Molecule 
clusters 

97 Geologic 
comb, form 

98 Antas 

99 Payment proof 
.00 Pan try 

pillager 
101 Frog and 
grasshopper? 

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melon 

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105 Sch. officials 

106 Yard’s 


The Asset Test byjohncheenman 


1 

2 

3 

4 

s 

iT" 





73~ 

_l 





Z07 Calamitous 

108 Cinch 

109 Roman villa 
feature 

112 Gogol's " 

Bulba" 

114 Press 

116 Thanksgiving 
time? 

118 Invoice for a 
zoo purchase? 

122 Richard III, to 
Henry VII 

123 Chile con 

124 " of 

dreadful note" : 

Macbeth 

125 AnAraaz 

126 Home of Iowa 
State 

127 Heroine of a 
d’Erlanger 

opera 

128 Regs, ordists. 

129 Out of kilter 


DOWN 


DOWN 


DOWN 


1 Lyricist David 

2 Huaab for 
Manolete 

3 Hialeah has- 
been. 

4 PsaJteria 

5 BriJtcben 

6 Bettered 

7 Sincerity 

8 Range over 
4,000 miles 
long 

9 Penitent 

10 Nat of Tel Aviv 

11 Conquered the 
Jungfrau 

12 Column-base 
moldings 

13 Surpasses In 
bewitchery 


14 Prince 
Valiant’s son 

15 Milksop 
16U.S.T.A. 

champ: 1968 

17 Arab prince 

18 Viscous 

21 Bear trails 

22 Wields a 
crowbar 

24 More tightly 
stretched 


26 Rialto ham 
28 Balls of yarn 
30 Boisterous 


31 Novelist Tyler 

32 King's • 
ransom? 

34 Archetype 


38 "All ," 

1931 sang 

38 Beehive 

39 Deliver 
encomiums 

40 Flaxlike fibers 

41 Literary 
platitude? 

42 Bombast 

43 Bone: Comb, 
form 

45 Spicy stews 

46 Patens 

48 Clavichord’s 
successor 

50 Ipso 

51 Incite 

52 Music 
arranger 

54 Shasbonean 



DOWN 


DOWN 


DOWN 


55 Bernese Alps 

river 

57 Rhyme 
scheme 

58 Ltr. writer 

59 Shinto temple 

gateway 

60 " of Evil." 

Welles film 
61 Author of 
"Krakatit’’ 

63 Partof F.C.R. 

65 Bungle 

66 Jamaican 
citrus fruit 

67 Rather, in 
Rostock 

70 Dog genus 

71 Ordination, 
e.g. 


72 Raven’s 
remark 

75 Leaks 

76 Untie 

77 R. Spencer, to 
J. Valentine 

78 Offspring 

81 Calif.’s motto 

82 Rabbit and 
Fox 

84 Upoluport 

85 What Mr. 
America 
pumps 

86 Windowlike 
openings 

88 Thespian 
James 


90 Economize 


91 Spotted 

92 wades of blue 


168 Gland 
secretion 


and green 

93 Nullify 

94 Hebrew bushel 

95 Word in early 
telegrams 

98 Strollers en 
masse 

99 Scans again 
191 Thin porridge 

102 Magnates 

103 Filch 


109 City on the 
Jumna 

110 Svelte 

111 Critic's 
accolade 

113 Broadcasts 

114 Uncouth 

115 Topsoil layers 


ANDY CAPP 


105 Compositors' 
units 


117 External: 
Comb, form 

118 Lost weekend 

119 Here, in 
Hytres 

120 Fleur-de 


107 Capitulate 


121 Bandleader 
Elgart 



ig iT.C tw 

r-« « 

u — ; ^ 
dtL 

tatf* Ciaan 

tgjr .'paca 


WIZARD of ID 


SPOR 


CANAAN 

By Charlie Smith. 416 pp. $17.95. 

Simon & Schuster, 1230 Avenue of the Americas 
New York N. Y. 10020. 


BOOKS 


tricked- up plot thai reads like a melodramatic epi- 
sode of “Dallas." Besides madness and incest, we 


Reviewed by Michiko Kakutani 

A S the Old South of plantations, small towns and 
-Tv extended families has given way to the flat- 


ay to the 

tened, homogenized landscape of the New — shop- 
ping mails, interstate highways, and prefab houses 
— the regional literature, too, has changed. The 
work of such younger Southerners as Bobbie Ann 
Mason, Barry Hannah, Marsha Norman, and the 
late Breece D’J Pancake may still commemorate a 
specific place, but those places are communities that 
have misplaced their mores and their history. In- 
stead of rebelling against the vicious hold of ances- 
try and tradition, the characters in this fiction tend 
to mourn the loss of their identity, the imperma- 
nence of their lives. 

“Canaan," Charlie Smith's first novel, is a throw- 
back of sorts to an older tradition, its subject mailer 
is violence and passion, not alienation; its themes. 


land, and family and the enduring bonds of blood. 
Smith's language, too. stands in sharp contrast to 
the pared-down, anomic prose employed by so 
many of his contemporaries; lyrical and dense, it 
carries echoes of wuliam Faulkner and Thomas 
Wolfe. 

Talented as Smith is, he has written an astonish- 
ingly uneven novd. His lush prose has a way of 
turning overripe — “angel or devil he had strength, 
■he had will, he had nerve; he would win" — and his 
taste for the Gothic often devolves into the merely 
grotesque. Interspersed with nostalgic, finely ob- 
served accounts of fumbling teen-age attempts at 
first love, are crude, repetitious sex scenes, set down 
in breathy romance-novel prose. And alongside 
subtle passages that conjure up small-town life 
during the 1950s are clumsy attempts to portentous- 
ly foreshadow the future. 

In fact, in his eagerness to keep the narrative of 
“Canaan" zipping along. Smith has contrived a 


are treated to suicide, attempted murder, and wife- 
beating. One character tries to bum down the family 
manse by dousing it with gasoline, and another goes 
at it with an electric saw. 


Canaan — the Burdette family's homestead 
comes across as both a very real place and a mythic 


kingdom: 25.000 acres of jpiney forests, cotton 


fields, and swamp that stretch as far as the eye can 
see: a promised land, reclaimed from nature by hard 
work, ruled and fought over by individual Bur- 
dettes. 


AN( NgW AIR W\U, 4 M& AnY 

tarn m i\& ettwoots 



+-lb 



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3ELR.-.Y BEACH. FVrid 
ffiLv-- a." aevas '.o sw 

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raslie 
t-Z. Ever 

aiaaciji. NivrziLcvi. ;he 

ia&iaLv*r.z : - <::•? Carji 


iiTied for Lead 


REX MORGAN 


l f “Canaan" is essentially the story or three gener- 
ations of Burdettes — and, in a sense, another tale 


of how the glorious South fdl into decline — it is 
dominated, nonetheless, by the figure of a woman. 
Elizabeth Bonnet Burdette. Elizabeth was once 


known as “the Beauty of Charleston,” and she still 
f d 

good at coftecting men — the sort of woman who 


ilvol 

lives every day as if it were a cotillion. She is a 
modern-day Scarlett O’Hara, proud, willful, and 


DENNIS THE MENACE 


Solution to Last Week’s Puzzle 



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□□du □□□□ union 
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□□□□ □□□□□□ □□□□□ □□□ 
□□□□□□a □□□□□□□□□□□□□ 
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□ □□LIU □□□□□ □□«□□ 


wears peculiar bats, paints her toenails red. and 
drives sports cars much too Tasl. You can picture her 
being played, in the television movie version or 
“Canaan,* by Elizabeth Ashley or maybe Margot 
Kidder. 


At times, Elizabeth Bonnet Burdette is so broadly 
drawn, so much a type, that she comes across as just 
that — a character sketch in need of an actress to 
interpret ber and give her a real dimension. Still, 
there are moments when Smith succeeds in pene- 
trating her hard, brilliant surface, makes us under- 
stand tier choice of negligence over an ordered life, 
her desperate need to escape the confinements of 
family and tradition. It is at such moments that 
"Canaan" gives the reader intimations that it is not 
just another piece of commercial fiction but a liter- 
ary work that, for all its flaws, helps us to re-imagine 
the South. 


Michiko Kakutani is on the staff of The New York 
Times. 



LA JOLLA. i. 

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HOW COULD SQWE1HING CALLED 
'CARROT CAKE' TASTE SO GOOD ? ' 


WEATHER 


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HIGH LOW 
C P C F 

16 <1 12 54 

■5 21 -9 16 

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-4 25 -20 -4 

4 18 -11 12 Sw 

4 18 -16 3 sw 

20 AS 8 46 a 

2 36 -I 30 Ir 

34 '-11 12 fr 
43 4 39 r 

18 -10 14 Ir 
39 -1 30 SW 
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16 o 
45 fr 
1 0 
26 o 
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36 Sw 
« a 
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21 Ir 
30 sw 
-7 19 el 
-9. 14 Sw 
■4 25 SW 


ASIA 


Bangkok 
Bafllag 
Hoag King 
Malta 
Now MM 
Sawl 


LOW 
C F 


19 


Tat pal 
Tokyo 


HIGH 
C F 
31 88 24 75 

5 41 -7 
21 70 

30 86 
24 75 10 

6 43 
12 54 

31 88 
17 43 

9 48 


15 59 
24 75 


AFRICA 


Ataton 

Calm 

Com Town 
Cacabkmca 


Look 

Nairobi 

Toots 


22 73 8 

13 SS 12 

26 79 15 

27 r 11 
24 75 14 
31 BS 27 
24 75 13 
21 70 10 


LATIN AMERICA 


BUMS Aim 26 79 16 

Lima 28 82 10 

Mexico City 22 72 5 

Rio He Janeiro 32 90 34 

sao Panto 


— — — — no 


NORTH AMERICA 


Atlanta 

Bolton 

Chicago 


ascas 

wlatn 

LViV 

EANIA 


-1 30 -7 19 
17 63 11 SJ 


0 
4 
na 

8 44 4 39 SB 
11 52 10 Bi 


Stl 


land 23 73 16 61 cl 

ey 25 77 19 44 h- 

rJaurfy; l a tag gy : fr4alr; n^wilj Mvsrcast; pemarflv 
showers; svsnow; sf-stormv. 


Detroit 

HOMtaia 

Hoastaa 

La Angeles 

Miami 

MtantapoiH 

Montreal 

NatMU 

NewTark 

San Fmodsce 

Soattla 

Taranto 

Washington 


16 -IS 
41 -6 
34 -2 
U -16 
» -2 
18 -13 
79 18 
43 I 
86 16 
66 9 
18 -20 

33 -3 
a 10 

34 4 
60 12 
45 2 
23 -9 
39 -8 
cloudy ; 


S cl 


21 fr 

2B K 


36 PC 
16 Sw 


18 fr 
r-raln; 


5ATVROATTS FORECAST — CHANNEL: Round. FRANKFURT: rkrfr. rwnw. 
-10 -14 <U—7). LONDON; Ooudj. Tt/ne. -1 — 4 (30 - 251. MADRID: Over- 
cod. Term 15-11 (59-521- NEW VORK; Portly daudv. Tamp. -1 — 8 
130— ISI-PARIS: Overcast. Tama. -2— -< (M— 2SJ. ROME: Owarcast. Tmtw. 
U — 5 152 — 39). TEL AVIV: Ooodr. Temp. 13— 10 155 — 50). ZURICH: Fair. 
Tamp. — B — -10 HI-141. Bamokok: Fair. Tamn. 34 — 25 1*3—771. HONG 
KONG: Cloudy. Tema. 21 — 17 (70 — 611. MANILA; Pair. Tamp. 32 — 24 
190 — 751. SEOUL: Snow. Toma. 7 — -2 MS — 23). SINGAPORE; Tliunoardorm*. 
Tamp. 31-25 (88-771. TDK VO: Rain. Tema. 10— 2 (50—341. 


WmtM Stock Markets 


Via Agence France-Presse Feb. 15 

Casing prices in local currencies unless otherwise indicated 


ABN 

ACPHoMina 

Aooon 

AKZO 

Ahold 

AMEV 

A 'Oom Ru b 

Amrotiank 

BVG 

Buahrmarm T 


397 JO 
192J0 


21470 2T7J 


Cakmd Hldg 
MOU 


EtMvlar-NC 
Fokkar 
CWBracaoai 
Halnakan 
Hoooovma 
KLM 
Naardan 

NatNedder 
Nadllovd 
Oca Vandar G 


ns 

US 

75 

149 

88J0 

3480 


9AJD 


5980 

59.90 

4740 


Philips 
Rabaco 
Radamca 
Raltaca 
Raranta 
Royal Dutch 
UnJIavor 
VftinOm moron 
VMF Stark 
VNU 


48.10 

S9J0 

7540 


49 JO 
4350 


27 JO 

146 

20980 


Previous : 201 44 


ArtWf 

Bakaert 

Oackami 

EBE5 

GB-ima-BM 

G8L 

Gevaert 

Mbefcan 

Kradioibank 


SaeGanaraie 

Safina 

Solvay 

Traction Elac 
VMlle Manfagne 


1720 1725 
SDOO 6050 
266 26S 

2000 2785 
2900 2900 
2010 2010 
3655 3730 
5930 5910 
7000 7780 
6910 6920 
1825 182S 
7320 7310 
4050 40* 
3925 3915 
5460 5430 


Stock Exchange index : 1H6J2 
Pravtoos : 1UB54 


AEGTetohmkw 
Allien vers 
Bad 
Beyer 

Ravar.HvML 

Bavar.Ver.Bank 

BMW 

C ornmerm u t A 

Canttgummi 

DaftirlerSanz 

Doouna 

Dautsctie Bobcoch 
DautscheBgnk 
Dresdner Bank. 
DUBSchuthe 
GHH 

Hochllef 

Haacfuf 

HOOSdl 

Halzmann 

Horten 

Kail + Sait 

Koniadi 

Kauffwf 

KHD 

KlaarfcnarWariit 


113 113 

1032 ion 

I BA30 I85J0 
196J9 19540 
317 318 
3MJ0 324 
34780 348J0 
1 68 U8 
121.40 119 

642 434 


358 360 

171 JO 172 
4105040280 

223 229 

16380 16680 
462 466 

mso 
395 


I Clove p rev. 

KruppStaftf 

S2JK 

43 




mtthonsa 

189 

184 

MAN 

15650 

1S9 

MonnnmBK! 

154 

154 

NvetaiiBaeiischaf 

248 

245 

flfluanch.Ruack 

1245 

1200 




HuttearsWerk* 

345 

345 



Scheiing 

47688 

478 

SI* mans 

547 54158 

Thwsen 

loo 

9070 

varto 

18630 18380 

Veha 

14870 

167 



Voflcswupenwerk 

19270 19470 j 


| Prevtoai ; 1.14A28 



II ******** l| 

Bk East Asia 

9AM 


amuna Kona 

>190 

1380 


lAsa 


Cross Harbor 


j® 

Hang Seng Bank 

4788 

4675 

HK Electric 

7.90 

785 

HK Hole- 1 4 

33 

3175 

HK Land 

480 

*325 

HK Shanghai 
, HK Telephone 

8.95 

4480 

845 

43 

HKWhart 

650 

615 


21 

*» *1 

jardbie Math 

8.75 


Jardtaesec 

885 

610 

New world 


570 

Shaw Bros 

Na 

NA 

SHK Praps 

980 

9.15 

Slrrw Dfl. -jy 

620 

690 

Stem* 

145 

149 

Swire Pacific A 

2*58 





wheetoefa 

440 

580 

whw 

*80 

4775 

World ln» 

120 

157 

Hang Saag Index : 

148693 1 

Prevfeas : UBC39 



I Bill, w WM nr 

- | | 

AECI 

ETKTlI 

Barters 

ml 1 1.; 

1 

Blyvaor 


■VTill 

Buffett 



Elands 


1 1- V /iB 1 

GF3A 

2575 1 

Harmony 


wZI' ’M m 

Kloof 

■ v.Vi 

K;.- J| 

Nrtocnk 

BQfi 


Pet Stem 


rip 

HMtPlOt 

■fMi 

1H0 



408 

SI Hetafid 


3150 

Sasot 

575 

575 

! Coawouta stock todm:tSU0 1 

| Previous ;7SUi 



[( Urtn { 


NA 390 
164 165 
273 27180 
1080 21180 
310 212 


21080 
210 _ .. 

ra 


AACaro 



.yora , 
jnGaia 


S 125 S srevt 

173 174 


509 

376 


385 

174 

235 

870 


U 7 

619 

51? 

385 

363 

250 

38 


174 

230 

472 


Brff Home Sf 

BrH Tatocam 

STR 

Burmoh 

Cadbury 5ctiw 

Charter Cons 

Coats Potorn 

Com Gala 

CourfuuMs 

Datoatv 

DeBeera* 

DldHIets 

Drtofanhrin 

Duntotr 

Pisans 

GKN 
Giaxo £ 

Grand Met 

Gukmass . 

GUS 

Hanson 

Hawker 

ICI 

Imps 

Ltoirtfs Bank 

Lonrho 

Lucas 

Marks and 5p 
Metal Bax 
MM land Bank 
not West Bank 
mtki natan 
Plassev 
Ratal EI*Ct 


Clem Pre> 
245 
126 
644 
217 
174 
205 
157 

nr 

142 
505 
487 
290 


294 


$24% S24W 
46 45W 


295 
S23 szrv. 


its 

190 

1146 

300 

235 

699 

209 

431 

85* 

200 

56* 

175 

252 

126 

410 

334 

669 

311 

172 

196 


196 

196 

11W 

*3 

23S 

707 

215 


176 

255 

I2S 

4TB 

337 

677 

311 

174 

196 


Rank 
Reed Inti 
Reuters 
Royal Dutch t 
KT2 
Shell 
STC 

5M Chartered 
Tot* and Lvte 
Tosco 
Thom EMI 
T.t. group 
TrertafoarHie 

Ultra mar 
Unilever c 
united Bhaiits 

VWwrs 

WDeep 
WXaMlnBS 
war Loan 3Mr£ 
eitaatwam 
ZCl 


193 *»2V7 

344 346 


S62 

348 


560 

345 


090^4963/64 
669 tn 

731 783 

192 19* 

499 502 

470 470 

238 237 

651 442 

238 242 

374 374 

149 MB 

206 2S2 

114*11 27/32 
214 2T7 

247 238 

3361* 336 

329V* 329 Vk 

35 34V4 

SB5 588 

17Vj 171* 


P.T. Index; 97986 
Provioin ; 98UO 


IPI 

Holcemenii 

Mediobanca 

M ontetHsan 

Olivetti 

PMMIJ 

RAS 

Rinmgante 

SIP 

Sola 

Stands 


18898 18260 
2900 2755 
7915 7289 
2250 3171 
11230 10888 
2710 2585 
SB SS 
4*10 42780 
7850 7730 
82500 80760 
86250 83990 
1569 1535 
6800 6718 
23M 2333 
73000 70490 
66280 640 
2205 2190 
2936 2920 
12090 11000 


MIS Index :1413 
Pray loos ;141B 


Paris 


Ah- LknAda 
Atothom All. 
AvDossoult 
Boncalra 
BIC 

Bouvgues 

B5N-GO 

Carretour 

aubMod 

CoHmeg 

Duma 

Elhkaullolna 

Europe 1 

Gen Eaux 

Hochette 

Imetal 

Lafarge Coo 

Leerand 

rOreal 

Aflat ra 

AAIehelln 

AAMPennar 

Moat Heimassv 

Maulknex 

Nord-Esl 

Qcddantala 

Pernod Rlc. 

Petrofas Cfael 
Peuaaoi 
Poefaln 


627 

225.90 

975 

605 

SAB 

642 


979 

574 


80 30 


259.90 299.90 


lain 
Printemps 
Rodtafectm 
Redoute 
Roussel udaf 


SourJ 

Telamacan 
Thomson CSF 
voteo 


2435 2*35 

491 500 

23980 245.10 


Agefl Index : V99J4 
Previous ; 199 « 
CAC Index : »M 
PreulDas : 20858 




Baustead 
CaU Storage 

DBS 

Fraser Neave 
Haw Par 


Keppei ship ' 
Mai Banking 
OCBC 
OUB 

Sen* Shipyard 
a me Darby 
S Steamship 
Si Trad tan 
UOB 


188 188 
258 156 

5.90 580 

5.10 110 

285 235 
149 152 

185 183 

5JQ 5.90 
9.15 93S 

4 196 
U7 186 

1.91 1.9] 

US 1.15 
688 446 

44* 482 


OUB index ;ILA. 
Pmhxis : 405.17 


Atartrhntm 


AGA 

AHaLOvOt 
a sea 


NA 370 
375 300 



Close Prev. 1 

Astra 

N.O. 

420 

Atlas Copco 

Ill 

114 

Baltaen 

173 

170 

Electrolux 

308 


Ericsson 

291 


Esseite 

340 

315 

Handel taken 

177 


Pharma eta 

205 

210 

Scob-Scanta 

NX}. 

NA 

Sandvlk 

395 


Skanska 

97 

N.O. 

SKF 

195 

194 

Swedisiwwatcn 

238 



NA 

272 

1 Aftarsvartden index ; 4H3g 1 

Prevlaas : 48340 



Si s y**y 1 

ACI 

194 



258 

260 


448 


BHP 

520 


Boral 

348 


Bougainville 

193 


Bramhtas 






Comolca 



CRA 

532 



292 

285 




Eiders ixl 

304 


Hooker 



Magellan 

235 



257 


Myer 



Oakbridge 



Peka 

437 


Poseidon 

280 


RGC 

390 


Santos 

550 


Si eta h 



Swmiand 

21 





Wormakl 

340 

343 

I Ail OnDnartas Index : 711 a 1 

Previous :7B5J0 



Source: Reuter*. 



II 1! 

Akei 

464 


Asanictwm 

670 

678 

AsdilGkm 

811 

875 

Banket Tokvo 

644 

*21 

Brtdgeslom 

S21 

52A 

Conan 

1420 

1400 

Cltah 

362 

330 

Dal Nippon Prim 



Dai wo House 

538 

541 

Fu|i Bar* 

1430 

13S0 

Full Photo 

1800 

1780 

FulHsu 

137C 

1370 

Hitachi 

885 

871 

Honda 

1460 

1450 


144 

146 

Japan Air Linos 

5150 

5300 

Kajima 

270 

Z71 

Kanxol Pavnar 

1310 

12H 

Kao Soon 

B16 

817 


Kawasaki Steal 
KJrtn Brewery 
Komatsu ltd 
KUtMia 

Matsu Elecinds 
Matsu Elec. Works 
NUtsubbAI Bank 
Mitsubishi diem 
Mitsubishi Elec 
Mitsubishi Heavy 
Mitsubishi Carp 
Mitsui and co 
Mitaukoahi 
Mfmmi 
NEC 

NKkoSac 
Nippon Steel 
Nippon Yuan 
Nissan 
Nomura Sac 
Olympus 
Ricoh 
Sharp 
Sony 

Sumitomo Bank 
Sumitomo Chem 
Sumitomo Metal 
Talsel Carp 
Talsha. Atarlne 
7dMdaC7ietn 
Tallin 

Tokyo Elec. Power 
Takva Marina 
Torav ind 
Toshiba 
Toyota 
Yamakhl Sec 


145 145 

581 580 

451 451 

320 325 

1610 1580 
&ta &40 
1420 1410 
*35 435 

399 399 

247 247 

518 516 

326 325 

4» 439 

Hen 1150 
1230 1190 
610 600 
U7 146 
24B 241 

603 683 

929 890 

1330 13*0 
na *99 
1070 1070 
44|0 6400 
1760 1690 
211 212 

146 145 

198 198 

-3B4 365 

*53 we 
432 435 

1510 1470 
725 707 

430 412 

435 430 

1330 1320 
403 509 




I Taranto 

Feb. 15 


NttkaMjJ. Index : 12,14029 
Prevtoa* : 1288189 


Pravtoos : 93188 


Bank Uv 

Brown Hover! 

Cl ha Getov 

Credit Suisse 

Etactrawatt 

Geora Fischer 

JpcobS ucnard 

Jebnafl 

LanatsGyr 

Nestle 

Oenikon-B 

Roche Baby 

Sandai 

ScMndler 

Sutter 


3700 3750 
ISM 1575 


Swissair 


union Bank 


2«H 2390 
2M0 2690 
.738 739 

6400 6400 
1«4S 1945 
1660 1650 
63W 6340 
1*95 1500 

era am 
TWO 7975 
3700 3700 
349 SO 
367 369 

H25 1120 

1495 1495 
3660 3*70 
«23 4260 
26350 20350 


available; xd: ox-dtvIdamL 


Japan Car Quotas Report Released 


United Press InKftutttondl 

WASHINGTON — Limiting 
the number of Japanese cars 
shipped to the United States sost 
American consumers SI5.7 billion 
between 1981 and 1984, a report by 
the UjS. International Trade Com- 
mission says. 

About $3.3 billion of that cost 
came in the form of higher prices of 
Japanese cam as a result of the 


trade restrictions, the agency said. 

The rest was due to higher prices 
of American-made cars. 

The report, released tins week, 
was requested by the House Ways 
and Means trade subcommittee. 

■ Under an agreement with the 
United States. Japan has limited its * 
exports of ears to the U.S. market 
to 1.68 million vehicles a year dur- 
ing 1981-1983- 


Cmadim stocks da AP 


MO Ac* lands 
110 AantcaE 
«oo Agra Ind A 
1830 Alt Energy 
2400 Alta Not 
3301 Atooma SI 
2360ATDCen 
26ArgtMCpr 
SOD Asbestos 
3U0Afcolf 
1781 BP Canada 
14320 Bonk BC 
23310 Bonk NS 
29838 Bwricka 
S3) Baton A f 
3902 Bonanza R 
6700 Bratome 
1360 Bratnatoa 
171*3 BCFP 
4024SBCR** 

19658 BC Phone 
33SDBrurawk 
tOlBQBuddCon 
36730 CAE 
SOOCCLA 
9MCad Prv 
10300 c Nor West 

ZlBCPodU-5 

*110 Can Trust 
..500 C Tara 
18163 Cl Bk Com 
700 Cdn Nat Res 
85804 CTI re At 

sasacutiiB 
14900 Cara 
2S00Celanese 
100 Cotan 175 P 
31MCDtetaA 

3200CDIStbfif 
10BW CTL Bank 
lMOC o nvenlra 
WcormratA 
457g Coseko R 
42Q0CanronA 
26757 CrawTUt 
34900 Czar Res 
(180901 Dean Dev . 
SQOODaonA 
6512 Den fannA 
5513 Denison Bf 
M00 Dowel con 
7400 DtefcAm A f 
lSDDDIcfcnsn B 
1915 Daman A 
M34 DotaSOa A 
2506 Du Poof A 

6482Dv1ex A 
7910 Eldhom X 
S 130Q Em« 

1800 Eaultv Sur 
_!*00 FCA inn 
30800 C Fcriam C 
mo Ptanbrdoe 
200 Pert/ Res 
4*50 Fed Ind A 
40D Pad non 


Mtak Low Close Cttoe 
Sir *7 17 — it 


51395 131* 13V* 

5697 61* 6W— V. 

520 19*. 19b- b 

815V* 15V* 15V*- to 
S22U. 21 Mi 22S4 


514 13V* 1346- b 

141 140 141 +4 

$16% 1644 169* + to 
405 , 400 400 — S 

$516 514 516 

517b 17M 1734— to 
511*1 1144 1144— It 
263 252 252 —13 

52216 7Ht 2Zto+ <6 
5154* 154* 1SH 
S22 21b 21b 

517 16b 16b— 16 

5261* 26V* 26 to — 16 
•SI 5V. ISto 15V* 

S24to 1 At 24V*— K> 
*30 DO 30 
532 3144 32 — to 

516 15V* 151*— T 

5314* 31to 3T4fc— to 
26 26 26 — 3W 

SIOV* 10'A 1016— to 

517 74M 17 
511V* lilt III* 

574* TV* 71* — 14 
11716 1716 17V, 

56b 64* *44+ V* 

56b 616 6b 
5114* 1116 1116— Mi 
495 495 495 +25 

584* 84* 84*+ 4* 

270 265 865 

512b 13V* 124*+ to 
5171* 1716 I7V6 + Vk 
174 "■ 

335 
305 


Hlah Iwram O W 


1121 Mcrtond E 
TOSJMalsooAf 
2D00MalsonB 


300 Murphy 
77001 


NattiscoL 
33679 Naranda 
1728 Norcen 
268854 Nva AHA f 
5566 Nowsca W 


425 415 GSj * S 

5164* 164* 1648— j* 
516b 1616 16V»— •*“ 
S7144 21b 21b: ■ 
E26V* 251* »»!-» 
5194* 19b IMfc- 1* 
5141* 14b 14b 
$7b 7 7 --'5 

5214* 21b 214*+ V* 
53 50 50 -3 


Peo-;^ 


3 
15 

■- Siv.sian 
u 

o 1~ 
-- J 


aa 

8B8 

838 

819 

443 

J14 


518 

17b 

18 + b 

700 Oak wood 

55 

495 

495 J- 

Sllto 

IK* 


39Q04 Ostiawa A f 


24b 

25 - 




IXOPDirawr 


445 

470 

Sffto 

8b 

Sto 

250 Pan Con P 

S28 

20 

2S~ 

SZ7b 

27 


2100 Phonlx Oil 

S7b> 

7b 

ri~. 

P.U 

54* 

4 

10050 Pine Point 

527V* 

271* 

Z71* + 


.693 
.481 

4St 
31 415 

s: cm 

to n* 


sw 

tCPU 

ssb 


169 

]74 + 4 . 

305 

335 +25 

90S 

305 +5 

li 

is —to 

I4to 

141 * — to 

9to 

10 

w* 

5to 

iw. 


275 

273 

Wt 

27b— to 

171k 

17b— to 


3406 F aty Fin 
347* Genius A 


2918 0 Geoc Camp 
73988 Caacrudp 
nooGthrotiar 
BBSoGoMcarpt 
556 Goodyear 
|0D Grandma 
1000 Gr endue 
15 s GL Forest 
®3 Greytind 
2800 Hrd Ing At 
2200 Hawker 
WhoybD 

1800 h Bay Cfa 

rmimasca 

310Olndol 

7is intaivj Gas 
367001 aft Thom 
2469 Inter PIm 
9ao iveeoB 
1090 Jannack 

S60Kam KBtte 
«?*CCTTAdtf . 
19450 L«an 
12419 Lac Mints 
2400 LOnt Cam 
14250 Uxona 
225 LL Lac . 
MHLaMawCa 
9500 Mice - - 
2900 Artr&ffl H K 


5371ft Wh 367*— V* 
5646 Ok iVl-f-Vs 
SW* 17V* Mto+1 

S74* 7b 7b 

*311* 21 21b+ b 

51 ?. 181* 19 + b 

SW44 93 93V* 

2S6 256 2S6 -4 
522 21b 2198+ 16 

521 Vi 2JVS 271* 

112 lib 12 + Vfc 
5271* 27V* 27V* 

Sill* UH* 11V*+ Mi 
2« 248 360 +15 
51IHCI 9b 9b- I* 
SSV* 5J6 5Vi 
saw 40v* + 1 * 
49 49 49 -4 

45 45 45 +2 

5881* 88 88V*- Vi 

52516 2Sto 2Sto— (* 

130 130 130 
522b 221* 22V* + I* 
825b 25 25b— V* 

5W6 18 18—46 

55491 53b 5396— 4* 
514b 14b 14to— to 

514 16 16 

Wto 9 991+ V* 

o» law 334*. 

521 21 21 + V* 

5121* T2b in*— to 
104 HM 104—1 
ST7 164* 17 — b 
92546 25Vk ISto- to 
5289* 28to 2816 
5114* 11V* 11 to— 16 
510b 10b tab ' 
S30to 30to 30to— M 

ffjrjr+A 

m 


riVILD 8FW u 

54058 Placer 
1052 PtovIbo 
2700 Que Shirs 0 
1 too Royrnc* J 
2110 Radaalh 
>7681 Rd Slenha A 
WK> RekhhoM 
30000 Res 5erv f 
199 Revn Pep A 
1200 Rosen A 
100 Rothman 
isroseentre 
: Soirtsf 
2470 Sears Can 
8921 Shell Can 
28817 Sherrltt 

700 Sterna 
3900 stater BI 
7005outtim 
nostBrodcst 
ZTl^SfviooA 
MOO So Intro 
.7100 Sleep R 
36600 Svtoieyo 
MOTalcarp 

900 Tare 

2Q0Teck Car A 
4225 Tack BI 
mTrnxGon 
1*750 Thom N A 
42155 Tor Dm Bk 
4393 Torsfar Bf 
20682 Traders A I 

400 T ms Ml 

1300 Trinity Res 
13864 TmAtta UA 
16096 TrConPL 
19620 Trtnwc 
S72TrtzecAf 
seoo Turbot 
2550 Unicorn A t 
750UnCarbW 
69430 U Entprisa 
20790 U Kona 
UWUSfett* 
1000 Vvi Dor. 
45MVenti a 1 
900 Vestured 
aaoweMwad 
600 Westfortg 
95S0 WwJmln 
lOOWestnhM 
7920 Wooten 


114 ... 

S25W 25 


-15 1 9 . 


- •* •» 

„ „ vr* 1 U.I- . i . !M5U 

3 » w ■ v, 7 J? J*® 1 ' 01 * 

..... T4 ^ 

ns m iB + s L. r M a 

105 

sSfc 42b 

RNV 1PV 
SSVU 8. 

S23S* 23 By*” 

**b Bto. Jto, u. Sets. 

846- M*r-£ 'W at r 


5144* 14b 1{b< B 
— 183 T85 / 5 

IQS ~ 


5to »*r Jf ^ ,c._ ‘ ++ 21 




1Tb 2-iS .. » » 0 u 

7} (//'.' -'"'"wn.Thom, 

fss MSS* 


'cr,- ; t 4ao «0« 

' <Saamtra 


n 
» ji 


e 

32 29 


W 26 


m n!‘ n! ‘ . 

l SL*?» 1 Vs tip „ 

faa. ll Mfl ^SSsivajr 

.2538 Yk Bear 511Vi 11% * pf Wch. 

a. 


PQ. 


TSEIM Index: 


^6M40 


M uu tr ral 


52435 Bank Mont 
20100 CIL 
lOOZConBafh 
10854 DamTktA 
3500 MnITrst 
76SU NatBkCda 
11114 Power carp 
342»IMtanM .. 
S2498 Roval Bank 
12539 RoyTrstco 
TOSStetabrgA 



iijto • is J |Si 2 

SS5 

ST .ftfir; 

arw*? s 


Total Soles M72A97 shores. 

am . 

.13020 - ...I® 5 * 




indea lr ta ls Index: 









Swiss Finish 1-2 
In Giant Slalom 


. VP 
SK 

-■ ■ V '■' 




IteAoocte 


P- 

i -4 


The North Stars and Red Wings in a Imnri that emerged on Detroit’s bench. 

Stars and Wings Tie , On and Office 


The Associated Pros 


Sonmor. Elis target? Detroit's in- sion and was taken to a hospital for 


DETROIT — The Minnesota jured goalie, Greg Stefan, who observation. 


orth Stars and Detroit Red wasn’t even in uniform. 


* Wings fought to a draw Thursday “You eel a mv in street dnth« troit Coach Nick Pohmo. The two 

=9“?”* ■ , ■^'ta&SPlE taSf^S' fg to »« «*»«* 

__ As the first period ended with Nick was all right,” Sonmor 

F^-^Dctroit leading 3-1, Minnesota’s said with a smil e. “He was saying, 

sWifli Plett and the Red Wings' NHL FOCUS- - • ■ ‘Glen, we’re too old fa this.’ * 

~=-. 7 ^ 3 reg Smith, who had tangled eani- Referee Ron Wicks, who handed 


>t to a draw Thursday 
l the coaches. 


Sonmor was intercepted by Do* 


[> - ’ : H in the period, squared off again 

• O the teams left the ice. Both 
’-^5 - Reaches emptied and the brawl 
.^1** -ta31ed into the Detroit botch, 
i 1 ' | where the Wings’ Danny Garc and 


^ -u “Nick was all right,” Sonnw 

■ said with a smile. “He was saying, 

NHL FOCUS • ‘Glen, we’re too old fa this.’ * 

Referee Ron Wicks, who handed 

punching oar players, and out six fi ghting penalties earlier in 
Link Pm going to watch the period, issued two majors, two 
’re crazy” said Sonmor, misconducts and six game ndscon- 
led from, his bench and ducts and qcctcd Somnor and Ste- 


The Associated Press 

KRANJSKA GORA, Yugosla- 
via — Switzerland's Thomas. 
BQigler woo his second giant sla- 
lom ski race of the season Friday, 
rallying to defeat teammate PLrann 
Ziubriggcn by one-hundredth of a 
second. 

Bthgler, fifth after the first run, 
completed two trips down the 
course in 2 minutes. 10 J I seconds. 
Zurbriggen, the first-round leader, 
was timed in 2: 10.22 while Marc 
Girardelli of Luxembourg took 
third in 2:10.42. 

Zurbriggen, the defending 
World Cup overall champion, col- 
lected 20 points fa bis finish to 
boost his season total to 207. 

Girardelli, the overall leader at 
215, didn’t add to his total despite 
the third-place finish. UndeT 
World Cup scoring rales, a racer 
counts only Iris top five finishes jn 
each discipline, ™ Girardelli al- 
ready had three victories and two 
seconds before today’s giant sla- 
lom. 

Sweden’s Ingem ax Stenmark, 
who has the most World Cup ca- 
reer victories, finished fourth in 
2: 10.45, his best giant slalom result 
of the season. The winner of 79 
races — inehidfng 42 giant dalnmc 
— in 11 previous seasons, the 28- 
year-old Slemnark has yet to win in 
this, probably his last year on the 
tour. The three- time overall cham- 


pion is ninth overall thk season 

- with 103 points. 

■ Rok Petrovic of Yugoslavia was 
"fifth in 2: 10.47. 

-. The mbttnte of artificial and nat- 
ural snow seemed to favor early 
"starters. Zurbriggen, the first start- 
er, led the field after the first beat 
with an intermediate time of 
3:03.75. Bthgler, first down k tls 
second heat, was clocked in 
1.-06.05, fastest fa the afternoon 
. run. 

Robert Erlacfaer of Italy was 
sixth, Began Krizaj of Yugoslavia 
seventh, Ricardo Pramotton of Ita- 
ly eighth, Yugoslavia’s Jure Franko 
ninth and Joergen Sundqvist of 
Sweden 10th. 

. Zurbriggen, gold medalist in the 
do wnhill and me fyimhmrd in the 
recently completed world Alpine 
ski championships, was somewhat 
handicapped by a bandaged right 
hand. He hurt the hand during 
Thursday’s downhill race at Bad 
Kleinkiichheim, Austria, when he 
slammed it into the icy slope to 
keep himself from falling. 

Girardelli skied strongly, but 
trussed any chance of scoring 
pcants in the race when he slipped 
slightly just before the end of his 
second run. 

“This course is very short,” stud 
Petrovic. “It’s like being on a 
string , and if you make a small 
mistake; you are pulled back.” 



tUIing ' *nnrim«d Tt— 

Thomas BQrgfer defeated teammate Pinmn Zmtasgen by one-hundredth of a second. 

sn he _ 

pe to 

•«& Scotland Gears Up for France 

ipped 1 tf 


i> |«here the Wings’ Damry Garc and tried to get at Stef an after what he fan. After thing? quieted down, the 
. M Vfinnesota’s Dino Gccarelli ex- termed a “sucker punch” on Ton teams battled to a 5-5 tie, thanks to 
yiianged blows. McCarthy. McCarthy reportedly third-period goals 52 seconds apart 

- ' Eater Minnesota’s coach, Glen had three facial cats and a concur by Minnesota’s Brian Bdlows and 


ttSSSs Celtics Thrash SuperSonics 


McCarthy. McCarthy reportedly third-period goals 52 seconds apart 
had three facial cats and a concur by Minnesota’s Brian Bdlows and 


SPORTS BRIEFS 


jf Navratilova and Evert to Break Tie . 

* * " DELRAY BEACH, Florida (UPI) — Martina Navratilova and Chris, 
vert Lloyd are about to break the deadlock. The two stars of women’s 
* amis, who are 31-31 in bead-to-fcead matches, will meet Saturday in die 
I /naic of the International Players tennis rfuunpionship - 
, k Evert, seeded second, rallied Thursday to beatunseeded Steffi Graf of 
■latest Germany, 6-4, 6-2. Evert trailed, 1-4, in the first set but won the next 

- Bght games. Navratilova, the top seed, won her semifinal matehm similar 
"jshion, racing to stop Carimg Bassett of Canada, seeded 10th, 6-3, 6-3. 

• Tiedfor Lead in San Diego Golf 

LA JOLLA, California (API — - Gary HaHbetg, Howard Twiny, 
zr7 — tunmy Valentine and Don Poafeyled a barrage of sub-par rounds with 
under 64s Thursday and tied fathefim-romid lead at the San Diego 

f\ wpen-gplf tournament. ‘ ’ i : ; 

s~ Two-thirds of die 155 players bettered par in the first round, and it 
t - ppeared as thoegh a two-round scoe of 140 or better — 4 under par — 

right be required to make the car fa the final two rounds. Brace iietz k e, 

- - - tevePate, Loren Roberts, Gene Littier and Vance Heafner were tied one 

V N I<a#65.— 1 — t— •*“— - J "- • 

SCOREBOARP ~ 

' Basketball 


Goodie Roberts. 

In other National Hockey 
League games, it was Washington 

4, Calgary 3; Philadelphia 6 , Que- 
bec 3; Chicago 5, Pittsburgh 4; 
Hartford 4, New Jersey 0; SL Louis 

5, Toronto 3, and Boston 3, Los 
Angeles 3. 

Polano was more upset with his 
players fa Mowing a 3-1 lead than 
he was with Sonina. Detroit actu- 
ally held a 3-0 lead on first-period 
goals by Ivan Boldirev, Ron Du- 
guay and John Ogrodnick before 
Minnesota rallied. 

“After everything was taken 
aside, h seemed Kite they were the 
better hockey team,” Polano said. 
“We seemed to slide after the 
fight” 

After Duguay gave the Red 
Wings a 5-3 lead with his second 
goal of the game at 11:45 of the 
final period, Roberts converted 
Dennis Marak’s centering pass at 
14:27 and Bellows beat goalie Cor- 
rado Mkalef from the slot fa his 
seeowFgoal trf the game-at-ttrlfc ■ 


Transition 


Standings 


■ASTERN CONFERENCE 
Attonttc DMIH 




w L 

PcL 

GB 

■:3Etan 

42 10 

JM 

— 

. nJkKMdilo 

41 10 

JO* 

ta 

.oMnaton 

28 25 

_S28 

UM 

-nr Jeremy 

25 27 

4*1 

17 . 

*w Yortc 

11 25 

-340 

34 ft 


Ctatrcl Dtateoa 
34 17 

479 

— " 

4tratt 

31 20 

408 

4 

, -40000 

25 25 

300 

Wr 

-■-lanta 

22 30 

423 

13 Vj 

-avaland 

16 35 

JI4 

19 

. dkna 

14 34 

JOB 

19ta 

V WESTERN CONFERENCE 

■C . MMMut Division 

twor 33 20 423 



ntawl 

JttI# 

V. Clipper* 
Men State 


postal SO 21 sn 7 

, dlae a » SB A 

."'n Antonio 27 25 £19 SVi 

ah' 24 W MU Kh 

nras Otv 14 35 JU 14 

ndAc DtvUloa 

V Latere 34 U Ml — 

WlltK 25 27 .481 11 

mono 23 21 .451 12Ki 

JttI# 22 31 ^15 MM 

V. Clipper* 21 31 JM 15 

Men state 11 48 .214 2IKi 

THURSDAY’S RESULTS 
ttanukee SI 21 24 31 U-133 

Son » 34 23 32 14— 12* 

-uonertef 12-255-7 29. Pnawv 7-15 W-12 24 
munlnat 10-264524; KeUen W-151VM31, 
•ponovKSi 10*12 40 24. R eheewa t ; MIKmw- 
e 54 (Uttar 12); lodtana 41 fKellooa, SM- 
newteh 13). Ante: Milwautee 25 (Pnra- 
s. MoncrM 4); Indiana 27 (Williams 7). 
entail 3MB »— iu 

m Yorlt 23 30 21 23— W 

Mailman 1020 10-11 3a UaVd 10-18 4-1024; 
no 14-37 1-4 29. Cummins* 8-14 44 2a'R»- 
md*: Houston 73 (Olahnvon 25): New York 
(Ournmlties n. Assists: Houston 34 
«Crw 7 >; mow York 28 fSoarrow 8). 
«nr n 44 B 23-138 

nsas dtv 29 21 27 34—122 

Sn«lbt>i54l 3-4 33. Natr 1221 5 4 29; Drew 
170-0 3a Theue 9-182-3201 Thorpe 7-1024 14. . 
sansno M 44 14. Reteoodt: Denver 55 
BITS); Kansas aty 50 1 Johnson. Thompson, 
orpe 4). Assists: Denver 39 (Hmztlk 10); 
m Otv 32 (Them 7). 
oeoBc 27 M 25 24-181 

i Aeitanta 27 23 35 94—331 

■enrta mb 4-42CMUehell 9-142-320; Nance 
15-719, Davie 8-14 2-2 ML Rteee n d t; Phoe- 
45 (Clones 7)i San Antonio 40 <CooK9l. 
Ms: Ptiaenix29 (Oavta 7); San Antanta 37 
nom 15). 

ta 38 24 32 2S— 118 

Me 25 2S 23 21— N 

tcHhla 1 1 -17 *-» 2*. PorHh S-U-L530; SJfcma 
■14524. Horataraon 7-104419. RsO ooed s : 

. Jon 55 IBM 13); SoaHta 39 (Chambers 
VMLSncma 7). Assists: Boston 33 (Bird 8); 
ttle 28 (Hondenon M). 


: .S. GoHege Results 

EAST 

aware St 79. Morgaa-St 77, OT 
■rMgft Dickinson 49. St Frauds, Pa 44 
a 47, Armv 45 
nhall 81. E. Tsnn. St 59 
sy 81, American U. Cl 
1 w St 7a Geo. Washington 47 
tan 47. Duo u e s no 59 
Josootrs. Pa 44. Massachusetts 51 
acute 94. Setan Hall 42 
net* 7K Rhode I stand 40 
SOUTH 

orn St 9a S* Carolina St 75 
mcsi 4X VMJ 58 
. ihdana St 87, Tennessee 82 
^ittlana Tedt 80TSW UxMona, 74 OT 
, - tanond 7t Radford 42 . .. 
mote 7& LvMttwv » 
ten 77. TaUadeRd 44 
oMa 84, RolHne 39 

- GeonMa 7a LMnsston 59 

. Kentucky 47, & Florida 41 
MIDWEST 
wit 44, M m tti wteta n i 42 
;; ugai 54. law sa 
o SL 72, Indiana 43 
o WtastaYM 7h Case ReMrvo 15. ■ 

- due 47, Wlsconsta S 
UtooisTAJwfloBa Sttt . . 


SOUTHWEST 
Arkansas 4a Texas 51 
Arkansas SL 41, TexaeArtlnatnn 40 
FAR WEST 

Brtatiam Young 77. Cotarado 51. 69 
Fresno St. 61. Hew Mexico St S3 
Hawaii 73, New Mexico 48 
Idaho SL 95, US. IglL 53 
Mo nh x ej Tech 7t CarralL Mont S3 
Nevada- Reno 59, Montana Si. 48 
K. Arizona 74, Montan o 72 
Oregon 7a Wateinstan <4 
Orison St 49, Washington St 49 
PocttTc 44. Lana Beach Si. 57 
Poppenflno 49. Gonzaaa SS 
Portland 83* Cant. Wash in gton 45 
Son Diooo St 7a Tmat-EI Pan -43 
Seattle Pacific 83. Al as ko-Anchoroge 79 
5outhem Cal 74 Arizona St 40 
Utah », Air Force 45 
Utah sr. 73, Foiierton St. 43 
W. Texas St. 4a Illinois SL 44 
Whitman 95, Akaka-Janeau 84 


I Hockey 
IVHL Standings 

WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick DtatUta 



W L 

T 

PtS 

GF 

GA 

Vttnhinotan 

35 

15 

8 

78 

244 

171 

PhUadtipMa 

32 

14 

7 

71 

233 

173 

M.Y. Istandtn 

1 30 

22 

3 

43 

253 

215 

N.Y. Rann 

17 

29 

9 

43 

191 

227 

Pittsburgh 

18 

30 

5 

41 

190 

343 

Now Joraov 

17 

30 

7 

41 

T83 

222 


Adams 

□fritted 




Buftalo 

27 

15 

12 

46 

202 

152 

Montreal 

V 

19 

K 

44 

214 

187 

buobec 

24 

23 

8 

40 

226 

2B5 

Boston 

' . 35 

24 

8 

58 

212 

202 

Hartford 

18 

30 

4 

42 

184 

341 

CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 



Norris Dtataton 




SL Lout* 

24 

» 

ia 

62 

213 

384 

CMcago 

24 

28 

3 

55 

223 

219 

Minnesota 

14 

29 

11 

43 

192 

227 

Dotrott 

16 

31 

W 

42 

288 

248 

Toronto 

13 

34 

7 

31 

174 

342. 


Sntvfte Dtrittan 


■ : 

Edmonton 

48 

10 


« 

283 

185 

Winn ipsa 

29 

23 

4 

64 

251 

2S2 

Cataarv 

28 

22 

7 

63 

259 

234 

Lot Angolas 

24 

22 

11 - 

W 

253 

240 

Vancowar 

14 

33 

8 

40 

194 

291 

THURSDAY’S RESULTS . ' 


Hartford 




0 

i : 

1—4 

n#w Jemv 




6 

8 1 

1-0 


CHICAGO— Signed Daryl Boston, octfkKd- 
er, and Ra nd y W arn raw Bab FoUoa and Bin 
Landrum, PltdiffL 

National Leagat 

CINCINNATI— Signed Tom Folev, InfleM- 
er. » a one-y e ar contract and Dm Porker, 
outfielder, to a three-year contract extension. 

LOS ANGELES— Announced that Mike 
Sdoecfa. catcher, wen Ms salary ort W n i Hcn 
cose. 

NEW YORK— Announced that Doug Sisk, 
anchor, lost Mi salary arbitration me 

PHILADELPHIA— Announced the retire- 
meal of Too McGrow, pitcher. Announced 
that Jerry Koosman. pitcher, last Ms salary 
arbitration cm o. 

SAN DIEGO— Readied a c ont ro cl agree- 
ment wttfc Eric Show, pitcher. 

FOOTBALL 

Canadian Feotttel Lsuoue 

LEAUGE— Named Dan Barter director at 
officiating and Ndl Payne assistant ifirector 
at offldattna. 

MONTREAL— Signed Dwight Bingham 
and Freddy Rogers, defensive linemen. 

Notional Football League 

BUFFALO— Named Art Asseito light end 
coocn and Bab Laahv roctavor coach. 

PHILADELPHIA— Homed MIK Jackson 
rumlaa backs coach. 

SEATTLE — Announced the resignation of 

8*la in ■ ■■ ■! ■ .. mm ■ - - - - — «- - 

r * wA ifu. mimBiva umruinaiur. 

Named Kent Steohonson offensive lino axich. 

Udta SBOes Football Leasee 

ARIZONA— Signed Billy Compfiekt rav 
Mna bate. 

HOCKEY 

National Hockey Leone 

N.Y. ISLANDERS— Asotarad Todd Lum- 
borOLgoaltendtr.ta i mfianapolls of the inter- 
national Horicev League. 

COLLEGE 

BALL STATE— Named Joe Racers track 
and cross country axich. 

WOOSTER— Named Bab Tucker head foot- 
ball coate 


World Cm 


(15). Stott aa goal; Hartford (on Resdi) 6-14- 
9—39; Now Jersey (on W eek s ) 4-7-4— 1 9. . 
q reb ec ■ 2 1-3 

PM tadeta hlo * 1 »-* 

Kerr 2 (45), Prwp (30). Sutter (9), SMsato 
(30, Craven 07); Lrmleux (5), P. Stately 
(241, Suave (8). Stott an goM: Quebec [on 
LteSwreft) 4-4-10—32; PMloMsrta (an Bou- 
chard) 14-6-14— M. 

UiMudo 113 6—5 

Detroit 3 116-5 

OOet(3).Acte> (U).Betlows2 (21 1, Roberts 
«4l; Boldhav 07), Dueuav2 (22).oeradn)ck 
(37).Trader (2).SMttoageel: Minnesota (on 
Menton 7-12-14-1 — 34; Detroit (on Metoche] 
9-4 9- 1 — «L 

Toronto 1 1 1—* 

St tool* 1 * •“* 

Sutler (29),GUtnour (15), PeflerstanJ (20); ■ 
Ihnacok (l71.Valve (28),Frycer (24).Stolsoa 
goal; Toronto (on Wamstay) 10-7-7—34; St. 
Louis (on SL Croix. Wregaet) 9-196-34. 
Pt ltsto re h * 1 *-* 

OUcogw 2 3 * 

Yoromdwk (9). Frmriey 2 (4). T. MixTOV 
(19), OCalUian (4); Young (22). Lemtoux 2 
( 34 J.ChatxdW). Shots engooi: Pltfshurte (on 
Boonerman) 14-HM— 38 ; OiIobo (on Romo- 
no) 1J-KH6-39.. , , _ 

WbteiegtM * . ZZ 

Calgary 8 3 6—3 

aaitaan (23). Adams Ul.Caraantar 2 (44); 
Beers (IB)', Tombed mi (15). Earn (13). Shots 
on eoafc WM 8 W9II (on Edwards) 7-6-1S- 
29; Catery (an Rlggin) 10-165-31. 

Boston ■ l 2 6-3 

I p i engsln 6 8 8 6—3 

MkttKotoa (20). (YConnofl (15), Simmer 
(27);l9teino (34), Kelly (7). Stott 5151. Stats 
ga goal: Boston (on Ella*) W44-2); Las 
Angelas (ea Keans) 10-11-5-2—28. 


MBITS GIANT SLALOM 
(At Kronlsfca Gara. Yugoslavia) 

L Thomas BOreler, Swttzartand. 2 minutee, 
1R2! seconds. 

2. Plrmln Zurbriggen, Swttzarland. 2:1022. 
1 Marc GtranMU, Luxembourg. 2:1042. 

A ingemar Stenmark, Sw e d e n . 2:1045. 

5 Rok Petrovic. Yugoslavia, 2:1047. 

A Robert Erioeher, Italy. 2:1099. 

. 7. Bulan Krtzat Yugoslavia 2:11.10 

6 Ricardo Pramotton. Italy. 2:1148. 

9. Jure Franko. Yuooelavto. 2:1149. 

- -10. Jun wen Sundmrtst. Sweden. 2:11.78. 

' II. -Alex GtaroL Italy. 2:11Jn. 

12. Hans Pleren, Switzerland, 2:1204. 

IX Hans Erm, Austria. 2:1212 

14. Max Juten. Switzer tend. 2:1254. 

15. Boris StraL Yugoslavia. 2:1244. 

IX Hubert Strote Austria, 2:1297. 

17. Ivene CamezzL Italy. 2:1298. 

U. Franck Ptacara. France. 2:IX1X 
19. Joel Game. Switzerland, 2:1X27. 
m Guenther Modar. Austria, 2:1352 

ZL Thomas Stangotofnaer. Austria. X'1359. 
22. Ernst Rledataperaar. Austria, 2:1X81. 

’ ZL Helm Halter. Italy. 2:1345. 

24. Jonas Nltason, Sweden. 3:1X91 

MEN'S OVERALL STANDINGS 

- 1. GirarOMU. 215 Points 

X Zurbriggen. 307 

. X Andreas Wenzal. Liechtenstein. 172 
A Franz H el n zer, Switzerland. 132 
X Peter Muller, Sw itzerland. 128 
A BlbBler. 125 

7. Helmut Heeflelmer. Austria 113 
X Peter Wlmsberger, Austria 111 
9. Staftmarh. 103 
in. KrtmL9? 

Tl. Marlin Hanoi. Switzerland, 93 
12 Peter Luesteer, Swltzerfand. 92 
JX Julen, 84 

U Oswald Tottte Italy. 82 

IX (tletf) Markus wbamaler. west Germany. 

and £nn, Pramotton, Erfocher, 74 

19. Paolo de CMesa. Italy. 78 

20. Karl Alafoer. Switzer lard. 5> 

ZL Mlenaal Main Italy. 3 

22. AMon Steiner. Austria 3 
2X Nitasoa 54 

24. (tied) Conradbi Cattlemen. Swftre rl c n d, 
and Daniel Matirar, Swttzertond. 3 


United Press International 

SEATTLE— The Bosun Celtics 
turned Tuesday’s embarrassment 
into Thursday's good fortune. 

“We got hurt in Portland and we 
had to make sure we made up far it 
here,” said K.C. Jones, the Critics’ 

NBA FOCUS 

coach, after his team beat the Seat- 
tie SuperSonics, 110-94. Thmsday 
night. 

“We woe ready for this game,” 
said Kevin McHale, who led the 
Critics with 26 points. “The loss to 
Portland was disappointing. We 
exeented better tonight. We played 
hard.” 

On Tuesday, the TYai] Blazers 
jumped on the Celtics, opening a 
26-point lead in the first half en 
route to handing Boston its 10th 
loss of the sesaoa 

Against the Socks, Boston ran 
off 13 straight points in the final 
minings of the first quarter and 
opening minutes of the second pe- 
liodtoimadran-n-pointleadL 


Boston look over sole possession 
of first place in the Atlantic Divi- 
sion. with the victory over Seattle. 
The Critics 42-10 record is a half- 
game better than Philadelphia's. 

Elsewhere in the NBA, it was 
Milwaukee 132, Indiana 128; Den- 
ver 138, Kansas City 123; San An- 
tonio 131, Phoenix 102. and Hous- 
ton 113, New York 10S. 

Cedric Maxwell scored 18 points 
in the first half but also picked up 
two technicals and was gected 
from the game with one minnte left 
in the second quarter. 

Seattle dosed the gap to 54-50 at 
halftime. Boston ran off a 14-6 
scoring burst in the opening min- 
utes of the third quarter to tak* 
control of the game. 

' Larry Bird, who finished with 18 
points and 13 rebounds, sooted 
eight points doling the period as 
the Celtics opened up an 86-73 
lead. 

Seattle never challenged in the 
fourth period. The Soaks, losers of 
seven of their last nine, were led by 
Jack Simka, who tossed in 24 
“points. ■ ‘ 


By Bob Donahue 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — It is 16years since 
Scotland last won a Five Nations 
rugby match in Pans, and veteran 
flanker David Leslie says he did 
not accept the captaincy with the 
idea of presiding this Saturday over 
an eighth consecutive Scottish de- 
feat away against France. “Flaring 
the French in Paris is a hurdle ,’ 1 the 

FIVE NATIONS RUBGY 

new captain said after a frigid final 
training session Fridav morning, 
“but I like challenges.”’ 

French premonitions varied. An 
apparent minority of insiders 
feared a combination of Scottish, 
spirit and dispirited French mis- 
takes. More numerous seemed to 
be those trusting in coach Jacques 
Fouroux to fire up his experienced 
team after its comedy of errors in a 
9-9 draw with revamped England 
at Twickenham on Feb. 2. 

Fouroux’s buildup theme is re- 
venge for the 21-12 upset by Scot- 
land in Edinburgh last March, 
when both teams reached the last ■ 
of the five Saturdays undefeated. 
A lopsided penalty count influ- 
enced the result in the home team’s 
favor and left unusual French bit- 
terness. 

A Scottish theme is winning at 
the rebuilt Parc des Princes stadi- 
um for the first time. Scotland won 
in suburban' Colombes in 1969, boi 


1 
* . 
i- s* 


David Leslie 


it lost there in 1971 and has lost on 
aD six rials to the Paris stadium, 
starting in 1973. France’s Five Na- 
tions. record at the new Parc des 
Princes is 20 matches won. one 
drawn (with England in 1974) and 
three lost (to Wales in 1975 and to 
England in 1980 and 1982). 

A Wuntfgt of straw was protect- 
ing the Paris tnrf against frost as' 
biting cold continued Friday: 

Snow in Cardiff forced ■ post- 
ponement on Thursday of the other 
match due this weekend, Wales vs. 
England. A new date remained to 
be set With normally scheduled 
Five Nations matches due on 
March 2 (Ireland vs. France. Scot- 
land vs. Wales) and March 16 (En- 
gland vs: Scotland, Wales T&rlhe-' 









•'Vv- 

i- .1 

•V* 

m 
% . m +¥ 








Me* 


■ mm , 

Head first and headed for the treacherous Shuttlecock Bend: They admit they are crazy and want no due. 

A Midwinter Madness in St. Moritz 


By Donald Nordberg 

Hewers 

ST. MORITZ, Switzerland — 
Whatever their nationalities, they 
are all eccentric “Englishmen 5 ’ 
when they ride the Cresta Rim. 

For 100 years, the members of 
the Sl Moritz Tobogganing Qnb 
have been risking fife and Hmh 
for the pleasure of sliding down 
1.212J5 meters (3,970 feet) of ice 
with only the vaguest semblance 

of control 

They give themselves prizes for 
success and failure. They admit 
they are crazy and want no core. 
And they politely resist all efforts 
to turn their lunacy into a real 
world sport. 

For two weeks this month they 
met in Sl Moritz to celebrate the 
centenary of the Cresta Run. 

In the early days, the riders 
vm the fastest men on earth. 
From the top, past the junction, 
through the bends and over the 
leap to the finish, they reach 
speeds as high as 140 kph (87 
mh). 

Their sleds, virtually un- 
changed io design since 1907. are 


Others, like Tony Emerson, a 
Lincolnshire farmer, get hooked. 

“It’s a drag,” he said. Emerson 
won the Bott’s Handicap Cup 
this year, his first victoiy in a 
major competition after 12 years 
of riding the Cresta. 

Julian Board, honorary trea- 
surer of the club ntid a mild-man- 
nered London accountant off the 
slope, said the membership roll 
— about 950 names, only naif of 
them British — is a closely guard- 
ed secret “But it contains lots of 
princes, archdukes and knights,” 


simple sheets of steel with two 
runners and a gliding padded 
seat No mechanical steering or 
brakes are allowed. 

Seven men have died and 
countless others have been in- 
jured attempting the Cresta Run. 
Most who try ii once leave aching 
and never return. 


One commoner. Jack Glait- 
f elder, a St Moritz merchant of 
tea and caviar and one of the 
dub’s many Swiss members, was 
an active nder for 12 seasons be- 
fore retiring from the slope eight 
years ago. He entered (his year’s 
Cente n ary Race, and wan. 

Sandy Gall, a television news- 
caster m Britain and a veteran 
member of the dub, joined the 
Seniors’ Cup competition and 
didn’t. But as his toboggan 
turned nearly sideways in the 
treacherous Snunkcock Bend, he 
proved hj m g glf among the top 
contenders for this year’s Drunk- 
en Crab Award. 

The Cresta Rim was opened in 
1885, as a development in the 
tobogganing that a group of En- 
glish invalids undertook as part 
of medical treatment in Swiss 
dinics. 


Twice, the Cresta became an 
Olympic sprat, in 1928 and 1948. 
when the Winter Games were 
played in St Moritz. The medal- 
ists were dub members. 

Bids by other countries to 
build somrahing similar have not 
been encouraged. A Canadian 
group once approached the Sl 
M ontz Tobogganing Qub for as- 
sistance and was pohtdy ignored. 
“We don’t want to lose our exclu- 
sivity,” Board said- 

Emersou tells the story a differ- 
ent way: “Anyone rich enough to 
want to build a ran would rather 
come to SL Moritz." 

Christian Brantschen, 35, a 
house builder, took over the task 
of budding the ran each year 
from his father. At a cost of about 
$ 100,000 be moulds sqow.and 
water into the Cresta Run. Unlike 
bobsled runs, there is no perma- 
nent support for the Cresta and it 
mdts away each spring. 

“He’s the only one who knows 
how to do it," Board said. “I 
don't know what we’d do if he got 
hurt." 

Glattf rider wonders: “Has he 
got a son?” 

Gunter Sachs of West Genoa-, 
ny. a former racing driver, is a 32- 
year veteran of the Cresta. Now 
53, he started riding the Cresta 
when he was at school in nearby 
Zuaz. “It’s not really as danger- 
ous as motor-raring, but it takes 


more courage," he said. “It has 
something of the pioneer spirit." 

Sachs, who finished seventh in 
the Seniors’ Cup, sponsors a race 
of his own each year. The prize: a 
set of buttons for a blazer. 
“There’s nothing you can do with 
a cup. But buttons you can wear 
all year and be proud,” he said. 

Some losers, too, can be proud. 
Anyone who spins out at the 
long, sweeping Shuttlecock Bend 
automatically becomes a member 
of the even more exchrove-Shiit- 
tiecock Qnb. which holds a separ 
rate dinner each year. 

“They even had an honorary 
member once, a horse cal^ed- 
Oppa” Board said. “Someone 
saw him walking up alongside the 
course, where Ire slipped and fell 
by the Shuttlecock. They even- 
brought him once to the Shuttle- 
cock Qub dinner.” 

Horses may be admitted, but 
not women. Since a ban imposed 
on Jan. 6 , 1929, no woman has. 
been allowed oo the run. 

At the dubbouse, a Swiss wom- 
an known to all as Ddores has 
been “manning” the door for 21 
years, keeping out strangers. To- 
ward the end of this years events 
she had had her fill and was offer- 
ing tbe job to every passer-by. 

Had she ever been tempted to 
sneak a ride on the Cresta? .• 

“No, Tm not that crazy,” she 
robed. 


land) and with March 30 already 
taken by the matches that frost and 
snow prevented on Jan. 19 (France 
vs. Wales, Ireland vs. England), 
I^ay could extend into April for the 
first time since 1973. 

Three postponements in a Five 
Nations season is unprecedented, 
at. least since the World War D 
break. Severe weather delayed two 
matches in 1947 and exte rn 1954, 
1955, 1956 and 1982. The death of 
King Georpe VI led to postpone- 
ment of England vs. Ireland in 
1952, and a smallpox epidemic in 
Wales delayed a match in 1962. 
Ireland's home matches against 
Scotland and Wales were canceled 
in 1972 after bomb threats. 

- Hie present erratic winter- — 
harsh cold interrupted by record- 
high temperatures early this month 

— has upset a lot of calculations. 
Tbe Welsh, who expected a tough 
debut in Paris on Jan. 19, will in- 
stead be “going into March unbeat- 
en,” as new captain Terry Holmes 
joked rat Thursday. England's first 
two-matches will both have been at 
home. The French, instead of start- 
ing 'confidently at home against 
Wales and building up to a finale in 
Dublin, started awkwardly- at 
Twickenham and wiH finish against 
Wales after a month off. • 

lire weather has prevented play 
at dub level, too, and many players 
are less match-fit than their coach- 
es would like. That applies espe- 
cially to older men return ing from 
'injury — such aS Leslie; 3Z, and 
French No. 8 Jean-Luc Jranri, 31. 

Leslie and prop Iain MOne were 
missed when Scotland went down 
.to a. surprise 18-15 defeat by new- 
look Ireland in Edinburgh an Feb. 
2L After sweeping their four ihatch- 
-es last year, for,thek. first- grand 
slam since 1925. the Scots go into 
their second match this year as the 
only team with a loss. . ; 

That was a bad start for nfcw 
coach Colin Teller and captain 
Roy Laidlaw, who has handed the 
captaincy on to Leslie with relief. 


navmg previously ji 

to Bucharest’ last May and to Aus- 
tralia in Edinburgh in, December, 
the Scots come to Paris with a 
three-match losing streak. Any 
complacency is long gone. •> 
Late injuries sidelined both first- 
choice wings; Jim Poflodc comes in 
on the left in place of I wan Tukak) 
' and Pete. Steven plays on-tbe right 
in place of Roger Baud.? There are 
11 holdovers from the grand slam 
team,' including halfbacks Laidlaw 
and John Rutherford — who -have 
now played a record 24 interna- 
tional (patches together — and full- 
back Re ter Dods, the goallticker. 
who has been averaging 13 points a 
match since the start of last year. 

The newcomers include' 6-foot-7 
(2.01-meter) lock Tom' Smith. 
Along with 6-foot-4No. 8 lain Pax- 
ton, Smith is crudal to Tdfe^s plan 
for-dominating the lineoots. - -^ 

-. The French also field 11 survi- 
vors of last year’s finale, with Phi- 
lippe Din trans replacing the retired 
Jean- Pierre Rives as captain. But 
.despite Fouroux's emphasis on. re- 
venge, tbe overriding motivation 
vinay bejnst to keep surviving./ 
t After Twickenham —..-when 
France failed to score a try -for the 
..first time in a Five Nations'udatcfa 
since 1975 — even such edafcflh$ed 
and still young stars as fiyhaH Jean- 
Pairick Lescarboura anddentej; Di- 
-HierCodomiou were told they' were 
dose to being dropped. Frawards 
are also at rid; and Jranel h^s de- 
■ Scribed his return as a “doabJc-or- 
nothing” gamble. The team faces 
Scotland with its back to the waR 
And . also with unpubliozed 
doubts about non-French refertes. 
-Hk Englishman due to control Sat- 
. a ur day’s match, Laurie P rideaiix, 
“has seen the lowest average of pen- 
^'hlty.. goals per match ot .any' rave 
Nations Teferee in the 1980s so.far. 
Also; home teams have kicked an 
• avefagel'of three penalty gpal$ per 
.. match in the ’80s, conmared with 
' an average of two by viators/But 
the penalty balance against France 
.under Welsh and Irish referees in 
its last two matches is a whbbpinz 
40 to 16. .TXT* 












Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, FEBRU ARY 16-17. 1985 


ART BUCK WALD 


PEOPLE 


Fees Along the Potomac 


Even Connell: Custer’s Latest Stand Forman Heads Festival 


WASHINGTON — “Hear ye, 
VV hear ye. In the case of the 


American taxpayers vs. Ed Meese's 
lawyers, the court is now in ses- 
sion.” 

“Proceed." 

“Your honor, as counsel for the 
American taxpayers I hold in ray 
hand a bill for legal services for 
5721,000. We 


"There isn’t a lawyer in America 
worth $250 an hour, your honor.” 
"Objection, your honor. Counsel 
has no right to dedde what lawyers 

are worth." 


“Let’s see where he’s going with 
his argument.” 


jm 

:0m 



believe this is 
wo high a price 
to pay to m ak e 
sure the next at- 
torney general 
of the United 
Stales is not a 
crock." 

“Objection." 

“Sustained. 

Counsel will 
stick with the Budiwald 
facts. 

“The facts, your honor, are that 
Mr. Meese’s attorneys charged my 
clients S250 an hour to defend him 
a g a in st charges of conflict of inter- 
est in helping get government jobs 
for individuals who loaned him 
money. We feel these fees are total- 
ly out of line with President Rea- 
gan's vow to cut spending in the 
government" 

“Objection, your honor. Presi- 
dent Reagan’s" political promises 
have nothing to do with my client's 
legal fees." 

“Sustained Counsel will refrain 
from mentioning Mr. Reagan un- 
less it has something to do with the 


“The Justice Department policy 
— a policy I hope Mr. Meese will 
continue —has a ceiling of S75 an 
hour on what a private lawyer can 
charge in a government case. Why 
doesn't it apply in this case?” 

“Your honor, the Ethics in Gov- 
ernment Act, under which Mr. 
Meese was investigated, places no 
restrictions on hourly Tates. If a 
self-respecting Lawyer in Washing- 
ton charged less than $250 an hour 
be would become the laughingstock 
of the capital” 

“It is so noted. Counsel for the 
taxpayers will continue." 

“Thank you, sir. American tax- 
payers resent the fact that Mr. 
Meese’s attorneys are socking it to 
them. I wonder if learned counsel 
would submit a $721,000 bid if they 
knew Mr. Meese was paying it out 
of his own pocket." 

“Objection. That is a theoretical 
question." 

“Sustained." 


Presley Museum 


Planned in Tokyo 


The Associated Press 


T OKYO — A museum featur- 
ing Ehds Presley memorabilia 
will open in Tokyo tnis fall, Ameri- 


can music and movie producer Jer- 
ry Weintraub said Thursday. 

Wedntraub said he and two Japa- 
nese partners will open the muse- 
um and that it will feature Presley 
trophies, records and costumes 
from a collection by Tom Parker, 
Presley’s longtime manager. 

Presley died of a heart attack at 
the age of 42, on Aug. 16, 1977. 
Weintraub said chose Tokyo be- 
cause of the many Elvis Presley 
fans in the Japanese capital al- 
though the singer never performed 
in Japan. 


“Your honor, counsel for Mr. 
Meese has charged 119 clients $250 
an hour for -conversations with the 
press over a period of five and one- 
half months. Why should the tax- 
payer pay for attorneys’ meetings 
with reporters?" 

“I can answer tha^ your honor. 
Mr. Meese was being tried in the 
press as well as investigated by the 
special prosecutor. It was necessary 
to insure accurate reporting of alle- 
gations against him, or else Meese 
would take over the Justice Depart- 
ment undo 1 a dark cloud. It's in the 
taxpayers’ interest to have aU.S. 
attorney general who is squeaky 
dean." 

“Your honor, just because Mr. 
Meese was cleared of criminal 
rhnrgpc agains t him doesn’t neces- 
sarily make him qualified to be 
attorney general What about his 
bad judgment?" 

“Objection. Mr. Meese's bad 
jud gmen t has nothing to do with 
our legal bflL" 

“Your honor, I say it does. If Mr. 
Meese didn’t show such extraordi- 
narily bad judgment in the first 
place; the taxpayer would not be 
stuck for $721,000." 


By Samuel G. Freedman 

New York Times Service 

S AUSALITO, California — 
“Even now, after a hundred 
years, his name alone will start an 
argument," Evan S. Connell 
writes of George Armstrong Cus- 
ter in his book “Son of the Morn- 
ing Star." 

“More significant men of his 
♦imp, can be discussed without 
passion because they are inextri- 
cably woven into a tapestry of the 
past, but this hotspur refuses to 
die. He stands forever on that 
dusty Montana slope." 

Custer stands forever between 
the covers of coundess books as 
well from the dime fiction of the 
1880s to scholarly tomes today. 
Ibis makes it the more surprising 
that Connell's contribution to 
Little Bighorn literature has be- 
come a best-seller and a critical 
success. 

There is also a story of personal 
vindication behind “Son or the 
Momma Star.” The book that 
has sola 86.000 copies, that has 
been purchased for paperback by 
Harper & Row for $210,000. that 
has hern named one of 1984'sfive 
best volumes of nonfiction by the 
National Bode Critics Circle was 
turned down by several major 
New York publishers. 

It was eventually bought by 
North Point Press, a Berkeley, 
California, publishing house that 
has 10 employees and makes a 
point of noting that its books are 
printed on aria-free paper. 

Connell, a soft-spoken man 
with skin as leathery as the flight 
jackets he favors, has suddenly 
achieved a vogue. From 1957 un- 
til “Son of the Morning Star.” he 
wrote 13 books of poetry, fiction 
and nonfiction, often getting ad- 
miring reviews but rarely making 
mnrh money. He sometimes sup- 
ported himself by reading meters, 
delivering Christmas packages, 
distributing handbills and taking 
rfcsumfa at an unemployment of- 
fice. 




the Kid, then went on to Custer 
and the Little Bighorn. Before 
long, that chapter had grown to 


nearly 90 pages. “At that point. I 
had to make a decision." Connell 







had to make a decision." Connell 
said. “I gave up the original idea 
and went with Custer." 

The research and writing con- 
sumed Four years. Connell read 
dozens of books about Custer 
and the Indian campaigns, corre- 




The film director MOos Forman, 
whose hit movie “Amadeus” has 
been nominated for 11 Academy 
Awards, was named president of 
the 38th Cannes Film Festival 
which will be held May 8-20. For- 
man. 52. who fled Czechoslovakia 
for the United States in 1968. won 
an Academy Award for his 1975 
adaptation of “One Flew Over The 
Cuckoos Nest." 


TV1 


sponded with two Little Bighorn 
experts, John M. Carroll and 
Charles K. Mills, and contacted 
libraries and historical societies 
from California to Kentucky. 
Four times he visited the site of 
Custer's catastrophe. 

• “I was absolutely fascinated by 
the detail” Cooneil said. “Not so 
much what is found in govern- 
ment reports as what turns up in 
diaries. The enlisted men, people 
you wouldn't expect it from, 
wrote some wonderful prose. It’s 
all bizarre and very human. 

“ I remember bring surprised 
to read about Major Reno charg- 
ing on an Indian village with his 
men wearing straw bats. I think a 
lot of historians, if they find 
something funny, don’t put it in. 
They think it alTtaas 10 be serious, 
and their books are so deadly 
dull" 

Beyond the humor. Connell 
also discovered the serious side of 
army life during the Indian cam- 
paigns — madness, suicide, de- 
sertion, maggot-infested provi- 
sions and an enormous naivete 
among soldiers who had come 
from Eastern cities and never 
touched a firearm before enlisi- 


Thorwn VxJor 

Evan S. Connell 


— to shoot a portrait of him 
brandishing a rifle. 

The image is almost laughably 
contrary to Connell's subdued 
nature. He approached the story 
of Custer (who won his stars as a 
general in the U.S. Civil War, 
then reverted to the rank of lieu- 
tenant colonel) not a 3 an aficio- 
nado of the Indian wars, but as a 
writer bringing uovelistic skills 10 
a work of nonfiction. IBs book is 
most notable for its ironic voice 
and its eye for detail — Custer 
matchin g into one battle with a 
16-man band on white horses; an 
Indian chief who is fearless in 
battle but terrified of a rudimen- 
tary telephone. 


“There are two explanations 
for writing the book, the 60- 
y ear-old Connell said in a recent 
interview. “Just about all the kids 


An&n Brae, rte o ncB Ct J uc n 


George Armstrong Custer 


Crazy Horse, elaborate desc : p- 
tions of the Sun Dance ceremony 
and scalping techniques, and a 
picture of Indians angered as 
much by deceitful traders and 
disease-bearing settlers as by the 
broad designs of Manifest Desti- 
ny. 

* For all of Connell's faith in his 
material the publishing industry 
largely disagreed. But the book’s 
subsequent success does not sur- 
prise its author. 


Luciano Pavarotti will star in 
“Tosca" when the Metropolitan 
Opera opens its next season Sept. 
23. Pavarotti, who this season is 
singing one concert but no operas 
at the Met. also will appear in 
“Aida." The new season will in- 
clude the Met premiere of Handel's 
“Samson" and new productions of 
Mussorgsky's opera “Khovansh- 
china.” Mozart’s “The Marriage of 
Figaro" and Bizet’s “Carmen." Sir 
Peter Hall is designing the new 
“Carmen.” winch will star Maria 
Ewing in the title role and Pbddo 
Domingo as Don Jos&. 


•‘I always thought it was a pret- 
■ wild storv" Connell said. “I 


in this country grew up on cow- 
boys and Indians. Maybe now it's 
“Star Wars,’ but when I grew up 
in Kansas City you could send in 
box tops, from Quaker Oats, I 
ihink, and get something like a 
color picture of Sitting Bull. 

“As far as this project goes, a 


few years ago I was sitting in a 
saloon wondering what to write 


“San of the Morning Star," 
however, has won Connell praise 
in periodicals from the Civil War 
Book Fxrhang e to the Manches- 
ter Guar dian . Just the other 
week. People magazine flew the 
author to the Little Bighorn — 
where Indians slew Custer and all 
250 of his troops on June 25 t 1876 


□ext 1 didn't have any ideas for a 
novel and for years whenever 1 
couldn't man ufacture something 
successful, 1 simply worked on a 
subject that interested me. And 
the Old West came 10 mind.” 


As for their controversial lead- 
er, Connell said; “I regard Custer 
as a professional soldier. He was 
a Geld commander, not someone 
making policy. He did his job 
fearlessly. People were always ac- 
cusing him of being impetuous. 
And I would agree with that, al- 
though Custer hims elf wouldn't. 
He got the job done, but appar- 
ently at a high cost to his own 
men sometimes." 


Connell originally envisioned a 
book of essays about the frontier. 
He wrote a 30-page essay on BQly 


Connell also did extensive re- 
search on the Indian side of the 
story. He found many interviews 
with veterans of Little Bighorn, 
some of whom lived into the nrid- 
20th century. From their ac- 
counts and from secondary 
sources, he put together portraits 
of chiefs such as String Bull and 


ty wild story," Connell said. “I 
had a feeling that since I found it 
so intensely interesting, other 
people would, too." 

■ Bighorn Survey' Planned 

Archaeologists and volunteers 
plan the first survey of a second- 
ary battleground in the Indian 
wars to learn more about the Bai- 
lie of the Li trie Bighorn, United 
Press International reported. 

More than 250 people have 
volunteered to work with scien- 
tists in the five-week survey be- 
ginning in May. according to Neil 
Mangum, the Custer Battlefield 
National Monument historian. 

Archaeologists and volunteers 
last May found thousands of arti- 
facts at the Custer Battlefield, 
which had beat nearly denuded 
by a grass fire in 1983. Among the 
finds were skeletal remains and 
hundreds of spent cartridges and 
shell casings. 

“The potential for finding 
more complete skeletal remains is 
very good there," Mangum said. 


The singer Stevie Wonder says 
his arrest Thursday outside the 
South African Embassy in Wash- 
ington was “my expression of love 
to ail the people of South Africa 
who are against the barbaric poli- 
cies of apartheid" Wonder arrived 
outside rite embassy in a black lim- 
ousine and left an hour later in a 
police car. one of 48 people arrest- 
ed in the latest of daily protests 
a gains t the South Africa’s policies 
of racial segregation. . . . The 


UN Center Against Apartheid an- 
nounced Thursday that country 


ringer Kenny Rogers had been re- 
moved from a blacklist of enter- 


moved from a blacklist of enter- 
tainers and actors who have per- 
formed in South Africa. The center 
said it took the action because of a 
letter received from Rogers promis- 
ing never to appear “in agnation 
where apartheid is in force.” 


Country music star Barbara 
Mandrel! seriously injured in an 
auiorabfle accident last September, 
is expecting her third child in Octo- 
ber. “We are shocked, surprised 
and thrilled to death,” she said in 
Nashville, Tennessee. “We’ve been 
through such serious hard times 
that it’s nice to have some good 
news. We’re overjoyed.” Mandrel] 
and her husband. Ken Dwfcwy, 


A New Mexico marathon runner 
won the Empire State Building 
Run-Up for the third year in a row 
by sprinting 1,575 sups to the 86th 
floor of the New York landmark 
and then sang an Indian song. A] 
Waque, who sometimes trains by 
r unning after animals on an Indian 

reservation, took first place in the 
stairwell race Thursday in 11 min- 
utes, 42 seconds, but finished short 
of the 1981 record of 10:59.7. Jan- 
ine Aiello, a substitute teacher from 
San Francisco, won first place in 
the women's division with a time of 
13:14, breaking last year’s record 
by 20 seconds. 


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new furriuture for safe. Tafr 563 22 54. 


TO SBE THE LARGEST COLLECTION 
of arirind posters in ov stmxt 


Srion du Vfeux Pc 
Porte da VersriBes. 


da Cohesion. 

, 18 Feb. 17th. 



THE RESIDENT OF AS1RQUMKU 
co m mit te e Dr. Hand AJazn. who 
gave the honorable doctorwe far 
tgyf*an rruxician Brtefl Homri, «ks 
al members of this oommitMa for 
conference March 1st, 7 pm.tnforino- Tmnru. 
tiorv 504 7854 Paris. ZUWOfc 



Price* from SFT23/XXL 
Liberri mort ga ges at W& fe tei ’esL 
GtoSPLAN SJV. 

Av Mon Repos 24, 

OUOCH icusartna, Switnrfond. 
Teh (21) 22 35 12. Thu 251 B5 frCUS 
Extrtofithed Snee 1970 



RECRUIIBL fa oel fe nt opportunity far 
indfeiduri or arganzalian to reauit 
for medical & vetemory schools, b- 
dusive repretentotion in your cbwiIiy. 
Send reswiM lot Ross Urevenity. 460 
Wert 34 Si, New York. NY lQQOl. 


MARKETMG TEAM MBHBERS. Ftgh 
oxnmaun. Sellng prestige service 
to Ml businesses, fospart Inti. Tel: 
279 39 75 Pots. 


Selina prestige service 
SMS. raapart Inti, Tel: 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


MARKETMG COORDINATOR fe- 


DWVER WANTS, mdfe wfemrie, for 
European travel Hur ting from Bel- 
(junt To start fexnecfeitefy. CcxYoct 


sewch, follow te. rypmg. Fluent Erv 
dah. Col Mas Sure! 32939 75 foe 


TOERs Diploma 4 3 years experience 
mrtmum required for "central dtter- 
rrin6~: 20 hours, Monday - Friday 
AM. Semi mtensrve. FTO/hbur + so- 
dri security. March ■ December 81 


BIGUSH NANMES 4 Mother s Helps 
free now. Nodi Agency, S3 Church 
Bood, Hove. UK TeM0P3) 290M/5 
YOUNG MAN seeks housework 4 
drivina 3 years experience. Tet 851 
5496,Pots. 


HAVE YOUR BMW, HBfflR 


POKCHE, JAGUAR ' con wted to 
meet llS-Safety 4 enesson stwrtaw 
for imparlto the U5. Orrwwk 6 Wy 
daaimerted 4 guaranteed to be » 
proved. For cats 5 yews &Q*dB^ arty 
safety changes we roqmred. n» 
cal or write for apprirtnwtf- 55 
AUTO CONVStStON, PXX_K» 


GIRL RDDAY - Ftorido firm. Came at 
ancst Tet 813682-1247. 


Duty. Arm owl Courses in LeuaBan 
Pnrret. for 1794 Her rid Tribute, 
92521 Neufty Cede., France. 


AUTOMOBILES 


now for interview Mr. 1 Hcfrnes, 
Strand Hotel. Qttend. T«L- Os tend 
703383. 


SRI LAMCAN, 29, seefa jet, speaks 
some Bngfsh/French. Para 201 W 74 


DOMESTIC 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


few CARS, DOT CONVERTB) 

w export to the US. now owdabl 


International Basiness Message Center 


SWITZERLAND 

f wajanar e eon buy a STUDIO 
APARTMENT or CHALET an LAKE 


ATTENnCN EXECUTIVES 


GENEVA - MONTREUX or m these! 
world famous rWOrtS: CRANS-I 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


MONT ANA, IS DIABtBgTS. 
BORER, V4LABS, ABBA, etc. fra 
SBIO/Sa Mortgaga 60% at 


nn 

Companions 

uu 

DAKS 

'LONDON 


DEMEXFORT 

PARIS a LYON • MARSH U.F 
LUIS 6 NICE 

tofl movmg by specie hi from mripr 
dtiesin Frwtce to cR cities fe the world. 
To! free fr om F rance 16 105) 24 10 82 
PBEE ESTIMATES 


6H% interest. 

REV AC SA 

52 rue de Mortbrfot. CH-1202 
G8CVA. Tet 41-22/34 15 4Q 
Telme 22030 


to the MemaSontA HerM Tn- 
b*«n% where mere fcwi a Ihirri 
af a mBkm raadan warU- 
w idte mart of who ex at in 
fitsifrieie art Mfelry, w* 
nod A Just Wax us (Paris 


THE WAY TO FORTUMEH 


USArSUCCESSHIL DALLAS, TEXAS 


FINANCIAL 
INVESTMENTS 
WILL PURCHASE NOTES owed or 


1 AU PAIRS- 1 hour from NYC One 
forrriy: 3 chJdrwv 5, 2, irrfrrt. Qher 
frxriy. 2 dvtdrwv 3 4 IKl 
housework, own room, English awak- 
ing. no smoking. Must foie cmdrenl 
Fteose sand photo, references & re- 
sume to: Brihenhous. 44 Crossman 

Ave.. Monroe. NY 10954 

AU PAIR IMMEDIATE- New NYC 
Cwe of infant & 216 yew rid. tight 


US. now owdabfe: 
k, Poiominp fecriher, 
537.000. 

1W. leather, fdty 


700344, D-7000 sarofvOfnuTrt 
13711)760966 or 721013. flx7253W4 

AUTOS TAX FREE 


500 SL Chcxnpt^w-melrikc brae 
loaded. USJ 39JOO. 


500 SO, Noutic-blue, 
yfr •gripp'd, USS37, 
Kns Aufo Converaon, t 


NEW MERCEDES 

PORSCHE. BMW, EXOTIC CAU 

FROM STOCK 






V; NrTw- 
I‘' , T 

1 -r..n l 




have two other dnldron. Matt, 14, 
and Jamie, S. In the accident. Man- 
drel! suffered a severe concussion 
and a broken leg and is still oil 
crotches. — 

D 


I ■-•'vl 


Jobs R. Pierce of Sianford Uni- 
veraity and Russian-born Epbaat 
Ktrfpfahki -Kaizir of Israel were 


chosen to receive the first Japan 
Prize for their scientific comribife 


[i.S. Ct 

0 to 


tions to world peace, prize sponsors 
announced Friday. The Science 
and Technology Foundation, a pri- 
vate non-profit organization. -Sod 
Fierce and Katchalski-Katzir win 
each be awarded citations, medals 
and a cash prize of 50 mifikra yen 
(about $198,000). Katchalski-Kai- 
zir, 68, was selected for ins accom- 
plishments tn the fields of biotech- 
nology and immobilized enzymes, 
the foundation said. He is a profes- 
sor at the Weizman Institute and 
Tel Aviv University. Pierce, 74; was 
cited for his achievements in the 
field of information and communi- 
cations. particularly his break- 
throughs in satellite communica- 
tions technology. Pierce teaches at 
Stanford University as a honorary 
guest professor. 


hudan 


Concent Gi 

About Poll 

Economic J 

R rv.-.-OHa 


rS " J. ;, :r :« 
•. ylir. it-v ! 


A memorial to Lord Loru 
M oontbttten, murdered by Irish 
guerrillas in 1979. was uztvefied at 
Westminster Abbey in London 
Wednesday. Mounlbalten, last 
viceroy of India before indepen- 
dence and unde of Queen Elza- 
beth, was blown up on board his 
boat off tfae Irish coast by a bomb. 
Prince PUE]k. the queen’s husband 
and also a nephew of Mountbauen, 
dedicated the memorial to the earl 
and his wife, Edwins, who died in 
I960. 


■'•■.cr,' rsfion ; 

^ r * 

“'f;-.; u ' - '• “' J? . ! “' 

‘ , ... tlL'-vwiSs 

P- <- 2SW 

--i V-. > ^>’-31 ^ 


m "firs. * 


has W 

Si;---; 1— 

thi 

t r: c ; t if 

ai 


r-Td *.f 


itt.-'”- 

- ircr; ■ — ' - '.-U' 

•- r- -VW , 




I V-;. • TJStucra 

! ar: M --.-s ^ 

5::k :rc ”• - c.^r 

j'; * . ' /.rua: ^ iTi 
..." r '^‘. rrrr!: 

•ij j >.*fju>eS 

I >;-vr • - .' M 

j j.- t. u* er 


Mr n —i - rded 
•i; closes 

i fr.-r.:- -.v.r: j 




wivj : . .. 

•U.U.W ^ • . . . _4.!CS. 


r=:-- -L-'.^TccA.ri 
Cer d'.s 


c, . . , . ._ j . 

“• - ••• • — rtv,- 

■ -1’ “ ;r.C P M 
* C;-nra: 


l r L ■’ or .a 

‘ t *’ - r j._ ut l 

T- -•- ■'•-•-••rfn: 
nrair. .. 

'.■piTj- : _ r. c! 

■■■■■■ ■■■ Mr 

r.i.-f.do 

~ r -' : T f 

P^s'st. 1. - -i r- 

.r-^cr. r— 
: --~i ' ■'-■'n and' 

*0Tj| * 

■' > wr 

Fur.--— ... x . . v 
Htu 

0| .... ■_ V ® 

achs-'" ’ „ 

pu ~ r 

kabi. trl;' - : V. : , ; R of 
dnnna 

peaiidlv 'C.. ■ ’\rr *=»! 
Bboui ,j. T,' i 

The-cV: ’ ■'= 

iComsauec JC ? 3 o e ^ c 




Kns AWo Coowboh, Exoort, 5fopnq 
7 Stuttgart 70, PXX fo 7b DMA 
Td 0711/760964/767815. Tlx 72396. 


for IMMEDIATE tfelvery 
BBT SBtVKE . 


6I3S9SJ before JO an, «n- 
eurktg that we Cwt Mb yea 


Nown Europa, 10 vary amazmg Aanr- 
icon reports in ana book; 

Haw to mrirn up to S750 noxt w ookw x} 
/ OtWr you: mril order business, your 


OPEC ewrtrfes. We have Jorge 
amourts US1 Td: 361 6500 Zuricfr. 


Doles, TX 75225. 
. Trice 730197. 


back, text year menage ini 
eppem’ wmr 48 boars. The 


GONTMEX |MMT Oparti): Cartfaus. 

| tort to 300 atm ww&iride • Air /Sma. 

Pwh - Can too I 


Cri)Onrfe281 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 

AUSTRIA 

VWWS HOUSING AGS1CY. 
0222-527964, Hodosy, Grabwi 31. 
Bntob: delwn Arts & housas. 


rate k US. $9.80 or local 
m tp riwdont p ar Sno. Too mad 
m a ede Bomgltle tetri nrifl- 
cride briBng aridnes. 


odvrrttstng agency or import - export 
business ri home / How to get tree 
pubfoty for your buwwss / Moles a 
nrtmB witfr aoRifred ads i Sel Wor- 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


motion by mafl / pubfah your nevriet- 
tor / How to occampEsfi anything you 
wart in Sfa / Secren of rfehert peafie 
260 PAGE5 - Spectacular potenfcA 
US$1 B + $2 for pastoj*. 

A. MidteL 27 Cues Prevafoye, 


MirffeL 27 Quai ftevafoye, 
35100 Barnet, Franas 


HOW TO GAM RNAOAlimfepen- 
denae so you eon retire and wioy Sfel 
Fw free mfa send self -addressed en- 
vekspe tot MoNer, CP. 6298. 00195 
Rome. Italy. 

GOURMET BBTAtffANT- SeWi 200. 
Pinna for 100 care. 20 year tease. 
New WoWo, Hawed. Hare Rrasier 

804528-2866 (USA) 


DIAMONDS 


riiafO; Gubermcn. 470 Golf Course 

Dr- teoria. NJ 07605 USA. 

AU PAIR • Imme tiuto posrti on . 5 mortfr 
rid baby. Need howetoeging skflit 4 
drivers Scans*. Sotory S32 merffi + 
room 4 bowd. Ma weak EngSshi 
Hw dogs. References 4 photo to Mrs. 
Sharon Demanet, 1065 6 - HAsdrie 
Blvd, Faster Qty.CA 94404, Sto. lOft 

2 AU. PAKS4MMBMATE. En^sh 
speridna. 2 fonxSes with young chil- 
SSi located new NYC footing for 
meiiflwm 1 year stay. Send photo. 

risfonr, tefephane & references to; 46 
Vbn Orden Bd, Horringtan Port, NJ. 
07640 ISA. 


DIAMONDS 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


Your best buy. 

Fme cfcsiunds in any price range 
at loweS whafejrie prices 
rirect from Antwerp 
center af t he tfiomon d world. 
FuS gowantee. 

For free pnee fat write 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


■mis WEEK 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


MONEY TREES? 


FRENCH PROVINCES 
UBOBtT. Becauee of fliwioat detaRs 


sA near Port du Gari wperb vflfo 
325 iqjn. at pound level, rice park af 


5700 'nnt, swiranfea pooL Vdue: 
Fl600j0a Saaflfo* al F12XMXXL 
TriVOffohourt^9242047Ttome l | 
(73 693563 


: . Exclusive DAKS 

clothes and 

accessories for 
men and women 
available from 
DAKS stockists 

around the world. 


CANN3. 5 minutei front the center. 
FM das reskfonca. Mnrvd bu 2 : 
bcAoorre uui lment 110sqjn.8alhs. 
Equipped btdien. office, ftrepfoce. | 
Terrace 16 sun. unsnlaae feaview. 



February 25th 


YGH Invert xi one of Americas mart I 
•earing tochnripgieri breqfefrraughs ei 

nut trite 


nn 

BEAirrffUL PEOPl£ 

UNLWUTBS B4C. 
U4JL1 W8BSWE 


d 1928 

B-2D18 Artvijup 
l 3) 234 07 51 


MERCEDES from EUROPE 
WE FEDERALIZE CARS TO MEET US 
SAFETY STANDARDS 

D.O.T. & E.P.A. 

5 YEARS EXPERIENCE 

L FRANK WC 

inrianaprin, Mono 317-291-4 108 


Ford 2Z2t£ rsSk^ 

RUTE WC 

Taunusdr. ffi 6000 


ROM STOCK 

Marodes 280 SL dm si 0 » tea. 


, Horringtan Park. NJ. 


Briffum - Tel. (32 3) 234 07 51 
Tk 7)779 syi b. At the Donond CUl 


Heat of Antwerp Diamond etdwfty 


BUSINESS WEEK 


INTERNATIONAL 


far many, many yean. 

BROKStTS BfOUiflB WVTTTOI 
Matend avoUle in Enabh. French, 
German Arabic. Bee 1^8, Herald 
Tribune, 92521 Neuify Cedes, France. 


A complete racial 4 bwineei servics 
nvrtdng a unate calfectiai af 
ttforted, versatife 4 nsMrwud 
imfendlldl for: 



DIAM0MK& 

ESTA1F JEWBRY 


GML RDDAY/ AU PAIR. WoVengton, 
DC Bright young woman to ok! 
bwywYflfocweer&howeptwhBlp- 
■ng weft {toys 2 & 4 2 days a weefo 
Roam, board, sotory. Letter, photo, 
references to: Edwwds, 10* Fourths*. 

j^WraKDC 2D003 USA. 


EXCBTIONAL OPPORTUNITY. 
Porsche Turbo, cedant h e dap rife r . 
FTO 0, l speed in execa af 
27WM/hour, custom wheels: Rea- • 
345 / 35VR15 (14 x 15). Front - 2^ / 
40VRT5 (11 k 19. fad exterior, block 
feather Meriw. (15538,500. For mare 
erfonty jo n. call (49) 7621-88011 
MBKEDB BOB 500 SE German 
tpobficDtoro, 10 morths, 6000 nries, 
^ABSetcZOjiOO. Tet France W 

40 64% 


Mereedei 500 
Mercedes 500 1 
Mercedes 500 S 
and many 
Ca^ac, Ferrari, Jr 
Land Rover, Porsc 
other lead 


new. 

k/S*,new 


■.Range Ram. 
Mernfes OW 


Scene day le gi U rafan fBoUe- 

KZKOVnS 




AUTO RENTALS 

OUHC RBir A CAR. Prestig 


AU PAIR. NYC dandy. Can of I 


Rofe %xrit. Men 
Smousme t, angt 
Qurron, 75008 


rit, M e r c e d es , Jaguar. BMW, 

BI, gndl eon. 46 rw fare 


damwi A and 


fte animak Send photo, reference*, 
phone to W£ Ua^lt Fifth St. 
Fardx. NJ. 08863 l&A. 


3 Farit. Tnfr 72053.40. 
FCHAROC 


PAGE 13 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


I CANNE5.TeL 


Lp Crabrtte, 
93)3819 19. 


OEAT BRITAIN 


D A K5 - S ; ■ T i c- :-0 1 ' i- : (TV- 1 2 C . 

Zi Jemyn S' r et!.. 


CHB5EA fflSMUL Grant dMbp. 
mert paterffoL 5 bedrooms. 3 recep- 
tion. Wfchen, ining room, gwden. 
El 95 M0 or rawed offer. T*07B9 
77^ UK. 


COTE D'AZUR 

CAQNQ 9JR ME8 
ban unfuritehed tpaooin vflb, 
i aq.ia ravAon, 5 bedroom, 
garden. FlOjOOO/morth. 

JOHN TAYLOR LA. 

Route db St. Paul 
06480 La Cole mt Loup 
Tot (93] 32 S3 40 


'SAAnfitiBb WANTS 


*» «■ « ■-> j- — - U|1|L ■■ - ■ 

ivauvi inwTww «?nn mnwr 
Tbatdier 


Mcjw nrifond whefosefer & importer 
m USA looking for name brwd fra- 


Bum; Union Carbide Face* A 

BadSa* In Scoftnd 4 Rw 


Branca- YSL Opium, Aran. Esfee 
Lauder, liven, «. Aha name brand 


212 * 766-7793 
212 - 765-7794 
330 W. 56* Sfe N.YXL 10019 
Service Eepretentoevos 
Needed Worldwide. 


KLOTZ DIAMOfDS 
D61C8 Waterttodt 
W. Germany 00041504*52 


AU PAN GIRL WANTED. Core for 2! 


H towtei qikI Ifo ad w C«»r« 


deidren oges 5 & B. Light housework. 
Qom to NYC. Own room 4 TV. Send 


fetter & picture to Oinfnrd, 4* hfigh-j 
view Terr- Dow, NJ. 07801 or call 
201-361-4841 


m Umdiund Oufeak: Japan 4 
TTiei Saviefe TeSt Trade 


LONDON SWT. £95^000. 3 bedroann, 
efaant flat. 2nd floor, views of Budt- 
Btohari Paiaee. Tet tandon 730 8762 I 
frfa Hte (Sale Apart! 


HOLLAND 


NOW ON SALE 


■Stem, eogy, etc COD or UGcril 
" USA cl 4] 248-1 651 at tlx no. 506176 
MV BJThPRBB. Our rep r eiertwi ve ■ 
w* be m England 4 Ewape March 
8-17, 1985. 


Renthouse International 


AT AIL INTBNATIONAL 


WANTS), DSnaWTORS for Kent- 
ba S Suntan OJ in Greece, i 


GREECE 


SWATHOSi Arohderi-brcker, vilai, 
land. CMoKhcdtas 042441457 


020-443751 (4 lines) 

Amiterjuiu. B ataflem 41 


ICWSSTANDS. 


perf u med wife ftowert 4 made in 8J. 
t n do n eri n Fw furttier in farm u tiaii 
eweaef 144 4671 42389 JG.BJ Telex 
739651 & Am. Robert TrriaL 


HS4CH HUH fASMON MODB. 
27, PR/ PA e xperience, Hatory of Art 
graduate free to travel, bSngui 
foote for London bated oparina. Tek 
3 pjn, 9 pen. 01-225 0368fljg 

YOUNG COW BEGANT * Ml, 
»- 

periexe m dafaguahed & tattefol 
oowifat. Tet 322/673 51 56. 

HAVE OFTKE, TH. TGEX, Secretary, 


OFFICE SERVICES au pair for ntc famey wnh 7 


CO-IMPORT / EXPORT 

Worid WMr Tax-Froa Cars ham Europe 
From BBan 


ZUUCK-ZUKKH-ZUKICH 


efxldren to aort in July/Aug. fw 1 
yew nnainwTL Experience & refer- 


BAWflflOBTRASSE 52 


man raqared Hem n M defafi ro 
FjO. fo 187. NY. NY 10040. 


MQSpec W Cwe in Stock - fotmedliito DeEvery. 

Two Hoar Showroom * Unique In Europe. 

500 St, 380 SL/C 450 SL/C, 280 SUC 500 StMO gJj 0 
““ 9, 350 SUC. 380 SK, 380 Sa, 450 SUL 350 SUL 


foifera awrifenyoyr idem 4 wnpm- 
ab. Write fol739. Herald T t4m», 


92521 NeuiTy Cedex, France. 


YOUR OFFICE AWAY FROM HOME 

• Offtce/Mowganw Services j 

• Company r enne faji m 

• How to do Bums tn /or / 

FROM SWITZERLAND 
Iknrirti Sendees ConeoK Cap. 
Bohthofere» SZCK8022 Zurich. 
Teli 01/211 92w. Tbu 813 062 


AU PAN MIAMI SACK R_ Own 
room, swim m ing pari. 2 smdl chS- 
efren. Send resime 4 rierta to faufo 


SEL 6, 9, 350 SUC. 380 SEC, 380 SB, 450 SUL 
28GSE/C PoriAe 911 SC. Twgq, Paredw 928/5 out 
P 990 Twfaa. P944. P 924 auL or net. 190D. I9Ot.3001IH. 


SdxA 1211 KBSt.for Horiw b- 
kxtdjl 33154 or cafl OB) 8617149. 


AU PAS WANTED to cars for 2 pnati 
chUm. Subwbwi NY area. House- 
keeping, Enriidi speriona Iferiy to 
Mrt C Kwp/22l Gordons Omr 
Bd. Mertbwg NJ 077a6 USA. 


600 Pidbaan tang, biadt, 280 SE 3j 5 U 190 % 3. efc. 

One af the graate e t Mercede s end Porsche ears }J 

iw p w l Ltg European care b foe U£A. Spedrf ee«Kan»' 
tron sfw inationi to American norms, for DOT fobeuf (AS- 


St. Tr u lder st ee nm eg 298, Hrm e tl Z oi ri , Befr^mw. 

About 40 nn. from Bnrtede Airport Zcwenten. 

Tefuw 39r876 (Hbem). - •• 

Phann Ol 1/27.23.44 - 27.23.91 -27J4-66-27JB.32. 


Imprimi par Offprim, 73 rue de [’Erangik, 75018 Paris. 


. . -IV