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The Global Newspaper 

Edited in Paris 
Printed Simultaneously 
in Paris, London, Zurich, 
Hong Kong, Singapore. 
The Hague and Marseille 


WEATHER DATA APPEAR ON PAGE lO 


No. 31,725 


INTERNATIONAL 



Published With The New York Times and Hie Washington Post 

* ZURICH, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1985 


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ESTABLISHED 1887 


J Korea 
^Shakes Up 
c ^Cabinet 

k : ; r - Intelligence 
Chief to Head 
Government 

. 7 The Associated Press 

• -? • V - t SEOUL — - President Chun Doo 
-I: ; Hwan on Monday named the bead 
. .. ■ of the national security agency to 

- lead his cabinet in a government 
i.J : shake-up that came a week after a 

' new opposition party made major 
‘ gains in parliamentary elections. 

' V It was the biggest shake-up since 
• Mr. Chun, a former general rose to 
pott-er in 1980. 

• T ! Earlier in the day, the 22-mera- 

. ; her cabinet headed by Prime Min- 
'■ ister Chin lee Chong resigned. 

The presidential office an- 
' nounced that the new cabinet 
would be headed by Lho Shin 
Yung. 54, director of the Agency 
for National Security Planning, 

- ' formerly called the Korean Central 
‘ . Intelligence Agency. A career dip- 
lomat, be was foreign minister from 
1980 to 1982. 

In the new cabinet. President 
'• Chun retained the foreign minister 
■_ - - and most of the ministers dealing 
with the economy, indicating that 
* there would be little change in his 
pro-Western and stability-oriented 

■ . policies. 

' - But the former general also 
brought in six relatively successful 
•• ■ - civilian politicians to help improve 
- ‘the cabinet's image and deal better 
with the strong opposition that 
emerged from the election. 

Nine ministers from the former 
cabinet retained their posts, while 
new people took 13 other posts. 
Those retained included Deputy 

■ Prime Minister Shin Byong Hyun, 

1 ■ ^Foreign Minister Lee Won Kyung, 

-Finance Minister Kim Malm Je 
r A: ^> x ,.and Defense Minister Yoon Sung 

■*. ' Mia - 

i iBCii ^ tas* Tuesday’s elections for 

the 276-member National Assem- 
’ I" - .!’ Wy, the newly formed New Korea 
. '"Democratic Party outpollcd Mr. 

‘ V . . ; • -£htin’s Democratic Justice Pirty in 
. - ^he country's four largest cities, in- 

- - =^duding the capital of Seoul 

The party, supported by the dis- 
sident leader, Kim Dae Jung, be- 


g U.S. Farms: 
The Trend Is 
s To Fewer and 
^Larger Ones 

By William Robbins 

• ^ ,u New York Times Service 

i KANSAS CITY. Missouri — 
ipreading hardship is speeding 
American agriculture toward a des- 
iny of fewer and larger farms. 

And while the result may be low- 
food costs, many of the more 
v : fficienl farmers in the United 
States will be forced out of busi- 
ness. and the economic and social 
jtt' osts for rural communities are 
«*** Jcely to be high. 

These are the conclusions of ag- 
''■‘‘’^jcultural economists who are the 
"'■examining mounting farm debt, 
_^> ;, ismg costs and falling crop prices 
tut are driving increasing numbers 
f growers out of business. 
t*...- As they examine the farmers’ 

. ' ; light, the economists are finding 
’ tings that undermine some widely 
dd bdids. These are some of thdr 
■ inclusions: 

•There is doubt that this eco- 

/• omic shakeout will eliminate pri- 
^>-;;iariIy the least efficient fanners, 
V aving the land to more effident 
.timers. There is no rush to snap 
. p lost land; fanners cannot afford 
and outside investors would prc- 
a - to wait for lower prices. 

. • It appears that a farm of mod- 
!»■' ' "ate size, the “family farm” much 
~ :vered by legislators, is not neces- 
. - " inly the most efficient production 
. aiL 

‘ . • • While debt problems are se- 
“V ndy burring those middle-saze 
. irms, some big producers are also 
feting the pain. 

• • Corporate giants are not nec- 
. . " sarily destinM to control food 

TOdllCUOD- 

The economists are looking at 
« situation with urgency because 
■ new farm legislation that the 
. fmfnig t ration is expected to pro- 
.. ase this week. The U.S. agncul- 
.< ire secretary, John R- Block, is 
. rpected to seek a reduction in the 
;l c-' mefits that the principal growers 
ive long enjoyed 
Some agridiltural economists 
, ; ,’y that food production will be- 
' . Hne less costly and food will be- 
^ «ne slightly less expensive, not 
1 . .txause more skillful operators will 
y" ke over but because of the losses 
Offered by failing farmers. Others, 
tr ey say, will get the lost land at 

agricultural economists, 
SajJiwever, foresee an increase in ab> 
uP^ntee ownership, with outside in- 
stepping in to bid on land 
r^Mat farmers cannot finance and 
■ffraCootiniied on Page 2, CoL 6) 



Lo Shin Yung 

came the second largest political 
pany by winning 68 seats. 

Mr. Chun's party holds 148 
seats. 

Mr. Kim returned to South Ko- 
rea shortly before the election, end- 
ing two years of political exile in 
the United Stales. The authorities 
immediately confined him lo his 
house. 

Mr. Chun's spokesman, Hwang 
Sun P0, quoted the president as 
saying he expected the new cabinet 
to carry on national tasks to “meet 
the expectation of the people aspir- 
ing for stability and reform.'’ 

The demand for stability, which 
often has been died in the past as a 
reason for suppressing dissent, is 
important Lo South Korean leaders 
as they prepare for the 1988 Sum- 
mer Olympics. 

■ Reaction to Scuffle 

A scuffle between security police 
and US. supporters of Mr. Kim at 
Seoul Airport this month was “a 
trivia] incident” in comparison to 
recent h uman rights strides in 
South Korea. Elliott Abrams, assis- 
tant U.S. secretary of state for hu- 
man rights, said Sunday in Wash- 
ington. the Los Angeles Tunes 
reported. 

Mr. Abrams cited last week's 
elections as proof of South Korea's 
commitment to human rights. 

Representative Edward F. 
Fei ghan, Democrat of Ohio and a 
member of the House Foreign Af- 
fairs subcommittee on human 
rights who accompanied Mr. Kim 
to Seoul, disagreed with Mr. 
Abrams. 

Mr. Feighan descri bed the scuf- 
fle as “an important incident” be- 
cause of the U.S. commitment to 
Sou th Korea. Washington provides 
$250 miHion in military aid each 
year, and 40.000 American troops 
are stationed there. 


U.S. Plans 

Satellite 

Defenses 

System Includes 
Surveillance 
Of Deep Space 

By Walter Pincus 

Washington Pan Service 

WASHINGTON — The Penta- 
gon is developing a generation of 
decp-space navigation, communi- 
cations and spy satellites capable of 
evading Soviet attack, aided by a 
nearly completed network of 
ground stations that will keep con- 
stant surveillance on all objects in 
deep space, according to sources 
inside and outside the Reagan ad- 
ministration. 

Studies are under way to see if 
the satellites also can be armed to 
defend themselves. 

The satellites, which would hov- 
er 22,000 miles (35,000 kilometers) 
in space, are being hardened 
against radiation and laser attacks, 
and some are being given tiny jet 
engines so they can be maneuvered 
away from attack. 

At the same time, Spacnrack, a 
little-publicized worldwide net- 
work of five space-watching facili- 
ties. is nearing completion. When 
operational in 1988, it will give con- 
stant global coverage of all satel- 
lites in deep space. 

“We are looking at the ultimate 
video game,” a nongovernment 
source said last week. “With tele- 
scopes and video displays, the 
United States will be able to watch 
any attacker approach its satellites 
and," by sending off signals, have 
that satellite maneuver away,” he 
said. 

Eventually, he added, it may be 
possible “to attack the attackers.” 

The space-based surveillance 
system, in addition to replacing the 
ground-based Spacetrack system, 
would serve as a pan of President 
Ronald Reagan's Strategic Defense 
Initiative, according to budget doc- 
uments made available by the ad- 
ministration. President Reagan's 
plan, popularly called “star wars," 
is designed to detect and destroy 
rnisalesTh flight. 

The goal of the new satellite sys- 

(Coatumcd oa Page 2, CoL 4) 



Westmoreland 
Drops Libel Case 
Against CBS 


Tha taocMd Fni 

Mohammed Habit, a militia leader accused of eoUabomtingmih the Israelis, Is pushed by 
gunmen into die trunk of a car in Sidon and driven away. His fate has not been learned. 

Across Borders, Pullout Leads to Fears 

In Sidon, Past Catches Up A City in Northern Israel 

With Israeli 'Collaborator’ Expects Renewed Shelling 


By John Kifner 

New York Tima Service 

SIDON. Lebanon — The past caught up with Mo- 
hammed Habli here Sunday. 

For the 32 months of the Israeli Arm/s occupation, 
he was one of a triumvirate of local militia leaders that 
Sidon residents say were “enforcers" for the Israelis, 
terrorizing the population. 

Now that the Israelis are pulling out of southern 
Lebanon — their last troops left Sidon on Saturday— 
their “collaborators," as they are called, are increas- 
ingly under attack. 

[Thousands of Moslem fundamentalists from Bei- 
rut. backed by hundreds of armed men. poured into 
Sidon on Monday, smashing liquor stores and demon- 
strating against President Amin Gemayd, Reuters 
reported from the dty. 

[Shouting slogans against Mr. Gemayel. Israel and 
the Lebanese Army." iw demonstrated forTBeSSB-^ 
tishment of an Islamic republic but then headed back 
(Continued on Page 51 CoL 1) 


By Edward Walsh 

Washington Post Service 

KJRYAT SHEMONA, Israel — Haim Bitton, di- 
rector of security in this northern Israeli dty. has been 
preparing for the day for six months. After last sum- 
mer's parliamentary elections in Israel, the mayor told 
him to begin cleaning up the dty’s 140 public shelters- 
because they would soon be needed again. 

Zeev Pdeg. the prinripal of Danzigcr High School 
here, waited a while longer before he acted. But by late 
November, almost two months before the government 
in Jerusalem made the inevitable decision to begin 
withdrawing the military from southern Lebanon, Mr. 
Peleg had reinstituted regular drills in schools so that 
children would know how to reach the shelters, and 
what to do when they gathered there. 

“1 knew it was coming," Mr. Pdeg said Sunday in 
bis office here, about 5 miles (8 kilometers) south of 
the 

What Mr. Bitton. Mr. Pdeg and others here have 
(Continued on Page 5, CoL 1) 


By M.A. Farbcr 

New York Tima Sen-ice 

NEW YORK — General Wil- 
liam C. Westmoreland hay dropped 
bis SI 20- million libel suit against 
CBS in an agreement under which 
the television network will not dis- 
avow the 1982 documentary on the 
Vietnam War that is the basis of the 
suit and will not pay any money to 
the retired general. 

As part of the settlement. CBS 
also agreed not to demand pay- 
ment of any court costs by the 
general lawyers on both sides of 
the case said Sunday nighL 

[The parties issued a joint state- 
ment Monday saying that “their 
respective positions have been ef- 
fectively placed before the public 
for its consideration and that con- 
tinuing the legal process at this 
stage would serve no further pur- 
pose,” The Associated Press re- 
ported. 

[“Historians will long consider 
this and other matters related to the 
war in Vietnam," the statement 
said. “Both parties trust their ac- 
tions have broadened the public 
record on this mailer." 

[“CBS respects General West- 
moreland's long and faithful ser- 
vice to his country and never in- 
tended to assert, and does not 
believe, that General Westmore- 
land was unpatriotic or disloyal in 
performing his duties as he saw 
them," the statement added. “Gen- 
eral Westmoreland respects the 
long and distinguished journalistic 
tradition of CBS and the rights of 
journalists to examine the complex 
issues of Vietnam and to present 
perspectives contrary to his own."] 

The agreement is to be read 
Tuesday to the jury in the case, 
which will then be dismissed. 

The settlement came after 18 
weeks of testimony by 36 witnesses 
in U.S. District Court in Manhat- 
tan and only a week before the 
case, which is believed to have cost 
at least $7 milli on to J 9 million, 
was scheduled lo go to the jury. 

The setllement discussion was 
apparently initiated last week by 
Dan M. Burt, General Westmore- 
land’s principal lawyer. 



l . • • i ■ " 








ySM 




mu* Vk ft 



Senator Says He’ll Show Pentagon 
Where NATO’s Strategy Is Flawed 



The New Yorir Tm 


Farmers and others onlookers await bidding on a foreclosed Nebraska farm, a scene that is 
becoming more common as the number of family-owned U.S. farms continues to decline. 


By George G Wilson 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Senator 
Sam Nunn of Georgia, the ranking 
Democrat on the Senate Armed 
Services Committee; has served no- 
tice on the Pentagon that in coming 
months he will show why he be- 
lieves that the current North Atlan- 
tic Treaty Organization strategy is 
a loser. 

Mr. Nunn and bis congressional 
allies intend to try to explode what 
they consider the myths of the 
North Atlantic Treaty Organiza- 
tion in a debate that is expected to 
be at least as far-reaching as last 
year's over the proposal to with- 
draw some U.S. troops from Eu- 
rope. 

The senator sounded ibe tenor of 
the upcoming NATO debate last 
week when be had General John A. 
Wickham Jr., the U.S. Army chief 
of staff, at the committee’s witness 
table for the first lime since Presi- 
dent Ronald Reagan sent his new 
military budget to Congress. 


Why, Mr. Nunn asked the gener- 
al is the United States spending 
billions of dollars to stockpile 
enough ammunition to fight for 
months m Europe when European 
armies on the flanks would run out 
of ammunition in a few days? 

“If you're a Soviet military 
man,” Mr. Nunn asked, “and you 
thought the U.S. Army could fight 
75 days, with everybody all around • 
them running out in about 12 days, 
would that add to deterrence?" 

He added that once a war start- 
ed, U.S. units could not dash 
around Lhe battlefield trying to dis- 
tribute ammunition to allied units 
that bad run ouL 
General Wickham conceded that 
in that “hypothetical" situation the 
UR forces would be better off with 
more tanks and artillery than a 
mountain of ammunition. 

Mr. Nunn and his allies cite the 
different ammunition supplies as 
an example of the mismatch be- 
tween the defense efforts of the 
United States and its NATO part- 
ners. 



V*.: 

I 

It- 



Getting to Top: Talent Helps but It’s the Practice That Counts 




By David G. Savage 

Los Angela Times Smite 

LOS ANGELES — A five-year study of 120 of the top 
artists, athletes and scholars in the United States has 
concluded that drive and determination, not great natural 
talent, led to their success. 

“We expected to find tales of great natural gifts,” said 
Benjamin Bloom, a University erf Chicago education pro- 
fessor who led the team of researchers. The group studied 
the careers of U.S. performers in six fields: concert pia- 
nists, Olympic swimmers, sculptors, tennis players, math- 
ematicians and research neurologists. 

“We didn’t find that at aU," Mr. Bloom said. “Their 
mothers often said it was their other child who had the 
greater gift" 

The most brilliant mathematicians often said they had 
trouble in school and were rarely the best in their class. 
Some world-class tennis players said their coaches viewed 
thffnn as being too short to ever be outstanding, and the 
Olympic swimmers said they remember getting regularly 
“clobbered" in races as 10-year-olds. 

The research conducted in-depth, anonymous 
interviews with the top 20 performers in the six fields, as 
judged by national championships or similar honors. 

They also interviewed their families and teachers, hop- 
ing to learn bow these individuals developed into great 
performers. 

In stead, the researchers heard accounts of an extraordi- 
nary drive and dedication through which, for example, a 
child would practice the piano several hours daily for 17 
years to become a concert pianisL 

A typical swimmer would teO of getting up at 5:30 each 
morning to swim two hours before school and then two 
hours after school to gain his or her goal of malting the 
Olympic team. 

Although practice and motivation seemed to explain 
their success, the performers, regardless of their field. 


appeared to follow a similar course of development, the 
researchers found. 

In practically every case, the parents played the key 
role, first by exposing their children al an early age to 
music, sports or learning. The vast majority of the parents 
were not themselves outstanding musicians, athletes or 
scholars. 

But the parents or the swimmers and tennis players did 
enjoy sports and valued competition, Mr. Bloom said. The 


These parents placed great stress on 
doing one’s best at all times.’ 


families of the pianists and sculptors appreciated art and 
music, while the parents or the research scientists dis- 
played a great love for learning. 

The parents of the mathematicians and research neu- 
rologists reported that their children showed both an 
unusual curiosity about bow things work and an “inde- 
pendent nature" that allowed them to play or work alone 
Tor hours. 

The parents also taught their children to value hard 
work and competition. 

“These parents placed great stress on achievement, on 
success and on doing one's best at all times,’' Mr. Bloom 
said. “They were models of the work ethic, believing that 
work should come before play and that one should always 
work toward distant goals." 

The results of the research will be published this week in 
a book titled “Developing Talent in Young People." 

The families said in the interviews that once a child 
displayed an interest and enth usiasm in a particular area, 
these parents encouraged them at every step and were 
winin g to spend countless hours shuttling them to and 
from piano, tennis or swimming lessons. 


The study also found that these achievers, an of whom 
were younger than 40 when interviewed, appeared to have 
gone through three distinct stages of development, regard- 
less of their field 

Al first, the parents exposed the children to playing a 
piano, tinkering with scientific games or hitting a tennis 
bad but it was just fun. They played tennis with their 
families, for example, and developed the habit of regular 
practice. Usually, the children also had some outside 
instruction, perhaps from a neighbor or a relative. 

Then, at some point, they began to gain recognition Tor 
their ability. A 7 -year-old would play the piano for a 
school performance. An 8-year-old would beat ail the 
other children at his local tennis or swimming club. 

“Within two to five years, most of the individuals in our 
study began to see themselves in terms of the talent field” 
Mr. Bloom wrote. “They began to see themselves as 
‘pianists' and ‘swimmers' before the age of H or 12, and 
‘mathematicians' before the age of 16 or 17." 

“Most of our talented individuals bad vm good experi- 
ences with their initial teachers, and many had developed 
a very comfortable relationship with than,” Mr. Bloom 
wrote. 

At the second stage of development, as a child's rapid 
progress become apparent, the parents usually sought out 
a more expert instructor or. coach. 

Typically, the new teachers “were perfectionists who 
demanded a great deal of practice time for the student and 
looked for much progress in a relatively short period erf 
time,” Mr. Bloom wrote. 

In the middle years, these young people first tasted 
extraordinary success. 

At this point, their commitment to their field escalated 
one step further. The subjects said they began “living” for 
swimming, a tennis or the piano and devoted hours each 
day to practice. ITiey also sought out the nation's best 
coaches or teachers. 


Sam Nunn 

This year, like last, Mr. Nunn 
and his allies are to argue that un- 
less European NATO partners 
spend more to build up their con- 
ventional forces, the only way to 
stop a Warsaw Pari invasion would 
be to Ore nuclear weapons. They 
quote past congressional testimony 
of General Bernard W. Rogers, 
commander of NATO forces, in 
making that argument: 

“Bemuse of the failure to meet 
commitments in the conventional 
area by all nations and through 
trying to buy alliance defense on 
the cheap by relying on nuclear 
weapons, we have mortgaged our 
defense to the nuclear response.” 

General Rogers added that in 
warning against having to resort to 
nuclear weapons, ‘Tm talking 
about it in terms of days, not in 
terms of weeks or months." 

In an effort to force European 
members of NATO to improve 
conventional forces and fulfill such 
commitments as bnilding shelters 
at airfields for U-S. warplanes. Mr. 
Nunn proposed last year to reduce 
the number of American troops in 
Europe if goals were not readied. 
The amendment was blocked on a 
55-to-41 vote. 

General Rogers is expected to 
repeat his warnings when be testi- 
fies before the Senate Armed Ser- 
vices Committee later this month. 

Why are the NATO armies clos- 
est to the battle area — the French. 
West German and Italian forces — 
putting new emphasis on light 
forces when the biggest problem 
for U.S. forces is to get heavy 
equipment from the United States 
to Europe, Mr. Nunn said. NATO 
partners should go heavy and the 
U.S. light, the senator contended, 
so it would be easier to airlift array 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 1) 


W illiam C Westmoreland 

The costs of pursuing the case 
for General Westmoreland — 
about 53.25 million since the suit 
was filed in September 1982 — 
have been borne by the Washing- 
ton-based Capitol Legal Founda- 
tion, of which Mr. Burt is presi- 
dent. 

He said recently that the founda- 
tion, which is supported by conser- 
vative foundations and business- 
men. was “$500,000 in the hole:" 

The suit stemmed from a CBS 
Reports documentary tilled “The 
Uncounted Enemy: A Vietnam 
Deception," produced by George 
Crile and narrated by Mike Wal- 
lace. 

Both men are individual defen- 
dants in the case, as is Samuel A. 
Adams, a former Central Intelli- 
gence Agency analyst wbo was a 
paid consultant for Lhe broadcast. 

The documentary charged that 
Geperal Westmoreland’s com- 
mand had engaged in a “conspira- 
cy" in 1967 to show progress in the 
war by understating lhe size and 
nature of the North Vietnamese 
and Vietcong enemy. 

As a result of this “conscious 
effort." it said, President Lyndon 
B. Johnson and American troops, 
as well as the public, were left “to- 
tally unprepared" for theTet offen- 
sive by the Vietcong. 

The broadcast said that, for po- 
litical and public relations reasons. 
General Westmoreland imposed an 
“arbitrary ceiling" of 300,000 on 
reports of enemy strength. 

Shortly after the trial began. 
Judge Pierre N. Leva! said the issue 
in the case was not whether Gener- 
al Westmoreland’s command was 
“right or wrong" in its reports of 
enemy strength but whether the 
general had “attempted to deceive" 
his superiors. 

General Westmoreland called to 
the stand 19 witnesses, including a 
number of his senior military aides 
in Vietnam and a battery of rank- 
ing government officials from the 
Johnson administration. 

Virtually all of these witnesses 
testified that lhe general did not. 
would not. and even could not de- 
ceive his superiors. 

CBS began presenting its case on 
Jan. 8. Besides Mr. Adams and Mr. 
Crile, its witnesses included George 
W. Allen, a former deputy to 
George A. Carver Jr., the chief of 
Vietnamese affairs for the CIA; a 
number of other CIA and military 
intelligence analysts from 1967; 
and, in recent days, two key aides 
to General Westmoreland. 

One of those aides. Major Gen- 
eral Joseph A. McChristian, testi- 
fied that, in May 1967, General 
Westmoreland delayed sending a 
cable lo Washington reporting in- 
creased strength of enemy irregu- 
lars because it would have been a 
“political bombshell." 

The other aide. Colonel Gains 
Hawkins, former chief of General 
McChristian's order-of-battie sec- 
tion. said that General Westmore- 
land had fixed a “dishonest" ceil- 
ing on total enetny-sirenglh figures 
because higher figures were “politi- 
cally unacceptable." 


INSIDE 


■ Liberalization of Ireland's 
birth control laws has provoked 
an intense debate. Page 3. 


■ Home mortgage foreclosures 

have increased in the U.S. and 
the decline in inflation is a fac- 
tor. Page 3. 

■ Egypt is reportedy withdraw- 

ing an air-defense brigade from 
Sudan. Pace 5. 


BUSINESS/FINANCE 
■ Six European computer mak- 
ers announced an agreement to 
coordinate development of 
software. Page 7. 

To Our Readers 

Due to the Chinese New Year 
holiday marking the advent of 
the Year of the Ox, the Feb. 20 
issue of the International Her- 
ald Tribune will not be pub- 
lished in Asia. 






Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19. 1985 


Liberalization of Irish Birth Control Law Causes Intense Debate WORLD BRIEFS 


By Barbara Fischkin 

InlentunonaJ Herald Tribune 

DUBLIN — A proposal to liberalize 
Ireland's birth control laws to allow the 
distribution of contraceptive devices to un- 
married people is provoking intense debate 


The opposition Fianna Fail Party, led by 
Charles Haughey, says that the legislation 
is not wanted or needed by the lush peo- 
ple. 

But the government has cited polls that 
show that a small majority of the Irish, 


in this predominantly Roman Catholic especially younger Irish people, would fa- 


lions. In fact, one person indicated to me European countries and legalize practices 
that I was promoting fornication." that are widespread anyway, particularly in 
Other legislators died threats if they Irish dries. Urban physidans often find 
backed the government. One said (hat be ways to bend the law so that they can 
had been told he would be bombed, anoth- prescribe contraceptives to single people, 
er was warned his house would be burned Some birth control clinics simply do not 


country. 

The plan, winch would permit over-the- 
counter sale of spermicides and condoms, 
is expected to come to a vote this week in 
the Dad, the Irish parliament. 

It is still unclear whether the coalition, 
which is led by Prime Minister Garret 
FitzGerald, has enough support to win 
approval. The coalition parties, however, 
are demanding that their members back 
the measure. 

The governing Fine Gael-Labor Party 
coalition, which introduced the proposal, 
holds 85 seats in the Dail the opposition 
Fianna Fail 74 and other parties 6. 


vor a liberalization. 

Legislators have been threatened with 
violence, upbraided by priests and bishops 
who warn they are leading the country into 
moral decay and lobbied by (heir constitu- 
ents. 

For John Ryan of Tipperary, a member 
of the Labor Party, opposition from his 
constituents became so intense this week- 
end that he moved to a Dublin hotel so he 
could think about the bill, which he sup- 
ports. in peace. 

“There was pressure on the phone, pres- 
sure on the doorstep, pressure every- 
where," he said. “There were signed peti- 


ask if a diem is married. 

Rita O’Malley, a married woman who 
had come to listen to Lhe debate last week, 
said that in her family planning clinic, 
“they don’t ask you if you’re married or 


and his wife and children kidnapped. 

Alan Shatter, one of three Jewish mem- 
bos of the Dail, received anri-Senriric mail. 

Mr. Shatter, who is for the proposal said. 

“I got stuff with swastikas on it.” 

Mr. FitzGerald introduced the measure single or nothing." 
last week as an amendment to a family Dr. Rory O’Hanlon, the Fianna Fail 
planning bill passed in 1979 that legalized spokesman' on health, said that just be- 
distriburion of birth control aids for mar- cause something is widespread does not 
ried people. The amendment would permit necessarily mean it should be legalized, 
angle people over 18 years of age to buy “None of us would be in favor of legis- 
“aonmedkal contraceptives” — spermi- taring for heroin.” he said in the Dail. 
rides and condoms — without prescrip- The proposal is said to be Ireland’s most 
dons. emotional issue since a referendum two 

The government said the legislation years added a ban on abortion to the coun- 
would bring Ireland up-to-date with other uy's constitution. 


Oliver Flanagan of Fine GaeL who has 
served 42 years in the Dail. longer than 
anyone else, has indicated he will vote 
agains t his prime minister. 

“You will answer to God for your ac- 
tions on this bilL” he told his colleagues. 

Noting tbe depressed state of Ireland’s 
economy he added: “The best the govern- 
ment can do is free availability of contra- 
ceptives? God save Ireland!” 

Sev eral w omen members of Fianna Fail 
said that they would vote for the bill if their 
party would’ permit it 

“1 would be ending a whole political 
career.” said Mary Harney, who will vote 
against the bill. 

Mr. FitzGerald also hoped that approval 
of the amendment would prove to Protes- 
tants in Northern Ireland that a united 
Ireland would not be ruled by Catholic 
doctrine. 


Greece Opposes U.S., Soviet Missiles 

NEW YORK ( AFP) —Greece’s opposition to the deployment of IIS.- 
built missiles in Europe applies also to Soviet SS-20 missiles. Prime. 
Minister Andreas Papandreou of Greece said in a interview published in 
the current issue of Time magazine, _ 

“We take the view that any measures, American or Soviet, Ihai.may 
lead away from detente to cold war are a threat to peace.” Mr. Papan- 
dreou said. He said that his Socialist government favored a freeze of 
deployment of nuclear weapons, particularly missiles. 

On the Cypriot situation, Mr. Papandreou said there were “ethnic 
bonds of language, culture and history* between Greece and the Mediter- 
ranean island, but that “Cyprus is not Greek territory." He said that 
“neither Turkey nor Greece has any business bring in Cyprus.” 


EC Ministers Back Italian Proposal 


BRUSSELS (Reuters) —A majority of European Community nations 
supported Monday an Italian proposal designed to prevent a rash crisis 
i his year, but diplomats said West Germany continued to hold, out 


against it 

Bonn has been insisting for several months that an agreement to 


Heseltine Defends Belgrano Sinking 
In Falklands War, Denies Cover-Up 


The Associated Press 

LONDON — Micbad Hesd- 
tine, the British defense minister, 
on Monday defended the sinking of 
the General Belgrano, an Argen- 
tine cruiser, during the FaUdands 
war, claiming that torpedoing it 
“effectively knocked the Argentine 
Navy out of the conflict." 

But in a House of Commons de- 
bate on allegations that Prime Min- 
ister Margaret Thatcher’s govern- 
ment has sought to cover up the 
reasons for the sinking, Mr. Hesri- 
tine declared that he “cannot give 
every single detail." 

The missile-armed cruiser was 


vor of tbe Japanese attack on Pearl 
Harbor, “came to us from the most 
sensitive sources.” 

Official sources said that reports 
on Argentina’s naval operations in 
the conflict had been held back to 
protea a vital in telligence-ga ther- 
ing network in Latin America that 
still is functioning. 

Amid allegations that there was 
no overriding need to sink the ves- 
sel Mr. Heseltine said: “Ours have 
not been the actions of people en- 
gaged in a ho/e-in-the-wajf cover- 
up in an attempt to mislead the 
House.” 

He disclosed that he would re- 


sunk by the nuclear-powered Royal **e disclosed mat he w< 

Navy submarine HMS Conqueror 1^ classified documents on the 


on May Z 19SZ killing 368 per- 
sons, the biggest single casualty toll 
of the war. 

Mr. Heseltine said that much of 
the “crucial information” that led 
Mrs. Thatcher to order the sinking 
of the former U.S. cruiser, a survi- 


sinking to a parliamentary commit- 
tee to prove that the government 
has not conducted a cover-up. 

Documents leaked to a member 
of Parliament showed that the gov- 
ernment had misled legislators 
about the course of the cruiser be- 


fore its sinking. The vessel was ini- 
tially said to have been sailing to- 
ward a British task force but 
subsequently was acknowledged to 
have been sailing toward home. 

He said that the rare move to 
hand over classified papers to tbe 
committee inves tigating allegations 
that the government deliberately 
misled Parliament (mi the sinking 
was “quite exceptional” 

Mr. Heseltine stressed that the 
facts surrounding the sinking were 
“totally inconsistent” with pub- 
lished leaks by a senior Defense 
Ministry official, who resigned 
over the weekend. 

The official Clive Pooling, sat 
impassively in the public gallery of 
the House during the debate. 

He was acquitted last week of 
violating the Official Secrets Act by 
giving confidential documents on 
tbe Belgrano sinking to a Labor 
Party legislator, Tam DalyelL 


Thatcher, Union Leaders to Discuss Strike 


Reuters 

LONDON — Prime Minister 
Margaret Thatcher agreed Monday 
to meet leaders of Britain’s labor 
union movement to try to revive 
negotiations in the 1 1-month coal 
strike. 

The meeting of cabinet ministers 
and seven major union leaders rep- 
resenting the Trades Union Con- 
gress were scheduled for Tuesday 
at No. 10 Downing St., Mrs. 
Thatcher’s office announced. 

Until now, the prime minister 
had refused any mediation in the 
dispute, which centers on the dos- 
ing of unprofitable mines. 

Political sources suggested, how- 
ever, that Mrs. Thatcher was reluc- 
tant to appear unhelpful at what 
may be a critical moment in the 
dispute. 

Nonnan Willis, the leader of the 
Trades Union Congress, requested 


the meeting Sunday night, a few 
hours after the collapse of an initia- 
tive to get the two sides together 
again. There had been a four month 
break in negotiations. 

Mr. Willis said tbe gap between 
tbe National Coal Board and the 
National Union of Mineworkers 
was so narrow now that a meeting 
between government and the labor 
movement could bring a swift set- 
tlement. 

At issue now is a coal board 
formula that agrees to an indepen- 
dent — but nonbinding — review 
of planned closings of money-los- 
ing mines. The union has reserva- 
tions about the plan. 

An coal board proposal to sbu! 
20 mines and ev entuall y eliminate 
20,000 jobs provoked the strike 
March 1Z 

Meanwhile, tbe coal board said 
that 964 more miners returned to 


work Monday, far fewer than on 
previous Mondays. Nearly half of 
Britain's 180,000 miners are now 
working, the coal board says. 

Mrs. Thatcher will be joined at 
the talks by Energy Secretary Peter 
Walker. Employment Secretary 
Thomas King and the deputy 
prime minister. Yiscount White- 
law. 


■ Thatcher-Reagan Meeting 
Mrs. Thatcher flies to Washing- 
ton on Tuesday, determined to 
press Presidait Ronald Reagan to 
do everything possible to make a 
success of the arms-control talks 
with the Soviet Union that are to 
opai in Geneva on March IZ The 
New York Tunes reported Monday 
from London. 


Senator Says He’ll Show NATO Firms 


(Continued from Page 1) 
outfits from the United States to 
Europe in the first days of a war. 

General Wickham and Senator 
Barry Goldwater. Republican of 
Arizona, the new chairman of the 
Senate Armed Services Committee, 
sounded plaintive notes in agreeing 
that the United States still did not 
have enough aircraft carrying ca- 
pacity to fulfill the war plans for 
Europe. The airlift shortage, Mr. 
Goldwater said, “has been 20 per- 
cent since World War II and there 
is no way of seeing an improve- 
ment.” 

Tbe reason for this, said General 
Wickham, is that as the U.S. Air 
Force builds more and larger cargo 


planes, the army fields more and 
heavier weapons than the planes 
can cany to Europe within the 
specified time. 

“Lightness is a state of mind," 
Genera] Wickham said- “We need 
to look in the army at lightening up 
One third of the 


our equipment 
weight of our ammunition is just 
wood, the way we have been doing 
it since the Civil War.” The army, 
be said, as part of its weight reduc- 
tion effort is starting to pack its 
ammunition in light plastic. 

Mr. Nunn and other congressio- 
nal critics of NATO’s mtUtary pos- 
ture are demanding a more coordi- 
nated approach to European 
defense, with heavy vs. light divi- 
sions one item on a long agenda. 


“The Gmeva talks are at the top. 
of her agenda.” said one of the 
officials involved in preparing for 
the visit, which will include an ad- 
dress to a joint session of Congress 
on Wednesday, the first such 
speech by a British prime minister 
since Winston Churchill’s in 195Z 
“Anns control will figure very im- 
portantly in what she says privately 
to the president and in what she 
says publicly to Congress,” accord- 
ing to tbe offiriaL 
Mrs. Thatcher and her aides 
have taken great pains in recent 
days to play down any suggestion 
erf a rift with Mr. Reagan. She de- 
scribed herself in an interview with 
CBS News over the weekend as 
“his greatest fan.” But there appear 
to be significant if subtle differ- 
ences between his position and hers 
on Mr. Reagan's proposed space- 
based missile defense system, and 
these are regarded by officials in 
London as sure to come under dis- 
cussion in Washington. 



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LMukT Pres tormanonel 

A modest headstone marks the grave of Nikita S. 
Khrushchev at the Novodevichy Cemetery in Moscow. 
It gives Ids name and the dates of his birth and death. 


Soviet TV Shows Khrushchev 
For First Time Since Ouster 


By Dusko Doder 

Washmpan Post Service 

MOSCOW — The image of Nikita S. Khrushchev appeared for 
several seconds on Soviet television screens Sunday for the first time 
since he was removed from power in October 1964. 

Khrushchev was seen in the rebroadcast of a joint Soviel-Indian 
film about Jawaharlal Nehru, India's first prime minister. Footage of 
Khrushchev that had been deleted in a showing of the film Jan. 26 was 
restored. Tboe was no explanation for the change. 

The Indian version of the film had shown Khrushchev, the former 
Soviet Communist party leader, meeting and conferring with Nehru 
and also included lengthy shots from Khrushchev’s triumphal tour of 
India. 

Mar shal Nikolai Bulganin, who served as premier under Khru- 
shchev but was subsequen tiy disgraced for alleged “anti-party” activi- 
ties, was originally shown as greeting Nehru on his arrival in Moscow. 
That was Marshal Bulganin’s first appearance on Soviet television 
since 19S7, when Khrushchev defeated his opponents. Marshal Bulga- 
nin allegedly supported the Khrushchev opponents. 

Sunday’s showing retained the footage of Marshal Bulganin but 
also showed Mr. Khrushchev in at least three sequences. 

The fact that Khrushchev’s image had finally been shown on 
national television on prime weekend time apparently involved a 
high-level decision. 

Since his removal in 1964. Khrasbchev's name had appeared three 
times in the Soviet media. The first involved criticism of him at the 
time his memoirs were published in the United States. The second was 
a brief announcement of Khrushchev’s death in 1971. The only 
positive mention came in February 1983 when Yuri V. Andropov was 
the party leader and involved Khrushchev's prominent role in the 
battle of Stalingrad. 

No picture of Khrushchev had appeared here for two decades. 
Sunday's action was not seen as indicating that Khrushchev was soon 
to be restored to the pantheon of Soviet heroes. By and large, he 
remains a nonperaon. 


Mengele Seen 
In Portugal, 


provide new- funds for the EC be directly linked to the entry of Spam add 
refuses to bring forward the agreement in spite of a deadlock 


fans. The 
Units 


Portugal. It refuses 
in the entry talks and the threat of 
1985 deficit is expected to be about 3 bi 
(about S2 billion). 

The other EC members back the Italian proposal to finance the deficit 
by grants that are refundable when the entry negotiations are completed. 


D’AmatO Says Poland links Solidarity Office to CIA 


By David Treadwell 

Las Angeles Tunes Service 

WASHINGTON — Dr. Josef 
Mengele. who was responsible for 
thousands of deaths at the Ausch- 


witz concentration camp, left his 


WARSAW (UPJ; — Tbe Polish government on Monday accused the 
Brussels office of the Solidarity trade muon movement of treason because 
of alleged links with the CIA. 

Colonel Zbigniew Pudysz, chief of the Interior Ministry's investigation 
office, said a military prosecutor was conducting an inquiry into the 
center. In an interview carried in Polish newspapers. Colonel Pudysz said 
exiled Polish leaders of tbe Bdgian Solidarity coordinating office woe 
ana -•»/ i/V working with the CIA and with an underground branch of Solidarity, 

t J m “The Brussels office heads are Jerzy MDewsid. Miroslaw Cbqjedd and 

J S others known for their anti-state activity,” he said in the state newspaper 

YoriTh^saii b f N Zycie Warszawy. “The investigation into this case concerns the crime of 

Senator D’Amato. who has lrcason - 

joined in a lawsuit with the Simon n a « » 

Wiesemhal Center for Holocaust KCCOrd SHOW DlSttlptS Area 

GENEVA ,AP> - Road. raU anfar uaffk in the Geneva ana 
. govemroen y remained chaotic Monday after a weekend storm that brought a record 

amount of snow — up to three feet (about a meter). 

Geneva's Coimrin international airport, closed since Saturday night, 
resumed only partial operation Monday. Planes were departing up to 
three hours late, and none were permitted to land. Trains were up to 90 
minutes late. 

Only a handful of Geneva's bus and streetcar lines were operating 
Monday after a complete halt on Sunday. Taxis were scarce. Some people 
walked an hour or more in wind and deep snow to gel to work. . 


uxnents about Dr. Mengele, said 
Sunday that the Nazi war criminal 
has the ability to move in and out 
of Portugal and Latin America 
“rather easily.” 

“Friends of his in Paraguay were 
receiving communications — 
Christmas cards, etc. — as recently 
as 1980." the senator said. “They 
were stampmarkrd and post- 


fS^raSi” European eaaauy ' China Rejects U.S. Charges on Rights 

r He said Dr. Meoeele traveled BELTING (UPI) — China ngected on Monday a Slate Department 

report charging human rights violations in the country, calling the 
allegations “groundless and improper.” 

In a statement issued by the Foreign Ministry. China said: “The Slate 
Department of the United States has made soundless and improper 
comments on the domestic affairs of China. We want to express our 
regret. All (he fundamental rights of the Chin ese people as stipulated by 
the constitution and other laws are fully guaranteed by the Chinese 
government. The Chinese people have never before enjoyed democracy 
and rights and freedoms so extensively and fully as they do today." 

The report on China was contained in die Slate Department’s annual 
assessment of human rights violations worldwide. It was issued last week 
in Washington. 


U.S. Seeking to Protect 
Satellites in Deep Space 


(Cootkmed iron Page 1) 
tem, according to an air force re- 
port to the Senate Armed Services 
Committee last year, “is to develop 
a space- based surveillance system 
which will provide full Earth orbit 
coverage, reduce dependency on 
overseas baring of sensors and pro- 
vide timely, operational coverage 
of objects and events in space.” 

In his annual report to Congress 
this month. Defense Secretary Ca- 
spar W. Weinberger said the space- 
based’ system would “defend U.S. 
space-based systems” and would 
“monitor hostile space weapons 
and satellites.” 

The United States and Soviet 
Union have two types of military 
satellites: those in low orbits above 
tbe atmosphere, up to about J.500 
miles high; and others that are sent 
much farther into “geosynchro- 
nous” orbit in deep space, where 
they orbit at tbe same speed as the 
Earth's rotation and thus remain 
suspended above the same spot on 
Earth. 

The Russians for 10 years have 
had a rudimentary weapon that is 
designed to knock down low-level 
U.S. satellites. Tbe Pentagon is be- 
ginning tests on its own weapon 
that would be able to knock out 


low-level Soviet satellites as they 
pass over tbe United States. 

Two low-level radars, one at 
Kwajalein in the Pacific and the 
other in the Philippines, which are 
not part of the Spacetrack system, 
would provide early warning and 
targeting of Soviet satellites for tbe 
planned U.S. low-level anti-satel- 
lite weapon. 

Neither country has developed 
weapon that could attack satellites 
2Z000 miles from Earth. Nonethe- 
less, the Pentagon has been at work 
for more than four years putting 
together its Spacetrack surveillance 
system. 

If a future Soviet weapon were 
launched at tbe U.S. deep-space 
satellites, the Spacetrack system 
would give American units “ade- 
quate time,” an official said, to take 
defensive actions. 

Next year’s defense budget con- 
tains funds, reportedly 520 milli on, 
to complete the final pieces of the 
Spacetrack sensor system. 

Three of the high-powered elec- 
tronic telescope and television- 
camera units already are in opera- 
tion in New Mexico, Hawaii and 
South Korea. The fourth unit is 


Mengele traveled 
and had great access in Paraguay. 
Brazil and Argentina. 

The senator said in an interview 
on ABC television that he would 
soon be releasing more information 
on Dr. Mengele. But he added that 
be did not know where Dr. Men- 
gde, who would be 73 if still alive, 
may be hiding now. 

The Department of Justice, at 
the direction of Attorney General 
William French Smith, has started 
an investigation into the where- 
abouts of Dr. Mengele, who per- 
formed experiments on thousands 
of Auschwitz prisoners and is said 
to have sent at least 400.000 people, 
mostly Jews, to their deaths. 

The department’s investigation 
also seeks to determine whether the 
UJ5. authorities had contact with 
Dr. Mengele after World War II. 
Evidence has surfaced that Dr. 
Mengele might have been arrested 
by American officials in Vienna in 
1947 and later freed. 

Rabbi Marvin Hier, of the Wie- 
senihal Center, said that docu- 
ments he has obtained or expects to 
obtain from tbe army under the 
Freedom of Information Act do 
not confirm or deny that the Unit- 
ed States once held Dr. Mengele in 
custody. 

But, he added: “For sure, the 
U.S. Army at Fort Meade does not 
know what it has in its files on the 
question of Josef Mengele. Wc 
have absolute proof of that” 

Tbe only way to find out what 
the UJS. Army has, he said, “is if an 
investigating team goes in and sifts 
through, document by document, 
because the ^compute: definitely is 


More Politicians Arrested in Pakistan 


ISLAMABAD. Pakistan (AP) — A new wave of arrests Monday 
virtually completed the military government's crackdown on opposition 
leaders, with parliamentary elections slated in a week. 

In Karachi Pakistan's biggest city, 980 mOes (1.580 kHomelas) south 
of here, four ranking figures were placed under house arrest, the police 
said. The fifth arrest took place in Lahore, 180 miles southeast of 
Islamabad. 

Arrested in Karachi were Ghilam Mustafa Jatoi, leader of the left- 
leaning Pakistan People’s Party; Sherbaz Khan Mazari, head of the 
National Democratic Party; Shah .Ahmad Nooraru, who heads a rightist, 
political-religious party Jamiatul-Ulema-e- Pakistan; and Kawaja Khair- 
uddin. leader erf the Pakistan Muslim League. Qaswar Garden, head of 
the Movement for the Restoration of Democracy, was arrested in Lahore 
along with at least six political activists, opposition sources said. 


For the Record 


not reliable." 


Jeremy Levin, the American television reporter who was freed Thurs- 
day after 1 1 months as a hostage of unidentified captors in Lebanon, 
returned Monday to the United States. He arrived at Andrews Air Force 
Base in Maryland from Frankfurt. (AP) 

Imdda R. Marcos, the wife of President Ferdinand E Marcos of the 
Philippines, said Monday in Manila that her husband has recovered fully 
from a recent ailment and will not resign. (UPI) 

King Hassan II of Morocco dismissed his foreign minister, Abde- 
louahed Bdakziz. early Monday and appointed Abdellatif F Uali. one of 
Morocco’s most experienced diplomats, to reptace'him. (AP) 

Foreigp Minister Andrei A. Gromyko of the Soviet Union is to vial 
Spain on Feb. 28 after talks in Italy. Western diplomats said Monday. 

(Reuters) 


; Trend Is to Bigger, Fewer UJS, Farms 
With High Social Costs in Rural Areas 


(Continued from Page I) 
many landowners being reduced to 
tenants. 

Most agree that the implications 
for the next few years are wrench- 
ing economic trauma, largely in the 
midcontinent, the principal food- 
producing region, which has en- 
joyed the greatest tax-supported 
benefits of price supports and sub- 
sidies. 

“Nobody is going to be left un- 
scathed. neither the fanners, the 
lenders nor the suppliers.” said 
Neil Harl a specialist in the eco- 
nomics of fanning and agricultural 


cold realism voiced by David A. 
Stockman, director of the Office of 
Management and Budget, who said 
recently that the farm economy was 
suffering from “overinvestment.” 
But most do quarrel with his con- 
clusion that fanning is a business 
like any other and that the farm 
and the national economy will ulti- 
mately be better off for a tempo- 
rary shakeout. 

“Clearly, if you let market forces 
make the decision for you,” said 
Michael Phillips, project director 
for the food and agricultural re- 
sources group in the Office of 


notnic strategies adopted by their 
government. 

“The guys hurting the most are 
the risk-takers of the 1970s,'’ said 
Kenneth Farrell director of the 
National Center for Food and Ag- 
ricultural Policy Research, a Wash- 
ington study group. “Many are 
pretty efficient fanners.*' 

Since that time, land and equip- 
ment values have toppled. Those 
same farmers’ debts could now 
equal as much as 60 percent of tbe 
shrunken assets. 

Thor downfall many experts 


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being built on the -British-owned Tcdmol °gy Assessment a congres- say, resulted from a fafliire lo for^ 

islandof Di^o Garcia in lhe Indi- £ ^^anSl omSL' toe * 0DaI agency, “then you are going 

Now. many of the experts also 


an Ocean. Construction of the final 
one in Portugal is scheduled to be- 
gin within 18 months. 

Although this ground-based net- 
work wfll not be fully operational 
until 1988. the Pentagon already 
has a research program under way 
for a space-based version to replace 
iL 

By tbe time the deep-space de- 
fense system is in place, the United 
States is expected to have its new 
sophisticated satellites deployed. 
These will indude updated versions 
of today’s intelligence and early- 
warning satellites and also the Nav- 
starand Milsiar systems, which are 
to provide navigation, targeting, at- 
tack assessment and battle commu- 
nications for aQ military services. 


many smal l communities tbe 
quality of life is likely, to be one of 
the victims.” 



“It’s cry-in-your-beer time,” said 
Kent Puchbauer. agricultural loan 
officer at the Cape County Baltic of 
Jackson in southeastern Missouri. 
“The farmers we are losing are the 
young, the knowledgeable, the ag- 
gressive, the ones American agri- 
culture can least afford to lose.” 

Like Mr. Harl and Mr. Puch- 
bauer, bankers as well as farmers 
look at the economic scene in light 
of the farm debt and interest costs. 
The debt has risen 63 percent over 
the last six years, to $215 billion 
from S132 billion. Interest costs 
have risen faster, reaching a current 
rate of more than $2 1 billion a year, 
while prices erf base crops such as 
com and wheat have fallen. 

Tbe debis, many be ginning with 
land and equipment loans for farm 
expansion in a period of prosperity 
in the 1970s. climbed as many 
fanners refinanced land mortgages 
to pay for crop and livestock losses 
on either crops or pDed unpaid in- 
terest charges on older debts. 

Few economists quarrel with the 


to witness a vast structural change 
in agriculture. The moderate-size 
farm is not going to be able to 
survive.” 

The number of farmers has grad- 
ually declined over the last 50 
years, to about 237 million, from 
more than 6 million. And now most 
of them, about 1.7 million, produce 
very little. 

Wtm win happen to the bulk of 
the 700,000 or so who produce 
more than 90 percent of the coun- 
try’s food is a matter of conjecture 
that can be added only by the past, 
say some other economists, such as 
John E. Lee Jr„ administrator of 
the Agriculture Department's Eco- 
nomic Research Service; 

“From 1981 to 1983, we saw a 
tremendous washout of business- 
es,” Mr. Lee said, “particularly on 


ask, should not the government act 
to ease the hardships resulting from 
its change of economic strategy? 
For the last two years many gov- 
ernment economists have been say- 
ing the problems were concentrat- 
ed primarily among middle-size 
farms with annual sales of 540,000 

to $500,000, leaving the largest, 
those with sales above $500,000. 
relatively untouched. 

Now many of tbe same econo- 
mists say they find that relatively 
few of the largest group are in- 
volved in production of grain for 
cash markets, where the problem 5 
have been most severe Those who 
are so involved, the economist Wf* 
often are suffering as wefl- 

The largest farms, about 25 JXm 


the Main Streets of small towns, or one percent, with sales aiw* 
We guess that when farmers go S500.0Q0 a year, produce about 30 


broke it will bring structural 
changes. But. to be candid, we 
don't really know the structural im- 
plications” 

Others question whether the fad- 
ing farmers are suffering From their 
own mistakes as much as from eco- 


percent of all farm products u> 
terms of cash volume and earn 
about half the profits. But a®*® 
them only 14.6 percent, or about 
3,650, are in the cash grain group- 
where most of the troubles b* vc 
occurred. 


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INTERNATIONAL HKHUJ) TRIBUNE, TI'ESDAY, FEBRI ARY 19, 1985 


Pa He 3 


In Managua, 

" An Increase 

In Squatters 

Sandinists Offer 
No Hope to Most 


StaJi 


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By Larry Rohcer 

Nete York Timet Service 

MANAGUA — In local slang, 
they are known as parachutists. 
They are the landless squatters of 
Managua, and they have earned 
iheir nickname by landing on emp- 
ty lots in every comer of the Nica- 
raguan capital and building them- 
selves makeshift residences of 
wood, plastic and cardboard. 

No one here, not even in Lhe 
Ministry of Housing and Human 
Settlements, knows how many 
there are, but their number is clear- 
ly growing. 

Managua's population has 
grown from 600,000 to nearly 
900,000 since the Sandinist govern- 
ment came to power in 1979, and 
lens of thousands or those new- 
comers have gravitated to “sponta- 
neous settlements'' indistinguish- 
able from the squatter slums of Rio 
de Janeiro or Lima. 

in the last five and a half years, 
the Nicaraguan government has 
spent more than SI 50 million on 
bousing programs for the country's 
32 milli on people. 

Even so, the Housing Ministry 
estimated in 1983 that the "housing 
deficit” was at Least 300,000 units. 
That situation appears to have 
been aggravated by the austerity 
budget this year, which has slashed 
housing expenditures by a third, to 
$40 million. 

The Sandinist government inher- 
ited part of the housing problem 
from the regime of General Anas- 
tasio Somoza. In addition, much of 
what is now central Managua was 
devastated by a 1972 earthquake 
that reportedly tailed 10,000 peo- 



Home Mortgage Foreclosures Rise in U.S. 

Decline in Inflation of Housing Prices Is Gtedm a Principal Factor in Evictions 


Nicaraguan settlers collecting their water at a communal tap in M anagua . 


TT» Nmr Yart Tmmt 


pie. Fighting during the revolution 
also look its toll on the capital. 

For many Nicaraguans, especial- 
ly those in the cities, the possibility 
of obtaining new or better housing 
through official channels seems to 
be receding. As a result, many have 
taken the situation into their own 
hands and moved onto unused par- 
cels of land. 

One day last September, for ex- 
ample, a small group of families 
occupied a vacant field just ofr one 
of Managua's main roads, naming 
their settlement Martyrs of Pan- 
tasma in honor of a group or San- 
dinist war heroes. Now, at least 
3,000 families, or more than 15,000 
people according to residents, live 
on the site. 

The settlers say that living condi- 
tions are precarious, with little pro- 
tection from the elements and diffi- 


cult access to water, toilets, buses 
and fuel. Their future, they con- 
cede, is uncertain. 

Some have come from the j»un- 
tryside in search of jobs and a bet- 
ter liTe in Managua. Others have 
been displaced from their villages 
by attacks by anti-Sandinist rebels 
or, they say, forced removal by the 
Nicaraguan Army. 

The government, however, has 
made it clear that its plans preclude 
aid to the squatters. Housing Min- 
ister Miguel Vigil Icaza said Lhat 
“almost no” new housing construc- 
tion was planned for Managua and 
that the problem was likely to gpt 
worse before it got better. 

“We do not propose to do any- 
thing,” Mr. Vigil said. “We are not 
going to expel them, but neither are 
we going to provide them with ser- 
vices like legal connections to water 


or electricity, much less start pro- 
grams for titles to the land.” 

Managua's squatters, he said, be- 
long to “nonproductive sectors” of 
the economy, and any effort to im- 
prove their living conditions would 
simply continue the “distorted eco- 
nomic structure” the Sandinistsare 
trying to eradicate. 

Some squatLens resent this atti- 
tude, and many fee) they are bong 
passed over in favor of Sandinist 
activists. 

In particular, thdr complaints 
are directed toward a showplace 
bousing project in a barrio called 
Batahola Sur in southwestern Ma- 
nagua. There, 860 new homes have 
been built and occupied by famili es 
chosen through a system in which, 
according to the residents of the 
model project, political loyalties 
were one of the principal criteria. 


Z-'ir'iRi 


Soviet Defector in U.S. 
Masters Media Circuit 


By Lloyd Grove 

Washington Post Service 

i ' WASHINGTON — Arkady N. 
— ... Shevchenko, a former Soviet diplo- 
. r. mat and now a writer, grabbed the 
reporter's band and pulled him up 
. _ the staircase. 

.. . “Arkady, don't you dare take 
. him up there!" cried Elaine, his 
wife of five years. 

Mr. Shevchenko continued op- 
i. Ti ward. Finally he nudged the report- 
\ rrv «[rn er into a shelf-fined sanctum con- 
taining a big brown desk. “Here is 
•" where Z wrote it,” be announced 
- ■ with a flourish. “I know you want 
to see for your story. I understand 

- these things. It’s very American, of 
- •' course." 

The author of “Breaking With 
Moscow," the memoirs of a Soviet 

- official who became a Western spy, 


said that it was only lhe second 

r rter had been per- 
the Shevchenko 


time that a 
milted in si 
household. 

“First was Mike Wallace, 
said. 


he 




Mr. Shevchenko, a former politi- 
cal adviser to the Soviet foreign 
minister, Andrei A. Gromyko, was 
the United Nations undersecre- 
: lary-general when he defected to 
• the United Slates in 1978. 

“American mass media are so 
much interested in personal life," 
be said. “We don't like to wash our 
dirty linen in public. American 
. mass media have a bad habit of 
looking always for the dirty story.” 
In the last seven years, Mr. Shev- 
chenko has parlayed his break with 
Moscow into a berth on American 
- television as Kremlmologjst-in-res- 
klence; a prestigious post teaching 
-"'at Lhe American Foreign Service 
Institute; a lecture circuit itinerary 
. - f^that, according to his agent, Joe 
f j[;. Cosby, brings fees above $12,000; 
i - * and. now, a book already in its 
, ( third printing at Alfred A. Knopf 
.before the official March I pub lira- 


marble end table, smoking menthol 
cigarettes. His hazel eyes glittered 
behind broad-Iensed glasses. The 
“vertical scar on left ankl e" — duly 
noted in his “permit to re-enter the 
United States,” the travel docu- 
ment he must use instead of a U.S. 
passport — is hidden by his soft 
black booL 

“I knew too much,” Mr. Shev- 
chenko said. “I think the Soviets 
would put me . in a mental institu- 
tion. They treat Sakharov better, 
than they would treat me.” Andrei 
D. Sakharov, the Soviet dissident 
and nuclear physicist, is forced to 
live in exile in Gorki. ■ 

Currently a resident alien, Mr. 
Shevchenko said be must wait an- 
other year before he can apply for 
U.S. citizenship, two and a half 
years longer than usual because of 
his former membership in the 
CommunisL Party. 

“I hear some people call me ‘the 
spy who came in from the cold to 
get to the gold.' But I had much 
more gold before the cold You see 
the lawn?” he said gesturing to- 
ward a white-curtained window. 
“In Russia I had a dacha with 
woods all around and a lawn for 
half a mile.” 

Mr. Shevchenko. 54, was born in 
the Ukraine, a doctor’s son who 
climbed the rungs of Soviet society 
to become a privileged and power- 
ful man, a prot6g£ of Foreign Min- 
ister Andrei A. Gromyko. 

It is still unclear why he decided 
to give it all up. Mr. Shevchenko 
said he did it for freedom. Others 
have suggested that be might have 
been blackmailed by the CIA. a 
charge he denies. 



Arkady N. Shevchenko 


“The trouble in the intelligence 
world is you never know who to 
believe;” said a former newspaper 
correspondent to Moscow. “For all 
I know, the Kremlin could be 
laughing their sweet little hearts 
opl” 

“He betrayed his country, and 
lhat speaks for itself,” said the So- 
viet Embassy’s press spokesman. 
Michael Lysenko. 

Mr. Shevchenko has lived in and 
out of the spotlight since April 
1978, when he became the highest 
ranking Soviet official to defect 

A month later, his first wife. 
Lina, died of a drug overdose in 
Moscow. The Russians said it was a 
suicide. 

A few months after that a call 
girl named Judy Chavez an- 
nounced Lhat Mr. Shevchenko had 
paid hex for companionship with 
money from the CIA. Mr. Shev- 
chenko admitted the relationship, 
but denied lhat the money, about 
$40,000, had come from the CIA. 


3d Heart Recipient 
Passes QuietNight 
Without Bleeding 

Untied Press International 

LOUISVILLE. Kentucky — 
Murray P. Hay don had a “very 
uneventful night” less than 24 
hours after a “perfect” operation to 
implant the world’s third perma- 
nent artificial heart doctors said 
Monday. 

Mr. Haydon's vital signs were 
“extremely stable” and his initial 
recovery was better than that of 
William J. Schroeder, who had the 
second artificial heart implant 
Nov. 25, doctors said. 

Dr. Lansing said Mr. Haydon, 
58, who was operated on Sunday, 
had no signs of excessive bleeding 
Mr. Schroeder, 53, had surgery to 
correct bleeding a few hours after 
his implant 

Mr. Haydon's clinical condition 
was listed as critical Monday, but 
stable. Sunday, he squeezed his 
wife's hand when she visited, and 
he waved to her during a later visiL 

Mr. Schroeder has had recurring 
fever since Feb. I and has been in 
low spirits because of ddays over 


could threaten his life, said Dr. Al- 
lan M_ Lansing, director of the Hu- 
mana Heart Institute. The first re- 
cipient, Dr. Barney B. Clark, lived 
112 days with the heart a Jarvik-7. 


By Bert A. Franklin 

New York Times Service 

Washington — T he rate of 

home mortgage foreclosures has in- 
creased to a level dose to the record 
set in the 1973 recession, causing 
anguish for tens of thousands of 
Americans evicted from homes for 
which they can no longer afford 
monthly payments. 

Many housing economists cast 
an unexpected player as the villain - 
the rollback of inflation, particu- 
larly in bousing prices. 

It has removed one safety net for 
homeowners at the same time that 
the customary causes of foredosure 
continue: loss of a breadwinner’s 
job, or of a spouse's second income, 
or exhaustion of unemployment 
benefits or cuts in pay. 

In earlier recessions homeowners 
could often avoid foreclosure by 
selling a house for more than they 
had bought it for, paying off the 
mortgage and moving into a cheap- 
er house. 

Today, with the abrupt slowing 
of a decade of inflation and with 
outright declines in house prices in 
some places; boosing officials say 
many young families are moving at 
a loss. 

From abandonments of Texas 
condominium units by unem- 
ployed oil-field workers to foreclo- 
sure auctions lhat have uprooted 
families in many communities in 
the industrial East and Middle 
West, officials sketch a picture of 
distress that has been liule noticed 
outside the housing and home fi- 
nance industries. 

The inventory of foreclosed 
homes held by the Federal Housing 
Administration, which guarantees 
about 13 percent of all home mort- 
gages, has risen to 40,000, up from 
28,000 18 months ago. 

Alan J. Kappeler, director of sin- 
gle-family housing at the FRA, 
called the high foreclosure numbers 
“alarming, from the standpoint 
that so many people are losing their 
houses." 

“You cannot say that the chan; 
in housing inflation is entirely tl 
cause of this,” he said. “But had 
home inflation not halted, it might 
have bailed out most of those who 
gpt in trouble.” 

The Veterans Administration, 
which guarantees 1 1 percent of aD 
new mortgages, took over 29,000 
foreclosed houses last year, 10 per- 
cent more than in 1983. 

According to the most recent na- 
tionwide figures, 25 foreclosures 
were begun in the third quarter of 
last year for every 10,000 mort- 
gages, the same rate as in 1973. The 
rate surpassed 20 in 1982, for lhe 
first time since 1975. at the same 
time that inflation was dramatical- 
ly slowing. 

La recent months, says Robert 
M_ O’Toole, director of- the VA's 
loan guarantee service, the six 
states with the highest and most 
static inventory of houses fore- 
closed by the agency have been 
Michigan, Ohio, Illinois, Indiana, 
Texas and California. 

The 10 cities with highest num- 
ber of foreclosure as of Nov. 1 
were, in descending order, Cleve- 
land; Camden, New Jersey; Las 
Vegas; Milwaukee; Chicago; New- 
ark, New Jersey, Philadelphia; In- 
dianapolis; Columbus, Ohio; and 
Tulsa, O klahoma. 

Homeowners who paid, say, 
$80,000 for a house in 1980, when 
interest rates were high, may find 
themselves among the thousands 
who have overextended their bnd- 


.i.Dooreuit 

/j? liiiW ■■*»*•* 

£ » * * Having 


Having revealed his work as a 
spy for Western powers, including 
the United States, Mr. Shevchenko 
is again riding Lhe wave. It started 
two weeks ago with the lead posi- 
tion on the CBS-TV program “60 
Minutes" and book excerpts in 
Time magazine and continued with 
appearances on ABC-TV and 
NBC-TV shows and a review of his 
book on Sunday in The New York 
Times Book Review. 

In an interview, Mr. Shevchenko 
tat tieless on a love seat next to a 


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gets. Selling the house now for the 
purchase price, without the added 
lift of inflation, would not net 
enough for a down payment on a 
more manageable home. 

The new surge of foreclosures 
has hurt mortgage lenders and in- 
surers. It has also heavily burdened 
the Federal Housing Administra- 
tion and the Veterans Administra- 
tion. 

The Reagan administration is 
proposing steep i nercases in fees to 
be paid by those who receive home 
loans guaranteed by the two agen- 
cies. Furthermore, bousing officials 

said the losses in the home mort- 
gage industry is likely to add to 
pressures for suffer credit stan- 
dards Tor qualifying for loans. That 
could put loans out of reach for 
man y. 

“No doubt about it. we've taken 
a tremendous hit," said Steven P. 
DoehJer, executive vice president 
of the Mortgage Insurance Compa- 
nies of America, the Washington- 
based trade association of under- 
writers of home mortgages not 
covered by the two U.S. agencies. 


These conventional loans consti- 
tute about three-fourths of the 30 
million home mortgage in force. 

Within the national trend of rap- 
idly rising foreclosure rales, there 
were wide regional variations. On 
Long Island. New York, the num- 
ber of foreclosures has declined in 
recent years. 

But in Tulsa, hit hard by the oil 
slump, lhe FHA is foreclosing on 
mortgages at a rate of more than 
100 for each 10.000. Houston and 
Denver, also hit by declines in oil 
or oil shale development, are not 
far behind. 

Mr. O’Toole said: “Your typical 
guy in a VA foreclosure is a Viet- 
nam veteran, blue collar, in a home 
with an average price of $43,000. 
The home loan was originally qual- 
ified based on two incomes, nis and 
his wife's, and that's where most of 
the problems start. When the hard 
times come, the first people laid off 
are the part-timers, and Lhat is of- 
ten the wife. Then, even where we 
see these people returned to work, 
it is at severely reduced incomes. 
The jobs that put them back in the 


‘employed’ column are just not as 
good"’ 

Thomas R. Harter, chief econo- 
mist of the Mortgage Bankers As- 
sociation, said Lhat unemployment 
has always been a cause for mort- 
gage delinquencies, “a problem of a 
month or two in arrears, but short 
of foreclosure.'* 

“With continued inflation.” Mr. 
Harter said “you could have sold 
that house off and paid back the 
lender and it would never show up 
as a foreclosure." 

In part Mr. Harter blames the 
home finance industry for its own 
problems. 

“When home inflation disap- 
peared they just didn’t believe it." 
he said. “They didn’t adjusL They 
thought it would all come back. 
They didn't^ tighten up the stan- 
dards on which they had made a lot 
of these risky loans’. Thev toe* risks 
because they thought, "no matter 
whai happened, they would be cov- 
ered by home-price inflation. De- 
linquency and foreclosure is the re- 
sult of that process, and now they 
are writing off a lot of those loans." 



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— — — - — - - — 4 Startfng April 2 


Delta Gets Ym Theie^gr- 





Page 4 


iterate 


INTERNATIONAL 

yv 



Eribunc 


PuUnthrd With Hie Mew ^ork Times and 1W Wadnngftm Pool 


Thank God lor Strasbourg 


President Ronald Reagan’s trip to Europe 
next May was beginning to confront him with 
diplomatic questions of greater complexity 
than he cared to cope with. He was to be in 
Bonn from May 2 through 4 for the seven big 
industrial democracies’ annual summit confer- 
ence on economic policy. That much was set- 
tled. But what about May 8. the 40th anniver- 
sary of the end of World War II in Europe? 
That is where the planning got stickier. Last 
June the Western allies of that war had con- 
spicuously omitted the Germans from their 
commemorations of the Normandy invasion, 
and the German government was not anxious 
to have the snub repeated. But Mr. Reagan did 
not care to risk any gesture that might have 
unintended implications in Europe's complex 
and unfamili ar internal politics. Precisely 
where was he to go, and what message was his 
presence there going to convey? 

The White House has now arrived at a deft 
solution. On May 8 Mr. Reagan will address 
the European Parliament in Strasbourg — in 
France, but on the German border. Strasbourg 
and the parliament symbolize a great many 
things that an American president can enthusi- 
astically support without fear of getting entan- 
gled inadvertently in the domestic divisions of 
die countries that he is visiting. Strasbourg, 
which has been under both flags, now stands 
for reconciliation between France and Germa- 


ny — the end of a longstanding and immensely 
destructive quarrel Created by the postwar 
movement to unify Western Europe, the par- 
liament there has become the European Com- 
munity's legislature. It hardly has the impor- 
tance of the national parliaments but, 
particularly since the recent introduction of 
direct elections, it is by no means insignificant. 
As a point on Mr. Reagan’s itinerary, the 
parliament at Strasbourg will stand neither for 
the war nor for the victory of 1945, but for the 
slow and patient work in the postwar years to 
tie die former enemies tightly together. . 

There were other visits that Mr. Reagan 
might usefully have made. He could have gone, 
for example, to the concentration camp at 
Dachau as a gesture of support to ail those 
Europeans — many Germans prominent 
among them — who are determined not to let 
time diminish the lessons of the Nazi period. 

But Mr. Reagan has chosen to follow the 
practice of other American presidents and 
avoid the sites that evoke the most painful 
recollections. Presidents are usually optimists 
who prefer not to dwell publicly on the dark 
side of politics and human nature. Mr. Reagan 
is going to Europe to celebrate the industrial 
democracies' present unity and the world’s 
hope of prosperity. Strasbourg is just the place 
in Europe for such a celebration. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Stockman and the Farmers 


In his present bridge-bunting mood, David 
Stockman is speaking much economic truth. 
He says that the country has more farmers 
than it can use, and that they have invested too 
much in their land and equipment There are 
going to have to be large losses, he further says, 
and some of those farmers are going to have to 
find other lines of work. But to listen to Mr. 
Stockman on fanners is to be reminded that 
gpod economics is often at war with good 
politics, and politicians are not always wrong. 

The question for public policy is not wheth- 
er people are going to be pushed out of fann- 
ing. That has been going on since the years 
before World War 1, and with the steady rise in 
farm productivity it is not going to stop now. 
For half a century the federal government has 
provided shock absorbers to slow this process 
and to make it less painful. But those shock 
absorbers are expensive. Mr. Stockman is also 
right in saying that this forced displacement of 
labor is the sign of a dynamic economy. Econ- 
omists usually talk as though people welcomed 
economic growth. People welcome higher pay 
for what they are used to doing, where they are 
used to doing 11 Bui economic growth strikes a 
much harsher bargain. It makes a society rich- 
er, but only by requiring people to leave their 
accustomed ways of life. It imposes immense 
strain era the people directly caught in it 
• Governments, including the one in which 
Mr. Stockman is a prominent figure, try to 


hold a balance. If they try too hard to stave off 
change with regulations and subsidies, the 
economy stagnates. If change proceeds too 
fast, they risk social explosion. That is what 
happened in Western Europe in the late 1960s. 
After two decades of the fastest economic 
growth in European history, a spontaneous 
rebellion against growth erupted with riots and 
strikes in France, mass ive demonstrations in 
Italy and a surge of terrorism in both Italy and 
West Germany. But not in Britain, where 
growth rates had remained low. The emphasis 
in Europe has since shifted to social stability. 

That is why the European Community, with 
a labor forcejust about the same size as that of 
the United States, still has more than twice as 
many farmers. And that in turn is why the 
Europeans now have vast, unmanageable and 
unsaleable agricultural surpluses representing 
a tremendous waste of labor, tolerated for 
social reasons but imposing a severe penalty 
on the economic progress of EC nations. 

Mr. Stockman advocates doing away with 
the shock absorbers. Here he speaks as a true 
economic radical in behalf of pure efficiency. 
Bui that is a pretty brutal prescription. The 
American practice is to do enough to avoid 
widespread despair throughout the Farm Belt, 
but not nearly enough to hold all the present 
fanners on the land Farm policy is one area of 
government in which half-measures work best. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


Justice, Yugoslavian Style 

The best analysis of the celebrated dissident 
trial that concluded earlier this month in Bel- 
grade came from a diplomat: “The authorities 
have retreated some, but it doesn't mean the 
cause of human rights has been advanced." 

Yugoslavia has extraordinary problems in 
this, the fifth year since the death of Marshal 
Tito. The centrifugal force of its fiercely 
proud, jealous and quite independent repub- 
lics and autonomous regions places at rid: the 
nation that they constitute. These tendencies 
are magnified by the deteriorating economic 
situation. There is fear, some of it justified, of 
external exploitation of those internal stresses 
both from the Soviet Union in the East and 
from Western, anti-communist enrigrf groups. 

The difficulties of the situation have encour- 
aged leaders to respond to challenges with 
cannons when flyswatters would serve. Six 
persons were originally charged with conspira- 
cy against the state. In the end, three stood 
trial on the lesser charge of generating “hostile 
propaganda." The trial of two others is pend- 
ing. Charges against the sixth were dropped. 

The openness of the trial was welcome. But 
the conviction of the three defendants, and the 
sentences ranging from 12 to 24 months, left 
an impression that intimidation of free discus- 
sion was intended, however open the trial 
These three men were guilty of making insult- 
ing references to the ruling Communist Party 
and bad even said thing s defamatory of Tito, 
according to the presiding judge. What they 
insisted were scientific writings were, the judge 
found, tnoety "political tracts." 

There were encouraging elements, however. 


Some intellectuals in Yugoslavia have resumed 
the private meetings in apartments, and the 
“open university" teachin g and talking that 
led to the original complaints in this case. And 
Miiovan Djilas. the celebrated former asso- 
ciate of Tito, whose subsequent criticism led to 
years of imprisonment, was allowed to observe 
the trial and speak freely to correspondents. 

If the trial marks the ascendancy of hard- 
liners. that would bode badly for Yugoslavia, 
if, as many judge, it represents a cautious 
move toward liberality, that could serve the 
nation wdL Its problems will persist if thought 
is strangled by some of Tito’s heirs. 

— The Los Angela Tuna. 

A Disastrous Adventure 

By the end of the summer and for the first 
time in three years there should be no Israeli 
troops left in Lebanon. What wQl “Operation 
Peace for Galilee" be seen to have achieved? 

The Palestinians suffered a major setback, it 
is true. But they have not been destroyed and 
the threat they pose to Israel is not significant- 
ly less than it was before the war began 
Lebanon, on the other hand, far from becom- 
ing the friendly, well-governed neighbor that 
Israel wanted, is now hopelessly fragmented: 
ungoverned and ungovernable. In most situa- 
tions it is Israel’s enemy, Syria, which calls the 
tune in that war-torn country. 

We are witnessing the final stages of the 
most disastrous adventure in Israel’s short 
history. The hope must be that Israel will have 
learned the lesson that not every problem can 
be resolved by resorting to arms. 

— The Sunday Telegraph (London). 


FROM OUR FEB. 19 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: 'Not Dead Yet,’ Mayor Says 
NEW YORK — Mayor William Jay Gaynor 
has shaken up things in such a fashion in the 
last few days that the rumor was started that he 
bad been assassinated. Hie report originated 
with newsboys, who. in endeavoring to sell 
their papas, raised an alarm about the time 
that crowds were “en route” to the theaters. A 
storm of indignation over the deception fol- 
lowed. It was found that the papers contained 
nothing alarming about Mr. Gaynor, who was 
besieged by telephone inquiries at his resi- 
dence. He replied that he “was not dead yet" 
The mayor has been busy cutting off official 
heads lately. He has removed the Aqueduct 
and Water Commission, and, declaring that 
two million dollars in salaries has been wasted, 
he has appointed a new commission. He has 
also opened war in other directions. 


1935: Nazis Execute Women ’Spies’ 
BERLIN — Glaring red posters beanng the 
signature of the public prosecutor cm the ki- 
osks of this city notified staring groups of 
Berliners of the grim fact that. Tor the first time 
in a period of peace, two women — Frau 
Benita von Berg and Frau Renate von Natzner 
— woe beheaded by axe [on Feb. 18] for a 
crime other than murder. Urey were found 
guilty of military espionage by the Nazi revo- 
lutionary tribunal, the People’s Court The 
cryptic official announcement simply stated 
that the judgment against the two women was 
carried out “after the Leader and Chancellor 
had made no use of his right of pardon.” 
“Everybody who commits treason against the 
Fatherland must be completed expunged from 
the commonwealth," says the "Nachtausgabe" 
commenting editorially on the executions. 


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TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1985 


Cycle of Famine Defies a Single Solution 


By Flora Lewis 


P ARIS — There is perverse com- 
fort in the Woridwatch Insti- 
tute's new report on the “State of 
the World." This is a case where 
words, if heeded, can weigh against 


those appalling pictures of people 
dying in East Afric 


i Africa. 

The urgency, tee immediacy of 
those pictures drain the spirit and 
compound the sense of impotence. 
Of course relief must be senL And 
of course it is a stopgap, a puff on a 
vestigial little spark of common hu- 
manity that can be bellowed into 
guilt or hardened righteousness. 

The Woridwatch report has the 
courage to lake a cool scientific 
look at what is happening and try to 
figure out the causes. Blame is 
pointless. There is a vicious cycle to 
which all have contributed, even 
some who with the best of good will 
helped reduce mortality rates and 
increase population, helped extend 
agriculture and deplete the soil 
helped increase industry and ruin 
agriculture, and so on. 

The comfort comes from evi- 
dence that we are finally moving on 
to an understanding of the cycle, 
that there is no single, simple crash 
solution such as zero growth, com- 
puters. politics or such. And with 
that understanding comes new evi- 
dence that the cycle can be reversed 
in a self-reinforcing way. 

Down 
in Africa.! 



'Say. I’m looking for a kid to plav '1985 * . . . ’ 


cycle: Start where you will 
l Population explosion is as 


a place as any, despite the fact 
has a scam popu- 


: the continent 
laiion compared with other parts of 
the world. But the fact that it is 
growing so fast has led to overgraz- 
ing and deforestation. 

The removal of ground cover 
causes rain to run off, which re- 
duces evaporation into clouds, 
which aggravates drought. In other 
parts of the world, the use of fossil 


fuels increases atmospheric carbon 
dioxide, which raises global tem- 
peratures. which helps cold lands 
but makes hot ones less productive. 
It also kills forests, through arid 
rain, which adds to the carbon diox- 
ide level because the greenery can- 
not absorb it for new growth. 

Turn the cycle around: Afforesta- 
tion and serious attempts to reduce 
population growth have a multiplier 
effect on each other. They conserve 
water and help hold down topsoil 
depletion. It is possible, the report 
says, to “transform a problem into a 
productive resource by planting 
trees. Energy conservation not only 
diminishes carbon dioxide forma- 
tion. iL adds capacity in many areas. 

Using dry statistics, the analysis 
confirm good news as well as bad 
news. In the United Slates, the tech- 


nique of ‘• minim um ullage,” leaving 
lubl ‘ 


stubble on the fields, which cuts 
erosion, has extended to a third of 
the crop land. In Kenya, with Swed- 
ish assistance, a relatively inexpen- 
sive soil and water conservation 
program is reversing the trend to 


ever lower food production. How- 
ever it would take a minimum of 15 
years to reach stability. 

South Korea and China are in- 
creasing their tree cover by con- 
scious effort, despite growing popu- 
lation. A watershed reclamauon 
project in Uttar Pradesh, in India, is 
adding productive land, even per 
capita. Brazil is beading to reliance 
on renew able energy resources. 

Admittedly, this is picking the 
raisins out of the pudding. There is 
not enough good news about how 
the worlcfs burgeoning population 
is doing what is needed to enable 
our earthly home to sustain us aiL 

But there is now a growing body 
of knowledge about what should be 
done, and enough examples to show 
that it is economically and socially 
possible. It is not actually being 
done for simpler reasons than might 
be suspected — a sheer lack of un- 
derstanding that the issues are prac- 
tical specific and interrelated. 

There is not a global all-encom- 
passing answer. In some places, ad- 
vanced technology can make a deci- 


sive difference. In others, familiar 
incentives to ordinary, sage hus- 
bandry could turn things around. 
Nobody has an effective super-the- - 
ory. This carries the encouraging 
message that everybody’s reason- 
able contribution can be a real help. 

“Ideology is not a substitute for 


intelligent, responsible policies,’ 
concludes the director of Worid- 


watch, Lester Brown. 

“Pragmatism is the order of the 
day. Even countries with en- 
trenched ideologies can embrace 
pragmatism.” Mr. Brown adds. 

There are needs for long-term, 
medium-term and short-term mea- 
sures to deal with famine. There are 
needs for international programs, 
national government decisions and 


plenty of private enterprise. 

They must not be allowed to un- 


dercut each other. Woridwatch has 
performed a service not only in 
warning that the cycle is hear" 
down now. which the daily he 


lines show, but that going up can be 


a cycle, too. No effort need be futile. 
The New York Tuna. 


Asia Growih 


Is Ignored 
By the West 


By S. Stanley Kate 


Steps Britain Should Take to Prevent a 'Maggiegate’ t£ ; !S 


W ASHINGTON — A generation 
ago, when it was revealed in 
London that a government minister 
named John Profumo had lied to Par- 
liament, Harold Macmillan, the 
prime minister, honorably resigned. 

Recently, when it became apparent 
that Margaret Thatcher’s govern- 
ment had misled or wrongfully kept 
secret from Parli amen t some salient 
facts about a military action in the 
Falklands war, no minister resigned. 
But the civil servant who told Parlia- 
ment the truth was criminall y prose- 
cuted for giving military secrets to 
“unauthorized persons." 

Here is (he story of the potential 
scandal which has received little cov- 


By William S afire 


Pooling, troubled by the misinforma- 
tion provided, became the British 


equivalent of a “Pentagon whisrteb- 
•arUac 


lower": He slipped Parliament docu- 
ments that showed the Argentine ves- 
sel sunk on a date different from the 
one the government had stated, and 
after it had been steaming away from 
the Falklands for 1 1 hours. 

This raised a legitimate question: 
Was the sinking a necessary action to 
protect British lives against a genuine 
threat, as Mrs. Thatcher maintains 
and most of the British public fer- 


vently believes, or was an order given, 
ffet 


Th 


erage in the United States. 

Arg 
inpre 

the Falklands, the Thatcher govera- 


Ihen the Argentine military 
.launched its unprovoked attack on 


ment and the British Navy responded 
heroically. News coverage, however, 
was tightly controlled; no questions 
were raised when the Admiralty an- 
nounced that the Argentine cruiser 
General Belgrano, supposedly ap- 
proaching the British landing forces, 
had been torpedoed and sunk with 
368 sailors aboard. After that sink- 
ing. all mediation efforts ended. 

Some opposition members of Par- 
liament were curious about the tim- 
ing of that decision, and the location 
and direction of the Argentine ship. 
Inaccurate information was given 
them, perhaps inadvertently. 

Last year, a senior civil servant in 
the Defense Ministry named Clive 


in effect, to shoot 368 fleeing Argen- 
tinian sailors in the back? 

Instead of dealing fully and hon- 
estly with that question, the govern- 
ment dealt with the whistleblower. 
The attorney general tracked down 
and indicted Mr. Ponting for violat- 
ing the Official Secrets Act (the 
shame of Britain’s legal system and a 
law that some insecure Pentagonians 
want the United States to emulate). 
Last week, 12 good Britishers and 
true defied the judge and unanimous- 
ly acquitted Mr. Ponting. 

Like Nelson at Trafalgar, the jury 
at the London court expected the 
civil servant to do his duty. 

Mrs. Thatcher now claims sbe was 
out or town and knew nothing of the 
infamous indictment, for whjch her 
Labor opposition all but called her a 
liar. But the essential point is not 
what Mrs. Thatcher knew about the 


indictment and when she knew iL 
Nor is it whether the far-lefL isola- 
tionist opponents of the war have 
ulterior political motives for raising 
the issue: Of course they do. 

The point is this: Why is the 
Thatcher government unable to give 
Parliament, and tee world, a fulf ac- 
count of its sink- the- Belgrano deci- 
sion? Who was responsible for. and 
who else knew abouL the news black- 
out and the misleading information 
fed to Parliament that now' raises 
suspicions of a deliberate cover-up? 
Can the government that failed to jail 
its accuser credibly investigate itself, 
or is a Royal Commission called for? 

When Mis. Thatcher comes to 
Washington this week, perhaps she 
will hare frank answers to questions 
on the minds of those who are not her 
professional detractors. As one who 
cheers the Conservatives, jeers at the 
nuclear kookiness of Labor, and 
rooted for Britain against the Argen- 
tine junta, may I suggest a lesson 
learned here a decade ago that might 

help avoid a “Maggiegate": 

It is not so much the original mis- 
take. if such there was. that ®ets you. 
It is the initial refusal to admit any 
error at any leveL foflowed by your 
indignation at the pryina of those 
election-reversing opposition politi- 
cians and sensauon-seeking journal- 
ists who you are sure want only to 
besmear you for their own ends. 

This self-righteousness leads to the 



M ANILA — From tee Troian 
Hone of antiquity to Ameri- 
ca's involvement in Vi etnam , govern- 
ments have distinguished themselves 
by an ataliiy to pursue policies con- 
trary to theur national interests. Bar- 
bara Tuchman, Pulitzer Prize-win- 
ning American historian, describes 
this in “The March of Folk.*' 

A prime example today is the 
West’s non-response to profound 
economic changes in the Asia-Pacific 
region. Asia’s GNP is growing hy 6 
percent a year, and trade and finance 
even faster. Its buanesses are both 
able and competitive. 

But the continent's move toward 
the center of the world econostir 
stage is hardly reflected in Western 
policies and programs. The West 
should be assessing what Asia's as- 
cendancy wiD mean for its owti na- 
tional economies in toms of growth, 
jobs, exports, imports, joint ventures, 
licensing agreements, financial flows, 
and pressure on currencies. And h 
should be shaping policies to ensure 
teat Western economies share the 
benefits of Asia's economic dyna- 
mism. But apart from an occasional 
conference on whether to call it a 
Pacific basin or a Pacific rim, there is 
little analysis of Asia’s strength. 

The contrast between America’s 
role as impressario of global econom- 
ic recovery in the ] 950s and the walk- 
on role the industrialized West is 
playing in Asia's development in the 
1980s could not be more striking. 
Rather than starching out solutions 
to today’s international financial and 
economic problems. Western nations 
seem to be looking the other way. 
Rather strengthening the insti- 
tutions they created to bring capital 
and development together, their sup- 
port is waning. And programs to edu- 
cate Asia’s future leaders in Ameri- 
can and European institutions have 
all but vanished. At a time when 
increased exports are vital to Asia’s 
access to markets and trade 


mancing is being curbed. 

Only Japan, at the hub of Asian 


expansion, seems to have a dear fix 
on Aria's future role in tee 


mindless fury at “leakers" who let the 
truth seep out, and is followed by 
your certainty that the nation's secu- 
rity — never the embarrassment of 
loyal officers and lifelong political 
colleagues — is the reason for your 
need to stonewall.' to backdate, to tell 
half-truths, to abuse power. 

Careful, Mrs. Thatcher. The Unit- 
ed Kingdom is not the United Stales, 
but public opinion in democrades 
lends to think that wherever there is 
cover-up. there is something to hide. 

The New York Times. 


The Economic Noose Tightens for Fanners in U.S. 


By Ward Sinclair 


W ASHINGTON — “They told 
me to call,” the conversation 
begins, almost without fail. The 
voice usually is tremulous and un- 
certain. crackling in from a recon- 
dite corner of rural America, reach- 
ing ouno a big-city newspaper for 
help or just a word of reassurance. 

Short of a trip to tee midlands, 
where farmers are bolding protest 
rallies and blocking foreclosure 
sales, the long-distance telephone 
easily is becoming the simplest, 
quickest way to assess the stress and 
the economic pain that are besetting 
farming communities in America. 

“They told me to call," it begins. 
The undefined “they" is an Ameri- 
canism for gaining entrte. Il is the 
spumed fanner’s idiomatic way of 
saying he is at his wit’s end and that 
maybe, through a newspaper, he 
can get the attention of officialdom. 

One day it is a farmer from Mon- 
tana, urging the paper to investigate 
the policies of the Farm Credit Sys- 
tem. Another day it is a farmer’s 
wife from Ohio, wanting to know 
how to escape the tightening eco- 
nomic noose. Minnesota is calling 
now, a odd owner saying that her 
town is going to pot and teat outsid- 
ers seem not to care. 

Off and on for three years these 
calls have come to the newspaper as 
the farm economy has continued on 
its rocky course, despite federal 
farm-program spending of more 
than $30 billion. It is as though the 
money has made no difference. In 
the beginning, most of the callers 



'Okay, bring on the sacred cows. 9 


complained of problems in getting 
Fan 


Icons from the Fanners Home Ad- 
ministration (FmHA). 

But now, as credit pressures have 
readied beyond those borrowers of 
last resort who deal with tee 
FmHA, the calls come more fre- 
quently, an average of perhaps one 
a day. stranger reaching out to 
stranger for tee kind word or tee bit 
of advice teat might save a farm. 

The people who call now increas- 
ingly are farmers or farmers’ wives 
who fit somewhere in the middle 
section of American apiculture — 
full-time family farmers who rely 
entirely on the soil to sustain them- 
selves. Of the country’s 2.4 million 


farmers, roughly 650.000 of them fit 
into this middle range. 

Increasingly, the rails are weight- 
ed with anxiety. The voices speak of 
fear of the future, diriUurionment 
with government and desperation 
over tee prospect of losing a farm 
teat has been in tee family for gen- 
erations. Young farmers, particular- 
ly, in a credit bind because they owe 


too much, get on tee phone. 

They tell of country banks that 


are tightening tee credit screws, 
darkening the hope of financing a 
crop for one more year. They talk 
with concern about what is happen- 


ing to their country communities, 
whe 


here they will go and what they 
will do if ihe farm fails. 
Newspaper-,, for 3)1 they are 


cursed and for all they are distrust- 
ed, always have been" this society's 
traditional, informal court of last 
appeal. When the congressman will 
not, when tee FmHA supervisor 
laughs the farmer out the door, 
when the bank turns a cold shoulder 
to tee loan applicant, tec telephone 
calls start craning thick and fasL 
Those calls often mean that the 
system is not working, is not re- 
sponding as iris supposed to. When 
a farmer is rejected by the FmHA. 
he is supposed to be told why and he 
is supposed to be told that he has 
appeal rights. Often he does not 
know of ibis until too laic, and then 
he phones the newspaper. If today's 
calls mean anything, there is mas- 
sive systemic failure and paralysis 


in tee institutions designed to serve 
the agricultural sector. 

The small farmers do not calL 
Statistics from tee Agriculture De- 
partment say that most of these 
small operators subsidize them- 
selves with off-farm jobs. 

The big fanners tend not to call, 
either, although many of the biggest 
operators who produce the bulk of 
the country's grains have credit 
problems as well. Perhaps too 
proud, perhaps able to find other 
financing, they do not call. 

“These people won’t give up tee 
' land," a woman from tee Midwest 
said the other day. “(If) they give up 
the land, they give up their homes. 
There is nowhere to go. They won’t 
allow themselves to be forced 
Another caller talked of plots — 
and with more and more frequency, 
there is a belief that a great conspir- 
acy is working to wrest the land 
from the tittle people and concen- 
trate it in the hands of tee wealthy. 
True or not, the belief is there and it 
is apowerful force in the country. 

The dairy farmer from Ohio is a 
regular. Last June, tee stale office of 
the FmHA approved the loan re- 
quest that was denied at the county 
leveL The money did not come. 
FmHA said it would be October 
and then January. It did not come. 
FmHA then said it would be early 
February. Thai was changed again 
to mid-March, almost too late to 
meet his spring planting needs He 
may gel the money or not 
A 60-year-old woman called from 
Minnesota, nearly in tears. With 
fear-struck voice she told of the im- 
periled family farm, the disabled 
veteran son who cannot get govern- 
ment help, her small-town raft 
about to go broke, her congress- 
man's secretary rude and unhelpful. 

"Where twll we go? What wifi we 
do?” she pleaded. “What will hap- 
pen to this town? All the farmers do 
is ril around and drink coffee. Yes- 
terday was Sunday and you know 
how many meals 1 served? Three 
breakfasts and one dinner. All tee 
rest was coffee. We can’t make it 
serving just coffee." she said. 

“They told me to call you," sbe 
had begun, but there was tittle to be 
said in reply. It hurt all day long. 

The Washington Post. 


economy. And by its active and visi- 
ble support for the development aspi- 
rations of its neighbors, Japan is en- 
suring itself a key role m Aria's 
coming era of economic ascendancy. 
Western industrialized countries 
would do well to follow Japan’s lead. 

For example. Western nations 
should upgrade their presence in Aria 
and attune their economic policies to 
Asia's development As a first step, 
they must realize that economic de- 
velopment, not military hardware, is 
Asia's top priority. Asia’s leaders see 
an expanding economy as their best 
faqpe-for higher firing slandardsr so- 
cial justice and political stability — 
and, therefore, as their best defense. 

Commerce — exports, imports,' fi- 
nance and investment —presents vir- 
tually unlimited opportunities for an 
increased Western role in Asia. 
Moreover, nothing would ensure tee 
West a greater stake in the region's 
economic future than opening up 
markets for Asian products. Asia will 
also need vast amounts of capital 
investment and imported goods and 
services to fuel its economic drive. 
Private investment by Westernere 
could advance the region's economic 
development objectives and ensure 
Western participation. 

Exporting to Asia will depend in- 
creasingly on contacts and credit 
Western countries coaid take another 
leaf from Japan’s book by sending 
more frequent trade missions to Asia 
with competitive financing propos- 
als. Whereas U.S. officials who visit 


Asia usually leave behind mutual se- 
curity agreements, Japanese officials 
leave behind lines of export credit 
The extent of Western participa- 
tion in Asia can also be measured by 
multilateral development institu- 
tions, namely the International Mon- 
etary Fund, the World Bank and tee 
Asian Development Bank. These in- 
stitutions loom large in Asia and their 


activities are monitored by gqvern- 
t to 


meats. Increased support for Asia's 
development institutions would en- 
hance the industrialized nations’ rde 
in the continent’s economic growth. 

Scholarships for Asia’s future lead- 
ers could agpin, as in the past, in* 
crease the West's role in Asian devel- 
opment. Few activities can make so 
fundamental a contribution to devel- 
opment or forge such Long-lasting 
links with Aria at so hole cost. 

It is economic folly by the West to 
pursue policies essentially oblivious 
to the economic rtmng p* now taking 
place in Asia. The Asian nations 
themselves are increasingly looking 
to tee West as their model fra future 
economic development They need 

ing toward^h^raL TbkpSea to the 

West offers an 

city to bring Asian nations to the free 
market side of the East-West eco- 
nomic ledger. To grasp tins opportu- 
nity would be a major strategic 
achievement for the West. To fail to 
do so would constitute the fiist chap- 
ter of a future “March <4 FoBy.” 


The writer is vice president, finance 
and administration, of die Asian De- 
vdaptnau Bath in Madia. He cm- 

Uibuied Ms comment to the Interna- 
tional Herald Tribune. 


LETTER 


World Arms Spending 


In “Middle East in Anns: Swelling 
Armies Lead tee World in Weapons 
Imports” (Jan. 29), David Lamb 
notes that “the region has less than i 
percent of the world's people, jet 
accounts for more than 8 percent a 
the world’s military spending- 
Could someone give me comparable 
figures on U.S. population andp**' 
centage of world military spending- 
BARBARA VAJK. 

Douamenez, France. 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1985 


IgtjQ Pretoria Drops Charge 
t| f | That Catholic Bishop 
' Defamed Police Unit 

• . r :.- , iiuKiatnJ Prru had correcily quoted Archbishop 

PRETORIA, South Africa — Hurley as saying (hat “security 
; The govemraem dropped a crimi- forces in South-West Africa (Na- 
nal case Monday against Archbish- nribia) were still perpetrating atroc- 
' t ■ . • op Denis Hurley, a prominent anti- ities against local blacks." 

1' >. c apartheid campaigner and South But the state recently acquired a 
“ 25 / Africa’s leading Roman Catholic tape recording oT Archbishop Hur- 
-r ‘ cleric, saying the charge that he had ley’s statements, and it showed dis- 
defamed police was based on hear- crepandes with the reporter's ver- 
sav. sion, Mr. Roets said. 

. . 1 Among Archbishop Hurley’s ■ 3 KiDed in JDtstnrbances 

Jft “ b “ 

• Anglican bishop of Johannesburg aovernment was about in 
wbo won the Nobel Peace Prize last CSSStolo^SUlS 
' TT.^ vear, and several overseas represen- A.«neni«t pJL 

Church. Spectators broke into ap- H B F 

■ t?- t hM, . wll “ lhe c * lar 8 e -M Genii Viljocn. lhe South African 

AiShichon Hiirinr m miflisU:r of stale administration, 

• - a Arcnbtsh^j Hurley, ,69, pres- denied **Ln the strongest terms" 

■ - to ^ ^ Southern AfncanCath- that the forced relocatira of 60.000 

; • oLc ?“?' l S Lr - C ?f e , rence ’ was - ** or more Crossroads residents was 
V' *' cus ^ of making false accusations imminent, saying, "I want to repeat 

ra y undertaking that notice wwbe 
.«■ i :■ . cn< f e H "" 1 given timeously of any steps envis- 

• - wd°oraed the tnal because “a lot of |ged in this regard." 

dinwnllcomeotiL Rumors that trucks and work 

t.- ^ P? crews were being massed to begin 

■ r: -' ' blCk the removal of people from the 

■ - ^ biSouth-West Afnca. or Na- near Cape Yown led to the 

■ mibia. The case against him was 

. .; ■ widely seen as part of a government 

effort to quell criticism from the ir -m t -m 

■ = churches, which have played a f /ffljf/P* l\f~k 
‘ ■' principal role in opposing the ■*-**-*'" ' 

white-minority government’s poll- ; 

' ' • des of apartheid. By Steve Lohr 

It is a crime under South African _ Netc York T,mes Seniee 
law’ to make false statements WELLINGTON, New Zealand 
.- against police — Prime Minister David Lange, 

; Frans Roets, the regional prose- w !~ Monday that he 

cutor, said in court that an investi- 
Vgation showed the allegations U 

- against Archbishop Hurto were ^poncaU by a U.S. destroyer, has 
.' • f Ed on hearsayf and that the to the nuclear 

- 'state, therefore, did not wish to disannament movement for at least 

. proceed with the case. two decades. 

• - . _ . .. . ... . , His stance rankled the Reagan 

Denis kuny. the archbishops administration and won worldvride 
. Lawyer, saidit was unfortunate that acclaim from anti-nuclear groups. 

lk» nSMWffVi n^iriu fnm inmw ... _ .K * 



Egyptian Air-Defense Unit in Sudan 
Being Withdrawn, U.S. Sources Say 


sion. Mr. Roets said. 

mg Archbishop Hurley’s ■ 3 KiDed in JDtstnrbances 
ters m the courtroom when Three men urere L-;u«i 

1 lencc ™ **« Crossroads squatter 

c ' { y Mooda > a ™* 1 rumors that the 

d ®ovmg residents to a new site. The 

of^kT Associated Press reported from 

Town. q U Xg P olic C 



By David B. Ortaway and Sudan are conducting secret 
Washington Pan Service talks on ending their support for 

WASHINGTON — Egypt has eadi other’s rebels. The Associated 
decided to pull out an air-defense Press reported from London.] 
brigade that it sent to the Sudanese Without Egyptian support, Gen- 
capital of Khartoum in March after eral Ntmcnrs survival in face of 
an attack on the city by a Libyan mounting internal opposition to his 
bomber, according to Pentagon government appears uncertain, 
and State Department sources. General Nimeiri has survived at 

The remnants of the brigade are least 20 coup attempts since com- 
scfaeduJed to leave by the end of mg to power in a nuKiaiy coup in 
this month following the failure of 1969. and his govercunou is fight- 
Egypt and Sudan to set up a perma- ing rebel secessionists in the south, 
neat air-defense system for the cap- Egypt is bound by a defense Lrea- 

itai, according to the sources. ty to defend Sudan against external 
The withdrawal of the brigade, aggression. In 1982 the two nations 
apparently purely for nriliiaiy rea- signed an economic integration 


and Sudan are conducting secret are worried about chaos erupting if 
talks on ending their support for General Nimeiri suddenly left the 
each other’s rebels. The Associated scene. 

Ptks reported from London.] The officials admit, however, 

Wthoui Egypnan support. Gen- that relations between Egypt and 
end Nimem s survival m face of Sudan have become delicate and 
mounting interna] opposition to his that Sudan has become a foreign 
goveramtmt app^ uncert^ policy preoccupation. 

General Nun an has survived at -n.! e ■_ nr..u- ■ 



sons, comes a mid increasing divi- 
sion within the Egyptian govern- 
ment over its policy toward Sudan 
and bow dose Cairo should contin- 
ue to associate itself with the Suda- 
nese president. Major General 
Gaafar Nimeiri. 


policy preoccupation. 

The fear in Washington is that 
coud in Soviet-backed Libya and Ethiopia. 

fioht already deeply involved in aiding 
te south" ^ r ™ els a 8 ainsl General Ni- 
nse trea- ““^’s government, will both rush 
external 10 whoever tries to take his 
.nations t*? ****** 
egratian 9“ s *^ n ™ o* shifting Egyptian 
attitude is the increased contacts 


The Hrfjjf w treaty does not com- between Cairo and Sudanese oppo- 
it Cairo to help General N imeiri sition representatives since last 


against internal unrest, but Egyp- 
tian mihtazy intervention already 
has saved him from his enemies at 
least twice — in 1971 against the 


Egyp tian officials in interviews Communists and in July 1976 
in Cairo last month made clear that against a Libyan-backed insurreo 


the issue was regarded as extremeh 
delicate because of General Ni- 


non in the capital. 

A Sudanese government source 


spring. 

President Hosni Mubarak of 
Egypt reportedly has been using a 
“kid-gloves" approach toward 
Genera Nimeiri, preaching moder- 
ation and reconciliation to him in 
their frequent meetings. 

General Nimdri's decision on 


Archbishop Denis Huriey, right, with Bishop Desmond Tutu in a Pretoria court Monday. 


ed in this regard." day of violence. Police used bird- 

Rumors that trucks and work shot, rubber bullets and tear gas to 
crews were being massed to begin break up crowds, 
the removal of people from the A Cape Town police spokesman 


Monday afternoon. He confirmed the government would bold off on 
that three men were killed and 1 1 forcibly relocating black villages 
people were wounded in (he fight- from white areas, but he specifical- 
ing. Iy excluded squatter camps from 


the possibility that he might turn Sudanese Army no longer fully 
on the Egyptians if -they pressed supported General Nimeiri. "But 
him too hard They thought he' they want a guarantee the JEgyp- 
might even mak e an allian ce with dans will not intervene if they act," 
his chief enemy. Colonel Moamer the source said. 


camp near Cape Town led to the said it was "quiet but tense" by late Mr. Viljoen said this month that the suspension. 

Lange: No Newcomer to Criticism of, and by, U.S . 


Qadhafi of Libya. 

[The London newspaper The 
Observer has reported that Libya 


Apparently no such guarantee 
has been forthcoming, largely be- 
cause Egyptian and U.S. officials 


leader of the Republican Brothers, 
a moderate Islamic fundamentalist 
sect, appears to illustrate that the 
Mubarak soft line is not working.. 
General Nimeiri appears deter- 
mined to follow through with the 
imposition of strict Islamic law in 
the country. 


By Steve Lohr 

Ne v York Times Service 

WELLINGTON. New Zealand 
— Prime Minister David Lange, 
who announced Monday that he 
will visit the United States next 
week to explain his refusal to allow 
a port call by a U.S. destroyer, has 
been sympathetic to the nuclear 
disarmament movement for at least 
two decades. 


- . the state needed nearly two years to 
V learn that its case was based on 
■ ' hearsay evidence. 

The charge, filed in October, fol- 
lowed Archbishop Hurley's rc- 
marks alleging that a South African 
. police unit in Namibia had com- 
mitted atrocities against black vil- 
~ lagers. His statements were based 
• on a church investigation into the 
conduct of South African military 
and police units in the war against 
: guerrillas in the terrority, which is 
- under South African control. 

. . ; Mr. Roets said the state initially 
could find do recording of the press 
. conference in February 1983 and 
. . based its case on a South African 
news agency report The reporter 
: later filed an affidavit saying he 


but it is not the first lime his out- 
spoken stands on issues have irri- 
tated U.S. officials. 

In the mid-1960s, Mr. Lange, 
then a crusading liberal lawyer, was 
a harsh critic of the U.S. involve- 
ment in Vietnam. Later, apparently 
in response to his anti-war activi- 
ties, he was denied a visa to (he 
United Stales. 

Yet the prime minister’s decision 
to ban a port call by an American 
warship unless the New Zealand 
government was assured it carried 



But the rejection of ships capable 
of carrying nuclear weapons is now 
pan of the political mainstream, 
certainly in the Labor Party, which 
won the general election in July by 
a nearly 2 -to-l margin. 


time last year, he espoused a "non- . 
negotiable policy" that neither nu- 
clear-armed nor nudear-powered 
ships would be permitted in New 
Zealand pons. The United States, 
as a matter of policy, refuses to say 


“The public response to this de- whether its warships are carrying 
cision has been very positive for the nuclear arms. 


Owiofts 

David Lange 


United Stales. power since entering Parliament in 

Yet the prime minister’s decision 1 977. 
to ban a port call by an American Moreover. Mr. I-mge has led the 

warship unless the New Zealand seven-month-old Labor govern- 
govemment was assured it carried menl on a surprisingly conservative 
no nuclear weapons was less a mat- path in the key area of economic 
ter of long-held principle than po- policy. To the delight of the New 


litical pragmatism. And it has been 
Mr. Lange’s reading of political 


Zealand business world, he has 
proven to be an advocate of free 


trends and shifts in public opinion enterprise and less government in 
that largely explain his rapid rise to the marketplace. 


The Past Catches Up With an Israeli 'Collaborator’ 

(Continued from Page I) nondescript yellow apartment “Everyone who was with Israel mosque just up the block, and he 


toward Beirut. Lebanese troops house. Others flagged down traffic 
wbo lode over Sidon on Saturday warning that there might be shoot- 

appeared powerless to establish or- ing ahead. Mr. Habli’s gunm en had con- Ma .V ^ Ior resistance activity, 

der.j Crowds on bakonies trolled a section of the old city. Of the clergymen at the 14 or 15 

Dozens of Lebanese and Pales- ^ ■ doo ^^ vs ^ mg*, extorting money from the gold mosques in the aft, be estimated 

limans wbo helped the Israelis have ^ bystanders Lhouehi were toets in the market and otter ttel the Israelis had expelled about 

assassinated m Ae pas. few *»» P "* 40 *** *<• "*“■ 10 lb “ 

weeks. In Sidon last week a masked ran into the building and came President Gemayal and otter h- ,/iM him 

gunman killed a pro-Israeli militia- QUl dr agging a manrn pale blue leading figures came to the city m? 

man in a video game arcade: anoth- paja^tnd slippers. Sunday to celebrate the departure whai had just happened to Mr. 


government.” said Mr. I .ang p “U Mr. Lange, 42, was raised in a 
has set off an upsurge of national- liberal Methodist household where 
ism in New Zealand." the children were drilled with the 

The prime minister's office says values of charity and duty, 
mail on the subject is running 95 After receiving a law degree from 
percent in favor of the ship ban. Auckland University. Mr. Lange 1 
and 15,000 people in Auckland re- went to work for a law firm in 
cently supporting the move. The Auckland that seemed to specialize 
Swedish Peace and Arbitration So- , 0 clients once described as “the 
riely. Sweden’s largest anti-war or- ^ down-and-outs." 
ganization. has nominated Mr. Mr. Lange won a seat in the 
Lange for a Nobel Prize. House or Representatives in 1977. 

Mr. Lange has been portrayed of in Parliament, his skills as an ora- 
late as an idealist willing to stand tor gained him national recognition 
up to a bullying nuclear superpow- a t a time when the Labor Party was 
er. But, in fact, the prime minisier in nee d of fresh leadership, 
tried to revise the Labor Party's ji W as on the issue of leadership 
hard-line ship ban policy in March and the economic policy failures of 
1 983. less than two months after he sir Robert Muldoon, the previous 
became the party leader. At the prime minister that Mr. Lange’s 
time, he considered the rigid anti- successful campaign last year was 
nuclear stance understandable, based. 

even admirable, but “unrealistic.” Mr. Lange’s election marked the 
Faced with a near-revolt in his passing of power to a young gener- 
party. Mr. Lange pragmatically ation of leadership in New Zea- 
c hanged his position. By election land. He is 22 years younger than 

Sir'Rpbert, and the members of the 

Labor cabineL are mostly in their 
~|~| -■ ^ • 30s and 40s. Their views on domes- 

nl 151 rWYraiYYr tic issues are more liberal and. in- 
UiUUnnaiUl leroationally, they arc less pro- 

American than their predecessors, 
mosque just up the block, and he "The Lange generation’s in- 
was returning for the first time volvement with America is protest- 
since the Israelis expelled him on ing the Vietnam War," a U.S. offi- 
May 25 for resistance activity. dal said, “not fighting side by side 
Of the clergymen at the 14 or 15 with us during World War IL” 


In Athens 

there's one luxury hotel the rest are judged by 

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will be killed.” said a boy of about «■» returning for the first time volvement with America is pre 
10. since the Israelis expelled him on ing the Vie tnam War," a U.S. 


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May 25 for resistance activity. dal said, "not fi 
Of the clergymen at the 14 or 15 with us during \ 


TSiSn: r pajamas and slippers, 

er body, riddled by gunfire, was ” . s 

found one roo ming with a sign Amid angry shouts and gestures 


of the Israeli troops. But in a way. 
the events on the few blocks of the 


. “““ O — — - -er- . , J.-.-- J thaw “fc «UIU uu LUC ISW UIMU Ul LUC 

_ reading, “collaborator." ^ MJside neighborhood Sunday af- 

Mr. Habli’s time came at 3 P.M. wrKtled the man to a Mercedes |eni00IJ about the turn- 


_ — came at 3 P.M. ” V" * ternoon told more about the turn- 
on Sunday in a hillside neighbor- over of power as the Israelis pulled 

hood overlooking the old dry. t p? Mercedes and a second car ^ 

Most of the city was still cele- full of gunmai sped off. Tcctc was . f M 

it was dear^at little good Habh. anotber car pulled up and a 
^yLTiS £e£ was in store for him. majjk ipafe blue eyes and a neat 

■ looned with Dags and clogged with The crowd that gathered in the 

marching bands, Boy Scouts and street was eager to identify Mr. The crowd rushed over and 
caravans of visiting dignitaries. Habli, or “the captain, as he was many began bugg in g him, some 
'-dozen young called, and explain wfaal was going weeping. 

es carrying Ka- on to a handful of foreign journal- He was Sheikh Mufak Rawas. 

les rushed to a ists who had stumbled on the scene, the Sunni Moslem clergyman of the 


. Suddenly a half-dozen young 
men in civilian clothes carrying Ka- 
lashnikov assaul t rifles rushed to a 


He was Sheikh Mufak Rawas. 


Habli. 

“Each Moslem is part of the Is- 
lamic resistance," he said. “We are 
with everyone who is against Israel 
and against everyone who is with 
IsraeL" 

■ Fundamentalist Protest 

Witnesses estimated that (here 
were -between 10.000 and 12,000 
Moslem fundamentalists in ibe 
demonstration against Mr. Ge- 
mayel on Monday, Reuters report- 
ed from Sidon. 

Escorted by gunmen with auto- 


More like floati o 
you're flyingA 


when 




vvV'.".-- ••• • . ’ 

.•?-*> > r Y. l *.v. y ' 






Israeli Town Expects Shelling Again 


(Conthmed from Page 1) realization that there is no longer a 
executed the first staae of its three- Atfva, the receptionist 


the Sunni Moslem clergyman of the matic rifles and grenade la uncher s. 

groups of demonstrators rampaged 
> • a • through the streets, storming into 

ifn Of A 0/1111 five stores to smash liquor bottles. 
/f/f O It was the first major show of 

, , , .. . , force by gunmen in Sidon since the 

But both students said they and Israeli withdrawal 
their friends supported the with- The demonstrators, mainly from 
draws! decision. “We have to get West Beirut’s poor Moslem sub- 
out of Lebanon, we can t ^ on like urbs, carried placards of Lebanese 


executed the first stage of its three- 
stage withdrawal from Lebanon. 


at the North Hotel which has been 





this,” Miss Zafrani said. 

Tf757S* Wt by The government of Mroe Minis- 

p^tSStetteeaitoKir- prefer tins. It’s belter than 600 ^ shimon Peres invested much 
L. ci d... ,h» miflw soldiers unea. ume and enerev in coavuana this 


yat Shemona. But when the with- 
drawal is completed — it is sched- 


Mr. Peleg. the school 


tiled for late simimer or early fafl— said, “It's not so much fear that live but to withdraw. In the days 
this community of 14.000 wQl again people fed as uncertainty. They following the cabinet's decision, 
be in range of Katusba rockets, the know tbey won t suffer like they Mr Peres; Mr. Rabm; the army 
Soviet-made weapon that Palestin- did m 1981. It won t go back to chief of staff. Lieutenant General 
ian guerrillas in southern Lebanon that." Moshe Levy, and the army's nonfa- 

constantivused to threaten and in- The first half of 1981 was diffi- era commander. Major General 
tenniuentiy shell this and otter cult for Kiryat Sbemona. The On Orr. viaied here 10 reassure the 
northern Israeli towns. town's population was then 18,000. population. When Mayor Prosper 

w o bm amid the pounding of artillery Azaran, a member oflsrad s nght- 

Menachem Be^n. who as jraoe barrages from the near- ist Likud bloc, organized a demon- 


principal, 
fear that 


lime and energy in convincing this 


Moslem figures and of the Iranian 
leader. Ayatollah Rubollah Kho- 
meini. 

“God is great, we want a Moslem 


fX&.v .>• 








ian guerrillas in southern Lebanon that. 

constantly used to threaten and in- The first half of 1981 was diffi- 
tenniuandy shdl this and other cult for Kiryat Shemona. The 

J •_ than 1 r rem 


aL town that there is now no alterna- city and an Islamic rqiublic," they 
tat five but to withdraw. In the days chanted. “Where was the army 
iey following the cabinet's decision, when the Israelis were here?" 
tey Mr. Peres; Mr. Rabin; the army Shops closed hurriedly and resi- 
to chief of staff. Lieutenant General dents retreated to their homes. 

Moshe Levy, and the army’s north- Troops stayed at their posts but did 
fi- era commander. Major General not intervene. 


northern Israeli towns. 

"• Menachem Begin, who as prime 

minster V 2 by Pal«tinian bases more than half stration to protest the withdrawal 

aon, promised that such attacks ^ r Je flcd The high decision, only about 50 people 

- vrald new come ran .g ^teSTl^ueSy was empty.T showed up. 

h 9 e rationaJe'for children kept at home by their par- Mr. Bitton. the security chief, 
i .JTBf destruction that e.t.^e spent days at a time in 


town's population was then 18,000, 
but amid the pounding of artillery 
and rocket barrages from the near- 


. Mi uit uuiui hum ■ rLJtare 

1 ascended on sonthera Lebanon ibe shelters, 
vith the invasion. Then, m J 

“Karushas will never again fall sP 0118 *™ “ 
-- m Kiryat Shemona," te exhorted brought 11 c 
n rallies in support of the war. « s UppqrtJ 
- ‘Never. Never again." 

But that was more item two 
' -ears ago, before more man 600 . j 
sraeti soldiers had died in Leba- .. I . , 
non, before the war deeply divided *‘“8 ; m 1 1 


„ c ^ ,l eliminate the threat against this 

But that was more than two other communities in northern 
' ears ago, before more man «JU Israe j 
sraeti had dirf Id i Ute- Mr. pdeg’s office. Nel- 

Aon, before the 1 [y ZaSi, 17, and Shukey Jacobs, 
^ he country and helped to mipple r 1981 Thev said thev 

be national economy. Now ihercis 

, w goveranent m abouIwtatwfflhappnimUKcom- 

.*rSlS5K=rE? , " b ibg niontlu as lhe mililaiy comin- 


the shelters. and a half years. We have finished 

Then in Julv of that year, a U.S.- the holiday and now we must pre- 
sponsewed cease-fire took hold and pare. Begin promised, and he tried, 
brought 1 1 months of quiet to Isra- We’re glad he gave us two and a 
el’s Upper Galilee region. The inva- half years of holiday." 
sion the next year was intended to j 


■ 3 Killed in Beirut Bombing 

A car bomb exploded Monday in 
a Shiite Moslem suburb of Beirut, 
killing three persons and wounding 
20 . security sources said, according 
to a Reuters report. The blast 
wrecked several cars and devastat- 
ed nearby buildings, they added. 

The bomb went off about 50 me- 
ters (54 yards) from an office of the 
Shiite Amal movement, but Amal 
sources said none of its members 
had been injured. 


iv 


1 No more 
comfortable^ 
place to rest your 
head. 


• ^ 

2 Contoured support for 

the small of your back. 


3 When you bit back - 
the seat cushion tilts up. 

4 Putyourfeetup- 
ifs made for It 


AUTHORS WANTED 


abtaly different wms. 

■AVe never promised that a single 

laiusha would not fall anywhere,” .... ..... 

Jcfense Minister Yitzhak Rabin IIITIinpC U/ANTFI) 
lid Jan. 17, three days after the gU II [IUIIO mn 1 tU 

ahinet approved the withdrawal R V N Y PUBLISHER 

lan. “NorwUl we make such a 

remise. senpb at ofl types, fiction, non-fidion. pochy, 

Hwe at the Karosha front Hne. iuwiie. ***»>* ond /rit^ worto. Nav, 

n . . , cunlr in ou*Pf* mehm wd Send for free boooet H-3 

lr. Rabins message has sunk in W wtagtPh» 1 5Mw 34 tha..Ne«YorV. n.y. i 
nd has been accqjted. There is a 10001 usa 





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Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1985 


ARTS / LEISURE 


Ex-Eagle Making Solo Flights 


By Michael Zwerin 

Inietiuinonal Herald Trtbune 

P iARJS — Don Henley, drum- 
mer and vocalist with the dis- 
banded raegagroup “The Eagles 
(“Hotel California," which he co- 
wrote), recently released his second 
solo album, “Building the Perfect 
Beast." which deals with ecology, 
spiritual values and politics, h has 
sold 800,000 copies, a number Hen- 
ley describes unenthusiastically as 
“all right," explaining: “I only 
break even at 750.000." 

In Los Angeles, be climbs into 
his car, shoves a work tape in the 
cassette machine, turns up the vol- 
ume and cruises around, making up 
his songs. “It’s the perfect working 
environment. The phone doesn'L 
ring, the scenery keeps changing. I 
get a lot of thinking done in a car." 
He speaks with nostalgia about the 
fast lane: “You can drive 100 miles 
an hour from the little town l come 
from back in Texas, to Dallas, 160 
miles, and not see one cop. not a 
curve in the road. I need space. I 
miss that in Los Angeles." 

He is “involved with" the Ameri- 
can Rivers Conservation Council, 
the Wilderness Society, the Sierra 
Club and the American Farmland 
Trust and be is suing the city of Los 
Angeles to try to stop developers 
from blighting the hills, as he sees 
it, with condominiums. 

“America runs on greed." he said 
last week during on a promotion 
lour to break “The Perfect Beast" 
into the European market. “Some- 
day it's gping to turn the whole 
place info a desert We’ve got to 
think of quality of life, not quanti- 
ty. America is obsessed with more 


and bigger. It's got to stop some- 
where." 


shiny things paid for by exploit- 
ative love songs. 

There is a love song, "You Can’t 
Make Love." on the album, but 
“it's really about semantics. You 
watch TV and you learn that if you 
buy your girt a diamond or a fur 
coat. well, that’s real love. But you 
can’t ‘make' love. Am I supposed to 
bring a hammer and some nails? Or 
tomato sauce and a bowl and 
spoon? Love’s a word that's been 
kicked around until it’s meaning- 
less." 

This is nou it appears, your ev- 
eryday. run-of-the-mill beach boy- 
cum-ski chalet pretty face. As long 
as he brought it up, what can se- 
mantics reveal about him? What is 
freedom? 

"Freedom is something you 
don’t really want when you getit." 

Success?* 

“I’ll never have the degree of 
'success' 1 had with the Eagles. I 
don’t want it. Success is peace of 
mind.” 

Rock? 

“Beats me. I don't really know 
where rock ends and pop begins. 
Those definitions are not so clear 
any more. Black music, for exam- 
ple, is getting more beige all the 
time. 1 guess rock has to do with a 
certain aggressiveness or texture. 
They put me in the rock category 
for the Grammy nominations so l 
seem to be a rock musician." 

Art? 

“I used to have a good definition 
or an. but I forget nght now. Any- 
way, I'm not sure that rock is art. 
Being classified as on ’artist' makes 
me nervous. Rock is peasant music, 
folk music. I wish I could remem- 
ber that definition." 


Writing songs about ecology for 
an album that only breaks even at 
750,000 copies while driving aim- 
lessly around polluting the environ- 
ment is a classic California contra- 
diction. And the blond, lean 
Henley, with his sexy draw! and 
solid cleft chin, is on the surface a 
classic California rode star, a breed 
that presumably thinks only about 
parties, gelling high and buying 


The Linden, Texas, high school 
band, wilh which Henley played 
drums, won state and regional 
competitions. He learned the rudi- 
ments and played jazz for a while. 
The awkward position required to 
sing and drum at the same time in 
rock groups gradually threw one 


shoulder higher than the other, and 
he has back trouble, so he doesn't 
drum any more. Anyway. "I'd rath- 
er write songs and sing. It's more 
fun.” 

A story about Don Henley 
would be 'incomplete without the 
fact that he was arrested in Febru- 
ary 1981 after Los Angeles para- 
medics reported that they hod 
treated a 1 6-year-old girl for a drug 
overdose at his home. It is unpleas- 
ant to bring this up because he 
seems damaged somehow, like 
someone traumatized by an acci- 
dent who now drives with exagger- 
ated sobriety in the slow lane. 

The sentence was suspended, but 
the experience might explain his 
intensity. He seems to be support- 
ing more than his weight. Pointing 
to a book about wine be was carry- 
ing, he said, somewhat defensively: 
“ Look. T m not serious off the time. 
You might call me a hopeful pessi- 
mist. But kids don’t read much any 
more: I think it's important to get 
information across with music. I'm 
going to stay and fight and do what 
1 can with what influence I have. 

“Everybody's talking about 
Ethiopia now. and I'm all for help- 
ing Ethiopia but there are black 
people starving on ihe streets of 
Los Angeles. Indians are freezing 
to death. And did you know that 
150 to 200 small farmers are going 
out of business every week? 

“Reagan's farm policy is de- 
stroying the fabric of life in rural 
America. He's letting big business 
pollute our rivers, allowing timber 
companies to destroy our forests. 
’And at the same time be speaks 
these platitudes about the old val- 
ues. 

“My father laught me how to 
grow vegetables. He was a farmer, 
and his father before him. I still do 
thaL My garden keeps me sane. 
And oh, yeah. I remember my defi- 
nition of art. Neil Young has a dog 
named Art. He wrote a song for 
him, ‘For Art’s Sake.’ Art is Neil 
Young's dog." 



Days of Long Johns Are Long Gone ; 
Winter Underwear Goes Fashionable 


By Nana- Bech Jackson 

Iniemcnonal Herald Tribune 


P i ARIS —As freezing temperatures return to laige 
pans of Europe, the appeal of “long underwear" 
grows — especially since long underwear now means a 
lot more than grandpa's long johns. It is even 


Don Henley: Being called an “artist’' makes him nervous. 


Brisk-Paced 'Mean Season’ 
Describes Risks of a Scoop 


fashionable. 

“Long" underwear still keeps a body warm during 
cold spells, but it is noi necessarily long and is not 
always hidden under layers of outerwear, h comes 
lace- trimmed and decollete in fine wools and silks for 
high-fashion women, in synthetic blends that have 
kept climbers cozy on Mount Everest and in space-age 
fabrics that look* like so much wrinkled cheesecloth 
until stretched over a skier's body. 

Designed for winter sportsmen, sufferers of arthritis 
and rheumatism and people who cannot or will not 
tolerate winter's cold, thermal underwear now in- 
cludes classic long- and short-sleeve T-shirts, lace 
camisoles, unisex rights, girdle- like warmers for the 
lower bade and stomach, shoulder warmers, boxer 
shorts, socks and caps. 

“In the last two or three years there has been an 
evolution, with more modem styles and an increase in 
sales. Even old people want to be stylish as they slay 
warm." said Henrieite Simonneu a veteran cold- 
wea chef-underwear saleswoman at a major depart- 
ment store in Paris. 

No matter what the fabric, the principle is the same: 
helping ihe skin regulate body temperature. 

“It is necessary for the body to keep a constant 
temperature. In cold weather the body must work to 
keep a temperature around 37 degrees centigrade [98.6 


more active in winter sports. 

-of-the-line iti 


Always a top-of-the-line item, a simple silk “ther- 
mal” undershirt retails for S30 to S40.- Lower in 
density than cotton or wool it is more mouture- 
absorbem and heat-resistant than wool 
Both silk and wool thermal undergarments are light 
enough to wear under body-clinging fashions. French 
women traditionally avoid bulky layering in drafty 
offices or restaurants by wearing a thin silk or wool 
undershirt under a silk or cotton blouse. 

When it comes to price and sales volume, the 
synthetics are king . One of the giants in the field is 
richls fisted 


Fahrenheiil while alsoworking for whatever activity 


C APSULE reviews or films re- 
cently released in the Untied 
States: 

The thriller “The Mean Season,” 
directed by Philip Borsos. reveals 
bow much can go wrong for a re- 


MOVIE MARQUEE 


porter who enjoys a symbiotic rela- 
tionship with his source, particular- 


ly when the source is a serial 
murderer who enjoys seeing his 
name in print When Malcolm An- 
derson (Kurt Russell), a reporter 
for a Miami newspaper, gels his 
first call from a man later dubbed 


“The Numbers Killer." Anderson 
is stimulated and mildly flattered. 
Anderson has caught his attention 
by locating a snapshot of the man’s 
first victim and describing it as “all 
that remained of her tragically 
short life.” Only later do the ethical 
questions raised by this inter- 
change become apparent, as do the 
dangers. “ The Mean Season.’ has 
a brisk pace and a lot of momen- 
tum," says Janet Maslin of The 
New York Times. “It also has a few- 
more surprises than (he material 
needed, since Borsos. who for the 
most part works in a tense, stream- 
lined style, likes red herrings." 


DOONESBURY 


^CAS HMEiQ 

cTWALENA 



HOUSE 


Finest and most Fashionable 
Scottish Knitwear 


b William Sneer. Knigbtshridgc, 
London SWIX 9HL. 

Td.: 01-235 10j<i & 01-235 71#. 


MR BmmXM GOING TO ASK 
YOU A FEW QUESTIONS TOSEBIF 
YOUR mu HEART HAS AFFEOET? 
|i YOLK ATrm&ES, OKAY?' 

7 1 mm nou on ^ tt) 



SAME AO TWVEALtW&B&N! 
/KMS CONTROL 15 INSANITY! THE 
SCMETS ARE MURDERING SUJIN5. 
APB? ANYONE WHO I 
W/m THEM SHOULD, 





the body undertakes. The energy expended is mud 
greater.* said Alan Nys. a sports medicine specialist in 
Paris. 

Keeping warm in winter, he said, is not only a 
matter of comfon. Cold contracts the capillaries car- 
rying blood to the skin, disturbing normal circulation 
and heightening the danger of sudden increases in 
blood pressure during physical activity. Cold also 
contributes to muscular and ligament injuries, be 
added. 

Like the stiiisuits in Frank Herbert's “Dune." ther- 
mal undergarments help the body conserve what it 
produces. The fictional stiiisuits conserved moisture; 
thermal underwear uses the body's heat as insulation 
against the cold. 

Known for their sexy underwear, the French are 
also major manufacturers and consumers of synthetic 
and natural- fiber thermal underwear. 

“Like most Frenchmen, I’m fond of my comfort,” 
said Pierre Mironneau. export manager of Pichon 
Freres. which has been making thermal underwear 
since 1890. 

The choice of thermal underwear material depends 
as much on personal preference as thermal qualities, 
but Dr. Robert ArnoL known as “Dr. Sport’ in the 
United States and author of ^portse lection” (Viking 
Penguin, 1984), offered this rule of thumb: “The 
slower your activity, the more you need layers of 
natural-fiber materials. Conversely, the more active 
you are, the less material you need and the more 
synthetic it should be." 

Although some people are allergic to wool or syn- 
thetics. cotton, the cheapest natural fiber, remains a 
year-round favorite for regulating body heat Worn 
under a layer or two of wooL it prorides extra warmth- 
But it leaves the wearer feeling cold and dammy if 
much physical exercise is undertaken. 

Wool underwear can be pure sheep wool or combi- 
nations such as angora and wool or wool and silk. 


r ffimar t. which is fisted on the French stock exchange 
and whose products are sold in France, Britain, Spain, 
West German v and Italy, with annual sales of well 
over $100 million. Begun in 1855 to manufacture 
menswear fabrics, Damart moved into synthetics in 
1950 with a knitted chlorofiber. A synthetic Daman 
undershirt retails for less than $10. 

The synthetic fabric helps insulate the skin against 
cold ana promises to raise body temperature several 
degrees through a kind of massaging action. 

In the United States, cotton thermal underwear is a 


traditional favorite, with wools and particularly sQks 

Iv physical fit 


considered luxury items. But recently physical fitness 
enthusiasts have moved into so-called space-age fab- 
rics, such as polypropylene. Dr. Amot, who encour- 
ages year-round outdoor exercise, says the new fabrics 
make it possible “to create your own micno-environ- 
menL" tn polypropylene underwear and headgear, 
body moisture is pulled to the surface of the fabric, 
where it is evaporated, instead of making the body fed 
cold and dammy. An undershirt of this fabric costs 
about $18. 

In Europe, where thermal underwear is often con- 
sidered a pharmaceutical or orthopedic item, claims 
are made about aiding rheumatism and arthritis suf- 
ferers, bronchial patents and those particularly sensi- 
tive to cold. The French Ministry of Soda! Affairs said 
in 1983 that a blend of merino wool angora and 
synthetic fibers eased certain rheumatic complaints by 
contributing to body heat 

Dr. Nys said his fellow Frenchmen liked the idea 
that thermal underwear could somehow make them 
healthier. Whatever the scientific basis for such 
cl aims , thermal underwear does help circulation and 
makes people more comfortable against the shock of 
bitter winter cold, be said. 


BBC Report on Ethiopia Famine Wins Prize 

A gence France- Presse 

MONTE CARLO — The British Br 
Corp. report on famine in Ethiopia that helped 1 


a worldwide relief effort has been chosen best news 
program at the International Television Festival here. 


l"‘ * 1 


- 3 — 



more expensive than cotton, but [ess expensive than 
pure sHk: A long-sleeved undershin for women runs 
$20 to 530. * * * 

Underwear wool is merino, sheared from a fine- 
wool family descended from sheep introduced in 
Spain by the Moors. Unlike coarser wools, merino has 
a higher number of crimps (or succession of waves) per 
inch, a denser fleece and a finer diameter. 

A knitted wool or wool-based fabric contains tril- 
lions of air pockets, making up as much as 80 percent 
of the volume of wool liber. Wool reputedly can 
absorb a third of its weight in body moisture. 

For more than 500 years — since the merchants of 
Lyon decided to concentrate on manufacturing fine- 
quality silks instead of peddling Italian silks — France 
has been a center of suk production. But the indosuy 
took on new life in recent years as consumers locked 
for ways to beat high energy costs and also became 


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AMEX prices P.— Earnings reports P,— 
AMEX hlohvTowsP — Ftfna rate nor ns p. s 
NYSE prices P.— Gold markets p. 7 
NYSE nlatn/iom P.— In tor ml rotes P. 7 
I Canadian nda P .10 Martin summary P— 
■Currency rates P. 7 Canons p._ 

Commodities p. 8 OTC slock P— 
Dlvtoentts P.— Other markets P .10 


BUSINESS / FINANCE 


TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1985 


Page 7 


•i ■_ 




FUTURES AND OPTIONS 

NYSE Finally Warms Up 
To Stock-Index Market 

By H J. MATOENBERG 

-V«f Vorfc Times Serricc 

N EW YORK — When stock-index futures were intro- 
duced three years ago this week, the New York Stock 
Exchange shrugged them off. as it had the new equities 
options 10 years earlier. That attitude persisted even 
after the more successful index options, also based on Big Board 
listed issues, began trading in 1982. 

Especially puzzling to many in the industry was that the Kg 
Board's attitude did not change after it subsequently opened 
futures and options markets on its own composite index. If fact, 
most news of its index market, the New York Futures Exchange, 

the past year has concerned 

the Big Board’s efforts to gel 

its offspring off the premises The options market 

and married somehow with , r 

one of New York's comxnod- (HI the Composite 

,ty “Ajte“‘ now past histo- “dex has been 
ry, said I vers W. Riley, exec- grow ing Steadily, 

utive vice president in charge “ a *~“*“v* 

of options and index products 

at the Big Board. “While we still would like NYFE's floor space 
for our new stock-options market, we are very much committed 
to our index-options market.” 

Indeed, the options market on the Big Board's composite index 
of about 1,500 stocks, which opened in September 1983. has been 
growing steadily. Last month, for example, average daily volume 
was up 40 percent from the 1984 level, despite the slow accep- 
tance of Lhe exchange's “jumbo.” or double, index option intro- 
duced last July. 

Moreover, Mr. Riley noted that his exchange was seeking 
approval from the Securities and Exchange Commission to trade 
index options based on stocks of technology companies listed on 
the over-the-counter market. 

AS for the SECs approval last Wednesday of the Big Board's 
plan to trade stock options, Mr. Riley said he did not 
-L- -A_ expect the first such contracts to be picked and ready for 
trading until late in the year. The Big Board cannot trade stock 
options already traded on other e xchang es, he said. 

Mr. Riley emphasized that Lhe Big Board will continue Lo 
strengthen its index-options market “because index options have 
only now, and I emphasize the ‘now/ become vital tools for 
institutional investment managers.” 

“Until now, few institutions were active in the index-options 
market and even fewer traded index futures," he said. “Most of 
the trading was done by individuals and exchange floor traders. 
Now it has changed dramatically. We see more and more institu- 
tions participating in the index-options market” 

Specifically, he said, “institutional portfolio managers have 
taken to writing, or selling, call-index options when they sense the 
market is topping out after an advance. By selling calls, they can 
hedge against a market decline as well as earn the premium 
income and continue to receive dividends on their holdings. Also, 
index options often eliminate the need to select which stocks lo 
sell when the market looks like it's about to top out” 

By selling a call, the writer in effect offers the buyer of the 
.option the right to buy the underlying “index" at a fixed price 
within a set period of lime. The buyer pays a premium for the 
option, which may or may not be exercised. If the call is exercised, 
or called away from the seller, no stock changes hands, only cash 

(Continued on Page 8, CoL 5) . . . 


Currency Rates 


.^1, it C j « *' *“*» 


. Lota interbank rates on Feb. 16 , excluding lees. 
Official fixings for Amsterdam, Brussels, Frankfurt, Mian, Paris, 



■% 

I 

DJM. 

FJF. 

ILL. . 

GMT. 

ILF. 

S.F. 

Yen 

Amsterdam 

3.712 

<489 

11 X 205 “ 

37 - 005 “ 

0.1839 

543 “ 

13105 “ 14 X 04 * 

Brvsxats(a) 

4544 

7 X 44 

2 D .11 

057 . 

3053 * 17.7715 

— - 

214535 25 X 34 “ 

Frank tori 

347*8 

1414 

— 

MJW“ 

1.417 X 

MJ 4 “ 

4571 “ 

11781 * 12445 * 

London (b) 

14935 

— 

1403 

10.9945 

2221.18 

40785 

72315 

3 JD 623 2 BU 75 

Milan 

102740 

233440 

41841 

202111 

54440 

30751 

72644 

7 X 21 


. I 
* \ 


£ 3Li 


Tokyo 
Zurich 
! ECO 
1 SDR 


WiM 11.053 
2 S 4 J 75 28247 

28015 10617 

0*T7 04115 

0 . 745*09 087488 


Closed 

4.95x 

3540 1349 • 

2780 * 0.1375 
£2250 48101 IJ74J3 25195 447335 

115271 945409 NO. 15713 434317 


38594 
7888 
B 4 . 9 B 5 * 


27034 15 LZ 1 • 

49.10 389-22 • 
7540 “ 4835 ' 


140 1877 “ 

9187 

18771 * 

18914 175485 
24794 250.943 


Dollar Values 


..-r . 

4 *=■ 

_ * Currency 

Per 

_ * Currency 

Per 

_ V Currency 

Per 



Eoalv. 

U.SJ 

Enolv. 

UAJ 

Eon tv. 

U 54 


•V 

8745 auctraOni 

1 J 4 Z 3 

09471 lr take 

18559 

04459 Stnaonorei 

23425 

; 

. 

0804 AHfrlan kMIIb* 

2 X 04 

00014 uraefl ikeket 

70158 

05335 s. African rand 1.1744 



tuns Btiekra fin. franc 

4445 

38444 Kuwaiti (Door 

OJOB 2 

08812 . 8 . Korean wan 

* 34.90 

- 


07445 Canatftaas 

1 J 395 

03937 Mdn.rinnH 

154 

08055 Swo. peseta 

1*175 


J r 

08054 DaaUi krone 

T 1.713 

0 .I 0 M Nora, krone 

9 JCS 

0108 Swrl krone 

9.2575 


v- 

01457 Ftawbb markka 

6465 

O 0 S 33 PklLpexo 

100495 

08235 Taiwan s 

3921 



08075 Greek drodu&a 
OI 2 B 7 Hone Kanos 

13 X 38 

IMS 

08054 Port.ncudo 

02792 Saudi rival 

17980 

15821 

0034 That bah} 
OZ 723 UJLE. dtrbam 

27 J 45 

14725 



■ Slnfin«: 1 . 15 Bt IrMi C 

fa) Commercial (rone (b) Amounts needed to t*J vane bound (c) Amounti neednd to buv am dolliir I 'I 
units a) 100 U> Units oi 1800 lv> Units Oi 10880 
MjQ.: not quoted; NA: not availably 

Sovran: Banov* du Benelux t Brussels): Banco Commordate Itoiiono (Milan); Banaue 
Nailonale da Paris I Parts); IMF I SDR I; Banaue Arabe el Internationale ainvesUssement 
(Omar, rival. mrham). Other data from Heaters and AR. 


Interest Rates 


] 


Eurocurrency Deposits 


Feh.18 


1 * 4 - 

2 M. 

3 M. 

6M. 

1Y. 


Swiss Preach 

Dollar p Main Franc sterltaa Franc ECU SDR 

BK. - a*. 511 . - 5 Ok Sift - 5911 13 9 iv 14 1 k 10 % - 10 % 9 OW . 10 % 814 - BW 

87 b - 9 5 9 b - 4 Ik Stb-SIb 13 % - 13 *. 109 b - 10 9 b 10 - 

9 - Wt IN - 4 % 59 b - 5 9 b 13 V 6 - lJVft .11 - 11 V. 10 %- 

9 % - m 6 R. - 6 % 5 9 b - 5 9 b 13 % - 12 *. 1114 - 11 % 10 % - 

9 9 k - 70 lb 4 % - 414 5 9 b - 5 9 b 12 %- 12 A 111 ft- 117 b 10 • 


10 V. KVl - 87 b 
1014 81 ft - 874 
10 % 876 -9 
10 % 9 % - 9 % 

Rates applicable to interbank deposits of SI million minimum for ooulvakmt). 

Source. Morgan Guaranty {dollar. DM. SF. Pound. FFl; Lloyds Bank (ECU); Citibank 
(SOB). 


Asian Dollar Rates 


Feb. 18 


1 ms. 

B*b -S 7 h 

Source: Reuters. 


lmos 
B 9 b - 89 b 


3 moo. 
89 k - 9 % 


4 mo*. 
97 b - 9 % 


Key Money Rates 

Uofted States 


Close Pre». 


Discount Rale 
Federal Funds 
Prime Rote 
Broker Lean Rate 
Comm. Paper. 30-179 days 
3 -monlh Treasury Bills 

5 - monlh Treasury Bills 
CD's 30-59 days 

CD's 40-89 days 

West Germany 

Lombard Rato 
OwemtpM Rate 
One Month Interbank 
3 -month Interbank 

6 - month Interbank 


B 

Clad 

101ft 

9-914 

Clsd 


8 

Wft 

101ft 

9 - 9 % 

840 

8.16 

8.34 

800 

823 


800 400 
540 SJQ 
545 545 
815 815 


Britain 

Bonk Bose Rato 
Call Money 
91 -day Treasury Bill 
xnanih Interbank 

Japan 

Dlsoounl Rato 
Call Money 
today Interbank 


Close Prev. 

14 14 

14 14 

137 b 1316 

13 15 / 1 * 13 % 


5 

4 3/16 
4 7/16 


5 

616 

47 b 


Gold Prices 


j 


France 


intervention Role 
Coil Money 
One-monlh interbank 
3-atontt) interbank 
*-manth Interbank 


101 * lOVft 
1076 1076 

10 11/16 > 04 « 

10 11/1* UR* 
10 9 / 1 * 10 9/14 


Horn Kona 

Luxembourg 

Paris 1124 kilo! 
Zurich 
London 
New York 


AM. PA aroe 

asd 

Clsd 

305.13 30349 — 049 

30400 30425 + 810 

30445 30440 + 040 

aid 


Sources: Reuters. Commerzbank, Credit Ly- 
onnais. Lloyds Bank. Bank of Tokyo. 


Official lixinos tar London. Pons and Luxem- 
bouro. ooenlno and ctoslna prices lor Hong Kong 
and Zurich. New York Comes current coni rod. 
AM prices In U 45 per ounce. 

Seurat: Reuters. 


Markets Closed 



reopen Feb. 25. 


European 

Computer 

Accord 

6 Firms Seek 
To Combat IBM 


By Bob Hagerty 

International Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Six West Europe- 
an computer makers, banding to- 
gether to resist the market domi- 
nance of International Business 
Machines Corp., announced Mon- 
day an agreement to set common 
standards for development of soft- 
ware used on their equipment. 

The six said they would promote 
standards for the use of the Unix 
operating system, developed by 
American Telephone & Telegraph 
Co. An operating system coordi- 
nates the software and hardware 
resources of a computer system. 

The companies are Nixdorf 
Computer AG. Ing. C. Olivetti & 
Co„ Siemens AG, NV Philips, 
France's state-owned Bull and 
1CL, which was acquired last year 
by Standard Telephones & Cables 
PLC or Britain. 

The agreement came afLer a se- 
ries of talks among the companies 
that began last June. 

“They are really facing a tough, 
uphill battle" in competing with 
IBM, observed Mike Rappolt. de- 
velopment director of the London- 
based consulting firm PAcieL “and 
it makes sense for them to come 
together.” But, he cautioned. “The 
history of such European coopera- 
tion is not a happy one." 

All six European companies al- 
ready are developing computer sys- 
tems using Unix, as is IBM, which 
offers the AT&T product as well as 
other opemting systems. The Euro- 
pean project is aimed at ensuring 
that a European standard wifl 
quickly develop and al giving soft- 
ware producers a lead on bow to 
develop programs suitable for use 
ao systems sold by all the major 
European companies. 

“We’re looting for a homoge- 
neous marketplace," said Keir 
Hopkins, ICL’s director of interna- 
tional network services and the 
chairman of the European project. 
The coordination should reduce 
IBM’s competitive advantage by 
offering users the chance to choose 
another widely established operat- . 
ing -system with a plentiful supply 
of software, he said. 

The six companies are putting 
together small task forces to pul 
their plans into effect, the 1CL ex- 
ecutive said. There will be no for- 
mal organization to promote the 
coordination, he said. 

Logics PLC, a big London-based 
maker of software enthusiastically 
welcomed the long-rumored coor- 
dination. Hector Han. commercial 
m ana g er of Logica's software prod- 
ucts group, said companies devel- 
oping software would view the 
common standards as vital infor- 
mation. 



Til* New Yvk Tvnej 

A family in Renhe, in China’s Sichuan province, displays its stores of grain. 

A Record Crop Is Changing China 


By John F. Bums 

.Vin‘ York Times Service 

CHONGQING. China — In Renhe township, 
an hour's bus ride from this teeming south China 
city. Chen Yanhuan and his family have stores or 
rice brimming over the sides of the cypress- wood 
coffin that sits in the bedroom of their mud -brick 
home. 

Mr. Chen's widowed mother, Zhu Shuhuan, who 
is 64. bought the coffin a few years ago for the day 
when she will be laid alongside her ancestors. But 
last year the family's rice surplus overflowed the 
giant earthenware vats and wicker bins ordinarily 
used for storage, so the coffin was pressed into 
service. 

More than six years after China’s 800 milli on 
peasants were released from Mao Zedong's collec- 
tivized system of agriculture to work the land as 
families, they are ru nning into un familiar prob- 
lems. Suddenly, in places like Renhe all across the 


country, there is relative abundance where famine 
or privation had prevailed for centuries. 

Last year, officials in Beijing announced that the 
grain harvest exceeded 400 million tons, a record 
accomplishment that they said made China self- 
sufficient in its staple food for the first time in 
history. 

This was not good news for everyone. For the 
United States and other grain exporters, it meant 
shrinking prospects in what has been one of the 
world's largest markets. In the past two years, 
China bought 42 million tons less than it had 
contracted to buy from U.S. fanners under a four- 
year pact stipulating a minimum annual purchase 
of six million tons. 

China also cut back other agricultural imports, 
such as soybeans. And when the United States 
imposed new textile- import restraints last summer, 
the Chinese shunted some food purchases to other 
(Continued on Page 9, CoL 1) 


BIS Figure 
On Bank Loans 
Revised Up 14% 


U.S. Firms’ Profits Flat in 4th Period 


By Nicholas D. Kriscof 

Vor York Tuna Sen iic 

NEW YORK — Solid economic 
growth continued to bolster corpo- 
rate profits in the fourth quarter, 
but the rising dollar on currency 
markets took a toll on profits in 
industries (hat depend on exports 
or compete significantly with im- 
ports. 

Overall, after- lax earnings prob- 


of the rising dollar. Exporters 
found that their gpods did not sell 
very weD because they were more 
expensive in relation to foreign cur- 
rencies. And imports, made cheap- 
er in dollar terms, flooded into the 
domestic market, replacing some 
U.S. production and bolding down 
prices and profits in many sectors. 

The fourth quarter capped a re- 
cord year for profits in the United 


Heavy Buying 
In Europe Sends 
Dollar Higher 

Reuters 

LONDON — The dollar was 
higher Monday after an active 
day that saw heavy speculative 
and corporate demand despite 
a holiday closure of U.S. banks. 

The dollar stood at 3.2788 
Deutsche marks in late trading, 
above the opening at 3.2548 
and up from Friday's 3.265. 
Dealers said European opera- 
tors saw Friday's softer levels as 
a buying opportunity and the 
slide late last week as a tempo- 
rary interruption to a strong up- 
ward trend. 

The pound ended at SI. 0935. 
down from SI. 1025 Friday. The 
dollar rose to 2.8015 Swiss 
francs from 2.7 805 and was at 
10.04 French francs, compared 
with 10. It was down againsL the 
yen, 256.575 against 259.225. 

London dealers said the dol- 
lar's sharp movement was exag- 
gerated by a thin market in late 
trading. 


ablv were about the same in the States, but earnings were most pro- 
fourth quarter as in the third quar- nounced in the first half of the year 
ter. after adjustment for seasonal when economic growth was stron- 
differences. But they were still high . fitt*- Profits dodined from an an- 
bv historical levels, not much below ' : nual rate of $150.6 billion in the 
the record set in the firei quarter oC>Tns r i_quarler, to $1502 billion in the 
1 984 when the economy was roar- - 
ing ahead at an annual growth rate 
of more than 10 percent. 

According to a compilation by 
The New York Times of fourth- 
quarter earnings reports from 247 
companies. 129 of them showed 
improved profits compared with 
the equivalent period a year earlier 
(including 13 that were in the red in 
the 1983 period). 72 showed a de- 
cline in profits, 3 were unchanged 
and 35 posted a loss. No compari- 
son could be made for 8 companies. 

“Profits were held down in the 
fourth quarter by price weakness," 
said Roger E. Brinner. chief econo- 
mist of Data Resources Inc., a con- 
sulting company based in Lexing- 
ton, Massachusetts. He noted that 
part of the weakness in prices was 
the result of competition from a 
deluge of less expensive imports. 

Mr. Brinner also noted that gains 
in productivity slowed as the econ- 
omy left lhe recession further and 
further behind. That means that 
labor unit costs rise at almost the 
same rate as prices, curtailing prof- 
it growth. 

Many industries felt the impact 


second quarter, to $141.7 billion in 
the third. Data Resources estimates 
that fourth-quarter profits were at 
an annual rale of $140.9 billion. 

‘There tends to be some slowing 
of profit growth as a recovery ma- 
tures," said John J. McAuley, an 
economist with Chemical B ank 

Average profit performance fig- 
ures conceal enormous differences 
among companies, even within in- 
dustry groups. For example, while 
Chiysler's profit rose more than 
fourfold over the fourth quarter of 
1983, General Motors's declined by 
32 percent, in part because of 
strikes late in the year. 


By Carl Gcwirtz 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — International bank 
lending at the end of 1 983 has been 
revised upward by 14 percent, or 
$155 billion, the Bank for Interna- 
tional Settlements reported Mon- 
day. due to a new, wider data base 
now in use. 

Lending to countries in Asia reg- 
istered the biggest change, a jump 
of 64 percent to $81.7 billion at the 
end of 1983 from the 550 billion 
previously reported outstanding 
then. Total lending to Asia in- 
creased further to $82.6 billion by 
the end or the third quarter of last 
year, the period covered in this lat- 
est quarterly analysis of interna- 
tional banking by the Basel-based 
institution. 

The BIS is commonly thought of 
as the central bankers' central 
bank. 

The revisions show that loans to 
Malaysia at the end of 1983 were 89 
percent greater than previously es- 
timated. at SI 1.4 billion — a total 
which rose to $11.7 billion by last 
September. 

The increase for the Philippines 
was 70 percent, to SI 3.67 billion at 
Lhe end of 1983. By the end of the 
third quarter, its bank debt totaled 
$13.72 billion. 

The other big jump, 52 percent, 
was for South Korea — to 52926 
billion by year-end and lo $302 
billion last September. 

The revision for Papua New 
Guinea, up 220 percent, was the 
greatest although the amount — 
$539 million at the end of 1983 — 
was relatively small. Likewise for 
Sri Lanka, up 122 percent at $769 
million. China’s debt at the end of 
1983 rose 81.5 percent under the 
new measurement, Thailand's by 
69 percent and India’s by 57 per- 
cent 

Lending at the end of 1983 to 
Latin America was revised upward 
by almost the same amount some 
$34 billion, but the percentage in- 
crease was a much smaller 19 per- 
cent 

The revisions for Latin America 
came as much less of a surprise as 
most of these countries are engaged 
in renegotiating their debt and the 


icy c 

bers and the amounts actually be- 
ing rescheduled has been a matter 
of record. 

The revisions result from the in- 
clusion of data from banks in Bah- 
rain. Hong Kong. Singapore, the 
Cayman Islands and the Nether- 
lands Antilles as well as more-com- 
plete reporting from banks in Swit- 
zerland. 

Lending at the cod of 1983 to 
members of the Organization of 
Petroleum Exporting Countries 
was revised upward by 25 percent, 
to $109 billion. Relatively token 
revisions of 2.8 percent for Eastern 
Europe, 2.4 percent for Africa (ex- 
cluding South Africa) and 1.8 per- 
cent for the Middle East, in addi- 
tion to the groups of countries 
already cited, account for $94.6 bil- 
lion of the overall 5155-billion in- 
crease. 

The new data also catch a $62.6- 
billion increase in deposits by this 
same group of countries — mean- 
ing that the revisions for the end of 
1983 show their net debt position 
increased by $32 billion. 

For the third quarter of last year, 
lhe growth of international bank 
lending slowed sharply — a $10- 
billion increase compared with 
gains of $25 billion in the previous 
two quarters. Most of the increase, 
or S8.5 billion, represented new 
loans to the major industrialized 
countries. 

The small $1. 5-billion increase in 
loans to other countries kept the 
pace of that lending for the first 
three quarters virtually unchanged 
from the comparable 1983 period. 

The BIS noted that Lhe ‘'main 
feature" of the third quarter was a 
decline of nearly $14 billion in Lhe 
total external claims of U.S. banks 
— a reduction of $17.5 billion in 
their interbank lines accompanied 
by $4-billion drop in their deposit. 

As a result, the interbank market 
— which is the base from which the 
Euromarket does business — con- 
tracted by $6.8 billion, double the 
previous decline in the second 
quarter of 1983. And, for the first 
time since the first quarter of 1 979, 
the gross size of Lhe international 

(Continued on Page 9, CoL 2) 


ARGENTINE 

REPUBLIC 

EXTBtNAL U.S. $ BONDS 

AND 

BONOS NOMINATIVOS 

THE WESTON 
GROUP 

Enquiries to: 

CH-1003 LAUSANNE 
2 Rue de la Paix. 
Telex: 25869. 

Tel.: 021/20 17 41- 


Notice To Commodity Investors: 

PROFESSIONAL 

MONEY 

MANAGEMENT 

Rudolf Wolff has developed considerable 
expertise In money management, and is 
able to offer proven programs for qualified 
investors who do not have the time or 
expertise to manage their own investments. 

Minimum initial investment $100,000. 

Button Weill, astonished in 1866, s a member of it* Noranos group of 
companies, a mining and resource group <*»ilh a net worth of £2.7 UHiorv. 


L Rudolf 
Wolff 


Please sand 

a detailed 
Rudolf woftt 
information Kit. 


Rudotf Wtotff Futures Inc. hhhhhmmm 
295 Madison Avenue, New York. NY 10017 J.SA 
Phone (2135730440 Telex ITT 423840 
Alin: William Rafter 


Name . 
Address 


Phone 


Tele/ 


2/ 19/85 



4 



Page 8 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY. FEBRUARY 19. 1985 


* Floating Rate Notes 


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Dresdner Bank 5V.4I 25-2 9948 99J0 

Dresdner Bank5 l *42 13ft 27-2 1 00.151 OOJ 
Ehtoado Nudeor 5ft-K lift 28-2 9975 MO. 
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*500 ON THE DOW 
and 

800% PROFITS 


Purveyors of doom profit py prophecizing the collapse of capitalism, parroting the gloom 
manifested by Spengler in his classic work. “The Decline of the WesF. Despite the surge in stock 
prices, pariahs o! pessimism continue to expound upon negativist themes. They exist in a subter- 
ranean world, ’.vr.ere fantasies, disguised as ideas, are churned out by charlatans. In times of 
stress, the.r-.vo.id cozes from the depths 2 nd suddenly fascinates and dominates multitudes of 
responsible peoole. CGR need only to allude the hordes of scared speculators who were cajoled 
into dumping stocks when the DOW dipped under 800. enchanted by the illusory glitter of gold at 
$820 an ounce, chasing silver up to S44 Our researchers recall a Sunday edition at a N.Y.C. 
newspaper, v/mch featured 20 advertisements extolling the virtues ofthe“barbarousrelic",when 
gold was glistening '-low. with gold around S300, advertisements or articles heralding gold, are 
rarer »r.ar- ^eemgso-'-s in Moscow. 

5 Wh.cn :s precisely the reason why we are. at this level, dedicated gold bugs, subscribing to 
: the law ■:* contrary reason As mavericks we urge readers to buy into weakness, to sell into 
I sirencth. rrpckmg "the manic -depressive nature of the “Street". It may be illuminating to note that 
] when the C-rov; i •^■.cnnging.v.-her, the DOW was under 800, CGR rallied its clients, prognostica- 
1 rtno fha- the ^ m-s-n ran market wifi thrust upwards on record volume as funds flow into dollars, 
S that the - v.-l- se j::-. \C00 before hitting 750". Our optimism was sustained. In June 1984, while 
i ‘he m=r- ; . :c.- j--r.se. our ana: ys‘5 1'ashed a buy signal, musing... ‘the market will erupt on 

i the uos: c r vipcnnng prophets of doom", 
i ‘/htr.i- i : vv 1 -a-tung seosic-ns. ih-s DOW scared 77 points. And now? 


longer t*-m ct-?s= soo,e 2c- 'JO in aodition. we focus upon two er 
dynamics to -aui:. as did a recently recommended "special situs 
brief -i me -span. 

Fpr your complimentar, 1 ccpy. please telephone or write to... 


\ I 


r -P“‘"- | p r- »■ 
j”.-'— " *J J 


FPS. Rnancial Planning Services bv 
Kafverstraat 112, 

1012 PK Amsterdam, The Netherlands 
Phone: (020) -27 51 81 
Telex 18536 


Name: 




Phene- 


^s’. pertrrmanc-e does nof guarantee future results 




IVfc-TiSW 


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Taranto Dam Inion 51*42 

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99.98 10008 
12ft IM HXU71004? 
10W 2M 9937 9947 


MJ 


/ Questions about long-term 
I international business ventures? 

Project planning? Market research and analysis? 
Long-term/short-term financing? Bond issues? 
Capital? Foreign exchange? Call LTCB, the 
Long-Term Credit Bank of Japan. We’re one 
of the world’s leading international banks. 
We specialize in looking at business 
long term, so we can help you plan for 
long-term success. And our experienced 
staff blows international finance through 
and through. If you have questions, LTCB 
can find the answers. 



LTCB 


International experience you ctmbanknn. 

The Long-Term Credit Bank of Japan r Lil 


Head OtHcw B ta K matlofrel Banktoq GrtHy.Oiemacftt, Tokyo. Japan ~fefc 211-5111 fotex J243Q8 London 
BtW1Cfe:i0Xing VVlillani Strem,Uxidon EC4N 7BR UX T5I: S?3-951 1 Tktoc 885305 Now York Branch; H0 
Broadway, Naw Y/vH, N.Y 10005. USA Hal: (210 246-2000 Tateic 425723 L*» Anglos Agency: South 

Flower Qroal. Suite 3700. L03 Anoeles, CaWomta 90071, USA Tel: CI31 639-5777 Hong Kong Branch: 
45th ROOT. Far East finance Centre. 16 Harcouit Road, Hong Kong Tfel: 628S670 Tatec 76ZS6 Sln&pan 
Brandt: 65 Chuiia Sired, #22-01/04, OC8C Gertie. Singapore OiO«, Singapore Tel: 919633 Tetec 23813 
Frankltarl, Parlft Bahrain, ToroohT, Daltaa, Haxfco Ctty, Panama, Sfto Paulo, Rio da Janeiro, Bo^ng, . 
Bangkok, Kuala Lumpor.Jalavta, Sydney. 

UCB International U*L (London), Nippon ^trepaanBanhSA(BntiMllM} > IJC8 (Schwab) AG tftiridik 
UC8 Trust Co, Vork), LTC8 Asia Ltd (Hong Kong) 


ROUNDUP 



S'.’ ‘ 


Caledonian Delays Public Share Issue JSH 

boosted by volatile profits from company whose shares are largely * : 


Oft 23-7 1003BI0030 
9ft K-7 9975 9945 
12 94 1003010035 
a u IBUBbid 
I Oft 20-5 IGOJINIUI 
12ft 1*4 IDQJTiaU} 
fft 10-7 99.M 50044 
10ft Z74 9975 100.10 
12ft *4 100.1210032 
214 100 5rt 
»% 9-5 W 7J 19032 
Oft 70/5 1004810038 
8ft 14 9933 10043 
Uft 9-5 UU016T.10 
Oft 2B-5 1003510040 
12ft 274 10038100*6 
10 54 Hto 99ft 

12 W 9942 IBft 
9ft 124 9930 10088 
Hft XM IH7210042 
9ft 84 1007713047 
lift IM 100.1910029 
9ft 22-7 100.101 HUS 

10ft M4 louobid 

10 114 10UJ10U2 

fft TM lausiou 
9ft 314 1004010048 
9ft 148 99.97 100/17 
12 94 1003310048 

ID 54 JB135IDW0 
12ft S-7 10Q40100LM 
9<« 284 9937 W/J7 
9ft 25-2 SUM 88.99 
Bft 94 99.98 1DQJM 


Riiilfr* 

LONDON — Plans for a public 
flotation or shares of Caledonian 
Aviation Group PLC. parent of 
British Caledonian Airways Ltd. 
have been postponed, although a 
share sale is still ultimately intend- 
ed, Adam Thomson, the company's 
chairman, said Monday. 

Circumstances have changed 
since the possibility of an offering 
was investigated Iasi year, he said 
at a news conference. Caledonian's 
finance director. Trevor Boud. said 
later that Lhe group's latest ac- 
counts were not viewed as a suit- 
able base for an early share issue. 


trading in used aircraft. 

Mr. Boud said large aircraft- 


trading profits were particularly of its shares are held in blocks of 
welcome in view of the setbacks 500,000 shares or more. 


resulting from political problems in Mr. Thomson forecast a signifi- 


Nigeria and Libya. Profits on sale cam improvement in results this 
of assets, mostly aircraft and parts, year, saying: “The airline industry 
amounted to £8.8 milli on against is recovering from the economic 
£1.9 mUJion the previous year. doldrums of the early 1980s and 
The group's 1983-84 operating British Caledonian is well placed to 
profit, excluding the aircraft-trad- benefit from this recovery." 


Pretax profit for fiscal 1983-84, 
iich ended Ocl 3). rose io £13.4 


which ended Ocl 3). rose to £13.4 
million (about S14 million) from 
£3 J million the previous year. But 
the latest results were' heavily 


ing contribution, was slightly down 
at £17 milli on against £17.7 million 
in 1 982-83. Revenue rose to £5262 
million from £428.5 million. 

Net profit after tax amounted to 
£12 million against £2.1 million the 
previous year. The company paid 
dividends amounting to £22 mil- 
lion compared with nothing the 
previous year. 

Caledonian is an unlisted public 


held bv' banks and other insutu- fteutea . t 

tional investors. About two-thirds MUNICH — Bayensche 
of its shares are held in blocks of Motoren Werke AG reported 
500,000 shares or more. record.results for 1984 and ex- 

Mr. Thomson forecast a signifi- pects farther records this year, 
cam improvement in results this The managing board chairman, 
year, saying: “The airline industry Eberhard von Kuen h am, said 
is recovering from the economic Monday, 
doldrums of the early 1980s and He said at a news conference 
British Caledonian is well placed to that profit and tax payments 
benefit from this recovery." reflect the 18-percent increase 

Last year's results also reflected in’ world group revenue last 
losses from the group's package year, to 16.48 billion Deutsche 


: , • jc-N- 


tour and helicopter operations, 
which were facing severe competi- 
tion. 

Mr. Thomson said British Cale- 
donian was launching new services 
from Britain to Dhahran and Jed- 
dah in Saudi Arabia this spring, 
while London-New York opera- 
tions would stan in the summer. 


marks ($5.06 bfflion). 

Hc gave no 1984 profit figure 
and he declined to predict the 
amount of the dividend. The 
company paid 1 1 DM. and a 1 
DM bonus, cm 1983 results 
when world group net income 
was-292 milli on DM on revenue 
of 11.9 billion DM. 


Stock-Index Futures Heat Up 


COMPANY NOTES 


(Continued from Page 7) 


never ignored the stock- and index- 


or. in the case of options based on options markets. The fact is that 
futures, the underlying futures con- most institutional and other inves- 


most institutional and other inves- Tuesday the introduction of a new 
tors did until now. and as a market cherry -flavored cola, said Jesse 


For example, Mr. Riley contin- 
ued. “We now see our composite 


our prime concern has always been Meyers, publisher of Beverage Di- 
to serve the needs of our members gest, an industry newsletter. He 


Coca-Cola Co. wifi announce in the Japanese domestic -market 
Tuesday the introduction of a new through public placement. The ap- 
cherry- flavored cola, said Jesse plication period is April 4 through 


[double] index trading at 212,75 
and a March 213 call selling at a 


and their clients." 


and a March 213 call selling at a 
premium of 25k. At that premium. q 

the seller is getting more than 1 s OlillOIl 
percent on the basket of stocks rep- T ^ n * 
resented by the index for a period 111 (j3S i rOJCCt 
of one month." 

Rouen 

What if the index tops 2 1 5 before ~ ™ _ Th- Knni 


the March option expires? 

He replied that obviously the 
seller faced a loss if the option was 
called at a higher price than that for 
which the contract was sold. In this 
case, the premium income can only 
cushion this loss. How big a loss 
depends on how high the markeL 
goes during the remaining life of 
the option and how long die seller 
decides ic sit with it before it ex- 
pires. 

The seller actually has several 
choices if the market rises. Aside 
from buying back his option, the 
portfolio manager can offset the 
loss on the option by selling some 
stocks profitably in the rising mar- 
ket or he can employ index options 
in a multitude of hedging strate- 
gies. Mr. Riley said. 

A final point made by the Big 
Board s options chief was that “de- 
spite all the talk to the contrary, we 


SYDNEY — The North West 
Shelf Gas Project will generate a 
net national benefit of around 4 


said the soft drink wifi be called 
Cherry Coke and will pot Coca- 
Cola in competition with Dr Pep- 
per. 

• Dairy Farm Co* a subsidiary of 
Hongkong Land Co., said it sold its 
catering division to Delaware 
North Companies Inc. of Buffalo, 
New York, for 125 million Hong 
Kong dollars (S1.6 million). 

Hbodostan Motors Ltd. of India 


billion Australian dollars IS2.9 bil- will assemble 10,000 Isuzu Motors 
lion) in the 25 years to 2009, con- Ltd. cam annually beginning in 


suiting economist Brown. Cope- September and 3,000 trucks annu- 
land & Co. said Monday in an aUy beginning in early 1986, Isuzu 


economic analysis of the projecL 
In a study commissioned by the 


said. 

Kobe Sted Ltd. and five other 


6. The issue price will be set on 
April 1 with payment on ApriV ll. 

Plepsi-Coh International, bever- 
age unit of Pepsico tea, said it 
would spend more than S4 million 
to set up a plant in Guangzhou that 
is expected to begin operations in 
late 1985. 

Pertamina, Indonesia’s state- 
owned oil company, signed a pro- 
duction-sharing contract withsub- 
si diaries of LLS. companies Unocal 
Corp. and Kaity Industries tea : 

Shanghai Harbor Container 
Carp, said it would commission 
two new container vessel berths by 
the end of this year, enabling it to 
raise annual handling of containers 
from 1 15,000 to more than 300,000 


project participants. Brown. Cope- Japanese and Australian compa- 20-foot equivalent units. 
land said the domestic phase is esti- cues are planning to extract gold Toyota Motor Corp. has been 
mated to generate net national from the bauxite mine farming part approached byi ^ China for heh> in 
benefits at a 10- percent discount of the Worsley alumina project in producing vehicles, its president, 
rate of around 400 million dollars Western Australia, a Kobe Sted Shoichiro Tqyoda, said. A Toyota 
in 1984 dollars. The liquefied-natu- spokesman said. spokesman said Mr. Toyoda or 

ral-gas phase due to stan produc- Mitsubishi Electric Corp said it other top officials may visit Beijing 
cion in 1 989 is estimated to produce would issue 1 00 million new shares soon. 

ret benefits of around 3.6 billion r — 

dollars at the same discount rata ADVERTISEMENT 

nhasc. which beean suanlvins eas I INTERNATIONAL FUNDS H 


London Commodities 


dollars at the same discount rata 
Participants in the domestic 
phase, which began supplying gas 
last year, are Woodside Petroleum 
Lid„ BP Development Australia 
Lid_ Broken Hill Ptv. Co. and Cali- 
fornia Asiatic Oil C?o. In the natu- 
ral-gas phase. Mitsubishi Corp. 
and Mitsui & Co. are to join the 
project as a single participant 


Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed 
18 February 1985 


THamrf asset yatae quota t io n * tfi 
exception of tone foods whose 
rnarqtaal symbols hxMctrte 
Id) - dally; Iw) - weekly; (U 






AL MAL MANAGEMENT 
Iwl AF-Mol Trust. 5A. 


BANK JULIUS BAER & CO. Lftt 


Feb. 18 


Figures in sterling per metric Ion. 
Gasoil in U-S. dollars per metric tan. 
Gold In US. dollars per ounce. 


Pakistan's Trade Gap Widens 


— Id) ■«*— 1 

— Id I rwihm- 

— in 1 Eaulboer Amorico. 


* 14901 ORANGE NASSAU GROUP 
* PB0S578, TO* Hogue (0701 44M70 
— fttl Hwr Oaftoa m ount l — 


-td I Eaurtnw Europe— — SF IUOZJ0 Z), 

-IC I EfluOsaer P<KJHc 5F 1 17830 Zj 


PARI90AS— GROUP 
,]|hs — <d ) Carfen intarnaHamd, 

S 1 16/lOO nm Lnu 


HIM Law. . daw Prwvtatn 
SUGAR 

Mar 11480 115.40 11*20 1)840 11840 11*80 
May 12340 12100 12120 12240 124/10 12*30 
Auo 131 /» 12930 130/M 13040 13100 13140 
Oct 13940 13740 13X00 13840 140/10 1*040 
Dec 147/M 14*00 14420 1*520 14*00 147.00 
Mar 18000 18000 15900 18000 18040 15140 
MOV N.T. K.T. 18600 18740 18840 18000 
817 lot* at SO tans. 

CffCSfA 

Mar 3,134 1115 1117 2.130 2,115 2.118 
MOV 2.154 1133 2,148 1147 2.134 2.135 
JIV 2.137 2,120 2.133 2.135 1118 2.119 
Sea 1130 110* 1118 1122 1103 1104 
Dec 1.998 1.982 1.995 1.994 1.978 1.984 


KARACHL Pakistan — Paki- 
stan's trade deficit grew to 5.30 1 
billion rupees (S337.6 million) in 


— Id ) Grotoar . 

— «> Stackbar. 


— Id J CSF Pund_ 


— Id I Crossbow Fuad. 
— 4d J ITF Fund N.V._ 


SF 171800* —(,,1 OBLI-GULDEN 

_ SF 2UI —id I PAROIL-FUND__ 
„ GF 1174 — Id ) PARINTERPUND- 


__ >91.12 
J3M1J242.il 

— SF9LB0 

— S 1.11133 
Y 10575900 

FL10S1O3 
S 10190 

— SHOTS 


s Vue- — Id 1 PAR i/S Treasory OaodL— _ SM1.10 


January-, an increase of 159 percent 
from 2.05 billion rupees in Decem- 


Mar 1138 1115 1127 HX 1115 1118 
May 1154 1133 1148 1147 1134 1135 
JIV 1137 1120 1133 1135 1118 1119 
Sea 1130 INK 1118 1122 1103 1104 
Dee 1.998 1,982 1,995 1.994 1.978 1.984 
Mar 1.978 1,978 1,988 1J«0 1.975 1,979 
May N.T. N.T. 1 .985 1.990 1.980 1,975 
!428>af9orM>ton9. 

COFFEE 

Mar 1330 2J10 1325 1320 1330 1332 
Mav 1389 1380 1387 1380 1388 1389 
JIV 2405 ZJ94 ZJ97 240J 1*01 240* 
Sea 1432 1418 2422 1*24 1342 1345 
Nov 24*8 3434 2438 1*37 1448 1*55 
Jan 24*5 1*3* 1*31 2438 24*0 2442 
Mor N.T. N.T. 2430 2430 2425 2438 
3.199 lots of 5 loro. 

GASOIL 

Feb 25*50 25150 25000 25350 Z50J2S 25075 
Mar 23675 23 *j 00 23125 23550 23125 21250 
Ad 22*25 2ZL00 223*10 323JS 22155 22150 
Mav 21850 21755 21750 217.75 21840 21825 
JiFi 215*10 21175 21825 215.00 71350 215L00 
JIv 21*50 31*00 21*00 21*50 21200 31*00 
Aug 21*00 21*00 215/M 21840 31150 31100 
Sea N.T. N.T. 215.00 220 J» 711 /M 22JUS0 
Oct N.T. N.T. 21550 22100 21100 22350 
L836 lots ol 1D0 tons. 

GOLD 

Apl 30840 30850 N.O. N.CL N.Q. NX. 
100 lots of 100 troy at 

Sources: Reuters and London Petroleum Ex- 
change fgasaV. 


from 2.05 billion rupees in Decern- 1 
her and a 27-percent increase from ! 
4.18 billion in January 19S4, Bu- 1 
reau of Statistics figures showed ; 
Monday. I 


BA NODE INOOSUEZ 

— Id I Aston Growth Fund — — — *1052 
— <W| Diver bond SF 8150 

— «wl FIF-Amertai 12035 

— Iw) F1F— Europe _______ SIOflB 

— Iw) Fl^-Padflc *1544 

— W I IndoxuBz MuHIbonds A *8740 

— Idl InOatuezMottlDondS 8 *14*22 SKAHDI FOND INTL FUND (4882382701 


London Metals Feb. 18 


Figures in sterling per metric ton. 
Silver In pence oer troy ounce. 


Today Previous 

Higfi grade caaoer cathodes: 

M>at 1.290/H 1291/X) 1J7B.0O 157950 
3 months U11/10 1 JIT -SO 1JC2JM 1J03J0 
Cooper cotnades: 

saal 1J8950 IJ9I5D UMJOa \JTTOO 

3 months 1J0350 1J0850 1J9750 1J99JD0 

Tin: spot 1053000105355010510501052050 
3 months 10535501Q536501052&501Q53050 
Lead: spot 33850 33950 33550 33850 I 

3 months 34550 3*850 34350 343J0 , 

Zinc: spot 79050 79150 78050 78150 I 

3 months 77875 77950 77550 77850 i 

Silver: soot 57150 57350 58650 58850 

3 months 59050 59150 S8UQ 58800 I 


BftiTANNMLFCW 271 St Hotter. Jersey UZ iSZT- a B gm (Star 

— Jtt) Brit -Dollar Inronm j OJ1R74" nm — 

— (w| BriMManaWCUTT *847* S VEH5KA INT EHNATIONALLT11 

—id ) BriL intUManaaaarti *0598 

-idtBrtt.tmuminao.Parn UJOB = 

— (wl BrilTmiversai Growth SM&s —1*1 SHB bittGrowtti Rmd. 

— Iw) Brll.GoW F und 1 1737* SWLS! 

— Iw] BrfLMonopXurrencv c 1536 _« j 

— Id) BrtLjwKm Dir Pari. Fd S05&5 _tu) 

— (w) BrilJeney Gilt Fund C0715 __*el 1 

— <a 1 Brit. world Left. Fond iUW _^ d) 

— fa) Btft. WarMTachn. Fund *0519 —(d) 

CAUITAI INTUBNOTinNAl -Ml 


CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 
— Iw] Cmritol Inn Fuad — _ 
— Iw) Capital Italia SA 


Zinc: spot 79050 79150 78050 78150 

3 months 77878 77950 77550 77800 

Silver: spot 57150 57350 58850 58850 
3 months 59050 59150 S8U0 58800 
Aluminium: 

soot 151350 151450 150230 150330 
3 months 154950 155050 153730 153830 
Nickel: wol *81050 *82550 *80050 *61050 
3 months **3050 ***050 *80050 441050 
Source: Reuters. 



SF 83330 
3M 773128* 
f 12X32* 
FL 11735- 
SF 9125 

5FBAOO 
SF 10477* 
5F2M5C 
SF 8575 
SF 12891 


—Id) 

— fd I 
— fdl 
-Id) 

UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND 

— Id I Ama U5. SI) SF 4*00 

— <d ) Bond-lnvast SF873Q 

— (0) Fsnso Swiss 5h. SFT31SS 

—id ) JDam-Invest 5F9B85Q 

— fd] Sam South Air. Slv sf 50330 

-fd 1 Sima (stack Priail SF 19530 

UNION INVESTMENT Frankfurt 

— IdlUrdranta DM 42.18 

—Id ) Unlfonds DM2250 

— IdlUnlnft — DM7755 

OAer Foods 


OIT INVESTMENT FFM 

— +ld 1 Cancentra 

— Hd) inri Rerrtenfond — 


HOUSTON^ TEXAS, IfJUl 


Parte Commodities 

Feb. 18 


For information contact: 


Sugar in French Francs pa 1 metric Ian. 
Olher figures In F rones per 100 ta. 


Uord J. Williams Realtors 

i29 FM I960 Weet, Stnu 21 


5629 FM 1960 Weet, Slate 210 
Bouton, To. 77069. 

ToLi (713) 586-9399. He 387356 


F8JC MGMT. LTD. INV. ADVISERS 
1. Laurence Pauntv HI1L EC* 01-8234680 

— Iw) F&C Atlantic * 15 

— (w) F8X BwraMCn *1 

— Iw) FftC Oriental *3! 


*1231 (d] 
tm 

*3557 (wl 


FOREIGN & COLONIAL 
RESERVE ASSET FUND 

PBCE5 AT 112JBS 
A: US DOLLAR CASH $10.18 

B: MULTKUSBJCr CASH S 953 

C= DOUAR BOhOS SI 06* 

Di MUTlOjaOOaCMM 5 9 St 

Ei SIBLING ASSETS £1028 

FCR9GN & COLCMAl 
MANAGWOMT (JHSEV) UNITED 
W MUICASTB ST8^T^T>HJSJffiSEY£l 
IH.: 053*27351 THfX: *192063 

FOR OTHER F 4 C FUNDS, SEE 
INTBINATIONAL FUNDS UST 


Mav 1429 1410 1416 1420 +21 

Aus 7310 1300 1300 !3J0 + 22 

Oct 1378 1370 1380 1370 +20 

DOC N.T. N.T. 1430 lAtf + 30 

Mar N.T. N.T, 1535 1550 +22 

May N.T. N.T. 1585 1510 New 

Ext. vat: 350 lot* of 50 tons. Prow, actual 
sales: 3584 lata. Oaen interest: 17593 
COCOA 

Mar 2330 151$ 130$ 2525 +10 

May 2535 2530 2535 2538 +9 

JIv N.T. N.T. 2500 — +5 

Sea N.T. N.T. 2588 2519 +12 

Dec N.T. N.T. 1130 — +« 

Mar N.T. N.T. 1130 — + S 

May N.T. N.T. 2.130 — +S 

Est. voi.: 45 tots at 10 tons. Prev. actual 
sales: 106 tot* Open Interest : 1538 
COFFEE 


FIDELITY POB *70. Hamilton Bermuda jb 

—1ml American values Common™ S 7X77 


— 1ml Ameitcan Values Common- S 7X77 

— Im] Amor V siuo Cum.Prrf *10150 J" 

-Id 1 Fidelity Anwr. Assets *8059 " 

— d) Fidelity Australia Fund *7.97 JJ 

—Id ) FjdWtty Discovery Fund jmn W 

—id) Fidelity Dir. SvBS.Tr *120.9* » 

— }d) FWelltyFy East Fund 119.11 » 

— (d ) FldefHv InTI. Fund S5*4S 5* 

— Id 1 Fidelity Orient Fund *2*98 JJ 

—Id ) Fidelity Front (nr Fund * 12*2 

— Id) Fidelity Pacfflc Fund *132.97 {» 

— (d 1 Fidelity 5PCI. Growth Fd., *1*03 JJ, 

—Id) Fidelity World Fond $3053 )*[ 


Mar 

2525 

2525 

2505 

TJQA 

-20 

May 

2450 

2550 

155Q 

255* 

— 5 

Jly 

N.T. 

N.T. 

ZS/fl 

— 

Unctv 

Sep 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2592 

2408 

+ 7 

Nov 

N.T. 

N.T. 

3586 

2420 

— * 

Jan 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2JB7 

2425 

+ 2 

Mar N.T. N.T. 25BS 

Est. voL: 11 tats ol 5 tans. 

Pr*M 

Uneh. 

actual 


FORBES PO BB87 GRAND CAYMAN Iw 

LmvtanAaenl 01-8393013 Iw 

— Curl Cnld Inrwni, % S/M* d 

— Iw) GoW Aanreciatton 1*30 id 

— <wl Dallor Income S 132 [d 

—Imt Strateota Tnsdtna *150 ( W l 

GEFINOR FUNDS. !"! 

-*w» East investment Fund *34630 IT! 

— (v») Scottish World Fund 10 1 


— nu KJ ruiw_^, & IZJJM04J im i 

^ISSafS^iisaa, 8 ™” jlj 


Galea: 20 iota. Ooen [merest: 186 
Source: Bourse du Commerce. 


[Gold Options (prices In S/az.). 


Price 

Wi 

Mir 

Ai* 

SO 

16251775 

75503700 


300 

7* 875 

isavKjo 

2S7UUS 

3W 

1JB- ISO 

1225-1373 

19502150 

330 

025- 150 

750 <00 

. 15001650 

330 

am as) 

450 600 

107*4225 

3*o 

001-050 

225 350 

775.925 


Gtid 30550. 30UD 



Asian Commodities 

Feb. 18 


VatansWUteWdd &A. 

I. Qwm do Mont Mine 
1211 Geneva L laHiiilnMl 
T«L 310251 - Tele* 28385 


HOfKLKONG GOLD FUTURES 
u per ounca 

Close Prevtaas 
Utah Law IM Ask BW ASk 
Fel) u N.T. NT. 30600 39UQ 30*00 30*00 
Mar _ N.T. N.T. 30*00 30*00 305 JM 307/M 
Apt _ 30740 X7M WM 3)0.00 SffJW 30950 
Jim ^ N.T. N.T. 312JM 31*00 31150 3T3JB0 
Auo _ 318J» 318/00 317/M UTMO 31650 318J00 
Oct ^ N.T. N.T. 32250 32*50 321.00 32350 
Dec - H.T. NLT.3375D 32950 32650 32850 
votuene: 23 Ms of MO at . , 

SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
U-Maerouoce 


&U3BA L A&S ET MANA G ENlE NT CORP. lr I 
PB 119. St Peter Part, Guernsey. 0*81-2*715 Id ) 

(ID) FuturGAMSJV *12247 lr) 

ImlCAMArfaltnm. Iw *12147 lr I 

Iw) GAMerlca Inc s 13840- (w) 

iw) GAM Boston Inc S 10652 Iw) 

tWI GAM Prmlbo. *1350 Id 1 

IWI GAM Franc-W, — SF 9958 jwl 

(d > gam International Inc. *10044 id) 

l»l GAM North America Inc. S 10259 1*1 

Iwj gam n. America Unit Trust, wzioa id) 

(*•1 GAM Pacific Inc *11359 Iw) 

S«l GAM Start. 8. Inti UnH Tnrsl, lasJBp Iw) 

(ml GAM Systems Inc.. ST0B40 WU 

Iwl GAMWorUhridBlnc. S1/D5B* Id) 


rA* 

4-1 M* 






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WS&I w* EXOTIC 


FROM STOC 


t- MM£SA irst m Mi t 
3 Sr tSVJX 
*=p=^ -s. -tt rak bo 
cr+to 1 >r JJLA. 

RUTS INC. • 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1985 


Page 9 


'Mini-Max’ Note Debuts on Eurobond Market 


By Carl Gewirrz 

Tniemanonal Herald Tnhune 

PARIS — A new instrument 
combining the features of a float- 
ing-rate note and a fixed-coupon 
bond, dubbed the “mini-max" by 
lead manager Goldman Sachs, 
made its debut on the Eurobond 
market Monday. 

Superficially, the instrument is a 
floating-rate note: 5200 million of 
10-year noncallable notes for Den- 

^ Bank-Loan Figure Is Revised Up 14% 

What sets it apart from standard 
FRNs is the guaranteed minimum 
coupon of 10 percent and a guaran- 
teed maximum coupon of 1 1 5a per- 


in effect. Denmark: is wiling to 
give up any decline in its interest 
costs if money-market rates decline 
for the guarantee dial its cost will 
not top 11% percent if rates sky- 
rocket. 

The cost of this insurance against 
rising rates is expensive. Denmark 
is paying a commission of 50 basis 
points to market the paper, com- 


pared with the low 15 basis points 
it previously paid on a classic FRN. 
(One hundred basis points equal 
one percentage point.) 

In addition, the margin is more 
generous than the low point over 
the three-month bid-offered rate it 
paid on an FRN offered in 1983. 

The initial market reaction was 
favorable, with the notes quoted at 


25 to 32 basis points below the par 
offering price, well within the total 
balf-poinl commission. 

Dealers said the Danish paper 
appealed to banks who see picking 
up more of a margin on this paper 
than on other FRNs and who be- 
lieve they can nimbly get rid of the 
paper before the cap takes effect if 
interest rates start to rise. 


teed maximum coupon or 1 1 ft per- 
cent. 

Normally, the guaranteed mini- 
mum coupon — which is virtually 
standardized at 5V 4 percent — at- 
tracts scant attention ih<** days 
with Libor at 9 1 * percent. With 
Ubor at that level, a minimum of 
10 percent is especially attractive. 

The catch, of course, is the cap of 
I lb percent, a toLally new concept 
in the FRN market. 


{Continued from Page 7) 
banking market contracted by $4.4 
billion. 

The BIS attributes the decline to 
the ripple effects caused by Lhe 
problems then being experienced 
by Continental Illinois National 
Bank & Trust Co., which was ulti- 
mately saved from collapse by the 
U.S. banking authorities. 

The report also attributes the de- 
cline to the boom in the interna- 
tional bond markets and the in- 
creasing popularity of Euronote 


facilities, which reduced corporate 
and sovereign demand for direct 
bank loans. In addition, the im- 
proved balance-of-payments posi- 
tions of many countries meant gov- 
ernments and their agencies had 
less need to seek loans. 


nominated in ECU that banks re- 
ported holding. Non-bank ECU 
deposits totaled only 5800 million. 


A special study on the develop- 
ment of the European Cunency 
Unit shows that this is overwhelm- 
ingty a bank market. ECU loans to 
non-banks totaled the equivalent of 
S2J billion last September of a 
total of 514.3 billion of assets de- 


Korean Car Exports Double 

Reuten 

SEOUL — South Korean car ex- 
ports more than doubled to 4,644 
in January from 1,738 in January 
1984, the Korea Auto Industries 
Association said Monday. Overall 
vehicle sales rose to 18,003 from 
16,829 in January last year, it said. 


OK Tedi Mine 

Bid Reported 

Realm 

SYDNEY — Papua New 
Guinea’s deputy prime minis- 
ter, Paias Wmgti, has told Aus- 
tralian reporters in Beying that 
China has offered to participate 
in the development of the Ok 
Tedi gold and copper mining 
project. 

But a senior member of the' 
Pori Moresby government said 
Monday that no official confir- 
mation had been received. . 

Papua New Guinea ordered 
closure of the mine two weeks 
ago amid a dispute with the 
consortium of foreign compa- 
nies over the project's funner 
development. Shareholders in 
the project are Broken Hill Pro- 
prietary Co„ with 30 percent. 
Papua New Guinea, with 20 
percent. Standard Oil Co. {Indi- 
ana). 30 percent, Degussa AG 
and Metallgesellscnart AG, 
both of West Germany, with 7.5 
percent each, and WesL German 
Development Co., 5 percent. 


W. Germans Resist E-Bond Reform 


A Record Grain Crop is Changing Life in China’s Countryside 


(Continued from Page 7) 
suppliers, such as Canada. Some 
Washington officials place the total 
loss of farm exports to China as 
high as SI billion annually in 1983 
and 1984, against Lola! U.S. farm 
exports last year of $38 billion. 

U.S. officials believe that Beijing 
will still buy about four million 
tons of grain annually from U.S. 
farmers. Chinese officials have said 
that they will continue to export 
rice while importing cheaper 
grains, principally wheat. 

Meanwhile, the grain surplus is 
bringing basic changes in the lives 
of the 2,000 people of Renhe, in 
Sichuan province. The agricultural 
policies adopted in 1978 by Deng 
iftaoping were tried out first in 
Sichuan, Mr. Deng's native prov- 
ince, and they have fostered a rapid 
prosperity. Now. growing numbers 
of Renhe peasants are diversifying 
into other activities — raising vege- 
tables. carpentry, pooling funds to 
start small shops or buy trucks. 


The pattern is exactly what Beij- 
ing wants. While sustaining the ag- 
ricultural boom, Mr. Deng hopes to 
invigorate the rest of the economy 
by mobilizing surplus rural labor, 
channeling it into small workshops, 
plants and service industries. Cni- 
nese economists estimate that up to 
150 million of the 350 million peas- 
ants engaged in agriculture can be 
redeployed. 

The idea is to stimulate the kind 
of growth seen elsewhere in Asia, 
without the social costs. Instead of 
disniptive population shifts into 
the big cities, Mr. Deng envisages a 
rural industrialization that will be- 
gin on a small scale and become 
increasingly sophisticated. 

To speed the process, the govern- 
ment has begun to manipulate its 
agricultural policies once again. 
With the triple aims of diversifying 
production away from grain, 
matching output and consumer de- 
mand. and making more effective 
use of rural labor, Beijing is moving 


cautiously away from centralized 
controls toward market forces. 

No Communist country has at- 
tempted anything like this, and it 
entails major economic and politi- 
cal risks. Peasants who have count- 
ed on the state to buy their crops 
will be increasingly dependent on 
the marketplace. Consumers are on 
notice that food prices, kepi artifi- 
cially low by the government, will 
over lime be allowed to float free. 
Laborers who have known nothing 
but rakes and hoes must learn new 
skills. 

Prime Minister Zhao Ziyang has 
said of the shift to market forces, 
“This is what we had hoped but not 
dared to do for many years.*' 

With $17 billion in foreign-ex-, 
change reserves, surplus grain to 
sustain the country, and an already 
impressive industrial growth rate, 
the government has judged that the 
time is ripe to risk the disruptions 
inherent in what amounts to a sec- 
ond economic revolution. 


For rural dwellers, the new po- 
licy si gnals an upheaval as great as 
the one that occurred in the 1950s, 
when Mao ordained the collectiv- 
ization of peasant life and institut- 
ed central controls. Families were 
uprooted from plots and forced 
into production “brigades’* where 
individualism was submerged. 

In the first phase of his reforms, 
Mr. Deng swept much of this aside. 
While the principal of collective 
land ownership was maintained, 
families were assigned their own 
plots to farm and encouraged to 
“gel rich.'* Sharp increases m the 
state prices for cotton and grain 
gave added incentives. 

In Renhe township, the results 
were dramatic. Harvests that had 
been virtually static during the 
commune years started to boom. 
From an average of barely 4,000 
pounds an acre (about 4,490 kilos 
per hectare) before the reforms, 
grain yields leaped to an average of 
6.900 pounds in 1983. In 1984 the 


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INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Back Page) 


1 WSSSSSSS^M 

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TO USA ROM £119 ana way. 
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HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


CHARTER A YACHT M GREECE. Dr- 
rod from owner of lorgesl fleet. 
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lima: 4f7 852 
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Sao Paula: 852 1893 

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township’s nine villages reported a 
harvest of 19.5 million pounds, 1.9 
million pounds higher than the re- 
cord set in 1983. 

Across the country, average 
peasant incomes have nearly dou- 
bled, to the equivalent of SI 10 an- 
nually per capita. In Renhe, fa- 
vored with the fertile paddies 
characteristic of Sichuan, the fig- 
ures are considerably higher. 

Recently, storage problems have 
developed along with increased 
grain yields. The township's grana- 
ry holds nine million pounds, but 
its doors were almost bursting from 
their hinges the day it opened. 

But with a total income last year 
of more than $1,430, Mr. Chen, 36. 
is not complaining. He has 
branched out into pig-raising and 
vegetable-growing. 

“The more we work, the more we 
get," he said. His mother paused in 
her chores to add: “Old Deng gave 
us back the land, and we’re show- 
ing him what simple people like us 
can do." 


Reuten 

FRANKFURT — Moves by the 
Bundesbank to allow foreign ha nits 
to lead-manage Eurobond issues 
denominated in Deutsche marks 
were rebuffed by the West German 
bank subcommittee last week, and 
the timetable for further action is 
unclear, bond market sources said 
Monday. 

“The gentleman’s agreem en t re- 
mains in force,” one highly placed 
West German banking source said. 
“Nothing has changed.” 

The Bundesbank will now have 
to decide if it is to make a unilateral 
ruling over future market regula- 
tion. Sources said it faces a tough 
decision, not wishing to relinquish 
control over monetary policy or to 
irritate West German banks. 

The bond-market sources said 
pressure for some liberalization of 
markets from overseas central 
banks, combined with political 
pressure on the Bonn government, 
is likely to prove impossible to re- 
sist in the aid. 

But it is unlikely that any speedy 
changes will be made to the present 
rules, which have excluded foreign 
banks since 1981, they said. Many 
had expected some announcement 
to foDow fairly soon after discus- 
sion of the issue last Wednesday. 

The six-member bank commit- 
tee. chaired by Wolfgang Roller, 
spokesman far the incoming man- 
agement board at Dresdner Bank 
AG. was unanimous in rejecting 
the Bundesbank's proposals. 

“It’s a shame because every U.S. 
bank wanted to be the first in” as 
lead manager, one banking source 
said. 

The proposals laid before the 
committee were to allow any bank 
with a full West German operating 


Net Asset Value 
on Feb. 7, 1985 

Pacific Selection Fund N.V. 
U.S.J1.40 per li.S.$1 unit 

Pacific Selection 
Fund N.V. 


license to bring clients to the Deut- 
sche mark Eurobond market But 
West German banks are insisting 
that this is not an offshore market 
in the way that the Eurodollar 
bond market remains exclusively 
outside the United States. 

They maintain that banks whose 
home-country market does not al- 
low West German banks to place 
paper directly with investors can- 
not expect to be given similar rights 
in West Germany. U.S. banks 
would be most affected by such a 
exception. 

The sources noted that apart 
from the stipulation that foreign 
borrowers cannot make domestic 
bond issues, the tine between do- 
mestic and mark Eurobond mar- 
kets is very hazy. 

Around half of all Eurobonds 
denominated in marks and issued 
in West Germany are bought by 


domestic investors. Many such is- 
sues, particularly from entities such 
as the World Bank or the European 
Investment Bank, can be used as' 
collateral against banks’ Lombard 
borrowing at the Bundesbank. 

The lifting of the 25-percent cou- 
pon tax on interest-rate remit- 
tances to nonresident investors in 
domestic bonds made the differ- 
ence between the two markets still 
more unclear. 

Aside from concern over loss of 
monetary control, the Bundesbank 
would also tike to make sure that it 
continues to have at least one West 
German bank involved in any fu- 
ture issue syndicate, the sources 
said. 

They now expect further discus- 
sions to go on behind the scenes, 
with the Bundesbank likely to take 
the debate to the various bank as- 
sociations. 




HARRY WINSTON 

crf^eiv^br/L 




Present 
during the 
month of February 





their latest collection 
at 

the Palace Hotel in Gstaad 
and 

the Badrutt’s Palace in St Moritz 

New York Gen&ve Paris Monte-Carlo 




| ESCORTS & GUIDES 



DUS5ELDORF/ COLOGNE/ BONN 
Engfch Escort Serwcs 0211/38 31 41. 

VSMA - DEStS BCORT Service. 
Tel: 52-30-355. 







t iV g 1 • l )i' irt 









Uji.A 1 

j I| W' / fotf 'Ifil' lAriiiiil 






VIENNA VP ESCORT SERVICE- Tel-. 
(Vienna) 65 4! 58 



™ NATIONAL 

COMPUTER 

CONFERENCE 


The Eighth National Computer Conference will be hosted by ARAMCO in Al Khobar, 
Saudi Arabia, on 17 Muharram 1406H, October 1, 1985. This will be a continuation of 
seven national computer conferences since 1394H (1974). 

The National Computer Conference will be sponsored by ARAMCO as an industrial repre- 
sentative for the first time following successful conferences sponsered by academic 
representatives in the Kingdom. Never-ending development in computer technology, its 
effect on managing computer resources and wide-spread computer use in industry suggests 
the following appropriate theme: ■ 

'COMPUTERS IN MANAGEMENT AND INDUSTRY 7 




Papers are invited on the following topics: 


1. Computer Management and Utilization 

2. Computer Graphics 

3. Office Automation 

4. Computers in Education 

5. Data Security 

6. Centralized vs. Distributed Systems 

7. Computers and Simulation 

8. Computers in Industrial Processes 

9. Other (Specify) 

The conference will include working ses sions on the following key issues. 

1. Computer Industry in Saudi Arabia 

2. Automation of Industry 

3. Computer Literacy and National Concern 

4. National Computer Data Communications 
Requirements 



The deadline for receipt of paper topic abstracts (minimum 250 words, maximum 700 
words) is March 6,1985. The notification date for acceptance of abstracts is April 15.1985. 
The full text of papers accepted by the selection committee is to be submitted by July 17, 
1985. Abstracts and papers should be mailed to the following address: 




CHAIRMAN, Paper Selection Committee 
8th National Computer Conference 
ARAMCO P.OJBox 1748 
Dhahran 31311, Saudi Arabia. 


IPR • 1 851 


For further information please contact any of the following Aramco offices in Saudi Arabia. 

Dhahran 875-5935 Jeddah 653-4655 Riyadh 464-1055 ext. 223. 


.4 \ » . y . 

























































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19. 198* 


PEANUTS 


IIIIIHUNHIIN 


I CAN'T BELIEVE IT... 
YOU'RE HELPING ME 
WITH MY HOMEWORK. 1 


IT S 5ETTEK THAN 
HAVING YOUR 
ATTORNEY SUE ME. 


I WONT NEEP YOU 
AFTER ALL, ATTORNEY. 
WE'VE DECIDE? TO 
SETTLE OUT OF COURT... 


. HOW W/LL I EVER PAY 
FOR MV NEW BRIEFCASE ' 


HHiiiiaim^H 
!■■■■ ■■■■ iial 





| r*fi -r< 


BLONDIE 


■ HONEY VCXI J / NO 
HAVE TO r— ' I WAy / 
WKE LP J V v 


I i absolutely rsbuse 

(TO GET up TOCftY / ANO 

r RJC7THEHMC3QE... f 


ainniBiiiim 




Bar vou 

I ARE UP 


1 CAN'T BELIEVE I ClD ) 

THIS TO MYSELF > | — ^ 


? THIS TO mfSEU= f 

/ 


ACROSS 


1 Storybook 

anirpal 
6 Ollie's pal 
10 Tennis great 

14 Davy Jones’s 
realm 

15 Singer Patti 

16 Payoff position 
at Belmont 

17 Start of a quote 
from 

“Hamlet"' 

20 Rent 

21 Work at 
steadily 

22 One makings 
goal 

23 Light-Horse 
Harry 

24 They give 
deductions 

26 Quote: Part ri 

36 Core 

31 Like kitsch 

32 Actual being 
38 Beef order 

37 Melodies 

38 Quarters for 
Leo 


48 Road-sign 
abbr. 

49 Spanish wine 
city 

50 “Much 

About 

Nothing" 

51 Henry rV’s 
birthplace 

54 End of quote 

58 Darling of the 
demos 

58 Be pleased by 

66 Unaccompanied 

61 Poker pair 

62 Antony's 
friend 

63 Yams 


19 “Off with 
youl” 

23 Instruments 
playing false 
notes? 

24 Phones again 

25 Involve 


Wf 


BEETLE BAILEY 


39 Coffee servers 

40 Skirt style 

41 Corporeal 
channel 

42 Quote: Part III 

44 Cup 

(yachting 

prize) 

<* New York 


DOWN 

1 Orange or 
Rose 

2 Pain’s partner 

3 Track 
tournament 

4 Outlaw 

5 Scrutinize 
8 Nimble 

7 Sailor 

8 Long, long 

9 Predawn 
workers 

10 Neckwear- 
XI Beach 

12 “Iliad" author 

13 Pitchers 

18 Bread spread 


28 Done, for short 

27 Lend an ear 

28 Merit 

29 Boat basin 

32 Emulate Juliet 

33 Hindu garment 

34 House location 

35 Time periods 

37 showing good 

will 

41 Elaine's town 

42 Omen 

43 “Das 
Rheingold" 
role 

44 Limits 

45 Bea Arthur 
rede 

48 Singer John 

47 Tracks 

SOSweetsop 

51 Louganis’s 
milieu 

52 Shakespeare’s 
wife 

53 Employs 

55 Broadcast 

56 Bout ending: 
Abbr. 

57 Dockworkers’ 
ozg. 


THAT & VMAT X CALL 
SPINNING YOUR 

wheels, zero . 


Tones, edited In' Eugene Molesko, 


DENNIS THE MENACE 






’Ami worth all -mis 


4 1 WAS HOPIN' 
YOU'D WIMP' 


THAI SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
s by Henri Arnold and Bob Lee 


Unscramble these four Jumbles. 
one letter to each square, lo form I 
four rmfirtarv wnftte I 


four onfinary manic. 


EPSIO 


TAPAD 


BROMEY 





FLEEDI 


HOW A STAG 
IS OFTEN FORCE C?. 
TO RUN. 


Now arrange the girded letters to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


Answer here: FOR 


Yesterday's 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Jumbles: GROUP WHOOP VENDOR PLURAL 


Answer. The tuba player liked Mb work because he 
was this — WRAPPED UP IN IT 


PPED UP IN IT 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


Mwn 

Amsterdam 

Athene 

BaroeMaa 

Belgrade 

Berlin 

Brussels 

Bucharest 

Budapest 


Costa oel Sol 

Dublin 

Edinburgh 

Florence 

Freak Fort 

Geneva 

Helsinki 

Istanbul 

Las Palmas 

Lisbon 

London 

Madrid 

Milan 

Moscow 

Manic* 

Wen 

Oslo 

Part* 

Prague 

Reykjavik 

Home 

Stockholm 

Strasbourg 

Venice 

Vienna 

Warsaw 

Zurich 


HIGH 

LOW 


ASIA 

HIGH 

LOW 


C 

F 

C 

F 



C 

F 

C 

F 


15 

59 

8 

46 

cl 

Bangkok 

Balling 

33 

91 

24 

73 

fr 

•2 

28 

-8 

18 

fr 

-6 

21 

-11 

12 

SW 

17 

63 

7 

45 

ct 

Hang Kang 

17 

63 

14 

57 

a 

13 


6 

<3 

a 

Sfinella 

31 

18 

25 

77 

d 

•7 

I* 

•14 

7 

fr 

(Saw Delhi 

27 

81 

9 

48 

fr 

-4 

25 

-9 

16 

0 

5eoal 

2 

36 

It 

32 

0 

■3 

26 

-8 

18 

fr 

Shanghai 

4 

39 

1 

34 

5W 

-5 

23 

-16 

3 

fr 

sampore 

31 

88 

75 

77 

0 


21 

-10 

14 

fr 

TolPel 

16 

61 

13 

55 

r 


19 

-14 

7 

fr 

Tokyo 

10 

so 

6 

43 

0 

19 

5 

66 

41 

9 

-2 

48 

» 

Q 

Ct 

AFRICA 






4 

39 

1 

34 

Ct 


23 

13 

9 

48 

fr 



3 




23 

73 

B 

46 

fr 

■^i 

31 


12 


Com Town 

» 

77 

15 

59 

(r 






GasaMaaca 

16 

61 

B 

46 

0 


-4 25 sw 

15 99 cl 

8 45 d 

-2 28 el 

* 43 a 

-3 26 Cl 


25 77 15 59 
31 M 26 79 
22 72 18 64 
2T 70 11 52 


LATIN AMERICA 


Zorich -6 2f 

MIDDLE EAST 


-24 -11 tr 
-4 2S Fr 
-13 9 SW 

-J 28 h 
6 43 0 

-25 -13 lr 
-9 16 fr 
•2 28 fr 

■9 16 SW 
•19 -2 SW 
-tf M fr 


prams Aim 27 Bi 22 72 fr 

Lima 24 75 20 68 O 

Mexico City 20 68 5 41 cl 

Rto dc Janeiro 31 BI 24 7S fr 

SM Paulo — — — — no 


WORTH AMERICA 


Ankara 
— — — » 
9Cnn 
Damascus 
Jerusalem 
T#f Aviv 


-7 19 -J7 1 SW 

18 64 lo 61 Cl 

13 55 2 36 cl 

12 54 5 41 ct 

17 43 7 45 d 


Aneborm 

Atlanta 

Boston 

Chicago 

Denver 

Detroit 

Honolulu 

Houston 

Los Angeles 

Miami 

Mhuicoponi 


OCEANIA 


Auckland 22 72 15 59 Cl 

Sydney 22 n 19 66 d 

cl-doudy; fa-foggy: fr-lgtr; rt-nall: 
dtihWKrt; sw-snaw; st-stormy. 


New York 
San FraadscO 
Seattle 
Toronto 
WostiingMa 


o- a vorccst; Dc-oortfv i 


YVES DAY'S FOtrecAsr _ channel.' Smooth. franKFURT: Fair. Temp. 
- 6 — -13 121 — 91. LONDON: POrtlY doudv. TeiW. 4 — -3 (39 — 261. MADRID: 
Fair. Toma. 9-5 (48-41). NEW YORK: Cloutfv. Temn. 3— -1 (38-38). 
PARIS: Fair. Tomo. 0 -- & (37—231- HOME: Cloudy. Temp. 9-5 (48-41). 
TEL AVIV! CtouOv. Temp. t7— > (63 — 46)- ZURICH: Fate, Temp. - 4— -?0 
121—14). BANGKOK; Foggy. Temp. 33 — 27 (91 — »l I. HONG KWHS: Cloudy. 
Temp, is — 16 (66 — *1 1. MANILA: Fair. Tamp. 32 — 23 (90 — 731. SEOUL: Snow. 
Temp. 3-—- 1 138 — 301. SINGAPORE: S*ormr. Toma. 32 — 25 ( 90 — 771. 
TOKYO- Rainy. T«n». 10—4 (50—39). 


ANDY CAPP 

| .IMETMUM IN THE iMARKET 


PET. ANDGUE9S MW- - 
WON THE 3»0<RDTAT 


WON THE 3ACKR3T A1 
BINGO LAST NGHT/ 


GOOD FOR 
HER. I AM 
v PLEASED - 
-I REALLY 
4CANTHAT 


(TRULY?) ^ 


TRUIY-I 


r THE MORE 
VdEYhWE 

jam, 

( OF 'EM V 


C lBfl^ DiJs Mitroi Newijuipera Llal 
Drtf bt Ntm Aiwtci Sfndiaic 1 


VIZARD of ID 

Vtm W TH£ m&M fc»T 




*rti0(fzm> an -m mu? wfe 
jM&cnxoF&mm 




REX MORGAN 


A YOUNG MAN BY 
THE NAME OF 
KENNY WANTS TO 
.TALK TO YOU, j 
fr MARTHA/ A 


I TOLD HIM 
NEVER TO CALL 

t ME HERE 
UNLESS ITS 
URGENT ' 


GUESS WHAT, MOTHER? I JUST 
TALKED TO BERT ANO HE SAID , 
THAT IF HE HAD KNOWN THAT I 4 
DIDN’T HAVE SCHOOL TODAY. HE 
WOULD'VE TAKEN ME TO. LUNCH — 
“TV AND MAYBE A MOVIE' r — 


DO VOU HAVE Y 
A DATE WITH J 
> KEITH TV 
f TONIGHT* 


WHY 
DO YOU 
ASK* 




R* 






GARFIELD 


HOW ARE \ 
voasootAK?] 


5 HOW WOULP 
l VOU FEEL IF 
,WU GOT SUCKED 
S UP IN A 
O VACUUM „ 

® CLEANER? 


HOW HUMILIATING/ ML, A MOUSE. 


nun rsLWvuLiesi mis; me., muixx. | ..nQCR 
SUCKED UP LIKE A COMMON 
PIECE OF DIRT. THAT5J0ST MV v 


LUCK/ WHAT ARE THE CHANCES 
OF THAT EVER 
HAPPENING? 


$ 0 , 


i GETTING s 
BETTER ALL 
THE TIME# . 
1 fPSAV ) 




an* Dw»2i9 






Wirkl Stock Utotos 


J'’ia Agence France-Presse Feb. 18 

Closing prices in local currencies unless otherwise indicated. 


ABN 

ACFHaMIng 

Aegon 

AKZO 

Ahold 

AMEV 

A' Dam Rub 

Amrobank 

flW 

DuehrmannT 

CatontJ HkJg 

Ehavler-NDU 

Fokker 

Gist Brocades 

Holnoken 

Hoogovens 

KLM 

Maarden 

Nat Nedder 

Nedllovd 

Oca Vandw G 

Pt*ho«id 

Ptiiltas 

Raboco 

Hodamco 

Rollnoo 

ROrenlo 

RovW Dutch 

Unilever 

VanOmmaren 

VMF Stork 

VNU 


Clow Prev. 

Kruaa Stahl 82J0 82.90 

Unde 429 JM 428 

Lutmaraa 787.00 ISP 

MAN 157.10 15*50 

iWarmesmann .15580 15* 

Mefallgesellschafl 25mm 248 
Muencti.Rurck 1235 1245 

Preussog 260.® m«: 

Rueloers Wrrkr 345J0 MS 

RWE 1*3.00 1 6150 

Saherlna 476JOO 47650 

Siemens S4SJJO 07 

thvssen 101 JU 100 

Varta 
Veba 
VEW 

Volksvmoenwerk 


Commonbank lime* : NJL 
Previo u s : 1,17080 


ANP.CB5 General 
Previous rseiao 


I index : 20328 


Anted 

Bokaert 

Cockrrtll 

EBES 

GB-IM6-BM 

GBL 

Gevaert 

Hoboken 

KretHetbarA 

Petroflno 

Sac Genera la 

Sa ti na 

Solvav 

Traction Elec 
vidlfe Monloane 


Be East Asia 
Ctieuno Kano 
China Light 
Cross Harbor 
Mono Sens Bank 
HK Electric 
HK Hotels 
HK Land 
HK Shanghai 
HK Telephone 
HK Wharf 
Hutch Whampoa 
Jar dine Math 
JardlneSec 
New World 
Shaw Bros 
SHK Props 
Slme Darby 
Statu* 

Swire Pacific A 

Wheel Mar 

Whaetock 
1 Mffnser 
World i nr I 


7450 2450 
1190 1190 
14J0 1490 
IB 10 
46JS 4750 
750 7.90 

3250 33 

45Q 450 

9 8.95 

6S5Q 6450 

^3 *t? 

950 375 

9J5 L*5 

6 6 
NA NA 
9A0 950 
NA 620 
NA 145 
2450 2450 
NA NA 
Susa. 6A0 
470 4M , 

240 2J2Q 


Bril Hama St 

Blit Telecom 

BTR 

Burmah 

Cadbury Schw 

Charter Cans 

Coats Pohms 

Cons Gold 

Court aulds 

Dalootv 

De Beers • 

Distillers 

Drlefonhrtn 

Dunlap 

Flsons 

Free St Gad 

GEC 

GKN 

Glaxo t 

Grand Mel 

Guinness 

GUS 

Hanson 

Hawker 

ICI 

Imps 

Uovds Bank 

Lonrho 

Lucas 

Mocks and So 
Metal Bax 
Midland Bank 
Not West Bonk 
Pllklnoton 
Plessev 

Ratal Elect 

Randlocilrln 

Rank 

need inti 

Reuters 

Royal Dutch t 

RTZ 

Shell 

STC 

SM Chorterod 
Tnfa and Lvle 
Tosco 
Thom EMI 


| HnN Sene index ; 1527.18 
PrevhNJi : lABJO 


Carre** stock index : 2162J6 
Previous : 219943 


F im kfart 


AEG Tetefunlen 
Alllaru Vers 
Basl 
Sever 
Sorer. Hypo. 

Bov nr-Ver, Bank 
BMW 

Commeatxink 
Contigummi 
Daimler Benz 
Degussa 

Deutsche Bobcack 
Deutsche Bcnk 
□rasdner Bank 
DUB SChuHie 
GHH 
Hochtief 


Hoesch 

Hotemafln 

Horten 

Kelt + Sofz 

Karstadl 

Kouftwf 


rtoecknor uwerke 


I12JD 113 
1037 1032 
109 JO IB* JO 
19&.I0 1 V6-S3 
3li20 317 

327 JM 32650 
37000 36750 
16750 168 

171.00 131.40 
64600 642 

35U0 33 

17150 I7l3 

40350 40350 

19170' 194 1 
22400 223 1 

16250 16350. 
44900 462 

19600 10950 
1IUM 395 
39900 NA 
16400 . 164 
271 JO 272 
21150 21050 

250JW 210 

26150 261 

7100 78-10 


AECI 

Barlows 

Blyvoor 

Buffets 

Elands 

GFSA 

Harmony 

Kloof 

NeOrnnk 

PsISIevn 

Rustbtat 

SA Brews 

3i Helena 

Sasal 


Blit Telecom I75 Vi 

BTR 430 

Burmah 216 

Codburv Schw 172 

Charter Cans 201 

Coots Pfrtans 156 

Cons Gold 517 

Court oulds 141 

Daloorv 500 

De Beers* 480 

Distillers 2*4 

DriefonlBtn 

Dunlap 45 Vj 

Flsons 281 

Free St Ged S23U. 

GEC 194 

gkn ■m 

Glaxo t ilk 

Grand Mel 295 

Gatnnass 231 

GUS 699 

Hanson 205 

Hawker <25 

ICJ 839 

Imps 19B 

Uovds Bank SS9 

Lonrho 171 

Lucas 249 

Mar* sand So (25 

Metal Box 415 

Midland Bank 334 

Not West Bank 664 

Pllfclnstoi 3®3 

Plessev 172 

Racal Elect 196 

Randlonleln Wh 

Rank 344 

need inti 554 

Reuters 348 

Royal Dutch t 49kk 

RTZ 654 

Shell 778 

STC 10 B 

Std Chartered 499 

Tata end Lvle 470 

Tosco 237 

Thorn EMI 452 

T.l. group 234 

Trafaliiar Bjo 370 

THF 148 

Ulfromar 203 

U iH lever e 11457*4 
United Biscuits 222 

Vickers 24S 

W.Deep *3? 

WXaldlnes S30k> 

War Loan 3W t 34% 

Wool worth 565 

ZC1 I7J2 


Air Llaulde 
Aisthom AH. 
Av Dassaull 
SoncQlr* 

BIC 

Bwvoues 
BSN-GD 
Carrttour 
Club Mad 
Cod mes 
Dumez 
EH-Acniitoine 
Ear one I 
Gen Roux 
HachoHe 
I metal 
Lafarge Cop 
L eg rand 
roreal 

Main] 

MMWIn 
MMAennar 
Moot Hanesav 
Moulinex 
Nord-Est 
OHddratale 
Pernod Rlc. 
Petroles (t») 

F>Otl0M4 

PoclDln 

Prlnfemps 

Radtomchn 

Redouta 

Roussel Uriel 

Skis Rcastsnol 

Sour Perrier 

Teienwcan 

Thomson C5F 

valea 


626 6Z7 

225 225.90 
975 975 

5*9 4 OS 

565 568 

449 642 

2400 2405 

1951 1962 
1848 1251 

sS 24 ®? 

142 242 

975 m 

sea 574 

187* into 
80 «30 
411.50 413 

30Wt 2047 
2305 2320 
1648 16S 


Astra 

Atlas Copco 

Bonder 

Electrolux 

Ericsson 

Essette 

Handatridcen 

Pharmacia 

Soab-Scanla 

Sandvik 

Skansko 

SKF 

SwedlstiMatch 

Volvo 


ARamarMn index ; 39U0 
Praviees : WL7D 


.71 71 JO 
1985 1900 

102.90 10X10 
7S.10 73 

7*4 777 

.711 705 

25550 259.90 


5X80 $4 
197 707 

255 25980 
1256 1251 
1540 1546 
2B35 3B25 
S25 528 
2400 24J5 
<96 491 
242 239 JO 


AC I 
AN1 
ANZ 
BHP 
Bora i 

Bougainville 

Brambles 

Colas 

Coma Ico 

CRA 

CSR 

DutMop 

Elders ixl 

Hooker 

Magellan 

MW 


Oakbrldoe 

Peke 

PoseMon 


i Auefl index : Iff Jf 
Previous : T99J4 
CAC Index : 36X99 
Previous : 88U8 


Sanlos 

Sleigh 

Southland 

Waodside 

Worr n old 


T.I. group 
Trafalgar I 


Boustaod 
Cold Storage 
DBS 

FroserMeave 
How Par 
Inchoape . 
KeppelStilp 
Mai Banking 
OCBC 
DUB 

Samb Shipyard 
Slme Dmbv 
S Steamship 
St Trading 
UOB 


585 5.90 1 

$.85 110 


Ad Drdlnartgs inbox : 
Previous :7S*je 
Source: Reuters. 


US 110 

m us 

253 249 

1M IAS 


,.lS 9AS 

1M 4. 

1-38 1J> 


1.94 1.9| ! 

1.16 1.1S! 


OUB index :4o*.ii 
PtotKxiS :4t5JS 


StoddMUni 


Altai 

Asohichem 
Asahl Glass 
Bank of Tokyo 
BrWaestone 
Canon 
C-ltoh 

Dai Nidddit Print 
Dahna House 
Full Bank 
Pull Photo 
Fulltsu 
Hitachi 
Hcngg 
IHI 


P.T.3B Index ! 97150 
Prev to m : 77? Ji 


AGA 

Alfa Laved 
Asea 


iSS^ u ™ 


Kalltna 
Kansal Power 
KaoStw 


476 464 

66* 670 

880 m 

650 644 

52* 521 

1400 1420 

£ £ 
555 .538 
1460 1430 
1790 1800 
1390 1370 
875 BBS 
1460 1460 
145 144 

£Ub 5)5® 
371 & 

1330 1310 
819 B16 



THE LIBERAL BOND LS A 
CONSERVATIVE AGE: .American 
InteUechuls in the 1940s and 1950s 


By Richard H. Pells. 468 pp. $18.95. 
Harper & Row. 10 East 53d Street, 
Sew York, :V. Y. 10022. 

Reviewed br WaJrer Goodman 


H ERE ihev- are again those favorites of 
.^merici watchers, memoir writers and 





XI America waichers. memoir writers and 
connoisseurs of the higher gossip: Dwight 
Macdonald and Man' 'McCarthy; Hannah 
.\rendt and Reinhold’ Niebuhr, Lionel and 
Diana Trilling; Sidney Hook, Irving Howe, 
Daniel Bell Paul Goodman. G Wrigni Mills 
and other present and past contributors to The 
Partisan Review. The New Republic, Com- 
mentary and DissenL The New York intellec- 
tuals are Fortunate this lime out in being in the 
hands of a chronicler who grinds no axes on 
iheir reputations and does them the courtesy of 
close if sometimes critical readings. 

In his first book. “Radical Visions and 
American Dreams." Professor Richard H. 
Pells, who teaches history at the University of 
Texas, looked at American intellectual life of 
the 1950s. Now be moves on to the next two 
decades, when radical visions had Taded and 
many intellectuals were gelling their highs 
from an .America that had defeated fascism, 
was holding off Communism and was prosper- 
ing at home. 

Pells is drawn to cantankerous spirits like 
Dwight Macdonald, who was wan 1 of the exer- 
cise of U. S. power in the 1950s. Not that 
Macdonald was right so much of the time — 


Solution to Previous Puzzle 


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DEa sassnaa ssn 
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EEQEsasasa oasa 
□ess saanQ ssss 
□ecjd saaoa aaau 


his withholding of support from the Allies in 
World War U was as wrong-headed as an 
egghead can get —yet by refuang to be swqrt 
aloag by either the Marxist train of history or 
the wagon train of U. S. boosters, he exenased 
the indqjendenoe of mind that alone justifies 
the inteuectuaTs vocation. 

Like a scientist who has spent y cars studying 
a certain species, Pells attributes to his speci- 
mens responsibility for every ailment that has 
afflicted the land in the last 30 years. He 
blames “liberal politicians and anti-Stahnist- 
inteUectuals” for constructing the “ideology of 
the cold war 7 ' that was the “chief inspiration” 
of McCarthyism, and ons spiritual paternity 
on intellectuals for the Beats, the New Leftists 
and the counter-culturists who slouched forth 
in tire 1950s and '60s, Surely, he is claiming too 
much for the influence of ideas, .not giving 
sufficient due to the many other ingredients 
that intellectuals have taught us, breed social 
change and political commotion. 

The reader is likdy to leave this book with as 
dear a recognition of the limitations of intel- 
lectuals as of their talents. They have, for 
example, not proved particularly good proph- 
ets. Generally they play catch-up with history, 
basierungto explicate events that they did not 
foresee. They can be trenchant or merely 
trendy. They are at their most valuable and 
most enter taining when they are challenging 
each other’s interpretations and not pretmding 
to any priestly girt. 

Pells is critical of famous observers of the 
1950s like William Whyte ("The Organization 
Man”) and David Riesman (“The Londy 
Crowd") for advancing no cures far the confor- 
mity that they diagnosed. That's another thing 
about intellectuals — they are more comfort- 
able at diagnosing than at prescribing. 

They also tend to stand, or redine, at some 
distance from most of the nation, a separation 
that sometimes them but totally is 

their special -str ength, lending a ltind of immu- 
nity against the fads and infections around 
them. To the degree that intellectuals succumb 
to popular crusades, whether for or against 
communism or anything else, they may win 
points in heaven and even do good on Earth, 
but at the price of compromising their own 
inimitable calling. As Pells reminds ns, it was 
Dwight Macdonald’s lonely and perverse dis- 
sociation from United States's war effort that 
permitted him to stand apart and protest 
against some Allied actions that cried for pro- 
test 


Walter Goodman is on the staff of The New 
York Times 


By Robert Byrnes 


Z OLTa RIBL1, theJiungar- 
ian grandmaster, defeated 


£~i ian grandmaster, defeated 
the the former world titlehold- 
er, Vasily Smyslov of the Soviet 
Union, in the Imerpotis Inter- 
national Tournament in Til- 
burg Holland, last year. Smys- 
lov had defeated Ribli in the 
1983 London Semifinal world 
championship match. 

The system against the Reii 
Opening with 2... B-N5 and 


taming a solid, dosed forma- 
tion to limit the scope of the 
white bishop-pair, might have 
been Black's best course. In- 
stead Smyslov's 11... P-B4?! 


quickly led to the opening of 
the center and a dear ad van - 


the center and a dear advan- 
tage in mobility for White after 
17NxP. 

After 19 . . . N-KI, it would 
have been an error for White to 
exhange his QB, since his pres- 
sure against the black queen- 


3 . . . P-QB3 that Smyslov used 
makes certain that Black will 


makes certain that Black will 
not have trouble with the devd- 
opment of his QB and that the 
white fianchettoed KB will 
have its diagonal blocked by 
the black QP braced by the 
QBP. 

Once Ribli had played 9 R- 
K 1 . it looked as though he were 
aiming Tor a break in the center 
with 10 P-K4, but 9... R-K.1. 
was the response to 10 P-K4 
that Smyslov had prepared was 
TO . . . P-K41 Ribli wisely al- 
tered his center strategy with 
10P-B4. 

In exchanging with 
10. . . BxN. Smyslov probably 
expected the routine 11 NxB, 
which would have allowed him 
to play 11... N-K5, with an 
easy position to defend. Ribli 
crossed him up with the recap- 
ture by II PxB! which kept 
superior center control for 
White. 

Perhaps 11... P-K3. main- 


ride would have been dissipat- 
ed. The retreat with *20 B-K3! 



stuck Smyslov with a burden- 
some defense. 

On 24 Q-B4, the threat was 
25 Q-B7!. but after 24... B- 
B3, there would have been an 
adequate defense in 25Q-B7, 
QxQ; 26RxQ, R-Q2; 27 R- 
Q 8 ch, R-Ql, etc. 

It looked as though 27 ... P- 
K4 would finally gain freedom 
for Black, but after 28 R-Ql, 
PxP; 29PxP!, the black knight 
was denied the vital K4 square. 
Ribli did not worry about his 
doubled KBPs because it was a 
queenside attack that he was 
ntiyingon. 

After 32 P-R5, Smyslov 
could not well play 32 . . . QxP, 
since 33 BxPch, K-N2; 34 B- 
Q5, Q-N5cb; 35B-N2, Q-Q 8 cb; 
36K-R2, PxP; 37Q-B7ch. Q- 
Q2; 38 QxP/5 will soon cost 
Black his vital QRP. Indeed, 
his only chance for further re- 
sistance was 32 . . . B-Ql. 

On 32... PxP?; 33Pxp. the 


exposure of thejilack. QRP: to 
tire diagonal attack doomed 
Smyslov’s efforts. And 
33... QxP; 34BxP, Q-N5ch; 
35 B-N2, Q-Q 8 ch; 36 Q-Bl 
would not let Black have per- 
petual check. . 

After 33...N-K3, 34BxN, 
PxB; .35 P-R61, B-K2; 36Q^4. 
the blade QRP had io drop and 
allow Ribli to promote his 
QRP. Smyslov gave up. 


ROT OPENING 


1 1 WCBJ 
1 P-KNJ 
J BJ« 

« PW 
1 B4Q 
8 M 


Clot* Pra*. 
415 N.Q. 
108 111 
its m 
304 m 
292 291 

340 340 

17* 177 

205 205 

435 N.a 
N.Q. 795 
96J 97 

192 195 

237 238 

260 N«. 


198 106 

262 2 SB 
468 468 

520 520 

33S Ml 
196 193 

388 385 

412 412 

250 250 

540 532 

293 292 

222 21 ? 
306 306 

212 212 
235 235 

2*3 259 

188 189 

70 72 

m 437 
■m 7x 
385 Ml 
554 550 

188 188 
21 21 
85 83 I 

340 340 


KanataM SM 
Kirin Brower 
Komatsu (Id 
Kubota 

Matsu Elecinds 
Matsu Else. Works 

Mitsubishi Bank 

Mitsubishi Clmn 
Mitsubishi Elec 
Mitsubishi Heavy 
Mitsubishi Cora 
Mffsur old co 
Mllsukashl 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NlJtka Sec 
Nippon Steel 
Nippon Yusen 
Nissan 
Nomura Sac 
Olympus 
Ricoh 
Sharp 
Sony 


Tor onto Feb. 15 \ 

Gmadkn stocks ■sin AP 


mob ImCmoOm 


BOO Acklonds 

1 10 Aanica e 


600 Agra Ind A 
1820 Ait Energy 
2400 Alfa Nat 
2301 Ahmma SI 
23» Armen 
24 Argus C m 
soo Asbestos 
TOOAtajl f 
17*1 BP Canada 
14320 Bank BC 
2X310 Bank NS 
MB Barrlcko 
200 Baton At 
3902 Bonanza R 
6700 Bratarne 
1360 Bramqlea 
17163 BCFP 
M24SBCRM, 

19658 BC Phone 
3350 Bruimt 
WIBOBuddCan 
36730 CAE 
500CCLA 
fSOGodFrv 
HB 00 C Nor Wost 
210 C Pacxrs 
4110 Can Trust 
..500 C Tung 
18162 Cl BkCom 
700 Cdn Nat Res 
B5004CTIre A! 
5850 C Util B 
14900 Cara 
2 SB 0 Ceianese 
100 Golan 175 P 
3IOgCDlsfl>A 
3200 CDIstb Bt 
10890 CTL Bank 
1000 Conventrs 
140 Congest A 
4570COS4fcaR 
428® Cannon A 
26757 Cmwn 
34900 Cnir Rn 
NHWIOaonOev 
SOOODaon A 
*512 Denison A 
5513 Denison Bf 
l«Dev«con 
7400 Dlduan A I 
1300 DldtnsnB 
1915 Damon A 
3W4 Dafanoa A 
2306 Du Pan! A 
*402 Dvt«X A 
7910 Eldtem X 
51300 Ernes 
1800 Eautty Svr 
1400 FCA Irrtl 
30000 C Falcon C 


Sumlfama Bank 
Sumitomo Chem 
Sum Homo Metal 
Taisel Carp 
Talsho. Morlne 
ToKeda Chem 
Tellin 

Tokyo Elec. Power 
Tokyo Marins 
Toray Ind 
Touilba 
i Toyota 
Yamaichl See 


IHkkel-DJ. index : 11149.15 
Prevteui : 1X14829 
New Index : *4691 
Previous : MU5 


Bank Leu 
Brawn B overt 


C«w Gsltry 

Credit sifee 

Eloctrawatt 

Georg Fischer 

Jacob SuchanJ 

JeJmoll 

Landis Gyr 

Nestle 

Oertlkan-B 

Rodie Baby 

Sarxta 

Schindler 

Sulzer 

ur 

Swtswlr 


3775 3700 
IS90 1580 
2815 2805 
2385 

2*90 2700 
745 738 

&42S 6400 
1975 1945 
1670 1660 
6330 6305 
1500 1495 
8750 8725 
7975 79S0 
3675 3700 
347 349 

368 367 
MJ 8 1121 
1490 1495 
3675 3640 
4240 4225 
20400 20350 


Swtas Volksbank 
Union Bank 


Union Bank 
Wlntertnur 
Zurtoti ins 


12123 Flcnontoe 
300 Fortfy R« 
4450 Fed ind A 
400 Fed Plan 
2400 f City Fin 
3476 Gendls A 
29180 G90C Comp 
73988 Geoaude 
2900 GibraUar 
8850 Gal deem f 

S50 Goodyear 

100 Grandma 
lOOOGranduc 
1375 GL Forest 
SlSGnyhnd 

3800 Hrdtng A f 
2200 Hawker 
1427 Haves D 
1 800 H Bay Or 
7776 ImaxD 

3100 1MM 
7TS inland Gas 

367D0 mtl Thom 
3469 Inter Pipe 
900 IvacoB 
iBOOJamocx 
560 Ksm Kolia 
Kerr Add 
19450 Lobatt 
12619 Lae Mnrh 
2400 LOntCem 
•<>'90 Locona 
225 LL Lae 
>X4) Lo&kn* Co 

4500 Mice 

2SOO Melon H X 


SBC index : 429.10 
Previous : 43U0 


‘NZ».: not Quoted; NA; TwY 
emaileWg; xd: *x-«vM end. 


crnipoelta Stock index :9MJV 
Prcvtou, ;713J» 


London 


AA Coro 

Allled-Lvom 
Anglo Am Gold 

Babcock 

Barclays 

&Af. 

Beocham 

BICC 

BL 

B DC Group 
Baals 

Bewater Indus 
BP 


Banco Comm 
Centrale 
Claatutels 
Crod Ital 
Farm Italic 
Flat 
Flnsidgr 
Generali 
I FI 

UolGCfncnti 

Mediobanca 

Mamedison 

Olhmttl 

Pirelli 

RAS 

Rlnascente 

SIP 

Snfc 

standa 


Chilean Bank Opens Antarctic Brandi 


I MIB ledex :U6I 

PwIh*;UU 


United Press International 
SANTIAGO — A Chilean bank 
has opened the first branch bank in 
Antarctica, to serve the resident 
population and tourists, the bank 
announced Monday. 

' The one-man office was opened 
last week by the Banco de Crediioe 
In versions at Villa las Estrellas, 
Chile’s Antarctic village on the 
South Shetland Islands. 


Six families live at the settlement 
set up last year across tire Brans* 
field Strait from a Chilean Air 
Force base atthe tip of the Antarc- 
tic Peninsula. 


“There’s quite a bit or tourism in 
the area ana eventually there will 
be 25 families living there." said 
Valery Norris, the bank's market- 
ing manager. 


High urn Clow Ctm 

517 17 17 -T5 

513VJ 1392 1392 

s*l* 6ft *W— U, 

sm in* to 

$15ft 15ft 15ft— ft 
S22ft 21ft 22to 

518 17X4 18 + ft 
sim lift lift— ft 

57 7 7 

,58ft Bft 8ft 

(271* 27 271* + U 

*6 5ft 6 
514 13ft 13tt— b 
141 140 141 + 4 

516ft 1644 16ft + ft 
m 4oo 40 i — s 
551* 5ft. SVi 
517ft 173* 173*— ft 
(lift 1134 113*— ft 
363 252 252 —IS 

say. 21 ft 22 ft + \4 
SISft 15ft 15ft 
522 713* 213* 

517 1634 163*— to 

W6ft 26ft 26ft — to 
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524ft 243* 24ft— to 
25 30 30 

S3Z 3134 32 — ft 

516 ISM 15ft— 1 
S3 lft 31ft 31ft— ft 

76 26 26 — 3W 

510ft 10to 10 % — ft 

517 16ft 17 
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5171* 171* 171* 

SM4 6ft 644 + ft | 
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SHH 111* II to— to 
495 495 495 +25 
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2W 2*5 265 

12ft + ft 
117ft 171* 17ft + ft 
174 1t« 1M 4- 4 

MS 30S 33S -MS 

305 305 305 +5 

S15ft IS 15 —ft 

if” *245 jf*- * 

350 9?2 10 

S5W 5M 5ft 
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380 Z7S 275 
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517ft 17 to 171* — I* 
537ft 36ft 36ft— to 
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519 VBft 19 +ft 
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511ft 10ft Jlft+ft 
260 248 260 +15 

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540ft 29ft 40ft + ft 
49 49 49 — 6 

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5251* 25ft 25ft— ft 
130 130 130 
522to 32ft 22ft + ft 
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51436 IIU. 14ft- ft 

516 16 16 

59ft 9 9ft + ft 
534 333* 31ft 

SH 21 21 + to 

512ft 12ft 19ft— ft 
104 HU HM — 1 

517 16ft 17 - to 
525ft 35to 2SM*— ft 
528ft 38ft 28U 
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510% 1034 1034 
530ft 30ft 30ft— ft 
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224 224 224 +4 

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1121 Marland E 
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7700 Nabisco L • 
33679 Norondo 
1728 Norcen 
268854 Nva AIIA f 
55*6 Now5co W 
5918 NUWSTSPA 
70a Oak wood 
39004 OshowaM 
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250 Pan Can P 
SlOOPfronUrOII 
10050 P mo Polni 
77 + Place GO o 
54050 Placer 
1852 Prowlpo 
7700 Que Siurg 0 
1000 Rovrocicl 
2110 Redpoth 
17*81 Ra Slonhs A 

2«H RofcftlwW 
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1200 Rogers A 
100 Rothman 
1500 Sceptre 
7040 sattal 
2470 Soars Cm 


2470 Soars Cm 
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30817 Sherrm 
780 Stoma 
3900 Slater Bf 


23132 SWa A 

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51 6ft 16V* 16to- ft 
52136 21ft 2134 
S26ft 2S4k 25ft— ft 
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SI 4ft 14to l«to 
S7to 7 7 —to 

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fl 50 SI -I 

55 495 495 

25 2434 25 — ft 

470 465 431 — 5 

120 28 28 -ft 

-57ft 71* 7M , 

S27ft 77V, 27ft + 1 

114 m 112 — 2 ^ 

«5to 25 as — to 
518ft ISKl Uft+to 
3M 380 365 +18 
SOU SVi 8ft 
S32ft 3236 32ft 
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51496 1496 M6 . . 
185 183 IK +5 

105 US 105 
S9ft 9ft N}*— ft 
549ft 4234 

56 5ft 5*6— jf 
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523 22ft 223*- to 
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i ii 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1985 


Page 11 


Breakthrough for f Gentleman Tim 



Compiled by Our Stuff From Dispatches 

DELRAY BEACH. Flordia 

— His opponent was Scott Da- 
vis, but Tim Mayotte was re- 
membering Bj6m Borg. “[ re- 
member what Borg said when he 
won Wimbledon," Mavotie said. 
“It's part preparation, part effort 
and part lit clc." 

The luck came in Sunday's 
third set, when umpire Charles 
Beck overruled a call Lhal would 
have given Davis a service break 
and possibly a straight-sets vic- 
tory. But they replayed the point, 
and Mayotte eventually held his 
service. He broke Davis in the 
sixth game and went on to rally 
for a 4-6, 4-6, 6-3, 6-2, 6-4 tri- 
umph in the inaugural Interna- 
tional Players Championship 
tournament, 

"I was nervous in the first set 
and into the second," Mayo tic 
said. “I wasn’t nervous when I 
walked onto the court. Then it 
dawned on me what I was doing 

— playing in a match like this? 7 
With the first victory of his 

professional career. Mayotte col- 
lected $112,500, more than he 
won in all of 1984. Davis took, 
home 556,250, the biggest pay- 
day of his career. 

When he dosed out the nearly 
3 '/j - hour match with a smash, the 
man the British press calls “Gen- 
tleman Tim" because of his on- 
court and off-court behavior 
dropped to his knees- and 
clutched his hands to his face. 
Sitting on the sidelines before the 
awards ceremony, he cried, bury- 
ing his head in his towel. 

There were nights during the 
two-week tournament when 
Mayotte had played virtually un- 
noticed in unseasonable cold. So 
it was understandable when he 
finally basked in the applause of 
a crowd exceeding 7,000. 

“It was just one of those days, 

1 guess, scary really, that the first 
win comes in such a big tourna- 
ment ” he said. “I'U always hold 
this tournament special. IU be 
honored to come back here. IU 
even live here.” 

The Davis-Mayotte final 
marked the first time in the open 
era that two unseeded players 






■ 7 ■ 

v ' 

l ■ ■ • 







Tim May ode: Tfl be honored to come back. H even Bve here.’ 


had reached the championship 
match in a tournament of grand- 
dam proportions. En route to the 
final, Davis eliminated nth- 
seeded Stefan Edberg and No. 1 1 
Tomas Smid. while Mayotte 
eased through the 128-player 
draw without facing a seeded 

pla fe the women's singles 
went according to form (Martina 


Navratilova beating Chris Evert 
Lloyd in Saturday's final;, the 
men's play was full of upsets. 
Top-rated Ivan Lendl, the 
French Open champion, fell as 
did all of the 16 sealed players, 
including a strong Swedish dele- 
gation led by Australian Open 
winner Mats'Wilander. 

Ranked 45th in the world, 
Mayotte had reached the final 
with a strong service return. But 
that phase of his game was miss- 
ing in the first two sets in the 
battle agains t his former Stan- 
ford University teammate. 

But then Mayotte, the 1981 
National Collegiate Athletic As- 
sociation singles champion with 
a habit of playing well in the 
biggest tournaments, began his 
comeback. 

Breaking Davis in the sixth 
game, he took the third set and 
then rushed to a 5-1 lead in the 
fourth with third- and fifth-game 
breaks. Hitting now with confi- 
dence from the baseline and at 
the net, Mayotte broke Davis to 
open the fifth set. And when Da- 
vis broke Mayotte in the sixth 


game, Mayotte broke right back. 

Scrambling for every point. 
Davis reached break point three 
limes in the eighth game; 
Mayotte held each time when 
Davis sailed service returns long. 
Davis, who at 22 is two years 
younger than Mayotte, fought 
off one match point and held 
serve in the ninth game, buL 
Mayotte would not fold. 

Leading by 5-4. he tried not to 
think ahead during the change- 
over. “I was nervous," he said "I 
just wanted to play a good game 
and not think about what it 
meant.” Serving for the match, 
he fell behind 30-40 — break 
point — before winning the next 
three points, two of them on 
smashes. 

Voted rookie of the year in 
1981 by the Association of Ten- 
nis Professionals, Mayotte 
reached the semifinals at Wim- 
bledon in 1982, the quarterfinals 
there in 1981 and 1983, the Aus- 
tralian Open semifinals in 1983 
and the round of 16 at both the 
U.S. Open and Wimbledon last 
year. (AP. NYT) 


Johnson Hot as Lakers Trim Celtics 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

INGLEWOOD, California - 
When the Celtics come calling, you 
can forget about (he laid-back Los 
Angeles image. The Lakers put on 
their best macho front Sunday and 


beat Boston in a rematch of last 
season’s championship series. 

“It’s a game for men when we get 
together,” said Earvin Johnson af- 
ter recording 37 points and 13 as- 
sists in the Lakers' 1 17-1 1 1 victory 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

Sprinter Kocfa Sets 2d Marie in 2 Days 


SENFTENBERG, East Germa- 
ny (AP) — Sprinter Marita Koch 
set ho 1 second world indoor best in 
two days by winning the women's 
100-meter dash in 1025 seconds a! 
the East German trade and fidd 
championships here Sunday. 

Koch broke the mark of 10:29 
held by fellow East German Mar- 
iks Gohr. 

On Saturday, Koch bad run the 
60-meter dash in 7.04, four-hun- 
dredths of a second faster than the 
mark she had set Jan. 29, 1983. 

Meanwhile, in Wellington, New 
TwiianH runner John Walker com- 
pleted a unique triple. 

The first man to run a mile in 
under 3:50 (3:49.4 at G&teborg on 
Aug. 12, 19J5) and winner of the 
1 ,500- roe ter Olympic gold medal in 
1976, Walker, 33. recorded the 
1 00th sub-4- minute mile of his ca- 
reer in a meet here Sunday. He beat 
Australian Pat ScammeU in a time 
of 3:54.57. 



Marita Koch 


Blackburn Playoff Victor in U.S. Golf 




.■.'■tC- •-% ¥: 3 


LA JOLLA, California (AP) — 
Woody Blackburn ended 10 sea- 
sons of frustration here Sunday by 
defeating Ron Street on the fourth 
playoff hole to win the San Diego 
Open golf tournament 

Blackburn, who lost his PGA 
tour card last year after failing to 
qualify in 20 of 21 tournaments 
during one stretch, won $72,000; 
his total earnings from 1976 to 
1985 were $151297. 

Blackburn, with a closing 7 1 , and 
Slreck (a 70) finished the regulation 
72 boles in 269, 19-under par. 
Loren Roberts closed with a 68 to 
take third place at 270. 

' Blackburn backed into the title 
on the 501-yard, par-5 18th hole at 
Torrey Pines when Streck hit his 
second shot into the water, took a 
penalty stroke, chipped to the back 
of the green and missed a long par 
putt. Blackburn paired the hole. 


SPORTS 


VANTAGE POINT/ George Vecsey 

Cynical Residue of Collegiate Double Standard 


Near York Times Sen icv 

NEW YORK — Somewhere in the slate of 
North Carolina today, there is undoubtedly 
a young college student wondering exactly 
wfaai's going on at North Carolina State 
University, Let's say she is 5-fooi-i wants to 
be a science teacher, is working hard for 
grades at a junior college — and cannot dunk 
a basketbalL Can't even dribble one: 

No college officials wrote her a letter a day 
begging her to attend their schools, tbe way 
Jim Valvano and his literary Sancho Panza. 
Tom Abatemarco, did for Chris Washburn. 
(“Follow tbe Pack! We gel great exposure on 
TV,” Abatemarco scrawled.) 

The future science teacher assumed she 
was turned down by NCS because her Scho- 
lastic Aptitude Test scores were, let’s say, 
only 800 — and State has a healthy average 
of 1030 for entering freshmen. But the other 
day she read in the paper that State had 
accepted Chris Washburn, whose combined 
SAT scores last year were 470 — 70 points 
above the minimum. Bui Washburn, of 
course, can dunk a basketball. 

“1 don't want to mislead anybody.” says 
Hardy D. Berry, the assistant vice chancellor 
at NCS. “Chris Washburn was recruited by 
this institution as an athlete." 

Berry defends the flexible process that 
brought Washburn lo State, saying: "I insist 
it's working for higher education." But he 


concedes: "I think it's used more for athletes. 
Everybody's very competitive.” 

The world could only have guessed at 
Washburn's qualifications if he had not been 
arrested not long ago and convicted of steal- 
ing a five-piece stereo set in his dormitory. 
As pan of the trial proceedings, his school 
records were requested by the court, and 
eventually became public. 

Perhaps the most glaring figure .on his 
school record was the 470 SAT score — 70 
points above the score for signing one’s 
name. Many highly respected authorities dis- 
count the SAT scores as culturally biased, 
and every college can point to successful 
students who had scored below the average. 
, The courts have often supported the prin- 
ciple of affirmative action by admissions 
offices, but any way you look at it 470 is a 
ludicrous score for a major school like NCS. 

“Chris Washburn was diagnosed earlier as 
having learning disabilities, says Berry “But 
he was qualified for admission here. The 
SAT is not the dominant factor at State." 

All wdl and good, except that basketball 
and Washburn have become an embarrass- 
ment to residents of the slate. The fust em- 
barrassment was the letter-writing campaign 
by the two coaches, as documented in a 
Sports Illustrated article last fall. The second 
was the guilty plea by Washburn, who insist- 
ed the theft was a prank that went wrong. 

Wake County Superior Court Justice Mil- 


ion Reid look the plea seriously and sen- 
tenced Washburn to 46 hours in jail, to be 
served on the first anniversary or the theft. 
He also imposed a stringent series of proba- 
tion provisions that include: 

• Payment of 51.000 of personal funds to 
the slate’s victims' compensation fund. 

• Mental-health counseling by a practitio- 
ner appointed by the court. 

• Drug and alcohol therapy (no drug or 
alcohol charges have been made or suggested 
in the case) and 30 hours of confrontational 
therapy. 

• Donation of 200 hours to a center for 
mentally retarded children. 

• Performance of 100 hours of “heavy 
housekeeping tasks" at a home for persons 
on parole. 

• Maintenance work for 20 hours for the 
Raleigh Police Department. 

• Surrendering his driver's license for 90 
days. 

• Subject to an ongoing search warrant 
“at reasonable times." 

• No use or possession of illegal sub- 
stances or association with users. 

• Be “gainfully employed" for the next 
two summer vacations. 

• Make a future visit to the stale prison, as 
well as normal probation limits. 

Washburn, who remains in school and on 
scholarship, was dropped from the squad by 
Valvano after the arrest The school is leav- 


ing it up to Valvano to decide if Washburn 
can return, which seems like an abdication of 
responsibility by the chancellor. 

The most likely scenario for "Coach V:" 
The counselor indicates Washburn needs 
some immediate goals — be passed aO four 
of his courses last semester — and must 
satisfy probation; Valvano reinstates Wash-, 
burn “for the good of the kid” just before the 
Atlantic Coast Conference tournament. 

Asked if Chancellor Brace PouJton and 
other officials are re-evaluating the role of 
big-time sports at State. Berry says: “I think 
the public expects a school to be competitive. 

“The history of American sports is tied in 
with education," he adds. Berry also defends 
big-time sports for helping to pay for all 
other sports, male and female. 

Said one State teacher: “Every coach in 
the ACC knows they cannot win the confer- 
ence championship without recruiting peo- 
ple who are incapable of graduating from a 
four-year college." 

Berry says NCS’s goal for Washburn "is to 
get his life in perspective. Since the age oT 12, 
13. 14. he's been told he's the greatest.” 

Like so many other schools. North Caroli- 
na State has stressed the wrong values by 
using professional-level athletes enrolled as 
students. And like many other schools, it has 
taught cynicism to applicants whose space 
was taken by someone just because that 
someone could dunk a basketball. 


Rangers Pound Islanders , 9-3 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Maybe all they 
needed was a strong dose of hefty 
National Hockey League opposi- 
tion. The New York Rangers got 
both during the weekend and ihe 
result was a sudden turnabout in 
tbeir fortunes. The Rangers fol- 
lowed up an 8-7 victory over Ed- 
monton on Friday with Sunday 
night's 9-3 rout of the New York 
Islanders in a brawl-marred game. 

After managing only 18 goals 
during an 0-6-1 road swing, the 
Rangers erupted for 17 goals in two 
nights at home against last year's 
Stanley Cup finalists. 

The Rangers moved three points 
ahead of New Jersey in the race for 
the final playoff spot in the Patrick 
Division as rookies Tomas Sand- 
strom, George McPhee and Grant 
Ledyard had big nights — Sand- 
stroin gening a goal and two assists 
and McPhee and Ledyard scoring 
39 seconds apart in a five-goal blitz 
during a 61'4-minute span of the 
second period. 

“These games give us more ex- 
citement and more drive," said de- 


fenseman Ron Greschner. “We 
take the body more. You have to, to 
get involved in the game. As for the 
scoring, we just decided lo shoot 
the puck. We hadn't been doing 
that all year.” 

Elsewhere it was Quebec 4. Min- 
nesota 3; Toronto 5. Hanford 4; 

NHL FOOJS 

Chicago 4, Detroit 4, and Winnipeg 
2. New Jersey 2. 

Tbe Rangers led by only 2- 1 after 
one period on goals by Sandstrom 
and Greschner (Stefan Persson 
connected for the Islanders). Barry 
Beck upped it to 3-1 with a shonh- 
ander off a 2-on- 1 break wiLh Mike 
Rogers at 10:48 of the second peri- 
od. Only 67 seconds later. John 
ToneOi banked a shot from the 
right-wing comer off the pads of 
Ranger goalie John Vanbies- 
brouck, narrowing the score to 3-1 

Bui (hen tbe Rangers broke loose 
for goals by Reijo Ruotsalainen, 
McPhee, Ledyard and Bob Brooke. 
And with 35 seconds left in the 
period after Bryan Trottier of the 


Islanders grabbed Steve Patrick in 
a headlock and slammed him into 
the boards, a full-scale brawl broke 
out. 

Clark Gillies belted Sandstrom 
and Ranger defenseman Steve 
Richmond came to the aid of his 
Swedish teammate. When Vanbies- 
brouck slugged Duane Sutter. Is- 
lander goalie Kelly Hrudey raced 
in from center ice and slammed 
into Vanbiesbrouck. 

After referee Andy Van Helle- 
mond sorted it all out, 1 13 minutes 
in penalties were assessed and both 
goalies were ejected along with 
Gillies. Richmond, Sutter and 
Janies Patrick of the Rangers. 

"I had to fight," said Hrudey. “1 
don't know why [Vanbiesbrouck] 
did what he did That was the only 
thing 1 could do." Hrudey was 
ready, though: “I feel better stay- 
ing at center ice," he said “Then I 
haw only half die ice to go to get 
in." 

Vanbiesbrouck claimed Sutter 
had sucker-punched Sandstrom. 
“Sutter deserved what he got from 
me," said the rookie netminder. 



The XMKXtad fast 

After soorii^ flic game’s first .goal, Ranger Tomas Sandstrom had 
two assists and the role of fall guy in a second period free-for-all. 


Woody Blackburn putt. Blackburn paired the hole. 

For the Record 

Lnfitt piacay Jr. became the third jockey in thoroughbred racing 
history to ride 6,000 winners by capturing the fifth race aboard Dona s 
Delight Sunday at Santa Anita in Acadia, California. Plncay, a 38 year- 
oldPmamanian. joined Bill Shoemaker (8,441 winners) and John Umg- 
den (6.032) as the only jockeys to reach the 6.000 plateau. (UP!) 


lifetime- she was the Olympic downhill bronze medalist in 1 976 and took 
the downhill silver medal in the 1982 World Championships. (AP) 


here. “Both teams are so aggressive 
and physical. You can't come in 
lackadaisical and soft because 
they’ll take your heart out, just like 
well take theirs." 

And Johnson, with nine success- 
ful free throws, did take the heart 
oni of a late Celtics surge. 

“Magic was ready to play," said 
Pat Riley, who recorded his 200th 
coaching victory since be became 
coach of the Lakers early in the 
1981-82 season. “He plays with the 
flow. He was excited and be wenL 
after it." 

Elsewhere it was Milwaukee 125, 
Chicago 105; Phoenix 1 15, Indiana 
97; Golden Stare 125. Washington 

NBA FOCUS 

121; Portland 1 15, Kansas City 96, 
and Atlanta 91. the Los Angeles 
Clippers 90. 

Los Angeles, which has won 12 
of 14 games since a two-point loss 
Jan. 16 at Boston, used an 8-2 spurt 
u> take a 26-21 advantage with 
three minutes left in the first peri- 
od. Larry Bird brought Boston 
right back, scoring on a jumper and 
feeding Dennis Johnson after a 
steal. 

The score was tied 103-103 with 
2:34 left lo play before Michael 
Cooper’s lay-up put the Lakers 
ahead for good. After Bird missed a 
3-point try with the shot clock run- 
ning down, James Worthy made a 
short jumper and was fouled by- 
Scott Wedman. The free throw 
gave Los Angeles a 1 08- 103 edge. 

Worthy added 24 for the Lakers. 
Bird had 33 and Dennis Johnson 20 
for the Celtics. 

"1 felt we had a great opportuni- 
ty to win," Bird said. “It's a tough 
loss but you can't be down too long 
because we have a game tomor- 
row." 

Boston's all-star center, Robert 
Parish, missed the second half with 
a sprained right ankle, and tbe Lak- 
ers were able to rum a 62-59 half- 
time deficit into an 86-82 lead after 
three quarters. Held to seven points 
in the first half, Kareem Abduf- 
Jabbar took advantage of Parish’s 
absence to score 11 points in the 
third period. 

“It was as satisfying a win as any 
I’ve had." Riley said. “Two hun- 
dred wins feels good, but you have 
to be blessed with some good talent 
to get there. IT! remember this 
200th win 10 years from now. ... It 
was probably more important for 
us to win than them — just to sort 
of quiet the talk that we can’t beat 
the Celtics, not this year" 

if the two teams meet again this 
season, it will be in tbe league 
championship series. Last year. 
Bird was the most valuable piayer 
as tbe Celtics beat the Lakers in 
seven game for the title. 

“This is a new year." Johnson 
said. “We have a chance to beat the 
champs. That's what it’s all about. 
This game was important for our 1 
confidence and it will do us good , 
throughout the rest of the season”. 

(UPl.AP.LATi \ 


SCOREBOARD 

Hockey | 
NHL Standings Sele 


Basketball 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick Division 

W L T Pt* GF GA 
Washington 35 14 S 78 344 174 

PnllodetohJa 33 IA 7 73 238 177 

N.Y. Islanders 30 33 4 M 240 338 

N.Y. Rangers 19 39 9 47 308 237 

Now Jersey IB 30 B 44 191 227 

Pittsburgh II 31 5 41 191 2S1 


Selected U.S. College Conference Standings 


SOUTHWEST 

Conference All Games 


Buffalo 

Montreal 

Quebec 

Boston 

Hartford 


IS 14 8 7B 344 174 

33 14 7 73 238 177 

I 30 23 4 64 26Q 228 

19 39 9 47 308 237 

IB 30 B 44 191 227 

II 31 S 41 191 3S1 

Adams Division 

28 14 12 48 209 157 

28 20 ID 44 221 194 

20 23 B 44 Z3B 209 

25 25 B 51 314 205 

11 31 7 43 192 250 




C 

1 





C7 





W L 

Pd. 

W 


BIG EAST 




N. Carol inn 51 . 

4 

4 

400 

14 

7 

J94 

So. (Methodist 

9 

3 

J 50 

20 


Conference All Games 

Maryland 

5 

5 

JOO 

19 

9 

A79 

Texas A AM 

8 

4 

Ml 

14 


W L Pa. 

w 

L 

PCt 

Clemson 

5 

4 

J55 

15 

B 

452 

Texas Tech 

8 

4 

MI 

16 

SL John's 

12 a ijmo 

22 

1 

.957 

wake Forest 

4 

6 

400 

14 

9 

409 

Arkansas 

8 

S 

-615 

17 

Georgetown 

10 2 433 

23 

2 

.920 

Virginia 

2 

8 

JOO 

13 

11 

-542 

Houston 

7 

5 

JB3 

15 

Syracuse 

8 4 467 

19 

4 

826 


PACIFIC 18 




Texas Cftrlstn 

6 

7 

443 

14 


Santa Clara 
St. Mary’s 
Goniaga 
Son Diego 
Loyola. Calll. 
Portland 


4 2 .750 17 7 .708 

5 3 .425 13 10 545 

3 4 ,439 14 9 409 

3 5 J7S 14 9 409 

2 4 .250 10 13 -435 
I 4 .143 12 11 J22 


CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 
Norris Division 


51. Louis 

77 

19 

10 

44 

719 

208 

Chicago 

24 

29 

4 

54 

231 

230 

Detroit 

17 

31 

II 

45 

219 

2&B 

Minnesota 

16 

31 

II 

43 

199 

237 

Toronto 

14 

37 

7 

35 

182 

252 


Sraytfc* Division 




Edmonton 

40 

12 

6 

86 

294 

in 

Calgary 

39 

22 

7 

65 

267 

228 

Winnipeg 

29 

24 

7 

65 

257 

262 

Los Angeles 

25 

22 

11 

61 

258 

242 

Vancouver 

17 

33 

S 

42 

197 

293 


SUNDAY'S RESULTS 
Toronto 12 1 1—5 

Hartford 2 I 1 0—4 

Ihnocok 2 (21). Daoast 2 (14). Frycsr (24); 
Malane 2 (141. Samuelsson 12). Dlneen (IS). 
Shots an goal: Toronto (on Weeks) 11*10-3— 
33; Hartford (on Wregget) 134-18-0— «. 
Detroll 0 3 10—4 

Chicago 1 3 1 B — 4 

Duo nay 3 (25). Oorodnlck 138); B. Wilson 
i7 1 , Paterson IS). Savord2(3l). Station goal: 
Defr oil Ion Bamtenman, SfcorodansU I 6-10-12- 
1—29; Chlcooa (on stetanl 7-20- 1 S-5— 50. 
N.Y. I ski odors 1 1 1—3 

N.Y. Rangers 2 5 2—9 

Sandstrom 121). Greschner 200). Bede 14). 
Ruotsalainen 130). McPhee (9), Ledyard 15). 
Brooke (SI. Rogers (201 ; Persson (3). Tonelll 
130). Bossy (47). Shots oa goal: N.Y. Islanders 
Ian Vanbiesbrouck. Hanlon) B-ll-lA — 33; N.Y. 
Rangers (on Hrudey. 5mlth) 17-15-7—39. 
Quebec 2 1 1—4 

Minnesota 1 1 1—3 

p.Slastnv 124). Gaulcl 2 U11. Lemieut ft); 
Broien (14). ciccoreiN (9), Maruk (14) . Stats 
on goal: Quebec (an Beauorel 12*10-11: 
Minnesota Ion Severn) 8-9-11—28. 

New Jersey 110 0—2 

Winnipeg 9 i i t— 2 

Clreiia ( 4 ), Ludvig (6>; Basdiman (22). 
Mullen 124). Shots oa goal: New Jersey (on 
Ben rend) 1 2-7-4- 1 — 24 .- Winnipeg (on Komp- 
purl) 5-17-J**— 45. 


Transition 


Boston ColL 7 4 JOB IS 

vmonovo 7 4 438 15 

Pittsburgh 4 4 500 15 

Connecticut 4 B 433 ID ' 

Providence 2 11 .154 9 ' 

Satan Hall 0 13 400 9 1 

BIO TEN 

Conference All 
W L Pet. w 
Michigan 11 2 444 20 

lowo 8 4 447 19 

Illinois 8 5 415 20 

Purdue 8 5 415 17 

Ohio SI. 7 5 -SB3 15 

Michigan St. 7 4 438 14 

Indiana 4 4 JOO 14 

Minnesota 5 7 417 12 1 

Wisconsin 2 II .154 II 1 

Northwestern 1 12 477 5 1 

ATLANTIC COAST 

Conference All 
w L Pci W 
Georgia Tech 7 4 434 18 

Duke 4 4 400 19 

N. Carolina 4 4 400 19 


Conference Ail Gamas 
W L Pel. W L Pet 
10 3 J69 16 4 427 
9 3 450 18 4 450 


Southern Cal 10 3 469 14 4 427 

Arizona 9 3 450 18 4 450 

Oregon SL ■ 4 447 18 5 483 

Washington » 5 443 IB B 492 

UCLA 7 5 483 10 11 474 

Arinina SI. 4 1 429 11 13 458 

Oregon 5 7 .4)7 12 13 .48b 

Cal Horn la 4 8 433 12 10 545 

Washington Sf. 3 ID 431 11 12 At f 

Stanford 2 10 .147 10 12 455 

SOUTHEASTERN 

Conference AH Gamas 
WL Pd. W L Pet. 
Georgia 9 5 443 17 4 .739 

Louisiana SL 9 5 443 15 B 453 

Kentucky 9 5 443 14 9 409 

M lSSte iPW) St. 9 5 443 13 10 445 

Florida 8 4 471 14 7 496 

Alabama 7 7 400 15 8 452 

Auburn 4 8 429 14 9 409 

Tennessee 4 8 429 15 II 477 

Mississippi 4 IS JB6 10 12 455 

Vanderbilt 3 11 .214 10 13 435 


Va. Common. 
Ala.-Blrm. 

Old Dominion 
S. Florida 
W. Kentucky 
S. Alabama 
Jacksonville 
NC Otar latte 


Memphis St. 
Virginia Tech 
Cincinnati 
S. Carolina 
Tulane 
Louisville 
5. Mississippi 
Florida Si. 


National Basketball Association Standings 


4 7 442 13 10 445 

2 10 .147 9 14 J91 
2 11 .154 9 14 J91 

SUN BELT 

Conference All Games 
W L Pd. W L Pet. 
n. 10 2 433 20 4 433 

9 2 418 21 4 778 

in 9 4 493 15 9 425 

5 7 417 IS 9 425 

f 5 7 417 14 II 440 

5 7 417 13 II 442 

5 7 417 13 12 420 

It 0 12 JW0 4 21 .140 
METRO ATHLETIC 

Conference All Games 
W L Pet. W L Pet 
9 1 .900 19 2 .905 

* B 3 427 17 4 .739 

7 4 436 14 10 483 

5 4 456 14 0 436 

4 7 444 13 11 422 

3 4 433 12 12 400 

>1 3 1 273 7 17 292 

2 8 400 10 13 435 

ATLANTIC !• 

Conference All Games 


Son Dleao St. 
Texas- El Pom 
B righam Yang 
New Mexico 
Wyoming 
Utah 

Colorado Sf. 
Hawaii 
Air Force 


WESTERN ATHLETIC 

Conference All Gomes 
W l Pet W I. Pel. 
SI. 11 3 JB4 21 5 JOB 

■CM ?1 3 .784 19 7 J31 

rang 9 5 443 15 ID 400 

a 8 6 471 15 10 400 

4 4 4® 14 10 483 
4 8 42* 11 15 423 
It. 5 7 417 13 II 442 


4 10 -2B6 B 14 433 
0 1} 800 5 17 427 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 



Atlantic Division 
W L 

Pet. 

GB 

Boston 

43 11 

J96 



Philadelphia 

*2 11 

jn 

V* 

Washington 

28 27 

509 

15Vi 

New jersey 

27 27 

JOO 

16 

New York 

18 36 

533 

25 

Milwaukee 

Central Division 
37 17 

MS 

_ 

Detroit 

31 22 

J85 

SVr 

Chicago 

25 27 

.481 

11 

Atlanta 

23 31 

A36 

14 

Cleveland 

17 34 

J21 

19V» 

Indiana 

17 37 

J15 

20 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 


Denver 

Midwest Division 
34 20 

530 

_ 

Houston 

31 21 

J96 

2 

Dallas 

28 25 

J28 

5% 

San Anioaio 

77 24 

J09 

6ta 

1/1 oh 

25 38 

A77 

8Vj 

Kansas CJtv 

17 34 

-321 

I6to 

LA. Lakers 

PadHC Division 
38 16 

784 

_ 

Phoenix 

27 27 

JOO 

11 

Portland 

25 28 

473 

T7VJ 

Seattle 

22 12 

407 

16 

LA. Clippers 

21 33 

-389 

17 

Golden Stole 

13 41 

226 

25V, 


BASEBALL 
American Leagse 

CALIFORNIA— Agreed to terms witn Don- 
nie Moore. Pitcher, on a one-year coni rn cl, 
BASKETBALL 

NatlOMl Basketball League 
LA. CLIPPERS- Placed Bill Walton, cen- 
ter. on tne injured list. 

FOOTBALL 

Canadian Football League 
EDMONTON — Named Don Sutherm assis- 
tant coach. 

National Football League 
BUFFALO— Named Ardell Wlegandt de- 
lenslve line coach. 

NEW ENGLAND— Nomad Ed Khavat de- 
fensive line coach 

United States Football League 
BALTIMORE— Traded Dave Simmons, 
linebacker, to the Houston Gamblers (or an 
undisclosed 1984 drat) choice. 

HOCKEY 

Notional Hockey League 
DETROIT— Placed Dave (Tiger I williams, 
left wing, on waivers. 

71. y. RANGE P5— sent Mike Biol well, riant 
wing, to New Haven of tne American Hockey 
League. 

ST. LOUIS— Extended the controcl of Ran- 
ald Coro ru vice president anddlrectar of oper- 
ations. through the 1980-89 season. 

COLLEGE 

ARIZONA STATE— Relieved Frank Mor- 
ris. men's iroefc and Held coach of his duties. 
Named Mike Gray interim men's (rock and 
field coach 

GEORGIA TECH — Extended the contract 
of Bobbv Cremlns. basketball coach 
STANISLAUS STATE— Named Bob Tho- 
mason basketball coach 
WEST VIRGINIA— Suspended Aundroe 
Davis, guard, indeflniiely from the basketball 
team. 


SUNDAY'S RESULTS 
Chicago 21 at 2f 31—105 

Milwaukee 27 31 34 33-115 

Cummings 7-1B 4-8 20. Money let 7-1S 7-7 21 ; 
Jordan 9- is £8 26. Dailey ID-17 0-3 2a Re- 
beanos: Chicago 48 (Cortina, Green Greer*- 
woods) : MKwoufcee S3 (Cummings. List or Bl. 


Anto Racing 

Top finishers to Sunday's Daytona 5H 
Grand National stock car race la Daytona 
Beach Florida (type of ear, laps completed 
and whiner's averag e speed In miles aer 
dour): 

1. Bill Elliott. Ford Tfumderblrd. 200. 
172445 . 

2. Lake Sneed. Pontiac Grand Prlx, 200. 
1 Oarrell Wolfrla. Chevrolet Monte Carla 

55 , 199 . 

A Buddy Baker. Oldsmoblle Cutlass, 199. 
5 Ricky Rudd. Ford Tttunderblrd. 1*9. 
t. Greg Sacks, Chevrolet Monte Carta 55. 
199. 

7. Geoff Badlne. Chevrolet Manta Carlo SS. 
198. 

X Rusty Wallace. Pontiac Grand Prlx. 197. 
9. Bobby Hllllti Jr. Chevrolet Monte Carlo 
55, 197. 

10. Netl Bonnett. Chevrolet Monte Carta SS. 
195 . 

11. Ken Schrader. Ford Thunder bird. 195, 

12. Mike Alexander. Chevrolet Monte Carlo 
SS. 195. 

11 Bobby WOwak. Chevrolet Monte Carlo 
SS. 192. 

14. Jimmy Means. Chevrolet Monte Carlo 
SS, 192. 

IS Morgan Shepherd, Chevrolel Monte Car- 
lo SS. 190. 


Assists: Chicago 24 (Whatley B); Milwaukee 
33 (Preesev Bl. 

Boston 19 33 20 19—111 

I— A. Lakers 34 25 27 31 — 1T7 

E -Johnson KM6 17-19 37. Worthy B-1BB-1024; 
Bird 14-22 4-5 33. D. Johnson 8-20 *-4 20. Re- 
bounds: Boston 41 [Bird 151; LA Lakers 45 
(Ramb(5 12). Assists: Boston 32 (Alnga. 
D-Mmson 10) : LA Lakers 28 ( E-tahnson 131. 
Ptwenb 24 18 37 24—115 

Indiana 28 18 21 30— 97 

Adams 9-1454 23, Nenee 8-T1 5-521; Thomas 
54 9-10 19. Fleming 4-17 1-3 13. Rebounds: 
Phoenix 44 (Adams II); Indiana 44 isttoono- 
vich. Thomas 41. Assists: Phoenix 28 [Mary 
S); Indiana 19 (Thomas 5). 

Washington 25 35 22 19 II 9—121 
Golden State 36 29 20 14 11 13—125 

Shari 16-26 14-1646. Floyd B-21 9-1224; Robin- 
son 14-27 4-5 32. Malone 9-38 4-7 25. Rebounds: 
Washington 42 ( Robinson 17 ); Golden State 43 
I WN teheed 141. Assists: Washington 24 IGus 
williams 8); Golden Stale 24 (Ftavd 111. 
Atlanta 31 19 2B 23-91 

l_A- Cli ppers 24 21 17 21—90 

Wilkins 15-31 55 34. E Johnson 7-14 2-2 16; 
Donaldson 10-13 4-6 24. Nixon 7-20 2-2 16. Re- 
bowds: Atlonta 44 1 Levlnestan 12); LA. Clla- 
pera 48 (Dona l dson 12). Assists: Atlanta 2D 
(E Johnson 10); LA dippers 23 (Nixon 11). 
Kansas City 31 19 21 2S— 94 

Portland S It X 31— US 

M.Thorruwon 11-.14 4-4 24. Bowie 4-9 9-12 71; 
Woodson 10-21 5-4 25. (_ Thompson 4-13 7-8 15. 
Rebounds: Kansas City 57 iL.Thompsan 131; 
Portland 54 (Bowie9I.AssINs: K ansa 5 Cl tv 2i 
(Orew, TTieas 71; Portland SM tvolentlne 7t. 



w l Pel. 

w 

L 

Pet. 

Temple 

12 

2 

JE7 

18 

4 

J18 

W, Virginia 

12 


J57 

It 

7 

496 

51. Joseph's 

10 


J14 

14 

0 

416 

MoaoctuiwttB 

8 


-571 

12 

11 

522 

Geo. Woshnatn 

7 


JOO 

12 

11 

SO 

Rutgers 

7 


JOO 

12 

11 

SO 

St. Bonaventur 

5 


-357 

11 

12 

478 

Pem Sf. 

4 

10 

J86 

B 

14 

■364 

Duauesne 

4 

10 

286 

8 

15 

J48 

Rhode Island 

1 

13 

J71 

7 

la 

J04 

MID-AMERICAN 




Conference All Games 


W 

L Pd. 

W 

L 

Pd. 

Ohio U. 

12 

2 

£57 

18 

5 

JB3 

Miami. Ohio 

10 

4 

.714 

15 

1 

452 

Kent Sf. 

9 

5 

443 

14 

9 

409 

Toledo 

9 

5 

443 

14 

9 

409 

E. Midi lean 

7 

7 

JOO 

U 

10 

J45 

W. MJchlgcxi 

6 

0 

439 

11 

12 

478 

Ball 51. 

6 

1 

429 

10 

13 

435 

N. Illinois 

5 

9 

-357 

9 

14 

J91 

Bawling Green 

4 

10 

JB4 

10 

13 

415 

Cent. Mlchlgn 

2 

12 

.143 

7 

16 

JIM 


BIG EIGHT 





Conference All Games 


W L 

Pd. W 1 

' m 

PCf. 

O 

J! 

a 

10 

0 

umo 

21 

4 

J40 

Kansas 

7 

3 

JOO 

20 

6 

J49 

Iowa 5t. 

5 

5 

JD0 

17 

9 

454 

Missouri 

5 

5 

JD0 

IS 

10 

400 

Nebraska 

4 

6 

400 

14 

9 

409 

Colorado 

4 

6 

400 

10 

13 

435 

Oklahoma SI. 

3 

7 

J00 

12 

11 

-523 

Ktmsas 51. 

2 

B 

JOO 

II 

12 

478 


MISSOURI VALLEY 


Golf 


Top flnlshen sod earn lugs la the San Diego 
Open gaH to ur uOMBt which concluded Sun- 
day at mo 4449-rard, PW-72 Torrev Pines 
coarse In La Jolla. CnlHantta (x-denotes Play- 
ed whiner) : 

x -WoodV Block bum. S72JW0 4446-44-71— 2*9 


Ren Streck. UX200 
Loren Roberts. S27J00 
Dan PohU17A00 
Rex CnhtwelL S17A00 
Fred Couples. SUMO 
Mark Pfell. 113,900 
Bill Glnsion. 511.300 

Vance Heafaer, SI 1.300 
Dan Pooiev. S11.H1 
Ed FiorL ksmoo 
Craig StodJer, 57.371 
Bobby Clamped, 57471 
Tim Norris, 57,371 
Mac O’Grodv. 17.371 
T.C- Chen. 57.371 
Bab Lehr. 57 Jn 
Gorv HnUberg. WJ71 

Phil Black mar, HJ14 

Al GeUxraer. 54414 
johnny Milter, 54514 
Peter Oosterhuto. 54514 
Keith FernuL 54514 
Sco« Slmnen, M514 
Pat McGowan. 54514 


474444-70—249 

*5484*48—2)0 

67-45-7049—271 

71444*45—271 

474945-72-273 

684*4749-273 

*84847-71—274 

65- 7044-73—274 
644*70-71—274 
4448-70-70-274 
67-45-73-73 — 275 
47-48-46-74— 275 
47-4459-73—275 
7*4458-49—275 
6857-70-70— 27S 

66- 7058-71—275 
44575*75-275 
675857-74-376 
715457-74-274 
475458-75—274 
6754-7575—274 
7058-7058-276 
47-71-48-73-276 
63475*72-276 



Conference Al! Games 


w 

L Pd. 

w 

L 

Pd. 

Tu too 

to 

2 

J33 

19 

4 

324 

Creighton 

9 

4 

493 

20 

7 

J4I 

Wichita SI. 

9 

4 

492 

13 

11 

■542 

Illinois Sf. 

8 

4 

447 

18 

5 

-783 

Bradley 

6 

6 

JOO 

13 

10 

545 

Indiana SL 

5 

8 

JBS 

12 

10 

JM5 

s. Illinois 

4 

9 

JOB 

12 

12 

JOO 

Drake 

3 

ID 

J31 

11 

13 

458 

W. Texas Sf. 

3 10 J31 
BIG SKY 

10 

14 

417 


Conference All Games 


w L 

Pd. 

W 

L 

Pet. 

Weber SL 

8 

3 

J00 

19 

5 

jn 

Nevada- Rena 

8 

3 

J27 

IS 

9 

425 

Montana 

7 

4 

434 

19 

6 

■760 

N. Arizona 

7 

4 

434 

15 

9 

425 

Montana Si. 

5 

6 

45S 

9 

15 

J75 

Boise 51. 

3 

7 

JOO 

13 

70 

J45 

Idaho St. 

3 

7 

JOO 

11 

IS 

423 

Idaho 

1 

9 

.100 

8 

17 

J20 


Nev-Las Vegas 
Fresno Si- 
Fullerton St. 
Utah SI. 

Son Jose St. 
Cnl-5onta BiD 
Col-lrvfne 
N. Mexico St. 
Poclllc 

Lena Both Sf. 


PACIFIC COAST ATHLETIC 

Conference All Games 
w l Pef. w L Pd. 
: Vegas 12 1 .923 19 3 J44 


12 2 aS7 17 6 78 

9 5 543 13 10 545 

8 6 571 15 8 455 

7 7 500 12 11 532 

7 7 J00 11 12 J78 

6 8 .479 II 14 AW 

4 10 284 7 16 JIM 

4 II £67 1 16 JU 

1 13 J171 3 20 .130 


WEST COA5T ATHLETIC 

Conference All Games 
W L Pd. W L Pd. 
Pepoerdine 7 I J05 19 8 .704 


IVY LEAGUE 

Con f erence All Games 
w l Pci. w L Pd. 
Peimsvh/anla 6 1 J57 1 ID 474 

Harvard 6 ? .750 M 4 778 

Cornell 6 2 JS0 12 8 MB 

Columbia 4 4 500 I 12 JU 

Princeton 3 4 AW 7 12 J68 

vole 3 6 jn 10 II >74 

Brawn 3 6 J33 7 15 JIB 

Dartmouth 2 8 .200 4 18 .183 

INDEPENDENTS 

W L Pd. 

Dcnrion li 7 J« 

Marauette 15 7 582 

Notre Dome 14 7 MJ 

DePawi 15 8 452 

Texas- San Antato U 8 JM 

Radford 15 9 525 

Chicago St. IS 10 400 

SW Louisiana 16 71 59 ] 

Utica 14 10 JB3 

Pan American II 11 joo 

Stetson 12 13 MO 

Brooklyn 11 12 J7B 

E. Washington 10 IS JOO 

Baptist 9 15 J75 

Tennessee St. 9 15 J75 

New Or toon* 17 M6 

Cent. Florida 8 16 J33 

Augusta 7 18 580 

Florida ABM 6 17 381 


College Top-20 Results 

Haw the tea 20 teams in The Associated 
Press and United Press International polls 
fared far Ihe weak ending Feb. 17: 

Si. John's 122-1 1 del. Columbia 4859; del. 
Pittsburgh 84-43: del. DePaul 93-80. 

G eorgetown (23-2) del. viltanova 57-50; del 
providence 87-73. 

Mic h ig an (20-3) del. lowo 56-52; dal. Minne- 
sota 6454. 

Oklahoma (2T-4J def. Iowa St. 104-76; del 
Missouri 8854. 

Memphis St. (1*2) def. Cincinnati 48-55; deL 
Florida SI. 7058. 

Georgia Tech (IB-5) lost to Virginia 62-55. 

Duke (185) def. Stetson 94-51; def. Notre 
Dame 11-tR. 

Syracuse (1*4) def. Providence 81-76: def. 
Seam Hall 9452: def. Louisiana St. 7454. 

Southern M et hod ist (30-5) lost to Bavlor 94- 
90,-dbf. Texas AiM S 1-77; OeL Louisville 7754. 

Kansas (3351 tail to Missouri 62-55; lost to 
Iowa SI. 73-70. 

Iowa (1*4) tost to Michigan 54-52: tost to 
Michigan SL 57-55L 

Louisiana Tech (22-2) def. Southwestern 
Louisiana 8376. OT; del. McNeese SI. 59-58. 

North Cora lino (195) def. Maryland 6844; 
lost to North Carolina Sf. 85-74. 

Nev ad a l a s Vegas n*3) deL Coiifomto- 
Irvlne 9*89. 

Tulsa (1*4) del. Creightwi 7853. 

VlUanova (154) tost to Georgetown 5750; 
tost to Boston Cattoae 4251. 

Illinoli (23-7) def. Northwestern 4442; del. 
Wisconsin 4849. 

Oregon St. 1184) def. Washington SI. 6949; 
tost to Washington 6045. 

Ataba mo -Blrwilaoham (215) tost to Virgin- 
ia Common weoltn 67-53. 

Maryland 0*91 lost lo North Carolina DO- 
SS; lost to Cletnson 71-44. 

OaPaut (1551 tost to Lavnla<IIL)7B-71; lost 
to 51. John* 9358. 


College Results 

CAST 

Adetahl SO. St. Mldmers n 
New Hampshire Col. S3. Sacred hWw * 
5L John's 91 DePaul » HKWl 78 

SOUTH 

Clem son 71, Marviomd 44 

SOUTHWEST 
Houston M. Rice 91 





Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1985 


. global _? 

1 


ART BUCHWATT1 

Stockman’s Trash List 


PEOPLE 


W ASHINGTON — David 
Stockman rane for one of his 


Translating: Language Is Not Enough A Gargantuan Price 


«jr:U 

. U SE3L* 


y" Stockman rang for one of his 
assistants. Tm going up on The 
Hiil lo testify today. What segment 
of the population haven’t we of- 
fended yeiT 

“Let’s see. You have the fanners 
mad at you. the students are up in 
arms and the military want your 
scalp. How about the American In- 
dians?” 

“I’m saving them for later. Arc 
the veterans 
licked off?” 

“They cer- 
tainly are. par- 
ticularly after 
you charged that 
the military was 
more interested 
in protecting 
their pensions 
than their coun- 
try.” 

“Can’t any- BodziraJd 
body take a joke?" 

“It’s hard to get people to laugh, 
Dave, when their ox is being 
gored." 

□ 





My job is to gore oxes. What 
sacred cows are left?" 

“Would you want to take on law- 
yers? They cost the country billions 
of dollars every year.” 

“No one gives’ you credit for at- 
tacking lawyers." Stockman re- 


plied. “Suppose I savage people 
who take the train and but to work 


every day and aren't paving their 
full fares?" 

“They're one of the most vocal 
groups in the country. Attack them 
for chiseling and you’ll have 20, 
maybe 30 million people screaming 
overnight.” 


Orchestra WaDsont Halts 
La Scala Performances 


The Associated Press 

MILAN — A walkout by the 
orchestra of La Scala forced can- 
cellation of two performances Sun- 
day and Tuesday of Franco Dona- 
tom's “Atem," starring Eleonora 
Jankovic and Rebecca Uuig. 

The action was called by the or- 
chestra members to protest a break 
in negotiations for a new contract 
They are seeking a private contract 
while the government, which subsi- 
dizes all Italian theaters, wants the 
workers to come tinder the public 
sector. 


“So be it Did you know that 
every Amtrak passenger costs the 
government S35 and every subway 
rider IS cents per trip? I'm going (o 
draft a statement" 

“Shoot" 

“Subsidizing trains and buses is 
an outrage, a scandaL Mass transit 
passengers are more interested in 
what they can save in fares than in 
protecting the United States from a 
Soviet nudear attack." 

O 

“Do you want to add that farm- 
ers. students and military retirees 
are the most guilty of abusing 
transportation subsidies?" 

“Why not? They can't get any 
more upset than they are right 
now." 

“Thai should take care of the 
House Budget Committee in the 
morning. What special interest 
group would you like to offend 
when you testify before the Senate 
in the afternoon?" 

“Did i trash small businessmen 
for trying to get government-guar- 
anteed loans through the Small 
Business Administration?" 

“Yes, sir. You told the press any 
consenting adult who asks for a 
small business loan doesn't deserve 
to be in business. You haven’t said 
anything about the environmental- 
ists." 

Stockman hit his forehead. 
“How could 1 have forgotten the 
environmentalist, who thinks the 
federal government should protect 
him from add rain and toxic waste? 
Take this down. Environmentalism 
is the last refuge of the scoundrel If 
you can’t drink (he water, stay out 
of the kitchen." 

“Well said, Dave. Any other 
group you want to humihate to- 
day? 5 ’ 

“Who’s left?” 

“Working mothers, senior citi- 
zens, the unemployed, urban dwell- 
ers and people who watch soap 
operas." 

□ 

“Put them on hold for future 
hearings. If I attack too many spe- 
cial interest groups in one day no 
one will pay any attention to me." 

“I couldn't agree with you more. 
I don't want to get personal, Dave, 
but are you planning to ran for 
public office when you get out of 
the budget office?" 

Tm not sure. What makes you 
ask?" 

“I was just curious.” 


By Shawn G. Kennedy 

New York Tima Service 




N EW YORK —The popular 
notion of the translator is of 


IN notion of the translator is of 
a spectacled soul hunched over 
dictionaries and phrase books, 
while his counterpart, the inter- 
preter, is seen at the elbow of 
diplomats or in the glass-enclosed 
language booths of the United 
Nations. But language experts 
say these visions of their work are 
outmoded. 

The skills of the translator, 
who takes the printed word from 
(Hie language to another, and the 
interpreter, who translates 
speech, are today as likely to be 
sought by high-tech manufactur- 
ing companies, advertising agen- 
cies and film companies as by 
publishing houses, governments 
or global organizations. 

Technological advancements, 
such as the development of com- 
puters that translate, have altered 
the way language expats do their 
jobs. But most professionals view 
electronic translators and com- 
puterized dictionaries as time- 
saving aids rather than as rivals. 



‘ 

\m ^ Si 

I ' $ ^ r‘3 

, ' 

Sr 1 

I'&V . f&r 


Ed«ad Mmnier/T^r New York Times 

Bruce Boeglin sees more teleconference interpreting. 


ing they would be translated 
overseas," he said. 

No statistics exist on numbers 
in the translation profession, in 


“The profession has blossomed 
ad technology has made our 


part because there is no state or 
federal certification. But Eva Ber- 


and technology has made our 
work faster, more exact and more 
complete," said Irene Agnew. 
The Los Angdes-based translator 
and interpreter founded a com- 
puterized translation service, Ag- 
new Tech-Tran. which she sold to 
Berlitz Translation Services. 

The expanding global market- 
place. competition from industri- 
alized nations such as Japan and 
West Germany and the emer- 
gence of the Middle East in inter- 
national affairs have afl had an 
impact on the profession. De- 
mand is particularly great for 
those fluent in Japanese, Chinese 
and Arabic and for professionals 
with technical or scientific back- 
grounds. 

David Laube, director of mar- 
keting for Berlitz Translation Ser- 
vices, a subsidiary of the world- 
wide language school, said that 
for U. S. companies the ability to 
communicate with pntmij at cli- 
ents and consumers overseas is a 
tool of competition. 

“At one time, for example, 
■'many American manufacturing 
companies felt comfortable ex- 
porting printed materials like 
product instruction booklets or 
repair manuals in En glish, assum- 


federal certification. But Eva Ber- 
ry, outgoing president of the 
American Translators Associa- 
tion, said more Americans were 
joining the profession. Since its 
founding in 1960 the association 
has grown from a few hundred to 
nearly 1,000 members. 

John G Miller, director of the 
foreign-language program at the 
School of Continuing Education 
at New York University, agrees. 

“At one time a great many of 
the translators and interpreters 
working in the United Slates were 
foreign bora, people who came 
here after die war, he said. “But 
that generation of language pro- 
fessionals is reaching retirement 
age and they are being replaced 
by young, well-educated Ameri- 
cans who have studied foreign 
lan g ua ges and lived abroad." 

Berlitz saw a demand for spe- 
cialized translation as more of its 
language instructors were asked 
by companies to be translators. 
Two years ago Berlitz established 
its translation division and it now 
has a full- time staff of 60 transla- 
tors in seven branches. 

Among the companies that 


Among the companies that 
have stepped up their use of 
translators is Hughes Ground 


Systems, a California-based mili- 
tary supplier. “In recent years our 


business has expanded beyond 
the NATO European countries to 
areas of the world like Asia and 
the Middle East where a knowl- 
edge of English is less prevalent." 
said George Flores, who acts as a 
liaison between the company's 
technical divisions and the trans- 
lation services and consultants it 
uses. “Our requirement for for- 
eign-language experts is ongoing 
and has grown twofold in the past 
few years and will probably con- 
tinue to grow." 

Peggy Gowen. a free-lance 
translator and interpreter who 
runs a service from her home in 
Manhattan, has seen several 
changes since she entered the 
field more than 20 years ago, in- 
cluding a demand for lan g ua g es 
spoken in the Far East and Mid- 
dle East as well as an 'increase in 
the amount of technical material 
she is asked to translate. 

A typical assignment when she 
began her company in the 1970s. 
she said, was acting as an es- 
cort/ interpreter for a European 
fabric company or fashion house. 

“Now my work frequently in- 
volves the translation of a legal 
document or material for an in- 
dustrial manufacturing compa- 
ny.” said Gowen. who has 
worked for the United Nations 
and the State Department and is 
fluent in French, Italian. Ger- 
man. Spanish, Portuguese and 
Arabic. She studied several lan- 


guages in school and learned oth- 
ers while working abroad. 

While the need of the business 
community for foreign-language 
expens is clear, the State Depart- 
ment remains probably the larg- 
est V. S. employer of translators 
and interpreters. Donald Barnes, 
chief of interpreters, maintains a 
roster of 1.000 full-time 3nd pan- 
time workers who interpret for 
Foreign Service personnel and 
serve as escorts for visiting digni- 
taries. The aaenc; tests appli- 
cants and requires no previous 
professional experience. 

Bruce Boeglin. who has worked 
as a UN conference interpreter, 
foresees growing work opportu- 
nities for interpreters. 

“As teleconferencing, via satel- 
lite. becomes a standard way of 
communicating in the business 
world, the use of conference in- 
terpreters by the private sector 
will increase," said Boeglin. who 
just retired as training officer in 
the UN interpreters section. 

An academic knowledge of a 1 
Language or the ability to do 
word-for-word translation of the 
spoken or written word is not 
enough. Those with an area of 
expertise have a definite edge. 

A director of Ad-Ex. a transla- 
tion service in Palo Alto. Califor- 
nia. serving companies in Silicon 
Valley, went so far as to say that 
his company lured few transla- 
tors without backgrounds in engi- 
neering, chemistry or mathemat- 
ics. 

Jerry Mryglot, a staff transla- 
tor for Berfirz who holds a bache- 
lor’s degree in Russian from Co- 
lumbia University and a master's 
degree in the language from Stan- 
ford University, took a course in 
securities to assist him with the 
large amount of financial materi- 
al he was asked to translate. 

Despite (he evidence of broad- 
ened opportunities for translators 
and interpreters with certain lan- 
guage and technical specialties, 
some in the profession say the 
current economic climate has 
stiffened the competition among 
the translation services and those 
who free-lance. “The strong U. S. 
dollar is hurting os now." said 
Berry of the American Transla- 
tors Association, who runs her 
own translation service. “Compa- 
nies are cutting costs by having 
their work done overseas." 


1 Gargantua II. the gorilla pro- 
moted by the Ringling Bros, and 
Barn urn & Bailey Circus in the 
1950s and '60s as the “world’s most 
terrifying creature,” became the 
most expensive stuffed animal ever 
auctioned when it sold for $20350 
to John Elmo, a New York interior 
designer. The 6-foot-taii (l. 8-me- 
ter) gorilla was the star attraction, 
but not the most costly, in an auc- 
tion organized by Guernsey’s 
Counity Auction erf New York. 
Brno, who designs hotels and res- 
taurants. would not disclose for 
whom he had purchased Gargan- 
tua n. “AH I can say is it’s not 
going to a restaurant," he said. 
Most of the 1,200 arcade machines, 
circus and carrousel carvings, cos- 
tumes. posters and equipment sold 
came from Circus World, the 
amusement park built in Orlando, 
Florida, in 1972 by Ringling Bros, 
and recently sold to James Mona- 
ghan, a real estate developer. Mon- 
aghan dosed the nark’s historical 
displays to add rides and exhibits. 
The highest price paid at the auc- 
tion, $385,000. was far a 1920s car- 
rousel carved near Coney Island. 


Barbara Kastt remembers her 
son. David, as a “gallant" teen-ager 
who died trying to save his younger 
sisters from drowning. Kastl, 17. of 
Southgate, Michigan, was one of 15 
Americans and Canadians honored 
by the Carnegie Hero Fund Com- 
mission. Five of the awards, each of 
$2,500 and a medal, were awarded 
posthumously. Mrs. KastTs daugh- 
ters got caught in strong undertow 
while swimming in Lake Michigan 
in July 3. Mother and son paddled 
out in a raft and reached Diane, 14, 
while Susan, 16, made it to a sand- 
bar. Suddenly, the rescuers were in 
trouble. “We were all in the water 
hanging onto the raft and then a 
wave came and knocked David and 
me off." Mrs. Kastl 41. recalled. 
“We just struggled about 10 feet 
away from each other. We couldn't 
help each other." The Pittsburgh- 
based commission has given 6.892 
persons more than $153 million in 
cash awards and medals since it 
was founded by the industrialist 
Andrew Carnegie in 1904. 


after bemeiitted with a new, lighter 
artificial Smb, a friend says. The 
23-year-old son of Senator Edward 
M. Kerned^, Democrat of Massa- 
chusetts, was fitted with the ncwfcg 
at the Sabolicb Orthotics-Prostbet- 
ics Cater in Oklahoma City, said 
John Sabofich, head of the center. 
Shboiich, who designed the pros- 
thesis, said his ahmunum and tita- 
nium creation is more pliable than 
old-style artificial limbi The youn- 
ger Kennedy has been towing the 
United States speaking about (he 
rights of the disabled,, whom .be 
prefers to call “physically chal- 
lenged.” 

D ‘ 

Gregory Hines led some of show, 
business’ fastest feel in a rousing 
tap number as 308 celebrities 
starred in a S 5-million benefit for 
the Actors’ Fund of Anierica, 
“Night of 100 Stars II." One of the 
evening highlight’s was a monu- 
mental tap dance featuring Hines, 
EKcfc Van Dyke, Donald OXjooatx, 
Ginger Rogers, Van Johnson, Na- 
nette Fahray, Gwen Verdoo, data 
Rivera and Alexander Godonuv. h 
got a standing ovation from the 
crowd of 5,882 who paid 550 to 
$1,000 for tickets. The first “Night 
of 100 Stars” in 1982 attracted 205 
celebrities. 


Sarah Caklwefl, artistic director 
of the Boston Opera company, has 
beat transferred to Massachusetts 
General Hospital's Spaulding reha- 
bilitation unit to continue recuper- 
ating from pneumonia. CaldweQ, 
60, was hospitalized Jan. 3 and had 
been in intensive care. Directors of 
the company have postponed the 
entire 1985 season, which was to 
have opened Feb. 3. They said they 
would replan the season and an- 
nounce the details as soon as Cald- 
well could resume her duties. 


Princess Margaret, a heavy 
smoker before doctors removed 
part of a lung last month, has 
kicked the habit, accoiding to her 
son. Viscount David Ladey, leaving 
London with his girlfriend, Su- 


zanne Constantine, to join his 
mother in Mustique, said she was 


Edward M. Kennedy Jr„ whose 
right leg was removed to save him 
from bone cancer II years ago, 
“feels like he has his leg again” 


“back on the road to recovery. 
She's getting better and is as well as 
can be expected." Princess Marga- 
ret, 54, was said to smoke up to 60 
cigarettes a day. Doctors said the 
tissue they removed was benign. 


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REAL ESTATE AGENT 

380 26 08 



PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


RELOCATING NYC BfVIRONS 


Off Relocation Director, Mrs. Scrlmg, 
*il be in Zermatt, Switzerland a she 
Tenne from February ?5 to 22. Co ntact 
her nr totoraiotiotid pockets a 1028) 
67 IB 01. Or unite 

WILD & ASSOCIATES 
400 Danbury Rd, WOton, CT 06897 


AT HOME N PARIS 

PARIS PROMO 

APARTMENTS FOR KBIT OR SALE 

gjSTpSf 0 563 25 60 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


GREAT BRITAIN 


AVE FOCH DUPLEX 

DOUBLE RECEPTION + 

5 B8XOOMS. 

5 baths, 60 38 


AROUND ETOflE 


M OUNTAIN RESORTS 

loraiy apartmerts with mognfreeft 
news of Ldw Geneva and mo u ntain . 


Wed finished, toeiy re ce pri ren . 2 bed- 
moms, luminous, high price. 766 3300 


Atonjneu* VBars, Verbmr. Us Dfabier- 
*&, Chateau cfOee near Gstaad. Ley- 
sin. rinr el it Opportu t d lB f Far 



75008 Paris 

Tele* 23108 F 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT IN PARIS 


16* BE5KNTUU. luxurious 200 
sqm, ad style or modem. 525 1)03. 


Woes from SF123JU0& 
lAetd m retgog es at 6W% interest. 

gloSTran sjl 

Av Mon Bepas 24. 

CH 7005 IrJUSCTWo, SwrteHuxt 
Tet (21J 22 35 IZ Tte 251 8 S MBJS 

wtedti b b od Sore 1970 


GENEVA 

NOTATE INDIVIDUAL OTTBtS 
far sole irr heart of Geneva historic 
residnrtrf properly of about 23,600 
sq.fr. Medl coud be easBy sutxfvxfed 
repenting an requnementsl situated m 
f p a aaut -cfed gotten, Ihs anqae 



74 CHAMF&aYSEES 8th 


Studo. 2 or Jroom apartment. 
One roonifi or more. 

I£ OARAGE 359 67 97. 


They w# be expected to 
ne-reodan wvdy rep^ red frirmdd 
stremnents in Engxdi and French 


property offers security/privacy/tron- 
'T'lify and is «d»o geogrtmteoaly m 
center re tow n. Substaria! price re- 
rened. Pninupub only reply m card*- 
rente to- Box 1793 Herald Tribune, 
9252) NeriUy luedex. France. 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


m ire ®®-STUO!Ol Afl comforts, filh floor. 

PLACE VENDOME Rt>/derr. visit today from midday on. 
3 bedrooms, eraphond 47, rue dAbosfa. Metro Setter 

AraiaWe per month. A# 265 11 99 OJARnBUTN. luxurious, giv- 
ing. bedroom, F8000 net per month. 
Tefe 72301 40 


This pad idectiy suits Engfish mother 
tongue cencidams vtoa hav* perfect 


hwotedgw of French. 


■ BesdUe hours 
luncheon vouchers or finn'i 
restaurant 


Send CV. and salary req ui r em ent s tor 


NATS FOR SALE 

PHOM 562-1640 

HATS FOR RENT 

PHONE 562-7899 

GFHCES FOR RENT/ SALE 

PHONE 562-6214 


' MPORT££ 



Canadian dob. 

Lighter than Scotch, smoother 
than Bourbon. 



International Business Message Center 


PORTE MAMOT, luxurious 2/3 
rooms. R6000. Td 720 94 95 


J67H. taSSL Beautiful 2 racm 
gotten, F7500 net 720 94 95 


Mm Mm 

Tour M re toton Codex 21 
92195 Para In Defense 2 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


BUSINESS SERVICES I PARIS AREA unfurnished 


Thesmootit and distinctive taste of 
Canadian Club is appreciated all over 
the world. Enjoy Canadian Club, neat 
on Che rocks or mixed to your taste 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


THIS WfflC 




Since 1858. 



BUSINESS WEEK 
INTERNATIONAL 


• Tbo Toughed Job hi B urines: 
How They’re Remaking US. Steel 



EXECUTIVE OFFICES 
LONDON W1 


MARAIS DUPLEX 

lOVaYRKHTJON + 


FrAy fumahad cw-concEhoned 
executive offices at prestige Wt od- 
drees ovgdabe it nr i wiu telytor periods 
from One north 


2 brehs, porting, FB500; 563 366 38 


CAN YOU SOL? 

We need American bw»*4iow far rr#er. 
ndtond derts vising ore plush Preii & 
Umdon showrooms. FSgh ticket elec- 
tronic seairity rurveifirevee prodldi de~ 
mold flood cksers with dried sola ex- 
perience who ike bn buds. WB1 Iran 
»i New York. CoS 
Mr, Hem, 211WW479 or wile 
CCS. 633 Third Av, NYC 10017, USA 


AUTO SHIPPING 


TRANSCAR 

THE CAB SMPHNQ 
5PK3AUSTS _ . 


Sendees ndude 

• BeOraric med 

• Telephone 

• Telex 

m fiag-Ecmie 

• Aucto-Visud presen ta t io n 
Ado 

• C o n fe rence rooms 

• Secretaiat Servian 



I FAST EXECUTIVE HCKnSMNG- 
L ffarHS*dMThctoTft/sDtesSnW<5 


pars m soo as w 

CANNK/MCE J73J 3EM 3 44 

FRANKFUST (061 C71B0 51 

BOMV / COLOGNE P7ZB) *217921 
STUTTGART (07031) 89087 

MUNICH |M9) n 10 *S 

BSEMEKHAVB'I pcTTi-ODa 

NEW YOWL Pig ®5‘7061 

HOUSTON F13 931 7605 

L05 ANGELS 213 215 31B3 

MONTREAL 574 866 601 

AGSUSWOUDWf 
Leave b to us to bring * to you 


February 25th | MONEY TREES? 


positions wanted 

F™ Sta. GLA^SLOTHI MK vrthtwitT*T»nga, ENOUSH DYNAMIC BUngud ■ 



Tet 01629 9999. The 291429 Stanford U. itkL Sfcon Vdfey. |50 
per cfay. USA Tbt 2M2D6 WM£ US 
ori Hong Kang Tk 30829 VOTING HX. 


Wrt 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 
MC. 

USA. * WOBtDWH* 


International Secretarial Positions 


• Britata: tnleniew Wfc MregreM 


UMoo Cortad* Ram A 
t hi Sudt c u d t France 


RDUOARY BANCMO on large coi- 
federated loora. The ally corrmer. 
piof bred writ o rep rea e tetotite office 
in London rperirAnra in Ms sennee. 
An* Qveneas Ban* & Trust (WAJ 


RENT 

YOUROFFia 


A complete sodd S business' rervice 
provitfcng a unique cofiej i ui i of 
tatotfed, rerwtfe 5 muetagud 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


X -Tf .. 

wt™ ® tlXJllBl 


Ltd. 28 Biodr Prim Ed. London SET. 
Tel 735 St7\ 


IE SATELLITE, 8 rue Gnomic 
751 16 Porii. Tit |33 II 727 15 59. 
Telex: leraM 620 1B3F. 


The Sarieh Tdk Trade 


NOW ON SA1£ 


AT ALL INTERNATIONAL 
NEWSSTANDS. 


’•k' 





IMMlOEAflQN TO USA 
MADE EASY 

AnomeySRedtreaWarerisas&Der- 
mcmert readme. Help* to sat up ISA 
bustnesssS locate cocnroadei ridus- 
hid & read en fa d red estate. For free 
brochure mite: David l b s on, 1221 



ZURICH-ZURiCH-ZURICH 


BM9&OfSTSASSe 52 
YOUR OFFICE AWAY FROM HOME 

• Office/ Management Sernas 

• Campaiy Forme*®® 

• Haw to do Banos in /®/ 

FROM SW1T2B5AND 



large Crenpcny 
reeks 


BILINGUAL 


SECRETARY 

far to odnen i itrtfi v g & intematwnd fi- 
nrem dep or tments. Perfectly Hnurf 

&p^/ Tjw jch. Shorthand fm 




Scdnhofitresw SI CH-8G22 Zurim. 
Tot 07/27! 9207. Tk; 813 062 


YOUR IONDON OFFICE 
01E5HAM EXECUTIVE CENTS 


OFFSHORE 
LIMITS) COMPANB 
BANKS 

INSURANCE COMPANIES 


Based or Sr. Orentm at Yveims ^SJ. 
Send written letter + CV. +■ salary 
’ requirad to reference; SB/HT/50. to: 
S0DB8KX Senrioe Becruternert 
SS. 36, 78391 XX O AKY CEWX 


TAX SERVICES 


c «5 , 2 

IS wgw Srtef, Loncxm Vvl. 
T«b (01)439 6288 Tbc 261426 


Worldwide 

N o nenere Ad nwte toJkjn 
fl e u d yn o de or Speoai 


LOtOON EB’RBmTATIYE 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


ASTON COMPANY FORMATIONS 
Dept HI. 8 Victoria St 


TAX HA VHV BASB3 BANC. 
tamed to henfing natters to confi- 
dence seefe tern deposits wtkh 
would beer i nter es t of up to 14% per 
amum European Overseas Sari. 

(W71 Dd. flereerentarwe OfriCt let- ] IMPETUS 
London 735 BI7] Trhn 2fl5i55Lj®G I p te* nr 


T71 


Douglas, tde of Mai 
T&. 0624 26591 


PASS OBGANtZATKTNreefe experi- 
enced secretary with good Bush 
shorthand, exceSeii typing sHs, 
fewowfedg e c t word proecssir^ an 
odr outage, goad French. Story 
per month x 13. Send CV. L 
photo before February 23 to; Person, 
nd Section, 4 n* Jean Rey, 75725 
Freis Cedcx 15. 


hawjstad *£<§5$ 


BBMGUAL AGD4CY h«y 

91 Rue du Faubourg St Honore L . Tempor ^r Of” 

SOflflftto* Jftei*: 7S8 12 40 ■ fax*** 


BRITT TRANCE 


let 0624 26591 
Trie* 627691 SPJVA G 


ZURICH * 252 76 21 

>l«u TW'Jf’bi* 


Has iffvncdiate opsnenys 
For eeperienend 





tan cn 
r. 63 Long 

YOUNG nBKH TrSngud ^37, 


44 nude 





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Hie v.-F^rt. 


Bud. Frendv 




EXPERKMCHJ DSU5H Jen 
tyda nee ded by trorafato w 

■■■1775 


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