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Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1985, France, English"

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JOHANNESBURG — South 
African security police arrested six 


meets, however, fall short of an 
assurance that no removal Is 
planned. 

Police initially said the death toll 


U.S., Soviet Revive 
Talks on Middle East 


By James M. Markham • die Soviet j 

New York Times Service interest in focui 

VIENNA - The United States £ 

and the Soviet Union held five 
hours of talks Tuesday cm prob- 
lems in the Middle East, their first 5® 
formal disaikans cm thereon to Jj^eGulf P 
more seven years. 

Emer ging from the conversa- The U.S. and 
lions at the Soviet Embassy here, ward the Arab- 
Richard W. Murphy, assistant sec- ' a sharply, wii 
retary of state for Near Eastern and vonng direct 
Sooth Asian affairs, pronounced partwsmvolved 
the exchanges “interesting” and pS for a mm 
said they would continue Wednes- mdudmglaad, 
day at the U.S. mission p^d the Pales tin 

Kept private bry agreement of nnatiem. 
both ado, the discussions repre- Mr. Murphy,’ 

sent the first attempt to probe for is a former am 
common groandin the Nfiddle East and Saudi Arabia, 
since an uWaled U-S--Soviet com- The Soviet 
mmrique on Oct 1,1977, that envi- ^ viadhnir P. 
sionea a regional peace conference, roughly Mr. Mu 
The fear of a joint US-Soviet in theSoviet Fa 


. The Associated Press 

BILBAO, Spain —An Iberia Air 
lines Boeing 727 crashed here 
Tuesday, killing all 148 persons 
aboard. 

Jochard W. Morphy, right, a U.S. assistant secretary at that Flight 610 from Madrid 
state, brushed past 8 journalist without commenting Tries- crashed an a mountain as it was 
day id Vienna at the lLS.-5oviet talks od the Middle East preparing to land at Sondjca Air- 
port in inis Basque industrial city. 
The airliner plane was flying 
~M~% • about 300 yards below normal alti- 

r gyt n't tude when it hit a television relay 

V X l.vl/1'l/D towers, an Iberia official said. 

A Basque terrorist group claimed 

r* ¥ n TTl m responsibility for the crash, but the 

fT/f /f f /h ri JTWCg airline dismissed the possibility. 

■lAlCvMy XXwjv The Bolivian ambassador to Ma- 
drid, I Adolfo SOeS Salinas, stud 
was the Soviet side that expressed that Bolivia’s labor minister, Gon- 
imerest in focusing (he initial dis- zafo Guzman, and three Bolivian 
cusaons an the Middle East, a engineers woe on the plane and on 
realm »h«t by Soviet definition ap- their way to Bilbao to negotiate a 
pears to embrace the Arab- Israeli train construction project, 
confrontation, t rfiannn l me Iraq- Iberia sources said that the for- 
Iraxt war and possible instabilities nier Spanish foreign affairs min i s - 
in the Gulf. ter, Gregorio Ldpez Bravo, was 


1^533^ « « from their action against daaaor 
ch-SS Tuesdayand hdd seven arawis had nsen bom five Mon- 
others for questioning in a country- to ,? me TQ ӣ a X__ a * t ?__ a 


wide crackdown on dissent 
The death toll from police action 
against protesters in Cape Town’s 
Crossroads squatter camp was re- 
ported, meanwhile, to have risen 
from five Monday to 13 on Tues- 
day. 

In the operation against critics of 


body was discovered' Tuesday 
morning and three blacks died in 
the afternoon when police fired 
rubber bullets, birdshot and tear 
gas at crowds of store-throwing 
demonstrators. 

But by evening, a police spokes- 
man said, 13 people bad died in the 


two days of unrest. The spokesman 

bo* searched in raids Urn boam 200 

people had been injured in the two 


fices of dissidents were said to have 
been searched in raids that began 
before dawn. 

Opponents of the regime inter- 
preted the action as undercutting 


Iran war and possible instabilities rer 


in the Gulf. 

The U.S. and Soviet stances to- 
ward the Arab- Israeli conflict dif- 


fer, Gregorio Ldpez Bravo, was 
also aboard. 

There were no immediate reports 


Rescue workers inspecting the wreckage of an Iberia airliner near Bilbao. 

Argentine Economic Chiefs Resign 
In Setback for Alfonsin’s Policies 


President Pieter W. Botha’s MlAtt Uuta^aj^aspo^ 


avowed readiness for limited re- 
forms embracing the country’s 
b lacks. 

“The fragile image of reason- 
ableness” created by Mr. Botha’s 
conditional offer to release Nelson 
Mandela and other jailed black 
leaders this month “has already 


ant Atti Lauhsche. a police spokes- 
man, said that “minimum force” 
had been used. 

The crackdown on political ac- 
tivists .was (he biggest in recent 
months and seemed designed to 
cripple the United Democratic 
Front, which claims the support of 
l.S million people opposed to 


ibouus mm utuuui ima ouutuj ■ • « ~ 

cracked,” said Patrick Lekota, 

spokesman of the United Demo- . *2^ ° C. r ^ ^ cssl °^ 

wi the lie to State President Botha's 


cralic Front. 


fer sharply, with Washington fa- on the nationalities of the other 
voting direct talks among the passengers, although most of them 


parties involved and Moscow push- were believed to be Spaniards, 
ing for a multilater al conference Air traffic controllers said that 
including its Arab neighbors the aircraft d is a pp e a red from their 
and thePalestme liberation Orga- monitors at 9:35 AM. local time. 
nmition. Civil aviation authorities said 

Mr. Murphy, who speaks Arabic, that the crash [occurred p Wt»theast of 
is a fanner ambassador to Syria Bilbao near the town of Durango is 

_ _ .. J ltd nvmtWQOh 


the plane was making its approach. 
‘Ten minutes before the expeci- 


the mber By William D. Montalbano 

St Of them . Log Angela Times Service 

uards. 

> said that BUENOS AIRES — With its 
from their attempts to control Argentina's 
xal time. galloping inflation an apparent 
rides said * aflure > President Radi Alfonsin's 
ratheastof economics team resigned en masse 
)urangoas Monday night in a move that 
caught the nation by surprise. 

heexoect- A presidential spokesman said 


ics and treasury ministries also an- Mr. Alfonsin in December 1983, as 
nounced their departures. Argentina returned to democrat 

The resignations came without after nearly right years of spena- 
waraing or immediate explanation. thrift military role. 

However, they clearly represented Mr. Alfonsn said that the plan- 
a setback for attempts by Mr. Al- ning secretary, Juan SounouDle, 
fonsin’s young democratic govern- 44, a respected economist with 


tk* ft™, a pretensions of a search for consol- 

■nulMcW aHianc^dT sup- 


e^tdssvJt —-Sj— jii 


announcement last month that a 

However, they clearly represented Mr. Alfonsin said that the plan- ban. The front’s patrons include ? cw ,^P ru ? 1 J? 6 
a setback for attempts by Mr. Al- ning secretary, Juan Sounouffle, Bishop Desmond Tutu, winner of [? r mil- 

f raisin’s young democratic govern- 44, a respected economist with the 1984 Nobel Peace Prize and a ■ . 

mem to walk an economic tight- broad international experience, vocal opponent of white minority . ■ 

lv.fi™™ volatile Anre^tine. «n,,U Mr fhinZmn Th^ n.le . tamed OD treason diargK_ Tuesday, 


rope between volatile Argentine would succeed Mr. Grinspun. The rule. 


workers and Argentina’s interna- secretary of internal commerce, Al- 


roughly Mr. Murphy’s counter 
in the Soviet Foreign Ministry. 


_!S atffflRsayffi 

m ?£SS SEEHSSS 

trip led to Egypt’s^ stMtej^ m smuiar wearner conditions were ... ... • ^ 

. h :'. - . with Israd under the Camp-David not mtend to he drawn into a dis- 


SSiSESS tt+X&EJS&tt Grinspun and the 


tional creditors. fredo Concepcion, 63, w» muku uuuk» uiunmi mua uua juiuu, f , . - ■ 

The creditors are demanding to succeed MxT Garda Vazquez. the wife of Walter Sisulu, wha like 
more stringent austerity measures, As the lightning rod fra the gov- Mr. Mandela is an imprisoned 

wdnch the workers rcjecL Mr. Grin- eminent’s economic policies, the leader of the AfricanNational ^ 3 ^ 111 British consulate m 

span had promised that austerity, combative Mr. Grinspun, 59, bad Congress, and Saw Kfldne. a blade . . . . 

imposed as a condition of the set- drawn fire from an sides. trade unionist The state s t*argcs agamst the 

dement last year with the IMF, In the last week alone, Peronist In Crossroads, police reported a ?^~ l _ ^ 1 !? , p 
would not produce a recession, labor unions challenged him, as- second consecutive day of protests 01 , ele ^ ao ? s 

That insistence, and the govern- sating that wage increases were against official plans to move tens naxearace aqmues tn 

ment’s pledge to increase real, or not keeping pace with inflation, of thousands of black people to a mc n ®T: 


63, Was Mnwd 


Those detained on treason 
charges included Albertina Sisulu, 


Priscilla Jana, said that eight other 
prominent figures associated with 


bank president, Enrique Garda 




tnp led to fcgyprs^ separate peace gesied that the Soviet Union does 

with Israd under the David not intend to be drawn into a dis- 14I ^ 

aoconfa andacoanuated lheSowa cnssionmriimnaovCTitsimCTven- 

Umon's exclusion from the mam- ^ ^ Af^janistan. The A fghani- on cne pLaQC - 

stream of MMe East diplomacy. ■ gtwn i«w jj the topic of stalled The plane clipped off two 0 
In Western Europe, the talks talks involving the Afghan and Pa- l0WerS ^ n ^ 


me dipped off two of the 
towers on the hill from 


and the International Monetary inflari o mi^&sted, wages, 1 
Fund. Mr. Grinspun into confli 

Wiihin ^an hour^ ^of tbdr reagBa-.-.nKireorlhfHlox.ecpnoim^ 
tions, most of the second- ' arid Mr. Ohospun and Mr. Gqzda 
third-level officials in the econom- Vazquez both came to office with 


spun had promised that austerity, combative Mr. Grinspun, 59, bad 
imposed as a condition of the set- drawn fire from all sides, 
dement last year with the IMF, In the last week alone, Peronist 
would not produce a recession, labor unions challenged him, as- 
That insistence, and the govern- sating that wage increases were 


moil’s pledge to increase real, or not keeping pace with inflation, of thousands of blade people to a 
inflation-adjusted, wages, brought and the ruling Radical Civic new township 10 mfles (16kilome- 
Mr. Grinspun into conflict with Union’s congressional caucus de- ters) away at Khayditshn. The au- 


Durban. 

The state's charges against the 
eight relate to their support for a 
boycott of elections last August for 
Indian and mixed race deputies in 
the new, three-chamber Parlia- 
ment. The white authorities depict 
the Parliament as an emblem of 
major reform, but it ignores the 


to explain how his policies were 
(Cnwdaned on Page 2. CoL 6) 


' Tuesday were widely seen as more kistam governments under the aus- w Wch Basque radio ami tcleviaon 
• - - ; - r .v are hrnarirasL The aircraft then 


. thorities deny that a nwve is imnn- . S 'SK ^ u 
nent and say ample wanting wtiB be , 


• - important for their symbolism than 

J for their possible repercussions in 


•‘•-V. the 


East Coming only 


- ia the ^ No., 27, 1983, a Boring 747 


pices of the United Nations. 

In Washingtoo, UA officials 
have insisted mat the Vienna talks 


Nations. are broadcast. The aircraft then 
slid down the pine-forested hillside 
U A officials before coming to rest in a ravine. 


Two commercial plane crashes in 


rroni; me Acvemu 

Westnufrekmdf CBS Continue Fight in News Media 


changes m the known U5. and On Nov. 27, 1983, a Boeing 747 
Soviet approaches to the region. A of the Colombian airline Avianca 
senior State Department offi c i a l crashed oatside Madrid, killing 
said last week that These ex- is] 

On Dec. 7, 1983, an Iberia 
jSJSL!!?!? Boeing 727 and a DC-9 belonging 


. neva on nuclear weapons, the Vmd- 

- • na forum is being broadly 
. if.. intespRted as a agn that Moscow 
• "iv". and Washington nave resumed a 
civil dialogue. 

The bilateral discussiahs in Vi- 
. --j' enna formally arose from a speech 
by President Ronald R ea g an on 
SepL 24 to the United Nations 
General Assembly in which he 
***"-f^ called for Washington and Mckcow 
T. - - ‘ to open discussions on regional 
problems to aQeviate tensions.. The 


- : enna. formally arose from a speecn management of UA-Soviet rela- r • i ■ c 

by President Ronald Rearan on tia^S to t^ntenS 
■ SepL 24 to the UniteTSations ESKSfi? ^ at the Nfadnd atrpraL k^a 
General Assembly to which he _ . ^ „ . 42pasoBsa^rdtheDC-9and51 eto^dand. 

”' t- VT called for Washington and Moscow ■ farad Reacts GmtKwdy aboard the 727. Army generals 

% to open discussions on regional An Israeli government official In March 1977, 582 persons were ^ 

problems to aBeviate tensions.. The welcomed the U.S.-Soviet talks, killed to a collision of two Boeing 
iika was also briefly discussed by but be said the Soviet Union must 747$ operated by Pan American 
Secretary of State George P. Shultz resume diplomatic relations with World AirwaymdKLM at the air- 
and his Soviet counterpart, Andrei Israel before it can mediate the port on Tenerife to the Canary Is- 
A. Gromyko, last menth. Arab-Israeti conflict The Assodat- lands, the worid’s worst civilian 


According to U^. officials, it ed Press reported from Jerusalem, aviation acridenL 

Happy (Lunar) New Year in Beijing 

Austerity Is Out of Favor, Festivities Are Joyous Again 

Rv Tohn F Bums tog Mr. Deng’s “flexible economic policy” for her 

NewYork Time, Service hoKday weWjetog. . . 

BEUING— When even the banana sitilera take Tte woman wu one of 600 mOLon travdeis 

saas^£sis.’'""“‘" 

JisSSSf BESS* S«,'K=3S=S 

snowstorm, yt^^merchants with three-whedea Ja ^. l ’ ^ ^ fOT i, 

biSS^wrre^tog from thornsual stations mflhrai ml. as. Many tfthese wUl be peaswfi 
Ste taae^Znpounds md holds. The mj i tom been 

bananas areTcover for black market currency rewwlfor the first tune decadp. 

dealings, which have boomed along with the rest of Officials arc expecting 800,000 people at an 

the eoomnny here to recent years. Tenmle fW* at Ditan Paric, a te of the 

The closure of the “banana bank” was one Ming Dynasty’s Temple of the Earth. The center- 
measure of bow the Lunar New Year hoe has piece of the Lunar New Year for cenmries, temple 
changed. A decade ago it was deemed reactionary fans were proscribed in the 1950s. This year, the 
to ran it by its traditional name, so it was dubbed paik has been opemri to hmidreds of merchants 


By Eleanor Randolph 

Washington Post Service 

NEW YORK — The war ended 
Monday, but the combatants 
found it hard to lay down their 
aims. 

Waiting to ABC television’s 
greenroom to go on the network’s 
nightly news program, William G 
Westmoreland, the retired UR 
Army general, suddenly spotted his 
adversary, Mike Wallace of CBS, 
on the screen defen ding the 1982 
documentary that accused General 
Westmorland of engaging in a 
“conspiracy” to suppress enemy- 
troop data daring the Vietnam 
War. 

T stiB bdieve there was a con- 
spiracy, 1 ' Mr. Wallace’s gravelly 
voice came over the airwaves. “I 
believe it even more after so many 
people came forward to support 
CBS to that courtroom.” 

General Westmoreland, his arms 
crossed, his famous jaw jutting 
firmly, shook bis head. 

“What a bunch of baloney,” he 
said. 

After withdrawing from his 
S]20-m£Qioo lawsuit and ending 
his court battle with CBS just short 

(Continued on Page 3, CoL 1) 



;r-" - -v. - : . 


-• v«- 


Ha Anooc*d 


W illiam C Westmoreland with wife, Katherine, after dropping Us lawsuit against CBS. 


Lawsuit, Like the Vietnam War, Was Tortuous 


the “Spring Festival” instead. Workers got three and entertainers offi 
days off, as now, but they woe well advised to keep lifetimes of the majo 
their revelries away from neighbors’ prying eyes. There are bird-si 
New, Maoist austerity is treated as a badmemo-. shows and beaury pi 
ty.and the traditional festivities are back to vogue, niously fashioned paj 
For weeks or dinar y Chinese have been hanging are consultants to a 
sQk lantems and laying to. food, firecrackers and traffic regulations an 
gifts. By ntidaftemoon Tuesday, nine hours before dans, comedians, wr 
the Year tit the Rat gave way to the Year of the Ox, competing to a nrarij 
everybody who could was shpping out of the plant rowing and catching 
or office and pointing his bicycle toward home. pole topped with lan: 
It was a mmky day, made duller by an nnnsuaBy As with other asp 

hemrv snowstorm. Bv afternoon the stm was a some people have l 


I heavy snowstorm. By afternoon the stm was a 

1 -* ■ I ■: ii. - - — L.11 .ml tin Cmhiililpii fhltftd 




roofs hung mysteriously to the gIoom, Evaywhere 
bicyclists were ciridrimg on the snow, and motor- 
ized traffic slo wed to a crawL Yet throu^i it all 
there was a joyfulness unmatched here at this 
season to years. „ 

The Jfinhua news agoiqy called it the most 
prosperous new year ever.” Along the dry’s mam 
shopping Street of Wangling, always crowdetL 
sidewalks were thicker stS with urban couples and 
peasants to from the country. 

• On the whole the man behind tbe refonns, Deng 
Xiaoping, has inverted the old personality colt, 
pref ening to shuo the limelight. But, as the ho&day 
began, (he association between Mr. Deng and the 
new prosperity showed through m some official 
quarters. A typical Xtohuadispau* quoted apeas- 
ant woman abbarf a train oulsde Beijing as credit- 


and entertainers offering things not seen in the 
lifetimes at the majority of people now living. 

There are bird-storing contests and fashion 
shows and beaury parlors and stalls selling inge- 
niously fashioned paper windmills and kites. There 
are consultants to advise on medical problems, 
traffic regulations and family planning, and magi- 
cians, comedians, wrestlers and bare-chested men 
competing to a nearly forgotten sport that involves 
tossing and catching a 30-foot (9-meter) bamboo 
pole topped with lanterns and bells. 

As with other aspects of Mr. Den^s policies, 
some people have taken the revival of the dd 
holiday traditions as an excuse for- “dipping into 
the big pot,” using public funds for private gratifi- 
cation. The Communist Party’s principal newspa- 
per, the People’s Daily, criticized officials last 
week to various regions of the country who have 
taken advantage of the festivities to throw lavish 
banquets, accept gifts and pass out unearned bo- 
nuses. 

In one case chronicled by another newspaper, 
the Economic Daily, managers of a glass factory to 
the northern province of Liaoning spent 4,400 
yuan ($1,553) on a 16-course feast of chicken, 
prawns, fish and sea slugs, “creating a bad impact 
on the masses.” The People’s Daily demanded that 
the culprits “study the three ‘do nets’: do not 
stretch out your hands for gifts, do not accept 
them, and do not use public money for tog ban- 
quets.” 


By David Margotick 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — In some ways, 
the course of General W illiam C. 
Westmoreland's battle a gains t 
CBS, whidi concluded Monday 
when Ins S120-nriltion Hbd suit 
against the television network was 
withdrawn, paralleled the tortured 
path of the war with which he is so 
closely identified. 

At the Federal District Court- 
house to Manhattan, as to South- 
east Aria, General Westmoreland 
waged an expensive, time-consum- 
ing battle against a powerful adver- 
sary, whose strength he. may have 
miriei w li mated 

Coming so soon after the very 
different outcome in Arid Sharon’s 
hbd stut against Time magazine, 
the Westmoreland withdrawal 
from the CBS trial was seen as a 
gain for the m«Hia although not 
without a high price. 

“CBS has won a great victory, 
but it sustained two years of in- 
tense public criticism as well as 
enormous financial costs,” said 
Floyd Abrams, a specialist on press 
law. “Large hbd suits are really 
death grips in which parties dutch 
each other for months if not years, 
at enormous pain and expense to 
both of them.” 

“Libel plaintiffs will be remind- 
ed of something they may have 
forgotten: that someone who 


brings a libd suit may suffer a Among them: Given its political- General Westmoreland, howev- 

sha tiering loss of reputation arising ly charged nature, should the case er, was faced with the far more 
out of the litigation itself,” Mr. have gone to court to the first difficult task of refuting an entire 
Abrams said. “We haven’t beard so place? Why did the parties opt out historical thesis: that be conspired 
much about that recently.” now rather than await the jury’s to mislead American leaders on en- 

Profes^or Vincent Blari, a spe- verdict? And what, if anything, emy troop strength in Vietnam. It 
rdalicf in constitu tional law at Co- should be done to make libel ao- was an area where evidence was 
1 umbra Law School, noted another tions less costly, so that newspapers contradictory, where fact and opin- 
conrideration. “This case,” he said, and broadcasters with fewer re- ion were intermingled. 

mm sources than Tune or CBS can de- In the end, be not only failed to 
NEWS ANALYSIS themselves? conclude his case, but publicized 

: ; : r At first blush, the Sharon and “ ?»» Y**!* accusations 

res ur rects the most important do- Westmoreland which were of which he had complamed. 

lerrent to libd actions: the fear that heard simultaneously six floors There was genuine pitfzkxnent 
the defendant will make his rase apart at the federal courthouse to Monday over ihe tinting of General 


treasurer of the United Democratic 
Front; the Reverend Frank Chi- 
kane, the front's vice-president to 
Transvaal province; Dr. Ishmad 
Mohammed of the Transvaal Indi- 
an Congress, and Isaac Ngcobo,. 
whose affiliation was not fmme di-. 
ately known. 

Mia. Sisulu is a president of op- 
position alliance, as is Archie Gu- - 
mede, who was detained to last; 
year’s crackdown. 

Tuesday’s arrests mean that thtr 
bulk of the group's leadership, is 
now behind rats. 

The front was fanned ia August, 
1983, to oppose a new constitution' 
offering a hunted parliamentary 
voice to some non whites but ex- 
cluding black people, who form 73 
percent of the population within 
South Africa’s traditional frontiers. 

The authorities and many of the 
front’s black supporters regard it as 
a champion of the outlawed and 
exiled African National Congress, 
which is committed to violence as a 
means of overturning white minor- 
ity rule. The front itself, however, 
advocates peaceful change! 

The otganization's affiliates in- 
clude church, trades union and stu- 
dent bodies opposed to the govern- 
ment’s racial policies. By detaining 
its leaders, Western diplomats said, 
the authorities have effectively re- 
jected die front as a potential nego- 
tiating partner to the proposed new 
forum. 


INSIDE 


■ Margaret Thatcher discussed 

the British coal strike with 
union leaders. Page 2. 

■ AnatoB Karpov said he would 

like the canceled world chess, 
championship to Moscow to be 
resumed. Pine 2. 


NEWS ANALYSIS 


In the end, be not only failed to 
conclude his case, but publicized 


“res ur rects the most important de- 
terrent to libd actions: the fear that 
the defendant will make his rase 
more effectively, more hurtfuDy,’ 


uk an e n u a m win. maxc ms taac ^ yjc federal COlirthOUSC to ‘"‘"““J' ov “ 

more effectively, more hurtfuDy,' York Gty had much to com- Westmoreland’s decision to wiih- 
mone credibly at trial than In prim mon. Each pitred a military man draw, particularly since the recent, 
or on the air.” against a media giant: each focused damaging testime^ agrina him — 

“Recently” Mr. Blasi continued, cm purported nnscoaduct in a far- by General Josgto A. McChrisnan 
“there’s beat a ldbd of promiscuity n ff irnnonularwar and Colonel Gams Hawkins — 


in bringing libel suits, based on a . . . 

fedtog that even iT the evidence was The similar ities stop, however, surprise. Both had made similar 
fairly flimsy or if the vodict were when one considers the chais e s . statements on the original CBS 
eventually overturned, the lawsuit that the two men attempted to re- broadcast, 
had a certain publicity value. This tote. Far Mr. Sharon, the charge General Westmoreland’s lawyer, 
case ought to be terribly sobering in consisted of one specific s ta tem ent: Dan Burt of the conservative Capi- 
that regard.” that an Israeli commission had td Le gal Foundation, denied that 

Still, for CBS the experience was found he played a role to the 1982 the fact that the foundation is 
not without its costs. The network massacre of Palestinian civilians in $500,000 in debt played a part in 
paid millions of dollars to vindicate Lebanon. the derision to settle. 

itself, a process to which its news- This he manayH uj refute. And Mr- Blast spe cula ted that the de- 


]?r j rnTn s ra i i ty off, unpopular war. 


could not have been much of a 


itself, a process to which its news- This he managed to refute. And Mr. Blast spe cula ted that the de- 
gathering procedures and the news- although he faded to prove that rision may have been a belated re- 
gatherers themselves were bared Time had lied or acted recklesly — action to the prospect that Judge 
and scrutinized as neva before. a showing required under the 115. Pierre N. Leva! — like Judge Abra- 
As the Westmoreland case caste Supreme Court’s landmark hbd ham D. Sofacr, who presided over 
to its abrupt end. two and a half ruling in New York Times vs. SolE- the Sharon case — may have asked 
years after it was first filed and 18 van — a public unconcerned with the jury to rule separately on the 
weeks after it went to trial it left legal niceties deemed him the victor questions of truthfulness,- defama- 
nian y questions hanging to the case. non and malic e. 


the derision to settle. 

Mr. Bias speculated that the de- 


■ EC foreign mmistos failed to 

agree on finding for this year’s 
budget deficit and on terms for 
Spam’s entry. Page %. 

■Thailand has accused Viet- 
nam of using poison gas against 
Cambodian guerrillas. Page 2. 

■ The U.S. aid cutoff has 

forced Nicaraguan rebels to re- 
duce their activities. Page 3. 

■ Wffiam Schroeder looked in 
on fellow artificial heart pa- , 
dent, Murray H&ydon. Page 3. , 

ARTS/LEISURE 

■Wines to go with hearty dish- 
es, using the meals of Georges 
Simenon’s detective; Maigret, 
as a guide. Page 6. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ The U5. dollar rose still 
higher to European trading 
Tuesday to set records against 
most major currencies. Page 7. 









Page 2 


Thais Say Vietnam 
Is Using Poison Gas 



By William Branigin 

Washington Post Servuv 

BANGKOK — Thailand ac- 
cused Vietnam on Tuesday of using 
toxic chemicals in battles against 
Cambodian resistance guerrillas 
along the Thai-Cambodian border. 
It lodged a protest at the United 
Nations. 

The Thai military supreme com- 
mander, General Arthii Kami an g- 
Ek. said the Thai Army Scientific 
Department had found evidence 
for the first time that rocket rounds 
fired by Vietnamese forces con- 
tained poisonous chemicals. 

The charge coincided with a 
claim by the Khmer Rouge guerril- 
la group that 1 1 of its fighters were 
in serious condition suffering from 
the effects of chemical rounds fired 
at them Sunday. 

Neither charge could be con- 
firmed independently. An official 
of the Army Scientific Department 
in Bangkok said be had no evidence 
that the rockets contained banned 
chemicals, and Western relief offi- 
cials cautioned that recent mysteri- 
ous deaths and illnesses of Cambo- 
dians along the border required 
further investigation before a cause 


has been found to back the charges 
with incontrovertible proof. 

General Arthit said officials of 
the Army Scientific Department at 
the Thai-Cambodian border had 
found remnants of four rockets 
that contained phosgene gas and 
hydrogen cyanide. The rockets 
were said to have been fired by 
Vietnamese gunners in Cambodia 
on Saturday and to have landed 
near the Thai border town of Ban 
Sanror Changan. No casualties 
were reported. 

The Bangkok World, a newspa- 
per. reported that a Khmer Rouge 
guerrilla commander, Mitr Sok 
Thiap. charged that 31 of his men 
were injured, 11 of them seriously, 
when Vietnamese forces fired rock- 
ets containing chemicals at a 
Khmer Rouge position. The com- 
mander was quoted as saying that 
those who came in direct contact 
with the chemicals suffered head- 
aches. fits of vomiting and difficul- 
ty breathing. 


could be pinpointed. 
The U.S. Emt 


bass)' in Bangkok 
has sent members of its special 
chemical-biological warfare inves- 
tigative unit to look into the 
charges, diplomats said. 

The United Slates has accused 
Vietnam of using chemical weap- 
ons in Cambodia and Laos against 
resistance groups for several years, 
but has said thaL incidents dropped 
off sharply in 1984. Specifically, 
die United States has charged that 
the Vietnamese and forces of the 
Communist government in Laos 
have dropped toxic substances 
known as “yellow rain" on Hmong 
tribesmen, killing many and forc- 
ing thousands to flee to Thailand. 
But so far no chemical ordnance 


■ Chinese- Vietnamese Tension 

Vietnam has declared that it in- 
flicted “horrifying casualties" on 
Chinese troops in fighting along 
the Chinese- Vietnamese border 
last month, Agence France- Press 
reported Tuesday from Hanoi. 

The fighting occurred when Chi- 
nese forces made an abortive at- 
tempt to take a Vietnamese posi- 
tion in Ha Tuyen province, 
Vietnam's official news agency said 
in a dispatch dated Monday. 

The agency said that the fighting 
lasted three days and ended on Jan. 
18. It did not mention Vietnamese 
losses. 

China and Vie tnam have traded 
accusations in recent weeks of in- 
cursions and provocations. No in- 
dependent confirmation has been 
available of either Hanoi's or Beij- 
ing's reports. 



TTw Auoeoicd ?rau 


POPE MEETS PERES — Pope John Paul II and Prime Minister Shimon Peres of 
Israel meeting Tuesday in the Vatican. Mr. Peres said he reaffirmed that Jerusalem 
would remain the capital of IsraeL The pope, a spokesman said, reiterated that 
Jerusalem should have an “international statute** protecting the rights of all religions. 


Karpov Says He Wants U.K. Leader, 

To Resume Chess Match Unions Fail to 

End Impasse 


Reuters 


MOSCOW — The world chess 
champion, Anatoli Karpov,. called 
Tuesday for the immediate re- 
sumption of his title match against 
his fellow Soviet player, Gary Ka- 
sparov. 


Thais Said to Repel Laotian Refugees 


By Bernard Gwertzman 

/Vpw York Times Stmt* 

WASHINGTON — Senator 
Mark 0. Hatfield and refugee ex- 
perts here have expressed concern 
over what appears to be a Thai 
government decision to use force to 
turn back Laotian refugees, includ- 
ing many who once fought in a 
clandestine army that was financed 
for a time by the CIA. 

Recent reports in the Thai press 
have said that since January, the 
Thai government, in an effort to 
hall the influx of refugees, has re- 
fused to permit Laotians to cross 
the Mekong River. There have been 
reports that Thai troops have killed 
some of those attempting to do so. 

Of prime concern to Senator 
Hatfield, a Republican of Oregon, 
and to the refugee specialists is the 
fate of the Hmong people, who 
were pan of the clandestine army 
that fought the North Vietnamese 
for many years before the Central 
Intelligence Agency cut off funds 
to them between 1973 and 1975. 

State Department officials said 
there had been little reporting from 
the \JS. Embassy in Thailand on 
the border situation but that no 
officials questioned the accuracy of 
the Thai press reports. 

Mr. Hatfield sent a letter to Sec- 
retary of State George P. Shultz on 
Monday expressing “grave con- 
cern" after he said he was not satis- 
fied with an earlier confidential ex- 
change with the U.S. ambassador 
io Thailand. 

. A similar view was expressed by 
Roger P. Winter, director of the 
US. Committee for Refugees, a 


nongovernmental group, who said: 
“Thai officials have implemented 
comprehensive patrolling along the 
Mekong River to interdict newly 
arriving Lao." 

Senator Hatfield said in his let- 
ter: “For 10 years, under three U.S. 
administrations, we have been 
largely successful in ensuring that 
there is refuge for fleeing Indochin- 
ese. And now the door seems to be 
quietly swinging shut on refugees 
from Laos." 

Senator Hatfield has a particular 
interest in the plight of the Hmong. 
many of whom live in Oregon. 

The Thai government has denied 
that it has a policy of turning back 
all Laotian refugees, but has indi- 
cated that it is concerned about the 
large increase last year in the num- 
ber of Laotians crossing the Me- 
kong River in boats and rafts. State 
Department officials said. Thai- 
land said nearly 20.000 Laotians 
fled to Thailand last year, and 
about 25 percent of them were be- 
lieved to be Hmong, the officials 
said. In 1982-83. the total was 
about 4.000. 

Thai newspapers, however, have 
reported such a policy shift, Mr. 
Winter said. 

He said that on Feb. 2 the Bang- 
kok Post carried a story datdined 
Nong Khai saying “hundreds of 
Hmong tribesmen fled across the 
Mekong River from Laos yesterday 
but were baned from landing by 
security farces stationed at Bung 
Kan District" 

The article said that more than 
300 of the hill people were refused 
permission to land by Thai border 


troops, and that they returned to 
the Laotian side north oT the Pa- 
kading River in the Paksane Dis- 
trict of Vientiane. 

“Gov. Sakda Op hong told re- 
porters at the scene that it was the 
government's policy not to accept 
any more Laotian refugees," the 
paper said. 

On Jan. 7. the Bangkok World 
reported that at a meeting early in 
January involving Prason Sunsiri. 
secretary general of Thailand's na- 
tional security council, it was de- 
rided “to take stern action over the 
influx of Laotian refugees." 

Mr. Hatfield said that he had 
sent a telegram to John Gunther 
Dean, the U.S. ambassador in 
Bangkok, and received a response 
on Jan. 21 that the United States 
would be working with Thai au- 
thorities “to ensure that newly ar- 
riving refugees from Laos will have 
access to screening and that refu- 
gees in potential jeopardy will not 
be returned." 

But he said that despite these 
assurances, reports of Laotians be- 
ing turned back persisted. 

Under long-established proce- 
dures, Thailand is supposed to ac- 
cept all those seeking asylum, 
pending screening to determine if 
those crossing the borders are le- 
gitimate refugees fleeing persecu- 
tion or retribution, or simply mi- 
grants looking for better 
opportunities. If they are in the 
refugee category, they would be eli- 
gible for emigration to the United 
Slates, and if migrants, they could 
be returned to Laos. 


Mr. Karpov insisted that he was 
fit enough to continue the match, 
which was called off last week. 

'Tin unhappy at the move." said 
Mr. Karpov, who had been leading 
5-3 after a record 48 games. “I want 
to start again as fast as possible so 
nobody can say time helped me 
regain strength." 

Mr. Karpov. 33. visited the of- 
fices of Western news organiza- 
tions in Moscow to deliver die text 
of a letter he said he had written to 
Florencio Campomanes. the presi- 
dent of the International Chess 
Federation. In the letter, he com- 
plained about Mr. Campom3nes‘s 
decision Friday to cancel the five- 
month-old contest. 

The decision caused scenes of 
anger when Mr, Campomanes an- 
nounced il at a Moscow press con- 
ference. Some eminent figures in 
the chess world accused Mr. Cam- 
pomanes of favoring Mr. Karpov. 

The federation president said he 
was hailing play because both play- 
ers were exhausted. A new match is 
to start SepL2L 

Looking relatively well despite 
the long match. Mr. Karpov said 
that everyone was unhappy with 
Mr. Catnpomanes's decision, 
which was made after the federa- 
tion president was called in by the 
Soviet organizers of the contest. 

Mr. Kasparov, 21. denounced 
the cancellation at the press confer- 
ence Friday, embarrassing Soviet 
officials. 

On Tuesday Mr. Karpov, who is 
high in the Soviet sporting estab- 
lishment, said that Mr. Campo- 
manes was called in as everyone 
felt the match had broken all limits. 

But nobody suggested canceling 
it. he said, adding: “There was only 


tani leader, insists that the negotKi 
(i Octc 


one request Since everyone was 
tired, the 


Soviet chess federation 
asked for a break." 

Although Mr. Karpov was only 
one game away from the six neces- 
sary to clinch the title, Mr. Ka- 
sparov had staged a comeback, 
winning the two most recent 
games. 


Insecurity and Fears Grow Among Ceuta Residents 

Spanish Enclave Feels Increasingly Vulnerable as Morocco Renews Claims 


By Edward Schumacher 

Sew York Times Seethe 

CEUTA — Greek mythology 
held that Hercules opened the 
Strait of Gibraltar by parting the 
twin pillars at its entrance. Today 
the pillars are associated anew, this 
time in a tale of diplomatic irony 
and political fury. 

On Feb. 5, Madrid lifted a 16- 
year siege and began negotiations 
over one of the pillars, the Rock of 
Gibraltar, a British colony at the 
southern tip of Spain that Span- 
iards have long regarded as stolen 
territory. 

Fourteen miles (2JL5 kilometers) 
across the deep blue strait stands 
the other pillar. Mount Acha. This 
one is on the Spanish territory of 
Ceuta, like Gibraltar a spit of land 
but off the Moroccan mainland. 

King Hassan II of Morocco said 
in an interview with Spain's state- 
owned television recently that if 
Spain recovered Gibraltar, Moroc- 
co expected to recover Ceuta and a 
second Spanish enclave. Melilla. 
150 miles down the Mediterranean 
coast. 

ft was a statement that Hassan 
has often made and Spain has al- 
ways rejected, noting that while Gi- 
braltar is a colony the enclaves 
have been part of Spain adminis- 
tratively since long before Morocco 
was a nation. 

But the beginning of the Gibral- 
tar talks has exposed delicate sensi- 
tivities in and out of the govern- 
ment of Prime Minister Felipe 


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Gonzalez. Television previews of 
the interview with the king ignited 
a furor and the network canceled 
its scheduled broadcast 

Rightist nationalists attacked the 
network for serving the king: Sena- 
tor Miguel Angel Roldan, a Social- 
ist from Melilla. filed a suit against 
the producers for “broadcasting 
statements menacing the territorial 
integrity of Spain." 

Meanwhile, on this eight -square- 
mile (20.6- square- kilometer) pen- 
insula. surrounded by sea and what 
Spaniards still call the Moors, the 

65.000 residents and a garrison of 

13.000 troops seem to have re- 
solved to stay, many saying that 
they are inured to the king’s re- 
marks. 

“Here we are going to be like the 
Saxons and defend what is ours," 
Senator Antonio Ratio Romero 
said. 

But the talk has a hollow ring. 
The recent events, combined with 
what many here see os a menacing 
pact signed five months ago be- 
tween Morocco and Libya, have 
a local sense of insecurity. 
'e J re sold," said a worried 
shopkeeper. 

Compared with Gibraltar. Ceuta 
is a poor cousin, larger in size but 
shabbier, and its mount is only half 
the height of the Rock. The Spanish 
claim goes back to 1415, when Por- 
tugal seized the strategic peninsula, 
then an Arab pirate den; it ceded it 
to Spain in 1580. Melilla, which has 
a population of 54.000. was con- 
quered by Spain in 1497. 

Spain has since taken and given 
up much of Morocco’s territory, 
but Ceuta and Melilla have re- 
mained apart in Spanish hearts. 
“This is a prolongation or Andalu- 
sia in Africa." said Luis Manuel 
Aznar. the editor of El Faro, the 
local daily. 

Ceuta's main business is as a 


duty-free port. Its 
ers and ship provisioned include 
Indians, Moroccans and more than 
800 Moroccan Jews. But Spanish 
Roman Catholics make up the 
overwhelming majority and (he 
language is Spanish, as are the ar- 
chitecture and customs. 

Memories of empire, particularly 
within the military, add attach- 
ment. A posting in Ceuta is one of 
few remaining for the shrinking 
Spanish Foreign Legion. 

To maintain "Hispanidad.” the 
government tightly controls the 
working permits for the almost 
16,000 Moroccans in Ceuta and 
bans them and other foreigners 
from buying property. 

But more problematic are the 
1.700 Moroccans who hold Spanish 
citizenship. They were given prop- 
erty’ rights by the Supreme Court 
three years ago. But all land pur- 
chases must be approved by the 
city council where the Moroccans 
with Spanish citizenship say their 
requests are quietly shelved. Per- 
mission to build a private Moslem 
school has been held up in Madrid 
for two years, they say. 

“We think someone bom here is 
one more Spaniard," said Ahmed 
Subaire, 38, the president of the 
management commission of the 
Moslem community, “They con- 
sider us second-class citizens." 

But among the residents of Ceu- 
ta there is a heightening sense of 
vulnerability. The government is 
reducing the number of troops here 
by 1,500 at a time when Hassan has 
introduced a new calculation by 
saying that the Soviet Union would 
never allow Spain, as a member of 
the North Atlantic Treaty Organi- 
zation, to control both sides of the 
strategic strait. 

Soviet cargo ships moored in the 
harbor are testimony to the fact 
that of the 10.000 commercial ships 


that took on supplies in Ceuta last 
year the largest number were Sovi- 
et. 

Spanish public resolve to hold on 
to the enclaves, moreover, is erod- 
ing. according to polls. Santiago 
Carillo, the Communist leader, ar- 
gues that the enclaves are Moroc- 
can. And the government, trying to 
improve relations with Morocco, is 
negotiating better defense lies and 
even a possible tunnel under the 
strait 

Ceuta's economy is also threat- 
ened. The Gibraltar opening prom- 
ises to siphon off many visitors — 
2.3 million came to Ceuta last year 
— who can more easily reach the 
duty-free British shops. 

“The government is not doing 
anything," charged Jos6 Maria 
Campos, president or the Chamber 
of Commerce, which has demand- 
ed that the government speed up a 
planned airport and cut the ferry 
fare from tire Spanish mainland. 

At an angry meeting of the city 
council. 14 of the 25 councilors 
demanded that the whole council 
gp to Madrid within a week (o 
speak with Mr. Gonzalez. The So- 
cialist mayor, Francisco Frair. was 
able to sidestep the motion only by 
postponing discussion of it on a 
technicality. 

Manuel Pelaez, Madrid's dele- 
gate here, said that many of Ceuta's 
inhabitants were guilty of “false 
patriotism." Civil servants, bank 
employees and military men are 
paid up to double to work here, 
while businessmen often keep their 
investments and even second 
houses on the mainland. 

But the pressures have spawned 
a Ceuta Nationalist Party, led by 
Francisco A lean! era. Promising to 
go to the United Nations to argue 
Ceuta's cause, he said, “There are a 
few of us, and we fight for our 
country." 


French Survey 
Shows Socialists 
Losing to Right 


Reuters 

PARIS — The conservative 
opposition would defeat the 


governing Socialist Party if par- 
liamentary elections were odd 


now in France, according to an 
opinion poll published Tues- 


poll, conducted by the 
Sofres organization and pub- 
lished in Le Figaro, a conserva- 
tive daily, said that 58 percent 
of voters would support the op- 
position, 40 percent would vote 
for the left and 2 percent for the 
ecologists. 

The poll, little changed from 
a survey three months ago, 
shows the neo-Gau llist Rally 
for the Republic party remain- 
ing France's strongest party 
with 26 percent of the vote. The 
center-right Union for French 
Democracy would get 22 per- 
cent and the extreme-right Na- 
tional Front 9 percent. 

On the left, 24 percent would 
vote for the Socialists, 13 per- 
cent for the Communists and 3 
percent for other groups. 

Elections for the National 
Assembly are due in 13 months. 
In local elections scheduled 
next month, the opposition is 
expected to retain control of a 
majority of France's depart- 
ments. 


EC Ministers WORLD BRIEFS 


Fail to Agree 
On Funding 
1985 Deficit 


Reuter. 


BRUSSELS — European Com- 
munity foreign ministers were un- 
able to agree Tuesday how to fond 
a budget defidt this year or bow to 
break the deadlock in the negotia- 
tions for Spain's entry into the EC 
diplomats said. 

Spain was expected to react an- 
grily to the EC stalemate. which is 
likely to affect parallel talks with 
PortugaL 

Officials said the foreign minis- 
ters decided to meet again Feb. 28 
to try to end the divisions before 
the heads of government meet 
March 2S. 

West Germany, which wants to 
keep up pressure for the early ad- 
mission of Spain and Portugal, 
blocked a plan by its nine partners 
to cover this year's large budget 
deficit. West German officials said 


they opposed the budget plan be- 
i the i 


cause it removed a link to the entry 
of Spain and Portugal and would 
end the need for quick completion 
of the talks on the entrv of tire two 


By R. W. Apple Jr. 

Sew York Time: Service 

LONDON — Prime Minister 
Margaret Thatcher refused to yield 
on Tuesday in a meeting with 
union leaders on the 49-week-old 
coal miners' dispute. It was the first 
time in her six years in office that 
she had met with leaders of the 
British union movement at 10 
Downing Street to discuss any 
strike. 

Just a few hours before flying to 
Washington to see President Ron- 
ald Reagan. Mrs. Thatcher told of- 
ficials of Lhe Trades Union Con- 
gress that no negotiations to end 
tiie miners' walkout were possible 
until the National Union of 
Mineworkerc had agreed to deal 
“clearly and unambiguously with 
the central point of the dispute." 


That means, in the prime minis- 
ter’s view, that the union must ac- 


cept. before negotiations begin, the 
right of the state-owned National 
Coal Board to dose mines that it 
considers uneconomic. 

Arthur Scargill. the miners' mili- 


tions, which broke down in Octo- 
ber. must resume on an 
unconditional basis. He was not at 
the meeting Tuesday, which he had 
more or less written off before it 
took place. 

The new general secretary of the 
Trades Union Congress, Norman 
Willis, had sought the meeting with 
Mrs. Thatcher because he thought 
that only a small gap separated the 
two rides and that the prime minis- 
ter could help bridge it. 

Although Mrs. Thatcher yielded 
a bit by agreeing to her first official 
formal involvement in the dispute, 
she was said by aides to have con- 
cluded after the hourlong meeting 
that major issues remained to be 
resolved- The coal board, for its 
part, said that there was still “a 
yawning gap" between the parties. 

While it is widely believed in 
Britain that the miners already 
have lost the strike. Mr. Scargill has 
vowed repeatedly to fight on. Some 
of Mrs. Thatcher's advisers, con- 
vinced that she has won a major 
political victory, now consider it 
urgent to find a face-saving formu- 
la to bring the dispute officially to 
an end to avoid lasting bitterness. 

But tire prime minister has re- 
mained determined that Mr. Scar- 
gill first concede the board's “right 
io manage." 


Officials 
Resign Posts 
In Argentina 


(Continued from Page 1) 
“going to get us out of this laby- 
rinth.” 

Although Argentina has pledged 
to reduce record inflation, and the 
government budget is based on an 
assumed inflation rate of 222 per- 
cent for 1985, inflation rates have 
risen steadily since Mr. Alfonsin 
took office. ' 

The inflation rate for J983, 
which Mr. Alfonsin blames on the 
military government he followed, 
was 434 percent. In the past 12 
months, though, the rate has risen 
to 776 percent — despite govern- 
ment pledges to control its own 
large deficit and to make chronical- 
ly uneconomical government enter- 
prises, such as the state ofl compa- 
nies and tire telephone company, 
operate in the black. 

The Alfonsin government prom- 
ised the IMF that it would reduce 
inflation to a yearly rate of 300 
percent by September. By govern- 
ment reckoning, however, inflation 
for January was 25 percent, and 
projections for February are for at 
least 20 percent more on top of that 
— far above the guidelines that 
Argentina said it would meet 

An IMF team that has been in 
Buenos Aires for the past two 
weeks was reported in the local 
media to be distressed by the rising 
inflation and by what it considers 
alarming flight of capital from the 
country. One Argentine news ser- 
vice reported that the fund officials 
had expressed their concerns to Mr. 
Grinspun and Mr. Garda Vazquez 
in a meeting Monday morning. 

Despite the summer hiR there 
has been a steady fall in the value 
of the Argentine peso against the 
dollar in recent weeks, both in the 
official and black markets. A 
black-market dollar dial bought 
170 pesos at the end of 1984 was 
quoted at about 324 pesos Monday 
before the resignations were an- 
nounced. 

After negotiations that lasted for 
aQ of 1984, Argentina reached 
agreonent with the IMF in late 
December for an economic pro- 
gram that included curbs on im- 
ports and reduced government 
spending to confront inflation. 

The IMF approved a standby 
credit of S1.4 billion that enabled 
Argentina to pay overdue interest 
payments on its debt and spared' 
foreign banks from having to write 
off the loans against their earnings. 
Subsequently, Argentina's 320 
creditor bards agreed to provide 
S4J2 billion in fresh credit to meet 
future interest payments. 


Poland Decides Not to Arrest Wal«ia 


WARSAW (API — Poland's government spokesman* 

Solidary leaders for their “unusually wicked plan tt i 
srcSaid Tuesday that Communist authorities wouM ^^neosaty 
measures to prevent unrest, but indicated that Lech Walesa wmikhwt 

fal ThemS^azy Urban, describing the Sofa jafly la deras n 
"imseritms pawn; pmfiil in his tragedy," saidJteaulhonBBahinjjss 
to imprison Mr. Walesa ai praenL “The stale anthopaaiOT,. 
the feeling todav that it would be ridiculous for them to anwtWata%* 
pmrnnoi acting on his own, dancing to the tune of vsnaaStfn fes* 

Ignoring a Gdansk prosecutor’s wanting that fe&csty 
to five vears in prison for continuing his union actowiws, ragged 
Solidarity supporters to launch a counteroffensve agjjnsti Btegtiwnb 
mem fay taking part in a 15 -mmute general strike Fdx Z8 ^ protest 

increases in food prices. . * - 


Kor ean Prime Minister Is Sworn Ini 


SEOUL (Reuters) — Prime Minister Lho Shin Yong was stwsuria 
Tuesday with a pledge to bring fuller democracy to South Korea; J;= ■ 
Mr. Lho. 54, who was foreign minister from 1980 to 1982 and afeeoer 
intelligence chief, said the results of national ekxdions tBa'tnBesday 
reflected the will of the people for democratic freedoms: HewHfe 
understood that the 40 million South Koreans wanted pt^tical stahffity 
as well as the development of democracy. He added, “Wewifltanyoiita 
more honest, faithful government respecting the wBItrf Ihe^sopfc"-— 
President Chun Doo Hwan's Democratic Justice Baity retained a 
majority, although the New Democratic Party, badc cdby KimDaefang. 
a dissident, scored unexpected gains to become the stro ngest p ppoahka 
group in parliament, with 67 seats. Mr. Kim, 59, who ret ur ned F&, 8 
from two years of exDe in the United States, said he had no particular 
complaints about Mr. Chun’s cabinet reshuffle on Monday.' 


muons. 

Spanish sources said that For- 
eign Minister Fernando Morin 
would complain bitterly to the min- 
isters about the ECs failure to 
agree on a common negotiating po- 
sition for its talks with Madrid. 

They said the ECs failure would 
seriously jeopardize the Jan. 1 tar- 
get dare for Spanish miry. They 
warned the bloc to expect a “time 
bomb" from Mr. Moran. 

The sources were apparently re- 
ferring to suggestions here that Mr. 
Moran might rell the EC that Ma- 
drid would rather stay out than 
accept unfavorable terms for entry. 

Diplomats and officials said the 
stalemate on Spain could adversely 
affect the group's financial prob- 
lems. 

Officials said the ECs budget 
commissioner. Henning Chris to- 
phersen. urged the ministers to end 
quickly the finan cial uncertainties 
resulting from the lack of a 1985 
budget. 

The group has been run on emer- 
gency financing since Jan. 1 be- 
cause the European Parliament re- 
jected a draft budget presented by 
member governments. Mr. Christo- 
phersen now estimates the budget 
deficit at more than 3 billion Euro- 
pean Currency Units (about S2 bil- 
lion). 


2 Israeli Officers Killed in Lebanon 


TEL AVIV (Combined Dispatches) —A senior Israeli afficex,thedncf 
adviser to the Israeli-supported militia known as the Sooth Lehannq 
.Army, was killed Monday in a guerrilla attack in southern Lebanon, a 
military spokesman said Tuesday. 

Colonel Avraham Hido, 41, died in a dash with gtmmen who fired a 
rocket-propelled grenade and automatic weapons at troops north of 
Nabatiyeh, the spokesman said. In a separate attack, an foaefi major, 
Shaul Zehavi 29, was killed by a roadside bomb that exploded neardie 
Shiite village of Bazouriyeh, the spo kesm a n said. 

In response to the attacks, Israeli troops imposed a curfew on s e v e ral 
Shiite villages in the area. In Sidon, meanwhile, a Le b anese man, Nazih 
el-Zein, accused of collaborating with the Israelis, was killed by gunmen 
as be drove to work, according to reporters on the scene. 

Several carloads of Mr. Zero's relatives then raced through SAM's 
main squares, firing sub machin e guns into the ah; the reporters sakk 
Shopkeepers lowered their shutters and the streets were quickly deserted, 
according to reports telephoned from the scene. (Reuters, At) 


Reagan Cautions Freed Journalist 

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Ronald Reagan told Jeremy Levin, 
a television journalist, on Tuesday that “I think I can be sure ofymirgbod 
judgment” not to disclose any details about his kidnapping in Lebanon 
that might endanger the lives of four other Americans stffl presumed to be 
held by the same terrorists. 

“1 can't tell you how gratified Nancy and I were to learn of your 
escape." Mr. Reagan said in an on-air telephone conversation over the 
Cable News Network with Mr. Levin, who was held hostage for li 
months. “Your abduction and that of our other Americans has weighed 
heavily on us for nearly a year. And not ... a day has gone by that you 
weren’t in our prayers." 

Mr. Reagan made dear to Mr. Levin that be hoped he would cooperate 
fully with UJS. officials about his captivity and purported escape last 
week, while resisting pressures to tel! the fall story publicly. Mr. Reag a n 
noted that he had called President Hafez al-Assad of Syria to thank him 
for Syria's role in securing Mr. Levin's freedom. 


Rocket Damages Saudi Ship in Gulf 


MANAMA, Bahrain (AP) — Jet fighters raided a Saudi Arabian- 
owned ship in the Gulf on Tuesday, about 70 miles (110 kilometers) 
northeast of Qatar, marine salvage executives said. It was the third attack 
on a ship in the southern Gulf in less than 24 hours. 

The executives said the 22,000-ton AI-Bakri-10 was hit by a rocket and 
sustained slight damage- There was no claim of responsibility for the 
attack, but the salvage sources, who spoke on condition they not be 
identified, said they bdieved Iran was responsible. 

The Al-Bakri- (0 was on its way to the Saudi oil terminal of RasTarinca 
at the time of the attack, the salvage sources said. No other details of the 
attack were available immediately. Two ships were damaged Monday in 
rockeL attacks north of Abu Dhabi, dose to the site of Tuesday's attack. 
Shipping sources said they bdieved Iran was responsible because the 
attacks were carried out in the southern, neutral paut of the Gulf. 


Basques Suspected in Madrid Killing 

MADRID (Reuters) — Ricardo Tejero, a director of Banco Central, 
Spam's leading bank, was shot to death on Tuesday in the garage of las 
Madrid home by suspected Basque guerrillas posing as police officers, 
police said. 

Mr. Tejero, 58, regarded as the bank's second-ranking executive, was 
shot twice in the head by four men. The men had produced security 
credentials of a type seized by French police in recent raids on hideouts of 
the Basque separatist guerrilla group ETA (Basque Homeland and 
Freedom). 

Nine-millimeter cartridges found at the scene were also of the type 
used by ETA. The rebel group has carried out hundreds of bomb attacks 
against Spanish banks during its 17-year fight for an independent Basque 
state. 


Ireland to Freeze ERA Funds in Bank 


DUBLIN (Reuters) — The Irish government on Tuesday introduced 
emergency legislation to freeze millions of pounds in Irish Republican 
Army funds discovered in an Irish bank. ' . 

Justice Minister Michael Noonan said the government had acted 
immediately upon receipt of information that the money was about to be 
transferred out of the country. He would not specify how much was 
involved but said it was a seven-figure sum “and I would not want 
anybody to infer from that that I mean the smallest possible seven-figure 


sum. 


The proposed law would authorize die justice minis ter to order a bank 
to transfer to the High Court any money suspected of belonging to illegal 
groups. If the money was claimed by someone who could prove be had 
gained it legally, it would be returned to him with interest IF it was 
unclaimed, it would be handed to the Treasury. Any bank failingor 
refusing to comply with lhe law would be liable to a fine of up to 100,000 
Irish pounds ($94,000). and bank officials could face up to. two years m 
prison. 


Supreme Court to Rule in Prayer Case 


W ASHINGTON (AF) — The Supreme Court, urged on by tbe Reagan 
administration, on Tuesday agreed to decide whether public Mgh schools 
may allow students to meet during school hours for prayer and rehgions 
worship. 

Tbe court will review a ruling that banned such meetings a Williams- 
port, Pennsylvania, high school even though tbe school afiows stndotis to 
conduct virtually all types of nonrehgious meeting?; during the same 
periods. 

Administration lawyers attacked a U.S. appeals court ban on the 
meetings, saying it casts constitutional doubt on a new federal law 
requiring public schools to provide “equal access" for student religious 
groups. The dispute, another outgrowth of the Supreme Court's 1962 
decision outlawing organized prayer sessions in public schools, arose 
when a group of students at Williamsport Area High School sought 
permission to form a religious group. 


Hanoi to Bnild Nodear Plant 

Agence France- Presse 
HANOI — Vie tnam pjans to 


build its first nuclear power plant, 
the official news agency reported 
Tuesday. It said that a nuclear 
technology center had been set up 
in Ho Chi Minh City to prepare for 
the construction of the plant 


For the Record 

Vice-President George Bush will visit Sudan, Niger and MaE 
March 3 to 10 to focus attention cm the need for aid and research mto 
farm production, the White House announced Tuesday. Mr. Bush win 
end his visit in Geneva with an address to the United Nations conferc 0 ** 
of members that- have pledged famine aid. 

Mohammad AH, the former world heavyw eig ht boxing champion, n# 
Tuesday in Beirut with Sheikh Mo hamm ed Hussein Fadlaflah* tbs 
reported leader of tin; Lebanese fundamentalist group Hezballab; on® 
private mission to seek the release of four persons presumed to be heMJjy 
Moslem guerrillas. (AFP) 

Sergio Toroagtu, a member of the Red Brigades urban memBagrwp 
who was condemned in absentia to life imprisonment by aMpan court m 
December 1984, was arrested Friday in a Paris apartment, polices^! 
Tuesday. (UPJ) 

Zimbabwe's first general election smee inde pe ndence, which wasduefc 

March, has been postponed until midyear hecaiw of difficulties in □£ 
registering of voters and drawing up of constituency boundaries, -) 05 ^ 
Minister Eddison Zvobgo said in Harare on Tuesday. .(Reidtrs) 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1985 


Page 3 


- . ' - i V H 


After 40 Years, Survivors Meet 
On Iwo Jima for a Memorial 


The Aaoauied Press rades died in the fi 

IWO JIMA, Japan — On a wind- along with nearly 
swept hill above the black, volcanic Japanese defenders, 
ash beaches where thousands of About 280 Amcr 


rades died in the five-week batik; dies. He was awarded the Medal of 
along with nearly all the 21,000 Honor for his action. 


swept hill above the black, volcanic Japanese defenders. Jack Manning of Dayton. Texas, 

ash beaches where thousands of About 280 Americans came — glided gracefully with his wife. 
U.S. Marines landed 40 years ago. former marines, wives and a few Connie, to “Moonlight Serenade" 
American and Japanese survivors children. There were 1 10 Japanese, at a reception that ended the day. 
dedicated a memorial Tuesday to including 50 of the IJMO or so who “The Iasi time 1 was here I was 
those wbo fought over this speck of survived the carnage that began dancing because there were bullets 
volcanic rock. and the nearly Feb. 19. 1945, when the first wave at my feet," he said. 

30,000 who died. of Americans stormed ashore. The American commanders had 

It was at least the third lime The memories, distant now but w^ied Iwo Jima as a base for 
survivors from both sides had met not dim, stirred deeply in many 
on the former Pacific battlefield. It t nf 


dancing because there were bullets 
at my feet." he said. 

The American commanders had 
wanted Iwo Jima as a base for 
fighters escorting B-29s bombing 
Japan, and as a haven for the 


on me lormcr r acute oatuciiclcL It Jacklyn l of Bowie. Marv- ja P an - ana as a naven ror me 
may well be the last for they are land, borrowed a flashlight and led wo “ ded Superfortresses, 
elderly now — the youngest in their the wav throueh a lunnd network Thc a***" 1 * was preceded by 

la. e 50s, and some pastSO. nsLTlmSfs mr hS nm tS b ° n - 


For most of the Americans, it from where he — a 17-year-old ^f^ nenl ’. 
as the first return to the island private then — threw himself on wbo .f*yP t them tty beach 


where 6.800 of their 30.000 com- 


private then — threw himself on 
two grenades to protect his bud- 


Nicaragua Rebels Curtail 
Fighting , Leader Says 


By Dan Williams 

Las Angefes Times Service 

ON THE HONDURAS-N1CA- 


Mr. Bermudez said that contin- 
ued funding is vital and that if 
Congress does not renew (he aid. it 


RAGUA BORDER — The cutoff r wou V have a devasuti ng psycho- 
of U.S. funds has forced rebels in andjVould raise the 

Nicaragua to reduce their level of m „ e of 1116 
combat by more than half since fast Reporters visited Mr. Bermudez 
summer, the military leader of the at his headquarters base last week- 
largesi ami-Sandinist guerrilla end-Theviaiwaspermiticdonthe 
group savs. condition that neither the location 

e ■ ' „ . , . of the camp nor the reporters’ 

Ennque Bermudez, commander of ^ng there be dis- 

of the Nicaraguan Democratic 

Fora, grated tha t only 25 per- Mr/Bermudez. 52, was a colonel 
cent to 30 percen t of his forces are ^ ^ Natioaa j Guard of the Nica- 
engaged m combat operations at raguan dictator Anastasio Somoza. 
any one time. The rest avoid con- wbo was overthrown by the San- 
taci, he said. dinists in 1979. A reclusive man, he 

Last spring, before the U.S. Con- has rarely welcomed journalists to 
gress declined to continue to fi- his base, 
nance the rebels, up to SO percent However, with a congressional 
of the guerrillas were in action, Mr. vote looming in Washington, the 
Bermudez said in an interview, rebels’ leadership aonarentlv has 


met little resistance. Then the bar- 
rage was lifted, and suddenly a 
seemingly endless hell of fire 
poured down on the beachhead 
from the Japanese defenders. 

At the dedication ceremony 
Tuesday, the former enemies em- 
braced, sometimes tearfully, and 
traded souvenirs. 

Retired Colonel Joseph McCar- 
thy. 72. of Chicago, was a company 
commander at Two. He won the 
Medal of Honor for knocking out 
several pillboxes and killing 70 Jap- 
anese. 

He was given a lanyard with a 
Japanese naval insignia, which he 
wore around his neck the rest of the 
day. Tm an Irishman, I’m senti- 
mental.'' Mr. McCarthy said. “I 
came because I felt I owed it to ray 
men. It’s a semimenial journey for 
them." 

Many old marines shook hands 



Spellbound in California's Sun 

When Reagan T ends to Chores, Entourage Finds the P ool 


By Bernard Weinraub 
Afeu- Yerl Times Service 

SANTA BARBARA, California — The tempera- 
tine climbs to 90 degrees Fahrenheit, the air is scented 
with jasmine and wikiflowers, and the terrazzo walks 
are filled with teen-agers and famili es walking to the 
beach. 

Arriving at the nearby Point Mugu Naval Air Sta- 
tion last Wednesday afternoon. President Ronald 


lane, jogged late in the afternoon and was seen carry- 
ing a duster of flowers back to the hoieL 
If there is a faint edge of irritation and envy among 
the visitors from the East toward Southern Califor- 
nians. it is voiced with gentle humor. Santa Barbarans 
of all ages seem in amazing physical shape. One New 
York-born reporter who bad lunch at the posh Coral 
Casin o Caba na Club, near the Biltmore, confided that 
he had never seen so many people in one room who 


lion last Wednesday afternoon. President Ronald he had never seen so many parole in one room who 
Reagan grinned as sunlight wanned his “I were so tall and so blond. “What do they do with 

can’t think of a better place to go." he said. people here under 5 feel 9?“ he asked. 

Then the president handed a large bean-shaped box Mr - f lea ? an himself seems somewhat : raunune *o the 

of Valentine candy to his wife, Nancy, boarded a rdaxcd S W* bae. ^ 20 interview pubhshed Sunday 
helicopter with her and flew to their five-room adobe ^y Tbe Santa Barbara News-Press, he discussed at 


PREPARATIONS — Members of the next mission of 
the U.S. space shuttle, set for March 3, finishing up 
rehearsals at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. 
From left: Senator Jake Garn, Dr. Margaret Rhea 
Seddon and Dr. Patrick Baudry, a French scientist 


ranch home atop a narrow, twisting mountain road 26 
miles (42 kilometers) northwest of here. 

On the face of it, even Mr. Reagan's foes would 
probably agree with his assessment of this town, which 
is 90 miles up the California coast from Los Angeles 
and fight years away from the grinding problems that 
confront White House officials in Washington. 

Until Sunday morning, when Mr. Reagan left his 
ranch to return to Washington, the problems of state 
seemed temporarily suspended. 

“It’s another beautiful day at the ranch.” sai d Larry 
Speakes. the White House spokesman, tieless and in 
blue jeans, to a group or re p or t ers the other morning. 
“The president and Mis. Reagan had their breakfast 
and are ready to go horseback riding. This afternoon 
the president will do the usual, tend to ranch chores 
through the afternoon.” 

Within an hour roost of the reporters had fled to the 
beach or to hotel swimming pools. 

The relaxed mood was evident among the White 
House staff. With a newspaper tucked under his aim. 
Donald T. Regan, the chief of staff, walked through 
the garden of the stately Biltmore Hold, eyeing the 
pooL The national security adviser. Robert C. McFar- 


rdaxed style here. In an interview pubhsbed Sunday 
by The Santa Barbara News-Press, he discussed at 
length the pleasures of cutting firewood on bis seclud- 
ed ranch, the mountain lions and snakes and bears 
that periodically appear and the privacy that nurtures 
him. 

“That particular place casts a spell on you,” be said; 
“When you get in mere it’s — the world is gone." 

Mr. Reagan recalled that he once had a problem 
with snakes on die ranch and he and some helpers 
collected more than 120 in grocery bags. 

“I didn’t want lo slaughter them." be said. “It would 
have been bloody, awful bloody." Instead, they 
dumped the snakes in a pond beyond the border of his 
property, apparently in pan of Los Padres National 
Forest. 

“We kept count — over 120 odd snakes we picked 
up and dumped," Mr. Reagan said. “But the last half 
sack full 1 had no time — we were leaving the ranch 
that day. So 1 just put it in the car and we started down 
the hiQ, Nancy and myself and the two agents in the 
front. You cross a stream about three times on the 
road down, so at the first crossing 1 said pull up. We 
stopped. I got my sack and got out and dumped the 
snakes, f came back and three people were just staring 
at me. Those were in the car all the lime?" 


Mr. Bermudez. 52, was a colonel with Taro Kuribayashi. an archi- 


Schroeder Peeks In on Third Recipient of Artificial Heart 


L-iUlcJ Press Imcrnulionul 


He added that it was the first 


LOUISVILLE, Kentucky — time that Mr. Schroeder had seen 


in the National Guard of the Nica- tect whose father. Lieutenant Gen- United Press inunnmmal He added that it was the first 

raguan dictator Anastasio Somoza, eral Tadaichi Kuribayashi, com- LOUISVILLE, Kentucky — time that Mr. Schroeder had seen 
who was overthrown by the San- manded the Japanese forces and William J. Schroeder took a wheel- the power unit from a distance of 

dinists in 1979. A reclusive nun, he died on Iwo Jima. chair ride to the hospital room d more than eight feet (2.4 meters) — 

has rarely welcomed journalists to Mr. Kuribayashi, 60, said he held Murray P. Haydon Monday night the length of the tubes, 
his base. “no bitterness, no recrimination at and did a “double take" when he According to Dr. Lans ing. Mar- 

However, with a congressional alL" for what happened. “All the saw the machinery keeping his fel- garet Schroeder, who was watching 

vote looming in Washington, the people who came here did it for low mechanical heart patient alive, her husband, said “Bill, that's an- 

aiViaIc 11 IcMwIorcKm •tAAoranflll hoc fk/Mr .Mimlnati " Ua mi J _ 1_ *i_l ..!J 'T.. .. L - -- 1 C .L. — ** 


manded the Japanese forces and William J. Schroeder took a wheel- the power unit from a distance of 
died on Iwo Jima. chair ride to the hospital room of more than eight feet (2.4 meters) — 


Bermudez said m an interview, rebels* leadership apparently has 
U.S. funding to ail the rebel groups decided to open up (he military 
cam e to S24 million in 1984. operation to gain publicity. “We 


came to S24 million in 1984. 

The Nicaraguan Democratic 
Force is the most important ele- 
ment in an alliance of Nicaraguan 
Indian groups and smaller guerrilla 
organizations that are battling Nic- 


have been losing the propaganda 
war," Mr. Bermudez said. 

Despite the aid cutoff, he con- 
tended that his forces remain effec- 
tive and have expanded substan- 


their countries," he said. a hospital spokesman said Tues- other member of the dub." 

The ceremony included Marine dav. Mr. Haydon was asleep at the 

Corps and Japanese naval bands. Dr. Allan M. Lansing, chid time. Dr. Lansing said that Mr. 
Buddhist and Christian prayers. medical spokesman for Humana Schroeder would not be allowed 
Among the speeches was a mes- Hospital Audubon, where both too close to Mr. Haydon until the 
sage from President Ronald Rea- men received their implants, said cause of his persistent fever was 
gan. He praised the “spirit, forti- that Mr. Schroeder appeared to be determined, 
tude and braveiy" that abounded more alert and responsive than pre- n r j, ■ 


aragua’s leftist Sandinist govern- dally during the last year. From on all sides, and said the outcome viousdays. 


meat. 

“Some forces are paralyzed,” he 
said. “We have had moments of 
crisis, not all places at once, but 
problems nonetheless." the moment, is adequately armed 

President Ronald Reagan is with rifles but needs ammunition, 
campaigning lo renew funding for The main effect of the shortage 
the rebels. Congress ended financ- of funds has been to force a change 
ing of the three-year-old insmgen- in rebel tactics, Mr. Bermudez said, 
cy last year after a controversy over The insurgents no longer try to al- 
the mining of Nicaraguan harbors, tack the Sandinist army head-on. 


8J00 troops at the end of 1983. the 
Nicaraguan Democratic Force has 


moments of grown to 14,000. he estimated. odds, to the high level of 


iuuc ana o.avcry uw. auuunucu more aien ana responsive man pre- Dr Lading Tuesday that, 
on all sides, and said the outcome vious days. like w r Havdrm “Mr Srhmeder 

“tad a direct impact in bringing Mr. Schroeder. 53. has not been “J J^j a Portable niSTlf 
two great manume nations, then at wdl enough _ to leave the hospital anything, he was more alert." 


He said that his entire force, for cooperation we enjoy 


ot peace 
today.” 


Atop 550-foot (165-meter) 
Mount Suribachi. Ihe marines 
posed for one another's cameras 


since he received his artificial heart 
on Nov. 25. and he has suffered 


Dr. Lansing caused a stir on 


nut. to. 1 , anu in. mu auiibiMi • j - , . r , 

'r - v — - 3 «**» M S 


posed for one another's cameras Mr. Haydon. who received a me- ^**5 (h^rened by the fever and 
before the permanent memorial chanical heart on Sunday, was the m ‘ uepresseo spmts. 
marking the spot where 3rd Divi- world's third artificial heart recipi- At a later briefing, he outlined a 
son marines raised the American enL The first. Dr. Baraev B. Clark. **f positive indications, in- 


The rebels’ mining operation was 
supported by tbe Central Intelli- 
gence Agency. 


“The war is prolonging" he said. 
“We have to be content with wear- 
ing down the enemy." 


Westmoreland and CBS 
Continue Fight in Media 


flagon the fifth day of the battle. A 
photograph of a flag-raising was 
one of the most memorable pic- 
tures of the war. 




lived 112 days after receiving his eluding Mr. Schroeder s recogni- 
heart in December 1981 uon of two mends he had not seen 

According to Dr. Lansing when in years, an improved appetite, two 
Mr. Schroeder looked in on Mr. ventures outside his hospital room 


Haydon. “he did a double take.” 
He said that' Mr. Schroeder was 


on Monday and a lower fever. 

He said that if Mr. Schroeder 



(Continued from Page 1) 

of a verdict. General Westmore- 
land remained dearly unbowed 
Monday after four and a half 
months in a Manhattan courtroom. 

Because neither side bad 
emerged as a dear winner, both 
launched offensives where tbe bat- 
tle had begun — in the news media. 
General Westmoreland was getting 
in his first salvo in an opening 
round of interviews. 

Of CBS network officials who 
say that they might rebroadcast 
“The Uncounted Enemy; A Viet- 
nam Deception," the program that 
prompted his lawsuit, he said: 
“Tormentors.’’ 

Of CBS witnesses, many of them 
army or Central Intelligence Agen- 
cy officers: “They sat there regurgi- 
tating rumors and suppositions and 
myths and barracks gossip.” 

Of his former intelligence chief 


m Vietnam for almost two years. ^ fade away - 

General Joseph A. McChrisuan, 

now retired, wbo testified for CBS: ■ Judge Disnu 


wbo defended their hamlets with 
punji stakes and handmade bombs. 

The general said he thought that 
if they had been added to the ene- 
my listings, it would have given 
U.S. forces in Vietnam a “license to 
kill” creating the possibility of 
massacres in Southeast Asia. 

“At first you get angry,” General 
Westmoreland said of the almost 
50 days that be sat in court. “You 
sit there and bear these outrageous 
things that make you furious. And 
then, you just get numb. I devd- 

S ! a callousness so that after a 
e it just went in one ear and out 
the other. It wasn't like real life." 

General Westmoreland said he 
would spend the next few days 
“trying to get this media exposure 
behind me,” giving nonstop televi- 
sion interviews, firing verbal vol- 
leys at CBS and its supporters. 
“Then, like good generals, TB 



surprised to see the shopping-can continued lo recover, he might he 
size unit powering Mr. Hayden’s able to take short trips outside the 
mechanical heart through two air- hospital in a specially equipped 
driven lubes. van. 


The AnooaMd Pies 

Juanita Haydon comforting her husband, Murray P. Haydon. He was reported to be in 
critical but stable condition after receiving the world’s third artificial heart! 


U.S. Cruise Missile Makes Successful Free-Flight Test 

CanpiM tv Our Stuff Fnmi Duputthn is that it flew down the corridor The United States has been al- gic Defense Initiative, popularly 


Confuted tv Our SiufJ Frum DtspMihn is that it flew do< 
GRAND FORKS AIR FORCE properly." he said. 
BASE. North Dakota — An un- The test began 


PiageT 


operly." he said. lowed u> test the missile in Canada 

The lest began at 12:06 A.M. as part of an agreement signed by 
tesdav. when a B-52 bomber took the two countries in 1983. 


armed U.S. cruise missile floated to Tuesday, when a B-52 bomber took the two countries in 1 983. 
a parachute landing on an ice-cov- off Tram Grand Forks Air Force U.S. officials have said thatCan- 
ered lake on Tuesday, marking a Base and launched one of two un- ada was chosen for the tests be- 
successfu! conclusion to the new armed missiles at 8:32 A.M. over cause its terrain is similar to that of 
weapon’s first Free-flighl lest in the Beaufort Sea near Alaska, ac- t fo. Soviet Union. 

Canada. cording to Major MacNamee. The In 0llflUM nn Mrtndav lh< , c,,. 


, , - - ... n . u Dl , . In Ottawa on Monday, the Su- . — r — ~ , - 

Anu-nudear protesters plans to missile lanaeo at I-.54 r.M„ ne creme Court dismissed an applica- zme about accelerated tests of aim- 
pui balloons and a net in ihe path said. J| on b ^ operation Dismantle “tg and tracking devices for defen- 

o f tbe missile did nol hinder the Before the test began, protesters group for an injunction to weapons, sucb as lasers, 
test- from the Greenpeace organization, halt the test, saying the group did He could not say whether the test 

Hie 18-foot (5.5-meter) missile w «o lost a court bid to stop the test, not prove ^ (j, e tests threatened targets would be simulated or reaL 
flew free for four and a half hours said tiiey would re ease balloons in personal safety or security of 


known as the “star wars” program. 

The program is aimed at devel- 
oping space-based weapons to in- 
tercept and shoot down attacking 
nuclear missiles. 

Mr. Burch confirmed an article 
published Tuesday in Aviation 
Week and Space Technology raaga- 


Mike Wallace 


flew free for four and a half hours ^ tney wouta release nanoons in ^, c personal safety or security of Aviation Wed: quoted General 

against CBS, The Associated Press under its own jet-engine power for Je missile s path in an attempt to Canadians. (AP. UPI) James A. Abrahamson of the air 

reported from New York. 1.500 miles (2.400 kilometers) and disrupt the test. force, chief of tbe space defense 

The U.S. District Conn judge parachuted onto a frozen lake at However. Major MacNamee ■ Space Anns Plan Accelerated program< b sorting tot shuttle 

dismissed the 12 jurors and five the Primrose Lake Evaluation was no lndicauon that In a ^or acceleration of tbe flights bemnnina in 1987 would lest 

Range near the Canadian Forces ' 1l S hl vvas affected by their el- ^ space defense research pro- aiming systems for lasers and other , 


dismissed the 12 jurors and five 
alternates, telling them that “it may 


now retired, who testified for CBS: 
“I never had any indication that he 
had a vendetta against me." 


moreland's voice, and his face grew 
red, 

“This totally perplexes me," he 
said. “It is perplexing lo me, and it 
is also disillusioning to me. You 
know, loyalty is a trait for the mili- 
tary. I was loyal to him.” 

Of Colonel Gains B. Hawkins, 
also retired, who was chief of Order 
of Battle enemy estimates in Viet- 
nam and who supported the views 
of Samuel A. Adams, a CBS con- 
sultant and Colonel Hawkins's co- 
defendant: “There was no indica- 
tion he had been disgruntled until 
Sam Adams made 10 trips, maybe, 
down to Mississippi to talk to him. 
Then he suddenly develops this 
posture. All on his own.” 

Mr. Adams has said that be and 
Colonel Hawkins talked for hours 
about the 1967 intelligence battle. 
On tbe witness stand. Colonel 
Hawkins said he ordered his offi- 
cers to pare down enemy troop esti- 
mates, an order that he considered 
“improper.” 

Like some of those who once 
suggested that the United States 
should have declared victory and 
withdrawn from Vietnam 20 years 
ago. General Westmoreland has 
withdrawn from his grading trial, 
oalKng himself the conqueror. The 
general said that tbe CBS statement 
citing his “long and faithful service 
to his country and saying that the 
network never intended to portray 
him as “unpatriotic or disloyal" 
counted as an apology by tbe net- 
work and cleared his name. 

General Westmoreland also de- 
fended his removal from the offi- 
cial enemy rosters of two categories 
of personnel that he labeled as “ci- 
vilians.” Known in military jargon 
as the “self-defense” and “secret 
self-defense" troops, these were 
children, women and the elderly 


■ Judge Dismisses Jury 
Judge Pierre N. Leval dismissed 
the jury Tuesday to formally end 
General Westmoreland’s suit 


diet you or I would have been able U.S. Strategic Air Force Com- 
ic render in this case could have mand. who was at the Cold Lake 
escaped widespread disagree- base during the test, called the 


menu" Judge Leval said. 


flight a success. “Every indication 


Mr. Burch said: “We’re now able , 
to bring in these aiming and track- j 
ing experiments about two years i 



to the wine of a B-52 throuahout , against soviet oaiusuc munis. 

Mr.Bmd^dr-W^no^ble 

test is expected before the end of rrom Washington. lo bring m these aiming and track- 

March. A Pentagon spokesman, Michael ing experiments about two years 

A cruise missile is a long-range, I. Burch, said the experiments, in- earlier than we expected Things 
jet-propelled missile that can be voJving at least two shuttle flights a are going along quite well and Gen- 
la unebed from an airplane, subma- year, represented a two-year accd- eral Abrahamson feels that portion 
rine or ship and guided to its target eration in one part of President of the research program can be ac- 
by remote control. Ronald Reagan’s proposed Straie- celeraied” 

Salvador Rebels Aiming to Hamper Harvest 

United Press international ments over the guerrilla radio from two large counterinsurgency 

SAN SALVADOR Leftist caused a halt to bus and truck traf- sweeps in which 11,000 soldiers 

guerrillas announced Tuesday a fic on major highways while drivers have been deployed 



Quartz. 

water-resistant 


guerrillas announced Tuesday a fic on major highways while drivers 
campaign to shut down El Salva- waited to see whether it was safe to 
dor’s transportation system during wa '^- 

the harvest season as part of their There was no immediate word 
war of economic sabotage. from the army on whether highway 

Radio Vence rentes, me guerril- patrols would be increased or 


Early Tuesday, rebels fire- 
bombed three trucks carrying sugar , 
cane in a raid southeast of the capi- ' 
taL military officials said The re- 1 
bels also bombed a gasoline station 


Radio Veneereraos, the guerril- patrols would be increased or beis also bombed a gasoline station 
la’s clandestine station, said the whether soldiers would be diverted owned by Texaco Co., an American 
“national shutdown of transporta- • 1 company, the officials said. 




“national shutdown of transporta- • 1 
lion" would begin Wednesday. 

Manila Paper Says 

ion and sugar. Trucks carrying ni A tv_*^ 

fann produce have been travding Tine tHOtOS U€pXCl 
day and night on the highways. T , . . 

“We call on all transport compa- /jVIPng Of V ICtUtlS 
uies and all of our countrymen to _ 

abstain from moving on the roads 77,f Aaxw,ed pre y 

across all national territory,” tbe MANILA — A Manila newspa- 
radio said. The strike, it said , was P®" published pbotogrmihs show- 
part of “our strategy of sabotage in ing Tuesday what it said were fire- 
the economic war against the dicta- men civilians looting the 


Colonel Inocenie Montano, 1 
commander of the Salvadoran 
Army Engineer Corps in Zacateco- 
luca, said that troops ambushed a 
column of 40 guerrillas who partici- 
pated in the raid, wounding three 
rebels. ! 


rpiaaeL) 

ZMonit-CaAo u. 

3, avenue de$ Beaux- Arts 

MONTE-CARLO / 


Reaching More 
Than a Third of a 
Million Readers 
in 164 Countries 
Around the World. 


VIOLENCE IN MEXICO — A woman was shot in the leg during a violent demonstra- RIO DE JANEIRO — At least hand of a woman, 

tjon Sunday over disputed returns from the Dec. 2 municipal election in Piedras Negras, 51 persons have died in incidents The Philippine News A; 

Mexico Three policemen were wounded in the shoot-out, in which scores of demon- related to Rio’s carnival festivities, ported Saturday that fou 


torship." bodies of victims of last week’s fire 

In previous campaigns, guerrillas at the Regent erf Manila luxury ho- 
destroyed the vehicles of those who reL 

ignored their warnings, but they The Ptople's Journal Tonight 
first emptied the vehicles of passen- said the pictures were taken from 
gets. In the past, such announce- color news film of last Wednes- 
— — day’s fire, which killed at least 25 

51 KiBed at Rio Carnival 

United Press international seen removing a ring from the right 

RIO DE JANEIRO — At least hand of a woman. 

51 persons have died in incidents The Philippine News Agency re- 
related to Rio’s carnival festivities, ported Saturday that four police- 
which began its second and last day men had been arrested and impris- 


Beverly Wilshire Hotel 

IN THE HEART OF LOS ANGELES 

Wilshire Boulevard at Rodeo Drive 
Beverly Hills. Calif. 90212 
(213)275-4282 Telex 69S-220 


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London (01) 9*3-3050 
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Chernenko Calls In Sick 


The medical component of intematicmal re- 
lations, specifically, of Soviet-American rela- 
tions. has been too little noted. This is a feature 
of the scene that became prominent in the first 
Reagan term and is apparently bound to be no 
less prominent in bis second. 

'* You know what we mean. In the first term, 
Soviet-American relations were horrible and 
arras control was going nowhere. There were 
various explanations, but one favored in the 
White House started from the fact that the 
leaders in the Kremlin were old and sick and 
kept dying. The president hims elf repeatedly 
lamented that be had confronted an unprece- 
dented difficulty in his approaches to the Sovi- 
et Union: He had had to deal with three Soviet 
leaders ( Brezhnev. Andropov, Chernenko) in a 
very short time. The transitions, he indicated, 
kept the Kremlin in a constant state of agita- 
tion. and it was hardly fair to blame the White 
House for the poor foreign policy results. 

All this came to mind the other day when 
we read, courtesy of Reagan administration 
sources, the latest medical bulletin on Soviet 
President Konstantin Chernenko. Suffice it to 
say that the poor fellow is apparently in dread- 
ful shape with irreversible emphysema. He 
may be meeting his maker within months, or 
sooner, or later. In any event, Mr. Reagan will 
then be meeting his fourth Soviet counterpart. 

. At first glance, the news looked grim, in 


different ways, for both of them. But what’s 
this? The administration believes, the story 
said, that Mr. Chernenko's health will not 
affect forthcoming arms control negotiations 
with the Soviets, and certainly not in the short 
run. U.S. officials, the story went on, have 
noted that relations between the two countries 
appear to have stabilized. So perhaps it will 
not matter for America one way or the other 
just how the redoubtable Mr. Chernenko fares. 

Well, we have a view of this latest use of a 
medical gambit in political analysis. The doc- 
tors of Kremlinology in the Reagan adminis- 
tration were almost certainly wrong the first 
time when they tried to attribute the deteriora- 
tion in superpower relations to the state of the 
Kremlin’s health. They could be wrong the 
second time in their evident determination to 
play down the effects of mortality in high 
Soviet places. In the first instance the adminis- 
tration, needing to explain trouble, wanted to 
show there was no Soviet partner. In the sec- 
ond, hoping to keep up momentum, it wants to 
show there is a Soviet partner. 

The plain fact is that the Americans don’t 
know and the Soviets don't know just what will 
come when Mr. Chernenko goes. Cheerful 
speculation that everything is on a steady 
course should not be allowed to interfere with 
careful attention to what actually happens. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


The General Surrenders 


- General William Westmoreland's quest for 
respect should never have come to court and 
his libel suit against CBS is wisely abandoned. 
A week before a jury judgment the general 
surrendered to the evidence that whether or 
not his superiors in Washington were in fact 
deceived, he and some of his aides in Vietnam 
in 1967 manipulated the estimates of enemy 
strength, apparently for political effect. 

. That CBS. 1 5 years later, found this already 
documented "conspiracy" worthy of a major 
expose was. professionally, an odd bit of news 
judgment. But it is one for CBS to make. 

That the program strayed from the net- 
work’s standards of fair play had been exposed 
by a TV Guide article and confirmed by CBS. 
Yet when General Westmoreland made his 
onhappiness clear, CBS offered a follow-up 
program with 15 minutes for his unedited 
comments. Hearing no apology, he declined. 

' By no stretch of law or logic, therefore, did 
the conduct of CBS or General Westmore- 
land’s hurt merit a $120-million libel action 
that cost the parties up to S10 million. 

The general has been called worse things 
than a poor judge of the enemy or a bureau- 
cratic maneuverer. Such judgments, in journal- 
ism and history, come with the territory of 
high rank in American life. They are also, 
mercifully, protected in law. which requires 
public figures claiming libel to prove not only 
the falsehood of a damaging defamation but a 
reckless disregard of knowable truth. 

• Unlike Israel’s General Ariel Sharon, who 
caught Time magazine in a costly error. Gener- 


al Westmoreland had trouble proving any 
falsehood. At the end, he stood in imminent 
danger of having a jury confirm the essential 
truth of the CBS report. For in court, as on 
the original program. General Westmoreland 
could not get past the testimony of high- 
ranking former subordinates who confirmed 
that he colored some intelligence information. 

The more interesting historical question is 
why he should have recoiled from higher esti- 
mates of enemy strength, which might have 
buttressed appeals for more troops. Most like- 
ly, he thought he was protecting President 
Johnson and the war effort from the growing 
public resistance to its cost. Perhaps he was 
also protecting his own past estimates of the 
number of American troops he needed to win. 

Merely to ask such questions shows why 
they do not belong in court No jury can decide 
which guerrillas a generation ago were proper- 
ly counted as “soldiers." No jury can prescribe 
the conduct of a field general toward his com- 
mander in chief. No jury should have to plumb 
the meaning of the Vietnam experience. 

As the general may finally have recognized, 
history is no less fickle than journalism. His 
reputation remains a totem in a wider conflict, 
both for opponents of the Vietnam War and 
for the defenders who put up the millions that 
financed his suiL His duty done, there is only 
one way for him to achieve the dignity he asks: 
keep answering the questions of those who 
may try honestly to understand a painful 
memory, but otherwise stand aside. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


British and American Libel Law 


, To understand the significance of the [Shar- 
on] verdict and why it is an occasion for 
celebration, it is necessary to know what would 
have happened in Britain, the country that 
gave the United Slates its original law of libeL 
| General Sharon would have won outright. 
The onus would not have been on [him] to 
prove that Time did him dirt. It would have 
been on Time to prove every detail of what it 
published. General Sharon need never have 
taken the oath, and the jurors would have been 
home in time for the Super BowL General 
Sharon would have been richer. 

! But public debate would have been — and 
indeed is — immeasurably poorer under this 
kind of libel law. It discourages the expression 
of honestly held convictions. It makes the 
tnoniioring of public conduct hazardous and 
postly. It protects reputations, but it protects 
them indiscriminately. The ordinary citizen 
going about his blameless life deserves to have 
bis reputation and his privacy protected, but 
British laws shield also the welders of power 
in public life whose private decisions and con- 
duct affect millions. Government power has 
Everywhere intruded more and more on pri- 
vate lives without any provision to make ac- 
countable the users of that power. 

! [The American press] remains free to pursue 
truth and to make honest error in the public 
interest Thomas Jefferson defended the Fust 
Amendment from skeptics of its utility by 


using a metaphor from bouse building. “A 
brace the more," he wrote, “will often keep up 
the building which would have fallen with that 
brace the less." He and his colleagues built 
better than they could ever have imagined. 

— Harold Evans, writing in 
U.S. News & World Report (Washington). 


Another Chance for Kasparov 


The unprecedented and indeed unprinci- 
pled finish to the world chess championship 
match in Moscow confirms one in the belief 
that pressure bad been put on the challenger at 
the beginning of the match in order to ensure 
that Anatoli Karpov should retain his world 
title. The charade by which Karpov [insisted] 
that he wanted to continue playtng the match 
was merely a plain mockery of those of the 
world chess enthusiasts who had hoped for 
some fine chess out of a contest between the 
two greatest chess players in the world. 

That Gary Kasparov should protest was 
only natural. He knew as well as Karpov that 
the champion's stamina was utterly gone. For 
the last few games lost by Karpov had been 
played by him in the style of a very weak 
player and he would probably have lost three 
more games. There is still a glimmer of hope 
for the challenger in the fact that the return 
match will be held later on this year. And then, 
if the challenger is stiD indeed in form, be 
should win the title without much difficulty. 

— The Tunes (London). 



Know Fear 


By George F. Wift J . 


L OS ANGtLth — lira-JUdQttU 
/ is a life-affirming peradn-^d 

reel ihinkere^Bne reason she£t)mh; 
of those things is that die passed 
through a furnace that few Tuscan- 

ofTiedand laugS^dtwS^ 
perhaps in Portugal, after a sfetynj 
Paraguay — there lurks an eril m^ 
who today has fresh reasons to fear 
the kind of steel and spirit he helped 
to produce in people likeber.-'.V-. 

Iren3 Neumann, as she was befBifc; 
she married Lane Kirkland, anti. fry 
sister Alena reached Auschw'& in 
October 1944. tumbling from caitfe 
cars with 2300 other Jews, Toe sisterr 
had been sent from Czechoslovak^ ' 
to a concentration camp fqr aytar 
before they arrived at ibe Ausdijwitz- 1 
depot under the eye of Josef Mengete. 

All but 200 of the 2300 were dis- 
patched to the gas chambera T&ese 


spared were thought suitable far la- 
bor. Any sign of infnimtyvevgcrwcar- 


Signs of a Fresh U.S. Approach to the Middle East 


W ASHINGTON — Something 
new and pronrisme seems to 


YY new and promising seems to 
have been added to the Reagan ad- 
ministration's approach to the Mid- 
dle East: a certain subtlety, for one 
thing. But also renewed energy, a 
sense erf 1 purpose, a readiness to ac- 
centuate the positive and, most im- 
portant, a reordering of priorities. 

The Arab-Israeli-Palestinian con- 
flict, it appears, is back where it be- 
longs on the administration’s front 
burner. And never mind the old Is- 
raeli arguments for standing pat: that 
King Hussein is a weakling, that PLO 
Chairman Yasser Arafat is a terrorist 
and that the Arabs are divided, unin- 
terested in the Palestinian plight and 
only concerned with saving their 
skins from Islamic fundamentalism. 

Once a pin. U.S. policy seems 
grounded on the far sounder proposi- 
tion that Islamic extremism and the 
Palestinian conflict are intertwined 
and thus doubly dangerous because 
they work upon each oilier. Resolv- 
ing the Palestinian question will not 
remove the fundamentalist threat, 
but cooling passions would stabilize 
the moderate elements in the Arab 
world. Unresolved, the Palestinian is- 
sue is not just a time bomb for re- 
newed Arab-Israeli hostilities, but 
dry tinder for the flames of funda- 
mentalism across the Arab world. 

If that proposition was accepted 


By Philip Geyelin 


in the first Reagan term it hardly 
sbowed in the IS months it took to 
develop the Sept. 1, 1982, definitive 
Reagan “peace initiative” or in the 
limp effort that lay behind it. But 
recent developments offer interesting 
evidence of a second-term turnabout. 

On Tuesday, for example. U.S. and 
Soviet officials sat down for two days 
in Vienna to talk about the Middle 
East — including the .Arab-Israeli is- 
sue. The Reagan administration has 
been at pains to insist that this signi- 
fies no change in its refusal to deal 
the Soviets in on the peace talks. But 
merely an “exchange of views," with 
no agreement expected, is better than 
a rebuff to that part of the new Jorda- 
nian-PLO agreement on a “frame- 
work for common action" that would 
bring the Soviets into the acL 

The "framework" conflicts in oth- 
er important respects with U.S. posi- 
tions and will certainly be put down 
as hardly worth talking about with 
the Israelis. But Washington wisely 
latched on only to the affirmatives.' 

“It seems as if some progress has 
been made," Mr. Reagan said, add- 
ing, “We’re being optimistic about 
it." Official background briefers 
called the a gr e em ent “a milestone" 
and noted that it represented the first 
Palestinian commitment “to a peace- 


ful settlement." Conspicuous by iis 
absence, officials pointed oat. was 
the standard Arab insistence on an 
independent Pales ?:n;an state with 
Jerusalem as its capital. 

This is an imporemt advance from 
the Fez Declaration by the .Arab 
League in September 1981 the only 
collective Arab response to Mr. Res- 
can 's ■‘initi 2 ti\ e." But Fez was more 


recognized by the United States.” 
Now. none of this guarantees 
enough Arab consensus, let alone 
concessions, to get negotiations go- 
ing. even assuming that Israel’s 
creaky coalition government, over- 
whelmed by economic crisis, is strong 
enough to do business. But former 
Foreign Minister Abba Eban, was 
optimistic, even before the most re- 


bor. Any sign of infirmity, even wear- 
ing glasses, could get apcraaatect- 
ed for death. Irena and Alma. wbo 
today lives in Geneva; nay have been 
spared because, although tbeywere 
nearsighted, their youthful- vanity' 
caused them not to wear glasses: : 
A “kapo” — a prisoner fraction; 
ing as a guard — asked theii biith 
dates. Having long since Install docu- 
ments, they could have said aitythhig, 
but they told the truth. What the 
kapo heard the identical dates (with 
their beads shaved they did noi stand 


out as identical twins), she told titan, 
to give different birth dates. Other- 


positive than the rejection of the Rea- 
gan initiative in its entirety by a 
unanimous vote of the Israeli cabinet 
the day after the plan was an- 
nounced. When King Hussein failed, 
after an eight-month struggle, to de- 
liver Mr. Arafat to the peace table, 
the whole process collapsed. 

That is what makes the recent 
burst of activity so striking, for it 
included not only ihe Hussein- .Arafat 
agreement but another lat ching on to 
the affirmative in a meeting between 
Mr. Reagan and the principal author 
of the Fez plan. King Fahd of Saudi 
Arabia. If they squabbled within the 
White House over the shortcomings 
they obviously find in each other's 
handiwork, it did not show in then- 
joint communique. On the contrary. 
President Reagan sent King Fahd 
home with a pat on the back of “ap- 
preciation for the Fez consensus, pos- 
itive elements of which have been 


cent developments. Writing in For- 
eign Policy magazine. Mr. Eban ar- 


gues that the dominant Labor Party 
element in Israel’s government is no 
longer “unconditionally opposed" to 
the Reagan plan. And it is more sen- 
sitive to the importance of going slow 
with West Bank settlements in the 
interests of keeping options open for 
future territorial compromise. 

Mr. Eban's great fear is of Ameri- 
can “passivity" that “would condemn 
the Middle East to a volcanic status 
quo leading to possible explosion." 

While offering no guarantee of suc- 
cess for an American role, he did 


offer a little homily that nicely cap- 
tures what would appear to be an 


increase in the Reagan administra- 
tion's involvement, as reflected in its 
performance in the last few days. “In 
the Middle East." Mr. Eban wrote, 
“we must team to be grateful for 
small merries — in which case we 
should stop ratling them small.'' 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


Blacks in South Africa Need Outside Medical Help 


wise they would be sent to Mengde; 
the sadistic pseudo-doctor ahd Sp- 
ence quack who conducted lunatic 
experiments, especially on twins, who 
mesmerized his small, warped mind. 

Recently in Jerusalem, at a meet- 
ing of twins and others who survived 
Auschwitz, a mother recalled that 
Mengde was enraged when she gave 
birth. He had not noticed she was 
pregnant. Novel forms of abortion 
interested him. so a chance had been 
missed. He forced her to cover her 
breasts with tape so that be could see 
how long the child would take to 
starve to death. He was enraged when 
she killed her own child with a mor- 
phine injection, in an act of mercy. 

The Lord said. Vengeance is mine. 
In Los Angeles the Simon Wiesenthal 
Center for Holocaust Studies- is -riv- 
ing the Lord a hand The center has 
discovered documents suggesting 
that U.S. authorities may have had 
Mengde in custody in 1947, and that 
in 1962 be may have sought admis- 
sion to Canada. It wants to know 
what the U.S. government knew and 
when, and whit is now being done 
about tracking him to Paraguay, Por- 
tugal or wherever. Good questions. 

A federal magistrate here held re- 
cently that Andnja Aitukovic, 85 and 
infirm, is mentally competent to co- 
operate with his lawyers in fighting 
extradition to Yugoslavia. He faces 
prosecution for complicity in the 
murder oF 770,000 persons while he 
was minister of the interior in the 


C AMBRIDGE, Massachusetts — Even if by 
some political and moral miracle apartheid 


some political and moral miracle apartheid 
in South Africa disappeared, the country’s 23 
million black and “colored" people would still 
face a grave struggle for survival Their medical 
and nutritional problems are serious. 

Black infant mortality is 190 per 1,000 bvr 
births —six times that for whites. Life expectan- 
cy is 15 years less than for whites; and 55 percent 
of black deaths occur between the ages of 1 and 
4. compared to 7 percent among whites. 

Malnutrition, even slow starvation, is found in 
the so-called homelands — barren land where 
millions have been compelled to resettle. Chronic 
gastroenteritis, malaria, typhoid fever and chol- 
era are widespread. Tuberculosis, virtually eradi- 
cated among whites, occurs at the race of 285 
cases per 100.000 blades. 


By Robert Coles 


There are only 300 black doctors — one per 
90,000 people. (The World Health Organization 


considers a rano ot one per lOJJOO too tow.) The 
ratio for whites in South Africa is l to 3 90. The 
disparity in hospital facilities is comparable: 
Entire black ajmmunities must make do without 
any medical assistance at afl. 

Blades’ educational needs are similarly stag- 
gering. Whole communities lack even minimal 
educational facilities. I have visited “tacky” 
homeland areas and urban neighborhoods where 
schools do exist — terribly overcrowded, under- 
staffed and with minimal facilities . 

Several years ago my two (then) high-school- 


age sons taught English and mathematics in a 
small school attended by more than 1,000 young 
children. (Technically my sons violated the law. 
because whiles arc forbidden to teach black 
schoolchildren.) The building was old and deteri- 
orating; it lacked a library and modern educa- 
tional and sanitary facilities. No teacher had a 
university degree. Some, but not aB, had finished 
high schooL They were paid meager salaries and 
the turnover was high. The classrooms were 
crowded — 50 students and more per teacher. 
Books and other instructional materials were in 
scant supply. The teachers repeatedly said how 
much professional help they needed. Nearby, 
hundreds of children had no education whatever. 

This tragedy lot millions who live in a country 
of substantial white wealth and power would 
present even a vigorously compassionate govern- 
ment with an enormous challenge. No doubt 
such a government would appeal to other na- 
tions, while mobilizing its own considerable re- 
sources, not to mention those of prospering busi- 
nesses in die cities. In the absence of such a 
government, there is plenty of room for initia- 
tives by others, including foreign business, foun- 
dation and educational readers. 


Transvaal and dedicated to training a full range 
of health professionals, began to graduate stu- 
dents only recently. There is much that foreign- 
ers might offer that schooL 

Tuition, books, room and board costs $2300, a 
huge sum for the average black student About a 
third of those accepted do not matriculate for 
lack of money. Since many students lade the 
necessary education, premedical programs in En- 
glish, math and science are under way but need 
further staffing; in 1984 there were only three 
instructors for 280 students of widely varying 
competence. The school library needs reference 
materials and teaching aids. 

Foreigners could offer experience and techno- 
logy to the aspiring doctors, dentists, nurses and 
veterinarians. We could contribute to specific 
programs — in rural medicine, in urban outreach 
clinics. We could help build programs in com- 
munity health, family medicine and nutrition 
through exchanges of personnel research grants 
and programs that enable our physicians, teach- 
ers and nurses to provide training. 

Such initiatives would enable concerned com- 
munities abroad to offer educational experience, 
medical skills and idealism to the people of a 
nation whose unique racial problems are a con- 
tinuing cause of worldwide concern. 


Nazi puppet government of Croatia. 
After four decades, Nazi crimes st£H 
resonate in this season or sickening 
commemorations, such as the com- 
memoration of what is ludicrously- 
called the “liberation" of Warsaw 
by Soviet oppressors. 

Why, it is frequently asked, contin- 
ue trying to prosecute old men like 
Mengde and Anukovic? Certainly 
the reason is not deterrence, not the 
prevention of Holocausts. No pun- 
ishment can affect the calculations of 
the genocidal who are not careful 
calculators of cost-benefit ratios. 

Yes, prosecutions foster awareness 
of the Holocaust, and pursuit of the 
genoddai is an obligatory response to 
ufe in an age of genocides — in 
Uganda. Cambodia and, today, Af- 
ghanistan. But, as to the bedrodt rea- 


son for pursuing the criminals, Irena 
Kirkland has a more correct idea. 


South African black leaders have appealed for 
American medical assistance. The sole medical 


7 he writer, a dvldpsydnatrist, has been conducting 
research in South Africa for the last 10 years. He 


school for blacks, founded in the 1970s in the contributed this comment to The New York Tones. 


; FROM OUR FEB. 20 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO Grandma’s Orbiting Ashes Will Be Watching You 

n > . <r ■* if r i-i u, inn«> f>. 1« . f 1«1. n*. Tl 


talO: Safety Urged for U.S. Miners 
NEW YORK — Recent disasters are held to 
emphasize the need of greater precautions for 
the safety of miners. The Philadelphia Record 
says: “The year is starting out with an alarm- 
ing number of mining catastrophes. The 
causes of explosions are pretty well under- 
stood, but the miners are careless, and the 
owners and the State officials are often negli- 
gent in enforcing the regulations." The Cleve- 
land Plain Dealer remarks: “Americans are 
shamelessly careless of human life when they 
engage in industrial pursuits, and nowhere is 
(his emphasized more than in mining. The 
number [of fatalities] has steadily risen in the 
United States." The Hartford Times adds: 
f*The sacrifice of human life in the mining 
industry has deeply stirred public opinion. 
{Study is now being applied to the invention of 
safety appliances. The need is obvious." 


1935: Stalm Consolidates His Power 

MOSCOW — Profound changes are occurring 
in the Soviet State which have significance not 
only for this country but for the whole world. 
The power of Dictator Josef Stalin is increas- 
ing steadily. Stalin is more firmly seated in the 
Kremlin today even than he was when on 
December 1 bis close friend and staunch ally, 
Sergei Kirov, died from an assassin's bullet 
The execution, soon after that assassination, of 
103 so-called “White Guards" was solely an 
emergency terrorist measure intended to strike 
fear into the heart of anyone who might be 
contemplating subversive action. There can be 
no question but that Stalin’s leadership is 
subject to criticism on the part of those party 
members who are opposed to the undemocrat- 
ic personal dictatorship. Whether or not there 
is a real conspiracy, the repressive measures 
have served to silence all criticism. 


B OSTON — I know a lot of people 
are dying to get into a space 
program, but 1 never thought it 
would go this far. Last week the Unit- 
ed States government approved the 
launching of the ashes of ten thou- 
sand into eternal orbit 
The aerial burial — a contradiction 
in terms if there ever was one — is the 
scheme of a Florida firm called the 
Celestis Group. They expect to 
charge a fairly celestial price of 
$3,900 for anyone who wants room in 
their 1,900-mile-high mortuary. 

The capsule of “ crenains " will 
be boosted into place by a private 
company beaded by an astronaut 
from the Mercury days, Donald K. 
Slayton. You have beard of astro- 


By Ellen Goodman 


even if the capsule is outfitted with 
reflectors so that my descendants 
know when I am watching over them. 
(Twinkle, twinkle, little Grandma.) 

But what is most startling about 
this space hearse is not its cargo. The 
glare coming off the capsule reflects 
our diminished idealism. In 16 years 
we have gone from putting a man on 
the moon to putting his cremains in 
orbit. The most lofty notions about a 
mission in tire universe have literally 
turned into ashes. Talk about your 
small steps for mankind. We are now 
on a new frontier for hndcstezism. 


The problem with this postmortem 
lift-off is not just profit. Columbus's 
trip had a profit motive. But the 
space sale is the most ghoulish exten- 
sion yet of the consumer ethic that 
promises us that we can buy anything 
as long as our check matches our 
whim. The sky is the limit. Or is it? 

This is the same ethic that puts 
up a billboard on a mountain. It is 
the same egotism that lays an owner- 
ship claim to a lake or a piece of 
seashore. It is the same marketing 


brothers would feel today about Su- 
persavers. Bui it is depressing to be- 
lieve that all that research paved the 
way for a celestial cemetery; it is tike 
discovering that the DNA double- 
helix could be used for a corkscrew. 

Remember in 1961 when Jack 


Kennedy gave the moon program its 
send-off? “No one can predict with 


Kirkland has a more correct idea. 

She knows there can be no propor- 
tionality, no punishment that “fits” 
the crimes. But she also knows the 
truth of this Italian proverb: Revenge 
is a dish best eaten cold. Her reason 
for feeling deeply pleased about the 
continuing pursuit of Mengele is this: 
Somewhere. Mengele is feeling fear. 

That reason may seem to lack 
metaphysical flourish, and it is not 
“forward looking" in the sense of 
having a utilitarian, reforming pur- 
pose. But the reason satisfies an in- 
tuition so deeply felt that it surely 
expresses some constituent of oar 
moral nature. It is the conviction that 
someone who has caused so much 
pain should never know ease. 

Lei us just say that Irena Kirk- 
land's thinking is correct, and get on 
with the prosecutions, by which we 
keep faith with the persecuted 
Washington Post Writers Group. 


mentality that is ready to sell fust- 
class tickets on any ego trip. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chairman 1958-1982 


from the Mercury days, Donald K. The same sort of thing is happen- 
Slayton. You have beard of astro- ing in a minor way at NASA, where 
politicians? Mr. Slayton becomes the the shuttle program has been suffer- 
first astro-mortician. ing an identity crisis. They want to be 

This business venture was ap- a glamor ops pioneering space opera- 


class tickets on any ego tnp. 

Maybe that is the way die Wright 


certainty what the ultimate meaning 
will be of mastery of space,” Presi- 
dent Kennedy said. Somehow 1 don’t 
think he expected that the ultimate 
meaning would be a trivial pursuit 
But today a piece of the sky has been 
sold off to the morticians. The rest 
cremains to beseem 

Washington Post Writers Group. 


Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed “Letters to the 
Editor" and must contain die writ- 
er's signature, name and full ad- 
dress. Letters should be brief and 
are subject to editing. We cannot 
be responsible for the return of 
unsolicited manuscripts. 


KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM SL PAJLEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 



LEE W. HUEBNER, Pidfidur 
Exeaahe Editor 
Editor 


Dqndy Editor 
Associate Editor 



International Herald Tribune. 181 Avenue Charles-de-GauHe, 92200 NemDy-sur-Seinc, 
France. Telephone: 747-1265. Telex: 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Paris. 
Director de la pMcaben: Walter N. Timer. 


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U.S. subscription: J 284 yearly. Second-doss postage pod a Lang Island Gty, N.7. 11101. 
© 1985, International Herald Tribune. AB rights reswW 



proved by the Department of Trans- 
portation, the federal boosters for 
free enterprise in outer space. Ac- 
cording to the DOT you can put 
anything (or in this case, anyone) into 
space as long as it does not jeopardize 
national security, international trea- 
ties or human health and safety. And 
we do not have to worry about the 
health of these passengers. 

For the DOT, this venture is “just 
another aspect of a very well estab- 
lished industry." Said a friendly 
spokesperson, struggling to contain 
the giggles, "It’s really no wierder 
than scattering ashes over an ocean." 

Frankly, the whole thing is a bit 
freaky for my taste. I do not want my 
final non-resting place to be in orbit. 


LETTER TO THE EDITOR 


ti on and a reliable transportation 
company. NASA hopes to be self- 
supporting by 1990. The conundrum 
is that the more they attract the pri- Unhappily, blatant breaches of 
vate trucking business, the less they history, if repealed often enough, ui- 
attract the glitter of public support, timaiely gain genera! credence and 
Imagine what would have hap* thus are accepted by succeeding gen- 
pened if NASA had contracted to erations as being the truth. Edward 
haul up this payload. Can you picture E. Dawson’s letter to the editor (Feb. 
the network c o rrespondents counting JJ is a classic example of this process, 
down for this macabre uprising; Turning reason on its head, Mr. 
“This is Lynn Sherr at the Johnson Dawson claims that the Soviet 


Stalin in World War II 


Space Colter in Houston. It's three 
minutes until the first celestial resur- 
rection.” NASA was criticized for 
hustling Senator Jake Gam u> the 


Turning reason on its head, Mr. 
Dawson claims that the Soviet 
Union's heroic struggle against Na- 
zism in World War II deserves more 
recognition than it is afforded, “and 
should not be subjected to our [West- 


heavens. What if it were shuttling his em] ‘historical distortions.’ 


ashes? The launch would be about as 
glamorous as jump-starting a hearse. 


It is not to indulge in a “historical 
distortion” but to make a statement 


of fact to point out that Adolf Hitler 
only fell strong enough to attack 
Western Europe after the conclusion 
of the iniquitous Molotov-Ribben- 
trop pact of 1939 between the Soviet 
Union and Germany. That pact al- 
lowed (he Sonet Union to join in the 
dismemberment of Poland and to 
launch a series of aggressive wars 
against its Central anaEastern Euro- 
pean neighbors, which to this day 
remain firmly within the Kremlin’s 
totalitarian hegemony. 

If this were not enough, one has 
only to remember that in 1941 it was 
not due to any change of heart in the 
Kremlin that tire Soviet Union en- 
tered the war, but because — con- 


trary to the pleas of Stalin right up to 
the 1 1 th hour, protesting that Hitler 
was about to break its alliance with 
friendly Russia — Nazi Germany 
went to war with hs erstwhile partner 
in crime, the Soviet Union. 

So at the end of the day we arein 
no position to celebrate victory is 
1945 of “democracy over dictator- 
ship" but rather to mourn the fact 
that instead, tragically, we in the 
West have all paid a high price to 
destroy one evil tyranny, only to seeit 
replaced by a no less evil but unfortu- 
nately more powerful one. 

Sir FREDERIC BENNETT, 
Member of Parliament. . 

London. - 


T v«lSS 


* V 

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■ ;; -i 

:. . r ; 

» cp.-- 

• , *rr> .t »3 


* £ 


:ztm 
vr:.. bit 


i n.r 7 - • - ■ 
l »*-, -- -. = 


eri 7;,. 
rjr;-. ; n rr .‘y 

‘-it 

•la-..- 

: l£, \jr . ’ 

Vkjt, 


Ronji.-i 

“a r 

paiKi :,v 


s“»! ai: rr ;.' 


-in r;.-..-.. V • 

•Mr. j,;, ; ' 

Nin, a.-; 

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41 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1985 


Page 5 ^ 


'I 


INSIGHTS 


^ Jack Kemp: 'Practical’ Conservative in Training for White House 


By Steven V. Roberts 

Nemr York Times Semite 

YVr ASHINGTON — - Jack Kemp is on 

\\f his way to the White House. As he gets 

▼ T off the elevator in the Ravbum House 
Office Building on Capitol Hill, fie sees a boy 
carrying a stack of boxes and gives the startled 
lad a playful cufT on the shoulder. Mr. Kemp 
does not walk to his car, he bounces toward it, 
emitting waves of energy. 

The silver Thunderbtrd is already at the ga- 
rage door, and he is momentarily embarrassed 
by the automotive finery. It's leased, he protests, 
not owned. As the Th underbird leaves Capitol 
Hill, Mr. Kemp recognizes a journalist in the car 
in front. At the next red light, he lunges out the 
door and shouts at the reporter. “When are you 
going to interview me?" 

During the drive up Pennsylvania Avenue in 
Washington, the talk turns to politics, and the 
congressman from upstate New York sax’s he is 
glad now that he did not run for the Senate in 
1980, or Tor governor of New York in 1981 “To 
be frank," he said, “who has more influence 
over economic polity? A junior member of the 
Senate, or me?" Yes, he acknowledges, those 
unconsummaied flirtations have left him with a 
reputation for indecisiveness, but he probably 
will make a firm decision by the end of this year 
whether to run for president in 1988. 

Campaigning for the White House has turned 
into a four-year marathon, and potential candi- 
dates start fining up money and manpower even 
before the previous president is inaugurated. 

Mr. Kemp knows that his friends will start 
drifting toward other candidates if he does not 
give an early signal of his intentions, and while 
he remains somewhat coy on the subject, he 
clearly is ready to go. those 50.000 names, 
slashed in his computer and wailing to be 
tapped for campaign cash, are not just a Christ- 
mas card lisL “Am I interested?" he asks rhetor- 
ically. “The answer is yes." ■' M.jwrr 

The 7Ti underbird pulls up to the White ... ’ -V -fj 

House, where Mr. Kemp wiD join other House ’ • ‘ 

Republican leaders and President Ronald Rea- 
gan's advisers for a strategy session on the 
budget. The guard asks for identification, and 
Mr. Kemp expresses annoyance that be is not 
instantly waved through. • 

When the congressmen emerge from the 
meeting an hour later, they strike a familiar 
tableau on the White House driveway: Mr. 

Kemp is talking, the others are listening. Now 
49, at 6 feet and 200 pounds (183 centimeters 
and 91 kilograms), the one-time quarterback of 
professional football’s Buffalo Bills retains the 
handsomeness of a star posing for a cereal box. 

A reporter asks for a comment on proposed 
budget cuts, and Mr. Kemp answers, “Cuts have 
got to be part of an agenda for growth ... We 
can't just offer sacrifice . . . Thais not what tbe 
president ran on 

As President Reagan delivered his State of the 
Union address last week and Congress got down 
to business, Mr. Kemp started the most impor- 
tant season of his political career. As the third- 
ranking Republican in the House, and as a 
senior member of tbe Budget Committee, he will 
play a leading role in the main debate facing the 
99th Congress: how to reduce a federal budget 
deficit that threatens to soar past $200 billion a 
year. He already has staked out his position, 
deriding feDow Republicans for their “hysteri- 
cal” concentration on huge spending cuts, and 
insisting that economic growth will eliminate 
the need for painful budget surgery. 

Mr. Kemp is the chief author of two bills 
designed to achieve more growth. One would 
provide tax benefits for companies willing to 
invest in “enterprise zones” and create new jobs 
in declining regions of the country. The other 
bill would restructure the tax code by reducing 
and simplifying rates while eliminating many 
shelters and loopholes. Mr. Kemp’s theory is 
that lowering the rates would give entrepreneurs 
more incentive to produce and earn, and that 
this rising tide of economic activity would fill 
the Treasury’s depleted coffers. Some Republi- 
can leadens are skeptical that either bin will 
become law, though Mr. Reagan expressed sup- 
port for both concepts in his inaugural address. 

Mr. Kemp bas a larger importance, however. 

His upbeat message has inspired a new genera- 
tion of lawmakers and helped spark tbe revival 
of tbe Republicans as a party of ideas and 
innovation. Representative Newt Gingrich, a 
Republican of Georgia, calls him “the first Re- 
publican in modern times to show it is possible 
to be hopeful and conservative at the same 
time.” 

The beginning of this president's second term 
also marks the beginning of tbe post- Reagan 
era. The Republicans already are looking for a 



n» Wuhoglon ftw 


Jack Kemp: “I think I fooled a lot of people in this town." 


campaign, the candidate I would least like to 
run against is Jack Kemp." 

Yet, for all of his potential, Mr. Kemp re- 
mains an untested and uncertain quantity. On 
the personal level some politicians who know 
him well still view him as an intellectual light- 
weight, a one-time star athlete with a good 
banter and a smooth tan, stuffed full of ideas 
that he does not completely understand. Dave 
Hoppe, his chief of staff, admits that the con- 
gressman “comes on like a bulldozer" at times 
and “turns some people off" with his ego. 

On the political level these qualities hare 
brought Mr. Kemp his share of enemies. More- 
over. many politicians still see the tax cut of 
1981 — co-sponsored by Mr. Kemp and Senator 
William V. Roth Jr., a Delaware Republican — 
as “voodoo economics.” To these critics, that 
was a wrong-beaded plan that threatens, eventu- 
ally, to-swamp the recovery in a tidal wave of 
deficits. Mr. Kemp, himself, admits that his 
political future is “inextricably tied to the health 
of the economy.” 

N truth, Mr. Kemp is a bit of a mystery, a 
blending of contradictory dements that de- 
fies an easy label but that broadens his 
political appeal. He is a Protestant, white con- 
servative from Southern California who built his 
political career in Buffalo, New York, a largely 
Catholic, blue-collar city. He believes in cutting 
taxes, but not in emasculating the government. 
He is cheered by business leaders in Dallas and 
by blacks in Atlanta. 

But the main reason Ed Rollins fears Jack 
Kemp is that the congressman has an aura 
possessed by only a few politicians in any gener- 
ation. Pan of it is bis vitality. And part of it is 
that indelible imag e of the gallant gladiator, 
repeatedly overcoming adversity as the screams 
of thousands echo through the bright Sundays 
of the past 

As Lee Atwater, tbe deputy director of Mr. 
Reagan’s 1984 campaign, put it, athletes might 
well be “the new American heroes who can 
transcend party loyalties." And Robert D. 
Squier, a Democratic consultant, added. “Rea- 


U1 Ul 

I 


g an, as the Groper, only played a football play- 
er. Kemp really was a football player.” 

Mr. Kemp's parents left the Middle West 
about 1 920 and settled in Los Angeles, where his 


presidential candidate in J 988 who can carry on faiher m a ^ m irking company and his 
the “Reagan revolution by continuing ihdr was a social worker. They had four sons; 

drive to become the dominant P&rty m “C Jack was tbe third. In their comfortable, middle- 
UnitaJ States. To many strategists in both par- ^ass home, he recalled. “Everything was sports, 
ties Mr Kerim has a solid claim to berna Mr. sports.” Asked to write a school compo- 


lies, Mr. Kemp has a solid claim to being 
Reagan’s heir. 

M ORE than any other potential nomi- 
nee, they feel he has the sort of per- 
sonal charm and appeal that has made 
Ronald Reagan so effective. And from a politi- 
cal viewpoint, he has the best chance of emulat- 
ing the president's extraordinary ability 10 ex_ 
(>and the Republican base and reach out to 


rition about a great invention, he chose ihe 
forward pass in football 
By his own admission. Mr. Kemp seldom 
cracked a book at Occidental College, a local 
school whose main attraction was the football 
squad. After graduation in 1957, the Detroit 
Lions drafted him on the 17th round. “I had no 
doubt I'd play pro football” Mr. Kemp said. “I 


independent voters. In fact. Mr. Reagan’s inau- don’t want to sound mystical, but I knew I'd 
gural -iddre? s. with its evocation of an “Ameri- play somewhere. 

’ "' So tbe young hero married the giri from the 

sorority house next door and went off to fulfill 
his destiny. But be never made it with the Lions, 
or any other team in the National Football 
League, and when the American Football 
League started in I960, Mr. Kemp jumped at 


can renewal” sounded very much like a speech 
Mr. Kemp could have delivered. Edward S. 
Rollins, woo ran the president’s last campaign, 
favors Vice President George Bush for the 
nomination in 1988 but admits. “If the vice 
president chose to run, and asked me to run his 


the chance lo play for the Los Angeles Chargers, 
who moved to San Diego the next year. 

During his years with the Chargers, Mr. 
Kemp fell under the influence of two men who 
helped form his political view of the world. One 
was Herbert G. Klein, editor of The San Diego 
Union and an insider in California Republican 
circles. Mr. Klein saw ihe young quarterback os 
a promising political property, and during the 
off-season, he had Mr. Kemp work for the 
paper, writing articles and absorbing tenets of 
the conservative creed. 

A very different mentor was Sid Gillman, the 
coach of the Chargers, a liberal who belonged to 
the National Urban League. The team was inte- 
grated, and when it played in the South, Mr. 
Gillman never let his players use segregated 
facilities. Unlike many conservatives, Mr. 
Kemp is a strong advocate of civil rights and 
federal help for minorities, and his position 
stems partly from his football experiences. 
“Jack.” commented Mr. Gingrich, “lileraHy 
showered with guys that most Republicans nev- 
er meet.’’ 

In 1961 3 crushed knuckle on his throwing 
hand put Mr. Kemp out for the season, and 
when the Chargers failed to protect their rights 
to the quarterback, the Buffalo Bills snatched 
him away for the token price of $100. Mr. Kemp 
kept up his ties to California, and during the off- 
season in 1967. he even served a brief appren- 
ticeship in the office of the new governor. Ron- 
ald Reagan. But it was Buffalo that really 
advanced his political education. 

Mr. Kemp found himself living and playing 
in a dty dominated by blue-collar trade union- 
ists with Democratic roots who worried about 
jobs and paychecks in a town in which the basic 
industries were collapsing around them. “That 
was a real blessing for me," he recalled. “That 
disabused me very early about ideology winning 
campaigns. Those guys wanted answers, they 
wanted problems solved." 

By 1 968. ihe Republican organization in Buf- 
falo was asking him to run for Congress, and by 
1970 — with his arm fading — he was ready to 
accept 

The old quarterback squeaked in with 52 
percent of the vote, and be came to Washington 
with a lot to learn about public policy. But he 
began reading widely, mainly in economics, and 
one bit of history intrigued him: The tax cut 
enacted during the Kennedy administration had 
engendered a strong recovery. Then The Wall 
Street Journal ran a piece by Jude Wanniski, 
one of its editorial writers, outlining the theories 
of Robert Mundell, a Canadian economist Mr. 
Mundell made the case for “supply-side eco- 
nomics.” the concept that tax cuts lead to eco- 
nomic expansion and an inevitable increase in 
tax revenues. 

S OON Mr. Kemp was in contact with Mr. 
Wanniski and other followers of the sup- 
ply-side faith, particularly Irving KrisioL 
the editor or The Public Interest During many 
months of talk, often far into the night at tbe 
Kemps' house in suburban Maryland, the sup- 
ply-siders refined their thoughts rato the Kemp- 
Roth tax-reduction bUT. 

“It was a radical idea,” said Charlie Black, a 
political consultant who worked for the Repub- 


Tunnel That Foiled GIs Now a Musem 


By George Esper 

The Associated Press 

C U CHI, Vietnam — The legend of the 
Viet Cong underground military bases 
that frustrated American “tunnel 
rats" lives on 10 years after the end of the 
Vietnam War. 

The showcase of the tunnel systems in this 
town about 20 miles (32 kilometers) north- 
west of Ho Chi Mini City has been turned 
into a museum that attracts mostly Russian 
tourists these days. 

A lour guide, Tran Thi Bich. uses a large 
diagram and a pointer to explain how the 
system was buil t, how it worked and its histo- 
ry. It is a nearly 200 -mile-long series of inter- 
connecting tunnels with secret entrances that 
wind around, in and out, up and down, sever- 
al stories high- 

The tunnels run through 105,000 acres 


brought in through bamboo vents and tbe 
entrances are camouflaged with grass. 

The system contains mess halls and brief- 
ing rooms with tables with bamboo lops and 
Jegs made of logs. The rooms are 24 feet long 
and 12 feet wide and are shored up with logs 
and sheets of steel seized from the runways of 
American air fields. 

The United Slates had its bombers, artil- 
lery and tunnel rats — the troops who 
searched out the Viet Cong underground, but 
the Vet Cong had a head start Using hoes, 
shovels and buckets to scoop out the dirt, 
they began digging the Cu Chi system in 
1948, when they were fighting the French. 

“They did it bit by bit" said Miss Bich. 
“They knew when each tunnel would meet by 
hearing the sound of digging on the other 
side/ 


The U.S. 25 lb Infantry Division moved 
into Cu Chi in the mid 196&S, but that did not 

f, ft. «■■« - of W- 


which was renamed Ho Chi Minh City after 
U.S. forces pulled out. 

The Viet Cong turned U.S. bombing at- 
tacks to their own advantage- When they 
needed to blast dirt some din. they waited for 
the bombs to drown out their own explosions. 

Miss Bich said the U.S. troops tried every- 
thing to flush them out. They attempted to 
pump water from a nearby river into the 
entrances, but the Viet Cong sealed them off 
with cement lids. 

Then tbe runnd rats went in. 

“But they were not able to penetrate.” Miss 
Bich said. “There were different entrances 
going off in many directions. There were 
different levels" 

As quickly as U.S. bombers damaged the 
tunnels, the Viet Cong repaired them. An 
American major once commented during the 
war that “occupation on the ground means 
nothing unless you destroy the underground 
tunnels one by one,” 

Cu Chi is a reminder of the task the 
Americans faced in Vietnam and why it was a 
difficult war to understand as well as to fight. 


bean National Committee at the time, “but 
politically, it had great value. The Republican 
Party since Hoover had been viewed as the party 


of the rich and ‘Big Business.' After Watergate, 
the corruption image was added into it. Of the 
first 10 things people though i about Republi- 


cans, eight or nine were negative. It didn't take a 
genius to see the way to shake our terrible image 
was to take Jack Kemp's bill, and bis rhetoric, 
and spread it to the party’s candidates. For tbe 
first time in years. Republican candidates were 
out there running for something, not just against 
something.” 

During the late 1970s, Mr. Reagan became 
enamored of supply-side ideas and espoused 
them during his campaign for the Republican 
nomination, but the congressman’s supporters 
were suspicious of Mr. Reagan’s sincerity and 
urged Mr. Kemp to make the run himself. As 
Mr. W anniski tells the story. Mr. Kemp met Mr. 
Reagan for lunch during the summer of 1979 
and spent beaus g rilling the candidate about his 
commitment to supply-side economics. Mr. 
Kemp's wife, Joanne; was along and, according 
to Mr. Wanniski was “mortified” at her hus- 
band's behavior. Bui finally tin agreement was 
reached: Mr. Reagan would support the Kerap- 
Roth tax cut. 

President Reagan kept his promise and even- 
tually Kemp- Roth was passed, but the New 
Yorker shunned the tedious work of legislative 
deliberation. And when tbe president agreed to 
a compromise bill that cm rates by only 25 
percent, rather than the 30- percent nit included 
in the original measure, Mr. Kemp publicly 
criticized the presidenL 

Over the next six months. Mr. Kemp’s name 
is sure to stay in the forefront as Congress 
struggles with taxes and the budget- Out of his 
concern that Robert J. Dole, the new Republi- 
can leader in tbe Senate and a likely presidential 
contender in 1988, is placing too much emphasis 
on deficit reduction and not enough on pro- 
growth policies, Mr. Kemp has developed a two- 
part strategy. One is an outside move: get the 
president and the White House staff on your 
side and then convince them to use their politi- 
cal leverage on Congress. 

Compromise is Mr. Kemp's approach to his 
tax-amplification bill co-written by Senator 
Robert W. Kasten Jr. of Wisconsin. His version 
would eliminate most deductions, tax credits 
and exemptions; all income would then be taxed 
at a fiat rate of 25 percent, as opposed to the 
current schedule, which goes up to 50 percent 
But Mr. Kemp lavishes praise on the two alter- 
native proposals. One was produced by Donald 
T. Regan when he was Treasury secretary, be- 
fore he became White House chief of staff. The 
other was produced by Representative Richard 
A- Gephardt, a Missouri Democrat, and Senator 
Bill Bradley, Democrat of New Jersey. 

At a press conference several weeks ago called 
by House Republican leaders, Mr. Kemp em- 
phasized the need to cooperate with these Dem- 
ocrats and “build some land of bridge across the 


aisle” on economic policy. His- fellow Republi- 
cans. who were in a more combative and parti- 
san mood, practically had to wrestle the micro- 
phone away from him. But Mr. Kemp said flatly 
that lax simplification “ain't gonna fly” in this 
Congress unless a plan is developed that has ihe 
support of both parties and the president. 

The new generation of young conservatives in 
the House, who have bedeviled the Democratic 
leadership over the pasi year, see Mr. Kemp as 
their “spiritual godfather," according to Mr. 


Kemp shows f it is 
possible to be 
hopeful and 
conservative at the 
same time . 9 


Gingrich. But Mr. Kemp disagrees with their 
guiding premise, that confrontation with the 
Democrats is always ihe best policy. He shares 
such basic New Right positions as opposing 
abortion and favoring school prayer, but he has 
never taken a lead on these measures and warns 
that Republicans can narrow their political ap- 
peal by focusing on such “social issues ” 

As these legislative battles develop, so will the 
political maneuvering for 1988. Mr. Kemp dis- 
cussed his prospects one day in Capitol Hill 
office, a room dominated by pictures of his wife 
and four irrepressibly photogenic children, aged 
13 to 25. Tbe oldest child, Jeff, is a quarterback 
for the Los Angeles Rams. 

\\ T ILL Jack Kemp run for the presiden- 
cy? Tbe minority view, based on his 

▼ V past cautiousness, is that he will not- “1 
do not lust after the presidency,” he will say. 
emphasizing the need to have something “bunt- 
ing in your belly." Does he have that fire? “I 
don't know.” be said. 

But the dominant view is that Mr. Kemp 
wants to be presidenL and that he will come 
under fierce pressure from his supporters to 
make the race. 

Meanwhile, the congressman is certainly act- 
ing like a candidate. His own political action 
committee, the Campaign for Prosperity, raised 
and donated more than $200,000 to Republican 
candidates for the 1984 elections. Another 
$50,000 was used to finance Mr. Kemp’s travels 
around the country, where be is in demand more 
than any other Republican except Mr. Reagan 
and Gerald R. Ford. 


If Jack Kemp runs for the Republican nomi- 
nation, can he win it? The conventional wisdom 
in Republican ranks is that George Bush’s loyal- 
ly io ihe president has earned him ihe support of 
many Reaganites. and ihe position of Front- 
runner. Bui as John Sears, a veieran Republican 
strategist, noted, any vice president “is obliged 
to be the party's greatest loyalist” In Mri 
Sears's view, Mr. Bush will nave a “terrible 
problem" establishing hims elf as an indepen- 
dent figure. 

Mr. Dole, another potential rival has made a 
strong start as the new majority leader of the 
Senate, but he is dearly gambling his future on 
the ability of congressional Republicans to re: 
duce the defid t and insure economic prosperity. 
Mr. Dole's predecessor as majority leader. How-' 
ard H. Baker Jr_ has quit the Senate so he can 
devote full time to malting money and running 
for presidenL but he has not been able to inspire 
any major political support for a mn. 

Mr. Rollins, the former Reagan-Bush strate- 
gist. sums up a widely held view in Republican 
ranks when he said,' “I think ihe potential is 
certainly there for Kemp to come down as the 
alternative to Bush." 

For one thing, Mr. Kemp starts with a broad 
geographical base; California, where he grew 
up; New York, where he now lives, and the so- 
called Southern Rim, where an emerging Re- 
publican Party responds to him eagerly. He also 
has strong ties to the party* s right-wing activists. 
“Kemp ” said Lee Atwater, Mr. Rollins’s depu- 
ty on die Reagan-Bush campaign, “has a belter 
chance to plug into Reagan’s philosophical base 
than any other candidate." 

Should Mr. Kemp ever get tbe nomination. 
Democratic strategists agree he would be a 
tough opponent in the general election. More 
than any other Republican, some fear, he could 
appeal to that crop of young, independent- 
minded voters who flocked to the Republican 
cause in 1980 and 1984 but have made no 
permanent commitment to the party and are up 
for grabs in future elections. 

Mr. Kemp has one other quality that might be 
more important than all the rest: He can tap 
into one of the basic myths of American life, the 
myth of the hero who has fought in distant lands 
and survived the trial by fire. For millions of 
Americans today, professional sports — partic- 
ularly football — nave become a kind of civilian 
equivalent of war. 

Mr. Kemp said that he has been listening, and 
learning, since he came to Washington 14 years 
ago. “I survived," he said, “and I dunk 1 fooled a 
lot of people in this town. They didn't think that 
there was much slaying power to Jack Kemp." 

Whether he has enough staying power for the 
exhausting grind of a presidential campaign 
remains to be seen. But a man who has bees 
wildly cheered, and unmercifully booed, by 
50.000 football fans on a Sunday in Buffalo 
knows so me thing about the vicissitudes of life. 
And the pundits who underestimated Ronald 
Reagan all those years could be getting ready to 
make the same mistake about Jade Kemp. 



APRIL 14 - 23, 1985 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 20 , 198 a 


ARTS /LEISURE 



Vintage Maigret: Accomplices for One-Pot Meals 


Bv Frank J. Prial 

AVh York Tima Semce 

N EW YORK — In principle, 
hearty dishes call for hearty 
wines. Paired with a braised beef or 
a lamb stew, an older Bordeaux can 
easily lose its nuances, while some 
of the lighter Burgundies will lose 
their taste altogether, so over- 
whelming is the one-pot ineaL 
What is needed are wines that are 
assertive and uacomplicaiecL 
To answer tins need, you could 
choose among any number of Cali- 
fornia wines. New York wines. 
Spanish wines or Italian wines. The 
dishes offered here, however, are 
essentially French. Let the wines, 
then, be French, too. 


best, however, when it is five to ten Mme. Maigret, " Haricot de mou- 
years old. Steven Spurrier, who ton" — a lamb stew. 


runs I'Aeademie du Vin in Paris. Courtine gives a recipe and sug- 


calls it “a classic country wine." It gests that, had he been able, Mai 


is perfect for this kind of dish. 

In “Maigret and the Informer.’' 


gret would have accompanied this 
meal with Chin on, a sturdy red 
wine from the Loire, made mostly 


the chief inspector takes his wife lo 7™ 

a local restaurant. They have co- J™ ' te 1 

aullles Si Jacques and cite de bceuf Rion ■* subsututed, 1. 

Msec. WidMhe beef. CotS ^ a^Gjgnndas. from 


surmises, they drink Chateau Leo- 
ville-Las-Cases, which is a second- 


itae area near Chateauneuf-du- 
Pape. It is full-bodied, rich, some- 


growth Bordeaux. What could 

Courtine have been thinking, rec- ^ 


onunending such an elegant wine? 
No matter. A Liovill e-Las- Cases 


hold up with the strong lamb. 

In “Maigret’s Revolver," the in- 


As for veal. well, like am good s^r resiaurast bearisi his name. 
Frenchman, Maigret ate veal in «v- chicken, 

cry stvle: blanqueuz fncondeau, . In the la« afiemcxL me j.N 
veal birds, everythin*. He seems judges, so me o, h*.- 

never to have eaten veal with Ori- as famous m the lood vorid a> 
ema! vegetables, however. My Blanc: descended on i loci Iresuu- 
choice with this dish would be tmi. It was an old-fashimad place 
eewurztraminer. preferably of the where ‘«al shoppers and shop- 
great 1983 vintage, whose wines keepers dropped in for runch. 
turned out as big and rich and The owner served beef stew in 
powerful as some California wines, huge bowk Great chefs who in a 
Gewurziraminer is often touted few hours would be preparing ex- 
as an excellent match for Chinese quisue and comparative^ delicate 
food — more often. 1 think, be- cuisine for appreciative psuo- 


1 070 spector and bis wife dine with old 

from 1978, 1979 or 1981, to name a ^ Pardons . They have 

Tm qvnilnn p and iwm vinladfK . .J 


cause there is nothing better. The nomes tucked awa> this homely 
classic French veal shank with the fare and washed it down with local 


Tew available and recent vintages. " \ “7 1 

^ ma „„ ™ TrXfZ brmdade de monte, a cod puree. 


Perhaps one of the best guides, 
unintentionally so, and one of the 
most entertaining can be found in 
the annals of the fictional Chief 
Inspector Jules Maigret of the Po- 
lice Judidare. In a hundred or more 
novels. Georges Simenon made 
oblique references lo Maigret’s 
meals, which, like the good bour- 
geois he was, Maigret almost in- 
variably took at home, from the 
kitchen of one of the most famous 
codes in French literature — Mme. 
MaigreL A few years ago, the 
French writer and critic Robert 
Courtine extrapolated about ISO of 
these references to meals and as- 
sembled a book of recipes as he 
thought Louise Maigret, who came 
from Colmar in Alsace, would hare 
prepared them. 

In the novel “Madame Maigret’s 
Own Case," for example, the chief 
inspector comes home to their 
walk-up cm the Boulevard Rj chard - 
Lenoir after a trying day. “The 
chicken," the reader is told, “was 
on the fire along with a beautiful 
red carrot, a big onion and a knob 
of parsley with the stalks sucking 
oul" A classic poule-au-pol — 
chicken in the poL After giving the 
recipe, Courtine suggests. “With 
the poule-au-pot, Maigret drank 
Madiran." 


SSSfKSS WUhit theydrink Hmnhape 

the braised beef. If I was going o Klr<n „ _ _ Kin rf- r f I1 | Thu hfe 


unexpected Oriental overtones wine served in thick tumblers, 
could be the one-pot meal this wine ftiae was Buge> . u cc 
has been wailing for. from the Ain deoartmem 


„~r™i o c „,h powerful white wine will have no 


hare preferred a PomeroL such as ',71 “/v, Z 

J^teau Nenin, which is softer and fish an(j ofl _ Hermitage ^ nol 


Thinking about wines to accom- 
pany that most f amili ar of one-pot 


The wine was Bogey. It comes 
from the Ain department of 
France, which is where Bourg-en- 
Bresse and Yonnas, Blanc's town. 


meals, the beef stew. I turn from are situated. 


less austere. 


notes on GegrgaSjiiKMn-s novels b1ml . uould 00l drc3m of 



Europe 

fitliVi 


irsrouos 


: Vife 


. . 1 ' > ” 
■■ A - r’.:b5*’ r - 

r- “ _ . 


_ cheap, however. A while ’82 Cha- 

in “Maigret and the Headless teauneuf-du-Pape from BeaucasleL 
Corpse," the chid* inspector calls or perhaps even a good white Cotes 




The Now York Tb> 


that afternoon, amid the laughter 


home to say he has been detained, du Rhdne, would be excellent and 
and asks what he is missing. Says less expensive alternatives. 


The setting was Bourg-en-Bresse and warmth of an unassuming res- 
in the eastern pan of France, where taurant. it seemed 10 rival the great 


Blanc, the chef-owner of the three- wines of the Cote d'Or. 


SILENT MOMENT — Jonathan N. Uppian, who 
teaches history at Mount Holyoke College in Massa- 
chusetts, meditates in the school's new Japan ese, tea- 
house, built to give students a sense of another culture. 


«--■ . „ ; icrnTi 

tclrcoi 


, rL -< c 

-■■■ V. " - ■; 'n.iricet 
•* .decent 


A.-—’- 

t»r. I-'- 


Rarely Staged 'Little Eyolf 9 Takes Apart a Marriage With Brazing Candor 


^ ,V> - j-icc Ou 
t r 7 Oecnur 


i i— irui 

-s— s 'jy 


By Michael Billington 

International Herald Tribune 


self to educating his son. The de- cidal figures from the Norse sagas 
"ossessive Rita is u — “ — ’ UI — *««- 


L ONDON — We rarefy see Ib- 
/ sen’s “Little Evolf." The out- 


earth bound” people whose 


A-/ sen’s “Little Eyolf." The out- 
standing revival at the Lyric Ham- 
mersmith, starring Duma Rigg and 
Ronald Pickup, is only the fifth 
production in London since the 
play was written in 1894. Such ue- 


in tensely jealous of the boy. No only hope is to achieve some small 
sooner has her murderous dislike good hoe and now. 


been revealed than we learn that What is astonishing is Ibsen’s 


Little Eyolf has drowned. The sexual realism. He shows that 
nightmare line “The crutch is float- women may have stronger appe- 


ing" resounds in the parents' ears, dies than men. He implies that im- 
The first act is exciting melodrama, potence may demo from guilt ( AI- 


LONDON THEATER 


What follows in the next two is a fred has never recovered from die 
remorseless stripping away of the fact that EyolTs lameness was due 


profile and sudden blustering to pack audiences into the AdelphL sole joke depends upon the hero’s 
rages, he captures precisely that el- ] t has the benefit of some sprightly behaving with Chaplinesque vuT- 
ement of the man-child often found n^i Gav tunes {including the garity amid the effete toffs. Whal it 
in Ibsen heroes. Cheryl Campbell “Lambeth Walk.” which overflows finally says is that silk purses can 
who seems to spend much of her in l0 the theater stalls like a Cock- be made out of sow’s ears, 
working life in Ibsen and Suind- ne y bacchanal). seducLive. cream- London has at the moment one 
berg, plays the half-sister with just colored, country-house sets by superb musical about the real 
the right hint of suppressed long- Martin Johns, arid a revised book working class, “The Hired Man"; 
ing, and Paul Moriany lends solid bv Stephen Frv. Yet. although the this one pats them patronizingly on 


into the theater stalls like a Cock- be made out of sow’s ears. 


W - “ rn '" • ‘ 


nev bacchanal), seducLive. cream- London has at the moment one 


colored, country-house sets by superb musical about the real 
Martin Johns, arid a revised book working class, “The Hired Man"; 


support as a road-building idealist. 
I doubt any married couple could 


gleet is hard to fathom, since Ibsen, 
with the iron simplicity you often 
find in an artist’s late works, here 
takes apart a marriage with a brac- 
ing candor that makes Edward Al- 
bee and Tennessee Williams look 
positively mealymouthed. 


“life-lies" with which Allred and to his F allin g oil a table during a 
Rita have surrounded themselves, bout of parental lovemaking). He 


Ten years earlier in “The Wild suggests that Alfred’s erotic dreams 
Duck” Ibsen put the case for pro- are filled with images of his half- 


I doubt any married couple could 
sit through this uncomfortable 
masterpiece without findin g in it 
somewhere a reflection of their 
own lives. 


by Stephen Fry. Yet. although the this one pats them patronizingly on 
audience appeared to lap it up. it the bead mid remarks how quaint 


has to be said that the show is class- they are. Robert Lindsay play the 
ridden, snobbish, mindless non- cheeky Cockney chappie with' a. 


rciisons 
^• L1 V ,; -a -/. a ' 

-OiMi:; erasers 1 
.u. -reji. F^T 


sense that only the deeply senti- brown-derby bounce, Emma 
mental Britons could take to their Thompson subdues her natural in- 


teedve illusions; here he argues that sister. 

“UdeEyoiTisnotaneasyplay 

world. Alfred i^es himS to 10 “ ^. e P end ? on a 

be a lofty ideaSldcvoted father, of claustrophobic reenmma- 

_T.“ _ i.:, i«ir * don m the open expanses of west- 


idligence as his simple sweetheart 



Madiran is a wine from the 
southwest of France. It rivals Ca- 
hors as the deepest-colored, long- 
est-lived wine from that region and 
is usually coupled with the cassou- 
lets, the white-bean stews, of Tou- 
louse, the capital of that part of 
France. Madiran can be drunk at 
two or three years of age. It is at its 



The title (possibly one reason for plaronic adorer of his half-sister. ^ 
the play’s unpopularity) refers to Asta; Ibsen peels off the layers of ^, 1 ^5y,; r ,fnf < S?nrcW- 

fcmpploisiaol Alfred M dR.i a a ^ding 

AUmera, who live on a comfortable an cdS: Similarly, Rita iSnss Da>ld- 

estate by a Norwegian Qord. In ihe that her fierce sexual passion lifts 

cnthrullmg fira att Alfred deodcs her Ohio the heroic plane: it 5S. 3?^^ 

to pve up work ooao unsmuen, doBtfL^ctm with grief and handi to wSve around 

pompously titled book on there- gndcAlfjcd and Rita come to teal- hn-husband-s throat as if unsure 
sponsibdity of man to devote him- Be to they are not grandiose sut- ^ or ^ 

J After EyolTs death she passes from 


A less welcome revival is the 
1937 hit musical “Me and My 

Girt,” which originally ran for 
1,646 performances at the Victoria 
P alac e and winch now looks likely 


Tbe plot (which could be com- and Susannah Fellows is pretty nif- 
fortably inscribed on the back of a tyasa predatory aristocraL What is 


. ... - -ffft pr 
-'mp3? 
7vnZ i.-r vtdCKST.fc 

Snr-rA Mia 
-z <r -• - • < clverf I 


postage stamp) concents a Cock- sad is to find audiences swallowing 
nev barrow- bov who discovers he is the antediluvian social attitudes of 


- -f^’raponc 

-Lb: -- - ‘ 


ney barrow-boy who discovers he is the anteduuvian social attitudes of 
a long-lost lord; and his girl, Sally, the prewar musical as if the last 50. 


who undergoes an Flfaa Doolittle- years were nothing but a bad - 
like transformation. The show’s dream. 


1943 Ship a Monument to 'Ugly Ducklings’ 

The Associated Pros Once a month, volunteers join cided it was the most promising 


1Z.9V. gaorgt? V tW.TZ3.32.3Z 

PfiRIS- FRANCE 


VHingOi, 


black-gowned guilt into a phase of ^ years, the SS Jeremiah O'Brien 


S AN FRANCISCO — For 
years, the SS Jeremiah O'Brien 


Cap tain Ralph G. Wilson to fire up candidate For a Liberty Ship resto- 
the Jeremiah O’Brien’s steam en- radon. Retired seamen and history 
gine. Twice a year, at $75 a person, buffs helped begin the work and 


practical i dealis m where she pro- was mothballs, collecting barna- 
poses to offer a home to the poor cles and a coat of rust only a sand- 


the ship carries tourists around San raised money. 


boys on the beach. Rigg manages to blaster could love. Then it was re- 
suggest that she has undergone a slored 35 a monument to the World 


Francisco Bay. It can also be visit- 
ed at its berth at Fort Mason. 


The ship is about 90 percent re- 
stored. “Our biggest problem now 


happy. c.*a 2 £ '85 





spiritual regeneration without sim- 1 1 Liberty Ships and the peo- 

ply sounding like a do-gooding P^ e w ho built and sailed them. 


The O’Brien was built in Maine is maintaining it,” said Wilson, 
in 1943, and for three years it car- who captained Liberty Sims in the 

■ , _ __ .... . u i ,< f T .1 


L£ TRAM BUU. AnvLyor MW IV floor. 
3430906. The final "BWIe tpoque" d tax « 
Pnrii. Uadi maw 180 F. wine, vd ivwe wd. 


CABARET 

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THE BffHANT ON THE RIVK 

Dinner aid Dana 

Wodd (ana. Good food, good inrmm. goat 
inpOntcn 139 Cranenoi U. T«L 834 1631/6206. 


charity- worker. 

Pickup has a tougher job as A1 


Most of the 2.751 Liberty Ships, 
built to carry supplies around the 


ried food, troops and ammunition. Merchant Marine. He said the pop^ 
In 1966 the U. S. maritime admin- ular cruises take two weeks to pre- 


Picfcup has a [(Higher job as Al- Duut to carry supplies around the 
fred since he has simultaneously to world and dubbed “uglv duck- 
suggesl physical attractiveness, lings" for their bulky, utilitarian 


istrator. Thomas J. Patterson, de- pare for. 


m HORSE 


' far and away 
the best nude revue 
in the universe" 

... iriyi the ptflt 


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LOEWS MONTE-CARLO 

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GOLDHN CARP 


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Statistics Index 

AMEX Prices P- ,J ( 
v AMEX IUflM/knrtP.10 I 
' n<SE orws P- • < 
NrtE HWO.IOW1 P.l# * 
CanMion f*oeu P.14 * 
Curfoncv rtW* 1 1 
Cwnmol»lM P.10 ' 
Dividends A 10 * 


Earning* resorts P — 
FHno raft notes P.— 
Cola markets p. 7 
interns rain P. 7 
Market sutmuorr P. B 
Odilons P.10 

OTC slack P.S2 

Other markets P.U 


WEDNESDAY , FEBRUARY 20, 1985 


<74 6 k CVTESNtTBWAL M *. f 

itcraloca^fcnbunc 

BUSINESS / FINANCE 


IMTEBMATIONA1 MANAGER 

Europe Firms Experiment 
With Videoconfere ncing 


Vi 


By SHERRY BUCHANAN 

Internal tonal Herald Tribune 

' IDEOCONFERENCING seems a long distance man- 
ager’s dream. Yet. in the United States, where it was first 


Y introduced, it has been slow to take off. Dataquesi Inc., 
▼ an American high-tech consulting company, projects 
that U.S. industry revenues will grow to only $450 million in 1988 
from $150 million in 1983, a steady, but uninspiring fate of 
growth. 

Ford Motor Co. in the United Kingdom currently is the only 
European company using videoconferencing across national bor- 
ders. But with costs coming down, the televised group telephone 
hookup is templing multi national companies in Europe. 
Government telecommunica- 


Onl 


lion authorities in Europe are 
beginning to market a trans- 
Atlantic videoconferencing 
service and are working on a 
European service that will in- 
clude France, Germany, Italy, 
the Netherlands and Britain. 

The European Community 
is planning a videoconferenc- 


'Some of our 
executives borer 
outside the video- 
conferencing room. 1 


Duel 


\ f • r* !?"i* 
1 » D i* il» 


ing link between Brussels and Luxembourg. Two London compa- 
nies. National Westminster Bank PLC and Colgate-Palmolive 
Ltd., have set up trial videoconferencing networks within Britain. 
Matra and Thompson Group of Paris are planning French 
networks. 

The main reasons companies use videoconferencing is for 
global product presentation, sales meetings and getting top 
executives with busy schedules together. 

“Design engineers based in the U.K. need to talk constantly to 
the production people in Germany, particularly during the 
launching of a new product," says Graham Fretwdl of Ford, who 
developed the company's facility in the London suburb of Brent- 
wood for videoconferences with its factory in Cologne. West 
Germany, and with the parent company in Dearborn. Michigan. 

“Ford has evolved from a set of national companies." he said. 
“We are tending to go into a worldwide car and worldwide 
sourcing of components." 

B UT some executives when conducting business over the 
telephone would rather be heard but not seen. And al- 
though new technology has reduced the slow-motion effect 
of the color-television picture, the images still can be a bit fuzzy. 
|i “Some of our executives hover outside the videoconferencing 
[rt room and don’t even want to come in," says Mr. Fretweli, 

^ Some executives also worry that videoconferencing will cut 
down on their travel. “They’re afraid they will lose their perky 
business trips," says Laura Turk of Intdmet, a joint venture 
between Inter-Continental Hotels Co. and Comsat General Co., 
which provides a New York- London videoconferencing service 
using Inter-Continental hotel facilities for $1,600 an hour. 

Videoconferencing also is expensive and can be inconvenient. 
Unless a company has its own videoconferencing network, a 
public facility must be reserved in advance. In addition to Inter- 
Continental hotels, most telecommunication authorities are pro- 
viding public facilities. 

“As cost becomes lower, executive acceptance level will rise," 
says Ken Newbury, an industry analyst with DataquesL 
British Telecom charges £650 ($715) and France Cables et 
Radio charges 9,000 to 10,000 francs ($900 to $1,000) an hour for 
the link from Europe to halfway across the Atlantic Ocean. But 
that is only about half the cost, since users must pay a U.S. carrier 
for the hookup between America and the mid-Atlantic point 
Since there is no commercial videoconference service within 
Europe, rates have yet to be agreed upon. The French are 
_r proposing 3,500 francs an hour for their half. Other government 
; telecommunications authorities and British Telecom have yet to 
announce their proposed rates. Ford’s link between Britain and 
(Continued on Page 13, CoL 5) 


L 


Currency Rates 

Lota interbank rates on Feb. 19 , excluding fees. 




4 PM. 

s 

* 

DM. 

F JF. 

ILL. 

eur. 

BJ=. 

SF- 


Amsterdam 

X74 

4094 

111205 s 

37/0 m 

0.1B34 

— 

5432* 

13335* 

14364 y 

Bmsetifal 

66*3 

72*8 

20.105 

6J713 

i2HS* 

17-7575 

— 

23591 

2568 ■ 

Frankfort 

13162 

1614 

— - 

3270* 

1.619 X 

HL345* 

4975* 

11788* 

1369 ■ 

London (b) 

1-013 

— 

1 634 

1TJDS2S 


4.1015 

72J8 

35715 

yuan 

Milan 

2A4A90 

Z337.50 

617X7 

201.77 

— 

545X5 

30J1? 

72441 

7823 

NewYorftfcJ 

■ 

137935 

13215 

10.155 

tom* 

1753 

6450 

28 M 

2UL7S 

Piwis 

10.139 

11869 

10592 

— 

4.954 x 

27017 

15323 * 

380338763* 

Tokyo 


2B4.fi 

79.00 

2585 

1281* 

7081 

39239* 

9382 

— 

Zartcfi 

2315 

10723 

BUBS* 

27.73 ■ 

0.1374 

74J7* 

43155" 

— 

1-0303“ 

1 ECU 

0-6709 

061 S3 

23249 

08081 

1.37383 

25306 

447234 

18896 176613 

1S0R 

0.96362 

0-674x3 

3.15952 

9-67674 

1.95400 

3577 

635411 

268SB 243330 


Pond’s, 
Stauffer 
To Merge 

Accord Valued 
At $ 1.25 Billion 


Inco Hopes to Mine New Profitability 

Nickel Producer Declining Nickel Inventories 

Gets Good Odds Pr/c0g - 35 

From Analysts mu.s.doaars _ S3 . 


Compiled In- Our Staff From Dispatches 

GREENWICH. Connecticut — 
Cbesebrough- Pond’s Inc. said 
Tuesday that it had agreed to pay 
$1.25 billion in cash to acquire 
Stauffer Chemical Co. in a transac- 
tion that would nearly double its 
size. 

The companies said that both 
their boards had unanimously ap- 
proved the $28 per-share tender of- 
fer, which surprised Wall Street. 

Chesebrough said that the tender 
offer was expected to start Wednes- 
day and would continue until at 
least half of the outstanding 
Stauffer Chemical shares were ob- 
tained. Any slock still outstanding 
would be acquired for the same $28 
per-share price in a merger immedi- 
ately following the tender offer. 

Chesebrough-Pond's. which 
makes and markets personal- 
grooming items, packaged foods 
and other consumer products, has 
estimated 1 984 sales at 51.8 billion, 
ft has not posted a loss in 29 years. 

Stauffer Chemical had sales of 
$1.5 billion in its last fiscal year 
ended Sept. 30. 1984. Stauffer 
earned $27 million, or 57 cents a 
share, that year, up from an $18.7- 
millioD loss the year before. 

Stauffer, based in Westport, 
Connecticut, makes and markets 
chemicals, and chemical-related 
products, including agricultural 
pesticides and food ingredients. 

A Chesebrough-Pond’s spokes- 
man said that the company would 
pay for the acquistion entirely with 
a revolving bank agreement- The 
company also said that it intended 
to maintain its current dividend 
policy. 

Stauffer stock shot up $5375 
Tuesday, to close at $27. and Cbe- 
sebrough-Pond's fell $3,875, to fin- 
ish at $33.50. 

Ralph E Ward, chairman of 
Chesebrough-Pond’s said that the 
acquisition would blend his compa- 
ny’s marketing expertise with 
Stauffer's research capabilities. 

Many analysts expressed sur- 
prise at the merger, saying that 
Chesebrough-Pond's was making 
its biggest acquisition ever at a lime 
of mounting competition. 

“It doesn’t make sense to me." 
said Joseph Kosloff. who follows 
Chesebrough-Pond's for Dean 
Witter. “Chesebrough is going to 
have to borrow $1.25 billion for 
this deal That adds a strong ele- 
ment of financial risk- - ' 

Other analysis said that the ac- 
quisition. would fulfill the aims of 
both companies to discourage po- 
tential hostile takeover attempts. 

“Executives at both companies 
have recently been scared that 
someone was interested in making 
unsolicited bids for their business- 
es," said Martin Rober, chemical 
industry analyst for Montgomery 
Securities. (Reuters. UP!) 


By Daniel F. Cuff 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Of all the 
mining companies attempting to 
dig themselves out of huge finan- 
cial holes. Inco Lid., the Toron- 
to-based nickel producer, is a 
leader among those that analysts 
say are in a good position for a 
turnaround. 

Not only has the company 
slashed its costs, but the funda- 
mental outlook for nickel also 
has strengthened. Inventories are 
at their lowest in eight years, de- 
mand has been holding reason- 
ably firm, and some analysts say 
nickel prices may rise this year 
because of a tighter market. 

Nickel is used to harden steel 
and is a big factor in stainless 
and alloy steels. These specialty 
steels have not suffered the same 
depressed markets us carbon 
steel 

Donald J. Phillips, Inco’s pres- 
ident. said last week. “We're see- 
ing strong demand. Supplies are 
tight" on the London Metals Ex- 
change. Nickel on that exchange 
dosed Tuesday at $2.29 a pound 
(about £4.628 per metric ton) 
about the same as a week 
earlier. 

Some of the improvement 
showed up in Inco’s earnings last 
quarter. The company showed a 
small profit, $43 million, its first 
after 13 consecutive quarters of 
losses. Thai still translated into a 
loss of 2 cents per share, howev- 
er. after allowance for preferred 
dividends. 

The net profit “was more psy- 
chologically important than 
real," Mr. Phillips said. “It 


Prices 
In U.S. dollars 
per pound 
at month end 


Dollar Soars 
As U.S. Declines 
To Intervene 


TAAy.cN 

4.W.? % S . ‘ " > 


Jan.'S5: 

S2.31 


.ft 

• 1001 1000 1000 1004 


llte^ 

A J J 

1980 1001 1 


showed we had finally turned the 
comer." 

For all of 1984. the company 
posted a loss of $773 million, 
substantially smaller than the 
1983 loss of $234.9 million. The 
improvement, however, was less 
than loco had projected. A year 
ago, inco pronounced that it was 
“on the road to recovery" and 
said that the “worst financial re- 
sults are now behind us." 

That recovery has not hap- 
pened yet. Although some Wall 
Street analysts had anticipated 
that the company would turn it- 
self around last year, most have 
maintained their favorable out- 
look despite the delay. They 


rim?«ofef£e* 
e "toihoasand» 
.of metric tons 
at month end 


. Jan. ’R5: 
6.528 


J O 

1984 

Source: CPU 

The tie* Yo» Mn 


point out that all the fundamen- 
tals remain in place. 

“It's my favorite stock," says 
John P. Ingersoll Jr. metals ana- 
lyst at Salomon Brothers, “but 
the strong dollar has kept the 
price of nickel down. The turn- 
around is slower in coming than 
1 had thought." 

Inco’s stock, which in 1980 
traded around $33, fell below S9 
last summer and has since risen, 
closing Tuesday at 513.75, up 
373 cents, on the New York 
Stock Exchange. 

Mr. Ingersoll believes that 
Inco, having cut costs so much, 
can be profitable Lhis year if the 
(Con timed on Page 11, CoL 1) 


Cumptled In Our SmJJ brum Uoputche* 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
moved sharply higher again Tues- 
day after it became apparent that 
U.S. authorities would not join in a 
concerted effort to cool the ad- 
vance. Gold was little changed. 

The dollar hit 3.3215 Deutsche 
marks in New York, up from 3.26 
on Friday and its highest level since 
late 1 97 1 . U.S. markets were closed 
for the Washington’s Birthday holi- 
day on Monday. The dollar also set 
a record high against the French 
franc, trading at 10.1550 francs 
against 9.99 on Friday, 

Indeed, the spiral continued 
worldwide. In Sydney Wednesday, 
the Australian dollar opened at a 
record low of 0.6830 against (he 
dollar and fell quickly to 67 cents. 

Carmine Roiondo. chief corpo- 
rate trader at Manufaclurers Hano- 
ver Trust, said that U.S. banks hud 
been caught short of dollars on 
Friday and Tuesday and had to 
buy some back. “It’s no surprise, 
the market just keeps testing a top 
for the dollar," he said. 

Analysts noted that the United 
States had signalled a disinclina- 
tion to intervene to slow the dollar. 
In Washington, Treasury Secretary 
James A Baker 3d. in testimony to 
the Senate Appropriations Com- 
mittee, said. “We don’t think any- 
thing can or should be done” to 
reduce the dollar's value. 

He said that the effectiveness of 
intervention on the currency mar- 
kets was “subject to question,” and 
indicated that the dollar's value 
might decline if the United States 
reduced the budget deficit. This, he 


Singaporean Raises His Bid for Wheelock Marden 


By Dinah Lee 

Imemiriomil Herald Tribune 

HONG KONG — The stakes 
have been raised for the third time 
in a week in the battle for control of 
Wheelock Marden & Co., one of 
Hong Kong's oldest trading and 
shipping companies. 

Singapore’s leading properly 
and hold magnate, Khoo Terk 
Puau who made the first takeover 
bid last Thursday, has raised his 
bid, a company he created for the 
takeover effort indicated Tuesday 
The new bid countered an offei 
Saturday from Sir Y.K. Pao, a 
Hong Kong shipping magnate. 

Mr. Khoo’s new offer was 7 
Hong Kong dollars (90 cents) for A 
ordinary shares and 70 cents for B 
ordinary shares. 


enough to give them 51 percent stantial Wheelock share blocks in shareholdos Tuesday, announcing 
voting control. Mr. Khoo is be- Hong Kong and London during the commissioning of “an indepen- 
lieved to hold a 24 percent interest the New Year break. dent valuation" of Hong Kong 


lieved to hold a 24 percent interest the New Year break. dent valuation" of Hong Kong 

in the company while Sir Y.K. is Mr. Khoo acquired his shares properties in which Wheelock is 
believed to bold 34 percent. last week from the family interests interested. The message urged 

After Mr. Khoo’s new bid was of John L Marden. the Wheelock stockholders to “hold your Whee- 
made public, the Wheelock board, chairman. It is believed that Sir lock Marden shares." 

in an urgent message to siockhdd- Y.K. obtained a large pari of his 

ers, advised them not to accept ei- present holdings from a director of 
tber offer pending a study of Whee- two Wheelock subsidiaries. John 

lock interests, Cheung. ■ iiAU»Acii»n 

Trading in Wheelock A shares Acting on behalf of an indepen- I MANAvaOvIcNl 


Housing Starts 
Jump 14,9% 

The .-tni* iiitcd /Vi %% 

WASHINGTON — U.S. • 
housing starts, pushed by a 
surge in apartment construc- 
tion. jumped 14.9 percent in 
January, the biggest increase 
since May 1983. the govern- 
ment reported Tuesday. 

The Department of Com- 
merce said that new housing 
was started at a seasonally ad- 
justed annual rate of 1.83 mil- 
lion units in January, compared 
to a revised rate of 1.60 million 
units in December. The figures 
are important U.S. economic 
indicators because housing usu- 
ally is one of the first sectors to 
decline when an economy 
slows. 

Meanwhile Tuesday, the 
Federal Reserve Board said 
that U.S. factories, mines and - 
utilities operated at 81.9 per- 
cent of capacity in January, up 
from the 81.7 percent revised 
December level. 

said, would lead to a decline in real 
interest rales, and thus in the dol- 
lar's value. 

Mr. Baker also said that the dol- 
lar might drop if foreign trading 
partners cut taxes and government 
regulations, and opened their mar- 
kets further to U.S. goods. 

Mr. Baker also said that inter- 
vention was a popular tool among 
U.S. trading partners, adding: “We 
have done some of this." 

Some intervention was reported 
Tuesday, but it was not enough to I 
stem the dollars advance. | 

“Clearly the market was wailing 3 
for the Federal Reserve to make a 
more determined effort." a London , 
trader said. “European central 
banks seem reluctant to move on ; 

(Continued on Page 11, CoL 1) 


ther offer pending a study of Whee- 
lock interests. 

Trading in Wheelock A shares 


ordinary shares. because or tne Chinese New 

Sir YJC’s offer of 6.60 dollars Year, there will be no more trading 
for A shares and 66 cents for B on the exchange this week. Huwev- 
shares was 10 percent more than er, Hong Kong brokers said that 
Mr. Khoo’s initial bid of 6 dollars trading in Wheelock might contin- 


whs suspended shortly before noon dent committee formed by mon- 
Tuesday at the Hong Kong ex- bers of Wheelock ’s board, the mer- 
change, with the share price at 7.10 chant bankers East Asia Warburg 
dollars. It had been fisted at 6.90 Ltd. issued an urgent message to 

before it was suspended on Mon- 

day. On Friday, the last full day of E ■■■■■ ~ ~T 

trading in Wheelock, the slock □ □ 

dosed at 6.40 dollars. | [ 

Because of the Chinese New 


for A and 60 cents for B shares. 

It was not immediately dear 
whether the two investors were bid- 
ding for all of the company's re- 


ue in the form of pledges to be 
honored when trading resumes 
next Monday. 

Brokers expea Sir Y.K. and Mr. 



maining outstanding shares or for Khoo to look for holders of sub- , 


German Upturn Continued in Quarter 


AosTrauaitS 
jutunea tenant* 
BeMaa fin. front 
Canadian S 
Dantti krone 
Ffnnittl markka 
Greek drodma 
Hm Kohs 


Dollar Values 

E<miv. a ' mOCT U 
0553 I risk C 1 

O0N4 isrooumebof ’ 

32373 Kuwaiti diner 0 

0-3973 Mokiv.iiaeeu 2 

0.1054 Morw. krone 
0.0533 PHI peso M 

QB0SS Port escudo I 

02 m Saudi rival 3 


S Per 

M. C-rmm ' US2 
0443 Singapore! 32575 
OSS S-AMcBitrand 1.9D47 
00077 S. Korean woo OtO 
00055 Span, peseta ISOM 
0.107 Swed. kroon 925 
00255 TntwoeS 3922 
UBSB TBaUMKI 27-9*5 
02723 UJLE.dlrbem 15725 


*Mertino:l.lK» Irish t 

foj Commensal franc tbj Amounts needed to bur are Bound id Amounts needed to bur one donor ft 
Unit! aMOO Ik) Units OMAN (V) Units Ol KUDO 
NA: not quoted; MJL: not crrallawe. 

Sources; Banova du Benelux (Brussels/; Buna Canunere/a/e ttattana (Ml/m/; Banova 
Rationale He Paris (Ports J; IMF <SDR); Banova Arobo a/ In t erna ti onale erurrtesttssemanf 
t dinar, rival, dtrhom). Other data from Reuters and AP. 


Interest Rates 


Eurocurrency Deposits 


Feb. 19 


IM. 

Sts - 

84S 

54. 

■54 

S«w 

-5*6 

14VS- 

14Ui 

10 s.- 

2M. 

14- 

B9S 

S*b 

- 6 

540 

- S9s 

14 - 

MW 

1016- 

3M. 

9 

9V6 

6 

- 6U 

S*. 

- S'* 

13 9V. 

14 h. 

1016- 

6M. 

Ih - 

9h 

6* 

- 6Va 

54 

- 5*6 

13 vs- 

I3iv 

IHb- 

1Y. 

10 W- 

10 H. 

4Vi 

■ 6H 

516 

- M 

12VS- 

124b 

114b - 


Rotes aPPtteabM fa interbank deeos/ts of Si ml/Jtan minimum far evOva/ent). 

Sources: Maroon Guaranty (dollar. DM. SF. Pound. FFi; Uovds Bank (ECU/; Citibank 
(SDR/. 


Asian Dollar Rates 


Source: Reuters. 

Key Money Rates 

United States o 

Dtscounl Rato 
federal Funds 
Prime Rate 

Broker Loan Rate 9 

Comm. Paeer, 3D-179 days 
3- month Treasury Bills 
5-manth Treasury Blits 
CD's 30-50 Oavs 
CD's 6049 aavs 


< mo*. 

9 A. -9*. 


Pray. 

Britain 

Close Prav. 

8 

Boik Base Rale 

14 14 

81 h 

Call Monev 

14 14 

IWs 

91 -day Treasury Bill 

131 b m 

9416 

B50 

8.16 

S^nontti Interbank 

Japan 

1413 15/16 

424 

Discount Rote 

5 5 

B80 

Call Mottov 

6 VS 6 3^6 

8.22 

60 -dav 1 mortal* 

6 7'I6 6 7/16 


Lombard Rate 
Overnight Rato 
One Month /nferbertfc 
J-montti inmraonfc 
4-month interbank 


Intervention Rate 
Call Money 
One-month interbank 
3-month interbank 
6-month interbank 


OHO 6 JJ 0 
SJi i60 
545 SiS 
6.15 4.15 

6M 6M 


lSh I0V2 
IDW I 0 M 
10 11/1410 1I/T6 
WklO 11/14 
10 9/16 10 9/14 


Gold Prices 


Nona Kona 
Luxembourg 
Paris (115 kllol 
Zurich 
London 
New York 


AJUL PM. ChPae 
Clsd 

39245 — — D5 

30200 30116 — I/O 

30175 301*5 - 140 

30190 30140 - 1.90 

— 303.90 — a* 


Sources: Reuters. Commerzbank. Crtdtt Ly- 
onnais. uovds Bank, Besik of Taftm. 


Official fixings l*r London. Paris and Lu»em- 
baure, opening and clwlng nrtces lor Hona Kona 
wid Zurich. New Vork Cemex current centred. 
AH prices fti USA ner ounce- 
Source: Reuters. 


By Warren Getler 

International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — West Germa- 
ny’s economic recovery continued 
in the fourth quarter last year, the 
Bundesbank sad Tuesday. It cau- 
tioned. however, that the economy 
could lose steam if the government 
fails to dispd confusion about new 
car-exhaust regulations. 

Boosted by exports and domestic 
demand for capital goods, ibe Wesi 
German gross national product 
grew 15 percent in the fourth quar- 
ter from the prexious three months, 
and 3 percent from the like quarter 
a year ago. the Bundesbank said. 

The central bank's findings, in 
seasonally-adjusted figures, were 
contained in its February monthly 
report, which focuses on the econo- 
my at year-end. The tone of the 
report was optimistic, and support- 
ed other analyses. 

The Bundesbank report empha- 
sized a 14-percent rise in foreign 
orders for manufactured goods in 
die fourth quarter from a year earli- 
er. It also noted a 6 -percem rise in 
domestic orders for capital goods, 
led by the electronic and machine- 
tool sectors, from the fourth quar- 
ter of 1983. 

Foreign demand and domestic 
capital investment wit] continue to 
serve as the impetus for economic 
growth in 1985, the Bundesbank 
said. 

Although private consumption 
has not been among the key factors 
in the recovery, (he Bundesbank 
voiced concern about consumer re- 
luctance to buy automobiles in ibe 
past five months. 


Richardson Savings & Loai 
Bank and Thist Company 

Cayman Islands. Wes) Indies 
oflenng 

9 . 75 % 

180 Day 

Eurodeposit 
amounts over 
0100,000 U.S. 

Member 

GttrEX'&x.sr' 

■ H klilwui Soringi & Urn 
Put cm », Lodi Boa 8 
12700 tafc Cut* OrtM. 5U» ISM 
DaSa. Too* 75351 
CnaAmBataDH 
TUMBBSZn ftdrtRDS0N»L 
■to- (214) W0-244I 


Domestic orders for automobiles 
in the fourth quarter, coming after 
die debate in Bonn on car-exhaust 
pollution that began last Septem- 
ber, fell 7 percent from the average 
in the previous three quarters, the 
report said. 

The drop in car demand, the 
Bundesbank said, “could lead to a 
long-term dampening of further 
economic growth if new emission- 
con iroJ proposals are not finalized 
quickly.’ 

Hie concern centered not only 
on the prospect that weak domestic 
demand for cars could keep private 
consumption in the doldrums, but 
also on the chance that postpone- 
ment of car purchases at home 
could hurt auto- industry suppliers 
and other sectors. 

In addition, any slowing of the 
strong foreign demand could leave 
the car industry on shaky footing. 

Some economists at West Ger- 
man research institutes have said 
that an amo industry burdened 
with domestic consumer uncer- 
tainty, and a largely saturated mar- 
ket for home construction, raise 
some questions about West Ger- 
many's growth prospects and 
chances for reducing unemploy- 
ment this year. 

Since the fourth quarter of 1982, 
the Bundesbank reported, the West 
German economy has grown 6 per- 
cent. The Economics Ministry’s 
forecast for growth this year is 15 
percent or higher, following growth 
of 2.6 percent in 1984. 

The Bundesbank said it sees no 
cause for alarm in January’s record 
unemployment figure of 2.62 mil- 


Mr. Everett W. YOUNG 
fcw been appointed to the position 
at Genera] Manager of 

MANUFACTURERS HANOVER 
BANQUE NORDIQUE 
on Febtnarr lot. 1985, 

Mr. Robert D. BEAUMO.YT 
«Im has retired. 

Mr. Evemt W. YOUNG. (11) 
a VS. di men. joined 
MANlfFACTURERS HANOVER 
group in 1970. 

He Kaa Vice President in the New 
York head office and subseqaenllv 
In efanree ot MHT SEOUL and TAf- 
PEI branch. 


lion, or 10.6 percent of the work 
force, up from 233 million, or 9.4 
percent, in December. 

The Bundesbank report con- 
curred with assessments by the eco- 
nomics and labor ministries that a 
dramatic jump in unemployment 
last month was attributable to ex- 
tremely cold weather and should be 
viewed as an exception. 


Options Ifrioes In S/oz.). 


Madison Avonue 
at 76th Stroot 
New Work 10021 

Cablo The Cariylo Mow Voric 
International Men 620092 
telephone 212-744-1600 

A member ol the Sharp Group 
since 1967 


MANAGEMENT AND BUSINESS 
IN THE ARAB WORLD 

A COURSE SPECIALLY DESIGNED 
FOR EUROPEAN/AMERICAN EXPATRIATE MANAGERS 

Aims of the course 

■To improve the effectiveness of expatriate managers and specialists 
by analyzing current social, economic, religious and political 
developments in the Arab world 

eTo increase their awareness of Arab managerial styles and behavior, 
thereby achieving greater understanding and effective working 
relationships between them and their Arab counterparts 

Course subjects include 

■Aspects and interpretation of Arab history. Islam, and politics 
•The changing pattern of Industrial relations in Ibe Arab world 
•The characteristics and styles of Arab executives 
■Roles of expatriates in managing a multinational staff 
•Comparative management systems: West. Middle East, Far East 
■ Conflict avoidance and resolution 
■Motivation of personnel in Arab organizations 


April 15-19. 1985 
Houston. Texas. USA 


April 22-25, 19B5 
Athens. Greece 



For hqidries/Rteervations, please contact: Course CoorOma nr 
UBRC, SA_ M3. Box B5014-1 541 0 Psychics. Athens. Greece 
Telex: 218336 IIERCGR - Tel: 681 181 1. 6826995 


hv» | 

Mi 

May 


250 | 

035-U75 

23253475 



300 

580 450 

1425-1725 

34503US 

310 | 

075- 175 

HX75-I22S 

I12S-W73 

320 

a& loo 

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330 | 

am- aso 

375 525 

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am- as) 

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1211 Gam I. SMtzafaurf 
TeL 31 8251 ■ Telex 28385 


ji|p TAIWAN 

8 MANAGED 

I COMMODITY ACCOUNTS. 


PERFORMANCE 
RESULTS FOR 
COMPTRENDU 

BEGINNING EQUITIES 
OF $100,000 
ON JANUARY 1 
OF EACH YEAR 

yielded the (blowing 
. after al chaoes: 

IN 1980: 4-165% 

IN 1981: 4-137% 

N 1982: 4-32% 

IN 1983: — 24% 

M 1984: —34% 

ai of 

FEB. 14, 1985 
EQUITY 
STOOD AT 
U.S. $98,590.21 
More than $ 50,000,000.00 
currently under management 

CaS or wnie RojaB Fraasr af 
TAPMAN, Trend Analysis and 
Porto*) Management Inc., 
Wall Street Plaza. New 'tork 
New \tifk 10005 212-269-1041 
Tel£KBMt 687173 UW. 


OPPENH EIMER 
OFFERS YOUR IRA AN 
ALTERNATIVE 
TO GUARANTEED 
LOW RATES. 


F or IRA investors seeking the 
assurance of a fixed rate, we 


JL assurance of a fixed rate, we 
suggest a bank.* 

For those investors more 
concerned with how high the 
race of return is, chan with how 
fixed, we suggest another route. 
TheOppenneimer Special Fund. 

Because over its life, the 
Special Fund has the best perfor- 
mance Yecord of all 361 mutual 
funds that have been in existence 
that long— an astonishing total 
return of 940%.** 


So if you had been able to 
put $2,000 a year into a Special 
Fund IRA since the Fund’s 
inception, your IRA would have 
been worth $104,570*** as of 
December 31, 1984. That’s an 
average annual return of 21.5%. 

The Special Fund provides 
an IRA investment based on the 
philosophy that the 
opportunity for a 
higher return is pref- 
erable to the certain- 
ty of a lower one. 


To M. Tucker Smith mi 3D rt 

I Oppenheimer &. 0>- 62-64 Cannon St. London EC4N 6AE England 
I Telephone 01-2 J6 6578 

I Please send me an IRA application and a Special Hind prospectus *«iih more complete informs • 
| tion. including all charges and expenses. Nl read h carefully before 1 invest or send monry 


□ Wlike to open an IRA. DIU like to switch my IRA- 


| THE 


i£> 1985 Oppenheimer Investor Services, Inc. ’Bank IR A's art insured and generally have fixed interest 
rates, whereas ihe Funds net asset value fhiauaies and may be subject 10 loss. "March 15. 1973-Detember ‘ 
31. 1984, Upper Analytical Services. Inc. •••Assuming a $ZjD00 investment on March 15. 1973 (incept ion 
of fund) and S2.000 annual investments on Am business day of each year thereafter with all dividends and 
distributions reinvested, fo&i performance is not an indication of future results. In the period shown. 
stock prices fhicnured severely and were generally higher ar the end than at the beginning. 








international 


TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 198o 


NY5E Most Actives 


Dow Jones Averages 


NYSE index 




AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ index 


OMR High Low Lot am 


Voi Hhrti Low Last Qmo 


0573 27M 
\tm 3Mk 

15363 a 
1304 45*6 
11307 21* 
7737 19% 
Mil 29 
7321 132* 
«7S 35 
<709 «* 
64 63 21* 
6218 63* 
6265 5 
1229 63* 
6UM 12* 


27 <65* 

38 % -* 
47 — 1M 

«* - * 
21 % + * 
18* — - * 
20Vi 

131* + % 
33* -0* 
40% + % 
2146 + % 
63* +46 
4* — V6 
42V6 - * 

12% -U, 


Indus 127941 120743 127152 120059 - 143 
Trans 62121 63346 62422 63220 + 2.99 
UMI 15181 15147 14943 15049— 046 

Coma 52241 52037 52065 52340 + 013 


Composite 

Industrials 

Tramp. 

Utilities 

Finance 


High Low Close arte 
10116 104.94 105.12 — 0.15 
120.93 12067 12090 — 019 
10X41 10X34 10X81 + 056 
5192 5191 5192 -Ml 
11043 110.46 11003—038 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
New Hlans 
New Lows 
volume ur 
v at ume down 


dose Pm- 
251 254 

313 20 

238 272 

802 W 

V 45 


Cempasile 

industrials 

Finance 

l.rsuronce 

L'lllilies 

Banks 

Trenso. 


— e. 
nun* 

Close Cti'ge Ago 
20091 —081 20657 
309.10 — 140 3UU3 
TP cj +0.13 32940 
32745 + 032 310.94 
267^8—072 ma 
25032-033 25038 
266.19—020 26X96 


NYSE Diaries 


Advanced 
Deenned 
Unchanged 
Total Issues 
Now Highs 
New Lows 
Volume up 
Volume down 


dose Fm. 

669 601 

910 914 

443 419 

3022 2014 

112 122 

6 2 

35.1SX25Q 

43403450 


Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


‘Included In the solos hour 


Buy Sola •ShYl 
185482 40X318 Z41S 
220798 609.349 15434 
211432 533447 1734 

197.175 483835 1314 

220392 559503 1J34 


VoLfiM PM 

90400400 


iflMnuno 

Prev awsolidoted dose 

1SW17J20 



Standard & Poor's Index 


Tables include ihe nationwide Prices 
up to the dosing on Wall Street and 
do not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


industrials 

Tnmso. 

Utilities 

Finance 

Composite 


Htgb Law Close Ctrt« 
20X56 20IJ3 70X2- — 
16201 1H.BC ItfJ* ''097 
7987 7886 76.92 — 0.C7 
2143 3132 2151 —110 
18141 10055 M -0^ 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


Bonds 
ui nines 
Indus Trials 


dose Cirte 

7+07 —007 

7182 -ft.14 

77.12 -OOT 



23* 16* 
24* 9* 
IB* 12* 
17* 13* 
39* 24* 
20* 18* 
14* 8* 


27 16 

«W 36* 

25* 16* 
23* 12* 
10 * 8 * 
17* 15 
19* 11* 
19* M 
41* 2S* 
12 * 6 * 
14* 8* 

42* 27* 
58* S3* 
32* 15* 
4* 2* 

51 36* 

24* 13 
2 
32 
7* 

79* 

13* 

19* 


30* 

35* 

36 
29 

28* 19* 
89* 62* 
26* 23 
2B* IB* 
22* IS* 
94* 

X 
23* 

39* 

62* 

107 

nr*: 

23* 

56* 

U* 

37* 

27 
25* 

43 
27* 

43* 

34* 

144 
2 * 

19* 

65* 

27* 

66 
77* 


Dow Lower in Sluggish Trading 


United Preys Inienvtionul 

NEW YORK — Trading on the New York 
Slock Exchange slipped lower Tuesday in the 
slowest action in more than five weeks. 

Some takeover and merger issues were in the 
spotlight but otherwise trading was lackluster. 

The Dow Jones industrial average, which fell 
7.95 last week, lost 1.43 to 1J180.59. 

The NYSE index fell 0.15 to 105.12 and ihe 
price of an average share decreased 4 cents. 
Declines lopped advances 909-662 among the 
2,014 issues traded at 4 P.M. EST. 

Big Board volume totaled 90,400.000 shares, 
down from 106,470,000 traded Friday. It was 
the first session since Jan. 9 in which volume 
was less than 100.000.000 shares. 

Ralph Bloch of Moseley. Hallgarlen, Chica- 
go, said that the 1 .3004 eve I on the Dow index, 
was a “psychological barrier like most round 
numbers.'* 


19* 16* 
33* 25* 
13* fiVr 
56* 43* 
29% 18* 
21* 15* 
43* 25 
28* 13* 

8* ’St 
S» 

a 


1129 54* 
1109 27* 
I49S 21* 
<229 42* 
1403 30 
1021 30* 
219 12 
217 55 

B n* 
65* 


18* 18* 
65 65 

37* 27* 
<6 66 
65 66 

24* 24* 
23* 21* 
S3 53* 
24 24* 

46 46* 

109* 
19* 

=■» 
54* 
27* 


He noted that the Dow hit that area a couple 
of limes last week and couldn't keep going. 
Other signs of a loss in momentum could mean 
the stock market will be in a resting period for 
several weeks. He said that there has been a 
“loss of leadership" with such bellwethers as 
IBM and General Motors down several paints 
from recent highs. 

Nevertheless. Mr. Bloch said. “I do not see 
the normal ingredients in front of a major top." 
He said that the present hesitation was a “nor- 
mal corrective phase after one helluva Janu- 
ary." 

Before the stock market opened, the Depart- 
ment of Commerce reported that housing starts 


increased 14.9 percent in January. It was the 
biggest rise since May 1983. 

Single-family housing suffered a 4-percent 
setback but starts of multi-family projects 
soared 51.S percent. 

Composite volume of NYSE-listed issues on 
all U.S. exchanges and over the counter at 4 
P.M. totaled 107,082,700 shares, down from 
124,899,600 Friday. 

On the trading floor. Stauffer Chemical was 
the most active NYSE-listed issue, up 5^ to 27. 
Ch esebrough -Pond’s has agreed to acquire 
Stauffer for S28 per share in a $1.25 billion deaL 

Chesebrough- Pond’s fell 3% to 33.50. 

Phibro Salomon was second on the active lisL 
dropping ft to 38ft. The company reported 
fourth-quarter operating net of 65 cents per 
share vs. 91 cents in the same period a year 
earlier. 

Phillips Petroleum was third, losing IK to 47. 
Phillips said Carl C. Icahn. a New York inves- 
tor. lacks financing for his bid for 70 million 
shares. Mr. Icahn says that he has the resources. 

Unocal shed ft to 454*. The stock lost 2'6 Iasi 
week as T. Boone Pickens and an investors 
group announced they had acquired a 7. 9-per- 
cent stake. 

Elsewhere in the oil group, Mobil added to 
27%, Chevron 'A to 33ft and Texaco l A to 35ft. 
Atlantic Richfield fell % to 467s. 

Diamond Shamrock lost Vi to 18% in active 
tracing. 

Colgate Palmolive fell 1 to 23V A major 
brokerage house said the stock would only be an 
average performer over the intermediate term. 


597 
760 

872 «% 

441 42* 

93 13* 

253 10* 

152 15* 14* 
471 33* 32* 
511 54 51* 

64 <3 

SI 53 

3£S% 

37* 37* 


9 Armca 

18 Armcpl Z10 
15* ArmsRa 46 
22* Arm Win 120 
29* Aimwnf 375 
18* AroCn 180 
13* ArowE 20 
16 Artro 32 
14 ArvUis 
34* Arvlnot 28G 
17* Morn 
20* AdiKHI 188 
33* AiMOPf 480 
31* AiMOPf 356 
45* ASdDG 2 80 
73 AsdOBf 475 
10* AIMm 180 
19* AtCvEI X48 
40* AtIRtCft 380 
32* AtlRcpf 375 
97 AtlRCPl 280 
II* Aliases 
If* Auoat -32 
29* AutaOt 82 
24 AvcoCp 
IS* AVEMC 80 
23 Avmrv 80 

10 Avtalln 

37 Avnot 80 
i 19* Avan 280 
i 18 Aym 


587 11* 11* 

13 22* 22 

14 22 * 22 

247 37* 37 
sKK 35 35 

5* 33* 33* 

1125 16* 16* 
n ism urn 

533 23 22* 

2 54 54 

728 22* 22 
115 29 20* 

502 42 41* 

22 38* 38* 


416 57* 57* 


3 93 92 

3 22* 22* 
127 25* 25 

3514 47* 46* 
lOQl 37* 37* 

4 113*112 

5 15* 15* 

501 20* 27* 
329 46 45 

12 50 49* 

20 23* 23* 
237 37* 37* 

18 14* M* 
407 36* 36 
1196 22* 22* 

46 25* 25 


11*— * 
22 * 

22 *+ * 
37* 

35 +1 
33*+ VI 
16*— * 
20 -% 
22 *— * 
54 — * 
22 *+ * 
29 

41*—* 

38%+ * 

57*+* 

92 

22 * 

25 

46*—* 
37*— * 
112* —4* 
15*+ % 
28*+ * 
45*+ % 
49*— % 
23*— * 
37*— I* 
M*+ * 

36 —1 
22* _ 
25 — * 


#9 






PH 






250 

J2e 

12J 
i 43 

34 

15 

80 

21 

1580 108 

250 109 

52 

.9 

80 

35 

84 

25 

152 

65 

54 

23 

280 

48 

180 

22 

150 

48 

1580 

08 

.10 

8 

272 

48 

.92 

35 

324 

98 

088 72-1 

1.17 118 

184 118 

72 

38 

180 

53 

180 

25 


132 65 26 16 

UG 112 85 • 61 

I Girt X47 108 9 

IGpf 195 1X0 12 

iStl 70 J 11 86 

rwnGp 136 47 11 116 
rvmF 188 25 14 777 
rnswk 180 25 9 495 
l 88 13 18 55 

84 25 37 158 

80 48 7 7 

216 123 28 

13 103 
184 55 21 1410 
180 23 0 1719 
4 55 8.1 2 

5300113 373 

84 47 17 22 

280 43 11 15M 

52 27638 217 


m 








282 87 7 1948 
284 113 4 123 
253*117 2 

222 98 8 142 
180 98 7 410 
156 85 6 191 

I 4.1B 123 6 m 

180 112 4 238 10* 
84 45 13 213 19 
15D 118 5 46 17* 

155 IQ 
78 75 9 56 19 

280 1T8 * 34 


78 75 9 56 

280 118 • 34 

70 27 12 107* 
80 18 38 328 
Ms 17 1689 

1-20 48 
460 88 
80 48 12 


i 




Jki Jb 


20* 10* BMC 


88 48 15 938 12% 12 


35% 10* Balmes 50 15 13 402 33 3J% 33*.— 1* 

22% 13 BArhlfl 52 S3 14 4W 17* 17* 17%— % 

36 IS 16 51 24% 24% 24%- % 


22% 15 Bier Inti 
24* 10* Baldor 


33* 

24% CBl In 

180a 58 

13 

512 

77* 

27 

27* +1 


62 CBS 

380 

38 

3 

1086 

80% 

79% 

00 + * 


4* OCX 


V 

7* 

7* 

7%— * 



US 138 


30; 

9% 

9% 

9*—* 

49 


240 

58 49 6115 

48% 

47* 4W6+ % 

30 

23* CIGcrt 

271 

93 


84 

30* 


29*+ * 


152 

45 

250 

08 

me 

J 

At 

28 

M 

15 

84 

33 

288 118 

84 

38 

54 

48 

138 

13 

-im 

25 

34 

8 


22% 11* Dallas JO 14 W 104 2T» 21 21*— * 
10* 9* DanunC JO 18 40 52 13% U* 13*— % 


30% 21% DanoCs 1 JO 43 93298 30% 29* 27* + % 
8% 5% Dandhr • 43 I5B -7* 7* 7*— * 

321 13* 10 ' 


8% DOOM .18b 18 321 13* 

(Continued oo PSge 9) 


& 1985 AT&T Communications 


AT&T INTERNAL (AUNG CENT! 





r-. > 9— y. 


£ 1 


I i 'Sk.-'. 
i*fc. 









f 


& 




* 



i;-W$k 3 r ; * 

i imsm*- .5 


;/ : vV " -i 


\Z~ V-'.\'~X.rir 

_ - rV * : X *S- 

3“* 




Hitrafoing more leg room, wide-bod) 



It’s all yours at the new AT&T International Calling 
Center in the International Arrivals Building at JFK Interna- 
tional Airport in New York. 

The AT&T International Calling Center is a spacious 


room filled with AT&T Public Phones. It features the AT&T ^ 

Card Caller, which accepts the American Express® Card, and ^ , . 
gives instructions on its video display screen in four languages, en\in 

And it has private areas that permit you to call in a larger, -J ^ c ^>h-pay 

X.'t; r ^s°give 

1 ai "en dan- 



























































ore comfortable environment. There are even phones to cash-p^gtravelers, and a library of phone directories from 

ore comioraoie eii travelers The AT&T International major cities m the US-, Europe and Asia. 

wmmodate The AT&T Internationa] Calling Center. All the advan- 

Sl2 A^Siint to answer your questions and assist tagesof ATWtednicIoBy ina^ 

The New flICT hrtemafiond Calling Center 









































i 


Tuesdays 

MSE 

Closing 


Tobies include the nationwide prices 
up to the dosing an Wall Street 
and da not reflect late trades elsewhere. 


tfMomn 

Histi Law Slack 


Dlv.YW.PE IWSHiohUwQuBt.CW'P* 


(Continued from Page 9) 



Ml 

31 

12 

170 

49 

9 

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86 


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1J2 

09 

7 

832 

30 

12 


49 

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9Sr 

J 


290 

185 


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29 


570 

79 

9 

292 

BT 

7 

497 

12.6 


70 

19 

70 

295 

69 


1.20 

32 


JO 

29 

9 

JO 

19 

20 

290 

62 

10 

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14 


Vi ST* 

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i7v* m 

4BM 34*6 

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m ins 

MM Wj 

17V, « 
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lOVa 74* 
3V* to 
37to 23 


Romod 

RansrO 

Revcm M J 

Raymk 

Ravthn 170 13 
ReOdBt 40 49 
RdBatpf 812 111 
RllRef USe M 
RecnEa 

Redmn JO IB 
Reece 


7M 7 
S «h 
MM 43U 
13 1JM 
on 47*4 
10V* W4 
2114 21 
IBM IP* 
164* 144* 
IBM IBM 
9 m 
it* i 
37V* 344* 


7U. 

44*— V* 
444* + 4* 
124*— V* 
474*+ Vi 
ID 
21 

UlA— 1V3 
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in* 

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364*— 4* 




264* 

JIM 
40 V* 

31 VS 
38 
274* 

4Vx 

m 
20 
37 
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164* 

16M 
164* 16M' 
64* 71* 






36 25V* SalnGE 

37V* 274* SNETI 
36 31V* SOME rt 

244* 219* SoPhrpf 
31 211* SeUnCa 

36V* 


m 


3W4 2716 QuakOB 1^4 39 11 654 38<* 37£ »*- » 

2146 IS QuafcSO JO UH 15 ^ 2 S5— 5 

ill* 64* Quanex 4» is m* » «* S 

33V* 23 Questar 170 59 9 2670 32J* 31M jjO * 

349* 14 QkRell 26e 1.1 19 9Q 23V, 224* 234*— 4* 




m 


^4. 






SC 




28 

4* SJ 
^ 22"* 


U.S. Futures 


Season Season 
HM Law 


Season Season 
Hlsh Law 


Oaen HWh Law Close Cho. 


2130 203S MOV , 

Esf. Solos 241# Prev.SaleB 4300 
Prev. Dev Oaen Int. 23.132 ofl7S6 
ORANGE JUICE (NYCE1 
15900 lbs.- cents Perth. 

18550 118-50 Mar I651» 17025 


Law Close 
2DM 


Groins 


WHEAT (CBT) 

5900 bu minimum- dollars per bushel 
494 1374* Mar 146 346V* 

4-05 3J21* Mav 137 138 

Ml 127T* Jul 131 331V* 

3.76V2 1294* Sea 132 132 

163V* 337M Dec 141V* 141V* 

1741* 143 Mar MU* ,144 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 11952 

Prev. Day Open Inf. 36396 UP 484 

CORN (CBT) 

5900 bu minimum* dollars per bushel 
125V* 165 MOT 2604* 848*. 


143 3454* — J01 

3354* 13646 -nJJZ}* 
129V* 130 —32V* 

129V* 330 —92V, 

M9 1394* —924* 
143V* 144 — JBV* 


18100 151.00 Mav 167J0 17260 

18465 15560 Jul 16933 17490 

1S2JK) 157.75 Sep 160-40 17150 

16160 15760 Nov 14OO0 17000 

luoa 15600 Jan 16000 16900 

17750 15630 Mor 16820 16820 

16150 16800 Mav 

Jut 

Esl. Sales 1600 Prev. Sahm l 320 
Prev. Day Open Inf. 7957 aft 14* 


16560 16930 
16700 17113 
16935 17150 
168*0 17150 
16800 16950 
16BJ00 16850 
16620 1685* 
16&5B 
16850 


130 1724* Mav 175V* 176 

331 236V* Jul 2.78V* 179 

121 Vj 2304* Sea 171 172 

195 165 DCC 166V* 2664* 

110 Z74V* Mar 175 175V* 


331V* 179V* May ZB1 2B1 


Esl. Sales Prev.Sata 1*558 
Prev. Day Open lnt.134J 15 in>192* 

SOYBEANS CCBT> 

5600 bu mini mum- dollars per bushel 
750V* 5694* Mar 534 579 


267V* 14741. —62 

1744s 175V* —62 V. 
178 17BM -92’4 
271 171*. —62 

1654* 1654*— 62M 
8741* 2741* — 62M 
260M 1804* — 62M 




ifc 







if 


08 100 
154* 16V* 
684* 6SM 
44* 44* 
134* MV* 
12 %*' 

36 

291* 
164* 
27V* 
151* 
28 
134* 
214* 
394* 

37 
14 
21 * 

371* 

m 

42 
291* 
271* 


nattonale Dm 

USEVES RENAULT 
international ISSUE 
OF FF 200.000.000,- 
7,25 % 1972 / 1987 

We inform the bondholders that the 
March 15, repayment instalment of 
FF 20.000.000,- has been made by 
purchase on the market. 
Amount outstanding: 

FF 82.000.000,- 


THE PRINCIPAL • 
PAYING AGENT 
SOCIETE GENERATE 
ALSACIENNE DE BANQUE 
Succursale de Luxembourg 
15, Avenue Emile Reuter 
LUXEMBOURG 


a* 



mu. Yuruv in &i IB 21&Z 4W SSVt 4Wj 

5gSSSS5-k 


so M 7aM~D l M 46 9 29 284* 284* 2H4*— V* 

241* 141* Zonata 64 53 19 6^ KM W* H 

574*1 10 iavro 70b J 16 301 3B SHfc 5TJ6+1 

fiSTST - 60 16 ,1 ^ 

S3 StozSKl? 132 *6 11 01 30M 30 30 - * 


NYSE HighfrLowa 


Feb. 19 


214* VF Carp 
54* Valera 
14 Valor pf 
2M Vaievin 
149* Van Dr s 
2M Vara, 
59* voroopf 
30M Vartan 
91* Vara 
174* Veeca 
34* Vnnda 
64* VestSe 
234* Viacom 
56 VaEPpf 
60V* VaEPaf 
68 v* VaEP Pf 
49V* VaEPpf 
i 14^% Vbhav 
i 254* Vornad 
i 50 VulcnM 


36 6 IS 

60 11 TO 
60 16 16 


1JM1L7 
M 1.1 17 
772 117 
884 117 
9J5 1IJ 
7 JO 117 
1JBSI 77 13 


73 1 32 
625 94* 

35 201* 
46 3 

71 25V* 
28 3 

18 74* 

680 41M 
77 13V* 
149 249* 
16 5 

60 U1* 
316 391* 
20z 65 
9SQZ74V* 
190* 824* 
160x 604* 

5 24V* 
71 351* 

6 75 


3016 314* + 1* 
91* 9V. — M 

2016 2016— 16 
21* 3 + Mi 
349* 2SM + 16 
3 3 

74* 746— Mi 
48V* 411* + 16 
124* 1246- * 
24V* 244*+ 16 
49* 49* 

10V* 1016 + V* 
381* 391* +1V* 
65 65 —1 

73 741*— 1* 

81 8246 + 4* 

604* 6046+ 1* 
24 34V* + V* 

351* 354* + 4* 
744* 75 + V* 


770V, 5691* Mar 574 579 

7.97 5814. May 597 57m 

7.99 57IW Jul 5.99 672 

736 595 Auo 690 605 

671 575 S#P 6JB 4JB 

678 577 Nov 677 US 

679 AID Jan 6.17 6.19V, 

772 624 Mar AJ0 632 

7.79 645V, May 636 639 

Est. Sales Prev. Sola# 25,161 

Prev. Day Open Int. 74J90 up 16 
SOYBEAN MEAL (CBT} 

100 Ians- dollars per tan 

20970 132J0 Mar 13270 13250 


569 578 —73 

583 5.904* —83 

6934* 671U —724k 

5.96 6IH —72 

597 673 — 71 

672 607V* —711* 

614 6191* — 71 

627 631 —72 

675 629 —72 


20570 13830 May 13790 13870 

19650 14470 Jul 14370 14370 

18070 M770 Alia 14620 14770 

179 JO 149 JO Sep 15070 15070 

180 JO 15270 Oct 15270 152J0 

18470 157 JO DOC 157-80 157.30 

16370 16070 Jan 159 JO 16070 

20650 16570 Mar 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 9355 

Prev. Dav Onen int. 42773 up383 
SOYBEAN OIL ICBTJ 
60000 lbs- dollars per 100 Rn. 

3040 22.95 Mar 2775 2805 

30.10 2270 May 267S 2775 

3070 2270 Jul 2615 2670 

ZT JD 22JD Aufl 2575 2570 

2625 22J0 Sep 2570 2570 

2600 22.90 Oct 2675 2575 

2475 2290 Dec 24.10 2475 

24.10 2370 Jan 24.10 M25 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 11921 

Prev. Day Oaen IM. 42795 up 1767 

OATS (CBT) 

moo bu mini mum- dollars per Mabel 


130.10 13170 
13620 13690 

142.10 14290 

145.10 14590 
14770 14870 
15070 15170 
15600 13770 
1S8J0 15970 

164J0 


Industrials 




ft 


vm 




2770 2872 —73 
2667 2775 +78 

2675 2625 — 73 

Ka 94 AC —.15 
25.15 2640 +.10 

2435 2*70 +75 

24.10 2470 +78 

2475 2*75 +10 


AMEX Highs-Lows 


Feb. 19 



196V* 1.70 V* Mar 1J3 1J5V* 

1.71 17914 MOV 1.70 IJ0M 

1JBV* 174V* Jul 175 175 

1.79 174 Sep 174 174 

17216 177 Dec 178 178 

Eat. Sales Prev. Sales 227 

Prev. Day Open inf. 4700 up 67 


134*4 135V* — 7016 
179 13m* —70V* 

1741* 17*1* — 70V4 
174 17XK -TOW 
178 178 +70V4 



NEW NIGHS 37 


AMCEntn 

Buckhofn 

CasttoAMs 

FMFSLnn 

JohnatwnAm 

MortlnProc 

NAwProe 

Soopaind 

Tyler wt 

AmContlnd 

Buckhornpf 

an Rivet 

FordCana 

KenwlnBti 

Metrocare 

Olsten 

SaabniCp 

UtiCesFIn 

Am Israel 

CDI Corps 

Clarasiat 

GarmRuP 

KevCa 

MonPwpfC 

PGElVOpfl 

SetasCarp 

Valspars 

SI&S&u. 

CPtrFoct 

HeaithMor 

Lynch CSV* 

MtaeOtti in 
Bound rSYB 
Tolon Rnch 
WeUflian 


NSW LOWS .4 


Alamo, 

Cotton n 

MokutcHan 

WIcMtalnd 



lor French, Spa 


3 e -weign * 

’ ■ ou cm tee 

•-brw«» +5,1 » 
-a i»ni pert 


Livestock 


CATTLE ICME1 

«K MX 

SS US is S§ S3 

4777 63.15 Aua 66X «6ffi 

&S90 6170 OCt 6S7T 6575 

6775 6370 Dec 6660 4675 

&7S 6623 F«b 6775 6775 

Est. Sales 15717 Prev. Sales 7.970 
Prev. Dav Open Int 58762 off 41 

FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 

44700 ita^ cent# perttL 
7495 6335 Mar 7130 7130 

7430 67 TO Apr 7220 7220 

Tin 6495 MOV 7140 7170 

7330 6670 Aua 7225 7225 

7370 6770 SeP 7170 £70 

7232 67-10 Od 71 JO 71^1 

7120 7UT0 Nov 71« 72J0 

Eal. Sales 1S16 Prev.^ha lJ97 
Pm. Dav Open Int 11771 off272 

HOttSCCMEJ. 
mssulbA- cants ner lb. 

5820 <7J7 Feb 5070 9095 

5445 45.10 Apr 4793 47.95 

5&m 4870 Jut 5ZS8 5125 

5527 4895 Jul 5325 53JS 

5437 47 JO Aua 5150 5155 

5135 4570 Oct 47.75 4830 

-3i*s 4620 Dec 4457 4*90 

4920 4625 Feb 4735 4140 

47J35 45J0 APT 

Est.SalPi 6109 Prow. Sales 4244 
Mv. Day Open Hit 28801 up 132 
PORK BELLIES (CME) 

38000 Ibtr cents per lb. 

8175 6095 Feb 69JD 7820 

8120 6810 Mar 48X 69^ 

KLGS3 6135 May WJO 7110 

Sj 6115 Jul 6990 7025 

B86S 6828 Aua 6890 8890 

7615 63.15 Feb 7025 7120 

7140 6470 MOT 

Est. Sales 4771 nw.SaM 
Prev. Day Open int 14707 a«379 


London Wfttaiii Feb. 19 

Rgures ta storllno pot metric Ion. 
Silver In pence per trey ounce. 


6410 6420 —90 

6642 6652 —178 

6770 6790 —JO 

6625 6640 —JO 

6490 6610 —JO. 

6640 6660 —M 

6775 6770 — 70 


Today Prevkns 

Hloft erode copper cnltiodM: 

•pet 12B400 12BS70 129070 129170 

3 months I JOT JO 1.30800 121170 1211J0 


London Commoditiefi 


Feb. 19 


Figures in sterling per metric ton. 
Gasoil In Ui Hollars per metric ton. 
Goto In U.S. dollars f*r ounce. 


Paris Commodities 

Feb. 19 


SMor in French Froncs per metric ton. 
Other figwes In Fronts per IH kg. 


Cash Prices . Feb. 19 


Financial 


7860 7120 —25 

7120 7130 -70 

TOW 7135 —TO 
7130 7195 —AS 

71 JO 71 JS -75 
71.10 7128 —AS 
7115 72.15 —J2 


spot 128170 128370 >28970 129170 

3 months 120270 120570 120570 12RM 

Tin: soot 1003570107607018030701803570 
3 months 1804670180497018035701003670 
Leadisaot 337 90 338JD 33870 33970 

□ months ' 34650 34770 34570 34670 

zinc: spat 811170 81270 79070 79170 

3 months 79070 790J0 77875 77970 

SUver:soot 5*570 54600 57170 57370 

3 months 58370 58570 59070 59170 

Aluminium: 


Hiefa Low Close arpe 

SUGAR 

MOV 1445 1420 1223 1.423 +7 

Aus 1235 IJW 1205 1 JOB +5 

Od 1J®« S3J0 1J65 1J70 +5 

Dec N.T. N.T. 1.625 1JS0 —5 

Mar 1260 13*0 1340 1350 +S 

May N.T. N.T. 1700 1710 + 15 

Est. vol.: 1290 lots at 50 tans. Prev. actual 
sales: 2237 lots. Open In terest: 17.796 


5852 5077 — JS 

46J5 4677 —30 

5130 52.15 —33 

5370 5330 -40 

5235 5145 — J5 

4733 48.15 —22 


Slock Indexes 


•pat ' 171370 171300 171370 171400 
3 months 1747 JO 1748J0 17*970 175070 
Nlekel:«> 44-wnn 462870 461000 4T2500 
3 months 463770 463800 463070 4L64070 
Source: Reuters. 


4735 4625 —25 

4650 —.17 


6930 7020 — 121 
6830 69.17 —05 
*935 6977 —120 

6970 7817 —M 
VSS 6875 — U0 
7020 71.13 —78 

6930 


SP COMP. INDEX (CME1 

cxOnto and cants 1B235 

1ffi35 15610 Jun 1(5.15 1B5L90 

19170 16070 SPP 1B830 1030 

19490 17530 Dec 19170 19170 

Eat Sales 53247 Prev. Sale, 56308 

Prev. Day Open Int. 52783 off 1203 


181 75 18270 
18495 T05.15 
18629 18640 
19IJ5 19170 


VALUE UNEHCCBT) 
pahts and cents 

20670 16810 MCT 20275 3022S 

21970 17370 Jun 20620 20439 

21230 18535 5ap _ _ 

EsL Sales Pr«v. Sales. 4J44 

Prev. Dav Open Ini. 7201 off 41 B 


20125 201 JO 
20570 2KM 
20925 


NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYFE) 
pa hits and cents 

10670 BB30 Mar 10US 10610 

1W9S 9070 Jun HUS mS5 

11120 9125 SOB 10920 10975 

Est. Sales 187B9 Prev. Soles 18120 
Prev. Day Own in*. 18541 uo30 


M575 1BS30 
10770 10775 
10920 109.95 


Commodity Indexes 


Close 

Moody’S „ 

Reuters 

DJ. Futures 123^5 

Com. Research Bureau. 24140 

■ Moody’s : base 100 : Dec. 31. 1931. 
p - preliminary : f - final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. 11 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec 31. 1974. 


Previous 

971.501 

101130 

125.15 

244.70 


S&p 100 Index Options 
Feb. 19 



MOV 16640 16660 16600 16670 MAO 16770 
3204 lots of 50 tons. 

Jy2r° A 2.130 1102 2.118 8120 8127 2.130 
Stay 8147 2J19 8130 8131 8146 8 147 

™ 8134 8109 8120 8121 8133 81M 

Sen 811* 8099 8104 Z1B 8110 8122 

DK 1.9*4 1.975 1990 ,9M 1JM 1996 

Mar 1906 1.970 1.W0 1 90? JJW 

MOV N.T. N.T. I960 19B0 MB 1.990 

8131 lots of 10 Ions. 

Sp irit 8324 8TW 8333 2225 83S 
SSS 8377 83*7 2J7D 8OT 8367 83*8 

Jlv 8405 2290 8*00 2702 2297 8403 

j— SS 8423 2735 2727 8422 8424 

8M 2742 2737 2739 2736 2737 
Jail 2747 2741 2735 2737 2731 8*30 

Mar 2225 8425 2726 2733 2720 2730 

1 JOB lots at 5 Ions. 

GASOIL 

Feb 2CLOO 252J5 2S2J0 25150 253JM 253J0 

21790 231 J5 ai js moo m» vulso 

Ad 224J5 22075 221 JOO 221J5 223JB 2Z125 
£Sy 2UM 2160 21790 21 7 JO 217JS 

jS\ 21690 21490 213JS 21490 21495 21590 
21490 21*S 2llS 21490 21490 21490 
/Hi 21600 21600 71800 31790 21590 21890 
Sod N.T. N.T. 21U0 23190 215J3 22090 
oS "IT. N.T.215.00 22290 21590 22390 
8226 lots Of 100 Ions. 

GOLD 

API 3O4J0 JO* JO NJ8 NA NJ8 N9. 
106 lots of 100 trov M. 

Sources: l^rn and London Petroleum Ex- 
ahaaoe Ibo&II)- 


cocoa 

Mar 8321 8305 2917 8324 +12 

MOV 8340 833a 8323 8330 —12 

Jly N.T. N.T. 2900 — Unch. 

Sep N.T. N.T. 8300 8329 +14 

Dec N.T. N.T. 8160 8195 +30 

Mar N.T. N.T. 8151 — +21 

MOV PLT. N.T. 8151 — +21 

Est. vaL: 90 loti of 10 tons. Prev. actual 
sales: 46 lots. Open Interest: 1938 

COFFEE 

Mar N.T. N.T. 851 S ZS35 +10 

MOV 2960 2960 8555 1570 +5 

Jlv N.T. N.T. 2970 2995 Unch. 

Sep 2709 840S 8*00 8607 +10 

Nov N.T. NLT. 8590 — +4 

Jan N.T. N.T. 8575 2715 +8 

Mar N.T. N.T. 8597 295® +12 

Est. voL: II lots of 5 Ions. Prev. actual 
sales: II lets. Open interest: US 
Source: Bourse Ou Commerce. 


Dividends Feb. 19 


Per Anri 
EXTRA 

_ .IS 


CMceeo Rival _ .15 

Font Motor Can .51090 

INCREASED 


4-20 « 

3-7 3-1 


Genuine Parts 
Limited Inc 
OMo Edison 
PS No Carolina 


+1 3-1] 

3-W H 

VS 3-7 
*W 3-11 


STOCK SPLIT 


JB Restaurants — 3- tor-2 
Wendy's international — 47or-3 


Philippine Flight 
Of Funds Reported 


Asian Commodities 

Feb. 19 


DM Futures Options 

Feb. 19 

W.Gvm UteMBflE rartsiris w mrt 


rT*Ti»Td»i 


Market Guide 


United Pros International 

MANILA — Philippine citizens 
have sent as much as $5 2 billion 
abroad since 1974. or about $600 
million less than the total debt that 
foreign banks are being asked to 
reschedule, il was reported Tues- 
day. 

The financial newspaper Busi- 
ness Day said it based its calcula- 
tions on U.S. Federal Reserve Sys- 
tem and World Bank documents. 

The government of President 
Ferdinand E. Marcos has asked 
foreign banks, governments and 


Armstrong Rubber 
Bacardi Corn 
Baxter Travcnol 
Chicago Rivet 
a Mas con# 
culhim Cos 
Dana Carp 
DanM industries 
Dominion Renuras 
Ford Motor Can 
Forward Indus 
Fremont Oe nrol 
Con Rod Inc 
Gray Comm 
HODeton Labs 
Hccta MMng Co 
imperial OH 
K Allow Co 
Mav Dart Stores 
McCormick & Co 
Natl Presto Indus 
Perry Drug Store* 

P itts-Dew moMe 
Sabine Carp 

wendy"* Irtlt 
Source: UPI. 


+1 

M5 

♦- 1 VI 

3-20 3jff 

+2 S'S 

+1S 

MS 2-« 

3-20 3-5 

H 

W 3-j 

>22 M 

+30 3-29 
+15- +J 
37 M5 
+15 MS 
M9 H 

>» H 
>1S M 

3- ,s .y 

+10 3-26 
>12 87T 

Vs +w 

>21 M* 
>14 3-1 


lending institutions to approve an 
$ll-bfilion economic recovery 
package to help ease the crisis, in- 
cluding the rescheduling of $5.8 
billion in loans. 


HONG KONG — Tbe Hong 
Kong Association of Banks -has 
cancelled a weekly imeresi-ral* 
meeting that h«H been scheduled 
for Saturday, a spokeswoman said 


inv7»rvMi l , ji , j.iE.i'.v«'«.-Eji 


held on March 2, after the Chinese 
New Year holidays. 























































V . 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1985 


Page 11 


S1NESS ROUNDUP 


Increases Offering 
25 r ' f i^^Of Texaco Canada Shares 


~ Untied Press Intrmanunal 

■ WHITE PLAINS. New York — 

/h . - -..'.^Texaco tnc. said Tuesday that it 
' - = , ■' ‘^.'aas increased iis public offering of 
... '• '-i ^./Texaco Canada Inc. common stock 
Canada to 14 minion shares 
'‘V.fSf -rom 12 million stores because of 
iirong interest from Canadian in- 
j*S;» restore. 

-Ify Texaco said that the expanded 


* l ‘ Jr ** 


(H lirVr-' " AOpw offering, the largest-ever stock of- 
. ' f * t fjewM 'ering in Canada, would raise Ca- 
• ' ■ r \ yp j ! tH.iadian ownership of Texaco Cana- 
*- lit R^Ja's shares to about 22 percent. 


• ■ 1_I|. CAaui > <umim * 

' ’ * v fcnijfc r companies in 

i . L Y c . {Jut L’ Texaco now owns 89.6 percent of 
c ‘Bf^rfexaco Canada's nearly 121 miJ- 
“ ion common shares either directly 
yi through subsidiaries. The re- 
naming 10.4 percent currently is 
teld by approximately 4.000 ihdi- 
, -ideals and institutions, 
i - . t Texaco has agreed to sell the 2 
z .} : 'i . nillion additional Texaco Canada 
'•? L : ». Shares under its_ increased offering 
•S ?;* an underwriting syndicate at 
•. ^ v'^.fiO Canadian dollars (S4634) 

- - ■: ! uer share for a total price or 484.4 
- ^Trillion Canadian dollars. 

• -; ! s.f 


Texaco Canada is one of the largest 
Canada. 



The underwriting syndicate is 
led by Wood Gundy Inc. of Toron- 
to and includes five other C ana dian 
firms. 

The oil company said that Tex- 
aco Canada shares were not being 
offered for sale in the United States 
nor to American citizens or resi- 
dents. 

Texaco is offering the Texaco 
Canada shares on a two-install- 
ment basis, with the first install- 
mem of 17.30 Canadian dollars per 
share due March S. 1985 and the 
balance due Jan. 15. 1986. 

In 1984. Texaco Canada was the 
leading producer of petroleum liq- 
uids in Canada. The company is 
engaged in exploration, produc- 
tion. refining, transporting and 
marketing. 

In 1984 Texaco Canada earned 
423.1 million dollars, or 3.41 dol- 
lars a share, up 23.1 percent from 
1983 levels. Revenues rose 9.4 per- 
cent to 6.27 billion dollars. 

Earlier this month. Texaco Can- 
ada acquired Canadian Reserve Oil 
and Gas Ltd., which has total as- 
sets in excess of 3.6 billion dollars. 


Canon’s Profit 
Rose in 1984 to 
21 Billion Yen 

Reuter* 

TOKYO — Canon lac. said 
Tuesday that a sharp increase in 
sales or ofrice-aulomation 
equipment boosted 1984 after- 
tax profits to 21.07 billion yen 
($82.3 million) for the parent 
company from 17.58 billion 
yen. 

Per-share profit was 43.75 
yen for 1984. up from 37215 yen 
in the previous year. Sales for 
the year ending Dec. 31. 1984 
were 485.02 biUion. up 30 per- 
cent from 374. 13 billion in 1 983 
sales. 

A Canon spokesman said 
1984 sales in the camera divi- 
sion sales rose only four percent 
from 1983. 

Office-automation equip- 
ment soles rose 98 percent, sales 
for optical machinery u> make 
integrated circuls were up 54 
percent and copier sales rose 20 
percent, he said. 


Elders Reports Net Profit 
Up by 18.6 Percent in Half 


Reuters 

ADELAIDE, Australia — El- 
ders rXL Ltd. reported an 18.6- 
perceni rise in net profit to 43.68 
million Australian dollars (S3 1.58 
million) in the half ended Dec. 31 
from 35.57 million dollars a year 
earlier. 

The group said in a statement 
that its Carlton & United Breweries 
Ltd. subsidiary had contributed 
significantly to' its record earnings ' 
in the first half. 

Eiders said that its Pastoral Divi- 
sion had posted a record profit, 
while its finance group had experi- 
enced strong growth in earnings 

Carlton's expansion into new do- 
mestic and foreign markets, aggres- 
sive marketing and asset andcost 
reductions had provided the base 
for excellent profit performance, it 
said. 

It also reported good seasonal 
conditions throughout Australia, 
which had resulted in record profits 
for the Pastoral Division. 

In addition, the wholesale fi- 
nancing business benefited front its 
expanded foreign network and at- 


tained its earnings from a wider 
range of activities, the company 
said. 

However, the international divi- 
sion’s profit was unsatisfactory, the 
company said. 

Lack of caule for slaughter, low- 
levels of animals for abattoirs and 
unsatisfactory margins on pigs 
were the major factors, according 
to the Elders statement: 

Elders said that its 500-miIlioa- 
dollar cash release program, an- 
nounced after the acquisition of 
Carlton in December 1 983. is likely 
to reach its target before the end of 
the current year. 

Cumulative. cash released so far 
amounted to 410 million dollars 
after asset sales of 140 million dol- 
lars in the latest half, according to 
the statement. 

Elders said that in the second 
half, its interest expense will be 
lower than the 89.24 million dollars 
recorded in the first half, as a result 
of the cash release program and 
lower levels of working capital re- 
quired. 


Inco Hopes to Mine New Profitability From Better Nickel Prices 


;t ; ' > 5< (Continued from Page 7) 

- u . J;; 1 rices of nickel and copper, which 
; H ! ' also mines, hold, 
r I i <!: 1. Clarence Mom'von, an analyst 
;; ■ j ;'.t Dean Witter Reynolds, believes 
V ■ oco's earnings will be dramatically 
? ' - igber, putting them at $2 a share 

.. : j t • .w the year, more than the Wall 
■ — ^treet consensus estimate of $1 to 

If prices go up this year, which 
: i .any analysts think likely, so much 
better for metals producers, 
if the dollar should weaken, 
; ; . lr. Ingersol) said that prices of 


nickel, copper and aluminum 
“could certainly move upward dra- 
matically — I don’t want to use the 
word explode.” 

Inco has been in a slump for 
some time, fighting for survival in 
the wreckage of the nickel market it 
once dominated. The company 
faces other problems that could 
hurt its hopes, for a turnaround. 

Its contract with the United 
Steelworkers or America at its big 
mine in Sudbury. Ontario, expires 
in May. Its debt is still towering, at 
$1.12 billion, and further reduction 


Dollar Is Sharply Higher 




(Continued from Page 7) 

iy scale until they receive the sup- 
art of the Fed.” 

“Once it was established there 
ouid be no large support, there 
as very strong corporate demand 
- Europe,” Daniel Holland, vice 
rsideni at. Discount Corp. of 
.tT ew York, said. Treasurers ap- 
■ irently decided it was time to 

- “ r :• “Some day the dollar will weak- 
, . * I ..1 but we don’t see it right away," 
* . :, r - 's. Rotondo said. “Even if doesn't 
- • • main at super levels it will stay 
!■' »ove 3 marks." 

.. ’’ Among other currencies in New 
wlc, the British pound was listed 
$1.0935 in late trading, down. 
. am Friday’s $1,108. The dollar 
... . is up to 2.814 Swiss francs, from 
7715; to 2,049 Italian lire, from 

)19; to 6630 Belgian francs, from 

.62; and to 260.75 Japanese yen 
. wn 255.75. 

t J » ; r-. .;y..rr.The dollar also rose sharply in 
^ i- *-• ir0 p e> caching new highs against 
... \ ■ * French franc and the lira, 10 a 

[ ^ Mi! -'"-year high against the Dutch 


guilder and a 7 -year high against 
the Swiss franc. 

It also scared to record highs in 
Norway at 9.48 kroner, up from 
9.3S25 Monday, and in Denmark 
at 11.85 kroner, up from 11.713 
The Danish currency is one of the 
strongest in the European Mone- 
tary System. 

West German foreign-exchange 
markets were closed for a holiday 
but in London, the DM closed at 
3.624 to the dollar, up from 3.614 
Monday in FrankfurL 

In London, one British pound 
cost $1.0932, a fraction more ex- 
pensive than Monday's 51.0930. 
The dollar reached a record high of 
SI.0838 against the pound during 
trading last-Tbursday. . 

Other late rates Tuesday com- 
pared with Monday’s late rates: 
3.0715 Swiss francs, up from 
3.0625; 11.0825 French francs, up 
from 10.9965; 4.1015 Dutch guil- 
ders, up From 4.0785, and 2236.2frj 
Italian lire, up from 2^21.18. 

The dollar dosed earlier in To- 
kyo at 26020 Japanese yen. up 
from 25635 Monday. 


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BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 


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M5 Eastern st„ 

Hew York. M.Y. 1M17. 
(212)70 WO. 


FOR SALE 

FURNITURE IMPORTER & DISTRIBUTOR 
IN U.S.A. 

Commercial & Residential 

1.5 milliofi scries. Excellent N.Y. location. Top lines, 
high visibility, growth potential. Tax loss creates high 
return opportunity. 

Preliminary contact: Telex 3766596, HOMEX, 
or call: 914-724-3232. 




QiTEfMATfONAL 

QEMMOLOOICAL 

IHS r m iT E 

CERTIFICATES ACCEPTED AND 
E COGNIZED ALL OVER THE WORLD 


NTWERP 



NEW YORK 


tC 

■ ONE WEEK INTENSIVE 
DIAMOND AND COLORED 

STONES COURSES. 

Pq* TKP4 inlflrtniMSR 

Schepdraat 1/7 - 2018 Antwerp 
TaL 03/ 232.07 J5 8 Bdghim 


U.S. VIRGIN 
ISLANDS 

Superb uaestment 
opportunity 

Important hotel, marina 
complex and valuable land 
■a ideal location. 

Offers inviied. 

For further information contact: 

Henry Ansbacher Inc. 
Tel.: (212) 688-5806. 


of pollution from its Canadian 
smellers —a cause of acid rain —is 
ex pec led 10 be costly 10 ihe compa- 
ny. 

In the days before they were hit 
by !ow-cosf competitors elsewhere, 
mining companies could control 
prices by curtailing production, 
fnco, for example, was able to set 
the price of nickel when it was the 
dominant producer in the 1950s. 

However, a number of countries, 
including Australia, Indonesia and 
France, now produce nickel and 
market forces now set the price. 


Mr. Morrison, the Dean Witter 
analyst, said producers typically 
get about 20 cents a pound over the 
London exchange figure because of 
quality and transportation consid- 
erations and ihe fact that buyers 
seek a steady supply in certain 
quantities. 

Charles F. Baird, Inco's chair- 
man and chief executive since 1980. 
has presided over the most trou- 
bled times for lnco. In 1981 costs 
had soared to more than S3 a 
pound from 52.40 the year before. 
Also in 1981. the company wrote 



Term loan 

The Republic of fiabon 

US 860,000.000 


syndic 

Maricel 


Banque National? de Paris and Gticorp Capital 

Is Croup. 

Due to a Very favorable market response, the faolirv amoum was raised from 
L>S $50 million to LIS $60 million, under the following main terms and 
conditions: 

Borrower TV Republic of Gabon, represented by its Minister of 

Economy, Finance and Participations Mr LEM- 
BOUMRA-LEP.UVDOD. 

Amount US $60 million (including our ECU tranche totalling 

the countervalue oT US 826,5 million). 

Period 8 years 

Interest rate 7/8% over Ubor for the first 3 years 
1% over Libor afterwards. 

Repayment In II semi-annual instalments, the firs! being 3 yean 

after the signing date. 

Drawdown period 18 months (nun the signing date, in three semi-annual 
equal tranche. 

Agents Gticorp International Bank Limited for the US $ tranche 

Banque National? de Paris for ECU tranche. 

Participants Lead Managers: 

BNP and Gticorp Capital Markets Group 
Managers: 

Bankers Trust Internatio n a l Unti l e d. 
BIAO Airibank, 
days Bank ; 

Markets Group, Credit Agrirole. 
Chicago limited. Lloyds Bank Interna- 
tional limited. Orion B a n k Limited, 
Standard Qiartered Bank. 

Co-tnnimgera: 

Credit Industrie! « Commercial de Pari*, 
Credit Lyonnais L'Earop&eane de Ban- 
qne. The Industrial Bank of Japan Limit- 
ed Paris Branch. 

Participant: 

Banque Lonis-Dreyfus 

Financial advisors Kuhn Loeb fehman Brothers Interna- 
to the borrower tional, lnc~ Maison Lazard el Compa- 
gnie, S.G. Warburg & Go. Ltd. 


1 rum inienouunai unuuu, 
ihanfc, Banque Paribas, Bar- 
, Pie, Qtase M a nh a t ta n Capital 
Ironp, Credit Agrirole. First 


off millions oT dollars on a closed 
Guatemalan nickel mine and on an 
unsuccessful attempt to diversify 
into the battery business. 

In December. Mr. Baird was able 
to tell an analysts' meeting that 
Inco could break even at $2.20 a 
pound of nickel before interest 
charges on debt and before taxes, 
and was working on even lower 
costs. 

Mr. Morrison estimated that the 
Inco break-even point would aver- 
age below $2 a pound for all of 
1985. 

Analysts say Inco has made 
strides in new mining techniques 
that others in the industry are emu- 
lating. Mr. Phillips cited bulk-min- 
ing methods, winch involve large- 
scale blasting and fewer workers, 
for “a dramatic increase in produc- 
tivity.” 



The Greatest Growth Opportunity 
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Owning an Entre franchise is a 
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We provide a comprehensive, 
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You proznde liquid capital of 
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'PUTtR 

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For the most in personal computing 

European Headquarters, 

17 Bath Road. Slough. Berks, England. 
(0944 753) 5 1222 


The 

International 
Herald Tribune 

invites you to 

Meet the 
New French 
Cabinet 

on February 26, 1985 at the 
Inter-Continental Hotel 
in Paris. 



confaeace caRSosanUibcxunki, otr 


JntmmkmlHeraldTnlxaie 
181 av. ChiBks*faGan8$ 92521 Ne^G&k%Frmc$ 




m NATIONAL 

COMPUTER 

CONFERENCE 


The Eighth National Computer Conference will be hosted by ARAMCO in Al Khobar, 
Saudi Arabia, on 17 Muharram T406H, October 1, 1985. This will be a continuation of 
seven national computer conferences since 1394H (1974). 

The National Computer Conference will be sponsored by ARAMCO as an industrial repre- 
sentative for the first time following successful conferences sponsered by academic 
representatives in the Kingdom. Never-ending development in computer technology, its 
effect on managing computer resources and wide-spread computer use in industry suggests 
the following appropriate theme: 

'COMPUTERS IN MANAGEMENT AND INDUSTRY' 


Papers are invited on the following topics: 


1. Computer Management and Utilization 

2. Computer Graphics 

3. Office Automation 

4. Computers in Education 

5. Data Security 

6. Centralized vs. Distributed Systems 

7. Computers and Simulation 

8. Computers in Industrial Processes 

9. Other (Specify) 

The conference will include working sessions on the following key issues. 

1. Computer Industry in Saudi Arabia 

2. Automation of Industry 

3. Computer Literacy and National Concern 

4. National Computer Data Communications 
Requirements 


The deadline for receipt of paper topic abstracts {minimum 250 words, maximum 700 
words) is March 6,1985. The notification date for acceptance of abstracts is April 15,1985. 
The full text of papers accepted by the selection committee is to be submitted by July 17, 
1985. Abstracts and papers should be mailed to the following address: 

CHAIRMAN, Paper Selection Committee 
8th National Computer Conference 

ARAMCO P.OJIox 1748 

Dhahran 31311, Saudi Arabia. iPR . 1 35 , 


For further information please contact any of the following Aramco offices in Saudi Arabia. 

Dhahran 875-5935 Jeddah 653-4655 Riyadh 464-1055 ext. 223, 





.2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY. FEBRUARY 20. 1985 



Tiiesdav^ 

A 


I 



CJosing 


mat's PM.. 
Pm. 4 PM. « 


Tables include the nattomride prices 
up to the dosing on Wall street 
aitdcie not reflect tale trades elsewhere. 


12 Month Sis. Close 

Hign 1 , 0 * Stock Dlv. YW. RE KKHHiof) LowQuoLCfT'ge 


1M 
25 
Ah 

m 
10ft 
w» 

4* 

am \m 

V 10ft 
4ft 

m 
7% 
Sft 
Sft 
14th 
25% 
4% 


s 




i.an v 
4*6 

am Stock 
1ft KWOkC 

D'v 

"ts. 



>*•*-■> 1 

JA - 

1 _J 

UtT.O-' 

2ft — 

14% 

10 KovCp 

JO 

15 

T9 

133 


lift 

12', 

lift 

9*4 KeorN n 

.*0 

10 

6 

i 

13ft 

IJ"S 

13': — 

6*4 




19 

Tt 

*ft 


C-* 

18*4 

14% Kenwln 

30a t2 

4 

39 

ITft 

16ft 

"9 t! 

IB 

10ft Krtchm 

JSt 

17 

28 

2* 

15% 

15- 


9ft 

» KvyCq 


2.1 


J1 

9i. 

9.T 

it- + 

17% 

B KevPh 

J0 

1.9 

18 

86a 

11 

10% 

TC*. + 

15 

5 Key Co 



10 

n 

7ft 

7ft 

7ft 

4ft 

2ft Klpds wt 




307 

r* 

J% 

3ft T 

5ft 

3ft KUwrt 




171 

4ft 

ift 

4% 

6ft 

3 Klrbv 




n 

3ft 

3ft 

3ft- 

J% 

2ft KtecrV * 

JMr 



lid 

3% 

Sft 


15 




15 

*6 


12% 

ir%— 

ISft 

Sft tCnoll 



li 

19* 

lift 


14ft + 

27V; 21 KoserC 

2J2 

BJ 150 

154 

27ft 

27ft 



AO 1.1 22 

Is 9 


22 22V: 
■eSz 37»» 
SQr 40 ft 
25z 42V; 
12 A 
vn 38% 

9 27** 


21 V. 21% 

n 9%— % 
19% 19ft 
16% 16% + 1% 
143, 14%— ft 
15*, 15ft 
IS 10 
16ft lift— ft 
lBft lBft— * ft 

9 9 -ft 

22ft 27% — ft 
37ft 37ft 
40V: 40ft 
4T j 42ft + ft 

■A 

37ft 38 +44 

22ft 22ft— ft 


3333 


w. 




10ft » 
17ft lift 
27ft 16ft 
3ft ft 
13ft Aft 
ISft lift 
4ft 9ft 
«ft 

& 

0% 



28 

3*b 

U 

20*6 


•ul 


ft*! 


W1 

26V, ICH 

J5 3 

16 

1T3 100 

98ft 

99*4— *4 

T 

4% ICO 


12 

96 

4*4 

6*4 

6ft— ft 

5% 

TV* (PM 

JOT IS 

10 

46 

3*6 

3ft 

3%— ft 

11*4 

6*4 IRT Can 


21 

12 

9% 

91, 

9*b+ ft 

AM 

2M 

4% iss 

IT, ImpGp 

.12 2J 
12b 5J 

18 

8 

3 

374 

% 

5% 

ZV4 

5%+ ft 
7% —ft 

214 

114 Inflnd 



12 

244 

2ft 

2*4 

3014 

25% ImpOHD IJO 


83 

35% 35V, 

35ft— *4 

10% 

6% I might 


11 

38 

T*6 

9ft 

T ft— 14 

23% 

lift Instnm 

JB 14 

30 

18 

20ft 

20 ft 

20ft 

3V4 

1% InstSy 


11 

931 

2*4 

2% 

2ft 

3*4 

2V, IneSvpl 

JSt 87 


4 

2*4 

21, 

214+ % 

TV, 

6% IrrtOyg 

M 


14 

9% 

9% 

9V4 

TV* 

5 Intro* 

771 U 

10 

29 

B*4 

8*4 

8*4+14 

16 

11 Intrnk 

.12 J 

26 

16 

14*4 

14*4 

14*4 

5% 

2% IntBknt 



336 

3ft 

3U 

3% + ft 

2*4 

1 IntBkwf 



28 

1*6 

IV, 

1V4+ ft 

17V6 

8*4 intKvd 


28 

7 

9*4 

9*4 

9*4 

1194 

8% up 

JT8 85 29 

14 

10% 

Iflft 

!0ft+ ft 

10% 

nh imseow 



5 

7*4 

7*4 

7*4+ ft 

6 

1 intota 



1* 

1*4 

1*4 

1*4 

28*4 

16*4 lonks 


12 

106 

27 

24*4 

27 + *4 

35*4 

18*4 IroaBrd 


14 

2 

31% 

31% 

11% — % 

5V, 

3 fsafrn 

-06 tA 

22 

16 

3*6 

3ft 

Sft— ft 


12 

IV, 

8% 

2 

13% 

13% 

559 

20V= 

19% 

59 

lft 

1*4 

203 

50% 

50ft 

12 

18% 

18ft 

114 

15% 

15% 

50 

3% 

19% 

196 

37% 

38% 

31 

514 

5ft 

24 

17*4 

lift 

73 

IJft 

Utt 

21 

1% 

1ft 

86 

11 

10% 

43 

2% 

2% 

68 

12% 

12 

60 

15V, 

15ft 

SQr 

32*4 

32ft 

42 

5% 

3V, 

20 

10ft 

10% 

40 

lift 

11 


a 


1 IS 


115 


17.1 


116 


127 


170 


,1 

T 

2.9 

10 

87 

13 

27 

7 

ID 

7 

7J 

13 

34 

9 

U 



34% 

16% OEA 



13 

3 

31% 

21*4 

71 An— ft 

22ft 

14ft Oakvrf 

in 

A 

M 

182 

21 ft 

21 

21ft— ■« 

7ft 

4 OdetAn 



57 

9 

7% 

7% 

7*4 + ft 

25ft 

13*. owe n 

JO 

1 2 

17 

401 

25ft 

JSft 

2S% + % 

6% 

3*4 Openhn 



24 

44 

5% 

Sft 

5%— ft 

8 

5% OrMHA 

JO 

48 

12 

2 

7% 

7% 

7*4— % 

4 

1 Ormond 



15 

3 

lft 

l*k 

14b— ft 

36ft 21% OSutlvn 

72 

10 

M 

21 

36% 

35% 

35*,— ft 

10% 

6ft DxtrdF 

.42 1 AJ, 

» 

4 

9% 

TV, 

Tft 

11 

7*4 OxarkH 

20 

20 

T 

374 

10ft 

9*4 

10 


17ft lift Jodvn JOblt V 15 

fft 5ft Jacobi 37 

5ft 2ft JctAm 4 38 

2ft ft MAwt 2 

8V. 3ft J strut jm 42 14 33 

6V. 2ft JofwiPd 254 

10V, 714 JohnAir JO 21 U W 

7ft 4ft Jmpjkn 6 7 


15 14ft 14ft 14ft 
37 7ft 4ft -4ft— ft 

1 3 * H V+£ 

31 7ft 7ft 7ft— ft 
6ft 5ft 5ft— ft 
lBft 10ft 10ft + ft 
5ft 5ft 5ft— ft 


34ft 29% KflGspf -450 125 


Sfc 25ft 3514 35*4 — 


3 


13 

10*4 PGEptA IJO 111 

27 

12% 

12ft 

13% + ft 

12ft 

Bft PGEofB 1Z7 I1J 

4 

lift 

11 

lift + V, 

11 

8ft PGEPtC 1J5 117 

2 

10% 

10'- 

10% + ft 

10ft 

8% PGEjrfD 1JS HO 

13 

18% 

10*4 

10% — ft 

10% 

8% PGEPfE 1J5 112 

39 

10ft 

10% 

10% — % 
9ft — % 

10ft 

8 PGEPtG 1J0 112 

51 

10% 

Tfa 

34 

28ft PCEpfF 434 111 

13 

£$ 

33% 

32% 

33 V, 

26*4 PGEpfZ 406 UO 

41 

30% 

31% + ft 

27 

21ft PGEpfY 3J0 117 

N 

27 

25% 

27 

21% 

T7V4 PGEcfW 157 112 

15 

21% 

21 

21 + ft 

19% 

1544 PGEpfV 132 114 

17 PGEdTT ZS4 HI 

13 

19% 

18% 

18ft 

21*4 

11 

21 

20ft 

21 ♦ la 


c 


Over-the-Counter 

Feb. 19 

NASDAQ National Market prices 






31ft— ft 
Tft+ ft 
31A — ft 

0ft— ft 
35ft — ft 
48 + ft 
Bft— ft 
12ft 
4ft 
•ft 

•ft— ft 
17ft— ft 
lift— ft 
15ft 
ft— ft 
37ft + ft 
6ft— ft 
1* 

15ft— ft 
lft 

13 + ft 
3ft 

25ft— ft 
5ft + ft 
7ft 

IS + ft 
TV,— ft 
7ft 
4ft 4ft 
6ft 6ft + ft 
ft ft— ft 
lift 31ft + ft 
18ft IT — ft 


6ft 6ft + ft 
7ft 7ft— ft 
16ft 16ft— ft 
13ft + ft 
27ft— ft 
6ft— ft 
3ft 

sr* 

20ft — ft 

n — ft 

7ft + 14 
18ft + ft 


281 8 7ft ■ 4- ft 
236 10ft 10 10 — ft 

-56 U 6 28ft 29ft 20V. 

L0O <4 81 41ft 40ft 41 ft + ft 

4810 TV. 9ft— ft 
228 18ft 18 1814— ft 

376 7ft 7ft 7ft 
9 9V, 9ft 9ft + ft 
5 4ft 4 4ft 
75 3ft 3ft 3ft + ft 
304 6 5ft 5ft— ft 
" 42 17V. 17ft 19ft 

11 lft 1U lft 
92 4ft 3ft 3ft— ft 
869 11ft HUS lift + ft 
82 3ft 3ft 3ft 
240 « 9 38 36 36 —lft 

227 4 3ft 4 
.16 M 257 12ft 12 12 + ft 

-14o 18 41 8 7ft 7ft + H 

8523ft 23*4 23ft 
.140 1J> 10 1414 HHA 16>4 

-20 2.1 113 9ft 9ft 9ft— ft 

245 214 2ft 2ft — ft 
SOC .1 S3 I8U 18 in, + ft 

23 ’% ’k’M 

t 5610ft 10ft 10ft 

15 lift lift lift + ft 

2523 22 22 —1 

180 02 84 29V. 2? 29ft 

as 14 13ft 14 + ft 
2054*0 18 42ft 42 42ft 

IJ2 48 157 27ft 27 27ft + ft 

1.12 IS 39529ft 39ft 29ft— ft 


Sales In Net 

108, High Low 3 P.M. OTTO 


Soles to Mel i 

108s HW Low 3PMOfge | 


DurFTl 
Dvtwcn 
DvntcC 9 


1J0 42 152» 28ft 28ft + ft 
2D 1.1 75 IBV, 18ft 18ft— % 

-88 44 4528ft 38 20 

.ISO 1 J 34511ft lift lift -f- ft 
487 lft 1% lft 
181 14ft 13ft 14 
1742 18ft 17ft 18ft— ft 
-32 1.7 640 19ft 19ft l»ft + ft 
ja 1 J 31 27ft 27 27ft + ft 

1J9 32 13 37ft 38ft 38ft— Vi 

Ji 47 77 12 lift 12 — ft 

.14 1.1 1515 14ft 14ft 

I 42 5ft 5ft 5ft + ft 

376 27ft 26 27ft +lft 


Sales in Net 

IBfts HMi Low 3 PM Ch'ge 

817 7ft 7ft 7ft 
4331 30ft 31 + ft 


Low SPOLCW 


Hi 


JBResi 24 tJ 
Jockcol t 
JacfcLfo 
JamWrr 

JcftBilt 140 45 
JotfNLs At IS 
JefSmrt -«Oa 17 


is 


7ft 
lft 
3ft 
12ft 12ft 
24ft 24ft 
7ft 7ft 
Oft 13ft 
7ft 7ft 
■ft 8ft 
7ft 7ft 
6ft 6ft 
5ft 
8ft 8ft 
19ft 19ft 
4ft 4ft 
I*ft 19ft 
lft lft 
7ft 7ft 
5ft Sft 
9ft 
3ft 


7ft + ft 
12ft 
7ft 4- ft 
32ft— ft 
ITft ♦ ft 
lift + ft 
17ft + >4 
lift— ft 
18ft + ft 
ft+ft 
15ft— ft 
ISft— ft 
18ft + ft 
13ft— ft 
10ft + ft 
Ife 
ft 
ft 

ft 

ft 
ft 

1 


lBft 19 — ft 
5 5ft 
37ft 37ft— ft 
20 20 + ft 

35ft 35ft 
23 ft 23ft + ft 
23 23 — ft 

8ft Bft + ft 

'W 

I B — ft 
Sft S% + ft 
4ft Sft 
*ft Tft+ ft 
28ft 21ft— ft 
IT 19ft— ft 


I 


434 2214 
111 1184 
7 Sft 
96 4 

-56 TO SB 38ft 
533 IB 

AM 4.1 23 W* 

1ST 9ft 
1123 lft 
180 3-1 145 53ft 

-80 TO tf 40ft 
15 TV, 

3 15ft 
Bill 

54 U 18 35ft 
24 6*4 

4 9ft 

-04 2 800 179- 

3 14k 
I 2 Bft 

to a an io 

J2 2 3 274 14% 
.16 A 371 26ft 
102 7ft 


20ft 20ft— m 
lift lift 
Sft 5ft 
Sft 4 4 ft 
27ft 27ft— ft 
16ft 16ft— IV, 
Mft 141, 

TL 

53ft 53ft 
4Bft 40% + ft 
7ft 7ft— 14 
15ft 15ft 
1W4 10*4 
34ft 34*4— ft 
6ft 6ft + ft 
9ft 9ft + ft 
17% 17ft 
lft lft— ft 
8Vi Sft 

9ft 9ft— ft 
M*k 14ft + ft 
25ft 26ft + ft 
7ft 7ft + ft 


11 

10ft— ft 
2Bft 
Oft 

3 sr* 

9ft— ft 
4ft 

15 -8 
7ft— ft 
4ft— ft 
4ft— ft 
19ft 
30ft 38ft— ft 
Sft 3ft— ft 
2ft 2ft— ft 
39ft 39ft + ft 
31A 3ft— ft 
SB 38*4+ ft 
4ft 4ft 
20ft 2Dft+ ft 
13ft 13ft— ft 
14ft 15 + ft 
9ft 9ft— ft 
9ft 9ft + ft 
7 7ft + ft 
46*4 4914 42ft 
9ft 9*4— ft 
37ft 38ft 
50 50V, 

Sft Sft 
IBV, lift + ft 
10 + ft 
15ft— ft 
lift 

2514+ ft 
m + ft 
13ft— ft 
19 

4ft— ft 
Uft+ ft 
23ft+ft 
W4 + ft 


3037ft 36ft 37 + V4 
85 lft lft lft— ft 


*2* 

9 

ift 

3ft— ft 
Oft 

7ft + ft 
9ft + ft 
21ft- ft 
45*6 + ft 
20 + ft 
2916 + ft 
9ft + ft 


jm s ns i$ is +ft 

24312ft 12ft 12ft— ft 
.12 15 466 8% 7*4 * + ft 

43 4V, 4ft 4ft — ft 
407 12*6 12ft 12*4 + ft 
5 lft lft lft 
423 7ft 4ft 7ft + ft 
297 5*4 94 SU 
.11 1 A 413 18ft 18ft lBft + ft 
1415ft 14ft lift— ft 
147 17V, 17ft 17ft + ft 
27 Sft Bft Bft + ft 
J8 M 4529ft 29ft 29ft 

82 7 4*4 4ft— ft 

2 7ft 7ft 7ft + ft 
,12s 9 31 13ft 13ft 13ft + ft 

1.60 42 2 26 24 26 +1 

291911ft 10ft lift— ft 
5780*6 00 80ft + ft 
7523ft 23*4 23*4— ft 
381 24ft 23ft 24 + *4 

57 Bft Sft Bft — ft 
J8 IS 5815V, 15 15 — ft 

.10 A 964 12 lift lift + ft 
248 U 10409% 8S*6 89ft 43* 
JM 3 1830ft 29*6 29*4 

105 » 31ft 31ft— ft 
t 251 lift lHfc lift— ft 
99 7 4ft 4*k + ft 
120 15 9 34% 34% 34ft + ft 

74 U PI 22ft 22ft 22% 

104 18 443 Z7ft 27ft 27ft 
1-96 6J 2563016 30 30ft 
1-80 6J 1730ft 29ft 30ft + ft 


J5e 10 57913ft 13*4 12ft— ft 


-ObU 507 24ft 24 U 
■W A 900 10 lift lift— 1 


11 28% 27*4 27*4— ft 




36ft 2914 X 
32 lift 32 
27% 27ft Z7ft 
53% 53ft 53% 
25 25 25 

MH 2M 34% 

a 21ft 31ft 
14 14ft 






19V, 19ft 19ft 
IS 15 15 + ft 

6ft 6ft Sft 


_ Bft 8ft + ft 
25ft 2514 25ft + ft 
31 31 31 

17ft 17ft 17ft + ft 
10ft 10 # 10ft 
Z» 22*6 22*6 
72% mu a 16— ft 
15*6 1516 15ft— ft 
27ft 34*4 26*4- ft 
*14 6ft 6ft 
45ft « 45ft +1 
43% 47% 43ft - 
29ft 29 29 

30ft 29*6 30ft + ft 
lift lift lift- ft 
10 9ft 946+ ft 
ft ft+ ft 
9*4 18 —ft 
Oft 14ft + ft 
10ft 18ft— ft 
2B*4 29ft 
7ft 7ft 
« 916- ft 
Bft 8ft— ft 
9ft 9ft— ft 
ISft 14 + V, 
3» 4 +ft 

•ft 8ft 

3*ft 14ft 
22ft 22ft— ft 
25 25 +lft 
31V. 32 + ft 

Bft 9 —ft 
11*4 lift 
34 Mft +14 
ant. 25*6+1 

lift mt + ft 
9 9 —ft 

36 34*6— ft 
X 30 —ft 
5% 5*4+ft 

4 4ft + ft 
6ft 614+ ft 

Oft Oft— ft 
5514 Sft — lft 
Sft Sft 
lift 17 

5 5 -g 

38ft 38ft— ft 

5ft Sft— ft 
14ft Mft „ 
Oft 23 — ft 
2ft Sft- ft 
14*4 1414+ ft 
IHJVj 100ft + ft 
21ft 21ft + ft 

1 s tS 

ink u*4+ *4 


ven beii 


% 

ftl QMS s 


2S115V6 15 1516 

42 4*4 4ft 4ft— ft 
5413ft tt II 
72 21, 2*4 2*4- 16 
27829*4 27*4 3 
MB 4ft 3ft 4W + ft 
91 lift II lift— ft 
12871116 70ft 11— ft 




-rn 


Artn Stock 


£ SABHas 
» SAYtatl 

ft w 

ft spb J0r IjO 

sPDms t 
ft SHi At as 

SafKTd 

Soto L50 4.1 


x IS* |S- lift* ft 
Si rti+Ih 

tl 17*4 17ft nft+ ft 

6818 « W 


V 




(Continued oa Page 13) 
















































































































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1985 


Page 13 



Global Natural Resources Ltd 

A Scheme of Arrangement dated 17th May 1983 
providing, among other things, for the exchange of 
bearer shares of Global Natural Resources Limited, 
formerly Global Natural Resources PLC, a company 
organised under the laws of England (Global-UK), for 
registered shares of Global Natural Resources Inc, a 
company organised under the laws of the State of 
New Jersey, USA (GlobaHJS), became effective in 
July 198a Pursuant to the Scheme of Arrangement, 
the issued and outstanding shares of Global-UK 
have been cancelled.They entrtlethe holders only to 
obtain registered shares of GlobaHJS in exchange 
for their bearer shares of Global-UK and have 
otherwise ceased to have effect 

Holders of shares of Global-UK will not be entitled to 
receive dividendsor notice of meetings or be able to 
vote or otherwise participate in the affairs of Global- 
US unless and until their bearer shares of Global-UK 
and the Form of Application to receive registered 
shares of Global-US, legibly completed, are received 
by the Exchange Agent named belowand the shares 
of Global-US are registered in the name of such 
holders. Accordingly holders of bearer shares of 
Global-UK are strongly urged to write to one of the 
addresses given below to obtain Forms of Application. 

Forms of Application may be obtained from the 
follow ng: 

Exchange Agent: 

Registrar and Transfer Company 

Attn: Exchange Department 10 Commerce Drive 
Cranford, New Jersey 07016, USA 
or from: 

Global Natural Resources Inc. 

5300 Memorial Drive, Suite 900 
Houston, Texas 77007, USA 

or from: 

Ham bras Bank Ltd 

Attn: Stock Counter, 41 Bishopsgate 
London, England EC2P 2AA 


\ rz>'r 




rUmne 




■ ^ n 

f i'l » i J t 




Europe Tries 
Video Calls 

(Continued from Page 7) 

West Germany costs tbe company 
about 5800. 

Yet trans-Atlantic videoconfer- 
encing rates have come down in the 
Iasi two years thanks io new tech- 
nological developments and to in- 
creased competition between long 
distance carriers in the United 
States. 

A new computer process called 
codec has significantly reduced 
transmission costs. Two yean ago, 
the transmission or a one-color 
television picture used the equiva- 
lent of 1,000 telephone lines. But 
codec compresses the image so that 
it only uses tbe equivalent of 30 
telephone lines. 

Installation costs for a videocon- 
ferencing room without the codec 
average £40,000 in Britain and 
from 300,000 Trancs to 800.000 
francs in France. In France, a co- 
dec is rented separately for about 
20,000 francs a month. 


PEOPLE 


Foster Wheeler Creates Unit for Asia, Pacific 


By Brenda Hagerry 

taeenuHetkd lU-niUT cSau- 

LONDON — Foster Wheeler 
Corp.. the U.S. engineering compa- 
ny. has created a new operating 
region encompassing 17 countries 
in Southeast Asia and the Pacific 
Basin. The headquarters for the re- 
gion. to be known as Foster 
Wheeler Asia, will be in Singapore. 

Alan McKerracher. who is’based 
in Singapore, has been appointed 
regional vice president. Foster 
Wheeler International Corp. In ad- 
dition. he has become head of sales 


who retires as head of the interna- 
tional operations department. Mr. 


maleh and Michel Cartillier execu- 
tive vice presidents. Mr. Betgner is 


Treumann cuirentlv is head or the general manager of the oank s 
credit department of the corporate global private banking group. He 
banking division at the Amster- joins AEIBC front Bank Leu mi Le- 
dam- based bank. IsraeL where he served as presi- 

■ , , „ _ _ . . dent. Western Hemisphere region. 

Bank Julius Baer & Co. said v <, rwr^ndhiliiv 


dam-based bank. IsraeL where he served as presi- 

■ , , „ „ _ . . deni. Western Hemisphere region. 

Baidc JuEus Baer & Co. said Mr Brokaw assumes responsibility 
Roger D. ^ oung has been appoint- } pr aEIBCs investment banking, 
ed a senior vice president of the comracior atH j project finance, 
bank and that he will succeed Fer- commo diiies and sydicaiions busi- 
nand koch as manager of its Lon- nej>s tt0 rldwide. and continues as 
don branch when he returns to the p res ;j en , Q f American Express 
Zunch head office later this year, basing Corp. Mr. Almaleh and 
Nippon Kangvo Kakumaqt (Eu- Mr. Cartillier continue as genera! 
rope) Lid. said K. Isozaki has managers of Trade Development 


and marketing in Southeast .Asia moved to London from Tokyo to Bank, a Geneva-based unit of 
and the Pacific Basin. become its managing director. He AEIBC. the international banking 


Mr. McKerracher is a senior di- succeeds H. Nakajima. who will be arm of American Express Co. 
x:ior of the U.K.-based Foster movine loTokvo shortlv as general Chase Manhattan LttL Lon 


rector oi the U.K.-based roster moving to Tokyo shortly as general Chase Manhattan LtiL London. 
Wheeler Energy Lid.. « well as of manager, international depart- has named John Murray an execu- 
Foster Wheeler Nigeria Lid. menL ai Nippon Kangvo -Kaku- live director. Mr. Murray, who 

Amsterdam-Rotterdam Bank W mam Securities Co. joins Chase from Salomon Broth- 

has appointed Piu Treumann a American Express International ers International in London, will be 
general manager, effective May I. Banking Corp. has elected Amos responsible for new bond Issue syn- 
He will succeed Koen Streeksira. Bergner. J. Barry Brokaw. Sam Al- dication. 


Foster Wheeler Nigeria Ltd. 

Amuerdam-Rotterdam Bank W 
has appointed Pitt Treumann a 


mam Securities Co. 

American Express International 


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MAJZAJS DUPLEX 

LDVH.Y BECHTON + 


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BFfB. TOWER 

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INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


(Continued From Back Page) 


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PARIS 527 01 93 PA YOUNG IADY 
Why not eommunccat with mo m 3 
hnoiKxm even if ! have to tiweB 




SECRETARIAL 
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EMPLOYMENT 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


EDUCATIONAL 
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U-5. EXECUTIVE- Earty 30's. Bade 
pound contract, morfetinq. project 
otki Ww tiatiorL vast knovriedge of 
Mdefle Eart aid Far Ea ste rn markets. 
Arabic tpeafcna WI be in London 
Feb. 36- 2iL U £ Ifc 910015795 to 
grange intarriew by Fob. 22. 


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BUY YOUR NEXT CAR 
TAX FRS AND USE OUR 
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Phone [212] 889-4484. Telex.- 427965 


SH1PSDE SA. Onasee de Worn 
465. 1040 Brunets, Belgium. 
Phone: (D2]6499062iniex: 63290 


NEW MERCEDES 

PORSCHE, BMW, EXOTIC CARS 

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Tel 02361 /7004 T* 8299S7AHS D 



PARS NOTE IHS PHONE AT ONCE 
7576248. Tnatfut VIP. tody, iraud 




SINGAPORE INTI GUIDES Call; Sm- 
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LONDON / HEATHROW GATWICX 
Escort Servxz Tet 727 9858 


HONG KONG 3-671267 young lady 



EUROPORT TAX HIS CARS 
06 far free catalog. 

Bee 1201 1 , Rotterdam Airport, Holond 
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10 YEARS 

We DoBvar Cm to die World 

TRANSCO 

Keeping a contort dock of more that 
300 brand new cars, 



PARIS YOUNG LADY, tourist guide. 
Tet Pent 807 84 95. 


PARS LADY INTUIPREJB. Travel 
companion. Para 633 68 09. 


TOKYO: 442 39 79 European young 


YOUNG LADY COMPANION, ton- 
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LOMX3N - Young Caribbean Lady, 
01-724 1859 Airports / Travel 


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Mer, Frorice 



AUTOMOBILES 


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AUTO RENTALS 


CHAFIC IP4T A CAR. PieShge can 
widr phone: Kotfs Spint, Mefoedes, 
Jaguar, BMW, insootmrs, sr»A an. 
46 r Ptnrre Qriyron. 7500B fans. Tet 
720 l3040l TNw 630797 F 04AFLOC. 


AUTO SHIPPING 


HOW TO IMPORT A EUROPEAN 
CAR WTO THE LLSJV. 

This document expWns fufty what one 
must do to brko o ear ir<o the LLS. 
safely and legacy. It indodes new & 
wed Eumpecm ateo priOL buying lips, 
DOT A ERA oonuB tyon o dd-goes, cus- 
tom clearance & dipping procedures 
as wefl as legoF points. B emu se of (he 
strong 6oAx, you cm save up to 
USSta^OO when baying a Mercedes or 
BMW m Europe & ertp ort ing it to tbe 
States. To receive the manual, rod 

f.L jcnruo, roaraoi jiji 

7000 Stuttgtft 1, Wed Germany 


SMPPMG CARS WORU7HUE 
We Shipped 29J50 Taurtat Cat 
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CAUL MATINA AT 

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TAX HIS CARS 
P.CT. 



DAWAJI TRADE 

KNTLDBJVSY 

We keep a lame stock of 
meet mr wands 
Tel: 02/648 55 13 
Telex 65658 
42 rue Lens, 

1050 Brunets. 


USA [CONN, NY, RA1ATTORNEY. 
Bcnrd L Burke. Tet (2C3) 97241000. 


SERVICES 


YOUNG LADY 

PA/ I n ter p r e t e r & Tourism Glide 

PAJUS 562 0587 


PARIS 557 56 09 

SuplasBrrdeJ I Educated 
Ixriy Co mp cadnn 


FOR SALE & WANTED 


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PERIOD AlffiUSSON CARPET 
Direct by OMwr, Geneva 
Superb cnefibon. autfieniiadBd origin. 
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for new teMrtraert. Ided for embassies, 
inti oraanaations. 

Sacrifice price. Urgent 

Contact SiMtzeriand 

TeL 41-21-74-12-93 / tfar 458324. 




COMMOOAL EXPORT AS5STANT 
Frendi woman, 40, Ruert Engfish, 
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nerve seaa iob with responpOirtet. 
Free now. wise Bcxx 1779, I taro Id 
Tribune. 92521 NetrOy Cede*. France 


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500 SB, 5EC, SL, imnwiote ddvery 
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Cal SB£CTtON - adl experience! 
SSECTTON Invert-Expert QmfaH 


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Yauna uduagted. rieganr & tnlngud 
tar days, everiiux & traveL 
PAMS 533 80 26 


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FOR REA1LY VJJ*. YOUNG LADY 
Sopfriticnted. Educated. MuWnguaL 
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P JL YOUNG LADY 
PARIS S65 03 BO 


PARIS: 520 97 95 

BILINGUAL YOUNG LADY 


YOUNG BEGANT LADY 

mUUUJNGUAL PUBS: STS ST O) 


P.O. Boot 1327. D-280B Syte, 
W. Germany. Tet 4242-60458, 
60459, 60450 fix.- 24109. 


NEW PEUGEOT, Land Rover, Barge 
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Britos, Zoernebaen 18, Mqaneriycafc. 

Holkad (DP0445492, be 47082 


BOOKS 


Small space 
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Herald Tribune 
is less expensive 
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For price 
details call these 
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representative. 


Paris: 747.46.00 
London: 836.4802 
New York: 7523890 
Frankfurt: 72.6735 
Hong Kong: 5.420906 


ESCORTS & GUIDES I ESCORTS* 


INTERNATIONAL 

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USA ft WOR1DWIDE 

Head office in New York 
330 W. 54fh &. N.V.C. 70019 USA 

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MAJOR OHMT CARDS AND 
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Thk awnrd- wr nning eenrice has 
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exdurive Escort Semce by 
USA 8 Uenadwd newt mm 
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LONDON 

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WOR1DWBE MU111UNGUAL 
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NEW YORK OfflCE 

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Coll tree from Ui: 1-800-237-0692 
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llAIMlin A Dot C GBWA HSST BCOKl SBMCE \ v^Tefc 021 4557584 

MADRID APPLE ■««*? 

-ESCORT «VKE * 80 STATlONS ^ 31 49 87 

TO: 2503496. CREDIT CARDS. 


ZURICH 

MBosEscorr soma 

TO 0172S2 85 18 


★ MADRID * 

TASTE ESCORT SBTVtCE 
Teh 411 72 57 


MADRID INTL 

ESCORT SStVICE 
TO 2456548 OBUT CARDS 


DUSSaDORF/ COLOGNE/ BONN 

Escort Service 027 1/38 31 41. 


VBMA - DESKS ESCORT Service. 
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FRANKFURT WNY ESCORT + trov- 
el service. Tet 069/55-72-10 


MUMCH HOSTS Escort + Gride 
Service. Tet £»/44ftS03B 


■T-lf 11 ;! - 1 Vi T 1 jT ». T 


BRUSSELS. ANTWERP NATASCHA 
Escort Service. Tel: 02/7317641. 


MUNICH. PRIVATE Escort Service. 
Td: 912314 or 918132. 


GENEVA - HEUNE ESCORT SEKVICE I *** ^ Europem Gride 

Tel: 36 29 32 \ faANKHJgT bcqct ^ 

vice. Tab 0696834 42. 


FRANKFURT “TOP TEN" Escort Sv- 
rice. 059/59-60-52. 





AR15TOCATS 

London Emit Service 
128 Wferare 5t, London W 1. 
AD nnar Cmkt Cords Accepted 
TS 437 47 41 / 4742 
12 noon - m idnight 


ZURICH 

CAROUC E5CORT SBtVlCE. 
Tet 01/252 61 74 


* Z U R I C H * 

GMGSr5 ESCORT SSMGE. 
TH: 01/363 08 64 


ZURICH 

SohiHh'i E«»rt* Goide Service 
TeL- 01/56 96 92 


* AMSTERDAM * 

Emt SanrieoL 227837 


ROME QUO EUROPE BOOST 
& Guide Serwce-Td: 06/589250*- 589 
1146 (from 4 pm to 10 (m) 


MIAMI, H USA _ 
EXCUdVE ESCORT SERVICE 
Box 520554 Micmi, a 331S2 


GENEVA ESCORT 

SERVICE. Tel: 46 11 58 


CHARUNE GENEVA 

Guide Soviet. Tel: 283-397. 


GENEVA -BBT 
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TH- 022/29. 13.74 


CFB5EA E5008T SBW1CE. 

51 Beaudkjmp Ptaa, London SW3. 
Td, 01 584 6513/2749 {4-12 pm} 


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AMSTERDAM (020 >-997 664 





m mm m 


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rope Escort Service. (0201906472 


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STOOWC4M ESCQRT-Gwde Service 


MADRID IMPACT ESCORT 6 Guide 
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Tet 01-373 8849. 


lONDON G«S BCORT Seme. 
Tet 370 7151. 


lOMJGNZOE WEST Heort Agency 1 VIH4NA VIP E5CORT SHtVCE. Teh 
Td: 01-579 7556 1 Wrona} 65 41 58 



















































































































ACROSS 
1 Culinary con- 


glomeration 
5 Indian state 

10 Additions to 
Itrs. 

13 Moslem deity 

15 Its capital Is 
Valletta 

16 Inlet 

17 Dough 

18 Violently 

19 Pt. orqt. 

20 Time period 

21 Steno’s words 
of rejection? 

23 Repeatedly, to 
Milton 

25 Kind of 
neckline 

26 River to the 
Ubangi 

27 Phrase fora 
touring 
stripper? 

31 Ancient, in 
poesy 

32 Exist 

33 Actor Mischa 

34 Hosp. group 

35 A sail 

37 Acts properly 

41 Suffix with 
musket 

42 Disburden 

43 Lunched 

44 This may be 
hard to 
swallow 


49 Ship with a 
golden cargo 

50 Suburb of 
Lifege 

51 Annede 

Beaupr£ 

52 Substitute 
dentist’s 
activity? 

55" , thou an 

sickl”: Blake 

59 Summer, to 
Zola 

60 Lovable 
marsupial 

61 German 
pronoun 

62 Painter 

Borch 

63 Ethyl acetate 

64 Auld Clootie, in 
Dundee 

85 Parts of a cen. 

68 Unkempt 

67 Erudition 


2 Exist 1 Some actors 46 Girl w 

3 Accor Mischa 2 Unbalanced 47 Openii 

4 Hosp. group 3 -eyed molts 

5 A sail 4 Shout an the 48 TVde 

7 Acts properly hum 56 Win b^ 

tl Suffix with 5 To 53 Iconoi 

musket (without forshc 

l Disburden exception) 54 jw 

3 Lunched 6 Rasputin’s tea negSsi 

4 This may be maker 58 A war* 

hard to 7 Due to appear 57Cookh 

swallow 8 Once upon direct 

47 Like a happy ■- 58 Lake! 

m edium ? 18 Petitioned Irelan 

^ JVnr York Tones, edited try Eugene MaUafca. 

DENMS THE MENACE 


medium? 

® JVnr York 


2/20/86 

11 Unaffected 

12 Lining fabric 

14 Like a kooky 

cook? 

22 Golden Hur- 
ricanes’ borne 

24 More faithful 

27 Lived 

28 Humorist Bill 
: 1828-1903 

29 Yellow or 
Black 

39" the 

land...” 

31 Like an alert 
ballerina? 

34 Napa 

36 Unsaturated 
alcohol 

37 Mary’s pet’s 
sound 

38 Vacation 
vehicle 

39 Catchall abbr. 

40 Diocese 

42 Stored grain 

44 Kind of belt 

45 Glde, e.g. 

46 Girl watchers 

47 Opening for 
molten metal 

48 TV device 

59 Win by 

53 Iconoscopes, 

for short 

54Dogpatch 

negative 

56 Aware of 

57 Cooking 
direction 

58 Lake in 
Ireland 




2-z a 




• I think, somethin's wrong wrm MhWisonS ears. 
&/EW TIME I GO 0*R THERE HE SWS HE CAN H EfR 
TbU CALLIN' ME-* 


THAT SCRAUBLB) WORD QAME 
a by Henri Arnold and Bob Lee 


Unscramble these four Jumbles, 
one letter 10 each square, to form 
four ordinary words. 


MOPET 


PHEES 




' WHAT ALL 
'THOSE SUGGESTIONS 
ABOUT MAPROVINS THE 
POU6HK1UT BUSINESS 
SEEMED TO HAVE, 


Now arrange the circled letters to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon- 


Answer here: 


Yesterday's 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Jumbles; POISE ADAPT EMBRYO DEFILE 


Answer How a stag Is otien forced to run— 
FOR "DEER" LIFE 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


A lgarv e 

A mere return 

ament 

BorceMna 

Bel? rode 

Berlin 

Brunets 

BocBarett 

Budapest 

CewstowB 

costa Dei Sol 

Dublin 

EdlnBunrti 

Florence 

Frankfurt 

Geneva 

Helsinki 

Iflaabal 

lm Palmas 

Lisbon 

London 

Madrid 

Milan 


f 4 Ir 
-12 H fr 
A 43 o 

7 45 r 

.13 9 fr 

- JO 74 tr 
.11 12 tr 
>19 -2 ir 

-8 18 sw 
• 10 14 tr 

8 4 A a 

9 3A r 
a 32 O 

-1 30 tr 
.1A 3 fr 


Bangkok 

Hem no 

Hone Kane 

Manila 

New Del hi 

Seoul 

Shanghai 

Slneopore 

TbM 

Tokyo 


C F C F 

33 91 ZJ 73 d 

-5 O -t U tr 

17 AS 14 a a 

32 90 24 73 Cl 

XT 81 13 54 Ir 

n SO 1 34 SW 

4 39 2 36 0 

31 a 26 79 o 

17 A3 4 39 o 

A 43 3 38 Si 


AFRICA 


Manic* 

Mica 

Oslo 

Paris 

Prague 

ReTkiavik 

Rome 

Stockholm 

StraMarg 

Venice 

Vienna 

Warsaw 

Zurich 


Zurich -A 21 

MIDDLE EAST 


14 57 cl 

10 50 fr 

■ A 21 a 

4 39 o 

■ 2 2B fr 

23-10 a 
19 -2 tr 

6 43 a 

M-lt Cl 
-A 21 fr 

11 12 fr 

0 32 sw 

1 34 tr 

19 -2 fr 

11 V2 fr 

-5 23 fr 

.7 to tr 

13 9 sw 

12 10 Ir 


Ale Mrs 
Cairn 

Capo Town 
Casablanca 
Harare 
Lowes 

Nairobi . 

Tunis 


14 61 ID SO o 

27 81 15 59 el 

21 30 15 59 fr 

17 6* 9 48 d 

27 81 1A 61 0 

29 84 25 77 d 

25 77 17 <3 cl 

t5 59 11 52 d 


LATIN AMERICA 


Buenos Aim 27 SI 23 73 . d 

Lima 23 73 20 AB d 

MextCB aiy 20 68 8 4A d 

Rio de Janeiro 30 88 27 » el 

Saa Paula — — — — *» 


NORTH AMERICA 


Ankara 
Beirut 
Damascus 
Jerusalem 
TAl Aviv 


-4 25 - 7 19 
18 A4 12 54 


18 64 5 41 

IS 64 8 46 


17 63 8 46 


OCEANIA 


Auckland 2! 70 IB 64 d 

Sydney 20 68 IS 64 sh 

cKloudvi fo-foMV; Ir-lalr: Marti; 
cloud v; r-raln; immwrs; sw-snowr; 


Afldwrm 

Allen ta 
Rostov 
Chlcueo 
Denver 
Detroit 
Honolulu 
Houston 
Les Angeles 
Miami 
Minneapolis 
Montreal 
Nassau 
New York 
Son Frond tea 
Seattle 
Toronto 
Washington 
no-not availa&to; 
sl -stormy. 


-10 14-21 
14 57 4 

4 39 -2 

1 34 -8 
14 57 -4 
.1 30 -B 
a 82 21 

22 73 B 

23 73 11 
25 77 16 

2 36-11 
-4 25 ■ 10 
25 77 13 

5 41 20 
20 68 70 ' 

S 46 2 
1 34-10 
11 52 -I 
oovercost; 


MANILA: Ho> available. SEOUL: Nci aval table. SINGAPORE: Not available. 
TOKYO: Wot available. 


PEANUTS 


Wt are 
you rows, 

. LINUS 7 > 


NOTHING 


NOTHING? IT 
LOOKS LIKE 
YOU'RE 
BUILPiNG A 
R 0 CKUJAIL 


( WHAT I > 
MEANT 
WAS 
NOTHING 
IMPORTANT 


PO YOU MIND IF 
. I WATCH? > 


kvVUCw>^3 


<3<nSUn|UFMM a 3MCM*.lK- 2-M 





FASCINATlNfc... SOMEBODY 
U5ELES5 WATCHING 
SOMEBODY DOING 
SOMETHING UNIMPORTANT.. 


BLONDIE 



ANDY CAPP 


MRRiAsetssuaEY 

GOING'S) B»NG- / 

A LOT OF -^-^SURE 
/CHANGE INTO \ rJ$U- 
Imvufe,flo ) l DeAR 



AND IF ITS ANYTHING- LIKEN 


MINE ITIS GOING TO TAKE A 
-t HELLUV4 LOT OUT OF fT, TOO 


WIZARD of ID 


Houpii \& 





SH£U1£J2- A MA* 

&/&-WAP 





REX MORGAN 


^ MOTHER, I WAS . 

THINKING— IF YOU HAVE A DATE WITH f 
KEITH TONIGHT, MAYBE BERT AND I ? 
Can ‘ 


YOU DONT INVITE A MAN 
TO TAKE YOU OUT TO DINNER 
^ AND A AWIE, KENNY/ — 


IS IT OKAY IF I 
TELL HJM WE'LL GO 
m — i DUTCH'? 




b ■«- 




>J- ; - 

J 


ZttetA- 


GARFDELD 


MEV, GARFIELD. I’M MI551NG 
A SUPPER.TWO SPOOLS OF 
THREAD AND 
( A BUTTON... 


,VOO WOULDN'T KNOW WHERE 
THEV ARE,WOUU? VOU? J 


MAH' I HAVE A ^ 
WORD WITH LOO , . 
l- SQUEAK? ^ 


1 THINK 
l PO... 


VROOMll 
VROO M' 


-JTMQW&Mo 



W)Hd Stock Markets 


Via Agence France-Presse Feb. 19 

Oosing prices in local currencies unless otherwise indicated. 



Bk East Asia 
Cheora Kang 
China Light 
Crass Harbor 
Mono Sana Bank 
HK Electric 
HK Hotels 
HK Land 


HK Shanghai 
HK Telephone 
hk wharf 
Hutch Whampoa 

ANP.CBS General lode* :»• HSC352S2? h 
Pravioas :3m JO Jardme Sec 



Jardinesec 
New World 
Shaw Bras 
SHK Props 
Stme Darby 
Stelu* 

Swire PadflcA 
Wheetock 
Wheel Mar 
Wlnsor 
World Inn 


24JU 2430 
1X85 1290 
14J0 14J0 
10.10 10 
47 4AJ5 
7.9C 7 JO 

3250 3250 
5JB 480 
9 9 

AS 6550 
AT? LX 
2150 2148 
10 95C 

9 JO 935 
A A 

HA. NA 
920 9 JO 
NA NA. 

NA NA 
24J0 3480 

^ | ^Chartered 

4 Jo 4.70 Tate and lvio 
2J0 240 


BOOKS 


MOSCOW RULES 


By Robert Moss. 390pp. SI 6.95. 
VillardL 201 East 5Qih Street, 
Sew York. S. Y. 10022. 


Reviewed bv Dennis DrabeUe 


■\/fOSCOW RULES" is ihe latest in a 
iVI snate of inside-Russta thrillere whose 


iVl spate of inside-Russia thrilleis whose 
appeal lies partly in their Iron Curtain-lifting 
properties — most western readers can’t gel 
enough information on Soviet foibles and ln- 
tra-pany politics — and partly in their tradi- 
tional values of suspense and inuigue. To these 
ingredients Robert Moss, an Australian-born 
journalist has added another surefire attrac- 
tion: wish fuliRmeoL “Moscow Rules" is 
about nothing less than a plot to bring down 
Russian communism. 

The movement emanates from the army, in 
particular Major General Sasha Preobraz- 
hensky. who has harbored a double grudge 
against the system since his college days. Ir was 
then that he learned how his father really died 
during World War II: not manning a cannon, 
as the official report states, but cut down by a 
fellow soldier he was trying to stop from raping 
a German girl. It was then that the authorities 
imprisoned and drove to suicide Sasha's dissi- 
dent girlfriend. He vows to join the party, resist 
co-optatioo. and transform the corrupt and 
deadening system from within. 

This, of course, is no mean trick, and Moss 
does not hesitate to help Sasha by delivering 


every year or two. something regime-shaluQgls : ■ 
likely to happen sooner or later. r- .> 

Moss' writing is always polished and praffi*: ; 
sional-in some places, inspired. I espeaai|rfi' 
liked one party cynic’s reflection: “One oTtte^ 
great achie veme nts of {our] form of society 
that the victims always fdt guflty." 

If this novel does not quite thrum the 
cord as soundly as a top-notch thriller xhoiild,T * 
it makes up for the shortcoming with its-ifvBSfL; 
ing portrayal of intra-parry machinatio^.: 
Then, too, there is the dieam-come-traeqo^ty* - - 
of its ploL Soviet domination — and ytbfcx.- 
Russian truculence — may not succumb the 
way Moss suggests, hut he all but convinces 4e' : 
reader that it will succumb. “Moscow Rules’" is - 
an antidote to the superpower brinksmandqj ;; 
and verge-of-destruenon blues. 


Dennis Drabe/le, a Washington lawyer and; 
writer, wrote this review for The Washington ' 
Post ’ 


BEST SELLERS 


him into the bands of serendipity. A friend just 
haopens to fix him uo with the daughter of the 


happens to fix him up with the daughter of the 
man who will become army chief of staff. 
Sasha marries her and eventually becomes her 
father's top aide, which positions him perfectly 
to produce and direct a coup- Posted to the 
United Nations for a spell he happens to run 
into a young woman in Bloomingdale's who 
looks just like his dead girlfriend. Besides pro- 
viding the obligatory love interest, she serves as 
insurance that his anti-Soviet anim us will not 
flag. 

And yet so strong is our thirst for transfor- 
mation of the Evil Empire that these coinci- 
dences go down as easilv as spring water: Sasha 
obviously needs all the help he can get, and the 


TWf New Ysrik Hums 

TtittliS LSb^on/raomfrtminxxctbaDZOOObcotaora 
throughout the United Stales. Weeks on fin are not BBceaaifly ’ 
omsttiilive .... 

FICTION 

Tta Lm Wafa 

wTJk W«k mUU. 

1 IF TOMORROW COMES, by Sidney 

Sheldon — ' - 4 

2 THE SICILIAN, bv Mario Puzo 2 14 

3 THE TALISMAN.' by Stephen King and ... 

Peier Siraub ... ~ 3 17 

4 THE LIFE AND HARD TIMES OF HEI- 
DI ABROMOWTTZ. by Jean Rivers 5 ■ 14 

5 SO LONG AND THANKS FOR ALL 

THE FISH, by Douglas Adams 4 . ID 

6 MOSCOW RULES, by Robert Moss. — 12 


GLITZ, by Elmore Leonard 

JITTERBUG PERFUME, by Tom Rob- 


bins — .. — — .... — 

V THE FOURTH PROTOCOL, by Freder- 

10 LADIES OF THE CLUR,"by 

Helen Hooven Sammyer . — 

1 1 LOVE AND WAR. by John lakes 

12 LIFE ITS OWN SELF, by Dan Jenkins „ 

13 ILLUSIONS OF LOVE, by Cynthia Free- 

man — — ■ — ----- 

14 THE FINISHING SCHOOL, tty Gail 

Godwin 

15 STRONG MEDICINE, by Arthur Hailey 

NONFICTION 


Iff 

tfSulli 


rtpj\N 


reader is prepared to let him have anything 
short of divine thunderbolts. And to be fair, 
one feature of the contemporary Soviet scene 
that Moss seizes upon — the tendency to pick 
aged time — servers as party bosses — lends 
itself admirably to his scenario. If the nation’s 
leadership is going to change arthritic hands 


I IACOCCA: An Autobiography, by Lee la- 
cocca with William Novak 




cocca nidi William Novak 

LOVING EACH OTHER, by LeoBuscag- 

tia 


CI T IZEN HUGHES, by Mkhad Dntmm 
THE BRIDGE ACROSS FOREVER, by 
Richard Bach 


SON OF THE MORNING STAR. Evan S. 

Connell 

MOSES THE KITTEN, by James Heniot 
PIECES OF MY MIND, by Andrew A. 


8 A*LK3?ri : iN THE ATTIC, by Sfad^bwer ' 


■i j:.:': ;-- - 5 sed 


Solutioa to Previous Puzzle 


5U3D — - 

THE COURAGE TO CHANGE, by Den- 
nis Wholey — — — — 

“THE GOOD WAR.- by Srads Teitd — 


eeddo aana □□□□ 

bbqdci anaQ anan 

EEOnHHClCIHEiaQHaQ 

hdh ana oaaaaa 
□as □□□□aaaa 
DCQnaH^aaHH 
ciDnan □□□□ aaaa 

onniD □□□□□ nana 
BEDE naan naana 
□□□□aoaaaQQ 
□CQEflBaa EHC3 
□ennan ama aan 
mEonaaaaananaaa 
oehq aa □□ aaama 

DEDE OC100 nonBa 


10 “THE GOOD WAR." fay Scuds Teikd — 
M DR. BURNST PRESCRIPTION FOR 
HAPPINESS, bv Georae Burre 

12 HEY’. WAIT A' MINUTE. I WROTE A 

BOOK, by John Madden with Dave Ander- 
uyn 

13 THE SEVEN MOUNTAINS OF THOM- 


AS MERTON, try Mkhael Mou 

14 ELVIS IS DEAD AND I DONT FEEL 


SO WELL MYSELF, by Lewis Giizutd 12 

15 CHOICES, by LW UEmann — 

ADVICE, HOW-TO AND MISCELLANEOUS 

1 WOMEN COMMING OF AGE. by Jane 

Fonda with Minton McCarthy l 

2 WHAT THEY DONT TEACH YOU AT . 

HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL by 
Mark H. McCormack — 3 

3 NOTHING DOWN, by Robot G. Allen 2 

4 WEIGHT WATCHERS QUICK START 


2 2 l’j i s- j '•! - - r -yea 

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lssr.:» > '-ejai r 

liir.c fi; u t!«m 

: L- ij.otTipJisi 
SS -.S' 

L’.; ' : 8 ;. i.'zi 

zs-t ±s Y-' r.. =ive 


PROGRAM, by Jean Nidetcfa 

THE ONE MINUTE SALES PERSON. 


Z.Z. AA*. ’• ~r.iU 


by Spencer Jchnsoa and Larry Wilson 


BRIDGE 


fivers. St 

A- 


Bv Alan Tmscoti 


O N the diagramed deal the 
contract was four spades. 


v/ contract was four spades, 
reached after West had opened 
one no-trump. This suggested 
15-17 points, but could have 
been 13-14 with dubs as the 
long suit West led the heart 
ace and another heart, giving 
the declarer a little help. Even 
so. there was no obvious way 
to make 10 tricks. 

After winning with the heart 
king South led bis singleton 
diamond in the hope that West 
would produce an honor. 
When West played low. Sooth 
concluded correctly that the 


diamond honors were divided 
and put op the ace. 

South then led to the spade 
ace and led another trump. Af- 
ter winning with the king. West 
was end-played. If he led a low 
diamond. Smith could niff out 
East's queen, cross to dummy 
with a trump and throw a dub 
on the diamond jade. The dia- 
mond king would be the third 
and last tnck for the defense. 

When West shifted to the 
dub long, he won in dummy 


the world's great players, that 
Was a bad assumption. 


NORTH (D) 

♦J« 


and misjadged the dub posi- 
tion. South assumed that West 


bad made a tricky lead from 
K-10 of dubs, bnt that would 
mean that West had overbid 
and made a major defensive 
blunder. Since West was one of 


«J83 

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WEST EAST 

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*8753 *U» 

SOUTH 
♦KQM75X 

OAK 

•141 

Nanb rad South a tie MnwB fc 
The bidding: 


_?hiudel?h:\ — i 

ivcc" .T.e^r 
Akz: - r>e:» Less rt 

-hr -.1 j.: ;n 

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ajui'; L>. visi 

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ME. FiXl 


North 

East 

SoNh 

wm 

l* 

tv 

14 

Pm 

1N.T. 

Pan 

ao 

Pm 

1N.T. 

Pan 

34 

Pm 

44ft 

Pm 

pm 

Pm 

West led Ae heart m. 



Clttf f’rr* 
239 237 

260 260 



v.r.uen 

■scfi-i/'J- -.:r.::r.c'cr. js. 

'■f JTC :bi 

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?S5T“'^ 

A F-T.gUi 

Mind. 


moku Etac.inds 
Matsu E lac. Works 
AUfsaMtfrt Bank 
Mitsubishi Churn 
Mitsubishi Elec 
Mitsubishi Heavy 
Mitsubishi Cora 
Mitsui and co 
Mitmikauhl 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NlkfcoSec 
Nippon SImI 
Nippon Yusen 
Nissan 
Nomura Sec 
Otvmous 
Ricoh 
Sharp 
Sony 

Sumitomo Bonk 
Sumitomo Chem 
Sumitomo Metal 
Tolsel Cora 
TatxhcvMortne 
Tafceda Chem 
Tallin 

Tokyo Elec. Power 
Tokyo Marine 
Toray Ind 
Toshiba 
Toyota 

Yamokhl Sac 


1600 1570 
655 651 

1470 1460 

416 423 

399 400 

347 245 

S 3 

416 417 

1Z» 1250 
12111 1210 
620 614 

14B 148 

241 242 

609 604 

947 

T420 1400 
935 . 9U0 
1070 MB0 
4400 4330 
1780 IB0D 
212 214 

145 146 

1*7 199 

§ 395 
S3? 
435 

1540 1550 
740 733 

4J8 431 

<35 <35 

1330 1320 
SW 400 


NBtkeUXJ. lutfa : 12,15646 
pyeyte u i : u.Mf.u 
New Index : *47.18 
Prrrfaa* : 966JH 


Zorich 


Bank Leu 
Brawn Ekrvert 


Stoehbobo 


Hang Soaa index : IA3L17 
Preview ; 1AZ7.1B 



ASA 

Alla Laval 

ASM 

Astra 

Atlas Cooco 

Baltden 

Electrolux 

Ericsson 

Esselie 

HandeiartEWt 

Pharmodo 

Soab-Scnnki 

Sandvlk 

Skomka 

SKF 


370 K.Q. 
196 197 
360 36S 

410 415 
107 108 
180 175 


Aka I 

AsohtCham 
Asahl Gloss 
Banket Tokyo 
Brid ge stone 
Canon 
Cl lot! 

Dal Nippon Print 
Qalmj Hou9S 
Full Bank 
FHlIl PtMlO 
Rrtltsi 
Hitachi 


307 304 

393 292 1 


340 3401 

173 174 


210 205 

K.0, 4% 


390 NA 
.97 «65 

1*5 192 


IHI 

Japan Air Lines 
Kollma 
Karrsal Power 
KOOSoop 
K awasaki Stacl 
Kirin Brewery 
Komarsu ltd 
Kubota 


460 476 
665 666 

875 HOC 
660 650 

SO 526 
’41» »«* 
225 329 

TOM 995 
557 SSS 
1400 1460 
1820 1790 
1360 1350 
£70 875 

USD 1460 
144 145 

5100 5050 
270 271 

1300 1330 
817 819 

146 146 
563 563 
444 442 

220 320 


ClboGetey 
CretfitSuIsM 
Eiectrowart 
Georg Fbenar 
Jacob Svchard 
Jetnwtf 
umbGvr 
Nettie 

OerllkorvB 

Roche Baby 

Sandoa 

Sctrtndler 

Sutler 

SBC 

Swissair 

Swiss VoHce&ank 

Union Bank 
Wlnlerthur 
Zurich ins 


3800 377S 
1600 1590 
2835 2815 
2290 2385 
2700 2690 
745 745 
642S 6425 
2010 1975 
1690 1670 
64ea 6330 
1510 1500 
8850 0750 
8000 7973 
3700 3675 
347 347 

360 368 

1140 7138 
1495 1490 
3670 3675 
<250 4240 
20475 20400 


SBC Index :*38J0 
Pre vi ous : 0.11 
'NA: net awfid; NA.: TwT 
4 WRMi; Ml: ax-dividend. 


Andersen Denies Lawsuit Allegation 


AACorp 

512*1 

512ft 

aIIM-Lvmm 

172 

l» 

Anglo An Gala 

582 

583 

Baococft 

143 

145 

Barctars 

409 

604 

Ban 

307 

SQ2 

BAT. 

361 

365 

Beecham 

365 

S3 

B ICC 

M 

240 

BL 

38 

38 

BOC Grauo 

303 

296 

Bants 

170 

174 

Bawalar Indus 
BP 

ft 

241 

565 





Banco Comm 
Centra le 
aocxiateis 
Crad Hal 
Farm Hallo 
Flat 

nnsioer 

Graeroll 

IFI 

Haleemantl 

Madlatxmca 

Montedison 

Ollvent 

Pirelli 

RAS 

Rlnascento 

SIP 

Snta 

Standa 


19700 19150 
3060 2940 
ago 8250 
2301 2387 
11650 11645' 
3700 2775 
56 56 

43500 44509 
7701 7WS 
82000 82500 
87350 88000 
1546 1571 
6965 6790 
2316 Z39S 
71 850 73000 
65850 69859 
2240 2250 
2890 2975 
12000 12140 


M1B index: U54 
previous: 1441 


Reuters 

LONDON — The accounting 
firm that checked the accountsof 
De Loreau Motor Co. has denied 
the British government’s allega- 
tions of negligence in the automo- 
bile company's collapse. 

Arthur Andersen & Co. said 
Monday in a statement that the 
allegations were without founda- 
tion and that it was confident the 
£270- million damage suit filed by 
the government would faiL 

The lawsuit, filed Friday in US. 


District Court in New Ytxk, allies 
that the company acted “fraudu- 


lently and with gross incompe- 
tence.” It named Arthur Anaer- 


tence.” It named Arthur Ander- 
sen’s brandies in the United Stales, 
Ireland and Britain. 


John Z. De Lorean set up De 
Lorean Motor’s Belfast plant in 
1978. The British government 
loaned De Lorean £77 million ($84 


million), but dosed the plant Ocl 
19, 1981 right months after it went 


19, 1982, right months after it went 
into receivership. 



L- - 


























INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 1985 


SPORTS 





China Becomes a Presence in World Soccer 


Greg Louganis 


Dread Pin* HanaMnol 


x)uganis Is Winner 
)f Sullivan Award 


mfnkrf by Our Staff From Dispatcher 

NDIANAP0L1S — Diver Greg 
iganis. an also-ran for the past 
: years, received the Sullivan 
ard here Monday night as the 
ion's outstanding amateur ath- 
;for 1984. 

.ouganis, 25, won the balloting 
2,500 participants who induded 
nbers of the press, past winners, 
sponsoring Amateur Athletic 
ion and representatives of the 
!. Olympic Committee. 

It's like the Heisman Trophy — 
- ist don't get a $7 milli on tro- 
Louganis said in reference to 
contract quarterback Doug 
tie signed after being selected as 
4*s top college football player, 
le 10 finalists were all Olympic 
i medalists — only the second 
e in the award’s 55-year history 
l has happened. 

-Auganis is the second male drv- 
o win the award that has gone to 
A and field stars 32 times. Sam- 
: Lee was the first diver honored, 
his 1953 accomplishments. 
Te years later Patricia McCor- 
Jt became the only woman diver 
ecdve the Sullivan, given annu- 
• in recognition of James E Sul- 
n, an AAU founder. 


"It means a lot to me because 
there’s only been three divers," 
Louganis said. “We are a minor 
sport but we're growing, and if I 
can be a pan of it I’m going to help 
in any way I can." 

The finalists were selected after 
being nominated by their respec- 
tive national governing bodies. The 
group included gymnasts Mary 
Lou Return and Bart Conner, run- 
ners Joan Benoit and Valerie 
Brisco- Hooks, skier Bill Johnson, 
swimmer Rowdy Gaines, horse- 
man Joe Fargis, wrestler Steve Fra- 
ser and synchronized swimmer 
Trade Ruiz: 

Louganis was a finalist for a re- 
cord sixth consecutive year. In the 
past, he has seen urdler Edwin Mo- 
ses, gymnast Kurt Thomas, speeds- 
kater Eric Heiden, distance runner 
Mary Decker and sprinter Carl 
Lewis win the award. 

This tune he brought impressive 
credentials. In sweeping the spring- 
board and platform competition at 
Los Angeles last summer, the three- 
time world champion accumulated 
710.91 points and became the first 
to break the 700 barrier on the IO- 
meter platform. (AP. UP!) 


Ihtemauorud Herald Tribune 

LONDON — The Year of the Ox begins 
Wednesday, and out of 122 nations entered for 
the 1986 World Cup. would you believe the one 
qualifying match this night of the Chinese new 
year involves Macao against China? 

It will be a long, uphDl furrow until Nov. 15, 
when we’ll know which two of 26 Asian commu- 
nities represent that part of the world in die cup 
finals. But this year, next year, next decade or 
next generation, the Chinese will get there. 

Just as long as China continues to come out 
into the world of play, its ultimate competitive- 
ness seems assured. A billion people from whom 
to select eleven, and a stoical oxlike determina- 
tion, make an irresistible formula. 

We had not known for 30 years what poten- 
tial lurked behind Mao's denunciation ot indi- 
vidual sporting challenge. (His own septuage- 
narian plunge in the Yangtze was by way of 
promoting health rather than more lurid aspects 
of sporting combat, and his approval of table 
tennis was linked to its usefulness in political 
maneuvering.) 

The 1984 Summer Olympics showed bow 
quickly China's sporting sons and daughters 
have adapted since the chairman’s death in 1976 
and the more recent return to sporting folds. Yet 
despite such natural gymnasts as Tong Fa and 
Li Nine and such ajjfied high jumper as world 
record-holder Zhu Jianhua. the soccer fraternity 
scoffs and assumes it will take an age for China 
to become competitive in, ironically, a collective 
game. 

Soccer's first mistake was to assume China 
could not produce a big enough team. Zhu 
happens to attack the highjump from an advan- 
tage of standing 6-fooi-4 (1.93 meters) in his 
spikes, but he is dwarfed by some Chinese 
basketball players, one of whom stands 7-foot- 
3. Myth exploded. 

Next, ask soccer’s complacent, how can Chi- 
na practice the game in such overcrowded land? 
True, with a quarter of mankind on a mere 
fourteenth of the earth under the red flag, there 
is a problem. Bui was it not the coufinedspaces 
of Brazilian shantytowns, was it not the 
crammed back streets of Britain and Hungary, 
that honed the best of soccer skills? 

A few years ago. when Chinese athletes 
emerged shy and suspicious as badgers caught 
in daylight, it seemed naivete would be their 


undoing. I recall the patronizing words or John 
Wile, captain of West Bromwich Albion, the 
English First Division club that toured China in 
a missionary role shortly after the Chinese were 
readmitted to FIFA in 1979. “We found that 
technically they were good.” he said, “but tacti- 
cally they were very niave." 

It was one of the kinder summaries of a team 
that, four years ago. visited Europe and was 
gently but soundly spanked by pretty average 
dub sides. 

But, behind grateful smiles, the Chinese were 
not just learning by losing. Argentina, the world 

Rob Hughes 

champion of the day, was being persuaded to 
give Chinese youth master classes. Id 1981 a 
cultural agreement arranged for the Chinese to 
undergo training and competition in the land of 
world champions. 

Professor lost d'Amico, director of the Ar- 


Eun 

the 


program 
‘look and 


geniine Football Association, set up a 
of 18 games plus 
learn" attendance at certain Argentine champi- 
onships. 

The opposition was selected with an eye to a 
fust rule of sporting encouragement — ' ' tough 
enough to extend the visitors, but soft enough to 
bui/d the Chinese youngsters' confidence 
through 12 victories, three draws and three 
defeats. 

Stage two came when d'Amico journeyed to 
Kunmig. capital of Yunnan province in the 
south. There, aL a sports center where 14 teams 
were concentrated, some 50 of China’s soccer 
coaches were the pupils. To quote the Argentine 
association: “Efforts were made to correct and 
improve technical skill by concerted action and 
to overcome the inhibitions which the Chinese 
were subject to, especially as regards reaction 
and decision at important moments." 

Of course, three weeks' tuition hardly enabled 
Chinese to scurry about midfield with the wis- 
dom of Osvaldo Ardiles, to defend with the 
venom of Daniel Passarella or to score with the 
speed and cunning of Mario Kempes. 

But at the eighth Asian Cup, held in Singa- 
pore last December, onlookers either glimpsed 
the total downgrading of the continent's soccer 
standards or the coining of the Chinese with 


gold, and not merely friendship, in their mind's 
eyes. 

No Asiatic team has yet remotely challenged 
uropeand South America's alternating grip*" on 
le World Cup. so the Asian cup is lhar sum- 
mil. “We do not expect to reach the f inal, " said 
China's captain. Zuo Shusheng. “Our aim is to 
learn more about football." 

But 1 suspect others are learning now f thal a 
Chinaman should not always be taken at his 
word. The Chinese beat Singapore. India and 
the United Arab Emirates, while losing narrow- 
ly to Iran, to win their group with 10 goals 
scored and two conceded. 

In the semifinal. China then eliminated Ku- 
wait, the Brazilian- propped team that at the 
1982 World Cup held Czechoslovakia and lost 
by a solitary goal to England. “We truly didn’i 
expect to reach the finals," Zuo insisted. “But if 
we win it will be the biggest triumph, making 
not only my team but the whole nation happy as 
well." 

There it was, a glimpse of naked ambition. 
Some Chinese — among them Zuo: his coach. 
Zeng Xudin and forwards Gu Gun naming and 
Li Hua — were outspoken in their Belief that 
Saudi Arabia, their opponent in the final were 
lucky to win, 2-0. 

China’s competitive intent is now an open 
secret. Its players have learned that one tourna- 
ment begins as another ends, that in modem 
times rite qualifying road is best taken cautious- 
ly. 

Last Sunday, China traveled to Hong Kong 
and found sufficient resistance — among people 
it will one day absorb — to settle Tor a scoreless 
draw (just as mighty West Germany would 
gladly accept one in Portugal this Sunday;. Like 
the West Germans, the Chinese have managed 
to insure that away matches are completed first 
so that home environment can help sway the 
necessary results later on. 

In our terras, it is “soaking up pressure.” but 
Chinese legend indicates we didn't invent it: 

A Chinese warlord receives dispatches from 
the front — 400 Japanese dead. 22.000 Chinese 
dead. The old man nods. A week later. 200 
Japanese dead, 36.000 Chinese. He nods. The 
next week. 500 Japanese and 47.000 Chinese. 
“Pretty soon." says the warlord. “No more 
Japs." 

Pretty irresistible, these Chinese. 



Where 

They 

Train 

Spring-training 
attestor (ha 
major league 
teams. 


The Nn York Tm 


Baseball Sun-Bell Bound 


Turpin, Rookie Fill-In, 
Sparks Cavs Past 76ers 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

RICHFIELD, Ohio — Cleve- 
land Cavalier rookie center Mel 
Turpin had plenty of motivation 
Monday against Philadelphia: the 
fact be was starting and the reason 
he was starting. 

*Tve been coming off the bench 
lately, so starting is an extra chal- 
lenge,” said Turpin. “And I only 
got (he start because of somebody 
else’s sadness" (Cavalier forward 


dyers, Still Winging, Rout Penguins 

to Hershey of the American Hock- 
ey League to gel hack into shape. “I 
’think that bang down was the best 
thing for me. It gave me my confi- 
dence back," he said. 

The Penguins have lost nine 
straight and haven’t won od the 
road since Jan. 2. They h3ve lost 17 
straight here, dating to 1974. “This 
is about as low as we can gel" said 
Coach Bob Berry. “I really don’t 
know why things have gone so 
poorly lately. It might be ihe wear 
and tear on the younger players, 
who are not use to being through a 
ran for the playoffs." 

Eriksson started the scoring at 
5:54 of the first period. Murray 
Craven made it 2-0, at 7:36. Peter 
Zezel 3-0 on a power play at 9:59 
and Ed Hospodar 4-0 at 10:46. The 
Penguins only one dot on goal in 
the period. 


1 The Associated Press 

. HILADELPH1A — What a 
.erence 10 days has meant to die 
■ ‘laddphia Flyers. Less than two 
-_-ks ago, the team was in second 

• :e in the National Hockey 
"igue’s Patrick Division. II 
, -its behind Washington. The 

NHLFOCUS 

ere were being written off as 
^aon-titie contender, and even 
‘• players seemed satisfied with a 

• Mid-place finish and the bomc- 
playoff edge that goes with ii 

“ ut suddenly they skated to five 
j. ight victories, and, after thrash- 
the Pittsburgh Penguins, 8-2, 
■a : Monday, they are only three 
7 .its behind the Capitals with two 
Vies in hand. In Monday’s only 


other game, Edmonton beat Buffa- 
lo, 6-4. 

The Flyers sewed four first-peri- 
od goals in less than five minutes 
against the Penguins, who totaled 
only 18 shots on goal to the win- 
ners’ 43. Six players scored goals, 
with Thomas Enksson contribut- 
ing two. Brian Propp added three 
assists and Tun Kerr twa 

The Fivers recalled goalie Bob 
Froese Monday and immediately 
tossed him into action. He stopped 
16 shots for his eighth victory (8-1- 
0) of the season. Froese never has 
lost to the Penguins, bolding an 8- 
0-0 record and a 2J8 goals a gains t 
average. 

Froese, 26, hadn't played in an 
NHL game since suffering strained 
ligaments in his left knee Dec. 1 1 
against Winnipeg. He was assigned 


Lonnie Shelton missed the game 
because of the death of his mother; 
he returned to his home in Califor- 
nia for the funeral). 

Turpin also remarked he’d been 
“I wouldn’t say lazy — maybe 
more relaxed than physical" but be 

NBA FOCUS 

was anything but too relaxed in 
filling in for Shelton. Turpin scored 
20 points and pulled down 17 re- 
bounds while World B. Free had 35 
points in leading Cleveland a 120- 
113 victory over Philadelphia. TEe 
Cavs (18-36) beat the 76ers for thr 
second time in four days, having 
won by 112-107 in Philadelphia 
Firday night 

Despile Andrew Toney’s season- 
high 43 points, the 76ers "lost for the 
12th time in in 54 outings. “An-, 
drew can drive to the basket and hit 
the outside shot" said Free. “We 
love to let him take that outside 
shot instead of Moses Malone get- 
ting inside shots and 20 free throws 
a game." 

“Cleveland played a very aggres- 
sive game." said 7 6ere coach Billy 
Cunningham. “Free and Turpin 
were the keys. We just let up after 
beating Detroit and we were too 
lax.” 

The Sixers took a 34-30 lead af- 
ter one quarter and scored the first 
nine points of the second. Turpin’s 
six points then keyed a 12-0 □eve- 
land run that cut'the deficit to 55- 
53 at halftime. Free scored 13 
points in the third quarter, indud- 



Ire Aaaoomd ftejs 

Cleveland's Mel Turpin, making an outlet pass off a rebound 
during Monday's 120-113 NBA victory over Philadelphia. 


ing two foul; shots that broke an 80- 
80 tie with 1:32 left and gave the 
Cavaliers the lead for good. 

Elsewhere it was Detroit 122, 
Phoenix 103; Boston 1 10. Utah 94, 
and the Los Angdes Clippers 125, 
San Antonio 121. 

Cleveland opened to 106-93 with 
6:14 to play, but Philadelphia drew 
to within 1 12-109 on Charles Bark- 
ley’s two free throws with 1:29 re- 
maining. Free i hen scored 4 points 
to seal the victory. 

“This was a great game," said 
Free. “It was for Lonnie and his 
family. I'm very glad we won.” 


SCOREBOARD 


Hockey 


George Kail the Cleveland coa- 
ch, praised his bench- “I'm proud 
of the guys like Phi) Hubbard and- 
Johnny Davis (15 points each)," he 
said. “All of us were undo- some 
emotional stress." 

The losers got 18 points apiece 
from Julius Erving and Barkley. “It 
wasn't enough." said Erving. 
“Their bench was too tough, and 
they played especially well consid- 
ering they were probably thinking 
of Shelton, 

“I think they felt they had to win. 
We certainly didn’t give it to them 
— they earned it" (AP. UP!) 


Basketball 


By Joseph Durso 

Sc*' York Times Service 

NEW YORK —The first sign of 
spring, a tractor-trailer track, ap- 
peared at Shea Stadium one morn- 
ing last week and started the annu- 
al ritual: Loading 300 dozen 
baseballs, 30 dozen bats, 75 hd- 
mets. several dozen trunks of base- 
ball equipment a pitching ma- 
chine, half a dozen exercise 
machines, and two canons of fine 
French wine left by Rusty Staub 
with the written admonition: “Be 
Very Careful" 

A moving van rolled up to Yan- 
kee Stadium a day later and started 
the ritual there. In went 27 trunks 
of baseball gear. 200 uniforms. 200 
bats, stacks of medical supplies, 
three exercise bikes, two pitching 
machines. 60 boxes of Yankee jack- 
ets for the concessionaire and Yogi 
Beira's golf dubs. 

“Also, 200 bags of day, weighing 
100 pounds apiece." said Nick 
Prion?, the team’s deputy director 
of logistics. “It's the day they 
pound around the pitcher’s mound 
and home plate. It's shipped from 
New Jersey, and we take it down. 
They figure it's more economical 
than buying it in Florida." 

On the southbound interstate, 
the Met truck was soon rolling to- 
ward Sl Petersburg on Florida’s 
gulf coast and the Yankee van to- 
ward Fort Lauderdale on the At- 
lantic coast. They and their heaps 
of gear were headed for the Sun 
Bdt camps where the surest sign of 
the season starts appearing this- 
week — spring training 

Outside the locker rooms of all 
26 big-league ballparks last week 
the truck scene was being played by 
people eager to get the show on the 
road. The cargo was pretty much 
the same, but the destinations were 
scattered from Mesa to Miami 
from Tempe to Tampa, eight 
camps in Arizona and 18 in Flori- 
da, all awaiting the tracks* return as 
precisely as Capistrano awaits its 
swallows. 


Nobody has been playing the 
scene longer than Pete Sheehy. This 
is the 75th year of his life and his 


58th with the Yankees, and this will 
be his 43d spring training as the 
team's clubhouse manager. He re- 
members padring trucks with ev- 
erything from Mike Kekich’s mo- 
torcycle to Whitey Ford’s sailboat 
“The biggest change over the 
years," Sheehy said while he and 
Priore packed, “is the type of 


equipment we use today, and the 
medicines. In the old days, the 
trainer had rubbing alcohoL Now. 
be sends cartons of supplies. Woo- 
die Schaefer of the Giants was a 
fighter who doubled as a trainer. 
Red Miller of the Phillies was a 
bartender. The average trainer was 
a rabdown guy. Now, he's a college 
man with medical training. 

"The players also couldn't afford 
to send a lot of stuff south in the 
old days. They didn’t make that 
kind of money. They weren’t fash- 
ion plates — most of them had one 
or two suits. They'd take the train 
to spring training. Everybody was 
required to live in the team hotel in 
Florida, and nobody was nerramed 
to drive a car. It was a different era. 

“Babe Ruth never came in here 
with personal stuff for the truck," 
he said. “It was loaded mostly with 
baseball equipment It didn't go to 
the airport either. They took it to 
Penn Station, and put the stuff in 
the baggage car." 

Over in the Met clubhouse, 
Charlie Samuels had the usual 
equipment tucked into trunks. But 
be also had a room FiDed with 
household gear and other impedi- 
menta dropped off by players and 
the office staff. He seemed incredu- 
lous: “We’ve got bicycles, baby 
stuff, two TV sets and coffee ma- 
chines," he said. “Last year, some- 
body bought a piece of antique 
furniture in Florida and shipped it 
back on the truck. When Dave 
'Kingman was on the club, he sent 
his jet skis on the truck. 

“And Rusty always has his wine. 
Til put it in the truck last and pack 
some soft stuff around it" 

At least Samuels and Sheehy do 
not have to get a truckload of bag- 
gage through customs. The Mon- 
treal Expos and the Toronto Blue 
Jays have that problem along with 
the ordinary ones, but they meet it 
by keeping detailed bills of lading 
on everything to go south. As they 
load their trucks, they are joined at 
the stadiums by a Canadian cus- 
toms broker and a customs agent 
who monitor the loading before tbe 
trucks roll. 

Returning north from spring 
training is even trickier for the bor- 
der-crossing teams, because they 
buy baseball and medical supplies 
in Florida and carry them back into 
Canada. On the return trip they do 
what all travelers are supposed to 
do: They declare them and pay. 


tional Hockey League Leaders 


NHL Standings 


Moat Hecfcev Uaw* leader? through 
IT: 

OFFENSE 

Overall 



G 

A 

p Pirn 

ky. Edmonton 

S6 

>03 

TS9 

34 

, Edmonton 

S3 

53 

106 

22 

•. N.Y.I. 

47 

51 

98 

14 

rchufc, Winnipeg 

36 

61 

97 

70 

a. Las Anoeles 

34 

59 

93 

36 

her. N.Vj. 

34 

51 

85 

39 

eon, Winnipeg 

31 

52 

83 

85 

*. Edmonton 

24 

57 

81 

72 

ns. Los Angeles 

37 

42 

79 

49 

m. Calgary 

28 

SI 

79 

12 

Jra SLLoois 

22 

57 

79 

23 

d, Chicago 

31 

46 

77 

34 

er. Washington 

35 

41 

76 

49 

U, N.Y.I. 

30 

40 

76 

73 

drinv. Quebec 

26 

50 

76 

7 6 

Philadelphia 

45 

30 

75 

31 

siter, Washington 

44 

30 

74 

63 

Hick. Octroi! 

38 

J< 

74 

IS 

nan. Detrail 

21 

50 

71 

42 

1. Quebec 

42 

28 

7D 

39 

letoyskl, Edmonton 

36 

34 

70 

52 


GOALTENDING 


(Empty-nti aoais In aarenihesM) 


BM 

MP GA SO AW 
Z406 101 4 ISt 

t 

955 50 

03.14 

tor 

45 4 

0X69 

tala (4) 

X424 159 

4 in 

n 

661 31 

12X1 

n 

2.621 134 

2284 

n 

» 16 

03.15 

ihtogtaa (5) 

X587 176 

3 259 

* 

484 17 

0211 

■•rgh 

7065 ISO 

1215 

n 

60 7 

07J» 

tadetphla (3) 

UN 177 

1 3.12 

5Y 

Z4IE 127 

1217 

ert 

1.145 <3 

D3J0 

itreal {«) 

3jsa if4 

1 128 

1,497 89 1 3.15 
1X14 107 1 154 

' mid Moog shared shutout JOft. 8-) 

noataa CO 

ISU 198 

3 138 

rs 

2J09-12* 

0131 

i 

956 56 0 351 

drl 

102 6 

0X53 

Holds 

164 14 

05-12 

too C3) 

U31 285 

0 MS 

nv 

679 38 

IUt 

tard 

IXS8 88 

0339 

Hu 

14S5 82 

0353 

*06 (1) 

X592 209 

1 349 


70 3 

0257 

i sn 91 

0243 


1.749 III 

1381 

toms (i) 

3411 208 

1 166 

denskj 

953 S3 

1127 

trmpn 

3413 173 

03.97 

tow) (4) 

1564 239 

1 3X7 

lin 

1253 133 

0154 

rds 

1.270 93 

04X9 

**■» U) 

1522 228 

6 188 

tv 

US K» 

2360 


Smith 

1X80 BB 

04.13 

Mttanson 

425 35 

04.94 

N.Y. istomten 

3457 228 

2 3 M 

LOW 

953 58 

1165 

Resch 

1,975 127 

0154 

Kampourf 

477 39 

04.91 

New Jersey (3) 

S*0S 227 

1 4X8 

Meioche 

1X97 01 

03XS 

Beoupre 

1X25 87 

1194 

Mekmson 

834 58 

04.17 

Sands 

87 8 

05X2 

Minnesota «| 

3X43 233 

1 03 

Janecvk 

2j m i3i 

1178 

Eliot 

1.468 107 

04X7 

Los Angeles (41 

3X44 2(2 

1 4X9 

Vonbte&roock 

1,710 ))4 

1198 

Hanlon 

1X58 119 

04JU 

N.Y. Rangers (41 

3477 237 

1 09 

Bernhardt 

1X16 77 

03X1 

Beeler 

633 43 

1468 

5L Croix 

5oB 45 

04X5 

wregeetl 

1607 W 

04X7 

Toronto (5) 

1X27 250 

1 4JS 

Hayward 

2X21 1<0 

04.14 

Holden 

213 IS 04X3 

Beta-end 

1X13 8) 

14X7 

Winnipeg (4) 

X447 142 

1 4X1 

Sionlowski 

20 1 

0360 

Ml lien 

2X99 185 

14X7 

weeks 

788 63 

1460 

Hartford (l) 

3407 250 

3 440 

Staton 

162S 116 

04X8 

Mm 

376 27 

04X1 

Mlcaief 

1X99 in 

04X4 

Detroit «1 

3400 248 

• 467 

Romano 

1J05 90 

14.14 

□Ion 

553 43 

04X7 

Herron 

1413 115 

0468 

Pittsburgh (3) 

3X71 351 

1 4X0 

Brodeur 

2.145 >61 

04X0 

Caprice 

980 85 

05X0 

Garrett 

407 44 

0649 

Vancouver 13) 

X532 293 

0 OB 


BASEBALL 

American Leagae 

BOSTON— Agreed to terms witn Many 
Barren, second baseman, an o one- year con- 
tract. 

OAKLAND — S*oned Jav Howell. Mlctier. to 
a one-vear contract. 

maHosei Leone 

C i NCI NNATl— Stoned Gary Redusand Kal 
Daniels, outfielders, and Mika Smith, Pilcher. 

NEW YORK— Agreed to lennswllh Dwiahl 
Gooden, pitcher, on a one-yedr eontraeJ. 

BASKETBALL 

National Basketball Awoctatkw 

LA. CLIPPERS— Stoned Chris Enaler.cen- 
i©r. ia a lOsbv coni rad 

NEW JERSEY— Placed Mike O'Koren. tor- 
wont on Ihe Imured tel- Re-woned Kevin 
McKenna, forward, to a contract far me re- 
mainder of Hie season. 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Paine* Division 



W 

L 

T 

Pts 

GF 

GA 

Washington 

IS 

16 

e 

78 

744 

176 

Philadelphia 

34 

16 

7 

75 

244 

179 

N.Y. (slanders 

X 

23 

4 

64 

760 

223 

N.Y. Rangers 

19 

2? 

9 

47, 

70S 

zn 

New Jersey 

18 

X 

8 

44 

191 

zn 

Pittsburgh 

18 

32 

5 

41 

193 

259 


Adams Division 



Buffalo 

28 

17 

12 

48 

713 

285 

Montreal 

28 

20 

ID 

6a 

2D 

194 

Quebec 

28 

73 

B 

64 

238 

209 

Boston 

25 

25 

0 

SB 

214 

205 

Hartford 

18 

31 

7 

a 

193 

250 


CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 


Norris Division 


St. Louis 

27 

19 

10 

44 

219 

208 

Chicago 

26 

V) 

4 

56 

231 

230 

Detroit 

17 

31 

11 

45 

219 

248 

Minnesota 

16 

31 

11 

43 

199 

23) 

Taranto 

14 

37 

7 

35 

1B2 

252 


Smythe (Nvtsian 




Edmonton 

41 

12 

6 

88 

300 

202 

Calgary 

29 

22 

7 

65 

267 

228 

Winnipeg 

79 

24 

7 

65 

157 

262 

Las Angeles 

25 

22 

11 

61 

258 

247 

Vancouver 

17 

33 

B 

42 

197 

293 


MONDAY'S RESULTS 
Pittsburgh o 2 0-2 

Philadelphia 4 1 »— 8 

Eriksson 2 (101. Craven (1B1. Zezel till. 
Hospodar (}). Props 131). Smliti ITT). Marsh 
(II: Shedden (29). McCorfnv Ml. Shots oo 
goal: Pittsburgh Ion Froesel 1-12-5 — 18: Phil- 
adetoiiM (on Romanol H-U-HM3 
Edm on ton X 3 1— 4 

Buffalo I I W 

Gretzky 3 (Ml. Anderson 2 (331. Karri tS*). 
Mossier (131: Hamel del. Ptrreauil ITS). 
T water (131. Perreault (23». ShOls on goal; 
Edmonton Ian Bar rosso) 80S — 21 : Buffalo 
(on Futirl 5-0-13— 3D. 


FOOTBALL 

National Football League 
DENVER— Named John Beake genera) 
manager. An nouncod mat Dan Reeves, coooi. 

would ostume me title at vfee president. 

United Slates Football League 
ARIZONA— Traded Lennv Willis, wide re- 
ceiver, to Memphis f or Mike will toms, co mer- 
boac. Traded Red McMillan, eernerDock. to 
Jacksonville In exchange tor future droll 
nicks and traded Those draft picks to Toman 
BaTforWtHord Morgan, wide receiver. Asked 
Ihe USFL lor a M4w rosier extension. 

DEKVE R— Cut Kevin Hoad. Bill Matthews 
and Dan Hinder hdfer. linebackers: Rich SlQ- 
ctwwskl and Dennis Edwards, nose tackles: 
Bob BlesieV and Norman Hill, running Bocks: 
Ike Jackson, aujrlcrbock; Tior Johnson, 
v. Me receiver; Mar Gill, center; Mark Shoos, 
defensive end. and Kerry Baird, car netback. 


Transition 


National Basketball Association Leaders 


Notional Basketball Association leaders 
through Fab. 17: 


TEAM OFFENSE 



G 

Pt. 

Avg 

Denver 

54 

6445 

119.4 

Detroit 

53 

619S 

116.9 

San Antonio 

53 

6152 

116.1 

LA. Lakers 

54 

6194 

114X 

Boston 

54 

6173 

11L3 

Portland 

53 

6057 

1 14 J 

Kansas Cllv 

53 

6000 

1132 

Philadelphia 

53 

S9BS 

112.9 

u»on 

53 

5m 

109J 

Dallas 

53 

5787 

109X 

Houston 

52 

564S 

108X 

Chicago 

52 

5632 

1082 

Milwaukee 

54 

5846 

108X 

Indiana 

54 

5B24 

107.9 

PhoonU 

54 

5875 

107.7 

New Jersey 

54 

5812 

1074 

a noma 

54 

5006 

107.6 

Cleveland 

53 

5643 

1065 

Golden State 

S3 

5613 

105.9 

Washington 

55 

5764 

1D4X 

New York 

54 

5649 

1046 

LA Clippers 

54 

5631 

I0U 

Seattle 

54 

539s 

99.9 

TEAM DEFENSE 



G 

No. 

Avg 

Milwaukee 

54 

5521 

102X 

Seattle 

54 

5586 

1034 

Washington 

55 

5773 

1056 

Houston 

52 

5549 

1062 

Boston 

54 

5797 

1074 

New Jersey 

54 

5799 

1074 

Dallas 

S3 

5695 

THIS 

Philadelphia 

53 

5704 

10)4 

Pnoenuc 

54 

5819 

1076 

Atlanta 

54 

5858 

I08X 

New York 

54 

S8SB 

IDAS 

Chicago 

57 

5656 

1086 

LA. Clippers 

54 

5876 

iau 

LA Lakers 

54 

5807 

1990 

Utah 

S3 

5826 

109.9 

Portland 

53 

5909 

11 IX 

Cleveland 

53 

sn* 

1126 

Indiana 

54 

6127 

113X 

Detroit 

53 

6023 

1136 

San Antonia 

S3 

6074 

1146 

Golden State 

53 

6085 

1140 

Denver 

54 

6279 

1UX 

Kansas City 

S3 

4222 

117.4 


MMKrtel. Mil. 
Gervin. SA. 
Griffith, Utah 
Abdul-Job br. LAL 
Thomas, Def. 
Samosan. Hog. 
vandeweghe. Prt 


48 309 307 HOB 73.1 
S3 M2 255 117V 3X3 

53 487 137 1177 222 

54 498 203 1199 Z22 
53 435 ISA 1175 2X3 
57 463 IS2 7148 HI 

49 411 251 1080 220 
FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE 

FG FGA 


Donaldson. LAC 
Gilmore. SA. 
Nance. Phoe. 
Aodui-Jabbar. LAL 
Worthy. LAL 
Chocks. Phil. 
Thorpe. K.C. 
Ruland. Wash. 
Johnson. LAL 
McHale, Bos. 


Pd 

235 349 Jgn 
340 S33 038 

404 768 an 
408 848 SKI 

mb no an 

277 480 577 
227 397 .57? 
250 439 .549 
344 609 268 
34« <17 544 


Malone. PnlL 
Williams. HJ. 
Olaluwon. Hau. 
Loimbeer. Del. 
Eaton. Utah 
Sikma. Sea. 
Gilmore. &A. 
Sampson. Hou. 
Smith. G J. 


REBOUNDING 

G OH Del Tot A vo 

53 25S 431 <8* 12.V 

54 Zn 432 043 ll.V 

52 281 335 <14 1U 

53 173 450 <32 11.7 

53 14} 4A5 tOb JL4 

54 140 444 586 10.9 

53 140 413 573 10JB 

53 153 404 557 10.7 

51 247 300 542 1 IU 


ASSISTS 



G No. 

Avg. 

Thomas. Oet. 

53 

709 

134 

Johnson. LAL 

51 

430 

124 

Moore. SA 

S3 

549 

104 

Niven. LAC 

53 

443 

84 

Theus. K.C. 

53 

438 

BJ 

Green. Utah 

49 

397 

8.1 

Bagiev. Clew. 

S3 

429 

8.1 

Richardson. N_f. 

54 

<31 

86 

valentine. Port. 

52 

413 

7.9 

FREE 

THROWS 




PTM FTA 

PCI 

Davis. Doll. 

112 

120 

-933 

Bird. Bos. 

240 

261 

.920 

TrlOuCkO. Det 

16S 

183 

.902 

Adams. Phoe. 

151 

149 

X93 

'vondewegtie. Port. 

251 

281 

093 

SIC htlng. Inn 

94 

106 

087 

Johnson, K.C. 

231 

251 

088 

Malone, wasn. 

95 

100 

080 

Cheeks. Phil 

119 

136 

075 


TMCEE-POINT FIELD GOALS 



SCORING 



FGM 

FGA 

Prt 


G FG 

FT Pts Avg 

Bird. Bos 

32 

68 

xn 

King. N.Y. 

38 

469 

283 1221 331 

Davis Doll. 

30 

<7 

MB 

Short. GX. 

SI 

544 

3 io 1433 28.1 

Free, Ciev. 

45 

IDS 

.429 

English. Den. 

54 

6)6 

263 149 S 27.7 

Eius Dali. 

28 

70 

400 

□on i lev. Utah 

39 

377 

324 1078 37 x 

Toncv. PnlL 

24 

61 

X 93 

Jordan. Chi. 

52 

S 33 

367 1437 27 x 

Buie. K.C. 

23 

63 

J 7 I 

Bird. Bos. 

54 

600 

240 1475 57 J 

Aoulrre. Dali. 

17 

48 

XS 4 

Wilkins. All. 

54 

558 

327 1458 276 

Grimm. Ulah 

M 

188 

XS 1 

Malone. Phil 

S 3 

4 H 

505 1353 2 SX 

Evans. Den. 

27 

77 

J 57 

Aguirre, Dali. 

52 

stu 

265 1288 240 

STEALS 




Cummings. Mil. 

53 

SIS 

344 1376 24.1 


G 

S 1 I 

Avg 

jannson. K.C. 

53 

4 « 

221 1227 213 

PrffienfsoiL NJ. 

54 

154 

£85 

NOM. Don. 

52 

459 

284 1202 331 

Moore. SA 

53 

143 

2.70 

Weolriage. Cm. 

"47 

418 

ISO 1064 23 1 

Gs WllHoms. Wash. 

52 

130 

2 X 0 


Thomas. Det. 
Lever. Den. 
Jordan. CM. 
Conner, GX. 
Rfvem, AH. 
walker, n.y. 


53 130 3 A 5 

54 130 141 

5 3 194 138 

51 U 3 2 J 0 
45 95 111 

54 113 Z 09 
BLOCKED SHOTS 


G BJA AVP 

Eaton. Utah 53 794 S5S 


Bowie. Port. 
Rollins. AIL 
Cooper. Den. 
Olotuwon, Hou. 
Gilmore. SA. 
Lister, MIL 
Somoson, Hau. 
Ah-Jabhor, LAL 
Walton, LAC 


49 123 Z 51 
48 117 244 

S 3 124 238 
53 Ufl 227 

53 119 225 

54 11 < 215 
52 110 112 
54 112 237 
45 91 207 


NBA Standings 

EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Aftoahc DhrkUoo 



W 

’ L 

Pci. 

GB 

Boston 

44 

11 

-SCO 

— 

Philadelphia 

42 

12 

X78 

ivs 

Washington 

28 

27 

X09 

16 

New Jersey 

27 

27 

XQO 

16W 

New York 

18 

36 

X33 

25Vj 


central OIvisnm 



Milwaukee 

37 

17 

JOS 

— 

Detroit 

32 

22 

X93 

5 

Chicago 

25 

27 

081 

U 

Atlanta 

23 

31 

036 

14 

Cleveland 

IB 

34 

X33 

19 

Indiana 

17 

37 

X15 

20 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 



Midwest Division 



Denver 

34 

28 

■630 

— 

Houston 

31 

2) 

-506 

2 

□altos 

28 

25 

X28 

5ta 

Son Antonio 

27 

27 

XOO 

7 

Utah 

25 

29 

063 

9 

Kon$<B Cllv 

17 

34 

X21 

161% 


Pacific Division 



LA Lakers 

38 

16 

.704 

— 

Phoenl* 

27 

28 

091 

Ilto 

Portland 

25 

28 

072 

1215 

Seattle 

22 

33 

007 

16 

la Clippers 

22 

33 

000 

16V. 

Golden Stale 

12 

41 

X26 

25W 


MONDAY'S RESULTS 
Philadelphia 34 21 29 29-113 

Cleveland M 13 34 23— 1M 

Free 11-7311-1335, Turpin 10-140020; Taney 
15-20 11-15 4i Erving 8-16 1-1 18. Barkley 5-8 B. 
J3HL ReBaoeds; PhiiodelphloSl IMokyie 101; 
Cleveland 43 iTuroln 171. insists: Phllodel- 
Dhta 24 ICheeks 81; Cleveland 38 (Bagiev 10). 
Phoenls 23 21 27 34-183 

Detroit 40 31 25 24-122 

Loimbeer 9-16 3-3 Jl. Long 8-1100 >4. Camp- 
bell A- 14 4-5 lb: Davis 9-20 2-3 21. Lucas b-10 fr* 
)& Rebounds; Phoenix 55 1 Lucas 15). Derail 
MtLalmtotor 151. Assists: Phoenix 28 (Davis 
St; Detroit 37 (Thomas 171. 

Boston 34 2* 30 2D— 118 

Utah 10 32 a* at- 94 

Bird 13-22 W 301 McHole 11-17 7-8 29; RoO- 
ens 10-16 2-3 22. Baiiev 9-21 1-2 19. Rebounds: 
Boston $9 (Bird 121: Utah 55 i Eaton TSJ. As- 
sists: Boston 29 IBlrd 10): Utah 23 (Green4). 
San Antonie 34 27 27 33—121 

LA, a (ppers 32 23 22 37-125 

Smith 12-72 ts 30, jonnson 11-224-7 26: Ger- 
vin 11.74 »-7 78.Mnare 9-16 7-e 2a. Rebound*: 
Son Antonio U (Gilmore 20}; LA- Cuppers 52 
(Donaldson 111. Aubts: San Antonio 25 
(Moore lit; LA. Clippers 29 (Nixon 14). 


College Top-20 Ratings 

Tbe top-20 teams In the Associated Press' 
college boskefbe)) poll fftro-olscr Wes Is 
parentheses; total petals based on 20-19-18. 
etc* records through Mondoy, Feb. Hand last 
week's rankings): 



Record 

Pis Pvs 

1. St. John's (59) 

23-1 

1199 

1 

2. Georgetown (1) 

23-2 

1141 


1 Michigan 

20-3 

1044 


4. Memphis Si. 

20-2 

975 


X Oklahoma 

21-4 

958 


6 Duke 

18-4 

913 


7. Syracuse 

19-4 

873 


8. Georgia Tech 

104 

720 


9. So. Methodist 

20-5 

675 


10. Louisiana Tech 

22-2 

<22 

12 

11. Nevj-Las Vegas 

20-3 

549 

14 

12. Tulso 

1W 

496 

15 

11 North Carolina 

19-6 

375 

)3 

14. Iowa 

196 

360 

11 

11 Kansas 

20-4 

353 

10 

16. Illinois 

90-7 

311 

17 

17. Va. Commonwelm 

20-4 

161 

— 

IB. Georgia 

17-6 

159 

— 

19. Oregon St. 

18-5 

84 

18 

20. Boston Coll. 

18-6 

73 

— 


The united Press international board of 
coaches top-20 college basketball ratines 
(Brst-place vales and records through games 
ai Feb. I7ln pa r ent Oases; total paints based on 
IS points tor first place, 14 lor second, etc.): 


1. St. John's (381 (22-11 585 

2. Georgetown (2) (23-21 540 

3. Oklahoma <31-41 422 

A Memphis SI. 119-3) 421 

S. Duke 119-5) S99 

b. Michigan (20-3) 3e7 

7 . Syracuse (194) 342 

8 So. Methodist (30-51 3*4 

9. Georgia Tech llB-51 249 

10 . Louisiana Tech ( 22 - 2 ) 199 

Jl. Nev-Los vegas ii*-3» 192 

12 . Tulsa ( 194 ) it* 

11 Kansas (2P*1 U» 

14 . Illinois ( 20 - 7 ) 103 

15. North Carolina (19-AI 87 

16. lawa (194) 72 

17. Oregon SI. (18-5) M 

IS. Vo. commonweim (awi 23 

19. Maryland (19-9) 16 

30. I tie) Ala.- Birmingham (71-01 13 

20. itie) Southern Col (W) 13 


(Nsle. Teams an probation by the NCAA 
ana ineligible tar the NCAA Tournament are 
inettgiWe tor top-TOconstdcroiion br DPI. The 
only such team mis season is the University of 
Akroni. 


Selected College Results 

EAST 

Allentown 69. Haverfard 51 
Boston U. <a Cotoafe 36 
Brooklyn Col. ID. Monmouth. N j. M 
Connecticut 71. Holy Cross 58 
Fordhom 74. Army 65 
Geneva 101. Alliance 87 
Ithaca 86. Carl land Si. 78 
Now 76. East Carolina ti 
Northeastern 75. Hartford 59 
Providence 74, SHon Hall 73 
Queen's 55. Trinity 51 
5. Connecticut 82. StoneMII 79. OT 
SI. Francis. Po. 95, Delaware SI. 84 
St. Thomas Aaulnas 59, Stony Brook 54 
Tufts 76, MIT 61 
UpmIo 83. Pace 70 
W. Virginia St. 69. Wesi Liberty <2 
SOUTH 

Citadel 82. Oavfdson 79. OT 
E. Kentucky 49. Middle Term. 67. OT 
Jackson SI. 49. Southern U. 46 
Jacksonville St. 85. N. Aiaaama 71 
Louisville 88. 5. Mississippi 71 
Memphis Si. 99. S Carolina 75 
Marobead St. 79. Tennessee Tech 7Q 
NE Louisiana M. 5E Louisiana 45 
Nlc hold St. 47. Sam Houston St. 40 
□Id Dominion 91. Dayton 82 
Randoiph-Macon 41. PiU.-Jahastom 40 
Rlcnmond 85. Hofstra 70 
Voidosia St. 74. Della St. 48 
Virginia Tech eg. Morgan St. 44 
W. Carolina <1. VMI 54 
William & Mary 89, American 61 
MIDWEST 

Akron M Austin Peov 66 
Bluftton 74, Defiance 72 
Chicago 79. Lake Forest 69 
Detroit 89, Evansville 75 
E. Illinois 7L ilL-Cnicogo 57 
Loved n. IIL 52. SI. Loud 43 
Notre Dame 61. Lovola. NUL 40 
OMa Western 81. Kenyon 73 
wavne, Mich. 79. Cent. SC Ohio 72 
Wichita Si. 95. Drake 77 
Woaeier 61, Denison 50 

SOUTHWEST 

Abilene Christian 82. Angela Slate 78 
BuDer 62. Oral Roberts 40 
Houston Bapldl 86. Pan American 75 
Prairie View 79. Grombiing 72 
Texas- San Anlnnlo 75. Hardln-SImmons 74 
Woviand Boprisf 89. Panhandle SI. 74 
Xavier. Ohio 73, Oklahoma City &2 
FAR WEST 

Aleck o- Juneau 89. Whitworth 82 
Arizona 63. Washington State 60 
Nevada- Los Vegas 78. Fullerton Stale 69 
Seattle 62. Aiaska-Foirbanks <0 
Webber Stale tFia) 89. Chamlnade 84 
UCLA TL Stanford <6 

TOURNAMENT 
CUNY 
First Roe ad 

Jutoi Jov 112. Medgar Evers 92 
Lehman 56, CCHY 54, OT 
sioien island n. Baruch 71 
York. N.Y. 87, H unier 72 






Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. WEDNESDAY. FEBRUARY 20, 1985 


Fiii?ru *«*■ 


OBSERVER 

The Wet Blanket Threat 


By Russel] Baker 

N EW YORK — Dear Secretary 
of Defense Caspar Weinber- 


Have you ever noticed how murii 
people love the weekend on Fri- 
day? How they wake up s miling 
and saying, “Thank the Great Bu- 
reaucrat Upstairs, it’s Friday!"? 
How they step peppily away from 
their benches [often before quitting 
time) on Friday afternoon with 
spirits soaring? 

Then comes Saturday. Every- 
body loves Saturday with its car- 
toon-packed mornings to keep chil- 
dren anesthetized while parents 
sleep and its afternoons filled with 
basketballs, footballs, hockey 
pucks, golf dubs. 

And how about Saturday night, 
Mr. Secretary! The old song had it 
right; Everybody’s crazy about Sat- 
urday night with its passion and 
wine' its movies and shootings. 
Would life be worth living without 
Saturday night? 

□ 

You know the answer, Mr. Wein- 
berger. You know the answer be- 
cause you, like all the rest of hu- 
manity, have awakened on Sunday 
feeling an inexplicable sense of de- 
pression. And as you have rubbed 
the sleep out of your eyes, you have 
realized what causes that depres- 


realized what causes that depres- 
sion. 

After a leisurely breakfast, after 
putting on your Sunday suit and 
going to church, after reading the 
funny papers — after all -this, you 
realize, Sunday morning is going to 
end and then it is going to be Sun- 
day afternoon for the next 14S 
hours. 

And after that — even worse! — 
it is goin g to be Sunday night 

Is there anything worse than the 
moment just at dusk when the de- 
spair ground into the soul by Sun- 
day afternoon turns into the resig- 
nation brought on by the 
knowledge that all of Sunday night 
looms on the horizon? 


I refer to the weapon known as 
“Wet Blanket” which is now on 
the drawing board in my laborato- 
ries at Befficase Science Industries 
Inc. 

It is my Finn conviction that an 
America aimed with a fully opera- 
dona] Wet Blanket system can have 
the Soviet Union at its mercy with- 
out threatening nuclear violence, 
which — you know it Mr. Secre- 
tary — would leave a terrible mess. 

All right what is Wei Blanket? 
Without the $800 inilliq n needed 
for research, I cannot be very spe- 
cific- I can tell you, however, that, 
when perfected the weapon will 
make the entire weekend feel like 
Sunday wherever its force is used 

Ima gin e millions of people wak- 
ing up all over the Soviet Union on 
a Friday morning with an inexpli- 
cable sense of depression, brought 
on by the terrible realization that 
all day Friday, and all night Friday, 
all day Saturday and all night Sat- 
urday is going to feel just as awful . 
as Sunday afternoon and Sunday 

night 

Once the United States has the 
power to make every entire week- 
end fed like Sunday all over Rus- 
sia. the Soviets will be too down in 
the mouth to stay devoted to Marx 
and I-anin and we can sell them 
good healthy Reaganism. 


Researchers Say Most People 
Are Inept at Detecting Lies 


PEOPLE 


Finishes 


I;. TJ 

IV ** 


By Daniel Goleman 

New York Times Seme 


N EW YORK — People are 
surDrisinsfv meet at detect- 


J- N surprisingly inept at detect- 
ing lies, new research shows. 

One reason is that most of the 
supposed clues to deceit, such as 
shifty eyes or nervousness, sel- 
dom, in fact, accompany a pre- 
meditated lie. Another reason is 
that people generally have not 
been aware of the more reliable 
indicators, which psychologists 
have only now began to identify. 

While people frequently expect 
a liar to give himself away 
through nervous gestures, for ex- 
ample, the new studies discern 


Dozens or studies have found that 
people’s accuracy at detecting lies 
usually exceeds chance by very 
little. While guessing would give a 
rate of 50- percent accuracy, in the 
recent studies the best rate of ac- 
curacy for any group has never 
exceeded 60 percent, and is most 
often near chance. 


This is true even for those in 
professions where lie detection is 
at a premium. In a study at Cor- 
nell University, for example, cus- 
toms inspectors proved no better 
than college students at guessing 
which people were trying to 
smuggle contraband. A study at 
Auburn University In Alabama 


Customs inspectors proved no better 
than college students at guessing which 
people were trying to smuggle contraband 


1 regret to teH you, however, Mr. 
Secretary, that your weapon buyers 
at the Pentagon seem to have no 
grasp whatever of the weekend’s 
vital role in human activity. These 
people have rejected my request for 
a modest sum —$800 million, to be 
precise — for research and devel- 
opment on a new weapon system 
that can change the nature of war- 
fare. 


But, you ask, is that weapon 
practical? Of course it is. I am al- 
ready collecting its ingredients. 
They include large quantities of 
sunlight captured and bottled at 
precisely 4:45 on Sunday afternoon 
in February, several minion miles 
of tape containing Sunday televi- 
rion interview shows with politi- 
cians, and milli ons of megatons of 
Sunday newspaper columns by ex- 
perts on insulating houses with 
plastic and commentators capable 

of findin g immens e si gnificance in 
events of no consequence. 

Obviously, building Wet Blanket 
win be an incredibly difficult task. 
If you could intervene to get me the 
S800 million at once, 1 could have 
my car repaired, pay the rent and 
get away for a two-week vacation in 
Ashury Park in order to bring a 
fully rested mind to the great task. 
Later, I promise, the costs will get 
into the more respectable multi- 


thai liars are more likely to at- 
tempt to inhibit ah such nervous 
movements, and so appear more 
composed. “Most liars can fool 
most people most of the time," 
said Paul Ekman. a psychologist 
at the University of Canfomia at 
San Francisco. 

Nevertheless, researchers have 
found that there are some specific 
physical signs that the purveyor 
of untruth cannot suppress. 

Lying takes many forms: 
hedges, evasions, exaggerations, 
half-truths, outright falsehoods. 
Soda] lies — the fictional previ- 
ous engagement for example — 
may make life work more smooth- 
ly or prevent hurt feelings, and so 
are tadtly ignored. Daily life is 
rife with lies, many benign and 
some malicious. 


“People tell about two lies a 
day. or, at least that is how many 
they will admit to,” said Bella 


DePauiq, a psychologist at the 
University of Virginia who is hav- 


billi On-do liar ran ge 

Yours in bellicose science. 


ing people keep a daily diary of 
lies they tefl. 

One consistent finding of the 
new research, conducted by psy- 
chologists at several universities, 
is that people dunk they are belter 
detectors of lies than they are. 


found that police deteedves were 
no more successful in judging 
people lying about a mock crime 
than were students. 

Another study found that sea- 
soned federal law enforcement of- 
ficers from the Secret Service and 
the criminal investigation divi- 
sions of the armed forces were no 
more accurate than were newly 
recruited officers. The one differ- 
ence between the groups was that 
the seasoned ofOcets, who aver- 
aged seven years of service, felt 
more confident of their ability to 
delect lying. 

Studies such as these have re- 
vealed that people are poor at 
detecting lies m large pan because 
they base their judgment on the 
wrong clues. For example, in the 
study of customs inspectors, peo- 
ple were most often thought to be 
telling lies if they hesitated before 
answering questions, avoided 
meeting the eyes of their ques- 
tioner or shifted their posture. 
None of th ese signs was actually 
more common among those who 
lied than among those who did 
dol 

Even people who make judg- 
ments about lying throughout the 
day do not seem to become more 


proficient at detecting lies. De- 
Paulo found. One major reason, 
she said, is that they get no sys- 
tematic information about which 
of their judgments are right. Of 
those people the customs inspec- 
tors let pass without inspection, 
an unknown number carry con- 
traband; of those they check, an- 
other unknown number of the 
guilty nevertheless evade detec- 
tion.’ 

The inspectors' occasional suc- 
cesses, DePaulo said, give them 
reinforcement for whatever 
grounds for judgment they use. 
"However." she added, ‘it is pos- 
sible that their success occurred in 
spite of their beliefs about cues to 
deception — beliefs which may- 
have actually been erroneous." 

The same holds, in theory, for 
these in other occupations where 
the attempted detection of lies is 
routine, such as courtroom law- 
yers. detectives or insurance in- 
vestigators. However, as some of 
the researchers acknowledge, lab- 
oratory tests of the ability to de- 
tect lies may not be a uue indica- 
tion of a person’s proficiency in a 
situation where be or she can ob- 
serve and quesdon die suspected 
person freely. 

Much of the new data has come 
from the work of Ekman. who 
describes his research on what he 
claims are reliable clues to lying in 
“Telling Ues." to be published 
this month by W. W. Norton. 

Ekman. whose theory is gener- 
ally accepted by other experts, 
says the least dependable indica- 
tors of lying are those channels of 
expression that a person can con- 
trol most folly. Thus, words are 
far less accurate clues than tone of 
voice, because it is easier to re- 
hearse what one will say than it is 
to control the pilch of voice while 
saying it 

By far the most reliable clues. 
Ekman said, are the responses a 
person makes automatically, 
which are subject to little or no 
control. Such responses are most 
likely during lies that are more 
important to ihe liar and in which 
he has an emotional slake. 

For example. Ekman' s research 
has identified certain movements 
of facial muscles that very few 
people can make deliberately. 


■:M> ■ W 






Gan «r> Erger*' Th. N— VortTvrva 

Most people cannot suppress the tight-fipped 1 smile, a 
sign of anger (left): slanting eyebrows raised only at 
the center also be a tell-tale expression of distress. 


Unlike most facial muscles, these 
seem to be regulated by a more 
primitive pan of the brain, v.oich 
makes it nearly impossible to con- 
trol them. When that muscle 
movement is part of an emotional 
expression, people are unable to 
conceal il 

Fkman believes at least three 
muscle movements are signs of 
emotional reactions that people 
who are lying often try to conceal: 
distress, fear and anger. 

The signal of distress or worn* 
is tbe lifting of just the inner pari 
of the eyebrows. “Fewer than 15 
percent of people can control this 
movement at wilL” Fkman said. 
"Woody .Allen is one; it gives him 
ihe ability to seem particularly 
sympathetic or vulnerable. But in 
most people, this movement of 
the brows happens only when a 
person feels genuine distress. It 
can also signal guilt. Ordinarily, 
this movement will appear despite 
a person's best attempts to con- 
ceal these feelings." 

Another reliable facial signal is 
for fear: The ey ebrows are raised 
and pulled together. “Not a single 
person we’ve tested can produce 
this movement deliberately," Ek- 
man said. 

The third is for anger; narrow- 
ing and li g h tening the mar gin of 
the lips. Fkman said this muscle 
action frequently appears just as 
someone starts to get angry, even 
before the person is aware of the 
feeling. It is. however, a subtle 
and fleeting movement. 

Smiles, too. can belie true feel- 
ings. A feigned smile. Ekman 
said, is likely to be asymmetrical. 


Although both sides of the face 
make the same movements, the 


make the same movements, the 
muscles on one side are stronger 
than the other and yield a slightly 
lopsided expression. 

One important factor in all this 
is how expressive a person is in 
general. People who are usually 
very expressive change drastically 
w-hde telling a planned lie. They 
seem to adopt a strategy of over- 
control said Howard Friedman, a 
psychologist at tbe University of 
Calif ornia at Riverside. As a re- 
sult they make fewer nervous ges- 
tures than they would ordinarily. 

When people care about the fie 
they are leUing, DePaulo said, 
their reponses are generally 
shorter, slower, more negative 
and more highly pitched than are 
their truthful responses. They also 
lend to avoid eye contact, blink 
less and make fewer head move- 
ments and postural shifts. 

While telling lies, people also 
seem to be prone to more prob- 
lems with fluency of speech, De- 
Paulo said. They tend to give 
shorter and more hesitant an- 
swers. speak in a higher pitch and 
make more grammatical errors 
and slips of the tongue. 

When people are judging 
whether someone is lying, they 
tend to use very few of ihese indi- 
cators. Most often, people judge 
another person to be lying when 
be does such things as smiling 
less, shifting his posture more ana 
taking longer to answer a ques- 
tion. None of these behaviors, the 
research shows, is actually more 
common among people Idling a 
lie. 


Jeff Keith, 22,^bo ksyas righj 
leg to bone cancer as z 
finished a U. S. cwa-ia-riaa iu* 
.After receiving congrantiafiom 
from President Ronald Reaga^ 
Keith jubilantly jumped into a* 
Pacific Ocean. Keith, of 
Connecticut, who wears an artSj. 
rial leg, began his iub-Jok 4 a 
Boston. American Cancer Socim 
volunteers lined the last : length <£ 
his route and released Moons ^ 
he passed, accompanied by'fdkw 
students from Boston CoHte 
where be has been lacr o sse gag 

Mayor Tom Bradley of Tos-Ana^ 
les. along with die boxers Ke&N*; 
ton, Pad Gonzales and other aft, 
letes, greeted him wbeuhe anfce£ 
Reagan called a few minutes 
to say that “Nancy and 1 prayed for 
you all the way." Mkhad McGee, 
director of athletics at the Univaji- 
ty of Southern California, give 
Keith a full-tuition schoknship fa 
graduate studies. Keith said he ins 
inspired by Terry Fox, an amplify 
who died of cancer in 1981 vhik 
attempting a similar run across 
Canada. Keith's leg was amputated 
above the kwe in 1974. - - 


- AT wSS3aT» a** 


ST. s i-* 7 


The British Broadcasting Corp. 
is still sore about losing “Dallas" to 
its independent rival Thames Tele* 
vision, but said Monday, night that 
it would resume screening its re- 
maining 13 episodes because of 
protests by viewers. “We were tak- 
en aback by the strength of viewer 
reaction," said Bffl Cotton,- manag- 
ing director of BBC-TV. On Feb. 6 
the government-owned network 
stopped screening the series it de- 
scribed as tbe jesvd in its ratings 
crown, saying it would not show 
the episodes until next autumn, it 
denial the move was intended as 
revenge against Thames, which 
planned to Stan screening its own 
episodes in the autumn. Thames 
paid £55,000 ($60,000) for cach 


the fin 
•.iJics mxrpj 
£■*- ±c area 
y Si Jon. On ! 
C' H.r-i— - former 
f Lisad 
. ui pw 

• •• Oibinst 


new episode, compared with 
£29,000 pounds paid by the BBC 


New York Times Service 


Cotton said tbe BBC would resume 
screening the episodes March 27. 
The BBC denied that its change of 
heart had anything to do with an 
juinmninmiHi r that an organiza- 
tion called Guild Home Video had 
acquired the video rights to the 13 
episodes that tbe BBC still has. 
Guild Home Video, winch is Brit- 
ish-based and Swedish-owned, said 
it would issue the video verson 
starting Feb. 27. 


7-cmL»v. CiTsai 
sUu.'.it Rub 

-'c/ Lahcr 
Lstjc r.-.rVrs ef the ! 
. r.*:. lament, sd 


To Hefon 


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W« have for for eaters: A very big 
choice of beauafj APARTMmTS/ 


'ajs uyCS, 

TELEX 612906 
TR 727 34 65. 


PARIS A SUBURBS 


7TH NEAR CHAMP MARS 


Ffah dees apartment, _ _ 
oW building, 315 sqm F8A»A» 

16TH NEAR TROCADERO 

700 iqjiL tawnheuM. 

with kxge garden + caretakers house. 
Exoelenf condtio n . 05.000.000. 

CABINET MARCEAU 

720 01 44 


LONM3PL atGUM). Dan privately 
aboard historic stdng ship to Green- 
wick Reservations. T* 01 -480 7295. 


CONTDCX (neer Opera): Coatu- 
ters to 300 cities worldwide - Air/ Sea 


Call Charlie 281 18 81 Paris - Cars too 


5700 sqm, swmrring poaL Valuer 
Ribo'ooo, Socrifioe al Fl^XXOOO. 
TetOffee hours (731 92 42 04/ Hamer 


Tef. Office hours (7^ 92 42 04/ Homer 
(73)69 3563 



BEL 

GROUP INTBTNATIONAL 
- IE LYS CHANTILLY 
25 minutes from Paris. 10 from Rorcy. 
mognifiaefti. fore*, golf, ane4eve> 320 
sqjn. house, 6 bedroom, 3 baths, do- 
ing. double fiwng. terrace, 320 tqjtr. 
baiement, pod. tenres. 


50 AVE FOCH 

125 sq.m. sumy. up per floor. 

adenoid recepion — 2 bedrooms. 

2 baths, jxxfena HIGH PJBCt 
KOISIVITY: 


choice of beaunful APAKTMBvTV 
VILLAS / CHALETS m ihe whale 
regional lake Geneva. Moaftwx&afl 
ferrous moureain resorts. Vary reason- 
cbty priced but dsa the best end most 
exclusive. Price from about USSALOQQ. 
Mortgages etf 6)5%. Hease visit us or 
phone before you mate o demon. 

H.SBODSA. 

Tour Grise 6. CH-IQC7 Lousarvs. 
Td.- 7 > / 25 26 1 1 Telex: 24298 SEBO CH 


EMBASSY: 562 16 40 


Receptioa 5 bedroaira. 5 beds. 
PBB¥Cl CONDITION. 2 mtads'roan 


fa e ui en cat bay a STUDIO 
APAfTTMENT or CHAiET on 1AKE 


'CONDITION. 2 modi' mono. 
EMBASSY SBTVia 
562-1640 Em. 367 


OeaVA - MONTRBIX or in thee 
world famous resorts: CKANS- 


20 nenutes from nxn. superb view an 
al Pone. Very high dass fwvnhouse, 
reoepfton*. terraces, 7 bedroom, 
baths, axetafcer * house. 2 ha park. 

THJEX 612906 
TH 777 34 65. 


MONTANA. US DUMBER, 
VBBflBL VRLARS, JURA, etc. fra 
SFliO^Oa Mortgages 60% at 


AROUND ETOtLE 


Wefl finished, lovely recefdtons, 2 bed- 
rooms. luxurious, high price. 766 33 00 


6K% merest 
REV AC S A 

52 rue de Morttbrilant 04-1202 
GENEVA. Tet 41-22/5* 15 40. 
Telex: 22030 



ho u dm ttmp h to mtd 
aMe bttsg atUma. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


International Business Message Center 





MBS AVAHABtE M 
USB 6 SWISS FRANCS 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


for vxftia projects, business kxxu, coi- 
kXcroi kxra, mortgage farilifiaj etc. Irv 


Jc/Broi kxxn, mortgooe foahnej etc . Jrv . 

tertsf e qu d to mty r bante lowest rate. AGENTS WANTED 

Broken protected rtr* mmniM, mri Intact 


Send defat of requremenb to tioenoed 
Swiss toot fund’s aocredted agents. 


Burebank Hale 
Mundtom Ra 
N814 


Ud, Bank House, 
addon, Narfafc, 
Englcnd. 


BUSINESS 


Tet (44) 508 30379. Tlx.- 975449 BBH G 


rtgh commission paid. Latest stahsef- 
thoart security products. 

• Mght virion 

• Sumilcnce 

• Ann- terrori sm 

• CountBr-irtfeBgsnce 

• Many, many more. 

Protected areas avcxbUe to quafified 


REAL STATE WITH INCOME? 

Then read on_ C o mb in ation coffee 
house, cfaco, cater 
Weekly grass soles 

NYC 


We have over 50 in c o me producing 
bcdcSnqs in NYC with 10% retera. NYv 
is the hottest red estate in the world! 
Sax IBQ5.Herdd Tribune, 92S21 Net* 
hr Cede*. France 


agents who whh to rep ties exdiarve 
prixlud fine of world hxnaus security 




IMPORTANT EQUITY in USA based 
eomfXMJf available. US$500 rrdton 


systems. Contact M Henri. 

(XS in Paris: 297 5600. 


For Sale 

SURPLUS PLANTS 
OXYGEN-NITROGEN- 
ARGON 


dotring compwiy with irtl franchise 
hos grarted vexuwide license to our 
diems » manufoetuie/nxxlmt fro- 


THB RNANQAL TIMES 


flrqMe/perfwne/coaneria Kne under 
me ir hpderKxi^ Qirt se ek &jr ope- 
on aptd porfdpation ogitf o nca 
m c ontr o ct n g monufacturin g and 


1 Tan Per Day QO Meter) 
5 Tons Per Day Q5Q Meter 
25 Tons Per Day VSD Mete 
75 Tans Per Day (2250 Meft 
Modem Liquid 
E xc e lle nt Condition 


LOW PRICES 
FINANCING AVAILABLE 


Nnslai Jaffa Cora, 9171 Wftrtra 
Beverly Mb, CA TO10 Tbu 67-4638. 



now aperctfei a atariMg of pubkaticn 
defiverv service to subscribers Dvmg in 

the fowwmg arecs: 

Pens - Lyon - Nice - Cannes . Monaco. 


BKOKBtS WANTED 

to sen property trust investm e n t s. 
USS5000 untested fxovides USJT5JX30 
bonded return guorarte ed. Flue tax 
free annual income of US$2500 plus. 
Contort Argyll GomyiB and company 
limited, Glencoe’. Boormbury. 
4741 Ow n riond, Austraia. 
Phono |Q79) 45762 Austrafia 


Far a free trial and further detail. 


Ban Hughes - F.T. Paris 

“Pigjgffw 

No FT no comment 


IMMIGRATION TO USA 
. MADE EASY 


Attorney & Recflor obtains visas & per- 
manert residence. Hefrato set up LSA 


burineues & locates axTxiwdaL indus- 
trial & re d d enl id red estate. Far free 
brochure write: David Hasan, 1201 
Dave Sl Sto 600, Newport Beach. CA 
92660 I^A. (71 <j 752 0966. 



17%% P/A 
kiUS$ 


UQ provides investors vdth a high 
fixed income with security by apercAng 



One of GdHbnitfs meet sucOHlfd Bed 
Estate compenies too tekelm t* 
land parcels avetidds for iittmoHnd 
invttfOri. The properties, ktatted 


UK & OFFSHORE 

COMPANIES FROM £90 


throughout the state im m p to 
from S10AM to UOOK. dl avdU* 
with terms. Far m ronn d ion about the 


eompany, their trade record and the 

praperto contoeh 


UJC + hie of Mon + Angufla 
Guernsey + Jet»Y + i^*“ ar 
Liberia 4- PananO + Detouam 
Ready-mode or to Ml 
Ful nominee, admirabiiM 
and accaurtieg bodc-up ■nuefrig 
bank irtrodurtiam 


CARS8ERG LAND CORF. 

PO Box 412 
London NW3 4FP 

Tel: 936 91 19. Tefefc 266048 ott3013 




LOOKWG TO PURCHASE large stock 
lots, eom me rod goods, mdustrid 
eqtkpmenf. frodurt 8 Deveopmew 
TreemgCorp. 310 E. 46 St, NY, NY 


U5 Red Spate Investment 
A Dewe l o y nw * 5en«c» Lie 


500 Qtahain Homb, 150 Reave St 
London W1R7A 


270 66 04. Tdcocs 46642 
MILAN: Via Bocmcoo 1 
20123 Man. Tei 86 7589/80 59 279 
Telex: 320MI 

YORK 75 Masfrsan Avenue 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


SPAIN. COSTA Kl SOk Fuerwola. 
C ommerad premises, freehold; best 
central position, currently fined a 
restaranf/bar. £110,000. Trt 0*9* 
712206 UK. 


SELECT COMPANY FORMATIONS 
Mt Pleasart. Doughs. We of Mon 



M U5. - FOR MUtTMAnONAIS 
CM FIRM 

htl & UJS. to dmmmg, accounting, 
fi nondd & busmes wnnCrt - red es- 


tote investments, poerdew companeL 
HAROLD GQiKTGN 4 CO. 


225 W. 34 St.. New Yak. NY 10121 
Tet 212-5963771. 



New Yoris. NY 10022. ToL (212) 605- 
020a Trie* 1E864 / TSW 
BOS . 15 Amu Vidor Hugo 
75116 ftw- Tel. 502 18 00 
Tdexi 6QQB93F 

wmiup*- 

Telex: 613458 

SWWOMt 111 North Bridge 8d 
n ° ta ’ yPore 

0617. Tet 3366577. Tbo 36031 


Tel: rail 439 


ZURICH: RvmwH 32. 8001 Zuidt 
TeL01/2l46in 
Tdex: 812656/813981. 


YCX* OfflCE M MADRS, at dty 
omer with meeting roam. AB ser- 


GAPA, VaBeher-