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The Global Newspaper 

Edited in Paris 

Printed Simultaneously 
in Paris, London, Zurich. 
Hong Kong, Singapore, 


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INTERNATIONAL 



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WEATHER DATA APPEAR ON PAGE 18 


Published With The New York Times and Hie Washington Post 


No. 31,730 


ZURICH, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1985 


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^TABLKHED 1887 


Shultz, Seeing ^Tyranny,’ Asks 
Aid to Guerrillas in Nicaragua 


By Bernard Gwertzman 

New York Tima Stnkr 

WASHINGTON — Secretary of 
State George P. Shultz has said that 
if additional US a id is denied to 
the rebds in Nicaragua, that coun- 
try wiD fall bio “the endless dark- 
ness of Communist tyranny" and 
that direct and costly U.S. action 
might be required later. 

Mr. Shultz said Friday that 
Americans had “a moral duty to 
help “the freedom fighters” who 
are engaged in combat with the 
govOTinienl of Nicaragua. His sug- 
gestion that feDure to do so might 
eventually force the United Stales 
into action there was the first such 
public statement by a senior Rea- 
gan administration offi cial. 

But President Ronald Reagan, in 
a meeting Friday with some edito- 
rial writers, said be did not envisage 
a U.S. invasion of Nicaragua as a 
possibility, given the opposition to 
such a move by Latin American 
nations friendly to the United 
States. 

State Department officials said 
that Mr. Shultz's remarks were part 
of a stepped-up campaign by the 
Reagan administration lo win con- 
gressional support for the Nicara- 
guan rebels. 

Elaborating on Mr. Reagan's 
comment at a press conference 
Thursday that he wanted “to re- 
move” the “present structure” of 
the Nicaraguan government, Mr. 
Shultz said it was “immaterial” to 
him how this was done. 

He said the Managua authorities 
could do h on their own or through 
agreement with other countries. Or, 


he said, it could be brought about 
“through the collapse of the Sandi- 
nista regime.” 

Senior State Department offi- 
cbis said ^tbe purpose of the polem- 
ical campaign, which was started 
by Mr. Reagan in a radio address 
Feb. 16, was to build a strong, mor- 
al case for persuading Congress 
next month to approve S14 million 
in “covert” funds already autho- 
rized for the rebels. The guerrillas 
are believed to have received more 
than S80 uHUon is recent years. 

The administration also wants 
congressional approval for any ad- 
ditional secret funds that might be- 
come necessary m the future for the 
rebels. 

A secondary reason, the officials 
said, was to put pressure on the 
Nicaraguan government to end 
what has been described as a Soviet 
and Cuban presence in Nicaragua, 
halt the support for rebels in neigh- 
boring countries, and provide guar- 
antees for free elections. 

The officials said that although 
alternatives to the covert financing 
through the Central Intriligcnce 
Agency have beat studied, none of 
the possibilities seemed to them as 
good as the currem method of se- 
cret funding. 

a wtcTwas of 

Representatives now, the majority 
would probably turn the money 
down. But they said, that the ad- 
ministration intended to avoid a 
vote for at least a month and to 
campaign hard to convince Con- 
gress of the moral and practical 
necessity for the money. 


After Mr. Reagan's Feb. 16 radio 
address, Mr. Shultz told the House 
Foreign Affairs Committee on 

bdS y “toe ? IrOT^St3i l ” a S 

that Americans had a moral duty to 
help out tbe rebels who were trying 
to prevent the “door being 
slammed.” 

On Thursday, Mr. Reagan main- 
tained the tougjhly worded rhetoric 
in his press conference, and on Fri- 
day both Mr. Shultz and Mr. Rea- 
gan returned to the theme. 

Mr. Shultz, speaking in San 
Francisco, said that “the bottom 
line” in Nicaragua was this: . 

“Those who would cut off these 
freedom fighters from the rest of 
the democratic world are, in effect, 
consigning Nicaragua to the end- 
less darkness of Communist tyran- 
ny. And they are Leading the Unit- 
ed States down a path of greater 
danger. 

“For if we do not take the appro- 
priate steps now to pressure the 
Sandinis tas to live up to their past 
promises — to cease their arms 
buildup, to stop exporting tyranny 
across their borders, to open Nica- 
ragua to the competition of free- 
dom and democracy — then we 
may find later, when we can no 
lo^cx avoid acting, that the stakes 
will be higher and the costs great- 
er.” 

A senior State Department offi- 
cial said that “the Shultz argu- 
ment” was that if the rebels were 
aided now, they could do the job, 
and the pressure on the Sandiinsts 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 4) 



Is Seen on TV 
Citing a Ballot 


By Cdestme Bohlen 

Waahngton Post Service 

MOSCOW — President Kon- 
stantin U. Chernenko appeared on 
Soviet television Sunday for tire 
first time in almost two months to 
casr his vote in local Soviet elec- 
tions. 

The film on an evening news 
program showed a visibly weak Mr. 
Chernenko seated near a ballot box 
in a small room. He was later 


On Dec. 24, Mr. Chernenko was 
missing from the Red Square line- 
up at the funeral of Defense Minis- 
ter Dmitri F. Ustinov. The day was 
bitterly cold and it was widely as- 
sumed that Mr. Chernenko was ad- 
vised to stay indoors. 

He reappeared on television 
three days later to give awards to 
Soviet writers and then disap- 
peared from view. 

Until Friday's announcement. 


Konstantin U. Cbemenko, the Soviet tender, is shown voti 
was distributed by Tass, fluid film of Mr. Cbemenko was 


Tl*> Aooodod Fm, 


on television on Sunday. 


Meese, After 13 Months , Confirmed 
By U.S. Senate as Attorney General 


shown standing, receiving flowers there had been conflicting reports 
and givin g a n ress agE to election from Soviet officials about -rite state 
workers, surrounded by officials of lu^ health. One had him on a 
who included Viktor V. Grishin, winter vacation near Moscow, an- 
the Moscow Communist Party other said he had been in- 
chief and a fellow member of the An election day appearance is a 
ruling Politburo. traditional one for Soviet leaders. 

A commentator <a id that Mr. Earlier Sunday, as reporters gath- 
Chernenko was voting in the Kras- at Mr. Chernenko's local poQ- 
nopresmski district in Moscow, mg station, it became apparent that 


where be lives. But tire room on he would not show up u front of 
television did not resemble the tire foreign press. 


By Leslie Maitland Werner 

New York Times Service 


and hearings resumed 
month. Critics contend 


polling station where he normally 
votes. 


u. .-v. a — . :r suit, sooke onhr a few words and Mr. Urerneoko i 


Instead, attention was focused 
on Mikhail S. Gorbachov, who is 
widely considered second behind 
Mr. Chernenko in tire Communist 


WASHINGTON — Tire Senate er, that far from exonerating Mr. illegally lobe introduced in conn if suk spd te only a wsrds and m Comimm 

bas voted to confirm Edwin Meese 3j^.rq,ort isuri poKre bsfieved m good faith ttol ShkSor 


3d as attorney general, more than a m 
year after be was first nominated pt 
by President Ronald Reagan. eti 


teznber by Mr. Stan dis- they were soring it legally. Mr. 
in detail a man lacking tire Meese also is emected to support cu £?~ 
qualifications to be the na- tbe imposition oi the death penalty loeso 


One Killed, 14 Injured in Bombing 
Of Marks & Spencer Store in Paris 


by President Ronal d Reagan. ethical qualifications to be the na- tbe imposition of the death p< 
The 63-31 vote on Saturday tiou’s top law enforcement officer, for certain federal crimes and 
came after five days of filibustering On Fm. 5, the Senate Judiciary lation that would restrict the 
by Farm Belt senators, who al- Committee voted 12-6 to sen d tire of state prisoners to appeal 
lowed the vote to t«k* place after nomination to the Senate floor, di- cases at tire federal level 
winning assurances *ha> t heycouM viding largely along party lines. But corrent department ofi 
introduce legislation to provide The 31 negative votes were tbe do not expect major policy ch 
emergencyaedii relief for rarnrers. most cast against a cabinet nomi- under Mr. Meese who, dong 
Six senators did not vote. nee in 14 years, and Common Mr. Smith, shares the admix 


His appeared tired unfo- possible successor, 
cured. Mr. Gorbachov, who lives in tire 

The scene was reminiscent of the same district as Mr. Chernenko, as 
last years of Leonid L B rezhn ev, do other members of the Soviet 
who would Trakn brief public ap- leadership, cast his ballot before 
pcarances to dampen specula tion tire cameras of both foreign and 
that he was gravely 3L Soviet television. 

Mr. Chernenko's reappearance At 53, Mr. Gorbachov is the Po- 


ses at the federal lewl that he waspvdy 3L Sonet ui ™siai. 

But ament department officials **• Chernenko's reappearance At 53, Mr. Gorbachov isthePO- 
i not myct major pnKry rfinnwn came as a surprise because his coo- utburos youngest member, 
ider MrMecsc whoL^one S stitumts in another Moscow dis- He was accompanied by his wife. 


under M^Meese who, afongwfth stituents mfotter Mc«a>w dis- 
Mr. Smith, shares the admmistra- tntturae told Fntay that be could 


Raisa, his 


Mr. Meese. 53, is to replace WD- .Cause, the citizen's lobby which tiou’s conservative views on lp gd ®° l defivw a traditional pro-dec- granddaughter, 
ham French Smith as attorney gen- opposed Mr. Meese, said it was the issues. tion speech on the advice of doc- Sunday’s deed 


iter, Irina, and a 


ham French Stmth as attorney gen- opposed Mr. Meese, said n was the 
eral on Monday, when he is to be highest vote against a nominee for 


Mr. Smith, who became attorney 


By John Vinocur 

. New Tori Times Service 
PAMS — A bomb exploded at 
an entrance to the Pirn's branch of 
the British-owned department 
store Marks ASpeaicer as It opened 
for business on Saturday, killing 
one man and wounding 14 people, 
police said 


indication of who was responsible 
for the blast, although they bad 
received a number of telephone 
caDs omcermqg hs origin. 

The callers claimed to speak for 
the Caribbean Revolutionary Alli- 
ance, an outlawed group seeking 
independence tor France’s Carib- 
bean territories; for Direct Action, 
a leftist extremist group that has 
announced its fusion with the Red 
Army Faction terrorists of West 
Germany; and for groups caffing 
themselves tire Fatah Revolution- 
ary Command, and tire Interna- 
tional Collective Army Against 
Unemployment. 

But police said that all the calls 
mine hours after tire blast was re- 
potted by French news organiza- 
tions, and that none of tbn claims 
contained any technical details in- 
dicating firsthand knowledge 
about the explosion. 

Employees at the store on Boule- 
vard Hanssmann, across the street 
from the department stares Calor- 
ies Lafayette and An Printemps, . 
said no Anaw had been received. 

Police said a French employee of 
the store, identified as Lfionard Ro- 
chas, died of his wounds hours af- 
ter tbe explosion. Two other 
Frenchmen were reported seriously 
burned. The others wounded, in- 
cluding two Britons, were hit by 
flying glass *nd debris, boqutal of- 
ficials said. 

The store, which opened in 1975, 
had been the target of attacks twice 
before. Bombs exploded on Feb. 
23, 1976, exactly nine years ago. 
and on May 4, 1981, causing some 
damage but no injuries. No one 
rlaitnad responsibility for either ex- 



sworn in by a notary public. A attorney general smee 1925. 
formal ceremony is expec te d early fit tire last several months, many 

next month. high-ranking offi cials left the Jus- 

All of those voting apritwf Mr. tice Department. Mr. Smith, antka- 


attoraey general since 1925. general in 1981, originally an- The announcement Friday had gates to republic parliaments, city 
In tire rest several mouths, many nounced his resignation, in January been the first official confirmation and district coumms. As in aD Sovi- 
high-ranking officials left the Jus- 1984 and had intended then to re- to tire Soviet public that their lead- et elections, the turnout was ex- 


Sunday’s elections, held across 
the Soviet Union, were for dele- 


tura to tire California law firm of a was 3L 


pected to be dose to 99 percent — 


ranfiTmatirm tm Rnfin- dny paring that he would soon be Icav- Gibson, Dunn, & Crutcher, where Mr. Chernenko, 73, who suffers or lOS tmfiion citizens, voting in a 
were Democrats. mg as well, did not replace than he had served as Mr. Reagan's per- from some form of lung ailment, poQ. with only one candidate for 

As a result, Mr. ' 


were Democrats. 

Little debate preceded the con- 


d to the afrktofiHthetrojobsinsi: 
last year including the CjvU Divisc 


wiB be sonal lawyer. 


possibly emphysema, was last seen each post 


six units, After Mr. Meese encountered publicly on Den. 27, all 


Division and difficulty in winning confirmation, was reported to have 


firmaticn vote, compared to the abre to fiu the top jobs m six units, After Mr. Meese encountered publicly on Dec. 27, although he Mr. Cbemenko and other mem- 

drawn-out hearings odd last year including the CjviI Division and difficulty in winning confirmation, was reported to have attended a hereof the leadership were elected 

and again this year by the Semite the Land and Natural Resources administration officials, mdnrtmg meeting of the PoKtburo on Feb. 7. delegates U) various republic’s Su- 

Jndkaary Committee. Supporters Division, which have been operat- Mr. Reagan, prevailed upon Mr.' His attendance at that meeting prone Soviets. Mr. Chernenko was 


and again this year by the Senate tire Land and Natural Resources administration officials, mdnrimg meeting of the PoKtburo on Feb. 7. 


mud opponents of Mr. Meese each mg 


Smith to remain in office until Mr. and his 


^xtoforfiftcOTmirotesbcfi^e thp ^iaiij4ee»*» Expected to t* 

Senate voted. — * 

Senator Howard M. . Metzen- 
baum, a Democrat di Ohio who is /!_ J Fi/J/wI 
one of Mr. Meese's most persistent l/iM> BlIIIpiI 

critics in tire Senate, said, “Let us 

not kid ourselves. Mr. Meese’s con- IL. ] 

duct has not indicated that he is a Mtt M. VmJ&mMMj Ms 

paragon of virtue. I would guess, as . 

others, he will he c onfirmed this ffiin/itmfy 
afternoon. We can only hope Mr. 

Meese’s future conduct wiB be bef- _ ” ° 

ter than his past conduct” twvtgvw* RmW 

But Senator Strom Thurmond, a MJFfZitt Urn 

Republican erf South Carolina who 
is chairman of the Senate Judicial By John Kifncr 
Cramnittee, said Mr. Meesc, an ad- New York Tima Service 

vocate of strong law enforcement BEIRUT — A disgruntled i 
measures, “was selected and ap- port guard dwrmnHinp a promoti 
pointed by President Re ag a n . It is hijnrjprf a f^hanwa* *rrtmrr 
assumed he is a man of character Sanmtiiv fmwd it tn fhi fnr f 


Ynfi tpepected to be a Meese eodd be awfnmaL j; • ^gjystedthat 


Sunday, sug- dated to the Supreme Soviet of 
wasvariabler^tecRnssimTedeiUIiOii. ' 


Hijacking 
Over Beirut 

By John KUbcr 

New York Tima Service 

BEIRUT — A disgruntled air- 


hijacked a Lebanese aodiner on 
Saturday, forced it to fly for five 


andquaKfied for tire position, bet^ Lebanon and Cy- 


Meese is a man of broad experience 
and he got a dean bill of health.” 
After tbe vote, Mr. Meese said he 
was “not bitter at all” over the 
confirmation straggle. 

“I think that politics played a 


pros and threatened to crash it into 
tire p residential patwe** The plane 
finally returned to Beirut mw the 
hijacker dis ap pe ar ed, apparently 
into nearby shantytowns. 

One passenger died of head injn- 


part in what took place, nes after he was sucked out of the 


■but that’s all behind usT he said, open door as tire plane took off. 

Saturday’s action brought to an Earlier, seven others ware injured 
end a difficult period for Mr. sliding down escap ' 

Meese, who had vowed to fight all with doors har 
obstacles to win the position to escape chutes dang 
wbkh Mr. Reagan nominated him East Airlines Boeh 
on Jan. 23, 1984. and forth between 


open and 
the Middle 
7 Dew bark 
nt and Of- 


Last year, ■ while Mr. Meese's pros as offi cials tried to talk the 
confirmation hearings were in pro- hijacker into giving up 
gress, ft was disclosed that he had “I have ri ghts as a Lebanese and 







In 1973, Joseph Edward Self, a 
fanner cbahmaQ of Marks & Spen- 
cer and a leading British supporter 
of Israd, was wounded in the head 
in a terrorist attack at his home in 
London. He died in 1982 at the age 
erf 77. 

The explosion on Saturday oc- 
curred at 9:31 AM. Witnesses said 
a man with European features had 
placed a duffel bag at a rear en- 
trance of the store on the Ruedes 
Mathnrins. near the Opera, and 
hurried away. The explosion fol- 
lowed. 


*• 

at* 




Firemen leaving the damaged Murks & Spencer store. 


failed to reveal a 515,000 interest- as an employee with you and that is 
free loan on his financial disclosure all I am demanding,” tire guard. 


farms, touching off an investiga- identifiwt as Doriad Hassan, said, 
non by the Justice Department. The incident painted up why the 
The inquiry was promptly airport has been gaming a reputa- 
broadened to indude outer aliega- tion as a dangerous place, 
tions raised in the hearings, such as Diplomats and security sources Leb) 
whether Mr. Meese had arranged say contending mffitfos have infD- jng I 
federal jobs for several people who traied the airport staff to find out 
had done him financial favors and about the movements of opponents The 
whether he had accepted prcferen- so that they can be kidnapped near ^ the 
tial treatment in gaining an Army tire airport 203 bs 


^ - 

ptf0r^ : ' _y, •* ’• , 

.:v 


! : j 1 


Jordanians 
Reveal Text 
Of Agreement 
WiththePLO 


By Judith Miller 

New York Tima Service 

CAIRO — Jordan has made 
public tire text of its agreement 
with the Palestine liberation Orga- 
nization that outlines a framework 
for a joint approach to peace. 

The agreement was signed by 
King Hussein of Jordan and Yasser 
Arafat, the chairman of the PLO, in 
Amman on Feb. 11. The text of the 
accord, distributed in English in 
the Jordanian capital on Saturday, 


Resen« i promotion. Last week, the dnef of security at ^ _ 

The inquiry, which was turned tbe airport. Brigadier General Yas- .he said contained hand grenades. A the plane flown into tbe nearby ^ThTpi/) w niadnaslv^atvi^t 

over to a court-appointed mdepen- sin Sweid, resigned, saying that burst of shooting broke out. In tire presidmtial palace. tiffiSolutio^n teemed St 

dent counsel as prescribed by the nothing was being done about his confusion, flight attendants pushed JamflNaamfih, the chief national 1 = 3 ^ m call for the creafinnnfa 
Ethicsto Government Act, Scared demands to fence off the perimeter passengers down emergency security officer, who negotiated p-wri™,- mentifvn^ 

Mr. Meese of any violation of fed- and keep gimmen away. chutes. with him. said, “We shall appoint a » jSr „ r mc P ,° one{1 

cizl criminal law. The independent Since the airport is in territory Tbe hijacker ordered the plane to committee to deal with aB these tk- United Statesfas miKiiiS 

counsel, JuobA. Stem, dectined to controlled by the arfite Moslem take off, arid for five hours it car- demands ft you crane back.” rrfosed to recoenize tire PLD ml 

evaluate Mr. Meese’s ethical qnab- nrifitia, it is particalarty vulnerable ded over Berrut, landed, took off The plane finally landed in Bei- jt accents RKfrfutinn 242 nnd ac- 

® catio “ s . /°T saying it was to hqaekers demanding tire return and landed again at Laxnaca, Cy- rut and the hijacker said negotia- t s _ c t s ^-y,. ^ 


their “bid for joint action” should 
be based. 

A key provision includes “total 
withdrawal” by Israel from “tire 
territories occupied in 1967 for 
comprehensive peace as estab- 
lished in United Nations and Seen- 
' rity Council resolutions.” 

Taher Hikmat, Jordan’s acting 
information minister, asserted at a 
press conference tn Amman on Sat- 
urday that this meant tire PLO had 
accepted UN Resolution 242, 
which calls for recognition of Isra- 
eTs sovereignty and braiders, in oc- 

Lebanese soldiers examine emergency chutes ripped dur- ^Sfunds thc renini - ^ occupied 
mg the hijacking of a MfrfaBe East Airfines jet in Beirut ^ * 53 ^* oouflkted with a 

■ „ . . statement issued in Tunis on 

Theinjadring on Saturday began were overdue promotions and pay Wednesday by tire PLO*s executive 
as the Middle East AirEnes flight raises for himself and his colleagues ft ^rnmiitw., which refterated the 
203^ bound for Paris, was boarding, and better equipment for airorat palestiniaii group's l ongctanriing 
Mr. Hassan brandished a bag that guards. He also threatened to nave oppodtiou to the key resolution. 

*LSS5J5E.“° lta •n*PWh«pn^ns« a i 


Glass was strewn on the street, 
and the door frame was destroyed. 
In tire store, sales counters were 
gmashwi and gpods spilled into tire 


The store, which sells British 

products, indoding clothing and 
specialty foods, dosed Saturday, 
butit was to reopen on Monday. 


Marks & Spencer has five other 
department stores in France. The 
rJiain celebrated its 1 00th amuver- 
sary in 1984 and is regarded as 
Britain’s most successful retailer, 
with sales of about $43 bjffion in 
1983. The dram has 262 branches 
in Britain, France, Belgium, Ire- 
land and Canada. 


Mr. Meese of any violation of fed- and keqs gunmen away. 

eral aiming) law. The independent Si^ the airport is in territory 

counsel, Jacob A. Stein, declined to controlled bv the Shiite Modem 

«nil.»I.Ur W-. ■, ■ , 1 li. 


beyond his jurisdiction. of a missing Shii te leader, Tmam 

Mr. Reagan then resubmitted Momssa Sadr, who disappeared on 
the nominatron of his longtime aide a trip to Libya in 1978. 


pros, then flew back to Beirtu. tore could 
Mr. Hiwam read a list of de- they were 
mantis that included what he said away. 


til him as long as 
Then he slipped 


accepts Resolution 242 and' ao- 

Theco^raikxion^tween tie 
(C onti nued on Page 2, CoL 3) 



1 . 

■ii — ** 

***** * 



’60s Civil Rights Activist Calls Integration a 'Sham, Con Job’ 


A’*' . 


By Juan Williams 

Washington Pea Service 

DELAWARE, Ohio — At 51, James Mer- 
edith has taken an unexpected torn in his 
march into U-S. history, lire young black 
man who sparked white riots by integrating 
tbe University of Mississippi m 1962 ana 
who was shot for walking Southern back 
roads to protest segregation in 1966 now 
preaches that integration is a “sham” and 
“the biggest con job ever pulled on any 
people." 

In a day of lecturing at Ohio Wedeyan 
University last week, Mr. Meredith said that 
the only people benefiting from integration 
are liberal whites and a few “black bourgeoi- 
sie,” 


He shocked students and faculty, and an- 
gered some, particularly blacks, with re- 
marks in which he seemed to be a black 
rightist, sometimes even sounding like a Rea- 
ganite. 

^Integration is the biggest cm job ever 
pulled on any group of people, any national- 
ity in tbe world,” he said to an American 
history class. “It was a plot by white liberate 
to gain Mack political power for themselves 
and their wild ideas, and for a few black 
bourgeoisie who were paid to exercise lever- 


other black pereon say integration (fid one 
good thing for them” 

A student asked Mr. Meredith if be was 


it is positive. 

“Absolutely, that i$ positively tbe case, 
especially as far as the black race is cod- 
caned,” he replied. 

Mr, Meredith was tbe point man in an 
integration fight that forced President John 
F. Kennedy to send 30,000 federal troops to 
Mississippi to protect him as he integrated 
the Univeraty of Mississippi. 

Mr. Meredith spoke with some disdain of 
his former dvfi ngbts fights. He told a re- 
pater that there ts “no nistoty I’ve been a 
part of that's wrath writing about, sothmg 
that has made black' people more .viable, 
competitive.” 

The rally accomplishment of tbe tivil 


rights era that Mr. Meredith acknowledged is 
■nSe 2 of the Ovfl Rights A« of 1964. which 
outlaws discrimination by hotels and restau- 
rants. 

In another class, a white student asked if 
he was saying “we sfaooidn’l let blacks come 
to school here, we should end integration.” 

“Have yon ever heard erf Irish, Poles, Ger- 
mans, Italians and Jews being integrated?” 
Mr. Meredith 1 asked. "They go anywheieand 

when^lacfc folks do tire saute .ching?^frfa a 
am job." 

He added, “The people who started this 
integration thing knew that in 30 years 
ihey^d still have the same thing, tbe same 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 7) 


INSIDE 

■ Pakistan is p r epa rin g for elections to national and provincial 

assemblies after nearly eight years of martial law. Page 2. 

■ The fans aid filibuster in the U5. Senate ended, but another 

skirmish on the^ issue is due this week. - Page 3. 

■ General WiBam C Westmoreland saw a “no-win situation” in his 

lawsuit against CBS. Page 5, 




ending a four-year pries dispute, Algeria said. 


Page 13. 


■ Cyprus's president rtgected a demand by parliament that he accept 
a United Nations-sponsored pact with Turltish Cypriots. Page! 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ first National Bank of Boston knew well before last year of a law cm 
reporting conqicy transactions, theUJS. government says. Page 13. 

SPECIAL REPORT 

An island divided: Thc key for peace is momentum in the Cyprus 
talks. Page 7. 



Pakistan Prepares for Vote 
8 Years of Martial Law 


By Srtvtn R. Wdsman 

KARACHI, Pakistan - After 
nearly deht 


10 ^ “ 

The voting for a National As- 
sembly and provincial assemblies is 
to take dace Monday and TTiurs- 
nay, and President Mohammed Zia 
tn-Haq has promised to return the 
“bon to civilian rule if it ones 
' smoothly. 

The stakes appear to be high, but 
one oould hardy tell on the surface. 

hi this vibrant port on the Arabian 
Sm, where tens of thousands Of 
™°ustratcirs have tay^n to the 
sheets in the past, rallies today 
consist of a few hundred people 
and break up soon after they start 
Demonstrations, processions and 
loudspeakers are banned. 

At the headquarters of Jamaat-i- 
Islami, a Moslem group that is indi- 
rectly supporting the election, de- 
spite a Iran on participation by 
political parties, a spo kesman held 
a news, conference Saturday to 

cnmnlnm ahom uni 


Pakistan. But they disagree wheth- 
er they mil be a step toward or a 
step away from democracy. 

General Zia’s supporters say the 
voting will at last confer legitimacy 
on his government and vindicate 
the.U-S. policy of suppor ting him 
with Urge amounts of tmbtaiy and 
economic aid. 

But in Karachi, the stro ng hold of 
dissent against General 2a, who 
seized power in a coup in 1977, 
critics say the elections are so obvi- 
ously minted that they could spell 
the beginning of the end of his ftnre 


Nearby, at the home of Mustafa 
Jaloi, the leader of the banned Pa- 
kistan People's Party, an unwel- 
come contingent of soldiers carry- 
ing rifles and handguns stood 
guard underneath the eucalyptus, 
trees and bougainvillea. Mr. Jaioi is 
under house arrest. 

Armed convoys of trucks and 
jeeps patrol the streets to make sure 
that what government officials call 
disruptions of the elections do not 
occur. The soldiers are camped (Hit 
in tents pitched at a sports stadium, 
a private dub and a youth center. 

People seem to agree that the 
elections may be a milestone for 



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DwAaodotadPtM 

PROTESTERS ARRESTED — Washington state po- 
lice remove protesters from the railroad tracks in Van- 
couver as they try to block passage of a train they 
believed was carrying nuclear warheads to the Trident 
submarine base in Bangor. About 106 were arrested. 


Israeli Troops Isolate 
9 Shiite Moslem Villages 


SIDON, Lebanon — Israeli 
forces sealed off nine Shiite Mos- 
lem villages east of Tyre an Sunday 
and cut roads across their front 
lines in south Lebanon. Lebanese 
security sources said. 

Fuel supplies were running out 
in the port of Tyre and floor was in 
short supply in the Shiite town or 
Nabatiyeh, where guerrillas twice 
attacked an Israeli post overnight 
Saturday, wounding three Israeli 
soldiers, the Lebanese sources said. 

In Td Aviv, an Israeli Army 


shooting at Israel’s liaison office in 
Nabatiyeh. but that there were no 

fa yialllBi . 

Israel said it kflkxl nine armed 
Lebanese in two Shiite villages east 
of Tyre on Saturday. 


Writer, Ihsan A. HIJazi of 7h? 
v York Times reported from Bet- 

•rime Minister Rashid Karami 
used Israel on Saturday of wag- 
a “real waT against Modem 
jges in southern Lebanon and 
lh]s government was consider- 

pdring the United Nations So- 
itv Council to hold an emergen- 

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Israeli soldiers told the residents 
over loudspeakers that the siege 
would not be lifted until gunmen 
who attacked an Israeli patrol in 
the area earlier in the week were 
handed over. 

The radio said that the witnesses 
managed to escape over the moun- 
tains and tide roads to Beirut 

The Israeli clampdown started 
Monday after three soldiers, in- 
cluding two officers, were killed in 
hit-and-run attacks by Shiite guer- 
rillas. 

The action against Shiite villages 
Saturday came after six attacks 
agains t Israeli positions in the Tyre 
sector Friday night, according to 
police sources. 

The Lebanese National Resis- 
tance Front said in a statement 
published Saturday that its forces 
mounted 1 1 assaults on the Israeli 
Army in the previous 24 hours and 
that they used rocket Launchers and 
mortars for the first time. 

The front, believed to be an um- 
brella group for several Moslem 
and leftist Tactions fighting the Is- 
raelis, said that the fighting would 
continue until the last Israeli sol- 
dier has left Lebanon. 

There has been an increase in the 
number of attacks by the guerrillas 
since the Israeli Army withdrew 
from the Sidon area to new lines 
farther south a week ago. 

The Israeli Army has embarked 
on what Yitzhak Rabin, the de- 
fense minister, called an “iron fist” 
policy to suppress the Shiite guer- 
rillas. 


UNIVERSITY 



BACHC L OR S MASIffTS dnpOCTORME 
Swh) uetsiieu revun* 
tor a ftpe evaluation 
raofic western umvctsty 

16)00 VW<wo Bd PjkZX Guana Cm£MB US* 


Last week, hundreds of Zia op- 
ponents were rounded up and 
jailed in what the government 
called a p re emp tive measure to 

ing a bo^^tdiai could cast doubt 
on the election’s legitimacy. But 
even people sympathetic to Gener- 
al Zia concede that tin move was a 
tactical blunder that highlighted 
the complaints of his critics. 

Shahida Jamil, chairman of the 
women's division of Tehrik-i-Istiq- 
lai, another banned party, said: 
think we’re going backwards. Zia is 
living in a fools paradise. That's 
the state of mind that caused him to 
call this ridiculous election.’’ 

Critics say the height of General 
Zia’s arbitrariness rame in Decem- 
ber, when election officials an- 
nounced that voters had s u pported 
a referendum backing his efforts to 
bring Pakistani law into conformi- 
ty with Islamic law. As he had 
promised to do before the referen- 
dum, Genera] Zia construed the 
results as ejecting him to a five-year, 
tom in office. 

Then he scheduled the legislative 
elections without saying what pow- 
ers the new National Assembly 
would have. He has promised to let 


the voters know about that issue 
“any day now,” according to a Ka- 
rachi newspaper. 

The general’s critics, discussing 
his promise to return Pakistan to 
dvinan rule, note that he has prom- 
ised an end to martial law since he 
took power in 1977. 

They question not bow big the 
turnout will be, but whether Gener- 
al Zia will lift martial law, resign as 
chief of staff of the army and share 
power with the National Assembly, 
as he has promised. 

By all accounts, many people in 
the opposition agonized over their 
decision to boycott the election. 
Some members of the fanned par- 
ties have bolted and are running for 
office as individuals or supporting 
candidates in defiant* of ^ party 
leadership. 

“The problem with the opposi- 
tion is that it has no coherent strat- 
egy except to criticize,*’ a Western 
diplomat said “There’s been no 
public outcry against the arrests. A 
lot of the rank and file in the oppo- 
sition are disappointed with the de- 
cision to boycott and worried that 
it could backfire.” 

■ Journalist Held 12 Honrs 

Police in Karachi released a local 
correspondent for the British 
Broadcasting Corporation on Sun- 
day after holding aim for 12 hours 
without giving a reason, Reuters 
reported from Islamabad, Paki- 
stan. 

Iqbal Jaffeiy, who also works for 
Time magazine and Danish radio, 
said plainclothes police took him 
from nis home Saturday but never 
showed him a detention order. He 
said the Karachi police commis- 
sioner, Syed Sardar Ahmad, was 
“apologetic” and blamed the arrest 
on confusion between civilian and 
military security agencies. 


Jordanians 
Reveal Text 
Of PLO Pact 

(Continued from Page 1) 

PUT’S Tunis declaration and Mr. 
Hikmal’s assertions Saturday led 
some Western officials in Cairo to 
express concern over whether pro- 
gress toward the resumption of 
peace talks could be made in view 
of the apparently conflicting inter- 
pretations of the Hussein- Arafat 
document. 

A Western official who has 
dosely followed the J ordanian-PaL 
estiflian negotiations speculated 
that Jordan might have released the 
text of the accord to dear up mis- 
understandings about its contents. 

The official also predicted that 
Israel would strongly criticize the 
agreement, since it calls for actions 
that Israd has consistently reject- 
ed. 

The document calls for the 
“achievement of a peaceful and just 
settlement of the Middle East cri- 
sis” and “termination of Israeli oc- 
cupation of the occupied Arab ter- 
ritories, including Jerusalem,'' 
based on five points. 

In addition to its insistence on 
total Israeli withdrawal from occu- 
pied lands, it assets that a joint 
peace bid should affirm the bright 
of self-detennination for the Pales- 
tinian people.” 

Palestinians, the accord contin- 
ues, will exercise this right “when 
Jordanians and Palestinians will be 
able to do so within the context or 
the formation of the proposed con- 
federated Arab states of Jordan 
and Palestine.” 

Mr. Hikmai said it was “prema- 
ture” to discuss toe details of such a 
confederation. A senior Jordanian 
official said this was among several 
items about which Jordanians and 
toe PLO were still negotiating. 

The PLO has long insisted on the 
eventual creation of an indepen- 
dent Palestinian state; Jordan fa- 
vors toe creation of an entity in 
association with Jordan, which the 
Reagan administration has also en- 
dorsed. 

Another principle for joint ac- 
tion calls Tor peace talks “under the 
auspices of an mieraational confer- 
ence in which the five permanent 
members of the Security Council 

will partidpaie ." 

Mr. Hikmai stressed Saturday 
that the conference would include 
toe Soviet Union, something to 
which both toe United States and 
Israel have objected. 

The accord also calls toe PLO 
toe “sole legitimate representative 
of the Palestinian people,” but as- 
serts that it will participate in any 
peace talks “within a joint delega- 
tion” of Jordanian and Pales tinian 
representatives. 

A Western official said this ap- 
peared to be a significant policy 
shift for the PLO, since efforts to 
revive peace talks collapsed in 
April 1983 over this issue. 

Mr. Hi Irma! urged the Reagan 
administration on Saturday to re- 
vise its Middle East policies and 
endorse the accord as an important 
step toward an Arab-Israeli settle- 
ment. 


Foreign Minister Yitzhak Sha- 
mir of Israel dismissed as “unac- 
ceptable” Sunday the joint strategy 
for peace in the Middle East devel- 
oped by Jordan and toe PLO, The 
Associated Press reported from Je- 
rusalem. 

“I think it is aimed more at influ- 
encing the United States to change 
its position toward toe PLO rather 
than at furthering peace,” Mr. Sha- 
mir said before leaving for a five- 
day trip to Western Europe. 



Tha AtMOawd Pre* 


WEST GERMAN CLASH — A leftist demonstrator held by a riot policeman is 
clubbed by another policeman during a protest in Frankfurt Saturday. Four demonstra- 
tors were injured and 35 were arrested in the protest over distribution of rightist leaflets. 

Pentagon and CIA Continue to Differ 
Over Estimated Soviet Military Outlay 


By Don Oberdorfer 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The admin- 
istration's civilian and military in- 
telligence agencies have sought to 
present a common front on toe 
question of Soviet military spend- 
ing, but newly reported statements 
by a Pentagon official appear to 
keep open toe gap between them. 

The Central Intelligence Agency 
issued a five-paragraph press state- 
ment Friday em phasizing that de- 
spite a slowdown in toe growth rate 
of Soviet defense spending, Mos- 
cow continues to ouispend toe 
.United States by substantial mar- 
gins “overall and in important spe- 
cific categories.” 

The CLA statement was handed 
out by the Defense Department, 
whose Defense Intelligence Agency 
has publicized higher Soviet spend- 
ing estimates than those of the 
CIA, a civilian agency. A CIA esti- 
mate made in congressional testi- 


mony in November and released 
last week put that rate of growth at 
2 percent. 

Friday's CIA press statement 
was handed to Pentagon reporters 
with a brief message saying that it 
was “coordinated with the Depart- 
ment of Defense” and that “the 
Department of Defense endorses 
the analysis/' 

At the same time. Harvard Uni- 
versity's Russian Research Center 
made available a speech there Feb. 
14 by Norbert Michaud, chief of 
the strategic defense economics 
branch of Defense Intelligence 
Agency. Mr. Michaud said his 
agency estimated an increase of 5 
to 8 percent in Soviet procurement 
of major weapons systems in 1983. 
measured in dollar terms, and “fur- 
ther increases” in 1984. 

These increases were highlighted 
by a major Soviet shipbuilding pro- 
gram in 1983 and aircraft pur- 


Shultz Warns of f Tyranny 9 


(Continued from Page. I) 
would keep Nicaragua fro§t, be- 
coming “another Cuba," deeply 
aligned to Moscow. 

But if the rebels are denied aid, 
the United States might at some 
time in the future, in some unpre- 
dictable way. then have to act to 
protect its interests, the aide said. 

Mr. Reagan, in his meeting with 
editorial writers, was asked why the 


United States, if it was so con- 
cerned about the Sandinists, did 
not just use itsuown troops. 

He said that “was not a possibili- 
ty” for the United States because 
“our own friends and allies south of 
the bonier, friendly nations and the 
Organization of American States, 
would not tolerate our going in 
with armed force in Latin Ameri- 


Ethiopia Demands Israel Return 
Falasha Jews Who Went on Airlift 


The Anociaied Press 

ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia — 
The Ethiopian government has de- 
manded toe return of Ethiopian 
Jews, or Falashas, who it says were 
kidnapped in an airlift to Israel. 

A statement by the Foreign Min- 
istry published Sunday in toe gov- 
ernment-owned Ethiopian Herald 
contended that the Falashas, 
known as Ethiopia's black Jews, 
were not Jews at alL 

The government, toe statement 
said, “calls on the international 
community to jprevail on Israel to 
respond favorably to Ethiopia's de- 
mand for the orderly and immedi- 
ate repatriation of toe abducted cit- 
izens.” 

In one of its strongest attacks yet 
on toe Israeli airlift. Ethiopia 
charged that thousands of Falashas 
were kidnapped with the conniv- 
ance of neighboring Sudan, which 


it said received $1,000 for each per- 
son taken to the Jewish state. 

“It is a serious affront to toe 
sensibilities of world public opin- 
ion that the current drought and 
famine in Ethiopia should be in- 
voked as an excuse for the Israeli- 
engineered. and Sudanese-assisted, 
massive kidnapping of the Fala- 
shas,” toe Foreign Ministry said. 

“The entire operation conjures 
up the revival of toe slave trade," it 
added. 

“The Sudanese- Israeli conspira- 
cy and act or brigandage is based 
on toe daim that the Falashas are 
Jews. But this is a serious distortion 
of fact, for which there is no histori- 
cal, archaeological or anthropolog- 
ical basis whatsoever." 

Israd mounted the operation last 
November to bring the Falashas 
from Sudanese refugee camps. It 
ended after news of the secret airlift 


was leaked to toe media It is esti- 
mated that about 10,000 Falashas 
reached Israel through the airlift. 

In the mid-1970s, Jerusalem's 
chief rabbinate declared toe Fala- 
shas Jewish descendants of the an- 
cient tribe of Dan. Falashas inter- 
viewed in Ethiopia have described 
themselves as Jews who have pre- 
served their faith despite attempts 
to convert them to Christianity 
over the years. 

The Foreign Ministry statement 
alleged that toe Falashas faced ra- 
cial persecution in Israel. “They are 
discriminated against in housing 
and the most menial jobs are re- 
served for them," it said. 

The statement also charged that 
toe Falashas were bang settled in 
toe “most precarious surroundings 
along the Israeli border to serve as 
cannon fodder in the event of hos- 
tilities.” 


Rightists Call for Protest in Noumea 


Roam 

NOUMEA, New Caledonia — 
White settlers fighting indepen- 
dence for this French tern lory 
called Sunday for a day or protest 
against toe expulaon of five right- 
ist politicians. 

The announcement came a day 
after militant Melanesians stopped 
the president of toe territorial gov- 
ernment, Dick Ukeiwe. from visit- 
ing his home island. They prevent- 
ed his plane from landing by lying 
on the runway. 

The anti-independence party. 
Rally for Caledonia in the Repub- 
lic, said a mass inarch had been 
planned for Tuesday morning, 
hours after a midnight deadline for 
toe expulsion. 

A party statement said that peo- 
ple should stay away from work 
and urged shops and other bus- 
nes5es to dose for toe day to pro- 
test (he order by Edgard Pisani, 
France’s special envoy to toe South 
Pacific territory. 

The five men ordered expelled, 
all members of toe rightist Caledo- 
nian Front, have gone into hiding. 

“We affirm, our decision not to 
leave,” they said in a statement on 
Sunday, adding that they would 
“continue the fight against the ar- 
bitrary justice which victimizes de- 
fenders of a French New Caledo- 
nia.” 

Mr. Pisani ordered them ex- 
pelled after dashes between police 


and (he tnilitantly pro-indepen- 
dence Melanesians,' or Kanaks. 

That violence, on Feb. 17. erupt- 
ed when several hundred settlers 
tried to stage a beach picnic in toe 
Kanak stronghold of Thio, a nick- 
el-mining town on the main is- 
land's northeastern const 

Two policemen and 11 Kanaks 
were injured in toe fighting. 

France's prime minister. Laurent 
Fabius, backed toe expulsion order 
on Saturday and rejected an appeal 
by Jacques Lafleur, leader of toe 
Rally for Caledonia in the Repub- 
lic, that toe five men be allowed to 
stay in New Caledonia. 

Mr. Lafleur. a member or the* 

Industrialist Kidnapped 
By ETA Freed in Spain 

The Associated Press 

SAN SEBASTIAN, Spain — 
Angel Urieaga, a steel mfli owner, 
has been freed 36 days after he was 
kidnapped by guerrillas of toe 
Basque separatist organization 
ETA his family said Saturday. 

His family said Mr. Urieaga, 36, 
was released unharmed Friday near 
the town of Astigarraga ana had 
returned to his home in San Sebas- 
tian. A spokesman for the family 
would not comment on reports that 
a ransom of up to Sl.l million had 
been paid for Mr. Urteaga’s re- 
lease.. 


French National Assembly, two 
weeks ago organized another con- 
frontation with Mr. Pisani when he 
called for a mass violation of a 
night curfew. 

On Saturday, officials said, 
about ISO Kanaks blocked the run- 
way on the eastern island of Lifou 
as Mr. Ukeiwi's plane tried to land. 

Mr. Ukeiwe, who opposes inde- 
pendence. said on his return to the 
capital, Noumea, that the protest 
was an intolerable constraint on 
the right to travel. 

He said he would soon go back 
to Lifou. Airport officials said that 
all flights to the island, about 125 
miles (Ml kilometers) from Nou- 
mea, had been canceled indefinite- 

iy- 

Mr. Ukdwfc tried to visit Lifou, 
most of whose residents are against 
independence, following a stone- 
throwing incident there Friday in 
which a policeman's jaw was bro- 
ken while he was driving a jeep. 

Police said- supporters oT the 
Kanak Socialist National Libera- 
tion Front threw the stones. The 
wounded policeman was flown by 
helicopter to Noumea. 

That incident followed renewed 
violence on the territory's main is- 
land, which came after a month of 
relative calm. 

About 20 persons have died 
since the Kanaks launched a cam- 
paign for independence in mid-No- 
vember. 


chases in 1984. Mr. Michaud said. 

Acknowledging differences with 
CIA estimates. Mr. Michaud said 
his agency was “basically using 
CIA prices" for Soviet weapons, 
adjusted for a “learning curve” he 
did not explain. He said toe main 
difference between the two intelli- 
gence agencies was over the quanti- 
ty of Soviet weapons estimated to 
have been procured. 

Robert Gates, toe CIA’s deputy 
director for intelligence, referred in 
congressional testimony released 
Thursday to “a stagnation in 
spending for military procurement 
after 1976” for toe Soviet Union 
that lasted for “at least seven years 
from 1977 to 1983." 

At another point Mr. Gates said 
toe preliminary CIA estimates for 
1983 “suggest that procurement 
may have experienced some mod- 
est growth over 1982” He de- 
scribed this conclusion as “tenta- 
tive" because of the difficulty in 
estimating toe distribution of costs 
over time and said another year of 
data is required before reaching 
conclusions about what is happen- 
ing. 

In its statement last week, the 
CIA said Mr. Crates' testimony as 
released by the Joint Economic 
Committee “presents a narrow 
view of Soviet military growth.” 
Emphasizing what it called “the 
broader context” toe CIA said de- 
spite toe decline in toe Soviet 
growth rate, the cost of Soviet de- 
fense activities “has exceeded that 
of the United States by a large 
margin.” 


WORLD BRIEFS W 

Birth Control Implant Found Effective!; 

N EW YORK ( AP) - A contraceptive that is v 

of a woman's upper arm for free yean at a cost of y 

found safe and effective by World Health Organization researchers, flte^r , 
Population Council has announced. • 

The six 1-inch (2.5-centimeter) capsules that provide COTtiroytion 
“winds up being the most effective contraception in the world, other man . . . 
sterilization.” said Dr. Wayne Bardin, vice president of toe coimal and ;. : . 
director of its Center for Biomedical Research, which developed toe - 
implant. The capsule-sized implants, tested by 16,000 women m the 
United States and 13 other nations, provides contraception by inhibiting: - - 
ovulation in at least 50 percent of toe women and preventing sperm from . - 
entering the uterus. Dr. Bardin said Saturday. 

The implants, manufactured by a Finnish pharmaceutical company 
and called NORPLANT, contain no estrogen, making potential side 
effects minimal, he said. NORPLANT was approved for use in nnlano 
two years ago; Sweden approved the contraceptive for use earlier this 
year. Applicati o n for U.S. Food and Drug Adminstration approval will j 
be made this year. That agency’s approval is expected in two to three 
years, Dr. Bardin said. j 

Waste Cleanup Plan Proposed in U.S. * 

WASHINGTON (NYTi — The Reagan administration has proposed 
a five-year extension of toe federal program for cleaning up tone wastes 
that would impose a new tax on toe disposal sites where wastes are 
dumped and double the slates’ share of the cost. 

At a news conference Friday on the S5.3-buhon proposal, Lee M. 

Thomas, head of toe Environmental Protection Agency, said toe plan 
would allow the use of funds approved by Congress five years ago only to 
clean up hazardous waste problems and emergency spills. i -_ 

Congressional Democrats and environmental groups, who are backing 
a S7 .5-billion program, attacked the Reagan plan as inadequate ^) de an 
up the 2^00 waste sites that pose the most immediate hazard. Commer- 
cial waste disposal companies said the new tax would pose an unfair 
burden on them, as did several state officials. The new proposals would 
require toe states to double their share of construction costs at toxic waste 
sites. 

Guatemala to Hold Vote in October 

GUATEMALA CITY (Reuters) — Presidential elections will be held 
in Guatemala in October, and toe country will return to civilian rule in 
January, the Supreme Electoral Tribunal has announced. 

Tribunal officials said at a brief ceremony on Friday that they, the head 
of state, General Oscar Mejia Victores, and toe constituent assembly had 
approved an electoral timetable drawn up by the main political parties. 

The assembly would draft an electoral law by the end of May and 
elections would be held on OcL 27. If necessary, a run-off ballot would 
take place on Nov. 24. 

General Mejia Victores promised to hand power over to a freely elected ! 

government soon after taking power in a coup in August 1983. Guatema- 
la has been ruled by military dictatorships or military-dominated govern- 
ments for three decades. 

Kuwait Crown Prince Is Reappointed 

KUWAIT (AP) — Kuwait's crown prince. Sheikh Saad al- Abdullah al- 
Solem al-Sabah. was reappointed prime minister Sunday and entrusted 
with the format inn of a new Kuwaiti government by the ruler, Sheikh ■ 
Jaber al-Ahmed al-Sabah. 

The outgoing cabinet led by Sheikh Saad had resigned Saturday after 
elections for a new partiamenL Since Kuwait gained its independence in 
1961 toe crown prince has always served as prime minister. 

Javits Enters a Hospital in New York 

NEW YORK (AP) — Former Senator Jacob K. Javits of New York, \ 
who has had a progressive muscle and nerve disorder for several years, j 
was rushed to a Hospital on Sunday because of severe breathing problems, 
officials said. He was reported in stable condttition. j 

Mr. Javits, 80. “was acutely III on arrival due to conditions arising from 
his pre-existing chronic condition,” said Jed Golden, a spokesman for 
New York Hospital. “He has since been stabilized” 

The former senator, a Republican who represented New York from 
19S6 to 1980, was admitted to toe hospital's intensive-care ward with 
“pulmonary complications,” Mr. Golden said. He gave no further details. 

Sri l-anton Aide Found Dead in North 7 

COLOMBO, Sri Lanka (Reuters) — A Sri 1 .an Iran official who had 
been abducted in Sri Lanka's northern region has been found dead, but 
another official seized with him has been released, government sources 
said Sunday. 


official who was identified as K. Gnanachandran, a government agent 
for the Mullativu district in northern Sri Lanka. His body was found 
Sunday in the Kilhnochchi district with gunshot wounds in toe bead. The 
officials said they did not know the motive for the kifimg. 

Mr. Gnanachandran and Kirupa Thilingan, a director of planning in 
Mullailivu, were abducted Friday from a bus at Parandan, 50 miles (81 
kilometers) from the provincial capital of Jaffna. The sources said the 
guerrillas, who are fighting for a separate state for T amils in northern 
areas, released Mr. Thilingan on Saturday. He was unharmed. 

Correction 

In some editions of the International Herald Tribune of Saturday- 
Sunday Feb. 23-24, a photo caption incorrectly identified Haing Ngor, a 
star of the movie “The Killing Fields." The photograph also carried an 
incorrect credit. The credit should have specified that it was an Associat- 
ed Press picture. 

MeredUhBeUtilesbtiiegm 


(Continued from Page 1) 

problem they could take advantage 
of. That was toe object of toe con 
job — to keep blacks separate." 

Mr. Meredith told students and 
faculty that he thought American 
blacks were now worse off than at 
any time in history, including the 
period when they were enslaved. 

He' argued that integration has 
ruined black education by taking 
away from black parents the con- 
trol of their children's education 
and antagonized whites to toe 
point that they do not even want to 
hire blacks. Integration has also 
destroyed toe black family, he said, 
as black children are told that while 
schools, white neighborhoods and 
white stores are better. 

Mr. Meredith predicted that un- 
employed black youths, who he 
said have robbed and torn down 
black neighborhoods, mil soon 
start rampaging in white neighbor- 
hoods and the suburbs. 

Like Bemhard H. Goetz, the 
man who shot four minority youths 
who asked him for money on the 
New York subway, he predicted 
that more whites would buy guns 
and go after blacks, and “no one is 
going to blame them.” he said. 

Mr. Meredith sees hims elf as a 
“general" as blacks begin to re- 


spond to toe racial conflict that he 
feels is imminent. 

He said that whiles are avoiding 
the “number one problem in Amer- 
ica — race," by staying away from 
blacks whenever possible and 
thinking of themselves as good peo- 
ple for doing it. 

He sees some hope in toe genera- 
tion oT whites around the age of 30. 
They know firsthand, he said, how 
badly integration has failed be- 
cause they had direct experience 
with it in school. 

He said young Americans were 
guinea pigs in a “disastrous social 
experiment” that involved mixing 
children from different social class- 
es in schools. He said these social 
classes could not mix anywhere. 

“My research shows today 
whites age 30 and under are more 
racially conscious and hostile than 
whiles over 50 because of desegre- 
gation,” he said. “The schoolchil- 
dren of toe past 20 years had to 
deal with it, they know (he prob- 
lems. Whites have developed hos- 
tilities people don’t want to ac- 
knowledge 

The tmder-30 group, be sa id, 
know they do not want their chil- 
dren to go through the class and 
racial sinre of school life that they 
experienced. 


Nigerians Flee Equatorial Guinea 


Reiaen 

LAGOS — Nigeria has sent 
ships and planes to neighboring 
Equatorial Guinea to evacuate 500 
of its citizens who have taken ref- 
uge in its embassy there, toe Nigeri- 
an news agency reported. 

The agency said Saturday that 
toe Nigerians had been taken there 
illegally as plantation workers and, 
in the words of Foreign Minister 
Ibrahim Gambari. were treated as 
“slaves." 

The agency said a Nigerian gov- 
ernment report said the Niger ian* 
fled to the embassy after one of the 
workers was shot to death in a 
scuffle with Equatorial Guinea se- 
curity agents. 


The agency said the Nigerian 
military authorities have sent two 
naval vessels and five military 
transport planes to bring the work- 
ers home. 

The leader of Equatorial Guinea, 
Colonel Teodore Obiang Ngucma, 
apologized to Lagos for toe inci- 
dent in which toe Nigerian worker 
died, promising that toe security 
official who snot him would be 
brought to trial, the agency said.. 

The evacuees were recruited by a 
Nigerian named Fi>m and smug- 
gled to Malabo, the cz^rital of 
Equatorial Guinea, according to 
the agency. It said Mr. Efim has 
been arrested and handed over to 
toe Nigerian Embassy. 


Presid ent 

truck at their C a 


Erlw k, *?•* 

Rockcfriisr fanui> dt 
mon<» to csmhb 
- i.-’-s Park svstesa is 
JJ'New York. toS 
H-ii National Park, 
taui Park m Maine 
Teior. National Far 

irir.t 

Vo* a foiiTtR-j 
R ock^faUer. I-Jimua 
I rr.ii’.jcns of do 
-a on': so*' how much - 
4.u0 ^ fc 

f TTiiiirc i/i Bra* 

Mile-, about .‘CO mile 
ai-seVii northwest of 

City . . 

-I * arsed me 
or. toe verge of radii 

o! ur.pl aunt 

son." Mr. RocksfeSh 
hen.-eif jubd:-“ded 
into 1C 1 - '.oli'.C-aaep 
stringer; resiricucnM 
■joe anc desfn of aev 
The :s ucqi 
more r&suufal than 
Rockefeller moved is 
J «■., Lee Ku liner, po 
i Le» Beach, told The 
Time*. “This p'.ace fl 
inzM-az) " People wt 
shacks. :ratiers and sc 
Bui r.o :T. : :er 
“Larr. iviil go arou 
ley and ;f he sees sot 
titinki is ananru-tivi 
people :? :he>'d dia 
he'ii pa. have it fiu 
j Let WuitV. a aright* 
I fishing e\peT “Scnr. 
j Whaflooi* ugly to L 
good tc. to err.." 

Taking Candv 
From Babies 

in aelcrifr.ce io me 
.smaL cm. urea, me Kri 
marke; chmr, has ren* 
iM-.Ti a; iiis: one 
cot!”.;: in each of its s 
Lou;* an.; Cincinnati. 

Snapper* tike Che 
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oid dangr.;?-. Cate, fc 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1985 


* *>te i 


®on 


AMERICAN TOPICS 



RouteoUntod Pina b fcm c*qnd 

President Ronald Reagan and Ins wife, Nancy, displaying their new bright red pickup 
track at (heir California ranch. The 1985 Font Ranger was a joint Christmas present. 


Hie Rocky Road 
To Better BeaverirfD 

Earlier in this century, the 
Rockefeller family donated land 
and money to establish the Pali- 
sades Park system in New Jersey 
and New York, the Virgin Is- 
lands National Park, Acadia Na- 
tional Park in Maine and Grand 
Teton National Park in Wyo- 
ming. 

Now a fourth -generation 
Rockefeller, Laurence, 40, has 
spent millio ns of dollars — he 
won't say how much — to buy up 
4,000 acres (1,600 hectares) of 
farmland in the BeaverkiQ river 
valley about 100 miles (160 kilo- 
meters) northwest of New York 
City. 

was worried the valley was 
on the verge of radical change, 
because of unplanned subdivi- 
sion,” Mr. Rockefeller said. He 
himself subdivided the land, but 
into 10 - to 100 -acre parcels, with 
stringent restrictions on the loca- 
tion and design of new buildings. 

The valley is unquestionably 
more beautiful than when Mr. 
Rockefeller moved in, residents 
say. Lee Kuttner,posmiaster at 
Lew Beach, told Toe New Ytxk 
Tunes, “This place was becom- 
ing scuzzy.” People were living in 
shades, trailers and school buses. 
But no longer. 

“Larry mil go around the val- 
ley and if be sees something he 
thinks is unattractive, he’ll ask 
people if they’d change it and 
hell pay to have it fixed up, "said 
Lee Wulff, a neighbor and fly- 
fishing expert. “Some resent iL 
What looks ugly to Larry, looks 
good to them/’ 

Taking Candy 
From Babies 

In deference to mothers with 
.small children, the Krpger super- 
market chain has removed candy 
from at least one checkout 
counter in each of its stores in Sl 
L ouis and n^ripnali 

Shoppers like Cherry Ydlig 
arc grateful. She said her 3-year- 
old daughter, Cate, had a habit 
of grabbing a sweet treat as they 
moved through the checkout 
line. “It drives tne crazy," Mrs. 
Yellig said. "If I'm coming 


through in the evening, it's a fact 
that 1 don’t want her eating can- 
dy before dinner." 

Kroger's new policy has yet to 
be extended to its other stores 
throughout the Midwest, and 
some marketing experts are dis- 
turbed. Sweets have been a fix- 
ture on grocery store counters 
since the days of gum drops and 
peony candy. 

Herbert W. Page, a former 
sales executive with Borden 
Foods, said candy at checkout 
counters sells three times as 
much for each square foot or 
space as the rest of the store. 
Shelly Grossman of the National 
Candy Association, a trade 
group, said, “Discipline begins 
with the parent, and our attitude 
is the product should be avail- 
able." 


Short Takes 

At age 26, the Barbie Doll, 
which evolved from the girl next 
door to a beach-lounging woman 
of leisure, wink dabbling at be- 
ing a nurse and an astronaut, has 
changed her ways again. Today 
her lifestyle «»« for business 
suits, a tiny attach^ case, even 
tinier credit cards, and her own 
office, equipped with computers. 
Spencer Boise, spokesman for 
Mattel Inc, said, “We are trying 
to update Barbie. She is a Work- 
ing woman and is dressed that 
way.” 


TSotes About People 

The current must for White 
House reading is Tom Clancy’s 
“The Hunt for Red October," 
about an attempt to defect with 
the Soviet Union’s most ad- 
vanced nuclear submarine. The 
New York Tunes reports that 
Nancy Reynolds, a Washington 
lobbyist, called it to the attention 
of a friend, Nancy Reagan, who 
enjoyed it and handed it to the 
president, who is said to be im- 
mersed in iL Robert C McFar- 
fane, the president’s national se- 
curity adviser, also is reading the 
book, as are other While House 
staff members. “Red October," 
by the way, is the No. I best- 
seller at Pentagon bookstores. 

President Ronald Reagan, in a 


widely reprinted interview with 
the Santa Barbara (California) 

News-Press during his recent vis- 
it to his ranch, said he expects 
that after his second term he and 
Mrs. Reagan will live in Los An- 
geles and vacation at the ranch, 
which would be “too secluded" 
to stay at all (he time. How about 
living in Palm Springs, Califor- 
nia, where the Reagans usually 
spend New Year’s? The presi- 
dent replied, Tve never been a 
great afitianado of the desert." 

Jeane J. Kirkpatrick is a life- 
long registered Democrat even 
though she addressed the Repub- 
lican National Convention last 

nnmwir and is finishin g out a 

four-year assignment at the 
United Nations for President 
Reagan. She says, “There's no 

? uestion about whom I support. 

think that once I'm out of this 
office I’ll have lime to think 
about it and maybe find my way 
out to a registration place." 

Paul Doughs, the former at- 
torney general of Nebraska, was 
convicted on a perjury charge in 
connection with the failure of a 
savings company. His lawyers 
appealed, alleging 36 judicial er- 
rors in the conduct of his triaL A 
state judge denied the appeal, 
rating that Mr. Douglas was enti- 
tled to a fair trial “but not a 
perfect one." 

Wondering About 
Craven Images 

A letter from Columbia, South 
Carolina, to The New York 
Tunes gently takes one of The 
Times’s book reviewers, Christo- 
pher Lehmann-Haupt, to task 
for r emarking , in a review of Gail 
.Godwin’s “The Finishing 
School," that “if the hook has a 
minor flaw, it is the name given 
to an old admirer of Justin's 
mother — a Southern boy. for 
whom she once saved the last 
dance, named Craven RaveuaL" 
The letter asks, “I wonder if 
Justin’s mother would have 
saved the last dance for Christo- 
pher Lehmann-Haupt. a Yankee 
boy no doubt.” 

The letter is signed DuVal 
Cravens Ravend, 

— Compiled by 
ARTHUR HIGBEE 


Poll Suggests Hawke Lost Support 
For Refusing to Let U.S. Test Missile 


By Steve Lohr 

Sew York Tunes Service 

SYDNEY — Prime Minister 
Bob Hawke appears to have suf- 
fered a significant loss of public 
support over Ins reversal of an ear- 
lier pledge to Washington to allow 
the use of Australian bases to mon- 
itor an MX misstie test. 

A Morgaa-Gallup poll published 
Wednesday indicated that for the 
first time since Mr. Hawke was 
elected in March 1983, support for 
his Labor gjvenunent fell below 
that far the Conservative opposi- 
tion. 

Mr. Hawke made the MX deci- 
sion tins month after a revolt in his 
parry. The results of the poll, based 
ou a sampling taken after the deri- 
sion, indicated that support for La- 
bor was down 7 percentage points 
Bmce laie January, to 43 percent, 
and that backing for the Conserva- 
tive opposition had climbed 6 per- 
centage prints, to 47 percent The 
public approval rating for Mr. 
Hawke fed from 65 percent to 57 

percent. 

“The MX controversy has done 
considerable damage to Mr. 
Hawke personally and to iris au- 
thority,” said Malcolm Mackerras, 
a senior lecturer and political ana- 
lyst at the Australian Wense 
Force Academy in Canberra. 

Internationally, the effect of the 
Australian rewssal was magnified 
bffatma* it immediately after 
New Zealand refused a port call by 
a US. destroyer unless the govern- 
ment was assured that the ship car- 
ried no nuclear weapons. 

The reversal on the MX issue 

indicated that Mr. Hawke misread 

the depth of anti-nuclear sentiment 
in his own party. The public bicka- 
ing that resulted, commentators 

MEMORIAL NOTICE 

Mrs. Catherine LEVTIN BESTERMAN 
A memorial service win be bdd oq 
Feb. 28. 1485 at 1 1 u&, at the chinch of 
Notre- Dame-des-Doul mrt. Rue Wash- 
ington, I0S0 Brussels. Bdghun. 


say, has unde rmin ed the prime 
minister’s authority, raising ques- 
tions about his ability to cooperate 
mSitaifly with the United States 
and his capacity to gain legislative 
approval for economic changes 
needed to make Australia more 
competitive internationally. 

The impression that Mr. Hawke 
may be losing control over the La- 
bor Party has particularly worried 
the business world. Mr. Hawke, 55. 
a former trade union chief, has tak- 
en the unusual course for a Labor 
Party politician of championing 
such free-market policies as float- 
ing the Australian dollar, deregu- 
lating the financial system, and 
lowering protective tariffs and quo- 
tas that shield certain domestic in- 
dustries. 

The prime minister and the trea- 
surer, Paul Keating, are the princi- 
pal advocates of these policies in 
the government and in the Labor 
Party’s right-leaning faction. 

The strong opposition to Mr. 
Hawke’s original position on the 
MX test came from the left, and his 
reversal was a show of strength by 
the left. Business leaders say they 
are concerned that the left may 
now nhaiteng e the prime minister 
on economic policy. 

“The danger is that the freesmar- 
ket philosophy pushed by Hawke 
and Rearing wifi be under greater 
pressure,” said Stuart A Fowler, a 
senior executive of Westpac Bank- 
ing Corp., the nation's largest pri- 
vate bank. 

The increased uncertainty about 
the economy after the MX shift has 
been registered in the foreign ex- 
change markets. Since the begin- 
ning of the mouth, the value of the 
Australian dollar has dropped 14 
percent, to about 71 cents to the 
VS. dollar. The Australian dollar 
has also declined by nearly 10 per- 
cent against the British pound, the 
Japanese yen and the West Ger- 
man mark. 

Other factors partly explain the 
recent weakness in the local curren- 
cy: a worsening trade position, the 


U.S. Senate Settles a Dispute, Prepares for Another 


By Steven V. Roberts 

Sew York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — The Senate 
has resolved one acrimonious dis- 
pute over farm credit measures but 
has set the stage for another skir- 
mish over the same issue this week. 

The agreement reached Saturday 
ended a weekloog filibuster against 
the confirmation of Edwin Meese 
3d, who was later approved as at- 
torney general. 

The farm -credit compromise. 


provides that members from both 
parties can offer proposals for ad- 
ditional aid to farmers who are 
seeking financing to start spring 
planting. The proposals, four from 
each party, would be offered as 
amendments to an African famin e 
relief bill that is scheduled for floor 
action Monday. 

President Ronald Reagan, who 
previously criticized the linking of 
the farm credit proposals to the 
Meese vote, said Saturday in his 
weekly radio broadcast (hat only a 
minority of fanners were in severe 


financial distress and that the tax- 
payers must not be asked to save 
every fanner. 

While lawmakers congratulated 
one another Saturday on reaching 
the accord, many acknowledged 
that the ferocious clash on the first 
major issue of the new Congress 
was “a bad way to get started,” as 
Senator Robert C. Byrd of West 
Virginia, the Democratic minority 
leader, put iL 

To many senators, the week of 
debate on the farm problems sig- 
naled the beginning of a campaign 
for political advantage leading up 
to the elections of 1986, when con- 
trol of the narrowly divided Senate 
will be decided. 

The week also provided the first 
real test of Senator Robert J. Dole, 
the new majority leader. Many Re- 
publicans said it was essential for 
their party to face down the filibus- 
tering Democrats and demonstrate 
their control of the Senate. 

Saturday’s agreement ended a 
frustrating week of false starts and 
failed talks that set Senate tempers 


boiling At the peak of animosity, 
Mr. Byrd told the Senate early Sat- 
urday morning that rite Republican 
message was, “Let the farmers go 


The week began when farm state 
senators saw that by holding the 
Meese nomination hostage they 
could focus attention on the farm 
credit issue. After several days of 
talks between lawmakers and ad- 
ministration officials, the White 
House agreed 10 expand existing 
loan programs and make them easi- 
er to use. 

Those changes, which did not 
require legislation, were put into 
practice by the administration Fri- 
day. But the filibuster continued 
because lawmakers could not agree 
on a formula that would permit 
Democrats to offer a package of 
legislative proposals on the farm 
issue that go beyond the adminis- 
trative changes made. 

The talks collapsed early Satur- 
day morning over that issue. After 
a few hours sleep. Mr. Byrd held a 
breakfast meeting with his Demo- 


cratic colleagues and planned strat- 
egy to continue their filibuster.. 
However. Mr. Dole and the Repub- 
licans came forward with a new 
offer, and an agreement was quick- 
ly hammered out by mid-after- 
noon. 

The Democrats are eager to offer 
amendments this week calling for 
even more generous loan programs 
to farmers. Senator J. James Exon, 
Democrat of Nebraska, said ou the 
floor Saturday that it was “vitally 
necessary" to go beyond the mea- 
sures agreed to last week and put 
more cash into farmers’ pockets by 
making crop payments available 
now that are usually made avail- 
able in the falL 

The Republicans strenuously re- 
sisted any agreement that would 
assure the Democrats a chance to 
offer amendments. Many farm- 
state Republicans are up for re- 
election next year, and they do not 
want to cast votes that could be 
used against them in the cam paign 

“They're paranoid about the 
1986 elections and losing the Sen- 


ate,” said Senator Edward Zorin- 
sky. Democrat of Nebraska. “This 
creates a record for the 1986 elec- 
tion as to who truly supports agri- 
culture and who doesn’t” 

“Farm Belt senators would be 
put on the record.” he added. 
“They would have to make a choice 
between following their party line 
or voting for their farmers. That's 
the bottom line.” 

Mr. Reagan, delivering his week- 
ly radio address Saturday, said: 
“About two- thirds of today's farm- 
ers have no debt problems and only 
a minority of the remainder are in 
severe financial distress.” 

Mr. Reagan said that “inflexi- 
ble" federal farm programs, “have 
increased dependency on the feder- 
al government, weakening incen- 
tives for self-reliance.” 

He said that the federal govern- 
ment had some responsibility for 
providing relief. 

“The same government which 
played a pan in this unhappy dra- 
ma must not mm away from those 
who are the backbone of our na- 
tion." be said. 


AFL-CIO Accepts Plan 
To Reinvigorate Unions 

By Peter Perl sion. The AFL-CIO spends S3 mil- 

Wathmgton Fan Serna: lion yearly on television advertising 

BAL HARBOUR, Florida — and production, and both the fed- 
Leaders of the 13-million-member eration and its unions must expand 
AFL-CIO, the nation’s largest la- the effort, the report said, 
bor federation, have adopted a pro- •Trying new approaches to or- 
posal for reinvigorating organized ganiang. Several government-em- 
labor, including more mergers of its ployee unions began as profession- 
96 unions, new recruitment meth- al “associations" for workers who 
ods, better use of the media and were not originally allowed to 
new cooperative and confronts- unionize. The Service Employees 
tinnrtl tarries for dealing with em- union also has formed associations 
ployers. of women office workers who inj- 

The rfmngps were recommended dally were reluctant to unionize, 
by a 25-member study committee The report suggests that union or- 
of the American Federation of La- ganizers can target “particular is- 
bor and Congress of Industrial Or- sues"in workplaces toward the “ul- 
ganizations and in most cases they Umale end" of winning support for 
would have to be approved by indi- unioniza t ion. 

vi dual unions. The document was 

approved Thursday by the federa- _ __ _ _ 

lion's executive council Japan May Ban import 

It proposes that collective bar- /v rj -1 >> ■ ni 1 

gaining agreements include use of Ol SOUth AlTlCan tfiOOd 
arbitration or mediation rather Return 

than strikes, and it recommends TOKYO — Japan may stop im- 
emphasizing the new concerns of porting blood from South Africa in 


In Athens 

there’s one luxury hotel the rest are judged by 

HOTEL ATHENAEUM 
INTER- CONTINENTAL 



high government budget deficit, 
and signs of a resurgence in indus- 
trial disputes. 

Bui the MX issue appeared lobe 
the catalyst The declining Austra- 
lian dollar, The Melbourne Age 
said Friday in an editorial, “reflects 
a global loss of confidence 

It added: “The MX missile crisis 
drew attention to Australia and 
cast doubt on the political strength 
and stability of the Hawke govern- 
ment” 

Mr. Hawke’s retreat on the MX 
misstie test has been seen as a vic- 
tory for the growing ami-nuclear 
movement in Australia. In the gen- 
eral election in December, the new 
Nuclear Disarmament Party won 
10 percent of the vote. The party 
called for the withdrawal of Aus- 
tralia from the ANZUS treaty with 
New Zealand and the United 
States, the dosing of all American 
military installa tions in Australia, a 
ban on visits by nuclear ships and 
warplanes, and a ban on the mining 
and exporting of uranium. 

Democrats collected 10 percent 
of the vote. They have a similar 
anti-nuclear platform but are not a 
single-issue party. 

“Hawke has always had (he view 
that the disarmament movement 
was something on the fringe of 
Australian politics," said Peter 
Garrett, 31, a rock star who is the 
principal spokesman of the Nucle- 
ar Disarmament Party. “But it does 
run across the political spectrum. 
There’s no doubt of that now. after 
die MX issue." 

Sane political analysts question 
whether Mr. Hawke's turnabout 
was an indication of the main- 
stream strength of the anti-nuclear 
movcmenL 

“The speed with which Hawke 
cut and ran may not have been 
wise," Mr. Mackerras said. 

Andrew Peacock, leader of the 
opposition liberal Party, struck 
the same theme Friday. 

“Hawke didn't fight for Austra- 
lia,” Mr. Peacock said. “He caved 
in to the left." 


vw ?lJ crs - , , , . . viewof Japanese opposition to Pre- 

TTm report acknowledges that to ria’s pt£<* of aparthrid, acco^ 

“umoos find themselves behind the ingiottebealth^wdfareminis- 
pace of change in American soa- ia Hiroyuki Matsuoka. 
ety and concludes that the seeds ^ Matsuoka said Saturday in 
of a resurgence" for labor lie m parliament that his ministry would 
undertaking new strategies and gounsej against importing blood 
reactivating old ones. from South Africa. A ministry offi- 

Its recommendations result from ^ ^ t Japan imported about 

public opinion surveys about OTe ^ <jf crude blood plasma de- 
umons and from imports anmnis- nvativea year from South Africa, 
aoned by the AFLCIO from ex- This compares with total blood im- 
pem at Harvard Uwvosrty. Mas- ports of \<50Q ions, mainly from 
sachusetts Institute of Technology, ^ United States, he added. 

Xerox Cop. and other mstiluttous. ^ : 

The recommendations include: : 

• Actively promoting mergers to 
improve the bargaining power of 
individual unions and adopting 
new guidelines for mergers. (The 
AFL-CIO announced Thursday 
the tentative merger of the 241 ,000- 
member Paperworks and the 
124,000-member Oil Chemical and 
Atomic Workers into the United 

Paperworkers, Energy and Chcmi- Tn A r A I 
ca! Workers.) | |<ADt A I 

• Establishing new categories of 
union membership at non union 
workplaces. By offering benefits 
such as supplemental medical or 
life insurance, job-training assis- 
tance or other inducements, uni mis 
could set up low-cost membership 
10 “introduce nonunion workers to 
the benefits provided by union rep- 
resentation.” 

• Setting up new mechanisms to 
stop costly battles between unions 

competing to organize the same *n 1 

group of workers. More than 10 I n 

unions, for instance, are campaign- 
ing to represent Ohio public em- 
ployees. 

• Experimenting with new forms The irdsrncdion 

of collective bargaining. Workers will be of keen intent 

often do not want traditional “ad- Thesmnfr 

vosariaT bargaining and formal inecorm 

employment contracts, the report hewthe Hungarian 

said. Unions could therefore in- and offers Western & 

stead provide advocacy for mat- _ 

viduafs" and could “negotiate Senior executives 

minimum guarantees that will serve JUNE 13 

as a floor for individual bargain- Keynote •-*- '1 1111 

ing.- S uch appro aches m used by Mr. Jdzsef Moqd, Deputy Prime Mn&er 

un^ reprsmungmuaoansmd fl* EconooiOutook 

• Expanding union use of dec- Prc^ W Bogo 

tronic media to combat the “near of the H u ngaria n Aax 

invisibility" of unions on televi- Foreign trade 


THE ADVANTAGE IS INTER-CONTINENTAL 

OINTER-CONTINENTAL HOTELS 

89-93 Syngrou Avenue, (301) 902 3666 Telex 221554 
For reservations call: London (01) 491 718L F^aris: (01) 7424)7-92, 
v your nearest Inter-Continental office or your usual travel agent. . 


HUNGARY 

A CONFERENCE ON 

TRADE AND INVESTMENT OPPORTUNITIES 


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SPONSORED BY 

THE INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

Budapest, June 1 3-1 4, 1 985 

The IrderrKdbnd Hercdd Tribune conference on “ Trade and Investment Opportunities in Hungcry ’ 
will be of keen interest to anyeseojbvecorK^nedrdxrut future econormcrelatiorK between E& 

The oonferencs prorides an extraordinary opportunity for business leaders 1o examine 
hew the Hungarian governments approaching questions of domestic and international economic relations 
and offers Western executives an unusual occasion for dreed contact with business leaders from Eastern Europe. 

Senior executives wishing to register for the conference should complete and return the coupon bebw. 
JUNE 13 JUre 14 


The BenMnfl System 

Mr. J6r*35 Fekete, first Deputy Presdent, National Bork of 

Hungary 


Professor Jazsef Bcxyiar, Director, Institute of World Economics Western Banking raid fkmgcwy 


Sl Vincent Official Resigns 

77m Ass octet ed Press 

KINGSTOWN, Sl Vincent — 
The governor general of Sl Vincent 
and the Grenadines, Sir Sydney 
Gun-Munro, has resigned, it was 
announced by the office of Prime 
Minister James Mitchell Joseph 
Lambert Eustace, a retired school 
teacher, has been named to succeed 
him 


of the Hungarian Academy of Sdenoes 
Foreign Trade 

Mr. bivan Tarek, Secretary of State for Foreign Trade 

The five Yecw Pkm 

Dr. Jdnos Hods, Secretory of State.. National Hanning Board 

Afternoon Address 

Dr. Armond Hammer, Qrdrman and Chief Executive Officer, 
Ocadeakd Petroleum Corporation 
Investment Incentives and Tax free Zones 
Dr. Pfeter Medgyessy, Deputy Minister of Finance 

Barter 

Mr. Sdndor Demcsak, General Merger, Hungaian Foreign 

Trading Bark 


M. Gabrid BcHer, Vice President and General Manager, 

Bark of America N.T V Vfenno 

Industrid Outlook 

Mr. Ferenc Horvath, Secretary of State for Industry 

Rand of Hungaian Jnctelricfsts 
Afternoon Address 

Professor Rkhard Partes, Director, Centre for Economic Poky 
Research, London 

Joint Ventures 

Mr. Ldszlo Borbely, Director General, Department far 
Mernatond Monetary Affairs. Ministry of Finance 

toid of Forei 9 i Compenes 

Atoderator: Mr.Tdmas Bed, President, Hungarian Chamber of 
Commerce 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE. MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25. 1985 






ape 4 


f 


West Gen 

HMS-m e wI°5 i * B MiniMw 

ste!^ if™ Ge nscher has 
C ^ nnan of ibe 

wavf^T^ 3110 *■&. making 
tSSrf .£* <* ^vmg the for- 

^“dwr. 57, who has led the small 
PJfy for more than 10 years. 
W ^PP 0 ” f or his ffi 
Bangc- 

^ the minister for ecoruX 

Mr- Bangcmann, 50, wfco en- 
***00 the West German govern- 
ment after losing his seat in the 
consultative European Par liamen t 
^ year, was unopposed. 

. Faring three critical state riec- 
uons next month and in May, the 
Free Democrats are seen as fight- 
mg for their political survival. 

The party, which brought down 
a boaal Democratic-fed coalition 
m 1982 by throwing its parUamen- 
tanr support to the conservative 
Utnstian Democrats, has been dis- 
placed by the leftist Greens as West 
Germany's third political force. 

The Free Democrats are now 
represented in only five of the II 
state legislatures, and public opin- 
ion polls show the party hovering 
below the 5 percent of the vote 
needed to gain legislative represen- 
ts. tkxL 


ian Party Picks New Leader 


DOONESBURY 



Hans-Dietrich Genscher, right, giving a symbolic bell to bis 
successor as chairman of the Free Democratic Party, 
Martin Bangemann. during party meeting in Saarbrucken. 

he intends to stay on in the govern- 
ment as foreign minister and depu- 
ty chancellor. 

The selection of Mr. B angemann 
has aroused little excitement in the 


Mr. Genscher, facing a revolt 
from the party's disaffected rank 
and file, said last May that he 
would Step down as chairman and 
make way for a younger leader. But 


British Troops Kill 3 IRA Guerrillas in Ambush 


Reuters 

BELFAST — British troops 
have killed three Irish republican 
guerrillas in Northern Ireland in an 
ambush, according to police. 

The troops, members of a uni- 
formed patrol shot the three before 
dawn Saturday in a field on the 
outskirts of Strabane near the bor- 
der with the Irish republic, a police 
spokesman said. 

Three rifles and two rocket 


launchers, none of them fired, were 
recovered from the scene of the 
ambush, he said. 

Police said the dead men be- 
longed to the Irish Republican 
Army, which is fighting to end Brit- 
ish rule in Northern Ireland. 

On Sunday. Irish republican 
guerrillas said that they bad killed a 
man m Londonderry on Saturday 
night because he was a police in- 
former. 


Police later found the man, who 
bad gunshot wounds to the head, in 
the city's Bogside district. He died 
soon after. 

Roman Catholic politicians re- 
acted angrily to Saturday's am- 
bush, accusing the security forces 
of killing the three in cold blood. 

"This is a continuation of the 
police sboot-to-kill policy," said 
Martin McGuinness, a local leader 
of the IRA's political wing, Sinn 


U.K. Marriage List Excludes AIDS Victims 


Rtuten 

LONDON — The publishers of 
Burke's Peerage, the directory of 
the British nobility, are to exclude 
sufferers of acquired immune defi- 
ciency syndrome, or AIDS, and 
their dose relatives from its new list 
of eligible marriage partners. 

“We are worried Inal AIDS may 
not be a simple infection, even if 


conveyed in unusual ways, but an 
indication of a genetic defect,” said 
she company’s publishing director, 
Harold Brooks-Baker. 

Mr. Brooks-Baker said the direc- 
tory's “Blood and Gold Chib,” a 
marriage guide based on noble 
birth or wealth, would exclude 
AIDS victims. 

“It could be that some people. 


because of their genetic makeup, 
are more likely to get it than others, 
as is the case with rheumatic dis- 
eases. We are not taking any 
chances.’* 

Fifty-five people in Britain have 
died of AIDS, which destroys the 
body’s defense a g ainst disease and 
is spread through sexual contact 
and blood transfusions. 


Fein. “These men could have been 
captured alive" 

Catholic residents of a nearby 
housing complex said they bad 
heard the three shout, “Don't 
shoot!" and offer to surrender. 

The deaths raised to eight the 
number of IRA men killed by secu- 
rity forces in three months. 

Republican politicians have ac- 
cused the security forces of shoot- 
ing to kill on several occasions in 
the past two years. 

In the last such incident, under- 
cover troops killed two armed men 
in an ambush near the town of 
Deny, near Strabane, at the end of 
Iasi year. 

In Banbridge. 80 miles (128 kilo- 
meters) from Strabane. hundreds 
of mourners attended the funeral of 
a Catholic policeman who had been 
shot by republican guerrillas 
Thursday while seated at the wheel 
of a school bus. 


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party, but concern to preserve a 
semblance of unity appeared io 
have rallied delegates around turn 
on Saturday. He received the sup- 
port of 352 of the 395 delegates. 

Once affiliated with the left wing 
of the Free Democratic Party, Mr. 
Bangemann was sent to the Euro- 
pean Parliament in Strasbourg af- 
ter urging a break with the Social 
Democrats, then led by Chancellor 
Helmut Schmidt, well before the 
1982 split He now supports the 
Free Democrats' alliance with 
Chancellor Helmut Kohl’s Chris- 
tian Democrats. 

But Mr. Bangemann’s lack of 
leadership experience and a culti- 
vated image as a maverick have 
raised doubts about his capacity to 
inject hope into Free Democratic 
ranks. 

After his election on Saturday, 
he pledged to pursue an active dia- 
logue within the badly divided par- 
ty- 

Mr. Rangmiann has already hart 
unfriendly brushes with his prede- 
cessor in the economic affairs post, 
Otto Lambsdorff, who was forced 
to resign after being indicted on 
charges of taking bribes. 

Mr. Genscher's withdrawal from 
the party chairmanship leaves open 
the relationship between him, Mr. 
Bangemann and Mr. Kohl in the 
center-right coalition. 

The foreign minister and the 
chancellor are close friends, but 
some political analysts foresee an 
inevitable loss of influence for Mr. 
Genscher after Saturday’s shift 


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U.S. Aide’s Trip Hints at Softening on Chile 


By Lydia Chavez 

New York Times Semct 
SANTIAGO — Last week's visit to Chile by 


hope to influence the Chileans. If anything, Mr. 
Motley's visit confused the picture rather than 
reinforcing z clear policy lme. In the last six 


trols and dosed six magazines that were consid- 
ered lobe overly critical of the government. 


__ Opposition leaders now complain of having 

laneh'nrn? ^ Matin "assistanT srcreiarv of months, the State Department has repeatedly virtually no way to communicate with support- 
aST&K&WiSM expressed its “Macenrover General Pinochet's 


suggests 

the Reagan administration may be taking a 
more conciliatory stance after months of in- 
creasingly critical comments about the govern- 
ment of President Augusio PinocbeL 

An official Chilean communique said that 
discussions with the Americans "developed in 
the climate of great cordiality, understanding 
and reciprocal interest." Even the police band 
added its bit, offering a short rendition of "Yan- 
kee Doodle” al thecnanging of the guard at the 
presidential palace. 

Mr. Motley also seemed pleased. "The desti- 
ny of Chile is in Chilean hands — in good 
hands," he said as he departed. 

One U.S. diplomat said of Mr. Motley: “I 
think be established rapport that wasn't there. It 
reinforced our policy of being neutral." 

Only three months ago, the same diplomat 
said that United States criticism was bound to 
increase; 

Diplomats here indicated that a policy debate 
was under way in the Reagan administration 
between offi cials who argue for stronger action 
and those who favor frieudly persuasion to try 
to keep General Pinochet to his own timetable 
of stepping down in 1989. At the very least, an 
official said, Chile will get increased attention in 
the next four years. 

The new U.S. interest the diplomats said, 
arises from concern that hard-line tactics may 
unwittingly strengthen and radicalize the left. 

But it is unclear bow the United Slates could 


crackdown on his critics. 

To back this up, the United States abstained 
recently on an Inter-American Development 

NEWS ANALYSIS 

Bank loan for Chile, making clear its unhappi- 
ness with Chile’s human rights record. 

However, future loans from international 
lending agencies apparently were not rtwenwt 
with General Pinochet and other government 
officials. There was a brief mention or the cur- 
rent ban on selling arms to Chile, but the thrust 
of this discussion has not been disclosed. 

Backing away from the Stale Department’s 
previous expressions of concern, Mr. Motley 
spoke diplomatically of Washington’s interest 
in tiie country’s development 

When a local reporter asked him for his 
thoughts about the Pinochet government’s press 
censorship, Mr. Motley referred to the size of 
the crowd at his airport press conference. “I’ve 
been in a lot of countries where you couldn’t 
gather this many people." he said, adding that in 
"generic terms." freedom of the press was a 
fundamental step in the transition to democra- 
cy- 

For Chilean journalists, Mr. Motley's obser- 
vation was hardly comforting. Until early last 
winter, the press was nearly free of censorship. 
Then General Pinochet damped on new con- 


programs are available in half a dozen daily 
newspapers and the president can be seen night-. 
!y on the television news. 

Diplomats and other officials here suggested 
that the U.S. change in tactics may make sense, 
hmu ise criticism has bad little influence over 
the years on the military ruler. General Pinochet 
has usually bridled at criticism, particularly 
from foreign sources, they say. 

Moreover, few, if any, viators from the Unit- 
ed States come away with the impression that 
the president is Ukdy to be drummed out of 
office soon. Even Chilean opposition leaden 
worry that he may be planning to stay beyond 
1989. 

His military hacking appears strong. The op- 
position is divided. “I don't see a fragility in the 
government structure," an official said, "or in- 
ordinate armed or unarmed force that would 
throw Pinochet oat of office in the next couple 
of years.” 

Therefore, some argue, it makes sense to im- 
prove relations in the hope of encouraging a 
peaceful transition as apposed to a conflict 
between the government and the opposition. 

At his press conference, Mr. Motley tried to 
brush off a reporter’s suggestion that General 
Pinochet's refusal to move toward democracy 
might provoke a “polarization" of political 
forces. The dilemma of democracy, be said, is 
that “people on the one hand say that it is going 
too slow and others say it is going loo fast" 

. “That is for the Chileans to decide," he said. 


U.S. finding Intensified Mexican Border Searches 


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By David Hoffman 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — The R 
administration has begun “wine „ 
down" intensified searches along 
the Mexican border that have 
caused long delays at entry points, 
according to administration offi- 
cials. 

However, the officials said Fri- 
day that Washington was still “not 
at all satisfied" with Mexico’s co- 
operation in the case of a kid- 
napped U.S. Drug Enfonxment 
Adminis tration agent, the incident 
that touched off the border search- 
es. 

President Ronald Reagan dis- 
cussed the border searches and the 
abduction of Enrique Camarena 
Salazar by telephone Friday with 
Mexico's president, Miguel de la 
Madrid, a White House official 
said. The 15-minute call was placed 
by President de la Madrid, the offi- 
cial said. 


trafficking and lamented the disap- 
pearance” of Mr. Camarena, the 
Los Angeles Tunes reported from 
Mexico City.] 

Earlier, President Reagan sent a 
personal letter to Mr. de La Madrid 
seeking better cooperation in the 
investigation of the Feb. 7 kidnap- 
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The administration is “kind of 
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ties have not been more coopera- 
tive, a second administration offi- 
cial said. 

U.S. officials are concerned that 
a Mexican police organization 


rallftrt upon to investigate the ab- 
duction in Guadalajara may have 
been involved in it, administration 
officials say. 

The White House spokesman, 
Larry Speakes, said Friday, “We 
would like to have more coopera- 
tion, and the only tangible evidence 
of cooperation would be some pro- 
gress in solving the case." 

The State Department has ex- 
pressed concern about six other 
Americans missing and believed 
kidnapped in Mexico. 

The stepped-up inspections at 
the border provoked complaints of 


economic hardship there and an 
expression of “deep concern*’ de- 
livered last week to Kenneth W. 
Dam, a U.S. deputy secretary of 
state, by Ambassador Jorge Espin- 
osa de los Reyes. 

The US. ambassador to Mexico, 
John A. Gavin, returned to Wash- 
ington for talks last week and re- 
putedly recommended that the in- 
tensified searches be relaxed. 

A Customs Service spokesman 
said Friday that waits at the border 
had been reduced to 90 minutes, 
compared with delays of up to eight 
hours the weekend before. 


Polish Unions Reject Price Increases 


By Robert Gillette 

Las Angela Tima Service 

WARSAW — Poland’s official 
trade unions have categorically re- 


better management of the centrally 
directed economy. 

Lech Walesa has joined other 
leaders of Solidarity in calling for a 
15-minute work stoppage across 


credibility with the public, these 
sources said. 

A government co mmuni que in* 
January outlined three sets of in-, 

Prrcirtra? R«,o, n emressed con- jecled the government's proposed stoppage aLT«» creases and called for a month of 

consumer See increases.^™ the nauon Thursday to protest the “social consultations" in work 

proposed increases. Officials of the 


cem for Mr. Camarena s safety and 
that of other Americans in Mexico, 
according to the official, who de- 
clined to provide farther details of 
the conversation. 


consumer price increases, saying 
that they would serve only to lower 
the country’s standard of living. 

The trade union movement, 
which the government hopes will 


[Mr. de la Madrid’s office said take the place of the outlawed Soli- 
Friday that in the call, “the prcsi- darity union, objected in principle 
dent ratified the firm commitment Saturday to price increases as the 
of the Mexican government to main instrument of Poland’s eco- 
m qjntain the fight against drug nomic reform. It called instead for 


SC/ 


BROADCASTING TO CABLE COMPANIES 
IN EUROPE & THE UK VIA SATELLITE 

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PROGRAM. MONDAY 2Stti FEBRUARY 

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TELEPHONE LONDON (01) 636 4077 TELEX 266943 


official unions, while openly con- 
temptuous of Solidarity, expressed 
similarly dim views of the price 
increases at a meeting in Warsaw 
reported on nationwide television. 

“The announced concentration 
of price hikes will lead to a decrease 
in the standard of living for work- 
ing people which we cannot ap- 
prove.” said Romauld Sosnowsld, 
vice chairman of the official 
unions' newly formed National Co- 
ordinating Committee. 

Portions of the statement by the 
official unions were broadcast on 
the slate television network’s main 
evening news and carried by the 
government press agency. PAP. 

Solidarity sources said the prom- 
inent treatment given to the criti- 
cism by the official unions made it 
seem likely that the government's 
own sampling of public opinion, 
and the prospect of work stop- 
pages, might lead it to postpone or 
revise the price increases. The gov- 
ernment-sanctioned unions appar- 
ently hope to reap credit for any 
retreat by the government and gain 


places and in the news media to 
choose the one least objectionable 
to the public. They ranged from 
sharp hikes combined with a lifting 
of rationing on most food items 
except meat to smaller increases 
and continued rationing. 

Overall, the government foresees 
a 12-percetti to 13-percent rise in 
retail prices but a jump this spring 
of 20 percent to 30 percent in the 
cost of natural gas. electricity and 
heating coal Rent, postal rates and 
transportation costs will also rise. 

Since the 1950s, price increases 
to shore up a stumbling economy 
have been a common cause of civu 
unrest Last year, however, the gov- 
ernment of General Wqjdech Jaru- 
zelski managed to introduce in- 
creases averaging 10 percent 
without major difficulty after an 
unusual period of public debate. 

Solidarity, speaking through its 
many underground publications 
and at least one clandestine radio 
broadcast, has for weeks de- 
nounced the proposed increases 
this year. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1985 




In CBS Suit, Westmoreland Saw ? No-Win Situation 9 


* v- « 
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tv* 

t /_ Si 



;7 r/v.trj 


By M.A. Farber 

V™ York Times Service 

NEW YORK — General Wil- 
liam C, Westmoreland's decision lo 
settle his libel lawsuit against CBS 
last week was prompted, according 
to his friends, by his demoraliza- 
tion over damaging testimony of 
his former aides and his feeling 
ihau however right he was, he was 
in a “no-win situation." 

The general knew from pretrial 
depositions bow witnesses were 
likely to testify- Nevertheless, his 
friends said. General Westmore- 
land was so shaken by the willing- 
ness of his farmer intelligent*? chief 
in Vietnam to “break the old West 
Point tie” and take the witness 
stand agaiasi him that he was open 
to a proposed agreement that bore 
a close resemblance to an offer 
made by CBS a year ago. 

A proposal in February 1984, 
nine months before the trial began, 
said, as did last week's joint state- 
ment, that both sides believed their 
positions had been “placed before 
the public," that the television net- 
work recognized General West- 
moreland's service to his country, 
and the general respected the rights 
of journalists to present views 
“contrary to his own ” 

General Westmoreland's suit 
arose from a 19S2 CBS documenta- 
ry. “The Uncounted Enemy: A 
Vietnam Deception.'' It charged a 
conspiracy by the general's com- 
mand in 1967 to show progress in 
the war by underestimating enemy 
strength. 

The 1984 statement said that 
General Westmoreland “believes 
that the broadcast was prejudicial 
in concept and execution.” The 
agreement reached last week does 
noL The 1984 proposal said that 
CBS News “stands by the accuracy 
and fairness of its broadcast” In 
the final agreement, this language 
was reserved for a separate state- 
ment by CBS. 

Although the settlement seemed 
sudden, there lies behind it a three- 
year-old story of failed efforts to 


resolve u case (hat eventually re- 
quired 18 weeks of trial and cost 
ihe litigants millions of dollars. 

On Monday, when the cod came. 
both sides laid claim to victory, but 
while CBS officials and their law- 


camp was bitterly divided over 
whether the general could have ob- 
tained a better outcome — cither 
earlier from CBS. or, later, from the 

CBS stressed that General West- 
moreland had received neither 
money nor an apology and that the 
network stood by its documentary. 

The general, who commanded 
the US. forces in Vietnam from 
1964 to 1968, underscored a pas- 
sage in the joint statement that said 
the network respected his “long 
and faithful service to his country 
and never intended to assert, and 
does not believe,” that he “was un- 
patriotic or disloyal in performing 
his duties as he saw them.” 

“If that statement had been 
made after the CBS program was 
aired, it would have satisfied me," 
the 70-year-old general declared at 
a press conference last Monday, 
standing beside Dan M. Burl, Ins 
chief attorney. Indeed. General 
Westmoreland said, had that state- 
ment been issued at any lime since 
the broadcast on Jan. 23, 1982. “it 
would have ended the episode.” 

To prevail in his suit, the general 
had to prove not only that the 
broadcast was false but also that 
CBS knew it was false or acted with 
reckless disregard for its truth or 
falsity. The first issue was called 
the “truth” issue; the second, the 
“state of mind” issue. 

In recent weeks, as CBS put on a 
series of military witnesses, the 
general bad become overwhelming- 
ly concerned with losing on the 
“truth” issue. He worried that the 
jury would be unable to distinguish 
what had actually happened in 
Vietnam in 1967 from what some 
witnesses simply recalled they had 


cold CBS during the preparation of 

ihe program. 

“If the jury had found against 
Westmoreland on truth, 1 ' said Jay 
Schulman. a political scientist who 
was one of Mr. Bun’s closest advis- 
ers on the case, “the trauma of 
defeat would have been too much. 
That was the Tulcrum concern.” 

Mr. Schulman said that General 
Westmoreland was “running pro- 
foundly scared” of the testimony 
for CBS this month by his former 
aides, not so much because of what 
they would leQ the jury but because 
their very appearance on the wit- 
ness stand undermined him. 

General Westmoreland's former 
intelligence chief. Major General 
Joseph A. McChristian, testified 
Feb. 6 that General Westmoreland 
had acted improperly and for “po- 
litical” reasons on one occasion. 

“It was a perplexing thing to me 
to see someone like McChristian 
testifying.” General Westmoreland 
acknowledged last week. He told 
friends that the trial had come to 
“look tike a no-win situation.” 

Both General Westmoreland 
and General McChristian are re- 
tired from the military. 

Mr. Burt, who is president of the 
conservative. Washington-based 
Capital Legal Foundation, which 
supported tnc general's suit, shared 
his client's growing pessimism and 
was under other pressures as well. 
Having spent more than S3 million, 
he was $500,000 in debt on the 
case. Each day. his expenses 
mounted. 

Meanwhile, CBS had become in- 
creasingly confident of winning; the 
“state of mind" element of a jury 
verdict, making it impossible for 
General Westmoreland to receive 
an award. 

But lawyers for the network were 
concerned about the public rela- 
tions impact of losing on the 
“truth” issue — as Tune magazine 
had suffered from the loss on that 
issue in the libel suit brought by 
former Defense Minister Ariel 
Sharon of Israel 


“If Westmoreland was ready to 
drop the suit on the right terms, it 
was in some ways better than win- 
ning a jury verdict,” said a CBS 
lawyer who asked notto be identi- 
fied. “Westmoreland could always 
attack a verdict that went against 
him. This, he couldn't. Besides. 
CBS simply had to respond to his 
offer. Il couldn't be seen as trying 
to pursue an old man and drive a 
stake in his heart." 

Following a controversy over 
“The Uncounted Enemy” in the 
months after its broadcast, CBS 
proposed airing a 45-minute fol- 
low-up discussion program, with 
an additional 15 minutes for Gen- 
era! Westmoreland to state his 
views. The general, however, de- 
manded a published apology, a 
“full retraction” on the air that met 
his approval and “was not less than 
45 minutes in duration,” and some 
payment. 

He also sought access lo a CBS 
internal investigation of “The Un- 
counted Enemy” conducted by a 
senior producer. Burton Benjamin. 
The report criticized some aspects 
or the documentary’s preparation. 

On Sept. 13, 1 98l General West- 
moreland, who lives in South Caro- 
lina. filed suit there. “There is no 
way left." he said, “for me to clear 
my name, my honor and the honor 
of the military ” 

In addition to CBS, the suit 
named George Crile. the producer 
of the documentary; Mike Wallace, 
its narrator, and Samuel A Adams, 
a former Central Intelligence 
Agency analyst who was a paid 
consultant Tor the broadcast 

The first overtures toward settle- 
ment were made in October 1982, 
when CBS asked its local counsel in 
South Carolina to talk the matter 
over with a nephew of General 
Westmoreland’s who is a lawyer. 
The talks got nowhere, although 
they were briefly resumed when, m 
November 1982, CBS won a mo- 
tion to move the case from South 
Carolina to New York. 

Around the same lime, Paul 


Thompson, a retired general who 
had been an editor at Reader’s Di- 
gest. tried to mediate for General 
Westmoreland. As a result of Mr. 
Thompson's intervention, Mr. Butt 

said, he met in November 1982 
with George Vradenburg 3d. CBS’s 
general counsel 

“I said, “Give us an apology and 
lots of money' — lots of money 
being only a negotiating ploy,” Mr. 
Burt recalled. “Vradenburg said 
no.” 

Frank Stanton, a former CBS 
president, also tried to arrange a 
settlement. But wben General 
Westmoreland insisted on on apol- 
ogy. a monetary payment and free 
air time, without a rebuttal by CBS. 
the network concluded that a mid- 
dle ground could not be found. ‘ 

Another attempt to settle the 
case was made in the fall of 1982. 
General Maxwell D. Taylor, who is 
also retired, was approached by 
Roswell L Gflpatric, a CBS board 
member. Mr. Gilpatric proposed a 
half hour of air lime for General 
Westmoreland, coupled with a 
statement by CBS that it never in- 
tended to impugn the general's pa- 
triotism. The offer was rejected. 

In the spring of 1983, the judge 
in the case, Pierre N. Leval, ap- 
proved Mr. Bun’s motion to force 
CBS to release the Benjamin re- 
port. Just before that approval, the 
chief lawyer for the network on the 
case, David Boies, let Mr. Bun 
know that CBS would never settle 
at a point when something embar- 
rassing to it had just occurred. 

In February 1984, in an exten- 
sion of Mr. Giipatric's effort, CBS 
proposed making a statement in 
which it said that it continued to 
stand by the “accuracy and fair- 
ness” of the documentary but did 
not intend to question either the 
genera/’s patriotism or his “loyalty 
to this country or to the presidents 
he served for so many years.” 

The statement contained some 
language and ideas that were nearly 
identical to the joint statement 


Cypriot Leader Rejects Assembly’s Demand to Accept UN Pact 


By Henry 

New York Tu 


y Kamm 

Imes Service 


prepared by the UN secretary-gen- 


eral Javier Pferez de Cuellar. This issued Saturday, the president ac- voted in party blocs. 


and angry statement position. All were present, and all sume he acted because he felt un- 


NICOSIA — President Spyros would reverse Mr. Kyprianou's re- cused the extreme left and right of Mr. Kyprianou's Democratic 
Kyprianou of Cyprus has rejected a jection of the document last month, collusion against Ins centrist lead- Party holds 9 seals, the Commu- 
demand by parliament that he ri- when he met in New York with ership and of trying “a political nists 12, the Democratic Rally II 
ther accept a United Nations-spon- Rauf Denktash, leader of the Turk- coup.” . and the Socialists 3. Both Commu- 


demand by parliament that he ri- when he met in New York with ership and of trying “a political nists 12, the Democratic Rally II 
ther accept a United Nations-spon- Rauf Denktash, leader of the Turk- coup.” . and the Socialists 3. Both Cominu- _ 

sored draft agreement with Turkish ish Cypriots, and the secretary-gen- But Mr. Kyprianou said he rec- nists and conservatives have affili- his conservative party. 

Cypriots or order new presidential eraL ognized that the parliamentary ac- ated labor unions and have a histo- 

d colons. The resolution demanded that if tion created a crisis that obliged ry of calling on them for political 

In parliament Friday, the tyro Mr. Kyprianou refused to accept him to make derisions, which he ends, 

leading parties, the conservative the agr eement, he must call new did not specify. He said he would 

Democratic Rally and tbe Commo- pr esidential elections. Under the announce them next week, 
nists, combined to censure Mr. Ky- constitution, the president is elect- Cypriots and diplomats said the 


easy in this marriage of conve- 
nience and hoped, with his move 
and with successful negotiations 
with Mr. Denktash, to gain the 
backing of Glafkos CLendes and 


nists, combined to censure Mr. Ky- constitution, the pres 
prianou by a vote of 23-12. ed for a five-year t 

They demanded that tbe presi- tenure is not affect! 
dent accept the draft agreement for mentary votes. Mr. 
a settlement of rite Cyprus dispute term runs until .1988. 


Mr. Kyprianou was elected with 
the support of the Communists, 


But the two principal parties sur- 
prised Mr. Kyprianou with their 
harsh criticism of his performance 
in New York. U is assumed in Cy- 
prus that the faflnre of the talks was 


ed for a five-year term, and his conflict could render Cyprus ungo- 
tenure is not affected by pariia- veritable. In tbe roll-call voting Fri- 
mentary votes. Mr. Kyprianou's day on four motions, none of the 35 


Cypriots and diplomats said the who are close to the Soviet Union, caused by. the two leaders' different 


He renounced their support in De- conceptions of the nature of the 
c ember, before the New York meeting, which followed separate 











meeting. 


ng*Q nations conducted by Mr. P6- 


members deviated from his party's Political analysts say they as- rez de Cufellar with each of them. 


Principal figures in tbe 
CBS libel case were: 
Clockwise from left, above, 
Mike Wallace, George 
Crile, Samuel A. Adams, 
General William C West- 
moreland, retired, and Ma- 
jor General Joseph A. 
McChristian, retired. 


agreed upon last week, but it was 
rejected. Mr. Burt according to 
CBS legal sources, objected at that 
time to any reference by CBS that it 
supported the broadcast 

In the summer of 1984. Judge 
Leval appointed a mediator, Ste- 
phen E Kaufman, to uy to pro- 
duce a settlement that might in- 
clude a broadcast on CBS by 
General Westmoreland that would 
not be immediately rebutted by the 
network. 

CBS and the general are believed 
to have been receptive to the idea of 
the program, but Mr. Burl contin- 
ued to press for an apology and 
money. 

Just before the trial started on 
Oct 9 — and again in late Novem- 
ber, when Mr. Bun was saying pub- 
licly that a settlement was less like- 
ly than “a bear coming down Fifth 
Avenue in a pink tutu with a 
reefer” — he and CBS exchanged 
proposals for resolving the case. 

The network's statement again 
contained references to the gener- 
al's loyalty, and CBS indicated that 
it might pay S 500,000 toward Mr. 
Burt’s legal fees. But Mr. Burt was 
said to have demanded a seven- 
figure sum, perhaps as much as $5 

million. 

“The insurmountable thin g was 
a retraction or apology,” a CBS 
lawyer said. “Money was never an 
issue with either side except as a 
symbol" 

Before the Christmas recess, Mr. 
Burt and Mr. Boies met in a jury 
room. Few the Fust time. Mr. Burt 
said he was prepared to settle with- 
out money. 

He wanted CBS to say it had 
learned as a result of the case that 
Genera] Westmoreland had “hon- 
estly and accurately” reported ene- 
my troop strength m 1967 and, had 



ry. %v» • s • * 

"•a*** -■«. 


this information been available in 
1982. it would have been included 
in the broadcast. CBS refused. 

Last week, with CBS buoyed by 
its prospects on the “state of mind” 
if not the “truth” issue. Judge Leva! 
informed the lawyers that Mr. Bun 
would have to prove his case by 
“clear and convincing” evidence, 
rather than tbe lesser standard of a 
“preponderance" of the evidence. 
In addition, he said, the jury would 
vote individually on “truth” and 
“state of mind.” 

“Even if we lost on the truth 
issue.” a CBS lawyer speculated, 
“the headline on the day of the 
verdict would read: ‘CBS' Wins.’ ” 
Still, the lawyer said. Mr. Boies told 
Mr. Burt that be was amenable to 
waiving a jury verdict and letting 
the judge deride tbe case. Mr. Burt 
declined. 

On Feb. 13, soon after General 
McChristian’s testimony and im- 
mediately following the start of the 
cross-examination of another for- 
mer Westmoreland aide. Colonel 
Gains Hawkins, Mr. Burt called 
Mr. Vradenburg. 

When they met on Feb. 15, Mr. 
Burt told the CBS counsel that he 
was still interested in settling. He 
sent tbe CBS lawyer a suggested 
joint statement that resembled his 
proposal just before Christmas. He 
also promised, in effect, not to re- 
vive his pretrial attacks on' CBS' 
regarding the documentary. Mr. 


- * 


f' . , .*V f *sr. 

W-' 


► 

■ ■ /" 
C V 


Hr 


■1 


• •• 





Vradenburg consulted Mr. Boies 
and on Fefi. 16 called Mr. Burl. 

According to Mr. Burt, Mr.. 
Vrandenbutg said. “You know, we 
aren't that far apart." But the CBS 
lawyer is said to have told Mr. Burt 
that his proposal was unacceptable. 
Mr. Vradenburg went back to the 
statement CBS had offered in Feb- 
ruary 1984. modified it so that the' 
phrase about CBS standing by the- 
documentary would appear only in 
a separate statement by the net- 
work, and sent a copy to Mr. Burt,' 
according to a CBS lawyer. 

On Feb. 17, after some changes; 
— the word “faithful” was inserted 1 
to describe General Westmore-' 
land's service to his country and the 
word “distinguished" was used to 
describe CBS's journalistic tradi- 
tion — senior CBS officials saw the 
joint statement at Mr. Boies’s law 
office. They were jubilant. 

General Westmoreland, who was 
aware that an agreement was under, 
discussion, was in Garrison, New' 
York, on Feb. 16. Mr. Burt read 
him the joint statement by phone. 

“1 listened to il and 1 thought iT 
made sense,” the general said. “J 
know the historians, can deal with a ' 
case like this but a jury — well it. 
could have been happenstance; a 
flip of the coin. I had to deride- 
whether to fight or compromise. 
Now, I've made a lot of decisions in - 
my life. You weigh theta You 
make them. And you forget them." 1 




The Mitsui Group sponsors 
“Close-up of Japan LONDON 1985” 


Nowrurning to standng ovations 


Earlier this month. The Mitsui 
Group brought “Close-up” to 
London with the goal of bringing 
people closer together. 

And it has, in more ways than one. 
Huge crowds have been attracted 
to its first two events. And have come 
away with a better understanding 
of Japan. 

Like the “Close-up” in San 
Francisco in 1983, the London 
programme presents some of Japan’s 
finest contemporary culture. 

This year, for example, Seiji Ozawa 
and The New Japan Philharmonic 
returned to London after an absence 
of ten years. 

Between the Philharmonic’s 
performances of Beethoven and 
Tchaikovsky, the audience was 
presented with a rare performance 
of Torn Takemitsu’s <e November 


Steps” — a double concerto with 
the Orchestra and two traditional 
Japanese instruments, the Brno and 
ShakuhachL 

Ozawa also treated the crowd to 
classical Japanese pieces played on 
these instruments, enthralling both 
audience and critics alike. 

Also featured in this year’s 
“Close-up” were two performances 
of Japan New Music Forum. These 
events introduced the work of two 
contemporary Japanese composers, 
Jo Kondo and Somei Sato, in concert 
performances by Music Projects/ 
London. A true East/West venture 
in the arena of avant-garde music. 

The remaining two events on the 
programme are UK premieres and 
promise to be just as exciting. Don’t 
miss this opportunity of taking a 
closer look at Japan! 


Issey Miyake: BODYWORKS 

FASHION WITHOUT TABOOS 

27 February — 9 April 

IQOO am. — 5:30 pm. (weekdays), at The 

Boilerhouse, Victoria & Albert Museum 

Issey Miyake, Japan's top international 
designer, is well-known for his translation of 
Western styles into uniquely Japanese creations. 

In "BODYWORKS” — a radical expression 
of the grace and beauty of the human body — 
numerous mannequins 
clothed in Issey's original 
costumes will be sus- 
pended from the ceiling 
of The Boilerhouse, 
illuminated by spatial 
lighting, and brought 
alive by sound effects. 

Admission is free. 

Closed on Fridays. 

For information on the 
exhibition, telephone 
The Boilerhouse 
Project, 01-581-5273. 

Photo by Mitsumasa Fujitsuka 



Tadashi Suzuki and SCOT 
(Waseda Sho-Gekijo): THE 
TROJAN WOMEN 

10 April, 7.-00 pjn, and 11 — 14 April, 

&00 p.nu at Riverside Studios 

The celebrated 
Japanese Director, 

Tadashi Suzuki, brings 
his highly acclaimed 
production of Euripides' 

“The Trojan Women” to 
the U-K. for the first time. 

The production cross 
breeds the classical 
Japanese theatrical forms 
of Kabuki and Noh with 
Greek tragedy. It was 
presented in Paris in 1977 
at the invitation of 
Jean-Louis Barrault and 
in 1984 at the Los Angeles Olympics Art 
Festival to wide critical acclaim. 

For information on ticket prices and availability, 
telephone the Riverside Studios, 01-741-2131. 


<=>MITSUI & CO.. LTD. 

Traders to the Worid. 

Temple Court, 11 Queen Victoria Street, London EC4N 4SB 
Tel: 01-6001777 Cable: Mitsui London EC4 Telex: 885531 





Pape 6 


MONDAY. FEBRUARY 25, 1985 


HfraUQKSribunc 

The Name Is 'Star Wars’ 


sSsaasaLwa 

M^hLS"® 1 -! 112 ? Phra * would it b2k 
because it gives a false impression of 

SSJfJ * rc ^“8 a bouL M The adminiv 

^ ^ search for a name 
iESJ *?S“ ^radical weapons program 
^table. The problem with “star wam,”how- 
eva; u not semantic. It is conceptual 
- ‘J* Presidoii and his aides have been seD- 
starwars on four different, incompatible 
grouods: ( 1 ) it is the only moral defense in the 

® II “ °^y research for our 
grandchildren. (3) It will soon be useful in- 
deed indispensable, even if imperfect (4) It is a 
proven stimulus to arms control. 

AH four arguments fail even the moral one, 
oe«usea “star wars" defense becomes moral 

°oly when it becomes practical. Yet merely 
pursuing it looks to be highly 
The moral w ay to prevent nuclear war. 

Mr. Reagan offered one noble rationale 
when he sprang “star wars” in March 1983. He 
said be wanted to rise above the ugly reality of 
defending the United States by threatening the 
existence of all life on Earth. He was therefore 
ordering the preparation of a foreseeable mis- 
sile defense that would make America and its 
allies invulnerable, eventually rendering all 
nuclear weapons useless and dispensable. 

Mr. Reagan saw even then that any defense, 
if paired with an offense, would be highly 
provocative to the Soviet Union, leaving it 
alone in danger of devastation. But Americans 
are not aggressive, he said. Besides, once the 
defease is completed, in 20 or 30 years, Ameri- 
ca would probably offer it to the Russians if 
they agreed to scrap most nuclear weapons. 

When the experts caught their breath, they 
proved even to the Pentagon’s satisfaction that 
a leakproof, Berlin-to-T okyo, all-cities defense 
is impossible. Even if it became possible one 
day, it would be so horrendously expensive 
that the Russians could easily damage., destroy 
or elude the defense at a fraction of the cost 
Don't get excited, it's just research. 

So the Reagan loyalists who found it impos- 
sible to support the vision of an all-cities 
defense retreated to a new line. They concede 
that it is a pipe dream to think that there 
will ever be a better defense for New York 
than the certain threat of destroying Moscow, 
and vice versa. And they are satisfied that this 
certainty will last into their grandchildren’s 
lifetimes. But what is wrong, they ask. with a 
lively search for alternatives? 

There is nothing wrong with modest re- 
search that can discourage the Russians from 
one day finding profit in renouncing the treaty 
against missile defense; indeed, the treaty en- 
visions such research. But no program pro- 
claimed with trumpets from the Oral Office, 
described as vital and funded with an initial 
budget of S30 billion, will be “research” in 
Soviet eyes. The mere pursuit of such vigorous 
planning and noting has to make (he Kremlin 
fear a defense that might actually withstand 
a small attack. The pursuit of this research. 
In short, would provoke the Russians to pur- 
sue their own provocative defense and to rap- 
idly expand their offense to guarantee penetra- 
tion of any American shield! 


WeU, not just research; we do need it now. 

Notjust research is what another wing of the 
administration argues. These officials do not 
doubt that deterrence works, either. In fact 
they say they need “star wars” to preserve 
deterrence. What if the Russians keep building 
those big and accurate missiles, they ask, one 
day gaining the capacity to use only some of 
their missiles to knock out all U.S. land mis- 
siles and command centos in a single attack? 

America would still have all its missile sub- 
marines, but they are hard to communicate 
with, it is said. There are bombers and cruise 
missiles galore, but they are slow and most 
effective against cities. No Russian leader 
would be crazy enough to order such a surprise 
attack, these strategists concede, but a Soviet 
leader might threaten one as a way of trying to 
exact impossible demands. A wabbly future 
president might capitulate to the blackmail 
believing that his only alternative was to attack 
Moscow — thus also dooming New York. 

Thai is the farfetched and unexamined the- 
ory that seems to be really driving “star wars.” 
It is the old, discredited “window of vulnera- 
bility” argument. “Star wars” is at best a 
scheme to defend land missiles, not people. It 
may also be an unadmitted scheme to make 
America the one that can threaten a surprise 
attack and benefit from “nuclear blackmail." 

WelL what is wrong with that? One thing 
wrong is the calculation that the Russians 
could not keep up with America's defense 
technology. They surely would, at all costs, 
and would also build a sore-to-overwhelm of- 
fense. And that would drive America into an 
even more panicky weapons buildup. 

Some defease can conceivably bolster deter- 
rence, but only after offenses are shrunken and 
frozen. And that requires coordinating with 
the Russians at the outset, not after they start 
building their own “star wars.” Meanwhile, 
there are vastly cheaper and less provocative 
ways to allay anxiety about vulnerable land 
missiles. Their warheads could be dispersed 
among more launchers, and launchers could 
be made mobile, impossible to find. 

Ok, really, it's just a bargaining chip after alL 

When the practical arguments start sound- 
ing overwhelming, the entire Reagan team 
reunites on a fourth justification: arms con- 
trol. Americans may be unimpressed but the 
Russians are mightily impressed. Why else did 
the y come back to the bargaining table? Why 
else do they insist that “star wars” be included 
in the talks that resume next month? 

If that is a serious question, there is a deadly 
serious answer. The Russians are indeed 
alarmed at being forced into a ruinously ex- 
pensive new arms competition that they know 
will leave neither side safer and probably make 
the world riskier. They are scared of “star 
wars” for the same reasons that Americans 
should be. They must be desperate to learn 
whether it can be stopped at a tolerable price. 

Can it? Mr. Reagan says no. “star wars” is 
not negotiable. He is committed, no mailer 
whaL But if it is unable to defend cities, 
unneeded for defending missiles, too grandi- 
ose to be just research and not a bargaining 
chip, wfaal is it? Whatever he may call it. it is 
still “star wars” — the most farfetched, least 
considered venture of the nuclear age. 

— THE HEW YORK TIMES. 


Imperial and Bellicose 


The imperial presidency is back. President 
Reagan will agree to live with a troublesome 
Nicaragua only if its leftist rulers will surren- 
der. If they do not, he wants a U.S.-backed 
proxy army to overthrow them. If Congress 
has passed laws that bar ibis, it is badly in- 
formed and those laws are only “proposals.” 
One thing to be said for Mr. Reagan's blunt 
words is that it is good to be done with the 
administration's palaver about supporting the 
Contadora compromise, whereby Nicaragua 
could live in peace if it bars foreign bases, 
weapons and advisers. Likewise abandoned is 
the pretense that Nicaragua’s principal vice is 
simiwHn^ comradely arms to Salvadoran 
gumSlas At his news conference on Thursday 
the president disposed of all this foliage by not 
even referring to it Asked if he was calling for 
the overthrow of the Sandinists, he could hard- 
ly have bent more blunt: “Not if the present 
government would turn around and say — all 
right — if they’d say ‘unde.’ ” 

As remarkable as his threat was Mr. Rea- 
gan's justification for iL He castigated Nicara- 
gua for its lack of freedoms, its betrayal of 
democratic promises made in 1979 to the Or- 
ganization of American States. All that is de- 
plorable, but does not threaten U.S. security. 
Yet Mr. Reagan claims a license under the 
OAS charter to do exactly wfaal that treaty 
forbids — to use force or the threat of force 
until a sovereign neighbor “says ‘uncle.’ ” 


The bellicose message is aimed at Congress, 
which voted last year to end CIA funding of 
the “contra” war against Ni c a ra g u a. He im- 
plies that legislators who oppose funding are 
misguided or craven. But it is not craven to 
bold the United States to the same standards 
by whieh it judges Soviet misdeeds. It is not 
misguided to wonder why 15,000 rebels have 
so failed to win support within Nicaragua. In 
four years they have not won and held a single 
town or even unified their command. 

There is no way to reconcile these failures 
with Mr. Reagan's portrayal of a country sub- 
dued by alien invaders — as if Nicaragua were 
Afghanistan. Nor do they square with Secre- 
tary of Slate George Shultz's dramatic asser- 
tion that Nicaragua is behind the Iron Curtain. 
What bolds the Soviet empire together is the 
Red Army, enforcer of the Brezhnev Doctrine. 
Say what you will about the Sandinists, it is 
not the Red Array that keeps them in power. 

The Reagan administration deals with these 
awkward questions by flourishing the presi- 
dent’s electoral mandate as if it were a magic 
cloak. But his is not the only mandate. Ameri- 
cans still elect a Congress, loo, and the one 
they elected in November is not much differ- 
ent from its predecessor. The 98th Congress 
said stop, and the 99th is very likely to reaffirm 
that “proposal.” What is unclear is whether the 
president will finally pay attention. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


FROM OUR FEB. 25 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Dalai Lama Flees die Chinese 
CALCUTTA — After fleeing from Lhasa, the 
Dalai Lama travelled night and day, with the 
Chinese in pursuit. At one of the various 
narrow bridges which had to be crossed, the 

Dalai Lama left his escort engaging the pursu- 
ers, and he was thus enabled to gam urns. He 
was followed as far as the borders of Sikkim. It 
is stated that he intends seeking an interview 
with Lord Minto. Two Tibetan envoys are 
here. They state that 2,000 Chinese have at- 
tacked the monasteries and killed many lamas 
in eastern Tibet The envoys have cabled to the 
Emperor of China begging him to remora thar 
grievances, but have received no reply. The 
object of their visit here is to call me attamon 
of the Indian Government to the intrusion, m 
the hope that Great Britain and India will 

request China to cease her operations. 


1985: Paraguay Leaves the League 
GENEVA — A telegram announcing Para- 
guay's withdrawal from the League of Nations 
arrived here today [Feb. 24], creating a crisis 
which may destroy Geneva’s prestige in the 
Americas and reduce the League to a Europe- 
an institution. Recommendations to end the 
Gran Chaco War with Bolivia were adopted 
here last November, and with the expiration 
today of the three-month grace, [economic] 
sanctions should operate automatically 
against Paraguay, the recalcitrant member, 
since Bolivia accepted the League report. The 
League’s impotence is emphasized by little 
Paraguay. According to economic and finan- 
cial studies of the League secretariat, it could 
not prolong a war 48 hours if the members 
took the Covenant seriously and Washington 
collaborated in economic pressure. 


INTERNATIONAL herald tribune 

JOHN HA Y WHITNEY. Chairma n 1958-1982 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


PHILIP M-FOISIE 
WALTER WELLS 
ROBERT K- McCABE 
SAMUEL ABT 

carlgewirtz 


LEE W. HUEBNER, Pubtiihcr 

Exeaane Editor REN£ BONDY Dandy PMsher 

Editor ALAIN LECOUR Assadaie PMahtr 

Deputy Editor RICHARD H. MORGAN Aaoaote PMska 

Deputy Editor STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Dotaer of Opemdaa 

Associate Editor FRANCOIS DESMA1SONS Director of Omdanvt 

ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Ihrravr of Adrertisms Sates 


ROLF D. KRANEPUHL Direaor of Advertising Sates 

r .muiifflial Herald Tribune. 181 Avenue Chari cs-de-Gaufle, 92200 NoiiBy-sur-Srinc, 
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uTToStai de 1.200.000 F. KS Noam B 7 32021126. Commission Paritoirc N* 61337. 


TheSDI 

Means 

Trouble 

By Stanley Hoffmann 

C AMBRIDGE. Massachusetts — 
Rarely has an American strate- 
gic revolution been initiated in cir- 
cumstances as likely to lead to enor- 
mous difficulties with the public, the 
Soviet Union and the allies as “star 
wars” — President Reagan's Strate- 
gic Defense Initiative. 

For the public, the main attraction, 
longingly described by the president, 
is the. eventual return to America's 
historical invulnerability: the protec- 
tion of cities from sudden devasta- 
tion. But most experts believe that 
such defense is extremely distant and 
doomed to imperfection. They per- 
ceive the SD1 mainly as a way to 
protect land-based missiles. 

Once the public realizes this, will it 
be willing to pay the enormous cost 
of a dubious program aimed at safe- 
guarding vulnerable missiles at a time 
when less vulnerable weapons like 
the Trident-2 submarine can perform 
exactly the same military functions? 
Especially if the Russians build de- 
fenses to protect the very targets that 
U.S. missiles are aimed at? 

As for the Soviet Union, some 
American officials appear to believe 
that it cannot compete in the buildup 
of effective defenses. Thus, America’s 
search for nuclear superiority would 
finally succeed and would restore the 
earlier U.S. ability to compensate for 
Soviet superiority in conventional 
warfare. The United Stales could 
thus prevent aggression against its 
allies by its ability to strike Soviet 
military targets while protecting U.S. 
missiles from a first strike or retalia- 
tion. But bow often in the past has 


TH E Hi$r#Y of THE- 
A 

pepucTijN A o-i 

W5 4 Ft 



commission pointed out. the Rus- 
sians have no incentive to try. given 
the size and capability of the arsenal 
with which America could retaliate. 

America's allies do not see what 
advantage they could derive from a 
situation in which the Russians, fol- 
lowing the U.S. example, would build 
defenses to protect land-based mis- 
siles and other military targets: The 
Russians would no longer have much 
to fear from the Atlantic alliance's 
threat of first use of nuclear weapons 
in case of a conventional attack. 

The allies thus see in the SDI one 
more bole in the American nuclear 
umbrella. The superpowers’ success 
in making their nuclear forces invul- 


nerable would increase the chances of 
a conventional war breaking out and 
destroying Europe. Much of the de- 
terrent power of the French and Brit- 
ish nuclear forces, which are current- 
ly undergoing costly expansion de- 
signed to enable them to to strike 
Soviet military targets, would be losL 

As each superpower continued to 
seek ways to make the other's nuclear 
forces vulnerable. Europe would look 
with dismay at the destruction of 
arms control possibilities, the result- 
ing political tensions between the su- 
perpowers and the hardening of the 
division of Europe that would follow. 

Today a strange diplomatic minuet 
is being danced- Washington tells the 


allies that “star wars" is just a re- 
search program to which they obvi- 
ously cannot object. Some officials in 
the Reagan administration also tell 
that allies the SD! has been a bar- 
gaining chip primarily used to get 
Moscow back to offensive- weapons 
negotiations. What will happen when 
the allies discover ihaL as Mr. Rea- 
gan insists, this is not a bargaining 
chip? They will feel swindled. Wash- 
ington will tell them that, after all 
they did not oppose “star wars” and 
it is too late for recriminations. 

A perfect defense that renders nu- 
clear weapons obsolete and replaces a 
strategy that relies on the threat of 
mass destruction is a noble dream. 


But. in the foreseeable future, defen- 
sive buildups would at best only sup- 
plement deterrence; far from contrib- 
uting to its stability, they would make 
it even more uncertain than has the 
recent development of offensive tech- 
nologies by both sides. The line be- 
tween deterrence and provocation 
would be even more blurred. The 
spiral of insanity driven by a combi- 
nation of shortsighted military logic 
and political illusions would spin 
more giddily than ever. 

The writer is chairman of the Cen- 
ter for European Studies at Harvard 
University. He contributed this com- 
ment to The New York Times. 


lion. But bow often in me past has 
Washington been mistaken about the 
Soviet Union's ability to catch up? 
Other officials believe that Mos- 


cow will follow America's lead to- 
ward ballistic-missile defenses and 
that the two rides should thus eventu- 
ally be able to reach an agreement on 
reducing offensive nuclear weapons. 
In the meantime, the buildup of de- 
fenses. they say, will contribute to 
stability by reducing each ride's in- 
centive to try to strike the other's 
forces. Buf tins is a pipe dream. 

Just as America has developed new 
weapons aimed at penetrating or 
overwhelming every defense the Rus- 
sians have devised, so the Russians 
are likely to concentrate on ways to 
keep U.S. nuclear forces vulnerable 
— by destroying defensive systems, 
by multiplying warheads on their 
missiles or by relying increasingly on 
cruise rather than ballistic missiles. 

Hie Russians, who see the Ameri- 
cans adding a defense against ballis- 
tic missil es to an enormous offensive 
program that will soon render vulner- 
able their land-based missiles — the 
bulk of their nuclear forces — are_ 
unlikely to consent to a drastic reduc- 
tion of offensive weapons unless the 
United States agrees to scrap or dras- 
tically constrain its defensive pro- 
gram. Since the Soviet arsenal de- 
pends more heavily on land-based 
missiles than America's does, a major 
effort to restore the invulnerability of 
that arsenal through defenses would 
predictably provoke an American 
counter-effort to render the shield 
and arsenal impotent through new 
offensive- weapons developments. 

This then is a recipe not for arms 
control but for endless escalation of 
the arms race. All of this to make it 
more difficult for Moscow to destroy 
American land-based missiles! To do 
something that, as the Scowcroft 


1 © Be 
CofriUiUED.. 


* «/*//<•■ W A«asm AMW < /he - 1 


Look Inside , Look Outside: Nuclear Winter Is Here 


C AMBRIDGE Massacbusetu — There have 
been a number of films in the last two years — 
such as “The Day After,” Testament,” “The 
Road Warrior” and “Threads” — that confront 
die threat of nuclear war by providing visions of 
life after ibe weapons have been detonated. But it 
occurred to me while watching “Repo Man” (the 
title refers to the employees of a fraudulent compa- 
ny that “repossesses” cars) that we live in a post- 
nuclear world even though the bombs have not 
gone off. Nuclear weapons are already taking a 
moral, spiritual, psychological and physical lolL 
In the film, the character of J. Frank Parnell, a 
middle-aged scientist, is first seen mysteriously 
driving a 1964 Chevrolet across the southwestern 
American countryside. In. the car trunk are four 
dead extraterrestrial aliens whose matter is capable 
of disintegrating — in a blast of heat and radiation 
— anyone wbo opens the 1 id. The driver weaves 
along the highway, sweating and drained, as the 
heat from the trunk penetrates the car. 

Parnell tells Otto, the troubled young punkish 
hero of the film, in anguished tones that Ms mind is 
eroding. He reveals that he has worked on design- 
ing the neutron bomb, which drove him mad, after 
which his project was canceled and be was loboto- 
mized. The neutron bomb, Parnell says, destroys 
people and leaves buildings standing “Fits in a 
suitcase. No one knows it's there until blammo! 
Eyes melt, skin explodes. Everyone dead. It’s so 
immoral, working on the thing can drive you 
mad.” As Parnell deteriorates further mentally, the 
heat from the aliens in the trunk exhausts his body 
until finally he dies. discarded on a bench. 

The movie is set in the post-industrial ruins of 
downtown Los Angeles amid uncollected garbage, 
streets littered with trash and debris, deteriorating 
buildings and discarded appliances and industrial 


By John E. Mack 

equipment. Figures in white space suits, aseptically 
walled off from contamination, pick up the drunk 
and dead bodies that fall b the streets. 

The moral code of the Helping Hands Accept- 
ance Agency, the gang that “repossesses” cars, 
stealing them “from dhdos who don’t pay their 
bills,” parallels the ethic of the neutron bomb. Cars 
are not to be damaged but people die meaningless- 
ly. or are killed without a thought in order to 
obtain a profitable object. No one seems to care. 

“Not many people have a code anymore,” one of 
the repo men says. Kill or be killed is the d ominan t 
ethic. Middle-dass punks with Mohawk haircuts 
or shaved heads commit crimes for fun. Zombie- 
like cultists spout forth a variety of formulas for 
salvation in a world that is out of thdrctmtroL 

“Repo Man” depicts the physical and moral 
desecration that results from perpetually commit- 
ting the planet's resources to nuclear annihilation 
instead of to the benefit of mankind. 

There now seem to be post-nuclear war zones 
in New York, Los Angeles and other cities, as 
whole neighborhoods, sections of the nation that 
the new prosperity has passed by. disintegrate for 
lack of basic resources. The poor must do without 
adequate medical care, and infanL death rates rise 
as health centers dose and billions more are devot- 
ed to instruments of destruction. The increasing 
□umber of homeless in America's cities have be- 
come the refugees of a potential war for which 
society is mortgaging its humanity. 

In midtown New York recently, two single- 
room-occupancy hotels that formerly boused poor 
people were demolished without a city permit. The 
motive was reportedly to beat a legislative deadline 


that would have placed a moratorium on profitable 
luxury conversion of such properties. Since appar- 
ently no attempt was made to disconnect water 
and gas lines, much of the block — and the people 
b it — could have been blown away. 

As many American young people grow older. 


they become afraid that they may have nothing to 
look forward to. They are uncertain about making 
lasting commitments to a future that they doubt 
they will ever see. For one rock music group, the 
Sex Pistols, “no future.” a tine from one of their 
songs, became virtually a motto. 

when governments take the lead in planning the 
systematic murder of mill i ons of innocent people, 
all other destructive behavior may become permis- 
sible. The justification for this — the activity of 
another nuclear superpower — seems inadequate, 
especially as the proliferation of nuclear weapons 
does little to change what is deplored about the 
alien power’s system or intentions. 

The nuclear winter is already here; it is a cold 
winter of the souL The bombs have not gone off, 
but they are affecting our moral and spiritual lives. 

A f3m such as “Repo Man,” even if this is not its 
intention, reveals to us the degraded human land- 
scape surrounding us. It does not have to be this 
way. We can still become aware of the violence 
that we are inflicting on ourselves as we threaten to 
destroy our enemies and our planeL It is not too 
late to take responsibility rath the Soviet Union 
and other countries for the world that we are 
creating. Die risk or going on as we are is that the 
loss of caring may permit the last destructive acL 

The writer, a professor, is chairman of the 
executive committee of the department of psychia- 
try at Harvard University. He contribuled this 
comment to the Los Angeles Times. 


Kirkpatrick Did a Job, 
But Is It the Right One? 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


By Robert L. Schiffer 


N EW YORK — Whatever the 
ultimate judgment on Jeane J. 
Kirkpatrick's four years as chief 
American delegate to the United 
Nations, she has had more influ- 
ence on America's policies there 
than any of her 16 predecessors. 
She took* the job believing her as- 
signment was to protect and en- 
hance “the legitimate aspirations 
of the American people” in an or- 
ganization that, she felt, had begun 


bat have been clear and straight- 
forward. such as (hose concerning 
the Afghanistan issue and attempts 
to expel Israel from the United 
Nations. But she has been unchar- 
acteristically silent b situations 
such as the on- again, ofT-agam po- 
sitions that the United States has 
taken in connection with the Law 
of the Sea Treaty, and. most re- 
cently, b the withholding of a 
promised and badly needed con tri - 


Walters is known for skill in quiet diplomacy , 
and this may be a good time to give it a try. 


to treat America as “the bad guys.'* 
She leaves it convinced that where- 
as “four years ago, the United 
States was isolated and humilia- 
ted ... that is not easy anymore.” 

It is a concept of the job dm her 
successor. Lieutenant Geneneral 
Vernon A. Walters, promises to 
uphold, but is it a valid me? 

Is that why the United Slates 
spends more than a billion dollars 
a year at the United Nations? 

That is the way Dr. Kirkpatrick 
saw it. and, while she was more 
abrasive than need be at times, she 
made it unmistakably clear that the 
United States could no longer be 
taken Tot granted. 

But rhetoric can take you only so 
far. Few delegates. Dr. Kirkpatrick 
included, take a position on any* 
thing without instructions from 
home. What she has had to con- 
tend rath are the echoes of larger 
foreign policy disputes b which 
respect for the United States is not 
won or lost because a chief dele- 
gate delivers a hard-hitting speech. 
Her predecessors were no less vig- 
orous than she in defending U.S. 
interests, but they, even as she. had 
to cope with the fact that, from the 
1960s on. Washington did noL have 
the votes to call the tune. 

Dr. Kirkpatrick has been at her 
best when representing policies 


bution to the UN Fund for Popula- 
tion Activities because the Reagan 
administration was vexed by re- 
ports of abortions in China. 

Not only does this latter action 
undercut one of the more deserving 
United Nations programs, b fact 
for domestic political reasons; it 

will change no thing in China, while 
prolon ging the agony of starving 
Africa, where food and population 
are biertwbed. This is no way to 
win the respect that Dr. Kirkpat- 
rick has been working for. 

The United Nations is in many 
ways its own worst enemy, rath 
deliberative organs that are less 
and less usefuL But that is the fault, 
of its members, who worry more 
about using the United Nations to 
score propaganda victories than 
for solring the problems before it. 

Dr. Kirkpatrick met the Rus- 
sians and the Third World head on. 


Deterrence by Suitcase 

The technical implausibiliiy of 
President Reagan’s “star wars’’ de- 
fensive shield is not its main problem. 
The very idea is archaic. It assumes 
that missile-carried weapons are the 
principal nuclear threat. 

As Professor Lloyd S. Etheredgeof 
the Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology wrote in The New York Times 
on May 27, 1981. “the Russians al- 
ready have the capability to place 
nuclear warheads throughout the 
United Stales quietly, as we have to 
situate them throughout the Soviet 
Union.” Technology has led us past 
the age of thrown weapons lo planted 
weapons. The new threat is b the 
detonation of planted weapons small 
enough to fit into a suitcase. 

Given the paranoia that fuels both 
the Soviet and the American military 
planners, can we safely assume that 
the planting has not already been 
done? For 40 years the ruling military 
axiom has been, “If we can do it and 
they can do iL we’d better do tL since 
they probably have done it” 

Could the Russians penetrate 
America’s borders so easily? Mexican 
peasants cross those borders almost 
at rail — and return home for birth- 
days. Sophisticated superpowers can 
enter with at least equal ease. 

Security lies not in laser fantasies 
b space but in belatedly serious di- 
plomacy and arms control on Earth. 

DANIEL C. MAGUIRE. 

Milwaukee. 


General Wal- 


and she completed the agenda she 
drew up for herself. General Wal- 
lers is known for his skill m quiet 
diplomacy. This may be a good 
lime to give it a try. 

The writer served as an adrisa‘ to 
Kuri Wddheim, what Mr, Waldheim 
was secretary-general, and to two 
United States chief dekpaes to the 
United Nations. He contributed this 
comment to The New York Times. 


Responsibility in Manila 

Regarding “ Philippines Puts Blame 
on IMF' (Feb. 6) by Mark R. Thomp- 
son and Gregory W. Slayton; 

1 must object to the tide given our 
column as not only erroneous but in 
fact misleading. Our thesis was sim- 
ply that IMF leniency in both its 
programs and its review procedures, 
coupled with its unwillbgness to ad- 
dress critical structural barriers tritli- 
b the Philippine economy, renders 
the IMF far from blameless in the 
current Philippine economic crisis. 
This is especially Hue in light of the 
fact that the IMF has had aim os l 
continuous standby arrangements 
with the Philippines since 1961 

Nevertheless it is clear that the 
primary responsibility for the crisis 
rests squarely on the shoulders of the 


current Philippbe government. An 
attentive reading of our column re- 
veals this underlying assertion. That 
your title obscures this important 
point is a mild understatmem. 

GREGORY W. SLAYTON. 

New York. 

TTie Very Same Man? 

Regarding the report “ Graphic A mi ■ 
Abortion Film Touches off Controversy 
in U.S. ” (Feb. 1 1) by Ruth Marcus: 

We are told that the busy President 
Reagan finds time for generous and 
inspired compassion for the fetus 
who experiences “long and agonizing 
pain” during an abortion. This sym- 
pathetic president is so considerate as 
to make it his concern that even the 
unborn citizens of his country will be. 
safe within the wombs of their moth- 
ers. Could this be the very same man 
who makes it his business to build the 
most sophisticated weapons possible, 
designed solely to extinguish thou- 
sands of lives at once — adults, chil- 
dren and fetuses alike? 

TANYA TOMKINS. 

Amsterdam. 

As a university student b New 
England 1 was a part of Students 
Against Nudcar Energy I SANE). We 
found it impossible to lease a Canadi- 
an-made documentary depicting the 
realities of nuclear arms, energy and 
politics. The film received worldwide 
recognition for its excellence, but it 
was banned b the United States by. 
the Reagan administration. 

Now I read that President Reagan 
is all for an emotional documentary, 
which is to be widely distributed, 
condemning abortion rights. 

Isn't politics grand? 

ROBERT ZAKIN. 

Brussels, 

In Orbit or the Suburbs 

Regarding the feature article “ A 
Space-Age Building" (Jan. 28): 

I was disap pom ted by your review 
of the Intelsat Building b Washing- 
ton. Benjamin Foigey makes sound 
observations on the building’s disre- 
gard for its context and for pedestri- 
ans. He discusses the mistaken place- 
ment of its main entrance. Those 
observations are ignored when he 
concludes that the bunding is a suc- 
cess because of its technological in- 


novativeness and energy-saving fea- 
tures. Such is the American worship 
of technology that we can forgive 
almost any sin if there is a new set of 
buttons or gizmos to distract us. 

i am very skeptical of the elaborate 
window shading devices. How will 


they appear in a few years, rusted and 
corroded? And what about the build- 
ing’s response lo the urban residen- 
tial scale of Connecticut Avenue? 

In European urban architecture, 
respect for history is a prerequisite of 
design. In the United States, sensitiv- 
ity to the historical is only an “op- 
tion” that the designer may or may 
not exercise. Surely, American cities 
will suffer if more “mini-in tdsals” 
begin growing — and if architects ape 
what they perceive to be approved by 
the press. Why not take a stand and 


say that Intelsat should be placed 
where it belongs: either b outer space 
or b the suburbs somewhere? 

NILS C. F1NNE. 

Helsinki. 

Who Pays This Piper? 

1 see that Jennefer Hirsh berg (Peo- 
ple. Feb. 6) has been hired as press 
secretary to Mrs. Reagan at an annu- 
al cost of $55,733. is Mrs. Reagan 
hersdf footing this bill, or are the 
taxpayers being asked lo fork over 55 
btg ones to keep the world informed 
on the colors of this year’s White 
House bathroom drapes and whether 
the president is talkbg to his son? 

DONALD ARTHUR. 

Munich. 

Protectorate, Not Colony 

Your reference to the sultanate of 
Brunei (People. Feb. 12) as a former 
British colony is bcorrecL Brunei en- 
joyed, from 1888 to December 1983. 
a special treaty relationship with 
Great Britain whereby its foreign af- 
fairs were the responsibility of the 
British government. Brunei was thus, 
throughout this period, a British pro- 
tectorate. This fact was emphasized 
when, on Jan. 1, 1984, the treaty was 
bilaterally terminated. At the cere- 
mony the Union Jack was not low- 
ered, as it had never been flown in 
Branei. The sultan issued a procla- 
mation of the declaration of indepen- 
dence of the sultanate. 

JEFFREY FJNESTONE 
Paris. 


lists 


r*vv.:. venation 

Rabbin 

sor.ust* 
-he smith. Th 
radise. its . 
‘J 'V ■! LM-'f:C. JpiT 

rXVz fresh produc 
dhiicred 

T 5 --* .-lUJilCTi IS dlfi 

• j-.-* Then. 

JCCjU. -s’. - 

s,m invasion ot 
-.ci-'.ef: ztxi than a 
{slims, .vntaming. J 
Cv oriel ficvernme . 
„off£ percent of the 

in.vritar.ee ci die fie 

!ceeti*.c p rurwsb. Cyp 

nif'.. niLr.; 18 p 

Cypnoi pop’-.*»aon. 
The C-rrtk Cvpriot ! 

other hand, 

cf ibs-rrhbs : O.OtX* : 
ih- north. I h oui one 


uct i'ii! cv ;? wrceB 

cert re*reci»vssy, at 
aK'Ut tnc s fi 
flccteu errjgrstioa 
the so-ih of 5.40*7 
l«”5 ar.d 

Be. in s-rutfc, tr 
rzyh A berisicr 
r;un !■* rre-mvasi 
livii* jv quick iy 
through the impterni 
sene.«’o: short-term 
By the south wj 
employment, a ; 
1 473 ?e.--cjp;ia inco 
reached. 

Kowev er. this ccon 
a :*m: cishked by I 
ners. -xae achieved at 
cos;, and many of j 
created 

ntanj:ng solutions no 
Aiwr"l474, priority 
housing ir.d employ 
gees fro rr the north. F 
tiuciura: projects sue 
strccticr. of schools, 
and Lslxxj air^on t 
es preference this ■ 
by deficit fmancicE 
coL-32eT.er.t cf labor 
vestment. 

Pri-.ate overccr.sc 
meani ma: zross con 
have reen mjcecuate 
lic . in .':' ::nenL re suiui 
- ; ai oi L'y^ru-'s traditii 
baian-ced bud rets. Si; 
:nve>;m;r.; ratio of 3 
• •.r.e Oi lie m 
world, has been fina; 
rowing The current 
^ar.ds at about 530 mi 
pfrrads < about 5351 n 
pew??: GDP, a 

1 J rder: i :-r ar. econon 
peop!-:. and its cebi- 
l} proem b !< 
! -re initial etnphai 
■Oiswive iow technoU 

“nempIovnienL ai 

lhe to lands of tht 


•<*> 

ajw, 








<7 » g K WUIMTlimj « * 

it cral (trib un c 

<ndi 1W V. *«rii IIwuilIWliJuwi.. IVm 






CYPRUS 



; • '■ '.J r- 

■V 3 1 rU 

r * J 


Economic Recovery — 
And Stagnation Sit 
Just a Street Apart 


Bv George Coats plain lilted the balance of the econ- 
NICOSIA — A waUc across the SSSStS^lSS^St 


?°" u nrTf5? J rt" 
sm ££X3es: Ehff& , ±s; 

visible in the Sabbincss of nonh- 40 g™”. 1 ”g?"- 


era Nicosia contrasts with the bus- 
tle of the south. The north is a 
driver's paradise, its roads almost 


percent and 40 percent respective- 
ly. while manufacturing contrib- 
utes 17 percent of GDP. 

But toe manufacturing sector is 


“ ,v « » characterized bv small-scale, fami- 

devoid of traffic apart from trucks j busked ploying i?v- 
produce, unhke the ^ of ^ five per- 

cluttered highway s of the south. ^ As such, it exhibits all the 
77jeatoho^d.ffOTnf : from a slfenglhii , bul ^ ^ the ^ 
decade ago. Then, the Turkish ness4; ^ of marginal producers. In 
Army s invasion of the previous addilioDi Cyprus’s traditional 
year left more than a third of the 1 ^ stem meanl ^ 

jsland, containing, according to ^ ^ ^ 

Cypn^ government' primates. duclivity . Jg* I0 ‘economic 
some 70 percent of the island s eco- . avah JL m _ rwi'i lack of ener- 


4* 


A SPECIAL REPORT 


MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1985 


AN ISLAND 
DIVIDED 

» 30 Years of Tension 

0# And Negotiations 


Page 7 



UN Peace Effort: 
The KeyWord 
Is Momentum 


!)■ Aaooaad firm * 


Raouf Denktash 


^.ano, coouumng. accoramg to Ubor ^ pn> 

Cypn 7 n\ 80VC . n ? e i n - ductivity. lading to economic 
some 70 percent of the island s eco- overbearing.Cypris’slackofener- 
nonic and natural resources, as the & resowg rented in a consider- 

gathered abIe boost in the inflation rale after 
together Turkjsh Cypn 01 wmmu- ^ 1973 ^ pricc lQfla . 

rnty. nuking up 18 percent of the doQ was ^ al , 3J pmeol by 
Cypnot population. the early 1980s. 

The Greek Cypriot south, on the Nevertheless, other external fac- 
other hand, was faced with the task lore have assisted the south’s recov- 
of absorbing 170,000 refuses from ery. Greek Cypriot entrepreneurs 
the north, about one-fifth of the quickly ^ exploit the Arab 

Ldand’s population, raising unem- ^ ^ ad diSon, Cyprus’s 

P'oy^pi £ 25 Pere“ L “ ]9 l 4 newly introduced offshore lcgisla- 
and 1975, the gross domestic prod- don ^ m pIace m riine , 0 bSefit 

uct fell by 18 percent and 20 per- from decline of Beirut in the 
cent respectively, and pessimism mid-1970s. The result has been that 
about the island s future was re- ^ M j dd ] e ^ ncw ^placed 
fleeted in emigration figures from Western Europe as Cyprus’s major 
the south of 5,400 and 5,600 in export market, taking about 50 per- 
1975 and 1976. cent of the south’s goods and ser- 


1955 Greek Cypriot nationalists launch 
EOKA, guerrilla organization 
against the British colonial administration, 
in favor of Enosis, die political union of 
Cyprus with Greece. Turkish Cypriot 
nationalists form TMT. whose goal is the 
partition of Cyprus between Turkey and 
Greece: 

1960 Independent republic of Cyprus is 
created under joint Greek Cypriot 
and Turkish Cypriot administration. 
Archbishop Makarios becomes president. 
The republic is guaranteed by Britain. 
Greece and Turkey. 

1963 Archbishop Makarios submits 

proposals to amend the constitution. 
Fighting breaks out Turkish Cypriots 
withdraw from the government 


1964 United Nations peace-keeping forces 
arrive. UN-sponsored 
intercommunal talks begin to resolve 
differences. 

1974 Interconununal talks appear to be 
on the verge of agreement Greece 

launches a coup against the Makarios 
government. Archbishop Makarios escapes 
and eventually returns as president In the 
interval. Turkish troops land in Cyprus and 
occupy 37 percent of the island. 

1975 Interconununal talks resume under 
United Nations auspices. 

1977 Archbishop Makarios and the 
Turkish Cypriot leader, Raouf 
Denktash. meet The two sides agree on a 
bizonal, federal nonahgned and 


But in the south, the turnaround vices, against 30 percent for West- 
was rapid. A decision was made to ern Europe, a halving of the 
return to pre-invasion economic pre-invasion proportion, 
levels as quickly as possible The drop in ou prices and more 
through the implementation of a modest wage increases, which last 


Potato Fanners Are Moving Mountains 


series of short-term action plans. 
By 1978, the south was back to full 


year for the first time approximat- 
ed the productivity rise of 33 per- 


employment, and a year later the cent in real terms, have reduced 
1973 per-capila income level was inflation, which amounted to 6 per- 


reached. cent in 1984 but is again showing 

However, this economic miracle, an upward trend, 
a term disliked by Cypriot plan- The south's economy is far from 
acts, was achieved at considerable out of the woods yet. The current 
cost, and many of the structural - (Continued on Page 10) 

weaknesses created then are do- 

manding solutions now. 

After 1974, priority was given 10 
housing and employing the refu- 
gees from the nonlL Farther infras- j 

tructural projects such as the con- 
struction of schools, roads, pons 1 ■ — 

and I-araaca airport were also giv- ..V . ■ .. • . \ ; 

en preference. This was achieved . ;y.. • * 

by deficit financing and the en- • j . 

couragemeni of labor-intensive in- ' '] O i 

vestment. ' -* a. ■ f * 

Private overconsumption has V | 2/ -- 

meant that grass domestic savings -L \ 1 
have been inadequate to fond pub- ’y i:? 

Uc mvmtmenL resulting in a reva- -X* 

sal of Cyrus’s traditional policy of 

balanced budgets. Since 1976, the s rr — ".VtVv 

investment ratio of 36 percent of - 

GDP, one of the highest in the V 
world, has been financed by bcrr- q 
rowing. The current foreign debt 

stands at about 530 million Cypriot ::::r£r::y^jg{ 

pounds (about S352 million^ or 40 — -~~Z> 

percent of GDP, a amsderaWe V! 

burden far an economy of 600,000 
people, and its debt-serving ratio 
was 10.7 percent in 1984. 

The initial emphasis on labor- - — — ::= - - — ' 

intensive low technology absorbed 

the unemployment, and the loss of 

the farm lands of the Messayoria 


By Kerin Hope 

LARNACA — Eager to get a bigger share of 
the lucrative British potato market, enterprising 
growers in the south of Cyprus bring truckloads 
of rich red soil to the rocky headlands of the 
island’s southern coast and plant where the 
dimate is milder and water remains readily 
available. 

Potatoes have replaced table grapes and or- 
anges as the Greek Cypriot farmers most im- 
portant single crop. The early varieties, harvest- 


potaloes” in Britain and West Germany. A 

smaller second crop, harvested in late autumn, uonj, accounting ror zu.o percent ot total agn- troops in Cyprus m July or that 
goes mainly to Anu? markets. cultural exports. year, after a coop led by the Athens 

“Getting the crop on the market early can The potato-growing boom is spreading now junta against the government of 
mak e a considerable difference to prices, so to the north of the divided island, although Archbishop Makarios. The north- 
energetic fanners simply move their field to Turkish CyprioL farmers say they are hampered era part of the island, about 37 
where the potatoes can ripen fast and the irriga- by the EC export ban on popular seed potato percent of its territory, has been 
lion works," the agriculture minister, Andreas varieties. Last year, farmers in the north export- under Turkish mili tary occupation 
Papasolomondos, said. ed 14,000 ions of potatoes, mostly to Britain, ever xjneff . in a de facto partition of 

Cyprus exported 160,000 metric tons of pota~ Before northern Cyprus unilaterally declared the island 
toes m 1983, the last year for winch complete independence in November 1983, the European A vital ingredient of the diplo- 
figures are available. Mwe tfian 70 percent went Community turned a blind eye to trade with the malic momentum is US. interest in 
10 Britain. Famings from potato sales totaled (Continued on Page 11) theUN peace bid. This interest lies 


goes mainly to Arab markets. 

“Getting the crop on the market early can 


Papasolomondos, said. 

Cyprus exported 160,000 metric tons of pota~ 


\ ~;.Sk By Andriana Jerodiaconou 

NICOSIA — The divided Greet 
V. &**«'*’' . J and Turkish Cypriots happen to 

have an idiomatic express on in 
common: “The sugar is in the wa- 
ter.” In both Greek and Turkish, 
JOBR; this is to say that a situation is 
ur 8 enL 

JHb The sugar is certainly in the wa- 

Th. AaocBtad Prat ter, after the failure of the January 

Spyros Kyprianou Ncw „ York - *««“ 

President Spyros Kypnanou and 

the Turkish Cypriot leader, Raouf 
independent republic as the basis for a Denktash. Their meeting was the 

settlement Archbishop Makarios dies. He is result of more than a year of diplo- 
succeeded by Spyros Ryprianou. matic effort by the United Nations 

secretary -general. Javier Perez de 
1978 Mr. Kyprianou and Mr. Denktash Cuellar, operating with the back- 
meet ratifying and extending the stage help of interested capitals 
Makarios-Denktash guidelines. such as Washington and London. 

It was considered the best chance 
1983 Greek Cypriots raise Cyprus issue at in a decade for reaching an agree- 
the UN Genera] Assembly. Turkish meal toward a reunited Cyprus. 
Cypriots pull out of the intercommunal Officials involved in the UN 

talks. Turkish Cypriots unilaterally declare peace effort now say it is impera- 
the occupied zone as the Turkish Republic dve to keep the diplomatic momen- 

of Northern Cyprus. Turkey recognizes the turn going that could bring Mr. 
republic. The UN launches new peace Denktash and Mr. Kyprianou back 

efforts. together for a second attempt at an 

agreement. If the initiative fails. 
1985 Mr. Kyprianou and Mr. Denktash observers believe it could set back 
meet at the UN in January. The two peace prospects for years, 

sides fail to agree on a draft settlement What is at stake is the future of 

^ ^ ^ m aw the island's two ethnic communi- 

ties. Since 1974, the Turkish Cypri- 
0 ots. who make up about one-fifth 

mountains 

across the military barrier known 
123 million Cyprus pounds (about SI8.4 mil- as the Green f-inp. Turkey landed 
lion), accounting for 20.6 percent of total agri- troops in Cyprus in July of that 


ed in April are sold as “small-size new- 10 Britain. Famings from potato sales totaled 


toes m 1983, the last year for which complete independence in November 1983, the European 
figures are available. Mmelfian 70 percent went Community turned a blind eye to trade with the 


(Continued on Page 11) 


in reducing Greek-Turkish ten- 
sions in the North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization and limiting congres- 
sional resistance 10 boosting mili- 
tary aid to .Ankara. The UN efforts 
also have the backing of the Soviet 
Union, which is anxious to prevent 
the permanent partition of Cyprus 
between NATO members Greece 
and Turkey. The Soviet Union 
would prefer a non aligned Cyprus. 

Washington, while stressing that 
it takes its lead from Mr. Perez de 
Cuellar, is playing the most impor- 
tant behind-the-scenes role. 

Last fall President Ronald Rea- 
gan called on Turkey to urge Mr. 
Denktash to ease his demands in 
the UN-mediated Cyprus negotia- 
tions. As a result, Mr. Denktash 
dropped a demand for a Turkish 
Cypriot presidency-in-rotation in a 
two-zone, federal republic, which 
both sides agree must be the frame- 
work for a settlement. He also 
made his most generous territorial 
offer to date, under which about 8 
percent of the Turkish-occupied 
zone would be restored to the 
Greek Cypriots. 

Those concessions made the Jan- 
uary meeting possible. Having got 
there, however, the two sides failed 
to agree on the meeting’s purpose. 
Mr. Denktash left, insisting that 
the concessions were his last word 
and that he had come together with 
Mr. Kyprianou to sign a prelimi- 
nary agreement. This text would 
have left to joint working groups 
such issues as the timetable of 
Turkish troop withdrawal guaran- 
tees for the future state, the right of 
movement, property ownership 
and settlement on the island, and 
the precise areas to be restored to 
the Greek Cypriots. 

Mr. Kyprianou ’s view was that 
the blanks pertaining to these is- 
sues had to be negotiated and filled 
in at the highest level before signa- 
ture and before the setting up of 
(Continued on Next Page) 


THE GREEN LINE 


Kyrenia 


Nicosia 


Famagusta 


Lamaca 


Limassol 




visit 


TURKEY 






<yPPtD> 

Recreation ana neaw o 


now 


hcM 


Growing Tourist Industry Becomes Multilingual 


By George Coats 

NICOSIA — Not so long ago. a foreigner 
who got into a taxi in Cyprus and gave his 
destination in broken Greek was automatically 
answered in English. Today, be is just as likely 
to get his reply in Swedish or German, depend- 
ing on how the taxi driver analyses his accent. 
The change reflects the expansion of the Cypriot 
tourist industry and the success of its quest for 
new markets. 

British passport holders still make up tile 
largest group of visitors to the island, but, in- 
creasingly, Scandinavians, Germans, mainland 
Greeks and, since the war in Lebanon, Gulf 
Arabs, are joining them. 

Last year, the Greek Cypriot south was host 
to more than 700,000 tounsts, IS.4 percent up 
on 1983’s total Each stayed an average of 10.6 
days and together contributed autre than 200 
mini on Cyprus pounds (S143 million), about 12 
percent of the gross domestic product, to the 
economy. This was welcomed by a tourist indus- 
try that a decade ago Inst its two main centers, 
Kvrenia and the Varosha area of Famagusta, as 


a result of the Turkish occupation of the north. 

Once the recovery started, it was rapid. The 
airstrip at Lamaca was converted into an inter- 
national airport to replace the one in Nicosia, 
which is now in the United Nations buffer zone. 

Building around the island’s formerly ne- 
glected southern perimeter began as the dis- 
placed hoteliers from Varosha turned Limassol 
into the island’s nightlife capital. At the end of 
last year, Limassol had 32 hotels and hotel 
apartments offering 4,652 beds, with another 
five under construction and further building 
already approved. Lamaca also has been devel- 
oped and it now offers more tourist accommo- 
dation than Nicosia. Ayia Napa. 10 the south of 
Famagusta, has retained an attractive elegance 
lacking in the more crowded resorts, while Pa- 
phos. with its new airport, offers a more isolated 
position and more sedate traditions. 

Between Paphos and the rest of the island lie 
the Troodos mountains, which rise to more than 
6.000 feet f 1.800 meters) and offer skiing in the 
winter and a refuge from the beat in the sum- 


yrenia and the Varosha area of Famagusta, as Cyprus also is looking to the middle- income 


market, and while projections forecast some 
800.000 tourists a year, plans are being laid to 
spread the load by extending the season from 
the present peak period of the six summer 
months to include the milder spring through to 
November. 

Holidays of special interest are being promot- 
ed. drawing on the island’s historical heritage. 
Walkers, wild-flower lovers and. should this 
winter’s return .of the mute swan for the first 
time in 76 years to Laraaca’s salt take be repeat- 
ed, bird-watchers all are being courted. 

In contras! to the south’s recovery, however, 
the northern areas have not fared so wdL The 
high-rise hotels of Varosha have been standing 
empty and unmaintained for 1 1 years. Attempts 
to attract tourists with hand currency have met 
with limited success, while the Cypriot govern- 
ment in the south has discouraged any interna- 
tional airlines except Turkey's THY from using 
Ercan airport, near Nicosia. Also, a ruling by 
Britain’s House of Lords that tourists could be 
sued for using the furniture and fittings of hotels 
formerly owned by Greek Cypriots in the north 
has acted as an obstacle to tour operators. 







most orgmal island 




as 


IT IS FAIR IT IS NOT FAR COME TO CYPRUS AND RELAX 




If* 

»: 

I 

i 


fc • 






CYPRUS NEW POTATOES 
ARE NOW AVAILABLE IN ALL 
EUROPEAN MARKETS 


THE potatoes with the superior quality. 

Clean, bright and colourful. 

Grown in One RED CYPRUS SOIL rich in natural 

minerals. 

THEY have a unique flavour and aroma. 

Tasty without being wasty. 

THEY boil without collapsing, fry, chip or roast without 
going soggy. 

Long lasting — buy them in bulk. 

THEY are specially selected by 

THE CYPRUS POTATO MARKETING BOARD 
Look for the C.P.M.R brand. 


<YPWtf 

THE ISLAND OF BEST QUALITY POTATOES 


AK enquiries to the Cyprus Potato Marketing Board 
c/o Cyprus Co-Op. Organization, 

88/90 Ftei ki ydun Road, London E.C.1 
TaL 01-278 1865, Teteu 268901, OR 
Cyprus Potato Marketing Board 
Cooperative Central Bank BuJcSngs, 2nd Boor, 
G regarlau Afxortiou Sir,, Noosta —Cyprus 
TeL 43106/7/8, Tala* 2276 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25. 1985 

A SPECIAL REPORT ON CYPRUS 




* rnm^hm 




MMdfa fi«f nmaroahc Arefrv* LinUd 

A Greek Cypriot outpost, left, and a military parade in northern Cyprus, right 


Midtihi Em lhalograirfac Af4we linU 


UN Force Maintains Stability of Island Military Kaleidoscope 


NICOSIA — Cyprus, the Cypriot government in- 
sists, is a nonaligned country. But since independence 
23 years ago, the republic has housed troops from two 
contending NATO armies and the United Nations, 
while it has shared the island with British bases, from 
which American U-2 planes have operated since 1973. 

In 1974, the military kaleidoscope took another 
turn, following the Turkish invasion of the north. A 
div iding ling was drawn, with UN troops holding a 
thin line between hostile forces. The UN role was to 
guarantee the republic's integrity. 

It is ironic that the plan for a Cypriot armed forces, 
foreseen 
came a 

sides of the dividing line had their origins 
militias. 

A visitor to the island cannot fail to notice the 
military presence. Between Larnaca airport and Nico- 
sia stands a large Cypriot National Guard camp. 



White-painted trucks and Land Rovers driven by UN 
troops are a regular feature of Nicosia traffic. And aL 
the end of Ledra Street, one of southern Nicosia's 
main commercial centers, shoppers move among- 
shell -pocked abandoned buildings, sandbagged firing 
positions and soldiers on duty. 

But the soldiers and gun emplacements have be- 
come part of the local scenery, and, in some ways, the 
Green Line has become a tourist attraction, like the 
Berlin Wall. 

Politicians on both sides of the line, as well as their 
leaders in Athens and Ankara, argue in the knowledge 
that the UN force is there to prevent major hostilities. 
“Our role is to keep the situation stable,” said a UN 
spokesman, “with toe full agreement of both sides and 
for as long as both sides want” 

The force’s 2JU men. drawn from seven nations, 
are clearly outgunned by both sides, and should its 
role in defusing the almost daily incidents fail, it 


would be pushed aside. To the north is a Turkish corps 
of two divisions, an additional Turkish regiment rep- 
resenting the 630-man contingent foreseen in the inde- 
pendence agreements and the brigade-size Turkish 
Cypriot security forces. 

Facing them across the UN buffer zone are 1J500 
mainland Greek troops, comprising the 950-member 
unit allowed under the independence agreements and 
many of the officers and noncommissioned officers of 
the 10,000-man Cypriot National Guard. 

Militarily, the T urks appear to have the upper hand. 
The 17.000 to 20.000 men in the north are thought to 
be belter equipped and better trained than the forces 
in the south. According to independent military ob-‘ 
servers, the Turks have the advantage of fielding a 
crack corps in Cyprus, which operates as an element of 
an army based on the Anatolian mainland. It has 
stockpiles, which can be rapidly reinforced, and total 
air superiority, with Turkey just minutes’ Hying time 


away. Cyprus has no airforce, and Greece, more than 
900 kilometers (356 miles) away, in practical terns has 
no air power over the island. 

The Turkish weakness is seen as a too rigid com- 
mand structure, with consequent tactical inflexibility. 
The quality of the 5.000 Turkish Cypriot security 
forces is not rated highly. 

Ingenuity is seen as one of the few assets on the 
Greek side. Mainland forces dominate the high com- 
mand, but a program of Cypriotization is, under way, 
and so is a rear mament plan. But air defense remains 
(be problem. Diplomatic sources report that the pur- 
chase of surface-to-air missies was discussed last year 
with the French government. 

However, while beefing up its forces, the Cypriot 
government has been cartful not to overstep the fine 
line between the defensive and offensive, for this 
might provoke what it hopes to deter. 

— GEORGE COATS 


Political Settlement Could Cut 
Greek-Turkish Gordian Knot 


NICOSIA — “The problems be- 
tween Greece and Turkey are like 
the Gordian knot; think of the Cy- 
prus issue as the sword that could 
cut through them,” one political 
analyst said, commenting on die 
role of Cyprus in Greek-Turkish 
relations. 

The search for that sword is what 
U.S. support for the United Na- 
tions peace initiative is all about 
The best evidence of this came last 
November, when it became known 
that President Ronald Reagan per- 
sonally urged Turkey’s president, 
Kenan Evren, to make concessions 
in the UN-mediated negotiations 
on the Cyprus issue. His main argu- 
ment was that this would smooth 
tensions on NATO’s southeastern 
flank. 

The United States and other 
North Atlantic Treaty Organiza- 
tion countries that are lending a 
behind-the-scenes hand to the UN, 
such as Britain, hope that a Cy- 
prus settlement would also mane 
the be ginning of the end of the 


Greek-Turkish quarrel in the Aege- 
an, the legacy erf the 1974 Cyprus 
crisis, which has disrupted the stra- 
tegic southern wing of the Atlantic 
alliance for more than a decade. 

NATO’s hope is that a Cyprus 
agreement mil prompt Prime Min- 
ister Andreas Papandreou’s Social- 
ist government in Greece to re- 
establish negotiations with Turkey 
to resolve their Aegean disputes. 
These include continental-shelf 
rights, the delineation of territorial 
water and airspace hunts, the shar- 
ing of military control in the Aege- 
an and the militarization of Grade 
islands such as Lemnos. 

A Greek-Turkish dialogue, on 
the level of foreign ministers, had 
begun under conservative govern- 
ments in Greece. But this was fro- 
zen when the Socialists came to 
power in 1981, on the argument 
that the status quo in the Aegean is 
already set by international law 
and is, therefore, not negotiable. 

‘ The Greek assistant foreign muH- 
ister, Yiannis Kapsis, whose port- 



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folio includes Greek-Turkish rela- 
tions. declined to comment on the 
impact of Cyprus on the grounds 
that the curent UN peace initiative 
of Secretary-General Javier P&rez 
de Cu6Uar is at a critical stage- But 
the Greek government spokesman.’ 
Dimitris Maroudas, stated in De- 
cember that the start of a dialogue 
with Turkey, on whatever level, 
“presupposes a just and viable so- 
lution fra Cyprus .” 

According to Turkish diplomats, 
the Cyprus problem is cited by 
Greek officials as an important ob- 
stacle to renewed negotiations on 
the Aegean issues. 

Some analysts believe that even 
if the UN's Cyprus peace effort 
bears fruit in Lite next few months, 
the resumption of a Greek-Turkish 
dialogue remains unlikely in 1985, 
an election year in Greece. They 
argue that Mr. Papandreou will be 
reluctant to abandon his hard-line 
stand on Turkey, which appeals to 
Greek nationalist sentiment, before 
the elections. 

Others argue, however, that vot- 
ers would respond to a successful 
resolution of the Cyprus problem, 
which Mr. Papandreou could point 
to as a foreign-policy achievement 
All analysts agree that the benefits 
to the West of a Cyprus-led recon- 
ciliation between Greece and Tur- 
key would be far-reaching. 

According to diplomats involved 
in the UN peace effort, one motive 
of the Reagan administration for 
wanting a settlement is that this 
would reduce congressional resis- 
tance to increased military aid for 
Turkey, whose strategic impor- 
tance has escalated since the end of 
Shah Reza Pahlavi's rule in Iran. 

The United States imposed an 
arms embargo on Turkey following 
the 1974 Cyprus crisis, when Anka- 
ra dispatched troops to the island 
in reaction to a coup mounted by 
the Athens junta against the gov- 
ernment of Archbishop Makanos. 

The embargo was lifted in 1978. 
Bui in view of the continued Turk- 
ish occupation of northern Cyprus, 


Peace: Keeping Momentum Going 


(Continued From Previous Page) 
working groups. What is required now is the bridg- 
ing of that gap, so that a second meeting can be 
arranged. UN officials say there win be mediated 
"contacts'* between the two sides at a lower level 
where the task will be to agree “on both the 
scenario and the substance" of another Kyprian- 
ou-Denktash meeting. All observers agree that the 
United States has a major role to play. Meanwhile, 
both sides are keeping the door open to further 
talks. The Cypriot president reiterated his commit- 
ment to continuing the UN peace process in an 
interview this month. “The UN's priority is that 
the meeting should be well prepared, and that is 
right. We can’t have another experience, where one 
side goes to negotiate and the other not," he said. 

Mr. Denktash has said that he is willing to come 
together again with Mr. Kyprianou, but that this 
cannot happen MFore elections are held in the 
occupied north, which was declared an indepen- 
dent state by the Turkish Cypriots in November of 
1983. This self-styled state has only been recog- 
nized by Turkey. Turkish Cypriot officials, howev- 
er, insist that the elections should not be construed 
as a move to consolidate statehood, and, therefore, 
that they do not conflict with a call by Mr. Ffcrez de 
Cuellar for both, sides to avoid actions that could 
jeopardize the UN initiative. Officials also said 
constitutional amendments might be necessary to 
permit Mr. Denktash to run for a third term as 
leader. 

“These things have nothing to do with the rein- 
forcement erf our republic, and this should be 
understood by all well-meaning people,” Necatin 
Erfdcim, a senior Turkish Cypriot official said in 
an interview. 

There are many reasons on both sides of the 
Green Line for wanting a settlement. For the 
Greek Cypriots, long-term physical and political 
security is the paramount concern. Their fear is 
that without a guaranteed settlement for Cyprus, 
ihe Turkish hold on the northern part of the island 
will become permanent, and that, in their view, the 
risk of another Turkish military move on the island 
will never be totally absent 


“My husband has a good income, and we lead a 
comfortable life; but I look at this every day and 
think, what's the use, there could be. another war 
tomorrow,” a Nicosia housewife said Many of her 
relatives and friends were among the 170,000 
Greek Cypriots who fled their homes before the 
Turkish troops in 1974. 

For the Turkish Cypriote, perhaps the major 


incentive for a settlement is economic develop- 
ment Once past the ‘Nvekome” sign beside the 
Turkish checkpoint on the Great Line, the evi- 
dence of the economic disparity between the north 
and south is obvious in dilapidated roads and 
buildings. 

The economy was a key concern among Turkish 
Cypriot pofitiqgns interviewed. “Look at them 
over there and lode at us over here,” one Turkish 
Cypriot official said, gesturing toward the Greek 

income of $4,500; wehave rare of SLoSo.” 

Turkish Cypriot leftist opposition leaders, who 
are pressing Mr. Denktash to come to a settlement 
with the Greek Cypriots, indicate that hopes that 
the 1983 declaration of a state would bring trade 
and tourism, along with international recognition, 
have been disappointed “Recognition tomes al- 
most impossible; even if states do recognize 
us, they will not be so important,” said Alpay 
Durduran of the Communal liberation Party, 
which accounts for about 30 percent of the Turkish 
Cypriot electorate. 

Chi both odes of the line, however, the view is 
that any Cyprus settlement must cany a fair price. 
“I have been around villages, talked lo peopleinaD 
walks of life; they are way, very disappointed that 
there was no agreement in New York,” said Ozker 
Ozgur, leader of the Republican Turkish Party, a 
leftist grouping that holds about 15 percent of the 
vote. “But they do not want just any settlement It 
has to be honorable.” 

To have any hope of success, the search fra an 
agreement that both sides can call honorable is 
what a future Kyprianou-Denlrtash meeting will 
have to be about 


pressure by the so-called Greek 
lobby in Congress against arming 
Ankara has remained high. 

For NATO, an easing of 
Greek-Turkish tensions might 
mean that a stalled project to set up 
a new command headquarters in 
Larissa, northern Greece, could go 
ahead. 

Athens and Ankara cannot agree 
on the sharing of military control in 
the Aegean under the new com- 


mand. The project has been on ice 
since Greece returned to the mili- 
tary wing of the alliance in 1980, 
after a six-year absence in protest 
over what was seen as NATO apa- 
thy during the Turkish invasion of 
Cyprus. 

In addition, a settlement could 
restore Greek participation in 
NATO exercises in the Aegean. 
The Papandreou government de- 
cided to keep land, naval and air 


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forces out of regional maneuvers to 
protest Turkish objections to the 
militarization of Lemnos. 

Above aU, NATO wants to see 
an end to a wrangle that threatens 
to weaken its southeastern flank 
with regard to what should be its 
main strategic concern — defend- 
ing against the Warsaw Pact threat 
from the north. Mr. Papandreou, 
who is also Greece’s defense minu- 
ter, has argued in NATO meetings 
that the main militar y threat to 

Greece lies not in the north but in 
Turkey to the east Greek adnmris- 
irations before him based their 
claims of a Turkish threat on the 
Cyprus experience of 1974, coupled 
with the deployment by Turkey of 
its 4th Army on the Aegean coast 

In January, the Papandreou gov- 
ernment formally adopted a new 
“defense doctrine” reflectin g the 
belief in a Turkish threat The an-, 
nouncement of the doctrine caused 
shudders in NATO capitals. But 
military experts pointed out that in 
fact, it formalized what has been 
tiie case since 1974 — that Greece 
is deploying its forces with an eye 
on its eastern borders with Turkey. 

Legen d bad it that the person 
who successfully untied the Gordi- 
an knot would become the master 
of all Asia. In this case, the reward 
would be a united NATO. 

— A. DERODIACONOU 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1985 


A SPECIAL REPORT ON CYPRUS 


Communists’ Supporting Role 
In an Entrepreneurial Society 


NICOSIA — Once a visitor gets to the four-story 
office block housing the Progressive Working People’s 
Party, known as A KILL, it is only a short walk to an 
imposing concrete building fronted with attractive 
stained-glass windows nearby. This is, in fact, the 
Soviet cultural center, built in 1979 as Moscow’s 
answer to the thriving American center on the other 
side of town. 

That (he two buildings are found in the same 
neighborhood is apt. AKEL had its be ginnings in the 
Communist Party of Cyprus, known as KKK. found- 
ed in the early 1920s by a group of Greek Cypriot 
workers inspired by the ideals of the Russian Revolu- 
tion. In an early letter to the British Labor Party, the 

If If If *c 1 mk. 


more than a secondary role, backing first Archbishop 
Makarios and, after ms death, in 1977, his successor to 
the presidency, Spyros Kyp rianou. 

In a 1983 “minimum policy program” formalizing 
AKEL’s alliance with Mr. Kypnanou's right-of-center 
Democratic Party, the Communists went so far as to 
pledge their support for a free economy and, even 
more startlingly, “the middle classes.” 

“We believe that Cyprus is still struggling for its 
national survival. To bid for socialist reform now 
would only divide the people and serve the interests of 
our enemies,” an official of AKEL said in a recent 
interview. 

Meanwhile, Cyprus is a thriving entrepreneurial 
society, made up of what one Western observer calls 
“incurable capitalists, including the Communists,” 
with its face firmly turned to the West. 

Allhough AKEL accounts for more than a third of 
the electorate, the Soviet Union and other East bloc 
countries attract less than 10 percent of the Cypriot 
students who go abroad for tbdr university education 
each year. According to the United States Information 
Service, Cyprus will draw 27S Fulbright scholarships 
in 1985. the largest number in absolute figures 
worldwide. 

The Soviet Union will award about SO scholarships 
this year. More significantly, the consensus among 
political analysis is that AKEL's electoral strength, 
estimated at more than 40 percent at its peak some 
years ago. is on a slow decline. One commentator 
invoked the “anachronism of a strictly orthodox. Mos- 
cow-line party, which entertains little dissent. Any- 
body who disagrees with the party line is expelled. 
Such is the disapline that few of them will ever reveal 
why. even years later." 

Other analysts die the evolving economic and polit- 
ical situation on the island. 

“When we first started the party, education was low. 
people were exploited by landowners, merchants, the 
church. The ground was very fertile; it was easy to 
spread communist ideas," says Ploulis Servas, a for- 
mer general secretary of AKEL, who was expelled for 
dissent in 1952. 

The first serious challenge by (he right, according to 
Mr. Servas, came only after 1955, when, through the 
EOKA fight, “the right swept the youth — they had 
the revolutionary slogans." 

But the battle is not yet over for AKEL. According 
to diplomats involved in the current United Nations 
peace bid for Cyprus, the Soviet Union's support of 
these efforts reflects above all the desire to see the 
re-establishment of a nonaligned republic on the is- 
land within which the party could form a power bloc 
together with the Turkish Cypriot Communist left, 
which comprises about 16 permit of the electorate in 
the north. 

In cooperating with the Turkish Cypriots, commen- 
tators say, the party can build on its past moderate, 
anti-natio nalis t image. 

Officials of PEO, the AKEL's trade union confeder- 
ation, which represents about 50 percent of unionized 
Cypriot workers, say they have had several contacts in 
third countries over the past years with Turkish Cypri- 
ot labor leaders, most recently in London in Novem- 
ber 1984, and that they look forward to more. 

“It seems to me that future cooperation between the 
Greek Cypriot and Turkish Cypnot Communist left is 
Something that Washington, which is in the driver’s 
seat in terms of the United Nations peace initiative, 
will be keeping a close watch on," one observer of the 
peace process said. '* 

— ANDR1ANA IERODIACONOU 


One of the determining historical characteristics of 
AKEL itself — the party was renamed in 1941 —by 


The party is one of the world’s 
largest nonruling Communist 
parties. It emerged as the 
largest party in the 1981 
elections. 


in the fact that it remained largely uninvolved in the 
guerrilla war of 1955-1959 against British colonial 
rule, which was fought under the banner of Enosis, the 
political union of Cyprus with Greece. 

This was partly because EOKA, the rightist nation- 
alist movement, by definition excluded AKEL. But 
the Communists also represented a political force, the 
only major force of its kind on the island, which 
rejected nationalism in favor of coexistence between 
the two ethnic communities, the Greek and Turkish 
Cypriots. 

Today, the pro-Moscow AKEL is one of the world's 
largest nonruling Communist parties. It emerged as 
the single largest party in the 1981 legislative elections, 
with 318 percent of the vote, a 1-percent edge over the 
rightist Democratic Rally. 

The only other significant leftist party, the socialist 
EDEK. lags far behind, with only about 8 percent of 
the vote. It is not surprising, then, that AKEL's tacit 
alliance with the island’s first president. Archbishop 
Makarios. spawned U.S. Slate Department fears of 
Cyprus as a “Mediterranean Cuba.*' The archbishop, 
who secured the party's support in exchange for legal- 
izing it, was tagged the “Red priest.*' 

“Makarios's nonaligned foreign policy, which 
looked toward the Soviet bloc as well as the West, 
contributed to American fears. But these were also 
fuded by the existence of AKEL behind the scenes,” 
Michael Attalides, a sociologist and author of a book 
on Cyprus politics, said. Yet, the party’s story is more 
one of what might have been. Far from setting up a 
“soviet republic," the 1 960 independence treaty set up 
a government guaranteed by three North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization powers: Britain, Greece and Tur- 
key. To underline the fact that Cyprus was part of 
NATO’s strategic territory, 99 square miles (257.4 
square kilometers) were aided under the treaty to 
Britain for. military use. • - 

Under these circumstances, AKEL never played 






b.Xi 


A farm produce packinghouse, left, and harvesting eggplants, right 


'SdiMhl 

Mtfcfc Em» HKHo y iyhc Anftw bmmrf 


EC Moves Closer to Agreement on Customs Union 


By Steve n J. Dry den 

BRUSSELS — After more than eight years of delay, the 
European Community this year may take the first steps 
toward completion of a final trade agreement with Cyprus. 

Following a meeting with Cypriot officials in December, 
the community announced that it had the ‘Turn intention" 
of preparing guidelines in 1985 for negotiating a customs 
union with Cyprus. 

Under a 1973 agreement of association, which the com- 
munity has concluded with only three other countries — 
Turkey, Greece and Malta — Cyprus and the EC have 
established a preferential tariff system. The customs union, 
which was to have come into force in 1977, would lead to the 
abolition of trade barriers and the adoption by Crams of the 
community’s common customs tariff for external trade. 

The communi ry plan, however, remains linked to the same 
larger EC and Cypnot problems that blocked its fulfillment 
in the past: the lack of a political settlement on the island 
and the enlargement of the community to include Spain and 
Portugal- 

The community has always maintained that the develop- 
ment of its trade relations with Cyprus cannot be separated 
from the island's political situation. When the community 
made its December statement, there was hope that the 
upcoming meeting between the Greek Cypriot and Turkish 
Cypriot leaders in New York would produce a settlement. 
The breakdown of the talks left the intentions of the commu- 
nity unclear. 

Even if the political situation improves, the community 
dearly appears to want to complete its enlargement negotia- 
tions with Spain and Portugal this year as planned More 
defining trade relations with Cyprus. At that point, although 
Cyprus can count on support for the customs union from 
such member states as Greece and Britain, there may still 
exist objections from other community nations that do not 
want to liberalize agricultural trade with yet another Medi- 
terranean country. 

This uncertainly is stretching the' patience of Cypriot 
officials. “Cyprus wants a dose relationship,” said Andreas 
Georgiades, a counselor at the Cypriot mission to the EG 
But, he added, “the importance of the community to Cyprus 
is diminishing each year." 

Another Cypriot official has complained privately to the 
community that EC-Cypriot relations areparalyzed. He said 
that Cyprus has been treated unfairly and penalized eco- 
nomically by community inaction. 


Cyprus is chiefly concerned by its negative balance of 
trade with the community, which grew from 97 million 
European Currency Units ($108 million) in 1976 to 508 
mjllion ECUs (S452 million) in 1 983. The community's share 
of exports from Cyprus fell from 44 percent in 1975 to 27.S 
percent in 1983. 

This trade slowdown has affected the chief Cypriot agri- 
cultnral exports to the community — citrus fruits, new 
potatoes, grapes and wine. The community’s main exports to 
Cyprus include cereals, animal feed, machinery, road vehi- 
cles and textiles. 

Cypnot officials blame much of the deteriorating balance 
of trade on the quotas that control many of their preferential 
exports to (he communi ty in the absence of a customs union. 
EC officials reply that part of the deterioration can be 
explained by the diversification of Cypriot exports, although 
they admit that some member states have blocked efforts to 
give Cyprus better trade conditions. 

As to the timetable for a customs union. Cyprus believes 
the community has its priorities backward. “A customs 
union will induce a politick! settlement by creating commer- 
cial and economic benefits that Turkish Cypriots would like 
to share in," a Cypriot official in Brussels said. The Cypriot 
government would also welcome the political support such 
an agreement would represent, officials of several EC coun- 
tries said. 

Cypriot officials have told the community they think the 
EC has made a mistake by not completing a customs onion 
agreement while the enlargement negotiations were under 


way. The entry of Spain and Portugal, they said, will only 
reduce Cypriot agricultural exports to the community that 
have already been weakened by several years of sluggish 


trade. The officials said Cyprus should be given special 
consideration apart from any new community policy on 
trade with noomember Mediterranean countries. 

Cypriot officials gloomily predict that even if the commu- 
nity adopts negotiating guidelines this year, it may take 
several mire years to complete a customs union agreement 
Turkish Cypriot officials, however, are opposed to the estab- 
lishment of a customs union while there is no political 
settlement 

“It’s a mistake to have a customs union [between the 
community and Cyprus] when you have no customs unions 
within the country itself," said Bora Atun, the representative 
in Brussels of the Turkish Cypriot government “They [the 
community] would be officially and effectively dividing the 


Mr. Amn, a former mayor of Famagusta, said a customs 
union would only perpetuate what he believes has been an 
unequal distribution of community aid, mainly benefiting 
the Greek Cypriot population. “We hare not received a 
single penny from the EC for any of our projects." be said. 

A community source said the projects proposed by the 
Turkish Cypriots, which included road and harbor improve- 
ments in the northern pan of the island, were rejected 
because they did not meet the EC criteria that they benefit 
the entire population. 

“Projects on the Greek side were rejected, too" on the 
same basis, the source said. The projects the community has 
approved have come under two financial protocols, the first 
running from 1979 to 1983 and the second beginning last 
year. The first protocol provided $33 million in loans and S8 
million in grants used for three projects: extension of the 
electrical system for the entire island, improvement of the 
water supply network in Larnaca, Nicosia and Famagusta, 
and modernization of the sewage system in Nicosia. The 
second protocol, which provided S3Q million in loans and 
$8.9 million in grants, is to continue the sewer and electricity 
projects and build a new water supply system for Nicosia, 
Famagusta, Limassol and Larnaca. 

Despite this appearance of community evenhandedness, 
Mr. Atun said the Turkish Cypriots remained unsatisfied 
with the projects Most of the construction, he said, is 
handled by Greek Cypriot firms, and many of the facilities 
for controlling water and electricity are or will be under 
Greek Cypriot control. 

In fact, unhappiness on the pan of one side or the other 
seems guaranteed no matter what policies the community 
pursues. After the Turkish Cypriot declaration of indepen- 
dence in 1983, for example. EC foreign ministers quickly 
condemned the move and restated that the government of 
Cyprus was the only one recognized by the community. This 
pleased the Greek Cypriots, but (hey were soon voicing (heir 
dissatisfaction with me lack of action by the EC to stop 
member states from applying the same preferential tariffs to 
exports from northern Cyprus as they did to those from the 
Cypriot state. 

If the Turkish Cypriots are not penalized for their unilat- 
eral declaration, “then they win gel the feeling they can take 
any action they want," a Cypriot official in Brussels said. 

An official of one EC state said that while the Cypriot 
argument had merit "if you were to say that there is a 
separate entity, from which you don’t accept exports, you are 
accepting the division of the island; we want to avoid 
anything that would consolidate that division.” 


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Cyprus: Recent Developments and Prospects 


ADVERTISEMENT 


A high-level meeting in New York between the President of 
Cyprus, Mr. Spyros Kyprianou, representing the Greek Cypriot 
community and Mr. Rauf Denktash representing the Turkish Cypriot 
community ended on January 21, 1985. The Secretary-General of 
the United Nations sand at the end of the meeting that the gap 
between Greek Cypriots and Turkish Cypriots had never been so 
narrow. He also said that he had invited the two sides to meet 
again, if possible before the end of February. 

President Kyprianou, answering questions from the press stated 
that he did not consider the meeting o failure and expressed his 
willingness to participate in further high level meetings whenever 
the Secretary-General invited the parties. 

By contrast, the Turkish Cypriot leader said that he would not 
commit himself to any new date for a meeting, that he considered 
the meeting a, failure and implied that everything that had been 
agreed up to that a stage must be renegotiated. 

Inconsequentially to these stated positions, the Foreign Ministry 
of Turkey on January 22 stated that "The Greek Cypriot side has 
thus demonstrated that it does not favour a settlement to be 
reached through direct negotiations and that it will persist in 
undermining even the most genuine efforts for such a settlement”. 

An evaluation of these positions requires a consideration of the 
background to the high level meeting, of its course and further 
prospects. 

Background 

Cyprus, has, since 1974 been divided. The efivision was brought 
about by the armed forces of Turkey which in the course of an 
invasion forcibly separated the Greek Cypriot from the Turkish 
Cypriot population of Cyprus and have remained in occupation of 
the northern 37% of the area of the island ever since. 

Repeated calls from the United Nations General Assembly and 
Security Council for all foreign troops to withdraw from Cyprus 
were ignored, and in November, 1983 the occupied area of Cyprus 
was declared an "independent state". 

This development, dangerous both for peace in Cyprus and the 
region, aroused immediate and definite international reaction. The 
United Nations Security Council took the rare step of stating that 
were secessionist actions not rescinded it would consider taking 
urgent and appropriate measures, and in the same resolution (550) 
requested the Secretary-General of the United Nations "to under- 
take new efforts to attain an overall solution to the Cyprus 
Problem". 

Proximity talks 

In accord with this and previous U.N. resolutions, the Secretary- 
General held an extended series of talks with the President of 
Cyprus and the Turkish Cypriot leader between August and Decem- 
ber, 1984. At the end of these series of meetings, the Secretary- 
General considered that enough progress hod been made to justify 
calling a meeting between the President of Cyprus and the Turkish 
Cypriot leader for direct negotiations to be held instead of the 
"proximity talks" in which up to that the Secretary-General had 
talked separately to the two sides. 

During the period between the end of the proximity talks on 
December 12, 1984, and beginning of the high level meeting on 
January 17, 1985, the Cyprus Government maintained a stance of 
cautious optimism and restraint, avoiding any comments on the 
substance of the negotiations process as had been requested by the 
U.N. Secretary-General. 

At a press conference on December 22 President Kyprianou 
summarized developments as follows: 

“After the conclusion of the third round of proximity talks in 
New York i talked about cautious optimism. As I have already 
stated, this is perhaps the first time since 1974 that some optimism is 
justified. But there is still a fat of distance to be covered in order to 
reach an agreed framework of a solution to the Cyprus problem 
covering edl its basic aspects." 


Statements by the Turkish side before the high level meeting 

President Kyprianou maintained this restraint despite numerous 
statements From the Turkish side which were by no means calculated 
to promote a constuctive atmaspere. The Foreign Minister of Turkey 
was quoted as saying (Reuters despatch, January 15) that Turkey 
would still keep some troops in Cyprus following any settlement 
between the Greek and Turkish Cypriot communities. 

Since the crux of the Cyprus problem is to ensure the withdrawal 
of foreign troops so that the Cypriots can five free from foreign 
interference within a constitutional framework they will themselves 
formulate, this was a particularly worrying statement. 

Another worrying phenomenon before the meeting were certain 
statements by Mr. Denktash about what he expected at the meeting. 
For example on January 6 (Kribris Postasi) he repeated: 

"Since my return I have been repeating one thing. The draft at 
the agreement prepared in New York cannot be changed. Not □ 
single word or a comma in it could be changed." 

This was a paradoxical statement because in New York there 
had been progress, a dosing of the distance in views between the 
two sides, but not agreement. Part of the documentation which hod 
come out of the proximity talks was a document entitled “agenda" 
or "preliminary draft agreement". But the documentation before 
the high level meeting included other documents as well. And before 
an agreement could be reached solutions had to be found for 
outstanding important problems. The prospect of their solution at 
the high level meeting was in fact what gave rise to guarded 
optimism. 

Purpose of high level m ee ting 

In view of statements by the Turkish side such as the ones quoted, 
and others, the Cyprus Government repeatedly sought clarifications 
from the U.N. Secretary-General and the Secretariat and from 
various interested Governments. And there were repeated assur- 
ances that the purpose of the high level meeting was to negotiate 
further. 

At a press conference on December 19, 1984, the U.N. Secre- 
tary-General was asked: 

"There seems to be some disagreement between the two sides to 
the Cyprus question about the precise nature of the meeting which is 
to tote place here in New York on January 17. Is this going to be a 
negotiating session, or in your estimate is this something different? 

The Secretary-General hod replied: 

"As you can imagine, I do not see the meeting as a mere 
formality. What I expected from the meeting is a constructive 
discussion in which the parties will present their views on my 
presentation." 

The Cyprus Government received assurances about the purpose 
of the high level meeting from responsible sources. And the 
documentation which had come out of the proximity talks itself 
specified that negotiations had to take place at the high level 
meeting. The texts which were the documentation for the high level 
meeting, and which Mr. Denktash later insisted should be signed 
virtually as they stood, themselves specifically refer to negotiation at 
the high level meeting. For example, in the document entitled 
"Agenda" and "Preliminary draft agreement'' it is provided that 
territorial readjustments additional to the areas referred to in the 
Turkish proposals of August 5, 1981, would be agreed at the high 
level meeting and that the extent of these readjustments and the 
number of refugees who would return to their homes would be 
defined in the agreement that would emerge. 

On another crucial issue, the question of the withdrawal of 
foreign troops, there is specific provision in one of the documents 
before the high level meeting, that the timing of the withdrawal of 
foreign froops would be discussed at the high level meeting. 

With oil these facts and assurances before 'rf the Cyprus 
Government went to the high level meeting despite Mr. Denktash's 
public statements. It was clear that there had been progress during 
the proximity talks which gave rise to guarded optimism. And it was 


also dear that much work remained to be done during the high level 
meeting before an agreement could be reached. 

Tha high level meeting in New York 

In his opening statement at the first session of the high level 
meeting Mr. Perez de Cuellar indicated what was to be done during 
the meeting. 

The Secretary-General sad (U.N. Press Release CYP/85/1 
Nicosia, January 18, 1985): 

"I have with me the documentation that we worked on during 
the proximity talks and to which I referred in my report on 
December 72. To move from this documentation to the conclusion of 
an agreement is the responsibility that now has to be faced. We dl 
know that work needs to be done in order to accompfish that task 
within the outlines elaborated during the proximity tdks." 

President Kyprianou proceeded to indicate how he considered 
the move should be made from the existing documentation to an 
agreement and his view of the work which needed to be done. This 
was in accord with his acceptance of the documentation presented 
by the Secretory-General as a beers for negotiations aiming at a 
comprehensive overall solution to the Cyprus problem. 

Mr. Denktash refines to negotiate 

Mr. Denktash insisted that what the Secretary -General had 
referred to os "documentation" and "outlines" should be signed 
immediately, with, at the most, the filling in of some dates, and that 
dl the substartiol undarified issues should be relegated to commit- 
tees. 

And for four days, Mr. Denktash opposed any negotiation on 
the outstanding issues and paradoxically insisted on the immediate 
signing of the incomplete documentation which had come out of the - 
proximity talks. President Kyprianou could not of course have signed 
these incomplete documents. As he indicated later (Press Confer- 
ence, Nicosia, 26-1-1985): 

‘You would be the first to criticize me if I signed something and I 
was notina position to tell you what I signed. For instance if I signed 
and you asked me, 'Mr. President on tha territorial issue, what did 
you accept' my reply would be 'I do not know .” 

And on the same occasion, President Kyprianou explained that 
there had been progress during the proximity talks, but progress 
which had not yet led to agreement on crudd issues: 

"Because there was no agreement reached regarding the timing 
of the withdrawal of troops. There was no agreement on that 
matter because it had not yet been discussed. There was no 
agreement on the issues of guarantees, the territorial issue and the 
fundamental freedoms." 

Mr. Denktash’s insistence at the Ngh level meeting that the 
incomplete documentation be signed immediately and all outstand- 
ing issues relegated to “working groups" was contrary to one of the 
provisions in the preliminary draft agreement he wished to sign. 

The relevant paragraph of the text indicates that working 
groups would be set up in the light of political decisions to be 
agreed upon at the high level meeting so that the details of the 
agreement may be elaborated. This is an entirely reasonable 
provision, for what would have been the consequence of relegating 
to committees important issues such as the question of Turkish troop 
withdrawal and international guarantees? Well if they had not been 
solved at a high level meeting they certainly would not have been 
solved at committee level. They would have remained unsolved, 
with Cyprus divided, and the Turkish froops continuing to occupy 
part of Cyprus. 

The Secretory-General, after the failure of the high level 
meeting to reach agreement due to Mr. Denktash's refusal to 
negotiate outstanding problems, [Interview to Gordon Martin of the 
BBC, January 24, 1985) naturally denied that an agreement was 
available before the parties at the high level meeting. The documen- 
tation they hod before them, he said, reflected the interests of each 
side and contained elements which reflected flexibility from both 
sides. 


It must be remembered that the Security Council's mandate was, 
correctly, for an overall solution to the Cyprus problem. An 
agreement on certain constitutional issues which could not specify a 
time-table for the withdrawal of foreign troops from the island, 
would certainly not have been an overall solution. 

Unfortunately, at the high level meeting, the Turkish side, for 
reasons best known to them, demanded the signing of an incom- 
plete set of documents which had come out of the proximity talks 
without the slightest change and without any discussion or negotia- 
tion. That is why there was no agreement at the high level meeting. 

Conclusions from the meeting 

The high level meeting was unfortunately not able to overcome 
the difficulties end arrive at an agreed comprehensive framework 
for the solution of the Cyprus problem. 

But the fact that the meeting did take place has convincingly 
demonstrated that with concerted international effort, and the 
sustained efforts of the Secretary-General of the United Nations, 
progress is passible. 

President Kyprianou stated at the end of the meeting: “We do 
not regard the effort of the Secretary-General as having ended. On 
the contrary, we have agreed with him today formally and fully that 
he should continue and we are at his disposal to do whatever we 
can on our side." 

The Secretary-General himself, at the end of the talks said; 

"I believe that in the search for a solution of the; Cyprus question 
the gap has never been so narrow, and there is need to persevere. 
Accordingly, and as the parties ere ready to continue their direct 
contacts within the framework of the good offices mission entrusted 
to the Secretary-General, I will remain in touch with both sides with 
a view to their meeting again at a joint high-level meeting, if 
possible before the end of February, 1985." 

Prospects 

The Greek Cypriot side has every reason to wont an early 
solution of the Cyprus problem. This position has been repeatedly 
stated by the President of the Republic, the Government of Cyprus 
and all the major political parties. 

President Kyprianou during the New York meetings, proposed 
the setting up of a high level meeting to deal with the following four 
fundamental issues: 

а) the withdrawal of non-Cypriot troops; 

б) the territorial aspect; 

e) the question of the three fundamental freedoms; 

dj the question of guarantees. 

He has repeatedly stated his readiness to respond to Mr. de- 
Cuellar's invitation to a new high level meeting and to discuss in a 
constructive spirit the outstanding substantive issues. 

It is to be hoped that a similar will will be shown by the Turkish 
side and that it will desist from creating new barriers in the path to 
an agreement, keeping the way open to a dialogue in a spirit of 
good will so that a framework can be arrived at as soon as possible 
for a fair and lasting solution to foe Cyprus problem which would 
put an end to the hardships of all the people of Cyprus and lay the 
foundations of a peaceful, prosperous state. 

The narrowing of the gap already achieved points foe way for 
international efforts during the next few weeks. Progress has been ' 
achieved, and the gap has been narrowed in important respects. 
For those interested in a solution to the Cyprus problem foe courses 
dear. To work on dosing the gap on those issues which are still 
outstanding. 


Prepared by: 

PUBLIC INFORMATION OFFICE 
NICOSIA - CYPRUS 





) 


*1 

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Mqy 25 - June 9, 1985 


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A SPECIAL REPORT ON CYPRUS 


Incentives Have Made Country an Offshore Business Center 


NICOSIA — “Until tine late 
1970s Cyprus was not on the nop 
as a business center,” said Sopho- 
cles Michadides, the central bank’s 
exchange control officer. “Now no 
serious company can faD to take it 
into account-” 

What put Cyprus on the map 
was its decision in the months fol- 
lowing the Turkish invasion of the 
north in 1974 to boost foreign-ex- 
change revenue by promoting the 
island as a center of business and 
financial services to the Middle 
East In the years that followed, 
businessmen took advantage of the 
island’s geographical position as a 
European country on the doorstep 
of the Middle East, especially after 

the Lebanese civil war reduced Bei- 
rut’s attraction as a regional opera- 
tions base. 

The incentive to set up in Cyprus 

was its legislation, which gave off- 
shore companies a special status, 
being considered nonresident for 
exchange-control purposes. The 
benefits include corporate taxation 
at 4.25 percent, one-tenth the nor- 
mal rate, while offshore brandies 
managed from abroad are totally 
tax exempt No further tax is paid 
on dividends to beneficial owners, 
while half the normal tax rate of 60 
percent is levied on earnings of 
foreign snployees of offshore com- 
panies and only one-tenth is levied 
on foreign employees living outride 
Cyprus. 

Moreover, offshore companies 
are protected by a nondisenmina- 
tory legal system that dearly sets 
out the rights and obligations of 


shareholders and directors. What 
they must guarantee in return is 
that their activities will be restrict- 
ed to outside Cyprus, that no fi- 
nance wifi be raised locally, local 
expenses will be covered from im- 
ported funds and, for companies, 
paid-up capital will be at least 
1,000 Cyprus pounds ($665). 

Offshore entities are also al- 
lowed transit rights, including the 
warehousing and repacking of 
goods in Cyprus as long as the 
goods are re-exported without any 
changp in their customs tariff das-' 
sification. Initial interest was 
shown by British businessmen, who 
sought to take advantage of the oil 
boom of the 1970s and the benefits 


of having personnel in Cyprus in- 
stead of having them travel from 
Britain to the Middle EasL 
A year after offshore legislation 
was enacted, 86 companies had 
signed up. This time last year there 
were 2,600; today, there are more 
than 3,000. Half of them originate 
in Western Europe and North 
America, and most of the rest are 
from the Middle East, predomi- 
nantly Lebanese, who have found 
that running costs in Cyprus are 
about one- third those in other cen- 
ters such as Bahrain. They also Gnd 
an educated labor pool, a low crime 
rale, available housing, good 
weather and some of the best com- 
munications in the region. As one 


businessman put it. they live like 
permanent tourists in Cyprus. 

There are, however, some prob- 
lems. Some managers complain 
that the 20-percent surcharge on all 
Cypriot phone bills over a minimal 
base and outdated telex facilities 
that can only transmit at half the 
speed of modern machines can 
raise “taxation" from the 4.25 per- 
cent to about 6 percent. Red tape 
can be a problem, too. The paper- 
work to get various permits is com- 
plicated, there are few resident 
Arab embassies, which makes get- 
ting visas for Middle East coun tires 
difficult and the Cypriot banking 
system, while adequate, lacks auto- 
mation. 



Learning languages in a Nicosia hotel training school. 


Winegrowers Seek Appellation Contrdlee 


By Kerin Hope 

LIMASSOL —The vines of Cy- 
prus are credited with providing 
the original cuttings for some of 
Europe's most famous wines — 
champagne in France, Madeira, af- 
ter Portuguese settlers moved into 
the island, and even Hun garian to- 
kay. 

Hie island’s robust xynisteri 
white grape and its blade equiva- 
lent, mavro, are still going strong 
today. Cyprus produces more than 

200.000 tons (181,440 metric tons) 
of grapes annually of which about 

130.000 tons are used for winemak- 
ing. That makes the Cypriots one of 
the world’s largest per-capita vine 
producers, although they are rally 
moderate drinkers of wine. The 
Cypriot national drink is a light 
brandy produced entirely for do- 
mestic consumption. 


Cyprus exports more than 2 mil- 
lion gallons (over 151 million li- 
ters) of sherry to Britain annually. 
The Greek Cypriot catering trade 
in London remains a stable market 
for Cypriot table wine. Sherry ex- 
ports could be threatened by 
Spam's upcoming accession to the 
European Community. But wine 
industry officials say they are con- 
fident that Cyprus sherry can re- 
tain its market share in Britain. 

In 1983, total wine exports 
readied 8.7 million gallons a nd 
earned 17.2 million Cyprus pounds 
(about $25.8 million) in foreign ex- 
change. The island’s biggest 
customer is the Soviet Union, 
of wine in bulk have risen from 
about 300,000 gallons in the 
mid-1970s to 4.6 million gallons in 
1983, representing 41 parent of 
total wine exports. In addition, al- 
most 6 $00 tons of a locally dis- 
tilled spirit. zivania, is exported to 


the Soviet Union every year for use 
in vodka production. Exports of 
zivania were valued at SI. 7 million 
in 1983. 

“We barely cover our costs in 
exporting red wine to the Soviets, 
but that's better than having to 
stores surplus," said George Chris- 
lodoulou, marketing manager at 
Keo, one of the island's four major 
wineries, which are all located in 
the southern port city of LimassoL 

The government is trying to re- 
duce the surplus and boost exports 
of bottled laNe wine by persuading 
the island's 30,000 wine-growing 
families to experiment with new 
types of grapes imported from 
Western Europe. Upgraded Cyprus 
wine could then compete with Ital- 
ian and German varieties in mar- 
kets Hke the United States and Ja- 
pan. 

At present Cyprus exports only 


Working Up an Appetite in a Country 
Where Byzantine Methods Are Best 


NICOSIA — The best way to 
learn about cuisine in Cyprus is to 
experiment on meze, a delicious 
medley of hot and cold appetizers 
found at tavernas throughout the 
island. 

In more leisured times, me- 
zedhes, as they are known in the 
plural, took afl night to consume, 
with dishes arriving in the intervals 
of drinking and conversation. To- 
day also, they are best appreciated 
slowly. 

Mezc is familiar in different 
guises in Greece, Turkey and Leba- 
non. Thasos Ioannou, a Nicosia ta- 
verns owner and the island’s schol- 
ar of the cuisine, believes it is a 
survival from the days of the Byz- 
antine Empire “Byzantine cookery 
forms the basis of much European 
cuisine today; it spread all over the 
eastern Mediterranean before the 
Crusaders took it bade to France," 
he said. 

At his tavema, Mr. Ioannou in- 
dudes mezedhes that were popu lar 
in medieval Cyprus. One intriguing 
example is a dish of stewed green 
peppers in a dressing that indudes 
coriander and garlic 

But modern Cypriot meze is dis- 
tinguished by the island's unique 
specialties, such as haloumi cheese 
and hiromeri pork, and a range of 


Haloumi, a soft white cheese that 
recalls mozzarella, is served grilled, 
often on top of a thin slice of 
lountza, a smoked park filleL It is 
often accompanied with shavi 
of hiromeri, cut from a leg of _ 
marinated for 40 days in a mixture 
of sea salt and red wine, pressed 
under mills tones and smoked for 
an entire winter. It rivals Parma 

hn«i- 

The dips are familiar from else- 
where — tar amo sal ata , pink fish 
roe mixed to a smooth paste with 
breadcrumbs, dive oil and lemon 
juice; melitzanasalata, a puree of 
eggplant; and tahtni. ground seame 
seeds mixed with garde, cumin, ol- 
ive dl and lemon mice. Next come 
the omelettes, which in Cyprus 
consist of gently stirred combina- 
tions of eggs and vegetables, nota-. 
bly wild artichokes or wild aspara- 
gus. Fresh mushrooms are served 
grilled or sauteed in butter and 
sprinkled with broad-leaved Medi- 
terranean parsley. 

Later come samples of main 
dishes: rich tomato-based casse- 
roles of meat and vegetables known 
as yiakni, which are the basics of 
Cypriot cooking. Not to be missed 
is o/Wia, a neck-of-pork stew pre- 



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pared with red wine, onions and 
ground coriander seeds. Another 
pork stew includes kolokassi, aland 
of sweet potato. 

There arc grills, too — spiced 
sausages, miniature lamb cutlets 
and sheftelia. a ground-meat mix- 
ture cooked like a kebab. 

Meze is invariably accompanied 
with a dish of lemon halves, the, 
sharp-scented island variety that' 
Cypriots squeeze on everything, 
even fried eggs. 

The other national dish is klef- 
tiko lamb (“robbers’ lamb”), joints 
of lamb marinated for several 
hours in oil and lemon juice and 
cooked over embers in one of the 
domed day ovens that stand out- 
side tavernas and homes. 

“It’s named for the brigands who 
used to rustle a lamb and bury it. 
Then they lit an innocent-seeming 
fire on top, which cooked the un- 
derground joint" said Paris Chris- 
tofides, a cookery expat who runs 
a hotel in the mountains of south- 
ern Cyprus. 

Local sweets are Turkish delight 
— the best comes from the village 
of Yeroskipou — and saujoukos, 
which reomres much patience to 
make. A threaded string of walnuts 
or almonds is dipped repeatedly 
into a thick cream of baled 
juice until it produces a long 
roll, which is dried in the sun. 

— KERIN HOPE 


1 1,000 gallons of wine annually to 
the United States. 

“We need to spend more money 
on advertising in the United States 
and developing better marketing 
techniques there,” Andreas Petron- 
das. a senior official at the Com- 
merce Ministry, said. 

Cypriot growers are trying out 
more than 70 new grape varieties. 
They are also bring encouraged to 
accept stricter control over viticul- 
ture with a view to producing trines 
to a standard like ine French appel- 
lation contrdlee. 

Cyprus table wine already has a 
good reputation for consistency be- 
cause of (he small number of winer- 
ies on the island and a tradition of 
strict quality control 

But Commandaria, the sweet 
fortified dessert wine first pro- 
duced by the Crusaders in the 1 3 th 
century, is still the island’s -odly 
appellation contrdlee. Made from 
grown in a group of 12 vil- 
an the slopes of toe Troodos 
range, it is aged in oak casks and 
carefully blended. 

Traditionally, Cyprus white 
wines have an edge over the reds. 
Two dry refreshing white brands 
are Keo Hock and Arsnoe. Befia- 
pais, a slightly petillant white, is 
growing in popularity. Of the reds, 
which connoisseurs say have im- 
proved markedly in recent years, 
Dranaine d’Ahera is rated highly 
for its smooth flavor, and Semdi, 
for a dry fruity flavor. Coeur de 
Lion is considered the best of the 
rose wines. 

In the north of the island, Turk- 
ish Cypriots drink wine imported 
from Turkey, for vine-growing tra- 
ditionally has been confined to the 
Troodos district in the south of the 
island. 

But Turkish Cypriot vine grow- 
ers who moved north in the 1976 
exchange of populations took both 
the xynisteri ana mavro vines with 
them. Heavier soils and hotter tem- 
peratures in the lower-lying north 
at first raised problems for growers, 
according to Turkish Cypriot offi- 
cials. 

But their vines are now begin- 
ning to produce, and an agreement 
was signed earlier this month with a 
West Goman firm to build a win- 
ery in the Karp as peninsula, in the 
extreme north of the island. 

“The winery will be equipped 
with West G entian machine ry, and 
the West Germans also will provide 
the know-how; we intend to be- 
come wine exporters ourselves in 
the next couple of years,” said 
Ayfer Said Eremen, an economist 
at the Turkish Cypriot Hanning 
Bureau. 




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The central bank accepts that 
there have been administrative 
problems and that the last decade 
has seen Cyprus feeling its way in 
what was, after all, a new venture 
for the island- The next stqp will be 
the establishment this year of a 
de partmen t within the tank to act 
solely as the link between the off- 
shore companies and the Cypriot 
authorities. 

The comparatively low dropout 
rate — about 10 percent of the 
registered companies are dormant 

and the continuing number of 

applicants suggest that Cyprus is 
offering what the offshore market 
wants. 

Those companies taking advan- 


tage of Cyprus’s offshore regula- 
tions operate through local lawyers 
and accountants. These local repre- 
sentatives have raised -their compe- 
tency to the point where many are 
now international experts is dott 
ble taxation, legal planning and the 
for ma tion of companies. Forward- 
ing agents have also benefited, and 
Cypriot banking has had an in- 
crease in deposits. 

But where the tanking system 
has shown limitations is tn its do- 
mestic lending policy. Planners say - 
that this has not been a major re- 
straint on devdopmeoL as the fault 
ties mainly on the demand ride 

— GEORGE COATS 


Swift Recovery Lives 
Next to Stagnation 


(Continued From Page 7) 

effort is to attract high technology 
and export-oriented investment 
The incentives include the Larnaca 
Free Zone, a 10-year tax holiday 
far those who introduce a product 
not yet manufactured in Cyprus, 
and other projects aimed at mod- 
ernizing machinery and encourag- 
ing private companies to merge and 
go public. 

But so far, results have been 
modest despite a real increase in 
manufacturing investment of 15 
percent last year. Only one compa- 
ny has moved into the free zone 
and electronics and computer man- 
ufacturers have yet to appear on 
the scene. One of the problems is 
that, with unemployment now 
down to around 3j percent, labor 
availability is tight, although plan- 
ners point to a pool of 1,500 unem- 
ployed graduates. 

The new projects are vital to tbe 
south’s economy. Forecasts for 
1986 put tbe value of exports at 
about 418.9 million Cypriot 
pounds, way behind imports, 
which are expected to total 826.1 
mini on pounds. After including in- 
visible gammg s and agricultural 
exports of 108.1 millioa pounds 
and with petroleum products 
amounting to 20 percent of import 
costs, next year's payments deficit 
is expected to come to about 652 
millio n pounds. 

But if the south has its economic 
problems, the Turkish Cypriot 
north is in worse shape. Inflation 
last year reached 70.72 percent and 
while the dominant agricultural 
sector grew by 7.7 percent in real 
terms over 1983, manufacturing de- 
clined by 63 percent As in the 
south, the economy is heavily influ- 
enced by external factors. But 
while the Greek Cypriots were able 
to link their fortunes to a booming 


Middle East to fuel their recovery 
after 1974, the north was tied to a 
rapidly declining Tur kish econo- 
my. 

The importation of Turkey’s 
mo ri b und public-sector practices 
as a way of getting factories and 
. hotels expropnatedfrom the Greek 
Cypriots started again has acted as 
a brake on private initiative. Also 
imported was Turkey's rampant in- 
flation, while Turkey's correspond- 
ing high interest rates acted to ri- 
phon off Turkish Cypriot capitaL 

Further, the embargo on the 
north by the internationally 
nized Cypriot government in 
south has complicated trade in 
such previously dominant areas 
such as Kyrenia and Famagusta. 

Tukish Cypriot planners say 
that their economy is only kept 
afloat by large amounts of Turkish 
aid. and they agree that tbe only 
growth points in their economy are 
the inflation rate and the bodgetary 
and balance-of-payments deficits. 
But the Turkish embrace, although 
unavoidable, has been too tight for 
comfort. 

Plans to sever the Hnk with the 
Turkish lira have been mooted for 
years, only to be shrived, planners 
say, whenever there is an apparent 
move toward a Cyprus set dement 
But if prospects for a settlement 
have inhibited the development of 
the Turkish Cypriot economy, 
these economic problems have also 
contributed to Turkish Cypriot in- 
terest in a settlement 

Turkish Cypriots know that their 
per-capita income is one-third that 
in the sodth. And despite a theoret- 
ical mmunamwage, they know the 
reality of between ■ 15,000 and 
.20,000 Turkish liras a month 
(about S42 to $55) is less than one- 
sixth of that paid across the border. 
The planners have looked into the 
future and, as things now stand, it 
does not work. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1985 



Page 11 


. * C* - ' 




-- ; 


- .r- .. "J 








’'Z * 




2* 


_-V 


/ 


* * 

& 


A SPECIAL REPORT ON CYPRUS 


Fine Lace 
Of Lefkara 
Tops List of 
Handicrafts 


LEFKARA — - In niour, [fae 
laccmakers of Lefkara at grouped 
in twos and threes around a stove, 
chatting as they embroider table- 
cloths, placemats and na piring in 
complex, elegant desgnstnai their 
ancestors learned centuries ago 
from Venetian ladies. 

Lacemaking and silverwork have 
kept this southern hill village of 
pastel-blue houses and red-tiled 
roofs prosperous for as long as any- 
one can remember. Lcfkarans used 
to travel throughout Europe with 
suitcases Riled with lace for sale. 
Today, the customers are mostly 
tourists who are on the lookout Tor 
high-quality handicrafts. 

Lefkara lace, a combination of 
artwork and satin-stitch embroi- 
dery. is prized for its natural odors 
and the rich, intricate texture of its 
formal motifs. Tradition has it they 
were developed by the wives of the 
island's Venetian rulers, who spent 
their summers in Lefkara in the late 
Middle Ages. 

The government now imports 
unbleached Irish linen and fine 
white cotton thread for the lace- 
makers. women of all ages who 
learn the skill at home. 

“My eyes are still good, so lean 
work five or six hours a day without 
difficulty,'’ said Eleni Kapravami. 
73, who started embroidering more 
than 60 years a$o. 

She was working on a large table- 
cloth decorated with an elaborate 
zigzag “river” design that will take 
more than a year to complete. It 
will sell for more than $600. A 
smaller tablecloth with simpler 
decoration costs around $80, while 
placemats and napkins sell for 
about $25 each. 

About a dozen silversmiths also 



work in the village, all specialists in 
producing chased silver trays, cen- 
sers and filigree-decorated tea- 
spoons and pastry forks, which are 
traditional wedding presents in Cy- 
prus. 

Lefkara lace designs are also 
usedin the filigree work known as 
irifourenin. Thin threads of silver 
wire are twisted into delicate flower 
and leaf shapes and then worked 
into settings of solid silver. Spoons 
and forks are cast in old-fashioned 
iron molds. 

iriot silverwork is reasonably 
and Nicosia silversmiths 
also specialize in copies of ancient 
and Byzantine pottery and metal- 
work. Gold jewelry is also a good 
buy since 18-carat gold is available 
at prices normally paid for 9-canu 
in Western Europe. 

The island's other traditional 
crafts, rugs and weavings, pottery, 
leather goods, woodcarving, bas- 
kets and copperwarc, are all dis- 
played and sold at the Ministry of 
Commerce and Industry’s handi- 
craft center in Nicosia. 

Visitors can wander through a 


CONTRIBUTORS 

GEORGE COATS reports bom Athens for The Guardian and 
BBC. 

STEVEN J. DRYDEN, a Brussels-based journalist, writes a bi- 
weekly column on the European Community for the International 
Herald Tribune. He contributes regularly to The Washington Post 
and The Boston Globe. 

KERIN HOPE is a correspondent for the Associated Press in 
Athens. 

ANDRIANA IERODIACONOU is an Athens-based journalist 
who contributes to the International Herald Tribune. The 
Times and The Washington Post , . . . . 


dozen workshops set around a 
flower-filled courtyard where 
about SO artisans work or train in 
different crafts. The center was set 
up 10 years ago with the aid of the 
United Nations Development 
Fund and the International Labor 
Organization to rescue disappear- 
ing crafts and provide work for 
refugees from the north of Cyprus. 

“At that time, the center filled 
both a practical and a psychologi- 
cal need to keep people occupied 
and preserve crafts from their 
homes in the north. Now we also 
research folk arts and find ways of 
adapting traditional crafts to con- 
temporary life,” Pan gratis Hadjith- 
eodoulou, the center’s administra- 
tor, said. 

Woven cushion covers, curtains 
and bedspreads in brilliant slri 
reds and bright bands of _ 
white and green are based on tradi- 
tional designs from northern Cy- 
prus. 

From the south come the paphi- 
tika embroideries, striking geomet- 
ric patterns in bright colors woven 
on the loom on white cotton fabric. 

Last year, a new showcase for 
Cypriot handicrafts opened with 
die 1-ailri Yitonia (literally folk 
neighborhood;, a two-block pedes- 
trian area within the old walled city 
of Nicosia. Traditional two-story 
bouses with dark wooden balconies 
and shutters have been restored as 
handicraft shops and centers, cafes 
and tavemas. Artisans can also be 
watched at work there, from lace- 
makers to an icon painter and mo~ 
saidst 

And not to be forgotten are the 
Cyprus tailors, skilled craftsmen of 
a different kind who can make a 
classic three-piece suit in imported 
English fabric in just 72 hours. 

— KERIN HOPE 


- V* 



CYPRUS TELECOMMUNICATIONS 
AUTHORITY 

(CY.T.A.) 

P.Q.B. 4929, NICOSIA - CYPRUS 


The Cyprus Telecommunications Authority is a Public Corporation responsible for 
the provision, maintenance and development of a comprehensive telecommunications 
service both local and overseas. 

The Authority's development, seriously impaired because of the heavy capital and 
revenue losses sustained as a result of the 1974 Turkish Invasion (1/3 of the Authority’s 
installations are in areas still under the control of the invader), evidenced a miraculous 
recovery and the following services are now provided: 

1. 24-hour inland and overseas automatic telephone, tele- 
graph and telex service. 

2. 24-hour telegraph, radio telephone and telex service 
with ships at sea. 

3. Telecommunication service, with aircraft within the 
Cyprus Flight Information Region. 

4. Phototelegraph service. 

5. Telefax. 

6. Datel. 

Cyprus Telecommunications Authority occupies an enviable position among the 
countries with the biggest number of f SD countries connected onto their telephone system. 
At present eighty five (85) countries are connected on the Authority's ISD service and more 
than 95% of the world's telephones can be reached from Cyprus automatically. 

One hundred and ninety seven (197) countries can be contacted by telex automatical- 
ly and the rest of the world, where this service exists, via the operators. 

T7ie Satellite Earth Station "MAKARI05”. with an antenna towards the Atlantic 
Ocean, has been operating satisfactorily since April 1980 and a further improvement of the 
international network is the introduction of a satellite via the Indian Ocean Region in 1982 
with a Standard B. Antenna. The new Satellite is operating as from October, 1982. 

Another Cypms-Greece submarine Cable System, APOLLO, of 1,380 channel 
capacity has been operational since the end of 1981, thus increasing substantially the 
Authoritv’s number of international telephone and telex channels via cable. This is in 
addition to the "APHRODITE" and "ADONIS" Cable systems of 480 channels each 
operating already with Greece and Lebanon respectively . 

Full telecommunication service to all rural areas in the island will be provided within 
the next three years. 

The Authority keeps abreast with technical progress so that it can give to the general 
public a modem and efficient service. 


Moving Mountains to Get In on the Potato Boo] 


{Continued From Page 7) . 

Turkish Cypriot sector, and agri- 
cultural produce received the same 
preferential treatment as Greek 
iriot exports. A Greek Cypriot 



lypriol farm exports 
find their way into the community, 
often via Turkey. 

Agricultural produce is one of 
the island's few indigenous raw ma- 
terials, and its high added value 
makes the sector important for 
both communities. 

Farming contributes 1 1 percent 
of gross domestic product in the 
south and 34 percent of export 
earnings. More than 60 percent or 
agricultural exports go to EC coun- 
tries and the remainder to the East- 
ern bloc and Arab states. 

Citrus earnings totaled about 
$20.25 million in 1983 and exports 
of table grapes, which reach the 
British and west German markets 
several weeks earlier than Italian 
and French produce, brought 
about $5.1 million. Wines and spir- 
its — mostly sold in bulk to the 
Soviet Union — raisins and grape 
must earned $25.8 million. 

In the north, the farm sector ac- 
counts for 18 percent of gross do- 
mestic product and 78 percent of 
exports, with most going to the EC, 
Turkey and the Arab countries. 

Agricultural earnings from citrus 
and potatoes and sales of live sheep 
and goats totaled $15 milli on last 
year, Turkish Cypriot fanners, who 
introduced vines to the north eight 
years ago, also exported 300 tons of 
table grapes last year for the first 
time. But in both sides of the is- 
land, development of water sup- 
plies for irrigation remains the key 
to boosting agricultural develop- 
ment In the north, where 60 per- 
cent of residents are full-time farm- 
ers, the focus has been on 
recovering dried-out duns groves 



mil lilt W x n utf ni l«c A r ch— UMrf 

Agriculture is important to both communities. 


in the Morpbour and Famagusta 
areas with aid from Turkey. 

In the south, where fanners 
make up just 20 percent of the 
labor force and two- thirds erf them 
work the land on a part-time basis, 
sophisticated irrigation projects 
have production of ba- 

nanas and avocados and encour- 
aged experiments with exotic vari- 
eties like kiwi and passion fruit and 
mangoes. But slow progress toward 
a long-promised customs union 
with the EC makes the outlook un- 
certain for Greek Cypriot agricul- 
ture, while Spanish and Portuguese 
accession mil affect both potato 
and citrus exports to the communi- 
ty. 

“It's very difficult to plan at pre- 
sent; we're in a vacuum because of 
the situation in Brussels. We fight 
hard for our quotas but what comes 
next is guesswork.” Mr. Papasolo- 
mondos said. 

Greek Cypriot offidals blame 
the island’s political problems for 
the delay. But they also suspect 
that the European Commission 
fears that a customs union with 
Cyprus may set an awkward prece- 


dent for future relationships with 
other Mediterranean countries. 

Meanwhile, two major irrigation 
plans, the $30- million Paphos pro- 
ject in the south and the $ 15-mil- 
lion Pitsflia project on the southern 
of the Ti 


sourios. the district agricultural of- 
ficer , said 

The Chrysochou project now un- 
der way will open up another 4,000 
hectares for irrigation. The biggest 
development of all, the Southern 
Conveyor project, will be ready by 
the end of the century. 

It wiQ bring water from the 
Troodos to the red-soil potato- 
growing villages in the east, where 

calinatinn has Hamayt rh* existing 

irrigation network, la an unusual 
baiter deal, the Soviet Union has 
offered to provide pipes, pumps 
and expertise for the project in re- 
turn for vine products. In the north, 
the Turkish government has con-' 
vibuted $16 million and technical 
assistance for the Morphou irriga- 
tion project to divert water to the 
region’s citrus groves. The project 
is now two-thirds completed. 


Turkish Cypriot officials also are 
encouraging mixed fanning in the 
north. Cows graze under the olive 


trees around Kyrenia on the north- 1 
era coast and a new dairy plant on , 
the Karpas peninsula is due for j 
completion later this year. 

“Development in processing j 
both meat and daily products for 
export has become a top priority,” 
said Huseyin Gultekin. president I 
of the Turkish Cypriot Fanners' 
Association. He said a modem 
slaughterhouse now under con- 
struction near Nicosia would be 
ready for operation “in another few 
months.” 

Now that vines imported from i 
the south have reached maturity. 
Turkish Cypriot growers look for- 1 
ward to producing wine in northern 
Cyprus for the first time. 


slopes 


froodos mountain 


ing an additional 6,500 hectares 
{ 16.000 acres) under cultivation. A 
third project, the Vassilikos-Pen- 
daskinos development, near Limas- 
sol and due for completion this 
year at a cost of 5 30 million, v HI 
irrigate another 1,300 hectares. 

In the dry stony mountains of 
the Pitsilia region. 1,730 hectares 
have been cleared in terraces where 
vegetables now sprout between 
knee-high mandarin trees, each ir- 
rigated automatically by an indi- 
vidual sprinkler. Water is pumped 
from 19 artificial ponds scattered 
around the district. 

The protect, assisted by the 
World Bank, has given the area a 
new lease on life. 

“Farmers are planting new vari- 
eties of vine, experimenting with 
potato growing and introducing 
cherries up here; the flight to the 
towns has stopped,” Demos Pis- 


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Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25. 1985 


ft 


This announcement appears as a matter of recant only. 

Tile Motes were offered and sold outside of the United States of America. 



Ford Motor Credit Company 

U.S. $100,000,000 
1 1%% Notes due February 15, 1990 

US. $100,000,000 
12% Notes due February 15, 1995 


Goldman Sachs International Cap. 

Deutsche Bank Aktiengesellschaft 

Swiss Bank Corporation International Limited 

Union Bank of Switzerland (Securities) Limited 

Commerzbank Aktiengesellschaft 

Banque Nationale de Paris County Bank Limited 

Credit Suisse First Boston Limited Merrill Lynch Capital Markets 

Samuel Montagu & Co. Limited Morgan Guaranty Ltd 

Morgan Stanley International Salomon Brothers International Limited 

Socifetfe Generale de Banque S.A.' Sumitomo Finance International 

January. 1985 


This announcement appears as a matter of record only. ■ 

The Notes were offered and sold outside of (he UhUed States of America. 


U.S. $300,000,000 

Chemical New York Corporation 

Floating Rate Subordinated Capital Notes Due 1997 


Goldman Sachs International Corp. 

AI-Mal Group Amro International Limited Arab Banking Corporation (ABC) 

Banca Commerdale Italiana Banco di Roma Banque Bruxelles Lambert S.A. 

Banque Indosuez Banque Internationale a Luxembourg S.A. Banque Paribas Capital Markets 
Commerzbank Aktiengesellschaft Credit Lyoraiais Dai -l chi Kangyo International Limited 

Daiwa Bank (Capital Management) Ltd. Daiwa Europe Limited DG BANK 

DculdicGamiRilchfldmb 

Dresdner Bank Aktiengesellschaft Enskilda Securities European Banking Company Limited 
First Chicago Limited F “P International Finance Limited 

Girozentrale und Bank der osterreichischen Sparkassen Gulf International Bank B.S.C. 

Aktiengeseihchaft 

IBJ International Limited KJeinwort, Benson Limited 

Kuwait Foreign Trading Contracting & Investment Co. (SA.K.) Kyowa Bank Nederland N.V. 
Lehman Brothers International LTCB International Limited 

Sheinon Lehman/ Ameris*n Exprcta Inc 

| M:t— ki.h; Finance International Limited Mitsubishi Trust & Banking Corporation (Europe) S.A. 

Mitsui Finance International Limited Mitsui Trust Bank (Europe) S-A. 

Montagu & Co. Limited Morgan Grenfell & Co. Limited Morgan Stanley International 

Orion Royal Bank Limited 

Sumitomo Finance International 
Svenska Handelsbanken Group 
The Taiyo Kobe Bank (Luxembourg) S.A. 

Tokai International Limited 


Nippon Credit International (HK) Limited 
Osterreichische Landerbank Aktiengesellschaft 
Sumitomo Trust International Limited 
Swiss Bank Corporation International Limited 
Takugin International Bank (Europe) S.A. 

Toyo Trust International Limited Union Bank of Switzerland (Securities) Limited 

Wardley London Limited Yamaichi International (Europe) Limited Yasuda Trust Europe Limited 

February. 1995 


This announcement appears as a matter of record only. 

The Nines were offered and sold outside of the United States of America. 


U.S. $125,000,000 

9 The Signal Companies, Inc. 

11%% Notes due February 20, 1992 


Goldman Sachs International Corp. 

Lazard Fr&rea & Co. 

Swiss Bank Corporation Internationa] Limited 

Bank of Tokyo International Limited 


Algemene Bank Nederland N.V. 

Banque Bruxelles Lambert S.A. 

Chase Manhattan Capital Markets Group 

Qw MwfaatUn Limited 

Morgan Grenfell & Co. Limited 
Nomura International Limited 
Union Bank of Switzerland (Securities) Limited 
Banca del Gottardo 
Bank Leu International Ltd. 


Banque Nationale de Paris 
Deutsche Bank Aktiengesellschaft 
Morgan Guaranty Ltd 
Salomon Brothers International Limited 
Julius Baca* International Limited 
Bank Gutzwiller, Kurz, Bungener (Overseas) Limited 
Banque Populaire Suisse S.A. Luxembourg 


Banque Scandinave en Suisse 


February. 1985 


Compagnie de Banque et d’lnvestisseraents, CB1 
Great Pacific Capital S. A. 


This annowncement appears as a matter of record only. 

The Notes and Warrants were offered and sold autstdeaj the Untied States oj America. 



**_';'* «_■ r ■ r - 
'Of: *■' f.'f" 

'is i ‘i 

•. . .. : '.X •; 


Mitsui Finance Asia Limited 

(Incorporated with limited liability In the Cayman Islandsl 

U.S. $100,000,000 

12% per cent. Guaranteed Notes due 1992 
and 100,000 Warrants to subscribe U.S. $100,000,000 
12% per cent. Guaranteed Notes due 1992 

Unconditionally guaranteed as to payment or principal, premium (If any] and interest by 

The Mitsui Bank, Limited 

(Kabushiki Kaiaha Mitsui Ginko) 

(Incorporated with limited liability (n Japan] 


Mitsui Finance International Limited Goldman Sachs International Corp. 

Hambros Bank Limited Morgan Guaranty Ltd 

Salomon Brothers International Limited 


BankAmerica Capital Markets Group 
Bankers Trust International Limited 
Chemical Bank International limited 
Commerzbank Aktiengesellschaft 
Credit Suisse First Boston Limited 
Lehman Brothers International 


Bank Leu International Ltd. 

Chase Manhattan Capital Markets Group 

Owe MmhiHm Limited 


Citicorp Capita] Markets Group 
County Bank Limited Credit Lyonnais 

Daiwa Europe Limited Kleinwort, Benson Limited 

Merrill Lynch Capital Markets 
Samuel Montagu & Co. Limited Morgan Grenfell & Co, Limited Morgan Stanley Internationa) 
Nomura International Limited Orion Royal Bank Limited 

Sodete Generale 
S. G. Warburg & Co. Ltd, 


Smith Barney, Harris Upham & Co. 

bnqNnlal 


Sodete Generale de Banque S.A. 

February. 1985 


i 

) 


tm 


— t 




MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1985 


HcralbSEEribunc 


BUSINESS / FINANCE 



Page 13 


EUROBONDS 


*n c . 


■ - ^ r 




*.»- ' A 


Surprisingly Short Life 
For New Mini-Max Floaters 


ByCAJRLGEWIRTZ 

International Herald Tribune 

P ARIS — Fads come and go. But even by Eurobond 
market standards, where the pace of change is hectic, the 
popularity of the mini-max floater initialed last week had 
a startlingly short life. 

By Friday, the four issues were trading at substantial discounts 
— indicating extreme market disfavor with the concept. 

Mini-max is so called because it corsets the interest cost of the 
borrower between a minimum (10 percent for Denmark, Com- 
merzbank "and Swedish Export Credit; 10ft percent for Chris- 
tiana Bank) and a maximum charge (1 Hi potent for Christiana, 
1H* for Swedish Export and 11% percent for Denmark and 
Commerzbank). 

At the launch, the minimum coupon represented a theoretical 
gain for investors: The London interbank offered rate was 9Vi 
percent and the mar gins to 

be paid by the borrowers — — — 

ranging from Vs to tt-point Eurobond Yields 
over Libor — would have in- W«k Ended Rrb. 20 

S:»! 0 «i' r .™r 5 l= WAS 

10 percent had there been no u.sj medium term, ina. _ iijv ■$, 

minimum. ConJ medium term I2J3 % 

The coupons in fact will French Fr. medium term 1186 % 

not ll TIT *7*7 “ ‘ Sterling medium term _ 11.17 % 

not De set for some weeks. Yen medium term, inti Insl. 7.43% 

And in the meantime Libor Yen ig term, inn insi. 12 * % 

has drifted higher, closin g ECU short lerm 9.61 % 

the wivt it 0.15/1 A i lt rrji 1 1 1 ECU medium term .... 1IL21 % 

the week at 9-iy (6 percent £CU Jeno jerm )0J2 * 

At that rate, of course, the eua long term »J 2 % 

10-percent minimum is of no FLx kg term, int'l insl. 10.18 % 

appeal as the initial coupon FLx m * dlum ,erm *as ^ 

(except for Christiana) would J****** *■ 


be paid by the borrowers — - — 

ranging from Vs to tt-point Eurobond Yields 
over Libor — would have in- W«k Ended Feb. 20 

S:»! 0 «i' r .™r 5 l= WAS 

10 percent had there been no u.sj medium term, ina. _ ujv % 

minimum. Cans medium term 1Z23 % 

The coupons in fact will French Fr. medium term it as % 

nor he VrTrnT cmni wJEc VUUm raedlum ,erm — H.W * 

not De set for some weeks. Yen medium term, inn Insl. 7.43 % 

And in the meantime Libor yen ig term, inn insi. 72* % 

has drifted higher, closing ecu s * 1 ° r1 iwm mi % 

t hp week it 0.1 5/ IX iLrrrjnl ECU medium term .... 1821 % 

rf X™ al **7 16 P” 0 ®* 1 - ECU long term 1032 % 

Al that rate, of course, the eua long term »J 2 % 

10-percent minimum is of no FLx ig term, ini'l insl. 10.18 % 

appeal as the initial coupon FLx m * dlum ,erm *as ^ 

(except for Christiana) would ** *• 

have to be set over 10 per- 
cent- Market Turnover 

Beyond the ups and downs For Wgdk Ended Feb. 21 
of short-term interest rates, {M,nooa 01 UJL 0o,kK *' mu** 
there was widespread criti- ratttt oattar Ecaoeaieat 

cisrn of the concern c«tel 15.161* Ram 3237a 

cismor toe concept. Eurocieor 3CU75JJ 2?«3Ji 22718 

While the relatively high 

minimum coupon generates 

some enthusiasm (the standard minimum on traditional floating- 
rate notes is 514 percent), it is not enough to off sei the drawback 
of the maximum rate. Critics argue that any investor willing to 
accept the possibility of getting locked into the maximum coupon 
if interest rates soar would do better to buy the outstanding fixed- 
coupon bonds of these borrowers (except Christiana which has 
only tapped the FRN sector). Their paper could currently be 
bought for yields close to or exceeding the guaranteed- maximum 
on the FRNs. 

The essential criticism is that the mini-max is neither an FRN 
nor a fixed-rate bond. It does not appeal to FRN buyers — 
largely banks — who want the assured comfort of knowing they 
will earn a fixed margin over Libor, which floats up or down in 
relation to their own funding costs of Libid (the interbank bid 
rate). 

A ND it does not appeal to fixed-income investors wbo cur- 
rentfy would be asked to accept a yield of just over 10 
J-JL percent from borrowers who should pay much more than 
that for fixed-rate money. 

The criticism might have been less vocal if short-term interest • 
rales had not risen, as much as they did last week — if the 
minimum coupon would have represented a comfortable gain 
over what a normal FRN would pay. 

But that was not the case. Bond markets last week heard Paul 
A Vdcker, the Federal Reserve Board chairman, tell Congress 
that policy was currently neutral, aiming neither to Iowa rales 
nor to raise them. This was not news; it confirmed what the 
market had already interpreted from the Fed's actions. 

But that was followed by news of a one-percentage-poim 
increase in the fourth-quarter rate of economic expansion, now 
put at a 4.9 percent animal rate. The size of the revision was a 
surprise. 

Markets read that as meaning the Fed would be under no 
pressure to Iowa- interest rales, that the business expansion was 
m no danger of stumbliag and that there was only one direction 
for Fed policy to change — namely less accommodation. 

“Money [supply] growth is pushing ahead vigorously with M-l 
increasing at an annual rate of 9 percent in January and perhaps 
more than 10 percent in February," said Henry Kaufman, the . 
noted Salomon Brothers economist. He added: “There is no 
known law of monetary economics that would suggest that 
money and credit growth will subside on its own account, 
particularly given the huge financing needs of the U23. Treasury 
and the enlarged credit demands from the private sector that will 
be associated with real growth of 5 percent, or perhaps higher, in 
several of the next few quarters.” 

This widely shared outlook cast a pall over bond markets as 
(Continued on Page 15, CoL 2) 


Last Week’s Markets 

Alt figures are cool dose of trading Friday 


Stock Indexes 

United States 

umml Pmm %a»ne 

DJ Indus U7&B4 1JB2 jQ2 — (MB 

DJUtti. 14927 15085 —078 

DJ Trans. _ 625.11 62971 —085 

S&P 100 IK82 T77JS — 188 

S & P 500 179X7 18120 —183 

NYSE Cp V04JJ1 10587 —180 

mu ft i w fww w n o r a wn * 


Money Rates 


United States umwi piwjnk. 


Discount rota... ... 

Federal fund* rota— 
Prime rate 


8 8 

B50 850 

1050 1050 


FTSE 100— NA 188120 — 

FT 30 97580 981.10 -021 


Discount...— .... 
Call money ..— ■■ 
Afrdav Interbank. 


Overnight 

1 -month interbank— 


„ Bank base rate— 14 14 

HangSeno- 1235.17 1205.93 +284 Coll money WWi M 

3^aonlhtn1ert«nk— 14v» 13V? 

■Jupwi DoBar ust ml pmJML % arse 

NHdcHDJ— 12,14786 12,1409 —081 — 

Bk Engl Index _ KA. 1SLD — 

West German Goid 

CDnvnerzbk 1,17680 1,16220 +1.16 London ojn. fix. S 29820 30COB -184 

HxHLS.bdt*tstnrBJma CmMtCa* Ltadan. RtdHadgsMdtohmaiaeUImJmusljaBtL 


NHrtuHDJ 12,14786 12,1409 —081 


Currency Rates 


Late inter bank rates on Feb. 22 , exducfing fees. 

Offidd fbdngs for Amsterdam, Brussek, Frankfwt, Mikxi, Paris. New York rates at 
4 P.M. 


Amsterdam 3832 4.125 

hwnblo) 668425 30575 

FraaHorl 38B 3245 

London DO 187*5 

Ml km 2.10630 2864J0 

NewYeriKd 1875 

Porto 10338 11.132 

Tokyo 362875 2M89 

zorica 1256 82673 

1 ECU 1*573 02114 

1 SDR 0.953002 02041 


02(24 Antrim scMHne 
•2148 BH l mlia.fr— c 

0721 QMBni 
amt OeaMrfcnmt 
8.1444 Ftapriili markka 
00074 Creek H ra d u en 
U2B MeeKsoat 


Dollar Valoes 

mL c ™ J 

8929 Irbh > 1 

80014 ttrarfl SJwkM 7 

UIH KeMBHAMr 8 

68093 MUnr.rtanit 2 

81094 Nm.kraee 
02552 PMLPtfe « 

0JDS6 Pert, ocvdo 11 

0279 leutf rtyel 


S.F. Yea 
1309 -145.93 v 
232775 2592 • 
11024 - on- 
3876 28135 
737 JO tuns 
2257 26225 
3222532376- 

9222 

120*7- 

18701 172.720 
17164 24961 


E«to. CmBCT 050 

044OB saoonns isos 

04945 S.AtrtcxH rsw> 7.0777 
88012 5 Kenan m 04890 
80034 Sera, peseta ’9520 
8KB0 SwHLkiW 9496 
02235 Tahemt 3922 
08336 Thai DOM 20895 
08722 UJLE.iBf1Mm 36735 


■stcmag;iJ7i Irish * 

(ol Ce mnmtM t r g x : (D1 hmnuntaPerdod to hw bob pwmd tel Amounanetded to bwv one del k>r I*) 
Unlttef W 1*1 UWts otlJBf lyJUrifitflUW 

N8U nalnuat6dj NJL: iwrt avalkfclt. 

Sources r Ofli—w du Benelux {Brussels}; Banco CommenUale Hafftmo (Mlkfal; Chemical 
Book {Hew Yor*>: Banaue NOttamie de Ptris l Paris); IMF (SDR); Bantwe Arabe of 
(nfvmtiooet* rmrvmllssemert (dinar, rind, dbfram). Otneettofofran Reuters and AP. 


Algeria, 
Spain End 
Gas Rift 

Madrid to Pay 
Compensation 

Reuters 

PARIS — Spain has signed a 23- 
year agreement to resume pur- 
chases of Algerian liquefied natural 
gas, ending a four-year price dis- 
pute in which deliveries had been 
suspended, the Algerian News 
Agency said Sunday. 

Value of the accord, signed in 
Algiers on Saturday, was not dis- 
closed. But Spanish sources said 
Madrid had agreed 10 pay S3.B4 per 
million British thermal units, about 
51 more than it was paying under 
the original contract, but well be- 
low the $5 to $5 JO that Algeria bad 
originally been seeking 

In addition, Spain agreed to pay 
Algeria for its failure to take deliv- 
ery of the 4.5 billion cubic meters 
(157.5 billion cubic feet) of gas a 
year provided for by the original 
contract. 

The agency did not say how 
much compensation Spain would 
pay, but diplomatic sources put the 
figure at 5500 million. Algeria also 
granted a six-year grace period dur- 
ing which Spain would increase gas 
imports to 3.8 billion cubic meters. 

Because its distribution network 
could not absorb all the gas and 
because of a decline in demand, 
Spain took only 13 billion cubic 
meters a year, Spanish sources said. 

Several countries, including Ita- 
ly, France and the United Stales, 
suspended or cancelled outright 
purchases of Algeria's natural gas 
when it sought to force up the pric e 
to rough parity, in toms of BTU 
content, with crude oil But Algeria 
lost much of its leverage in Europe 
when the Soviet Union emerged as 
a huge new supplier, and most of 
the disputes have been settled. 


Chesebrough Move Raises Eyebrows B&ttk ill 60S tOH 

StaufferMerger WaiHed of LaW, 

U.S. Official Says 


Stauffer Merger 
Seen as Bid to 
Avert Takeover 

By Daniel F. Cuff 

New Tori. Tunes Service 

NEW YORK. — Chese- 
brough-Pond’s Inc. is one of the 
Tew companies that get high 
marks cm Wall Street for excep- 
tional skill in making acquisi- 
tions. But not so with its latest 
maneuver. 

For decades. Chesebrough- 
Pond’s manufactured and mar- 
keted such stalwart products as 
Vaseline petroleum jelly. Pond's 
cold cream and other home-care 
and cosmetic products. Then, 
some 15 years ago, the company 
started to add sudi items as spa- 
ghetti sauce, tennis racquets, 
shoes and children's clothes. 

Disparate though they were, 
they were part of a grand strate- 
gy that made good economic 
sense. The acquisition strategy, 
according to analysts, was to buy 
what Chesebrough- Pond's con- 
sidered undermarketed brands 
and expand them. 

Ragu spaghetti sauce, for ex- 
ample, was a regional brand 
made in Rochester, New York, 
when Cheseb rough-Pond’s took 
it over in 1969 for $44 million. 
Chesebrough marketed the sauce 
skillfully across the United 
States. In the first nine months of 
last year, the company sold 5250 
million worth of Ragu. 

The diversification strategy al- 
lowed Chesebrough-Pond's, 
based in Greenwich, Connecti- 
cut. to continue its enviable re- 
cord of earnings and dividend 
growth. Until things soured last 
year, it had reported 28 consecu- 
tive years of increasing profit. 

Now, Chesebrough says it 
plans to add the Stauffer Chemi- 
cal Col, but as Wall Street sees it, 
the proposed acquisition does 


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not mesh with the company's 
prior strategy. 

Analysts size up the Stauffer 
move as a transparent attempt 
by Chesebrough to protect itself 
from being taken over. Analysts 
said there appeared to be few 
business opportunities is the 
proposed SI. 25-billion link be- 
tween Stauffer’s chemical opera- 
tions and Chesebrough 's brand- 
ed products business. 

The latest move comes while 
the conippy is still under the 
stewardship of its acquisition 
strategist, Ralph E Ward, chair- 
man and chief executive. It was 
Mr. Ward who caused conster- 
nation in the board room when 
he bought Ragu 1 6 years ago and 


-$19mfHlon 


TV Nw Yoti Tmea 


pitted the company against such 
food giants as H_J. Heinz Co, 
Campbell Soup Co. and Hunt- 
Wesson. 

But Mr. Ward made it work 
and be went on to apply some of 
the same principles in the acqui- 
sition of Health-lex children's 
do thing, Bass shoes and Prince 
tennis racquets. 

Ail these products were an odd 
fit with the company’s 80-year- 
old Pond’s cold cream and its 
Vaseline petroleum jdly, which 
goes baa 115 years. But they 
had (me thing in common: a 
strong brand name. 

So Chesebrough-Pond’s be- 
came a highly diversified, con- 
(Contmoed on Page 15, CoL 1) 


By James Stem gold 

Net t York Times Service 

NEW YORK — First National 
Bank of Boston, which has main- 
tained that it was not aware until 
Iasi year or a 1980 law requiring it 
to report international currency 
transactions, was the subject of ah 
extensive examination in 1982 by 
the Comptroller of the Currency 
that concentrated on its large cash 
tra n sfers, the government's chief 
bank examiner says. 

In addition, the bank received at 
least four notifications from the 
Comptroller between 1980 and 
1984 that the law requiring the re- 
ports to the government bad been 
tightened, banking officials said. 

The law. known as the Bank Se- 
crecy Act, was enacted in 1970 to 
help the government trace money 
laundered by organized crime. 

Two weeks ago, the bank plead- 
ed guilty to a felony charge of hav- 
ing failed to properly report 51.22 
billion in international currency 
transactions, mostly with Swiss 
banks, from July 1980 to Septem- 
ber 1 984. It was fined 5500,000, the 
maximum for the offense. 

At a news conference on Feb. 1 1, 
bank officials main tain ed tha t (he 
reason the reports were not filed 
with the Internal Revenue Service 
was because, when the changes 
were published in the Federal Reg- 
ister, they were not noticed by bank 
officers. The bank on Friday again 
said it had simply missed the 



But officials in the comptroller’s 
office, which regulates nationally 
chartered banks, said that four no- 
tifications of the changes were sent 
to the Bank of Boston and other 
national banks. 

Al] the notices were addressed to 


William L. Brown. 

the bank's chief executive, William 
E Brown. 

In addition, the comptroller’s of- 
fice received a recommendation 
from the Treasury Department in 
1982 to perform an extended ex- 
amination of the bank, John F. 
Downey, chief national bank ex- 
aminer, said in Washington. The 
comptroller was asked to look at 
compliance with the laws requiring 
reports of Luge cash transactions, 
both domestic and international 

That examination look place 
from September to November 
1982. Mr. Downey said. 

He said that by taking special 
note of the Bank of Boston’s cur- 
rency transactions, “it was a clear 
signal to them that we were were 
interested in this area.” Still, the 
bank did not file the currency 
transaction reports for the interna- 
tional transactions. 


Volvo Baying Iranian Ofl A Dizzying Slide Carries Canada’s Dollar Toward 70 Cents 

to u.i...i. ...j:.. ...Uii nf 


AB Volvo’s oil trading subsid- 
iary, Scandinavian Trading Co., 
has agreed to buy 5250 million 
worth of oil from Iran in 1985, 
Reuters reported Sunday from 
Stockholm. 

Scandinavian Trading's manag- 
ing director, Jan Danidsson, said 
the company would reseD the oil to 
the highest bidder but did not dis- 
close the price per barrel agreed to 
in the purchase. 

A finance ministry official said 
Iranian ofl sales to Sweden would 
total $400 million in 1985. 


CompHtd by Our Staff From Dispatches 

TORONTO — The Canadian dollar 
dropped so low last week that newspaper 
cartoonists began poking fun at the belea- 
guered currency. 

14 Buckingham Palace is on the phone," 
Finance Minister Michael Wilson lelLs .Prime 
Minister Brian Mulroney in an editorial car- 
toon in The Globe and Mail “The Queen 
wants her face removed from the doflar." 

Indeed, the value of the currency fed so 
quickly last week that money traders and 
exchange dealers speculated that Canada 
could be headed for a dollar worth 70 UB. 


cents by the end of this week, although at 
least one dealer disagreed. 

“I would hazard a guess that around 72 
cents is the bottom,” said Rod Fowler, for- 
eign exchange manager at Wood Gundy Ltd. 

One trader described it as the worst week 
ever for the Canadian dollar, in terms of 
rapidity of decline. 

The currency opened the week al 74.65 
cents and fell to as low as 71.78 Friday 
before settling in late trading al 72.1 cents. 

“The U.S. dollar has been rising against all 
the world's currencies," said Bany Daven- 
port, a vice president of the Bank of Montre- 
al. “What we’ve got is a super U.S. dollar." 


Evidence of mounting concern over the 
Canadian dollar was the widening of quote 
spreads, analysts said. The normal bid-and- 
offer spread far the currency is about three 
points, hut during trading Friday it soared to 
20 points, dealers noted. 

On Thursday, the Bank of Canada pegged 
its key rate at 10.95 percent, up from 10.48 
percent a week earlier. 

Earlier in the week, Mr. Wilson was forced 
to borrow $500 million from international 
bankers to add to the government's reserve 


part of Ottawa to defend the dollar at current 
levels.” 

Some dealers also said the Canadian dol- 
lar’s run may have been exacerbated last 
week from effects of the sale of 495 million 
dollars of shares in Texaco Canada Inc. 

The sale, the largest stock sale in Canadian 
history, involved 14 million-shares by Texaco 
Canada’s U.S. parent, Texaco Inc., as part of 
a transaction mat will allow it to take over 
another Canadian oil company. 

The Canadian dollar has beat falling since 
November 1976, when it took 97 Canadian 
cents to get $1 on the spot market. 

((/PI, Reuters) 


7 Firms Acquire Stake in DaimchiKiko 

Reuters 

TOKYO — Seven foreign companies have acquired a total of 160,000 
shares, valued at 436 billion yea ($16.6 million), in Daimchi Kio Corp-, 
a Japanese manufacturer of industrial robots, a company spokesman said 
Sunday. 

The companies include Baring Internationa] Investment Management 
LuL, with 40,000 shares. Royal Bank of Scotland PLC, with 30,000 
shares, and Phillips & Drew, with 20,000 shares, the spokesman said. He 
did not identify tne other four companies. 

The transaction continues a trend of foreign companies acquiring 
interests in the Japanese robot industry. 


All these Bonds have been sold. This announcement appears as a matter of record only. 


NEW ISSUE 


February 1985 


Orders Rise 
ForU.S.-Made 
Factory Took 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Orders for U.S.- 
made machine tools, a closely 
watched indicator of economic 
health, rose 12.1 percent in January 
from a year ago, the industry’s 
trade association said Sunday. 

But the National Association of 
Machine Tod Builders added that 
the net orders for January of $21 1.9 
million represented a 17 percent 
drop from December's levels. 

“January is usually a slow mouth 
because manufacturers are reluc- 
tant to make big outlays at the 
beginning of the year," said Chris- 
tine Chien. an analyst with Pruden- 
tial-Bache Securities Inc. “Decem- 
ber is usually strong because people 
want to use up their budgets.” 

Analysts said they were still pre- 
dicting a steady rise this year in 
orders for the tools, power-driven 
machinery that cuts or shapes met- 
al, with improvement in the auto- 
mobile and nriliury industries re- 
sponsible for most new orders. 

Miss Chien said she expected or- 
ders for metal-culling lads, which 
make up about two- thirds or the 
industry, to climb 30 percent. 

James A. Gray, president of the 
tool builder's association, said. 
“Although we lost about one-quar- 
ter of our industry in the Iasi few 
years, the machine- tool industry , 
continues to restructure and re- 
build itself from a very modest 
base.” I 

The industry has been battered . 
by foreign competition and is re- 
covering from record depressed 
levels in 1983. 

“Foreign competition continues 
to be a major factor, garnering 50 
percent of the market in some sec- 
tors,” said Richard Rossi, an ana- 
lyst with Merrill Lynch & Co. 

Shipments for January totaled 
$1 37.8 million, up 22 percent over 
January of last year, but down 50 
percent from December. 


$ 5 bilRon 

JB7D 

$30 billion 

U75 

$.100 billion 

ram 

$200 billion 

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KLM Royal Dutch Airlines 

(fConinJdijJte Luchtvaart Maatschappij N.V.) 

At present 5 5.4% held by the State of the Netherlands 

Swiss Francs 200,000,000 
614% Subordinated Bonds 1985 ff 

Life: until the liquidation of KLM Royal Dutch Airlines 

6 &% interest, payable annually in arrears, for a first period 
of ten years from February 12, 1985 to February 12. 1995. 
Afterwards, the rate will be adjusted for each subsequent ten year period. 



Kredietbank, (Suisse) S. A. Nordfinanz-Bank Zurich 



Business W 

International 

12 cneimi re Huai iioaaeneiiv.SMa'Niand 
AIT IVSmrtN 

Raua lend ny FREE S&-MGE SWEfWG 
*E*£tonns Countertrade Opporti rales" plus 
news o> eonJorenees. reports and advisory 
services 


Comoany Nvno 


•Ouarnuosamnwea. Aiktorycui coRyioday 1 i 
IHTJ 


Clariden Bank 
Amro Bank und Finanz 

Armand von Ernst & Cie AG 
Banco di Roma per la Svizzera 
Banque Generale du Luxembourg (Suisse) S.A. 
Banque Indosuez, Succursales de Suisse 
Banque Morgan Grenfell en Suisse S.A. 

Caisse d’Epargne du Valais 

AJgemene Bank Nederland (Schweiz) 

Soditic S. A. 
BA Finance (Suisse) S. A. 
Banca del Gottardo 
Bank in Liechtenstein Aktiengeseilschaft 
Bank of Tokyo (Schweiz) AG 
Bank Oppenheim Pierson (Schweiz) AG 
Banque Gutzwilier, Kurz, Bungener S.A. 

Banque Scandinave en Suisse 
Barclays Bank (Suisse) S.A. 
Chase Manhattan Bank (Switzerland) 


Lloyds Bank International Ltd. 
Banque CIAL (Schweiz) 

-Credit Industriel d" Alsace et de Lorraine AG- 

Fuji Bank (Schweiz) AG 
Gewerbebank Baden 
Handelsfuianz Midland Bank 
Hypothekar- und Handelsbank Winterthur 
Maerki, Baumann & Co. AG 
Sparkasse Schwyz 


Citicorp Bank (Switzerland) 

Credit Commercial de France (Suisse) S.A. 

First Chicago S.A 

Manufacturers Hanover (Suisse) S.A. 

Mees & Hope Finanzgesellschaft AG 
Nederlandsche Mfddenstandsbank (Suisse) S. A. 
Nomura (Switzerland) Ltd. 

Sanwa Finanz (Schweiz) AG 

The Nikko (Switzerland) Finance Co. Ltd. 

The Royal Bank of Canada (Suisse) 







Pa *e U 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25 , 1985 


International Bond Prices - Week of Feb. 21 


Provided bj Credit Soisse First Boston Securities, London, Tel.: 01-623-1277 

^ fticea may vary according to market coudi boon and otber factors. 


RECENT issues 


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Ilk "89 Dec 97k 1147 1140 

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SB Quebec Hytbo-Electrlc 
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Ilk 73 Feb 100ft 1145 1147 

lift 70 Apr 77ft 1116 1177 

14 71 Jun 106ft 1242 1X15 

15k W Sea UOft 1284 080 

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7ft© Jut Oft 1144 UJl 847 
12ft TO Feb W 1X50 IX5B 

Ilk 71 May toft 1187 1U7 

llfttojul 161k 11* Till 

imTjFeb ms ms ii* 

lift 7* Aua w 164* Hurt 

Uk© Jaa M2kR.1T _ OJS 

3ft W Dec to 1UN11J9 US 
I Ik to Feb tOfk HUB 
18k 74 Ok Wk 1834 ._ 

Uk 525 Apr Ian 658 14.U 

9% ©Apr 99k 1039 7* 

IfttoAAOT 97k 10531X75 670 
IftVJan *5 1X05 625 

ukuod a wp 
U ©Jon TO 1X11 
H to Jot »7 1U7 
14k© Apr HMft 1185 
lilt WAApy toft >183 
llkTJMcy tok 1X74 
Aft 75 Jurt T, 731 
Ik ©Apr TO 1SJ 

12 toNo* 1* ll© 

9k « Nov 79ft BUS 980 

0 15 Od to 9* 931 612 
m Vfjoi TOft a* ni7 

13 ©SM W 9J5 _ 1115 

15 ©NOV HI 1173 1384 1483 

Ilk ©MOV Mlk UJB ,1210 

15ft ©Apr a U48Hat652 

9 «Mar 91 10741187 7.16 

TktoMor 99 1625 1634 934 

TfttoFcb to IMJ 1181 133 

10 74 Ana 17 1X33 1266 11© 

TktoScP 92ft 1U0 >Z» KUO 
9 BSD8C 97 KZM26 90 


11 to AM Id 111* 1113 13© 

9k W Feb toft 1683 RJ7 

nvVAuo to 1243 1557 

1 71 MOT V 1141 IZAl tail 
HftTZApr 102k HUD 1631 HIS 
9k 85 Jul Mk IXB 987 
7k W Ate 71ft 1112 14JD 7.tt 
7V:© Apr KTi 11C 1&58 Ui 

fktoUay 9Tu US r.«I 
15ft ^ Apr lot' 1 . urn .185 

17H "SAtav Mwt 987 TZJ7 
i ft 75 Jun w Mi 0© 60 
lift ©NOT IW 1133- 1X41 

1! to Feb W HB2iX7S!ia 

* 7J Dec Dft 1241 l*J9 HUS 


Amt Security * M 

SMO Snd Nat amlns Fer Ilk 721 

SMO SndNatCheAitesFtf lift 72 1 

l» 5nd No« ClwntroFor Ilk to I 

•at 45 SndMotOwntasFcr Llktol 

H 158 Total Oil Marine «i®J 

GERMANY 


—— Ylelfl 

MHdta Are 
Ate Price Mat Lite Corr 


12k 72 Dec »ft 1225 
lift 73 AAar ©k 1184 
Ilk toAte ©ft 11* 

ilk to May IMft iius 

TktoMar 97k 10.71 


Ilk ©Nov MOV, 11© 
*k©Fob toft 1188 
11 to Mar TO 1199 


TV) ©Mav ©ft 1X10 iut 6* 


lift ©Jin 77k 1657 KLfl 

7WW Fct 87b 11J5 IS 

13k ©0d IBS 11* 1282 

WtatoMOT *7 1130 MJ5 

UftWOd IS 1125 1X74 

lifttoJon ©ft ixi9 n* 

11 71 Altar 75 1X28 1X51 

7 toJim 102 431 666 

7 to Jun 87 IU9 us 

SkTlAAoy © 677 1ST 

SkTJMov S3 112 9.94 

UftWOd 181k H.7* 1143 

Uk V AM TO 1180 OJt 

13ft w Sop HSk iu* 12* 

6k 71 May Ml 685 6.17 

6k 71 Moy 77 HAt in 

11 7<) Apr 96ft 1183 1188 

7k to Feb *2ft 10851X15 638 
6k ©Jut 14 1I6B IM 

8 73Feb 87ft 1L47 9* 

4k to Aun 57ft 7.73 7J6 

9 toDCC 1» 171 (91 9.-83 

7k 70 Mar 0 1X25 851 

I 71 Dec sift 1U3 9© 

7k©MOT 93 1143 ajD 

Ilk 76 Dec 99 IXM n* 

Itftto Jon 105k 786 1031 


STS Bad FTncnce Europe 
S15& Bet) Fboico Eurepo 
SW BMiOveRKX/w 
ft MO Bat fransoitartlco 
SHO Bam Hill Fame AAv lift ©Jim «fk 1157 

5380 8am loll FtocncXM 
575 BamisdieVereiRSbk 
559 Bow 07e EirterarilH ... 

SWO esmmertoak Ftaana UftWOd IS 123B 

smo CommcRbad Finance lift to Jon ©ft 1119 
*108 ComntartbMk FUweo II 71AAar B 1230 
STO CetnmenbanfclitllW/* 7 to Jun 102 639 

SM C tttau en bo M) InN Xjm 

SS# DTwwjlnHFHiWrtt „ 

59 Dogma Into Fin X/w Bk 73 May 83 11£ 
SM DfutadioBMk Finance llkWOd 181k w.7* 

S» Daotute to* Finance UktoAM « mo 

STO Doutacbn Bee* Ftemce lift ©Sec MSk IU* 

SMO D«u»dtaaa*U»W/« 6k 71 May U! 665 

SW Deutadta Bank Lux X/w 6k 71 May 77 HAt 
SUB Dnanar Finance 11 to Aar toft 1183 


7 toJim 102 
7 to Jun S7 
8k 73 May © 


SS GiitettaHnongehuetto 
5125 HoedBt FUmce 
505 Hoedvst Finance XJw 
1© Scbertapleii FlnXAv 
ito Starnes Wcjftm Fin 
S29 5i*m*K watornX/v 
*70 vote MR FtnonCOJWm 
IU voOayssmOvoneas 
5M Wafa Finance 
ecuto westtb Finance 


6k 71 Moy UI 685 
itt 71 May 77 HAt 
11 to Apr toft 1183 


8 73 Feb S7ft 1147 
4k to AM 87ft 9.72 


1 Amt Security 

115 Borreooarrt 

19 DonNarauCrtditsrt 
ts con Narke Credtibatai 
1 nlr IN EXsporitwm 
: nfcrioa Exspjrtflnons 
S» eiopurtfinm 
59 cMpertfmam 
5 75 Etwyltiiuns 
S IDG EkSBOtlfnWns XJw 
nVvW EkaoerHUtans 
19 EArpartflmyiS 
S m Ek«»ri5«M 
1 SM Ekmrtflnom 
rkr 250 EkwRIrant 
rirWO Norpa HypaeHorwun 
SB Horan ummunalbani 

1 B Horans Kommurwam* 

S60 Noraa lemnumolDBik 

57S Noran Awranundbonl. 

5?S Norwa Itenmunotrw* 

59 ttoratao 
39 Ntrotpr 
rar29 Nor* Data 
540 NOB6 Hydra 
1 59 Norsk Hvdrc 

1 IX Nortk Hydra 

IB Nerak Hydro 
19 Norsk Hydra 
5 60 Norik Hydra 

1 nVrXB Norsk HV*o 

19 Honk Hydra 
, JIM Norsk Hv Bra 

I 150 Nors* Hydra 

SI Opplandskratl Krattta 
S3 OttaCJtv 
t IS Osin Oty 
nu-ico Oslo CHv 
515 IhtaCih' 
tfioo Osin City 
s« OstoCUy 
nkrWO (WoOtv 
nkriSO Oslo Ci ly 
550 Oslo City 
IIS Ratdm-Sutaai Hrafi 
SW Stotnil Den Norskt 
Sun SI0I0H Den Nersko 
SIM 5totaM Den Norsk* 


YlfiO 

MtOCIC Art 

Ate Price Ate Lrt C'jrr 


SfttoFen © 

13 toMev IGJk. 
lift 70 ktav « 
lOftVDd W) 
Il'.toJim Ul : 
« St Sep 93 
11L. t7ian Vi 
7ft ©Jul TS'k 
13k ©Sen 104’T 
12 ©Jon lOi-i 

lift 79 M0v 103k 
yft 75 c eo !«-; 
lift to Not ©ft 
10k 73 Jd TOft 
IPi ©Apr 181ft 
ft'EW *e 
7ft to Dec U 
r-. 71 Dec 90 

BftTIAAcv 90': 
9ft totor 84 ? 
9k B* Apr Wft 
(ft ©Ate 91ft 
10k ©Dec IDS 
yH-aSJiw TO 
"ft -ft Fee wv 
14ft ©Jul IWVs 
12 toFei KS r - 
lift 71 Mar 130k 
1 Tisep Tk 
12 ©on TO 
(ft TJfAcr n 
1?k 7! NOV lift 
9k 74 Jon «9=k 
6k to Dec r 
9 to Mov 100 
Pi to Jun 7? 
0k to Jon UOft 
Ik It Ate Wft 
7k ©Mar 92k 
7 ©Ate 95 
10k to Feb TO 
11k 71 Alto 1(7 


11 71 1236 
1X52 iai» 
T£L3E tM 
69 9X7 
•87 SSI 
UI 
1057 238 
... Ik© 732 
989 1337 7 .1B 
9J2 9ASI035 
Ui Ifcil 


5k to NOT (Tv 11 41 1174 IflLel 
6*4 ©Od «S 9JI 932 rJS 

12 ©Apr 1IC 1£JB KaS 

13ft© Jul WT-ft 1131 lift 

9 ft ©AM 96 :l T 7 1132 I0O 


SOUTH AFRICA 


SM Iceland 
SIS leeiand 

SB intend 
S9 loetand 


SktoJon « 11.1S 11.1* 192 

8 ©Feb TJft 1182 1283 8to 


7 © Feb Wft 12a 1X72 9 SI 
*6 ©Doe © IXM 12© 12a 


12ft 72 Dec 

IRELAND 


SS Souin Africa 
SS souta Africa 
ecu 40 SeultiAlnco 
US South Africa 
19 Anuta A/TMTKxm Coro 
39 Essom Etadr Supply 
S7S Esosm EledrSucaty 
SIS Escom EleclrSuOotv 
STS Escom Elecir Suoptv 
ecu 40 fosi Tetacpm Frefonu 


I ©FCS 9* ft IL29 IXB 60 
7k ©Dec «- 1X35 1X72 6*e 
Ilk ©Ate TO 1081 IMS 

17ft ©Jul 99 1X76 1X43 

7ft ©Mar 95ft VLB5 1X46 .*45 
8V86DK © 1039 1692 L’6 

lift ©Jim 98 122 11.73 

9k © Mur Mft 11X11X49 M 

IT’m to Feb (8 IXB 1XJD 

llft©Qd TOk 1084 IUT 


8W©Feb 17ft 118* 1X26 *32 
lift 74 Apr Wft 1281 113* 

loitTS jan 100ft tan taw 


SOUTH AMERICA 


SB Alta Romeo lid 
SSB censwita Dl CnePfo 
SS EnlEntaNar 
SB Eid Ente Nm Idroeor 
S30 Ert ErVeNm Idrocar 
SB EntEnteNuz idracor 
SS ForravteDeltoSiaro 
115 OTwrii tali (lux) 

19 Site Soc Fin Tatecomm 
StO Turin City 


7ft to Apr 77ft 1X57 IXM 7jn 
7ft to Jen a HL7* 1X74 653 


r ©Jun 92 1046 1154 7© 

toJM ^ 057 1664 134 

6k© jun 94ft 173 1127 7.14 

6ft ©NOV *4 1701431 7 JI 

8k to Feb 96 U49 1146 9.11 

*ft© NOT 79 10X5 1085 940 

7ft to May W 1X79 1300 Iu 


SS Brazil (k 

5H Cokvnblo Sk 

SSO Vmezurto Bk 

kd 19 Etalrueraj Ik 

SIS VeneiueUsi Telepbone (*» 

5PAIN 


Ik ©Dec 90 1X70 16X1 “17 

rv © Fib 64ft U.14 1637 «3t 
Bk 72 Dd 76 14X3 |TJ9 I LSI 


Bk 72 Od 
S'. toOet 
8k ©Dec 


9100 Spain 15k ©Apr W 

sa Auloprtcs 7 ©Jul 95 

sa Ini InsHlut Noe Indu 6 ©DC 97 

SIS Pe honor BfttoDec 97 

SIS Perronor 7k to Jon 9] 

SUPRANATIONAL 


4 71 May 91ft 10461X92 763 

JAPAN 


112* UJ8 
94211© 737 
931 10X5 135 


BfttoDec *7 1032 1036 LTa 

7k to Jon 92 TOe9 12.12 033 


sa Bonk Of Tokyo Curacao lift ©So* 187ft ilS 
SIS Bank Oi Tokyo Coracoa 11 ©Apr Mft 1145 
SHO Bod* Oi Tekvo Ctaftcse llfttoDee IWft U47 
eat 48 Boat Oi Tokyo Curocoo 10ft 71 F«b TOft 1UD 
smo Baft Oi Tekvo Curacao 
eaiS Baft Of Tcdtva Eomcoo 

Of Tokyo C 

Computer 


ecu 40 AJrtcal DevotOP Bon» 
tcu 35 Atria* DrrtfiP Bank 
SS Aston Develop Bank 


10k 79 Dec u»k 163 
10k 71 Dec 101 k H34 
8k to Aua 77 1089 


SMO 

sa 
s« 
sa 
sa 
ss 
sa 

SB Esaori-li 
sa FufllnHI 
SS Fuflkora 
SX FoiButre 


ink 71 Feb TOft 103D 
71 Jim 107ft 1184 
©Nov Wft M35 

to Jm ill 1239 

©Mar 111 194 

©Mar S3 11© 
71 Aug 102ft 1X62 


HIGHEST YIELDS 

to Average Life Below 5 Years 



1»79AU0 102ft 1265 
BfttoDec Wft lilt 111 
13* to DO HUk 1IJ9 
Uw 71 Jim I09ft HAS 
TOftTOMoy ,-94ft 1178 
7ft © May m 1X14 

7ft ©Mov SSft 1225 
W. © Hot 102ft 657 
9ii ©NOV *1 11© 10J4 

11 ft 70 Mar Mft 11.90 1X91 llil 

12k ©M ot Ml 11X1 txe 

12ft © Od TOW 1180 1X22 

Wft to Apr Wft 11JM 
lift W Ate tflBft 1L32 
lift ©Jun Wft 1614 
UftWOd 184ft 1152 
lift© Not 100ft 1168 


SB Cetombtn 
S9 Vcnaueto 
SIS toad Foam D/e Canto 
S M Hd to a Tnmcsnltnr 
SX Bouxtw Dr Guinee 
SJ5 Brazil 

S3 EtaEnte Not Idracor 
SIS Weteuetan Telephone 


Bk to Feb lift 15.14 1637 «3* 
Sk to Od 76 UO 1721 1151 
5ft to Not 74 15471689 737 

6ft V Ffb 77V> 1436 U36 IM 


1X571564 624 
1X13 1531 127 


SB Homden Alev Ftnan X/er 9ft 71 Jun 85 1117 1539 1118 


adS Inn Harvester Crsdil 
HMO Charter ConsoDd 0/5 
HUD praw-ftavtanc 
mix □mentsLotoree 
HI® Ea Euro Cad 6 5Mel 


>4521631 1648 
1645 17JS 9.TS 


7k ©APT ©ft 1X49 1597 638 
7ft© Jd 18V, 1144 1568 647 
7ft ©Apr 92 11771559 7X8 


lift ©Dec ion* 11471144 7154 


LMW/vr 
UdXAv 
. __ LMW/n 
llab C Co LU X/w 
SM INhCCpUd 
SS JapanAlritau 
STB -kjOTAlrttans 
un Jauae AlrQnui 
S54 Japan AlrOnes 
J42 Japan Atrlbws 
SM japan Devdai Boik 
SIS Jcpan Devetap Ba* 

*30 Japan Svnth RubbeW/« 
*30 taoilynb Rubbe X/w 
SS Ju&co Co Ltd w/w 
sa Jusco Co Dd X/w 
sa unofEtaclrtc power 
sa Kayobo mdnrirvW/w 
sa Koycdm industry Xftv 
I TO Xvowa Finance !hk) 

SM Kvushu Etadric Powor 1 
STO Lena- Term CradH Bank 1 
sns Lont-Tcrm - - 
oif73 Lpna-7«rm 
STO LOftoTenn Credit Bank 1 
STO Lono-Tertn Credit Bm* 

SK Lono-Terai Credt Bank 
SIS Lana-Torm Credit Bank 
STO Lana-Term Credf Bank 1 
STO Laeo-TermOe 

SSSfiSZ**. > 

,*.S T 

SS S£JfflSS x/ “ 

ISiSi 

ta Mttautddd 

s® MlbutotaN 
sa HAllSUbtaW Ftalhklx/w 11 
sa MltaubWd Finance 
S» Mitsubishi GaiW/w 
150 Mltau*sftlGq*X/w 
*40 AAltautdihlMplolW/w 
SM MUsubUhl Metai X/w 
SIM Mitsubishi MeM W/w 
S1Q8 MftaMbWdMeMXAr 
*12 MffsuOuW Rayon 
sa AAfstd EnoOioerbi W/w 
*a Mltaul Engkieorbl X/W 
sa Mitsui Enokwertn W/w 
*a Mitsui E n a hw erln X/w 
sa MnsulFlnenoeAata 
*a Mitsui Finance Asia 
sa fMtsd Flnaics AMo 
sa MtttuHnalFtomi 
sa AEltaui Trad Fbi (hU 
sa Mppan CroSl Bank 
SM NlmmCridf Bank 
sa Hloeai CradH B©k 
tm Nippon Croat Bank 
Slag Nippon CratolBa* 
ecua Nippon CradH Bank 
sa Nippon CaM Bunk 
SIM Nippon CradH Bank 


Wft to Feb Wft 1154 
UfttoJid 10*ft 1164 
12 71 Dec 100ft 1L92 
ItTft 72 Jun *S 11© 

HM 75 Jon 95ft 1161 
11 ©Fob 141 IX 
1) ©Fab © 1)69 

7ft ©May 96 165 

7Vj ©May 95ft 1X82 

13ft ©Aua ID 1161 

11 73 Jim 99 1U71133 11.11 

12ft 74 May TOft 11.18 1166 

13ft © Aua 111ft 1134 WM 

11 ©NOT Mil, 11.17 11.11 11.M 
10ft 78 Apr 98 1XU 1131 11.18 


HIGHEST YIELDS 

to Average Life Above 5 Years 



HI 74 Jul rift 1612 1746 1X9* 
ID 74 Feb 83ft 1135 I4J1 1TJ* 
Bk to Dec 83 1265 U® 10© 

* ©Od 82 IXII 1364 lOto 
7ft 71 Mar C Q©llS2irjB 
9 Vv77Mct 82W IL73 1141X06 

* ©Feb 82 UIO 1147 10.98 

* to MOV D 11J01I43M14 
lift ©Jim IN 11611324 1X7: 
19 76 Due 114ft U-25 1186 KJL5 
14ft 70 AUO IMft 1X23 1123 Uto 
9 ©Feb 15V: 1X30 1255 U53 

W 74 Moy 90 1162 1X08 11.11 

U ©Jui MIft 1167 M6fl HE 


BftWFeb 108 ft 1667 
UftWOd 104ft 1039 
TftWMov « 671 

786 W May 84ft 11© 
I to Dec 151 X96 

I to Dec 86 1X65 

12ft WOd IB 1167 
616 ©Feb lift 7ja 
6ft ©Feb 13 1182 

1719 70 May ID 1X02 


— HIGHEST CURRENT YIELDS — 


SITS Me >lce lift ©Jul WTft 1568 

* 75 Femes PeirateasMexIC 17ft 14 Nov IK 1X61 
*75 Ode Edtem Fmoiee ITftWJid TO ' 

1 15 OMe Edbon FtanmcP ITftSSOcJ TM 

*75 Gensfor 17ft WOO 1B6> 

SM Gaff States 0/s Final 17ft to Od iou 

*70 Nerttani Indkma Publ T/fttoOd 105 


17ft ©Od 106ft 1531 
17ft toOd 106ft U9* 


Hftto Jui t 
lift WApr 1 
15ft © Aon 1 
>!* to Jan I 


STO Oftes Service Od 
SB Com Products CPC 


17ft to Od 105 1531 
17 toSen 104 1535 


11 WMor 97ft 1160 
~ to Jun Mft 1164 


cn*a Noefonoi Hramdora 
odtO General Moftr* Accept 
aiSK Scdnt-LnurcM 
dt*M HudsonsBar 


lEfttoSep to ua 
rift nwr UOft 1737 
18 ©Od 106 14© 

17ft ©Mot TOft 158* 
18 ©NOT ID 1454 


toSep 10S 1L21 

©Jd TOft 1163 
~ 1132 
1138 
Dec toft 11.74 
Feb raft 266 
Feb 82k ixoa 
Jon 144 675 

©Jon 77 ua 


cnSIS Sac tfysoRtaqae Praam 17ft *86 Dec IB 


MB 

it*©2? 

11 ©Jan 


»HSn 96 ft 488 SM 

Ift 7) Apr TOft 7JT 7J7 
»ft©AuB BBW IM XIV 
lift ©NOT 77ft 1177 IX7I 
9ft 74 Feb 9*k 741 737 

lift ©Mar toft 116* 1155 

lift ©May 105ft 1057 1027 1182 
7ft 14 Jen 97ft *© 9© *a 
Mft WApr TO 11.77 1382 

Eft to Jun *5"j lOtoltol 681 
(ft to Dec 91k 1(283 1274 677 
Eft ©Mar © HUB 1526 699 
IP* 87. Mar ID 1081 1X79 


5ft to Nov 76ft 683 
5ft to NOT Eft 1X76 


Jui ID JUJ 

May Kft 11 

s«I T* 


lift toMcr 101 
UftWNov llBft 
lift to Jm *7ft 


97ft 11 
5 ft ii 

in iu3 

llBft 113* 
*tft 1133 
Kft 651 
84 1XD 


Ss 

Not Wft 

r 

.sis 

UftWNOT TO TLN 
12 © Feb 180ft 1133 
Uft ©Jd IMft 1 
190 to Aug 111 l 
ii to mot Tift I 

MS iKf 

lift ©Feb 76ft 11© 


STO Nkscn *U*«i Kctausfdk Uft©Sep 


sa Nippon Mbrins 
Sa NhwopMMno 
sa Nippon Shtaw 
siwncon 


sa Nippon Start Cora 
sa Nippon Tetapra Telepfi 
sa Nlopan Teieora Tewh 
SIM Nippon TetaoraTeksb 
STO Nbmn Tefeara Tetopb 
si» Nlopan Tetegre Tetaoh 
SM Nlpnen Yioan Kdmsbl 
STB Nledmiwol Cora W/w 
*70 NMntvmi Cora X/w 
S mo Nonwro Eirwv 
sa NemoraSpcurWMW/W 
»W Norowu SccullteoX/w 
SM OhbaynsW-Gond W/w 
SM ObbovatoKumlX/w 
*30 Omran ToMsl Ele W/w 
SSO Omran roMNEte X/W 
SM Onoda Conwii Co W/w 
S30 Ocndc Cement Co XAv 
sa Orftni Lcavne (cart) 
*40 Renew) IncW/w 
*40 Renown Inc X/w 


wSn 

©Mm 
to Jan 


lift 71 Feb 181ft 1097 
12ft ©Aua IMft 1135 
*%72F*b toft 1143 


13ft ©Aug HJSft Uto 
(ft ©Fee Mft 
(MVFeb 03ft 11.06 


155 

1073 1066)035 
1057 1131 

1184 
11JI 
1X0 
731 


(ft ©Mar 
16k 17 .Mar 
TftWApr 


91 1133 1«» _ 

Eft ©Od 93ft *57 IU* 731 
llfttoMav IMft 113(1135 1147 
UftWOd TOft 11 a 3 1UD 
mwSep 104-4 731 1031 

Ik ©Od a 11331231 *38 
•ft ©Dec 19ft 1 144 1131 1029 
IB to Mar K*ft 7Jtl 9J5 9J9 
UtatoAw 10lft 1X45 1X70 

716© JU ■ 12JC 1255 1051 

* ©Apr 15 1L7B1244I8S9 
Ilk ©Sep IWft IOC 1174 

* ©Jun II 1232 l26SI1.il 

* 76 Moy D Uto 1341 1884 

Bk ©Od 71ft 1XU 1176 11.15 
116 71 Am lift 11)3 1265 1U5 
9 to Jtpi 79ft 1X11 1251 1132 
It ©Jui m 1092 I1J0 
lift ©Jul HUk «2 H72 

lift 70 Jd IMft 963 KJ6 
11% ©Feb 101ft 1X51 1U7 1U0 
lift© Feb HBft 1059 T0JH 11J33 
♦k ©Apr HUft 1383 1146 UE3 
11ft©Jd 106 1037 1085 

lift W5*o IOt 1047 Iftl* IOC 
13 ©Od 10116 lia 1137 
11% 73 Oct 161ft |L56 1138 

11 ©D»c 103% 1030 109 1B59 
13 ©Dec IDIft 1171 1182 

111*74 Feb IMft 1132 1135 

lift 75 Jon 98ft 11© 1131 1165 
Wk©Mor »7W JlflS 1246 UTO 
11 ©Mov 96ft 1161 11© 1X43 
11 75Aug *Sft 1134 1X18 1152 
17ft to Dec IWft 1X83 TXM 

^ ©5*0 Mft 671 674 (JN 
to Jan 99 7© 134 684 

toMcr 07ft 737 955 

M to Am 78ft 10.14 1039 185 
Ivy to May toft 971 1042 661 
(VitoAua 97ft 636 936 667 
Iu. ©Am *5k 1081 144 

R © Jim 97ft 7.71 842 647 
©Jd 97ft 1082 187 

7ft ©Aua »2ft wa 1237 784 
7ft ©Od 9 2 1037 1180 7 m 

7 ©Dec 91V: 10421093 »6J 
12ft to tan IMft 1694 1X23 

K to Feb Mft 1(87 yja 
W Feb 9* ft 1 1.19 1134 Kill 
Mft to Am »5 955 *a *695 

11 to Jun TOft W86 KL97 
BftTBSep 94 1065 *31 


9 ©MOV 
B*©Od 
116 71 Am 
























■ ^ 1 ■ ■ 




T ■— ^ - ‘ 






17ft ©Dec 99 IXB 
Eft to Not icjv, 140 


n.©AB r nift 2a 

TftWAor 16ft 1197 


TViWAflr Itovi 180 
7ft © Apr BE 1182 


IB SI coil Co Ltd X/w 
SSO SoltemotnWO*) 


TWtoJul 97ft lia 
• © Fob 90 9.12 

E WFefc lift 1235 


181 
453 

7.41 
593 

BE >1© 6JI 
77ft ua ixm *a 
90 1.12 657 


5k ©Mar 12ft 1054 
)lft985te 97ft 12)1 


434 

1137 
1131 

.... 1219 

11% ©Jon *Tft 1193 118211a 
lift© Jd 104 12a 1X90 


lift ©Dec 99ft ua 
1214 71540 Wft 1155 


SB Sonwolntl FtarnttHk 
SM Stewa lid Finance Hk 
Sia Scmwa loll Ftaonra Hk 
SOI Soppora B rawertei 
sa Setno Transbortot W/w 
SM SektaTnxtomriotXAv 
SIS Sahra Storas Mm XAv 
sa Sober Stans Dec 
*» SWtaaku Etacfr Povwr .. . ... 

SM Sumitomo Construe W/w TftWAer 177ft 


lift© Jd 104 1232 

Eft © Mar 90ft 979 


MSWMor 6JW 1231 
11 ©Mar W.S 1181 


11 ©Dec Mft llj; 
lift 70 Jon 99ft 1145 


X/w TftWAer Efft 11© 


ISftWJd Ulft 1X02 


sa Smnltoraa 
sa SdnNomo 

SS Sumitomo ... 

SI00 Sumitomo Francs Asia 18%70Jw> Kft 1154 
SUB SdRitamafkvonceAte l?a*©Atar 123k ilps 
sun Sumtserao Finance Ado lift ©Mar 99ft 1185 
*40 SumUsno Heavy In W/w (ft WMor 91ft Ui 
S48 Sumitomo Heavy In X/w Eft ©Mar 82 1X14 
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West LB 



Eurobonds - DM Bonds • Schuldscheine 
for dealing prices call 


dOsseidorf 


Westdeirtsche L^ndesfaank. Head Offfca. PO Rn> rt-aa 4/vm 

tSS?» and •— 


London 


WDSMeiftStiw Landesbanh. 41. Moorgat& London ECZfl 6AE/UK 
Teiephone 6386141 -mex 887 984 


LuMmboui 


lfrta ? at * onal SA. 32-34, boulevard Grands-Ouchesse Charlotte 
Luxembourg, Telephone 44741-43 * Telex 1678 unoiotte. 


Westdeutsctia Landesbank, BAIbwer, 38th Floor. 12 HaraOurt Road. 
Hong Kong. Tetephone 5-8420288 ■ Telex 75142 HX 


Marketmakers in DeutschmarkBondsWGSt LB 

Westdeutsche Landesbank 





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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1985 


Page 15. 


New Eurobond Issues 


Amount 

(millions) 


Cfluo Price 

Mot. Price end 


Phillips Sets 
New Deadline 
For Voting 


FLOATING RATE NOTES 


Canadian Imperial 5200 

Bank of Commerce 


2005 bmean 100 


Interest pegged to average of brtl aid offered r«*» fa 6- 
month EurodoSm, reset monthly. Cdfablo in 1966 at par 
and u d ee m obte m 1995 and 2000. Feet 0.34%. Denomna. 
bans $10,000. 


Christiana Bank 


1995 'A 100 


Over 6- month Libor Mbnimum coupon 1016% and mawmum 
1)16%. Nonc nt nb te . J75 milton n&urd now end J25 mXxvi 
reserved far a 6-mcrtti top. Feet D .49%. PenomtnahoiB 
SKUOOl Payahle May 15. 


Commerzbank 
Overseas Finance 
Denmark 


1995 Y» 100 


Over 6-month Libor. Mramum coupon 10% and manmum 
11%%. NancotoUe Feet 075% Payable May 15. 


1995 3.16 100 


Over irfnonth Uxv. Mnenufn coupon 10% and manmwni 
1 1%% NonaAifaie. Feet 0-50%. Denomnatiom 510.000 


Electncite do France 


1997 libid 100 


Weted pegged to Ihe t>d rate far 6-month Eurodollar i, reset 
nxyMy. C oHoble or per m 1986. Each $10,000 note with ID 
warrants. Holden of 30 warrortj entitled to exchange unU 
Feb. 1966 a 510,000 note far M4% ea^denammated bonds 
of 1995. Exchange rota to be set Fab. 27. Ecu bonds first 
callable at 100% m 1992, and at 103 if lea than 10 nvttton 
ecus worth of bonds is atued. Warrants priced at 514 each, 
finished the week a $1216. Fees 0X5% 


Kemira Oy 


ll'iixhinfiioti Poll Service 

BARTLESVILLE, Oklahoma — 
Phillips Petroleum Ca officials, 
apparently unable to assemble 
enough shareholder votes to pass 
their disputed plan to recapitalize 


the company, nave extended the 
deadline for shareholder balloting 
until Wednesday. 

The voting was first extended 
until Saturday, but Phillips delayed 
it again late Friday because oT de- 
velopments in a court case in Dela- 
ware, where it is incorporated. 

A company spokesman, speak- 
ing alter the stockholder meeting 
Friday at which the results were to 
have been announced, said Phillips 
would use the extra lime to lobby 
more shareholders to vote for the 
proposal 

Phillips needs about 78 million 


1995 A 100 


Over 6-morth Ubor. Cottoble m 1987 at par. Additional $25 
mfton reserved for a 1 -year top. Few 055% DenomttxHKW 

siojooo. 


riuuips needs about /s million 
shareholder votes to pass the pro- 
posal. and there have been reports 


2005 Kbof 100 


Interest pegged to the offered role for 6- month EurodoUore, 
reset monthly C triable of par m 1996. Feet 0.10% Ctenan- 
nations $100)100. 


that the company is several million 
votes shy of that. Several large 


Swedish Export Credit $125 1992 A 100 


Over 6- month Libor Hnmun coupon 1D% aid maximum 
11*i% NoncoBabi? Fees 0X0%. Denominations 110.000 


shareholders have said they would 
vote against the proposal. 
Reportedly, Phillips was shocked 

ihr rlrrianr nf (lanital frii.irtl- 


FtX ED-COUPON 


Engelhard 


Copenhagen 

Telephone 


199? 1U-4 99A 
1995 10W 100 


96.88 Coflobb or 101 in 1990 

— Smbng fund to sort in 1990 to produce on 6 yr average kfr 


Euratom 


19 97 10 TOO 


98.25 CoHabb at 10116 in 1994. Sinking fund to start operating in 
1999 to produce a 10-yr average life. 


Pechiney ECU 50 

_EJB Q 75 

BP Overseas Finance Y 17,000 


1990 TO 100 

1992 12 100 A 


1992 7 100 


98.25 NoncaUofale. 

98.38 NoncoBabte. Payable May 29. 
98 Noncalabte. 


NZI Overseas 
Finance 


1992 ISh 9914 — Redeemable a» par in 7990. 


Eourrr-UNKED 


Kao 

$70 

2000 

3 

100 

97 

Onodo Cement 

$35 

1990 

open 

100 

99 

Honda Motor 

DM200 

1990 

□pen 

100 

99 

Honda Motor 

DF 100 

1990 

open 

too 

99 


Semiannually- at 104 in 1988. Convertible at 661 

yen a share and at 262X0 yen per dolor 


Coupon jt ideated at 8%. Nonoalkiblt. Each SSJX3D nM with 
one wcrranl exercisable into shares at an anhapded 216% 
premium. Terms to be set Feb. 27. 


Coupon inchoated at 3%%. NanoaBabie. Each 5, 000-mark 
note with one warrant exercreoble into company's shore* at 
cm antnpaied 2H% premium. Term to be let Feb. 28. 


Coupon indiailed at 3ft% Nanadloble. Each 10<00(kgu8der 
note with 2 warrants exercisable into shares at an antedat- 
ed 216% premium. Terms to be set Feb. 27. 


ian Trust Ca of Los Angeles — 
which holds about 3 percent, or 
more than 4 million shares, of Phil- 
lips stock — to switch its vote 
against management. 

At the stockholder meeting, 
many speakers expressed fears that 
without the $8-biUion recapitaliza- 
tion plan, Phillips would be taken 
over and broken up by the New 
York financier, Carl C. Icahn, who 
is offering $60 a share for about 
half the company. 

A spokesman for Mr. Icahn. who 
owns slightly less than 5 percent of 
Phillips, lold the 5,000 sharehold- 
ers at the meeting, “We are not 
against Phillips. What we are 
against is die recapitalization." 

Under the plan. Phillips' share- 
holders would receive $60 in debt 
securities for 38 percent erf the 
shares, $3.32 market value in a new 
preferred slock for each common 
share following recapitalization, 
and $50 cash per common share in 
a self-tender offer. 


Banks Rush to Sign Up lor East German Credit 


By Carl Gewirtz 

International Herald Tribune 
PARIS — Banks clambered last 
week to get into the seven-year syn- 
dicated credit for East Germany. 
As a result, the 5 150- million loan 
— which was to have been doubled 
in size — was increased to $400 
mini cm and may yet rise to $500 
million. * 


had previously paid for five-year 
money. 

Why banks are jumping into 
these loans is probably best dem- 


tnese loans is probably best dem- 
onstrated by the latest borrowing 
conditions for Spain, which has not 


conditions for Spain, which has not 
traditionally been considered abet- 


SYNDICATED LOANS 


“Clearly,” admits a manager 
who does not want to be identified, 
“the loan is overpriced.*' The East 
Germans are paying ft-point over 
the London interbank offered rate 
or fc-poinl over the prime rate. 

Even the loan for Vneshtorg- 
bank, the Soviet foreign-trade 
bank, winch had caused a stir with 
what looked like a very skimpy 
margin, is to be doubled to 100 
million European Currency Units 
(S65.7 million). 

Vneshtorgbank is paying l A- 
point over the interbank rate for 
the first three years and %-poinl 
over the final four years — a sharp 
decline from the Vi -point margin it 


terixredit than- the Soviet Union. 
Spain is issuing floating-rate notes 
at Libor flat (no margin). 

Interest on die 20-year notes will 
be set at six-month Libor but that 
will be reset monthly. Ibis mis- 
match formula now so popular in 
the FRN market allows banks to 
finance their holdings with lower 
cost one-month money and pick up 
the one-percentage point differ- 
ence currently prevailing between 
the one-month rate and the six- 
month rate. 

Although (he terms were initially 
viewed as wildly aggressive, the re- 
sponse was sufficiently large to en- 
able managers to increase the loan 


$25 million, to $375 million. In- 
cluding the commissions of 10 ba- 
sis paints, the cost of money to 
Spam is a thin 2 basis points over 
Libor. 

Portugal also benefited from the 
current climate of high liquidity at 
international banks. Initially, there 
was considerable doubt bow well 
Portugal’s request for a $150-mil- 
lion note fadhty would be received. 
But managers report that it has 
been completely underwritten — 
along with a companion SI 50-mil- 
lion syndicated emit. 

The notes or bank advances mil 
be open to competitive bidding, but 
if underwriters are forced to lake 
the paper they will earn the same 
return — ft-point over Libor — as 
offered cm the syndicated credit. 

Turkey, which bad considerable 
difficulty in finding underwriters 
for its $500- million hybrid note fa- 
cility, last week was able to close 
the underwriting at the desired lev- 
el 

Managers also report success in 


marketing the $100-million bank- 
guaranteed FRN for Inco. The 10- 
year loan pays interest at 3/16- 
point over Libor — a low cost for 
Inco which up to the third quarter 
of last year has reported a string of 
quarterly losses. Banks promising 
to repurchase the notes at par on 
any interest payment date will be 
paid an annual fee of %-point over 
Libor for the first five years and 14- 
point over Libor thereafter. 

Thai fee is paid whether or not 
the banks lake the notes. The fees 
are high compared to what banks 
currently earn in note placement 
facilities, but so also — in the view 
of many bankers — is the risk of 
providing the guarantee. 

The London branch of Siam 
Commercial Bank Ltd. has ar- 
ranged a S 50- million backup certif- 
ies ie-of -deposit issuance facility. 
The CDs will have maturities of 
three and six months and will be 
priced to yield 10 basis points over 
Libor for the first $30 million and 
15 basis points over Libor for the 
remainder. 


U.S. Tretmuy 
To Stop Issuing 
Certifkatesin ’86 


Market Is Cool to New Mini-Max Floaters 


New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — The Trea- 
sury Department says that, be- 
ginning in 1986, it will stop pro- 
viding engraved paper 
certificates for government 
notes and bonds. 

Although 95 percent of Trea- 
sury debt is already in book- 
entry form, with records main- 
tained in a computer system, 
many individuals still request 
printed -bond certificates. Trea- 
sury bills have not been issued 
in certificate form since 1979. 

Use of paper certificates is 
greatest among people buying 
Treasury notes and bonds di- 
rectly from the Federal Reserve 
or the Treasury, thereby avoid- 
ing fees charged by banks and 
securities firms. 

Outstanding notes and bonds 
will not be affected by the new 
program, the Treasury said. It 
said it hoped to have the pro- 
gram in place bv mid- 1986. 

Treasury officials estimated 
that the book-enuy program 
would save the government $46 
millkni by 1993. 


(Continued from Page 13) 
short-term interest rates surged 
and contributed to a mighty rise in 
the value of the dollar on foreign 
exchange markets (further fueled 
by President Ronald Reagan’s 
comment that the gain reflected the 
relatively poor economic perfor- 
mance of other countries). 

This turned out to be a perfect 
setting for Electridte de France to 
launch its $300-milhon FRN con- 
vertible into European currency 
units. FRNs offer investors the 
greatest protection against rising 
interest rates and the one-year war- 
rants to convert into Ecu bonds 
provide a convenient way to specu- 
late on a decline in the dollar, 
which most experts agree is now 
vastly overvalued. 

The only problem was that EdF, 
after months of market soundings 
and haggling with prospective 
managers, had knocked the terms 
to the bare minimum and at the 
same time had lost the momentum 
that a new concept would normally 
commsnd. 

Interest cm the FRN, which car- 
ries no margin, is to be set at the 
six- month London interbank bid 
rate. The pricing is rock bottom as 
banks who would normally buy 
FRNs finance themselves at Libid. 


The inherent profit for buyers of 
the EdF paper derives from ihe fact 
that the coupon based on the six- 
month rate is to be set monthly. 

This allows bank investors to 
fund their purchases by borrowing 
one-month money. Currently, 
there is a one percentage point dif- 
ference between one- and six- 
month interbank rates, allowing 
bank buyers to earn one percentage 
point by this mismatch. 

(CIBC is also using the mismatch 
to attract investors. But it is paying 
no margin over Li mean, the aver- 
age of the bid-offered rate, which at 
least assures banks 1/ I6-poim over 
their Libid funding costs.) 

There is no guarantee, or course, 
on the constancy of this mismatch 
as the spread between the two rates 
could later narrow or even reverse. 
A standard feature of financial cri- 
ses is that the yield curve inverts, 
making the shortest term money 
more expensive than longer term 
funds. 

Each $10,000 EdF note carries 
10 warrants. To convert. 20 war- 
rants and one $10,000 note are 
needed to buy the equivalent of 
$10,000 worth of Ecu bonds bear- 
ing a coupon of 9% percent matur- 
ing in 1995. (This means there will 
always be $150 million of the FRN 


outstanding and that a maximum 
of 5150 million equivalent of Ecu' 
bonds will be issued.) 

The exchange rale, to be fixed 
when the final terms are set on 
Wednesday, will be at 3 percent 
below the rale then prevailing. 

In other words, the dollar would 
have to fall 3 percent against the 
Ecu before conversion would even 
be worthwhile. In fact, it would 
have to fall even further to amor- 
tize the cost of the warrants ($14 
for the initial 10 warrants and 
whatever the market will bear for 
the additional 10 thal will need to 
be bought in the secondary mar- 
ket). And finally, there is an addi- 
tional implied cost as the 944 per- 
cent coupon is currently below the 
prevailing rate. 

By contrast, Euratom is offering 
50 million Ecu of 12-year bonds at 
par bearing a coupon of 10 percent 
and these were quoted at a discount 
of 1^ points. 

The package was priced at 

101 ,4a 

The FRN ended the week at 
99.62, well within the 45 basis 
points paid as commissions. The 
warrants got off to a rocky start, 
falling to SIQVi, but ended the week 
ai $12£ — pulling the price on the 
package at 100.87. 


Qiesebrough Seeks Protection 
Through Stauffer Acquisition 




(Continued from Page 13) 
sumer paefcaged-gpods company. 
Then problems began to crop up. 
“They’ve been limping along foi 
the last two or three years,” said 
Joseph H. Kozloff, analyst at Dean 
Witter Reynolds Inc. 

James Waggoner, an analyst at 
Bear, Stearns & Co., added, “In 
1984 it all caught up with them.*' 
The company, which was formed 
in 1955 with a merger erf ihe Pond's 
Extract Co. and the Cbesebrough 
Manufacturing Co., reported last 
week that its earnings for the year 
had slipped $11 mutton from the 
year before, although fourth-quar- 
ter net was up 23 percent 
Mr. Kozkrff said that Ragu lost 
market share to Campbdl's Prego 


sauce . The shoe business “was 
killed by the strong dollar and the 
flood erf foreign imports.’* he said, 
and the “tennis- racquet business 
was hurt because the market is 
shrinking.” 

Mr. Waggoner said that when 
inflation lost its vigor, “they lost 

£ tiring flexibility, and they didn't 
ave the benefit of lower raw-mate- 
rial costs 

In addition, the company las! 
fall (fid some management restruc- 
turing. George F. Goebder, 43, was 
named president and was said to be 
heir- apparent to Mr. Ward, who 
was 63 at the lime and planning the 

management succession. 

Mr, Ward, according to analysts, 
put more responsibility on the divi- 


i a 


Ralph E. Ward 


son level and caused some strains 
in those units. “At Health-tot, in- 
ternal controls fell apart” Mr. 
Kozkrff said, “and in apparel when 
you’ve got a foul-up, you've got a 
problem." 

In addition, the company last 
fall bought back 5 percent of its 
stock from Carl C. Icahn, the finan- 
cier. The repurchase was widely 


seen as “greenmail," a buying-off 
of an unwelcome takeover attempt. 
The company also bought a com- 
pany that it was said not to want, 
t he p lastics division of Mr. Icahn’s 
ACF industries. 

Those developments “didn’t 
help on an emotional level,” Mr. 
Kozloff said. 

Both companies are saying thal 
Stauffer’s research and develop- 
ment skills mil provide new prod- 
ucts for Chesebrough’s marketing 
creativity. 

The analysts, however, believe 
that the main motivation for the 
deal is to discourage takeover at- 
tempts by assuming a heavy debt 
load that do potential raider would 
warn. 


Why did Chesebrough-Pond’s 
pick Stauffer? Mr. Ward Has been a 
director of Stauffer, which is based 
in Westport, Connecticut, near 
Cheseb rough's headquarters, for 
right years. 


j. 





























p age 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY. FEBRUARY 25. 1985 


kteraational Bond Prices - Week of Feb. 21 

Provided bv Credit Suisse First Boston Securities, London, Tel.: 01-623-1277 

Prices may vary according to market eondhkiafl and other factors. 


*** Security 


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B It Mar 97 1121 1350 ITS 

7* 17 Jan 91 1157 1X12 806 

7 74 Dec 97* 752 7.1t 

B* 14 Del H 11X7125D9.11 
IJ*tS0ct ID 1172 1245 1121 
II* 19 How IBB* 1157 11X9 

14* W Men 1B3 1171 14X 

7* -87 Feb 94 1151 1154 75B 

11*19 Sep HI 1154 11X1 

12**09 Od 101* 1159 12.19 

4*72 Jan 96* 738 457 

11* 72 Jan IB* 1157 11X2 

t 17 Mar 94 11X0 13X3 151 

17* 17 Oct 102* 11.lt 1217 

12* If Mar 102* 11X1 1230 


1137 

113 

115) 

1052 

11X0 

10X5 

1156 

HUB 

nJB 

IL« 

1154 

1351 

MjSJ 

1455 

11.11 

1150 

un 

1229 

1450 

1458 

1139 


10X4 

11*9 

1119 

urn 

UJB 


5* ‘■Nov 


1(51 

15X7 1459 7J7 


*«W Security 

* *22 SSTW-Laniberi Inti 
SUM WeUsFaruaCa 
STM WMbFotwCo 
STS Wellt Fargo Inh Fmo 
*75 UMHtRnaintiFta 
*9 Wttefflortner Capitol 
*9 W t ve r hOBueer CBcita) 
JIB Weyerhaeuser Co 
SKt) 5en»Ftanai 


Middto 
7 Mat Price 
ID* *0 Feb 97V. 
13* 7i Sep id* 
IZ*7i Dec m. 
15 ISSnp IBl* 
15 *7 Mar w 
10* to May n 
77ft »«av 99 
12* 17 0a HI* 
14 37Aw 19* 


TMM— - 

Aye 

Mat LHeCorr 
10.99 1054 

1135 129 

1154 1155 

>1.19 1474 

1121 1454 

119 HUM 

UJ1 1157 

(138 124 

1221 13X9 


DM STRAIGHT BONDS 


AUSTRALIA 


dram 
tan 200 
An SI 

On SO 
dram 
dram 

dm 300 
dm 2m 

dm 200 

dm 500 
am 50 
*n» 
drain 
dm loo 
am in 
dm» 
dm in 
attain 


dm ua 

dm 100 
dm MO 
dm Ha 
dm 19 
dm 300 


Auxtmlta 
AuFraHc 
Australia 
Australia 
Austro Ha 
Australia 
Australia 
Australia 
Austraibi 
Australia 

Austral hei Ind Dev Co 
Carnoto Invm Eurape 
tamenlev irai FM 
Mount Iso Flnoncs 
Mount iso Fbmca 
PopuoNewGbMM 

Queensland AJumlno 

Rund Industries Bank 


7 TO Fob HI* 
nvDti 101* 
t nsep *ru 
5* VNav 98* 
I* 71 Mar 102V, 
97k 71 Feb 109 
W871 D«C 109ft 
7* 72 Nay 101ft 
51b 73 Jot Kft 
7* YtNo* 47 
I* 17 Nov 
7* 16 Jun 
4*17 Jai 
7H70Mar 
7* 72 Apr 
6* n Jul 
BA 15 Nov HIM 
5ft 17 Alta 99* 


180ft 

99ft 

99* 

91* 

99 


485 428 &9B 

757 8.15 

489 117 

118 439 585 
751 753 

7X4 858 

753 855 

£8 ® 

7X4 7X7 

453 49 427 
738 7.H 7J1 
496 7.11 176 
7X8 7X4 

758 7X1 
758 738 40 
7X1 7X3 846 
459 454 452 


AUSTRIA 


Austria 

Austria 

Austria 

Austria 

Austria 


daiuo 
dm IB 

ii 

dm 120 
dm 19 

S! 


dm 9 

Ii 

dralOO 
dm in 
dm 100 


Austria 

Austria 

Austrian Csitral Bank 
Austrian Contra] Bank 

Austrian Control Bonk 

ssEjjgH’ 

OenuuMtaheertn Aa 
Gtrai Bank Snarkassen 



Voest-AMne 


7X4 123 

753 4X2 

731 US 

7Jt 7X3 

7X2 7X3 

US 93 

115 875 

757 859 

43 633 4*1 
4W 754 Ut 
7X1 754 

459 HO 639 
U9 174 

750 9X1 

73 720 415 
490 734 441 
656 751 UV 
756 U2 

03 451 157 
US 455 1X2 
114 757 BX2 
723 749 637 


BELGIUM 


dm HO Betatcclrtc Finance 
dm HO BeMedric Finance 


CANADA 


dm 100 
(tailB 
dm no 
dm TOO 
dm HO 
dm no 
dm HO 
dm 200 

dm TOO 
dm MB 
dm in 
dm 100 
dm HO 
dm 100 
■tat 80 
dm S3 
dm 108 
dm 100 
dm 100 
dm 180 

Midi 
dm MB 
am MB 
Itn M0 
dm 180 
tan 19 
dm 200 

tan 10B 

dm 100 
dm 108 
dm 200 

tan 150 

dm 100 

dm 19 
dm 19 


Air Canada 
JUr Canada 
Amco l off 
8 rascai Inti 
Conataan imperial BL 
Export Develop Cora 

Manitoba Hrara-Blectr 
ManHutaPravtaae 
Modlobn Province 
Montreal aty 
Montreal City 
Montreal City 
Montreal Clfv 

Montreal GN 

New Brunswick Pravlnc 
Newfaumfland Province 
Newteundkmd Pravkite 
NewtaMKflond Province 
Nova Scotia Power 
Nava Sadia Province 
OntortoHyOra-Electr 
Ontario Hydra-Electr 
OntartaHytaa-Eteclr 
Ontario Province 
Quebec Hydra 
Quebec Hydra 
Quebec Hydra 


OuebecHvdre-Electrtc 
Quebec Hvdra-Electric 
Quebec Hvdra-G lectrtc 
Quebec Hvdra-Electric 
Quebec Hnbo-Eleclrlc 
Quebec Pravince 
Quebec Province 


Oft 19 Apr 186ft 
9 izaub Tea 
7*13 Jin 98ft 
1* fl Dec Hi ft 
SftlflOct HI* 
7 00 May 99* 
6ft ffl Del go* 
**■87 Jon HO 
W 13 May W* 
7*HOd HO 
8*5*6 Jut HO* 
7 17 Jul 108 

7 If Apr 101 

i -raseo 95* 
6* 13 Jen <7ft 
4*VNev HO 

8 15AOB 99* 
** 07 Nov HO 
6ft 9 Act 99ft 

7 17 Dec 9914 
7* 16 Dec IDO* 
7ft 16 Dec 108* 
6ft 17 jun no 
Aft 18 Mar HBft 
6 17 Sea «ft 
7ft 19 Mot HDft 
IB* 11 Dec ID* 

8 13 Feb H2* 
7ft K May HI* 
I 16 Sep HI 
6ft 57 Apr 99* 
6ft 17 Aug <9 
6* 17 Dec 97ft 
6ft W Mar 99ft 
7H17FW Ifllft 
7* 17 Jun 100 


721 

755 

7X2 

7JS 


113 

133 

7X* 

113 


1X6 7X6 8« 
725 755 

7.16 636 

473 471 625 
724 722 

7X2 7X3 

7X4 7X1 8X4 
637 63B 730 

471 6X7 633 
482 7X0 430 
7.11 7X4 631 

472 472 875 
8.13 177 E52 

473 472 475 

448 451 453 

73 7.42 75S 
7J4 7X9 773 
722 734 7X1 
49 4X7 49 
431 411 447 
644 7JB 409 
478 737 

734 9.13 

7X1 752 

7X5 745 

724 635 732 
lit 721 455 
633 6X7 

7X6 6X1 

449 442 49 

437 737 

722 725 


Ami 

Security 

« Mai 

Middto 

Price 

Avt 

Mat L He Cut 

am 50 
tan 75 

icetond 

Iceland 

7ft 17 Art 
■ft 92 Jun 

dm 100 

Duebec Province 

6ft 07 Jut 

mft 

824 

607 

6X7 



IRELAND 

dm in 

QiM*c Province 

6 YD Mav 

97ft 

650 

703 

615 



HU* 86 Dec 

dm 200 

Quebec Province 

7ft Yl Art 

100ft 

7J4 


7X6 

dm 100 

Ireknd 

dm ISO 

QMOK Province 

10ft Yl Sen 

ill* 

U4 


4X9 

dm IDO 

Ireland 

fft VI Sen 

dm in 

Quebec Pmi nee 

18ft Y2 Feb 

lllft 

707 


9A 

him 12 

i rotate 7J5D3 

; re jon 

dm 200 

Quebec Province 

791 YS Feb 

Wft 

70S 


Mi 

tan HO 

Ireland 

rkreju 

dm 100 

Rovai Bank Of Canada 

7ft YD Aua 

94ft 

7J9 


171 

dm in 

1 refund 

Oft +1 Sep 


DENMARK 





dm in 
dm in 

lietond 

Ireland 

8'- 71 Dee 
Bft Yl MOV 








tan IS 

Inland 

fl read 

L3rl 

Dmmrth 



18) 


mm 

am too 

Ireland 

7ft 75 Feb 


Drrmai k. 
Denmark 
Denmark 
Denmark 
Denmark 
Dmwrk 
Denmark 
Denman 
Denmark 
Daman 


dm 100 

dm 100 Denman 
tan 708 Denmark 
dm ion 
dm NO 
dm 110 
dm HO 
dm 150 
dm 130 
dm 700 
amine 
dm 100 
llmlH 
dm iso 

dm ISO 

dm 100 
tan 75 
*r22S 
tan 75 

am HO 
cm ib 
dm 40 
tan >s 

dm 48 

tan 105 
dm To 
dm <0 
•n 40 
dm 58 
tan Uo 
tan 19 

dm HU 
dm W 

tan 180 


13i 


723 


Ceoenhooen Cilv 

Canrtnaen aiv 
Canenhagen atv 
CdAenbaseo Qty 

Canenhagen Cltv 
Copenhagen City 
CawnbpgtaiTele ohore 
Censdnoea retsptm 

Coperthaam Taletdione 
Copcnhgggn Telephone 
Dn Drama Bank 
Julkm Telephone 
Jutland IMHdnne 
Jutland TftaiOMM 
Mortuooe Funk DcnmcrU , 

Mnrtraige Bra* Denman Bft'VOJul hbw 
M ortaoee Bmk Denman 7*1100 99* 

ftft rtao oeBont Denmark m it Nov r Hu 
Mortgage Bata Denmark OftYSFeb 1B3* 
FINLAND 


6ft 17 Dec HO* 143 431 L7I 

4 WFeb 97 7.K 4H 

10 TOMOT «Sft 7X9 9X8 

7ft HMov 1 00ft 7X3 721 

4ft W Feb 97 7X0 6JB 

9* If MOT 1C 1X4 419 957 

7ft W Asr 1ID* 7X4 741 

7* 19 NOV 99* 7J4 70 

9ft 10 Mar 185ft 8.15 . 9JB 

I* 12 Feb IB* W 8X7 

ICft 12 Mar ua 420 9X0 

• UMOV HBft 7X6 7X4 

7ft 14 Apr «ft 735 731 

7* Y4Ndv 99ft 753 729 

7*14 Aar HO* 74B ?» >73 

I'.iHiDeC Wk 732 7X5 IJt 

6* 17 Sep 97* 723 721 6J9 

6 IONOV 94ft 720 759 OS 

8ft 14 Jan HI 123 UO m 
7* 15 Feb 95ft 1X5 772 

7ft 17 Jill 99ft 728 7X2 7X4 

1 -874*1 r 98* 7X2 7.N W 

6ft -M APT 9SM BJH 9.18 47* 

I* 13 Jul 10K 111 L47 

BUN Nov 101* 7X1 7.15 115 

6*17 Mor » 7X9 7X0 SB 

7N. 18 Feb <1* 724 7.«1 7X4 

IftIBFeO 101ft 117 837 

7 C Jul 99* 7X4 7X1 7JB 


7X9 

731 

821 

733 


17 

739 

944 

BX3 


dm 130 
dm HO 
tan IB 
dm HO 
tan IB 
dm 159 
dm IB 
dm 158 
dm 208 

dm 59 
dm 75 
Om 60 
dm 71 

dm SO 
*n M0 
dm 80 
dm 50 


Finland 
Finland 
Finland 
Finland 
Find md 
Finland 
Finland 
Ftntand 
Finland 

HetHnhl Qtv 
imqtrai Vaima 

a MUM Book Finland 
Httge Bank FWand 
Routflniukkl Ov 
Rautaruukkl Dy 
Tug Po w er Ctrnpony 
Union Bank Ot Rntand 


5* 16 Fa 

lift II NOV 
8 0* Dec 
7 VAPT 
7ft -M MOV 
AFbr 
i ra Nov 
7ft 11 Apt 
7 12 Jon 

Oft 13 Jun 
I 17 Jan 
I 16 Dec 

7 17 jm 
»BApr 

8 H Sep 
6 18 Feb 
6ft 18 Dec 


FRANCE 




AeroPOrtDe Ports 

Banaae F rwic Com E «t 

Bangue Franc Com EaI 
Banaue Franc Com Ext 

SZEff&TS 

CahnCMi CaeoEao 
catsse Centr Coop Eca 
Catae Not Aatorautes 
Cotne Not Energte 

S!S!; 



25S 

An HO 
dm HO 
am 200 
dm HO 
tan 200 
tan IB 
dm IB 
tan 45 
dm 1D0 

dm 100 
dm 100 

tan HO 


tan 150 
tan 150 
dm 660 

tan 600 

tan UO 
dm HO 
tan 250 
tan 250 


Electridft France 
Efcetrtdfc France 
Eftclrtctie France 
Francorte Prtrate 
Micbefln Flnoace 
Haanult A ixe tn u n ce 
Renault Acceptance 
Sdr Develap Regtenal 
5dr Develop Haaknri 
Sod Nta Chemtas Fer 
Sncf Nat Chemlns Per 
Sad Nat cnemlai Fir 


8* U Dec 
7* 17 Jan 
; V Feb 
5**88 Jan 
I* 89 AW 
I* 99 Jul 
BA 14 Sop 
1*15 Jan 
7* 18 Mar 
8ft 85 Apr 
6ft 86 Jul 
7 VAPT 
8ft 14 AM 
B 13 Jan 
Bh-SSOcI 
1*17 Mar 
9ft 11 Aug 
7* 11 Feb 

I UMOV 

7* 17 Feb 
8*18 Jul 
7* 13 APT 
8* 13 May 
6 07 Od 
Sft-MFea 
I* IS Nov 
1*17 5en 
weraocs 
8ft 05 May 
7* 10 Apr 
18* 06 Jul 
1 18 Jun 
7ft 06 Apr 
7* 13 Jun 
I* 12 MOV 
7* 13 Mta 
fft-noec 


99Vt 

105 

101 

99* 

HO* 

187* 

HI 

100* 

9* 

III 

un 

101 

99ft 

*7ft 

ion 

H 

90* 


101ft 
111 
Ml 
97* 
106 
III 
101* 
101 w 
Ml ft 

ram 

ran 

99 

Ml ft 
HI 
DM 
< 0 * 
M6ft 
HO 
100 * 
95* 
HD* 
100 
HNft 
98* 
111 * 
1D2* 
105ft 
183* 
W* 
99ft 
Mlvj 
110 * 
IB 
110* 
104 
110* 
70)* 


6X1 528 
7X1 nun 
7X7 732 
7.12 7X2 702 
7X1 7X4 
7X2 9X9 

726 7.92 
7X4 7X8 

727 7X9 
111 7X9 653 
736 734 BOO 
7JS 7.11 722 
7X1 7X5 704 
646 7X2 SB 
731 7 36 
627 7.13 412 
7X1 7X7 642 


738 733 LU 
7.14 747 
439 496 730 
632 7X4 531 
759 823 
72* 3X9 
7JS 7.99 
733 735 8JQ 
7J8 744 
157 322 146 
804 753 6X6 
7X8 7X3 737 

751 un 

752 732 
731 730 8X6 
491 6X3 
828 892 
725 725 
751 75. 
758 741 
721 107 
724 725 
7.90 0X7 
473 7.M 411 
735 73* 
751 607 
W K.7 
751 111 
494 6X9 841 
757 729 
8AS 10X9 
751 7.94 
7X7 7 43 730 
721 7x6 702 
7X7 729 829 
7X3 713 736 
737 732 729 


GERMANY 


AudlFInonci 
Boyer Capitol Cant 
Baver Capital Car W/w 
Borer Capital Cor X/w 
DUmler-aem 
Dbocbso InH Fin 
DrestaMr FJnonce W/w 
Dresdner RnonceX/ft 


7ft 14 Feb 98 749 733 

7*59 NOV 102 J IB M 
7* 15 Ifth ftft 2.93 279 

2* 15 Feb 60* 72t 400 

I -65 Nov HUM 251 2.77 723 

7ft 14 Feb 99* 734 732 

4 10 Jtm 119 220 147 

4 10 Jin HBft 1X9 191 


American Exchange Options 

For the Week Ending Feb. 22, 1985 


Option &nrtni Calls 

Puts 

Option & price Colls 

Puts 





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113ft 110 
113ft 115 
111* 120 
111* 125 
H7H 
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76ft 
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7ft 

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70 Xft 
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36ft 

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a 

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33ft 

a 

8ft 

9ft 

ft 

ft 

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a 

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r 

33ft 

38 

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1 7-14 

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38 

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35 

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15 

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25 

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20 25-16 

a 

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30 

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20ft 

a 

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35 

IMA 

3* 

19-16 

2ft 

DunBrd 

40 

r 

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1 

34ft 

40 

9-14 

17-16 

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t*9b 

65 

r 

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45 

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5 

I 

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15 

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9 

13-16 

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2 

2* 

189* 

10 

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M 

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35 

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a 

7ft 

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27 

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45 

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3* 

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50 

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a 

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55 

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4 

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GoM NO 

101 15-1* 

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70 

r 

r 

ft 

r 

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15 

MA 

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r 


Option 8. price Calls 


Puts 






rl 13-16 







70ft 




29k 

4 

Grace 

40 

2 

r 

1* 


nn* 

85 r 

2ft 

r 

r 

40ft 

45 

7-16 

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r 


Tandy 

a 

59k 

7 

« 

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a 

9k 

r 

r 


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a 

2ft 

Jft 

IJ-I6 

1ft 

LO Fa C Wft 

f-M 

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r 


30ft 

is 

ft 

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49* 

5 

22ft 

a 

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r 

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a 

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6* 

MA 

3-16 



5-1* 

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r 


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ai iMA 

23-14 

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MACOM 


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r 

r 




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30ft 

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Thrfty 

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a 

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U Cart) 

39 
39 
39 
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27ft 25 
27ft 31 
Wrtl Lm 35 
36ft 40 
VknCoNA 5 


30 r 9* 

35 4ft 5* 

40 15-16 27-16 

4$ * ft 

SB 1-M ft 


ft r 
* 15-16 
ift 2ft 


3 
ft 

2ft 3 
5-16 15-16 
9-16 


3ft 3-16 
Ift r 


Option A prlat Calls 


N DM 25 
25ft 30 
NMedEn 20 
37ft 25 
27ft 


1ft 


Ift 

* 


N Sami N 
12* IS 7-16 


ift 

JW r 
ft 19-16 
Zft 3* 


12* 

NaMAl 

15ft 

NOW 

39ft 


20 t-16 

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V * 
25 5ft 
30 23-16 


ft 

2ft 

ft 

3 


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35 

9* 

r 

OOECO 

3S 

r 

r 

SSft 

M 

r 

r 


45 

4ft 

r 

48ft 

58 

15-14 

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48ft 

55 

5-16 

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35 

r 

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40 

9 

99k 

48ft 

45 

59* 

59* 

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50 

2 

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48ft 

55 

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1 

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40 

r 

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ff 

r 

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50 

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1* 

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B 

2ft 

r 

a 

a 

7-14 

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M 

35 

ft 

i 

ROvDul 

45 

r 

9ft 

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a 

4ft 

r 

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55 

19-14 2 5-14 

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48 

MA 

r 

Senile 

n 

PA 

s 

57 

56 

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Sft 

57 

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SI 

65 

MA 

11-16 

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35 

29* 

r 

JSft 

40 

ft 

r 

Sftrtg 

a 

r 

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a 

a 

ft 

IMA 

Storer 

35 

74ft 

r 

589k 

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14V, 

r 

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45 

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sm 

50 

r 


sm 

55 

A* 

r 

son 

40 

2* 

5* 


65 

1ft 

J* 

Term co 

a 

r 

r 

38ft 

35 

4 

Jft 

38ft 

® 

1 31*1 13-14 

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45 

3-16 

7-16 

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40 

3 

r 

40’- 

45 

1ft 

2ft 

Zenllh 

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a* 

r 

229k 

a 

it* 

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22« 

a 

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a 

ft 

r 


3* Ift 2ft 


4* 

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7 

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1ft 

Jft 

7* 


1ft 2ft 
r r 
* 13-M 


Ift 

4 


6 * 

2 


1-16 

9-16 

2* 


dm 250 
am 250 
dm 78 
dm 150 
dm iff 
dm un 
am iff 
dm 300 

am 300 
am 2M 


Orewnw Fincnce w/w 
Drntawr Finance x/w 
Hoindi Finance 

Koufbof Frncni* Ww 
Kaulliat Finance ft’w 
noeduter-HumWIcl 
Lmae mtei ft/w 
VHHinti Finance w/w 
Veba InH Fimnx K/w 
VbUuwduot Inti Fin 


7JC 


T3iep u: 180 

nsea HD > 7-5* 

-<1 jul 131 7.X 

91 Nov 95* UB IF 

14 Nov J5: 478 4JC 

27 Mar 7.11 IX UO 

14 Dec HD* 274 U13 

13 Dec UJ ZX 15* 

T3DCC afl'v JJ3 4X8 

93 Mar 99* 7 46 7J4 


ICELAND 


100 * 


ITALY 


tan 100 Ailentat Nazion-Sirade 
dm 100 ConsareM Di Credlta 
dm 100 Cretan) QeOltoODere 
Om 158 Fwruvle Drift Stolo 
dm 100 Ferravie Dtfls State 
dm 100 OUwtH InH (luil 


fluff Jun 10T. 
8ft 91 Jm H2ft 
B 91 Jan HD 
I*ff Mar 101ft 
I HAST 101ft 
I* H JB1 103 


JAPAN 


0)71 50 
am HM 
dm 120 

am 100 
dm 40 
nm 108 
am HO 
dm HO 
dm HO 
dm to 
dm 81 
dm HO 
am 106 
am 100 

dm 100 
tan 100 
dm Iff 
tan 100 
dm 721 
dm HO 
dm HO 
tan 150 
dm 300 
dm 380 
am 100 
dm 100 
tan HO 
dmleo 
am in 
tanB 
tan 50 
tan 110 
tan IB 

dm 200 

dm IB 


Bonk 01 Tokyo Curacao 
Bunk Of Tokyo Curacao 
Full EtarilKCa W/w 
Fun inti Finance Ht. 
HOMma-Gwni Ltd 
Japan Airlines 
Joaan Dewlap Bank 
Japan Develop Bank 
Jaoon Pnance Munlflo 
jopon Svntt) Rubber 
JusobCoLM 

«-jmsol Electric Power 

Kobe Dlv 
KebcGlr 
How City 

Kobe Citv 
Kobe Otv 
hooeCilr 
Kobe Dlv 
Kubda Ltd 

Lane- rent, Cmflf Bonk 
Mitsubishi Heavy 
MJHubMM Heavy W/w 
MmutrtshJ Heavy X.*» 
Mitsubishi MrM W.'w 
NHognCradUBank 
Nippon 5lltlMn ft/w 
Nippon 5>u naan X/w 
Nippon Tricaro Tel con 
Rtrrltini ftafttl *•/« 
Rhythm WUttti Xim 
SumUamo Flmaia Asia 

Sumllema Finance Asia 
Tokyo Electric Power 

Yokohama City 


Sft 17 Jin Ml 
TWOOFiO OB* 
3* 90 apt lari 
r*i7F«b « 

8ft 25 Jun 100", 
8ft 07 Nov 101 
7ft 07 Sen HI 
7ft 90 Jul HBft 
7ft 11 Jul ISO* 
10* 25 APT HBft 
ift 08 Feb ica 
7* 06 May 
7* 06 Feb 
Sft 06 Jut 
6*27 Stay 100 
6ft07jui <B* 
7* 0900 
8 18 Jul 
7 93 Jun 
7ft 18 Apr 
■ WAuu WI* 
1ft 07 Dec HOft 
3A09APT ID* 
Jft 29 Apr 
3ft 04 Dec 
7*91 Apr 
3* 90 Jan 
3* 90 Jm 
5ft 07 FeO 


181 

Wi 


108 

H2 

96* 

99V. 


90* 

* 8 * 

97ft 

98* 


I*0IJul 


961V 

126ft 

98* 


5* 08 Jul 
7* 90 Nov 108* 
8 91 Aim 1112ft 
6V, 05 MOV IBB 

t 06AUO <n* 


LUXEMBOURG 


dm HO Aided Finance 6* 07 Jun 99 

dm 50 Arbed Finance • 07Jun 100 

tan US SocCenlr Hvctealm 7ft 14 Nov 96'. 

MEXICO 


dmaiS 
tan HO 
tan 100 
dm 100 
am iff 
tan 150 
dm ICO 
dm IB 


dm 108 
dm 40 
dm in 
tan HB 
dm 150 

tan I5P 

dm l« 
dm HO 


dm 135 

dm 200 

dm HO 

dm 100 
dm 709 
tan 75 
dm 250 
dm HO 
am 700 
tan IB 
dm 200 


dm 20 
tan 100 
dm Iff 
tan TOD 
dm 180 
tan HO 

dm 200 
dm 200 

tariff 
dm aa 
dm 250 

cm 550 


dm 50 
dm 75 
dm 50 
dm 50 
dmff 
dm (21 

dm 50 
tan 68 
emit 
nd 520 
dm IB 
dm uo 
dm HO 
dm 200 
dm HM 
dm Iff 


Mateo 

k naico 

Banco Nodonol Odne 
Com! Moo Fed Electric 
Camlston Fed Electric 
Npdonal Hnandera 
Pome* PetroteasMnic 
Pom*. PeholeosMiuric 


6 05 Apr 91 
7* 08 Jon 79V- 
■ 04 Nov 10D 
7* 05 NOV 99V 
6* 08 Apr 96V; 
11 90 Mor I US 

7 06 Jan 991! 

II “ 


10 Feb m 
MISCELLANEOUS 


ArubBanktaaCorp 
Ind Minin Dev B* (ran 
I nd Minin Dev Bk Iron 
Matovfla 
Megal Ffemnce 
Wool Flnoner 
Nall Bank 01 mranrv 
Trane Euroo Ncrtur Gas 


t 08 Sep HNft 
7ft 05 May 100* 
7ft 07 Jul 98* 
6ft05 5ep 99ft 
6*10 Jan 97 
8* 94 Jon 182ft 
6ft 05 Nov « 
t 13 Nov 102ft 


NETHERLANDS 

AkzoHv 9 YQ Mcy 1115’ft 

Barter Travenol InH 7* 14 Feb 98ft 

Estel lhaneti-Hooouv) 8ft 25 Jun Ml 

EsM (honcti-Hoooovl TftffAua lBUft 

NoderianfceGaMite 8 DDK ISO 

Philips Gloellamoen 9ft 04 Dec 104 V. 

PhmpeUaaianBW/w 3ft 11 Dec 101* 

Phil ins G1 sell amoen BftilJun Hfift 

Robabaik Nederland 7ft KOd 99* 

Shell InH Finance 6ft 07 Apr 99ft 

Stall InH Finance 6* 09 Feb 99* 

HEW ZEALAND 


New Zealand 
NewZeakmd 

New Zeakma 

New Zealand 
Now Zealand 
New Zed nod 
Nm Zealand 
NawZealaret 
Naw Zealand 
New Zea laid 
Nm Zealand 
NewZookmd 


5* 04 Mor 
7ft 06 MOV 
■**06 Nov 

6*07Jkm 

7 07Fet 
9* 07 Jul 
7ft 07 sea 
7ft 28 Jul 
8*07 Del 
9ft 19 Dec 
7* 11 Apr 
7*1100 


MW 

183ft 

100ft 

If 

w 

163 

100* 

100* 

ID* 

107* 

98* 

98* 


NORWAY 


Antal Oo Sumukri Verb 
Antal Od Sanndal Ve/k 
Bergen Otv 
Bermmair 
Den Norsk. Induitrvbk 
Om Marsh indastrlbk 
Naroes HvPateklorenln 
Marges Hyoalefcforenln 
Norms Kamtnunolbank 
Nugn KamnuinalBank 

Norges kommunalhank 
Norms Kommunoldonk 
Norges Kammunanmik 
Norms Kranmunalbank 
Norges Kunuuun u lbonk 
Atorges Kantmunalaatk 


IB 07 Dk 102ft 
10* 09 Jul 107V, 
8ft to Mov 101* 

7* 09 Feb 99 
6*2IJun 9 ft 
6 07 Mar W: 
7*07 MOV 99ft 
6 19 NOV 96 

K 05 Oct 106ft 
07 Mar 181ft 
6* 09 Jan 98ft 
7 09 Apr 100 
7ft 04 Aug HI 
6 09 Dec 96* 
6 10 Aug 
7* it Jul 


4C* 

KB* 


7.47 

:x 

1 71 

120 


mJR 

7X5 


4.74 

7J9 


4.14 

774 

3.16 

;.i4 

707 


fti; 

SU 


0X4 

7.95 


(13 

791 


(04 

7.4J 


7M 

801 


7 JO 

744 


IF 

7U 

7X1 

824 

706 

72* 

7IU 

(17 


0X2 

m 


701 

709 


807 

705 


83* 

714 


7.73 

194 


191 

754 



(47 


an 

7X8 


004 

7.15 


706 

7JI 


IM 

704 


761 

k57 


1020 

A A3 


(JM 

793 

804 

707 


6X3 

7X7 

710 


305 

873 

671 

679 

UP 


608 

7.11 


7.U 



704 

7.(1 


724 

7X4 

7X4 

7X1 

7X9 


?.» 




7.91 


3X2 



308 

152 


113 

7J7 


744 

145 


131 




*34 


508 

1X1 






7® 

7X5 

77J 

7.® 


780 

403 


650 

7X1 

671 

7.W 

773 


60} 

(94 


900 

743 


701 

1809 



7.44 

703 

774 


7.4* 


(Jl 

837 

7J0 

106 

4.14 

699 

9X4 


1038 

131 


702 

(48 


1004 

7X1 


796 

400 

899 

748 

IS* 

844 

789 

48* 


853 

609 

744 

6X4 


JJi 


7.95 


607 

704 

724 

7® 

7*7 

7a 

(93 

7X4 


734 

4X8 

(59 

a 47 




797 

7.9* 

800 

715 


4 39 

324 


3X6 

7X1 


006 

773 


748 

8/5 

in 

603 

607 

w 

880 

7M 


0.14 


ia 


7ff 

7a 

771 

601 


631 

899 

89* 

7.11) 

7.7* 


898 

627 


707 

704 


7X7 

7ff 


7.99 




7X1 


Iff 

7® 


734 

(.91 



8.99 


WOO 

Iff 

207 

864 

7.99 

768 

7.37 

716 

141 

80S 

48) 

7.46 

AT? 

IM 

7X9 

7.29 

701 

7X6 

6 79 

791 

7.90 

IM 

702 

6J0 

a 

1x2 

*19 

899 

698 

700 

UP 

691 

7.a 

801 

776 

670 

672 

7,19 

iff 

7X* 

7X4 

7.73 


am IK 
dm Iff 
am 20a 
cm IS 
dm Iff 
tan IOC 
or. IK 
Cm iff 

dm >90 
cm BO 

dm 9Q 

cm 60 
CmW 
Cm 100 
3m S3 
dm iff 
tan Iff 
2W35 


Njraes hsmutudEaGii 

Nora! ue 

Nsrame 

Narva was 

NcneaCdl 

Ken* nvttra 

Norsk r!«Orc 

Norsk M,dre 

Ncru H.aro 

DjioCiD 

OaoClM 

OUoCiIy 

OswCiit 
Oslo Cltv 
Slra-Kvind 
SicioHDmNors.e 
Slcleii Den Narske 
Trwcneim Orv 


I * 14 Dec 

6 28 Jun 

6 09Ngv 
7'. vote 

7 01 Jul 
y 07 Star 
6*1? Jun 
P7I3 Jun 
9 125co 
7ft 0: Jen 

9 *37 Mar 
(*19 Mar 
JftWJU 
7* 13 Mgr 
Sft 05 Jun 

6 26 5«P 
Sft 09 Mar 
5* 08 Apr 


HB* 

TB0* 

96ft 

(5* 

47ft 

Iff* 

« 

HD* 

l»* 

100* 

HB 

IIB* 

9W. 

101* 

ion 

94.; 

99 

94ft 


7.41 7J2 8X7 
7J1 7J8 J.96 

SS JS % 

TJ8 7J9 7.0 

ME 

In m E 

7X4 494 7X4 

’ill® 

7J4 7 48 7X5 
856 5X6 LU 
415 6X4 6X3 

Tff Iff IS 


PHILIPPINES 


cm ISO PtullDDi/iM 6* 25 Apr 99 1 ; 11X7 6J1 

SOUTH AFRICA 


tan in 
dm Iff 
dm iff 
tan 700 
tan Iff 
tan iff 
dm ISO 
tan Iff 
dm iff 
dm iff 
dm 150 
dm iff 
dm Iff 
tar HO 
dm 10O 
dm Iff 
dm Iff 
dm HO 
an in 
dmff 
tan 50 
omlOO 
Cm Iff 
am iff 
dm Iff 
on 140 


dm ISO 
dm Iff 
dm iff 
dm Iff 

am I SB 
tan ISO 
em <58 
tan 250 
dm ISO 
tan Iff 
am Iff 

dm 2<D 
am 1 ad 
An IB 
dm iff 

am ISO 
dm Iff 
an I SB 
tan 750 
amis 
dm iff 
tan 125 


tan SO 

dm 200 
dm UO 
dm Iff 
dm IBB 
tan >00 
tan Iff 
dm IDO 
dm Iff 
tan 100 


South Africa 
South Alrice 
South tlrlco 
South Air lm 
5ootn Alrira 
EsramEMctrSusrtv 
EicamElvctr SuOPtv 

Emm Eleetr Sup«y 

Etcom E lea r Suool v 

Eicstn Eledr SuwL» 
ExomEHOrSitaPtv 
Emm Eftctr 5uOOJ* 
Exam Electr Stanly 
Emm EbdrSudrtv 
Ivor Iran Steel 
Ivor iron Steel 
Ivor Irtr Steel 
I lay Ira, Steel 
I sew iron Steel 
Johan nefburtr CTTv 
Johannesburg Oh> 
JohraitesburgCiiv . 
Ron Triecom Pretom 
Pgsl Telecom Pretoria 
SOUtn Alrlca K ailaarS 
South Alrica Tranuwr 

SOUTH 


3ft 25 Nov 

J* 06 Now 
7 27 Nov 
Sft II Dec 
7*12 Dec 
m0JAor 
I 26 Mar 
6* 27 Sec 
9* 27 Nov 
7 01 Mav 
Ift 13 Ata- 
ev; 10 Jun 
I 13 Aor 
1*12 SeP 
7* 06 Jun 
7 27 Apr 
7 28 Mar 

9 28 MOT 

8ft 01 NOW 
1 2s Sett 

1B 06OC1 
i* 17 SCO 
9 10Oa 
BftlUim 
7ft 08 JW 
7ft H NOV 

AMERICA 


HD 

HI 

ID* 

101ft 

97V, 

700* 

101ft 

18ft 

104* 

44 

un* 

wo* 

64ft 
100ft 
1 00ft 
44 
94 

Iffft 

100ft 

UVu 

113ft 

97ft 

Iff 

1171* 

99* 

«ft 


Argentine 

Argenlme 

Brazil 

Brazil 

Brazil 

Brazil 

Brazil 

Venezuela 

Venezuela 

Vncwii 

Bnd larawllhie) 

Brew I brazil) 

Brew IhrazOI 
Camp Encrg Sao Paula 
Cara Vole Da Rio Does 
flrlrabns 
Eletrabras 
Elerrobros 
Lgm-Senilcos Brazil 
Uoih-Svi-viaa Brazil 


P eiiu bi ai 


Spain 

Seoul 

Aumar 

kunphtai 

Auteotilm 

S unmtofco 

Euntadm 

Ffiao 

Renta Ned Hadaral 
Paile Red NKtaiml 


Sft 08 Nov 
7ft 04 Mar 
B*06Oci 
7* 07 Jan 
8 17 Aua 
6*17 00 
4* 08 Jim 

6 08 Mta 
Sft Ml NOW 
416 10 Hav 
T616A6W 
6* 26 Mta 
Sft 07 Apr 

7 07 Nay 
Bft 04Dec 
6* 06 Apr 
7 07 Feb 
7 07 Sen 
6* 06 MOV 
9ft 10 Jan 

7 08 0(3 
■ 09 Od 

SPAIN 

6 08 MOV 
8* 12 AUO 
7ft 08 Feb 

8 1600 
6* 07 Oct 
8* 06 Feb 
8 07 Jan 
7* 12 Jan 
1*11 May 
10 13 Mav 


46* 

9flw 

un 

97* 

44V, 

188 

HD 

Hft 

42 

183 

ff* 

41* 

UOft 

95* 

108ft 

"ft 

47* 

94ft 

9TA 

Iff 

96* 

91ft 


8k* 

182* 

un 

U3 

44* 

HDft 

H4* 

<8* 

Iff* 

110* 


ADO 14] &2S 
7X7 U7 W 
6X7 6X3 6.98 
LI4 237 
8.19 7.95 

m sn a* 

6X4 491 7JS 
6lB9 72B 6JS 
7X3 1X7 

7J5 761 7X7 
B.1B AXO 
LS7 4.16 

ax? BiK 

174 U1 
7JB 7X0 7J1 
IS 7.45 7X7 
7JB JM 7X7 
8X3 178 

U1 131 8X6 
7J7 7J3 7JB 
736 9X6 

7J4 BXI 6X7 
LS7 8X7 
808 83 

7JS 7.4! 7i6 
82c 7.90 


752 aw 673 
7.99 825 7X1 
7J4 kJ4 UB 
859 7X1 

831 80S 

673 6/3 ATS 

814 8.98 

817 9X4 635 
831 9X3 7JJ7 
9X3 8X1 9X7 
801 7 JO 

8X5 684 

7 .17 6» 839 
9JZ7 9X3 7J5 

815 0X3 8X6 

8)9 6X5 

839 7.16 

7JD 7JI 7X4 
811 6X7 

849 844 8B 
822 9X1 737 
838 863 813 


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| NASDAQ National Market 


Sofas In Ngf 

100s High Low Close OVge 

(Continued from Page 15) 


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550 Sanya EkdricCo S IS Hoy 
940 Seam Calm 5 WNou 

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118 SuailtonraCarp ZftKMrt 
99 SgmttonH Etocfrie SftlTMar 
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$30 Suihllonio Metbl fnduM 7 15540 
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138 I Sen 71 jijoiB* OH 5X73582/9 


71 JA 133 
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171- 183 
189 2X7 


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$« Alatfca imregto(2X3 aft^Dec 
$9 Anwricoti Carl 707 _ fkWMnv 
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125 American Motor Ulff A 12 Apr 
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128 tarter* lari Ul It 13 ' 

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535 Beatrice Forth 2L7T 
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5 30 Crutcher Flnanc29XA 

515 Cummins Ini Fm 1B75 l*140d 
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19 Drtiten Carp 13.75 
tan 718 DmtKfa TaaeaSJB 
(8 DkJaohone Inti 3819 
(IB Dtahsn Finance 3308 
(15 Dvnatodron Ini 1103 
IW Eadmun Koaok 10x2 
515 El ECO Labalnt 21.98 




5 84 Mm 
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15 May 73 maturity 

30 Aug *3 maturity 
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15 Mav W maturity 
1 Jin 73 maturity 
MOrtr maturity 
I Dec 67 malumr 
lAuai3 maturttv 
1 Jul 71 moturttv 
1 Mor 73 maTurOy 
1 Apr 73 moturttv 
1 Apr 74 maturity 
90dM maturity 
IS Jun 73 maturttv 

31 Jul 78 maturity 
I50d 68 maturity 
5 Fed SB oMfurinr 
tAua® moturttv 

Bft 15 Auo® maturity 
W 15 Dec 48 maturity 

(7 t5 Oct n matiettv 

ff I Apr W maturity 

® 4 May 81 maturity 

9 Jun 77 mahirltv 
1 May *9 maturttv 
1JJ73 maturi ty 
INovaT UtorH 
1 Oct 68 maturity 
33 Feb 81 maturity 


(13 Electron Memorize.® SftKDec 


(9 Eahrlbie Inti 2571 
59 F«J Dent Stores 3479 
59 Feddm Cositai 71.1* 
(AB Firestone Q/sHM 
(75 Ford IntlFInon 26X8 
sn GoNuy on Inti 5SX1 
(9 General EI*ctrt24J7 
S IS Geamea maria 2*73 
S50 GUiette CompUra 
(75 Gillette 0« F 1 1(52 
(IS GrociWrO/j Rtf 
59 Creot Western 30JD 


8* *95 Dd 
(ftreDK 
5 Y2 May 
S re Alar 
5 88 Mo- 
an re Jan 
4ft TO JWI 
Sft re Mor 
n*t7Dee 

8 HI Mar 

S t6 Apr 
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I® 

217 

78 

WW 

254 

a 

115 

40 

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(AO HeHnoridi Payne 17J2 iftYSOd 


SU Holiday lam 2(57 
IH Honeywell CaMt 16X7 
19 IrtiO/g Franco 30.41 
(K inoD/i Finance 2181 
(9 inti 5 tom) Elec 1(40 
(16 mil Stand Elec 1545 
(25 Inti Stand Elec 17.14 
19 Inti Tetophane 1782 
(9 Intercom Hotel K JO 
(15 lie Fin Hoitana 24.72 
(9 IH Storalui ILU 


SSOct 

* 86 Hav 

4 tj Aug 
Ift DO SeP 

5 re Feb 
SftreOec 
Aft 09 Nov 
4ftW0d 
7 re Jun 
Aft re Mar 

Aft re jut 


Iff Koher Atonnaiti ®*2 5 re Fra 
5 re Feta 
•ft re Auo 
8 W Jun 

a reod 
s re Jut 
S reMoy 
‘ YSDd 


69 r.Wae Walter 11X8 
SK KMKr-Care lnl5S07 
(9 Lew Petrol Lac 416* 
S® Lear Petrol Lpc 130* 

IH Llv Inf 1 5507 

538 Marine ANdkaid 2501 
SB Mor lew Inti Fin 47X8 
625 Masmiiual utge 31 01 
115 Mown* uoi Mine S8 lSI 
(15 WlCooftofCa ITia 
IK Mgt Ind FlnC207 
(75 Mlto1C0l(litII.75 
, Inti 3061 
10 Inti 3174 
i Energy <3® 
an Jp O/v 3877 
aol Cot 53X1 
Oft Fin 2779 

IH NormeraTeMaiXLTl 
69 Pen Amtrhzrt TV® 
(22 Penpo Ftnoncv 3101 
125 Penney Jc Eutop 18X7 
SK Penney Jc InH 12.19 
o Capitol 2477 


tSea® mntirtty 
15 Mav 49 maturttv 
10073 motrttty 
15 Jul 4* noturtfy 
7 Apr si maturity 
15 Jut 4* mahirtty 
15 Dec 72 mntrtlfy 
Bft 37 Dee 48 mairtOv 
79 9 Art 74 maturity 

50 7 Mav II maturity 

155ft 15 Jun 73 mahirtty 
76 1 Nov 48 maturity 

<8 30 Jun 73 maturity 

lllft I Mar 83 maturi iv 
*7 I Aua 47 molumv 
94ft 28 Dec® mafurilv 
ffft 4 May II maturity 
142 I May 7) maturity 
■ ID ■ Jul 72 mahmtv 
135 1 Mav 78 3* Jul 97 

lHft I Art 81 35 Aug DO 
61 15 Aua 46 malurltv 

Blft UunAf maturi Iv 
Uft 15 Mav 78 maturity 
17 IS Art 73 maturth, 
9Sft 20 Mor 72 maturity 
« 1 Jon 67 3 Jan 8* 

itft 1 Feb 78 maturity 
87M » Aua 49 maluritv 
HM ISesW matuilty 
1W 15 Aug 83 moturttv 
in 17 Dec 79 matoifv 
183 4F«bn maturity 
87ft 1 Feb 49 maturity 
Wft 15 DecU moturttv 
5 Jan 8) maturity 



9*23 



*23 

138 

1511/7 

856 

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.101- 30* 

528728 

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675 Xeruv Caro 676 


tL 17 Jul 

171-3 

15 Mor 73 maturttv 








JttWMZV 

tfi-reDec 

0“! 

14 

tJaam maturity 

13 Mar 61 maturttv 

(87 

K5X6 

7 97 Doc 

92 

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»J1 1/2 

2B(® 

S 17 Jur 

BlVj lSMorn maturity 

*48 1/2 

53.72 159 

JVj-asoa 

101* 




8 IS Nov 

MVS 

11 Fgb(| malurUv 

*21 1/3 


4k. 17 Jun 





nvBDrc 

192 

1 Jun 69 moturttv 
1 Dec 18 maturity 



1FL V5 Mav 

>«*- 




111 

1 May 49 maturity 







iwreD« 


ljmai maturttv 

Iff 1/4 

*3280 

S -89 Dec 





4V, -37 Aug 


1 Aug 73 maturity 



8 76 Art 

127 

250081 motor Ity 

(38 


4b. 14 Nov 

nn 

15 Jul 72 mnttn-lt* 


9HM 






I 76 Dec 

A* 

3 Mor 81 maturtry 










31 Mar 69 maturity 



» 87 Od 

23 

30 Apr 73 mofurirv 



PkWMor 

MM 

1 Junia imdurlly 


K3- (.13 

4k. re Mov 


1 Jan 69 maturily 



12V, 17 Auo 

131 

7 Jena maturity 

(18188 

(X9- 9.17 

5. 17 Jul 

12B 

1 Feb 73 maturity 



w-rejiF 

91 

8 flo* U maturity 



a. re Dec 

7| 

1 Art 0U maturity 



XUKFeb 

1Q7 

15 Mar 74 malwtt* 




101 

15 Mavn moiurttv 



11(6 re May 

107V: 

IMayU maturity 



lift I* Mar 

U3 

15MgyM moturttv 

150 

42U 8X2 



15 Aar 64 msittrlty 

*441/1 

9 JO (fl 



15Dac7B naturllv 



8V. 16 Mor 

83 



90U8 



1 Art II 1000(5 





HA119BI rnatyrlTY 





24 Feb II maturity 



5 re Feu 

14* 

1 Fee *9 maSurtrv 


uL 3X6 

7 19 Sep 

112VJ 15 niter M msiwilv 

13(7/8 

(57 J2 

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44 

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(381/3 

147 J] 

4»37A«- 


1 Aor 73 mmuctir 



(UffApr 

aws 

1 &w 7i niB.uritv 

*41 1/3 




1 May 69 maturity 



5 retMC 

U-S 

1 Jan JS mutiatty 

SMB 

171X8 659 


HIGHEST CURRENT YIELDS 


On convertibles having a conversion premium 
ol Ie»s man 10%. 


1140 EhJer.Nv3S.il 

19 Mb Ouenaes I119SA 
(9 South CaOt Edl Alff 
SM DoM Inc 
520 Tom Manta Kirisba 
515 MassnuudMIoeSUO 

18 Sadryp Etodrit Lfl 
(35 IndnmeBennulSlff 
SIS OvnaiedrailidSIff 

19 ina Oft Ftoance 21X3 
IB American Medico 400* 
19 AsaAb 

59 Lnr Petrol Lpc 4206 
$8 Ewtteto 

59 BOOtS Co LW 
1186 Id Finance Iff 
SIS Asia Co 


nvg+4Jul 
lift re jut 

lift Y7 Auo 
6 Vz 74 AtiO 

AireMOf 
i rejui 
BftreMar 

AftYJArt 
fftfJMcv 
(ft DDSeo 
9ft Y? May 

fareseo 

1 W Jui 

7*reM0V 
6ft Ti Auo 
iwreoei 
Sft V3 Jan 


Wft 36 See 14 
102ft l Nov 84 
137 7 Jon 83 

73 1 NmTf 

n 1 Dec 80 
«ft 9 See 81 
W 'Art® 

80ft 15 CXI 77 

115 fSeeff 
1UW (Art 81 
19 XAwff 
lOVl IF* S3 
Ml 17 Dec 79 
104 15 Mb 79 

91 1 Feb 79 

lift. 15 Oqt 84 
00 I See 73 


■Aug 94 
21 mot 96 
maturttv 
20 Mor 95 
II Mar 92 
maturttv 
25 Aug oo 
maturttv 
15 Jun 96 
malurity 
SMovlf 
I JUR 
10099 
I JffliW 


tafi 1187 BUS1XJ1 
Ad urn nd 1444 
I1AJB 
Y042. 980170 
YI9] - 231299 
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YJTTff-tftiM 

O385-P604JJ9 

(1229 

(43 

120720 

5kr 170 - Btf 297X62 
5 21338 

sir 13 -5krn*J77 
am - b 117381 
a 800 

Y 43858- 49ft/I(l 


2996- 171 
301 (08 
(ff 9J7 
009 1X9 
803- 129 
871 1007 
Iff IXl 
4J9 408 
ff 1.79 
J9 SJ6 
Iff AM 
TV 1X2 
844 ff 
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01 SX7 
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Explanation of Symbols 


CHS Canadian Dollar 
ECU EuroMrti Correncv Unit 
EUA European Unll of Accaun! 
L Pound Sterling 

DM Deutsche Mart 

HMD Norwegian Kranee - DM 


SDR SpecU Drawing Rights 

T TCfl 

LPJ LuwnWortg Franc 

5FR S wfgF nmc 
FF Frandi Franc 









INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1985 





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For the Week Ending Feb. 22, 1985 



| Option B-nrlco Colls 

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Mutual Funds 

OosJno Price* Foil. 73, 1W5 


NCW YORK (API— 
TIM hutoarfm ««to- 
ilon*. swriM bv ttw 
National Association 
ol Socurtlteh Dam- 
irs, l nc. ora Hw wlc 
n at wWdi Vmh 
sscurtltes cswM hay* 
t u n »ld (Nat A>Mt 
VWu*l or tnMil 
lvalue phM Mini 
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ABT Family: . 

Emro 111* 1842 
Gminc USl 107 
Seeing 11J8 1144 

Util Inc 74.11 1741 
Acorn F J2J? NL 

AOV 2040 NL 

Atufura 1120 NL 

AIM Fund*: 

CvYld 1200 1163 
Gmwy 9M 9 M 
HIYM 960 1040 
Summit 542 
Alliance Cop: 

Inti 104S 1144 
MOTta 946 964 
ToCtl 105 2049 
Alpha F 1B.1B 1967 

Amor Capital; 

Carp AJO 7J2 
CmstK 1A1A 1540 
Entrp 1121 1134 
E«ti 46 J» NL 
Fd Am 1148 1157 
GvSec 1145 1139 
Grow 1444 NL 
Mortar 1249 1367 
HI Yld 937 HL48 
Mun B 1747 1045 
OTC 10-11 1165 
Pace 20.12 2169 
Prowfd 4.74 513 
Vertr 1461 14J0 
American Fundi: 

A Bal 967 1090 
Amen 067 949 
A Mlltl 1564 1644 
Bond 1246 1344 
Eupoc 1363 15.11 
Fd inv 11.91 1369 
Grwtti 13.70 1467 
incom 11.11 1114 
ICA 11.16 1120 
NEco 1541 1664 
N Pars 762 655 
TaxE 946 1066 
Wsh Ml 9.97 1060 
A GttlFd 744 B3S 


•M Aik 

CnpttG 1294 NL 
Equity 10.10 NL 
Galen 9.15 NL 
HIYId 1410 NL 
Calvert Group; 
Eatttfr 1747 NL 
Inca 1441 NL 
Sodol sass ML 
TKFL 1048 NL 
T»FL 1467 NL 
Calvin Bullock; 
AWG< 749 440 


BW Aife 

ran EH 71.12 NL Option 

Ttlrd C 767 NL Utils 

6oaf erti rJt £07 incam 

Eaton Vance: US Gat 

EH Bal 731 768 ColTx 

EHStk 1148 1146 FnfGG 

GvtotJ 1111 1199 Fd oSW 

Grwth 440 721 GITHY 

HIYId 4JB 522 GTPac 

Incsas 968 9-?2 Gale Op 


Mil Hd M 

NL Option 641 763 

NL UtliS 439 469 

067 Incam 264 120 

US Gov 767 731 
768 ColTx 447 474 

346 FrBGG 1455 1532 
199 Fd 0f5W 10.95 1144 
721 GITHY 1029 NL 
£22 GTPac 1438 NL 
9.92 Gale OP 1438 NL 


741 154 1 Gen Elec Inv: 


EMratattt Group: 


1B5B 2063 EElfnln 

1546 1761 EHnTr 

1164 1264 ElfnTx 


1049 NL 
2337 

J0.1S NL 
3446 


Baton 
BuNCfc 
I Canon 
Dlvtd 
Hllnc 
Man in 
TxFro 

gssr 

cm 5h* 
Chan Fd 
Oip oir 
Chestnut 


1141 124B 
1721 1861, 
766 849 
114 343 
1047 1150 
1160 1262| 
9 JO 10.18 1 
17.11 IJ6B 

12.10 1333 

15.11 NL 
642 NL' 

W-32 NL, 
S0J4 NL 


Cflem 939 1026 US Lo 1039 NL 

EnsRs 11.181222 Gen Sec 1145 NL 
Survey 136615.15 GkitelEr X340 NL 

EmftBM 1544 1444 Glntel 80.13 NL 

EnSUtll 2261 NL OrpHSm 9J0 NL 

Evram r 4«S NL GrasnEa 11.78 NL 

EvfwTtl 1648 NL Grttl ind 11 JO NL 

FPA Fund*: _ GrdPkA 1638 2069 

Caplt 10.18 1137 Ham HDA 565 639 

Nwlnc 837 NL Hart Gtti 1065 NL 

Parmt U63 1533 Hart Lev 1246 NL 

Perm 1643 18.17 Home Inv r Ian NL 

Frm BG 14.14 NL Hqr Man 22 43 NL 

Paderoted Fund*; Hutton Group: 

CPCsh 10 79 NL Band r 1040 NL 


BM A*fc 

LehCQP 1827 NL 
Letitmrtl 1743 NL 
Levroe 740 NL 
Laxlnatan Cro: 

CLdr lr 1127 13.19 
GaMM 291 NL 
GNMA 744 NL 
Grow 841 ML 
Restl 1637 NL 
Ltoarty Group: 

Am Ldr 1143 NL 
Tx Fro 897 NL 
US Gvt unavall 
UndDv 2266 NL I 
LJndnr 1937 NL 
Latxnls Savies: 

Caplt 1930 NL 
Mut 1767 NL 
Lord Abbeti: 

AHt ltd 934 1067 
end dto IBM 1167 1 
Dev Gl 839 9.17 | 


incom 
i TaxFr 
TaxNY 
VolAp 
Lowry 


366 334 
948 MM 
941 1809 
963 1874 
948 W3A 


A Her ho 
A Invest 
A Inv In 
AmMod 
A NIGttl 
A Ntlnc 
vAmway 
Analyf 
lAmstna 


265 NL 
735 NL | 
9.17 NL 
3240 NL, 
365 421 
1968 3065 
SJ6 637 
14944 NL | 
7.16 NL ! 


Axe HouoMop: 

Fnd S 960 1QJ6 
Incam 440 4 69 ■ 
Stock 747 838 
Bn bun Grow: j 

. Bond 149 NL 
Enters 1139 NL 
Gwfh 1245 ML 
UMB SI 1137 NL 
UMB B I860 NL 
3LCGI 1890 1848 
9LC IRC t££2 14.94 
Beoe Glti 1568 NL 
Beat Hill 1855 NL 
3ennorn Capitol: 
CorTFL 960 NL 
CalTFI 9.70 NL 
CanNT 1036 NL 
3emer Grow: 

100 Fd IW5 NL 

101 Fd 1465 NL 
Boston Co; 

CapAp 2568 NL 
, Modi 1043 NL 
/ SpGth 1730 NL 
3awser 277 nl 
iruce 703.W NL 


CIGNA Funds: 

Grwth 1369 14.15 
HIYId 943 1041 
incom 672 736 
MimfB 69* 755 
Colonial Funds: _ 

CnPA 1479 1616 
CpCstl 4846 4945 
CpCsIl 4889 4969 
Fund 1443 1569 
GvSec UJ6 1240 
Grwtti 1030 1149 
HI Yld 7.17 749 
Incam 674 733 
Optlnc 826 963 
OPtl II H-93 1364 
Tax Ex XIM 1240 
Columbia Fun®: ... 
Fixed 1205 NL 
Grlh 2331 NL 
Mimic 10.10 NL 
ICwItfl AB 147 159 
CwHfi CO 202 ZTB 
Composite Group: . 
Band 9J1 NL 
Fund 10 JO NL 
Tax 656 NL 
USGov 162 166 
Concord unavall 
canstei G »J? nl 
C ard Mut 563 NL 
Copley 749 NL 
iCpGaah 4733 NL 
Ctrv Cap 1679 1816 
Criterion Flmts: __ 

error c* 966 10J8 
IrtvOI *■£ 9.92 
PUM 862 944 
QUQITX TJ4 1030 
I smut 15J0 17.16 
□FA Sm T7B60 NL 
DFA Ini 10040 NL 
Dean Witter: 

CaiTF 1060 KL 
, DvGt r 855 NL 
DhflGt 1361 NL 
HIYId 1332 1369 
indVi r 1074 NL 
NtlRsc 741 NL 
SearTx 10J5 NL 
TaxE* 967 10J9 
i USGvt WJ2 NL 
Wrtdw OM urn 
Dataware Group: 
CMC 857 1015 
Decat 1540 1765 


Exch 3748 NL 
FT im 964 NL 
Fdllnlr unavall 
GNMA 1057 NL 
Hi 1cm 1145 1246 
ince unavall 
Short 1017 NL 
SI Gvt unavall 
sikBd unovaa 
Slock 1739 NL 
FldMitv invest: 

Band 651 NL 
Canon 5641 NL 
Canttd 1075 NL 
De*tnv 1230 


Emra r 11.15 NL 
Gwtti r 1346 NL 


Oatlnc 
GvtSc 
Natl 
NY Mu 
(RlStck 


942 NL 
945 NL 
1029 1072 
9.95 1036 
15.18 1560 


De*ftiv 
Dlscv 
Ea Inc 
Exctl 
Fidel 
Fredm 
Gvt Sec 
Hllnca 
HI Yld 
Lt Mun 


2538 2631 
4653 NL 
15.98 NL 
1337 NL 
9.12 NL 
863 NL 
1146 NL 
U1 NL 
3733 3848 


IDS Mutual: 

IDS Ag r 632 NL 
IDSEa r 660 NL 
IDS I nr 531 NL 
IDS Bd 442 478 
IDS Dll 762 739 
IDS Ex 463 500 
IDS Grl 1655 1742 
IDS HIY 368 619 
IDS ini 5.13 540 
IDS ND 845 8S9 
IDS Proa 673768 
Mutl 11.17 1176 
IDS Tx 34B157 
Stock 1658 1745 
S elect 746 866 
VartaB 867 849 


Mun Bd 687 NL ISI Group: 

MassT 1064 1014 Grwth 686 750; 

Marc 143 1474 Incom 372 466 

MtaSc 962 9.93 Trat Sh 1010 1164, 

NYTxsn 1063 NL industry 614 NL 
NYTxMu 1054 U45 Inf Invsl 971 1041 
Purlin 1215 NL Invst Portfolio: 

SeiDef 1133 1340 Equity 956 NL I 

SMEn 1863 11.15 GvtPI 840 NL 

SMFIn 2200 2245 HIYM 872 NL 

SelHIt 20.14 2055 Opto 851 NL , 

Sol Lei 1343 1370 ITB Group: 1 

SeJMtl »J* 955 inv Bo* unavaN 
SdTctl 2340 226B Hlfnco 1422 1SJ3 

SelUtll 1761 1828 MaTF 1472 1545 

SecSH 1211 1248 Inv Re*h 4M 540 

ThrHt 974 NL Istel 1113 NL 

Trend 3942 NL IwGttl 1120 NL 

IduCOP 19.15 NL I wired 11161 NL 

Inandal (Yob: JP Grth 1150 1560 

Band 622 NL JP Inca 808 872 

Dyna 747 NL Janus 1228 NL 


SeiDef 1133 1340 Equ 
SMEn 1863 11.15 Gvtt 
SMFIn 2200 2245 HtYI 
SMHIt 20.14 2055 Oph 
Sol Lei 1143 1370 ITB G 
SMMtl Mi kg ln*S 
SelTch 23402m Hlto 

SeUJtll 1761 162? Mai 

SecSH 1211 1248 Inv to 
ThrHt 974 NL istel 
Trend 3942 NL IwGfl 
FMuCOP H.15 NL twins 
Financial (Yob: JP Gr 

Band 622 NL JP Im 
Dyna 747 NL Janus 


Dyna 747 NL Janus 1229 NL 
FncTTx 1422 NL Joan Hancock: 
induct 452 NL Band U.14 1557 
incom 871 NL Grwth 1261 1162 
MYiar 777 NL USGvt 629.9.15 
Fst Investors: Tax Ex 9JS 1816 1 

Bad AB 1242 1139 Koutmn .14 NL I 
Disco 1121 1444 Kemper Funds: 

Govt 1154 1244 ColTx 1226 1264 


Lutheran Bro: .. 
Fund 1564 1647 

incom 853 698 

Muni 692 728 

Mass Finance 
MFI unavall 
MFG 9.90 1039 

MSNC unavall 
MS VA unovall 
MIT unavall 
MiG unavall 
MID unavall 
MCD unavall 
MEG unavall 
MFD unavall 
MFB unovall 
MMB unovall 
MFH unavall 
MMH unovall 
MSF unavall . 
Mathers 18.94 NL 
MesCtvl 2101 NL 
Merrill Lynch: 

Basic 1428 1SJ7 
COPlt 2095 2241 
Eau Bd 1126 1163 
FedSc 953 10.17 
FtfTm 1209 NL 
Hllnc unavall 
HI OH unavall... 
inIHM 946 1034 
inTrm unavall .. 
LtMal 978 9J88 
MunHI 9JJ9 947 
Muni In 762 731 
PaeFd 1613 Jill 
Ptmlx 1151 1231 
SdTcti 9.14 9.99 
SpI VaJ 1266 13® 
MM AM 651 7.11 
MMAHI 509 556 
MwBBV 1169 NL 
MSB Fd 2162 NL 
MdIGvl 1005 NL 
[MiU Ben 1099 1201 
Mulual at Omaha ; 
Amtr 966 NL 
Grwtti 893 645 
incom 859 9® 
Tx Fre 965 1082 
MtWual 1767 NL 
Mut Shr 5440 NL 
1 Nat Avia 948 1058 
Nattad 1209 NL 
Not Securllle*: 

Baton 1452 1545 


BM Ask 

Partn lire NL 
NY Mun 169 NL 
NY Vent 7.98 872 
Newt Gl 2649 NL 
Newt Inc 811 nl 
N icholas Group: . 
Nkchol 29-T3 NlI 
Nlctl II 1119 NL 
Ncfidtc 359 NL i 
NE InTr 1165 NL 
NE InGt 1159 NL 
North Star: _ 

Apollo 1039 NL 
Band MS NL 
' Rnokm T76t NL 
Stock 1146 NL 
NovaFd I4J2 NL 
Nuveen 749 NL 
Omeoa 1152 NL 
OPPenhelmer Fd: 
AfM 15.19 1640' 
Direct 1941 2143 
Ealnc 7.18 765 
Oppen 9.U 9.re 
Gold 620 678 
HI Yld 17.17 1841 
Prem 213* 2132 I 
Racy 1122 1445 
sped 2070 22421 
Tnroot 1897 1669 , 
Tx Fro 7.94 831 1 
Time 1360 1431 i 
OTC Sec 1832 1774 
PcHzCol 1233 NL 


Paine Webber: 


Allas 

Arne 

GNMA 

HIYM 

invGra 

PaxWld 

Petxi Sa 
Penn Mu 
PermPrl 


877 958 
1159 1465 
945 1000 
9.91 1035. 
976 1019 ' 
1140 NL 
839 NL 
651 NL 
1053 NL 
848 927 


BM Ask 

Vavmj 1644 1819 
Quasar 5043 NL 
Ralnbw 815 NL 
ReaGr 1147 U.94 
RoChTx 1816 11.10 
Royce 7.79 NL 
SFT Eqt 1818 11.13 
Safeco secur: 

Eautt 1002 NL 
Grwth 1764 NL 
Inca 1240 NL 
I Munlc 1172 NL 
SIPaul invest: 

Caplt 1033 1099 
Grwtti 1171 1246 
HlCO 9.42 1062 
Sped 1747 NL 
Scudder Funds: 
ColTx 971 NL 
I Devto 6166 NL 
COpCr 1464 NL 
Gratae 1264 NL 
Incom unovall 
inti Fd 2155 NL 
MNIB 759 NL 
NYTtm 10.15 NL 
Security Funds: 
Adlan 774 
Bond 74B 866 
Entity 536 S56 
invest 866 V4B 
Ultra 766 870 
SMectad Funds: 

Am Shs 11.13 NL 
SpI Shs 1842 NL 
SeHamai Group; 
CapFd 11.13 1216 
CmStk 1210 1365 
Camun 055 934 
Growth 5L29 570 
Inca 1157 1258 
MOS&T* 7.19755 
MldiTx 733 770 

MinnTx 764 739 


1157 1258 
7.19755 
733 770 
764739 
723 759 


771 843 
567 642 
14581573 
478 544 


Delaw 
Deleft 
Tx Fre 
Delta 
DIT CG 
DIT AG 
DIT Cl 
PGDh> 


1735 21.15 
754 834 
675 730 
1238 1353 
11.74 NL 
1852 NL 
947 NL 

7819 NL 


NYTxF 1207 1361 
90-10 13.1? 1442 

Opto £22 £63 
Tax Ex 8H 966 
lexFd 10.77 NL 
WlEa SOI 539 


DodCx Bl 2666 NL, 
DadCx St 2478 NL 
0n» BUT 1819 1885' 
Dreyfus Grp: , 

A Bps! 1W8 NL 
CfllTx 1127 NL 
Drayf 1137 18.97 
Intorm 1264 ML 
Lem 1637 1739 
GttlOp 970 NL 
NY T a 1337 NL, 
SPI Inc 761 NL 


70-10 181? 1442 

Opto £22 £63 
Tax Ex 8H 966 
FlexFd 1077 NL 
64 WlEa £34 539 
44 Wall 571 NL 
Fnd Gth _ 445 464 
Founders Group: 
Grwtti iW NL 
Incam R19 NL 
Mutual 9.92 NL 
Sped 2643 NL 
Franklin Grow: 

AGE 365 330 
DNTC 1023 11 JO 
Equity £11 551 
FedTx 1030 1063 


incom 814 866 
Grow 1229 Uil 
HI YU 181B 1893 
IntlFd 120) 13.17 
Mun B 813 854 
Opto 11.10 1222 
Summ 2648 24.75 
Tech 1157 1233 
TOt Rt 1184 1113 
USGvt 861 877 


1207 1361 Mixi B 813 854 
181? 1842 Opto 11.18 1232 
£22 £63 Summ 3848 26.7$ 
8H 966 Tech 1167 1233 
10.97 NL Tot Rt 1164 1113 
£21 £29 USGvt 861 &97 
$71 NL Keystone Mam; 

643 464 cut Blr 1£J5 NL 
roup: Oa air 1 iM NL 

M NL Cu*B4r 767 NL 
1819 NL CU5 Kir 841 NL 
9.92 NL CM Kir 644 NL 
Uw43 NL Cl» Sir 1970 NL 
aw: Cos S3r 819 NL 

365 33d Cut 54r £71 WL 

U3 11JI3 inti r 669 NL 
£11 551 KPM r 1264 NL 
070 1063 T*Fr r 768 NL 


Band 
CaTxE 
FedSc 
Grwtti 
PnU 
incam 
ReaiE 
Stock 
Tax Ex 
Tot Re 
1 Fairtd 
NOtTrie 


123 348 
1144 1207 
1153 1236 
168 9J6 
7J6 7.94 
770 7.74 
764 850 
9J1 1064 
841 865 
£27 676 
9JJ7 9.91 
1259 1374 


Gold 868 171 KldPea r 1561 NL 

Grwtti 1216 JJLl) |lmh 2653 NL 

NY Tax 9*4 1038 LeSOMOS 2135 NL 


Nationwide Fde: 
NOlFd 1071 1158 
NafGllt 859 ?JS 
NatBd 907 961 
NEUie Fund: 

Equll 20.02 2176 
Grwth 21J1 2116 
incam 1035 1U4 
Ret £q 19.10 2876 
TaxEx 677 739 
Neuberoer Berm: 
Enrav 1865 NL 
- Guard 4137 NL 
UWv 190 NL 
Mannt 7.17 NL 


CvFd 1646 17.99 1 

Grwtti 1816 1548 

HIYId 9.11 960 

Stack 127* I195| 

PC Cp 1870 NL ' 

Pilgrim Gro: 

Mob C 741 7.99 
MOD In 822 886 
PAR 2ZM 2104 
PIIO Fd 1858 1572 
Pioneer Fund: 

Band 868 949 
Fund 2044 7236 

II Inc 1643 17.96 

III Inc 1830 1163 
Pfftmd 1257 NL 
Price Funds: 

Grwth 1833 NL 
Gthlne 1121 NL 
incom 872 NL 
toll 1117 NL 
N Era 1814 NL 
N Harts I860 NL 
ShTrB 899 NL 
TxFrl 843 NL 
TxFrSI £62 NL 
PrtoPTE 9J8 962 
Pro Services: 

MedT 9.98 NL 
Fund 1047 NL 
incam 830 NL 
Prudential Bade: 
AdlPtd 2157 NL 
Equity 1560 16J0 
Gktol r 1163 NL 

GvtSc 1IUI0 1810 
HIYId 1800 1073 
HYMu 1801 I47D 
MuNY 1829 NL 
NDK 1355 J8J2 
Onto Or 1531 1895 
QTY Inc 1462 U69 
Rjdft r 939 , NL 
Utility 1051 HJ7 
Putnam Funds: 

Conw 1377 f£IH, 

CalTx 1155 1823 

Caplt 7JS 
CCAro 47-24 4&45 
CCDSP 47 JS 4856 
infoSc 1216 1129 . 

In* Eq tb73 1820 1 

Gcani 1150 1257, 

Grolnc 1878 11.78 
Health 1662 1838 : 

HI YW 1£2S 1835 
Incom £77 7M 
Invest 1823 11.18 
NYTx I860 I5J3 
OPtn 1133 1205 
Tax Ex 2147 2254 
USGta 1617 1468 
Visla 16J0 1761 


Nairr* 763 759 
NY Tax 7.1 H 754 
OtltoTx 769 744 
Senllnel Group: 
Baton 1063 1896 
Bond 815 872 
Com 5 1803 T7J0 

Grwth 1165 15.14 
Sequoia 3764 NL 
Sentry 1898 1163 
Shearsan Funds: 
ATKM 7265 NL 
AorGr 1 1-716 1230 
Appro 1662 I960 
CalMu 14JD 1877 
FOVcri 881 7.19 
Global 1960 2864 
HIYId 1831 W6S 
MoGvf 1264 1341 
MMun 1365 1816 
NYMu 1812 1866 
Sherm D 804 NL 
Sierra Gl 1169 NL 
Stoma Funds: 

COPtt 1827 1560 
Ineo 756 826 
invest 765 85* 
Sad n 766 7.93 
Trust 1146 1252 
vent 1067 1161 
Smim Barney : 

Eaul 1365 NL 
Indira 89S 950 
USGvl 1260 1369 
SoGen in I£18 l£90 
Swininc 469 NL 
Sow In 2IU* 21.14 
state Band Gro; 

Cam SI £40 560 
Diver* £24 664 
P roars 820 896 
Si Frm Gl unavall 
StFrm Bl unavall 
StSttMt Inv: 

Exctl 0660 NL 
Grwth r $25? NL 
Invst 6815 68S2 
Steadman Funds: 

Am Ind 269 NL 
assoc 64 NL 
Invest 141 NL 
Ocean 850 NL 
Stein Roe Fas: 


usaa Group; 

Comsto I860 NL 
Gold 743 NL 
Grwth 14.15 NL 
Inca 11-00 nl 
S hit 1810 NL 
TxEH 1164 NL 
TxEll 1161 NL 
TxESh HUB NL 
Unified Mamin : 

Acum 4J6 NL 
Gwtti 19.14 NL 
Inco 1214 NL 
Mutt 1259 NL 
United Funds: 

Aeon 769 848 
Bond £35 565 
GvtSec £14 £35 
ltd Gth £16 £64 
Gan Inc I5JV 1882. 
HI Inc 1£2S 184B 
incam 1807 1£32 
Muni 837 864 
NwCcPt 892 £38 
Retire 564 816 
ScEna 890 9.73 
vana 554 805 
Utd Services; 

GtoShr 459 NL 
GBT 1365 NL 
Growth 768 NL 
Prspcf M NL 
VOiFra 1851 NL 
VahM Line Fd: 

Band 1161 NL 
Fund 1224 NL 
Incom 833 NL 
LOV Gt 1814 NL 
MunBd HUG NL 
SM Sit 1366 NL 
VKlhpM 1460 1563 
VK US 1468 1862 
Vance Exchange: 
COpE I 6£39 NL 
DBstf 4164 NL 
DWTl 7205 NL 
ExFd I 10662 NL 
ExBet 9251 NL 
FklEI 5764 NL 
ScFIdf 6231 NL 
vwioiiard Gnxw: 
Explr 38U NL 
Gold £26 NL 
Ivest 1833 NL 
Mora 1165 NL 



High Law Last cbtae 
OTO 2Hk 259k — AS 
Wk 2K, 2Vb —~r* 
r* u? nh +vt! 
4H. 33k — h, 

99k B4fc 89k —Ik 
1BU, 16Vk I7M — lS 
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JP 561k -Hfc 

w; 739, + 3 

im rate mo — m 


Pickens Raises 
Stake in Unocal 

United Pres 1 International 

NEW YORK — T. Boone Pick- 
ens Jr., the chairman of Mesa Pe- 
troleum Co., and his partners have 
raised their stake in Unocal Corp. 
to 9.7 percent from 8.5 percent, a 
filing with the Securities and Ex- 
change Commission shows. 

Unocal based in Los Angeles, 
has frequently been mentioned as a 
potential acquisition target even 
though it has adopted some of the 
strongest anti-takeover defeases in 
the od industry. Mr. Pickens said 
he does not plan to pursue control 
of Unocal but has earmarked funds 
to buy as much as 15 percent of the 
company's stock. , 

Unocal stock dosed down 12_5 
cents, at $46,625, Friday on the 


NMST 3961 NL 
QDIv I 1660 NL 
OO Iv l| 747 NL 
QDvIll 2131 NL 
TCint 2809 NL 
TCUsa 3238 NL 
GNMA 9.15 NL 
HIY BO 8S2 NL 
ICBnd 7JB NL 
ShrlTr 1UH NL 
Ind Tr 2105 NL 
MuHY 9.1# NL 
Mumt m« NL 
MuLb ♦ M NL 
MlnLa 1818 NL 
MuSdt l £33 NL 


uciun iSrn 7 7%= 1* company’s stock. , 

. UMCEI 80 1 lta ite lMf «... , . _ 

m usp ri 2H>28G w7 kvi iota inv. Unocal stock dosed down \2S 

w uokiwi *° m 6 t Si 6 + cents, at $46,625, Friday on the 
ii£ ?5’K T iS- w New York Slock Exchange. 

Unimot 65e 16 6S2M » 2te + W 
UnBCPS 1J» 26 5339 39 39 

UnFatO 0382 9 0» 8* + » . 

ursSc 3X4 u m ml S Raytheon Wins Contracts 

I Return 

WASHINGTON — Raytheon 
Co.’s missile systems division won 
UJL Army contracts of $107.2 mil- 
lion for 145 Patriot missiles, five 
firing units and ancillary items, and 
for $76 million to design, manufac- 
ture and test 550 4.2-inch guided 
anti-armor mortar projectiles, the 
Defense Department said. 


Cap On 2154 NL 
Dlscv 951 NL 
Spud 1558 NL 
Slack 1828 NL 
TaxEx 80S NL 


TfllRet 22.11 NL 

Uniy 1660 NL 

StratCas r.vi 864 

St rot Irw £09 £56 


Strut Gin 1824 NL 
Strongin 1818 1836 


Weltel 1362 NL 

WMItn 1301 NL 

WtKfST 1837 NL 

Vanturln 18321108 
WallSl 895 967 

wain EQ 1£19 NL 

wstord 12HJ 1815 

Wood 5initiwn: 
atvn 40«l NL 

N«UW 1965 NL 

Pine 1362 NL 

YaSFO 830 862 

nl — No toad 

isobn dtaroel 

(— Pnjvidud oavi 
quote r- Redemption 
charge may apply. 
x—Ex mvtoend. 


Gold Options dritotavaLt 


SO 875-1025 
300 ITS- 13} 
310 US-Q5D 

so am- oat 

330 0M- 025 

MO 


GcU2nS -299J» 

VNhb* W hke WdiSjL 

*• Qwi 4o Mostt-Banc 
12tl Genera |. Swhzettawl 
Td. 310251 - Tdn 28345 

























































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBLNE. MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1985 




BOOKS 


NIGHTS AT THE CIRCUS 


By Angela Caner. 295 pp. $15.95. 
Viking, 40 West 23d Street. 

New York, N. Y. 10010. 


Reviewed bv Michiko Kakutani 


Fewers and appreciate her spedalness --that 
is, accept the marvelous on faith. . 

Is Fewers, as Walser keeps asking himself; 
fact or fiction? Is her act the real thingor just 
another confidence trick? In raising sm± ques- 
tions. Carter is addressing all those sticky is- 
sues about storytelling that are so dear to 
f the none 


practitioners of 


L OUD, bawdy and unabashedly sentimental. 

/ the heroine of Angela Carter's latest novel 
is a wonderfully vital creation. Though she is 
held up as a sort of paradigm of “the New 
Woman." Fewers. as she is called, is not your 


; nouveau rvttian, but as long 
i the lens of 
being overly 


as she examines them through the lens of 
Fewers and Walser, she avoids 


average feminist heroine, or even your every- 
day circus star the 6-foot-2-inch, blonde 


ACROSS 


1 Large, thick 
pieces 
6 Cicatrix 

10 Expense 

14 Chaos 

15 Hawaiian 
island 

16 Butter’s rival 

17 Witchdoctor's 
fetish 


18 Secluded spot 

19 Plant 

20 Panic 

22 Varied 

24 Entranceway 

26 Caper 

27 Kneecaps 

31 Typical 

3S Cargo 

38 Chinese weight 

38 Yam 

39 Rainbow 

40 Spouse’s 
relative 

41 Antique 

42 “How 

sweet 

Gleason 

44 African lake 

45 Punctilious 
one 

46 Frat brother's 
activity 


48 News-item 
heading 

50 Not so plentiful 

52 Siberian river 

53 Draftees 
57 Liturgy 

61 Rant's partner 

62 October stone 

64 “Beau ’’ 

65 Gen. Bradley 

66 Exploding star 

67 Spars 

88 Multitudinous 

69 Watched 

70 Subtle airs 


DOWN 


23 Altar words 

25 Wet 

27 Glen 

28 Main 
corporeal 
vessel 

29 Implied but 
unspoken 

30 Caesar or 
Waldorf 

32 New Zealand 
native 

33 Spent 

34 Shelf 

37 Twangy 

43 Argentine 


“Cockney Venus" possesses a pair of wings 
that make the Winged Victory look like a 
plucked chicken, and a gift for tall-iale- telling 
that would cause Scheherazade a tinge of envy. 

As Fewere recounts her life story to a skepti- 
cal American reporter named Jack Walser, the 
following “facts” emerge: She was “hatched.” 
not bom, the product of a love affair between a 


Leda and a swan; she grew up in a London 
brothel under the watchful eye of a one-armed 


madam known as Admiral Nelson; she served 
a terrible apprenticeship —as a freak on public 
display — at Madame Schreck’s museum of 
female monsters, and she wenl cm to become 
one of 


sf fin-de-siecle England's most popular 
celebrities with her trapeze act at a London 


1 Injection 

2 French poet: 
16th century 

3 Declare 

4 Got on 

5 Academy 

6 Soak, in 
Yorkshire 

7 Serene 

8 In the van 

9 Modern 
convenience 

10 Solace 

11 Mixture 

12 Hawk 

13 Related 
21 Vagabond 


45 Ky.'s 

Pennyroyal, 

e.g. 

47 Teachers' ore. 

40 Riddle 

51 Indian soldier, 
formerly 

53 High-school 
dance 

54 Vishnu 
incarnation 

55 A tsar 

56 Redeem 

58 Member of the 
U.N. 

59" boyl" 

60 majestfe 

63 Stripling 


ANDY CAPP 


•D New York Tunes, edited by Eugene Matesko. 



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WIZARD of ID 


oightspoL 

Bizarre as such events may sound, they soon 
take on the weight and substance of reality — 
thanks 10 the author's expert manipulation of 
point of view and her ability to nail down the 
wondrous with details that are visually precise. 
Nol only Fewers. but her whole world — at 
once mundane and grotesque — come bril- 
liantly into focus. It's like watching the unveil- 
ing of a canvas by Bosch. 

As she did in such earlier works as “Heroes 
and Villains" and “The Magic Toyshop." Car- 
ter. a British writer, uses her gift for enchant- 
ment to create fairy tales with modern morals. 
In the case of “Nights at the Circus," the moral 
is at least twofold. The first involves standard- 
issue feminist concerns: how women are used 
and abused by men, and how their imaginative 
and intuitive gifts are debased by the rational- 
ist. male world. The women in “Nights at the 
Circus" are all victims — as an unusually gifted 
female, Fewers. especially, is treated as a freak 
— whereas the men emerge as either sex fiends 
or unfeeling dopes. Even nice Jack Walser 
suffers from the nasty male commitment to 
logic: he has to survive a siring of terrible 
adventures before be can fall in love with 


DENNIS THE MENACE 



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HAVING PICKED MARTHA UP 

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TO A QUIET RESTAURANT, BUT 
BEFORE GETTING OUT OF THE 
CAR HE ASKS HER A QUESTION. 


I THINK I WAS IN LOVE 
WITH YOU ONCE BEFORE YOU 
LEFT TOWN' IT WAS A 
TERRIBLY traumatic time 
FOR ME-BUT I SURVIVED/ 



r WHEN YOU RETURNED 
MANY MONTHS LATER— I FELT 
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pl uSortunaiely, as ‘‘Nights at the Circus" 
progresses. Fewer* and walser become less 
and less important, and Carter’s narrative 
gradually loses both its focus and its drive. 
Walser. it seems, has become so intrigued by 
Fewers that he’s decided to accompany her on 
a worldwide circus tour, and the traveling 
troupe is soon trekking across ihe vast prairies 
of Russia, where it falls prey to shamans and 
marauding bands of murderesses and bandits. 
During these travels, we catch only intermit- 
tent glimpses of the two would-be lovers. In- 
stead, Carter spends an inordinate amount of 
time concocting outrageous incidents and giv- 
ing us sketches of other arcus members — the 
Ape-Man and his sniveling lover, Mignon; 
Buffo, the Master Gown; his sidekicks. Gxik 
and Grok, and the Human Chicken. 

No doubt their problems are supposed to 
complement Fewers, but the oddness of these 
other characters simply has the effect of mak- 
ing ber seem less special, less interesting as a 
heroine. In the London demimonde, she had 
been a glorious anomaly;, on the road with the 
circus, she is just another freak. 

The world of the circus, of course, gives 
Carter lots of opportunities to exercise her 
florid imagination, and there are passages in 
the second half of “Nights at the Circus” with 
arresting poetic imagery. For instance, describ- 
ing a tiger on the loose, she writes, “It came out 

of the corridor like orange quicksilver, or a. 
rarer liquid a quickgold. It did not so 

much run as flow, a questing sluice of brown 
and yellow, a hot and molten death." 

This same gift for language, however, has a 
way of turning mushy, and combined with 
Carter's penchant for digression, it results in 
verbal riffs that function not as parts of the 
overall story but as wordy prose poems, strung 
together for the sake of effecL “This dance was 
the dance of death," she writes, describing the 
downs’ requiem for one of their dead. “They 
danced it for the wretched of the earth, that 
they might witness their own wretchedness. 
They danced the dance of the outcasts for the 
outcasts who watched them, amid the louring 
trees, with a blizzard coming on." 

It isn't just Carter, as narrator, who indulges 
in such pretentious observations. Her charac- 
ters, too, have a way of making message-laden 

r aches, meant to elbow the reader into seeing 
the symbolism beneath the embroidered 
prose. “You might have said we constituted a 
microcosm of humanity," says a middle-aged 
tart named Lizzie, “that we were an emblemat- 
ic company, each signifying a different propo- 
sition m the great syllogism of life." 

Fewers, too. is somewhat prone to such 
metaphysical meditations, but she delivers 
them with such verve and irreverence that we 
never redly mind. As she fades into the back- 
ground in the second half of the novel we miss 


her energetic presence, and the balance of 


“Nights at the Circus 
ing to the didactic. 


1 tips from the entertain- 


Midiiko Kakutani is on the staff of The New 
York Times. 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscoct 


GARFIELD 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
by Henri Arnold and Bob Lae 


Unscramble these tow Jumbles, 
one ten w to each square, to lorm 
lour ordinary words. 


LICCO 


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ORFID _! 



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HEV. GARF1ELP, WHATSAV WE 1 / GEEJT5 BEEN A LONGTIME) 
^HAVE POTATOES FOR PINNER \ SINCE I FIX El? POTATOES J 

/ TELL ME S 
^ABOUT ITp^ 




I N the methods being used, 
South’s sequence showed a 
balanced hand with about 23 
higb-card points and a five- 
card spade suit Four hearts 
was a cue-bid suggesting six 
spades, and the invitation was 
accepted. 

Prospects or success were 
□ot very good, but South made 
the most of his chances. He 
woo the opening heart lead, 
cashed the spade ace and led to 
the heart ace. He ruffed dum- 
my's remaining heart high and 
drew trumps. 

The obvious play at this 
point was to finesse the dia- 
mond ten, hoping to find both 
missing honors wiift East. 


South improved his chances, 
however, by finessing the club 


queen. If this had fallen he 
would have fallen back on the 
double diamond finesse. 


had held the club king he could 
.have wrecked South’s plans by 
ducking. 


But when the chib queen 
held he gave himself an extra 
chance by cashing his last 
trump and putting pressure on 
EasL That player was Forced 
down to three diamonds and 
two clubs, so three rounds of 
diamonds forced him to lead 
from the club king at the fin 1 
ish. 


WEST 
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Notice that this play would 
have served as well as the deep 
diamond finesse if East held 
both missing honors. However, 
it did leave open the possibility 
of a defensive coup: If West 


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MAT A MAN WHO 
I CAN'T SEAR CHILDREN | 
I UNP0U3TEPDT 15. 


SPORTS BRIEFS 


Now arrange the circled letters to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested bv the above cartoon. 


3 Tied for Lead in Doral Golf Tournament 


Print answer horn: f T I I I X J| 


Fridays . 


(Answers tomorrow} 

Jumbles: FOCUS BALKY TORRID LEEWAY 


Answer Whai a hyphen permits you tg 
BREAK YOUR WORD 


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MIAMI tUPI) — Frank Conner shot a tournament-low 67 Saturday to gain a tic 
at 212 with Tom Kile, the defending champion, and Bill Kratzert after three rounds 
of the Dora! Open. 

Jack Nicklaus, Peter Oosierhuis and Mark McCumber were at 213. 

Kite shot 71 over the par-72. 6,939-yard Blue Monster course. Kratzert. sirug- 

: ng down the stretch, managed 69, and Nicklaus shot 69. Oosierhuis led most of 
day, but bogeyed the last Tour holes to finish with 71. McCumber. who started 
the round tied with Kite and Gary Hallberg, bogeyed the 18th hole Tor 72 while 
Hallberg shot 74 for a 213 total. 

Friday. Kite shot 70 to tie McCumber and -Hallberg. The key to Kite's round was 
the par-3 fourth hole, where he accidentally moved the ball as he addressed it for his 
second shoL Thai cost him a stroke, but he chipped in from 18 feet for par. 


£ 


Money-Losing Cosmos Quit Indoor Soccer 


NEWARK, New Jersey (AP) — The Cosmos announced Friday that they are 
dropping out of the Major Indoor Soccer League after losing $1 J million and 22 of 
their 33 games. But officials said the dub would continue to “operate as a 
professional soccer team." League officials said they would revise their season 
schedule to compensate for the withdrawal. 

The Cosmos averaged 4,181 in attendance for 16 games at Brendan Byrne Arena 


in East Rutherford. New Jersey although they drew twice as many spectators on the 

nth pla 


road. The club said it would continue with plans to present international exhibition 
games against world-class opponents in Giants Stadium this spring and summer. 


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ARCADIA, California (AP) — Gordon Jones, a sportswriler for the Los Angeles 
Herald Examiner who ran seminars on how to handicap horses, was arrested 
Saturday and booked for investigation of bookmaking, authorities said. Arraign- 
ment was set for March 12. 

Los Angeles County sheriffs vice officers and Arcadia police arrested Jones, 49, 
and his daughter, Joanne Jones, 20, at a hotel across the street from Santa Anita 
Racetrack. Deputy Bob Stoneman said Jones had $1,503, “in a bunch of different 
envelopes," in his hands when arrested. 

Jones, who has worked for the newspaper 17 years writing handirappinci features, 
also ran a handicapping school at the Santa Anita fnn, police sakLJones was 
featured in a recent Los Angeles Times article about reporters who make bets at 
race trades (IHT. Feb. 21). 

Herald reporter Kerry Webster said the newspaper knew about Jones’s handicap- 
ping seminars. “As I understand it, what was happening was he would have bis class 
bet as a result of their lessons,” Webster said. “He would have his class going across 
the street and place bets. The trouble was he collected the money outside die race 
track. The wacky thing was he'd been doing it this way for six years.” 




Raeber Retires From Ski Racing 


0: FOlr. Tamo.* — 1 <48 — 341. 


SCHOEN Ri ED, Switzerland (UPI) — After a season hampered by injuries, Urs 
Raeber, 26. of Switzerland has retired from ski racing. Raeber won two races last 
season and won the special World Cup Downhill Trophy. 


Pena Injury 
Threatens 
His Career 


Cavaliers Overcome Bucks, 128-106 


Los Angela Tima Service 

VERO BEACH, Honda — 
The cartilage damage in pitcher 
Alejandro Pena's right shoulder 
is so severe that his career is in 
jeopardy, Dr. Frank Jobe, the 


Los Angeles Dodgers’ physi 

lid Fri 


ci an, said Friday. 

Even if Pena is able to pitch 
again, he may have to alter his 
style and rely Jess on the fast- 
tall that made him one of the 
dominant right-handers in (he 
National League, Jobe said. 

Jobe operated on Pena last 
Tuesday, and found that his 
hard-throwing motion had 
worn out the shoulder joint 
“He’d worn off a lot of cartilage 
from the rim of the socket, in 
both the front and the back," 
Jobe said. 

Jobe could not recall treatin, 
another big-league pitcher wi 
a similar condition. Pena, 25, 
completed his second full sea- 
son with the Dodgers last year. 

Pena, who led the league with 
a 2.48 earaed-run average last 
season, first complained of 
soreness on Aug. 7. He made 
only one start in September, 
pitching only four inm ngs. 

Jobe, disputing a suggestion 
that the Dodgers had been neg- 
ligent in not operating sooner, 
said: “I don't think (here's any- 

S we could have done that 
d have changed his 
course.” 

Meanwhile Pena, who recent- 
signed a one-year contract 
or a reported $360,000, awaits 
an uncertain future. Asked 
whether he were afraid, he said 
quietly: “A loL Yeah." 


Z 


Untied Press International 

RICHFIELD. Ohio — Even 
though he did not play. World B. 
Free look the parting shot in the 
Cleveland Cavaliers’ 128-106 upset 


NBA FOCUS 


victory over the Milwaukee Bucks 
Saturday night 

-Milwaukee? They're fat cats. 
They probably thought they’d 
smash us, especially since I wasn't 
playing. But we showed ’em," said 
Free, who sat out the game with a 
bruised and sprained lower back. 

Johnny Davis, replacing Free in 
the starting lineup, scored 23 points 
to pace the Cavaliers, who had 
eight players in double figures. 

Cleveland improved to 20-37 in 
winning its first game in seven 
meetings with Milwaukee. The 22- 
point decision was the Cavs’ Largest 
winning margin this season. 

Elsewhere Saturday, it was New 
Jersey 111, Detroit 103; Chicago 
140, Golden State 125; Washing- 
ton 123, Houston 115, and Dallas 
121, Kansas Gty 98. 

On Friday it was Boston 115, 
Chicago 105; Golden Slate 131, 
New Jersey 127; New York 113, 
Atlanta 105; Indiana 122. Los An- 
geles Lakers 1 13; Philadelphia 1 10, 
Detroit 99; Utah 102. Cleveland 
98; Dallas 110, Washington 101; 
Houston 117, Portland 103; San 
Antonio 118, Phoenix 111, and Se- 
attle 133, Denver 123. 

In addition to losing Free, Cleve- 
land played Milwaukee without 
center Lonnie Shelton, who was 
attending his mother's funeral. 
And rookie center Met Turpin Ml 
the game in the third quarter with a 
sprained right ankle. 

The Bucks, who continue to lead 
the Central Division with a 3SX-18 
mark, had a five-game winning 
streak snapped. 

“We've beaten Philadelphia 



Craig 
Cavaliers 


Tba AuoootoJ fan 

of the Bocks fouls Mark West of the 
going up for a shot in the second quarter. 


ch, George Karl. “It was beautiful 
execution under pressure, especial- 


ly considering our depleted roster. 
Sidney Moncrief scored 22 


twice in the last nine days and "now 
. Cleveland's coa- 


Mflwaukee." said 


points for Milwaukee, which has 
lost only three of its last 19 con- 
tests. The 22-point loss was the 
largest of the season for the Bucks. 


Roy Hinson, who scored 15 of 
his 19 paints in the second half, led 
a 15-6 Cleveland burst at the start 
of (he fourth quarter to seal the 
decision. 

Phil Hubbard added 17 points 
for Cleveland and John Bagiey had 
14 points and 10 assists. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 25, 1985 


9 



SPORTS 






Spinks Retains Crown on TKO 


United Pm i Inlrnunonal 

ATLANTIC CITY. New Jersey 
— Michael Spinks needed six aun- 
uies of play and 62 seconds of work 
Saturday to retain his undisputed 
light- heavyweight tide against Da- 
vid Sears. 

After losing the first two rounds 
on two of the judges' cards, Spinks 
decked Sears with an overhand 
right early in the third round and 
pounded away with both hands un- 
til referee Larry Hazzard stopped 
the fight at 1:02 of the round. 

“1 knew I could hit him with the 
right from (he start," Spinks said 
after his ninth title defense. M I hit 
him with the straight right hand 
right away, but being off for awhile 
and being in such good condition, I 
fooled around and wound down." 

Spinks improved to 26-0 with 18 
knockouts in his first fight in nearly 
a year. 

He last defended his 1 75 -pound 
(79.5-kilogram) title by winning a 
12-round decision over Eddie Da- 
vis on Feb. 25. 1984. 

Sears, the World Boxing Associ- 


ation's second-ranked contender, 
fell to 16-1-1. 

Spinks, who is considering a 
move up to the heavyweights, 
weighed in at a surprisingly light 
17Cn. Sears, who weighed I74'ji. 
thought he could take advantage of 
his superior weight and Spinks's 
habit of starting slowly. 

Spinks needed two rounds to size 
up Sears, who scored with several 
combinations to the head in the 
first two rounds. 

Spinks did bide in the first 
round, although he gave an indica- 
tion or things to come when he 
landed a hard right to the head just 
seconds into the fighL 
Latc in the second round with 
his back to the ropes, Spinks 
stunned Sears with a chopping 
right to Lbe head. The shot brought 
Spinks to life as he sent jabs at 
Sears late in the round 
At the start of the third round. 
Sears began to throw a left book 
but Spinks beat him to the mark 
with an overhand right and Sears 
fell face first to the canvas. 

Sears took a six-count, and 


Spinks sprinted across the ring and 
pounded him in a neutral comer. 

Using left hooks and right up- 
percuts, Spinks peppered the flail- 
ing Sears to the head until Hazard 
broke the lighters but let the action 
continue. Spinks resumed his at- 
tack. and after a brief two-handed 
flurry to the head, Hazzard sepa- 
rated the fighters again and 
stopped the bout. 

"1 was looking for it. but I was on 
my own offense at the lime and be 
came back with the right," Sears 
said of the knockdown punch. 

Spinks, 28, won the WBA title 
with a 15-round decision over Ed- 
die Mustafa Muhammad, on July 
18, 1981, and the World Boxing 
Council crown with a 15-round de- 
cision over Dwight Muhammad 
Qawi on March 18, 1983. 

It was the second victory in three 
days tor the brothers Spinks. L eon, 
31, the former heavyweight cham- 
pion, ended a layoff of almost two 
years Thursday night when he 
stopped Lupe Guerra in the fourth 
round in Detroit. (VP1. AP) 



RfedwUmtKf Pres 


Michael Spinks catches David Sears with a right in the second round of their fight 


For a Man of Peace, McGuigan Is Becoming Quite a Fighter 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

BELFAST — Barry McGuigan is an lrish-bora 
fighter who holds the British and European feather- 
weight crowns, and who moved a step closer to a world 
title fight Saturday when he scored a 10-round points 
victory over (he former World Boxing Council cham- 
pion. Juan LaPorte, at ihe Kings Hall. 

As he won his fight here in Northern Ireland, both 
Catholics and Protestants were rooting for him. That 
is because when McGuigan gets into the ring, civfl 
strife is forgotten. 

McGuigan likes it that way. A Catholic married to a 
Protestant, be has been outspoken in the cause of 
peace. 

“They should let me do the fighting," he says. “I 
believe that peace is our only hope," 

Although LaPone, from Puerto Rico, was the most 
experienced fighter he had faced in winning 24 of 25 
professional bouts, the 23-year-old McGuigan 's big- 
gest fear was the memory of just how devastating his 
own punches can be. 

In a fight in London in 1982 he knocked oul a 
Nigerian fighter. Alima Nustafa, with a flurry of blows 
to die head. Nusia/a never regained consciousness. He 
survived on a life-support system for several months 
but, after he was taken back to Nigeria, the system was 
disconnected and he died. That prompted hate mail 
that added to McGuigan's already deep distress. 

The support of his family and his manager, Barney 
Eastwood, helped him return to the ring before the end 


of the year, winning two fights against weak oppo- 
nents. Since then he has not looked back. 

By defeating a name fighter such as LaPone, 
McGuigan and his supporters hope he will become 
well enough known in the United States that he cannot 
be denied more bouts against top coumetition. If so, 
his fans are convinced, he will lake his place in the long 
line of great Irish fighters, stretching from the barek- 
□uckler Dan Donnelly through John L Sullivan to 
Gene Tunney. 

There also are those who say that McGuigan has 
had a sheltered career and that without the backing of 
the Belfast fight crowd he will be just another boxer 
with no chance of winning the fame accorded Donnel- 
ly. whose mummified arm is preserved in a glass case 
in a barroom in Kildair. 

McGuigan dismisses such talk. “1 have challenged 
them all." he said. “1 have said HI fight wherever they 
want me to. Pm not afraid of fighting outside Belfast." 

He is also the ranking contender for the British 
Commonwealth crown, but so far has not been able to 
get a fight with the WBC champion, Azumah Nelson 
of Ghana, or the World Boxing Association champi- 
on, Eusebio Pedroza of Panama. 

McGuigan was bom in Gones on the southern side 
of the Irish border on Feb 28, 1961. His father, Pat, 
was a one-nighi-stand singer and was constantly away 
from home on the dance-ball circuit. Too young and 
too far away to become really interested or directly 
involved in the civil strife of the era, McGuigan took 


up boxing at the Smith boro Oub down the road from 
his home, and became single-minded in his pursuit of 
excellence in the sport 

Now, he gets support from both sides of the border, 
which has led to two nicknames. In Ireland he is 
known as the Gones Cyclone. In Northern Ireland he 
is the Belfast Bomber. ' 

As McGuigan works to live up to the latter nick- 
name in the ring, be strives to end the real bombings 
that have marked the Catholic- Protestant conflict. 

If the talk in the bars and on the streets is any 
indication, he is at least doing his pan. Discussions 
recently did not focus on bombs or politics. Rather, 
the issue was bow tickets for the fight could be found. 

U seems unlikely that a boxer can affect deep- 
rooted sectarian hatreds, but when McGuigan entered 
the ring at Kings Hall, the cheers from the crowd 
might have given skeptics pause. He entered following 
a blue-and-white United Nations flag and carrying an 
olive branch. 

“If 1 can make people a little more aware of the 
deare for peace by all sides in Ireland by carrying the 
flag of peace," be says, "then that is my contribution. 
That is the best ] can do." 

Against LaPorte. in a fight televised in the United 
States and Britain, McGuigan defied an early cut to. 
hopefully, set up a showdown either with Nelson or 
Pedroza. 

LaPorte, a New York-based fighter who lost the 
title to Wilfrede Gomez last year and now is ranked 


third in the super-featherweight division, was soundly 
beaten by the Irishman, who is ranked fourth in (be 
world. The victory was McGuigan’s 1 9th straight, 20 
coming by knockouts. LaPorte, 25, who weighed 127*4 
pounds to McGuigan's 127, now is 25-6. 

McGuigan was caught only twice. He tried to mix it 
in the middle of the fifth round and Laporte landed a 
stiff, short right that shook the Irishman. Laporte 
followed up but McGuigan weathered the attack and 
even got through with a stinging left hook of his own 
near the end of the round. 

Laporte, who held the world title for nine months, 
hurt McGuigan with a right hook in the ninth, but the 
European champion had the wit to avoid the follow 
up. 

Apart from those two brief moments of anxiety, 
McGuigan dominated his opponent to a remarkable 
degree. 

Laporte, who has never been knocked to the canvas 
during a career that includes six fights against world 
champions, was rocked by a right hook in the Iasi 
minute of the figfal but had the stamina to hold out. 

British referee Harry Gibbs raised McGuigan’s 
hand after the bell. The victory was by 99 points to 97. 

"Good fighters bring out the best in me,” said 
McGuigan, who had a small nick by his right eye and 
another on his nose. “I don’t think I’ve fought better. 

“He [Laporte] is a very nice man, a gentleman. He 
was a very, very slick opponent." (NYT, AP, UPI) 


Oilers Get 2 Late Goals 
In 3-3 Tie With Capitals 


By Robert Fachet 

Washington Pnsl Service 

EDMONTON. Alberta — The 
Washington Capitals were two 
goals ahead with less than 17 min- 
utes left in regulation time, and 
were preparing to celebrate a rare 


NHL FOCUS 


victory over the Edmonton Oilers 
Saturday night. 

In stead, they settled for a tie. 

Jari Kurd and Mark Napier 
scored two minutes apart to even 
matters for the Oilers, and. despite 
some great chances on each side 
during a five-minute overtime peri- 
od. it ended lhai way. 

It was the - second 3-3 result here 
this season between the National 
Hockey League teams with the two 
best records. Each time the Oilers 
came from behind in the third peri- 
od to frustrate the Capitals, who 
have won here only race in six 
years. 

The Oilers beat the Capitals, 8-5, 
on Nov. 9. in their only meeting 
this season at Washington’s home 
rink in Landover, Maryland. 

Saturday's game, which may well 
be a preview of the Stanley Cup 
final, left Edmonton with 93 
points, the best total in the league 
and 12 points better than Washing- 
ton. 

In other NHL games Saturday, it 
was Calgary 5, New Jersey 1; To- 
ronto 4, Detroit 2; the New York 
Islanders 7, Boston I; Los Angeles 
2, Hartford I in overtime; Montre- 
al 6, Winnipeg 4; Quebec 7, Van- 
couver 5, and Pittsburgh 3, Minne- 
sota l. 

On Friday, it was Edmonton 6, 
Quebec 3: Sl Louis 4, Buffalo 1; 
the New York Rangers 8. Pitts- 
burgh 3, and Minnesota 4, Chicago 

The first period of the Oilers- 
Capitals game produced tight 
chocking on both sides. Each team 
scored a goal oat or an official total 
of six shots for Washington, two 
for Edmonton. 

The Capitals moved in front at 
3:06 on Lou Francescbetti’s second 
goal of the season, off a rebound 
from a shot by Scott Stevens. 

Edmonton caught up at 14:34 as 
Paul Coffey skated down the left 



Mark Napier 


side, drawing most of the defenders 
to Him, and then put a rinkwide 
pass on the stick of Pat Hughes. 

In the second period, the Capi- 
tals look a 2-1 lead while Glam 
Anderson was in the penalty box 
for kneeing Francescbeiti. Bobby 
Carpenter scored a 1 11:14, his 45ln 
goal off feeds from Stevens and 
Mike Gartner. 

Each team look 11 shots in the 
period, and Washington goalie Pat 
Riggui made a couple erf excellent 
saves. He thwarted Hughes's 
breakaway backhander and he 
stopped Wayne Gretzky circling 
out from behind the net 

Edmonton goalie Andy Mock 
stopped both Francescbetti and 
Greg Adams on attempted jams 
from behind and he made a good 
save on Gartner after Francescnetti 
set him up in front. 

At 3:09 of the third period. 
Gartners 39th goal raised Wash- 
ington’s margin to 3-1, off a two- 
on-one break. Gaetan Duchesne 
and Carpenter assisted. 

The Capitals were given tittle 
time to celebrate. A Gretzky pass 
from behind the goal line found 
Kurri open in front, and he beat 
Riggui for his 59th goal at 3:36. Il 
gave Karri 113 points, matching his 
NHL high, and the assist extended 
Gretzky’s most recent scoring 
streak to 10 games. 




SCOREBOARD 


Hockey ] [ 

Basketball 


NHL Standings 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick Division 



W L 

T 

Pts 

GF 

GA 

Wmitlnotoa 

34 

16 

9 

81 

355 

181 

Ptillodetohla 

35 

16 

7 

77 

250 

1B0 

N.Y. Ittandon 32 

34 

4 

48 

277 

236 

N.Y. Roman 

2D 

30 

9 

49 

219 

3*4 

Pittsburgh 

30 

33 

5 

4 5 

205 

271 

NOW Jersey 

18 

33 

8 

44 

200 

244 


Attains Division 



Montreal 

30 

31 

10 

70 

234 

203 

Buffalo 

28 

18 

12 

48 

314 

169 

Quebec 

to 

34 

8 

48 

255 

226 

Barton 

24 

26 

8 

40 

218 

214 

Harttard 

2D 

33 

7 

47 

203 

257 

CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 



Norris Dtvtslan 




SI. Louis 

38 

71 

10 

44 

227 

317 

Chicago 

77 

30 

4 

9 

235 

234 

Detrail 

18 

32 

11 

47 

224 

Z74 

Minnesota 

17 

33 

11 

45 

206 

344 

Toronto 

15 

39 

7 

37 

»I 

267 


Satyflw Division 



s-EOmontan 

43 

13 

7 

93 

318 

212 

Calgary 

30 

34 

7 

47 

279 

343 

WlnfWMg 

30 

34 

7 

67 

264 

276 

Las Angelos 

37 

23 

11 

65 

271 

253 

Vancouver 

18 

35 

8 

44 

211 

311 


(x-dlndied MavoH not) 

FRIDAY’S RESULTS 

si. ums o a a— « 

Buffalo 9 1 O—l 

PostatMkl Or). HlcJeev 17). FMorko 173). 
Wilson Ml; Andrevcnuk (») shot* on seal: 
SI. Louis (on Souwal 6-10-7—21; Buffalo (on 
Warns lav) **-13— 23. 

H.Y. Rangers 6 0 4-8 

piitumraft • f 3—3 

Sundsiram 311*1. Ruatsololnefi (71 1.S. Pat- 
rick do). Brook* (6), Graschner (11», HtO- 
boro 113) ; SheddtnZ OOl.Lemleux 1 27). Shot* 
oa deal: N.Y. Rowers (on Ford) 13-4-10 — 2d; 


European Soccer j 

WORLD CUP QUALIFYING 
European Groan Two 
West Garmony Z Portugal 1 
Point* Staodtoas: W«*t Germany. Portugal 
6; Sweden 4; Czechoslovakia 2; Motto a 
ne» Mattfcw: March Z7. west Germany vs. 
Malta; April 30. Malta vs. CMdwstovokta; 
mov 1, Czechoslovakia vs. West Germany: 
June 5. Sweden vs. Czechoslovakia. 


ENGLISH FIRST DIVISION 
Sheffield We d n es d ay 1, Warlord 1 
Arsenal a, Manchester United I 
Coventry City L Cheheo 0 
Leicester Cttv 1, Evertoh 2 
Liverpool 2. Stoke CTIV 0 
Newcastl e United I. Luton 0 
Nottingnam Forest 2, Southampton 0 
Quean* Pork Rangers I, Sunderland 0 
West Bromwich a Tottenham Hotspur 1 
west Ham United 1. Anton Villa 2 

Point* smarting!: Everton 55; Tottenham 
Sl; Manchester United 48 ; Liverpool XS; Not- 
tingham Forest 45; Sheffield Wednesday, Ar- 
senal Southampton 43; Chelsea «; Aston Vil- 
la 37; Norwich 36; Wes! Bromwich 35; Queens 
Park Rangers 14; Newcastle 33; West Ham 
31; Watford, Leicester 38; Sunderland 79; 
Coventry 28; Ipswich, Luton 72; Stoke 12. 

FRRItCH FIRST DIVISION 
Metz 1. Toulon 0 
Sodwux vs. Nancy, postponed 

ITALIAN FIRST DIVISION 
Ascoll 2. A veiling 2 
Cromanose a Alalonta 0 
Florentine a Samoderio 3 
Inter t, Torino 1 
Juventue 1, Verona 1 
Napoli 4, Lazio 0 
Rama a Milan J 
Udtnese 4, Como 1 

Points Standage: Verona 39; I tiler 28; Tori- 
no 36; Samodorta. Milan 35; Juventus, Roma 
23; Flarantlna, Napoli 20; Atatonfa If; AveP 
llnolS; Como 17; Udlnese 16) Ascoll 13; Lazio 
10: Cremonese 8. 


Transition 


BASEBALL 
American Loam 

CHICAGO— -Signed Cteri* Guillen, short- 
stag, to a ono- v oar contract. 

NEW YORK— Signed aay OtrtsMnnsofi. 
Jim D es hn to s. AMmnso Pulklo. Blithers: 
Mike PaoUaruM, third baseman, <■*> vie 
Mata, oulftoktor. Stoned Bert Brndtov. KOUy 
Paulk, Mark Suva and Kevin Hkker, push- 
ers to minor league contracts. 

National League 

lOS ANGELES— Reochod c ontract oarae- 
ments wtm Frank] In Stub** Nrst Bosemon- 
outfietder, and German Rivera, third base- 
man. 

new YORK— Announced that Howard 
jomson. tofWder.ond wk Gartner, pHcftefi 
bave agreed to term* on one- war contracts. 

SAN Francisco— Stoned Dan Gladden, 
on Welder, and Jeff RaMraon, Ditcher, to one- 
ycar contracts. 


Pittsburgh (an VathiaNireuck) 12-17-13—42. 
Chicane e 1 0-1 

Minnesota 2 11-4 

Giles (4), Payne 2 (23). Berghmd (5); Ole- 
zvk IM). Shots an goal: Chicago (an Beaupra I 
11-4-6-21; Minnesota (on Pong) 11-44—22- 
Quehec 0 1 2-0 

Edmonton 3 2 1—6 

Hurrl (58), Napier (14). Fogolln [4).Coftev 
(35). Gretzky 161). Hughes (B); Ashton (23). 
Lemteuk (9) .Maxwell (7). Shots 00 goal: Que- 
bec ton Moon) 11-9-15—35; Edmonton (on 
Gam! In) 12-188-35. 

SATURDAY'S RESULTS 
Toronto 1 8 3-4 

Detroit 2 8 8-4 

Anderson (17), Solmlna (5), terming (7). 
Terrion (toi; Gore (161. Yzerman (221. Shots 
on goal: Toronto Ion Stolon) 9-1 Ml-— 31; De- 
troit Ion Bernharan 664—23. 

Boston 8 1 6—1 

N.Y. Ukudnrs 13 2-7 

Lo Fontaine 2 (15), Bossv MVi.Toaeni (33). 
Gillies (11). B£utter 137), Jonssun (12); 
Crowder (24). Shots on Boat: Boston (art 
Smttti) 6-13-4 — 38; N.Y. IsJanders (an 
Posters) 7-14-11 — 32 

U» Angeles 8 I 8 I— 2 

Hartford OBI 6—1 

Kelly (B). □ leone (361 ; Fenton 121. Shots on 
gaol : Los Angeles (on Lluf) 8-9-11-4-32; Hart- 
ford (on Jonecvtc) 6-564—28. 

Pittsburgh 1 1 1-3 

Minnesota ooi—l 

Lemleux (28). Hannan 111. Rtasttng (6); 
Pome IM). Shots an goat: Pittsburgh (m 
Beauero) 8-64—21; Minnesota (an Romano) 
13-11-21— 44. 

WmhlneUm J 1 1 8—3 

Edmonton 1 8 2 8—3 

Francescttetf I C2), Carpenter (45). Gartner 
1391; Hughes (9). Kurri (591. Noptor (151. 
Snot* an goal: WbsfUnaton (an Maaol 6-rr-fc 
2—28; Edmonton (on Rtogln) 2-11-7-1—31. 
Winnipeg 1 3 8-4 

Montreal 1 3 2-4 

Nashmd CGl.GaUtev (13). Niton 2 (17). DeB- 
tois (9). Kurvers(lO); Small 1221. Picard (10). 
Carlyle (13). Hawerchuk (37). Shots on goal; 
Winnipeg (on Soetoerf, Roy) 66-2— U; Mon- 
treal (an Hayward) 9-16-15—40. 

Quebec 1 1 5—7 

Vaacouver 1 1 3-6 

Maxwell (8), Lemleux 110). Cote (12). A. 

Stastnv (32). P.Stastnv 128), dub (11), Kum- 
nel (6); Neety 2(14).Grodtn (21 i.Halward (5). 
Swidstrom I1B). Shots on goal: Quebec lori 
Brodour) 66-12-24; Vancouver (an Bou- 
chard) 15-7-16-36. 

Catoarv 8 * 1-5 

Mow Jersey I O I— I 

McDonald (151, Known (191, Gubin 2 (14), 
Nilsson 1 (30); Meagher Stats an goal: 
Catoarv (on Kamppurl) ID-129-32; New Jer- 
sey (on Edwards) 8-9-14—31. 


NBA Standings 

EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic Division 



w 

i L 

Pet. 

GB 

Barton 

45 

12 

-789 

— 

Philadelphia 

44 

12 

-786 

w 

Washington 

30 

28 

J17 

15W 

New Jersey 

20 

39 

.491 

17 

New York 

19 37 
Central Division 


25to 

Milwaukee 

39 

18 

-684 

— 

Detroit 

32 

25 

-541 

7 

aueaoo 

26 

29 

J73 

12 

Alton to 

24 

33 

.429 

14V5 

Cleveland 

20 

37 

351 

19 

Indiana 

IB 

to 

-321 

2DV0 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 


Midwest DtwMaa 


Denver 

35 

21 

A25 

— 

Houston 

33 

Z1 

sm 

3 

Dallas 

32 

25 

561 


Sen Antonio 

ZB 

28 

J00 

7 

Ulan 

27 

29 

.482 

8 

Kansas City 

is to 

pacific Division 

321 

17 

1_A. Lakers 

40 

17 

J03 

— 

Phoenix 

77 

30 

-474 

13 

Portland 

25 

31 

Mt> 

Mft 

Seattle 

24 

32 

jm 

15VS 

LA. Clippers 

22 

34 

J«3 

ITVj 

Golden State 

13 

44 

230 

27 


FRIDAY'S RESULTS 


Detroit 24 H 21 32— 99 

PMtodetobto 25 23 35 28— IM 

Barkley 13-14 5-9 39. Malone 6-16 10-10 22; V. 
Johnson 8-20 36 19. Lang 8-15 M 17. Campbell 
MH 17. Rebounds: Detroll 39 (LolmbeerB), 
Philadelphia 54 (Bartley II). Assists: Detroit 
25 IV. Johnson 15). Pltllodolphto 23 Honey 9). 
OoMnn State 28 24 34 33—137 

Hew Jersey 37 » 25 26-127 

Short 13-26 8-11 35. Flovd 12-15 7-9 32; Bird- 
song 14-21 66 32. Dawkins 12-14 6-9 30. Re- 
bounds: Golden State 37 (Short 9), New Jersey 
43 (Gm inski tS). Assist*: Golden State 22 (ivtt- 
son 71. New Jersey 37 (Richardson 151. 
Chicago 25 31 24 35— IDS 

Boston 32 31 33 29-115 

Bird 16-2804 34, McHale 9-16 66 34; Jordan 
B-18 10-12 26. WoohKtoe 7-154-7 18. Corzf no B-13 
W 13. Rebounds: Chicago 47 (Johnson 9), 
Boston 50 1 Me Ha to. Parish 11). Assists: Chi- 
cago 24 (Jordan 7). Boston 34 (Johnson U). 
New York 33 » 23 19—113 

Atlanta 36 21 35 31—185 

King 15-29 56 35, CUmmfnes 17-17 <W 22; 
D.wilklns 10-239-11 31. Rollins 7-135-5 19. Rfr- 
boaads: New York 55 (Cummings 13). Atlanta 
40 (Levlnaston. D.wiiklns 10). Assists: New 
York 19 (Walker 7), Atlanta 77 (Johnson 9). 
Los Angeles 34 27 29 33-113 

Indiana 33 28 30 33—121 

Williams 72-79 7-13 3), Kellogg IMP 1-2 25; 



Bnriwi 


A HEAD UP — Arsenal’s Viv Anderson beads ball over 
Manchester United’s Jesper Olsen, United won, 1-0. 


Abdui-Jatmr 13-14 8-15 28, E Johnson 89 4-4 
22. Robamds: Las Angelos 48 [Riunbls. Abd- 
ut- Jabber 7). Indiana S3 (Williams, Sllpano- 
vkJi 81. Assists: Los Aneoios 26 (E Johnson 
11). Indiana 33 (SicMIns 12). 

Utah 28 24 27 23— TO 

CtovrtHK) 38 25 23 31—91 

Bailey 12-23 3-3 27, Griffith 9-24M 21; Hub- 
bard 7-16 5-18 19, Free 7-21 W 18 Rebounds: 
Utah 64 (Eaton 15], Cleveland 66 (Hubbard 
111. Assists: Utah 96 (Green 9). Cleveland 21 
(Free 7). 

Washington 27 38 IS 19— 181 

Dallas 21 28 JO 29—118 

Aguirre 17-29 9-11 45, PertJm 8-13 5-5 21; 
Motone 9-17 9-2 70, Robinson 6-12 2-7M.Ro- 
Iwands: Washington 46 1 Mdhorii lOl.Dal 10545 
(Vincent. Nimptilus 8). Assists: Washington 
33 (Gus Will knns 12), Dal las 16 (Davis. Black- 
man 4). 

Per»o*rt 22 28 » 27-182 

H o u s ton 27 29 36 25—117 

Otaluwon 14-24 7-18 35. McCray 8-14 2-2 II; 
Bowie 11-15 «6 75. MThcmpsan 9-22 46 27. 
R eb ounds: Portland 44 (Bowie 11). Houston 59 
[Otaluwon 10). Assists: Portland 16 (Drexler, 
Bowie, Colter 4). Houston 31 (Hollins 8). 
Son Antonio It 26 28 33—110 

Phoenix 37 37 38 27—111 

Gervln 14-25 46 32. Mltcholl 12-37 66 38; 
Nance 13-21 862L Edwards 8-120-0)4, Adana 
6446 16. Rebounds: San Antonio 46 (Moore9), 
Phoentx 49 1 Nance 11). Assists: San Antonio 
70 (Moore 7), Phoenix 77 (Mocv 6). 

Denver 38 19 36 41—133 

Seattle 39 46 24 94—133 

Chambers 13-3B 36 29. Sikma 7-13 7-8 21; 
Natl 6-16 4-5 it* issei 5-7 M 15. Rebounds: 
Denver 51 ( issoL Kopldd 7), Seattle 63 ( Sikma 


.13). Assists: Denver 35 (Lever 7). Seattle 36 
(Henderson 8). 

SATURDAY'S RESULTS 
Hew Jersey SUN *7—111 

Detroit 38 M 25 26— TO 

WM llams B- 12 9-14 25. Richonbon 9-21 6-7 24.' 
Birdsong 10-2) 4-7 34; Lalmbacr 12-27 7-B 31, 
Thomas 8-142-7 19. Rebounds: New Jersey 61 
I Williams 20), Detroit 59 (Lalmbaer 21). As- 
sists: New Jersey 23 (Richardson *>. Detroit 
96 (Thomas 17). 

Milwaukee to M 21 39— u* 

demand 11 38 35 *3—178 

Dovts 7-13 9-11 33 Hinson 7-16 S3 19; Man- 
ertot 8-16 68 22. Cummings 8-21 1-3 17. Rs- 
bosnds: MJIwauM*47 [Cummings 12). Cleve- 
land 55 (Hinson 8). Assists: Milwaukee 16 
(Praslev 6). Cleveland 28 (Bagiev 18). 
Guides state 31 31 29 27—125 

Chicago 16 36 <2 36—140 

Jordan 15-30 M to. Wootrldoe 11-17 44 36; 
Flora 9-15 7-10 25. Short 6-W 11-12 23. Rn- 
hoaeds: GaWan Stole 4B [Smith 9). Chicago 41 
(Greenwood 10). Assisti: Golden State 17 
IFtovd. Wilson. Conner. MJohnson. Bnatz 3). 
Chicago 49 (Whattov 21). 

DaNhs 35 36 35 28—121 

Kansas City 34 38 22 >1—91 

Btodarai 13-18 36 27. Vincent 6-11 66 18; 
vwaasan 17-20 3-3 27. Thorpe 6-e 1-3 13. Re- 
bounds: Dallas 56 (NimaiihB 13). Kansas City 
47 (Thompson io). Assists: Dallas 4) (Davts 
11). Kansas Cllv 39 (Olberdlna 7). 
Washington to 16 35 >6-121 

Hoodoo 96 27 35 37— IIS 

Williams 13-21 4-5 30, Malone 11-16 66 28; 
cxaluwon 9-1* 11-14 29. Hollins 611 4-4 16 Be 
bounds: Was h i n gton 36 (Mohom 9), Houston 
32 (Sampson 12). Assists: Washington 20 (WH- 
licms ID, Houston 23 (Hollins 5). 


Selected U.S. College Scores 


FRIDAY? RESULTS 
EAST 

Columbia 58. Brown 56 
Dartmouth 75. Princeton 59 
Northeastern 78. New Hampshire 70 
Perm SX Harvard 51 
Yale 75. Cornell 61 

FAR WEST 
Colorado St. 8X Wyoming 68 
Montana 63. Idaho SI. 62 
Montana St. 79. Weber St. 66 
New.- Reno 87, Idaho 7* 

SATURDAYS RESULTS 
EAST 

Bravm 63. Cornell 60 

Budmeil 77, Lafayette 75. OT 

CUnfeiuS 77 . Boston U. 68 

Duauesne 63. Penn St. 61 

Georoe Washington 71. St. Bona venture 56 

Georgetown 68. Connecticut 47 

Holv Cross 66, Ford ham 62 

Maine 66. Cotoate 60 

Now 48, Army 47 


Tennis 


MEN'S TOURNAMENTS 
lAt Taranto) 

Quarterftaais 

Eilat Tettscfwr (2), U A. net. Ramesh Krtsh- 
non (6). India. M, 64. 

Kevin Curran (31, South Africa, def. Bud 

Schultz. Ui, 64. 60. 

Anders Jarrra (1). Sweden, def. Peter 
Fleming. UJ_ 7-6 17-5). 60. 

woltekFlbok, Poland, def. Gene Mover (5). 
UL 6-1. 14. 64 

Sent Moots 

Anders Jarrvd i)>. Sweden. d*J. Wgftofc FJ- 
bak. Poland 44. 64 63. 

Kevin Curran <3), South Africa, del. Eliot 
Teilsctwr (3). Ui 63. 6-3. 

<A( La Quinta, CaJHontla) 
Quarterfinals 

Greg Holmes, U1L dot. Jimmy Connors. 
U-S. 60. 6-3. 

David Pate.u4.del. Aaron Krtckstoln. ILSs 
6-1. 24. 6-L 

Ubor Plmak, Czechoslovakia, def. John 
Ltovd, England, 6-1, 14 64 
Larry Stotanfcl UJL def. Tarlk Benhabtles. 
Franca. 7-5. 74 (7-2). 

semi Hoots 

Lorry siofanki, U-5. def. Greg Holmes (Ml. 
u S. 64 *4 64 

David Pate. UA. del. Ubor Plmok (V), 
Czechoslovakia. 74 (84), 64 


WOMEN’S TOURNAMENT 

(At Oakland CafiforiMo) 
QunrferNnati 

Zina Garrban. UJL del. Barbara Patter, 
UA, 7-5, 44. 6-L 

Helena Sukava. Czechoslovakia, def. An- 
drea Temesuan, Hungary. 74 6-2. 

Hams MmMUlknva. Czechoslovakia, aeL 
Wendy Turnbull, Australia. 6-3. 64 

Chris Evert Lloyd U -S.def. Claudia Konde- 
Kltsch. West Germany, 64, 6-i 
Sernfflaato 

Chris Evert Uova. U £ m deL Zina GorrHon, 
US- 64. 6-2. 

Hana Mandllkova. Czechasiovakla. def. 
Helena Sukova. Czechoslovakia. 64 6-0. 


Penn 95 Dartmouth 76 
Pittsburgh 58. Boston CoiL 55 
Princeton 52, Harvord 45 
SL John's Bt, Syracuse 83 
St. Jasaphrs 71. Rutgers 57 
west Virginia 76. Rhode (stand 89 
Vote 55. Columbia S3 

SOUTH 

Alabama 81. Vanderbilt 56 
AieQamo SL 77, Grambllng 59 
Alcorn SI. 70, Tanas Southern 66 
Auburn 69, Mississippi 57 
Duke 67, Georgia Tech 62 
E. Kentucky n, Murray SI. 10 
Louisiana SL 61. Florida 59 
Memphis Sl. 81, va Commonwealth 73 
Norm Carolina h Clomsan SO 
South AtaBonu 60. Ata.-Blr>nknehani U 
Tennessee 79, MHSiSsipOl SL 64 
Tutona 64 SW Louisiana 53 
Virginia Tech 87, Florida SI. 75 
MIDWE5T 

Ball Sl. 92, Miami, Ohio 81 
Demon 72, Merawette 59 
DePaul 87. La Salle 48 
Indiana SI. 77. W. Texas SL 64 
Iowa SL 82. Oklahoma SI. <7 
Kansas 82. Oklahoma 76 
Kansas St. 76. Color odo «7 
Kant SL 76. Ohio U. 46 
Mich (gun 75, Michigan SL 73 
Missouri 49. Nebraska 50 
N. Dakota Si. n, N. Colorado 70 
Northwe s tern 78. lovn 58 
Notre Dame 47. Brigham Yeung 58 
Ohio SI. 77. Illlnola 64 
Oral Roberts BO. Detroit 70 
Purdue 72. Indiana 43 
wtenita Sr. 7£ Bradley 45 

SOUTHWEST 
Baylor 88. Houston 84 
Louisiana Tech 100. Arkansas St. 67 
So. M ethodist 64. Texas 40 
Texas Tech SB. Texts ASM SO 
Tulsa 79. Drake 54 

FAR WEST 

Air Force SB. Hawaii 54 

Arizona 47. Oregon SL 52 

Arizona SL 65. Oregon 64. QT 

Catorade St. 7* San Diego St. 72 

Lon a Beach Sl. 73. New Mexico 51. 78 

Montana St. 78, Idaho SL 4S 

N. Arizona 80. idahg 75 

Neuado-Uft Vegas 81. UC Santa Bar ba ra 71 

So. Calltornia 75, Collfonila S3 

TexnSrEI Paso 79. New Mexico 65 

Woshinotan 68. Wastilngton st. 55 


Tobogganing 

EUROPEAN CHAMPIONSHIPS 
(At Sorafeva Yuaoslovlot 
Final niaclna* after four heats: 

1, Nice BaracchL, Switzerland,] minutes HM 
Seconds 

i Andreas Schmidt. Austria 3:37.50 
3, ura voscolL Switzer land, 3:3U8 
A Michael Grunberaer, Austria 3:39.17 

5. Martin Thaler. Austria, 3:39-33 

6. Alfred MartbiL Austria. 3;39.97 

7. Hans Peter Strittmatter, West Germany, 
3:4023 

& Erich Grot. Switzerland, 3:4136 
9, Frank Fltokewski, Wes) Germany. 3:4047 
ID. Jechen Heitor, Austria, 3:4173 
11. Rotand wirin, Swiuerlana, 3:OJU 


Brisco-Hooks , Dixon Each Set 2 Marks 


By Randy Harvey 

Ua Angeles Times Service 

NEW YORK — Diane Dixon 
and Valerie Brisco-Hooks have 
been stepping on each other’s shad- 
ows a lot lately, which could only 
lead to one thing. They gm on each 
other’s nerves. 

For that reason, some say, they 
were running in different events 
Friday in (he national indoor 
diampionships before a crowd of 
14,358 at Madison Square Garden. 

So what happened? 

Not only duf they both set world 
indoor bats, they both did so 
twice. 

During the morning preliminar- 
ies, Dixon ran 440 yards in 52.77 
seconds, breaking Brisco- Hooks’s 
three- week-old mark of 52.99. 

Brisco-Hooks followed that by 
running 220 yards in 23.08 seconds 
in the preliminaries, bettering 
Chandra Cbeeseboroogh's three- 
year-old best of 2325. 

In the evening finals, Dixon 
again broke the world indoor best 
in the 440 by running 52L20, and 
Brisco-Hooks then ran 2195 in the 

220 for her second mark of the day. 

Thus, once again- neither had the 
spotlight to herself. 

Actually, Dixon did literally 
have the Garden spotlight on her 
for a minute, when she was present- 
ed with the Olympic gold medal 
Lhai she did not receive Iasi sum- 
mer in Los Angeles. 

As an alternate member of the 
victorious 1,600- meter relay team, 
she ran in the semifinals but not the 
finals. Only the four women who 
ran in the finals received their gold 
medals at the Coliseum. 

Who was she filling in for during 
the semifinals? 

Brisco-Hooks. 

Their difficulties began this year 
at ihe Mfllrose Games here in Janu- 
ary, when Dixon beat the favored 
Brisco-Hooks in the 400 meters 
with a time that would have been 
considered an American record if 
the timer had not malfunctioned. 

Brisco-Hooks, who won three 



Valerie Brisco-Hooks 

Olympic gold medals last summer, 
then broke the world record in the 
440 in Dallas and the 500 in San 


Hooks catching Dixon at the finish 
line. After the photos were studied, 
Brisco-Hooks was declared the 
winner in an American record time 
of 52.63. Dixon was given a time of 
5164. 

Dixon's coach, Fred Thompson, 
later sent another photo to an ofE- 
dal of the meet at the Meadow- 
lands, who nded the race a dead 
heat and decided they should share 
the record. 

That did not please Brisco- 
Hooks. 

Asked wily she and Dixon are 
act friends, she said, “Because 
she's a cocky little brat.” 

When that was relayed to Dixon, 
she said, “That’s like ihe pot calling 
the kettle black.” 

Then last week, the referee of the 
Meadowlands meet ruled that 
Thompson’s protest was not valid 
because it had not been lodged dur- 
ing the meet, and reinstated Brisco- 
Hooks as the winner. 

Thompson responded by threat- 
ening to withdraw Dixon from the 
meet here. But after setting the 
world best for the second time Fri- 
day night, Dixon said she knew 
Thompson was bluffing. 

She also said she was not disap- 
pointed about Brisco-Hooks's deci- 
sion to run in another event. 

“If 1 had beaten her. she would 
have been upset and would have 
had to wait until the outdoor sea- 
son to get back at me,” Dixon said. 

Tve had enough of her this in- 
door season. Boy, have 1." 

Brisco-Hooks was conciliatory. 

“I was really happy for Diane,” 
she said of Dixon's Olympic medal 
ceremony. "Without her and Dea- 
ean Howard," she said of the other 
1,600 relay alternate, “I don’t think: 
we would have it. I never would 
have gotten that third gold medaL” 

In an upset in Friday’s meet, 
Doug Padilla ran a 12:57.15 in the 
three-mile run to beat Farnorm 


Diego before meeting Dixon again 
two weeks ago in the 400 at the Coghlan, 1259.56. Cogfalan had 
New Jersey Meadowlands. won 16 straight indoor races since 

Their race was a classic, Brisco- his last loss in 1981. 



BEST EV HIGH JUMP*— Patrick Sjobepg of Sweden setting a world indoor best in the 
high jump Fnday night Sjoberg cleared 7 feet, 9% inches in a track and field meet in West 
Botin, bettering the 7-9% set in February 1984 by Carlo Thraenharrff of West Germany 








LANGUAGE 

Star Wars ’ Acronym Gap 


By William Safijte 
W ASHINGTON - What’S in 
» an acronym? Plenty. In areas 
®* public controversy, propaean- 

/ te seek to get a message intoSe 

& name of their product or program, 
\ and when they are successful the 
appears every time the sub- 
ject comes up. 

The Reagan administration was 
aim in its early days to the need for 
a fresh start" in anns-control ne- 
gotiations and was aware that Rea- 
gan had campaigned against the 
second SALT (strategic arms limi- 
tation talks) treaty as “fatally 
flawed” They came up with a fresh 
acronym: the strategic arms reduc- 
tion talks; acronamed START. 

The trick in aero naming is to 
And a series of initial letters that 
spell out a pronounceable word 
MBFR, the interminable negotia- 
tions in Vienna about Mutual and 
> Balanced Force Reduction (which 
rightists remember in derision as 
| “More Better for Russia"), is not 
an acronym. MBFR is pronounced 
as a series of letters, not a word 

Acronyms applied after the fact 
of naming an organization or pro 
gram can ridicule the activity 
named The Law of the Sea Treaty 
advocates did not recognize the 
time bomb ticking in the treaty’s 
name; when the selected initials 
came out LOST, the opponents 
who considered it all to be a power- 
grab by the Third World had a 
handy weapon 

□ 


twe, or SDI; this phrase has not 
caught on, and the initials do not 
form an acronym. 

What to do? Hie aides of the 
defease idea were having a field 
day with the buflt>in derision of 
Star Wars. The president com- 
plained; “I wish whoever coined 
that expression would take it back 
again, because it gives a false im- 
pression of what it is we're talking 
about.” In his second inaugural ad- 
dress, he came up with a lame sub- 
stitute: a “security shield” which, 
like “security guard,” is redundant. 


Friends From The Killing Fields’: 
There’s Not Much Rational About It 


By Joyce Wadler 

H'asftoigron Past Sennet 


N EW YORK — They are middle- 
aged men with children, but when 


toe Lexicographic irregulars are 
oiled upon now to help the admin- 
istration find a suitable and catchy 
name for what, let's face it, every- 
body calls the Star Wars program. 
Here is the current state of play: 
The president is downier “security 
shield” no acronym. The Pentagon 
has its chips on the Strategic De- 
fense Initiative, initials SDL I like 
“global shield" no acronym. The 
Charles River gang, up at Harvard 
and the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, which pooh-poohs the 


imaged men with children, but when 
they speak of each other in the war they 
covered together 10 years ago, it is in a 
language eerily like that of lovers. 

Here is the Westerner, Sydney H.. 
Schanberg, talking about his Qunbodian 
translator and assistant, Dilh Pram dur- 
ing the fall of Cambodia to the Khmer 
Rouge in the spring of 1975: “For all the 
obvious cultural differences, we were 
functioning pretty much as one person at 
the time.” 

Here is Dilh Pran talking about the 
time he risked his life to argue for the life 
of Schanberg: “When I save him, at that 
time, in my mind he's like a brother." He 
is quite passionate, his voice as loud as if 
will get in a conversation that covers the 
destruction of his country and much of 

his f amil y** 

“There’s not much rational about 
this.” Schanberg says. 

It was a famous magazine piece by 
Schanberg, a story of friendship and sac- 
rifice and war. It is now “The Killing 
Fields," a film. U veils the story of a 


progra m, prefers to stick with Star 
Wars. (They are also stuck with 


Imag ine the chagrin of the Rea- 
gan people, so sensitive to the nu- 
ances of implanting “sell" in pro- 
gram titles, when the president 
announced his idea for a defense in 
space against missiles, and die no- 
tion was headlined as “Reagan's 
Star Wars Proposal" The applica- 
tion of the movie title to the futuris- 
tic defense was buttressed by the 
president's earlier use of the phrase 
“evil empire" to describe the Soviet 
Union's imperialism, which 
seemed identical to the “empire" 
lined up against the good guys in 
the George Lucas films. 

Grimly, Pentacrats jettisoned (he 


MAD, the acronym for Mutual As- 
sured Destruction, which describes 
their strategic deterrence. They 
now realize that MAD is even 
worse than LOST.) 

Anns-control types within the 
administration, who call them- 
selves arms-reduction specialists, 
are toying with such ideas as the 


Study of Protection (acronym: 
STOP) and the strained Security 


STOP) and the strained Security 
Assured for Each (SAFE). In a 
New York Times interview, the 
president floated out a play on 


"This guy, his heart 
is too tight. When you 
see a wounded soldier, 
he have a tear 
sometimes, he cannot 
even write. He is 
involved too much . 1 " 1 


MAD: “Why don’t we have MAS 
instead — Mutual Assured Securi- 


phrase that bad been used by the 
program’s early defenders — High 
Frontier — whiehcoraes down to 
the acronymic HIFRON, no com- 
petition for Star Wars. Instead, bu- 
reaucrats, in what can be charitably 
called a holding action, described 
the idea as Strategic Defense Initia- 


ty." (MAS may not fly — it sounds 
vaguely Marxist) 

Here is your chance for arms- 
cootrol immortality, terminology 
division. The prize for the best 
name fora substitute for Star Wars, 
if it leads to adoption by the ad- 
ministration, will be an invitation 

to accompany me on my next pri- 
vate luncheon at the White House, 
an event that may never take place. 
Send your entries to Star Wars on 
Language, The New York Times 
Washington Bureau, 1000 Con- 
necticut Avenue N. W„ Washing- 
ton, D. C. 20036, U .S -A. 


Cambodian who saves the life of his 
American friend and employer, and the 
newspaperman who afterward is unable 
to keep his friend safe. How can you 
reduce to a few sentences the complex- 
ities of their lives, Schanberg wants to 
know. How can you attempt, now, to put 
reasons on actions that were so entirely 
of the moment? 

He says this at his office at The New 
York Tunes, where he writes a column on 
urban affairs and where Pran is a staff 
photographer. Schanberg is SO. He had 
open-heart surgery last year, not surpris- 
ing for a fellow who by all reports distin- 
guished himself during his stay in South- 
east Asia as much by his temper as his 
tenacity. Pran, 42, has had problems with 
his teeth — four more mil be pulled this 
month — and sometimes with his skin. 


particularly on his feet “Hie dirty wa- 
ter," he says, referring to his four years of 
forced labor in the rice fields. 

In 1972, Schanberg arrived in Cambo- 
dia for The New York Tunes and began 
work with a translator nam ed Dith Pran. 
They were from two different ends of the 
universe — Schanberg, a Harvard schol- 
arship student from Massachusetts who 
worked his way up from copy boy to 
foreign correspondent; Pran. bora near 
Angkor Wat in northwestern Cambodia, 
his marriage arranged according to tradi- 
tion, the son of a self-taught engineer. 
Pran, by accounts of some correspon- 
dents, was a gentle, generous man. 
Schanberg was driven, competitive, tem- 
peramental — yellmg if his copy was not 
transmitted, refusing to show ms stories 
to other reporters even after they were 
published, screaming openly at Pran. 

“Most of us would scream and yell in 
our room, but he'd do it right there at the 
from desk," recalled one reporter. “He’d 
be screaming al Pran when he got out of 
the car, screaming at him at the desk, 
then dismissing him like an aide. . . . 
On the other hand, when things went 
wdl. he would give him outrageous tips, 
hundreds in bonuses." 

Schan berg's copy, this reporter said, 
was considered “wonderful — you loved 
the sense of outrage he brought to a 
story.” Schanberg is now considered by 
some the conscience of The Times, par- 
ticularly in his columns on the homeless. 
His reporting then was also conspicuous 
in its humanity. “He committed himself 
to a war in Cambodia when nobody else 
cared about Cambodia." said Peter Os- 
nos, a one-time competitor from The 
Washington Post. 

"He's not like other journalists — be 
respect my opinion," Pran said. “He let 
me read his articles, and if 1 don't like, we 
discuss, and sometimes he change. . . . 
He know about Cambodian tradition, be 
pul die hands up, know how to respect 
people, to speak politely, because 1 teach 
him the Cambodian way." 

But it’s been said he used to kick you, 
Pran. 

A sigh. 

“I wish you would not print that. It will 
make him very sad. It is true. 1 cannot lie 
to you, but he is not like that anymore. 


blame me, but later he come to me and 
say. ‘Pran, I really feel sorry, can you 
forgive roe?’ ” 

A Final explanation: “This guy. his 
heart is too tight. When you see a wound- 
ed soldier, he have a tear sometimes, he 
cannot even write. He is involved too 
much.” 

The U- S.-backed Cambodian govern- 
ment began to lose to the Communists. In 
April 1975 the Communists moved in on 
Phnom Penh and the U. S. Embassy 
evacuated its people. Through Schan - 
berg's intervention. Pran’s wife and four 
children were flown out. Pran remained 
— and his remaining, in the film, is at- 
tributed by one journalist to Schanberg’s 
desire for him to remain. 



On April 17 the Khmer Rouge took the 
city. Schanberg and Pran. accompanied 


Tta New York Tin 

u«l., * 


by rwo other journalists and their driver, 
went to the city’s largest hospital to try to 
determine casualties. As they were at- 
tempting to leave, all except Pran were 
arrested. Pran argued with their captors. 
The Western journalists thought he was 
arguing for his freedom but their Cambo- 
dian driver explained that he was arguing 
to join them, because he knew they had 
no chance without him. Later, arguing 
that they were foreigners who had come 
to report on the Khmer victory. Pran 
saved their lives. 

After the city was evacuated. Schan- 
berg and Pran and their Cambodian driv- 


Pran and Schanberg: “Now we see each other more dearly.' 


ers, Hea and Sarun. sought refuge in the 
French Embassy. Then the Khmer Rouge 
announced that all Cambodians had to 
leave the embassy. Hea and Sarun. with 
money from Schanberg. slipped out the 
□ext day. Schanberg attempted to fake a 
passport for Pran. The French spotted it 
and insisted that it would jeopardize the 
entire compound. Pran was forced oul 

He says now that what his character 
says in the film, at that moment, is what 
he said to Schanberg: “Take care of my 
family. Sydney. Don't let anyone be 
mean to ray wife." 

Was Schanberg as much of a creep in 
person as be is on the screen? 

“I can’t answer the question because 
it's somebody else’s perception. 1 think 
that the movie is a rough one. and. uh. it 
portrays a very determined and abrasive 
and whatever reporter, but if that is 
somebody’s first question coming out of 
the movie, they’ve missed the point 

“I don’t think any film provides every 
piece of a human bring, but I think the 
movie is accurate and fair in portraying 
that part of me. . . . The three things 1 
insisted on in first discussion with this 
movie was that it had to be about real 


. . . Before, be have many things on his 
bead, and also he is young and there are 


bead, and also he is young and there are 
many technical problems when you are 
covering a war in another country. 

“I know this guy. his heart is different, 
his temper is different, he born that way. 
you have to tolerate him. When post 
office don't work, he get so mad and 


Cambodians, and to tell the story of 
Cambodia, and to portray me honestly." 

After Dith Pran left the embassy, it 
was Tour vears before he escaped to Thai- 
land. He was beaten almost to death, had 
malaria, worked 14 hours a day, at times 
lived on a spoonful of rice and, to supple- 
ment his diet, lulled grasshoppers or 
snakes. His father died or starvation, 
three brothers and an uncle were shot, his 
sister and her daughter were killed. 

Schanberg returned to the United 
States. He wrote hundreds of letters in an 
attempt to find Pran and took on much 
of the expense of caring For Pran’s wife 
and family. His marriage unraveled. He 
won a Pulitzer Prize for international 
reporting and accepted in the name of 
Pran. 

In October 1979, he and Pran were 
reunited in a refugee camp in Thailand. 
Schanberg has recalled Pran saying. “I 
am reborn. This is my second life." 

Why did they stay in Cambodia as long 
as they did? To what extent did Schan- 
berg’s desire to stay affect Pran? 

“I was doing journalism for three 
vears, no, five years, and then Sydney 
and I both got the same idea to cover the 
story.” Pran said. “I decide to stay Fust 
because I didn't believe when one side 
come up they kill their own civilians, and 
also because the people I used to visit to 
cover the story didn’t get panicked, so 
why should 1 get panicked?" 

Schanberg said: “These questions are 
difficult to answer because they are not 
questions you pose to yourself during the 
situation. ". . . You just do what viscer- 
ally makes total sense for you to do." 

He added later: “It's culturally insult- 
ing to ask why Pran chose to stay. The 
assumption is that the Westerner is in 


charge and that the assistant, because he 
was an assistant and comes from a coun- 
try with a colonial history, would do 
anything the Westerner wants him to 
do." 

But in this case, the Westerner was in 
charge. 

“Yes. but the assumption that just be- 
cause I was in charge I would put a life at 
stake is a fundamental mistake." 

Bui he has written about feeling re- 
sponsible for Pran. 

“I was responsible for him in the same 
way he was responsible for me. His re- 
sponsibility for me led him to argue his 
way into that lank. I think that was 
because it was unthinkable for him to be 
separated from me, just as his forced 
departure from the embassy was un- 
thinkable for me. Part of his decision I 
think was instinct, and sheer loyalty and 
courage, but 1 don't think any human act 
like that is ever so clear-cut that it doesn't 
have lots of little pieces, and one of those 
little pieces was that he was on the street, 
alone and isolated, and without us, with- 
out me, it was something totally miss- 
ing;" 

They spoke in turn, describing their 
feelings when Pran was forced to gp. 

“I know Sydney will be all right, family 
will be all right . . . You don't think 
backward anymore. You just thinking 
ahead, now you in risky situation — you 
life, if you little bit left, "little bit right, you 
get killed." ■ 

And Schanberg? 

“It bad to be the worst day of my life." 

He said later “I think we romanticized 
each other. I think we know each other 
better now. . . . Now we see each other 
more dearly, as human beings with 
strengths and flaws." 


New York Tunes Service 


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Paris& suburbs. Berts/ soles 551 09 45 


By Phoni c Call your load PIT representative with your text You 
will be in form ed of the oast knmedu te ty. and once pr e payment it 
mode your ad uni appear wMin 48 hows. 
Co*fcThebo*icrateisS9aOpor Sneper day + kxx4 faxes. There ere 
25 letters, rijpn cmd spaces fa the ftrt fine and 36 in the Mowing fines. 
Mamim pn is 2 fine*. No abbreviations accepted. 

Credit Conic American Express, Dinar 'i dub. Eurocard. Master 
Gird, Access and Visa. 


SWITZERLAND 


HEAD OFFICE 


LATIN AMERICA 


5th IN RENOVATION 


GREAT BRITAIN 


MAYFAIR OR KBGMGTCM, 2 su- 
perbly fwrashed serviced flais each 


with 5 bedro oms, color TV, washing 
machine etc. £230 per wear. Tefc 01- 


Luurioui ducSo F4500. 

2 roams in dwiex WIOO- 
EMBA5SY: 563 68 38 

iY AT BUDGET PWCES Try Flo- 
the Eif« W 


GSTAAD 

APPARTMENT 


Pak (Air classified only): 
747-4600. 


MOVING 


contact oar bed cfcributar or: 


M widBsd Fh rdd Tribune 
1005 Tre Sm CammrcU BuOri 
24-34ftama*y Rood 
HONGKONG 
Tefc HK 5-286726 


INTERDEAN 


WHO BSE FOR TOUR 


H* 

TERRORKT 




REPORT 

(A prefowxd newsletter) 

WBUSHED TWICE MONTHLY 

US$100 per rear 
sere or mad 


33020 





PARIS A SUBURBS 


SUNNY SOUTHERN SWnZBOAND I 
OOF HOUSES LUGANO 
5 comfortable nice designed houses 
pfcbon derebpmanfl. At idySc bco- 
tion u djo in inq the fonxxa gedf Knb of 
Lugtma. Afl houses with private garden 


UIXURY AT BUDGET RICES Try Flo- ban 
total op u iiinw** near the Eiffel Tow- 
er. From are week upwards, Fuly 
, aquipoad studos to 5 room*, with or 



EUROPE 


Embassy Service 


8 Are de M n e i e 
75008 Part* 
Telex 231696 F 


YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT N PARIS 



ANSCOMBE 6 RtNGLAND with of- 
fices in St Johns Wood & Ketvmytai 
offer the best service in reridwilicl 
letting. Tet 722 7101 (01). IRC. 


74 CHAMPS-ELYSEES 8th 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


Studio. 2 or 3«>aiii upu Hne n t- 
One month or more. 

If GUUBDGE 359 67 97. 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 


COtHTNEX (near Opera): Gatfbut 
ten to 300 reiei worldwide - Ar/Sea. 
Call Charlie 281 1881 Farit -Cars loo 


FLATS FOR SALE 

. PHONE 569-1640 

FLATS FOR RENT 

PHONE 562-7899 

OFFICES FOR RENT/ SALE 

PHONE 562-6214 


APARTMENTS - CHALETS 

AwAMe for (Wrote by 
r erei gnere . 

A wet from 5FJ23JOO. Mortgages of 


AT HOME N PARK 

PARIS PROMO 

APARTMENTS FOR RENT OR SA1E 

563 25 60 


Armterdren: 26-36-15. 
Athens: 36 1 -8397/360-2421. 
BrmMh: 343-1899. 
Copen h agen : {01)329440. 
Fr ru r kf wrt . (069} 72-67-55. 
Ur u tem w. 29-5844. 

Lfafaan: 67-27-93/66-2544. 
London; (01)8364802. 
Madrid; 455-2891/4553306. 
WUm (02) 7531445. 
Norway: (03) 845545. 
Ram* 6793437. 

Swedon: 08 7569229. 

Tel Avfv: 03455 559. 
Vienna: Contact Frcmkfurt. 


Bogota 212-9608 
BuonaeAtat.414031 
P*rt-3]2J 

Guayaquil: 431 943/431 
lima: 417852 
Praam 644372 
Son Jose: 22-1055 
Smttaga; 69 61 555 
Sao Ponte 852 1893 


MIDDLE EAST 


Bahrain: 246303. 
Jordan; 25214. 
Knwofe 5614485. 
Ubanan: 34 00 44, 
Qatar 416535. 

Saudi Andrea 
Jeddah: 667-1500. 
UAL: Dubes 224161. 


FAR EAST 


ft ices from 5F123jQDQ. Maritnos of 
6h% Meres f. WimT 
GLOBE PLAN 5 A. 

Ay. MonJtepcn 24 
CH-1005 Lausanne Switzerland 
Tefc (021)22 35 12 Tbu251B5MBJSOt 


Bangkok: 39006-57. 
Hang Kong: 5420906. 
Manita 817 07 49. 
Seoul: 725 87 71 
Singapore: 222-2725. 
Taiwan: 752 44 25/9. 
Tokyo: 504-1925- 


PERSONALS 


BUY, CALL WAS SUPBU I 
you, you're terrific, vai'ra riv 
my rend. I love youl Jean 


International Business Message Center 


£BCL 


■■ '•••* 'Cry*; 






The Architects of Timec 







iMmm 




mm 






BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


700000 TONS BITUMINOUS rad 
req^ed. M. George fxonomou. 
P.a Bra 3900, Athens 10 210. T* 
3202726. 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


wn 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

INC 




THIS WEEK 


March 4th 


UK & OFFSHORE 

COMPANIES FROM £90 


V ^ V l,f >. •d'br ' 


LUC + Me of Man + Angufia 
Guerraey + Jersey + G&rafar 
Uberia + Pammw + Delaware 

Readymade or lo wit 

Ful nominee, admnstrotive 
and assuming bod-up inducing 
bank ntiradustiaat 


Earn high m nmi n ron at Europe's larg- 
ed & No. I sdfing time there rwort 


AUTO RENTALS 


Contort Mr. Doan d Apartoda 4, 8201 
Atbufena, Algarve, Portugd or csfb 
010 351 B953I97 


PARIS 

near CHAMPS ELY9SS 



BUSINESS WEEK 
INTERNATIONAL 


SHECT COMPANY FORMATIONS 
Ml Pleawri, Dowlas, bfc of Men 
Tet DaudilBM 23718 
TtbHaKTG 


i Tbe Raiders: Hour Takeover Fean 

■ we ■ i HehiaJne 

Oman uvponsi Mnimar. 


• Hefv: ATlT and ODvelft An Odd 
Coapie Theft RoarUting. 


i Prance: b M Monmdt D od ro n h. 
Snare Only A “Grande 
Dfcreon"? 



SttWlNDtNG CHRONOGRAPH, WATER RESISTANT 

Avtribfato ln Sled, oambmaifon of steel and 18 Icl gold or of! 18 kf gold 


nflrrrrir 




NOW ON SALE 
AT ALL 

INTERNATIONAL 

NEWSSTANDS. 



OFFSHORE 
LIMITED COMPANIES 
BANKS 

INSURANCE COMPANIES 


RENT 

YOUR OFFICE 


reflh el f addin 




NEW MERCEDES 

PORSCHE, BMW. EXOTIC CARS 

FROM STOCK 


CHAHC.RBn A CAR. Prestige an 
mi* phone: Reft Spirit, Mrtfltdu, 
Jaguar. BMW, Muusnm, snxd 091. 
46 r Pierre Owrron, 75008 Prim. Tet 
720JCM0. Tefc 6M797FOWLOC 


far IMMEDIATE tUhen 
_ .. best ssrvres 
rat dnppfafl, Ineu rance, baatL 
co n vers i on fa U-SJL 


RUTE INC. 


AUTO SHIPPING 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


Worldwide 

No mn e mA dmin ut ro li on 
Readymade or 5pead 


Fub serviced o ffi ces, seoretms and 
busmess afwscry tervrat, phone, telex. 



Don't uh* 
MI8MAH0NAL 
SEOtHAJHAL POSITIONS 


Tefc 627691 SPIVA G 


name brand Iragrtrees. Please for- 
wtnl details. Confidenti a lly assured. 
Tefc na 353240 attrt Mr. Charles, P.a 
Bo* 102, little Ft*. NJ. 07424 USA 



YOUR OFFICE M PARIS RIGHT ON 

THE CHAMPS EYSSS 

uDawY samcH) offices 
T elephone arauwing, Tefc Ffc 
entoid, meeting room ; 


fa the WT Ottafied Section. 



Tremusrtr. 53, 6000 FraMl rt, 

W Gem, tel (OS 69-232351, It* 4D559 
Information only by phene or telex. 



PAGE 4 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


ACTE. 66Qnnpi Bweei toil Bdi 
Tefc 562 66 00. Tut 649157F 


FRXJOASY BANKMG an ksge art- 


SWBS RUU4C5 WANTS 


trfogeis-^oyfers - Jocritere 
da Mon*'Bbnc 
EtflGeneve- 


port, 12 oountnes anatysed FgM de- 
tofc WMA 45 Lywfuni TCE, Sk. 
Mr. 501. C. Horn Kang. 


Arab Owhks Bank & Tnaf [Wi] 
Ud, 28 Bade ftmee Bd. London SE1. 
Tel 735 8171 


toefc QT2) 427-7176 B4 tori or Ba 
1181 Grwe Station, KY, N.Y. 10028. 
ftinapda only. 


TAX SERVICES 


YOUR LONDON OfflCE 

OCSHAM E»SmVE ( CBURE 
Co m p rehen rive range of serviait 
150 hnenf Street 
Tefc (01}439 £288 Ifac 261426 


OR - THE CRBK DG IA CRB* tern- 

jjprary h fappeo gfa reoutf fato^naf or 
Engfcn mrthe* tongue wrateiu, 
PmTSS 82 30. 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


FRBKH MO USA TAX ADVICE & 
return. Pant band US Q1A 359 63 01 


AltCNS SECRETARY, Engfch 
French. Tel: 9825268 


SPEAKWHI needs aye ri enoad TEFL 
teoc hen for Soudi ftri wfwrb. Tefc 
0783302 


\:4N CLEO v XHl'l LS 

' . w ORU> F A MOUS: J E WELEiER's - ' - 
NOW HAVE A SHOWROOM IN 

LONDON 

153 JSEW BOND STREET. 
-.TELEOT-49 1 J 405 ^.i^TEjLEX;:Z 6626 S^ 


in i ***’. 
HofiS fvi,n ? r 


rTs 1.731 


toffs Thneli 


Bv Berr.jit: Gwe 

Vr* i‘-i r rem St 

WASHINGTON — 1 
cfi'daU k 
; aco-T 2 £;c ?y :hs rc-Ti 
a; narriiijncris ‘^ine ex 
jeretj:. “S-rt -id Sauc 

Bu: officials s a 

ifccre hji “%■•! >r. r tsx 
raoter.er.. fi-r L’niu 
begin a r.?v. MiJtlle Eas 1 
aatot. 

“A: utp.i. we thmi 

a proces; pir.g on in 
world of de:?r.:n z its 
coiianons. and :l is not : 
Lhe U ruled to h 
itself in:c a xiaior 
pirLT.er'. ciVuiai said. 

Tr.e cffical *a;d tiiai 
nan) easiness" about 
uon. Hi iiiz lie Dai 
waned :c see Arab ml 
up behind iCinj Hussein 
and giving rhea' biasing 
goiiaiin: v.i Israel 

■■WV-j bir see out l 
Saudis jj; : 'ifii'.hing 
about ±s£."h: said. In at 


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