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Newspaper 

Paris 
taoeoudy 
Zuxi^ 

Kong, 
and 

WEAWet DATA APfCAK ON PAOB 1 8 


31,732 



INTERNATIONAL 



SrUjutte 


{^iblished With Tlie New YtnHk limes and llie Wadington Post 


**R 


Paris, Wednesday, February 27 , i985 


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ESTABUSHED 1887 


Mubarak Envoy 


Reportedly Begins 
s^Talks With Peres 








•^V 


CmpiUbf Oir Staff FrtmDapadte 
JERUSALEM ~ TIk foreign 
policy adviser lo Presitot Hosni 
MubsnUc of Egjpt arrived in Israel 
on Tuesday and begin flfa «.-ith 
" Prime MinalCT Shimon Pe^ 

' . Other Israeli leaders, Israd Radio 

r‘“.“ The radio said.ihai Osama d-Baa 

had arrived in Jsrad as a personal 
■ -• •• envoy of Mr. Mnbarak and w-as 

- -'".c. p- :f bohuag talks at dm prime imnis- 

:;■ -■■-s.-- 1®"* wth Defense Minister 

'o:: Yitzhak Rabin and mx) «Tn'ntq»f^ 

-"^‘.i^^^niihout potfoh'o, Ezer Weizman 
- i 3od Mosne Arens. Both Mr. Wdz* 

. L man and Mr. Arens are loiinerde- 

■T ' -■ •• ."'''s Tease ndnisiers. 

••• 

^ :’l* An independent source, who 
2 ' ':;v>.^adced not 10 be identified, told The 

Associated Press that Mr. P^ 
;>;7>fflei Mr. Baz alone at home befoe 
'V'. I :^^^:^;bdogjouedbyibeodKrimnistefs. 

^ Israd's energy minister, Moshe 
- -=^<'-.''^Shahd, a Peres confidant, was in 
^ '••.:;r>'Cdro on Tuesday ni^t hoi ' 
‘talks m oil purchases, 
may see Mr. Mubank, who dis- 
'.'_T * dosed Monday mght that another 

’^..Egyptian env<^, Mohammed Ab- 
.'>■ :^.dellah, i^atnwm the pariia- 
t'JTsz jlvineDt's foreign affairs committee, 
..'badrnetMr.PezesinRmnamatliis 
haynonth. 

Mr. Mnbaiak has offered sug- 
' -:::gKtions to bridge the gi^) between 
- : :the Arabs, sriw want an intena- 

r:;tioiial MSddle East peace confer- 
'-.iurence, and Israd and the United 
•" r^xjStates^ fMcik have rejected the 
’::i*f:^idea, in part because it would in- 
T.x: vdve the Soriet Union. Israd and 
. ' ;;^ibe United States wani individual 
.-. r.ti'^^'Arab paities to ooter dued talks 
- ^ .. "'With umd, with Ring Hussdn of 
. ^ ;^‘Jordan negotiating the future of the 

. .... .. ^ ''"^Isndi-oocDpied West Bank and 
the Palestinians.. 

The Egyptian leadet^s views 
* in an interview with The 


ctf Jordan and Eaksiine LibexatioD 
OrgnuzatioOfTasssaid. (AP) 
• An underground Shihe h^ 
tern group, in a warning published 
Tue^y. said it would lannch aev- 
en sufcitt attadcs against U.S. and 
Israeli interests tmoughout the 
world if Israd did not stop within 
24 hours what it called ‘'massaro*' 
agamst tbepeogde of soDthm Leb* 
anon. 

The wamix^ came bouts after 
the Lebanese govemmeni called 
for an uigeni meeting of the United 
Nations Seenrity Conadl to discuss 
Ivadi raids on villages in southern 
Lebanon that have left at least 12 
persons dead in five days. 

The tefcist ontspaper As SaTir 
said it had received a call from a 
person who issued the wamiitt in 
the name cd the *The Sm^ &dr 
Brigade." The grow is named after 
Musa Sadr, the Lebanese Shiite 
roiritnal leader who dbi^ipeared 
ou^g a vial to Libya m 1978. 

(UPI) 

■ Ban mi JoumaEsts 
Jo/m Kifner of The Sew yiork 
Tuner raorted from Beirut: 

The uraeii Anm on Tuesday 
fonnaliy banned Westem joumat- 
ists bam in Beirut from entering 
territory it cntrols m southern 
Lebanon. 

Hie order camft as the Israelis 
in^Msed a dusk'to-dawn curfew on 
southern Ld»non m the rixth * 
ot vriiat Defense Kfinister 
RaUn ^ Isnd caOed an ‘%>n fist* 
crackdown on Shiite Moslem4ed 
resistance to the occupation. 

LeaOets dropped fim ainaafi in 
the areas south ai the litani River 
warned t,jeba«ese ihQr would “risk 



RALLY IN NEW CALEDONIA — Oppooenls of 
independcaoe marche i d Tuesday fo Noumda. Haey were 


led by Dkk Ukaw4 ^ offidtl, and 

Jao|im lAflenr, tbe reg^’ls legislalior in Farit. Pi^ 4. 


U.S. Charges 9 



Mafia Network 


E^ Mary Thornton 

Wathiitgtam Peat Serriee 

NEW YORK — The all^ 
kaders of New York Gqt^ uw 
1 Clime families have been 
by a federal giand juy 
hoe on duiges that thi^ panio- 
pated in a "ttaamissioD" controt- 
ling nadonv^ oiguiized crime 
actirities that langed^fiom murders 
to tftowAMViiw drug iraffirlritig ^ 
gambling and labor racketeering. 
p in Moi tom Mmfwmcnrt Tbaaiiay 

A IS-count indictment, an- 
nounced Iw U.S. AttomQr Rn- 
do^ W. charged that 

nine top leaden of the Genovese, 
Gaokbino, anri 

Organized crime families 
regulated a^ divided Mafia ac- 
tivities, wrbwting a twiiltiw>iB»fin . 
doQar extortion scheme that the 
mob allegedly used to control the 
concrete ffidutjy. 

Ibe indicimeDt also diai^ that 
the fiftwwwcwAn 26 Mafia 

families «rini« the country, 


PoUsh IMpIomat to Be Expelled From US, SMinisters 


The AaoeuteO Pros test hi gtiAr food prices had bffffP 

WASHZNCTOK— Af^geredby A^kming a govemment 

the expulaum-of an Amo&n dip- de^on to revise the plaa for im- 
lomat from Poland, the United poang ineveasea. 

States is letaliaring by a In abandonmg the plan, the gov- 

Pdidt ^lomaL enunent said that it bad decided 

The I^h chaigi d'affaires, instesd to gradual raise prices 
Zdzislaw Ludwiczak, was sum- and to raise old-sge and disunlhy 


apparently ^ 
eavetheUnt 


was 

mted 


moaed to the State 
late Monday and infonned that the 
Po^ fflfiitaiy attacM, Colonel 
Zygmunt S^nimnski, had been d& 


your lives" if they veniured forth ‘ riarg d persona non grata or- 


t ^st.‘ C^eufwiJkeNewYazk Tunes and in comments 
sti to reporten Monday nigbt- 

In other devdopments. news 
. ^ igendes iqiarted; 

*** ■■ . f •TIu Soviet Dnkia has iqected 

■ ,■ vfr. Mubarak's praposal for talks 
. . . w t9s*.-xtween Israd and rqpnEsentatives 

. j •■•••ir.j’. 


during the emfew. 

The leaflets, written in Arabic, 
also decreed that no motorcycles 
wera pennined “day or night" and 
that cars t^i only earned a driver 
were dso fodudden, in an {^qnient 
atten^it to prevent sincide car 
bombers. The leaflets warned that 
aPtcanobUes paded by roadsides 
mthoot their drivers would be rou- 
ddely blown up. 


desed to leave. 

It followed Poland's dedrion lo 
the U3. mfliiaxy attachfc, 
C^ond Fredeiidc Myer. uibo was 
accused of taking {diotogn|)hs in a 
militan zone. 

As U3. and Pdish spdtesmen 
traded charges 'Husd^ over the 
inddeot, the Solidarity leader. 
Lech Walesa, announced in War- 
saw that a IS-minuce strike to pro- 


pennons to ciudurai the indict on 
the poor. 

After the announcemeat in 
Wariiingion that the Pdirii diplo- 
mat was beirig e:q)died in reialia- 
drai for the actioo against the 
Ametican. the State Dqmtmem 
said that “any repetition of sxh an 
outrageous action [Mil] have as 
even more serious impact on our 
rdatioos.” 

That warning was reMaied 
Tuesday by the White House 
^xdresaan, Larry ^real^ who 
said: “If they do it again, well 
reaOy get cough." 


Mr. Szymsnski 
even 48 hours to leave the 
States; Colonel Myer was g^veai 48 
botin to leave Poland. 

fo addition, the administratxofi 
said that it was posmoaing talks cm 
a ea»»* and tecmiology agree- 
ment that were sdwdulea to begfo 
this week, and dda^ng the letom 
to Warsaw of the U.S. charge d*af- 
foiita, John Davis, who had been in 
the United States for coissltatioas. 

The administratioo is sued a . 
strong protest over what h called 
the outrageous treatment that Col- 
onel Myer and his wife, Barbara, 
suffered at the hands of Polish se- 
curity officials. 

The Polish government spokes- 
man, Jerzy Urban, dgmiat the alle- 
gations. 

Mr. Urban said that the U.S. 
expulsion of the Pdish diplomat 
*iw just revenge, a vendetta" and 


was a “step toward wonening the 
already hu relations between the 
two countries." 

Th^ State Department ti>»r 
the United Stales had sat a note of 
protest to Pefirit officials. 

Mr. Urban Pofab anthod- 
ties had igeoed the U3. note; 
sriiidt conqnamed that after being 
detained by priice, Nfo. Kfyer sras 
forced lo undiesi Mr. Urban is- 
sened it was libdoos and contained 
“false facts." 

Denying that Mrs. Myer bad 
been rmsmeaied, Mr. Urban said, 
however, that she was seaidaed by 
fanale police officers to detennine 
whether axiyth^ was hiddm in her 
clothmE. 

Mr. Urban said Tbesday that 
Cb lonri Myer and his wife woe 

hi^ncf rtwy did nOt UD- 
mediatdy identify thaadves as 
drpJomatic peraa m d. 






Sps- , 











Mugabe Parly 
|To5Kffliiigs 

^ Reuiaa 

HARARE, 2iiibabwe — Bishop 
^bcl Muzorewa, a Zimbabwe op- 
- ftdriftn leader, dmiy d Tnesdi^ 
^lat fottoweis of Prme hamster 
^'fobert Mimabe^ ru^ party bad 
j^iuidered ^ tqiposition parfy of- 
j0-dals on Simday. 

^ In the inddent, the most virient 
^«t in the eampaign for general 
(ectioQs m Jboe; ihrse women azrd 
M inen were drag^ from a traitt 
the northwestern tovm of 
«4wange and ritoL 

{A govenunent yokesman said 
l^ues^ that two men thou^ to 
government supporten had 
v'een arrested in cormeetko mlh 
ae Mayings, United Press Inteina- 
'onal reported from Harare. 

^ PTbe two people arrested are 
*^ispected of beii& suppratets of 
^ ru^ ZANU^F and no at- 
.mpt is beii^ nwHft to hide their 
Juried assodadon,” the s[gg^ 

^ded to let thelmvake^ course 
^•id no' stone vdQ be left unturned 
V'^Juing the mvesogatimL"] 
j.^,At a. news coherence, Kshop 
'.^^Inzor^a sud that police at 
' % wange had “ooofinnea that the 
'•asms were podtivdy identified 
ZANU-^ siqrportas.” 

- ZANU-FFstands.fbrZmbabvm 
fiican National Union-Fatriotic 
root, Mr. Mugabe’s Mify. Bish(^ 
uzorewa the united Afii- 
m National a minorify 

f®9- 

' Anian who said he witnessed the 
indent in Hwai^ said at the 
conference mat the killing s 
carried out Iw ei^t men, 
of them aripan irilh pistds 
one with a rifle, who uanted 
kNUtiogans. 

The man, Fanny Qubafawe, said 
sni^iects were arrested aftv the 
' ;>^Jings, vAich oocoired Sunday 
~ ^v'eaiDg as the train was aboot to . 

<iveHwBngBfor'tfaes(»tfawestem 
. " . ^ ^;ye#Bnlawaya 

- ^The offkaals of Nditm Mn- 

V*- '-rewa’s par^ had iravded to tiie 

'.'ning town to attend a rafly, 

^ ■ tidi was sumred by police after 

^'Mted disturbances. 

7 . - - ^ J'-V yoshua Nkomo, the leader of the 
. ■ ‘ jrdn (mositioa grotqung, the Ps- 
" . >MicnDnt(f(Mm^theZifflba- 

.**‘‘ J ‘ a - *e African Peq^s UnionX ^ 
'ed at Bishop Mmorewa's house 
ring the news conference. 

Bishop Muurewa, who was 
-.t' 1 ' -■ me minister in the N ra rifl l gov- 


i# T ^ 

^ - - **:-"=“ 





Re^an Rejects New Bid 
For Cuts in Spending 





'A 




jr>' 




unent in 1979, said his parfy had 
' mvedinfosmatioD that the eight. 
/^>ecis were issu^ the weapons 
the ZANU office in Bulawayo. 
'He said all d^t werefipmTriia- 
ula, a townwp in westam Bu)^ 
'yo,a^wereto^t400Zifflba- 
e dollars (about $250) for grang 
Hwange-to disrupt rally. 


ritioa leader, 

Joslnm NIc«do, in tbe bid^s Harare home Mr. Nkomo offered coodoteaces for tfae 

murders of Mazwewa fcdkmeis; die Msht^ Uamed (he kilfing; oo die rafing party. 

Marcos to BemstaJbe Ver^He’s Qeared 

Meetii^ Press After 8 Monllis, Present Says He’s HeaUiy 

By William Bianigin 

Pear Seniee 

MANILA — President Ferdi- 
nand £ Knfoicos said Tuesday tiiat 
he would reinstate General Fabian 
C Ver as armed fences of staff 
if tiw gen^ were acquitted of a 
fth^rg a of invcdviemttt m the 1%3 
ipiifKier of a leading opposition 
leader, Beni^ S. Aquino Jr. 

Generali. 64, a dose confi- 
dant and oooan of Mr. Marcos, 
was tmpliea tfld along with 24 other 
officCTS «>w«t militar y men and one 
dv iiiati by an <^ii^ fact-finding 
board Ian October. Mr. Marcos 
proooptfy rqdaced General Ver 
witi^an acting chief erf staff, and 
tbegmeraTs fonue has lemained m 
doubt since thn He is being tried 
in the case with the 25 others. 

Mr. Muxxis, 67, made thedudo- 
sure at his fi^ news conference 
ance June. It was also one of his 
rare public appearances rince No- 
vember, when there were reports 
that he had serioos health prob- 
lems. 

Mr. Marcos said Tuesday he was 
recovering from a severe virus, a 

bad asthma attack and other ad- opened Friday before three ju<^ yearhchadbeenplacedinaaoxy- 
nienis. He denied that be had had in a avilian court normally used to ■' . ^7 ' 

surgery. He made rimilar assertions try small-scale comipiion cases. (CkwiuiuedodlrageACoLS) 


before tdevisiOD cameras and a General Ver and seven others are 

gathering of ai^ in Deember. accused as acce^ories to tbe mur- 

In reqionse to a qumtion, Mr. dersof Mr.AquinoandoCRdando 
Marcos said that “tbm is a fonnal Galman, who tiie govonment con- 
agreement among seoior officers of tends kflled Mr. Amtino on Ai^ 
the ann^ forces that if General 21, 1983, at the Kunila Intema- 
Verisacquitt^hewniberetuTned tiooal Airport Militaiygna^ shot 
to his positiraL" Mr. Marcos said Mr. Galman after Mr. Aquino was 
this agreement was readied at a shot 

meeting in his office with com- One civilian is an kcoo^ 

mandets (rf aD the service brandies, 

(tivitions, brigades and rqioaal 
crasnands.. 

Iifr. Marcos did not say when the 
mee^ took place or give Further 
details, and senior government of- 
ficials prtrfessed not to know about 
iL 

Later, at a protest rally of about 
3JXX) marcb^ near the Malaean- 
ang presidential palace, Mr. 

Aquino's youz^ biotber, Agapiio 
Aquino, said that Mr. Marcos was 
“inqNuing our minds to accept his 
future aeti^ tbe acquittal and re- 
instatement of Gtaaal Ver, no 
matter bow unaccqitable it is to tbe 
Hlipino people." 

The trial of General Ver and tbe 
25 other defendants formally 


pliee; the other defendants are 
diar^ as principals. 

At his pres conferaice Tuesday, 
Mr. Mai^ declined to commem 
m tbe t^ or to say vriiether be was 
still sure, as be said he was in 1983, 
tint no fflilii^ men were in^rfved 
in the assassioatioa <rf bfr. Aquino. 

Mr. Marcos also asserted that 
the counuys Communist insurgen- 
cy is “under firm contrd by the 
govemmrat” and iteoied tliat it 
was growing. Last mootL in a mes- 
s^ to the National Assembly, Mr. 
Marcos caUed attention to the com- 
munist threat, asking for “rmdve 
to drive this menace fo our 
society.” 

Ibe pieadent disdosed that at 
one pomt during his illness last 


United Frea Imenaiimal 

WASHINGTON — Preadeni 
Ronald Keuao, in a 7S-inifflire 
meeting on loesdw with Repuhli- 
can congressional lenders, raused 
to yeld any ground lo tiieir ra- 
quesu f(tf reductions in tbe militaiy 
budget and a freeze on Social Secu- 
rity bsMfiis. his spokesman said. 

Larry ^leakes, the presideni’s 
chief spokesman, also sud that Mr. 
Reagan-“was very strong" against 
any further i^islatian lo provide 
asergency financial aid to fanners. 

Mr. Spwes said that tbe pres- 
dent stood on ddense cols arid So- 
da! Seoirity “cuctly where be 
stood on day one." He Ddieves if he 
propoaed a freeze on the Social 
Seoirity cost-of-living allowance, 
Mi. ^lokes said, “the Democrats 
would pick it up and demagogue 

iL" 

Mr. Speaks said Mr. Rsgu’s 
response on tbe issue of reducing 
tmlitaiy spending was that he 
“does not miok that it’s necessary 
and would, therefore, be opposed 
to it" 

RqjTteentalive Robert H. M>- 
cbel, a RepubUcan of Blinds who is 
the House mioorify leader, said af- 
rer the nwi a ing mm ‘*maybe we 
have to do that for the adnnnisira- 
tion,” inditing that Congress 
may have to make the miliury cuts 
without hfr. Reagan’s approval 

Robot J. Do^e of Kansas, the 
leader ol the m^ority Rerablicaas 
in (be Senate, also m^ dear after 
the meeting that tbe 5.9 pererat 
real imease in miUiaiy sf^ding 
that Mr. Reran has proposed for 
fiscal 1986 win not survive in Con- 
gress. 

Republkan senators seddng to 
reduce the p^ected 1986 deficic of 
more than $200 btOioD are sedring 
$14 bOlion more in spending cuts 
next year than the bOHob of- 
fered 1^ Mr. Rea^n, Mr. Dole 
said, aodin& “it's no secret" tbe 
Pentagon laces further aitbacks. 

"We’re not trying to undercut 
the preskleBl," Mr. Dole said. 
‘‘Were ti}^ to put to^tiiei a def- 
icit-teductiaa paiAage big enou^ 
to have an mqiact on interest rates 
and tbe finimriat markets.” 

Senate Republican leadets held a 
nuddav meaiog to discuss tbe de- 
fense budget A Senate Budget 
Committee spokesman said tbe 4 
percent growth rate proposed by 
Rq^blii^ on the Senate Anned 
Services Committee “is loo 
and would not ftxm the basis for 
compromise. 

SenaUM' Pete V. Dmnenici, a Re- 
publican of New Mexico vrifo is the 
rfiairmfw of tbC Bu^ CCMIUIltt- 
lee, said a “subsianti^ reduction" 
for the militaiy will be required. 

The president's remaiis on aid 
10 farmera came as the Senate cem- 
tinued 10 debate two bills, one to 


provide emergen^ credit rdief to 
fanners and anotbv to provide im- 
mediate advances on crop price- 
support loans, normally not re- 
ceavm until barvest time. 

Farm state senators staged a fili- 
busier trf several drc to win tbe 
to introduce the Iqjriatioo, 
vriiidi is 01^0^ ^ tbe Senate 
Rnublican 
’The farm debate 
an unosnal lobbying effort this 
week, as governors and several 
hundred le^slatqis from 15 fatm- 
mg states, mpinHing the entire 105- 
member South Dakota 
deicraded OD Congress 
■ (Sonora Back Freeze 
The Natioual Governors Associ- 
atiou called Tuesday for a one-year 
fedcnl budget freeze^ induing de- 
fense and Sodal Seemify funds. 
The Associated Press reprated. 

The resolutioD was acc^ied by 
the govemois at their winter meet- 
ing by a vote of 27-9. It had been 
accepted Sw«d«y by tbe executive 
counril of the association, wfakh 
has a Democratic nugori^ erf 34 to 
16. 

In other votes, the governors re- 
lesototions demanding 
lent Reagan submit a bal- 
anced budget to Congress and that 
Social Seemfy be exempted from 
tbe call for a budget fre^ 


.t <rf 


Several Governors in U,S, 
Decry For&gn Investment 


By Toldrin 

ffete York Timer Seniee 

WASHINCrTGN ~ Frai^ a 
technology drain and objecting to 
what they ceiled a lack of lecqnocir 
ty, several Western governors have 
exfwessed concern over mcreased 
fordgn investment u the United 
^tes. 

Some ddraies to the meeting of 
the National Governors Associa- 
lion noted Monday that sranetime 
this spring foreign investments in 
tbe Unitra States will exo^ UE. 
investments abroad. 

Govttoot Rkhaid O. Lamm of 
Coforado said Jjqnnese investois 
Tmri purchased high-tec'bnology 
fffmpffwMg and had boi^^ 

32.000 patents. 

“This is me of the real national 
mictatfi^ that's.' grang to haunt us 
for years to come,” Mr. Lamm said. 

“There is a sfrong sentiment on the 

tofraditionaHyc^tais^ 

here. I do not want the Japanese 


In a contrary view. Governor La- 
mar Alexander of Tennessee por- 
trayed forqgn inv es t m ent in the 
Umted States, sodt as Japanese 
auto plants in his state, as a my of 
preserving American jobs that 
might otherwise be deployed by 
inmoited products. 

Crovemor Robert Kerrey of Ne- 
brarica, a member of the westem 
Ooveenras Assodation. said for- 
lers “bring in jobs and money 
n they come m to invest, but we 
find ouradives importing their 
^oducL The trade deficit creates a 
mqor emplayment problem fra ns 
athom^ 

Utah’s governor, Nonnan Ban- 
gerter, noM th^ a Saudi investor 
had binlt a huge office complex in 
Salt Lake Qfy. “We've had too 
mnrJi foreign mvestmdit in office 
space and apsrtnimt space,” be 
said. Bet be said fordgn mvestment 
was often wdcome because “we've 


coming in and bizjnxig up American 
teebndogy. I do not want them in 
ottr state. I don’t want Ae Arabs 
owning our ba^ or the Japanese 
owning our means of production.” 


Utah.” 

(Jovexnor Robert Graham (rf 
Florida warned thm foreign invest- 
ment was “putting America in the. 
position of raig a debtor naticn, 
with less control over our desi^y.” 


that it anthraized at least five mni^ 
dess, inriiiiWng the of 

fiarmin* Gahuit^ then boss ofthe 
Bonanno family. 

“This is a bad day, piobatty tiie 
worst ever, for the Mafia," Mr. 
Oinliam si^ He said it was the 
first tune a federal mdictmeat had 
charged so many raganized crime 


Are Defeated 
In Pakistani 
Elections 


TheAjaodaiedPna 

ISLAMABAD, Pakistan — • 
rVwMt Mohammed Zia nl-Haq 
dissoived Ins cabinet on Thesday 
after five mmisteis were defeated in 
National Assembly dectianSy'The 
defeats woe seen as a setback for 
General Zia’s nnlitaty »r>it a 

repodiation of fow. 

The general, who hint hnwHi^y 
(rf opposition leadm arrested bo- 
fore the vote on Monday, had said 
that the deraitm for ibe 217-seat 
isaemUy — the first in ei^t years 
— woiud be tiie Gist step b a 
gradual return to danocm^. 

Pakistani opposition leaders 
called the vofo a sham beesnse of a 
ban ent i^tical nrfivify. In tbe 
dqfs leading iqi to tbe balloting, 
officials of Gound Zia’s xegnne 
said 369 people were arrested Tbe 
opposition said the figure exceeded 

2,ooa 

Thera were rerarts of scattered 
vidence and at least fonr deaths, 
but voting generaDy was rqiorted 


figures showed that 


3S mDliai voters took part Gener- 
al Zi& said he belted at least 40 
peraest wonld go to tbe pcdls, while 
oppoation leaders called for Faki- 
Btanis to b(^tl tiie dectioos. 

bfine members of General Zia’s 
17-member calnnet were running 
for election. The defeat of five was 
seen 1^-analysts as a sign of voter 
nnhappiness over die neglect of lo- 
cal issues and dissatisfaction with 
xtafitaiyiule: 

One Westem dqilomat called the 
results “a vote a^abst martial law. 
it nmst be wonymg to tbe r^me. 
It looks like the assembly wm be 
more vocal G c im t wI 2a had 
expect^" 

The five defeated cabmet minis- 
ten were Raja Zafaml I^, infor- 

matim ffpti TCHffOaS nffairt ntUUS- 

ter; AH Ahmad TaJpnr, defense 
mbister, Niaz Mohammad Arbab, 
c tf ] iiir ft Ghiilam Das^hir 

Khan, labor minister, and Rqa S.- 

Irandar Taman, water and pOWCT 

mbister. 

Mr. Haq, whom General Zia 
considere be major proponeo 
his to enfocce Islam 

(Cootmned oo 2, CoL ^ 


Wnham H. Webster, director (rf ' 
the Federal Bureau of Investiga- 
tido, the ifldictnient “histOTt ' 
ic." 

“It es^Ntses the structure and 
leadership of organized cibte (A a 
scale never done before,” he said. 
“It alleges not only the activities 
regnlatd and authorized by tbe 
comndsarat, but alM a 54-year his- 
tory (rf the comnnssioo’s role b 
faaiilating the illegal activities of . 
La Cosa Nostra.” 

The nine were arrested Monday 
nighL These indicted indude re- 
pined family bosses Anthony Sa^ 
lemo of the Genovese family Paul 
Castdlano of tbe Gamlnno family} 
Antiuwy Corallo of the Lucchesd - 
famQy; ndlip Rastelli of the Both 

atnnft family and fVnnam faTV i 

gdla of the Colombo famify. 

The others were Salva* 

tore Santrao, alh^ underboss (rf 
the Lucchese fatmly; Christopbet 
Ftnnari, an all^isd adviser to the . 
Tm'h^ family; RaM Sc(^ a 
pnrMcted member of the Ctdomm ' 
famity anri the pierideut of the 
Concrete Wotken Kstrid Cramdl 
of the Laborers International 
Union of North America; and An- 
klfo DeSacrqoe, tqiuted oncleriioss 
of the Gandnno family. 

Tba inritfftmmr eayt tbn enmmis . 
Bon cantioDed cxmeni coptraris 
by rii^ngnaring which cooiqiaiiy 
would be allowed to make a low bid 
on a project and by tiueatening 
labor ptrarfons or supply disivqi-- 
tions (cr anyone who trira to un- 
derbid the (kagnated cooqany. 

The vrinnas aDes^y were re- 
quired to TTiake payoffs to the orga- 
nized crime families. 

Investiratras planted a bugging 
device beoziid & dashboard of a ■ 
1982 Jaguar driven by Mr. Coral- . 
lo’s chmxffenr, allowmg than to ■ 
trace Mr. Conllo to a meeting of' 
family and lo bear him latgf 

rii«fa»yi^mg thn w tfj. ring 

The iorikameat charged that the 
connnisskBi was fonned b .1931 by 
niari*f (LutkyjXudano and o t l wr 
New York crime figures to coordi- 
naie the roerations of tfae five 
crime famines; vdiicfa bad been 
ftomishiM since the turn of the 
ceotuy. One of its princapal duties 
was to resolve leatferehip disputes 
that arose among various factions. 

The indfctments are based on a 
39-moatii cooperative effort After 
tbe New York Stale Organized 
Crime Task Force bra& mvesti- 
gatb^ it went to U5. auttiorilies 
becanse there is oo racketeering 
statute m New Ycnk. 


INSIDE 





A detail from “OrweO 
* 94 ** by Qirilstian Doc^ 
one of the designer mgs 
that are appearing — on 
walls as weD as floors — 
in the U.S. Page 8. 

■ Metdeaa officials arrested 
four si»pects m the abdnctbn 
of a U jC drug ageoL PageX 

■ Britab'h coal board said neai^ 
ly haU (rf tiie striking ndnecs are • 
back at work. Page 4. 

■ Moscow hopes to use the U.S. 
proposal fra qiace-based mis- 
sfle ddfenses to divide Westem 
allies, a U3. aide said. PhgeS. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

■ U.S. consumer pices in- 

creased by 0 l 2 peicait dnring 
Janoaiy. PageR 

■Wdl Street “poison-pill” 
takeover defease a^ears to be 
deadly moBcine. l^geSl 


Dcdlar Drops in N.Y. 
After Yolcj^ Remarks 

The dollar plummeted m New 
Yoik Tuesday after congressional 
testinxM? by the Federm Rra^ 
cfaainnan,PaulA.V(rf(dKr,wasm- 
teipreted as pesannstb fowaid the ' 
doUac^s future Page 9. 




Computer Tampering: Bypctssing the Diphnm MUh 



By Judith Cummings 

• .Vm- York Times Service 

'LOS ANGELES — From campuses to 
Confess, there is concent that ille^ com- 
puter<i$sisted tampering n-ttb edu<^tinna\ 
grades records coi^ replace old-fash- 
ioned diploma miUs and unaccredited of^ 
shore schools as the easier way to a university 
d^ee. 

■Educators, le^lators and law-eofmce- 
Diem officials say that no one has a r^ble 
idea of the extent of computer tan^tering. 
f^resentaiive William J. Hi^es, Demo- 
c^t of New Jerse>‘, whose computer crime 
measure was pa^ by in the last session of 
Congress, said in an interview ttet neither 
^eges nor fmancial institutions were wdll- 
ii^ to document the suspected problem for 
f^ of losing public cooTidence. 

'.Hiis month the University of Southern 
California and the Los Ao^te district attor- 
ney's o^ice said they were Invesugaiing alle- 
gations that bogus degrees bad sirid for 
as much as S23.000. and bad been "docu- 
mented" by faked complete transcripts 
planted in the university's computer. 

Some (rfficials in academia, such as Shel- 
don Steinbach, general counsd to the Ameri- 
can G)uncil on Educauon in Washington, 
say "there is no evidence that this is a wide- 
spread problet^" 

But some investigators, such as a Los An- 
geles law-enforcement ofTi^ who did not 
want CO be named, said it had bera rumored 
that grade foigeiy by computers was hap- 
pening at schools "all over the place." 

The University of Southern California 
case marked the Hrst time it has been allied 
that a computer has been used to fake entire 


transcript according to specialists in educa- 
tion and in bw enforcemcQL 


was made in connection with the arrest on «»nati» , disagreed with Mr. Kirby's assess- 
dnig charges of a former USC snidenu man. "Over half the students here at USC 
Bui they say that less grandiose ctnuputer Syltaa Mamiing, vice provost of the uni- are on fmancial aid," be . 

tampering at univeraties, from the changing veisity, said in an interview that nine more — ’*''* ' 

of grades for individual students to tampon students had been added ^nce October to 
tng with research prcgecis, has become a those vriiosegr^es were under invesugaiioo. 
growing source ^ concern. But she also said that no evidence had been 

It has led schools to lake greater security found to date “that entire transcripts were 
precautions, computer manufacturers to dc> fabricated." 

vdopnewsecurity technology to k^ ahead Howewr, Qifion H. Garrou. who beads 


U.S. Court 

Broadens 

Ri^tsof 


If computer tampering is happening 

here," Mr. Singer said. Tm sure it’s happen. « ri _ 

g4u. .ta p«idcn. for d,r. " OO** SUSpeCtS 
management and research of the Amencan 


Gklleges and finnnHal institutions are snspected of being 
unwilling to document the problem of computer- 
doctored grades for fear of losing pnblic confidence. 


of skilled amateurs, and l^slatures to vote the district attom^s compnter crime unit, 
new criminal penalties. said the case was sbfl open. "Based on iflfof- 

’the University d Southern California in- mation we have reodved," he said, "we are 
stalled a computerized system for academic pursuing the possibOi^ that pfaoay d^rees 

record-keepii^ in December 1981 were created. 


In October 1984 the university said it was 
invesiigatii^ll students suatected of paying 
to have riieir grades changed m the school's 
computer, and that it had djyh^igffd an 
employee in the rectsds and re^flration of- 
fice after she admitted that she had been paid 
51,500 for changing rive grades. 

Recently the Los Angdes County district 
attom^'s office said it was investigating an 
allegation that complete falsfied iranscnpis 
had been inserted into the computer system 
for students who had paid as ™rh as 
$25,000 for a doctoral d^ree. The charge 


When the issue arose last faU, John Kirby, 
editorial director of (he student newspqier. 
The Daily Trqan, told a local iqiorter dial 
he "wasn’t reaUy surprised" by the incident. 

“You have a school here where there's a 
large portion of the student body that has a 
goM amount of money," he sahl "There’s 
always the posribili^ that someone is going 
to have a price that’s going to be met" Mr. 
Kilby said early this month that be wmild 
not comment furtluT on the matter. 

Michael L. Singer, president (rf the student 


Ass^atioa of Collegiaie Registrars and Ad- 
missions OTficers. said the issue of computer 
security has become "a really hot topic" for 
di s cussio n at the groiqi's national conven- 
tion scheduled for April in Godimati. 

&nployers are increasingly contacting 
schools to check applicanis' education re- 
cords, Mr. Gwinn said. For cbeaieis, he said, 
h fyig computer transcripis hold a special 
appeal in t&t when an uasuspecring school 
administration punches in the requested 
name, the computer turns out the veri5'to£ 
transcript, although a false one. 

Mr. Hu^es, diairman of the subcmnnni* 
teeon cruzKcf (he House Judida^ Commit- 
tee, said that he planned to reintroduce a 
"computer tre^iass" measure that was de- 
leted in the passage of the ComprdieDSive 
Crime Conirm Act d 1984. 

The Hughes provision w(HiId create a new 
felray offense punishable b;^ up to 10 years 
in prwm for anyone who gain^ $5,000 as a 
r^t of improper use of authorized access to 
a computer. 

I^. Steinbacb said the American Council 
on Education was backlog (he legislation for 
passage in the current ingress. "If kids can 
break into highly sophisticated military in- 
u^'gence ctunputers, we query whether indi- 
viduals of equal capad^ can break into 
universi^ computers," he smd. 


WORLD BMEIg 

EC Readies Accent OD Wine ^ 

BRUSSELS (Raitos) — European Commimiw fan n nna is^'wi^ r 
eluded Tbesday a deal to Icwes* the group’s sto^^of unwanted, 
remoi^ one of the main barriers to ^laatsh and ftntnguese motto; 

came after months of 

SyLinfJ^Grce^ouse 

TIC very MUsfactorfagremim It is a myof iitqi foreari m tangnig :^:. 
WASHmOTON - Tta U5. poljL bade to raUty." EC soinces aid to agra ama da 

Supreme Ccun ruled Tua^y tol Xe^nled asucces tor Italy, to cunsnt holder of to conimmlyfit 
the state must provide m mdig^t presidency whii hdd behind-thMceMS tafts m an effijtf.ta ' : 


c riminal defendant with free p^- 
ehiairic assistance in prqiaiing an 
insanity defense if the daendam’s 
sanity at the time of the crime is 
seriously in question. 

The 8-10-1 dedaon. written by 
Associate Justice Ihuigo^ Mar- 
shall, was the first Supreme Court 
ruling in years to extend an impm'- 
tant new constitutional right to 
c riminal defendants. Associate Jus- 
tice William R Rehnquist dissent- 
ed. 


reach an agreemmL 


Tang f.fiaysTLS.to(jrtCoaperatiap 

LOS ANGELES (AR — Tlie Rc^ adgm ristratkm jntends to ae^. 
down its cooperation with New Zealand on d^ense and 
retaliation for Wellington’s banning of U.S. nudear wanto - 
harbors, Prime Minister David Laii^ said 'Diesd^. He called mfrUiS.- • 

dectsion serious and damaging. , . ij . ■ • 

Mr Lange said a top State Dwartment oEuaal e^lamed to mm a 

series of measures to limit cooperation. “ThoremeasnTeaiaatopain^^ 

to the «n ton»flwic*^^^ring and defense Edd^” Mr. t i ang e said at a news ; 
conTerence here. He said the measura were not "die IdM d actxm 
The court overturned (he death which a great power dioold talte aga^ a small, loyal ally." 
sentence of an Oklahoma Earlier Tuesday, Mr. Lange met widi Winiam Brows, asastant sepror 

convicted of muidaing a minister tary of state for Asian and Pacific affmis. Mr. ftom dianct^M 

and his wife, whose request for psy- tbdr hourlong talk as "friendly as well as frank and candid,** mid sadthe. 

United States wanted "an equitaUe sointion*’ to the coofli^ Bat ^ ■. 
would not say whether prraiess was made. - 

Mr. Lan^ saM Tnesday he hoped the dispute would not aneo^JS.- 
New 7«*1 and trade agreement op for renewal in March. B efore th e - 
nw^ng with Mr. Brown, he said u planned to reiterate his country^' 
position on the wai^p ban. 


chiatric assistance in mounting an 
insanity defense was denied the 
Oklahoma courts. Ihe man, Glen 
Burton Ake. was given a court- 
appointed lawyer but could not af- 
ford to hire a p^*chiatri5L As a 
result, be presented no expert testi- 



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that was^^ne at the time of the Oslo Spy Siiqiect Denies He Confess^- : 

™®- OSLOfNYT)— A former Norwegian diplomat accaised of 

The “demeniary principle. Jus- the Soviet Union and Iraq insisted Tuesd^ that the dramatic co nf e sswiis .. 

rice Marshall said, was that "when revealed Monday by the state prosecutor at the opening of his truu were 

a state brings its judicial powa to 

bear on an mdigeni defendant in a cpAairiwa for the fiist Hwwt m an outline d his view of the charm 
criminal proceetfing, it must take a^iSthim, Ame Treholt dmcribed the first after his arrest 13. 
steps to assure that the defendmt ago as a "Kafkaesque" mghtmare of endless questioning, and . 

kffl^rirtn (hat led himtomake im numenais responses. "1 felt tra.die 
world had collapsed under me," he told the seven judges. ^ • . 

Mr. Treholu who was head of the Foreiga Mmistiys pass cBi^ 
rhaiim^ thc cDUTt's deostoo uot to oaToc csqierts rranested w his 
attorneys to the panel awaegng the in^cntance « the mronnatra teis 
to have given to the Soviet Union over a 10-year period and to . 
Iraq after 1981. 


has a fair opportunity to present his 
defense." 




Piridstani womea woridn^ on Monday at a pcdlix^ stafitm in Karachi. 

Zia Dissolves Cabinet Following Elections 


(Gairtmued from Pii|!e 1) 
law, was the most pFominent of the 
defeated ministers. 

Two other hi^ offkdais were 
also defeated. The state mmister 


for social welfare. Mahm ud AH 
lost in Lahore while General Zia’s 
adviser on inteniai trade, Sbdkb 
Ishrai Ali lost (0 a fmmer student 
leader m Rawalpindi 




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Pakistan UAmsiGor^ 

Gmatpeople tofly wtth"' 


‘ FLYING to: ABU DHABI AMMAN. AMSTERDAM. ATHENS. BAGHDAD. BAHRAIN. BANGKOK. BEUING. BOMBAY. CAIRO. COLOMBO. 

• COPENHAGEN DAMASCUS DELHI. DHAHRAN. DHAKA. DOHA. DIVBAI. FRANKFURT. ISTANBUL. JEDDAH. KANO, KATHMANDU. 

] KUALA LU.MPUR. KUWAIT. LONDON. MANILA. MUSCAT. NAIROBI. NEW YORK. PARIS, RIYADH. ROME. SINGAPORE. TEHRAN. 
i TOKYO. TRIPOLI dnil 24 tiesdnaniMis aiihin PakKian. iAL(PMC|«es 


A govcmmeni s^kesman said 
Tuesday that General ZJa asked 
eight mmisters from the dissolved 
ralnnei to stay on "uotiJ the forma- 
tion of a new govemnieiiL" 
General Zia ouda«*ed poliiical 
parties after the July 1977 coop in 
which ito overdrew iPrime Minister 
Zulfikar Ali Bbutio. and they were 
not allowed to contest seats in 
Monday's ekciion. The 131 can- 
didates, few of them w^-known 
figures, ran as independents aJid 
campaigned on local issues. 

■ UEL Eim^ Sees Risk for Zia 
Pakistan's election has moved 
(he countiy closer to democracy 
but also has posed formidable risks 
for Goiaal Tia if be fulfills his 
pledge to lift martial law. the U.S. 
ambassador, Deane R. Hinton, 
said Tuesday. 


There must be "meaningful ac- 
cess to justice." Justice Marshall 
said, not simply "mere access to the 
courthouse doors." He said that "a 
criminal trial is fundamentally un- 
fair if the stale proceeds against an 
indict dtfendani without making 
certain that be has access to the raw 
materials int^ral to the buildi^ of 
an effective drfense." The dedsira 
was based on the doe process guar- 
antee of the 14ih AmendmenL 

Most states now provide some 
form of psychiatric assistance for 
indigent defendants. But Arthur B. 
Spitzer, who argued the case for the 
American Qvil Liberties Union, 
said Tuttday that the decision es- 
tablished a broader ri^t than was 
now available in many of those 
states. 

The court said the state must 
provide a psydiiaiiist not only to 
examine the defendanL but to also 
"assist in evaluation, preparation 
and presentation of the d^ense." 

In his Assenting opinion. Justice 
Rdmquist otgected particularly to 
the so^ that language. He said 
the court was giving defendants ac- 
cess not only to a psychialrisL but 
to a "defease advocate." At the 
mo$L he said, the right should be 
"to an iodqiendem p^chiatric 
evaluation, not to a defense consul- 
tant” Justice Rehnquist added that 
it was "bigldy dmb^'' the consti- 
tution required the states to make 
an insani^ defense available at alL 


Report Sees 
U.S. Hunger 

. 0 ^^ A V # H U V2U V1|C «A UJ6 

Mr. Hinton urid The Washing- /§q rqiorled Tuesday, 

on Post in Islamabad that if mar- The agency quoted 

ial law were lifted it would be a « dhTsIw^roo&xeii: 


Chess President Defends EGb Dedsion 

MANILA (AP) — The presideot of the Werid Chess Federation 
remained finn Tuesday to ois' dedatm to end the wotracted woM 
cham pionshtp maiirfi between the cfaanqiioD, Anatoli Iksupov, and ho.. 
challenger, Cary Kasparov, saying, "it was xi^ then, it is c^t today. 

' Rorencio Gampnmanes said he was turonig down Mr. Karpov’s v 
fonnal request to reconader his demsios Fd>. IS stoj^ring the inudi, 
which had gone throng 48 games in more than five mont^ widi *Tk> 
certain end m sight** Mr. Karpov was learfin^ Mr. Karoarov five ptnes 
to three and needed one more victory to retam the wood title. AIukk^ . 
the chanmon had won the first five games it was evident he was tiring' 
and the^^enger rallied to win three gam^ After Mr. Kanatov's tintd 
victory, Mr. Campomanes made the surprise dedakm. 

Mr. Campomanes reiterated a call for a new match between Bilr. 
Karpov and Mr. Karoarov, both of the Soviet Union, and said he was 
leaving fonni^tion d rules for it to the World Chess Federation congress 
in Graz, Austria, in A^sL He prqMsed that the new aiatcfa start on- 
^l2. 

U.S. Charges 3 Federal Uniaa Leaders 

WASHINGTON (UPT) — The government filed fonnal chaiw oq 
Tuesday against three union presideiits. smring their support of WdterF. • 
Mondale's presidential canqiaign vi(datedU.S. law. 

The prosecutions under the Hatoh Act of 1939 have been denouncedby 
rirtually every msgor union in the United States and by a number nc 
congressmeiL The thrre uiuoQ preadents, repiesentiiig government wxd^ 
^ said they fight tiie rtiiarges to the Suprone Court because tiwir 
rii^ts to free speech are threatened. The law piddbits partisan pditiod 
campaignnig federal 0 

K. William O'Connor, special counsel for the UB. Merit Syst^ ■ 
Protection Board, announce the filing c€ tte diarges Tuesday against 
Kamdb T. Blaylodt of the Americmi Federation of Covemment fin^ 
ployees, Moe Bffler of the American Postal Wodeera Union and >finoent 
R. Scmbrotio of the National Assodation of Letter Caiiriera. 

Deatii of Gandhi Aseasrin Is Detailed 

.NEW DELHI (Reuters) — Two Sikh bodyguards accused of matda^ .' 
tng Prime Miiaster Indira Gandhi were shot while trying to take a gon 
from one of ti» guards who had detained them, the ftess Trust d Inm . 


ton 
rial 

"lug plus" in making P akistan 

more appealing to U.S. critics of 
aid to the country, a bulwark 
ag^st Soviet expansionism in the 
regioa. 

"Hungs are gmng to be difiermit 
around bm with an dected parUa- 
menL Anytime you dect people, 
those people seek po^. The ques- 
tion is, «»n he maintain equilibrium 

or balance, or will it get mit of 
control again as it has in the past," 
Mr. Hinton said. 


Tarsem Sin^ JamwaL commander of Mrs. Ga&r 
dhfs border potice guards, as saying that die two suqiects, &twant Singh 
and Beam Sngh, were taken to a guard room after th^ had riiot Mrs. 
Gandhi at her residence on OcL 31. Mr. Jamwal said he was guarding die 
two men inside;, the agency said, quotiim a statement from police. 

“They became restless," Mr. Jamwal was quoted as saying. "Beaut 
Sngh moved from the efa^," he said, adtfing: "suddenbr hejun^xd from 
his chair and tried to get hc^ of my Sten gun." Mr. Jamwal also said the' 
other suspect had mow at tte same time. "In die sa^ that ensued 
there was firixm from m carbine,'* Mr. Jamwal said Mr. Beaot 
died, but Mr. &twant mngh recorered. He faces dusges of murdering 
Mrs. Gandhi 


MamKsSa)^ 

He’dKeepVer 

(CoBtomed fram Page I) 

gen tent "because I was hardly 
breatiting" because of a serious 
asthma atiadt while suffering from 
an unspecified virus. At the time 
the public was told that Mr. Mar- 
cos had (be flu. 

The president also ruled out 
holding a new electkHX for a presi- 
dent or vice president btfore ^ 
term expires in 1987. 

■ Gahnans Defy Court 

Rdaiives of Mr. Galman defied 
a court subpoena to testi^Tuesday 
at the trial The Associated Press 
re ported from Mmiila. 

A lawyff for Mr. Caiman's fam- 
ily tdd the court the relatives did 
not show up because the court had 
failed to emorce its previous order 
to inqirisoD the officers and sol- 
diers charged with k^ing Mr. 
Aquino and Mr. Galman. The de- 
fendants are in militaiy (xistody, 
GMfined to barracks. 


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BOSTON — Hunger has 
reached epidemic proportions 
across the United Stalk, ikviim up 
to 20 nnHioD people vulnerabte to 
fear aud illness b^use of econom- 
ics and conscious government p^ 
licy. a group of doctors and public 
berith expms said Tuesday. 

The r^ort by the Physician Task 
F<Mce on Hui^cr in America was 
based on a yewoog investigation, v • • i « 

Immigration Aides Accused by U.S. 

not belter." WASHINGTON (AP) — Hiri>~rankii^ officials of the Immigcatioa 

“The recent and swift return irf Naturalization Service intmered with investigations into aD^ed 
hunger to America can be traced in comrotion 1^ agents, an internal Justice Department report said, 
substantial measure to clear and Altl^gblsubstantial strides" have been made into investigating such., 
conscious policies of the federal all^tions since 1980, it smd, "serious institutional obstades to - 
government," it charged. vigorous pursuit of these aud other aUegatioos have been raised. Smne^ 

"a^rW, lack of food is not the uus mierference has come from INS upper inanagemenL 
paus^ of hunger in America," said agents have to deal dail}i with inunigrants "many of vriiom nnwi* 

the report titled "Hunger in Auier- fi^ yiuntrift where the practice of gving mtuities to mvernmmt ~ 
ica: The Growing ^lidemic.'' The officia ls for official acts is accepted." Itaddedihai "When the coin rt«”*y . 
task force was headM by J. Lany of the umnigration laws tmddw large backlog of peading JNS marief« «ie 
Brown of die Harvard School d ®tided to the mix, siDjations highly suscqitible to corruption result"' ' 
Public Health. 

East West Germany Schedule Talks 

said. "While no one knows the pro- BONN — The first talks at the catnnet level between East and W^ . 

dse aufflber of htingiy America Germany since Sbplember will take place next mtmtiL West Gen^ 

available erideoce indicates that up officials said Tuesday. 

to 20 nnilioD citizens may m The West German economics mmister, -Martin RafigwHaart ^ 
hungry at least some period of time establish hi^Ievel contacts when he meets the 

each month." Erich Honedter, in East Beriin on March 12. " 

The authors of the rqxMt rea- . ^•Hooecker^ederff a planned visit to-Wfisi Germany last Sotfent •• 
soned that the 1 S3 miUjon Ameri- casing a mw setback to Chanodlor Helmut Kdd*s drive fnbettet 

cans who Uve -below the oTfidal East Gennany despite the then-^nevailaig chill in East-Wcart'^ 

poverty line and do not receive ^tiOlts. 
food stamps are unable to secure an 

fe'&‘„'rbr4S Tawan Admits Using Gang Leader . . . 

ed sutooups of Ameri^ living TAIPH (Reuters) — Taiwan admitted TuesdS that a aane leader 

near the pov^ line Who also do charged irithilK murder of a Chinese-Ameritaawnter in OMiiaww 

empu^ its miht^ inielUgence bureau. 

Ji^Kx minister SUhOu-yang said a probe into the killmg of Heo9 - 

Liu in Daiy Qty on OcL IS showed the huremi hawt w^^iit ed a l y l 
leader, Chen Qu-li. Mr. Shih said Mr. Chen was recruited ]^' 

year to coUea information about Cbing. The bureau said Mr. CSmo tw 
eiiglqy^ because he claimed to have access to information in niina. 

Mr. Shin said a court had conqileted a preliminary hearin g 
Cto Wu Tun. another gang leader also charged with the ^der. He 

earn thd lain omm .* k_ l. ^ _._f 


not receive foM asastance for a 
total of 2185 minio n, which they 
rounded down to 20 million. 

Tbey called on Congress to in- 
crease w^are and food stamp 
benefits and ease eligibility require- 
ments; restore free and low-price 
me al programs to seboeds; 


the Women, Infants and Children said the two were expected to be tried soon butaive no date. Offirial 
nuiritkffl program, and offer more wuice^dTuesday thetrailwasexpectedtostartmtwoweekstfid^ • 
meals for the elderly. it would be open to the public, unlike the initial h^^ringt which woe hdd ' 



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in camera. 


Correction 

An article about the Bank of Boston in the Feb. 23-24 editioiis 
incormtly^ted that the ccunpany had dedinedtXKiimeBiabotoalie^ 
bop^t the bank had had dealings with ngamzed crime figmcft .OP 
Feb. 21, the company said that several mid^vdamlayemw beim 

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UmRNATIOIVAL HERALD TJUBDIVE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1985 




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U.S. Planning to Set Up Mengde IFos Involved in Drug Trafficking^^ CIA Reports Hint 


Supercomputer Centers 
For Academics, Industry 


By Oa^i'd E, Sanger 

.VrH Yerk Tunta Sen uc 

WASHINGTON — Tlie Na- 
lional Sdeace Fouadatkm has an- 
nounced plazis to spend S200 mil> 
lion lo create supercomputer 
centers at four of the nation's le^- 
iog universities. The move is the 
broadest U.S. effort yet to promote 
research using advanced computer 
technology. 

Federal officials said Monday 
that the primar>' motive for the 
five-jear progrtun was a “desper- 
ate, overwbdming need" among 
academics tor access to supercom- 
puters that could help sofve a 
range ot basic research problems. 

Some also said it constituted a 
U.S. version of Japan's Super- 
Speed Project, a joint effort of gov^ 
emment and industry to build the 
next generation of high-speed com- 
puters. 

While they vary in design, super- 
coasters arc ^eraUy used to 
solve problems that could talu 
v-ears on conventiona] mainframe 
computers. Mc»t of the madiines. 
whit^ cost more than SIO millioo 
each, are used by the Defense De- 


American leaders in supercom- 
puters: Cray Research and Ae 
Control Data Corp. 

The piojea of greatest interest to 
the industry, however, is the coi- 
laboratimi between Cornell and 
IBM. Supercomputers are virtually 
the only types of computers that 
IBM does not currently manufac- 
turer, in pan b^use the market 
for the machines is considertal lim- 
ited. 

The Comell approach is oq1>' one 
option the company is exploring in 
supercomputer design. IBM ofH- 
dals disclosed that the company 
also has supercomputer-related re- 
search projects at New York Uni- 
versity, the Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology and Rice Universi- 
tv. 


By Ralph Blumenthal 

.Vtfk" York Ttmes Semtv 

NEW YORK — The Central 
Inidiigence Agency began receiv*- 
ing reports in 1971 that Dr. Josef 
Mengele. the Nazi war criminaJ, 
was heavily involved with mi- 
ners in iUe^ narcotics (raffu^ng 
in Paraguay, accordjqg to govern- 
ment documents. 

The documents, provided in 
censored form by the ClA for a 
Senate inquiry, indicate that 
agency officials in Pari^uay gave 
credence to the reports and for- 
warded them to headquarter.s in 
Washington, which, in turn, que- 
ried other federal investigative 
agencies on the matter as recently 
as 1979. 

The partially blacked-oui doc- 
uments do nol establish the truth 
erf' the reports and leave many 
questions unanswered about Dr. 
Mengele. Dr. Mengele was the 
chief doctor at the Auschwitz 
death camp, where millions of 


people died. Among the questions 
are to what extent the uiforma- 
ti(Mi was pursued in the seard for 
one Nazi Germany's most no- 
torious fi^tjves. 

"They just let the infminatioa 
hang ih^” said Senator Alfcmse 
M. D' Amato, Republican of New 
York. “No cme pursued this." 

A sptAeswoman for the OA in 
Washington said Monday that 
the information about Dr. Men- 
gele was disseo^led "as appro- 
priate" to other government agen- 
cies. 

TTie spokeswoman said she 
could not discuss whether or not 
the informaiioo was forwarded to 
other got'emments, such as West 
Germany. 

The documents, which were ob- 
tained by Tbe New York Times, 
offer these new accounts: 

• The CIA's Strategic Narcot- 
ics Team approached other feder- 
al agencies in 1979 for further 
information on reports of drug 


trafficking by Dr. Meogele, sedt- 
ing to bade up an article that the 
team had submitted for publica- 
tion in the International Natcot- 
ic .1 Reidew. 

• A 1974 CIA ddiriefing of a 
source who interviewed Nazis in 
Paragimy product information 
that Ur. Nlengde had UDdeigoDe 
plastic surgery and iqipea^ to 
be much younger than ^ age, 
which wi^d now be 73. The 
source also repemed that a {^to- 
graph in Paraguayan passport 
files showed Dr. Mengele after 
the p^iic surgery. 

• iTte same source rnmned 
teaming that around 1968 Dr. 
Meogele was living in Paraguay 
with Martin Bonnann. Hitler's 
designated successor, who is be- 
lieved by most authorities to have 
died in Berlin in I94S. 

According to one CIA docu- 
ment, Dr, hfengele arrived in Par- 
aguay for the first time around 
19S1 and lived there and in Brazil, 


rally Mexico Arrests 4 in Abduction of U.S. Drug Agent 

i could take w O 


>-ears on coovenuonaJ mainframe L-mteU Pros Intmuaumai 

?! TUUANA. Mexico-Foursus- 

whiA cost ^ UiM SIO milton peels, three of them former Mexi- 
each, are used by the Defei« Dc- can federal agents, have been ar- 
panmeriL mteUigence^oa and rested in the Udnapping of a U.S. 
nauonal latwraiones. Only a hand- dnig^enL 


fui are available to academic and 
industrial researches. 


There was still do word on the 


"If this gets off die ground, 1 whereabouts of Enrique Camarena 
suspect it will be very difficult for ^3zar, an agCQl of tbe U.S. Drug 
rheJapanesetokeeptrp,"safdKea- Enforcement Agency who was ab- 
neth G. Wilson, theNobd laureate <iucted Feb. 7 in Guadalajara by 
in physcs who will be in charge of bdieved to be involved in 

tbe new National Advanced Sdeor trafficking, 
tific Computing Centers at Cornell Tliree of the four suspects were 
University in Ithaca, New York. arrested ^ Mexican authorities 
TTic other centers will be at Sunday and presented at a news 


Princeton University in New Jer- conference on Monday. A Mexican 
sey. where a center will be rtm by a official said one of the four meo, 
oonsorriuru of several other Ivy Tomas Morlet Bt^uez. was "a 
League universilies; the Uiuveraty m-iin su^mci as the intellectual au- 
of lllinds, widely considered at the thor" of the kidnapping, 
forefront of supercomputer re- , , « , 

search; and the University of Cali- 

fomia at San Diego, where 18 uni- »he Fed^al Juitaa^ P^ m 
versities are joining the rffoit. Tyuana. said Mr. Morlet bad re- 
Tlieprqeci announced Monday. c«Uy reu^ from the Cto 
the largest supereompuier effort in of Federal Sec^iy^e for^ m- 
the United States outside of the “IJjgence s^Jice. TOe otto .sus- 
miliiarv, marks an unusual collabo- 55^ **^^^*^ Ennque 

raUon between the federaDy fi- OonzdezAguJar, a former heuten- 
oanced Nau'onal Science Founda- antcoIondinMe^atysiransit 
tion. universities and private pohee, and Edu^ Ram^ 
industry. Corporations, altmg with ^ ® 
state goveraments, are expei^ to 

match the S200 million "sred mon- All three carried credentials of 




i 

*•* < . . ••.V}*: •* v ^ 



: - 




Three of die four suqiects. identified as fonner Mexican federal t^ients, are, left to ri^b 
Tomas Morlet BtHt)uez, Enrique GtHozalez y^^inlar and Edinrdo Ramirez Oraz. 


match tte 5200 milliOT "s^ n^- All three carritxi c^entials of by the Federal Judicial Po- thought we were 
qy," as foundation offldals called tbe Department of Federal Secun- Ouinlero ' 

it, and underwrite joint research w, although all said they were no _ . . . ^ ^ j 

nrf\MMu*le at iVi* iMiiTMwAtin. ll-at tuill InnnA,- m fai4*ra1 corui/v ® MeXiCail OftlCimS A SSBlI Cd 


thought we were gening dan^- jara ^ort two da.ys after the kid- 
ously close ho tbe traffickersjL tl^ napping of Mr. Camarena. 
backed off.** Members trf the Depann^l of 

Last November, be said, Mexi- Federal Secniiiy were guarding the 
can ^fidals tried to direct DEA plane, Mr. Mullen said, and al- 
agems away from a plantation in lowed it to take off after taUdng at 
Oiihuabua state, where 10,000 tons the scene with Federal Judidal Po- 
of marijuana, the largest single sei- lice, tbe Mexican equivaleni of tbe 
zure ever made, was found. 'The FBI. 

only sutislic we have so far in that “They let the suspects gel away," 
case ts tbe prosecutor, who was Mr. MuOen said. ‘Then they start 
assassinated." Mr. Mullen said. die raids." 

Mr. Mullen said that in tbe case In Mexico Gty, Sergio Gairia 


it, and underwrite joint research ty, although all said they were no 
projects at the tmiversities that trill longer in federal service, 
give private industry access to tbe w„ v;,,. j ....krtrSiiA* Thornton of The Washing' 

Sadunes. ion Post reported from Washinpon: 

First among the donors is the Sullen, elaborating on his 

Imcmaiional Business Machines allegation, said Monday that Mexi- 

wolSd spend $30 rnflUon,m equip- attemptedtothwanothermvesu- 

meotanld employees, tolipiStJn gjntw. out of Guadalajara last gations by his agency in Mexico, 
dftxt at Cornell to construct a su- “Mexico hasn't arrested a major 

percomputer 40 times Caster than On Sunday, the head of tbe U.S. drug trafCcker in eight years." Mr. 
tbe fastest now connDer- Orug Enforcement Adminisira- Mullen said, "prey were happy to 

dally available. Tim Enton Coro., don. Francis M. Mullen Jr„ alleged have us come in and make a big 
thft American Telephoae and that agents in the Darartinent of headline once in a while. But when 
graph Co. and the I,o c kb w d Cotp. Federal Security had reded an at- it rurally started to hurt, when they 


percomputer 40 times Caster than 
tbe fastest machine now connDer- 
daily ava^ble. Tlie Exxon Coro., 
the American Telephoae and Tde- 
giuh Co. and the Lockheed Coqi. 
will partidpate in the emter in 
PrinKUm.' 

Univerrity (rffidals insisted that 
they would ctxitrol access, to the 
machines and said U.S. fnnds 


only sutistic we have so far in that 
case is the prosecutor, who was 
assassinated." Mr. Mulien said. 

Mr. Mullen said that in tbe case 


of Mr. Caro Quintero, the DEA. Ramirez, Merico's attorney gener- 
had asked Mexican aiiiborities to al, said trfridals were gatberi^ in- 
detain his airplane at the Guadala- ftnmatioa oa the inddenL 


rrinoftton. 

U.S. Considers Aid Diversion to Nicaragua Rebels 

machines and sard U.S. fnnds O 

Resistance to Secret QA Funding Plan Leads White House to Wei^ Options 

products for industry. But the pro- 


ject still appeared to raise questitms 
about tbe changing nature of cor- 
porate-university relationships. 


hhon anxmg companies ^ronsor- 
ing the work. 

"It is clear that superoomputers 


NaiioiiaiScienceFoundation.-But 

^^ofS£d£day. 

o^to the oompuimg power llwy gy^ congressiona] Democrats cut 

• r . „ . off secret CIA funding last year, 
in^m recent years aajtoc af^r nore than J73miIlion had 

MenspemsinceWSl.andcongrcs- 

miss be ^ dal a 

attait^ some of tte most ptesmrg — 
problems of panicle ptay^, bio- 
technology, aerodynamics and AirForfift 

automobile design. Lmry Smair, ~ 

the University of Illinois astro- C»h1a TUfiniiftfs 
physicist who will direct the super- 

conqiuter center there, said be has ne Atsodaud Pms 

been forced to go to Municih regu- «,^c„,xir-Tr»xi -n,. 

laily to gain atxsss to a supercom- WASHINGTON The air 

piit^ that cffl iM aid in the study of fotoo and ^ space agency haw 


By DotJc MtiManus newal of such aid is imliJcely to be discussing," a senior State Depart- caUed tbe Sandinists a “totalitar- 

Las Angles Times Senm approved. Because of this, several ment ofndal said. Other options ian, brutal, and cruel rerime" that 

WASHINGTON TheReaean alternative functng plans are being reportedly include withdrawing could not be acceptable to the 

Both the software and tbe desi^ administration is consider^g a worked out, including the diversiOD U.S. diplomatic reception from United States unless “they’d say 

few new types of stmereonqniters rebels righting of eoononuc aid, the sources said. Nicar^a and extending open mQ- “uncle.'" 

Nicaragua’s leftist gpwnmeni bv Under one version of the idea, it^ aid to the rebels, w proving Mr.Tinoposaid:;ifMr.R«^ 

dwrung nmney that bad been in- officialssaid.U.S.nioncvwoiildgo wd to dependents of toe guemljas is saying his goal is to overthrow 
bhon amrag companies sponsor- tended as economic aid for Central to Honduras as economic aid with while encouraging other couatnta our government, how can we con- 

America, officials said. an agreement obliging toe Hondu- and pnvatooiganizaiioiis to extend tinue in Conl^ora w ^ to solve 

_ Preridoii Ronald Reagan and rans to turn some of toe oKmey , ... ... toe proWeins in toe region?^ 

cretary of State George P. Siultz over to insurgents. . official said toe adrainistra- The talks, sponsored by Colom- 

U hope to persuade Congress to rnnemss has annimriaiM «W7 tion has not yet settled on any sm- bia,Venezuda,PananiaaDdMexi- 

pfoveSMatillioabcovertfuad- ^^^^SwioSSbrHo^^ glet^hon. touse as soon as we co, the four Contadora countries, 

; that toe Central ImelligeDce ^ bu, j, i,-- w do toat you 11 ^ constituenaes have been under way for more than 

spney is to provide to toe msur- -aust of disouies with the^ondu- “P against iL iwo years but a^reared to be dead- 

^riKoffraalssai^nday. rangovetS^lTHoSi^Md toe , i 

But coneressronal Democrats cut n..-^ c...^ funding will be pursued fust and an are aamed after an uland oQ Pana- 1 


prowa wu^mTOvm runa. million in economm aid for Hondu- ^ 

B that toe Cen^ In^gence ^ ^ut it has not been spent be- Sr If" 

Spney is top^de to^ msur- cause of disputes with toe Hondu- a pia 

^ toe officials ^ Monday. gpvertmieni. Honduras and toe , ^ ^ 

Buicoiiff^nalDemocratscui UniSSsiatcs are at odds over toe funding wtol» pursued fei and an 


level of U.S. aid, and over a mili- p P“ 

uiytraittiDgcenter toat toe United 

Stales wants to establish there. . ofuoj 


aitemative plan adopted only if ma where the four countries Erst 
toai plan fads. met. 

Rd>el ofGdals have said toey are Mr. Tmoco, who has served as a 


Stales wants to establish there. ofCdals have said toey are Mr. Tmoco, who has served as a 

Bo* .dmmistrjUon offid^s 

andmembm of Congress have Htmduras, H Salvador and Israel, chief negotiator in the ttireci talk* 

all of which are heavOy dependent betweeSicaragua and the United 
vert , aid mon^.UMgecooormc ^n U.S. aid, ^ He 


Uack boles. 


~ devdopmeni aid lo fund insuigents 

Tlifimiftfs "could simply be Ui^aL" said an ■ Talks *Dead,' Managua Says 

Settle Ihspute ofndal^J^edooItTbcnaned m JTZ yL 

The AssodM^ Press House Dmocrats have said toey Times retorted pom Wadm^on: . 

Washington The air would fight aid W the rebels in any A senior Nicaraguan offiaal has | j - ~ 

force and the agency have form. And toe Republican chair- said that President Reagan’s recent 
settled a dispute over use of toe “an of toe Senate Foreign Rela- tor^is ag^ his counity had 
en«w shuttll with toe militanr uons Committee. Senator Richard killed the Contadora n^ouattoos 


States that ended last month. He 
was in Washington this week to 
lobby in Congress against renewed 


shiiifit with the militanr uons Lomnutiee. senator Kicnaro xiiiea me v..omaoora n^ouanon: 

Srecuigtoiacofie-toinJofalffi G. Lugar of Indiana, said last week for a regional peace treaty in Ceo 
OQ^m awhile s^jTJe^^ STtoStde fhSSto^urn for *hat be was concerned toat toe tnil America, 
nology ^ la^ - Iff mke ianw< m. United States could “lose control" In an interview on Monday, Vic- 

or*e«bdsifU.=irfj^wm wHuspTmoo. Nica^a'sd^ 
wnai prompt t..^gres imi Amnautics and Qnoiv- Adminis- routed through another govern- uty foreign minister, said toat as far 
yeartoaIlo«icS40minionfor^ ^“uu« Adimms- ^ as his gSerameni was concerned, 

first year of the supercomputer tiaaan. said inesoay. . ^ . toe COTiadora peace process is 

prqiei^ over tbe olgechons of stxne The dispute came about when air Mr. Shultz outoaed toe nto last -dead," 


PiageT 


project, over toe olgechons of some The dispute came about when air Mr. Shultz outlined toeid^ last 

in the atonmistration, b^d force dfci d fd to use misales to wedt to toe Senate Intelligence 

as much to do with industrial ewn- laimrfi iqj to 12 air force satellites Committee and got a mixed recep- 
pedttveness as tbe quality of aca- and three satellites for toe National congressumol sources said. 

dgmie rescaicb. Numerous corpo- Oceanic and Atmospheric Admin- Mr. Shultz said he would prefer 
rations noted that Japan has nwde istradon that otherwise have toat such an arrangement remain 
its supetconqKilers widdy avail- been tiaasparted on toe ^>ace shut- covert, but rome Republicans said 
able to industry and M»d the de. Mr. fc^g e said that NA^ toey would insist on oven funding 


as his government was concerned, 
toe Contadora peace process is 
“dead," 

A senior U.S. ofiidal said that 
he, loa believed tbe Contadora ne- 
gotiations “are probably finished." 
But another senior offidal, in toe 


that such an arrugerami rem^ suue Depanmenu said: “We coo- 


linue to support toe Contadora 


ooic iU iauusuj auu aoiu uic uip uc, mr* uioi AAeo*.** wm pTOCCSS. 

chines have cat some mdustiial de- wwld ^agree compleld/* that the ud some Democrats said they ^ conference last Thurs- 


ago proc^ses by 90 percenL 


air force sho uld have 10 ringle-use wanted no funding at all. 


Three of tbe four oonqmters used rodtets to launch rnOhary satellites. The economic aid idea "is one of 


in toe prcgeci will come from tbe 

Tliais Say Vietnamese 
Seized 11 Fishing Boats 

The Assadeted Pr^ 

BANGKOK ~ Vmtoamese sa; 
val vess^ have ewtured 1 1 That 
fidiing trawlers and about 300 fish- 
ermen who, toe Thai govanoUDt 
said Tuesday, were fishiog in Thai 
territorial waters. 

The dqmty (firector-generai (tf 
tbe Thai Hsheries D^artment, 
Plodprasop Suraswadl said that 
the Yietnamese warships opened 
fire on the Thai boats on Stini^y. 
There were no known casualties. 
The fisbennen were in an area 
where the boundaries of Vietnam 
and T hailand ir tfet, he said. 


He said toat NASA would revise 
its pricing formula to encourage toe 
Daense Dqurtment to use toe 
shuttle by iMucing toe cost per 
toutlle flight according to toe aum- 
bei- of flights per year. 


waniconoiuDUingaiau. day, Mr. Reagan said he wanted to 

The economic aid idea "is one of "remove" the “present structure" 
four or five options toat we are of the Nicaraguan government. He 



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Argentma and Uruguay. He has 
bem sought for extradition by 
West Germany «nec; J962, ac- 
cording to one' of toe CLa docu- 
ments. 

Israel; imelJigence teams also 
repor^y were seeking Dr. Men- 
gde in tbe 1960s. Tbe United 
States, which has no jurisdiciioo 
lo try war crimlDals. recently an- 
nounced a Justice Deparunent m- 
vesiigation into reports toat Dr. 
Moigele may have been in arorv 
custody in 1M7. 

The first of iIk newly released 
ClA documents is a cable dat^ 
July 12, 1972. from the .Asuncion, 
Paraguay, station to ClA head- 
quarters. Tbe cable r^rred that 
a "petty criminal" hid out at a 
farm near the town of Encarna- 
cidn. which is 185 miles (29S kiio- 
meters) southeast of .Asuncion. 
The farm, toe document said, was 
owned by a man named Dr. Men- 
gele wtoo was using tbe name Dr. 
Henrique Wollman. It added: 


"Reisort suggests be and others 
heavily involved in narcotics traf- 
fic.” 

The cable said toe c4fice was 
seeking to determine whether this 
was toe Dr. Mengde wbo was the 
former Auschwitz doctor. It 
quoted a repon that Dr. Mengele 
"enjoys the profeciioD" of Prai- 
dent Alfredo Siroessner. 

A second cable to headquariers 
a few weeks bter confirmed that 
this was indeed the Nazi fugitive 
and said he lived in a villa north- 
east of Asuncibn. about 30 
from toe Brazilian bewder and 
worked as an auto mechanic. 

In 1979, toe documents show, a 
ClA mvestigaior asked ofiTdoIs 
of the Drug Enforcement .Admin- 
istration and toe Customs Senice 
for any tnfonnation they' might 
have on drug trafficking' by Dr. 
Mengele. The ClA also suggested 
that tbe btsiaess owned by Dr. 
Mengde’s family, a German farm 
machinery maiiufaciuring com- 



This iNcture of a man al- 
leged to be Dr. Josef 
Mengele was taken in 
1979 in Paraguay. 

pony with ofiices in South .Ameri- 
ca. "could serve as a mechanism 
to move or launder large sums of 
money, as well as to cover the 
movement of illicit narcotics." 











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Foes of New Caledonia Independence 
Rally in Defiance of Emergency Rule 


INTERNATIONAL HEKA ED TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 19go 


The AsscdiueU Pms 

NOUMEA, New Cal edn nia — 
Thousands of people who oppose 
independence Ux this French lerri- 
toiy defied a ban on demonstra- 
^loos on Tuesday and marched 
peacefully in the streets of Nou- 

The organizers of the demonsira- 
tioo. called a ‘‘march of liberty.** 
esi^ted (he crowd at 40.000. Oth- 
er estimates varied from 15.000 to 
31000. 

I“For a dty of 60,000 inhabitants. 
lias is exiraordinaiy.*' said Roger 
Laroque. mayor of Noum^ and an 
anti-independence leader. 

Jacques Lafleur, New Caledo- 
nm’s conservative deputy to the 
National Assembly in Paris, de- 
manded that a referendum be orga- 
nized immediately on indepen- 
dhnce. “If the government refuses, 
we will lahe the initiative ourselves, 
in a month, to o^anize it" Mr. 
I^eur told the crowd. 
.Supporting him was Dick 
Ukdw& the Melanesian presidan 
of the territorial govemmeoL Both 
liave opposed another referendum 
plan, devised Edgard Pisani. the 


French govemmeni’s special envoy 
to New Caledonia. 

Mr. Pisani's p lan rails for inde- 
pendence “in association with 
France.** meaning that France 
would provide security and defense 
for the South Pacific archipelago. 
He has called for a refeneudum on 
the plan in July, but negotiations 
on possible revisions have broken 
down with both pro- and anti-inde- 
pendence groups. 

Tuesday's demonstraliOD result- 
ed from Ksani's order for the 
expulsion of five leaders of the ex- 
treme-right Caledonian From. 

The five were amon| the oiganiz- 
ers of a white settlers picnic Feb. 
17 in Thia a sUon^oid of pro- 
independence Melanesians, or 
Kanalu, on the east coast of the 
main island. The Meianeuans of 
the Kanak Sodalisi National Lib- 
eration From saw the picnic as a 
provocation, and dash^ wi± po- 
lice who had been sqiarating them 
from the settlers. Nine persons 
were injured. 

The five rightists were ordered to 
leave for violating a state of emer- 
gency that was declared last month, 
and which bans mass gatherings. 


They ha\’e refused to leave and are 
now in hiding. 

The paitidpants in Tusday’s 
protest which was also illegal un- 
der the state of emergency, flew 
French flags and anti-indepen- 
dence banners in a cortege led by 
Mr. Laheur. Mr. Laroque and Mr. 
Ukeiw& 

Mr. Lafleur, who heads the Rally 
for Caledonia in the Republic par- 
ty, the New Caledonian branch of 
the Gaullist Rally for the Republic, 
said the demonstration was a pr^ 
lude to an even larger march in 
France “so that New Caledonia re^ 
mains French. ** 

In Paris, the government spokes- 
woman, Geor^na Dufoix. accused 
the R^y for the Republic of hav- 
ing “once crossed another 
stage in the escalation of ill^^ty** 
by supporting the demonstration. 

Mr. Pisani said at a news confer- 
ence in Noumea l^t the demon- 
stration was “useless." 

“It will change nothing.*' be said. 
“The problems remain. One must 
Mic^ them up and resolve them. It is 
not in demoosu'atii^ but in putting 
forward new ideas, in accepting d^ 
bate, that we will make things pro- 
gress." 


Papandreou Is Accused 
In Failed Cyprus Talks 


UN Troops in Lebanon Are Caught in the Middle 

Units Struve to Keep Fighting Between Israelis and Shiites at a Minimum 

withdrawal 


By Henry Kamm 

Vfr Yori Tsmes Sermv 

NICOSIA — Rauf Denkl^ 
the leader of the Turkish Cypriots, 
has accused Prime Minister An- 
dreas Papandreou of Greece of 
brin ging about the failure of last 
month's UN-sponsored negotia- 
tions for a settlemeni ot the Cypnu 
priri}lem in order to sustain his 
claim for continued U.S. arms aid. 

Mr. Denktasb met last month 
mth President Spyros Kyprianou, 
leader of the Greek Cypriots, in 
New York under the auspices of 
Secretary-General Javier Perez de 
Cuiliar. High hopes were dis^ 
pointed r^en the communal lead- 
ers failed to agree on a draft accord 
for a federal rq>ublic that wu 
thought to have been accepted in 
thm rounds of negotiations in 
which the secretaiy-geoeral met 
separately wtb Mr. Kyprianou and 
Mr. D^task 

, Mr. Denktasb is nresident of the 
independent republic in northern 
Cyprus that is recognized only by 
Tnrit^. He said Monday that Mr. 
Kyprianou refused to si^ Uw draft 
foQo^i^g “strategy and tactics pre- 
pared in Athens." 

“Mr. Papandreou cannot afford 
to have the Cyprus problem come 


to a successful end," the Tuildsb 
Cypriot duef said. He said it was 
the only way that the prime minis- 
ter could maintain his cbaige that 
Turtcey was a threat lo Greece and 
continue to claim U.S. military as- 
ristance. Last year, the Unil^ 
Stales provided S500 million in 
such aid. 

“I cannot afford to have Turkey 
punished. 1 must help the onlyjav- 
ior of my pet^le at aU cost," be 
^ded. 

Turkish sources reported before 
the talks that the United Stales had 
told Ankara that it would be diffi- 
cult for the Reagan administration 
to persuade Conmess to maintain 
the present level or U.S. aims aid to 
Turkey unless progress was 
adiieved toward an agreement end- 
ing the occupation of nortbem Cy- 
prus by approximately 20,000 
Turkish troops. 

Congress has mandated a T-io 
10 ratio in militaiy assistance to 
Greece and Turkey and resists r^- 
ular administration attempts to im- 
prove this pn^rtion in Turkey's 
favor. The Turkish government is 
aware of the fact that Greece has 
more friends in Congress than Tur- 
key and has yielded to Uil. urging 

Mr. Denktasb said that the pack- 
agf of concessions that brought 


Rauf. Denktadi 

abrait the UN meeting was **dead." 
He said the Turkish Cypriot 
would take no new oegptiati^ ini- 
tiative until this summer at the ear- 
liest and would proceed with the 
adoption of a constitution and 
presidential and parliaraenta^ 
elections to make Uie secessionist 
state a rei^ty by June 23. 

■ Talks Postponed 

Mr. Kyprianou postponed talks 
in London with Prune Minister 
Margaret Thatcher because of the 
constitutional crisis, Reuters re- 
ported from Nicosia. A govern- 
ment sj^esman smd a meeting 
planned for Thursday was post- 
poned at Cypriot request and no 
new date has been set 


By Jonathan C Randal 

U'ashiiigiofi Pm Service 

NAQOURA Lebanon — United Nations 
pea^eepers in southern Lebanon are fmdiog 
themselves hard-pressed as Israel's wititdrawal 
from the area turns into a bloody confrontation 
with Shiite Moslems. 

Two recent ioddenis were symptomatic of 
the new tensions. 

In the Ciist, French troops of the lO-nalion, 
5,900-man force were roughed up as they sought 
to stop Israeli soliUers, recoding to an attadc 
on a patrol, from destroying bouses in a Shiite 
village. 

The other incident involved a near gunbatile 
at the Qas^yeh Bridge over the Litani River 
Mm an Isra^ infantiymao fired at French 
guards protecting a routine UN convoy to pre- 
vent its moving north to Beirut 

The incidents were not Judged serious in 
themselves. But they recalled the almost oon- 
stant bad relations between Israel and the li^t- 
iy armed UN Interim Force in Lebanon, or 
UniTiL fitHD its inception during an Israeli ad- 
vance into the south in 197S, until last summer. 

The participating nations include a Swedish 
medical team and an Italian helicopter unit plus 
infantry from Fiji Finland. France. Ghana, the. 
Netheriands, Ireland, Nepal and Norway. They 
are responsible for a 4j0-square-mile (1,118- 
square-uloineter) area 3 to 6 miles (4.8 to 9.6 
imometers) north of the Israeli border, stretch- 
ing from the Mediterranean to Mount Hennon. 

The UN force also has theoretical jurisdiction 
under UN Scoirity Council Resolution 425 fw 


the roughly lOO-square-miie border strip. But in* 
practice the area was controlled even before 
Israel's 1982 invasion by the Israeli .4rmy oper- 
ating almost op^y aibogride the thinly dis- 
guised formal presence of its Christian Leba- 
nese allies. 

Unifil's fixed positions and foot and motor- 
ized patrols in the past detained, disarmed tmi 
released the Lebanese Christians allied uiih 
Israel and their foes, the ^estinian guerrillas 
and their Lebanese alUes. 

(.inim’s mission, to help the Lebanese go%‘.ern- 
meot establish its sovereignty' down to the bor- 
der as well as to monitor Isra^'s withdrawal and 
help maintain peace and security in the south, 
became increasingly difficuli, however, as the 
Palestinian-Israeli confrontation on the Leba- 
nese border became mcrea5m|]y tense. 

Before the 1982 invarioo oT Lebanon. Israel 
complained frequently that UniHl bad t^n 
ineffective in pre\’enting Palestinian guerrillas 
from establishing mOiiaiy bases in its pan of 
southern Lebanon that put Palestinians within 
artillery and rc^et range of settlements in 
northern Israel. 

Today, as in the pasL Unifil can do little to 
stop belligerenis determined to shoot at each 
other, but tbdr contacts with all parties and 
sometimes their presence has been enough to 
prev'ent the use of heavy weapons. 

Israel’s distrustful view of Unifil changed lut 
summer with the inauguration of Prime .Minis- 

tff Shimon Peres’s coiition goyermnCTL 

Suddenly Israel found virtue in Unifil. uymg 
to persuade the United Nations to move foi^ 
north to the Awali River defense line to provide 


cover for its owrn army's withdrawal a^ to 
remove the peacekeepers from their positions 
close to the Israeb-Lebanesc border. 

If UnifQ were to move north, observers noted. 
Israeli forces would have h^ a freer hand to 
intervene south of the Ulam River. 

U is in dial area that Unifil, since its moep- 
lion, has tried to contain the level of violence 
between the Israelis and their Lebanese alhes on 
one side, and first the Palestinian guerrillas and 
now Tj»ha>n«g Shiite Moslems on the other. 

Syria vetoed Israel's plans for Unifil to move 
north, apparently to ensure that the Isra^ with- 
drawal from Lebanon would be as painful as 
possible. 

This has left the small strip of souUiem Ld>^ 
□on with a volatile mix of angry Shiites, Isradis 
increasingly determined to suppress attacks 
against thetf withdrawing fo^ and UN forces, 
once ayin caught in. the middle. 

What worries Unifn officers is the possibility 
that Israel may seek to expand the old borto 
region under the control of its Ldjanese alhes 
into a uniform. six-miie-deq> securiQf bdL 

Such a six-mile zone was widdy believed lo be 
the Israelis' goal during their initial 1978 ihva- 
sion c4 souths Lebanon, which was thwarted 
by quick American-led d4>lomacy at the UN 


Security CounciL setting up Umfil. 

A Unifil source said, “If the Israeli Aiw 
Slays on in the Unifil operations zone," which 


»MIf9 VU ai* v aa iiw a * 

<naic« its way 35 mQes from the Mediterranean 
to the Syrian border at vaiying distances from 
the Israeli border, “despite Shiite oppodtion. 
then Unifil’s position caught between them 
would be very diffic ult, inde^ untenable." 


Nearly Half 
(M Miners in 
U.K. on Job, ■ , 
Board Says 

Reuters 

LONDON — More than 1,400 
miners abandoned Britain’s ^ ; 
week coal strike on Tu«ds>v pi- 
ling the number of BBneis now - 
wooing at almost SO percent tn the 
work force, the National Ci^ .- 
Board asserted. • „ . , • 

But the National Union U : 
MinewmrkOT dieted the board’s: 
fipif gg. sayng that only 36 perogt 
of its members arc working. T« 
board, which is insisting on tte 
ri^i to dose pits on econonBc 
grounds, has said that it will cath : 
rider tlm strike at an end 
more than half the work force is 
back. 

The Conservative govemment. 
and the board ruled out further 
talks and laimdied a canqiaign id 
persuade nonets to go bade after*.- 
the collapse last week of a peace 
initiati ve. 

N^tiatitms between the board ' 
and ^ union collapsed in Ooo- . 
ber. 

According to tiie board, 1.^ 
miners went bade to work on the -; 
morning shift on Toesday, raising 
the number now working to more - 
than 92,000. This was a iccoid re- 
turn for a Tuesday, a sp^ieaUani 
said. A one-day lecwd 3,807 
miners rpiit the strike on Monday. 

Meanwhile, leaders of the minas - 
bad further talks in London da . 
Tues^y with senior trade uniOB 
^ficials. who were the instigatOD 
ot the failed peace initiative. 

Newspapers said the return to- 
worit was a slap in tiie face for the 
union’s president, Arthur Scatg^' 
The Daily Express, which siyporis 
the government, described it as a 
victory for sanity. 

The strike, wtudi has cost Bntain 
more than £2 billion (about S2.1 
billion) accortfing to independent 
f grimnteR, began last Maioi over 
piatK to shut 20 pits and diminate 
20.000 jobs. 

The government said it has -a- 
fered the miners the best deal in 
their history, with promises to ior 
crease investment and not to pm' 
miners out of work against ifieir - 
wilL 

Strike Called at Frendi Ports 

Reuters 

PARIS — The Communist-led 
Graeral Confederation of labor. 
has called a 24-hour strike oi tl» 
administrative staff and crane^ 
oators at all French seaports. The 
strike, wind! will start at midm^t. 
Tues^y, was called to protest what 
the union called managemenfs 
failure to reach a salary s^enumt 
for 1984. 







INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WED?^ESDAY, FEBRU.4RY 27, 1985 


Page^ 


Joatas,; 


. ' ■■ -V. 


. ' •, 


Shultz, Weinberger Ask 
G>ngress to Support MX 

Production of 100 Missiles Called Vital 
To Military Strength and Arms Control 








TAc' Pfi‘\ 

WASHINGTON— The Reagan 
jjminisirution's lop Jtplomaiii; 
anJ defea*« ofriciais lold Con^*s$ 
on Tuesday ihai the production 
and deployment of hXi MX mis- 
siles is v1ijl lo effective arms con- 
irol and to national military 
strength. 

In a rare joint appearance. Secre- 
tary of State George P. Shultz and 
Secretary of Defense Caspar W. 
Weinberger urged Congress to ap- 
prove money for the entire MN 
missile fleet. 

“This is no time to cast doubt on 
our national resolve," Mr. Shultz 
^aid. 

A decision to halt or slow the 
MX program. Mr. Weinberger told 
the Senate .Armed Ser\'ices Com- 
mittee. u'ould convey an unmistak- 
able message to the Soviet Union 
“that we lack the will to achieve our 
goals in the world." 

Mr. Shultz said the L'nited States 
must move ahead with the MX. an 
iniercontinenia! ballistic mbsilc 
with 10 warheads, because it repre- 
sented a credible deterrent to nevs 
Soviet missiles. 

Mr. Shultz insLstod that the MX 
and the research and development 
of a .space-based mis^sile defense 
were “not bargaining chips." 

“They represent much-needed 
modernization, consistent with ex- 
Lsting arms control agreemenb." he 
said.' "They are an essential ele- 
ment tirf* our deterrent posture. .And 
they are the foundation on which 
an effective arms control regime 
can be builL" 


The Congress is expected to vote 
on production money for 21 MX 
mis.siles in the next several weeks, 
.A first group of 21 missiles was 
approved in 1^3. 

■ Soviet ‘Peace Offensive* 

Earlivr. Don OherJorfer The 
K'lis/i/ngrun Post reponed from 
Washinpirm: 

.A senior Stale Department offi- 
cial has warned that the Soviet 
Union has started a campaign to 
use the U.S. proposal for ^acc- 
based missile defenses as an issue 
in the coming Geneva arms negoti- 
ations to divide the United Stales 
and its West Eurc^ieon allies. 

But the offidaL .Assistant Secre- 
tary of State Richard R. Burt, pre- 
dicted Monday that an "alliance 
L‘on.sensus” on the plan, which the 
Reagan adminksiraiion calls the 
Strate^c Defense Initiative, would 
thwart the Soviet efforts and en- 
hance the U.S. bargaining position 
in the Geneva talks. 

Mr. Burl and his Pentagvm coun- 
terpart. .Assistant Secretary of De- 
fense Richard N. Perle. appeared 
before the Senate Foreign Rela- 
tions Committee to discuss U.S.- 
Soviet relations and arms control. 

Mr. Burt seemed more positive 
than Mr. Perle about arms control 
and the Geneva talks, which are 
scheduled lo begin March 11 

He cautionecC however, that the 
United Slates was "running the risk 
of another round of euphoria" os 
the negotiations neared. 

Mr. Burt said the Russians were 
in “the early stages of a new ‘peace 




Richard R. Burt 

offensive,'" and adcM that "we 
must guard against the buildup of 
expectations which the Soviets are 
surely seeking to manipulale." 

Among the «gns of a Soviet 
“peace offensive." according io 
Slate Department officials, are 
Moscow's recent decision to permit 
international inspection of some of 
ib civilian nuclear facilities and the 
U.S. visit set for next wedt of a 
large, prestigious Soviet delegation. 

Mr. Burt testified Monday that 
the administration had held meet- 
ings with ib allies in the North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization to 
“demystify" the Strategic Defense 
Initiative and increase support for 
iL And Mr. Perle said the Pentagon 
was studying ways to involve the 
allies in the research leading to a 
decision on the plan’s feasibility. 

In Geneva, the Russians are ex- 
pected to emphasize a willingness 
to make major cuts in long-range 
and intermediate-range nuclear 
arms if the United States will curb 
ib plans to explore the miliiaiy 
uses of space. 

Under questioning Monday 



QLk, Pentagon Stress Unity on Analyses 


Gromyko Presses Italy on Space Arms 

He Urges Rome to Oppose to Reagan’s Anti-MissOe Plan 


Compiled hy Our Staff Firm Dapauiia 

ROME — Foreign Minister An- 
drd A. Gromyko of the Soviet 
Unitm, in an attack Tuesday on the 
U.S. plan for space-based missile 
defenses, urged Italy to express its 
opposition to putting weapons in 
space. 

Mr. Gromyko, after meeting 
with Fordgn Minister Giulio An- 
dreotti for nearly three hours, said 
in a iuncbeixi toast: 

*<We do not bade that we would 
like to see also Italy among the 
countries that have raised dieir own 
votce" against armaments in space. 

llie Soviet minister said be was 
confident that Italy would be able 
to contribute "concrete acts" to- 
ward making a success of rite new 
U.S.-Soviet arms coniFol negotia- 
tions in Geneva, which begin 
Maicb^l2. • V - i- • 

No details of the talks between 
Mr. An&eotti and Mr. Gromyko 
were relea^, but the Italian news 
agency ANSA said the principal 
sulnect was ^t-Wesi relations. 

While banking PresideDt Ronald 
Reagan’s dedsoo to go ahead with 


research on an anti-missQe defense 
system in space, Italy has made 
clear that it shares Smriel concern 
over the notarization of space. 

liie agency said the two men 
discussed the Middle East and 
Italy’s growing trade imbalance 
mth the Soviet Union, which was 
4.1 uillicm lire (about $2 billion) 
last year. 

In addition, Italian sources said, 
the talks touched on attempts by 
Italy, as current president of the 

Ihmocrats Trim Staff 
In Washington Office 

Vtuttd Presj Inienuaiowd 

WASHINGTON — Paul Kill, 
the Democratic Party’s national 
^airman, has dismissed about 30 
of the par^ beadquaners' staff of 
so, bringing to its lowest level in 
recent years. 

Mr. Kirk said that when he was 
elected to his post this month he 
pledged to "run a lean, political 
strike force in Washington, and 
send more resources where the ac- 
tion is — in the states." 


European Community, to launch a 
new Middle East peace initiative, 
and Italian concern over human 
rights. 

Officials said the two men met 
privatdy for 20 minutes and then 
were joinol by their aides and other 
officials at the Italian Foreign Min- 
istiy. 

After the talks. Mr. Andreotti 
was host al a lunch for Mr. Gromy- 
ko at Palazzo BarberinL He is al^ 
scheduled to meet with Pope John 
?Bvii fl on Wednesday. 

Mr. Gromyko, who b^an a 
ihree-day virit to Rome on Mon- 
day, was to meet later with Prime 
Minister latino Cnud in the Cfajgj 
Palace. 

The Socialist prime minister, a 
stre^ supporter of Italy's loJe in 
NATO, is leaving Monday for a 
visit to Washington where he will 
address a joint meeting of the U5. 
Congress on March 6. 

Mr. Gromyko is on his first visit 
to Italy in six years, and his first to 
any West European country de- 
ploying U.S. intermediate-range 
mi^es. (AP, UPI) 


Richard N. Perte 

from Senator Jesse Hdms. a Re- 
publican of North Carolina, Mr. 
Burl smd he was “not aware oT 
any U.S. agreement that would re- 
lieve the Soviet Union of iu obliga- 
tion to reduce its strategic nuclear 
arsenal as called for in the SALT-2 
treaty on strategic arms limitations. 
Although the U.S. Senate refused 
to ratify the 1979 treaty, both sides 
have expressed wilUn^ess to ad- 
here to its terms. 

Mr. Burt said he understood that 
in June 1982, Foreign Minister An- 
drei A. Gromyko had made it ‘Xeiy 
dear" to Alexander M. Haig Jr., 
who was then secretary of state, 
that while Moscow would "not un- 
dercut" SALT-2, it would not make 
the arms cub the treaty called for. 

Mr. Burt described this as a “uni- 
lateral" Soviet statement and said 
he was "not aware any U.S. 
agreement" 

Some conservatives on Capitol 
Hill have charged that the Reagan 
administration agreed lo ixrmi t the 
Rusriam lo forgo the prqected re- 
ducUorb as part cA a “secret execu- 
tive agreemem" with Moscow. 


Soviet Says BLO 
Ignores Problems; 
Funds May Be Cut 

The Aaoeiated Presi 

GENEVA — The Soviet dele- 
gate to the International LaborOr-- 
ganizatioQ said Tuesday his coim- 
iry may consider financial 
sanctions against the body if radi- 
cal changes are not made in its 
activities. 

The delegate, Leonid Kostin, 
said that a complete withdrawal of 
funds from the ILO was **out of the 
quesiion,** and that be could not 
say when any posrible sanctions 
rmgbt take effect The Soviet bloc 
contributes about 20 percent of the 
ILO's $255-nuUioo budget 

Mr. Kostin said the ILO was 
ignoring major problems such as 
reducing unemploymeot towering 
inflation and d^oping social ser- 
vices, and warned that the conse- 
quences could be ^very sqious.r 

The executive committee' of the 
ILO, a United Nations org^iza- 
tion that monitors work conditions 
and living standards for workers, is 
meeting this wedc in Geneva. 

Mr. Kostin emphasized that ^e 
Soviet Union was not considering 
withdramng from the ILO. • 


Bx'BilIKdier 

.ViXt't'uril rim»5cviar 

WASHINGTON — Analxsis 
for the Central Intelligence Agencx 
and the Pentagon there is exi- 
dence of a sudden spun in Soviet 
spending on weapons procurement 
for the first time since the mid- 
1970s. But the agencies differ 
sharpiv on the pace of this buildup 
and what it means. 

The Pentagon's Defense Intelli- 
gence Agency estimates that the 
weapons pan of the Soviet military 
budget increased between 5 percent 
and 8 percent from 1982 to 1983. 
the last year studied, and says pre- 
linunaiy gg ns point to an increase 
for 1984. 

The CIA. basing ib estimate on 
what one official said was "a little 
more cautious" forecast of how fast 
new weapons would roll off the 
assembly lines, said Monday that 
Soviet \^pons spending rose be- 
tween 1 percent and 2 percent in 
1983 and that it was too early to tell 
about 1984. 

A CIA analyst added that his 
agency consider the evidence for 
the l'983 spurt to be tentative. 
"We're less ceruin that the change 
occurred in 1983." he said. 

Economic analysb from the two 
intelligence agenaes spoke to re- 
porters on Monday in the office of 
the Defense Department sp«:4Les- 
man. Michael 1. Burch, in an at- 
tempt 10 dispel reporb that they 
disagreed on the Soviet buildup. 

The differing estimates of Soxiei 
spending have become part of a 
running debate over U.S. military 
spending, with critics of the Penta- 
gon citing the ClA numbers as evi- 
dence that the Defense Depart- 
ment has exaggerated the Soviet 
competition. 

“] think the administration has 
definitely oversold, the Soviet nuU- 
lary thrrau" Senator William Prox- 
mire said Monday. Mr. Proxraiie, a 
Wisconsin OenK^t, is the rank- 
ing Democrat on a congressional 
econonnic subcommittee that last 
week i^e public the transcript of 
CIA testimony last Novembn on 
the Soviet economy. 

In that testimony, the CIA’s dep- 
uty director for inteUgmoe. Robert 
Gales, cited “prelimina^" evi- 
dence of an acceleration in Sovin 
weapons-buying in 1983 after six 
years of "stagaalion.** 

He said that overall Soviet mili- 
tary spending had growti at the rate 
of about 2 percent since 1976. after 
adjusting (or inflation. That is the 
same estimate the CIA has used 
since 1983. 

The CIA and Pentagon analysts 
generally agre^ Monday that 
growth m Soviet budgeb. after 
sur^g in the 1960s and early 
1970s, tapered off in 1976 as the 
Soviet econcMDy sagged. 


More like ftoati ng when 
yq^re flying 













■v.. 


.A Defense Intelligence .^geoev* 
analvsi said Nfonday that “we real- 
ly don't take issue with" CI.A esu- 
mates that the growth in rubles, 
adjusied for inflation, fell to about 
2 percent from 4 percent or 5 per- 
cent. The defense agenev a 
figure of about 5 percent for drcse 
years, but that estiirjte is not ad- 
justed for inflation. 


Russians spend 13 percent to 17 
peieeni of their gross national 
product on the miliiarv while the 


ri^i" when he said the Soviet 
economy could not stand a return 
to the military buildup raies of the 


United Slates spends about 7 per- N"®*!? » 

cent of its CNP. the total value of TT'® and the Pcoiagon m®9j 
goods and services. The GNP of iure Soviet w•eapoQ.^-spendln^ 
the United States, however, is through the use of satellite photo- 
aboui twice that of the Soviet graphs, obsen-ation of weap^ms 
Union. lesb and deliveries and other info^ 

One of the Pentagon analysts mation to calculate what SoviSi 


Both agencies estimate that the also said Mr. Gates was “probably faciories are producing. 







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Page 6 


WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1985 



YotkriMgaBdTlieWaplih.ytM 


I "n wr^-LT ■ i It Matters Which Kremlin Faetwn Wins 


Pinochet Gets Approval 


frtiir adminiswtion is recondi^ to various South American coimtries. Its unwill- 

mili^ dictatorship in ingoess to give any creit to the pressures 
TKai emhairased to say so. applied by the Carter adimnutiation once 

the uiCTedible message delivered there seemed only partisan. Now it seems right to 
M»»*iu** Secretary ^ State Langhome wonder if tte Reagan team fei^ any responsi- 
otiey. He rests e^y wth the Pinochet bility for political trends in tte hemisplure. 
gme s plw to penmt no elections until 1989. Much depends on the Chilean dr arnfl- 
No one should b^armed or fooled by Wash< Across the coutinent the future constitutional 
n^g^ s recent refusal^ to vote for new inter- podtum of the mili tary is a subject of delicate 
national loans to Chile. That was only an o^tiatioa.Continiiuig violence and unrest in 
finely ^tore to u^ress liberals in Congress. Chile, wb’di die dictatorship invites with its 


Mr. Motifs diploma^ is truly breath- 
tal^g. He was the highest raakiag American 
viator to Chile ance General Pinochet re- 
imposed a Stole of siege last fall and ended all 
pretense of liberalizatiou. The mas;; roundups 
of a detade ago were resuiD^ nlienating Chil- 
ean jMlitidans of every stripe and iw*Hing to 


policies, malfe life even more diffi^t for the 
fragile democracies in neighboring states. A 
democratic restoration, however, could bri^t- 
en economic prospects, facilitate r^onal co- 
operation and reassure fordp investors. 

For decades priOT to 1973, Chile was a 
democratic redoubt in a sea of Latin (Uctaiors. 


9 uip\. ouu leauMig tu UBDlOCrailC ICOOUDl m 3 563 OI 1.400 OlCiaiOTS. 

me dismissal t^ Sei^o Onofre Jaipa. the most Today the reverse is inieL It may four 

impressive dvilian in the Pinochet cabineL years or more to get rid of this dietainrship, 

Tl^ appalling stance is particularly hard to but even one year should be too loug for 

take from an administranon that has claimed rq>resentatives of the United Slates, 
so much credit for restoration of democracy in THE NEW YORK TIMES 


An Import Surcharge? 


The dollar continues to defy reason and 
remedy. Its value is too high, tfie experts say. 
That inflates imports, hurts eicports and tnaVes 
everyone nervous about a sudden collapse. 
Ind^ Britain’s Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher wains of a possibly ’^nita}’’ shake- 
ouL Do something, people say. No one is quite 
sure what, but there U one truly rotten propo* 
dtion we should all get out of our heads right 
now. It is called an ii^rt surcharge. 

The surcharge idea floating seductively over 
Congress would increase all tariffs temporarily' 
by ^ peroenL A tariff that is now 10 percent 
would riK to 12 percent and then dr^ back to 
iO peremt in four years. The Ic^ is that by 
making impo^ cost more, America could sa\'e 
some jobs in industries that cannot bold their 
own agi^t competition from abroad 

That is no lo^c at all but counterproductive 
protectionism at its worsL And it would not 
even address the problem of the strong dollar. 

The dollar is worth 70 percent more than 
four years ago in tenns of a weighted mix of 
foreign currencies. Sooner or later, say the 
erperts, it will stc^ climbing. But thor certain- 
ty is wearing thin. They were positive it would 
happen wnn American interest rates fed 
Rates have fallen and the dollar rose. Western 
countries have tried selling dollars to increase 
the supply and weaken the price. It strength- 
ened instead Some authorities are bemnning 
to say that the strong ddlar may be with us for 


several years more and the worid mil just have 
to reckon with it Bui no one knows. 

The surcharge plan is tempting because it 
would cut imports aiuf the budget deficit in 
one stroke. According to Data Resources In- 
corporated it would chop the trade by 
$161 billion during thrw years and r^uce 
prospective budget dcTiais by a third 

Those are h^y sums, but import sur- 
charges are still a terrible idea, ^emporaiy” 
u'ade restrictions tend to Uve oil The two-year 
curb on Japanese automobiles has siretdied 
out to four and has not de^tely ended yet 
Far more serious, restrictions on sales in the 
world’s richest market would suidy invite 
global retaliadoiL Ai worst that could lead to 
another worldwide recessioo: at bem it wraild 
set an outrageous exanq)k,Jusi as Washington 
is pressing to negotiate new trade expansion. 

While import restrictions can save some 
jobs, they would eliminate others and as the 
presidait observed last week, raise prices, too. 
Industries depadent on imports for materials 
and components would suffer because costs 
would rise. And when other countries retaliate 
with higher tariffs, jobs in America's export 
industries would be cut back even more. 


The strong dollar is aproblein. sure enoogh. 
ut a remedy that would hurt more Amerkans 


but a remedy that would hurt more Amerkans 
than it helps, and injure other countries in the 
process, is no remedy at all. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Waves at the Stations 


A small but disagreeable cloud has formed 
over the broadcasts that the U.S. government 
beams, by way of toe Voice of America and 
Radio Liberty, to the Soviet Unioo. In recent 
months there have been cootolainis that a few 
at toe broadcasts are titled with at least a 
trace of onii'Senutism and anti-democratic 
sentiment The managers of the stations insist 
that there is no sut»taoce whatever to toe 
charges. Those who raise toe issue make a case 
that unwiitin^y toe managers have aired a 
very few broad^ts to wb^ overicnies and 
implications they may not be fully sensitive. 
Something troubling appears to be in the ur. 

The difficulty seems to lie in the reproduc- 
tion, in secUKS of toe Emigre staff, of some of 
toe ethnic and political tensions of todr native 
land. Tbe older senior ranks tend to come from 
toe mostly Russian emigration of the Cold 
War y^is; newer staff members come from 
the Jewish emigratioa of toe 1970s. The result 
is a volatile political cbemisliy that American- 
born radio executives may sometimes find 
difncult to assay and control, espedaUy when 
they have a contemporary American variety of 
anti-communism foremost on their mind. 

This is tte context in which a dh^ute arose 
over whether there was a hint of anti-Semitism 


in a new passage of a Soldienit^ novel 
broadcast on toe Russian service of toe Voice 
of America. Alexander Solzhenitsyn, toe ex- 
iled Rusrian writer now living in Vermont, is a 
doodnant Ggnre in the American etuigii com- 
munity. As with stnnlar charges that have been 
made about some programs aired by Radio 
Liberty, the issue requires a very Gne sorting 
out of toe broadcaster’s mess^ and toe lis- 
toier’s pacepdoa. In radio, wito its empfaass 
on verbal and cultural inOectioo, toe po^bili- 
ties d mixed signals are coosiderabl& 
Congressmen are concerned, and tbe Gener- 
al Accounting Office has been kokiDg into 
Radio Libei^. Dus is u^leasant but neces- 
sary. The Voice of America, speakmg for toe 
UJS. government and pec^le. and R^o Lib- 
erty, whidi seeks to provide its listeners with 
the native material that their governments cen- 
sor, are iaqrortant mstniments of U.S. forago 
policy. Most of their wort is beyond cavil But 
the stations are very delicately constructed and 
balmiced enterprisss. Di^ require managers 
of great petitieri sopUsticatioiL It would be 
intolerable if either station harbored any trace 
of the prgudioe that is ranqiant. under dfidal 
^xmsorship, on Soviet sdL 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


Hie Dollar: There May Be Time 


President Reagan can have made few new 
friends in Europe with his remarks about toe 
dollar. Many embattled officials and bankers 
00 tUs side of toe water are no doubt writing 
add memoranda abemt hubris and nemesis — 
or of toe pride that comes before a faU, if they 
have a more homespun lurn of phrase. 

It is dear that at some stage — and probably 
quite soon — the exaggerated glamour in 
which investors see the U.S. economy will 
grow paler. However, there still appears to be 


adequate time in which to mount a program of 
steady defidt reduetkm for tbe yew ahead, 
until tbe growth of debt, both aational and 
comnierdal, falls into step wth the growth of 
otoer detaeats in the U.5. economy. Such a 
program ought to ensure a rdativdy soft land- 
ing, unless eiqrboria blinds tbe Americans to 
the need to do anything at aH 
The prosperity and emplcorment wfaidi the 
preadeni's policies have generated are genu- 
ine; and, ^ven good management, they can 
remain so even toe bills fall tore. 

— The financial Times (London). 


FROM OUR FEB, 27 PAGES, 75 AM) 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Tnriss and Bulgarians QaA 
SOFIA — The engagement which began {on 
Feb. 23] near Dormoudievo and Chouren con- 
tinues in a desultory fashion. TTie Ttirks con- 
tinually provoke and attack toe Bulg^an out- 
posts. lire warlike feeliiig in Bul^a has in 
the last wedt or two bra conaderably in- 
creased by the arrival in Bulgaria of nuinennis 
Macedonian revolutionaries who have been 
driven from chat province by toe vexations and 
threats of toe Young Turk Government. 
MeaowUle it is reported from Constantinople 
that toe Youitg Dgks declare that there 
be no peace or tranquillity possible until Bul- 
garia has been crushed. At every instant Tur^ 
key is foi^ to mobilize her troops. It would 
be better to strike the blow at once. 


1935: Arizona BOl Aims at ABens 
PHOENIX — Legzslatioo iaqxM^ fines and 
inqrrisonment for any alien ineligible to dti- 
zen^ wiw owns, rent^ occi^ies, manages or 
controls Arizona faimlands was placed Mote 
toe state l^lature foo Feb. 26] and is 
sc^uled to be appro^ in a few days. Die 
new measure is mra more drastic than any ctf 


the previous bills aimed at Japanese and Hin- 


du farmers, who were toe otgecis o[ night 


rrids and bombings last fall, which resulted 

in Japan’s Amba^or Makoto Saito twice 
mating rqpreseatatioDS to toe State Depan- 
oenL vicdeoce last autumn started when 
natives allied that Japauiese fanners -were 
Howii^ in from the Impmal Valley in Califor- 
nia. where toe drou^t had ruined cropi 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 
JOHN HAY WHm^EY. Chetnnan 19S8-I9S2 


KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SUL2BERGER 

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^l9S5.IaematioaM Herod Trmne. All ri^resmei 


W ASHINGTON — Sure signs of a po««r 
stniesle flash torou^ toe reports fran 


YY struggle flash torou^ toe reports iron 
Moscow on the health of Gmeral Secreta^ ICoQ- 
stantln Cberseoko. The poljtica] jostl^ ex- 
plains why toe i^ess has had to become a matter 
of public discussiOD in Russia. It also suggests 
that the outcome matters a lot to Amerka. 

On one side, stresring toe mvi^ of toe mala- 
dy and g« 6g«ring toe need for a leadership 
ehanffi, is a group connected with the secret 
police. Fighting b^k vdto stories of Mr. Cher- 
nenko in action or on the edge of recover is a 
Central Com^ltee crew known for trykg to 
thicken diplomatic business vrito America. 

Two recent reports intimated toe krmmal na- 
ture d 1^. Chernenko's illness. One was a stoty 
f3ed by an Amaican journalist long in Moscow 
who is thfliig ht to have close KGB tia. A s^ood 
was a planted rumor that blazed throu^ the 
Moscow diplot^tic community and was itea 
traced back to a KGB source. &>to stories indi- 
cated that Mr. Chemeoko's health was so precar- 
irais that a diange at the (op was immliienL 
They sug^sted that he v^d keg) toe largely 
ceremonial job as head of the Presidium of the 
Supreme Soviet but would alnndoQ tbe key job 
of gen^ secretary. That post would be filled by 
toe heir apparent, «iio now functions as a seomd 
secretary — Mikhail Gorbachov. 

Amen can experts say toe KGB group that 
planted toe rumors was linked to toe late Yuri 
Andit»ov. It is dose to Mr, Ckirbachov, who was 
pushed by Mr. Andn^Mv into toe number two 
spoL It wants, in the words of one American, "to 
get Russia tnoying again.” ^us it stresses eco- 
nonne modernizatioo, discipline and a crack- 
down on conuption. Most ic^rtaat is a le^er- 
ship passage from age (Mr. Chernenko is 73l to 
youth (Mr. GOTbaefaov wiD be 34 on Saturday), 
Mr. Chernenko presents an ea^ target He hu 
long suffered from emphysema: he looked frail 


By Joseph Kraft 


even when be was making regular appearances 
last fail For more than SO days thereafter he was 
not seen, and he missed a number of critical 
appointments. His appea^ce is Moscow Sun- 
day to vote for himxlf in elections to the Su- 
preme Soviet will not end toe jost^g. espedaUy 
since his frailty contrasted so markedly wito the 
fine fettle of Goibachov, who was accorded 
high publid^as he cast his balloL 
But Mr. (^emenfco and those around him 
have been able to counter the rumors of terminal 


deal of 1971 Since Mr. ChenienLo's return they 
have fostered a renewed dialogue with Washing- 
ton on aims control trade, cititural relations, 
srientific exchanges and —as evinced by a meet- 
ing on toe Middle East in Vienna last week — 
discussion of regional differences. 


Nicaragua: 
Congress 
Is Warned 




d>- 


Events will probably settle soon toe present 
ctional battle in toe Kremlin. If Mr. Oteitienko 


If Oiem^iko goes, a chance 

fortpddcimpromnentof 

T^ationswillhatebemlosU 


factional battle in toe Kremlin. If Mr. Chernenko 
recovers to the point of being able to do business, 
toe inertia of the Soviet system will probably 
work to ke^ him on as both general secretary 
and presidenL In that case tbe growing East- 
West dialogue viU abnost surriy continue. 

If Mr. Chernenko does not recover in the next 
few weeks, a change is like^. Promotion of Mr. 
Gorbachov to be general secretary is obviousW 
one possibility. But the recent iafi^Ung leads 
many .American expem to doubt that the ’’lei's 
get Russia ffloving again" clique has woo the day. 

Some ILS. omcials believe that toe fonner 


{Qiiess and the need for an eariy leadership stufL 
Tass circulated a report that Mr. Chernenko 
attended a Politburo meeting in mid-February. 
When he missed one important appointment his 
absence was crated to ‘^dociors^ orders** — as 
if be had stayed away only as a precaution, and 
not due to physi^ necessity. 

Amerfcao experts connect tbe group fighting 
back for Mr. Chernenko wito an old Kremlin 
gang that came to hold high CeDtral Committee 
posiilpos under Leonid Brezhnev. Those omcials 
went into eclipse during the brief period of Mr. 
Andropov's tenure as general secretary. They 
have re-emerged wito M^. Chernenko, who was 
himself an aide to Mr. Brezhnev. 

The hallinark of the Brezhnev-Chemenko 
backers has been detente with the Ltniied States. 
Under Brezhnev they hdped prq>are far-re^- 
ing agreements on arms control and the big grain 


Leningrad party boss. Grigori Romanov, who is 
61 and sain to fiav'e anx^ support, will beat out 
Mr. Gorbachov. Or another old-timer might be 
moved in as general secretary. That way the 
privil^es of toe old gang would be preserved, 
and youth would be k^t at bay a little longer. 

The United States, confronts wito such pro- 
found uncertainty, has decided to wait and see. 
Hence toe comments made by an unnamed 
White House source — probably National Secu- 
rity Adviser Robert McFarlane — to tbe effect 
that Mr, Chemeitoo might last quite a while and 
that it did not make much difference to Big Two 
relations who replaced him. 

If only because Washington needs time to 
work out its own position, the wait-and-see peri- 
icy makes sense. But change at toe top in Russia 
is bound to make a difference. If Mr. Chernenko 
does go. a chance for quidc irnprovement of 
Soviet-U.S. ties will have bra missed. 

Las Angeles Times ^yndlfenra 


By Philip Geyelin 

W ASHINGTON — When the 
U.S Congress voted year • 
to shut off money for “covert’’ operar- ! 
tions in of toe hTicazr^uan : 

counter-revolutiooaries, the “con- 
tras," the gener^ sense was that toe. 

issue was dead. But there was RonakI ' 

Reagan on a F^. 16 radio show and 
then at his press conference last 
Thursday — on a landslide re-dec- 
tion roll, pram free rein to the sa me 
old ideolracardriycs and inmossible 
dre:^. (race a|ain, they bore no 
relation to anything that could pass 
for a realistic Nicaragua p olicy. 

The first instinct of congressional ^ 
oitics was to conclude toat ii will not 
w^ any better this time than dw . 
last But toe force of the ernsade is 
giving some erf theopporition seem^ 
thoughts. At tbe very least the issue is 
going to be front znd center in Con- - 
gross this year. “If the presideat real- __ 
ly wants to put on a fuu-court press,” . 
says one coogresrional opponent, 
'it’s going to be a dose, faara fighL” . 

Last year Mr. Reagan sought uo- 
successAilly to cajole Congress by re- 
assurances that — never . ™n d the 
occasional rhetorical excess ~aU he 
really wanted to do was “inconve- . 
nienoe’' the Sandinists *^mto ton 
quit” exporting their revolution. He 
piDmised the Senate mqority leader, j 




V--U r- 


^ 1 •“ 


J 0; %a 


i'a I . 

iA Hi ‘ . ::\.e ' 


svv'- 


'I .. H J 


The People 'p. 
Want to -Tii* 

Talk Back 


By Fred W. Friendly 


N ew YORK — The long battle 
between William Westmoreland 


IN between William Westmoreland 
and CBS is over. D^te all toe fancy 
lawyer language the first and n^ 
^ng question is stiO ''Who won^ 
The disturbing reality, though, is that 
toe serious question is **Who lost?** 
And the haunting answer “Just 
about eveiyooe.*' Perhaps the bloodi- 
est casualty is hatd-hitting journal- 
ism, whiito remuns under siege. 

\^t is clear is that the suit had 
little to do with libel; its resolution 
was never appropriate for a coun of 
law. This was a dispute over sloppy 
journalism, and serious rqiorting 



nm suffer the greate^penal^. 
The documentary *‘Tne Uno 


tbe docuineat^ **Die Uncount- 
ed Enemy: A Vietnam Deception** 
was flaw^ The process by wnich it 
was assembled was unworthy of the 
serious broadcast journaUsm that has 
been the ballmark of CBS News. 
That is what most professional jour- 
Oedists have concluded. 

Yet whatever the progr^'s jour- 
nalistic flaws, it was not libel As a 
public figure, General Westmoreland 
would have had to establish ro^ioe. 

The iqwils of defeat are every- 
where. Soious, probing documenta- 
ries on network televuioo may al- 
ready be an endangered spedes. The 
“chiU," as it has come to be known 
ffom the Westmoreland, Sharon and 
other cases, is ubiquitous. The crux 
<rf toe problem is that there is still 
no fitting and reliable mechanism 
for tbra individtials who rightly or 
WFOi^y consider themselves unfairly 
defai^ to have their day in tlw 
court of public opinion. 

Thirw years ago a psychotopst 
told Enc Sevareid that “toe Achilim* 
bed of lelevisioa would come to be 
toe viewers* inabiliQr to talk back to 
the blade box." Alas, that is because 
access to your tdeviskm set and, to 
an almost eq^ de^ee, oewanaga- 
rines, b so difficult to adneve. The 
problem is omupounded by tbe fact 
that tbe joumaUsts, who are tbe gate- 
ke^ers of the system, are con- 
strained by Umited and expensive air 
time and print space. 

What emerges from tbe Wesunrae- 


Courtrooms Are Not the Proper Forum 


By William C. Westmoreland 

Theymter, )>,ia}commaniM U.S.f(orxsm PleBiam fiam 1964 to I96&. lOTZt^fajryyxniBamyd^cfstcff. 


N ew YORK — Since my dedsioo to withdraw my 
libd suit asninst CBS in letura for its acknowleds- 


X N libd suit against CBS in letura for its acknowl^- 
ment- that 1 had conducted myself fakhfully and in a 
patriotic and loyal manner. I have received postive and 
native responses from those who supported me in my 
effort. Perhaps toe most signincant lesson I have learned 
u thb: A court of law b not toe proper pl^ for dedcUng 
nutters of historical sunificance or indeed judgmg tbe 
motives of toose who played important roles in histoiy. 

As my case and othen have demonstrated, America 
and its dtaens. public and private alike, need some 
nongovernmeotal, nonjudicial forum where complaints 
against toe media can be beard, judged and redressed. 

Thb b not an iodictiBent of the legal system. All who 
participated in my case, iododing toe defeadams and 
thdr counsel behaved in a proper mann er Bm one 
cannot recreatea majcK historic event in tbe csounroom. 

As for the CBS Reports televbioD program “The Un- 
counted Enemy: A VreinaiD Deception." 1 know that it 
was biased, mwlea^ng — far from oNective. Bui that 
sennetimes occurs in joumaUsm. which properly seeks 
to expose mbdeeds, t»d judgments, acts against the 
public intoitsL And sometimes an ovozealous repoitCT or 
producer gets carried away wito what be t^ she perceives 
or bdieras to be the facts and comes up wito what one 
would Gonsider irrespoQstote rqwrung. 

Wbeu thb occurs, where can the victim go for redress? 

Given the power erf the media, wfaiefa tend to aa as ibeir 


personal sacrifice, in time and moo^, and countless 
hours of thought. I now fed that thb an^e resort is 
UDsatbfactory to me as a plaintiff and. 1 bdieve. to CBS 
or any other pan of toe media. And 1 do not betieve such 
oonfroDiauoDS serve tbe public interest. 


What, then, b toe answer to such situations, laige and 
lall? We are all familiar wito “conectioos” and ‘^ktias 


own judge and jury insofar as their own acts are con- 
oeraed, thoe b only the court of law. 

Hovwver, having bra through almost two years of 


small? We are all familiar wito “conectioos” and ‘ietias 
to the editor" in the prinlei^nass. Tdevis^ because of 
toe “fairness doctrine," oRot an occasional idruttaL 
Otherwise; there exbts no forum other than courts vriiere 
a complaini can be lodged and a dedsioa reached. 

Until recently, many re^oosible editors and rqiorten 
supported tbe private National News CounciL a forum in 
wUcb beard a complaint and hand^ down a 
Donbtnding. nonpunishuig opinion. It sert^ a public 
purpose, but some members of tbe media refused to 
support and cooperate with the organization becaoselbw 
feara it would lead to imerference wito Fust Amend- 
ment rights. So toe National News Council died. 

As one who believes in freedom of information — and 
that, indeed, a free press b a bulwark of democracy — 
1 have DO wbb to restrain the press’s right of and free 
inquiry. But if public opinion b U) conlinue to support 
that right, toe media must demonstrate that they are 
responsible. No one is perfect or infallible. Only wbm we 
admt our failures can we build strengUi for our successes. 

Many of my friends and supporters share with roe the 
hope that in toe future produras. writers and editors xrin 
demooslrate a greater sense of respoosibili^ in draling 
wito issues of l&torical importance. 

77it’ New York Times. 


land litiution b a crying, almost des- 
imw plea for access, p^cularfy air 
time. The stark reality b that unless 


Juries Seem to Be Saying tke System Is Unfair 


Howard Baker, that- Washington was . 
not tilting to “destabilize or over- 
toi^ the govemment of Nicaragua.** 
No such reasoned restraint b-in evi- 
dence thb time around. 

Hb radio chat was vintage, pie- ■ ■ 
presidential Reagan, fdl of the lo- ' 
malice of revolutioas. To deny aid to - 
“freedom figbtets," he aligned, would • ' 
be to “betray our centuries-old dedi- 
cation to supporting those who love , 
freedom. Thb b not only l^aL it’s 
totally consbtenl wito our hbtory." > 

It b neither one. The prerident did 
not seem to know of the Boland • 
Axradment, when asked about Its • 
prohibitiotts of aid such as toat for :■ 
the “contras." Hb reapmue was a..- 
reference to “proposals^ in Congress 
thru he tho^t hacked a conq)lete 
understanding of what b at stake • ' 
there and what we're trying to do.** - 

Congress knows the stakes. And it • 
knows the nature of tbe Sandinist.. 
legmie. The debate b not over wheth-' . 
er the Sandinbt presence b a bad 
thing but over what to do about it 

So when toe president says that' . 
Congress does not understand what ' 
“we are Dying to do about it," be b . * 
getU^ m theheart of what toie forth- , 
coining dd>ate b gc^ to be about: ' ■ 
hb double-talk about practical ob|40-' 
tives as distinct from optinnun do:.- , 
sues; the means to be employed. 

0»gi^ questions the basb in 
international law and the moral 
grounds for UJS. mterration. It. • 
questions, as wdL the dedication ; 
democrai^ among tbe mixed bag of 
disenchanted fonner Sandinists and 
eqnally disgnintlod former foQowm . , 
Ql tbe Somega diciatoisinp wiuxa- ' 
Mr. Reagan would have us rrazd,. 
uniformly as " f ree d om fighters.*^ 

In fab radio address Mr. Re%an ^ 
did not even make the case against ! ■ 
toe Sandinists as an active menace to 
toeir neighbors. He waned of a Tor- 
tress Nicaragua" that “intends" to . ' 
export communism. Otberwbe be. 
spdte only <rf what tbe “totalitarian” . 
Sandinbts are doing interoaOy. “It b ' 
bnitaL cruel," be said. 

So it may be. Congress b not hag- 
gling about that But you will bear ' 
pleoQrrrfaigumem over whether sop- . 
porting the overthrow by fcMxe m' 
tegunes whose internal pnurtices toe , 
United States abhors b “totally con- 
ristent with our hbtory." 

Mr. Reffian still reuses to say that . 
toe goal of U.S. policy b to remove ' 
the Sandinist govramenL Instead he. ■ 
talks about removing it “in tbe sense 
of its present structure, m which it b a 
Co mmunba , totalitarian state." 

Leaving aride tbe semantic non- 
sense of that re^Kose, coosi^ hb' 
reply when asked for a third time ' 
whether he was not “advocating tbe 
overthrow of toe present govern-'' 
meot” Hb answer “Not if toe pre- 


tbere b smne ima^oative, creative 
way of answering stroi^ docu- 
mentaries win disappear fnRD the air. 
It b just that mirole. 

Aa aus{Ncious bemnnine woidd be 
the annauncemeat that CK b setting 
aside half an hour once a month for 
creative redress. It would be expen- 
sive, but not qjmp are d with the cost 
of doing nothing. 

Meanxrfule, ndtber televisicn nor 
print publicatcons are umnune from 
toe public percqiiion that ediion and 
producers — tbe ga t dceepers — are 
insensitive and uowUltag to Ibten to 
serious viewers and readers who 
sometimes feel “thQ^ got it wrong." 

The ultimate answer to oU tob ex- 
orbitant and often uiuecessafy litiga- 
tion is gome to be found in toie netfs- 
rooms of Amezica. uot in its court- 
rooms. Tbe genuine loser in all thb 
litiratioD b toe American pubhe. 

'The ea^ way out for toe networks 
and stations is to slow down, as 

they have already, and eventually to 
eliminate hard-hitting, investigative 
rqiortiag. As attomey Floyd Abrams 
commented, “If news oiganizations 
let up a Ut, no one would ever know 
it — oewspsneTs. screens would still 
be filled with oaws. The sort of 
porting that b libd-rbky b the sort of 


W ASHINGTON — On tbe 
morning after a chamragne 


Bj Jim Fain 


basb oelebratmg victory in the West- 
mordasd libd suit, CBS News Presi- 
dent Edward M. Joyce wrote a sober- 
ing meaDoraodum ro hb staff. He 
praised seoior producer Burton Ben- 
jaadn, Imd conducted an inter- 
nal investigation and found 1 1 major 
flaws in toe controversial broadcast 
The documentary was revealed in 
the trial as a program that no sound 
jouniahst b luely to cite with pride; 

Because tdeviaon lusts for arania, 
it needs villains. General Westmore- 
land was tingled out as a con^irator. 
How does an aggrieved sutgect talk 


back? CBS offered General West- 
moreland IS minutes to reply, but 
that was biein toe eameandne felt it 
was inadequate. A Wter mechanism 
b needed. To be valid it has to in- 
clude production resources. Making 
a reasonably effective television film 
b eDOnnously expensive. 

Although many in the media com- 
plain of present libel law. it is liboal. 
If a public figure b involved be is fair 
game for wluiever a newsman wants 
to say about him as long as tbe jour- 
nalbt believes be b teOing the truth 


and exercises reasonable care. But 
juries have recently bra awarding 
huge judgments in defiance of the 


sent government would ... say 'un- 
cle.' " If the Sandinists would let tbe 


law. only to bave them overturned by 
judges. They are saying. I think, toat 


ihM feel toe ^stem b unfair. 

The only practical answerbfor the 
media to dean up their acL The free- 
dom of present law b necessary to 


provide the livdy debate toat keeps 
democracy bealUiy. The trkde is to 


“contras" back into the government, 
be wu saying, then they could all get - ' 
on with toe original democratic aims - 
of toe revolution against Soraoza. 

Tbe absurdity of that proportion - ' 
conveys the hypocrisy, as as toe ■ 
absent of a serious policy. 

The problem b not, as 1^. Reagan . 
suggests, that Cramess does not tm- ' - 


exercise it courteously but wito fas- 
tidious fairness, never abusing it to 
ventilate biases. The public will not 
stand by indefinitely if it feeb televi- 
sion is mbustng its awesome power. 

Ouc News ServicA 


deistand what “were ttyingm da” It - 
understand all too wdL Die prok ' 


tem craes down to politics. Apresi- 

dent with a spedal gift for converting' 

pipe dreams mto popular cutfes may - 
not need a serious policy. 

The Washington Post. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Hiaiiks to Service 


piaterial (bat serves Ihe public in a 
imimie wav. If the press lets UD. I'm 


unique way. If the press lets up. I'm 
afraid toe public never know 
what it has Iosl" That would be the 
ultimate tn^y for a democracy 
.that is y/imy dependent on a frn 
flow of public infonnatiofl. 

Freedra of the press b a protec- 
tioa a safe^ valve, for all atizens, 
not just for those who are lucky 
enoii^ or rich enough to control ihie 
levers d communication power. 


The Hriier, a farmer aeadem if CBS 
"Sews, is Edward R Mmoae fm^ssor 
emeritm at du Columbia Grahan 
(fJowm^sm. Vds has been adi^fam 
an taiide in The Wadiingion Pool 


Regardins the rwon “GaBniih De- 
rida U.S. Oater piplomais as TimitT 
(fA 14) Yinoevr 

It was with ^eai dbmay toat I read 
Mr. Vioocur’s article wherein he 
chose to use the word "scorn" — 
nnucb^ in headline by "derides" 
— to purport to describe toe feelings 
of Biyhusband, Ambassador Evan G. 
Gal^ih. toward members of toe 
U.S. ForeigD Service, li is because 
we have such strong feelings to toe 
coDiraiy that I would like to pub- 
lish these few words now. 

I say now, because iromcoUy. with- 
out any provocation. I was thinking 
of writing an article in probe of toe 
Forr^ &rvia, and to stir up aware- 
ness among Americans of this group 
of dedicatal men and women whose 
mbsion and existence are largely ig- 
nored and rarely considered. 

Unbelievable demands are made 
upon their time; patience, n^ves. Ur- 
gent and stressful aiuations con- 
stantly cause them to worit late into 
rhf nigh y weekends and holidays. All 
of thb b generally unknown, 


Even in the confines of one embas- 
sy, DO one hears much of toe details 
of what happened in a given dav. 
There are too many. One can hardly 
remember in one week toe events of 
toe previous one. There b almost al- 
ways a crisb of one kind or another. 
Everyone always pitches iiL There b 
tremendous goodwill 

Frusiraiipns over toe rather cum- 
beisome bureaucratic process, which 
must be fdlowcd to get things done, 
are o^jed with. The added stress of 
today’s security problems b met with 
resolution and courage. Tbe outsidtn' 
cannot ima^ne these conditions. 

Tbe result b toe formaiion of a 
strong bond and support system be- 
tween those working in each posL 
and between posts — a tremendous 
sense of teamwork and the feeling of 
purpose, of doing something that 
matters, and of serving one's country. 
Thb sense of teamworic Miends to 
family members as weU. It is this 
spirit which gets thii^ done, no mat- 
ter what, under all drcumsiances. 

How mahy times, in France, peo- 
ple have come up to me and to others 
of us (we being symbob of our coun- 


try) to express todr thanks for toe 
American presence, for all toe Ameri- 
cans have ^ven in the past and toe 
support and help ih^ continue to 
offer. Each time, this gesture of grati- 
tude b enormously movir^ and it 
makes one realize that all tl^t effort 
whicto has been so poinstakindy and 


manov, as defense mmister. Howev- 
er. thb Kremlin-watcher is tob usi-' 


versUy d^ariment did plump 
unequivocally for Marshal Sokrdov, 


alt under the ^are of a precipitate 
television interview with toe B^ 


graciously tendered, by toe ^idgn 
Service, has been wortowhile. 

I have been privil^ed to be a small 
part of toe team in Paris for more 
than three years now. It has been an 
eye-opener. The bottom ^e as far as 
I am concerned, and my bu^d 
joins me wholeheartedly, is that we 
have an unending admiratirm for 
these our rriends and co-workers. We 
extend to them our gratitude. 

MARIE R. GALBRAITH. 

U.S. Embassy, Paris. 


JOHN ERICKSON, 
Director of Defense Stu(^ 
University (rf Edinburgh. 


Don’t Be Liable to Snh 


la "Lawarit, Like the Vietnam 
War, Was Tortuous" (FA 20), David 
Margolick asks, “And what, if any- 
thing, riiould be done to make hbd 
actions less cc^y, so that news- 
papers and broadcasters with fewer 
resources than Time or CBS can de- 
fend themselves?” 1 findtbb question ; 


i > 


Bv L« 


He '-v. 

r-.-,-. JJ' 


O-aW - • -V . 

iliLL- - 


pn’ jit 
i-ij L.iC'i.".-' *i:» 

F.or-"' 

Ii,. ; 

•uiucci r,. 4 •— • -> - 

j,r\-;::|\0 ...* '-'tJi Ji'1 

ipv. M-tj-'’-""- ” 
:Jn!f;/.M*ra: 
uiu' I. .S. r.j '.0 Li 
X’ ft.rr*T5»u I' 
h;i kVrr.f «* "’jiiC.o ** 

: ),• 'i r.d :>tju 

p,'K;r .ir.d - jhtLi ad 

MN has be 

Siriif.::; Ini: 

PMa'ii"; '.he iT.ited 


7h'. L J; i «” .'ti 
ef 

4f51;. ccliinj 

s' >r u p:w 
J 0'.er?.r,*r.: bu: ‘‘kc 

■iiiii L,T7,?ir.' I'f j 

icf. 4". \-.jj 
juh'.’ 

risiuO 
'-.It heip 

JiiiUMr. :ri G: 
liM A. Grc 

aiiiiwitff ,\f- Rcjza 
Itti'i ?rcrj:aii'.T fo 
li'lCeV.'h;;; H-'USC ! 

ofi 

Mr. 2ro 

tti'&.'iw '.hr first.n 

.wurted b\ 
Mees's 3d. \vh, 
aitoDev gsr.ira!. and 
".■H S'irc-. M 

'^hc: lop 

‘‘'Kij baromt 

iiie \-i 

fjlir. Srnn^. Calife 
^nfr.rs::. :hc rubli 

<1"'. jTijit’e a peu: 
tooin Uiv.f ■„> 

Such r.oi 


One Who Got It Ri^l 


dbturbing. It implies that most libel 
cases are uniusUned. 

If journalists wtoo make acensaf- 


In “Kremlin-Watching Has Its 
Frustrations'* (FA 18), ftaae Gus- 


tions such as that nwrff against Gco- 
^ WestmoreUmd wdl sprad more 


lafMn makes some very pertinent 
(Mints, in particular about [ailure to 
predict the appointment of Sergei L 
Sokolov, rather than Grigori V. Ro- 


time substantiating their daims, pep‘- 
haps the necesriev for brioeins nbd 


haps the necesrity for bringing n 
cases will subridcL • 


CLARENCE H. KING 3d. 

Brussels. 






•• -S r ■’">! ■ 


5 Rugged ImUriduaUsm, Values of the Right in U.S. Called ^Cancerous’ 


By Anne C> Roark 

Los Angela Tima Senut 


•is T OS ANGELES— The rugged sdf-rdiaace 
I Anwricans hold SO dear, personified by 
M J Joho Wayne and ^ Aioeijeaa cowboy 


lo see the bO(A, those ulto know of it ocmstderit 
pan oT an emer^g and hnhly conuoveiaal 
national debate on the role of ethics and values 
in American soee^. And those who have acta- 
ally read advanoed copies of the book are toot- 


that, as ooe ps^hoiherapist they interviewed that, if you are in the game of politics, you are 
put h, **in the w you’re really uoi^ aiul you not playing fairly. You are not getting involved 
really have to answer 10 youtsetf.** because you ama good eiiizett. You are not 

*^e m eaacaned,'* Mr. Bdiah and his e<d- seeking umat is best for the communicy. Yon am 


that, if you are in the game of politics, you are ’’The BeDah study and oiben move in the 
not playing fairly. You are not getting involved direcuon of asUng what it nw*ns m pan of a 

because you am a good diizett. You are not conunufflQr.'’ Mr. Bdl said. In a wiiiien com- 


I*. And those w4k> hawe acta- *^e are eoacemed,*’ Mr. Bdiah and his c<d- V/wian« meat 

copies of the book are tont> leagues said in the snidy, “ that this hKhvidual* there &t reasons crt uiilicy. You ate after your elude 

tmorlp" ctnrfmt «ha lOSAe mao mw...... — .V^. l. - ■ ■ -i-- m ^ ** 


tng it as a “benehmaric" study of the 1980s ism may biM grown cancerous, that it may be own Intemst&'* 

A fmMmmrnwt jukapwiatw ela^ fnu ^ - ^ ^ a 


t -it incapal^ oH a commitmeot to their nwi 

'-'iiz. I’ssic instituttoos — nantage, family, idigion 

■i 4'.~. and poliiics — acoordim to a smdy ptihiidwni 

b>’ the Univndty of Cahfornia Press. 

The project, five years in the tnaking ^ 
" conducted by Robert N. BeUiah, an eminent 

*' B(^i*eIm^Chufor1Iia,soci<)k)d5^.aodfollroI^ 


American character and the first in a series of 
’’liberal coumerauacks" against the neo-conso^ 
vative mommeai that has dawtiwiited politics in 
recent years. 

Both the tide oi the book and the qnesdoos 


T he result is that the iagrimriap* that uaditio/ial vatnes.” But, h 
safegoard democn^ and fteedom are awfully shallow and a bit 
beina threatened. lh« said. Peaok mar- aacl. narmlg siiimlv do noi 


threatening the sunnval of freedom iisdf.” Betlah did note that ‘’there is a growing and 

nostal^ for the small town, a lot of tarn about abot 
HE result is that the institutions that teaditional vatnes.” But, he added, “a lot of it W 
saf^nsrd democraqr and fteedom are awfully shallow and a bit ^mny. For the most four 
being threatened, th^ said. Peopk mar- pen, people simply do notluve the langua^ to snid 


on am meat pr^iared for the pnfalidier, Mr. Bell eon- 
r your eluded that the study would become “the oon- 
temporaiy bendunaxk from which to look bade 
owing and to look forward, m the continuing inquiry 
about about American cultare." 


Working with Mr. Beflah on the project were 
nuUy shallow and a bit ^mny. For the most four yoonger sdiolars. three of whom had been 
A. people simply do nothave the language to snidents « his at Berkdey or Harvard. 

Ek about those encents. We-hope the book at Ann Swfaidler, wto now teadies soddogy at 

ist wtU bqja that dascusaon again." Stanford, conducted interviews about love and 

AmoDgtbehaadftilQfscholarswhohaveKad mamage in seirral suburixan imigbbothoods in 


taised in the prcgect are based cm a 150-year-oId ly, for example, not out of loyalty or a sense of talk about those encents. We-hope the book at 
audy. called “Democracy in America.'^ by the commitment or a bdief in the value of the least will that disaKrion again." 


French historian. Alexis Se Tocquevill& In lak- institution of m«friay nod fas 
mg the “moral puls^ of America in tte l^Os, sense of “psychdopcal sdf-fi 




t. Boleley, Cauforn^ sodoihmsi, and four 
' scholars representing the fields of socii 


suah, an eimnenl Tocqoeville found the same erosive private tn^ 
isz, and four other vidtiafi^ that ilfr. Beilah and his <wtlwwwf 


■■ . 


March. 

.Although few scholars or politictans have yet 


found in the 1980s. "Only it is worse to£y," 
Mr. Bdiah said 

In mterviewing white, middle-class Ameii> 
cans, Mr. Bdiah and his oftitaagii« found that 
maiqr people in the United States have been 


insatutioo of mani^and fam^, but mit of a Amoog tbehandfol of scholars whohaven 

sense of “pncfadopcal sdf-fcdfulmeiu.” Thw the book, the dtscusston certainly has 
become mvdved in poUxi 4 not fluted any dvie Daniel Bdl, a professor of social 
obligation or with any desire to seek what IS best Harvard UmversiQr, said that ftf some ye 
fw the community as a whole but in an effort to now Americans ‘^ve been hearing from i 
defend their own “special interesta** ioieUeciuals on the ri^L the eonservativ) 

That is why polities has become so “morally who have provided mud of the nndetiriani] 
unsavoiy* to many Americans and “the polin- of the Reagan administratioa's wn nhaiac mn i 
dan” is held in such Im regard. Mr. Beflah “individuals and their right to oo their a 


poll DCS and vohmteer oiBaaizations in a small - 
town near Bostm and a suburban area near San 
[Kego. 

WiHiam W. SuDivan, a philosophy professor ■ ! 
SI La Salle CoU^ in Philaddphia, studied two , 
oigannarions that esKiged from the pofitica! . 
movement of die 1960s. the Institute for the 
Study of Gric Values in Fbiiadd^ia and ihe'V- 
Campaign for Economic Democracy in Santa • ' 
Monica, California. 


mtOQ, an assodaie professor at 
now Americans ‘^ve been heating from the the Chandler Schod of Theology at Emory 
inieUecnials on the riAk the eonsovatives" Univarsity, inieniewed Aeiaptsts and pqdiia- 
who have provided mnai of the nnderpnnings tiists in the South and the &n Fnme wo Bay 
of the Reagan administratioa's wn nhaiac mn th^ area. 

“individusls and their right to no their own Richard Madsen, a sodoloesi at the Univer- 


swept away by “radical individualisin,** a sense explained in a recent imeiview. “People asaune thing, useocumbered by government. 


siQr'of California at San Diego, studied local 


the Herit^ Fon^tion and the American En- • - 
teiprise Institute. 

^ That study will foDow a number of other 
similar studies on American eihks that are now 
bring conducted by scholars around the United • 
Slates and financed by major foundations. 


McFariane in the White House: A Modest Conciliator Comes of Age 


By Lou Cannon 


• l^usAingun fiasr Savicf 

WASHINGTON — He is a hiddea hnmi 
briund administratiem foreign policy, and the 
^ 1 . most prominent survivor of a second-term 
shake-up that has bronght new faces to Presi- 
. deal Ronald Read's 9^te HcRjse staff. 

He remaius ddiberacely. obscure, ovetshad- 
-i ' '.'1 owed by two cabinet members. Secret^ of 
. iv. State Ceoige P. Shultz and Defense Secreta^ 
-*V. Caspar W. Weinberger, but he has made 
J: mark with Mr. Ream by briinng to resolve 

many of the policy dosagreenienu beiwra the 
two stroeg-wiOed secretaries. 

His [awiite ioedianiaB for domg this is a 
' ' private weekly breakfast at whidi he and the 
' ‘ • ‘ ~r . two cabinet members reason together. srithouL 
their aides. 

Robert Carl McFariane, known to colleagues 
•“ '.-r ' as find, is a soft-spoken fonna- maiine who as 
' *, national security a^irs adviser fdlcnvs seem- 

r.' iii^y cmitradictay inqieratives, asid who is 
‘r.. guided by a view m Sovim power as grim and 
; r pervasive as that of the preadenL 
- A conqBatof who values (fiphMiatie endeav- 

ors, Mr. McFariane nevertheless was the most 
- . ^ J.'.' peisisteat admiofsiratian expeumit of sending 
the U.S. ndliiary to Lebanon. A Vleinam vcier- 
■ an who suppCHi^ U.S. invdvement there, he 
; 7" has come to bdieve that Americans wdD never 
' T.'" back a long and limited war. 

; A longtime advocate of offensive nndear 
. ' fri power a duef advocate in preserring the 

7 MX missile, he has become an advocate of the • 

* . 7 . V .7 Strategic Driense Initiative; the plan aimed at 
V 7 ' protecting the Umted StaDUs from nudear mis- 

• • •• -• tiles. 

• '' 7;;7 Tho^ a keen student ri* military affmrs, he 

* ~ ~ Dverestiinaled the effectiveness of (te Lri)m>ere 

' ■ ^ ■ ' Anny, vritich coDapsed at a ctu^ pdnL 

Workmgfmapresdernwbopreacfaescahmet 
'.1 -i- goventment but likes to. make deds i ons in the 
’ - closed company of a few advisexs. Mr. McFar- 

• ■- lane, 47, ba& qmetly hdped to centraKze powa 
... .1',::'. in the ^^te House. 

HediafCBdpoatibha^Kn-andduii^ 

. . ing groups tlffi helpril proi^^ 

. a^omistratioh unity cm aiins coutred at the 

January talks in Gtmeva between Mr. Siultz 
- . - 1 : and Andrd A. Qaanyko, the Soviet foirigri 
. .z: nunister. Kilr. Rea^ later called Mr. Mtfar- 

. r lane's pr^aratimi for that “superb," acoorfing 
■ to tire White House sxd:esna^ ^eakes. 

. r .~- - - z Administratiem dndalspdnt to two signs of 
‘ L .V:- Mr. McFarlane's growing mluenoe: He ^ be 
. assigned the first-floor office in' the White 
House occupied by the presidents counselor. 


Robert C McFariane, one 
of the few high-ranking 
U.S. officials who practices 
the motto on President 
Ronald Reagan^s desk: 
**There is no limit to what 
a man can do or where he 
can go if he doesnH mind 
who gets the credit.^^ 


a:.' E dwin Meere 3d, vriio was sworn in Monday as Mr. McFaiiane’s tdend* and subonfinates 
. '-7;. Bttmeygisneiahaiidhehasgrinedthetpproval attest to his politeness and say that he never 
^ j;: of NaiicyReagaiL Mrs. Reagan’s social opinioiD sboutsandrardycomplains.Heisdesaibedas 
' of her husband’s top aides is often an interest- loyal to friends and extremely protective of his 
' '^7.- ingly iriiable barometer of thrir infhience., wife, Jon<^ and ihrir three Andt^ , 

' ".'-I At the annual New Year's Eve par^ at the Muditf Mr. McFarlane's htunor is self-dep- 
,'.7, Palm Springs, California, home m Walter H. recatory: He likes to iril of (he time a late-night 


Aaoeoheig, tire puhlisber and former aznbassa- trieviaon show producer (old brm he had ‘ Vhg 
dor, she made a point ei eohig across the ball- most borink face" she had ever seen. 

« _S ■mw. vr.t . 


room floor to praise Mr. McFarlane’s danc 
Sudi incidaO would never be rdated by 


McFariane, \riio is conadered a ti^-lipped ccitirizes his eftminaiidw -m. riii*f l^t be 


1 - workaholic. 


ADMINISTRATION oCfid^. say be is umnist Pairidc J. Bochanan. as a “Jeane Kirk- 
/% mlling to sacrifice public image for pri- patrick in long pants.” 

-L^^vate influence and to trade the After the November dection. Mis. Kiriq:^- 

tation he stfll holds at the Defense and State ncj[ was the riT conservatives, inclumng 
departments as an ideal staff man who poses no Mr. to replace Mr. McFariane when 

threat to Mr. Wanbesger or to Mr. Shultz. tire aticed to leave as UN ambassador. Instead, 
Mr. Mtfailane is aware, aides said, of Mr. Mr. Reagan gave Mr. McFariane a prmimt and 


Reagan gave Mr. McFariane a prmi^t and 
~ Reagan's desire to ^ve his calrinet officers be public vote ca confidence. Mrs. lUi^iamdt has 
7 policy rookesmen. He may be one of the few returned to leaching. 

•: higtHBmdng o fPriw^ edio practice the motto In an administration that has raised internal 

by a sign, on tire presitot’s deA: feuding to a high art, Mr. McFarianehesori- 
. ' . *TheieisnolifflittoviAatamancandoorwfaeFe lected an incoognious set of admireis, among 
'r' be can go if he doesn’t mind trim gets the them former Secretary of State Alexander M. 


credit.” ' Haig Jr. and Treasury Secretary James A. Baker 

Mr. McFarlane’s expresskmless »wnnw has 3d, who had feuded untb Mr. Haig when be was 
~ produced a public of determined dnirnacs While House chief of staff. 

- that friends say shidds a man triio piivat^ Mr. Haig said Mr. McFariane has brought a 
' disriays sharp wit and perfonns a near-pafect needed “sense oi order and prtrfessionaiisni to 
. . of H^* y A. lUsshigBr. He uses the the foreign priicy processes of the Reagan ad- 

parody to remiiid bearers of tire contrast be- mmistralioo.” But ne warned that Mr. McFar- 
' • ‘ tween hims^and the highly visible inteUectaal lane would face public scrutiny and criticism 
' / who was PresdentRidtardM. Nixon's satir^ ifow titat he has his image as a junior staff 
security adriser. . man. 

A BaltiiDore Sun iqioner, Robert Ibiiberg, Kenneth M.Duberstein, former White House 

' recently quot fid Panl M. Weyiidi, the New conBestional liaison and Baker loyalist, said 


man \riio piivaldy Mr. Haig said Mr. McFariane has brought a 
lOnns a near-p^ect needed “sense oi order and prrrfessionaiism to 
singBr. He uses the the foreign pdicy processes of the Reagan ad- 


Kermeth M. Duberstrin, former White House 
ngrestional liaison and Baker loyalist, said 


Right activist, as saying of Mr. McFariane: Tie Mr. McFa^e hu become “the honest broker 


was emt^ ^ God to dirappear into crowds.” of the administration, giving the president vdiat 
FriendssayMr.McFailaaerditiushismleas he wants and needs is a national securiQradvis- 
a quiet source of power, helping to provide a ex." , ^ ^ 

theoretical framework for apresidcnt who, like Mr. McFariane, the son of a New Deal Dcm- 
him, is detdnuned to maintain U.S. mili^ ocralic c o ngres s man ftoip Texas, also has the 


power. Mr. McFariane wrote the 
Mr. Reagan’s speech of hfotefa 2 


of many congrestional Democrats. 
Bsentative Les Aspin, Democrat of Wis- 


^ called for crea^ of tte-spacerbaaed rmssi\A comm and the new chaiTmm of the House 
' 'defense. Armed Services Committee, credited Mr. 

In an infrequent imoview, Mr. McFariane McFariane with ‘Tueakmg the armssrentrol 
I- described his goals: gridlodc” because be understood House pbliti- 

The woriouves in the cratstam threat. of cal realities. Mr. Asjm was an architect of 
nuclear *nnnitiatirtn -Jbe president believes, coaerestionricoixwramisesihataUofwedli^ 

■ and I have strongly urged that he pursue, n production of the MX mistile in exchange for an 
; fundamentally different idea, and that is that administration oomnuunent to negotiate with 
you really can n to a defensive strat^y. That the Soriei Unkm. 

. 1 ' would be a hisUMic acconmlisluiieat if he were Mr. Dubeistein recriled a meeting with Sena- 
‘ able to set thatiu motion. And that is probably tors William S. Cohen of Maine, Warren B. 
the angle greater opportunity before iis.” Rudinan of New Hanmtiaie and Slade Gorton 
The m&vrew which took place in Mr. of Washington, all moderate Repubheans, who 
McFaiiaM’s basemou office m the White srid the MX^wotdd never if viewed 

• House, was obnduffied ground rales that siitqily as *a R^ubhean m is sil e. 

• •- permit no attribution without permissioiL Mr. From tins meeting came a decisioQ to coi^i 

. McFarfaiwstartedL as be often does, Mr. ^ailane; who was then to 

• ing uses and of UjS. military power liam P. the nahonalsMuiuy adviser. 

mibeSOihcennifyemphasizingwhathesecsas Out of the McFarianfrDuberstem consulia- 

‘ atwcMxaWiystrmnVisolaikioisia nons caiw the proposri to a 

A 1^1. . * A1 - Aa VVllMlAn #ll9t WAtiM fiimiWt iM MX Mil 9mi$ 


atwcMxaWiystrmnVisolaikioisia nons caiw the proposri to 

Although m the middle of what aides de- mission that would suppon arid ^ 

; .. scribedasatypkallT-homday.Mr.McFarla^ conooL Its dtaimark aapsied 

• did not hufiy the questkmer or ^ answers. He latte, was Brew Scowcf^^ reu^ an- foiw 
, • RMwi in amM4l fnr whnm Mr. McFariane had worked 



sr^ at the Mudi oX Mr. McFarlane’s htunor is self-dep- 
Walter H. recatory: He likes to iril of (he time a late-night 


He is not above a barb at his critics. Follow- 
ing the habits ai a imlitary career, he never 


centiy described Mr. Reagan's new director of 
oommuiucanoiis, the conservative former coJ- 


maudibib^. was one of command. His scstest 
tone reserved for his strongest answers. 


More recently, Mr. McFariane was credited 


with a White House decision to postpone sub- 
mission to Coi^ress of a Sand Aiabias anns 
padage that m^t have resulted in an embar- 
rassing foreign policy setback. 

What happen^ at a Jan. 23 ineeting that was 
not publidy announegi, is tyiiical of the way 
Mr. McFawe exeidses his influence as an 

ina^ man 

Aooordmg to administration dficials, Mr. 
Weinbeigier ardently simporred the Sandi aims 
sale with backing Crnn ni^ranlang State De- 
partment officials friendly to the Saudi Arabi- 
an& Mr. McFariane careftilly prepared his ap- 
position and came armed with iidonnatioa 
pnivi^ ^ con^esaioiul allies that die pro- 
posal faced^c^ipoatKRi on Capitol H3L 

As an alteniative, he proposed deUying the 
sale and devefoi^ a comprehenrive arms 
package for the NG^e East, an idea that car- 
' lied w day with Mr. Wdnbet^ and Mr. 
Shuhz. 

“Ihe White House saw this as a nonstarter," a 
taunriedgeable official said. “McFariane con- 
vinced everymie there was no point to subont- 
ting something that the Cragres wouldn't 
bw,” 

Ut. McFariane did not come earily to influ- 
enoe in a post tadd by such dotzanant pobik 
figures as Mr. Kisangier and Zbigmew Bizezin- 
ski. Fewer chan seven years ag^ be was ap- 
proaching retiretoent as a Marine lieutenant 
odooel cbeeifiilly acknowledged the tmli- 
(ary maxim that those of hijiber rank are more 
inidligent 

He had not been totally disabosei of this 
brilef when he replaced Mr. Clark 16 months 
ago in a White House riiake^ 

“He is the perfect No. 2 man or maybe No. 
2Vi" a White House official said ato Mr. 
McFariane arrived there in 1981 as c^iuty to 
Mr. Clark. 

Mr. McFarlane's Groerience speared to sup- 
port this assessmenL lie was a imutaiy assistant 
to Mr. Kisanger in the inid-19'^ and im- 
pressed his boss with bis tKIigenw- 

In 1976 and 1977, he served as Mr. Scow- 
croft's staff man in the White Hc»i% and bis 
lovMritibility approach today is lemmlsceoi eX 
the approach Iw Mr. Sooweroft, arbirer <X 

S utes between Mr. Kisanger and a stiotig- 
xl defense secretary. James R. Sdilesinger. 
In both portions, Mr. McFariane earned a 
reputation as a bard woriur. 

Mr. McFailue J^ed the staff of ibe Senate 
Armed Services Committee, u^ere a former 
colleague, Rhett Butler, remembers him “hitting 
the ground numing from Ore first day." 

On the comminee, beaded by Jdm G. Tower, 
Ri^bUcan of Texas, then a setretor and now an 
administratioa aims-control n^tiator, Mr. 
McFariane play^ a role in dedtions th^ led to 
comminee lotion of SALT-2, the anns trea^ 
that Prudent Jimmy Carter vnthdrew from 
Senate coDsideratioa uter the Soviet invasioa of 
Afphanioan fo DecembCT 1979. 

When Mr. Haig became secretary of state, 
Mr. McFariane became Ids counselor imtil he 
entered the White House as Mr. Claries ckpoty. 

Qark ddegaied by iDdinatkm and neces- 
si^ because he bad little badcgiound in foreign 
affairs, so Mr. McFariane often became a son t^ 
surrogate oaticMial security adriser who bribed 
his and the presideDt and n^otiated with 
CongresA 


*Tf Bud had been a ccvtlian instead of a 
miHiary man, hb experience would have seexoed 
terrific,” an admimnntkm ccdleague said ro- 
ceaUy. “fo fact, he has more experioce and 
foragn ptdicy kziowledge than any other official 
in the adnenistration, and he bears a greater 
burden than Scowcrofl did because the presi- 
dent has no one around like KUsmgo' and 

who left the administnlioD after 
dashes with White House officials and cabinet 
cofleagnes, said he bdieved that Mr. McFariane 
had restored professkmalism to an office that 
had fallen into disrepute. 

‘3ud has provided a mandaie of snhstance 
rather thanbopolism,” Mr. Haig said in an 
interview. “106 seoeiiuy of state has been the 
spokesm^ as he is supposed to be. The payoff 
is a coasLStency of pot^ and a d^m oi pre- 

itifttaMiry fhai it TSg yP**' 

date a tough, predictable, coosisiait set oT pri- 
des." 

T hese policies are based on a grim as- 
sessment of Soviet power, which, Mr. 
McFariane wrote fiire years ago in the 
naval jonraal Proceedings, is capable of a “w- 
dear victory" not throup war but expanding 
its iaflaence in Europe and the Third Wmld as a 
result of acfateviog aodear parity. 

Mr. McFariane, concerned that the United 
Stales was nzming inward afto the Vietnam 
War, strongly criticized what he saw as U.S. 
strategic and political weakness since World 
WarO. 

“We must not aDow bad pohdes to take on 
l^tima^ amply because ib^ were not accom- 
panied by a hdocausu” Mr. McFariane wrote. 
^Having superior taSStaiy might has provided 
an enoanoDs bedu for flabby tMnKng. We 
could affend kss-than-optima) strat^ plan- 
ning becanse posh was sever going to come to 
sbe^ We have bad the luxury of being able to 
befooli^" 

Mr. McFariane, who served two combat tours 
in Yietnam, wrote that he saw the war there as a 
disaster in wl^ the Rusrian^ iritbont firing a 
shot, “watdied wbBe the United States was 
bronght to its knees in a foragn war after an 
investment of more than SlOO billion.” 

Bui be continued 10 favor uring the mOiiory 
to sup p ort diplomatic c^'ecthv^ prorided that 
its period of uvolvement was 
“Fd never now say that we should have sus- 
tained a conflict over five years," Mr. McFar- 
lane told The Wall Street Journal recently. 
“Five years is simply iacotzqiatible Mth Amen- 
can values and the American attenitoi span. 
The most rdevani lesson 1 learned is what is and 
what iffi’t sostainable by the American peopln” 
Is 1983, as Mr. Cladds deputy, he was sent to 
Lebanon, where he segotiamd a critical cease- 
fire and became deraly Immersed in that coun- 
tiy's policies of coomet 
Mr. McFarlanelookedontheLdraneseatua- 
don as a textbodc example of the lowHsrder 
confronlatioiu he had antidp^ed in bis 1979 
article. He saw the Rtu^ans woridng through 
Syria and others to destabilize the hfiodle JEak, 
and be joined Mr. Shitiiz in strong advocating 
the deplcyment of U.S. Mai^ to help shore 
op the govemfflCQt of ProkieDl Amm Gema^ 
Mr. McFariane took over as national security 
affoiia adviser one wed: before the Marine 




headquartes in Beirut was demolished in a 
soiddB tnicfc-bombmg in October 1983. More 
than 240 U.SL servicemen died, and Mr. Rea- 
gan’s poii^ was left in rains. 

In sobseqtKnt months, Mr. McFariane tided 
with Mr. Smdtz, fayorh^ armed retaliation for 
the bombing and resisting withdrawal of U.S. 
forces fr^ LebanotL 7^ lost ofi both counts 
to the coiribined oppotition of Mr. Wembeiger, 
the Joani Qnefs of Staff and public opinion as 
jefleoed tluoagh RmbHcan senators in con- 
versations with Mr. Reagan. 

Mr. McFariane never discussed the with- 
drawal publidy bot confided 10 friends his bit- 
lemcss about the Fentagoo oppotitioo to de- 
pfoymeDL “Our processes have fdledi,” an 
ofucial i^ted him as sayii^ 

His alreoment with jVfr. Shultz <m Lebanon 
cast Mr. McFariane for a time as an adversary 
to the PeotagoD. On that issue, be was not a 
conciliator but an advocate who periodically 
gave optimistic assessments about the quality di 
the Lebanese Army, wfaicb disintegrated at a 
crucial momeoL 

Mr. McFariane suffered 00 other issues dur- 
ing his first months chi the job, bat also from the 
sen-effacemeat that nltimaidy was to prove his 
greatest asset 

“^le of Bud’s ar^nstments was the sudden 
teap,” a friflod said. “It was a fairly short time 
beftreen when be was lieutenant colonel and 
national seemiQF adviser. It was a year or two 
before his talents could be realized and be 
recognized that deferential thinldiig no longer 
served his job. It speaks wdl he ar^usted so 
quickly, but there was a period when sw-depre- 
cation and modes^ got m his way.” 

Mr. McFarlane^s qualities as a conciliator 


and his political understanding as much as his 
substantive bad^round helped him make the 
adjustment in 1984. 

Publicly, the ndmini yt rah o n had been embar- 
rassed b>’ several accounts of disarray that char- ' 
acterized arms coniTOl processes during the first V. 
tenn. Frequmt (Uvisions between Mr. 9iultz 
and Mr. Weinbeiger on a wi^ range of policy - ' 
issues added to the impression ctf an administra- ' 
tion that could not get together on fore^ 
policy. 

Mr. Read's political advisers also pressed •, 
anxiety pnvaiefy, especiafly after the disclosure 
last nmng that the Central Intelligence Agen^ ' 
had directed the miiUDg of Nicaraguan harbors. ' 
These advisers said they distrust^ the ClA ; 
director, wnUam I Ca^, and were worried 
(hat some agency adventure would put the preti- " 
dentonihedefentiveaiak^mmnentuitore- ' 
election campaign. 

But Mr. Baker, who was consistently at odds 
with Mr. Clark and Mr. Casey, had fonned a ' ' 
dose working rdationship with Mr. M^arlane, , 
who ended up meetingr^ularly with Mr. CasQT \ 
and inviting him to poiodic lunt^ whh Mr. '' 
Shuliz and Mr. Weinwrger. Some ihou^t that ' 
move would provide an e^y wanting of sur- ’ 
prises, but no surprises matenalized. 

To defuse Shultz- Weinberger tensions, Mr. f 
McFariane began weddy breakfast meetings f, 
with them m which they could air grievances 
and make policy recoiumaidatioos in coofi- ! ' 
denix that i^t they said would never lave the 
room. 

A White House official described Mr. McFar- 
iane as “using the Soaatic technique of always 
asJdng good questions, never pushing" is meet- 
ings with Mr. Sboltz and Mr. 'Weinberger and in 
National SeemiQr Council meetings where all 
are preaenL On many issues, this has produced 
conqiromise subseq;^tly approved 1 :^ Mr.- , 
Reagan. 

Duough (his process and over time, Nfr. 
McFariane also overcame Peniagon susindon 
that be wa&a mere handmaiden ofJtir..Shulcz. . *, 

In fact, on the Strata Defense Initiative ■' 
and Central America, Mr. McFariane's positiem ' • 
was much closer to that of the Pentagon than of 
the State D^nrtment, and he did not let his ^ 
fnend^ with Secret^ of Slate Shultz inter- ' 
fere with poliQr. 

In fact, an adntiflistialion official who fovors ' 
the missile defense plan ciedils Kir. KfoFadane 
with persaading a i^tical Mr. Shultz to siq>- 7 
poniL «• 

Theplam trinch haspieoocmml Mr. Reagan, ’ V' 

is the ooe issue that has built Mr. McFariane’s '‘‘‘ 
lelatiouship with the pretident. Mr. McFariane 'f 
has legul^ briefed reportexs on the issue; •- 
ftm phaazme not the improbable dream of an 
‘is^eoettabte shietd." as does Mr. Reagan, but ' 
the value of a less-than-perfect missile defense 
as an elonent of deterrence. ■■ 

“Strategic deterrence could evolve away from ' " 
nneJear offensive deterrence and into defenrive 
deterrence." Mr. Md^iiane has contended. 

As the revamped Re^an team starts the 
second tenn, no one is talking about Mr. 
Md^arlane as a No. 2 man. But after the depots 
diirf cti Michad K. Deaver, leaves this 
spring, Mr. McFariane will be the White 
House's ranldog senior oFTidaL 

The new ctuef of staff, Donald T. Re^an, has 
told Mr. McFariane that he will not mtetfere 
with Mr. M^arlane’s time with the resident, 
wiiicfa averages about four hours a w 6 dc,couadr 
erably more than the amount Mr. Rea^ . 
^leiuis with Mr. Shultz or with Mr. Weinbei^. : 

. In recent months, a Wlute House official s^ ' 
Mr. McFariane has become coofidem enmish • ; 
that he “feels free to tdl bad jdees to toe 
prerideoL" The joke to which the offidal re- > 
lened was idated during a plannin|ineetmg for 
this ^nin^s Bonn ecanonuc summiL 

It was about a ezicIeBt who was aftaid he ' 
would be stepped on and asked an owl what he 
should do abwt iL The owl suggested that the' •> 
cricket become an eagle: The cru±et agreed md 
asked how he should make the transformation. 

“Thafs Ir^^cs,” the owl replied. “Fm in - 
planning.” 

And so, at the White House, is Mr. McFar- > 
lane. 


TheGl 
Newroa 






Page 8 



ARTS/LEISUBE 


Eurythmics Ts a Project, Not a Group’ 


By Michael Zwerin 

Inunuuumil HeraU Tribimf 


group,” said one of its two mem-' 
bers, Dave Stewart The other. An- 


The team’s cbemisti^ 
them from Boy 


tes 

lomas 


P t APTC M kMcwBiu 1 uc uiu6i« nu" UHau iiuiu ovy luuuiaa 

^ Lennox, expia^ Cbe prweefs Dtdby, Hb TTraniMon Twins, Lau- 
ir. ^ ^ creativity per^Bctive: “Pop music is a trite rie Andason aM the rest of the- 


ir. .u ■ , V perqjective: “ftp 

ineir JcBoin from the Beatles to idiom which has the pn *™ *i al in it 


,'aie studio 

to something of gnaH^” virtuo^ who also faave'stage mes> 

Ft^omng the British ptm diarts eaoe, intdkcuials wi± a funl^ 
can become "^tifliz^ like Iwtenfag side, muriaang with a voiutl imagt- 
to the daily nevro/ said Stewart, natton. Most of all th^ hm 
who considers himsdf Eun^)^ found a w^ to combine avam- 
not British. To escape the “stifimg garde cxpenmeniation with mass 
‘UVNumber-One’ syndFome" and appeal 

. — io“g«oureaisoffthegroiind,’’ibe “We come from the left and end 

n^, but uese three each dianged two settled in Paris for three up at the ri^t," is the Stewart 

months this winter to lec^ th^ puts 1 l He synthesizes and invents 


Steely Dan to Euiytlmrics. The 
Beatles need no utroduciion. 
Stely introduced, rock to 
chords with fancy numbers. Eu- 
lythmics married it to Karibdnz 
StoBkhausen and John C a g e 
Making any one artist or group a 
bendimark is more or isss aiti* 


“Emyihinics is a project, not a next album. 


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CS31 SO.M.GO - 


sound using methods not yet in 
method bo(^ creadi^ the method 
books Qi tomoirow, jxpgramnnng 
more than anaaghig the melodies 
he and Lennox write with dements 
siidt a$ duAcmg tzaia wbe^ a Hsh 
slapping on a table, breaking milk 
bottles, a pinball machine running 
up a score. Excess sounds (“Dave 
dosng stodio doot’’) are fQed for 
future use in the project’s head- 
quarters, an old Londem duirdL 
“St^body watdiing us in the 
studio iTtig ht thinlf WeiC tnad 
scientists,” Stewart said, when 
we’re fiaighed it sounds Uke a hit 
an ^\e Tm obsessed with coml^- 
iog both lev^“ 

They add musiciacs onstage — a 
human tevd can also be part of the 
fflOL Their alnliiy to reproduce la- 
bmoudy layered studio sounds in 
real time jg state-of-the-art. This 
frees Stewart bom button-poshing 
on stage, frees lum to plqr his first 
love, the guitar, wiiQe Lennox' 
singSf pscinE, all in white with red 
doves, fadd^ a plastic mask over 
her face, the scene. She is 

the star, the one the press apes for. 

Beiiig interviewed “tau^ me a 
lot about mysdt” she said. *Tt’s 
healthy to be forced to verbalize 
ndut you're doing. It’s rather like 
^’re a pei^ and you have to 
kea sharpening it or it gpes UouL” 
Growing op in .^tiand, she 
snuBed Bute from the age of 7 untQ 
she realized she hated it after quali- 
fying for the Rt^al Academy <tf 


Mu^ She worited in restaurants 
and bookshps and b^an to sing as 
she discovered J<Hii MitcheD and 
Motown. Then she met Stewart 
who, after absorbing folk, blues 
and rock, began to leave the crowd 
when he pla;^ lute with a Renais- 
sance chamber ensemble. The first 
time be heard a synthesizer be was 
pfiui7«t "that a machine could 
m^e such warm and human 
swmds.” 

They started what he calls “a 
cottage industiy,” making tapes at 
home. Together thn began to em- 
bgiiidi the songs they wrote with 
iiniiciial elements — Calypso steel 
dnims, tape of a dulcimer running 
haclcw ard through the recording 
hiwiie Th^ came up with tbdr 
first hk albi^ ‘*Sweet Dreams Are 
Ma^ Of This,” for a cost of about 
£S400 (about 55,715). IVofits were 
reinvest into eqinpmeni. which 
Stewart learned how to repair and 
then r eprogram. 

De^te his eairii^ and beard, be 
r emin ds you of a no-nooscnse 
warkahohe executive. *Tf you listen 
to our sin^ ‘Love Is a Stranger,' it 
sound like an Abba love song 
at first But the lyrics are meant to 
disturb you. You’ll be even more 
disturbed when you see the video. 
On top of it remember, is this little 
inece chocolate cake; la-de-la- 
The most frightening inece 
of film footage I ever saw was in 
‘Qodcwofk Orai^’ when the guy 
plays mtb his knife and says, ‘Pret- 
ty, pretty.' That sort of smm up our 
muac; a juxtapoation between the 
glamorous and the horrible. The 
good cop and the bad cop. If you 
liirten to all of OUT five alblUDS, 
you’O find ^t juxtaposition a 
common deuominator.” 

This is what attracted them to 
accept the cotmmssion to write the 
miidf! for the film “1984,” which 
causoJ something of a scandal in 
tbe industry because there was al- 
ready a recorded, credited score. 
“Nobody told us about (hat at the 



QriUmfcu 

Enrydunics* Dave Stewart and Annie Lennox. 


be ginning ,” Stewart sud. “The film 
had gone so much over bui^et that 
the producer wanted a soundtrack 
that ne could release as an album to 
gel back some of tbe investmenL 
We saw it as a great qiportunity to 


experimenL At one point it got so 
/ell just give us 


heavy we said, *Wt 
our music back.' The producer has 
been brilham using the sioiy to get 
publicity.” 

He compares their London 
church with Andy WaihoPs Fac- 
tory: “We have a video section. 


project We have pemle weniong 
d I iove (he idea 


oa 


on these things and 
that something is alw^ 
at home even when Fm away, 
place is fuQ of people dc^ thin g s. 
When I call in, I don't get a lot of 
dead equipment” 


New Designer Ru^ Cost Enough to Hang on Watt 


By Josq>h Giovannini 

New York Times 5 en«r 


N ew YORK — To tread or not 
to trmd on the carpet is the 
quesriem. Over the last decade, a 
growing number designer rugs or 
art rugs have appeared in stores, 
diowiooms and galleries. Because 
<A their artistic images and exeat- 
don, they could as easOy be hung 
on the Widl as placed on tbe floor. 

These indo^ Hmited reissues of 
dassic rugs done in the 1920s, '30s 
and ’40s, and recently designed 
works by artists, craft artists and 
aidiitects who nonnally work out- 
side the conunocial mg industiy. 
The mgs are named and signed, 
and have the visual presence of 
paintings. 'They are often made in 
limited editicuis and la^ from 
about $1,000 to $8,000. Ih^ pro- 
vide a focus for a room in a way 
that most plain or evenly patterned 
waU-to-ww carpets do not The 
nigs range in size from 2 fay 3 feet 
(60 by 90 centimetem) to 8 by 12 
feet 

The strifc^ black and white 

** ft»nffi1fn«rlfiTig c” fOT CXEllDle— a 

vigorously graphic 6-by-6-fbot nm 
(k^ this year by the New York 
aicbitea Aian Bndisbaum for the 
New YoA eancem Vgoske — is 
not the mg for nentral even i 
sadi as an office, bat [ 
a rng /or a samll seating area. With 
numerous risnal anti cr^ 

OR, snch rugs give scale to a space, 
and be^ mart and define an area. 

While the New Yosk gaDety 
Modern Master T^iestiies has, 
smoe 1968, engaged such American 
artists as Robot Motherwell and 
Roy Liditenstein to deagn tqies- 
tries, many of which can M used as 
ivgs, a strong new thrust has come 
from the carpet manufactnrer 
V'Sodre. In 1 y 79 tbe company 
commissioned the Princeton azchi- 
teci Mkhael Graves to deagn a nig 
tl^ beca^ the first in a series that 
now includes a second Graves, as 
well as by CSiarles Gwathi^, 
S^lton Mindel Hairy Smith- 
Miller / Laurie Hawkinson, Nob & 
Nod and Tod Williams / Bfllie 
Tfaien. The collection wQl include 
detigng 1^ Richard Meier, Stevea 



*K>iwen '84,*’ one of a collection of eight designer by Christian One. 


HoU, Roger Fern, Michael KalD 
and D(dKxa Rdser. 

The New Yoik interior derigner 
Barbara of Dexter De- 

rign, is nsii% a 'Tod WDiiams / 
^ie Tsien nig in tfaie home ot an 
an M^ector. “Jt ats wdl on the 
flom and holds the space in a won- 
derful way,” she s^ “It's part sQk 
part wool ana there's a subtle, 
shimmering quality between 
them.” 

In 1983 the Classic Galinyintio- 
<hio^ ei^ abstract rags in limited 
editions. Created by the Paris de- 
agner Christian Due, some are ir- 
regulaiiy sbsgied; most are done in 
co^ neutral colors, with ayptic 
marfciiigs. Other companies that 
now cany art rugs include the Gal- 
kzy of Afmlied Arts and Furnimre 
the 2(ra Century. 

Alt tugs, however, do not nor- 
m^y lend themselves to mass pn> 
ductioa; the mediiini, in fact, is 
eqiecially suited to craft artists, 


who bring close, peiwnal attention 
and sIdU to each design. The Amer- 
ican (^t Museum is showing 
“For the Floor” in its gaDery at 77 
West 4Sih StieeL through May 1 1, 
48 rugs handmade by the artists 
who ^signed them. Many of the 
crah artists exhibiting have back- 
grounds as painters, and they often 
use theoolofs and im^es that char- 


y O • GAUMDNT CHAMPS ELYSEES, GAUMONT LES HALLES, SAINT GERMAIN STLIDIO, UGC DANTON, 
14 JUILLET BEAUGRENELLE. MONTPARNASSE BIENVENUE. 


7 


ACADEMTr' AWARD 

NOMINAnOISS 

including 

BEST PICTURE 


BEST DIRECTOR 

Robert Benton 


BEST ACTRESS 
Sally Field 




SAUy FIELD. 


PLACES IN THE HEART 


Tii^Pfctu«sP»Bette-SALiynEU)-TnJ«^ UNDSW CROUSE- ED HARRB -AMYMADIGAN 

JOmMALIOVKll-I>^hfl^‘GLCWER-Ediled by CARXUTTLETOACR- Director of Phol^rapltyNESPORALMEI^ 
Eicrutive Producer MICHAEL HaOsMAN * nodiced 

WiittwejidDbBCledttyROBERT^n^ «" 


timmiunfftiTi 


acterize their paintmg.^- Some rX 
the carpets, or siinilar <mes, can be 
commissioaed: addresses of the 
artists can be obtained from the 
iDuseum. 

*nus land of rug is bring m- 
creasingly accepted and is once 
ag^n an active element in interior 
design.” says Mchael Steinberg of 
Furniture of the 20th Century. In 
1981 the showroom started to tm- 
poit reissued classics by Eileen 
Gray, whose work. Sieinbeig sa^, 
was iafluemial in reawakeolng in- 
terest in tius sort of nig. The firm 
now also impo^ Juan Gris rugs 
and carries “Dtoner at 8,” a rug 
designed last year by the New Yon 
arrat^ Rcdim Stern. 

Steinberg auiiimtes the popular- 
ity of these rugs partly to POsi- 
Modetnism. vrara “has reintro- 
duced color and decoration to 


architectUFe.” he says, adding that 
Post-Modern architects no longer 
conrider the floor a neutral pl^ 
requiring a uriifonn floor covering. 

Fiances Nelson, director of tbe 
Gall^ of ^iplied Arts, says, 
“Artists now are interested for the 
first time since the 1 930s in making 
n applied an that can be used.” The 
gahery is seUing several rugs de- 


signed by the painters Robert Za- 
kaniteb and Robert Kushner. Za- 
kaniich drew the cartoons for his 
carpets on the floor rather than on 
a wall since he intended that they 
be us^. and seen, on the floor. 
Unlike a painting, his two carpets 
have no or dowiL The painter’s 
8-by-12-foot carpet — a sumptu- 
ously colorful rug with large, softly 
edged pink petals against a field dr 
about 35 colors — was woven in 
Aubusson, France. The all-wool 
rug costs SS6J)00 — the most ex- 
penave by far of these art rugs. 

Most of tbe rags at V'Soske are 
designed by architects and have 
strong mtial qualities. In “Ihe 
Scarf,” Tod Williams and Billie 
l^ien have “dropped” a silk scarf 
on a wool rug — what appears to be 
a scarf is actually part of the rug, 
woven in rilk. 


Stage ^Seven Year ltch^ 
IsNotUptoScmtch 

By Michael Billi'ngton 

leremuwHal Hertdd Tnbune 


L ondon — Hollywood has al- 
< ways fed off Broadway, and 


occasionally trumped it Once yw 
have seen Hepburn and Grant in 
“The Philadelphia Story" or 


THE LONDON THEATER 


Matthan and Lemmon in “The 
Odd Couple,” any st^ revival is 
bound to seem a bit tame: Tbe 
same, I fear, is even more true of 
^niie Sevoi Year Itch" currently 
b eing revived at the Albety theater 
with Patrick Mower and Adnenne 
Posta giving two perfectly good 
performances but unable to exor- 
cise memcnies of Ton Ewell and 
Marilyn Monroe in the Billy Wild- 
er film of 1955. 

George Axrirod's play, wrii^ 
in 1952, has now acquired a socio- 
logical interesL It is abont the sexu- 


<me of (hrir nomber whose identity 
Galy Gay is forced to assume) is a 
Tibetan pagoda and its wottiup^ 
peis are Chinese. 

What tlM play needs is a dynam- 
ic idaicatum t^ continues Kip- 
ling’s ’’Soldiers Three” with Ch^ 
Unesque screen comedy. What h 
gets is some pretty frantic mug^ng 
with Spall veering wildly between 
Charles Laughum at his most nuPti 
and a dandified NoSl Coward. 


al temptations besetting a solitare 
husband during a bot New York 


summer. But the background is as 
•fasdnating as the for^round. Ax- 
drod us back to a time when 
Freudian shrinks were automati- 
cally fiumy. wbeo cbeq> pocket 
were tniting the bocdcstalls 


up ffh flr g f s and threatened with ex- 
ecution, breaks down into a blulv 
bering, sweating quaking wredt 
does the play to ^ one’s 
iiwagiria tiim: the nearer & chara^' 
ter gets to dea^ the more the {day- 
comes to life. And the final im^ 
of ^>aU sii^e-handeiSy craning 
down the occupants of a Tibetan 
fortress certainy rams home 
Bret’s message: 

The rest of the equate frer^ 

with humor. The signal exceptim IS 

hfiriam Atogolyes. who plays die 
canteen-wooian widow Btfoidt (a 
forerunner (ti Mother Oxirage) 
with a sly parody of seductiveness. 
Whether earesang a cucumber or 
rotating her ample hips, Maigolya 
(last seen as Gertrude Stein) xnm-' 
lessly sends up ail our stock notions 


lessly senos up an our stocxaoams 
tbonies “The Scariet Letter” as I Rnt the other members 


computers, and there's always 
some band rehearsing. I want my 
life to be flexible, lo involve con- 
stantly changing stimuK. We'ie al- 
ways changing our band’s li^p, 
for example. We want to int^rale 
art, video and ethnic variety in our 


of tbe cast undercut this quirky, 
fimay, haunting jtiaywithastyle^ 
iiffring tiMt is bro^ rather than 
BrechL 


Was an Adulteress”) and when 
gmnking was a penzu^ble social 
activity. Drawing on his first dga- 
rette in tix we^s, the hero cries, 

“All those wonder^ ingenious tars 
and resins,” a line that nowadays 
would get him nm out ot town by 
the various anti-stnoldng leases. 

The play is admittedly very tfif- , ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 

ferent ftom tbe film in that it focus- biguaty. But The Garden or Ea- 
cy on tlii» fftans a^prf fanla-ries of the ;^ailiL whicfa the tOUling 7:84 
deserted male who is on stw company has brou^t to the Siaw 
thioiighouL And, to be fair, A^- Thea^ is mess^e-drama pure 
rod is (titan very funny about the and ample: Peter Cox, the drama- 


Brecht, in his maturity, com-' 
bined Miaixirt icieas with ircmic aiD- 


difierent mores of tbe 39-year-old 
J(tim Doe hero and the 22-year-old 
actress from tbe upstairs apjartmeat 

who interrupts his reveries: the 
man’s idra oS a seductive phono- 
graph record, for instance, is Wal- 
ter Huston's CEoaky rendition of 
“September Sm^” But although 
the play has its pen^ (the hus- 
band’s dreams, for instance, are 
voy much rdaied to his jcb of 
thinldng up lurid paperparic cov- 
ers), it has little of me ar^ sensu- 
ality of Trader’s movie. 

Watching tbe current revival di- 


rected by Jan^ Roose-Evans, it is 
alsohardl 


[ to bariish mootories cti the 
screen stars. Patrick Mower recap- 
tures the infidelity wdl but Moww 
(who once playM Don Juan) has a 
much too raidsh and romantic 
presence to convince ycu he would 
ever be sweaty-pairned about a 
date. Posta plays the upstans ao 
Cress as an ankle-socked ioBocent 


tist, has come up witii a morale- 
boosting entertaizunent deamed to 
raise (be ^rits of those iavraved in ' 
the year-(M British mineis' strike. 
Set in a w^aie-dub in die heart of 
the Kent ntinwig cemununity, tbe 
play says imequivocany that things 
win never be the same even when 
the strike is settled; that the polioe 
cannot be trusted, that the bieadt 
between strikers and workingmm- 
ers wQl never be healed and t&t the 
militant minmt ' wives Will QO Ic 

er be content mthtben^ttikit 
enslaves. 

It sounds hectorii^ In fact, 
though totally cne-sided. the piebe 
is si^ririn^y dieerful and enter- 
tainmg Tfa^ is partly because (ti 
s<nnB tuneful songs by Paul Attia- 
hams. It is also because cast, ditec- 
tor and even audience have an un- 
trouNed faidi in the ri^tness of 
their cause. When at the end a 
striking miner’s wife mme on stage 


who flops around in barebaU -mid announced, ‘'This playistrue.' 
sweaters a nd dmilrs potato chips in she was cheered. Tto may not teO 


mance comes from Royce NGIls as 
a fiastered, Panama-hatted psychi- 
atrist who dearly cannot k^ his 
own liNdo undff control When 
Mnis is on stage, Axdrod’s play 
lakes over and you teaqrorarfiy for- 
get the long smidow cast tty Ewell 
and Monroe dreamily whispering 
that she krmw a piece of mosic was. 
classical when it had “no vocals.” 
□ 

Sometimes prerious tbeater pro- 
duetions cast their own shadows. 
Nine years ago the Royal Shake- 
^)care Conmany meinorably re- 
vived Brecht's 1925 oooiedy about 
the rec(»stnictioa of the human 
personality, 'IVIan Equals Mu.” 
Now the same play has been re- 
vived by tbe cosmemditaD Almeida 
theater troupe (wmdi alro has a 
company in Paris playing Dos- 
toyevsky’s *The Posesed”) in a 
production by David Hayman and 
the result is strenuous, hectic and 
only patchily funny; indeed tte 
play ^y takes off in the second 
half when we see a sinmle Irish 
porter. Galy Gay (played^ Timo- 
thy Sfutil), transformed into a 
drodly fighting madiine throngb a 
mixture of intunidation and fear. 

The piece itself remains fasdnat- 
ing and uacbaracterisiic. Not only 
does it pre-d^ Bredit’s eqxiusal 
of Marxism, it rigorously contra- 
dicts ft since it sbo^ what ha p|«n«i 
when a robust individual is taken 
over by mass ideology. It dso an- 
tidpates 20ib-ceDtm techniques 
of brain-w^rihing. is even 
more strikmg is Bredit’s poetic, 
gBo^apU^ coitiusion. *nie set- 
tn^ is Britirii India, the soldiers are 
KipUngesque Tommies but the 
temple they raid early on (losing 


much drama but it certaialy 
tells us something about the cur- 
rent, ^ded state of Britain. 


DOONESBURY 


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HcnilbS:©ribunc 


Slatutics Index 



AMEhprtcn P.I3 EorAlflM <*Mm P.)S 
AMEX nwn.'tMnP.U Film rm notes P.I3 
Nv^E Bciesi P 10 Com imrkait p, p 
Nvof nnm/fBwi P.t» iniernt rotes P. 0 
ConoAon swdks P.H AMrxei sucnmoi • p U 
CuirefK* rotes P. « Options p M 

CemiiwaitMs P.M QTC stock P.U 

Olvidenos P.H Onief worseis P.IS 

^XDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1985 


BUSINESS / FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 10 


** 


Page 9 


IWTERNATIOliAL MANAGER 

Executives Get Tangled 
In U.S. Immigration Laws 

By SHERRY Bi aa.AN.AN 

/RtefitatfitMw/ HemiJ Tnhunr 

A top French executive being transferred to hi.s companv’s 
U.S. affiliaxe for a few years expected his famiiy to be 
granted twx»- to ihree>year «sas as well. But when the 
U.S. State D^anmeni found out that he wns not 
married but was Using in “concubinage,** it refused to give the 
family the same visas. 

“Spou^ only” declared the U.S. Slate Department. In 
France, living en conetAinage, which allows couples to Hie taxes 
.separately and gives all dependents tn the arrangement social 
security benefits, recently has become a legal ^lemaiive to 
mam:^. And that, according to officials at the U.S. consulate in 
Paris, has created unforeseen — 

problems for some e.xecutives. , . 

After much faag^ag. the Alter three years ... 
executive's family finally left 
for the United States armed e.\p6Ct tOe 
with tourist visas that allow 

only a maximum stay of six COfHpanj tO have an 

Amencanin thatjob.’ 

But ibe case points up the ^ 

difficulties some European ~ ' 

companies have had ^ing with the intricacies and idionucra- 
sies of U.S. immigration laws. The statutes, like those of' many 
other countries, are d^gned to allow adjmission for foreign 
employees wi^ special treats or those employed by foreign- 
‘ bas^ coo^)anies, but prevent the influx of worieers who could 
take jobs away from Americans. 

“It goes in periods,” said one French executive. “U.S. authori- 
ties get a little nervous, then w'e restrain oundves a Uttle and 
don't apply for as many visas for a while.” 

Some French companies with large operations in the United 
States said that tb^ recently have found it difficijli lo obtain 
business visas for French technical managers and workers, 
known as E-1 visas. 

A French croissant company that has been rapidly expanding 
■ in tbe United States was denied visas for additiodal croissant 
bakers last year. 

“We didn't think they had to be French to slap on a lump of 
frozen dough,” said one U.S. government offldal. 

T he company, which has created 1,200 U.S. jobs since it 
b^an operation in the United States in 1974, was sur- 
prikd 1^ the decision. Since then, it has opened a aois- 
sant-baking school in Waslungton, D.C., and graduated its rust 
class of 50 American bakers. 

According to U.S. government sources, consuls now are ex- 
pected to tell companies with E- 1 visas that at some point in time, 
they will not get additional £-1 \isas for technical managers or 
workers. 

**At the beguming, a company can bring in highly skilled 
technicians to start up their operation,'* said one UJS. govern- 
ment offidaL “After three years we just wouldn't grant anymore 
&1 visas. We expect tbe company to have an American in that 
job.” 

There are other visas available — the H-1 for people with 
special skSllic, usually granted to entertainers, soentists and peo- 
ple recognized as leaders in their pt^cular Helds, and tbe L-1 for 
executivo-levd transfers within an mtemationaloompany— but 
applications Hrst must be made at an Imnugration and Natural- 
ization Service oRjce in the United States. The process can be 
time-coasumingand the visas are issued for a inaximum of two to 
three years. 

Yet companie prefer the E-1 visa because it has certain 
advamages over tbe other business visaSi. Con^>anies need only 
apply for E-1 visas at the U.S. consulate in tbdr home coootiy 
and, once issued, the Cve-year E-1 visas are renewable. 

“The beneGt of tbe E-1 visa is that it's the cheapest, you don't 
need the assistance of a lawyer, it’s very cmivenient and you are 
sure to have tbe visa before you leave Paris,*' says Philippe Sfaiti, 
(Coatinaed on Page 17, CoL 1) 



Late interbonk roles on Feb. 26 , enduing fees. 

Official fbdngs for Amsterdon, Brusseb. FranUwt. Afflon, Paris, York rdes ert 
4 PM. 


i 

f 

DM. 

pr. 

HL. 

«Mr. 

BP. 

SP. 

V«l 

3S3B5 

4.103 

11040* 

37A* 

0.1013 


&63* 

13435* 

'150400 

ms 

701)25 

3ai6» 

&592S 

233* 

I7J72S 


33X75 aue* 

3469 

3.621 

^ - 

3171S- 

ia«x 

0L165* 

4.962* 

11050* 

' iaz7* 

lasts 

- 

3A12S 

IliDIQ 

2.2S1M 

4.ID3S 

7170 

0055 

274X0 

S.1S7J0 

X361J0 

63sm 

20447 

_. 

SS1J4 

31JI7 

740J15 

0304 

- 

1067 

3J95 

10X75 

2.11100 

3J46 

60M 

2X7S 

260X5 

IWitf 

itai 

IjOSTV 

■ 

4JS« 

Z697S 

ISIS* 

3i2ii4asn« 

aioas 

27706 

7620 

24X4 

12X2* 

63.10 

370SQ* 

9000 

— 

2«31 

3BM 

S4.4S* 

27.615* 

01X54 

74X35* 

41925 * 

— 

I.12B2* 

IUM3 

06ISS 

20213 

6X919 

101929 

25192 

447463 

IJ76S I67JU 

AWias 

arena 

12B23? 

MUMS 

003676 

3J237 

66MS6 

27720 347.144 



Dollar Values 






Per 

s 


Pv 

« 



trenc* 



CTTMMf 


CWtOBCT 

UAS 

uas 

Bmhn 


UaX EqolV. 



.AAVterdmi 
Brvssdsta) 
PruicMrt 
London (b) 
Mitan 

HctfVerktO 
Pens 
TekvE 
zertefe 
I ecu 
I soft 


s 

E«N<r. 

Ci*S AosIrailHS DJDII IrMS 1.UM 

W414 AOrtnOBKhniH UM U0I3 IWMdUWkW 7S4JS 

a0U3 BtMMftLAwc «f.n uxn tCMemehm- uon 

SlTW CvwEteS 1J» 03W Molay.rtaeBIt Zill 

nfoB [Tflifc Itmai 13 jO aiPU MarM.JDaM U3 

B.UI FtawrtnMrtka IMS *iea PMLpoe isnss 

kJWS CrMknedima ISliE DUOS* Part.feKOdo USA 

&13S1 HomKohS TJOSS 027ft Sondlrivel isn 

f SforHaBiMNS Irttnt 

lei ConHiwrclal frone (bi Ameurrii newM le buy one Bound Id Amounlf needcii ta bm em bellor (•> 
UAHs of MMX) (Mila oftaeo (y) UnNs s< iftflN 
NO.: not AuQled; NjL: nel avnlloblt. 

SourePK aentvp du aaowbui Banea Commtrelole Italkm mUan); Baimit 

Natipaue dp Pwts (Paris/; IMP (SDRii Benoue AroDs el itdemailanMe tnneestosemem 
Idkvr, rlval,dlriiam/.Piher data Irani Revlen end AP. 


0.4317 SMoPoroS 2J7K 
«4S3 S.AMeaarwrillsn 
aam S.MarBen«n MUO 
QM51 SyuOMUa ISMO 
ftlWO SwaaLklHW 10077 
U3U Tblwans 3fJS 
Oioa TMbdrt 3U7S 
03733 UAe.«Hm U737 



Enroemrenej Deposits 


Feb. 26 


SwM 



Dotar 

D-Mark 

Pme 

SMrtinB 

Prone ECU SDR 

UW. 

0<H. 

- 09k 

5W - S9h 

59k - 6«k 

14W • 14W 

lOH- 109kt«k - 10 IW 

- B9h 

aw. 

0 

• 9* 

5<W . SW 

S9k ‘ 

' 6lk 

14W • I4W 

104<- M9k 10 - lOM 04i 

. « 

3M. 

9W - PH 

59k • 61k 

6Hi 

' 6«k 

1414 - 14U 

11 - 111k lOlte- 10»h 19k 

- 9tk 

6M. 

9«k ■ 99h 

6Vi - 6W 

6Vk • 

6*k 

131W 139ta im- 1l*k 1010- 10V6 91k 

- 9lk 

1Y. 

10M - 1066 

6N - 61k 

59k - S9k 

129k- 13 H. 

119k- 12 1D<e- 101k 9h 

- 996 


Rotes cwiWcaWf ta Merbank dMcHs el 51 million mMmm lor eeuMaMnU. 

Soareas; Morwan Caaneity tdeBar. DM, SP, Pevad, PFI; LlaetH Bank IBCU/t Citibank 
ISOR/. 


Asian Dollar Rates 


Feb. 26 


Ime. 

n* -m 

Seurea: Beulors. 


imos. 
f n, >5 Ik 


3mee. 
9H -fvy 


Sims. 
fW - to 


10U -tnb 


; Key Money Rates 

' United States 


‘ Dfscocflit Hate 
‘Pederal Pumts 
Prime Rote 
' erokar Loon Role 
'Comm. Paper. 3b-i7f dovs 

Treotwv B)Ms 
c>monih Treasury Bills 
CD's aue* days 
CD's dbB9 dovs 

West Gtemanr 

Lombortf Bate 
OwemisM Rede 
One AMRtfi iMerbenk 
3mnnth inlertRHik 
bmenm IMorbank 

fnaet 

Intervention Rate 
Call Money 
One-mgntb intereonk 
3-monffi (nterbanit 
etnonlb InlertaAh 


CtoM Prev. 

8 • 

7H 8M 
tOta tOVb 
fu-eiv 
US 179 
U1 U6 
14? 149 

122 118 
84t aa 


laa 

SJO 

US US 

Its its 

140 140 


IIP4 lOW 

int 7M 
MM MM 
w«fe MM 
10 7/U IB 7/U 


Britaia 

Bonk Base Rale 
CaU Money 
viHloy Traosurv BUI 
XiTMnfti lirtyrOonk 


Owe Prev. 
14 14 

12 14tt 
13 «. IM 
UIV 


Dbeeunt Role 
Cell Money 
40.dav Interbank 


s 

6 th 
6M 


i 

su 

4«y 


Gold Prices 


] 


50VTBM: fleuteoir Conmonbank, CmH* 1-v- 
avtala, L/oyds Bank. Bank el TM>o. 


AM. PM. CbUe 

nUS 7SJU& — tUS 

28150 - — llin 

384S0 38164 - UQ 

28415 28125 +■ IJ» 

s fjfM 3B5JS + ISO 

- 28100 +kOO 

OtnctBl lUiiiBS ter London. Paris and Luiiein- 
Dourotopaiino bU! desine wins fbt Hona Iona 
md LuTich. New Vort Cemeo eurrsnl conirocl. 
All prices m uas per ounce. 

Source; RPwfens. 


Hbm Kene 
Lvumbouro 
Paris MIS kilo) 
Zurlen 

LiOKlDn 

New fork 


Some Compaides That Have AckNited “Poteon PR” Pravisbms 

Com parties with proviaione glvfnfl their shoreholdars aoeclaJ riehta mm would make a takeover prohiblttvely expansive 


Company 

Potential AcQuIrer 

Date “PelMTn 

Pflr'provMon 

announced 

Outeema 

Phillips Petroleum Co. 

Cart C. Icahn 

February 

1985 

still being fought 

Colgate-Pelmolive Co. 

Sir James Goldsmith 

October 

1984 

remains 

independent 

Household International Inc. 

not specified 

August 1 984 

remains 

independent 

Crown Zelierbach (nc. 

Sir James Goldsmith 

July 1964 

remains 

independent 

Bell & Howell Co. 

National Education Corp. 

July 1963 

remains 

independent 

Lenox Inc. 

Brown-Forman Distillers 

June 1983 

agreed 
to be taken 
over 


ttw Ka<, ro>> tf 


Putting Poison in the Corporate Pillbox 


By Tamar Lewin 

Nnr Tima Servur 

NEW YORK — Wall Street's “poison 
pith” appear to be deadly medicine — even 
thou^ no company has actually had to swal- 
low one yci. 

'The pmson pill is an increasingly popular 
defense against takeovers. 'Though it can uike 
different forms, the basic strategy involves a 
company giving its stockholders the right to 
buy shares at a special price, or gfit otW 
beneTits, when a hostile bidder tries to take 
over the company — making such a takeover 
pri^bilivdy eiqjmive, or *>>isoaous,'‘ for 
the would-be a^uirer. 

Tbe defease, aad tbe phrase, e/naged in 
tbe course of Lenox Inc.'s 1983 battle to fend 
off a takeover by Brown-Fonnan Distillers 
Corp. — althou^ the china and silverware 
company ultimately decided to dissdve its 


pill and acoepi a bid from BnowTt-Fonnan. 

StilL most takeover e^rts see the poison 
pill as a perfectly effecth% preventativer No 
L-onipany that adc^pted the pill has ever 
had to use iL 

The term immediately joined such other 
takeover argot as “vritite krti^L** “crown 
iewels” and “golden parachutes.” However, 
two takeover experts. Martin Upton of 
WachieU, Lipion. Rc^en & Katz, and Martin 
Siegel of Kidder. Peabody & Col, who helped 
design (he poison-pill daense, deny coiniag 
tbe phrase. 

Whatever the ori^ o( the name, the tactic 
is spreading. It has been adopted by perhaps 
a dooen companies, and many more are said 
lo be considering it - 

Most recently, a New Y'ork rmander. Carl 
C Icahn, has aheged that Phillips Petroleum 


Co. has cried to mount a poisoo-piif defense 
to avoid hu> bid. Phillips's independent direc- 
tors, however, characierize their approach as 
a “fair-value plan.” 

“Takeover defenses, like women's clothes, 
tend to go in fads.” said .Anhur Fleischer Jr., 
a New York takeover lawyer. ‘Hl^nainly. poi- 
SOD pills are in the news right new. and 
they're what everyone is talking about IMiile 
only a handful of compaitie.<^ have actually 
adopted them, a lot of companies are going 
through the process of self-cxaBiination. 
thinking about whether they want to do it.” 

A poi^n pill can take diiHertnt forms. In 
one variety, known as a “right-of-iedemp- 
tion” pill tto defensive company gives eara 
shareholder some extra bonus rights if an 
unfriendly suitor buys, say, 20 percent of the 
company. Upon reaching the 20-perceni irig- 
(Cbn^ned oo P^ 15, CoL 1) 


Dollar Drops 
In N. Y. After 
Volcker Remark 


Accounting Rule Puts France at Odds With EC 


By Carl Gewirrz 

laumalioHat HeraU Tnhme 

PARIS — A revision in the 
French law governing how compa- 
nies ke^ tfaw books is creating a 
quiet stir within auditing pro- 
fession as weU as at the Commis- 
sion des Operations de Bourse, the 
government watchdog ^cocy of 
the stock exchange. 

Because of the rerisioa. auditors 
say they fear they will no longer be 
able lo rign company reports stat- 
ing tl^ are “true and fair,” while 
COB ofHrials worry that share 
prices will not adequately reflect 
the true standing of a i^pany 
because of the reporting change. 

The revision, for which oriitaer 
the govern men i. the national soci- 
ety of auditors nor the national 
employers' associatira is willing to 
accept responsibility, mandates 
that compames wtucb have private 
retirement plans cannot make bal- 
ance-sheet provisions for accrued 
expenses until an employee has re- 
tim and begias drawing beoefiis. 

. To oof^ly with European Com- 
tnimiiy directives aimed at hanno- 


nizing consolidated company re- 
ports. which ore due to take effect 
in France stari^ in 1986, audiux'S 
have bseo advising French compa- 
nies for almost a decade to b^n 
showing these potential liabilities 
rather than waiting and being 
forced to report very large excep- 
tional diarges in one gulp. 

However. Article 87 of the 1985 
Finance Bill enacted at the aid of 
lasc year, now prevents companies 
from doing thaL 

Michel MalUeU’Lassus. an ad>^s- 
er lo Finance Minister Pierre 
govoy, said the Illation was not a 
governmem iniiiauve. “it was pro- 
posed from tbe floor and we ac- 
cepted it.” he said, adding that “it 
was our uaderatandiag that it had 
the backing of the Fatronat.” the 
national eoqiloyers' association. 

But a Pa'tronai spokesman, 
Christian de Bonnet-d'Oleon. cate- 
gorically denied that “We had 
nothing to do with tL” be smd. 

Orndals at the national society 
of auditors as well as at the COB 
indicated that they are wtvking to 
have the iogislation repealed. 


Accountants report that only a 
limited number of French compa- 
nies are affected since few Hrms 
have private pension schemes 
aimed at supplememing the stale 
retirement funds. Nevertheless, the 
companies which have such private 
plans are among the nation's big- 
'They include such major na- 
tionalized entities as Qi^triciti: de 
France. Pechiney. the state rtilway 
SNCF. Renault. Rh^ne-Pouienc 
and Sl Gobain. as well as such 
private-sector giants as Air Li- 
qukfe, BSN and Peugeot. 

To give an idea of the amoums 
invt^^. accouniams cite the ex- 
ample of Sodeie NaiiooaJe Elf Aq- 
uitaine. tbe siate-ouTted oU con- 
oero. ^cb is praised for its high 
reporting standards. At tbe end of 
1^3. the latest period for which 
data are available the oil company 
repmiad it had 5 billioo francs 
fS474.8 miliion at current exchange 
rates) benefits due employees. 
Qf a 742'(nillion'fraoc charge 
against earnings that yev in a con- 
tinuing process of building reserv es 
to Tmaoce the costs. 

Tbe private plans largely date 


from the l9S0s. when companies 
needed to provide atiractite bene- 
Tits to compete for workers. 

Accountants report that most of 
these private plans are not funded, 
meaning that the cosi wUI be 
charged to cuneai income as the 
benefits are paid. And in many 
cases, the potential costs have not 
been carried on the books as a 
liability, but simply iccotded as a 
footnole to the annual report 

This was due to change. Direc- 
tives comiog out of the EC Com- 
raissioo in Brassris, aiming to har- 
monize company reports and 
consolidated results, say that all 
liabinties should be recorded on the 
balance sheet This EC standard- 
ized oseihod of reporting is due lo 
come into foice here on Jan. 1. 
1986. for all companies with listed 
shares or public debt, and in 1990 
for all other companies. 

As it now stands. French law 
appet^ to be in violation of the EC 
directives. 

Critics see tbe govemmenl as be- 
ing the priiDBiy beneficiary of tbe 
legislation. 


Con^kti tf Oar Siutf Fnm Dapiarhe. 

NEW YORK — The dollar 
plummeted Tuesday in New Y'ork 
in “extremely disorderly" trading 
after Federal Reserve Board chair- 
man Paul .A. Vdeker's testimony to 
Congress was inierpreied as p^- 
misuc on the doUar.s future. 

Cold recovered almost half of its 
Monday losses. 

After rising shaipiy in Europe, 
the dollar plunged in New Y'oik 
trading. 

“It happened suddenN- and the 
market was so disorderly that 
banks W'ere not ^ving quotes most 
of tbe moTTung.” said one currency 
dealer, adding that the spreads be- 
tween buy and sell prices “were so 
wide you'couldn'i gel a price.” 

Mr. Volcker said that tbe size of 
the U5. budget deficit w.i5 a peril 
to the dollar and would evemuaily 
lead to the currency's fall. “The 
scenario is there. 1 can't predict the 
i)jnina,”'Mr. Volckersaid. “h'snoi 
a very happy prospect, to say the 
least.” 

Although his statements were 
meant as a long-term forecast, they 
were perceived as a slightly more 
uegativ-e stance. 

One bank trader maintained that 
Mr. Voicker's remajls were “care- 
fully orchesmled” lo offset the im- 
paci of hi.<« testimony last week to 
the Senate, which helped propel the 
dollar on its latest onsraught 
againsl the world's currencies. 

Mr. Volcker said then that the 
Fed had stopped easing its mone- 
tary policy and he did not nile out 
tightening later this year. 

' “Maybe tomorrow people U'iU 
come to the conclusion that they 
overreacted to Voicker's remarks 
and push the dollar back up.” said 
Timothy Summerfield, chidf trader 
in New York for Contioenial Illi- 
nois Bank. “Some will call this a 
technical correction that was over- 
due. 

“But tbe market is too long of 
dollars and there has to be a blow^ 
out down the line,” Mr. Summer- 
Tidd said. 

Dealers were sbakeo by the lack 
of Fed presence to smooth out 
wbat “was disorderly irading in 
any sense of the term.” said Daniel 
Holland, vice president at Dis- 
count Corp. of New York. "If in- 
lerveniioD poli^r is to smooth out 
such markets it should be on the 
way down as well as tbe way up.” 

In New York, the British pound 
finished at S1.0670. up from 
51.0532. Other late rates m New 
York, compared with late rates 
Monday mduded: 33950 Deut- 
sche marks, down from 3.443; 
10J7S French francs, down from 
10.535; 3.84^ Dutch guilders, 
down from 3.905; 2.875 Swiss 
francs, down from 2.915. and 


Reuters Pretax Profit 
Rose 34% Last Year 


By Bob Hageir)' 

tnlenufiaiial Herald Tnbane 

LONDON — Reuters Holdings 
PLC reported Tuesday a 34-per- 
oent rise in pretax proTii for 1984 
and an agreement to acquire Rich 
Inc., a Cmcago-based designer of 
communications systems for Tman- 
dal dealing rooms. 

Reuters, a flnaacial-information 
and news service that went pubUc 
with a share offering in London 
and New York Iasi summer, repim- 
ed pretax prdit of £74J miUion 
($78 nullioa). up from £55.2 roil- 
tion in 1983. 

Net profit soared to £42.6 nul- 
lion from 1983’s £11.6 millioa. 
which was depressed by a deferred 
tax charge of £18.9 mlUioa. 

Revenue grew 29 percent to £313 
nuIUon, from £242.6. 

The ngmes mildly disappointed 
some bullish institutions, analysts 
said, and Reuters shares slippy 9 
pence (o close on the London Stock 
Exchange at 365 pence each. 

Reuters, which announced talks 
with Rich last November, said it 
had agreed to acquire the company 
for about $2 miUron in cash and 


new Reuters shares with a current 
value of S55J rnilljoa 

'the sale is subject to an audit <4 
Rich's accounts showing pretax 
proTu of at least $4 million (or the 
15 months ended last Dec. 31. as 
wdl as se\vra] other ooaditions. In 
the year ended last Sept. 30, Rich 
said it had revenue of $30 million to 
$35 millioa. 

Reuien already distributes lUcb 
systems in Europe. Rich calls itself 
the largest supplier of dealiog- 
room systems in the Uaiied States. 

Reuiets conceded that its reve- 
nue growth was slow in North 
.America, where the compaov faces 
tough competition from Teleraie 
Inc. and (^uotroo. 

In pound terras. North Ameri- 
can revenue rose 20 percent, but 
roost of that pin reflected the de- 
cline of the pound agmost the dol- 
lar. Reuters decUn^ to say bow 
much its U.S. revenue grerv In dol- 
lar terms. 

For the cuneni year, the London 
stockbrokerage of Buckmaster & 
Moore tentatively forecast tbai 
pretax prefit would rise about 35 
percent to £100 millioa. 


U.K, Trade Gap 
Narrom;Bonn 
Reports Surplus 

Coi^iledly Oar Sadf Fwm Dafandns 

LONDON — Britain rep^- 
ed Tuesday that its trade deficit 
narrowed in January from the 
previous month, while West 
Germany said its surplus for the 
month feU 67 percenl from the 
Dece m ber Figure. 

Id Britaia, the seasooaily-ad- 
jusied visible trade deficii nar- 
rowed in January to £76 million 
($79 miilioD) from defictis of 
044 millioa in Decmber and 
£239 million io January 1984. 
the British Department of 
Trade and Industry said. 

The d^aruneni said Brit- 
ain's current account surplus 
widened lo £324 million in Jan- 
uary. from ^6 millioD in De- 
onnber. In January 1984, the 
cuiieni account showed a deti- 
cit of £46 milLton. 

West Germany’s trade sur- 
plus in Januao' narrowed to 2.0 
bUlioD Deutsche marks ($576J 
millioo). frmn 6.1 bfllion DM in 
December and from 2.6 billion 
DM in Januaipr. 1984, the Fed- 
eral Statistics Office an- 
nounced. fAP. Rfxaers) 


2 Retirees of Boston Bank 
Reportedly Under Scrutiny 


French Officials See Improved Economy 


huemaiional HeraU Thhune 

PARIS — Freoeb cabinei minis- 
ters asserted Tuesday that the So- 
cialist government's economic poli- 
cies have begun to produce 
signififant improvements in tbe 
country's economic performance. 

The inflation rale in France will 
fad this year to 43 percent after 
dre^ping to 6.7 percent last year 
from nearly 14 percent three years 
ago. according to Kerre Bdtgovoy, 
minister of budget, economy and 
flaance. The new rale will moke 
France more competitive with oth- 
er leading industrial counlries. he 
said. 

In a further move lo encourage 
forei^ invesunenL Mr. B^regovny 
announced that government ap- 
proval no longer would be requir^ 
for such investments under 51 mil- 
lion — twice as much as tbe previ- 
ous ccili^ 

Edith Cresson. minister of indus- 
trial redeployment and foreign 


trade, said that France's trade sur- 
plus io (cidusirial products reached 
nearly 100 billion French francs 
($950 million) last year, more ibaa 
three times hi^er than the 1982 
figure. 

Analysis have noted tbal 
France's exports last year were aid- 
ed sales of Aitbus airiiners 
worth 20 billioo francs. 

Bigger profit margins in France, 
she said, have revived Industrie 
invesuneoi, which last year aver- 
aged 9 percent nationwide and 7 
percent in private industry — Uie 
highest levels since 1973. 

Both officials were addressing a 
business conference, “Modernixa- 
(ion: Priority for the French Ecoo- 
Offly.” sponsored by tbe Interna- 
tional Herald Tribune. 

Hinting at posable French ^v- 
ernment moves to reflate tbe econ- 
omy. Mr. Beregovoy said that b: 
would lower interest rates as iofla- 
tion falls. All price controls, be 


said, would be lifted before 
France’s parliamentary dectioas in 
1986. 

Saying that France hoped to see 
stronger growth in Western Eu- 
rope. he predicted that in IWS, 
European oronemfes would ex- 
pand by neariy 3 percent . 


By Fox Bucrerfidd 

Hew }' 0 ri Times Srrrue 

BOSTON — Two recently re- 
tired employees of tbe First Na- 
tional Bank of Boston are under 
investigation by a federal grand 
jury DO suspinoD that they may 
have belp«J tbe city's reputed oiga- 
nized-CTiine fanuiy launder money 
through the banik. according to 
sources familiar with tbe inquiry. 

The two former employees, a 
branch manager and a teiler. both 
worked at the Bank of Boston's 
branch in the North End section of 
Boston. The branch is three blocks 
from the headquarters of the An- 
giulo family, which tbe Federal Bu- 
reau of InvestigatioD says is the 
leading crinunaf syndicate in Bos- 
ton. 

Wilham L. Brown, chairman of 
Bank of Bosloo Corp~ First Na- 
tional's parent, said last week that 
the bank oti^t have been "uawit- 
tingly” used by the Angulos to 
launder as much as $2 million. 
Money laundering is the moving of 
funds resulting from illegal opera- 
tions into channels where they can- 
not be traced But Mr. Brown in- 
sisted there was “no evidence 
whatsoever” that any emplace erf 
the bank had “benwted in any 
way” from its dealmgs with the 
underworld group. 

However, the New England Or- 
ganized Crime Strike Force is in- 
vestigating reports that the two re- 
tired empToyees may have received 
smal l ca^ payoffs to put two com- 
panies owned by the Angiulos on a 
special list that exempted their cash 
transactions from being reported lo 
^ Internal Revenue Service, say 


officials and lawyers knowledge- 
able about the inquiry. They may 
also have played a role in the 
bank's failure to report the Angiu- 
los' large-scale purchase of cal- 
lers’ cbedts for cash. 

Linder a 1980 federal regulation, 
hanks must report all cash uimsac- 
tions over $10,000, though the 
banks may exempt certain legiti- 
mate retail businesses that norri^- 
ly deal in large amounts of cash, 
such as supermaikeis. Only depos- 
its and withdrawals, not purchases 
of caper's checks may be exempt- 
ed from the retorting requiremenu 
which was designed to help the gov- 
ernment trace money laundering 
by organized crime and narcotic 
d^ers. 

llie two employees are Gloria 
Cushing, (he former branch man- 
ager. who is 59 years old. and How- 
ard K. Matheson. the former teller, 
who is 64 years cAd. 

Mr. Matheson said Monday that 
be and others in tbe branch had 
accepted bottles of whisky at 
Christmas time from the Angiulos. 
along with other “little satisfac- 
tioos.” which he would not identi- 
fy. But be said these were “nothing 

(Continued on Page IS. CoL 1) 


2.113.00 Italian lira, douit from 
2.ISS.OO. 

Earlier in Europe, the dollar's 
late rates Monday, included: 
3.4690 Deutsche marks, up from 
3.4375; 2.9310 Swiss francs, up 
from 2.9115: 10.6145 French 
francs, up from 10.5395 ; 3.9355 
Dutch guilders, up from 3.SOSO. 
and 2.167.90 Italian lire, up from 
2.151.50. 

Gold reacted positively to the 
dollar’s decline, gaining b^k S6 in 
New York of the 5J2J0 it lost on 
Monday. .At 3 P.M.. gold was at 

5288.00 a tro^ ounce, up from 
S282JK). 

Eariier in Zurich gold rose to 
S28S.25 an ounce from $2843 and 
in London it dosed at S285.7S 
against $284.25. (VPI, Rmersi 


Prices in U.S. 
Rose 0.2% 

In January 

By Jane Seaberry 

Uiashingioa PcnSeniee 

WASHINGTON — U.S. con- 
sumer prices rose 0.2 percent last 
month, as widespread modoate 
price increases suggested a fourth 
consecutive year ^ modest infla- 
tion. 

The Consumer Price Index in 
January iDcreased at a 2J-pefceDt 
annual rate and was 3.6 percent 
higher than the >'ear before, the 
Labor Depaitmeni said. Consumer 
prices rose 0.3 percent in Decem- 
ber. 

In a separate reporu the Com- 
merce D^artment said that fac- 
tory orders for durable goods rose 
3.8 percent in January, but orders 
for capital gpods excluding defense 
plummeted 11.5 perceoL 

EcDQomists sai^ that tbe dura- 
ble-goods numbers reflected a 
slowdown in business spending as 
well as an increase of imponed 
equipment made relatively cheaper 
by the rising value of the dollar. 

Larry Sp^es. the White House 
spokesman, said tbe consumer- 
price repon was “particularly good 
news ai this stage of the busmess 
exp^on" and that it stiowol that 
“prices are down and staying 
down.” 

“What we're cootinuizig to get is 
really. reaOy good numbers.” said 
Steven Woods, an economist with 
Chase Econometrics. “There areno 
pressures in the economy for 
wanJ inflation. ] expect it to contin- 
ue.” 

Just as the strong dollar has 
helped weaken the capital-goods 
industry, it has also bem a ^or 
reason for the moderation in infla- 
tion, economists said. 

In a recent report Allen Sinai, an 
economist with Shrarsoo Lehman/ 

(Continued on Page 17, CoL 1) 


Hlp'mpiiiAN 

M.V^.AGED 

COMMODITY’ .ACCOUNTS. 


PERFORMANCE 
RESULTS FOR 
COMPTRENDII 

BEGINNING EQUITIES 
OFSIOO.OOO 
ON JANUARY 1 
OF EACH YEAR 

yieUsd ihe tolOMiing 
after an charges: 

IN 1980; -l-1dS% 

IN 1981; -MSTK 
IN 1982: •f-3296 
IN 1983: -24% 

IN 1984: —34% 

Oi tl 

FEB. 21, 1985 
EQUITY 
STOOD AT 
U.S. $102,479.96 

More than $ 50 , 000 , 000.00 
currsnfV undermanagefnent. 

Cad or write RneB Frnaer at 
TAPMAN, Tiend^Analysis and 
PwtfoDo Management, tncL, 
was Street Plaza. New Mxk. 
New V6rk 10005 212-269-1041 
'blexBMI 687173 UW. 



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Hilan Ph (2) 2784 32 Tlx 335 475 
Madrid Ph (1)2593324 Tlx 44192 





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New address 
os of March 4, 1985 


13, Route de Hertssont 
P.O. Box 391 
CH- 1211 Geneva 12 


Tel. (022) 46 91 55 
Telex: 427 620 WOR 




s'. 



Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1985 


NYSE Most Actives 


VOL HMi IM, 

inn 21H n 
WJ& 

urn ma I? 
15630 17U U)ft 
i«u ma 3096 
<r>t 

122SD 146b 14(h 

njSS ’SS 

11433 4S66 439h 
113H 3m 3sn 
11231 SDH 4» 
mn 4416 43H 
10684 SO 47H 
1QSB7 «H m 
10SM 32 31M 


21H + H 

21H 

m% -H 
I7H + H 
2PH + H 
—I 
14H 

134V6 + 6, 
4566 +1 
33H 

43H — H 
44U 4>H 
4TH -(216 
OH + 16 
33 


Dow Jones Averages 


Opn HMi LOW Ln6 Om 

Indus I2M.30 13*3.10 1273JI 13S6.11 4- &6l 

Tram 42281 6I4J0 61980 63180 4- 786 

UHI 14L49 1487 14781 14044 — 086 

Comp S1984 S368I 51789 52386 4> 387 


NYSE Diaries 


NYSE Index 


HMI 68W OoH CltVO 
corttposiH 104.90 mn io^ +i80 

indudrlals 1^.15 120^1 

rm» in8t 10048 10180 +I8I 

UtintiK CTCT S386 5381 +084 

nnvicu 10886 10781 10883 1.13 


Adveneod 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total Issues 

eimma Ulaeluk 

■WW niB|B 

New Laws 
VMumeup 
Volume down 


1019 487 

561 Ills 

427 441 

2007 3042 

S7 41 

7 6 

76822.120 
2S864.490 






Bvv Salta 

•Sim 


1X876 49239S 

1840. 

Feb.B 

I75.4M 534J0S 
153813 489860 

2813 

39857 

F6b.X X1832 509.236 

Pah 19 mXD .552347 

‘liKludod In Iho ooMB Tiguros 

1J07 

18U 


'Biesdao ^ 

Ms; 

Gosm^ 


»«'«»4au 

1l4,I50i0l0 

Prev.4PJA.vol._^ 

89J4IUie0 

PTBvcoeselidatad doe 

114,351 jSe 


AMEX Diories 


Advanced 
Declined 
undioneed 
Total issuas 
New Hlehs 
New Lews 
Volume UP 
Volume down 


Tables indude the notlonwide prices 
UP to the dosing on Wall Street and 
do not refled late trades elsewhere. 


Standord & Poor’s Index 


Hion Low aose Cn'oe 

industrials 20187 300.IS 2D1S: 

TranSP 160.94 1SB81 le081 ^181 

UlMlllSs Ta.i7 77.9J 7844 +0.« 

Finance 30.98 30lu 20.93 ■'0^ 

CompeSlM 14188 179.16 1BI.1. ■*• 1.9» 


wasdaQ index 


ComPKlIe 

Inousiriols 

Finance 

Insurance 

Ulilllln 

Banvs 

Trcnso. 


woelc 

06» Circe Aoo 
MSifl +186 ».9I 
307 a2 tIxI 309.15 

• 2 5JS5 

37487-0.9? rPX 
ZJil2a *■ 143 
24785—086 3S0.72 
USJ6 +ia 26419 


Inrsm Iftnee Bond Averqgeil 


Sands 

utllllies 

industrlois 


Cine Cii'90 

7102 —086 

tS^ 

7642 + 0-06 


AAAgy Most AcHves 


VOL HM tew Laet .ttag. 


13 im 
3«6 WH 
im rs» 

SH 3H 
17 H M 
9H 8H 
»b 3»b 
12 H 12 - 
11H im 
9 H IH 
aiH 2M 
15 H MH 


11H +H 
SSH I'H 
12H ' - 

8H 

17 +m 

9 + M 

Ptb +lb 

I2H -i-H 
im +H 
9H +H 
34H +1H 
15H +H 


AMEX Stock Index 


Htah tow CKw Ctfge 

iS 254.M 



NYSE Jumps in Active Trading 


m 16H AAR 40 28 16 435 21i4 20H 31 + Vb 

33H 9H AGS 11 38 15H IS IS - H 

18U> II AMCA 39 11H 11H 1IH+H 

I7H UVa AMP 80 38 37 345 l«H 16H 16H + W 

51H 49H AMF Pt 580e 98 100 51 SOH 51 

40H 241b AMR 9 4975 4IM 39 40H +IW 

30<4 ir&AMRpf 2.1B 108 12 20 30 3D — H 

23 IV ANRpI X12 98 399 22 22 22 +110 

UH 8H APL 3 9 lOH 10H lOH <!• H 

6ta6 44H ASA 280 48 12M 46H 4SH 46H + H 

37 16 AVX 82 14 14 114 22Vb 2316 22H— H 

49 36H AULOb 180 25 14 1579 4BW 47U 47H + 16 

25*b 16(b Aceovws 44 1.9 IS 3B1 339b 2ZVk 23Vi + M 

33H 12Vb AcmeC 40 28 170 17H <7 ITM + 46 

lOH 816 AcmoE 82b U 12 35 10 9H 9*b 


lOH 816 AcmoE 82b U 
17H IS AdoEx 2.110128 

20 1IH AdmAU 82 18 

19H 8H AdvSys 811 68 19 71 13H 13 12—16 

411b 25Vb AA60 14 4046 33H 32 33lb+1Vb 

I2H 6H AdVBt .12 1.1 373 IT lOVelOH+H 

144b SM Aorflox 13 TV I3H 134b 13Vb + U 

«lb 27U AelnLf 284 68 3V mi 404b4016m+tb 

5046 924b AetLpI 587e108 73 SS46 SSIb SM 

3ZM 1546 Ahmns 180 43 16 4D4S 3046 27H 28 + lb 

4H 2H Alleen 30 V 3 3 3 — 1b 

51 30 AirPrd 180 24 11 321 4VH 4V4b 44H— Vb 

3416 13 AIrbFrI 80 28 13 SS33lb33 2M+H 

3 VbAIMoas 27 20 1«b 14k 14b + 1b 

27lb 21 AloPPl 284011.1 1021 26fb 261b 261b + lb 

33 am AlaP PCA 2V3 128 5 3110 2116 3116—16 

7Vb 6 AloPdpf 87 118 6V 74b 71b 74b+lh 

73H 6119 AloPul V80 124 600z 72Vb 72H TSH + W 

60 56 AloPpf 881 128 3602 68 68 68 

13H 10H Aleoscs 82 74 8 M 1246 12H 13W— Vb 

1V4b V16 AlshAIr .14 8 V 1741 II4b 171b 18H + H 

1616 lOPb Albiias 88 28 It 21 1516 144k 1446— lb 

3TVfa 221b Alblm 86 23 12 40V 3046ai16S6 + H 

3546 231b AMOn 180 48 11 2723 3S 2nb 2746 + 16 


35 10 9H 9H 
54 1646 164b 1646 + 16 
42 1946 191b IVtb + H 
71 134b 12 12—16 

1046 3346 32 33tb+1Vb 
373 IT low inb+ V6 
TV I34b 124b 13Vb + 16 


Uniied Press Intemaiiemi 

NEW YORK — The stock maiket closed 
hi gher in aciive tracUng Tuesday, with investors 
M^ng eDcouragement from a new report show- 
ing iwation still in cbedL 

Technology issues and defense stocks scored 
some of the hesl gains. 

The Dow Jones industrial average jumped 
8.61 to liS6.ll. The blue<hip index had beta 
up more than IZpoimsbeforepuUiagbackabit 
at the finish. 

The New York Stock R'whai^ index gained 
I to 104.S2 and the price of an average share 
increased 33 cents. Standard & Foot's SOO-stock 


Ms. Latimer said the buying inter^t seei^ 
to favor blue dups and other big capitalization 
issues, with ^secondaries not receiving much 
benefit from the impiDved tone." 

Hairy Villec of Sutro & Co., Palo Alto, C^- 
fomia, said the market was **consolidating nice- 
ly" following its gains earlier in the year. He 
y»ifi the market was “poised for a move in 
excess of 1300” on the Dow Jones industrial 
average. 

Keith Hertell of Drexd Bumhim bunben 
said buying programs by some institutional 
investors pn^Ued the market higher. He noted 
that 4^en the buying programs neared compie- 


i T* 1 1 iw. y L; 




2 Vb AIMM6 
27lb 21 AlOPPl 2.94511.1 

33 2616 AlaP pCA 293 128 

7Vb 6 AloPOPf 87 118 
73Vb 6119 AluPul V8B 124 

60 56 AloPpf 888 128 

13H 10H Alegscs 82 74 

1V4b 916 AlshAIr .14 8 

1616 104b Albiies 88 28 

3TV6 221b Alblm 80 23 

3546 23Vb AMMI 180 48 


3546 231b AMMI 180 48 11 2723 36 271b 2746 + 16 

36 271b AleaSM 18D 34 n 106 3519 35 3SW + 14 

29 17 AlexAbc 180 38 722 2716 2M 2M— H 

3Mb 3M Altxdr 36 27 234b 2BH 2346— Vb 

091b 63H AllgCp 286t 28 I 11 7Mb 7719 TVb + H 

20M 1846 Aieint 140 58 166 27 SiH 27 

3M 1516 Alelnpr 2.19 118 IS I9H 1V<6 Itab- M 

301b 34H AltaPw 280 21 8 1516 29H 29H 2946— Vb 

33H 1544 AllanO 80b 21 13 56 191b 1916 1916 
3946 3816 AlldCPB 180 48 8 1197 3616 3799 Mb + 1b 


52M 53H AMCPpI 684 109 
lOTVblOeM AMCpf 1289el21 
23Vb 1046 AlldPd 
5646 30 AIMStr 212 29 
1419 51b AlUsOi 
27 24 AllsCof 

27 X ALLTL 184 7.1 
251b 3046 AUPr 8D5 28 
43 3044 Alcoa IX 23 

2746 ISVb Am« X l.l 


684 109 16 6216 63 68 — H 

289el21 X mOhlOZIh 102th + 1* 
16 2246 22U 2216— 1% 
212 29 9 737 5<1b 5316 541b +11b 
IX 716 7 716 + 1b 

3 X16 »16 2916 + lb 
184 7.1 I M 3S9b 2S4b 2S4b + 4b 

8D528 13 3X 8 8—16 

IX 23 1216307 8 X 369k- 16 

X l.l 1436 im TO 1041+16 


3419 2246 AmHes 1.10 23 14 14X 291b SVb.m-- 1b 


144 901b AHespf 250 29 

246 116 AmAor 
194b 1519 ABokr 
65H S24h ABrond 290 58 
2746 S(4b ABrU Pi 275 108 
6614 8 ABfUp( 287 48 


1 l22V9ISIb 1231b +419 
222 3 146 1H— Vb 

8 1916 191b 191k + 19 
573 66Vb 65Vb 6616 + H 
X 271b 374b 274h + 16 
1 661b 46Vb 66V9 + 1b 


7716 5146 ABdcM IX 24 10 739 6546 6«H 6M +1 


351b IVIb ABIdM X 25 13 
X 1046 ABosPr 84 28 14 


5 24H 341b 34H+ 1b 
40 X 2319 3346+ V6 


ft<y|iTips by a 2-1 ratio among the 1,998 issues 
traded at the dose. 

Big Board volume totaled 114.15 million 
shflipy, up from 89.74 milli on traded Monday. 

Before the stock market opened, the Labor 
Dgartment reported the Consumer Price In- 
dex inc rppw*t 0.2 percent in January for a 2.3- 
percent inflation rate on a compound annual 
basis. 

The Commerce Dqiartment said new factory 
orders for durable goods rose S3.9 billion or 3.8 
percent in Jamiaiy, ^ter a revised 1.9-percent 
drop in December. 

in still another report, gross weekly earnings 
of U.S. workers deoeased 0.8 percent in Janu- 
ary. Wedcly earnings increased a revised 0.6 
percent in December. 

Trude Latimer of Evans & Co. said the mar- 
ket seemed to respond to a slight easing of 
interest rates. The federal funds rate dipped to 8 
percent and U.S. Trust Co. lowered its broker 
loan rate to 9'4 percent from 916 percent. 


U4u 

I5H+ lb 
14Vb+ 1b 
l64k + 46 
41b + W 
131b 

6519 + 46 
+ 4* 
194b + 1b 
iaJ!a 

73 +149 

464b 

0619 +11, 
1046+ <6 
391b 
Xlb 

2SVi+ V4 
2JU— Ik 
461:— U 


ItManlh 
Mien Law Stack 

son 4j'i, ouPoni 
X16 SOH CuP^iti 
44'6 39 auPnl I 
30H a'l, OukcP 
764b 64 Oukep 
7746 9Tfi Oukep 
25H 3149 Oukeu 
U X DvkPP 
7B(b 44^ DukOfl 
73 51’6 DunBri 

16H 1V4 OuqU 
1546 I2U Duapf 
17 17b DUk Pf 

17% 13% DukPr 

16W 3Vi DvccP 
24% I7ib DvnAn 


SI2 Close 

Div YW. PE lDDsHMhLowQW..Ortie 


0 3996 8' 6 
X 33 
137 42% 

7 3X3 2946 

200Z 74 
43QZ 69*b 
X 25W 
6 3219 
3002 7616 
21 982 70 

7 4382 16% 
140z 15% 
200z latb 
1600Z 1746 
11 61 ISU 

13 19 8 


S7H 8 + % 

33 8 - % 

42 42 

2P4b 7949 + !b 
71% 8% + % 
XVh 69% +1% 
2446 25V« + -I 
3149 8 — % 
76% 76% + % 
W19 691b + % 

1 $ lsVb+% 

15% 15%- *b 
16Vs IbW 
174 b 17H— % 
13% 1346— % 
XH X + % 


Mr. Henell said a report that short interest 
on the NYSE increased to a record of nearly ^ 
miliinn shares was positive. A short position 
involves the sale of borrowed stodc which the 
seller hopes to replace at a lower price. If the 
market starts to rise, short sellers often cover 
thdr positions, adding fuel to the upward move. 

On the trading floor. AT&T was the most 
active issue, adding li to 21 Vb. 

FPL Group was secoad, losing Vb to 21Vk. 

Public Sendee Co. irf Colorado was third, 
shedding V* to I9Vi. 

Schering Plough fell % to 39V^ on heavy 
volume. 

Exxon gained Vs to 474k Sun Co. H to 477i, 
Atlantic Richtield 1 to47Vi, Royal Dutch 1V6 to 
S3 v 4 and Indiana Standard V: to 61. 

Mobil gained ^ to 29%. The company agreed 
to fvtihang g certain East coast service stations 
with Crown Central Petroleum. 


Protect your Short-Term 
Gains with the Long-Term 

Security of Gold. 

The spectacular rise of the dtjar ^ 

of many paper investments has biou^ 
substant^ profits. Hie wisest mvestore 

DOW convert part of their gains mto 

Krugerrands. 

Why? 

Krugerrands are tender bufliOT 

coins. The most widdy emulated ^ 

widdy recognized - gdd coum m WTO 

And because they contam 1 ^ oz. 

1/4 oz and 1/10 oz of pure gold- with ^ 
a touch of hardening allqy- you cai^ 

certain that in the long nm, they *iU 

secure the vahiS d your invesfin^ profite. 

Adc your bank or broker today or , 


Guide to Gold and 


Com division • 1 , ruedela RAlissene 

CH -11204 Geneva - Switzeriand. 


55H 40% AmCan 290 58 11 067 51% 51% + W 


34% 8% AConpf 2M 118 

40 X AConpf IX 68 

19% 1646 ACOuBd XX 118 

3346 25% ACopCv 686824 
11% 6% ACailC 
M16 43H ACvon 1.90 38 

3946 15% AUT SZ 15 


2M 118 5 X 334b X + 16 

IX 68 693 4M6 45% 45% + 46 

XX 118 62 11% 10% 1546 + % 

686X24 61 39% 35U 69%— % 

13 X 946 9H 9H— % 
1.90 38 12 IM1 52% 51% 52 + % 
X 15 27 942 2514 X% X%— % 
236O10LI I 2909 21 3046 M + % 

IX 18 IS 9093 43 4146 m + 46 


314k 15% AElPw 2360108 I 3909 21 W M + % 

4346 X AmEm IX 38 IS 9m 43 «% + 46 

» 14 AFMnll 84b 28 13 W S&. 

30% 194h AGnCp IX 14 9 1X1 2m2pb3M+H 

S SHAGnlwr 3SS 1IW11 im+% 

sm AOnlpU46A118 n X 644b 54% 

0% 58% AQnIPIBSJOi 78 * S.. 91? u. 

57 43% ACn Ipf 3X 21 > 9** £ 

X 40UAQnplD 384 48 TX X 50% X + H 

X Zm AH4rtl IX 38 12 X 31 31 ^ ... 

11% 719 AHeM 03 94b tab 946— % 

m 46% AHoHM 290 58 13 2309 51. . 56% ^ +1% 


X X% AHev 1.13 24 10 1701 3116 324b 33%— % 

fi% S% An^ch 6X 78 t 1317 82% 82% 5346 + 4b 

X x% AiSoS X 8 16 1141 22?.P.}‘,21}£1 S 

IX 112%AIGPPf 5X 48 a 125%IX%1X%+ % 
M 18% AMI •7230142X9msm+% 
6 3% AmklMI Tin M 346 W— % 

46% 3744 AM»ta9 XX 48 V 1116 ^ « W-rH 

«l% 23% AFrMM 841 18 S 3M m 41% ^ % 

13% V ASLF% 8 175 13% 12 12 — % 

ll 10 A6MP X 58 IS 1« 1£g MW ^ 

35% 22% AmSM IX 85 13 Ze»9Ha%+% 


55% 36% AmSiar 


8 l» 12% 12 12 — % 

X 58 IS 1U 14% 14% 14%'* H 
IX 85 13 3X3346X%5%+% 


18 11 662 53% 


a 2244 I 
34% 18% I 
X% 13% I 

22% 16 I 

23% 14 I 
34% 17% , 
29% 3044 , 
43% 31% I 
3944 31% < 
61% 45% I 
X 73 . 

3516 15% 
25% 19% . 
53% 40% 
X 32% . 
IX 97 . 

TO 119b . 
3«% 1144 . 
46% 29% . 
50% Zi 
X 19% 
39% X 
15% ID 
41 27 

415 415 
. 35% 19% 
36% IS 


10 365 MW 3546 H% + 4k 

9 41 33% X% 33% 

I 409 16% 15% 16 + H 

X 30% 19% 2D%— % 

a 131 s x% s + % 

3707 3344 22% 32%+ % 

14U 39% X X — % 

17 41% 41% 41%— % 

21 1844 38% 38%— % 

9 734 5799 57% X% 

151 X 9Z X + 44 

10 X 21% 21% 21%— % 

B 116 34% 34% 24% + % 

21 3645 47% 46% 47% +1 
SDi M 36 M 
3 111%1ll%111% +146 
50 14% 14% 1414— % 
X 3345 X 36% X + % 

X 10M 45% 43% « +1 

ID X 49% 499b 49% 

12 X 24% 23% 3iVb + % 

I 16 42 37% 37% 379b 

8 74 14% 14% 14% 

i IS 695 34% 33% 34% + % 

1 352 3S3 3S —61% 
' 10 2434 a% B% 22% 

ID IX 24% 26% 34% + % 


46% ASIrplA 480 65 116 M% W M% + % 

51 ASIrpM 680 128 BS4 53%M+% 

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X% ATATpf 144 108 *«36%»16%+% 

^ ATATPf 384 108 M ^ 9 S%— H 

27% AWUtr 280 44 7 X 43% 42% m + % 


9% 30% ATATpf 144 108 64 

5 ^ ATATPf 384 108 _ 54 

29% 30% AinHUH 2X M II ^ ^ 

33% XWAtiMrMi IX 58 • 2 3M 33% W%— % 

S 17 AiTN«}> X 8 IV Ml **S w 

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SS% AMwui 200 28 10 1403 77 Wk X +1% 


44 AnfNUpISX 68 
0% Anlslr X 18 
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97 79 ArlPpf 

33% 13% AiKBul 
34% 16 Ando 
H U ArtnRt 
X% 9 Arnica . 




“Weh^f come to learn more about your Enviro-Spray. 


drowPak"* from our Enviro-Spray Systems, Inc. 
subsidiary, is the most innovative and versatile 
tcchnologica} development in pressurized packaging 
in 40 veaxs. For our 1984 .\nnual Report write, 

(imw Group. Inc. 200 Park .\ve.. NS’ 10166. Depc.G 


Awigrip, Devoe, Ameritone, three of our well-known ibrand names. 














































































INTERNATIONAL 


TRimjNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1985 


Page 11 


•: S;;?: 

i 


Morgan Guaranty Ltd 
outranked all other U. S. firms 

in 1984 Eurobond volume 






•v. 


. ■ In 1984 the international capital markets continued 
: to grow speetaculariy. New-issue volume in the inter- 
l national bond market alone reached $108 billion- 
■ ‘ nearly double the size of the U.S. corporate bond 
market. 

This growth reflected a broad and grovving range 
■ : of financing opportunities for issuers in the intema- 
■: tional capital markets. 

The Morgan Bank concentrates on helping issuers 
. take advantage of these opportunities. Last year 
' Morgan Guaranty Ltd, our Eurobond underwriting 
■ ; subsidiary, was lead or co-lead manager of the hi^- 
. : est volume of Eurobonds underwritten by any U.S. 

. firm for aU issuers, in all currencies. 

Significantly, these issues have been consistendy 
well received by investors. This record of success will 
: increase market demand for our clients’ securities in 
:■ the future. i 

; " Behind Moi^an’s strong peiformahce is the 
^ uniquely comprehei^sive set of capabilities that we 
put to work for the long-term interests of our clients. 

□ IhiKivativeiiess- In a poll last fall by Euramoney 
■■■ magazine, participants in ie world’s capital markets 
voted Morgan the most innovative bank in both the 
y -international bond and syndicated loan markets. 

: □ fotergarional arbitrage. As a major participant 


jOiscussing a client^ needs in the international capital markets are four Morgan hankers. From leh, Phelps Montgomery. Banking Dhdsioxi; 
Hany RounddL head. Private Placement Advisory; V^Wier Guben. head, and Erica Hickman, International Financial Management 


ploit intermarket arbitrage opportunities for dients. 

□ SwE^s. Morgan is the only intermediary that 
can act with equal proficiency as either principal or 
agent in rate and currency swap transactions. Our 
strong capital position, reflected in Morgan’s AAA/Aaa 
credit ratings, enhances our role as principal and can 
reduce client costs and risks in the swaps we arrange. 

□ Secondary markets. Our commitment and abil- 
ity to make active secondary markets for the issues we 
manage encourage market receptivity to future issues. 

□ Distribution. With more than a century of 
experience in the international markets, Morgan has 
developed a broad, efficient distribution capability 
which translates directly into more cost-effective 
financings for our dients. 

Measure our performance. Let us compete for your 
mandate. You’ll find we deliver imaginative services 
in the capital markets with the same high quality and 
skill that have long been hallmarks of all Morgan 
banking business. 

Morgan Guaranty Ltd, 30 Throgmorton Street, 

London EC2N2DT 

Morgan Guaranty Trust Company, 23 Wall Street, 

New York, NY 10015 Member FDIC 



Eurobond rankizigs— 1984 
All issues, all currencies 


Rank 

1 

o 

Underwriter 

Credit Suisse First Boston 
Morgan Guarani 
Morgan Stanley International 

No. of 
issues 

78 

3a 

Dollars in 
millions 

$12,243.8 

5,965.2 

5,470.6 

3 

47 . 

4 

Salomon Brothets International 

31 

4.981.3 

5 

Deutsche Bank 

49 

4,736.8 

6 

Merrill Lynch International 

26 

4,165.9 

7 

Goldman Sachs International 

24 

2,493.3 

8 

Nomura 

33 

2,288.9 

9 

S.G.^^MuIg 

23 

1.836.5 

10 

Banque Nationale^e Paris 

10 

1,756.2 

11 

Dresdner Bank 

23 

1,749.8 

12 

Banque Paribas 

15 

1,460.4 

13 

SBC International 

15 

1,373.6 

14 

Societe G^nerale 

12 

1,333.4 

15 

Lehman Bros Kuhn Loeb Inti 

n 

1,287.8 

16 

Orion Royal Bank 

20 

1,179.5 

17 

Daiwa Europe 

22 

1.170.3 

18 

Commeizbank 

18 

1,141.6 

19 

Nikko Securities (Europe) 

17 

1,079.0 

20 

Barclays Bank 

2 

950.0 

Source; IFR Bond Database (Intemorionol Firunictnp Review) 
Sole lead managers receive full amount of the issue; 
joint lead managers receive equal amounts. 



in the capital, credit, and local currency markets— as 
well as in woridwide fiireign exchan^, government 
bond, and bullion markets— we find many ways to ex- 


The Morgan Bank 






Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1985 


Tuesday 


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Old 00 not reflect late trcKtes elsewtwre. 


laMtanm 

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Sb. Clou 

Piv. VKL PE 100>HiotlLflWQUBt.OlkW . 


(Continued from Page 10) 


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57 45ft LTVef 4 4Pft 49ft 49ft— ft 

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69 SOftLTVpf 575 U 32 A 64ft 65 — ift 

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79ft 64 LOFbf STS 67 1 A A A 

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BO 56ft Litlon 248 25 9 36M 49% 48ft A —4% 

25% im UttenDf 278 87 1 22% 22% 23% + ft 

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a 4* LAwSbf 577 10J 17 49ft 49ft 49ft 

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A lift LOMU A 1.1 


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4 14ft M 14ft— ft 

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■mo 

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ITS 111 
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2d1e119 
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127 lOilA 

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13 9 119 Aft 


111 lOA 59% 

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127 lOilA 
124 MttoUSft 

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107 ^ ■ 

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70 49 W ft ISft 
256 U 9 SA Aft 
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pf ZTS 97 116 A 

74 27 10 72 29ft 

76 27 M 959 A 
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2K 

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Mft 

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A 

Mft— % 
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41ft— ft 
7Sft + % 
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1370 119 
970 129 
170 110 


SlblOl 101 101 
19QZ 62% 6S e — % 
26A M 67 67 


270 55 13 2AA 39%A +ft 


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T.A 19 15 


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870 94 3306 U 84 A 

170 77 7 418 16% 15% 16 + % 

76 17 16 14 36% 36% 36%— « 

176 14 22 2360 49 47% 48% +1% 

76 11 IS n4 37ft 36% Aft— % 

iS 127 8 381 9% 9ft 9% + ft 

78 17 16 2S a 21% 21ft + % 

T.A 2915 A4 ^Mft|m+^ 
ITAIST 31 2m 25ft Aft— % 

177 111 » lift 15% 1S%— % 

1730.1 10 4ft 4% 4% . 

148 37 13 5971 39ft37%38% + % 

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74 14 A 783$ 38ft A ^ +1% 
270 147 6 5459 15% ISft 15% + % 
4A 119 SOT 31 31 31^— % 

779 T37 303 a 91% Aft 

8^ M7 AA a 61% 6l%— % 
141 127 J9 10% 10ft lOft-ri? 

173 125 tl ^ 

77S Ml 570* 57 56 56 —1 

1A 125 A 9% 9ft 9ft + ft 

17.12 1S4 SDZIia%nB%1IS%— % 

1575 isa aoiio7 

9A ISO 00s 68 

770 Ml 940* 55% 

173 77 II 43 10% 



240 18 13 3442 89% 
48 11 13 339 23% 
170 17 3 56% 

240 SlO 912546 49ft 
40 17 9 1A 36% 
78 7 9 » 36 

271 77 7 34 A 

14 2U 30% 
176 24 11 1302 46ft 
174 19 6 A1 31% 

.17r 7 44 A 22% 
I7D 37 11 776 am 
112 IT 1 77% 
397 11% 
76 17 12 1A 13ft 
.16 17 16 196 Mft 
3 99 lift 

45e 10 10 18 Aft 

40 U 37 8 18% 

170 39 31 2445 Aft 
40 7 7 13T7 13% 
70 SI 74 19ft 
40 17 U 19 17ft 

173 107 6 234 17% 

248 129 12 Aft 

S40 113 A 33% 
S72 132 A 32% 
176 47 17 200 34% 
116 16 0 611 A% 

17 6» sift 

100 ST 7 a Aft 

15 3293 IBH 

.13 4 B 1A 30% 

260 45 U 3413 57% 

a 26 a m 13ft 

140 25 10 U 46 
192 107 8161A 19% 
ia 137 7 912 7% 

174 Ml IS40S 7% 

ia 144 271b 7% 

7.15 M7 MOT 44K 

944 16.1 10b Sift 

853 167 200lA% 

2 856 5 
180s 11 
56 II 
A 16 
1 14 


a% 

4ft— % 
11 — ft 
II — ft 
15% 1S%— % 

I M W 

12 Mft 14% M%— ft 
14 13% 13% Uft— % 
409 29% A 2S%+ ft 


IR 107 7 2799 Aft Aft 2S%— ft 


2 13 U U + ft 
28b A A A —I 
Bb A A A +1 
129b A 37% 37% +1 
ISOb 44 44 44 

10 U 17ft 17ft— ft 
55b S6% 56% S6ft + ft 
a a 19ft 19ft— % 
9Sb M 65 M 
Mb iS 65 66 


LUM 
32 2>H kwbns 

19% ISft kvckvs 

16 18% Luksnb 


21% Uft MACOM A LI a 
SI 36ft MCA A 17 A 
36ft Mft MCorp 140 11 7 

14% 7% MOC a 34 10 
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17% 13ft POCCe 1T2 107 7 BS 17ft 16ft 17% + ft 

43ft 3m PocLte 372 II n 3A 4Ift 4m 41 — % 

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39ft a NCNB 172 IT 9 m A 3m 3m 

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372 77 I 22 33U 33 3IU 

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54% 38% PtobiA 248 57 11 1962s SC% a% 54% + ft 

am 71 Noleo 1A 44 M 577 Aft 25ft Aft +1 

29ft » NoNwo 7 15 am 31ft 28ft + ft 

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29ft » NoNWO 

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A 43ft 43U 43ft+ ft 
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OBLIFLEX 


Limited 


ObliSexisan open-ended invesbn&itOampany incorporated 
in Jersey: Charmeli^ane^ 


Obliflez aims to provide investors vnth the ppportunity to 
invest in international bond markets in a convenient and fle^le way. 
Obliflex offers a variety of portfolios of bonds 
and other instruments denominate in a range of currencies. 
Initially Obliflex will offer investment in six individual 
cutiendes (U.S. Dollaz; Japanese Yen, German Mark. 

Dutch Florin, Pound Sterling and Swiss F^anc) 
as well as multi currency investment portfolios. 

Investors may switch between po^lios. 


41ft 76 
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LOMBARD, ODIER (JERSEY) LIMITED 

Fbr further details and copies of the prospectus and 
application form (on the terms of vi^ch alone applications 
will be considered) please contact.' 


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Bft- ft 
Mft 

am— ft 

ML— ft 

Aft + % 
21 % + % 
4fft^% 
74%+IU 

am+-.% 

2 »— ft 
» +* 
im '• 
2I%— ft 

.im+'ft 


33ft 2I« VFCarp 1.12 14 I 
ISft m vaim 

24% 14 Volorpf 354 17.1 
m 5U \bMyln _ 

34ft 15 VonDn 91 16 7 
6% 2% Voreo 

im 5% Vorcopf . ^ 
46ft30%Varlon 26 7M 
13% 9ft Voro 50 35 9 
2m im VMC0 58 15 M 
m 3% VWiM 

im m vbWb i5Ddii7 _ 


4N 3m 

■77 10 
A 30% 


B 3Sft + ft 


39% 24% vtaeeni 


17.1 26 30% soft 20%— >14 

. 0 3 m '3%^% 

16 7 A ^35 »+% 

50 3 - 2% 2% . 

13 7% 7ft- 7%+% 
7 M 347 39ft 30% Bft— % 
35 9 0 13% 11% H%— 1% 
15 M 0 sm am ai%— u 

14 «% 4%. 4% . 

17 M 10% 10ft UU+'ft 


43 86ft VOEPPf 500 125 
75% 80ft VBEPpr 504 HI 
79 67% VbElPf 110 115 

■m 40ft VbEPPI 9.R 125 
41% 40ft VoEP Pf 750 111 
43ft 51% VBEP Pf 755 135 
Zl% M VWWV 1059 77 
41% 35% Vontod . _ _ . 


1.1 17 1374 39%'B% 3l%+,ft 


VuiOlM 200 35 11 


0 41 £ £ — .U 

3b R R - R 
0 76 76 76 — % 

10b R » R -4ft 
Bb 59ft sm Bft . 
SOb 61% 40 80 —ft* 

13 W A BU A -+ » 
15 3077 41 43 M— 'ft 

11 6 77 7m-7T +% 


9ft 4% VdobMC 
47ft 31 VMMrt 51 

56% am ra uM i i oo 

21ft 15ft WKHR6g150 


B 21 WIOOR 253 86 7 M 2m 20* 304.+.% 
smaoHWbdtvs 92 10 II 147 mnftm.. 
asu MM woddrt 50 29 n n soft aou am— i* 

9ft 4% VdobMC 0 8B 9 m 9 + ft 

47ft 31 VIMSMrt 51 O A 3B6 45ft ^ BU +%* 
56% aoft ra UM i l 05 TO IV £6 S4H Sft 
21ft raft WKHRig 150 SOI 19% Aft 19%.+, ft 


aoft 2m waicsY 55 u u 0 am Mft 20* + % 


4IU a UAL Jb 15 7 4915 47U 40% 46ft + % 
B 34% UAL Pf 250 75 41 32% AU 33% + % 

I5H m UCCEL 19 SO 14ft M% 14U— U 

23ft Mft UQl ZM 9.T IT IA 22% 22% Bft— % 

26 IfftUGipr 275 115 HtaA A A 
lift 3 UNCRb 414 9% 9 9ft 

14 Id URS 5b 19 19 IM 13% 13ft 13% + U 
A imUSFGo 200 400 T7R A% AU Aft + % 
71% 45 USG 356 49 7 aOT 49 40ft 8m + % i 

im Uft UniFrN A 15 13 40 17U 17ft ITU 

WU » UMNV 40b 40 9 444 OTft 85U 17ft +1ft i 

41U am UComnslO* 45 10 48A 30* 34M 36% 

50ft am UflCarb 140 05 8 1M7 39ft 39ft 39H+ ft i 


7% 5% UfflonC 


5% 5% 5% 


UnElvc 172 105 6 I5R Mft Mft 14% + ft 


A 25ft UnEI pf 4M 129 
aSft Bft UnElPf 400 130 
Aft 39ft UnEIPI *50 120 
am Aft UnEIPlM4O0 114 
41ft 41ft uei pfk UO 113 


9Sb A 30% 31 
40b sm A A —1% 
1b so so R + ft 

R 30ft 29ft 29ft— U 
3b M 40 « I 


BrazO Debt Negotiadons 
Are Postponed Pending 
Outcome of IVDP Talks 


PeterNewbald, 

Lombard, Odier (Jers^) Limited, 

17 Union Street, 

Jeis^, 

Channei Islands 

Tfel: (0534) 73377 Ifelex: 419228G 


Kenneth Cholerton, 

Lombard Odier International Ibitfolio 
ManagementLimited, 

PDttland House, 72-73 BasinghaQ Street, 

London EC2V5FB 

IbL (01) 606 981 1 Iblex: 8814499 


Company Earnings 

Revenue ond profifs, in mfliions, ore in locol 
currencies unless otiwrvrise Indicated 


AustroHa 

CRA 


rear 

Revenue M— 

M«l IrtC. 

PerSnore_ 


AU+% The Ataodaitd press 

^+% PARIS — Talks on rescheduling BrazS’sddit 

K to arasiem gownunaits have been postponed 
+ift utitil the oountry straightens out its relations 
m— ft with the IntematioiiaJ Monetary Fund, a senior 
atft + ft official familiar with the n^tiations ifaid Tiks~ 

Brazil is the wwld’s laigest debtor. It owes 
I nMXe than $100 billion to private and govetn- 
P'.flvniliorfi lenders and has run into difficulty recent- 

xjoiiuu^D ly for failing to meet IMF economic targets. 

rt mniions, ore In locol Brazil's finasoe minister, Einane Gaivias, ^ 
ttiwrvrise Indicated said last month he planned to approach the I 
Paris Qub of western ^enuneat creditors ; 
vior im na ®hout le s c hAtufin g S8.8 oillim in interest pay- 

menisduebetweenl98Sandl991.Another$45 
pffSiMR^ 057 174 l^op in prindpal payments are themeUcallv 

- NW iwf IneMes hit 64 5n» 5 ..mm .k.* i ^ 


aJSS 10 due during that same period. 

«OeJ am WPV^ Otpmum 6d*emi ■ fh •! -T I 9__ 


Hie shares of Obliflex Umited are not available to ai^ U.S. person 
(as defined in the prospectus). 

Hie information contained in this advertisement is provided by 
Lombard Odier international fbrtfblio Management Limited, 
a Licensed Dealer in Securities. 


Britain 

Rmilers tMAngs 


Seolhhind 


roar tRf 

Revenue^ 3110 
PretwNet- 7o 
Per Shore 0.109 


mOear. 

Revenue.^ 

19 s Net in& 

MA PerShore,^ 
3625 TiOP 
S52 Revenue-.... 


10 im 

3,181 1711 
307 305 

165 053 

10 10 

111 .851 


Japan 


MotsuriiHo B. bid. 

rear 10 10 


Revenue 472T 199T 52TJ5* — ' 

Net Inc. 8314B1 1510 ^ 

Pei-Share_ I34J3 10172 


II-S was hoping to stretch the principal 

.. ... . payments over 16 years, but faflure to meet the 

moJ“”"5r 10 ^ delayed that resinicluring. 

Revenue 3,181 2^1 Postponement of the Paris Club on the 
M 053 iaierest repaymeuts foUowed the IMFs recent 
Tib M 10 move to cut (rff further credits to Brazil until the 

NdtK _ -1605 1315 country proves it can adhere to iu austerity 

With few ezaptioniPa^ 

sxumJwenitvHtaKcreati. cheduungs are granted only to countries that 
Westefn Air Linm an acceptable austerity program with 

_ Iff g w. 10 m the IMF. 

NeMn^J^ 7A loHB ‘TTi® Mcd 10 feview Brazil's economic targets ^ 

MAcMb ’5*5 program with the fund has essen- i 


MU auaner net tnehiOes 
SXM/rUlflen frwti 0o«dW. 

Westefn Air Lines 

tsfbiBr. ' 10 10 


evenue R7 RilS 

A im — 7A lo»5D 

erShore OA — 

a: less. 1905 nef McMn 


I Unttad States prgoemffr 

IU b i temotioncd V 

i ONiQuar. 10 1983 .IsIQgw 

! Revenue 67SJ 5^ Revenue.. 

iHetlnc 109 TO gW lne. - 

PerShor*_ 057 053 PbShori. 


ArNn gsfn ef 545 mmen tially removed (he basis for talks with the 

mm apft MU nef 5 k4w6m rtnh** /mn nTfinql ...5 

eretaK ooOte/BmUlketfnm ^lUD. ODC Official Slid. 
prsMrtvinnsierx Bankers are uncertain about when the taiw 

WeOvoco between Brazif and its eovemment creditors 

RilS5?l_ ^ B6A place and say a formal rescheduling of 
Nil ine. — 217 197 govemmau-to-govemment debt hing p* qq a 
new agreement with the IMF. 


WolU* 150 45 I B4 
WUTJ pf 150 105 Bft 
Wbnea Jf <5 n ^ 
WmCRi 35P 

Womrl. 158 45 n 30 
WoahG* 156 13 8 0 
WMlNnt MB 45 M B7 
«MiWr 2^ Til 8 121 
WOte 58 15 17 11B 
WalkJn 52 l2 12 m 
WOVQm a 15 10 8 

W eenU IA 

MWOO Jb 5 13 0 

W eftMk T« 25 13 ' U 
01UT 250 47 I 10 
0IFP9 45bUU 60 

TMPM 250 105 IS A 
Wifldys Ji 15 17 30 
WbACo 54 U 13 A 
WPenPpfkSD 115 Mb 
vngptp IB 55 9 B 

WNctTelJM 2 

WlUUrL. 0 

VriAIrwf 3g 

WMrpf 250 IU B 
WAIrpf IM 115 A 
WCNA 1447 

WCNARf755 147 4 

WPoel 8 f 

WUnlen MB 

0UnM ' 5 

WBUpIS 37 

WAUPfE 48 

WUTIPf 3 

WUAPfA 19 

VmeE* 150 35 10 40 
WesM Ml U 9 446 
Wtrerh UO 43 30 2135 
WevrU 110 65 lU 
Weyrpr 450 95 88 

Wbeiue STS 85 lb 
WhetPII A 

WhPffpf 409 184 Mb 
WMrM 250 43 9 im 
WMte 158 45 9 0 
0Hehl II 343 m 

Wtimeh 58 25 0 0 33% 

WlebM 35 A lift 

wnirdii . IA MU 

wnikim 150 S.1 4 10 38ft 

wnma 91 0 

WlUtwO .10 15 n 49 1% 

WlnDIX 158 SO 12 0 33% 

wmmg .0 5 i7 nsf w% 

Wtaner 20 s 7 * 

WIecEP 258 73 7 M 
wi»Epr 850 113 Mb 
\mtglif 775 IU 0 
V06M 25S 105 V 

nn*^ ZM &r « 0 

WMePS 356 U 7 0 

wnm 158 U 9 8 

WolvrW A 12 IS « 

VMoOPf 50 35 M » 

Mtohrtfl 159 44 w m 

WI0V Mb 11 10 S 

9^Su» Ja 11 H ' 99 

Wynne -50 27 I IR 


85U— H 
9U '. 
AH + ft 
34%+1N 
37ft +% 

n%— ^ 
A -4% 
»%+30 
48ta+% 
36% + % 
W%— *% 
10ft+% 
3I%— % 
30 %+% 
Aft+I 
46ft . 
36«— ft 
21% +J* 
30 — -*ft 
Aft 
A ■ . 

11 - 

S9k S% + % 
Tft Ift + -ft 
MH 17 +ft 
18 Uft+.-ft 

IA%n3%+5* 
f% 9 — ,ft 
39% 30% ! 
4ft 4ft>^ 
7%. 7% 

A A -n-ft 

0 0>T.ft 
38ft 81% +t 
Aft 39% — ft 
A 30%+% 
40% 40%-kft 
49 49ft— % 

Wft Ifft + ft 
15ft l«+*ft 
Aft 38% +.1* 


154 40% 40% 

88 49% 49 
1b 89ft Wft 
A 15% 15ft 
Mb 34% Aft 

! 1491 48% 41 

0 A an* .. . „ 

II 0 29% 30 29 +S% 


S8%+.lh 

40ft+G 

A +tt 


33% m 
21 lift lift 
0 Mft 


23ft 

lift— % 

M — '% 


ISft B%— It 


44% 31% Xvm 350 47 U S0 4Sft 44 4«%+% 

Aft 4S% XmOKBf S45 WO 2D5 60% 80ft 50% + ft 

29 19 XTRA 54 25 10 48 27ft 86% 25A— ft 


30 A ZefeCp U8 45 9 23 20ft 20% 30ft ‘ 

26% 14ft ZOMta A 55 15 0 14 Ml* 15ft— ft 

a A Zavift 5b 7 15 10 '57 56% 57 +8ft 

Aft 18ft ZenrniE 6 10 33M 2Mk Bft + U 

27% 18 Zen 50 15 19 118 26% M A% + ft 

Aft Aft zuniln 133 43 11 ib 80% 3l* 30ft ' 


Soles flgurns or* unoMctaL Ycorlv highs end Iom relicct 
ttie PTfvleueST weeks pfis the aim^ii«BlkOulnDfWieW0 
trading 4av. When a bill or sleek Otvkiend omewitlno ft 25 
percenter more twi teen eeid. lb yeorth l Bhl u w range end 
dividend ore eiiown tar tb new static eniv. Unless eiherwi» 
noieck rates of dividbds ora emuol OMuraemenls bend en 
the totaet dectoFtitoa 
a — dividend Oise exirats). 

t— (mnualraleiifdlvidendplusstockOMdend. r 

e—iiaaMaHno dividend. 
tid— colled, 
d — new yeertv low. 

c — divroend detiored er PoM in eraceding 12 nmfhs. 

9 — dividend In Canadian funds. suMed to m nenrasMince 
tax. 

I— dividend detinradBftarspllt-up or static dividend. ^ 
i— dlvkbid 0d this veer, omitted, deferred, or no ocHon 
token or lofest dhrUend meeflng. 

k— dividend dedered or neld ttris veer, an occunwlnilve 
bill wlHi dhrldends In arrears 

n —new taeue In tb peel a weeks. The Meh4ow rave begins 
with tb start ef tratinu 
nd — next dey dtilverv. 

P/E — Price eomlngs 0le. 

r— dividend declared nr paid In preceding 12 menllft bus 
stock dIvMand. 

s — stack spilL Dividend begins wHn dote ef MIL 

t— dividend paid bi slock ki preceding 12 monttiSpestlm0d 
cash value en exHiividend ar ex^btrioiiilen dote, 
u— new yearly hlgli. 
v — trcidine tiolleu 

v1— In benkruplev or rcctivertiilp or being reergonbed un- 
der the Bankruifey Act, or secvrRtei assumed inr sudi oenv 
poilts. 

wd — vdwn distributed. 
wl—Mhen Issued. 

WW — wlltl WOfTOId^ 

X — n-dfvMendor sjcrfehls. 
xdls— ex>dlstr1bullan. 
xw— crithoiit werrantz 
V -ex-divldind and soles In fiilL 
vM— yield. 

*— soles In faW. 


NYSEHighs-Lows 


Feb. 26 


NEW HIEHS 



Avne92s0pr 

MMMRm 


PtdMmeLnpr FeiRbere 
Nerliit ngsrMiPf 



inlbeTrih 


Get 

EridayS 

maes. 











I7W 

IIW Jadva 

JBb Z5 

9 

9 



VAk+ W 









5« 

Vk JalAm 



8 


2W 


m 


M &V 

17 

Pk 

8 







sw 

5W 

9W+ W 

1UV 

7W JetnAm 

JO U 

» 1105 

inv 

11 

11W+ M 





M 


M 

SW 


ZIW Jwiwr 


* 

2 

2DW 

2DW 

39W 


MW 


4JB ]£« 



m 


s 

4W 

IM KeaokC 


fO 

3 

2W 

2lk+ W 



m 

5 


JR M 11 W 

4« 

4 

41b 


SU 

RMSei 

8 

4>k 




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HTC 

1 

Mk 

Ml 


Republic of Ecuador 

Internationa] Oil Tender 


For service contracts in exploration and production ot hydrocarbons in the Republic of Ecuador. 

CEPE 

(Ecuadorian State Petroleum Corporation) 

Duly authorized by the special bioding committee invites national or foreign, state or private companies, associa- 
dom or consortia to participate in the foUotwing ^eciel bids; 

1 . Pacific coastal region (on-shore), special bids numbers: 

001- CEL-BS FDR BLOCK ND. 5 

002- CEL-65 FOR BLOCK NO. 6 

Each of the above blodcs has an area of 200,000 hectares. 

2. Amazon region (ort-shore), special bids numbers: 

003- CEL-B5 P-R BLOCK NO. 7 

004-CEL-85 FOR BLOCK NO. 1 6 

Each of the above blocks has an area of 200,000 hectares. 

The corresponding legal documenis, the contractual basic provisions, the proforma of the contract, the general in- 
structions for the Udders, the forms, the instructions for awarding the contracts, the instructiona for evaluating the 
an example of applicalion of the aforesaid evaluation tor selecting the best bid, the technical and economical 
requirements and the Mormalion for each region wiU be harulecl over lo the interested parties next 2Sth February, 
1 985 by CEPE’S petroleum contracting unit at the following address: 

Avenida Colon No. 1021, Floor 8 
Edifieio Banco Continental 
Telex 2861 CEPE Ed 

Telephortes S44-939, 551-888 and 544-800 
P.O. Box 5007 or 5008 
Quito, Ecuador 

(JBon aavmenl of the norwefundabie participation fee of U.S. $50,000 (Fifty thousan^ S. doiiarsj tor each region, 
SSftoSIlAmazon, this wilt be deposited at CEPEs treasury office located in the first floor of CEPE'a mam office 
buHding; Caile AlpaWana and 6 de Diciembre, Quito-Ecuador. 

The tander bids wilt be received at the secretariat of the special bidding committee located at the 9th floor of the 
rFP^main buHding of Alpallana and 6 de Didembre streets untU 1 7:00H. June 24, 1 985 
^ Oral. Sokm Espinosa 

General Manager 


Europe 

Dr. Maurfcfo Gandara 
Ecuadorian Ambassador 
London - England 
Telex No. 883103 


For further informafton pfeasd confaof.' 

U.S.A. 

Sr. Mario Ribadeneira ing. Carios Monteadeoca 

Ecuadorian Anibatsador CEPE 

Telex No. 64188 Telax No. 794528 

Washington, D.C. Houston-Texas 


■ •-■Tl Action Alert 

Ten^tocte _ 

rock solid 
stock picks. 

At Bache Securities, we continue to see the U.S. stock market 
offering excellent investment opportunities in 1985. 

Our latest “Action Alert” contains ten U. S. stocks we expect to be 
leaders in the months ahead. All ten demonstrate solid fundamentals, 
and range from aggressive to conservative. 

If you're an ambitious investor, send for your free copy of our top ten 
U.S. stocks. Call or contact the Bache Securities office nearest you. 


London: 5 Burlington Gardens, En^and WIX ILE, Tel: 439-4191 Iblex: 263779 
New York: 100 Gold Street, Special and International Accounts, U.S. A. 10292 Ibl: 791-4425 
Zurich: Wasserwerkstrasse 10. Switzerland, 8035, T^l: 361-4422 Tbiex: 81336 
Singapore: Wing On Life Building, 150 Cec3 St., Kepublic of Singapore, 0106 Ibl: 224-6122 
Hong Kong: Shell House, 24-28 Queens Road Central, 9th Floor, Ihl: 852-5-229051 
IhlecHX 62201 

□ Please send me a copy of your “Action Alert-Tfen Stocks. ” 


Name _ 
Address 


Thlephone 


Bache Securities 


Interaatioaal oSces: Amsterdam, Athens, Brussels, Buenos Aires, C^tdsso. Cologne, Dusseldo/f, FratU^t, 
Geneva, Hamburg. Hong Kong, London, Lugano, Luxembourg. Madrid, Monte Carlo, Montevideo, Mmick, New 
ibrk, Fbris, Rotterdam, St Cna. St Thomas, San/uan, Shtgedfore, Stuttgart, TbfyoandZtaiek. Alsoi0liotesm 
Melbourne andSydney, 
































































Over-the-Counter 


Feb. 26 


NASDAQ Notional Market Prices 


eoonei 

BstnOie 

BatnPC 

BraaCe 

BrnetiC 

Branco 

BrwToin 

Bruno 

Buffion 

BulMTr 

Bmhfn 

bma 

fitted 

BullrJ 

BiftlrMI 


Salas in Nat 

IMS HioA Low SPALCn^ 

1 3 «at its AH— ^ 

7 7 J»S 

,10a 3 108 »Ui MM IS —I 
153 IS TAi— 

UO M27 SMSIM— M 

lA i« 7U 7 7<iS— '■« 

1 S3 3M M IV^ 4- 

1.1 M M. 25ta 2A 4 ■« 

m i‘s iM 
2St2AM 2M M — % 
30 1JD 3Sn 20 » 

LI 72 SI SDV; SI + i« 

1WSS 7SS TVa 7H 
Oia .4 13 iri7 17 17 — U 

132 4.7 37 0 3bM 0 4 M 





CAU FOR INTERNATIONAL TENOERS FOR THE CONSTRUCTION 
OF THE MAPE RESERVOIR QAM ANO CONTROL WORKS 

The Minisli; of Q>mpiiter Sdeoce and Public ContiactB annoonces an international call for teoden for the conslnictioa 
of the riviJ worits of the nupe laervoir dam and conmil works, situated 70 km Noidi <d Foumban. 

The finandif of the project is beii^ arranged with the following oiganisttions: 

— La Caiue Ceotnle de Comntion tcoDomique (CCCL) 

— La Banque Europeenne dlnvestiaKaieni (&E. 1 .) 

— Ln Banque Afrioune de Developpemeni (B!a.D.) 

— The Govemment of the Republic Cameroon. 


Tbe tenderer shall submit a tender in aocoidance vrith all the nquiianents of the paitidpitiiig rmandal iostitutkias 
mentioned above. 

Hie works have been divided into two lots: 

LotljL 

A) A concrete structure iDcotpontiii^ a spiOwaj and control works of some 40 m in ovenllbdgfatwMi sector ^ties both 

in the lower outlets and the upper sluices. The troiks also the two concrete wing walls for d» connection to the 

MistifilUti dam. 

The quadcj' of coocme is to the order of 30 000 m*. 

B) A head caoe cua] of some 1060 m in length and 15 m in width at die bane. 

Excavation quantities are in the order of 640 000 m*. 

Q A tal race canal of some 1250 m in lei^ and 25 m at the boae. 

Excavation quantities ate in the order of 910 000 m*. 

LeH.B 

A) A eaithfilled dam of some 1521 m in lengdi and with a 35 m he^ht 


Ato. 1st 1965 
No^ 1st 1985 
Dee. 1st 1986 
Julv 1st 1967 
July In 1988 


B) 7 auxiliary eaftfafilied damn ^ffOK 2092 m in loigtfa with the a hemb raiy^ from 1 m to 7 m. 

The lo^ volume of the embanlmienla is in the order 800tX)0 nP. 

Hie project's main bigel dales are the foUowii^ 

— Contract award Aug. 1st 1965 

— Works start up on site..„,....._.,.......nn> ....... — ....... — Nov. 1st 1985 

— Rhrer cut off and dmsioa of the nape — >.. — ...... — Dee. 1st 1986 

— paitiel impounding of the reservoir to devotion 710. .......1 July 1st 1967 

— Worb completed, ready to impoiind to — inly In 1988 

The wofis lots axe dhtiiiet and can heawaided ngcdis- or sepeiately. 

However, kn l.A is reseraed to individuals, firms, companies, corporation or joint ventures origmating in the ’'(nnc 
zone”: this part bong financed by ~la C.CCE.” 

lie tendeimts b^ sdecied for one and/or the other lot will have to consdhite, before the final award, a joint venture 
or otherwise, jointly and severally liable for the two lots. 

Call for the tender docnmeots cu consolled at die RfinistiT of Computer Scieooe and PnUie Contracts - Contract 
Direction in Yaounde, immediatelv after release of tbepreeent ooDURunKjni and obtained on presanadon of a proof of 
payment for the sum of 400 000 f CFA from the 50N^ aecoumanL 

^NEL shall orpniK <d the benefit of the tendoers, a fidd trip on the die. followed by a hii^i^ session duiii^ the 
week aiding April 13th 19K. 

The tenden ciiner in French or in Ei^lidi shall be forwarded to the tbllowii^ address: 

MINISTRY OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AND PUBUC CONTRACTS 
CONTRACTS DORECnON - YAOUNDE, CAMEROON 

and shallhe at 12 (nooa),Mayl5tb 1985 at the laiMt either lyregisteied mail with recdpt Of dcpewred against recdpL 
The tenders shall be labeled as follows: 

Tall for Imeraatinml Tenden cf May the 15di 1985 for the co»tnjc!u» of the ra^ resovoir Ann ud eofftrol 
works — Lot 1 — Gvil engineering" — to be opened only in a tendoriag epenii^ eession. 


The bid 
National 


shall lake pbce in die conference room d the Mhusixy of Computer Science and PuUic Contracts 
lion in dos«I session. 




ROBOT H. MAKOE5SAULT 

Polysar UmHed h pieosed io ora 
neunee the oppoinlment of Or. Rob< 
ort R Marehescndt lo the eompe- 
ny's Botfd of Direclorv 
Or. Worc hes aouh, o Vioe 4V ei i - 
dent of Xerox Coflode Ine. end 
hoed of the Xen» Reserarh Cenke 
of Canada in Mississauga, Ontario, 
is pronmeri in #» field of poper. 
and ffore dwini s tr y . 

Bom in Mentreed, Dr. Mq r dis s - 
Muft wo* edueofod at the t^ofo 
Cnflege, now Conoonfio Univeraity, 
and oompMad deoeral ro s e or di ot 
MeOB and poskfoctoral stupes or 
the UrdversHy of Upprolo in Swo- 
den. He spe^ several years in the 
United SfM os o rasoorchsdentrst 
in industry, and has held professkx^ 
oI appoMnienis ol the 5tato Untwr- 
lily of New York and the Ifoner^ 
shy of AAontreoL 
Dr. MordmssouTt has been Infk^ 
entbl in the overqfl od vancei u ent of 
sc i entiBe roseardi in Canada s a 
mnnfoer of sevwol Notionai Re- 
seoreh CeuncH of Conodo onnmik 
lees. 


Seeon Scoson 

HInli Lew Oven High low 


Groins 


WHEAT (CBT) 

& 000 BU minimum, oetlenocr bushel 
004 Um Atar 31454, 3L474. 044 

4^ UIM MV M4«L 3JB 1S4 

3.70 124 Jul lasva 1274 13S 

17«W 337 SCO 10 10 ISSN 

1&3M ItoM Dec 13<M 13Th U4 

174M 148tt Mar 

Eat.Stf*t Prev.SolM nM7 
Prav.DovOpeniRt. 0il74 oN16S 
COftN CCBn 

IMC bu m Wmum* eoMers per twshel 
13SV] U1I3 Mr 2At*i U3W ISIV 


laO li74 

331 173W 

UtV: 1*7 

1«S tu 

118 iTOVi 

UIW 175V> 

Est. Sotos 


Mev in iTIti 
Jul 174(n ITPa 
Sea 2A74 UV 
Dec laM. 244U 
Mot 171(^ US'A 
MV 1734 1744 
Prev.Salok 3tMa 


Pr«v.Oe«Oecnini.taM<2 eK3iS4 

SOYBEANS tCBTT 

3.300 bu minlmum-deilersporbushe 


7.«0V> 10 

7.V7 SJ2 

TSf UO 

7J4 1A4 

ATI &B4 

AM AM 

A7V ATS 

7A3 AiS 

7.77 A35 

Est. Soles 


Tter &a SMt« 
Mv &75W &am 
Jul sat &7II7 
Auo A«8 in 
See U7 S.7S 
Mev A*lv> AM 
Jim A04W Ain 
Nto- AIS AIS 
MV 

Prav. Soles 0AS7 


Prov.DoyOoniRl. 71510 bft(J0 
SOYBEAN MEALtCBT} 

I ae wn dollars par Ion 
2DVA0 13140 Mr 13430 (3348 


nm mao mov oom tau» 

19AM I24J0 Jut I3UD 13UK1 

isaao t 0 ja am tanoe catno 

179J0 14180 Sep 14088 14188 

18BJD 1415D Oct 14198 14S58 

18480 I47JD Dec I47J0 UB70 

1AU0 14780 Jon 1SB38 15108 

3BA48 ISAM Mr IS4M 19AM 

Esr. Sales Prev.SoWs iatii 

Prw, Dffv Open im. 41842 oH IJM 

SOYBEAN OILtCBTI 
40800 Ibo- dollars per 180 ibA 
sue 2iaS Mr 3145 3153 

H.I0 3198 MOV 04S 77M 

SeJO 2170 Jul 2AJ1 0M 

2730 21SB AM SA90 24M 

2A3S 3150 S4P 3&M 2S80 

IlM 21W Oct 2AJS 2SJS 

2A7S 2170 Dec 34JS 34J0 

24.ra 2146 Jan 2485 2L70 

Eat. Sales Prev.Soies IA42S 

Prev.DavDeenlm. 4A7M upTAS 

OATstenTi 

AOOO tau miRliTHin>.daliars p«r bushel 
IMVb 1J8U> Mnr IJ34 IJS 

1.71 1A7W MV lABVs 147 

1.7BV3 141 Jul 144>«. l44liS 

(J9 (40 Sep 141 (41b 

1 J2b 144 Dec 14S 145 

Ext. Soles Prcv.solib 47D 

Prwv.DovOpenlAl. 3424 gH 71 


Livestoc 


CATTLE (CME> 

40JI00 Ibi- eenisper lb. 

4V80 S140 Apr 4545 4SL7S 

475D 4A» Jun 4A8S C7M 

4747 dltS AW 4A1S «4M 

4148 Oct 4440 44A2 

4745 6140 Doe 8408 8A1D 

£745 8A25 Feb 

Elt.Solti IA878 Prev.Solfes 21098 
prov DeyOeeiiiRl. 0.O24 up 118 
FEEDEB CATTLE (C*4B> 

44800 Ibi-eWM Per ib. 

7479 8AH MW 8448 7110 

7430 8740 Apr 7189 71.(0 

7175 8475 MOV 7840 7045 

7170 8840 Am TIBS 7115 

7100 4780 Sep 71.15 n45 

7383 87.10 Oct 71.18 HJS 

7120 7040 NOV 71JD 7100 

ExI.SalM 2477 Prav.SolbS 1142 
Prev, Oov O pe n tirt. 11.177 off257 
NOOStCME} 

30800 IbA- cents per lb. 

M4S 4A10 Apr 4828 4858 

S48 4840 Jun 5188 028 

9177 4175 Jul naS S22S 

5447 4740 AW 5175 0.17 

0.75 4A00 Oct 4470 47JD 

9115 48J0 Dec 4A7S 4758 

44J8 4425 Feb 47J8 4745 

47.35 45J8 Apr 4A08 4A0D 

Es>. Seles 7511 prev. Seles 10JB3 
Prev. Day Open InL 38.200 oH479 
PORK BELLIES (CMEt 
mCOOrhs.. esnlSPerlA 
040 4110 Mar 4A28 4110 

cue 41.15 MV 8A4I 47.15 

1247 8115 Jul 4128 080 

8885 4020 AW 8ASD 080 

7115 4115 Feb 8858 8B58 

7140 8480 Mr 

Est.Salos am Prev.Seles lOJOB 
Prev.DovOpeniaA IS884 up8 


COFFEECtNYCSCE) 

37580 lbs.- eWTW eer lb. 

1S17D 1219 Mr 14100 I4UB 

1XLM 12281 MOV U187 >4289 

I47JD I0JH Jul WAS 

M758 12780 SW WJ5 14120 

1417S 1295S Dec 1040 12178 

1080 1219 AW I0jn 1080 

108S I08S AtoV 

1349 1319 Jul 

Est. Sales Prev.SUB 2853 

Prev. Dev Open lid. 13417 uPTD 
SUOAftWORLD 11 IKTCSCe) 
iiuno lbs.- cents per lb. 

1180 174 AM 115 10 

109 170 MOV IPV A18 

7.75 423 Jwl 40 447 

775 458 Sep 452 478 

vns 47V Del 450 <75 

775 52b Jon A32 S40 

90 &7V AMT 578 107 

7.15 AM AAov 880 110 

457 827 Jut 840 450 

E0.Salc8 I8i89 Prev.Soles 17JZI 
Prev. Dev Open tut. BIOM pffWO* 
COCOA (WYCSCEI 
10 metr I c ton»- 8 per tan 

2Sn im Mer 057 09 

2570 3030 Mer 07V 074 

2400 2B«r Jul 219 219 


30 J-.M 
10Vii v80'-2 
128U +81 

137% +80% 
l42l< *31 


+80% 
171 U, +JN)4« 
175 +80% 

28BV; +81 

Itfit +JIT 
172 +81 

178% +.01 


154% +JI3 
iJJVt +81% 
ass +82% 

&87Vt +80% 
laSW +82V: 
A«a% +83'i 
485 +83V1 

AITVb +84 
88SV: +85Vs 


13480 +130 
131.70 +280 
1040 +138 
14080 +140 
14180 +180 
1449 +19 
)S0l9 +140 
1S1D0 +120 
rs750 +150 


2114 —87 

0.15 —87 

3450 —87 

2480 —.15 

2550 —85 

2980 

2440 —.14 

240 —.10 


IJ4W +sCe% 
150% +80% 
153% +80V| 
>51% +8IU 
U413 +80W 


4&T2 +0 

03S +0 

4417 +0 

445S +.10 

44.10 +0 

<49 *3S 


440 —0 

710 —0 

7087 —0 

7110 +0 

710 +0 

710 +0 

710 +0 


017 +30 

SD80 —0 
00 +.10 
910 

00 +AO 
00 +0 
480 +0 

449 +0 


4847 +0 

<057 +0 

419 +0 

<437 +AO 
<70 +0 

470 +.13 


(417D +30 

M1I2 +0 
141.10 +0 

1370 — 0 

130J3 +0 

1270 —AO 
12457 >-47 

12S.12 -JO 


190 +0 

40 +.11 

40 +.10 

474 +.11 

40 +.13 

541 +.15 

SA9 +0 
A13 +84 

4J7 +0 


710 —ai 
21M — 0 
7147 —30 


»15 ana sea 21jj 213B 

3337 1999 Dec am ^ 

3149 MB Mar 900 ^ 

2130 2DI4 Mev 90« 2019 

2035 2015 Jul 2020 2020 

Esi.Scles Prev. Sales 1717 

Prev. Dov Open int. 2137B up 115 
ORANSE juice (NYCE) 
iSOOOlbi- cents eer lb. _ _ 

1050 1109 Mr 1W0 1490 

1SS0 1510 MOV 17080 1710 

111 1 85 I5S0 Jul I7L1D 171JS 

1B100 1S7JS Sep 100 100 

1S10 100 Nqv 1609 1610 

1W0 156.00 Jon 

1779 ISAM Mr 

1<20 1400 Mr 

Jui 

ESI. Soles Prav.Selei 64i 

Prev. Dev Open inr. 4.7M oHoo 


Metals 


COPPER(CaMEX) 

2&09lb&-eenl9Perlb. 

<280 610 Feb 

9120 550 Mnr S70 57.75 

<20 ass Apr _ 

720 5L30 MOV 500 5BJ0 

025 570 Jul 580 00 

mo 570 Sep 00 00 

0485 509 Qee 080 600 

5420 00 Jon 

800 00 mor 4l0 610 

7400 61.10 Mv <30 <20 

7440 610 Jul 6113 6U5 

7a«0 <130 Sep 610 <10 

700 65.70 Dec 640 640 

Est.Solex Prev.SalM 3103 

Prev.OuvOPWiint. 006 effllll 

SILVER (COMEX) 

|i‘QV cvnti PRf tre> oz» 

7238 6078 Feb _ 

1008 5478 Mnr SSTS 5718 

5728 5410 Apr 5440 5648 

15110 5588 Mav S<78 SnJ 

1018 5678 Jui 5778 508 

118U 5788 Sep SSLS 5988 

I23&8 57X0 Dec 5778 61S8 

I 21 S 8 4310 Jon _ „ 

11938 4108 Mor 43U 4308 

10408 4300 MOV 6338 6348 

7458 6448 Jul 6408 6408 

9408 4588 Sep <98 6558 

7458 <798 Dec <<78 <528 

Est. Seles Prev.Soles 4I.7U 

Prav.OavOeenim. 04J9 eH18S4 
PLATINUM (NYMfil 
SB truv OS.- dollars par rrov OI. 

w»w> lesjH Mar 

4479 2449 Apr |4M 970 

4479 2499 Jul 2519 2S70 

3930 2519 Oct 2570 3440 

3719 910 Jon 3640 2710 

Est.Solos Prev.Sotis 1701 

Prev. Dor OaeninL 14833 up 107 
PALLADIUMtNVMEI 
IMPevat-Miiartperas _ 

1419 1070 Mr 1110 1140 

1590 I860 Jun 1870 11170 

1490 1049 Sep 1070 11178 

1410 1040 Dee 1090 1120 

1270 1140 Ator 1570 1110 

U.Saloe Prev.Satop 928 

Pw.DavOaeninl. 4812 oH1<3 
Ext.Selos Prev.SatM 79 

Prev.DovDpeninl. 4812 041143 

OOLD (COMEX) 

IKtrovei-dollBrapertravon. _ 
rv>M> 3810 peb 2BS0 aS19 

3110 010 MOT 040 309 

SIAM 3B14D Apr 2850 2710 

5100 2870 Jiai 2870 MX 

4SS0 2710 Aug 3770 2000 

4910 2970 Del 2770 3849 

079 3810 Dec 3049 nO0 

4BS9 3060 Feb 3100 3140 

4740 2140 Aar 3140 3140 

4350 3200 Jun 32U0 3220 

43S0 3310 Aw 390 3580 

3730 3340 Oct 300 33588 

34U0 3420 Dee 34U8 341M 

Est.seies Prev.aeM <1451 

Prcv.DavObenlnt.14aa77 up«17 


2115 2121 

298 m 
290 3» 

209 99 

209 99 


t<80 MBAS 
17080 1780 
>709 1710 
WAO i<70 
199 1680 
1690 
1670 
1670 
1670 


570 
570 570 

5775 
90 M 

MAC aS 
590 570 
680 600 

610 600 
610 610 
620 610 
6S9 6145 
640 6115 


5478 
5578 988 
5448 5710 
5648 576.1 
5748 S8S8 
5868 5547 
5778 6108 
6158 
6142 <348 

<318 <378 
<408 <478 
<558 <617 
<478 <118 


3S10 
1460 2S20 
3520 2570 
2570 209 
2640 26870 


1110 1110 
1070 1119 
190 1110 
109 ni0 
M70 7100 


2849 980 
3840 3020 
3IS0 3»0 
SfP0 SP49 
2740 980 
2770 2030 
3030 30870 
3100 3130 
2M0 3170 
32U8 325.10 
3500 3310 
3350 3370 
3420 34410 


Financial 


us T. RILLS (IMM) 

St mllllMVPlsef I0PCL 
Till 170 Mar 710 710 

7181 P.U Jun 71.11 71.17 

710 S4M Sap 709 709 

100 8SJ7 Dec 709 98lS 

909 840 Mr 780 7W 

7027 00 Jiai B70 90 

00 00 Sap 870 870 

90 9.17 Dec 

Est. Seim Prev. Seim 70S 

prev.DavOeenlni. 44882 affSB 

to YR. TREASURY (CBrO 
S100800 Prtiw pti A lands ol 10PC2 
0 7835 AAar 77.17 7707 

533 70+ Jun 78.34 7831 

81-13 75.18 S4P 770 784 

»a T^U Dee 

880 7^11 Mnr 7+a 77 

7734 770 Jun 

Ea.Sotm Prwv.Solm 1192 

Prev. Day Open Int. 4702 wl02 
US TREASURY aOHDStCBTI 
(ft nrf TTM iVlir i+t A Wnm rt 19 irtl 
77.15 S70 Mr 783 18+ 

7M5 57-0 Jun ST-l 9-10 

7+2 57-10 Sep 4S-7 4S.1I 

7+5 573 Dec <7.22 0-9 

7MD 573 AUr 57+ 57-18 

78-K 5+37 Jun <+-14 <+3S 

7+3 5+9 Sep <<+ 4+-U 

<«-26 935 Dee 4S3I 4+4 

47-13 5+37 (Mr 4+-I3 <5-9 

<83 6+3 Jim 

6S-26 6+21 Sep 

Esl.5el6s Prev.Solm176Ja5 

Prev.DovOwnintJXMn oH44S 
OIUWA (CBT) 

SlOlUn Brin- PM (L CBim Of no PC( 

78-17 57-3 Mot 68-12 <811 

<827 S7-T7 Jun <8-9 it3S 

<84 S8n Sep <827 <80 

<B-(3 S84 Dec 

a 09 Mdr 

673 SB35 Jun 

<73 021 SW 

EN-Soim Prev.Setcp 101 

Prev. Dov OoMilrrt. S07 up IS 
CERT. DEPOSIT (l*UU 
SI ni I n hawpfs of IDO 
710 BS83 Mor 7073 TOM 

710 850 Jun TIM 7021 

709 00 SOP 90 90 

017 8134 Dec 90 90 

90 840 Mr 00 180 

90 860 Jun 

509 570 Sep 

Est.Sditt Prw.Sohs 511 

Prwv. Dor Open im. 11717 aflB 
EURODOLLARS (IMM> 

S) mlinon+MoMUpcI. 

710 014 Mar <054 7B9 

700 OL9 Jial 9J7 90 

700 0453 Sep 90 90 

90 140 Dec 051 500 


710 710 
710 71.12 
7051 509 
7057 700 
90 700 
90 070 
90 90 
570 


785 7844 

014 780 
7747 78<4 
78M 
76-82 7+31 
8+15 


<817 783 
017 <87 
<747 0I< 
<73 <827 

923 0.» 

911 <+0 
<631 914 
6531 6+6 

912 99 
921 
9U 


073 910 

917 4*37 
<80 683 
6818 
a 

915 

M 


700 fOM 
011 010 
90 90 
8721 90 


7047 700 
90 00 
9.16 BUM 
076 00 



SP COMP. INDEX (CINE) 

pcRitiMidcrols 

100 1SI0 Mar 1800 100 

mx 100 Jun 040 040 

IfIJD MOM SbP 1070 070 

1M0 17S0 Dec 17110 100 

EsLSdlSt 042M PiWv.Soim am 
Prev.OovQpenlnL SS;i74 eftOZI 

VALUE UNEOCCBn 
pniBh and cants _ „ 

EMM 100 . Mar 1900 2010 
t»AO 1720 Jun 2^ 200 

21130 inias Sep 2060 2060 

ftOAt 2000 One - 

bt**-*** Pi«v.Sales 4764 

Prav. Dov Open inL OSSI aH9 
HYIE COMP. INDEX (HYPE) 

Mar 040 100 
0095 700 Jiai 0<JS 15US 

1110 710 Sep 1000 1055 

1120 1010 Dee 1120 1120 

EMBoim tS37l Pr6w.0Mee UM7 
Pretf.DavOPMlnt. 003 upT4 


»40 tf^ 
190 INS 
100 013S 


g 0 20015 
0 204SS- 
3M0 0005 
ZIU5 


10445 050 
060 070 
0075 10.15 
m0 1120 


CommodKy indexes 


Cime 

MnnNvHL .* 9490 f 

Pp,i7iiiW_ 2.02&.10 

Dj.Fuhirns 120.12 

Com. RcseorchBureou. 238 l 00 

(Moody'S : base 100 : DI 0 . 31 , 1931 . 
p - preliminary; f • finat 
Reuter* : bane 100 : Sod. 10 , 1931 . 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec 31 , 1974 . 


•■Prwtan' 
946i60f' ‘ ' 
2A2Z.KL: • 

- IIBSB- 
»M0 + • 

, -,i " 


NYCSCE: 

NYCE: 

comer: 

MrMB: 

KCBT: 

NYFE: 



H 0 NQ-K 0 N 6 BOLD FUTURES 
UJJpersMK* 

CMm Preview 
Hteb Lew BM AM BW Ask 
Feb. H.T. N.T. 2010 2 S 40 2*40 2760 
Altor. I 4 T. N.T. 2 B 0 2 S 40 2 N 0 2760 
AN — 3000 20 X 0 2060 aO 60 2700 ? 7 tM 
JW _ 74 T. N,T. auo 2700 2770 010 
AW .. N.T. N.T. 2730 2 T &0 30 X 0 3800 
Oct _ 74 T. N.T. 2700 300 3100 nZ 0 
Dec - 3060 3840 030 3050 3150 3170 
W>urne :24 1 et»et 10 w. 

SINOAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
UAJbwPuuce 

Prav. 

N( 9 I Lav SettM seftfe 

Mar N.T. N.T. 200 2 M 

API 20.10 200 2050 2770 

JW N.T. N.T. 290 3010 

Veiuma; <74 Meat 10 ec. 

KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Mionia GCfiti per Ule 

CIOM Previous 

Old Ask BU Ask 

Mor . 1540 IU 0 190 1570 

Apr 1700 T 7 I 0 1730 T 740 

MOV 17*0 1760 1770 17 B 0 

Jun _ I 7 S 0 3800 1770 910 

Vatwne: 27 letL 
SINSAPORE RUBBER 
Sins ouu i s Gsnti p 9 kiM 

CfOM Pravlew 

BM BM A«ii 

RSSIMor- 16)0 1 X 30 >6525 16 X. 7 S 

RSSIAPi- 1670 190 1700 17175 

RSS 2 Mar- 1570 1550 1570 15 X 0 

RSS 3 Mar- 1560 ISX 0 15 X 0 15 X 0 

RSS 4 Mar- 1470 1510 190 1510 

RSS 5 M 9 - 1410 1440 1410 14 UD 

KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 

( We lev 7 l wrtnB pMr P9 9lBai 

Oew PrivWes 

BM AM BM AM 

Mr 1.17V 1,330 1.170 100 

API 1J0 1210 1.10 1210 

MOV t,MB 1,30 M 0 1,190 

Jun...., 1.19 1,170 1,19 1.170 

JiT 1.128 1,10 1,19 1,19 

Aw - 1 J 9 1 .I 7 D 1.19 1,170 

sen ... , 1,130 U 7 V 1,19 1.170 

twv 1 , 1(0 l,( 7 V UIO M 7 P 

Jcn-,,, , 1,110 1.170 1,110 U 7 V 


London Commodities 

Feb. 36 

Fiswras in storting per metric Ion. 
Gomti In U.5. OPtlora per metric toa 
Com in U.& roilors por own. 


Web Lev Qsse Pravtoro 
SUGAR 

Mr 1110 10 X 011501110 190 1100 

Mv 1170 1119 1150 11601140 1149 

AW 1350 1210 1210 1340 12 X 0 199 
Oct 1330 1300 1310 I 3 UD (90 1380 
Dec N.T. N.T. 1300 1370 13 X 0 1370 
Mor 1540 1510 1530 1549 1510 15 UD 

MOV 15 X 01570100 — ISB 0 I 90 

X 334 wis el 9 Tons. 

COCOA 

Mr 1345 207 207 200 £29 204 

Mav 1344 200 207 2.29 129 205 

JIV 204 201 1306 220 130 196 

Sep 200 IIW 1 IB 3 1154 110 119 

Dec 207 USD 101 loss 1057 1012 

(Mar 1062 UNO 10(1 109 10*4 109 

(Mbv lOS 109 109 109 109 109 

507 lbt 5 Of lOtonL 
COFFCe 

Mor 1433 207 201 1403 1410 1415 

MV 193 149 IASS 149 1453 140 

JIV 200 1476 1477 1477 140 140 

Sep 1553 159 15 X 1533 1516 159 

Nev 105 1541 159 1544 206 159 

JWi 159 1537 159 1525 ISIS 159 

Mr N.T. N.T. 1510 159 1470 159 

1717 IM 7 of 5 lens. 

GASOIL 

PW 3540 2450 3470 2500 25 UP 2540 
Mr 22 S 25 2 S 60 227 J 5 900 23 X 0 23825 
API 2170 2130 ZI 70 2170 21 X 25 2150 
MV 3130 300 31175 31125 2110 2110 
Jun 3110 200 2110 2110 3100 2100 
JIv 3100 2070 2110 3120 990 3110 
Aw N.T. N.T. 2100 7150 2070 2150 
Sep N.T. H.T. 2100 3300 300 290 
Oct N.T. PLT. 2100 2360 200 22 S 0 
IP 36 letv 0 lW lem. 

GOLD 

Apt 950 950 KO. NjQ. N.a NA. 
Minis etm IrovOL 

Sdurcre; RWtera and London Ps/ra(ewit £«• 
tfiaw p e ipneetu. 


Paris Commodities 

Fob. 36 

Suoor to FivDdi Fran per melrlc Ion 
Ottisr fiems in Francs PE W ks. 


Hlub Lav Opm orae 

SUGAR 

May tAW MT5 1,40 FA22 + M 

Aw 100 103 105 1.515 +9 

Oct 100 100 105 100 +21 

Dec H.T. N.T. 101 100 +11 

Mur ipse IJ9 1,79 IJ9 + 16 

Mor 105 100 105 105 +9 

Ew, veL: lASDiots el 9 lens. Prav. eetwl 
»iw: 1.10 tots. Open bitergsr: 17,101 

Mar 1410 1445 1435M 149 + 10V7 

Mev 149 149 149 202 +9 

JIV N.T. H.T. 1370 — +10 

Sea 1400 13H 1340 130 UrDl 

Dec N.T. N.T. — V3V1 — . IS 

MV N.T. N.T. — 1210 —10 

(Nay N.T. N.T. — 1310 — 10 

Est. voL; 10 lets of 10 tans. Prav. octuat 
Mies: 19 (els. Opwi Interest: 1.0B 

COFFEE 

MV 1*9 2+10 — 2+9 + 9 

l>^ 160 1655 1665 170 +25 

Jly N.T. N.T. 160 — +10 

SW N.T. N.T. 2710 1735 + M 

^ N.T. N.T. St15 ^ +15 

Jvi N.T. NT. 170 170 +9 

MW H.T. H.T. 1707 2J9 +9 

.B9 ._vel.; 84 Ion V 5 tms. Prav. actual 
Mlw: 9 Ms. open Merest; MS 
Sewicv; eewedWCenwriarae, 


Markot Guide _ 


CMobve Baani of Trade 
CMcop* ManmEle Eudwwe 
iPten ei Mcrad M tw s l erv Ainrkat 
Ot OitooM M isuA itlte EKdMnpe 
Nev York Ceeea Swv. Ceflae Baid wP O s 
New Yerk CWtcw eiTBhanea 
Cenui w dlty Eadwwe, New YVk 
New y»rk amtowiND fudictDe 
Ifieni gtv navO uf Tnide 
Mew y art Putww CeUiw e i 


Cash Prices Peb. ^ 


CommodBy nan Uon 
CoHeu* Santee. lb 
Prmtclolti 54/9 a lb, vd - 
DoM blllelilPltM.ton_ 
iren3FdTY.PMla.tan 
Sleet scrap No I bw Pirt. . 
Lead Spot, lb 
COppv elect, (b 
Tin (Slrelb). n 

line, E. St. I- Basis, lb 

Palladliim.iB — 

511 W N.Y.U -- 

Sburae.* AP. 


DM Futures Options 

Feb. 26 

KSsniaiMart-aUKinvbtBiesB’flart 


Stilie 


CvteStiae 


ftasOitlle 

Hk- 

1A0 

JM 

10 

srat 

(MV 

AM 

Jn. 

gr 


HAS 

US 

LS 



in 



00 

1.9 



19 


086 

0J2 

10 

10 

10 

70 



035 

070 

2« 

Uf 

79 


— 

X17 

00 

ISS 

39 

39 





Coki: 

^ VM.X1Kepvi M.4DJVI 



Mon. V4L 4JI5 epee M TUB? 


Source: CMS. 






Hunt Loses Round With British Firm 


volwine: 5 Weal 9 lem. 
Soura; Rtuttn, 


S&P 100 Index Optiona 
Feb. 26 




London Metals Feb. 26 

Floures in stertlnp per metric ton. 
Silvv In pence per tray ounce. 


I 


PdMeU 

MV Ul Mer JN7 

1 / 1 * - 
in6 l/W UI6 - 
I/M VU «k <6 
R Trit IVM 1<6 
% 1% ZN 3k 

277 Ik 4% As 
N7 7 7% - 


Dividends Feb. 26 


Cemnaev Pv Amt par Rk 

INCREASED 

Kentudir Central U S 0 3-37 >12 
USUAL 


CafvncTIcut Nai G 
crane Co 
BWltee FndCarp 
Psi Cvnmerce Cve 
GenI Mills lee 
Koneb Servless IK 
Mvine Midland Bks 
McOmMIiCe 
Olia induBiriK 
pnrucfons Ins. Ca 
SviDlevaSXSi 
uim Sonesrp 
unitod iiiuitilnettne 
Wausau Povrr MJID 


Q 0 >9 >14 
Q 0 >14 3+ 

Q 0 >9 >14 
0 0+1 >15 

O 0 >1 +10 

0 .» +1 >17 

Q 0 +1 >1 

Q 0 >9 >11 
O .10 >14 39 
O 0 lb >11 >I 
O 0 lb +15 >9 
Q 0 >37 M 
0 0+1 >11 
Q .17 +1 >13 


Today Pravleos 
Hluh erode capper cattiodes: 

SPQI 10&0 1J660 1JH90 1000 

Smonlhs 1070 I0&0O I0T0 1010 

Copper celheuas: 

spot 1040 1,3660 1040 1060 

3 menihs 10X0 1050 1050 1070 

rut: spat 1O0(t0>O010ia>350IO,1450 
Xmonttw 1U3O0ia2a50IB)«l01D.16S0 
Leoarcpul 3300 3310 3370 3310 

JmanItB 3400 3410 34X0 XC0 

Z(nc»pel 53X0 8370 5300 3210 

Omenlhs 1170 7350 7150 SU0 

Sllwr:spet 5310 5340 5220 5240 

3 manHs 010 5530 590 5420 

Altimlalien; 

Spot 10D0 1,8210 1030 1040 
SmonttH 1070)0X0 1010 10X0 

NkkBl:SPel 4050 4A4S0 4JBX0 4050 
3mpntb7 456X0 8590 44470 415500 
5pv*re.* Recdera. 


Jq«n Margin Buying Rises 

Ratten 

TOKYO — The (mtstaoding 
balance (>f iz)argia*bnymgp()siti()Qs 
Ofl the T(^o, Osaka and N^g(^a 
stock exdianges rose 23 billion yen 
(about S88 millioo) last week to 
Z9913 billion m rweriag a 
record high for the second slia^ 
week, the Tokyo Stock Exchange 
said. 


The Ajtoaaxtd Pnta 

NEW ORLEANS — Ndsoa 
Bunker Hunt, the Texas million- 
ai/)^ has fsil^ in an aitempt to 
revive an appeal from a judgment 
orderix^ him to pay S40.8 million 
to E Britidi oil coamany. 

The Sth U.S. ^cuit Court of 
Appeals in New Orleans refused 
Mooday to bear Che new appeal, 
because Mr. Hunt's lawyers filed it 
one day after a 3(May deadline had 
expi^ 

The case oritinally arose from a 
1979 order by the British courts 
that Mr. Hunt pay the S40.8 tml- 
Uon to BP Expiation Co. (Libya) 
Ltd, which had sued hfr. Hunt 
four years earlier as a result of thdr 
venture in a Libyan oil field 

Af to* appeab throi^ the British 
courts, the S40.8 u^ou award 
subsequeotfy was upheld in Dallas 
by L/.S. Districl Ju^ Joe A. Hsh 
on Jan. 23, 1984. 

Mr. Hunt's lawyeis filed thdr 
appeal with the Sth U.S. Circuit 
Coun of A{ip|^ here 3 1 days after 
Mr. Fish denied Hunt's motion for 
a new trial, but that was one day 
beyond the deadline, and the court 
refused to hear the 

Mr. Hunt’s lawyers tried to get 
Mr. Fish to vacate and then re> 
enter his March 12, 1984, refusal to 
grant a new trial in the ease. Had 
Mr. IHsh done so, it would have 


son denied any abuse of discredoo.' ^ 
by Mr. Fish, sa^g Mr. Hunt's ^ 
lawyers made a costiy miscalcuU-. . 
tion. 

The dispute stAmmeH Inmi an. 
award by the Libyan govenuneoT 
granting Mr. Hunt a 56-yeaE oS '' 
exploration and drilling coikcs-. 
sion. 

Mr. Hunt entered into an agree-' ' 
ment with BP to do the exploratkaj' ' 
and set terms for fuuire sharing hi 
pFoT ^ts from the oQTidd.'whicb siitK - 
s^ueatly was natiomfized by the. 
Libyan govemmeoL " 


Resorts’s license : 
Renewed in U.S. ' 

The Aaadatai Rear 

LAWRENCE TOWNSHIP,.--- 
New Jersey — The state Carino.- 
Coatrol Commission renewed .r . 
sorts lntentatioittilnc.'sgani^lL - 
cense Tuo^y, eodiog the « 

reriew of an Atlantic Oty 
since gamWing was leg^i^ is ^,T«4 
boardvralk town. ! .r 

The conmnssioo voted 

itject a recommendatkm-lV 

gaming investigates to l 

permit, but the panti criticized Rfi-V’v 
sorts’s mternti business piactiee& 


Jd SS^biii 

Wand 

y^ior- 

fr'" ' 

fr 

a pr 

Is 

Cp^' 


AAiuDoi; M'MonWitr; O-Ouetmlv; s-sera+ 
(UiaanL 


























































ROUIidup 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 



‘^»a Says Net 
«>8ed30%inl984 


WAXA, Japan — . t- “®“^20-pcnxnt increase in over- 

5“^ I^unrial Co. allies of video emiipmeoL 

incicased sal«rf3?!f*" .^®®¥3Dys®dthatccHnimi- 
location and industrial equipment 
boosted arSS^3^“®' 32 percent and sales of 

®*nlin.l^. 6*'^*«JUper- euctnmc conqjooents, mrfttHmg 
^ 8»ani eJectronie.«*i--- ““conductors, rose 41 pereenu 
I 2?^“*doStoSS^ HoIae^q)pliancc sales rose 15 
' P^tmsin»g<taMiidforair 

o^tJOTere and microwavB ovens, 
. Nov- 20 l 9d bom iS ancfio^qiiipixieni sales sta^ 


aenL cent from 19S3. 

largest nr mhu^ Matsushita markets its prodocts 

“der the National, P^asonic, 

y® last year, reaili- Quasar and Tedtnics brand names. 


Otoiovvixi 

equmment. 

*w»as, its 


ntal investment rose 72 per^ 
rom 1983. 


ArcowBuM 

PtantinFrance 

Reuters 

LOS ANGELES — Atlantic 
RichDdd Co. said iWlay that 
it plans to build a plant at Fos- 
sur-Mer, France, near Mar- 
seille, to produce 180,000 tons a 
year ci propyl eoe oxide and 
430,000 tons of gasoline-gi^ 
teruaiy bu^ alc^L 

The conq>any said coostnic- 
tion on the p^t, which mil 
cost up to S2S0 "niiinn, Is tenta- 
dvdy sdieduled to start in the 
seo^ quarts of 1986. Aico 
sud die startup is oontingent on 
ea g^negring aw design confir- 
mation of the ciqiitd estimates 
and on the completion of con- 
tracts for raw mataials, utilities 
and products. 

Pn^>^|ae oxide is used in a 
wide variety of common prod- 
ucts vriiile bn^ alcohol is an 
octane enhancer. 


Wheelock Takeover Bid Raised to $320.5 Million 


By Dinah Lee 

lutemaiUml Herald Trrbwie 


ibie symbol of the colony’s roots in 
l9tb-cen&Jiy coloiial trading and 


Mr. Kboo's last tnd came Feb. YJL was 
19. on the eve of a five-day break m 

HONG KONG— Sir Y.K.P &0 shipping. trading fcg the lunar new year hoU- because (rftnc.unwnnanam^ 

issued a new challenge Tuesday to Hie sraboiism of the well-k- day. The Malaysian real-estate eof Hcs. *‘Bm . there are a 
the Singapore property and bank- iKwn colonial fanuly name of Mar- tr^wr raised the bidding to 24 cash-ridi assets. fiJa «ong^ 
ing tycoon, Khoo Teck Puat, in ^ ^0 way u> a stniggle be- bUDon dollars through an offer of 7 
their 12-day laitle for control ^ tweeti two self-made Asdan tycoons dollars for the A ahaies and 70 vdopmt 
Wheelock Maiden & Co., one of also has not gone unnoticed in the cents for the Bshases. eonsidets attractive tne oa**^ 

Kong's oldest shilling and r^jon. One merchant banker involved said. « ,/v » 

trading companies. Ti^iL's move is the fourth full shSSi^WdSf U 

Sir Y.K. raised the bidding for bid for (be Wheelock group. Tlie ^ S&fl2vioBCoip.,anasso- 

Wbeelocklo2.5bilIionHongKong firei came on Feb. 14^ Mr. m 

dollars (S320Jn^m) through a Khoo offered 1.9 billion doUarsaf- SSSraS^^Ke take- 

new offer of 7.40 doUais a share for te having purchased I3i percent Accot^toUtelat«te^^ ^ 

the ordinaiy A shares he does not of the wuiSrighte from theM^ S!;v1?SSn?^?^JlSes^ mo^ AlM^r 
already own and 74 cents a share den fainiWdiaSoIduig. • ^y 3 percent of Whed^TOt- r^v^^caynou^ 

d.„ «»«ol of ttc 

TTk takeover dud to captured later when his company, Hongkong Ste^ dark, an executive with lystssaidthebidawe^to^- 

the irnagutetion of Hong Konfr dfc Kowloon Wharf & Godown Co, Wai3cy Ltd- said 'Hicsday that Sir antee ultimate vfctoiy for Sir y A- 


QiendcalFinns 

SetUpGrovp 

Reutea 

BRUSSELS — Tbirty nia^or 
*K«Mtion to m 


mmon uinwA lorooga an Oucr « / ncai 0 O 6 Liuahv^— 'Yv 
dollars for the A dunes and 70 vdopoent Corp-. that w > 
cents for die Bshases. enodets attractive, the banicx 

Om merchant badeer mvoived said. • . ^a» ■ 

in the bidding said, “Wc’ie getting Oa Monday, Sr Y^ m^ 
down to a little sdid lump of re- strat^.hid a H dw^ 4 s™ 
maininsdiaFes— the bard cote. Sr to Alfied Investors Coip., an 

tr tr •_*' .a mi* mmM tmm'tmA i**um*t m ant mmnanV ffl UW 


already own and 74 cents a share deo family ghaw*nTiting 
fortteraminiiilBshaio. sir YJL slepptii in two days 

The takeover dud to captured later whe n h»s com pan y, Hon gkong 
the irnagination of Hong ICong, ^ Kowloon Wharf & Godown Co„ 
which is only now emerging fr(Hn raised t^ to - hininn 

two years of political and economic AYllar c nwirhflnt hanlr, Wairi- 
voiadlity. Although the Wheelock ley j^uL, said Tuesday that Sir YJC. 
group has not farra wdl in the face now controls 38 percent of Wbee- 
'of a three-year property slun^ in iwk, hawng captured 4 percent in 
Hong Kong and an international recent days in general trading in 
shaping lecessimi, it remains a vis- Hong Ko^ and L^don. 


uwy ij pavwi u( vviKcuiw* B *VL- .viuv.m, - -- - . r-— ^ ...» Cmm a c*nea 

» »» coooot Of db. ^ntin 


an executive with 


nying the st^ to Mr. Khoo. Ana* 
lysts said the bid aRie^ to giiar- 
vintnrv for Sir Y 


pj^thehidnstty^ 

W the Europ e . 

P bffwwit jdhnufacnneis 
matioas said Ttojy- 
T^^bo*.faww^ 
*^^fciatioa a Pctiocto 

pSS^ni 

jmjte the ecoMoms ^ « 
tole of an induslpf. i 
prodneas . 




[Batikof America 
I Beductiotts 


COMPANY NOVES 


Um^ rrj VIIKOP saui 11 oas i 

. SANFRANCBCO-Baokof 
^rS| or ahS1e?iwmt 

W ite bimdtt and rS^DTsteff federal suit challenging 
l^oae-tentiL ^ takeover measure passed 

, Bank of America cunently cm- G««*P on F*. 7 . Coop 
Plpjj about 32,000 people L the 5 I««“V 

retafl division and offiSC said the ^ to have th< 

staff would be reduced xnai^ dared unlawful and mva 
throi^ attrition. Oown Gntral Petrolc 

A Mnlfamimca spokesman also raid it win «t*angf» all 
^d that an intemd investigation New Jeis^gasdtostatii 
<A recent losses connected" witii Mobil Corp. serwee static 
faulty mortgage lew p^ bad |inia. Norm Caiolioa. So 
been conqdoed a^ that the han^ Ima and Georgia, and 1 
win tak e action shoirOy. He said the dosed amount of cash. 
r»TOia^ hadiiotfa^ Ford Motor Go. Ud. < 

with the faulty loan pods. said it bu won an order 


GHiccap said it to signed an cars from Avis Rent a Car Ltd. 
reement in principle wim RCA Ford said the contract was valued 
xp. to e^ore the possiMlity of at £37 million ($39 millioa). 
nniiig a jcMOt viclecitex operatioiL HaciiscMis&OosfiddPLG’sutt- 


fonhiiig a jcMOt viclecitex operatioiL Hacrismis&OosfiddPLCsutt- 

Cooper Labondorio, of Palo friendly tender offer for Pauls PLC 
Aho, Califorma, smd it to filed a ^ be referred to the British 


NCR Co^'s personal-ccHupmer 
division said it b^an shipment to 
dealers of its new iow-cost personal 


al-C(Hnpoier antee Trust PLC under terms of its 

shipment u> tender offer. 

nstpersonal Parry Drag Stores said it to 


t««wviai auii ful lUlU* j — j 1 , ^ 

takeover measufe passed 1^ Rofer ^tade and Industry DepaiUBent 

Group on Feb. 7. Ccxiper, vriiicfa * j 

owns nearW 5 oeroent of Rorer. ftyoccra Carp, and Fiqi Pboto 


Hairismis & Crosfield PLCs un- computer network, the NCR agreed to acquire Apex Drug 
friendly tender offer For Pauls PLC PC2pc. The company said the Stores Inc., a 27-store Michigan 
will not be ref e rred to the British product allows multiple hookups of cton, for an ondisdosed amount 
Monopolies Commission, the peisraalconqiutersforcoinmeFcial of cash. Peny said the purchase will 
Trade mid Industry Dqurtment plications. increase the number or stores in its 

MLCA™lMYNewZ«- «id u 


ter videotape recorders in Japan 

Oown Central Petroleum Cora, r^r ruled. The purchase, an- 

said it vrin mcefaange all 16 c^its uounced in Januaiy, will make NZl 

Ufc U« life msun«.« 

MobU ^.servia MonteSon ^tiwSdaUy ««opatty “ New Zealand, 

gima. Norm Ca i plina. South Caro- tmnhled I talian o hem i cfilsc o n pgm , Pednsidar & Oriental Steam 


uiliiliud ui ^wiikuiciwuu riavuv69 o. i • 

Beet™. Cdn. hes 


gtae,Norih&.pliniSoulhan> 

^ and Gec^ and an iindis- came close to breakeven in 1984. 
aosed amount of cash. according to Gemina SpA, a finao- 

Ford Motor Go. LuL Britain dal holding company that holds a 
said it has won an order for 7JX)0 17.1-peioent stake in Montedison. 


Pednsuhr & Oriental Steam tion tty a U.S. court and ordered to 
Navigation Co. PLC said it has give $100,000 to a child-abuse pro- 
been tendered 353.6 million ordi- gram for railing to promptly report 
nary shares, or 86.6 percrai of the thesideeff^ectsofadragblanieaFor 
total outstanding, of Sterling Guar- -35 deaths. 


Boston Bank Retirees Reportedly Under Scrutiny 


1 large amounts of answer any quetions about it 
for cash that they Barry Alien, a qx)kesman to the 


record amount 

There is no apparent connection 


(Ctotnned from Page 9) public reports that the Angiulos tiling her case, said he would not hanig« and was fined $500JXX). a 

very bu” and were no different had often bou^t large amounts of answer any questions about it record amount 

from v^t mailmai qt firemen cashier’s checks for cash that they BanyAIi^aqiokesmantotbe There is no apparent connection 
nnght receive at Christmas. brought to the bank in paper bags. Bank m Boston, said he could not between the bantsfaQuie to report 

Mr. Matheson acknowledged Mis. r.,«hinc wiii^ at home, answer any of a list of 10 questions Urn cash triers arid ite inclusion 

that he h?t¥Mgif “didn’t pa y would not come to the ph on e, But ■ about Mrs. Cusldng, Mr. Matheson of the A n giuto on its exenqit list 
at ten tion to the regulations^ about her hii<hanH, Thomas L. Cushing, die bank s exempt Usl But one exeoitiye of the Bank of 

reporting cash transactions. “If you said that she would not commeai William F. Wdd, the U.S. atior- said the bank had 

had to stop and bang out a report on anything. ney in Boston, also said he would ^ ® JPilty pltt on tte 

. Fricn*^dtaMnL.M.ing have no_c^l jpd d=dinrf„ 


had often bou^t large amounts of 
cashier’s checks for cash that they 
brought to the bank in paper bags. 
Mrs. Cushing, called at home, 


Bank m Boston, said he could not between the bank's faQuie to report 
answer any of a list of 10 questions the cash transfers and its inclusion 
about Mrs. Cusldng, Mr. Matheson of the Angulos on its exenqit list 
and the bank's exempt Usl But one executive ^ the Ranir of 

William F. Wdd, the U.S. atior- had 

ney in Boston, ^ said he would ^ m “!i 

hSe no erSem and declined to foreign iranractitms woidd ^ ite 

say whether Mrs. Cushing or Mr. 

Malheson had bmi lOdM^lbh SteBank of Boston 


torev^sn^ mnssflio^yon d Friends silid that Mis. Cushing 
gt anything done, he ^d- bad woiied at the branch f<*3 
ed. ’TdteshaveenOa^tOdOJUSt 35 v™ miikmir her w»v un fmm 


c(L*nellen have enough to do just 35 years, making her way up from Matheson had been notified that 
tpute to balance out at the end of yjm|j attPuHani and teller to sccre- ihey were currently targets of the 


die day. and then a«a!tfanf manajjwir grahdjury. 

He added: “Especially if you and manager, Mr. Matheson^ 
know the customer, you may cut a scribed her as a “very smar t worn- 
comer. What are you gmng to do, an, dedicated to the bank." 


tk«» ■- _r , 1 .. MUi wees. LUC DOllA Ul IXniUD 

currently targets of the acknowledged that, from 1979 to 
1983, it had sold cashier's checks 


[A Bank of Boston Corp. spokes- totaling S7,372J43 to membeis of 
man, Wayne Taylor, denied that the Angiiilo family. Of that sum. 



WflfiamL. Bnnm 


dteovo former ^1^-^un- 163 ch^ totaling $2,163,457, not be included on a bank’s exempt 
A lawyer familiar With the case (to m^tigaura by a federal grand were for cash. Mr. Brown, the list without special pennissiSn 
Angiutohes^^mra^r^^ said the Bank of Boston had hired jury, tl« Assocteied Press nqwrled bank’s chairman, admitted that it frenn tto Treasury Damrunent 

Womersrfti^i^^to flie Boston Taw firm of Goodwin, from Boston. “As we have said in was “inegal" to the bank not to ^ 

tirst wrat ro wore tnere m years ^ yj defend Mjs, one pf^ conference afire anoibcr, report those ca^efs checks sbTd I ' 

Md They were vey nice jeo- Qishing 3 nd thatshehadrefu^a we are n<rt aware that the bank or forcash. 
pie who always treated me like a iKWFmmmtoffertoiJeadeuiltvon anvof itsemploveesarethesubiect -ru - 1 »u_. .•« 


$ 

£ 

$ 

£ 

$ 

£ 

$ 

£ 

$ 

£ 

$ 

£ 

$ 


BULLION INVESTORS 


CONTROL U.S. $ 20,000,- 

in GOLD, «LVER or PLATINUM for O.S. * 5,000^ 

Q... Which bullion dealer offers, you the investor, 

to-date means of accumulating gold, silver, platinum a 
major foreign currencies ? 

Q... ALEXANDER & SEBAG TRADING - Tbe precious metals 
specialists ? 

A... Sf YES □ NO 

Attention : JOSEPH CORBIEL (Chief Trader) 

Precious Metals Department 

Rll in return coupon below to receive free information brocih tM^ 

Return to : ALEXANDER & SEBAG TRADING BELGIUM N-V- 
Antwerp Tower - de Keyserlel 5 - P.O. Box 24 
2018 ANTWERPEN (Belgium) 

Telephone : 8-231-4805 (25 lines) 

Telex ; 32182 - asebag b 

Name: ; ; — 

Address: -; ^ ^ ' — 

City: 

Country: 

Telephone : home office 

Telex : ^ 

Note : Inquiries cannot be processed without telephone numb£3r 


To help you start your portfolio 
we will send you one - 1 oz, Canadian Maple Leaf Gold coin 
with an initial investment of $ 1 0,000.- or more. 
Licensed bullion dealer in uixembourg. 


govemmoit offcT to plcad guilty ou anyof ittemplityeesarethesu^ai The bank also reported that, in 
Sera^cman. chai^ that die was involved in of any ongomg mvestigation, he 1932, it had been notified by the 

htoeover. he added, he bad potting the Angulos on the exenqn said Tuesday.] Treasury Departinent that st^ne of 

Usl Her defe^ was ttot she <hd Mrs. Cushing and Mr. the coraparues on its exempt Usl, 

exempt Ust. which to^eved was not unde^d the regulations, the Matbcron retired last^nth short- ‘ 

prepared fty Mrs. Codung. source said. (y before th© B ank of Boston plead- 

Aboot two weeks ago. Mr. Math- Domis Sa^, a monbre of the ed gufity te fafling to report SIJ 

eson was the sounx of the first law firm who was said to be ban- bUhon in cash transfers vntb Svriss 


not understand the re la ti o ns, the Matheson retired last mn^th short- induding two Angiiilo concerns. 


sourcesaid. ly before the Bank of Boston plead- did not qualify for exenqjt status. 

Dennis Sajdor, a member of the ed guilty to failing to report $1.2 The two Angiulo companies 
law firm who was said to be ham- bilhon in cash transfres mtb Svriss ' were real-estate ooncrens that can- 


Poison Pills in the Corporate Medicine Chest 


(Continped tron Pi^ 9) 
ger, the suitor would face a huge 
adcled eiqiense. 

Another variant, known- as the 
*nq>-ovet" pin, provides diat if the 
conqiany is aoquiied and metged 
into another corporation, each of 
the origmal sbaireioldets can buy 
extra stock in the new merged cor- 
poration at, s^, half price — thus 
dOutmg the ac^nring company’s 
stock. In some pSs, both ap- 
preoefaes are combined. 

In Philips case, the comply 
to adoptra a plan under whim 
shardutideis (xito swap each of 
their shares for $62 in notes once 
sranecMie tmys ax least 30 percent of 
the company. Sudi a proviaon 
would ni^ Mr. Icahn’s acqi^ 
tion of PhQlto far more expensive. : 
He has offered $60 a share for 45 
percent of the oQ company and is 
tiying to defeat the company’s pro- 
pose $8-billioa recapitalization 
plan, scdiediiled to a Wednesday 
vote tty riiareholders. In a sq»rate 
tact^ he also is trying to unseal the 
board and replace mem with bis 
own directors, who then would 
withdraw the pilL 

Phniips’s poison pill to generat- 
ed cri^cism not only from Mr. 
roahn, but fran T. Boone Pickens, 
who said ^ ^ was “designed to 
entrendi management and 

shortstop a proposed tender offer 
to the shareholdres oi Phillqu.’’ 
Mr.' R^ens, a Texas oilman, re- 
cently made a profit of nearly $90 

miliioavriienheaBeed todr^his 

plan to take over raiUqis, and sdl 
his 5.8-percent stake bad: to the 
company for $53 a share. 

Since the pHl is still a relatively 
new defense tactic —and takeover 
experts axe jnst begimnng ro turn 
their attentioa to devdoping an 
“antidote'*— it is too soon to say 
whether poison mils are the ulti- 
mate weapon in the takeover waK 
Many companies, however, fed 
need whatever weapems they 


can get, and with good reason; In- 
dustry statistics show thru once a 
takeover is started, the target com- 
pany to only a one-in-five chaneg 
of r emahmig md^iendeDL even 
though the origmal suitor usually is 
not the one that finalty makes the 
acquisitioa. 

But even if continued experience 
shows that poison pills r^y do 
wto off unwanted takeovers, there 
are th<wte wto suggest that tto 
may have too maqy unpleasant side 
effects to be widdy prescribed. 
S(nxie experts p so far as to predict 


that, over the tong run, the p(n^ 
pill may become a f^onn (if suidde 
pill. 

“The p(asoa pill raises troubling 
issues, more troubling than most 
defensive tactics against take- 
overs," said Harvey Goldschmid, 
who teaches corporate law at Co- 
lumbia University School of Law. 
“Depending on bow substantial the 
redemption is, if an acquirer hits 
the tngger ptanL it may force an 
unhealthy restriicmring of the com- 
pany’s ratio of debt and equity." 

Indeed, the adr^tion of a poison 


pill and the potential for enormous 
dd>t that it r^resems may affect a 
conqiany’s ability to raise money, 
and may therefore dqjress the vd- 
ne of a company’s sto^ Since it 
also cuts deqily mto a basic share- 
holder right, that is, the right to 
decide vbo should control the cor- 
poration, shareholders may not be 
wQling to pay as mudi for the en- 
cumbmd slocL 

A more subtle coucem is that the 
adi^tion of a poisim ^ ^ves the ' 
in^resaoo that a company tltinks 
it is vulnerable to a takeover. 



COME TO EUROPE. 


COME 70 SHERATON. 


iijoanso i9a^ 
775 IsmiAA 
asD- an usivs 
- US- am sm rm 

0^175 4»S3D 


90% RIGHT; 800% PROFITS 

A s(x:iologisthas noted that in “becoming part of the “Crowd*, Vie Individuai feels airoepted; 
ttie kony being thatac(»ptan(» can diminish opp(xtunfty*.The human connection is imperaUve, 
but it can be distorted by “Elitists”, pre-conditioned to capitaliza on the timidity of the “Crowd”, a 
“Grower craving leadership. On die “Street”, communication is "overkiir. Each day, an analyst 
somewhere. Is preparing a buy, sell or hxM recommendation on one of the 2,353 stocks on the 
NYSE, orthe4782 equities traded under NAS DQ auspices. How cap an investorcommunicate? 

Perhaps the ”random walk” theory makes sense. The concept that the random behavior of 
particles was paralleled by the price behavior of stocks was formulated in 1900 by a Frent^ 
mathemati(tian, Louis Bachelier. 

His s^ies were rediscovered by researchers around 1960 and tested in a succession of 
statistical projects. The evidence shattered tiie daims of “chartists”, - “technical analysts” - 
concerning a system of forecasting stock levels on the basis of past patterns. 

There are few free lunches on the “Street”; an investor has to sniff scores of reports before 
inge^ng a “three- s tar" security, a chore that the average (^ap cannot harxile, for he cannot 
communicate with "Elitists”, with "Sponsors”, who buy wholesale, ultimately rdailing their 
inventories to die ”Crowd* at premium prices. The Jaws of supply and demand on the ”StreeT are 
l^islated tty ffiey create demand, tiiey manufocture the "paper", the stock. 

Our success is not predicated upon a crydal bail; we trace the pirouettes of the ”Esto>lish- 
ment”, focudng upon secxjrities that offer dramatic gain, (fown-playing entities with limited 
levei^e. in str^sfrig that approximately 90%of equities recommended by C.GR. subsequently 
advanced, and that 929b of oir carefully honed “short sales” have sagged, we are not seeking 
plaudits, we merely want readers to mock pr^ling opinion. Our forthcoming letter highPights 
securities that appear under massive “Elitisr accumulation. In addition, our resaarchers 
recommend twolovHvfeed entries with the dynamice to mature, emulating a previously reviewed 
"spei^ situa^” that spkalled 6009b in a brief time span. 

Fbr your eompTmentary copy, please write to or toaphone.. 

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I Address: 

I 

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I , 

Past performance does not guarantee future resi^ 


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CNTERNATIONAL 


Over-the-Counter 


Feb. 26 


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INTERNATIOISAL HERAU) TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1985 


ZE, an Export firm, INames 
ord Wilson as a Director 


. By Brenda Hagcrcy 

^ fattnuUiMtji iJmdJ 7/ftVcw 

: • ONDON — ICE Group Ltd., a 
'v. -11 company that helps ornmgt; 

1 A’cntures lo China, announced 
^ -'sday that it had recruited a 
' ' erfui uUy. Lord Wil>on. the for- 
Briiish prime minister. 

' - he rormer Harold Wihson. 68. 
'' was Labour Pan)' prime min' 
Trom 1964 to 1970 and from 
( to 1976, tzas agreed to beo^e 
• • 'rector of ICE. An aide to Lord 
_..on sakl the directorship is his 

4e's a statesman with iremcn- 
; eaperienue," exulted Ro^ 
ihoua, chairman of the 
. .'-old company. He said Lord 
' ' on would ira\el to China on 
ilf of ICE, which also helps to 


arrange trade exhibitions in China. 
‘The former prime minister said he 


developing the V2SU0 turbofan air- 
craft nigine. is owned Pratt A 
Whitney. RoUs-Royce, Japanese 
Aero En^es Corp,. MTU Mo- 
toreo'und Turbinen^Union MOn* 
chen GmbH and Fiat Aviazione 
SpA. 

Bouygues Offshore said Henri 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


took the job iargelv because he is Martial has becune pre^ent-di- 
eager to bdp small and midsized Seoeral, succeeding Henri 

companies develop overseas busi- wBo has left the cmnpoiv. 

ness. Mr. Mania! formerly was a senior 

In addition loaiding ICE with its exploraUon rad 

China businexs. Lord®Wi£^ w£ ^ 

was preadeni of the Great Britain- 66-percmi 

USSR lOT* owned by ihc Freaeb consinici/oo 


USSR Association since 1976. 
could play a oujor role in the core- 
pray's plan to devdop business 
with the Soviet Union. 


group, Bouygues. and 34-percent 
bv Elf. 


ith the Soviet Union. ,TJT 

, . _ . . ^ branch m Dusiseldorf and named 

iDtenotM^ Aero Engines AG joshio Sakakibara general manag- 


said Arthur Wegner has become its 
chairman. He is prsideat cri* die 
Pratt A Whitney l^vision of Unit- 
ed Technologies Corp. and takes 
over from Ralph Robitts. who is 
managing director of Rolls-Royce 
Ltd. Imemational .^o Engines, a 
Zurich-based joint venture that is 


mtinentiU nUnois Names 3 to Boetrd 


HICAGO — Continental lUi- 
: C^. has named three direc- 
lo its board at its r^ular board 
ling. 

be new' directors, named Mon- 
are .Archie Boe. former choir- 
' of Aiisiaie Insurance Compo* 
and former president of Slears, 
buck & Co.: John Jtrimson. 
ident and pubhsber of Johnson 
lishing Co., and Leonard La* 
chairman, diief executive and 
ident of Alberto-Culver Co. 
aniinenlal Illinois said in Oe- 
aer thai nine of iu 14 directors 


would not stand for reelection at its 
annual meeting in April. Since that 
lime, three dimiors have reagned 


er. He formerly was in the interna- 
tional dqiartment in the bank's To- 
kyo office. 

nr Corp. has named Robert T. 
Lehman a vice president. Mr. Leh- 
man will continue as director of 
administration at ITT Europe in 
Brussels. 

Kuwmt PetroleiBQ International 
LuL has ^pointed Nasser Al-Sa- 
iem vice presidenL He moves to the 
Londem-based unit of Kuwait Pe- 
troleum Corp. from another KPC 
unit. KPC bu bought most oX Gulf 
Chi's refioiDg and marketing assets 


and tHo directors, in addition to in Europe over the past two years 


the three named Mondav, have 
been appointed to Coniihentars 
board, brmging the total number of 
outside directors that will stand for 
reelection to cighL 
The restructuring of Continen- 
tal's board is the result of a July 
agreement between xfae ct^any 
and federal relators during the 
severe financial difficulties chat 
Continental's bank, Coaiinental Il- 
linois National Bank & Trust Co., 
suffered last ^ring and summer. 


BodngNames 

StnmtsResuknl 

The Tren 

SEATTLE — Boeiag Ca has 
named a new president as pan 
of a series of management 
changies aimed at achieving an 
“orderly transition'’ between 
the parent compray and its sev- 
en operating divisions. 

Frank Snrontz was named 
president and elected to the 
board. He had been proudent 
of Boeing Commercial Airplane 
Co., the unit ihai makes com- 
mercial jetliners. 

Mr. Sbrontz replaces Mal- 
colm T. Stamper, who had been 
president of Boeing and a b^d 
member since 1972. Mr.SIalI^)' 
er was named vice chairmaiL 
Named as new president erf the 
commerdai-airplaoe company 
was Dora D. Thornton. Mr. 
Thomioa. 56, had been a senior 
vice president. 


firm. Y. Onda, previously geoeral 
manager of the parent, succeeds 
Mr. Isoda as pn^denl and chitf 
adnunisiralive officer ot the U.S. 
subsidiary and as general manag er 


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and set up Kuw'oit Petroleum Inter- of its new Chicago branch. 


notional to oversee these opera- &soSlaiidanlTbailaiid.aunitof 
lions. Euum Corp., has appointed Roy 

Dmwa Securities Ca of Tokyo W. Weilrad as its cmdnnan and 
said S. Uemura has become manag- managing director, succeeding W'il- 
ing director of its international liam A. JacksorL who moved frooi 
business and corporate-finance dc- Bangkok to Rio de Janeiro to take 
panmenis. T. Isoda succeeds Mr. up the post of president of Esso 
Uemura as chairman and chief ex- Brazil. Mr. Waland was senior 
ecutive ctf Oaiv/a Securities Ameri- managing director and general 
ca Inc., a New York-bas^ subsid- manager of lo^tics for General 
iary of Daiwa Securities, an Sekiyu, another Exxon Corp. afftU- 
invesimeni banking and brokerage ate, in Tokyo. 


up the post of president of Esso 
Brazil. Mr. Wetland was senior 


EC Official Resigns Amid Personal Troubles 


nulled h* Our 5 m// From Dt^nuidia 

I/ASHINGTON — John M. 
ders, the Securities and Ex- 


admitted that the charges are true. Judge James S McAuliffe said pay cut when be left a large Wash- 
A Wall Street Journal article on be would permit a 90-day post- mgton law rino lojoin the SEC,^^ 
MondayioldofMr.Feddcfs’smar- ponement lo May 20, ttpresang siafL experie^ financial 



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sicallv abused his wife durins tedders is also still grappling with “You’ve got five children,'’ Mr. separated in 1983. 
? iKr^ ® *esal problems that arose from his McAuliffe said, “and the court has ^s to the questi^ 

lohn Feddcre l^tendered hU former as^atiem with ^lUand a very special in^t m what hap- Mr. Fedders and 
mation.'' said Man' McCue. 'Y*“‘^** has bera ite sulgeci pew 10 those children. Soulhiam 

SBCs spokeswomarL She said of a prolong! invesugau^ At that ^L the judge began had been a former 

-jS.R.&,lheSECchainnaiL Outside the courirwm addres^g both partie at Fedders, Mr. Shad 

accepted OieresignatioiL. 2? SEC was. 


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SECr«okS;«»^ ^ sS of a prolonged investigation. At Umt ^L ihe.judge began 

c n ih.> 9Fr rhnirTnnn Outside the couiiFOom Monday, addressing both parties at length, 

a Shaken, downcast Mr. Fedders, noting his sympathies for the iitju- 
.. S^FraIkL,a^« who siantM fert 10 in^ (2.0M ries suffer^ by Mrs. Feddere ra^ 

■ - cesman, said the adnumstraiion »««»). com assc^ Jifr. Fedders s condiuon 

Id have DO immediate com- for the third day of tnal m the « that of a m^c depressive 
r ftfi Ihp r«ianJ!iir^ tUvoTCe suit 10 begin. “There are many forms of manic 


As to the questions surrounding 
Mr. Fedders and the bribery easel REAL ESTATE 

Southland Com,, WANTED/EXCHANGE 

had been a former law cbent of Mr.. 

Fedders, Mr. Shad said that as far 
as the SEC was concerned, Mr. 

Fedders had not violated any secu- 
rities laws. 


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Id Sw M imrnS ing for the third day of trial in the as that of a manic depressive. ^ . . . 

1 ftfi iS divorce suit to begin. “There are many fornis of manic . “We did an exhausuve mveshga 

JSSJ Mmnp a,rv Wr. Fcddcrs dedincd to com- depression," Mr. McAutiffc said tion ran by »meone wto ^ not 

mem then on his future at the com- “And it is an illness that most often under Mr. Fcddm rad who was 

rli^v^rMSSSTra^ “A« J era ihink of DOW is affects the most gifted in our soci- a^ntable to the M 

ipfddS* nSSS reconciliation with my wife." he ety." sioil" Mr. Shad said. “And the fiiU 

tS» in f!/ said "I am praying and cannot talk After the hearing. Mrs. Fedders’s cpn«ioo acayted the findings 

aboul anyUting dsc. EvcT siDcc tltis oounsd, Mr. Renchan, said that no that he had not violated ray sccun. 

ijMs^dormance siait^itisjusi about the only reference to manic depression bad ties law. 

1r. Fedders is coiicsiing di^haw thought of." According to securities lawyers 

e proceeding brought Iw his ^ ^ “ P^vaie practice, Mr. Fedders 

. QiarJotte ^>oahue Fetters, lawyer, Hal Witl, ^ uurwloccd the subject on his strengthened tbecoouniSMon's 

has told a Maryland couit that queried a ponporicnirat.bta. Fed- own. Enforcement Division. 

opesforarec^Uation-Mrs. ders s cran^ BryaruRcnehan. opr . Acc^g to -lesi^ny at the /Atyr 4W 

Jot has charged that she suf- ^ mouon. tnal, Mr. Fedders, who took t tug 1^77, AP) 


Id have DO immediate com- mg tor me uura oay cx mai in me 

t on Ibe resignation. ^ 

It. Shad e^ed strong sup- Wr Fedders dedmed to com- 
forhisenf^rcemcnidiicrmra mraiihcnra^sfutiwat^com- 
rview on Monday rad praised misao^ J era ihmk of ^ 

^teSSSs--'- S'JSSffiSES 

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^ ; secutives 
for Visas 

^ I 

HContmiied from 9) 

I'^^innel director of Renault 
% L, a unit of French auio- 
% • T that owns 46 percent of 
R ' ican Motors Corp. 

e E-.l visas are grrated as part 
Jat^ Insaties between the 
kI States and most Western 
^ i oera governments. Tbe^ Itea- 
equire foreign companies to 
hf 1 : jobs and train workers in the 
XNiDtry. 

• get the E-1 visa, employees 
truly essential to the ran- 
of the conqiany," said Rich- 
i Goldstein, a U.& lawyer that 
l^^iiizes in immi^tioD law. 

rnpanies, on the other hand, 
6 f ithatiotransfeningtechnical- 
S - iOed people &om tte home 
" jy, th^ are iransfening teeb- 
y to lire United States. 

3T the E-l visa, we say that 
e transfer Renault tech- 
y to the United Stales," says 
Ifarti. “For exanq>le, Ameri- 
lofars is building a Renaull- 
led car in the United Stales. 

- Dancer that has d^gned the 
x» for the U.S. market did it 
ance. Now we want him to 
over to the United Siatro un- 
1 E-l visa.” 

ices in U.S. 

y'seO. 2 % 

^ I 

;Coatiiiiied fimn Page 9) 
lean Express said that “infla- 
prospecis reinaiD bright" as 
od pressures have remained 
led. 

additioiL small wage gains 
increased piDductivity rave 
unit labor costs from riang 
'y and no or bottle- 

, nave occurred in the produo- 
lipeline, he noted. And world- 

6 ; oil iirices remain weak, 

P tog m inflation being about 1 
, ' atage prrat lower year 
.t (^rwise would be. 
cootinuing strong dollar also 
to sustain low inflation, af- 
g prices directly through pur- 
of goods and services 
d and indirecUy because of 
• conmetitioa fimn foreign 
icers,*^ cooduded. 
i CPI was 316.1 last mmith, 
mg tbt g0(^ costing 510 is 
would have cost $31.61 last 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1^85 


Page 19 


SPORTS 


• ii-. 


yad to World Cup 
^coming Rocky 



tfroitiii’noi ifmU Tnhuf 

■ IDON — Tbe Meucan sun 

7 /7-.->hfch the )986 WorU Cup 
T>.':7;.kri|| be played is likdy lo be 
iting. But unless some of the 
jeis begin beaiiiw up now, 
N ay new get to Mraco. 

after shaping up so 
last summer's ^opean 
onships, now has all but ca- 
, For the second succes* 
Hhaiie game, its lackadaisica] 
.. Oas have been expc^ed; in 
-'.''I'v where Sweden «uily won 
■vember, the West Germans 
‘ ed Suni^y. 

T, VoIIct. r^lacing the great 
'‘.^etnz Rummenigge. cut 
\ on the left, creating a goal 
’ - re Uttbarski. (hen scoring a 

OB Hughes 

himself. Germany clung 
'..^isly to that first-half lead 
. tinted PortugaL 2-1. 

‘ West German team may be 
relation to those in the h^- 
. Frana Beckenbauer, now the 
■ er. but three victories in 
oniesis means the gateway 
ko is half open. For Potiu- 


how they would cope if English 
fans started throwing stones from a 
comer of the grouod!" 

Finally, the Eng^ tried to sug- 
gest flying in their heroes day of 

the match. "Not unless vou want to 
give us tbe points,*' rmlied the 
Irish. “The rules ^recify the visiting 
team must be in a countiy 24 hours 
before a match." 

So tbe English team must stew in 
a heavily guvded country hotel, 
savoring feelings that soften up 
many a team visiting Belfast, be- 
fore the Irish take a run at dim 

It has to hdp if, like Nortbem 
Ireland's goalie. Pat Jennings, vou 
are bom to the "bor^ iroubltt." 
Jermings, the most placid of ^ams. 
is about to escape the obseuritv of 
the Arsenal reserves Iw equi^ing 
the record of England *5 rormer cap- 
lain, Bobl^ Moore, in playing his 
lOSth imemaiioDal matu. 

On die English side, led by AC 
Milan's astute Ray Wiloins, a 
young man named Trevor Steven is 
awaiting the chance to play for his 
country for the Hrsi time. Taught 
by Burnley, whiA specializes in 
grooming gifted schoolboys, Sto- 






•spite the flickering promise SpRUl 8e6&S TCVCHge 
i-ager Robeno Futre, that . « , « , 

against Scotland and 
the Irish have more 
than one score to 

with strategic theory. 


ay be nearly closed, 
xeni friendlies it had been 
mass, shunning die creative 
iabie gicnius of Bend Schus- 
J Hansi Miiller, who had 
listlessly. Confu^, or so it 


nesday. another four quali- 
latches will be played in Eu- 
'he atmomhere be par- 
- y cfaaigea in Seville, where 
^ »dcs revenge against Scot- 
' 3d in Belfast, wbm tbe Irish 
ore than one sconr to settle 
e English. 

I as ui^and defeated Tur- 
!). in istanbnl in November, 
loers' manner. Bobby Rob- 
ked of Northern Irdand be- 
• hard nut to crack.'* 

' lerihanheiho^LTbeJEn- 
'‘ootball Association’s ded- 

- cut tbe Irish, after 100 
' ~if home internationals, ran- 

A'indsof Park will be a very 
place for England,*’ warns 
,;-h seereuity, E)ave Bowen. 

! sure we will be made very 
^',ie." said Rohson. Just in 
E ngland’s ‘'anti-hooligan liai- 

- ficer," Leslie Walker, was 
'bed to advise tbe Roy^ 171- 
nstabulaiy. 

- could hardly believe our 
Bowen said. “Lads who 
their lives dealing with 
and terrorists were asked 


ven is a perceptive right-sided mid- 
fldder on the E\'enoQ team that 
leads England’s First Division. 

His caJ] came at the expense of 
tbe “bitterly disapjMMoic^ Glen 
Hoddle. the ^ted Imt unpredict- 
able player as cherished in ^gland 
as ScDuster and MiUler are in Ger- 
many. 

The Englisb-Irisb match will be a 
raw-boned affmr and no place for 
faint hearts. A draw, says Robson, 
would do nicely. 

But there been a toudi of 
humor to the match. Thieves who 
raided the Itisb team headquarters 
overlooked terrace lidtets worth a 
black-market fortune and took 
only VIP passes. If those passes, 
since replaixd, are used tlw will 
deliver iheir bidders into the bands 
of the local consudwlaiy. 

We can only guess at who or 
what will be ddivered in SevOk. In 
November, Scotiand beat S^pain for 
the first time in 21 years. And. as 
Emilio Butragueno. the goal scorer 
known hi Mawd as “e/ buitre." or 
the vulture, warns, tbe Spanish 
mood is uncompromiang. 


For the Niekros, Good Times Start After 40 


Mignel Munoz 

Not that that is evident from the 
flattery of Miguel Munoz, Spain's 
62-yvar-old managn'. He calm the 
Scottish side, whiu beat his ^fo- 
pean finalists, 3-1, “(he best / have 
seen from Scotland, ever." 

Thai team is a blend of youth 
and experience. Mo Johnston, 21, 
who is boyish and bouncy, is paired 
with Kenny Dalglish. 33. who has 
bad % caps. In midTield, Paul 
McSiay. 20. already » a clever ap- 
prentice to tbe hard and wily mas- 
ter, Graeme Souness. 

“! am envious of the men Scot- 
land may not play," Munoz said. 
Scotland will keep its selection of 
players secret until the final hour, 
but those exmmsive artists, Gordon 
Strachan, Charlie Nicholas and 
Steve Ardtibald. probably will sii 
out this match. 

“Had Archibald been bom in 
this country, he would be on my 
team," says Munoz. Archibald, the 
RoUs-Rc^ mechanic who has be- 
come a very wealthy football play- 
er, tops the Spanish le^es in scor- 
ing udtb 13 goals. But Andoni 
Goicoeebea wiU nol soon fof|el 
Jdinston, who twice escaped him 
to score in Gla^ow. 

Europe’s antagoiusms probably 
seem grade to the El Salvadorans. 
Th^ despite the civil war, the 
oaUaial team is about to eclipse 
Surinam, setting a World Cup 
qua^ynng match with Honduras. A 
siittilar match, a few years ago. was 
•blamed for starting a war bnween 
the countries. 

Even the Albanians, withdrawn 
(hough they are. have (be fever. 
After (bey gained a 2-2 tie in Po- 
land and oulplayed Bdgium, 2-0, 
an anonymous Ab anian commen- 
tator wrote in FIFA News tbai “'Lf 
Albania shiHild beat Greece home 
and awav [the firsl maidi la to be 
played V^edoesday] it wiS probably 
only need one point when Poland 
go to Tirana in May to qualify for 
the fmal competitioo.’’ 

Albam'a's naked intent has been 
announced. 


VuueJ Ffru tiavnatiMal 

KISSIMMEE. Florida — Ten 
years ago much the basd»0 
work! wasn't interested in Joe 
Niekro. Now the 40-year-old 
knuckleballer is nearing his 200th 
major league victory and hopes, 
with his brother, Phil to set a re- 
cmd. 

Niekro is seven victories shy of 
200 — not bad for someone piwed 
up fw the waiver price after Atlan- 
ta released him and Detroit turned 
him down in favor of younger 
pitchers. He hopes to read 3)0 
early this summer as a Houston 
Astro. 

But he also has another goal. Joe 
and Phil Niekro, who pltdies (or 
the New Yod Yi^ees and has 284 
career victories, need S3 more vk- 
torres between them to reach SX 

as ifm^roUms with the most vic- 
tories in baseball history. 

“That's the one we're after." Joe 





Joe Nidtro 


Nidox) said. “That wiU stand for a 
long time." 

(f that happens, the Niekro 


brothers will give the game ban to 
their father. 

And Joe Nidcro’s flnandal fur 
ture lodes tmgbt. He could sim a 
contract wiaifing him the highttt- 
paid player in ^ Astros' history. 
Ffe is entering the fmal year of a 
three-year eootraet wonb about 
$850,000 a year. Conrideiing bis 
value to the team, his contract 
probably will smpass tbe S 1 millkn 
a year that teammate Ndan Ryan 
earns. 

Ten years ago, the Astros were 
about the only ones who wanted 
Nidcra 

“When I came here the question 
wasn't 200 wins," Niekro said “I 
had 58 wins, so No. 59 looked a 
long way off, let akne 200. 

“1 was more worried about vriio I 
wus going to work for. .A lot of 
people didn’t think I could pitch 
any more. It’s a good fee^ to be 
al^ to do this after a lot of people 
didn't tiunk I could pitch. No one 


_<umu 

I. ADEk 

— SSOUh 

w.unt 

.noPw. 

Zft 

jDn 

moo 

-3»!i 



PInl Niekro 

had faith in my knucideball the 
way I did.” 

But Niekro is sbomng no signs 


lowing do 
16-12. After 10 starts, be was 2-7. 

Afler June I, Niekro was 14-5, 
his best run ance he won nine of 10 
down the stretch in 1980, the only 
season in which the Astros won a 
division title. The performance le- 
inforeed the Niekro family’s reign 
as the grand old men of piidii^ 

Phil, who will be 46 on .April 1. 
was 1 Min bis first season with the 
Yankees last year. He, too, was 
released by Auanta after pitdung 
20 seasons for tbe Braves. 

Since 1979, when he became a 
full-time starter, Joe Ntduo has 
not missed a turn because of tUness 
or injury. Exdudiog tbe 1981 sea- 
son, which was shmtened by a 
strike, be has averaged 37 starts, 
seven innings per start and 18 vic- 
tories per year. 

“Ev^ year, Joe is a given,” said 
Bob UUis. the Astros^ manager. 
“You can count on him. He’s one 
worry 1 dmi’t have.” . 



Jets Set Team Mark 
In Scoring With 12 


lam w UnNdPfmliiMniofcBiirf 

Referee Kemy Frazer chafs wilb fhe Rangers' Aitork Osborne as two (inegiiai try to break 
iq> a first-^ieriod fight betw^ WflSe Hi&ct of the Range's and die Ptany TuridiinlL . 


The Ajxodatei/ frea 

NEW YORK — In thdr previ- 
ous game, the Winnip^ Jets man- 
aged onW 13 shots in losing to 
Montreal. They rebounded Mmi- 
day night by scoring near^ that 
many goals *nd ovenvbdnting the 
New York Rangers. 12-S. 

The Jets collected four goals in 
each period to set a team scoring 
record and band tbe Rangers their 
wost defeat on home tee ance 
1944. 

“Evaythixig seemed to begdng 
in tOD^t," s^ Dong Small, who 
began and ended the blitz of goalies 
Glra Hanlon (seven saves in 12 
shots) and Jt^ VanbiesthoucL 
'*Wben you get the next four goals 
after bemg down 1-0, it gives you a 
big lift You fed lo^ and more 
ccMofidrat, like you can try anything 
and do it” 

The Jets* goals included a short- 
handed effort by Thomas Siera 
and one oa a power-pbQr by IMe 
Hawerchtik, whose thira pouits 
gave him 101 for tbe season. They 
scored on long shots — Robert K- 
caid’s fust m two goals on a 
screened blast from 5S feet -> and 
short levins, such as Laurie Bosdn 
man’s first two. 

Randy Carfyle, Perry Turnbull, 
NiD and Dave Babydi also scored 
(or (he Jets, who won thdr 15th 
road game to tie another team re- 
oord. The 12 gpais surpassed the 10 
WtnnixM^ scored against Tmonto 
in 1982 ^ Los Angdes in ’83. 

... In other NEDLgaines, iLwas Chi- 


ideUnes Behavior for Coaching: A Few Guidelines on the Art of Oiair-Tfirowing 


hy Scott Ostler 

Los Angles Tima Serna 

DS .ANGELES — We are aO aware by now that Bobby 
: ^t, Indiana Universtiy’s basketball coach, made a mis- 
' . in throwing a chair across the court last Saturday to 
est the oCndating. 

•• is form was terrible. And this is a coach who puu so modi 
s oa fundameoialsL 

e threw the chair sideann. skidding it aaoss the court 
n»}& wnmg, wroiig. 

s any professional wrestler could emlain, the overiund 
'ery is tv superior to sidearm cfaair-tnrowmg and creates 
’ 'ter inpacL 

' nightjust lost his head. Wrestlers, a more cerebral lot than 


basIcetbaO coadies, climb lo the of the ring ropes before 
huiiing chairs or other wrestlers mlo the audrace. Knight 
should havejunq^ed up on the scoiekeqxr’s table and dashed 
the Aair to the floor. 

he hurried his throw. After siud^ng the game films 
of the 72-63 loss to P^ue and noting his doppy ledmique. 
Kni^t announced that he was sc^. He also seemed apdo- 
getic about ^ b^vior. but hequicUy explained why he blew 
up. 

“I’ve besu upset with the ofTidauag all year long,” Knight 
said 

Well then. No wonder he threw that chair. Somebodv's got 
to bring to public attention the scandalous way basketball 
referees always seem to pick <» the losing team. 


Still, tbe tanmiffl stuff has gm to stop. Somdwdy could get 
hurL Knight could have pdled a nmsde. 

Knight's siddine behavior is hardly representative of all 
coaches, but it is a problem. Here is the sdlution: 

Put the coach in an isolation booth at the of the arena. 
Give him a phone to relay strata and adrice to an 
coach on tte bench. 

Actually, it's not my idea. It bdot^ to Cliudt DeBus, 
coach of the Los Angeles Track Gub, and a student of qiqris 
psychology in general. He reasoned: “The coach's jtA 
shouldn't be to yell at the referees and players, it shrald be to 
make decisions. If you remove youis^ from the noise and 
pressure of being on the sidelines, you have a better chance to 
make calm, radonal decisions." 


1 chink Onus's idea has soine merits, but also some 
.drawbacks. 

With the coaches stuck up in the rafters, tbe fans would 
have nothing to watch but a hyekaWail game, which can 
become very boring. 

Also, if the coaches were not on the adelines, we would 
have no way tojudge their cQwehmg ability, other than by bow 
teams jdiQted. As all sports fans knw, tbe true measure 
of coaching greatness is bow much a coadi can get away with 
bdore he is fired or indicted on aimznal dimgra 

No, tbe ooadi bdongs on tbe addines. If his actions indte 
criminai crowd b^vior and result in bod^ harm to referees 
and embarrasanem to the school, that's a small price to pay 
for the tgMtersirip and mspiratitm the coach provides. 


cago 4, Toronto 3 in overtime, and 
I£xmesota 5, Ktisburgh 4. 

'‘We came out quick and caught 
them," said Haawirauk, set 
two of Winnip^s ttarra goals in 
100 seconds in the first period. 
‘Tb^r sagged when they fell behind 
and we would keep taking it to 
than. 

'‘W^ve got the offensive players 
who can produce when th^ Mve 

]VHL FOCUS 

to. It’s lough to work cm your de- 
fense in a game like this. It's a lot 
easier to play when tbe dub is soor- 
iug like this and the attitude is 
fresh." 

Boschman said tbe tight race for 
sectMid place in the Smytbe Divi- 
sioD, whidi the Jets lead by two 
pennts over Los Ai^es and Calgar 
ty, has made his »«»«> “pn^ 
hun^.” 

“it was a big game with three 
teams tied for sco^ gc^ m." he 
said. “We wanted to take it to 
them, get 00 (bear defense and test 
ihan.'*’^ 

They did, and the Rangers fmled 
tbe test 

“1 think tbe score ^leaks for it- 
sdL” said left wing hutk Ctebome. 
*Tt seems tiiat whenever the de- 
fense got caught the Forwards 
weren’t there to badk them up. It 
also seemed that every time we 
cleared tbe po^ it went ri^t onto 
ooe of tiuar stidu." 

Dim Maloney scored twice on 
power pJays for tbe Raztgers. Ron 
CresdmcT had another power^lay 
'goaL whfie Timi Laidlaw and Steve 
Patrick also beat goalie Brian Hay- 
ward, who had 41 saves. Steve I^- 
tidc added two asasts, and his 
brother James had thira asasts. 

“They scored so many bad 
goals," said James Patrick. “It was 
really a frustrating nigbL Evoy- 
body was trying to do it by them- 
sdves. To ga back in the we 

had to take chances. But we tried to 
get tbe sixth goal before we even 
got tbe second." 

Laidlav/s goal was bis first ance 
Feb. 1 1 , 1984. When it was suggest- 
ed that the shodc of his scoring nuy 
have left bis team reeling, Laidlaw 
said, “111 never do that ^ain. May- 
be we got a little overconfidrai arm 
they tboi^ that if I scored we 
cotdd ^ a bundle." 


OREBOARD 


Hockey 


»ial Hodc^ League Leaders 


' dtox lbne0 Re5 to: 




TonMIL N.V.I, 

X 

48 

a 75 

Edmeotoo i 

OFFENSE 





Kerr. phllodelPhta 

9 

X 

81 X 

Peeters 

Overall 





(Sortner, Woshlngten 

X 

9 

81 51 

Keans 


G 

A 

P Ptai 

Sovera CKlcoH 

31 

49 

9 X 

SvhfsaM 

Edmonton 

61 

189 IX 

X 

p. stueinv. Quebec 

X 

a 

9 76 

Doikalokls 

dmenton 

58 

54 113 

34 

Corponier, wesMnston 

9 

a 

X 9 

BesMlt (37 

.Y.L 

49 

SI in 

U 

Oorodnlck. Deirett 

X 

V 

76 X 

Beucbord 

7 4i5 wtoaipoa 

37 

61 

9B 

78 

KruslieInvskL Edmenion 

X 

X 

75 a 

GoBselln 

■ Los Anoeles 

36 

61 

97 

X 

Tovtor. Lns Anoeles 

34 

41 

75 1M 

Sevtonv 

• . N.V.I. 

37 

S3 

98 

41 

POWER-PLAT GOALS 


Qeebec (1) 

idmo0oa 

25 

9 

n 

M 




GPPP 

Coioarv 

X 

54 

84 

12 

Kerr. Phllodetorito 



• WH 

nnfiz 

Ln Anoetos 

X 

44 

a 

9 

Andrevetuik, Bvftalo 



913 

WBfTBiVT 

Liul 

b Wkeileeg 

31 

a 

a 

H 

Howerchuk. Wlimlpeo 



au 

' SU.OUIS 

X 

9 

a 

a 

Tremblay, Montreal 



ai3 

SI. Loels (3 


Standings 


WALES CONFERENCE 
PotrMe «vN1m 

W L T Pis OF 6A 
on 36 lo V II 3SS HI 

•Mo 36 16 7 n SS4 HI 

ndora 32 25 4 68 2B0 240 

' «ora 2D 31 9 4P 284 2S6 

h 20 34 S 45 2N 276 

wv H 33 a 44 30D 244 

AAonw PMsl6B 

31 31 H n 338 306 

30 ID » 68 2M ?23 

30 34 8 68 355 236 

36 36 8 60 218 314 

30 33 I 47 205 360 

■AMPBELL CONFERENCE 

Narrto OMsNo 
‘ 39 21 ID 68 230 319 

29 30 4 63 343 341 

18 33 11 47 236 277 

3 18 33 II 47 311 348 

15 40 7 37 194 271 

SnYHw DMsioo 

•on « 13 7 93 310 712 

31 26 7 69 2H 281 ' 

38 25 7 67 280 247 

ICO 28 23 II 67 275 255 

T 18 35 a 44 211 311 

M plOY oH SPMl 
660NOArS RBSULTS 
I I 4 0>-5 

h 311—4 

ns), Graham 131, Pom |3S). Qc- 
'11. Boroiund 16I: RNslina 171. Bul- 
SM«m (311. Lomfeint (291. SMs 
AMnnesaia (Ronwnol B-I3-I1— 33; 
n (on MolBdw) 4.I0-7-3I. 

4 4 4—13 

MTS I 1 S-5 

(a4i,Canvle O3i,ao6cftnwn 2 (34). 
l1).NIU(4),B(ibychl9).HB«mrcrwk 
1 <2$;. Tumauii (i7t; LeMttw m. 
<BI.SJ*olricK (lll.Gre6ctmer (131. 
9ol: winnioao lonHontaaVonblM- 
l•14.|^-B: »LV. itenowt (on Hov 
17-13-46. 

1801-4 
1110-3 
0 3 09). SutMr (tfl, Snortf <3Zi; 
l1.0onaoo<20).Vaiw(29),S(wH«0 
MO (on Derwftof W ) 10*10-4-4—38; 

«i emnortiunl tH4»14 4 44. 


SHOET-HAHO COALS 

GPSH 

GTOtckv, Edmonton 63 10 

PrapN PhROdipfiio 55 5 

Bosov. N.V.I. 57 4 

KOSMT, Beolan 57 4 

Mosotof. Edmenion 37 4 

Torrlon. Toronto 57 4 

rmuor. N.Y.I. 49 4 

CAIMEWINNING (M1ALS 

GPGW 

KiHTl, Edmonton 5911 

PEICBtnv. Quobee 59 8 

Oorponfor. tWashtaoton 61 7 

Gdrtnor. Woshlnelon 61 7 

Crolsky. Edmonton 62 7 

Karr. PMlodelPlile 57 7 

Noshind, Montrool 63 7 

SHOTS 


GPS 

57277 

63373 

62353 

6139 

62215 

6324) 


Bourque . Boston 
OreUkv, Edmonton 
tMofMOk LOS Anoeles 
Gortnor. WoiMnaton 
NlchoHs. Loo Anpoloi 
AsecuuHt. catMomle 

SHOOTING PRRCBHTAGE 
(mbdmim S HtotsI 

GPGSPet 

Vouno. PltlAureh S83210I2U 

Simmer, 1.00 Angofes-Boston 4927 9428J 
Kuril, Edmonton S9S92092SJ 

Tovlor. Loo AnpolOB 934132255 

Knnh'ski. Edmonton 6336149265 


OeALTENDIMO 

(EfnptvNict eoois (n ooroninooesi 


SfeorodensU 

Bonnormon 

Pnne 

CIHOOBO (5) 
Hrudov 
SmAh 
Molfimon 
M.V. lilondoro 
Bodupra 
JMelOdW 
JMtIonson 
Sands 

SMonomio (5) 
Lemmin 
Edwards 
CMBorv (» 
.wnoevk 
EilOt 

Los AWPilOl (61 
Vonblosbrouck 
Hanlon 

H.V. Rnnoers (4) 
Low 
Resell 
Komppuri 

Hew Jorwv IS) 

UM 

Stonlmmkl 
Mttlon 
weeks 
NorHM m 
O omhon i t 
Bester 
St. Croix 

wreoooii 



MP GASOAvf 

TOTMto 

Borrosso 

ISX 111 

4U4 

Hoyword 


1415 SS 

8119 

Hetden 

Cleutter 

9 4 

034D 

Eehrsnd 

BwNaio (4) 

568W TO 

4 29 

WtontoB 

Mason 

91 31 

1181 

Sietan 

RIODln 

1746 19 

2ia 

Mlo 


3B M 

S1I5 

Micalel 

Wushtoutob (51 

1712 in 

3183 

Demii 1 


554 18 

8118 

Romane 

Lindberdh 

1975 la 

1347 

Dien 

Jensen 

9 7 

87X 

Herron 

PMIedelMta 18} 

1578 HI 

1 343 

Ford 

Pov 

X 0 CDJN 

Piitibsn 

Penney 

1463 138 

7114 

eredeur 


MX 73 

03X 

Caprice 

menimni to) 

un 2m 

1 IX 

Garrett 

Mo68 

149 95 

1 116 

VoncDew 


Basketball 


Funr 1E« 113 1 155 

(Fuhr and Mooe snored shutoul Jon. ■). 

1»6 3I3 3U9 

2E69 IS OIS 
1BU 9 0143 
in 6 0353 
164 14 0513 
JUn 9M 9 19 
UU 93 0145 
1,455 19 0167 
699 43 1169 
3J73 236 1 359 

» 3 0 257 

IJ13 94 0 179 

1549 119 119 

3551 319 1 lit 

UII3 54 1130 
7jn 175 0 193 
60 4 0 650 

57466 IS I 181 
IJ73 113 3159 

1550 « 0199 
435 S 0694 

56MM 3159 
1505 R 1567 

1197 81 oin 

834 S 0617 
87 8 0 552 

17S304 I tn 
2539 143 0 167 
1.4S 101 0636 

319 347 0 194 

2561 1371 1 164 
I5H II 0640 
5709 BS I 4JM 
IJ79 117 1 19S 
1533 IS 0 455 

5601 344 I 457 
99 a 1165 
3iBS IS 0159 
597 9 0553 
3505 344 1 658 

63 3 D 1.90 

n 1 0350 
3559 157 169 
( 913 69 1654 

M54 39 3 6S 

1561 87 0157 
6S 43 I6JE 
59 45 067S 
1542 U 0459 
it 5707 39 I 459 

3541 Its 04.13 
313 IS 0633 
1.173 87 1455 
(61 58S S6 I 6S 

1505 125 0616 
376 S 0631 
1JW >31 0654 
I 35S 377 0 450 

1>QS 99 14.17 
543 43 0667 
1513 115 0458 

in ir 0£60 

(3) 3511 371 I 453 

53S >78 0659 
980 BS 0530 
407 64 0 659 
' ma « 11 CM 


NBA leodert Ibroooli Fob. S: 
TEAM OFFENSE 

6 Pt. 


Denver 

Detroll 

Son Antonio 

l_A. Lokon 

Boston 

Pcfttond 

PhUodelMki 

Konsos CHv 

Dallas 

Houston 

CMeooe 

Utah 


917 

6634 

6616 

976 

940 

tsn 

6462 

6331 

639 

6118 

5994 

6302 


Avo 

1195 

1165 

1151 

1151 

1165 

1119 

1114 

1111 

1095 

109J 

>095 

10BJ 


dation Leaders 

l_A. atpoers 

a 

Chlcoeo 

SS 

l-A. Lakers 

9 

utoii 

57 

Cleveland 

a 

Portland 

a 

Indiana 

57 

Detroit 

57 

San Antonio 

57 

Golden Stole 

V 

Denver 

St 

KeiMS City 

54 



SCORING 
G FG 


MItwoukee 

V 

6194 

1057 

Kino, N.Y. 

41 

ao 

Hew Jersey 

V 

6154 

1050 

Blld. Bos. 

9 

Ml 

PneenIx 

SB 

439 

ia.9 

snort. G4. 

SB 

576 

jndlono 

57 

6IX 

M?J 

Eiwitoft. Don. 

57 

650 

Afionta 

M 

60X 

ia4 

Donliev. Utah 

39 

sn 

Clevelima 

a 

6891 

1069 

Jordon. ChL 

SS 

59 

Golden Stole 

a 

4089 

lOU 

Wilkins. AH. 

56 

a4 

New York 

a 

5994 

1054 

MOIOfW. PhiL 

a 

49 

WasMnpton 

9 

46M 

toll 

Aflidmx OaJL 

56 

545 

LJ6 Ciipwers 

a 

599 

1066 

Cummlnow NUt 

S6 

540 

Seotiie 

a 

aa 

1014 

weoirideo. ChL 

SO 

44B 


TEAM DEFENSE 


Non. oeib 

ss 

407 


G 

No. 

Ava 

Moncriel. AUL 

51 

49 

Mltwaukee 

57 

5878 

uai 

jennsen, KX. 

56 

as 

Seattle 

a 

5916 

lOlB 

Abdui*Jobbr. LAL 

9 

542 

WUhlnotan 

a 

6in 

1053 

Gervln. SJL 

a 

sa 


FT Pts Avo 
305 1325 3U 
362 1631 VS 


Dallas 
Boston 
HouNon 
New Jersey 
Phliodelehki 
AKonto 
Phoenix 
New York 


St 6107 107.1 FIELD GOAL PERCENTAGE 

50 6220 1075 PC PGA PCS 

9 6021 1075 OnrwMson. use 39 775 557 

57 610 I07J (Himoro, SJL 361 570 533 

51 6147 1075 Honee, Phoe. 495 830 506 

Ss 6075 loas Ahdul-JcBbar. LAL S41 913 5*4 

SB 6302 1057 jmwwi, LAL 376 654 57S 

57 6211 109A Cheeks, f>WI. 386 4«6 575 


GoU 


StoMsDcM leaders OP tbe p ro t t s slflwolBolL 
ers AsseciolleaTeiir tbroooB Ibe Derai-Eost- 
ere Open, eompl e ted Feb. M; 

EARNINGS 

I. Mart 0*M«araS1«662S: 1 Lamv Wadktos 
5181850; 1 Crole SlBdier n3165S; 6 Calvin 
F«eleSl07^:5.RanStreckS77jR;6Waadr 
Biockbum S759M; 7. Lwrv Mize 671658; 5 
Mark kseCumber S7250Q: 9. Corev Povin 
59.19; 15 Ed Fieri 557^24. SCORING 
I. Lannr Wqgklas, 4529. z Cioto Stadler, 
6571. 1 Gen Pooiev.9a9.5Corev Povin, 9A 
A Lorry Mice. 0956 6 Scon Slmnsoib 957. 7. 
(lie) Ren sireek and Mark O'Meara 6957. 9. 
Ed FlorL 9J6 15 Don PohL 69JS. 

AVERAGE DRIVING DISTANCE 
1,JlmDeM,276.llAndv Bean,7752.1Fred 
Couoles.2755. 6 Oai Pent 274JL 5. (del Oreo 
Twloeband Bill Glossea3735. 7. Joev Simto- 
lor, 2725. 5 Uoc O’Crody, 2716 9, Rennie 
Blodi 271.9. 15 Tom Pui-txer, 3706 
DRIVING PeRCENTAGE IN FAIRWAY 
LLee EMer.B312.Gnie UttlH.aaai Mike 
Re«d.JB56Caiwln Poeia.7B15iromKlle.JBI. 
6 Jaek Renner. .780. 7, Mf to MorUKOff, J75 5 


iiiet Tim Norm and David Edwards J69, H, 
Doue TewolL JS5 

GREENS IN REGULATION 
I. Don PoM, JBI 1 Corov Pevin, JB5 1 Dane 
TewolL 767. 6 Joek N1D.IOU5. J66 5 Al Cel- 
ooToer. .761 6 (liel Seen shnecen ana Jooy 
Gardner, .797. 5 Gory Koch. J61. 9. Jim Si- 
morn, .7S5 15 Lerrv MUo, J49. 

AVERAGE Puns PER ROUND 
I. Morris Hotoiskv. 27551 Lenny Wodkbit 
25061 Cralo Stadler, 3519. 6 (lie) Ron Streck 
■M Don Pooley.35316Rex CaMweU.25457, 
Lorry RlnMr.3S80.5Praid(Connor,3856 9.4 

tied with 2596 

PERCENTAGE OF SUB-PAR HOLES 
),LonnyUledkbB,J97.1Cralv5iedler,59). 
1 Tom walwn. JS4. 4. Mark OWlwra 49. 5, 
Chip Bock. J06 6 Lorry Mize, 445 7. Ren 
Strock, 4B. 5 Gll Moroon. J36 9. Don Peolev, 
435 15 Ed Plori. 431 

BIRDTES 

1 (Mel. Lorry Ml» and craie Stadler. 105 1 
Fred Gouptos, 101. 6 Lorry Rinksr. 99.5 Lorsn 
RabertL 95 5 Ed FtorU 91 7, Mark CTMOBra 
91 5 Willie Weed, 91.9. JOlinny Miller, 95 15 2 
lied wim 89. 


TharM. KjC. 
weilliv. LAL 
RuteML WON). 


AMtane, PhlL 
winioms, NJ. 
Lolmbeer, Del, 
OlatuMMi, Hoii, 
Eetafk Utah 
Slkma Sea 
Gilmore. SJL 
Somoeen, Ho5 


Ml 410 574 
430 764 573 
350 438 59 
REBOUNDIMG 

e OR Oef Tot Ava 
57 270 468 746 111 
57 232 457 689 111 
57 191 493 684 110 

56 300 356 656 1)4 

57 153 503 655 115 
57 146 479 635 114 
57 19 445 6U 158 
56 19 438 Sn 157 


Tha mp oea KX. 
Pcwlsli. 


Thomoa Dot. 
Johnsoa LAL 
Moon, 5A. 
Nixon. LAC 
TheiM. KX. 
BOBley. Clev. 
Rlchardsoa Nj, 
Green, UMh 
voionllna. Pert. 


56 182 416 598 HU 
56 195 391 586 105 
ASSISTS 

6 Na Awa 

56 755 135 
S 685 ns 

57 585 153 

$6 470 54 

56 459 J4 

57 461 51 

57 461 51 

53 426 84 

56 434 74 


Selected CoDegeResnlts GiDege Top-20 RatingB 


EAST 

Buckned 75. Lehtoti SI 
Connodlait 76 Boston CML 9 
Holy Cress 55 FoIrTlold 56 
Howard 06 Oetoware SI. 67 
SOUTH 

Alcorn St. 106 Prairie view 86 
5 Tennessee St 75 Mississippi 66 OT 
Jackson SL 66 GrambHne 44 
kkorWioll 75 W. Cotolino 9 
ktomphto SI. 75 5 MtasNsIpnl 9 
Richmond 81 Amorlam 63 
VOL CotTimonwealHi 75 OM Dominion 9 
Vlrotnie Tech 75 Sewtti CeroHno 67 
William 5 Morv 9. NX^WHmineton 9 


Tennis 


Tour Leaders 


TM top 21 toons In TIN Assedotod presr 
eeweoo b os betboll poE CWri t Ptoc o wtos to 
PtoreoMitoeo; tatol poioto band op 30*1F-15 
ito; recor* IbreMMi Fc5 a« end tato woebY 
ftwklnss): 


MSN 

Bamhips 
nMiiBb Fob. 34) 

1, -nm Moyorta SI17.055 1 Scott Davis, 
P&365 1 Stotan Edbera. 566495 6 Tomas 
SmU. S65IH. 5 JoM McEWM, 5 54.0 9 6 
Lorry StetankL S50.D45 7. YennlGfc Noon. 
SS594S. 5 Kevin Curren 47,015 9. Robert Se- 
OMO. S46675 15 Ken FlQCb. 541405 
Thor Petals 

l.jonnMeeitnK.l7!447Belflf5ll««nLendl 
13656 5 JImmv CennerL 11067. 4. Mots Wl- 
londer.916355 Andres (SonMz,8i.19.6Andsrs 
Jorrvd, 9.717. Henrik Sundstrem. 4745 5 Pol 
C(bIi, 4546 9, 5)e4cM Edbera 4517. 15 Mirri 
KrtekmeUt, 4A55 

WOMEN 

Eomhis* 

(Tmaoh Feb. M 

1, (Morttae Novrotllova S186437. 1 Civb 
Sverr Lieyd. S99437. 1 Hona Mondllltova 
S67J37.6Cotor1na Und4uist.sa8405l Kotliy 
Jerdork 536.305 5 CarHns Baaelb 836405 7, 
Gtol Ferwndez. 831.137. 5 Bonnlo Gotooek, 
00837.9. sieHl 6ra(.8355ll lOPeanul LHile, 
829 J75 

190603 Tear Sertc6 Potato 

}.Atorrin0NBvnitMei«,169pelni5lOv)s 
Evwl Llova3M5lHnwMendlikOwa14l6 
6 Zlno Gta-riioa 1455 S. Manueto MoleM. 
1445. 5 Claudio Kohde-KHsov U3& 7, Heleiw 
Sukoval.4O55CarllnoB0Hlt.1J75 9. won- 



Record 

PtS 1 

1. St. Jebn% (64) 

»-t 

1288 

1 Cwroolawn 

25*3 

1216 

1 Miditoon 

31-3 

119 

4. Mem0is St. 

22-3 

11U 

S. Duke 

SOB 

9X 

6 OkWMRM 

2M 

901 

7. uwlstona Tedi 

244 

771 

5 Nerib Corellno 

n-6 

784 

9. Nev.4.0 VlOH 

32-3 

678 

15 (Seorwlo Tedi 

19*4 

6M 

11. Koneos 

2G6 

647 

11 Svroeuae 

156 

645 

11 So. MuinetfUt 

31-6 

sa 

K (Seorola 

19*6 

49 

15 Tulea 

384 

414 

M. N. CargHna St. 

l»J 

245 

17. Vo. Cemmonweoim 

21 -S 

»9 

15 lllltMiS 

31-5 

19 

19. ArfMnO 

30-7 

134 

a Loyola III. 

3GS 

98 




Tbe United Preu tateraoHanal board 9 
coaches top-S iwKms (Brit n toc e votos 0d 
records tbreeiiP pi>iBoiofFe53«wweotoo 
ms: total potato based w U eelols tor Rnl 
Moca H tor Mceod. etoj: 

1, St. Johrrs (361 (34.1) SH 

1 Ceeroelown (31 I3S-2I 59 

1 MRiitaan (21-31 •49 

6 MempMs SI. (3M) 476 

5 Duke I3DS) 386 

6 Ohianemu (3151 3M 

7. Ldulslana Tech (24-3) 338 

5 Kone0 (8S41 39 

9. Sa MeitwdM (31*6) 331 

15 Nev.-L0 Vooos I2M) 212 

11. North Carglbta (2141 206 

11 Syracme (iMI 164 

11 Gemota TeUi (I«-6) t69 

16 TulM (204) 130 

15 Georpta (156) 83 

16 MDnols (21-ei 39 

17. Anzono (20-7) 26 

15 va cemmonwsoltn (ivsi m 

19. N. CorolbM St (U.7) 23 

25 (.ouMond SL (174> If 

(Note: Tooms w probation by Ibe NCAA 
and lnel>Mbie tor me ncaa Toumuneiit ore 
taellsible tor top-28 cwklderntlonbvUPl.Tlie 
0|y such team this MOSon is the Uidverslly ot 
Akroni. 


Football 


IJSFli Standings 

GASTERH CONFERENCE 



w 

L 

T 

P0 

PF 

FA 

Birmlnohom 

1 

0 

0 

1400 

X 

30 

jodaenvltle 

1 

• 

0 

1408 

a 

14 

MempMs 

1 

0 

0 

1480 

X 

3 

Tompa Boy 

1 

0 

0 

1400 

35 

7 

Boitlrmre 

8 

1 

0 

480 

U 

a 

New Jersey 

0 

1 

0 

400 

IB 

X 

Ortondo 

8 

1 

8 

400 

7 

X 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 


Arinno 

1 

8 

0 

14M 

9 

7 

Houston 

1 

0 

0 

IJNO 

34 

33 

ookiond 

1 

8 

0 

1480 

X 

10 

Denver 

8 

1 

0 

4H 

18 

31 

LOS Arastos 

0 

1 

8 

408 

33 

34 

Portlona 

0 

1 

8 

4H 

7 

9 

Son Antonie 8 10 .MS 

Msnaav*s Result 
Memphis 35 Sv Antonio 3 

3 

X 


Transition 


BASEBALL 
AflMrtc0 Laopee 

MILWAUKEE— Stoned Bontost Riiei. In- 
BeMor, and MEce Felder. outfleWer. to one. 
year co nt roeto. 

TORONTO— Stoned Gory Allonson, 0tcb- 
er.teomlnor-ieaeueeentrtitaandlnvItBdhlm 
to troMM eomp m o nen-restor player, 
NoHenta League 

PHILADELPHIA— AtmewKed that Bdi 
Nohoradinp. cotiMr, two lotoed me camp M 0 
noivrosler. unstoned Player. SMed Kevto 
GroM and Rocky Oilldrasb Pitchers: Mike 
Dtaz, eoMMr; Finneisca Melandes. Rick 
S0U and K«n JodCMR. Inflelders, Old Rondv 
Sotowa eulfleldor, 

ST. LXUlS— Nomad Dol Moxvfll eenerol 
n tan owr. 

BASKETMU. 

Nnftoeel BoGcotboU ikiedoBon 

BOSTON— Acoutrod Rev Wliilonto euera 
(ram New YOr* toTMConareimdHlaettarntn 
toe 1905 and 1986 motto. 

FOOTBALL 

NottooBl FeoibaU t rnniie 

DENVEN-Nomed Al Miller strenem md 
eondlMoniiip cooctL 

NEW SNGLAMt^Stoned Arnold Gorrwi, 
sototv; Rickv Askew, tietitendi KednEowoh, 
wtoe roceiwkr. and John Staevenb oHonslv* 
llnonma 

SGATTLS— Stoned LMw Prwolrtctee . punt- 
er. 

COLLEI5E 

ARIZONA STAT E AwwuiHid Rwt ivy 
WRitoma. ttodifieid eondi, Iws restoned to 
Bcceni o simllv bosINm with Deirett of Itw 
NFI- 

CINCiNNATI-Extond0 >0 ooRtract of 
Tony Votoo, basketball cooeb, mrouBh the 
t9B948 oeosort. 

HUNTBR-H am odGnrvWtohNtott H Biotfs 
voilevball eeodi. 

KINGS POIN T Aimeuncod that Bill 
Zwoon, esslslDnl taolboil oadi and baseball 

0BCR.li 0 f as tonedlo0lerBrlM ateHti«iita«g