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The Global Newspaper 

Edited in Paris 
Printed Simultaneously 
in Paris, London, Zurich, 
Hong Kong, Singapore, 
■vftie Hague and Maneille 


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WEATHS DATA APPEAR ON PAGE 16 


Published With The New York Times and The Washington Post 




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No. 31,686 


Vietnam Commutes Tutu Asks 
Death Sentences of 2 Economic 
(hiUty of Treason 'Pressure’ 


Agence France- Prase 

HANOI — Vietnam on Thurs- 

commuted the sentences of two 
of five prisoners sentenced to death 
for treason and espionage last 
month, including a man whom 
prance regards as a French nation- 

the Vietnam News Agency re- 
ported, 

Mai Van Hanh, 56, and Huynh 
Vinh Sanh, 63, bad their sentences 
f-nmira ilgd to life imprisonment, 
die agency said. 

The two men were among five 
were sentenced to death Dec. 
IS in Ho Chi Minh City, formerly 
Sai ffui, on charges of treason ana 
spy in g for China, with Thailand's 
mBjphdty. They were also alleged- 
fc in touch with the UjL Central 
Intelligence Agency. 

France had asked Vietnam to 
show clemency to the five, particu- 
larly Mr. Hanh, whom Paris re- 
gards as a French national, but 
Vietnam insisted that he was Viet- 
namese like the other prisoners. 

Sources earlier said that French 
dip lomats had not been allowed to 
contact him. 

The agency made no mention of 
the fate of the other three men 
condemned to death after Viet- 
nam's biggest espionage trial since 
tbeCommunist victory in the Viet- 
nam War in 1975. 

- The three included a second man 
who has claimed French citizen- 
ship, Tran Van Ba, 39, but the 
French authorities have not said 
that they regard him as a French 
national. 

Last week, the French prime 
jntister, Laurent Fabius, sent a 
Swsage to his Vietnamese counter- 
part Pham Van Dong, asking him 
to spare all five prisoners. As the 
former colonial power in Indo- 
duna, France is the Western nation 


that has the closest lies with Viet- 
nam. 

Mr. Hanh, an airline pilot, head- 
ed the list of the prisoners whom 
the People's Supreme Coun had 
condemned to death. 

Their only hope of commuiation 
was from the Stale Council, a colle- 
giate group representing Vietnam's 
leadership. 

The agency report said the coun- 
cil had studied the request for clem- 
ency presented by the two prison- 
ers after iheir conviction at the 
public trial and decided to com- 
mute the sentences. 

“This decision proves that the 
state and the people of Vietnam are 
resolved to punish traitors and 
spies, but at the same time apply a 
policy of clemency for the guilty 
who show sincerity in admitting 
their crimes." it said. 

The three prisoners still on the 
death list are Tran Van Ba. 39. Le 
Quoc Quan, 43, and Ho Thai Bach, 
58. 

Mr. Ba is the former head of a 
Vietnamese student association in 
Paris that backed the now defunct 
pro-American government of 
South Vietnam. 

At least 21 defendants appeared 
during the five-day trial, charged 
with having tried to topple Hanoi's 
government. The other 16 were g^v- 
ea prison terms ranging from eight 
years to life. 

The co-defendants were accused 
of infiltration, espionage and sabo- 
tage operations m southern Viet- 
nam since 1981, using arms and 
money supplied by Beijing ami 
with the support of Thai intelli- 
gence. 

The court was also told that they 
had contacts with “American im- 
perialism," particularly with the 
CIA. 


Urges Conditions 
On Investment 
In South Africa 

By Allistcrr Sparks 

Hiuiinjiw /Vi tl Scmi-i* 

JOHANNESBURG — Bishop 
Desmond M. Tuiu. the Nobel lau- 
reate. has called for a campaign of 
“persuasive pressure" on South Af- 
rica requiring foreign companies to 
attach conditions for reform to 

Reverend Jesse L Jackson has 
asked Pope John Paul II to visit 
South Africa. Page 2. 

iheir investments for a test period 
of 18 months to two years. 

At a news conference Wednes- 
day, Bishop Tutu said he was not 
yet campaigning for the withdrawal 
of foreign capital from South Afri- 
ca. Bui he said a campaign of polit- 
ical. diplomatic and economic pres- 
sure against South Africa was "our 
last chance to avert a bloodbath." 

if the conditions were not met 
within the specified time, "the pres- 
sure must become punitive and 
economic sanctions should be ap- 
plied," Bishop Tutu said. 

The news conference was his first 
public appearance since returning 
home from a widely publicized 
three-month international tour. 

It was the first time the Nobel 
laureate has adopted a specific po- 
sition on the divestiture issue, 
which affects a large number of 
foreign companies operating in 
South Africa. His call for “persua- 
sive pressure" stands in marked 
contrast to the Reagan administra- 
tion’s policy of “constructive en- 
(Continoed on Page 2, CoL 2) 


Reagan, Nakasone Plan to Seek Ways 
To Open Japanese Markets for U.S. 


By Gerald M. Boyd 

New York Tuna Service 

LOS ANGELES — President 
Ronald Reagan and Prime Minis- 
ter Yasuhiro Nakasone of Japan, 
seeking to ease some trade barriers, 
have agreed to anange high-level 
talks on finding ways to open sev- . 
end Japanese markets to U.S. prod- 
ucts. 

The agreement occurred 
Wednesday after the two leaders 
met to discuss trade and other is- 
sucs, amid growing pressure for the 
administration to take tough coun- 
termeasures against Japanese trade 
..barriers. 

j The new high-level effort, an ad- 
ministration official said after- 

Some Japanese say Nakasone’s 
U& visit is Bke paying homage 
' (h fumlnl nmeron. PflCC 6- 



.ward, will concentrate on specific 
sectors of the Japanese economy, 

. including telecommunications. 
Computers and electronics, medical 
' supplies and forest products. 
ijBe' Reagan-Nakasone talks, 
^fckh lasted about three hours, 
toot place as Secretary of State 
George P. Shultz prepared to hold 
arms control talks next Monday 
.and Tuesday in Geneva with For- 
eign Minis ter Andrei A. Gromyko- 
indie Soviet Union. 

■Taking note of the Geneva meet- 
ing in a statement as he departed 
. Tor Washington later, Mr. Rragao 
said he had informed Mr. Naka- 
sone of bis intention “to pursue 
effective arms reduction agree- 
ments with the Soviets seriously 
and zealously, while pointing out 
that we believe that some hard bar- 
tkimng Iks ahead." 

“I told Prime Minister Nakasone 
that if the Soviets are prepared to 
cooperate, then we will make pro- 
gress," Mr. Reagan said 
- (Mr. Nakasone later disclosed at 
. a news conference that h® “ad 
k raged Mr. Reagan to meet with the 
Soviet president, Konstantin u. 
<3rernenko, as soon as Posa^ e ; 
saying there should be no illusions 
6ver the prospects of nuclear ' war. 
Renters reported from Los Ange- 

’ ("1 asked Mr. Reagan 
efforts be made so that he row 
hold talks with President tner- 
tienko at the earliest possible time, 
Mr. Nakasone saiil 
• Discussion of the trade problems 
had been expected to be themosj 
important aspect erf the meeting 
- - between the president and the 
. mime minister and of the ^vortong 
lunch" that followed. 

t Officials have projectwl the 
all U.S. trade deficit for lastyearaj 
about $114 billion, of which about 
$34 billion is a result ofthe trade 
imbalance with Japan. They 
estimated that unless there are n 
‘ concessions, the trade jBU*uon 
with Japan will remain bleaks wi* 
tiic deficit climbing this year 
. about $40 bfllion. „ . H „ 

. “We both recognized,. Mr- Rea 
gan said after the sessions. 


. . . j. 

• > 




■ ***' 



EaumOnttd Puss UvuMiand 

President Ronald Reagan and Prime Minister Yasuhiro 

5SSS chatting in Los Angeles after their meeting. 


PARIS, FRIDAY, JANUARY 4, 1985 


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Norway Plans Protest 
To Soviet Over Missile 






a > • -i •. 
*. *■ "* ■■ 


as* s* 


, _ nouncmg me iuuucul. _ ^ 

Two Ethiopian Jewish boys with a balloon in Jerusa- u ^ thought to be the first time Ol |- f/i Wnilf< 

lem's Share! Tsedek Hospital after their arrival m Lsrael. a Soviet cruise missile has vio- L/l tiC/l olX iAJ tJOIW 

lated the borders of a country out- -A 

Ethiopian Jews Airlifted SSSStS Soviet Space- Arms Off 

M. w are in effect pilotless aircraft that _ „ , _ . , , ....... 

n rrn 1 * T t can hue the earth's contours to By Bernard Gwertzman ko that ihe United Stales. 

fiv I hnnsmws to Israel avaunt detection. *. ^ w ^ * 

AJJ IIIOU^UIRW W XOI UA.I/ Thc missile inadent became WASHINGTON — President search m o defensive technol 


By Per Egil Hegge 

Iniemaumal timid Tribune 

OSLO — Norway plans to pro- 
test to the Soviet Union after a 
Soviet cruise missile (lew over a 
sliver of Norwegian territory, offi- 
cials said Thursday. But Norwe- 
gian politicians seemed to be play- 
ing down the incident and said that 
it would not harm Norwegian-So- 
viet relations. 

Norway’s prime minister. Mr. 
Kan re WiBoch. said that be as- 
sumed the missile overflew Norwe- 
gian territory by accident. 

"Nonetheless, the episode does 
involve our territory, and this must 
be made clear to ihe Soviets,” he 
said. 

After keeping the matter secret 
for five days, the Defense Ministry 
announced Wednesday that the So- 
viet missile was picked up on Nor- 
wegian radar at about 1:30 P.M. on 
Dec. 28 as it approached the Nor- 
wegian-Soviet Border area from the 
Barents Sea. 

There has been no explanation 
for the Norwegian delay in an- 
nouncing the inciden t. 

U is thought to be the first time 
that a Soviet cruise missile has vio- 
lated the borders of a country out- 
side the Soviet-led Warsaw Pact 


NORWAY 


SWEDEN 



SOVIET UNION 


FINLAND 



- are in effect pilotless aircraft that _ „ , _ . , ........ 

I , f 7 can hue the earth’s contours to By Bernard Gwertzman ko that ihe United Stales, wttle 

Is to Israel avoid^dar detection. York T,ma Semce serious .about l going ahead with re- 

40 w M.OI WA/I/ Thc missile incident became WASHINGTON - President search into defensive tcdmol^. is 

r . known just before Secretary of Ronald Reagan has instructed Sec- mlereste ^ in hiring the Soviet 

and tacit of upoaire iomodon Sute oi~ p. Shultt and Foragn «taiv oSTGrorge P. Shultz, in conennsand m .discussing possible 

Mnis^SraA-Caron^kowen testings Montand Tuesday ways io lrnut dyloymeni of new 
soipnon Toutnie has been extended ^ ^ Cieneva on Monday with Minir Andrei A. of e^ve and deferunve systems 

to 12 months. (or u.^^e, ulks on aims eon- Gromyko, to spurn any Soviet pro- ^ T hc president and Georg 


By Thomas L Friedman 

New York Tuna Service 

JERUSALEM — Israel has res- 
cued more than 10,000 Ethiopian 
Jews from their f amin e-stricken 




0ff,mIS 531(1 menile Jewish community was air- was the main factor that caused instead, the officials said. Mr. 
timp rin«- Ihe rescue lifted tolsrad shortly after the Jew- Moscow to break off previous arms Shultz has been told to follow a a PP. r °ach for genres “Ihs going 
It was first tunc ance the ram* established in 1948. control talks with Washington. , W( v track aooroach: to seek to per- *EP- ^ 


Their absorption into Israel is ixoL 

■obably the most challenging ef- North Atlantic Treaty Organizer 
rt faced' by the government since tion deployment' of cruise and Per- 


lUil IdUAJ UJ Uiv ^rviuiuvou UOU UCpU/jflUUU UI UIIUW HUW A U 

the equally underdeveloped Ye- ching-1 misales in Western Europe 
men i tf Jewish community was air- was the main factor that earned 


_ can be sure that Shultz will not be 

ogy, according to White House D„«i 9 n t n U » 


officials. 

Instead, the officials said. Mr. 


daring the Russians to walk out, 
but wtII be trying to find a common 


the failure to overcome these obsta- 
cles in trade will complicate our 
abiliiv to fulfill the vision of inter- 
national partnership between Ja- 
pan and the United State that we 

both share.” . . .. 

Mr Nakasone said, tn a similar 
statement, that "it is importaniio 
implement appropriate emnnnc 
policies in our respective counmts 
^nd to endeavor to maintain and 
expand the open market. 

Among the steps that were 
agreed upon, the two leaders said 
J^Tfor Nlr. Shultz and Japan s 
foreign minister. Shintaro Abe, to 
oversee a stepped-up effort for re- 
moval or trade restrictions in sexer- 

31 BnS°iW ers lalcr i , a ^ 0X 

dminisu^tion official said he ex- 

S^efforttoopenihe^ 

|j2?6 r Shultz and Mr. Abe. He 

Mr. Naka- 

gffirisas 

Ss 'ndusuy- U.S. businewmcn 


have complained that licensing re- 
quirements have made it difficult 
to penetrate the Japanese market in 
an industry that is logo from pub- 
lic to private control April 1. 

The official said that in addition 
to focusing on that area, Mr. Rea- 
gan had raised concerns about oth- 
er restrictive practices, 

He said the high-level review 
would probably first involve the 
telecommunications industry, fol- 
lowed by consideration of other ar- 
eas. No timeuble has been set for 
the start of the review, although it 
should be soon, he added. 

Although some U.S. officials 
have expressed frustration over the 
slowness shown by the Japanese 
government in lifting barriers, the 
senior official said he had been 
pleased by Mr. Nakasone's assur- 
ances at the meeting. 

“Commitments at tilts level and 
from this man have been carried 
out," he said. 

The official said that one imme- 
diate step that Mr. Nakasone. in a 
gesture of his commitment, had 
agreed to was to appoint an adviso- 
ry committee that would include 
three foreign representatives, in- 
cluding the chairman of the UJ5. 
Chamber of Commerce in Japan. 


operation began that the Israeli, 
governm ent has publicly confirmed 
its existence. The officials declined, 
however, to give any details about 
bow the rescue operation has been 
organized and what other countries 
are involved; any discussion of this 
remains under military censorship 
inside Israel. - 

For a long a time the operation 
was kept secret, causing the Israeli 
government to remain silent while 
Jews in the United States and Can- 
ada protested its alleged inaction. 
There have been periodic reports, 
invariably denied by the Marxist 
government in Addis Ababa, of 
Ethiopian persecution of its Jews. 

Moshe Gilboa, director of the 
Foreign Ministry's World Jewish 
Affairs Division and pan of a five- 
member government panel that 
spoke about the Ethiopian rescue 
at a press briefing, acknowledged 
that “outside bodies” and other na- 
tions helped in the exodus of Jews 
from Ethiopia. 

“When the time will come, it will 

be our honor to disclose the people 
and the governments who helped,” 
Mr. Gilboa said. 

Mr. Gilboa said that Israel’s ab- 
sorption of thousands of black 
Jews from Ethiopia “absolutely re- 
futes the cruel and incorrect as- 
sumption that Zionism eouals rac- 
ism,” a charge made by some 
Islamic and Third World nations. 

A palpable sense of pride was 
demonstrated at the briefing over 
Israel's absorption of these black 
Jews from one of the most underde- 
veloped and impoverished regions 
of the world. 

“It is very important to see how 
thev look when they arrive and how 
they look the day after and a few 
hours after that," Haim Aharon, 
the head of the Jewish Agency’s 
immi gration department, said in a 
radio interview. “They are com- 
pletely different people. We teach 
them how to eat, how to use elec- 
tricity. which they have never seen, 
how to use hot water and how to 
use bed sheets.” 

Ten years ago Israel was home to 
only about 200 Ethiopian Jews. 
They are often called Fa l a sh a, or 
“stranger" in the Ethiopian lan- 
guage of Amharic, a term they re- 
gard as derogatory. 


Mr. Levinsky said the 10,000 In Moscow, the Soviet Union 
who have arrived mav not be a maintained silence on the erase- 


wuw uavv Bliivvu “4“.' “ ■ — ; , _ - 

majority of the Ethiopian Jewish missile incident. Both the Defense 
population. Since little accurate and Foreign Ministries declined 

r * , . • -i l l. L. — 1 on <Ki> mnramromml 


control talks with Washington. two-track approach: to seek to per- nmor * m , nf : 

In Moscow, the Soviet Union sua de the ftussians to resume the dl ™iv U '5 wS 
msfauined silenK on tbejOTK- suspended [ negotiations on reduc jJ^Such. No^SnS 

are likely to be ready for deploy- 


ing each side's medium- and long- 
range offensive weapons while of- 


population. Since little accurate and foreign ivumsmo ucumcu range otiensivew^pons wuuc oi- *. ^ 1990s ^ the earliest, 

census date is available it Is hard to comment on the announcemmt rcring only to hold discussions on ™ frfomSsnaS. andl Srefore 
give a precise figure, but Israeli fnmNorasy, the only NATO fut^ »u.^edrfras«L ,hcre is coaScrahle time m div 


£1VW 4 F ,VW4 *' "'I \ - V C ‘ # 

government officials estimate pri- member bordering tne boviet 
vateiy that there are about 25,000 Union in northern Europe. 
Ethiopian Jews, flew many remain Western diplomats said tne 
scattered in refugee camps or have Kremlin probably wanted to awnd 
died of famine, is unknown. poisoning the atmosphere ahead of 


Union in northern Europe. are held, the U5. goal will not be to 

Western diplomats said the seek a- ban on such technology, as 


are held, die U-S- goal will not be to Gmmvn ore snn- 


the Russians have urged. Instead, Hftailwl nepntiations on soe- 


scattered in refugee camps or nave Kjemim prooamy wauieu lojivow ^ Kusaans nave urgea. msicau. ^ ne p 0 tiatiotis on spe- 

died of Taurine, is unknown. poisoning the atmo^hereatead of Mr. Shultz will seek to ranvmce the ^JSmuStetw. 

Among the 10.000 Ethiopian the Geturva udks. TT^. diplomats Soviet side that r«ean± into space 
Jews in Israel, Mr. Levinsky said, : “iSksSi nounced that the Shuliz-Grotnyko 


their parents. umaais m uiuh 

“War and famine and the eternal were 

dream to return to Zion have com- ti,cir re. 

bined and created that new wave of agencies reportedthe followm^ re- 

immigration," Mr. Levinsky said. (Continued on Page A CoL 4) 


olfenuve weapons, thc officials »^oT» S^lTwiS 


immigration," Mr. Levinsky said. (Continued on Page 2, CoL 4) would marce u ciear to wr. y ^ nuc ] ear ^ outer space arms.” 

The talks, the two sides said, are 

“to reach a common understanding 
• 7 as to the subject and objectives of 

U.S. Aides Say Paraguayan Officials s -Sg^ 0 ; jtttira - of ^ 

* pp, -m # talks on outer space arms may 

May Be Involved in Drug Trafficking Rftgfig 

r. i i d - the importance that the United A subsequent inquiry by U.S. possible and because of Mgcowj 

By Joel Brinkley Slates sovenunem attaches to the investigators has disclosed connec- strongly stated d«we to dteenbe 

New York Tima Semce destruction of these chemicals, the lions between suspected drug traf- them as aimed at bamng the mili- 

WASHINGTON — A recent has been instructed to of- fickers and senior Paraguayan mih- tarization of space, 

seizure in Paraguay of chemiah fef j|s ^ ss j SLance ,*' including help- tary officers, U.S. officials said. Ad immstra lion officials ac- 
used to manufacture cocaine has . -j_ r „ v Wwnived " Thev said the president was not knowledge that Mr. Shititt s m- 


By Joel Brinkley 

New York Tima Service 


tarization of space. 
Administration officials ac- 


n Paraguay of chemiak induding help- tary officers, U.S. officials said. Mmni^Tauoa omcials ac- 

SSfJS.'SlSfE bS'lhl! ing “defray ihe costs involved" Tlrey aid thj president was not J*., Mbs m- 


led U^. officials to believe that 'senior arao'ng the offices. . siroctions to stress that U.S. re- 
senior members oT the Paraguayan by ggyuj- that Brazil's federal pohee. investi- search on anti-missile systems was 

miliiarv eovenuneni may be in- j oarino n rhpmical seizure in that not subieci to being curbed fall far 


_ _ UIdUl] IMU.IH1 J.-V'UV—, — . . — X At II r 

military government may be in- t0 destroy "the chemicals gating a chemical seizure in that not subject to 1 being curbed Tall far 

volved m drug traffn±mg. accord- «. < ^ u j don i v hc made at the highest country last summer, said they short of the Sowel insistence that 
ing to Reagan administration offi- wicj - tn other words bv President learned that two known drug traf- the talks should lay the graund- 
ciSs. f y fickers were accompanied by a Par- work for bamimg development of 

Despite repeated requests from . ^ ^ monlhs> ^ aguayan general when they visited wtapons m space, 

the United States, the offi rials said , , , a,. Fnronean countries to buv But officials said this was the 


chemicals or to discuss the matter 
with the U.S. ambassador. 

The U.S. officials also said they 


round and that they 
riit the Soviet Union, ap- 


on the problem, the officials said. As a result of those assoed 
In December the foreign minis- and the government's refusal 


associations paremly eager to halt U.S. develop- 
efusal to de- mem of new systems, would refuse 


nckTraajid soiior ParagQHvan mib- 

SSSrSl SSSSsF® festtss?™ 

that is true. The government of poinunent among U.S. allies who 

Paraguay knows what to do with ; — have been pleased with the resump- 

- J — ’■ — ____ lion of arms control talks. 

INSIDE In anticipation of whai is expect- 

ed to be considerable pressure by 
.. . ™ f(W i„ n i the Russians against VS. plans to 

Q fafia wffl pnwWe iret continue the ami-missile research. 


assertions, saying: l don 1 lium c 
that is true. The eovemmem of 
Paraguay knows what to do with 
the chemicals. Paraguay doesn't 
need the United States to ten us - 
what to do." 

In September the Paraguayan 


GovcmmmlcJficials d. 
rescue opnalioD of the Elhiopims 


began around 1977 under the gov- 
ernment of former Prime Minister 
Menachem Begin, who took a great 
interest in their plight, particularly 
after a 1975 ruling by Israel’s Se- 
phardic chief rabbi, Ovadia Yosef, 
that the Ethiopian Jews were de- 
scendants of the tribe of Dan and 
were therefore Jews. 


ether, acetone and hydrochloric 
acid. The chemicals in that quanti- 
ty and combination are used only 
to convert coca leaves to cocaine, 
according to U.S. drug enforce- 
ment officials. 

The official at the Paraguayan 
Embassy said that Paraguayan cus- 
toms agents never would have 




wen: uiciouic jswa. -o— — 

According to Israel's “Law of seized the chemicals in the fus 
Return" any Jew who comes to P' 305 if the government was in- 


JV£IU1JU any Jtw wuu ujinu tu ~ _ . . 

Israel is eligible for immediate citi- volved in drug tnMdtint 
zenship wiS full rights. Paraguayan officials have said 

The rescue efforts picked up they are conducting an mvesnga- 
*p*4 about 1980 is dvil mr non of tedmralsBnnt 


apecu in aix.>ui i7ou oa u*u wai — •- , . 

aid famine in nortbero Ethiopia, U.S. dmg,enfoi^^t offiojk 
where the Ethiopian Jews resided said that with 49.000 gallons, drug 
in a string of their own villa ges, traffickers could make more than 
began to take a serious tolL tons of cocaine. That js&hou 

_ m -S iha umnitnl mill Wl- 



Akiva Levinsky, the acting chair- 
man erf the World Zionist organiza- 
tion, said during Thursday’s news 


10 percent of the amount that en- 
ters the United States in a year. 
Most of the cocaine munuf ac- 


tion, saio aunng inunuays news 

briefing that "a little more than lured m South 

10,000 Ethiopian Jews" had been for the U.S. market. ^ Ocmta the 



. — -V r- A 


brought to Israel in the past few 
years. He said that most of them 
were living in government-run ab- 


U.S. Embassy delivered an official 
note to Paraguay's foreign minis- 
ter, Carlos A. Saldivar, asking Par- 


were uving UJ gu va uiucm-i uu air , - 

sorption centers around the coun- aguay 10 destioy ihe uhemteats. 

uyT leanull! Hebrew, acquiring a 

„ad= and la™ ho« 10 cop, ^ JSSiSS- 


with a modern Western society. 
Because of language problems 


J1UI6 — - fi 

Industrial or medical applications. 
The note added that “because of 


DetaO from a work of 
Piero deDa Francesca, 
die 15th century Italian 
master. A three-day 
Tuscan trip “to see 
Piero whole,* on Page 8. 


INSIDE 

■ i™Ba wiH provide free legal 
aid to victims and survivors of 
the Bhopal gas disaster. Page 2. 

■ Congressmen leaving the 
House intelligence watchdog 
panel say the CIA has been 
brought under control. Page 3. 

■ The confessed shooter of four 
men in a New York subway 
pleaded for understanding of 
his “monstrous” act. Page 3. 

■Nfcff&gna’s coffee harvest is 
bring banned more by bureau- 
oats than In' rebels, a senior 
Sandinist official said. Page 6. 

OPINION 

■ Europe’s ailing economies 
have resisted all cures, and the 
continent “is shrinking at high 
speed," Giles Menitt writes on 
the Editorial Page. Page 4. 

BUSINESS/ FINANCE 

■ New orders to US. factories 

soared in November but new- 
house sales tumbled 10.6 per- 
cent. Page 11. 


the administration is planning to 
step up its briefings and public 
statements. 

These wiD be aimed at convinc- 
ing the world that the Soviet Union 
has quietly had a similar research 
and development program that is 
more comprehensive than any un- 
dertaken by the United States since 

. - - ' f .i ^ 


sDe treaty of 1972, which was sup- 
posed to limit defensive weapons. 

■ An official said the United States 
may be willing to disc&ss restraints 
on testing a new anti-satellite 

weapons system if the Soviet Uniat 

agreed to the U.S. concept for a 
two-track approach. 

Mr. Reagan discussed the U-S. 
position Tuesday in Palm Springs. 
California, with Mr. Shultz, Robert 
C McFarlanc, the national security 
adviser, and Defense Secretary Ca- 
spar W. Weinberger. 

■ Appeal from Soviet Jews 

A signed appeal from 73 Soviet 
Jews asking Mr. Shultz to “speak 
because our mouths are silenced” 
appeared as a full-page advertise- 
ment in East Coast editions of the 
Wall Sueei Journal on Wednesday, 
Reuters reported. 



rage 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 4, 1985 


** 


India to Provide Legal Aid to Victims 
Of Gas to Block Foreign 'Exploitation’ 


Ihe Ass, iiard Press 

NEW DELHI — India will pro- 
vide Tree legal aid to victims and 
survivors of the Bhopal poison gas 
disaster to protect them from bong 
"exploited by foreign lawyers, the 
Press Trust of India reported 
Thursday. 

It said the minister of state for 
law. H.R. Bhardwaj. told High 
Court lawyers that the federal gov- 
emmem bad decided to set up a 
special legal aid committee to lake 
Bhopal compensation claims 
against the U.S.-based Union Car- 
bide Corp. through the courts at 
government expense. 

■ He did not specify whether the 
committee would deal with the 
cases to be submitted to American 
courts. Union Carbide is based in 
Danbury, Connecticut. 

According to the agency. Mr. 



John P. McCauley 


dents were killed and nearly 
200.000 were injured or claim last- 
Bhardwaj told the Indian High ing ill-effects from the accidental 
Court lawyers that foreign, partial- release of methyl isocyanate gas 
larly American, lawyers were ac- from the Union Carbide-owned 
uvely seeking powers of attorney chemical factory in BhopaJ in the 
uom victims of the accident. * * * - 

“We do not want the tragedy to 


early hours of Dec. 3. 

. ...... , - - A Chicago lawyer. John P. 

be exploited by foreign lawyers," McCauley, ended a two-week rc- 
Mi. Bhardwaj said. view of the Bhopa 


Meanwhile, in Beaumont. Texas, 
a group of lawyeis filed a 550- 
billion suit Wednesday against 
Union Carbide on behalf of the 
victims of the Bhopal disaster. 

More than 2,000 Bhopal resi- 


Bhopal situation Tues- 
day and predicted that Union Car- 
bide and its subcontractors might 
ultimately have to pay SI billion, 
which would be the highest damage 
award in U.S. legal history. 

In Houston. Benton Mussel- 


white, part of a legal team repre- 
senting victims in the accident, said 
the suit was based on a provision in 
Texas law that could give the state 
jurisdiction in the case. 

The provision. Article 4678, 
grants citizens of foreign countries 
that have equal treaty rights with 
the United States the right to sue 
for damages in Texas courts, he 
said. 

Mr. Musslewhite said laws in 
most other states do not spell out 
the legal rights of foreign citizens. 

Although other American law- 
yers have filed rf.niwy lawsuits in 
various U.S. courts on behalf of 
Bhopal victims. Mr. Mussetwhite 
said he expected the judges to rule 
that the case should be heard in the 
Indian courts. 

“In all candor, the central con- 
troversy is that Union Carbide 
wants the case handled in India, 
where personal injury recoveries 
are virtually nonexistent, and the 
plaintiffs want the case handled in 
the United States, where they can 
recover just damages." Mr. Mussle- 
whiie said Wednesday. 

The suit alleges more than 30 
counts of negligence, incloding 
claims that the company knew the 
equipment intended to prevent the 
release of the deadly gas was inferi- 
or and inadequate by U.S- stan- 
dards. 


Pole Testifies 
He Didn’t Want 
To Kill Priest 

The Associated Press 

TORUN, Poland —A Polish 
security police lieutenant testi- 
fied Thursday he never intend- 
ed to kill the Reverend Jerzy 
Popieluszko and said be turned 
his back when his superior offi- 
cer beat the pro-Solidarity 
priest in a Tonrn parking lot 

Lieutenant Waldemar 
Chmielewskj took the witness 
stand for a second day in the 
trial in which be and three other 
security officers are charged in 
the October abduction and 
slaying of Father Popiduszko. 
He described the night of the 
priest's kidnapping as a “long 
nightmare." 

“It seemed to me were were 
overstepping the limits of our 
mission,* said the 29-year-old 
officer, who stuttered nervously 
throughout his testimony. At 
one pant he required medical 
attention after be grew faint. 

Lieutenant Chmielewski said 
be grew outraged at the repeat- 
ed beatings of Father PopLe- 
luszko by Captain Gizegoiz 
Piotrowsld when the priest tried 
to escape in the parking lot of a 
Tonm hotel, and that he turned 
away to chang e the license 
plates on the kidnappers’ car. 



A wooden cross near a highway in Gorsfc, Poland, marks 
the site of Father Jerzy Popieiuszko's kidnapping. 


WORLD BRIEFS 


Jackson Asks 
Pope to Visit 
South Africa 

By EJ. Dionne 

New Yon: Times Service 

ROME — The Reverend Jesse L. 
Jackson urged Pope John Paul H 
on Thursday to visit South Africa 
and speak out against apartheid. 

He declared that the pontiff 
could “have a profound impact in 
mobilizing the moral forces of the 
world." 

Mr. Jackson, a Baptist minister 
and former U.S. presidential candi- 
date, spoke at a news conference 
after a half-hour audience with the 
pope. He praised the pontiff re- 
peatedly for his work on human 
rights. 

Mr. Jackson said be had asked 
the pope to focus the world's atten- 
tion on the problems of blacks in 
South Africa, much as be had mo- 
bilized world (minion on behalf of 
the banned Solidarity trade union 
movement in Poland 
“We appealed to him to consider 
taking the same type of action rela- 
tive to Poland," Mr. Jackson said, 
“and, when it is feasible for him to 
do so, to visit Smith Africa because 
his presence there would serve to 
inspire people and to bring about a 
more just society." 

"There are tremendous parallels 
between Poland and South Africa," 
Mr. Jackson said He noted that 
both the Solidarity trade union 
movement and black unions in 
South Africa had been “broken” by 
the governments in power. 

Dissident leaders had been im- 
prisoned in both countries, he add- 
ed, and the churches in both places 
were “under pressure." 

“The pope's position on apart- 
heid and his consideration of go- 
ing" to South Africa, Mr. Jackson 
said "would have a profound im- 
pact in nwbflizing the moral forces 
of the world to measure human 
rights by one yardstick." 

He said a papal statement would 
encourage countries to re-e xamin e 
their “kinship" with South Africa. 
He listed the United States, Israel, 
Japan and West Germany as coun- 
tries that should alter their rela- 
tionships with South Africa. 

Mr. Jackson's visit here was part 
of a hastily arranged trip that also 
will take him to London and may 
lead to a visit to the Middle East 
Mr. Jackson, who secured the 
release of a U.S. airman from Syria 
last year, said he is trying to win the 
freedom of three Americans who 
have been been kidnapped in Leba- 
non and are believed to be in the 
bands of Islamic extremists. 

But Mr. Jackson played down 
the possibility of a Middle East 
journey. 

"If we determine specifically 
who it is that we can communicate 
with to make our moral appeal we 
will do so directly," he said. Bui he 
added that a trip to Lebanon or 
Syria was “not yet feasible.” 

“It is premature at this point to 
take that action,” be said. 

Mr. Jackson's visit with John 
Paul was arranged quickly, with the 
pope apparently agreeing to see 
Mr. Jackson on very short notice. 
Mr. Jackson thanked the pope for 
granting the audience “in a very 
quick turnaround." 

Mr. Jackson, who had received a 
visa to go to Smith Africa from Jan. 

4 to Jan. 12, said he was waiting 
instead fed permission to go to 
South Africa in February to attend 
the ins talla tion of Bishop Desmond 
M. Tutu, the winner of the 1984 
Nobel Peace Prize, as Anglican 
bishop of Johannesburg. 



Norway Plans to Protest to Soviet 
Over Air Space Violation by Missile 


_ 


Jesse L. Jackson with Pope John Paul DL 




Tutu Says Foreign Investors 
Should Pressure South Africa 


(Continued from Page 1) 

gagemeni" which is based upon 
dose cooperation with South Afri- 
can govemmenL 
As a South African it is illegal For 
Bishop Tutu to advocate economic 
sanctions against his country. In 
the past he has been deliberately 
vague on divestiture. 

Even the call which Bishop Tutu 
made Wednesday, with its implidt 
threat of sanctions, could mean 
that he is running a risk of prosecu- 
tion. He apparently has judged that 
his increased international status 
since being awarded the Nobel 
Peace Prize has afforded him a de- 
gree of protection. 

In calling for conditional invest- 
ment. Bishop Tutu has opted for a 
middle course between divestiture 
and appealing to U.S. companies 
operating in Smith .Africa to adhere 
to a code of conduct called the 
Sullivan Principles. 

About 120 of the 350 American 
companies operating in South Afri- 
ca subscribe to this code, but Bish- 
op Tutu considers it inadequate. 

The code was devised by the 
Reverend Leon L. Sullivan of Phil- 
adelphia. ft requires companies to 
do such things as improve working 
conditions for black employees and 
ensure that they are paid the same 
wages as whites. 

Last month, a meeting of sub- 
scribing companies agreed to lobby 
for social changes as well 
Under his "persuasive pressure" 
campaign. Bishop Tutu said that 
investing companies should de- 
mand that specific reforms be 
made within a certain time. 

The reforms to the apartheid sys- 
tem of segregation should include: 
abolition of the migrant labor sys- 
tem and the housing of black work- 
ers with their families; ending the 


pass laws that prevent blacks from 
moving freely into the cities; unre- 
stricted labor union rights for aQ; 
and investment in black education 
and training. 

“If these reforms are not imple- 
mented within the time limit, then 
the pressure must become punitive 
and economic sanctions should be 
imposed,” Bishop Tutu said. 

He said bis proposal was intend- 
ed to “show that we are trying to be 
reasonable. We are saying, please 
can you give us a way of changing 
apartheid reasonably peacefully." 

But the Nobel laureate warned 
that he might reassess bis stand- 
point on divestiture in less than two 
years, “because I think that we are 
having a crisis in this country that 
is deepening." 

Bishop Tutu met with an array of 
foreign leaders during his sojourn 
abroad to receive the Nobel prize 
and returns as the most widely ac- 
claimed black man in his country's 
history. 

But Ik firmly renounced any 

claim to political leadership of his 

people. He said his major concern ylieDeC Statute 
now would be to serve as the new 
Anglican bishop of Johannesburg, 
a post he assumes next month. 

“1 am a political leader by de- 
fault." Bishop Tutu said, “because 
the real leaders of our people are 
either in prison or in exile.” 

He added that as bishop of South 
Africa's largest and most racially 
mixed city, **I want to be pastor to 
all the people and to care for all of 
them. I am concerned for both 
black and white.” 


(Cotrtinaed from Page 1) 

action from the major centers in- 
volved: 

• In Washington, the Pentagon, 
noting it had no reason to doubt 
the Norwegian report, said it did 
not consider the incident a provo- 
cation by the Soviet Union. A Pen- 
tagon spokesman said it appeared 
that the Soviet missile had mal- 
functioned. 

• In Helsinki, diplomats from 
NATO countries said the missile 
incident had deeply embarrassed 
the F innish government. Neutral 
Finland is bound by a 1948 treaty 
to repel any attack against the Sovi- 
et Union launched through Finnis h 
territory. 

The Finnish authorities have so 
far said only that Finland's air- 
space was violated. They have said 
nothing about the origin of the ob- 
jecL 

But in bis New Year message. 
President Mau.no Koivisto strongly 
advocated a prohibition against 
cruise missiles flying across the ter- 
ritories of the five Nordic coun- 
tries. In Oslo, officials assumed 
that his statement had some con- 
nection with the cruise episode al- 
though the matter had not been 
made public at the time. 

• In Brussels, where NATO has 
its headquarters, officials voiced 
concern. 

“We view any Soviet violation of 
allied national airspace as a matter 
of serious concern," a NATO 
spokesman said. “We understand 
that a Norwegian reaction in the 
form of a protest to the Soviet 
Union over this violation of its air- 
space is expected shortly. NATO is 
being kept fully informed by the 
national authorities concerned." 

Officials said the NATO reac- 
tion reflected a desire not to chill 
the climate before tbe talks in Ge- 
neva. 

NATO experts in Brussels added 
that the Soviet Navy tests cruise 
missiles regularly in the Barents 
Sea, north of Norway, to familiar- 
ize submarine crews with the weap- 
ons. 

“The Soviets regularly bold fir- 
ing practice with submarine- 
la unched cruise missiles in the Ba- 
rents and Baltic seas," a NATO 
military official said. “There are 
standard testing areas in interna- 
tional waters, some of which are 
designated as impact or danger ar- 
eas for shipping." 

In Oslo, a Norwegian defense 
spokesman said the missile was fly- 
ing at an altitude of approximately 
4,000 meters (13,000 feet) and at a 
speed of 1.1 Mach, 10 percent fast- 
er than the speed of sound. 

Norwegian defense experts said 
it was fired from a submarine and 



Kutie Willoch 


probably went astray, either for 
technical reasons or because of a 
human error. It continued on a 
steady southwesterly course along 
the Pasvik Valley where il flew 
above Norwegian territory for less 
than one minute. It entered Finnish 
airspace and it is thought to have 
crashed in northern Finland, east 
or Inari Lake. 

Military experts said the missile 
almost certainly self-destructed be- 
fore impact. They said il probably 


received a radio signal to make it 
explode when it became clear that 
its initial path had been altered by 
technical or program error. 

A Norwegian bear hunter. Her- 
man Sotkajaervi of Pasvik, said he 
saw the flame and heard a loud 
screaming noise from tbe missile's 
engine. “It made the windows of 
my bouse shatter and the whole 
house shook." he saitL 
Military experts said the noise 
may have been caused by the: 
of the miss ile as it was bi 
through the sound barrier. 

In the thinly populated area of 
Arctic Finland, Finnish border 
guards resumed their search for the 
missile on Thursday. 

According to an official state- 
ment in Helsinki, four helicopters 
and about 20 soldiers took pan. 
The statement also said that an 
unidentified Hying object was reg- 
istered as entering Finnish airspace 
from the northeast on Dec. 28, but 
Finnish sources refused to specu- 
late on the nationality of the object, 
and, pointedly, did not use the term 
“missile.” 

A spokesman for the Furnish 
border guard said on Thursday 
night that more helicopters and 
men would continue the search on 
Friday. 

Conditions are difficult as the 
sun does not rise above the horizon 
until Jan. 20- 


Bonn Delays Flick Corruption Trial 

BONN (Reuters) — Tbe trial of three key figures in a West German 
political bribery case known as the Flick affair has been postponed 
because or a legal technicality, a court spokesman said Thursday. 

Two former economics ministers. Ouo Lambsdorff and Hans Frider- 
ichs, and the former general manager of the Flick industrial empire, 
Eberhard von Brauchitsch, were to go on trial in Bonn on Jan. 10 to 
answer corruption charges. Mr. Lambsdorff and Mr. von Brauchiisch 
also are accused of tax evasion. They have been charged in connection 
with a large lax break granted by the government to Flick in the 1970s, 
The spokesman said that the tax evasion charge against Mr. von 
Brauchitsch had been made only on Dec. 28 and the law requires that the 
accused be given at least two months' notice before standing trial He said 
that since the prosecution wanted to link the corruption and tax evasion 
charges, the scheduled trial of the three men could not begin next week. 
No new date has been set. 

J 

Vietnamese Repulse Khmer Rebels 

BANGKOK (API — Vietnamese troops holding the Cambodian 
resistance camp of Rithisen repulsed a guerrilla counterattack Thursday 
with mortar, tank and artillery fire and attacked the neighboring camp of 
Nong Chan, guerrilla and Thai military sources said. 

Thai military sources said that five guerrillas were killed and 24 
injured. The Red Cross reported treating 48 wounded. No estimates of 
Vietnamese casualties were available. 

The sources said the Vietnamese apparently intended to prevent 
guerrilla reinforcements from leaving Nong Chan for Rithisen. three and 
a half miles (5.6 kilometers) away. Toe Liberation Front's dawn counter- 
attack at Rithisen involved a mortar barrage but made little headway, 
sources repotted in telephone calls from the Thai border town of 
AranyapratheL 

Dispute Slows Lebanon Road Opening 

BEIRUT iAP) — A dispute between Druze and Christian militias 
blocked the dispatch of about 200 internal security policemen to remove 
barricades and explosives Thursday from the coastal highway linking 
Beirut with Israeli -occupied southern Lebanon. 

Radio stations of the rival factions blamed each other for the sna g s as 
the police force, equipped with bulldozers and mine sweepers, spent most 
or the day in barracks awaiting orders to move down the highway. The 
operation was to be the first stage of an attempt to reopen the road. It 
would put the Lebanese Army in position to move into southern Lebanon 
once Israeli forces begin withdrawing from the region. 

A coordination committee made up of army and police officers as well 
as Druze. Christian and Shiite Moslem militia representatives failed to 
iron out the last-minute differences over the location of police posts and 
the removal of concrete barricades on the road, according to radio 
reports. 

Gandhi Selects 2 Crisis Managers 

NEW DELHI (Reuters) — Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi on Thursday 
selected ministers for two crisis-management committees. 

Home Minister S.B. Chavan and Finance Minister V.P. Singh were 
joining Defense Minister P.V. Narasimha Rao on the powerful Cabinet 
Committee on Political Affairs, a government spokesman said. 

The Press Trust of India said Education Minis ter K.C. Pant, Mr. 
Chavan and Mr. Rao, were also appointed to a high-level co mmi ttee to 
examine the crisis concerning the Sikh majority in the state of Punjab. 

Reagan Plans More Aid lor Africa ^ 

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Ronald Reagan said Thursday he 
would ask Congress for an additional S235 million in drought aid for 
Africa in this fiscal year. Congressional critics said they wordd seek $1 
billion. 

In addition to the emergency food aid request to Congress, Mr. Reagan 
said the administration would come up with an additional $176 million of 
emergency food aid that could be granted without congressional action. 
Together with $590 million in assistance already granted since the fiscal 
year began Oct. 1, Mr. Reagan said tbe new aid package would increase 
total U-S. disaster relief to Africa in the fiscal year to slightly more than 
$1 billion. 

Democratic critics, however, said tbe action was not enough. Sixty- 
eight representatives and three senators said they would introduce a bfll 
calling for $787 million in immediate food and transportation relief to 
Ethiopia. Chad. Mozambique. Sudan, Mali and other African nations. 
The remainder of their proposal would go for long-term agricultural 
development. 


Reagan Says 
Deaver, a Key 
A ide, to Leave 


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Beijing Tees Up for Tourists 

A genet France- Prase 

BEUING — A golf course, 
which will be pan of a complex that 
includes restaurants, a swimming 
pool and an aquarium, is to be built 
near one of China's top tourist at- 
tractions, the tombs of the Ming 


Is Overturned 

Reuters 

MONTREAL — A provision of 
Quebec's language law that forced 
most businesses to have signs 
worded only in French has been 
struck down by a judge of the prov- 
ince’s superior court 

Justice Pierre Boudreaull ruled 
in favor of five Montreal-area mer- 
chants who challenged the provi- 
sion on the ground it violated a 
provincial human rights charier 
guaranteeing freedom of expres- 
sion. 

This provision was the last major 
vestige of bin 101, which was 
adopted a year after the 1976 elec- 
tion of Premier Rene Levesque's 
separatist Parti Quebtoois govern- 
ment. The provision making 
French the province’s sde offid 


Compiled by Our Statf From Dapmdta 

WASHINGTON - The White 
House deputy chief of staff. Mi- 
chael K- Deavcr, who is one of 
President Ronald Reagan's most 
influential advisers, mil resign in 
the next few months, it was an- 
nounced Thursday. 

A member of Mr. Reagan's inner 
circle for nearly two decades, Mr. 
Deaver reportedly has been offered 
in excess of $200,000 a year to head 
the Washington office of Burson- 
Mars teller, a leading public rela- 
tions firm. 

He had been talking about re- 
signing for three years, saying his 
572,000 White House salary was 
not enough to live on in Washing- 
ton. 

Mr. Deaver. 46, is a public rela- 
tions man who controlled Mr. Rea- 
gan's schedule and media contacts 
with a keen eye for what would 
play best on the evening news. His 
concern was not policy, but promo- 
tion and public relations. 

He has served Mr. Reagan as the 
custodian of the presidential image 
and chief protector of the first fam- 
ily. 

Each morning, he and other 
members of tbe senior White 
House staff would deride on what 
single, favorable message they in- 
tend to convey and arrange' Mr. 
Reagan's schedule accordingly. 

No one is closer to the president 
— or more protective. Mr. Deaver 
worked for Mr. Reagan in Califor- 
nia. served as his chief of staff dur- 
ing the 1976 campaign, and re- 
turned as deputy director or the 
] 980 campaign and deputy director 
of the transition. 

Mr. Reagan said Thursday be 
accepted the resignation with 
“deep regret." 

“Mike has rendered 18 yean of 
loyal and outstanding service to me 
and to the first lady, both 
fomia and in Washington,” the 
president said. “Nancy and I will 



Michael K. Deaver 


Australian Assails U.K. on Inquiry 

LONDON (Reuters) — An Australian judge heading an inquiry into 
British nuclear bomb tests in the 1950s criticized Britain on Thursday for 
its lack of cooperation. 

Judge James McClelland was speaking at the first hearing in London of 
an Australian Royal Commission examining the conduct and safety of 12 
atmospheric atomic bomb experiments carried out in remote parts of 
Australia from 1952 to 1962. The three-member commission was set up 
amid public outcry over allegations that the tests caused injury and 
disease to veterans and aboriginals living near blast sites. 

Replying to a promise of full cooperation by a British government 
representative, the judge said be bad received such assurances before. “If 
I retain some doubts as to the wholeheartedness of these assurances," he 
said, “it is because they have not always been matched by conduct that 
one might have expected.” 

Anti-Terror Unit Growing, NBC Says 

WASHINGTON ( AP) — The U.S. Defense Department's special anti- 
terrorism forces now include about 2,000 people, according to NBC 
Television. 

The network said Wednesday that two (rider nuclear submarines, the 

Mr. Reagan added that “much of ^ ara Houston and John Marshall, soon would begin carrying “counter- 
ihe s ucce ss we've enjoyed in the florist commandos instead of Polaris missiles." fit addition, NBC said, 
first term is directly attributable to three-month investigation had determined that Navy Seal teams and ^ 
him. His shoes will be difficult to Atrny Delta units, trained in rescuing hostages and coup ter- t er rorism,^ 
fill and be leaves with our best have been assigned exclusive use of a dozen transport planes and two 
wishes and affection.” dozen helicopters. 

Hie statement sairf that Mr . ^ em P hasis 00 training and outfitting anti-terrorism forces is de- 
□Javer would “remra to the nri- W 1 l ? of fllfi .P robtal “ contributed to the failure of 

vare V ^ctorat a SVbesubS- ^ 5“ h ? sla S e ««ue “ >980. NBC said. Michael I. Burch, 

aumt^deiermfnSiim inrfS ST ** ^“S 011 s top spokesman, refused to comment on the NBC report 
eral time rf’March to May aUng a stand “ s P° Uc y a ^ uist discussing special operations 

1985.” forceS - 

In the White House, Mr. Deaver /vij . rp • A ., JT1 

has been as powerful as any other LDH13 10 1 1*1111 ATUiy lO AlU IWYinOmy 

BEUING (Reuters) - The chid of tbe gaKml staff. Genera! Y^g 
» counselor, lta " S ” is “ MV ' no " ty “ d 

In an interview with the English-language Ohms Daily published 
Thursday, he said a large number of officers and soldiers would be 
discharged. The army would continue to improve its weaponry and 
increase education and training, he added. Its total strength is now four 
million, according to the London-based International Institute of Strate- 
gic Studies. 

Last month, China announced the resignation of 40 of the army's most 
senior officers to make way for younger men. The military has also been 
told to retool some of its defense industries to produce consumer goods ft 
for the civilian market and to help the economy in any way il ran 


Edwin Meese 3d, who is awaiting 
Senate confirmation as at Lorn ey 
general. In addition to his close 
relationship with Mr. Reagan, Mr. 
Deaver has been a confidant of 
Nancy Reagan. 

Along with Mr. Baker. Mr. 
Deaver has been considered a mod- 
erate force in the White House. 

He has received a $9,000 ad- 


vance for writing a diet book, and _ 

has been promised another $9,000 f OT the JcteCOFO 
after delivering a manuscript. Al- . .. 

though questions were raised about ™ <* 12 ™ Gennans boarded a homeward train Thursday, 

the propriety of the project, the m *? n “ s of asylum in the West German Embassy in Prague. It was 

White House determined that there “j? s* 00 ™ group m two days to leave without the guarantees they sought 
was nothing improper. “ fr®®. P®®*8e to ^ es 1 L Twenty-eight East German asylum-seekers 

.. TT7 . are believed to remain m the embassy cjpI 

Mr. Deaver is the second dose The hnm* nf 1 1 c STiiIb..-. j , . (dP) 



Interior Secretary William P. 
Clark, onetime national security 


attacks on U.S.. British and French targets since Da.li (UPT> 


ningNews reported. 


tractions, trie tomes ot tne Mmg ■ ■“ president saia. rvancy and I win \-iaix, oneume national security _ „ ■ — ' 

dynasty emperors, the Beijing Eve- language had already been ruled sorely miss him, as will the nation, adviser to the president, an- SWKine French seamen threatened Thursday to tighten their blockade 

unconstitutional in superior court. He has compiled an outstanding nounced earlier that be was leaving polish dmnd ports after tbe failure of talks on Wednesday to end 

record dining his four years of ser- soon to return to his California t “ ai four -day dispute with the Sealink feny company (Reuters) 


exhibition sale of 
Iranian and Oriental carpets 
at wholesale prices 

from 10 am. to 12 p.m., inch SUNDAYS, until JANUARY 8 

at HOTEL GEORGE-V 

— 31 Avenue George-V, Paris 8* 


vic£ to this administration. 


ranch. 


(AP. UPI) 



HARRY’S NEW YORK BAR ® 

Est. 1911 

Just tell the taxi driver “sank raa doe noa” 

• 5 Rue Daunou, PARIS 

• Falkenturm Str. 9, MUNICH 

• M/S ASTOR at sea 



r ^ name m a tew days. (A Pi 


WJflSssr* w-ssaas™ 

spokeswoman in LomsviJle. ^ 





** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 4, 1985 


Page 3 


House Watchdogs Say They Have Brought CIA Under Control 


% Margaret Shapiro 

. iV?***™ An, SlTTIir 

WASHINGTON - Senior 
of the House Permanent 
iaea Committee on Intelligence 
including some of the sharped mil 
«o of the Central iScncc 
A c ency s performance over the last 
two years, say thev believe ihe 
agency is no longer the unconuol- 

afa J e ,^ ucde P &am " of 1960s 
ana 1970s. 


The o * u ,uuc iruarmauon invoiv- 

_‘t c "oitoe of Representatives mg controversial programs, such as 
““"“rpan. cover, CIA-suppS.cd aclion 


excesses of the past are extremely most severe under President Jimmy 
rare — the so-called ‘rogue ele- Carter, when the CIA was run by 
phani* syndrome." Stansfield Turner. 

Representative G. William The lawmakers said that there 
whitehurst. Republican on Virgin- always has been a tcntdliveness in 
a ' j au *’ ' ^ agency has the relations between the CIA and 

made some mistakes, hut no more the intelligence committee. Initial- 
than any other agency in this city." ly. the agency was especially reluc- 
. ;* 1 the same time, however, there 
is f rust ration over what some mem- 
hers think have boat intentional 
efforts to hide information involv- 


Whilc an intelligence committee 
assignment now is quite coveted, it 
was not always. Many lawmakers 
were pul off by the cloak-and-dag- 
ger world, the demands of the com- 
mittee and the stria secrecy rules 
binding members. 

Mr. Whitehurst recalled his first 


U P lo .n»nitor and rein in 
,n ? after incidents in which h 
spied mi U.S. citizens, con dug cd 
.illegal wiretaps, intercepted mail 
..nd was involved in two assassina- 
tion plots against foreign leaders. 

. A majority of the House commit- 
tee wul go on to other assignments 
this momh under a House rule that 
limits service on the committee to 
six years. Interviews with this 
group- Hve Democrats and three 
Republicans, show that they do not 
feel the CIA is out of control de- 
spite criticism last year of such ven- 
tures as the mining of the Nicara- 
guan port of Conn to and the 
issuance of a guerrilla warfare 
manual thai seemed to advocate 
political assassination. 

"The CIA is a lot belter and 
more capable than I believed when 
I went on the ra mming. " cjii/t 
Representative Albert Gore Jr. of 
Tennessee, a moderate Democrat 
•^'vho is leaving the committee and 
'ihe House because he was elected 
to the Senate. “It’s a new era. Those 


against the leftist government of 
Nicaragua. And despite partisan 
splits over the proper role of the 
paneL there was strong sentiment 
that careful congressional oversight 
was needed to curb potential ex- 
cesses by the agency. 

“I’m supportive of the CIA." 
said Representative Norman Y. 
Mineta. a California Democrat 
who came onto the committee 
when it was set up in 1977. But, he 
added, “we have to dig. probe, kick, 
cajole in order to get the facts." 

“Even when we get the respons- 
es." Mr. Mineta said, “there's a 
suspicion about whether it’s the 
right answer.” He added, “You 
have to ask the right question and 
you don't know whether you're get- 
ting an honest answer and you 
don’t know whether the answer will 
be the same tomorrow." 

Democrats said they think this 
problem has been worse under un- 
der the current director of central 
intelligence, William J. Casey. Re- 
publicans said the problem was 



The CIA is a lot better 
and more capable 
than I believed when I 
went on the 
committee/ 


Albert Gore Jr. 


tant to divulge information about 
coven operations. 

“The intelligence community op- 
erated almost forever without hav- 
ing to report to anyone," said Rep- 
resentative C.W. Bill Young, a 
Florida Republican. “In the begin- 
ning, they looked on us as some- 
thing they had to put up with." 


confidential briefing by Mr. 
Turner. “I almost got physically ill 
afterward," he said. “Emouonallv. 
I mus bothered by it. concern all 
might lei it slip out.” 

Under laws governing the CIA. 
Congress is supposed to be kept 
fully informed in a timely manner 
of intelligence activities. Congress 


does not have approval power over 
specific agency operations but she 
congressional oversight process has 
had some success in trimming ac- 
tions or blocking them altogether 
by going directly to the president. 

Congress also controls the agen- 
cy's purse strings and as a last re- 
son can use this power to force 
changes. Last year, the House Per- 
manent Select Committee on Intel- 
ligence led a successful congressio- 
nal effort to cut off all funding for 
the CIA-backed rebels fighting the 
leftist government of Nicaragua. 

Several lawmakers said the agen- 
cy' learned to be more forthcoming 
after discovering that the commit- 
tee. which meets in a guarded room 
on the fourth floor of the Capitol, 
could be trusted. 

One committee member said he 
believes the CIA tested the panel in 
the beginning by giving it informa- 
tion about a former congressional 
colleague's links to a foreign gov- 
ernment to see if the information 
would be leaked. The committee 
apparently passed (he test, the 
member said. 

While relations between the CIA 
and tis congressional overseers nev- 
er have been particularly warm, 
they have soured decidedly in the 
last few years because of conflict 
over the Reagan administration'* 
covert efforts in Nicaragua. 

“Until we hit Central America, 
the committee was truly a biparti- 
san instrument of oversight in the 
House," said Mr. Whitehurst. “But 
after Reagan adopted a more activ- 


ist role" in Central America “the 
committee fractured right down 
partisan lines." 

The committee members, partic- 
ularly Democrats, blame much of 
the recent rocky relationship on 
Mr. Casey, who, they said, has an 
abrupt manner and gave many 
members the feeling that the over- 
sight process was at best an annoy- 
ance. at worst an interference. 

An equally significant portion of 
the current ’wariness between the 
House committee and the CIA 
stems from the belief, especially 
among Democrats on the panel, 
that the administration is using the 
agency rather than diplomatic 
channels or more overt methods to 
press its Central American and 
Nicaraguan policies. 

"The CIA is prohibited from ret- 
ting policy." said Wycbe Fowler 
Jr.. Democrat of Georgia. “The 
grave temptation is to use [it] as an 
instrument of foreign policy, mili- 
tary policy, as a routine matter 
rather than as a last resort." 

“Casey is the first director of the 
CIA on the National Security 
Council." Mr. Fowler continued. 
“That’s policy-making." The com- 
mittee's problem, he said, “is that 
we so strongly disagree with the 
policy. We especially disagree with 
using the CIA as an instrument of 
the policy." 

Even with the tensions or the last 
tw o years, most departing members 
of the committee are reluctant re- 
tirees. 



Uimd ft «d Wm o Kmoi 

William J. Casey of the CIA at a congressional hearing. 


Clinic Attacks 
Condemned 
By Reagan 

United Press InzcrrunianoJ 

Washington — president 

Ronald Reagan, responding to 
pressure for a White House state- 
man, made his first direct condem- 
nation Thursday of recent bomb- 
ings of abortion rimirs He called 
them “violent, anarchist activities." 

* Mr. Reagan said he had request- 
ed Attorney General W illiam 
, ijjrench Smith to ensure that “all 
'federal agencies with jurisdiction 
pursue the investigation vigorous- 

' He did not, however, go as far as 
aides wanted. He did not specifi- 
cally ask the FBI, the federal gov- 
ernment's most expe r ienced inves- 
tigative agency, to make it a top 
priority. 

Mr. Reagan has been an outspo- 
ken supporter of a constitutional 
amendment to ban abortions, ruled 
legal in most cases by the Supreme 
Court in, 1973. _ ..... . 

TJritfl now, bis spokesmen, 'when, 
asked, have condemned the 30 
bombings that have occurred in re- 
cent yems. but Mr. Reagan hnnsrif 
has not commented publicly. 

Groups favoring a woman’s legal 
right to choose abortion have urged 
tire president to speak out against 
the “reign of tamr." 

- In a onfrparagjaph written state- 
ment, Mr. Reagan responded: 
u “1 condemn, in tire strongest 
terms, those individuals who perpe- 
trate these and aB such violent, 
anarchist activities. As president of 
■the United States, I wul do all in 

'my power to assure that the guilty , , . , . . , 

are brought to justice. Therefore, I phaded for sympathy for his fear, 
will request ihe attorney general to frustration 
see that all federal agencies with 
the investiga- 



For Many Ex-Congressmen, Switching Sides Means More Pay 


By Margaret Shapiro 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON — A few weeks ago, 
congressional authorities gently told Repre- 
sentative Jerry M. Patterson, Democrat of 
California, who lost his re-election bid, to 
vacate his Capitol Hill office so it could be 
repainted for its next occupant. 

For days, until he finally moved out last 
week. Mr. Patterson had to operate out of 
cardboard boxes, a humble and harried end- 
ing to 10 years in the House of Representa- 
tives. 

But Mr. Patterson, like many other depart- 



Ihi Anodmad ftaa 


Bernhard H. Goetz, right, was led to a car at the Concord, 
New Hampshire, police statfonoo Thursday to be returned 
to New York Gty to face charges of attempted murder. 


congressman 
commodity in a city that runs on political 
connections, access and inside information. 

As the 99th Congress was being sworn in 
Thursday. Mr. Patterson was settling in as a 
partner in the Washington office of a Cali- 
fornia law firm. There, he expects to work 
with and lobby for some of the financial 
institutions whose representatives testified 
before the House Banking, Finance and Ur- 
ban Affairs Committee on which he served 
as a subcommittee chairman. 

For his efforts on behalf of these and other 
clients, Mr. Patterson can expect to earn 
from $100,000 to $200,000 a year. The Re- 
publican who defeated Mr. Patterson in the 


election last November, Robert K. Do man, 
will be paid S7S.100 a year in the House. 

While many of the 50 departing members 
of the 98th Congress are returning home to 
retire or resume professions they practiced 
before entering politics — ranging from 
farming to dentistry — at least one-fourth 
have chosen to remain in Washington. 

They hope to cash in on their time and 
expertise on Capitol Hill by becoming Wash- 
ington lawyers, lobbyists, consultants or 
high-ranking federal employees, often repre- 
senting groups that they once helped to regu- 
late. 

The U.S. Association of Former Members 
of Congress lists as many at 130 former 
lawmakers who succumbed to “Potomac fe- 
ver" and the lure of hefty salaries and never 
left Washington. 

“It’s a canard that members of Congress 
are in Congress because they can't get a job." 
said Representative Barber B. Conable Jr., 
Republican of New York who retired Thurs- 
day after 20 years in the House, where he was 
the ranking Republican on the powerful 
Ways and Means Committee. 

“That's certainly not the case when they 
leave. I’ve never known anyone to leave 
Congress and go to a Iower-paidjob.” 

Mr. Conable plans to stay in Washington 
a few months to work on a book at the 
American Enterprise Institute but then to 


return to western New York to teach and 
serve on corporate boards. He said he was 
astounded at the number of offers he re- 
ceived from law firms, consultants and trade 
associations to be their Washington insider. 

“Your marketable skills are in govern- 
ment," said Representative William R. 
Raichford, Democrat of Connecticut and 
another Section Day casualty. “I have two 
children in college, and that doesn't allow 
you to contemplate too long. You're out of 
Congress Jan. 3, but the tuition bills keep 
coming Jan. 4.” 

Mr. Raichford and Representative Ray 
Kogpvsek. a Colorado Democrat who re- 
tired, are joining Gold and Leibengood, a 

fonril^ ^associates of Senator Hercvard H. 
Baker Jr„ the Senate Republican leader from 
Tennessee who retired. 

Mr. Baker, who is considering a race for 
the presdency in 1988, may be the most 
marketable member of the 98th Congress. 
He reportedly will earn as much as $800,000 
annually as a lawyer and influence broker in 
the Washington office of the Texas law firm 
of Vinson & Elkins. 

Four other departing senators, John G. 
Tower of Texas, chairman of the Armed 
Services Committee, Charles H. Percy of 
Illinois, chairman of the Foreign Relations 
Committee, and Roger W. Jepsen of Iowa, 


all Republicans, as well as Jennings Ran- 
dolph, a West Virginia Democrat, also are 
planning to stay in Washington, according to 
aides. 

Mr. Percy and Mr. Jepsen, both defeated 
for re-election, have not settled on new em- 
ployment, although Mr. Percy may be in line 
for an ambassadorship. Mr. Tower, who re- 
tired, plans to teach a few days a month as a 
guest lecturer at Southern Methodist Univer- 
sity in Dallas. But he and his wife, TJlla, will 
live in Washington, and he is said to be 
interested in a high Reagan administration 
appointment. 

Mr. Randolph, who came to Washington 
in 1932 as a House member and retired this 
year, has decided to pursue “a new career'’ in 
Washington, according to an ride, who add- 
ed that the senator has not said what that 
career will be. 

Senator Walter D. Huddleston. Democrat 
of Kentucky, another election loser, has sent 
his files and official papers to the University 
of Kentucky, according to an ride, but has 
not resolved his future. 

Senator Paul E Tsongas, a Massachusetts 
Democratic who derided not to run for re- 
election after discovering that be suffers 
from a form of cancer, is returning to Lowell 
to practice law and serve on corporate 
boards. 


Subway Gunman Calls u s : Ho “f® Votes 
Shooting 'Monstrous’ moBeatHansen 


Reuters 

NEW YORK — In a statement 
to police, a man who has confessed 

rnTTitw^ork subway said the 
shooting was “monstrous” but 


non’ _ 

Treasury Department officials 
said Wednesday that they believed 
the c ase s of arson and bombing at 
abortion cfinfcs represented the 
work of individuals rather than an 
conspiracy. 

Family p lanning groups, femi- 
nist organizations and abortion 
chnics, however, have grown in- 
creasingly disturbed at the govern- 
ment's response to violence against 
» dimes. Hie FBI reported 30 ai- 
' tacks on such ri*n«s since May 
1982. 

The White House spokesman, 
Lany Speakes, said statutory au- 
thority for the investigation rests 
with the Treasury Department's 
Boreas of Alcohol, Tobacco and 
Firearms. The FBI woul d be in- 
voSved only if it woe d etermin ed 
lhai an interstate “conspiracy” ex- 
isted. 

Me. Reagan a ly» avoided 

fee void “terrorise I 

base given die FBI authority to 
ento- fee cases on a full-scale basis. 


Instead, Mr. Reagan used the 
ward^anaidBsCatm^ 

jy applied to persons seeking to 


of Alcohol, Tobacco 
has been hampered 

. . 4 . ... 1 . 



m attempt w 

Service. ^ The Narion- 
pjjyrifm has also lob- 
mst various firearms 
reposed bylbebu- 

s said fee bureau has 

-ertise" in investigat- 
■ • - 12 of the 30 



in Washington, six 
no in Oeatjps and 
aiih Dako ta, Dria- 
>1k, Viigima. 

■HI was ■“iuvestigat - 

i exicoC lcnd ' 
dp to the Treasury 

bombing occurred 
lay in Washington, 

y a day *e arrest Of 
a in the Christmas 
of three clinics in 

ida. f 

sdav, the mayor of 

Columbia, Man on 

jr the FBI 10 


and rage. 

Portions of the statement were 
obtained from law enforcement of- 
ficials, who said that Bernhard H. 
Goetz displayed some remorse but 
was determined to tell the world his 
story “as a victim of crime.” 

They would not reveal Mr. 
Goetz’s account of the actual 
shootings — which in New York 
are known as the “subway vigilan- 
te” shootings — saying it would 
jeopardize a trial. But they suggest- 
ed that he had little recollection of 
the details. 

The city doesn’t care what hap- 
pens to you," said Mr. Goetz, a 37- 
year-old electronics engineer, after 
surrendering Monday in Concord, 
New Hampshire. “You don’t know 
what it’s like to be a victim." 

At a hearing in Concord on 
Wednesday, Mr. Goetz waived ex- 
tradition and was returned to New 
York, where he was to be charged 
with attempted murder. 

Mr. Goetz was the object of an 
intense manhunt by police but was 
a hero to many New Yorkers out- 
raged by street crime. He said the 
young men he shot had surrounded 
him on the subway Dec. 21 and 
demanded $5 from him. 

“I have $5 for each of you," po- 
lice quoted him as saying as he 
pulled out a pistol and shot all four. 

The four young men were later 
found to have criminal records. 
Three of them carried sharpened 
screwdrivers in their pockets at Lbe 
rime of the shooting. 

Two of the four remain hospital- 
ized from the shooting, and one is 
paralyzed from the waist down. 

In 'his statement to police. Mr. 
Goetz said he had acted in self- 
defense and after a previous mug- 
ging. 

But be said: “I’m not trying to 
justify what 1 did or something like 
that. It was monstrous." 

Mr. Goetz told of being mugged 
near his apartment in 1981 by three 
youths who tried to snatch $1,000 
in electronics gear. He said he had a 
“minor permanent injury" from 
the assault. 

Mr. Goetz said: ‘They caught 
the guy who did it — there was a 
total of three of them, but the guy 
that actually did it — they caught 
him anti he was back on the street 
in two hours and 35 minutes and 
was charged with malicious mis- 
chief." 

He then told of trying to arm 
himself legally and being refused. 

“i tried to gei a pistol permit and 
spent over $2,000 and I went 
through all kinds of hassles and 


paperwork and everything." he 
said. 

■ Arraignment Is Described 

Speaking softly and staring at 
the courtroom floor Wednesday at 

his arraignment, Mr. Goetz told a 
judge that be would not fight extra- 
dition to New York to face charges 
in the shooting. The New York 
Times reported from Concord, 
New Hampshire. 

The police had said Tuesday that 
Mr. Goetz would fight extradition; 
he gave no explanation for his 
change of mind. 

Mr. Goetz appeared unmoved by 
the proceedings. But as he was 
handcuffed and led from the court- 
room be paused for a moment and 
looked up. 

“Vultures." he said, glaring at a 
group of reporters who had asked 
him if wanted to say anything. 

At the hearing. Assistant Attor- 
ney General Andrew Isaac of New 
Hampshire said of Mr. Goetz's 
statement to Concord police: “I 
didn't see anything to indicate 
Goetz was in fear for his life at the 
time.” 


The Associated Press 
WASHINGTON — The House 
of Representatives voted on Thurs- 
day to seat an Idaho Democrat who 
defeated George V. Hansen, a Re- 
publican congressman who was 
convicted of fraud charges last 
year. But, in a disputed Indiana 
race, it decided that neither candi- 
date should be sealed immediately. 

In the Idaho case, the vote was 
407-0 to seal Richard Stallings, 
who had been certified by stale 
officials as the winner over Mr. 
Hansen by a 170-vote margin. Mr. 
Hansen was defeated for re-elec- 
tion after he was convicted of fail- 
ing to report loans and other finan- 
cial transactions. 

By a 238-177 vote, the Indiana 
election dispute between Richard 
D. McIntyre, a Republican, and 
the Democratic incumbent, Frank 
X. McCloskey, was sent to the 
House Administration Committee 
for further study. While the com- 
mittee investigates the contest, the 
House clerk will represent the 8tb 
Congressional District of Indiana. 

Mr. McIntyre was certified by 
state officials in Indiana as the win- 
ner, although a recount continues. 


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Page 4 


FRIDAY, JANUARY 4, 1985 


Reralb 


international 



Pgfafehwt With The V» Ywt Tmw id The Washington Part 

War on the Coffee Crop 


'Hie WaBUngan I Europe ’s Decline: What Illness, What Cure? 


Coffee, the principal cash crop in Central 
America, is being harvested now. The guerril- 
las in El Salvador ami Nicaragua are doing 
their best to make sure the crop does not come 
in. It is a form oF warfare — attacks on coffee 
farms and mills and on other economic targets 
— that has cost El Salvador perhaps S I billion 
since the guerrillas took up arms in 1979. 
Nicaragua’s costs have been lower but sub- 
stantial Farmers and their families and other 
civilians are killed in these attacks on civilian 
targets. This is happening in places that, with- 
out a war, were already miserably poor. 

It is foolish for insurgents who hope to take 
over a country to cripple its economy and 
destroy its infrastructure and, meanwhile, to 
risk alienating the people by shredding the 
means of their livelihood. The Sandinlsts were 
guided by this logic when they took over Nica- 
ragua from the Somoza regime. The guerrillas 
they then set loose upon H Salvador, however, 
have had no similar sense or scruple. Nor have 
the Nicaraguan “contras." whose principal 
sponsor has been the American government. 

Sometimes an effort is made to say that one 
group of guerrillas or another is more respect- 
ful of the common people and of thetr need 
to make a living. But both groups of insur- 
gents. in El Salvador and Nicaragua, routine- 
ly inflict awful H.-imay and hardship. 


That both do it has a further, political im- 
pact on the treatment of this particular aspect- 
of Central America’s agony. It inhibits con- 
demnation of iL True, the United States pro- 
tests the economic damage done in El Salva- 
dor. and compensates for a good bit of it with 
aid. But Washington cannot speak with a loud 
and clear voice when it is sponsoring an insur- 
gency that follows similar tactics in Nicaragua. 
This is one more reason to end that sponsor- 
ship. For their pan, the Sandinlsts are eager to 
tell the world of the havoc being wrought by 
the contras. Their complaints must necessarily 
be set against the havoc caused by the guerril- 
las they encourage in El Salvador. 

In the Salvadoran peace talks, the Duane 
government proposed to outlaw attacks on 
civilian economic targets. This was a humane 
and popular proposal — even though the Sal- 
vadoran Army has been known to destroy 
crops in areas said to be under guerrilla influ- 
ence. But the guerrillas and their civilian com- 
rades turned the government down, asserting a 
right of sabotage as a weapon in a “people's 
war." The bishops plead in their homilies for 
an end to attacks on the people, and the 
insurgents' radio orders up more devastation 
against the “oligarchy’s economy." Destroyers 
are never short of fancy rationales. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Clark’s Quiet Departure 


As secretary of the interior for the past 16 
months. William P. Gark worked with consid- 
erable skill to turn down the heat in that big 
building. He ended the daily rireworks dis- 
plays and. in general, got the place back to 
work. His predecessor, James G. Watt, who 
took delight in outrageous ideological ges- 
tures, had started more fights with fewer tangi- 
ble results than anyone in the administration. 
Judge Clark discreetly ended the fights and 
reopened diplomatic negotiations with most of 
the department’s former adversaries. He re- 
lumed the department to its job as steward of 
vast reaches of America’s land and water. 

True, be was assisted by luck. When the 
administration came to office, energy prices 
had been rising fast for two years. Oil and coal 
companies were surrounding the department, 
baying for access to mining and drilling sites. 
But when he arrived, prices were railing and 
the enthusiasm for expensive exploration was 
greatly diminished. He had the advantage of 
being able to work in relatively quiet times. 

Secretary Gark pushed the White House 
hard for more money for the national parks, a 
difficult thing to do when the current was 
running the other way. That startled people 
who thought that, as a Reagan administration 
insider, he would try to apply the rule of the 
market to everything in sight including the 


hiking trails and campgrounds. But it was a 
useful reminder that the conservation move- 
ment in the United States originated chiefly 
with conservatives, and that the relationship 
between those two words is not a coincidence. 

The next secretary's main job will not be to 
generate any sweeping new policy, but rather 
to maintain the quality of the work force that 
serves this gigantic department. Mr. Reagan 
was not the first presidential candidate to run 
against the federal government and the people 
who comprise it. He merely represented a 
trend that bad been increasingly pronounced 
for two decades. Mr. Watt was not the only 
cabinet member to regard his permanent civil 
service with suspicion, but he carried it to a 
pitch of adversarial hostility. An administra- 
tion that wants to increase efficiency in gov- 
ernment needs to think carefully about the 
quality of the people it can attract and hold. 

Mr. Gark made important improvements 
during his tenure, but as he returns to Califor- 
nia be puts behind him the power that flowed 
from being one of the president's most trusted 
aides (in the State Department and National 
Security Council as well as at the Interior 
Department). Whether these improvements 
will prove to be more than temporary will 
be up to the next secretary. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST 


A Flight From Regulation 


The death of the U.S. Civil Aeronautics 
Board after 46 years warrants a commemora- 
tive marker, but it is a milestone, not a grave- 
stone. Federal regulation does not yield easily 
to market competition, yet the example of the 
aeronautics board shows it can be done. 

The board's main function was to regulate 
routes and fares. Over time, this became cozy 
protection for existing airlines and a tremen- 
dous obstacle for prospective new ones. The 
traveler, deprived of choice, was the loser. 

The phase-out of regulation has not been 
smooth. Many travelers find themselves con- 
fused by more choice than they can digest, and 
more than two dozen airlines have faded, un- 
able to meet the challenge of competition. But 
airline deregulation has had the intended ef- 
fect. Fares have been widely cut and the public 
has a greater variety of service. 

Despite President Reagan’s ambitions as a 
deregulator, he had nothing to do with this. 
The board was killed by a congressional 
amendment to the deregulation bill President 
Carter proposed in 1978. Mr. Reagan has yet 
to accomplish anything as lasting. And to the 


extent that he has deregulated, he has created 
skepticism about his reasons. 

Two days after taking office, Mr. Reagan set 
up a Task Force on Regulatory Relief. Casting 
deregulation as “relieT for business was a 
telltale. The original strength of the movement 
was its benefit to consumers. Efforts to pro- 
duce such relief in the Environmental Protec- 
tion Agency brought scandal instead, tainting 
the whole eminently worthwhile theory of de- 
regulation. Mr. Reagan claimed credit for oil 
and gas price deregulation, and he deserves 
some for speeding it up. But the heavy lifting 
on both was done by Jimmy Carter. 

Mr. Reagan’s most effective deregulaiory 
action was to issue an executive order in 1981 
giving the Office of Management and Budget 
authority to rale on new regulations after 
weighing the cost of compliance against the 
presumed benefit. In addition, he has appoint- 
ed regulators who share his view that less is 
better. Bui he has not brought about the revo- 
lution he had in mind, even though the idea of 
deregulation has become biparusan. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Other Opinion 


Bads to Antarctica 


Antarctica should rightly be made accessi- 
ble to all nations. Its destiny should be decided 
by the international community rather than by 
so-called trustees who have been self-appoint- 
ed. If need be, Antarctica should come under 
Uni ted Nations supervision. The old argument 
that first comers and claimants have a special 
responsibility cuts no ice. 

In view of the need to review and update the 


existing treaty system, Malaysia has proposed 
setting up a UN committee to study the issues 
in depth, to reconcile conflicting views and to 
redress deficiencies in the present regime so 
that it can be made more truly representative 
and equitable. Although, given the resistance 
of vested interests, the UN committee will not 
now be immediately set up, it is at least heart- 
ening to note that the matter will again be on 
the General Assembly agenda this year. 

— The New Straits Times (Kuala Lumpur). 


FROM OUR JAN. 4 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Despite U.S. Boom, Many Suffer 
NEW YORK — The subject of the cost of 
living continues to be a leading topic. A recent 
study of the standard of living in this city 
shows that it is impossible for a family of five 
or six to maintain a normal standard under 
$800 a year. The investigation also shows that 
among 1 ,000 men who have been compelled to 
ask for aid, the average yearly wage was from 
5525 to $750. The present prosperity boom has 
added little to these wages, and thousands of 
families are trusting to charity for aid. Mr. 
GiFford Pinchou in an article on “The Conser- 
vation of Natural Resources," declared: “The 
income of the average family in the United 
States is less than $600 a year. [But] far more is 
at stake than mere wages: in a word, the 
welfare and happiness or the misery and deg- 
radation of the plain people." 


1935: Lindbergh Baby Trial Opens 
FLEMINGTON, New Jersey — Mrs. Anne 
Morrow Lindbergh took the stand here (on 
t an 3] and in a trying ordeal told of the events 
leading up to the kidnapping or her year-and- 
a- half-old son, while Bruno Richard Haupt- 
mann, a stolid and unemotional carpenter who 
is on trial for kidnapping and murdering the 
child, shifted uneasily in his chair to avoid the 
glances that the witness frequently cast in his 
direction. Earlier Mrs. Lindbergh wept as At- 
torney General David T. Willentz made his 
opening statement. Time and time again he 
figuratively dangled the noose over Haupt- 
mann’s head as he told how the state would 
show that the prisoner crept into the baby’s 
room, carried the infant down a ladder and 
then killed the child to abandon it in a road- 
side grave in the Sourland Mountains. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HA Y WHITNEY, Chairme n 1959-1982 

KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 



LEE W. HUEBNER. PtAUsher 

Executive Ethlor 
Editor 
Dqnay Edam 
Deputy Editor 
Assoame Editor 


IntenuukMuJ Herald Tribune, 181 Avenue Charte-de-Gaulle, 92200 Nniilly-sur-Sciiic. 
France. T6qAsat£l8l-V2£S. Telex: 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Paris. 

Dveaeor de la publication; Walter N. Thayer. 

Asia Headquarters, 24-34 Hennessv J Id. Hang Kong. TeL 5-285618 Telex 61170. 

MacKkkm. 63 LmgAmfLoukSWO. TeL 8364802 Telex 262009. 
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U.S. subscription; $284 yearly. Second-dan postage paid at Long Island Gty, N.Y. UlQl. 

C 1985. Inunudtonal Ham Tribune. All rights reserved. I 


Damn Publaher 
Associate Publisher 
Associate PubBsher 
Dueeur of Operapons 
Director of Gradation 
recur afAdremsiag Sola 



This is the first of two articles. 

B RUSSELS — Europe’s diseased 
economies look a sharp turn 
1 for the worse in 1 984, and the prog- 
nosis for 1985 and beyond is poor. 
The malaise that at (hie start of last 
year was being called Europessi- 
mism had by the dosing months 
developed into Eurosclerosis. 

It could be that much of the sick- 
ness is psychosomatic — that the 
patient is talking himself into devel- 
oping the very symptoms he dreads. 
Indeed, the question is high in many 
Europeans’ minds: Are Europe’s 
economic ills real or imaginary? 
And if real, are there industrial poli- 
cies that can cure them? 

There is quite a media ne chest of 
policies for rejuvenating tired, flab- 
by European industry. The regimes 
being prescribed range from more 
research-and-developraem spend- 
ing to more cross-border partner- 
ships between big corporations. Ail 
the cures have failed to make much 
of a dent in Europe's main problem, 
which is that it is becoming smaller 
and weaker and sicker than ever, 
Europe’s pervasive cultural influ- 
ence makes it hard to grasp that, in 
relation to the rest of the world, it is 
shrinking economically at high 
speed. The cradle of Western civili- 
zation for more than 2,000 years 
now risks being eclipsed by newly 
industrializing countries that a cen- 
tury ago were virgin forest. By the 
early 21 st century, when the global 
population will have gone from to- 
day’s 4.6 billion to more than 6 
billion, Brazil and Indonesia will 
each have more people than all of 
Western Europe. Twenty-five years 
ago. Europeans accounted for 15 
percent of the world population; in 
another 25, if not sooner, the figure 
will have shrunk to 5 percent. 

There is little Europeans can do 
— or would want to do — about 
their numerical decline, and they 
draw strength from the knowledge 
that quality, not quantity, counts. 
But now ihe thought is dawning 
that Europe's early lead in educa- 
tion and technology may no longer 
guarantee it a disproportionate 
share of wealth and influence. 

At the outset of the 1970s the 10 


By Giles Merritt 

countries now in the European population but industrial output. 


Community still enjoyed a striking 
degree of "prosperity. That privi- 
leged position has already been 
eroded. Thanks to the Community. 
Europe is arguably more cohesive 
than before, bul ii is also poorer. By 
the early 1970s, Europe’s economies 
had a combined gross domestic 
product equal to that of the United 
Slates and more than twice the total 
figure for the 10 leading Pacific Ba- 
sin countries, including such eco- 
nomic powers as Japan, Hong 
Kong. South Korea and Taiwan. 

Today the picture is very differ- 
ent The economies of the Pacific 
Basin countries have forged ahead 
to stand at more than two-thirds of 
the ECs total gross domestic prod- 
uct, and that figure in turn has 
shrunk to 93 percent of the size of 
the present O.S. economy. Many 
forecasters expect ihe Pacific Basin 
coun tries to overtake Europe in eco- 
nomic terms by the century's end. 

The secret of the success among 
the Pacific Basic nations is not raw 


Through the 1970s .Asian competi- 
tors such as Japan chalked up a 28- 
percem rise in industrial produc- 
tion. Meanwhile. U-S. output was 
increasing by 12 percent and the EC 
figure was rising a mere 7 percent. 

Nobody in Europe or the United 
States any longer needs to be told 
about the virtuous circle the Japa- 
nese, Koreans ei al entered by link- 
ing output to spectacular improve- 
ments m productivity. The 1970s 
saw Japan's output per worker rise 
145 percent, while in the United 
States the rise was 20 percent. 

In the EC. productivity advances 
were all too often of the dubious 
son in which output remains static 
while employment shrinks. The re- 
sult for Europe is that disastrously 
high unemployment, now around 
the 12 -percent mark, threatens to 
become the norm. And that will 
block the adoption of tough new 
industrial restructuring policies, 
which in the short term would leave 
even more people without work. 


To many Europeans, “industrial 
policy" is code for the dilemma of 
having to choose between employ- 
ment and innovation. They know 
that the ECs slowness to innovate 
will mean an unstanchable hemor- 
rhage of jobs. But Europe is unsure 
how to weather the social and politi- 
cal storms that would probably be 
sparked by the son of industrial 
“streamlining*’ that might cut one 
job in three in some sectors. 

What to do with Europe’s out- 
moded and inefficient industries is 
one side of the coin. The other is 
how best to encourage the birth of 
thousands of small businesses that 
are Europe's only hope for combin- 
ing innovation and renewed em- 
ployment- The decline of traditional 
industry can be better handled with 
help from EC-level cooperation 
pacts, such as the “burden-sharing 
regime" for steel. But the encour- 
agement of entrepreneurial new 
businesses requires much more than 
a new EC policy. It needs a new 
attitude in which small businessmen 
are no longer dismissed as small fry. 

InremJTi'VmJ Herald Tribune. 





^ . 1-. _ fc C»V_ i 


Gandhi ’s Victory May Portend Closer Ties to U.S. 


W ASHINGTON — Recent 
events have smashed many of 
the resentments that for years Kept 
India near the lop of America's mosi- 
d is liked -country list. Now. with the 
emergence of Rajiv Gandhi as a new 
leader with a huge majority. Wash- 
ington may even find that it wants to 
work with Delhi. 

Peculiar historical conditions 
forced the two great democracies 
apart in the period after the war. The 
United Stales took upon itself the 
task or leading resistance to commu- 
nist expansion. That meant troops in 
Europe and the Atlantic alliance; 
support for newly independent coun- 
tries that were militamly anti-com- 
munisi: participation in wars in Ko- 
rea and Vietnam; and even coopera- 
tion with distinctly undemocratic 
countries when they turned anti-So- 
viet — notably Pakistan and China, 
neither very friendly to India. 

The Indians took upon themselves 
the leadership of a middle group of 
countries. They played the United 
States against die Soviet Union in 
bidding for economic and military 
aid. They turned a blind eye to the 
horrors of Communist rale in Russia 
and Eastern Europe. They put a 
plague on both houses in Vietnam 
and Korea. They found the United 
States as much to blame as the Soviet 
Union for the arms race. And succes- 
sive Indian leaders talked down to 
the United States in tones of sancti- 
monious moral superiority. 

Beneath the stereotypes, realities 
were changing. The great drought of 
1966-67 forced India to turn to the 
United States Tor food. The aid was 
forthcoming in what, apart from the 
Normandy landings, was probably 
the greatest armada ever organized. 
As condition for the help. President 
Lyndon Johnson obliged India to 
raise farm prices, distribute seed, fer- 
tilizer and pump-wells, and begin a 
birth-control campaign. By the mid- 
dle of the next decade Indian agricul- 
ture was thriving. 

At the some urae. the Soviet part- 
nership yielded bitter fruit. Huge 
steel and irrigation projects failed to 
pay off. Centralized planning lost its 
cachet Though the Soviet Union re- 
mained a vital ally for dealing with 
China and Pakistan, the socialist 
model was rejected. In 1977, a loose 
band of conservative parlies took the 
majority in the Indian parliament or 
Lok Sabha. away from Indira Gan- 
dhi. In opposition she learned some 
of the lessons of defeat When swept 


By Joseph Kraft 


back into office again in 1980, she 
was a chastened leader. She contin- 
ued to look to Moscow for security, 
and did not seriously condemn the 
Soviet invasion of Afghanistan. She 
stamped down hard on dissident 
movements in Lhe provincial states. 

But she explored avenues of concil- 
iation with Pakistan and China. She 
turned toward the United Stales that 
curious half-smile that was her trade- 
mark. Her meetings with President 
Reagar. — at Cancvm, Mexico, in 
October 1982. and in Washington the 
following year — were friendly. 

Rajiv, the 40-year-old son who was 
made head of the Congress (I) Party 
upon Mrs. Gandhi’s assassination, 


offers to his country — and to the 
United States — elements of a fresh 
start. Unlike his illustrious grandfa- 
ther and mother, he is a real, honest- 
to-God technician — an airline pilot 
by training and inclination. He re- 
stored order with dispatch, first after 
his mother's murder, and then after 
the terrible chemical leak at Bhopal. 
In his campaign he traveled all over 
India by helicopter. 

He sincerely admires those things 
that Americans do well. It is signifi- 
cant that among the many new faces 
in the cabinet, he has brought in a 
minister of planning who used to be 
ambassador in Washington. 

His victory was by a well-nigh uni- 


Upward Mobility for Chinese Comrades 


H ONG KONG — China's eco- 
nomic reforms have captured 
.the attention of businessmen, diplo- 
mats and politicians, but a less publi- 
cized restructuring of society is likely 
to have an even greater impact on 
modernization efforts. 

The Communist triumph over Na- 
tionalist armies in 1949 heralded not 
so much the dawn of a new epoch as 
the beginning of a new dynasty, with 
Mao as its emperor. In the imperial 
era. virtually the only path to wealth, 
power and prestige lay in success in 
government-sponsored examina- 
tions. followed by an official career. 
After 1949. the only route to success 
lay in membership in the Communist 
Party, which opened the door to life- 
time official posts. Being an official 


standing. Outside of officialdom 
there was nothing. 

Traditional China had looked 
down on merchants and their materi- 
al pursuits, and successful entrepre- 
neurs had to enhance their social po- 
sitions by allying their families to 
those of scholars through marriage, 
or by paying for official titles. Com- 
munist China choked off the chan- 
nels of upward mobility that had 
opened during the republican de- 
cades by abolishing the private sector 
and the rewards it offered, narrowing 


the scope of available opportunities 
by doing away with suen high-pres- 
tige professions as the law and bank- 


ing. playing down the role of profes- 


By Frank Ching 

sionals in general by overemphasiz- 
ing political altitudes, and practicing 
an extreme egalitarianism that abol- 
ished distinctions of achievement, 
such as rank in the military', academic 
titles and degrees in universities. 

All ambitions were channeled into 
one narrow bottleneck: the party’s 
upper echelons. This was bad not 
only for the nation but also the party, 
for while it attracted idealists it also 
drew opportunists. While Walter F. 
Mondale can lose an election and still 
retain a respected position in society 
as senior partner of a law firm, in 
China there is no alternative to being 
in power. It is all or nothing. 

The gradual de-emphasis of poli- 
tics after the ascendancy of Deng 
Xiaoping saw material incentives be- 
ing rehabilitated. The innate desire 
for self-betterment was recognized as 
a stronger instinct than altruism. 

Now the Chinese show signs of 
appreciating an individual's need not 
only for wealth but also for social 
standing Universities are awarding 
graduate degrees, academic titles are 
being revived and restoration of mili- 
tary ranks is being considered. Titles 
and ranks bestow a certain social 
standing and imply the right to a 
certain style of lire.’ 

The document on economic reform 
made public in October contains a 
paragraph that for the first time 
linked status, not just income, with 


work. Referring to “workers and 
staff” of enterprises, it said “their 
social prestige and material benefits" 
would be closely linked with work 
performance. This implies that enter- 
prises will have a greater hierarchical 
structure, with differentiation ac- 
cording to job and social standing. 
Managers will be accorded the re- 
spect they deserve. 

The recent tendency had been to- 
ward less social differentiation: Each 
person was addressed as “comrade.” 
Aside from a handful of “leaders of 
the party and the stale.” all others 
were simply members of the masses. 
Thai may well explain the defection 
to the United Stales of the tennis star 
Hu Na. While she could expect fame 
and fortune in the West an a tennis 
champion could look forward to in 
China was a lifetime as a coach, with 
little recognition. 

The drive toward egalitarianism re- 
sulted in such absurdities as having 
someone introduced as “a responsi- 
ble person of a department con- 
cerned” without any inkling as to 
what the person's title was. 

By opening up more channels for 
upward mobility outside the party 
and government, China will enable 
more people of ability to develop 
their talents, relieve persona] and so- 
cial frustrations and bring about a 
richer, happier, more stable society. 

The writer, a former Wall Street 
Journal correspondent in Beijing con- 
tributed this to The New York Times. 


Vietnam, 1960: One Man’s Military ' Accident 9 


C HARLEVOIX, Michigan — A report that a 
secret helicopter unit of the U25. Army’s 
101st Airborne Division repeatedly makes covert 
forays into “hostile regions” of Central America 
“to aid pro-American forces” surfaced recently. 
Last month, the Knight-Ridder newspapers re- 
ported that families of Americans killed in such 
actions were told their sons or husbands had died 
in accidents far from Central America. True or 
not, this report is painfully familiar to roe. 

In 1983, shortly after Christmas. I learned that 
my son, Thomas L. Dammann Jr., had made five 
covert parachute jumps into North Vietnam in 
1959 and I960. The United Stales was not yet at 
war with North Vietnam but Washington was 
saying that America had a vital interest in Viet- 
nam’s mineral wealth and offshore oil. 

Tommy’s leg was shattered in an incident after 
his fifth drop. He was 20. Officials at Fort 
Benning. Georgia, told his mother and me that hp 
suffered the injuiy in an auto accident near the 
base the night before his discharge was due. 

Tommy kept this secret for 24 years. And for 
24 years he limped through life on a kg two 
inches shorter than the other, fighting an anger 
he would never fully express. We did not even 


By Tom Dammann 

know he had been in Vietnam until last January, 
when his wife. Marilyn, called to (ell us he was in 
the Veterans Administration Hospital in Tomah, 
Wisconsin, being treated for “post-traumatic 
shock syndrome" because of Vietnam experi- 
ences. It was only then that Tommy finally re- 
vealed that the auto accident was a covenip. 

Tommy settled in San Francisco after his dis- 
charge, was married, started college and got a job 
on the San Francisco Chronicle. By the mid-'60s 
he had lost his wire and his job. He participated 
in several anti-war rallies and was jailed once. 

For years he tried a variety of jobs. He went to 
Europe, he tried living with us. He wrote well but 
was afraid to submit his work to editors, afraid of 
rebuffs. He moved to Michigan’s Upper Peninsu- 
la where he lived. alone for years, reading and 
drinking. He was hospitalized for alcoholism 
several times. Then a year ago last fall. Tommy 
was ragjng at the nightly news, screaming of the 
naked similarity between Washington’s explana- 
tions for present actions in Central Amenta and 
the pre-Vietnam statements. His secret was be- 


ginning to come out. Frightened, Marilyn took 
him to the VA hospital. 

I talked to Tommy several times afterward. He 
avoided talking about Vietnam. Once, in answer 
to a question, he said, “I was dropped into North 
Vietnam five times. Dad: four times from Libya 
and the last time from Fort Benning.” 

Marilyn and Vietnam veterans in the “rap 
group" ihe hospital encouraged Tommy to join 
told me this: After completing their first four 
missions, Tommy and bis buddies came out of 
North Vietnam two by two, but on the last foray 
their commanding officer ordered them to ren- 


25 men. Tommy was me of three survivors. 

My son’s traumatic experiences, and his tor- 
tured life, do not prove anything about the Rea- 
gan administration’s tactics in Central America. 
I am certain or one thing, though —Tommy will 
never again reveal his secret. He died last June, 
apparently in a fall on his stairs at home. 

The writer, an occasional contributor to The 
New York Times, wrote foreign dispatches for a 
newspaper syndicate from 1959 to 1970. 


versa! landslide, and he ran well in 
nearly every part of India. 

The size of his victory proves that 
Rajiv Gandhi is his own man, noLjust 
the relative of his relatives. The land- 
slide also answers a basic question 
posed by a population of 700 million 
spread over a vast area divided into 
22 states with a bewildering variety of 
religions, castes and tribal affiliations 
— it shows that India is a nation. 

Trying for smoother relations 
makes sense for the United Slates. 
One sure cost would be an increase in 
rid through the World Bank - some- 
thing that ought to be done anyway. 
As to grins, there is something to be 
said for a decent rapport between the 
world’s largest democracies. 

Los Angeles Times Syndicate. 


Reagan 
Fights the ’ 
Calendar 

By David S. Brodei* 

W ashington — There are 
two calendars at the White 
House these days. The first measures 
the tenure of the president as pre- 
scribed by the Constitution, and 
shows 210 weeks left. The second 
reflects the time insiders think be 
really has to accomplish his major 
domestic policy goals. It runs out 
before the end of 1985. 

Why the rush? In part it may Hi 
that so many of the senior White 
House aides think of themselves as 
short-timers. Counselor Edwin 
Meese 3d is awaiting confirmation as 
attorney general. Tne chief of staff. 
James A. Baker 3d, is increasingly 
impatient to find a major cabinet 
post. Michael K. Deaver. deputy 
chief of staff, wants to quit after the 
inaugural ceremonies to make money 
as a public relations man. 

Mr. Baker’s policy deputy. Rich- 
ard Damian, would like to leave too. 
for a job involving foreign economic 
policy. The budget director, David A. 
Stockman, is also eager to expand his 
income m the private sector. 

But there is more to the sense of 
urgency. There is the bunch on the 
domestic side of the administration 
that after 1985. Ronald Reagan will 
increasingly focus his energy on fotyj 
eign policy. The lure of an arms con- 
trol summit with the Soviet leaders is 
a powerful one: A man who has won 
two landslide victories for president 
has little left to spur his ambition 
other than the Nobel Peace Prize. 

So the White House wants a fast 
start on key domes tic measures — the 
deficit-reduction package and tax re- 
form — once the inauguration is out 
of the way. But managing the whole 
project will test the skills of the presi- 
dent’s aides as never before. 

The tax-simplification proposaL 
which Mr. Reagan has yet to endorse 
in anything more than concept, must 
be put into a final form that com- 
mands bipartisan support from the 
main tax-reform advocates in Con- 
gress. Without a credible tax-simpli- 
fication and rate-reduction plan, Mr. 
Reagan will have little to offer do- 
mestically but the pain of his budget 
cuts. And Republicans in the Horn- 
and Senate facing re-election nejjt 
year abhor the role of Scrooge almost 
-as much as Mr. Reagan does. 

But here’s the rub. The only way 
the White House can foresee uniting 
the Republican Party on the budget is 
to force Congress to deal with the 
spending side of the proposal before 
any decisions are made on revenue 
levels. Otherwise, there will be a fatal 
split between Senate Republicans, 
many of whom prefer higher taxes to 
severe cuts in domestic programs, 
and House Republicans, most of 
whom are dead set against tax hikes. 

How to separate the revenue and 
speading sides of the budget? No one 
is certain, bm the adamancy of the 
president’s opposition to tax hikes 
may convince the lawmakers that 
they have no option but to address 
the spending cots Fitsl 
Even that does not begin to solve 
the political problem, for there is 
widespread recognition in the While 
House that the budget decisions the 
president made in December win not d. 
survive sera Liny on Capitol Hill. — 

Having failed to force Defense 
Secretary Caspar Weinberger to ac- 
cept the Pentagon’s prescribed share 
erf the spending cuts for future years, 
there are those in Lhe administration 
who would like to make Mr. Wein- 
berger. rather than Mr. Stockman or 
the president, spend his political cap- 
ital defending uie budget proposal in 
Congress. Their not-so-secret hope is 
that Mr. Weinberger and his budget 
will both be cut down to size. 

Once the Capitol Hill political pro- 
cess has determined a realistic de- 
fense budget figure, they say, it migh t 
be possible — but still not easy — to 
bargain for a set of domestic spend- 
ing reductions that would share Lhe 
pain equitably. This would permit a 
solid phalanx of Republican senators 
and a handful of conservative Demo- 4 , 
crats to pass a budget resolution. 

Until that happens, they concede, 
there is uo way to force ihe Demo- 
cratic leadership of the House to give 
the president a vote on a similar 
package. Delay in the Republican 
Senate, they acknowledge, means de- 
feat in the Democratic House. Once a 
spending package passes the Senate, 
however, the president can take to the 
airwaves and the campaign trail de- 
manding action in the House. 

Bui it is not even certain that Re- 
publican senators will go along with 
Mr. Reagan; the budget cuts he is 
proposing go at the heart of the Re- 
publican constituency: Farmers, 
small businessmen, veterans, realtors, 
exporters, and Medicare beneficia- 
ries are all targets of proposed cuts. 

So you can understand the urgency 
of a quick stan. And you can also 
understand why some of die presi- 
dent’s men are looking for the exit # 
The Washington Post. 


LETTER 

A European Hot Potato 

Regarding the opinion column “4 
Strategy for Overcoming the Partition 
of Europe" (Dec. 29}: 

Zbigniew BrzezinskTs view is not 
new. The problem is that Britain and 
France are quite happy lo have the 
United States at the forefront of re- 
sponsibility for the defense of Eu- 
rope. The European Defense Force. 
f envisaged back in Pierre Mendfes- - 
France s day. was a hoi potato to that ** 
cunning fox, who artfuHv placed it in 
the pockets of Uncle Sak 

Europe has been in a political sies- 
ta since 1950. It was President Carter 
wno first disturbed this tranquillity in 
forcing the NATO decision to station 
new missiles and spend at feast 3 
percent of each member nation's 
gross national product on defense. 

M. KIRCHHOFF. 

Kehl. West Germany. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 4, 1985 


Page 5 



1963 Marital Lather King, Jr. 19M Lyndon B. Johnson 


TIME 

MIN OF THE YEAR 

Triumph andTrial 


1965 Gen. Wb, C WesbnoreLmd 1966 The 25 and Under Generation E*67 Lyndon 8. Johnson 


1968 Auden, Bonnan and Lorcfi 1969 The Middle Americans 


1970 Willy Brandi 


1971 Riduni M. Nixon 




1975 Women of the Year 


1 97b iBnmy Carter 


1977 Anwar Sadat 


197BTeng HsUo-p’ing 


1979 Ayatullah Khomeini 


1900 Rrtuld ftafpn 


|9BI Loch Wra 


WS2 Machine of i he 


WKJ Reason and Andrppov 


1984 


was a year that brought us images and ceremonies of unem- 
barrassed patriotism: the fortieth anniversary of the Nor- 
mandy invasion; the honorable interment of the Viet Nam 
war’s own Unknown Soldier; the year of our first woman vice-presidential nominee 
and our first black presidential candidate of a major party. It was the year when the man 
who preached caution and self-denial was buried by a landslide vote for the man who 
said, “America is back." It was a year in which, for a change, things seemed to work: 
when phrases like “Feeling good" and “Go for it" made perfect sense. 

Nothins seemed to dramatize America’s optimism and renascent self-confidence 
more than the Los Angeles Olympics. Their impresario, Peter Ueberroth, is TIME'S 
Man of the Year. 

The Olympics had their own magic, to be sure. The athletes, the city, the weather, 
even the intransigence of the Soviets seemed to conspire to make them succeed. But 
with a steady and'certain instinct, iron dedication, ebullient imagination and incorrup- 
tible self-interest, Peter Ueberroth made the wondrous best of a great thing. TIME 
acknowledges him not only for his own achievements, but for his symbolic representa- 
tion of the entrepreneurial spirit that is so manifestly alive and well in America. 

Ueberroth displayed the free-wheeling initiative, improvisational courage and will 
to win that TIME finds at the very heart of America’s traditional self image - and in 
such contemporary entrepreneurs as the men who invented People Express and MTV, 
the women who single-handedly provoked war against slipshod educators and drunken 
drivers. The individuals, in short, who see a problem, and take risks to solve it. 

What TIME assesses is something beyond the practical side of the new American 
optimism, that upward spiral of people who feel good about their country because 
they're doing well, and in some cases may be doing well because they feel good about 
their country. What TIME celebrates is, rather, the feeling that glowed, spontaneous 
■ind unexpected, in the faces of people who stood beside dark roads in their bathrobes 
to watch a runner carry the Olympic torch through their town- through their nation. 



-i 




















Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 4, 1985 


Coffee, Not Contras, Seen as Problem 

Nicaraguan Aide Attacks Bureaucracy, Plays Down Rebels 


By Stephen Kinzer 

-• New York Times Service 

MAT AG ALP A, Nicaragua — 
Bureaucratic problems within the 
Sandinist government have harmed 
the Nicaraguan coffee harvest 
more than rebel attacks, according 
to a senior Sandinist official. 
■.‘The most serious problem is 
lack of transportation," the official, 
Daniel Nuie. said, Mr. Ndflez is 
in charge of the coffee harvest in 
Matagalpa and Jinotega provinces, 
where two-thirds of Nicaragua's 


where two-thirds of Nicaragua's 
coffee is grown. 

. "The resources are there," he 
said. "The problem is to focus the 
rest of the country on ibis region." 

Coffee is Nicaragua's main 
source of foreign exchange, and the 
hard-pressed Sandinist govern- 
ment has said that all possible re- 


sources would be allocated to the 
harvest Rebel troops, known as 
"contras," threatened a concentrat- 
ed offensive to disrupt II 

"With all the help the contras 
have gotten, they haven’t been able 
to do very much," Mr. Nuhez said, 
adding that there had been four 
attacks on state-owned coffee 
farms since the harvest began in 
October, far fewer that had been 
expected. 

Rebel forces have received more 
than $100 millio n in covert aid 
from the United States, but the aid 
has been suspended by Congress. 

Daniel Ortega Saavedra, the 
Nicaraguan president-elect, toured 
Matagalpa and Jinotega on Mon- 
day, accompanied by other top of- 
ficials. Mr. Nuflez said Mr. Orte- 


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ga's presence reflecied the relative 
tranquillity in the region. 

Mr. Niiflez speculated that rebel 
forces were weakening. “H could be 
that the contras have peaked,” he 
said. 

Prospects for a renewal of U.S. 
coven aid to the insurgents are 
questionable, but rebel leaders say 
they are confident that the aid wifi 
be approved. They point to the 
continuing economic decline in 
Nicaragua and the consequent in- 
crease in public discontent as signs 
that the government is losing 
strength. 

Mr. Nunez said he believes the 
country's estimated 4,000 licensed 
street-corner salesmen pose a 
greater danger to the revolutionary 
process than the armed insurgents. 
Some of these traders import goods 
that are generally unavailable and 
sell them at high prices, while oth- 
ers buy at subsidized government 
markets and then resell their pur- 
chases for profit. 

In recent weeks, the Sandinist 
press has been clamoring for a 
crackdown on these independent 
peddlers, whom it blames for push- 
ing the price of many goods beyond 
the reach of ordinary Nicaraguans. 

"These people are the political 
arm of the contras." Mr. Niiflez. 
said. "There is a whole Mafia of 
salesmen." 

Mr. Nunez said many residents 




0 WL£5 >« 

HONDURAS 


Ml 

A student picks coffee beans at a farm in Nicara- 
gua's Matagalpa province that belonged to Presi- 
dent Anastasio Somoza, overthrown in 1979. 


.. . t; 

ifATAGAIPA^ 


"NICARAGUA^ 
unogua 0 *-■ ’ -j; . Jt 

Raafc . \ 

/ V- COSTA 

i ■ '• p irA 


of northern Nicaragua think that 
cities near the traditionally pros- 
perous Pacific coast, including Ma- 
nagua. are receiving preferential 
treatment in the distribution of* 
goods. 

He added that government em- 
ployees were selling items ear- 
marked for controlled distribution 
at exorbitant prices and that they’ 
should be dismissed from their 
posts. “For me. it is more impor- 
tant to end this speculation than to 
defeat the contras," he said. 


“If every Nicaraguan child in the 
most distant comer of the country 
cannot get a toy for Christmas, 
belter not to import any toys at 
alL” Mr. Nunez said. 

"The northern zones have known 
nothing but war for two genera- 
tions. It is time for the Pacific to 
give us a little support." 

He said that during Mr. Onega's 
visit here the two men spoke pri- 
vately and agreed that strict new 
economic measures were in order. 


■ La Prensa Fails to Appear 

The opposition daily newspaper 
La Prensa failed to appear Wednes- 
day because of Nicaraguan govern- 
ment censorship imposed shortly 
before the newspaper was to go to 
press, said Jaime Chamorro, the 
editor, according to a Reuters re- 
port from Managua. 

Most of the censored material 
dealt with public protests against a 
decree introduced Monday requir- 
ing dollar payments for purchase of 
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Honduras to Expel Nicaraguan Rebels 


The Associated Press 

TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras — 
Foreign Minister Edgardo Paz Bar- 
nica said Thursday that Honduras 
would expel Nicaraguan rebels 
who have operated from its territo- 
ry since 1981. 

“All these people will be kicked 
out immediately from our territory 
because they nave compromised 
our sovereignty" he said. 

Mr. Paz Bamica did not say how 
the government would cany out 
the deportation of the heavily 
armed anii-Sandinist guerrillas or 
to which country they would be 
sent. Estimates on the number of 
Honduras-based rebels, who oper- 
ate in northern Nicaragua, have 
ranged from 8,000 to 12.000. 

Most of the Honduras-based re- 
bels belong to the Nicaraguan 
Democratic Force, whose military 
command is dominated by former 
members of the National Guard of 
Anastasio Somoza, the rightist dic- 
tator who was overthrown in the 
1979 Sandinist revolution. The 
Sandinists abolished the National 
Guard. 

Misura, an organization of dissi- 
dent Nicaraguan Indians, also has 


its headquarters in Honduras and 
is believed to have about 2,000 to 
3.000 fighters operating along Nic- 
aragua’s Caribbean coast 

The rebels have received about 
$80 million in aid from the U.S. 
government. Congress cut off assis- 
tance in May 1984, but is consider- 
ing renewing iL 

Nicaragua frequently has ac- 
cused Honduras of sheltering anti- 
Sandinist guerrillas and has said 
that the situation could bring war 
between the two countries. 

The conservative Honduran gov- 
ernment has permitted the United 
States to build military installa- 
tions in Honduras and to hold ex- 
tended military maneuvers. But re- 
cently, the government complained 
that Honduras had not received 
sufficient economic and military 
assistance for the role it has played 
in U.S. strategy. 

“Officially, we do not know the 
whereabouts of the so-called coun- 
terrevolutionaries, but our authori- 
ties will find them and expel them," 
Mr. Paz Bamica said. “Honduras 
wishes to live in harmony and 
peace with its neighbors and with 
the rest of the nations of the world. 


For that reason, the contras will be 
expelled immediately.” 

He said that Honduras has al- 
most 50.000 Salvadoran, Nicara- 
guan and Guatemalan refugees. 

■ Executions Threatened 

An Indian rebel leader has 
threatened to execute 23 Sandinist 
prisoners of war if Nicaraguan 
troops try to liberate them by force. 
United Press International report- 
ed from Managua. 

The Misura rebels, who inclcie 
three Nicaraguan Indian groups, 
said they captured the soldiers in 
an attack D><£. 25, in winch they 
seized the military base of Wasba- 
puii. 180 miles {290 kilometers) 
north of Managua in Zelaya prov- 
ince. 

Steadman Fagoth, leader of the 
rebel organization, had offered ear- 
lier to exchange the POWs for 10 
imprisoned Miskito Indians He 
said over the clandestine guerrilla 
Radio Miskito on Wednesday that 
the army of the Sandinist govern- 
ment has “prepared an offensive of 
700 soldiers with the intent of re- 
taking the military base" of Wasba- 
pull 


Nakasone’s Trip to U.S.: 
A Taste of Feudalism? * 

Some Japanese Say His fisitlstike 
Paying Homage to Ancient Emperors 

Bv Clyde Haberman But in the last few days Tokyo 

Nf* York Times Service has acquired a silky grace more 

TOKYO - Centuries ago. feu- Rivaling perhaps, ton tnherem 
dal lords were forced to travel from beauty. The whole aty has become 
all over Japan to take up residence an Oriental Easter Parade -~ wom- 
everv other year in Edo, as Tokyo ea m kimonos of colorful swirls or 

was'then called. ^ 

For' the Shogun, presiding in men who left Western suits in jta 
Edo. it was useful. He not only got closets and ventured * or * ““‘I 
these people, who were potential mandtngly in dark-blue robes and 
threats, to live within eyeshot but wooden clogs. > . , . , 

he forced them to spend a great On Jan. 1, starting at nudn#t, 
deal of money on ihe pilgrimage, millions of people poured into 
depleting their treasuries. Shinto shrines and Buddhist tera- 

The procedure was known as pte- The holiday is, foremost, a 
sankin kotai. and it came to mind religious occasion, given to families 
for some Japanese because their and to reflection, 
prime minister. Yasuhira Naka- More than 80 nrilhon worshipers 

sone. is in the United Slates this - two out of three Japanese — 
holiday season to confer with Presi- were estimated to have visaed 


dent Ronald Reagan. 

It amounted to a latter-day san- 


shrines and temples by Thursday 
night. On Wednesday, by the many 


kin kotai, some said, pointing out -thousands, people enmehai their 
'that the politicians of Japan's gov- way across gravel paths at Nyuba- 
e ruing parly pick a prime minis ter shiinae to enter the Imperial Palace 
everv other year, and then almost grounds, where the 83-year-old em- 
im mediately — by habit, if not peror, Hirohito, wished them yet 
edict — he goes to America. Just another good year- 
like the feudal lords in their treks to Like most of Asia, Japan od- 
Ed 0 serves the 12-year zodiacal cycle 

There were people who grum- borrowed from the Chinese. Unlike 
bled that by now the Japanese most other countries, however, Ja- 
shouid be beyond having to make pan starts itsyearat its own pace— ± 
these pilgrimages. characteristically speeded up, on * 

Some members of Mr. Naka- Jan. 1 instead of late February 
sone's entourage were also known when tbe lunar year begins, 
to be unhappy. After alL no matter By acclamation, 1984, the Year 
what unders tandin gs he may reach of the Rat, was deemed a dull year, 
with Mr. Reagan, regardless of No one said that as a complaint, 
anything the communiques will mind you. The economy chugged 
say. the real issue was that the along nicely, and when workers 
prime minister had done something opened envelopes containing year; 
virtually no Japanese ever does in end bonuses — worth two months 


the first few days of January. 
He worked 


salary, in many instances — they 
found they had done 5.4 percent 


New Year’s Day may be a hdi- better, on average, limn in 1983. 


day in most countries. In Japan, it 
is a passion. 


This is the Year of the Ox, and 
the Japanese Zodiac Almanac, a 


People prepare for it in a frenzy popular publication produced by^ 
of cleaning and shopping and mail- 8 r o^P of astrologers, predicts that 
ing and gifL-giving and drinking. be marked by prosperity but 

The object is to obliterate the old also b y economic tension between 
year. This will soon be followed by Japan and the United States, 
another round of parties, to greet Then a g ai n , one did not need a 
the new year before it has a chance fortune teller to figure that out 
to grow cynical with age. A 1 " 10 ? 1 “y SP 6 ®* b * 311 

Few big cities could be trans- American politician or government » 
formed quite as s tartling ly as To- official makes much the same£? 
kvo is during the New Year boli- P ob } L . 
diiys. That is a big reason why Mr. 

Businesses shut down, some for Nakasone was in California with 
nearly a week. People fill the Mr. Reagan this week instead of 
streets, as always, but they do not bac k home, 
race as purposefully as usual. If it is His family would probably miss 


possible for crowds ever to be gen- 
tle, they become so in Tokyo with 
the new year. 


him, he said the other day, but his 
wife, Tsutako, took solace in being 
spared the usual stream of visitors 


This is not, most people would to the prime minister’s residence, 
probably agree, the prettiest of cap- Actually, Mr. Nakasone added jok- 
itals. Its architecture is functional, ingly, she might not consider it a 
and the dominant color is ferro- bad idea if be made an American 



■> 

It' 



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INTERNATIONAL 


Jan. 4, 1985 


WEEKEND 


Page 7 


The Celebrity Architect Arrives 


by Paul Goldberger 


N: 


EW YORK - If 1984 will b 
remembered for anything, it wij 
*•> I " as lhe year in which architect 
^ mo v «i into full-blown celebrity 
This phenomenon has been coming for 
l^ng l ' rae — Philip Johnson’s visage ha 
bemned out at us from the covers of variou 

for rive y™ now. am 
Michae 1 Graves was commissioned to desigj 
a shopping bag for Bloomingdaie's mor 

a !°- bul 11 

higher gear than ever last vear 
The evidence of all of' this is partly it 
actual buildmgs. partly in attitude. There an 
buildings by “name" archi 
ft.ts fTlling the downtowns of major cities ii 
the United States than ever before; at ; 
meeting of the Urban Land Institute in Bos 
ton in October, an audience of 2^00 shewee 
up to hear a panel of architects and real- 
estate developers proclaim the advantages ol 
hiring a celebrated architect to design a com- 
mercial building. The very banks and insiir- 
ance companies that a few years ago were 
r - I? V 1 ? 111 # *? fhi^ce buildings by well-known, 
'’♦'nigh-design” architects have now come to 
demand the very names they once rqected. 

Some of this, of course, can be attributed 
lo the altogether admirable higher level of 
design consciousness that has come lo be in 
the last couple of years, and not to the mere 
pursuit of celebrity. And perhaps these two 


things cannot be fully separated — maybe 
under the right conditions the pursuit of 
celebrity is. in itself, a factor that can raise 
the levej of design quality. 

Thai is the way we can describe what has 
happened to Richard Meier, the architect 
who has played a major role in the news all 
year. In April, Meier was named this year's 
winner of the Pritzker Prize, the $100,000 
award that has come to be thought of as the 
Nobel Prize equivalent in architecture, and 
has. in itself, done u fair amount to enhance 
the sense of the architect as celebrity. 

And then in October, the J. Paul Getty 
Trust, which administers the S2-biltion en- 
dowment of the Getty Museum, named 
Meier the architect for the immense cultural 
complex it plans to build on a 740-acre (298- 
heciare') mountaintop site it owns in Lbe 
Brentwood section or Los Angeles. The Get- 
ty project, which will involve a new museum 
and two related arts institutions, was per- 
haps the most coveted architectural commis- 
sion in the world; Meier edged out two other 
internationally known architects, James Stir- 
ling and Fum'ihiko Maki, to win the job. 


T HE point here is not to say that the 
Getty was in search of a celebrity. 
Quite the opposite — the Getty con- 
ducted what may be the most serious, consci- 
entious and complete search for an architect 
any institution has ever embarked on. 

But this earnest quest, which created more 


than its share of suspense in the architectural 
world, had the effect of focusing attention 
not on actual buildings or designs, but on 
individuals, and thus, perhaps inadvertentlv, 
it enhanced the whole tendency to t hink of 
architects as cultural celebrities. Though 
Meier has had a wide reputation for years, he 
was not thought of before the Pritzker Prize 
and the Getty as a mainstream commercial 
architect; he was considered loo serious, too 
intense, a designer for that. Now real estate 
developed are knocking on his door, too. 
and he is being mentioned as a possible 
designer for Lhe kind of projects he was never 
offered before. 

So perhaps this is a case of the notion of 
architect as celebrity being all to (he good — 
lots of media attention is brin gin g more 
work to an architect of recognized quality. Is 
it the same in the case or another major event 
this year, the announcement that the govern- 
ment of France bad hired l.M. Pei to reno- 
vate and add to the Louvre? 

Pei’s scheme, announced in February, 
calls for the construction of a gla« pyramid 
in the center of the main court of the Louvre 
to serve as a new entrance to the vast muse- 
um. It caused considerable controversy, and 
not surprisingly; it is a startling design, on 
balance, to this viewer, loo abstract and 
purist an object to bring unity to that com- 
plex melange of classical buildings. 

Though Pei’s proposed reorganization of 
spaces within the Louvre was thoughtful, 
and his belief that the Louvre should not be 



frozen in time is unquestionably correct, the 
glass pyramid still had an uncomfortable au- 
to it. a sense of not belonging to the Louvre 
but of being imposed on it from without. It 
was hard not to think that the French gov- 
ernment, aware of Pei's international celeb- 
rity as the architect of the wildly popular 
East Building of the National Gallery of Art 
in Washington, hired him in the hope that he 
would be able to bring some of tiuu success 
to Paris, whether or not it was well suited to 
the problem at hand. 

Other events, too, seemed to center 
around the idea of celebrity. Donald Trump, 
the flamboyant builder who has become 
New York’s' best-known real estate develop- 
er since William Zeckendorf Sr. — Trump's 
name is now a household word at least as 
well known as that of any of the architects he 
hires — not only asked Philip Johnson to 
design a building (a project that has since 
been abandoned}, he filed two unusual law- 
suits involving architects and architecture. 

One was a libel suit against the architec- 
ture critic of the Chicago Tribune. Paul 
Gapp, for writing negatively about Trump’s 
plait to build the world's tallest building on 
the East River, a scheme that Trump claimed 
had been “virtually torpedoed” by the nega- 
tive review. Trump’s plan was hardly far 
enough along to be destroyed by anybody, 
let alone an out-of-town critic; suing Gapp 
suggested that he, and all architecture critics, 
had more power — and thus more celebrity 
— than they really do. And of course the sun 
did much to increase Trump’s own celebrity 
too. 

The other lawsuit was less frivolous. It was 
against an architect. Philip Bimbamn, who 
had designed Trump Plaza, Trump's new 
apartment house on Third Avenue, and then 
proceeded to provide a similar design for a 
rival developer, Morton Olshan, who 
planned to build it across the street. Trump 
was able to get the architect and developer to 
agree, in an out-of-court settlement, to make 
significant cosmetic changes in their design 
to avoid absolute duplication. The legal pre- 
cedent for architectural design is not dear, 
but the additional boost this gives to 
Trump’s celebrity certainly is. 

R ATHER more directly connected to 
the growing desire to see architects as 
celebrities is the success of a new 
design company, Swid-Powell. which was set 
up to produce household objects by well- 
known architects. This year Swid-PoweU’s 
first collection came to the stores, and it 



Richard Meier's High Museum of Art in Atlanta. 


includes dinner plates by Robert Venturi. 
Robert A.M. Stern. Richard Meier, Stanley 
Tigennan, Laurinda Spear and Charles 
Gwathmey and Robert Siegel, among others, 
as well as ‘glassware and serving objects. 

There is nothing wrong with any of Lhis — 
in fact, it follows the increasing tendency of 
furniture manufacturers lo offer tables, 
chairs, sofas and the like by celebrated archi- 
tects. This year saw Gwathmey Siegel furni- 
ture from 1CF and a line of Robert Venturi 
furniture from Knoll, for example. There is 
plenty of historical precedent, since archi- 
tects from H.H. Richardson and Stanford 
White to Frank Lloyd Wright have designed 
household objects and furniture, »mt con- 
temporary architects have long craved a 
chance to do the same. 

The challenge, however, is particularly 
difficult in the arena in which Swid-Powell is 
operating, for it is especially easy when pro- 
ducing small objects like plates and glass- 
ware to fall prey to the temptation to market 
anything that has the right name on it The 
outlook here seems promising, since the first 
collection is generally strong, most notably 
in the plates of Gwathmey SiegeL And the 
Swid-Powefi’s principals have had the good 
sense to say no to some designs by very 
famous names that were not up to par. Ar- 
chitects are not licensing companies, the way 
fashion designers have become — they are 
creators whose names, if they are to hold 
what meaning they have, must not be al- 
lowed to become labels. 

For the real question underlying all of this 


is not whether architecture has become a 
creature of fashion; it always has been that 
to some extent, and it is surely so now. The 
question is at what point this tendency to 
pursue 'the fashionable compromises the in- 
tegrity of the an that must, at bottom, be 
part of all great architecture. When we think 
in terms of actual designs, the lure of fashion 
has probably got the belter of us, as it has 
when the lust lor the new becomes the over- 
powering factor in a design judgment. 

B UT none of this should blind us to 
some of the truly distinguished archi- 
tecture being made now. The kind of 
architecture that best expresses the spirit of 
this time, the architecture that picks up bits 
and pieces of history and puts them, collage- 
like, into a new and complex whole, can yield 
maslerworks. Though I have seen it only in 
photographs, I suspect that James Stirling's 
new museum in Stuttgart may have been lie 
finest building to have opened this year. The 
LTV Tower in Dallas by Richard Keating of 
Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, among the best 
skyscrapers built in the United States this 
year, shows the possibility of thoughtful conr 
nection between the Modernist skyscraper 
tradition and the new, romaniic-Modemist 
impulse, as does the recent work of Kohn 
Pederson Fox, Cesar Belli. Helmut Jahn and 
Michael Graves, whose Humana headquari 
tens in Louisville. Kentucky, will be finished 
this spring ■ 

0 19S5 The New York Times 


Through 'Swan Lake’s’ Troubled Waters 


by David Stevens 


P ARIS — Hardly any ballet in the 
repertory can challenge the inde- 
structible popularity of “Swan 
Lake,” not only for the atmosphere, 
color and variety of Tchaikovsky’s score, but 
for rite universal appeal of its tragic story of 
lovers destroyed by outside forces, however 


LCUXA.U ulllMl a IUXI 5 U1UV IU flUUIVTV uuu pupu- 

laxity throughout the dance world, or has 
had its libretto so incessantly rewritten or 
otherwise tampered with, or its score so 
thoroughly cut, added to, drifted around and 
generally mutilated. 

As a result, although almost every major 
production of “Swan Lake" traces its ances- 
try to the celebrated 1895 staging by Marius 
Petipa and Lev Ivanov in SL. Petersburg, no 
two productions are absolutely i d enti c al and 
some are downright eccentric as choreogra- 
phers strive to clarify the story or give partic- 
ular significance to the fairy tale. 

Thus, Rudolf Nureyev’s new choreogra- 
phy and misc en scfcne for the Paris Op6ra 
has reopened the debate for the umpteenth 
time, with reactions ran ging from qualified 
approval to outrage. It is Nurwey’s second 
go at “Swan Lake” — he first did it 20 years 
q ago for the Vienna State Opera —so he has 
--'had plenty of time to think about it But one 
of the particular problems in Paris is that it 
replaces one of the most important postwar 
productions of the work, one that has been in 
the Paris repertory for almost a quarter- 
century and the only one op to now that the 
Optra’s ballet troupe has ever had. 

“Swan Lake,” the composer's first ballet, 
was commissioned from Tchaikovslty by the 
Bolshoi Theater in Moscow in 1875 and 
produced there in 1877 in choreography by 
one Julius Reisinger, the theaters ballet 
master, whose competence and im agina t io n 
for the job at hand appear to have been slight 
'or nonexistent- Furthermore the conductor 
had never before been confronted by a score 
that was so complicated. For a variety of 
reasons, in the course of performances about 
a third of Tchaikovsky’s score was cut and 
Replaced by the music of others. A revival m 
j 880 choreographed by Joseph Hansen, who 
succeeded Reisinger as ballet masto, fared 
no better. In addition, the public was hardly 
* used u> ballets of such dramatic content, let 
r alone to such an ambitious score. The result 
was no success, but not a disaster other, and 
the Moscow production ran until its sets 

^Whm^Mkovsky died in 1893. only This 
production had been staved, and he died 
understandably believing 
pot a success. 


it the score was 



1 jjeauiy — 

d prodded by Ivan Vsevo- 
r of the Imperial Theaters, 
*. The comj^ s 
niaded to revise the compb- 

breuo. Some of the changes 

at least harmless. He eunM 
ricked stepmother and pro- 
toT rod MrrBMOdmgJy 
e role of to ^ 

ssstassss 



romantic apotbeo«s- 

ie original order of Tchai- 

k notros peeled radjcal 
_ j music bv Tcnai- 


kovsky was introduced, the chief villain of 
this being the composer-conductor Riccardo 
Drigo. 

No matter. Petipa laid out the broad lines 
of the staging and entrusted the choreogra- 
phy of Acts 2 and 4. the “white” acts, to his 
assistant Ivanov, while doing himself Acts 1 
and 3, with their national and character 
dances. The production was laniard on its 
road to overwhelming popularity, and Ivan- 
ov’s Act 2 in particular has almost achieved 
the status of an untouchable masterpiece, 
one that has a life of its own in companies 
who lade the desire or the resources to pro- 
duce the full work. 

But the road to worldwide popularity was 
not smooth. Diaghilev sought to introduce 
“Swan Lake” to the western Europe in his 
1911 London season, in a version that elimi- 
nated Act 1 and compressed the remainder 
into two acts. But he was a victim of his own 
success in introducing modern works and the 
“new art” of Mikhail Fokine, and this revival 
was seen as uninteresting and the work as 
old-fashioned, even though Nijinsky danced 
the prince in three performances. Diaghilev, 
no slouch at judging public taste, was in this 
case only a few decades in advance of the 
post-Wond War II wave of enthusiasm for 
the Romantic ballet repertory. 

It was not until 1934 that the first com- 
plete production of the Petipa-Ivanov ver- 
sion was given in the West, mounted for the 
Vic-Wells Ballet in London by Nicholas Ser- 
geyev, a former ballet master of the Mar- 
yinsky who fled Russia daring the Revolu- 
tion with his annotated choreographies. This 
was the basis for all the later productions by 
the Sadler’s Wells company, today’s Royal 
Ballet, as well as by numerous other compa- 
nies in the West 

Despite the fact that the Paris Op&ra Bal- 
let is one of companies in the world best 


endowed to handle major works with large 
supporting forces, it was not until 1960 that 
“Swan Lake” entered its repertory. 

In I9S3, Vladimir Bourmeister, ballet 
master of the Stanislavsky and Nemirovich- 
Danchenko Music Theater in Moscow, 
staged an important revival of the work, 
significant in that it was the first to return to 
Lhe original order of Tchaikovsky’s score and 
in the special attention that Bourmeister — 
who was, after all flying under Stanis- 
lavsky’s flag — gave to the dramatic content 
He retained the Ivanov Act 2, however, and 
be was in no position to return to the original 
tragic ending. With the advent of socialist 
realism and the requirement for “positive” 
heroes, Soviet endings to “Swan Lake” have 
been happy ones, sometimes with Siegfried 
defeating Rothbart in hand-to-hand combat. 

When the Bounneisler production toured 
in the West in 1956 it created a considerable 
stir, one result bang that he repeated the 
production for the Paris Opira. Inis version 
— revived frequently in different Paris sites, 
such as the courtyard of the Louvre and the 
Palais des Congrfes. and with changes of 
d£cor — has been Lhe Paris production until 
Nureyev introduced his new version last 
month. 

Nureyev’s version, t fapres Petipa and 
Ivanov, is of considerable interest, eclectic 
and with touches of originality. His overall 
concept is to treat the story from beginning 
to end as the prince's dream. As in Vienna 20 
years ago, tins prince is a dreamer — in no 
mood to assume the responsibilities or lead- 
ership, let alone marriage. 

An added opening scene shows a young 
woman being spirited away by the evil Roth- 
ban. The pnnee is awakened by his rather 
sinister looking tutor to join his friends, and 
in the dream the tutor is transformed into 
Rothbart — and danced by the same dancer. 


The role of Rothbart is further enhanced by 
a vigorous virtiosic variation introduced into 
the middle of the Black Swan pas de deux in 
Act 3. 

Nureyev also greatly enhances the role of 
traditional mime in the middle two acts, 
although the opening act has become largely 
a succession of seemingly unmotivated 
dances. 

The most welcome change is a return to a 
semblance of a tragic ending Dream or no 
dream, this version is a metaphor for an 
impossible love. There is no overflowing of 
the lake, but Rothbart again sweeps up 
Odette — as in lhe opening scene — and they 
rise beyond the reach of the prince, who 
collapses. 

Inis new “Swan Lake” has solid assets in 
the sets of Ezio Frigerio and the costumes of 
the Franca Squaraapino. Frigerio has de- 
vised a vast, square-cornered space in Vic- 
torian Gothic style with a back wall that 
slides apart 10 reveal watery scenes that 
vaguely evoke Monet, while Squaraapino 
has created Italian Renaissance costumes in 
subdued hues. Despite the mixture of styles 
— after all, one can do anything in a dream 
— the result is harmonious and appealing. 

Finally, the return of “Swan Lake” to the 
company’s repertory is welcome for the i 
health cif he company. The double role of 
Odette-Odile is one of the most testing in the 
repertory, the Paris troupe has alot of young 
ballerinas who can only benefit from coming 
to grips with it In the first casts, Elisabeth 
Plaid and Claude de Vulpian displayed solid 
technique but not yet a great deal of charac- 
ter, and much the miw could be said for the 
attractive prince of Charles Jude. Patrice 
Bart made the most of his double role as the 
tutor and Rothbart. giving a brilliant ac- 
count of his new, close- Lo-lh e-ground Act 3 
variation. ■ 




It’s Lift-Off Ti] 


II 


e 


For Digital Sound 


by Hans Fantel 


N EW YORK — In the history of 
the phonograph, last year is likely 
to be remembered as a watershed 
separating two eras of reoorded 
sound: analog and digitaL 
Not that digital sound dares from 1984. Its 
invention, in fact, was not a single flash of 
anyone’s inspiration but an accretion dating 
back to Napoleonic times when a French 
nobleman, Baron Augustin Cauchy, laid the 
mathematical foundations that were lata* 
radically elaborated by Dr. Claude Shannon 
of Bell Laboratories into the theory basic to 
digital encoding. But 1984 unquestionably is 
the year in which digital sound came into its 
own as a force in the market. 

At the year’s beginning, the technical mer- 
its of digital sound were no longer in doubt; 
yet, whether the new format would find the 
public acceptance to assure its commercial 
1 health was still uncertain. Now that question 
has been resoundingly resolved, and digital 
sound — as embodied in the Compact Disk 
— is clearly destined to be the standard of 
the future. Next to the introduction of elec- 
tricity into the process of sound recording in 
1925. this is the most far-reaching technical 
shift in more than a century of phonography. 

To appreciate the nature of this shift in its 
intellectual and technical aspects, one must 
turn to the ideas of Thomas S. Kuhn, the 
eminent historian of science. Kuhn points 
out that different precepts about nature pre- 
dominate at different historical periods and 
shape the scientific imagination as well as 
the technology that grows from it. The cur- 
rent changes in methods of sound recording 
illustrate this strikingly. 

When Thomas Edison conceived the idea 
of sound recording in 1877, the prevailing 
imagery of invention was mechanical, condi- 
tioned by the machines that had transformed 
life during the Industrial Revolution. Ac- 
cordingly, it took shape as a purely mechani- 
cal contraption, wiggling in analog motion 
to the musical sound waves, dependent on 
needle and horn. There was. in consequence. 


a kind of harmonious coherence between 
Edison's inventive mind, the menial cast of 
the surrounding culture and the character of 
his producL 

By the late 20th century, the dominant 
mode of scientific and technical thought had 
changed. Physical reality was no longer per- 
ceived in terms of classical mechanics as a 
continuous exchange of forces. Physical real- 
ity was seen in terms of quanta that shape 
the universe through the action of discontin- 
uous packets. As & conceptual mode and 
style of thought, this relates also to the 
computer’s way of dealing with data — 
chopping all forms of information into bina- 
ry bits. Since the digital phonograph deals 
with music in the form of computerized bits, 
it brings the method of sound recording in 
line with the prevalent technological and 
intellectual climate. One might say that the 
digital phonograph restores the original har- 
monious coherence between the instrument 
and its era. 

But in a trading civilization, ideas are 
proved not only in the laboratory but also in 
the market. It is in this respect that 1984 has 
placed history’s stamp of confirmation cm 
the idea of digital sound. Final figures are 
not yet in, but it is evident that sales of 
digital record players have spurted in the 
closing months of last year. 

O NE reason for this sharply acceler- 
ated growth curve is a kind of digital 
population explosion. Almost every- 
one who hears a good digital sound system is 
so enraptured by its superior sorties that he 
wants to share his enlnusiasm with music- 
minded friends. Thus, public awareness 
spreads in geometric progression — some- 
what like the multiplication of rabbits. 

Victor Hugo is to blame, among other 
things, for the old saw about nothing being 
more powerful than an idea whose time has 
come. It's not really a provable statement, 
but as a case in point one might tite the 
digital phonograph in 1984 . ■ 

O f«K5 The New York r,ma 











Page 8 


■ POONESBURY 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 1, 1985 


TRAVEL 



m 5 H 




Following Piero’s Trail 


Portugal’s Holiday Staple 


by Patrick Reyna 

L ISBON — Holiday tables elsewhere are 
high with seasonal specialties like 
roast goose, turkey or ham, but in 
^ Portugal from Chnstmas to Epiph- 
any. everyone looks forward to yet another 
serving of the daily favorite — bacaihao, or 
dried, salted codfish. 

The day before Christmas, President Ra- 
in alho Eanes sal down to a codfish lunch in 
the presidential palace with three Portuguese 
emigrant families home for the holidays 
from France. West Germany and Luxem- 
bourg 

Boiled codfish garnished with potatoes 
and broccoli cut across political Ones on 
Christmas Eve in the homes of Mario Soares, 
the Socialist prime minister, his conservative 
opponent Francisco Lucas Pires and the 
Communist Party leader, Alvaro CunhaL 

The same dish, perhaps this time with 
chopped onions or cream sauce, also ap- 
peared on menus for New Year's Eve and for 
Epiphany, the Feast of the Three Kings, this 
Sunday. In between and during the rest of 
the year, people in this country of 10 million 


will eat bacaihao for lunch and dinner — and 
even for breakfast in some places. 

No one is certain when Portugal’s love 
affair with the pel amigo or “old faithful" — 
as the fish is known here — began, but for 
centuries Portuguese have fished the icy 
North Atlantic where the cod lives. 

The government regulatory commission 
for cod sales estimates annual per capita 
consumption at 17 pounds (7.7 kilograms). 
The commission says at least 3.3 pounds are 
eaten during the holiday period. 

Because of a variety of international regu- 
lations, the Portuguese fishing fleet's annual 
13,000-ton quota cannot meet the country's 
demand for cod. So Portugal imports an 
additional 25,000 tons from Iceland. 20.000 
tons from Canada, 18,000 tons from Norway 
and lesser amounts from Denmark and the 
United States. 

Although cod is eaten fresh in many coun- 
tries, in Portugal bacaihao is always dried 
and salted, except for the heads, which are 
sold fresh as special delicacies. The cod ar- 
rives “wet,” or fresh, in Portugal where it is 
salted and dried on huge racks. 

The pungent odor of salt aid permeates 
Portuguese supermarkets as well as the 
smallest village shops where the flattened. 


triangular pieces decorate the windows like 
so many grayish, salted kites. 

Salt cod may have been what gave early 
Portuguese mariners an edge on the rest of 
the world’s sailors as they set forth in the 
ISth and 16th centuries on their voyages of 
discovery. The dried Fish kept indefinitely 
and provided captains and crews with a 
nourishing if boring diet. 


V " ASCO da Gama munched on bacai- 
hao as he rounded the Cape of Good 
Hope in 1489, and another Portuguese 
navigator in the service of Charles V of 
Spain, Feraao de Magalhaes, better known 
as Magellan, probably grew tired of it in the 
three years it took him to become the first 
captain to circumnavigate the globe. 

Although fast-food restaurants have come 
to Lisbon and the country's bigger dues, 
there appears little danger that the Portu- 
guese will abandon the bacaihao for some- 
thing like a hamburger. After all as everyone 
here knows, there are at least 363 ways to 
prepare bacaihao — one for each day of the 
year. ■ 

© IQS5 The Associated Press 


INTERNATIONAL DATEBOOK 





• Royal Academy of Arts (tel: 


•The£ire3 sur4(tel: 327.09.16). 
RECITAL — Jan. 7: Elena Iakoubo- 


EXHIBlTlON — Jan. 1 1 -March 31: viich guitar, Russian ballads. 

" 4 i-i 


VIENNA. Koazerthausriel: 72. 12. 1 1 ). 
RECITAL — Jan. 6: Herbert Tachezi 
organ (Bach). 

•Museum of Mankind (let: 93.43.41). 
EXHIBITION —To Jan. 20: “Medi- 
eval Art from Serbian Monasteries." 
•Slaaisoperflel: 53240). 

BALLET— Jan. 10: “The Fairy Doll" 
(Hassreiter). 

OPERA — Jan. 6 and 11: “The Queen 
of Spades" (Tchaikovsky). 

Jan. 7: “Lohengrin" (Wagner). 

Jan. 8: "Elektra" (R_ Strauss). 

Jan. 9: “II BarbierediSiviglia” (Rossi- 
ni). 

OPERETTA — Jan. 5: “Die Fleder- 
maus” (J. Strauss). 

•Theater an der Wien (tel: 57.96.32). 
MUSICAL— Jan. 5-6. 10-11: “Cals" 
(Lloyd Webber). 

•Volksoperild: 53240). 

OPERETTA — Jan. 5: “The Csardas 
Princess" ( Kalman). 

Jan. 6: “The Merry Widow" ( Lehar). 

BELGIUM 


ANTWERP. Roval Flemish Opera 
(tel: 233.66.85). 

BALLET — Jan. 5: “Coppelia" ( Saint- 
Leon. Delibes). 

OPERA — Jan. 6, 9, 1 1: “Samson et 
Dalila" (Saint-SaCos). 

BRUSSELS, Bellevue Museum 
(161:511.4425). 

EXHIBITION —To Jan. 20:"Colum- 
bian Gold Artifacts." 

• Palais des Beaux Arts! tel: 5 1 129.95). 
CONCERT —Ian. 1 1 : Flanders nil- 
harmonic Orchestra, Francois Huy- 
brechis conductor ( Bach, Sibelius). 

DENMARK 

COPENHAGEN, Nikolaj Gallery 
(tel: 13.1626). 

EX HI BITIONS— To March 3: “Sovi- 
et Revolution Posters," “Aboriginal 
Art." 

•Radio House Concert Hall ltd: 
35.06.47). 

CONCERT— Jan. 6: Radio Light Or- 
chestra. Raman Zdlinger conductor 
(Mozart, Strauss). 

•Tivoli Hail (Id: 14.17.65). 

OPERA — Jan. 5: “La Traviata" (Ver- 
di). 

Jan. I I: “Cavalleria Rusticana" (Ma- 

MxfsIcAL — Jan. 5, 7-1 1: “Guys and 
Dolls” (Loesser). 

ENGLAND 


“Chagall." 

•Royal Opera (id: 240.10.66). 
BALLET — Jan. 8: “Swan Lake" 1 Pe- 
tipa/ Ivanov, Tchaikovsky). 

Jan. 9: “Nutcracker" (Ivanov, Tchai- 


kovsky). 
Jan. 10: “ 


“Cinderella" (Ash ion. Profcof- 


songs and poetry (Okudzhava, 
kin. Pasternak). 

GERMANY 


BERLIN. Deutsche Oper (tel: 
341.44.49). 


DCHIBrnON — To Jan. 20: “The BALLET — Jan. 5: “Nutcracker" 
Spirit of Christmas with the Nutcrack- (Ivanov. Tchaikovsky). 

t ■» j ,, U|V - . Jan. II: "Les Intcrmiitences du 
OPERA — Jan.7andll: DieZauber- Coeur" (Petit. Debussy Wagner) 
fldte" (Mozart). OPERA— Jan. 7: “Aida" (Verdi). 

* 2 V 3 - l 3 L- Jan- 8: “11 Trovatorc" (Verdi). 


“Georg® Jan.’ 9: “The Mamageof Figaro" (Mo- 


Stubbsf 1724- 1806)." £rt»' * ^ 

- Jan. IQ: “The Merry Wives of Wind- 
To Mar. 31 : William James Muller, sor" (Nicolai) 

“John Walker Prints 1976-1984." •Philhannome(td: 25.48.80). 

^ ^bert Museum (td: CONCERTS — Berlin Philharmonic 
589.63.7 1). Orchestra — Jan. 5 and 6- Riccardo 

|XH|BmON-ToFeb.28:“BriLish Muti conductor 1 Bach, Bruckner). 
Biscuit Tins. Jan. 8 and9: Riccardo Muti conductor. 

Jan^: Thomas WilUams Palmer Trio l in cn *>o, 


delTAccademia Nazionale de Santa 
Cecilia, Gerd Albrecht conductor 
(Ravel, Orff). 

TURIN. Teatro Regiorid: 54.80.00). 
BALLET — Jan. 9-1 1: Ballet Thedtre 
Francois ( Rudolf Nureyev). 

OPERA — Jan. 6: “Maria D'Alessan 
dria'*(Ghedini). 


TOKYO. Idemitsu Art Gallery (tel: 
2 13 J 128). 

EXHIBITION— To Feb. 3: “The In 
lerinfluence of Ceramic Art in East 
and WesL 
• Kanagawa Ken mi c Hall (tel: 
662.59.01). 

Jan. 13: Yomiuri Nippon Symphony 
Orchestra, Seiichi Miisuishi con due- 


by R.W. Apple Jr. 

E ACH generation makes its owtt list 
of ibe greatest artists of (he past; it 
is not uncommon for someone who 
was little known in his own life- 
time, like Vermeer, to be judged a paragon 
hundreds of years later. In our own day, 
perhaps the most dramatic example of the 
upgrading of a painter’s reputation is that of 
Piero deua Francesca, that mysterious ge- 
nius of the quattrocento from the Tuscan 
backwater of Sansepolcro. Almost ignored 
in the 19th century (Ruslan barely mentions 
him), Piero is acknowledged today to be one 
of the greatest artists who ever lived, worthy 
or comparison to Leonardo or Van Eyck. 

His relatively few surviving pictures ap- 
peal strongly to our modern eyes, condition- 
ed as they are by Cubism 'and Gfczanne, 
because he was a master of geometry and 
volume. There is something almost abstract 
in his faces, and there are no grandiose 
flourishes. As Aldous Huxley, a great admir- 
er. put it: “A natural spontaneous and un- 
pretentious grandeur — this is the leading 
quality or all Piero's work. He is majestic 
without being at all strained, theatrical or 
hysterical — as Handel is majestic, not as 
Wagner.” To which I would add that Piero 
infuses his subjects with a timeless serenity 
that is devoid of sweetness. It is that which 
guarantees, in the words of the late Kenneth 
Clark, that he will remain on the creative 
pinnacle “even when the tide of taste that 
carried him there has withdrawn.” 


We know relatively little about his life 
not even, for sure, to whom he was appren 
ticed, although it is thought likely that be 
first worked with Domenico Veneziano. He 


was born about 1420 in Sansepolcro (some- 
times called Borgo San Sepolcro), a town in 
the upper Tiber Valley between Assisi and 
Florence, and spent most of his life there, 
dying there on OcL 12, 1492 — Lhe very day 
that another Italian, Christopher Columbus, 
made his momentous discovery on the other 
side of the world. But he also worked in 


Florence and Urbino, in Ferrara and Rimini 


and he clearly came into contact with and 
was deeply influenced by the work of the 
Florentine Masaccio and Lhe Flemish Rogier 
van der Weyden, who also spent time in 
Ferrara. 


American museums, so rich in the work of 


so many Old Masters, afford little opportu 
nity to relish the genius of Piero della Fran 
cesca. In New York, there is only the Frick 
Collection's fragment of the great SL Augus- 
tine altarpiece, painted for Sansepolcro; two 
other fragments, one in the Frick, the other 
in the National Gallery in Washington, were 
probably done by an assistanL The only 
other universally acknowledged Pieros in the 
United States are in New England — a 
“Virgin and Child with Four Angels” at the 
Garlc Institute in Williamstown, Massachu- 
setts, and a powerful “Hercules” in the Isa 
bella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston. 



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Piero's “ Resurrection ,m in Sansepolcro. 


AndsnonVnlM 


•Ko 

CIR 

irakuen ata 
CUS— T 

aiumdel 
o Feb. 1 

Great American Circus. 


(Schumann. Brahms). 

RECITALS — Jan. 5: Micfade Cara- 
pandla piano (Mozart Beethoven). 
Jan. 7: Christian Lindberg/Jakob 
Lindberg trombone (Frescobaldl We- 
ber). 

Jan. 8: Ann Mackay soprano, Geof- 
frey Parsons piano (Mozart. R. 
Strauss). 

Jan. 10: Landini Consort (Landini). 
Jan. 1 1 : Emanuel Vandi viola. Kathron 
Sturrock piano (Bach, Nardini). 

FRANCE 


PARIS. Centre Georges Pompidou 
(tel: 277.12.33). 


tische Kunsl (tel: 40J0J8). 
EXHIBITION— ToJan. 13:“Korean 
Art" 

•Oper der Stadt (td: 2125.81 ). 
OPERETTA — Jan. 5: “Die FJedcr- 
maus"(J. Strauss). 

•ROmisch-Germanisches Museum 
(tel: 221.23.04). 

EXHIBITION — To Jan. 27: "The 
Treasures of San Marco." 
FRANKFURT. Alle Oper (lei: 
134.04.00). 

BALLET — Jan. 7: "Swan Lake" (Pe- 
tipa/ Ivanov, Tchaikovsky). 
CONCERTS— Jan. 10 and 1 1 : Radio 
Symphony Orchestra of Frankfurt. 
Hiafau Inbal conductor, Stefan Ka- 
masa viola (Tchaikowsky). 


•Tokyo Bunka Kaikan net 
82821.il). 

Jan. 8: Japan Philharmonic Orchestra, 
Willi Boskovsky conductor (J. 
Strauss). 

Jan. 9: Tokyo Philharmonic Orches- 
tra. Tadaaki Otaka conductor (Bee- 
thoven, Stravinsky). 

Jan. 10: Yomiuri" Ni 
Orchestra. Seiichi Miisuishi am due 
lor (J. Strauss). 

Jan. 14: New Japan Philharmonic Or- 
chestra, Takashi Asahina conductor 
(Tchaikovskv). 



AMSTERDAM, Museum Fodor(td. 


-r , -.o OPERETTA —Jan. 5: “Gasparone" 

^ (MfllScker). 


dinsky^ 'TTomage to KdmweUer.” RECITAL — Jan. 10: McKenzie- 

Tri £ ^ Ware DuofBa^, Honogv). 
EXHIBITION— To Jan. 26. Fred «Cafc Theater (id: TT.'mIM). 
raereiL THEATER— Jan. 6, 8-11: The Roar 

^'¥; IO i' a n 7 . or the Greasepaint -The Smdl of the 

EXHIBITIONS — To Jan. 7. Crowd" (Newley). 

T^8: 5 wS(1684-172I)." HAMBURG, Staatsoper (tel: 

To Feb. 4: “Zhongshan: Tombs of .”1 . - . _ „ . „ 

Foigonen Kings.” SiK 

•Mus6edu Louvre (id: 260J926). Jan. 8: "Homage lo George Balan- 
EXHIBITIONS — To Jan, 28: chine" (Balanchine/ Nmmeier.Tchai- 
“ French Drawings of the 17th Cemu- kovsky). 

? <■" OPERA — Jan. 6: “Lohengrin” (Wag- 

o April 15: “Holbein." ner). 

• Musee du Luxembourg (tel: Jan. 9 “Cosi Tan tutle" (Mozart). 
23425.95). Jan. 1 1: “Don Carlos" (Verdi). 

MUNICH, National Theater (td: 
lyte, Auguste and Paul Flandrin. 22 13 16) 

■Palais des Sports (td: 828.40.90). OPERA — Jan. 5: “Madame Butter- 

O RCUS — To Jan. 1 3: Moscow Or- fly" (Puccini). 

cus. Jan. 6 and 9: “Arabella" (R. Strauss). 


ftSs-PSr 1 " Barbi “ n CCQtrC <lCl: -SdlcPleyd riel: 563.88.73). 

O-T - To ia, 
wJi” 7: “ Fo " i Nalivi,i “ 01 "" 

To Jin 20: nre Tusol 1836- ***** “-duclor (Hnndnl 

Barbican Hall — Jan. 8-1 1: BBCSym- •ThWlre des Champs Elysees (id: 


EXHIBITION —To Jan: 20: “Dutch 
Drawings Since 1 945." 
•Rembrandlhuis(ld: 24.94.86). 
EXHIBITION — To Jan. 6: “Rem- 
brandt as Teacher. 

•Rijksmuseum Vincent Van Gogh 
(td: 76.48.81). 

EXHIBITION —To April l5:“Duich 
Identic 
•Stedc 
EXHIB 

Grande Parade." 

•WiUet-Hdthuysen (td: 26.4290). 
EXHIBITION — To Jan. 13: “Mas- 
terworks in SQver. 


O see Piero whole, one must devote 
several days to the project and visit 
the places south and southeast of 
Florence where much of his best work re- 
mains: Arezzo, a somewhat forbidding 
place, and Perugia, self-confident on its hill 
top, and Monterchl an out-of-the-way ham 
let that most travelers speed past, and Sanse- 
polcro itself, a compact little town of 6,000 
people with ridged red roofs, and Urbino, 
the city of Raphael, with its glorious Ducal 
Palace, and finally Rimini, now a grotesque- 
ly overbuilt resort. There are other Piero 
masterpieces to be seen elsewhere in Europe, 
but not many: more about them later. A 
good approach is to take a three-day trip, 
starting and ending in Florence, traversing 
some magnificent scenery, but concentrating 
on this one great artisL (On the way you will 
not want to miss the Fra Angelicos in Corto- 
na or the Giottos in Assisi; the Blue Guide to 
Northern Italy will lead you to those delights 
and many more, but you will have to length 
en your trip accordingly.) 

While you are visiting the UffizL before 
setting off, take special note of the Urbino 
diptych, which depicts Federico da Monte- 
feluo. Duke of Urbino — a celebrated gener- 
al who was the sworn enemy of Piero’s early 
patron. Sigismondo Malatesta — and his 
wife, Battista Sforza. They face each other in 
profile, against a panoramic landscape: she 
wan and almost lifeless, in jewels and clothes 


rendered with a Flemish passion for detail 
he hook-nosed, dark and powerful in a sim- 
ple red cassock and matching fiat haL On the 
reverse they approach each other in ceremo- 
nial chariots, accompanied by various Vir- 

I tues; beneath are verses extolling his tri- 
umphs and her restraint. The handling of 
color and Light is incredibly deft and deli 
cate, never melodramatic. 

Arezzo, just 50 miles (80 kilometers) down 


cus. jun- o anu (iv ouau»j. 

•Salle Pleyet (lei: 563.88.73). Jan. 8 and 11: “Joan of .Arc at the 

CONCERTS— Jan. 7: Orchestra Co- Slake" (Honegger), 
lonne, Claude Bardon conductor Jan. 10: “Adriana Lecouvreur” (G- 


f an 9 and 10: Orchestra de Paris, Dan- 
iel Barenboim conductor (Handel 
Beethoven). 


phony Orchestra, Peter Edrv&s con- 723.3627). 
ductor (Stockhausen). CONCERT — Jan. 8: Orchestra Na- 

Barfaican Theatre — Royal Shake- banal de France, Tanias Vasary cou- 
pe Company — Jan. 7-1 1: “Peter ductor (Mozart). 

’ (Barrie). OPERA — To Jan. 7: “La Pfiricbole" 

tlsh Museum (tel: 636. 15.55). (Offenbach). 

1 1 BITIONS —To Jan. 31 ; “Japa- RECITAL — Jan. 9: Marilyn Home. 
Painting* fmm ihe Hnrari CrJlec- •Theatre du Rond-Polni (tel: 


Pan” (Barrie). 

•British Museum (tel: 636. 1 5.55). 
EXH I BITIONS —To Jan. 31 : “Japa- 
nese Paintings from the Harari Collec- 
tion." “Prims in Germany 1880-1933." 
To March 10: "The Golden Age or An- 
glo-Saxon Art: 966-1066." 

•Hayward Gallery (tel: 928.57.08). 
EXHIBITIONS —To Jan. 6: “Henri 
Matisse Sculpture and Drawings." 

To Anril 30: “Renoir." “John Walker: 


256.70.80). 

CONCERT — Jan. 6: Nouveau Trio 


HONGKONG 

HONG KONG. Citv Hall Concert 
Hall (teL 790.7521). 

CONCERTS — Hong Kong Philhar- 
monic Orchestra — Jim. 6: Kenneth 
Scherraerboni conductor, Judith Hen- 
ley soprano (J. Strauss). 

Jan. 11 and 12: Kenneth Schermer- 
hom conductor. Monique Duphil pi- 
ano (Bernstein, Bruckner). 

ISRAEL 


To April 30: “Renoir." “John Walker: de Madame Angot" (Lecocq). 
Paintings from the AJba and Oceania Jan. 6, 8, 10: "Die Fledermaus" (J. 
Series." Strauss). 

•National Theater (tei: 9282252). RECITAL— Jan. 7: Teresa Berganza 
THEATER — Jan.7andl0:“Concrfa- mezzo-soprano, Julian Alvarez Perajo 
nus" (Shakespeare ). piano (Schubert Schumann). 


Pasquier ( Schubert. Brahms). ISRAEL 

•Tne&tre Musical de Paris (tel: 

233 44 44) 

OPERETTA— Jan. 5.9. 11 :“LaFiiie JERUSALEM, Israel Museum (td: 


69.8211). 

EXHIBITIONS — To Feb. 28: 
"Eliahu Gat-Women and Nature,” 

“A Vanished World - Roman Vish- 
niac." photographs. 

ITALY 


556.8921). 

EXHIBITION — To Jan 31: “Turner 
Watercdors. 

•Usher Hall (tel: 228. 1 1 25). 
CONCERT — Jan. 11: Scottish Na 
liana) Orchestra, Vernon Handley 
conductor, Paul Tortelier cdlo (Bizet, 
Berlioz). 

GLASGOW. Theatre Royal (tel: 
331.12.34). 

OPERA — Jan. 9: "Capriccio" (R. 
Strauss). 


BARCELONA. Gran Team del Lkeu 
(tel: 318.9277). 

OPERA — Jan. 5. 8, 10: “Tosca” (Puc- 
cini). 

MADRID. Teatro Real (tel 
248.38.75). 

CONCERTS— Jan. 10 and ] 1: Span 
ish Radio-Television Orchestra and 
Chorus, Mi 
ductor (Bee 
Jan. II: Spanish National Orchestra 
and Chorus, Maxinriano Valdes con 
ductor (Schumann, Saini-Saens). 


the autostrada, was the birthplace of Pe- 
trarch, the poet, of Guido, who invented our 
musical scale, and of Vasari, the artist and 
biographer of artists. But it owes its modem 
fame to Piero, who painted a St. Mary Mag- 
dalen in the cathedral about 1466, and cov- 
ered the choir in the Church of San 
Francesco with his mighty frescoes of the 
Legend of the True Cross. 


Already hanging in flakes from the walls 
140 years ago. they have been repeatedly 
restored, most recently according to a system 
whereby heavily damaged areas have been 
filled in with a distracting, supposedly neu- 
tral buff color. The lighting is not all that it 
might be. the church is often crowded and 
tour guides deliver their spiels, usually full of 
misinformation, in voices better suited to the 
parade ground. But the pictures are great 
enough to withstand all of that and more. 
Symmetry vying with irregularity, the pale- 
ness of the palette and the skillful and unob- 
trusive use or perspective combine to yield a 
remarkable monumentality. The Queen of 
Sheba adores the wood from which the cross 
was made and visits Solomon in two of the 
most famous scenes: Constantine and Hera- 
dius defeat infidels in two others. “The 
Dream of Constantine” is usually counted as 
the most dramatic of Piero's visions. For me, 
the most gripping passage in the frescoes is 
not any of the hundreds of human figures 
that are to be seen or glimpsed, but the 
rearing gray horse at the extreme left of 
Constantine s victory, seemingly ready to 
gallop off the wall washed by what Clark 
calls “Lhe most perfect morning light in ail of 
Renaissance painting." 

After lunch, make for Perugia, like Arezzo 
an old Eiruscan city. As H.V. Morton re- 
marks in “A Traveler in Italy.” the curious, 
haughty beauty of Piero's women has an 
Eiruscan quality about il and so do many of 
the faces you will see as you stroll down the 
Corso Vannucci, Perugia's main street, to the 
National Gallery of Umbria. One of the 
least-known of the great museums of Italy, it 
contains major works by Perugino and Pin- 
turicchio. a rare if wretchedly preserved ex- 
ample of the work of Domenico Veneziano. 
and a polyptych attributed to Piero. .After 
Arezzo, you will have no difficulty in coming 
to the same conclusion as the experts — that 
most of it is the clumsy work of others: but 
the Annunciation at the top, especially the 
brilliant perspective and the glowing color of 
the colonnade, is pure Piero. 

Route S3-bis leads north along the Tiber 
to Cittd di Castdlo. and from there you fork 
left on S22I to Monterchl where Piero’s 
mother was born. Monterchl is relegated to 
the small print by the guidebooks, and until 
recently there were no signs lo tell the travel- 
er that there was anything to detain him. I 
was taken there many years ago by an old 
friend, Raimonda Buitbni. a Piero fanatic 
who lives in Perugia, and I have been back 


xl 





KoTrri 3 rrr kwa 


WEEKEND 


GENEVA, Petit Palais (td: 46. 1423) 

I BOLOGNA. Teatro Comunale (tel: EXHIBITIONS— To Jan. 15: “Stein 
**■» 70 091 len. 

OPERETTA — Jan. 8-9. II: “The . K-Gossch 'JOO-IDM.** 


HOTELS 


HOVEL LUTETIA MRS **** 

FT 31S PBt KRSON 

pauw occummcy ■ "a* mb* a mmch hi 

A nADmONAL 1W STVlt 
MNOVATOI HOTB. 

HOHT M WE WAIT OF MURK 
300 KXMH. ABt CCVUTiaMNG AND 
SOUNDPROOF WINDOWS ON lOUtfVAlD 
COCKTAM- LOUNGE AND 
TYPICAL MH9AN RESTAURANT 

4S, Bd. Ih^di-7S0M-W p) 54AM.I0 
— - ....i-WmWUM 


HOLIDAYS 


ROME 

RESIDENTIAL AREA 

Lovely apartments by day, by week or 
by month. Direct phone, autonomous 
heating, bar, restaurant, garage, 
24 houriervloB. 

RESIDENCE 

CORTINA D'AMPEZZO 
. (39-6] 3387012 - 3387015. - 


Mazy Widow” (L6har). 

MILAN. Teatro alia Scala f tel: 
80.91.26). 

OPERA — Jan. 5, 8, 10: “Carmen’' 
(Bizet). 

Jan. 6, 9, 1 1: “U Barbiere di Siviglia" 
(Rossini). 

RECITAL — Jan. 7: Renata Scouo 
soprano. Thomas Fulton piano (Scar- 
latti, Respighi). 

PARMA. Teatro Regjottd: 22003). 
RECITAL — Jan. 10: Renata Scdto 
soprano, Thomas Fulton piano (Scar- 
latti, Respighi). 

ROME. Accademia Nazionatedi San- 
ta Cecilia ( td : 679.03.89). 
CONCERTS — Jan. 6-8: Orchestra 


ZURICH. Operaha us (id: 251.6920). 
BALLET — Jan. 6 and 1!: “Time Out 
or Mind" (MacDonald, Crest on). 
OPERA —Jan. 5: "Tosca" (Puccini). 
Jan. 10: “Don Pasquole" (Donizetti). 


NEW YORK. Lincoln Center (td: 
870.59.60). 

New York Ci ty Bai let — Jan. 10: “Jew- 
ds"( Balanchine, Fau re, Stravinsky). 
•Guggenheim Museum (tel: 
360.35.00). 

EXHIBITION —To Feb. 3: "Robert 
Motherwell." 



several times; the Madonna del Parto in a 
tiny chapel in the village cemetery, below the 
old ramparts, may not be the artist’s master- 
piece. but it is my" favorite. Only a small altar 
shares the chapel with the fresco, which 
shows two angels drawing back the flaps of a 
vaguely Arab tent and. in the center, the 
virgin' obviously pregnant, her dress open 
down the front aha seemingly too small to fit 
over her swollen belly, to which she points. 
Her face, as Kenneth Gark points out, has 
the calm, detached beauty of a Buddha. The 
impact of lhe painting itself can only be 
increased by (he knowledge that this icon of, 
birth stands amid memorials to Lhe dead^;- 
beginning among ends. 

From Monterchl it will take you only a 
few minutes, following route S73, to reach 
Sansepolcro. The local picture gallery, 
housed in the Town Hall, is blissfully re- 
laxed, a world away from the guards and 
crowds of the Uffizi or the Louvre. Yet it 
contains, in a single room, a charming por- 
trait of Sl Julian, discovered only in 1954, 
which may be a fragment of the same work 
from which the Hercules in Boston came: the 
early Madonna della Misericordia, partly by 
assistants, but with a luminous portrait of 
the Virgin at the center, in which she shelters 
worshipers with her cloak; and the “Resur- 
rection of Christ.” The last is a picture of 
awesome power, perfectly preserved by the 
whitewash that covered it for centuries. Four 
Roman soldiers have fallen asleep beside the 
sarcophagus, three of them with their hel- 
mets on, all of them sprawled awkwardly. In 
the pale light of dawn, Christ towers above 


Detail from the frescoes in Arezzo. 


them, bold as the Pantocrator in the conch of 
a Byzantine church yet intensely spiritual, 
staring straight ahead with one foot posed on 
His tomb. If any artist ever succeeded ii£ 
cap Luring the dual nature of the Savior, goC§ 
in man, it was Piero in this painting. Huxley 
was transported by it; "It stands there before 
us in entire and actual splendor,” he wrote, 
“the greatest picture in the world.” 

T HE S73-bis loops up out of the valley 
and across the lulls toward the coast, a 
time-consuming if lovely journey to- 
day that must have been physically punish- 
ing when Piero frequently made it in the 15th 
century. Urbino is 42 miles away, the seat of 
the Montefeltros from Lhe 12tb to the 17th 
centuty and the object of artistic pilgrimages 
ever since, despite its remote location.^ The 
town is dominated by the Dural Palace, the 
masierwork of Luciano l-ain - ana and one of 
the greatest of all Renaissance buildings, in 
which the National Gallery of the Marches is 
laid out. Curiously, Lhe museum has only one 
Raphael and a relatively minor one at that/ 
but it has two Pieros. “The Flagellation oi 
Christ,” one of his most perfect pictures, 
almost Euclidian in its logic and precision, is 
not really about Lhe flagellation at all; it is 
instead a portrait of the three important men 
in Lhe right foreground, while the abuse of 
Christ in Lhe left background represents an 
event in their lives or perhaps the subject of 
their thoughts. The Sinigallia Madonna is 
much less satisfying, with a Christ child of a 
strangely middle-aged aspect and an angel 
who looks more like a school prefect. (The 
museum also has another picture, the fam- 
ous “Perspective View of an Ideal Town.” 
that is sometimes attributed to Piero, but the 
museum no longer considers it his work. It 
remains fascinating.) 

Our final destination is Rimini, an easy 
hour's drive up route S423 and then along 
the coast on the autostrada. There, in Alber- 
ti's intriguing Malatesta Temple, a combina- 
tion of church and temporal shrine, you will 
find above the door in the Chapel of Relics 
Piero’s heraldic depiction of the tyrant Ma- 
latesia kneeling before his patron^ SL Sips-* 
m und. He is as hawklike as nis enemy. Mon- 
tefeltro. The fresco has crumbled badly, bill 
Malatesta's face, the architectural frame, the 
rich green swag across the top and Lhe two 
magnificently painted hounds in the lowo- 
right remain to remind us of what was. 

From Rimini, one can take the autostrada 
to the Forli turnoff, then take S67 back to 
Florence. That will permit a luncheon stop at 
Gianfranco Bolgnesi's charming restaurant. 
La Frasca, in Castrocaro Terme, before 
heading across the moun tains . The rest of 
Piero’s major works are all in big cities, so 
you can see them in the course of other trips: 
the Sl Jerome in the Accademia at Venice; 
the Madonna in the Brera Gallery in Milan, 
with an egg (symbolizing the creation?) sus- v 
pended over her head, which sprang back to' 
life after an extensive recent restoration, and 
the Baptism of Christ the Nativity and St. 
Michael (another fragment from the Sl Au- 
gustine altarpiece) — all in the National 
Gallery. London, The Baptism, with its hov- 
ering dove, its keenly observed landscape, its 
three angels and its shadowless sumpUious- 
ness of coloring, is much the finest work by 
Piero outside Italy. ■ 

'' /W The York Tima 


ul‘l! 
il U‘* 


- — * 


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* 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 4, 1985 


ir.'.T.-' * 7 .? 


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*£>*• 

■v ••- W>'S1 

■ : : -’uiS 






that’s Doing in Brussels 


TRAVEL 


by Paul Lev»i s 

Brus “k is one or Eu- 

2 W«» comfortable and 

mend!} cities. Gening around is 
easy; parks and museums are un 
crowded and scantily attended; 

bous^ seems to be a restaurant and often a 
jupreingly good one; people ar^Ed 
Englijh is almost a national language. 

,SP llaL thc seal Ii,c E«ro- 

^ V mi ^oth bureaucracy 

4od fcme-away-from-homc for countless 
cations. Brussels is a cosmopolitan 
aty. P[ multitude of nationalities rub shoul- 
the slrecls * wh ile restaurants and 
g»t4s cater to a wide variety of tastes in 
food ad entertainment. Yet underneath this 
easygpng. international exterior. Belrium’s 
capiui is in a state of nux. Its center of 
^avit is shifting subtly, fragmenting into 
rival ?eas, each with its own offerings. 

Fotsome visitors the city is important 
todayas the sue of Europe’s newest Modern 
Art huseurn. For others it has become one 
of th roost lively centers of the antiques 
uade English speakers value the amount of 
Enghh-langoage entertainment available — 
;rar tore than in any other Continental city 
.As fc restaurants. Brussels has a! wavs had 
man; of course, but new pockets of gastron- 
omy tre opening up. 


A decade or so ago, thc social epicenter 
of Brussels, the area to which visitors 
automatically gravitated, was thc 
Place de Broucktre. dominated by the old 
Metropole Hotel with the Theatre Royal de 
la Monnaie (opera and ballet) a block away, 
and the Boulevards Anspadi and Adolphe 
Max. a bustling thoroughfare of commerce 
dividing the city in half. Today, this pan of 
town seems increasingly shabby, dark and 
run-down. By contrast, the Grand "Place, 
which has always been the city’s greatest 
gory, is becoming even more attractive os 
more entry streets are confined to pedestri- 
ans. reducing the flow of traffic through 
Europe's finest medieval square. Why they 
refuse to ban vehicles outright, as conserva- 
tionists demand, remains a mystery. 

Old favorites are still there. At the Roi 
d’Espagne Cafe in the northwest corner, pa- 
trons quaff their beer under inflated pigs’ 
bladders in the company of a stuffed horse. 
At night, the gold-painted facades of the old 
Guild Houses are magnificently illuminated, 
while on Saturday and Sunday morning, 
when traffic is excluded, the celebrated flow- 
er market lights up the Grand’Place with a 
quite different array of colors. 

A short distance from the south side of the 
square is the renowned fountain of Manne- 
ken Pis, a bronze statuette of an unabashed 
cherub. To the north, the Petite Rue des 
Bouchers still leads into Europe’s single 
most densely concentrated mass of gastro- 
nomic excellence. And at this time of year. 




*rps& da £- 

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many of the restaurants packed into these 
tiny streets offer a splendid array of game 
from the Ardennes Fores L 


-m 


After dinner, the cozy Estaminei on thc 
Grasraarku a liny bar with antique oak 
benches, is still the place for a nightcap of 
Gueuze, die bitter brer brewed without yeast 
and found only in Brussels. The more adven- 
turous may try La Mort Subite, the echoing 
student caf£ on thc Rue Montagne aux 
Herbes Po Lagers, which hasn’t seen a paint 
pot in this century. 

Yet, while the Grand" Place and its envi- 
rons are deservedly the city's single biggest 
tourist attraction, other areas are bidding for 
attention. None more so than the area be- 
tween the Place Rqyale and the Grand and 
Petit Sablon squares. The artistic event of 
the decade in Brussels was the opening in 
October of the new Modem An Museum to 
coincide with the modernization of the old 
Beaux Arts Museum, which adjoins it on the 
southern side of the Place Royale. The result 
is a huge museum complex, covering the 
entire histoiy of Wesiera art and now one of 
ihe most modem and best arranged and 
lighted collections in Europe. 

The visitor entering the Beaux Arts from 
the Rue de la R£gence first wanders through 
its high 19th-centtuy galleries, which house 
the museum’s 16th-. 17lh- and 18th-century 
collection, now rehung with greatly im- 
proved lighting. A separate part of the old 
museum building displays its medieval mas- 
ters, including a special section devoted en- 
tirely to BruegheL A short passageway leads 
from the old museum into the stylish new 
Modem Art Museum, an underground laby- 
rinth consisting of eight semicircular, sunken 
floors, with windows looking out on a huge 
conical light shaft with a pond at the bottom. 
Although the modem section contains works 
by Henry Moore and Arp, its collection is 
devoted mainly to Belgian artists, including 
Ensor, Delvaux and Magritte. Belgian art 
may not be the most exciting, but the muse- 
um makes the best of it. Admission to the 
museums, which are open daily, except 
Monday, from 10 AM. to 5 P.M., is free. The 
new museum also allows access to a redeco- 
rated 18th-century palace, Altenloh, on the 
edge of the Mont de la Cour. Its dazzling 
white and gold facade is reminiscent of the 
Baroque palaces of Vienna. 

Only a few yards away, the Rue de la 
R6gence leads into the Square du Petit Sab- 
lon, a pretty square, floodlit ai night, with a 
garden in the center surrounded by 48 col- 
umns, each bearing a statue representing a 
traditional Brussels craft Below the Petit 
Sablon is the Place du Grand Sablon. a much 
bigger square, full of antique shops and, on 
Saturdays and Sundays, the site of a big 
antique fair that many people believe is one 
of the best in Europe. Certainly, the selection 
seems just as good as in the more fashionable 
areas of Paris’s Flea Market, and prices are 
definitely lower. After inspecting these stalls, 
walk a quarter-mile along the Rue Haute to 
the capital's own Flea Market, centered in 
the Place du Jeu de Balle. It displays an 
enticing pile of old Belgian junk, including 
everything you don't need but cannot live 
without. Bargain ruthlessly. 

Thc Sablons, once a rather poor area, is ' 



The Palais de Justice seen from Place Royale . 

becoming a distinctly fashionable neighbor- paneled di 
hood as developers snap up the old Flemish an open Hi 
houses near the square and turn them into menu at 1, 
expensive homes and apartments. Smart Theresiau. 
shops and restaurants are sprouting all over lunch, foil 
the place. No surprise, then, that in Belgian rounding fc 
French, the equivalent of gentrification is 
Sablonisanon. 


paneied dining room in the old abbey, with 
an open fire at one end. Try the immense set 
menu at 1 .300 Belgian francs (without wine). 
The restaurant is an ideal place for a Sunday 
lunch, followed by a tramp into the sur- 
rounding beech woods. 


% V T HILE Belgians expect to eat copi- 

\\/ ously. they also like to dine in grand 

▼ V style. The Maison du Cygne. on the 
Grand’Place at No. 9 (tel: 511.8144). is 
grand and comfortable and offers diners one 
of the most spectacular views in Europe. Try 
thefewlleiif de lurbot et homord, a mixture of 
turbot and lobster in flaky pastry. Expect to 
pay at least 1000 Belgian francs (about S32) 
a head, excluding wine. 

Less opulent but serving finer food — it 
has three Michelin stars — is Comxne Chez 
Sol 23 Place Rouppe (tel: 5 12291 1), a short 
walk away. This is a small serious-minded 
restaurant where reservations are essential 
Specialties include a lofcvster casserole. Din- 
ner will cost at least 3.000 Belgian francs, 
with wine, a person. Among the many good 
restaurants concentrated in the Petite Rue 
des Bouchers area are Chez Vincent. Aux 
Armes de Bruxelles and Chez Leon. Dinner 
at these will cost around 750 Belgian francs. 

The thick forests that surround the city 
and are one of its glories hide expensive 
restaurants like the noted Villa Lorraine on 
the Avenue du Vivier d’Oie (tel: 374 3 1.63). 
In summer eat outside on a shaded terrace 
surrounded by woods. Specialties include 
escallops of duck liver cooked with figs and. 
in winter, venison cutlets cooked with truf- 
fles. Count on from 3,000 Belgian francs a 
head. Bui the woods also harbor such less 
grand eating places as the Abbaye du Rouges 
Cloitre, off the Chaussee de Tervuren (tel: 
672.45-25). Here, meals are served in a long. 


T HE best expensive hotel is the Amigo 
(tel: 511.59.10), a fine old Flemish 
palace with tapestries on the walls 
and flagged stone floors, just behind the 
Grand’Place. A double room and bath costs 
around 4,000 Belgian francs a night. More 
modem and still close to the city center is the 
Royal Windsor (tel: 511.42.15) on the Rue 
Duquesnoy. where rooms are 4.000 to 5,000 
Belgian francs. The Astoria (tel: 217.62.90), 
103 Rue Royale, is a hotel in the grand old 
European style that has fallen on hard rimes 
but it offers good value at 2,000 to 3,000 
Belgian francs. For a clean, inexpensive fam- 
ily hotel, try die du Congr&s on the Rue du 
Congr6s(td: 217.18.90). It has no frills but is 
quite central and gives sound value at less 
than 2.000 Belgian francs a room. The Brit- 
ish Embassy often lodges f amili es there 
while they are looking for permanent accom- 
modations. 

A major innovation in recent years, and 
one reason the city is easy to move about in, 
is the Metro, a safe, clean, well-lighted sub- 
way that comes in from the eastern suburbs 
and cuts across the city. Tickets cost 28 
Belgian francs for any distance. But the 
Mfctro has also contributed to the shift in the 
city’s center, by linking the Quai aux Briques 
and the Place Sainte-Catherine on the west- 
ern side with the rest of town. An old canal 
where once barges canying fish from Ostend 
to the capita] were unloaded, has now been 
turned into a series of illuminated ponds 
leading down to the old Church of Sl Cath- 
erine. The merchants* warehouses on each 
ride are mostly restaurants, specializing in 


seafood. If you dine along the Quai aux 
Briques, the place for an aperitif beforehand 
is the Spinnekopke. an 1 8th -century Flemish 
farmhouse turned into a small bar and eat- 
ery. a couple of minutes' walk away on the 
Place Jar din aux Fleurs. 

So far as drinks are concerned, the city's 
speciality is Belgian beer, and there are more 
than 48 varieties, some in corked bottles, 
some drawn direct from the cask. Try Kriek, 
a cherry-flavored variety of Gueuze and 
much less bitter, or the raspberry beer called 
Framboise. The dark, sweet Trappist beers, 
made at local monasteries, are too heavy for 
some. But Oude Hoegaarden, unfiltered and 
fruity, is much lighter. Prices range from 60 
to 120 Belgian francs a glass. 

The city's weekly. English-language maga- 
zine, The Bulletin, lists all theaters, films and 
concerts, recommends restaurants and mu- 
seums and provides a synopsis of local news 
and features. In particular, it provides de- 
tails of English-language theater. The Bulle- 
tin is on sale all over town, at 50 Belgian 
francs, but buy a copy at the airport or 
station on arrival because it’s an indispens- 
able guide. Those interested in dance trill 
need no introduction to Maurice art’s 
Ballet of the 20th Century, which has been 
celebrating its 25th anniversary this year. 

For most of the winter this company will 
be at the Cirque Royal or the Theatre Royal 
de la Monnaie. featuring Bq art’s latest prin- 
cipal dancer, the American ballerina Snon- 
ach Mirk. Several new centers of theatrical 
activity this winter include Plan-K, a con- 
verted sugar mill on the Rue de Manchester, 
which offers a variety of plays in many 
languages as well as dance. In the suburbs 
are old favorites like the Erasmus House at 
Anderlecht, preserved as a museum and full 
of furniture, books and manuscripts that 
belonged to the great Renaissance scholar. 
Dosed Tuesday and Friday. ■ 

o IMS The New York Times 


Offbeat Guides for Travelers 


by James T. Yenckd 

■wr "W ~r ASHINGTON — So many new 
y.\llf travel guidebook series have ap- 
% l/u peared in the last few years that 
▼ It it’s often hard to decide which is 
"best fff your trip. Each offers something a 
bit dilerenL 

Anting the latest collections in U. S. 
bookjores are six offbeat series that origi- 
ns ted outside the United States. They are 
qualii’ alternatives to such st andar ds as Fo- 
, dor’aFielding’s. Frommer’s, Birabaum, Mi- 

3 and the Blue Guides. 

new series — Insight, Dumont, Corn- 
Guides, Travel Survival Kits, Gault- 
and Knopf's art guides — share a 
• conhon characteristic: They are aimed at 
■exp ienced travelers with a strong interest 
in li raing about the place they are visa ring. 
- 1 sir strength (with the exception of the 
Ga t-Millau restaurant series') is the in- 
.dq i detail they provide on history and 
cul re. You don’t buy one of these guides if 
* all hi are looking for is the most comfort- 
j^pblhoiel or a good beach resort. 

I most cases, the texts won’t become 
odated anytime soon, which mak e s the 


f good holiday gifts for travelers whose 
are still in the indefinite future. The 
to” advice has been relegated, quite 
• pperly, to an appendix, since it is assumed 
" any travelers already know how. 

' fwo of the series — Insight and Travel 
Svival Kits — feature less- visited Asian 
; a African nations and keep the Iow-bud- 
-g traveler very much in mind. Two others 
5 Dumont and Companion — are long- 
Jnding historical and cultural senes popu- 
Fin their home countries. The remaining 
“jo — Gault-MUlau and Knopf — are spe- 


njyr guiUGJ. . , 

I Each series (with one exceptioru noted 
■How) has been attractively designed. The 
generally, are excellent and the pboto- 

P appealing. These are books to read 
you go and to carry along on the tnp 

idy reference. 

^insight Guides 
P A sprightly series, lie Insight 

light contemporary life m a numbCT Oi 
Asian, Pacific and Western Hemispherena- 
ftibns. One of this 

(California," describes ‘The LA Sound, for 
•ST and notes in a chapta on The 
'Sbortine Lifestyle” that today s • boy-girl 
. city is “So wbtMtt do you 

: *orit out?” - 1070 rhe 5-. 

■ Originating in Singapore m 197a the» 
ries vras the idea of Hans Johannes Heeler, a 
. West German student of book 
who has Riven them a classy, well-packaged 
S- fotf of Rood, clear maps and splashy 

cdor photos. The series has 
STSTtities, which are released I in £ 
MJnited States by PrenUC^Hall the New 

^ P ^&cg«ha by tetuns of 

writers, ^toreand ^ 

on a special aspect of ^ p ro _ 

its moods, its ^ informed look 

vide an unusual as well as an 
at what makes Los A gc 


Among other destinations in the series: 
Ball Burma, Hong Kong. Indonesia, Java. 
Korea. Malaysia, Nepal, the Philippines, 
Singapore. Sri Lanka. Taiwan, Thailand, 
Australia. New Zealand, Hawaii the Ameri- 
can Southwest. Florida, Northern Califor- 
nia, New England and Mexico. (Prentice- 
Hafl. about $15 paper.) 

Travel Survival Kits 

This jaunty series is directed at individual 
travelers who shun escorted tours to explore 
remote parts on their own. As the name 
suggests, it presents the basic, practical in- 
formation needed to get along. The series got 
its start in 1974 when Tony and Maureen 
Wheeler, a British couple now living in Aus- 
tralia, toured Southeast Asia and produced 
what became a very popular guide for the 
world’s vagabond youth, “South-East Asia 
on a Shoestring," now in its fourth edition. 

Their firm. Lonely Planet, now has pub- 
lished more than 30 titles by a variety of 
authors and is one of Australia's largest 
independent publishers. Their latest bode, 
all 820 pages of it, is about China. The series 
has been distributed in the United States for 
about six years. 

The series is divided into two categories: 
“On a Shoestring." compact editions for the 
low-budget travel and “Travel Survival 
Kits,” appealing to a wider audience. 

The series’ authors tend to be young ad- 
venturers, and they bring a lively, upbeat 
tone to the lexis. These are attractive books 
with good maps and color photography. 
(Lonely Planet, from $7 to $15 paper for 
“Survival Kits" and $2.95 for phrasebooks.) 

Dumont Guides 

It’s the past — art, architecture and histo- 
ry — that is the focus Of this longtime Ger- 
man-language series, which is just now bring 
updated and translated for English-speaking 
readers. About 80 titles have been published 
in German in the last 20 years. The first two 
available in English are "Paris and the He de 
France” and "Ireland.” 

These books are written not by a team but 
by individual authors. They are experts in 
[heir field, says the publisher, who can bring 
to the books “sophisticated knowledge of art 
and history." Klaus Bussman, the author of 
the Paris book, is professor of an history at 
the Professional College in Mflnster. 

As an example of the historical detail 
included, the book devotes the first 100 of its 
519 pages to the rise of Paris from its begin- 
nings to the "Transformation of the City 

Since de Gaulle." 

The guides (to countries, regions and cit- 
ies) have been “extremely successful" in 
Germany, says the publisher, and are also 
being translated into Dutch. 

The firm plans to publish abouL six titles a 
year. Upcoming early next year are guides to 
the Greek islands, the French Riviera and 
the Loire Valley. A Tuscany guide is due in 
the fall. To follow are Egypt. Scandinavia, 
Mexico, Japan. India, London, Israel and 
South America. (Stewart, Tabori & Chang, 
about $13 to $15 paper.) 

Companion Guides 

Like DumonL ihese books have been pub- 
lished abroad for a number of years — 
beginning in the 1960s in Britain —and only 


in the last two years have been made readily 
available from a U.S. publisher. 

Their aim, loo, is lo provide an expert's 
guidance to understanding a country's his- 
torical and cultural heritage. 

The differences between the two series are 
in appearance and content The Dumont 
guides have a sleek, modern look to them 
with an easy-to-read page layout. The color 
photos are excellent. The look of the Com- 
panion guides, on the other hand, borders on 
the old-fashioned; they have fewer pictures, 
and these are black-and-white. 

But the Companion guides take a much 
broader look at a country, including exten- 
sive observations on the people and their 
customs. The Dumont series puis its empha- 
sis on full descriptions of art and architectur- 
al treasures. 

Sometimes a bit scholarly in tone, the 
Companions are often quite evocative of a 
place, and the subjective observations of the 
authors make pleasurable reading. 

Among other destinations in the Compan- 
ion series: Florence, Venice, the Greek is- 
lands, mainland Greece, the Loire, London, 
Normandy. Rome, Shakespeare country, the 
south of France, the West Hig hl a n ds of 
Scotland and Turkey. (Prentice- Hall about 
$13 paper.) j 

Gaolt-Millau Guides 

Henri Gault and Christian Millau are a 
pair of winy, controversial French critics of 
fine dining who are credited with coining the 
term nouvelle cuisine. They rate restaurants 
and lodgings in a (so-far) short "Best of the 
World" series (France. Italy. London, Paris, 
New York, Los Angeles). 

Restaurants are scored on a scale of 0 to 
20. and exceptionally good places are award- 
ed from one to four chef's hats based only on 
cooking and not on decor or atmosphere. A 
top rating is hard to achieve. Only in France 
does any restaurant get a 1 9. In "The Best of 
Italy," a nation of excellent cuisine, only six 
restaurants rate an 18, and none gets higher. 
In “The Best of New York," revised this year 
to include more holds, shops and nightspots. 
Lutece is ranked at the top of the city’s 
restaurants, also with an 18. 

But the real heart of the guides is in the 
lively capsule descriptions of each establish- 
ment, both fun to read and containing all (he 
information you need to know to make a 
dining decision. (Crown Publishers, about 
$13 paper.) 

Knopf Traveler's Guides to Art 

These are excellent guides for independent 
travelers in Europe. They are designed as 
reference books so readers can quickly find 
ihe most important art treasures in or near 
the cities and towns they visit. 

To dale, there are three books in the se- 
ries: France, Italy and, most recently, Britain 
and Ireland. 

The first three are attractive, although a 
bit heavy in hardcover for easy carrying. 
They work best for non-students of art, who 
want 10 know something (but not every- 
thing) about the works they are seeing. Par- 
ticularly helpful are the biographies of major 
artists and brief essays on art history and 
various regional schools of art. (Knopf, 
$14.95 hardcover.) ■ 

r< /(igj The Washington Post 


Our exclusively- designed 
leather pocket diary 
is thin, flat and elegant. 


No sooner was it introduced 
chan everybody wanted one! 

The International Herald Tribute 
diary started as a distinctive 
Christmas present for a few of our 
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PLUS: Pages of useful information. 
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distances, vintage chart and other 
facts... all in this incredibly flac little 
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Order vonr International Herald Tribune dbnes today! 

U.S. S19.50 or equivalent in convertible currency. Price includes tltree initials 
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Outside Europe, add S3 lor additional postage. 

Return this order form to: r --— a 

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□ Please charge ro my credit card: □ VISA □ AMEX □ DINERS 


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Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 4, 1985 


m 


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Thursdays 

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AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ index 


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New Lows 
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Volume dawn 


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Industrials 

Finance 

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Utilities 

Banks 

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United Press Intenuttmui 

NEW YORK — Prices on liie New York 
Slock Exchange declined sharply Thursday 
when a modest gain suddenly disappeared in a 
wave of last-hour selling. 

IBM and General Motors were among the 
prominent losers. 

The Dow Jones industrial average, which fell 
12.70 Wednesday, tumbled 9.03 to 1.189.81 It 
was the rim time since Dec. 17 that [he Dow 
index has been below 1,190. 

Dedining stocks topped advancing ones by 
an 8-7 ratio. Volume totaled 88.9 milli on shares, 
up from 67.8 million shares traded Wednesday. 

The Dow average fluctuated during the day, 
losing ground in early trading but heading high- 
er when some institutional investors came in 
with organized buying programs. When the 
buying orders were filled. the day's gains were 
trimmed back. Then last-hour selling sent the 
Dow index sharply lower. 

Michael Metz of Oppenhehner & Co. said 
psychological factors affected the market rather 
than any fundamental news. He said traders 
were “disappointed new investment money did 
not give the market more of an upward push” 
and they threw in the towel when they saw the 
day’s gains fading. 

Mr. Metz said the stock market probably will 
sag for the next several weeks because of “limit- 
ed institutional interest and no individual inter- 
est.” 

Newton Zinder of ELF. Hutton Co. called the 
day's results “very disappointing" with the Dow 
breaking below 1.190. He said the next test on 
the downside would be 1.180. 

There was a mixture of economic news 


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pf 164 117 16 15% 15% 15* 

: 170 46 9 297 28% 28 28 — * 

In 63 16ft 16 16 

60 17 8 68 Z7% 27% 27%— ft 

6057 6 17% 17 17% + ft 

60 26 6 3033 17ft 16* 17 + ft 

600 16 6 136 29ft 26% 28%— ft 

63 is ft 31 31 31 +1% 

L76 66 13 2478 63ft 42 62ft + % 

3029 14ft 13 13 —1% 

70 46 9 7 Uft 257b 26ft + ft 

78b 3J 18 729 24ft 24ft 24ft— % 

■20 11 7 202 aft 38* 38% 

.16 1.1 17 84 IS 14% 15 + ft 

60 57 9 418 27% 27ft 27ft— Vi 

'50 47 11 222 51% M Sift + ft 

LIS 95 6 540 31% 33 33 — % 

68 116 2 49% 49ft 49% 

58*117 90 50ft 50» SOft + ft 

62 133 1 18% 18% 1BV» + % 

75 147 3502107 1«%W/ +1% 

75 147 390Z107W 107 107ft +1 

JB 56 10 156 389b 37% 38% + % 

64 55 13 1806 34% 33ft 33ft + % 

70 1J 11 562 12 11% 11% + ft 

76 22 12 468 16% HU 16%—% 

4 3588 18ft 17% 17% + ft 
7 2513 & 3ft 27* + ft 

2 27ft 27% 27%+ ft 

I 15ft Uft ISft + ft 

6 15% 15ft 15ft + ft 






throughout the day. The Commerce Depart- 
ment said sales of new angle-family homes fell 
10.6 percent in November to a seasonally ad- 
justed annual rate of 591,000 units. It was the 
worst setback in nearly three years. 

In another report, new factory orders in No- 
vember increased 4.3 percent to a seasonally 
adjusted SI 93.81 billion. It was the biggest 
improvement since June of 1983. Factory orders 
had declined in September and October. 

U.S. department stores reported pre-Christ- 
mas sales were up modestly from a year earlier. 
One analyst estimated the increase for the in- 
dustry as a whole at 7 to 8 percent. 

IBM was the most active NYSE-listed issue, 
falling 1 to 120. 

Atlantic Richfield was second, off ft to 43ft. 
A block of 720.000 shares crossed the NYSE 
tape at 43ft. 

Illinois Power was third among the actives, 
unchanged at 23ft. 

Polaroid fell % to 26ft. A block of 898,400 
shares at 27ft. 

Southern California Edison was unchanged 
at 22ft. A block of 600,000 shares crossed at 
22ft. 

In the oil group, Phillips shed ft to 42ft, 
Mobil ft to 26ft, Sun Co. ft to 44ft, and Unocal 
1 ft to 34 ft. 

Bristol Myers fell 1ft to 49ft. A spokesman 1 
said the company knew of ao reason for the I 
decline: 

Genera] Motors skidded 1ft to 75ft, Ford 1ft 
to 43ft and Chrysler 1 to 30ft. 

Hercules fell l ft to 32ft. A block of 425,100 i 
shares crossed at 32. 


5% 3 
18% rob 
38% 28% 
14% 9% 
MW 8% 
15% 12% 

a* is* 

34% 20% 
33% 20 
11 3 i 

18% 7 
14% II 
41 30 

16 13% 

45W SAW 


4% 4% 
14% 14% 
35% 35% 
10% 10 
11% 11V> 
14% 14% 
19% If* 
24W 23% 
33 32% 

3% 3% 
7% 7Va 
11 % 11 % 
37% 36% 
15% 15% 
44% 44% 


4% 

14% + w 
35% 

10 — % 
1I% + w 

14% 

rob— % 

24% + W 
32W+ Vb 
3* 

7%+ V» 
11% + % 
36% — 1% 
15*- W 
44% 


CAN 800% PROFITS BE ATTAINED? 



5 3 


«fi 


IT* 




7* 7* 

54% 54% —11b 
44% 44 Vi— % 
22Vb 23Vb 
law izw 
n iiw — % 
16% 16* + % 
26 36 — W 

I3W UV5— % 
23% 24 + % 
14* 14*— % 
28% 28Jb— % 
19% T9%— * 
U 10% 

5* 5% + % 
33% 33% 

33% 33* 

31 31%+% 

14* 14% 

21% 22 + * 
55 55 +2 

20% 21 + * 
15 

51%+ * 
25%+ * 
31%+ * 
8 + % 
3Hb + % 
4 + % 
% 
% 
% 
* 


Every speculator is a romantic, seeking a fiscal Dufcinea. an enchantress; somethlngJhat 

oHereanaHuringt^aIlenge.HisinBnitelyrnorerewaiding,financlailyandp^^o*ogicauy;iaina 

Dulcinea, the “unwanted', than to hibernate, waiting tor IBM to raise *J2 

vibrant when lived outside the living room; we must strive far goals beyon^aatyrwaiweu 
to, musing that most mortals are * ..content, playing Bingo. 

DCW 1 meDulcineasofthepastwillquiveragainLthereareIatentCOmROLD^ASflnavvw^& 

trading In silence at less than 10 times earnings. There are also in&jbattng wranua sjbw 
dormant, but physically alive and developing under the tundra of hopeJn detecting emenng 
shares with the potential to rocket, we, as contrarians, refute the dull orthodoxy ottne wrer 
During the deptfisoflheoirglufouranalysts unearthedan embryonlcoiland gas^uity n«m a 
HAWK RESOURCES (Vancouver Stock Exchange] at $2; in less than six months Nn v 
spudded to $16. be tore a 4-1 split. Current price? $4. with evidence of persistent investm it- 
calibre buying. , , 

As a corollary to detecting luture 'winners'’ we focus upon seasoned shares, entitles o of 
favor with the “Crowd*, having recommended BOEING at $16. FORD below $18. G.M.a $40 nd 
SEARS, at S18 (before sprits). At the time, the “Quartet- was as unwelcomed by the streeijas 
Freemasons In Moscow. PemapsC.G.R.'s most pivotal prophecy wasf urthered Iri thesumm^of 

1982. while the DOW wasdraoping under 800. In refuting Ihe Street. C.G.R stated “The DJI W i. 

TOUCH 1,000 BEFORE HITTING 750". And now? We believe the DOW wHl catapult over 2.C 0. 
that a massive Inflationary cycle is coalescing amongst the drivel of those who insist [ at 
deflation will reign. Our forthcoming tetter. reviews a tow-priced stock that could matinee ito 
prominence; in addition, we list “Big Board’ shares that may be absorbed at premium pno l 
F br your complimentary copy, please write to. or telephone: [ 

^ CAPITAL FP5. Financial Planning Services bv 

-VV.l: KahrerstraaiTI2, > 

GAINS 1012 PK Amsterdam, The Netherlands 

Phone: (020) -27 51 81 f 

Telex 18536 


w 


Name: 


Address: 


bl 




1J6 3.1 15 
10 
15 

160 4J 9 
168 1QJ 7 
SJM &J 
765 14.1 
736 136 
275 116 
124 115 
3.13 135 
112 136 

2 JS ns 

360 136 
362 137 
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228 125 
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39 39 39 — % 

55 54% 54% 

MW 
38% 

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32% — % 


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20 JWTl 
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12% Jormwy 

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23* Jr+tPI s 
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5* Jewkr 
28 JnhnJn 
37% JflhnCn 
21* Jorum 
15* Jostmi 
21* JoyMfg 


II 42 26* 
7 128 29% 
9 194 IS* 
128 12% 
10 236 40* 
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26% 26*+ % 
29 29*+ % 

IT* 18 — Vi 
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16% 16% 

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35% 35%— % 
41% 41*— % 
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■ 7 

M 

5* 

160 

46 


206 

34 

23% 

160 

46 

9 

3137 

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27% 

68 

44 


841 

1% 

1% 

66 

7.1 


48 

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rib 

264 

44 

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44 

1670116 


49 

UK 

13* 

164a 76 


22 

17 

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26 

15 

371 

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66 


17 

107 

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160 

23 

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97 

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7 

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60 

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83 

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168 

53 

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24 

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284 

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30 

247 

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M 

36 

8 

898 

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148 

17 

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472 

43% 

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5 

14 

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J4 

14 

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1145 

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1 

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4* 

40 

56 

9 

4831 

33 

32 

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32 

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60 

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62 

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133 

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126 


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9 




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20 



68 

16 

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1435 

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60 

56 


786 

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.19c21,V 


SB 



40 

27 

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15 

15 

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60 

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1 

103 

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43 

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589 

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3894 

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145 

29* 

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1273 

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415 

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289 

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33 

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400 

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134 

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112 

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567 

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131 

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19 

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217 

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482 

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385 

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■1 100% 101 +1 

1209 

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37% 

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78 

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1+^4 


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34 

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2.7 

260 

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162 

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24% 26% 
12% 12% 
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10% 10 
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48 48 

21* 21% 
54 53% 

14* 14* 
11 10* 
Mb 24* 
8% 8* 
25 25 

14* 14% 
2* 7% 
11 % 11 % 
71* 2D* 
24* 24 
4£h 43* 
15* 15% 
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27* 26 
10* 7* 
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3% 3 
29* 29 
15% 14* 
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31 37 

5. a«% 
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27 36* 

44 43% 

70* 70% 
24% 


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54 +1 
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33 

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43*- % 
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27* 

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17% 16% 
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40 27 
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Jj*FCO 60b 46 17 
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NBI .1 

NCH 37 46 12 
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Sjf*» 60 IT 8 

NI I IK) 7 

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i as. i 

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NPCof 130 116' 
NatGvu 136 u i 
NtHom 


17* — 

50 VI — *4 
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18 'VJK 

B — Tu 


41* 40% 
51 Vb 50* 
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27% 27% 
31* 31% 
14% 14 
M% 25% 
17 17 

13% 13 
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TV* 21 
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2* S* 


y\cto 





























































i !° ^S, 



Statistics Index 

•AMEX HIM P.M Ewnlngi renort& p 
XMEX MatasAMP.U 

HVX art*. P.io CM? p ? 

NVSE MahtAmt P.13 Intern! rm« p 
™ Mortow^p-;; 
Sfl""wrete6 P.11 0 , rites p' S 

P.I7 OTCste* 
p ” ornwmprtm , » 

FRIDAY, JANUARY 4, 1985^ 


- 

;■■■■■: 

;• 

'■ ■ 

■ ::.:r 

. - 


•••-s'-,* Si. '90(1 

; 


•-: . 

- •'. ' 

' ?■<■ *• 

- " ~ ‘ *'^risn 
&3al 
. " . ;;; : i *&r. 
_' ' . i:r -i:- 2 r- 

. . \ ..‘^asar 

“ — *»»vfi* 


TECHNOLOGY 


-* — • uic locjiui nas provea me icasi Dully oi toe 

concept —and turned up some problems as well The difficulties 
are the same as those that have plagued other electronic engi- 
peere, including those at the Ford Motor Co„ which also is 
investigating the idea’s possibilities. 

I NITIALLY, Renault’s work centered on voice control of 
secondary functions, such as wipers, turn si gnals and power 
windows. Part of the research also centered on the sort of 
information that drivers would want from the car and on how 
■ much they would be w illing to pay for it, Mr. Dubus said. 

At its heart, the system has a central computer and voice- 
recognition components, and its basic version works weQ in most 
sorts of traffic and noise situations. For Renanlt, word recogni- 
. tion was 95 percent, according to Mr. Dubus, with the car failing 
to comprehend about 4 percent of what was said to it, and 
misinterpreting I percent. 

- A computer interprets speech by converting the sound waves to 
ejyctricaf impulses, then translating them into digital form and 
comparing the combination of digits with a “template” that tells 
the computer what is meant The chief difficulty is the wide 
variation in the way words ate said — the inflection, the speed, 
the accent — and in separating one word from another. 

Two forms of the system exist, the speaker-dependent version, 
in which the computer is trained to recognize a specific person’s 
voice, and the speaker-independent system, which responds to 
words spoken by any voice at ah. The latter is mndi more 
complex and less successful, req uiring far more computer memo- 
ry to sort out even a small vocabulary. 

I The strides in compressing the .sire of computers while increas- 
ing their power are what have made speech recognition in 
automobiles posable, but the state of the art st£Q is such that 
speaker-dependent systems are-more practical at present. As a 
specific voice is programmed, the computer leams the frequency 

(Continued on Page 13, CoJL 9 


Currency Rates 


Late interbank rates on Jaa 3 , excluding fees. 

Offiad fixings for-Amsterdam, Brussels, Frankfurt, MiVan, Paris. New York rates of 
4PM 


'^tmtertom 35 


sSnetenSam 3571 4.105 

■rasaetibi) 4340 725335 
R uMMIk I 1,442 3535 

London lb) 1.151 

Milan 154750 253950 

NowYarfcld 1-1512 

Porto 95915 11.17 

Tokyo eland 
Zurich 35238 35152 

1 ECU 17014 05144 

ISM 0478509 0551492 


eWv. Cu ™' usj 
05115 AMHVSmt 15323 
05441 OaUriaa tcbHHag 2252 
45157 Motes fin. franc 4358 
03557 Cnpadtaas V3Z15 

AMU' DaoM krone HJ18 
0.1512 FtaoWtaiark 45M 
00879 Ortakdracnua IMS 
0.1279 Ke(M Kona I 75H5 


(ML FJ=. ILL. SUr. BJ=. SbF. Yon 

11278 • 34535 * 01833 5535* 13434 *142177 

20525 4-5405 13535* 177545 24.199 2555* 

32575* 151SX 1857 * 4594* 12021 • 1240S • 

14355 11.1315 023018 45938 72745 30123 258225 

41577 20159 54575 30734 74335 7753 

21535 95575 174130 • 2559 4210 24155 25210 

30409 4777 X 27155 15388* 37U28SM* 

82095 * 27005 * 01344 7373 * 4.13* 12386* 

222 M 42233 1J4252 25144 444444 12 428 174245 

309814 9-48332 170702 34943 420375 25449 ILQ. 


Dollar Values 


t Per t Pw 

KH |,. CUrT * CY U22 EM*. C * T " CT Hi* 

8708 Irilll C 10121 02555 SteMN t 21953 

00014 UrallAafeU 43870 04975 S-AMeoa rand 201 

1944H Koncdfldbnr DJDtt 00012 2 Koran wen RMJO 

04075 Mom. riWBfl .2454 07057 fen*. MOT* USDs 

OH92 Morw. bra 9.1575 01108 Md.Uw MBS 

BMW PMLPttW 19706 USS3 Tahmns 3947 

0089 PcrLtscsdO I70J0 06X7 TUMI 27215 

02792 Saudi rival 3583 02m UAE-dbrUm 1473 


CSterflngel.lMBlritef 

(a) CamnUxdal franc lb) Amounts waned to buv on* pound Id Amounts needed tobuvona dollar (>) 
unlit of no (xi umtsonoooiv) wiksommco 

j£^i amtaue du Benelux (Brussels); Banco Cammerdate itottana IMttanl; Banqim 
/3wtanai? da Ports (Ports); IMF (SORIt Bangu a Ante* at Internationale dNMflMMnf 
(atnarJtr aft. dtrhom). Other data tram Reuters and AP. 


Interest Rates 


Enrficorrency Deposits 


I. ir?* jrz jn.wr- » - • 

St &-K 

2J- S? '2 « .«» M9WlDte.1in.-Hte 9W -9W Bte -8te 

Seurcfx: Morgan eoonmlr (Mar, dm, sf. rr " 


Asian Dollar Rates 


ft. -s«. 
n: Roman. 


3BI06. 

Ste-IK 


Httall>5Sfcribunf 

BUSINESS /FINANCE 


Mnstry Hopes to Perfect 

That listens io Driver 

By MARSHALL SCHUON 

• Sew Tort Times Sendee 

1 1 w tow fuel and lights left on.TodS. 

19908 “nv^wiu, 
a 

a,^ W 22s S F erf?nn Slmpl ' : funclions . such as starting the 

engine and turning on the 6 

lights^ and windshield wipers. - 
But the end product is expect- X t • , 

ed to be a car that can be told Yoice command ran 
to tune its radio, alter its inie- . # , 

rior climate and dial its cellu- promote Safety 
lar telephone, as well as re- Jw antn* t k«, 

■pond to questions about ™ aUU>S ' me 
engine condition, fuel econo- experts Contend. 

my and the driver's trip in ^ 

general. 

^Renault is one of the manufacturers heavily involved in re- 
on what has come to be called automotive dialogue. Daniel 
Dubus, chief engineer in the company’s Scientific and Technical 
Allairs Division, said studies over the next year will provide 
m a nage ment with sufficient information so a decision ram be 
made on marketing cars that bear an ri intomM 


Sey Money Rates 


Dated States aoa prw. 

Otcowrri WTte ■ 5 

fSpvI Funds “* * 

Plnw Rote IW ™* 

bEZt UW1 Rote 
dfnm. Paper, 30-n? daw 
»mmHi Treawry WIN J77 721 

Mnaiti Treasury BUN .1; 

dys 3079 days ^ KS 

tDY 40-09 days “- 12 w 


550 550 
540 540 
570 580 
525 520 
520 520 


Lombard Rate 
Oranrigbl Rata 
One Manlti interbank 
hnpifli interbank 
4-fnontti Interbonk 

|hmce 

Owe month Interbank 
3-nwtti Interbank 
frnnnttv Interbank 


Britain 

Close 

Prev. 

Bank Base Rate 

• 

m 

Call Mornv 
fl-dov Treasury Bill 
frmontti interbank 

■ 

10 

101* 

9 3/14 
10 5/U 

Japan 



Discount Rote 
Cull Money 
40-dav Interbank 

s 

asa 

3 

4 9/14 
4 5/14 

J Gold Prices | 


Mte 1W 
ii liv* 

10 9/14 »te 
10 9/16W U714 
10 5/14 10 5/M 


Sources.- Reuters, Cmnnieniia^Ovaii Lit- 
-jewels. Liam Bank, Bank ri tekn. 


a w . pjul ram 

s s “ 1S =2 

30123 30027-4.14 

E* m S3 SS =3 

- 30140 — 1-® 

!SLll ftelrw far Lon**, Port and Lueem- 
aSclasIwi price* W Hono Kunu 
J^ZuriSw 3 U York Cotb currant eantnicL 
an prices In L7-S-* aef oance - 
5arot.' Reuter*. 


■ Martels ^ k<™ m 

- Financial markets were closed i nu™«j 
Uapan for a holiday. 


** 

Dollar 
Retreats; 
Gold OR 

Profit-Taking 
Cited in Selling 

Untied Press International 

NEW YORK — The dollar re- 
treated Thursday but still remained 
near record levels in Europe, with 
dollar holders extremely nervous. 

Cold fell early, but finished 
above the $300 level. 

The British pound advanced on 
ibe weaker dollar and dealers said 
there ‘'was no great panic” by the 
Bank of England to support it 
After dipping to $299.50 at the 
morning fixing, gold dosed in Lon- 
don at $303.50. down from 
Wednesday's dose of 5305.50. 

Republic National Bank in New 
York closed gold at $302 an ounce, 
down from $303 Wednesday. 

The New York Commodity Ex- 
change settled the January contract 
at $301.40, down from $302.60. 
This was the lowest since June 22, 
1982. when it settled at $298. 

The dollar fell back from an ear- 
ly surge in Europe and dealers at- 
tributed the selling to profit-taking 
on Wednesday’s advance. 

“The dollar was overbought for 
weeks and especially on the first 
day of the year,” said Timothy 
Su mmcr fidd. chief trader in the 
New York office of Chicago's Con- 
tinental Illinois Bank “People got 
themselves overloaded with dollars 
and that’s why we saw this reac- 
tion.’' 

There has been speculation of a 
concerted central rmnlr effort to 
halt the dollar's surge which has 
been hampering the Federal Re- 
serve’s efforts to bring down inter- 
est rates and hurting UA. exports. 

The pound recovered from trad- 
ing lows to close in London at 
$1,151, iro from $1.1485 Wednes- 
day. Id New York it finished at 
$1.1512, up from $1,145. 

In New York, the dollar dosed at 
3.1535 Deutsche marks, down from 
3.1775; at 9.6575 French francs, , 
down from 9.715, and at 1.941 Ital- i 
ian lira, down from 1,947. 

In Europe, it dosed at 1,947.80 ; 
lira in Milan, down from 1,949.50; i 
at 3.1662 Deutsche marks in 
Frankfurt, down from 3.1727, and i 
at 9.6915 francs in Paris, down 
from 9.72. ' < 


Page XI 


Calls for Changes Bring Tug-of-War 
Over Japan’s Postal Savings System 


By Susan Chira 

,Vpw York Times Service 

TOKYO— Japan’s huge post- 
al savings system, which for de- 
cades has financed industrial 
growth and government deficits, 
is fadng pressure to change from 
officials at home and abroad. 

The system was designed to 
encourage savings when Japan 
needed a steady source of low- 
interest funds to rebuild its in- 
dustry. But in an age marked by 
increased competition from 
commercial bonks and by inter- 
est-rate and capita] -market de- 
regulation. there are questions 
about its future role. 

The postal savings system has 
$375 billion in assets, making it 
one of the world's largest institu- 
tional investors. Sixty-three per- 
cent Of the population maintain 
an account in a post office. With 
its convenient branches, rax ad- 
vantages and relatively high in- 
terest rates, the system has at- 
tracted nearly 21 percent of all 
the personal ravings in Japan. 

What to do with these ravings 
— where to invest them and who 
has control over that decision — 
is the subject of a debate with 
domestic and international rami- 
fications. 

There is talk, both from within 
the government and abroad, of 
allowing some of the money to 
be invested overseas, as a Anther 
step toward internationalizing 
the yen. 

Such a course would mean less 
money available from the postal 



Factory Orders 
Up, Home Starts 
Down in U.S. 


Tho Nm Voit Tires 

A savings counter at Tokyo's Kyobasfri post office. 


fund to invest in government se- 
curities to hdp finance Japan’s 
budget deficit, but it would also 
make more Japanese funds avail- 
able for investment abroad, 
where rates of return often are 
higher. 

There are also calls from rival 
commercial banks and the Min- 
istry of Finance to revise or scrap 
the postal savings system be- 
cause they see it as a barrier to 
financial liberalization or as un- 
fair competition. 

Whether any of the proposals 
bear fruit will depend on the out- 
come of a protracted bureaucrat- 


ic battle between the two minis- 
tries that control the fund, the 
Ministry of Posts and Telecom- 
munications and the Ministry of 
Finance. 

The Ministry of Posts, which 
administers the system, has pro- 
posed that it decide how to invest 
the deposits. Now, the Finance 
Ministry decides, and it has tra- 
ditionally chosen to invest the 
savings in government bonds 
that finance industry, public 
works projects and measures to 
fill budget gaps. 

If the Ministry of Posts gained 
(Continued on Page 15, CoL 6) 


Chinese Retail Spending Is a Record 


Reuters 

BEIJING — China’s one billion 
people spent a record amount of 

spendevm more tins yea?thehfin- 


RetaO sales rose 17 percent to 
300 bfflion yuan ($107.5 bHHon) 
and could go up by nearly 20 per- 
cent in 1985 if wage and price re- 
forms are taken into account, the 
ministry told Xinhua, the official 

news agency. 

It said luxury goods, clothing 
and better food were in demand. 

However, western economists 
said this spending spree, while re- 


flecting the success of the incen- 
tive-led economic boom, could also 
cause inflation. 

They said the government would • 
have to tread carefully frith its far- 
reaching economic reforms. 

The Communist Party is in the 
midst of an ambitious economic 
reform program, relaxing slate con- 
trol, introducing market fortes and 
encouraging consumerism. 

China has antinunneri that dur- 
ing 1985 it will adjust prices to even 
out the distorted state-set price sys- 
tem, but workers’ real incomes will 
be protected where needed by wage 
rises. 


This means more money will be 
chasing a limited number of con- 
sumer goods! 

Hie Ministry of Commerce said 
sales of food last year increased by 
18 percent, clothing by 16 percent 
and household goods by 20 per- 
cent. 

This year refrigerators, television 
sets and high-protein, foods are ex- 
pected to be popular. 

Fancy electrical goods have re- 
placed the three status symbols of 
only a decade ago — the bicycle, 
watch and ™»ni»i sewing "w™"* 
— which most people now have. 


United Press International 

WASHINGTON — New orders 
to U.S. factories soared after two 
months of setbacks, but new-house 
sales tumbled 10.6 percent, the fed- 
eral government said Thursday, re- 
porting November figures. 

U.S. factories received 4.3 per- 
cent more orders in November than 
October, for the biggest improve- 
ment since June 1983, the Com- 
merce Department said. 

Even without on enormous in- 
crease in military orders, which ac- 
counted for two-thirds of the No- 
vember improvement, orders 
would still have been up by a strong 
1.7 percent. 

The month's gain was especially 
welcome after declines in Septem- 
ber and October. 

The increases were mainly in du- 
rable goods orders, large items that 
indude automobiles, heavy appli- 
ances and machinery. Thai catego- 
ry shot up 7.8 percent in Novem- 
ber. 

Orders for nondurables, such as 
chemicals and paper, were up 0.6 
percent. 

New orders were worth $193.8 
hill i nn after seasonal adjus tment , 
yet were still below the most recent 
peak of S196.5 billion in March. 

The drop in house sales was 
more severe than analysts antici- 
pated, especially since mortgage 
rates were more than 2 percentage 
points lower than in the summer. 

Warren Dunn, senior vice presi- 
dent of the Mortgage Bankers As- 
sociation, said, “A very significant 
factor which can’t be overlooked is 
that even though interest rates be- 
gan to drop in the third quarter, 
they are continuing to drop. 

“I think a lot of people were 
simply bedding off.” 

The association sees sales pick- 
ing up again through spring. 

Another factor inflmmcmg the 
decline was the way state subsidies 
of interest rates, through housing 
revenue bonds, dried up in October 
and November. 

House sales were up 1 6 5 percent 
in September, a surprisingly large 
increase attributed to the same in- 
fluence in reverse, as stales rushed 
to use up revezuie-hond authority 


before the government’s fiscal year 
ended SepL 30. 

New-house sales gained a revised 
0.9 percent in October. 

The average price of a new house 
jumped S6j00 to $101,000. 

The average price had shown a 
rare drop in October, going from 
5100,900 to S94.700. But it re- 
bounded in November to S 101,000. 
That compared with the average 
for all of last year of $89,800. 

New-house sales were at an an- 
nual rate of 591.000 in November 
after seasonal adjustment. 

Even with November’s decline, 
new-house sales averaged an annu- 
al rate of 641,000 through the first 
II months of 1984, above 1983’s. 
12-month total of 623,000. 


China N-Pkuti 
Gets Approval 
In Hong Kong 


United Press Intenutdtmal 

HONG KONG —The Hong 
Kong government approved 
Thursday a plan to hup China 
build a nuclear power plant, 
clearing the way for Bering's 
first foreign joint venture in nu- 
clear energy. 

The endorsement was amon^ 
the final hffil hurdles fadng the 
S3J-bQlion Daya Bay nuclear 
station, which will be built in 
Guangdong province in south- 
ern China. 

WJ\ Stones, a senior official 
of China Light & Power Co., 
the Hong Kong utility taking 
part, said he anticipated swift 
final approval by the CHinesi* 

The 1,800-megawatt plant 
will be China 's first joint ven- 
ture with foreign concents in its 
nodear power program, whose 
long-range target is to build at 
least by tire end of the century. 

The Daya Bay plant is to be 
supplied with pressurized water 
reactors by the French nuclear 
firm Framatome SA under li- 
cense from the UJS--based Wes-' 
-doghouse Electric Corp. 


Study Endorses Futures, 
Advises Caution on Use 


By Nancy L Ross 

H'osAingron Past Serrice 

WASHINGTON — The first 
comprehensive report on the effect 
of futures and options trading on 
the U.S. economy concludes that, 
while these markets serve a useful 
economic purpose, they have a po- 
tential for causing harm if they 
function improperly. 

The report, prepared by the Fed- 
eral Reserve, the Securities and Ex- 
change Commiss ion and the Com- 
modity Futures Trading 
Commission, recommends close 
coordination of regulation of these 
markets, but no new legislation. 

The study, prepared at the re- 
quest of Congress, was to be re- 
leased Thursday. A copy was ob- 
tained from Representative 
Timothy E. Winh, Democrat of 
Colorado, chairman of the subcom- 
mittee on telecommunications, 
consumer protection and finance. 

Futures are obligations to trade a 
specified contract on a given date 
at a price set in the present. Op- 
tions give a bolder the right to buy 
or sell a contract at a specified price 
before a stated time in exchange for 
a premium. 

Futures and options are written 
on commodities, currencies, stocks, 
government obligations and indi- 
ces of common stocks. They are 
used by hedgers to offset risk on 
fluctuating prices or interest rates 
and by speculators to make a prof- 
it. 

There are 11 commodity ex- 
changes and five securities ex- 
changes trading options in the 
United States. 

Congress instructed the agencies 
to study the economic justification 
for futures and options, the effect 


on the formation of capital and 
liquidity of credit markets, the ade- 
quacy of existing regulations to 
prevent manipulation of underly- 
ing securities markets and of inves- 
tor protections. 

Representatives of more than 
100 financial institutions and com- 
mercial firms active in the markets 
were interviewed and a survey of 
participants is contained in the 
700-page report. 

A draft copy caused John Dam- 
gard, president of the Futures In- 
dustry Association, to declare that 
the long-awaited report “does not 
seem to break a lot of new ground. 
It does not se t the stage for a battle 
between the CFTC and the SEC, 
which is one of the industry's con- 
cerns." 

Among the findings: 

• F inan cial futures and options 
appear to have no measurable posi- 
tive or native implications for the 
formation of capiuti and appear to 
have enhanced liquidity in some of 
the underlying cash markets. 

• While institutions use the mar- 
kets for hedging, most individuals 
use the markets for speculation. 
They are, on the whole, well edu- 
cated, have net worth over 
$100,000 and are experienced trad- 
ers with few complaints about bro- 
kers not informing them of risks. 

• Options and futures markets 
do not take money away from busi- 
nesses, fanners or governments 
seeking financing, although the di- 
rection of the flow of money may 
be slightly altered. 

• Their effect on the flow of cap- 
ital to risky investments is minor. 

• Futures and options do not de- 
stabilize cash market prices and, 
indeed, may work to stabilize them. 



For the man with exceptional goals, 
anew dimension in banking services. 


AMC Expects Annual Profit 
In 1984, Its First Since 1979 


The Associated Press 

DETROIT — American Motors 
Corp. said Thursday that it will 
post its first profitable year since 
1979 when its 1984 balance sheet is 
made public in February, 

America’s No. 4 automaker, 
which is 46-percent owned by the 
French company Renault also an- 
nounced that firing demand for its 
Jeeps had pushed employment at 
its Toledo, Ohio, assembly plant to 
nearly 7,000. Thai is the highest 
level since AMC bought Kaiser- 
Jeep Corp. in 1970. 

Jeep sales are running 90 percent 
above last year's rate. 

Josfc Dedeurwaerder, AMCs 
president and chief executive offi- 
cer. made the announcements at a 
news briefing. 

AMC lost money in 14 consecu- 


tive quarters before turning a $7.4- 
million profit in the fourth quarter 
of 1983, ending the year with a loss 
of $146.7 million. 

Through the first nine months, 
the company earned more than 512 
million iHic year. 

However, AMCs only U.S.- 
made cars are the subcompaci Re- 
nault Alliance and a hatchback ver- 
sion called the Encore. 

Sales have leveled off, leading 
AMC to cat prices last month as 
the rest of the U.S. auto industry 
was raising them. 

Mr. Dedeurwaerder said that 
AMC was on schedule with plans 
to import more cars from Renault 
and fill out its mirima lira* with a 

new car mqfto in Canada 

Production is to begin in 1987. 


TlThat makes Trade Develop- 
Wment Bank exceptional ? To 
start with, there is our policy of 
concentrating on things we do 
unusually well. For example, 
trade and export financing, 
foreign exchange and banknotes, 
money market transactions and 
precious metals. 

Equally important, we are 
now even better placed to serve 
your needs, wherever you do 
Dusi ness. Reason: We have 
recently joined American Express 
International Banking Corpora- 


tion, with its 88 offices in 39 
countries, to bring you a whole 
new dimension in banking ser- 
vices. 

While we move fast in serv- 
ing our clients, we’re distinctly 
traditionalist in our basic poli- 
cies. At the heart of our business 
is the maintenance of a strong 
and diversified deposit base. Our 
portfolio of assets is also well- 
diversified, and it is a point of 
principle with us to keep a con- 
servative ratio of capital to 
deposits and a high degree of 


liquidity-sensible strategies in 
these uncertain times. 

If TDB sounds like the sort 
of bank you would entrust 
with your business, get in touch 
with us. 

TDB banks m Geneva, London , Paris. 
Luxembourg. Chiasso, Monte Carlo, 
Nassau. 

TDB is a member of the American 
Express Group , which has assets of 
US$ 44.0 biuion and shareholders' 
equity of US$ 4.0 billion. 



Hade Development Bank 


Shown at left, the head office 
of Trade Development Book, Geneva. 


An American Express Company 





Page 12 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 4, 1985 


\Vt ! - 


Ihursdays 


12. Month 
High Low Shld 


SH. Qbsb 

loot hmiLow Qoot.Oi'K 


i ISMgrtth 
HWLOw Slock 


Sis. Oose 

IBs HI* Low Bum. Qibe 


II Manta 
Woh Low Slut* 


Sis. Close 

IMS HtoiLOw QwHOi'oc 


i:.uorfn 
Hion Lf« sw a 


51s. CtoW 

IMS HIM L0« QUO Chjf 


12 Month 
h^i low Siaefc 


Ste. Cttae — • 

HBsHWiLow Quu-n^ 


(l'i: i' 


N)SE 


32 34% ONEOK 156 19 S 

25ft 19Vi OrwnRk 104 0.1 9 
13* 51* aramte J3i s* u 
3D 19M drWnC J6 15240 


a sum 2M+ % 


14% 8% Orton P 


12 6ft Orton of JO 7.1 

am at ortonpt its ioj 
am im ouidms m 73 

21ft in OvrhDr 40 11 
31ft 17 OvrnTr M 2 A 
lift 13 Ovttlo JO 37 


3Bft 251ft OwenC 140 4-5 
46ft 31U Owenlli USfc 41 
SOft I Oft Oxfcrts 40 36 


44 U 1 
40 11 * 

M 24 12 
JO 37 8 
140 45 * 
JSb 47 8 
40 34 6 


4)6 25% 24ft 2Sft— ft 
66 10% 9% W 

is 21ft aft aft+ ft 

214 9 Bft Sft — ft 

3 7 7 7 

St 25ft SSft 25ft- ft 
457 Z7ft 27ft 27ft— ft 
420 Mft 10ft lift 
88 Z7ft 26ft 26ft— ft 
C7 13ft 13 13% + ft 

346 aft sift aft— u 
631 40ft 30ft 39ft— ft 
746 lift lift lift + ft 


1*2 11JI S 
260 127 
440 136 
*33 137 
1J6 54 11 
1.94 74 8 
244 X3 
4J0 11* 
4*4 117 
-54 1.9 14 
2*0 4.1 6 


Tables Include the nationwide prices 
up ta the doting on Wall Street 


IlManth 
HWiLow Stm* 


dw.ym.pe imshhuhow qwtaiwl 


Mft 18 PHH *0 3 
38 24ft PPG 144 4 
24ft 15 PSA 40 2 
19ft 13ft PSAdnf 1*0 11, 
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*8 3* 11 472 2S% 34% 25%+ft 
144 *3 8 456 Oft 33 33ft 

40 2* 36 30ft 20ft 20ft— ft 

1*0 11* 43 16ft Mft 16ft 

140 120 45 12ft Oft 12% + ft 


JB 26 20 
140 3* 8 
1.92 Id* 8 
2.10 114 


(Continued from Page 10) 



33 .7 543 

MO B.1 3 

42 23 12 1257 

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12 7288 
37 10 40 

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11J 2 24ft 

7* 7 4 25ft 

107 4 311 22ft 

125 5007 20 

13* 3Bz 64 

123 33 31 

127 3 16ft 

115 12 27ft 

12 10 7 15ft 

UK 33 39ft 

374 2 12ft 

294 16 Bft 

27 » 343 35ft 
142 

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41ft 38% POcLts U2 8* « 221 46ft 40ft 40ft- ft 

9 20 ft PcLum -1*0 4* 13 115 25 24ft 24ft 

10ft 5ft Poe Res *5r * 19 6 6 4 

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71ft Oft PecTete 540 7* 8 973 69ft 68% 69 + ft 

25ft 2. PMifai 2*2 9* 7 706 25ft 24ft 25% + ft 

Sft 27% PocHBf 4*7 124 31 32% » 32ft + ft 

38ft 23ft PotflWb 60 22 35 831 27ft 27 271* + ft 

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34ft SBft PonABfc 66 3* 8 30 20ft 30ft 30ft— ft 

«V> 4 PanAm 2031 4ft 4ft 4ft— ft 

6 1ft PanAwt 163 2ft 2 2 — ft 

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« 31 PanliEC 2*0 4* W 1057 37ft 35ft 36ft- ft 

6ft 3 PanfPr U 315 4 3ft 4 +ft 

16H 12 Pnprcft *0 5* 13 30 15ft 15 15 


917 

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30% 

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30%+ ft 

7 

32% 

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32ft + ft 

12 

32 

3141 

31% — ft 

so 

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504 

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74V. 

74% -m 

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2? —lft 

137 

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17% 

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359 

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1894 

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72 

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SOBZ 

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7K 

7%— ft 

4003 

71k 

79k 

7ft + % 

507 

42 

47 

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110 7 

57 

57 

57 —1 

Site 

50 

48 

50 

100= 

51ft 

flft 

51ft +lft 

10= 

60 

40 

60 -2 

205 

4 

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200Z 

9ft 

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9ft + % 

17 

9% 

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7 

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13% 

10 

18 

12 

12 


lift + ft 
K 

4 

10ft 

Wft 

10ft + ft 


Mft 8ft Rowan 
Mft 41ft Roy ID 


451* 37ft Ruhrmd *4 u 17 


68* 9389 8ftSft+ft 

2*70 i» 4 2904 49ft 48ft 47 + ft 


aft 13 RUSSBn 12 10 17ft 16ft 17ft 4- ft 

20 lift RusToo Jt 4.9 8 142 15ft 15ft Uft— ft 

35ft 17ft RvonH 1*0 4* 13 91 25ft 25 25 — ft 

S3 3 * 30ft RnJerS l jjffl 23 8 1407 48ft 47 47ft + ft 

27ft IZft Rvtand 60 2* 13 263 21ft aft aft + ft 

20 Bft Rrmers 4 703 10ft 10ft 10ft 


19 44ft 44 44ft + ft 
10 1714 16ft mi + ft 
142 15ft 15ft Uft— ft 
91 25ft 25 25 — <4 


23 Mft Systran 1*6 56 11 

38ft 28ft Svbrnirf 240 7J 

1 5ft W 51PSC3 . . 18 

56ft 37ft 5m(w 16" 36 12 

38ft 25ft Sysco *6 1.1 15 


1*0 54 II 79 Wft Wft ^ 

240 7J I ? 5 J " 

16 43 >2 12 12 

1 411 14 12 440 48 47ft 47V5 

26 1.1 15 1310 33ft 33ft 33ft + !* 


103 10ft 10ft 10ft 


43ft 31ft 5CM 2*9 4* 9 

43ft 23ft SFN 1*0 3* 9 

12ft 7ft SL Intis *0b 2* 10 
30 l«ft 3 PS Tec *0 3* 11 
26 15 Sabine *4 * a 

23 16 Satin Ry 2*59166 
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10 5ft SfadSc 79 

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29ft 21ft Sofewy 160 5* 9 

3S% 24ft Sees M U 13 
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Mft 9 SPoul 1*0 11* 

12% 4ft Salmi 

34ft a SatlleM .16 6 14 

23ft 17ft SDleGa 2.10 92 7 

10ft 6ft SJlKSlB *2*10.9 9 

10ft 8ft SJuanR 16 

51 3SVi Sandra St U U 


L7 9 106 42ft 42 42ft + ft 

10 a 76 43ft 43 43ft + ft 

l* 10 27 10 ID 10 — ft 

l* 11 7 20ft 20ft Mft + ft 

2 a 120 16 Uft 16 4- ft 

__..J6 62 17ft 17 17ft 

*4 17 14 252 Mft 14 Uft + ft 
79 a 7ft 7 7ft 

19 424 25 24ft 24ft- ft 
4 9 860 27ft 27ft 27ft + ft 


30ft 24 TECO 
ISft 7ft TG1P 
Kft lift TNP 
36 17 TRE 

a: 58ft TRW 

179% 134 TRW Pi 
lift 3ft TecBeof 


220 7, 9 

1*0 b ]j 


3*0 4.1 10 692 73ft 72 
AM it 1 159 159 


678 29ft 29ft JW- ft 
57 9ft Bft Bft 
16 13ft 13ft 13ft — ’h 

46 20V. 20 20ft + ft 

692 73ft 72 73 +» 

1 159 159 159 +3ft 


34ft 23ft Vtacom 62 1* 12 
62» 54 VoEPp* 772 12* 

71 60ft VBEPPl 8*4 13* 
77ft Mft VoEPPl 939 11* 
Cft 52ft VoE PO 7^ 128 

RtSS^SKn 

srxasa 2*4 a* s 


94 32ft 32ft 32ft 
mt 60ft 40ft iRy^jv 
lOte 67ft 67ft 
6k 75ft 751* TSftfi? 
30= 40ft 60ft 68ft Xh, 
lOOOz 56ft 56ft S6ft+£ 
25 18ft a Mftls 
! 34ft 34ft 34ft4.? 
9 68ft 67ft mt-V* 


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9ft 61* W o ln o c 119 7ft 7 7ft 

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45ft 28ft Woftm u 76 mh iS fL + » 

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32ft 23ft WoICSv *5 14 16 16 31ft Wft 3] ft— u 

3!ft 73 WOHJ I I JO 38 7 159 31ft 31. 37ft + i 


4ft 446 4ft + ft 


70 49V ToflBrd 1.12 18 3 31B rift S9% « — Jj 

15ft W Toller 11 9 13ft 13ft 13ft + ft 

17ft Uft Tolley Bt l.m 6* 2 ley 16'-| u;- 


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J 7 9 19 Wft \Vh~ ft 

3 23 lou 10ft 10ft + ft 

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6 14 198 25ft 25ft 25ft— ft 
2 7 180 2Zft 2241 224i + ft 
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3ft 2ft Telcom 5 9 2ft 2ft 717— Jf* 

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4446 32ft Teams 192 7* ■ ,9B I SS ££ ££ 

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39ft «ft Terdyn HB»» *ft~ 

20ft 9ft Tesora *0 4.1 17 570 9ft 9ft 9ft— ft 

36ft 20ft Tesorot 116 10* 114 71ft 21 21ft— ft 

48ft 31ft Texaco 3*0 U 83571 33ft 34W + ft 

42ft 33ft TxABc 1J2 4* 8 633 33ft 32ft « 

48ft Mft Tex Cm lit «l 7 1699 » Mft 2!*^ 3f 

35ft Uft TxEsls 2*0 IS 9 3K 79ft 2Bft WS ^ ft 

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36 le 30ft Norton 2*0 5* 11 534 Mft 35ft 35ft— ft 

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44ft 24 Nucor J6 1* II IM 3146 31ft aft— ft 

12ft 446 NutrlS 32 U 59 5ft 546 J*+ft 


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11 TO 16 ISft 15% + ft 

.16 IS 511 6Ki 6ft 696 + ft 

1.12 as iB 602 a** aw aft + % 

52 U 24 Vt 15ft 15ft 1516 + ft 

203 1ft 1ft 1ft 


24ft 14 POVINW *4 1* 15 612 Bft 23ft 23ft— ft 

20 lift PoyNP M 511 IT 182 17 Uft lift— ft 

as 13ft PorCafl .16 1J U I960 lift ISft 16¥><f ft 


23 10ft 10ft IBft + ft 
2*8 11* 9 632 24ft Mft 24ft + ft 
272 WS 7 4523 26ft 25% 26 — ft 
1 M 11* 1 17ft Uft Oft 

2.17 126 3 T7ft 17ft 17ft + ft 

143 12* 19 19 18ft 19 + ft 

7*0 13* 1526= 60 59M 60 — 1 

8*8 13J 170S 60 60 60 

7*0 12* 202 40 60 60 

146 2ft 2ft Zft 

.1* I* 7 3 966 9ft 9ft 

5 57 6ft eft 6ft 

176 13J a 453 13V, 13ft Uft 


51 35Yi Sandra JB 16 14 668 35ft 341* 34ft— 1ft 1 

2446 18ft SAnJtRt IM U 11 6 21 7} 31 + ft 

36ft 201* SFeSoP 1*0 19W1S1 25ft Mft 25ft + ft 
34ft Mft SotWel 14t U It 2 33 33ft 32ft— ft 

17ft 12ft SOkriRE *0 1* 44 62 17 17 17 — ft | 

19ft Uft SovClP 1 60 SS 6 61 18ft 18 10 I 


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17ft Uft 30U1RE 20 1* 
19ft Uft Sav£lP ijo AS 
20ft Mft SavE A 1*4 6* 
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2 31 3K 32*.— ft 

62 17 17 17 - ft 

01 18ft 18 10 

S 19ft 19ft 1946— ft 

1U 5ft S 5ft— ft 

32 *ft 9ft 9ft- ft 


286 30 37ft 37ft— ft 

1907 37U 37ft 37ft 

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111 74 73ft 73ft + U , 


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4516 28ft Wdarn u 76 ff** « + ft 

22ft ISft WkHRSOMO 101 18ft Uft Uft— ft 

32ft 23ft WalCSv *5 1* 16 U 31 ft Wft 3] ft— u 

32ft 22 WoHJs 1*0 3* 7 ISP 31ft 31 3Hi+ft 

9ft 7ft Walljpj 1*0 11* W Oft re, 

42ft 29ft WDllJ pi 1*0 M 1 « d « 

28ft 17ft Woraw *8 4.9 7 745 18VS. U 1R6 

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lft Penao 54 46 ft ft 

soft 3tft PanCai 41 535 46ft 46ft 40ft— U 

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57% 46 Penney 2J6 il 7 1990 4616 46 4616— 16 

2546 19ft PaPL X40 9* 8 556 25ft 25 25ft 

36ft 30ft POPUP* 4*0 1X0 100= 33ft 33ft 3M -t ft 

37ft 30 Popup! 4*0 1X4 620= 34ft 33ft 33ft— 1 

27ft 21ft PoPLPprXC 110 S 24*6 26ft 26% + ft 

2Sft M PoP L tort-99 Tl* 1 23ft 33ft 23ft— ft 

65ft Mft PaPL ur 8*0 13J 10BK 62 62 62 — ft 

26ft 22ft PcPLdortJJ 12J 6 2Sft 2S46 2Sft + ft 

29ft 25ft PtiPL torOTS 111 34 2896 28ft 2846+ 46 

84ft 45ft PaPL Pt 9*4 11* 3000k 79ft 79ft 79ft— Oft 

97ft 8146 PePLBTlUO 13* «i B8ft 88ft OBft 

1(0 Mft PaPLPTllOO 1X1 Uz 99ft 99ft 99ft 

68 , 58ft PoPLOr 8*0 1X4 200= 65 65 65 +lft 

42ft 31 ft Penwtt 120 17 10 M 39 3046 Mft— ft 

» Penwpf 1*0 7* 86 a 22ft 22»i+ ft 

45ft Mft PanrssK 2*0 SO M 1415 44ft 43ft 43ft— ft 

B3 72 Pera P<B 8.00 10* 4680= 79ft 79ft 79ft + ft 

ISft 9ft PmEn 1*6 7* 7 178 I5tt ISft ISft 

33Y6 23ft PeoBOV *4 1* 13 39 30ft » 30ft + 46 

«ft 34ft PepsiCo 1*S 4* 20 832 C7ft 42ft 42 ft + ft 

Htt ^25 Ptoket *6 XI ft 1543 26% 26V. 24ft + ft 

10ft 7V, Prmkjn l*2el5J 7 667 8 7ft 8 + ft 

im 1*46 PorvDr JB TJ 13 23 17ft 16ft 16ft— ft 

SS 2ft? M** **« A3 14 110 1244 U44 32<ft + 44 

324* 26ft Pet Re 1S3613J) 36 27ft 26ft 27ft 

1746 14 PefRaPt 1*7 10* TO 1446 Wft Wft— ft 

8ft 446 Ptrrnv l=no21* 31 4ft 4% 444— ft 

4246 2946 Pfttar 1*2 3* 13 5233 40ft 38ft 39ft— 1ft 


1*6 13* 8 453 13W 

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1*8 4J 16 US 29 

7 345 Bft 


18ft — ft 
Mft- ft 
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40 33 SchrPta T*a 4* TO 1060 36ft 35ft 36ft + v 

S 35ft Sdihnb T*0 U 9 7639 37ft Mft Mft— 1ft 

Uft 7ft SdAN .12 1.1 20 1392 IT Uft 10ft + ft 

29 )9ft Scnolnd Jt XI T1 322 24ft 24ft 24ft— ft 

99ft 29ft ScotFtt 1*0 XI 36 309 SIT Sgft S» + W 

35 25ft ScottP U2 X3 10 3W 34ft 33ft Mft— ft 

16ft lift Scottvs *2 X9 10 141 13ft 13 13ft + ft 


42ft 33ft TkABC 1*2 4* 
40% 36ft Tex Cm 1*6 40 
35ft Uft TxEste 2*6 7* 
2544 MU TxgTpf 2*7 11* 


2544 MU TxgTpl 2*7 11* 
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149ft 11144 Texirut ZOO 1 J 
5ft 1 Tex Hit 


0* HI 74 77U73ft+ft 47% 27V> Wati* JH 1* 16 823 44ft 44ft + w 

14 521 25ft 25V. »ft— ft 27ft IB WatfcJS JX 1* 13 221 22ft 22 22ft +2 

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M 5 25 2& + £ m2 12% we»D .» j u sb xu am + * 

4* 8 633 33U 324# 32ft— j* 3714 29ft WebMk 44 II M 5 3644 36ft 36ft- a 

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JB 7 S 9 295 29Vs 2Bft 2K6 -r 46 50 40 WMF Of SAJellA 4 44 4344 44 +fe, 

*7 U* " 25 2f“ 22? * * 3ft 22ft WrtFArt 2*0 1X7 IT _44 26k 2 HA +5? 

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*0 IJ 9 704 119 11746117ft . 


1% 1ft 1ft— ft 


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28ft 16% WestCo * 21 1 


.ISO J 14 357 20ft 20ft 20ft + U 

M 1* M 33 3644 36*4 36ft- 2 

L16 47 7 429 Mft 4544 45ft-* 1 ; 

LOMU* 4 44 Oft 44 +fej 

1*0 187 IT 44 26ft 26 26U+ i? 


*9 13 M 815 17 


41 S3S 4646 46ft 46ft— ft 
5*7 4* 57 114 113ft 11315— ft 

Ut 11 7 1990 4446 ft 46M— ft 

2*8 9* 8 556 2514 25 25% 

4*0 110 100* 3344 33ft 33ft + ft 

4*0 1X4 630= Mft 33ft 33ft— 1 

042 110 5 2646 2646 2646 + ft 

X90 1X5 1 2JU 33% 23ft— ft 

8*0 115 10B2 62 62 62 — Ml 

&2S1Z7 6 25ft 2546 25ft + ft 

X75 111 34 2S96 28ft 3846 + 46 

9*4 11* 2(09= 79ft 79ft 79ft— 2ft 

1*0 13* 48= B8ft 6Sft OBft 

OOC 1X7 Uz 99ft «9ft 99ft 

0*0 1X4 300= 45 45 45 +lft 

2*0 SJ 10 M 39 38ft Mft— ft 

1*0 7* 84 23 22ft 2216 + ft 


38ft 27ft QucdcOa 807 37ft 37ft 37ft— ft 

JJ86 19 QuotttO 3D 4i 13 431 17ft 1746 T7ft— ft 
m> 646 Quo re* 43 64 8ft 7ft Bft + ft 


T2fc 646 Quo hex 43 64 Bft 7ft Bft + ft 

Mft 23 OUBBtnr 1*0 5* 9 126 X 29* 29ft— ft 

30ft 14 QfcRell *0e 1J 13 U 16 15ft 1544 


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165 11.1 1268 

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37ft 24ft Pablo 1*0 43 
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7546 5B46 NYNEX 6*0 XI 0 1037 74% 73ft 74 —ft 


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23ft 20 
20ft 17ft 
22ft IBft 
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113 1BS46 
1 OBft 101% 
Mft 32 
30ft Mft 
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30 23ft 
33ft 25ft 
S3V: 41 
aOft 45 
3646 18% 
28ft 21 
Uft 10% 
62 47ft 
87ft 76 
17*4 12% 
42 52 

184e 15 
106% 96ft 
69ft 56 
23ft 19ta 
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33ft 25ft 
37ft 2046 
aft 544 
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Pi XI2 1X3 
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235 11% 1046 1016— ft 5546 43 

7 20ft 20ft 2Dft + ft 10ft 4 

12 17% 17% 17% — ft U4ft 97 

8 19ft 19 19 106ft 87 

27 49% 49ft 49ft— M 72 55 

48 108 10746107%— % 67 51 

2 10446 104ft 104ft— 46 <6 44 


1*0 4* 13 192 22ft 22 


1*0 43 U 113 2846 27ft 2846 + ft 

1*4 13L9 S 2208 13ft 13% 13% — % 

X90 119 206= 28ft 28 28ft + ft 

4*0 13* 160= 33 32 32 +1 

im it* am so so 50—1 

8 JO 147 200= 56 557. S5ft + 46 

XSO 141 47 25% 24% 24% + 46 

3*3 143 19 271k Z7ft 27ft— 46 

1*0 1X4 3 Mft Mft Mft 

B*4 146 150= S9ft 59 99 +1 

10*8 12* 1500= 84 84 84 + % 

40 2* 17 40 1446 14ft 14ft— ft 

7*0 13* 50= 58% 58% 58% +2 

X27 7X7 a 17ft 1746 17ft + % 

14*0 1U 10=105 l« 105 +1 

8*8 1X5 IQz 63 63 63 — I 

ZOO *8 9 2383 22ft 22ft 22ft— % 
*0 103 26k 0 7ft 746— Y6 

1*0 5* 8 379 30 28% 28% —1% 

1*8 X9 19 14 37 a a 

9 176 Oft 8% 846+ ft 
SJ 8 65 lift 1446 Mft 


10 9 Ptiimer 2*e iaj t 

32ft 24 PWlEpf 4J0 143 

33 25 Phi IE pf 440 14* 

34 25ft Phi IE pf 468 144 
50ft 40 PMIEM 7*0 M* 
02ft 50% PMlEfri US IS* 
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5546 43 PtlllEpf 7*5 15.1 
10ft OH PMIEPf 1*0 14* 

116ft 97 PMIpf 17.12 15* 
106ft 87 PM1B Pt 15*5 147 
72 SS PhHE pt 9*2 142 
<7 51 PhllE Pf 9*0 15* 

50 44 PMIEPf 7*0 147 

56ft 40ft Phi IE pi 775 14* 

20 15% PhflSutJ 1*2 7* 11 


17 10 7785 aft 30 


MM 15 MH 15 
100= 30 X 30 
560= 31 30% 30% + % 

30= 32ft 32ft 32ft 
Zte SO SO 50 
90= 58 57ft 57ft — ft 
167 94* 9% 94S— 46 

400= 52% 51% 52 — ft 
2W 9% 9ft Oft— ft 
520=112 lllftlia +ft 
>080=105 103ft U3ft— lft 
250= 67 <7 67 

210= 63ft 63ft 63ft +U6 
100= 53 53 53 -I 

610= 53 52 S3 +1% 

13 17H 1 7ft 17ft 


AO 1* II 
*6 X0 9 
1*0 ' 4* 7 
X12 9* 
X12 1X8 
1*4 1* 7 
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J2 2* 22 
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1*4 5* 11 8M 
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M XI 10 -149 


Bft Bft— ft 
35ft 3Sft+ ft 
2846 2896 + 46 
32ft 32ft + ft 
BH Bft+ ft 
346 34k 
Wft 14%— ft 
34 34 —1 

5ft Sft 

18 IB 
4ft 446— ft 
53 53%+ ft 

13 13 — ft 

40% 404k 
8% 846 
16ft 1646 + ft 
20ft 20ft— ft 
13ft Uft— ft 
12% 12% — ft 
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8^ «»+% 

a* 32ft + ft 
5V6 5%+ ft 
146 1 4k— ft 
40ft 40ft 
IBft 1846 + % 
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an ZH6 
24% 2446 + % 
28ft 28ft + % 
25ft 26% +1 
16% 15ft + ft 
23% 24 — % 
11 Uft + ft 
334 6 3346— ft 
IBft im 
12ft 13 


35 25% ScottP LI 2 X3 

14% ms Scottvs *2 1? 
Wft 20ft Scovlll 1*2 X* 
30 18ft SeoCntn AS \A 
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13 12ft SeaCpfflilD U* 
IS 12 SeeCpfCXW HJ 
aft MHSeaLdn M 2* 
5% 246 SeoCon 

«ft X Sflsarm *0 XI 
21ft 12ft annul 
28% 18% SedA/r JO 1.7 
32ft 19% SealPw 1*0 3S 
Mft 27ft SearfeG *2 * 

4M6 79ft gears 1.76 5* 
10246 97 Searipi 6*3e 67 
53% 38 SecPoc 2*4 47 
22% 12ft SeioLt 


27ft 17 TexOGs .IB 1* 10 5504 17% 16ft l7%— ft 

39 31ft TkPOC M 1J 17 18 31% 31ft 31ft— H 

Mft 2046 TOkUtU X36 9J 6 aSO 26% 2gt % 

Bft 2 Texflln 24 2ft » 2ft _ 


*2 X9 10 Ml 1346 13 13ft + ft 

1*2 XS W 2726 39ft 38% 39ft + % 

*3 1* 5 46 29ft 29 294* + ft 

7*8 Ml 14 10% 10% 10%— k 

2.1 Q M* 23 14% 14k 1*16— ft 

XYB \4J 31 14ft 14% Wft + ft 

*8 2* 228 18% 10% 1846 

48 3% 3% 3%— ft 

*0Xl»34339ft® 39-H 

18 IM 17% 1646 17 —ft 
*8 1.7 U 35 Mft 23% M 

1*0 19 0 55 2S% 2Sft 25ft— ft 

SI * 73. 452S 64% 63% 64ft + % 

1.76 SJ 8 5584 32% 31H 31% + ft 

6*8e 47 20 9946 9946 «F%— ft 

2*4 47 7 283 51% 51% aft— ft 
10 18 13% 13ft 13ft 


43ft 25% Texfron 1*0 SJ 12 532 33% 37ft 32ft— % 


9ft 5l« TTrac* 
22% U46 Therm E 


13 4ft 6% 6ft + ft {fjr 
a 19% 18k 19% + ft 
» 35 34% 34% — % 


38 28% TlUnBts 154 16 14 269 K 34% 34%— % 

18% 1246 Thomln *B> 19 10 22 1816 17% IMfc- k 

Mft Uft YnmMcd *0 ZJ 7 12S 16 Uft 1^.+ ft 

2146 lift Thrifty *2 2* 15 206 2046 20 2046 + ft 

*0 47 955 19ft 19 

455 6ft 6' 


2*ft 17% Tidrrtr 
9 4% Tletfln 


32% 20% SvcCps *0 1* 14 488 21 27% 27% — % 

a lift SftaUee J1 SI U M II 13% U + % 

2246 10% Showln *0 2* 7 149 19% 154* 19% + % 

61ft 39 Sheno ZOO 3* 10 348 54% 55ft 56ft + % 

39ft 28ft SheJIT XI2e 7.1 4 1328 30% 29% 29%— % 

29ft 17% ShefGto 78 25 7 100 28ft 2746 2744 — ft 

30% IBft ShetGpf 1*0 ** IB 30% 30 'm 30% 

3Z4S 22% Sfmrin 76 27 10 28B 2846 28 20 — % 

,£S 1 w ** *"* + * 


8316 A2ft PhllMr 1*0 4J 10 M62 90% 79% 7946 

17% 1W6 Phllpln *0 2* 10 7» 17ft W46 16%— ft 

56% 3346 PMIPef 2*0 5* 7 9459 43ft 4246 4Z%— % 

25ft 46% PWTVH *D 1* B 102 3444 24 34ft + 4k 

39 27ft PledAvt *8 * 7 899 34ft 33ft 33ft— ft 

32 2346 PleNG 2J2 7* 8 22 31Vi 31 a% + % 

a 14 Fieri 4 a 15% 1444 UV6 + ft 

«% S P'Uhrv 1*6 X* 10 953 44% 43 4346—46 

M ”2*“' ,J< dl 7 934 30k 30% 3046 + ft 

36% 26ft PHnvB 1*4 X0 10 1391 34% 34% 3446— 4* 

72 53% PltnSpt X12 XI 4 «8f% 68% 68Y6— 46 


102 2444 24 24ft + 4k 
899 34ft 33ft 32ft— ft 
22 31ft 31 a% + Y6 
21 15% 1446 15% + ft 


13% 13% 13% + % 

11% 11 11 


16ft 946 Pit&tn 154 9% 946 9% + % 

1746 8% PIonRe *0 1* 12 496 14% 1344 14% + % 

24ft 1246 Ploritm .16 1* 13 3 13% 13% 13% + % 

13% 7ft Ptavtwy _ 3 23 lift 11 11 

35% 23% P Issey lA2e 4* II i 23% 23 23 — ft 

2344 15% PoooPd *0 3* 16 189 Wft 15% 15% 

3446 25ft PotorM 1*0 17 2010174 28% 2*44 2644—1 

24ft lift pondn JO J 8 57 13% 13 Uft 

2644 IS POPTQI *0 5* 15 6 16 16 16+% 

19% 13% Portec *0 2* 52 18 77ft 10 + ft 


13 Uft 
16 16 + % 
17ft IS + ft 


3*0 47 10 2502 73ft 71ft 71k— % 

4.10 BJ a 48% a 48 

1 19346 1 0346 Km — ft 
1*0 19 7 353 34% 3346 34ft + ft 

1*| 5* 9 25 274k 2746 27ft— ft 

1J0 L4 1666 20ft 19ft 20ft +1 ft 

*1 I* 16 896 25ft 24% 25ft + % 

16 256 6% 6ft 446+ % 

1.12 X8 7 51 2944 29% 2946+ % 

1*0 47 15 34 38% 37ft 37k— ft 

*6 3* W 479 20 1946 1946+ ft 

2*0 113 5 132 19ft 15% 10% 

2*4 73 f 13 33% 33ft 33% 

a 33 9 1101 30ft 30% 30% — % 

3* 9 87 6346 63 <3 —ft 

0 346 43% 42% 42 — 14 
Z0e 1.1 27 1365 17% 16% 17ft + ft 
*21 .1 24 3C8 15ft 14% 15% + % 

At 44 15 614 9ft 946 9ft + ft 

a 2ft 246 2ft 

*40 7 2t Mft 144k W46 + % 
1*8 4J 12 495 25% 25 25ft— % 1 


16ft 12ft sierPoc 
35ft Mft Slsnoi 
58 48ft stem pf 
35% 20ft Singer 
30ft 26% Stner Pf 
19ft 12% Skyline 
aft 9% smttnin 
60% 90 SmkB 
56% 361% Smudtr 
37ft 27 SnapOn 
38 27 Sonol 

17ft 12ft SonyCp 
29ft 27ft SoeUn 
ISft 2746 Source 
20W 10 SroCppf 
27ft 22 SaJerln 
484k 3&% Soutfwn 
Mft 22 SOdBX 
1246 5% SeetPS 
2446 17ft SCO IE 5 
18% 14% SouthCa 
34% 25ft SOirrGE 
36% 27ft SNETI 
36 aft SOME Of 
49ft 41% SOME Pf 
3446 a% 50 RV Pf 
31 a% SOlIrrCo 
Mft 23 Soutine 
19% Tift So Roy 
1046 6% Soumrfc 
54ft 4i semkpi 
29ft 14ft sw Airis 
22ft 13 SwfFor 


IB 30% X'm 00% 

10 2BB 3846 2B 28 — % 

5 159 4% 5ft 5% + ft 

11 123 12ft 1246 12ft— U 

7 10a 15ft 16 16—46 

M 973 32ft aft a —16 

7 5646 56 56ft— 46 

14 252 29ft 2946 29% + % 

2 28% Eh 28ft— ft 

23 US Mft 16% 16% 

10 66 10ft 10ft 10ft 

f 2359 53% 53ft 5346+ ft 

14 75 53ft 53 53%— ft 

13 175 3446 34 34ft— % 

6 1115 33% 33% 33ft + ft 

11 M72 M 1346 13k— ft 

9 U 23% 23ft 23% 

X 25% Mft 34%— % 
0 20% 20% 20ft + % 

8 U 26% 364% 16% — % 

10 a 43 eft 4246 + % 


33ft Time 

*2 

1.0 

14 

436 

12 Tim pi* 



19 

20 

28ft TlmeM 

1*4 

15 

11 

1186 

49ft Timken 

l*Qa 3* 

12 

49 

2Sft TodSto 

122 

63 

6 

88 




10 

4 

13ft TolEdla 

X52 

161 

5 

70S 


X72 



B 

22 TctfEdPf 

X75 

166 


45 

20 TolEdpf 

347 

169 


83 

35% TolEOof 

621 

164 



13ft To! Ed pi 

2*6 

163 


2 

13% TolEdPf 

2*1 

1X9 


6 





149 

16 Toot Rot 

48 

16 

10 

40 


US 16 15ft lSk + ft 
06 2046 20 2046 ♦ ft 15Vl 

159 19ft 19 19 — ft 

155 6ft «* 6k— ft 
136 43!% C 43% +1 

20 18U IBft 18ft— ft SE 

38ft 38ft 38ft + % S 

51% 51% Sift— % Sjt 

31ft 30% aft + ft. ™ 

274m 27ft 27ft + % » 


28% 16% WestCo M 23 9 
53ft 3446 WstPtP Ut U i 
12% 9%WoWTgl*4 
5ft 2% WnAIrL 
2% kWiAlrwl 

WAIrpf Z0O 17* 
WAIrpf X14 17* 
WCNA 

WPocI * 

WUnton 
Wnunpf 4*01 
WnUpfS 
Wnlt pfE 
WUT1 PiA 


1*44 16%.. 

39 17% 17% 17% 

*a % x xt£ 

25 Uft 11% lift + ft 

4 12% 12 ra — % 

164 4% 6k 4ft 

20 UT TOMHOk 
2974 B% 8ft Sft 
1 28 2H 28 + 4t 
H » » » 

149 6ft 6 6ft + ft 

13 84S «6 W6 + % 


2Sft 25ft 2Sft 
2544 25ft 2546+ % 


15% 15ft 15%+ ft 
43V 41 41 —2 


18% Trchrns 150 12 11 292 31ft KP. 31%'+ % 


0 307 25% 2546 2S%— ft 


13 11 7% 7ft 7ft 

7 6937 23 2244 22% + ft 

6 2623 IBft 18ft 10%— ft 

7 12 3346 33 33 — ft 

9 158 36U 36 36 — ft 

I 33Y6 33ft 3346— % 
1010= 43ft 43ft <3% +146 
3 23% 23% 23%+ ft 
17 211 27% 26% Z740 + % 

8 1538 27ft 27Yk 27% + % 

10 710 12 1146 11% + ft 

4 102 6% 646 64. 

6 40 48 48 —1 

13 541 22V 21% 22 

95 15% 15-4 15ft— ft 


9246 TrchPf U*B»10.9 
9% ToroCe *0 U 9 
1 Toko 
11% Towto 

3141 ToyRU 21 

25ft TsyR v»l 
ISft Tracer *4 U 13 
746 TWA 8 

11% TWA pf 225 167 
16ft TWA PlB 2*5 10* 
20% Tronsm 1*4 62 13 
164. Tran me 222 11* 
10% TARtfy l*0e 86 
33ft Transco 2*4b 4* 9 
42ft Trnscpf 3*7 6* 

19 Tran Ex 2*0 1X1 

6ft Tronscn 5 

20 TrGPPf 250 112 

6% TrnsOh 1« 

28 Tranwv 1*0 5* V 


X9 10 1IM IM IM +1 
IJ 9 113 lift 13 . 13 — U 

419 1% 1 1% 

89 12 Uft 11% 

21 2679 39 38ft 38% 

11 26 2546 M + % 
IJ 13 343 26% 26 Mft + ft 
8 1542 10W 10ft 10% + ft 

63 206 134m Uft Uft 

0* 9* 20ft 20ft 20ft + % 

62 13 852 Mft 26% 26ft + % 

1* 71 1846 18ft 18ft + ft 

8i I 11% 11% 11% 

4* 9 144 51% 50ft 51ft 

6* 36 56ft 55ft 564k +1 

XI 113 21% 21ft 2146+ U 

5 159 9 Bft Ft + 46 

12 18 22% 22% 22% 

19 42 9% 9ft 9% 


43 33ft 32ft 33ft + 46 1 


WstoEs LOO 19 9 3015 24 25% 25%-% 

Westvc IJ2 3* 8 219 37ft 36ft 36ft + % 

Weverh 1.30 4* 16 2234 30ft 29ft + S 

wavrpf ZBD 7* JOS 49% 39% 40 + ft 

Weyrpr 450 92 Zl 48ft 48 «ft + % 

WheiPM a 1S6 13% 13ft— v 

WhPItpf 5*0 1XS 250= 27% 26ft 27 + ft 

WhlrUX 2*0 43 9 1345 46ft 4546 44 — ft 

WMTC 1 JO il 9 764 29% 29ft 29% + ft 

White pfODO 73 1 38% 38% 38%- ft 

WflHeM 8 37 21% 2146 21V— ft 

WWftaK *0 27 7 409 22ft 21% 22%+% 

Wlebktt S3 S 7ft 746 746— ft 

Wllfrdn 7 m 9* *% + H 

WllUom 1*0 4*6 323 2946 » 29 — ft 

WTImEl 415 2% 2% 2% + ft 

WltshrO VO U 17 46 646 6% 6%— ft 

WfatDIx 1*8 5.1 12 157 33U 32ft 3216 + « 

Wlrmbs .We J 13 1102 IS 14ft Mft + ft 

Wlmwr 13 5 6% 6% 6% 

Winter J 3 4% 4% 4% 

WtacEP 2*8 73 7 471 31% 31 ft 31ft V 
WISE Pf 8*0 1X1 8720= 73% 73% 73% —Hi 

WlsE pt 7*5 112 100Z 66 64 66 +1 

WlsGpf Z53 I0L5 2 34ft Mft 2416 + ft 

WIscPL X56 8* 8 IM 29% 29ft 29ft— ft 
WlscPS 2*6 82 7 123 3146 31% 31% + ft 

WItCD 1*8 4* 8 186 33% 33% 33% + % 

WohrrW 24 2J 14 M8 10% 10% Wft 

Wood PI 37 3* 14 28 20ft 2S% 20ft— ft 

Wetwttl 1*0 42 9 389 37ft 364. 36ft— ft 

WrMAr 33 3 246 2% 

Wrfoty iJOaXO 11 <u 61 60% 60%— % 

Wurttzr X 3ft 3ft 3ft— % 

WytoLb 22 2* 9 194 W% M Mft— % 

Wynns *0 11 7 38 19% 19 19% + % 


28 20ft 20% 20ft— ft 
389 37ft 364. 36ft- ft 
33 3 246 2% 

60 61 60% 60%—% 
30 Sft 3% 3ft— % 
194 14% M Mft— % 
36 19% 19 19% + % 


23% Tmwtd *0 1* 18 2146 29% 29% 29ft— % 

9% Tw Id tvf A 41 13% 13% 13W— ft 

22% Trwld pf 2*0 7.1 2 28 M 28 

1446 TtvHJPf L90 II* 73 I6tk Mft 16%— ft 


25% Trawler 1*3 5* 9 2772 37% 36% 37 


MU. Mft MM — H | Stt at 25? S2 2S“ S 


21% Tricon 55*02* 
30 V men of 250 1X9 


Uft 10% £WIGas 150 8* 12 104 U Uft Uft— ft 

71ft 55 Sw*ell 5*0 73 86524 70% TIPS 7Cft + ft 

27% 19Y6 SwEnr J7 2*14 18 30V 20% 20U1 + ft 

22 17 SWtPS 1*0 9* 8 Till 21 20H 20% 

21 lift Spartan 52X719 28 Mft 14 14— ft 

2SU 18 SpedP •’ ~ ••• 

SO 33ft SPMTV 


S TrlSain 10 

12ft TrlalrrO *0 25 39 
20ft TrlaPc 1*0 32 8 
M Tribune *4 25 
4'i Trtcntr J4e 85 
S% Trice .16 X6 
13U Trlnty JO ID 
lift TrltEne .I0b 3 
8% TrtlE Pf 1.10 11* 
33% TucsEP 2*0 63 


I5%C2* 126 25ft 25 25 — % 

!50 1X9 2 23 23 23 + ft 

10 23 6ft 6ft 6ft 

*0X7^ 55 wu. 36ft Mft~ W 3146 M ZaleCp 122 XI 8 422 M 2546 25ft — ft 

ju 25 13 311 Sft— % Z4% 15U Zapata *4 52 13 229 16% Mft 1616 

J4.SI 8 S 4V6 4ft l£— W 49 2846 Zarre *00 3 12 640 45 43% 44% +1% 

14 if 2Q 49 4ft 6 4ft J9 W TMlUtiB 4 723 19% 194k 19%— ft 

m 291 17 16ft 16ft 18 Zero *0 12 17 r5 23ft 23V 2316—8 

IB, 3 15 443 15% IS 15 _ ys 30% 21ft Zumln 122 S.1 11 112 2S% 2446 2546— ft 

.10 11* 139 10% 9% 10 — ft 


50% 45ft Xerox pf 5*5 112 
Mft 19 XTRA M 2* 


186 4846 48% 4846— ft 
148 224k 22% 22% + % 


1*0 9* 0 Till 7 1 20% 20% 

52 37 19 28 Mft 14 14— ft 

23 50 22% 2146 22% + % 

152 47 I 5783 41% 41 4I%— ft 


10% TulUM 
16 TwInDs 
25% TvcoLD 
23% Tyler 


1*0 6J 8 
-52 45 9 
*0 <8 10 
*0 Z4 9 
70 2* 8 


441 4146 40% 4] — % 

6 11% 11% I1Y3— k 

7 1646 16% 164k— ft 
295 33% 33V 33% + ft 

26 29% 294k 29% 


NYSE Qighs-Lows 


41% 31ft SouerD 1*4 47 11 IS 39ft 33ft 38% — % 


54% 37% SabMi 1*0 XI 
MU 17ft SWlev *0 X9 
27ft 16% StBPHI 54 XS 
22 13 SIMotr 32 U 

SOft 48ft 5(01 nd 3*0 S* 


XI 15 1151 53% 51% 52 — ft 

X9 16 914 71 20% 20ft + ft 

X! 10 118 19ft 18% 18%— % 

14 0 230 13ft 13ft Uft + % 

SJ 7 255? 52V 51ft 51%— 4k 


UALPf 240 7* 


SMOOtl 2*0 63 6 3640 41V 40 


U-S. Futures Jan. 3 


Open HWi Low Ctoee Cho. 


Open Htah Low Close Cho. 


18% 946 stPacCo * U l 
17 il 5tandex a 15 10 
29% 19% Stonwn .96 X0 10 
30ft 23% SharfWtl 1*0 X4 II 
lOV Sft 5WMSe TTOalZ* 


.40 22 B 50 ISft ISft Uft— ft 

-52 X5 10 254 15% IS 15 

.96X010 S32 25V 24ft 25 +16 

*0 14 II 12 29ft 29 29ft 

.2DQ1Z* 4 10% 10 10 — ft 


Season Season 
Utah Lew 


Open High Lew Ckae dig. 


WHEAT (CBT) 

5*00 bu minimum- doliera per bushel 
4*4 138 JUar 145% 147 1434k 3*4 -*216 

4IK 134% May 3*0 3*0% 137% 32746 — *H% 

190 129 Jul 3J3W 134% X22 3J2 — *lft 

376% 3*246 Sep U546 13546 3*3% 350% — *2 

363% 137% Dec 145ft 3*6 143ft X4346 — *2 

374% 148% Mar 1*9% 349% 148% 348% — *2% 

ESt. Sales Prev. Sales 4*56 

Prev.Day Open Ini. 4Z912 UP 259 
corn lean 


JUIC E (70YCE) 

15*00 A&- cents pgr lb. 

185*0 1B9*0 Jan 16000 160*0 159*0 159*0 +« 

105*0 11850 Mar lS» MlS 142*0 16XU +l£ 

105*0 151*0 May 164*0 MAM MXTS iliS 

184*5 155*0 Jul 164*0 MOO lS*0 16420 +2 

«}■» 161*8 SOP 16U0 162*0 WM 161*0 +J0 

^ l ! ,ow J 41 - 00 ,41 - 23 161*0 16125 +JD 

12® $»'«*'** i«zs i«g 

gx Setae 700 PrevTsata* 978 MMB +JS 

Prow. Gey Open Int 8*00 eff M2 


BRITISH POUND (IMAU 
Speraeund-1 paint eauais 30*001 

Jan 1.1495 

1-5178 1.1385 Mar 1.1460 1.1500 1.1410 1.1478 

12150 1.1370 Jun 1.1460 1.1470 1.1430 I.M5B 

1*450 1.1360 Sw T-WSJ 1.1450 1.1415 1.1440 

1-2710 1.1405 DOC 1.1435 

Est Sales 5*65 Prav. Sales 6*91 
Prev.Day Oeen Infc 16*16 UP 792 


ZSft 15ft SkufCh 1*4 XT 34 1067 17ft 17% 17% + ft 

4% 2% Straw .12 4* 64 3 3 3 

17% Mft Sferchl 76 4* 10 31 17% 17ft 17ft + ft 

12ft 9% StiiBcp 72 7* 10 28 IBft 10 10ft + ft 


.12% 7% UCCEL 30 

23% 16% UGI X04 9* 12 
11% 2 UNCRes 

14% TO URS Mb 36 
3CT\-T7% USFGS 2*8 77 
65ft 45 USC 3*0 XT 

19% 12% UniDyn *0 37 

ZF% 13% UnlFnst 2D u 

92% 75 UnINV 4 Joe 4* 


UOb 35 13 
X0B 77 8 
3*0 XT 6 
*0 37 8 
2D IJ 12 
42De 4* 8 


12V 9ft 5MBCP ... . 

30 23% SterlDB 1.14 4* 12 

23ft Uft SlrvnJ 1*0 7* 14 

36 259k StwWra 1*8 57 18 

12 8% StkVCpf 1*0 9A 

43V 32% SteneW 1*0 4.1 8 


72 7* 10 28 IBft 10 10ft + ft 

1.14 4* 12 1636 20% 23% 2*%— % 

1.20 7* 14 177 17% 16% T7ft— ft 


42V 20% U Camp* 1*4 4* 10 296 36% 
65ft 32% UnCortJ 3*0 «2 13 2798 37% 
7% 4% UnlonC 24 4% 


_ 29% 29 V 29ft + % 1 
440= 10ft 10lk 10%— ft 
110 39ft 39ft 39ft— % 


CANADIAN DOLLAR (IMMJ 
Spar dlr-1 point eauatt *0*001 


*050 

JB35 

*444 
J 440 

Mar 

JWI 

.7550 

*560 

*50 

*585 

*546 

*307 

*495 

Sep 

Dec 

2533 

*540 

*533 


43V 25ft 5taneC *0 2* 23 108 30ft 30% 30ft— % 

53% 32V StDPStW 1XO 15 I M3 41W 40% 40V— I 

18V 15% SforEq 1*4 1X3 14 53 18 17% 17% 

14% 2 vIStarT 1998 9% 3% 2% 

47ft 30ft Scorer *0 3 167 46U 45% 46ft + % 


18% Uft StnrEq 

14* 2 VIStarT 

47ft 30ft Storar 
20% 20 SlrtMfn 
27% 14V. strMRI 
9 3% SuavSb 


7% 4% UnlonC _. ._ . . 

16% 12 UnElec 172 1X« e 1171 Mft Uft 15%— ft 
27 21 UnElpf XSD 1X7 100= 27% 27% 27% +1V 

31 25% UnElpf 400 1X3 2Qz 30 30 X + ft 

49 39% UnElpf 6*0 1X5 lOz 47% 47% 47% — % 

30% 24% UnEI pfM4A0 1X3 25 Xft X X 

99% 48% UEI nfL 8*0 13* 2SDz 57ft 59 59% + % 

23% 18ft UnElpf Z9B in 45 22% 22% 22ft 

23ft 19% UnElpf 272 12* 2 27ft 2Tft 22ft + ft 

60 49 UEIplM 8*0 1X6 300= 59 99 59 + ft 


7 3712 44k 44 44% + % 

324 31% 30% 30ft— Yt 

0 177 12ft 12% 12V + % 

2 120 22ft 22% 22ft 

M7 9V 8* 9%— % 

3 TO 11% 11% 11% 

8 996 27 26% 26k— ft 

A 300 59% 59 59 — ft 
B 175 16% 16 TMk + % 

2 25 15ft 15 15%— Mi 

1 161 88V S7k 88 — ft 
0 296 36% 35ft 36 + ft 

3 3798 37% 36k 37 

24 4% 4% 4% 


AlaPwdePPf Amsted ArvMln2pf Avon Cora 

AVCO32OP0 Ba»E\«4Prt CNAFYnT Cnnwhrf r - 

CenHud Ora CeofVtPS Co(S0152Sp CWSOISU 

CyclapeCP FleetPnGrp* OnDynam HondlmaiT* 

HIltonHIl Hotel I nv IIIPw824pf JerGe 875pf 

LodedeGass Pacfcp407p Potom Elec RhierOakn 

RotUnCamn RMlimEnvs SfratMla UnEI ISM 

UnEl4p M 


Am toe Inc 
IIIPw 11 75p 
Pleesev 
TescAmBnch 
ZenlHiE 


Aearcolnc 
Mocy pfA 
PaerRCem 
TnasOCat 


BalhrMfe 

vlManvIHe 

RorcrOt* 

TsPecLd 


Bril Pet - 
MurahyOtl 
Sander* s 
UnltDrlll 




52ft 34ft UnPoc 1*0 4* 15 1855 41ft 4D% 40% + % 


4% 4% 4%— % 


EeLSoMB 998 Prev.Sala X169 
P rev. Doy Open im. 7.170 off MS 


bu minlmuni- dollars perbusbef 
X25% 2*5 Mar 271ft Z72U 270% 171% +*pft 

XX 272% May 277 278% 277 277% +*0ft 

X76% Jut 2*0% 2*1% 2*0% 2*1 

321% 274 Sea 277 277% 275% 275ft — *1% 

235 271 Dec 271% 273% 271% 271% — *1ft 

Xia XB2 Mar XB4 284ft 2*2 2Z2ft — JOft 

321ft 288% May 289% 2*9ft 289% 289ft — *1V 

E*f- Sales Prav.Sahn XJD1 

Prev.Day Open Inf.i38*l2 up 135 
SOYBEANS (CBT} 

5*00 bu minimum- dollars pgr bustwl 
$9 Tan 5*9ft 574% 5*8% 573% +*4ft 

720% 57* Mar 5*2% 5*7% 5*1% 5*6% +*4% 

727 523% MOV X94 6*1 X95 XWft +JM% 

739 xra Jul 6*5% All 6*5 A0»ft +*5V 

7-54 6*7% Aug 6*9 613% 6*8% 6.12ft +*4ft 

HI j* AlWe 612% 6*9% 611% +*3ft 

6« 6*2 Nov 612% 616% 612ft 615 +*2ft 

67V 625 Jan 625 629% 625 628 +22 

7*2 638 Mar 6*0 6*1% 6*0 6*1% +*2% 

Est. Sales _ Prav.Sahn 21662 


COPPER CCOMEX) 

25AO0 IBe<- cents per 0J. 

aj& ^ 5680 5600 5600 5633 +AS 

53 55J0 Mar 5635 5728 5830 ajj 

MW ctiS < 1*J V 57J0 SiM +5 

i U ' ££ 58X5 SXft +J0 

»-» 5«to 58*5 59*5 58*5 59*0 +*0 

SS 2® j* »« »*> SUf A* + M 

sss ss ss * w «» »» jhs 


FRENCH FRANC (IMMJ 
S per banc- 1 point earn o sxsoaoi 
.11905 .10235 Mar -1B2S0 .TQ2&5 .18050 .10290 

.11020 .10400 Jun .10250 

.10430 .10200 Sep .10210 

Est. Salas 31 Prev.Sales 41 
Pray. Day OPen Int 360 up 28 


30% 21% SunBkS 120 61 9 159 29ft 29% 29ft— % 

X 34V Sun Or *8 I* X 9 29ft 29% 29ft 

9* 7% Sun El IM 8% 8ft 0% + V 

59% 43% SunCa 2J0 X2 11 885 45 43% 441k— ft 

22 89% SunCpf 225 25 2 91% 91ft 91% —4ft 


GERMAN MARK (IMMJ 
S per mark- 1 point equate! 


59% 43% SunCa XX 52 II 
122 89% SunC pf 2*5 25 

52 34ft Sundstr IX 6l 13 
15% 7% SunMn 12 

IB-i 4V Surntat 5 

33ft 23% SuprVI *8 XI II 
34% 19ft SupMkt *2 13 14 
19ft M Swank *0 55 10 


IM 8% lft «% + ft 
R5 45 43% 44%— ft 

2 91% 91% 91%— 4ft 
27 44V 43V, 44 V + % 
Ml 8 7% 8 —ft 

6 6% 6% 6% + ft 
06 32% 31% S2 +% 


115 82 UnPcpf 7*5 7* IS 93ft 91ft 93 + % 

18 9ft UWroyl *3e 2 5 422 13% 13% 13% — % 

66 n% unryfpf 8*0 12* 220= 65 64% 64% - % 

6% 3% UnltDr 48 376 3% 3V 3%— V 

71V TDV UnBrntf 8 101 17% Wft 10% + % 

17% 9% UBrdM 18 lift 10% 10% 

31% 20% UCEHTV .14 JU6 234 30% 30V XU— ft 
29 23* UnEnrg 2*8 9.1 12 166 27V 27% 27% — % 

23% 9 U Ilium 2*0 1X6 3 234 Mft 14 Mft + ft 


17% 9% UBrdof 
31% 20% UCIHTV .14 
29 22% UnEnrg 2*8 


H| Pad Takes Effect 
|I; On Trade of Sugar 


*8 2.1 II 236 32% 31% 32 + % 
*2 12 14 336 33% 33% 33% + ft 


The Associated Pros 

LONDON — The International Sugar 


15% 15% 15% — % I 


573ft +*4ft 
5*6% +*4% 


7B70 427* SOP 

Ert.5oMi 7JBQ Prev.Sofes 9*92 
Prav. Dov Open int 85*16 off 586 


6U0 6150 61 JO 4250 


4110 

*lo2 


*180 




*733 

*191 

Jun 

*214 

*222 

*198 


*545 

*230 

too 

*243 

*248 

*342 

3050 

*610 

*257 

Dec 

*276 

*283 

*273 

*284 


Est Sates 19.146 Prav. Safas 1X566 
Prav. Day open int 36007 up 261 


679 ! 

7*2 

Est. Sales 


Prav. Day Open Int. 68*47 up 17 


SOYBEAN MEAL (CBT} 

TOOtorw- dollar, per tan 

xg*0 137-90 Jan 13X50 139*0 138*0 13X80 

209*0 M3*0 Mar 143*0 14470 14370 14660 

206*0 149 JO May 149*0 1SXS0 149 JO 15X10 

3SStS Jul 15X00 15X70 154*0 15520 

I5HK 5 |U » 1SM0 J 57 - 50 >5650 157*0 

32-S ISH® 55? 3 WJ0 ,5U0 wjn 

160*0 Oct 160*0 16QOO 168*0 160*0 

w*» MAW Dec 16600 J6600 165*0 16600 

Est Sales Prev.Sales 18*77 

Prav. Day Open int 38*64 uaW7 


SILVER (COME3D 

M00 trey air cents per tray 06 

1575* 61X0 Jan 9910 610* 593* 6069 —16 

723J 6165 Feb 610* — 19 

1620* 618* MPT 61X0 620* 61X5 6WJ —4* 

151X0 627* May 634* 629* 621 J am* — «j 

W610 637* JUl 634* 637* 631* 633* —4* 

1183* 648* SOP 642* 647* 642* 6437 — 63 

352-2 ^ «« **“ MM 660* 46X3 — 4J 

1215* 687* Jan 666* — 4J 

!i£2 an Mar ““ 677* 477-6 —62 

1040* 699* May 490* —44 

MS* 719* Jul 7060 706* 704* 702* — 4J 

940* 745* Sep 71X6 —64 

Est Scries 20*00 Pray. Safes 17*61 
Prey. Day Open Int. 81 ASS up 1.185 


JAPANESE YENUMM1 


004695 *03984 MOT *04000 *04001 

004450 *04019 Jun *04014 *04019 

004150 *04087 Sep 

0043SD *04184 Dec 
Est. Sates 6334 Prev. Sotos 1387 
Prav. Day Open Int 13*12 affix 


*04004*84812 — W 


SWISS FRANC f IMMJ 
Sperf rauL -l petal equals 9 0 Own 


Sales M Burrs are unofficial- Yearly htehs and laws reflect 
Itw prav taus 5& weeks Plus the current week, but not ttie latest 
trading day. Where a split or stock dividend amounting lo 25 
prncent or more has been paid, the year's htgtHow range and 
dividend are shown far the new stock only. Unless otherwise 
noted, rotes ol dividends are annual disbursements based on 
Ihe Latest declaration. 

0 — dividend also extrolsl. 

b— annual note pf dividend plus Stock dividend. 

C— liquidating dividend, 
ad — called, 
d — new yearly law. 

e— dividend declared or paid In preceding 12 months, 
g — dividend In Canadian funds, sublect to 15% non-restdence 
to*. 

1 — dividend doctored after sptlt-up or stock dividend. 

I —dividend paid this veer, omitted, deferred, or no action 


§2 19 3 f $£ 51% aSt+% TVrWoiedfmj 

S £% iJ!Su U 3 I n ?r ^ft SS SSt 5S LONDON - The International Sugar 

2* ISftSM ’St’S. 4W two 15% ll^-ft ^ re 5 ne ;; •«« 011 Y T??* 

41% g% unirinn *2 * 24 is 34% 36% »% after doobts had been expressed as to whether it 

T6 H 9V. uiSSS 1-56 ^ 7 ira* i5ft Sft «%z V would gam enough support to be ratified, die 

3?* 22* uwbc .12 j 7 1840 33% 3?J+ % International Sugar Organization said Thurs- 

13 .5% USHom 512 6V 6% 6%— % day. 

io ^ ^ aSj— ii% The doubts were removed when India accept- 


-5035 

■3837 

MO r 

JK2 

*863 

JB 6 

*850 

+9 

4*00 

JHJI* 

Jun 

*895 

*907 

*885 

*895 

+7 

4*30 

*930 

Sep 

*935 

*940 

*930 

*940 

+7 

4340 

*987 

Dec 

*997 

*997 

*997 

*997 

+77 


taKen at latest dividend meeting. 

k — dividend declared or paid mis year, an accumulative 


Eat. Sates 1X128 Prav .Sates 7.184 
Prav. Day Opeon*. 1XX51 upon 


SOYBEAN OIL (CBT} 

60*00 lbs- dollari per 100 lbs. 

305D 22*s Jan 257D 2525 2545 2523 

3M0 2X95 Mar 24*8 2S21 36BS 2X15 

30,10 22*0 May 2460 2423 34*0 34*5 

3020 Jul 2430 2645 3430 2442 

2720 2Z50 Aug 3430 24*1 3430 3430 

25*5 2Z50 Sep 34*5 24*5 24*5 24*5 

26J10 2X90 OCt 2375 

2475 2220 Dec 23*0 2360 2X40 2X50 

Est. Solos Prev.Sales 8237 

Prav. Day Open Ird. 40099 off 165 


PLATINUM CNTMEJ 
T-S 50 trey tHr do Ikes per tray ol 

■* f«*a 27200 Jan 272*0 275*8 272*0 27320 —JO 

*47^5 2^*0 Apr 279*0 281*0 27830 27830 —70 

iS-5 SS Ju ' ISP* ’ a * x 2w - , ° — 1 'At 

WJ*0 KL» Od 29X50 29X50 25X50 29X40 -2JQ 

37150 305*0 Jan 257.10 —XX 

+22 Est Sates 1*47 Prav. Satas XI TO 
+25 Prav. Dov Open InL 14689 up 164 
+27 


Industrial 


OATS (CBT) 

5*00 bu minimum- do! tars per bushel 
l-Sf* !2 M° r «J"6 1*0% 179ft 1*0% 

21, t 121 Mav 176ft 176ft 176ft 176ft 

178% 1*9 Jul 172 172% 172 172 —*0% 

J-ZL. i-£L w ]£i ]£} J- 47 +■“« 

1*2% 172% Dec 1*9% 

Est. Salas Prav. Sates 169 

Prav. Day Open Int. 3755 up 19 



117*0 113*0 11X45 —2*5 
11675 11275 11320 — 220 
11650 11525 11320 -XX 
117*0 115*0 112X -XX 
417 



1*00 txt ft 

Jan 149AB 15X30 149» 154X +450 
Mar 159X 14X90 15870 11X70 +Zffl 
May 167-50 I49X 16650 169*0 +1X 
Jul 17230 17610 17170 T7X40 +1*0 
JW* 17X70 17570 17440 17550 +130 
•*«y 17*50 17630 17478 17SJ0 +*0 

Jmi 10050 MOJO 18050 180*0 +1*0 
Mar 1825D 

"rev. Sotos U21 
L 9747 Oft 182 


COTTON 2(NYCE) 
50*00 ibv- cents per to. 


GOLD CCOMEX) 
iw troy ar-^pi tars per fray at 
S3 wi*o Jan xzto 

52X00 303JH Feb 3DZS0 

NVjr 304*0 
*St 387*0 Apr 30650 

Jun 310*0 

Aug 31430 
OCt 327 20 


79*5 

4X12 

Mar 

4&95 

£7*5 

6550 

6699 

+95 

79*0 

44*0 

MOV 


£7*0 

44*5 

£793 

+98 

79*5 

6740 

Jul 

67*0 

48JS 

47*0 

6X55 

+66 

77 JO 

6725 

Od 

4X25 

£8*5 

68*5 

6X60 

+JS 

73*0 

6X00 

Dec 

6X30 

48*0 

6X25 

6X75 

+44 

76*5 

69*5 

Mat 

May 

49*5 

69*5 

69*5 

6990 

70J5 

+60 

+60 


Issue with dividends In arrearx. 

hew Issue in the past 52 weeks. The Moh-iowranoe begins 
with Ihe start of Irodlrrs. 
nd — nexl day delivery. 

P/E — pclce-eornlnfls ratio. 

r — dividend declared or paid In Preceding 12 months, plus 
stock dividend. 

S— Stock split. Dividend begins with date at Split, 
sis — sales. 

t — dividend paid In stock In preceding 12 months, e st imated ■ 
cash value on ex-divldend or ex-dlstrlbutton daft 
u — new yearly tosh, 
v— trading halted. 

vl — In bankruptcy or receivership or being reorganized uo- 
defthe Bankruptcy Act, or secun lies assumed by such oom- 

pantes. 

wd — when distributed, 
rri — when issued, 
ww — with wwrmtls. 

* — ex -dividend or ex-rights, 
xdis — ex-diitributton. 
xw— without worrorls. 
y — e*-dhv idend and sole* Into IL 
vld — yield, 
i — sola In toll. 


411k 32% Unlflim 33 M 

34 ft 25% UJerBk 1*6 41 
M 9ft UtdMM 

3% 2% UPkMn 

35 22 UtalrG .12 J 

13 5% USHom 

38% 28ft USLeas 
srv n USSfroe 
33 1 6 2! USSteei 
58% 49ft USSttnf 
157 115ft USSttpr 
31% 22% USSttnf 
43 31ft USTab 
70% ffl% USWast 
41H 2B% UnTdis 
35ft 27ft UTchpt 
22ft 17% UnTVel 
17 12 UWRS 

34% X Unttrde 
24 14ft Untvor 
27% 18% UnhrFd 
■22 15ft ULaafe 
43ft X Unocal 
72% 45 Uplahn 
35% 23% USLIFE 
34V1 25 U5LF pf 
9ft Bft UsffeFd 
25% 20% UtaPL 
25ft 21ft UtPLof 
25% 21ft UIPLpf 
21% 17% UtPLof 
19 ISft UtPLpf 


« 2+ft -i % i nc ooudls were removed wnen India accept- 

241 si aS si + % ed the pact at the last minuie. Thai put the 
S number of sugar-exporting countries canyin® 
” m wft % oul membcrsh ip procedures by the Dec. 

1 ^ IS; »» deadline at more than the minimum needed for 


* 2*63 22% 21ft 2T%— % 
9 X 15% 15% 15% 


18 115 36V 26% 26ft 


the agreement to take effect. 

The new accord, which was adopted by sug- 


12 5 17ft 17ft 17ft— % VJ aufi- 

M s 23ft 23% a%—% ar-cradiiig countpes last July in Geneva, needed 

8 37S 35% 3^-1% the support of countries accounting for 50 per- 

” 449 SS SSI % ^ of world exports and 50 percent of worid 


9% 9ft 9ft + ft I 


10 992 22ft &% 22U. + ft 


5 19ft 19% 19% — ft 
10 17ft 17ft 17ft— % 


32% 21ft VFCorp 1.12 42 7 

23% 5% Votoro 

3t It Voter pf 3*4 19* 

5% 2ft Voter In 
24% Mft Van Dr s S2 At S 
7ft 2ft Varen 

58% 30ft Vartan 34 7 13 

15% 9% vara JO 3.9 B 

24ft 17ft vecco JB 1* 12 
6% 3% Vendo 
Wft «ft Vests* 1-200117 


X wS^ft 3 2%+% unports to enter into force. 

>92 22ft 22% gft + ft The International Sugar Organization said 
is Mft n% US + % that 53.8 percent of the world's exports were 
il t7ft 17% u*~ now covered by the pan as a result of signings 

— 1 at the United Nations and subsequent ratifies' 

X Mft M% Mftj. J t ! on ? ? f P rov “ionnl applications. On 

74 6% 4% Aft + % the importers’ side, the figure was 73 J percent 
S '5t ’SS 'm + * The new accord replaced the old pact which 
3 ^ lft" * expired after seven years on the last day of 
“ Mft 10 Wft + ft pecraben The new convention has no econom- 
17 20ft ivft 20ft + % »c provisions and so cannot regulate either 
S lovS 4** tow + % world supplies or prices. 


60 24% 24% 26ft + ft 


6% 6ft 6ft+ % 
17ft 17% 17ft + ft 
2% 2ft 2% 


X 2% 2ft 2% 

J 13 386 36% 3* Mft— ft 

49 8 9 Mft 10 TOVi, + ft 

1* 13 717 20* 1V% 20ft + ft 

tO 4% 4% 4% 

1 3 64 10ft W 10ft + ft 


London Commodities 


E8»- Soles XSD0 Prav.Soko. 1288 
Prav. Day OPM1 inf. 16727 uaiu 


Jan. 3 


Paris Commodities 

Jan. 3 


Asian Commodities 

Jan. 3 


Cash Prices Jan. 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CME) 

40*00 Ib6- tents o«- to. 


6750 

62*0 

Fab 

6725 

£7*2 



6837 

6340 

Apr 

6840 

6840 

6740 

6745 

68*7 

4X00 

Jun 

6X15 

6820 

4760 

6765 

4645 

43.15 


46*5 

66*5 

6SJB 

65*5 

6X10 

6140 

Oct 

6420 

£4*0 



65 40 

6360 

Dee 

65*0 

65*5 

6X10 

6X30 


Fob 331*0 
APT 337 JO 
Jun 34320 
Aug 351*0 
OCt 

Prav. Sates 34*00 
rtf.170285 up 2*78 


HEAT1NO OIL (NY ME) 
42*00 gal- cants per oal 


Est. Sates 16*61 Prev.Satas 11*19 
Prav. Day Oornint. 58*54 upB12 


Financial 


8X75 

7070 

Feb 

7125 

7X10 

70X5 

71.11 

+JM 

8X60 

69*4 

Mar 

70*0 

71.10 

6923 

7X14 

—sa 

8X75 

£7*1 


69*0 

»» 

47*0 

«U9 

—.17 

0X40 

47*0 

May 

4X30 

48*0 

*6*5 

67*0 

—.14 

7840 

£690 

Jun 

4720 

£720 

6730 

66*0 

— .W 



Jul 




67.15 


7X50 

7X50 

Doc 




7190 




Mar 




£10 


Est. Sotos 


Prav. sates 1X977 





Figures In sterling per metric ton. 
Gosall in Ui floKars per metric Ion. 
Gold In U5- dollars per ounce. 


Sugar to Frendi Francs per metric ton. 
Ottw figures hi Francs per ISO kg. 


11920 1171 
128*0 1262 


117*0 118*0 130*0 12060 
12S*0 12680 127*0 127*0 {tec 


Prav. Day Opwi Int. 22780 off 2J91 


136*0 134*0 13XB0 136*0 137*0 137*0 
1*1*0 14120 142*0 U120 14L« 146*0 


SUGAR 

Htefc 

Lew 

Clew 

ora# 

Mar 

1*35 

1*10 

Ull 

1J13 

— 33 

Mav 

1*85 

1X55 

1*63 

1*64 

— 7D 

A UP 

1*18 

1490 

1440 

1450 

— X 

Od 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1494 

1496 

— 21 

Dec 

N.T. 

N.T. 

1X40 

1J7D 

— 20 

Mar 

1680 

1475 

1671 

1660 

— 24 


HONC-NONC GOLD FUTURES 
UXJNronna 

Clan Previous 
Hteh low bu Ask Bid Ask 
Jan _ N.T. N.T. 3DZ00 306*0 30&*0 308*0 
Fab - OW*0 30600 3ra*0 305*0 30600 310*0 


SEESS*" 1 Th. aST 

Prinlcioth 64/30 M yd ^ o.^ QM 

fran'ycJKj _ 473*0 45X00 

hy~2 Phlte, Ton 21X00 mm 

Capper gleet, lb _. SS 

Tin (Strnrtsl. lb 

l Bl «T7brrZ ^ ^ 

PalkxUum.az V47 77^ 

SHver N.Y.a* 

Source: AP. 


I 309*0 312*0 314*0 


FEEDER CATTLE (CMS! 

46*W lbs.- cants par Hx 

72*0 4575 Jan 71*7 71*7 71*5 71 JO —35 

73*5 6575 Mar 73*5 72*7 73*0 73*7 —32 

72*0 67*0 AST 7X30 7X50 71*0 71*7 — *0 

7020 6495 MOV 711*5 70*5 6977 69.90 —77 

70*0 4640 Aug 69*0 49*6 49*5 49.12 —78 

6870 67*0 5«P 6870 68*0 48*5 68*5 — *0 

4825, 67.10 OCt 68.10 6610 4770 47.90 —35 

Est. SOies MU prav. Sates U77 
Prav. Day Open Ini. 8J23 up SO 


HODS (CME) 

3L0Q0 n*L- cents ocr lb. 

58*0 47 J7 Fab 5X50 5X50 5285 5X97 —78 

54*5 4X10 Apr SOLIS SQ.15 49*5 4972 — *5 

5X40 48*0 Jim 54*5 5670 5*35 5*52 —JO 

5X77 4695 Jul 5520 5X20 5670 55*0 —52 

56*7 47 JO Aug 5610 5610 53*5 53*2 —AO 

5175 45*0 Oct 4970 4970 49.10 4920 —A0 

5085 44*0 Doc 49 JO 49 JO 4080 49*7 —35 

4970 4625 Fab 49 JO 49 JO 49 JO 48AS — *5 

47*5. 4675 Apr 4610 +*S 

Est. sates 6*39 Prav. Sa tea 4*48 
Prav. Doy Open int. 242% up 241 


US T. BILLS (IMMJ 
Si ml D Ion- Pts of M0 peL 

91.95 87*9 Mar 91*6 9177 91*5 9173 +AS 

91*6 07.M Jim 91.M 9125 91.14 91*1 +A3 

9121 *6*4 Sap 9071 9078 9071 9074 

90*2 8X77 DOC 90*7 90*0 9037 9035 

WUI «**0 Mar 9OC0 90JB7 9032 9002 —*2 

90*6 87*1 Jun *978 8978 8978 8975 -JJ2 

*971 8600 Sap 19 JO — *2 

EsLSatas PnnLSates 6569 

Prav. Day Onan lat. 4XSZ1 up 1*31 


CRUDE OIL(NYME) 
1*00 bbt- da I tors car bbL 


. N -T. N-T. 1*9*0 149*0 150*0 751*0 i 


10 ¥6 TREASURY (CBTJ 
5100000 prtn- pfs B Xtadi Of IM pet 


81-27 

70-25 

Mar 

79-3 

79-21 

79-1 

79-23 

81-7 

70-9 

Jun 

78-20 

796 

78-20 

79-2 

80-23 

75-18 

top 




78-15 

7B08 

75-13 

Dec 




77-30 

78-23 

75-18 

Mar 




77-15 

78-9 

77-22 

Jun 




77-1 

EsLSotes 


Pr»». Sotos 6645 




31 JO 

2564 

Fob 

36*7 

3113 

31-30 

2523 

Mar 

2X94 

3101 

3145 

2X5B 

APT 

2X82 

2590 

3028 

2545 


££ 

3X78 

29-55 

25*0 

Jun 

25*3 

29-54 

25*5 

Jul 

2SL70 

2X72 

2997 

2629 


2X70 

2570 

29 JO 

3620 


29 JO 

3620 

Del 



29 JO 

2540 




2950 

3620 


2X57 


2944 

2946 

Fab 



»A5 

2945 

Mar 



2945 

2X70 

Apr 



27 JO 

27 JO 

May 



2L70 

3170 






Jan 



Esi Sates 


Prev.Sales 1X551 


Mar 16420 16X20 164*0 164*0 165*0 14620 
May 17060 17000 170*0 17120 T7Z2D 17X20 


2*46 ion at X tons. 
I COCOA 


7T- 

r v 

rtr 


1*876 L865 1*871 1*73 1*73 1*74 
1*68 1*80 l*ffi 1*83 1*85 1*84 1 


1*95 1*87 1JW? 1*88 1*90 1*91 
1*94 1*99 )*90 1*91 1*93 1*94 
1*45 1*40 1*41 1*43 1*43 7*48 


Est. val.: 1*00 tots of SO tons. Prey, actual 
sates: 225 lots. Opart tatorasf: 16267 
COCOA 

Mar 2*070 2*45 2*70 2*72 +5 

May M.T. N.T. 2*00 2*90 Unch. 

Jlv N.T. N.T. 2*85 — Unch. 

Sop N-T. N.T. 2*90 ZIOC Unch. 

Dk N.T. N.T. 2*40 2*50 —25' 

Mar N.T. N.T. 2*tt — — 25 

Mo* M.T. H T 2*4Q — 25 

Est VOL: 15 tats at TO tons. Prav. actual 


□•C - N.T. N.T, 324*0 32600 332*0 33600 
Volume: 24 late of TOO ax 7^ 


20-23 26-28 

6+47 69ft- 72 
5*538 62335 

0*5 0*9 

171 163 

LOBS 6535 


+ s SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
Z3 UXSpct aaaca 


1*40 1*34 1*35 1*«8 1*35 1*40 I salto: IOW*-OPsn lnteraN: HI 


Prav. Day Open int 49*09 up 2 


Prav. Day Open Int. 37271 up 7271 


Stock Indea 


May N.T. N.T. 1*30 1*55 1*30 1*70 

1256 late of 10 tons. 

COFFEE 

Jan Z25D 2221 2235 2738 2759 2261 

Mar 2780 2240 X273 2277 27X 2790 

MOV 2795 2771 2790 2792 2795 2799 

Jlv 2*90 2773 2794 2799 2793 2794 

S«P 2798 2775 2796 2799 27S3 2JS4 

Nov 279S 277* 2792 2795 2711 Z2B3 

Jan N.T. N.T. 2286 27*7 2770 2730 

, 3734 lots of S l«n». 

! GASOIL 


Fob 305 JB 302*0 

Mar N.T. N.T. 

API N.T. N.T. 

Volume: 385 lots o* 100 oz_ 
KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 


J fw Sa«to Settle 
302*0 30X90 306® 

N.T. 30690 31640 

N-T. 307*0 3I2J0 


Dividends 


Jan 

N.T, 

N.T. 

— 

2J10 

— 30 

Mor 

2490 

2490 

2480 

2495 

Unch. 

May 

H.T. 

N.T. 

1480 

1500 

+ 10 

Jir . 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2460 

2J10 

+ 5 

Sep 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2440 

_ 

UndL 

Nev 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2440 

— 

+ 5 

Jan 

N.T. 

N.T. 

2457 

— 

+ 6 


Esf. voL: 20 lots et 5 tens. Prav. actual 8*®¥ 
sates: 2 tots. Open interest: 292 Jim. 

Source: Bourse du Commerce . 


PORK BELLIES <CME) 

38*00 lbs.- cants par m. 

61*5 40*5 Feb 77*0 77 A0 7537 1537 —2*0 

8170 40.10 Mar 7720 7750 75*7 75*7 — 1DC 

8X00 61.15 Mav 7825 7 675 77*2 77*2 —7XB 

82.47 4X15 JUt 7U0 78*0 77.17' 7730 —137 

80*5 462D Alia 7X90 7X90 74*0 74*0 —1*7 

7X15 4X15 Fab 7640 7640 4620 4620 —2*0 

7140 6420 Mar 67*0 —3*0 

Est. Sales M49 Prev.Sales X34l 
Prav. Day Open Int. 1X806 up 299 


US TREASURY BONDS (CBT) 
(8 oct-noWW-pte 632ndsof loot 


(8 Dct-SIOQ 
77-15 
77-15 
76-2 
76-3 
73-30 
70-4 
49-25 
6WK 
667 
48-11 
67-19 
Est. Soles 


TC-cts&32ndaofia0pci) - 
57-27 Mar 7TKI 70-28 70-3 70-21 

57-20 Jim 49-10 70-4 69-10 69-2 9 

S7-10 Sag 4M7 69-U 4677 «M 

574 Dk 468 48-28 48* 40-33 

57-2 MOT 47-25 46-12 47-25 469 


5+29 Jun 67-13 47-31 47-13 67-26 49 

5+29 Sep 67-13 67-19 67* 67-15 +9 

5+25 Dec 67-3 674 66*30 67-5 +9 

5+27 MO- 6+17 <7 6+19 6+38 49 

44-3 Jun 4+11 4+23 4+11 4+20 +9 

6+21 Sep 6+13 6+16 66ft 6+13 49 

Prav.soieslOW* 


SP COMP. INDEX (CME) 
potato and cents 

1BA2S 153*0 Mac 16825 169*0 167*0 167*5 1*5 

,71 -2 jn » 

JS52 S? 4 1700 ,7M0 ,7M6 171 “ -*- 30 

I772D 17726 Due 17+00 —1*0 

M. Sates «M6« Prav. Seles 3X700 
prav. Day Open Int. 41*83 oft 1.108 


Prey. Day Onan lnL1992M off 3*14 


VALUE UNE(KC8T> 
points and cents 

S538 5SS 5ST 183 igffi £1 zS 

Prev.Day Open inf. 424D up 332 


COFFEE C(NYCSCE) 

37J00 U*l- cents per 1 A 

15X50 12X50 Mar 14M? 142.90 140*0 14271 +1*0 

152*0 122*1 MOV 13928 140*0 13B65 13928 +20 

14920 121*0 JUl 13720 13X50 13725 13X50 *M 

1 47 JO 127*0 SOP 136*0 13+90 13520 136*5 +*7 

141*0 12925 Dec 134*1 13X50 134*0 135J0 — *0 

13420 128JD Mr 134SS +*• 

13225 131*0 MOV 133*1 

Eal. Soles 3*00 Prev. Sotos 1*10 
Prav. Day Open un. 12*57 up 26 


(MIMA (CBT) 

SMM00 Prln-Ptea32ndsof 100 pc» 

499 57-4 Mar 40-19 68-26 68-17 48-25 

695 57-17 Jun 6745 6+3 67-25 68-1 

4+20 59-13 Sen 47-13 47-14 67-12 47-14 

68-13 57* Dee 6+26 4+39 6+26 66-30 

67-15 58-20 Mar 4+13 6+15 6+13 6+15 

67* 5+2S Jun 6+38 6+1 65-28 66 

Sen 4+23 4+23 65-21 6541 
Est. Sates Prev.Satas 896 

Prev.Day Ocan Inf. 7*67 t)f>231 


NYSE COMP. INDEX (HYPO 
potato and c ant s 

103*0 8820 Mar 9725 9X10 9+40 96*1 —IS 

105*0 KM Jun 99*5 9920 fXW »1o -JB 

W5JQ 91 JB top 1Q!*0 101 JS 10UU 9935 -JB 

gstsmes 11*94. PiSSfsqfcs 8314 ,0W0 

Prcv. Day Open Inf. 7237 upM 


Jan n72S 214*0 21650 21675 21X50 71X75 
Feb 21775 Z14J0 216J0 2167S 2I5J0 21X75 
Mar 21X25 21225 21X75 214*0 31225 21X50 
API 21X50 21X25 21 1.75 212*0 ZKLOO 210JB 
MOV 71X00 711*0 312*0 21225 21Q25 2HL50 
Jun N.T. N.T. 114*0 21235 209 JC 310J0 
jlv N.T, N.T. moo 214*0 a»J0 21 2JD 
Aug N.T. UT. WOJDC 72X00 206*0-212*0 
Sep _ N.T. N.T. 200*0 224*0 20X00 214*0 
XS58 lots <rf TOO tons. 

COLD 

Fab 30610 30070 304 JO 30650 307.10 307 JO 
API 337*0 305*0 NXL N.Q. NJX N.O. 

517 Ms of Mlmrac. 

Sources: neuters amt London Petroteum Ex. 
change (oasotu. 


DM Futures Options 
Jan. 3 


Close 

BM, Ask 

Jan 187*0 188.00 

Feb T9Z50 1912S 

Mnr 19775 198*0 

Apr — 71058 70650 

May 306*0 207*0 

Jun 209*0 210*0 

Volume: 26 late. 
SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Singapore cento par kilo 
date 


Previous 
BU Aik 
NA NA 


company Par Amt Pay Roc 

INCREASED 

Consol Cap inc Trud M.17% l-ji 1-14 
USUAL 

Branfon Banks Q ,157 1.5c j.-ic 

Caterpillar Trot Co 0.17% MO 1-18 
Eaton Vanes H Y F O .15 i.ff 


Pray teas 
BM Ask 


Eaton Vance GO Tr. 

First Conn Bancors 
Godfrey Co 
Houston Indus. Inc 
Mutool Svas Ll ins 
Nob i* Ami. inc 
Perm Square Mil Fd 
V<*T Dvsen Air Inc 


QikWB MsrcasHli Exttsnae. 
W.Ganm kkrt-n^ai marts cb* per not 


Stake Cotta-Settle 
Price Mar Joe Stef 

II M? — — 

n B*o 1.10 — 

» ojs in 120 

34 0.16 8-51 9*5 

35 407 830 640 


Psts-tottte 
» ta JB» 
0.17 — — 

8J3 642 - 

CUS 1*4 Uf 

'£ ™ r 

X14 - - 


RSSTJan— 16875 14925 1782$ Irajn 

RSS1 Fjb^ 173*0 17125 17X50 174*0 

51 J7 Jon— 160.00 161*0 160.75 14175 

3 Jan_ 15BJ* 159*0 15871 1597J 

RSS4Jan_ 151*0 IS100 I5T75 5X75 

RSS5J<m- 143*0 145*0 14375 14575 

KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
Malaysian rtnggtts pgr 25 ten 

Close Prav tons 


■157 |-25 1-15 
.12% 2-30 1-18 
.15 1-31 1-2 

.10 1-31 1-2 

JO 1-25 1-14 
-13 2-1 MS 

+2 3-11 3-1S 
^ 1-21 1-14 
*3 1-28 1-14. 

JO 1-25 :* 

.10 1-31 I-ftU 


Aanuat. 

Source: UP/. 


.- M-MorttUy, Q-fluartsTty; S-5ent- 


EC Inflation Rate 
Is Said to Narrow 5 


London Metals Jan. 3 

Figures In sterling per m stele ton. 
Silver fn pence per tray ounce. 


Csrtmateo total vgLUM 
Caftj wed. vet. 4*17 apse 
Pits: wed. vsLUB eaan 
Source: (ME 


. Votome : 0 tote at 25 Ions. 

Source: Pouters 


Commodity Indexes 


SUGAR WORLD 11 (NYCSCE) 
11X000 ltn.-eenH par 1b. 


1360 

4*2 

Mar 

615 

616 

4*6 

601 

1 -J8 

HUB 

634 

Mav 

447 

648 

629 

649 

— *3 

9.95 

463 

Jul 

4*9 

4*3 

673 

683 

+*1 

925 

490 

Sea 

5*5 

xas 

5*0 

404 

i — m 

9*5 

5*7 

Od 

X22 

«*) 

X16 

529 

! — *2 

950 

555 

Jan 




X70 

i -an 

9*3 

6*2 

Mar 

AT? 

620 

XI6 

AM 

—07 

XSO 

150 

MOV 




tM 



Est. Sales 10*73 Prev.Sales 6132 
Prav. Day Open Ini B1J02 up 793 
COCOA (NYCSCE) 

10 mefrKtons-SPer ton 


CERT. DEPOSIT (IMM) 

SI mlllton- pis of 100 pet 

91.17 8X43 Mar 9085 9029 908) 9092 

90-55 8X30 Jun 9X24 *026 9024 «L33 

9M6 EX*0 top 8**1 89*1 89*1 89*8 

»*3 8S24 Dec 8926 

M.10 86*6 Mar 18*9 

8880 864] Jun 8X67 

87*6 07.16 Sap 8X38 

Est. Sates 966 Prev.Sala 566 
Prav. Day Open ini V4732 up 139 


Clan 

n/uxxtY'x 962.10 f 

Reuters 1,91+00 

DJ. Futures 12187 

Com. Research Bureau _ 26120 

Woody's : base 100 : Dec 31. 1931. 
p - preliminary; f - final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. 18. 1931. 
□aw Jones : base 100 ; Dec 31. 1974. 


Prsvlous 

WCSOf 

1,91950 

123J6 

243A0 


Today PrevfaiH 

High orMe copper cothodw: 
scot 1.13600 L 13650 1,13600 1,137*0 
3 month s 1.14 X50 1.14X00 1.142*0 U42J0 
Cower asltiotitt: 


Britain's Jobless Rate 
Was 13.4% Inst Month 


S&P 100 Index Options 

Jan. 3 


2570 

1988 

MOT 

2021 

2033 

2018 

2038 

+3 

2570 

3020 

Mfry 

304> 

sa 

2048 

2056 

+2 

3400 

2049 

Jul 

3056 

2053 

9157 

46 

2415 

2053 

SeF 

2065 

2065 

2055 

2060 

« 

2337 

1999 

Dec 

tun 

3014 

3000 

20H 

+*» 

2095 

300 

MOT 




2019 

+* 



May 




2009 



Est. Sates 1*29 Prav. Sates 1*25 
Prev.Dav Open Inf. 21*43 up 407 


EURODOLLARS (lfAM) 

SI millten-ptsaf 1 DO act. 

90*3 8XV4 Mar 9044 90*0 9043 90*7 

W22 8Z49 Jun >9*5 09*9 19*3 89*2 

8924 66S Sep >925 894S 0923 89*0 

»20 8680 Dec 1X91 89*0 8891 8X97 

«M 16.10 Mar 8X51 8X64 8XS BUI 

8841 0673 Jun CX23 8X27 BL22 mi. 

SKI £•« Sep 8735 8794 87.91 EM 

8927 89*5 Dec 8770 

Esf. Sates 17*95 Prav. tote* IZ7S5 
Prav. Dev Open Inf. 86654 up 1*26 


Market Guide 


Chjcggo Beard et Trade 
pricogg M ercantile EkOwnge 
j*d«TBttanot Monetary Market 


NYCSCE: 
NYCE: 
COM EX: 
NYME: 
KCBT: 
NT PE: 


OfOrfcow Mercantile Exciionee 
New York Cocoa. Swear, coffee E xt hc n ga 


»*ew York Cotton Endorse 
Csnunadfiy Exctanga, New York 
NewYort Mercantile EschcBige 
Kornis ary Board of Trade 
New York Futures Estfianoe 


L4Pd;jpel 
3mon1lH 
Zlnc:sp«T 
3 mantes 
Silver :spat 
3 months 
Aluminium: 
s pot 

! ) months 


Ntos: The Associated Press Pf 

Spot M2U0 l,13&*0 1.128*0 1.130*0 r nwrvrw r\ _ I- . , 

j months 1,143*0 i.i45*o U4X0O 1.145*0 LONDON — Despite a slight 

Ttai spot 9945*0 9*5100 9975*0 9,915*0 dcdioe ill the nnmhP r of DeOTlle 

smwrtte 9,m*o 9^X00 95x5 without Jobs. Britain's une^Sy- S" 

S2 Sra S^ 00 0X01 ratc was unchanged in De- IS 
SS SS 1S2n from a month eariier at \% 

sum 529*0 s39*d 540*0 13.4 percent of the work force, the >2 
54.*o 541*0 551*0 552*0 Department of Employmern said " 


ChlcogoBoord 


l The ■issocuuetl Press 

1SJS BRUSSELS - The European 
1 J “ '“Onimunity’s average inflation rat* 
was 6 5 percent for the 12-raontl 
— period io November 1984, the EC* 
statistical agency, Enmstu, an- 
18 nounced Thursday. It was the low- 
est rale in more than !2years, Eur- 
ostat said. 

Cr^r, , . _ V 


Co9s-U=St POh-LUt 
J* Feb mot Jan Fee Mar 


Consumer prices in the EC rose 


— 14ft 
7ft 9% 
3ft 5ft 
lft 3 
ft lft 
1/16 % 
1716 3/16 


% 6 5 j'i* 

1SD6 lft, 3% 
3% 4ft 4% 
8 % 8 % 
n - lift 


2\-2 52" w*o Thursday. TStalSuSSw.^ 


3 months 93650 92X08 939*0 930*0 Th* aa^nrv cn!H „ n T Vtel Pel veiotna 1(0094 

Nickel. Spa I 6190*0 4195*0 6T7SJXJ 6185*0 1 , 5310 *J€CailOerS Ufl- Total p«f open Ini 35X121 

3 months 6305*0 4210*0 62is*o 6220*0 employment rate was up from 118 , 

percent in December 1983. 


months to Novemben West Ger 
EfoL^? bourB ’ 3 P®* 0 ^ GlSt 


Fran LJeim,ar ^ 6 percent- 
^nce. 7 percent; Irelmuffi 7 mt' 


Source: CMOS. 




'-Vt ija 


\lTrt 


1 M ’ 




lilt r.ik-nwdr 


^bnn 




■■ 


^ 


VV 


vW:--r. 




Sr-. , -*\.r 


.’<J 














S-SJ 


\£G> 


>> 

'fH, 

^ndar 

°-v Id s 

-^T^rJhf 


- 

Vi } .f4‘J5 


■S>7$ 

:■:' 

r -wloqyj g* 

■ : '^S 

try ™(? 


• •-Jld 6^7 
■:. r J^«t 

-. ..- .'s‘‘0!af 

- 

• :: .' S: ^^ 
. ;; 

.". * - ■*'■ icijgjp- 
,'-j- 


. ■■ ..-y 


TffiiS 


P .*a» 

•V , 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 4, 1985 


BUSINESS ROUNDUP — — — -- - ■ ■ - — 

^ Betters Western Union Lenders Defer Interest, Agree to New Loan 

jlW U -lOStr The Assorted Press , " 

UPPER Sa nni fdtvcd *, to the banks, are secured by a first step,” said Robot W. U- a quarterly dividend for the first Western Union spokesma 

XIiavuI Jcrsev — r , u ®J® l 1 lhe . 00 tporaiion’s assets. venitel Western Union's newly ume in 35 wan, a third-quarter net rcnR. Bechtel said that if th 

IfWCCuSQieS finals h 3 v^“ The loan is due March 28 whQc elected duinnan of the board and loss of S15J million, and a request pany woo the wage cone 


Page 13 


PCOPU 


UPPER Sahhi f Dmrh to the banks, arc secured by a firs; step,” said Robot W. L* 

vauR Wtsiem Union's newly 


The Auoaaud Press 

■ NEW YORK — Major U.S. ic- 
taflers on Thursday rtyoned mixed 
December sales, and industry ana- 
lysts said the results for the stores' 
most critical month were ge ne rally 
disappointing. 

Sears. Roebuck and Co, the 
largest U.S. retailer, said its sales 
for die five weeks ended Dec. 29 
rase 4.7 percent over the level of a 


K mart Carp, said sales for stores ny JJ ,! °‘ ,ts ruu “ ciaJ difficult! 
open more than a year spurted 124 ... ** ie ncw loan is guaranteed 
percent. The No. 2 retailer in die “? TKJr ? U00 ^ 1116 8«araa 
United States promoted its rner- “ weU “ die corporation’s exisi 
ebandise very aggressively through- 
rat the season. tv _ b 

J.C Penney Ca. ranked third. A 3T6Ilt Jf imi 
said sales mcreased 6.8 percent. 

“The sales overall were below T A C^ll Aff 
expectations. In contrast to the 1 ^ OCil UU 
double-digit gains that many retail- __ 

?3?Sb"2S.“i£s? Bumble Bee 

said Jeffrey Feiner, a retail analyst By Bill Ritter 

with the investment firm Merrill Lujupb 

Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Inc. SAN DIEGO — Castle & Cot 

David Taylor, an analyst with ^ nc -* in its continuing effort to 
Prudential-Bache Securities Inc, vest itself of its fish-packing ope 
said: “It was a very mixed bag. It Jions. says that it has agreed to • 


Jer w u7«m.TT ■ Jr** on me corporation s assets. yam, western union s newty 
ficials ^ loan is due March 28 while elected chairman of the board and 

lend- h*r.t* ! k m0iraced j t ^ al 31 die deferred interest is due April 1, chief executive officer. “The loan 
I^TlKi.^ ^“ dlodefer ^ consummated today helps the cor- 

ments nn ,^^ 0D ui interest pay- Western Union also said it has potation meet its immediate cash 
25? on loans and have made an agreed to issue immediately to the hods." 

fo*coSL!S ° f — '° warrants to buy 500.000 But he said the company is coo- 

iarv t.. ™bsid- shares of common stock of the cor- turning negotiations with its lend- 

Thr J e !?F^ ph 9°' P oralxon ’ 80431 under certain cir- ers to provide additional financing 

that 1 ctnnstances, warrants to buy an ex- seeded to meet remaining cash re- 

^25OJ»0 shares in April quiranenis for t£S5iarttr of 

dSf e ^t« rCS 5f UCnin ^? Its bank The warrants can be exercised this year. 

MM 3S™ 6 wlutfh cxcceth wdiin 10 yean of their dates of Word of (he new loan and de- 

n n frr° ... . .... . issuance and at per-share prices fened intcresipaymcnt agreement 

sure* w mea ’ w ® percent of the average followed weeks of grim news for 

nv of the daily closing prices of the the 144-year-old company. 


a quarterly dividend far the first Western Union spokesman War- 
time in 35 years, a third-quarter net ren R. Bechtel said that if the corn- 
loss of $l£j million, and a request pany won the wage concessions 
for pay cuts from its two unions. and adHiriflrtal nr rangr- 

Union members were to finish meats from the it would be 
voang by tlK aid of the week on an in “an improved position.** 
agreement calling for pay reduc- Mr. Bednd said the $15 


Vew Loan Japan Bank 

Western Union spokesman War- A TlYWlTlltK 
ren R. Bechtel said that if the com- 
pany won the wage ctxtcesaons if 

and arrange, MWmSfT 

meats from the banks n would be c5 


tioos reported to be about 10 per- in interest 


sures arc needed to help the compa- of the daily closing prices erf the 
ny wit of its financial difficulties, common stock for specified mea- 
The new loan is guaranteed by suring periods, 
toe corpora lion and the guarantee, ,l we are pleased that we have 
as weu as the corpora lion’s existing been able u> complete this critical 


nnng negotiations with its lend- cent. 1km loan 

s to provide additional financing The present three-year contract of purpo 
icdcd to meet remaining cash re- ends in July. He do 

liremems for the first quarter of Western Union's stock plunged the com 

is year. to a low of $8,125 a share In 1984. financial 

Word of (he new loan and de- from a per-share high of $39.75. after the 
rred interest payment agreem e n t In trading Thursday on the New was case 
[lowed weeks of grim news for York Stock Exchange, Western Fmazu 

e 144-year-okl company. Union stock dosed at S&5Q, no ed that \ 

Late in November and last change over Wednesday's dose, stem fro 


By Brenda Hagerrv 

rad ibe SI5 raSuii 

LONDON - Japan 

I be med for a range uooal Bank Lid. has eppoinled e 

t , .. , new general manager and three 

to comment on why new ^ memteri 

^ S The London-based consortiura 


conyany am aMe 10 win die consortiura 

fmanoal ^r angema its just weds ^ nann-H Yukio Okumura 
^ tettOO-mOhon credit hne 

cd that Western Umai s problems ^ d Bank Ltd. in 


change over Wednesday's dose, stem from a combination of bad ^ m 

month, the company announced The company had announced its .luck, poor management, and a fast- urVT. ^ v xi,:., 

the cwwdlatlou of a SlOO-naHkm loan agreement after trading ended changing, highly competitive tele- i£5 

line of bank credit, the dapping of for tlJday Wednesday. coonScugns Uu^. 


Rules Eased on Some U.S. Accounts 


By Tom Furlong 

Lax Angeles Times Semce 

LOS ANGELES — Without 
much fanfare, many UJS. hnnir« 
and savings and Icon companies 
have begun offering small deposi- 
tors the opportunity for higher in- 


mrey reiner, a retail analyst By Bill Ritter have begun offering sma ll deposi- 
ts m vestment firm Merrill UsAngda rmaSemce tors the opportunity for higher in- 

1 . Pierce. Fenner & Smith Inc. SAN DIEGO — Castle & Cooke ,ercsi rates on savings and checking 
rid Taylor, an analyst with Inc-.in its continuing effort to di- accounts. 
nfial-Bache Securities Inc, vi esi itself of its fish-packing opera- A new banking guidelin e that 
“It was a very mixed bag. It nons. sa>? that it has agreed to sell w? 11 into effect on Wednesday 
1 like K man had a strong its Bumble Bee Seafoods division stipulates that depositors with rela- 
l A lot of the general mer- to a group of investors led by Bum- uvely small accounts now need 
ising chains like Sears, Pen- blc Sec management. m a i ntain a balance of only SI. 000 

nd Woolworth did not do agreement, announced F 10 receive market rales erf 

Wednesday, is a leveraged buyout, interest on money-market ac- 
rey Edelman, an analyst with management of Bumble Bee counts, time deposits of 7 to 31 
Witter Reynolds Inc, said: borrowing a S40- million down pay- days and so-called “Super Now" 
use of the way the calendar ment a gainsi its existing inventory 


ney and Woolworth did not do 
wdL" 

Jeffrey Eddman. an analyst with 
Dean Witter Reynolds Inc, said: 
“Because of the way the calendar 


checking accounts, which offer fea- 
tures such as interest and revolving 
credit. The minimum had been 
52300. 

The rule change is the latest de- 
velopment in the gradual deregula- 
tion erf the UJS. banking industry. 
On Jan. ], 1986, even the 51,000 
minimum balance will be eliminat- 
ed. 

Previously, savers unable to 
maintain the S2.500 mi nimu m 
could earn an interest rate of 53 
percent on their passbook ac- 
counts, well below the prevailing 
bonk money-market rate of 7.7 to 
8.7 perc e nt. 

The new guideline is optional 


however, and industry surveys indi- 
cate (hat many large financial insti- 
tutions are keeping at least some of 
the S2J500 mini mums. As a result, 
savers seeking higher rates will be 
faring a wide range of choices that 
wil] vary both by institution and by 
account. 

In California, for example. Bank 


Chrysler 
Automating 
3 of Its Plants 

The Associated Press 


Ltd. in Tokyo after three years in 
London. 

Named to the bank's board were 
Hiroshi Karriwa from Sumitomo 
Bank, Teruo Inukai from Tokai 
Bank and Yujiro Oshima from 
Daiwa Securities. They succeed 
Hiroshi Takatori of Total Bank, 


Schaefer Elected 
Caterpillar Chief 

Los Angeles Tuna Serna: 

LOS ANGELES —Caterpil- 
lar Tractor Co. has elected 
George A. Schaefer, vice chair- 
man, to succeed Lee L Morgan 
as ehainwin. 

Mr. Schaefer, 56, joined Cat- 
erpillar in 1951, ana moved up 
through the company's finance 
and accounting staffs. In 1976, 
he was named a vice president , 
in chaige of the company's fT- > 
nanaal and data processing op- 
erations. and became an execu- 
tive vice president in 1981. 

Mr. Schaefer was named a 
director of Caterpillar in 1983, 
and vice duirman last August. 
He will take over as eharnnan 
on Feb. 1, after Mr. Morgan 
-retires. Mr. Morgan will r emain 
on the company's board. Cater- 
pillar said. 


leaving the London-based mer- 
5f rosn, x4 ia !S , ‘S w chant bank of J. Henry Schroder 

ShogoMoiria °f Musutasha Sank Wagg & Co, where he has been a 
and Hiroo Waianabe of Yamatchi dxrartor for 15 years. In 1983, he 
Securities, all of whom are taking advised Hanson on its £280-million 


up new posts within their parent 
companies. 

Japan International Bank is 
owned by Sumitomo Bank Ltd, 


In California, for example. Bank DETROIT — Osrvsler Core, Japan iniernaiionaj name is 
of America has lowered the mini- which was left short of metal- .*?? Sumitomo Bank Ltd, 

mum to 51,000 on Us Super Now stamping capacity by plant do- wisifo^Bank Ltd, Tokai Bank 
account, but is keeping the S2300 smi/b^anseofitt fmailkal crisis. Ltd, Fuu Bank Lld, Yamaichi Se- 
minim um on its money- mar ke t ac- is turning to increased automation, ~ Nusko Securities Co. 

count. including the use erf robots, at three and Daiwa Securities Co. 

“ incrase “ 6c - Bank of America Names 


Money-market accounts are sav- plants to meet an increase in de- 
ings accounts with limited check- mand 
writing privileges, while Super ~ . . . . . . . 

Now accounts generally offer im- W^ncsday that it 

limited check wnting. ™ spend S120 million to install 


Its Manager for Norway 

Bank of America said it has ap- 


feU, the final two weeks were very 311(1 P^B ^ balance, which was ¥ n 1 t. ipxt • mr 1 1 

strong, helping to bail out the 1101 disclosed, from profits over the Japan itRUKS ltS€ll INO# 2k 111 World 
month. Nevertheless it wasn't next ^ ve years- The total value of 1 

“T^-'chmuna, sen™ ™ On Technology Spending in 1984 


The Christinas selling season 
had (me more weekend this year 

than las t 

“It would have been a lot worse 


Talks about such a buy-out were Asso ™ led Pnss 

first disclosed last June. TOKYO — Japan spent S28.6 

Completion of the transaction bifikmi7J yiffionyenj on technql- 


Outside of California, according E.^ machiner y al in pomted Nikolai Hamilton From as ^ McCann as president 

to Rate Monitor a Miami- Twmsburg. Ohio, and dm Detroit its counlry manager for Norway, m a n a g i ng director of its Soul 

based newsletter, 21 finan^ai imti- suburbs of Sterling Heights and Mr. From, who will be based m , Group- They 

rations surveyed last .week had in- Warren - London, succeeds Morten Aass, b3sed near Lmidou. 

araed tira lltor.vmild lower the ita^ionHiodostdtiireeofils "'S! ef i:™ b S; ^ Dodge Cormlhe 


/ne Associated mss value of goods and services sold in 

TOKYO — Japan spent S28.6 one year. 


London, succeeds Morten Aass, 
who left tbe b ank. 

Mr. From had been based in 


(S322- million) takeover erf UDS 
Group PLC a British retailer. 

Allegheny Interoatiomil Inc, tbe 
Pittsburgh- based maker of cotK 
sumer products and high- technol- 
ogy industrial specialities, has' 
named John Bloxridge and Tony 
McCann vice presidents. Mr. Blox- 
ridge will cominue to serve as pres- 
ident and managing director of Al- 
legheny's Wilkinson Sword 
Consumer Products Group and 
Mr. McCann as president and 
managing director of its Sunbeam 
International Group. They are 
based near London. 

Phelps Dodge Carp, the New 


But those very promotions thar markets tuna under the Coral label 


retailers used to attract shoppers 
jut going to hurt their profits, the 


analysts have been warning. 

“It wifi not be the best Christmas 
as far as profits are concerned. If 


Bumble Bee management, which three-fourths of the total 
outbid two other suitors, also is ^ a P an * r 9 Jort J py . 
negotiating to buy that plant ao- ““L, . Coordination 
coidmg to Vice President Ernest said Wednesday. 

W. Peterson, a member of the Japan ranked second or 


sy in 1984, ranking it second in . ^ rcpoft emphasized, however, 
e world behind foe United States, lhatcxI ^“S t ?? 0 ? baacreaearcb 
cording to a government suray fose only shghtly. A mnt report 

ree-fourths of the total spem in Spcnd " 

nan the mm hv the u 8 research. 


muumums «n thru money-madret ox stanroing plants during its B- ^ “ Y^-^ased copper producer and 

acooimts, while 20 had said they nanrialSs m the l^l^Os and Si ^ d co PP er 311(1 ^ od ' 

”«**«*■ . ... early 1980s. The crisis led the feder- ^ ^PPOm^d Palndt J. kyan 


However, the survey showed that al c T lze ? md V sm “. 1 


drop the mint m ums on [he s 
Now accounts, while 26 said 
would not 


prevent it from failing. 
Employment levels at the three 


Agency 


w-t were to make a compilation erf group buying the division. Others 
aL 4he retailers reporting I would in the group are President Patrick 


Japan ranked second only to the of tb 
United States, winch spent $83.3 tuxes. 


ingem basic research. Though the reduced mmmnnns ^ remain virtually un- 7 V***- n“ n ? m ”,. L>avid 

Manufacturing companies ac- areT^on for savers, they pose chan^ after th^equiMrat is 

counted for more than 90 pawnt & Sp ° tesmaD Z^tob^riL^SidSt 

of the private concerns expends lenders, industry officials say. saja resoonsibfe for ooerations in Cen- 


this, the electronics and The new plans should attract 


suspect their fourth-quarter profits W. Rose and two otter vice presi- 
will decline about 5 percent bom dents, I»m« T. McCarthy ami H. 
lastycar,” Mr. Friehnan said. gjwinwtfi B eamon. 

The C2iristmas sdhng seasmi is Bnmble Bee, with annual sales of 

crucial to the retailers because it abort $2fflmiIEkm and 1300 work- 
accounts for about a half of thdr era worldwide, also has canneries in 


annual profit and about a third ctf 
tteir sales. 

Most of the re tailer; operate on a 


W. Rose and two other vice presi- '528.4 billion, it said, 
dents, James T. McCarthy and H. Conducted annually since 1953, 
Kenneth Branson. the survey polled 17,800 private 

Bumble Bee, with annual sales of and govcnune at-affi liated corpora- 
abort $200 millio n imd 1,500 work- dons and nztiversdies. 
era worldwide, also has canneries in Viewed as a percentage of the 

Puerto Rico and Ecuador. It is gross national product, Japan, at 
based in San Diego. 2L58 percent, ranked fourth behind 

Castle & Cooke, whose major the Soviet Union, at 3.66 percent; 


billion. The Soviet Union spent machinery industries accounted for new funds from small savers, but hood and trank lids, 

$28.4 billion, it said. one-third. they also should increase the cost of doors. France, Austria, Belgium, the 

Conducted annually since 1953, money because some new accounts m n . Netherlands and Switzerland. Na- 

mNDON^M^ gyferffirr 5 saiaiiss: 

a PLC amwimced Wednesday UA banks and savings and loan the company said m a ^^ 1 ^ produ 5^ y 


oauzeo maustnes group, net ore a senior vice presidenL He aronwc 
then, he was based in the San Fran- responsibility for the company's 
cisco-based bank’s shipping feroup foreign mining operations as wfcll 
in the London branch. 35 small nnnes division and ex- 

National Advanced Systems (E»- ploration and energy activities, 
rope) Corp. has named David J. both domestic -md foreign- He 
Koch rice president and director of been haseH jn Swth Africa, where 
marketing. He su c ceeds John Cur- he had saved as managing dimnor 
ran. who has become vice president of phdpg Dodge Mining Ltd^ a 
responsible for operations in Cen- nnit 

trai- Europe. Mr. Curran wifi over- _ . . . , . , 

see the company’s subsidiaries in ^Jmg-Arabran Investmert Bank 


Grand Merf Completes Buyout 

Reuters 


rcspunsicwe ior operations in ten- n nit 

tralEurope. Mr. Curran wifi over- _ . . . , . , 

see the company’s subsidiaries in TnuB-Aratem hwestniert Baak 
France, Austria, Belgium, the EC rf Bahram has appomted Da- 
Netheriands and Switzerland. Na- ^p-Ora^dire^.HejaiMd 
donal Advanced Systems, a subsid- the tenkm 1980and is asenwr woe 
iaiy of National Semiconductor president, responsible for the Gulf 


WIOUU IT1 WUVWVAT “ IVR JMUUI& mvouuu u . ** _ , 

tan PLC amwiiMed Wednesday U A banks and savings and loan ®P® rat * 0l J' com P an y 


that its acqtnation of Quality Care organizations. 
Inc. has become effective with die As a result. 


fiscal year that begins in February product line is Dole, has been dis- West 
so that the Christmas and post- posing of its fish canneries and sea- and i 
holiday sales can be counted in the food packing plants since mid- cenL 


r Qartas Airways LaL said Ron J. 

the Soviet Union, at 3.66 percent; * nc - Las become effective with the As a result, only a handful of Chrysler also win outfit older Yates, formerly deputy chief execo- 

West Germany, at 2.79 percent, issuance of 37 million new Grand financi a l institutions around the machines with devices that wifi five, has been appointed chief exec- 

and the United Stales, at 165 per- Met ordinary shares at 290 pence country are actively promoting the automate them, and robots wifi be utive officer. He fills a vacancy cre- 

cenL ($336) each, worth a total of abort new accounts, said Gail Liberman, used to move materials, the spokes- ated by the death of Keith 

GNP is a measure rf rhe total . £107 million. editor of the Bank Rate Monitor, man said. Hamilton. 


year’s , results,. .. 


GNP is a measure of the total 


($336) each, worth a total of abort 
£107 milliGn. 


man said. 





West German Production 
Held Steady in November 

Reuten like period last year, when the in- 

BONN — West German indns- dex stood at 98.1, the nnmmy said. 


Hamilton. 

Hanson Trust PLC, a British in- 
dustrial group, has appointed 
Hugh Ashton as an executive direc- 
tor. Mr. Ashton, 55 years old, is 


division. Also, the bank has pro- 
moted Mohamed Saecd Al Haiti to 
manager in the Gulf division. 

BICC PLC said Sr William Bar- 
low has become its chairman and 
chief executive on Jan. 1, following 
the retirement of Lord Peimock. Sir 
William had been depnty chairman 
and chief executive of BICC since 
July 1, 1984. BICC is a British mak- 
er of cables and wire and is in- 
volved in engineering and contract- 
ing. 


• 'iV ’ ,*r >T;> ; ; yc>. •' - , /{• J1Y MW j — 

^^fcSthe 

New Fioich 
Gibinet 

Feteuaiy 26, 1985, Paris 

following the success of our 1982 conference ; we are pleased to announce a one day bribing session 
focusing on “Modernization : Priority for the French Economy ” 

• With the cooperation of the French Government, we have gathered together the key ministers most 
directly involved with policies affecting business activities in France. 

The program will include presentations by: 

Pfene Beregovoy, Minister of Economy, Finance and Budget 
jftBrt, Cresson, Minis ter oflndustrial Redeployment and Foreign Trade. 

Hubert Cnrien, Minister of Research and Technology. 

IVficbel Dddwne, Minister of Labour, Employment and Vocational Trading. 

Roland Dumas,* Minister of External Relations. 

■Mr n*wtuaa*Mn|nicffe 

Addifocwl Insights w® be provided busine^ exautivesacliveV doing For advertising infoonotion end 

‘ l. business- ness with France. edrtond synopsis, please contact 

byap^ownal^ To register forthis exceptional Her- Mandy Lavriher f AclvBrtis^ 

sr 1 **"™ 

: : ’'hSjSss.HMpMii* HrrjtibfeSUlvM^ 


Ptet^rehJtrifcrj 


trial production, seasonally adjust- In a statement, the ministry said 
ed, was imehanged in Novenfoer that manufacturing industry was 
after a revised 3.6-percent rise in unchanged in November rfler a 
October, the Economics Ministry 2.7-percent rise in October, while 
said. output in the construction sector 


The ministr y had originally put feD 1.6 percent compared with Oc- 
tbe October rise at 23 perceuL tober. 

The production index, whose 100 Tbe ministry said that total out- 

base is 1980, was unchanged from put remained at tbe same high level 
101.8 in Octoba’. In September It as the previous month, alter tbe 


stood at 983. 

The provis 
ure is 3.8-perc 


October figures had been revised 
lal November fig- upward. 

t higher than in the The basic economic trend was 

best illustrated by comparing Octo- 

ber-November with Augnst-Scp- 
, « t ember; when a 6-percent overall 


9 ^ toinJUf wiioi «a irpuvuu uvuou 

LAXtPT f j ffl * expansion occurred, the ministry 

. *7 -a Capital goods output in Octo- 

fc fr.marfpn ber-November singed foward 113 

AJAjJmsIAXJ, percent compared with the corre- 
sponding 1983 period, while the 
construction sector showed a 1 -per- 


•. 't.r' ■tyfis !’ '!» 






SURNAME 


SrviKS^r-siife 


(Continued from Page II) constrod 

patterns of that person’s speech, cent faH 

and recognition accuracy can be 

almost perfect. _ 

However, noise; or even a cold 
that altera the speaker’s tones, can 
cause a misunderstanding or total 
lack of comprehension. The further 
difficulty is in separating phrases. 

One way to do that is for the speak- 
er to inject pauses between each 
word, although even then back- 
ground noise can seem to string the 
words together and be read by tbe 
computer as a phrase. 

‘ Filters are used to solve that 
problem to some extent, but the 
slow enunciation of words is artifi- 
cial and the engineers are at work 
on another way of doing things, in 
which the computer is trained to 
pick command words out of a 
phrase that it otherwise does not 
recognize. Tbe system, called con- 
tinuous-word recognition, also 
eliminates the problem of extrane- 
ous noise, since the computer am- 
ply rejects it as another word for 
which it cannot find a match in its 
memoty. 

Some road nose is excluded, the 
engineers say, because the actual 
bandwidth that a computer re- 
quires is narrow, with all the infor- 
mation needed to understand hu- 
man speech contained in the 300 to 
3,000 Hz range. The vocal range is 
greater than thal of course, but 
high fidelity is not a factor for the 
computer. 


SILVER SPUR 
SILVER SPIRIT 

Paris delivery tax free 
F.F. 786000 & 682000 



FRANCO BRITANNIC 

25, rue P.-V. Couturier, 92300 Levallois 
Tel. : (01] 757.50.30/Telex 620420 

JAGUAR - ROVER - RANGE ROVER 


COMMONWEALTH OF THE BAHAMAS 
IN THE SUPREME COURT 
Equity Side 


1982 
No. 639 



Gold Options (frko to S/qz.). 


IZJ 

F* 

| 


310 

m 753 



SO 

as - sot 

W751M) 

330 

VO 

1J0- 275 
075 175 

tso. 750 

400. JJ0 
07C nH 

12501400 

MS-W75 

& n O TK 

350 

39 



175- 300 

a ILS 

A7S «5 : 

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VUeonWMteWeUSJL 

L Qui 4u MowHHmk 
1211 Ccscrt I. S wt nertin a 
T«L 316251 - T«fe* S3K 


IN THE MATTER OF 

BANCO AMBROSIANO OVERSEAS LIMITED 
(IN LIQUIDATION) 

AND 

IN THE MATTER OF 
THE COMPANIES ACT (CHAPTER 1 84) 


NOTICE TO CREDITORS 
OF INTENTION TO DECLARE DIVIDEND 

Rule 68 of The Companies (Winding-Up) Rules, 1975. 

TO: ALL CREDITORS WHO HAVE NOT LODGED THEIR CLAIMS. 
NOTICE is hereby given that a third dividend is intended to be declared 
in the above matter. You are mentioned as a Creditor in the Statement of 
Affairs, but have not yet proved your daim. 

If you do not prove your daim by the 4th day of February, 1985, you 
will be exduded from this dividend. 

DATED this 14th day of December, 1984. 


GEORGE CLIFFORD CULMER 
GEOFFREY ADAMS DINWIDD1E 
JOHNSTONE 
JOHN FORSYTH SMITH 


Official Liquidators, 
P.O.Box SS-6347, 
Nassau, Bahamas. 























INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 4, 1985 



Tatttei taclode noliwjwtoe prices 
up to the dosino mi Wan Street 


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257 114 
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NASDAQ Nalkmal Market Prices 


sales In Net 

iota Mob Law 3PJK.arK 


Jan. 3 


Net 

3 P.M. am 



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Sft 414 + ft 
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26714* Mft 
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28 * am— i 

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It m+M 

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13 U +* 
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6 6 — ft 

2Kb 2S*+ * 
13 13M+ * 

ft * 

VKb 1 QU— ft 


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OpHcC 

opmcr 

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OttrTP 268 96 
OwanM J6 27 
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717 15 MU 14*— ft 

129 30 29ft 29* 

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139 5ft 5* 51b— ft 
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Sales* Net 

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JetAAort 

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Jlfvs 

JhnAm J0a 4.1 
Jonlt« f 
Jooel A t 
Jnsnhwi JO 6A 
Jura 

Jvsllns JM 22 


4014* M 14* — ft 
42 3ft 3* Sft— ft 
36 30% a sa — ft 
3 14ft Mft Mft 
12 31* 19* 20ft 

44 4* 6* 4* 

744 17 14* 17 

4» S* * * 

2 7ft 7ft 7ft 

45 4 3* 3* 

44 3* 3ft 3*— * 
97 7ft 7ft 7ft 
16 20ft 20ft 30ft 
21 Mft 13* 13*—* 


Horten 

KMyJn 

Km* 

KyCMJ 

Kevtx 

KtyTm 

KeyCms 

KJmftoJ 

Kinder s 

wIKeu 

Krov 
Kruor S 
Kulebe 


. 32214* 14 Uft 
n 4* 4* 4* 

J6 25 7022ft 22 22 

in Mft Mft M% 

601 4A 30 Uft 13* Uft— ft 
9° 7* 6ft 7ft + * 
IMS 1% I* 1*+Mi 
160 45 47 44* 44ft 44ft + * 

60 23 169 B 34* 35 + * 

150 5* Sft 5*— Vi 

sr *~ r-* 

J4 1 9 8 29ft 29 29— ft 

“ - 

AS 5 59 Tl* II* 11* 

62 25 MW mb 72* 12*— * 
J4 6 4M2S* 31* 25ft 


29013ft 12ft 13 

m 4 4ft + ft 

7225ft 25 25 — ft 

it J* j* 2ft— * 
6128* 2Tb 20ft 
1? 3* Sft 3* 

61 Wft 10ft 10ft— ft 
626 6ft 9 Sft + ft 


.9 

123417ft 

17 

A 


7ft 

2.1 

a 5* 

4ft 


IM 12* 

B% 


18 6 

4 


132 2ft 

Ztt 


4 Sft 
S Hb 

St 

3 

11 Uft 

Uft 

1.1 

55 29* 

» 

4A 

53 a* 

26% 

12 

47 9* 

9fa 

36 

49 Sft 

an. 


38717* 

16% 


324 17* 

14 


14 7* 

7* 


nil 3 

Sft 

A 

17 21ft 

a 

5 

414 21* 

21U 


218 7 

6* 


525% 

25* 

14 

19 34* 

34* 

17 

144 43ft 

43 

5.1 

86 19* 

?9fa 


73 W* 

MU 


38011* 

11 


7915ft 

1SU 


231 I'M 

7ft 


1 7* 

7» 

32 

4018 

I7fa 

5A 

a 20* 

IT* 

35 

184 28* 

»* 


85 4* 

4 


300 IB* 

17ft 


113 4U 

4ft 


920* 

28 


17 8% 

BU 


111 



2030 8* 
U 4* 
25013* 
299 15* 
4014* 
1134ft 
10813* 
451 0 
212 * 
715ft 
311 13* 

34 4* 
3739* 
17 4* 

35 34* 
3207 5* 

4713 

22 7ft 

« 3 

82 3ft 

a 21 * 

741* 
IQS 4* 
99513* 
1343 24 
M 29% 
57 5 

046 25* 
& Uft 
4*22 
1025 34* 
1 19* 
2 13* 


I* 8* + * 
4ft 6ft—* 
12 * «*+* 
18* 18ft— * 
Mft U% 

34% 34ft 
Q* 13*+ ft 
lift lift—* 

Oft 12ft 

Uft 15ft— ft 
13* UM— lb 
4ft 41b— ft 

a a 

Sft 4* 

24 24ft— lb 

Sft 4ft— ft 

a* a* 

7ft TV.— 'ft 
2* 3 +& 
3ft Sft + ft 

a* a* 

41* <1* 

5* 6 
Uft U* 

Sft Sft — ft 
29% 29%— ft 
4ft S + ft 

a a — u 

Mft 14ft 
21ft 72 + * 
a 24M + * 
19* 19*— ft 
13* Uft + ft 


22ft 22ft 22ft 
23* 23* 23* 
a A A A 

260 10* 10* IM+ ft 
23* 23ft 23ft 
5* 5ft Sft 


52 2ft 2ft 
7 3* 3ft 
40 2ft 2ft 
141 3ft 3* 
26 Uft 13* 
47 21b 2 
599 34* 35* 
41444* 46ft 
45 22* 72 

M3 30ft a 

17720ft 191b 

no Mft Uft 

247 4* 4V. 


3U- ft 
3ft— ft 
1ft- ft 
3*— ft 
1414 + ft 
3 -lb 
34 + ft 
44M— ft 
22*+ U 
30*+ ft 
30ft + 16 
Mft— fa 
4ft 


(Continued oc Page 15 ) 


N4l.UA.yfll 
I'® - famb'lU' 


Commodities 


-C 


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• 


% . 


At • • A 



-- 4 ^' 

• ■*£ **&<*% 


Page 15 


International classified 


;^Sj9 


REAL ESTATE 

tqrent/sha rf 

HOLLAND 


At 


PJJTpl HOUSING CBRRE R.V. 
.Pf*”!; Vafemasir. 174, 
Anraerdon 030*?! 234 or 623K2. 


-■<s‘ 


HJWBMW MAKSAASDU 
hit Homi ng Seryke fat i tn l i 
Tel: 020-768022 


USA 


WC 


■';£aS* 

•'‘■■■saas. 




47tfi Si Eosi 

RIVER PLAZA' CORP 
dag JKAMMASSJQOlXI TOW8L 
Ouaety Investor-Owned 

A \ll C cTJ n,^, A P° rn W« In 
?jyNew hi Service BvMta with 
Pool .Heat* <3*. end 
Houseleepmfl Semen A«q dabfe 

immediate Rented 

SPECTACULAR 
.1. X 3. A 4 H eAoon. 

.Apateenti from $2420 
Hirohed Aparbnerti Aho Avafcfcla 

Info Cal 772-3191990 
c- - ,2 - 7 59<®44 

Sat - Suit 1 1 - 4; Mon lo Fn 9 


r. 'l ' ‘Wj 




T f^ MOST EXQUtSnt ) -bed, com 

K&^sSsu 

OWNER 2I2-33S-19S7 amenJ 


° n Road 


"5P S[A™ BLAND. 3- bedroom 
hpuM. full kitchen. Short ferry rK fe to 
Secure ok. Beautiful 




J!ff- .Week or month. ^ tg+q W83. 


12 Schubert St. SI. 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 


--‘/-'“vrffofcte. 


:v vtB »S 


•• ^fesar 

^4 


■i> Managers 




• v ..-^Sth J 


• ■’ ■■ =-'i- r J2caa 


P ARB-NEAR PARC MONCEAU. 3-4 

a bedroom ^funuched cportnwm A»3 
I June 15. 1985. Prefer homeVe— oe 
E- «»L but not required Quolity un 
portotl. Houja exefange in Santo 
Barbara. Ca&fonua opnonal. Wdkam 
Wayne, 101 E. Victoria. Sana Bwfao- 
ta, CA 93101 USA. 


M3JILLY (92) OR 17TR. 2 '3 rooms 
65 sa.m. Maxmwn F5.000 charges 
■Rtafad far Engfah executive ir 
France 12-18 month*. Serous refer 
ences. Storing Jan. - Feb. 85. PossibiW 
ly parking Teh (23) 59 76 17. 


AMOEN HOUSE a Pblazzo .anted 
preferably fe South of &6m bu< 
would consider Pom™( Sored 
France. Greece with 10.0fl0sq.m_ga 
den nut have vast srfhixwoom. .’ 
beds, wil buy /rent Cavendish. Apcn 
todo 96, Estepona. Malaga. Span 


NEW YOMC-LONDON. Exchange 
^Murray HD. Mnih oHm auefio for 
London studio. 6 months every yea. I 
Bm 209. Ocean Gty, NJ 
“1 399-3AM USA. 


EXCHANGE NYC apartment 2 blocks 
from U.N. fa opatment m Iftlan. 
Good location Bar 1591. Kerojd Tri- 
hune. 92521 NeuBy Cedex. France. 


EMPLOYMENT 


EXECUTIVE 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 




Africa 

-• :-:T=ar! 

v- 

AtfSESSM ENGLISH SPEAUNG 
ISne Germoi helpful] iota people 
wanted, unCrreted earning potential, 
must be prepored lo trend in 
Germany. U& 0614244071 between 
10A30, Mr Taerser. 

GENERAL POSITIONS 


AVAILABLE 

'.rr_ !-!tk 

ENGLISH SPEAKING SALE GBL 

wanted. Wrie witfi reference & photo 
if poaiiJe to Deufcch, 1 Bd duMcxtf- 



pvnaBMp 75006 Paris 

.y.inuzii 



(Continued From Back Page) 


employment 


GENERAL 

posmoNS wanted 


H £**“**» LADY, French. 

Itoton ipokm seeks rabni 


5“ *’' 0 ** l *»i 


I®® fWMo STRIPS deagner 


' pm France 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


PARIS La DBB4SE 

SECRETARIES 

bikroud. mramum BIS level 

Lnowledae IBM word processa, 
perfect knowledge of Engkdv 

tbex operators 

working with computet letayed 
«W*nent. Written Engbsh. 


B ^n gu al FngUta£ench, 


Apply. PSOOEST ett 
•. lAiomesnil 2t5 lq 6) 
295 bd Raspari 235 14 30 



Don’t mile 

INTERNATIONAL 
secretarial POSITIONS 

TUESDAYS 

<n the MT Qauifaed Section. 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 


l 1 .T * ve - m Oorronic 

help worldwide. Cofl Soane Bureau. 
London 730 8122/5142 (24 hotn) U- 
CEMPAGY TK: 895ft£wQAhff G. 


EXCaiSVT COOK, chauffeur. 38. 

free now. good presentation, refer- 
ences. seeks poonon m pnvam home. 
Td: (94)73 84 71 or wntfc GREGOtSE 
GUY. lo Lanousme, 83340 Le Thor- 
anet. France. 


FSOiOf OB, 33, seeks rasponsUe 
position with travelling person or fom- 
Jy- rtghest references. Free from Jon- 
uoy. Bo. 40144, LHT., 63 Long Acre. 
London. WQE$iH. 


ALWAYS AVAILABLE LONDON only 
babyntinders & Id das daBy maids. 
CcA Soane Bureau, London: 730 
B1 22/5142. UCEMP. AGY. 


MGUSH NANNE5 & Mother's Helps 
free now. Nodi Agency, 53 Church 
Rood, Hove, UK. TijQOT} 29044/5 


FOR SALE & WANTED 


3AXXI YEAR 010 certified ock beam. 
Cl 850. let UK 0277 222269. 


COIXECTORS 


COMPLETE COLLECTION of Fortune 
pumas For safe from Jan. 19, 1957 
. u day. (1957 to 1972 tee bound). 
Tet 260-3705 Ext 1193. Peris. 


AUTOMOBILES 


. MaCPBFOBUSA 
— wrafeew, os types m reedetefr or 
rfr 2SC *•". aweUsle, acco>cb<g lo 
wi DOT/CTA Swi de Automata) hpan*. 
in unce 1973. B99B bncfenboq. djCtn- 
OV. mony.Ph«W:P58381/36)3TL54n45 
xa 

^ AUTO SHIPPING 

for" 

m. HOW TO IMPORT A EUROPEAN 
CAB INTO THE UAA. 

* Ttw doeumerY explans fudy who* one 
32 nwi do to bring a car erta fa U£ 
“feta and feg^r. B mdude* newi 

- 

•an dmance & proaxkxei 

“ « fegd pares. Becawe of the 

itio^g dolor, you con save up lo 
US$16,000 when buying a Mercedes, or 
BMW « Europe A mpat»m a to ftw 
States. To rccerve fha manud, lend 

USJ, p?^re S fer^ 09e,: 

7000 Stuttgart 1, Wat Germany 

FRANKRJKT/MAM-W. Germany. K. 
bermam GmbH. Tel 069-443371. 
Pki-up al over Eixope B fo/r»fhip*. 

TRANSCAR 20 nw Le Sueur. 75H6 
Pan. Tek 000304. htcr. 839S31 
Anlworp 233 9985. Conner 394344 

AUTOS TAX FREE 

Rads Raw* Camidw Canvort&e, 

— July 19S2 2JOO Ian. whrta/mopwbi. _ 

y Bewdey Mufeanna Turbo, Da. 1984. 

B >J00 bn, acrykc wfete/pathmart. j 

^ Rofa Roytw SBver SpfefL Mach 1984. ft 
' J.800 km. darer/mognona fkfxd rad. 

! TheieautanotaiesareaHownedbyihe 
some coffenor who hot tejArtemenri 

- on order. They are avafobfe aretwei- 
oteCy. TeL: 3 j - 93 - 25 63 91. 

TAX FRS CARS 

P.CT. ^ 

Larged Sbowraom 8 Invwttorv 
AR make*, at modeh, brand new 
Iperfoon 1. 2008 Antwerp, Betaurn 
Tek 3/231 59 00 
Tb 35546 mCART B 
Ap|dy for our cokxx- cofcdooue 

US$5 rah V W 

TAX raff CARS: MfRCTOES, Rdb 

Boyce. Audi Volvo, Porsche, BMW. St 
We heap o rege stack of bnxxi new 
and good used ra*. We da the 
D.O.T. red fLPA. an ore own pr+ 
Rises. We aha tdoe care of the sHp- 
pmg ad bending in UAA.Gtefart us — 
at these numbers: leL Belgium u 
050/71 5071, feL USA 301 /633J6) t. , 

dx BaUren 82209 EUKOaU B, ttx 
U5A. 3995689 via U5. NV Erea An- i 
to't tntemoOoncf, Konran AUricfarei 

47. 9990 Mddegem. B^irnv. 

TAX RS AUTO SALES ™ 

Oder your European - (JS - ad UK ( 
autamotafes. 

Car rerad, unkmded ndeoge. — 

Leoeng new car 1 lo 6 north* EX 

Telex 200572. Td: 651 4342. A 

Pancrei, 2 A ve Porte de Saint douci » 

fferi* 75016. E 

d 

BJROFOKT TAX RB CARS 4 

Coil for free catalog. — 

Bon 1201 1, Rotterdam Airport; Hoflcnd. 

T* 01M13W7. TW 2X71 M. _ 

MEW PEUGEOT, land Barer. Range T> 
Rarer, ToQtata, 4x4, tropcai tpea. R» 

Brifas, Zonnebaai 18. AAxxrjarv Te 

brad. Halted 030445492. t> 47082 Be 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


BUY YOUR NEXT CAR 


BUY-BACK PROGRAM 


AND 


SAVE 


FREE BUY-BACK FOLDER TO: 


miiunJuui A- pari. The hfatherfan 

Phone (02)152833. Telsi: 12568 


.SHffSIDE Int, S76 Fifth Avenue. 


465. 1040 Bnueh, Bdgun 
(07)6499062. Tetev til 


63290 


ROUS-ROYCE 

BBHLEY 

BRITISH MOTORS 
WRIGHT BROTHRS 


MONTE CABO 
hMpdh of Monoc e 
Tab (93J 50 64 84 
Telam 46947S MC 
OffieW Dirad Factory Dealer 


^WoHdwid. 


I since 1925 


PORSCHE, BMW, 


FROM STOCK 


for UAMBMATC dekvery 
BEST SSlVtCE 

For shipping, raorana^bond, 


RUTE INC. 

Toumastr. 52. 6000 Fitsdrfuri. 


TRANSCO 

TAX FRE CARS 


one hundred brand new oars, 
enmpeMiveJy paced. 

Send for free catalogue & dock 1st. 
Transta SA, 95 Noordelann, 
2030 Antwerp, Betafe™ 

Tok 03/542 62 40 (10 «4 
Tlx. 35207 TRAMS B. 


BtYSMTLTa 


Porsche, Ferrari, 


Raver. 


Worldwide cfe^V^Kiaerlsi 6, 
2018 Antwem. Tie 72950 B. Tet 32 7 


3 / 233 99 St. Tie 72950 BOSS. 


for 


W Germany. TtL (0) 211 


LEGAL SERVICES 


nono Av*., Suite 203. Houston, 
»77057. Jet [713)789-0904. [Nor 


SERVICES 


_ wn 

BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE 

— IM1MITED MC 

OS A. A WORLDWIDE 

A mmpfefe soad & business somiae 
D growing a urique ccflecBon of 

luknted. versatile & mUtdurgud 
mtavduds for- 

ftahwvCommeroal-ftirt'PTamDtiorB 
Corwenaav Trade Show+Aoss Pan® 
Speed Fven+liroge MebnfB's 
Seed HaraHndeuftEraeiarei 
w 5oo9 Cmpraon+Tour gude*. ere. 

*■ 212-765-7793 

212-765-7794 
330 W SMh Si, N.Y.C 10019 
Serwca fieptmentmivH 
* Needed Wtaldrede. 

0 

YOUNG LADY 

PA/ Interpreter & Tourism Grede 

PARIS 562 0587 

YOUNG VIP IAOY GUW 
TrSogud Ixferprefer 

PARIS 533-8026 

MTi YOUNG LADY GUIDES 
rduented. for day. dinnrrt a travel 
PAMS 1 AIRPORTS Tel: 527 90 95. 

YOUNG MULTILINGUAL LADY 

PARIS: 525 81 0? 

? PARIS 527 01 93 PA YOUNG LADY 

Why nor oommuncate with me m 3 
language* even il 1 hove to fraud* 

YOUNG GOMAN LADIES - Muftrtn- 
gud remediate service m Europe. 
Karels 322/734 38 86 

DO YOU NEB) A HDIO+BIGLJSH- 


PAMS BXJCATED, VIP sopfesectfed ! 
young fody compmcn. Fa days, drv . 
ners & everings. Con travel 27/ 0169. • 

rTrif r ■■■[ 

PARIS NOTE THIS PHONE AT ONCE 
757 62 48. Trurtful VIP. fody, travel : 
conpnon. 


iiMklii 


SNGAFORE BVTL GUIDB. Cat Sin- t 
gapore 734 96 2& p 






FBANKRJST - YOUNG LADY cam- u 
port on ad gude. Tet fW) 44 7775 li 

PAMS NTL FfiRSONAL/BUSfhCSS u 
Aieidant. TeL 828-7932. U 

PAMS LADY INTBtPRETER. Travel u 
companion. Pars 633 66 09. U 

PAMS YOUNG LADY, toons gude. u 
T«L 807 8495 Pam. U 

u 




Place Your Classified Ad Quickly and Easily 

In the 

INTBtNAlTONAi. HBUtU) TRIBUNE 


• —-VW 
.■■I' ^ P- - 


:*-vp 2Z1 


By Pbana. Cal ycx* load BfT represenkmve with yoar text You wBl be mfotmed of the cost itnmedia te fy, and once prepayment is made your ad veil 
nppnnr wit h i n 48 hows. 

CoA^boMrMisW.lO per Simper day + bed taxes. There are 2S fetlef^egnsimd spaces ■> the fir* fait and 36m the lallowmg Ines. Minmum 
space « 2 knot No afabrewahons accepted. 

CreA Cards: Amariam Express, Diner’s Chib. Euroard, Master Card. Access ami Visa. 


HEAD OFFICE 


k. on Inquin 




RAWS: For Franas and dl coun- 
tries not bled below- 181 Atm. 
Charles-dn-Gaulle, 92521 
Neudy Cedex. Tel: 7474600. 
(for Clasvifod only). Telex: 
613595. 


Tefew >2731 (Sm* 

SPABt Alfredo Urdauff 5or- 


_Martl.6D.Pb- 
8. Madrid 2S020. 


1 t • 




EUROPE 


AUSTRIA A GERMANY: Su- 
semne Kefler or. Sigrkt Konrad, 
I.H.T., Friedridistrasse 15, 
D 6000 Frankfurt. Tel.: 
|69) 72 67 55. Telex: 416721, 

BBX3IUM A IUXEMBOURG: Ar- 


*0 Ti _ 

TeL 455 28 91-4553306. The 
47747 SUVA E. 

SWITZERLAND: Guy Van 
Tlxryne and Mcnhcd WWler, 


"tM «gnes". 15 Chenin Davei. 
1009 Fully /Lausanne. 


Tel^ 

Telex: 






ins. NBC*?, 


thur Maixner, 6 Rue Louis Hy- 
mans, 1060 Brussels. Tel.: 


343.1199. Telex: 23922 AMX. 

GRSCE A CYPRUS: J.C Remes- 
son. Pindarou 26. Athera. TeL: 
3618397/3602421. Telex: 
218344 BSGR. 

ISKAHf Dear Bwfich. 92 Usushkin 
Street. P.O. Boa 11297. Tef 
Aviv. TeL: 45 55 59/45 91 37. 
Tlx.- 341118 BXTV K. EXT 6376 

ITALY 


10211 29-58-94. 
w2zGVTCH 

ONTO KINGDOM: Jufa Byme. 

WH U Ta.: A ffT&36«S: 
Telex: 262009. 


ECUADOB: Ltagi Lomenno. P.O. 
Bax 300 Po G centro. Guayaquil 
TeL. 43) 943/43*. The 3414 
PttCONED. 

PANAMA: Juan Mmwel Handal 
Estuio Cansultrvo fmanaero 
SA, Aportodo 002, Ponana 5, 
R-P- TeL 644372. Ik. 368 
2641. 

WUiF rt imki 5cwgie«eo,Alvo- 
rsz Colder an 155 Pisa IT. San 
bidro. Luna-27. Tda 41>852 
The 20469 GYPSA 

VBEZUBAi Mr. Juan Wulff, 
Aportodo 6111. Ox ocas 1010. 
TeL (582) 331454. Tl*. 2S212 


JAPAN: Tadashi Mori, Medo 
Sate: Japan Inc, Tamurocbo 
Buikina 3-3-14. Shimbashi, 
Minafo-ku. Tokyo 105. Teiet 
25666. Telj 5£U 1925. 


OPECSelsDate 

For Next Meeting 


Shifts Urged in Japan Postal Savings 


H) 


I'mieJ Press Imenuhonjl 

GENEVA — OPEC oil minis- 


that power, officials said they 
would consider investing up to l6 
percent — about S35 bSion — of 
the monej’ overseas, probably in 
U.S. Treasury bills. 


Tbe divided 13*meraber Organi- 


OPECs six-minister price- set- 


Thr session will also review pro- 


in order to give a better rate to our the postal savings system as im- 
cusiomera.*’ mune 10 market forces. Because the 

Mr. Tateno said that he had met system, controlled by a government 
with Beryl W. Sprinted, U.S. under agency, does not have to be profit- 
secretary of the Treasury, to dis- able, they argue, it can offer nigher 

cuss this idea. Mr. Sprinkel said, interest rates than the market dic- 
__ 4 _ . . _ however, that he had not brought tales. 

The Ministry of Posts also over- up that possibility in recent talks The lowest rate offered at the 
sees a separate hfe insurance fund held here with the Ministry of Fi- post office is 188 percent. Most 
of about S96 bfliion. It has control nance. banks offer 1.5 perccnL Most post 

of this runtrs mvesi^t^ and to Thai ministry has consistently office deposits, however, are in so- 
date it ms mvened SI J bdlkm m opposed both ceding control of the called Teigaku deposits, which af- 
toragn bt»ds. Bui munstiy offi- funds and investing them overseas, ter three years offer 5.75 percent 

Muneo Ohashi. deputy director interest, a rate very similar to that 
general of the ministry* s banking offered in special bank accounts, 
bureau, ihai it was ministry Private bank interest rates are set 
policy that all government funds by the Ministry of Finance, bm the 
should be manage d Lo one place — Ministry of Posts may set its own 
the Ministry of Finance. 


rials said that they did not foresee 
extensive investment in commer- 
cial markets, foreign or domestic. 

“Our fund has a public nature,” 
said Tadao Taieno, director of the 
Postal Savings Bureau's interna- 
tional service division. “It should 
be for public use. not commercial 
use. But if private banks can invest 
overseas, we may do the same thing 


Over-the-Counter 


Jan. 3 


NASDAQ Notional Market Prices 


Soles to N 

IMS HIM Law IPJACIYae 


(Continued from Page 14) 


452 M 10H II 
im I a 
is77 ivM m» ins — % 
mil tt. 6 to W4 u. 


401416 IB MU 
«7 2 1 22*. 23 +4 

M m K *16— >A 
!5k 54k 5W + V» 
619 2046 20*6 20'-— M 
127 164k l6Vb 164k— Vk 
143 34k 3Sk JVk— Ml 
231 15 144k UN + 4k 

38 154. 15V. TSVk + U, 

1 44k 41k 416 4- Ik 
9 44b 4*6 416 

3/S lint 40 1646 

2 34k 216 216 
20 14k 14k T4k 

36 1246 114k T24k + Vt 
26134k 134k 134k + Vk 
511 TOrt 1046 — - 4k 
a 7k 74k 74b + 16 

67 3346 33 3346 + 4b 

14 1016 94b 94k— Ik 

74 844 74k B44 + 4H 
554154k 144k 154k -f M 
22 74% 7 7 

1494 1114 184k ItM— Ik 
206104k 1040 404b 
175 14k 146 146 

IlSMkk 134k 1346— 1% 
5 134k 134k 134k + 4k 
R M fk 91k— 16 

4* JVk 346 216— 46 

1326 254b 2546 

1223146 3146 3T46— 16 
93 SW 54k 54k — 46 

Ml 14k 146 Ilk +16 

1200 324% 271k 32 +2 


A 


.We U) 

1JB 4J 


UJ0 4.1 


Me 1A 


1J0 40J 
1A0 16 
-3D J 


UVaBs 

UnvFm 

UnvHIt 

UnwHW 

UFSBk 


L44 4.1 


1 1746 17%* 1746 +■ Ik 
1268 1016 94k ID 
730 154k 141k 1446—46 

* % % "fc* 

I S3 1846 M 181k 

3550 494k 49Vk 

35 Z7Vk 27U. 2746 
>1816 104k 104k 

18721 2246 23 +16 

50 2H 24k 246+ 16 
469 94k 84k 9 — 46 
260 13 121k 1246 + 4k 

77 I5kk 4546 154k + 4k 
70 104k 704k 104k 
25 346 246 216 
22* 2446 244k 241k— 16 
72 2% 24k 24k 
30 5Vk 54k 54k— M 
585334k 324k 3346 + 46 
50 34k 346 246 
28151* 1546 154* 
412114k 1146 1116— 16 
3 45 45 45 

454 244k 2346 24 —lk 
41 161* U M 
17 25 349k 35 +1* 

II 144k 1416 1416 

81 1016 10 1016 + 16 
12 4 4 4 

22 9 81k 9 


Net 

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406 SVk 

3V. 

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28ft 



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24 


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1* wy. 



VecfrG 



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ft 

ft 

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1B7 3*k 

3ft 


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ft— ft 

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3ft 


VICOTD 





Vlctros 



54* 2ft 



JieotFr 

_27» IX 

36*12% 

lift 





2 10V. 






4016 

17ft 


VUTecft 



3B 2ft 

Tfe 


Vodavl 



46 7 

6ft 


volflnf 



216ft 

16ft 

16ft 

Volvo 



3123ft 

23ft 

23ft + ft 

w 1 

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M 

42 

■m 

20ft 


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a 

2 

■ 1 , 11 

»ft 


wikrTeC 



M 9 

6ft 


WshE 

IN 

&7 

23419ft 

19U 


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■I 



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wriiLi 

lift 








Wmbttrs 

J6 


30 13 






33 9ft 



WnCakS 

W 

62 

146 



WsfFSL 



47 6ft 

6ft 


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1 9 



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5ft 



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253 18 



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7519ft 

IBft 


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29514ft 




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16 25ft 



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74 3ft 

3ft 


|V| 



306 7ft 

7ft 

7ft— ft 

wntmt 

IJ0 

43 

125 3$ 

34ft 34ft— ft 

WUIAU 



159 Ift 

Oft 


wmxSn 



3 IDft 

10ft 


wibmF 



US 9ft 



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Wlndmr 

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WtrmEn 



T? 2ft 



WberO 

M 

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7719ft 

19ft 


WoatfD 

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33 

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IBft 

Worlho 

Jt 

24 

51723ft 22ft 

23>k 

Writer 

-T5e 17 


7ft 


Wyman 

JO 

33 

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24 

24 

A 1 

Xebec 



452 4ft 

3K 


Xlcor 



907 IDft 

Bft 

10 + ft 

XMex 



17512ft 12ft 

12ft- Vk 

YtowFf 

1J0 

XI 

76332 

31ft 

32 




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43 3 
9) lift 

2ft 

lift 

2ft— ft 
lift 

Ztanltf 

1-24 

4J 

631ft 

31ft 

31ft 

ZHef 



45 4ft 

4ft 

4ft 

Zhrod 



8 Oft 

Oft 

*ft— ft 

Zondvn 

-34 

18 

51 9 

8ft 

9 + ft 

Zymao 

Zvtrex 



8 5* 

7ft 

1ft 

5*-Hh 


Floating Rate Notes 


Jan. 3 


Dollar 


Issuer/Mla cpn/MaL Ceeasn Next BM AsU 


KOREA: Unrversd Publications 
Agency L>d.. UFA Building, 
CFO Bax TfeO, 54 Kyanu- 
Dong. Orangno-ku, StOUL 
Td-j 7258771 TU.: 48504 UN- 
PUB. 


MIDDLE EAST 


PHIliPPtFB: P»er Q^otarto. 
Media Representatives Inc.. 
Garden Floor, Cormrtibn pla- 
za Paseo de Rom. Mahrti. 
TeJ.: 817 07.49. Tlx.: Ml 12 
MBPN. 


Sandy O’Hara, vraernakonal Her- 
c4a Tribune, 850 THrd Awe, 
New York, MY. 10022. ToL 
212-752 3W0. T«le» 427 175. 


LATIN AMBUCA 


BAHRAIN: Barbara Avis. TeL 
693392 

JORDAN: Dr. On ALHanan. 
Jericho PubfaWng and Adver- 
tising, Shataaugh Building, 
5th Roar, Shabsough Street. 
Ammon. Tel.: 25*14. Tlx.: 
2(207 JORHTL 


SINGAPORE, MALAYSIA: Stan- 
ley Tan, CHENEY TAN ASSO- 
CIATES, 163 Trc* Sfreet, Lion 
Huat Buidng No. 0M1 , Sngo- 
pote 0207. TeL: 222-28-93 fel- 
mu 3S9B3 CTAFMS 


ROME: AntamO Sambrrtlo, 55 
Via della Mercede, 001 B7 


via aeiia wun™, -C" 

Rome. TeL 679-34-37. Telex: 
620500 PPCSRL 


ARGENTINA: Ms foraeE, Av. Al- 
vecr 1891, Oept. 312, Buonos 
Aires 1 129. TeL 41 -40J1 Dept. 
312. Tele* 21930 ALPOi AiL 


MILAN: lira Rancoti, 20090 
Sear ate S. F&ce, 


dewura j- , a-w. Torre 5i Tel.: 
75di 445-Tetex: 311010 
NETHBILAI«JS: Arnold Tees- 
ing/AHans Gnm t Prof. Tulp- 


- .-ft - " 




; /• *■ + 




may rvi7u*Q -.—r- 

stroaf 17- 1018 GZ AjBfydcnn. 
Tel.: QiO-26 36 15. Telex: 
13133. L 

PORTUGAL- Bta Amber, K Ruo 
das Joiek* Verdm. Lsbon. 
TeL 672793 & 66^44. 
SCANDMAVtA 
DENMARK: Aoge Petenfn, 
MttfekBootafM H-C An- 
dersens Blwf 11. . HeBU 
329440. Telex: 16447 flntad^ 
COPBWAGGN: Aage Pekersen. 
Inrer-Ad, KC Anderwm BoUe- 
vord. DJC-1553 Copenhagen 
V. Denmark. 


BRAZIL Antonia Scar one Six. 
Caba Postd 3099, CB 1 01*42 
Soo Paula. TeL 852 1893. Tlx, 
1124491 SOGBR. 

CARIBBEAN: Janes Furey. 210 
East 47 th Street. Suite 1 1 F, Nmv 
York, N.Y. 100f7 USA 

CHUB: fceordo Puentes Stone-Pa- 
see Phillips 451, Ofidm 1255, 
Scnticqo. TeL 61 555. Tbt 
4402680. 

COLOMBIA: Rafael Uribe Rive- 
ro, Carrara IT Not 71+0. Ofv 
ana 302, Bogota TeL 212- 
9608. IK- 43281 RHU CO. 

COSTA RICA: Neville Hobson, 
Asesores en Gnmm u nionciones 


KUWAIT: John Mundy Tel.: 
5614*85. Thu 46656 ARZCO ICT. 
QATAR: Adel Sufi cn. Dona Pub- 
ic Relations, P.O. Box 3797, 
Doha. Teiv<l 6535/41 1177. 
Tbu 4984 DANA. 

SAUDI ARABIA- Rashid Matter. 

FcAwl BuihncA Advertising. 

JeddrdL. TeL 667-1500. TU-- 
403381 COLORS. . 
Dunam. Tel.: 834-3*66. Thu 
601504 BUTRES. 

UAL Ravindra Soo. Pan GuM 
Pubficity. P.a Bax 3294. Dubai. 
Tel.: 224161/2241*2. Tlx.: 
45884 BANCO EM. 


TAIWAN: Ye Ovang. B«OCH 
Publicity Agency. P.O. Box 
ItAi Taipei. TrL 752.4455. 
Teixr. H887 EPOCH 


THAILAND: Siaw Caro, Tfe 
Lcle Pubh'ljng Co. Linrted, 
91< • 1 1 Soi Thaonkx Suknunv 
.it Sc. 55 eMkot ’.Cl 10. P O. 
cox 11-539 TbL >J(kS7. 
Tcfex. 20.T3 CAPO TH. 


AUSTRALIA 


FAR EAST 


SYDNEY: iim McGowen. 
McGowen Media rky. Lra, 4V 
Falcon Street. Craws Nest. 
New South Wales 2060, Aift- 
hatx TeL: 929 5*39 Telec 
26482 


HC.4G KONG: C Cheney & As- 
sociates Lhi. 506 Car Pa Com- 
morckJ BuBcfina IB-20 Lynd- 
hunt Terrace, Central, Hong 
Kang. Tel.: 420906. Telex: 
6307V CCAL HX. 


MBBOUON^ Mr. Robert Gaff, 
Fte«J ro.ee Media Represantts- 
lives Pty Lid.. 349 Moray St- 5. 
Melbourne VIC 3205, Td.: o90 
8233, Tic.: 391B2 


ESCORTS & GUIDES 


INTERNATIONAL 


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LONDON 


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Teh 938 1647. 


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Tet 2503/96 - 2503494 Cietfa rack. 


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TASTE BCORT SHYlCE 
T«L41172S7 - 4117602 


MADRID INT'L 


ESCORT 5BVKE 
IB: 24565« CRHUT CARDS 


amstbidam jasmine 

BCOPT SBEVKB. 020-366655 


A/-JTRD4M CITY 

HeaO Serticn. {0)20-340507 


GENEVA 

escort S9VIG 
1*46 09 28 


GBCYA » BEAUTY 1 
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tel- 29 51 30 



ESCORTS & GLIDES 

ESCORTS & GUIDES 

Amsterdam Four Roses 

Escort ServKB (0) 1D-W3 ? 6 

BRUSSELS, BELGIUM VJJ>. BCORT 
ft TRAWL SERVICE. 02/ 537 33 97 

NEW YORK Renee ft Gafanefc Escort 
Service. 212-223-0870. 

OC5EA Bean SffVICE 

51 Bewdnmp Ploa, London SVY3. 
Td: 01 5U 6513/2>49 (4-12 pm) 

FRANWU6T -1- 5UHOWONG5. 
Caroines's Escnrt ft travel lenece. 
Enafcti, French, Gennas spoken. TeL 
SW143 57 6i 

GENEVA ■ BEST 
ESCORT SERVICE 
TEL 022/29.1374 

FRANKFURT. BRUSSELS, G8CVA, 
Maim, Germcn Escort Sena. Con- 
tort Brussels lei: 322/734 38 8b. 

BRUSSB5 MIOCIE BCORT AND 
GUDE SStVKZ. TH: 733 07 98 

AMSTERDAM. BnroekAnfvmra The 
Hagvr. Ifotferdan. College Escort 
Sennce. Amstadam {0031 3JI - 901266 

STUTTGART - PRIVATE Escort save*. 
Tek 0711/2621150. 

HAMBURG - KATHRYN ESCORT Sen 

vice. Multiingiid. 040/2798168 

VBMA’S RR5T BCORT Service. 
022444191 or 722-432. muUngud 

DOMINA, AMSTBDAM BCORT 

Glide Service. TeL (020) 762862 

VBMA ETOfiE ESCORT 5ERVKL 

Tet 56 78 55. 

MJSSELDORf-COLOGNE-ESSBil Ex- 
clusive escort rarwoe. 0211-6799863 

LONDON ESCORT SERVICE. Tet 937 

6574. 

FRANKR1RT + 5URROUNORYGS 

Qrisxna's Escort Service. 069/364656 

IOMXM BCORT AGH4CY. 

TeL 935 5339. 

HlANKfUET JBMY ESCORT ft travel 
settece TeL 069/55-72-10 

MADRID IMPACT BCORT & Gude 
Service. MuMmfxxd. 261 41 42 

FRAMCRMT - PETRA Escort & Travel 
Service. TeL 069 / 68 24 05 

LOfOON TRUDffi BCORT Service. 
Td D1-V3 8849. 

HOUAND-JB ESCORT SBLVK£ a» 

222785. 030-944530. 02997-3685. 

LONDON GBUE BCORT Senna. 
Td. 370 7151. 

KABEUTS ESCORT SOVKE. Frradr- 
furtarea TeL 62 88 05 

VOOiA VIP ESCORT SBtVlCE. Tek 
{Vienna} 65 41 58 

BRUSSMS. CHANT AL ESCORT Ser- 
vicb: Tef- 02/520 23 65. 

LOM»N ZOE WBT Escort Agency 
TeL 01-579 7556 

GENEVA CHARTS® Gude service. 
TeL 283 397. 

LONDON AQUARIUS ESCORT Ser- 
vice. Tek 226 2386 

U3M30N USA BCORT SERVICE Td: 
402 0557 

MLMOt ‘STARWOOD' Escort + 
Gude Service. Td 069/4486038 

NEW YORK, HOWARD BRADLEY 
Male Escort Service. pl2] 868-1121. 

GBCVA- HBBE BCORT SOVKE 
3 pun. to 12 pun. Tel: 36 29 32 

ASTMO-S BCORT SBtVlCE Fiatturt 
■ 069 / 81 70 93. 

KAREN - FRANKFURT ESCORT Ser- 
w®. Tet 069/88 62 88 

BRUSSH5. ANTWBtP KAT1A Escort 
Service. TeL 02/7317641. 

LONDON JACQUEU+E ESCORT Ser- 
vice. Tel. 81 -402 7W9 

DUSSBDORF/COLOG+E/BODM. 

6«tT Escort Service. 0211 / 383141. 

TATJANA ESCORT SBVKE. Frank- 
fun area Tek 81 01 *7 

FRANKFURT/ MUNICH Male Escort 
Service. Q69/386441 & 089/3518226 

TR AVIV STYLE ESCORT SBLVia. 
W.OWdBN 

MUNICH PRIVATE BCORT SERVICE 

TeL 918132 « 912314 


Ailwd Irtsb 54k-fS 
AlUed Irtrti SV.4J 
AJIM lrmSUr*7 
Allied Irish -pern 
Arao BUs Core 
AHamlcFinlat-M 


9kv 184 *94} 9151 
114k 17-4 UtLMlOUl 
9kk 8-7 HXUF10O3S 
1Mb 296 941k fSIfc 
17V, |U 19B9tS7 
104% 38-} 99 JB UBti 


Bca Comm. IWtaiB 9*46 9% W 9942 9975 
BrnNioLovereJTb-91 1D«. 2+4 1002310*32 
Bonru [» Rome -91 _ Wk 74 99J8 9MB 

Bonce Some SfilrllD SV. «b 294 «JS 99JB 


BmcoPkrtotves 
BiOl Greece -91/94 

Bk on retoM 24*49 
04.01 Ireland 21*42 
Bl Montreal SW-90 
Sir Ol Metereol 5 
Bk 01 Monlreal £<*-91 
Bk Of Ne* York -96 


464k »5 f92S HUS 
11% 161 9U0 9842 
94k 3U WL131KOS 
II 22-1 99JS 10025 
9k 2W 1002810046 
W* 28-1 IDOJiHXla 
101k 364 10d77100-87 
»«b 14-1 100JD10I.T2 


Bk Of Novo Scotia SVr4B/V3 l(Bk XW 4004818078 
root Novo Scoria 2W-94 13W 11-1 1804510078 

Bk 01 T09V0J4VM 
Bk Of Tokyo 51*49 
BkOt Tokyo -<7 
BkOt Tokyo 21* feMB/91 
Bk Ot Tokyo S4b^toc88^1 

B4 Amertaa SV>-M 

Ban turn Trust Sta 
Bankers Trust SVr9* 

Bq Aruba Invert 24M7/91 
BWJfl 
BblS -99 

Ba Indosuez 5V+f9 
Bq Indasun 544-99 


11 MA TBL7818QJ0 

1»4 »l 1084010020 
72kb 261 1007810048 
125* +2 45 1 721 0142 

9k* 174 1002710042 
Ik* M 99.93 worn 
9S 22-3 1003010040 
»»» 13-2 1000910019 

12 294 9020 9950 
ffe 17-4 1004210072 
11k* 114 180(810021 
1>* J4-1 1014016146 
Uh. IV 3 10100101.10 


Bo L'Unlan Eurnpeene 51b 8k* 204 10OM18O34 


filer S'- 47 
Bfce2U-OCtaa 
BtcelU-tona 
B(CSS4te99 
Bno5lb-9J 
BnoSvWmm 

EnoJ*,® 

EnByi-asm 

Bnu7W-Urk* 

BnpSW-99 
BnpS’-49 
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BnpSlM-eo 
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EaWorrmSb^m/ki 

Bara ays Overseas 5-95 
BardOVS Ovenaas S -t0 


Barclays Overwas 544 
CMreenBkiWr* 
Bereen Bk 54k08/91 

King Beta Sltadko99/(U 
Kew Bflo Sllg oct-99/04 
lOno Beta5ten-94/04 
k.tna Brto Site -oerp 
Ccce 5^-98 
Ccce 5*^83 
Cnco5 , irW97 
CncaSV»40/95 
cntsfa-90 - 

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□be (Wklvl 54b-9* 
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Carter el 54L4(te*4 
Oxne Moraotton 5W9J 
C/W5W09 
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Chemical [Wktyl 5- -94 
Chrln Ionia Bk5fe-9I 
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125* 38-1 

104* 304 1807046010 
12k* 22-1 1003910049 
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125k +2 10*7310060 

«4k T2-2 WfifEWlM 
114* 2S-3 9972 Nd 
104k 31-1 10*2510035 
tkfc 134 1084810020 
9ku 5+ 9927 99J7 
1000 H 1002010040 
17H 43 HI. 10181 3S 
17k* J2.1 1DQ241KU4 
95* 11-3 I0U0WO4I 
125k k-2 M0JS1004* 
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124k 11-2 1004810050 
134» 11-7 10075103 £5 
9S» IW 1002510036 
13V. 'Jr 3 1008210095 
94b 7-4 1008410094 

II* 2*4 43041 WCL71 
105* 8-5 1004510025 

8% 3-1 9022 9037 

124* 18-1 1002210037 
9kb 28-5 99J2 18032 
125a 311 1002210032 
99b M 99,65 9975 
IK 27 3 100351 0O4S 
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IJK +3 WO401DO5D 


KSMr/Mtac*B/Mat Counoo Next Bid . 


Ic InduSrles ■ -91 


lb<5 
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Ireland 3b-kk/99 


INS 


Italy (Rombttc)54*-99 
Clows*-® 

Italy -89/94 

J.P. Morgan 54*-97 

Koo-4eb92 

KopJ4+may92 

Klktaaort Benson S5b-95 

KtetaMI Benton 5W-M 

Korea Day Bk 71 3-M 

Korea ExcMee* 74%48 

Una>ln24*-99 

Lloyds St*-93 

LioyasSUrM 

Ltoyds--84 

LtCbS4k-iuU9 

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Cretfil Fonder 5WOTO 
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Credll L»on54te9E/97 
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Crwt Lymcre-99 

Credll Lron 5W4an92/W 
Credll Lven55*-iiM92/N 
CTBd Nall Slip 51*81 
CredNdtl 5 tte 54*90/94 
CredltoRStall - -94 
CredHDnstalt 51+91/97 
Creditanstalt 5JM6 
Dallchi Kooovo 54*96 
DcmTOcOUeSK-99 
DenNorrtH-novfl 
DenNorske-detSB 
Denmarv 5>*irti<S/9B 
Denmark SlteocrtMO 
Denmark 54*84 
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Die Eret Oast 5W-92/94 
Dresaner Bart SK-93 
DresdnerBank5>*-89 
OrMOwBoik 51*92 
EUoraJoNudeor5te-89 
EdI 548-99 
EM S**-95 
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Gdi-oere 

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Grind kiys51*-9! 

GrkxUays2ki84 
Great Western Fh 541-94 

HI)! Samuel 51*88 

Hill 5armjel Perp Six acre 9K 2fr5 92J9WJ*. 
Hbceno Americano 5Vb-K IJK 7*J 1JB8BM8.W 
Hydra Qlrtbee 54*44 12K 22-1 1004HHLS8 


12 24-3 1089110100 

124998 18187101.17 
9% 31-5 IBLlSltOJO 
1248 22-3 1HU4I0O54 
Mr. 128 10175100*1 
94% 8-3 .3&231IU3 
94k 278 100.1010020 
17 98 I0OJ71OU7 

94k 1-7 99JM 1ULB4 
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IS*. 2 1-3 IUBJ5101L75 
12 98 10Q9B10UD 

9K 9-7 1006510085 
9k* 2U 10087100.97 
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9* 1 9-3 9W5 10050 
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19k. 154 1003310092 
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124k 8-2 106 77 1 0047 

12k* 38-1 99.11 100B1 
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W. 252 99 J7 9937 
121* 27-3 18025T8035 
12h 28-2 1802011045 
124k 252 100421002 

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fkb 178 99.9310033 
13K.253 1804910059 
9K *57 tffi.1 810073 
fK 218 99 J7 99^7 
I » 252 1005110087 
Nk 355 If Si 9985 
10 212 9990 10030 

84* 23-1 97* «4k 
9K *3 9988 9978 
179k U-1 99.95 I0U5 

II 354 1005710887 

<K 15* 1803110041 
l79k 22-1 100.181003 
9K 11-2 1007810030 
91/1211-3 1003510040 
10K 1+5 H4k 97kk 
9k. 255 100. 1210033 
1 278 UOAtlOOkTS 

12 253 MOJ51009B 

I» 52 1008010171 
» 21-1 9U0 99 JO 
IV. 352 1003710057 


kkolanlaSVrOMO 

Mnn O/Srra 2*r-M 

Man Hon fWklyl 51*9* 
Marine MkOend $**-94 
Marine MkJtaJSi** 
Marine Mklknl -09 
Medon Bk 51+96 
MkHaM 54551 
MMIandS-89 
Midland SUrkl 
MldtoM9+l 
Mteta) 5-kt 
Mitsui Fin Skrft 
Morgan Granted 5 -94 
Mortgage Den 24*96/93 
Marianne Oen *44-12 
Not BkDetrail 21*9* 
Not Bk ArnMa$4*-MVK 
Natl UMrtmln 54*91 
NdlWertmln 54*98 
Natl kfcstndo 54*94 
NedIWestmta 54*92 
Natl WesJmfa -oera 
NestrOy Slb-94 
New Zealand 51*87 
New Zealand SM 51*92 
NtaoonCredBBk 54*90 
Nippon Cram Bk 54*05 
Nknan Credll Bk *1*86 
Nordic Inf Fin 24*91 
Okas'** 

0*5*4-94 
DO) - -9S/99 
Onshore MMna 51*91 
Offshore Minina-* 
HMIik4UN 
PkOenkenS-M/fl 
Queensland 51* -96 
Rant* 5te-91 


U14 151 9975 WLB 
12 94 B630»O2O 

U 5* IWSObld 
im* 255 1O08CM67O 
i2fe M-i munaue 
131k N-I 99.9* HO* 
10H 274 9»J5 100.lt 
I»b *J 1KL20U0J0 
124k 21-3 1084k V8 
9k* 55 9937 99 J7 
9% 19-2 100J910W9 
124* 1-2 1007610076 

101k 9-5 1 00471 0072 

m* J9-2 laajBiBBTS 

I2K 27-3 10B4S10U8 
10 S8 904k 9m 
n 94 9«k 9Hk 
9kk 04 9985 9975 
Nkb 384 100^010090 
hr- 44 1 00701 QUO 

114* 184 4008510075 
Ok 22-1 100JDMLSS 
184k 1+5 99 JS bid 
18 IW 1007510085 
9% ru laosMOTO 
«4 31-5 WU5WU5 
«* 104 9975 99JS 
12 M 1008510080 
10 54 IDO30I00J5 

ra. TtA 180231*63 
W! 28-3 99J0 18080 
94k U-l 77. U *7.29 
11« M W0J4100J4 
94* IW 9978 9988 
94k 153 9984 9974 
99* 352 4003210012 
12kb 251 1008010035 
9*fc 3*4 1008210087 
79k 74 1007010085 
IT 304 I0M71BLZ7 
1» +3 1008510070 

121* +3 1002010040 
13k 1H 1000010005 
17% 1M 1007010180 
9kW 194 4003010032 
9k 253 9975 9985 
214 9977 9*87 
42% 4+1 1005518065 
9k 274 100884*20 
11% 1*4 400001009* 

I Oft 254 100J3WLO 
129* 1+5 1004840051 
124* 25-2 100*810870 
lift 94 1007440014 
9% 3*4 WU8100JB 
124k 11-2 1084210072 
94* 284 9985 WO 
U00 lb-l 1087210037 
III* 55 9975 10025 
104k 255 100*540072 
10k 252 180218070 
11% 114 108/0100.43 
9% +6 1000510042 

T2% 2+1 1 0070 10040 
121* 2+2 9775 9675 
9% 19/* 1007510021 
10k 55 1004810078 
i2ft 2+3 leoTsnaas 


BoyairoSa)ltad5VV*riifl1ft 1+1 1X27M0J3 
Sdton¥i54r91/93 9ft 5* 1007310043 

nwi Int. Ftn 21*80 lt% 2+3 1005010075 
Senwa-M/2N4 12ft 2+1 ioo3nauj 

Sanwaim. Fin 51*92 IT- 19-2 1008510015 
Scandinavian Fln5Vnrtr9311% 154 99^ 10058 
Scandinavian RnSk-dec939k 214 9070 9080 
Scotland Int Fin 51*92 lift 2+3 1009510175 
yd S’- 48 HHb 30-1 100BS1001B 

Seat 51*90/93 91* 2+4 9970 99J0 

&5£.5ft* W, +6 *970 10005 

STJE-m 9% 194 *970 9975 

SarteteCenwale5lb+V*S 13ft +3 Ml .131*1 23 
Soctete General* 546 -90 IDft H 10QJ6MB44 
Sactele Gen Mar 51*94 12ft 1+3 1007810040 
Sodete Geno/efe W-novN MU 1-5 10UD10UO 
Sacb-91 10ft TCI 100291 DOJI 

Saaln HUngaem) 546+2/97 12ft 25-7 HIUDHIIUO 
kingdom CH Soaln ?*-93 12ft 28-2 WSLM1S195 


Spain -99 
Stand Chart 51*90 
jnnd cron 5V<-9t 
Stood Chart 50-91 
Stand OvrtSkriSiartO 
Stand Chart -aeiv 
SWe Bk 01 India 5%r47 
SamlUffte F inance 54*-88 
Sumltemo Tn.il 516-93.14 
Sicasvallbanknn t-85 
5weden9-Tl 
Sweden 514-87/89 
Sweden 5>4 -93/03 
Sweden Sft-a/n 
Sweden -vmm 
sweeenperp- 
Sweden-oaiC 
Td vo Kobe 546 -93/04 
Tirtualn 54*42/94 
TOkal Asia LM 5W44/99 
TareMa DMrioknSVUB 
Tevn Trust 51*92/99 
Tvo51m 44A4 
Union Bk Norway SV+99 
Untied 0/Sw»Gk 5-11 
Wiliams + Grins 51*91 

Wfirtd Bank - -94 
Y okohama 51*91/94 
Zentrelesaarkassn 5ft-91 


94k 28-5 9950 9940 
13% 1+3 1007210882 
9ft +7 100.1510025 

Hft 20-5 1004510055 
129* 11-3 nUBlOLlD 
10ft 74 9982 9972 

«ft iw mb mn 

i7y 11-7 inu5ini55 
17* 11-3 1007410036 
lift ",4 9950 Oil 
189* 24-1 lHUZTDOvQ 
12ft 2+2 10015110081 
10ft 30-5 I0044UB89 
12ft +2 10U4IDU4 
fto 9971 99J1 
13ft in 1HL2S10C30 
H«M I ixitfl9924 992* 
Hft 3+5 1D0J010O40 
12ft 1+3 10051100*1 
9% 124 lBOJBma 
12ft MI 190801(870 
9% U4 1003210081 
9 7-2 975D 9850 

12ft 29-2 9U0 HUB 
VK. 2+3 99 JS 10035 
12ft 1+3 H0J5H0J5 
086 2+2 9072 9192 
lift 24 lOeLeiOLB 
13ft 1+1 1008010055 


Non Dollar 


PTH Brunswick SbtW9i 
Aru-97 

Bk Montreal 54644 
Bk Tokyo 40/90 
aamdosKlftfl 
C.ircarD S.T/4 eH-10 
Cram 5f*ft 
Cr ed Natl SHb 5V+91/9S 
Denmark 91/9+10 
1. 1.1. 5 -94 

Kin g dom Betnfura 5 -94 
LHVdSS-86 
Sncf 54*90/93 
YdrtAlreSft4in4 
Credll Fender 546-99 


lift 1+2 9043 99*3 
mu 1+2 9945 9930 
111k 277 HAS 9940 
9% 21-7 9940 
feb 2+2 99.15 9930 
M 1» «S 99.18 
IIM JU 9945 99 JO 
9ft 1+3 99 JB 9945 
PCt 2+2 9975 9950 
Hft 1+4 WJ5HJ0 
Krib 1+1 99 JB 9973 
9% 2+2 99.13 9920 
Wft 2+1 1003010085 
18Yt 1+3 99519941 
fix Hal 9945 » 


Source : 
London 


OW» Sum-First Boston LM. 


IF YOU GET A KICK O/T OF SOCCER, 
READ 

ROB HUGHS 

WEDNESDAYS IN THE IHT 


iniercst rales for postal savings ac- 

Nor does the Kfinisuy erf Fi- 

nam-r lilrv ;hf idea of investing Nagao Hashiiuoto, a manager of 
postal funds abroad. “We have a the Federation of Bankers Assoda- 
huge deficit." Mr. Ohashi said, u 00 of Japan, also argued that the 
"These funds can go to help the Ministry of Posts has unfair lax 
government deficit. There is no advantages. As a Government 


need for postal savings lo invest 
directly abroad.” 

George P. Hutchinson, manag- 
ing director of Salomon Brothers 
Asia LtcL said that the S35 billion 
the Ministry' of Posts said it would 
invest abroad could easily be ab- 
sorbed by U.S. capital markets. 

But he said that a decision to 


agency, he said, it does not have to 
pay the taxes on income. 

Therefore, be said, if interest 
rates are deregulated, the Ministry 
of Posts would be freer to raise 
rates because it does not have 
equivalent costs. 


Uft Sdiu UMI a UO.U1UU LV> | 

invest that money abroad would tUUlTgClS tO ijltY 
cause some disruption here because ® 

fi.'FB Natural Gas 


funds for the budget, and it wanted 
neither to issue more bonds nor 
raise taxes. 

As a first step, the Ministry of 
Posts has requested that it be al- 
lowed to invest S4 billion on its 
own directly in government bonds 
in the fiscal 1985 budget. 

No final decision will be made 


Into Next Century 


Reuters 


ESSEN, West Germany — 
Ruhrgas AG. the energy group, has 
announced an agreement with a 
Dutch supplier, Gasunie, that as- 
sures most of West Germany's nat- 
„ ural gas will come from Western 

until the parliament votes on the Europe well into the next century 
budget later in the year. But what- Ruhigas is the main buyer of 
ever the outcome — and few be- Soviet natural gas from the once- 
lieve that the Ministry of Posts will disputed Siberia-Western Europe 
win this round — the debate over pipeline that the United Slates 
the postal savings system is unlike- tried to block on the grounds that it 
ly to end there: would make the Europe over-rdi- 

The Ministry of Finance makes ant on Soviet energy, 
no secret of its desire to see changes A Ruhrgas company statement 

in the system, especially in light of said Wednesday that Gasunie 
its recent agreement to deregulate would c ontinue to supply about 6.5 
Japan's financial markets and in- billion cubic meters (227.5 billion 
terest rates. cubic feet) of natural gas a year to 

The ministry, as wdl as commer- West Germany until about 2010. 
dal banks that compete with the An earlier accord was due to expire 
post office for accounts, criticize in the mid-1990s. 


-ADVERTISEMENT- 


INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 


Quotations Supplied bv Funds Listed 
3 January 1985 


Tire net asset votae quotation* thown below are supoUad bv the Fond* Dsted v*tM Nw 
exception of lame tends whose quotes are based on iuae prices. The following 
marginal symbols Indicate froaneoev of quotations supplied for the IHT: 

M3 daffy; Iw) -• weekly; lb) -bl-fflontlilv; |r) -mularty; (I) - irmyirtariy. 


AL MAL MANAGEMENT 
(w) AF-Mal Trust. S> 


—Id) Sever Beleaalnaent-f- 


S 35.10 


S 140A1 LLOYDS BANK IKTL POB 43a Geneva 11 

bank jui lux mpp rn.cn — H"| Uovds Inll Dollar. 5 10140- 

1 “■ U< t c m — Mwi Uovds Inti Europe SF 102D0 

— la | Boerbano ■ — «-(wr) Uovd* Inti Growth— SF 1B25S0 

5 * Uovd® inll Income— SF 3OMJ0- 

1 1SM-S2 — H»*l Uovds inn Pacific SF 13aiD 


— Id i _ 

—Id | Eaulboer Amorlco 
— Id ) Eaulboer Euro** 
— 4d ) Eaulbaer PaeWlc. 
— Cd > ^ 


— I*f ) stockbor. 


— Cd ) CSF Fund. 


— Cd 1 Crossbow Fund - 
— Cd) ITF Fund N.V__ 


IfiihSo pahisbas-croup 

- SF 9623X1 — d I Cortexn Intemationdi 58449 

SF IS61J0- — Iw) OBLI-DM DM 124524 

.r,7« -4"> OBLIGESTION SF 91S5 

— Iw) OBL1-OOLLAR S 1JHB.14 


SF 10^4 — Iw) 08LI-VEN. 

* 1X48 — Cw) OBL I -GULDEN. 


BANOUE INDOSUEZ 
— Cd J Allan Growth Fund. 
— Cwl Dtverbond 


-t 


d 1 PAROIL-PUND. 


Y 106,16X00 
FL 104975 

*9241 

S 99.92 
S 10004 


• in nr, — .d) PARINTERFUND- 

5FBL55 ~ id 1 PAB t*® Treasury B4Md_ 

5 17S3 Ravel Bank Of Canada>POB 24tGoernsev 
. S 975 -Hwl RBC Canotfion Fund Ltd— S 1044 
S 1593 -+tw> RBC Far Easl+PaclflC F6. S 1012 

S9CL12 -+CW) RBC inn capital Fd. *1027 

S 1X8 Tt -tlwl RBC Inn Income Fd. * 1058* 

BRiTANNiA8>OB 271. St. Hollar. Jersey i+(w> hbc NortifAmerfFa^lZI jS)?- 


— Cw) FIF — America 
— Iw) FIF— Europe _ 
— 1»> FIF— PodHc. 


— Cd I Indosuez AMitlibondt A 
— fd ) Indawez MuKIbonds B 


— (w» BrfMMlar Income- 


— Cw) BrltS Monoo.Curr . 


— Id ) Brit IrriLSMonoOPortf- 
— fd ) Bril. Inta Manaa-Porif . 
— Cw) Brll.Unlvoreol Gniwlti — 
— Iw) Brit Add Fund. 


— (w I Brtt-MarenLCurrency- 


* SOW- SKANDIFONO INTL FUND C4++23827D) 

' 10951 — Cw)lnc.:Bld S47B Offer S3. 13 

- — (w)Acc.: Bid S478 Offer SS.13 

I S 0960 SWISS BANK CORP. 

*0737* — Cd ) America Valor SF 53475 


— (d | Bril. Jason Dir Port. Fd . 
— Cw) Brll-leree* Gill Fund. 


— M 1 Bril. World Lais. Fund— 
-Cd ) Brit. World Tectia Fund. 


C 15.14 —Id ) D-Mark Bond Selection DM 13241 

S0.983 —Id ) Dollar Bond Selection % 1X181 

£0224 — Id) Florin Band Selector*— FL 12742 
*0.959 — fdi Iteervolor 


S074S —Id ) -tapen Portfolio- 


CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 
Iw) Capital int 1 ) Fui 


— (W) Capital liana SA. 


— (d J Swiss Forelon Bond Sal- 
« —Id ) Swrixvalor New Ser._ — 
— W I Unlv. Band Select 


* 1076 _(d ) universal Fund- 


SF818B 
SF 81075 
SFI09A3 
SF 77575 
SF BUS 
SF IT3J6 


CREDIT SUISSE II5SUE PRICES) UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND 

—Id ) Actions Sulwes SF339JS’ — Cd ) Amen ua. Sh. SF 3950 

— (tfl Bond Valor Swf SF HOLDS — Cd 1 Bond- Invest SF 7025 

— Cd) Bond Volor D-mark DM 10542 — Cd > Form Swiss Sh, SF 12540 

— Id) Bond Valor US-OOLLAR S 10803 — Cd ) Japan-invesf SF9445D 

— Cd) Bond Valor Yen. Yen lOU+DO —Id 1 Sofit South Air. Sh SF 470.50 

— Cd) Convert vofor Swt SF ia+45 — fd ) Sima (stock price) SF 20440 


—Idl Convert Volar US-OOI-LAR. * 1MLS4 U NION INVESTMENT Frnrtlhirt 

—Id I gy greF - . — - »F _BOOOO I Unhroma DM 4045 

—CO I CS Fonaii annas SF 734D id ) UnlfondB nut wm 

—Id I CS Foods— im r__ — SF1TC75 -_( d ) unirak DM 7144 


— (d)CS Monev Marke* Fund— *102940 
—Id ) CS Money Market Fund DM 1D1540 
— Id I Enerafe— Valor, 

-Id I U 


sf Bsiran •*> Actlbonds investments Fund. 
8C ■*“ 1.1 AerlvMt Inti 


Other Funds 


— Cd ) Euroao— Volor_ 


—Id 1 Pacific —Valor. 


SF14L00 lw) Act! Wit Inti 


DIT INVESTMENT FFM 
■Id) Concentra. 


— Hd I lnf*l Rentenfbnd . 


Dunn & HurBin a Uovd George- Brussels 
— fml DKH Commodity Pool- S Z7186 — 

—cm) Currency + Geld Pool S 17U3 — 

— Cm) MfinciL Life Fut. Pool—. S57B40 — 
—Cm) Trans World FuL Pool, s 79425 — 


F&C MGMT. LTD. INV. ADVISERS 
1. Laurence Peuntv Hill EC4. 01-423-4680 

—In) F+C Ailanllc S 10.15 

— Iw) FiC European—— S94I 

— Iw] FAC Oriental *2489 


SE iMm tw) Aqullo Inlemallonal Fund— * 1044)1 

SF 16+m (r J Arab Finance i.F SB6B80 

tb I Artane— *1.499.57 

DM2473 Cw) Trusfoor hill Fd. IAEIP) — nail 

DM mo CdJBBLFONDS BF4122 

Cw) BNP Interbond Fund — *10571 

(*») Bcndsetex-lssue Pr— - SF 14)J5 

Cm) Canada Gtd-Martaage Fd * BAS 

(d ) Capitol Preaerv. Fd. Inti S1I4M 

iw) aiodei Fund *1.79 

Id I C-I.R. Australia Fund S 9.99 

Id ) C-IJft Japan Fund — *970 


Cm) Cleveland Offshore Fd.. 
Iw) Columbia Securities— 
Cb) COMETE- 


S 179449 
FL 10419 
*914.19 
I 14)60.00 
— *9.42 
_ * 25.71 

* 71 JO 

id j PikWffer.Wld wide lyt .Trt *974 


FIDELITY POB 671* HomUton Bermuda 


Id ) Cons. Banks Fund. 

(w) Convert. 


—Cm) American Values Common- *70.92 '*} S'9/^7. 


— Id ) Fidelity Amer. Assets _ 


— Cd ) Fidelity Australia Fund 

—Id ) Fidelity Dir. 5vas.Tr 

— Id 1 Fidelity Far East — 

— fd ) Fidelity Int*. Fund 


—Id 1 Fidelity Orient Fund — 

— Cd ) Fidelity Frontier Fund. 
—Id ) Fidelity Pacific Fund-.... 


*6205 CD I Drakkar InvesLFund N.V — *94047 

*77V 18 ) Drertus Fund Inll *3400 

*11974 I w) Dreyfus Interconllnent — *3073 

e if 'is Cw) The Establishment Trust.. S 1:04 

SS013 <d) Europe Oblloallons LF 2M9M 

S2494 fwl Flret EaoleFund S11AS2JX) 

Iflil lb ) Flftv Stars Ltd. SB3749 

S 13X04- »w) Finsbury Group Lid S 109.95 


-Id I Fidelity Sort. Growth Fd. *1194 }«} Pr 

— (d ) Fidelity World Fund * 28.10- «*•' Forextung 


Iw) Formula Selection Fd— 

FORBES PO B887 GRAND CAYMAN (d ) Fandltalla . 

London Aoenl 01-839-3013 Id 1 Govemm. Sec. Fund* 

— Iw) Gold Income 58.16- w I Frankt-Trust Imeretns 

— (w) Gold Appreciation 5442 Iwl Houssmann HldOS. N.V. 

— Iw) Dollar Income. *7.99 (w) Hesllo Funds. 


—(ml Shnateafo Tradln 


GEFINOR FUNDS 
— Iw) East Investment Fund. 
— Iw) Scoillsli World Fund— 


*1-00 lw) Horizon Fund, 
(b ) I LA inti GoW 


*35382 <1! 


Cw) iniermartiel Fund 


U« (W) Inn Currency Fund LW. 
S136J0 Jr > ifrf-l Securities Fund 


(d ) invesla DWS 


(r ) invest Atfanhaues 


.... ... 111674 

—Iwl Stale SI. American , 

Copt I.GukLLId.Lon Aoenl J1-49142W 

GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT CORP. 

PB 119. SI Peter Pori, Guernsey. 048I-S871S 
lm) FuhirGAMSA 

(mIGAM Arbitrage inc ..... 

(w) GAMerlco Inc * 121J10 Id 1 Klebiwort Benson Ini 

I w) GAM Boston Inc — S 627)3 Cw) KMnworr Bans. Jap. 


(r ) Italfortune Infl Fund 

S 11078 (w) japan Selection Fund 
111*22 Cwl japan Pacific Fund 


(w)GAMErml(b0e. 


iw) GAM France- VuL 


S 1109 Id ) LHcbri Fund 


iw) gam i memo Hanoi me., 


(w) GAM North America Inc— 


tw) GAM N. America Unit Trust 
lw) GAM Pod lie Inc 


SF iw) Louenm Cap Hold 
s m 1 1 leuibocr 
* (w) Lloyds Inti. Smofl C++ 
t lw) Lusiund 


411177 lm) Mognatund N.V. 


Iw) GAM Slerl & inti Unit Trust. 12150 o W ) Medkrtanum SeL Fd. 
iw) GAM Systems Inc. S CD lMsfeore. 


(w) GAM Worktwtde Inc. 


(ml GAM Tycho SA. Class A. 



G.T. MANAGEMENT (UK) Ltd 
w) Barry Poc Fd. Ltd. 


—td l G.T. Applied Science 

—Id ) G.T. Aston HJC GwtttFd 

— Iw) G.T. Asia Fund. 


— Cd ) G.T. Australia Fund- 
— Id 1 G T. Europe Fund — 
-(d ) GT. Dollar Fund— „ 


SraU8lw)NAAT. 

SI0L51 (d ) Nlkko Growth Padane Fd *970274 
Cw) Mlooon F'uvl *»ifr- 

„ cwl NOVOIK invaslmenl Fund — SH7JN 

■_ tw) NAM.F. S I38JB 

«m) MSP C I T ilSOJJ 

Vi’E. Cm) Opportunity Investors Lid-— S34,)/ 

Iwl PANCURR1 Inc. *1430 

S22J3 (r) Parian Sw.REst Geneva SF 1797.00 


— Id I G.T. Band Fund- 


—Id ) G.T. Global Technlav Fd 

— co ) G.T. Honshu Pamnnoer 

—Cd ) GT. invest mem Fund 

—Id ) G.T. Jsrtan Small Cfi-fund „ 
-Id ) G.T. Techno tosv fund. 


C 1 .M2 ir I Permal Value Fund K.V i 1,137.40 

>.'*« lb ) PI Blades S9S170 

(nl p SCO Fund N.V.™ S 10406 

m ) Putnam Infl Fund J5S.18 

Cb ) Prl— Tech *873.14 


Cw) Ounnhim Fund N.V. 

*fV»: (d) Rente. Fund 

iTvil id ) Rflntlnvesl 


S 3JXZ2J2 
LFU1140 
LF 1/15072 
*1050.9382 
54.13 


id ) G.T. South anno Fond S1152* id i Reserve insured Deposits 

ESC TRUST CaiJERSEY) LTD. j 

1-3 Seale SUl. Holierril53+36331 (wl Samurai Portfolio. SF 10775 

TRADED CURRENCY FUND. Id i SClrTech. SA LuxemDauro — S9J0 

ftldJlreT: RM rtftpnfiar S9970* tw) State St. Bank EwltyHdusNV SBJD 

iw.Sjrefem^tmentFund-- S19A9 

INTERNATIONAL I NCOME FUND [6 ) Syntax LJlL *490 


-Id ) Short Term 'A' (Accuml S 1^362 j w I*Sl!l 6 i ,-?ll!5- F ?eiT‘ 

-Id ) Short Term 'A' IDIsIr) S 1JU81- }" Tokyo Pat HoU. {Sea), 

— Id ) Short Term "S' IAcaMi)_ S1J2Z7 < w ? !« *” N.V— 

-id) Shan Term -S' lDh.li) * 03*25- Traaspartflc Fund 

-Cw) Long Term-. *2371 ! a > T urauaH e Fund . 


SF 10115 

- $97.57 
*13171’ 

- ssua 

*9777 


(w) Tweedy Browne rLv.CknsA * 174SA9 
JARDINE FLEMING. POB 70GPO Hp Ko (w) Tweedv^rowne n.v.ClaasB *1^3202 

—10 ) J.F Japan Trusl Y 47» (d ) UNICO Fund DM 72.90 

—lb ) J.F South East Ask) *27.44 id 1 UNI Band Fund 5959.57 

— (b 1 J.F Japan Techi^laay— Y517SI tb ) UNI Caalial Fund S 1045.92 

—lb I J.F Paci 11c Sens. I Ate! * 536 (wi United Cop. Inwt. Fund LW.— S122 

— Cb) J.F Australia .... *458 iwl wedge Europe N.v„_^_ S4XS0 

Iwl Wedae Japan N.V. — 5 8117 


NIMARBEN 
—Id) Class A. 


— iw ) Class B - ua. 


— lw) Closs C- Jtxmn. 


(w) wedge Padfle N.V., 
-sSii CwiwedoeuAiiv.. 
_eya.il i_i ei— 


S57.1S 

*52.17 


ORANGE NASSAU GROUP 
PB 15578, The Home (0701 449670 


S7BA7 lm) WlndiesCer Financial Lid- — *832 
-* ^ lm) Winchester Diversified**.^. *19 JIT* 

id l work! Fund SJ1 S 1079 

Iwl worldwide Securities S/5 3*3. *4045 


(w) WgrtdwMe Seecfel 5/S 2Va. *1487.13 


DM — Deutsche Mark; BF — Belgium Francs; FI. — Dutch Florin; LF — 
Luxembourg Francs: $F — Swiss Francs: a — asked: + — Offer Prices; b — bid 
change P/V *10 to *1 per unit; njl— Naf Available; N.c— NarCammunlcofed;a— 
New; S — suspended; 5/S — Slock Split; ■ — Ex-Dividend; - — Ex-Rts; — - 
Gross Performance index Nov.; • — Reflemm -Pries- Ex-Couoon; Formerly 

Worldwide Fund Lid; & — OHer Price incl. 3% prelim, choree. ++ — dally stock 
price a* on Amsterdam Slock Exchonge 

















Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 4, 1985 


iSSSIHBUHinU 


PEANUTS 

WOUJI THAT'S A TOUGH 
QUE$nON.J4MM..LET 
ME THINK —HMM... „ 


I HAVE TO SAY, 
GEORGE WASHINGTON 


I’M RIGHT?' MEU)! 
UJHAT A RELIEF... 


YOU PROVE ME TO 
THE WARNING TRACK 
ON THAT ONE, MA’AM 


BOOKS 


ilUlllllllHIII 


BLONDIE 


m 


■■■ 

HI 


ACROSS 


sv.w.n 
servicewomen 
9 Picket 

13 "The 

Love” 

14 Where to seek 
what’s chic 

15 Approve 

18 Warm-up for 
Winfield 

19 Beings 

28 Impish doings 

21 Understands 

22 Not 

(zilch) 

23 Assagais 

26 Slipcover 

material 

30 Thane's group 

31 Eastern inn 

32 Anguillifbrm 
creature 

33 Swimming 
stroke 

37 Montpellier 
Mrs. 

38 Poet Dickinson 

39 Nautical term 

40 Hinged hooks 

42 Wall boards 

44 Horseshoe pan 

45 is busy 

48 Quite sore 

49 Bayou craft 

53 He aims high 


55 "Stole 

s« 

58 Cenobltes 

57 Tortosa’s river 

58N.BA.team 

59 Becomes the 
plaintiff 

6QT.VA. works 

DOWN 

1 Bishop’s wear 

2 even keel 

3 Daugavpils 
native 

4 Court principal 

5 Reportable 
Income 

6 Most of 
Switzerland 

7 Supportive 

8 Garden 
legume 

9 Vlchyssoise 
base 

10 Analogous 

11 "Good counse- 
llors no 

clients”: Shak. 

12 Sizes up 
visually 

14 Swivels’ kin 

17 Where 
Pompey rode 

18 He’s quick on 
the flaw 

22 Marshal 


23 Trickster 

24 Egret's pride 

25 Atelier prop 
28 Provides an 

overhead 

27 English 
hynmologist 

John Mason 

28 Staircase 
feature 

29 Les femmes 
31 Move furtively 

34 Eat one's 
words 

35 Blends 
38 Paid 

kidnappers 

41 Wedding-cake 
features 

42 Does some 
■ handwork 

43 Both: Prefix 
45 Yokels 

48 To (as 

erne) 

47 Handle 
harassment 

48 Quatre et 
quatre 

49 Boleyn or 
Hathaway 

50 Mr. Eban 

51 Semester 

52 Hitsigns 
54 Gambler’s 

marker 



#my'o vou 
PO that 
BOSS? ] 


BECAUSE 
■ l KNOW 
BUMSTEAD 


\m 


THE BU&B3 HE LOCKS, 

THE MCWS HE'S 

GOOBIMS OPF=- r/ 










BEETLE BAILEY 


FILET MiSNON 


PEAS, BAKED 


POTATOES 



ALBERT SPEER: The End of a Myth 

By Matthias Schmidt. Translated From the 
German by Joachim NeugroscheL 276 pp. 
Document illustrations. SI 4.95. 

St. Martin’s Press. 175 Fifth Avenue , 

New York N. Y.10010. 

Reviewed by 

Christopher Lehmann-Haupt 

t 6 A GREAT poet might possibly be able to 
-CV express the numbing evenness, the 
emptiness and helplessness, in short the intan- 
gible horror of imprisonment,” wrote Albert 
Speer, the former armaments minister of Ger- 
many. in ‘"Spandau: The Secret Diaries.” 
“Compared to what should be said.” this “dia- 
ry remains nothing but a catalog, usually of 
trivialities.'’ 

But one of the trivialities that Speer neglect- 
ed to mention, according to Professor Matthias 
Schmidt's “Albert Speer: The End of a Myth" 
is that he was receiving regular secret ship- 
ments of pate de foie gras, champagne, and 
Russian caviar. So accustomed did Speer grow 
to these luxuries that once, when he was sent 
pressed caviar, a somewhat less expensive kind, 
he asked that only bdu«p be sent in the future 
— and it had to be fresh. 

This is a minor example of the hypocrisy 
exposed here by Schmidt, who teaches at the 
Friedrich Meinecke Institute for Historical Re- 
; search, in West Berlin. Of not much greater 
importance is the author's musing, on Speer's 
claim that he planned to assassinate Adolf 
Hitler, along with several of his cronies, by 
dropping poison gas down a ventilation pipe of 
the Reicn chancellery bunker, and was thwart- 


the Reich chancellery bunker, and was thwart- 
ed only when the exhaust was raised to the 
beight of 13 feet. 

“The picture of Speer as an assassin on the 
prowl seems bizarre and grotesque," writes 
Schmidt, possibly inspired by a colleague of 
Speer's who cynically observed of the assassi- 
nation attempt that “The second most power- 
ful man in the state lacked a ladder. 1 ' “Imagine 
the head of the German armaments industry in 
the dead of night, shrouded in a dark. overcoat, 
holding a briefcase containing several vials of 


poison "as. stealing through the garden of 
Reich chancellery, peering in all directions, 
wondering whether he has been sighted by any 


WIZARD of ID 


® New York Times, edited by Eugene Mateska. 

DENNIS THE MENACE ’ 


it> 44UrTMrA Go&rttW! 


^ . XI 


Fifty- > 
iw 0 
AmcM 

MKW&, 


'T ^ 


REX MORGAN 

'I'D LIKE VERY MUCH TO TAKE YvESl BSPr? Ty&SB \ 
VOU IV WNNEI? TDbSeur, AMSfTHA/) ARE SOME THINGS \ 
CAW VOU GIVE ME SOME TWlB'J fD LIKE TO PISCUSSJ 
n TO talk WITH YOU? l |jMT| ALSO/ if— jT 


f \ 

CAUr IT I 

* ■fug' 

q i 


ONE CONCERNS AMI 
ENVELOPE I PICKED 1 
UP TUtS AFTERNOON 

at an attorneys'^ 

> OFFICE.' r -ncr 



or the seo tries, then attempting to introduce 
the lethal gas into the air shafts, and finally 
sneaking away from the scene of the crime!” 

However trivial these examples may seem, 
they- should convey the thoroughness with 
which the author sets about to demolish the 
myth that he believes Speer so cannily con- 
trived to paint for posterity. From the details in 
his autobiography that he gave of his birth, to 
his version of the role he played in the conspir- 
acy of July 20. 1944. Speer was, the author 
argues, an opportunistic liar striving subtly to 
(Associate himself from the typical Hitler 
henchman. 

Documenting his case with detail that rarely 
grows tedious, Schmidt exposes the following 
major flaws in the monument that Speer, who 
died in 1981, erected to hims elf. He argues that 
despite Speer's claims to having been a disin- 
terested bystander, he was in fact a master 
maneuvers in the endless power struggle that 
went on around Hitler and continued to win 
until it suited him to do otherwise. 


He insists that Speer knew about and en- 
couraged extensive deletions in a daily omce 
log of his official dealings from 1941 to 1944. 
yet later presented these expurgated docu- 
ments as fact He shows how Speer successfully 
manipulated the judges at the Nuremberg trial 
and then covered this up in his memoirs by 
misquoting the court transcript. Most damag- 
ing 0 r alL he persuades us that despite Speer’s 
clever claim that he was willfully ignorant of 
the Final Solution, he in fact not only knew 
what was going on at Auschwitz and other 
concentration camps, but was himself respon- 
sible for the deportation of 75,000 Berlin Jews. 

What we are left with, in short, is not only a 
devastating portrait of a Speer who was at 
heart no different from any other of the Nari 
leaders, but also a detailed analysis of taJfr 
Speer managed to sell himself as the dispas: 
sionate technician whose guilt was somehow of 
a higher order and therefore more palatable. _ 

’‘Under the most disparate conditions: 
Schmidt writes, “a chameieonlike opportunism 
enabled Albert Speer to pursue three extraor- 
dinary careers and to achieve success in each 
one: as an architect, as Nazi minister of arma- 
ments, and as a witness writing for posterity. 
During these three careers, he hogged the lime- 
light more and more, manipulating it as effec- 
tively as the mass ed searchlights in the ‘cathe- 
dral of light' that he invented. If we look at his 
achievements, setting aside moral consider- 
ations, then we would have to credit Speer with 
genius — a genius motivated by his drive to. 
become and remain a historic figure." 

But historians won't and can't accept Speer’s, 
self-portrait. Schmidt concludes a little lamely. 
“We have no choice but to call Speer's writings 
the most cunning apologia by any leading 
figure of the Third Reich." The trouble is, 
so r unnin g that its mendacity is difficult 
swallow in digestible lumps. That's why. 
Schmidt's description of Speer as an Inspector 
Clouzot-like assassin is more effective in its 
way » ban much of his careful documentation. , 

That's why one has to keep in mind onei 
particular picture of Speer in his prison cell at 
Spandau. As be writes on a sheet of toilet paper 
of the numbing monotony of his imprison- 
ment, he licks a few stray morsels of caviar 
from his thumb and washes them down with a, 
sip of champagne. The caviar is fresh beluga.. 
Plenty more of it is on the way. 

Christopher Lehmann-Haupt is on the staff of 
The New York Times. 

■ k 

Olympic Park Face-Lift .. 
Collapses in Los Angeles 

The Associated Press . ' 

LOS ANGELES — -The SI -Pershing Square 
cleanup that began before the Summer Ol^i- 
pics has been discontinued, and some residents 
Tear the park may again be a refuge for drifters 
and drug dealers. 

Security patrols, cleaning crews and live en-- 
tenainment were discontinued last week by the 
Pershing Square Management Association^ 
Food stands erected under colorful tents did 
not make enough money to support the effort, 
officials said. The park is a few blocks from 
Skid Ron-, and homeless people are already 
reclaiming the turf. “I was over there this 
morning, and it’s already started,” CCA presi- 
dent Christopher Stewart, president of the 
Central City Association. 






Teah.MomtoatS Sank H?z. m opening 

BRANCH Offices AIL OVER THE HOUSE/ 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
g by Henri Amok) and Bob Lee 


Whan l cast 
apeHs they 
slay coat! 


GARFIELD 


Unscramble these tour Jumbles, 
one letter to each square, to form 
(our ordinary words. 


COUPH 


FRYOT 


HEELAX 


. i* 




By Alan Truscorr 

O N the diagramed deal 
South heard his partner 
bid and rebid dubs. West’s one 
no-trump intervention, fallow- 
ing an original pass, showed 
length in the unbid suits, and 
was predicated on the favor- 
able vulnerability. 

When North eventually in- 
dicated a preference for 
spades. South made an imagi- 
native leap to slam. This was 
based on the fact that his 
spades were strong and his 
hearts were weak. If the con- 
verse had been true, he would 
have been content to play at 
game. 

The bidding suggested that 
East would have the spade 


BRIDGE 


king, but. as it turned out. 
South was not interested in fi- 
nessing. West would have 
beaten the slam if he had made 
an attacking heart lead, but, 
not unnaturally, be made the 
obvious lead of the diamond 
queen. 

East took his king and led a 
diamond to the king In dum- 
my. South cashed the club ace. 
ruffed a dub and led to the 
spade nine. This simultaneous- 
ly removed East's re mainin g 
trump and provided the entiy- 
to run Lhe clubs. 

Notice that it would not 
have helped East to withhold 
the spade king, for South 
would have played clubs, ruff- 
ing the second round, and 


crossed to the diamond kingrb 
continue dubs. 


NORTH 

*943 

^98 

OKS • ^ 

♦AKQ 1052 #> 

■ EAST 

♦ K73 
9Q10 ' 
■>9092 
•J979- 


WEST CD) 

*65 

CKJ87 

4QJ1084 

*94 


SOUTH 
* AQ J 198 
7A5432 
*A7 

*3 

North and Saab were vulnerable. 


The bidding: 
Wen Natb 

East 

Sooth 

Pass 

1* 

Pass 

1* 

1N.T. 

3* 

Pass 

39 

Pass 

3* 

Pass 

8* 

Pass 

Pass 

Pass 



West led tbs diamond queen. 


Canadian Stock Markets 


Amsterdam 


WHAT THAT 
©KILLFUL 
WITCH WAS. 


r s - - i i rp-*\r — F ~ “I Now arrange the circled letters lo 

[ ] [ ] form the surprise answer, as sup- 

Nv A Iv A gested by the above cartoon. 

Print answer here: A “ K X I .H I X X T 

(Answers tomorrow) 

Yesterday's I Junibte9: RSHY 6011(35 SUGARY BELFRY 
I Answer Figures don’t lie— but liars do this — 
FIGURE 


Prices In Conodlon.cenfs unless marked S 


Other Markets Jan. 3 


Closing Prices In local currencies 


Toronto 


BSN 

Carretaur 
Club Med 
Colimtt 
Dum« 
EJI-aauilalne 
Europe 1 
Gun Eaux 
Hochette 
I metal 
Lafarae Cap 
Lea rand 
fOreal 
Matra 
Michel In 
MM Pennar 
Maet MermeMV 
Moulinex 
Nona- EM 
Oeddenmie 
Pernod Rlc. 

Pel roles (Fm) 
Peuotrol 
Podoln 
PrMemps 
Rod hi tech 
Redoule 
Roussel Uckri 
Skis Rosstanal 
Sour.Pentai- 
Telemecosj [flits 
Thomson C5F 
Valeo 


CHW Prev 
1380 Z385 
1.793 1.871 
UBO 14)51 
2AO50 239 JO 
<75 <70 

215.10 214.70 
736 757 

531 530 

1.435 1.647 
7ADS 7240 
365 341 

1*50 1,851 
2J2t 2248 
1.745 1,735 
740 745 

4140 4150 
1.884 1.860 
9050 9060 
75.10 7*JB 
458 455 

715 719 

247 246.10 
240 240 

40 4OJ0 
1U 114 
21S 217.10 
IJOl IJQ0 
1-660 UK 
1.910 1,910 
48&S0 488 

UK 2315 
410 410 

240 239 


Close Prev. 
Ericsson 257 25 a 

Esselle 290 290 

Handelsoanfcen 189 1HT 

Pharmacia ibs 187 

Saab Scania 430 429 

Sondvlh 315 

Skansko 91 Z I 

|KF 171 

Swedish Match 2S5 255 

Votvo 213 21i 

AffmvarMut laden :382J0 ’ 

Previous : 38250 
Source: UpUmOsbanken. 


Sydney 


188 1V2. 

243 243 

514 514 

508 514 

319 319. 

158 143 

350 355 

392 390 

204 ML 
*n 495 
779 279 

1S7 197 

307 309 

183 183 

717 210 

335 MT 
165 16* 

45 -48. 

450 442. 

260 268 
335 340 

552 556 

148 T68 

25 25 

.!* « 
316 312 


































WcXZs. 


Mie. 

<0r >W 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 4, 1985 


■ 

T ‘ i -:.r4 l r - Von t Kl; 


1 SPORTS 

Britain Young Tops Final College Football Polls 

funiiMh' Oh 1 Stuff From Dopuichn w*t*l • ■> 

miaMI Moments afi-r rh.. i- if 1 ? ,s . “'^PPpintmeni ihai Writers Assoc ia lion of America Oklahoma — and seventh in the Southeastern Conference from 

JSSL H JaStal aSJSZ 7 ,dn V "E lh f ^ampionriiip.- and bv l he National Football UPlSfr pearing in a tori same this wi« 

iMffiSrnS James said. "Bui I wont go ou. and Foundation. The writers* poll ‘ "7 ,^ j,,™. » h e said. In the UPI pofNcbnuka 

^ poff ,hedamn r oof ---. T Ws placed Washington. Florida and followed by Boston Col 

Boston and Nebraska died for ^MT*5t*LSfS and OUnhoma te Olhho 


Foundation. The writers' poll 
placed Washington. Florida and 


* 

■3S%s 


5S ™rcrc n £S' ,,icd fOT 

,W lS*on!dto of bis players. Bm 5 h,p r ° unt ' 1 beh " ld BYU fair to vote for tains that have 


U* dtouMere ship rings this year, but we'll al- 

jaicWednesday afternoon. he came ways have a lot to remember and a 
bad to earth when the final 1984 lot to be proud of 
Associate* 5 ftos j and United Press Said BYU Coach laVel! Ed- 

jnlemational college football polls wards, preparing for the East- West 
were annotiKed. Shrine Game in Palo Alto, Caiifor- 


Thc Sporting News named Flori- 
da No. 1. followed by Nebraska, 
Washington, Brigham Young and 
Boston College. A computer rank- 
ing bv The New York Times placed 
BYU 10th and Florida fust. Boston 


• Brigham Young, the nation's nia: “The Iasi month has been very BYU 10th and Florida fust. Boston Florida was nbced cm probation 

only undefeated major-college draining and hectic. I know' the College was ranked second by The earlier jus season bv the National 

m“ ,B o l ^ SaS0n ^ polls are not an exact science — Times, followed by Nebraska, A^AwSfi 

™'°? g” [b.ynvver h^bon.-hmw. r. Oklahoma Stnlv and Washm 6 ton. ^ThJdr^uSnumcroosrecmi.- 

Michigan and finished fjrsi in both happy to be No. 1.’ James was ih„ fl-m. w tH«i»r«nns The 


news agency polls. Washington, 
hopeful that its New Year's night 
upset would help sway the vote its 
way, was second in each. 


they never have been — hui we're Oklahoma Slate and Washington, 
happy to he No. 1." James was upset lhai Florida 

ongium i oung. which has won considered by many to be tb 
^4 straight games since losing its strongest team in the country, fin 


Oklahoma — and seventh in the Southeastern Conference from ap- 
UPI voting. pearing in a bowi game this winter. 

« ht> curt 1° die UPI poll Nebraska was 
My ftyESSSthSiSw diirdL followed bv Boston Coilege 

wWchkadar^ctocof^nng 
■ “ , Jr XL Tj nrp i n viola, inn die nauonal title with a convincing 

*&~ ******* 
full of money and 1 would go out "jfjjr . * . ih . 

and devdop a pretty good football SSEoSShSS^J 

Ieam ' ceived 17 more first-place votes 

Florida was placed on probation than Washington in the UPI poll 
earlier this season by the National After (earning the outcome of the 
Collegiate Athletic Association, polls, Oklahoma Coach Barry Swii- 
which had found numerous recruit- zer said Washington “deserves to 


dear ran®, 

TttSBTCCBCHQF 

Twmmw 

TWWTTEFORQIR 
E-ORKQRD- , 


BUTIHEGamiE PRESS 

pbbbcttws us, swims vc 

Doer DES® ID BE 
*1 w THECOJNTEY- 


rair to vote for teams that have 
gotten where they are is violation 
of the rales. You give me a suitcase 
full of money ana I would go out 
and develop a pretty good football 
team." 




1983 opener to Baylor, also fin- 
ished first in voting by the Football 


New Giant Challenges the Elite of Sumo Wrestling 


- : - :L . --^Lebanjn 

'-'fficcrsasKj 
. . failed K! 

. ' ' r ^posisaad 
' to radbo 


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TT' 5 ' '*■ Singh »w 
- - -".s : Cabins 

• - sail 

U Pam. ifc. 

• — g**~ -'i: c aawifp ji 

~ - : U!c of Ptmjab. 

\id for Africa 

. ' • ^rTandask 

‘ ivjsi aid (a 
• • - ••■s' *oidsdSl 

. • Mr. Reaps 
. i.; : 5 1 mOLioa of 

..r.rix-so^ icmm. 

- six the fted 

increase 

- :: .^raj noisrhai. 

ai-jaga. Sixty- 
.. uAhics a W 

. .. "?r:r--CjieSefiiJ 

■ ;-.r iin.ir naiioni 

• -Mm i^iculturi 


•• iiacairinM • 

... : Thasfcif 

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• • - ^ * if:c safety oi H 

’ - • .wr ii; parts i i 
1--- — wassatg ; 

a’a.T ^ 

-'_ir tOien® 3 ® , 
— . *iT..'i£ j®®®- ' 

'V LLsracas."!* 

’ ‘ , ;0 Ci3KI iW 


By Tim Pearce 

Reuitrry 

TOKYO — A massive 20-vear- 
oJd Samoan who has beaten the 
cream of sumo wrestlers while still 
a beginner has sunned the conser- 
vative guardians of Japan's oldest 
sport 

Salevaa Fuauli Atisanoe, whose 
atyo name is Konishiki, has bum 
Jpbn the ancient riles and tradi- 
donsof sumo like a bombshell and 
carved a swath through the heavy- 
weight ranks with his l .87-meter 
(6-foot-2), 215-kilogram (474- 
pound) frame. 

-In a land where regard for one's 
seniors and long years of grinding 
work remain the respectable way to 
niccess, KonishikTs lightning ad- 
vance to the lop sumo division in 
just over two years has been star- 
tling. 

Still more disturbing to some tra- 
ditionalists is the fact that a for- 
eigner — Konishiki is an American 
Samoan raised in Hawaii — is beat- 
ing the sons of Japan at their own 
sport. 

Tradition rules in the sumo sta- 


Tiiho os saving Konishiki’s vic- 
tories over the grand champions 
were “a shame for Japan." Said 
author Naruo Merita, who uses a 
sumo background for his novels: 
“If a foreigner becomes a y t >ko:unti. 
sumo tournaments should be called 
off." 

But others were more positive. “1 
dislike the closed wa> in which the 
Japan Sumo Association operaies." 
novelist Sokun Kawakami was 
quoted as saying. "1 think the stan- 
dard of sumo will improve if more 
foreigners join the sport." 

Shukan Bunshun reported that a 
"stop Konishiki" movement was 
being talked of in the sumo stables, 
with suggestions that he be bribed 
to lose key matches or that his stew 
be spiked with sugar to induce dia- 
betes. a common sumo wrestler’s 
illness. 

konishiki's mentor, a Hawaiian 
named Jesse Takamiyama. became 
immensely popular during a 20- 
year sumo career here that ended 
last June. Takamiyama made his 
home in Japan and look Japanese 
nationality; he never became a 
grand champion. 

The fact that Konishiki has not 


tries, where hard training and large grand champion, 
helpings of a stew called chnnkon- The fact that Konishiki has not 
ate build up the competitors for the spelled out his plans disturbs many 
nqpnent when one man hurls his who pride themselves on their per- 


opibnent out of the five-meter di- 
ameter ring or onto the ground. 

After storming through the lower 
divisions, Konishiki, the heaviest 
5umoist on record, entered the top 
division for a September touma- 


ceived uniqueness and who believe 
that foreigners can understand 
them only after years of residence. 

For tire moment, the conserva- 
tives' fears have been allayed. In 


the most recent tournament, in No- who is past his peak but still a 


James was upset that Florida, ing and other violations. The be No. 1. They’re a better team, 

considered by many to be the school has appealed the three-year than BYU. I guarantee you." 

strongest team in the country, fin- probation to the NCAA and will The Cougars had been ranked 
ibhed third in the AP poll — ahead have a hearing next week, but the No. I for the final three weeks of 

of Nebraska. Boston College and Gaiors were prohibited bv the the regular season. 

' “Trying to legitimise" the Cou- 
gars' top ranking "got to be a little 

Til • /i n TVT J • oId ’" ^ Edwards. “Parity has hit 

Elite of Sumo Wrestling Edwards said be was glad the 

v C7 race for No. 1 was over. “It's 

strange. As long as we were No. 3. 
fourth or fifth, nothing was said. 
Everyone felt comfortable with 
that. Bm as soon as we were ranked 
No. 1. a lot of people became un- 
comfortable. I think the team han- 
dled the pressure well. We were 
always having to defend our rank- 
ing.” 

Edwards also said the title would 
bring increased regard for BYU 
and its campus in Provo, Utah. 
“We've finally caught the attention 
of the Eastern media," be said. 

Much of the criiirism — implied 
and otherwise — of BYU's sched- 
ule had come from Coach Barry 
Switzer of Oklahoma, which had 
previously been second-ranked. 
Switzer had said be believed the 
winner of the Orange Bowl should 
be regarded as national champion, 
so there was irony in the fact that it 
was Oklahoma's loss in that 
that helped solidify the national 
championship for the Cougars. 

BYU opens against UCLA next 
season, then plays Washington in 
Provo. Although cer tain to capture 
the nation's attention, the game 
will not resolve the conlrovery that 
has surrounded the ranking of col- 

— „ . , lege teams. A playoff system would 

v .JH settle the issue, but most coaches, 

TtoAuooiMdPm including Edwards and James, are 

Konishiki, right, throttling grand champion KhanoumL not in favor of breaking away from 

the traditional post-season bowl 

ver grand champion Kitanoumi, tion to ozeki before being inline for 8a ?“ faffina to convince 

fho is p2St his peak b - " P to grand champion. 


MT SHOULD Wt Pa 
OHIORD? 




FUW A DECENT 
SCHEDULE! 





VANTAGE POINT/ Dave Anderson 

Plenty of Room at the Top 


Konishiki, right, throttling grand champion Kitanoumi. 


over grand champion Kitanoumi, 


tion to ozeki before being in line for 
promotion to grand champion. 


. . ,u , K . , , !««*■ VI liA. pvuj. a WM i auvn 

his weak points began to turn die his becoming a grand champion ^ tQ sla a playoff without 


nfent in Tokyo. Reinforcing his veraber, KonishikTs pistonlike tough test. But opponents who had Some observers believe his No. 1, James stood in strong de- 
training with power-lifting sessions pushes and relentless shoving style studied KonishikTs style and found strength, size and dedication make ^ ^ polls. “1 don’t know 
in a rented garage, he beat two were countered by more ague and his weak points began to turn jme his becoming a grand champion l0 sla „ e a payoff without 
vokozuna (grand champions) and more experienced opponents. tables and he tailed off to a 5-5 inevitable. playing 14 or maybe even 15 

wound up with 12 victories and Unusually tail for a sumoist, record before retiring wiih five Others say the best Japanese su- games." he said. “I think that’s way 
three defeats to take second place Konishiki’s center of gravity is days to go because of an injured moists now have his measure and ^ much t0 ask 0 f kids who report 
overall higher and his balance less stable right shoulder. that he; like his mentor, will never 5^^ we eks earlv in the summer 


tables and be tailed off to a 5-5 
record before retiring with five 


inevitable. 


Others say the best Japanese su- h e said_ **j think that’s way 


His success sparked rumblings of than those of the classic shorter- 
chauvinism, even xenophobia, legged Japanese wrestlers, 
from sumo veterans and enthusi- Konishiki opened the Fukuoka 


days to go because of an injured moists now have his measure and ^ much I0 ask of kids who report 
right shoulder. that he, like his mentor, will never severed weeks early in the summer 

Cfi*n#« jvnupfr qm rAQCCiKCina im . . .. . * . . 


Sumo ^xpCTts are reassessing reach the top. . , and work all the way- through -the 

Konishiki s chances of winning Either way, he has given the an- Christmas season. People forget 
promotion to the sought-after sta- dent sport ajolt that seems certain ^ thev’re students, too.” 

«nc iinl'A-tiH/T 1-lfs mrrPnllv hnlfic rtqn.l4rrir ext rv\rmV*li- * * 


asts. The sports weekly Shukan tournament, the last of the year’s tus of vokozuna. He currently holds to raise its standards of competi- 


Bunshun quoted former yokozuna six major events, with a victory sekiwake rank and needs promo- tion. 

Leafs Lose to Penguins, 2-1, on Final-Period Gaffe 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dupacha Pittsburgh forward Wayne Babych With the score l-l and six min- Babych. "1 guess 1 touched it, then 

TORONTO The Toronto got credit for the goal, and the utes to play, goalie Tim Bernhardt the pock stopped on the line and 

fc&wfe Leafs have found plenty of Penguins skated off with with a 2-1 left his crease to chase the puck into Salxning tried to clear it, but in- 
waysto lose hockey raum** this sea- National Hockey League victory. a comer. Pittsburgh's Warren stead he knocked it in. What can 1 
J - - Elsewhere it was Philadelphia 5, Young beat him to it and dumped say?” he said with laugh. "It was a 

NUT FOOTS Edmonton 2; the New York Rang- it to the side of the net Defense- terrific effort on my pari. Actually, 

linL ruuj - ers 6, Vancouver 0; the New York man Bcuje Salming tried to lift the HI take anything I can get — they 

son, but they outdid themselves Islanders 7, Detroit 2; Quebec 7. puck down-ice but it hit Babych haven’t been going in for me at aJL" 


IW IOLH. IL3 auuiuoiiw v*mipvu rt. . « . J • 

ij Bui he said he was ^fired up 

about getting a chance to play 
BYU — You might see sparks fly- 
ing. One thing about the college 
| • J ££ game — these young people are so 

f^nOn 1 tH iTl^ competitive . . . Illl be a two new 
V/J. twi VCU1U rootbaI1 leaiT ^ but m be 

_ , . „ . .... No. 1 against No. 2. BYU and 

Babych. 1 guess 1 touched it, then Washington.” (WP,NYT) 


York TiiKet Service 

MLANQ — When a football team professes to 
have two No. i quarterbacks, it really has none. 
Ask any coach who ever tried to juggle two quar- 
terbacks. Transfer that to the final college football 
rankings and the answer is obvious: This season 
there was really no deserving No. 1 team. 

As boxing p<»ple might say, the title should be 
vacant. 

Unbeaten but untested. Brigham Young has 
been voted the top-ranked team, ahead of Wash- 
ington, in both The Associated Press pane! of 
sportswruers and spomcasters, and in the United 
Press International panel of coaches. In the hum 
and whir of The New York Times computer, the 
University of Florida enraged os the No. 1 team; 
Boston College was second, Washington fifth and 
Brigham Young a trailing, 10th. 

Blushing with innocence, the Tones computer 
judged teams primarily on performance, not on 
conduct Naming Florida as the No. 1 team is like 
naming Willie Sutton as the nation's No. 1 bank 
guard. Apparently there was no computer input mi 
the appealed probation for recruiting violations 
that kept the Southeastern Conference champs out 
oi a bowl game despite a !M-1 record. 

But the Tunes computer spewed out all anyone 
has to know about why Brigham Young doesn't 
deserve to be No. 1 even with a 13-0 record. In the 
Times computer, the won-lost-tied record of a 
team's opponents weighs heavily, for better or for 
worse. Brigham Young’s opponents had a com- 
bined 62-71-3 record against other teams. Boston 
College's opponents, in contrast, were 80-42-2; 
Florida's were 69-46-4. 

Brigham Young played only four teams that 
finished above .500 — Air Force (8-4), Hawaii (7- 
4), Utah (6-5-1), and Tulsa (6-5). 

Brigham Young had the nation’s best major- 
college record, but its Western Athletic Confer- 
ence and its schedule were far from the nation’s 
best Its WAC opponents were Air Force, Utah, 
San Diego State, Texas- El Paso, Colorado State, 
Wyoming, New Mexico and Hawaii; its other 
opponents were Pitt, Baylor, Utah State and Tulsa. 

With that schedule and with a shaky 24-17 
victory in the Holiday Bowl over Michigan, which 
finished with a 6-6 record, Brigham Young doesn’t 
deserve the top ranking. 

More than anything else, Brigham Young’s 
Haim to the national title has shown the need for a 


national championship playoff among, say, four 
teams. Determine who's No. 1 on the field, not by 
vote or by a computer. 

I'm not on The Associated Press panel but if I 
were, I would have put Boston College first for two 
reasons — strength of schedule and strength of 
attraction. 

In a twist of hype, Doug Flutie’s theatrics may 
have tended to obscure umat the Golden Eagles 
did as a team. Flutie got so many headlines that the 
team's accomplishments were virtually ignored. In 
its 10-2 record, it lost only to West Virginia by a 
point, and to Penn State, by 7; it beat Syracuse 
(which upset Nebraska), Miami (which defeated 
Florida) and Houston in the Cotton Bowl 45-28. 

Flutie completed only 13 of 37 passes against 
Houston, but his stature was put into proper per- 
spective by Pat Haden in the CBS Television 
booth. Awaiting a fourth down in the first half, 
Haden talked about how Houston was about “to 
punt to Flutie." Not to Boston College, not to the 
player who was the B.C. punt returner. “To Flu- 
tie," as if that were the name of the team. As if that 
were the name of all the players. 

If B.C. had done what it did with an unappealing 
awkward 6-foot-2-inch quarterback instead of a 
handsome 5-9^4 quarterback, the team might have 
earned more respect and more votes. 

The University of Washington, meanwhile, 
moved up to second place in both news-agency 
polls after a 28-17 victory over Oklahoma in the 
Orange Bond. What nobody will ever know is how 
that game might have tinned oat if Oklahoma had 
not been penalized 15 yards when its pony-drawn 
Sooner Schooner rolled onto the field to celebrate 
an apparent 22-yard field goal that put Oklahoma 
ahead, 17-14. 

But a penally flag against Oklahoma for illegal 
procedure had been dropped. Moments later an- 
other flag was dropped for the covered wagon's 
illegal procedure: Unsportsmanlike conduct. 
When the Sooners had to try a 42-yard fidd goal 
after the two penalties, it was blocked. They later 
took a 17-14 lead anyway, but who knows what 
would've happened if the wagon hadn't gone on 
the field, thereby joining the Stanford hand’s goof 
in college football history. 

Outside in the Orange Bowl parking lot, Wash- 
ington rooters were heard chanting, “We want the 
wagon.” To their credit they weren’t chanting, 
“We're No. 1." No team this season deserved it 


-.rii-— — ers 6, Vancouver 0; the New York man Bcuje Salming tried to li 

son, but they outdid themselves Islanders 7, Detroit 2; Quebec 7. puck down-ice but it hit Bx _ 

here W ednesday nigh t by putting Hartford 3. and Chicago 3, Mon- and dropped to the goal line. Young scored the winners’ other 

the winning goal in their own net treal2. “There was a big scramble," said goal on a penalty shot Referee Ter- 

ry Gregson awarded the shot at 

„ 10:22 of the opening period after 

Twin Towers 9 Lead Rockets to Victory 2 SSS3tsSt 

the second period when Peter Ima- 

Comrfai br Our Staff From Dispatch* game-winner from the right side of Fitch, the winners' coach. “On the cak redirected a shot from the bine 

DFNVER — When Ralph the lane. last play we warned to bring it into line over goallender Roberto Ro- 

Samwmn is on his game. Houston A desperation Lafayette Lever 3- Lloyd, and he had his choice of mano’s shoulder while the Pen- 

Thaiooes double point shot at the buzzer hit the rim going to one of the ‘towers’ or he guins were a man short. 

when AVeem OlaiuwonSboL and and bounded away. Alex English could shoot it if he couldn’t get it to Last year Pittsburgh won only 16 

ritAt tuoc rhe here Wednesday ‘ led Denver with 33 points, and them. games and accumulated only 38 

mat was me case nere weunesuay j. . . h- hit aw*™ an h .u: 


Twin Towers 9 Lead Rockets to Victory 


. 

•" ■ -wcuef- 

- -- :r: -“-■sBCsaii 


r-r- j i t 


Basketball 

National Basketball Association Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
AHonllc MvtaJM 


WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS 


EnfllUii 14*22 M 33. Noti 71-25 k* 2& Re* 


Hockey 
NHL Standings 


Boston 

27 

W 

4 

L Pet. 

■SIB 

GB 

Atlanta 32 31 32 26—131 

Wilkins 13-21 9-11 35. E -Johnson 8-140-0 18; 

pnnadBiptiici 

26 

6 

A13 

vs 

Wootriage 10-21 5-7 75. Jordan 10-14 6* 25, 

Washington 

19 

u 

SU 

7V: 

Daliev 6-16 l-i a Rebounds: Chicago 57 

New Jersey 

IS 

18 

ASS 

12 

( Greenwood 101, Atlanta 54 1 Rollins, williams 

New York 

12 

22 

253 

!5*i 

91. Assists: Chicago 15 (Jordan, Matthews 4). 

Milwaukee 

Centred Division 
22 11 

6*7 

_ 

Atlanta 32 (Rivers 15). 

Cleveland 28 IS 20 29—188 

Detroit 

17 

15 

JOI 

414 

Detroit 29 27 28 24—188 

Chicago 

11 

16 

3DD 

5V, 

Laimbeer 14-22 T-o 35, Tho nas 4-14 14-1722; 

Atlanta 

14 

19 

6124 

8 

Davts 7-12 6-6 2Q, Free 7-20 0-2 15. RebOoads: 

Indiana 

9 

22 

J90 

12 

Cleveland 61 (West 11). Detroit 63 ILalmoeer 

Cleveland 

6 

23 

-207 

14 

21 1. Assists : Cleveland 21 ( Davis 9), Detroit 29 


' r 

- — 

- -v ; :rs3CKf* 
-• " ‘ rjni® 5 


tolESTtK NanhadM — lOrfb-kth. 

takers” combined for 56 points fourth period. . 

, 113-lllNa- “Wc said during lie Iasi couple 


arm 26 rebounds in a 113-111 Na- 
tional Basket ball Association vic- 


Naii had 28 — 10 of them in the “Fortunately he hit Akeem and 
fourth period Akeem hit the shot" 

“We said during the last couple It was a milestone of sorts for 
of time-outs that the team that Olajuwon. who has a team-leading 

made the fewest mistakes down the average of 19.6 points a game. 

ciretch would win, and I think it “That’s my first game- winning shot 

. , ...II ■ J T>211 .L. - 1 U A nnN liD f/Ofl 


“Tliafs my Tint game-wiiiniiig^oi 
tm « way,” said Bin in d> p^" ha sa,d. ,AP. UP,, 


56-33 — “and it’s really that sim- 
ple," said Doug Moe. the Denver 


- . “I thought we did a good job in a 
lot of respects, but wejusl couldn’t 
get our rebounds. We’dstop riiem 

NBA FOCUS 


- y ' 




--‘J., lr tt3f 
;■■■*$> 




f 


* ' • » ■ 




. . 

• • ' 

■ v -' y ' 

. * • 

.■ ■ " i- 


handle,” 

■ "Elsewhere it was Boston 110, 
New Jersey 95; Atlanta 121, Chica- 
go 107; Detroit 108, Cleveland 100; 
Phoenix 1 15, Kansas Gty 107, and 
Philadelphia 118, Seattle 109. 
Ajjhe Rockets won the game on 
Baguwoifs 10-foot jump shot with 
three seconds kft, his 27th point erf 
tht ganift Samp son had 29, and 
each collected 13 rebounds. 
c- The victory put the Rockets in a 
fijfst-piace tie with Denver in the 
Midwest Divison after Houston 
moke an eight-game losing streak 
bjj the Nnggets’ borne court. It also 
Jvas the Rockets’ second victory in 
three games with Denver this sea- 
son. 

The Nuggets were in front for 
most of a Oght final quarter and 
regained the. lead, 109-107, with 58 
seconds left. Bm 12 seconds later 
Lionel Hollins tied the game on 
two free throws. . ... 

^After Mike Evans slipped while 
brin g in g the ball back up-court, 
Hollins gained possession and was 
fouled;, again he hit two from the 
Kne, putting the Rockets back on 
top, 111-109. . J . 

Denver’s Calvin Nall Ued the 
score for the final time on two free 

. . . AFrna 





Denver’s Calvin Nall uea me ^ 

score for the final time on two free . . , I t " A ^ fl ! edh “ 

throws with 12 second teft- After a £ven Johnson seemed ready to applaud rookie M«- 
timeout, Lewis Lloyd dished off m Jordan's slam-dunk style a! one point Wednesday, bat 

despite Jordan's 25 points Chicago fell to Atlanta, 121-107. 


points; this year, under new caocb 
Bob Berry, it’s the most improved 
team in the NHL with 15 victories, 
34 points — and 44 games left. 

After a nine-game early-season 
winless streak, the Penguins were 6- 
14-3. Beny shook up his lineup and 
gave Romano a chance to play. 
Pittsburgh is 9-3-1 in its Iasi 13 
outings. Romano has started the 
last four games. 

At 6-27-5, tile Leafs have the 
league’s worst record. (UPI. LAT) 

Budd to Reside 
And Compete as 
British Citizen 

The Associated Press 

LONDON — South African- 
born Zola Budd said Thursday 
she will continue her interna- 
tional running career as a Brit- 
ish citizen and resident. 

Ending speculation about her 
future following her collision 
with Mary Decker in the 3,000- 
meter final of the Summer 
Olympics, the 18-year-dd dis- 
tance runner said she would 
compete lata this month at the 
British indoor championships. 

Budd became a British citi- 
zen last March to compete at 
the Olympics, but returned to 
her homeland after the Games 
and indicated she might take up 
running there again. Had she 
done so, her career would have 
been jeopardized; South Africa 
is barred from international 
competition because of its 
apartheid racial policies. 

Last weekend, Budd won a 
road race in Zurich, her first 
competitive appearance since 
the Olympics. 

In a statement issued Thurs- 
day, she said: “My final wish is 
to be treated and accepted as 
any other British athlete." 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Midwest Division 

Denver i» 13 JM 

Houston 19 13 JM 

Dallas IS IS J00 


(Thomas 13). 

Barton 21 M 76 38— in 

New Jersey 24 16 39 38— 95 

Bird 10-19 2-2 23. Alnoe 7*9 4-6 20; Gmlnskl 9- 
1* W 23, Richardson 8-19 0-0 16. Rebounds: 


28 M 2f 24—107 boeeds: Houston 70 (Sammoa Olaluomi 13). 


RMJadoMla 28 IS 29 34-111 

Seattle H 34 M 24— W9 

Malone 9*199-11 27. Ervino 7-12*922; Clun* 
Mrs 8-20 lD-122ASIkma 8-1*4-420. B abounds: 


College Top-20 Polls 

38— 1M „ . 


WALES CONFERENCE 
PBtric* DtvlxUn 


Utah 

San Antanlo 
Kora® City 

1— A. Lakers 
Phoenix 

Portland 

la- dinners 
Seattle 
Golden Stale 


IS tl 45S 4V» Boston 44 (Parish 13). Now Jersey 55 


14 II JGBR 5 
II It 40 1 

Pacific Division 

22 10 A88 — 

II 15 545 412 


Football 


5 (Gmirisu 181. Assists: Boston 27 (Bird 101. 

7 New Jorsov 23 (Ronsev 7>. 

Phoenix 27 20 23 25— IIS 

— Kansas City 33 21 32 21—107 

Wi Ed words 8- 17 4-7 22. Adams 7-1 3 j-3 16; Jotm- 

8 son 8-23 2-3 lft. Olberding 7-11 3-4 17. Rena nods: 
BM Phoenix 461 Nance 14), Kansas atv 63 (John- 
Btt son 12). Assists: Ptwerdx 31 (Adams B>, Kan- 

11 sas dry 3* (Thcvs 9>. 

Houston 34 24 23 38—113 

Denver 25 14 34 24-111 

I Sampson 14-24 t*i 29.0k>luMn 10-21 7-1027; 


Final 1984 College Polls College Results 


The final 1984 united Pros unemotional 
loo-M cot lese football rotlm with firxJ-ptoco 
votes ana records in oarenltieses (total points 
based oa 15 paiatt tor firs) pioce, ia for tecaad, 

etcJ: 

1. Brlghom YoufM (28) I1M) $79 

2. washineton (til 411-13 541 

J. Hoaraska (10-2J 50ft 

L Boston Colieoe 1 10-2) 439 

5. Oklahoma Slate (10-21 376 

A Oklahoma (9-2-11 34$ 

7. Florida (i) (9-1-11 328 

a Southern Methodist (10-21 310 

9. Southern Cal 19-31 245 

10. UCLA (9-31 229 

11. Maryland (9-31 ITS 

12. Ohio Stats 19-31 144 

IX South Carolina (10-21 143 

14 Auburn (W> 

15. Iowa (7-4-11 ra 

16. Louisiana Slate (B-3-T1 48 

17. Vlralnla IB-2-21 *5 

IX west Virginia IM 34 

19. Kentucky (9-31 28 

19. Florida SI. 17*3*21 28 

The too 20 team* in the final Associated 
Press I9M college hntbsffl poll, wilh first* 
Moce vain la parentheses, season records, 
total points based an 28*l9>lft,eic.atKt rank- 
ings la the previous poll; 


EAST 

Boston CoL £7. Providence 55 
Canlslus 56, New Hampshire 47 
Drvicel B9, Delaware 75 
Fair Pie W 86, Dartmouth 70 
Florida a&M 97, Alabama 51. 90 
Georgetown 71 Set on Hall 56 
LafaveHe 47. Colgate 40 
Lehigh Jo, Rider 59 
Pittsburgh U, Westminster 50 
Siena M Army a 
St. John's 57. Connecticut 51 
Tawson St. S6. Hofstra 78 
Vlltanova 81 Syracuse 70 

SOUTH 

Clemson 84. Aooolochlan St. 77 
Davidson 68. Furman 47 
Florida 84, Tennessee 70 
Florida A&M 97, Alabama St. «> 
George Mason 104. American U. 78 
Kentucky 68. Auburn 61 
Louis la no St. 79, Georgia 74 
Marshall 90, Delaware St. 62 
Maryland 5ft. N. Carolina St. S6 
Memanis St. 71 Detta St. 41 
Old Dominion 86. s. Alabama 84 
sw LMislona 61 Fresno 51. 56 
Tennessee St. 7(, Austin Peoy 7$ 
Tennessee Tech 99. Milligan 62 
Vanderbilt t& Mississippi 61, OT 
Virginia 67. Virginia Tech S9 
wake Forest 64. william A Marv 47 


TbetopSOtamnslaTlie united Press Inter* chtoaao 
nattoned board of coaches college basketball st. Loul: 
pall (with firsFptoce votes, records and total Detroit 
Mieta): MIWM 

1. Gaaroetawn (35) 1241 52S Toronto 

2. Duke 9-0 484 

1 Mem eh Is SI. 9-0 438 Edmond 

4. St. John's 9-1 330 CalpWY 

5. Syracuse B-l 321 Winn lew 

6. Illinois 11-2 289 Los Ant 

7. Georgia Tech 9-1 284 Vancowv 

8. Southern Mettwdist ID-1 278 

9. North Carolina B-I 218 VOpcnav 

IB. DePaul 8-2 207 H.Y. Ra 

11. Kamos 8*2 144 Gresdt 

12. India no 9-2 134 sondstre 

13. Washington 8*2 115 Vmcouv 

ia Oklahoma 9-3 96 New Yoi 

IS. Louisiana SL 9-1 79 Harttord 

16 Maryland 11-2 42 Quebec 

17. Michigan 8-2 30 p.Stas 

18. Louisiana Tech ID-1 25 (3).Kum 

IT. Vn Com m onwealth B-l 24 Francis I 

2a Ohio St. 8-1 20 oa goal: 



W L 

T 

Pts 

GF 

GA 

Washtnaton 

22 

18 

7 

51 

160 

118 

Philadelphia 

22 

10 

5 

49 

157 

in 

NY Islanders 

21 

15 

1 

43 

1*1 

148 

Pittsburgh 

15 

17 

4 

34 

129 

154 

NY Rangers 

13 

19 

5 

31 

135 

1ST 

New Jersey 

12 

20 

4 

2* 

124 

149 


Adonis Division 




Montreal 

21 

10 

7 

49 

158 

125 

Buffalo 

16 

12 

9 

41 

134 

113 

Quebec 

17 

16 

6 

40 

IS! 

148 

Boston 

16 

16 

6 

38 

139 

133 

Hartford 

13 

18 

4 

30 

113 

152 

CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 



Nerrts DfvMoe 




Oitooao 

18 

17 

3 

39 

153 

141 

St. Louis 

15 

15 

5 

35 

130 

135 

Detroit 

13 

2B 

5 

31 

141 

173 

Minnesota 

12 

19 

6 

30 

128 

m 

Toronto 

6 

27 

5 

17 

114 

177 


Smyth* Dtvittaa 



Edmonton 

25 

• 

4 

54 

in 

122 

Calgary 

20 

15 

3 

43 

in 

151 

Winnipeg 

19 

15 

4 

42 

156 

IS 

Los Anaeles 

15 

M 

ft 

38 

163 

149 

Vancouver 

ft 

34 

5 

21 

120 

214 


The top 28 teams in The Atsodatod Press 
college basketball pell fwttb flrsHdace yotes, 
records and total points]; 

1. Georgetown (61) 1241 1220 

2. Duke *4 H32 

a Memphis Si. 94) 1078 

a Si. John's 9-1 954 

i Syracuse B-l 930 

6. Illinois 11-2 836 

7. SMU IM 771 

a Georgia Tech 9-1 746 

9. North Carolina 8-1 666 

10. DePaul 8*2 629 

11. Kansas 8-2 611 

11 Indiana 9*2 51* 

11 Oklahoma 9-3 385 

14. LSU 9-1 W 

15. Wartitogtan 8-2 374 

16. Michigan 8-2 272 

17. North Carolina St. 7-3 261 

1ft. Louisiana Tech 10-1 IB 

19. Montand ti-2 125 

20, Vo. C o mmonwe al th 8-1 120 


WEDNESDAY'S RESULTS 
yppimevar o • o-e 

PLY. Ran p er * 2 3 1—6 

Gresehner (6). Ftorelc (3). Regers 2 (13), 
Sartos? rom (ii), s. Patrick (8), Shots oa goal: 
Vancouver (on Vanbleebnwck) 10-7-6—21; 
New York (on Bredaur) 17-134—38. 
Hartford 1 • 3-3 

Quebec 8 4 3-3 

P.Startnv IUl.CoM (6). Hunter (10), Same 
131. Kumpel (3).A.Startny (22), Pa lenient (I). 
Francis (11). Boutatto (5). NevfeW (Ml. Shota 
oa goal: Hartfdrd (on Bouchard) 54-B— 1 17; 
Quebec (on Mlilen) 5-17-11—31 
Pit m a n gh 1 8 1—2 

Toronto 118-1 

Yount (24). Babvdi (9); Ihnacak (9). Shota 
oa goal: Phtsburah (on Berahardt) 8-8-5—21 ; 
Toronto (on R o mano) 9-10-11—30. 

Montreal ft 1 1-8 

CM fillip 1 2 0—3 

ffCattohan t3l. Lvstak (7), Fraser (17); 
Kurvers (71. Waller (12). Shota an goat; Mon- 
treal (an Bantionnai) 108-10—28; Chicago 
(on Penney} 1M0-4— 2S. 

N.Y. litaadare 12 3-7 

Detroit ft ft 1-2 

La Fontaine (W), Bourne (7) Bossy (34) R. 
Sutter 3 (23) Kerr (»; Lambert (9). Oorod* 
nick (25). Shots on Goal: New York (on Sta- 
ton) 14-16-14-42; Detroit (an Hradcy) 17-13- 
11—41. 

PhUadetotUo 1 2 1-4 

Mhum Im 1 | g 1 

Rich Suttar (3). Ron Sutler (6), PrePP 2 (20) 
Careen (19; Cottav 2 CTAK StaftM 6d goal: 
Philadelphia (on Moog) 8-11-10— 29; Edmon- 
ton (on Lindbergh) 12-10-10-31 



Record 

Pis Pvs 

MIDWEST 

1. Brigham Yeung <38)134)41 

1.160 

1 

Akron 71 Hiram 66 

1 Washington (16) 

11-1-fl 

1.140 

4 

Brother 74. Creighton 72 

3 Florida (61 

9.1*1 

um. 

3 

Cent. Michigan 78. Ball St. 75 

a. Nebraska 

10*241 

1.017 

5 

Cincinnati 61 Florida 51. 63 

5 Boston College 

10*241 

932 

8 

Dayton BCL Lnvata, IIL 70 

6 Oklahoma 

9-2-1 

B83 

2 

E. Michigan 81, M. Illinois 56 

7. Oklahoma Stole 

10-2-9 

864 

0 

Indiana 87, Michigan 62 

& 5a. Methodist 

10-24) 

761 

10 

Ken! si. aa Bowling Green 66 

9. UCLA 

9-341 

613 

14 

Morauette 66. Wto-Green Bay 48 

ia Southern Cal 

9*341 

596 

18 

SOUTHWEST 

11. South Carolina 

10*24) 

557 

7 

Arkansas 7a Tims A&M 67 

12. Maryland 

9-M 

552 

12 

5. Arkansas U. Louisiana Col. 32 

13. Ohio Slate 

0-34) 

497 

6 

Southern Methodist 64. Rlee 57 

1*. Auourn 

0-441 

432 

16 

Texas-Sen Antonia 101. Baylor 91 

15. LSU 

8-3-1 

314 

11 

Teias Tech 67, Texas 60 


Transition 


16. I owe 

17. Florida Slate 
■a. Miami 

19. Kentucky 
20 viralnla 


228 FAR WEST 

207 15 Brtoham Youno-Hawaii 102. Hastings el 
l«6 13 Colorado ftl. Honiara 67 

,S2 Gonzaaa 66. Idaho 54 

119 Nev.-Los Veoas 142. Utah SI. 140, 3 OT 


BA5KETBALL 

National Bosketbaa Assackrtion 
new JERSEY— Signed Kevin McKenna 
forward, and Owls Engier. center, to 10-dav 
contracts. 

HOCKEY 

NattoMl Hockey League 
MINNESOTA— Sent Dirk Graham and Bo 
BeraJund. tarwards. to Springfield 01 
American Hockey League. 

WASHINGTON — Seal Bob Mason, goaL 
tender, to Binghamton of Hie American Hock- 
ey League. Recalled Al Jenson, goaltender, 
from Blnahomlon. 

COLLEGE 

FULLERTON STATE— Naned Letame 
Gretke ac>>«0 athletic director. 

MIAMI, FLORIDA Named Paul Jett* de- 


tenstoecoordinatorand secondary cooch.and 
Tony wise ottenatve Hno OKNh. Promoted Art 
Kehae tram graduate assistant to assistant 
offensive line coach. 


Tennis 


CHALLENGE OF CHAMPIONS 
(Al IM Vegas) 

Round 

John McEnroe del. Johan Kriek, 5*7. 6-4. &-3 
Jimmy Connors def. Jimmy Arks. 6-0, 7-5 
Second Rnnntf 

Vttis GenMaifis del. Guillermo vitas, 6-4. &-7 
(7-51. 6-3. 


i 






Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 4, 1985 


OBSERVER 


The Woolf at the Door 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — 1 have tried io 
become interested in Virginia 
Woolf. I have tried, yel I cannoL It 
is not. as Violet says, because I am 
insensitive. Insensitive indeed! 

“This time. Violet, you go loo 
far." I told her. “I. who’ have spent 
my life reading ‘Remembrance of 
Things Past.* by Marcel Proust, am 
nothing if not sensitive.** 

This exchange occurred when 
she handed me last Monday's 
Woolfbook-of- (he- Day. U was 432 
pages long. I nearly wepL 
“Violet —432 more pages about 
Virginia Woolf?" 

“Not about Virginia Woolf,” she 
said. “About Virginia Woolf's fa- 
ther.'* 

“I've already read it," I cried in a 
delirium of relief. 

“No. the one you read was about 
Virginia Woolf's husband. He was 
named Leonard. Virginia Woolfs 
father was named Leslie.” 

The people who populate Woolf- 
books all have names like Leslie 
and Leonard, or Lytton. Noel 
Maynard and Harold I know this 
from reading the diaries of Virginia 
Woolf, the letters of Virginia 
Woolf, and the letters of- Virginia 
Woolfs friends. 

These letters and diaries were 
heavy going. Yet I know they are 
full of wiu beauty, and stunning 
observation. 

Violet assures me they are. 
Sometimes I think maybe 1 could 
savor the wit, beauty, and observa- 
tional power if only'Virginia Woolf 
had made diary entries about or 
written letters to and received let- 
ters from a few people with names 
like Spike. Zi ggy . Nino and Hoss. 


Last Sunday’s Woolfbook-of- 
the-Day selection, which Violet 
gave me, was “The Letters of Vita 
Sackville-West to Virginia Woolf.” 
Instead of giving me the book and 
politely leaving, Violet said she in- 
tended to stay right there and 
watch me read it, which she did 
most annoyingly, so I handed her a 
volume of Marcel Proust's “Re- 
membrance of Things Past,” telling 
her it would make the evening pass 
magically. 

In short order the two of us were 
snoring. At sunup Violet awoke 
just in time to get that day's book 
— about Virginia Woolfs father — 
fresh from the presses. 


I had barely cracked Chapter 1 
when Tuesday was upon me. bring- 
ing VioieL “Why are you groaning 
in your sleep?” she asked 

“A nightmare, - 1 said “I was 
dreaming you had brought me a 
new book tilled “The Letters of 
Vita SackviUe-West to Virginia 
Woolfs Father.” 

It was no nightmare. She had 
placed the book m my hand before 
waking me. Here was an interesting 
phenomenon which 1 had observed 
among Woolfbooks now and then 
in the past They had a tendency to 
become cumulative. 

In 1 978. Tor example, there was a 
famous week that began with Mon- 
day publication of a biography of 
Virginia Woolfs chiropractor. On 
T uesday came a splendid photogra- 
phy book tilled “Virginia Woolf's 
Chiropractor’s Dog.” and on 
Wednesday a book of cartoons ti- 
tled “It's a Virginia Woolfs Chiro- 
practor's Dog's Life." 

Now. with Virginia Woolfs fa- 
ther's biography on the bedside ta- 
ble. “The Letters of Vita Sackville- 
West to Virginia Woolf lost in the 
bedclothes, and “The Letters of 
Vita Sackville-West to Virginia 
Woolfs Father” clutched in my 
hand I sensed that something big 
might be in the making. 

□ 

‘Tomorrow’s book,” I told Vio- 
let, “could well be ‘Virginia 
Woolfs Father’s Mother’s Letters 
to Benjamin Disraeli.’ ” 

“Don't strain for Philistinism,” 
said VioieL “In your case, it isn’t 
necessary.” 

My guess was wrong. 1 should 
have known it would oe. Woolf - 
books are never peopled by charac- 
ters named Benny, and neither Dis- 
raeli nor Virginia Woolfs mother 
Figured in that day’s publishing 
event. 

Instead the remarkable book Vi- 
olet brought me was titled ’Hie 
Secret Diary of Vir ginia WoolTs 
Chiropractor’s Doctor's Dog, as 
Told to Vita Sackville-West." If 
you can believe that Miss Sackville- 
West was willing to sit up nights 
-making diary entries for a chiro- 
practor's dog, you may be amused 
to learn that the absence of inter- 
esting names in Woolfbooks is be- 
cause interesting names gave Vir- 
ginia Woolf a pain in the neck. 
Only 28 pages long, this is my kind 
of Woolfbook. 

Sew York Times Service 


Hemingway’s ’60 'Summer’ Also Rises 


By Edwin McDowell 

Ne%- York Tuna Service 

N EW YORK — In die late summer of 
that year, 1960, Life magazine published 
three consecutive installments of “The Dan- 
gerous Summer." excerpts from a lengthy 
manuscript by Ernest Hemingway. The com- 
plete book. Life said in a preface, “will be 
published by Scribner's next year.” 

The book never appeared. However. 
Charles Scribner's Sons, Hemingway’s long- 
time publisher, will publish “The Dangerous 
Summer" next June in a sharply edited ver- 
sion of Hemingway’s chronicle of the Spanish 
bullfight season of 1959. 

“It has been silling aL Scribner’s for a long 
time, because I don't think Charles Scribner 
Jr. thought it was worth bringing out in book 
form as it was,” said Carlos Baker, Heming- 
way's biographer and Woodrow Wilson Pro- 
fessor of Literature emeritus at Princeton 
University. “Hemingway was not in very 
good shape that summer, the summer he 
turned 60. He was very mean and curmud- 
geonly a lot of the time. What he wrote was 
not always up Lo the Hemingway par, it 
tended to grow loquacious. But honed down 
sufficiently, the book should be pretty good.” 
Scribner, chairman Of the Scribner Book 
Companies, shares Baker's observations — 
which is why, he said, “The Dangerous Sum- 
mer” was not published in book form sooner. 
“It badly needed editing." he explained. “1 
managed to whittle it down some over the 
years, but I was never really satisfied. So we 
turned it over to Michael Pietsch and he did a 
wonderful job.” 

Scribner, who had edited a number of 
books by and about Hemingway, and 
Pietsch. a Scribner alitor, worked from the 
original 120, 000- word manuscript, which 
A. E. Hotchner, Hemingway’s friend and 
traveling companion, had helped edit down 
to 80,000 words. The Scribner version runs to 
about 44,000 words, more than one-third of 
which has never been published. 

James A. Michener, who compared Hem- 
ingway’ s original version of Pan 0 of the Life 
series with the new Scribner version, writes in 
the introduction to the forthcoming book: 
“No magazine could have published the 
entire version. No book publisher would have 
wanted to do so either, because it was redun- 
dant. wandering in parts, and burdened with 
bullfight minutiae. I doubt if there will ever 
be much reason for publishing the whole, and 
1 am sure that the average reader, even one 
who idolizes the author, will have lost little if 
the manuscript stands as offered in this book. 
Specifically, I think Hotchner and the editors 
of Life did a good job in compressing Hem- 
ingway's extraordinary outpouring into man- 
ageable form, and I believe that the editors of 
Scribner’s have done an even better job in 
presenting the essence in this book.” 
Hemingway and Life had an earlier and 



Stephen Lnrrfv Dushn Fill win 

James A. Michener (left) has written an introduction for Ernest Heming- 
way's “The Dangerous Summer” and Charles Scribner Jr. win publish it 


more memorable partnership, when in the 
fust week in September 1952, the magazine 
carried the complete version of “The Old 
Man and the Sea." The success of that ven- 
ture led the Life editors, seven years later, to 
commission Hemingway to return to Spain 
— the setting for “The Sun Also Rises” and 
“For Whom the Bell Tolls” — and write of 
the rivalry between the two great matadors: 
Luis Miguel Domic guin, who had come out 
of re lire mem seeking to reclaim his title as 
Spain's greatest bullfighter, and his brother- 
in-law Antonio Ordonez. ‘ 

“Hemingway and Hotchner worked hard 
cutting it down,” Baker said, “but it still 
turned out to be 750 pages triple-spaced 
when they sent it to Life, what didn't make 
the Life version, as I remember, was a lot of 
descriptive material about the northern pan 
of Spain, the Basque area." 

What also did not make either the Life 
version or the forthcoming Scribner version, 


according to Michener. are the purely bull- 
fight passages, which were cut sharply. 

In deciding to publish “The Dangerous 
Summer,” Scribner said he felt something 
akin to the time after he and Maiy Heming- 
way edited “Islands in the Stream.” die post- 
humous Hemingway novel published in 1970. 
“A lot of critics and reviewers gave us grief 
for publishing it,” he said, “but then Edmund 
Wilson wrote in The New Y orker that it was a 
splendid book.” 

Michener said that in writing "The Dan- 
gerous Summer." Hemingway was unwise to 
have attempted this return to his youth, and 
he tried to hang far too much on the slender, 
esoteric thread of one series of bullfights. But, 
he concluded, “the book provides man y in- 
sights into Hemingway's character, his brava- 
do. his preoccupation with death, his intoler- 
ance toward inferiors, his wonderful 
generosity when he identified with someone 
he deemed worthy of respecL" 


PEOPLE 


Advice for an Adviser 


Dr. Joyce Brothere advises mil- 
lions of people through her books, 
columns and appearances on radio 
and television but her husband says 
she gives abysmal advice to her 
familv. The problem? She is too 
emotionally involved with her chil- 
dren. according to Dr. Milton 
Brothers, a diabetes specialist at a 
veterans’ hospital in New York 
City. He told Family Weekly. “Psy- 
chology is an expertly trained art or 
science but with her family, she’s 
abysmal. She totally loses her ob- 
jectivity. When it comes to giving 
advice" to her daughter or her 
grandson, she is not the right per- 
son.” 

□ 

After seven years. Rolling Stone 
guitarist Ronnie Wood finally mar- 
ried his long-time girlfriend Jo 
Howard Wednesday, but Mkk Jag- 
ger couldn't make the wedding. 
Wood. 37. and Howard. 29. were 
married in the Uxbridge registry 
office in London, but followed it 
with a blessing service at a 600- 
year-old country church in Buck- 
inghamshire and an all-night star- 
studded champagne bash. All of 
the Stones except for J agger, who 
was reportedly in the Carribean on 
holidav with girlfriend Jerri HaD, 
were on hand for the occasion. 
Wood, who was divorced in 1978. 
and Howard have been together for 
seven years and have two children, 
6- year-old Leah and 18-month-old 
Tyrone. They also have two boys 
from previous marriages. 

□ 

Governor Mario Cuomo of New' 
York, admitting he’s not the “most 
committed fan” of “The King." has 
proclaimed Tuesday to be Elvis 
Presley Memorial Day, marking 
the 50tfa anniversary of the singer’s 
birth. In fact, neither the governor 
nor any of his staff noticed that the 
proclamation issued Wednesday 
incorrectly listed Presley's ageas 32 
at the time of his death in 1977. He 
was 42. “We'll have to put out an- 
other proclamation,'’ said aide 
Madeline Lewis. 

□ 

Arthur ScargQL president of Brii- 
ain’s National Union of 
Mineworkers and leader of the 10- 
momh-old coal strike, was voted 
Man of the Year in Britain by lis- 
teners to Radio 4. one of the British 
Broadcasting Corp.’s four domestic 
radio networks. The BBC said 


Wednesday that the choice of Scar- 
gill was an “overwhelming" one 
among the “several thousand post- 
cards” it received. Several -who 
wrote said that however much they 
disliked the fiery Marxist union 
leader, he was undoubtedly Man of 
the Year for 1984. Peter Bnpmds, 
a Conservative lawmaker, de- 
scribed Scargih's selection as “out- 
rageous." Scargill's wife, Anne, 
who like her husband joins strikers 
on the picket lines, came 9th in 
Radio 4’s poll for Woman of the 
Year. First choice of listeners was 
Prime Minister Margaret Thatehero. 

□ v 

Tearing Norgay, the partner of 
Sir Edmtmd Hillary on the first suc- 
cessful ascent of Mount Everest, 
has been hospitalized with lung in- 
fections, doctors said. Norgay, 70, 
was brought from Darjeding in 
northeastern India last month to a 
hospital in New Delhi where doc- 
tors said he was progressing well 
and would be discharged soon. He 
works in Datjeeling as an advisor 
to the Himalayan Mountaineering 
Institute. Noreay, who with Hillary 
conquered the world’s tallest 
mountain in May 1953, has been 
described as the greatest Himala- 
yan mountain guide of the 20th 
century. Norgay was bom in Nepal 
but has lived in Darjeeling for. 
many years and is an Indian ati^ 
zen. . . . Former boxing Champii, “ 
on Sugar Ray Leonard was injured 
in a car accident Wednesday night. 
Leonard was listed in stable condi- 
tion at Prince George's General 
Hospital in Bdtsville, Maryland, 
with bruises on his chest and cuts 
on his face and wrists, police said. 

□ 

Raped Murdoch, the Australian 
publisher who has put The Times 
of London back on its feet finan- 
cially by broadening its appeal 
says there is a limit of how far he'd 
go for the paper. “I think I'd go to 
prison for The Sun but not for The 
Tunes," Murdoch said Wednesday 
■cm a televirion program marking 
The Times’s 200ih anniversary. 
The Sun is a racy tabloid owned by 
Murdoch. “I’m hot allowed to have 
anything to do with the editorial 
[content] of the Times. I don’t sec 
why I should pay tire checks and 
to prison." The founder of The 
Times. John Walter, at one time 
spent 16 months in prison for iibeL 


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REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FOR MORE REAL ESTATE 

oppoRiuranasa 

PAGE 6 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


CANNE5 RARE, new vilo, exquisite 
designing, large bing ream, fire- 
place. 3 bedrooms, 3 bade, pod, 
txflamtefong panoramic views. 

~isa),000 SS. 47 Lo Crobette, 
06400 CANtfS. Tef= (93) 38.19.19. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


BEAUVAIS. 1. HOUR tram PARIS, 
near CDG airport, in quiet vT 
t nous* 


beautiful 18th century house com- 
pletely restored 1981, outbuikfings. 60 
sqjit 'aathedref Ming, h 
place, silting roam, library, 
cfmmg, 4 bedrooms, 3 herbs, Kneti 
room, numerous closets. + 7 rooms 
partly restored in 3 bixkfings. centred 
beating throughout. 5-room keeper's 
lodge. Excepnond garden, stream, 
large btchen-gcsdori orchard, pri- 
vote courtyard Total surface: 6,000 
sqm. Beautiful, quel seduded siting. 
Fishing, hunting are®. Ideal for Mrm- 
nor center, note, community, or lex or 
family. Al requests to Ben 1586. Her 
dd Tribune, 92521 Netifly Otoe*. 
France, who wil forward 


MEUBR, CHALET. Large luxury chalet 
in seefoded village 15 rtia from 
slopes, buJt as Irmly residence cdy 
two years ago. Present lay-out gives 4 
double bob. 2 wrth bathroom en 
sute, 2 end* bedrooms and 1 further 
bathroom, dressing roam with dumb 
mg, drawing room, (fining roam. lu- 
perb modem fittedrachen, WC. laun- 
dry room, sb room, video room / 
bedoo m . office / bedroom, dark 
room / bathroom, double gexage and 
d wortantxt- 


, Decoration od 
step of Ihe highest quertty. Fireplaces 
ei drawing roam and master bed- 
room. Ody reason for sde is change 
of jab. Subdortid offers required. 
Bax 1587. Herald Tribune, 92521 
NeuHty Codex. France 


COTE D'AZUR 

It b rare m CAMCS 
to fttd a property in good confitm for 
sde at a pnee of FI ,380,000. 
Here 4 a with: 

3 reception rooms, 4 bedrooms. 

2 bathroom. Servants room, etc 
Sma> garden, near exceBert shopping 
center and bus route. 

Kef: 649. Apply Sde Agent: 

John TaYlor sjC 

55 Lo Croaette 
06400 Ccxvmx 

Tel: |93J 38 00 66. Tele* 470921 F 


COTE D’AZUR, FOR SALE by owner. 
3-bedroom qxrtmsrd, fornshed or 
udumished, movern condbon, nortfv 
south view of sea & mountains, pool, 
private gexage, storage, terra cot* h, 
m high stuuuig FtZxon sea of fkx. 
Phase oo* Ntos (93) 81-97-01. (93} 86 
35-82, or contact owners: Assatourion 
Properties. 9465 Wfehire BJvd. S/724, 
Beverly Hfa, CA. 90212 USA. Telex 
194795 ASTERN BVft 


CANNES MAfOBJEU luxury reo- 
denae, beautiful 3-roaro apartment 80 
sqm. 2 terraces, view on the Marino; 
pool new terra, golf, sea. 
F840/XX). SSI, 47 La Gdsetl 
CAWES. Te£ 1931 3819.19. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


GERMANY 


ROMANCE IN MUNICH 

Hats in lovely castle in Nymphenburg 
from $63,000 up to $490,000. 

Flats in Gruenwafd 
From $293,000 up to $387,000 
Please write to: 

Mr. Kefanur ELSTB 
P.O. Box 90JH07. 

D8000 MUNICH 90, Wed Germony 


FRANKRJRT. Central west-end loco- 
hon, 2-room aportmem, 80 srpn. n 1 
yeex dd IxJcfing, garage, equipped 
ntdien. DM390/XBJ Td- Paris 703 35 
12 oftw 6pm. 


ITALY 


POKTORNO 

ftafcan Rviera. Magreficenf 6000 nun 
residence with spientfid view on harbor 
+ Plana, wrth 3 sdons, 6 bofioote, 
some in separate shxfiat certrd her*, 
dl modem comfort. Brochure available 
DC HAAS Red Estate 
Sdmuwweg 32, Wmenoar, Holand. 
TeL 31 (df 17$1 - 19229 or 14400. 


PARIS A SUBURBS 


O1M0 S815 PARIS 16*. Offfloeh. 



lery, kving. dnrng room study, 2 bed- 
rooms, 2Txjths, largo lutdwn. tAily 
roam. Mdds roam & oelkx. (2-car 
garage on ueniees for rent onM. 
Kofi) 6227294. USA 313-922 2141 


ILE ST LOUIS 

95 sqjn. to be renovated, 1st floor, 
3.40m high rue le Begmltar. 


74 60 


PORTUGAL 


PROPERTY OF ROYALTY situated in 
mast desirable txea in ESTORIL, Por- 
tugal Howe, needng some renxro- 
tion & grounds cover 5000 *aja Of- 
' ' ' J from US$460000 


Tare coraideted 
equivalent ui Sreri 
Wm# to Dr. Jose 


ar Swiss Francs. 

_ Judke. Rua 

Shra Carvaiha No. 234 [7th Roar), 
1296 LISBOA Codex. PortugoL 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


MONACO 


MONTE CARLO 
Principality of Monaco 

Mart Exdrnt New Panoramic 
VBa an Ihe Roof 
Inaedble 36(7. sea <xxJ moumomiew. 
kxge and specious apartment, roof 
garden. Lrvmg aid doing room, master 
suite with 2 baths exxf t^aumgraom, 2 
b edroom with bathroom, buin m kitch- 
en on the sane Hoar, sep a rate guests 
apartment write fivmg room, 2 bed- 
rooms, 2 bads and latchen, 4 garages, 
4 cedars. Luxurious condoasnwn with 
pod and te rete court. 

For <xiy information & to veil: 
JOW4 TAYLOR Al® SON 
20 Bd des Moufas. 

MrxiteCcxto 

S 50 3D 70 
uc 469180 


MONTE CARLO 
frinapdHy of Monaco 

S&1ING VERY EXCEPTIONAL 
APARTMENT, PATIO. 

7DO «qjn. private gard en 
Reridertid txEa. Center of tovm, enfin. 
300 sq.m, fining space, kxge entrance, 
kxge reception, library, (fining, TV 
room, 4 bedrooms. 3 bods. 1 room for 
staff with bath. Lrxge modem fdfy 
equipped Utdwn. ? large spare room, 
small office, kxge dressing roexn, go- 
rage. Hbh dau services 
Air axxfitioned, electric bfends. etc. 
EXCLUSIVE AGENCE INTERMEDIA 
B.P. 54 

MC 9000! MONACO CEPEX 
Tel: P3| 50 66 84 
The 469477 


SOUTH AFRICA 


ME MOUTH RANCH. 900 acres, 45 
rules from East London. 16 miles from 
Coast. Writer, obundont wridife. 

SCWCDBt KING COMPANY. Aus- 
tin. IX USA 512477-5827. 


SPAIN 


fflZA, STA. EULAUA. Beautiful vila 
on the sea 2 Swno rooms, 2 dongs, 5 
double bedroom, 3 berths, 2 taxhens, 
separate staff quarters, ferae garden 
leading to p rivate b each. Tel«4*xie. 
Private sole 5F950.000. Tet London 
01-3700349. 


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• Mailbox, tel ephone and telex 
services 

■ Trandt*on and secret<7>d sannes 

• Formexion. domefiohon «d 
administration of Swiss ad foreign 
cofflpow 

Fufl enri fi da nc e end tfiscrehon assured 

BUSHES ADVISORY 
SOVKE5SA 

7 Rue Muzy, 1207 G&4EVA 
Td 36 05 40 Tefes 23342 


YOUR SWISS BUSINESS 
p BASE N LUGANO 
ruBy eitegrated business services 
phone t trie, ,'mai services, 
tronsknons/od nuiteiro tiont 
booUaepmg. Td 091/231.161 
Tlx: 77S(4 PMSA CH 


your LONDON OFFICE 

CHBHAM EXECUTIVE (BIT1S 
Camprdansrv® range of serwM 
1» Regent Street. London Wl. 
Tab |D1) 439 6388 Dx; 361426 


YOUR OfflCE IN PARIS: 1H£X, 
ANSwBHNG SERVICE, secretary, 
errands, molds, Svb 24H/doy. 
TeL PAT: 609WW 


PAHS ADOSESS. Orarps-H 
Some 1957LSJ*. provides 


telega meeting rooms. 5 rue d’Artoo, 
75006. TeL jfo<7Qi. Tbc 642504. 


vnps-Etates. 
iimj, pnane. 
rue d Artoa. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


SWITZERLAND 


SWITZERLAND 

FAMOUS RESORT AREA 


DO YOU WISH - 

• TO BUY AN APARTMENT 
OR A HOUSE! 

• TO RETIRE IN SWITZERLAND! 

• TOINVBT IN SWITZERLAND? 

CONTACT US: 25 YEARS OF EXPB9- 
ENCE IN BUILDING AND SailNG 
FINE SWISS REAL STATE 

SOOMSA. 

P.O. Box 62. 

1884 Vilors. Swinrekxid 
Thu 456213 GESE CH 


SUNNY SWTTZSUAND 

LAKE LU GANO 

Lqtoi'de apartmerus in a beaufifd part 
with swxrvnrig pod, own krang 
stages, first quo Sty equipment like fire- 
places. large terraca, bull-m kit c he n s, 
etc. Prices from SF453.900 tm to 
SF 1,1 23/4®. Mortgages up to 60% at 
law interest rates. Sole* permits ro 
foreignen ore avdfade. For Further 
deiaik pieaje contact. 
EMBATOHOME LTD. 

16a G. Carton 3 
0+6900 lugtmoftxodeo 
let Switzerland 91 -542913. 
Tele*.- 73612 HOME CH. 


SWITZERLAND 

FOREIGNERS CAN BUY: STUDIO/ 
APARTMENTS, CHALETS, VILLAS. 
Prices from about SFl 00.000, Reborn 
Lake Geneva. Moure u» & famous 
Mogntdn tesarts. We have for you a 
Fxg choice of very reasonably pneed 
Swiss homes, but also the very best & 
fhe most excfusiTO. BEFOGE YOU MAKE 
A DEO SION contact: 

H_ 5SOLD SA 

Toix Gate 6. CH-1007 Lousrxwe. 
Tel- 21/25 26 11 Tele* 24298 SBO CH 


IENZERHHDC - GR1SONS. Luwnaus 
modern home of actor Hom Budv 
hdz, great da area. 9 rooms. 5 bed- 
rooms. 4 baths, 3 ocres. near small 
stream; CoS Paris 624 5853. 


USA GENERAL 


GEORGIA FARM. 1068 acres, open + 
wooded land, 3.000 ft grass cararip, 
kxge home. Tfc-c ae pond with cdxa 
Mcny other tarn buJcfcra. Bids cen- 
xdered wort Feb. 15. I®: Orchee 
Farms, P.O-Box 515 7 . Cardtie, Ga 
31015 USA. 1912)^1164. 


AMBUCAN REAL BTATt New 
Hampshxe'i beautihJ Idces area. 
Mowiee CoBins. Century 21 -'Comer 
HouTOjMreecfth, N.K 03253. Tel- 
fUBI 2797971 or 2534110. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


USA GENERAL 


barn, terearm, modmr I 
caretaker 's house. $800 
Western Inc. PO BOX 2524, Gf 
VUE. S.C 29602. The 570356. 


TEXAS. 662 oaes on Ldm 

Unique resort devetopmenf poperty. 
Sed uded cove has 4 rnim Idee hont- 
SCHNBD«/UNG COMPANY. 


1^- 


2-477-5827. 


USA RESIDENTIAL 


SAN RANOSCO PBANSULA 
OCEAN VEW ESTATE 
FABULOUS LUXURY 


private baths. Every conoowtole 
knarry mduefing 9 whirfood tubs 14 
hrepiaces. todoor seimnxng pod. Ap 
praiomateljr 8 ones (additional acre- 
age avail able}. Hefewt d bant door, 
rge brxn. ~ 


Large brxn. Gtx 
Iffinti cwt 


images & 
mduded. 


USJ7/JOO.OOO. 

Brochure avaiabh 

HARK GAN, WBDeiMUUH CO. 

344 Lenny Street 
San Francisco, CA. 94108 
(415) 434-3600 


NYC SUBURB/ WESTCFC5TER 
Bronxville VtJoffe, N.Y. - 28 mm. to 


deagner 


btchen. adfoining' family 
■ng master bedroom Hxte 
s eaddtiond berfiaoms. 2 
room, excellent schoak. 


LEY 

914/337-1410 
85 Pondfidd Road 
BronxriSa, New York 10708 


OCEAN WALK, JUFTTER FLA. The 
perfect getaway with the uktmate in 
luxury located «t sane teller FLA. 
rtrectfy on a 700 ft. beach. Iha is 
south Hondo's gold coral Theater, 
shopping, culture! everts, deep sea 
fishing, warenparts art abound hwe. 
Only 5) min, to We st P dtn Beac h Wl. 
Axport. For detaled eifomMAon on 
our dramertic Europearwnspired 
home^eoch with its own priverte 


omaang amenities 1 pneed 
' ' art £305) 7^377 
or wnte ro Ocean Wa« Sda Office, 


pad i . _ 

■X prooied <due art i 


1200 S. Ocrexi Dr, Jupiter, FL 33458. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 

USA RESIDENTIAL 

BRONXVILLE, NY - quart v>ll<ne one 
so. m4e 28 ran iron NYC fcxnsus 
school h-12. Grooous homes 1 coop 
apartments Wnte for brochure. Deed 
Real Estate. 120 Kcrfr Ave.. Srorrcrte. 
NY 10708. (914) 33T-0900L We are 

re location speadfotj 

SPORTSMAN'S PARADISE. 4 bed- 
rooms. 3 baths. Iiaury home on 110 
ocres in the heart of South Texas 
Brush oOuntrv. Excellent hunting & 
fahmq. S275 Out!. 512 449-2667 JSA 

DARIB4, CONWCnCUT. Erecutive- 
-type homes, for rent * sale. Pleasant 
N Y. Gty suburb French taoten. No- 
tionwxfi: canKaions. Ca£ TIBBETTS 
REAL STATE. Tel: 203 655-7724. 

USA 

COMMERCIAL 
& INDUSTRIAL 

ST. LOWS, MISSOURI. Uagut dowrv 
town reuf estate aaoss from $135 
miUion UrtOn Strtion re^evdoptnent 
prafect. 550.000 sQ.fr. buikfinq space 
or 3.4 oaes For a m^ed-use prafeo 
[corporate heodquartefi, condos, mo- 
tel. etej. Outngln safe or codevelop. 
US$4 . 8 ariion protect. Cmiaa W.k 
MUBl C&JTURY afCTTJC Inc 183 1 
Otestrxil SL St. Louh, Mcx O3103L Tel 
314-342-24^0. USA. 

REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 

AUSTRIA 

VIENNA American rents 4*oom hx- 
nished Aat fabng Opera, $750 month- 
ly + axidomwium. feease cdl Rome 
06863085 or Itroyw Sieger Vienna 
526874 

FRENCH PROVINCES 

VILLAGE IN VAUCLUSE. 2 bedroom 
Family house to rent, near Gocdes 
Tek PO) 72 20 10 

GREAT BRITAIN 

CHELSEA RIVERSIDE 

HOUSE TO LET 

Owrmina moderased Vctonon house. 
3 bedrooms, sitting room, 
dining room. Street pariann. 

Cdl Mdverra (Agent) on 01-581 2337 

LUXURY EXECUTTVE APARTMENTS. 
Kngtabridge/CMsea. Ova 100 
Fully serviced siudfos. 1 S 2 bedroom 
apartments. Alt modern convereences. 
Mimmum stay 22 days. Prices from 
£145 par week. Please cortad Lor- 
rone Youig, NGH Apartments, Ndl 
Gwyrm Horae. Sloane Ave. London 
SWi Tel- 01-589 1105. Hr 295817 G. 

CENTRAL London Luxury fumahed 
Bats. Amor ■can kitchens. £280 'week- 
sleeps 4 or £175/ vnek • deeps 2. Tel: 
064421 22W or 01-486 3415 fU*) 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


GREAT BRITAIN 


HOLIDAYS and TRAVEL 


LOW COST FUGHTS 


USA 


From 

London 


EAST COAST FROM 
MR? WEST FROM 
WEST COAST FROM 
SOUTH EAST FROM 


£119 

£160 

£212 

£195 


Aitfwbare fa o nyw ha re 
to ISA on BRANfFF £95 

NATO London 734 8100 


NY ONE WAY JUft Every*. N.Y. - 
West Cost $141. Paris ZS 92 9tt 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 


DIVING HOLIDAYS 
, #4 MALDIVES 

Came aid rive umpofed dream safe 
in Indian Ocean. Stay d blond Resort 
Holds wdh Bnrdmdo Qub Kuramhi 
or Mer-A^a Owen Fesdu « tow rates 
far divers red non dhrere, spead group 

rates, begumers cows, open aTyea. 
Eesenndiam, mformoli»t 
Urnwsd Ltd. tftrt tore- Huft, 
Merte. Repubfic of M&m. 

Thu 66raTuM0^T MF. 


1M LAST GREAT LUXURY; told at- 
vacy. w a t e rf r ont m lush rrep«d pfoa- 
Wton houses, large staff took* offer 
yw every need A CotoR Unversfy 
Hotel School frorxng site in Janadan 
wuihc o c st flshng vtToae. Groups 
from 2 to 12 shore $200 to $600/ day. 
Roa & Moncure. Boss AUev. Alexan- 
dria, VA 22314. Tet 703-549-5276 


Improve par Offprint , , 73ruede I'Evangik 75018 Paris. '■ 





CHslTRAL LONDON - Executive ser 
.•ten apunwids in new buikinm, 
comfortably himnhed and fu5y 
equipped, bafy mad service |*toa 
through FnJQxor TV. Phone for bro- 
chure fOI) 388 1342 a write Presiden- 
ticl states (Mayfcxr I Ud., I University 
SI . London WC1E6IE 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/ SHARE 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


74 CHAMPS -RYSEES 8th 

Stwfiai 2 or 3-roam upm liiwnt 
One month ar mare. 

If CUUBDGE 359 67 97. 


LUXURY SERV1CB7 HATS xi Moyfar 
and Kenungton <xe the aherratives to 
expensive hotel oceom m od un an. 
uxiraa Awdrii A Company. 156-157 
Oxford St . London Wl or p 


434 1701. lit 266746. 


phone 01 


LOMTON BAKER ST. Self-atfereig 
holiday flaS. FuSy er^PPed, cdor 
Ti. kn*i deetx '-6 penems. Seff- 
contrxned ham £90/waek. Crawford 
HoCdoy Flats. 33 Crawford St.. Lon- 
don Wl. Teh 01-402 6165. 


JOW4 BIRCH hra 20 year: experience 
in Reread. Long or short tenancies, 
Cenird & sdxirban London S> Aber- 
deen. Birch & Co 01-499-8802. 


and houses. Consult Ihe Steads 
TttLond 
fete* 27346 RESDE G. 


PWig^tUy aid [Lewis. TeL London 


8391 


London. Surrey & Bertshre. Conrad 
MAYS. Oxshon (037 284} 38M UK. 
Tefex: 89551 12 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 

HOTELS 

ROUND TV* WOOD 

London, Toronto, Hawaii, rip, Audrain. 
BoS, London Iron £769. 

Over 50% saving on First Clcss Travel 
Aus. / NZ. Prenyl quotation service 
mailable from UK's foremost 
Rocnd World Spwnntot. 
TwCortmentd Travel Co. (Deal HI1 
62 Tr ofdgo Square. London WC2 
T5= 01-930 4751 

N.Y.C. Horn BARGAIN 

TMSAD + SZIjOO per person, double 
occupancy, entitles you to real value m 
New York Next tune i ry CENTURY- 
PARAMOUNT HOTH, 235 Wes 46th 
Sfreef. N.Y.C. 10036, oonvenert The 
rtres, everything _fe50 rooms with both, 
TV, air contfihorxng. Sngtes S38. Re- 
5»VB now. This is a ‘'sleeper" in xvery 

CHARTS A YACHT M GSBCL Oh 
red from owner of forgot flett. 
American managamenL Excnlfem 
crews, garf. homed. Vafei Yodta. 

G^Lta^TSf^^l, W94%°r£ 
21-2000. USA offices.- Fir food. Am- 
bier, PA 19002. Tek 215 641 1624. 

FRANCE 

PARIS •Razo MMieau 10 

Ave. t Zokt. 1-2-3 roam Flats, bath, 
bkhon, fridge. Tel: 577 7! 00. 

GREAT BRITAIN 

Far mare HOLIDAY A TRAVB ADS 
PLEASE TURN TO 
PAGE 8W 

in the wskbo section 

B»l PLAZA HOTH, LONDON - 
Kensington) beS SfuaBon for bi»ness 
and plaiEure. Al rooms boh ' show- 
er » TV / sefephone i rorto ! har 
dryer, eta Restaurant ; bar / sauna t 
mrasage. Stores £30, doubles £42 
indiBire Enpbh treakfast. wnra & 
tax. 68 Queen s Gate. London SW7. 
TtJ; 01 -370-61 1 1 . Hxj 916228. 

PIAWWG TO VNT USA, busuess 
or pleasure & frav* no one? Don't 
worry. W» r» range efl your trfo if 

you contact us. 703-922B091, 6213 
Larbour Dr., tier. VA 223)0. 

DRBCOU. HOUSE 200 sMt rooms, 
£55 par weak, ported bwd. Apply: 
172 New Kent food, London SP ATT. 
Tet 0! 703 4175. 

CHAJTTB AEGEAN OlAllfitGE 
M/Y. 125'. 13 pffsons go cuiywhere. 
We are the bed in Gre» binds. Tat 
3236494. Tkj 222383 Metfitenoneoi 
Cfuw Ltd.. 3 Stodbu Si.. ARiem 

HOLLAND 

SAVE HOTH. expense. Rent a defuxa 
flat. SlX/wnrt- Kamqy Aportmerra 
NZ VoCTburpwd 63, 1012 R£ Arrster- 
dan. Tet (2513112314, ’fOJ 20-2659X. 

MaLAS YACH7WG. Yxfrr Oiartm. 
Aeodemios 28, Alhem 10671, Greece. 


fices m St John Wood & Remington 
offer 'he best service m residential 
letting. Tel. (01)722 7101. 


Sumi 

4 bat! 


AVB4UE FOCH 

ptuous receptions, 5 bedrooms, 
Ira. duplex. Embassy 563 68 3k 


TO MILES SOUTH PARS, among 
■real. 4/5 room Rot, 140 Kutl in old 
style restored house aximtetely for- 
nrihed & nevrty emnpped. F4,000 / 
month. Teh (6) 


DEAL FOR SHORT TBtM STAY. Parts 
dudios & 2 rooms, decorated. Contact 
Sorefan; B0 me Ureversite, Rons 7th. 
Tet (1) 544 39 4Q, 


Bffia TOWS, by owner, luxurious, 
long term, srudo, lerithen, both, log- 
High dan buibfing. F4J00 + 
— 747-4472. 


MUETTE FACING BOIS. Fhgh doss 
buk£n& lovely 80 sqm. apartment, 
twphpn. 1 bedroom, d comforts. 
nOWL Tel: 577 95 34 


15TH PASTRJE. 2nd floor. Sft. hafl. 
Iving, 4 bedrooms, erwipped kitchen, 
both, centre* herting Pcxtang. F8J00 
+ I JW0 charges. Teh 705-3(71. 


SHORT TERM in Latin Quarter. 
No ogerts. Td= 329 38 83. 


TROCADBIO. Umvious, 2 room and 
I independent room. 647 STB? 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/ SHARE 


PARIS AHEA FURNISHED 


HMl B RUNS. OFBtA. Double tong, 
I roam, terrace, FuSy equipped, oakx 
TV. telephone, for 2 riorera F6000 
per month. Tel: 563 17 27 ext 325. 


PLACE DU TBTRE. Original 
about 90 sqra, ex miu o ni . 
Tet 281 10 M. 


PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


AVL MONTAIGNE. 100 sqjn. oport- 

ment, twin 2 bedrooms, baths. 
FI 4^00 charges included. 720 7961 


SWITZERLAND 


To Rato from July 1, 1985 
TERRACED HOUSE. COMPlfUY 
RJSNISHH) 

B4 BAEOi/WOUHAU 

(40 namrtas owqy from Zundl Aiportj. 
with splendid view OH Lcrtoe of Zurich. 

516 roams, 144 sc^n., wide terrace. 
Long term rent ponibfe. MontWy rent^ 
SF2.475, without furniture. Full or pw- 
6al taking-over of luxury Furrefure pre- 
ferred, price SF125JXXL Inquiries to 
Chrffre (NT 008 ZL OFA Orel Fusdi 
W etfeo AG, P.O. Box 4638. 

8022 ZURICH, SWITZERLAND. 


JANUARY, 12 KJA from Gstoad Jan. 
11 ■ Feb. I. 1$ chcrtel, 3 bedrooms. 
Fwitrotic view Alps. Tto 030/51437. 


PAGE 15 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


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in Germany. 

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from yoa 

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This applies whether you 
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