Skip to main content

Full text of "International Herald Tribune , 1985, France, English"

See other formats





i0f *u 




& Global Newspaper 
* Edited in Paris 
Printed Simultaneously 
in Paiis, London, Zurich, 
Hong Kong, Singapore, ' 
The Hague and Marseille 


T — VllVtlf 

Singapore, 
id Marseille 


;^SsS 

■■■ V 




WEATHER DATA APPEAR On PACE 13 


No. 31,687 


11 era lb 


INTERNATIONAL 



^ ,Uer of strat 

Bead i Ng 


w . 

ofSt^aw- " 

*D,* G !' udi «‘ 

— Aft 


Published With The New York Tunes and The Washington Post 
^ PARIS, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, JANUARY 5-67l985 


Mgtgo .&0ODn tool Li5tf Nx-«7r— 7JQ **■ 

Adi L_ _JBS. Ur ISJOIjf* Onn — WBBd» 

uE—MWO" janta <s% ***** — rj? 6 ? 

Mini *5gJ». ShLlAlie 0 *" — 4SDh ^ 

cl*. Cl 131 Oprfwwi jor. 

“SE«rz:«(W ^ ^ -*» l 

amwt^UOD*. r-;^ sp°“ ,H3 ** 

to**. .KBP $-*« 

SSd— 7»FM 

Fr ro »rn p **” ra '“«■ tan*9 OjDOEta 

C™of»_2»DAL ***> 35 Gw Turtaj._-Ti.anOO 

G< cor Main— SO P •*»■“ — i53 Cfc. UAi AJOtWn 

Br. N«**ta«*»-271R. US.M.(£ur4-BLBS 
Jroi 115 Rob IL 1‘****° — ,r 0D. 

ESTABLISHED 1887 


&£«3;S 






v *• 

v • : ^ ‘ Y >*1\ ,L 

- * ■•'•’ HvL 3 * - 

• - 

Danfe 7 ?- 

■??»4 
, : ; 

*- •• 

- .: 'V^'toOC* 

' -’-'-pcJictsakl 

Auara^ 
~ : P} !* Ti»j 
-'sirm* 

■ r ; -owlsrhe'd 

j-- : ’> ^arejjjij 

- -_•■•■ '•-:'A'ahei K 

mad® 

■ ' ■ ■“ £3tccaij 
■ '■• ..-sib I* 

- _ - '•!>: sStOH 
Zt looa'io 
■l- ''-- '-^u3a§ 

- - ■; * il.cf. ^ -k Bn 

- •"• •‘-.“lorEba 


*- r V: bT^TI 
' SET ME 

•-> 'vitl\ RT-MSBH ' 

• ZGXVjuui 
- ' - . U.-JC.S.- 

-. : —m 


Congress Is Warned 
Of Swelling Deficit 

Stochnan Says Reagan’s Plan Will Fail 
To Reach Goalof Saving $100 Billion 


By Jonathan Futtbringer After the meeting with the Re- 

WA^riSr S ZT" publicans. Mr. Stockman said that 

WASHING 1 UN — The Re agan Mr. Reagan still in i ended to send a 
admunstranon ms warned die new budget package to Congress that 
Congress that deficit projections would cm spending around S40 bil- 
«re higher than anticipated a lion in 1986. which is in line with 
month ago, when President Ronald the proposal nulling j n December 
Reagan approved his deficit-reduc- “The plan as of now is that we 
ing P* 31 ?* . are just going to fall short or the 

Administration officials said target," an official said, adding that 
Thursday that Mr. Reagan did not the administration "is too far 
intend to change his budget plan, along” in the budget process to 
which he will submit to Congress in make changes, 
early February. This means he will According to the analysis given 
fafl short of his goal of reducing the the senators bv Mr. Stockman Mr 
deficit, now ptujoctod to top S200 Reagan's plan' would trim the defi- 
Wllion this year, to about S 1 00 bil- cit from S200 billon in fiscal 1 985 
Bon in 1988. to S 178 billion in 1 986. S 1 67 billion 

As the 99th Congress convened in 1987 and 5139 billion in 1988. 
Thursday, leaden of both parties Under the deficit target set by 
jajd then top priority would be a the president in December, the def- 
Ljicit-reduang package, but actu- icit was to have been reduced to 
al goals and tactics remain to be S168 billion in 1986, S136 billion in 




Soviet Says U.S. 
Must Now Give 
Ground on Arms 




!* 5i 3w> ./■cOxa.K* ST. - • 




decided. 

David A. Stockman, director of 
the Office of Management and 
Budget slid at a meeting of Senate 
Republicans that the Reagan defi- 
cit plan would fall about $40 billion 
short of the president’s goal for the 
fiscal year 1988. 

The Reagan proposal will fall 
short for two reasons: slower eco- 
nomic growth than had been antici- 
pated, and Mr. Reagan's refusal to 
approve the larger reduction in the 
mflrtary budget proposed by bud- 


1987 and S98 billion in 1988. 

It was not clear Thursday wheth- 
er the administration would strive 
for the target deficit through nego- 
tiations with Congress after the 
budget was submitted, nor was it 
clear if Congress would try to reach 
this SlOO-billion goal. 

“I would regard a deficit in the 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 1) 



The AsivcuteJ Press 

MOSCOW — The Communist 
Pany daily newspaper. Pravda, 
said Friday that the Soviet Union 
had displayed a readiness to reach 
agreements at arms talks that are to 
stan in Geneva next week. Conces- 
sions, it said, were “the business of 
the American ride." 

The unsigned editorial rein- 
forced the main themes of the 
ICremlin's pubic stand toward the 
talks between Secretary of State 
George P. Shultz and Foreign Min- 
ister Andrei A. Gromyko, which 
are to begin Monday. It stressed 
that space weapons were of “prime 
significance" and tried to place re- 
spon&ibilty for easing world ten- 
sions on the United States. 


Geneva Preview 

For Arms Talks 

Never before haw the United 
States and the Soviet Union in- 
structed their foreign ministers 
to produce an agenda encom- 
passing “the whole range of 
questions concerning nuclear 
and outer-space arms.” That 
objective at talks in Geneva will 
be analyzed Monday in a spe- 
cial set of articles in the Inter- 
national Herald Tribune. 


gresrive quarters of imperialism. 


“Now. when we are on the eve of U.S. imperialism above ah, which 
a meeting of high-ranking repre- count on further intensification of 


sematives of the U-S.S.R. and the 
U.S A- in Geneva." Pravda said, 
“peace-loving people have the right 
to expect that the American side 


the arms race." 

It continued: “Historical experi- 
ence teaches that it is necessary to 
fight war before it starts. The busi- 


Pole Testifies in Court He Was Assured of Official Protection 

Lieutenant Waldemar Chmielewski, testifying above in the murder of the Reverend Jerzy Popiduszko, told the court in Tonm, Poland, 
Friday that his captain assured him he would not be prosecuted because the investigating officials were “good guys." Story on Page 1 


will assume a constructive, realistic nesslike, specific proposals of the 


post non. 


U.S.S.R. form a realistic program 


The editorial began with a harsh for ridding the European nations 


attack on U.S. foreign policy, say- 
ing: “People are watching with 
alarm the dangerous policy of ag- 


■ ■ ■ ,?/.AiVFUN*S8 

■ ■- By Axel Krause 

^ “ ^ International Herald Tribune 

— PARIS — Renault, France’s 

slate-owned automaker, had a loss 

. , . IfSJ of about 9 bBHon francs (S929.9 

million) in 1984, the largest ever by 
a French company, industry ana 
j^vermnernoffitials said Fnday. 

■: - ^ -- : ~1 jr. The figure approaches the land 
' r ..:*»■.% f ***f losses posted by the Chrysler 
: : 'ri Carp, in the late 1970s and early 
' : V^V- 1 980s. TbeU.S. automaker had to- 
- / : tal losses of S3 J billion from 1978 

to 1981. 

: •' •“ " ' — A Renault spokesman would not 

:"r : ■ ,^r deny orcrafirm the figure and oth- 

er details that were published Fri- 

U— ^ — day by Ubiratioii, a Paris daily 

newspaper, saying it was “too ear- 
pAGE 15 ly” to determine Last year’s loss. He 

-ad MORE said the company expected to re- 
r0 prat its 1984 results in the spring. 

[LASSIFiC™ Renanllhad a loss of 1J7 billion 

' francs in 1983 and a loss of 128 

— billon francs in 198Z 
— ~~ Govemmau officials said that 

- an imn^dijite consequence of the 

1984 Renault loss could be an ac- 
celeration of management reorga- 
nization started by the company 
i $kt month and more layoffs. 

‘ ^ “There are real problems aL Re- 

nault, which are bang resolved, but 
natch remains to be done," an offi- 
cial said. 


The effect was to shif no the new 
Congress the decision of whether to 
make deeper budget cots or to im- 
pose tax increases to achieve the 
gpal of reducing the deficit to S100 
billon by 1988. 

Senator Robert J. Dole of Kan- 
4, the new Senate majority leader, 
submitted legislation that would 
make the goal a matter of law. 


Renault 
To Report 
Record Loss 
For 1984 



Soviet Apologizes to Norway, Finland 
For Violation of Airspace by Missile 


■ iSTrSV r- 

t ^ JHk J 




. -,V f . » * !* ■ * \ , ' ,,, r ■ .On 

■ ?*’■><& :»-'*• ''^rr 


. ... : Vrl 

• ‘ ’-.-.-'•-1" 
: rr. «- 


PAGE 15 

:OR MOW 

CLASSIFIES 



Ethiopian children enjoying themselves outside their new homes in Eilat, Israel. . 

Culture Shock of Ethiopians in Israel 

They Confront a New World, Frightened and Destitute 


By Thomas L Friedman 

Hew l'ivi Times Service 

JERUSALEM — When Ethiopian Jews first ar- 
rived at Sbaare Zedek hospital in Jerusalem, muses in 
the isolation ward where the Ethiopians were being 
treated started noticing a lot of bread crumbs around. 

When they changed the sheets (me day, they discov- 
ered why. The Ethiopian newcomers, who for the last 
few months had walked miles for a bit of food, were 


By Per Egil Hegge 

International Herald Tribune 

OSLO — The Soviet Union 
apologized to Norway on Friday 
for the violation of Norwegian air- 
space last month by a Soviet cruise 
missile. 

Only hours after his Norwegian 
counterpart in Moscow had deliv- 
ered a protest to the Soviet Foreign 
Ministry, the Soviet ambassador in 
Oslo, Dmitri S. Poliansky, a forma 
member of the ruling Politburo, 
asked for an audience with the 
Norwegian foreign minister. 

In an unusual demarche for a 
Soviet diplomat, Mr. Pofiansky 
said the Soviet Union regretted lie 
incident 

He said it was doe to a technical 
error and promised that measures 
would be taken to prevent a recur- 
rence, officials said. 

Foreign Minister Svenn Stray ac- 
cepted the apology and told the 
ambassador that the incident 
would not harm Norwegian-Soviet 
relations, they said 
[In H elsinki, the Soviet ambassa- 
dor to Finland, V ladimir M. Sobo- 
lev, told Foreign Minister Paavo 
Vayrynen that the incident hap- 
pened during a Soviet Navy exer- 
cise in the Barents Sea. The Associ- 
ated Press rqrorted 
[“During firing exercises, a firing 
it. AtaodcMi p>« target strayed from its given course 

DUtside Heir new homes in EQat, Israel. . because ct a i the 

ministry quoted Mr. Sobolev as 
— e m ^ _ _ saying. “He said it might have been 

thmpums m Israel thaT point have violated ll ^mnish 

X airspace. Mr. Sobolev expressed his 

r, , , , , rfc . government's regrets because of 

, r Tightened and Destitute wirat bappemd-i . . 

c 1 A Norwegian Foreign Ministry 

behaved like persecuted people, suffered from severe spokesman said that Mr. Poliansky 
shock and refused to be separated from their had identified the missile as an SS- 
Families” N-3, a 1960s desten known by its 

The first slop for Lhe Ethiopian Jews in Lsrael is Bra- North Atlantic Treaty Organiza- 
Gurion International Airport. On Thursday night, a don code name of “Shaddock" and 
reporter for the Israel Army radio described a recent said by the West to be capable of 
arrival scene: carrying a nudear warhead. 

“First off the plane were two children who were The spokesman said Mr. Po- 


Soviet a 

aegwrari 


hors. The N 
U F inlan d v 


of Norway’s original as- 
ednesday »bat the mi Bril* 


assumed mat r mian a wouia mn sertion Wednesday mat the nnssii* 
make such an announcement with- had penetrated Norwegian air- 
out first having assurances that it space and fallen in Finland. 


would not adversely affect its deli 
cate relations with Moscow. 

■ Finland Seeks Wreckage 


The independent Hdsmgin San- 
omat, Finland's largest newspaper, 
said that the government handling 
of the modem raised suspicions 


Finnish border guards on snow- “ mc 
scooters and pamlsof local volun- 

urn on sk« rarched Fridiy hot pubhcmd»t >H if Nonray had not 


wreckage of the ""‘sale in and 
around the 1,000- square-kilometer 
(400-square-mDe) Lake Inari near 
the Soviet frontier, Reuters report- 
ed from Helsinki. 


raised the alarm. 

Finland is linked to the Soviet 
Union by a 1948 friendship treaty. 
Helsinki’s Swedish-language dai- 


and the whole of mankin d of the 
threat of nuclear war." 

“The Soviet Union dearly sees 
what an important meaning the 
correction of Soviet-American rela- 
tions has for the whole world." 
Pravda said, adding: “We have 
plenty of good will, desire to coop- 
erate on an honest, equal basis. 
These are the business of the Amer- 
ican side." 

■ Politburo Meets on Talks 

Earlier, The New York Times re- 
ported from Moscow: 

The Soviet Politburo announced 
on Thursday it had made an “ap- 
propriate decision" on its position 
in the coming U^.-Soviet talks. 
The statement after the Politburo's 
weekly meeting gave no details. 

Bui a commentary in the govern- 
ment newspaper Izvestia reflected 
a growing pessimism that has been 
expressed m the official press. The 
commentary said Washington's in- 


Beyond the adjacent Soviet bor- .said that it was obvious that the 
derate thebases of the Kola. Penin- Finnish authorities would have re- 
sola, said by the West to be the mailed silent about the inddedt 
world's largest naval complex and until it was publicized by Norway, 
home of the Soviet Union’s North- Under the 1948 treaty, Finland is 
era Fleet. bound to repel, if necessary with 

The government of Finland, Soviet help, any attack against the 
meanwhile, cami> under criticism in Soviet Union across Finnish terri- 
tbe Finnish press for its cautious tory. 


ty newspapo; Hufvudstadsbladet, sistence on its plan to lest space 
raid that it was obvious that the weapons could make agreement 



“If the decision to pul arms into 
space is definitive," wrote the com- 
mentator, Valentin Falin, “then 
arms talks, if it is thought worth 
even beginning them, win not see a 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 6) 


Scientist Says 
Water Caused 
Bhopal Leak 


NEW DELHI — Water entering 
an underground storage tank prob- 


miles for a bit of food, were attached to transfusion tubes. They were put into liansky reported that he had been 


cralsauL , jcwnaonins , . nortion under their ambulances with their parents. The Ethiopian Jew instnided by his government to say 

Renault yas na ti o n alized in 1945 ILuiesses ? fearing t£u the nurses were really came here destitute. Most are very young people that the missile, which he described 

autratarcMCly.^ portrayrf wholuivivedfcovsriar.djoun.jy. as a “cruismg larger” was not car- 

HBJu kS 11 3 SSmMiv C Lories told bv the Israel “They are tal and thin. At first, they were very tying “any ammunition or poison- 

^bm^e^lh^ys^told fcfclgjg Bm whe they realized fc. fcy had ousnuiteAfc- 

Hi^SrhMr .secret arrivals over the anived in the Holy Land, they asked where Jerusalem A government source m Oslo 
e Ethiopian Jews durmg their secret arrivals over the was knell down pn ^ ^ g^d ^ said that the Soviet government 

rta*ri!lISI!' ttv pnwmmenL acknowledfiinE for prayed. Eighty percen i or the children who got off the clearly wanted to prevent the mri- 

^ plane werebarefooL Some were naked except for a T- dent fern poisoning the East-West 
e first time that it has been secreuy surging me r flfnww h*»hrforeMn n dav’smfflt- 


,,v-^ 


by the current Frendr government 
as a model of how stare-owned en- 
terprises should be run. 

Renault, its unions and the gov- 
ernment have resisted major reduc- 
tions in the company's workforce, 
which is 98,000 in France; down 
from 103,000 at the end of 1983. 

Offi cials of the ministries of in- 
dustry and finger*, who confirmed 
the SMulUon-franc estimate, said 
that they were studying measures 
to absorb the loss. 

They said these might involve 
new loans from nationalized banks, 
fresh international Wmmdng gener- 
,ated by Renault, or direct aid that 


going to run oat of provisions at any moment. 

This is but one erf the many stories told by the Israel 
doctors, nurses and social workers who have treated 
the Ethiopian Jews during their secret arrivals over the 
last few months. . , , 




President Reagan with Interior Secretary William P. dark. 

Few in California Cadre 
Remain With Reagan 

By Hedrick Smith 

Hew York Tima Service 

WASHINGTON — Two high- 
level resignations from the Reagan 
administration within a week re- 


brought to Israel in the last few years. uira ' 

A decade ago, there were only about 200 Ethiopian aiosi chenshed f 

Jews in Israel. Government officials said the rescue Once °ff the p 

JSS» Ethiopians began around 1977 under V* screening 
nt Prinv Minister Menachcm Bran. ^ rsvs - aixonlmg 


them were canisters of water. Water is apparently their mg in Geneva between the Soviet 
most cherished possession." foreign minister, Andrei A. Gro- 

Once off the plane, the Ethiopians are pul through a myko, and his American counter- 
quick screening process to make sure that they are part. Secretary of State George p 
Jews, according to a social worker involved in the Shultz. 


Sam minister, Andrei A. Gro- sloped wiihm Pres.dc.it RonaU 
mvkTand his American counter- Reagan’s inim aide and imy soon 
nart S^n-tarv of Stale Crenw. P. leave him without any of his long- 


state-owned companies. 

“The government, which is also 
(Continued on ftge 2, CoL 7) 


INSIDE 


r p-" Miniaer Menadtmi Bean. Jews . acconnng to a social woreex mvoivea m me muiiz. —————————— 

« a absorption. Those discovered to be Christians, the Thfitwommaretoineetlodis- NEWS ANALYSIS 

For sodal worker said, are given temporary visas and sent cuss a resumption of arms control . " — : TT 

of urnmagmed abundance where people are nice wwort on kibbutzim. talks, which were broken off by nmeCalifoniiaassoaalesmhistop 

the 2/°I n0 j*? a IiS, t^hawinr wmntoms similar to Those who are determined to be Jews are given Moscow just over a year ago. staff. 

“We found i n immigration cards. They gel their Israel identity NATO deployment of U.S. Per- Although resignations are com- 
^ f ^^^bhL^the^^ientof cards, however, only after they “renew their Judaism,” shin|-2 andlw-flying cruise mis- mon at the start of a preadmfs 
Dr. Chaim „ 7 .. H which for the women usually means ritual immersion siles m Western Europe in late 1983 second tom, some dose political 

internal medKUU . “Thev ® die mikvah bath and for ibe men, who already are prompted the Soviet Union to allies pointed out that the depar- 

many of the Ethiopian Jews have been taken, mey , a cerenmny wpervised bv rabbis. Aoe breZoff the talks. tures would highlight tbe nvalry 


NEWS ANALYSIS 

time California associates in his top 
staff. 

Although resignations are com- 



•* i 


fc» Jnwr tave ta. 

rites of renewal are necessary, a government statement 


■The largest telescope in the world is to be 
built in Hawaii with a $70-miflion gnurage 

■ Rz^wraMhc Ls Aspln, » 

Pmtagon critic, has been elected to lrad 
House Armed Services Committee, rage-* 

■ HtBtdreds of Japanese, left as children^ 

China at the end of World War n, are 

l rdatives in Japan. 

■ Leontyne Price has made her fin^era 

curtain call in New York. ra * e 

BUSINESS/FINANCE . 

. j Tf C nFflznale 


Trib' 


have reached agreement on EC steel ^ 



rites of renewal are necessary, a government statement Noway is the only NATO mem- and feuding that have gone on be- 

says, because of the Ethiopian Jews’ “significant isoia- ber bordering the Soviet Union in tween ideological conservatives 
lion from Judaism and the Jewish world for hundreds northern Europe. and pragmatists at high levels of 



of years.” On Dec. 28, the Soviet cruise tbe adimmslration. j 

In the airport reception area, the Ethiopians are missile entered Norwegian airspace They also privately expressed 
each given a pair of tennis shoes, jog gin g pants (be- over the Pasvik Valley in the north- concern that President Reagan s 
cause they easily fit all sizes) and jackets. eastern part of the country, near loss of longtime high-levd asso- 

Doctors move among the new arrivals trying to fc point wfmfcbontas of Nor- ciares reflecu a cmam loss .of _m p- 
weed out those widrwule illnesses who are innam of way, Finland and fc Sovtet Union 
immediate aiwmotL Tic healthy are split up into 

family groups and sent Hrsl to one 0 [ tile dozens of The tmssilf fcnentered Finrnsh ycaBago ; 

absotpL centers around fc rxnmtiy. By most ao and is fcn* to have ^s^gmepta^odt® 

counii the Ethiopians are bong well ieeiJed. crafcdm Arenc Finland. sfcn^y pow.the way th erewasm 


expressed 


Edwin Meese 3d 
^pressed the fear that their leaders 


in which at least 2,000 people died, 
India's top government scientist 
was reported as saying Friday. 

The Press Trust of India news 
agency said Srimvarsan Varadara- 
jan, scientific adviser to tbe govern- 
ment, said at a meeting of the Indi- 
an Science Congress in Lucknow 
that the water set off a violent reac- 
tion in liquid methyl isocyanate 
stored in the tank ai a pesticides 
factory owned by the Union Car- 
bide Corp. 

“Just half a kilogram {one 
pound] of water entered the under- 
ground methyl isocyanate tank," 
the Press Trust quoted Mr. Vara- 
darajan as saying. 

This triggered “a runaway reac- 
tion that probably puled the entire 
tank from the ground causing 
cracks on its concrete shield." He 
gave no indication of how water 
entered the tank. 

Gouds of poison gas escaped 
from the lank Dec. 5 and spread 
over Bhopal in central India in the 
worst industrial accident ever. 

The explanation by Mr. Van*- 
darajan, who led the government 
team that investigated the tragedy, 
was the fust official account of the 
reason for the disaster. 

■ U.S. Doctors Report 

Michael Wines of the Los Angeles 
Times reported in W'as/u/igion: 

Survivors of the Bhopal disaster 
are suffering far fewer lasting 
health problems than was first 
feared, but the Ives of thousands 
still may be shortened by chronic 
lung disease and other respiratoiy 
problems, two American doctors 
said Thursday. 

Tbe doctors sard that the health 


were losing nut leaving pragmatic- outlook was especially uncertain 
minded advisers with greater influ- f OT children under age 8, whose 


ste plan, no dear 
way there was in 


The Norwegian government re- 1981," said a Reagan associate, 


ence on Mr. Reagan on both do- 
mestic and foreign policy. That 
would subtly change the political 
complexion of the administration 
in its second term. 

Personal rather than political 


Les Aspin 


A Jewish Agency ofnrial quoted by the Israeli Army ask Moscow about the epi- Right — the younger, more ideo- ty chief of staff, and Interior Secre- 

sodc. _ „ logical R^bUon, who me purb- ury William P. Dark. In adriitioii. 


know the problem of color exists,” the official said. M It 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 3) 


The Finns generally refrain from ing particularly hard for conserva- 
anything that could irritate their live action on sodal issues — 


(Continued on Page 2, CoL 2} 


lungs were not fully developed. 

Dr. Gareth Green and Dr. Jef- 
frey Koplan, members of a four- 
member medical team that the U.S. 
government sent to Bhopal shortly 
after the disaster, said that many of 
those injured by (he gas appeared 
to be recovering well. 

Most of the deaths from the gas 
occurred in the first two days after 
the accident. Dr. Green, a Johns 
Hopkins University public health 
scientist, said at a news conference 
that doctors did not expect a steady 
stream (tf additional deaths. 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY. JANUARY 5-6, 1985 



Israelis Fear Disclosure 
Of Aid to Ethiopian Jews 
Could Endanger Airlift 


'T ; -- 

1 v * "V- 1 ' 


Realm 

TEL AVIV — Israeli officials 
voiced concern Friday that interna- 
tional publicity might endanger the 
airlift of Ethiopian Jews to load 
and an inquiry was ordered into 
press disclosures about the opera- 
tion. 

Ethiopia accused Sudan on Fri- 
day of collusion with Israel in what 
it called illegal trafficking in Ethio- 
pian nationals. A Foreign Ministry 
statement condemned a “conspira- 
cy between the Sudanese govern- 
ment and foreign powers in the 
illegal trafficking of Ethiopians 
from Sudanese territory to Israel 
and other countries." 

The statement said it was known 
that a large number erf Ethiopians 
had recently been crossing the bor- 
der into Sudan as a result of 
drought or due to “forced persua- 
sion by anti- Ethiopian elements 
operating in that country. 

The airlift, an open secret m Isra- 
el for months, has been reported 
prominently in the world media 
since censors allowed foreign corre- 
spondents to tile stories about it on 
Thursday. 

Israeli officials say more than 

10.000 Ethiopian Jews, known as 
Falashas, have been brought to Is- 
rael, many in an airlift that began 
in November. Immigration offi- 
cials estimate that more than 

12.000 Jews remain in the villages 
of Ethiopia's Gondar region. 

Israeli radio quoted Ethiopian 
immigrant leaders as saying that 
disclosures about the airlift could 
have grave consequences for the 


Ethiopian Jewish community and 
that the operation should have re- 
mained secret until the last Jew was 

out. 

Yehuda Dommitz, director of 
the Jewish Agency's immigration 
department, said that an inquiry 
had been ordered into the leaks. 
Some newspapers have suggested 
that an interview that Mr. Domm- 
itz gave to a West Bank Jewish 
settlers' magazine, Nkuda, set off 
the disclosures. 

Cl iftim Aharon, head of the Jew- 
ish Agency, announced Thursday 
that he was suspending the immi- 
gration director. Mr. Dominiiz 
turned up for duty Friday, howev- 
er, and said he was working nor- 
mally. 

“Nobody knows what consCj 
quences tins publicity will have," 
Mr. Aharon said. 

Israel and Ethiopia have not had 
diplomatic ties since a pro- Soviet 
Marxist regime took power in Ad- 
dis Ababa 10 years ago. 

Israeli military censors now are 
allowing correspondents to report 
some details of the airlift. Accord- 
ing to Western sources, Ethiopian 



b' 

■ ' -*iX 

. ■ • 


. — ,■ 
' b, "V : 




••a 


Dm AnodoJocf FVec 


Ethiopian children with their Hebrew teacher and an Israeli friend in an absorption center. 

Ethiopians Confront Culture Shock in Israel 


Jews are leaving by way of Sudan. 

Jews in the Unitea States are 
helping to finance the airlift, code- 
named “Operation Moses," in pri- 
vate fund-raising appeals in New 
York. 

Officials said it had become in- 
creasingly difficult to conceal the 
operation, partly because of the ef- 
fort necessary to absorb the immi- 
grants in Israel 


(Continued from Plage 1) 

is a very painful problem. I mil never forget what a 
beautiful 14-year-old Ethiopian bey said to me: ‘We, 
the Hack Jews, are happy that them are white Jews. 
I'm not sure that all at the white Jews are happy that 
there are blade Jews.' ” 

Those E thiopians found to have serious health 
problems are usually seat to Shame Zedek Hospital, 
whoe they are kept together in a special ward for 
tropical diseases. 

**We are seeing infectious diseases wc have not seen 
since medical school,’’ Dr. Hershko said. The diseases 
include tuberculosis, malaria, typhoid, jaundice, dys- 
entery and malnutrition. 

When they first arrived in the hospital, said Amalia 
Oren, a Shaare Zedek soda! worker, many of the 


Rival Militias Delay Lebanese Plan lor Move Along Highway 



Eric Wehrfi 


United Press International 

BEIRUT — A three-hour meet- 
ing or rival militia representatives 
ended in deadlock Friday, blocking 
plans to deploy Lebanese troops 
along a key coastal highway lead- 
ing to Israel's front lines in south- 
ern Lebanon. 

The uni" antagonis t*, the Chris- 
tian and Druze Moslem militias , 
blamed each other for the dead- 
S lock, and the delegate representing 
£? the Amal, the Shiite Moslem mili- 
tia, walked out in anger, officials 
said. 

The Christian and Druze militia- 
men control the coastal highway 
the Lebanese Army plans to use for 
its move southward. The Shiites 
” have no presence on or along the 
highway. 


Meeting in the presence of Leba- 
nese police commanders ordered to 
supervise the deployment, the 
Christian and Druze militia* ar- 
gued and haggled over “everything 
from where the soldiers will stay, 
how many will patrol which route 
and how many wifi man which 
checkpoint where,” a conference 
source said. 

“There is just no trust between 
the Christian and Druze militia* ," 
the sources said. “The whole de- 
ployment plan is hanging in the 
balance, and it would be strange if 
anything short of an emergency 
cabinet meeting or direct Syrian 
mediation could break the dead- 
lock.” 

Minutes before the meeting 
broke up, the Shiite militia repre- 


sentative walked out of the confer- 
ence room after telling those pre- 
sent he would not return unless 
they agreed on the deployment 

No date was set for the group’s 
next session. 

Lebanese officials hope the 
army’s deployment to the Israeli 
front lines ai the A wall River in 
southern Lebanon will put the 
army into position to take over the 
region if Israel's troops are with- 
drawn. 

Israd, which invaded Lebanon 
in 1982, has said the Lebanese 
Army is incapable of controlling 
the region and preventing attacks 
on Israel's northern border. The 
issue has become a stumbling block 
in troop withdrawal talks between 


Deficit Will Grow Again, Stockman Warns 


(CantimKd from Page 1) 

$ 1 30-hillion area to be a significant 
achievement," the adminis tration 
official said. 

Mr. Stockman also told Republi- 
cans that the projections on the 
deficit were now higher than in 
December, which is one of the rea- 
sons the administration falls so far 
short of the original goaL 
He told them that an across-the- 
board, one-year budget freeze, in- 
cluding military spending and 
spending an Social Security, would 
not be enough to reach the $100- 
bOlion deficit goaL 
Die freeze concept is popular on 
Capitol Hill because d does not 
ehminale or cut many popular do- 
mestic programs, as the Reagan 
plan would. Also, there would be 
savings from a freeze of the mili- 
tary budget, a move Mr. Reagan 
strongly opposes. 

“It’s a little worse than I 
thought,” Senator Dole said after 
tire meeting with Mr. Stockman. 
•The numbers are bigger.” 

But rather than rejecting Mr. 
Reagan's goal. Senator Dole sub- 
mitted legislation that would make 


Security cost-of- Irving increase for “We have to go bade to the bar 

one year and malting major reduo- sics, which are catastrophic health 
dons in tire militaiy budget would care, income supplements for So- 
have to be cansideraL dal Security and a defense that is 

Senator Dole and other senators appropriate without the tremen- 
acknowledged that a freeze would dons outlays that are there,” he 
not achieve the $100-biHion goal said. 

But he said later that “it still wffl be ^ QCW Adkil are 

Sphere we S2 18 billion in 1985, $225 Wlion in 
1^ WOJhDtao fct 1OT7.U S» 



■ 'd • 


Alan Simpson of Wyoming, mid billion in 1988. These compare with 
after l^stoSman’s briefing. ” projections made in late November 

Senator Simpson said that a one- of $223 btflian in 1985, $214 billion 
year freeze or eliminating ail cost- in 1986. $232 billion in 1987 and 
of -living increases would have to be $224 btfiion in 1988. The defirit in 
part of any package. 1984 was $185 billion. 



David A. Stockman 


Few Remain of Reagan’s California Cadre 


(Conferoed from Page 1) 

FHonn miw tn th#» 1981, the beginning of Mr. Rea- policy factions within the adminis- 

Kfs . clark OaA fsccndl, 

die White House soon to become as Praulent Rffl^ts na- taking the more conservative pos- 

auoraey general. He was renomi- ad ' n ?*. Sj? Janu ' *“* Kp ^ r by J%5 

nated for the^odtion Thursday by November 1983 colleagues to have be« frustrated 

President ReaSn. J 3 Then departures, other officials by internal power struggles indud- 

™ . say, signal Doth their fatigue from ing policy and personal clashes 

Those three advisers had been demanding fobs and a lack of on- with each other. 


have been in the While House since But as representatives of rival 


the SlOO-bfllkm deficit target in the main holdovers from Mr. Rea- 
1988 a law. He and other senators gan’s tenure as governor of Califor- 
nian sai d dia t elimina ting the Social nia. Mr. Meese and Mr. Deaver 

exhibition sale of 
Iranian and Oriental carpets 
at wholesale prices 

from 10 a.m. to 12 p.ro., ind. SUNDAYS, until JANUARY 8 

at HOTEL GEORGE-V 

31 Avenue George-V, Paris 8« — 

k Top level jobs 

domestic 

m W andmtematumal 

■ r 550 - $200,000+ 


The **1CA Executive Search Newsleuer" is a unique publica- 
tion created in 1974. It has readers in 60 countries and lists in 
exclusivity more than 500 job opportunities each year ranging 
from S50 to S200.000 or equivalent. 

The information is provided only by reputable 
txeculive-tturtfi firms in many countries at no cost to than. 
These true search Consultants never advertise rheir assign- 
ment in any publication of any kind. They use the 1CA Exe- 
cutive Search trade newsletter only to supplement their own 
made-to-measure search procedures. Subscribers can read the 
newsleuer at home in full security. If opportunities interest 
than, they write 10 us and we pas on the inquiries to the Con- 
sultants concerned who will (hen contact suitable candidates 
directly. 

The newsletter is thus a simple way of keeping in 
touch with possible opportunities at home and abroad, in 
rampfetc confidence - which makes sense even if your present 
job is reasonably satisfactory. Only subscribers can have 
access to these opportunities. 

Airmail subscription rate for 10 is&ues: U5SI85. 

Subscribers residing in countries with currency -control regula- 
tions will receive a pro-forma invoice upon request. 

Please send your name and address with your subscription to: 
>T fl A International Classified Advertising, Inc. 

575 MADISON AVENUE NEW YORK. NT 10022 -U S.A. 
■ (jne specimen upon request PEP. HT) 

mMwJ NEW YORK PAR15 


ovember 1983. colleagues to have been frustrated 
Their departures, other officials by internal power struggles in dud- 
say, signal Doth their fatigue from ing policy and personal clashes 
demanding jobs and a lade of op- with each other. 


portunity to move into the advisory With the president's re-election, 
position of greatest influence, Mr. Deaver was understood to 
White House chief of staff. have aspired to replace James A 

There is also, officials say, a Baker 3d as White House chief of 
broader understanding that Presi- staff, if Mr. Baker left the adminis- 
dent Reagan has only eight or nine (ration. Conservatives had pushed 
more months to score major Mr. Clark for that post, hoping he 
achievements in domestic affaire, would replace Mr. Meese as their 
Concern about what is seen as a principal avenue to the president 
limited window of political oppor-j But President Reagan asked Mr. 
amity has left some officials feeling Baker to stay on. 
that tins coming spring is a wise “Clark was frustrated by the 
time to make a change. powrx struggles that were going on. 

For months, both Mr. Deaver according to the people around 
and Mr. Clark had advised close him,” said Howard Phillips, ebair- 


assodates that they were eager to man of the Conservative Caucus. 


return to private life, either to re- 
lieve financial st rains on their fam- 
ilies or to be free of the intense 
pressures of highjposts. 


“He read the tea leaves and saw 
that the president did not have a 
significant role for him to play in 
the second administration." 


interested to seeking 

EMPLOYMENT/HIGHER EDUCATION 

personal contacts, business associations, travel in 

U-SA, Canada, Europe, Middle East, Iran, 
Africa, New Zealand, Australia, etc.? 






EMPL0YMEN77HIGHER EDUCATION 
SCHOLARSHIPS & BUSINESS CONTACTS 
s ^J^ ma ™^15^ aaa,T ^^> Wi| i»eifcriBflda&a9eit address- 

ad AIR MAiLanvBiope (23 x Wans) do «ac«he kifcnnetign, rtvfce& tarns tram 

OVERSEAS EMPLOYMENT & EDUCATION 
INFORMATION SERVICE 

3721 Poplar Street. PQ Baa 33M 
Erie, teinaylwnla IfiSOfl, UfiA. 




or equivalent value (c«H) in iny otter curtwc* 
TtK»efumtsfttnq3Cax>an5or2DoflareorOriePoundorTQnRhateG*c.raceiw 
their replies by SEA MAIL In M months. 

This sanies la nsQlsftmd with Prothonotay in County of Erie & Seaetayof 
Stare, CammonuAjaitfi ol Pannsytuarta, USA 

ACT NOW - WORLD EVENTS CHANGING FAST 


Fewer Jews 
Emigrating 
From Soviet 

By William G. Blair 

New York Tunes Service 

NEW YORK — The number of 
Jews permitted to emigrate from 
the Soviet Union dropped below 
1.000 last year for the first time 
since 1970, according to American 
Jewish officials. 

From a peak of 51,320 in 1979, 
the number of emigrants declined 
1 to 896 in 1984, according to o Bi- 
dais of the National Conference 
and the Greater New York Confer- 
ence on Soviet Jewry. 

At a news conference Thursday, 
the chairmen of the two groups, 
Morris B. Abram of the National 
Conference and Herbert Krooish 
of the Greater New York Confer- 
ence, described 1984 as “a bleak 
year” that was “dominated by ha- 
rassment and a new wave of arrests 
and persecution” of Soviet Jews, 
particularly Hebrew teachers and 
other cultural activists. 

The officials asserted that the 
Soviet government was engaged in 
“a systematic campaign to disrupt 
all Jewish religious and cultural ac- 
tivities” that threatened “the very 
survival of Judaism in the Soviet 
Union.” 

They estimated that 20,000 of 
ihe more than 350,000 Soviet Jews 
who have taken the preliminary 
steps in the long emigration process 
have been turned down officially 
by the Soviet authorities. The Jew- 
ish officials said there were 2J to 3 
million Jews in the Soviet Union. 

The two men called on Secretary 
of State George P. Shultz to raise 
the issue of the plight of Soviet 
Jewry with Andrei A. Gromyko, 
the Soviet foreign minister, when 
aims limitation talks resume next 
week in Geneva. 

Mr. Abram said the two groups 
have received no assurances from 
the Reagan administration that the 
rights issue would be included in 
the Geneva talks. Bui be added that 
he had “no reason to doubt that it 
win be raised at Geneva.” 

Mr. Abram and Mr. Kronish 
also appealed to Konstantin U. 
Chernenko, the Soviet presdent, to 
permit the emigration of Soviet 
Jews “in significant numbers.” 

I CHURCH SERVICES I 


TWOU 

UMON CHURCH OF TOPOU, P.O. Box 
6397, AwWv*. W.i 71468. Friday wviw 
10:30 a.m. 

houaio 

UWARIAN-UNiyBtSAUST. worship and 
adivitiai in Eunpm. Contact BJU, Stew 
Dick, SwinBrtnwt 20. 1271 NCHuiz*n,The 
Nthuriantfa. TeL- 1+311 B» 21 52 55073. 

To place an adtaetisemenl 
in this section 
plume contact: 

Me Elizabeth HER WOOD 
l&l Ave. Cb.-de-Ganlle, 
92521 Nenillr Cedar. France. 
TeLs 747.12.65. 


The Associated Press 


Ethiopians were afraid of the Israelis in white uni- 
forms. 

They would hide under the bed sheets or cover tbdr 
heads with a towel, be said. 

But gradually, the barriers broke down. 

There was a major problem finding the right kind of 
food for the new arrivals, Mrs. Oren said. Normal 
Israeli hospital fare includes things like yogurt 
fresh avocados, cheese, bottled milk and boiled meats, 
none of which were part of the Ethiopians' traditional 
diet. 

“They wanted only rice and potatoes,” Mrs. Oren 
said, “so now we bring them one pot of rice and 
potatoes and they all sit around a table together and 
eat We have added milk to the rice to make sure they 
get enough nutrition.” 


Pole Testifies WORLD BRIEFS 

He Received p owe u Has Cancer Surgery 

Assurance ot wASHiNGTON(^ r J^cei^F^or^.a&^« 

Court underwent surgery for prostate cancer Friday and was reported to 

Protection M neinain in the Ro^ Mafaodia 

bRodhrater, Minnesota, for 10 days to two weeks, the &ptcme 

^ ^ orwhat furto f any. Joai* 

not beprosecuied for the killing of Powell would receive. 

a pro&^darity priest because the _ c« • - TH_ • 

Interior Ministry officials invesu- GlVCS ASYIUIH tO jOViet rilJSlCISt 

gatm| the slaying were g WASHINGTON (AP) — The Umted States has granted political 
Lieutenant Waldemar Chmie- asylum to a Soviet physicist whose seniority and credentials place him in 
lewski nearly wept as he testified the top rank of defecting scientists. . _ . 
that he twice turned away in horror Artem V. KuKkov, 51, was returning to the Soviet Unton on Dec M 
as the ca pt ain, his comma pdin g of- after finishing a three-month assig nm ent as an ex change snenost ifj 
ficer. beat the Reverend Jerzy Po U.S. nuclear research laboratory in Batavia, Imnois, whenhe requested 
pieluszko before the priest died. asylum at C h ica g o’s O’Hare International Airport. Tne State Depan- 
Friday was Lieutenant Chmie- ment said Thursday that the request had been granted. 
lewskTs third day on the stand and Mr. Kulikov is believed to be the first Soviet higb-euergy physoa to 

the fifth day of the trial, in which he seek asylum in the United States. He was a senior physicist and drat 
and three other security officers are engineer of the Leningrad Institute of Nudear Faysics and had been 
charged in the October abduction working with three Soviet colleagues at the Fenm National Accelerator 
and tHUing of Father Popieluszko. Laboratory in Batavia, west of Chicago. 

Lieutenant Chmielewski. 29, 

3 Are Charged in Bombing in Britain 

are charged with abducting and LIVERPOOL, England (AP) — Dozens of policemen guarded a 
murdering the priest. A fourth offi- Liverpool court Friday as two Irishmen and a Briton charged with a 
cer. Colonel Adam Pietruszka, 47, b^K^o fat Britain appeared. The men were ordered held until Jan. 11, 


anti killing of Father Popieluszko. 

Lieutenant Chmielewski. 29, 
Lieutenant Leszek Pekala, 32. and 
raptain Gizegorz PiotrowskL. 33, 
are charged with abducting and 
murdering the priest A fourth offi- 
cer. Colonel Adam Pietruszka, 47, 


the two countries. The talks resume 
Monday. 

Elsewhere in the capital, protest- 
ing parents and relatives of kidnap- 
ping victims opened some of the 
roads linking the Christian and 
Moslem halves of Beirut 

There was no ward, meanwhile, 
on the fate of the Swiss chaig£ 
d’affaires, Eric WehrlL kidnapped 
Thursday by four gunm en as he 
drove from work to his home in the 
seafront area of Raouche. 

In Bern, Swiss officials speculat- 
ed that the abduction could be 
linked to the arrest of a Lebanese 
man in Zurich in November. The 
man was arrested at the Zorich air- 
port with explosives. He reportedly 
said he was on his way to Rome to 
join an attack on the U.S. Embassy. 


his three subordinates. They face Patrick Brazil 34, and William Grimes, 43, and the 

possible death penalties if convict- ^ton, Peter Jordan, 60, were arrested Dec. 24 and held under Britain’s 
«L Prevention of Terrorism Act, which permits the police to hold suspects 

Lieutenant Chmielewski said f OT a wee j- before bringing them to court The men’s lawyers made no 
that three days after the lulling, he application for baiL 

asked Captain Piotrowski what the ^ ^ charged with conspiring to cause an explosion HkdyfV. 

officers should do to protect them- ^H.^Tippr life and property. Under court-ordered restrictions, details c? 
selves from arrest and prosecution. ^ my DOl be published. 

“I was told there was nothing to ybe last major terrorist bombing in Britain was an Oct. 12 attempt by 
worry about,” he said. “Piotrowsla ^ ou iiawed Irish Republican Army to assassinate Prime Minister 
said the people involved in the m- Margaret Thatcher in a Brighton hotel during a Conservative Party 
vesugation are good guys. conference. 

Asked to nam e the members of 

Nicaraguan Politician Backs Rebels 

Lieutenant Chmielewski said they WASHINGTON (WP) — Arturo Jos6 Cruz, leader of the democratic 
indudal General Zratm Plage w the Nicaraguan government, has shifted his position to 

and Zbtpnew JaMoufa, both i offi- Sor»^ ntinu ed U.S. hmding for the rebels fighting the Sandmen 
cials of the In ten or Ministry. Colo- 

uel Pietruszka was also a member ^ k wouId ^ « s terrible political mistake” to end the U.S. 

of the mvesngatmgcommisaom ^ program ^ Smict ^ halted aid to the Nicaraguan pjvero- 
1 w ^™ ann i 0im u No y.‘Jn ment. He also asked other governments and private organizations to 

demand steps toward democratic refonn a* a condition for further aid to 

l JiJL oman ' reimport was a help to the Reagan admmistratiotu which regards 

Church, had been suspended from con^yedrebd attacks as crucial to its policy of pressuring theSandinists 
duty for failure to supervise prop- regional peace talks and domestic political concessions. Mr. Cruz 

lieutenant Chmielewski disput- hadpreviously said that the rebels provkied the Sandinists with an excuse 
ed the findings of the autopsy re- 10 re P ressioIL 

port which said the priest died of ^ 

strangulation or suffocation. He Ronnml 

said that “no person could have r ur JACCUru. 

survived so many blows to the The world rfiw channik m, Anatoli Karpov, and his challenger, Gary 
head.” Kasparov, agreed to a draw Friday in the 38th game of their marathon 

“I am convinced that (he cause marrh in Moscow. Mr. Karpov leads 5-1 and needs one more victory to 
of death was beating," he said. The retain his title. (AP) 

2ribS ^Sttte^takS St T“™g seamen blockading four French channel ports threatened 
A-* jJ-jj tougher action Fnday after police cleared a quay, allowing a passenger 

leading them to the priest’s body. A bon* planted by a leftist urban guerriUa group known as GRAPO 
Lieutenant Chmielewski his exploded Fnday m a shopm Madrid, slightly injuring one person pobce 
pregnant wife sitting in the audi- sa ^-. . _ , „ . , ..... , ... 

JnSTrobbed and said that “for all 4 P™Mnn^ Ti«^^ of 

practical purposes, I have lost my April 2 to 4, the Foreign Ministry said m Ankara on Fnday. (Reuters) 
family." After regaining his com- — — - — 

posure, he went oil- “T had to con- _ 

t?£tSS~SZ Renault’s ’84 Loss to HU 

suffering. That could not be hid- 

3b— 1 ■SSf.Ttai Record 9 Billion Francs 

twice asked Captain Piotrowski to . . . 

leave the priest alive on the side of (Continued from Page 1) worldwide demand for cars and 


said that “no person could have A 111 imavi u 
survived so many blows to the The world chess ctampkm. Ana ' 
head.” Kasparov, agreed to a draw Frida; 

“I am convinced that the cause mnrrb in Moscow. Mr. Karpov lea 
of death was beating,” he said. The retain his title, 
officer, sto tiering nervously de- blockading fo 

sSSS SsS 

leading them to the priest’s body. A , b «™P. 1 f n ■ ^ 5 ,ef . tus i 

Lieutenant Chmielewski his exploded Friday m a shop mMadi 
pregnant wife sitting in the audi- 

ence, sobbed and said that “for all , lVOm^ Ti^Ozal (rfT 
practical purposes, I have lost my April 2 to 4, the Foreign Ministry 
family." After regaining his com- 1 — 1 — — 

posure, he went on: “I had to con- 
sider that the priest also had a fam- T) . 1x9. 

•‘y,- the people who were MXGlWttlUZ S G 
suffering. That could not be hid- 

Lieutenant Chmielewski said he f? £)/ l /)7YI Q Mai 
and Lieutenant Pekala at least IMXVf \A* S l 
twice asked Captain Piotrowski to . 

leave the priest alive on the side of (Continued from Page I) 
the road. Both times, he said, they the company’s shareholder, will 
were ordered to “keep driving” to- draw the necessary oouchisoos 


the road. Both times, he said, they the company’s shareholder, will trucks expected in 1985. ,> 

were ordered to “keep driving" to- draw the necessary conchiaons Bernard Hanon, who joined th** 
ward the dam from which the three about what is happaring,” an offi- company in 1959 and whose term 


threw the priest into a reservoir rial said, adding that the loss figure as chair m an was renewed indefi- 
with a sack of rocks tied to his neck, “is quite a blow and follows some nitely last May, has been increas- 
Father Popieluszko, a defender mistakes made by the company.” ingly pressured by the government 
of the outlawed Solidarity free He and industry sources riled to accelerate a managem ent reorga- 
trade union movement, was ab- continuing delays in b ringing to nization started in mid-December, 
ducted on a highway north of To- market Renault's completely rede- Company sources said the reor- 
run on Oct 19. His body was signed R-5 compact car, and the ganization, which involved placing 
pulled from a Vistula River reser- company’s apparent inability to new executives in unprofitable sec- 
voir 1 1 days later. take advantage of an increase in tore, would probably not stem 


U.S. Must Give Ground 
On Arms, Pravda Says 

(Continued from Page I) nuclear war through mutual vul- 


take advantage of an increase in tors, would probably not stem 

losses in the Dear future, and that 

much would depend on the world 
, ^ -m market. 

I'V’tf* I VtWEl Ylfl Renault and government sources 
* w/ wj X U11U emphasized that the main reason 

for the big loss last year was a fall in 
O tenirfi sales amid a sluggish world maritet 
LdVtXCl. “We were hit by the world prob- 

w jem,” one of the sources said, add- 

nudear war through mutual vul- ifrg that Renault's 1984 world wicF 
nerability “are being called into sales of motor vehicles slipped 


liwlv t(*mno from the Americans “ neranuny are oeutg cauea imo 

^^xpSssion of doubt about que^on." New tedmd« and la Koma 15Q -0°0 nnit5 
the value of even starting substan- Soviet mihtary buildup have made to two mflltou units, 
live talks reflects a suggestion last *** V "* for a 8 auist nude " Comrneatmg on the loss, nidus- 
week bv V adim V Zagiadin first ar-anned missiles more urgent and try and government officials con- 
deputy of the Communist Party’s ««*« “w® possible, he said. ceded that Renault faced severe 
international department. "I would ask you,” the president problems, including excess man- 

n.u .1 — : j wrote, “to rememher that the anali- power and a sluggish worid market 


The Pobtburo statement said wrote, “to rentember^that^tbe quah 


you,” ihe president problems, including 
mber that the quali- power and a sluggish 


that “queSonsrelated to the forth- *y of our future is at stake and to 5* ^ JT 

mmin. nuwlim" in Honwri Haj reflect on what we are trying to phasized that Renault’s mainprob- 


coming meeting" in Geneva had 011 Y™ 1 wc are_trymg w 

been discussed and that “an appro- achieve - the strengthening of out 
priate decision on the Soviet to preserve the peace while 

Union’s position was taken." **^8 awa y ^ can F 11 
In another context, it described peudence upou the threat of nticle- 
Soviet interests as “prevention of 31 rcteliation. 
the arms race in outer space, radi- a White House spokesman said 
cal reduction and then destruction Thursday that the report was ro- 
of nudear arsenals, and removal of viewed before publication by a 


reflect on what we are trying to p“«i«uuihv Renames mam proo- 
achieve — the strengthening of our was P°° r management and that 

ability to preserve the peace while responsibility for improvement 
shifting away from our current de- resle ^ with Mr. Hanon. 
pendence upon the threat of nude- French government sources said 
ar retaliation." that roughly 2 billion francs were 

a whit* Uni.c» nvJ.K-,- j ^ because of the cost of retrain- 
A White House spokesman said jnp arir j rwsettUocT iiM ^nir « 


its as "prevention of “ iwaliafion-” 2 biUion francs were 

i in outer space, radi- A White House spokesman said ; no „„a re ^f a * n * 

and then destruction Thursday that the report was re- S 

enals, and removal of viewed before publication by a ,. nrriri 5^J^ ai | cs 

Thursday, the The report seemed to minimize mobile sector. 

toe intense d^ate m Congress and According to industry rtrnom in 
J^dSVdefoSs ^ on 8 outside the gov- Detroit, most U.s!anSaE^af- , 

ai SrS SSS-5 **» twgT'eatly improved prt^ts in 1985^- 

°f Staff, many respect- and 1984, planned to build more 
r “ ^7 ed scientists and other experts be- cars durine the first mistier of 

SdSi Ifeve that, mth firm lea^^p and 
ton to aeter a nuclear adequate funding,” the project od last year 

. succmi . in achlcvi "S 11 •»*- Tlie iwo Volks- 


the threat of a nuclear war ” 

In Washington on Thursday, the 
White House issued its first public 
report on President Ronald Rea- 
gan's proposal to develop a defense 
against nuclear missiles , arguing 
that the time had come to move 
away from reliance on weapons of 
mass destruction to deter a nuclear 


WhU, depart™ b. JS ""JS 

mony given btfore Congress this lion defense. Inc - a »» 

year by an array of PentSon offi- tary of the West German automak- 

rials, the report seemed dearly ® r ’ v . oU “wagenwcrk AG, and 

aimed at the general public rarher twt o i j it American Motors Corp^ wtodi is 

than at expert* Woman Holds Hostages 46.4-percent owned by Renault 

In the foreword to the 10-page Amu** , AMC ^ it planned to re- 

brochure, Mr. Reagan wrote that ^CTeHi/ia^I/pOiT duce production at its Kenosha, • 

“we must seek another means of The Assodaud Press Wisconsin, plant by about 10 per- 

detening war. It is both militarily CLEVELAND — A woman ccnt starting next week, 
and morally necessary.” puDed a gun at a gate at the Geve- Edith Cresson, the French minis- 

The report using language that land airport Friday, wounded a ^ of industry and foreign trade, 
avoided technical intricacies, re- flight attendant and a gate agent recently compared Renault to Pen- v 
viewed the background of what the and then boarded a Pan American g cot SA, the privately owned.** 
administration calls the Strategic Worid Airways jet where she was French automaker that is also ex* 
Defense Initiative, which has be- holding five people hostage, the Parted to report a loss this year, 
come popularly known as “Star Federal Aviation Administration In an interview with L’Usinc 
Wars" since Mr. Reagan an- said. NouveUe, a business magazine, 

nounced it in a March 1983 speech, A Cleveland police spokesman, Mrs. Cresson said that Peuaeotwas 
In his introduction, Mr. Reagan Detective Robert Bolton, said that “well managed," and u^d Re- 
rriterated major themes of that one flight attendant and four pas- null to step up the streamSuina of 
speech, saymg that the basic as- sengers remained aboard the plane its management and to work to 
sumptions behind trying to avoid with the armed woman. improve earnings. 


The Associated Press 


CLEVELAND — A woman ^ string next week 
puDed a gun at a gate at the Geve- Edith Cresson, the French minis- 







. rni;'- ' a. 


> 114 Loss to A 
f Billion 






■■ :r:5*c 

■ . . - p-* 

■ji ^ 


u! 


■ ~ a Ji' 1 ' 
- -■ ’ 


:^ 1 S 


s-"' ^ 

' sU-' 

: -:;V : <5* 

■ „ ■ , -w J V' ■ 

•..C^ 

. ; V* 

■ ... to- 

,■ , V / 


- X 

''Vi^ 

*■’ f-’i * 



** 


$70 Million to Be Used 

To Build Huge Telescope 

1L. C 1 ni.i , I 


INTERNATION At HERALD TRIBUNE, SATIIRDAY-SU1SPAY, JANUARY 5-6, 1985 


Page 3 


Mr» York Tima Serrice 

Pasadena California — a*. 

ironomos here have announced a 
private grant of $70 million that 
thqr said would enable construe. 
tew of the world's largest optical 


believed it was the largest private 
scientific grant in history. 

The time has come to build more 
powerful, ground-based optical 
telescopes. Mr. Goldberger said. 
TTic 200-mch Hale telescope on 
Mount Palomar had “reached the- 
~ oreucal limits," he said, addins: 

pKtdBoopemnbemceasbig “New udmo'. sot nute. 
tnd four trass u powerful M ^ possible to tog the nan ■■ 
Hale Tdescope on Palomar Mora- slra.” g ™ 1 

lhe lar?esT ^ tbc the new technology has been de- 
Umted States. veloped at the Lawrence Berkeley 

It wffl be nearly twice the size of Laboratory by a University of Cah- 

the largest optical telescope in the f°niia astronomer. Dr. Jerry Nel- 
world, a 236-inch (6-meter) instru- son. The idea for the new telescope 
mem in the Caucasus Mountains in originated at Berkeley in 1977 , Dr. 
the Soviet Union. Nelson said in an interview. Several 

\ The William M. Keck Founda- wcrc discussed and in early 

doo, of Los Angeles, nam^ after ^7® *be idea of using a segmented 
the founder of the Superior Oil Co., ““Tor was agreed upon, 
awarded the grant to the Califo rnia Instead of being ground from a 
Institute of Technology and the s * n S le piece of glass, the Keck pri- 
University of Calif onua to build maj ^ ^rror wul be a mosaic cont- 
end operate the instrument. Cal- P 0 ^ of 36 hexagonal mirrors, 
- ~ each measuring six. feet wide ami 

three inches ihidc. 

The array of mirrors weighs less 
than a single lens and can be male 
faster and for less money than con- 
ventional technology would allow. 
The 200-inch mirror at Palomar 
weighs 16 tons. The 400-inch Keck 
mosaic of mirrors will weigh 14 
tons. 



Leader of House Armed Services Panel Deposed 

Democrats Elect Aspin to Replace Ailing Price, Breaking Seniority Tradition 


tech officials announced Thursday. 

The Keck Observatory, as it will 
be known, will be built atop Mauna 
Kea, an extinct volcano on the is- 
land of Hawaii 

The instrument will use new 
technology to create a mirror sur- 
face measuring almost 400 inches 
in diameter. 

Plans call for construction of the 
observatory to begin next January. 
The project is be completed in su 
and a half years. 

The telescope “will be four limes 
s'more powerful than Palomar ," said 
’ Howard B. Keck, chai rman and 
president of the foundation. Tm 
told it will permit one to see the 
light of a single candle from the 
distance of the moon." 


A model of what may become the world's largest optical 
telescope is displayed by Marvin L Goldberger, right, 
president of Caltech, and Howard B. Keck, chairman of the 
foundation that is donating the $70 million to build h. 


Two engineering problems had 
to be overcome. Dr. Nelson said. 
First, a new mirror fabrication 
technique was needed. The hexago- 
nal mirrors are not symmetrical he 
said, and have to be specially 
warped “They look like potato 
chips," Dr. Nelson said. 

Second, a highly precise method 
of computer control has been de- 
. — — — - — veloped to keep the mirrors proper- 

Marvm L. Goldberger, Caltech's ty ali gned as a tingle light gath ering 
president, said he and colleagues unit A computer vvaJldseck each 


mirror's position 300 tm** a sec- 
ond and wQJ simultaneously cor- 
rect the position of each one. 

This is important. Dr. Nelson 
said, since the observatory will en- 
counter high winds at its site 13,600 
feet above sea level on Mauna Kea. 

The new instrument is expected 
to open new horizons to optical 
astronomers. With the Keck Obser- 
vatory, Mr. Goldberger said. 
“Well be able to look back to 12 
bi lli on years ago." Astronomers 
believe the universe is IS billion to 
16 billion years old. 

The new telescope will permit 
scientists to study galaxies billions 
of years further back in time than 
before. They wifi be able to study 
infant galaxies, investigate the na- 
ture of quasars, and study douds of 


gas and dust that give rise to new 
stars and galaxies. 

With special detectors, the tele- 
scope will allow astronomers to 
view infrared light found in space. 

The Space Telescope to be 
launched next year should comple- 
ment the Keck Telescope, Mr. 
Goldberger said. 

The Keck telescope could be the 
first of a new generation of more 
powerful ground-based telescopes. 

In August, the Japanese govern- 
ment annmmwH plans 10 build a 
295-inch reflector telescope on 
Mauna Kea by the early 1990s. The 
University of Texas is considering 
a 275-inch instrument and the Na- 
tional Science Foundation has long 
discussed the possibility of a 590- 
inch instrument. 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — House 
Democrats, breaking with the con- 
gressional seniority system, in- 
stalled Representative Lcs Aspin, 
46, a Pentagon critic, as chairman 
of the House Armed Services Com- 
mittee. They removed Melvin 
Price, an ailing 80-year-old repre- 
sentative from Illinois. 

In selecting the Wisconsin Dem- 
ocrat on a 125-103 vote Friday, the 
House Democratic Caucus also by- 
passed another House veteran, 
Representative Charles R Beoneti 
74, of Florida. 

Representative Aspin, a former 
Pentagon official who was an aide 
to Robert S. McNamara when he 
was defense secretary, is regarded 
as an expert on defense. He has 
played a key role in putting togeth- 
er compromises to save the power- 
ful new MX missile during the past 
two years. He was the seventh- 
ranking Democrat on the commit- 
tee in terms of seniority. 

“It was not a reaction against the 
personalities of the other candi- 
dates,'’ Mr. Aspin said. “It was a 
sign that we ought to be taking a 
serious look at defense, trying to 
balance the deficit and national se- 
curity interests." 

He said in a statement later that 
the vote showed “that the party 
wants to take a clear direction on 
the issues of arms control and de- 
fense spending.” 

In replacing Mr. Price, who 
headed the committee Tor 10 years, 
younger House veterans ignored an 
emotional appeal from House 
Speaker Thomas P. O’Neill Jr. of 
Massachusetts, who had urged 
them to uphold the seniority sys- 
tem and keep Mr. Price in power 
despite his health problems. 

Mr. Aspin’s selection was the 


only surprise in a closed caucus of 
House Democrats. 

Representative W illiam H. Gray 
3d. of Pennsylvania, a leader in the 
black Congressional caucus, was 
unanimously elected chairman of 
tie powerful Budget Committee. 
He succeeds a more conservative 
native, James R. Jones of 
who was forced to give 
up the seat after four years because 
of a Jength-of-ierviee "rate, 

House Majority Leader Jim 
Wright of Texas said of Represen- 
tative Price: u ! think there was a 
sense that Mel because of his phys- 
ical debilities, does give the impres- 
sion of not being m command of 
the situation." 

“His mind is dear but his speech 

is Halting and he is physically rav- 

r by rheumatism or arthritis,” 

Wright said. 

Mr. Bennett, leaning on a cane, 
appeared saddened by the vote that 
denied him a committee chairman- 
ship after a 36-year House career. 

“I’m a guy 74 years of age, in 
good health, and my peers turned 
me down," he said. 

“But 10 or 15 years from now-111 
be knocking at the pearly gates and 
St. Peter won't ask me if 1 was ever 
chairman of the House Armed Ser- 
vices Committee." he said. 

Representative Patricia Schroe- 
der, Democrat of Colorado, de- 
fended the choice of Mr. Aspin. 
saying, “We need someone who is 
vigorous and can present” defense 
issues. 

She said there has been a sense 
among Democrats that under Mr. 
Price the committee has beat mov- 
ing toward the right on defense 
issues. 

“As he’s gotten older and a little 
frailer it’s been much easier for the 


minority party to really central it," 
she said. 

Representative Samuel S. Strat- 
ton, Democrat of New York, who 
supported Mr. Bennett in the vote, 
said Mr. Aspin won “because there 
were more anti-defense liberals in 

the Democratic caucus than people 
who support an adequate defense." 

Mr. Aspin has accepted a presi- 
dential commission’s recommenda- 
tions for installing a limited num- 
ber of MX nuclear intercontinental 
missiles, a move that raised eye- 
brows among many House mem- 
bers who looked to Mr. Aspin to 
lead attacks on President Reagan's 
defense buildup. 

Mr. Aspin led those pushing the 


compromise through the House, 
and is credited by many with sav- 
ing the MX. a weapon many critics 
and supporters believe trill lose its 
congressional funding when it 
comes up for a vote in the Senate 


Meanwhile, in the Senate, two 
critics of the Reagan administra- 
tion's coven actions in Central 
America were appointed as the new 
leaders of the Senate Intelligence 
Committee. David Durenberger, 
Republican of Minnesota, was ap- 
pointed chairman, and Patrick 
Leahy. Democrat of Vermont, was 
named vice chairman. 

The Senate committee oversees 
all intelligence agencies 


7 Protesting e Corporate Evil 9 Held 
AflerRaMonPennsybanmOuirdi 

The Associated Press 

CLAIRTON, Pennsylvania — Sheriffs deputies aimed with clubs 
broke into Trinity Lutheran Church at dawn Friday and arrested 
seven dissident church members and union leaders who had barricad- 
ed themselves inside since Nov. 13 in protest of “corporate evil” 

The authorities said there was no resistance from those inside the 
church, and Police Chief Kenneth Ujevicfa said that none of the four 
men and three women arrested was injured. 

The seven were dial for contempt of court, for ignoring a judge's 
order to vacate the church. The congregation split after its former 
pastor, the Reverend D. Douglas Roth, began preaching that too little 
was being done to help the unemployed. 

Deputies posted two “No Trespassing" signs and removed about a 
dozen gas masks, several baseball bats and a pipe from the church. 
The operation involved 44 deputies and other police officers. 

“We were being told repeatedly that they were going to use the baO 
bats," said the Allegheny Country sheriff, Eugene Coon, adding of the 
size of the raiding party: “It was absolutely necessary. I think a show 
of force had to be mad e so there wouldn't be any resistance or 
bloodshed in the church." 

Mr. Roth was jailed Nov. 13 for 90 davs for contempt of court, for 
defying a court order that he obey his bishop and step down as pastor. 


AMERICAN TOPICS 


\ 


i 


*■ 


Mind Over Mercury 
Up in North Dakota 

Minot, North Dakota, is 50 
miles (81 kilometers) from the 
Canadian border, a place with 
electric outlets in the hotel 
parking lots so guests can plug 
in their engine warmers over- 
night, and where people cany 
survival g ear in the car (rank 
when they drive in the winter. 

With the town itself and the 
.surrounding farms steadily los- 



Too arid for crime. 

ing population, Minot, popula- 
tion 33,000, b looking for new 
business and industry. The 
city's rhyming motto: “Why 
not Minot?" 

But Mmotans don’t mind die 
cold. SJL Olsen, head of the 
chamber of commerce, said. 
“Anytime yon ask about the 
cold here, people will tell you, 
‘Keeps the riffraff out.’ " 

“Keeps the riffraff out," Ser- 
geant w illiam Fkscb of the Mi- 
not police department said 
when asked if he minded the 
Gold. “Try panhandling in this 
weather, and after 30 seconds 
your hands JaU off." 

Equal Access Law 
Backfires in Boulder 

Last summer, Congress 
passed the Equal Access Act, 
requiring public high schools to 
give student religious groups 


rooms after school that are ac- 
corded to secular groups. 

Backers described the law as 
simplicity itself. But the city of 
Boulder, Colorado, one of the 
first in the United States to ny 

to cany out the act, did not find 

that to be the case. 

When members of a Presby- 
terian prayer group asked for 
classroom space, other students 


complained mat 
rise to evangelism and prosety' 
feni g The school board held 
public meetings on the ques- 
tion, ihm ruled that daarooms 
would not be available for any 
Student group unless it was 

‘curriculum- related, school- 
.an 


Gerald Caplan, a lawyer for 
the school board, says that 
probably means the Sparmto 
Club gets a dassroom and the 
Sid Club doesn’t No religuws 

group wffi be currictdimweiai- 
SH* srys, so 
banned. , #lv _ 

Boulder thus has turned the 
equal access law into an equtd 
nonaceess policy. Mr. 
says: “It is a very, very broad 
law You either fct everybody 
in, or you keep evoybody out 


On a Gear Day 
Yoa Can See LA- 

in 1984, for the first dme 
since scientists began » 
the levels of 

wars ago, the Los Angeles 

onri^lage smog 

^eSds read J - 35 

mfflkm for an hour and fa^ 

Said schools either close 


or severely curtail activities. 
Since the record 23 second- 
stage alerts in 1978, the number 
of such episodes has steadily 
declined. There were three in 
1983. 

But despite California's un- 
usually strict pollution controls, 
the traditional Los Angeles 
haze persists. There were 94 less 
serious first-stage alerts last 
year, when the ozone level 
reaches 2 parts per million for 
an hour, drivers are asked to 
avoid unnecessary trips, and the 
very young and very old are 
urged to stay indoors. 


New Jersey Police 
Go Fishing for Cars 

Not all cars involved in insur- 
ance fraud go to “chop shops" 
where they are dismantled and 
the parts resold. New York and 
New Jersey police have con- 
chided that some owners simply 
dump their cars in the river, 
report them as stolen and col- 
lect the insurance. 

Police divers in Edgewaler, 
New Jersey, across the Hudson 
River from New York City, 
have fished out 27 cars that had 
been rolled off a disused pier 
into 45 feet (14 meten) of wa- 
ter; They say about 40 mote 
cars are yet to be brought to the 
surface. 

Many of the recovered vehi- 
cles are expensive, late-model 
cars and nearly all had been 
reported stolen by their owners. 
Many still had the keys in the 
ignition. 


Short Takes 

Before 1979, only five states 
— Iowa, Nebraska, Oregon, 
New Jersey and Delaware — 
had laws allowing prosecution 
of husbands for raping their 
wives. In the past six years, 
however, 18 more states have 
been added to the list, and cam- 
paigns are under way in an ad- 
ditional 13 states to outlaw 
marital rape, a potential total of 
36 out of 50 states. 

New Jersey has enacted a law 
requiring casinos to invest 1.25 
percent erf their gross revenues 
in projects to redevelop Atlan- 
tic City, where the casinos are. 
and other blighted rities in the 
state. The measure is expected 
to yield about 51.6 billion over 
the next 25 years. 

iVfidrigan lawmakers who de- 
feated mandatory seal bdt leg- 
islation received Christmas 

cards from Dr. Beverly Ander- 
son, a psychiatrist and medical 
examiner, containing gruesome 
color photographs of violent 
traffic deaths. Dr. Anderson 
said she could not force legisla- 
tors to vote for seat belts, “but I 
can lefl them to t hin k. 

Random Thoughts 
Concerning Politics 

' ig of quotations 


A sampling oi quotations 
from “A Guide to the 99th Con- 
gress," a 1985 datebook, calen- 
dar and reference manual pub- 
lished by LTV Corporation, an 
aerospace and energy catnpa- 

Dy john Kenneth Galbraith, the 
economist: “Nothing is so ad- 
mira ble in politics as a short 


Lyndon B. Johnson: “I sel- 
dom think of politics more than 
18 hours a day." , 
Anonymous; To err is hu- 
man, to blame it on the other 

party is politics." 

’ — Compiled by 

ARTHUR HIGBEE 



It takes a special kind of knowhow 
to cultivate the perfect pearl. 


Great ideas are like pearls. In the beginning, 
they’re hardly more than a seed. However, given 
the right kind of environment, a good idea can 
mature into a radiant reality. Much like a grain 
of sand can become the perfect pearl. 

At Epson, we know how to cultivate the 
kind of ideas that will produce products 
people can trust. We approach every idea 
from the very beginning. We carefully evaluate 
its worth, and before proceeding any ftjrther, 
we examine its applicability. If we find any 
flaws, any imperfections, we stop. 

Most corporations can dream up ingenious 
product concepts. But what makes Epson 


different from everyone else is that we create 
products for people. Almost every single 
feature on an Epson product is designed to 
make your life easier. You’ll never spend 
weeks trying to figure out how an Epson 
product works. And you'll never find un- 
necessary gimmicks either. 

Epson’s commitment to fulfill human needs 
is apparent in such outstanding products as our 
liquid crystal display, and the world’s best- 
selling printers for personal computers and 
totally portable cordless personal computers. 

Epson. Wb know the difference between 
great ideas, and great ideas that work. 



Portable Computer PX-8 


EPSON 


EPSON GmPOIIAIION. HMd Ollicfl' SO HiiotAa. Stiioiirtaft. Nagwo 3BW Jann 

B>SON FRANCE &A- to. IUJ WPl SHOp. LevalMs-Pwiet. France Phone. (1)738. 67 . t-i—- rou mnu ctcrmnum; traihhc im Rnnm an TKknshaiEui Cantie. East Wind 68. Modv Road 


EPSON atCTROfOCS (SINGAPORE) PTE, 

TsfnsnatBu, towloan. Hong Kong Phone. 3^3 — 

Telex: 24444 EPSON CANADA LTD. 285 vondand BML. WBowble. Qniano M2J ISS Canada Phone- (416) 495-9955 
Caracas 101Q Venezuela Rune- 35-06-04 Telex- 27660 





Page 4 


SATURDAY-SUNDAY, JANUARY 5-6, 1985 



PtaUUKd 


WHii The ISew York Tunea and The Wastriagum Post 


The Big News Is Chinese 


The biggest news of 1984 and perhaps even 
1985 may turn out lobe the piecemeal revolu- 
tion that is transforming China, Change and 
reform have gone so far that the Chinese 
Writers' Association now demands the once 
unthinkable: real artistic freedom. In the mov- 
ing WOnlS Of (he group's 80-year-old rhairman, 
Ba Jin: “We yearn for China's Dante, Shake- 
speare, Goethe and Tolstoy to appear." More 
remarkably, Mr. Ba's sentiments were second- 
ed by a Communist leader who assured writers 
that “literary creation must be free." 

Given recent Chinese history, these stirrings 
need to be weighed cautiously. In 1957 Mao 
called for a hundred Bowers to bloom; then 
came the sickle. During the Cultural Revolu- 
tion in the 1960s writers who yearned for a 
Chinese Shakespeare woe turned into plumb- 
ers, as happened to Ba Jin. Six years ago Mao’s 
heirs permitted a “democracy wall” in Bey mg, 
then jailed those who used it. But now Deng 
Xiaoping, the shrewd reformer who survived 
Mao's jails, has loosed a flood of change. 

A new slogan was unfurled — “one flag, two 
systems" — to justify promising a capitalist 
future to Hong Kong and autonomy-with- 
nniou to Taiwan. Market incentives were in- 
troduced to Increase food production. Foreign 
investment was welcomed to modernize a 
backward economy. Having won the friend- 
ship of a wary President Reagan, Mr. Deng 
reasserts nonaligrunent by coaxing SI. 8 billion 


Fault Isn’t Only Japanese 


President Reagan's long lunch with Prime 
Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone was evidently a 
very pleasant and relaxed affair. A number of 
people in the administration are currently very 
irritated with Japan, but the president is not 
one of them. They are mostly trade specialists 
who accuse the Japanese of resorting to unfair 
restraints to hold down their imports from the 
United States. The trade specialists in any 
administration are always uneasy about this 
tradition of warm meetings between the heads 
of the two governments. In talks at that level, 
the trade quarrels are always balanced — wise- 
ly — against the strategic and political inter- 
ests that the two countries share. Approached 
that way, the trade agenda usually seems a 
little less urgent. A succession of presidents 
has chosen not to press the Japanese as hard, 
personally, as their trade negotiators would 
have liked — not to mention the American 
exporters who egg the negotiators on. 

After their meeting this week, Mr. Reagan 
and Mr. Nakasone said they would set up 
discussions of ways to open Japanese markets 
wider. That is a reasonable idea, but hardly a 
new one. The U.S. government has been com- 
plaining for years that bilateral trade is unbal- 
anced in Japan’s favor. Periodically the negoti- 
ators sit down and, in time, produce a series of 
measures that are supposed to open up the 
Japanese market and put things right. But 


when the same people sit down again a year 
later to talk about the same complaints the 
imbalance is usually bigger than ever. 

Perhaps it will be different this time. But 
there are two factors — one on each side — 
that will limit the success of even the most 
vigorous efforts to increase U.S. sales to Japan. 

On the Japanese side, the barriers to imports 
these days are not the kind of legal quotas or 
regulations that a government can cancel The 
real barriers are attitudes — a cautious inclina- 
tion to prefer Japanese products and to avoid 
becoming dependent on any foreign source at 
supply in any but utterly unavoidable cases, 
such as industrial raw matmak. Opening up 
the market to manufactured imports takes not 
government decisions but an extraordinary 
amount of salesmanship and cajoling. 

On the American side, there is the reality 
that the dollar’s exchange rate is now extreme- 
ly high. Against the yen, in terms of the things 
it can buy, it is now overvalued by about one- 
fourth. A Japanese buyer has to want an 
American product badly enough to pay a 25 
percent premium over the price of its Japanese 
competitor — or, for that matter, its French or 
German competitor. As long as American fis- 
cal mismanagement perpetuates an overpriced 
dollar, the prospects of reducing trade deficits 
through exhortation will be dim, at best. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST 


Other Opinion 


The World Watches Geneva 

Deciding the fate of humanity is no small 
responsibility. On Jan. 7 and 8 that responsi- 
bility, defined as such last month by United 
Nations Secretary-General Javier Pfcrcz de 
Cuellar, is in the hands of two men. It is an 
awesome task which faces George Shultz and 
Andrei Gromyko when they meet in Geneva 
for the latest round of talks on nuclear arms 
control The pope was right when he said on 
New Year's Eve that the only chance for a 
lasting peace was a radical change in inter- 
national relations. Let us hope that Geneva, 
1985, signals a step toward this. Then “star 
ware" can go back to Hollywood. 

— Business Tones (Singapore). 

The initiative lies with the United States. 
Mr. Gromyko must understand that it is not 
enough to (hop preconditions for a return to 
the negotiating table. The Soviet Union will 
have to do something about its offensive nucle- 
ar arsenal if it really wants concessions. 

— The Daily Telegraph ( London Jl 

Nakasone Needs 'Firm Resolve’ 

The latest Japanese- U.S. summit meeting 
was held at the right time, considering that 
U-S.-Soviet talks are at hand and that the 
Reagan administration is working out its sec- 
ond-term policies. It was also timely since 
Japanese-U-S. trade friction appears to be 
bubbling to the surface again. 

We hope that a U ^.-Soviet summit will be 
held as early as possible and lead to nuclear 
disarmament. During the talks the West must 


preserve its unity, and any necessary defense 
buildup should be carried out as planned. 

In the economic sector, it was natural that 
the Japanese-U.S. s ummi t focused on the trade 
imbalance between Japan and the United 
States. The fact that Japan's trade surplus 
amounted to nearly S35 billion last year is 
cause for criticism of Japan among Americans. 
Mr. Nakasone must accomplish the opening of 
the Japanese market with firm resolve. 

— Yonmni Shimbun (Tokyo). 

Hie PLO’s Dilemma Remains 

In spite or the renewed activity among Ar- 
abs anxious to see the beginnings of a new 
Middle East peace process, it is not possible to 
be sanguine abont the immediate results. The 
recent meeting of the Palestine National 
Council in Amman, though it was another 
success for Yasser Arafat in that it took place 
at all, did not and could not resolve the Pales- 
tinians' central dilemma. Unless they recog- 
nize Israel’s legitimate place among the na- 
tions of the Middle East, they cannot expea a 
change of mind in Israel toward the PLO, or 
the support which they need from the United 
States. Once recognition is bestowed, however, 
they have nothing left to negotiate with; noth- 
ing remains in tbrir hands to give. When the 
Palestinians are accused of dealing entirely in 
nods, winks and qualified hypotheses, the ac- 
cusation may be fair but the defense against it 
is valid. This is by no means the only obstacle 
to success which the Palestinians face, but it is 
the most serious diplomatic difficulty in the 
way of getting negotiations started. 

— The Guardian (London). 


FROM OUR JAN. 5 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: War Preparedness Averts War 

NEW YORK — The New York Herald says: 
“The most potent energy for the preservation 
of the peace of the world is, in these vexing 
days of international competitions and jealou- 
sies, the preparedness for war that averts at- 
tack or that settles the quarrel most speedily 
and with the least sacrifice to humanity when 
arbitration and concession prove to be of no 
avail War pure and ample, or war for war’s 
sake, is the crudest survival of barbaric years, 
and it is unfortunate that continuing peace and 
security are rendered possible only by the 
superior armed strength that makes attack 
hazardous in result and destructive in expendi- 
ture. Until man becomes superman and purer 
motives inspire human conduct, the power to 
resist assault or to make it abortive must be 
almost the sole preventive of war." 


1935: Roosevelt Proposes Jobs Plan 
WASHINGTON — Relief by employment 
instead of by Federal and stale funds, through 
creation of a new and enlarged Public Works 
Administration which would give employment 
to 5.000.000 persons on Federal and state 
relid rolls, in short “an American plan for 
American people," was proposed by President 
Franklin D. Roosevelt in his message to Con- 
gress [on Jan. 4], Hie President declared the 
time had come for the Federal government to 
quit the business of relief and make every 
effort to provide work for all able-bodied em- 
ployable individuals to preserve “their self- 
respect and self-reliance." He said a continued 
system of doling out funds would be a “de- 
stroyer of the human spirit." The President 
promised the cost of the scheme would be 
within “the sound credit of the government.” 


international herald tribune 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY, Chairman I9S3-1982 

KATHARINE GRAHAM, WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


LEE W. HUEBNER, Pobtahtr 
Executive Eduor 
Editor 
Dtpan Editor 
Drpm Editor 
Associate Editor 



Deputy Psbbsher 
Associate. Publisher 
Associate Publisher 
Dtnaor ef Operation 


International Herald Tribune. 181 Avame Charies-de-GauHe, 92200 NemOy-sur-Seme, 
France. Telephone: WM265. Tdoc 612718 (Herald). Cables Herald Paris. 

Direetettr de la miBcotion: Weber H, Thayer, 

Asia Headquarters. 2^aetutessy^Htmg Kong. 7^5-283618. Telex 61170. 
MaurineDtr. UJL: Rohm MocKkhan 63 LatgAtm Latdtm WG. Tel 836-4802 Tdex 2b2009. 
Sji. au capital de 1.200000 F. RCS Namene B 732021126. Commission Paritaire Na 61337. 
U.S subscription: S284 yearly. Secoad-dass postage ptdd ta long Island Gtp, N.Y. 1 1101. 

C 198$, International Herod Trunme. AB rigfor reserved | 


rector of Advertising Saks 



Europe’s Good Old Ways 
Aren ’t the Way Forward 







in trade and aid from Moscow without yield- 
ing on ideological or diplomatic differences. 
As Mao never said, a thousand steps can 
succeed where a great leap forward fails. 

To be sure, Mr. Deng is a Communist, and 
sprouting seme capitalism is easier than toler- 
ating some freedom. But each inroad into 
dogma erodes its authority. Horrified old 
Maoists understand this ail too well So does 
Mr. Deng, an octogenarian who is reaching for 
allies among the young. If he brings a new 
breed into power, China’s third revolution 
may prove more lasting than Sun Yat-sen’s 
attempt to build a republic and Mao’s cam- 
paign to turn China into a vast commune. 

Communism can be humanized by Commu- 
nists. The crimes of Stalinism were exposed by 
Nikita Khrushchev, who curbed blood purges. 
The leaders of Hungary’s rebellion in 1956 
were Communists, as were those of the Prague 
spring in 1968— experiments aborted by Sovi- 
et invasions. By contrast, Mr. Deng's most 
dangerous opponents are internal: the armed 
forces and a dogmatic old guard within the 
party. But time and again his personal author- 
ity has tipped the balance. This stubborn, 
sensible pragmatist confidently proclaims a 
permanent “open door" to the West. The hard 
task is to welcome the ideas of Jefferson, but it 
no longer seems unthinkable in a China willing 
to admit Goethe and Tolstoy. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES 


By Giles Merritt 

This is the second of two articles. 



B RUSSELS — In tomorrow's world, peo- 
ple involved in the processing of infor- 
mation will be recognized as producing the 
same sort of basic raw material as do steel- 
workers today. Yet confusion over the differ- 
ent value of service and manufacturing jobs 
persists in Europe as elsewhere — and per- 
haps more in Europe than elsewhere. Europe- 
an policymakers’ efforts to revitalize industry 
are dogged by the fact that most Europeans 
would prefer a return to the good old days, 
rather than venture into a sci-fi future. 

Such conservatism is fundamental to Eu- 
rope, whereas for people is most other parts 
of the world — and still to some extent in 
America, too — technological change carries 
a promise or better times to come. 

For Europe, technological change means 
industrial restructuring, and industrial re- 
structuring is notoriously a euphemism for 
sweeping job losses and misery in outmoded 
19th century industrial townships across Eu- 
rope. Politically, even for hard-nosed govern- 
ments like Britain's Thatcherites, there is 
much to lose and all too little to gain from the 
str eamlinin g of the old industries that still 
account for some 35 percent of all manufac- 
turing jobs in the European Community. 

The price to the EC has been that in the 
short span of the 1970s it threw away what 
bad seemed an impregnable scientific and 
technological lead. While European industri- 
alists and their various finance ministry bank- 
ers waited despairingly for an upturn to res- 


cue traditional sectors like steel, shipbuilding 
and textiles, the Japanese had unsentimental- 
ly begun to abandon them and move into the 
new technologies they now dominate. 

Just how sharply Europe had gone into 
decline was fra a while hidden from sight To 
some extern the ambiguous role in Europe of 
American-owned multinational corporations 
makes it hard to spot the shortcomings of EC 
industry. But of late the European Commis- 
sion has been pounding out the message that 
die ECs share of the world market for infor- 
mation technology is half what it should be. 
Worse, Europe’s appetite fra the new wealth- 
creating technologies is also being diminkh«i 
by this new backwardness. 

A consultants' study by McKiosey & Com- 
pany recently warned the Community that by 
1992, unless a miracle occurs very soon, Euro- 
peans wtQ be consuming less than half as 
much electronic equipment per bead as Japa- 
nese and Americans. Other warnings have 
pointed out that the ECs natural share of the 
information technology market should be 30 
percent and not the present 15 percent, and 
that by the early 1990s its share will have slid 
further to just 10 percent or a world market 
likely to be worth SI trillion a year. 

Pressure for new industrial policies to help 
turn Europe around has thus become so great 
that it is at last counteracting the forces of 
conservatism. Most EC countries — even 
France and Italy — have come to see that 
their attempts to protea their national higb- 






GREE 


tech sectors are in fact sentencing them to 
death. Action programs at EC level are now 
proliferating in telecommunications, micro- 
electronics and various biotechnologies. 

Yet recognizing that European countries 
must start to pull together if they are to close 
the yawning technology gap still does not add 
up to a coherent industrial policy for Europe. 

In the 1970s there was a vogue for trans- 
national mergers in Europe; for a while they 
seemed the answer to fragmentation and the 
lack of a genuine common market. Since then, 
however, such partnerships as the Hoesch- 
Hoogovens German- Dutch steel venture, the 
VFW-Fokker aviation pan or the Dunlop- 
Pirelh tire-makers’ marriage have all been 
destroyed. If anything, the trend nowadays is 
for European groups to ally themselves with 
American or Japanese competitors. 

The result is that there has been uo sponta- 
neous unification of the ECs more advanced 
industrial sectors, nor is there likely to be. So 
any industrial policies aimed at harnessing 




European economies of scale must first over- 
come the differences that separate the EC 
member states. Divergent technical stan- 
dards, highly restrictive national government 
procurement practices and some stern EC 
antitrust laws all ueed thoughtful reform. 

Sweeping away sneaky nontariff barriers to, 
trade is an important prat of any strategy fra 
the industrial regeneration of Europe. Bat it 
tends to be more of a slow unpicking than a 
fast sweep, even though time is very short. 
The jfKvwning president of the EC Commis- 
sion, Jacques Ddors, has already made it 
p lain that when the new Commission takes 
over in Brussels on Monday the drive to 
develop such EC-level policies will be a top 
priority. In the capitals of the four largest 
member states, though, the accent remains on 
national interest. For the present, the best EC 
industrial policy that can be hoped for is a 
framework that will stop the member govern- 
ments' national policies from dashing. 

International Herald Tribune. 


Geneva, 1985: Talks for an Agreement to Out-Talk the Hawks 


W ASHINGTON — “Jaw jaw 
beats war war” is the best that 
can realistically be said about the 
resumption of arms talks in Geneva 
on Monday. The only accord in right 
is an agreement to keep talking. Hope 
lies in the possibility that serious 
negotiations will stretch out lone 
enough to prevent the open break 
that American hawks seek in order to 
shatter the whole framework of arms 
control past, present and future 
Signs of Soviet seriousness in the 
approach to Geneva are particularly 
impressive. President Konstantin 
Chernenko has repeatedly said that 
agreement across a broad front is 
possible. Mikhail Gorbachov, the 
heir apparent, delivered the same 
message on a recent visit to Britain. 

Tbe Russian delegation includes 
three senior officials long involved in 
serious and occasionally successful 
arms control talks. The list is headed 
by Foreign Minister Andrei Gromy- 
ko himself, without whom no accord 
is possible. Deputy Foreign Minister 
Georgi Kornienko, a genuine expert 
known fra being tough but serious, 
will also be on hand. Finally there 
will be Viktor Karpov, a self-assured 
veteran of many past negotiations. 

The high quality of the Soviet dele- 
gation announces that Moscow has 
changed the psychological tone of its 
approach to the Reagan administra- 
tion. Whatever their inner motives, 
the Russians want outsiders to be- 
lieve they are serious about seeking 
aims control. Because of the recent 


By Joseph Kraft 

leadership switch, or because erf the MAD. He announced that research 
bitter setbacks occasioned by their was under way on a scheme for an 
negative approach to the first round anti-missile defense that would ren- 
of talks, the Russians are at pains to der incoming miss iles “impotent and 
be seen cocking a respectful ear to obsolete.” The proposal known as 
what the Americans have to say. the Strategic Defense Initiative and 
A similar change in tone character- later baptized “star wars.” was vi- 
izes the evolution of the Reagan ad- aously attacked by arms control pro- 
minis Lralion. Mr. Reagan came to ponents on two grounds: It would 
office denouncing the SALT-2 treaty not work as a total defense, and it 
negotiated by Jimmy Carter with would break the existing ABM treaty 
Leonid Brezhnev, the SALT-1 treaty and force both superpowers into a 
put together by Richard Nixon ana new and dangerous arms race. 

Henry Kissinger in 1972 and the test As 1983 drew to a close it became 

ban accord worked out by the Kenne- clear to the Reaganites that their po- 
dy administration in 1963. rition on arms control was politically 

The doctrine known as mutual as- costly. Allied leaders became itchy, 
sirred destruction, or MAD, was cen- and many Americans worried about 
tral to aD three accords. The basic 
idea was that neither superpower __ „ _ 
would attempt a serious defense t % f BYYOd 

against the missiles of the other ride. XI'lm 

The population of each country was, 

in effect, held hostage to the other. v\ 7ASHINGTON — Four dc- 
Thus at the heart of SALT-1 was a W cades of fraud are enough. The 

formal agreement by each ride to coincidence of the hist<tri ral ralwiHir 
limit drastically the building of anti- and the quickening pace of what is 
ballistic missile systems, or ABMs. called US.-Soviet “dialogue" make 
For three years the Reagan admin- this the moment for the United States 
istratioa declared to the world its m denounce the aareements entered 


sliding into a nuclear war. So sudden- 
ly the White House began talking up 
peace and the need for competing 
powers to live together. In that 
changed atmosphere, in June 1984, 
the Russians proposed talks about 
“star wars.” Washington replied with 
an OK, providing Russia’s offensive 
weapons were also on the agenda. 
Thus were bran the talks that bring 
Secretary of State George Sbultz and 
Mr. Gromyko together in Geneva. 

As preparations fra the Geneva 
talks began in Washington, old argu- 
ments re-emerged. Mr. Shultz and 
Robert McFariane, the president's 
national security adviser, seemed to 
emerge on top of the heap. Their 


notion, apparently, was that if the . 
Russians agreed to cut back offensive 
weapons, the United Slates would 
tai .out restraint on “star wars." - 
But Mr. Reagan declared that he 
“would not give up the SDI or the. 
opportunity to develop it” 

That sounds like total deadlock,' 
but time offers room for maneuver. , 
As the two rides settle down to mara- 
thon talks it will become increasing^ _ 
dear that “star wars” is a tedmologi- * 
cal bust. Rather than go for a wash- 
out, Mr. Reagan will look toward . 
some kind of accord. My theory is 
that George Shultz win know how to. 
bring Him there. After all, if am& 
control had been so easy to kill ft* 
would have been dead long ago. 

Las Angeles Tunes Syndicate. 


1985: Time to Denounce Yalta Fraud 


W ASHINGTON — Four der 
cades of fraud are enough. The 


and the quickening pace of what is 
called US.-Soviet “dialogue” make 
this the moment for the United States 
to denounce the agreements entered 


hostility to arms control. Apart from into 40 years ago at Yalta. 


a huge defense buildup, Mr. Reagan 
personally called the Russians “liars” 


A chapter in the final volume of 
Churchill’s history of the war opens 


and “cheats" and other names that with these words: “As the weeks 
rule out the mere concept of accord, passed after Yalta it became clear 
Then on March 23, 1983, Mr. Rea- that the Soviet government was doing 
gan suddenly unveiled what was, in nothing to cany out our agree- 
effect, his dream machine for killing meats ...” Churchill was referring 


PS 



Geneva: Wishful Thinking Won’t Do 


W ASHINGTON - In preparing B y Malcolm Toon 
for Monday s meeting between — 

Secretary of State George Shultz and ilu! w * er U.S. ambassador to the 
Foreign Minister Andrei Gromyko, it Soviet Union from 1976 to 1979. 
is vital that the United States avoid 

the mistakes made by Prime Minister leader could mean a new Soviet out- 


even if, like Mr. Gorbachov, he may 
not have known Stalin, is undoubted- 
ly a faithful heir of the Stalin legacy. 
This means at least the following: 

ati TV. m l_ — . r . 


By George F. Will 

especially to Poland, on whose behalf 
Britain had gone to war in 1939, 
when Moscow was Hitler's ally. 

In February 1945 the Soviet Union - 
began seating Poland from Western 
eyes and destroying democratic de- 
ments. There were fewer of those de- 
ments than there might have been. 
When the Polish resistance rose in 
Warsaw against the Germans, the So- 
viet army loitered on the outskirts of 
the city to let the Nazis massacre the 
Polish freedom fighters, who would 
have been inconvemeni for the arriv- 
ingSoviet totahtarians. 

The Soviet Union compounded its 
crime by refusing to allow U.S. and 
British planes to land in Soviet-held 
territory after dropping supplies to 
the Polish resistance. This was six 
months before Yalta. 

Hie Yalta conference ended on 
Feb. 11, 1945. On Feb. 27, Andrei 
Vyshinsky, the satanic prosecutor at 
the 1930s Moscow show “trials,” ar- 
rived in Bucharest lo demand that 
King Michael of Romania dismiss 
the all-party government. The next 
day, Churchill wrote, Vyshinsky re- 
turned to the king, “banged his fist on 
the table, shouted for an immediate 
acquiescence and walked out of the 
room, slamming tbe door. At the 
same time Soviet tanks and troops 
deployed in the streets of the capital 
and on March 2 a Soviet-nominated 
administration took office." 

The Yalta agreements “landing” 
the allies to work for open societies m 
Eastern Europe were forlorn at- 
tempts to blunt Soviet bayonets with 
parchment. It took six days for them 
to be revealed as an empty pretense. 

Yalta did not “give" Eastern Eu- 
rope to the Soviet Union; the Red 
Army took iL But Yalta codified the 
West's wishful thinking about the So- 
viet Union. The coming Sbultz-Gro- 
myko session, like the arms control 


Margaret Thatcher during the recent look and h 
visit to Britain by Mikhail Gorba- Today any 
chov, the current front-runner in the chav in 


roved Soviet behavior, 
ort to see Mr. Gorba- 


KremJin succession sweepstakesL 
It is not so much what Mrs. 
Thatcher said — “I like Mr. Gorba- 
chov; we can do business together” 
— that is disturbing as the giddy 


trigger the same sort of flak. But (hat 
is precisely what must be done. 

Mr. Gorbachov is tbe youngest 
and without question the best educat- 
ed and most intelligent of the likely 


reaaion to her assessment of Kon- successors to the ailing Mr. Cher- 
stantin Chernenko’s heir apparent by nenko. Some self-styled experts have 
observers of the Soviet scene who held that he most therefore be viewed 
ought to know better. What we are as less ideologically motivated, more 


bearing today is almost a repeat of 
what we heard about Yuri Andropov 


made, more flexible and easier to 
with than his predecessors or his 


when - he succeeded Leonid Brezhnev principal rival, Grigori Romanov — 
in late 1 982 — that the former KGB who is still in contention despite the 


chief was a flashy dresser, a lover of fact that Mr. Gorbachov holds all the 
jazz, a flaent English speaker, a positions held by Mr. Chernenko be- 
friend of Soviet dissidents, virtually a fore he succeeded to the top job. 
closet liberal and thus a useful inter- I do not think much of tins argn- 
locutor for Western statesmen. mem. We beard it when Mr. Brczh- 


locutor for Western statesmen. mm i We beard it when i 
The difference is that then the nev was in decline and again when 
myth was RGB-inspired. Today it is Mr. Andropov was terminally ill and 
fostered by myopic Westerners who it turned out U> be wishful thinkin g 
are misled by a stylish topcoat, a A Gorbachov or a Romanov, in my 
snap-brim fedora and a svelte spouse, view, will provide more of the same in 
When some analysts sought to set Soviet policies and behavior, 
the record straight on Mr. Andropov The style of leadership c 
— by pointing out that for years he with the succession, out 
had masterminded an agency that stance will not Like Mr 
was preoccupied, inter alia, with ar- and now Mr. Chernenko, 
resting and torturing innocent citi- candidates for the top job 
zens. penetrating and undermining litburo are members of a l 
Western society and irradiating ing collective leadership 
American diplomats — they were ac- been in place since Mr. 
cused of being incorrigible hard-lin- twilight years. More impc 
era unable lo recognize that a new likdv successor to Mr. C 


Soviet policies and behavior. 

The style of leadership may change 
with the succession, but tbe sub- 
stance wflj noL Like Mr. Andropov 
and now Mr. Qemenko, all viable 
candidates for the top job in the Po- 
litburo are members of a long-stand- 
ing collective leadership Hat has 
been in place since Mr. Brezhnev's 
twilight years. More important, any 
likely successor to Mr. Chernenko, 


strengthened by Stalin, that the cfao- Union cafl 
sen few rule tbe masses and that dis- hi to adop 
sent, at home or dsewhere in the relational 
Soviet camp, most be crushed. relations v 

• He wifi be a fierce defender of Perhaps 
the integrity of tbe Soviet empire that 10 mt0 a § 
Stalin carved out of Europe and sue- at Yalta w 
cessors extended to include Cuba, if only fra 
Ethiopia and Afghanistan. 

• He will continue to take advan- 
tage of opportunities to expand Sovi- 
et power where he can do so with 
impunity — without risking a mili- 
tary confrontation with the West Lawless 

• He will be rigidly opposed to 

that degree of innovation that would Regprdw 
seriously downgrade the role of the gea ‘v — a 
party in Soviet society. Lee Den 

We are far from the generational tional appr 
change in Soviet lead ashy that was menace, wr 
a favorite theme of academics when any way” t 
Mr. Brezhnev began his decline and impasse. 71 
again wfam Mr. Andropov was cm his rare that mi 
deathbed. That change will crane Just as ti 
only when we have in the Politburo fried and ft 
men no longer stirred by the dan of ject to the 
the October Revolution, or even by state, so wi 
tales of heroics in World War n, and dash until 
who are more concerned about re- sovereignty 
spending to the dying needs of the History 1 
long-suffering Soviet people than mgs do not 
about subjugating others abroad. rule of law. 

Mr. Gorbachov does not fit this so infatuate 
pattern. Wishful thinking cannot that we will 
contribute to a stable relationship rule of law 
with the Soviet Union. 

las Angeles Tunes. , 


Union can be talked into talking, and 
into adopting the forms of orderly 
relations, then the substance of such 
relations wifi somehow follow. 

Perhaps we should periodically en- 
ter into agreements like those signed 
at Yalta or, 30 years later, at Helsinki 
if only for what they can teach. That 


is, such agreements can be useful, be- 
cause of tbe lesson thai can be ex- 1 
tracted from the instant and compre- 
hensive Soviet violation of than. 

The problem is that Weston gov- 
ernments wind up teaching t^eir pub- 


lics precisely the wrong lesson, they 
refuse to teach the lesson by de- 
nouncing the agreements. Instead 
they convince themselves and their 
publics that there is something inher- 
ently wholesome in the mere “pro- 
cess” of producing agreements. 

It may be argued that denouncing . 
the Yalta agreements would be an 
empty gesture. Not true. It would be 
an act of public pedagogy, underscor- ' 
ing a lesson at a pregnant moment. 

Plans are now being made for corn- }? 
memorating the 40th anniversary of 
the end of tbe war in Europe, and 
there is'a revival of the son of senti- 
mentalism that helped produce Yal- 
ta. Today the sentimentalism is, “We 
were friends then, so ... ” 

“Friends”? In 1945 the sentimen- 
talism trad: the form of the belief that 
the Soviet regime, which can claim 
legitimacy only as tbe enemy of bour- 
geois democracies, would desire in 
peace a continuation of the coopera- 
tive relationship that served it well in 
war. In 1985 the anniversary of V-E 
day will be an appropriate moment 
for commemorating the faa that the 
Soviet Union began (he war as Hil- 
ler’s enthusiastic ally. 

It was convinced that Hitler would 
destroy England and other decadent 
bourgeois democracies, and was ea-tf 
ger for that outcome. Hitler initiated* 1 
the ruptnre with the Sonet Union, - 
which then received enough aid from 
the decadent bourgeois democracies 
to survive and become the legatee of 
Hitlerite values — conquest, totali- 
tarianism, anti-Semitism. 

June wiD bring the 10th anniversa- 
ty of the Helsinki agreements on hu- 
man rights. Those agreements are ex- 
tensions of. the Yalta agreements, but 
are even less defensible because they 
came after 30 years of experience 
with the Yalta agreements. Under the 
Helsinki agreements the Soviet 
Union undertook to stop being the 
Soviet Union — that is, to be mini- 
mally civilized. It has, of course, 
dined to do thaL So 1985 is the year 
also to denounce the Helsinki agree- 
ments. A decade of fraud is enough. 
Washington Post Writers Group. 


letters to the editor 

Lawlessness Is Passe No Teaching of Hebrew 


Regarding “5b Nuclear Winter. Yes. 
Realty —and So WhatT (Dec. 20); 

Lee Dembart, arguing against emo- 
tional approaches to tbe nuclear arms 

menace, writes that “there may not be 

any way” of escape from the presalt 
impasse. There is a way, although it is 
one thai many win not readily accept. 

Just as the dty states of Italy quar- 
reled and fought till they became sub- 
ject to tbe government at a 
state, so win the nations of the world 
dash until they learn to cede thor 
sovereignty to a world government 
History has shown that human be- 
ings do not live peaceably without the 
rule of law. Are today’s human brings 
so infatuated with national “freedom” 
that we will prefer midear death to the 
rale of law over nations? 

ANGUS SIBLEY. 

• London. 


Regarding the report “Soviet Jew Is 
Jaded far Drug Traffuddn^ (Dec. 2D 
We read that Yuli Fdrightwn , sen- 
tenced to three years in a prison 
esntp. is “said to have irritated offi- 
cials by giving Hebrew lessons with- 
out authorization." But no Soviet Jew 
has been able to obtain permission to. 
teach Hebrew in the last 20 years. 

Under Soviet law and the Helsinki 
accord^ any language can be taught, 
out Hebrew teachers have been na- 
rassed and persecuted on false i 
charges in increasing numbers. Duf- 
mg 1984 there was a terrify ing escala- 
tion of attacks on Hebrew teachers. 
Aleksander Khohniansky of Moscow 
and Mark Nepomniashy of Odessa 
face irnmmeni “trials" because they 
are active in teaching Hebrew. 

rttaeker. - 

London. 






'JA^XZ& 


Suspect in Subway Case 

fe Charged in N.Y. Court 

.Sew lort Times Service ■■ , 

NEW YORK - under light sc- Md 

f b «?XTS 33 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, JANUARY 5-6, 1985 


Page 5 


■.“fflrissaii awSSv 5 * 
SSS^E 3 £S£ee&V 

£T4nI^ff ^ Id ™ au f or,acs 9"SM*r caUed it low. 8 

nc in leaded to kilF the four ’ Mr m 

young men . M ■ ,9 oe *» ^ 7 * «tnendered to 

“He stopped shooting only be- SLfeJ5° nd f ? “ <>cord. 
cause he ran out of ammimidon? Aflcr «- 

Susan Braver, an assistant district vS U %, h Tfc 7>S j Clur ? e(i 10 * ,cw 

3 ££ SEteSZ 
SW'assSE, 

«w^‘iSSKSiS 

[Two lawyers and five men who justification has 

’ — not been made out dearly," the 

r*i 1 prosecutor replied. 

lOrOntO _T7W>P • *?' GoeE appeared distracted 
* "I/cJ m the courtroom. On occasion, he 
•mm’ -a* • seemed to mumble to hiroself. His 

LUes Medicine ha Jf “ tro “ lon ™- 

During the IS- minute arraign. 
T fir* I ✓y . ment. Mr. Goetz, an electronics en- 
1TL Al/l j f jflSf} &ncsr, said nothing except his 
"" name when asked. 

A/w Vo,* Times Service _ In seeking the $50,000 bail. Miss 

TORONTO a i *-mnnih Braver said Mr. Goetz had been 

wsligalionby) a Royal Commission “ wilh ^™ig mclhodicaljy 

.-*■>10 the deaL of' 36 iXSIi 5 SS E’EJKS* m * SL? 0 "^ 

s- b ^“ m “ ! 

The _ panel. called the Grange S£td SWftrf £ 
^ youto had cmnind rwrdT^ 

S£3^te52dE E™ “X?* -3™« 

H5Sfc - p*z P, *~ * 
hr^IysnspiaousordigiKintoiao Brenner. a defense lawyer 

^He was referring 10 the heart S^£“££SiK 
ding found in grrat quanDDes in reque^f the judge, Sareued for 
the bab>es- It said 10 more were mT G oetz to be released Ki own 
suspicious m what became custody or on low baiL 
taownasthe sick bds case." By to time Mr. Goete arrived at 

But to commission failed to ex- the courthouse, he had been in po- 
phun the mystery of the Oaths, ^ce custody for nearly four days. In 

New Hampshire, he bad waived his 
March 1981 at Sick Childrens right to a lawyer and gave a long 
Hospital No motive was suggested statement to New York detectives, 
and because of a court order no He case has drawn public sup- 
suspects could be named. port for Mr. Goetz. When the po- 

report noted that deaths re- £* set up a telephone number for 
iaed to digaxm were 625 percent dps in the case/many caflere en- 
more apt to occurwhen a particular dosed the shooting, 
shift or nurses was cm duty, and 
argued that naturally occurring di- 
goxm-Kke substances could not ex- 
plain the d eaths 
“The theory of multiple, repeat- 
ed, concentrated, fatal error must 
be rejected as untenable," Judge 
Grange said. 

Susan NeQes, 28, a member of 
the nursfng team on duty when 



Japan’s 40-Year-Old ' Orphans 9 

Left in China at End of War, They Seek to Find Families 

By Clyde Haberman of World War IT rather than as oae as well as those brought over by the 


By Clyde Haberman of World War IT rather than as one 
Sew York Tones Service of its arcbitccis. 

TOKYO — Her name was Ze ‘‘BasicaUy, to Japanese govern- 
Having, and sbe said she was Japa- ment dotted these people m the 
□esc. an accident of birth not re- confusion surrounding the end of 
fleeted in her Hfe, the war." said Tetsigi Mizumoio, a 

Sbe knew little about Japan and *““* official in the Health and 

no thing nf itc language shf had no Wdfaic Ministry. 


Japanese government. 747 of the 
1*590 Chinese identified as “or- 


ment deserted these people in the phans” have located relatives. 

confusion surrounding the end of Most returned to China al 


, an accident of birth not re- contoaon surrounding the end of Most returned to China after- 
sd in her Hfe, the war." said Tetsigi Mizumoio. a W( | , 0 rejoin families they had 

e knew little about Japan and “ *** Heal111 and started on their own. But 205 peo- 

In g of language sho had no "diare Minist iy. ^ ^ _ . pie thus far have elected to remain 

lections of her parents, not A P® conqu^ tochuna m ^ jap^ aided by small govera- 

rhwr iwniK 1931. At one point, 1 3 million Jap- n)cnl grants and training in Japa- 

u she assumed her father was a 3 ° ese By®* “ere, bdping to exploit ncsc language and culture, 
oese settler in northern China to non is natural resource^ As is not an easy 

orid War II, probably one of the nde of w turned against Ja- ^^f usua j)?^q u i re s a pa iSS 

"'SXL . 


recollections of her parents, not 
even names. 

But she assumed her father was a 


1931 . At one point, 1 3 million Jap- 
anese lived there, bdping to exploit 


Japanese settler in northern China to region’s natural resources. As 
in World War IL probably one of to ride of w toned against Ja- 


the many men in similar situations pan in tne tvws. many men among 
who were forced into the Japanese to Manchurian settlers were con- 
Annyin the last months of tfiewar. scrips into the army, their fam- 
Sheknew— or at least had been ihes left helpless and forced to flee 


tokl m uc h later, dnne she was only aCT0SS I'Aancnuna 
2>™o!daitimtime--lha hfl troops invaded, 
parents did not take her along in ‘Tterc were case 
the Japanese evacuation from 
Manchuria in 1945. Sbe grew up Killed, Mr. Miz 
with three separate Oiin»p fam- "Many parents died 
Dies, and, wben she was 13, a foster Chinese detention 
mother provided scattered details were . starving and : 
about bar past- families to take tbet 

And so, even though she is now «*■ 10 s 00 ^ 1 

Al , ihp mrubw nf fmir rhild rffp jmtt parents were simp 

a store derk in eastern China's abandem their child 
Liaoning Province, Ze Jiaying nese families, m mosi 


the Manchurian settlers were con- severing oi links to umm ano a 
scripted into the army, thdr fam- dtffi^t-nMalwayssuaessfid- 
ilies left helpless and forced to flee transuon to Japanese w^ys. A few 
across Maichuria after Soviet ^ endured _ unhappy en- 


counters with relatives who had 


‘There were cases of children shaped new lives and did not want 
surviving when their parents were t? reopen door* they thought were 
killed, Mr. Mizumoio said. closed, 

"Many parents died in Soviet and But the searches go on. More are 
Chinese detention camps. Some scheduled to amve in March. They, 
were starving and asked Chinese wo, will be put through days of 
families to lake their kids so they waiting and wondering, and some, 
could eat. In some extreme rays, like Ze Jiaying, will return to Chi- 
parems were simply forced to na. still "orphans.” 





ANNIVERSARY ERUPTION — A fountain of red and yellow lava shoots into the sky 
from Hawaii's Kilauea Volcano, which Is continuing to erupt two years after the current 
series began Jan. 3, 1983. Geologists said the lava was flowing slowly toward a bousing 
subdivision about six miles from the mountain but posed no rinmerfiwtg threat 


CBS Trial Jury Sees Letters on Intelligence Ties’ 


By MA. Farber 

New York Times Service 


Meacham had consistently told 
CBS they did not portray any “fak- 


NEW YORK — After a two- ingof intelligence. 


week recess, the jury in General 
WZffiam C. Westmorland's libel 


Each time Mr. Crile said he had 
relied on the letters and went on to 


them to Samuel A. Adams, a for- 
mer Central Intelligence Agency 
analyst who was writinga book on 
a dispute between the CIA and the 
military over enemy strength dur- 


caxne to Tokyo in the hope of find- 
ing her real family. 

Virtually the only mark of identi- 
fication she had was a birthmark 
just above her right ankle. 

T am not very optimistic," die 
srid. 

Nor were many of the 44 other 
Chinese men and women with her 
in a drab, dormitory-style budding 
that was used to house athletes in 
the 1964 Summer Olympics in To- 
kyo. Nearly all wore identical light- 
blue suits and sat at long tables, 
looking vaguely out of place in this 
high-tech capital. They passed the 
Hm<» talking and leafing through 
Japanese newspapers they could 
not read. Mostly, they waited for 
someone to claim them. 

AD were Japanese-bom, all were 
abandoned by parents in the con- 
fusing final days of the war, and all 
were now in Tokyo looking for rel- 
atives. In Japanese, they are called 
zanryu koji or Teft-behind or- 
phans." The Health and Welfare 
Ministry estimates that about 2,000 
of them remain in China, still con- 
sidered "orphans" by Japan even 
though most are now in their 30s 
- ------- ------ and 40s. 

ow lava shoots into the sky 

tw o yey s after ft eemrent <S™id 352 of dm. have come 

ag slowly toward a bousing y, Tokyo since 1981 at Japanese 
wed no immediate threat. government expense on errands of 

1 hope similar to Ze Haying’s. Until 

recently, most found someone — 
_ f T • 9 an elderly father, a graying aster, 

D^ftHCG I il PS an oldCT cousin. 

^VlltA/ But the latest group, the sixth to 

In a letter the next day. Com- .reccndy to Liao- 

mander Meacham complained mig Province only 15 of the 
about a press briefing he prepared 45 having enjoyed success, 
on enemy strength and said: **1 Many came here knowing noth- 
have never in my life assembled more than a family name or 


abandon their children. The Chi- 

nese families, in most cases, treated OA /vui i _x. r n_ 

these Japanese kids as though they oU,UUtl Lett V letnam Legally 


evidence. 

The commission Thursday rcc- 
ommended that she be cranpcnsal- 
ed by the government for her legal 
costs of $76,000 if sbe dropped a 
$650,000 suit charging the govern- 
ment with wrongful imprisonment 
and malicious prosecution. 


^Gaban Anns Budget to Grow 

Agenee France-Presse 


Navy intelligence analyst 
Vietnam saying “outright 


lies" and to documentary, demonstrated and Mr. Crile are drfendants in the show when we try to sdl them this newspapasjamng the memories of 


“truly gargantuan falsehoods” Commander Meacham s con tern- 
were involved in estimates of cnc- poraneons " admi ss i ons" and ac- 


my strength. 


knowledgment of the "perversion 


trial. 

In a March 20, 1968, letter, Com- 


crap. 

In 1981, wben Mr. Crile and Mr. 


readers who then called govern- 
ment officials with further dues. 
In that fashion, Liu Shuyun, 44, 


The letters, from Commander a responsibility to properly in- 
James Meacham to his wife, were form the country as u> the nature of 
introduced Thursday by David the enemy we were fighting." 
Botes, the lawyer for CBS, as part Commander Meacham, who is 


mander Meacham wn^^One can Adams brought up the Idten with 

have no small comprefaaision of Commander M«u*am dnmg an d ^ Qzaki of IbX 
the nusmanagemeni of Uuswar un- mj=mewm London^ he said th^r p^ect^Veastern Japan. Mis. 
less be has seen the outright lies did not reflect lies but matters of ^ j a noh£i4 TT 


of an.effmt to show that the net- now military correspondent for the Westmoreland's command, 
work used reliable material in pro- British magazine, The Economist, "I’m not talking about co 


IG3» UG U2W, SCULL U1E UUU1KUL UC3> U1U UUl IHIGLL HQ LrtJL UMlktia Ut X . u -q __ 

jodta nations" d [Ga»l Mt' 

Westmoreland’s command. In a pret/ial affidavit, the com- . 

“I’m not talkinc about confusion mander said the "exameraied tbet- torw _ 


paring its 1982 docomentaiy, 
Uncounted Enemy: A vu 


A — Cuban military Deception." It is the subject of the the navy in 1973. 


spending is to increase by more genetaTs $120-mfihon suit, 
than onwpiartCT this lyear to $1,765 As be read from the 10 letters, 


British magazine, The Economist, "I'm not talking about confusion mander said the "exaggerated diet- 
served in South Vietnam from mid- and inefficiency, which to a certain one" of his letters resulted from Ms 
1967 to mid- 1968. He retired from extent are products of all wars." he having been "bored" wilh his job. 
the navy in 1973. wrote, “but about muddle-beaded "1 never intended that the harsh 


panese, the bome- 
the “orphans” has 


Some of Commander Mea- 
cham’s letters to his wife, Dorothy, 


wrote, “but about muddle-beaded “1 never intended that the harsh P ro ’ vwJ 10 a ealharue experience. 
thinkin g, co ver-y our- ass orders, language in those letters be taken Some, especially older people, 
lies and outright foolishness on the literally," he said. But in another break into tears over the painful 


news- Mr. Boies repeatedly asked George in Charieston, South Garolnia, con- very highest levels. The crime is affidavit, his wife, from whom be is re mind e r s of the war’s end. 

riday. Crile, the producer of the docu- tamed stark comments on the pro- that you couldn't tell anyone even now divorced, said he saved the There are those here who say 


pane? Granma reported Friday. Crile, the producer of the docu- tamed stark conn 
The fall national budget will mentary, whether he had depended grass of the war. 


amount to $13554 billion. 


SERVICES 


on (hdn, although Commander In 1980, the commander gave believe it. 


if you wanted to — no one would letters becanse they might be "of that this is another example of Ja- 


his tori cal importance. 


pan’s dwelling on itself as a victim 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL _ ... m _ - 

^pandirt new how, 3 tnfcoons, 2 Chinese Offuial SaYsnetorm 

hrem. fuly firnirfied^fl com- vv J «f 

Remains Faithful to Marxism 

Dr. tea), «n Conova 30. 30038 J 


(Con tinned From Back Page) 


SOUTH OF FRANCE Young lady com- SERVICES LOW LUfiFL F1JUHIS 

nrruinj, Tel: (931 85 19 90. - ' 

-5- PASS LADY MTBVRETBL Travel TO USA HUM £U9 one way. 

^0^.^633 68^ NATC London 01-734 8100. ^ 

HONG KON6 ^620000 Young lady PffiYWWf. +* ^ HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 

Wg. PBSONAl/BUSS'KS TO yygj USA. bums 


LOW COST FLIGHTS | HOLIDAYS & TRAVEL 



RAMnnrr - young raDY«^ 

pamon and ^jide. Tet P®1 W 77 75 


Asnftad. Tel: 82&793Z 

LOW COST FUGHTS 


or pleasure & have no m Don'i 
worry. WS orrange vM your trio if 
you co ntact us. 703-9228091, <213 
Lnfapur Dr, Alex. VA. 22310. 

HaiAS YACHIM3. Yadn Charten. 
Aeademias 28. Athens 10671. Greece. 



forts. Mad, phone, color TV, Avait- 
oUe at dedy price of one hotel doi^te 
room. Early boohing aiaaestcd Wnte 
fsr Dr. Pbzzo, via Cbrwvo 30, 30038 
Scinea. Venice, hdy _ 

HOTELS 

SWri’ZERLAND 

G9CVA 

BeSDBKE DE FSANQ 

* Ave. de France, CH-1 202 Geneva 
Tet 0041 2731 1479 
BwutifJ. fir st .dag , oir •con ditio n e r^ 
•vetbred RyiHhsd apart neats end 
shxSae. Fufty equipped kitchen, 
daly maid servKB. 

Weekly and monthly rates, 
tree lent location. 


77ir Associated Press pty and danand are an essential 

BEIJING — A senior Chinese part of a Socialist economy, 
economist who helped draft the But he repeated the party line 
Communist Party's free-market that China’s system differs from 
economic reforms said Friday that capitalism because the state owns 


ideology Das 
from facts.” 


ESCORTS & GUIDES I ESCORTS & GUIDES ESCORTS & GUIDES ESCORTS & GUIDES ESCORTS & GUIDES foreign jotiinalisis. 


the reforms were faithful to Marx- the factories, farms and other { 
ism, which be said was an evolving means of production, 
ideology based on "seeking truth Mr. Lin said he was one of “a • 
from facts.” small number" of economists who j 

"It is not Marxist or Marxism if helped draft the Pam’s reform ! 
we persist in doing only what Marx proclamation of Oct. 20 outlining | 
said and never do what Marx did China’s shift to a market -oriented | 
not say." Lin Xfli told a group of economy. j 


INTERNATIONAL 

ESCORT 

SERVICE 

USA ft WORLDWIDE 

330 SSft&WSl* 

212-765-7896 

212-765-7754 

llama aeon CAMS AMP 
MAJ a E05 A£Xg 1H>..,. 

Private Maailwihf* A« 


USA I intemafioate "••LI"*'* 1 


wbhngyoua 

HAPPY NEW YEAR 

godiva 

escort service 

NY c,l*WY0M( 

212-420-8995 i 


QJ f hem from VTM . 


CAPR1CE 

escort SaVTCE 

M NEW YORK 
T8U 212-737 3291. 

LONDON 

Portman Escort Agency 

£7 CUBom SirMt, 
London W1 

MWg24» Wlli8, 

Ai mc»r ateSt a»* aeapiad 

LONDON 

BELGRAVIA 

End Swvica. 

Tot 736 5877. 


LONDON 

BS7 escort service 

tel 200 8585 

LONDON 

KB4S84GTON 

fip mtjte eft®* ««ptea 

arbtocats 

12 noon • irKJmfpH 


LA VENTURA 

NEW YORK BCOftT SERVICE 

213-888-1666 


LONDON 

MANDATE MTERNATK3NAL 
MALE BCORT AGS4CY 

Tab 938 1647. 


MADRID STARS 

ESCORT SERVICE 

Tab 2503496 - 2503494. Gerff cad , ; 


★ MADRID * 

taste Barer savra 

Td: 4117257 -4117602 


GENEVA 

escort senna 

Tab 44 09 28 


GENEVA •BEAUTY* 
ESCORT SERVICE. 
IB: 29 51 30 


Amsterdam Four Roses 

Escort Soviet (01 20-964376 

CHB5EA ESCORT SERVICE. 

51 Beaudherap Place London SW1 
Tet 01 S84 6513/2749 (4-15 pm) 


GB4EVA-BEST 
BCORT SERVICE 
m.- 022/29.13^4 


BRUSSH5 MiCHHIE ESCORT AND 
GUIDE SERVICE IB; 733 07 98 


BRUSSELS, BOOUM VJ.P. ESCORT 
6 TRAVa SOVKE 02/537 33 97 


BABSIPS BCORT SStVKE, Frank- 
furt area Tet 62 88 05 


■■■■M " ii 


foreign journalists. "Some people, including some of 

Mr. Lin is the latest Chinese ide- our foreign friends, have this mis- 
ologjst to reject suggestions that understanding," he 1 said. "They 


MB 


China is retreating hrom Marx's 
theories and moving toward capi- 
talism by promoting market forces, 
private enterprise, competition and 
foreign investment. 

Speaking informally at the All- 
China Journalists Association, Mr. 


think China is developing capital- 
ism This does not accord with real- 
ity." 

Defending China's interpreta- 
tion of Marx, he said: "Seeking 
truth from facts is Marxism. Marx 
hims elf never made any specific 
prediction about the future.” 

His remarks were consistent with 


Lin acknowledged that China's prediction about the future. 
DussHJxwF/GotjOGNE/BOMi. shift uwwrd a market economy, His remarks were consistent wifli 
imi Egan Snvw. mil / 383141. which he called “Socialist com- commentaries last month in the 
frankbjrt/mumch Mde ban modity production," is not part of People's Daily tot asserted tot 
ServiaL 069/386441 & 089/3518226 rlatgjrei Mn nricm. classical Marxism cannot always 


MUMCM PRIVATE ESCORT SERVICE 
Tefc 918132 m 912314 





issical Mandsm. clasacal Marxism cannot always 

The 19th-century philosopher provide solutions to Chinese prob- 
ett visioned a system in which man- terns. The statement provoked con- 
ey becomes unnecessary. Mr, Liu siderable interest, and some West- 
said, and failed to understand that era commentaries suggested tot 
selling, buying and the laws of sup- China was rqecting 


escort senna 

TEL 2456548 CREDIT CARDS 


ZURICH 

CAROLINE BCORT SERVICE. 
Iff: 01/252 61 74 

SHF- AMSTBiDAM 

Escort Service. 227837 


AMSTERDAM OTY 

Eieeri Stem. (0)20440507 

AMSTBIDAM JASMffC 

ESCORT SERVICE 020-366655 


Service. 212-23OT0. 


msaavi £mmBrarsBMCEN»,Y»k Beijing, in Wooing Taiwan, Says Ties 
MADRID INT'L T5R.-|ggBf" To Hong Kong Won’t Be Cut in 1997 


LOfOON OLYMPIA BCORT Ser- 

FRANKFURT + 5URROUFMNGS. 1 TA 01 381 6852 

Corofew j Esart A frowd 1 service. | ummcAi muim n ahic p. 

G -» -*- ■ “ “SS’SgS. 1 








wa. TeL 01 381 6852 Reuierz from Taipei tot to Taiwan gov- 

montreal Canada, glaus Es- BEUING —Taiwan's links with eminent was rethinking its staled 

_cwf a tk«k Soto 514765435. wfl] 0 ot be cut when plan to cut all links with Hong 

*5^ES«i^]42. G,J,de C™* lakes back control of the Kong when to colony reverts to 
Lo nd on trudie BCogr l a^ >» lo “y from a Chinese connoL 

.MBIJ3EBW. Ministry spokesman said Friday The latest issue of to Chinese 

vwuw^ORTsraviCEM "After Oitos^^UOTofto magazine. Rnd 

j H ■STARWOOD 1 Emn T Fla S’ that Sna's para- 

6wfcSerSej5^44^3 ^tinnt mourn leader, Deng Xiaoping, has 

siMow-HtAMOURT Escort &w “J T aiw L in bclter lcnns for Taiwan 

el Somes. Trfi 069 / 59-50-46. tween Hong Kong and raiwan, m- ^ those the British obtained for 
karen - ruunkpurt ESCORT Ser- eluding those in the snipping, CMl u K 

wco TJ- iMP.'JH Al An in A nilnirl nuug ivoufi. 


The latest issue of to Chinese 
jmmimist Party magazine. Red 


KAABM - RAMGVRT ESCORT Ser- 
vw.Tetaip/Masa 

UtfOON JACQtSItCESCORT Ser- 
v-ob. ToL 01-402 7949 


aviation, economic and cultural 
fields and exchanges of personnel, 
will remain unchanged.” 


Mr. Deng reportedly said tot if 
reunification is to be peaceful it 


f sSS!SS (STffllfS & W T h5X5: ^ He was responding to reports must be acceptable to 


were their own." 

The search for roots b^an after 


.-tecni't- France-Presse 

GENEVA — About 30,000 peo- 


Japan and China restored diplo- pie left Vietnam legally last year, 
matic ties in 1972. up from 19,000 in 1983, the United 

Altogether, counting those who Nations High Commissioner for 
conducted private searches by mail Refugees said Friday. 


BROADCASTING TO CABLE COMPANIES 
IN EUROPE & THE UK VIA SATELLITE 

H A N N E L 

PROGRAM. SATURDAY 5tt JANUARY 



CONTACT SKY CHANNEL. SATHUTE TELEV6I0N PLC FOR FURTHER ^FORMATION 
TH£PHONE LONDON (01) 636 4077 TELEX 266943 


INTERNATIONAL POSITIONS 


International F inancing Or ganizati ons 
(United Nations) located in Rome (Italy) 
seeks candidates to fill two vacant 

Project Controller 

positions. 

Incumbents will report to Director Africa Division Project 
Management Department and will be responsible for pro- 
. cessing of development projects at all stages of the project 
cycle including: 

— -Identification and preparation of project*; 

— Participation in project appraisal and arrange- 
ments with cooperating institutions and/or 
co-finance ra; 

— Preparation of loan documents; 

— Project monitoring, follow-up and review of 
supervision reports; 

— Preparation of project reports for governing 
body and annnal program of work. 

Candidates should have an advanced University degree in 
Economics, Agricultural Economics or Agricultural Sci- 
ence, with experience in project formulation and imple- 
mentation. Excellent knowledge of English or French and 
good working knowledge of the other language. Ability to 
travel extensively, also to tropical countries. Age: 30- 
45 years. 

Depending on experience and qualifications, net base sala- 
ry per annum will range from U.S. $27,611.52 to 
U.S. $35,084-50 with dependents, and U.S. $25,671.67 to 
U.S. $32348.99 without dependents. Cost of living allow- 
ance subject to change according to United Nations 
Common System will range per annum from U.S. $3,157 SI 
to U.S. $3,916.38 with dependents, and U.S. S2S33.45 to 
U.S. $3,614.39 without dependents. 

Initial contract is for two years. 

Deadline for appficatioos is February 15, 1985. 

Send applications in first instance to: 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 
55 Via della Mereede, -00187 Rome, Italy. 


EUROPEAN 

OEM SALESMAN 

KENNEDY, a leader in the manufacture of magnetic tape 
and Winchester disk drives, is seeking a European Salesman 
to identify, qualify, sell and provide customer support to 
large OEM's in Central and Southern Europe for all KEN- 
NEDY products. 

Qualifications include a technical degree, 5 or more years 
experience with an impressive track record in computer 
peripheral equipment sales to OEM's and multilingual fluency 
to indude German, French and English. 

Ideally, candidates will be domialed within commuting dis- 
tance of the KENNEDY Belgian office (St. Niklaas), however 
other locations will be considered. 

For immediate and confidential considerations ; please send 
your resume and salary history to: 

Professional Employment 

KENNEDY COMPANY 

1600 S. Shamrock Ave., 

MONROVIA, CA 91016, U.S.A. 


SALES MANAGER 

Required to heod London office of major Spanish resort/ 
residential development. Top producer required with high- 
ly developed sales and marketing skills. Languages an 
asset. 

Potential for major earnings for suitable applicant. Pres- 
tige offices from which to sell proven, highly saleable 
product. 

Reply in uniting giving full particulars 
of background and experience, with references: 

Box No. D-2128, International Herald Tribune, 
92521 Neuilly Cedex, France. 


Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, JANUARY 5-6, 1985 


ARTS /LEISURE 


London: Art Nouveau , 
Design, Bloomsburies 


By Max Wykcsjoycc 

International Herald Tribune 

L ON DON — Because of popular 
' interest, the show of “An 
Nouveau from the Anderson Col- 
lection" at the Geffrye Museum 
has been extended. In 1962, before 
the general interest in the art and 
artifacts of the tura-of-the-centuiy 
period, Sir Colin and Lady Ander- 
son began to add to a small inheri- 
tance of Art Nouveau pieces. By 
1978, they had accumulated more 
than 130 prime examples, which 
they gave to the Sains bury Center 
for Visual Arts at the University of 
East An g lia, Norwich, which made 
them available to the Geffiye Mu- 
seum for a London showing. 

The show includes furniture with 
inlaid wood decorations by Emil e 
Galie (1846-1904) and Louis Ma- 
jorelle (1839-1926) who initially 
trained as a painter but on the 
death of his father returned to 
Nancy to carry the family business 
of cabinetmaking into the realms of 
Tine art. 

La the glass section too, it is the 
French who take pride of place, 
with cameo and enameled glass 
again by Galle, a bowl and a flow- 
er-shaped ash tray by Gabriel Aigy 
Rousseau, and wine glasses by 
Rene Lalique (1860-1943), though 
the American glassmakeT Louis 
Comfort Tiffany (1848-1933) and 
several anonymous German and 
Austrian designers are also well 
represented. 

In ceramics the Minton and 
DouJion factories, and William 
Moorcroft (1872-1943). working 
for Liberty’s, predominate. In the 
fields of “pure'' art, anonymous 
sculptures of nymphs gazing into 
pools and graphics by the British 
artist John Hassall (1868-1948) and 
the Czech Alphonse Mucha (1860- 
1939) add further dimensions to 
the evocation of a richly creative 
period. 

“Art Nouveau from the Anderson 
Collection Geffrye Museum, 
Kingsland Road E2, to Feb. 2. 

□ 

A wholly different aesthetic is to 
be seen at the Victoria and Albert 
Museum, in the Boilerhouse Pro- 
ject's display “Post Modern Col- 
or,” a gathering of new furniture in 
Formica's newly perfected material 
ColorCore, which lends itself to 
multi-colored layering and carving 


in the manner of orthodox wood- 
work and marquetry. The work of 
18 designers is represented, six each 
from Britain, France and the Unit- 
ed States. The American contribu- 
tions are especially jokey and col- 
orful, none more so than “Dress 
Her" by Jay Stanger, a liquor cabi- 
net in the shape of a woman, its top 
of ColoiCore slats, the skin of ver- 
tical strips of beefwood, both open- 
ing to disclose a bar. 

"Part Modem Color," Boiler- 
house Project. Henry Cole Wing, 
Victoria and Albert Museum, to Jan, 
13. 


Though the Bloomsbury Group, 
the mutually admiring set of writ- 
ers and painters centering on the 
Stephen sisters — Virginia, who 
married Leonard Woolf, and 
Vanessa, who married the art critic 
dive Bell — is chiefly famed for its 
iiteraiy abilities, those closely asso- 
ciated with the menage A trois set 
up by the Bells with the artist-de- 
signer Duncan Grant at Charles- 
ton. a farmhouse in Sussex in which 
they lived from 1916, have been 
promoted as the protagonists of a 
major 20th-century art movement 
in Britain. In truth they were artis- 
tically inferior to their contempo- 
raries, the Vorticists Wyndham 
Lewis, Edward Wadsworth, Fred- 
erick Etchdls and Christopher Ne- 
vinsou. However Charleston was & 
haven for many competent paint- 
ers; was decorated by Vanessa Bell 
and Grant; and is now the subject 
of an appeal from the Charleston 
Trust, which is pledged to make an 
endowment of £740,000 (about 
$852,000) to the National Trust, 
which will preserve Charleston as 
an artistic shrine. The loan show 
running at the KiddeU Gallery, 
Sotheby’s, “The Charleston Artists 
and Their Friends" has much work 
by Bell and Grant, and by their 
mends Simon Bussy (1876-1934); 
Dora Carrington (1893-1932), trag- 
ic companion of Lytton Strachey, 
Roger Fry (1866-1934), chief aes- 
thetic theorist of the Bloomsburies; 


1974) and Edward Wolfe (1897- 
1982), the latter two of whom were 
without doubt the most able paint- 
ers among the Charleston friends. 

“The Charleston Artists and Their 
Friends," KiddeU Gallery 33/34 
New Bond Street, Wl, to Jan. 21. 


INTERNATIONAL 
EDUCATION DIRECTORY 


GERMANY 


YOU WANT 
TO SPEAK GERMAN? 
...SPEAK TO US FIRST 



Goethe-lnstitut 


More than 3 million students since 33 yean 
146 institutes in 66 countries 


e. g. MELBOURNE, TeL 518838 

BUMS ARES, TeL 31 1-8964/8 
BORDEAUX, Tel. 446706 

15 institutes in the Federal Republic of Germany 

For detailed informat i on: 

GOETHE-JNSTITUT 

Zentralverwdtung 

Lenbachplatz 3 . 

D-8000 Munchen 2 / 

Tel. (OJ 89-5999-MO / 

Telex: 522940 / / 


BELGIUM 


// / , 

#// 


f CUT THIS OUT \ 
i TO LEARN FRBICH | 

I Ceran. a chateau in the Belgian Ardennes where you team and five h 
m French. Small groups and private lessons, with tailor-made ■ 
programmes for individual needs, ensure real progress. Good food, ■ 

I good company, good teachers. Come and team, and enjoy yourseH. ■ 

We teach private people, companies, embassies. EEC. SHAPE eta. | 

I For complete documentation, send this coupon or phone : ■ 

I am interested in courses for: □ Adults □ Young People | 
m □ Private □ Business _ 


COMPANY 

ADDRESS 


^CERAIM/ 164, Avenue du Chateau. Ntvaz6, B-4880 Spa. 
^ Belgium. Tel :087/77 39 1 6. Telex 49650 a 


U.S.A. 


PREPARE FOR: 



GREAT BRITAIN 


QnyBi M anBiK. w r y drhft 

hooter iway tram the tanSf. Over BO 
aoWfeJa ob dims tan ... enmpowr 



EDUCATIONAL 
tgBTl CENTER 

TEST nCMWnOH SPCOAUSTS 3KX KM 

Far information regarding 
programs authorized under 
Federal te* If enroll 
non-lmmiflram alien siudenls 
m me u S A please call 

21 2-97 7 *B 200 

avwnB:0eptHT 
Stanley H. Kaplan 
Educational Center Ltd. 
T3i West 56 Street 
New York. N Y. 10019 
Permanent Centers in More 
Than 130 Mam US CiWs 
Puerto RrCO 5 Trento Canada 


niMmooortiioes.rolwta.ranoJiMiuwotfc 1 

*^eu;«taraiii|«OTbcwrt 

t asstsse as s b 

naaimMi 

or-fUnae (or brodun/Rra* GuMa. 

yWwSc.Ge d iT u ndi ettw C a iii M i d t M ii i ri. 

T* (MOM 5«H CM W 


- ARNOLD LODGE - 

PREPARATORY SCHOOL 

Bowl and arh p re p aed for Common &v 
tranmmriSdijIciranipi to ol PuUe SdwoU. 

Boardan nc ta pud from rtn age of 7. 
floyodte and WS video andabh front 

Mn.CE Bern, 

AhmM Mae SdwoL K«>iww«i Iteoi 
lEAMINOrONSM, WWIWIWSHIIfc U*. 


Send for a free copy of the 
INTERNATIONAL 
HERALD TRIBUNE 

INTERNATIONAL 

EDUCATION 

GUIDE 



French Art Market Steers Own Course 



international Herald Tntme when _ works 0 f m are offered at French A rare, superbly preswjd Ml hook £ the 

F ) ARIS — The auction market increasingly auctions, they come from private sources, and Merovingian period, tnA iatliJMN trancs, 
gives the impression of bring managed from rarely cany huge reserve prices. This makes the multiplied its estimate etgnt-loKL 
London and New York, with Sotheby’s and French market highly attractive to buyers. In More telling were the prices offered far rda- 
Christie's steering the ship. But France, through the last few months, sensational successes have jjvely common pieces. The 16,000 francs paid 
a combination of legislation and economic fac- - for another bronze belt book with silver inlay ol 


Duncan Grant's “Still Life With Matisse” in London. 

Paris Museum Displays 
A Riot of Circus Toys 


tors, has been turned into a fortress opera ting 
on separate lines. 

Unlike their Anglo-Saxon counterparts, 
French auctioneers are not businessmen, but 
judiciary officers. They are appointed by the 
Ministry of Justice after they have been granted 
permission by their professional association, the 
Chambre Nationals des Commissaires Poseurs, 
to buy the right to hold their office. 

They are under no obligation to conduct 
sales. If a Paris auctioneer has not conducted a 
sale in a year, he is still assured of a modest 
income. A percentage is levied on the proceeds 
of each sale, one naif of which goes to the 
auctioneer who has sold the hems, and the other 
half to the professional body, which divides the 
total equally among the auctioneers each year. 

The net intake per auctioneer, which is kept 
secret, would appear to amoant to a monthly 
salary well above 10,000 francs (51,000). Thus 
the more active members of the profession sub- 
sidize their colleagues, and the necessity to pool 
objects for sale in a market where the supply 
dwindles every year is not felt as it should be. In 
a free- market system, two-thirds of the present 
auctioneers would go bankrupt within months. 
This explains why London has been able to gain 
the upper hand against Paris. 

Vendors are deterred from selling in Paris by 
inadequate advertising and publicity outside 
France, and by poor servicing in sale catalogs 
often sent oat too late to give buyers abroad 
sufficient notice. The red tape faced by foreign 
vendors and buyers has further contributed to 
divert from the Paris market works of art avail- 
able for sale in Europe and the United States. 
Whatever comes up for sale at Drouot essential- 
ly comes from France, whereas in London the 
proportion of foreign consignments can be hi gh 
in such categories as Impressionist and Modem 


SOUBEN MEUKIAN 

been scored by leading Paris auctioneers, always 
in connection with private collections, or even 
single items from private collections turning up 
on the markeL 

In early November there was the case of a 
Ming ewer in blue-and-white porcelain of the 


Mms ewer m oiue-ano-wmu: pwurmm «« 01d Impressionist works that 

early 15ihcratut>^ Thesis rare— ^y three KS a fully fbishedirepan^ 
other instances are on record, one in the Tehran “““ -3 


otner instances are on recoro, one mi*.™™ ^ L&jpCd Botfly’s painting of a crowd iff 
Musmm of Aacrent tan. mote m ihe Top- ^ouv^micliing tht newlfhimg “Empcr- 
kap. Museum m lsimbul rnd a ted one m the ^^ r ^ don - byG^li^vklTte 
Freer Gallery of Art m Washington. All stow - „ . R * advised theimema- 


some Ha may — as did the Drouot piece with a 
crack under the spout and a chip off the top of 
the handle. 

The auctioneer, Eric Buffetaud, had spotted it 
almost by accident when inspecting items in one 
of his own nm-of-the-mill auctions that was to 
be hdd at Drouot last June. Having whisked it 
out of the bottom shelf of a case, he submitted it 
to the Chinese expert Michel Beurddey. 


expert Bruno de Bayser bad advised the interna- 
tional community erf collectors and dealers, and 
the price zoomed to 1.9 million francs, a record 
for a neoclassical drawing. • 

Other prices were more b alanced . A marvel- 
jous painting ascribed to the Le Nam brothers, 
which, like much of the work associated with 
them, raises unresolved art historical questions, 
was bought at the same amount by an American 
foundation. Given its condition, that was prob- 


Together, they did a thorough job. Photos ably about the right price. A portrait by Ma- 
were dispatched worldwide to the right people, dame Vigge Le Bum that ranks among her most 
On Nov. 6, in an otherwise dull sale, there was a accomplished works was not ex a ggerated at IS 
90-second fight between Bluett of London and million francs — it was reportedly acquired by a 
Myrna Myers, an American dealer in Paris who U.S. syndicate of dealers- Not was a first-class 
said she was representing an American coOec- view of the CMteau de OuDon in Switzerland 


tor, who won it for 560,000 francs. It was a huge 
/price, although one that did not result from the 
reserve, which was low. 

On Nov. 26, it was the turn of Jacques Tajan 
to register phenomenal prices in a sale of antiq- 
uities collected by the late Annand Trampitsch. 
The sale expert, Jean-Philippe Mariand de 
Senes, a recognized specialist in Ancient Near 
Eastern seals and cylinders, had made up for the 


Master paintings. Old Master drawings or an- sldm P- v ca“tog, produced under pressure, by 
tiquities. Distressing as this may be to French personally contacting dealers and collectors 


By Michael Gibson 

lnumananal Herald Tribune 


J auctioneers, it holds considerable advantages 

m. red Bailey Circus. B™ ^ysuim « plteed b, specu- 

j' } m * Bliley, Dealers who buy important works of art in 

“0 BiU a**- one place. iobrie/loteUten by auction £ 
-oKtitabogcrrserecpriceV ensures 


around the world. 


iManaiumajnercddTHbuiK and Batiey, with the Ringling Dealers who buy important works of art in 
T)ARIS — The arcus, in the Brothers, mid Buffalo Bill Cody, one place, in order to resell them by auction in 

A sense any modern child under- f em J°. have 311 anotherwilh a huge reserve price that ensures 

stands the word, developed in the ^led degree of showmanship to ^ dedred maAup< scnd ^ 

course of the 19th century. The art, simulating toy manufac- France. They need the trunroeis of imemational 

Romans had circuses with acrobat- turers m Europe and the United publicitv. * 

ic riders and ju ggler s, as well as States to produce toys rdated to 

unsa vory acts in which h uman be- ihe circus. One was the Humpty- 

ings were tom to pieces by wild Chimpty Circus, a charming toy 

beasts, or gladiators were pitted patented m Philadelphia in 1903 by Tl ___ ^ II, 

against elephants, tigers, lions, hye- Albert Schoenhut that was popular £\0fl OilOtVSm MJt 
nag hippopotamuses. But after the 10 the United States for more than 
fall of Rome the circus went into 30 years. _ . 


by Gustave Courbet at 2.6 million francs, a 
wonderful painting but an austere one with 
stern colors, not altogether easy to sdL 
The triumph of the season occurred on Dec. 
12, when a bronze horse fully signed by the 
Dutch sculptor Adriaen de Vries turned up oat 
of the blue in a sale conducted by Raymond de 
Nioolay. Its provenance can be traced back to 
1716, when it appears in an inventory concern- 
ing an ancestor of the family that sold it. On the 
day of the sale, all the dealers who could haw 
taken an interest in such an item were present to 
take pari in the bidding. At 102 million francs, 
it set the world record for any Renaissance or 


The result was the best attended archaeologi- m ™ ‘u-d ramion nancs, 

cal sale I have seen at Drouot. Jerome Eisenbere 2 561 the world record for any Renaissance or 
of New York, who bought more than 10 percent ® aT ‘N ue hrcmze. 

of the lots in the sale, was bidding against the These scores show that Paris has a potential 
agent of Robin Symes of London, with plenty of too often obscured by its outdated system. Buy- 
private buyers chiming in — the ideal combma- ers should remember that they have here the last 
tion at auction. Many prices paid that day were hunting ground where a high proportion of the 
enormous, not necessarily for the finest pieces, game conies from private owners. 


Rome Shows: Daubers, Degas and Donald Duck 


eclipse and took shape again only 
in the late 15th oennuy. 


Other acquisitions include toy 
clowns, toy acrobats, a life-size 


By Edith Schloss 

International Herald Tribune 


many more. The works include 
nude studies of Italian youths and 


In the 19th century, it came back group of automatons entitled “The "D OME — The city of Rome has °jf P 0111 *}*? <rf friends, family and 
to boisterous and gaudy life, with Gown and the Photographer" and -IV allowed a group of eight con- h^rf m Italy. T^ large oil of 
ail the attractions we have come to countless posters. The toys include Kmporary artists to stage a lively the BeUeHr Jaunty includes his 
take as a matter of course: lions, some by Fischer-Price and Steiff event its historic “bridge of the an- aunt. Laura, .her daughters and ha- 
pJmhantc wrnhatc rlrwnc mil « that are in airmil nmdncfinn RCls.” uncouth husband. It was painted in 


elephants, acrobats, clowns and a that are in current production, 
pathos different from that of its “Le Cirque a le JoueC Musee 
Roman predecessors. des Arts Decoratifs, 107 Rue de Ri- 

The Musfe des Arts D&oratifs,. voli. Paris I. to Jan. 28. 
which is inclined to pay scholarly- „ 

attention to matters most people 

take for granted, started to take an The Janette Ostier Gallery on the 

interest in toys rdated to the arcus. Place des Vosges has specialized in 
after acquiring a delightfully intri- Japanese art of the past for 30 years 


cate scale model of “Le Cirque and is celebrating this anniversary 
Frangais* that sprawls over 15 with a show titled “One Thousand 


gels." uncouth husband. It was painted in 

The “Trattisti ” or Daubers — Florence and is brooding and 
which in this case means to be defi- & rave > reflecting the drama of an 
ant and outrageous — build stoic- unhappy mar ri age. There is also a 
tures made of everyday materials, nrinor version and many sketches 
The objects, made of old sticks and f° r tins painting. 


stones and new ribbons, tinsel and 
jute, are beguiling. 


Only an affectionately wicked 
sketch of his posturing fellow artist. 


square meters (18 
January 1983. Thi 


re yards), in Years of Japanese Art" It includes 
to a buying more than 200 items: paintings and 


spree in which more than 4,000 toys prints, objects and masks ranging 
from all over the world were col- from the 8th to the 19th century 
lected They range from 1880 to the and a stunning series of illustra- 
present. and their display fills a tions of the 11th-century “Genji 
large part of the museum. Monogatari,” the first novel of 

- The mrior item remains the “Le d*™ner analy^ everwriltar land 
Cirque Franqais," with its 12,000 P oss, * , jy the mastorwork of Jap- 
pieces and 865figures of trainers, nese ^ tcrat “ re - T* 16 , selection 

acrobats, clowns (Grock indudedX ^ *** j^L°J re f%l C 

animals and attendants. There are ^ the humorous and the fantastic. 

other scale models too, including “MUie ans (Tart Japontds, ” Ga- 
the Knie Circus, founded in 1808, lerie Janette Ostia \ 26 Place des 
the Sarrasini Circus and the Bar- Forges, Paris 3, to Jan. 13. 


INTERNATIONAL 
ART EXHIBITIONS 

PARIS 

GALERIE DES ORFEVRES 
68, Quai des Orfevres - Paris - 326.81.30 

Robert 

TANCREDE 

Paysages d’ Europe et d’Amerique 
8 Janvier - 26 Janvier 

GALERIE MERMOZ 

H PRE-COLUMBIAN ART 

6, Rue JearvMermoz, 75008 PARIS. Tel.: 359.82^44 


This is not exactly a new an the little Neapolitan, Carlo Pelle- 
forra. We have seen this kind of grini, who later became a collabo- 
rough, loose, handcrafty type of rarer of Vanity Fair in London, 
work before, including that done foreshadows the quickness and 
by C a l i f ornia funk artists or by acute sense of movement of the 
others in the Whitney Biannual ballerinas and bathing women, 
show in New York six years ago. which are the typical images that 
The display in Rome includes an come to mind first when Degas is 
assemblage seemingly made of mentioned. 


sampietrmi, the Roman cobble- 
stones; a long, white, fence-like se- 
quence of upright willow branches 
and colorful stretched, ornamented 
hides. It all stands over the river, 
among Bernini's fluttering marble 


“Degas in Italy " French Acade- 
my. VUla Medici, Trinita dei Monti 
/, until Feb. 10. 

O 

Toti Sdalqja. one of Italy’s lead- 


angels and against the silhouette of mg abstractionists and an influen- 
ihe Eternal Gty's cupolas. They tial teacher, presents a group of 
provide a welcome note of vitality, action paintings liberally brushed 
a gay and rough fofl to an ancient in wide fluent strokes and spatters 
setting. in dark earth colons. They hark 

*7 Trattisti , " Ponte Sam'Angeio. back to the *40s, a sort of reapprais- 
□ al of the first onslaught of the pio- 


setting. in dark earth colons. They hark 

*7 Trattisti , " Ponte Sam'Angeio. back to the *40s, a sort of reapprais- 
□ al of the first onslaught of the pio- 

Drawings and paintings made in " ffj g. New , , York 
r. j which Saaloja went to meet in the 

Italy, ot mspiredby tt, throw a new UnitedSlaI ^ 

hght on Edgar Degas s passum for to these times of superficial and 

often slovenly work it Jsgood to see.; 

E55LS * ■«!* 



Florence. IBs ties with mis oxintry =535555** W 

were natural, for his grandfather balanced. _ „ . , 

three of his deters many Nea- Tm Scud<ya, Gallem Hsola, l ui tt rASHINGTON — A 55-foot- 
politan aristocrats. His sons, one of ^ Jam tary. yy ygh g 7-nieter ) Calder sculp- 

them Degas’s father, represented ■ O lure is being built with private 

his Neapolitan bank. The show called “I Love Paper- funds to fill the lobby of a Senate 

to this exhibition there are de- mo " — Paperino stands for Donald office building that was left bare 
tailed, careful drawings based on Duck — demonstrates that a good because of federal budget cuts, 
works of Giotto, Uccello. Carpac- artist can improvise on an theme. Nicholas Brady, a wealthy Re- 
do. Fra Angelico, Mantegna. Gen- especially on such a captivating publican who served as New Jer- 


Matta's “Papariuo secondo,” mocking D. Duck and pope. 

U. S. Senate to Geta Calder 


But during s controversy 

W^ HINGTON -- A55 - f001 ' ^ building's costs, money for" the 
regonana 5, throufft January. Whigh (17-meter) Calder sculp- sculpture and for 32 other items 
□ lure is being built with private was cut from its construction bnd- 

The show called “I Love Paper- funds to fill the lobby of a Senate get, lowering the price from S17& 

n - ■ »_ f - r-fc ■ ■ UlliMinn tlini nM . L milliM I. ft 90 .2IV=__ 


works of Giotto, Uccello, Carpac- artist can improvise on 
do. Fra Angelico, Mantegna. Gen- especially on such a c 
tile. Bellini, Mlchaelangelo and Pop Art figure. Mario 


Nicholas Brady, a wealthy Re- 
publican who served as New Jer- 
sey's junior senator for eight 


Illinois Art Museum 
Badly Damaged by Fire 

Untied Press International 


changes old Donald — he's 30 months in 1982, raised money to 
now! — into a fluid, sparkling little P a y for the mobile and stabile de- 
action painting. Alberto Panes cd- signed to fit in the cavernous Hart 
ebrates him with a witty assem- Senate Office Building, 
blage. “Donald Duck Trophy," ac- Alexander Calder's “Mountains 
compamed by a group of whimsical uud Clouds," made of black steel, 
small paintings. Tommaso Casmllw was intended to be ins t.i l i e d in the 


r= WALLY FINDLAY = 

Galleries International 

new yoHc • Chicago - palm beach 
bevBriy hsis - pars 

EXHIBITION 

BALARIN 

GANTNER - F. GAIl 
HAMBOURG - V1GNOIB 
MKmWHY-SEBIRE 

Permanent exhibition of 
Impressionists and 
past impressionists 

2 Aw. Mafignon - Paris 8th 

M: &UU7A ntefor «mL Hdar 

10fM.I*1 fjn. - 2M H7 pjn. 

Hofd George V- 723.54.00 
31 Ave. George-V - Paris 8fh 

«B.ln.aL1IU0BiL-l w-aS0l«9pa. 


PAAM/ BMW YORK 

ZABRISKIE 

STANKIEWICZ 

724 Fifth Ave, New York 

JUNKO YODA 

37 rue Quincampoix, Paris 


"ART 

EXHTOmONS” 

^ANTIQUES” 

"AUCTION 

SALES” 

appear 
on Saturday 


EVANSTON, Illinois — A fire makes a bright collage, Bertolini w hite marble, nine-story airinm of in the spring, according t 
lhat gutted two stones of the Byer has the duck attacked by toy air- die Hart building when it opened in Carroll, executive g«i«»nr 
Museum i of Ihe Arts here desto^ed planes, Lorenzetti sculpts an ab- early 1983. architect of the CapiioL 

SI2 million of art and historic let- s traction of him in brass, even 

ters. Malta has something surreal to say , Ty . _ 

The blaze Dec. 31 destroyed about him. The rest or the artists td&IIl fVreck RpWVlfa Nn Tnvi<inv« 
most of the museum’s modem art are less painter! v and tend towards rr ireWSUTUS 


million to S138 milli on 

The stabile, depicting a jagged 
range of mountains, is being built 
by the Segre Foundry in Connecti- 
cut- Crystallization Systems Inc. of 
Long Island, New York, is building 
the motor-driven mobile, whiefi 
will represent clouds drifting over- 
head. 

The sculpture should be com- 
pletely installed by mid-February 
and an unveiling will likely be hdd 
in the spring, according to Elliott 
Carroll, executive assistant to the 
architect of the CapitoL 


More tril'ng were the prices offered far rela- 
tively common pieces. The 16,000 francs paid 
for another bronze belt book with stiver inlay of 
the Merovingian period, estimated to fetch 
1,500 to 1,800 francs, is truly astonishing. Ihe 

120.000 francs paid by a New York dealer for a 
limestone carving from Ancient Egypt, repaired 
and restored, is mind-boggling. And so is the 

560.000 francs given for a marble torso of the 
first century, only 70 centimeters (27 inches) 
high and devoid of any particular merit. 

Two days later, Lurien Solanct was auction- 


■ hi’ 4 
f r i 
site 



collection, most of which was in- more graphic, carioonish efforts, as '«• rress 

sured. according to the museum’s is to be expected with this kind of a THENS - Greek divers last 

founder, S^haa Byer. Its colleo- su^ea matter. AnKmthsearc^eS^nSf ^ teZSk riS 

non included documents wotteo An assortment of films with the a merchant vessel chartered hv the n , alC 
^ President Abraham Lincoln, the original^. Qu^ is also on hand. British dipionuuuSd^SvJhi^ Eon iSs^ 

Amencan revolutionary^ Samuel Compared with the usual senous was wrecked off a souK Greek bdLt 
Adams, the novdist Charles Dick- an show, this is a spriehtlv and island in 1802. hut foimH -n.. .. . 


founder, Stephan Byer. Its colleo- subject matter, 
lion included documents wotteo Anassortmei 


The Associated Press 

A THENS — Greek divers last 
■ mouth Searched the rnnuine of 


ens and monarch* going back to 
Richard I of England. Officials say 
arson has not bom ruled ouL 


DOONESBURY 


Samuel Compared with the usual serious was wrecked off a southern Greek 
es Dick- art show, this is a sprightly and island in 1802, but found no sica of 
bad to mterKting novelty. its cargo of ancient scuIpiuresT 

□alssay / Lme Paperino." Palazzo Bras- Costas PapathanaiaajoukM, a 
tiL du, through January. Greek government marine archae- 


baOasL 

The Mentor, a two-masted sail- 
ing vessel, foundered off Kytbera 
island in 1802 with 17 crates of 
sculptures aboard. 


THBoocmm? muir/m 
MBYOUr&m THeFBGTWEt 
mmiriH&B. hop. mm co 
\ ALICE. / mnumoF 
i MYfBUOGS? 

•jkj 


M*esem,imTmGNE 

HCUTHREE SQUARES AM*. 
WUROM BABMM.AW 
Tm&WKEpmhm 
^ ONALLWGHrl 


I jL , Hi;. 

•'••i. -a-. 


meNTHE/m&MEiN 
l&EVESIERm t IJ05T 
PecmprrMSAREAL 
WA51F JOHANS IT Au. 
^tJO MYSELF! \ 

i 


rat. 


50 1 SEE. 

hi, Guys. 

t HL 

I m 

MAN. 




ANYMORE 

JEUA 

ALICE? 

m 




i 



1 . : r 1 , j' ?*■ 

Y J L't+\>+ij4 


Statistics Index 


'«C 


°Uft 


agiex bt te» p.ii 

AMEX MaMnmsP.il 
j«ySE BrtM* P- 8 

MYSE Mflttt/lom P.10 
ggpodka stocks P.13 
Oxwocv iflte P. 7 
cmMdnm p.io 

p-io 


ronert, 

rote noies p.„ 
Wd irwnupjj p t 

IniKHt roles p' 7 

"arte* summarv r' 8 

p in 

°TC start p'“ 
<>*»«• mantels p 13 




r .;'V:N>S 


:Y-?Ytb 


-■=:v"'S?SS 
. .. •■ 


- rp»» 

^sKS* 


r.»© 


- ■ • _ 

S* 

— -: 0 ' 

: =«*« 

- ■'.. ••: 2ss x* 

- T'_ " ^s-j- 


Donald Dud 


f y . y\ 

. J \ 


' ' ’/!' 

' V>' 




i sAt^ay-sx jndav^^^ 

! ECONOMIC SCEME 

! These Experts Are Gloomy, 

: But Try to Offer Solutions 

: By LEONARD SILK 

v« >«* Tima Seme e 

1 850 called econo- 

. tabd mSta BjdS'gSS, 0 ' lh ' Sei«« ■ 

gteomy prog^UMtors^il » W “ iSK"* of ^ 

i thus, who said that DODulaiinn oJ^iv 6 Bcva-cnd Thomas Mal- 
f |$hc means of subsistraa iLuliiS^,^ 0 ^ d mev,tabIy outnm 

^ as famine. pes^^iS l ” Pulati0n 

nn I l ll M S ^5 n h Z S S. yl h, Wai Malthus-s forecast was 

dda^||a^i^^ 0 ^d 0 oUierW'ise aS eurbS^OreU^p^^nv^^ 
stmets, humanity would suffer grievously P UVe m ‘ 

The economists who gath- 
ered in Dallas last week for ~ — 

the annual meeting of the Economists who met 
American Economic Associa- i 

tion were, oo the whole, prettv recently were pretty 

dismal. But, like Malthu* j- . , . J 

they were looking for rente- ^ sm a ^ but were 
a= for the troubles they fore- looking for remedies. 

Alexandre Lamfalussy, as- “ 

^tont generai manager of the Bank for International Settlements 
in Basel, was embarrassed to note that, contrary to his expecta- 
tions when he agreed to address the economists, do international 
fi n a n cial crisis was at hand. 

n £ l want to take the easy way out by frightening you with 
^po ssible future crisis scenarios.” he said, “only to end up by 
trying to persuade you that — despite the numerous wrongdoings 
of governments and even the occasionally silly behavior of 
market participants — the naturally enlightened and effective 
cooperation between central banks will either avert the crisis or at 
least contain it.” 

Ins te a d, he described the confusions facing policy-makers with 
the international financial system as caught in four “intercon- 
nected evolutionary processes.” These are, he said, disinflation, 
internatio nal fra tion, innovation and deregulation. Economic the- 
ory, he said, provides “only limited guidance” and history offers 
no help in a situation without precedent. 

W T HAT to do? Mr. Lamfalussy strongly warned against 

\l/ returning to what he called “complete ad boc-ry” — 

▼ T unlimited discretion for the monetary authorities, while 
also warning against retreating to rigid and nrahamcai rules. 
“The road to follow," he said, “is somewhere in between: rales 
applied with a pragmatic sense of discretion.” Easie r said than 
done, he added. 

Lawrence R. Klein of the University of Pennsylvania, a whiner 
of the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Science, used an 
econometric model to trace the effects of partial disarmament on 
10 developing countries. He found that small benefits “could 
Accrue to these countries without harming the industrial country 
suppliers of arms,” because the latter would compensate by 
selling capital goods to the developing countries. 

But Mr. Klein cautioned that his analysis did not take account 
of why the 10 developing countries have such large military 
outlays nor the strategic consequences of unilateral cutbacks: “It 
merely concludes that it would be beneficial for economic perfor- 
mance if the disarmament could take place." 

Barry J. Nalebuff of Harvard University tackled the issue of 
how to achieve a more stable equilibrium between the contestants 
in an arms race. He concluded that research and development 
and arms negotiation should be directed toward “preventing 
hidden or 'discontinuous jumps in the quality and quantity of 
strategic weapons.” 

A technique that makes winning a nuclear war easier would 
give both countries an incentive to race faster and more reckless- 
ly. “To provide stability” he said, “we should concentrate our 

(Continued on Page 9, CoL 8) 

Lota interbank rates on Jan. 4 , excluding fees. 

A Official fixings for Amsterdam. Brussels, Frankfurt, Milan, Paris. New York rate at 
WP.M. 


tawtentem 
BnacMal 
Fi w nU taf t 
Laadan (b) 


s 

8 

DlML 

FT- ItL Bfctr. 

BJ=. U>. Yea 

3371 

4.116 

112885“ 

36*7 “ 8-1836 

5*41 " 136.145*141*47 

6132 

7Z96 

208765 

*54 33608“ 17.74 

34.1445 3S.J03- 

3.1636 

3*45 

— 

32*45* 1*37 X 8857“ 

4.5*4“ 12040*12535 * 

1.153 


3*558 

11.1445 1214*0 4.1M 

73.995 3*24 291*95 


<1*50 20040 

3.162 ?-&» 

1060* — 
79*6 26.14 

BZ935* 27.105“ 
•»*aw <4269 

109534 9*6938 


54440 30455 739 J1) 7402 

1574 4138 16275 25135 

2711 11295“ 14095 1SJ7“ 

7001 399 W 9039 

71495* 4.1445“ 14083“ 

26187 *4473 13506 170114 

3*938 61-9518 154* 247.04* 


. , - - • 'j 

fntrt’taCalfr 


Dollar Values 


S _ Per 

Ecetv. Cum “ cv UAS 

08U5 AotfrotaU 1724J 
0045 Amnion xrtUUog 2220 
00157 Bctataa Ha franc <3*5 
bjsb etunAef 17IW 
00884 Danfsllkrooe 112875 
01577 FtaUmt tSt 

00079 CrMfcdredwwi 1273S 
01279 HBwKonoS 7JJ 


* CHTtscr 
Enolv. 

09871 IrttbC 
00014 inwHdnlul 
177 KnalH fflow 
04071 Malay, rtootfl 
01094 Narw.kroae 
0650B PWLPKB 

00059 Pari, escudo 

02793 Saadi rival 


POT S W 

US* EobJv. ttS4 

U)U1 0*55 SftMBMrtl 2198 
64US 0495 s-fUrfan rand 28282 
030*1 00017 S-Karaonwaa UMO 

7*55 00857 SMSLmeta 17*30 

9.12 01109 Sued, kroon 9JH5 

19*965 0JBJ53 THUMBS 39*5 
17000 00348 TMbaM 27.195 

igyn 02723 uxotlitan .3*73 


35 ter 1 ta»:U 49 Irtahc 

Oimmerclaifriiric (01 Amoixte deeded ro Buy one pound (cl AmcurrtsneeBedfobuvixiHtiortar 1*1 

Until of 100 (x) Units of un (V) LWIsol t&OOO 

W JL: ^ Bonco cetrmmrdoM neJkmi (Mlkm); Bonouo 

{dinar, rttvl. dtrtmm). Ottmrdato from Reuter* and AP- 


Eurocurrency Deposits 

' ’ Swtas SSS? 


fSoaJ - 

V. ( rili 

v As ian Dollar Rates 


eih -81k 

Sourer: ftmitm 


teat*. 
Ilb -85U 


UnHed States 

Discount Rot* 

Federal Funds 
Prime Rate 
Broker Loan Rota 
Comm. Poper# 30-T79 dovs 
3-mtwti Trw«u«V Bills 
44nonm Trwwry Bills 
CD'S 3049 am 
CD'S <049 HOWS 

West Cernumi 

Lomberd ROW 
OverMaM Rale 
BOOne Month Interbank 
”*nwrtt» Wterhoitt 
6-montn interfaenk 


Clow Pro*. 

b > 

2% *» 

VPk I0» 

9V.-10I44W1-10V1 
8J0 

7.7* W* 

8.10 B.H 

005 M2 

LID M» 


5J0 5J0 

5*0 5*0 

5JB0 

5*0 MS 
MO 5S0 


BritaiP 

gunk Base Rate 
Coll »»« 

914ta7 Treasury Bill 

j^nonfh ln»rhw* 

Japan 

Dlseowm Roto 
Coll WOW 
(Mov Interbank 


Gold Prices 


/.jy, 

t’ V-;/ 


i n tarwe nM cn Rate 

Coil ftaan ey M ?/i» to 9M 

tafrmanlh Interbank 9716 

Smooth intaiteAk M 5A6 

Aenonth infertwh 

Sources: Reuters. eaT ^^f 0 ^f t ^ 

atHta turds Ban*. BnnK of Tot-vo. 


UnallGEeribunc 

BUSINESS / FINANCE 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, M-l, Page 8 

Page 7 


Diamond, 
Occidental 
May Unite 

2 Boards Plan 
Monday Session 

The Associated Press 

LOS ANGELES — Occidental 
Petroleum Corp. and Diamond 

Shamrock Corp. announced Friday 
that they were considering a merger 
that would form America’s sev- 
enih-largesi oiJ company. 

One source close lo the parties, 
who spoke on condition that he not 
be identified, said it was “an ac- 
complished fact that Occidental 
would either acquire or merge with 
Diamond Shamrock." 

In a joint statement, the compa- 
nies said only that they “are en- 
gaged in discussions looking to- 
ward a possible business 
combination." 

The companies said directors 
would meet Monday to consider 
the proposal and that “a further 
announcement is expected to be 
made shortly thereafter." 

The terse announcement con- 
firmed Wall Street speculation that 
erupted earlier Friday after Occi- 
dental Petroleum and Diamond 
Shamrock both asked the New 
York Stock Exchange to suspend 
trading in their slock 

After the announcement, trading 
resumed, with Diamond Shamrock 
jumping S3 to close at $20.75 a 
share and Occidental Petroleum 
slipping S2 to close at $24.75. 

The action came just one day 
after Occidental Petroleum’s 86- 
year-old chairman, Armand Ham- 
mer, in an interview with The Asso- 
ciated Press, revised his previous 
prediction that a spate of oil-indus- 
try mergers had “run their course." 

Though he gave no hint of an 
agreement with Diamond Sham- 
rock. Mr. Hammer said be expect- 
ed more takeovers because oil re- 
serves are limited and “it is cheaper 
to buy new reserves on Wall Street 
than to discover them yourself.” 

In 1983, Diamoad Shamrock 
posted a net loss of $562 million 
because of a $ 194.3-million pretax 
writeoff of its entire investment in 
the highly touted Mukluk well in 
the Beaufort Sea off Alaska. 

Diamond Shamrock aud its part- 
ners lost $1.6 billion on the project, 
which turned out to be the most 
expensive dry hole in history. 

A takeover would give Occiden- 
tal Petroleum control of Diamond 
Shamrock's proved reserves of 
1202 million barrels of oil and nat- 
ural gas liquids and 9152 billion 
cubic feet (27.5 billion cubic me- 
ters) of natural gas. 

Occidental has proved reserves 
of 1217 billion bands of oil and 
natural gas liquids and 332 trillion 
cubic feet of natural gas. 

Occidental is the’ 13th-Iaigesi 
U.S. oil company on the basis of 
assets and the 10th largest by sales, 
according to the Oil & Gas Journal 
a trade magazine, which based its 
rankings on 1983 results. 

Diamond Shamrock is the 19th- 
largest ofl company on the basis of 
assets and ranks 26th on the basis 
of revalue. 

The new company would rank 
seventh in sales and nine in assets. 

Occidental had earnings of 
$3843 milli on on revenue of $1 138 
billion in the first nine months of 
the year, while Diamoad Shamrock 
had earnings of $171.4 million on 
revenue of $3.45 billion. 

Occidental's president, Ray 
Irani, 49, was a former director of 
research at Diamond Shamrock. 




Sees! 


b rVr* ’ 5 

If 


EC Announces 
Pact With U.S. 
On Steel Exports 











m 






-4* ' f . * 


8» Nn> Vert Tm 

France's nuclear reprocessing complex under construction at La Hague. 

Nuclear Recycling: Europe Is Ahead 

After Carter Proliferation Fears, U.S. Gets a Late Start 


By Paul Lewis 

.Vnw York Times Service 

CAP DE LA HAGUE France — A row of huge 
concrete bunkers under construction on a Nor- 
mandy cliff here bears witness to the commanding 
lead that France's nucfeaiJndusuy, among those 
of several European countries, is taking over the 
United States in one area of nuclear technology. 

These radiation-proofed buildings will house the 
world's first fully commercial nuclear reprocessing 
plant. The state-owned nuclear services company, 
Cogema, plans to open the plant in 1989. 

Several European rivals are following dose on 
Cogema ’s heels. British Nuclear Fuels Ltd. wiQ 
open a similar plant at SeDafield in Britain in 1990. 
West German, Japanese and Belgian companies 
are also p lannin g to enter the commercial repro- 
cessing business. 

At the new La Hague plant, technicians operat- 
ing remote-controlled tools from behind glass win- 
dows five feet (about 13 meters) thick will cut up 
spent fuel rods from pressurized water reactors, 
dissolve the pieces in nitric acid and then extract 
the un burned uranium and plutonium. 

The relatively small amount of radioactive waste 
left over is put into insoluble glass blocks, which 
will eventually be buried deep in the earth. But the 
uranium and plutonium recovered by the repro- 
cessing operation can be used again as reactor fud. 

Reprocessing thus closes Wiiat scientists call 
“the nuclear fud cycle," theoretically enabling a 
given quantity of uranium fuel to be “recycled" 


time and time again through a nuclear power 
reactor, since each passage uses up barely 2 percent 
of its energy-producing potential. 

Already, utility companies in West Germany, 
Japan. Switzerland, Belgium, Sweden and the 
Netherlands have contracted to use all of the La 
Hague plant's annual 800-ton reprocessing capaci- 
ty during its first 10 years of operation. They are 
putting up the roughly S2.7 billion needed to buDd 
the ptanL A separate, older plant at the same site 
reprocesses fud from France's own reactors. 

Britain's 1200-ton SeDafidd plant is also fully 
booked for die first JO years of its life by European 
and Japanese utilities, which are also helping to 
pay for its construction. 

In addition, Japan is planning a 1200-ton repro- 
cessing plant at Tokai Mura, while West Germany 
is considering a 350-ton plant in Bavaria, and 
Belgium may reopen a wnaii reprocessing plant at 
Mol. which it closed in 1974. 

“European and Japanese utilities have consis- 
tently supported reprocessing," says Pierre Mot- 
ion, secretary general of the Uniped, an interna- 
tional trade association of electricity suppliers. 
"Reprocessing is energy conservation," says Mau- 
rice Delange, industrial director at La Hague. 

By 2000, Nukem. the West German nuclear 
services company, estimates that West European 
reactor operators will be reprocessing more than 

(Continued oo Page 9, CoL 4) 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

BRUSSELS — The European 
Community and the United States 
reached an agreement Friday that 
would limit EC exports of steel 
tubes and pipes to the United 
Stales to 7,6 percent of the domes- 
tic U_S. market for 1985 and 1986, 
compared with 14.6 percent last 
year, the EC Commission an- 
nounced here. 

The agreement also resolved a 
dispute that surfaced this week 
over EC steel that has been held up 
at U.S. ports since late November. 
Ai that time, the United States, 
accusing the EC of refusing to 
abide by previous pipe-export 
agreements, blocked all imports of 
EC stoeL 

The dispute this week, concern- 
ing whether the blocked steel was 
inouded in the new 7.6-percent 
quota, held up formal agreement 
on the quota agreement itself, 
which was accepted by the EC on 
Dec. 29. 

The EC had argued that all the 
steel should be admitted, since it 
had been shipped in 1984. The 
United States rejected this view. 

Under Friday's agreement, the 
United States will admit about 

60.000 metric tons (66.000 short 
tons) of the stranded steel without 
counting it as part of this year’s 
quota. 

The rest of the steel pipe at U3. 
borders will be counted against the 
1985 import quota unless it quali- 
fies for exemption under a so- 
called “short supply” clause. 

That clause, contained in the 
agreement, allows nnlimiiwl im - 

tubes that are^^produ^d^i the 
United States. 

The exact quantity of steel being 
held by U3. customs has not been 
made public, although U3. offi- 
cials have estimated that 100,000 to 

200.000 metric tons of steel have 
been shipped from EC countries 
since the embargo was imposed. 

In Washington, the U.S. Trade 
Office said Friday that it had “an 
agreement in principle," but did 
not confirm the EC accounts on the 
embargoed pipe. It said a formal 
letter remained to be drafted on the 
accord. 

Under the new agreement, EC 
sources said, the community's sales 
of pipes and tubes to the United 
States should amount to 730,000 
metric tons this year, compared 
with 1.06 million tons in the first 
nine months of 1984. 


That figure compared with 
474.694 tons in 1983, according to 
EC figures. 

The agreement provides EC 
members with the following quo- 
tas, expressed in percentages of the 
U3. market: West Germany. 2.82 
percent; Italy, 2 percent; France, 
0,93 percent; Greece, 032 percent; 
Belgium, 0.48 percent; Britain, 0.40 
percent; the Netherlands, 0.28 per- 
cent: and Luxembourg, 0.17 per- 
cent Denmark and Ireland do not 
export tubes. 

Diplomats said that France had 
not obtained an exemption for de- 
liveries to the United States by the 
French company Vallourec, which 
has a major contract for the con- 
struction of U.S. pipelines. 

Because of the Vallourec issue, 
France last week had considered 
joining Greece and Italy in oppos- 
ing the agreement and thereby 
blocking EC approval of it The' 
reasons for France's derision to ap- 
prove it were not immediately 
dear, although some sources said 
that Vallourec's pipe might not be 
available in the United Stales and 
therefore would be exempt from 
the restrictions. 

The agreement announced Fri- 
day ended several months of talks 
over the issue, one of the most 
serious trade disputes between the 
EC and the United States. 

Last fall, reacting to pressure 
from the steel industry, the United 
States accused the EC of reneging 
on an agreement in 1982 that it 
said, required the EC to limit its 
share of the UJS. market for steel 
pipes and tubes to 5.9 percent The 
Europeans said they viewed this 
level as a guideline rather than a 
requirement 

In late November, the United 
States threatened to impose the 5.9- 
percent ouota unilaterally, and 
dosed its borders to EC steel pipes 
and tubes. The EC reacted with 
threats of retaliation, raising the 
specter of a trade war. 

In December, the United States 
informally set the 7.6-percent fig- 
ure, in a meeting between William 
E Brock, the U.S. trade representa- 
tive, and Etienne Davignon. the EC 
industry commissioner. But the 
tentative agreement contained sev- 
eral exemptions, and was repudiat- 
ed by the While House. 

Later last month, the list of ex- 
emptions was shortened to pipe 
that is not made in the United 
Slates. (AFP, Reuters) 


Crude Oil Prices Decline in U.S. to Lowest Level Since L979 


Reuters 

NEW YORK — Crude oil trad- 
ed Friday at the lowest prices since 
the Iranian revolution in 1979, and 
$8 to $1 1 a barrel below those of 
early January 1982, traders said. 

Commenting on the continuing 
price fall analysts said no bottom 
is in sight, but they expected prices 
for sweet, or low-sulphur, crude to 
fall to at least $25 a barrel before 
stabilizing. 

“We’ve grown so used to seeing 
$25 a barrel talked about that it h as 
become almost self-fulfilling,” said 
a trader in Houston, Texas. 

Industry analysis said the lack of 
demand while crude oil supplies 
are growing is contributing to the 
weaker prices. 

Forecasts suggesting that oil de- 
mand is not likely to expand this 


year added to the pressure upon 
crude oil prices, they said. 

Adding to the panic in the mar- 
kets, the analysts said, is uncer- 
tainty about official prices. 

Friday prices tumbled 50 to 60 
cents a barrel as crude futures con- 
tracts were hitting record lows 
amid panic selling, futures analysts 
said. 

.Andrew Lebow, an oil analyst 
with Shearson Lehman/ American 
Express in New York, said the pan- 
ic resulted from a lack of buyers in 
the futures market ‘There are no 
buyers and the trade is selling off," 
he said. 

Despite some short rallies, which 
slowed the downturn, analysts saw 
little likelihood for sustained gains. 

“With each new low the market 
is entering new ground and there is 


no benchmark for support," Mr. 
Lebow said. 

The cash markets for domestic 
and foreign sweet crudes were 
equally under pressure and Middle 
Eastern crudes, which had been 
weathering the storm of the last 
month, began to show signs of 
crumbling before the pressure, 
traders said. 

Spot prices for the U.S. domestic 
benchmark crude. West Texas in- 
termediate, for February delivery 
at Cushing. Oklahoma, JieD 95 cents 
a barrel this week to $2520. 

North Sea Brent cargoes for Jan- 
uary loading dropped 50 cents over 
the week to $26.05 $26.10 while 
cargoes loading in February 
dropped 65 cents a barrel to $25.75. 

At these prices, light sweet 
crudes were trading at prices that 


ranged from $8.75 to more than 
$1 1 a barrel below those of three 
years ago. 

Sour erodes had been held up as 
a result of demand led pressures for 
residual fud to replace coal lost to 
the shrike in Britain and as a result 
of uncertainty concerning the 
OPEC benchmark prices. 

Analysts say there are signs the 
strike is winding down and this 
demand for residual fud and heavy 
erodes will falL 

There is also increasing skepti- 
cism that OPEC can maintain the 
$29 a barrel marker price for Saudi 
light, analysts said. 

Rumois have surfaced in the 
markets that indicate that Saudi 
Arabia will riiang p or bas 
the mixture of crude oil in its ex- 
port pared and win increase the 


amount of heavy crude to 55 per- 
cent while decreasing the amount 
of light crude to 25 percent 

Arab medium will remain the 
same at 20 percent of the export 
pared. 

Based on the price changes an- 
nounced effective Jan. 1 for these 
grades the net effect of this move 
would be to reduce the price of an 
export cargo to about $2736 a bar- 
rel at official prices, about 30 cents 
below the official price of an export 
pared in December, traders said. 

Traders speculate that the Sau- 
di’s may have hoped such a move 
will increase liftings from compa- 
nies that have been underproduc- 
ing but ofl traders said Arab heavy, 
which is now 50 cents a barrel high- 
er officially, was less desirable as a 
result 


Mexico Pays $ 250 MiMon Toward Debt Principal 


SWte* pPJS? ECU SDR 

' tmar 4™*- « 10ta-M*.W -»* 7*-8» 

W. M -BW SW -5*. 4£;4£ 10 * «,* - 10 * 9* ■ » A. 8 - 8W 

6*6. Wt - 9* 5N> 10»- 1<W» 11W- ** ** - ,l * 

IbdnupuHcabletoMB Bunk I ECU J; CMtmn* 

Sources: Mn» Guaranty tootiar. wv 

(SDR). 


By James L Rowe Jr. 

Wajftin$r<.m Post Service 

WASHINGTON — Mexico has 
paid bade $250 million of the more 
titan $50 billion it owes banks, in 
the first payment of debt prindpaf 
by a large Latin American debtor 
country since the region’s econom- 
ic crisis erupted in August 1982. 

The payment on Thursday will 
be applied to a $5- billion loan that 
Mexico negotiated at the bright of 
ihe debt crisis in late 1981 


7% 8 

* 7/16 10 

10V* low 


s S 

6 3/16 6 4/16 
6 5/14 6 5/16 


principal, and Colombia so far has 
not faced a debt crisis, although its 
economic condition is deteriorat- 
ing. 

Mexico, which is up to dale on 
interest payments due 10 banks, ap- 
parently made the principal pay- 
ment as pan of an attempt to per- 
suade its bank lenders to stretch 
out its debts that come due by 1989 
into a 14-year loan. 

The long-term Mexican loan, 
which the country's key bank lend- 


ers negotiated in August, has been 
hailed as the start of the second 
phase of the Latin American debt 
crisis. This phase deals with the 
region’s debt and economic diffi- 
culties as a long-term problem, 
rather than as a crisis that would 
continue to bring banks and debt- 
ors back to negotiations every year. 

The complicated nature of the 
14-year Mexican loan request, 
which involves more than 800 
banks, $50 billion in debts and 
hundreds of separate loans, pre- 
vented the agreement from being 
signed by the end of the year. 

The tentative accord that was 
reached in August called for Mexi- 
co to repay $1 billion in principal 
by Dec. 31, 1984, in return for the 
14-year stretching out of most of its 
payments. 

Since the agreement was not rati- 
fied by the banks, Mexico was no 
longer obliged to pay the SI billion 
by year-end. 

Bui last month, the finance min - 


JLNL !»**■ C>7» 

30X25 30135 - O* 

HonB moo - +M0 

LuuhtUjowo — rare + s as 

P oitoHMuw ^ ^ + ,a 

ZBriCft 303*5 303.15 + 

London _ 398.10 — 3J8 

AH Prices h. Uil vet ounce. 

S&jTCtt' RfittCfS, 


South Korean Trade Gap Narrows 

The Associated Press 

SEOUL — South Korea’s trade deficit in 1984 narrowed to a 
preliminary $1.57 billion (129 trillion won) from the previous year's 
$1.97 billion, the Trade and Industry Ministry announced Friday. 

The improvement was attributed to a better- than -expec ted export 
performance last year for which the ministry had originally assigned a 
$27 billion target. 

Economic recoveries in the United States and other mrior markets 
were seen as responsible for South Korea’s export growth. 

In 1984, South Korean merchandise imports stood at $30.72 
billion, up 173 percent from a year ago. while exports rose 203 
percent to $29. 1 5 billion, according to the minis try. Both export and 
imports figures were annual records. 

The ministry said it aims at $33 billion in exports in 1985, up 132 
percent from last year, and at $34 billion in imports, up 10.7 percent 


ister. Jesus Silva Herzog, said that 
Mexico would pay not only the $1 
billion when the 14-year loan is 
signed, but also an additional $250 
rndlioa in principal the next time 
Mexico was scheduled to pay inter- 
est on the S 5-billion loan — even if 
tire accord had not been ratified. 

The due date for the interest was 
Thursday. William R, Rhodes, a 
Citibank vice president who beads 
the bank negotiating committee 
dealing with Mexico, announced 
Thursday that Mexico had paid the 
$250 million. 

Mexico touched off the debt cri- 
sis in August 1982 when it told 
lenders it could no longer pay its 
debts on time. 

In quick succession. Brazil. Ar- 
gentina and Venezuela made simi- 
lar pronouncements. 

Mexico, and later Brazil under- 
took stiff austerity measures de- 
signed to reduce inflation rates, in- 
crease export earnings and 
conserve dollar reserves by cutting 
imports. The countries also drasti- 
cally cut domestic subsidies and 
other government spending to re- 
duce their budget deficits and their 
need to borrow. 


Gold Options ^riDcsbvcK.). ! 


The programs met the approval 
of the International Monetary 
Fund, which lent the countries 
(Continued on Plage 9, CoL 6) 


RES IN DEP 

An Account for the Cautious kwe*» 
to Protect and Increase Capitd 

US DoSar Denominated 
insured by US. Govt. Entities 
Important Tax Advantages 
Competitive 
Money Marker Yields 
No Market Risk 
Immediate LiqukSty 
Absolute Confidentiqfity 

CHEMICAL BANK. New York 
Custodian 

CAYMAN NATIONAL BANK 
AND TRUST 
Registrar 

RES IN DEP 

Case Post ale 93 

1211 Geneva 25, Switzerland 

Please send prospedus and 
account application tO; 


fob 



I 05 MZOO 





5 / 5 -tX 

1125-1475 


ano- 425 

980-109 

1550-1780 

025 - 1.25 

6 UJ- 79 

11751325 

001- un 

175 525 ■ 

&91000 


275 425 

575 725 


Gatf real -33233 

ViknrsWWteWeW SA. 

I. Quta *1 Muot-Bbnc 
1211 Geneva L WBaU 
TcL 310251 ■ Trim 28385 


Net ~utmn On USA. 


Receive 12 wee ks 
of Value Line Efr 

for $65 v 

This trial subscription is open to you only if no member 
of your household has subscribed to Value Line in the past 
two years. We make this special offer because we've found 
that a high percentage of new subscribers who try 
Value T.me stay with us on a long-term basis. The in- 
creased circulation enables us to keep our subscription fees 
to long-term subscribers lower than would otherwise be 
possible. 

Under the special offer you will receive all the full-page 
reports to be issued in the next 12 weeks on the more than 
1700 American stocks and 93 industries regularly 
monitored by The Value Line Investment Survey 

In the Selection & Opinion section, which accompanies 
your weekly reports, you'll also get analyses and forecasts 
of the national economy and the stock market . . . 
guidance on current investment policy explaining Value 
Line's b ullish long-term position on the securities markets 
. . . plus Value line's specific stock selections. 

Take advantage of this special introductory offer— and 
receive as a bonus without extra charge, the “A Sub- 
scriber's Guide” booklet (illustrated above), which ex- 
plains how even inexperienced investors can apply thou- 
sands of hours of professional research to their own 
portfolios by focusing on only two unequivocal ratings, 
one for Timeliness (Performance in next 12 months), 
the other for Safety. Send payment along with name and 
address together with this ad to DepL3i3Joi 

THE VALUE LINE 

711 THIRD AVENUE, NEW TORE, N.Y. 10017, 
U.S.A. 

Payment ta local currencies (British £66, French fir 610, Swiss fir 
266, mi 200) and requests for information shonld be directed to: 
Value line, Aft.: Alexandre de Samt-PhaBe, 2 Are. da Villara, 
75007 Paris. ClfeL 55L6339) 

Distributed by KLU Royal Dutch Airlines Publications Dis- 
tribuliao Service HoDaitd ^ 4 tt. 8 «eeke lor cWIvavy. 


i 






Dow Jones Averages 


OPM HWl LM Lost Qm 

Indus I1B7.I7 119269 117867 illAM — 4X6 

Trans Vf 4rn win <a«i is 

U HI 14465 147,16 14177 M&54— 072 

Como 48173 48*31 *7103 48093— Off 


nyse Diaries 




dan 

Play. 

Advanced 

644 

751 

Decflnad 

872 

80S 

Unchanged 

473 

457 

Tatar iseuet 

2009 

2013 

New HUs 

17 

29 

Now Lows 

21 

17 

Volume up 

147*1600 


volume down 

42J8260S 



Odd-Lot Trading in N.Y. 


ftoy 5am «SbTt 
106 381972 865 


Jon. 3 141N6 «972 

Jon- 2 13530 389,176 

Dec. Jl 140,933 532618 

DCC.M 1Z7J5D 491146 

Doe.27 112,152 420778 

■included in the sales flaurei 


Fridays 

NISE 

Closing 


V«.aMPJirt 776MXM 1 

pm.«pjA.voL m um 1 

Prer camolldoted dost 1B&A82X10 

TW*w Mode fte MflnwUe ptIch 
white dosing u won stmt 


NASDAQ Index 


Advanced 
Declined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
Hew Highs 
New Laws 

Votumeuo 
Volume down 


CSase Prer. 
243 2sj 

2SS 266 

234 235 

762 764 

10 14 


I Standard & Poor's Index ] 

Hist Lew One COIN 
industrials 18114 181.76 18124 — 0.90 

Transe. 142.13 14082 14156 — 065 

U( 1 1 If 1 m 7571 7*63 74J0 — 051 

Finance 1056 1034 1037 —0.10 

Composite 16*57 16136 16160 -089 


Com Dos lie 

industrials 

Finance 

insurance 

Utilities 

Banks 

Tramp. 


Week 

Close Ctaf* A*6 
246.19 — 022 246.06 
259 J7 — 0.13 250« 
WBX3-057 298.18 
m?6 - 1.00 28115 
235.17-035 0661 
33065 — 0.17 W*1 
23650 — UH 23769 


IrTnw Jones Bond Averages] 



Close 

ChtTO 

Bonds 

7267 

— 0X8 

Utilities 

(4>tp 

—0.15 

industrials 

7633 

Uncfi. 


AMEX Most Actives 


■1 

WL 

Hi* 

LOW 

Last 

CM* 

AM inti 

4644 

3* 

3% 

3* 



4408 

23b 

7J 

22* 

— % 


3584 

11b 

11 

11% 

— % 

CryslO 

WDHriH 

1573 

1283 

M 

9b 

3 

3 

9 

— % 
+ b 

Key Pit 

1192 

9* 

ff* 

9* 

+ K 

BAT 

1191 

4 

3* 

4 



10T7 

14* 

14 

14b 

— *r 


844 

9* 

9% 

9Vi 

+ % 


818 

13% 

13% 

13* 

+ % 

Coi«bG 

797 

8* 

8% 

3* 

+ % 

□irAdn 

790 

A* 

6* 

6* 

+ K 


AMEX Stock Index | 

Htefi Lew Close cum 

20124 201.93 20121 —198 


12 Man in 

High Lew stack 


513. Close 

HMj High Low Quai.Ch'Be \ 


3 18* in IB* 

92 13* 13b 13%— to 
6 14* Uto UK— to 


JO 15 BO 279 14% 1416 14* + to 
. 6 3403 35* 35b 35* 


5ft 'Sft M U 14 3 18% in 184% 

5^ JSS.. „„ 10 92 13» 13V, 1J%— Vti 

1 AMC* 150 M 6 Mto U16 UK- to 

]?L? 15* AJJF JO 3J BO 279 14V* UK 14%%+ to 
jVto 24 Ut AMR A 3403 life 3 5Vi 2&1H 

®* 1BK AMR pi 2.18 117 1 19W mS 19W — to 

A^: Hp1 lW 5* 7170 36*. 36% 36%-% 

JH* >£ }PL „ „ ) « in in m + u 

$?> 4446 ASA 100 65 469 47% 44 46 — * 

22 I* AVX J2 1.9 10 29 17K 169k 169k - to 

4BU 36% AbfLab IJO 38 13 1390 40% 40 40to 

23Jfc 1 6 Vi ACCDWdS 64 28 18 733 21% Tito 21% + K 


Prices on NYSE Slump Again 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Prices cm the New York WT C* / r, wv , no 

Stock Exchange slumped again Friday, record- WMJhXSj JUppij xjfUWS 


17 Month 

HWiLnw Stuck 


SB. Close 

HDSHtntiLcw Quel. Or* 


17 Month 
Higti Low Stock 


SfiL CkM 

D™. vtd, PE IDDs HWi Low Quot.Pi'gj 


Uto tto Ertsmnt 20e 1J VS 30 11% liw Uto 

JSVfc 17% EesBan X h 4 10 101 IS IS IS + to 

32% 15% EssoxC JOB 4.1 10 21k 199% 19% 199* + to 

34to Tin* Estrtne 72 3X II 10 24% 24% 249% + to 


1 ma «% w5- to stock Exchange slumped again Friday, record- 


's* l 5 *5“?* 2.11C11B 

II* AdmMI J2 20 
Hto 8% AdvSvs 811 75 
41 to asv% AMD 
Uto 6to Adveet .12 14 
15* 89% Acrflex 


8 3 I6to 14 16 — K 

17 45 10% 10* 10% + * 

13 3500 am 28% 29 + to 


4*J 6* Adveer .12 14 34 M% 79% 7*- to 

■5* Bto Acrflex 10 42 10% 109% 10% + to 

2? AefnLI 244 73 30 1194 369% 36U 369*— to 

SiS! A £ ,Lpf iB7o,0J 141 SSto 54% 549% + 9k 

*£? Ahntns 120 4.9 It 37% 25V. 249% 349%— 1 to 
59% 2* At lean 6 296 ZK 296 

4*to 34% AirPrd 140 27 10 SMI 469% 44to 449k— 2 

30to 13 AlrUFrt sC 12 10 65 IB* 189% 10* 

4V« _ie% AlaMea 50el25 254 4 3to 4 + to 


4to 1* AH1M00 50*125 
31 26b AlaPpfAX92 TZ9 

79% 4 AloPdpf 87 114 
71 61% MaP at 9M 134 

Mto 56 A lap pt 848 VIS 
139% 1016 AMBK9 X 7 A 
I7K 9K AlskAIr .14 14 
229 % 159k Alberta 5* 13 
25to 22VS Altrtsra M 14 
4 HA 23 Vj Alcan 140 44 


254 4 3to 4 + to 

32 30K 3Dto 30to 
24 79k 7K 79% 

AOOz 48t% 68 48 + to 

Sfe 61 to 61 to 6IV1— Ito 
3 ITto I2V% I2to + to 

269 1496 149% 149% 

22 2096 20 20 — 9% 

90 2Bto 2SK 20 V* + <6 

WD 28 379k 2796— K 


The Associated Pros 

NEW YORK — The narrowest measure of 


The Fed said M-l rose to a seasonally adjust- 
ed $557.6 billion in the week aided Dec. 24 


Digital Equipment dropped 3 Vi to IQS. Digi- 1 
tal said rumors that it was laying off some i 


w* ■£ SBl * 54 a ' ,7 S into im% + k m S *hcir third straight loss since the beginning The Associated Press 

SJ 1* *vx ^ vs io *% 17K i6* i«k- to °^ e flew . . , NEW YORK — The narrowest measure of 

gSSSJSSi.'S aS'S WcompulCT and other ^ u^. money supply. M- 1, rose S6.7 bfflion m 

SS '15 SS3I % 8 ,1 'g 'S a ’ffi * s s ™ 3in “ i “ tllal ’ lc losses 111 a * saon <4 9 uia mid-December, the Federal Reserve Board re- 

S Si 7s if 45 I$S X iomT ii . P»r Jones average of 30 industrial Fed said M-l rose to a seasonally adjust- 

.» 14 “w «% ™ a ?ffi B SS t , t, f 1 i r soflllc ed $557.6 bilUoa in the week ended Dee. 24 
T SSSS* i64 7J M n2 &S a ° a ^f 0 86 E 1 ’ 18 ?- 96 - . from $550.9 billion the previous weeL M-l is a 

,™MSSf" iteRd0 " measure of money supper gnmrth tlutinduda 

S “ -3 B 8 “j £ 1% mood of SSd m ^M^.S " d 

, 4 V. ito AkiMou 40*124 254 4 3 to 4 + »% disappointment among traders over the mar- 

79% T“ aIopSS? “a? ill S ^ ^ ^ ket’s sluggish start on 1985. Once the pressure 

uto 56* AtaP 51 valu “to “to “to iito of yea^-eod lax selling was lifted, many market- Digital Equipment dropped 3V4 to 105. Digi- 
int 'Sk aSSu? IS i4 a 269 iSi! {SR IJto + * watchers had been hoping for a rally. tal said rumors that it was laying off some 

22*. i5v. Alberto 44 i7 17 22 209« 2o 2o — 9% The news Thursday of a 4.3-percem rise in workers were untrue. 

4ua 2a£ akbT 3 140 o ” a t£ nt ^6 - 1 factory orders during November provided an Scovill climbed 2\ to 42W. An investor group 

xf* ai^jx IS 44 11 8iB Sk ot* a*" upbeat signal for production activity in the said it raised its offer for the company's stock 

»v% a!Ec£ limb u ” a riZ, tj* rf*- * stages of 1985. But it stirred little enthua- from $35 to S42JQ a share. 

ASP.p’ ijJ „ lBttai »k- * asm for slocks. Gold-mining issues were weak as the price of 

a* UK aid in ai 2,19 ilj 3 179% i79k ink + v% Brokers noted that Wall Street was bracing gold closed below S300 on the Commodity 

» 244% aKpS? u u i is! m m 3*4- v% for *he Federal Reserve's weekly report on the Exchange in New York for the first time in 

nto MK wwoU i40 b ^ , 8 4a34Ku JS+to moQe y due out after the close. The more than 2% years. ASA Ltd. was down % at 

if* 3* 1 ft figures were expected to show a sharp increase 46; Homestake Mining V* at 20 ft, and Campbell 

raw m<sc at 1239*123 140 in7to 1029% io2to + v% for the week ended Dec. 24. Those expectations Red Lake Mines ft at 16ft. 

§» 3o* SIS ug u i n auT «k + w w1L ' rc fulfilled, and then some; when the Fed In the daily tally on the Big Board, about four 

S» ■>?* Sil^i ot a 14 a is*— vl reported a $6.7-biUion rise in M-l, the basic issues declined in price for every three that 

^ “ AttT rt lfl6M a measure of the money simply. advanced. The exchange's composite index lost 

ft 2046 AiptiPr 3M i.9 i8 17 219% 219% n3+ v Prices of government bonds dropped about .45 to 94.60. 

1796 is£ a!SS a u 8 ™ if' 1 wft im— 'US ^5 for every $1,000 in face value m Friday’s Nationwide turnover in NYSE-listed issues, 
K* ahSS 340 33 * ^ SJ% activity as long-term interesi rates rose. including trades in those stocks on regional 

» ii w E& io ^ iTto Honeywell fell 1ft to 56ft. In the course of exchanges and in the over-the-counter market, 

gv% 52* a Brand 175 64 ? i7i 43v» «9% 62*-i issuing a forecast of higher revenue and earn- totaled 96.89 milli on shares. 

g*% 53 ABrdpf 247 ^44 4 Sto MV* uto— 2* ings for 1985 on Thursday, the company said it Standard & Poor's index of 400 industrials 

2to SS ^ iS ii « § 3* StoTto saw “cautionaiy sigiials in the economy.*’ fell .90 to I82JW. 


fffc 15* EssbxC JBOb 61 10 
34* TO* EsWnc Ti 10 11 
33K a Ethyl JS 24 >1 

11 3 EvonP 1471384 

"10* 7 Evanpf 1.40 184 
16* 1< Evan pt zm 1U 
41 30 excels 940 44 ID 

16 13* Exartsr 181eI14 


40b 4.1 10 21k 19* 109% 19* + * 

J2 34U 10 24* 24* 24* + K 

M 24 11 133 3296 32* UK— K 

471364 161 396 M 3* 

M 18J 16 79% 7V1 7to- * 

L10 11? 2 Uto 11* Uto— to 

40 14 ID IS 349% 3&to 3%to 

81CU4 U 15* 1SK U* + to 


4Sto 36* Exxon 14) 77 6 4176 44to 44* 44 K— K 


289% 21 iCInflB 130 47 7 
84* 63* 1C In pi JJD 12 
?9k 49k ICN 51 

aS*22*1CNRf 2J0 10 l 7 
17* 14 INAIrt 142 11J 
1?* UK IRTPrs 140 U 90 
<79* zm irr co 140 as o 

BTto 46 ITTDfH 440 74 
76 40 ITT Of K 440 74 

n 44to ITT mo 540 94 
sm 28 ITT pW 245 54 


182 28 27* Z7to— * 

5 82* 82* 82*-* 

303 99% 9 9to 

22 25* 24* 25* 

33 1696 16* 1496 + U 
9 IB* 90* 98K 
667 2? 28* 28* 

1 57 57 57 

28 53 53 SSto— * 

30 SS9* 55 55to+1 

5 39 3896 3836— * 


T7 Month , „ r 

High Low Sioa OK. I'M- PE 

10* Zto IMTriiNt 

30* 13* Main pf 

15* 9K iwwam 6 

43* 30* MavDi 142 u 8 

55 36* Marta 240a |8 >0 

32* 35* McOraf 240 87 


Sis. Oas? 

100s HWI low QuM-OHm 

272 6* 4* 6* 

434 SK 24* 25 — * 
134 121k 124% !»% 

446 39* 3ffh 37*+ * 
01 44* 43* 44*+ * 
4- 2Sto 25* 25* 


31* 2JK Me Deri 1 JO 74 24 06 2** 24K 3fl%- * 


12 6K McDNwt _ 

UK 6* McDW 40 17 95 


6 * 6 * 4 * — * 
7* 7* 79% + to 

52 51* 52 + * 


SSto 4094 McDnlS 32 U 12 IK B 51* 52 + * 

73K 47* AteDnD 1JI 24 9 377 70 UM 68*-^ 1*1 

43 31* McGEd 200 5J 12 214 3796 3716 3796 

34 SfcGrt? 3JJ IS 164 41* 41* 4M% 


2* lKk Alberta Jl 17 17 2220*30 30 — * 

»to 22to AJblSns it 24 12 90 28* 28* 2SM + * 

41 to 23to Alcan ]J0 U I 2403 28 379k 2796— to 

364% 27* AICOSM 130 33 n 1W 30* 30to 2096— to 

25* 17 AlexAlx 1-00 tj 818 23* 22* 23 

gto 16* Alexdr 23 61 21* 20* 2D*— to 

§7V% 624% Alls Co UJBb U 0 4277*77 77— * 


3to 16* Alexdr 33 61 21* 20* 2D*— to 

S7* 63* Alio Co l-08b 1.9 B 42 77* 77 77— * 

2696 23 AUCPpf 186 11J 2 2SVI. 25* 25*— * 

W 1896 AMInt W W M 133ZFto33V.23*%to 
S* 15i« AJBlnol 11? 123 3 17* 179k ITto + * 

*3to 8) Abl PfC 1125 124 544 91 90to 91 

30 24* AllaPw 270 94 ■ 1231 38* 28* 28*— to 

26 1596 AltenG 35 10 71 17* 17 17* + * 

455 34K 34 34* + to 


371* 28 'A AlWCps 130 U I 

64* 53* Aid Copt 174 ll3 

113 99 AktCopflUa 11 S 

107V>I0OK MOC pi 1239e113 
33to B9k AIMPd 
56* 38 AIK1S tr ZM 43 S 
17* 5* AJIlsCb 
40 34 AIKC Pi 

25to 20 ALLTL 1M 75 B 

M 77 AU-T pt 706 14 

27 2096 AfpilPr 309 1.9 18 

«* 30* Alcoa 1190 13 8 

2796 I5to Am roc 30 1 J 


22 19* ITto 19to— U 
2410 43 I 730 48U 48 48* + to 

1 H 6 * 6 6 * + to 

279 25 25 35 — to 

134 74 I 68 24* 34* 241% + * 

X8& M 6 339% 32* 329% 4- 9% 

309 1.9 18 17 21* 21* 21* + * 

1.20 13 8 1706 36* 3596 15*— 1* 

30 I J 569 16 15* 15*— * , 


34* 23* Ant Hat 1.10 48 • 3969 33to 3296 23 — * 


144 101 AHespf 250 15 

3 Ito AmAgr 
19 14 A Baler 10 

65* 52* A Brand 175 68 9 

98* 24* ABrd Pi 275 10 a 
65* 53 ABntpf 167 42 

77to 50to ABdcst 110 U I 

36* m% AQIOM M 16 II 

33* 179k ABusPr 56 23 12 


40* Am Con 190 5J 12 41? 5016 £0 


1 99* 9?to 99*— 6 
299 2* 2to 2* 

92 17* 17* 17* 

171 63* 439% 62*— 1 

3 26to 26 36 

4 63* 63* 63*— 2* 

TIM 61* 609% 61 — * 

95 21* 23* 23* + * 
43 21 2096 21 + V% 


fell .90 to 18234. 


24K 21 to A can of 280 11.9 
109 103 ACan pt 1175 13J) 

IT* 16* ACaaBd 120 1U 
3396 25V% ACOPCv 6560263 
149k 6* ACCtltC 


53* 42* AC van 
2994 1896 ADT 


1B0 11.9 4 239% 23* 23* 

3J5 13J1 5 106*106 104 — * 

220 1‘I.B 91 18* 18* 18*- to 

6560263 49 27* 27 27V% + to 

3 23 6* 6* 696 

1JNI 1? 11 843 48* 48* 48*— to 

.92 4J 20 316 20to 20 20*+* 


71* 15* AElPw 1260108 7 1635 21 20* 20*— to 

39 25 Am Exp 1J8 35 IV 6406 36* 3616 3416— to 

25 13* A Tamil A4b 2J 12 200 23* 22* 23* + * 

269% 19* AGflCp .90 16 9 2139 25* 21* 25 — * 


25 13* A Tamil Mb 17 
269% 19* AGOCp .90 36 

9K 5* A Gal tot 
57 51* AGrilB(A6Jnell.9 

72* 57to A Gal pfB 5J*5o 85 
S3 39to AGPPfO 264 S3 
14* 7Y> AHOlst 


233 8* Bto Bto 
SO 53 53 53 

3 7Dto 69* 6916— IK 
103 5ib so* so to— ito 
42 81% 8 8to + to 


55* 4696 A Home 264 52 12 1277 51 to 509% 50*— * 
42* 26b AHOXP 1.12 40 9 1301 281% 27* 28 — to 

78 6TV% Amrtch 600 BJD 1 1014 75* 75to 75V, — to 

73 HFto AlnGrp 64 J 14 W2 66* Mto 64 to— * 
ITS 112* AIGPPf 565 46 2 121 121 121 —Ito 

28* 19* AMI 60 12 11 12117 20 19 19 — * 


8* Ito AmMoi 4638 4K 3* 4to + to 

39* in. ANIR3S 222 SL9 7 2S8 38to 379k 37*— * 

36* 22* APreskl .741 2J 4 690 3216 31 9k 31*— * 

15b 9 ASLFto 7 7 11 10* II — * 

16 10 ASblB 6056 28 305 14 Uto Uto + * 

m, 27* AmStd 160 S3 10 614 31* 30* JOVl— * 

W% 15* ASterll 15 31 22K 22* 22* 

41* 26* AmStor 64 U B 267 39Vk 38* 39 

50* 461% AStrPfA 4JB BJ 255 50 50 50 

Klto 51 AStr PfB 660 115 34 51* 51* 51* + * 

20K 14* AT&T U0 6.1 1310271 19* 19 19* + to 

36to 30* AT&T pf 364 108 12 33* 33* 33*— * 

37* 31* AT&T pt 3J4 116 152 WA 34* 34to— * 

41 27 AWOtr 160 44 6 31 36* 36* 34to + to 

}2 10 AWatBt US 11.1 10b 1116 1116 llto + 96 

27* 20to AmHotl 248 95 1 34 2ft* 26 26to— to 

65* 5W ATrPr L3Se BJ 12* SZ 64 6+S+ to 

916 4* ATrSc 601 7* 716 7K 

72* 5816 ATrtM 5J5. 75 Bx 71* 711% 71*— to 

»* 26* Affltran 160 56 7 12 28* 2896 2896 

30* 17 AtneSOK 20 6 14 301 25* 25 2596+ to 

83 60 Amwpf 537 70 10 76K 76K 7616—* 

3Dto 21* Ametek 80 13 13 83 24to 23* 2416 

30* 18* Amfac 5 466 18* 1816 18* + to 

2J 10* Anrtnc s 33 u* Uto u*+ * 


AStr PfB 680 U2 36 51* 51* 51* + to 

AT&T 120 6.1 1310271 1994 T9 19* + to 

AT&T pf 364 108 12 3Tto 33* 33*— to 

AT&T of 324 118 152 Mb Mto Mto— * 

AWOtr 160 44 6 31 36* 36* 34* + to 

Awatpf 125 11.1 lOllz 1IK 1116 UK + 96 

AmHotl 248 95 11 34 26* 26 26*— 16 

ATrPr USo U 12x 64* 64 64K+16 


12 Man lit 

High Law Stock 

12* 9* 

7* 2* 

181% 14* 

36 28 
33* 29 

am u 
33 22* 

44* 261% 

36K 23* 

39* 25* 

1916 13 
17* 15* 

37 23 

50 15 

7* C* 

50* 44* 

20* 12* 

99* 44* 

20* 12* 

12* 3* 

IS 11 


Dm. YU. PE KBsKMtlLfN QuoLGfK I HWlLo* Stock 


689 12K 12* 12* + to 
241 3* 3* 3* + to 

1-32 7 3 14 17* 17* 171%— to 

112 &9 8 43 35* 35* 35*— Vk 

195 1U 28 31 31 31 

50 U 5 2 16* 16* 16* 

186 SB 10 2SB 27* 27 27* + * 

188 1? 14 208 37K 36* 364%— to 
180 10 8 973 33* 33 239%+* 


48 14 16 154 33* 33 


44 U 108 
116 1Z5 33 

T64 64 12 654 
140 10 7 1026 
85 11 5 

543911.1 211 

84 S3 14 21 


W* 14* 14*+ to 
1716 17 1716+ K 

25* 25* 25*+ * 
46* 46K 46* + to 
6* 6* 6* 

4? 48* 48*+ to 


84 17 14 23 14* 14* 14* 

260 AJ II 2238 55* 54* 54*— to 

62 11 197 16* 16* 16* 

29 5 4T% 4Va — Ik 

2.10 188 31 13 Uto Uto— to 



33* 241% CBI in 
87* 61* CBS 
10K 416 CCX 
10* Bto CCXpt 
27 CIGNA 


.7* 716 716 


30* 17 AtnesO I 
83 60 Anrospf 

30to 21* Ametefc 
3o* 18* Amfac 
20 IB* Amfcsc 


3?* 26* AMPS 
24 14* Amaao 


25* 25 25*+ to 

7616 76to 7616— * 
Mto 23* 24* 

18* 1816 IB* + K 
11* Uto 11*+ to 
32 31* 31*— * 


tt S*52 

31 13* 12* 

& SJ*SX 

656 2* 2 


WW 23* CIGof 
9V» 496 CLC 
32* 21 CNAFr 
H* 8* CNAI 
41* 3416 CPC IfU 
19 14* CP Nil 

26to 18* CSX 
156 117 CSX pt 

33* 22 CT5 
IS? .6* C3 lltc 
28* 22* Catiat 
«* Bto Conor 
23* ll* Cal Fed 
42* 32* CatFdP 
24* 13* CalHui 


:B[ In 160a 56 IS 26 25* 251% 25* + to ! 

B5 300 A3 9 367 73 71* 71*— 1* 

CX TO 23 5* 5* 5to 

CX Pt US 135 200* Wl 916 914— to 

IGNA 260 5.9 19 |W4 449% 43* 43*— * 

IG Pf 235 108 176 27* 2716 Z7to + K 

CC 25 5* 3 Sto+to 

NAFn 13 172 32 31* 32 

MAI UOalU 7 ! IB* 10* + to 

PC Inf 220 53 14 236 39*3816 38*— * 

PNtl 160 13 8 131 18* 18 1816 

SX 184 4J 7 1935 23 22* 22*— * 

SXpf 780 58 3 140 139 U? -4 

T5 180 11 13 63 33 32* 32*— 1 


38 35 9* 9* 9*—* 
9 88 27 26* 27 +* 


21* 12* Amraps 4 31 12* 

241% 19 AmStti 160 58 7 62 34 

37* 25* Airaltd 160 48 17 283 37* 
7to i* Anaonp 656 2* 

X 19* Anahnia 17 637 23K 

W6 1916 Anchor 168 7.1 17 247 21 to 

3S* 24* AnCtav 182 38 16 100 35* 

12 91% AndrGr 80 28 22 M 1016 

33* 16to Anoallc 56 38 10 98 17* 

74* S3* AntUKJS 280 28 li 111 71* 


23* 115% Col Fed 82 28 4 
42* 32* CalFdpf 4J5 118 

jss ansa. ^ li n 

S* lfl%CRLkS X '* 


12 1473 9* 916 9* 

4 805 16 15* 15H- * 

8 42to 42* 42* 

79 28 1414 14 MK + M 

6 12* 12* 121% 


774 17* 1616 1C*— * 
41 4to 4* 4* 

1 12* 121% 12* + K 


32* 16to Anoallc 56 38 10 

74* S3* AMMtB 280 28 18 

54K 44 AlMMUPf360 68 

2S 13* Anlktr 88 18 21 

T7 8* Anthem .04 j 13 
16* 10* Anthnv 64b as 6 
14* 9to Apache 88 28 10 
4 1% AochPwt 

20to 15V% ApcflP unZ809lZ5 
55* AoPwpt 8.12 126 
Jl* 2716 ApPWPf 4.18 138 


2V% 2 2to *«i CDJTI5P 2J0 37 11 190> 68K 67 67 —1 

23to 22* 231% S., ?** CdPOCB 160 88 37* 371% 3716— K 

21 to 20* 20* 23* T4K ConPEg JO 7 IHV* I8to IBto 

359% M* 3fl%— « 174*123* CDPCttk 88 -1 15 59 159 157*158 —0 

jS&S=S % 

i? .. .. _ _ _ _ 


s 21 ^ ^ 

J 13 102 13 12* 13 

LS 6 12* 12* 13* 


28 10 311 Id 


261 16 
5100x 64* 
W 31* 


•a Tt+>? 

15* 16 + K I 
63* 64* +1* I 
31 in* + * 
29 29 I 

2BK 2816— ' '* 
9* 10 


29* 26 ApPWPf 31SJ U1 1 29 29 29 

31 17* ApIDto l.ljt 48 17 267 29 2816 28 to— * 

29* 8 AppIMg 1.141118 63 21 IB 9* 10 
M* >5* Arch On ,14b 8 16 1366 18* 18* 18* 

22* 14* ArtzPS 260 11J t 916 22V. 21* 22 — to 

28* 23 ArfPpf 368 128 22 27* 27* 27*—!% 

2716 131% ArkHS* 60 24 7 58 16* 16 16* + * 


174*13* COPCItk 88 ,115 59 159 157*158 ~0 

-,iL. ,22?? S*’* 1 . 1 ?. .I- 54 *4 W 1M 43* 4216 4216 — to 
708* 1«* COPH pf lOJOPKXC 134 101* 101 16 101* + * 
18* 11 Gartnoo 68 65 U* 11* 11* 

36* 24* CortlHa 182 10 10 40 34* 33* 31* 

5OT6 Carnot 2814 3200 82* 82* 82*+* 

31* 13* CaroFI 86 1 1 II 136 21* 20* 21 —1 

26to 1916 COTPw 240 107 7 355«x 34* 241% 24* 

19* CarPPf 147 128 21 22* 22K 22b— * 

36* COTTee 210 U M 54 29* 38b 39* + to 

7Vk corral 87 8 13 22 B9b 8%k 8* 

«b 309% CarsPtr U0 38 17 42 17* 37* 37* + * 

78J6 CaJHw 122 13 44 41 33* 22* 22*— to 

19b CarTWI 68 18 10 ITS 27b 27 27*— K 

151% 9b COKNG UO &2 9 38 14* Mto 14* 


2564 

63 

2365 

132 76 9 2817 
66 28 11 1797 
450 128 lOz 

180 38 12 63 

18 U IS 284 
2.90 98 54 

86e 6 3 HO 
60 28 8 OT 
60 16 13 351 
JB 44 11 41 

268 111 12 
84 19 14 56 

42 45 10 7H 
246 37 15 08 

180 36 23 81 

60 8 37 3 

84 3 16 77 

160048 22 7 

15 481 
60 18 S23 

ttV. °1 

11 73 

180 11 10 449 
443 98 6 

440 88 8 

40 U 7 115 
33 205 
238 18 4 160 
1.100118 7 

180 37 9 Z 
1.10 27 10 63 



22*+ to 
33*+ to 
37 

^%+lto 

m a 

»8&=a 
88-* 

47*- to 

34**— to 
50b— * 

r+s 


44K— * 
32*— to 
46* 

44 — * 


27b 131% ArkHS* 60 26 7 58 16* 16 16* + * 

27* la Arhip 180 64 14 1673 16* 16* Mto— to 

lb to Arm Ft! 35 

13* 9* Armada 27 7 12b Uto 12b + b 

23* 9 Armen 583 10 9* 9*— to 

33* 18 Armcpf Z10 104 25 19* 19b 19*+* 

17* T5to ArmsRi 68 24 7 51 19* 19 19% + * 

34 22* ArmWJn 180 34 9 293 33b 32* 33b + * 

29 18* AraCp 180 48 9 49 28* 28b 28b— to 

29* 13b ArowE 80 18 7 116 15* 15b 15* + * 

22* 16 Artra 82 18 SB 17b 16* M* — to 

19* 14 Arvlnl 7 106 19* 18* 10*— * 

46* 34* Arvlnpf 280 48 3 46* 46 46 — * 

34* 17* Asarco 801 17* 17* 17* 

29* 20b Ash IOII 140 66 205 25* 24* 24*— b 

40K 33* AstllOPf 440 I IJ 7 38* 38* 38*— 1% 

40* 31* AstllOPf 386 118 29 36* 35* 36 — b 

61* 45* AsdDG 240 58 8 2132 49* 49 49*— b 

98 73 AadDpf 475 58 424 80* 79 80*—* 

28* 18* Afhkjne 160 86 15 5 19b 19 19 — to 

25 19* AtCvEI 268 131 7 1020 24* 24* 241% + K 

52* 40* Ah Rich 380 78 16 5307 43* 42* 42*— * 


40b 30* CarsPir 180 38 17 42 

32V, IBto CO+Hw 182 58 4* 41 

27* 19* COrfWT 68 18 10 115 

151% 9b COKNG 180 &2 9 38 

19* 91% CastlCk 105B 

33b 15* CStlCuf 116 184 

52b 28* CotrpT 40 14 1476 

25* 16 Ceco 86 17 9 65 

82 62* Cetaue 460 54 7 299 

38to 34 cehkl pf 450 120 1 

IS 7* Cenavn 81* .1 17 174 
. 381% 30* CenM 238 66 8 376 

26* 17 Centex n m 

ZZ* 16* CenSOW 180 84 4 09 

257% 161% CenHud 284 114 5 IMl 
23* 18* ConllLt 2.14 98 8 112 

42 36 CnILipf 440 11.1 50a 

T7V» 14 CnllPS li* M 7 MB 

22b 17* CnCoEl l.w 88 6 81 

i£K 7* CeMPw 168 147 4 232 
m% 14 CnSora 84 58 11 94 

17* Wh CVtPS 180 108 5 20 

17* 7* CentrDt 38 

9* 7* CntryTI 88 84 8 34 

25 18* Canvill 240 128 8 34 


22 B* 8U S* 

42 17* 87* 37* + to 
41 23* 22* 22*—* 
115 27b 27 27*— K 

38 14* 14* 14* 

1058 13* 12* 12*—* 
184 22* 22 22 — to 

1476 31 30* 31 + 1% 

65 20* 20b 20*+ K 
299 80* 80 BO* + V6 
1 37* 37* 31*— to 
174 8 7* 8 — 1% 

374 37b 36* 37b + to 
38 22* 221% 22*— to 
4» 22* 22* 22*— to 
188X 24* 24b 24*— 1% | 
112 231% 23* 2JVk— to 
50a 40* 40* 481%— Ito 
MB 17b 17 17 —to 

81 221% 21* 22* + 1% 
233x 9* 9b 91% + to 
94 Mto 15* 15*- * 
20 17* 17* 17* + l« 
36 10b 10 TO — * 
34 9b 9* 9* 


I?* 10M DamanC 80 1J 33 
JTto ZIto DanoCp 188 48 8 
7* 4* Oanafw 
Ub 8* DOW .18b 14 
Wb 64* DortKr 484 58 10 

59* 38 DatoGn 18 

30* 13* Datpnt IS 

12K 8* DtaDn 80 28 9 

W% 12* Dayeo 84 14 6 

37V. 26* DavtHd 84 24 12 

16b 11* DaytPL 260 1X0 7 

2M% 19* DeonF s 68 U 15 
4«% 24* Deere TOM 38 19 


47 tl 

51? 26b _ 

29 7* 7 7 

Uh 16 ms lib IQ* Hb+ K 
18450 10 38584 B3* 84 + * 

18 3736 56* 55* 55b— 1* 
_ „„ IJ 1113 191% 19* 19b- b 
80 28 9 100 9 8* 8*- 1% 

J4 14 6 25 15* 15 IS*- to 

84 24 12 3086 30* 29* 30* + to 

LOO 1X0 7 407 15* 15* 15b 

68 I J 15 21 36to 15* 26* + Vk 

OO U If SM 38* 29* 29*- K 


B*=8 

32b + b 
41* +1* 




*** J«% 1O0 38 If SM 38* 29* 29*— b 

I!* j ?*!" ? U2 B 162 21* 21b 21b— K 

*3! 27 ~. ? c !? oA r 40 16 8 2713 44b 43b 43*— * 

4K DoWono 54 5 4* 5 + to 


25 18* Canvlll 240 123 8 34 21* 20* 21* 
23* 15* CrtiMd M 28 11 174 22* 21* 22to 


38% 32* ANRcPf X75 108 
125 97 AtIRcPf 200 27 

20 14* AtfasCP 

*«b 18b Auoat 82 13 14 
40* 29* AutoOf 42 14 18 
49* 24 AvcoCp 10 

98* 52 Avcapl 
23* 15* AVEMC 40 38 11 
32 23 Avery 40 18 13 

15 10 Avloll n 6 

491% 27 Avnet 30 13 14 
26 19b Avon 2J0Q 93 9 

42* 18 A yd in 9 


25 

10b BMC 

68 

36 M 

36 

31* 

IS* Baimcs 

50 

17 10 

96 

2JVS 

15 Bkrlntl 

.92 

88 16 

913 

36% 

10% BaMar 

36 

18 U 


3b 

* vIEskJU 





2 atauos 




45% 

28% BallCo . 

1X8 

29 11 


23% 

UM BallyMf 

50 

17145 

12/2 

IS* 

7* Bally Pk 


18 



X75 108 lOQz 34* Uto 34* 

200 27 16 102* 102*1021% —2* 

18 15 15 15 

82 13 14 150*21* 71* 21*— to 
42 14 18 369 3S% 38* 38to— to 
10 69 49* 49* 49* + to 

3 98* 98* 98* 

40 38 11 8 19 Iff* 19 

40 18 13 173 31* 31 31 - to 

6 9 121% 12% 12* 

30 13 14 710 37to 33b 33* 

230 93 9 1338 21 2D* 21 — to 

9 45 21* 21* 21* — b 


13* 13 13* — Vk 

27 26* 26*—% 

16* 16 16 — to 

20b 20^ 20b— to 

3 2M 3 


27* 17 CeasAIr .40 21390 528 19* 19b T9* 

38* 16* aimptn 60 13 10 3843 71* 21b 21 to + to 

29 19 CMIIpf 180 5.1 13 23* 23* 23* + to 

56% 43b CMnl Pf 440 98 156 50% 49* 50 — Ik 

12 8 ammSo 60 48 10 160 Bb 8to Bb + * 

12% I vlChrtC 212 lb 1* Ito— * 

6to b vfCtrt wt 17 + 

Uto Ito vlairtm 26 1% 1* 1* 

52* 35* Chase 365 74 52763 47*47 47* + to 

44 36% ChOM Pf 585 127 16 41* 41* 41* + * 

50 « Chase Pf &57oU4 335 53* 53 53 + % 

57*51 Chase Pf BJOellJ 581 52* 5216 52* + b 

19 13* Chelsea 46 17 B 3 17* 17* 17* + to 


2 2 « 1» OonfUs 

SJ? 47b 30b Dernm 

101% 401% 4BU— 1V% M* Mto DeSala 14B 43 

»b 5* wvkTto l?* J1 J! ' 2*“ 168 118 

S w DetE Pf 9J2 118 

.22 ™ iS + b 55., «% DetE pf 748 1X7 

(M 15« \5V» — Mi 57¥f 46 DflfEBf 7J& iu 

« W “» 34 IV* DEpfF 275 1U 

^ ™ 2«6 20 DEWR U4 114 

™ Uto 19* DE pfO 213 1X6 

19 DEnfP 112 138 
19* 19b 191% 33K, mi DEpfB JJS 118 

n* 21b 21M + Hi 25* 19* DErtO 360 1X7 

»* 19* DEWM XC1J6 
-®% 49* 50 — % 30 24b DE orL 480 UJ 
Bb 8* Bb + * 30* 24* DE 5 k 412 138 
lb 1* Ito- to TOO* S'' OE pfl T2B0 128 
17* 13b DetS pr 288 126 


25S5f ' Jt 11 “ 223 56* 55* SSto— 1% 

12? g etlMT * I? 47 22* 22to 221%- to 

30b Dernm 15 90 42* 42to 42to+ 1% 

Uto DeSala 160 48 V 10 32to 3Zto Sto- b 

”to 168 118 7 284 15* ISto 15b- Vk 

59 DetE pf 932 138 50z ABb 67 67 

47*DetEpf 748 1X7 lOQz 56 56 56 +1 

46 DetE Pf 765 118 400z 54 M 54 +T 

45V% DWEpI 786 134 230z 54 54 54 — K 

DEpfF 275 IU 6 24 33* 23*+* 

20 OE nrR 384 136 6 24* 24* 24* + to 

19*DEpfO 113 116 TB 231% 5 3 —5 

19 DEPfP 112 138 3 24 M M +1 

19b DEpfB 275 128 I 27% 2Z* 22*— b 

19* DE pfO 360 117 73 23* 24* Mto— to 

191% DE pfM 362 134 16 251% 25 25* + V% 

24b DEdtL AM 118 20 29 28* » 

24* DE PlK 4.12 1X9 14 2V* 29b 29% + 1% 

“ OEpfl 1280 12J 17 100U 100 l« ill 

13b Petgpr 288 128 7 T7% 17* 17* + b 


» 48 Chase Pf 6J7P126 335 53* 53 53 +% 27% 21* CHGIa 

CTto 51 CtMnepf 680ell8 581 52* 52K 52to+ b 22* 16* DtamS 

19 13* Oietaea 46 37 B 3 17* 17* 17% + to 3H% M* DtoShi 

36% 24* Chemed 16B 54 11 271 26* 26b 26b— to B8to Sb DMbld 

OT% 23toOlNY> 236 TiJ 5 1651 34* 33to 331%—* Jl]b 70* DtoltaJ 

S r s» s ssoits ^ s* r %*+ s t r 1 B as bst2 

*b 30 Chevm 260 BJ 7 2272 30* 30 30* + to 29b 28% DonfitS 

43b IB* CNWsf 10 98 24% 24* 241% 24* 16 K 

VS* 94* OUMIw B4 78 191 to 186*191 to +6 30 U* DonLJ 

74* <7 CMMIpf 13 67* 66 67b +11% 49b n Donfcy 

25b 16 ChlPnT 7 21 19* lWk 19* + to Mto nu, dotkv 

15 7* ChkFull JOt 41 135 111 1% I 8U— to 40 DoW 

35b 24% ChrfsCr 68TI6 291 3Sb 34K 36 + * 34to 25* OowCh 

10% 5 Chrism l S* 8* 8* 51% Sm DowJn 

13% 9* Chroma 36 10b 101% 10*— tt w ™ Drava 


17* 80 48 10 UO 18% 18% 18% 

J5 SSf 0 '- -Si H 23 .M3 74% 14 14%+ to 

23 17 DIGIopf JB XS 10002 2S 25 25 +2 

2% 21* DJGlaof 285 BJ 6 Sto Bto §*- * 

16* DtamS 1.76 86 6855127 21 18 n +3b 

38* 34* DloSh Pf 400 T1.1 14 36 351% 36 +1% 

»to m Dl-hld 180 17 11 « 71% 70S 71b- to 

UW 7W* Dfdtal 1311954 108*104 MS —3* 


16* 6to Domes .12 IQSB 6* 6V% 6* 

»b 20* DamRs 272 9J 8 640 28% 28* 28to- to 

5P 9 It,. Dana Id 66 17 8 14 17* 17% 17* + to 

30 14* DonLJ 88 3 IB 23 30 29% 29* 

2£ 3 160 11 14 204 47% 47* «*_ * 

Mto Wk Donmv UO 46 in 4 M*k Mto 24* 

S.*, S? K22L .S X? 13 186 35* 34* 361% +1 

34to 25* OowCh 160 66 10 2574 27b 27 27 to— * 

K* S2Ji n 13 3 ’■? 20 303 <7^ «% 40to— * 
M 7£» Drava ^ 46 60 Uto UK IT* + to 

Zf% 15b D rear JO 48 14 277 lfl 17* I7to to 

IB* 14* Drexfl 200 UJ 7 18 IT* 17*- b 


15% 7* Bally PK 18 141 9* 9to 9% + to 

40% 30b BaltGE 380 BJ 7 2092 40 39% 39* 

26b 20* Bncone 160 X9 9 199 25* 25b 25* + * 
«V% 3* BonTex 80 48 25 1180 4* 4to 4* 


fib IB* CNWst 10 98 24% 24% 241% 24* 16 DOH 

195* 94* CWMtw 14 78 191 to 186*1911% +6 30 U* Donu 

749% <7 CMMIpf 13 67% 66 67b +11% 49b 82 Boot 

25b 16 ChlPnT 7 21 19% 191% 19% + to I Mto Bb naral 

15 7* ChkFull 33t 4.1 135 189 Bto B 

10% 5 Chrism 1 8* 8* 8* | 91* jsie DowJi 

13% 9* Chroma 36 10b 101% I0to— b | 15 Drava 

n* 20* Chrjjr 160 XJ 4 7795 30% 29* 30 — to 23* 15b Drew 


058 6* 6% 6* 

640 28% M* 281%— % 

14 17* 17% 17* + to 

23 X 29% 2V* 


34* Chwbbs 230 43 11 952 51b 50% 51b 
21b Church 60 27 17 462 30* X 30 


5519 38 Bmfoo 1.W 21 11 230 51b 51 51b 

43* 29 BkBOS 260 58 6 49 40* 40 40* + b 

53* 43 BkBospfX95e 86 U 47 47 47 + to 

36* 26b BkNY 204 56 6 37 35b 34to 34*— b 

25 15% BnkVaS TOO 43 8 287 24% 23* 23* 

23% 14% BnkAm 152 86 10 2844 17* 17to T7% 

52to 40 BkAm pf 5810121 250 43 42% 43 + % 

211% ?1K BkAm pf 288 ifi 14% 14% Mto 

29* 22% BfcARty 260 8,1 B . 20 29* 29b 29V>— 16 


30to 21b Church JO 27 17 
43 35to Cln Ball 212 78 7 
15* 1* OnGE 216 145 6 

33% M* ClnG Pf 485 146 
fgJ6 50 CtnGpf 930 166 
52% 39 OnGPf 764 145 
641% 68 OnGPf 988 145 
34% 20 ClnMM 82 X3 34 
33* 20* ClrdK 84 26 U 
291% 16* OrCItY JOB 6 13 
19* 13to Circus 12 


78 1«% 14* I4*+ to 34b 30to Spmof aS 1?0 8 ^ 5 


Lli 145 6 478 14* W* 14* + to 

175 146 200a 33 32 33 

' 166 10DZ 63M 62% 611% +1 

'64 149 AOOz 51 59 50 

•88 145 300a 64 63 64 +2 

82 X3 34 IBS 22 21% 21* + % 

84 26 13 206 31% 21 31to+ to 


Mb 30* duPmpf 350 UJ 

44 39 OUPnfpf 450 UJ 

20to 22b DwkaP 268 86 

761% 64 Da kept 880 128 

am sm oukeaf 880 iaj 

67 n ihikepf 7J0 126 

25 21% Dukepf 269 116 


A 13 569 21* 71b 21* + * 32* 28 Duke pi 355 IU 

12 u 1P4 mu 17* | «b S% SSw aS 123 


58b 37* BonkTr ZTO SM 6 1060 Mto S3* Mb- * I PJK?- ^ * KS HS S un Pl d !■“ XO 19 


23% 19b BkTrpf 2J0 116 

39 35 BkTrpf 422 115 

12* 7to Bonner JAe 6 19 
37* 19 Bant 64 25 9 

23% 18 BamGp JO XJ 6 

44 32to Barnet 1J6 38 8 

46 35 Baralpf 2J7 56 


2 211% 21V% 21to+ to 
I 36* 36* 36* + to 
7 10 9* 10 — b 

78 221% 21% 71 H— * 
13 21 % 21 21 — Ik 

049 42% 42b 4Zto— to 
632 44b 43* 44 — b 


86 68% CM [CP Pf 853e118 210 72 711% 71to 

441% 32 atvlnv ZJO 5.1 9 BOSS J9b 30% 39% + 1% 


16% 11* DMU 
15* 12b Qua Pf 


33% 31* Barvwr 60 28 13 589 22* 22 


68, 491% CtVinpf ZJO 36 3 99% 

26b 21* Ctyinpf 287 IU 1440 24to 

11% 61% aaffr 82b 98 13 7b 7 

39 23* aorkE l.» 41 14 Z15 26* 261% 26* + to f 55 43* DiMPf 

13% 6% OavHm 15 45 13 W* U + b 1 is* DycoPt 


SS + % JS* IW DOOPrK X10 1X5 

^ „ l«6 13* DudPT 25I14J 

S’* 22 Duan r 285 115 

26* + to 55 43* Dim Pf 780 I3J 


121k 8% BAS IX -12b 15 10 

27* 17% Bausch X XI iS 
24* 11* BaxtTr 53 25 10 
25% 16% Bov Fin 50e J 17 

30 19* BaySIG 260 93 8 

39* 28* Bearing 1J0 XI 11 
36 24* SeutCo UQ U t 
65% 46% Beatpf 138 66 


.13b 15 10 16 10b 10% lOto — to 

88 XI IS 542 25* 25 25b— b 
53 25 10 4537 13b 131% 13b + to 

50e J 17 60 25 24* 25 + % 

JO M B 31 20* 28 28% — b 

JO XI 11 14 32% 32% 32% . 

30 4J 9 924 28* Mto 28%— to 

138 66 242 5316 53 53 — b 


20b 13* ClevEI 252 1X9 5 1704 19* 19% 19U 


35 17% 17* T7%— 1% | 23* I7to DvnAm 


8B U 7 
80 3 IT 


5* 32 31b 31*— to 

7k 40to 40 40 — % 

7 1728 29 28* 28*— b 

5 ftc 71% 71% 7T%— I 
570z 66* AS* 66* +1K 
KOz 63* 63* + Vk 
18 23% 23% 23*- to 
13 321% 33 32 

_ MOZ 67% 66 67% +1* 

9 4M 63* 62* 63b— 1 

6 862 15 !«% 14*— to 

290z 14% 14b 14b— % 

7 Uto IS 15% + to 
200k 1 6V» 16% 16l%— |% 
10(ta 24 24 24 

390z 52 51 S3 

7 u 10b 10 wva— to 

1 27 22% 21* 21*— to 


41b 30* BecfnO 180 XO 13 265 40% 39* 40* + to 


10% 9% Baker pf 
go* 12% BeWnH 
30% 19b BHHwt 


60 26 12 
J6 2J 12 


30 19% BelHwef j0 28 


38 5b 5% 5% 

60 10% 9% 10b + to 
33 16% 16% 16%— b I 
67 25% 24% 24% —1 , 

0 25 24* 24*— 1% I 


SPA 46% ClvEIPf 760 1X5 
17b IBM devote M S3 
17* IS* Clvpfc Pf 253 135 
20% 14* Clvpfc Pf 184 118 
31 22toClerax 180 48 
T7* 14* ChitoMn 
» 22% dueftT 1J0 3J 
19% 14% Cluerpl 1J0 U 
29* 1216 Coacnm 60 26 
3fb 23% Coastal 60a 16 
39 24% Off pf 153 6.1 


350z BBS 
65 13% 11% 11%—* 

3 16* 16% 16% — % 

102 IF* 15% 15% — b 

199 38% 28* 28* + * 

9 16b M UK + to 

647 27% 27% 27% + % 

2 17% I7to 17% — to 
183 17% 15% 17 
49B 28* 27% Z77b— 1 
8 31 30 30 —I 


Cocoa 176 44 U 1012 62% 62 


83 &S% BeUAil 660 8.1 8 1171 79% 79% 79* 


22b 9% Golem 

37* 25b Cotemn 180 44 


2298 13% 12% 13b + * 
» 26b 26 26% 


27% ZZ* BCE 9 2M 100 28* 25% 26%—% 

35% 19% Bellllld J2 16 11 5 23K 23 B + % 

359k 27b Bel ISO I 260 77 8 3008 34 33% 31*— to 

SDK 35* BeJoAM 82 13 16 16 43% 4] 43% + to 

«% 73 BndM pf 4JB4 5J 11 Blto B1K (IK + K 

S5% 23 BenfCD 2J0 65 B 194 32* 31% 32 — to 


35% 23 BenfCP 2X0 .65 
35b 30b Belief pf 4J0 126 
1S2 184% Bene! at 550 3J 
30* 17 Benefpf 250 125 
•to 3to BengtB .Ue 4J 
16K 71M Bergen 
8% 3% Berlunr 
19K 10* BMfM M XI 
39% 14b BefhStl 60 36 
99% 37b BefhSfptXM 125 
3m IB* Beih3lDll» 11.9 
34 19% Beverly J2 U 

34% 18* BkjThr JD 18 
28% 17b BIOCkD 64 25 
27* 20 BiCkHP 161 *J 
m 14K BkdrJn J* 12 




BICkHR 260 55 12 


150 126 1 34 34 34 

^ XB 90tl43% 143% 143% — 7 1 

150 IXS 20z 20 20 20 — b 

,15e 4J 7 238 3% 3% 3%— % 
8 114 TJb 13% 13b 
10 13 4 3% 3%— to 

84 XI 11 119 lib M UK + K 

60 36 886 leto Mto 16% 

LOO 1X3 192 40* 40* 40%—% 

[50 11.9 S3 21% 20% 21 — to 

J2 1 J 18 m 31 30% 30% + to 

JO 39 16 551 20% 20b 20* 

64 2J 12 873 23 22* 2»— b 

60 4J 7 34 36* 26% 36*-% 

56 18 9 57B 17% 17% 17%+ % 

60 58 12 « 45% 44* 45* 


Sfito 70% CatgPol USB U ID M2 24b 23% Mto 
39% 27% CWIAlk 1 JO 18 7 239 38K 77* 30 - K 

16% 9to Col Fits * .16 1.1 11 M 15 14% 14%—* 

31% 20* Cel PfM 160 58 9 163 27% W% 24% — K 

57 39% Cottlnd 258 XJ 11 442 51% 51 51% + to 

37% 27 CoiGae UO 98 4 123 37% »* 32*- b 

36% 21b CSOpf 3L4S 4 24 25* 34 

107 96 CSOpf D1S2S 144 4101107 105% 104 —1 

107% 95 CSOpf nU8S 748 22flrl07% W WVi 

41% 37b Camhln Z08 SA IB 95 36* 38% 3B%— % 

3S% 25* CmbEn 1 J« 55 13 424 33* 33% 33*— % 

21% S Coimfli 80 16 12 1071 12% 11* 13%+% 

26* 15% ComMfl JA 23 13 10 16% — — “ 


3 6% 26% EGG M 15 IB 389 32 31* 31*— * 

33% 21* ESvst 50 20 13 306 24* 24b 24% 

26% 2D* EoaleP TJM 46 9 15 24 23% 23* + K 

*& u *fSSL MU rk’fV* 
a n ,ft , * + * 

J3% 6% EsAJrpf 56 11 

!2£ S? *L ” 11%— b 

19% 9* EAlrpfC 9 13 12% 13 

27% 19b EastGF 150 4j 9 3463 27* 25% 27* +1% 

M 12% eadUtf 134 11 3 6 73 16* 16% 16* 

2a. SS ms? HS 8 44 ^ 3122 19 ** •»“ * 

Si 1 ? H? 4 Eatw 180 25 8 130 53K5Uk52K+% 
HS S3? l chnn . .86 29 U 94 25% 2** 25% 

2* S3? Ec ** rd 1X0 36 12 200 27* 27% 27* 

« B% &mm 16 41 B 2 33b 31b 33b— to 

!£5 II.. E P° . 84 15 12 443 16M Mto 16%— * 

1B% EriHord JO 24 16 997 23* 22* 23% + K 


78 60b EsKod 

56% 37* Eaton 
27b 20b EchJln 


389 32 31* 31*— * 

304 24* 24b 24% 

15 24 22% 23* + * 

#34 17 16% 17 + * 

5B2 4% 4 4% 

n '« T£ 

56 11 10* UH— * ; 

47 11* 11 ll%— b 

9 13 13* 13 


129 70 A9K 49*-* 

130 » Hi 52b+ Vk 
94 25% M4 25% 


38* 71% CmwE 100 1BJ 
29* 21* CurEpf 162 XI 
16b 13 CwEpf 180 127 
Ub 13b Cwe Pi ZOO 119 
24* 20% CwEpf 187 113 
ff% 54% CwEpf 860 1X0 
57 46 CwEpf 784 1X4 

25% MU ComES 2J2 95 


12 10 16% 15% 15% — * 

4 3118 It IT* 17*— to 


1X0 105 7 2661 27% 27* 27* 


I 77% 27* 77% 

W 15% IS 15 — % 

4 15b 15% 15% 

5 23K J3K 33* 

SOt 64% 64% 64% + % 
SDK 54 54 54 

63x 22* 22* 23%—* 


160 26 15 1853 55 Mto 54* 
190 46 11 <77 If* 3tb 39% 


C7* 44 '" BoImC PfSjOO 95 10 52* 52* 52* 

97U 15b iolffier .10 5 25 32 21 to 20* 21 + K 

2* iwS ftorfS W«»S« Aft OVt- K 
g% 16% BorgWO ■ 9a * 4,4 S 2 l£ 2 l n s ~ * 

n& AMs mrmm 35 5n 5 5 

Mb e«ed U4 96 B 27BX 34 33* 23* 

63 BotE rt BJ8 122 2009 72% 72% 77% +1* 

mu, 9 iSeSr U»1W 4 TO 9% TO +to 

'21? -Zu, aScS 166 UJ 21 12% 17b 12*+ to 

JI& 5% bZSX jab IJ 10 10OT 19* Mb 

“2 i5[? SSoSr 160 55 10 37 29b 3B% 28% — * 

meS 41 BrlStM 160 38 15 2877 50% 49% 49% + % 

Mb BrtSJlPf 2X0 19 11 104% 104% KMM-* 

’^lltoBflSpt ??60#X * OI 72 21* 21% 


34% 20* Carad 180 45 11 421 26* 2k* 24* + Ml 

38 16% CPtyti 84 .9 23 350 26% 26% 3jK 

3*% 26 Comoor 55e 19 11 4 29* 29* 29* — to 

21* 11 CampSc 10 49 13* 13* 13*— % 

46b 29 Cnfvsn 30 Kin 3S* 34% 35 —to 

2BK 19* ConApB 67 13 13 153 27 36% 26% — * 

22* 13b CcraJr 84b 1.1 12 371 21* 21b 21* + to 

18b 12* ComES 152 XI 7 9 17 14* 16*— to 

25 19% Cm M3 260 M I 20 24* 24* 24*— b 

IBM IS* Come 68 29 4 91 V4 TO* 14 + % 

31b 27* ConsCd 212 7.1 7 2186 30 29* 29%— to 

40% 95 ConE pf 465 126 2290z 38K 37* 37*— * 

44% 38 CgnEPf 5X0 119 2 42b Ob 42to— to 

34% 25 CensFd 164 46 10 178 31* 31% 31* 

30 20% CMFtfl 1X0 15 11 79 29 2B% 28%— Vk 

42K 31 CmNG 2J2 5J 8 742 41 40* 41—* 


2* «a 66 28* a* 28 *+ b 

* “li IfS 3 " 1 2 27K 27* 27b— * 

M* 9 EIToron 12 52 11* Uto 11* + b 

15% BtoEleor J6 4.1 11 9 8* B%+% 

ffk 2* ElecAs 3 3% 3% ]% 

JW 4* EMM U 46 4* 4% «%— % 

J2£ .1* SfffiSL" - 7X0 119 5 B* B* I*- Vk 

34% 13 EtehOB JD8 621 23 21b 21 31* + % 

'U? X0 6X 12 29 U* 13* TO* 

» E»drrf 30 82 7% 7 7%— * 

77b SM ElPOEl 260 U 13 934 69 68% 6B%- * 

10* SVt EmRds 94f 9J 16 2J3 TO* 9% Uto 

26 71* EmrvA 50 XJ 10 137 16* 16% 16* 

160b <9 ! 3B 79 38% 28% _ % 

'Sf *1™ CmoDl 124 u 7 40 11% 18* 18%+ * 

4* 3* EfWPf 67 11J 5001 4 4 4 

«k 4 EfflOPt 50 116 Wht 4* 4* «*— % 

Si ~ EmPPf 91 115 20Qz 8 8 8 

fnora. J2 X7 IS 432 27* 27% 27to— * 
29* TBU EreteSu 56 2J 11 11 28* 2BK 


160b 49 | 3M 29 28% 2*0— % 

1J6 9J 7 40 18% 18* 18% + * 

67 113 SOOZ 4 4 4 

50 116 Hh. 4* 4* «*— % 

91 115 200i 8 8 a W 

J2 27 IS 432 27* 27% 27%— * 
56 IX U II 28* 28* 9% 


22% 17% EiHercn 160 79 17 Z173 20* 20 


an 97 EnKhpflOJl 106 530x100 

^ 1ft I3£5* 28 176 a 

31* 9% Entarn ss 9 

TO WHElrtnen 185c U 38 17> 

71* 16 EnMIn UO U 7 JO » 

3M 23b E OUtfOX 1JD 58 13 U 33 

,5% 3 Eoutmk 3 « 

lift HI ,M ,s i # 

Wk 28% EofRlB IJ2 43 5 59 3S1 

14* 9% Eaulttn .13 18 7 7 W 


ttiW ff%99%-l% 
55 9* 9b 9*— * 

25 lift Eft + * 

50 20% 20* 20% — u 
U 33 31 33 

3 4b 4% 4K + Hi 

if Eft lift 7k 

59 3S% 3S* 3S%— to 

7 WK 10 10b + b . 


Dn.YU.PE lOSs Hlati Urn OjoI.QiYh 


4* 

24*+ % 
28% — % : 

38 

37% +1% 

39 42% 
an* 

17% +1 
18b + * 
37% -HU 
18% + to 
iBb + to 
18 + to 
12 — to 

iir* 

tzb + * 
36* + b 
6% + * 
1%+ K 


6 40 

380 4.1 8 615 
225 X! 7 
X76 86 f 1528 
nl 48 

88 22 U 8 
32 

30 4J 9 62 

360 10.0 13 

.16 T8 9 4B 
82 9 19 302 

5 5 

38 45 8 14 

80 23 15 155 
9 341 
164 49 7 7 

21 534 

152 G 9 B3 
.16 XI 9238 
I 90 XI 8 32 

164 63 14 188 

JO 56 17 74 

260 46 8 413 
180 46 9 92 

ZOO 65 10 19 

80 ZJ 2333 
6J4BZ16 M 

264 

JO 41 9 2166 
3 17 7 21 

168 59 7 139 

UD 4k 11 10 

60a i.i 9 111 
1J2 66 15 474 
1-30 8J 14 459 
1 537014.1 2 

14 7732 
426 

X34 56 7 122 

257 83 9 

84 26 10 137 
2J8 6J 6 36 

IN 209 
263 103 210 

134 7.1 13 186x 
64 43 8 299 
150 49 7 87 

1X0 XI 17 24 

J5e 5 6 

8 168 
J6 L4 10 521 
JB 26 TO 223 
M 25 12 2S 
161 123 3 

80 6 1 ? 50 

12 495 
.140 5 13 II 
XM 9J 9 1249 
60 10 12 39 

114 

58 28 18 150 
60 27500 397 
280 45 10 26 

160a 17 312194 
156 11 J 14 
164 28 14 149 
64 17 12 207 
68 7 J 14 18 

134 15 60 35 

131(216 IM 
60 X7 12 659 
60 20 14 35B 
60 27 5 81 

2X0 75 32 

60 IJ B 74 



25* 15 GAP .180 6 425 

32 20 GAFpf 180 39 3 

34% 29* GAT X 180 XT <2 
44 33* GATXpf 250 65 1 

41b 19% GCA 14 345 

65* 48% GEICO 31 15 10 41 

TOto 4 GEO TO 

13% 5* GF Cp 26 

43% 34% GTE 3X8 76 7 1371 
22* 19* GTE pf 268 UJ 27 
10 4% GalHou 17 

50* 33* Ganrft 168 XI 18 512 

23* 17% GapStr 50 26 11 154 

38* ID* Georht 60 X6 13 138 

Uto Getca 56 14 13 13 

53* GemCa 127 11 

Xb GnCOrp 150b 45 15 3262 

15% GAInv 2X541X1 195 

29* GnBdh 1X0 26 8 61 

42 GnDvtl 1X0 15 9 1S52 
48b Gen El 280 XJ 13 3869 
Mto GnFds 250 46 9 1177 


Sb gSe? 

tfto GnFdi 


7%+ Vk 
54 — % 
72 +2U 
43%— «k 
22b— b 
12% 

IB*— * 
16*- to 

13% 

Bto- % 
28% 

19%— to 
10% 

5%+ to 
33*— K 
34 + b 

31% 

14% — b 
21 *— * 
Z 1 K + U 
14% — % 

51% + U 
24to +1 
31 — % 
71k— to 
31% — to 
4to + to 
16* 

23*— to 
25%—* 
30* — to 
53% — b 
20* + * 
is*+ to 
41*+ b 
18b + % 
14b + % 
4i*— r* 
26%— * 
9*+ M 
45to- K 
6 — to 
25% — * 
26 

19%+ * 
24*+ * 
31*— * 
H*— K 
28*— b 
25% — to 
33to+ % 

29 - % 
12* 

3M— * 
21 +1% 
34* + b 
23% 

13% — Vk 
4 — to 
17 + % 
15 + to 
49*— * 
43M— * 
11* 

59 + b 
11% + to 
8* + b 
29*— b 
Rk- to 
14H+ to 
30* + * 
22b— to 
27U 

30 - Ik 


24%— b 
30*— * 
32% — b 
42 

34 — * 
57U— to 
4* 

6 —to 
40b 40*— b 
22 22 —to 

5% s%— to 
47 47% — to 

15* 15*— b 
64* 64* 

34 34%+ * 

16* 16% + K 
41* 42%+ b 


25* 15b JUIflt 180 7J 22 153 16% 16* 16% 


38* 30* lciotKJp 128 a 5 
26 13% idaolB 


151 38* 38% 38* + to 
19 13% 13% 13% — to ! 


23% 17* lllPewr 264 116 41 0627 x 23 22* 22*— b 


34% 27b UPOwpf 4.12 1X9 

SO 49U llPOWPf 575 UJ 

50% 45* llPOWPf 5X3 111 

36 28% llPOWPf 467 1X3 

32 25% HPOwpf 4X0 1X2 


730y 32% 32 32 — * 

240x 48* 48* «% + % 
4x 48 48 48 +lb 

5940y 33* 33* 33*- b 
4x 30% 30b 30b— % 


33* io* Mcinrg 
44b 32* McKern 260 63 10 
69 54 MClCpf 1J0 19 , 

15% 10 Met. eon • 

6% 3* Mcceo wt , , „ 
41b 27% Mood 120 U 1 


22 zm 27 Z7b+ * 
47 38* 38% 38% — % 
7 61% 61% 61% — 1 

17 11 10* 10*— b 

11 4 3% 4 +to 

490 37% 33* 33% + to 

18 Mb 16 16*- to 


29% 21b ITWs 64 28 15 289 28 Z7% 28 + % 

37% 37* Impawn 100 6.1 12 1424 33* 33 33 — to „ 

9* 5* ImcICo 101 8* 8b 8%- b » 

15* 8* IN CO 80 IJ 1537 12 11* 11% + % 7B 

T7to 14 IndlMpf 115 UO 1 14% 14% 16%— to Mb 39 

17* 14* IndlMpf 125 1X0 II 17b 17 17* 36* 72 

2Jb 20% IndlMpf 275 IZ2 5 22%22%22%+b 3to 2 

25* 16% IndIGss 118 61 4 69 27* 23 23b— b 22 1 X 

15 5% innrco .14 2615 302 5* 5* 5*+% 35* 24 

24b 13b lafmtc 13 99 16* Mto Mto— * 9 f 

55* 35% InoerR 260 5J 67 45 «4b 44% + b 4% 2 

35 27* Ingppf 285 76 7 31% 31% 31%— b 56 48 

15% 10% I nor Tec J4 4J 19 4 13% 13b 13% 4 7 

32* 19% IntOStl JO 23 1086 22* 22b 22b— * M% IT 

48% 38* InldStp# 435 IU 535 41% 41b 41b — b ** _£ 

21% 14 (nsllco UO 54 10 83x 18% IB* TO* 42% 37 

12b 4% InOPRs 241 4* 4b 4* + to M* V 

29% 11% IntgRac 5 IB 13% 13* 13% 25% 17 

33% IV IntgRpf 3J3 14.1 ID 21* 21% 21%— to 27b 23 

Mb 42 IntgRpf 6630146 20 46 66 46 18b 11' 

<2% 25b IntgRpf 685 146 49 29% 29% 29% 85% 49 

18b 7b IntRFn 31 8* Bto 8b X O 

18% 15% llcpfia XlOallJ 29 17% 17* 17* 23 T 

68 55 Intern 3X8 X1 923160*60 60Va+ % 19% 15 

25 130 129*130 +2 20b 17= 

191 10* 10* 10*— to Mto 4 

TO <3b <3* 43* 32% 7X 

41 9b 9% 9% 51k 1 

16 18% la* 18% 9% 51 


22 12* Mesnik 84 1-3 13 IB Ub 16 IBto— to 

«% 3«S SSra 76 29 7 1011* 36% 26 26 — * 

53 33% Mellon 260 SX 7 576 45% 44% 44% —lb 

26* 22* Mellon pfZ80 UJ « 24* 24* + % 


45% 30* MelvtU 1J2 14 11 527 rb 36* 36% + * 


18% 15% HaiSe X10O11J 

68 55 intern 3X8 XI 9 

146% 120 inter pf 775 &J 
IS* 9% Infrfsf 60 £6 4 
51% 41 UArfli 360 6A 6 

19* 8* I ntmed 
2T% 1«* LntAhj Jl U I 
m% 99 IBM 460 17 12 


Merest 180 28 9 16 5$% SSto 55* + b 

Merck 120 15 M 1122 91* 90% 90*— * 

Mor df h JO IJ TO 47 54% 54% Mto- to 

Mercvn JO 3X111 2*44 26% Uto 26* + % 

MesoOf 1973 3 2% 3 + to 

S 5 946 77* 17% 17% — to 

MmoR 176e X9 26 30% 30 30 - * 

JleIXO 8 39 6* 6* 6* 

22 3b 3to 3K + to 


59 40b Merest 188 22 

97% 78b Merck 180 13 

56b 39 Mor df h JO 1-5 

36* 22 MerLvn JO 3X 

3% 2 MesoOf 
22 12* MeeaPt 

35* 24* MetaR 176e X9 
9 5 to Mesab JlclXO 

4% 3b Mestek 
56 48% MtE PfH 8J2 1X1 

4 2* MexFd .130 47 

Mto 11% MchER 1J8 8J 


26 30% 30 30 — * 

39 6* 6* 6* 

32 3b 3% 3b + to 

iOfa 53 H 55 
363 2% 2* 2* 

31 16 15% 15% — * 

8 5 4* 5 + to 


6* 4to MICKID s M 18 10 8 5 <% _S + to 

42% 32* Midcan 2J6 5J 8 1794 61% 4ffk 48%— to 

M* 9b M klS ID 178 119 5 3041 13% TO* TO*— to 

25* 17 MMFtas TOM 56 18 25 U 17% 17% + * 

27b » MWE 268 10X TO 36 76* 26% »6— to 

60 11 TO 32 12% 


27b 23 MWE 

18b 11b MJitnR 

85% 69K MMM _ 

30 23* MMPL 256 86 

27 7b Ml ml ns 
19% 15 MoPSv 130b il 
20b 17* M OPS Of 266 12J 
Mto 4 MltCl 


TON 56 18 25 18 17% 17% + to 

261 10X TO 36 26* 26% 2fi*— to 

60 11 13 32 12% 12* 12% + % 

X40 +4 12 2556 78% 77* 77*- to 

256 16 7 ID 29% 29% 29% + K 

166 9b 91% 9to— to 

180b 6-1 6 29 19* T9* 19* 

266 128 2 20* 20* 2DK 

1007 6% 5* 6 + Ik 


128% 99 IBM 460 27 1210010 120*119 119*— b 

29b 22% IntFlav 1.12 48 M 343 26* 26b 26%— * 
13* 5% IntHnrv 1183 0* 8 Bb + to 

9* 2% IntHT wt Iff 5to 5to 5* + to 

44% 23% IntHPtC 66 40% 39 40% + % 

50* 20* IntH ofA 24 31 30 21 + to 

28 17* IntH PfD S3 25% 75 25 to + to 

49 32% intMln 260 73 11 106 6 36* 3» 36% + b 


IntMn pt 4X0 116 1 33 35 35 +1 

intMUlt 176 67 8 107 26* 25% 26% + U 

intPOPr 260 45 11 936 53 Sib 52% + % 

IntRCS 14 123 12* 12 12* 

IrtfNrth 268 6J 7 193 40* JVto 39% — I* 

Irrmtof B68 10J 30i 84% 84% 84% + to 

mtNf pfJULSO 76 1 M2K14ZK142*— Ito 

IntoGoi 1X0 31 11 10 33% 33* 33% 

IntBOkr 10 16* 16to 16* + b 


35* 30b InlMnpf Am 116 
33 23 infMuH 176 67 8 

59% 46 IntPOPr 260 45 11 
17% « IntRCS 14 

<2% 32* IrtfNrth 268 6J 7 
87* 82b InMtPf 868 IOlO 
1 148% 126 MtNf PUOJO 76 
36 24* IntoGoi 1X0 ID 11 

17b 10 IRtnc*r 
19* 15% IntStPW 150 1X1 7 
20 16* InPWPl 258 11J 

18* 14K lowaEI 1.90 106 7 
27* 21% lavrIIG 260 95 7 
1«% 17 lowlllpf 2J1 120 
30* 25 lowoRs 3XB 105 7 
33* 26 I pa ico 292 9.1 8 

14* 9* IpcoCn 34 XI * 
Mb 23% irvBks 1J4 U 1 
54 42* IrvBkPf XlVelU 


32% 23to Mobil 250 86 7 9665 16% 25% 2S*— V. 

5* % vIMoMH 43 to * * 

9% 5% MOdCpI 34 4* 6% 6b ** 

74 Mb Mohaec 60 1 J 9 » 22* 22* 22* + * 

16* 8% MahkDt 1304 10% 10b 10b— to 

24b Id* Monrch JO X3 23 40 15* 15 15Vk + * 

53% 40* Monsns ZJO X5 8 1821 42% 41% 41%— to 

30b 26 Mid DU 256 BJ 7 IB 29b 29% 29* 

30* 14* MaaPw ZOO 106 8 362 19* 19% I9b 

17b 14% MonSt 1.KW10X 75 16% 16* 16*— to 

8* 6* MONY JO 96 8 173 8% 8* 8% 

45* 34* AMareC 2X0 46 12 26 45% 45* 45*— to 

25% IM MOTTM 1X4 47 11 3 2Zb 22b 22b— to 

28% 23% MCTMPf 250 107 14 24* 24b 24% + * 

80* 56% Morgan 460 5J 7 1774 78 76% 76*— 1* 

39to 28b Morgn wl 23 39 38* 38*— to 

34b 26% MPTKnd 160 4.1 8 58 33% 33% 33% 

33 IBto MOraaS JO 46 8 44 18% 18b 18b-* 

IB 12 MIoRtv 164o 95 10 159 17b 16% 17b + % 

3Tto 20 Morion & 64 24 12 342 26* 26 28%— % 


3 2Zb 22b 22b— to 
M 24* 24* 24% + * 
774 78 76to 76*— 1* 
22 39 38* 38*- to 

58 33% 33% 33% 

44 18% 18b 18b—* 


MlBRtv 16*o 95 10 1S9 17b M* 17b + % 
Merlons 64 26 12 342 26* 26 26%—% 


24 18% 18* 18*— * 46% 29b MOtrias 64 17 10 2474 36% 33% 33%— * 


290z 19% 19% 19% + to 

121 17* 17* 17* + * 

23 27* 27% 27b 

lOQz Ub 19b 19K + * 

M 29% 29% 29b 

279 32* 31 32b— b 

43 11 10* 11 + to 

58 32b 32 32 — to 

25 45 45 45 


24b 15* Munfrd 54b 26 11 

43 26 MurnhC 160 37 9 

38% 24 MurnO 1X0 47 9 

24* 18* MurryO 180 67 10 

13 11 MutOm 1640116 

11* 3* MyerLn 


41 21% 20% 20*— b 

37 37* 37b 37*— % 

873 24 23% 23*— to 

15 19* 19b 19b—* 

37 12* 12* 12* 

35 4b 4to 4Vk— % 


27*20 JWT I 1.12 48 11 43 26% 36% 26%— % 

35% 23% J River 56 1.9 9 560 29% 28* 29b— to 

19 12% Jormwy .10 6 8 69 17* 17b 17b—* 

15 10* JoonF I.ISe »6 115 12% 12 12 

41b 23* JeflPIS 172 14 ID 309 39* 38* 38*— * 

2f% 24% JorC Pf 4X0 143 

Uto 12* JerCpf 218 1X3 

8 5* Jewlcr 18 


120r 28b 20 28 —1 

25 Mto Mb 16% + b 
8 7to 7 7 — to 


25% 14 NAFCO 
SI* 39* NBD 
28b I4K NBi 
20% 16% NCH 
36% 23 NCNB 
33 20* NCR S 

24% 13 Nllnd 
17 lDtoNLInd 
2% % NVF 

49 33% NWA 


JOb AS 17 38 17% 17* 17* + % 

260 4J 7 59 50* 50b 50b 

11 222 16% 14% 16*— % 
72 XJ 12 II IM li 18* + * 

172 XB 9 143 35 34* 34*— K 

JO 38 8 ytm 23% 24* 241k— * 

7 23 17 16* M%— Ml 

80 1.9 75 315 I era 10% TS^D— % 

JO 11 W 1244 42* 41* 43 + * 


42% 28 JcihnJh 188 36 M 220 35b 35% 35b + * 

69* 37% JahnCn 156a A3 9 CT 43 41* 43 +1* 

.30* 21* Jansen 1X0 47 14 2 24 24 24 — to 

22% is* Jaetens JO X7 13 a 21* 21% 21*— % 

32* 21* JayMfO 160 56 M 384 25% 24* 25% 


38% NabscB 268 AJ 11 1411 51 


5P35, 50% — % 
180 AJ 13 197 25* K 25 — * 

7 79 27 26 26 — TK 

37% 27% NofCon 1X0 12 8 32 31% 31* 31% 

IBto 11% NfCnvs 76 25 15 1492 M* MU 14% — i t 

30 22* NofDtat 280 86 11 103 26% 25* 26% + W 

19b 16b NDtotpr 1J5 185 317 17* 17 17* + * 

20* 12% NfEdue 11 9B0 13 12% 1H- b 

29% 16% NatFGe 158 76 4 33 25b 2Sb 25b— v» 

22 Wl NFG at 270 11X 1 10* 20* 20*—% 


22 Ub GnHast 60 23 2 
19% 8* GnHous 84 27 10 
34* 15% Gnlnst 50 XI M _ 
60 41* GrUMIIts 121 A5 12 784* 

CBBEn 5 *S 

Uto » oSf? 0 ' *M U ,3 ill 

SBASSl. 164 26 22 % 


30b 
16* 17% 


M 39* GnSfcml UO X9 13 196 
8* Sb Gensaa 9 213 

3V IJ* GnRad .M 6 14 82 

25b IS Genstg 1X0 ff 

33* 24 GenPti TOO 13 M 322 

25* 18 Go POC JO X2 11 2376 

36* 33 GoPepf 234 68 4 

35b 32b GaP PfB 234 tA 8 

31 30b GaPcpfCZ24 A9 1 

27* 22* GaPwpf 364 13J I? 

30% 25% GaPwpf 376 1X1 II 

22 17b GaPwpf 256 126 8 

21 17 GaPwpf 252 127 If 

24b 21b GaPwpf 275 124 18 

62% 52 GaPwpf 7 JO 1X3 220r 

61* Sib GaPwpf 772 1X2 lODz 

32 20% GertoPs 1.16 47 ID 148 

21 12 OerMs .12 J 11 291 

10* 6* GtantP 10 


II* 5b GfbrFn 
26b 16* GfffHIII 


.17 J 11 291 
10 

3 436 
52 28 14 411 


58% 42* Gillette 260 AS 10 853 
17* Uto atome 13 

.9* 4% GloWM 84 58 Z75 

26 17* GlofaMpf 350 173 41 

15* 8% GldNua 10 482 

6% J* OWN wt 319 

25b II GldWF 80 J f 512 

36* 24* Gauch 156 5J 6 939 

31% 23 Goodyr TOW 63 7 2761 

20% 13* GordaJ 52 XX 0 437 

36% If GouM 68 13 12 306 

46* 36% Grace 250 73 10 ZZ3 

46 47 Gralngr 184 22 12 16 

13* f% GtAFet 60 X0 8 237 

70a 26 9 
lJ5el16 6 
152 A3 7 


18 11* GtAtPc 

39* 27% GtLkln 
21% 15% GNIrn 
43b 31 GINNk 


<7% 51% GINNk pfATS 88 


26* 16% GtWFfci JB XJ 9 1233 

19* «% GWHbd 34 410 

15% Ub GMP 172 UJ 9 74 

26b IM Grvytl 180 AJ 12 681 

S 2* Graiier 5 183 

20 U* GrawG JOB 22 IS 48k 
Wi tV, GrubEI J8 IX 10 153 

29* 21* Grumn 1X0 18 7 255 

26b 23* Gram pt 2X0 HLB 11 
8% 4b Cranial .16 XO 24 IS) 

23% 16% Guardi 32 16 13 93 

33 20 Gullfrd 60 XI 7 13 

35 2Sto GHWkt .90 18 8 566 

62 516 GtfWpf 535 WJ 1 

24b 12 Gulf Rs 25 5 312 

U* ID GlfStUt 164 127 6 902 

30% 24 GtfSUPT 3JS 1X9 39 

W4 27 GHSU pr 460 118 25 

29b U* GAtra 5Se AD 8 274 


49*— * 

K=3 

^+to 

u*— % 

^+* 

EZl 

w* 

Z2b i 
W +* 
5#to+ to 
24*— to 
19*+ to 
f — to 
f* + to 
23*- to 
53*— 1* 
12 * 

4*— to 
20%+to 

22* 

26b— * 
25*+ to 
17% + * 
Mb- * 
39*— b 
56b— to 
13b— * 
15b— K 
37* 

MK + to 

35%+ Vk 
57* 

23*-* 
Mb + * 

15 # + * 
24*— to 
3 

18%+ to 
8 + to 

Mto— to 
is* + to 
s* 

23 

12 + to 
Mto + to 
i7b 
12* 

12* 

17* + Vk 
B + % 
13* 



80 ZX 10 114 

12 517 
184 16 8 1772 

13 73 
40 A1 40 440 

475 86 2 

80 O 58 
60 48 1869 

2X6 UJ 4 236 
4XS 1X6 llttc 
280 112 70 

2X3 1X1 M 
1X0 28 11 Ul 
2X6 117 5 329 
276 88 7 95 

282 117 2 

283 117 15 

228 

60 ZJ 8 34 

150 1BX 11 
875 UJ 10 
176 45 12 233 
1X0 35 4 15 

JO 36 18 484 
2J4 97 I 71 


I.W A1 12 212 


130 63 19 UB 
aoo &a i 

AN AJ 11 
280 46 9 372 
74 26 M 121 
280 93 74 507 
32 17 72 55 

M 46 17 306 
4X0 11J -«te 
1254 

2X0 XI 12 479 
60 15 » 64 

-141 3 27 29 

60 36 4 25 


8* 

U* + * 
34to— % 
28*- * 
14% 

55% +2 
T7 + Vk 
9*+ % 
20 + to 
32% 

16*- * 
17*— to 
46b + % 
17b 

19* 


« 27 MalGvp 176 AS 6 236 39% 3nk 38*— * 

5b 2% NtHom 51 2* 2* 2* 

37* 23% Nil 857 29628 27*28+* 

25* 17* NMkdE 52 23 12 1651 22* 23% 22% — Vk 

12* 6* NMIneS 3 7* 7* 7*— to 

»b 20* NIPresf ixo AO 12 -3 24* 24* 24* 

Mb 9% NfSemi 12 3977 12 11* 11* + % 

B* ZIto NtSvIns 1X0 17 11 S3 27 16% 27 + % 

ITS 31* NShmd -««« 36 TO* «* TO* 

U* 10 Nercon _X* 3X 6 544 10* 10* 10* 


317 17* 17 17*+ * 

im 13 12% 12*— U 

33 25b 2Sb 25b— to 
1 »* 20 * 20 *— to 


16*- * u* 10 Nercon X2e 3J} 6 544 10* 
17*— b 39b 21* NevPw 276 97 0 42 28% 

46b + % 14 Uto NevPnf 160 1X5 450r 13b 

17b 20% 17% NevP pf 250 116 200z 20% 

31%+* 14* 8% NevSvL 50 45 5 3 11% 

19* 40* 28* NEnaEI X60 ?J 4 3N 36* 

19 + % 26b 21b NERPpf 276 UX 1 34* 

23*— % 36* 19 NJRec 2X4 76 7 11 26 

14%— b 23 14* NY5EG 264 HU « 386 22* 

14*— U 30 24 NYSPf 375 125 10Hz 30 

73*— u 69 55% NYSPf 868 135 50a 65 

39to— to 26 19* NYSPfA 3X3elX2 2 23 

26*— to 17% 13% NYSPf 212 127 3 16* 

lb 29% 24 NYS PfD 3J5 1X4 5 28 

21 +b 17* Uto NewoH JD 38 W 14 15* 

24*- to 40* 2B* Nowtni 68 18 25 1134 39* 

12to- to 16to 11 Mowflll 47Bo37.1 2 12* 

!2_ 7b NwhIRi 2J5829S 30 0* 

22* -- " 

3b+ b 
Mto + to 
28*+ to 
86 * + 1 * 

66 +3 

47*—* 

29b + to 


Newmt 1X0 25 29 361 36* 36 


42 28% 38b 28% 

■tail 

ii-Pf* 

TlitV- 

5 28 27* 28 + % 

14 15* 15* 15* 

24 39* 39 39 

2 12* 12* 12* + Vk 
30 8* 8* 0* 

8 ’KfeS-* 

H »b §E 25b+ to 
50a 27% 27% 27%+ to 
»>*u% :n% 31% +% 

2 21 * 



4b KRTn 10 ffk 5* 5* 

WA HollFB 1X0 A3 134 23b 23* ZBk— * 

44 27% Halbfn 1J0 64 9 42* Z7* 27 27*— to 

Ito * Haltwd X8 64 571 lb Ito lb 

Bto 5* Ha Iwdpf 56 65 51 Bb7*8b+* 

5S* saw Homrt> 2X4 A4 8 15 46b 46 46b + to 

13% 11% HonJS 7X701 IX 93 13* ID* 13* 

15* HanJI 164a 97 31 19% 18* TO* 

21% HndtplI 72 22 14 472 41b 39% 41 — U 


at 15% HandH 66 A0 17 

24b 16* Hanna JO 23 11 

45 23* HarBrJ 1X0 U 12 

49 32% Harlnd 72 17 17 

13% 7* Harnui 7 

Wl 14% Hn>Rw 60 26 17 
42% 22* Morris 68 X3 12 
15 10* HarGrn 

» 19 Harm 181 U 12 

37* 23% Hartmil 1.12 37 9 

16b 13* HattSe 160 116 10 

21U 15*HawEll 164 77 8 

11* 8 HtmA -TOO. 7 & 


664X17 52 16* M* 16*+% 

60 23 11 14 17* 17* 17*— U 

X0 23 12 45 44% 43b 43b— 1 

72 17 17 23 47* 47% 47%— K 

7 158 9 B* 8*— b 

60 26 17 36 38* 28U 20* + % 

68 X3 12 390 27% 25* 26*—* 
10 32% 12 12* + * 

81 U 12 71 24 26 24 

.12 37 9 305 38* 28% 29* + * 

60 116 10 9 15* 15% 15% — * 

64 77 « 67 21 20* 20* 

-We. .9 8 35 10* 10b VHk+% 


34* 15* Haxtom X6 16 44 210 26* 26 3f%— * 

13% 9 HCRLOfc .32 12 18 2318 9*10— * 

15* 9* Hecks 88 26 27 25 Mto IB* 10* 


15* 9* Hecks 
23% 13b HedaM 
38% M* HeKmn 
21* 15* HefUa 
45 32 Heinz 

» 17b HfthleC 

25* 18 HdraP 


88 26 27 25 M* IB* 10* 

800 15 M 581 13* 13* 13* 

6B> XI 8 661 M 15 15*—* 

X6 2X 11 IS 11% 18b 18*— % 

160 17 12 07 43% 42* 42*— to 

S 37 Uto 15* 16 + * 


27 22* LN Ha 264eML6 9 15 

15* 7* LFE 31 

17% 12 LLE Ry 282el58 556 

5* 2 LLCCp 6 

19* 8* LTV 1445 

30% M LTVA 631 27 9 

60% 45% LTV pf SXO 18J 1 

31% 18b LTV pf 106 146 Ml 

*9 50% LTV Pf 585 9J 29 

17* TO LTV pf 125 86 70 

IB* 10% LQuInt 14 41 

34* 15* LocGss 170 AJ 7 77 

12* 8% Lofdrgg 80 26 41 

31* 23* Lafrapf 264 96 16 

18* 12* Lamaur 64 17 4 N 

3* 1* LanSn 152 

14% 10% Lawtlna 54 AJ 13 131 

J6to 13% Oar PI 3D 7 TO 499 

29* 20% Lear Paf 267 UJ 26 
49% 37% LearSa 160 A1 ? 379 
19% 14 LeaRnle XA 26 13 41 

39% 34% LswyTr 150 il 10 15 

28 20% LooEnt JO 71 15 57 

13* 9 Leo+ta 20 70 17 5 

31* IMk LeaPlal 64 23 9 108 

5 ZVh UBftVol 234 

38% 25 LVInpf 3 

19% 13* Lehmn 29Bel9J 213 
IWfc 9* Lennar 80 15 16 14 

33* 16 Leucttt 6 33 

36 20 Lluodpf 2X0 57 22 

Oto a LevISt 1* 76 11 483 

43* 35* Levifz 31 17 9 51 

50 38* LQF 1X2 36 7 S3 

79 62 LOP pf 475 67 24 

26* 21 UMyCp 72 2J 14 768 
67* S3 Lilly 370 47 10 593 

28 ISb Limited 84 7 19 97 

41% Mb UncNte 164 47 9 393k 
21 11% UncPL 22401 Ofl 7J 

N 16b Lilian 260 XI 9 576 

25% 16% LHtWlPf 260 96 6 

48* 30% Lockhd 65e IX 9 574 

42* 30* LocttN 60 26 12 17 

106% 70% Loewi i 160 IX 8 196 

XZ* W LomFtn 1.16 19 12 249 
OTk Ml LfiinMt lX6el0.1 SO 61 
29b 17* LnStor 170 77 9 304 
53 44 LuoeSpt 5X7 11X 265 

11% 3* LI LCD 2 1407 

33 16 LH- PfB 4O2 

30 14% UL PfE SOOZ 

65 35 LI L pfl 1 

23b Bto LILpfX 62 

2336 * LILPfW 13 

23% 9% ULpfV 22 

28 UK LILpfU 33 

23 Bto ULpfT 13 

17% 6 ULpfP 1621 25 

U 7 LI L PfO 65 

<H 34 LonoDr 168 27 13 43 

39* 18% Loral 68 17 15 570 
IS 11 LoGenl 54 47 9 25 

34* Sb LoLond IXO U io 363 
29* 17 LaPoc 60b 37 26 433 
37% 28* LaPLpf 450 118 23 

24 16* LaPLpf XM 1A8 11 

Mb 22* LauvGa 264 96 8 415 

49* 31 Lowsti 200 A3 4 48 
2Sto 14b Lowea X2 1J 15 1157 


Xb + b 6* 1* Nwpork 9V 1* 1% 1 

to* f to U* U NlaMP 2XO 117 6 B12 17 16* M 
2*to + to 2Jfc a NtoMpf X60 1X5 10Z 25b 35b 25 

5 n* +1* 38* mt, NlaMnf 360 1X1 5* 27% 27% 27.. . . 

« t +3 MW 24 NtoMpf AM UX 2D0Z 31% 31% 31% + % 

* 5 32?* 4X5 136 lOQz 35* 35* 35* + % 

29b + to 25 19% NkxMpf 276 127 2 21* 21* 21* + b 

?5 -* '«» 223.137 _ 17 M* 16% 16b + to 

I lb— * 17* 10* Nlcotof ON 4 8 NI1S M* 15 

lfffc+ to M* 24b NICOR 3 106 IS *3 29b M* 29b + * 

33%— 1 19 12% NabfAf .13 J 36 309 13% 13b 13% + to 

!<to+ to 64b 45% NOTfkSa 380 55 5 1129 58% ST* 50*+ * , 

35* — Vk 38* 17b Norlpi 1 17* 77* 17*— % h 

Kft + J? S 14 2*S g SE-?3 b ,M 7 ’IS 35% 34to 34*- 
53ft— 3to 50 43 Honor Pf Age! 07 40 44% 44% 44%+lto 

16* 17* 12 NMtek XS 5 7 119 15% 15* 15% 

I ff NACoal IXO XT 4 5 47* 47* 47*— K 

I <?£ SN* NAPIJIS 3X0 26 8 298 36b 35* 36 

— 21* 13* NEurO UtoHLB 9 49 14* Mto M% 

ff% 2«k + to Ifto 1W* NonfUl 165 IU 5 1559 14% Mb 14* 

!?% !?% . ttto lffk NIMPS 156 1X7 4 3451 11% IT n* 

TO 42 42 42 — % 


14% 14*— % I 48% 42% NIPS Pf AAlelTX 


2% .3% A*to 33* NoStPw 384 76 7 1220 41* 41% 41* 

19% Mb 33% 28 NSPWPT 3X0 UJ 100Z 30% 30% 30%+ b 

M M +1* 35b 30 HSPwPf AM 12X 300Z 34 34 M +1% 

45% *%+ % 36% 31* NSPWPf 4.18 121 27002 33* 33* 33* + * 

21b 21b— % 36% 32 NSPpt AM 117 200a 35 M M 

53% 55 +1 62b 29* NerTel 60 IX 8644 23b 31 b 31*— 1% 

M% 14*+ b 5% Zto Nihaafg 17 3b j 3b + b 

ID* II 39% IJ0 16 11 314 35* 35% 35*- £ 


24* 25 + * 62b 40* Nwtlnd 268 56 18 779 SO 49* ffl + * 

8to 8K— b 22% 19% NwtPpf 250 127 3 M H* 19to 

25 25 25* 8* NwSIW 20 U lffk II + to 

Mft Mg*r to MK » A Narten 2X0 57 11 M 35% 35 35b- b 

.S .ffi" 4 "'* 5ft 2ft ,JI0 7J 12 7,0 23 23%— * 

JJtl U% 58b 48% Neel pf 6.150123 3 S0% SB% 50% +2 

21 ? to— to 57* SI Nwstpf 591*116 1 52 S3 57 +TU. 


3 20 W* 19* 

30 II 10* II + % 
TO 35 35b— b 


58b 48% Nwetpf 6.150128 
57* SO Nwstpf 57M1I6 


3 50% 5B% 50% +2 


24* 2«k— to I 41* 2D* Nova 
43 43% — b I 44b 26 Nucor 


IS 15 - * 
29* 29*— b 
27* 28% +1% 
10b Wb— to 
18* 10* + to 
3 3% 

29 30 +1 

IS IS* + to 
12% 12* + K 
31b 31*+ * 
33% 34 +2 
2Sb 25* 

37 37% + % 


W% 4* NirtrlS 82 il 
75* SB* NYNEX 6X0 8.1 


LVinnx 1 52 n 52 +1% 

X9e 13 9 935 23* 23 23% - 2 

X6 13 11 262 31* 31 31b 

32 il 112 6b 5b 6K + * 
U0 8.1 B »91 74* 73* 73*— * 


27* 23% oSutoP 158 57 » 10 0 2ffk Wk &L± XL 

11 VtoOodPWt IIB7 10% au 

23?h 20 OcdP pf 2.50 12 J) 1 2ff9k 7t nt 

SIS IS* OCCl PPl 2.12 122 4 \7*b 17H T7H + 

22Mt ISita OcdP pf 2J0 12J 4 TO i»3a ltv 

J/ 3ra+M| 5lUi 4914 OcdP Pf 425 l3 21 40U. iSZ & 

25 2J““ Jk| IJJifclSJ OedPPftta 144 40 10734 )07**l07fe 

WVi 7DV» *— U [ IQfli%lDTUi Ocd of 1442 14J) 4 ln«u iiuu, mm « v 

24* 24* + % | 107 100 OcdPpnAM 138 -OztoT iK^lS* * 
34% 22 ODECO 148) 46 14 264 23 39% 77% 4. u 

5% *25 Oddon 1X0 66 M 297 28* 28% Mto— to 

30^ Mb Ian I3S S 21 5_ IM 13% Ub 

SJEdpf ISO 1X9 3Qz 28Vk 2M 28V& 

33 25V^i OtiEdpf 444 143 20Qz 31 11 31 ij_ 

5JJ 2 OhEdirf 734 14$ 3S60z SI 4Mh 50 

|SJ ft. SIS HS Vt ^ SSto 55b 55* 

2* It" 9?|4 Pf 350 1X7 79 25% 34% Mto + * 

ȣ 32,, SJ^d pr X92 1A1 25 27* 27* 27* + b 

14* 10* oilEdnf UB 15.3 5J }4% ||kx to 

« S. TQJ6 127 548z « B5 BS " 


1J2I S 

45 

188 27 13 42 

68 17 IS 570 

54 47 9 25 


24% IBb moral 1,16 55 U IM 
32 a* Lubyss 54 2X 18 7 

lffk 15* LudcvS 1.14 65 9 954 
Uto 10% Lufcm JO 36147 55 


64* 65 — % 
26b 26*— * 
37% 27*— * 
20 * 20 *+ % 
65b 45%— % 
3D* 20*— % 
43* 42*— * 
33b 33b— % 
99 101% +1% 
29b 29*— % 
33% 31% + % 
24% 24*—* 
48* 48*— * 
7% 7*+ * 

24% 24% —1% 
22% 22%+ b 
57* 57* 

17% 17* + * 
17* 18 + b 
18 18% + * 
21 Zlto+ * 
14* 17 +* 
13* 13% + * 
IS 15% + to 
CB6 43*— U 
24* 24*— * 
11 11 — to 

19* 38 — * ! 
71* 21* + * 
B 30*+ to 
Uto 22b I 
SA 26% + b 
U 46 — % 
M% Mto— b 
n% 21b 
86* 27 + % 

17* 17*— b 
11* 11*+ b 


1157 10% fft 9* — >1 

i s®& asa so* 

4 17* 17* 17* + ms 
4 19 IB* 10*- 
21 49% 48* 48*— *;*• 
40 107*107*107*— * 

4 104* 104% 104* + b 
**106 106 106 
244 23 22% 22*+ * 


3% 28% 2BM 28% 

20* 31 31 31 — % 

3 Mto 51 49b SB 

TOSOz 55% 55b 55* 

» »% 34% Mto + * 
25 27* 27* 27*+ b 


lift I?* S™*"*® 60 19 16 452 14 13b M — * 

HZ ffv, ^ IH 122! 


41% 51% QhPpta 760 12J ISO* ff ' SBVi ff " +'£ 

62 52 OhPpfC 760 135 I50z 56% 56% 56%— I* 

w r* sgg^t *5 , g • ® ™ * 

23% 25% OHn 1£0 57 8 566 28* 28* 25*— * 

Omo iic 1X8 29 19 250 37% 37 37% + % 

21? Omnew f 151 gu 014 

Onslda J9Q SL5 S 6 UW iiu uu 

- ax 8 zm 25% 24% ft 

X3 U 64 10b 9* TO* W 

JJ 21* 21% 21%—% 

26 *60 O* B% 8%—* 

TOO 78 25% 25b 2SH— b 

23 * 1665 SS SIS SS— b 

19b— * 
24% — b 

UK - 


MLB 75 25% 

23 9 1665 27% 
XI 9 67 19% 

26 11 187 26* 
U I ® M 
A4 8 8M 31b 
AX 8 689 39* 
52 8 75b 

1* 8 252 11* 


U* 11 Hem Inc 70e 77 
38 27b H«rcuT9 UO SO 

t9 T3* H e m e xse 3 
23b TO* HerttCnf 150 AS 


17 23 161 19* 19b 19* + b 


1 11 * 11 * 11 * 


37b HercutS UO &0 9 1053 33 31% 32 — b 
13* iier n c xse x 32 zm wb is* is*— % 


41b SS* Haratiy 160 37 II 179 38* 37* 37*— % 


24* 9b Heseten 36 6b 6% 4b + Vk 

25 9 Hestnpi 4 9% 9% 9¥i— % 

«% 31% HewIPk 32 7 TO 2757 34% 33% 33*— b 

30 17% Kernel 60 22 17 117 27 25* 25*— 1% 

17% U H (Shear 50 37 11 IS* 15* 15* 

12% 1% HIVUt .15 15 9 45 10 9* M 

25 17% Hllntare Jl 25 11 20 20% 20% 20*+ b 

SB* 45% Hllten 140 U IS 151 57% 56% 96* — * 

44% 31 Hitachi 78e J 11 111 33* 31* 33% — % 

51* Kb Holiday N U U 1987 43* 41* 41* 

H 45b HailyS UB 16 W M 71% 71* 71%— % 

7m 12 HarneD 30 MN 17% 16* Mb— % 

20* 11* HmFSD 7 26S lffk 19 19 - % 


6b 6% 4b + Vk 
9% V% 9Vi— % 
34% 33% 33%—% 
27 25* 25*— 1% 


ff* 13% MACOM 73 17 30 1481 If 18% lffk— * 
Artk 34* MCA JB 22 19 1915 39* 38* 39* 

29b 16% MCorp 160 67 i 665 21 20% mu- % 

42 34 MCOrpf 350 95 7 37 36% 37 - * . 

TO 7* MOC 33 27 9 42 11* .11% lib— * 

ft ’ll? “I 1 6* U IS US 37% 37% 37b 

13U 9b MQMGr 64 17 29 33 12 11% Uto— K 

« 9 MG66Gr pf64 3J 16 11% 11* 11% + % 


£§•13 ■SS'iStBfi-'s'ia 

J3K P5Adot 170 IU « lS Wi m 2 + W 
S* SS E*F LtB la aa n ^ 


r mawrnn u 16 11% IT* 11% + % I Jgn s* PocRm 6ip ~u 

“to MGMUa J»f U 14 4TO 11% 11% 11 b- * 20* U* 

2% MGMUW1 31 2% 3% 5%— % | 19 IfflPortd x n 

Wft MGMHo J0e 10 U 361 20* 28 20* I 71% 57% ££+2- <5 H 

31 19b 19b 19b 


» 17% Hllntare 

SB* 45% Hilton 

44% 31 Hitachi 

51* Kb Holiday 
75 45b HailyS 

2 m 12 HemeD 
20* 11* HmFSD 


11™ SS* ^OCLTO « Ull 25 40* 40* M* 
Sv. ^ A8 U Ml ^ 24* £& 


2Bb IT* MS LID 


HI 2S* 24* 25% + * 

3S ,Sft .ff® ®% + % 
5ff lift TO*— b 

TO 14* Mb 14* 


2ffk 11* HmFSD 7 265 lffk 19 19 - * 

ffk 8 HmeG pf 1.10 127 33 0* 5% 5% 

36* 20% Hmsffce JO IX 24 744 30* 30% 20*— b 

20* 8* HmetFn 6B3J4 7 12 12 13 + % 

60b 41% Honda 60C J lfl 7W 48% 48 48% 

*«8 48* HonwUs 1X8 36 9 7383 56* KVk 56*— 2% 

28% 19% HOOvrU 1X4 45 9 8x 23% 23%. 23U 

26* 18 HftnBn 1.12 44 8 63 25* 25% 2S%— * 
10 3* Horizon 19 4% 4* 4% + Vk 

40* 35 to Haven 50 1 J 12 3140 35* 37* 38% + * 

ff 21* Hotelln 260 9.1 13 237 35* 25* 25*— U 

35b 2m HauonM .96 29 13 Jl * B S% 

19 13* HOuFOb 60 27 II 290 18* ISb IBb— % 

■JJ* « Hewiin ITS A3 1 4U ff X* 3Z*+ Vk 

75 54% Holntpf 137 37 2 73% 73% 73% + * 

72% 61 HtalatBf AS 9X 12 69% 69 69b— b 

22% 17* Heulnd 268 IIX 6 2217 22% 22 22% 

SK 39* HouNG 2X0 AX TO 909 40* 40 40* + K 

20 ObHeuOR 2lfe19J MS 11b ftollK-flb 

Mb 11 MOurtCn 68 24 20 19 Ub 15 15K + U 

26 20% Hutabrd 2X0 IX 11 *17 Mlk 24% 24* 


67 2S Maomll 1 JB 25 14 488 44*43*4<U + % 
53* 28% Mae? I J4 25 It 854 41% 40* 40* 

61% 36* Mocvof 475 115 348* 37 36% 37 

19* 17* Mad Res 239 12% 12% UK — b 

43* 24 BtooKf X0 25 6 435 35b 34% 34% — % 

29% 17b MOIASf 334 26U 26 26 — b 

26 12% Manhin JOblOS 5 UkMIlMtll 


31 2% 2% 7% — % 19 U* Po^ M1M29 m 2 lift Hft“ 14 

688 44*43*44% + % 3SK2T PaZlte, el ’S -1 J* » W— % 

856 Utfc «* «* ^ |% »% pgSra LOT m 7 3 S2ft?? k ft-to 

239 12% Ub U% — b ff* 24* tamBc 170 17 TO 2ft 26% 27% + % 

g ss g" 2 « ” 3 ss ss a?s 

a iff !ffl a*s Jr .!* pSM, ^ K !* S„ 


26 12% Manhin job 2X 6 20 Mb 14% u« + to i T* 

20b 13* MamiNI 72 21 15 33 15% IS* U%— * 23* 13% ~ ,, „ 

WK 10% ManrCi ,U 7 M 310 16b IS* Mb + % N 31 H 12 

61% 22% MtrHan 3J0 9.1 4 SON 35* 34* 35%- * 2 ESStSF W 43 


61% 32% MtrHan 3J0 9.1 
53 40 MfrHM 5JM137 

TO* SM vIManvt 


Mb W% vIMnvtpf 7 18* 18* 18*+% 

XV, 21 MAPCO 1X0 37 10 243 26*26*26*+* 


W4 21 MAPCO 1X0 37 
6* 3 Marnfz 
2% 1 Morale 
20* lffk MarMltf U0 57 
43% 27b Marian 52 IX 
M* 9* MarkC 33 3 2 
19* 16* Mark pf 130 BO 
80b 58% ManrM 54 j 


B 3S* 34* 35%- * 
9 44* 44 44% + b 

n 5* 5% 5*+ % 
7 18* 18* 18* + % 




31 3b 1% 3% 

58 1% 1% IK 

ixo 37 5 n mm m%— k 

52 IX » 442 41* 4« 41—1 

33 22 36 42 18% 10 is 

[JO BX 18 15b IS 1$ — K 

5* 7 13 79 74% 73% 73% — * , 


if 4 HS 

M 12 % Parks i 
IJ* 6 PorkDrl 
16* 25b PofMH 
71* 12% ParkPn 
.7% 1% Parptrt 


^ “if 


4 3* 4 

14* 14* U*— % 
16* M I4%— b 


TgSA .I* 


lffk 15* 15* 


S* fttoSsar is » if S s* £±w 


39* 25% MntiM 260 A3 43 199 J7 56* S4*— * 


14* 9* Huffy 
21* 12% HugftTI 


60 22 | 67 13* 12* 12* + % 


Bb 17b HuohSn 32 U 


P 21% Homan 
34% 17% HuntMf 
39% 23* HIlttEF 


68 3X 11 1347 
64 W 15 3 

JO 27 19 1726 


143 13% 12* 12* 
43 17* 17* 17% 


Mb IBb Hydro! 172 17 I 


17* 17% + % 
ZM 22b— U 
21* 23* 

27 27* + to 

23% 2Z%— * 


46* 30* MartM L34 32 AU 43* 41% 42*— * SOU U 

74 S5 MrtMjjf 433 7X 20 70% » 70— % la ff 

M* a* Mary K .12 U II 419 9% 9 9* + K 57*46 

33* 22% Mncn 56 U U 6* 27* 26 b 25* 19 

12% 7% MOSSMT ,M 16 13 22 Ub 11 11% + to 3r% 30 

18* 15* MaM 1J8 9 J U 161 lffk 18% TO* + % 67 CT 

4% 2b MaeeyF 2N 3* 2* 2* 77* » 

25* 20* MaeCp 2JB IU 26 25* 25b 25* 9% 20 

11* 9* Maslnc US 117 41 UK 11 11% - Vk “ 

Ban 51* MatXlE 65r J 10 5N 62 61% 61*— * 

12* 4* Mortal MU TOW 9* K) 


70 — % 122 94 

MA+ W 57% 46 
Mb— * 25% If 


* lift EWNP 

25 13% PevCNi 

] fft AKPoatadv 

J* , p«m 


34* PenCen 
94 PgnCor 


'ft 94 PenC pr iff 47 
37% 46 P enney 2136 <1 
ff* PaPL 268 I0X 
37% 30 PoPLpf 450 1X2 
67 g% PnPLpt 860 13J 
2* g* PBPLdprXA IZJ 
ff* 20 PaPLdprz.90 113 


60 SX II 277 12 11* U + ft' 

to if 13 *90 '2! 14W % 

.S It *8 ‘tz.J* 

_ 40 533 46* 44% 46*Z% 

7 ,8,'gS'Jl 'g^r'S 

JO-0 B 599 2SVk lo* 3ia_ il 

3 S3 3^7% 

70 113 6 23% 2JW 23% + b 


(Continued on Plage 10) 


i 











v/v. 

. aar 



tr\ alia Fraui 




** 


BUSINESS ROUNDUP 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURPAY-SLNPAY, JANUARY 5-6, 1985 


Page 9 


Judge Orders 
Air Florida to 
Stand Trial 

The AssjfitileU Press 
MIAMI — A federal judge ha* 
ruled that Air Florida and ihrec 
Central American airlines must 
stand trial on criminal charges of 
conspiracy to fix prices in violation 
of VS. antitrust law. 

The ruling Thursday by U.S 
District Judge Lenore C. Nesbitt 
reversed an order Sept 10 by U.S 
Bankruptcy Jud§e Sidney Weaver 
indefinitely staying criminal pro- 
ceedings against Air Florida. 

*A week after Air Florida filed 
3 for protection from creditors 

under Chapter 11 of the federal 
bankruptcy law, a federal grand 
jury indicted the airline. 

The indictment chnrgpd that Air 
Florida and the other twee airlines 
conspired to fix rates on routes 
between cities in die United States 
and Centra] America in violation of 
the Sherman Antitrust Act. 

Air Florida resumed flying and 
rehired some of its 1 J 00 fired em- 
ployees in October under ihe n.-mu> 
Midway Express, a subsidiary of 
Chicago-based Midway Airlines. 


Diversifoods Chief to Leave; Dividend Is Dropped 


■ Vrt York Tunes Servi.w 

CHICAGO — Diversifoods 
lnc.. which has been in turmoil 
since October, has announced that 
its chief executive is leaving the 
company at the request of the 
board and that the founh-quaner 
dividend is being omitted. 

Donald N. Smith is stepping 
down both as chief executive and 
president. HU resignation follows 
the failure of an investor that he led 
to arrange financing for the buyout 
of Diversifoods. 

"Hie group, which included other 
senior managers and Allen & Co., a 
New York investment firm, had 
proposed a leveraged buvout of the 
company in October. 

On Ocl 15. the investor group 
announced its intention to offer 
S 15.50 a share for Diversifoods* 
roughly 33.7 million shares for a 
total of about 5525 million. On 


Dec. 10 Diversifoods announced 
that a tentative agreement for the 
leveraged buyout had been lami- 
nated. 

On Thursday, the company 
dosed at $9,50, up 12.5 cents, in 
over-the-counter trading. 

Diversifoods, based in Itasca, Il- 
linois, was formed in December 
I9S3 by the merger of Godfathers 
Pizza Inc. and Oiart House lnc.. a 
chain of steak and seafood restau- 
rants. 

After the hoard voted to omit the 
dividend, Kenneth E. Pieper, a 
company spokesman, said that the 
payout, which has ‘'traditionally 
been about 8*2 cents in each of die 
first three quarters, will be evaluat- 
ed on a quartcr-io-quaner basis." 

Mr. Pieper said that John M. 
Creed, who has headed the compa- 
ny’s Chart House unit, would be- 
come president and chief operating 
officer. Mr. Creed will share the 


chief executive position with Wil- 
liam £. Trotter 2d, chairman, and 
W. David Hanks, who has been a 
company senior vice president for 
finance and administration. 

The company reported earnings 
for the nine months ended Sept. 30 
of $212 million, or 66 cents a share, 
on sales of $420.7 million, slightly 
down from earnings of $22,9 mil- 
lion, or 69 cents a share, on reve- 
nues of $359.1 million in the period 
a year earlier. 

Last month. Diversifoods pre- 
dicted that fourth-quarter earnings 
would be sharply lower than the 
SSJ million, or 25 cents a share, 
recorded in the last quarter of 1983. 

The earnings decline, coupled 
with continued difficulties that 
Godfather’s Pizza was having in 
formulating a new deep-dish pizza, 
apparently made lendere wary of 
financing the Smith investor 


group’s leveraged buyout proposal 
of SI 530 a share. 

The company's board rejected an 
alternate buyout plan, consisting 
hasically of cash and debentures, 
from tire investor group. 

Early last month, William M. 
Thdsen, the founder of Godfa- 
ther’s and Diversifoods’ vice chair- 
man, announced he was resigning 
as a director because of ‘'communi- 
cations difficulties with manage- 
ment that had built to a crescendo 
throughout the year ” according to 
Bruce C. Rohde, Mr. Thei sen’s at- 
torney. 

Diversifoods operates more than 
1.400 restaurants in the United 
States, Canada. Puerto Rica and 
the Virgin Islands. In addition to 
Chan House and Godfather's. Di- 
versifoods is the largest Burger 
King franchisee in the country and 
operates Luther's Bar-B-Q' and 
Moxie’s hamburger restaurants. 


COMPANY NOTES 


first City 
Improves Offer 
or ScoviH 

Reusers 

NEW YORK — First City 
Properties Inc. said Friday that 
it was increasing the price of its 
offer for ScoviH Inc. to 542.50 a 
share, or $522 million, from 
£35, or £430 million. 

ScoviH stock rose $2.75 to 
$4225 Friday in trading on the 
New York Stock Exchange. 
Hist City said its offer will ex- 
pire Jan. 18 unless extended 
and withdrawal rights wlQ ex- 
pire Jan. 11. 

The company, controlled by 
Canada’s Bdzberg family, said 
its increased price results from 
negotiations with Morgan Stan- 
ley & Co. Inc. and Moigan 
Lewis Githens and Aim Inc^ 
jwestment bankers for ScovilL 
vFnst City said it expects the 
ScoviH board to act on the in- 
crease offer and related pro- 
posed arrangements between 
the two companies this weefc- 


Aetna Life & Casualty Co. share- 
holders who participate in the com- 
pany’s dividend reinvestment pro- 
gram can buy additional shares at a 
5-percent discount from the market 
price, Aetna has announced. Linder 
the plan, participants may also 
make addiuooal cash payments to 
buy more shares at market price, 
and the company will continue to 
pay brokerage or other related 
charges. 

Alpha Micros) stents has esiab- 
lisdhed three new divisions: com- 
puter systems, video technology 
and service, the Irvine, California, 
technology group has announced. 

Control Data Crap, plans later 
this month to introduce three new 
computers with memories four 
times larger than current models, to 
replace three machines in the 
Cyber 1 80 series, the company said 
Two of the new units will be priced 
abouL 12 percent less than the mod- 
els they are replacing, while the 
third model, the cheapest of the 
three, will be more expensive than 
its predecessor. 

Dana Carp- said the Federal 
Trade Commission has requested 
additional information on its pro- 
posed acquisition of Warner Hee- 
bie Brake & Gutch Co. The com- 
pany said the request extends the 
waiting period rrmnecteri with its 
tender offer of $157.5 million, or 
$30 per share. 

Ford Motor Co. has announced 
an average price increase of I per- 
cent, orabom $90. for light trades, 
effective next Monday. Ford has 
indicated that it will not increase 


the prices of its 1985 car models, in 
an effort to maintain sales momen- 
tum. General Motors Corp. last 
week increased the prices of its 
1985 models by an average of $296, 
and Chrysler Corp. has said it has 
not decided whether to change its 
prices. 

Hdkmetks lnc. has lost its sec- 
ond director in two weeks, former 
Treasuiy Secretary William E Si- 
mon. A spokesman for the Califor- 
nia high-technology company said 
Mr. Simon had told board mem- 
bers that he had "other obligations 
that made it impractical" to stay 
on. Two weeks ago. Charles W. 
Missler, the chair man, president 
and chief executive, resigned, also 
citing personal reasons. But there 
were reports that both departures 
were related to the refusal of Ber- 
nard B. Katz, the largest sharehold- 
er, to give up control of the compa- 
ny. 

Pantry Pride Inc's chief operat- 
ing officer, president for food 
stores and a director, Daniel E 
Josephs, has resigned effective Jan. 
18 to become president and chief 
operating officer of Dominick's 
Finn- Foods Inc. of Chicago, Pan- 
try Pride announced. The company 
said Harold F. Rawlisg has been 
named president of supermarket 
operations. 

Rapid- American Corp. said that 
Stephen L. Pistner would be taking 
over as chairman and chief execu- 
tive officer of McCrary Corp., 
Rapid's retail subsidiary, effective 
Feb. 1. 


Europe Takes Lead Over U.S. 
In Nuclear Waste Recycling 

ty of reprocessing combined to de- 
ter private investors. 

As a result U.S. reactor opera- 
tors stHl stockpile ail of their spent 


(Continued from Page 7) 
four-fifths of the 3.000 tons of fuel 
that they will be using annually. 

The US. nuclear industry seems 
unaffected by the revived interest 
in Europe and Japan in commercial 
reprocessing, despite the Reagan 
administration’s efforts to encour- 
age (he development of a private 
reprocessing industry in the United 
States. 

A commercial reprocessing plant 
that operated for six years at West 
Valley, New York, was closed in 
1972 for alterations and expansion, 
but it was never reopened, partly 
because of increasing worries about 
its safety. 

Then in 1981, President Ronald 
Reagan lifted the ban on the repro- 
cessing of U.S. nuclear fuels that 
had been imposed by tbe Carter 
administration, Much tried unsuc- 
cessfully to get the technology out- 
lawed throughout the world. Presi- 
dent J imm y Carter argued that the 
plutonium produced would farib- 
tate the proliferation of nudear 
weapons. 

But (he Department of Energy 
failed to persuade private compa- 
nies to complete a planned civilian 
reprocessing plant at Barnwell, 
South Carolina. 

Then, uncertainty about the fu- 
ture course of U.S. policy, unre- 
solved regulatory problems and 
doubts about the economic viabffi- 


Exxon Is to Buy 
Grace Oil Stake 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — W. R. Grace 
&. Co , a chemical concern with 
wide-ranging energy holdings, 
has announced an a g r ee ment in 
principle to seH several of its oil 
and gas interests to Exxon 
Corp. for about $126.5 miUioQ 
in cadi. 

Grace announced Thursday 
that Exxon had agreed to pur- 
chase tbe oil and gas interests 
presently held by Grace's Grace 
Petroleum Corp. subsidiary. 
The agreement includes related 
assets and certain exploration 
rights in Alabama. Louisiana, 
Oklahoma and Wyoming. Eight 
different oil fields are involved, 
it said. 

Grace said that a purchase 
agreement is expected lo be 
worked out shortly, and that a 
dosing agreement is expected 
within 90 days. The accord is 
subject to government approv- 
al Harold R_ Logan, head of 
Grace’s Natural Resources 
Group and a company vice 
chairman, said: "Exxon offered 
us a fair price for a portion of 
ihk b usiness. " 


fuel and buy new supplies every 
time a load becomes exhausted. 

“To make sense economically, 
the users needed the federal gov- 
ernment to buy the plutonium at 
tbe right price,” says Stephan Kraft 
of the Edison Electric Institute, a 
Washington-based body represent- 
ing U.S. utilities. 

Within the nudear industry, atti- 
tudes toward reprocessing often 
seem influenced by factors other 
than simple economics, including 
the desire to master an advanced 
technology and develop alternative 
energy sources. 

While the Carter administration 
did not want to encourage an in- 
dustrial process that would greatly 
increase the amount of plutonium 
in existence, European supporters 
of reprocessing see the process as a 

nwane of extracting almost unlim- 
ited quantities of energy from the 
world’s uranium reserves. 

Ini daily, they plan to bum some 
of the phrionium created in pre- 
sent-day pressurized water reac- 
tors. They assert that this is an anti- 
proliferation measure; since the 
plutonium is destroyed. 

But eventually, the plutonium 
will be used to fuel the new genera- 
tion of fast breeder reactors. 


NYSE May Ease Rules 
On Share Voting Rights 


Mexico Pays 
Part of Debt 

( Continued from Page 7) 

money and induced banks to lend 
them more to ease the domestic 
impact of their austerity programs. 
Nevertheless, tbe programs result- 
ed in severe recessions in Mexico 
and Brazil. 

Today, however, both countries 
appear to be emerging from die 
recessions, and have shored up 
their finances so that they no long- 
er need new loans, although major 
debtor countries still cannot repay 
their outstanding loans on sched- 
ule. 

■ Penman Interest Payment 

Peru has made a payment of 
about $52 milli on to its creditor 
banks as pan of a plan to dear 
interest arrears on its bank debt, 
Reuters quoted banking sources as 
saying Friday in London. 

Late last month, the outgoing 
economy mi taster. Josfc Benavides, 
said Peru would repay $50 to S51 
mini on, but the sources said tbe 
figure that had been paid was 
slightly higher. 


By Michael A. Hilrzik 

Lus Angeles Times Sen in- 

NEW YORK —The New York 
Stock Exchange is poised to over- 
turn its half-centiuy-old prohibi- 
tion against listed companies issu- 
ing multiple classes of slock with 
unequal voting rights. 

The ban has threatened to drive 
some prominent corporations that 
use the maneuver as a takeover 
defease off the Big Board and into 
the over-the-counter market. 

The exchange announced Thurs- 
day that a subcommittee of its pub- 
lic policy committee has recom- 
mended allowing companies to 
issue new classes of such suck as 
long as they have the approval of 
holders of ’two-thirds of existing 
common shares and the approval 
of a majority of outside directors. 

Under the proposal, the voting 
differential between the new shares 
and tbe old could be no more than 
1 0 - 1 . and no shareholder rights 
other than voting could differ. 

The recommeodatioa must be 
approved by the full committee; the 
NYSE board and the Securities 
and Exchange Commission. 

But the immediate effect is the 
end to delisting proceedings, pend- 
ing the possible rule change, that 
the exchange has started against 
four companies: Dow Jones & Co, 
publisher of The WaD Street Jour- 
nal Hershey Foods Corp.. General 
Cinema Corp. and Coastal Corp. 

All established new’ classes of 
slock as takeover defenses. 

Implicit in the subcommittee’s 
recommendation, said panel’s 
members, is tbe notion that the 
exchange should allow a corpora- 
tion to make any bylaw’ or charter 
change that gam* two- thirds ap- 
proval from shareholders, a suffi- 
ciently large block to protect exist- 
ing shareholder interests. 

"That’s a big, big hurdle," An- 
drew G Sigler, a subcommittee 
member and chairman and chief 
executive of Champion Interna- 
tiona] Corp., said of the approval 
requirement. "I’D be damned if I 
can see bow they will get it in most 
ablations." 

[Some Wall Street experts were 
concerned the proposed change 
would encourage widespread adop- 
tion of different classes of stock by 
many companies hying to prevent 
takeovers, the Washington Post re- 
ported. 

[‘‘I would hate to see any deterio- 
ration in the New York Slock Ex- 
change’s high standards for list- 
ing," said John G Whitehead, 
retired senior partner of Goldman, 
Sachs & Co. 'Taking any voting 


rights away from public stockhold- 
ers is a very serious matter.*'] 

The NYSE no longer dominates 
trading in shares of major corpora- 
tions as it once did. 

Some large companies have cho- 
sen to remain in the over-the- 
counter market, which now nearly 
matches the Big Board in efficiency 
and liquidity, two key consider- 
ations for publicly traded corpora- 
tions. 

The exchange also has lost its 
virtual monopoly in trading of 
stock in its own listed companies, 
as more trading is executed on re- 
gional stock exchanges and by bro- 
kerages specializing in private 
transactions. 


Economists 
Are Gloomy 

(Continued from Page 7) 

efforts not on winning the race, but 
on making the arms race imwinna- 
bie." 

It is not quite dear how this 
applies to President Ronald Rea- 
gan’s instructions to Secretary or 
State George P. Shultz, in next 
week’s meeting with Foreign Min- 
ister Andrei A. Gromyko, to reject 
any Soviet proposal to negotiate 
limi ts on developing new anti-mis- 
sile defenses. But it seems to imply 
that the United States should avoid 
alarming the Russians (hat they are 
falling dangerously behind in tech- 
nology. 

However. Mr. Nalebuff added 
that there was a value to being 
perceived as irrational. "Because of 
the incentive xo be perceived as 
irrational" he told the economists, 
"appearances of irrationality can- 
not automatically be assumed to be 
true. Unfortunately, this leaves lit- 
tle room in tbe arms race for the 
truly irrational.” Mr. Shultz, 
though an economist, may have 
difficulty in foUowing these' guide- 
lines. 

In a more traditional area of eco- 
nomic analysis, Ben E. Laden, chief 
economist of T. Rowe Price Asso- 
ciates Inc., the mutual funds con- 
cern, found an "extremely high po- 
tential” for attractive returns in 
equities in the years ahead, because 
"the improvement in infla tion and 
the return of satisfactory economic 
growth should allow the stock mar- 
ket to catch up for underperfor- 
mance during the last 15 years.” 


Over-the-Counter 


Jan, 4 


NASDAQ Notional Market Prices 


Sales* .NO 

IMs Hint) Law SPJULOraa 


27 sm 


tstr 


M 2 A 
M U 


MB 4.T 
sa i-» 

MM <2 


Mm IS 


.12 1 J 


Mb 23 
M 3.1 


Aitdron 

AtwdOc 


M 43 


165 M 
5916% 
16 Art 

8 2ft 


BBOO 2JB0 *3 
BFICU1 _ 
BlWCb Mm U 
BPISv 
OS Com 
dnlrdC t 
UofiScD 

Bonww M sa 
BqnoH JO TOZ 
BtNE 284 4J 
MMAm JM H 
BontoG M 24 


.156 U 

Mali 
£20 5-1 
- .12 20 


im + rt 
26ft + ft 


IISM u* 
I ft » 


BjeRw 

S'"" 

Blare 
IrtfcR 
flijic 

'I 1* 54 
BabEvn JO 1-7 
BftHTc. .16 2.1 

gentt? . 1 M j 
grwTom * , . 

Bruno XO V* 

Buffim 

BufldTr 

Burirt 

SL .n* u 

Binrflr 


Sates in - -v Net 

VMS HMl LOW 3PALCh\K! 


BMA 

BustnM 


106 


24716 491 * 491* 
51 5% 3ft 3ft 


CCOR 

CPRhb 

CUT 

CPI 

CPT 


100 5.1 


6ft 

7ft 


CACI 

CbrySc 

CalAmp 

ColMIe 

GalStvo 

Cal kxi P 

Comv 

CononG 

CepFSL 

CopCrto 

CardDls 

Cardins 

Carotin 

Cartort 


Cencor 

CntrBc 

Cent cor 

On Sep 

CnBshS 

CFdBk 

Central 

CerbrA 

Germ* 

Cetus 

QmcCp 

OiapEn 

OtrmSs 

cnkPid 

OkTcn 

ChLwns 

Onnn 

CtirvE 

email 

CMPoc 

Oiomer 

Chrarw 

QirDws 

Chvras 

Cipher 

Clprico 

Clrcon 

ClzSGo 

CtlFWS 

CtzUt A 

CIzUtB 

CrtvFefl 

OairStS 

OarkJ 

OearCh 

aevtRt 

attitme 

Cube Lb 
CocaBIS 
Coeur 
Coswrfe 

CatwnlS 

CotabR 


.16 1 J 


JOm X 


uo u 

USSb is 
1J2 5J 
1.12 17 
M 18 

.12 2.1 


.10 1.1 

J 6 1-4 

. 12 s 1 J 


Collins 

Col LI AC 

coi me 

CsWNtfi 

Col D*o 

Camalr 

Comes! s 

CMltflO. 

Cemrflol 

Comerc 

Oitcsu 

OnIStir 

CwlffiF 

dnwTi 

Com Am 

Comind 

ComS vs 

CmpCrd 

CbrtPM 

cmpoT 

ConipC 

Qnpcrr 

GomPCP 

Cemgus 

CmsAs 

CptAUt 

CmflOl 

CPtEnt 

CmOtH 

Cmpidn 

cmpLB 

CmPiM 

OnpM 

CpIUSB 

CmPtrtr 

CrfcM 

Cmsrvs 

Cansnr 

cmpsbf 

Comtai 

Coneptl 

Cantor* 
aicap 
CCbpB 
CCopS 
Con For 

9 ,PV SJ 

Cons Pd 
Consul 
CntIBCP 

ciiHim 

CHHIJC 

CnfinftJ 

Cl LOST 

Gonvst 

Conmse 

coprflf 

Coots B 
CopviH 
Corcoin 
Cordis 

CsreSI 

Connn 

Cosmo 

CrtBrl 

CrUncC 

CrO"** 5 

O-osTr 

CwrnBh 

CruntP 

CiiimPr 

cuilum 

Cveore 


J6 441 
S2 33 
t 

1 J 0 43 
JOe 21 
JM X 
m 34 

1 J 2 7 3 


56a 21 

t 


rt 12 

JO 4J 


.12 A 

.16 10 

210 61 
sa 34 
50a 47 
lJ4el6fl 
150 SJ 

36 20 


Jir 

JO 15 


J» J 


.12 U 


1360129 
1580 9.9 
136 120 

126 p 
sm 15 

20* 63 


12 6 ft 

526 S 

16 35ft 35ft 
153 15 Mft 
006 6 ft 6 ft 

5a 3ft 3ft 
355 4ft 4ft 

15916ft l«ft 

13 3ft 3ft 

51 9ft BM 
17B 3ft 3 

37 3ft 3 
1 D 0 «ft Bft 
116 U 17 

164 6 ft ■ 

77 1ft 1ft 
2613ft 13ft 

140 12 lift 
53 2ft i ?* 

78 8 ft Oft 
a 14ft uft 

416ft Uft 
2*52Bft Z7ft 
12 9 9 

34 37ft 37 

165 25 m 
4928ft 2816 

30733ft 32ft 

15 5ft. 5ft 

IS 4ft 4 
174 9 4J4 

10 4ft 4ft 
64 6 6 

40 17ft 16ft 
48 13 12ft 

17 7ft 7ft 
0927 26ft 

349 5ft 5ft 
111 ft lift 
33912ft T2ft 
8780ft 79ft 
45 19ft 19 
430 7ft 7 
513ft 13ft 
148 10ft Wft 
29621ft 21ft 
1 8 ft Bft 

24 6 5ft 
47719ft 19ft 

43029ft 27ft 

16 25ft 25ft 

1015 J5.. 

11919ft 19ft 
126 9ft 4ft 
124 W 10 
10 26ft 26ft 
913 12 ft 
31 !ft 3ft 
88818ft 18 

183 4ft 4ft 
174717ft lift 
124 5 4ft 
20 29ft 28ft 
31616ft Uft 
10616ft 14 

55 1 Va 
1813 ttft 

159 20ft T9ft 
224 13ft Uft 

527 2ft 2ft 

527 34ft Mft 
240 27ft »ft 

36 11 ft lift* 
2 B 8 ft Bft 
7 76 25ft 
12 3ft SJ* 
16618ft 17ft 

25 9ft 7ft 
98425ft 24ft 

1311 & 

1 13ft Uft 

528 25V. 24ft 

116 7ft 7ft 
943 1ft IJJ* 
33 3 2ft 
1711ft lift 
84119ft Uft 
75 4 3ft 
13910ft 10 ft 
6 4ft 4ft 

56 7ft 7% 

491 7ft 7ft 
284 Oft aft 

M2 3ft 3ft 

105 16 15ft 
SJV Uft W 
84 4ft £ 
U 5ft SJ 

4 2ft 2ft 

5 6 ft 6 * 
45 3ft 3» 

435 W I** 
4 aft 8 ft 
4 21ft 20ft 
471M*» » 
3017ft 17 
113 U 25ft 
22 7ft 7ft 
24 35ft 35 
1 5ft «■ 

52 6 5ft 
432ft lift 

1410ft 9* 
237 3* 3» 
99 6 ft 6 
95 6 ft 6 
3883 6 ft 6 
230 17ft left 
H 3V. 3 


6 ft + ft 
8 + ft 
3Sft— ft 
IS 


Jft- 


A0 

23 

1982 18 
806 20% 

17% 

16% 



300 7Yb 

7ft 



511 8% 

on 

200 

63 

7*1 All* 
202 3% 

44 

3 

.14 

18 

158 Jft 

66UV4 

57b 

’lrt 



1312ft 

12% 

JO 

15 

471 22% 
U 

aib 

91b 

.44 

26 

25018% 
3 24'* 

IB% 

Mft 

» 

U 

11 17lb 
4 19% 

19ft 


M + ft 
4ft— ft 
18ft 

3ft— ft 
*V>— ft 
3ft 

3ft + ft 
8ft + ft 

17 —1ft 
8ft 

.lft 

13ft 

lift— ft 

2 

Bft 

14ft + ft 
Uft 
21 

37ft + ft 

34ft 

24ft— ft 
33ft + ft 
Sft 

Oft + ft 
9 + ft 

4ft * ft 

4 + ft 

Uft 

12ft + ft 
7ft— ft 
2 6ft— ft 
5ft— ft 
lift 

12ft + ft 
79ft— ft 
?9ft— ft 
7ft 

13ft— ft 
70ft 

Zlft— ft 
Bft— ft 
5ft + ft 
19ft— ft 
27ft 
28ft 
28ft 

9ft— ft 
29ft +lft 
2Sft+ ft 

15 
Uft 

9 — ft 

10 

26ft— ft 

13 
3ft 

18ft + ft 
4ft— ft 
72ft 4- ft 

29ft + ft 

Uft 

16ft 

7 + ft 

12ft— ft 
20ft + ft 
13ft— ft 
2ft 

34ft + ft 
27ft + ft 
10 ft— ft 
8ft + ft 
26 + ft 
3ft 

18 + Vl 

9ft + ft 
25Va + ft 
6ft— ft 
13ft + ft 
25’* + ft 

7ft - 

1ft 

2ft 

lift + ft 

19 — ft 
3ft- ft 

Uft + ft 
4ft— ft 
7ft 

7ft + ft 
8ft— ft 
3ft + ft 

16 + » 
lft— lft 
6 

5ft 

2ft 

6ft 

Bft 

Zlft 

26 — U 
17 

25ft— ft 
7ft 
35 

5ft + ft 
5ft + ft 
32ft 

9ft— ft 
3ft 

6 - ft 
6ft + ft 
6ft + ft 
17 + ft 
3ft +ft 
1714 + ft 
19ft + ft 
7ft 

8ft— ft 
44ft + ft 
3ft 

5ft+ ft 

14 -ft 
lft+ft 
12U + ft 
22ft— I* 

9ft + ft 
IBM + ft 
24ft— ft 
17ft + ft 
19ft— ft 



Sales In 


Net 


188 s 

Z 

i 

s 

f 

1 



D 


1 

P'S 



85111* 

rm 

llft+ 1* 




8 7% 

■n 

7% + 4* 

I 1 w '^1 



419 25% 3*4* 
142234* 237b 

25 — ft 



a 

23ft + ft 

OronBto- 


■ V 

67- 47* 

4ft 

AH' ' 

DartGp 

J3 

li 

1 83 

£1 

83 

Datcrd 

M 

88 16% 


16% 

DtolO 



27911% 

tj H 

lift + % 

DtSwtch 



328 5ft 


5ft— ft 




1 4 

■ ■ 

4 




W 12ft 

jr.'l 

12ft 




76 34b 


3% + % 




30 6ft 

6 

6V* + ft 

DeOSh 

-ISe 

j 

30 171* 

17 

17 — ft 

DccrtO 



15411% 

lift 

11%+ ft 

DeWbA 

33 

14 

7a 


21 + rt 

Delchm 

XO 

!J 

232 Uft 

14% 

14rt + rt 

Delta Ol 



7 7ft 


lft— % 

□eltous 



104 lft 

i% 

1%+ % 

□enelcr 



149 5V> 

Sft 

54*— ft 

DentMd 



S3 6ft 

6 


DkwDt 



125 3V* 

3 

3%— % 

OtoaPr 



15 8ft 

Sft 

Sft 




934 24* 

2ft 

2ft— V* 

Dlceon 



4121* 

lift 

lift— ft 




1 11% 

71% 

17%+ ft 

1 



106 44* 

4 

4ft 

| B e* 



891 14% 

72ft 

14 +1 







Dtortex 



8 25ft 

25 

25ft 

□1st Loo 



37 6 

4% 

4+7* 

Dvfood 

X6 

18 

8016 94* 

Bft 

5%— % 

DocuOf 



207 4% 

4% 

4%+ ft 

DtrGrU 

XO 

1J 

317 20% 

20ft 

20ft— % 

DwnB 

iao 

63 

736 25ft 

2bft 

2S%— ft 

DrdiH 

xo 

\J 

23 12ft 

LrJ 

12ft— ft 

DovIDB 

88 

SO 

111 17% 

li*3 

17% 


-15e 1J 

10 10 

9ft 

10 — % 




1510ft 

10% 

10%— ft 




26113ft 

13ft 

13ft + ft 

DwckAs 

32 

26 

813ft 

13% 

13% — ft 

DunkD 

32 

1 A 

8123ft 237* 

234*+ % 




185 101* 

9% 

10 

DurFII 

.H 


71 17* 

n% 

12% 




42 Jft 

3% 

3% 





IBft 


Dvson 



224 9% 

9ft 

9ft— ft 

ll * 

EHInt 



30 2ft 


2% 




167 % 

% 





4ft 





8 9 

Bft 

B%— % 


IM 


124 27 

36% 



■12 


267 9ft 


9% 

Educom 

4181 

22 

170 3% 

3ft 

Sft— ft 




31 10 

9% 

10 

ElCrtlc 



a 7% 

74* 

7ft— ft 

El Pas 

U6 11.1 

829 13% 









EBrtta 



5 8% 

8% 

8% 




292 64* 

6% 

6ft 







ElcNud 



63 94* 

9ft 

9ft+ % 

ElcRnt 



3619 

18% 

18% 




76 18 






2813% 

Uft 

124. 






Sft— ft 




25 8% 

“ft 

OM w 




1617 ft 





180 7% 

7ft 


Emulx s 



1939 Bft 

7ft 

B + ft 




9 6 






37 6ft 

6% 

6ft + % 




80 7% 

7ft 

7% 




30 TV. 






228 28ft 

3BVa 

»%— % 




12 8% 

■ft 





4 4% 

4% 

4%— „ft 




173 % 

ft 





6013ft 

12% 

Uft + % 




430 16ft 

15ft 

16ft +1 




29817ft 

Uft 

174* + % 




286 6ft 

6 




383 29ft 



EvnSul 



364 134* 
791 rt 

% 


Exowir 



16010% 

9ft 

10 — ft 

i 



F 


J 


X2r 

A 

176 5ft 

5% 

5rt— rt 




10 146 

1ft 

lft + 7* 








152 

11 

635 49ft 

49ft 

49% 

II?- ■’71 



28422ft 

32 

22% — 7% 

Krrri 



249 5ft 



F 16 ran 



5914 

lift 

13ft- V4 


2.40 

52 

156 46% 

46 

46% + % 


2.M 


113 51% 




M 

10 

M2* 

22% 

22ft 



11013% 

13% 

13% + 7* 




» 144k 

Uft 



20 

M 

W 3ft 

3% 

m 




359 6% 

6 





15 Eft 

Sft 

ift — ft 

FAlaBS 

too 

44 

Bsavb 

21ft 22% + lb 



33 

3027 




1.10 

43 

1725% 

25% 

25% 




6713% 

13 



ia 

51 

4 23% 

21% 

23%+ ft 



36 18% 

18% 





52611ft 

11 

11 — ft 




225 9ft 

9ft 

9% 

FFOCol 



10 U 

14 

14 + ft 

FFFtM 

XOe 

1.1 

100 18 % 

18 

IBft + 1* 

FtFnQi 

SO 

4 A 

18 18% 

U 

18 




72187* 


18V* + % 

FtFIBfc 

A0 

1J 

32 27% 

22 

42 



58 

14131% 

JOft 


FMdB 

UO 

SlO 

147 31ft 

31% 314* + % 


2t0b 63 

14 53 

52ft 

52ft— % 


JDe 

.1 

a i3ft 

13% 

13ft+ % 


J6 

16 

96® 

26ft 

Z7 + ft 

FISvFlO 

JOs 20 

119 20% 

a 

20% 




2 8ft 

Bft 

8ft 


1.10 

56 

367 19ft 

19% 

19% 


160 

58 

35 29ft 

29% 

29% 


ia 

29 

632 35 

34% 

34ft— rt 




72 6% 

61* 





4 13% 

13ft 

U%+ ft 

FEflFdl 

JBe 1J 

5816 

15% 

15% + 7* 

nuns 

33 

24 

443 29% 

39 

29%+ ft 

Flaw5y 



158 141* 

13% 

14 


XO 

16 

7312ft 

12 

12% + rt 




2U 4% 

Aft 

Aft 

FLU" 

JJ7 

S 

632 14% 

U 

Uft 



3 

363 13ft 

Uft 

13% 


.96 

IS 

651 Mft 

27% 27ft— ft 


UK 

55 

222 1H% 

10% 

187b— 4* 




6614% 

Uft 

Mft- rt 

ForinS 



257 2% 

2% 

3ft + % 

Forum 

M 

J 

S54 7% 

6% 

7 +1* 




861 22% 

23 

a —4b 


JO 

28 

429 17ft 

16% 

17 — ft 




399 91* 

8% 

9 

FiHHBs 

JO 

21 

451 14% 

Uft 

144*- % 

1 



G 


1 

GTS 5 



a ioft 

18ft 

1016 + rt 


KLAa 



37114ft 

Uft 

15% — ft 

KVPhr 



30 Aft 

4% 

Aft 

Komar 

J 6 

24 

192 Kft 

20 % 

21 Vb — % 

KOTOW 



155 144* 

nft 

147b— ft 

KOB/BT 

Ktrydon 

401 

44 

913ft 

a ? 

13 

Oft 

13%— ft 
7 

Kelyjn 



481 lrt 



Kama 

UO 

Ail 

19 44% 

44% 

44% — ft 

KyCnLf 

JO 

22 

214 37% 

35 

37 +2 

Kevex 



11 54* 

5% 

SVa— ft 

KevTm 



27 9ft 

91* 

9ft— rt 

Klmbal 

M 

ts 

BM 

Sft 

28ft— ft 

Klmbrfc 



77 6 

57b 

Sft— rt' 

KJncnki 



33 7% 

ift 

7%+ ft 

Kinder* 

JDi 

A 

533141b 

Uft 

14ft— rt 



So*e» In 


Ref 1 


lots 

HIM* Lew 3P-M.CMW 

Gaiileo 



2 U 

13 

13 -% 


.10 

1J 

142 8 

7ft 

7ft— 1* 

GondHg 



»1H* 

lift 

lift- Vb 

Garda 



166 2% 

2 

.2% 

Ganetcti 



859 367* 

367* 

36% + ft 




66 5% 

Sft 

54* 

-GoHme • 

• 


18 7% 

7- 

71*-+ lu 

GenelE 



7 34* 

37* 

3ft 

Genet L 



1 3% 

1 % 

34b + ft 

Genets 



275 54* 

Sft 

Sft 




687 5ft 

S 

51* + % 

CaFBk 



86 70% 

184* 

10 % 

GerAWs 

c* 

14 

44 5ft 

S 

57% 



J 

5026% 

364* 

26W— V* 

GteaTr 



25 1ST* 


15ft + ft 

GtanFd 



375 8% 

84* 

Bft— ft 

GMCott 

GdTaco 








3 4* 

ft 

4*-rt 




711 15% 

14ft 

154*+ % 

Gctt 



32 104* 

187b 

10 % — ft 

Gould P 

30 

El 

36 U 

744* 

15 




£& 

7 

7 





9% 




1244 Sft 

S 

5 — % 

GWFSB 

Ate 3J 

14*5 

UV, 

14%— % 

GBavCs 



aw% 

10 % 

10 % 

Green T 



2115V, 

IS 

15-1* 

Gtecfl 



65127* 

lift 

12 % 




75 Uft 

Uft 


GtfBdc 



2961 15ft 

is 

15% — % 

GMHuC 



5 7ft 

1 % 


Gull 

JJ5e 


4 9% 

9% 


11 tf 

HBOs 

.14 

J 

286 17% 

lift 

17 — W 

HCC 


J 

23 7% 

7% 

7% 

H WO Att 



4510 

9ft 

70 




61216 

12 % 

12 ft 




2 6 



Hodwxi 



1 2 

2 

2 - ft 

HaleS y 



2 9* 
304 lft 

« 

lft+rt 


.10 

3 

19 U 

13% 

14 + % 

HarpG 


13 

40 29% 

29% 

29%— ft 

HrtfN 1 


6JD 

«26ft 

26% 

26% 




3 9ft 

Vft 





I Bft 

ift 

8 ft— % 

HltftAi 



1617 

U4* 

76ft— % 

HrthCSs 



3417ft 

17 

171*+ 1* 




75 7% 

/ft 

7%— ft 




9® 3ft 

2 ft 

3% + Vb 

H*ch9A 

.14 

J 

2771b 

21 

21 ft + ft 


.10 



21 % 




370 61* 

Aft 

6 V,— 7- 



24 

23 35 

Mft 

34ft 

HerltBn 

740 

33 


634* 




SO 







4 TOft 

10 ft 

10 ft 




2538 61* 

Aft 

6 —5 




39 15% 

1SH 

lift — % 




urn 7% 

7% 

7% + ft 




5 7ft 

'/ft 








HooKDr 


so 


a 




15 

30*284* 

284* 





65 44* 

41* 





33118% 

UVb 

18ft + % 




4 4% 

«Y* 

4% 




329% 

at* 

»% 





8 % 



1 4ffT 


70 35ft 

35 

35 




25 4% 

4 





114 171* 

16% 

16%— % 




15 5 

4% 

5 + rt 




108 5% 

5ft 

5ft 

HyteTUW 



15 7 

6 % 

6 %+ % 

1 



1 


1 




14 81* 


7ft— 4k 



J 

22936 

35ft 

3546— % 

IPLSv 



6 lib 

1 % 

1 % + % 

ISC 



182 9V* 

9 

9% + % 

lad 



115 4 

3ft 

34b— rt 




30 64b 

Aft 

64b 




117 24b 

7% 

25b + 7% 




56 4% 

4 

44*+ 7b 







IndIN 

140 

A3 

76 33 

32% 

33 




48 23% 

a% 

Z3% — t* 

Inttm 



619% 

19 

19 

Infmln 



10 Tft 

71* 

7ft + ft 

Irrt son 



398 8% 

B% 

Bft 

Into Gen 



57 3% 

34b 

JM 

1 vB 



7T7 

17 

17 

imoDv 



47711 

Wft 

11 + ft 

Intel 




a 

28%+ % 

IMIS* 



SB Bft 

8 % 

BM— rt 

intrTel 



30 Ift 

lft 

lrt— rt 

liumd 



40313ft 

13 

13%+ ft 




19 8% 

Ift 

B%+ rt 

IntriFlr 

.16 

14 

47110ft 

187b 

101 * 

litTrtoc 



72 5rt 

Ml 

5ft + % 




83949ft 

48ft 

49ft- ft 




321 59* 

57* 

Stt + ft 

intmec 



907 17 

lift 

MM + ft 

InCapE 



37 2rt 

3ft 

2 % 

Into In 



121 13ft 

U 

13ft— ft 

iGcm* 



164 IS 

14tt 

Wrt— 4* 

Ini Kins 

t 


10216ft 

Uft 

lift 

IntLse 



1012 % 

12 % 

12 %+ ft 

irUMobil 



204 64b 

ft 

6 % + rt 

IRIS 



30 17* 

1 ft 

IT Corp 



5215ft 

15 

JJrt+ % 

intlohjl 



65 4 

Sft 

3rt + rt 

Invtxe 

Die 

J 

446 4ft 

3% 

3M— M 

Iomega 



6*4 8% 

lrt 

8%+4b 

isotndx 



211 

11 

11 - % 

Itel 



98 54* 

5ft 

54*+ 7b 

IttHpT 



226% 

26% 

26%+ ft 

| 



J 


' 1 

JBRest 

36 

1 J 

27 Uft 

14 

UVb 

Jockool 

1 


7 3% 

3ft 

3M 

Jock Ur 



23680ft 30 

30% + % 

JomWtr 



17317ft 

lift 

lTW+lft 

JetSmrt 

400 20 

B2D% 

19ft 

194*— 1* 

JetMarl 



60 7 

6 % 

Srt+ rt 

Jerico 

.12 

3 

204 Wrt 16ft lift .. 





ft 

%+rt 

Jonlcbl 
Jane) A 

t 


J 3ft 

346 

»— n 

1 


SO Mb 

Sft 

3rt 

JOBPhSfl 

50 

6 J 

B Tft 

71* 

74* 

Jvno 



151 2044 

Xft 

ai*— % 

Justins 

301 

11 

9 Mft 

Uft 

Mft + 4b 

M ^ M 


Sates In Nat 

108s Hftu Low iPALOrae 


vJKoss 



40 rt 

rt 

10-* 


M 

5 

401 12 

lift 

lift— Vb 


32 

2t 

233 12% 

12% 

12%- 4* 

IColeke 

.16 

J 

238 25 

24% 

284*— 4* 

| 



L 


1 




44 84* 

8% 

8% 

UN 



525 67* 

6 

Art— ft 




28613% 

U 

U —ft 

LTX 



396184* 

18 

ii% — rt 




37 144* 

UVb 

1444 + ft 


LOAa 

30 

232 34% 

347* 

34% + % 



S 

1 13% 

13% 

73%— ft 



M 


11% 

11%— % 



63 


12ft 

1246 4- 7b 


41 

AS 

21 15ft 

1ST* 

15ft 

LndBF 

JO 

44 

109 134* 

13% 

734*+ ft 

LdmkS 



70 6% 

6% 

6%+ 4b 


JOo 

2.1 

40 39ft 

39 

39 


XSe 

*0 

3 674 




XO 

1J 

15 Mft 

247* 

M7* 




171 6% 

6ft 






1J 


LewteP 

Xtb 

33 

» 7% 

74* 

Tp+JM 




1806 3ft 

2 

3ft +rt 

Lexldta 



116 3ft 

3% 

3ft 

Uebrt 

37 

3 

89 22 

21% 

21 Vb— % 




20 674 





15 

84 134* 

194* 

1346 




210123% 

72V. 

224*— ft 



7J 

5 29ft 

29ft 





39923 

M% 





5U% 

M% 

14%+ ft 


1X0 

55 

3722 

21% 

22 




1849 34% 

23ft 

24 — ft 

Lyphes 



238 14ft 

134b 

Uft + 4b 

I 



M 


1 




4752 7M 


7% 




pL ’ J 

■ 

5%+ % 



15 

1 - ■ . ■ 

r ~7 

15% 





f " 

18ft— rt 





|Ttt 

lift 





pf\'~ 

44* 




W 1 rTilM 

r» ^ 


ModGE 

UO 

9 a 

2122% 

T'*.- 











a b 

0 

8 — % 

Ma trite 

Jle 


68114* 

11% 

11% 

MatSd 



11511% 

10% 

11% 


J0 

*3 

81 19 

184* 

184* 


2J0 

44 

■ T.l 

45 

45 — % 


XM 20 

■inrj 

Mft 










3 


7 


MrktN 




431* 







27ft— % 

Mautor 





4% 






10%+ ft 


.10 

A 

■TTJ3 


27 - % 

r"~-i j 



353 234* 



r ■ " . ■ 



|HK M ■■ 






452 47* 

4% 


r’-frFi 



B j 

4% 

Jft + % 


■88 

20 

190 32ft 

32 

32—1* 

McFad 



610 

ID 

10 




17 12 

12 




J 

21 6% 

61* 






5% 

Sft— % 




57 73% 

13% 

134*— % 










23 544 

54* 

5ft 










1417 19% 

Wft 

197b + % 


1.92 

SO 

30733% 


33% — ft 


U8 

3 S 

fcr ' if 


43ft 




1C ^ ■ 




SO 

3 S 

mr 






W 1 1 





A5 

^ 







Y ,v~i 






1 rTV | 









M 

61 

■ v i ■ 


9ft 




653 28ft 


2744—1 




124 3% 

3% 





1 10 





12 

a 5% 


5% 

MkrTc 



6aa% 

25 lb 

2S%— 1 




33 5 

44b 

5 




167 5% 

51* 

5ft— % 




as 5rt 

4% 

5rt+ % 

WriSiFd 

JO 

12 

42184* 

78 

18% + V* 

MJdBko 

1.12 

33 

m r i Yl <3 


29% + rt 






4 





B 1 


MtttHr 

At 

1J 


CjTI 

34% — ft 




101 4 

3ft 

Sft + 4h 

Mimpr 

At 

1J 

292 34% 

33% 

33% — ft 




SOI 3 

2ft 

3 




403 19% 

19ft 


MQmH 

Jle 


30 1444 






374 84b 


Bft + rt 




1257 8% 

87* 

84*— rt 


UO 

If 

14 35ft 

f- ' J 

35ft— ft 




67 Tft 


7% 


J3 

.1 

733 29ft 

r 1 

9ft 


V40 

U 

29 44 


434* — % 

Moncor 



343 34* 

3 

Sfc + 4b 


J5e 20 

3918 

17% 

17ft— rt 

MonAnt 



16 8% 

Ift 

84b + 4b 

Monolit 



1198 14 

134* 

13ft— rt 


130 

45 

HI 28ft 

Ft4J 

aft 


Ol 


3154* 

E3 



- 12 r 

1.1 

14 10ft 




JO 

2J 

3716% 

16% 

16% 




715 4rt 

44* 


MotClb 

M 

L5 

25 UV* 

13 



JO 

1.7 

292 34% 

367* 

36ft 

Mviais 

.101 

A 

118 26ft 

24% 

24% — 7b 

1 “ 



N 


J 


NCACp 

NMS _ 

Mo nrrvS 

N Bn Tex 

NIC tvs 

NtCotr 

NData 

NHlttlC 

NtLumb 

NMlcm 

NTort 

NotrBfv 

Noual. 

NetenT 

Norton 

MwfcSac 

NetwkS 

NtwfcEl 

NBnmS 

NE Bus 

HHmpB 

HJNOtS 

NYAIrl 

NY Awl 

NwldBk 

NmptS 

NwpPh 

NICMB 

NIcfcOG 

Nike B 




16 7ft 

7ft 

Tft 

■ J 





2 7ft 

2 M 

2M— 1b 

r- n 

54 

23 



1513 

U 

13 




J4 

40 

25731 

20 ft 

20 ft— ft 

RPCVEI 

XO 

11 

1.90 

5J 

5737ft 

37ft 

37ft + rt 

Retnb 



XA 

1 J 

44 21 

aft 

20 ft— rt 

Re llob 



.44 

48 

150 94b 

9 

9% + % 

Renoi 



JOe 

14 

55211* 

2046 

204*— V* 

RpAUtO 

At 

54 


29 Sft 

5 

5 

ftp HI tft 





225 *4* 

44b 

Art 

RestrSy 



t 


152 3ft 

31* 

31* 


,ise i A 



HD 4% 

44b 

Art + Vb 

1 '•’’T , m ( 

me 

S 



245 54* 

54b 

54b— % 

Rexon 



JO 

10 

20 a 

74* 

7ft— ft 

Rev Rev 

\XA 

19 

129 9 

87* 

Bft— ft 

Rhode** 

30 

15 



103 7ft 

74* 

7ft + lb 

RiUlm 





117 224b 

234b 

22 % 

Rftzvs 





2D 34* 

Sft 

3ft— rt 

Rival 

JO 

*5 



65 Oft 

8 

b — ft 

RoodS* 

1 J 0 

34 

At 

15 

45 32 

31 

31 

Robesn 

t 


JO 

35 

m a 

224b 

23 * M 

RabNuB 

J 6 

A 

M2 

A7 

2124 

aft 

334* 

RobVpf 





4 S 


Roc tor 
FfawraS* 

28b 15 



2411 

10 % 

11 

ReseSB 

J 8 a 1 A 

06 

3 

11723 

22 % 

22 % — tb 

Rouse 

S2 

23 


S75 6 % 

Sft 

6 rt + 1 b 

Raylnt 



1 


44 3% 

3 


RoyPlm 





10 4b 

M 


RoriRs 



AM 

45 

1942 8 ft 

8 % 

8 ft + ft 

RuitPel 




Sale* hi lUt 

1404 Hleii LOW J9AOl9t 


<46 19 

Nortrtlr M u 
Norsk B .12* j 
Narstan 
NAtlini 
Nests v 

NwNG t<44 17 
NwlFn LU 10 
NwNLS JO 2-9 
NwSfPS 2.70 702 
Novmtx 

Noxan .92 11 

NudPh 

Numrax 

NutiiF 

NuMed 


29917ft 
468 3016 
1 38 

115 6 ft 
55 7ft 
157 7ft 
66 16ft 
397 39ft 
166 28ft 
4821 
49 4ft 
28144ft 
343 5ft 
70 4 
79 9 
a 9ft 


17 17 — ft 

29ft 30 — ft 
38 38 

6ft 6ft— ft 
7ft 7ft— ft 
7ft .7ft— ft 
16ft 16ft 
39ft 3914 + ft 
27ft 27ft— ft 
20ft 2ffft 
4ft 4ft— ft 
43ft 44 — ft 
5ft Sft 

8 a 

Sft t + ft 
9ft 9ft— ft 


OCGTc 
oakHin 
OM Roc 


Ocfiiae 

Offs Lon 

OallMs 

OMoGo 

OkNCnts 

Old Rep 

OtdSPfC 


OnUne 

Onyx 

OptlcC 

OptlcR 

Ortxmc 

Ortott 

OrtaCp 

Oshmn 

OttrTP 

Ovrtxp 

OwwiM 

Oxoco 


50 2ft 2ft 
7 » » 

181 2 ft 2 ft 
35 Jft Jft 
93 74 ft U 

a ift ift 

S3 26 1114 36ft 3Sft 
268 SJ 9246ft 44ft 
14223 2Zft 
68 U 6431KV 30ft 
2*0 136 2 2D lift 

.139 J 13616ft UH 

10 4ft 4 

412 Ift Ift 
32 15 Uft 
775 30ft 30 
44 74ft Uft 
26 5ft 5ft 

766 6ft Sft 
JO 1J 516ft Uft 
248 97 1M 27ft 27ft 
75 10ft TOft 
JS 2J 39 13ft O 

51 3ft Sft 


2ft . 

Sft 

2ft + ft 
349 + ft 
14ft 

lft— ft 
36 

46ft— ft 
23 + ft 
30ft + ft 
20 + ft 

Uft 
4ta 
lft 

14ft— ft 
301* + ft 
lift 
Sft— ft 
6 ft +1 
Uft 
27ft 

iavi— ft 
13 —ft 
3ft— ft 


PNC 

PaMB 


2J2 5.1 
1J0O {7 

JO ss 
.13 IJ 

ParfcOh M 4J 


POCFS7 

PocTel 


Potrkl 

PoulPt 


Pavctac 

PeakHC 

PearlH 

PraGM 

PenaEn 


Peep Ex 
PeopRt 


JO 37 


Mr 16 
2JB 7J 
Jt 33 


Prtrtte 1.12 4J 


M 3J 
S3 IS 
.12 16 


PSFS 

PtiltGI 

PtmxAm 

PlcSnv 

PVcCafe 

PlonHI 

PionSts 

PoFWk 

PicvMa 


PMI5I 

Powell 


PwConv 

ProcCsi 

PrpdLO 


PrtcCm 

PrtcCos 

Prtrmx 

PradOp 

Pn>9C» 

PropfTr 

Provln 

PvllTm 

PurtBn 


.16 36 
.14 J 
1JD 86 

AO 2J 


179918ft 
75445ft 
70*6 8 ft 
II Uft 
a lift 
a 7ft 
293 74ft 

6 9ft 
57 74 

746 4ft 
22 7ft 
» Sft 
17 22ft 
40 9 
4613 
55 22ft 
518 6 ft 
V76Vt 

si aft 

363 9ft 
83 ft 
33 7ft 
SI (U 
526ft 
10 6 
736 Bft 
7023 15ft 
70 3* 
95 19ft 
11718ft 
732 
24 B 
2610ft 
138 a 
49 23ft 
2 7ft 
60 lft 
313 161* 

7 7ft 
14 33ft 
60 6 ft 

240 3ft 
384 4ft 
49716ft 
548 42ft 
4115ft 
t0 4ft 
9635 
148141* 
2815ft 
47 4ft 
30 Uft 


ID 10 ft 
45 45 

B BV. 

131* 13ft 
131* -13ft— ft 
7ft. 7ft 
14ft 141* 

♦ft 9ft— 1* 
13ft 14 + ft 
4ft 4ft + ft 
7V. 7ft— ft 
6ft 6ft+ ft 
22ft 22ft + ft 
9 9 —ft 

Uft 72ft 
22 221* 

A 4 — ft 
26 U —ft 
2 81* 28ft 
9ft 9ft— ft 
ft ft+fc 
7 7 — ft 

Sft «W 
2 * 1 * 36ft 
5ft 6 
Bft Bft 
15ft 75ft 

3 Sft— lfc 
18ft 19 

18ft lift— ft 
31ft 31ft— ft 
7ft 7ft— ft 
TOft Wft 
27ft 27ft — ft 
22ft 22ft— ft 
7V. 7ft 
Ift lft 
15ft 15ft 
Sft tft— 1 * 
33 331* + ft 

6ft 6ft + ft 

Jft 3ft + ft 

Aft Aft— ft 
15 16ft +lft 

4ft Aft — ft 
34ft 35 +ft 
13ft Uft + ft 
15ft 15ft— ft 

4 .4ft + ft 
141S Uft + ft 


QMS S 
Quotfrx 
OuokrC M 

OuoiSv 

Quontm 

Quest** 

Quixote 

Quotrn 


M 


60 12ft 12 H 12 ft— ft 
m am 4ft 4ft 
45 25 Mft 24ft— ft 
7 2ft 2ft 3ft 
239 20ft 28 201* 

599 Jft 3 31* 

sm 10 in* + w 

355 Bft 8 ft lft— ft 


RAX 

RPMS 

Rods vs 

ferttnT 

Rotfce 

Rodion 

Rosen 

Rnlnr 

Romtek 

RrnrEn 


IJ* 17 
J4 1J 


42B 10 ft 
293 14 
30 13ft 
56610ft 
30 Sft 
5 10ft 
373 6 ft 
25847ft 
in 43k 
1312ft 
31194b 
6 54b 
22 2>ft 
2S5 Sft 
58 64b 
43122ft 
131 94b 
38 4ft 
29 Bft 
9411ft 
■ 13 
10711 
520 

448 34k 
27 31ft 
5012ft 

=31 IK 

15012ft 
4ii n 
6 6ft 
77141* 
37 9ft 
3314ft 
10 Uft 

233ft 
271 181* 
46 84b 
1073 6 ft 
21 13ft 


9W 9ft— ft 
T3ft 13ft— ft 
Uft 13ft— lb 
9 10ft +lft 

HI* ***< li 

10V. m* + ft 
6 eft + ft 
46ft 47 — ft 
Aft Aft + ft 
12 ft 13U. — ft 
19ft l»ft— ft 
“ ft 

lft 
5ft 


4ft- ft 

1 % 

13 


ift 
27ft 
5ft 
6 ft 
22 
9ft 
Aft 
Bft 
lift 

n 

10ft n 
20 20 
2 ft a —1 
311* 31ft 
121* 12ft— ft 

Si + V* 

12ft Uft— ft 
29 ft 29ft— ft 
ift ift 
Uft 14ft + ft 
9ft 9ft— ft 
U 14 
18ft IBft+l 
19ft 14ft + ft 
3Nb 33ft 
U 18 — ft 
Bft SH— » 
Sft 6ft— ft 
131* 13ft 


Sales In Net 

188s Hhrt LOW JPJM.Oi'ae 


. 10 r 1 J 
r 

*8 3J 
1-50 46 


SAY Ind 
SCISy 
5EI 
SFE 
SP Drue 
SRI 

So l e c rd 
Safeco 
SofHlHi 
St Jude 

StPoul XD0 SS 
SalCpt 

Smftr JHr 3 

SandCW 

Sate! cd 

SavnF l<60o 45 
SvBkPS 33 33 
ScanOp 
ScanTr 

Scherer 32 33 
ScMmA 56 23 
SdCmp 38 SJ 
Sdlncs 
3d MIC 
SdSfl 
SdSySv 
Scttex 


SO 4.1 

A5 J 

m j 

1.12 4.1 
.14 1J 
M 1J 
LAB SJ 
.16 S 


136 41* 
10 11 
a 3ft 
13 141* 
121 7ft 
2458 5ft 
~ II* 


41* + ft 
II 
3ft 
1 SW 

Tft— 4* 
51*— ft 
21 * 


SvcMer 

Svmast 


Stir Med 
ShwRItB 


ShefdW 

Sftonev 

ShonSos 

Shpsmt 

Silicon 

silicons 

Silicval 

Sillcm 

Slltec 

Slmpln 

Slpoln 

5IsCp 

Staler 

Skipper 

StoonTc 

Smith L. 

SmlffiF 

Society 

SoctySv 

Softedi 

SottwA 

SoacP 

SonrPd 


SoHoaP 

SlhdFn 

Soufrat 

Sovran 

Sovran 

SpcMIc 

Span* 

Soecds 

Spctran 

Soeccti 

SoertlD 

Spbc 

Slat Bid 

Standy s 

SWMIc 
Std 
S ton dun 
Starsrs 
StaSlB 
SlateG 
Steig e r 
StemrL 
StewStw 
Slwlnf 
SHfel 
StedcSy 
Stratus 
StrwCs 

Stryker 

StuartH 

Subaru' 

SubrB 

Sum mo 

SomtHI 

SunCst 

SunMed 

SHlSL 
Sup Rle 
SupSky 
SlSKlBX 
Sykes 
SvmbT 
Smear 
Synieen 
Smtrex 
Syscon 
SyAsoc 
Svstln 
SystGn 
' '..d 
Cp 


.16 5 

.100 20 

JO SJ 

M J 

IJO *J 

1300 X 0 
JO 1J 

52 1 3 
58 35 
.10 15 
758 45 

OS» 15 
JS 3 


30 35 
UH 45 


Rea 1.16 25 


106 25 
-lib XI 


50b lJ 

55 15 
158 15 
154 43 


t 

.128 J 


34 1J 


116101* 9ft 101*4-1* 
468513ft 12 12ft— 1ft 

52 13ft 13ft Uft 4- ft 
138 8 7ft ■ 4- 1* 

31 144* 14ft 14ft— 1* 
696 17ft 17ft 17ft 4- ft 
1313 lift 13 
55232ft Bft 32ft— ft 
390 U Uft 13ft— 1* 
71 Mb Bft Bft— ft 
2145 52 50ft 5Dft— lft 
82 Sft 3ft Sft 4- ft 
• 7ft Tft 7ft 4- ft 
9 8 U 7ft Tft 
I ft ft ft 
5636 351* 35ft— ft 

194 27 26ft 26ft— ft 
168 7ft 6 ft 7 4-1* 
15121* 131* 131* 

22 10 9ft 9ft— ft 
1 75ft 15ft 75ft— ft 

4 5 S 5 — ft 

5 74b 7ft 7ft + ft 
3ft 

11 
34b 

. I. 

270 6 51* 5Vk — ft 

9319ft 19ft 19ft— ft 
350 Tft 7ft 7ft + ft 
1611 12 lift lift— ft 
125327 2Sft 27 4- ft 

63 13ft Uft Uft 4- lb 

357 27ft 27 27 — ft 

313 301* 29ft 29ft— ft 

6317 74ft 16ft— ft 
587 17 761* Uft 

200 32 311* 31ft— ft 

4 UV* U1* 131* + 1* 

1 5 S 5 

168 7ft 7 7ft + ** 

41 lift lift lift— lb 
33 15ft IS 15 
11613ft 13 131* + U 

30 Bft 8 ft Bft— 1* 

73 U 13ft 14 4- ft 
1414ft Uft Uft 
7 41* 41* 4V* + ft 
29 157* IS 1514+1* 
65 7 Bft 70V* 70ft + 1* 

10 4ft 4ft 4ft + ft 

43 Jft Sft 3ft 

20 7ft 7ft Tft 

427 361m 35% i 36V, 

46 12 lift 12+1* 
172 74b 7 7 — ft 

515ft 15ft 15ft 
26 37ft 39 39ft + ft 
20 76ft Uft 167*— ft 

31 23ft 23ft 23ft— ft 

5 41* 4ft 41* + ft 

64 SI ft 31 31 — 1ft 

247231* 22ft 23ft + ft 
229 Bft 8 Sft 

621 39 38ft 33ft 
125 Sft 2ft Sft— ft 
705 3ft Sft 3ft + ft 
11011 ft lift lift + ft 
4 lift lift lift + ft 

32 Sft Sft Sft + ft 
U 31* Sft 31* 

1014ft Uft Uft— lb 

330 5ft Sft 5ft 
64 221* 22 2214 + 1* 

40218ft U 18ft— ft 

1244ft 44 44 — ft 

11 «» «H 4ft 

233 10ft Mb 18ft +11* 
99 461* 45ft 46ft + ft 
242 Sft 4ft Aft— ft 
93 64b 61b 6 ft + ft 
16 41* 4V* 4ft— ft 
lift 12 + ft 
23 23 — ft 

a Sft— ft 
Oft— ft 

... 914 91b 
47511b 511* 51ft— 1b 
9734ft Ml* Mft 
21 34* 3ft Sft + ft 
HU 115 115ft + ft 
43 43ft 43 43 — ft 


tome Mel 

toot High low SP-M-arge 


TBkGas 

Tucker 

TwnCtv 

TvsonF 


1 J 0 Ll 

as x 


197 31ft 314* 314* 

52 5 5 5 —lb 

141 14* 1ft lft + ft 
937 33ft Sift 33 + lb 


31 12 
13 231* 
142 6 
11 9ft 
18 91b 


578 31* 
679 7ft 

23 iK 
4 7 
136 10 
716 
2 84* 
43 4W 
247 1ft 
22 n* 
203 31b 
89 9ft 
87 41b 
31 131b 


+Jb 
7ft— ft 

lft 

7 

»ft— ft 
16 

Oft— >* 

41* 

lib 

9ft + V* 
37* + ft 

9ft— I* 
3ft 

13ft + ft 


Systmt 

SCTCP 


J4I X 


1 lift Uft 16ft 
264 64* 6 ft 6 ft— ft 
3 71ft 7ft 7ft 
BUI* 15ft 15ft— ft 
898 12ft 10ft 1 IV* — 2 


TBC 

TCACb 

TocVhr 

Tandem 

Tandon 

TcCom 

Teieo 

TicmA 

Tel PI in 

T*itm 

Te i e crd 

Telepld 

Tetvid 

Tekjos 

Telxnn 

Tames 

TndrLv 

TgmrDs 

ToSdOto 

Texan 

THerPr 

Thetfd 

ThdN e 

Thor In 

Thortec 

ThouT 8 

3Com 

TlmeEs 

T me Fib 

Ttaronr 
Tafiia 
TaHSVS 
TrakAu 
Triads v 

TribCm 

TnisJo 


.12 J 


Jle 


204 11 10 ft 
13 HI* lift 
2 81b 81* 
106218ft IB 
. 4027 6 ft Mb 

1 6 ft 61b 
37418ft IB 

232323 22ft 
286 Oft 9 
30 5ft 51* 
14 1142 201b 19ft 
184164b lift 
236 31* Sft 
5715 
75 li 
30 Aft 
10 4 
IWW 

13 2ft 
130 lft 
WISH 131b 
a 71b 7ft 

3J 58 33V. 33 

2 9ft 9ft 
121 8 ft Bft 
502 UVb Wb 
156 7ft Sft 

77111* 10ft 

14 10ft 104* 
461 lft 11 * 

B3l34b 134b 
64131b 131* 
ill 10 ft 
309103b 94* 
10 2ft 2ft 
M 726 26 


14ft 

15Vb 

Sft 

4 

m 

2 ft 

it* 


13ft 

14ft + ft 
Sft + Mi 
IBM + lb 
4ft + rt 
61b— ft 
18ft + lb 
22ft 

9 —ft 
54b 

197b— ft 
164b + M 

sm— n 

14ft 

U + lb 
4 — 1b 
4 — 1* 
Wb— rt 
2ft 

lrt-rt 
13% + ft 
71b— ft 
33 —ft 
94* 

Bft + lb 
16% + ft 
ift— rt 
111*+ ft 
10ft 
14* 

13ft 

13ft— ft 
10ft— ft 
10ft + lb 
2 ft 

26+1* 


US LI CO 

UTL 

Ulfrey 

Unarm 

Until 

vtUMoll 

UnPlntr 

UnTrflc 

UACom 

UBAIcfc 

UBCm 

UnEdS 

UFnGrp 

UFstFd 

UOran 

UPr*gd 

US Ant 

USBcp 

US Cop 

US Dsun 

USHts 

USShn 

USSur 

USTrk 

USTr 

usmtn % 

UnTelev 

UVaBa 

UnvPm 

Unvttft 

UFSSk 

U rower 

U9catp 


120 63 
Me j 


2 JO 48 
.12 A 

. 10 e 18 

180 63 


48 284 * 
19174* 
1283 10 
43715ft 

78104* 
1949% 
441 274* 
2101 * 
20923 
20 3ft 
363 m 
678 134* 
47 15ft 
618ft 
27 21b 
446 Ml* 
15 2ft 
12 5ft 
466 33ft 
230 3ft 

66 157k 
6111* 
41*4411 
_ 21 94 

42 16ft 

144 41 72*5 

5 U4* 
351 10ft 
U 9 
65 »* 
■078 33 26 37* 


1-20 1DJ 
180 38 


38% 28ft— ft 

171b 171b 
9ft 9V* — ft 
Uft 151* + M 
8 ft «*+% 
% Trt+ft 
18ft IBft + ft 
491b 49% 

27 27ft 
707* 107* 

22ft 22ft— ft 
2ft 2ft— V* 
Bft 9 +1* 
12ft 131b + ft 
15ft 757* 

Wft 10 ft 
Ift Ift 
241* 24ft— ft 
2ft 2ft— ft 
5ft Sft 
32% 33 — ft 
3ft Sft 
15 15 — ft 

lift 111* . 

44ft 44ft— ft 
34 M — ft 
U 161* + ft 
34ft 34ft— rt 
14ft Uft 

10 W - ft 

Bft 9 + 1b 

Sft 51* 

31* 3ft— rt 


VLI 

VLSI 

VMX 

VSE 

VaitOLa 

» 

ValLn 

Vrtnzetl 

VectrG 

Venfrex 

Vela 

VJcorp 

victras 
Vldeocp 
vjederr 
vtklng 
Vlrefek ' 

VtoTech 

Vodavl 

VoltIM 

Volvo 


1 U 6 
557 87* 
68 97* 
5 74* 
316 lift 
50 Sft 

34 397* 
* 25 

36315ft 
425 3M 
119ft 
20 12 
5 lift 

aw 

397 2ft 
90 Tft 

35 17ft 
156 24ft 


SM 5ft 
7ft B — ft 
9% 9ft+ rt 
7ft Tft 
Uft lift— 1* 
av* Sft + ft 
29 297*— ft 

247* 24V*— ft 

- - — + ft 


^ ft’ 


3 S w 

14ft Uft— ft 
2 ft 3 
19ft 19ft 
lift » 

111* UV* + 7b 
17ft 18 
Ztb 21 *— rt 
6ft 6ft 
Uft 17V* + lb 
234* 241*+ lb 


W 


WD40 

WorttC 

WlkrTei 

WWiE 

WFSLs 

WMSB 

wovetk 

VMhbs 

WestFn 

WrtlFSL 

WMlcr 

WtTlAS 

WmorC 

WriwdC 

Welfra 

Wtcot 

Wldcom 

wiiimr 

WlllAL 

wmsSn 

WitanF 

wibnH 

Wlndmr 

vnnnEn 

Wberc 

VVCCXJD 

Worthg 

Wyman 


JS 

tx 

203*04* 

201* 

204*+ rt 


3 

4204* 

204* 

20ft— 4* 



337 Flfa 

sn 

97* ■ 

ft 

158 

03 

659 79% 

19ft 

JVM- 

% 










111* 

11% ■ 




25 7ft 

7 

7 



29 

7 13 

12% 

12% 




8 9ft 

fft 

Oft- 

ft 



4 64b 

6% 

6ft- 

rt 



1 5% 

5% 

6% 




3017% 

124* 

12% - 



72 

a is 

174* 

18 - 




111 UVa 

u 




738 25% 






2 Sft 

Jft 

Jft i 




399 7% 




150 

44 

626 3446 

341* 

Mft- 

% 


279 8% 

BM 

8% 




440 10ft 

10 

W — % 



17 Oft 

9 

9%- 

% 



21 11% 

11% 

ll%- 

ft 


\A 

57 57* 

4ft 

5rt- 




19 24* 

2rt 

2ft- 

7b 

JB 

44 

»19rt 

19 

19 - 

rt 

JO 

35 

9718% 

17 

17 - 

-lft 

56 

24 

242S 

73 

a 


M 

33 

66 24% 

2t 

24% -4 

% 


1 * 1 

Xebec 

1074 4 

3rt 34b 

Xlcor 

610 10% 

94* 1Q% + M 

Weft* 

8212% 

12ft 12ft— ft 

| 

Y 

1 

YlowFI 

1J0 3.1 32 32% 31% 32 

1 * 1 


ZenLbB 

ZenUc 

Zleoler Ma 
ZkwUt 1J4 
ZIHH 
ZJvod 

2andvn 36 
Z vinos 

Zytr*x 


arm* u% ib%— v* 

25 3 2ft 2ft— ft 

40 12 lift 12 + ft 

a 31% 31ft 31ft 
74 Aft 4% 47b— ft 
16 6ft Alb irt 
134 9 Sft 9 +M 
U0 1% 1% 1% 

91 3 lib lrt— rt 


Reaching 
More Than 
aThirdof 
a Million 
Readers in 
164 Countries 
Around 
the World 


Hcnri&^Sribunt 








Iridajs 

MSE 

Gosb^ 


Tables include the nationwide prides 
up to the dosing on Wall street 


12 Monte 

HhftLsw Srack 


65% MM PaFLpr 0X0 113 
aw 2»* poPLdp»aai \u 
2W 25V. PaPLdprUS 133 
WVi Bits PoPLprlUJO 114 
1® UO 

« Mw poplpt tan m 
*2 *% PaPLpr 830 112 


ISOz A3 AIM A3 +1 
11 25% 25% 2S% -M4 
IS 2K HVs 2816— % 
650* 90 0 » + % 

3Qztfl0 100 100 + 16 

5te 36% 58V> 58% 

OlOOZ 6$% 64% ASM + % 



S* SI? Pwwtt 230 £7 10 137 35*4 38 38%. + Hi 
i £“■ g®""* 1 56% 56% 56% + % 

fS 3L tio u 38 22 % 2 m am— % 

?£* ^ £""») 2J0 5.1 ID 2856 4304 4316 CVS.— % 

Wh 7* PmEn IP 71 7» Ira Mft is* 

MM Jj 12 13 SS 3014 30% 30V. 

Si P*” ICu T.68 +0 20 730 421*i 42 «2Va — % 

SU 7 i? 55? EI -** it 16 l«t 26% »% *%— H 

]$% _?3* PrmMn 1720157 7 10 8% 7% B 


J0«i 70* Prmlan 172*157 7 10 8Vb 7Tb B " 

1®£ !£* P e rrP l J0 M 1! 147 l«b 16% l«b— % 

•££ SS £!E5 '■* *5 i4 47 m am mm + m 

??5 ?*14 Petto 153ellO 46 27% 27 2714 

’ZS 14 £•?>**»» 1-57 10_fl 27 14% 140b 14% 

JU Sflnv 1X0*217 1A A W A 

2m Pflnr IJ2 14 13 3282 014 38% 014 
25 12% PhtloO 257 1M 1316 VH4 + % 

404 M Phrtpur £00 U? IN U 35% 36 

2f* PhlM X* 17 10 36K 31% W% 31 . . 

* PWHJEI 120 149 4 1393 15 14% 1«— 14 

3m 24 PtlllE Pt 430 14.1 114fc 32 30 30% + VS 

S £, E5 lEpt **> t« «Qi 31% 3116 31% +1% 

M 25% PtlllE pf 440 119 40dz 3m 33%. 33% +(% 

55 IS. ^"EPl 7JW 119 100* SOM 50% SOM + % 

$2% 5014 PtlllE pt US 149 lOOz 38% 58% 58% +114 

1016 6% PtlllE pf 03 144 435 m 91b 914— Vk 

5S4 43 PtlllE pf 7X5 153 4Wz » 51% 51% — Vi 

JOUi 6% PtlllE pf 138 187 M 9% 9% e%+% 

11AM 97 PhllPt 17.12 157 310*112% 112 112% + W 

47 SI PhflE pf 9 JO 140 ASDz 64 62% 64 + % 

56 44 PtlllE P( 7J50 147 120* 53% 53 S3 

M 1514 PhJISub 1J2 7X 11 21 17% 17% 17% 

S3'-.-. 6214 PtillMr 140 43 10 1431 79% 7914 79Tb + % 

17% 10% Pflllpln M ZB IQ 374 17% 17 17% + 54 


17% 10% Pflllpln .48 25 10 

47 26 Phil in of IK! 24 

56% 33% Phi I Put 241 U 1 

28% 1614 PhllVH .40 1.7 8 

0 27% PladAvt 78 X 7 

32 23% PfeNG IK 74 I 

21 14 Plerl 4 

45% 33 Pllibrv 156 34 10 

33 71% Pioneer 131 U 7 

36% 26% PltnvB um 11 io 
77 53% PltreB pf 212 3.1 

16% 9% PltTstn 

17% 8% Ptemto 20 \A 12 
24% 12% Plonfm .16 U 12 
13% 7Vi PKtvtmy 3 

35% 23 PMMV IXXBe 44 11 


M IB 10 374 17% 17 17% + 14 

150 24 1 4! 42 42 

240 14 a 9254 44% 47% 44% +1% 
41 17 I $11 24% 23V 24 — M 

SS & 7 2048 33% 33 33 — % 

IK 74 I 17 31% 31 31% +V 

4 16 15% 15% 15% + % 

1J* 36 10 440 43% 47% 4316— % 
1.24 *» 7 800 30V. 3BV, 3m 

UM 11 10 942 34% 33% 33% — V 

III 11 2 68% 68% 66% + % 

4T2 Vtb 9% 9% + % 
20 1-4 12 123 14% 13V 14%— % 


73% 15% PopnPd M U 16 


0 13% 13% 13% — % 

s> ll 10% <n 

1 23 23 23 

21 li% 15% 15% 


34V 25% Poland IjOO 3*20 1670 26V 25% 26 — V 


34% 11% Pcmdrs AO J 8 

26V IS PopTal M SI IS 

19% 13% pprtec AO 23 

86 72% Portrpf 550 IS 

17% 13 PortGE 1J2 11.1 5 

96% 90 PpGpf IIJIJ 123 

21% 17% PorGpf 260 125 

33% 28% POTG pf 4-40 128 

32% 28% PprGof 432 136 


Z78 13% 13 13 — lb 

29 15V 15V 15V— % 
0 17% 17% 17% — % 
Kh 73 73 73 

320 16V 16% 16V— % 
tOz 93% 93% «3% 

2 20V 20V 2DV + % 
276 32% 31% 32 — % 
44 31% 31% 31% + Vb 


25V Polltch 1J6 5L4 11 01 0V 28V 28V— % 


25V 19% PptmEl 164 7S I 3SS 

41% 36 Pot El pf 4 SO 115 150 

37% 25% Piwtnrl JS4 IS 14 76 

KV 23 PrlmkB 200 21 6 147 

21% 11V PrimeC 14 1121 

25% 16 PrlmWI .12 S 20 53 

art 45% PrPCfG 260 46 11 1974 
14% 7V PrdRsti 38 23 20 12 

47% 31 Prpler 1-40 3-9 8 6 

19V 16V PSvem 1.92 IOlO 8 B3B9 

18V 16% PSCotpf 210 IU 7 

13% Ok PSlnd IX® 138 2 661 


25 19% PSIflPf 3J0 157 

8V 6 PSInpf 1.04 119 
50 36% PSInpf 7.15 17K 

66V 49% PSInpf 9-14 UM 
SB 44% PSInpf B52 17X1 
£7 43 PSInpf 238 165 

66% 50V PSInpf 960 I6J 
12V 3% PSvNH 

19 6 PSNH pf 

19% 6V PNH PfB 
0 8% PNHpfC 

0 7 PNH PlC 

21V 5V PNHPfF 
0% 7% PNH PtG 

2Mb 19% PSvNM 288 116 
27% 20% PSvEG 272 105 
13% 18% PSEGpf 1-40 114 
33V 0 PSEGpf 44K 128 
35 2B% PSEGpf 4.18 13J 

0 29% PSEGpf 430 124 

18% 15 PSEGpf 217 125 
SAW 46% PSEG Pf 660 126 
20V 16% PSEGpf 243 126 
AAV 55 P5EGpf 760 112 
64 55 PSEGpf 868 124 

4% 2% Publlcfc 

13% 7V Pueblo .H 17 


’S 8 385 to 2SV 25V + % 

5 ISOz 0 0 0 + V 

S 14 74 28V 28V 28V— % 

Ll A 147 33% 33 33 

14 1121 16V 16% 16% — % 

5 0 53 0% 24% 25% + % 

LA 11 1974 56 55% 56 + % 

17 0 12 10% 10% 10%— % 

19 8 6 35V 35V 35V + % 

6 8 0309 19% 18% 19% 

4 7 18% 18% 18%+ M 

8 2 661 7V. 7 7V + % 




Sffltt 23 21% 0% + % 

600* 7% 7% 7% 

580z 42 41 42 

6301 57 55% 55% — IV 

82Qz 0 48 48 —2 

0OZ 90 SO 30 —IV 
10* 59 at 59 — 1 
1 46* 4 3% 4 

9i*0Z 9% 9% 9% — % 

8 9% 9% 9% + % 


12Vi 12% 12% + % 
10% 10% 10% — % 
70V TOM 10%— % 


Ion + % 
MVi— % 
U%— % 
lBVi — % 
3% 

38%—% 
M%— % 
33V— % 
29%— % 
*4 - % 
31%—% 
99% + % 
91% 

U%— % 
32%—% 
14V + V 
1916— Hi 
55V— % 
30 + % 

a +14 

3616 

28%+ % 
5V— % 
12% 

lAVb + % 

31V 

5C% 

29% — % 
2BV + V, 
16%— % 
16%-% 
53V 
52% — 1 
34 -% 
33% — U 
13V— % 
23V— % 
35%+ % 
20% 

25- * 

0 -% 

7% 

22Tb — % 
18%—% 
3J% + % 
36% + % 
33%+ % 
23Tb 

25V— IV 

2m 

ii% 

4M — Vb 

49 +1 

71V— U 
15%+ % 
13% 

69% + % 
0 % 

MV— % 

14 
22% 

399b — 1 
33V 

38V— % 
51V— % 
JflM 

18V— % 
14% + % 
30% — % 
* - V 
18% + % 

15 

25%+ % 
29% + % 
10 

18%+ % 

17%+ Vb 
10% 

2816 — Vi 
17% 

29%+ % 
10% 

39%— % 
30V + % 
19Tb — % 
17% 

2% 

•5Tb— % 
30%— » 
WTb— % 
AH+ % 
29 — % 
28Tb— % 
8 %+ % 
14% 

91 — % 

«%- % 

a 

6Vi— % 
D 

JJ%— % 
15% 

19 — % 

n%-% 
pv + % 


ICUHinUM CuA.Qrw 


72% 73% +1% 
■ % 
1% 

% 


U.S. Futures Jan. 4 


Sooion 

Season 


MlaA 

LOW 

Ooen hwh Law Close Qs- 


Grains 


WHEAT (CBT) 




5X00 Mi wrinHn wn- dollora pot busftol 



4X4 

138 

Mar 3X3 3X3% 

3X0% 

3X1% —.02% 

+05 

+34% 

Mor 137% 3X7% 

334% 

136 —XI*. 

3X0 

129 

Jul 232 3X2 

3X0 

3J0% —JJita 

V6% 

332% 

Sop 3X3 330 

3X1% 

3X1% —JR'S 

3-63% 

137% 

Dec 3X3 3X3 

3X1 

3X1% —02 

174% 

148% 

Mar 3X8% 3X8% 3X6 

3X6 — X2% 

Est-Sales 


Prov.Salos 9X55 



Prev. Day Open Int. <3,915 upixu 



CORN (CBT) 




SXOBbu minimum- dal lore par buNiol 



325% 

70S 

Mar 272% 272% 

2X9% 

269% —OS 

3 30 

272% 

May 278% Z7S% 

2.75% 

276 — 

U1 

276% 

Jul 2X1% 2X1% 279 

279% —XI* 

3J21% 

274 

Seo 276 276 

274% 

274% -jnm. 

2J75 

27) 

Dec 2.72 272 

2X9% 

2X9% —jo 

no 

?.ta 

Mar 2X2% 2X2% 

2X0% 

2X0% —02 

131% 

2X8% 

Mav 2X8% 2X8% 

2X6 

2X6% — JOU. 

Eft. Sates 


Prov. Sates 2+523 



Prev. Day Open lnt.l31X91 upl.979 



SOYBEANS (CBT) 

SXDBbu minimum- dot lore per bushel 



779 

5X7% 

Jan 574% STS 

5X0 

£60% — .17+ 

7.90% 

579 

Mar 5X6% 5X8% 

573 

+73% -.13 

737 

373% 

May +01 6X1% 

5X5 

5X5% —.14% 

7.99 

6X3 

jul +10% +11% 

675 

575% —M 

7J6 


Aua +14 +14 

6X0 

6X0 —.17% 

671 

6M5 

S4P +11 +11 

6X0 

&D0 —.114 

+60 


Nov +16 +16 

+03 

6X3% —.11% 

+79 

+» 

Jan +21 +21 

+16% 

+16% —.11% 

7X2 

+30 

Mar +39 +39 

+30 

+30 —.11% 

Est. Sate) 


Prev.Sates 28X89 



Prev. Day Open Int. 087*4 atf353 








Vi'kA 
11. »T*'7 1 

MEA 




208X0 

137.90 

Jan 139X0 139X0 

135L50 

135X0 —130 

209X0 

VC3X0 




20500 

19+50 

18+00 

17V-50 

18050 

18+00 

149X9 

15+50 

15+30 

150L50 

16QX0 

165XQ 

MOV 130X0 150X0 
Jul 15+00 15+00 
Aua 15+70 196X0 
Seo 16000 160X0 
Oct 160X0 160X0 
Dec 16+50 16+50 

1 

14+30 -am 
151X0 -3X0 

15100 —4X9 
155X0 —470 
15+00 —400 
163X0 —3X0 


i S hw" 5 TSS n Open Hlon Low Dose Om. 

COCOA (NYCSCE) 

lOmeiriclcra-lPWtnn __ 

2S7B a i!" ^ SS M S +a 

2570 00 MOV 3055 00 ^ jggf TJ 

2400 2049 Jul 2068 »J8 2M0 ®JL 

3415 3053 Sep 3065 3065 05S 0» 

2337 1999 Dec 018 2K0 015 017 +J 

W5 ra Mur xa W »» 

Mav » ,a 

i Est.scles P rev. Soles 14« 

Prev.Gov Open I nt. 3UtJ OPtTS 

ORANGE JUIC E 1NTCE1 

' lasXO^" 1600 1*00 J57-5Q ~I~3S 

inccfj liacn MoT 1MJ0 IA3JQ 1SVJ5 159.45 “W* 

!£S 1SSS -T iSS !S TS3 ^5 

B !mJS 3S iSS iSiS H || 3 

!B5S C3 £ IU 

Est. Sale® Prev. sales 697 


l»0 Mar 
Mav 


Prev. Dav Open rnt. 806 off 44 


Metals 


industrials 


32% 21V VF Carp 1.12 42 7 190 26V 26% 0% + % 

23% 5% Valero 1496 7% 5% 7% + % 

0 14 Valor Pf 144 187 73 18% 17V 18% + % 

5% 2% VaJeyln 0 2% 2% 2%— % 

24% 14% VdnOrs 0 47 5 0 19% 19% 19%—% 

716 216 Varco 3 TV 2% 2% 

58% -row Vartan 0 J U 450 36V 0 0% 

15% 9% VPfO JO 37 8 13 10V 10% 1016 

26% 17V Veeco 32 1A 13 115 20% 19V 20 — V 

6% 3% Vanda 13 4% 4% 4% 

34V 23V Vtoeem -42 12 12 53 33% 32% 0% 

63% 54 VaEPpf 70 128 600* 60% 60% 60% 


27% 20% PSvEG 272 105 6 3319 0 25V 2STb— % 
13% 10% PSEGpf 1-40 11-4 22 13V 12V 12V— % 


71 60% VaEPpf 884 130 

79% 67V VPEIpf UO 11-4 
77% 68% VaePaf 975 13JD 
63V 50% VaEpfJ 772 127 
58% 49% VaEPpf 70 127 
61 51% VaEPpf 7-4S 124 

73V 0 VuknM 244 16 10 


13 4% 4% 4% 

53 33% 0% 32% 

600Z 60% 60% 60% 

330z 6B 57V 61 + % 
20z 75% 75% 73% —7 
138* 75% 75V 75V 
1001 61 41 61 + % 

rate 56 55V 56 — % 

450z 39V 58 59V + V 

57 48% 67V 57V 



Livestock 


CATTLE (CME) 

40000 Itae cenH per Kl 

6730 620 Fob 6405 6632 AS85 45.92 —0 

6072 AX40 Apr 470 67A2 47.12 47.17 — 0 

6877 650 Jun 67.55 6777 670 67-55 —.10 

A6A5 63.15 Aup 6575 66J» 6580 6&B2 -0 

65.10 610 Oct 610 6195 630 630 —SD 

6560 6140 Dec 6125 6525 6525 6570 —.10 

Est. Sales 11346 Prev. Sales 16-861 
Prw.Dov Open Inf. 50054 

FEEDER CATTLE (CME) 
lima lbs- cents per lb. 

7100 6575 Jan 7LW 710 7U0S 710 +.10 

7385 557$ Mar 730 7277 7275 7£9D —.17 

720 670 Apr 7170 71.92 710 71 AS —M3 

TOM *4J» MOV 6985 69®fl 6975 »0 -.10 

7OJD0 660 AUP 66-90 6970 66.90 MTS +.13 

6870 570 Sap 4605 6025 630 £6.15 +.10 

4675 67.10 Oct 580 6085 680 5775 +0 

Est.Scdes 991 Prev. Sales 1713. 

Prev. Day Open InL 8823 

HOGS (CME) 

3&000 tea.- cents per Ol 

S®JS 4787 Feb SUB 5370 5265 SW7 +.10 

5+45 45.10 Apr 00 4987 4975 490 +0 

5580 4040 Jun 540 UM 5475 5480 —.12 

5577 4875 Jul 5475 550 5475 5*85 —.15 

5*37 47^0 Alia SS82 5400 SXTO 5190 +0 

5175 Asm Oct 4970 4977 49.12 49.15 -^05 

5085 4670 DOC 490 00 49.10 4920 -.17 

. 4970 4675 Feb 490 +75 

4735 4575 APT 4430 +.10 

Est. Sales UM Prev, Sales 6839 
Prow. Day Open Int. 24798 

PORK BEL1JE5 (CME I 
3800 tes^ cents per Ox 

BIAS <075 Feb 750 7570 7475 750 —87 

SUSS 60.10 Mar 7S0 7565 740 75J5 —SI 

820 61.15 May 76.15 7703 76.15 76JB — -17 

8287 62.15 Jul 7670 77.15 7635 7697 —S3 

8065 600 Alia 7370 740 7370 7+0 +32 

75.15 63.U Feb WMS 690 470 670 —0 

7140 64 Mar 470 

Est. Sales 701 Prev, Sales 6549 
Prev. Doy Open im. 1306 





Pood 



ai 

COFFEE CMYCSCE) 
37X00 BKr eaXa per lb. 






15150 

121XD 

Mar 

14220 

14289 

131X5 

13245 

—1+26 


12201 


139X0 

14070 

139X5 

14070 

+72 

14970 

171X0 

Jul 

13875 

139.15 

13800 

130X0 

+70 

147X0 

127X0 

Sop 

13+50 

13775 

136X0 

137X3 

+X7 

141X0 

12975 

Doc 

135X0 

13+20 

13560 

13575 

+75 

134X0 

128X0 

Mor 




13405 


13275 

131X0 

May mas 

13375 

13375 

!!»« 

— l76 

Est. sates 

2750 Prev.Sates 2X96 



1 Prev. Dav Open lot. 1X953 up 496 




I 5UOARWORLD 11 (NYCSCE) 





1 112X00 lb&^ amts per lb. 






1360 

4X2 

Mar 

4JH 

+15 

+01 

+13 

+05 

10X0 

4J4 

MOV 

440 

4X1 

+37 

+50 

+MS 

9X5 

463 

Jul 

478 

+92 

473 

+92 

+.10 

975 

490 

Sop 

5JU 

+05 

+00 

+13 

+09 

9X5 

507 

Oct 

+18 

574 

£15 

572 

+.10 

9X0 

5X5 

Jan 

S60 

560 

5X0 

575 

+M5 

9-33 

4X2 

Mor 

+15 

+31 

+12 

+31 

+.15 

+50 

6X0 

Mery 




6X0 

+70 

EsL5ates 12X05 Prev.Sates 10X11 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 81356 up 2X64 





Financial 


UST. BILLS (IMM) 
si million- Pteaf inpct. 

9L9S 870 Mar 9176 910 9172 9172 

9186 87,14 Jim 91.26 91 0 91.19 910 —XI 

9171 8694 Sep 907B 9079 9072 9073 — JH 

V0j62 0577 Dec 90-42 9642 9633 9074 —XI 

9027 860 Mar Jttfll 

90JK 87J31 Jun 890 8923 8976 8974 +0 

8971 B80 S«P 890 atSS 00 OtSl +JQ 

. Dec . 890 HhOl 

Est. Sales Prev. Soles 7-617 

Prev. Dcnr Open Int. 0300 up 987 

18 YR_ TREASURY CUT) 

S1IXUXU prfn- ate A 3Znda of 108 Pdf 

• 81-37 70-0 Mar 89 80 79-10 79-17 -4 

81-7 70-9 Jim 79+ 79+ 78-30 78-27 —7 

00-33 75-18 Sen 78-18 78-18 785 78+ —7 

78-28 75-13 Dec re 78 77-31 77-24 —6 

7833 75-18 Mnr 77-W —4 

784 77-22 Jun 76-® —4 

EsI. Sales Prov. Sales 803 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 37.111 off 160 

US TREASURY BONDS (CBT) 

(8 act+lDUno-ats & 32nde of UUectl 
77-15 57-27 Mar 70-s? 7D-31 78-3 70-10 —11 

77-15 57-30 Jun 70+ 70-7 6+9 £9-17 —12 

76-2 57-10 SBP 49-T7 69-17 68-21 680 —13 

7+5 57+ Dec 68-2B 6U8 6B 68-10 —13 

7330 57-2 Mar 48-11 011 47-19 67-26 —13 

784 54-® Jim 67-30 67-30 67+ 67-12 —14 

69-75 54 -79 5eP 67-19 47-19 64-Z7 67 —15 

69-0 56-23 D«C 66-® —15 

69-7 56-77 Mar 44-13 —15 

68-11 6+3 Jun 66-5 —15 

67-19 6+31 SeP 66-15 66-15 65-25 00 — 15 

Est. Sales Prev. So la 132.91 □ 

Prev. Day Ooen Int.l95,15B off 4.116 

GNMA (CBT) 

SIOOOOO pHo- P ts A 3and>of IMpct 
694 57-5 Mar 6+29 68-® 00 00 +2 

05 57-T7 Jun 4+2 6+3 67-31 6+3 +2 

0® 59-13 Sep 67-17 67-17 67-13 67-16 -HI 

013 59+ Dec 6+30 4+01 00 6+01 +1 

47-15 38-20 MOT 015 016 015 016 +1 

47+ 58-25 Jun 02 +3 

023 0® Sep 031 00 00 00 +3 

Est. Sates Prev. Sates 425 

Prev. Day Open let. 7A80 iml3 

CERT. DEPOSIT (IMM) 

51 million- pts of 100 pci 

2HZ SH2 hfaT * aw vxm 90-91 — jn 

TOSS B5X J»m 9042 9043 90® «U1 — XQ 

9006 H5JM SOP B9JM 8M4 8944 B9JB —JH 

89^ B5L34 Dec W41 8941 0+1 0935 -OR 

sp<8 8656 Mar 8899 

®A6 8746 Sep _ 8038 

eti-Sa%6 Prey. Sates 644 

Prev.OavOnen Inf. K716 off 16 


Stack Indexes 


SP COMP. INDEX (CME) ' * 

points and cents 

18025 15330 Mar 167.10 14735 16+80 16640 —JA 

18070 154. W Jim 17020 17035 169XW 100 -0 

18390 16000 Sep 17X00 173.10 172.10 17240 — 4» 

1/7-20 10JBJ Dec 17540 

Est- Sales 42461 Prev. Sales 46464 
Pr»v. Day Onen Int. 41X83 
VALUE LINE (KCBT) 
points and cents 

19650 1018 Mar 18030 18040 17945 18030 +0 

19/40 17300 Jun 183X5 18120 182X0 T8320 +3f 

190*5 18573 Sep 18595 +20 

Est. Sates Prev.Sates 3X48 • 

Prvv. Dav Open Int. 4X57 up 117 
NYSE COMP. INDEX (HYPE) 

Points end cents 

10340 8020 Mar 9640 9 055 9540 96.10 — JS 

tasxo 9000 Jim 9&as va® km mas -m 

105X0 91X5 Sep 99-93 99.95 9935 99 JO -23- 

Dec msa WL29 10120 10120 ~^ai 
Eat. Sates 10778 Prev. Sates 12.957 
Prev. Dev Open int. 7X93 off M4 


CommoditY indexes 


Close Prevraii 

Moody's 957X0 f .. - 96210 f 

Reuters T,t»lJ0 1,916.« : 

OJ. Futures 122J88 123X7 

Com. Research Bureau. 241 JO 243 JB. 

Moody's : base 100 : Dec 31, 1931. 
p - preliminary; f - final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sea. 10, 1931. 

Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec 31,1974. 


Market Guide 


CBT: Chtazeo Board of Trade 

a+E: Odcapo Mercanffle Exchanae 

IMM: intenwllmi o t Monetary Market 

i_.mN4 .-. ? OiIcdoo Mercxmflle Exctiano* 

gJCSCE: New York Cocto. S ypar. Co ffee Exchonue 

H2I-L Nw York COtton Excbonae 

COMEX: Com modify Exchanno, Now York 

NYMB: New York Mercantile Exdwnpe 

SS«. JUrreof Oiv Board of Trade 

NYFE. New York Futures Exchanoe 


Paris Commodities 

Jan. 4 ■ 

Soflar in Frencft Francs per metric ten 
Other figures hi Francs per 100 kg. 


Htok Lew CIM CNN 

SUGAR 

Mar U13 1X01 1X02 1JU —9 

Mav 1X60 1X53 1X52 1XSS —11 


London Commodities 

Jan. 4 

Figures in sterling per metric ton. 
Gosoil in U.S. dollars per metric ton. 
Gold m U5. dollars per ounce. 


Asian Commodities 

Jan. 4 




Auo 1445 1445 1432 1445 —8 5UGAR 

Oct 1499 1485 1498 IJOO —4 Mar 11740 116X0 116X0 11620 177 40 HUM 

JJ1 N.T. IXt WO UtK*. May 125L30 12+00 124X0 12*20 125+0 12540 

Mar 1470 1.670 1450 1475 —0 Aua 13520 13440 13440 13440 13540 13*40 

Esl. vol.:U)l» lots of 50 Ions. Prov. acnmi oa LO40 4140 UI20 *1+0 IC20 

tain: 100 lob. Open mterest: HUB Doe NX nx 147X0 iImo «xo iSxi 

COCOA Mar I63J» 162X0 16220 14248 164X0 16440 

Mar 2072 2X70 2X00 2X85 +12 Mav 170X0 17040 16820 14940 17040 17120 

May 2X85 2X65 2X85 2X» +5 794 lots ol 50 Ions. 

Jlv N.T. N.T. 2X90 — +5 

SfP N.T. H.T. -ism 2,105 +5 COC 

Dec N.T. N.T. 2JM0 — +5 Mar 

Mar N.T. N.T. 2X40 — unctL May 

Mar N.T. N.T. 2X30 — —5 Jly 

Est wol.: 0 Ms Of 10 tens. Prev. actual 5a> 
sales; 25 lots. Open Interest; 731 Dec 

COFFEE Mar 

Jan tLT. N.T. — 2510 Undt Mav 

Mar 2511 2505 2480 2510 Unch. 1* 

Mav 2510 2500 2490 2500 + 10 ___ 

Jlv N.T. N.T. 2488 — +0 

Sea N.T. N.T. 2460 — +W 

Nov - N.T. N.T. 2475 — +15 Mor 

Jen N.T. N.T. 24U — +11 MOV 

Est. voL: 25 lob of 5 tans. Prev. actual 
sates: 20 lots. Ooen Interest: 310 
■Source.- Boursa Ou Commerce. 


05 +5 COCOA 

— ,, + s Mor IASS 1465 IX7S 1X77 1X71 1X73 

— UnctL Mav ixm L876 ixas 1X86 ixbz 1X83 

— j Jtv 1X94 100 1X92 1X93 1X87 1X88 

»v. actual Sep 1X97 1X87 1X9* 1X98 1X90 1X91 

DOC 1X48 1X40 1X44 1X47 1X41 1X43 

Mar 1X45 1X*5 1X45 1X55 TX35 1X48 

May N.T. N.T. 1X20 1X80 1X30 1X55' 

1489 tuts of 10 tans. 

COFFEE 

Jon 2X45 220 2X38 2X43 733 5 trw 

Mar 2287 2X40 2276 7377 2275 2X77 

May 2301 2272 2381 2282 2X90 2392 

Jl» 2X05 2X80 2283 2288 229a 1299 

» 

Ja Z,»£ r «5 l £- a . 2M 


London Metals Jan. 4 

Figures in sterling per metric ton. 
Silver in pence per Irov ounce. 


Today Previous j}? 

Hlati erode copper cathodes: Aug 

Spot 1.1060 1,14X60 1,13*00 1,13*50 San 


GASOIL 

Jan Z1&75 217X0 71 7 JO 21733 31+50 21+75 

F6t> 21+2 217X0 21+73 07X0 21650 71+75 

Mar 216X6 713359 210X0 21175 21175 71+80 

Apt 21175 210.75 21075 21175 21175 212X0 

MOV 21350 21075 210X0 210.75 217X0 21225 

Jun 711X0 2UX0 209X0 TIOlSB 210X0 21275 

Jly N.T. N.T. 20+M 711X0 210X0 214X0 

Aua N.T. N.T. 205X0 27000 70000 222X0 

Sec N.T. N.T. 205X0 220X0 200X0 226X0 

3JS1 lots of MM tons. 


AmeHessaf AMI Irtc 
fpl Gre Hamwnn 
NMndPS adl OcdP afj 
torerGp RnssToes 
5MOIIOb TexAmBnch 
WiaelPItSil ZetiHhE 


AJarcalnc 
lllPwll 73p 
Poet f Re* pf 

Scrndam 

TxPadLd 


vl — in bankruptcy or receivership or betna reorganized un- 
der the Bankruptcy Ad. or socwll Ms assumed bv such aHn- 
pcnles. 

wd — when distributed, 
wl — when issued, 
ww — with wor ran is. 
r — w-dtvldemi or ex rWi Is, 
vdis — ax+lstrlbutten. 
xw — without worrents. 

V — e«-dMdend and sales In lull, 
yld-yteid. 
z — sales In full. 


UAWWffl Not Press 
For Eariy Chrysler Talks 

Reuters 

DETROIT — Hk United Auto Waters has 
dec i ded not to pursue an early reopening of 
contract negotiations with Chrysler Cofp. bo- 
cause of the company s refusal to agree 10 let the 


3 months 1,147.50 U4&00 1,14330 1.143JOO 3-7S1 lot* of MX) tons. 

Cffrra * ctJfhodes: 

spot LUU» 1.13+00 1,128X0 1,130X0 GOLn 
Smonlta LMWMM LmSuSS 
Tin: spot 9X20X0 9X25X0 9.945X0 9X55X0 * 376 iMiSmI&E? 

3 monttn 9790X0 9X00X0 9,910X0 9X20X0 Saurao: aeutrnnmOLnnlm. 

Lead; soot 375X0 384X0 373X0 37+00 P*tro7tvm £>- 

3 monttn 2050 329X0 330X9 331X9 

Zinc: loot 705X0 706X0 690X0 691X0 

3 months 699X0 700X0 686J0 687X0 


3 mon th* *2850 329 XQ 330X0 331X0 

Zinc: soot 705X0 7X6X0 690X0 691X0 
Smooths 699X0 700X0 686JD 687X0 
Silver: spot 53288 52358 527X0 529X0 
3 months 515X0 536X0 541X0 5*150 
Aluminium: 

soot «BX0 90+00 90150 90250 

3 months 92780 928X0 92+50 925X0 
Nickel: spot +200X0 +210X0 +190X0 +195X0 
a months +190X0 +300X0 +205X0 +210X0 
Saurat: Bm/ttrs. 


Dividends 


Jan. 4 


.. I.I7U 1-220 

Volume: ll tots of 35 tons. 
Source: Reuters. 


Per Ami Pay Roc 
INCREASED 


DM Futures Options 

Jan. 4 


CUosd Mircaniile Ejtrtome. 

W. Cenrni MaUSflBO morks, as* per mrt 


I 


SiS* § i « a Growth Predicted 

usual w-v ^ assoaation, which wfl] alJow them 

STcorp o H 2-1 i5S tor Weliermanv tnnwaice in jevising banking ’ 

Etectnea Go* a xi 3-is v 2 i J f^dations. the official said. I 

S S-i l:i* BERLrfTwST^ ■„ . Forei gn bankers have wdconjed 

Resources . 76 M3 i -0 Dci+LtN — west Owmany will the moves but have called for fiff- 

»ei; m^mooiwv: o-omtonr; s-sonu- register moderate economic growth ther Iiberali2atkra measures; m- 

-■ vp/ RiSHW duding freedom to sct^braiSi 

2 .P5 31cent » but unem- offices in the southern port of Ka5- 
pl^^t remammg at 9 percent, hsiung, and authority to^ept^- 
to a foreast by the Insti- rent and deposit aaountsm 1 Tai- 
tum for Eranomc Rescanrh. wan doUa^AI banES 

re ^ ease d Thursday, °n Tarwan dollar imMinta wuu!a 

aports ue expeewd lo rix 7 pms. He^^otoaS. 80 ’' 1 ^ 

percent, at a ume when world trade 1 

(sprcd icled to increase by onjy 4 . . " 

pereenL Per a pi la income, the in- ,F YOU GET a kick m it r« 
sQtute said, should increase I per- REad^ ^ SOCCER, 

cent in real termc fnr ,L= k S nn. 


.10 2-4 1-18 

77 3-11 2-18 
XI 3-9 MI 


Cash Prices Jan. 4'. 


Commodity and Unit Frl a£ 

Coffee 4 Santm. lb 178 1 S 5 

Prtntctoth 64/30 38 %. yd _ <L7B &K 

Steel billets I Pitt.), Ion 47160 453.00 

Iron 2 Fdry- Phltok. ton 713.00 213X0 

Steel sanoa No 1 hw Pitt. _ 81-82 B&49 

Lead Spot, lb 19-23 2678 

Owe otocl. lb — 64-67 W %-0 

Tin (Straits), lb sS«25 63m 

ZteCjE SI. L. Basis. % 0+5 M9 

Palladium, oz - 121 us 

SlhmrN.r.ax iso, BJ4 

Sourca: Af. 


Taiwan Studying", , 
Moves to Relax " 
Mariket Controls^ : 

Reuters 

TAIPEI — Taiwan is studying 
cneasures to further relax bankihg 
and financial regulations, in an ef - 1 
fort to liberalize its money markets, 
the central bank govonor, Chsm a 
Oii-cheng, has nyorted. A bank- 
ing source said the measures would - 

allow the banks more leeway in 
filing their rates. _. _ j 

Mr. Chang, who made Lbe aii^ 
nouncement Thursday before~ia”, 
parliamentary committee on H- ' 
nance, did not elaborate. But a 

bank official said that be ginning on ' 

March 1 , the government would no . 
longer fix the ceiling for local bank 
rates. 

He said that 10 leading local 
banks would be allowed to fix their : 
own rates each day, including 'the • 




• ] I 1 1+itM ri 


cra[b«a^fcri i bim<‘ 


9Mke 

CaHt'Seue 


PnK-Seffla 

Pita liar 

Jea 


Mar 

Jan 

Scat 

30 — 

— 


OIJ 



11 l.» 

— 

— 

034 

063 

_ 

S S£ 

1.15 

— 

as 

JJ7 

UO 

0 as 

<7* 

U9 

1X8 

1X3 


1 31 8.14 

0*5 

SS 

UT 


_ 

35 006 

038 

333 

— 

— 

ENtiwakd Intel wilM 




COlU: Ttatf+M. 2988 opaalM. 24116 

Pats: Tnurs. voL M3 epos lot. i£9i) 


Source: CME. 







cause of the company’s refusal to agree to let the 
union set a strike deadline, onion sources said 
Friday. 

The decision came during a meeting of the 
UAW's 150-member Chiyskr Council, which 
represents 65,000 U.S. hourly workers at the 
third-largest Americas auto company. 

UAW and company officials previously had 
discussed reopening labor talks before the mid- 
Oclober expiration of the contract covering 
Chrysler workers in view of the UAW’s goal of 
bringing their wages and benefits in Hne with 
recently negotiated pacts for hourly workers at mm * . r ^ _ 

General Motors Carp, and Ford Motor Co. Awards Contract cws+bb m+lm 

Lee lacocca, the Chrysler rhaimian . vriixle Reuters {*!«• J * n Fe * 1 Mor J*" ^ * 

not ruling out early talks, said Chrysler would MELBOURNE — Broken Hill !§ 
not agree to the union’s demand that it be given Pty. said Friday that it has awarded '*> 
the strike option before the existing contract a ’64-million- Australian-dollar i» 

“ds. (S51. 8-miIIion) contract to SMS iw 

Chrysler workers are paid about SI an hour Scftloemann-Seimaq for the design, 
less Uian Ford and GM workers, according to supply, erection and commisskm- 
imioD officials, in a carryover from past codecs* ing of a continuous slab Katrina 
sons the union made when Chiyskr was on the machine at its port Kembla steel- 
brink of insolvency a few years ago. wo 


Cteveeok Core 
NY5 Electric 4 G 
Realm Carp 
Super Rite Foods 
VWa Resources 
frJUmio); M-Mn 
AaavaL 


2-15 1-0 
1-22 1-14 


S&P 100 Index Options 

Jan. 4 


cent in real terms for the first time 
m three years. 


READ 










































\ 




T<-. - , N| 


' -^sS 


•-'•■ V .c 1 ^ 


-. - ---"•-. 

- “ •? • f 


■ 4 


-■■'"Si 


~Ȥy 

i;Cia ®»S 


j'-li-i. iaa Backs | 




■■ j 

- • -.-raa 5 ji 6 . : ,« 


> Tf 

> o 


> Hi 


r-'-to 

••••. 3 

“ “■ri 

'■■’•' ■— ■: =s a: -ri 

.:.. i :3i»:B J§| 
c Jfij 

•• ; . >■ • .*• . V"»ls*^a 
-■j-'i :. rr.ii''. a 

""1 ■• 

4 Loss fo!| 

• "•_ y i 

(lion From | 

- --. ■y-rss.-^jj 

- •_': J « 

•• : ' -V" - | 

-• ‘ ~ 

•• •-"-. ......n*. 5S>V V'J 

• -• - ;. 

• - • 

' r --& M 

■ ; - r; ^sr 

. "i v(4 


fridays 

amex 

Closing 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SUNDAY, JANUARY 5-6, 1985 


VoLaUpjii.. 

PW.4PJiw 


TG EL , «££. , !“ Wlcei 

w to tt>t ctp&ino on wati s?reet 


■2AUnm 

H i** 1 to* itatfc Pl y rm PE 

5|r '■*■ 

aw jqij. 

3»% 13to 

«*■ »* 

*% 3'* 

AH 4ft 
WH 11% 
ii% at* 

7H 4 

W 9% 

pi 

M 5% 

a 

2 m 

3V. 

9Vt « 


SB. O0J6 

WteMUflLmt OuaL Chita 

a 21 »% n + ft 

i mmm + ik 

624 14** 14V* 14*— W 

I* A 4H AAM 

If » M » 

4 M M »+» 
33 12H lM 13* + * 


nutatt 

MMlM stock 


JjyVlaPE nfehtou,, SSFr.*- 


a assii, » » 

32»EftS. « •’« J 

Sl»i 2 S'' 5 g'g I1 » 


5% 5 J 

JS 3ft a*; 


JJS (Htanu 
■** «% Action 
. JH 39* Acton 
\J% Jto Mmra 
rjg* K^AORUS) 


** 3 & J ti + * 

fi » iS iJs 

a 2 <H 4ta 4>A — V* 

.0 S 3 'H .iv+S 


i* ,i!S ,5 «-*■«£+* 
S masses ^ ® ® *»=» 

3 T^sss? - s »J 1 ?; s; s * 

3 Stttss. , 3 8 g a=t 

Wt 72 Mmtton 7 ?? Jp* 3H ♦ V. 

K «i Albert? « n ^ ^ W*+H 

^ lg »S- U 

S'* T?* aSScS* ” s 1a -' « » 21 W ~^ 

S* Kitts 3 B« ■» }g !£]£::» 

^ .S*?® 0 . s is 5 ?S ffi L 


28 Vl 2Ita 
It* tw 

4* IV. 

34H 13H 
OH U 
H H 
»» 
22 H Is 

14U. tV. 


T3H 4Vt 
»«■ U*h 
8 * 3H 
23* 14H 
40 33* 

11* 6U. 

4« I* 

22*. IS* 
5* 3* 
lit* 5* 

rp\ \\ 

bVi 2* 
2* u 
4 U * 
6Va 3* 

10* Sib 

3o ms 

w iva 
34* 24* 
10 3* 

12 * 7H 
** 7 
4* IM 


ns a* 3* a*—* 

3D M 10 21 4k 4M 4*— » 

a f 14% 14 14 + H 

14 i m an an— n 

15 I H A *H— H 

. 33 an j* jh 

-ao 3 i: i4i m * am— n 

7 n 4 3* v* ♦ Vt 

a too m ** **+% 

■ ,7oaj • a§ a si a-* 

140 c 2sn 2sn 2$w— n 

4 no it tvi w + n 

■ m i* i* 

2a a 2i% am 21 %— % 
bo 3.1 as » am 2311 »„ „ 

1300 H % K— h 
M M 11 ID am 77* 37*— k. 
Aim 11 22 im 13* U* 

as* tin at n« im nn 


RUenth 
MWILOW StoCt 


«* an LQBen m m 

3* 7k» UPM 7 

AH 23% LofcoSo .lfc 
14* llCh LndBAn M M » 

IM 11 u&nki .«• .* 

17H 7V> UMr M 

an 3 * uukob 

3H 2t% LMTIi 12 

44n am Lonmn u 

in 3% LrhwT 1* 

«* S uvlttn 5 

4% IM LdflOO 

31 U UMtam V JM 

35 20 Lorimr » 

Ton 30* Loulic* ISO 14 20 

am an unw m * it 

12* an LUMvE 17 

IM IM LOflO 411 12 10 

U% IlUyMi 4 

aan 12% IVrtCSr .M A « 
ton M LvncnC SO 2.1 15 


Hi. Clue I iTMcmn 

lOWnoaLoi. Punt Cage l w'SHLOn Sb» 


7 W. 2H m I 

1 sn sn sn 

13 25H 2*H 24H- * 

3 14% 14% MW + Vk 

9 17 la* 14W + H 

1 ion raw ion 

35 5 £ S 

5 to to » + k 

24 43% 411b 4in— I 

SAM an— Vb 
a sn sn sn 

so an 2 2 

JM 232M2S 8—4 

IS 40* TBYi 30 30 — % 

14 Ton tow wn + v» 

4i m is im- n 
11 ia an 4- n 

32 13 it* on— n 

T5 12 Ilk 12 — U 

7» 24U MW 25 + H 

5 n 9k W 


40 W 13 12 

J2 11 as 27 

13 3 

140 U a ■ 

6.W«2M 3 317, 

.12 IU 

7a 

140 U 5 0 

14 36 
It 234 


JO»14J 

M \S 7 
II 

.72* Zt 0 

13 

.10 \3 
JOB u s 

45 


12 7* 7 n% 

v 15H tan 15 

3 3% 3% TV— n 

■ to* 18% tan— % 
317 k 34 33VS 33*— 1 

114 0% ■ « 

7a 2* 2% 2% 

I 17 la* 14* - Vt 

U 3* 3* 3*4- * ] 

2M an aw an ♦ n 
» m» ii nn— * 
9 3 a a , 
s n n n 4-W 
1111 1 + n 

s 3 * j* 3 *+ n 
u to* wn ion— w 

to 21* 21 21*4- n 

la 3 1* 2 

10 34 34 34 

* sn 5 * sn 
w cw aw aw— w 

7 0 7* a 

7* 3* 3* sn 4- * 


31 

320 SJ 13 


£ - 13 u 5 

n% 7% AHIttlM 
JW 4 Alsraal * 

INI t2H AMzaA J2 is 1 

-® u 8 

SS&ttS? 

m! .J* **nPin» 

a ■" « 14 

!«• WJ Am Royal 

S - 06 l< S 

J)n 3% AndJcb 
1 Antfreo JJ 7J 12 

Wl *% Ana lea rt 
<K?* Anna! Mf 

n.p n Ana ia v 
SS S; ArooPf 
I5J M Ajrrtrm 7 

£ 8SSES* 50 11 38 
uS u 12 

,» .3* Astmtc 
’7% M* Astral of 1 JO 105 
m K AttsCM 
W 3% Atlas Ml 
J>> iS Audio* JSe tjf 12 
Jg Autos*. 1-OOa 11 if 
2m MHAuondta JO 5L0 a 


50 fP* 8 flu L. 

17 m an 2*- * 

.34 Bi 23V. 23*— * 
1300* 7n 7 7* 

50!ta 7 7 7 + * 

3*5 8W 8W 4* +¥ * 

II 5 4* 4V— * 

2 IS I s3- is* — * 

*2 'S? ’?> 4. n 

39 1* 1% 

7 4% 4* 4% + * 

17 40% 40% 40U- * 
V * * * 4- * 

u t sn 15* IS* 
sm ,sr u* iS;^; i? 

57 ,W ,* ,*^* 

sj m 3% 3*4- * 


5 10 10 10 -W, 

» a* an an— * 

3 i i % - ^* 

2 j* j ft+v * 

3 m f* n. 4- * 

II IBW 18% law 

to 7* an an— w 

4 10% 10* 10% 

J» a* sn zw 

5 T7V* 17 17* 4- U 

57 * 'H * 4-H 

a 3% 3w 3W 

p *n 4% 4W — n 
34 47% 47* 47*— W 


4 Jk 12* a% FPA 17 

E” £• 2B* 14* Foblnd J 24 i 

in— n nn ** FtCann IJOaHJ 7 

I*— * 24* 10* FIF&Ln 60b Z5 13 

> . ^ 17* 12% PtachF 14 

' + H If* ■* FllcGE 1A0 1Z3 4 

S' 2TW 22* FIlOE Bf 4JD 163 

5* — *2* •* Ftonen 

* 3IW 23Vk FVoRck .70 23 B 

^ + n 3in 22* Fluke U7I 4.9 11 

< *K IB* a* Fooarm 

- 4- * VOW 7W FbotoM 

>w— * aw 4* FttilllG 

W 4- * Miu 42* Feu-oCn 0 74Xto 
n _ 2IW IS Fame A .15 A 329 

% 4- * 32% 11% FarfBlL 30 

*— % 2* W Fat amt 

%— * 37 2f Frame 1J8 Z1 t4 

^ TEVi 14 FreaEI 14 

*4-* 9* TfcFfWm J0&Z4 1I 

— W 5* S FrtosE n 10 

n— n 14* 12 Frisch 1 32 1 A 15 

4* is IW FnitHd 

— * 0* 4* FrtAWf .171 2J 

Vk + * la* 10* FtirVH n 13 


,13a 3J 
-15 A 10 

a 

23 


JOS J 20 
M4A9 
*44 U 14 


on 3* BAT 

at am bdm 

» 1* BRT 
a »BSN 
m * BTK 
** 7* Babur 
■*n 7* BatdwS J2n 3 J 

7J4 2% BolyMwt 

*25 *1 5"Fd 21te 9.1 
4* 4* Banatra 
« *n BnkBJd AO SJ 
.Rh 3* Boren 
. «fc Th BomEn 
,<k 4* BaryRG 

34,13 

4* I* BertOl 

iwiSKS ^ 

HL. J2 M 15 

m 3% BettfCp *491105 
*6* mi BIcCd 60 is 7 
Mk 4* BIKrltB .15 2*4 
^ Wlk BklMM IBB 45 11 
.*£ IT** lllBUB 60b 3*4 7 
a* * BiodcE 
171* ffb BtountA *45 IT 
V HR* BJounJB M 27 
32 17» Botarf jOS J 

2tn nn bowvoi 20 

m KSSSf 34 0 

If 12 BOWDB 
15* 5* BrodNI 
3» 31* Bracna M0 
MM 11% Broun ■ 
an 21% BntFB 
4 2* BocMw. 

<n sn Bu»Bf jo tu 

an Tin bubii so u 


17* 11* CDIs 
on 9% CHB 

£l£l%l C * J4 22 15 

.wjsasjjd. v 

Ok n CURE 124 107 U 
2S WVk CUmtn JO 29 23 
W 7* Cotprgp JM1Z0 3 
MM 9* COraco .32 26 IS 

<* 3 CcBiwnl 

ran u* CMarco 60 
34% 25* CWlna 10 

» a* Conan 
a* a* Coras u 

n m CmoA .10B zi » 
lin 5% CaroEn M 

43* 36 CaroPpf 5J» TZ5 

an ancoaMon j*ii7j » 
am an cu>pd 2»u 

» 4* Costiod 

m * Gantaol 
27% 20* CanMFf 360 MJ 
14% II CoitSa U0B136 
am 14* CtrrFo 1B1 

.11% cnccfac 

IM ZnOiRIDH „ 14 

lan ctvtMA JO 6 » 
T*n 14* ChlRv 1 JO 63 9 
ion 9* 
ion IM 
27* IS* Of Pal 
21* 17 CtyGos 1JB 57 11 


M2 Mb 2 

s t t ft-* 

b tw m m, 

4 6% 8* BW— * 

11 2* 2W 2W— * 

5 22% 22% 22% 
a 5* 5* 5* 

17 7 7 

5 3* 3* 3* 

5 3* 2% 2% 

5 4% 4% 4% 
i9 ion ton ion + % 

44 6% a» 6% + W 

44 2 1* 7 + n 

7 13% is* ran + * 
137 4* 4* 4*— n 

7 39* 39% 39% — * 

90 39% 30 39% — % 

38 22* 22 22% 

13 3% 3% 3%+ W 

77 24n 2m 24* + n 
5 an an au + n 
9 22 11% 23 

23 23* 22* 23*4-1% 
105 1 * * — % 

57 15 14* 14*— % 

16 14* M* 14*— * 

8 23* 23% 23% — * 
lio 12% 13% ran— * 

1 9% on 9H— % 

51 3% 3 3% 

61 14* 14* 14% 

a •* a* an+% 

15 22* 22* 22*— % 
15 13% 13* 13 — * 

«a »% n% si* 

2 2* 2* 2%—% 
a sn 3* 3*— n 

30 33* 32% 33*4-1* 


15* 15 15*4-* 

9* 9* 9%— Vb 
7* 7*—* 



161 47 7 3 

J5e A 14 45 

14 W 

ia a 

72 34 

68 4J t 46 
J2Be 67 » S 

.10 J 12 41 

9 

J0 16 12 45 

4 1 

140 im 3 

JO 26 » 11 

68 19 5 11 

160b 19 ID U 
32 176 

64 29 10 192 


Z5D 103 
1.12 44 M 
140r 6.1 8 

J2 ZB 
60 2J 10 
621 76 8 


60 26 22 8 
60 1J 14 270 
7 142 
238 2 

60b 49 9 a 
62 3584 

jo u w a 


to » V « 

17 15% 15* 15% — Vb 
I 10 18 10 4- * 

6 24* 24* 24* 4- * 

IB 13* 12* 13* — * 

104 10* f* 10*41 

5 24* 24* 24* 

37 f* fVb 9* 

97 33 31* 31*— * 

a 25% 25* 25% 

14 m H 8*— * 

6 8 8 8 

37 7% 7* 7*— * 

7801 97* 97* 97W — W 
34 If* 19% 19% — * 
112 15* IS* 15% 

274 1 * * 

1 32* 32* X*— * 
48 16* M* 16*— * 

7 iu an m-b 

5 5* 5% 5* 

21 15H IS* IS* 4 W 
33 13* 13% 13*— % 
5 4 6 6 

8 14 14 14 


4* 4*— % 
a* 4% 4 % 
* *— M. 

4* 4* 

3 3 

12% raw— % 

2* a* 

25* 25%— * 
nn nn— * 

7* 7* 

in* w* — * 
2* 2* 

14* 14*— W 

3 a 

14 14* -f W 

4% 4*+ * 

ran ian— * 

8* M 

a* s% 4 w 
aan 2iw— % 

9% 9W— % 
22% 22*4 W 
24* 25*4 % 

a* 3* 

13* 15 41% 
*% S *-H 

34* 24*— % 
25* 25*— W 
23* 23*4 * 
IM IM 
17* 17* 4 * 

a* a* 

l i* 

12* 12*— W 

30* 30*— % 
31% 31* 
ia* 14*4 * 
7* 7*— * 
H>% 18% — * 
11 II*— * 

34* am 


7 12 13* 13* 13* 

ra » m 1% i* 

6* 56 w an a* a* 

3 1* 1* I* 

60 U 5 l 9H 9% 9n- * 
124 3 3 3 I 

44 i n i 

168 116 2 3* 12% 12% 12 W— ’to 1 

18 7 5* 5* SH 

45 147 5 5 5 

2js ia? i mi nn 2in- * 

7 31 22% 22* 22% 

13 14 MW 14* 14% 4 % 

JOoT.9 7 5 10% 10%-ta 

,ta j 17 33 is* un im- 

129 10% 10% lCW— * 
33 IS 21* 21* 31* 

240 156 13 39 13W 12Tb 13*— * 

600 36 I 109 21* 21* 24%— % 

2400214 164 9% 9 9% 4 % 

65*67 IS 9*9 9— M 

168 16 12 43 64 43* 43*— W 

JO IJ 14 !0 15% 15% 15*— W 

671 5.9 5 37 6% 4* 6W 4 * 

.15 16 12 29 9* 9* 9% 

13 II | 13* 13* 13*— * 

15 24 21* 21 21*— * 

23 J»3 6W «M 6*— W 

64 42 12 7 10* TO* 18* 4 * 

AC 26 7 1 19% If* 19% 4 * 

J3r 26 14 7 IW 8% 8% 4 W 

24 16 11 112 15* 15* 15% — * 

64 56 8 3 19* 10 to 

-20b 16 1J 52 11% 11 II* 4 Vb 

■28b ZS 11 46 11% 10* 11* 4 

U49 0.1 a as 17% 17* 17% 4 * 


64 

1% 

ift 

ito 

33 

4 

3ft 

3ft— to 

10 

4ft 


4to— ft 

67 

Sft 

Sto 

SVi 

43 

ran 


tw* + to 


7% 4V, 
S>W 49 

3a% am 

22* w* 

*4* 31* 
«* 3* 
5* 4* 
5% an 
i3* law 

3s“ 25W 
44* 34 

3* 1* 
1JH K 
on a* 

Jo 9,, 
4»a 3* 
«b 3* 
7* 2% 
14% 7* 

W* 5 < 

>a% t% 

14V, 5* 

IS* 10* 
a * sk 
13* 8 
m, ion 
IV* 9% 
16% 12* 
»'* Si, 
2H -v, 
nn e* 

9U 7% 
9V> 7% 

ft. If 

72* 41 
77 64* 

14* 6* 
10% a* 
15* 
is low 

4 an 

10* 4* 

am is* 

48% S3 

nn aw 
it* im 
12% 6% 
18% MW 
4 IH 
14% «W 

ia* sn 

4* IW 

9 S% 

10% an 

II* s 
14* 5% 
17% 11W 
27% 16% 
4% * 

14* 6* 
13% 10% 
4% 3% 

row 4 

Tn IH 
37% irt 
9% 5 
M 9% 


Xt! 86 13 12( 


Sli Cos* 

jSiijfttg; Suet cou 

2 7% 7% r-— * 

UCx 55* SS* SS* 

4 35* 35V. 35W— * 

23 31% 21* ai%— * 

5 4*W 44 V. 44% t fa. 


v: worth 

W9UW itoti 


Sit Close ! 

MUtiwnLow OtiM.Cnitol 


nManlti 
Hronunt Mo«* 


631 3.1 7 
.13 J II 
60e 40 4 

60 36 9 
JO 36 24 
JO 26 10 
68 36 4 

61 36 5 
260 147 II 

IS 


121 SVb 4% 5 + * 

S 5W r- 5W 

r* s* sn— * 

11 II 13% n 

aa sw s* s* 

25 37* 2T* 27* ♦ W 
9 <S% 4T- 45% — % 

to IW 1% IW 
39 \T\ 13% 12* ♦ Vb 
9 2% 2* 2%— * 

138 l % vb— K 

1 5% 5% 5% 

17 4 4 4 — * 

33 2* 2% 2% + tk 

2 8% an aw + * 

4 8% 8% V%— Vb 

as i5w is* is*— n 

f 10 9% 10 + w 

ii im im i;%— * 
33 an 6* on i 
34 13W 10* 10*— * I 
9 14* ;n 14* 9 % I 
14 12% 12% 139b + W 
34 13% 13* UH * % 
S 6W a* a% 

5 W % %— * 

5 b% sn an— * 
43 b% •* an + * 
u tk ii an—* 
Sex 42 42 42 4- % 

io raw tr* raw— * 

9 i*n w* ran 
to taw ia* is* 4- n 

2 69 <8% 49 ♦ * 

» 73 71% 73 +1 

13 7% 7* 7* 

3 7% 7* 7*— * 


7 2 USRInd 

a*% ran umw, k 

JJb * UnVoora 
n% II* unknpf JS a.1 
Jin an Unhprn 
ra% im uAirm mu i 
3au sw UnCssF 160b 25 7 
3% 1% UFeodA .» SJ 15 
3% 1% UFooeB 14 

U* ID* UtMad 651 56 M 
21 ID* USAS wl 
Mrt s% UStOen 28 

10% a* UlriMV .91411X4 12 
Uk * LRiwCm 15 

ton sn UnlvRi 

18% f* UnvPot 


» 4% 4* aw-F* mm 

^ T1 « 

37 2* IA 2H- % 11% 4* 

K 344 14% 14% 14*—% m 3% 

soa SW % lb ran 15% 

re n* mt ran— % • 10* % 

227 T 8% S* 4 7% 

9 8 15* 15% 15% — % ,«% 

7 I 35 B » +ft IW » 

is as in m in m 7% 

14 44 in in in ran wn 

M 30 13% 12% T3* + H 29 1* 

2 19% 19% IBn 4- % !8H 9V3 

a a* raw ins. ion 4- u » 

12 3 7 7 7 10* 7* 

4^C. 1 

is* ran 

23% 19% 
40 35% 

U* 11 

an 2% 
17% 12% 

34% 77% 

19 12 

7% 3* 


U 9% VST n 
20% 14% VallvR 1.95 U 7 
38% 15% Volapra M 32 10 
14% 4% VirMm 
5* 2% Vertt IT 

J2? l«k ViAmC 68b ZJ t 
10% » VI ten 

>* % Varna 

17% ll* Wall JO 1J 9 

8* 3% Vanato .W 22 

>* 4% VlBtNfl 
w* 5% Vtam ID 

Mb 2% Vlmga 39 

59 42 Volntln 

13% 8 VMm J4 41 11 

MW imvmccp 600 36 I 


6 » 135 36 U 2»* 24* + U I «h 


10% 5* Nonrck 7 133 5% 5% S%— 'A 14 9 

33* 12* NtPotm .10 6 IS 9a 17 16% 16*— % , 

.3 .1 NafeLB 70 IV* I* I*— * 1 

SB 25* NHunp 60 1J 34 34 47% 45% 45*— 1H 1 

19% 11* NNVaAr J91 4j IS IS 14% 16% 16%— % U% t. 

14% 10% NPinRt .94 4 J IS 1017 14% 14 14% — % W, 7 

21* 13 NP roe 1 Jl9 u I 11 U* 14% 140a — % 28% 5 

39 31* NY Tima -57 16 16 275 37* 36% 36%—% tr- 6 

9% 4% NevrDE JS* SJ 4 12 5 4% 4%— W 18% 13 

14* 10% N aat 63 26 M 23 13% 13* 13* + W 17 6 

14% 11% NmpEI 1J0 ll.1 I 77 13* 13% 13* 0 7 

3* % Nexus 13 1% i* iv. + % S% 1 

10* 5* Nlcnets 5 20 7% 7% 7% 20% 13 

3* 2W Roto* 12 2 2% 2% 2% 53% 33 

13% 10 NordR n 8 32 12% 12* 12% -4 % 9% 3 

IS 13% MoCtfOo 55 14% 14% 14%—* 18% 7 

35 29% NIPS Pi 435 136 160c 37% 32* 3T%— W 108% 74 

5% 3* NuMTZn 4 S3 SVb 3 3— * 9* 3 

10% 5% MuUpi 14 1* 8* B% B%— % 32 21 

14* 9* Numac 20 W* 10* 10* 13* 8 


Jt 26 20 7 IX* n% |2* 4- W 

2 3% 3* 3% 

68 16 46 43 5% 5% 5% + * 

60 43 5 li 19* 19* 19% — * 

Z79I 46 ID 14 49% 68* 69* + % 

13 10 8% 8% 8% — * 

19 I 15 IS IS — * 

5 9 9 9 + * 

48 4.1 II U 14* 14% 14* 

10 24 1% 1% 1% 

W 13 15% 15% 15% — % 

Me u 14 ii a a a — * 

n an r- J%+% 

53 6W 4W 6% ♦ * 

7 3 9% 9% 9%+ * ; 

10 9 7% 7% 7% — % , 

J4 17 i: 52 6* 6% 4* + U 

A U 11 2 11 13 13 — * 1 

Amt 13 II 544 2 SH 29 25% + % 

204 n % % 

699 J 10 28 9% DW 9% + % 

32 u i ra i7% raw ran 

11 38 4% 4n 4% 

44 4% 4* 4% + % 

5 Tto I* 2* 

130 4.9 11 185 2<W 24% 24*— Vk 

68, 46 34 5% S% S~k + W 

.16 IJ 16 7 13% 13V. 13* i- % 


7 

10 

34 3L7 12 


tt% aw orre 
27% 17% Walbar 
15 ID* wain 
37% 23 WOMB 
37% 23 WtansC 
6* % WmCwi 

12* s* WIIIHm 
85 *0% IMAPF 

34 17 WRIT 


18 

60 2.1 10 
60 14 7 
.14 J IS 
.11 6 14 


12* 5* WfhHm 5 

85 40% WMVPBl 60 I J 14 
34 17 WRIT 160 46 16 
8% 4% Watte A 68 26 4 
9W 4% Wanes .14 IS 5 

s% anwnutra 

77 13% WlMdbf Z42 186 

9% 1% wabcor 


IS 11% 11% »%— % 
151 7* 7* 7* 


49 9% 9* 9% + % 

I 20 U. 2D% 20% 

u ran im ifv.— % 
553 aw a M— H 

27 an 2% 2%—* 

27 17% 17% 17% — n 
45 4* A 4* + n 

5 * * * +% 

12 12* 13 13 

12A 4* 4% 4* + % 

3 7% 7* 7%— * 

55 4 5% »- * 

3 3* JV> 3* + Vb 

47 54% 54* 54* 

5 8% 8% B%+W 

4 Ub 1514 15W 


is 7 an 7 

4 18% 18% 18% + * 

8 11% 11* I1W— M 

408 23% 23 23%— * , 

33 23% 22% 22*— 1 

55 1* I I 

I 10* 10* 10* 

2» 78* 78 78 — % 

22 23% 23* 23*— * 

7 8 7% 7%— W 

20 8* SW 8%— * 

157 3% 3* 3% 

1 14 14 14 

30 2* 2 t - * 


17% 5% rank Co 

5% 4* roranv 


14* 5% zimar 


Sis. Qua 

Pik. YM.PE llXbHrgfi Low OuBtOlM 

7 5 an an Jn+ n 

12 35 13% 13* 13% + % 

.12 26 38 3 5 5 5 

.10 1 J 3 7% 7W 7% + * 

11 65 10% 10% 10%— % 

8 2% 2* 2* 

J) U 7 3 22 22 22 + % 

15 315 13% 13* 13* — h ' 

JO 10 110 9 9 9 

17 1283 9W 8% 9 + <* ■ 
63 7% 7% 7*-% 

lJOeaa 14 16 17% 17% 17%+ % 

V J3a SJ a tS 23% 33% JM— Ito 

16 380 16 15* M + % 

5 3* 3* 3* 

7 3a 9 8% 8%— * 

13 1% 14b 1% 

jO 35 II 15 14* 14 14* + * 

2.16 93 14 22* 22% 22%+ % 

450 110 HOz 37* 37* 37* 

JS 19 > 4 25 13* 13% 13% + * 

641136 16 40 3% 3 3%+ % 

I JO 1+1 3 12% 12% 12% 

SO 16 H 1 30% 30% 30% — W 

SC .1 319 17% 17% 17% + * 

M • 14 14 4* 4* 4* 


5% 5* 5% + % 
4 4 4 — * 


AMEX Higfaf-Laws 


AM Inti 

LandmfcU!* 

ParmaRE 


Dvcommun 

Untmarn 


ATTFd n Buall Ind 
PGET20PIG PGE 225pfL 
5M Sharks 


Irpouato Bd 
PUMG 


Hellanuilcs 

WonoLobC 


MuHartznn RtUAssoc 
wstnHItnn Vartfnev 


11% a* T Bor Sto 7.0 23 

17 TV, TEC JAa J 18 

28% S* TIE 10 

ir- aw tii 40 

18% 13 TobPoa 60 16 10 
17 6% TtedBr 

8 7% Town 

S% l!b TchAm 

20% 13* TchSvm U 


0* BW B*- 

W* 10* 10* 


27% 14% OEA 
22* 14* Ookwd jMb 6 
4% 4 OttoiA n 
4% 4% Odets 1 
lan 9 OflArt 34 16 

20% 13% Ora ton 60 U 

3% 3* OOktoP 

4 Mi 3% Oponhn 
9W S% OrtolH B AO 103 
4 I Ormond 
5% 2V. Ottox 

35 21% Qiuuvn 60b Z1 


10% a* OtiraF 


60b Zl 13 
621 56 10 
JO Zl 7 


4 IT* 17* 17* 4- % 

4 39 20 20 — 'A 

■ 4% 4* 4% + W 

1 5% 5% 5% 

1 14* 16* 16* 

17 VSH 10% 11% 

21 sn 3% 3* + * 

2 5* 5* 5*— W 

6 S% 5% 9*— W I 

21 1% IW IW 

40 2% 2% 3%— W 

1 29 W. 29 VA 29 W— * 

B to to 7W— * 

113 PW 9% 9%— * 


KM 4* HAL. 7 

13% 9% HUBCn 60a +7 11 

11* 7* Hamptl .931 9.T 8 

27* 24% Huifrd .90 2J 11 

42% 23 “ 

SO* 22* 


7% 7* 7% — * 


M iS*-* # 

K 8 +.W 2% 


at tin nn «%+' % 

49 28% 20% 2D%— % 


i» ran 

SS 


14% 
32* 

8* 8% 

» 48 +1 


30ft B* aonM| 
.9% 6% aortcC 
Mb »% Clartall 

ss’ssd 


TM W* OvtMA JO 6 18 153 
rT9% 14* ChlRv 1 JO 66 9 3 

20 73 

6 11 
160b 36 0 121 

Zl* 17 CtyGas MO £7 11 1 

' ~ 16Sh Lfl • 

JBe 24 7 1 

30u Z5 9 13 

S2 , £gK - M 3,0 - J 

M 4% Goth. 30 26 B » 

4 7 ColFwta _ 22 

15% 8 CornMn 3 16 

K% 8* Cumins ... 5 

U 12 ComApf M2 126 2 

** * ComdrC _ 71t 

IW 7% Comm 30 Zl 9 267 

on 4% ComoD 5 114 

Mb 7* CmoCn 12 * 

9* a* Cmo PC 72 31 

n IT* Cochin JOB 13 9 3 

ia% 6% ConcdF 5 21 

a » ConrHm _7 __4 


10 1 X* 

1# L 
12 3 sn 

12 15 8% 

14 11 to M K 

SDz 40 40 a +1 

* 15 3% 1% sn 

1 27* Z7W 27*+ * 

ii nt ^ 

29b 25* 34* am— u 
Z 12% 12% 12% 

181 3 14% 16% 16% + % 

• 4 7* 7 7* + Vb 

14 200 3V. 3* 3% 


44% 25* 
19% 14* 
9% 5* 

ran n% 
13% M* 

s% an 

13% 77k 

18 2% 
5* 2% 
24% S* 

3% 4b 
0% 4% 

5 an 

14 9% 

13% 6* 
33* 25% 
22% 0% 
10* 2W 
Mb 11% 
> 1 % 
vn a* 

14% 8 

nn 6* 

38 aM 
36* 30% 

an i«% 

10 7% 


60a 4J 11 10 13% 12% 12% 

Jit 9.1 I 2 low 10% 10% 

.90 26 11 16 32% 32* 32*— % 

JO 6 10 174 57* 57 57%+% 

12S 29 2BM 28* 

60a 16 7 4 29 20% 39 ♦ * 

L94B103 7 33 19% 19% 19% — * 

8 82 6% 6* 6% + % 
37 2 14% 14% 14% 

56 43 8 3 11* n* 11* 

200 26 VV 5 7% 7% 7% 


.IS J 

W 

4 

lBto 

10ft 

10ft — ft 

1175c 

374 

2% 

2% 

2to+ M 

7 

3 


3to 

3to . 


26 

33/ 

1 

* 

Vu 

5 % 



. / 

«to 

4to 

4to— H 


39 

4 

3% 

8% 

3V, _ 


20 

55 

11% 

10ft 

lift + *4 

.128 1 J 

16 

36 

7% 

/ft 

7% 

1J8 26 

M 

SO 

30% 

30to 

30% — % 


311 76 12 269 10% 10 


163829.3 

9 

300 10 7 
124 14 12 
Ui 11 11 
60 26 14 
.15 


11 3* 2* 2*— * 

10 14% 14* U% 

la zn 2% 2% + * 

541 4% 4% 4% 

34 13* 13 13 
10 16% WW W%— * 
21 37% 37% 37%+% 
40 35% 35* 35*— * 

8 20% 20W 2flW— V. 

122 8* 8% ■%— % 


153 X 31 a —1% 
3 .17% 17% IT* + * 
73 li% 18% 10* 

11 15* 15% 15*— * 
ia 26% 24 2m + % 

i a* an a* + * 


■ aan a tn 36% — n 


■ 11% 5% Coras! 

7* 2 Cmwt 
W* t% ConsOG 
9% 3% vIContA 41/ 

1Mb 4% vKMApf _ ® 

Mh 12U csaWfl 7 4 

M% 7% Cook Ini JOB 15283 J 
49k u CoracHan 158 

IW J* CrtCrd”* Mf 3J ,1 36 

2* % crwfrd ... l* 

S5^S^ i^it ,3 4 

.^r^ptijranj , 1 
v^b B* crawni J U » 

S% 1 crutcR 3 JO 

17 7* Cmto 1573 

ran 13% ct«C 29 25 9 33 

28 21* 60 10 10 19 

tn H enten 11 


1 b% on on— * 

13 28% 2B* Mb— % 

8 17% 17% 17% + % 

02 4% <* 4* + * 

25 7% 7% 7% + W 

22 3% on 3% 

ia n% n* tin— n 
s an an an— % 

2 U* 13* 13% 

ia % n % +M> 

67 9* 8% 9* + % 

14 7H 7% 7%— * 
85 11* 11 II — W | 
a 6% 4% 4* +. % 

3 15* 15% 15% 

a 9 an 9 — % . 

4 16% 16* 16% + * 

09 6% 6% 4%— % 

O to to 2W— Vk 
77 B% 8% Mb+ * 

T7 an b* an + % 


26 1J 9 
26 


SS IIK 70% 11% + % 

A 18 17% 17% — * 

4 14* 14* 14* 

158 1* 1 1 — % 

ft ‘ft ‘k ‘IT* 

i a* 8* «*— * 
54 Z7% V 27W + * 
10 10% 10% 10% 

5 17% 17* 17* I 
2! Tin 11% 11* + w 
43 lk ik m+u 
F73 to a 1 -w 
33 15% 15% 15% — * | 


3* in DWG 

21 15% PolBEn 

18% J%. Dorman 
S% ft Dom«no 


82 2* Z* .2Jb 

II M* 25% 25* 

162 4% 4* 4W— M 


82% 34% ICH 25 2 12 

9 4% ICQ 10 

5% 2* IPWV JBrlJ 1 

11% 6% IRTCnn 22 

4* 4% 165 .13 17 15 

2% 1% ImoGa .134 56 

3* 1% Impind 

34* 25* imnOUa M0 

10% C* Inflow 

3% i* inusv 

3% 2* InsSypf 351106 

9% C* IMCtYfl M 

17* 11 Intmk .13 16 
4 2% IntBhnt 

3 1 IrrtBk w| 

16* 13* VrrtCJrV 20 16 
17V. 5* inHydn 

4% 1% IrvtPnrt 

0% 1% lUDta 

25 14% Ionia 

31* 17% IroaBrd 


17% 10% Jactvn 
10* 5* Jocota 
17* tan J«w« 
7* 3* Jet Am 
y* % JUAwt 
7% 3% Jetron 
10 3% JohnPd 

12% 7* JohnAm 
7W 5 JmpJkn 
29% a% JuPlter 


37% 28* KnGSPl 4JD 1ZI 
5% 1* KopokC . . 

16% 9% toffln 60 36 4 
8* 3 Kanbn 16 

21 10% Hofehm J8t 14 39 

9% 5% KeyCo 30 32 
28* 6 KsvPtl 30 Zl 
5% 3% KJnult 
39% 10% KlnoR 20 A 
7% 3 Kirby 
S* 3% KltMfo 


12 26 73* 73* 73*— * 

10 9 5* 5W £%— * 

9 34 3 3 3 

22 40 B* 8% 8% +44 

” a Si it sft+ft 

a 2% aa 2% 

357 32* 32 22 — W 

9 13 7 6% 7 

10 75 3 1* 2 

1 2* 3% 2% + M 

a 7% 7* 7*+ n 

17 9 13 11* 13 + * 

«s to to to 

jo in in in 

9 3 10% 14% 10*— V* 

26 2 on sn on— * 

5 2* 3* a* 

43 1% 1* 1* 

10 a 27* 22% 22* + M 
15 117 35* 31* 33%+7W 


9 13* 13% 13* + % 
25 6W 4* 6* + * 
13 15% IS* U* „ 
43 3* 3 3* + % 

Ml 7k * 

22 7 ** 7 

4 3* 3* 3%— * 

29 7* 7% 7* 

» 5* 5* 5*+ * 

4 28* 28* 38*— * 


13% 18* 
11 % 8 * 
10% 0* 
10% B% 
io* aw 
1BU ■ 
33* 30* 
31% 26% 

aa* a* 
a* it* 

19* 15% 
20% 17 

a* 17% 
9* 7% 
20% 15W 
18V. 13% 

I 14* 13* 

14 13* 
17% 14% 
10* 13% 

9 7% 

30 14* 

37* a 

37% a* 

63* 53% 
<2 35* 

2% % 
X* 27* 
11* 5* 
7* 3* 
23% 15% 
17% 10* 
5% 2* 
7* 5* 
13% 7* 
11 % 8 * 
42* 32* 
2S 15* 
2% 1* 
32 24 

’ft ’“SI. 

33% 23 

14% 10% 

to ft 
II* 4% 

15 7% 
23% 12% 

2% 1% 
12% 3* 

a 2* 

12% 5 
17% II 
70* 57 
14* 4% 
20* 13* 
2* * 
14* 7* 
9% 4% 
14* 7% 
1»* 12 
23* 11% 
30% 18% 
24% 18* 
9W 6% 
1% Vi 
9 4* 

a 3% 

20V. !S*k 
25% 18* 
35* 30* 
18% 14% 
3 25% 

18* 15% 


1-50 1Z1 5 12% 12* 12* + * 

IJ7 123 1 11* 11* 11*— % 

MB 127 2 9* 9* 9*— % I 

135 123 516 10W ID 10W + * 

135 1ZS a 10VA 9* 10 — * 

130 123 M 10* 9V, id + * 

434 112 17 33% a a 

466 too 5t an a* a* 

330 I ZB 13 25* 25 25— * 

2.57 123 124 20* 19Tk 20W— * 

232 126 5 IB* :9% il%— W 

254 1Z5 136 20% 20* »% + * 

Z42 1Z8 22 20% 20* 20* + * 

213 1Z1 1 ft to to 

237 726 tl IM 18% 18*— * 

205 121 9 16* 14* 14% + * 

200 124 1Z7 16% 15* 14* 

1.94 127 7 15% 15% 1S%— * 

225 1X5 1 II U U 4k 

204 1Z7 33 14* 14 14* + Vb 

1-09 125 13 B*8%S%+n 

1.13 56 4 22 19* 19* !*%— Vb 

04 1ZS 2Qz 34% 34% 34% 

450 T 29 510, 36 35 35 —I* 

754 123 101b 60 60 60 + % 

5LD0 126 3Mb 41* 41* 41* +„% 

15 % * ft— ft 

A0 13 20 40 34% 34 34% + % 

13 5 6% 6* 6%— * 

14 4 7% 7* 7% 

50a 33 8 6 10% 18% 18%—% 

20 6 10* 10* io*— n 

24 44 3% 3* 3%+ % 

.13e M 11 11 7% 7* 7% + U 

621 76 24 TDQz 11% 11% 11% 

AOb 45 15 16 B*8*B*+% 

IJfc, 339 5 M 9 38 — W 

130 63 -9 2* 17* 17* 17% . 

JSrtOfl 7 9 1% 1% tw 

240 76 18 64 32V. 32% 32% + % 

JO 17 9 3 11% 11% 11%— W 

r 1111 

XO 29 ra 5 27% 27% 27% 

31 3 11% 11% 11% 

233 3* 3* M— % 

Lwt 41 % ft ft— ft 

Le pf 155 224 33 7% 7W 7% 

Lrpf 2X 244 11 to to to 

Lepf 133 214 9 14% 14% 14% 

ILD J2el1£ 2 ®4 J 1* 2 

oPd 10 «% 4* 4*— % 

2 60 2% 2% 2%— Vb 

40 106 5% 5* S% 

A0 XO 15 13W 13 Vito + % 

160 24 11 2 70 70 70 

-08e 16 B 28 8% 8* 8% + % 


130 67.. * 

JSrtOfl 7 
240 74 18 
JO 13 9 

r 

aura 

a 


AD 10 
160 26 11 
68* 16 8 
JO 


19 1 4% 4* 4* + M 

42 9 0% 8* 8% 

la 9 16% 14* 16% + W 

-14b J J9 TO 2D* 20* 20* + W 

26 27* 77 27 — H 

22 46 I 60 19% 17% 19* + * 
30 23 123 11 7%7%7%+n 

5 * ft * 

60 96 6 I 9 Ik Oft— * 

17 17 3*. 3% 3%— Vk 

11 9 19% 1?* 19% + % 

204 21 7 3 25% 25* 25W— * 

435 125 23PZ34 34 34 + % | 

234 1Z3 VI 18% 1* 19* + to 

4J7 i*o ii a* 3i% a w— w 

234 126 I 18* 18* 18* 


3b 34% 34% 34%— * 
18 3% 2* 2* + to 

1 11% 11% 11% 

I 3* 3* 3* + * 
O 16* 14 16 — * 

i 4to aw 6% + * 


18* 8* Knooo 14 

14* a* Knoll 13 

24% a KooerC 220 9J14I 


JO 

Zl 

16 

lire 

9ft 

9% 

9ft 

+ 

ft 



9 


4 

4 

A 

— 

lb 

JO 


22 

ii 

36% 

36 lb 

36% 

— 

to 




71 

3ft 

3Vk 

3to 






5 

4ft 

4ft 

4ft 

+ 

to 

OJX 

A 


36 

3% 

3% 

3to 

+ 

to 


14 

21 

11 

11 

11 

rew 

to 



13 

7 

11% 

11 

lift 

+ 

lb 


11 £ RA. 351 £- 13 

<l« V* RMS SI 

1C 2 3to P.TC 

16% 13*b ficoan .12 J a 

a 12* Kans+5 2? 4: 

4% to Rutl hi 
15to lOVi r.n.-.r A2 11 t 
39’*. Wk. Jurmli 1 1960c 
7to t RlincT i- 

17% TO* Rauu.c. 6 U I 
47* Z7Tk RbstIA 17 

9* 5% ReStAiC 3 

4* 3% RtxMcr t 

18 9% RIMetP JO IJ M 

9* 5 RehT tw 

20V, im ROmvi 52 37 14 
3Sto 20V, Purer* .12 5 IS 

7 2 RoonPtv 

5% 3% RoyPJm 

29% 27% Rudekpf ii 22 
S% 3* RbVr a 

18 11% RteMll Jo ZV it 
18ft 10* Ryjoft 50 23 11 


•to 3* SMD 
4* 3* SPWCp 
IS 7 Sooe 
11% 7* Salem 
4* * SCarto 

Tib 6% SDoopi 


J51 i- 13 76 4A. 6% i% + H 

6 4 3ft 4 + It 

5 3% 3* 3* 

.13 J a 2 14 16 16 — * 

— 4" 48 16ft 16% U-ft + * 

io i* r.b i* 

52 z: e it m. in i«*— * 

'60s. 5 111- ll* 11 -b 

:■ » 7 7 7 

6 ii I 5 11% II* W4b— % 

17 465 37* 36% 1S%— to 
3 25 5* Sla 5H 

e a sn :* :* + u 

a IJ M eJ li Tl* + % 

S 7'i :w TW— w 

53 23 14 K I* . I« l» — % 

.12 J is 8 aft 7. * 3*— * 

a 2 * ;% 2 * + * 

1 3% 3% 3% 

50 23 1 26 26 X + % 

a IX Ri i% 5%— Vb 

JO ZV It 1S4 V4to lift V4to + % 

50 23 11 70 IS* H 10% 


9 3* Jft 3ft— Vb 

3 3% 3% 3% 

12 7% Vtt 7V. + * 

4 8% 6'4 Sto + * 

3 1% 1* Ito + Vk 

11 7* 7* 7* 


Floating Rate Notes 


GeniinanoS%«9/*2 

Ctnflrafla>S42M 

Gzt>$*89 

GA5to-92 

Gzbperp-I&7/14 

CUSto-94 


9to 206 UEJ810CA8 
17* 2-1 1TOU0L2B 
0* 11-7 1001712077 
91/R11-3 1BOJOHSL8 
1+5 96 5/897S/8 

*k 29-5 I OB. 171 
9. 27-3 


MMr/MfeaK/Mot COMttlRexf Btf/ra M 

VO. S! 


AMdMB>5nra 

«Wh1*5K<87 

K. 


rassss® 

ft&Kf 

SSiKKSffi 


SEEStar-fc&gg 1 

4gss33ss 

IsS IIHB 

3S£SS s »Vi K » 

smurS£iEi 


BkOI 7rimS*a 
BkOfTOfnwJVfcff 


Sw W?SS^ 


g&m& 

KKS SBftw l « &S& 

SI?.. .... le&iffias 


SSSSSI^ 

BbLW«oEuf5n« 

B W WP 

BM5VHKM 

ksst 8 

KlvHAfl 

BafSto-C 
BBPflMSM 
BnP lYr*JH 


Bf*9£6 

S*Wna^«/M 


i3* w 

12* 31-3 HOJSVjaOB 
Mb 2M mXlKM 
ffi, *li maious 

isfiis® 

CM 2 74 lOBJCW).^ 
IJ* 1H 99JS 

m 3i-' 

ft a’ffifss 1 

lutu icfijn*4i 
i2* ** vruiiwia 
im 22-1 THk3O10UO 

Ss m*NBM 
in 02 wJJSi»i c 

in ii-i MLWSS 

7* W 


mtaow giwrewB ;-”. ^ w.n 

gssssssisr s 

gnBUlMT 9% 

Kite BB» Site -Vone. 1 ' 

aaiiawp m 


CiWa5%«R J* 

Cut 5W-99 ii* s+« 

Cn»5to-91 If* 

ClOc cvniy) 5to-96 8ft 3-1 

COCSto-94 2* »» 

Carter*, S+LJto-M !& 

Chase Manhattan 5*93 U% Jl-i 

rjtrtm 5U-09 9to 5-3 

ffieoJBLSto-* Jft w 

Ovetracai ( Wkrvi Sto-* Sft 1+1 

Oirbhtnio 9* JM 

Qiistkffria -9A HIW 4-3 

SaSrTrStolYl Xf 

Citicorp Seal 5 %a* 9* W-3 

C11lOcl9i- IW »■! 

Clllcarp 1 61 7ft J+3 

ailraroJJMoW - Mto *1 

Cormner j Oanb SW-8T 9ft n-x 

Commanbankrto^ai IHb »5 

Comm Urti Montreal Sto-91 IJto JM 
Cef5to*yn J_w 

CdJW-WH ’ J . 

gifiS* % & 

SSSISS 7 ” z « 

aS5rDuMor<»5VrW/92 9* 2+6 
CtkSI Fonder 5VMWW 12 W 
Cmf»ForEMWlS%-92 » W 
Ci-Lyon5to-93y% )1% 

Cretfi Lvon5to-67 2* Tf-3 

Cra6HL»an5%WW IT M 

CrtrfnLranitoaPiW W 

CrwBILVonSW+l/9S 9ft W 
Credit Lynn cnr-99 9* 27-4 

Ciw#TLV«5VH^26 W6 JOJ 
CreaH Lyon 5%>laflB2JW 9* |*6 
Cred Null Sib 5%« 12% jOJ 

CredNail51ta5% WM VSH V-J 

rvedHonstan - -9, 13to ll-J 

CredirandoH 5*91/97 9ft IM 
CredlfanEtall5jB+6 Wb K-2 
Doi lehl tonavoSto-to ID* 

DaskeOlle 5to99 J. 7;2 

Wl»IWTta™«2 W w 

penNorsbr-decW *% IM 

rwuitort 5 1 -a*JCn3flr^C *1 

SSSSftoddBAO 11% JM 

Is 

sssst£%* w | 

DresJner BonkSW62 J* 4 

IS® Mw:,eor « &T issaw 

s? k srss 

STB-SKIK 
I S. h £« 


li 

■^t 

fSrcj 

i 

l niil 

nr 

TirTt 


M 


frrr* 


Jicjit 

m 



! 




CaSVrW 9ft 59-5 I OB 171 

Gire5l6-*1 «. 27-3 

GHrkaoY*5to-92 12 2N 

Grindtar»SVlrW . IJ* W 
Greol WesMm Flu 51661 IJ- S3 «J7 99J7 
HmSomudSto* 12* 2S-2 1033715057 

Hill Samuel Para Stoaerp 9* »S *250 ?43 
HbBane Amertam5to-T5 11* 244 100601 OLID 
Hv«o Quebec Jto-94 r»k S-l 1004510054 
lc Indus riei-^l I3to 151 99.7S mSS 

ladonaUa-um 12 W lOOJKTOaii 

1W5VJ-6S H M 1B9J0M1 

IH$%4XW8I 1BH 3C5 1D0531D3J3 

I retard 5%W?9 I2H l« 1MU51GB50 

Rep. Ireland- +4 UH JW WJ4 10064 

IM5W4S 10% 2W 9935 1D0.U 

Italy IRapubOcV 5to69 12% +3 1063410034 

Cl toil 5V. 12% 71-3 HptM0% 

Holy J*/94 9ft 95 4*30 9999 

J-P.Mnrocn 51+97 9ft IM HBJ0WIJU 

Kop-febn 12* W iaua iau6 

K6P5IHIW92 HH 9-5. WUJIOdn 

KJekwnri Bamoa5ft-91 lift 19-2 WOOTflOB 
KMMon Benson 5V+% Un. Z7J 10201063 
Korea Dev Bfc 7.1 J Ur-H 56 9I_ 17191/7 
Korea ExctKMM 7H 12 9-4 Itll&fJ.I 


Offmore Minins Sto 41 
OHdvre Minina- 46 
PlreHl 5to.tr/T4 
PktankenS -88/91 
Queenpond 5to-M 


*. +6 18bJ8108t4l 
lift 23-1 IDOJaWSAO 
12* 35-2 TTto 9B. 
fto It/I 1863510858 
lift 95 lOQJOlflBR) 


Rnraf B* Scot load IW46/VI 1% 16-1 I0S33KU3: 
5al lamo 5 V, +1/93 V* 5+ W0J510B35 

SanwlBLFVnStoa 11% 763 NOJOtOOn 
Som« -94/2064 17* 21-1 M0J5MO45 

Sanwa Ini fTnSVi-92 12V. IM 10064111616 
SakbUnavtan Fin 5to4»r93 lift 154 9975 10BM 
Sa»8novianFHi5to4taS3WL 71+ 9170 9U0 
SaKlonO Ini Fin Sto-U Ilk 25-3 1B695Hn6i 
SrrdSV-M 10V. B-l 1061010120 

•* >4 9971 9941 
SFJE.SW4T 9=4 36 99.98 10005 

SJ.E.-9I 9ft 1*6 9950 99« 

Sac Mo Generole5to 40/05 u* +J IDllllCiiJO 
SodeleWnerobSto-W io% is MOJima 
Sodeie Gen Mar 5+94 12ft 1EJ I0BJ410DJB 
5e'J*1eGantreleSVi.-nmM «ri 74 E03»ui 
5/>en-9i 10% a>8 1003810638 

rwknlKtaatfwriJli-tira 17% 2S-J |(I64JK»J3 
KJnodcffi Oi Spain 5W-*3 17+ 7M I26L5186H 


1 L Incoin 5to-*9 9ft lj-e W65 9»r, 

Uot» 5V,-91 lift M 1068010290 

LkrrdeSto+2 Tft 66 lOOJSlOOJj 

! LJoytb- -44 11* IM IS6B51QBU 

LlcbSVHuro 12ft 2>1 IOBJOWLS4 

LK±Sto« 18H U-5 rajSbid 

Lia5*-liMB9 19 11+ WL751B685 

Ucb5*46 9* ipi 10BJ01027S 

LUlSto-92 9% 3V5 1064010650 

> MyaOeS VeWW 9ft IM T9J5 W+J 

MakryM SW4BV89/92 IT 9-4 1026510680 

MolarsJuSto-dcd*/9J M « 106310635 

Mctavsia 51+88^3 177. 82 I06S10Q67 

ManHan0/59u5to-M V/S 202 9937 10607 

Moo Kan fWUyl 5k-W 9% 1+1 87JS 97iS 

%ertv*MdtadS9!rJH lift 9-1 1062410636 

MarlneMWtald5to-H 9to IM W88 99JQ 

Marine MUand 49 9* 1+3 <9 JO 99 JB 

Mellon Bk Sto- K I* »2 10600 106 10 

MM0MI5*R 17ft 28-1 M66JTW3C 

Midlands -49 9% 266 1063810673 

Midland 5to-92 9* 76 10678I4OS5 

Midland «-91 11 384 IDI :n«130 

MftJtomiJ-W 12% + i lOOcnpn.l 

MUM FfbSV.96 IK 4-3 10251106L. 

Manian GrenMI 5 -H 13* IH 99 Ji IJ6I8 

Martaase Den 5*68/13 lZto IU 106K101JI 

MerfeaacDmfH-92 tft 196 1DBJ01D0J 

1101 Bk DOIrell $1+94 Bft JB-3 992 99^3 

Nafllh AroWa 5V+9«fb, 21-6 99 J7 9947 

HoHWesbnlnStofll 12ft 1+1 1065610046 

Rail Wffhnln 5*40 9h 276 1065310063 

NUlW0Hniln5to-H lift 146 10292101 j; 

Noll WuUmbi 5W-92 KM 256 UOAIOIJU 

NenweciRwi-un is. us H65B106M 

KesieOy 51+94 n% 25-2 lausiOBJB 

mm Zealand 5W87 ||* +4 M67S106S5 

Ne> Zealand SM5%42 9* 266 MDJ0T0640 

Nippon CrtdHBk 514-90 T7% 11-2 1024510275 


Soon -99 

Stand Chart 5V>4S 
StonflChaniVrM 
Stand QW1 5W-91 
5"y«J Churl 5to mart# 
rrj Dicrl -cerp 
i’Sle bhOI India e%-47 


9% »5 9945 99.75 
12* K-2 1006710677 

«. +7 nu»«zx 
10% 2+5 1065010640 
lift 173 HIjBZIOI.12 
10V> 7S 99JB 99 JO 
*\ 31-5 90 JO 10600 


SumHwoF holes 5*« 12* 1M I064S106H 
SwMtan»Trusi5to62/94 12t. 11-2 IOOJ4102J4 
Sundnadomben 6 -65 11% vu 99.90 hM 


SundnattKrkfn i -65 11% IM 99.90 bid 

TuadieJ+l Hft 3+1 MQJTIoac 

SSI2S22 IS- 1! 1 tui 10661 

S kRden SO-91/B3 ICP. 2 B-5 108 451EJ0 

n* +2 iS.inM3i 

Stedbi J9/M/99 9* 99JI 9»a 

Swoeiipank Uto 9/1 1962/10039 

TolinKabe5U-92/U TO* x.j |0sjmnr« 
Tobuoln vvnru l?to 1+3 lOBJllOOil 
ToLOrAsioLWP+WW 9ft 174 IflcSm* 
Terenta DomWon SW62 IX 1+2 100401068 
«ft !♦* iKur.KLe 
TreSU-fLU* 9 7J 97 J8 98J0 

UiWlBk Nerapy5U-99 IT* 772 NUD 99J0 
UnltM O/Seos Be 6 49 9h 2M 99.75 iulh 
WIW oro + Ghmya-f 1 U% |+] 1067H0684 
World Bank - .« 2* *. 3 «jj 

rokmmnsv+fl/w 11% 74 hbjsmi? 


ToWVnxa Sto 41(99 
Tvola-HTU 
Union Bk Norway 5V.-99 
United o/Seas Be 649 
Wllltams + Gfym 5'6-91 
World Bank ■« 
rokaanaSto+1/91 


-vrycni .-uosajm 

■SlCir r«Bi5>i-9S 
(-ii-ll 1..IJ. 3uli<5U-9S 
rull.. ai/96 

SirflnoneeStoJ? 


. • .7* «% 

y«„ iJ W/d W.78 
12% 1+1 U*07 

11 3 M 100.60 1 80 7 6 


NIooonCredHBfeStoJS 
Ntaai Cp-on BL6*8 a 
H urdle im FM5VMI 
ou$to«6 
OS) Sto 44 
04J--9S/99 


ft «»» 

1300 1+1 150271063? 
10+ 94 99:5 I DO 2? 
M% 20-5 1B045140JS 
U* 286 WL5SM68 
lift 11-4 1D6B718617 


Zirtrolewartiassc 5to-91 17% l+l 1003810653 

I NonDoHor | 

isner/Mln cpd/MsL Caupoo Hnd 8 M Asm 
P nw N Bruiaetck Sto lift 19-2 96625994B 
An; 97 -1+2 9945 -99 50 

Bi Mom red 119] 273 ffiB 9945 

B» T5W, M/90 9ft 21-2 7? Jo ^ 

Bs imsouBi 5V. -91 Wk 31-3 C9J5 99 M 

cmoomMMdHo pm 1+2 $£ 

I Come 5*46 raw 21-3 9973 »Ja 

1 CredN^Stlvi>->r/Vi f* IM 99.73 99JS 

Denmort 9T/9+16 Dd Z72 9*a 9*n 

^S+4 NT* 15-1 9»id 99 JD 

Klnadom Seioium 5-4, 18% 1+1 99+8 99 

H BY £ S .2 i », »ft 25-1 79.13 993 

5 .SS../MMJ 10% l+l 1C6381KU5 

Vbrijd bioSto -Tl/* 10% 773 9951 «i6 

CredM Fonder 51649 fl, km3 9945 99A 

U .^r ° f ■ CrCail 5ul^^e ‘ F ' r^, BosJm L«, 


53% 33W TecftOo 
9k 3% TpcnTp 
is% 7ft r«cmn 
Off* 76 TaionR 
fVk 2 Telocnn 
32 21W Teitlex 

ira, Sto TeiDTa 
18% 7% Tel ad 
5* 2to Toiespii 
4* 3V» Tennery* 
10ft 5* Temar 


33 25Vb TexCdS IJO 
9* S% TBxAIr 
10V), Sto TexAE JPI 44 
22W 16* TexAE Pf 
20 3U Tuscan t 

«U 4* ThrD B J4 IJ 13 

9 3% ThrD A M Zl 13 

11% 3* Tidwell 

9 49k Tof-ld 

13k» 7% TcilPIO J4 

77 2T Tot Pi Pf Z8B I1J 
13* 0% Tmii-X .10 1.1 

l»w llto TtosTdc J6 A) 

19 13% TrtBboo 40 29 

15% 7% TrlSM AOe 48 

7% 3to TriHme 

14% 3% Trklex 

6% TV, TubVtrr* 

14* 10tb Tullex AA 42 

2«% 19* TurnC a 1.10 Aa 


SU 7.B » 38 2% 7 Tm + to 

X6n J 18 I IV 9. K 

10 646 +ft 6% 014 7- Vb 

40 21 Bft (ft Bft— * 

JO 14 10 90 1+ft 146b 16ft 

6 7ft Tft 7% 9- to 
11 3* 3ft 3* + lb 

46 ZV, 51b Sto + Vb 
14 4 laft I6to iftto 

14 5 50ft SOW 50*— to 

7 39 4ft 4ft 4ft— Vb 

JD Zl 8 49 14% 14% 14% 1 

Joe J 73 1 0501 Ml 98W 100ft — 1 I 

2S Zto 2ft 2W— to 
AA 14 13 10 27% 27% 27% + % 

J6o 18 9 54 Tft 9* 9to— to . 

49 4 7ft 7* 7ft 

194 Jto 3to 3* + Vb I 
12 3 4to 4to 4to— Vb 

2S Sto 5Vb 5% 


The Glo 

News 









40c 48 « 
9 


15 *7* 27V, 27V1 — % 

■44 9% 9to 9*+ lb 

T76 6to 4to 6»b— Vb 

3 18% Uto 18% + ft 
349 5V, Sto 5* + Vb 

37 5 4to 4*— Vb 

32 4ft 4«b 4ft— Vb ' 

48 4 3% 4 + ft 

ll 7* 7% 7H— to 

94 * * 9 

1 24* 34* 24*— * 

3 Bto 8% MV- to 

14 13* 13% 13ft— lb 
8 13ft 13% 13ft 

1 Sto Sto 8% 

2 4ft 4ft 4%+ to 
a 4 3ft 3*— to 
18 2ft 2% 9% + to 
is into tovb m + u 
10 23* 22* 23 


M 




—id ) CSF Fund 

— Id ) Crossbow Fund. 

—Id ) ITF Fund N.V 

BANQUE.INDOSUEZ 

— <d I AMteGrayrth Fund 

— <wj Dtvnrbond_ 

— iw) FIF— America 

— (») PIF— EunJPB 

— iwl FI F— Pacific — 

— id I indusuK MuttKxnds A- 
—id ) Indosiiee WluHtaomM 0. 



CAPITAL INTERMATIOMAL 
—ind Cocifai inti Fund.. — 
— IW) Capital Italia 8A 


SF 54240 

3M122J6 

s mis 

FLTZ7JS 
SFSL5D 
SF82Z50 
SF109J7 
SF 27700 
SF 81 JS 
SF1U47 


— IW) CapdaJ italta SA *10J6 — [g J 

UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND 

—id ) Amen UiSh._ SF39JS 

—id ) Bond- Invest 5 F 7025 

— UDFwaoSwVnSh. SF 12600 

— id » Japan-invmt 5F 937.50 

—Id ) Soft! South Air. Sh. 5F 456J0 

—id ) sima (Mock prica) SF90&Q0 

UNION INVESTMENT Frankfurt 

—id } Urdranfa DM 40. 10 

— <d) Uniforms DM 1984 

—id) Unlrok DM 71 JD 

Other Funits 

(w) Acnbanda I n y ualino n ts Fund. 4 20L53 

(w) Achveiflnfl *7615 

(w> AnuJta infornotional Food— S 10+01 

niTiuuccTurNTEui ir 1 Arab Finance Ur 868660 

FFM nuttn IblArtane S1J1621 

raJi+iw 1*1 Trusteor InO Fd. IAEIF) 51611 

— Hd llnri Renterttand DM 9250 m \ bbi pneine BF01B5 

Dinai & Harem 6 Uewd Gaoreo. Brussols iwj B NP Int ertend Fjxxl _ 5 1 Q+a« 

—(nr) DBM Commodify Pool. *27284”' iw) B owd^ltar : raaue Pf— — — - SF )41-g 
— Iml Currency A Gold Pool S 175J3 — Cml Ciodo j^td-Mpi-tpoeo Fd *655 



— Im) WUMSu Lrte Ful. Poo) — *57640' 
— (ml Tran* World FuL Pool. *794JS* 
F8C MGMT. LTD. INV. ADVISERS 
I. Laurence Pounrv Hill. EC4. 01-6234680 


— Iwl F6C Atlantic — 
— iwt r AC European. 
— ml FAC Oriental 


W 1 Capital Prn»erv. Fd. Ir 

iw) Citadel Fund 

id 1CU.R. Australia Fund, 
fd I Cj JZ Japan Fund — _ 
im) Cleveland Offehonv Fd 


S10-W iwJ CoiumdtaSeairftlBS FL 104.19 

*9-59 id ) COMETE— 5 916.19 

*240, id ) Cora, donks Fund S1J46D0 

i, mv, I w) Convert. Fd. Inn A Cert* .... S 942 


FIDELITY FOB 471 HamUton Bermuda ii cSSSS S' US 5r>rtk~' *9An 

— iml American Values Common. *7657 «{ cratvfn. i-u. inn B LBrt»_ *zsji 

— (m> Amer Vah/os CumPref — *10625 ? n wS ggST5ilgTS? to"" 

-id ) FWellfy Amor. Assets 8 4153 ° 1^2.1 nfnrtiiu i 

—id I FWellfy Australia Fund +784' 5 { Sjji® 1 p2W5S"l. ILV — 

— <d I FktalllvOir.SwBS.Tr 5 11977 

—la j Fidelity For East Fund sra.iB 1,2 

— Id ! Ftaellfy Inl2 Fund *5006 ”»E^^Wun^Trvil___ M84 

— id ) F ktoiltv Orient Fund S 2504 } |S^ I 2K I K“2 ,,S . kiJor* 

—Id I FlddltY Frcntlor Fund *1180 k f S1 «MTi2 

—id I F Well tv Poaflc Fund *13296- J® } H^toreUi 

— Id > FKtalllvSpel.GnwrttlFd. *1191 r 

—Id 1 Fidelity Wbld Fund ST7J8- \Z\%222S?J F m,r 5 - F ?5% 

FORBES POB887 GRAND CAYMAN iwl Formula Selection Fd. SF7258 


London Aoent 01-839-3013 Id ) Fondltalki- — 5 2691 

— (»l Said Inromo *614' Id 1 Gowernm-Soc. FuntM___ $8586 

Gold Apprectallon *482 fd J Frankt-Trust Intanlns — DM <140- 

— fw> Dollar incanw *7J9 iwl HauMiPain Hktas. N.V *9980 

— im) Strategic Trading * 1JH Iw) Hast* Funds » 77.75 

lull HnrTm Pnnd « 1 (VM 15 

CEP'NORfONPS. it) ) fLAlntl Gold Bonrl - . .. 59JSD 

— <w) East Investment Fund — _ * 35 3 KJ ir, i ca *1171 

-i*)totllrfi World Fund s 11+95 iw) imSSS^cet Fund- *30401 

—Iwl State SL American.— — ■ ■ — - S 136J0 (wi inn Currancy Fund Ltd— * 22J4 

CdPtl.CuM.Ud+iinAQonlAl-4714230 (r ) Inn Securities Fund *781 

GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT CORP. W> inuesta £>WS. DM 41.U 

PB 119. SI Peter Port GoenHey. M81-J8715 [r > !m^_A)irertrayte-_— *4A< 


iml FururGAM c « S1I0J8 ir J HolforTune Inn Fund SA__ 1 1632 

l«) GAMerlCO Inc 512UB ™ ^pch P reafU: Ftm d— — *99^ 

(w) GAM Bostiv) Inc S81J1 g. SSWJJ 1 o f <t ^~ s *7?i? 

Iw) GAM inlemtrffonol Inc 5 {S'! Hold «5iSnn 

Iw) GAM North America Inc. * J^} m-inii r.u: 5 

(w) GAM N. America Urn! Trust ( »J UWBlfill- Small Cos. *1274 

fw) gam P odflc me. — snjJ7 

Iw) GAM Start. A inti Unit Trusf- I23JOP JJ*,’ /JSKSSJIIi'w’pd *«W54 

i mi gam System - s io t Mwioianum 5eL Fa 3 ] Zj4 

i”! gam SSSSS wSfel^l^TT raJ ji»»-vwta«» vu jh 

I m) GAM Tycba &A. Clar > A — — * W $} & 55irS535f?riW0^ 

G-T. MANAGEMENT iUK) UtL Iw) Nippon Fund *29+0- 

—Iwl Berry PanFiL Ltd. — S9J2 Iw) Kovotac I nwhn a nl Fund *87.04 

— fd l 0.7. Applied Sconce - SJ+15- |w| NAM.F. *13+83 

-idlG.T.AseonHXGwrtkFD — *IW imlHSPFJ.T 81514S 

— iw) G.T. Asia Fund — _52S4 I fm: Opportunity Investors Ltd_ S 3417 

—id ) G.T. Australia Fund SELE- !»■) PAKCUfiSJ Inc. S t£JT 

—Id ) G.T. Eurane Fund S3. Vi jr 1 Partan Sw. R Es* GettavD SF 1 J97+-J 

-id I G.T. Dollar Fund * 13.1s tr : Formal value Fund N.V S i.iXxo 

— id) G.T. Bend Fund S9J5 jb) Ptatades. *95439 


lit) GAM Worldwide Inc — 

im) CAM Tych* SJL Clar i A 

G.T. MANAGEMENT iUK) UtL 

— Iwl Berry Pac.Fd.LkL 

—Id 1 G.T. Applied Science 

—id ) G.T. Aseon HX. GwfttM- 

— iw) G.T. Asia Fund 

—id 1 G.T. Australis Fund— — 

— Id | G.T. Eurage Fund 

—id I G.T. Dollar Fund 

—id J G.T. Band Fund — 


. *9 JED 
. *11.71 
*306JH 
. *2224 
_ *781 
DM41.14 

— *644 
_ *1632 

* 101 JS 
. 19935 

pfl 91 
. *7143 
11J)59J)5 
*15221 
S L26ZDD 
. *127+ 

- *69.25 
*15417 

. 51234 
Y111J22 
. S10JS 


—id] G.T. Bond Fund — — S W5 iblPletadas .. *95439 

—Id I G-T. Gtatel Techr^rv Fd 111JS ywi PS eg Fund N.V. S 10486 

-id) G.T. Honshu Pathfinder—. SJiSS id ) Putnam Inn Fund *5483 

-Id )G.T. investment Fond *W£S ffa ) Pri— Tech *87114 

—Id ) G.T. Jason Small CaFund- KlJCr w) Quonhim Fund N.V._ S3JSL32 

-fd ) G.T. Tedmolocrv Fund ^ 5 2SJ9 (d j Routs Fund LF 2306. 00 

—id ) G.T. South CWra Fund S1332* (d 1 Rem invest LFIJOSOJI 

Eac tw»t cgus asE-f i L m IS I SSSraJIBSS^lfTSS 


Eac TRUST cat JERSEY) LTD. IS J ^ T n)*tR*S _____ S All 

ro!x?ph S ritp wuevruia 1 | w > Samurai Porrtolto SF 107JS 

CURRE NCYFUN D. 50070- Id I SCJ /Tech. SA Luxembourg — *9.47 

f j rS« fw) Stave sl Bonk Equity Hda*NV sui 

ZiS 1 Term "A* IDIJn' 1- ‘ s'lJOTl' tSSo Grtwtti Fund SF 10.15 

—id ) snarl Term A (Diar)_ — sijijoi . w Takva Pec HoRL *9737 

“12 ! SS 1“"" 2. fnS? — SBJH26* >w Tokyo Pot Hold. N.V. S 13271* 

z&j }y iSus 

ffi SSSSSSKSSSS I KS 

fe5£^^=rv 5 2?«1 id aiMfcgrzi 

=lb } Sc ^TiaSj Sifc ID 

-4b > J.F Australia * 458 K SSgg 

NIMARBEN (w Wedge Japan K.V S83J1 

— fd ) Class A — 58Uj iw Wwige Pacific N.V. SS7.17 

— 4w I Clots B - LLS *5-24 l " Wedge UAN.V *5218 

— Iw ) Class C - Japan .*7867 jm Winchester Flngndal Ltd. 1852 

ORANGE NASSAU GROUP _ {J S s '?S 

PB8SS78. The Hague IWDI46W8 W ^SSftww«e»*«Jfc. *40^ 

iwlWortdwue Special 5/5 Zto. *1JS7.13 

DM — Deutsche Mark; BF — Belgium Francs; FL — Dutch Florin; LF — 
Luxembourg Francs; SF — Swiss Francs; a 1 — asked; +— Offer Prices,-b — bid 
change PA/ *10 to 51 oer unit; NA . — Mol Available; N.C.— NotCommuntoilBd.-o— 
SSTs - suspended; S/S - Stack 5Pllt^- Ex-OlvAtend; “ - Ex-R»; — - 
Grass Per fnr mono, i ndex Nov.; • — Rodemw-Pnee- Ex -Coupon; — Formerly 
Worldwide Fund lM; 9 — Offer Price Ind. 3% prelim, enarpe; ++ — dolly stock 
price as on Amsterdam Stock Exchange 


— ib ) J.F Pod lie 5ec5.1Acc) . 
—4b ) J.F Australia 

NIMARBEN 
—id ) Class A- 

— iw I Class B - US 

— Iw ) Class c - Japan 

ORANGE NA-5AU GROUP 

PB 85572 The Hague IWW 44*638 


rfat A? 



ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 

Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed 
4 January 1985 

Tbe net OMtt valiieauetaflaassbDbm betow cw* supplied by the Fuads IWed wM the 
w axNta i ef mom Mad* wtwn ctuofe* ora baaed on tam prtaet. Tbe taOewtag 
morainal symbol* IndlCDta ireqiMocy of quotations sappltad (Dr Ibo IHT: 

Cd) -dally; iw) -weekly; (b)-b+moattdy; irj-rewlarfr; O) - Irregularly. 

AL MAL MANAGEMENT 

(w)AFMal Trust, SA *13983 

BANK JULIUS BAER 8 CO. Lid. 

— (d)Baerbond SF 971 JIT 

—id ) Cnnbor ________ SF 11 51 80 

— (d ) Eautoaor America __J S 107180 

— fd ) EmiBjoer Europe SF 111400 

— Id ) Equlbaer Pnrl fir 5F I131JB PARI SBA5— GROUP 

— Id i Grrtoar__ SF 971 JO —id ) Ccrtexo International **471 

— id 1 StacttW SF1571JXP — 4w) OBU£Ml-_- DM_1J47J7 

— (wi OBLICESTIQN— 

- |F2+« _<«,) OBU-DOLLAR 

- SF1659 _<w)OBU-YEN__ 

- *HA2 —Iwl OSU-GULDEN 


SF 971 JO — (d ) Cortoxn International *1478 

: 1571 JO* — 4w) OBLJ-DM DM1JM7J7 

„„„ — fw) OBLIGEST/ON SF91JB 

fPJJS — iw) OBU-DOLLAR S 1JWL64 

SP 1 — iw) OBLl-YEN_ Y 10AT2200 

- *1342 — IwlOBU^ULDEN FL 105629 

— JdlPAROIL-FUND *9296 

«,«B7 — <d) PARINTERFUND S99J9 

'SF8T55 -< d > PARUSTraoeurvBond— S 10602 
. *17.53 Royal Bank Of CanadaPOB 242Gugrnsey 
_ *9.75 -+iw) RBC 
. *15.93 -+(W RBC 
. *9612 -+fwi RBC 
*14233 -Hw) RBC 
... -+ld 1 RBC 

JQBB57* ■+!*) RBC 
*883* SKANDIFOND INTL FUND I4+8-23627D) 

. SBB66 — (w)lnc-: Bid 8478 Offer *5.13 

*1.117 — twIAcC.: BW 8478 Offer 15.13 

SWISS 
— fd) 

yy* — w j 

■ 5-J5 — < tf i 

E0J23 — (a ) 

*6954 —id) 

80-741' — (d ) 

—id > 

*3275 “«} 

*1076 — 2 


STOCK ADVICE 
For Next 2 Months 
Only $7.50 ($32.56 Value) 

If you w3 fil in the coupon below red retwn it la us. wall send you our eray-to 
?^- lto ^_ n " ia, . Adwi5ar T Swv,c * ****** ""O' rtxk far lha next 8 weeia. 

Tta ta a $3256 vatae breed on our tegular price, bu, oil you send « S7J0 — wWdl 
is «ixxjt one quarter the regular pries. You van $25.06. 

Induded are our wntidy Market Canmamrey, Sock Servia Digest— Digett of 
30 Sonnce*. MartnaneaABiingi study on 700 dodo, Dow Theory “Buy" 

and ^ g^ on fl» general markM, Bwmw Outkiok. Industry Sportrfit. ore) 
Anaiysb Oioieei. Slack recommendation mdude: (1) Stocks recommended by 
X other AArnen; H Growth dodo,- (3) low Priced list; reid (4) Special Situatians- 

15 Ci^sttai Gem Stocks and 30 Stock Sp&t Candidatet 

You oho receive -our fa, of -15 Favorite Capital Gam Stacks far 1984" induded 
are 5 low paced stacks. And our Buy-SdWoId advice it offered an 22 gtonour 
aam such re Syntax, Avan, Dmy, Burroughs BM and Xerax. You obo reeeiv* 
our fcl oorto ire ng 30 siodL ipfa c a ncSc kA e*. 

Rl m Ihe coupon below and send it today u«lfi $7 JO far an 8 week trial of Dow 
Theory Foraasb. Moneyhac* guarredee. Offer open to txWiold, with no hid 
tutacriphon in me pad 12 month*. (SuUoiptiun eanreN be ossified without your 
content J 

$32-56 Value Only $7.50 

DOW THEORY FORECASTS, BJC, Dept. NYP1 1-5 (5005-244-15^3) 
Gnnd Centred Slirfion, P.O.Box 5 1 10, New YoricMT. 10163-5110. 


ary state up 

Fayafah in U.S. funch only. 

{ ) Qwdc here for last half 1 9B5 OUTLOOK ph» IM of 12 ffiwmmt brakm 
whole mfcced rata* can lave yrei i^> to BOX on your brokerage commhsioas. 


Intelligent 

investment 

decisions 

Success formula: “Buy now what 
the masses will want later”. A strate gy, 
one of many specialized approaches 
to mastering the science of investing. 
INVESTORS ALERT newsletter is 
dedicated to high growth stocks using 
techniques, research and strategies 
utilized regularly by the professional 
investor. To profit at investing you 
need all the necessary information to 
make intelligent decisions. INVESTORS 

I ALERT is reporting on several 
high-growth issues anticipating 
important new advances. For your 
copies of IN’. JSTORS ALERT at no cost 
simply telephone Amsterdam I 

020-26 09 01, telex 14507 (firco) or 
return the coupon. 

First Commerce Securities B.V. 

Herengracht 483 

1017 BT Amsterdam Tbe Netherlands 
Phone: (0)31 20260901 Telex: 14507 firco nl 

Gentlemen: Please send me a free annual subscription 
to your weekly INVESTORS ALERT newsletter. 


ADDRESS 


PHONE Business. 
PHONE Home _ 


COUNTRY. 


i 



Page 12 


ACROSS 

I A 

(deductive) 

7 Wetland 
10 Target for 
Trevino 
14 Gift housing 

18 Unter den 

10 News agcy. 

20 Biblical 

prophet 

21 Ancient 
Crimean 
people 

22 Acquiesce 

23 Irwin Shaw 
, novel 

28 Admen’s 
come-ons 
28PhilMahre's 
forte 

28ATazzan 

30 Cape in Mass. 

31 ‘*1 

Rhythm” 

32 Where to see a 
memorial 

33 Japanese 
woman diver 

35 Dissents 
30 Kingsley's 
"The Sands of 

38 Role for 
Flagstad 
40 Moved ahead 
cautiously 
42 Eject roughly 

44 Hangs 
gracefully 

45 Banned 
pesticide 


DOWN 

1 Riodela , 

Uruguayan 

border 

2 Gone 
heavenward 

3 Ramifications 

4 Keats works 

5 Errat bridge 

6 Prefix with 
version 

7 Baum marten, 
e.g. 

8 Certain 
projectors 

9 Plated, as 
some coins 


ACROSS 

46 Opening to a 
mold 

50 Border on 

51 Jumped an 
electric gap 

52 Billy or Tokyo 

53 Lachrymose 

54 A.E.F.after 
Nov. 1918 

56 Channel island 

57 Extent 

58 Passes, in card 
games 

59 Being, to 

Baudelaire 

60 He sings "Ridi, 
Pagliaccio" 

61 Fired 

62 Employ 

63 Canal maker 

65 An article for 
Andr£ 

66 Sir Stafford 

, British 

statesman 

eSCulex'skin 

70 Go oystering 

72 Gullet 

75 Roundup item 

76 Register scorn 

77 "Bonanza" 
ranch 

79 Bass-baritone 
Monk 

80 Seems 
reasonable, 
with ,, up" 

81 Wallace 
colleague 

82 Actress Gray 

83 Hammers 


DOWN 

10 Oneof Noah's 
descendants 

11 Arabian 
sultanate 

12 The whole 
story 

13 Sixth sense 

14 Book also 
called* 'Voinai 
mir” 

15 Cugat 
specialty 

16 Sheik of 

17 Longfellow’s 
murmurers 


ACROSS 

84 Brit, 
legislators 

85 “. . . there 
ain't no— 
Clause": Chico 
Marx 

86 Sans mixer 

87 Interior styling 

89 Antal , 

conductor- 

composer 

90 Bill’s partner 

91 Footless 

94 Indo-Chinese 
people 

95 Sister of Baal 

96 Fannie chaser, 
in bank l ingo 

98 Johnny — 

101 Down at the 
mouth 

103 Not inter- 
minable 

105 Actress 
Parsons 

107 Vacillate 

110 Food named 
For a goddess 

111 Singer Ross 

112 Story's stan 

113 Writer Talese 

114 Awn 

115 Statue taken 
down from 
Piccadilly in 
'84 

116 Deteriorate 

117 PeerGynt’s 
mother 

118 Annie Oakleys 


DOWN 

21 Crag 

24 Stags' mates 

25 Wood sorrels 
27 Swizzle stick 
34 Choral 

composition 

37" .Brute" 

39 Iris Murdoch's. 

"The Love 

Machine" 

41 Alienate 

42 Part of a 
fishhook 

43 Nuptial verb, 
at times 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SU1NDAY, JANUARY 5-6, 1985 

Contras by Stanley glass peanuts 



© jYeu> York Times, edited by Eugene Mahaska. 


DOWN 

44 Count of Monte 
Cristo 

45 Motherless 
.calf 

47 Standing 

48 Prod 

49 Observed 
52 Grommets 

55 Comeback 

56 He may be 
fording 

60 Grants 

61 Divers 

62 Vicissitudes 


DOWN 

64 Walter and 
Willis 

66 This goes like 
claque work 

67 Famed 
missionary in 
Maine 

68 Swinburne, 

eg- 

71 Former 

72 Approximately 

73 Where Bhutan is 

74 Desire 
76 Margaret 

Mead's 

laboratory 


DOWN 

77 Slender cigars 

78 Custer’s last 
major 

81 Home of the 
Whitney 
Handicap 

85 Type of boom 

88 Elmer 
Gantry's wife 

89 Temper 

90 Otherwise, to 
Ovid 

91 Stroll 

92 Central and 
guiding 


DOWN 

93 Bangor 

neighbor 
97 B.M.I. rival 

99 Overjoy 
100 Bartdkand 
Lugosi 

102 Diffident 
104 Early 
Peruvian 

106 A Trojan War 
precipitator 

108 Drag 
lOSWoad 


PEANUTS 

/ HERE, ^ 
( ANOTHER 
LETTER FROM 
WJVRBfiJNK 
V 5P1KE.. J 


1 PEAR 5N00fY, LIFE HERE 
ON THE DESERT 15 SOOP... 
THE REAL ESTATE BUSINESS, 
HOWEVER, HAS BEEN SLOW.' 


11 T AM UOFIN6 THAT 
MV NEW LOCATION e 
WILL HELP 7 ' • I 



BLONDIE 

I'LL. MAKE ONE . 
MOU TOO, ELMO 


WHY AREN'T YOU EATING 
YOUR SANDWICH, ELMO ? 


I BECAUSE, I VSL 
ONLY GOT ONE 
MOUTH 



BEETLE BAILEY 


Well/ can Vou ^ 
IMAGINE MOW 
I FELT. SO I 
WENT... AMOS/ 
VOU'RE ER&I NO / 
OUT OF THE / 

room 


no, i'm 
not 



...ANP I SAIP 
TO HER, I WAS 
NOT USE P TO 
SUCH BEHAVIOR 

...AMOS/.. 

YOU'RE EPGltiG 
OUT OF THE ft 
ROOM/.. Mk 


NO, I'M 
NOT 


...A NP SHE 
SA1PTO ME-. 

AMOS/.. ^ 


NO, I'M 
NOT 


ANDY CAPP 


tESIAUmtT 
. 7i i f mr 


l^TAMI CT54A4ED UPfiBOUT? I'LL JELL M3U ' 

YOU NEB3NT HAVE TOLCs the WAITER WE 
T WERE IN A HURRY- WE WERE IN OUT j 

** T IN TWENTY AM NUTES _ y -S 


’THERE'S NO PLEASING ’EM, 
CHALKIE - WHEN WE'RE . 
> EATING AT HOME THEY < 
CANT WATT TO CLEAR AW«Y 
St, , AND WASH UP 


THE BRAIN 

By Richard Restak, M.D. 368pp. S24.95. 
Bantam, 666 Fifth Avenue, 

New York, N. Y. 10103. 

Reviewed by David Graber 

A LTHOUGH movies and television programs 
.based on books have included some of the 
finest productions of those media, the act of cre- 
ation in the reverse direction has generally produced 
literary bastards. Not so “The Brain" based on a 
recent and popular PBS television series of the samp 
title. 

The science and medicine of neurophysiology has 
advanced at a dazzling pace in the last few decades. 
The days when one profession studied “the mind" 
and another studied “the brain” with nary a pleas- 
ant word between them are largely finished. These 
days, we map the brain's intellectual and emotional 
functions and consider to what extent memory is 
preserved as electrical charges as opposed to chemi- 
cal compounds. This stuff is inherently fascinating 
to most people because it hits them — literally — 
where they live. But pop psych books tend to suffer 
from a high coefficient of garbage, while the medical 
and physiological literature simply is unapproach- 
able for most people. 

“The Brain,” is most engaging — and pretty 
respectable from a scientific standpoint In most 

DENNIS THE MENACE 


BOOKS 


aspects Res ink’s book follows closely the contents 
of the series: While it loses the obvious visual and 
acoustic advantages of television, compensation 
comes from the author’s freedom to delve more 
precisely and deeply into what are complex sub j ect s 
and the reader's freedom to review and ponder. 
Besides, the generous endowment of drawings and 
photographs in the book should provide adequate 
food for the right cerebral hemisphere's gestalt 
processing functions. 

Most of us have been exposed to “the headlines” 
in contemporary brain research: The two hemi- 
spheres of our cerebrum have different functions 
and may differ in relative importance for different 
people: our emotions reside in a part of the brain 
remotely connected to the intellectual part; many 
mental diseases, including schizophrenia, are not 



_ — VA* a Jjvuia- 

try v traces these and other equally tantalizing lines 
of investigation through their historical develop- 
ment, contemporary realities and case studies. 

Take memory. Scientists generally recognize two 
distinct kinds of memory: short-term and long- 
term. Under normal circumstances, a portion of 

Solution to Last Week's Puzzle 


□□□□□ □□□□ □□□ □£]□□□□ 
□□ana □□□□□□□□ □□naan 
uanaQEJaaaaunna nonuun 
□□a boo aanaa □□one 
□□□□□□a □□□!! □□□□□ 

□□□□an □□□QHBBann □□□ 
naaan unnau unoio uuu 
□□□ □□□□ aaaaa aaaa 

□□Dooaaaaaaa naaaB 
□□aaaoa naaaa anaaaD 
□□□□□□a □□□□□ aaDnaaa 
□□□unn nnona □□oanao 
aoaau □auaaaaaooua 
□Baa □□□□□ □□□□ □□□ 

□aa Dana aouaa ebqdjb 
□□ a BEnnaaaaaa anaaaB 
□□□□□ □□□□ □□□□hqd 

uaaaa aauna □an □□□ 
□nanao □□□□□BaaoDanaQ 
aaaaBD □□□□□□□□ Guano 
□aaaan aaa aaaa Daaao 


.George M/ilson iffcwcAN ion SAYthose thinss It imu.be 

Y&RS BETORE THEY TAKE CHILDREN UP IN THE SPACE 
SHUTTLE 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


AnictanUuu 

Athens 

Boreetaao 


Costa Del Sal 

Danila 


Istanboi 
Lax Palmas 
Lisboa 


Rcvklnvlk 

Romo 

Stockholm 


Venice -3 26 

Vienna -7 19 

Warsaw -9 16 

ZBrtCfi .7 IV 

MIDDLE EAST 

Ankara 7 *5 

Balrai IB a4 

Damascus 10 01 

Jerusalem — — 

TefAvtv U «0 

OCEANIA 

AscUaM 25 77 

Svdnev 27 m 


ASIA 

HIGH LOW ' ■ ■ 

C F C F 

10 01 13 55 111 BartOfcOk 

-3 26 -7 T9 sw Mdlmi 

13 55 9 48 e Haas Kean 

0 03 -1 30 o Manila 

-4 25 -13 9 d New Dene 

-0 21 -9 10 sw 5eoal 

-5 23 -9 10 SW 5tMnehal 

-7 19 -9 io a Singapore 

-7 19 -9 10 a Taipei 

-fi 21 -■ II d Tokyo 

14 57 5 41 o j. j. 

0 43 0 32 sh AFRICA 

4 39 O 32 Cl auum 

4 » -i 21 fr can 

-a IB -11 12 tr cone-now 

-4 25 -10 14 sw casobkmca 

■*5 /, ■” i 5 HararT 

5 41 4 39 d loom 

20 68 14 57 cl SairaM 

15 59 11 52 r TBnte 

3 38 0 32 O 

5 41 -3 2i r LATINA 

1 34 .7 19 cl — — 

-6 21 -11 12 sw BoeewAlrw 

-9 10 -13 9 a Una 

0 43 -1 28 fr Mwtfai City 

-9 10 -13 9 tr BtodeJcmeli 

2 36 1 34 sw SaoPmlo 

i 41 -, 4 J9 ? NOR T H S 

s 41 -4 25 d AKfMnm 

-II 12 -13 9 lr Aftantfl 

■5 23 -fl 18 ft fSSS 

-3 26 -6 21 fo Svcooo 

-7 19 -8 18 sw 

■9 10-11 12 fr 

'1 w -* «• Honok*. 


HIGH LOW 
C F C F 

31 M 21 70 fr 

-1 30 -8 18 Cl 

21 70 15 59 O 

14 57 S 41 O 

17 03 9 48 o 

-1 30 -7 19 fr 

4 39 3 38 e 

27 81 24 75 o 

20 08 15 59 O 

8 40 4 29 a 


Atolers 17 03 3 38 

Cairo 19 <0 9 48 

Cape Town 24 75 II 54 

Casabtaoca 22 73 9 4V 

Harare 28 82 16 01 

Laaos 30 86 20 79 

Nairobi 25 77 14 57 

Tools 13 55 6 43 

LATIN AMERICA 

Buenos Aires 33 90 19 to 

Lima 26 79 16 61 

Mexfca Cttv 22' 72 5 41 

Rla Oe Jmwlra 31 88 21 70 

SaaPaato — — — — 

NORTH AMERICA 


-3 26 -0 21 sw 

0 43 1 34 a 

1 34 -3 26 d 

•I 30 -14 0 fr 

9 48 -6 21 fr 

2 36 -7 19 fr 

— — no 





Hearten 

13 

54 

-5 

23 

lr 




Las Aaeelex 

21 

n 

9 

48 

fr 

3 

38 

r 


94 

75 

21 

70 

d 

12 

54 

fr 

MianeapeBi 

2 

34 

■8 

16 

fr 


30 


Mmt-em-i 

■* 

21 

-17 

1 

d 

— 

— 

no 

Nassau 

23 

77 

20 

60 

lr 

7 

65 

fr 

Hew York 

4 

39 

-1 

30 

r 




Sop Francises 

14 

SI 

4 

43 

PC 




Seattle 

6 

43 

1 

34 

Is 

18 

44 

sh 

Taranto 

-2 

28 

-8 

18 

PC 

19 

64 

fr 

wash biotas 

5 

41 

-1 

30 

r 



short-term memory is passed to a storage area where 
it may be retained for the rest of one’s life. Neuro- 
physiologists have encountered patients who — 
after traumatic injury to the temporal lobes, are 
. unable to form any new long-term memories. Other 
i traumas in the same area have produced profound 
amnesias, while not inhibiting the acquisition of 
new memories. Stimulation of the senses — espe- 
cially taste and smell — can evoke long-forgotten 
memories, as Marcel Proust illustrated so exhaus- 
tively. Experimental electrical stimulation of specif- 
ic loci in the temporal area can evoke a specific suite 
of memories, and do so repeatedly. There is a 
powerful link between emotions and memoiy: Most 
older adults can recall what they were d oing mi 
Nov. 22, 1963, while the day before is probably a 
vague blur. 

The best way to memorize information is to 
visualize it in some way; people with superb recall 
invariably “picture" their memories. And as one 
ages, it ts not the oldest memories that fade; oldsters 
typically remember details from their youth while 
struggling to recall events bnt a few years distanL 
Another fascinating area in Restak’s book deals 
with rhythms and drives. Although human beings 
now live in a world of their, own mutiny wit h light 
and temperature under artificial control, the old 
circadian cycle continues to function within us. This 
innate dock, which for sane reason runs on a 25- 
hour period, fights back when we attempt to alter 
our natural periods of waking and sleeping through 
such technological marvels as mnltiplemne-zone 
flights and rotating work shifts. 

Traditionally, uoirophysiologists have learned 
how different parts of the brain function by n ring 
animal models and by taking advantage of “fortu- 
itous" accidents or diseases among people. Today, 
these methods have been supplemente d with gad- 
gets like positron emission tomography (RET scan) 
and brain electrical activity mapping (BEAM scan) 
that permit investigators to observe brain function 
and to locate where various men m l activities are 
taking place. 

“The Brain” is excellent popular stience; It’s fun 
to read, high in information content, scientifically 
honest and should have broad appeal. 

David Graber, a research saentin with the National 
Park Service, wrote this review for the Los Angeles 
Times. 


U ClMO Oi*r In* Ungon. Ltd 
PBt b|H— i 0— itei SyndMH 

VIZARD of ID 

\ f ^ 

*/ 

i\ 

r \ mrvw~ ? . j 








FT 

cP 

i jifi 

\ 

) 

{ — 

1 


El 


REX MORGAN 

Wtuerzueisuon. 1 

I JAkF -- COIMUS OUT 
|L OF UlS HOUSE/ A 


KENNY? JUST A MWUTEA 
SOU/ 1 have a message) 
FOB vou FROM >DUB 1 
— r MOTWEfc' r— 


(T $ 


GARFIELD 


J?NV CftVTS 
1-3&5 



ONE THING I LOVE 
3 ABOUT OP1E 


r HE’S SO 1 
PU5HOFFABLE 


Canadian Stock Markets Jan, 4 

Prices In Conadlan.cmts unless marked $ 


Toronto 


d-cloudy; (o-foMv; fr-folrj h-tuiH; nomt avaiiabia; hwi uut ; oe-parriy 
clouov: r-raln; sft-wiowors; sw-snow; si-sJormv. 


2034 Abll Prce 
500 AcHonds 
1700 Aon lea E 
20 Aero Ind A 
7195 All Enarey 
1000 Alla Nal 
100 Also Cent 
1BS3 Ahwmo St 
TO Arson 
02ArausCpr 
3VOOAto> I I 
19605 Bank N 5 
21000 Barricko 
200 Baton A ( 
23150 Bonanza R 
4774Q Bralonw 
250 Bramaiaa 
100 Brenda M 
13451 BCFP 
23740 BC ROS 
48880 BC Phone 

oooBnnmfc 
2 W 0 Budd Can 
9155 CAE 
200CCLA 
4100 cntMtj b I 
60205 Cod Frv 
1500 C Nor West 
32S0C Padtra 
7058 Can Trust 
5400C Tuna 
icascGE 
17570 Cl Bfc Com 
5300 Cdn Not Ras 
SWiOCTIreAr 
360 Coro 
469 Cetanes# 

100 CHUM 
7300C Dlstb A 
4HM COtettl B ( 
2052 CTL Bonk 
16205 ConwestA 
l5MCesaka R 
'«»Conron A 
IBSOCrownx 
27350 OtOf Res 
145767 Doon Dev 
55DOOaenA 
3700 Denison A 
3800 Denison Bt 
3420 DOvol con 
11250 DWcnsn A f 
loflooicknsiB 
IKBDonian A 
7470 Daftaca A 
7900 Du Pont A 
33400 DvluA 
HOOeiCftloniX 
1«) Emco 
13530 Equity Svr 
700 FCA Inti 
1167 Flcnbrdoe 
1100 Fardy Ras 
1800 Fad Ind A 
2100 Fad Pton 
5600 FCHy Fin 
930Frudtauf 
TOOGendbA 
67740 Gcac Comp 
9204Geacrude 
565 Gibraltar 
4730 GaMCqrp | 
HUGrandna 
SSDOGranduc 
tWGL Farad 
ITMGrayhnd 
40TD H Group A 
TOO Hawker 
514 HwesO 
1807 H Bay Ca 
4424 Inrasco 
100 inimtcas 
39831 (otpr Pice 
100 Jwmoefc 
166 Kerr Add 

6B64Labatt 

16284 LKMnrls 
400LOntCem 
610 OLacana 


Hlah Lata CJaee Cttpe 

*?? + 
*1166 mil int- 
is 5 5 — 

5W6 19W 19W — 8* 
8141% 14V* 14V* 

Sint 1916 19*1 

S1W I8VS 1«6— 
5178* 176* 178* 

ip, I0»- 
*79* 71% 79* 

*1316 129* 13 — 1 * 
150 146 146 -4 

S1496 1416 1496— 16 

405 400 «Q 

*SV> 5 5—16 

5161% 161% 16(%— 

* »* 896 9* 

*10W» 10*6 101% + l* 

258 555 256 —6 

*22 21*6 211 * 

51316 1316 1316—96 
*14 1396 14 4-9* 

515 I486 149k 

5241% 2fl6 2496— 1* 
56 5*6 59k— 16 

535 15 15-16 

525 25 35 

5281% 2816 28*9 4- 
532 311% 311%—!% 

5141% 14 14164- 1* 

554 54 54 —1 

52916 7P\ 289*— 

18 18 18 4- 1% 

■996 91* 99% 

na in* 12 4- 16 

4* 4** 

*27 37 37 

56 5*6 596— 1% 

56 596 596— 16 

SHU* 98* m~ 'i. 

278 270 275 — 3 

*1196 711% 1)96 
SU 15 15-16 

™ lg +10 

238 227 235 —4 

Si® ZS) 23® -6 5 

*16 15*6 16 +|* 

1141% 141% 141% 

Sm 7 7 —9% 

450 4B —15 

^ 4 52«“ ,s 

220 220 220 , 

52496 2416 241*— 1 

« 8* 281% 2896-16 
4M 448 440 —10 

515 15 15 4-16 

Sgt 69* 616— 1* 

5T7V* 171% 171% 

»Vi HU 80U-96 
» , .350„ 2S5 4-10 
19V%— 

521 2896 27 

51216 12 12 

$191% 1916 ltu— 
£41% 241% 34!%- % 
*J2Vh m* 12 , 

V 8 ** 2 ***- 2 

r 

44 44 44 

583 S3 02 L 
824Ht 241% 241% * 

S17* 7 17% 7 _t* 

, IWL 189*4- U 

1716- 4 

fiou 109 % lod 

M»% 1 ^4V%- 

522W 22 23V*— V* 4 

WU 2416—1 

,n% «W 

591% 996 99%+\6 Tl 


J 200 LL Lac 1 

• 3S3a LoWowCa s 

1000 MDS H A 518 

11400 MICC 26 

iWOMdonHX * 

794Markind E 455 

6100 iMobon A I SIC 

12020 Nabisco L 524 

H7B2Noranda 517 

4990 NOTCH! 515 

171728 Nva AttA I 5 

310 Nowsco W *18 

34361 1 NuWstHJA 41 

32280Qkwxxj *! 

3776 Ostxnwi A f 5231 

®S0 Pwn?«r„ 55 

22800 PanCtm P X 

»JPemb4w ST71 

3700 Ptionlx on SO 

KPbiePoM SZ 

1«Q ploc* GO a 102 

3S9WPtoear 5211 

*l%« 

*7D0GueJmna 395 

900 Ram Pet j 

* 

SSS Rodcath 5329 

36M6 RdStenfts A 5979 

1103 RetehhoW 589 

7970 Res Servl 165 

raw Raman 513 

565D8caplre 551 

WOOScomi *171 

15700 Soar* Can S7V 

22195 Shan Can 5229 

77750 Sberrm U 

aoSKAH-BI 581 

SOOSouttm 553 

360031 Brodat 512 

72473 SteleoA 1209. 

2200 SuJpSro 285 

«SSswR 220 

28Suacornr S23fl 

56166 Sydney e 25 

5600 vare rsi 

_1000 Teek car A s»a 

iSWTa^Bf SU 

300 Tatodvne SIS 

27*2 Tex Gan 53694 

1XO Thom N A MVS 

34775 Tor Dni Bk 511 

STrSw*' ^ 

. .sfflsum §! 

TW77TrC»PL $219* 

102114 Trlmoc 430 

ngTmacAf saw 

was Turbot 29 

WOOD Unicarp A I 5796 

««a U Entprloe $1ZU 

33DUKWO $1» 

U Sfacoc 110 

SvSwAf ^k 

iSttaBT. fr 

llfl Wwfnil B sill* 

HO Weston . $741% 
JffJSWbodwdA SUM 

Total sue* L477410 shores 


Htofe Low Close arvei 

*361% 261% 261%— 
SW 181% 18*4- 
$109% 1H6 18*% — 9* 
245 250 245 —ID 

522%* 229% 224*— 
4S5 ASS 455 -5 
51«fc MU 1616— 1% 
5241% 24 24 

52% 179*4-1% 

5159* 159% 159%— V 6 
$71% 7 7 

$1896 1896 1846 
47 40 40 4- 1 

*5 5 5 

5231% 23 231%+ 96 

*5 490 S - V* 

5381% 2BU 28U— 
$171% 17V% 171% 

58 71% 8+96 

S 22 V 6 2216 22 U 

STjiTJr-* 

$SV% 51% 51*- 

58 8 8 

5329% 32 32 — 4* 

5179% 179* 179* 

58** 81* 89% 

165 m 153—7 
S13U 739* 131% 

JSS ,5S jvn+v* 

$771% in* 179*- |% 
57V i 7U 79*- 1% 
S22U 229% 229% — V* 
561% 6 U 69b 

.“fi « «*-!% 

» 53 53 — 1% 

512 12 12 

HH 6 201 % 2046 
285 285 255 +5 

220 219 219 +4 

5234* 239* 2J»-U 
25 20 20 —3 

*151% 15V. isv% 
sn* 9*6 99%— to 

SWU WU 104%— 

510 10 10 

5369% 36U 3416— 1% 
MU 49% 49V% — to 
51016 171b 179%— 

san% 209% an%— 9 % 
$7/7 

450 450 4S- , 

524 239% 231*— 1% 

$31% 211% 219%- 'A I 
420 405 410 —10 

5239% 23 23 —1% 

29 28 29 +2 

574* 7% Hb~ *% - 

$1ZW mu 119*— 9* 
$T«b W 10 

110 MS 110 — s 

as zos +s 

S» 5U 59b 

SUM 10 10 

13 13 13 

>119* in* 119* 

5741% 74 74 

sin* 1046 in* 

tin urn lou- . 


I Amsterdam 1 

Close Pro*. Bayer 

ABN 372 368 Bd T«T- Hypo 

ACF Hofdlnp 190 ijtjo .Bayer, Ver Bk 

Aepan 15550 152 BMW 

AKZO 702.HJ 10030 Commerzbank 

AHald 1 HJD 193 CanHpummr 

AMEV 216JB 212JM Dabnter-benz 

AUam Rub £75 &7Q Dewnua 

Amrabank •- " “ r *~"* — ” — L 

BVG 

Buerhmom T 
Coland KIdp 
Eliewler 
Pakkar 
Gbt Brocades 
H elnekon 
Ho agowe ni 


Other Markets jan. 4 


BMW 370 

Commerzbank 149 
CanHpummr UA90 
Dabnler-benz 597 
□ewoua Ml 

DwtsdwBank 3B3JO 
gjiwdnerBonk 191 J0 

Of. Babcock 15850 

DutL sctiuHhe 219 
GHH IKLBO 

Hochtief 490 

HMChsi 191 

Hoesctl 97 JO 

Hollmonn 3S7MS 

Harlan m 

Kail U. Sale 247 

Karstodt 237 

KtorfHot 21750 

KHO 25450 

Ktoecknerwica 7150 

Ktupp-huetto 79 

Unde 396 

Lufthansa uu 

MAN. 15858 

Mannesmeam 151 

214 

NtoendLR LB75 

Prsussap 254 

Raetoerawke 325 

RWE 787 JO 

ADKbt index: u 7.11 baiennp 452 

Pmrfaas: W» 

Soon* : Amsterdam stock Ex- Vorta*^ B |« 

“*«**■ Vobo mjn 

I — 1 VEW 7a 

I Brussels I V6lta ™»« aoojo 

iraid T42S 1500 S51S12SW!i^ w,aj8 

Bekowl ISX 4520 AFP 1J0 

CockartU 260 240 

EBE5 2555 2JB3 r - 

GBL 2AM 2JJ58 r LI __„ 

GBInnoBM uw ua MOng KOfM 

Gewoort 3400 3595 

Hoboken 6490 6580 

KrediefOank 7500 7^ss Bk East Asia 24J0 2 

PafroJlTM 6.^0 &m Cheung Kong 31 iqj 

Soc Generate 1530 15 » OttoaLtohl 13.10 125 

Son na 7500 7J30 p%»iHan»r \aj* 1 

Mvay A090 4.U0 Hagirng 46 4 

TrocKanEftM xm 35K HK Elec 850 45 

VMontam 5530 5.100 HKHatets Z7.U 2451 

Baerse :9761s — 


Closing Prices In local currencies 


Shneoarbv us 655 DfcflUers 

ISmPncHteA 8.’SK ,,eln 

s*nns Ppefflc A 2150 2T40 Ounlac 

Whe^Mar N.Q. 1.14 Rsans 

Wlweloek 455 3.925 F5.Geduld 

«"WJr 5 J 5 <55 GEC 

World inn 1.74 174 GKN 

I Johannesburg 1 hoSSE-sm 


Haddlavd 

Oce V ender s 

Pokhord 

Philips 

Rabeco 

Rodomco 

Rnllnco 

Rarmto 

Roval Dutch 

UnHever 

IftnOmmer 

VMF-Stork 

VNU 


AECI 

130 Bartonw 

78 Brwoar 
394 Buffets 
7 JM Elands 


Biyvoar 1510 1 . 

Buffets 6700 6 i 

Elands ? 

GF5A 2450 z 

Harmony mh % 

rm 7i 

Hejftanh 1740 71 

PStSfeyn sign a 

SA Brews 690 4 

SfHJhia™ 3175 30 

Sasol 570 5 

Composite Stock Index :MA. 
Pray tool t9*850 
Source: WedbarNL 


London 


’ Hong Kong 


AACOTP. 
Allied Lyons 
AnaloAm Old 
Babcock 
Barela vs 


,065 1U5 S& Bflnk 

IS8 lSS? 

1 s 

™ ™ S&ggf* 

1140 1170 SSKf 00 
Rank Orp 

. 37 "„ _ M0 Reuters 
lexilLA. Ryl Dutch 
RTZ 
SxHI 

1 STC 

I Std Chartered 

— I Tale Lvte 
311% HtlA Tosco 


mnn am mv awiran 

r— r — . 5SS-. a a asas 

L Frankfurt J S| K SSK 

AEG 1BQ30 10030 StmeS^ *32 SSHSf*** 

Allianz Ver*. 990 779 SHK ftSS 8.10 8 DobH^s 


HK Land 
HKSbanenoi 
Slock HKTrt 


34J0 24 BICC 

lftJI! BL 

S 12 3 iSS, 6 ™- 

ji aj£ gr rterlnas 

37.W 2450 Bril Home St 
355 3525 Brit Telecom 
B50 830 BTR 

55 5450 Burmah 

.135 _S35 Cadburv Sen. 


850 8 JO Coats Pat 

835 819 CamGato 

120 535 CourtaokSa 

_ 18 18 I Ctoioetv 

810 8 1 On Beers 


Montreol 


Hkrtt Law dose Cboa 


orgBankMont 5259* 

2HSS5i£?, 5149% 

.USPomTxtA 5134* 

WWNatBkCdo 514V* 

”J™Pw£?<an» $381* 

IWAoltondA $14*6 

4 SEE 55*2 wa 

JSSSwTnrtoo $171% 

_ 1500 SWnbraA S 34 V> 

Tow Sotos 1.442328 ShwST 


2SV* 25V%— 16 
13V6 16*%+ to 
I3ft 121% 

141* 149b— to 
28V. 2816+ V* 
U to 1496— U 

«%29n*- to 
171% 171% 

26 3616+ 9* 


| Conodion Indexes Jon. 4 | 

Dose Prevfoos 
Montreal 109.17 109 JO 

Toronto Z353JU 3J77JJ0 

WiBlrMi index. 

Twvno: T5E 300 Index. 

Italian Prices Increase 0.7% " 

/fatten 

ROME — Italian consumer 
prices TOse 0.7 percent in Decem- 
ber, compared with a 0.6-percent 
November increase, the govern- 
ment statistics bureau said Friday. 
The year-to-year December rise 
was 5.8 percent, compared with 
118 percent in December 1983. 


U.S. and South Korea 
To Start Exercise Feb. 1 

The Associated Press 

SEOUL — U.S. and South Kore- 
an forces will hold their 10th annu- 
al joint training exercise be ginnin g 
Feb. 1 , ibe Combined Forces Com- 
mand announced Friday. 

Cofond Theodore R. HeiL the 
command spokesman, said that for 
the fourth consecutive year the 
North Korean-Qunese side of the 
Korean Military Armistice Com- 
mission was bang invited to ren d 
observers to view the exercise, 
which will involve about 200.000 
troops. 


5111% 511 to TOSCO 
164 155 Thorn EMI 

S80 PM Tlgrp. 

140 140 JraWdor Hse 

559 9 99 T*1 HOUSOS 

400 473xd UlTramor 

338 343 UnHevar 

375 373xd UJd : Biscuit 
243 reirri Vickers 
38 * 1 

252 249 W.Deap 

190 IBSxd WHokUnps 
223 217 W?ol worth 

478 473 2d 

246 246x0 F.T, X Ib Obx :W1 J8 
,0 S? 1QS PrTeioa* :938TB 

2M2oi'“ L Milan 

477 07 52JES£? n,m IW 

7K W SEt 0 *® 2J 

IS] CtoahoieH 33 

JS 471 " Crodital £t 

** *° FawiWalla 83 

FW 5j 

FlnsWcr 

m Oanorall 3U 

v* IFI s3 

e , ItotoemeiiW 4841 

*. i ass? *S 

aivom 

PI nrtli 7$ 

lKore * ^WCento 

lannu- w 

ramna simda 


290 2S5xd 
1246* 5234% 
Susp 75 

2*5 291 
52216 S2T16 
212 212 
TO ISO 
11 JO 

298 298 

229 230 

489 497m 
T1< 332xd 
429 427 xd 
726 724 

184 179 

527 529 

163 163 

253 249xd 
390 3B8xd 
337 337 

iiBiiim 

5B9 SB9 

202 202 
262 256 , 

$921% $911% 
360 290 

532 528m 
292 J92 

C429k I42IU 
504 a G 
448 60 

NA 276 
472 472 

03 430 

234 234m 
459442 
234 232 

336 331m 
149 146 

198 196 

11 10 
110 19Sm 
214 211 

<35to 051% 
534 S3A6 
528 5Z7to 

,573 573 

1396 14 


Oumez 694 

E H-Aou Hoine 2i8io 
curape i 7773 

Gen Eaux 529 

Haawtte 7^25 

I metal 77 . in 

|-2»on»aCop 343 

Leorond IJ 154 

L’Oroal 2.240 

Mama 7 jn 

Mlchelln 735 

MM Pmnar . 45 

Meet Hemessy 1.900 
Mauilnek vojg 

JJard-EsI 7L70 

Occidental 45 S 

Pernod Ric m 

Petroles (f»> 245» 

Peuwtof 241 

Podaln 4 ] 

Prlntemps 704 

Rod la tech 312 

Redout* ,4jf 

Pauwel Uclaf 7^79 

Skis Rosotonol ]5oo 

SourJ>errter M 6 , 

Tdomecanlaue Un 

raanwonCSF 424 

I Valeo 2<2 

Aoefilna«: 1 MJ 2 

Pre* lo an: 11341 
CAC Index: 181 A0 
Previous: I 88 JO 
Source: AFP. 


Ookb^Woe 87 & 

Passldnn 5° 450 

PMflWon 260 260 

B£. gf m 

StokMi SS ® 

5S» I 1 

Warmold ^ 3^ 

piisjsrssr 1 mtm * 

Source: Reuters. A 

Tokyo r 


Singapore 


Boustead 
Odd Sffsmae 
□05 

FraaerNeave 
Haw Par 
inehoape 
KeppelShlp 

OCBC° n * t * n * 

OUB 

Sevnb auoyard 
Stow Darby 
5 Steamship 
StTrafflno 

UOB 

Previous: 39850 

Sauna?.- Reuter* 


XS 1M 

Z58 2JB 
545 SJ5 

f-S 492 

1J7 2 

UB 7M 
J-S '-*9 
5JO 5A5 

184 xao 

,_S1 

1-S 1JS 

un 

4S6 4J3 

*28 IS 


Akol 441 

Asohl Cham 714 

AsahlGton 884 

BnoDntano 51 4 

Conon \j3sc 

°N|dpot Print 975 

DahvuHouse 584 

Full Bank 

Full Photo 1,570 

FulHeu |3 jS 

Hitachi MO 

itST* 1 1JJD 

i ' m . «* 

l |2t l 335 

JAL c / w 

Kail mo ao 

SR*- 1 d 

Elec lads ijso 

“ahuEtoc works 


Stockholm 


I&890 18630 

&3W 87^ 

l«B 4092 
*6 46 

JU00 38990 

54S0 5A30 

68400 47,400 
68700 69J80- 
1274 1J74 

W05 8929 

1^6 WJi 

fys smib 

52859 535 

!<840 1250 

ZI54 8150 
7450 7J71 


™mmb! un 

Saurca; Milan Slock £*■ 

oxmwt 


*®A 364 345 

Atia Laval ik wT 

sussr 0 ,55 

Bssr s s 

^^<*1 191 m 

nnwinocla IBS ibs 

Swwi* Match % JS : 

Vo * vl » 218 213 

Syfak vortHew Index: 39850 

Prevtoui; 382J0 

Source: U ptanSaDanken. 

Sydney I 


Mltoub Bank lSn 

Kgur s 

J»sr v gi 

Mitsui 

MJtoukashJ 

t^a 

Nlhkosec ^ 

Nhwan Steel ,3 

SSS? V “" I 

Nomuro sac m 

'« 

Ss? 1040 

Sum! Bonk JJH 

Suihj Cham 218 

SSL"*" | 

Takeda 5" 

Tv'Wn 2J 

Tk Marirm jS 

’-I 

Toshiba JS 

Tovola . 2l3 , 

Vamoldil Sec ’mo 

SSaS.'Sgj.nau, 

Source : nmnenT 


471 

335 

1240 

*30 

1220 

342 

410 

243 

SS5 

342 

369 

1220 

600 

is 

272 ■— . 
4H ft' 
892 W 

’'is? 

.981 

1 . 100 - 

3250 

1238 

217 

154 

3S 

432 

.734 

1200 


Zurich 


AlrUauklo 
Alsthom AH. 

AvDassauli 

Banealra 

BIC 

BSN 

Correfaur 
Club Med 
Caflmao 


557 553 

mao 20020 

82 m 
sm 570 
SW SOB 

-Z3? 7,0 

2251 2280 
1294 1393 

2 IS 3 SJ 


ACl 
AN I 
ANZ 
BMP 
BOfOl 

Bmoolnvlito 

Brambles 

Coles 

Comolco 

CRA 

C5R 

Dun toe 

Elders ixi 
►tookor 
Mooeiian 
MIM 


m las 

2*2 » 
22 5i4 

n$ 5Q8 

317 319 

157 15B 

3«9 350 

395 392 

™ 204 
482 492 

275 279 

185 187 

?!£ 307 

IS i«, 

go 217 
224 MJ 1 
145 145 


tank Lou 

S.™!"" Boveri 

pSKsr 


ssii 

2*30 SfllL W. 

,“5 415* 

i-12 1,900 ™ 


nostie 


8F*"” if IS S 

Cbr Ji g. 

Union Bonk 1*SS 1*2S! 

W1ntortlS- k JS ^ 

®18M 

Source; Reuten. 

•iSiio S »».*ii 


|c. 

i 1-- - ■ - • 


g^r- 

SS5:',' 




« 






»■. • 


) j. '\ f \ 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, 5ATURDAY-SUNDAY, JANUARY 5-6, 1985 


Page 13 




SPORTS 




QirardeUi, Figini Cup Winners 

The AssocUued Press 


S-'.-J?: . Vl ‘ tlXaS 


owwoaming vicioiy in a Worid 
Cup slalom here Frid^. 
Meanwhile, in Maribor, Yugo- 
. v slavia, Michda Figiiii won a woro- 

i en’s World Cup giant slalom race, 

,.~. V *£tpL ( leading the Swiss to Gve of the first 

TABU) CUP SKnNG*~ 

i six places. The Swiss sueak was 

-■ -.T: ^iq il- ^ interrupted rally by Blanca Fcnun- 

■„ ,> dez-Ochoa of Spin, who finished 

: - ^ S| W" third. 

— v ^ffiraiddITs fourth triumph of 
i— &nied the season, the second in a slalom, 

■ T* gave him the overall lead in the cup 

standings with 120 points. 16 ahead 
of Switzerland's Pirinm Zflihrig- 
' ;r ^v5 s hiiy^ go, who fell in the first run and 
' failed to pick up any points. 

^ A 21 -year-old native of Austria, 
rjiL* , Girarielli posted the best tunes in 

~ u ^Ulo in ]) , both nuts and ontskied second- 

. place Florian Beck of West Genna- 

n ny by a whopping 2.45 seconds. 

fl riionX^i Ihgemar Stenmark of Sweden pm 
in a daring second run to move 


cup (Iq. 


gnu — fastest in both runs with 
beat times of 1:25.96 and 2:17.47 
— won in 2:33.43, ahead of Vreni 
Schneider, who docked 1:15.99- 
1:18.05 For an overall 2:34.04. 








ieh c,,-;.. t.— .r ““ i . ia.uj ror an overall r.ium, 
sition Hp u v ^ Fernandez-Ochoa posted 

S £ a ^vS,^ rd r. Wlt S. Y, iP 0 ' ,:I6 - 22 *** 1:19-26 dockings fora 
run* 3 ^ tu * 1 ,oul <* 2:35.48. Thcraurscffaffing 
runjbehmd Austrian Franz 342 meters, was flagged with44 


run, behind Austrian Franz 
Gruber. 

Gmbea: fell in the second leg, 
while Krizaj made several mis t a ke 


gates on both runs, 

“It was Yeiy. very difficult," fi- 

gini said afterward. “It was a hard 










In ,h. , .. hiu mu imawaiu. Ji was ii oaiu 

UKCOUrsClo,lrop course with many ruts. It was my 
uj pace. rim giant slalom victory, my best 

11 s a dream come true to finish result so far this season, H she add- 
second,” Beck said. “1 could have ed “It was practically impossible 
had an even belter time, but I made on the track not to makp a mis- 
one mistake at the bottom of the take." 

, n<x “■** s^prisai The partly icy slope, abundantly 
by my second place. I was not ner- sprinkled with water by organizers, 
vous, t so I look a lot of risks in both took a heavy toll in the first heat, 
nms. His previous best finish was with about a third of the ski era 
eighth, this season at Sesiriere, Ita- dropping out in spills from missed 
*V- gates. 

"I had a very good second run The second run also was selec- 
and it M really boosted my confi- five, but there were fewer falls. 

formas Mv Fourth through sixth places went 

win i K H} *° Switzerland^ Maria Walliser 

win a gold medal at the world r2.-H.A2i Frit* 


Free Sparks Cavaliers 

To Victory Over Bullets 

Gwiptfcrf by Ovr Staff From Dispatcher 24, while Jeff Roland had 19 and 
RICHFIELD, Ohio — The ide- McMfllen 16. 
visitm cameras were on, and World The Cavaliers led, 22-16, after 
B. Free knew it. “I knew it when I one quarter, 
came into the gym and laced on my Free and Baglcy scored eight 
sneakers,” Free said after coining points each in the second period as 
i Cleveland expanded its lead to 54- 

NBA FOCUS 46 auhe half. 

Free's three-point shot at the 

off the bench to score 21 points and third-quarter buzzer gave the 


Giraraeui postal tne oest tunes in i naa a very good second run The second run also was selec- 
both runs and outskied second- ““ 11 realty boosted my confi- five, but there were fewer falls. 

pb “?, Fbr if£^ Gcnna ' said ^tenmarJu; 1 thmk my Fourth through sixth places went 

ny by a whopping 2.45 seconds. form ts commg back. My goal is to , 0 Switzerland Maria Walliser 
Jbgonar Stenmark of Sweden pui a gold medal at the world f 2: 35.62). Erika Hess (2- J6 13) and 

SLiflWS? 3 ?^ s* fc to l “ ove if , ° nships m 800,110 nttt Zoc (2:36J3). Seventh was 
from Ulh to third in the final plac- m0fllh - Olga Charvatova of Czechoskwa- 



lead the Gevdand Cavaliers to a 
100-93 Mariana 1 Basketball Assod- 


Oevdahd a 77-70 
Washington pla; 


without f or- 


ation victory over the Washington Cliff Robinson, a former 
Bullets here Thursday night Cavalier who was out because of a 
“Every time we get on national bruised knuckle, 
cable TV, we have to prove our- "He 5my_5 home with a bruised 
selves," Free said. knuckle? That wouldn’t keep me 

“Announcers talk about us being oul «” F** 6 - “He probably hurt 
the lowly Cavaliers, or the Cadav- himself signing ^autographs. 


Stenmark, who has won a record 


Olga Charvatova of Czechoslova- 
kia in 2:37 J9, who finished ahead 


1 * 






k ^Back s R eh4 S5 


- t-7 

■ ■ a ^ 

’ : -h5sbj 


Beck had totaled 1:53.74 to edge 
Stenmark. who clocked 1:53.77 for 
his best finish of the season. 
ft- “i was very confident in both 
nms and I had no problems on the 
course. I made two very good 
runs." GirardeDi said. 

“I was trying to put a record 
maigin between me and second 
place. I didn't do it this time, but 
rQ try again in Kitzbuehef in the 
next race." 


79 World Cup races, has said he of Yugoslav Ania Leskovac 
would retire at the end of this sea- (2:38.08) and Americans Cindy 
. Nelson (2:38.48) and Eva Twardo- 

Friday's race began in a blizzard kens (2:39.02). 
that later slackened, but snow fell _ 
throughout. The first run was B Scheduling Changes 
markal with 64 gates and the sec- World Cup organizers an- 
ond with 68; the course had a verti- nounced Friday scheduling 
cal drop of 195 meters (640 feet), changes after the cancellati on ot a 
The A m erica n s, competing for men's slalom and a giant slalom in 


£i^n/Uhtd ftyp htoitfiand 

Tom McCarthy began his hat trick against goalie Bob Janecyk at 14:39 of the first period. 

NorthStars Win on Double Hat Trick 


Compiled ty Our Staff Fnm Dtipatcha the third of their c aree rs for botl 
INGLEWOOD, California — Acton and McCarthy, who each 
There was a time when hat tricks also contributed an assist Thurs- 


the first rime in a slalom this sea- 
son. did poorly, with only Bill 


ueira, Spain. 

he giant slalom will be held 


the third of their c aree rs for both was not lack of effort, it was just 
kcion and McCarthy, who each dumb, 
ilso contributed an assist Thurs- “Everybody was trying to do 
Iny ihinp individually. 

Neal Broien and Mark Nanier “The thud period was an anbar- 


Johnson finishing both runs. He Tuesday in Schladming, Austria, 
placed 28th, next to last The slalom is set for Monday in La 

In the women's giant slalom. Fi- Mongie, France. 




- : ‘ -Hii'.'TCagg 


'•*" ' •“-^ar.Gr 

• : • * i — •■- •^raaok 
• • “:i-;iianr 

it 

- 

"iter 

r r .-K© 

•fe- 

-rr.divisn 


4 Loss to 1 
Jlion Frants 


' V 

...... Aj-Ds^ 

.. .Widtfes 

".VI- 

• jy.'tj 

-■ - - - ■ . 

-'■.’.T.-dDE* 
'.."Tv; sad-* 


• -• f 

■ ■ Vjjjj jj: 

-"v-i 


49ers’ Defense Big Key to NFC Title 

The Associated Pros the NFL the 49ers surrendering That explains the talk about the 

SAN FRANCISCO— Sunday's 248 points and the Bears 260. Both reincarnated Monsters of the Mid- 
NFC title game is being billed as a teams allowed 24 touchdowns (10 way. Defensive coordinator Buddy 
showdown between the Joe Mon- rushing and 14 passing), with the Ryan's philosophy is to attack, 
tana-led offense of the San Francis- difference in the points coming on “They’re a tight man- to- man, 
co 49ers and the National Football those allowed by ChicaBD's offense, bmnp-and-nin and come-after-you 


were commonplace for the Minne- day. things individually. “You have to win those kinds of 

sota North Stars. But this year the Neal Broten and Mark Napier “The third period was an embar- games because you can’t expect to 

team that used to boast one of the also had three assists as the North rassn ^J OJ " a i . le ? I “. ^ 15 ^ shoot the lights out every mghL" 

National Hockey League’s most stare erased an early 2-0 deficit P°sed to have disapline. Washington shot only 41 percent 

potent offenses has had trouble wth four unanswered goals. Minnesota s eight goals wot the from the field in the first half and 

— — — 1 ■— — . result of improved teamwork. As f inish ^ the game at 46 percent. 

NHL FOCUS fi*£iJ5 e c^ t ^ “p a h ^ e But the BdietT who were behind 

— finished strong, scoring Lhree goals, better together now, and were most of the way, tied the game 

scoring goals at afl, let alone in l “f: u . a * lwo W McCarthy, sla ying at home in our own zone mcc in the fourth quarter.— the 

barrages. But Thursday night Keith a 6** ns| resenre goalieDarren Eliot, drfensivdy said McCarthy. last time at 93-93 with 1:31 to olav. 


ere. “It gets the adrenalin going, 
because we want to show people 
what we can do.” 

The victory improved the Cava- 
liers’ record to 7-23 and ended a 
three-game losing streak. 

Washington feO to 19-14 as its 
three-game winning streak was 
stopped. 

Elsewhere, it was San Antonio 
116. Dallas 115; Milwaukee 11!. 
the Los Angeles Clippers 87; Indi- 
ana 1 12, Golden State 96, and Port- 
land 123, Seattle 89. 

“The loss him more than usual 
because we had the opportunity to 
win despite malting mistakes and 
not shooting well," said the losers’ 
coach. Gene Shue. 

“You have to win those kinds of 
games because you can’t expect to 
shoot the lights out every night.” 

Washington shot only 41 percent 
from the field in the first half and 


“No, I wish Cliff were here. Na- 
tional TV — that brings out the 


best in me.* 


(AP, UPI) 


scoring goals at all, let alone in 
barrages. Bui Thursday night Keith 
Acton and Tom McCarthy both 
racked up three goals in powering 
Minesota to an 8-3 rout of Los 


rgdaced Bob Janecyk after A cton said injuries to key playere 

^ .partly responsible for 


NFL PLAYOFF PREVIEW 


Lwgue-leading Chicago Bear de- York’s’ rally touchdown coming on " “The reason they can get away 
& se led by all-pros Dan Hamp- a 14-yard interception return by with playin g a gambling kind of 
ton, Mike Singletary and Richard Harry Carson. defense is because they have truly 

Dent. The Bears, 10-6 and Central Dir outstanding players. They have a 

Except for something that’s been vision tidists in an irpuy^riddled great defensive line and lineback- 
owriooked — the 49ers have a de- season in which they used six quar- ing and, when they're healthy, a 
ferae, too. Not as overpowering as terbacks, also arrived here via the secondary that's as good as any 
Chicago’s, perhaps, but just as ef- defensive door — a 23-19 victory around." 


rushing and 14 passing), with the Ryan's philosophy is to attack, 
difference in the points coining on “They’re a tight man- to- man, 
those allowed by Chicago's offense, bump-and-nm and come-after-you 
In San Francisco's 21-10 verdict type of defense,” says Paul Hack- 
over the Giants last week, the de- ett, who coaches San Francisco's 
fense pitched a shutout — New passing game. 


“The reason they can get away 
with playing a gambling kind of 
defense is because they have truly 


Elsewhere in the NHL it was U1 ^§ 
Vancouver 6, New Jersey 4; Hart- 
ford 6, Detroit 2; Calgary 4, Phila- FrV’ 
ddphia 3, and Montreal tied Sl , h 
Louis, 2-2. los£1 

“We’ve had a terrible time." said “II 
Minnesota Coach Glen Sonmor. “1 thefi 
kept saying we'd start scoring be- OJC 
cause that's this team’s history. We La 
bad hoped Tommy Mac would be not 1 
the tonic we needed, and It looks gone 
like he will be." game 


last time at 93-93 with 1:31 to play. 
They had trailed by 93-85 after 
n „:„ n had been partly responsible lor Free hit a 20-footer with 3:30 left, 
i Minnesota's scoring drought. but Jeff Malone and Gus Williams 
S, 10011 tbansdvB 0,11 “f “You look at So toplriB - each hit a three-point shot and 

XI 1 01x10 [Ciccarelli, broken wrist], Tom McMillen sank two free 

,»lZ e McCarthy [sprained ankle] and throws to tie iL 

Dennis Maruk [strained knee Hga- Cleveland’s Phil Hubbard was 
^olls. who scored twice for the ^ ^ fouled hy Greg Ballard and hit two 

“When guys like that are out for foul shots to put theCavsahead for 
“If we’d have played Hke we did a while, your scoring is going to good; Williams then missed a 20- 
the first 10 mining we'd have been suffer. foot shot and Free fed John Baxley 


Cleveland's Phil Hubbard was 
fouled by Greg Ballard and hit two 


s history. We Los Angeles Coach Pat Quinn is It’s like winning — when you start, 
!ac would be not happy with a team that has it just snowballs.” 
and It looks gone wudess (0-4-3) in its last seven With its victory Minnesota, win- 

games. ner of four of its last six, jumped 


ferae, too. Not as overpowering as 
Chicago’s, perhaps, but just as ef- 
fective — particularly in one vital 
statistic: points allowed. 


ffer. foot shot and Free fed John Bagley 

“Scoring goals is all confidence, far an 18-footer that made it 97-93. 
s like winning — when you start, Hubbard then stole a pass to clinch 
just snowballs.” iL 

With its victoiy Minnesota, win- Bagley scored 28 points, Roy 
r of four of its last six, jumped Hinson had 17 and Hnbbard 15 for 



The hat tricks were Minnesota's “It was the dumbest game we ahead of Detroit into third place in the winners, 
the first of the season. They were played all year,” said Q uinn, “it the Norris Division. (UPI, AP) Williams 


Williams led W ashing ton with 


over Washington in which they reg- 
istered seven sacks (three by Dent, 


But the 49ers. 1 1 -point favorites, 
also have good defensive players. 


During tin regular season, San who led the conference in the regu- i Turaner and 


SCOIUEBOARD 


Francisco and Chicago were 2-3 in lar season frith 17%). 


backs Ronnie Lott, Dwight Hicks 
and Carlton Williamson are all go- 


MumdJWm I ‘ 

■ * A C 7 X Wright, was a second team all-pro. NtSA OiaillfingR 

For AFC Clash With Steders 


Basketball 


Football 


By Gerald Esfccnazi 

New York Tuna Service 
MIAMI — The Miami Dolphin 


TV tW * Ut€>olC# Dean, who held out for the first 10 

games. He had two sacks against Ekra)Dn 
duce 513 points, the team yielded the Giants last week after register- phuoaoipnio 
298, only 48 more than last season, ing four in six regular-season woswnaroo 
In fact, while so much attention games. Six in seven games is an all- ^ 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
AflBiHc DM Nan 


defense might have been so awed boen focused on the Steeleis’ pro pace, 
by the offense's ability to score this stinginess in yielding yardage (they “I thin 
yaffn that it amp ly relaxed when ranked fifth, to the Dolphins’ rusher as 
it got on the playing field. 18th), Miami has actually permit- 49er Corn 


“I think Dent is as fine a pass- 
rusher as there is in football," says 


18th), Miami has actually permit' 49er Coach Bill Walsh of the man 


( i That theory was offered Thurs- 
v uav bv the team's nrnmuwm man, 
M 7-inch dOO-. meter) D«« 


ted fewer points. 


he hopes can be kept out of quar- 


“This is our best defense and the icrback Montana’s face Sunday. 




W 

L Pet. 

OB 

Boston 

27 

6 

jne 

— 

PhUadelphio 

26 

6 

JU3 

to 

Washington 

19 

14 

.576 

8 

New Jersey 

15 

18 

ASS 

12 

New York 

12 

22 

J53 

15M 


Contra! Dhrtaton 



Milwaukee 

23 

11 

474 

— 

Detroit 

17 

15 

-531 

5 

Chicago 

)6 

14 

J00 

6 

Atlanta 

14 

19 

X24 

BV* 

Indiana 

16 

22 

J13 

12 

Cleveland 

7 

23 

M3 

M 


best football team I’ve 


Betters. “We woea’t ready for the ^ Betters, who is in ms sevenrn fense can stop almost anything 
success the offense was gmno to season- “When things were going Chicago throws at them — be it 
have,” said the left defensive end, bad for us we went back to defen- world-class speedster Willie Gault, 
explaining the Dolphins’ latc-sea- basics. We realized we had an who broke loose for a 75-yard TD 
son drfenkve slump. In its final opportunity Hke this once m a life- against Washington after taking a 
five p»*w* Minim ridded 137 time with Marino and Clayton and 10-yard toss from quarterback 
p fnriht Duper." Steve Fuller, or all-time NFL rush- 

Tbe defense recovered in a fine _ TaJd ^ opportunity to the ing lea<fer Walter Payton. 

*t.in In the. Super Bowl, though,. wiU require a Walsh is hoping the soft grass 


The 49ers are confident their de- 


WBSTERN CONFERENCE 
MMWMl DMNM 


s seventh fense can stop almost anything 
ere going Chicago throws at them — be it 
to defen- world-class speedster Willie Gault, 


five games, Miami yidded 137 
points. 

The defense recovered in a fine 
31-10 victory over Seattle in the 
divisional playoff Saturday, limit- 
ing the Seahawk running game — 
so effective a week before in a play- 
off victory over the Raiders — to 58 
yards. 

Now it is preparing for Sunday's 
American Conference champion- 
ship gam*» a gains t the Pittsburgh 
Steekxs. who have a more powerful 
&ptmd attack and a slick quarter- 
back, Mark Malone, who can 
freeze defenses. 

Could Miami’s defense have 
been lulled by an offense that was 
aide to score more than 500 points 
this season, that set league records 
for touchdowns and pasting yard- 
age? 

For despite the performances of 
Dan Manno and receivers Mark 
Clayton and Mark Duper, the de- 
fease was getting virtually as much 


Steve Fuller, or all-time NFL rush- 
rnity to the jug leader Walter Payton, 
ill require a Walsh is hoping the soft grass 


Super Bowl, though, will require a Walsh is hoping the soft grass 
more physical effort by (he defense turf of Candlestick Park can slow 
against the Steders, according to up Payton as it has the Los Angeles 
nose tackle Bob Baumhower. Rams' Eric Dickerson (only 98 

“Seattle used hands, they shield yards in 26 carries here), Tampa 
you," he said. “The Steders aren't Bay’s James Wilder (18 carries, 89 
position-blockers. They come at yards) and Washington's John Rig- 
you.” gins (just 12 yards on 10 carries). 

Baumhower is one of the several “Generally, we’ve dealt with top 
members of the Dolphin defense runners oo our field very well," 
whose names begin with B, which is Walsh says. “The great runnos 
why the unit has been called “Die generally do better on artificial 
Killer Bees" and the “Bee-fense.” turf." 


Denver 

19 

11 

594 

— 

Houston 

IV 

13 

594 

— 

□altos 

15 

16 

AB4 

3Vi 

Utah 

15 

18 

A55 

4VS 

San Antonio 

IS 

18 

ASS 

4to 

Kansas Cttv 

11 

19 

J67 

7 


Pacific Dhrisloo 



LA. Lokors 

22 

10 

498 

— 

Phoenix 

18 

15 

545 

4 Vi 

Parttand 

15 

18 

ASS 

7VS 

LA. Clippers 

14 

20 

An 

9 

Seattle 

14 

X 

An 

9 

Golden State 

10 

21 

323 

llta 


THURSDAY'S RESULTS 
WMMiplOP It M M 8— 93 

cumttud nan n-*n 

Frwt 9-I7M 21. Hinson *-M S-t IT s Williams 
10-34 3-5 34, Roland 54 9-13 19. RsbMads: 
waaMnohm47 < Dayo 91. CMwMtand 53 ( Hlraon 
101. Assists: Washington 25 (Roland 9). a eve- 
land 24 (Bagley 7). 

i_a. ettawers 19 » a* 23- tr 

MihMukM J»nn 33—in 

Moncriaf 8-1554 21, Cummings 8-21 4-5 30; 
Jonraon 8-19 5-7 21. Smith 8-16 4-4 20. Re* 
booads: Lot Anootes 59 (WOtton IlhMIlweu- 


JUUGT OKS auu UIC LUU. rt n n 1 . 

Amnng ihe other “Bees" are Hue- As for Gault, coruerback Wright UOllege MeSUitS 

backers Bob Brudzinski, Jay thinks he has the answer. “We face EA5T 

Brophy, Mark Brown and Charies guys like him every week,” Wright duomgim so. Masnoctwits a 
Bowser and defensive end Kim Bo- says. “Til play just like I did Last VIn ’ lnla 67 

hamper. week — in Ins face all day. If he lano lw . u> sort* n ’ 

For good measure, the Black- gets by me, well, then he’s a prob- Lamm. mn. 7 *. pairwah oiaunson «a 

wood Brothers, Lyle and Glenn, Ion — if Fuller can get him the J^fST^i5SS.“.Y. 44 

play at safety. ball." iwitMaitM-n m. Maim 71 

Rutoars 74. Rhode island 48 

— Temple 77. 51. Joieah’s 45 

“ ^ Uiksi 73, Vermont 40 

SPORTS BRIEFS 

■ Alcorn SI. B8. HL-aikaao 74 

— * Augusta SO. W. Carolina 85 

3 Worid Bests Set at U.S. Swim Meet 

FAYETTEVILLE. Arkansas (AP) - The University of Arlcan^ J^^ s ?^S^ T e «»54 
men’s 200-meter freestyle relay team set a world-best of 1 : 30.85 Thursday Mississippi st. n, Awa oma n 
at the US. Interaational swiming meet here. The Arkansas squad of 

Chris Cautwcll, Norman Wyatt, Larry Craft and James Pringle had bdd s. Fiwido m oroowyn cmi, «6 
the mark of 132J6 coming into the meet. sw toxos sl 44 , GromMing as 

Two other worid bests were set opening night at the 16-ua m meet E ast ,***, 5t . a 

German Dirk Richter’s 54.34 m the 100-tneter backstroke lowered the evansviiie so. Nebraska 73 
marit <rf54i5 set in 1981 by Beagt Baron of Sweden. The U.S. women’s g«wj vooov st wl Micnim Toeti to. 
7n0-meter freestyle relay team won in 1:43.50; the previous mark, “ 


fense was getting virtually as much 
playin g time as the offense, which 
- j.V-s’ . averaged 32 points a game in only 
_ - ■ jig?* 30 mnmtes 18 seconds c£ playing 

. • , time. The defense got tired. 

it? "fifty-four seconds on the field 
' ; *V- S «t" and the offense scores in four plays, 

and we have to go bade," Betters 
said. “It’s a highpowered offense, 
;..i '‘.Ctfif so we started playing a laid-back 
■ - _ - -ir- - "' game. Fm glad we finally pulled 

- ; pot of it.” 

Bettos is the quarterback-chaser 
• -- - y on a defense always known far bc- 

• ing tinfty, smart and tricky, if not 

; i' i 


■jv-'iiys 

^ 

. - i^-V 
* , 

L ' .If 


a ^ m .„tp r 

•• 

r r^t4 

- 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

3 Worid Bests Set at U.S. Swim Meet 


“Because we play in this heal, we 
were always conscious of our 
wei g h s keeping it down so that in 
the fourth quarter we wouldn't 
coine apart," he said. 

frt lhe past, die defensive philos- 
opher was Bill Arosparger, who left 
after last season to coadti at Louisi- 
ana State. IBs replacement. Chuck. 
Studfey, changed some ways of do- 
ing rimi y He wanted the players 
to attack more and force m istak es . 

“Amt was always coming up 
with new schemes.” Betters said, 
f ; lfand he’d show something each 


&. FJorido m Brooklyn Crtl. 46 
SW Texas SL 44. Grumbling 35 
MIDWEST 

DcPotH 76, St. AtorvS. ColHL 53 

Evansville 80. Nsbra rt ia 73 
Graid voUav SL 90, Michigan Tech Sl OT 

mv&er "freestyle rday team "won in 1:43 JO; the previous mark, 

1:53.45, was held by the Sl Petersburg, Florida, Swim Club. imm sl iu. Morgan st 67 

World bests are marks set in short-course (25-meter) pools. Worid w«<» n. t«u» southern 74 , ot 
records can only be set in 50-meter pools. MtaI«Sa S «.^iSS si ” 

- _ , a v MV, -m Ohio U. 73, Miami (Ohio) 62 

Bramble and Holmes to Defend Titles 

NEW YORK (AP) — Livingstone Bramble will defend his World rsl two* oiriaian 73 

Boxing Association lightweight title against former champion Ray Man- a 

^Feb. 16 in Reno. Nevada, it was announced late Thursday. Bramble SSfSSm £ st. * 
look Mancini's crown with a 14tb*round knockout last June 1. ToiotrAmnoton 67. nonun simmons 53 

And Larry Holmes will pm his International Boxing Federation TuSa 90 * tiwionB st^n^^ 
heavyweight title on the line March 15 in Las Vegas against U.S. Boxing Sl ^ s 

Association champion David Bey. Holmes is 46-0 lifetime with 33 Briahoni Young 42 . Tems-ei pa» aa 
knockouts. Bey, 27, is 144) with 1 1 knockouts; he won the USBA title by Sk'JSf S“ " 

defeating WBA champion Greg Page. cotoradD sl 69. Hawaii n 


f : rana nea snow suukuuuh B • - - 

Georgia Football Program Penalized 

iSSonil Collegiale Athletic Auoriatioii. 

ment on our hne, be more aggres- (rf illegal finandal assistance pven a Geotgia player in 1982 by 

-at A»actlv imfpwjfiad “outside representatives." the school's football scholarships 
StilL this sea^ has wjh be reduced to 23. from the normal 30, in 1985 and 1986. The penalty 

th^Sffeare 8Se5i*>- not lhe foolbaU leam ’ s tekvision M **»*'-&** m^mccs. 


Oklahoma SL 4& Arkansas 51- S6 
Oral Roberts 86. Kansas St. 71 
ToiatrArtinaton 67, Hardin SlmmarK 63 
Tuna 9Q, Indiana St- 71 

FAR WEST 
Boise Sl. 63. Graal Fails S 
Brigham Young 42. Texas- El Paso 60 
Chaminade 86 Host bias 76 
Citadot 93. Eraklne 61 
Colorado SL 69, Hawaii 58 
Fordhom 67, Long Beach 51. SS 
HawalhHUo 1UX Aloaka-Folitianks 84 
Idatw 5t. m, U X international S» 
Montana 72. E. Woshlnaton 59 
Now Monica SL 78. FuRerton Sl. 63 
Oregon SI. 59. UCLA 49 
Pemrdne BZ No. Arizona 65 
San Diego SL 6ft Wyoming 57 
San Jose SI. tX CoMtvIne 71 
Sa California 63, Oregon 59 
Utah 66. New MenJco 43 
Washlrwtan 78, Stanford 49 
Washington Si. 86. CalMomla 47 


kaa 56 tPmsey 121. Assists: Las Angeles 17 
(Nlwn 7], Milwaukee 29 (PrautV 111. 
Dallas 34 27 29 25-115 

Son AMonlo 28 27 31 30-116 

Oorvtn 18-31 7-6 33. MttdieH 12-19 85 27i 
Aoolrre 9-1* 4-7 22. Vincent 10-19 1-1 21. Ro- 
bonds: Danas 41 tvinemi 9). San Antonio 57 
(Banks and Moore, 101. Assists: Dallas 39 
(Davis id, San Antonia 30 (Moore 14). 
Seattle 24 IS 27 21— 89 

Portland 10 37 34 38-123 

Vandeweehe 11-1689 30. Pawn 7-1355 19, 
Ores lar 9-14 1-2 19; McCormick 8-11 45 3a 
Chambers 4-9 34 15 , Henderson 4-7 7-6 IX 
Rebounds: Seattle 47 (McCormick 9). Port- 
land S3 (Bawte9). Assists: Soattto 71 (Hemtor- 
son 4}. Portland 30 (Dnncler Ml. 

Indiana 17 39 20 31—172 

Semen State 23 21 23 29— 96 

Keitogg 15-16 V2 31, SIcMIng M0 2-2 19; 
Short 11-25 7-9 31 Whitehead 38 35 U. Re- 
bounds: Indiana 56 (Williams 11). Golden 
Slate 53 (Smith end Johnson, 18). Assists: 
Indiana M (SIcMIng 6). Golden Stoto 16 (Brat* 
5). 

World Cup Skiing 

MEN'S SLALOM 

(At Bod wiessee. West Germany) 

I. Mara Glrantelll, Luxembourg. 5446- 
5643—1:512) 

Z F tor lan Beck. West Gormanv. 5546- 
3006—1:53^4 

X 1 nuemor stemrwrlt. Sweden. 5441 -57 J6— 

t:53^7 

4 Paolo de ChNsa. Itrfy. 5430-5708— 

1^366 

5. Baton Krlza], Yugoslavia 5506-5806- 
1:5434 

6. Oswald Tatsch. Itatv. 550V5804-1 :5407 

7. Andreas wenzei. LiecMensteka 5568- 
5473 — 1 15401 

6 Michel Vton. France. 6575-59^9—1 ‘JSM 

9. Joel Gaspaz, Switzerland. 54095809— 
1^5.18 

10. Thomas Slangasslnaer, Austria. 5476- 
5649-1:5505 

11. Daniel Fontaine. Franco. 5491-5940— 
1:55.94. and Fraak WOradL West Germany, 
548649 JM — 1 :5594 

13 fUchard Promatton, Italy. S7J9-S49S— 
1:5404 and Cholkl IsMoka, Japan. 5446 
5936-1:5404 

ME NTS OVERALL STANDINGS 
1. GirardellL 120 paints 
1 Pirmin ZurtjrtMwn. Switzerland. 104 
1 Wenzel, 76 

4 Robert Ermcher. Italy. 44 
4 Max Julen, Switzerland. 40 
4 Martin HanoL S wilier land. 58 
7. Krlzal, S3 

6 Thomas Burgler. Swllzerland. S3 

9. Tatsch. 51 

10. Do ChkMO. <7 


WOMEN'S GIANT SLALOM ^ 

(At Marltw, Yugoslavia) T" “ 

1. MlcMta Flow. Swl Norland, 1:159*- ^ 

1:1707— 3: XM3 ^X, ln _ 

I Vreni Schneider. Swltzwtasd. 1:1596 

1' 1505— 2'3404 2™" 

3. Blanca Fei-nondez -Ochoa. Spain, 1;16Z6 R#furm 
1:1996-3:3508 

4 Marla Walllsor. SwHiertand, 1:16JH6 
1:1934—2:3503 OFFEN! 

5. Erika Hess. SwIUertand, 1:17.11- ( 

1:1940—2:3413 Fim Da 

4 Z« Haas. Swtthertand. 1:1456-1: 1995- Rushing 
7:3453 Passing 

7. Olga Charvatova Czoehostovcfcla Penoftv 
1 :17 JO-1 : 2099— 2:3799 YOt Gal 

4 Aula Lesfcowsek. Yugoslavkb 1:1792- Av0 Per 
1:3036— 2:3861 Rethtara 

9. Cindy Nelson, U.S- 1:1705-1:3063- Avg Per 
2:3648 Rushes 

ia Eva Twardabong. U.&. 1:1796-1:3193— Yards P 
2:3993 Passtna 

11. Irono Epp to. west Germany, 2:39.16 a« Per 
1£ Mlchoekt Gero, West Germany. 2:3951 posse* l 

II Monika Hass. Switzerland. 3:39^ Cemplet 
WOM£IT5 OVERALL STANDINGS pd Can 


Ilia, 70 
< Haas, 65 
£ Wollber. 61 

4 Chrtsteilo Gutgnordi France. 57 
7. Fiolnl end Schnefdar, 55 
9. Brigitte Oertll, SeilHsrlond, 54 
11 Micfteeto Gsra, Wtost Germany. 51 


NFL Playoffs 

TEAM COMPARISONS 
NFC CfmmH np rti lp 
OFFENSE ChL 

Go m e s (W-U 1M 

First Downs 397 

Rushing 144 

Passing 115 

Penally . M 

Yds Gained 5437 


A vo Per Game 
Rosttoia 
A vu Per Game 
Rushes 

Yards Per rush 
Pairi ng 
Ave Pw Game 
Pause AN. 
Completed 
Pel Completed 
Yards Gained 
Socked 
Yards Lost 
Had Intercept 
Yards Opp Ret 
Opp TDs an Int 
Pools 
Avg Yards 
Punt Romms 
Avo Return 
Ret tar TD 
Fumbles Bv 
Fumbles Lost 
Oop Fumbles 
Opp Far Lost 

Poet Time 

Touchdowns 

Rushing 

Passing 

Returns 

FC/FGA 


DEFENSE 
Pts Allowed 

Opp First Das 


339.8 397J 

raug nur 

*710 aW 

WSJ 1541 
675 514 

44 44 

1472 3961 

1545 24M 

290 496 

226 312 

57.9 4Z9 

2695 4679 

35 27 

223 178 

15 10 

241 155 

3 0 

65 62 

395 40l9 

43 45 

163 I1A 


DEFENSE 
Pts Allowed 
Om First Das 
Rushing 
Panina 
Penalty 

Opp YO Gained 
Avg Per Game 
Opp Rash 
Avg Per Game 
Rusties 

Yards Per Rush 
Opp Pass 
Avg Per Game 
Passes AIL 
Completed 

■Ewrik ■— » m 

rAJ LviilldOMI 

Tackled 

Yards Last 
IntarosPtod By 
Yards R e turned 
Rtf tor TD 
Opp Pent Rat 
Avg return 
Opp KO Ref 
Avg return 
Opp To u c h dow ns 
Rushing 
Passing 

Returns 


USFL Draft 


Cleveland's Roy Hinson, go- 
ing over Rick Mahorn fra- 2 
erf his 17 points Thinsday. 


Hockey 

NHL S tanding s 

WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick DlvisJaa 

W L T Pts GF GA 


307.3 3366 

1617 2155 

IDL1 1347 
454 458 

35 47 

3299 3245 

2042 2041 

515 551 

299 31D 

58.1 543 

47 42 

390 339 

31 24 

433 478 

4 2 

37 17 

95 41 

61 44 

21.9 207 

35 39 

12 16 

IV 22 


Washington 
PhDodeboMo 
NY Islanders 
Ptttsfauruh 
NY Ranoen 
New Jersey 

Montreal 

Buffalo 

Quebec 

Boston 


22 10 7 51 140 118 

22 11 5 49 160 1 14 

21 15 1 43 181 146 

15 17 4 34 129 154 

13 19 5 31 135 151 

12 21 4 28 T28 IS 

Adams DtvtHaa 

21 10 0 50 IM 177 

16 19 9 41 164 113 

17 16 6 40 155 148 

16 M 4 38 139 133 

14 18 4 32 119 IS 


22/28 25/35 

325 473 


Rusnina 

72 

Pam np 

122 

Penalty 

22 

oop Yds Gained 

3836 

Avg p«r Game 

2415 

Opp Rusk 

1377 

Avo Per Game 

86.1 

Rushes 

378 

Yards Per Rush 

14 

Opp Pass 

2484 

Avg Per Gams 

155.4 

Passes Alt. 

435 

Compleiad 

196 

Pet completed 

455 

Tackled 

72 

Yards Lost 

583 

Intercepted By 

21 

Yards Returned 

290 

Ret lor TD 

1 

Dae Punt Rot 

41 

Avg Return 

6.1 

Opp KO Ret 

48 

Aug Return 

214 

Opp Touchdowns 

>9 

Rushing 

10 

Passing 

14 

Returns 

5 

AFC enamptonihln 

OFFENSE 

Pit. 

Gama (W-U 

9-7 

Find Dawns 

302 

Rushing 

117 

Passing 

167 

Penalty 

18 

Yds Gainad 

5420 

Avg Per Game 

3366 

RidM 

2179 

Avg Per Gams 

136.2 

Rushes 

574 

Yards Ptr rurii 

3J 

POSSUM 

3241 

Avo Per Game 

202 5 

Passes Alt. 

443 

Completed 

240 

Pet Completed 

542 

Yards Gained 

3519 

Sacked 

35 

Yards Led 

*78 

Hod inter cent 

25 

Yards Opp Rtf 

371 


28 Too team-bv-team tetediwi* (n Thonday‘1 

13 unmd State* Football Leonov college draft 
30:26 (overall metochan autnbenla parentbsees): 

57 OPEN DRAFT 

21 ArtzMMt: (2) Tory Nixon, DB, San DleaoSL; 

22 (131 Ronnie Washington. LB, NE LouteJana; 

4 (15) Seem Thomas.DB.Tann Christian. Bam- 

6/34 more: (14) C3wT* Burfeott, WR, Jadcson St.: 
471 (21 ) wavne Davis. DB, Indiana SL; (301 Roger 

Caron, T, Harvard. Birrotnoboxn: (I) Jerry 
st Rice. WR, Mississippi Valley St.; (101 Kevin 
248 Alloa T, Indiana: (32) Tracy Mack. LB, Mb- 
ntn sourl.Oepy er : (4)Jol»nNevera.LB.FuUertwi 
10T St.: 123) Brad coup, WR, E. Control OJcUio- 
173 ma; (51) CaMnLovealLDa. Idaho. Hoastaa: 
28 141 RaMiel Cherry, QB. Hawaii; (9) Mart 

8178 Travnnwtcz.C Nebraska: (241 Andre Harris, 
rnj DB. Minnesota. Jacksonville: (19) IMIkePen- 
1795 dleton, DB, Indiana: (27) Mlko Hamby, DE, 
U22 Utah St.; (471 Mike Kelley. C Notre Dame. 
432 Lbs Angeles: (14) Steve SewelL WR. Oklahe- 
42 mo; (17) Jame s momp. WR, Texas Chris- 
338] Han: (38) Kevin Wthlanu. DB. Iowa St. 

211 J Memphis: 134) Henry Will ten*. WR. East 
544 Carouno; 154) Welter Stanley, WR. Mesa CW- 
298 lege: (40) Mke Prior. DB, HUnolS SL Now 
544 Jersey: (5) Jesse Penn, LB. Virginia Tech; 
51 (II) Lee Rousan. RO, Colorado; (26) Peter 
343 MuMoon. QB. Hotv Crass. Oakland: (7) Bob 
25 $tondi(er, OT, TenrL-Chottanaaaa; (25) Tima- 

345 fhv williams. DB, North Carolina A&T; (52) 
2 Reginald Lanohome. WR. Elbabeth City St. 
30 Orlando: (161 Lamas Bnwn.T, Florida; (33) 
4j George Adams. RB, Kentucky; (39) Andre 
78 ReeawR-Kuttown 51. Portland: 122) Daryi 
192 5mim,DB,N. Alabama.- (34) SMCV RaMfltOR. 
24 WR, N. Dakota Stj (37) RetMrtBrcmon.DE. 
>0 Arkansas. San Antonio: (3) Isdac Holt, DB, 

14 Alcorn St.: (24) Greg Greety.DB. NIctMlls St.: 

0 (96) Robert Lewis, RB, Texas Tech. Tempo 


CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 
Norris Division 

Chicago 18 17 3 37 153 Ml 

SL Louis 15 15 4 35 132 137 

Minnesota 13 19 4 32 134 151 

Detroit 13 21 5 31 14J 179 

Toronto 6 V 5 17 114 177 

Saiyttw Division 

Edmonton 25 8 4 54 188 122 

Calgary 21 15 3 45 192 154 

Winnipeg 19 IS 4 42 154 153 

LOS Anoetes 15 15 8 38 144 157 

Vancouver 9 24 5 21 124 218 

THURSDAY'S RESULTS 
Vancouver 3 1 3-4 

Now Jersey I 3 6—4 

Gradln 2 (17). Tontl (12). Gllils (2). Lomov 
nit. Smyl (ID.- MacLean (6). Muller (9), 
Gaanetlil. Larimer (2). Shots an goal: Van- 
awvar (on Reschl 14-9-7— JO; New Jersey (on 
Brodeur) 8-13-1*35. 

Detroit 1 1 8-2 

Hrattord 2 1 3—4 

Dlneen 2 (5). Fronds (12), Boutolte (4), 
Crawford 2 (12); Oerodnk* (34). Gore (10). 
Shots an pool: Detroit (on Milton) 13*4-24; 
HarHbrd (on Mlcatof) 11-16-15-44. 
Minnesota 2 3 3-6 

1 « Anoetes 2 1 6—3 

Acton 3 (11), /McCarthy 3 (13), Bellows (15). 
Povne (15); Nlcholb (23).Tytor(19). NIchoite 
124). Shot* an neat: Minnesota (an Janacyft. 
Eliot) t-e-9— 2S; Las Anoetos (an Meiansan) 
13-12-7—32. 

MUadeMa 1 6 2-3 

Catgary 12 1—4 

Eaves (7). Quinn (V). Sheehy ( 1). Loab (to) ; 
Tocchet (7>. Carson (13). Prapp (71). Skats aa 
gacd; Ptilladalphla (on Locnolln) 12-11-9—32: 
Catoary (on Lindberah) ID-17-13 — 3S. 
Montreal 8 1 1 *-4 

SL Load 2 8 8 6-2 

Nastund (24). Trambtav (to): Mutton (17). 
Federiia (IS). Shots an ooot: Montreal (on 
Lfut) 5-1-16-1—23; St. Lads (on Soetoert) 44- 
W-l— 25. 


Transition 


BASEBALL 
Nattoaed Leaouo 

NEW YORK— Signed Rusty Stoutx plnch- 


Bav: (8) Don Anderson, DB. Purdue; (12) nlttef - *■ 


Tennis 


CHALLENGE OF CHAMPIONS 
(At LA* VODOSi 
Second Round 

John McEnroe def. Jimmy Art®. 44. 64. M 
jimmy Connors del. John Krtafc. Gl* *■* 
Yannick Neoh del. Ivon Lendl. 74 P-5). 6-7 
15-71. 4-1. 


Opp TDs on Int 
Pouts 
Aw Yards 
Pent Returns 
Avg Return 
Ret lor TD 
PmnMes Bv 
Fumbles Los 
OPP Fumbles 
Opp Fum Lost 
Poes. Time 
Toechdowns 
Rushing 
Passing 
Returns 

FWFGA 

Petals Scored 


Mike Gam. DE. Notre Dome; (28) Com Ja- 
cobs. LB, Kentucky. 


m 387 TERRITORIAL DRAFT LIST 

17 115 Thetopsetectlooslotbe itSFLIlefTnoriai 

47 343 Bogotlottoo Brafl: 

18 29 ArissnaiDoug Alton, WR.ArizanaStJ Stove 

3Q «34 Boadwav, LB. Arizona; Lynnden Brown. DB, 

nas m t A i tuzna BatUnare: Caesar AMlwrL LA 

77 i9]8 Pittsburgh: Trey Benson, LB. Pmsburgh; 

i -mi Russoll carter, WR. Tempi I. Btontogbam: 

u 484 Ctovion Boaulord.WR, Auburn: Rob Bonnet. 

II te TE, W. Vlnrinta; Gregg Cart, LB, Auburn. 
Ml 501B Denver: Mark Alton. DB, Brigham Yeung; 
vu jui Marv Allen, LB, Briahoni Yauag; David 
M3 572 Burke. DB, Ne br aska. Hoastoe: Ron Ander- 

Mg 347 jon, LB, So. Methodist: Andrew CamobeiLG. 

542 442 Sa Methodist; Ray Childress, DT, Texas 

ne 5144 A&M. JadaaitvUle: Chip Andrews. P, Gear- 
35 is gia; Scott Bornotd.DE, Wisconsin; Peter BIb- 

08 128 zek, T. Georgio Tech. LOS Anoetos: Damon 

25 (• Aflon, QB, FUflarton SL; Paul Berner. OB. 

H 377 Pad He; Duane Blckatt, LB, USC. 

1 1 Mei apb ls: Richard Anderson, K, Wonder- 

78 51 blit; Danny Andrews, WR, UCLA; Dwight 

4U 4L7 Btotock. TE.Mocnoh[» st. Hew Jersey: Doug 

41 39 Fluito,OB. Boston Cottage; Gerald Aflen. LB. 

Uj (4 Svroeuse; Akwi Andrews. TE, Rutgers. Oak- 

I a toed: Kevin Bowman, WR, San Ja» St j Tom 

40 26 Briow. LB. Stanford; Bob Fresco. QB, Son 

15 18 Jose St. Orlando: Willie Broughton. DT, Ml- 

30 22 omLFtortao; Ed Bnwim.WR.Mioml, Florida: 

II 12 Dallas Cameron. DT, Miami. Florida. Port* 

1-33 30:18 had: Richard Byrd. DT, So. NUssiUtPPl; 
45 70 Ricky Chatman, LB. LowiSlonn St; Jetf Dale. 

13 18 DB, Louisiana St. San Antonio: Joel Barrett, 

25 ‘49 TE, Baylor; Nikita Blalr,LB,Texa&-EI POSOi 

7 3 Graao Bamcamn, DT, Bavtor. Tanga Bay; 

>32 9/19 Billy AltoaRB. Florida SU Allen. RB. Florida 

B7 513 SL; Jtotn Barite, DB. BettkwCookman. 


PHILADELPHIA— Stoned Greg Grew.oui- 
Holder. to a tnrao-vear contract. 

ST. LOUIS— Announced the restoration ot 
joe McDonald, vice pnaMent and general 
manager; ha will remain with the did) as a 
consultant. 

SAN DIEGO— Signed jerry Royster, bv- 
OeUer-outftolder, to o two-year contract. 

HOCKEY 

Hatkmal Hockey Loom 

EDMONTON— Assigned stem Smith, d»- 
ttnseman; Atone Hobsctwl 4 center, ondGord 
Shervsn, right wing, to Now Scotlo of tt» 
American Hockey League. 

HARTFORD PocnHed Ray Ferrara can- 
tor. from Btnohamtan of the AHL. 

n.y. islanders— R eturned Gerd Dtneen, 
dotoneemon, end Ren Handy, left Mna to 
Saringftota of Ihe AHl_ 

M.Y. RANGERS— Sent Dave GaaMr.an- 
tar.ond Chris Kontoe. toft wtng, to New Haven 
of me ahl. Rearitod Mario Pn»bc.guafiend- 
er, tram New Haven. 

QUEBEC- RNtattad Joan-More GauOn, 
right wing, and Mike Hough. Ieh wtng, from 
ihe AML. 

VANCOUVER— Rocaitod Brucs Hottownv, 
de f en se m en , tram Fradortcton ot the AHL. 

COLLEGE 

NORTHERN ARIZONA-Narttod Tom Jur- 
tch acting osslstont to the athletic director. 

OREGON ST ATE-Announced Dee An. 
draL athletic director, will leave that position 
February 1. homed Ed Sow«h assistant toot- 

ball coacn; ennouneed that Tim Hundley, de: 
tensive coordlnota r ; Craig BoHsr, defensive 
line coach, and Randy Wegner, Inside line-' 
backer coach, will be retained. 

SYRACUSE— Named Chester Gtadchuk Jr. 
associate athletic director. 






Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, SATURDAY-SU1NDAY, JANUARY 5-6, 1985 


ART BUCHWAI.n 

T he Sky’s the Limit 


TT/ASHlNGTON — The beau- 

W ty of the Star Wan defense 
system is that eveiyoqe can discuss 
it with authority, because no one, 
including the people in charge, has 
any idea of what it is. 

I realized this when 1 attended 
one of those Washington cocktail 
parties where the power elite gather 
to exchange gossip and informa- 
tion that only 


decision makers 
are privy to. 

“Is it true," I 
asked a source, 
who has one of 
the largest of- 
fices in the Pen- 
tagon, “that Star 
Wars will be- 
come a bargain- 
ing chip in the 
Soviet-Ameri- 
can arms talks?" 

“Nuis," he said defiantly. “If we 
ever decide what it is, we mil never 
give it up." 

“Isn't it easier to give souk thing 



up in arms talks that we don’t have, 

than 


i something that we do?' 

“Not if they have it, and we 
don't." 

□ 

“Do the Soviets have a Star Wars 

defense?” 

“They must have or they 
wouldn't want us to give up ours.” 

“Maybe they don’t have it, but 
hope well go ahead with it any- 
way,” I suggested. “Did it ever oc- 
cur to you that the reason the Sovi- 
ets are making such a big thing of it 
is because they want us to spend all 
of our money to develop it, so we 
won't have any left to mah» the 
weapons they don’t want us to 
build?" 

“Of course, it's occurred to us," 
he said. “But our answer to them is 


there's no price you can put on 
; figure it 


national security. Once we 

out, all our other weapons will be 
obsolete." 

“How can you say that when you 
have no idea what it is?” I 


Film Crosses $84 Million 

United Press International 

HOLLYWOOD — In the month 
since it was released, Eddie Mur- 
phy’s “Beverly Hills Cop" has 
grossed $84 million in the United 
States. The 1983 Christmas box- 
office leader, Clint Eastwood's 
“Sudden Impact," made a $40 mil- 
lion holiday gross. 


“We may not have any idea what 
it is, but we do know whin we want 
it to do — and that is blow up every 
Soviet missile before it hits its tar- 
get-” 

“That’s a tall order. Will Star 
Ware be able to do that?” 

“We may never know, but nei- 
ther will they. Once we install it in 
the sky no one will have the slight- 
est idea if it can do the job. But it 
will keep the other side guessing. 
And that's the best deterrent there 
is.” 

□ 

A man who has one of the largest 

offices in the White House joined 
our group. “The president wants 
Star Wars because he believes once 
we develop it we will no longer 
have to depend on mutual terror to 
avoid nuclear war.” 

“But the president says he 
doesn't know what Star Ware is 
either," I pointed ouL 
“He's not a scientist and doesn't 
claim to be one. But he believes in it 
more than anything he hac ever 
advocated. Besides, since he's pro- 
posed it be has to go ahead with it. 
or he would be sending another 
wrong message to the Soviets." 

An assistant secretary, who has 
one of the largest offices in the 
State Department, said, “Even if 
Star Wars doesn’t pan out the way 
we envision, it will still be worth the 
cost just to show our NATO allies 
that we have no intention of leaving 
them in the lurch. If nothing else, it 
will strengthen the West's commit- 
ment to repelling the Soviet mili- 
tary threat/" 

“Then our allies are for it?” 
“They are as long as it doesn’t 
cost than any money.” 

□ 

An assistant labor secretary said, 
“When you're talking about Star 
Wars, you’re talking about the hun- 
dreds of thousands of jobs it will 
provide for the next 20 years. It’s 
not just a dream, bnt a shot in the 
arm for every defense contractor in 
the natron.” 

“I take it then,” I said, “that 
everyone in the government is sold 
on it?" 

“They better be if they want to 
keep thor jobs in this administra- 
tion.” 

“Bui how much will it reallv 
cost?” 

The Pentagon man tittered, 
“When it comes to funding Star 
Ware, the sky’s the Limit." 


Leontyne Price Ends Her Opera Career 


PEOPLE 


N, 


By Mary Campbell 

The Associated Press 

EW YORK — The soprano 
_ Leontyne Price, the first 
black American singer to achieve 
superstar status in opera, bid 
farewell to her opera career with a 
glowing performance in “Aida." 
the role many critics consider her 
greatest. 

Her finale on Thursday, her 
193d performance at the Metro- 
politan Opera, came 24 years to 
the month after her debut there at 
the age of 33. 

Price, 57, acclaimed as one of 
the century’s leading Verdi sopra- 
nos, wifi continue to perform 
concerts and recitals, a practice 
followed by many opera singers, 
enabling them to cnoose songs 
best suited to their voices. 

It was Price's fourth perfor- 
mance this season in the title role 
of Verdi’s opera, the story of the 
daughter of the king of Ethiopia 
held captive in Egypt. The opera, 
directed by James Levine and 
featuring James McCracken, 
Fiorenza Cossotto, Simon Estes 
and John McCurdy, was televised 
in the United States by the Public 
Broadcasting Service. Tickets for 
the pecfoimance were sold out by 
mid-November. 

After Price's aria in Act HL 
“O, Patria Mia,” which begins, 
“Oh, my country, I shall never see 
you again,” the audience stopped 
the opera with a four-minute ova- 
tion. 

Though Price remained in 
character, her lips trembled and 
she bowed her bead. When she 
raised it, her eyes were glistening. 

Price had intended to an- 
nounce her retirement on televi- 
sion at a prerecorded intermis- 
sion interview. But newspaper 
stories appearing before the fust 
of the four Met “Aidas.” revealed 
that it would be her last opera 
role, and Price decided against 
the intermission announcemoit 
She will continue to give con- 
certs and has many bookings for 
the next three years. 

Among those in the audience 
were Pace's brother, Brigadier 
General George Baker Price, of 
Columbia, Maryland, and his 
wife, Geonpanna, and Peggy 
Chisholm of Laurel, Mississippi, 
Price's home town. Chisholm is a 
daughter of Mrs. Alexander Chis- 
holm and her late husband, the 
white couple who helped Price 







Diabetes Expert Honored 


Dr. Donald F. Steiner of the Uni- abama. was committed to a state 
versity of Chicago Medical Center, mental hospital in mid-December 
whose work on the body’s process- and is responding well to treat- 
ing of insulin have helped treat dia- menL Probate Judge Marion Brta- 
betes. has been named recipient erf sot said Thursday ne ordered Mrs. 
the Wolf Prize for Medicine, the Wallace seat to a mental hospital 


Israel-based Wolf Foundation an 
ntnmced in Tel Aviv. He will be 
awarded $100,000 by President 
Chaim Herzog in May. 

□ 


Dec. 14 at the request erf her moth- 
er, Ruby Folsom Austin, and her 
brother, Charles EBis Jr. Mrs. Wal- 
lace, a niece of former Gorennr 
James E. Folsom, married Wallace 
__ ___ __ ^ . in January 1971 and was with him 

Dr, Milton Ifrothers, husband of when he was shot in a LanreL 
the psychologist Joyce Brothers, Maryland, parking lot during the' 
Thursday denounced as untrue a 1972 presidential campajgnTwal- 
mag^ne interview in which 1 be was wag paralyzed from the waist 

quoied as saying that his wife of 35 down. The couple divorced m Jan- 
yearsgave abysmal advice to her uaiy 1978. 





own family. Brothers, a diabetes 
specialist at a veterans' Hospital in 
New York, said the interview in 
Family Weekly was a “hatchet job" 
and had upset his wife. “Nothing 
primed in the derogatory aspects or 
the interview remotely resembles 


D 


ifc 


Ms. magazine’s “Women of the 
Year” Hst ranges from the vice 
presidential candidate Genh&se 
Ferraro to the rock star Cynfi 
Lauper, and includes a 1 0-year-old 




Thomas Plate, editor of the maga- 
zine, said: There's not the slightest 
doubt in our minds that Dr. Milton 
Brothers said what he is quoted as 
saying.'' The interview, conducted 
by Ann Salisbury, a free-lance jour- 
nalist, quoted Brothers as saying of 
his wife, “For her, psychology is an 01 

expertly trained art, or science. But 
with her family, she's abysmal. She 
totally loses her objectivity." 

Brothers said he told Salisbury, 

“When it comes to the family, she 
does get emotionally involved and, 
at times, is less objective than she 
ought to be. I said nothing about 
‘abysmal' and there is no question 
the family follows her advice:" He 
added that their daughter, an optb- 
amologisi in Iowa and mother of 
two cmklren. has often benefited 
from his wife’s advice. 


Leontyne Price at her final opera performance; inset in “EraanT in 19601*” 


financially 10 get a musical edu- 
cation. 

Price studied at the JuiUiard 
School in New York and received 
her first critical notices in the role 
of Bess in a 1952 New York pro- 
duction of Gershwin’s "Porgy 
and Bess." She sang “Tosca" on 
NBC-TV in 1954 and made her 
debut with the San Francisco Op- 
era in 1 957 and the Vienna Slate 
Opera in 1958. 

When she first appeared at the 
Met. on Jan. 27, 1 961, as Leonora 
in Verdi's “II Trovatore," she re- 


ceived a 40-minute ovation, one 
of the longest in the house in the 
last 25 years. 

Price, who has lived in New 
York’s Greenwich Village for 30 
years, has appeared in operas by 
other composers, including Mo- 
zart, Puccini and Richard 
Strauss, but she always won her 
highest acclaim as a Verdi sopra- 
no. it was her “Aida" dial mwdfe 
her an international star, when 
she sang the role in leading Euro- 
pean opera houses in the 1960s 
and became a prot£g£e of the 


conductor Herbert von Karajan. 

She also created the role of 
Cleopatra in Samuel Barber’s 
“Antony and Cleopatra” for the 


opening performance in the new 
Metropolitan Opera House at 
Lincoln Center in 1966. She will 


Foreign workers have been invit- 
ed for the first time this year to the 
New Year reception of Queen Bea- 
trix of Holland. Tur kish and Mo- 
roccan workers, constituting the 
two largest single groups, are on the 


its award. Ferraro, who met with 
the others at a ceremony in New 
York Thursday, was died “for her 
steadfast courage, humor, and 
grace under pressure in represent- 
ing women and America’s majority 
views on eauahty." Gloria Stemem, 
said the awards were 
the feminist magazine's answer to 
Time's “Man of the Year.” Charity 
Grant, 10, was honored for refusing 
a “good reading award” from a 
male-only dub m Iowa “for the 
spunk, foresight and generosity to 
take a stand at age 10 , to 
better future for all of ns.” . 
others honored were Rc 
Moss Ranter, a sociologist and 
business consultant of Cambridge, 
Massachusetts, for demonstratin g 
that equality to workers can be 
good business, and Mary Sinclair, a 
'nuclear power expert of Midland, 
Michigan, for stopping a nudear 
jpower plant in mid-construction 
•after a 17-year fight. 

□ 

Larry Gafin, lead singer of the 
country music group the Gatlin 


.. . 







FiV>; 

i>£‘ 

IjJ - 
!-*%■ 


•Mr.. - 


■ . V j Z' \\ h ? , 'V ** 

• • I":** f. 

' ” ’ -7 ' sy.Tf 



guest list for the festivities Jan. 9, Brothers, disclosed tie is undergo- 
which will be held at Amsterdam's “*8 treatment for drug addiction at 

inic. “On 


next appear at the Met in recital, 
with James Levine as accompan- 
yist, on March 24. 


“I'm trying to exhibit good 
taste," she said of her farewell. “I 
prefer to leave standing up, like a 
well-mannered guest at a party.” 


Dam Palace, according to a royal 
spokes m an. He said between 5 and 
10 guest workers were invited to 
symbolize the approximately 
100,000 foreign workers livin g in 
the Netherlands. 

□ 

Cornelia Wallace, ex-wife of 
Governor George G Wallace of Al- 


MOVTNG 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


ALLIED 

VAN LINES INTI 


OVB 1.000 AGENTS 
fa U-5.A- - CANADA 
350 WOfllll-WDE 
fUS ESTIMATES 

PARIS DadMnfa InMfnaffand 

(01) 343 23 64 

FRANWURT 

(069) 350066 

MUNICH ijis. 

(089) 142346 

BREMEN 

(0421) 498161 

LONDON 

(01) 953 3636 

BRUSSaS: Zngfar sa. 

(02) 435 66 14 
CARO Affied Von law ton 

(20-2) 712901 

USA ABM Voi tins* ton Cap 
(0101) 312-681-8100 


SUBSCRIBE 
to tho 
INTERNATIONAL 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


a California dinic. “On Dec. 10, 
1984, I checked mysdf into the 
CareUnit of Orange, California, as 
a voluntary patient for the treat- 
ment of alcohol and drug addic- 
tion," he said. The group is to per- 
form at a presidential inauguration 
gala Jan. 19. A publicist said c-.. 
appearance will be the group’s first 
since Gatlin was hospitalized. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


HERALD 


TRIBUNE 

AND SAVE 


EXCEPTIONAL CANNES CKOtSETTE 
bwiutifirf opartnwrt 165 sqjn, 5 bed- 
rooms, 3 baths, doff roam, largo ter- 


race, umpaflabie seaview, cellar, ga- 
rage, justified price. S3, 4/ lx: 


Crooette, 06400 CANNES. Tab (93) 
38.19,19. 


As a new subscriber to the 
totemafiond Herdd Tribune, 
you con sow up to 42% 
at the newsstand price, ' 
an yore ooui#ry of i 


J UMQUE CAP tTANTlBS fabulous 
property, 4 ha seolront 600 sqjn. 
modem vBa receptions, fireplaces, 5 
wdroom, 5 brths. guest apartment, 


Fw deft* 
an ttis special introductory offer, 
write tos 


SB. 47 LoCrtwette, 06400 CAfiNES. 
Tet (93} 3819,19. 


IHI 

922ho NSfaSy^r^MR^ 
Or tel: farfi 747-07-29 


I COTE E7AZU8 near ST. TBOPEZ.ex- 
«nmd with private access to sea, 
located m Var, boautJd 1500 sqm 
plot of land, partly wooded. Terraced 
pre-den (werloakfag tea easting 
howe on Bterenowtfign potable. Tet 
Paris 6244027. 9 am / noon. 


W ASA AND paotc 

oortad our looot tfefnbutor on 


BAMXJL - COTE D'AZUR. Atoque 
famished apartment, best situofod wi- 
ki, on seashore, sphmid seaview. 
near center, adm. R,1 mfion. Tel 
Fnmce 94/*8445. 


INTERDEAN 


HenM Tribune 


WHO BSE FOR YOUR 
FELT MBNADONAL MOVE 


[ 1005 Tai Sang Cammerda! Bo3drig 
24-34 Henoeenr Rot 1 
HONGKONG 
Teb MC 5-286726 


GREECE 

POROS-tSLAPB mD VILLA restaod. 
IS) sqm fanwhod, garden, view. 
Liwrom LTV, BPA 3, K3MA. My. 


FOR A FRB ESTIMATE CA11 


AM51HSAM: 
ATHENSt 
MARCH ONAi 


Bsrnmk 

BRUSSBS: 

CADIZ: 

RAMCFURT: 

G8BVA: 

U 3 FBON: 

MADRID: 

MANdCSTO: 

MINCH: 

NAMES: 

PARIS: 

ROME: 

VBMA: 

ZURICH: 


0711 89.93 M 
[01)961.12.12 I 
03 [65 231 IT 
[02241 166062 
OT2 1)170591 
■j720.95.63 
956)863144 
06190)2001 
022)43.85.30 
01)961 .41 A1 
01 [671.24 SO 
061)7072016 
089)1415036 
081)7801622 


IONDOIL EMGLANDl Dine priwdefe 
aboard hataric scitiio chip to Groen- 
( wicn. Beservtfiom Tet 01 - 4» 7295. 


SHATHOS: Afchkect-broker, vflav 
land. C Mowhoios 0424414^7 


ITALY 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


EMPLOYMENT 


EMPLOYMENT 


SWITZERLAND 


SWITZERLAND 

H3RHGNSS CAN BUY: S1UDKV 


APARTMENTS, CHAUETS, VUAS. 


Prk» barn about SFlOOjXX). Recfan 
lake Geneva, Montana 8 famous 
Mountom resorts. We have for you a 
choice of vwy reasondbly 
Swbi homes but dso the very &est& 
me mast ewusve. KKXE YOU MAKE 
A DECISION contact: 

„ K SSJOtD SA. 

A OM0Q7 Laumne. 
Tet 21/25 26 11 Tefac 24298 SBO CH 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


VUAGE IN VAUOUSE. 2be*oom 

fe n %n. h S 5 5 n ’?„ rBrt ' 06W G0rdei - 
Td: (sffl 72 30 10 


HOLLAND 


Renthouse International 
020448751 (4 lines} 


Amsterdam, Bofestein 41 


BUSINESS 
OPPORTUNITIES 


PORTOFMO 

Itafimi Kvima Mopn g r u it 6^000 sqjn. 
reridenoe with upfairH view on harbor 
+ Ram* with 3 udacq, 6 bttfrooro. 


COMPUTER PORTRAITS 


al modern comfort 

D£ HAAS Real Estate 


He stixioL CM«rd het»’ 
fort Brochure avofabie 


T-SHIRT FOTOS 
NOW M RU COIOR 
analog busmen that can earn you 
$ 8000 - 110 , 000 / month. New and used 
stems from 518000 - 530 , 000 . Kama 
Co. ppt.J 5 Beefhavensfr 9 


Sdtotiwwea 33 , Wossenaar, Haloed. 
TeL 31 Rf 17^1 - 19239 “ 


i a 14408 


PORTUGAL 


I mlntecEiii I _ rranaun/nr. uerm 
| Teh 069-747800 The 412713 


Frantfjrt/W. Germany. 

12713 KEMA 


ream of royalty situated 

most demride area in ESTORU, Por- 
* 5 * 9 “^ HamneetCng some renovo- 
kon & pwnds cover 5000 sqjn. Of- 
fers comdered tram US$ 460 jOOO 


EWTCH HOUSING CENTRE 8V. 

. w**- Vdeninstr. 174 , 

Amsterdam. 020621234 or 62322. 


reiH BRUM MAKHAARDU 
faYl Housfaa Service-RenWi 
Amsterdam. Tel: 020 - 768022 . 


ITALY 


CONTOEX: Cosdutere to 300 rites 
worldwide - Air/Sea Cal Charie 
281 1881 Paris - Cars too 


BAGGAGE moved via Air/Sea USA/ 
Worldwide. btCCSS Bemoan Co. Lon- 
don 603 1266/7. WeeEen&474 4743 


HOW TO MAKE US$254000 
through mufafavel mdl order sofa. 
Tlw report wfl pye you mudi needed 


The report vrii give you much needed 
mfofiwAcn to firip you in this plan. It 
wSilmr you how you really an 


SEvo Carvdho No. 34 ( 7 fc 
1296 US 8 QA Codex. Portunat 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


the 


AMB 0 CANS MBNA 

Aswaotion far Americans — v 
abroad. Take toe hassle out of hon- 
<Bng your personal busmen in the 
Stale*. We connect you with finanod 
6 tax experts, rmlce it ecoy to get US 
products $ services a nd hefcwilh 
employment campaigns. Write far de- 

Srafc AAOCApOoji 124 , Colin- 
*Be, 5 - 62234 , USA. 


rt«*e a qureter nriScm dolors in j 

or 4 months. Order ties report 

Concise ftisneB Services. PO Bax 
8982, ScotfeWt AZ 85K2 USA ad 
enclose US$10 fir ihe equivalenr in 
cny convertth aerency). 


VHAMOURA-ALGAKVT Furnished 
uporlimnt with pool, near Cosmo, 

1 'Sedroam, bath. 

---iiici- utod Mr. Rrto, 

tot 9*023 - 932829 . 


SWITZERLAND 


[ BUY/SBX GOD BUUK3H crude; 
afc/funh I _prime banks caltolerat fi-l 

nandng l/WJP. Adc Colleen tor: 

grimes/ Aaa-Preiidenl LA Cafe 
r/LSA Tfa 181 349 AJSA/8561 ISA 
Rebeccn/Ziiridu Tbs 812981/B126S6 
WOFOi 


LAKE GB4EVA and 
MOUN TAIN RESORTS 

AfAfl Turn ilk 
G eneva. A 


ALCSHOUCS ANONYMOUS in 
Porisi 630965 . Geneva 
.Rome 39 48 91 


| ART CONSULTANT IN ISA 8 19* 
century Ens&h paMngs wfll execute 
bids, oo mm arions etc. 8 advise on 
purchases for privese or inves tm ent 
purposes. Bax < 9802. IJ1T, 63 Long 
Aon. London. WOE 9JH. 


Ai» awgfabfe n famous 

s-n '■“■'to: Wkxs. Vttrber Les 

DwNerefc. Chcteou DOex 



Companions 




DAKS 


LONDON 


DIAMONDS 


DIAMONDS 


toysm. Chdels swnSoNe. Ex 

■SFtnWRE- 

Av Mon R epps 24 , 1005 Lousonne. 
Switariond. Tet pit 22 35 1 Z 

^ TefaeSlBSfijSOL 

Cenmns Gotf and 
ConntiyCfcb - lovely toMtoms 
ovaflabto at attractive priaes. 


Your bed buy. 
fine damondi in miy price range 
at lowest whafaiae prices 
•fired from Antwerp 

lithe tfiamond world. 
Mflupromre 
For free pra 1 st write 

Joadn GaUmfafa 


Exclusive DAKS 

clothes and 
accessories for 
men and women 
available from 
DAKS stockists 
around the world. 


__ 1928 

■ — — B -2018 Antwerp 
rtoort of Antwerp Diamond industry 


DIAMONDS* 
ESTATE JEWERY 

Sp eoafaed m lar^naed 
and exceptond gems. 


In the chairing mounhan resort of 

LEYSIN: 
RBIDENCE LES FRBCS 

E splB ?5 fid ***** p* 10 * 0 - 

S 0 * 3 Q ran. from Montour an Ida 
Genera by car, 
yw an awe quoity nsadencas 

sir&rrs , fS‘ o " 1 

CTytromww far lesure and sports 
B°"i olt}- 

to*to at low 5 F. rates 
up to mlX nortaagec. 

_ Haase co nl od : 

■■H— fa s ftene s. 1854 Loyw 
SWIZB 1 AND 

Tet ( 025 ) 34 11 551 lu Mofes 2 dd 29 CH 


non DIAMONDS 
D 41 W Weitontodt 
W. Germany (XM 9 - 61 50-4652 


OFFICE SERVICES 


Y <^ SWBS BUSWES 

BASE D| LUGANO 


trowtoiitoVgitoiinBiration/ 




ifmsach' 


SUNNY 5WIIZBIIAND 

LAKE LUGANO 

Lrieride eparenMi in a beauhful pwk 
with swmxinQ, pool, own fencing 
*18«- f«t quafity equpmenr Oe Rre- 
pfetrefapjitonrtk^ buften btchens, 
m i&SSi fr° m **53 f 90O up to 
£1,121401 Hartgarp up to 6 K at 
few Merest rrire JSahs permits to 
knjgmt ap a vafebte. far farther 

_ Via G. Cotton 3 

OidPOO Uigono-Porotito 
Tet Svetaricwl 91 - 542913 . 

Tetex: 73612 HOME Oi 


Whan m Rome: 

PALAZZO Al VHABRO 
l^mry apartment house with famished 
Hris, awanable for 1 weefc end more 


EXECUTIVE 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


AUTO SHIPPING 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


SALES ENGINEER 

A Major US. fadntrid 


I AU PAIR IMMHXATE todwdud or 
frank iitferestod in an au par oppor- 
tunity. fim fa i with young dmm 


CAR MTO THE U-S-A. 


corporation a waking on autstondnq 
odunt to til a new pre- 


Hong Kong resdmtf w 
com enginuring and safes ponton. 

P°od, Pharmaceufad or beverage in- 

rfastry experience would be ’ * 

vrimble. Experience in drt__. „ 

Qsna burines 



2 AU PAMS: 1 German « Autoian, I 
Spanish or Hdfen. Core for & teach 2 
year old native language. Notvsrnofe 
or. need not speak Engfish. Send r»- 
swne to Donna Wienhous, PO Bar 58 


ma&ig prints and xi uino buaness 
«fc»rit£nieiit apfas. Fluenl m AAmdorin R 323<4 - 

& Enrisfr a reouk promt AU PAM DAUAS/FT. WORTH. 3 


I USJI 85 D jadd USS 1-50 far 
Pi_ Scfwmdt. IWflld l : 


-jr—. a requxpnwni. 

Pfeato apply m strict confidence with 
n* resume & udary expected, together 
with one recent phots to 


1 ST, P.O. Bax 99074 , Hong Kang 


hqmr children. 12 yetx oU & 2 ba- 
bies. Own room, non-smoier, dnws 
Sam 

ery f 

ROOM. BOARD + S 7 S/week in ex- 
d tony fa pq rt-iriiw cMdmre 8 Sght 


7000 Stuttgart I, West Germany 


EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE 


harefteepina Mich free tone to work 
out days. Weekend/ evre off. Long 
Wand, NY I 5 l£) 883-3539 Eves. 


WORLDWIDE Car shippnig < 
Emu 32 . : 


«* ATX, NV, Ankernu ! 


EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT 
4 1 CORMRATE CONOBtGfa 

NOW SOLE STAfF TO US/ 
OH EXECUTIVE 
IN ARAB GUf . B SBQNG 
USA OR OVBB^AS POSITION 

■ ExceBent adnrnpratnc/reseivch/ 
pfannfeg & inti conderge dab 
8 + yean recent <rarid-witfe 
experience 

• VersatiWdisoreei & setf-storter. 

• Qvafifind protective driving/ 
firearms/ first ad/secunry. 

• Age SO /born USA 

• Available 10 Feb. 

_ Contact: Robert Frederick 
Bwc 5494 , Ohahran, Saudi Arabia 


bfand, KlY 1516) 883-3S5P Eves. 

AU PAIR NY AREA. Oddoara far 2 - 


from NYC 5 dews. S&O/manh. P.O. 
BOX 852 , PeehtoL N.Y. 10 S 66 , USA 


AUTO CONVERSION 


AU PAflt-NAMNY. Engfeh speakinc, 
tars fcn^y.TWadS 


nan-smofasr, dodor's ... 

WoriwMon. PA 19034 USA. 


| HAVE YOUR BMW, h _ 

PORSCHL JAGUAR converted 
tUSSafetyr 


MATURE IADY NBEDD far fal time 
fiouieheepBig aid bobysitteig of one 


year old. Permcment position. USA 
Write Bax 


,‘ar **"' 


92521 Neuifly Ceoxx, Fronre 


AU PAIR MAMiATTAN. Cyme old 
boy, own room + bath. Bfaui Jan. 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


30 . Rmjy with jAoto/teL tSas 444 
CPWTNYC 10025 . Tel; 2124634127 . 


DOT/B>A CONVBBfONS 

S 3 . Acceptance guaranlc 
O, 6200 Freeport Cent! 


Phone: 6794325 , 6793450 . 
Write Via del Velabro 16 , 
00186 Rome. 


ROME 
RKffiamAl AREA 


U «riy ap artments by day, by week or 
by moalh. Direct phone. Autonomous 


heating. Bar. Reriourare. Garage. 
24 hour service. 

8 S 8 JB 4 CECOBTWA D’AMPEZZO 
P«) 3387012 - 3387015 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


74 CHAMP5-ELYSEES 8th 

Slwfia 2 or 3 -room apartment. 
One month or more. 

I£ OARDGE 359 67 97 . 


RffERNATiqNAl EMPLOY MBIT. 
•rateMionab techririoB. there is al- 
ways a need far people in overseen 
proteasl We can contact 4000 Ameri- 


eai oompaaes operating on projects; 
wuldwide + 1%000 firms m 133 j 


enuntria. far free "irriarrotton write 
ta Iml CprjEw Gveriants. 2730 San 


MOWHrS HBPH l Private room, 
bath. 2 anti gxk Write xidudmg 
* nwnbtf, photo: Wanormor 

■ Z 3 I St. feivadafe, N.Y. 1 Q 463 , 
AU PAM far newborn. I 

to Mr. & 

Verixl 3924 S. An. Tempo. AZ 
85282 USA 


lix 49956 B?. 
Bekyum the 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


recruiter 
Excellent opportunity far nfividud o* 
argornaiion fa recruit far mednd & 


IMMEDIATE HSS-AU PAM 
sufeirb NYC family + 2 dStOen 
Write Bum 9 Country CU) La* Mm- 
sey. NY 10952 USA 


veterinary schools. Exclusive represen- j 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 


totom m yaw country. Send resume to: I 
Unrremty . 460 


Rou Urxverety 4&0 West 34 St.'’ 
New York NY 10001 . 


ALWAYS AVAILABLE - AU PAHS, 
US&3 


B 4 GUSH SPEAUNG SA 1 ES GfRl| 
W nte with refiawioe & photo I 
rf pasubie to Oeutsdi, I Bd du Mcvx- ( 
pornasse. 75 M 6 Paris 


dvkfren's nanny, mum's helpers & u* 
brandies of 1 st ctes Sve-m domesric 
help worldwide- Cci Soane Bureau, 
London 730 8122/5142 04 hotird U- 
CEMPAGY.Tbe 895 Qg^OAfig G. 


far /MMS 2 MTE delivery 
„ BEST S 8 JV 1 CE 
far rieppang, incunmca, bond, 
■nrendon m UJJL 

RUTE INC. 

Tounussfr. 52, 6000 FnaoJrfurt. 


SHORT TBM in Lntm Quarter 
No agents. Tet 329 38 81 


1 57 H NEAR S 8 F£ 2 -rqaru, large Sv- 
mg, bedroom. Coafert Teh 70 fe 4317 . 


15 fc SHORT 


rtC*T TTBM, bedroom, both, 
i. ri axnfarh, single. 828 - 52 19 . 


SPAIN 


MAUflKA, SPAfN-SEGANT 4 - 

bedroom prowndol v 4 a with rad, 
lwc ? n 9 - SP yfi!i °f' n a. torrooa,sun 
5 nsnutes toYacht 
Pub. 44-27981460 UX 


SWITZERLAND 


MBRCALTraretaw seeks enthusiastic I 
‘■roAeif, sdertofic 4 transfetmg expe- 
nenoe. US oA Kraus 23305 09 Paris 


GENERAL 
POSITIONS WANTED 


EXGEUBfT COOK, chauffiwr, 38, 
tree now, good presentation, refer- 
ences, scab pavtibn in privote home, 
TehJP4)738i7for vra£ GffiGOIRE 
GUY, La Limoucme, B3343 La Thor- 
onef, France. 


FROM STOCK 
Mercedm 500 SB, new. blwtiack 
Me (cedes 500 SE. new bkiebtxi 


Mm cedes 500 SC new, dark Hue 
Mercedes SOO^/SB/SK; nevT 


others 


SOPIRSTICATaJ FRB4CH model 27, 
hftngraL Free to travel. Loofe for 


r. 3 3 , set 

mj. r fiamy imaioitvuL riBR Trout jgn- 

xy.Box 4 C “■ 


seeks respon eU a 


uory. Box 4 qW^LKT, 63 Long Acre, 


London. WC 2 E 9 JH. 


, and — 

Ccdiflac, Ferrari, 

Laid Raver, Pot 

orar leadng mdsei 
Same day regetr a ti on pmibfe. 

KZKOVrTS 


brahigho.; 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


an 'Au Pair in lBAlf posJhfe fe 


WtH S g ft ^ O **07 Zurich 
Tel: 01/202 76 ll Telex: 815911 


SPEAKWOL needs e 
teachen far South 

Ewjr- Tdi ^ 3302 


JAFWARY . 1 2 KM. from Gskwf Jaa 
I. fe c#v*rt 3 bedrooms. 
Fantastic tow Alps. TA 030 / 5143 ?. 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 

NEUR1Y (92) OK 17Hd. 2/3 rooms ■ 
£-35 Moxmitn RJJQO dopes 
m^nfed tar EngEsh executive in 
raica 12-18 months. Serious rtfer- 

ty parking. T* [ 2 ^ 39 76 17 . 


EMPLOYMENT 


^^orawm^rosmoNs 

fOOK INQ. 

“fNTEBIAIlONAL FOSmONET 
PAGE 5 


EXECUTIVE 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


EXBOJlTOFRBICH/aiGUSHsecre- 
wy 35, good presentation, me 

a9 feyek, seeks fan / part-time Pons 
92521 NeuiBy Cejex. firmce. 


trawl, sects pagtose m intenanond 

oomDanv. Tel 326 33 90 Paris. 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

PHEMOBTr OF.raM CO. desires five 
m + donshc secretary fa cknfex 
pnNhouie looried m tA, c31 
yews oriege etkxadan preferred. 
Pfepcwd to work 6 months or more. 
Swd photos + resume. FuS sponsor- 

stfdssasagljjj 


LA. Norvsnofcer. Anna Bashit, tefc 3 - 
776436 , 10 Tarod 5 t, Rang Gat, 

■taod 7 WL I 

suburb of OWUSHNAWIT 34 , trained &«xpe- 
1 nenced. Re f tt u ces owdable, seeks 
position now. Tet Eaton Bur ecu 730 
956 A. tic. UK Gi tabynwid Agency. 
ENGLISH BUTia/OIAUFTHJR “ 


TRANSCO 

TAX FREE CARS 


US dtgj euelatf referen ces . Free 


-v Bwwu 73 M 566 , 
l^Kkto.EifabtmiBnt Agency, U& UK. 
ALWAYS AVMABU UJNDON only 
& f* dflB daSy nods. 
Cri Sfem Bureau, fandon 730 
8132/5141 UCEMP.AGY. 


r- wwre-H Ui HUE I 

on« hwdrid brand n>w cars^ 

- . ®mpoMi»eljr priced. 

Send frsr free a*o&tie & stock fat. 
Troreoo SA. 95 




Z DAWAJI TRADE 
J/i INTL DEUVKY 

tips. We kap a ferae stack of 

an- man ore brand: 

ures Tel: U 2 /MB 55 13 

(he Telex 6565 S 

to 42 rue lens, 

5 , or 1050 Brussels. 

send 

HiROPORTTAX 
1 . raSCARS 

H Cafl or write far free asdog. 

jn Bax 12011 

rtK Rotterdam Airport, Holid 

— TeLmff 623077 

WV- Telex 25071 ffCAB NL 

535 ' | 

HMOffi 6 USA SPECS. 

31 Afl moke* far wwldwKte defivrey from 
44 stock. Send for a TAX-FREE catalog. 
BMW - MERCSS - POKSCW: 

— VW - SAAB - VOLVO - PEUGEOT 

— HJROrt AUTO BSOKSLS 

E 5 . POB 214. 3430 A 8 fifieuweaefa Hoifarid 
to Tel: | 0 ) 3402 - 41346 . Thu 76 D 68 EAB NL 
rds 

dy 

X RG TEAM 

se Offers tw free con at few prices. Al 
w Jypejcnew& used. Fasidefiv- 

» ery. PO Bbx 2050 . 4 B 00 CB. B 8 H 3 A / 
•d: Holcmd. Tel R 76147961 T 1 » 742 B 2 

c EXPERIENCED CAR TRADERS far 
OA ^“dos, BMW. Porsche, oflex ful 
fa- service imparl / export US DOT & 
j. EPA for tourist & deafer. Oceanwide 
7 f Wto*. Tersteeganstr. 8 . 4 Duessel- 
1 ■ 



LEGAL SERVICES ac 

US IMMIGRATRM vbcb, Aftys. Spiaj Q 
& Rodney 1925 Brkkel Av, Mare R. k> 
33129 . let 13051 6439600 . tx 441469 . S. 

FOR SALE & WANTED im 

PAWHNGS BY RENEE PERIL Pur- ™ 

a 2 S 3 » PSfSP Pfefe. S 

Jf model at DoeOei oral 1930 , aka me 

- "*««tod to Imowcflfenee Pfafe ^ 

"tog *> Franca. Please airmcxl Wor- 
mtftan / photos to- Early Silver . P.O. =: 

Woferbeds = 

d Tel: ai/ao 38 65 - 6 ^ 25 526 ^ 

- 

BOOKS — 


STAMPS & COINS ? 

TOHCAL STAMP catalogs W SdW- 
xfe AG. 0+8832 WbBerau, S*™** 

EDUCATION 


Ploee Your dassifiod Ad Qukkty and Easly 
In the 

INTERNATIONAL HBtAIDT&lBUNE 


By Phone: Cal your fecal HT repreMrtalive with your text. You 
vrill be informed of Ihe cost ximecfiaMy, and once prepayment is 
made yaw ad wiB appear within 48 hours. 

Cash The basic rate isJ9J0 per inepw day -Mood taxes. There are 
25 fetters, p|p« and spares fa the first fine and 36 in the foSowing film 
Minimum spaae s 2 Enek No cfabraviafiore accepted. 

Oerit Cards: American Express, Diner's dub, Euroasrd, Masier 
Cud, Access and Visa 


HUD OfFICE 


LATIN AMERICA 


Peefes (For classified adyj; 
747 - 4600 . 


EUROPE 


260615 . 
Athens: 361 - 8397 / 360 - 242 ), 
Brussels: 343 - 1899 . 
Cnp enha o e rv ( 01 ) 329440 . 
fared*!* ( 069 ) 72 - 67 - 55 . 
lousemnm 29 - 58 - 94 . 

Uriban: 67 - 27 - 93 / 662544 , 
Loodwi! ( 01 ) 8364802 . 
Madrid: 455-2891 / 4563306 . 
MRrew P 2 J 7531445 . 
Norway: p 3 ) 845545 . 
Rpumb 679 - 3437 . 

Tel Aviv: 03-155 559 . 
Vienna: Conrad Frankfurt. 


Bogota: 212-9608 
Bn mi ps Aires: 41 40 31 
Pop!. 312 ) 

CavsnxK 331454 
Gvayaqua: 431 943/431 
Imre 417 852 
Panama: 664372 
Sai Jose: 22-1055 
Sreitiago: 69 61 555 
Soofasslo: 852 1893 


AU 9 DLS EAST 




i : I’/-, i *j 


s 693592 . 

_ : 25214 . 
Kvwrit: 5614485 . 
(hdre: 416535 . 

Sand Anritia: 
■faddriu 667 - 1500 . 
Damnran.- 834 - 3466 . 
UAL- Dobed 224161 . 


MB EAST 


WHIP STATES 


Bretgkofa 390 - 9657 . 
Hong Kong: 5420905 
Mariks 817 07 49 . 
Sere* 725 87 73 . 
Singapore: 222 - 2725 . 
Tcdwrae 752 44 25 / 9 . 
Tokyo: 504-1925 


AUSTRALIA 


Now York: (212) 753-3890. 


Sjrdnoy:929 56 39. 
Melbourne: 


690 8235 


EDUCATION 


PENPALS 


NTT YOUNG IADY GLIDES 
, Jure' * 

[PARIS 


D -1000 Berfin 1 


P-O Bax 11 


Direct Ser- 


52701 93 PA TOWG IADY 
whynri cammuni culB with me in 3 
tonguogm even tf I have to travel? 


SERVICES 


wri 


UNUMI 1 H} BMC 
U-SA. A WOUBWB 3 E 


to o unfere 1 crisaon of 
L / "gg fe* mMngigl 
refividuds far: 


PO BoxTWk. Bev^rty Hifc CA __ 

AU PAIR IMMEDIATE portion ma- 
ture yauna I adv. Core frv 3 mum 
dddren 


ENOJSH NAIMSS & Mothers Hefee 


free now. Nash Agency, 53 Qturrh 
good. How. Uiemj 5 M 2 W 44 ^ 


Rais 

Jdy l 


, Cerakhe CooveHfcfe, 
1200 km, whife/inogiola. 


yauna lady. Cbrafar 3 raiiim 

ran ( 4 , 3 + 2 moNhs) + |J YOUNG IADY seda hautnrarit, baby 


Twbfc Od. 1984,1 
1 - 2D0 bn » *fefe/pndimont. 


UNWRSITY 

BRADFORD 




Social CongnmoneTour guides, etc, 


_ mmmeka-. 

- , Sind refarenew 

+ pfatelm Ms RC Sham 621 S. 
Bristol LA, Arfng ro n NefehaTu 6000 S. 


MA. M PEACE S1UDC& 

I M arch 1984 , qre invited from suitably 

4 MXJ bn. darn/mognafia p^sd red. te»Hfed cmfidetos for thk aw yarn 


2]W65-7793 
212 - 7 U -7794 
BOW: fifth Sf H N.Y.C 10019 
MrvtOB 


AU-PAK 


FOR NEWBORN. Ugh: 
nwnnofeng, sonent- 
, ppm & bored. Sort 
!■ «wf fcfitor, references & 
Srtufe 1 * to ?r- frfarww Girev 
^iM&M.a.htowOrteare.IA 


AUTO RENTALS 

AU5TBA C EAST EUROPE USJ1500 
per day. AutahcMO, franurijnied- 
«wr. B, A -1020 Vienna TeL 241694 . 


SERVICES 


YOUNG LADY 

PA/ Interpreter A Tourism Guide 

PANS 562 0587 


educated, for day. Jain & Travel 

& A0VORT5 Tab 527 90 95. 


YOUNG MUURMGUA1 LADY 

PARIS: 525 81 01 


[YOLMGGEMAAN LADIES - MjMfe- 
fESSSP. spy™ to Europe. 
322/734 38 66 


|DO YOU NSDA raENOt-84GUSH- 


PADS DUCATS, VIP sophahretod 
JtoWto fadyeenBomen, far doy x, dn- 
nem SevreengL Can trgveL 2770169 . 


L OHD OK. Young Germrei/french eff- 
PARS NOTE IMS PHONE AT ONCE 

757 62 48. Trustful VJi>. lexfe. M 
ootnponiaiL 


/: = 




PAGE 5 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


aMy. Telj 


AUTO SHIPPING 


AU PAR, TOTAL CARE of infant for . 
yrodagB preres. Haucekeepfeg, oaole- 
mg. Engfidi speaking, nanrenakre. 

assshfits 

Wbadfend fft.CA 91367. U5A 


SWING CABS W 08 UWDE 


Thnt,,, . a yropeMimej. iriesyMtu 

^ °renecf by Ihre peace Eaary aid research, 

™»«eegor has reafeamenls and ownanert, peacemaking 

"n order. Ittw are awiUile mimed- nrewkifenl mewemenb, sadd » 

93 - 25 63 91. femahviM, H*d World dmelepnwtf, 
gM=eduoalioii & conflict fa Northern 

1>W Sdwol of Poore ^udfej is the only 
.jtopadma'4 m the Urued 
KintHio ew ton: derfa ncckoively nfth 
I pnoc e and i ll related SIMS. 
Appfctfwns Froni those wahma to por- 
I sue a protram of reseordi wff iAa be 


’ Merced«* and Poracfw Cara 


WANTS. Ft. Louder- 
^ onda. core far . house & 2i 

- J* ,2 - Dnww bento I 
a !**■ Wn»* M«. 
S^^^Wia^Ptantotwn, 
n. USA 33322 or aal (305) 472620. 


CALL MATTNA AT 
ANTWERP 20 (fees ( 3 ) 234 36 U 


SHIP YOUC CM TO 6 ROM USA 
VIA ANTWBLP AND SAVE Free ho- 

toL Remfar sckfingh Airport dekvery. 

Kribbettrool 2, Antwerp 

Belgium. Teh 231 42 39. ifa 71469, 


TAX FRB CARS 
P.CT. 

Ire gerf fl ieyraom ^ Inventory 
Al wetas, d modak, brand new 

Tbc 35546 PHCACT B 
far SHL *d«f eokfague 
USS5 cosh 


CO-IMPOKT/EXPORT 

World Wide Tax-Free Cars From Eorapo 
Fran BiOan 


200 Sp W C ars in Stotk - toimadiato Drtvrey. 

Two Hare Sfeowroaai - Urriqua In Eurap*. c 

i 


further infa niBiion and tq ^fi o a i to rt 
wm Tram; 


280 

PPM 




350SE/L, 



Imprime par Offprint, 73 rue de 1‘EvangOe, 75018 Paris. 


Stock: Mercedes, BMW, ASa 


luiTS.r 00 ,/ out. or not. 190D, 

280 SE 3, 5 L, ifo \ 3,'ote. 

^ ^ Qroctett Afiareades an/ Porsche ami spedofisto, fre 






BMW 

HD 7 TOP, Unfed Kfegdafe. 


Telex: 39,376 (Hbaml 

"hmw 01 1/27.23.44 * 27.23.91 - 27.24^6 - 27.26.32. - 


& -r-