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The Globa] Newspaper 

Edited in Paris 
Printed Simultaneously 
in Paris. London. Zurich. 
Hong Kong. Sj^^poV, 

The Hague andM^^il e 


Heralit 


INTERNATIONAL 




J ° rd *n 


WEATHER DATA, 


No. 31,688 


"Page is 


Published With The New Yo rk Times and The Washington Post 

~ ZURICH, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 1985 


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Shultz, Gromyko Arrive for Talks 


Foreign Minister Andrei A. Gromyko, making a rare speech in En glish on Iris arrival 
Sunday in Geneva, promised to seek mutually acceptable accords to prevent a space arms 
race. With him was Anatoli F. Dobrynin, the Soviet Union's ambassador to Washington. 

Jordan, Citing U.S.-Israel Ties, to Buy 
An Air Defense System Made by Soviet 


Soviet Study Sunos 
Deep Differences 
With Washington 

By Dusko Doder 
and Don Oberdorfer 

Wtahmgtan Past Service 

GENEVA — A Soviet study 
charged on the eve of new U-S.-So- 
viet talks that President Ronald 
Reagan's space-based defense plan 
is a dangerous and costly ‘'decep- 
tion" that could increase toe 
chances of nuclear war. 

The 42-page repon by a presti- 
gious panel is the roost complete 

Stalemates from the past and 
President Reagan's space de- 
fense plan arc the backdrop for 
this week's U.S.-Soviet arms 
talks in Geneva. Pages 4, 5. 

account of the Soviet attitude to- 
ward Mr. Reagan's Strategic De- 
fense Initiative known to have 
reached the West- A copy of the 
report was obtained by The Wash- 
ington Post. 

Taken together with U.S. state- 
ments. including one by Mr. Rea- 
gan last week, the report drama- 



■ SbuM ? speaWng Sond^ on antral in Geneva, securily adviser. Assistant Secretary ol State Richard R. 

WidiTnni were, from left, Robert C McFarfane, national Bnrt, and Paul H. Nitre, special adviser on arms issues. 

in the talks beginning between Sec- — — - 

retaiy of State George P. Shultz 

neva on Sunday. Senate Republicans to Offer Deficit Plan 

The document concedes that 1 «f«r v 

parts of a space-based anti-ballistic- By Jonathan Fuerbringer "We're determined to bring Mr. Dole also said that the Sen- ty recipients is opposed by th 
missile system, which it refers to as New York Tima Service down the deficit, ” said the Senate ate package mil probably have to White House ana many Demc 

SPAMS, ma y be feasible but at WASHINGTON — senate Re- majority leader, Robert J. Dole of indude major savings in military crats. Such cuts would Hkdy t 

enormous cost, which it estimates publicans have decided to write Kansas, after a three-hour meeting programs and a freeze in the cost- part of a program to reach tl 

at $1.5 trillion to S2 trillion. their own package of legislation to of senators and administration of-hving increase for Social Securi- SlOO-biHion goal, Mr. Dole said. 

Bui it maintains that any hoped- reduce the federal budget deficit, in leaders on Friday. "We are not ty, two proposals the president has Based on a new administratio 

fa increase in U.S. security would an extraordinary move that could even pleased withthe a dimnis tra- opposed. Getting toSlOObillkmin budget analysis, it would take $5 


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By Charles P. Wallace 

i‘4 Lo s Angeles Tima Service 

BEIRUT — Jordan, one of the 
doses! U.S. allies in die Arab 
world, has announced that it plans 
to deploy a Soviet-supplied arr de- 
fense system early this year. 

The announcement was made by 
the Jor dan ian Army commander. 
General Sherif 7 j» id Bin Shaker, 
rfnring a speech to militar y officers 
in Amman on Saturday mghL 

General Shaker aim announced 
that Jordan, which formerly de- 
pended primarily on Lf^. mmtaiy 
■ equipment was^ ^negotiating other 
' arms purchases from Emopeaxt' 
countries.. 

“Jordan is kxridng to coodude 
more tteals with Britain and France 
in order to support our forces and 
strengthen its military structure de- 
spite our limited resources," Gen- 
eral Shaker said, according to an 
Associated Press dispatch from 
Amman. 

The Soviet air defense system 
ff purchased by Jordan is believed to 
v ° consist primarily of surface-to-air 
missiles and radar to control them. 


The size of the purchase was not 
disclosed. 

Initially , the Reagan administra- 
tion had proposed selling Stinger 
anti-aircraft missiles to Jordan. But 
King Hussein of Jordan rqccted 
the offer last March when the plan 
encountered resistance in the U.S. 
Congress from supporters of Israel. 

King Hussein has since ex- 
plained that he was mining in the 
Soviet Union and WestonEnrope 
as arms suppliers because the Ui 
relationship with Israel had tilted 
the United States away from an . 
even-handed approach to the Mid- 
dle East • 

“We have turned to (tiverafying 
sources for opr weapons after cer- 
tain difficulties with the United 
States," Hussein «rid in an inter- 
view published in October. “We 
bring weapons to defend ourselves 
against the danger rtf some minis- 
ters in the present Israeli govern- 
ment who claim that the Jordanian 
east side is also part of IsraeL" 

He was referring to the East 
Banlr of the Jordan River. The Jor- 
danian portion of the West Bank rtf 
the river has been occupied by Isra- 


el since the 1967 Middle East war. 

Jordan was believed to have 
turned to the Soviet Union for anti- 
aircraft missiles largely because the 
Russians offered easy credit toms, 
according to UiL officials . 

Jordan's economy has been hard 
hit by dwrfining support payments 
from Arab oil producers and lower 
remittances from Jordanians work- 
ing abroad. 

Another pro-Western Arab 
country, Kuwait, bought a Soviet 
air-defense system last year after 
the Reagan administration's plan 
to supply Stinger missiles became 
stalled in Congress. The transac- 
tion reportedly had a value of $325 
million. 

The Soviet Union also is the pri- 
mary arms supplier to Syria, which 
is Jordan’s area rival. 

The Damascus government has 
received hundreds of millions rtf 
dollars in missies and sophisticat- 
ed tanks from Moscow m recent 
years, and reportedly negotiated an 
extension on its debt to the Soviet 
Union late last year. 


Senate Republicans to Offer Deficit Plan 


By Jonathan Fuerbringer 

New York Tima Servi ce 


"We're determined to bring Mr. Dole also said that the Sen- 
down the ddiat," said the Senate ate parVajy* will pro babl y have to 


ty recipients is opposed by the 
White House ana many Demo- 


WASHINGTON — senate Re- mqority leader, Robert J. Dole of include major savings in military crats. Such cuts would Hkely be 
publicans have decided to write Ka n sas, after a three-hour meeting programs and a freeze in the cost- port of a program to reach the 
their own narlap^ of legislation to °f senators and administration of-hving increase for Social Securi- 5100-biDion goal, Mr. Dole said. 

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for increase in U.S. security would 


be illusory. It said that “die very put the Senate, rather the tioa’s $140 telhon in *88. We’d like l 
attempt to create” such a system White House; in the lead on fiscal 10 8° lower. 1 " 
would be “a heavily destabilizing policy. was Mr 


two proposals the president has Based on a new administration 
>osed. Getting to $100 billion in budget analysis, it would take $54 
8, Mr. Dote said after the meet- bQlion of spending cuts in the 1986 


would be w a heavily destabilizing policy, 
factor" and increase the likelihood The Senate package would be 
of a preemptive nuclear strike and aimed at reducing the deficit to 
nuclear war. $100 billion in 1988, a goal that 

The report was sponsored by a President Ronald Reagan adopted 
pane] railing itself Committee of last month. However, because of 
Soviet Scientists for Peace, Against economic conditions and tbe presi- 


lt was Mr. Dole's first important everything. 1 


inOp “ menu you have to co nsider fiscal year, another $94 bilhon in 

■ n J lADH a (MID L*IU ■ in no 


1987, and $118 bilhon in 1988 to 


Nuclear Threat 
a group headed 
deyev, director 


The Senate package would be initiative as the new leader of the Mr. Dole and other senators ao reach the S 100-billion goal 
aimed at redneingthe deficit to Senate's Republican majority. He knowledged that they may not be ‘Die decision came after a meet- 
$100 billion in 1988, a goal that !efl open the possibility of tax in- able to assemble a package of ing among 26 Republican senators 
President Ronald Reagan adopted creases, which Mr.. Reagan op- spending cuts that could be ap- and three of Mr. Reagan’s most 
last month. However, h«-an«y of poses, in a ddition to spending cuts, proved by Congress and still be senior advisers — the chief of staff, 
economic conditions and tbe presi- Senator Ted Stevois of Alaska large enough to reach the $100- James A. Baker 3d; Ins deputy, 
dent’s deosicn not to make large said after the meeting, “Ultimately bflfioo target Richard G. Dannan, and the direc- 

cuis in die military buildup, the we’ll have to do some increase in Cuts in military spending might tor of the Office of Management 


Senator Ted Stevens of Alaska large enough 
said after the meeting, “Ultimately biffioo target 
we’ll have to do some increase in Cuts in m2 


administration package now pro- revenues” before the end of the not win the support of the White and Budget, David A Stockman. 


Space Research, which is in many j£*s a- deficit that year of. $140 decade ter reach the goal of a baT House, and el imina tion of thecost- 
respects the Soviet equivalent of bilhon. ancedbndgeL of-hving increase for Social Seaui- 


respects the Soviet equivalent of bilhon. 

the U.S. National Aeronautics and 

Space Administration. 

A reference to tbe document ap- /O _ 
peared in a Soviet scholarly journal HJcl 
last month. There were no indica- 
tions that the report, which cites 
Western and Soviet published ma- v^CaJ 
terials, is a classified document. 

Most of the report maintains a 
scholarly tone. It departs notably -i- “ 
from this, however, to denounce 
U.S. “assertions" that ibe “Star jIJL-r, 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 5) ^ «*■ 


Mr. Dole said that Republican 
(Continued on Page 2, CoL 4) 


Gandhi Asks 


Sudan Move Halts Airlift 

Of Ethiopians to Israel 

By John M. Goshko Htiuopiain Jews from the region. 


By John M. Goshko 

Washington Poet Service 

WASHINGTON — Sudan, re- 
acting to Ethiopian protests and 
concerned that other Arab coun- 
tries will «tfnptarn, has canceled its 
cooperation with an Israeli-orga- 
nized airlift carrying thousands of 


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INSIDE 

■ China’s w r ite s have a new 

constitution that refers to “de- 
mocracy and freedom” in liter- 
ature. Page 2. 

■ Polish authorities invited 
public reaction on plans to in- 
crease food prices. Page 2. 

■Those accused in the 30 at- 
tacks against U.S. abortion 
cfioics share many traits, but 
apparently no plot. Page 3. 

FINANCIAL ROUNDUP 

■ On WaB Street, caution is the 
bywad fa 1985 after many ro- 

*i vestors suffered disappoini- 
^3 ments last year. Page 7- 

■ Holders of shares of Staar 
Surgical Sterling Extruder and 
Allied Products had cause to 
celebrate in 1984. A look at top 
gainers — and losers. Page 

■ Complete listings for 1984. hy 

exchange. Pages 13-17. 


New Flo-like Hkess 
linked to Herpes Virus 

The Associated Press 
. NEW YORK— A newly recog- 
nized flu-tike illness marked by fe~ 
fttigue, fever and swollen glands that 
T can persist fa years has been 
linkedto a virus in the herpes fam- 
ily, wording to reports in the An- 
nals of Internal Medi e me. 

The disease is especially trou- 
bling because it cannot be dctcctea 

by routine medical tests, despite ns 

obvious symptoms, researenera 
said. They^aid nothing can now be 
done to alleviate the ailroenL 


diplomatic sources said. 

The sources said the Sudanese 
action “lolls this program dead as a 
doornail” leaving approximatdy 

6.000 Falashast, a Ethiopian Jews, 
behind in Ethiopia with little hope 
of escaping the country, which is 
suffering from drongbt and fa m i ne . 
In Israel officials said 12,000 had 
been left behind. 

Tbe sources said Sudan notified 
the United States on Saturday that 
publicity about the airlift meant 
that it could no longer cooperate in 
the pro gram , in which Ethiopian 
Jews were flown almost daily from 
Khartoum to European cities. 
From there, they went to Israel. 

Tbe United Stales is known to 
have played a major behind-the- 
scenes role in obtaining Su dan ese 
cooperation despite the fact that 
Sudan, as a largely Arab country, 
does not recognize Israel and con- 
siders itself in a state of belligeren- 
cy with (he Jewish nation. 

’ U.S. officials refused to com- 
ment about U.S. involvement in the 
program a about co mmuni c ati on 
between Washington and the Suda- 
nese government. 

However, in a further indication 
die program has been derailed, 
jrans European Airways, a Belgian 
charter airline that has been mak- 
ing the flights from Sudan, an- 
nounced Saturday it would no 
longer participate. 

press reports began ctraiialmg 
last month, and more frequently in 
the last few days, that the Israeli 
government was trying to bring *e 
Falashas out in large numbers. Ibe 
reports, including the first pubhc 
disclosures in Israel of the airhfi, 
have said that between 10,000 and 

20.000 Falashas have been airlifted 
or were awaiting transport. 

Since the overthrow of Haile Se- 
lassie, the Ethiopian emperor, in 
September 1974, the Israeli govern- 
ment has been smuggling Falashas 
out of Ethiopia- They are settled in 
a region around Gondar that 
been particularly bard-hit by awl 
war and famine, factors have 
increased sympathy in Israd for 
them and led to the recent large- 
scale effort to get th«n out 

According to the sources, the 
United States, which is a major aid 


B -t i .4^; 














Th* ArandrtKi IYhb 

An Ethiopian Jewish boy tries to avoid taking medkaue 
administered by an Israeli nurse in a hospital a t Tel Aviv. 


donor to Sudan, readily cooperated 
in persuading Sudan to permit the 
airlift. 

The sources said the Sudanese 
government, aware the project 
could subject it to criticism in the 
Arab world, had insisted on secrecy 
and set the condition that tbe Fala- 
shas moving through its territory 
be taken to Europe rather than di- 
rectly to Israd. 

After reports about tbe magni- 
tude of tbe airlift appeared last 
week, Ethiopia’s leftisi government 
denounced it as a "sinister opera- 
tion” and said it would protest to 
Sudan about "gross interference" 
in its in tonal affairs. 

The Falashas, who according to 
legend are descended from King 
Solomon and the Queen of Sheba, 
are an impoverished group. They 
are mostly potters by trade who 
have lived for centuries in isolated 
villages. 

Their plight has been a source of 
contention for years in Israel, 
where many contend the Falashas 
are not Jews and not entitled to 
settle in the Jewish state under its 
“law of the return.” 


However, the Israeli government 
has been under pressure from Is- 
raeli and U.S. sympathizers cf the 
Fa lasha s to do something fa the 
group. 

Q Pubfidty Stops Airlift 
A spokesman for the Jewish 
Agency, the Israeli immigration or- 
ganization, said Sunday that the 
airlift of Ethiopian Jews had 
stopped because of the publicity 
given to it, Reuters reported from 
Tel Aviv. 

Newly arrived Ethiopian Jews 
cried when told the news by welfare 
workers. Some accused interna- 
tional news organizations of en- 
dangering the lives of relatives stiQ 
in Africa. 

The last plane, with 200 Falashas 
aboard, amved in Td Aviv on Sat- 
urday night. 

□ Libya's Reaction 
Libya has requested a special 
meeting of the Arab League to dis- 
cuss the airlift. Radio -Tripoli re- 
ported Sunday in a broadcast mon- 
itored in Paris, according to 
Agence France- Presse. 


Prnajab Crisis 

By Sin joy Hazarika 

New York Tuna Service 

NEW DELHI — Prime Minister 
Rajiv Gandhi has appointed a spe- 
cial cabinet group to propose ways 
to resolve tbe political crisis in tbe 
northern state of Punjab. 

The prime minister, in a nation- 
ally televised speech Saturday, said 
tbe top priority of his government 
would be to find a solution to Sikh 
separatism in the Punjab. 

Mr. Gandhi vowed to protect the 
lives and property of India’s 14 
million Sikhs, two of whom have 
been identified by police as tbe 
assassins of his mother, Indira 
Gandhi, the former prime minister. 

But, be said, “India’s unity is 
paramount; everything else comes 
after that” 

He added, “There cannot, and 
will not, be any concession to sepa- 
ratist ideologies and to the cult to 
violence.” 

Mr. Gandhi also emphasized his 
commitment to modem technology 
and announced a reorganization of 
the education system. 

“We must go’beyond tbe preven- 
tion and suppression of violence,” 
he said. “We must cure the minds 
where hatred and prejudice arise.” 

Mr. Gandhi India’s youngest 
prime minister, was installed Tues- 
day after general elections in which 
his Congress (1) Party swept 401 of 
508 electoral races, tbe biggest vic- 
tory won by any political group 
since India became independent in 
1947. 

Until last June, tbe Punjab, In- 
dia’s most important grain-produc- 
ing region, had been ravaged by 
two years of unrest led by a Sikh 
fun damen talist preacher, Jarnail 
Singh Bhindranwale. Mr. Bhin- 
dranwale was killed with hundreds 
of followers in June when Mrs. 
Gandhi ordered the Indian Army 
into the Golden Temple in Amrit- 
sar, but his supporters still occa- 
sionally conduct attacks in the 
state. 

Mr. Gandhi announced no 
rhnngffs in the policy of nonalign- 
ment first enunciated by his grand- 
father, Prime Minister Jawaharlal 
Nehru, and followed by his mother. 
Mrs. Gandhi’s critics often accused 
her of leaning toward Moscow, an 
assertion she denied. 

India’s relations with Pakistan. 
Sri Lanka and Bangladesh have 
been strained, and Mr. Gandhi also 
said that his government would 
seek to improve relations with its 
neighbors in South Asia “on the 
basis of mutual respect, sovereign 
equality and Friendship.” 


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Cambodian civilians from AmpO crossing the border into Ta Phraya, Thailand. 

Vietnam Presses Cambodian Rebels 

Hanoi’s Troops Said to Dig In on Border With Thailand 


By Barbara Crossette 

New York Tima Service 

BANGKOK — Officials of tbe 
Cambodian rebel group under at- 
tack by Vietnam say that Vietnam- 
ese troops appear to be digging in 
for a long stay along tbe border of 
Thailand and Cambodia. 

The rebel officials said the Viet- 
namese and Cambodian troops 
loyal to the Phnom Penh govern- 
ment appeared to be see king to 
keep the forces of the Khmer Peo- 
ples National Liberation Front 
from retu rning to some abandoned 
border settlements as quickly as 
they bad done after previous Viet- 
namese assaults. 

“This is a major change in tac- 
tics,” a spokesman fa the front 
said Saturday. “The Vietnamese 
pym to be coming to the border to 
stay." 

Officials said rebels trying to re- 
turn in late November to the Nong 
Chan camp, the first to be attacked, 
bad dug up “more than a tho u sand 
mines " apparently planted by the 
Vietnamese and Cambodian loyal- 
ist forces. Penn Thai spokesman 
fa tbe front, and Vora Huy Kanih- 
oul, a member of its administrative 
staff in Bangkok, said the mines 
were small devices, designed to 
maim. 

Mr. Penn Thai the sot of a for- 


mer Cambodian prime minister. 
Pom Nouth, said the mining of the 
camps, particularly civilian areas, 
might cause officials to dday indef- 
initely the return of non-combat- 
ants to their former homes. More 
than 100,000 civilians have fled to 
sanctuary in Thailand. 

The nrixl officials said six of 
seven guerrilla camps bad been 
evacuated, in some cases oily of 
civilian non-combatants, in other 
cases of both non-combatants and 
guerrillas. 

Resident non-combatants were 
recently evacuated from the Liber- 


ation Front headquarters at AmpiL 

The Vietnamese and their Cam- 
bodian allies faled to take Ampd 
in fighting last spring. In that at- 
tack, near the enH of the last dry 
season, sane small planes were 
used, officials of the front said. 

Liberation Front officials said 
helicopter gunships have also been 
used against rebel teams that had 
infiltrated the area around Tonle 
Sap, tbe lake in northwestern Cam- 
bodia where Vietnamese fishermen 
have been reported to be settling. 

The dry season offensive along 
the border —an annual event since 
Vietnamese forces invaded Cambo- 
dia in late December 1978 and an 
Jan. 7. 1979. established the present 
government rtf Heng Samrin in 


Phnom Penh — began earlier than 
usual because the rainy season was 
unusually short in the area along 
the Thai border. The attacks could 
go on until early summer. 

According ro Mr. Vora Huy 
Kanthoul 109 people are known to 
have died since the Vie tnamese at- 
tacks began in November. The 
largest number, 55, was registered 
at Nong Chan camp. Eleven dead 
were reported at Baksei camp, fair 
deaths at Obok and 38 at Rithisen 


■ Rebel Leader V&ts Ampil 

The leader of the Khmer Peo- 
ple’s National liberation Front, 
Son Sann, paid a surprise vial Sun- 
day to his key base of Ampil He 
said he had come to boost the mo- 
rale of defenders preparing to resist 
an anticipated attack by Vietnam- 
ese forces, Reuters reported. 

Mr. Son Sann said that Vie tnam , 
ese troops might attack Ampil on 
Monday to mark the sixth anniver- 
sary of their intervention in Cam- 
bodia. 

Ampil the command headquar- 
ters of the rebel group, is its only 
major base still intact since Viet- 
namese troops began their dry sea- 
son offensive against jnemlte 
bases along the western Cambodi- 
an border in November. 


i 







Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 1985 


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The A**** opaons weetcs aneai 

Nuns walked through the snow to Mass in St Peter's Basilica in Vatican City on Sunday. 

than initially projeci 

Cold Grips Europe; Storms Kill 26 in Algeria 

M. M. y O successful model, I 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

LONDON — Icy weather gripped Europe on 
Sunday, and in Rome, people threw snowballs 
instead of coins into the Trevi fountain. 

A.I least 26 persons were reported to have been 
killed in Algeria in a week of flooding, torrential 
rain and snow. Tunisia rushed 13 tons ol medicines 
and emergency- supplies, including thermal blan- 
kets. to its North African neighbor. 

Belgrade radio said three persons were killed in 
a truck-car collision on a snow-covered road in the 
Serbian mountains of Yugoslavia, 60 miles (96 
kilometers) south of Belgrade. 

Three homeless persons died of exposure in 
France over the weekend. 

Rome got its first real snowfall in 14 years on 
Sunday. By noon, at least four inches (10.2 centi- 
meters) had fallen, both airports were closed and 
trains were late. 

Both Romans and. tourists threw snowballs into 
the Trevi fountain instead of the coins that are 
supposed to ensure that travelers one day return to 
Rome. 

In the village of TrepaUe di Livigno, the tem- 
perature reaimed -36 degrees Fahrenheit (-37.8 
centigrade], the coldest recorded in an inhabited 
spot in Italy. 

French meteorologists said the mercury dived to 
-27 Fahrenheit (-318 centigrade) in the Doubs 
region near the Swiss border. 

Paris had its coldest day since 1956 with a low of 
12 Fahrenheit (-1 1.1 centigrade). 

In the area surrounding Nice and Cannes, resi- 
dents awoke Sunday to see a layer of white on 


palm-studded avenues as up to 10 inches of snow 
fell on the region. 

Snow fell in and around London, disrupting 
public transport and sparking a spate of traffic 
accidents. 

The coldest spot in West Germany on Sunday 
was Kemp ten m the Bavarian Alps, where the 
temperature was -17 Fahrenheit (-27.2 centigrade). 
On the autobahn, traffic jams of up to 60 miles 
were reported, but the ski slopes of the Alps and 
central highlands were packed with vacationers. 

In the Mediterranean basin, sun-seeking tourists 
from northern Europe found hail and icy winds in 
the coldest winter in 30 years in Spain's Balearic 
Islands. People in Barcelona wore their fur coats. 

Overnight temperatures were as low as -22 Fahr- 
enheit (-30 centigrade) in Austria and a further 
drop to -40 Fahrenheit (-40 centigrade) was fore- 
cast for Sunday night. 

Temperatures of 5 degrees Fahrenheit (-15 cen- 
tigrade) greeted U.S. Secretary of State George P. 
Shultz in Geneva. 

In Belgium, snow blanketed roads and all week- 
end soccer matches were canceled. 

The Soviet press has reported that this winter 
seemed colder than most with daytime tempera- 
tures regularly falling below average in the central 
part of the country. In the Kirgiz Republic, border- 
ing China, the mercury dropped to -50 Fahrenheit 
(-45 centigrade). 

The newspaper Selskaya Zhizn said Sunday that 
most of the Soviet Union was under at least six 
inches of snow. (UP I, Reuters ) 


Chinese Writers Get Their f Freedom’ 

But New Charter Demands Adherence to the Party Lute 


By John F. Burns 

Nr* York Times Service 

BEIJING — China’s writers 
were given a new constitution on 
Saturday that spoke of their right 
to “democracy and freedom" in de- 
veloping a literature that served a 
readership beyond workers, peas- 
ants and soldiers. 

The development followed an 
eight-day congress of the Chinese 
Writers' Association that was dom- 
inated by calls for creative free- 
doms and by a keynote speech 
from a top Communist Party fig- 
ure, Hu QilL promising that they 
would have iL 

But a description of the new 
charter that was issued on Saturday 
by the official Xinhua news agency 
indicated that it retains strictures 
about writers remaining faithful to 
the party and to Marxism-Lenin- 
ism. Id effect, the party seemed to 
have loosened its controls as it has 
on earlier occasons. but to have 
retained broad ideological con- 
straints that could be invoked 
against any writer venturing too 
far. 

The news agency said that the 
charter ‘‘encourages Chinese writ- 


ers to emancipate their minds and 
to be bold to break new ground.” It 
added, citing the charter: “They 
should develop a great variety of 
new themes, styles, forms and 
genres and start a free competition 
so as la raise the ideological and 
artistic levels of literary creation.” 

Another key passage said that 
under the new charter the writers' 
association, “led by the Commu- 
nist Party and guided by Marxism- 
Leninism," should adhere “to the 
orientation of art and literature 
serving the people and to the policy 
of ‘letting a hundred Dowers blos- 
som and a hundred schools of 
thought contend.' '* 

The reference was to a phrase of 
Mao’s dial launched an explosion 
of intellectual creativity in 1957. 
But Mao tolerated criticism of the 
party during the “hundred flowers” 
period for only a few weeks before 
launching a crackdown that sent 
many intellectuals to prisons and 
labor camps. 

In 1980, Deng Xiaoping, the 
Chinese leader, spoke out in harsh 
terms against artists engaging in 
“bourgeois liberalism," and re- 
minded writers that while literature 


might not have to “serve" politics, 
that did not mean that it could be 
separate from politics. 

Some Western diplomats believe 
that the congress was less impor- 
tant for what it heralded in litera- 
ture than as a measure of a shifting 
political balance at the top of the 
party. In this interpretation, the 
congress was used by Mr. Deng 
and his associates to signal a new 
offensive against more ideological- 
ly conservative figures who have 
resisted economic changes and 
have been generally opposed to any 
relaxation of artistic controls. 

The tactic of using the arts as a 
political tool has a tradition here 
dating back centuries. Under the 
Communists, artistic matters were 
the initial battleground in the 
“anti-rightist movement” of 1957, 
and again at the outset of the Cul- 
tural Revolution, in 1966. 

In October 1983. a“spiritual pol- 
lution” campaign that began as an 
attack on purported rightist influ- 
ences in the aits quickly developed 
into a broader political campaign 
before Mr. Deng, sensing a chal- 
lenge to his polities, ordered it halt- 
ed. 


LET US HELP THEM 
HELP THEMSELVES 



In many countries, individuals 
and organisations are acting to give 
the poorest the means to come up 
in the world and act towards a 
better future, in order to try and 
break the vicious circle of poverty 
and underdevelopment. 

These well-established bodies are our natural partners in a field 
they know well. With them, we create and carry out concrete 
programmes: the creation of nursery schools in the new slums in 
North Bombay; a travelling creche to serve construction sites in 
Poona; help for women’s organisations in the mountains of 
Maharashtra; help for school drop-outs in a slum of Poona City 
(India), and others. 

Our role and support are meant to be short-life, and aim at 
helping our partners at a critical point in their own evolution. In 
order to maximise its effectiveness, A.C.I.A.D.'s co-ordinators give 
on-the-spot, short term support at vital stages of the programmes, until 
these are self-supporting. 

A.C.I.A.D. is a trust registered in 1983 under the 1901 french 
Non-Profitable Organisations Act: the sociologists, doctors, economists 
among its members have considerable field experience. The 
competence of the team has won its support from a number of 
national as well as international bodies. 

But we need your help too: support our activities and send your 
donation to FONDATION DE FRANCE- A.C.I.A.D., 44, rue Ginoux 
— 75015 PARIS (FRANCE). You will be send a receipt and a 
brochure. 


A.C.I.A.D. 

Association de Cooperation Internationale au Developpement 
44, rue Ginoux — 75015 PARIS 


Warsaw Asks 
Poles’ Views 
On Hans for 
Price Rises 


By Bradley Graham 

H'tohingion Pat Service 

WARSAW — Polish authorities 
have published three sets of price- 
rise options and invited citizens to 
phone or write in their reactions in 
an attempt to consult the public on 
the sensitive issue of food price 
increases. 

Increases in the cost of food are a 
potentially explosive issue in Po- 
land, where past attempts to raise 
prices have led to riots that have 
toppled Communist Party leaders. 
Mindful of the political repercus- 
sions, Polish officials preceded in- 
creases last year by floating several 
options weeks ahead of time. 

The increases that subsequently 
| look effect were somewhat less 
than initially projected, and no un- 
rest resulted. 

Viewing last year’s approach as a 
successful model the authorities 
have again proposed three variants 
for public discussion. State-con- 
trolled newspapers carried detailed 
charts and descriptions of the plans 
on Saturday, showing what each 
option would mean for individual 
items. 

Essentially, Poles are being 
asked to weigh the burden of higher 
prices against the prospect of an 
end to the rationing of some key 
foods. The first plan, the minim um 
option, would mean that rationing 
would continue but that the cost of 
living would increase by only 3.1 
percent. 

If people are willing to pay sub- 
stantially more for their butter, 
sugar and flour, as outlined in op- 
tions 2 and 3. then the rationing of 
these foods could end. according to 
the proposals. Only meat and choc- 
date would remain subject to ra- 
tioning. 

Although the difference between 
the least expensive plan, which 
would raise the overall cost of liv- 
ing 3.1 percent, and the most ex- 
pensive one, which would increase 
it 4.2 percent, appears small (he 
low figures are somewhat decep- 
tive. 

Each option conceals large in- 
creases for certain foods, even in 
the first plan, under which the price 
of flour would go up 24 percent and 
that of sugar 25 percent. To dis- 
pense with rationing coupons, flour 
would have to rise in price 41 per- 
cent, sugar 73 percent and butter 29 
percenL 

The government's economic plan 
for 1985 calls for retail prices to rise 
9 percent. It also speaks of a 3 
percent to 4 percent “spillover ef- 
fect” from pnee decisions last year. 
Together, this means a projected 
price rise of 12 percent to 13 per- 
cent this year. 

Food price increases are forecast 
to make up about one-third of this 
total. The jump in food prices is 
due to take effect in March. 

In the meantime. Poles were ad- 
vised in Saturday's announcement 
to submit their comments on the 
proposed options to the ministry 
responsible for prices or to local 
government or newspaper offices. 





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Piilll 



The Aoooeed fass 


Senator Edward M. Kennedy touring Soweto on Sunday. 

South Africans Protest 
Against Kennedy’s Visit 


By Alan Cowell 

|Vw York Times Service 

JOHANNESBURG — White 
police officers scuffled with pro- 
testers as U.S. Senator Edward M. 
Kennedy arrived in South Africa 
and was met by black demonstra- 
tors chanting, “Kennedy go 
home!” 

The protesters Saturday said 
they belonged to the Azanian Peo- 
ple's Organization, a “black con- 
sciousness'' movement that ex- 
cludes whites from its activities. 
The group, underlining a division 
in black r anks over the visit of the 
Massachusetts Democrat, has at- 
tacked it os an effort to secure “a 
ticket to the presidency” of the 
United Slates. 

In the arrival hall at Johannes- 
burg's Jan Smuts Airport, police- 
men fought with some of the 40 
demonstrators, dra gg in g at least 
three of them into custody. 

The incidents came shortly after 
Mr. Kennedy was welcomed to Jo- 
hannesburg by his hosts. Bishop 
Desmond Tutu, winner of the 1984 
Nobel Peace Prize, and the Rever- 
end Allan Boesak, president of the 
World Council of Reformed 
Churches. 

In a symbolic gesture. Mr. Ken- 
nedy spent the first night of his first 
weeklong visit to South Africa at 
Bishop Tutu's home in. the huge 
black township of Soweto, outside 
Johannesburg. “We want you to 
visit the ghettoes in which we live,” 
Bishop Tutu said at the airport. 

Whites normally require a per- 
mit to visit Soweto and are prohib- 
ited from spending the night there. 
Kennedy aides said this require- 
ment had been waived for the sena- 
tor. 

Irarann Moosa. a spokeman for 
the Azanian People's Organization, 
said Saturday, “There will be ac- 


tion taken against Kennedy. The 
whole country is our terrain. Wher- 
ever he goes, we will be there.” 

The group issued a statement 
Thursday saying that Mr. Kennedy 
“must be informed that the op- 
pressed blacks of Azania are not nts 
ticket to the presidency and that 
our enemy includes the imperialists 
of the United States.” Azania is a 
black activist term for South Afri- 
ca. 

The Afrikaans- language newspa- 
per Beeld. regarded as close to the 
ruling National Party, also suggest- 
ed in an editorial that Mr. Kenne- 
dy's visit was designed to win black 
votes in the 1988 election. 

Mr. Kennedy is making the first 
visit by a member of his family to 
South Africa since his brother. 
Robert F. Kenned v. came here in 
1966. 

About 500 black people, many 
holding candles aloft greeted the 
senator’s arrival at Bishop Turn’s 
home. 

■ Kennedy Tours Soweto 

Mr. Kennedy toured Soweto on 
Sunday and said it was one of the 
most distressing visits he had ever 
made. Reuters reported. He spoke 
during a visit to a migrant workers’ 
hostel a squalid living area for sev- 
eral hundred single men 

“This is one of the most distress- 
ing and despairing visits 1 have ever 
made to any facility in mv life- 
time” he said outside the quarters 
where men sleep eight to a room. 

Under the South .African system, 
many such laborers must leave 
their families in rural “homelands” 
to gain employment in the urban 
areas. 

Mr. Kennedy said people who 
cared about their families had to 
choose between providing for them 
or living with them. 


Senate Republicans to Offer Deficit Plan 


(Confirmed from Page 1) 

committee chairmen and members 
of the leadership would begin work 
this week with a goal of giving him 
a proposal by Feb. I, three days 
before Mr. Reagan is scheduled to 
send his budget for 1986 to Con- 
gress. While there was much coop- 
eration and negotiating on the bud- 
get in Mr. Reagan's first terra, it 
always came alter (he president 
submitted his proposed budget to 
Congress. 

The head start announced Fri- 
day evening could give the Senate 
the upper hand in deriding priori- 
ties. But, senators acknowledged 
afterward, U would also expose 
them to taking the political heat for 
unpopular budget cuts. 

There was no immediate reaction 
from the administration to the Sen- 
ate initiative. Mr. Baker indicated 
to reporters that the administration 
would still like to get to a $100- 
billion deficit, even though their 
current budget proposal wdl not do 
it. 

Senator John C. Danfonh, Re- 
I publican of Missouri, said “oh, 

1 yes," when asked if the White 
I House now wants the Senate to 
make the tough derisions on cut- 
ting the budget 

An administration official said 
that the White House wanted to see 
if it was possible to arrive at 3 
consensus among Republicans on 
an approach to reducing the deficit 
that might be acceptable to the 
president 

The most popular idea on Capi- 
tol Hill now is an across-the-board 
budget freeze, including elimina- 
tion of tbe cost-of-living increase 
for Social Security recipients for 




budget at the 1985 level Mr. Rea- 
gan opposes both these proposals. 

Friday’s meeting, which was or- 
ganized by Mr. Dole, came the day 
after administration officials said 

the president's 1986 budget which 
will probably be sent to Congress 
on Feb. 4, will not include enough 
reductions in proposed spending to 
cut the budget deficit, now project- 
ed to be more than 5200 billion, to 


$100 billion in 1988. According to 
administration figures, the package 
would (all about $40 billion short 
in 1988. 

Meanwhile, Mr. Reagan on Fri- 
day reversed himself and decided 
to permit cost-of-living increases 
next year in three benefit pro- 
grams: Supplemental Security In- 


come, which pays benefits to the 
needy aged, blind and disabled; 
veterans’ pensions, and compensa- 
tion to veterans with service-con- 
nected disabilities. He also decided 
to allow a larger increase than orig- 
inally planned for Medicaid, the 
federal-stale health program for 
the poor. 


Moscow Report Emphasizes 
Differences With Washington 


(Continued from Page I) 



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Wars” proposals “spell salvation 
from nuclear missiles for man- 
kind'’ The report says that these 
are “perhaps the greatest-ever de- 
ceptions of our time.” 

Mr. Reagan said Thursday in a 
pamphlet released by tbe White 
House that “the United Slates 
seeks neither military superiority 
nor political advantage" in seeking 
a space-based defense. 

He said the effort is “both mili- 
tarily and morally necessary" be- 
cause the basic assumptions of se- 
curity through the threat of nuclear 
retaliation are called into question 
by a Soviet military buildup and 
improvements in defensive tech- 
nology. 

In a section of their report devot- 
ed to possible countermeasures 
against a space-based anti-missile 
system, tbe Soviet researchers list- 
ed five types of “active" counter- 
measures that could be used 
against a space-based, defense. 

These include small high-speed 
ballistic missiles that could destroy 
orbital combat stations that the re- 
searchers anticipate some versions 
of the U.S. plan would need. An- 
other is “space mines,” defined as 
satellites equipped frith missiles 
and other weaponry. Another pos- 
sibility is "clouds of obstacles” 
placed in space. 

Ground-based lasers to attack 
the U.S. space-based stations and 
decoy missile launchings to confuse 
the system arc also discussed. 

Altogether a "highly efficient 
countermeasure system" would 
cost only one to two percent of the 
cost of the space-based system it- 
self. the report said. 

■ Arrival Statements 

Mr. Gromyko and Mr. Shultz 
said Sunday that they would strive 
for peace, but their remarks high- 
lighted differences in the U.S. and 


Soviet approach. Reuters reported 
from Geneva. , 

Mr. Shultz said be bad come on a 
“mission for peace” but added: 
“We have no illusions that progress 
will be easy to achieve." 

He said he hoped the talks , the 
first between the superpowers for 
1 3 mouths, would lead to equitable 
and verifiable agreements. But he 
did not refer to space weapons. 

Mx. Gromyko, arriving after Mr. 
Shultz, said in a brief statement 
that be would “proceed from the 
fundamental policy of the Soviet 
Union aimed at strengthening 
peace.” 

However, the 75-year-old minis- 
ter. speaking in English, pul the 
stress on space weapons. 

“The Soviet Union is in favor or 
working out basic guidelines to ori- 
ent negotiations towards reaching 
mutually acceptable accords which 
would prevent the arms race in out- 
er space." he said. 

At tbe same time Moscow was 
seeking to ensure advancement 
"along the path of radical reduc- 


ing run the complete elimination 
of nuclear weapons,” he added. 


* w 

Iran Asks UN Probe of Iraqi Raids 

TEHRAN (Reuters) — Iran has formally asked the United Nations to 
survey damage that Iran says was inflicted by Iraqi air raids. on civilian 
areafnear the Gulf war fronL a spokesman for a UN inspection team in 

T S^“l«q y of killing oeariy 30 Irivtaand 
100 in raids last week at the town of Bostan. nine miles (15 kilometers) 
from the border, and four nearby villages m Khuastan 
reported raids against Iranian positions m the Misan area of the south- 
central war from buL made no reference to Khuzislan. ■ 

Iran said that Iraq had broken a UN-negotiated agreement that was 
reached last June and by which the tu-o sides undertook not to attack 
civilian areas. 

Gemayel Calls lor Full Israeli Pullout 

BEIRUT (Reuters) —President Amin Geraayel said Sunday that ther^ 
was no change in Lebanon's attitude toward deadlocked troop withdraw- 
al talks with IsraeL The talks are due to resume Monday after an 18-day 

C “The position of Lebanon concerning the south remains unchanged,” 
Mr. Gemavd told Beirut’s diplomatic corps in a traditional New- Year 
speech. Political sources said earlier that Mr. Gemayel would offer new 
ideas to trv to save the negotiations, which have been bogged down over 
who should police south Lebanon after Israel pulls out its 10.000 
occupying troops. , . 

Israel has threatened to leave the talks and take unilateral action unless 
Lebanon made concessions before negotiations reopen at the border 
village of Naqoura. But in his speech. Mr. Gemayel repeated Lebanon's 
demand for a total Israeli withdrawal. He insisted that the Lebanese 
Army should deploy throughout the south and rejected any role for the 
Israeli-backed South Lebanon Army militia. 

Aspin to Head Anns Panel in House 

WASHINGTON (LAT) — Democrats in the House of Representa- 
tives have broken one of Congress's deepest and most stabilizing iradi- , 
lions — awarding committee chairmanships by seniority — by narrowly^ 
removing Representative Melvin Price, Democrat of Illinois, as chairman 
: of the .Armed Services Committee. 

In a ballot to choose Mr. Price’s successor on Friday, the Democrats 
r eac hed far down the committee's seniority list to Les Aspin. of Wiscon- 
t sin. a frequent Pentagon critic who was the committee's seventh-ranking 
1 Democrat. 

The 121-to-i 18 vote unseating Mr. Price, 80. was the most dramatic 

* violation of the seniority system in a decade. The close vote reflected the 
1 conflict between the Democrats’ desire to strengthen their hand against 
1 President Ronald Reagan’s arms buildup and their attachment to a 
1 system that many credit with bringing order and continuity to the often 

■ unruly body. The Democratic Caucus then chose Mr. Aspin. who was 
opposed by Charles E. Bennett of Florida, the second-ranking committee 

■ Democrat, by a vote of 125 to 103. 

Angola Says It Killed 3,000 Rebels 

LISBON (AP) — Angolan government troops killed more than 3.000 
: opposition guerrillas in the central province of Huambo in 1984 and are 
> stepping up efforts to wipe out the rebel National Union for the Total 
Independence of Angola this year, an army commander said. 

In a report received in Lisbon on Saturday, the official Angolan news 
agency. ANGOP. quoted Major Armando Da Cruz Neio as saying Lb& 
insurgents could no longer combat Angolan forces directly and weW 
: reduced to “desperate acts of banditry” against civilians and economic 
, sabotage. 

The major said 152 rebels were killed and 93 captured in a recent battle 
for the town of Cuca. the agency reported. It said the repelling of the 
attack had foiled rebel plans to occupy part of the provincial capital of 
, Huambo. 

: 45 Hospitalized in Gas Leak in India 

NEW DELHI (AP) — At least 45 workers at a textile null, owned by a 
large, private sector company in southern India, were hospitalized after a 
toxic gas leak, authorities reported. They did not specify the name of ibe 
firm. 

K. Sivadasan, labor minister of Kerala state, said Saturday the chlorine 
gas leak occurred Friday in the dyeing section of the factory in Koratty, 
270 miles (435 kilometers) southwest of Madras. He said the cause of tbe 
leak was not immediately known and that the 45 stricken workers were 
out of danger. He added that an investigation was being headed by V.K. 
Radhakrishnan. the government’s joint director of factories and boilers. 

Employees of the factory's dyeing department staged a strike Saturday, 
demanding adequate safety measures in the plan L the United News of 
India reported The workers demonstrated outside the factory, charging 
that the accident was caused by management's negligence, the agency 
said. 

t 

Plan for New Caledonia Is Assailed 

PARIS (Reuters) — A New Caledonian political leader has con- 
demned as “a monstrous idiocy” a reported plan for makin g the South 
Pacific territory independent under a contract of association with France. 

The pjan drawn up by Edgard Pisani. France’s special envoy to New 
Caledonia, reportedly would make the territory an associated state with 
special lies to France for a transition period of five to 10 years. Mr. Pisani 
is to officially announce his plan Monday. 

“If this means making New Caledonia independent, I say it is a 
monstrous idiocy.” Jacques Lafleur. who heads the anti- independence 
Rally for Caledonia in the Republic, told the newspaper Le Monde on 
Saturday. He said a provision of the plan offering sovereignty to the 
indigenous Melanesian Kanaks was an attack on the European ‘seltlers, 
who make up 37 percent of the 145.000 population. 

Mr. Pisani was quoted by the weekly Le Nouvd Observaieur as saying 
that his plan would offer guarantees to both the Kanaks and the 
European Killers. 

Barbie Investigation Nearly Complete ^ 

LYONS, France (Reuters] — The pre-trial investigation of Klaus 
Barbie, who is accused of committing Nazi war crimes in France, is nearly 
complete and the care will probably go to trial this year, according to 
legal sources, but Barbie will face only three of eight original charges for 
crimes against humanity. & 

The sources said Saturday that lack of documentary evidence and the 
few remaining survivors of the atrocities allegedly committed by Barbie 
had caured the investigating magistrate to drop at least five of the charges 
iff n 7 ' for J?* role « Gestapo chief in the dty from 1942m 
1944. Barbie was extradited to France from Bolivia in February 1983, and 
is in prison in Lyons. ; * 

The sources said the magistrate, Christian Riss. was expected to 
publjc Prosecutor with his final conclusions (Scare 
P««cuuon will then prepare ns mdictnSl and subntitU 
to the court which could request further information. 

Greens Reject Coalition in Saarland 

EPPELBOIW-SAAR, West Germany (TJPI) — a Saarland state 

^rS™™ G ^“u P l rty ,- 0Q Sunda - V overwhelmingly rejected any 
SJS ^th the Social Democrats after £ K election * 

A two-thirds majority of the convention ddarates alcn mo 

S«te Iponed a JX1SS5 

SSI S part > ^ ^ter the election. 

****** leader of the state's 
ti^iWe^S\hPv d J? ld c ^P enUm with the Greens would be 


Sri Lanka Tamil Rebels for the Record 


Said to Delay Secession 

Return 

COLOMBO, Sri I jpka — Sepa- 
ratist guerrillas who threatened to 
declare an independent Tamil state 
in Sri Lanka on Jan. 14 have post- 
poned the declaration until April, 
the national security minister, La- 
lith Alhulathmudah. said. 

The state radio on Saturday 
quoted the minister as idling a ral- 
ly that the rebels had been thwarted 
in their aim as a result of counter- 
measures taken hy the security 
forces. 


' Friday ^ V'mSES* f° Url ' f d “ WfiDi 
reported in lair condition. Minnesota hospital and was 

crash, the airline said The 7 ^ 7 ^ ^ md ^ g no survivors ^ 
Tuesday, minutes before U P“P^ 

Claus foo BSlow rite 1 U MW 

on charges that he ’tried to kill hS wSfwSnhT” 3 secofld T' 

injections at their Newport home. «.^^ a . vo “ B Q!ovk- with insulin 
Arlene Violet, said Saturday. Island s a «ontey general, 

which specializes Tn treating heart and ,-hif' , J” don s Br °nipton Hospital. 
Clarence Houre. her mothe^id^ d,5ea **' sa,d a spokesman at 





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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 1985 


A MERi c^y topics Abortion Bombers Act 'for the Glory of God 9 

. TOI L fll ** */ V 


‘ Great White Sharks 

Biting in California 

A narrow triangle of Pacific 
Ocean running 80 miles (130 
kilometers) along [he Pacific 
Coast off San Francisco, from 


fc^M b00 fe‘" A “fcheo 

Tire on New Year’s Eve de- 
stroyed the ToU House Resiau- 

rani at Whitman, Massachu- 
■ Ihc lalc Ru «h 

Wakefield originated chocolate 
dup cookies in 1930. ... Chief 


By Joe Pichirallo the United States at abortion dinics and offices of 

and Ruth Marcus those supporting the availability of abortion, includ- 

trcMmm Tm '"f M >«r- Tin? cl™cs ™ tombed in Pffla- 

WASH1NGTON - Federal Uw enforcement offi- J h ’. Flond f’ “ “J 1 Washtngion. D.C. 

dab mv a nationwide investigation has failed to ^'1 'i 10 1 \ die 

uncnvtr'rvirfrnre- ihmt ike. w sJdaot number of attacks on abortion-rdated centers since 


Ptmi Reyes to Monterey Bay. «« Warren E. Burger who 
and ttlending to the Farallon ^ l° n 8 complained about the 
Islands 25 miles offshore, has Supreme Court’s work load, 
become the area of the world's a 10ih Supreme Court ju£ 

highest madence of great white U(X should be added to handle 
shade attacks on humans. administrative t ^s k s but no! to 

Gteat white sharks, the sub- decide cases. 









■j . w a'.'" T 


. i • j . ■ ■ 


and extending to the Farallon 
Islands 25 miles offshore, has 
become the area of the world's 
highest incidence of great white 
shark attacks on h umane 
Great while sharks, the sub- 
ject of the film "Jaws." can 
reach a weight of 5 tons and a 

length of 30 feet (9 meters), and 
no other sharks match their ag- 
* gresaveness. 3 

For decades Australia was 
the center of white shark at- 
tacks. But scientists say the du- 
bious distinction has passed to 
California. There have been 29 
great white attacks on humans 
within (he so-called “Red Tri- 
angle" since the 1920s, and the 
rate has increased from one ev- 
ery few years then to one or two 
per year now. Few of the at- 
tacks, however, have been fatal 
John McCosker, director of 
the Siewhan aquarium in San 
Francisco, says attacks are up 
because the shark population ts 
up. That, in turn, appears to 
result from a resurgence of the 
great while’s favorite meal, 
seals and sea lions, hunted to 
near extinction at the turn of 
the century but, with conserva- 
tion laws, now numbering in the 
teas of thousands. 

Deregulation a Boon 
For Chicago Airport 

Midway Airport, well within 
the Chicago city limits, was the 
world’s busiest as recently as 
1959, then lost ground to 
(THare, northwest of the city, 
which could handle bigger jets. 

With the deregulation of U.S. 
airlines. Midway has had a re- 
birth. The airport now handles 
. U million passengers a year 
(down from 10 million in 1959 
but up from a few thousand in 
recent years) and operates 112 
flights a day. 

Many of these are night 
flights by old cargo jets flying at 
\s low altitudes with noisy en- 
gines. Residents of .the smg le- 
famfly houses that largely sur- 
round the airport are asking the 
city to ban flights from mid- 
night to 6 Ail 

Short Takes 
American and European fash- 
ion designers who decreed over- 
size men's clothes for women 
have produced a bonanza for 
old-clothing stores in New 
York Gty. Men’s coats from 
the 1940s and 1950s are selling 
fast, usually from $20 to $75. 
Those in the know say the coals 
should look too big for the 
wearer. Ideally, the sleeves 
should be so long that they have 
to be rolled back. 

The CM Aeronautics Board 
went out of existence last week 
and, al though bureaucracies are 
widely held to be self-perpetu- 
ating, it was not the first federal 
agency to be dissolved. Scores 
of others have bit the dust over 
ihe past 50 years, incl uding the 
WPA, or Works Project Admin- 
istration (1935-42), the Bureau 
of Animal Industry (1884- 
1953), the Bureau of Light- 
houses 11789-1939) and the Na- 
tional Screw Thread 
Commission (1918-34). 

Shorter Takes: There are 
191.2 millio n television sets in 
the United States, or 23 sets for 
every American home, accord- 
ing to the 1985 Television and 


uncover evidence that the 30 violent attacks against ? auoraon-raaieo centers since 

abortion clinks in the last few years are the work of an .. . , , . 

organized group, despite allegations by many support- Abortion times have also been the target of in- 

ers of the clinics lEl some™ Ihc ioddenu arTcon- “ ™P lo ' WS ; 

ncaed. telephone bomb threats and other forms of 

There is no indication thai any cf the seven men and ^ a *^ menL .... , , 

two women chanted or convicted in ih<> urarta irnnv Debate oyer the bombings reached a crescendo last 


two women charged or convicted in the attacks knew VViT- j vf^vr a , a ® oenflo 

others who participated in attacks in other cities. vZSljiSftS** a f d ^ i c ^, Yca f s Day^tacks. 

. But interviews with friends, lawyers and prosecu- 


Notes About People 

Howard H. Baker Jr., Repub- 
lic 311 of Tennessee, the outgoing 
Senate majority leader, said last 
week that he “would like to nm 
for president in ’SS." but would 
make no firm derision until af- 
ter the 1986 congressional elec- 
tions. 


nut interviews wun menus, lawyers ana prosecu- y , — j V — ~T ° — .. . — 

tors of the accused, and with some of the defendants de Pj ored •J* violence at dimes, 
themselves, suggest that the attackers share many Mr. Anderson, the Army of Cod leader, said last 
characteristics. They appear to be blue-collar, lower- week: “People get aroused when there’s injustice in the 
to-middle-class people who have no history of violent l “ d -" He made the conpents in a telephone inter- 
acts. They appear to be deeply religious and politically ^ ron ? P™ 00 “ Oxford, Wisconsin, where 
unsophisticated. he is serving a 42-year sentence. “They don't want to 

Motivated by thdr anti-abortion fervor and am- sit while their brothers or sisters are bring 


befriended. Hie youths, aged 19 and 18 at the time of 
the attacks, had been trained to have unquestioning 
respect for thdr elders and looked on Mr. .Anderson as 
a "father figure," thdr lawyers said. 

“But for this course of conduct I think [hey could 
aptly be described as all-American kids.” said William 
Lucco, an Illinois lawyer who represented Matthew 
Moore, who is serving an eight-year sentence for the 
kidnapping. Wayne Moore reedved a four-year tom. 

Mr. Beseda, who bombed the Feminist Women’s 
Health Clinic in Everett, Washington, often held a 
huge sign depicting a dismembered fetus during the 
months be picketed the clinic. Fdlow pickets said Mr. 
Beseda worked hard to keep the protests peaceful and 
calmed other demonstrators when they grew' a giiawd 
His lawyer. Thomas Hillier. said Mr. Beseda is a 



UNtaifi' * 


President Ronald Reagan for the first time specifically Beseda worked hard io keep the protests peaceful and 
deplored ihe violence at dimes. calmed other demonstrators when they grew’ plated. 

Mr. Anderson, the Army of God leader, said last His lawyer. Thomas Hillier, said Mr. Beseda is a 
week: "People get aroused when there’s injustice in the loner and an "exceptionally naive man who believed 
land." He made the comments in a telephone inter- ver y strongly that abortion' is wrong." 
view from federal prison in Oxford, Wisconsin, where Mr. Beseda took the stand against his lawyer’s 
he is serving a 42-year sentence. “They don't want to advice and admitted that be had set three fires at the 






vinced that they are acting “for the gkwy of God." as 
one of those arrested lold federal investigators, they 


murdered." 

Despite 12 years of unrelenting efforts — including 


have become frustrated by the failure of the main- picketing, protest marches and lobbying for a consti- 
stream movement to stop abortions and are willing to tutional amen d men t to ban abortion — and the elec- 
risk long prison terms to achieve more immediate don in 1980 erf a president committed toils cause, the 



results. 

Curtis Beseda. a regular on the picket line at the 
Feminist Women's Health Center m Everett. Wash- 
ington, decided to firebomb ihe clinic after watching 


anti-abortion movement has been unable to undo the 
Supreme Court's 1973 decision legalizing the 
procedure. 

Those who attack clinics “are not wild, crazed 


woman after woman ignore his pleas not to have an terrorists," said Joseph M. Schridler, executive diree- 
abortion. He said he bombed the facility because he ,OT of the Chicago-based Pro-Life Action League. 

rhnf ulvininn ic -til. n.Mi.r „r «^l. " “'Thi-v 1 ., m nMnU uiti I, u-mt in niff -.hnMii.nv' «... nl 




;:**£*: * 


Camara Pain 

Senator Gary Hart 

Senator Gary Hart, Demo- 
crat of Colorado, has not dis- 
closed his plans for 1986, the 
last year of his term, or for 
1988. the next presidential elec- 
tion year. On Thursday he will 


believes that abortion is "the greater of two evils." 

Don Benny Anderson had not been active in the 
anti-abortion movement before setting out on a four- 
month campaign of violence, on orders, he said, from 
God and the Archangel MichacL With the aid of two 
young followers, Mr. Anderson formed the Army of 
God and set fire to two abortion clinics in Florida, 
bombed one in Fairfax County. Vir ginia, outside 
Washington. D.C., and kidnapped the operator erf an 
Illinois abortion clinic. 

Joseph Grace, described by a psychiatrist as a 


“These are people who want to put 'abort tnnes' out of 
business" and “who have derided h uman lives are 
more valuable than real estate 
Mr. Anderson, a Mormon and father of seven, “had 
never thought much about abortion" before he was 
called on to give a talk on the issue at a church 
meeting, according to Mr. Schridler. “It overwhelmed 
him that it was such a terrible thing.” 

A fugitive from Texas, where he had been convicted 
of roil estate fraud, Mr. Anderson — described as a 
charismatic, outgoing man given to grandiose 


“religious political fanatic” in search of a cause, set schemes, whether for makin g money or stopping abor- 
fire to a Norfolk, Virginia, abortion clinic and was tion — embarked on a four-month, three-state cam- 
arresied after he fell asleep in his van a block away, his paign of violence against abortion clinics in 1982. He 
shoes still soaked with kerosene. Mr. Grace called set fire to two, bombed one, and kidnapped the doctor 
himself a member of the Army of God, but later who directed another and his wife. He was convicted 
conceded that he knew of the group only through news in all four incidents. 


reports. 


Mr. Anderson, 43, look with him Matthew and 


Since 1982 there have been 30 bombings or fires in Wayne Moore, the sons of a Mormon family he had 


Everett clinic and another at a clinic in Rrilinghnm 
Washington, between December 1983 and April 1984. 

“The type of action 1 took, as reprehensible as it is, 
is the one sure way to prevent the death of unborn 
children,” Mr. Beseda said in a telephone interview 
from jail last week. He has been sentenced to 20 years 
in federal prison. 

Joseph Grace, 35, embraced pessimistic and extrem- 
ist views on a variety of political issues, according to 
his lawyer. Berry Willis. He feared imminent nuclear 
annihilation and the Soviet menace. 

But Mr. Grace’s opposition to legalized abortion, 
fueled by avid reading of the Bible, became an obses- 
sive concern. Mr. Willis said. 

Shortly before dawn on May 26. 1983. Mr. Grace, a 
Vietnam veteran and a self-employed painter, broke a 
window in the HDlcrest Clinic in Norfolk, Virginia, 
and set fire to kerosene he splashed on the clinic's 
floors. Mr. Willis said. 

Mr. Grace was convicted of arson and sentenced to 
20 years in Virginia state prison. 

A court psychiatrist found that he was a “religious 
political fanatic,” suffering from “grandiose ideas" 
and “paranoid feelings." Mr. Willis said. 

Last week, two newlyweds and a couple engaged to 
be married, all young, fundamentalist Christians, were 
arrested in the Christmas Day bombings in Pensacola. 
Florida. Matt Goldsby, 2], said the teachings of his 
church infused him with anti-abortion fervor, and his 
growing anger and frustration led him to attack the 
climes. The bombs were meant, said bis fiancee, Kaye 
Wiggins, 1 8. as a “gift to Jesus for his birthday." 



Ths Aoooawd Press 

Matt Goldsby, 21, was charged with the 
-Christmas Day bombings of three Florida 
abortion dinics. His fiancee said die bombs 
were “a gift to Jests for his birthday.” 


start a trip to Europe, giving ¥ T C Mq v ClVA 

speeches or conferring with of- ^ ITlity \X1 VC/ 

ficials in Britain. France, Swit- * 

zerland and the Soviet Union. D/vnf 

Beddne Clark Church, widow John Tower 




Honduras Arrests Nicaraguan Indian Dissident 


Beddne Dark Church, widow 
of former Senator Frank 
Church, an Idaho Democrat, is 
bring urged by friends and par- 
ty workers to nm in 1986 for the 
seat her husband held for 24 
years. Mr. Church died in 1984. 
If Mrs. Church, whose fore- 
bears were long active in Idaho 
politics, derides to make the 
race, she would face the man 
who forced her husband into 
retirement in a dose and bitter 
contest in 1980, Steven D. 
Simms. A conservative Repub- 
lican, he is expected to sent a 
second Senate term. 

Conservative Republicans . 
have begun to advance the 
name of Faith R. Whittlesey as 
a replacement for Jeane J. 
Kirkpatrick as chief U.S. dele- 
gate to the United Nations. 
Mrs. Kirkpatrick has made it 
known that she wants to leave 
the job. Mrs. Whittlesey, 44, a 
conservative with an outspoken 
manner, was ambassador to 
Switzerland before becoming 
the presidential assistant for 
public liaison. 

Nancy Reagan’s press secre- 
tary, Sheila Tate, ran into Rosa- 
lyim Carter's press secretary, 
Mary Finch Hoyt, at a Wash- 
ington luncheon recently. Mrs. 
Hoyt said nothing made her so 
nervous at the White House as 
parties at which President and 
Mrs. Jimmy Carter found them- 
selves standing together with no 
one around them. Mrs. Tate 
agreed, saying she gets nervous 
when silent guests surround 
President and Mrs. Ronald Rea- 
gan. 

— Compiled bv 

ARTHUR HIGBEE 


Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — John G. 

Tower, recently retired chairman of 
the Senate Aimed Services Com- 
mittee, is (be likely candidate to 
succeed Arthur F. Burns as U.S. ~ *vjp 
ambassador to West Germany 
when the 80-year-dd Mr. Bums 
retires tins year, according to Rea- 
gan administration sources. 

The sources said on Friday that , , _ „ : — . — - ... 

Mr Tower 59 a Texas Republican John G. Tower immigration laws, but other offi- Sandmist authorities accused 

who did not seek re-election last dais said be had done soby holding him of leading a separatist move- 

year after 22 years in the Senate, to beanne ambassador to the Euro- two press conferences. They said he meat and of having been a member 
had had HiancnW with senior l* 30 Community, the sources said, would be expelled soon. of the National Guard under the 

White House and Stale Depart- They said Mr. Shultz is largely The a n no un cement came one Anastasio Somoza, who was over- 
rant officials about taking the succeeding in his determination to day after another top leader of Nic- thrown by the Sandinists in 1979. 
Boon post after Mr. Bums, who is a number of important cm- s Indian guerrilla^ Brook- Nicaraguan Indians have long 

former chairman of the Federal Re- bassies, particularly in Latin Arne - - l.vn .Rivera, was reported by his ^ isolation along the coun- 
serve Board. tea* with ambassadors chosen from a««s j^.Losu Kira to have been Xl y s Atlantic coast. When the San- 

The appointment of Mr. Tower, the career Foreign Service. wound aim a ^hnm allack ami dinists tried to assert control over 

a conservative, would be welcomed They saul that John A. Fcrch, a W hiding mVasma on the ^ and relocate them be- 

by the Republican right, which has career diplomat who has beaded Caribbean coast of Nicaragua. of rebel activity in the area, 

expressed concern that a reshuffle US. mterests section in Cuba ^ A nuktmy mtdligaice source m w Honduras or Costa 

of key foreign policy posts is an ance 1982, will become ambassa- Honduras, who asked not to be Rica, where another Indian organi- 
attempt by Secretary of State ** Honduras, succeeding John identified.^ tow The Assooated mtimu Misurasata, is based. 


Di T acheS duras khd offered bun" and “en- If true, they said, this would Despite repeated voles in recent 
^TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras — dan gened the neutrality erf Hondu- throw into doubt the results of Mr. years by the House against aiding 
The authorities have arrested ras in the face of the internal Rivera's recent efforts to conclude the rebels, the admimstration be- 
Steadman Fagoth MMer, leader of conflicts of the Central American a separate Indian peace agreement heves it has a chance of gaining 
a Nicaraguan Indian rebel group, nations. with the Sandmist government in approval for such aid in March or 


on charges of violating Honduran 
immigration laws, according to 
Foreign Minister Edgardo Paz BAr- 
nka. 

Mr. Paz B&mica said Saturday 
that police took Mr. MUfler into 
custody in Tegucigalpa, the capital, 
hue Friday and continued to bold 
him. 

Mr. Paz BAmica did not specify 
how Mr MQBer had broken the 
immigration laws, but other offi- 
cials said be had done so by holding 


with the Sandmist government in approval for such aid in March or 
Managua. April because of what it sees as 


In a news conference Thursday. Managua- April because of what it sees as 

Mr. Muller said. “Never have I had Rafael Zdaya, a Rivera deputy, growing opposition in Congress to 

the support of the Honduran gov- “other Misurasata official, the Nicaraguan government and its 
eminent in the liberation work I Gufflenno Espinoza, said Mr. Ri- ties to Cuba and the Soviet Union, 
have t ak*n upon myself vera entered Nicaragua on Dec. 22 Although detailed plans for the 

Li, w, ■»„ ■■ w, <» 23 to speak to guerrillas and lobbying effort are not final, the 

°^ e . „ lctt Nl c ??gy» ™“- Indian villagers about his contacts officials said, it will include publi- 
late last year with the Sandinists. cation later this month of a report 
^ S ^ But soon after Mr. Rivera ad- on a mffilary buildup in Nicaragua 
an appointed body that acts ss a dressed a merte at Tasbapamn. and other efforts Bv novcmntbt 
legislature. „ i 


cation later this month of a report 
on a military buildup in Nicaragua 
and other efforts by government 


^ on Pearl Lagoon about 40 miles (64 officials to focus public and coo- 

Sandinist authorities accused kilometers) north of Bhiefields. grcssional attention on Soviet arms 
him of leading a separatist move- they said, Sandinist farces opened shipments to Nicaragua, 
ment and of having beat a member a concentrated attack using air- U-S . atf a, the rebels, which was 


to became ambassador to tlte Euro- wo press conferences. They said he ment and of having been a member a concentrated attack mang air- u_g aid to the rebels, winch was 
pean Community, the sources said, would be expelled soon. of the National Guard under the planes and patrol boats along with hmneied through the CIA starting 

Tlidkir rmJ Mr Cltidfw IamaIh BflflrtlYTI/'MIlMlf f'nitlP An»> AftlCtaCirt Qrwtin-ra nrlirv oinv. iMuumdl — _ C* E> 


They said Mr. Shultz is largely The announcement came one 
m«»wlin g fn hie Hri/ nnina rinfr tp day after another top leader of Nic- 
staff a number of important em- aragua’s Indian guerrillas, Brook- 


of the National Guard under the planes and pah 
Anastasio Somoza, who was over- ground troops, 
thrown by the Sandinists in 1979. As he sought 
Nicaraguan Indians have long Rivera was wo 


As he sought to flee the area, Mr. 


in 1981, ran out in Se 
Since then the rebels have 


tember. 

inanced 


staff a number of important em- aragMS Indian guenill^ Brook- Nicaraguan Indians have long Rivera was wounded, the aides re- their operations with private dona- 
basrira, particularly in Latin Amer- was reported by ; his ^ed in isolation along the corn- ported. Mr. Zdaya said rebel radio tions and with money and aims 

ica, with ambassadors chosen from mttes m Costa Kira to have been uV S Atlantic coast When the San- communications reported that provided by governments, indud- 
therareer Foreign Service, woundolm a ^(hnm attack and dinists tried to assert control over guerrillas took Mr. Rivera to a bm brad’s.' accenting to rebel lead- 

Tbey saul that John A Fcrch, a W Deluding m the hills on the ^ and relocate them be- mountain hideout. But they have administration officials. 


attempt by Secretary of State “Of 10 Honduras, succeeding joim mcnniieu, iota ine msoaaKw 
George P. Shultz to purge conser- D. Negropome, who is bring reas- Press that Mr. Mfclkr might be de- 
vatives from positions of influence “8°“* *o Washington. That re- ported He gave no details, 
within the State Department solves a dispute caused by Mr. On^amday, the Nicaraguan For- 


cause of rebel activity in the area, not desaibed his injuries or how . October Tonaress mnmved 

r y H m to* {Af - wr - AFP) iM-ffi'flrSiSEh 

Rica, wh ere an other Indian oigam- ■ New Aid Campaign die current fiscal year bin stipukt- 

Pkilip Taubman of The New York ed that noneof the money could be 


within the State Department 
The sources said Mr. Shultz 
wants to remove the assistant secre- 
tary for economic affairs, Richard 
T. McCormack, a former aide to 
Senator Jesse Helms, a conserva- 
tive Republican from North Caro- 


Offidals of Misurasata who dis- Times reported from Washington: spent unless it renewed approval 

dosed that Mr. Rivera had been The Reagan administration after February, 
wounded said they believed his plans to issue a white paper de- A White House sp okesman, C. 
daiKlestinepresenrainsideNicara- scribing an arms buildup in Nicara- Anson Franklin, would not com- 


«nt unless it renewed approval 
ter February. 

A White House spokesman, C. 


arid MT shultz Shultz’s origbal intention to send ogn Ministry asked Honduras to , ™ Sino me >'. «* P 13 ** 10 ™ a . ^ 4 A wmte House spokesman, C. 

L. Craig Johnstone, a deputy assis- extradite Mr. MODer, saying he had ^de^presenra^Nuy scribmg an arms buildup mjfirara- Anson Franklin, would not com- 

tautsractaiy for in^^American been “charged and cSted in j^.^ been revraled by a Sandn^- pra m an Klounve new adnutus- mem Saturday on whether the ad- 

a affaire^toHraiduras. Nicaragua to common law of- Jf “ 1 **** campaign to persuade ministration was preparing a new 

a foranx mde to ^ ... . fenses " launched last week by the Nicara- Congress to renew aid to Nicara- attempt to wm congressional ap- 


tive Rraubbcan from North Caro- Mr. Johnstone did not want Mr- MMer, 34, beads the oraam- 
lina. His replacemem would be the assignment and because conser- zauon ol Miskito, Sumo and Kama 
John Michael Hennessy, a banker vatives charged that be did not known as Misura. He has 

and economist who served under *»ve a suffiriendy tough altitude wi “ T 5yP“ ®“™ ru ' 
Mr. Shultz when he was Treasury toward the Sand i nis t government aiy 1981 with thousands of Inmans 
secretary in the Nixon adminisira- m Nicaragua. Mr. Johnstone now is who oppose Nicaragua s leftist 
jj on slated to become ambassador to S andin i s t government. Misura has 

Mr. McCormack might be made Algeria. [ought alongside the Honduran- 

ambassador to the Orcanization of The sources said another major based Nicaraguan Democratic 
American States, live sources said, *bif l would send Harry G. Barnes Force, the major U^- backed rebel 


launched last week by the Nicara- Congress to renew aid to Nicara- attempt to win congressional ap- 
guan Army constituted an attempt guan rebels, senior administration provaf to resume awa.«8tang»> to the 
to kQ] or capture the rebel leader, officials said Friday. rebels.” 


Mr. Shultz when he was Treasury ‘°w arc * 
secretary in the Nixon adminisira- N, car 
lion. slated t 

Mr. McCormack might be made Algeria, 
ambassador to the Organization of s 

American States, the sources said, ~ ufl wc 
where he would replace J. William Jjj. 
Midden do rf 2d, another outside H 1 "®- ” 
appointee with ties to Mr. Helms. ™ *De c 
Mr. Shultz wants Mr. Middendorf t*®® 


“If you are wondering 
why Berlin is a prime 


Jr., now ambassador to India, to group fighting the Sandinists. 
Chile. Mr. Barnes is well regarded Mr. Paz BAmica said Mr. M Oiler 
in the career Foreign Service, and had “abused the hospitality Hon- 

his reassignment to Santiago is re- 

garded as a sign of concern within „ , 

the State Department that rising fr hue UOUS6 \jOUHSd 

STS Asks Probe of Denver 

area. The Associated Press 

Mr. Barnes will replace James A WASHINGTON — The White 
Theberge, a conservative political House counsel, Fred Fielding, has 
appointee. said that he has asked ihe Ofmx of 




Russell Page Dies; Landscaped Parks 


The Associated Press gant small gardens. BuU he once 1977 the medal of the French Aca- 

LONnON Russell Pane. 78 a said, “I haven’t had a garden since I drinie d’Arclntectiue. 

was 10. I’ve got loo mafly of other . He tagned parts an_dgardms 


ra^Mfrom dty parks to window P co P' e s - . . 

boxes, (tied Friday at the Fitzroy Lady Bird Johnson asked him m 
Nnffidd Hospital here. 1966 for advise on her project for 


Nnffidd Hospital here. 

Mr. Page; who once said there 
was no such thing as an ugly plant. 


1966 for advise on her project for 
humifying the nation's capital 
that she sDonsored when her nus- 


He designed parks and gardens The sources said other planned 
in right European countries, as well changes would send Lowell C. Kil- 
the United States. Egypt and the day. a deputy assistant secretary, as 
Wki indies ambassador to the Dominican Re- 


White House Counsel 
Asks Probe of Denver 



and landscaping estates 


ant, that she sponsored when her hus- 
irks band, Lyndon B. Johnson, was 
de- president. 




Colombia Sends 4 

To U.S. for Trial 

Los Angela Tima Ser nee 
WASHINGTON — Colombia 
has flown four fugitives indicted on 
idnie charges in ihe United States 


Mr. Page, who was bom in Lin- National Surgeons’ Institute, in 
coinshire in central England, stud- Budapest oo Saturday. 


West Indies. amoassaaor 10 me uomnnean ne- 
tt Other deaths public and Charles A Gillespie, 

Professor Pal Rubauyi, 80, a spe- also a deputy assistant secretary, to 
cialist in thoracic surgery, a former Colombia, 
professor of the Budapest Unrver- Some sources had said earlier 
sity of Medicine and director of the that Mr. Gillespie, who oversaw 


ea. The Associated Pros 

Mr. Barnes will replace James A WASHINGTON — The White 
icberge, a conservative political House counsel, Fred Fielding, has 
ipointee. said that he has asked ihe OtLhrc of 

The sources said other planned Government Ethics to investigate 
a ng es would send Lowell C. KD- whether Michael K_ Deaver, the 
y, a deputy assistant secretary, as deputy White House chief of staff, 
jbassador to the Dominican Re- failed to comply with federal re- 
bbc and Charles A. Gillespie, portin g req uiremen ts in mnnertinn 
io a deputy assistant secretary, to with a real estate investmenL 
tlombia. Mr. Fidding said Friday he 

Some sources had said earlier made the request several weeks ago 




in Germany, 
let us enlighten you! 


uztzy's R+D workforce are in Berlin. 


that Mr. Gillespie, who oversaw and thallhe inquiry “is ongoing.” 
U.S. activities in Grenada after the It was announced Thursday that 
U.S. invasion in October 1983, Mr. Deaver is planning to resign. 


led painting at the Slade in Ion- Lotto Maiadc. 85, the Yugoslav would become ambassador to Bo- The Wall Street Journal reported 
don. From the time when as a boy conductor, Friday in Zagr eb, Yu- livia. However, the sources added, Thursday that a friend erf Mr. 
he bought a plant at a country god avia. He conducted the Dies- that plan was changed after death Deaver, Berger Benson, arranged 
flower show, his first love was gar- ifcriin and Frankfurt opera threats from drug traffickers forced for him to make a $10,000 profit 
dating, which he described as “a orchestras and was known for his the withdrawal of Lewis A. Tambs from a money-losing real estate in- 
matter of attainable perfections. subtle interpretations of Beetho- from the U.S. Embassy in Colom- vestment, for which Mr. Deaver 
: (IU.M or** n he fmiohi vco. Wacner and Bruckner, win- bia. did not disclose his liabilities. 


matter of attainable perfections. 
During World War IL he fought 


subtle interpretations of Beetho- 
ven, Wagner and Bruckner, win- 


witb the Free French forces and ning several international prizes, 
fmm 1945 to 1962 lived in France. But after World War II, dunng 


, ui uic — 1Q .. 1%; j- prance. Bui an«r world war il, dunng 

whid, h, morcd ,o Zagreb,^ 


•wx luilUflm — - - — i — . ■ . J_J WHICH DC UIUVCU IO U0CD, U1CD 

lion since the two countnes con- His best-known work mriuoea ^ ^ ^ pro . Nazj frcc ^ of 

chided an extradition treaty m landscaping Les HallK m Croatia, and was named a colonel 

1982, the Justice Department an- fonner frml and viable ^ ^ Croatian army, Mr. Matacic 

aounced. . now transformed into was never allowed to perform in 

Three were indicted by federal complex of Belgrade, 

grand juries in Miami or Wtudung- tiques, and die General Robert E. Cushman Jr, 

ton on charges of comqjiracy to in byjc Rtw ^ames, ?Q nQmhalei b p^ deal Rich, 

import and distribute cranne. Tm which he remodeled m i^ - ard M. Nixon as a commandant of 

fourth was indicted ondiarges that ^ Page ^ remodeled Long- ^ Marine Corps in 1971 and d ea- 
stern from a multimimon-doUar, cham racecourse outside Paris, uty director of the Central Intdh- 


In Amman 




money-laundering operation rdat- landscaping u 

ed to the drug teade. Justice u® - don of window boxes, 
partmait officials dial the extradi- i n 1951 hewasawa 


champ racecourse outside rans, uty director of the Central IntelH- 
frora its landscaping to a prolifers- gem* Agency from 1972 10 1975, 


TheTedmical University and the 180 R+D institutes 
practise technology transfer par excellence. 

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In CAD/CAM, software, laser and 
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resources are outstanding. 

Also 

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m of window boxes. Wednesday at his home in Fort 

In 195 1 , he was awarded the Or- Washington, Maryland, apparently 


lions, which took place on . ihe British Empire and in of a heart attack. 

Saturday, as a sign of Colombian a* m m p 

officials' willingness to defy threats 

“Of violence and cooperate with ef* p"” a I f 

%ns to stem the flow of cocaine exhibition Sale Ol 

m to th A^i 1 M St Sce Mmisw i- p . r.ian and Oriental carpets 

Rodrigo Lara Bonilla, who was at 5 « | • 

the center of Colombian investiga- Wholesale DHCeS 

tions of drug syndicates, was assas- 
sinated. Preadent Bdisario Betan- , a m to p. m ., incl. SUNDAYS, until JANUARY 8 
cur then promised that his nation 

otHOTQGEORGE-V 

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Page 4 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 1985 


By Murrey Marder 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON - In Geneva 
this week, the Reagan adnunistra- 
lion and the Soviet Union will be- 
gin a difficult search for a measure 
of stability in their relationship, 
some middle ground between the 
glow of dAtente in the 1 970s and the 
bristling hostility of the early 
1980s. 

That goal is not listed on the 
schedule for the meetings Monday 
and Tuesday between Secretary of 
State George P. Shultz and Foreign 
Minister Andrei A. Gromyko of 
the Soviet Union, but it is there 
between the lines. 

The negotiations they seek to be- 
gin in nuclear arms control are 
more complex and controversial 
than ever. U.S. and Soviet diplo- 
mats agree it will take unusual 
long-term resolve on both sides just 
to sustain the negotiating process 
in the constant friction of super- 
power rivalry. 

American specialists ouiside of 
government see a major obstacle to 
agreement in the much- publicized 
split within the Reagan administra- 
tion over Soviet strategy, a split 
that has not been resolved by the 
president. 

Never before have the United 
States and the Soviet Union in- 
structed their foreign ministers to 
produce an agenda encompassing 
"the whole range of questions con- 
cerning nuclear and outer-space 
arms." That sweeping objective 
was inspired not by op timism, 
however, but by failure; it is a 
catchall for past stalemates and 
new dile mmas . 

Dual negotiations to limit inter- 
mediate-range and intercontinental 
nuclear weapons collapsed at the 
end of 1983 in Geneva. Nine 
months earlier, on March 23, 1983, 
President Ronald Reagan an- 
nounced proposals for the space- 
based defense system dubbed “Star 
Wars," later named the Strategic 
Defense Ini dative. 

By challenging the concept of 
nuclear deterrence, which is based 
primarily on retaliation bv offen- 
sive weapons, the anti-missile space 
defease helped to throw the entire 
subject of nuclear arms control into 
widening arcs of controversy. 

The world attention on the 
Shultz-Gromyko meeting bothers 
diplomats much, more than it pleas- 
es them. They see the attention as 
out of all proportion to anything 
this week's talks can achieve. At 
best, they will reach agreement on 
an agenda for subsequent arms ne- 
gotiations. 

Procedural issues, which set the 
stage for later talks and normally 
are important only to specialists, 
suddenly have heroine front-page 
news. 

Mr. Shultz was dismayed to bear 
in mid-December that U-S. xdevi- 


Catchall for Past Stalemates 


sion networks planned to send star 
“anchor teams" to Geneva, auto- 
matically raising public expecta- 
tions for spectacular results. The 
Reagan administration, which ini- 
tially was eager to dramatize its 
desire for arms control, be gan to 
caution against inflated expecta- 
tions, which could put pressure on 
the United States in the bargaining 
at Geneva. 

I T is a maxim in diplomacy that 
serious negotiations take place 
in secret, and the more serious, the 
more secretive. East-West diploma- 
cy often flouts the rale. Bom sides 
have jockeyed for public advantage 
in advance of the Shultz-Gromyko 
talks. 

Mikhail S. Gorbachov, a Polit- 
buro member, was in Britain last 
month, openly soliciting allied op- 
tion to the American space- 
defense plan, illustrating the 
weight being given to public diplo- 
matic maneuvering. So did the 
counterattack justifying Mr. Rea- 
gan's plan in its current research 
stage during the president’s meet- 
ings with Prime Minister Margaret 
Thatcher of Britain and other 
Western leaders. 

The Russians fear they will be 
leapfrogged by the sort of nuclear 1 
technology that could arise from 
research on space defense. This 
fear ensures a continuing drive by 
the Kremlin to exploit widespread 
Western European apprehension 
about any shift in nuclear strategy. 

To Europeans, that strategy, 
with all its contradictions, has 
brought 40 years free of nuclear or 
conventional war between the ma- 
jor powers. 

It is not entirely coincidental, 
therefore, that the U.S. and Soviet 
delegations in Geneva will both be 
equipped to draw on the knowledge 
and memory of senior officials who 
participated in shaping that 40- 
year history. 

On the Soviet side, of course, it is 
Mr. Gromyko. He is now at the 
peak of his political influence at 
age 75, as deputy prime minister 
and foreign minister serving a new 
Soviet leader, Konstantin U. Cher- 
nenko. 

On the U.S. side it is Paul H. 
Nitre, who will be 78 on Jan. 16, a 
special adviser to Mr. Shultz. 

Both men are walking libraries 
for seeing '"new” problems in nu- 
clear arms control as variations of 
old problems that appeared in 
some form during the last four de- 
cades. At some points, the two su- 
perpowers have advocated posi- 
tions opposite to those they now 
bald 

Mr. Gromyko, who became So- 
viet ambassador in Washington in 
1943 at the age of 34, has dealt with 
14 U.S. secretaries of state, while 
Mr. Nitre has served Democratic 
and Republican administrations 



Paid H. Nitze 

intermittently since 1940 as a po- 
, licy-maker or senior negotiator. 

I N 1950. as bead rtf the State 
Department's policy planning 
staff, Mr. Nitre was chief designer 
of a directive known as NSC 68, 
which is still regarded as the basic 
document on U.S. strategy in the 
Cold War. 

The directive was a blueprint for 
expanding U.S. military power and 
hardening VS policy for “contain- 
ment" of the Soviet Union by "a 
policy of calculated and gradual 
coercion'' after it broke toe U.S. 
monopoly on atomic weapons in 
1949. 

NSC 68 was deliberately written 
in alarmist rhetoric to jolt the fed- 
eral bureaucracy. Mr. Reagan 
could readily have drawn on it for 
his "evil empire" descriptions of 
the Soviet Union. It depicted 
Americans in “their deepest peril" 
confronted by “a slave state," a 
“despotic oligarchy” reaching Tor 
“world domination." 

Mr. Nitze has long ceased using 
such rhetoric. Mr. Gromyko, in 
standard Soviet style, employs 
equal or far-stronger language in 
his current official writing. 

A foreword by Mr. Gromyko to 
a 1983 book tided “Modem Diplo- 
macy of Capitalist Powers," for ex- 
ample, illustrates that the U S. and 
Soviet indictments of each other’s 
operating methods are exactly the 
reverse. It includes such character- 
izations by Mr. Gromyko as: 
“Needless to say, deception, blade- 
mail and dictation, which have be- 
come the stock-in-trade of bour- 
geois diplomacy, are inapplicable 
in the practices of socialist diplo- 


macy for reasons of principle and 
morality." 

In Soviet diplomacy as well as 
ideology, it is a fundamental con- 
tention that the United States mo- 
derated its policies toward the So- 
viet. Union only because it was 
“compelled" to do so by the growth 
of Soviet power, especially strategic 
nuclear might. 

The Soviet Union therefore attri- 
butes the nuclear ■■parity" or 
“equality” with the United States 
that it achieved at the end of the 
1960s, and confirmed in the U.S.- 
Soviet detente accords in the early 
1970s, solely to Soviet strength. 
This induced “greater realism” in 
Washington’s policy. 

Geneva has special significance 
in the two nation’s conflicting per- 
ceptions of their nuclear-age histo- 
ry. Thirty years ago, the city was 
the site of the first postwar East- 
West summit meeting, the four- 
power conference of 1955. 

At that point, two years before 
Sputnik, the Soviet Union’s break- 
through in space and missile tech- 
nology, the United States had over- 
whelming nuclear superiority over 
the Soviet Union. Secretary of 
State John Foster Dulles traded on 
this for his “brinkmanship” brand 
of diplomacy. 

President Dwight D. Eisenhower 
overruled Dulles' objections to 
U.S. participation in the confer- 
ence. So Dulles set out, alternative- 
ly, to deny what the State Depart- 
ment listed as the prime Soviet goal 
in Geneva: to seek “moral and so- 1 
dal equality” with the United 
States. 

D ocuments made public in 

recent years show that the 
State Department cautioned Presi- 
dent Eisenhower to avoid “social 
meetings" where he could be p ho- 
lographed with Soviet ofGcials 
such as Nikita S. Khrushchev, who 
emerged at Geneva as the domi- 
nant Soviet leader among the suc- 
cessors to Stalin. If that proved 
impossible, Eisenhower was ad- 
vised to display “an austere counte- 
nance on occasions where photo- 
graphing together is inevitable.” 
Dulles was troubled by other 
possibilities. He confided to a col- 
league that be was “terribly wor- 
ried" that the British or French 
delegations at Geneva might “fall 
for some Soviet trick.” or “accept 
some near disastrous compro- 
mise.” But what “most worried” 
him. Dulles said, was “some slip of 
the president's.” 

Eisenhower was “so inclined to 
be humanly generous, to accept a 
superficial tactical smile as evi- 
dence of inner warmth." said Dul- 
les, that the president “might in a 
personal moment with the Rus- 
sians accept a promise or a proposi- 
tion at face value and upset the 
apple carl." 

None of those calamities came to 


pass. Except for Mr. Gromyko, 
then a deputy foreign minister, and 
his boss, Foreign Minister Vya- 
cheslav M. Molotov, the Soviet of- 
ficials were awkward novices on 
the world stage, with larger con- 
cerns and inhibitions of their own. 

“We returned to Moscow from 
Geneva knowing that we hadn't 
achieved any concrete results" on 
nuclear arms control or any other 
issue, Khrushchev wrote in his 
memoirs. “But we were encour- 
aged, realizing now that our ene- 
mies probably feared us as much as 
we feared them." 

“The Geneva meeting," said 
Khrushchev, “was an important 
breakthrough for us on the diplo- 
matic froaL We bad established 
ourselves as able to hold our own in 
the international arena.” 

Eisenhower's great disappoint- 
ment at Geneva was Soviet rejec- 
tion of the “Open Skies" plan he 
unveiled. He proposed that both 
supppowers open their tmitory to 
aerial inspection and exchange 
blueprints of militar y establish- 
ments. 

But Eisenhower was almost 
alone in his surprise, for the plan 
was drafted by specialists with the 
genera] expectation that it would 

be scorned. The Kremlin under 
czarist or Communist rule always 
has placed the highest priority on 
Russian secrecy. The Soviet rebuff 
of “Open Skies" became pan of the 
internal U.S. rationale in 1956 to 
“open up” the Soviet Union unilat- 
erally with American U-2 spy 
planes. 

One Soviet history notes: “U.S. 
leaders sometimes had to give up 
their Cold War dogmas and agree 
to talks with Soviet leaders: at Ge- 
neva in 1955, at Camp David in 
1959, in Vi enna in 1961, and at 
Glassboro in 1967.'’ 

But “these talks had a short-lived 
effect,” says the book, “because the 
American side was not yet pre- 
pared to accept in good faith the 
principle of peaceful co-existence 
as the basis for relations with the 
Soviet Union.” 

It was at Glassboro, New Jersey, 
that President Lyndon B. Johnson 
and Defense Secretary Robert S. 
McNamara tried in vain to con- 
vince Prime Minister Alexei N. Ko- 
sygin that the Soviet Union should 
abandon a nuclear strategy based 
on defense — the early Soviet par- 
allel for Mr. Reagan's space- based 
defense plan. 

T HE arguments being used to- 
day on both sides of the current 
debate about defensive versus of- 
fensive nuclear deterrence, and the 



Tho ABnnntari Press 

Foreign Minister Andrei A. Gromyko, left, saying farewell 
ro Henry A. Kissinger in January 1976 as the U-S. secre- 
tary of state left Moscow-after arms control negotiations. 


risk of an endless arms race, repeat 
almost verbatim the debates of the 
1960s. But now the arguments are 
in reverse and extend to projections 
of exotic space defenses. 

Not until Congress narrowly vot- 
ed for an anti-ballistic missile sys- 
tem did the Soviet Union, which 
already had missile defenses 
around Moscow, shift course. In a 
180-degree turnabout, the Kremlin 
made an anii-h .iili.s ric missile pact 
its priority. This was out of concern 
that it would be overrun in the 
technological race with the United 
States, a Tear of Soviet strategists 
then as now. 

Negotiations between 1969 and 
1972, known as Lhe strategic arms 
limitation talks, or SALT-1, with 
Henry A. Kissinger as the chief 
strategist of the Nixon administra- 
tion. produced two fundamental 
accords: the Treaty on limitation 
of Anti-Baliislic Missile Systems, 
and the companion agreement on 
Limitation of Strategic Offensive 
Arms. 

For the Soviet leader. Leonid I. 
Brezhnev, however, the most glit- 
tering agreement signed in the 
Kremlin with President Richard M. 
Nixon in May 1972 was a docu- 
ment that meant little to Ameri- 
cans: “The Basic Principles of Re- 
lations Between the U.S.S.R. and 
the U.S A." 


For Moscow, it represented not 
only acceptance of the Soviet con- 
cept of “peaceful co-existence” but 
also its long sought “equal securi- 
ty” and “equality" in all fields. 

In fact, the document reflected a 
double mi ^representation: Soviet 
“peaceful co-existence” excluded 
any limitation on support of ideo- 
logical warfare or “wars of national 
liberation.” The UR. pledge of 
“equality" did not really concede 
to the Soviet Union equal pre-emi- 
nence in world affairs, or an equal 
voice in every dispute. 

The Nixon-Kissinger strategy, in 
any event, intended to rely primari- 
ly on a combination of “rewards 
and punishments” to induce Soviet 
restraint in its international con- 
duct, or to praalize the lack of it. 

But American expectations of 
Soviet behavior were so inflated by 
the Nixon administration and so 
unfulfilled, that in the turmoil of 
the Watergate scandal and the 
Vietnam War, U-S. strategy was 
denied both carrots and sticks, as 
Mr. Kissinger bitterly protested. 

U.S.-Soviei detente policy, start- 
ed in 1972, crumbled in stages be- 
tween 1974 and 1979. The Soviet 
intervention in Afghanistan at the 
end of 1979 was the final blow to 
dfetente. It carried down with it the 
last hope of the Carter administra- 
tion for ratifying the successor to 


Allies Fear U.S. Project May Go Beyond Research 


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By Michael Oder 

Washington Post Serf tee 

LONDON — President Ronald 
Reagan’s determination to press 
ahead with research on a space- 
based defense against missile at- 
tack is causing anxiety and confu- 
sion among U.S. allies in Europe. 
But Lhey acknowledge that it has 
played a valuable role in getting 
Moscow back to preliminary arms- 
control talks. 

The anxiety steins mostly from 
the fact that while Western Europe 
does not want the space defense 
project to go beyond the research 
stage and wants it used as a bar- 
gaining chip for agreements with 
Moscow. Mr. Reagan and Defense 
Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger 
appear to believe in the project and 
want to see it ultimately developed, 
tested and. if it works, deployed. 

The confusion is over whether 
the project, officially called the 
Strategic Defense Initiative, will be 
on the negotiating table. It is still 
“very difficult for European gov- 
ernments to fathom where the U.S. 
is going on this issue," a West .Ger- 
man said. 

The allies generally accept the 
idea that tbe United Slates must 
keep up research in areas such as 
anti-missile defense, especially 
when Moscow has such programs. 

British, West German and 
French officials make it clear that 
the allies realize that Soviet con- 



Margaret Thatcher 


dialogue 
A Wet 


A west German said the project 


But allied officials stress that the 
adcing at this point is for research, 
di development and deployment, 
ad that this card should be played 
j reach an accommodation. 

The allies' problem, according to 


out losing the ability to stop the 
project later. 

Some officials voiced concern 
that once the $26 billion for the 
research program begins to flow 
heavily, the momentum and finan- 
cial pressures will be hard to con- 
trol. 

“The research label will inexora- 
bly be exploited." one said. “Work 
will go well beyond it and all of a 
sudden, there we are," 

On the other hand, the project is 
so personally identified with Mr. 
Reagan, and involves a defense 
that may be 15 years away from 
reality, that it could be difficult for 
a later administration, even a Re- 
publican one, to sustain support for 
the project 

“l told the president of my firm 
conviction that the SDI research 
program should go ahead,” Prime 
Minister Margaret Thatcher said 
after meeting with Mr. Re3gan on 
Dec. 22. 

However, virtually all of the pub- 
lic commentary by allied leaders, 
including Mrs. Thatcher, on space 
weaponry and defense have been 
negative. 

Mrs. Thatcher has expressed a 
view shared by West Germany and 
France that a space arms race must 
be avoided. When one side goes 
beyond research, she said, "the oth- 
er win surely follow and within but 
a short time' we shall have the same 


military balance but at a higher 
level and at a higher cost.” 

Last month. President Francois 
Mitterrand of France suggested 
that Lhe American plans amounted 
to “overarmament." 

In her meeting with Mr. Reagan, 
Mrs. Thatcher “hammered out.” in 
her words, four points of agree- 
ment on space that European offi- 
cials believe could become an im- 
portant benchmark of presidential 
commitment Those points slate 
that any actual deployment would 
“have to be a matter for negotia- 
. lions,” and that the overall aim “is 
to enhance, and not to undermine, 
deterrence.” 

But the allies, officials said, are 
still worried that the system will 
not work and will drive Moscow 
into a new round of weapons devel- 
opment that could leave Europe 
“out in the cold." 

This was a reference to the pros- 
pect that a missile screen over the 
United Slates might be viewed in 


Europe as a U.S. attempt to decou- 
ple itself from Europe, which 
would not be protected, or at least 
not as well as the United States. 

There are also concerns that a 
superpower race for missile de- 
fenses could make the existing Brit- 
ish and French independent deter- 
rent force of nuclear-tipped 
offensive miss vies useless. 

One of the most striking aspects 
of the current and relatively sudden 
international focus on space- based 
defense is that it has overshadowed 
the initial deployment of cruise and' 
Pershing- 2 missiles little more than 
a year ago. 

But allied sources say the focus 
on space is a double-edged sword 
It lends to hold down any lingering 
political controversy over the mis- 
sile deployments, but it also threat- 
ens to lead governments to forget 
that the Europeans still want to 
negotiate reductions in the threat 
posed by growing numbers of Sovi- 
et SS-20 medium-range missiles- 


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1972 accords limiting offen% 
weapons, known as SALT-2, a 
product of seven years of effort by 
three administrations. 

E ven before the shock over Af- 
ghanistan, a decade of accu- 
mulated ^ grievances about Soviet 
nuclear and global policy engulfed 
the second arms treaty in Senate 
hearings. One of the principal at- 
tackers was Mr. Nitze,. who had 
helped to negotiate the first strate- 
gic arms treaty. 

A broadside of charges that the 
Soviet Union had violated its 
pledges, had achieved nuclear su- 
periority. and had thrown tbe Unit- 
ed States on tbe defensive globally, 
carried into the 1980 presidential 
ram pai gn to bdp elect Rona07 
Reagan. 

The Reagan administration, on 
taking office, returned to NSC 68 
prescription formulated in the 
1950s for building military strength 
as a prelude to bargaining with the 
Soviet Union. 

Bv contrast, in the administra- 
tion's negotiations so far, Mr. Nilze 
has been in the unusual role of a 
moderate, especially after the 
White House and the Kremlin in 
1982 balked at his “walk in the 
woods” effort with a Soviet coun- 
terpart to break the deadlock over 
limiting missiles in Europe. 

The opportunity now recurs for 
another attempt to crack the nucle- 
ar impasse between the Reagan ad- 
ministration and the Kremlin. Just 
over a year ago that appeared hr* 
probable to many in Moscow. 'Tbs? 
Soviet leadership was telling its cit- 
izens that the two superpowers ap- 
peared to be on 3 collision course. 

“Comrades, the international sit- 
uation at present is white hot, thor- 
oughly while hot," said Grigori V. 
Romanov, a member of (he Soviet 
Politburo, on Nov. 5, 19S3. 

Thai somewhat overstated ten- 
sion has lessened, but it can never 
disappear while the United States 
and the Soviet Union remain nucle- 
ar rivals. Five years ago, the former 
British ambassador to Washington, 
Peter Jay. wrote bluntly about the 
disappointment in store for those 
who envisioned an end to U.S.- 
Soviet nuclear rivalry: 

“Tbe United States and the 
U.S.S.R, are doomed to watch one 
another like hawks, to negotiate 
constantly by day for strategic par- 
ity and to plot ceaselessly by m^r*, 
for strategic advantage. Since ne^ 
iher can or will feel roily confident 
unless its parity is more equal than 
the other side's parity, dynamic in- 
stability is inherent in the very stat- 
ic stability they seek." 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JAM ARY 7, 1985 


Page 5 


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^‘v<jndReseffl' 


Sp a ce Defense Is Still a Puzzle 

^ey Issue at Talks Is Vague, No Closer to Development 


By Don Oberdorfer 

W'arii'nj/un 

WASHINGTON - On March 
23, 1983. President Ronald Reagan 
surprised the world, and all buta 
few of his closest advisers, by an- 
nouncing a high-priority research 
and development program to find 
ways of intercepting and destroy- 
ing enemy nudear missiles before 
they could hit the United Stales. 

The Strategic Defense Initiative 
quickly captured the public imagi- 
nation as the “Star Wars" plan be- 


toM P° , ^ nt,aJ levera gc of Reagan at the White House in Sep- 
toe United States in renewed bar- tentoer 1981 

8a jE5 Union. Another influence, by most ac- 

*” w ”y did the issue of counts, was the High Frontier pro- 
aJJ-SE ^f frasc re, ^K n “ **“ U -S.* P°saf for a noonuefear space-based 
^w^rangtahje^anat. defense developed by a group of 
sc ^Sf years- conservatives under retired Lieu- 

,nKr onui i am view umH the tenant General Daniel O. Graham. 
^ •i' 60s was that no defense was a defense policy adviser to Mr. 
possible against the destructive Reagan durragthe 1980 campaign. 
2“ al , lackl specially In mid-Jamiary 1982 Mr. Rea- 


Lr ITS? *?* “H** ****£*1 1982 Mr?& 

ouicldv ^ ’“grange mis- gan was briefed on a High Frontier 

* th ? 4 L? a '? m s P Ke - report that advocated “a layered 

nauoo as the “Star Wars plan be- By 1966. however, radars and siraiesic defense" to rcnlace mutu- 
cause of its reliance on exotic weap- other defensive technology had ad- a) assured destruction 
ons in outer space. Mr. Reagan vanned to the point that the Soviet . n h j. 

Vlied it “a vision of toe future Union was a fcS2 0eneraJ w aQl 

wviich offers hope" to break out of anti-missile defense around Mos- £j aicm al ^ TC P°J t ' 

tiw grim postwar balance of i error, cow that would use missiles to hit general ^receptivity from Mr. 

The leader of toe Soviet Union at ottonriariiST . su W >or V 


■Vdjed it “a vision of toe futVe Union was ISSSg Z a lS3 UeoeraJ no1 

waich offers hope" to break out of anti-missile defense around Mos- Sa 65 *" 1 al “l* TC P?J 1 ' 

tiw grim postwar balance of terror, cow that would use missiles to hit eenera ^. recepuvny from Mr. 

The leader of toe Soviet Union at other imssteT *5" “SL-? h* *"* ■ SUpP ° r \ 

^ v - Andropov, re- President Lyndon B. Johnson j£J Geo^A. K^nrth™? ^ 

sponded with unusual speed and was under growing pressure to T' Ueor E L *; Ke ^ VDrtij - d - 

blummss from the Kremlin. spend billions on an elaborate U.S. A u new ^a* nimed out 

Just four days later, Andropov defense system, despite tbe clear !2.-^ , c JH? a ™ involved the Joint 
personally denounced Mr. Rea- prospect that both Soviet and U.S. Staff. They were mcrcas- 

gan's plan as threatening to “open defensive programs would be over- lf ^v ? 0, !^S? ed ^ le , m , and 
toe floodgates to a runaway race of whelmed by rapid developments on v y m . , over ^ U, ° u j , i® of 
all types of strategic arras, both the offensive side. the nation s latest proposed addi- 


all types of strategic arras, both 
offensive and defensive." 

Just the U.S. intention to devel- 
op means of stopping a Soviet re- 
taliatory strike. Andropov said, "is 
a bid to disarm the Soviet Union in 
the face of a U.S. nuclear threat." 

Rarely has there been such a dra- 
matic example of words and con- 
cepts outpacing tangible facts and 
capabilities. 

V Mr. Reagan's proposal it has 
now been learned, was adopted in a 
highly personal, secret ana almost 
accidental manner. It bas long been 
clear that his announcement pre- 
ceded his administration's own 
studies to determine toe technical 
possibilities, practical objectives 
and strategic rationale of toe plan 
he already had announced. 

In terms of tangible scientific 


the offensive side. 

To head off such a costly compe- 
tition, Johnson proposed to toe So- 
viet Union in December 1966 tatU 


Lion to land-based strategic offen- 
sive forces, the MX. 

It seemed to toe nation's uni- 


vici union m ueccmDCT two taivt *• 

on limiting anti-ballistic missile fptmed military leaders that con- 

UiL J . d linitrtl ft.liiinn* nnlv nn ctnlnric 


systems on both sides. Moscow re- 
plied that it was necessary to deal 


linued reliance only on strategic 
offensive forces was a questionable 


pucu uuii u was necessary to firfU -vi-wui/i*™.- 

with both offensive and defensive P 0 ^ ^ or toe future, 
arms in considering limitations be- Mr. Weinberger was informed of 
cause of their integral relationship, the chiefs' view that a more inten- 
The negotiations on the Strategic sive program of investigating a 


■ uw uvgviLUiuuus uu uk aiTv piugiotii uivnugauug a 

Arms Limitation Treaty that began strategic defense should be consid- 
in November 1969 finally produced ered, an official said. But be and 
a treaty in mid- 1972 sharply limit- others said there was no formal 
tog the ABM programs on each recommendation at this point for a 


“ig, uiw ni/ivi piugi>uuh uu taui lu-vmui^uui&uuii at uua j. 

side. It also produced a separate full-scale national effort. 


“interim agreement" that was to be 
toe first step toward serious limita- 
tion of offensive weapons. 


Mr. Reagan met toe Joint Chiefs 
in toe presence of Mr. Weinberger 
on Feb. 11, 1983. The main subject 


n . | l T UU ■ bU, 11, A I uv UAtAAlA 

By agreeing in 1972 to all but of the meeting was to be the MX. 
abandon strategic defense, the two But at the mention of strategic de- 


— j — ■ — _ “o — : " — . . dui at uic luguuuu ui audicgiL uir 

In lerms of tangible scientific powers in effect enshrined their fense as an option to be crasidered, 
and military development, very lit- mutual vulnerability and toe threat according to one participant, Mr. 
tie has changed since March 1983. of retaliation as the basis for their Reagan displayed an immediate 

A WKitP Hnucp cnolrKni < in Security. i 


A White House spokesman said am. -.«««»*- 

Thursday that as of now, the Sira- In a pamphlet made public A/w ,- 

Defense Initiative "doa not" 

tuftlly be able to fulfil] Mr. Rea- thing, he said, the pace of a con- oc P cctcd . l ° muc “ , 

gan’s “vision" has cast a doud of toiuing Soviet offensive and defen- A participant told a friend later 

doubt over tbe fundamental pro- sive military buildup “has upset the toaUas toe discussion proceeded, 
mises and equations that underlie balance in the areas of greatest im- Mr- Reagan asked those around the 
nearly two decades of U.S. -Soviet portance during crises." . "Woukl it not be better to 

anus control negotiations. For another thing, he said, “new defe Q ? lrves than to avenge them, 

i /Mr. Reagan’s a»ce-based de- technologies are now at hand which To tins observer, familiar with the 
fense plan will be at the heart of the may make possible a truly effective presetents ways, toe rmg of that 
discussions this week in Geneva nonnuclear defense." xhetonc signified a policy change 

between Secretary of State George A variety of officials and former whose time had come. 

P. Shultz and Foreign Minister An- officials interviewed recently said Mr. Reagan was due to make a 
drd A. Gromyko. they believed that Mr. Reagan’s long-postponed address to toe na- 

Seiuor U.S. officials said it is interest has been reinforced by Dr. lion late in March to defend U.S. 
dear from the stOl-secrei tort of the Edward TeBar, the father of the military budgets and programs, es- 


and strong interest 
According to a second-hand ac- 


to half an hour, though it had been 
expected to be much briefer. 

A participant told a friend later 

.1 * a I : J! J.J 


Weapons at Issue in Geneva Who Distrusts Russians 


P. Shultz and Foreign Minister An- 
drei A. Gromyko. 

Senior U.S. officials said it is 
dear from the stOl-secrei text of toe 
Nov. 17 letter from the Soviet lead- 
er, Konstantin U. Chernenko, 
which proposed toe Geneva talks, 


UlilVKUd UiUU ViWWWU IHAdlUJ MIU I*U . Vt(U UUW IU UUUIV U 

they believed (hat Mr. Reagan’s long-postponed address lo toe na- 
in teres t has been reinforced by Dr. lion late in March to defend U.S. 
Edward Teller, the father of the military budgets and programs, es- 
UiL hydrogen bomb. Dr. Teller pedaliy the MX, against growing 
had opposed the ABM treaty, and criticism. In advance of toe speech, 
at a government laboratory he White House aides were searching 
sponsored tbe development of X- for a new dement to make toe case 


GENEVA — Secrctaiy of State George P. Shultz and Foreign 
Minbler Andrei A Gromyko will have toe following weapons sys- 
tems to consider at this week's talks: 

SPACE 

Ballistic Missile Defense; In March 1983, President Ronald Reagan 
proposed a Strategic Defense Initiative to speed research into defen- 
sive weapons to he deployed in space as a shield that would make 
nuclear missiles “impotent and obsolete." 

Hailing this research program is likely to be the main Soviet goal in 
new negotiations. 

UJS. military scientists are working on the feasibility of directed* 
energy weapons such as lasers, intense beams of light, to be deployed 
in earth orbit and aimed at missiles in flight. Moscow is also 
conducting laser experiments. 

Deployment of lasers is space could be decades away. 

Anri-SateUite Weapons; Moscow has successfully tested a nonnu- 
clear space weapon designed to put low-orbiting reconnaissance and 
other satellites out of action. Guided by a radar sensor, it discharges 2 
duster of destructive pellets. 

The United States has been developing an and -satellite system and 
Iasi June tested a nonnuclear device, with on-board computers, it 
located a target and destroyed it with a metal net A test of toe 
guidance system was carried out in November. 

Both superpowers rely on satellites for earth surveillance and early 
warning of atomic attack. 

INTERCONTINENTAL NUCLEAR WEAPONS 

Intercontinental ballistic missiles are the most threatening because 
of their high accuracy and destructive punch and because many are in 
ground silos vulnerable to a surprise first strike. 

The Soviet Union has 7,700 intercontinental strategic ballistic 
missiles, and toe United States has 7.297, according to Western 
figures. 

NUCLEAR BOMBER FORCES 

The Soviet Union has 100 long-range Bear bombers and 43 long- 
range Bison bombers. Both can carry a combination of nuclear bombs' 1 
and air-launched cruise missiles, according to toe International Insti- 
tute for Strategic Studies in London. 

The Pentagon says the Soviet Union is flight-testing toe fast, long- 
range Blackjack bomber, which is likely to go into operation in 1987 
to replace toe less capable Bison. 

The United States has about 240 B-52 nuclear bombers that can 
carry bombs or air-launched cruise missiles, as would tbe B-l bomber 
that the United States wants to deploy be ginning in 1986. Washington 
is also working on a “stealth" bomber that would, in theory, be 
difficult to detect by radar. 

The International Institute of Strategic Studies counted about 
1,000 long-range U.S. air-Iauncbed cruise missiles as of July. 

Negotiations on intercontinental missiles, known as toe Strategic 
Arms Reduction Talks, or START, began in June 1982 and were 
suspended by Moscow in December 1983, after new U.S. medium- 
range weapons began arriving in Western Europe. 

INTERMEDIATE-RANGE NUCLEAR FORCES 

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization is in the process of 
deploying S72 Pershing-2 and cruise medium-range misales in Eu- 
rope in response to a Soviet build-up of SS-20S. U.S.- Soviet talks on 
intermediate-range missiles began in 1981 but were broken off by toe 
Kremlin in November 1983. 


WIUU1 uiupuacu UIC UUUWVM UlULO, *** “ uunAuwij uv »•*!**»• mvkjw hiuvm mhuvusu^ 

that toe highest Soviet priority sponsored tbe development of X- for a new dement to make toe case 
there would be. an stopping toe ray lasers generated by nudear more palatable to toe public. 

U.S. drive into space. This fact pro- weapons. Dr. Tdler visited Mr. This new dement was prepared 


in great secrecy by a very s mall 
group of aides. 

Mr. Weinberger, who was travel- 
ing abroad, reportedly argued until 
the last minute against toe an- 
nouncement of the Strategic De- 
fense Initiative. 

Though military programs were 
changed little, toe change in philos- 
ophy announced by Mr. Reagan 
generated strong reactions among 
scientists, politicians and arms con- 
trol advocates in toe United Slates. 
Bui the strongest reactions were 
from the Soviet Union. 

Only a day or two after the ad- 
dress, the Soviet negotiator, Viktor 
P. Karpov, raised toe issue with 
U.S. negotiator. General Edward 
Rowny, in the Geneva strategic 


Seen as Chief Mover on Soviet Policy 


arms reduction talks, according to 
administration sources. 

If an effective space-based de- 
fense plan is as impractical as por- 
trayed by some U.S. private ex- 
perts, why are is the Soviet Union 
so strongly opposed and so eager lo 
negotiate on toe subject? 

In answer to that question, John 
D. Stem bran er. director of foreign 
policy studies at the Brookings In- 
stitution in Washington, said that 
“toe Soviets understand the pros- 
pects of an effective defense are 
very smalL" They are concerned 
because tbe Strategic Defense Ini- 
tiative “involves a surge of technol- 
ogy across toe board," he said. 
“Most of it will show up in toe 
offense." 


By Fred Hi art 

Wathzrrgton Past Scmar 

WASHINGTON — Richard N. 
Perfe. who did as much as any 
American to doom dtenie during 
the 1970s, thinks that tbe Soviet 
Union is “a place where everyone 
lies all the time." 

As the Reagan administration 
resumes a dialogue Monday with 
tbe Soviet Union in Geneva, with 
Mr. Perie in attendance, that opin- 
ion may be crociaL 

Despite his relatively low-rank- 
ing job as assistant secretary of 

Arfenv for international security 
policy, and despite bring a Demo- 
crat in a Republican administra- 
tion. Mr. Peric has had more influx 
eoce on policy toward toe Soviet 
Union during the put four years 
than any other administration offi- 
cial, according to experts inside 
and outside government 

Mr. Perie, 43, was the intellectual 
force behind U.S. aims control po- 
sitions that were so stringent that 
President Ronald Reagan's first 
secretary of state, Alexander M. 

. Haig Jr., labeled them “not nego- 
tiable" and "absurd.” 

Mr. Perie was tbe architect of a 
campaign to restrict toe flow of 
Western technology to toe Soviet 
Union, and he played a key role in 
shifting, the debate over arms con- 
trol to the question of alleged Sovi- 
et iratmtwortomess and “verifica- 
tion.” 

He is “the single most effective 
bureaucrat in the government," 
said Senator Larry Pressler, Re- 
publican of South Dakota. He is. 
Mr. Pressler said, “toe strongest 
single force against an arms control 
agreement-" 

His influence rests in part on the 
bureaucratic skill depth of knowl- 
edge and consistency that have 
matte him a fo rmidab le intellectual 
force on the right since be became 
an aide to Senator Henry M. Jack- 
son, Democrat of Washington, in 
1969. Senator Jackson died in 1983. 

That background and a relish Tor 
battle have helped Mr. Perie out- 
maneuver foes within the Penta- 

S in the State and Commerce 
_ ailments, in Congress and 
among toe European allies. He of- 
ten does this with charm, some- 
times with undisguised contempt 
for what he views as their woolly- 
headed tomlring 
Mr. Perle’s success has also rest- 
ed on the administration’s disarray 
and inexperience in arms centred. 
And it has depended ultimately on 
Mr. Reagan and Defense Secretary 
Caspar W. Weinberger, neither of 
whom shared his arms control ex- 
pertise when they came into office 
but both of whom have tended to 
share his world view. 

“Richard is a skillful bureaucrat 
and a tough political insider and all 



Richard N. Perie 

that, " said Walter B. Slocombe, 
who held Mr. Perle’s job in the 
Carter administration. “But he 
doesn't do it all with mirrors. He 
does it because he has the support 
of Weinberger, who, when push 
comes to shove, usually has toe 
support of toe president." 

Nevertheless, more moderate of- 
ficials in tbe administration would 
rather blame Mr. Perie than Mr. 
Reagan when they lose, and Mr. 
Perie at times seems to enjoy toe 

imag f that makes him a target. 

Son of a California businessman, 
Mr. Perie attended .Hollywood 
High School and, in toe early 
1960s. tbe University of Southern 
California. 

Mr. Perie spent a year at the 
London School of Economics and 
then did graduate work at Prince- 
ton University in international re- 
lations. As pan of his Princeton 
research, be spent considerable 
time in Europe, studying the nego- 
tiating strategies of Denmark and 
Britain for entering toe Common 
Market 

Mr. Jackson hired him in 1969 
and Mr. Perie worked far tbe sena- 
tor for 10 years, reaming only afta 
helping to prevent Senate ratifica- 
tion of the strategic arms limitation 
treaty negotiated by the Carter ad- 
ministration. 

The “only unambiguously suc- 
cessful arms control” pact, Mr. 
Perie said, only half facetiously, 
was the agreement around the turn 
of the century to ri mil fan™ the 
Great Lakes. 

Mr. Perie does not hesitate to 
dismiss the U.S. militaiy and the 
State Department as Unequipped 
to negotiate with the Soviet Union 
because both want agreements too 
badly. 

He said he favors talking to the 
Soviet Union, in part because nego- 
tiations bdp maintain political 


support for military spending in 
toe WesL But be said the prospects 
for favorable results were dim be- 
cause the “terrible failure" of toe 
Soviet revolution has left that na- 
tion dependent on “sheer brute 
face." 

Mr. Perie operates with an air of 
certainty that tends to knock others 
aside. Fbr example, on the last day 
in office fa Frank Cariucri, toe 
deputy secretary, Mr. Perie per- 
suaded him to strip authority for 
export controls awmf from Richard 
D. Ddouer, then undersecretary 
for research and development, and 
give it to Mr. Perie. 

"My argument was very simple," 
Mr. Perie said: “‘I want to do 
something to solve this problem, 
and Dick DeLaner doesn’t.' " 

His sense of certainty tends to 
silence those who might take a 
more moderate position on arms 
control — what Mr. Perie would 
call a more “naive” view — in an 
administration where no one dares 
look soft on toe Soviet Union. 

In 1983, for example, the admin- 
istration was preparing adraft trea- 
ty to bon chemical weapons. Mr. 
Perie thought that the Soviet Union 
would cheat on such a treaty unless 
Washington insisted on inspection 
procedures allowing U.S. officials 
io check suspected chemical arms 
factories. 

The Joint Chiefs of Staff op- 
posed such inspection rules be- 
cause the) 1 did not want their stocks 
subject to Soviet snooping. Tbe 
Central Intelligence Agency feared 
that the Russians would take ad- 
vantage and pry into unrelated 
U.S. secrets. 

State Department officials op- 
posed Mr. Perle’s proposal because 
they thought that the Russians 
would never accept such rigid stan- 
dards and, worse, because the 
Western allies knew that the Rus- 
sians would not accept them. 

Mr. Perie persuaded Mr. Wein- 
berger and, later, the Joint Chiefs 
of Staff. Mr. Weinberger's support 
ensured that toe Perie option was 
put before Mr. Reagan, and the 
president went along. 

“It may mean that we can't get 
an agreement on that basis; they 
simply may not be prepared to 
agree to that degree of inspection," 
Mr. Perie said. But he said that an 
agreement without such safeguards 
would be worse than none at alL 

Mr. Perie said he opposed earlier 
arms control agreements because 
they gave toe appearance of modi- 
fying Soviet behavior and thus less- 
ening Western resolve to keep up in 
defense spending without reaDy 
limiting Soviet militaiy growth. He 
said he would favor an agreement 
that would reduce both sides’ arse- 
nals but that chances for such an 
agreement are slim. 


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Page 6 


MONDAY, JANUARY 7 


1985 


Hera lb 


INTERN^IONAL 

PuHwhfd Uijh Hf V» York Hdks and The Ta tigpn a Pan 


tribune 


Starting Over in Geneva 


Two things are essential For any deal on 
limiting nuclear weapons: a Forum for bar- 
gaining and plausible proposals. The United 
Slates and the Soviet Union are miles from the 
latter, but inches from the former. So when 
they finally meet today in Geneva it will be a 
success if they agree only to meet tomorrow 
and tomorrow and tomorrow. If they can 
achieve even that much. Secretary of State 
George Shullz and Foreign Minister Andrd 
Gromyko will have earned their fare, and the 
thanks of a worried world. 

There have been no bilateral arms talks 
since December 1983. when the Soviet Union 
broke off dual negotiations on iniercoatraen- 
tal and intermediate missiles. The purpose was 
to portray President Reagan as a warmonger, 
playing to the fears or Western Europe’s peace 
movement. Bui then leaders changed in Mos- 
cow. Ronald Reagan took up the peace issue 
during the campaign and the Russians began 
to dear the path to Geneva. 

To get moving again. Secretary Shultz pro- 
poses a fresh approach. First he calls for bun- 
dling ail offensive weapons into a single set of 
negotiations with the aim of achieving real 
cuts. Then he proposes sitting down to discuss 
only defensive weapons — meaning “star 
wars" and anti-satellite weapons. And even 
these discussions would concern deployment, 
not research and development. 

The fust offer makes sense as a face-saving 
device for both parties to resume meetings. 
The bigger the bundle, the more room for 
swapping concessions in different categories 
of offensive weapons. But that pinched second 
offer has the smell of an interdepartmental 
consensus expressing only the minim um agree- 
ment among the hawkish and the less hawkish 
in the Reagan administration. Unwilling to 
knock heads, President Reagan has by default 
yielded to those who favor only what the 
Russians are certain to reject. 

At the same time, though, the Soviet 
Union's staled position on defensive weapons 
is equally onesided. As a down payment on 
unspecified concessions. Moscow wants to 
ball all space-related weapons immediately, 
from still remote “star war" lasers to killer 
missiles for destroying satellites. Such a ban. 
according to President Konstantin Chernen- 
ko. would “facilitate" limits on other weapons. 

fn short. Messrs. Shultz and Gromyko will 
be swapping wish lists, the ritual preliminary 
to real bargaining. What happens next de- 
pends on how capable their bosses are at 
wringing from divided bureaucracies a better 
offer that the other side cannot refuse. 

President Reagan's track record on this is 
unimpressive, and President Chernenko's is 
untested. But eacb is anxious to avoid the 
odium for driving the arms race perilously 
higher. So what is most likely at Geneva is that 
the superpowers will parley to parley. That is 
surely better than not talking at all. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Having earlier portrayed the pending Gene- 
va talks as an achievement for its diplomacy 
and a harbinger of better East-West tunes, the 
Reagan administration now speaks of a useful 
but necessarily modest occasion that will 
merely let George Shullz and Andrei Gromyko 
start trying to get together on arms control. 
The scaling down of public expectations is 
wise. The whole grim record of arms control 
failures and frustrations is being brought to 
Geneva, along with a lot of mutual distrust. 
Just to agree on a workable agenda will be a 
strenuous and time-consuming task. 

What is reasonable to ask? That each side at 
least address the other’s principal anxieties. 
On the American side, concern focuses, as it 
must, on the question of Soviet compliance 
wit h past accords and on the threat that Soviet 
heavy land-based missiles continue to pose to 
U.S. land-based missiles, the American com- 
mand and control system and American peace 
of mind. On the Soviet side, concern centers on 
the quickening U.S. deployment of numerous 
accurate new offensive weapons and on the 
possible eventual success of President Rea- 
gan's missile-defense project: taken together, 
the ingredients of a capability for a first strike. 

It is not necessary' — nothing in the history 
of arms control indicates it is feasible — to 
tackle Lbe whole of the two sets of concerns. 
The test will be whether appropriate pieces can 
be isolated for the purpose of renewing a 
negotiation. Mr. Reagan has high arms control 
ambitions. Still, ambition can be a trap. The 
Soviet-American circuit is frail and easily 
overloaded. After much roughness and a long 
hiatus, what is most needed is a sure start. 

Too Uule is known of the debates that pro- 
duced the position Mr. Gromyko brings to 
Geneva. Too much may be known of the 
debates that produced the U.S. position. Per- 
haps insufficient attention is being paid to the 
effect that the very process of a negotiation, if 
one actually begins, can have on that position. 

The Russians assail Mr. Reagan for launch- 
ing “star wars." But of course. They would 
love to see him abandon, for no price at all, a 
program that may greatly widen die U.S. tech- 
nological edge even if it never gets beyond the 
current protracted research stage. 

American critics of “star wars." forgetting 
perhaps that Mr. Reagan is a strongly re- 
elected president with a determined grip on the 
idea, assail him for saying he is unwilling to 
trade it away. But in a certain context, one 
which Moscow can shape by addressing U.S. 
fears, the unnego liable becomes negotiable. 

It is uncertain whether the Geneva negotia- 
tors will be able to break past the familiar 
obstacles. But it is good to see Mr. Gromyko 
and Mr. Shultz heading there. Dialogue is 
important It offers the essential reassurance 
that the superpowers, with their immense re- 
sponsibility to the whole globe, seek a greater 
measure of control over the common destiny. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


Three-Sided Poker in Geneva 

The third power at the negotiation table in 
Geneva today will be weapons technology — 
technology as an impersonal, con-ideological 
force that drives the arms race and the various 
theories contrived to manage it politically. 

For more than a year the United States and 
the Soviet Union have hardly been talking, 
and for more than a decade they have been 
unable to come up with any ratifiable major 
treaties. This diplomatic hiatus, however, has 
placed no inhibitions on the relentless thrust of 
weapons technology. Stealth bombers, cruise 
missiles, mobile rockets, infrared sensors, laser 
and directed -energy weapons — many innova- 
tions will be haunting the Geneva negotia- 
tions. The onrush of weapons technology is 
eroding the premises on which existing strate- 
gic arms agreements are based. 

We may be moving into a period when the 
array of weapons is so varied and so unverifi- 
able that humanity can save itself only by 
using its inherent good sense. If politicians 
finally face the reality that weapons techno- 
logy will not provide’ security, perhaps they 
will put more reliance on humanity’s instinct 
for survival. In the end, i t is our only hope. It is 
Geneva's brightest promise. 

— The Baltimore Sun. 

We have expressed anxiety about space ar- 
mament since President Reagan’s ‘'star wars” 
speech in March 1983. We are opposed for 
three reasons: First, this initiative leads to 
arms expansion; the side developing defensive 
weapons will not throw away its offensive 
weapons and the other ride might increase its 
offensive weapons and try to break the defen- 
sive network. Second, it costs an extraordinary 
amount of money to develop space arms [and 
the resulting] U.S. deficit would weaken the 


power of the United Slates. Third, it deepens 
the crack between the United States and its 
allies. If the United States becomes an invul- 
nerable fortress, will Europe be left outside? 

Will the Soviets subscribe to decreasing the 
number of nuclear missiles they have deployed 
in exchange for America stopping the develop- 
.meni of space weapons? U the [Geneva] meet- 
ing collapses, the United States will have to 
proceed. This is a dangerous game of poker. 

— Asahi Shimbun (Tokyo). 

This meeting has all the omens of failure. 
Not only because the accumulated problems 
are of course too vast and complex for even the 
start of a solution in two days of spectacular 
negotiations. But above all because Messrs. 
Shultz and Gromyko arrive in Geneva with 
completely contradictory positions on the 
main subject of discussion, “star wars." 

The Soviets have not quite claimed that their 
return to the negotiating table is a concession 
that must be repaid — but almost. The press 
and the leadership in Moscow assert that the 
other ride must prove its “goodwill,” “confirm 
its words of peace by actions” and “renounce 
the quest for military superiority" by aban- 
doning its space defense program. 

— Michel Tatu in Le Monde (Paris). 

It looks as if we can expect a year — or 
maybe several years — of talking, blit little real 
progress. And the only person that would 
really suit would be Richard Perie. Last week 
he gave his influential perspective on what lies 
ahead. “The sense that we and the Russians 
could compose our differences, reduce them to 
treaty constraints, enter into agreements, trea- 
ties, reflecting a set of constraints, and then 
rely on compliance to produce a safer world — 
I don't agree with any of that." 

— The Observer ( London l 


FROM OUR JAN. 7 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Saragossa Bombs Cause Worry 
MADRID —The situation in Saragossa com- 
mences to trouble the Government here. Even 
those who two months agp refused to ascribe 
importance to a bomb explosion there, and 
attributed it to a private vengeance, qow admit 
that some secret Anarchist centre exists in that 
city, plotting to terrorize the authorities and 
the population. The four petards of [Jan. 2], of 
which two exploded and two were discovered 
in time, induced the Governor to summon all 
the city authorities to a meeting, It was decided 
not to create un necessary alarm, to double the 
police vigilance and to send a detailed report 
to Madrid. Id spite of the panic which the first 
explosion caused at the church of Pilar, during 
a large religious ceremony, the population is 
calm The city has resumed its usual aspect. 


1935: Hunting Heresy Whb Terror 
MOSCOW —The heresy bunt which is always 
under way in this country is now conducted 
with increased vigor as the result of the Krem- 
lin’s decision, following lbe [Dec.!] assassina- 
tion of Sergei Mironovich Kirov, former secre- 
tary of the Communist Party at Leningrad, to 
stamp out apposition. For every person exe- 
cuted, imprisoned or exiled, twenty or perhaps 
fifty are questioned, dismissed from their posi- 
tions or expelled from the Party or the Young 
Communist League. Terror strikes not only at 
acts or die intention to act, but also at ideas 
expressed in private conversation. Officials are 
disciplined even for relating counterrevolu- 
tionary anecdotes — the type of anecdote 
which has flourished in every country in Eu- 
rope subjected since the war to dictatorship. 


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Small Steps for a Courtly Nuclear Dame 


Z"' 1 AMB RIDGE, Massachusetts — When Sec- 
rotary of State George Shultz and Foreign 
Minister Andrd Gromyko meet in Geneva, there 
is a real possibility that, although they will talk 
seriously, they will simply talk past each other. 

As in previous negotiations, the Americans 
will focus on the practical details of aims control 
They will be interested chiefly in settingup a new 
schedule for negotiations. The Soviets wul dwell 
on broad declaratory principals: a ban on space 
weapons, a freeze, a comprehensive test ban. 
Deeply suspicious and skeptical, they will de- 
mand to know American intentions: Is the Unit- 
ed States seeking superiority and giving up re- 
straints on defensive weapons? 

Impatient Americans, like a young man eager 
to live with his girlfriend, will want to know 
where to put the furniture. The Soviets, like a 
demure maiden, will insist on knowing American 
intentions firsL These talks may become a dia- 
logue of the deaf. How, then, can Mr. Shultz and 
Mr. Gromyko maximize the chances of making 
progress at the negotiating table? 

To understand the talks, we need to step bade 
and understand the historical context In the 
1970s. the detente years, the United States was 
essentially playing “Let's make a deaL" Wash- 
ington calculated that there were deals to be 
made involving arms control, trade, human 
rights and Vietnam. When the Soviets did not 
abide by America's rules of fair play, but 
launched an immoise arms buildup and engaged 
in aggressive behavior in the Third World, Amer- 
ica called off the game and went home. 

The Soviets saw the situation differently. Sim- 
ply put, they were playing “Let's form a relation- 
ship." Given the Soviets' deep-seated feelings of 
insecurity and inferiority, that new relationship 
with the United States in the 1970s meant a great 
deal to them. For the first time the United States 
acknowledged Soviet-American military parity. 
Moscow greatly relished the prestige and en- 
hanced self-confidence of being an equal partner. 
A marriage of sorts was in the making. 

Picture how the situation looked to Soviet eyes 
as the decade turned: The Soviet bride is Stand- 


By William L. Ury 

mg with the American bridegroom at the altar 
when suddenly, in front of the whole world, he 
changes his mind and stalks off. The bride waits 
through 1980 and 1981. embarrassed and puz- 
zled. Finally she gives up and goes home, huxnili- 
aied and angry. Decisions in Moscow ore made 
coolly and rationally, as in a chess match, but it 
would be a mistake to overlook the emotions 
lying just beneath the surface. 

The “people problem," through mispercep- 
tions and excessive suspicions, can easily frus- 
trate progress at the negotiating table. What, 
then, can be done? The most important outcome 
of Geneva may be not substantive progress in 
arms control but a restoration of confidence. 

A kind of courtly dance needs to follow Presi- 
dent Reagan’s change in rhetoric. The strategy 
for the United States is to search for low-cost 
steps that yield high benefits for the relationship. 
One possible step would be to reaffirm an agree- 
ment that has already been signed: the Basic 
Principles of Relations oF 1972. The United 
States also could ratify the 1974 Threshold Test 
Ban Treaty and the 1976 agreement on under- 






-•/fC' 


Drawing tov Bcftrendt in Hat Porool lAintterdom). 
Distributed by Cartoonists & Writers Syndicate. 


ground nuclear explosions for peaceful purposes, 
possibly with a protocol on verification. 

.And Washington could restore the Soviet air- 
line’s landing rights in the United States. That 
may seem like a small matter to .Americans, but 
to tire Soviets, acutely sensitive about their pres- 
tige. il would be a welcome sign. 

Since the Soviet shooting down of Korean Air 
Lines flight 007 provoked the termination of 
Aeroflot's landing rights, it would be fitting to 
restore them in conjunction with the initiation of 
lall s covering incidents in the air. Modeled on 
the successful agreement that the two navies 
reached in 1972 to avoid collisions at spa, such an 
agreement would specify procedures 10 follow in 
the event that an unauthorized aircraft neared 
either side’s borders. Recent interviews with So- 
viet officials have shown interest in tins idea. 

Starting with such relatively minor steps, both 
sides could focus next on substantive issues on 
which agreement might be easily reached. One 
candidate would be measures to avert dangerous 
crises that could damage the relationship or, 
worse, provoke a nuclear confrontation. 

in a speech last March that the Soviets repeat- 
edly cite. Konstantin Chernenko proposed rules 
of conduct for nuclear powers. The very first rule 
emphasizes the prevention and control of crises. 
Washington could show interest in Mr. Chernen- 
ko's proposal and suggest a set of talks to discuss 
how to implement iL In that context, both sides 
could consider crisis-control centers in Moscow 
and Washington to avert accidental nuclear war. 

Having built the necessary momentum, the 
negotiators then could tackle the trickiest issues 
of all: nuclear arms and space weapons. 

Progress toward serious arms control can be- 
gin in Geneva, but only if the two rides control 
their expectations and. building on small steps, 
create a climate of confidence after years of dull. 

The writer is director of Harvard's Nuclear Negoti- 
ation Project and author of Beyond the Hotline: How 
Crisis Control Can Prevent Nuclear War." to be 
published by Houghton Mifflin in March. He contrib- 
uted this comment to the Las Angeles Tunes. 


Helping a Hindu Revolution to Stop at the Border 


N EW DELHI — A conservative. 

Hindu revolution has swept In- 
dia. Ignoring their discontent over 
die Congress Party’s five years of 
misrule and corruption, Indian voters 
have given 40-year-old Rajiv Gandhi 
a sweeping mandate that they with- 
held from ms mother, Indira Gandhi 
and even from his grandfather, Jawa- 
harial Nehru. While the extent of this 
mandate is reassuring, its nature 
seems quite ominous. 

The election was reassuring in that 
the Indian people have entrusted Ra- 
jiv Gandhi with safeguarding the 
country's unity. He wrapped hims elf 
in the flag and sold himself as the 
political bar to Indira Gandhi, whose 
assassination by two Sikh security 
guards in October became synony- 
mous with an assault on the Indian 
state. In death, then, Indira become 
India and, in effect, campaigned 
posthumously for her son. 

The Congress Party’s triumph is 
frightening because Rajiv Gandhi de- 
picted the assault on the state as the 
work of separatist Sikh fundamental- 
ists. His campaign theme of “unity in 
danger" deeply touched many Hin- 
dus, appealing subtly to their histori- 
cal fears and mistrust of non-Hindus. 

Mr. Gandhi's mandate is a tri- 
umph of neo-Hinduism. Thousands 
of chauvinistic Hindus abandoned 


By Harish (Chare 


their traditional champions — right- 
wing parties like the Bharatiya Janata 
Party — to rally under his banner. 
Those parties have been decimated, 
but the right-wing constituency has 



Rally GandhU by Sudhir Oar. 


in fact been strengthened and en- 
larged, putting the liberal, democrat- 
ic fringje in mortal danger. 

Strangely enough, Rajiv Gandhi is 
not, to use VS. Naipaul’s phrase, a 
“believer." He and Ins dose advisers 


Men Overboard! Or Just 
Horses for New Courses? 


By Janies Res ton 


I’m tired of Lave: 

I'm still more tired of Rhyme. 
But Money gives me pleasure 
all the time. 

— Hilaire Bdloc 

W ASHINGTON — A funny 
thing happened to President 
Reagan on his way to “four more 
years" in the White House. Just 
when he had set the Ship of State 
on the ’‘right" course, his loyal 
conservative crew began diving 
from the poop deck. U wasn’t a 
case of mutiny on the Bounty, but 
the lure of bounty on the shore. 

The first to go overboard was the 
president's own lawyer, Attorney 
General William French Smith. 
Then Ed Meese left the upper deck 
for the Justice Department, but 
hasn’t quite made it 
This left Judge Gark, who al- 
ways seems to be leaving the State 
Department or the White House or 
the Interior Department for some- 
where else. He decided over the 
Christmas holidays that it was time 
to go back lo California. 

Finally, Mike Deaver, the door- 
keeper and stage manager of the 
Oval Office, concluded sadly that 
be couldn't live happily in Wash- 
ington on $72,000 a year, even with 
bis wife's lucrative assistance, and 
took refuge, at $200,000 a year, in a 
local publicity establishment 
How to explain that the first to 
jump ship even before the start of 
the second cruise were the skip- 
per’s first officers and closest 
friends? The short answer is that 
they have always been more inter- 
ested in Ronald Reagan than in 
revolution, in electing rather than 
in governing, in helping their bud- 
dy when a second term seemed like 
fun. The first four years were a 
lark, but another four in Washing- 
ton would be a sentence. Mr. Smith 
lives in a hotel. Even George Shultz 
rents a furnished house. 

Obviously. Messrs. Smith, Clark 
and Deaver don't think the battle 
or the budget is over or, despite the 
spectacular election victory, that 
the conservative realignment of 
American politics is assured. 

But the Republicans, or at least 
these California Republicans, are 
not like the Democrats, who think 
of politics as a life career and wear 
themselves out in the process. Re- 
publicans seem to think of politics 


as a temporary adventure or nob- 
lesse oblige duty, to be performed 
for a while before they go home to 
better business and a prominent 
notice in “Who’s Who." 

The president has lost Howard 
Baker as the Republican leader in 
the Senate, which is a serious loss, 
but be retains Jim Baker, who is 
restless, as chief of staff in the 
White House. So he’s one Baker 
down and maybe one to go. 

As for Mr. Reagan’s departing 
conservative buddies: With due re- 
spect for their temporary efforts, 
they are disposable and replace- 
able. In his first term the president 
chose the best of his friends: now 
be bas a chance to replace them 
with the best of his party. 

As for “Poor Mike" Deaver, 
now to be “Rich Mike," he loses 
his office but not his influence. He 
will be as close to the president and 
Nancy Reagan as her telephone, 
only now be will be paid more. 

Conservatives have clearly lost 
some influence in the White House 
and the Senate, with Bob Dole in 
charge for at least the next couple 
of years, but they still have some 
powerful advocates in the cabinet. 

They will have to get rid of Ray- 
mond Donovan at Labor, although 
he is not a convicted crook, be- 
cause he is an embarrassment- But 
the conservatives can still count 
on Cappy Weinberger, the verbal 
gunslinger, and other pearls at the 
Pentagon — not forgetting Casey 
at the bat in the CIA. 

Even so, it's interesting why the 
president let his buddies jump. He 
could have held them, because they 
respect him. merely by insisting 
that he needed them and didn't 
want to be left alone with a lot of 
pragmatic bakers and candlestick 
makers. This he didn’t do, maybe 
because he understood ihor long- 
ing for home. He most think about 
that himself some nights. 

Also, preparing lo take the vows 
and state the purposes of a second 
term, be is clearly the most success- 
ful and powerful politician in a 
changing world ana may very wdl 
lake a different show on the road, 
with different themes and advisers. 

For his good companions are 
tired of Washington, where the sun' 
doesn’t shine, but money gives 
them pleasure all the time. 

The New York Times. 


have never, for example, made any 
secret of their appreciation for blue 
jeans, the Beatles and computers. Mr. 
Gandhi even has a non-Hindu. non- 
Indian wife. Yet the silent Hindu 
majority that never accepted Nehru 
— because be talked of secularism — 
nor made peace with Indira Gandhi 
has now taken to Rajiv. 

In voting Congress back to power, 
the Hindu majority seems to be say- 
ing it did not really mind the horrible 
anti- Sikh carnage after Mrs. Gan- 
dhi's death. Never before has the ma- 
jority so betrayed its temperamental 
appetite for intolerance and extreme 
methods. The same electorate that so 
decisively rqecled lbe emergency re- 
gime in 1977 now seems ready to 
swallow an authoritarian pilL provid- 
ed it is adequately sugar-coated. 

Mr. Gandhi's stunning victory 
si ... aid prompt Washington to re- 
think its policy toward India. The 
sudden strengthening of the regime in 
New Delhi has strategic ramifica- 
tions in the South As an region. 

On the face of it. the ideologues in 
Washington ought to welcome the 
Congress Party’s new ascendancy. 
The torch has passed to a generation 
of Indians who are totally untutored 
and uninterested in Fabian socialism, 
that pernicious doctrine that influ- 
enced Nehru and stalked Indira Gan- 
dhi. Rajiv Gandhi is conspicuously 
nomdeologicai — and that in itself 
makes him a friend of the West But it 


Outsiders Have a Role to Play 

By Thomas P. Thornton 

W ASHINGTON — If India is lo 
remain united, Rajiv Gandhi 
must undo his mother’s legacy of 
over-centralization and restore a 
workable federal relationship with 
the state governments. An integral 
part of that job involves renewing the 
Congress Party as a constructive po- 
litical force, not just the vehicle of 
individual political ambitions. 

Despite impressive progress. India 
remains a country of hundreds of 
mihions of very poor people and un- 


even economic development, beset by 
corruption at almost all levels. Needs 
and expectations are immense and 
solutions hard to discern, although 
more effective use of the private sec- 
tor and further loosening of controls 
are high on the list. Mr. Gandhi can 
at mast make modest progress, but 
some sense of movement is needed to 
give Indians renewed hope. 

In teroational problems are less im- 
mediate but they also must be ad- 
dressed. Relations with Pakistan are 
dangerously strained, and there are 
unique opportunities to compromise 
differences with China. From his pre- 
sent position of streagth, Mr. Gandhi 
can afford to take some of the politi- 
cally unpopular steps needed on both 
fronts. Ultimately India needs to ar- 
range better its relationship with the 
United States and upgrade its non- 
aligned credentials by moderating its 


tilt toward the Soviet Union. Mr. 
Gandhi is untested as a statesman. 

He will need the support of Paki- 
stan, China and the United States. 
Heavy-handed attempts to sway In- 
dian policy are not called for, but 
Washington can help by ensuring 
that capital, trade opportunities and 
technology are available on reason- 
able terms, and by avoiding actions 
that could impede India’s rapproche- 
ment with Pakistan and Coma. An 
invitation to visit the United States 
this year would enable Mr. Gandhi to 
explore these matters at a high level 

America has an interest in seeing 
that Mr. Gandhi's triumph does not 
turn into an empty mockery. A 
strong, unified and dynamic India 
can become a valuable economic 
partner and play a constructive role 
m South Asia and beyond. Success of 
democracy in India gives important 
testimony to the broad validity of 
America’s values. If Mr. Gandhi fails 
to meet at least some of the expecta- 
tions generated by his victory, Indi- 
ans will come more and more to de- 
spair of democracy as a way to deal 
with their country's problems. 

The writer is adjunct professor of 
Asian studies at the Johns Hopkins 
School of Advanced International 
Studies. He contributed this comment 
to the Los Angeles Times. 


also makes him impressionable. The 
problem begins at the bonder. 

The neo-Hindu constituency ac- 
cepted Mr. Gandhi's contention that 
Pakistan was propping up the move- 
ment for an independent Sikh state to 
be called Khalistan. and these voters 
do not expect him to tolerate any 
open encouragement of the separatist 
forces in Punjab. Washington must 
make the rulers in Islamabad under- 
stand that even a minor provocation 
could bring out the worst jingoistic 
response from Rajiv Gandhi's India. 

For the time bong, both Moscow 
and Washington favor the consolida- 
tion of Mr. Gandhi's rule. Yet the 
slightest indication that Washington 
remains unconcerned about Indian 
sensitivities on the Khalistan busi- 
ness would enable Moscow to drive a 
wedge between Mr. Gandhi and the 
United States. Moreover, the separat- 
ist problem in Punjab can be defused 
democratically and without volence 
only if the protagonists of the Khalis- 
tan movement are made to believe 
that they no longer have the ear of 
powerful officials in Washington. 

The danger, given the proem Indi- 
an mood, is that any evidence of 
external support for Sikh separatism 
could give the Indian political temper 
an irreversible jingoistic turn. That 
would spell certain trouble for South 
Asia and for democracy in India. 

The writer is assistant editor of the 
Hindustan Times. He contributed this 
comment to The New York Times. 


On Balance, 
Why Balk# 
At Teace’ ? 

By Stephen Rosenfeld 

W ashington — as George 
Shultz and Andrei Gromyko 
sit down in Geneva, we are back into 
our usual dizzy argument over the 
purpose of it all. Some hope the meet- 
ing will be, in a common phrase, “a 
step toward peace." Others fed that 
the very statement of such a hope for 
peace indicates a dangerous fuzzi- 
ness. Why is it that we cannot get this 
peace business straight? 

Peace is one of those cor 
whose intensity as a symbol and t 
peal as a slogan long ago thrust il into 
a special category. It is not just a 
desirable strategic condition or goal. 
It is also an object of the fiercest 
tactical political striving. One may 
realistically accept that peace in any 
meaningful sense is not within reach. 
But immense political rewards, and 
ego rewards, are available to those 
who win credit Cor earnest pursuit of 
it. It can become a political necessity 
to deny such credit to a foe. 

Typically, the Reagan administra- 
tion reached out for the term “Peace- 
maker” when the MX missile got 

stuck in a congressional mire. Alert to 
the magic of the word, tire missile's 
doubters effectively denied the presi- 
dent its use. They went him one bet-' 
ter, lassoing the word, as in “the 
peace movement," to character^ 
much of the opposition to Mr. Re# 
gan’s general military policies. 

Which of the two better deserved 
to appropriate the powerful symbol- 
ism of peace for its political pur- 
poses? Thai was what much of the 
1984 election was about Mr. Reagan 
lost some semantical battles, but the 
“peace movement" lost the war of the 
election and was reduced to hoping 
that even in defeat some pan of its 
favored policy might be honored. 

As it happens, the intellectuals 
have been even more vigorous than 
politicians in fighting lbe battle of 
“peace." The most intense argumen- 
tation these days comes from conser- 
vatives. What is striking is their fear 
that the democratic publics of the 
West will fall prey to Communist 
wiles and their own weaknesses and 
will force their governments to go 
the way of appeasement. 

Jean- Francis Revel the French 
commentator, offers in his somif} 
book “How Democracies Perish" the 
sound comment that the Communists 
have always sought “to tap for totali- 
tarianism’s profit the energy men de- 
vote to so many just causes in the 
world" — foremost among those 
causes, peace. Moscow terms its pol- 
icy a “struggle Cor peace." 

Mr. Revel's contexL is contempo- 
rary Europe, and his book is rich in 
insight and detaiL What it lacks is 
balance. To see his anxiety pour out 
page after page, you would never 
imagine that Moscow had faOed to 
block the American missile deploy- 
ments. The poor Fit of prophecy and 
political reality characterizes ranch 
conservative discussion of “peace." 

Richard Pipes, the Harvard scholar 
who woiked in the National Security 
Council in the first Reagan terra, has 
a new book with no less grim a title, 
“Survival Is Not Enough." He writes 
that “the chief instrument of Soviet 
Grand Strategy is political attrition, 
which, in practice, means exploiting* 
the open character of democratic s&T 
cieties for the purpose of inciting in- 
ternal divisons among different social 
groups and between their citizens and 
their elected governments." 

Lenin regarded pacifism as a “pet- 
ty bourgeois illusion," Mr. Pipes re- 
calls, but found sponsorship of a pac- 
ifist program useful lo “disintegrate 
the enemy, the bourgeoisie.” 

. American doves play innocently 
into Soviet strategy, Mr. Pipes sug- 
gests. by their argument that nuclear 
weapons have allegedly made East 
and West equally interested in peace- 
ful relations and that friendly ges- 
tures by lbe United States will gradu- 
ally eliminate frictions between them. 

I am prepared to believe that some 
Americans, feeling as they do (and 1 
don’t) that nuclear war is a live, im- 
minent, almost certain, daily pqu& 
bilily, are negligent and sometimes 
even drippy in their assessments of 
Soviet policy and that they surrender 
too easily and uncritically to the lures 
of a one-sided “peace." The political 
system, however, permits constant 
calibrations of popular feeling on this 
issue. The evidence of Mr. Reagan's 
defense increases and his landsli de 
re-election is that Mr. Pipes's alarms 
about the softness of the American 
people are vastly exaggerated. 

He frets, for instance, lest Ameri- 
cans accept a definition of peace as 
die absence of overt hostilities — a 



seek, _ 

tire existence of accord and role by 
law. That seems to me much closer to 
the American consensus. 

I don’t think it is necessary — • 
certainly il is not becoming — to shy 
away from “peace." $ 

The Washington Post. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

Nuclear Winter Fallout 

Regarding the opinion column "Nu- 
clear Winter: Dying A Cold, Dark 
Death " (Dec. 15) by Tom Wicker: 

Recent work suggests that fire- 
storms after a large nuclear exchange, 
and the buoyancy of dark clouds 
heated by sunlight, might rapidly 
propel very large quantities of Frae 
particles to high altitudes. Submicron 
particles at stratospheric altitudes 
(where there is no rain-out) would 
last for a year or more. 

As our TTAPS group — Turco, 

Toon, Ackerman, Pollack, Sagan — 
originally stressed, and as the Na- 
tional Academy’s report underscores, 
it is as probable that nudear winter 
effects would be more severe than in 
our baseline case as that they would 
be less severe. So the climatic catas- 
trophe we outlined in October 1983 is 


unfortunately not the worst possible 
outcome, by any means. 

Nuclear winter is not amenable to 
experimental verification — at least, 
fewwish to perform the experiment. 

The implications of nuclear winter 
are not merely minor increments to 
“the already known perils.” Nations 
not in the northern mid-latitude tar- 
zone might collapse even if not a 
angle nuclear weapon fell on their 
territories. A devastating fust strike, 
even in the absence of any retaliation 


dear winter, then there are far too 
many such weapons. The urgent task 
before us is — safely, verifiaWy and 
bilaterally (ultimately mnltilaierally) 
to make major reductions in these 
grotesque, bloated and ultimately 
suicidal nuclear arsenals. 

CARL SAGAN. 

Ithaca, New York. 


Diplomatic Wonderland 

oihain^r m ia i a EvanProctor of Rabat and LzJS 

whatever, could lead to the climato- Alexander of Almeria (Letters, Dec 

IKS *¥ aggressor / /) miss a humorous literary allusion 

nation. For these and other reasons, they think the embassy spokesman 
^ miroduccs a range of ™ Mexico City was seriouswhen be 
possibilities (see “dangerouser and dangprouser." 
FOTogn^Affarrs. Winter 1983-1984). The reference is to “atriouW and 


Mr. Wicker reaches an important 
conclusion. If a tiny fraction of the 
global inventory of 55,000 nuclear 
weapons is sufficient to produce nu- 


currouser." in Lewis Carroll’s 
Through the Looking Glass-” 
RICHARD PATRICK WILSON- 
Mobile, Alabama. 








j£- 

r 

\Y» 





*- ■- k* - 


Ai 'i' 


•’ 5v- 

^>v' 


HcralbSSribunc 


p„ ™ Monday, January?: 


1985 


BU SINESS / FINAN CE 


eurobonds 


Will Treasury’s Borrow ing 
Send U.S. Firms to Europe? 

By TERBY GROSS 

N ew/ ^ Herald Tribune 

year in Mmvntarif .V s - Treasur y has rung in the new 
™ uc . h ^ = same way n rang out the old— 

“ si ^ ° f 

da^°tS n i5 i r e h ??q bl,StneSS openw * for lhc » ye^ last Wednes- 
not«' f^L em ? eni auctJoned off *5-75 bUIion in 

10-^ aMlhCT S 4 - 28 baUon of l9 -y= ar - 

June'S, “t ll K S^ OUnC ‘ : ' , W “ ta “ d “> »“■ “ ““Old 

Monday in a sale of three- — 

and six-month bills. p.. rrt u / ._j 

A , t f em cndous edifice of For W B sk Ended JLt 2 
words has been erected about ujls i 0 term, inn insi.’ _ n.n % 

the effect, or possible effect, u - s - s (on o term. ind. it.w % 

on U .S. credit markets of this r L**L'f jm l T m - lnd - - n-9* ■*, 

seemingly insatiable Trea- French Fr.Xnuim t^T \zn % 

sury borrowing requirement Yen 10 ,ern i. inn insi. 7.15 % 

Almost all economists frH ™ ,e TLr 9 l 7 * 

agree that extensave Treasury- Sg .SS 5 

borrowing will be one of a eua long term 9.41 % 

number of factors exertine FLx lB ,erm - in,, ‘ Inst- 9.99 % 

upward pressure on interest FL S mrd,UTn ,erm * 

rates over the coming enow. 

^months. In addition, credit 

market analysts have said Market Turnover 

that uncertainty about the JsrWaak &**W Jon. 4 

political process on deficit NB1HWIor 

?*“ - aCl “* Cede, «SS aSS E, "S 

drag on bond pnees in earlv 

1985. 

t ^ ere 15 nothing dose to unanimity on whether red ink in 
Washington will mean much to the Eurobond market. And 
among those who believe there will be some effect, there is 
disagreement about just what will occur. 

There are those who think that when the U.S. Treasury is 
forced to borrow more. U.S. corporations are squeezed out of the 
credit market. Given this assumption, it might seem fair to ask 
whether those U.S. corporations will look toward Europe to 
satisfy their borrowing needs. 

But there are others who challenge the squeezing-out assump- 
tion. 

'"The squeezing-out concept is really fallacious,” said a syndi- 
cation manager for the London branch of a U.S. investment 
bank. “What it means is they'll have to pay more. Literally, there 
is money there, it's just a question of how much it costs.” 


H E added that the only companies that could be the victims 
of squeezing out would be those of lesser quality, compa- 
nies now able to issue so-called junk bonds in the UJS. 
market, “if you have higher rates, there are marginal borrowers 
who might not be able to access the market” 

Most analysts say the question of whether to borrow in the 
United States or Europe is purely financial- “I t hink one should 
think of an overall need for borrowers to raise dollars,” said 
Jeffrey Hanna, an economist for Salomon Brothers in New York. 
“Those dollars can be raised in the United States or abroad. A 
U.S. corporation looks at the relative attractiveness of borrow- 


ing” in both places. 
He said that bolt 


He said that both markets offered opportunities for raising 
money, and “when a corporation does issue, it says: t OJC, where 
is it cheaper?*” 

Others agreed. A London syndication manager said: “They 
come to Europe as an attractive alternative to the U.S. on cost. 
Very few come for any other reason.” 

Borrowing costs in both the U.S. and Eurobond markets could 
be expected to rise at about the same time, so the main attraction 
the Eurobond market offers to U.S. companies borrowing in 
Europe — the relative cost advantage — would remain intact 

“We’ve seen significant periods in the last nine months when it 
has been substantially cheaper to borrow in Europe over the 
three- to 10-year maturity spectrum,” said a syndication manager 
in London. 

But many analysts see this cost differential narrowing. 

\ “It is unhkdy that the Eurobond market will offer the substan- 
tial yield advantage that it did for much of 1984.” Mr. Hanna 
said. “The removal of the withholding requirement has gradually 
created a change in the spread relationship," he added, referring 
to the removal last summer of the U.S. withholding tax on bonds 
bought in the United Slates for non-U-S. investors. 

Eurobond yields, and hence the cost for a company to borrow, 
“have risen vis-a-vis domestic yields,” Mr. Hanna said. 

The syndication managers tend to look at the market in terms 
of what it will cost their client to borrow. Portfolio managers view 
it in precisely the opposite way: with an eye on the kind of return 
they can get for their investors. And as the yield differential 
(Continued on Page 11, .CoL 1) 

J Last Week’s Markets 

I AO figures ore os of dose of trading Friday 


Output 
Is Down 
In U.S. 

2-Year Low Cited 
For December 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Production last 
month reached its weakesL point 
since the recession ended in De- 
cember 1982, and other Indicators 
point to further deterioration in 
coming months, the National Asso- 
ciation of Purchasing Management 
said Sunday. 

The association, a trade group 
made up of industrial purchasing 
managers, also said that both the 
rate of new orders and the level of 
employment had declined to their 
lowest levels since December 1982. 

Only prices showed improve- 
ment in December, the association 
said. Its monthly survey of more 
than 200 purchasing managers 
from 20 industries said that more 
members had reported price de- 
clines prices than increases. 

Robert J. Bretz. chairman of the 
association's Business Survey 


Stocks: Caution Is the Word 



members had reported price de- mr q 

r u Nervous Start. 

Robert J. Bretz. chairman of the ” 

association's Business Survey Q. • j 

Committee, said that the survey's StTOTlSt A/WUStl 
findings bad indicated a further c? 

slowing of the economy in Decern- O P 

ber, after several months of decline seen Tor 00 
(hat had been interrupted .by a J 



slowing of the economy in Decem- 
ber, after several months of decline 
(hat had been interrupted .by a 
pause in November. 

Mr. Bretz, who is director of cor- 
porate purchasing for Pitney 
Bowes Inc., said the economy 
shows no immediate signs of im- 
proving. 

The association said its compos- 
ite index for the economy had de- 
clined to 51 J percent during De- 
cember, from 52.1 percent in 
November. A reading below 50 
percent indicates the economy is 
contracting; a reading above that 
level indicates growth. 

“This index has languished dose 
to the 50-percent level for five con- 
secutive months.” the association 
said. 

The index relates seasonally-ad- 
justed monthly performances in 
new orders, production, employ- 
ment, vendor performance and in- 
ventories. The figures are based on 
U.S. Commerce Department anal- 
ysis, the association said. 

The association said that 22 per- 
cent of its responding members had 
reported declines in production in 
December from November. This 
was the highest percentage since 33 
percent reported declines in De- 
cember 1981 Only 17 percent of 
the respondents reported an im- 
provement in production. 

Twenty-four percent of the com- 
panies reported a decline in new 
orders, compared with 19 percent 
reporting an increase. This was the 
widest negative disparity since an 


The Nw> Yot* Tre 

In 1984, the Dow was all but stagnant, but experts 
say that 1985 may be fruitful, given a little prudence. 


By Vartan ig G. Vartan 

New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — Stock market investors are 
edging into 1 985 with nervous glances back at 1 984 

— a puzzling and disappointing year for equities 

— wondering whether history wui repeat itself. 
Contrary to the usual start -of - th e-year optimism, 
caution is the operative word on Wall Street. 

“When it comes to the stock market, 1985 will be 
a classic case of first the bad news, then the good 
news," said Standard & Poor’s Outlook “With the 
economy expected to slow to a craw] in coming 
months and concern over fiscal and monetary 
policy lin gering , stocks are hkdy 10 head lower 
early in 1985 before rallying sometime in the 
second quarter.” 

Market strategists at Merrill Lynch concur. “We 
believe that a generally cautions approach is indi- 
cated on an intermediate-term bass,” said Robert 
J. Farrell, chief market analyst for Merrill Lynch. 

The company's strategists said that during the 
early montns of 1985 the Dow Jones industrial 
average could “test” the lows readied in July 1984, 
in the area of 1,080. The analysts expect the aver- 
age to reach new highs “in the 1,400 to 1,500 area” 
by December. 

The Dow, the market’s most dosdy watched 
barometer, ended 1984 at 1,211.57, down 3.74 
percent for the year. Its 30 components are bine 
chips, and, in a year when investors emphasized 


quality, the industrial average fared far better than 
most indexes of lesser-grade stocks. 

However, the New York Stock Exchange's com- 
posite index of common stocks outperformed the 
Dow, which suffered from large losses in such 
issues as Union Carbide Corp., Bethlehem Steel 
Corp. and International Harvester Co. The Big 
Board index ended at 96J8, up 126 percent. 

The secondary-quality issues were mostly lag- 
gards. The over-the-counter market came under 
the greatest pressure, with the NASDAQ compos- 
ite index dosing at 24735, down 1 122 percooL 
The American Stock Exchange’s market value 
index, heavily weighted with energy issues, also 
slipped. It dosed at 20426. off 8.41 percent. 

One area that investors did - seem to favor was 


defensive tactic, the Dow Jones utility average 
finished at 14932, up 13.41 percent. 

What land of a year, then, was 1984? 

It opened on a note of optimism as stock prices 
and investor hopes alike ran hi gh- A forecast by 
Heiko H. Thieme, head of equity operations for 
the Atlantic Capita! Corp, an investment banking 
arm of the Deutsche Rank, typified the high hopes. 
He saw the Dow at 1300 by August- . 

In early January, the industrials came within a 
paint at topping the record dosing of 1,28720, set 
on Nov. 29, 1983. But it was mostly downhill after 
(Coatinned on Page 9, CoL 1) 


Page 7 


U.S. Auto Firms 
Record a 13.2% 
Rise in ’84 Sales 


Compiled by Our Staff From Ikspadta 

DETROIT — U.S. auto sales 
Iasi year surged 132 percent from 
1983, making 1984 the best year for 
the domestic industry since 1979, 
according to industry reports rev 
leased late Friday. Analysts pre- 
dicted that the sales recovery would 
continue through 1985. 

According 10 the reports, sales of 
new domestically produced and 
imported cars totaled I0J9 million 
units last year, up from 9.18 million 
in 1983 and just below the 10.7 
million of 1979, which is consid- 
ered to be the industry’s last good 
year before the recession. 

Overall. UK consumers bought 
a total of 14.1 million cars and light 
trucks in 1984. 

Although total sales fell below 
the peaks set in the mid-1970s, the 


U.S. Unit to Probe Auditors 9 Ties to Failing Firms 


orders, compared" with 19 percent By Nancy L Ross whether the auditors did thdr job properly, the A high SEC official, who asked not to be 

reporting an increase. This was the Washing™ Poa Service *“** ***&■ named, said that few of the recent business 

widest negative disparity since an WASHINfrmN — A oihcnmmitt«* of th«- The hearings, the first substantial inquiry into difljodties could be attributed to false or nris- 
1 8-point difference was recorded as k ^ accom rdng profession in seven years, were leadmgaudm, 

^ I ^ OT ^ e ^ mDeccro ' likely to bold a series of hearings beginning next P ro P , P led t b J “ m . ^ npnber 0 r In the late 1970s both the House and Senate 

bejJSfc. month into auditing firms andih^rSaritmship **“*■“ « « to an mcratang Md ovaaghj (hearings into .the aocountmgm- 

“Tbe negative level of this lead- to some lame business failures, a subcommittee number of complaints brought against accoun- dustxy. Out of those came the Public Oversight 
ing indicator offers little hope for jjde has indfeated. tants by the Securities and &mhange Commis- Board, a group that checks reviews that ac- 

inunediate improvement in the _ si on in the past year or so. counting firms perform of one another. The 

economy,” the association said. The Energy and Commerce ^txx>mmittee on For example, the agency required Aetna Life board makes its findings public. 

The association also said that oversight and inyerogatrons, chaired by Repre- & Casualty 60. and Financial Corp. of America, The board, whose 5800,000 budget is paid by 
only 6 percent of its responding ^t^veJolmD. Dmgell, the Michigan Demo- u> change their accounting methods rad restate the accoun ring profession, is headed by a former 
members had reported hiring more CTa \. wb I ° chairs the full rommiuee, has earnings. This resulted in considanbly Sears, Roebuck & Co. chairman, Arthur M. 
people last month, the lowest level outlined^ nine areas of concern. Inese include ] ower profit figures. Wood. Its other members are Mdvin R. Laird, a 

since 6 percent in December 1982 auditors ^dependence, compliance with stan- Ln 1983, Aetna settled its dispute with the former secretary of Defense; AA. Sommer Jr„ a 
The figure for last month also com- dards, adequacy of disclosure and the effective- SE £ b y jedooug its profit figure by $203 mil- former SEC commissioner; John D. Harper, a 
pared with 13 percent of respon- ° ess °» mdusliy overaght of accounting firms jj on ^ m jg percent, from the $522 milli on that former chairman erf Aluminum Co. of Amoica; 
dents who had reported employ- aut * 11 pubhdy-beld companies, the aide ongmaify had been reported. and Robert K. Mautz, an accounting professor. 

nw-ni oamc in Nnvpmlvr S8JQ. FPA rKnhml itc nta> tin th thn SFP Inst vwar hmril hac nrt rfflOira nr MifiWHTlBil 


sion in the past year or so. counting firms perform of one another. The 

For example, the agency required Aetna Life board makes its findings public. 

A Casualty to. and Financial Corp. of America, The board, whose $800,000 budget is paid by 
to change their accounting methods rad restate the accoun ring profession, is headed by a former 
their earnings. This resulted in conaderably Sears, Roebuck & Co. chairman, Arthur M. 
lower profit figures. Wood. Its other members are Mdvin R. Laird, a 

In 1983, Aetna settled its dispute with the former secretary of Defense; AA. Sommer Jr., a 
SEC by reducing its profit figure by $203 mil- former SEC commissioner; John D. Harper, a 
lion, or 38 percent, from the $522 nrilHon that former chairman Of Aluminum Co. of Amoica; 


dents who had reported employ- 
ment gains in November. 
Twenty-three percent reported 


iai audit puDUciy-Deia companies, toe ame originally had been reported. 

“4- FCA resolved its case with the SEC last ; 

The subcommittee will examine the roles of by turning what had beat reported as a $1 


and Robert K. Mautz, an accounting professor. 

The board has no censure or enforcement 
authority. In its seven yean of existence, it has 


declines in the number of employ- the so-called Big Eight firms, as well as those of million profit for the first six months of 1984 never made a public anrouncement of wrong- 
er in December, and there were smaller accountants, in financial crises at such into a 579 -9- million loss. It later dropped its doing, and has concluding that peer review was 
frequent reports of plant and pro- institutions as Penn Square National Bank, accountant, Arthur Andersen & Co., bat said good, said Thomas P. Kelley, group vice presi- 
duction line shutdowns and lay- Continental Illinois National Bank & Trust Co., the decision did not reflect differences on ac- dent and a member of the American Institute of 


Ford Motor Co. and Chrysler 
Corp-. which are expected to report 
combined earnings of about 510 
biDion. 

That sum would be a 62-percent 
improvement on the record of 
$6.1 5 billion, set last year. It would 
also amount to 122 percent more 
than the $43 billion earned in 
1978, when total car and truck sales 
readied 15 million. Even allowing 
for inflation, $10 billion in profits 
for last year would be appreciably 
better than the 1978 earnings. 

“Profits this year are absolutely 
staggering and would have beat 
higher without the strikes at GM,” 
said Ann G Knight, an auto indus- 
try analyst at Paine Webber. She 
sajd the reason the industry could 
earn more money on fewer sales 
was that it had slashed its overhead 
and improved the productivity of 
its factories. 

“They really have cleaned up 
their act," she said. “I think they 
learned something" from the severe 
slump of the late 1970s and early 
1980s. 

Although the major automakers 
announced Friday that sales tailed 
off a bit in the final 10-day period 
of 1984, falling 22 percent, ana- 
lysts predict that the industry’s 
sales in 1985 win be at least as good 


l peer review was 
group vice presi- 


offs, it said. 


and Financial Corp. of America, to determine counting. 


Certified Public Accountants. 


Chrysler Planning 
Some Price Rises 


DETROIT — Chrysler Corp. 
has announced that it plans w 

freeze prices on 1985 domestic 
small cars, but wQl increase prices 

on larger models. 

Chrysler said Friday that $1 10 to 
$226 will be added to the price of 
its intermediate and large cars, de- 
pending on the models. The in- 
creases, which will take effect with 
toe shipment on Jan. 9, will amount 
to an average of 0.9 percent, or 
5106, for the entire Chrysler fleet. - 

Last week. Ford announced an. 
average price increase of l percent, 
or about 590, for its small trucks, 
but indicated that it would not in- 
crease the price of its 1985 cars. 
Late last month, GM increased the 
average price of its 1985 models by 
an average of $296, or 2 percent. 

as in 1984 and possibly better. 

Philip Fricke, who follows the 
industry for Goldman Sachs, esti- 
mated that auto sales thin year wQJ 
reach 10.9 mini on, and light trucks 
33 million, for a total of 14.7 mil- 
lion vehicles. 

‘The major problem for 1985 is 
supply.” Mr. Fricke said. “Will 
GM, Ford and Chrysler have 
enough cars to sell? Some of GM*s 
larger models have been in short 
supply all year." 

Mrs. Knight said the fact that 
fewer vehicles were sold last year 
than in same past years suggests 
that more growth is possible. “They 
haven't robbed the next couple erf 
years of demand, so the car compa- 
nies have some good years ahead of 
them,” she predicted. 

Analysts' forecasts of sales this 
year range from 103 nuffion to 1 1 
million. Combined with light 
trucks; including the popular mint- 
vans, total sales could reach 14.7 
million to 14.8 million vehicles. 

Another reason for the indus- 
try’s prosperity, analysts said, is the 
renewed interest in larger, more ex- 

(Cantfmed on Page 11, CoL 2) 


RudingtoHead 
Key IMF Pond 


WASHINGTON — Finance 
Minister HL Onno Ruding of 
the Netherlands was elected 
chair man of the Inter national 

Monetary Fund’s policy-mak- 
ing Interim Committee, the 
lending agency has announced. 

He will succeed Willy de 
Qercq of Belgium, who is re- 
signing following his appoint- 
ment as a member of the Euro- 
pean Community’s Commis- 
sion. Mr. Ruding, the Dutch 
finance minis ter since 1982, 
hdd previous positions in gov- 
ernment and in commercial 
banking. 

The Interim Committee, 
which has 22 members, advises 
(he IMF on overall monetary 
policy as well as on how to deal 
with sudden disturbances in the 
world monetary system. 


Stock Indexes 


lotfWk. Prw.Wk. WCtfM 

DJ Indus— 1.184.M 1004.17 —1ST 

DJ UHL 14604 14400 —0.18 

DJ Trans.— 5S3JC 556.91 —069 

S& P100 161410 I64J5 —1S8 

S & P 500 16168 16636 —1-55 

NYSE Cp 9460 95419 — 134 

Britain 

FTSE 100— T3K60 1.2252) -0S7 

Pi'S) 94060 9ZMH +135 


Hone Sena- 13*230 U*" +M6 


Nikkei DJ- 114SS8JM ^ +(U3 

W«t Gammy 

Comment* 1.11Z70 Id® 7 - 90 +M3 

hums, kttotskm JonsCwM Ot ta®** 1 


Money Rates 

United States mem. ptnio. 

Discount rate 8 B 

Federal funds rnte_ 8ft BW 

Prime rat* 10=«i 1016 


050 S3) 

S55 550 

5J0 5435 

W6 9VS-*. 

Bft B*h 

Iff* 9 'ft 


DoBar lopm. pthwh. 

BkEnal Index — 14560 14460+069 

Gold 

LomJonpjn.fi*.! 301)5 3104)0 -231 


Discount 

Call money 

60-dav intertjank. 


Lombard — 

Overnight . 
l-month Interbank — 


Bank base rate 

Coll money 

3-month InleftMnk ■ 


Currency Rates 


Late interbank rates on Jon. 4 , exdudine fees. 

Official fixings for Amsterdam, Brussels, Frankfurt, Milon, Paris. New Yoric rates a! 


Amsterdam 1571 
BnweBftd OB 
Frankfort 3.M£ 

U«d«* mi ’-'g 

MU on 1.94450 

JMwYoffttd — 

Port* 

Tokyo Z52J7S 

1 ECU *2|* 

1 SDR 0978393 


1 currency 
.1X045 Ausnfao kMPoo ze* 

USE 

0.1517 niLki#"** “! 

00079 Greek***" 0 ' 

01779 HO* * 


DHL FJF. B * F - T“ 

v,X7- 0.1336 5641* 136.145 »I41J6y 

5HS ’S £5* 17.74 — 34.1445 25.103* 

aJ,tf W W 1627 x 885J* 094* 12040*1 .2535* 

lt5X ) ].1645 123460 4.1143 72.W5 UM M.9M 

‘H WM1 5444)0 30A55 73»70 *692 

‘ItS ^645 1,93860 * 1574 63J8 26273 25135 

!z? 0865, Z711 15295* U*’> 

rSf 54.14 1104 * 70.91 3WJ9* 


50040 

9*65 193840* 
— . 4.9865s 

34.14 1104* 


27^05* 01353 73695* 4.1465* 

483*0 1J60.97 15117 44473 


2.230S 6S2« 

32*524 966938 1-W1J3 

Dollar Values 

1 curmcr , 

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0.9871 trt*hf 

(i am* Itnuril 
327 KmtnDI <SrW 
04BB ilokn. rlnonll 
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26275 25305 
14895 1837 * 

<ft3* 

10383* 

1*506 >78.1 U 
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lil Enohr. 

10111 (USt SlBW*orel 2.H8 
tan* 0695 *. Africa* rani UK 
jjoai 00012 &. KsrwmwBo 83860 
24SS O0OS7 Spoil peseta 17430 
9.1 J 0UW IMLHm 1015 
tjAiS IMDS3 TahWHl S 3965 
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(0) ol 10000 

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Gold Slides 
Below $300; 
Dollar Mixed 


The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Gold bullion 
slumped below $300 an ounce last 
week, dosing at a level last seen 
two and a half -years ago and ex- 
tending a slide attributed to the 
combination of falling oil prices 
and a strong dollar. 

The dollar was mixed on world 
foreign exchanges, fluctuating in a 
narrow range thal left the U.S. cur- 
rency near all-time highs. 

Gold briefly dipped below the 
psychologically important $300 
barrier on Thursday before staging 
a slight recovery. 

On the New York Commodity 
Exchange, gold bullion for current 
delivery fell S3.30 to dose at 
$298.10 a troy ounce, the lowest 
finish since the S29S of June 22, 
1982, during the depths of a severe 
worldwide economic slowdown. 

In later trading. Republic Na- 
tional Bank in New York said gold 
bullion was bid at $299 an ounce, 
down $2.75 from the late bid 
Thursday and off $9.20 from the 
end of the previous week. 

Gold hit a record high of $S75 a 
troy ounce during trading on Jan. 
21, 1980, a lime of double-digit 
inflation and international unrest 

Gold, a traditional hedge against 
inflation, had also been a haven for 
funds in times of political and eco- 
nomic unrest. Bui with inflation 
slowing in recent years and attrac- 
tive reunis offered on dollar-de- 
□ominaled investments, gold — 
which pairs holders no interest — 
has lost its luster to investors. 



r* 


Euro-clear 


securities transactions settled during 1 984 have exceeded 

StoOQjOOQOOQjOOO 

this compares with $613 billion during 1983 


The Euro-clear System is operated under contract by 

Morgan Guaranty Trust Company of New York 

The Euro-clear System is a service of 

Euro-clear Clearance System Public Limited Company 


December 31 1984 




INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 1985 


International Bond Prices - Week of Jan. 2 

Provided by Credit Suisse First Boston Securities, London, Tel: 01-623-1277 

Price* dm y vary according to market condition* and other factor* 


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Eurobonds* DM Bonds • Schuldscheine 
for dealing prices call 


DUSSELDORFl 


SaSS TeJ^hone 82fi 31 22/826 374rt 


London 




Waodeutscrfig Land-bank. 41. Moorm' London EC7 fl fi A Ptt w~ 

Telephone 638614t ■ TeJax 887 984 ZH 

Luxembourg 

Hong Kong 

Wfestdeutache Undesbank. BA Tbwer. 36th Roor lj Marrw..^ o r 

l-tong Kong. Telephone 5-8420288 ■ Telex 75142HX Haroourt Road * 

Marketmakers in Deutschmark Bonds V\feSt LB 

VVte;(d eutsche Landesbank 




















































































C' 







■ i 1 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 1985 


Page 


; ; j I 


•- ! i" • 

y r_ i'i. 
"1 

•• ; *' •k: 

; ; / 


After a Dimppointing 1 984, Analysts See Hope for a Good Late 1985 — But Caution Is the Word 


President Ronald Reagan. 

Why then did so many profes- 
aonal money managers and indi- 
vidual investors absorb losses in 
tbor portfolios during the oast 
year? And why did ah those cheery 
forecasts of a “second leg" to the 
bull market fail to materialize? 

One factor cited repeatedly was 
the huge federal budget deficit. But 
it was something of a red herring. 
Instead, two surprise developments 
really sent the stock market off 
tract Fust interest rates rose in 
gdhe first half of the year, contrary to 
fawt forecasts. Then, in the second 
half, the exuberance fed by a sing- 

fears of a possible iW^kML^lh 
developments caused investors to 
shim stocks and switch to bonds 
and other fixed-income instru- 
ments. 


As if investors did not have 
“oughto worry about, the Trea- 
bomb- 

{?*” *® ** ^ock market in late 
November with a proposal for a 
wide-ranging overhaul of the tax 
system. The net effect was to in- 
■CTease uncertainty, for corpora- 
fcons as well as stockholders. 

“A serious new negative in the 
economic outlook," said Albert M. 
wqjnilower, chief ecooomist for 
the Fust Boston Cozp M “is a possi- 
Dle paralysis of investment pur- 
chase decisions, for both tangibles 
and securities, induced by uncer- 
tanuy over tax reform." 

Adding to the volatility in the 
marketplace was the increased 
domination by pension funds and 
other pools of institutional money.' 
that now account for an estimated 
M percent to 65 percent of New 
York Stock Exchange volume. But . 
for all their cash and research and 
timing signals, even professional 
money m a n ag e rs were whipsawed 


by a market that produced little in 
the way of sustained leadership. 

The big-capitalization Dow in- 
dustrial stocks did not fare too bad- 
ly. But their performance masked 
the extreme weakness in broad sec- 
tors — especially technology stocks 
but also most low-priced and spec- 
ulative issues. Here the legacy of 
1983 played its pan. By the late 
spring of that year speculative ac- 
tivity rose sharply. This led to a 
boom-and-bust cycle that exerted 
its influence through 1984. 

Amid widespread investor jit- 
ters, earnings disappointments in- 
variably touched off selling. In a 
single day in July, for example, the 
ITT Corp. saw nearly one-third of 
its market value disappear after di- 
rectors unexpectedly cut the divi- 
dend. 

Another drag on the market was" 
the liquidation by such giants as 
Chrysler Corp. and Bethlehem 
Steel or huge amounts of stocks in 
their pension funds in order to buy 
bonds and lock in generous yields. 


For Most Investors, ’84 Was Trying, 
But Far From the Worst of Times 

By James C Condon 

Wew Font Times Service 

NEW YORK — For most inves- 
tfio*. 1984 is likely to be remem- 
bered as a trying year: Hardly the 
best of times, bin with the Dow 
Jones industrial average down a 
little less than 4 percent, far from 
the worst. 

But even in such a ho-hum year 
there are shareholders who have 
real reason to celebrate: holders of 
Siaar Surgical, Sterling Extruder 
and Allied Products, for instance. 

They managed to pick the largest- 
gaining common stocks on the 
three major markets, according to 
tabulations compiled by The Asso- 
ciated Press. 

Shares in Staar, a small, over- 
the-counter company, rose eight- 
fold to dose at $9 in" 1984, malting 
it the best performing stock of the 
year in terms of percentage iy«in 
The company has won Food and 
Drug Aonmnstration approval to 
expand testing of its replacement 
-k^ns for cataract patients. 

■ On the American Exchange, 

Sterling Extruder led the pad. A 
manufacturer of plastic-forming 
equipment. Sterling was the benefi- 
dary of the surge in capital spend- 
ing by American businesses: Prof- 
its in the latest nine months more 
than doubled, and its shares dosed 
1984 at $16,125, about three-and-a- 
half times thdr 1983 dose. 

Allied Products, the leading New 
York Stock Exchange performer, 
returned strongly to profitability to 
1984 by shedding a money-losing 
fastener division and strengthening 
its specialized farm equipment and 
industrial products divisions. 

Holders of Allied Products stock 
for the entire year saw their invest- 
ment rise 122.9 percent, to dose at 
$19.50. 

Unfortunately, in 1984 it was 
easier to pick losing stocks. The 
Amex market value index dropped 
8.4 percent and the NASDAQ 
.composite index of over-the- 
-counter stocks fefl 1 1.2 percent. On 
the New York Slock Exchange, the 
1,185 declining issues barely out- 
numbered the 1,109 advancing is- 
sues. But at the Amex, losers clob- 
bered gainers almost 2-to-l. 

Seventeen of the 30 Dow indus- 
trial companies fell; the worst per- 
formance was Union Cartnde 
Corp.’s 41-percent decline. The 12 
gainers were headed by Exxon 
Corp., which managed a 20-percent 
rise. One component. United Tech- 
nologies Corp., was unchanged 
from 1983. 

According to Robert H. Stovall, 
director of portfolio strategy at 
Dean Witter Reynolds In&, 1984’s 
biggest losers “were companies 
that ran into management prob- 
un badtuck, or both. 


^1984 Gainers and Losers on the N.Y.S.E. j 

ii S ,' E corniro" stocks that showed the largest percentage gains and 

Pl ??S^5. ad,U8tod *" ap4lta ' IMIngs Include no stocks 
that had fewer than 1 ,000 shares traded or lhat traded for leas than S2 a share 

| GAINERS 

Ofnali 

ZhOCK 

18M 

Okas 

ftnsnt 

Cftmsftgn 

UttCkM 

i 

Commant 

Allied Products 

19ft 

+122.9 

Manufacturer redeploys as- 
sets, returns to profitability 

Republic Gypsum 

V8fS 

+114,3 

Strong earnings gains lor 
wallboard maker 

Mattel 

10)4 

+105.0 

Toy makBr. now back to 
basics, stages recovery 

Rollins Environmental 
Services 

14ft- 

+ 95.1- 

Concern benefits from new 
P.C3. disposal rules 

Cowles Broadcasting 

45% 

+ 94.7 

Broadcaster agrees to be ac- 
quired by a private company 

Chicago Milwaukee 

188K 

+ 92.0 

Railroad is the object of a 
bidding contest 

Donaldson, Lufkin & 
Jenrette 

.29% 

+ 86.7 

Broker to be acquired by 
Equitable Lite 

Tonka 

41 

+ 82.2 

Toy maker's Gobcte area hit 
and aid results 

Tootsie Roll 

•31 

+ 74.6 

Candy maker turns in a better 
than expected results 

Orange-co 

10ft 

+ 703 

Florida freeze yields higher 
margins for citrus producer 

LOSERS | 

Storage Technology 

2ft 

-83.5 

Victim of miscalculations and 
tough LB.M. competition 

Western Union 

8ft 

-78.0 - 

Stiff Molting for the profits 
from electronic mail venture 

Hesston 

5 % 

-74.1 

Depressed market hurts 
farm-equipment maker 

Omni care 

7% 

-74.0 

Health-care company has big ■ 
loss, start plunges 

Williams Electronics 

2% 

-713 

Rs coin-operated video 
games are money losers 

Valero Energy 

6 ft 

-70.1 

Trouble in a refining subsid'- 1 

ary hurts energy concern j 

Anacomp 

2ft 

-87.9 

Software concern a 5 project | 

fails, results in big losses 

Mission Insurance 

8% 

-873 

Deteriorating results hurt 
property casualty Insurer 

Public Service of New 
Hampshire 

3ft 

-67.4 

Seabrock nuclear plant a 
heavy burden 

Consumers Power 

4% 

-67.3 

Canceled nuclear plant hurts 
Michigan utility 


Source: Associated prrnu 


was $1.25, below the threshold for 
inclusion in the tabulations. Shares 
in Financial Corp., a fast-growing 
thrift institution that was squeezed 
when interest rates moved against 
it, dosed out the year at $7,875, 
down 61 percent. 


U 


-Ubese stocks; unfortunately, creal- 7 nlortunately* it 
ed their own bear markets." . . « 

The Big Board’s two largest-de- was easier to plCK 
dining stocks illustrate the point t , _ 

Storage Technology Corp., a maker losing Stocks Ulan 
of large computer storage devices, 

was unable to keep pace with inter- winners last year. On 

national Business Mac hine s J 

Corp.'s Innovations- Losses forced fh e New York Stock 
the company to file for reorganiza- 
tion under the u.s. Banimiptcy Exchange, losers 
Act, and its shares plunged 83.5 5 ’ 

percent to dose at $2-25. 

Western Union, which posted 
the second-largest decline on the 
New York Stock Exchange, suf- 
fered from abrupt ma nag e m ent 
shifts and an inability to odlect a 
payoff from its big investment m 
electronic mail. Its shares dosed at 

$8.75, down $27.75, or 76 percent. 

Two New York Stock Exchange 
companies that suffered widely re- 


outn umbered gainers 
by 1,185 to 1,109. 


The American Exchange's larg- 
est decline was suffered by Crystal 
Oil a refiner plagued by losses. Its 
shares fefl $11,125. or 77.4 percent, 
to dose at $3 .25. Shares in Webcor 


^todletbacks m 1 984 — Conti- Hectronics, a tdephone equipment 
* aental Illinois and Financial Corp. maker, dropped 75 perttnt, the 
of America — are not inducted next-largest declme. Like T1E- 
oi ^ — ■ Communications and Teleconcepls 


1 3S ! h S , 5 C ta (wWdniam>wW missed the list" of 
SLST biggest kisersf. Webcor was hun by 

“"JffE*.. were diverted increased competition m the glut- 

consumer 

“ mPa ^ta^e' i ^ t cmnpMT P HcSthdyne was the largest over- 
Z! £ * StaK the-coimterloser. Red ink in tts 


PERSONALITIES PLl£ 

MARY BLUME 


division that makes infan t moni- 
tors and the announcement that the | 
company and some of its officers 
were bang sued for violations of 
securities laws sent Health dyne 
shares down B4.9 percent, to 
S 2-875. The second worst perfor- 
mance was by Visual Technology, 
down 84.8 percent The compaj 
which recently announced that it 
would be merged into Lee Data, 
had troubles introducing a portable 
personal computer. 

Gainers on the Big Board also 
included Republic Gypsum, up 
1 14J percent, and Mattel Ino, up 
105 percent. Republic, a leading 
manufacturer of gypsum wall- 
board, reported good earnings im- 
provement Mattel after shedding 
its non-toy operations, also report- 
ed improved results. 

Other big Amex winners were 
the ICH Corp., a big insurer that 
acquired Bankers Life. Its stock 
climbed 161.9 percent. Louisville 
Cement in third place, was up 133 
percent on the news that it would 
be acquired by the American sub- 
sidiary of a French cement maker. 

Two other big gainers in the 
OTC markets were new companies: 
Universal Trading Exchange, 
which operates a corporate barter 
clearinghouse, and Panaiech Re- 
search and Development, which 
won the marketing rights to a new 
semiconductor chip. 

Who were the investors who won 
and lost in the 1984 markets? 

“In 1984 the retired folks who 
stuck with safety and income 
stocks, suddenly found they bad 
bought performance slocks," said 
Mr. Stovall of Dean Winer, 

“Meanwhile, the business school 
graduates who went for high-tech 
issues found themselves in a bear 
market.” 


Gold Options (prietflaS/oi.). 


Mai 

Mv 

Mar 

*»* 

y* w 




ill .no 

isj- at» 

1375-1525 

220M375 


125- <75 

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14S1775 

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155- VS 

ifQ. &Q9 

I2S1375 


n .VL nm 

<25- 575 

&75-1025 

Nil 33J 



IS <75 

4S 775 


Gati3KS-:nU5 

Vtleen White WddSJt. 

!. Qnai At Monf-Baac 
1211 CctKia I. Sntecrtaad 
Tel. 318251 ■ Ttk% 28305 


N.YJ&E. Volume 

Total share «oiun» on the Nn Yort Stock 

Exchange tar each year 


IBM 

23,071.031,447 

IMS 

21 ,589,576,097 

1BS2 

t6.4S8jDS8.7BB 

IBM 

1 1,853,740, 6SS 

1980 

11.3S2293J531 


Such selling is expected to contin- 
ue. 

“Whal you're going to see in the 
early months of 1985 is more pen- 
sion funds either indexing their 
ratios to match the broad mar- 

or switching into bends.’' said a 

money manager at a major bank. 
“The net effect will be to cause 
confusion over the ultimate direc- 
tion of the stock market." 

Individual investors had their 
own problems trying to pick slocks 
in 1984 and many people aban- 
doned the equity market Some ex- 
perts said Wall Street itself was 


partly to blame because it has in- 
troduced so many alternatives to 
stocks. 

"The retail market for individual 
customers is, in a sense, a self- 
inflicted wound by the brokerage 
industry.” said a top-producing 
stockbroker at one nationwide 
firm. "In recent years the broker- 
age houses have emphariyed pack- 
aged products, such as leasing pro- 
grams, tax shelters and new mutual 
funds, partly because the commis- 
sion payout to salesmen is attrac- 
tive ana partly because it usually 
rakes customers two or three years 
to End out that they have made a 
mistake." 

Perhaps the chief saving grace 
for many investors was the bull 
market in corporate takeovers and 
mana g em ent buyouts. The largest 
takeover on record, a $13-bilIion 
deal, saw the Gulf Corp. acquired 
by the Standard Oil Co. of Califor- 
nia. But there were scores of other 
sizable acquisitions. This frenzied 
level of merger and acquisition ac- 


tivity resulted inn huge amount of 
net liquidation is yw riti tt by all 
types of investors. 

According to estimates by Nan- 
cy Kimdman, an economist at Sal- 
omon Brothers, individuals alone 
sold nearly $124 billion more in 
stocks than they bought In 1984. 
This record amount of liquidation 
contrasted to net selling by individ- 
uals of S39.4 billion m 1983 and 
£26.6 billion in 1981 

Stin, for all the disenchantment ■ 
the stock market caused in 1984, it 
also produced occasional flashes of 
lightning, In the first three days of 
August, the Dow soared a total of 
86.80 points as investors responded 
to indications by the Federal Re- 
serve that it would not tighten cred- 
it conditions. 

And the industrial average 
jumped nearly 35 points on Dec. 
18, thanks to signals that the Fed 
was casing its credit reins. It 
proved, if nothing else, that caution 
has not cornered the market 


Most Active N-YS-E. Issues In 1984 


Stock 

Vbbma 

(WHoni 

OtStana} 

if 

ISM 

LOW 

IBM 

Ooe* 

Change 
From *83 

A.T.4T. 

415.4 

20ft 

14ft 

19ft 

+ 1ft 

I.B.M. 

2B7.4 

128% 

99 

123ft 

-i- 1ft 

Exxon 

232.2 

45ft 

36ft 

45 

+ 7ft 

General Motors 

101.8 

82ft 

61 

78ft 

+ 4 

Ford Motor 

189.2 

51ft 

33 

46ft 

•+ 3ft 

American Express 

176.0 

39 

25 

37ft 

+ 5 

Chrysler 

176.2 

33ft 

20ft 

32 

+ 4ft 

Merrill Lynch 

182.6 

38ft 

22 

27 

- 5 

MoM 

155.3 

32ft 

23ft 

27ft 

- 1ft 

National Semiconductor 

162.6 

18K 

■ 9ft 

lift 

- 3ft 

Phillips Petroleum 

147.3 

66ft 

33ft 

44ft 

+10ft 

Sears 

145.6 

40ft 

28H 

31ft 

- 5ft 

ITT Corporation 

142.6 

47ft 

20ft 

29ft 

-15ft 

General Electric 

141.1 

69ft 

46ft 

56ft 

- 2 

AMR Corporation 

136.0 

41 ft 

24ft 

36ft ■ 

0 


Th®«® Mines me a summary ot 1984 trading. Each stock b shown 
nMth ta dMetond tar the year, sales In hundred*. prica/eamings ratio 
and itw year's high, low and doofno price*. Change and percentage 
chance flouree ara from 1 983 doling pricaa; wluma and price data 
ora baaed on conaoMatad tracing. 


ON THURSDAY, 
NOVEMBER 29, 1984 
FINANCIAL HISTORY 
MAS MALE. 


/he day marked a new phase in the integration 
S' ( and the expansion of the world’s capital markets. 
Ft also introduced the United States to a financial 
instrument effective for portfolio diversification — 
a growing need for money managers in the inter- 
nationalized capital markets. 

What happened on November 29th was the 
first public offering in the US of securities denomin- 
ated in ECU, the European Currency Unit. A major 
currency of the European Economic Community 
( EEC), the ECU is widely used and accepted in Europe 
and in the Eurobond market. 

Bear, Steams & Co. was the first investment 
banking firm to propose that the European Economic 
Community undertake a public offering of ECU- 
denominated securities in the U.S. The EEC care- 
fully considered our concept and then decided to file 
a registration statement with the SEC. They selected 
a group of three managers, including Bear Steams, 
to bring the ECU 200 million issue to market. 

Some had said it couldn’t be done. 

In pioneering the public introduction of this 
financial instrument in the US, we demonstrate 
more than our broad knowledge and expertise in' 
the needs of issuers and investors in the world’s 
capital markets; we demonstrate our commitment 
to an expanded market for ECU-denominated 
securities in the US and throughout the world. 


Evidence of this commitment appears in our 
organization. Trading, Sales and Marketing, Corporate 
Finance, Syndicate, Administration and other areas 
of Bear Steams have consolidated for the execution 
and the after-market support of transactions in 
ECU-denominated securities. Further evidence of 
our commitment is our intent to maintain liquid 
primary, and secondary markets for the issue ami to 
conduct trading in both New York and London. 

.As acceptance of the ECU grows, so do its 
markets. The potential for the ECU is vast. And so 
are the advantages for both issuers and investors. 
Through our expertise in ECU financing we can 
help issuers and investors finance or manage assets 
in the world’s capital markets. 

Watch. History rarely happens right 
before your eyes... The world’s capital 
markets are becoming the world capital 
market. 

Interested issuers and investors in ECU- 
denominated securities are invited to contact 
Bear, Steams & Co. in New York: 

Ed Rappa, Market Development, 212-952-8063: 
Ronald Shiftan, Corporate Finance, 212-952-5964; 
Tom Tarantino, Trading, 212-952-7128; or 
Clive Beigel, Sales and Marketing, 212-952-8966. 


Number of ECU Per Dollar 


1.4- 



•76 *77 '78 TS 


This graph depicts the relationship of the value «il the 
115 linllir to iht: ECU from 1976 to the present. During 
this period, the high and low exchange rales of the ECU 
in terms olU-S, Dollar* were SI. 45 and $.71. respectively. 


I \0 



Page 10 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 1985 


International Bond Prices - Week of Jan. 2 

Provided by Credit Suisse First Boston Securities, London, Tel; 01 - 623-1277 

Price* may vary according to market condhlomi md other (acton 


Security 


Mat Price Mat UMCwr 


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Own Merest UKLuf 
r — Nol traded.*— Hone offered a— QM. 


Ali of these securities have been solcL 
This announcement appears as a matter of record only. 


U.S.$67,000,000 


Farnsworth and Hastings Limited 

16}4% Guaranteed Bonds due January 15, 


Unconditionally Guaranteed by 

Cambrian & General Securities 


1988 


p.l.c. 


Price 100% 

(adjusted for inleriwl) 


Drexel Burnham Lambert 


INCORPORATED 


December, 1984 


dm 9 Bonk Oi Tokyo Curacao 
dm WO BankOTTokyoCurocno 
dm IX Fall Electric Co W7w 
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dm 40 HazamvCamt Ud 
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dm IB Japan Dflvttop Bank 
am 100 japan DrakP Bank 
dm 100 Jowra Rngna ttailds 
dm 40 Jvan 5ynm HuDbu 
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am IB KansaiEltKSricPiiwcr 
dm IB KabeOtv 
dm HS Kobe City 
dm IB Xouaty 
am ho KAbeCty 
dm ISO Kobe City 
dm 100 ttfcfQlv 
dm 120 KabAOtv 
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dm KB Lbip-Tcfin Credit Bank 
arntt* NUtKihtohl H«awy 
dm BO MHwWaMhtevyW/p 
dm DO MttSilHM HKW XJw 
dm NO NUEwbishiMriol WA* 
dm HM NbpMCraditBank 
dm HO Ntpoon TaHpra Tiltsh 
dm SO Rhythm Wbfdiwn* 
dm 50 Rtiythm woteh XA> 
bn IB Sumitomo Ftame* Asia 
dm IB Surafea* Fraancc Alia 

dm SB Tokyo E Metric Pnw«r 
bn IB Yokohama □* 


TO 77 Jul IB LM 

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79k 16 May lOOU 7M 7J8 7J3 

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SWEDEN 


am 188 Sweden 
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IF YOU GET A KICK OUT OF SOCCK, 
READ 

ROB HUGHES 

WEDNESDAYS FN THE IHT 


CONVERTIBLE BONDS 


Amt Security 


130 ABaAh 
17 a Ak» 29 ib 
*88 Alusuttse Coral 17BB 
1*0 Atmrisseiim 
121 Amro Bon* B£93 
135 Babcock Nader land 
184 Bbe Brawn Boveri 541 


$30 Beetfwn Fin 339X3 TO 73 Sec 

*» Boric Co Ltd TO73Auo 

« CU»-G*lBy Oft 1330 A 74 Jul 
Oe<n 5ataH Bahamas 41*71 Dec 
1H9 Credit lute* Bahamas TO 73 Dec 
151 Efoctrawrtt Finance i HJun 
120 EtMVksr4Mu«tXS TO Vi Mar 
$25 Emu Nv 414* 7tt 77 Jun 

SS EselteAb TO 19 May 

tf IB Gervris-Daiaae 43 j 17 Jun 
IS Hanson O/s Flnonce 9* 75 Oct 

SIS Haraun Oft Finance fttTtOd 

$41 HeaflOvens 3U3 SttVAuo 

1100 Id F40B1CB 145 S*T*Oa 

5 HO Id Inti Fm 12*47 TO 770a 

*35 inchcaa* Bermu 15143 TO 73 Apr 


ft MM 

MW- 

PrfcCP 

—Cobs. Period— 

—Caw. Priced/*- 

COrr 

Cw.YTds 

Pnh-SbS 

9* 96 Sep 

EUROPE 

124 1 Feb 82 ISJunN 

Skr ITS - skr 185061 

3-14- 158 

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fill 171X8-1111119*1 

lift 4JD 

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I Jon 79 51 Dec 48 

MI41.90- MI41J1I 


7 1JOO 

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O 113 - P 16999 

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5 200 3/8 

49J7 29 


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$34 I ntershap 0ftS.fi 
124 iidentHaOft fftB 
135 AAetrapol flai Estate 
5657 


55* MWwTkilnM _ 

*58 Maet-Hamesey 4£S 

in Rank Oraanbri 4U4 
Idm 28 Rrihrnans latt 1481.48 
15* Sandor Finance 5X0 
$k* Sandai Oft 5A5 
135 Sandvfk Ab ZL74 
120 Slater Walker ZR*5 
$49 SurvefHriKt 
$93 SurveH'ance 
1170 Swiss Brilk Co Oft 
$B Tovtor Woodrow Inti 
125 Item Inti Fbame ..... 

$Q0 UBedWrifflbowai UO 4*17Mav 
$$15 Utas Irmraat 1590 5 79Mziy 


. TSAiib 
S ttTOOd 
t 73 Da 
S’* 7* Jan 
* VJm 
7 79 jan 
*1* 73 Feb 
Mb 72 Jril 
5 IDfC 
TOVDee 
AttVMar 
TOITMoy 
AVi 73 Jun 
4*74 Jun 
AUTO DSC 
suTODec 
7 II Jul 


89 

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9* 

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144 

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89 

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185 

I) 

74 

94 

94 

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184 * 

151 

91 


I Feb B* maturity 
155*078 18 Alio 92 
1 Feb 79 1 Jul 93 

3Sep79 mataritv 
ID Jan 77 maturity 
10079 maturity 
n Oct 13 29 Jun 98 
1 May* 38 Feb 95 


$ws_ 
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pTB8 - a 1768*7 
$475 
S1000 
$ 1258 

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15 Juab maturity nfl5882-hfl5SJM3 
155*0 79 5 Mov 89 Mr 153 - skr 314x88 


IS Sea 72 maturity 
15 Jot 81 70095 

I Aus 8$ 7O09A 
lJantf mol m l t v 
150014 10099 

I Mav 71 l Sea 97 
150077 IB Mar 91 
UFebll 15 Jul 95 
3 Apr 79 maturity 
1O0B3 maturity 
I FeOBl 15 Dec 95 
$ Apr TO maturity 
7 Jan 85 2 Apr 99 
lAFeb 74 maturity 
1 Jon 73 maturity 
10O83 maturity 
310077 maturity 


ft 13*6100 
P 42 -PKJH 9 
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95 

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2 Jan 71 BMarB Skr 281X8- S 42.03 
1 Jan 73 14 May 57 P115-P2S7X49 


120 Aida EnatweriuB 
$40 Al Inornate Ca 
lb AJtainmriaCa 
STB AitnoranloCa 
$30 AsahlOptkriCo 
111 AstesCo 
STD BrkfgeMene Tire Co 
SB Canon Inc 
$9 Canon Inc 
$50 Canon lac 
SIS Dot Nippon Prkitfnp 


5tt 7* Mar 
7* 75 Mm 
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3 79 Mar 
7 74 Mar 
TO 73 Jm 
SWWDte 
TOW Dec 
TO 75 Dec 
7 77 Jun 
TO K May 
DaWlnc *Vj74Auo 

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1 Jul 83 maturity 
1 Jut 94 maturity 

IStPl maturity 

93 * 15 Jan It 1 Nay 98 

90 1 Nov 71 lOJuf B 

133 1 Jim 77 mnhirtry 

97 IFebB maturity 

JAPAN 
141 
19 * 

130 
M 


$1850 
$1991 
12B 

O 3X7 - o £10973 
n 3X8 - B 544909 

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$762/1 


13 

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$50 Dalwo Securities 5*7*Seo 
$40 Doiwc Securities S*V Sea 
110 FanucUd SttVSv 

SB FriltsoLld 5*7#Sen 

SIB FuHtsuLM 3 79 Mar 

$10 Furakawa Electric SttVMar 
$48 HltochlCtXUeUd SttVSep 
$40 Hitachi Credit Corn 5 Tssen 
S1SD Hitachi Lid TO 74 Mar 

$50 Honda X4alar Co LM S*WMor 
SB Hondo NWorCaLU 5*77Feb 
IW Hongo Motor Co LM SttVFeb 
SB Ito-Yokado Co LM TO 73 Aus 
125 JocesCoLM 7* 75 Mar 

125 Jons Co Url Mite 

SO JuicoCoLM t TQFeb 

$100 JycWdnr Coma Japan 5 Vi Mor 
SB kaoboaPCoLla * TlSw 
SW3 Kntnnabl Sled Co 5*1 74 Mor 
SB Komatsu Ud TttTOJun- 

$50 KsnWitrdw Photo 4 79 Apr 
$2S KototefcMl Co LU 7 74 Fab 
$40 Kvnoo Hokko Kogvo 4V, 77 Dec 
SB Mokito Elec works 4tt79Aug 
$30 Moral Co LM 4*71 Jen 

$58 Moral Co Ud * TkJon 

SIB MotupiM Elec Indus TO 78 Nov 
SH0 MotBdHhi Eiac Worts 7* 75 Nov 
SB MkiebeaQiLM 5* 78 Sep 
130 Minolta Camera Co 71475 Mar 
$« MinoUa Camera Co S 7* Mai 

IB AXUsufataiU Cora TO 71 Mar 

$40 MfeubtetCeni 4 72 Mar 
560 MiftuMsW Coro 4*745(0 
SB MltsXibid EttOrCO TOTtMtar 
HR MltsubUlEttch-ce to 78 Mar 
SUD Mltsuhlllll Heavy IM itt 79 Mar 
$20 Mffsul Real Estate A 93 Sep 
$25 Mitwl Real Estate 7V. 75 Mar 

$« MurataBteiteturta* Sttl&Mar 
SMB ttarota MoufachirlnB 3* 79 Mar 
SUB Munda MaraUachirtne 3*70 Mar 
SUD Nec Corporat io n 3*«Mar 
$38 NUaoki EnotneBrtnp 7*%Mor 
$» NlpoonEttOrtc TO 7? Mar 
$58 NbmnKoaaku A 79 Sep 

SIB Ubpan Kokn AH 7* Mar 

SB HlanMOtl 5* 71 Mor 

SB NimnOU Jtt 79 Mor 

$38 Nippon SeSu> TttTXOd 

170 NjPPOatWikO TO 79 00 

IW NMtmi Motor TO 78 Mar 

$48 Nlten iwcriCona ■ -ttMar 
JM wmpEttdrictnbaf » tzsbp 
128 NfffO Electric Induct A TtSep 
$48 Nino Electric Indust TO 7* Sep 
$S ffvk Uno Ntaoairtuaa 7*1* JKor 


10081 28 MOT M VJB1JB- MA744 
II Feb 80 34 Mor 95 YS3UO- 5S2S24 
13 Jui*l 32X4or9* Y 94830 - 90455 
BAptH 22 Mo-99 Y 1139 - I2BL777 
I Nov 19 15 Mar Or Y457JQ- 512.144 
1 Sep 78 B Jan 93 Y 40650- 471B5 
'Mar 83 2BDac94 Y 478 - 584073 

23AU079 30 Dec *4 Y 37990- 463.91} 
* tel 81 21 Dec 95 Y 582.10- *79X80 
I Jul 83 2) Jun 97 Y59LB- 986727 
1 May 91 10 Apr 84 Y1345B- 9U13 
1 NovT9 30 Auo94 YB*3- 943J2J 
3BAua« BMar« Y34BXB- 2MJQ 
‘AU0 7# 15 Mar 71 Y5HX8- 425J85 
lfl Dec 8 1 25 Sep 96 Y 441X0- 482951 
10083 25 Sap *8 Y45U0- 446317 
SJWB4 23 Sep 98 Y7D322B- 7455218 
1 Jul 81 21 Sec M Y602JB- 4I7J73 
1 May 84 Z3 66r 99 Y 122690- I4S&346 
15 Jul 51 W Mar 96 Y3B- 33S.I71 
8 Feb 83 715*094 YST5- SAUV7 
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3JMW8! 79 Mor 96 Y48A48- 573.101 
I May 79 34 Feb 89 Y43U0- 542.93B 

I Mar c a Feb 97 Y 759X0- B07JX4 

UO* WJunB 17 Feb 98 Y8U-9QMI 

B0 23 Jun 79 30 Aub93 Y 825J0 - 976581 


91 

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10077 15 Sen 92 Y396H- 377J23 
> Sep 51 25 Mo- 96 Y 279 - 24SB9 

5 Jon 75 maturity Y146J8- 297114 
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l Apr 81 , 

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Y 473 - 71928 
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j Jan o 30 Morn ran-JJizjx 

1 Junto 20 Mam Y 3H - 07X95 

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1D077 3 Sep 92 


15 Jan SI BMarto 
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5FtnC25MarV7 Y*9U0- TOXW 
J3O0II a Sen 19 YI441-I4HJM 
I Jul 17 a Marts Y1B- 71&507 
11 A»-p 20 Men « Y 964 - 1019X90 

BMorU 17 Mgr 99 VHS2- 1HU91 


IBtt 

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$78 OkJ Electric 
Ib Orrropuc onftou Co 
$88 Ora Pharmaceaf (ad 
$40 CVlem Finance Ca 
SB Orleat Leasing Co 
su maeicawta 
1 41 RkMCaUd 
$2S senkyo Electric Co 
150 sammEledricCo 
SB StMKCaLM 
$« Sean Co Lto 
IB Safchul House Ud 
$58 StarMlp 
$70 SumNomaCm 
550 SuailhhMElectrk 
$38 Sumitomo MetcMiiduH 6 
$58 suenfemo Metal inctott 7 


Itt H Sap 
TOW DO 
Itt 71 NOV 
TO 77 Her 
to See 
M71 5a 
TO 75 Sep 
TOTS Mar 
$ 76 Nov 

WK 

3 79 Jen 
Itt-OOftb 
TtoffMar 
3* 77 Mar 


SB SunttomoMcWlmMfSttlbSap 
IHO T«km Sanyo EMtric lttflMm 


$78 Tokyo Core 
Sb T<*vu Land Cora 
SB Toshiba Ceramics Co 
IB Toshiba Coro 
$M tdvoawu Katana 
IB UtoooatCarP 
19 Yomal0H Securities 
IB YpmanoucU Phamn 


Sb BOwvaBty lave 51.92 
5 W0 Ehte9Nv35S.H 
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$9 fend Selection 71 51 


115 Adoressagropn I2B 


TOYS San 
TO 7* Mar 
3* 74 SAP 
71k 74 Son 
7Vi76Mar 

4 79AU0 

5 toSte 

4 71 Dec 


17S 1 Dec 79 V4O0H Y 319 JO- S7X99 

104* T9 MOV 04 » 0099 Y 43* - *17.1X1 

to* 5 Apr 83 34 Mo- 98 YA3AX8- A74J4S 
KM 170080 BMarto Y3AI.18-4lUn 
2» IMP 77 2* Sep 97 Y 477 JO- 60799 
ZB 1 Jul 79 79 Sep 94 Y 735 - S48JM 

205 1 Sep II a 5*0 « YM-B97B7 

IM 1 Apr 81 25 Mo rto Y2P6B- 15100 

89ft 1O0W TJScpW Y585- SJ9.W2 
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150014 34 An 99 


Y78H- 2184X11 
YW.I0- 77X393 
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Ywa-iwas 

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YAH - 8A5JB 
Y2S97- 3808.152 
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YT7SJ8- 20.112 
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B- 1421AM 

MISCELLANEOUS 

» TSDK m W Apt 81 moturllr tBSat25niS 25X17 
lltt «J0 rat BS0PI4 7 Jul 94 auflK70U$29W 
Htt 74 Jot IW 1 Hoy 84 26 Jul 94 nzSlitonzslJU 

A* It Mar UB ISapTI 71 Jon 84 rndSJCrj J* 2/9 

UNITED STATES AMERICA 

itt S Mav 38 IDecfB maturity $89 


3 Alia 83 ziSeato 
31000 71 Ditto Y 


x-ifj 150 
US- 235 
(Jtt- 4JS5 
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UAS 2X7 
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1676 <59 
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117 153 
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131- 1J1 
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113- 151 
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52 Itt 
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4X7 J7 


7792 1.H 
1.1* 4B 
*2 490 
745- 7 JO 

152358 


Amt Security % Mat 

SB Alaska intaftta 42X3 TO 75 Dec 
SB Americzn Cal 1759 «ttttMay 
$« Aamica> Emhw$ 1U3 4* 17 May 
335 American M«flaibJ5 TO 77May 
$25 American Motor 1415T 
$50 American Totacc 555 
SB Amt LncPra 19.14 
$75 Apache latt Fa 4124 
SB Bankers InfiLu 3H3 
$b Barnetl Oft Fin 2524 
I2D Beatrice Foods S7.M 
$25 Beatrice Foods XJ72 
$25 Beatriar Foods 3571 
$2$ Beatrice Foata <3 « 

$25 Blacker Enoray 4591 
$35 Broadway-Hale 71tfl 
$7 Carrier Oft Ub 
$U Cdc Cantr0 Dot 1555 
$50 Charter Inti FI 2051 
$58 Chevron Oft Fla 5U7 
S*0 Owner Oft 1613 
SU Cumin- Oft 11X1 
$110 Cwnjol iitfl HM 
$25 CantJ 70 latt 42.11 

$30 Crutcher Ftapnc29X* _ 

1 IS Cummins Ini Fin 1445 61*1500 
$30 Cummins Hit Fin 27X5 5 -88 tea 
$3D Daman Cora I Jtt 
dm 718 Deuftdie Teuco 598 
SI Dtchwhone Inti 3119 
$11 Ototeun Ftnmica 3UQ 
SIS DvnakKUonimaitt 
$30 Eastman Ivodok 1DX7 
$15 El Eco LoOO lid Tltt TO 87 Dec 
$13 Ele ‘ 



TOWDec 
5 WMav 
5* 18 Mar 
TO-9SOO 
•*75 May 
4*11 Mov 


Electron Memorl »Jt5 SWWDec 
SB Esfertine Inti 2U1 TOTSOd 
$30 Fed Depi Store* UB ” 

$30 FeddersCOTItai 21.15 
Id Fimlone O/s 3104 
$B Fora lira Cash z>Jl 
$7$ Ford Inti FUton2*XI 
113 Ga5my Oil Intt 5DX1 
IS General EMctri 2177 
$15 Genaco world 2133 
$50 Gillette Comp U9] 

$75 Gillette Oft FI l&S 
515 Grace Wr Oft 17X5 
$50 Great Western 30JQ 


4* 15 Dec 
5 92 Mav 
5 18 Mav 
* -filter 
5 IS Mar 
B 1 -!! -94 Jon 
4V. 17 Jun 
5* 18 Mar 
TOW Dec 
I 13 Mar 
5 15 Apr 
7* to Jun 


IB 

74 

94 

1 


$60 Kirtmerich Payne 17J2 TViYiOO 


$15 Holiday \m, 7151 

$» Honeywell CepH 1647 
SB mo Oft Finance J09J 
$50 im O/s Finance 2111 
$50 Inti Stand Etoclltt 
$16 Inti Stand Etoc 15X5 
$zs inil Stand Elec 17.1* 

$50 inN Tetashane 1792 
$20 Intercom Hotel tabs 
$15 lie Rn Hahttno H77 
$20 III Swwon ItSS 
IB ijUser Aluminum 40x2 5 
SB KiddeWottelLH 5 


$50 Ktndv-Cans Irt 5687 
SB Lear Petrol Lpc 429» 
$b Lear Petrol Lnc XU* 
SU LtvinnS597 
SB MartoeMidMnd2Ufl 
IB Morion Intt Fin 4780 


I 1500 
A Hi Nov 
A Y7AUB 
TO to 5«P 
S Hi Fab 
5V. to Dec 
MV NO* 
TOW Oo 
7 1* Jun 
4* 16 Mar 
A* to JUl 
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fetal '-Corar. Porto*- — Corar. Price oftb- 


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118 BAueC maturity 

18 10073 maturity 

3b 15 May *9 maturity 
81* I Jun 73 m at u rity 
71* 140011 maturity 
IB I DecO maturity 
111* lAuptt maturity 
154 IJuin maturity 

119 I Mar 73 maturity 

103 1 Ai>r73 maturity 

130 1 Apr 74 maturity 

a 2000 b maturity 

.84 15 -fm 73 motarttv 

109* Ilium maturity 
83 L50d68 maturity 

B 5 Feb 88 maturity 
IB IAusaI maturity 
to 15 Aua 51 maturity 
to IS Dec 18 maturity 
B* 150083 maturity 
95 I Apt w maturity 
41 4 Atav II maturity 

l£ M Jim 72 maturity 
W IMay 6* maturity 
77 1 Jultt maturity 

to*. I Mov 67 IS Apr U 
233 10068 maturity 

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82 100 73 maturity 

ft ISJutAf maturity 
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IB ISJttita maturity 
<6 U Dec 77 maturity 
n 31 Deed motarttv 
IS* 10071 maturity 
128* B apt 74 maturity 
50 7 May 81 motarity 

15 JUI 73 maturity 
> Nov 61 maturity 
30Jun73 motulty 
j Mar 83 maturity 

1 Aua 67 mahiritv 

»Wi 28 Dec S3 motarttv 
91* 4 May 81 maturity 
ltf 1 May 71 maturity 
tIO 1 Jlil 72 maturity 

Ito 1 May 70 26 Jut 97 
'M I Apr 61 2SAUDB 
Oh lSAuab maturity 
SI, I Jun *9 motunty 
I** 15 Mav 70 maturity 
K* 15 Apr 73 marurttv 
WW 20 Mor 72 maturity 
91 I Jan 67 3 jan 86 
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.* IS tea 83 irmturity 
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101* 4 Feb 11 maiuritv 
75* J Feb 69 motarttv 
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94 38 Sep 61 maturity 

81 1 Jan 78 moturtfv 

2 ’VJwM nwhFBy 
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250a ST maturity 
IS Jut 72 motulty 
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* 



U.S. Deficits 
And Markets 
In Europe 

(Continued from Page 7j 
nanows, there exists an opportuni- 
ty to switch out of Eurobonds and 
into Treasuries. 

“The main characteristic of the 
Eurobond market is that it's verv 
defensive" said Edward Dove 
who manages fixed-interest portfcv 
hos for Lazard Securities in Lon- 
don. 

He said that a number of Euro- 
bonds are now trading through 
^Treasuries. meaning that vield can 
* - be picked up by selling th6se Euro- 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 1985 


Page 11 


f New Eurobond Issues 

Issuer 

Amount 

(nuiiions) 

Mat. 

Coup. 

% 

Price 

Yield 

at 

offer 

Price 

end 

week 

Terms 

aoATiNG rate notes 

Bilbao lnt‘l 

$100 

2000 

3/16 

100 

— 

99.10 

Over franmti timeon. Redeemable at par in 1993, 
1995 and 1997. Infer may be peed d hoidera' 
option in company's stack at a 3% dbesunx 

Onrush Pc^jer Mills 
Assodation 

$100 

1995 

Vi 

100 

— 

99 JO 

Over &• month Libor. Bedeemabi* at per in 1990 
and 1991 Denominarions SKtiXXL Fees 070%. 

HXBVCOUPON 

Sallie Mae 

V25.DOO 

1992 

6* 

99% 

6£? 

98 

Nonralofe. 


bonds and buying Treasury bonds He said that the added volume of willing to buy U.S. government se- 
. luce maturity. He said that as new Treasury paper could be coun- curities when wi thholding was re- 
inierest rates rose, “I would think tered by the increased number of quired of all U.S. issues. “They’ll 
inai turooonds are going to look a investors who could now hold buy Treasuries if they're yielding 
utue expensive, ’*'■ --- 3 3 & 


Treasuries, investors who were not more,” he said. 


Puces Drop Slightly as M-l Rise Fails to Impress 


By James Stemgold 

iVen- York Times Service 

NEW YORK — A 56.7-bihion 
increase m the basic money supply 
although larger than had been ex- 
pected, failed Friday to impress tile 
credit markets. Prices fluctuated 
indecisively but finished on a posi- 
tive note. 

While bond prices were down 
slightly for the day, they closed well 
above their lows for the session, 
and some shon-tenn interest rates 
fell. Investor interest remained 
slack, analysts said, as it had been 
‘ most of the week. 

Late Friday afternoon, the Fed 
reported that M-l, which consists 
of currency in circulation and all 
kinds of checking accounts, rose 
$6.7 billion for the week that ended 
Dec. 24. well above earlier expecta- 
tions erf an increase of about $4.5 
billion. Thai follows a modest $200 
million decline the previous week. 

There had been concern during 


PermatoBuy 
Rest of Kaiser 

Lm Angela Times Service 

LOS ANGELES — Kaiser 
Sled Corp. has announced that 
Penna Resources Carp., a Colo- 
rado coal-mining concern, will 
acquire the stock in Kaiser that 
it does not already own from an 
investor group led by J.A. 
Frates, an o ilman from Tulsa, 
Oklahoma. 

The transaction, the value of 
which was not reported in the 
announcement Friday, will give 
Penna control over Kaiser’s 900 
million tons of high-quality 
coal reserves, much of which is 
located in the Trinidad-Raton 
Basin, just south of Penna's 
Colorado reserves. 

Penna and the Frates group 
have managed Kaiser since they 
acquired it last winter, in a 
transaction valued at $374 mil- 
lion. The Fraies group subse- 
quently gave Perma an option 
to become Kaiser’s sole owner. 


ihe day over bow large the increase 
would be, but by the time the figure 
was announced many analysis barf 
already altered their forecasts to 
show a bigger decline. 

Therefore, the announcement 
had little impact on the market In 
fact, bond prices rose slightly after- 
ward. as investors appeared to 
show' relief that the increase had 
not been larger. 

The market was also given a 

U.S. Credit Markets 

boost by a drop in the rate on Fed 
funds, reserves that banks lend one 
another overnight, to its lowest lev- 
el of the week. 

“There’s no question that the 
money number was higher than ex- 
pected, but as the day wore on. 
people were increasing their predic- 
tions, so it wasn't a surprise,” said 
Robert Parry, chief economist at 
Security Pacific National Bank in 
Los Angeles. Raymond Stone, a 
money market economist with 
Merrill Lynch & Co., said, “The 
market was just glad to get that 
obstacle out of the way.” 

Although it raised some con- 
cerns, the increase left M-l well 
within the Fed's target growth 
range of 4 percent to $ percent 
annually. The M-l measure stood 
at a seasonal] y-adj listed $557.6 bil- 
lion for the week that ended Dec. 


U.S. Consumer Rates 

For Vlfook EmM Jan. 6 

Passbook Savings 

.5X0 % 

Tax Exempt Bonds 

Band Buyer 20-fiand Index 9.B7 % 

Money Market Funds 
DanoanuB's 7-Oav Averoae 

. 131 % 

Bank Money Marker Accounts 
Sen* Rate Monitor index 

. 8J3 % 

Home Mortgage 

FHLB average 

.14.16 ft 


Analysis said this eases, for the 
time bong, fears that the Fed might 
have to slow money growth by 
pushing interest rates higher. In ad- 
dition, many analysis said that they 
were already expecting a decline of 
a nearly equal size to be reported 
next week. 

“The way these numbers have 
gone, a large increase is typically 
offset by a decrease of similar 
range, because of problems with 
the seasonal adjustment factors, 
and this is likely in this instance.” 
Mr. Parry of Security Pacific said. 

In market action, the Treasury’s 
llft-perceoi bond due in 2014 
slipped by 7/32 of a point, to 100 
28/32 offered, for a yield of 1 1.64 


slight 2 basis points, to 7.83 per- 
cent, while sh-momh Treasury bill 
yields [ell l basis point, to 8.15 
percent. A basis point is one-hun- 
dredth of a percentage point. 

The drop in bond prices followed 
a generally pessimistic week, but 
several analysts said that the mar- 
ket might now be set for some im- 
provement. 

“People were skittish all week; 
there was a lack or retail interest,” 
said Mr. Stone of Merrill Lynch. 
“Most people are still sitting on the 
sidelines. 

He added that the sell-off Last 
week may have been been over- 
done, presenting some bargains. 
He said that should sentiment re- 
vive; prices could climb rapidly. 
“It's a weird thing that people have 
interpreted just about everything 
so negatively this week, but 3 
things pick up people could climb 
on the bandwagon quickly,” he 
added. 

The market was given some 
cheer by the decline in the Fed 
funds rate. The rate never traded 
higher than 8tt percent Friday, and 
late in the day was quoted as low as 
7!4 percent, ihe lowest levels of the 


24, the Fed reported, well within . 
the target range of S546.8 bOHon at with 1 1.6 1 percent Thursday, 
the bottom and $570.1 billion at 
the top. 


percent, up from 11.61 percenL 
Thai left the long bond down about 
Ifc points for the week, or $15 for '* 
eachSl.000 in face value. weck - On Thursday, Fed funds had 

Elsewhere, the Treasury’s 10- averaged 8.77 percenL 
year, 11-4- percent note slipped At the high point for the funds 
6/32, to 99 28/32 offered, for a rate Friday, the Fed manged SI j 
yield of 11.65 percent, compared billion of customer repurchase 

agreements, which add funds to the 


At the shorter end, the yield on 
three-month Treasury bills rose a 


money system and ease upward 
pressures on interest rates. 


Atari Unveils 3 Personal Computers 


Consolidated Trading 
Of NYSE listing 

Week ended Jon. A 


sates Hied Low Lost cute 
6A6BXQ0 Z1 17Vj 21 +3b 
4.92X600 19% 19 19ft +’A 

1952400 123 119 119% — IV 

3440400 45U 47% *4% — 1% 
1328400 45% 43 43% — 2Vj 

2.961700 23 22% 22ft +% 

1831900 43% 38% 42% +3 

2331700 34% 33% 33% +ft 
1720300 Z7% 25% 25% —2% 
2488.100 45 44% 44% — % 

2499 300 32% 29% 30 —1% 

24MX0D 111 104 1 05 —5% 

1384,900 44 % 42% «ft —1% 
1361400 23% 22% 22% — % 
1227X00 7836 75% 75% —2% 
1209.000 38% 35% 3»% —1% 
1128X00 15% 14 14% —1% 

2X71900 12 10% 11% — % 

1031400 71 68% W% +ft 

2X22X00 28 27% 27% +% 

iM«s Traded In: 12111 
Advances; Ml ; declines: 934 
unchanged: 316 
New highs: ill ; new lows: S3 


CHamS 

ATT 

IBM 

Phi I Pel 

FordM 

SOriE 

Sawlll 

Bet I So 

MoMI 

Exxon 

Owslr 

Digital 

All Rich 

illPw 

GMot 

Sdihnb 

PedNM 

MfndPS 

SwBoll 

CmwE 


This week. 


votvmo 


1982 same we e k. 

1984 ta date. 


1983 to data 

1982 Mutate— - 


314X40X00 shares 
249420000 shores 
48i.«OM0O snores 
234.180X03 snares 
461X00X00 sham 
486X00X00 shores 


Cons o lidated Trading 
Of AMEX listing 

weekended Jan. 4 


WangB 

Sato* 

1X68.100 


Law 

23 

Last 

23ft 

AMInff 

>J80200 

3ft 

2V 

3ft 

TIE 

912J ffi® 

7ft 

6ft 

6ft 

BAT 

74X000 


3ft 

4 

DomeP 

741X00 

IV 

lft. 

lft 

GtfCd 

S77J00 

11V 

11 

lift 

HouOT 

SOV.IOO 

«ft 

4% 

4*b 

TexAJr 

458.980 

w 

BV 

9% 

CrvstO 

451900 

3ft 

2ft 

3 

PetLw 

384400 

4% 

3% 

3V 


+% 

+% 


— % 
+18 


— % 
— % 


Volume: 24XMXOOs«£M 
Vm r to Dale: IM*UW> shores 
Issues traded In: 899. __ 

Advances: 453 : declines: 779 
Unchanged: 16> — 

New Htahs: 36 ; new laws: 29 


Treasury Bills 


Due 

no 

1-17 

1-24 

1- 31 

* 7 

2- 14 
2-21 
z-H 

3- 7 
3-M 
Ml 

3 - SB 

4- 4 
4-11 
*■18 

4- 25 

5- 3 
S- 9 

H4 

5-23 

5- 30 
0-6 
0-13 

6 - 20 
0-27 
7- 5 
Ml 

B- 8 
9 ■ 5 
TO- 3 

10- P 

11- 29 

IMS 





Kredietinx Indices 

(Base 100 May l. 1*771 

indusiriai s. jJS 5 Lj,.— — — - 

lull Institution* USS L.T 

US s medJuiw win -r- _ — “ 
Canadian term — — 

ECU medium lertn 

UC 9 

o «- — : 

Guilders - . — 

FF snort term . — — — — ~ 

FMi» • 


i nil i rut. F U* medium term 

F t u* medium w* 

wn inst. Yen Iona term - — 

ECU shortterm. 

ECU lone term 


Jan. ■* 


93.109 

96X97 

103.933 

104X79 

106X4 

90J09 

NO. 

101228 

1215*3 

100X41 

106X89 

104.19 

103.946 

102.375 

106.994 


By Thomas C Hayes 

New York Times Service 

LOS ANGELES — The Atari 
Corp.. which is believed to be short 
of cash after disappointiagChrist- 
mas sales, exhibited three new com-' 
outers over die weekend at the 
Consumer Electronics Show In Las 
Vegas. 

On a different stage at the trade 
show, a number of large Japanese 
electronics manufacturers showed 
off their first home computer-en- 
tertainment systems for the UJS. 
market, with prices bdow $500. 

Analysis are uncertain about the 

S irospects both for Atari and for 
apanese companies such as Sony, 
Matsushita, Yamaha and Pioneer. 

For Atari, the big question is 
whether it has the resources to go 
against Apple Computer Inc„ In- 
ternational Business Machines 
Corp. and Commodore Interna- 
tional Lid. in a battle for sales of 
personal computers in the £700- lo- 
$1,500 range. 

For the Japanese companies, a 


| NASDAQ National Market 


Soinin Nat 

100s Hlun low Clear Cb’oe 


132 22% 21% 21% — % 
403 1896 1714 18 — 1 
5Q6 17% 16% 17% + Vj 
.135 « 3V 3%— % 
2033 18 17 18 + % 

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1226 10% 9% 10% + Vi 

X 14 41 19V* 10% 19% + % 

1604 4% 4 4b — % 

75* 8 7% 8 + % 

243 7% Mk 6V — % 
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t 437 26% 55% 26 
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t 7373 Z9» Bft Bft 
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63* 7% 6ft 7 + % 
164 13b 12% 12% — % 
24 095 16% 16% 16% + % 
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1602 7% 2% 3H— % 

1128 8 6» 71*+?% 

3860 9% 9% 9% 

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87 7% 7 7%— % 

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IX 5773 31% 30% 30%—] 

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780 8% 7% 8 + % 
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Analvi 

Anaren 

Andrew 

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APHcC 

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APtaCm 

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Aatasir 

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Archive 

AraoSv 

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AsdHSt 

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Austron 

AfwdOc 

AulTr-f 

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Austan 

Avocre 

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Avatar 

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AzfcM 

All CM 




14% 

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6185 % % % + % 

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JM U t» 22% 21% 22 — % 

6StaJ6 16 16 

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77 2552 11% 10% 11% + % 

187 5% 4% 5 
261 9% 9 9% + % 

1337 35% 34% 34% — % 
98 7% 7 7 — % 

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13446 20% 18% lf%— % 

30667 29% 27% 28%— % 

287 29 28 28%—% 

321 12% 12% 17% 

803 27 25% 26 + % 

123 10 9% 9%— % 

140 % % % + % 

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Delegates at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas 
gathered Saturday at the Atari Corp/s display booth. 


new owner. Jack Tramiei, will set 
for the company in the personal 
computing market during 1985, ac- 
cording to analysis. 

The new Atari computers, ana- 
lysts said, will be priced between 


major uncertainty is whether con- S500 and S900, depending upon ihe 
sumers will go for the aging, dghi- amount of memory'. If successful, 
bit computer technology in their Mr. Tra raid's strategy would 
computer systems, selling for under sharply undercut IBM and Apple 
$500. Some analysis said sales in in price. IBM’s PCjr and Apple's 
Japan have been disappointing, lie and Uc models are priced under 
Shipments are expected to reach S 1,000. Apple’s Macintosh is a vaO- 
the United States by May. able at S 1 .595. 

The response from dealers, as Bui many are skeptical of Atari’s 
well as potential investors and chances. An executive at Warner 
lenders, is likely to play a big part Communications Inc., who asked 
in how ambitious a course Atari's not to be identified, said it was 


unclear to Warner what products 
Atari would make this year. Mr. 
Tramiei bought Atari from Warna 
last July, but Warner retains an 
interest in the company. 

Douglas A. Cayne, an analyst 
with the Gartner Group of Stam- 
ford, Connecticut, said Atari's new 
machines probably were based an 
the same microprocessor chip, the 
Motorola 68000, as Apple’s Macin- 
tosh. He said Atari’s new machines 
mimic many of the easy-to-use fea- 
tures of the Macintosh, through an 
operating system developed for 
Atari by the Digital Research 
Corp. 


Come x, NYSE End Talks on Futures Market 


By Elizabeth M. Fowler 

New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — Alan J. Brody, chairman of the 
Commodity Exchange Inc., has announced that he has 
ended talks with the New York Stock Exchange about 
the possible joint operation and ownership of the 
slock exchang e's ailing subsidiary, the New York 
Futures Exchange. 

He said Friday that the talks, which began early in 
1984. had reached “an impasse." 

For its part, the Big Board said only that discus- 
sions have been terminated.''’ A spokesman added, 
however. “We are continuing discussions with other 
exchanges for a possible joint venture.” 

The New York Futures Exchange trades futures 
contracts and options based on the slock exchange’s 
composite index. The Comex, which is a center for 
trading silver, gold, copper and dumraom futures, 
also provides option trading u gold and stiver. 

Wall Street experts said that the leading contender 
for a joint venture with the New York Futures Ex- 


change now was the New York Mercantile Exchange, 
noted for its willingness to add new products. 

By buying or selling futures contracts, a trader can 
take a position in a substantial amount of a commod- 
ity or a financial instrument, for a relatively small 
amount of money, for a slated time. 

The trader usually does not take delivery of the 
underlying product, but liquidates the position before 
the expiration date. The trader's risk in a futures 
contract can be considerable, because the trader may 
be asked to put up more money to carry a deteriorat- 
ing position. 

An option on futures is different. Call options give a 
trader, for a small premium, the right to boy futures 
contracts; the risk is limited to the premium paid. Put 
options gives a trader the right to seQ a futures 
contract 

The New York Futures Exchange had 1983 reve- 
nues of $7.7 milli on and expenses of $1 1 .8 millio n In 
1984, according to a spokesman, the results were 
closer to “breaking even.” 


U.S. Auto Sales Advanced 13.2% in 1984 


(Continued from Page 7) 
pensive cars and the increasing 
purchase of options, even for small- 
er models. 

“Detroii is finally making some 
interesting cars and people are 
looking at them as an investment, 
and Arthur G- Davis, an analyst 
with Prescott. Ball & Turben. “Peo- 
ple arc loading them up aid financ- 
ing them over four or five years. 
The skinny stuff just ww * 1 se “ 

m Virtually all auto companies in 
the U.S. market reported increases 
for the vear. "The biggest percentage 
SerVas Honda oiAmeng 
which more than doubled us sales, 

l °The imports’ share of the market 


fell to 24.4 percent from 27.9 per- 
cent in 1983. 

.Among the domestic companies. 
Fold showed the biggest gain in 
auto sales, rising 26 percent, to 
1,979,315. Chry sler auto sales in- 
creased 14.1 percent, to 1,078.716, 
while GM, which was hampered by 
strikes last fall registered a grin of 
133 percent, to 4.600,512 cars. 

Of the Big Three, Ford registered 
an increase in market share last 
year, to 18.82 percent, from 17.11 
percent in 1983. GM slipped to 
43.74 percent from 44. J 5 percent, 
and Chrysler was down marginally, 
to 10-26 percent from 1029 per- 
cent Honda of Japan inaeased its 
shrie, to 6.10 percent from 4.91 
percent 


In the latest 10-day reporting pe- 
riod, which ended Eiec. 31, sales of 
new domestically-built cars totaled 
179,993, down 2.2 percent on a dai- 
ly rate baas from 206,610 last year. 
There were eight selling days in the 
period this year and nine last year. 
Daily sales totaled 22,449 this year, 
compared with 22,957 a year ago. 

For all of December, with 25 
selling days this year and 26 in 
1983, new-car sales by the six com- 
panies totaled 560,672, or 22,427 
daily, up 4 3 percent from 559,421, 
or 21,516, a year ago. Sales of im- 
ported cars totaled 207,154, or 
8-286 a day, up 12 percent from 
192.347, or 7,398 a day. 

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Jertcn .12 3 1821 17% 16V 16V— ft 

jllr * 233* % ft % + % 

Jan ICO t 234 4 Mi 3V— ft 

Joncl A 1 327 3V 3ft 3V 

Jasmin X0 6J 133 7ft 7 7ft + Vh 
Juno 347 20V 20ft 20ft- % 

Justin s xm ii 22s Ub i3v Mb + b 


KLAS 1503 1*V 15V 15ft— % 

KV Phr 187 4V 4b «V + ft 

Kaman X6 24 448422b 20ft 21%— ft 
Karchr 775 14ft 13ft 14% — u 

K«ler A« 44 332 14V 13 13% — 1 

Kavdon 245 7% 6% 7% + ft 

KelvJn 4328 Ift Jft lft + % 

Kama 1X0 4A 690 44% 43% 44% + ft 

KvCnLI 80 U n 37b 34b 36ft +2ft 

Kevex 5*2 5ft 5ft 5ft + ft 

KevTm 5B5 9ft 9b 9ft 

KevCms S4 *b a 4 

Kimbal X4 1.9 1(M 29b 28V 28V— b 
Kimbrk 147 6 5% Sft— ft 


K Inca la 


206 7% 

6b 

7% +1 

RestrSv 



117 13 

12 

13 

Kinders 

A6 

A 2511 15» 

14% 

14V . 

Reutcrl 

.15* 

1 A 

52* 11% 

taft 

11 

wlkoss 


215 ft 

ft 

ft— ft 

ReufrH 

S9e 

J 

67 20% 

20 

20 

Krev 




uv— b 





TV 

3% 


X2 

£6 23*0 13ft 

12% 



1.9* 

X9 

155 33 

31b 

31% 

Kulcke 

.16 

A 1*10 96 

24% 

24ft— ft 

Rhodeis 

XO 

1A 

406 im 

lift 

1314 


UDBrnk 

UN 

LSI Lag 

LTX 

La Petes 

LaZBv 

LodFm 

La'idlw 

LomaT 

Lancasl 

LndBF 

LOmkS 

Lonecs 

Lanaty 

Lowing 

Lee D la 

Lolner 

LewIsP 

Lexicon 

Lexldta 

Uetari 

Lllnus 

UeCam 

UtvTuI 

LinBrd 

UncTei 


2483 BV Bft B% 

1057 6V 6 6ft— ft 

3103 13% 12 13ft +1 
1046 39b 18 U%— U 

256 14V Ub 14V + ft 

1X40 £0 454 34% 34% 34% + ft 

•12a .9 222 13V 13% 13% — % 

.16 1A B79 12 11% 11V 

30 63 23 >7V 17b 12V + b 

AB 4X 288 15ft 15ft 15ft 
AO AA 1491 13V 13ft 13% 

161 *% * 6% + % 

XOo 2.1 99 39% 39 39 

XSe 4X (44 6ft 6 6b— % 

30 IX 159 34V 24 24U + ft 

4944 7% 6% 6%— ft 

135 13ft 12V 13 + ft 

X8t» 3J 145 7% 7ft 7% + b 

2331 3ft 2ft 3b + ft 

643 3ft 3% 3b 

JO J 4*9 29 20% 22 + V 

X4 M 15 42ft 41V 42ft + ft 
581 6b 5ft 6b + ft 
IX 3401 M 13% 13V 

5546 24ft 22V 23 -Ift 
?X *16 29V 29b 29b — b 


X0 


Llndbrg 

.16 

12 

17B 5 

4ft 

5 

+ % 

UiCJcS 



3308 25% 

?J% 

25 

— U 

Loco IF 



692 14% 

14 


LangF 

1X0 

5A 

118 22 ■ 


99 


Lotus 



*484 24% 

«% 

2* 


Lyrelon 



750 20 

19V 

19V + b 

Lvstai 



373 MU 

13V 

14b + % 


M 


XOe 

X0 4A 

JO IX 
1X0 SX 
1A0 5.1 

2A0B 4.9 

jm 


G 


GTS 5 

Galileo 

QamoB 

Gondii g 

Garda 

Genelch 

GnAut 

6nHme 

GanetS 

Gene* 

Genova 

GaFBlc 

GerMds 

GibsG 

GluaTr 

GfenFtf 

GidCorr 

GdTaat 

Gotaas 

Gait 

Gould P 

Graco 

Gran ire 

Graetii 

Grpn&c 

GWFSB 

GBavCs 

GreenT 

Gtech 

Gulltrd 

GltBdc 

GIINuc 

Gull 


.10 


133 10b 10 
42 13V 13 
IX 361 B 7% 
263 lift lift 
2054 2ft 1ft 
2546 36V 33V 
5% 5b 
310 7b 7 
193 3% 3b 
im * 3ft 
363* 5% 5ft 
284* 5ft 5 
.10# U « 56 ft 
2993 15ft 10% 
IX M7 5ft 4ft 

x 2 i* 27b an* 

1*0 ISV 14V 
4737 9 BV. 

*0 10V 10% 
1043 % ft 

2M2 1 5ft 13% 

104 11 10% 

£1 310 lib ?44i 
4X 43D01 10b 

388 7% 6ft 
425 9ft 9% 
11760 5% 5 
■48 b 3X IB0*J5b 14% 
220 10V ID 
305 15V 15 
3405 12ft 11V 
296 14% 14 
18459 15V 14% 
223 2 IV 
AS* X 116 9% 8b 


XS 

XI 


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13 — '* 
7V 
11V + b 
2ft + b 
36% +2V 
S19 
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3ft + % 
3ft 
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5 

10b— V 
5ft + ft 
24ft— V 
15V + ft 
«V— U 
10% —ft 
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10V 
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10ft— ft 
7 + ft 

9ft— ft 
5 — ft 
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10% 

15 — ft 
12 — ft 
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15 — % 
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9ft + ft 


.16 


.10 


.10 

X4 

1A0 

xa 


.w 

.10 


HBOS 
HCC 
HCW 
HMOAm 
Habers 

HadCO 

Ha dew 
HaieSv 
Halml 
HamQII 
HotpG 
HHINe 
H alliwy 
HawfcB 
HlttiAs 
HlttlCS 5 
Himin 
Hlthdvn 
HecflBA 
HechnoB 
Helen! 

Helix 

HenrdF Aj 

HerltBn 1 J 0 
Hertay 

Hlbercs 1X0 
Hlcfcam 
Honan 
HmFAz 
HomeHl 
HflWCft 
Honlnd X6 
HaokDr UN) 
Hoover 1X0 
Honlnd 
HwBNJ 
HungTg 
HudtJB 
HntgRs 
KuntgB 
HuTCd 
HvbrHc 
HvdeAt 
HfttaAX 
HytakM 


1X2914 17b 16V 1*V— b 
X 151 7% 7b 7ft + b 

2.1 160 5b *ft 4ft— % 

397 10V 9V 10 — ft 
293 IW 12ft 12V 
133 * 5ft 5V+.ft 

1432 2% 9 2 

69 


ft ft iff** 

J S21 14ft lift 14 

1.1 136 29V 28V 29V +1 

6jC 7TB 5W 24ft 26ft— ft 

2X 10Q PU 9b 9b 

3 A 74» Bft Bb Bb 

1*59 17b 16V 16V— b 

471 17b ISV 17b +2b 

183 8 7b 7ft 

7414 3b 2ft 3b + ft 

J 3349 21ft »V 21b + Ui 
X 563 21V 21V 21V + b 
1159 7b Sft 6ft— ft 
50 25b 34 V 24ft 
2 A 176 35b 34ft 34V + V 
17 467 43ft 42V 43ft + ft 
95 4ft 4b 4ft + b 
SX 205 20 19b 20 +1 

142 10V tab 10b 

23588 12 4ft 6 -Sft 
498 15ft 14V 15ft + ft 
4010 7ft 7 7ft + ft 
386 8 7b 7V 
32 360 IB 16V 17% + b 

SX 197 21 19V 20 — % 

3X 1106 29 28ft 28ft— % 
515 4ft 3ft 4% + % 
1680 19 17 18ft +lft 

30 4ft 4 4%— % 

32720% 20 20% + % 

169 9b Bb 9b +| 
1.48b 42 JSB 36b 35 35b— % 

2S1 4 V 3V 4b + b 

Hi 17b 16b 17b +71* 
501 5 4ft 4ft 

284 5V 5 5V+ ft 

200 7 5ft 6% 


1LC 

iMSInt 

IPLSy 

ISC 

Icot 

tmunex 

imuno 

Imogen 

iwanp 

indoHII 

IndIN 

intaRse 

Inllrn 
intraln 
instNtw 
I mean 
inKGen 
ISSCO 
InloDv 
mid 
intlSy 
IntrTM 
Intrnd 
nMvn 
I nhl Fir 
Infrfac 
mtarph 
inirmon 
inlmec 
Inlratef 


109 Bb 7ft 7V 
XO X 697 3bft 35ft 3Sft-l 
1239 1% 1% 1% + % 
22*4 9b Bft 
440 4 3ft 
69 6ft 6b 

382 3 2V 
'' 2ft Ift 


538 4ft .3% 
179 19% 19 


9 — ft 
3ft 

6ft+ % 

l 

4ft + ft 

19ft+ ft 

1X0 42 162 33b 32ft 33 — b 
204 24% 33% 34% + ft 
370 19% 18% 19% + V 
44 7% 7 7V 
97 1BV 17V 17ft— 1 
3256 9b 8ft 8ft- ft 
972 3V 3b I%— % 
36 17b 17 17 

1173 II 10 11 + V 

20369 20ft 27b 28% + b 
2529 Bft 8ft 6% 

804 1ft 1% Ift + ft 
1555 Mb 12b 14b +lft 
164 8% Bft 8ft- ft 
.16 IX 2511 10ft m »0% +1% 
97 Sft 5ft 5ft— % 
1 151 B 55b 48V 49% —5 
*93 Sft 5ft 5ft + ft 
2387 17 IS 17 +1V 
TBS 4 5ft 5ft— ft 


MCI 
mi w 
MPSls 
MTS s 
MTV 
Macras 
MaoiTc 
MacfcTr 
MadGE 
Maectl 

Mai Rt 

Mairilt 
MgiScI 
ManlhM 
MtrsN 
Marcus 
Moraui, 

Mara si 
MrtaN 
Msceln 
Massior 
MathBx 
MatrxS 
Moxcre 
Maxwtf 
MavPr 

Mccrm 
Me Fad 
McFari 
Mede* 
MetjCre 
MeticISt 
Meilllx 
Megdls 
Mentor 
MenlrG 
MercB 5 
MercBk 
MS&Cd 
MerSv 
MrdBc 
MrdBof £50 
MerrIB 1X0 
MervGs 
MeirAIr 
MetSL 
Ml com 
MicrD 
MlcrMk 
Micmv 
MIcrTc 
Micro® 
McrSm 
MdPcA 
MdSIFd 
MldBks 
MflwAir 
MllITCtl 
MJIIHr 
Milllcm 
Mllllpr 
Mlnlscr 
Mlnsir s 
Mftcttor 
MGask 
Manic A 
MOUCB 
Madlne 
NIMKlr 
Malax 
Man Co 
Morroar 

Mama 
ManAnl 
Manalii 
MonuC 
MarFlo 
Mar Kb 
M orrsn 

Moseley 

Moran 
Multmd 
Myhms 


X4 


2X0 


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AO 

200 

XBe 

ASe 
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.10 


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1X2 

1A8 


£40 


30935 7V 7b 7% 

112 5b 4 A, 5 — ft 

20 6 6 6 

IX 730*15% 15% 

1071 18% 18ft 18b— % 
370 12 10 11 V +1% 

751 *% 6 6ft + ft 

IBIS 14ft 13ft 14 + ft 
9A 183 22% 23b 22% + ft 
232* 12 11b Ub 

447 Bb 8 8 — ft 

443 19b 11% 11%— b 
1428 11% 10ft 11 — ft 
4J 405 19 1BV 18V— ft 
4A 348 45% 44% 45 + % 
£0 131 I4b 14 14b + b 

3*0 7 6% 6ft 

J 771 7b 7 7 

17 2165 *4b 43 43b— V 

120 27V 27 27b 

62*9 4V 3ft 4ft + ft 
S93 11 10 11 +1 

A 217 28 27 27 - V 

3251 25% 22ft 23b -1% 
22B 9b 8V 9 
3478 4ft 4% 4ft— ft 
3ft Sft Ift + b 

32b 31ft 32 + % 

tab 9V 10 — ft 

12b lift 12b + ft 

a 5 % 

14V 13b 13V— b 


177 15ft 15% 1 


+ ft 

in 6 5% sft + b 

2S6 11% 10V 11% + ft 

19ft 18% 19ft + % 


5X iS 8j33b 


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40 6.1 


A* IX 


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41 23b 22V 22V- % 
508 40% 39 39ft- ft 

115 29V 29 29b 

59 21% 20% 20% — V 
879 13% 11V 13% + % 
*57 lift 10V 11 - ft 
265 10ft 9V 9ft + ft 
2043 29% 27% 27V- % 
657 4 3ft 3ft + b 
64 10b 10 10 - b 

91B 5ft 4ft 5ft + b 
3245 27ft 251* 2S%-2 
988 5 4ft S + ft 
low Sft Aft Jfft + V 
’ — ~ 4V Sft +1 ft 
17V taft + ft 
29ft 39% + 

Ift 4 

... _ Ift IV + ft 

517 34V 34b 34ft + ft 


Boies In Net 

100s Htgti Lm* Close CnM» 
1337 Sft 2V 1ft + V 
M2 3 * V 4b AVi + V 
997 16% 149* 16% +1 
1542 42% 40V 41V + ft 
670 15% 13b IS + % 
.16 £6 540 4V 4ft 4% 

;{* J 199 35 34% 35 + % 

PTOPlTr 1X0 0A 302 14b 13V 14V +» 

PM)al 361 2% IV It* — % 

Prmln 167 15ft 14ft 15% + % 

PilHTrti MI 4b 4 ,4ft 

PWlBn A0 18 37* 15 14 14% + % 


Preway 

Priam 

PrtaCm 

PrtaCfls 

Prironx 

ProdOo 

ProoCo 


QMS a 1752 lift 12% 12% + % 

Quadra 1577 4V 3ft 4V + V 

QuakrC A8 SA IIB 2» 24% 24% — 1 
QdOlSv 145 ZV 3» 2% 

Quantm 988 21ft 30 30b- ft 

QUUIM 1821 39* 3 VA 

Qulxata 169 10V ID 1§V + b 

Qucrtrn 5705 SV 8 8b + b 


1X6 

34 


RAX 
RPMl 
Rods vs 
RQdtnT 
Radio* 
Radian 
Raoen 
Hal sir 
Romlek 
RovEn 
Reoane 
Recotn 
RedknL A4 
Reeves 
RocvEl 30 
Reetss A9 
Retiab 
Rellab 
Renal 

RnAtrta A4 
RaHim 


1808 11 9% 9V— 1 

707 14 13% 13% — b 

*57 14b 13% 13% — ft 
1861 tab 7b 10b +3 
469 9 89* 8ft- % 

6 10b 9V 10b 
1*25 4% SV 6% + V 
3X .817 47ft 46ft 47 — ft 
822 5 4ft 4V— b 
1A 2*9 ISV 12V 13b 

132 20 19ft 19ft— M 
IBS SV 5% Sft 
£3 70 28% 27V 28 

3832 5V 5b Sft+% 
XI 1542 6V 6ft 6% — % 
J 221 13b 12% 13 

1903 22ft 22 22% — % 

323 10 9b Bft— % 
MS 4V 4h» 4b + b 
54 445 BM 8 Bft + ft 
813 Uft 10V lib + % 

+ ft 


RIcfiEI 

Rttzvs 

Rival 

RoodS 5 

Rabeen 

RobNua 

Robvsn 

Rockor 

Rasesst 

RaseSB 

Rouse 

RavBGp 

Roylnt 

RayPlm 

Ror IRS 

RgylAIr 

RuMPel 

R van Fa 


M 


9 20V 2fift 2tm— ft 
988 2% IV 2ft + ft 
66 1206 12% lift 12ft + ft 
34 2434 30V 29b 29b— V 
146 6% 6 6b 
A 5S7 14% 13 14 +96 

296 9ft 9b 9ft + ft 
1517 14V 13V 14ft + ft 
28a IX 47 20 17% 19 —1 

J28o 14 771 20% 19ft 19ft + ft 
.97 £7 259 34% 33ft 33ft- » 

164 2 lft 1ft + ft 
819 lib 18 18 

Ml Sft Bb Bft— ft 

3271 8 5% *V— lft 

43 7% 7b 7% 

168 13V 13b 13ft— b 

361 T9 TBb 19 + % 


1X0 


XOO 


SAY Ind 
SCI 5v 
SEI 
5FE 
5P Drug 
SRI 

Safecrd 
Safeco 
SofHINl 
SiJude 
SIPaul 
Sai Cat 
San Bar 
5andCM 
Soietao 
SafeJ5v 
SavnF 
SvBAPS 
ScanOp 
ScanTr 
Scfterer 
SctilmA 
Sclmed 
SdCmp 
Scilncs 
ScIMIC 
ScISH 
ScUrSv 
Sdln 
SeaGal 
Seagate 
SecTao 
5EEQ 

Setae! 

Semlcn 
Sensor 
SvcMer 
Svma&l 
Servlco I 
SvcFrct 
SewOak .1* 
ShrMed 48 
Sitwmts 1A8 


1230 10b 9 10b +1 

7532 14% 12 12%— lft 

301 14% 13% 13ft— b 
.Mk- IX 484 8 7b 8 + % 


.12 IX 
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32 13 



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35% 

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2736 

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tab 

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717 

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632 

Bft 

7ft 

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140 


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444 7V 7 7% 

.1 1401 29% 28ft 29b + V 
3X 1023 44% 43% 43% —1 
7 9S :vs 3 3% + ft 

15 100 18b 17% 18 

319 9 Bb Sft— ft 

3867 14b 13% 13ft 
4A 73 28b 28% 28b— ft 
92 ISV 1 Sft ISV + b 
.12* 1.1 157 10V 9V 10V + V 
48 £9 957 17b 16% IM6— % 

1400 4ft 4ft 4ft 

X0 IX 146 13% 12V 13 + % 

AO 1.7 *49 37 3*b 36b— % 

.10! A 645 25% 34b 24% — ft 


1X0 

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MCA a, 

NM5 

NapcoS 

NBnTer 

NtCtvs 

NtCptr 

NQata 

NHItaC 

NiLumb 

NMJcrn 

NT ecu 

NatrBlv 

Hcuigfe 

Noun wt 

NWsnT 

Nelson 

NwLSec 

Nerwks 

NtnkEI 

Neulrgs 

NBrunS 

NE Bus 

NHmaB 

NJNatS 

NY Alrl 

NY Awt 

MwldBk 

Newpl 3 

NWPPt! 

NlCalg 

NIckOG 

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M u i ds lr 

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Nan Ian 

NAIIln s 

NestSv 

NwNG 

NvrtFn 

NwNLS 

NwstPS 

Novmh, 

Noxell 

NucIPh 

Numrax 

NutrIF 

NuMed 


34 8 7% 7V— b 

286 3ft 2ft 2ft 
144 13 12b 13 + % 

A4 4X 531 21 20V 21 + % 

1X0 5A 1023 38ft 37V 37V- b 
X4 IX 371 2Tb 20% 20V 
44 48 2607 9V Bft 9ft 

JOe 14 72 21b 20% 20V— % 

486 5% 4ft S + ft 
237* 4ft 

I 255 3ft 
2B6 4% 

635 5V 

16 IV 

JO 2A 270 B 
647 9 
2896 Bft 


4%— V 
3b— ft 
4% 

Sft— ft 
lft 
7V+ ft 
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7V + % 


XO 

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XO 

1.12 


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3ft 
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5ft 
lft 
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7V 

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1WB 22ft 22b 22% 

337 4 3b 3V + ft 
A 246 34 33 34 

221 Sft 7% Bft + b 
IX 11B32 S3 31 

£5 149 23 22ft 23 + ft 

A3 338 24 23Vr 23V + b 

S ft « 1? 

43 11 lOft taft + ft 
J 450 23% 22% 23 — b 
1B9S 6ft Sft 6 + b 

f 333 m 3^ 3ft— ft 
*06 ft 

AOe 4X 704* Sft 7V Bft +1 
A* X7 2923 18 16V l| +1% 

40 14 102* 31b 29% 29%— IV 

■12e X 9* Bft 37ft 3B + ft 

1657 6% SV «b + ft 
557 8 7b 7ft— ft 

1452 7b 7ft ,7V 
144 &X 442 16ft 16ft 16% 

1.16 3-0 681 39b 38V 39b + % 

A0 X9 B44 28ft 27% Z7%— lft 
2.10 1E1 250 21 20b 20ft + ft 

137 4ft 4b 4b— ft 
.92 XI 798 45% 43V 44 — ft 
1345 5ft Sft Sb 
218 Bb 8 8 — b 

302 9b SV 9 — b 

1658 9V 9b 9V + b 


OCGTe 
OakHIll 
oaiRec 
Dceaner 
Odllas 
OftsLog 
OgllM* 
OWoBc 
OMnCo 
OidKnt s 
Old Rep X8 
OfdSafC £60 


QnoBCP 

OnUne 

Qnvx 

OpttcC 

CnHcR 

Orbonc 

OrbH 

OrfaCo 

Osiunn 

OttrTP 

OvrEw> 

OwenM 

Dxoco 


.13e 


X0 

£68 


778 2ft 2b 2b— ft 

221 3% 3ft Sft— ft 

392 Mi 2% 2% — b 

714 3b 3% 3ft 

313 14% 13V 14% + b 
455 2ft lft lft 

2A 3KS5 36b 35% 36 
50 2 S»V 50V SDV +1V 

5A 743 46ft 46ft 4*ft— ft 
3Wx23 22 23 

£9 498 30ft 30 30* + V 

1X1 248 20ft 19% 19ft— ft 
J 6*5 17 16V* Mb- 9* 

381 4% 4 4b 

3811 1% Ift lft + ft 

1555 16b 14b 15 — ft 
1658 30b 29% 30 + % 

235 14 V 14ft 14% 

1767 6ft 5ft SV— ft 
570 6b 5b 6b +1 
IX 487 17 16 16b + b 

9X 217 22 27% 27V 

66 10V 10% 10% — b 
2X 392 13V 12% 13 
1178 3ft 3b 3% 


PLM 

PNC 

PabsJB 

Paccar 

PaeFst 

PocTel 

PacoPh 

FanCMX 

Panspn 

Partaan 

PorkOti 

PgtntM 

Porrkt 

PaulHr 

PauiPt 

PavN 

Pavchx 

PeakHC 

PearIH 

PagGM 

PenaEn 

Pentar 

PmpEx 

PeepRt 

Percept 

PenCpt 

Petrtte 

Ptirmd 

PSFS 

PhllGI 

PlmxAin 

PlcSav 

PlcCafe 

PlanHI 

PtonSts 

PoFou 

P lev Mg 

Pore* 

Pm LSI 

Powell 

Powrlc 

PvrCOftv 

Pretest 

Pr«tt« 


.U IX 


AO 4J 


A0 £7 


.12 2A 95 6 Sft 6 + ft 
2X2 S.1 757 66% 65% 45ft + ft 

4463 10b 10 10 

IXfe 17 214) 65b A4% 45 + % 
1939 8% B 8b- b 
JO XX 193 14% 12V 13% + ft 
304 13ft 13b 13ft + ft 
101 8 7ft 7V + ft 
886 Uft 14 14b 

85 10 Oft 0V— b 
150 14b 13V 14 
1145 4ft ift 4ft + b 
463 7% 7b 7ft— ft 
72 13 12ft lift— % 
104 7ft 6ft 6ft- » 
7122ft 2B* 22% 

419 9ft 9 9 

987 13% 12V 12ft 
1253 Bft 22 22b- ft 
XtT IX 1361 7 6 6 - ft 

2X0 7J7 57 26% X 26 — b 
36 U 535 29ft 28ft 28ft- ft 
3119 10ft 9ft 9ft— % 
3712 ft ft ft 
126 7ft Bft 7 +ft 

234 Bft 7ft Bft + V 

1.12 4J 237 26V 25V 26b 

«5 6% 5ft 6 - b 

7074 Bft Bft 8% 

48 r U 3679 15ft 15% 15V + b 
441 Bft 3 3ft 

1326 28 18ft 19 -1 
AO 3J 761 lift 18% 10%— % 
.92 15 1890 32 31% 31ft 

.13 U 139 Bb 7% TVs— ft 
381 10% 9V 10% + b 
691 28 27b 27ft + ft 

391 M Hft 37ft— 1 
580 7ft 7V 7V 

57B 2 IV Ift 

1075 MV 15% 15V 
445 7b 6V 7<k + % 
.16 X 179 IJb 3iv J3b +l' } 
>75 AV *% 6 - 


Shetav 

Stwklhl 

Shonev 

SIkwtShi 

5tanmt 

Silicon 

Silicons 

Siikvoi 

SlltOlx 

Sllfec 

SJmpin 

Stanln 

SiSCP 

Slnfer 

Sk toner 

SkxeiTc 

SmtihL 

SmlltiF 

ISS^V 

SoMecti 

SotlwA 

SonocP 

SonrFil 

SoBosi 

Soutrst 

Sovran 

Sovran 

SpcMlc 

SpanA 

Speeds 

Spctron 

SoecCll 

Soon ID 

SWre 

StafBM 

Standv s 

StdMIc 

StdReg 

Stand un 

Slonhes 

StarSr s 

SloSIB 

StoteG 

Steiger 

StenvL 

SfewShr 

Slwlnl 

sum 

StockSn 

Strata# 

SlrnCs 

Stryker 

StuartH 

Subaru 

SHtafB 

Summa 

SumiHI 

SunCst 

SunMed 

SunSL 

SuoRie 

SupSkv 

Suprtu 

SuorEq 

Svkrn 

SytnbT 

Syneor 

Synlecb 

Syntrex 

Syscan 

SrAsoc 

Swim 

Svslntg 

SvstGn 

Svetml 

SCTCp 


315 14V 14 14% + ta 

3X.1243 IB 17ft 17V + b 
681 13% 12ft 11% 

4A 2045 33% 32% 32ft — ft 
637 >5% lift 14 —lb 
1230 9 B% 8V + b 
SA 4606 53ft SSft 50V— 2ft 
1152 3% 3b 3b— b 
3 IBS 7ft 7 7 — b 

156 SV 7U 8 + V 
200 ft V ft 
126 6% SV *% + V 
105 36V 35b 35b + ft 
458 28% 26% 26% + ft 
703 7b 6V 7 — % 

56 6 12% 12b 12ft + b 
3J SOS 10 9ft 9V 
2J 76 16% 15V 15V— V 
59 8 7b 7b 
19 5b 5 5 — % 

70 7ft 7V 7ft + % 
417 4b 3V 4b + ft 
439 11% 10% 11 + V 

436 4 3ft 3ft— ft 
217 16b 15V ISV— % 
231 7ft 7% 7b — % 
~~ 4V Sft + ft 
2b 2ft + % 
5% Sft— ft 
19% 19ft— % 
8 B 
7 7ft 

_ 11% lift— % 

6.1 3819 27ft 26b 27b — b 
2346 15 1* 

501 SV 5% SV + ft 
IX 1426 13ft 13% 13V + b 
IX 27B0 27% 36ft 27% — % 
SA 1202 3B?i, 29% 30%- V 
... .9 259 17% 16% 16% 

2525 17 15 16% +1% 
.16 X 1700 XJ% 31% 31ft 

VM 13V 13 73 — ft 

.106 2fl 87 Sft 4V 5 — b 
2338 7V 7 7ft + b 
1121 I? 

151 
ST9 


1.12 


5A 


25029 Sft 
9«1 2% 
883 6 
4.1 358 20 
29 Bft 
J 2901 7ft 
J 9894 12 


A0 5.7 


1.70 AJ 


31 

1X06 £1 g 

A0 1J 216 
177 

U 8041 33 
XB 702 23b 
IX B07 8% 
4J 1370 3* 
323 2% 


X7 

XB 

.10 

1A8 


TV 7 7ft + b 
« lib u% + ft 
15% 14% IS + b 
t|% 13 TJb + b 
.9 8% Bft— b 

211/14 13ft 14 + ft 

191 15b I4V 14V 
172 «b 4 4b + b 
107 15% 15 15% + b 

384 10ft 10 taft + ft 
177 4% 4 4% + % 

3b 3ft + % 
7% 7ft 
35% 36b 
lift 11% 

7 7 - b 

JP iT*- » 

6V 16% 14b- % 
nv 23ft 23ft- ft 
4b 4 Au 



30ft 31 + V 

22V 23 ft + % 

3SH MLtit 

2b 2% 

3 Jft— ft 

10% Mb + % 


A5 


XO 

1X0 


1.16 


215 tab 11% 11 V + % 
.9 455 5% 5% 5% + b 
78 3V 3b 3b 
I5B 14 V I4V 14% + ft 
3A 12*1 t 5 5% — ft 

A5 271 22b 21V 22 + « 

2)47 19 18 10b — b 

£6 116 44V 43% 44 — b 
175 5 4% 4V + % 

19 71 20% 2T + % 

801 12 « 11% +S% 

205 46% 45% 46% + % 
571 5b 4% 4ft— b 
919 6ft 4V» A% + ft 
44 4ft 4ft 4b 
264 12 lift 12 + V 
198 23% 22% 23 + b 

42> 6V 5V ift— b 
7* 9b BV BV— % 
3*16 9% 9 9’.; + ft 

•9Gb IX 223 51 V 50b 51V + % 
129 34% ?«V 24b — v 
05 1 A BB 3ft 3b Jft + ft 

1*8 IX 440116 113% 115ft +1V 
1X4 4J IBS 43ft 43 43 — b 

I7BB 3b 2% 3 + ft 

IX 17*4 8, 7ft 7ft— b 
129* 1% 

5* 7b 
1075 10b 

2 


1X0 5J 


1A6 2J 
-15b XI 


.72 XI 


X9e 


t 

.128 


7ft 
lb 
*% 

9b 

65 left ISV 16 — b 
71 8V 0% Bft 


lft 
7 + % 

9V 


597 4b 3% 

68 10ft 10^ 

3359 lft 1% 

294 9V 9b 
577 3% 2% 

1317 9ft 7% 

1471 4% 3V 
1.7 390 13V 12V 13V + ft 
220 16b 15V Mb + % 
069 7% 6% 6%— % 
44 7b 6V 6V 
81 7b 6V 7b 
J 128 17b ISV ISV— % 
4360 16b tab >l%— 4b 


4b + V 
tab 
]%+ % 
9%+ % 
Mk+.ft 
9b +1b 
4%+ b 


TBC 773 11 10ft 10V 

TCA Ch .12 X a I4b 14 14b + b 

Tecvh, 102 B 8b + b 

Tandem 7771 20% 1* 18ft— lft 

Tcmdon 3099B 6V Sft *V + ft 

TcCorn 57 6V * 6% + % 

Telco 701 19 17% 18Vj + V 

TtailA 1 4281 33% 22ft 22V— % 

TelPlin 3337 9% 9 9ft— % 

Telcrn B9 5% 5 5b 

Tefecrd X8 \A 21 97 21% 19 19%— V 

Tnfeplet 1182 17 tab 16ft + ft 

Tm l*k) 2003 Ift 3ft 3b + ft 

Tetobx 772 tab 14% 14V— b 

Tolxon Xle 418 16 14V 15ft + ft 

Tom co 141 4% 3ft 4 

TndrLv 231 ft 4 4 

TermOs >1*1 IM* 9% 9%-l 

Tesdota 139 2b 2% 2b + % 

Tenon USB 1ft 1% 1V+ b 

Ttartne XS* 2A 182 12% lift 12% + b 

TherPr 291 13ft 13ft 13ft 

TTirmdc 13 77 let* 70% — b 

TrwlM 172 7ft 7b 7%— b 

TtxJN 5 1X8 3J 411 33b 33 33 

Thor In 332 10b TV 9V + % 

T Nortec 585 Bb 7ft Bb + b 

TTiohT s 2088 >6» 14ft >6% + ft 


3 


*17 7% Bft 7 + % 


TlmeE s 
TmcFIb 
nprorv 
Totuc 
TOIISVB 
TrokAu 
TrlodSy 
TrlbCm 
TrusJo 
TBkGes 1X0 
TuckDr 
TwnCtv 
TtwnF AB 


X6 


1862 lib 10% Ub 
243 taft 10% 10V + b 
t 1669 1ft lft lft+% 
475 13ft 13b 13% — % 
90 13% 13b 13b— % 
485 11% 10% 10V + % 
1505 10ft 9V 10% + b 
211 2% 2ft 2b — ft 
1A 144 26b 25V 26 + ft 

£1 *36 32 31ft 31ft— b 
286 SV 5 5 — % 

580 iv ib m+ft 

3 2641 3»U 27% 33V— % 


U 


USLICO 
UTL 
uitrsv 
Ungmn 
Unifl 
v! Untoll 
UnPfnfr 
UnTrSc £40 
UACorrt .12 
UBAlSk 
UBCrt 
UnEdS 
UFflGrp 
UFstFd 
uCrdn 
UPreecf 

US An I 

uSBcp 
US Cop 
USDsgn 
US His 
USShn 
ussur 
USTri- 
US Tr 
UStatns 
UnTetev 
UVaBs 
UnvFnr 

UnvHtt 

UnvHld 

UFSBk 
UrgeCr 
UHBfe 


42 *1 2&V 28ft 28ft 

153 IS 17b 17% + % 
A 5598 Mb Oft 9%— % 
3532 16 14ft 15b- ft 

1417 % \ 

837 18V >8 ISV + V: 
4A 127 50b 49% 50 + b 

A 515 27ft 27 27%— % 

IX 93 10% 10% 10% + b 
47 919 B 27V Hft- 'A 

ID 2ft 2ft 2b 
2225 10 SV 9 — ft 
1609 13V 12b 13V +1% 
556 15ft 15ft 15ft + ft 
2/910% 9V I0b + % 
330 2ft 2V 2ft— ft 
41 2033 25ft 24ft 24b- b 
386 2ft 7ft 2ft 4 ft 
202 5ft ift 5%— ft 
3194 33% 32b 33 + ft 
Mb 1A 742 4 3ft 3V + ft 
503 IBft IS 15 — Ib 
1X0 107 740 lift 11V, 11b 
1A0 £6 1224MSb 44ft 44%— % 

X 861 25b 23V 24 -1ft 

184 16b M 16b + b 

41 152305 34% 34ft + ft 

53 14V 14ft 14% + ft 

1193 10b 10 10 

294 4b 4 4 — b 

214 9 8b 9 + V 

« B4 5 5% 

X7e 12 45$ 3ft 3b 3b- ft 


X6e 


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1X0 


1X0 


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1A4 


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5% 

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7 LSI 


>335 8% 

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/MX 


2032 9b 

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9% + li 

J5E 

.15* 

IX IDO 7V 

7ft 

7V + ft 

JalldLg 


1714 12% 

11% 

lift 

7alF5L 


■05 SV 

8% 

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¥alN« 

lXti 

4.1 2978 29b 

28V 

29 + M 

/oiLn 

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1A 419 25b 

ST" 


ilonDus 

AO 

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13b +lb 

Varuatt 


206 ». 

*'4 

Wi + ft 

uacirc 


1086 ^ 



i/efliret 


2667 4 



Veto 


3653 Ik 




(Continued on Page f’l 


















Sotos In Nel 

loss HWi Law Last Ch'oe 


'■to Htoh Low Last dCM 


lg 4 m 4 + v. 

- “ .R Si! 

■ to ft 2k— ft 
193 2 *6 2V» 3tt + lb 
«» m gs £?+£ 

Mb 7*9 g + ft 


isss 

r "8 CSS 41,1 

jgs J,BU «r€£Si 8 

Aero un m S? jS SStJ’ 

Actvsn 36,0 , 

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AfIBcp ijo SJ n 19 ,{* 

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IOOB HIM Law Last Chb» 

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258 90 

154 « 

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lOOs High Law Last Cti’se 

I AB1 12*9 IM9 IMS 
BJ 
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14 
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TM 

tft 

4*9— ft 

5ft 

5ft 

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91k 

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9ft 

21 

20 

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A}**. 120 sa 50 ii 38Vs 41 

Ajconwt 6)9 4*9 tto — to 

AlexEn 957 3 ZTh 3 + to 

Aljpiln Jta J 10 51 51 51 

A ISeos 90 Bto 1 a — to 

.<2? ,JI 13 48to 4Bto «TV3 
AJIOCod IJOg 51 83 !9to ]« 19*9 + to 

AlfdRsh 121 2Va 219 7ft 

iso 9 or* n*— w 
AtoSehr 3 10 10 10 

s* 21 7V. 7 7W + to 

A jmer 373 « n 414 44. 

Allron 23V 9h 9U ou. 4. u. 

, J,7e ^ » 4VH 4lfc JSS + ^ 

Amrtbc 142 *7 M 23 23 23 

AmBusuh 103 414 av. 

AniAjwr IJO 4.1 5 24 to Mto 24to 

AB4CI 1 40a 19 10 ISVj Uto 15Vi 

?S* ,, 7L l« 3V9 314 314— to 

AC“tdt 3-44 IU 79 31 to ZT 21 to + to 

SE5«« 941 Bto 7 Bto+lto 

AExpl s J7 ju TV- m 4 i* 

AFIHrn 1 52 SJ IB 25 25 25 

APn pfo 1.00 11J 8to Bto Bto 

AFn pfE 17)0 115 Bto RU Bto to 

AP" DIF 140 14A 13*6 12V? |§vi— to 

AFum JB 25 ISO 9to Bto 9Vi 4- u, 

AlndmF 1.1a 7j 308 J4 15ft lift + to 

Atntaar BSB 13 12to 1114 to 

AlnvLf JOb U M 4H ™ '|5 * 

“*-*«* Bto Bto Bto 

AmUrt* IB Sto S^ 1 to 

2 ssa* 

AJJJdl wt 652 y. K h. 

AMonlt 1416 4 3to m_ a* 

ANtHW 1.16 19 40 WW19 l»S+2 

ANflrtPI 883 to to 

AmPoC 5 *to 2to 2to— to 

ARecr .16b 1J 143 916 914 9Vl 
AmHes; 109 29k 211 2to 

AmSIWd 198 B 6 6 

ATrusi 21 5to 5 514— 14 

AWSlCB I 4to 4 4to 

Amtiral 1047 l«to IB 16 — to 

Amlstar 192 634 634 6% 

Amas* ]J0a 3.1 3 3Bto 3BW 38V. 

Ampslof 42 SJ 25 5to Sto 5to 

Amsdrpt M 1IA 7B Sto » Sto 

"WrGr 52 lOto 10 10to + to , 

tadrsn 90 2V. 2to 7to + to 

Andrsin 37 2to ZT* 2to + to 

Andovr 174 6to Bto Bto 

AngSA mo 5.9 1133 llto llto iito— to 
AfWAGs JOI 2S 1325 Bto 7% $ 0 -% 
AdMDI 77 3 3 3 

ArabSh 15 ft.* 614 614 

Arden jl ,3V. |to 13M 

A^vaea 106 lto lC IS— H, 

Armet 27 llto 1114 iito 

Arnold M 2.1 30 29 29 29 

ArowB Z04 4.9 5 42 42 42 

Ashton 1394 Bto B Bto + to 

Aspjjun 93 4Vfe 4 4 

AsdBcp JOb 19 161 2Bto 26 2Bto + to 
AssdCa 33 5 Bto 5 

Ash-Ma 63 Bto Bto ito— u. 

Aslran u » M Sto 

ASJron .10 1J 49 Bto Bto Bto 

AjJ rS 7"" 12 12 12 

BlicoFn II 5 5 5 

AllanTl 149 bu Bto Bto— to 

*"«•« U2 85 B« 2BV? 2Bto to U 

AllP^n J3e 4 !7 g / 7 — 1 

AudVId 1S7 I2to I2to 12to + to 

Jail 133 2to 2to Jto + to 

AutoCl'' .lfl 14 19 1014 Tto 9to— to 
AuIMed 298 314 3W 2to 

AutaSy 330 9to 9to 9U. 

Autamtq 9 214 2to 214 

AutoCp 20 4H 4*4 44* 

A union 35 w„ m c^_ 

AvatoPt 10 Sto lib Ito 


714 
ZP* 

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3to 3to 3to 
23 22 22 

50Vi « SOto 
30 2999 29*4 

3to 3to 3*9 
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14V, 


S K 157 Bto Bto 

SABHos 37 B 6 

Cftl cm 98 lto Ito 

Ph -I0e £ 3 17 12 

35 Bto Bto 
SSo £ 81 31 *(. 31 

J20 IB 32 17V2 17to 
107 3to 1 

1-54S IU 434 Iito l<to 
5 8 I 
300 L! 13 24» 24 
43e UU 1739 4to 4to 

JSBo 3J 236 2to 244 

.150 15 144 T5Vi 15V» 
Mo U T21 23to 23> 
11 3to 3ft 
143 2to 948 
Bto 
Bto 
3to 
Jto 
Bto 
7to 


Ito 

12 

Bto 

31—14 

17V) 

3to+ to 
15 -Ito 

i_* 

2to— 
15to + to 
2314 
TPb-Ki 
Zto— to 


JLG 



154 4ft 



JMB s 


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XI 19 

171k 


JP Ind 



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lift 


Jaebsns 

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24 

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JeffrGo 



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1 





JeffBsh 

1J0 

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113 32ft 




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22 

n zoft n 2o*9 

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112 3ft 



JetA un 



7 3ft 

3*9 








JoneVs 

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38 

187 3ft 

Sft 


Jcalyn 

IX 

4.8 

125 26ft 



Judvs 

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25 

3 4ft 

4ft 

4ft 


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2BO 9*9 

9 

9 — ft 

k VgglR * 

7A2e 9$J 2514 flft 

Tft 

7ft— to 

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54 tft 

5ft 

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1 26 ft 

24 V, 

2411 f 

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132 Iff* 

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27 20 

26 

36 

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44 9 

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8ft— ft 

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58 13 

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i 

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75 39ft 

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74 14ft 

14 

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11 27 

36 

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147 Sft 

3 

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9 VlCtMkt 

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X ltto 

14*9 

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SB Sft 

5 

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FCA Ini 367 6*6 6 6 

PHCPt 140 85 I IB IS IB 

PcGpR lAOb 7J 167 30 19*4 20 

nKinld ID 9 9 0 

Pocinw! \ \ 


PacWB SBo J 27 7VV tv, 7V? 


7J 

45 
537 
333 
144 
SB BB 
2.9 153 
39B 
10J 160 
3J 332 


PockSv 

Poors! 

Par Ph 

ParTch 

PartiCm 

Parkwv 

Partex 

PosF B, 

PdsFAs 

Pat lex 

Patrk un 


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79 12 12 J2 

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319 121* 12 12V. + to 

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35 I Bto !Bv7 lftto + to 
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2 10'^; 10 10Vj 4- 

S 10 10 10 

134 4*6 4*4 4to 

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PMI wf 
FabWhl JO 
FoIrLn s .16 
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FndSec 
FlneAun 
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1 FtAmar 50 
FslAms 1 JB 
Ff of A of 59 
FABkPBAJO 
FASkPBBJO 
FTAFad 
F Bn La s A0 

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FICarIn jg 
FIColBs -10c 
FtComB 
FlCmd 1A4 , 
FConns I JO 
FOlMuf 
PEsIC S 1.90 
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FFvnl 

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FFdAust 

PFdBrk 

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FtFdSC 

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FlFnd UBb * 

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FtindBc I JOB 3 

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BBS to to 
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32 Bto 614 
5 BOto STto 
307 Sto 5 
S3 5 4*6 

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I V2B 3to 3'A 
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2 A 18 Bto Bto 
I 2A 141 Bto B 
15 72 10 • 9K, 

180 2V* 3to 
BO 60 40*4 40 
12S W* 9to 
4J 9to 9<to 

1 1. 230 4 a a 

47 7to Bto 
74 5*6 5*4 
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SJ i5to isvi, 

45 703 2Bto 24to 
BJ B 14to 14*6 
3A 512 7to 7*9 
2L0 IN W 
54 Bto Bto 
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7J Sto Sto 
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26 10 19** m* 

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3J 52 32to 32to : 
42 14 UVa 
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26 379 4Sto 45to . 
4J 57 22to 22V, : 
32 13to I Jto I 
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41 16 151*1 

345 Bto Bto 

42 14*6 14*4 1 

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120 Bto Bto 
114 Bto Tto 
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b a, 'h-lh 

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32*6 
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22*4 
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12*4— to 
16 +14 

8*4 + 14 
14*4 
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10*4 


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HGIC 

HP5C 

HnchCo 

Halifax 

Holmlun 

HomO pt 

Homnd 

Honvl s 

HarfcnO 

HrtiSlm 

Harvln 

Hauser 

Hourly 

HawkC 

HawfhF 

HHAwl 

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HerttFd 

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Hloftvtd 

HlnesL 

Holly In 

HfwdPk 

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HrznAIr 
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A. t 3J 

lJ5e BJ 


1J0 25 
JO U 
160 7J 
1J0 SJ 
J4 11 
•f 


63 414 
IU 9to 
41 3*4 
Bto 
61 5to 
I 7 17to 

I 28 414 
23 3 

a 16 

3 **6 
BB 27V. 
9A7 Ito 
120XSBV. 
92 37 
142 It 
74 13 
13 314 
10 ZJto 
139 Tto 
7to 
16 13 

BIB 1 
X BOto 
B 17 
530 30 to 
82 Zlto 
1B1 27 
15 

110O 8*6 
13 10 
221 16 
7 9to 
IBB 4*4 
699 2 
43 9 
9 23to : 
49 2*6 
16 A 


. Bto 414 
1 9to 9to— 16 
• 3*4 3*6 
1 4<4 414 
> S 514 
1 17V, |7to 

1 Bto Bto + IB 
3 3 

I5to I Sto— to 
I 4*6 4*6 

77V6 27V} + 16 
1*4 1*4 + to 
SBV, SBto 
35to 37 +lto 
IB 16 
13 13 

2211 22V. 

lu. 2? ^ 

714 794 
12Vi 13 + to 

1 l l V»-ft 
40V, BOto 
1514 17 +1*4 

hr-.* 

15 IS 
Bto B*6 + to 

StoS + to 

5to 9to 
4*l> 4*4 + Vk 
1*4 1*4— 16 

J»*4 9 * to 
23 Zlto + to 
2*4 2*4 


Patriot IJO 4J 60 24*. 24V, 24*4 + to 
1 T15 I7to IBto lBto —I 

Paxton AB 2J 5 17 17 ,7 — to 

Form* 41 111*, )W . JO*. _ 16 

PeerOi ijo u 4 ibv. lBto iB.i 

PjerMI J7 02 7 llto llto llto 

PenlnFd 25 9** Bto ffU— 1 

|{»o O OJlMto 37to 27to — 1 
Penbc pi 2J0 SJ 25 40 40 40 

Penta 1S5 3 3 3 

Pflnwit ju 7 ^, iu. n, 

1* 15-1 502 17to ITto 17to 
PeoBnC 1J0 U 59 26*4 Uto 26*. 

Peopflc i AB 25 33 16W IBto lftto 

” ctF A tt 73 7V9 7to 7to 

e^mAin 679 12to llto I2to + to 

^ tS ^ 3 to: ^ 

sgft. j. 23 & u 

PWdnv .14 2J M0 Bto 6 Bto + to 

“1 2*» 2to 2*9 + Vx 

PotlbiM 20B 3to 3Vi 3 to + >4 

Phrmcta 1766 151- jy A ^2 + , 4 

<34 Sto Bto Bto 
Phrmwt K ft 7: I* 

Phtinun 2B34to3< 34to- to 

PJWXMd 144 7*9 7 7ft, + Vl 

PJmAG 210 5*4 5-to Sto + >4 

P|»{n£t 20 tto tto 6*6 

pEXSJ, 340 3V* 2to 2V* + ** 

PnylnMI 5 |'.* j-k 

PJJVTln 34 44 63 tto 4 6 '-to 

PnysTc 77 4*. ,1. 

Pled Be M ZB 3 24to 54to 24to 

PftdMo J6 4.1 14 1 Bto Bto- %. 

PU^ .,4 M 35^ 34 + to 

rw» 8107 to + 

E!” , E dl 47 9 Bto Bto 


I4to 



17*6 


ft 

14 

+ito 

2999 

+ 

to 

14ft 

+ 

ft 

Bto 

+ 

to 

8ft 

_ 

v* 

13ft 

+ 

to 

lift 

+ift 

7ft 



13ft — 

V: 

11 



m 



Aft- 

_ 

*9 

9ft 



Bto 




PUtBr* *■* 'm ]$!£. 15?* 14 + TchCom IM 

PtaSU * eS ’Si l ? 4 - 56 TchEaC II 

SSs - 17 t is 

EshE » 36 ,s f k: ^ 5320757 


ssr 


170 2to T* 2 to 
Tt Tto 4'<t Tto + >6 
5v- Sto Sto 
109 4W Bto Bto 


PMRsIc .74 25 250 27*4 27to 27*4 + y, 


Pr^S IJSa 7.9 2M 26^ XV? 23to— 2V- 

30 W* SS SSZzto 

* ■» J 4 Wto 37to Mto + to 
M 3J 125 T7to 16*9 lBto— >4 

HrmwD 884 Bto 4Vj 4*9— to 


3>* » 2to 2*9— to 

*«'*> ^ S a 

p* 71 A0 *3 bS 3S ^ 5S 

]44 4to m, 4 + to 

Proorp 140 4*4 4*6 4*6 

ProtO) 1-24 3J 419 38 3714 37to_ to 

ProvBC .Iffie J 41 to 4!to 41 to— 1 

ProyUA 2J8 3J 61 77V: 77 7/ - ft 

PrvBosI J54 s 4to 4V-_ w 

pSdBk 144 ,3 'A *31* 13to 

KCc ,aSJ ft ft ft 

5S|B,C 1 n A4 MS 21ft 20*4 20*S-lto 

1.12 4J ?S^»ft2t 3 !2-*4 

it 35 

PyrmO tat 9 c o 


Mutual Funds 

Closing Prices Jim. 4, 1984 


EitnTr 2flJ3 


QualMII 

Quanta 

Qntmxs 

Quarex 

QuabcSt 

Quest ch 

Qulntrl 


Bto 4to 4to 
S< 2Vr 2to 2*6 
47 llto 11 11*4 + to 

74 6*9 5*4 6*9 + *i 
*12 2ft 2to 2%+5V 
IS 5*4 4*4 4*6 

76 7*6 7V9 7*1 + *9 


1031 
749 
1280 
1249 
977 
662 
10.14 

973 
ms® 

9 JO 
Gr 
9JB 
1453 
755 
7J4 

6J3 .... 
077 11.77 
I OAT ML 
5.58 ML 
971 NL 


1254 14.lt 
U24 1350 


B39 NL 
7JT NL 
152 NL 
259 NL 


ft TEL Off 2J3e 22J 745 lOto 9*6 ICBi— *1 
TL5 13 5 5 5 

** TRVg 200 i*. 

T5CCP -75eS0J IJ Ito Ito m 
ft TSCIne 2i 7>4 tto 7*4+1 

TSI JO 5 1Q5 6*6 Bto Bto + ft 

514 IK ITto lBto +lto 
- Toeviia n 7to 7to 7to 

ft TeroVf 87 196 !*■ i*h 

tSt^. - 200 ^ 17 *0 *0* + <4 

• H^ 00 ' ft ft ft 

« TchCom 149 4 3*6 4 

A TchEaC 19 21 21 21 

4 Tchlnds JB3 J 42 5*6 Sto 5*6 

Tecum 020a 17 112 BBVx BSto SBto +1 
TecoPr A04 247 l ito ito ito 

Tie™ wt * » « ft 

TIonB I 25 J3 73 23 

TelMex J2r 5J207S7 

' IffiTi, 5*i 3*6 5*4 

. ’* ’“W 10ft + to 

i’f ft to ft 

Tetnfx 9 137 tto 6 tto + ft 

' tHHUS? 170 ffl **** ,vv * 

■ M ,0 ! *9*9 lift + to 

; WB* M BJ I 7to 7 Tto + to 

TeroQi 415 Sto 5ft 5ft + to 

i TeroMg I 752 Ito Ito Ito v, 

: - i781 ^ 3«a IS i!?+to 

*43 2*6 2ft 2ft 

Th^rAW 1 *3^ IJft ITto +IV6 

TnrnAV 70 sv* Sto ju 

twUSk *A **■ 5ft Sto Jto 

Tjd^l, sat 13 « Aft Bft 4ft + to 

Tier co 88 8ft B 8 

Thnbrld | 2IB Sto S 5ft + ft 

Tinslv 7 4*6 7 + to 

tSIS? lii* / J^ 44 144ft I44to— 1ft 

™e£Tr 1.90 44 54 4]ft 41ft 41ft 

TolTrpf 250 9A 11 31 31 31 

TbBtqs 523 4ft Bto 4*6 + to 

TopsyA 47 3ft 3ft u. + ft 

T°tRuv 101 3 2ft 2*6— £ 

JOr J 44 9*6 949 9*9— ft 

Trtmtnd l 9 3^ svb ai* + 

tJSmV? Tl24 # ** 18Wl 

* lg Sft 4ft 516 + *k 

imsder J2r A X 5ft 5 5V«— to 

2f* Tft 2ft 2ft + vS 
TrwIBc , *y; 4ft 4ft 4ft- to 

TravRE J9r 4.1 IB 999 9*9 9ft 

thS - 'S4 2S 279 A 

TrlCfim _52 5 S 54 K R3a bv 

2^ Sto m 5S + V6 
TrbCun 73 17 U itil 1734 

THI^ 1JOe “ex?? 4 ? *?«. ft 

KiSy 7471 1 iKi 1 + 

thJ 3?S? » 3ft 3ft 3 to 

tISI* « HS S 4 * -S -ft 

I ™* _ J* U 77 7 4*6 7 + v. 

TrHoilG 2279 1*9 lh ill * 

TratNJ L20e 3J 34 32 32 « 

l.n 4J 25 £ M S 

TuriPar IB 5*9 5*6 5*6 

TumrB M 17ft Tm 1^6- V. 


5183 4to 3*6 4 — 

23?0 10ft 3'a 10ft +1 
2tS4 12*6 i2to |2to — 


lowFt 1J0 SI 3339 3?to 31*6 32 + u 

SSh? 2002 T* l |£ 14 2>- M 

MR 1 & U 195 *2 ifi ,2^ 
S Ut 43 iJ*™* 31to 3? to — V 

a. * ,3Sgi., 

^ a i- a !S*S 

JheGiobaT 

Newspaper. 


Ampri 

pan 

F.yp 

harirrti d~1 

hr|tl 

JbYIC 

For die Week Ending Jan. 4, 1984 

'UU 

uua 


Option B. price Colt* 


Aetna 35 

34*9 40 

An> Cue « 
mn so 
Am Ena 25 

MU. 30 
3BU. 35 
IL SBto BO 

L Am Horn 45 
L 50*6 X 

L 58*9 55 

L BouaLm 20 

L 2Sto 25 

L Kto 30 

lenso a 
»** M 
Jurroh 45 
SM4 » 
H*6 55 

S4*i 60 

I : Toi a 
Cmer M 
c ru a 
Bft a 
3299 <S 
DorHC 75 

m a 
H U 
Ig Eq 75 
Ml n 
MS B 
ms n 
Ito 95 
ns no 

KB 105 

ib in 
Ml 115 
ann a 
pit. 55 
Wt 60 1 
59*9 4J 
> PM 45 




* m lib r 

TTto r r r 

Bto tft i-u ft 

Ift Ito to 17-16 

to Tft 1*9 4to 

r r l-l* r 

m 2to 7-14 1ft 

r ft 4< r 

Sto r r r 

ft 2 r Ito 

r 7-16 r r 

3ft r l-l* r 

to ft r r 

r t 1-1* r 

Sft Bto M4 r 

ft 2fc 1 2 

> » 4ft Jft 

Jto 1ft 


Oft S 
ndrr a 

Bn a 

uid a 
■ft a 
m> a 
evm a 
Mft a 
a 
» 


r ito r 

3ft 4to to 1 

to Ift 2ft 
Wt s r 

» r r 

-ft Sft r 

ft Jto Ito 

X r r 

B r r 

20to 22to 1-16 to 
ISft IB 3-14 Ift 

Wto Hto to i 

ift loft « 3to 

2ft 7*9 33-14 5ft 
16 5 5 719 

to Sto lift io 

9*9 r MB r 

<ft tft Ml 15-14 
11-14 2(9 Ift 3714 

MB I MB 5*9 r. 
Jto 4*9 l-U *6 

M6 1ft Tft 2ft 

1-16 7-16 r r 

11-1* r to r 

M* 5-ft r r 

11-16 7ft 3-14 ft 

l-U ft 4ft r 

MB r r r 

ft 13-u ft r 

t. J-U r r 

3 r r r 

to r r r 


Hatton X 
I 27*6 25 

r Bto a 

r 27*6 a 

r . 27*6 « 

; LtJIv 45 
> UonHcm X 

1 an a 

aw a 
Kto as 
! 3Sto bo 
worrit a 
s*to b 
St*, a 
W4 3S 
MnoPt 15 
17ft X 
17V, J5 
HOtrta 33*1 
33to 34ft 

nft a 
an a 

21*9 JO 
PMM IS 
nto a 
Ptiney a 
xrn a 
Proc G a 

SB 55 

a to 
5Dklee is 
tow a 

72ft 75 
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lift 35 

aw a 

»» a 

J4to « 
Texan a 
33ft as 
»ft « 
TDrffy 15 
2016 B 
u com a 
one as a 
my a 

37V9 « 

17ft X 
O S St 28 
2Sto a ■ 

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23*6 a 
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r Tft r r 

2*6 4 to 1 

to I ll.ftlH-w Ift 
>U ft r 7ft 

/ W r r 


> r r 

f r into 
I Sft r 

’ ** 33-14 

* ft 

i Aft 7ft 

S 23-14 Jto 
to I s-14 
! l-tt 9-14 

Jto at 
ft 15>I4 
r to 

1ft • 

to I 

3ft Sto 
i 11-14 2ft 
ft 13-16 
1-1* *6 

r r 

4 r 

ft 2 

Sft tft 
ift 2 7-14 
I-U 1M6 
ft 1 

2 r 
**211-14 
4ft 516 
ft I 13-14 
Mt ft 

1-16 to 
l-U i 
4 r 
3-16 13-16 I 
r 3-14 
519 t 
7-1* Ift 
r 7to 
70-14 4 

3-141 15-14 
r ll-U 
r to 
r Sft 
13-U 1A 
l-U ft 
ft Bto 
3-14 Ift 
r Mt 


r 1-16 
l-H 1-u 
r 7-14 
*9 


r ft 
ft 1 13-U 
5ft 5 


, t 5-lfl 
IMA 7ft 


l-U ft 
ft 1 15-16 
3 4to 
• r 
r 12*6 
r ft 
ft ll-U 
Aft r 
1-14 r 
Ito Ito 


nestng 23V. 

1*9 

j 


25*9 

» 

Hi 

r 


25*1 

2S 

*4 

Ift 

V 

2Sft 

a 

l-U 

r 


F«a 

MOV 

Feb 

May 

M F 

TS 

7-U 

1 

1 l-U 

Uft 

» 


ft 

r 

M R 

2S 

10ft 

r 

r 

3519 

X 

5)9 

7 

to 

15ft 

£ 

7V, 

3*9 

in 

35*9 

40 

7-U 

1*9 

r 

S A 

« 

4)9 

B 

*4 

46 

45 

Sft 

4ft 

2*6 

«6 

SO 

| 

19-14 

5ft 

44 

a 

ft 

1ft 

•ft 

44 

60 

1-1* 

11-14 

14ft 

44 

61 

l-U 

514 


44 

X 

1-14 

9 


imCan 

40 

ion 

9 


58)9 

45 

Sft 

r 


an 

SO 

in 

2 

■ft 

son 

a 

n 

r 


fuo 

H 

1*6 

2ft 

ft 

Mto 

a 

5-14 

ft 

3ft 

lift 

35 

r 

3-M 

r 

vnM 

a 

t 

Sft 

S-U 

33ft 

a 

7 

r 

Tft 

out 

Ml 15-14 

Jto 

ft 

11*9 

15 

3-14 

to 

3ft 

lift 

a 

MB 

19 

r 

stem 

a 

Aft 

P 

3-74 

31 

a 

1ft 

3 

15-14 

n 

as 

S-14 

1 

Aft 

Ji 

a 

r 

5-14 

r 

in Ed 

a 

5 

5 

r 

391* 

X 

9-U 

1 

f 

Mvb 

IS 

2 

2ft 

r 

14*9 

a 

ft 

13-14 

t 

imBni 

ss 

r 

9*9 

r 

CSV. 

« 

4n 

4ft 

1*9 

43ft 

45 

r 

1 

t 

43*4 

70 

to 

r 

7ft 

MlM 

10 

t 

ft 

r 

rm 

a 

r 

ft 

r 

eHw 

X 

5*4 

r 

r 

Sft 

a i iT-i* 

2(9 

i 

Kft 

a 

ft 

1 

r 

C A 

a 

4ft 

r 

to 

N 

a 11-14 21-14 

r 

M 

a 

ft 

v> 

t 

4(890 

M 

5-16 

MB 

t 

tin 

a 

to 

Ift 

ito 

17ft 

45 

r 

7-14 

r 


a s ?%. 

» 3-14 11-14 

20 ft Ito 

a 1-16 r 

a r 5-16 

a Tft ju 

a ft ft 

S 4ft i 

IO Jto Tto 

IS 3-16 r 

a l-U r 


« 1H 29.lt 

SO 5-14 1 

“ ft to ni 

“ r ft i 

« r Jto i- 

40 5 4ft V 

*5 ito Jto II, 

“ M* Ift Sft 


•7ft » 13-16 I 15-16 
CBevm is r , 


“ Sft r Ito 

*5 2 7-16 j*. 


1ft 3to 1ft 

^ r r 

3ft 4to to 

ft 1*4 r 


g ?ft r vi 

2 ■ »* r 

J* Jft r r 

3ft <ft ft 
2 3* 1ft 1 11.1* 

2 tB ! « 

r _ J“i Mar Jun 

» .2 "? 

3 -u ? 


ti v. ; *■'* 

14 Jto ]»% jl 

J *¥ »? 

3 ,.E ,W4 r 






































































1 iw . ■ 


Market Indexes 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 1985 

1984 Consolidated Trading on U.S. Stock Markets 


Page 13 


I ' Dow Jones ] 

him lm Close enj 

IrtftiS 128.74 170084 iiBtn _ 

Trans S9XW 4»xi 5X51 -47.0? 


500.W 51X02 42US 4ml; 


Standard & Poors 


IndusfiaU 
Trunsp. » 
UltlllhK 
PI nonet 

Composite 


High Law Clout CBTM 

>91 48 147J5 1B6J4 + a 13 
l**-** t«JJI MWI — 1XW 
f 2 * 0 wm + 9.73 
lUfl 14JJ9 1BKI + Qj£ 7 
17041 14702 167J4 + 2J1 


Diaries 


NYSE 


Sales 




High 

Low 

Close 

Ch’de 

Composite 

Imtustrlatft 

Transp. 

uimim 

Finance 

9X12 

11482 

IESL46 

5185 

*7.94 

B5.U 

99.73 

7111 

4X94 

7674 

9X38 

110.58 

9001 

5187 

9783 

+ 120 

— 077 

— 788 
+ 5J3 
+ 131 


Nosdna " I 



iflti 


Composite 

industrials 

plno new 
Insurance 

Ulllllln 

a os** 

Tran bp. 


HIM Law Claw OTo© 


788.41 23191 
££48 348.14 
3W43 251 87 
MAOfl 72&.U 
inM 
■Q0J3 17X37 
39154 19X86 


247J5 — J| JS 
M 0 .n-sa .95 
2*8.42 + 71M 

+ S-il Advanced 
3013 Oedlnod 
3S2 + ?95? Uncnonoed 
339M — 41 J1 Total luua 


Tim Yr Last Vr 

345 *97 

£33 338 

26 9 

924 944 


Total 19B4 
Total 1983 
Total 1982 
Total 1981 
Total 1980 


Total 1984 
Total 1983 
Total 1982 


AMEX 


IJgWAMO 

1001370000 

1337370000 


■nipiiii! 

IMffflimi MIMI ■Bill 


1 £.150019387 
1580X547.400 
8 X 0374360 


I I 1 I I i ! 

Dow Jon es industrial 
verage 1 I | | I 


Percent Gainers 


AMEX 


3 






*73 
*07 
6 X1 
' 2% *23 
' 7% 

■ 1 % 

13% 

A 

■ in 
. 25 « 

6 % 

■ 2 * 
ft 


m 




*5 


Most Actives 


■irULUBflWiai 

i—wwiia — ■—■■■■ni—fiaiiiaiBmBM 


AMEX 


2 % 

9* n* 

24ft 5% 
15*5 3% 

81* 2* 
2ffta 5Va 
M 
1095 
99k 
IMS 
118* 


716 
716 

5% 

«% 

A % 

ID* 3ft 
m 2 * 
in* m 
1416 3ft 


Law 

Last 

Cling 

6 

7% 

— 6* 

21ft 

29* 

+ 4ft 

44k 

6 

—17ft 

24ft 

20 

—14 

4% 

6 

—14 

4 

13 

l5vi 

— 0% 
—15% 

0 

9ft 

— 7% 

17 

22% 

— 9* 

12ft 

15% 

+ 1* 

7* 

0 

—12ft 

V* 

12% 

+ 2% 

7* 

11% 

— 2 

54k 

7% 

—15% 

6% 

8% 

— 2% 

3% 

5% 

— 1 

15% 

20% 

— 1% 

6ft 

15ft 


10 

12* 

—lift 

10% 

11* 

— 4* 

3% 

Aft 

+ 2ft 

1% 

29k 

— 5ft 

15* 

24 

— 7 .. 

3Zft 

a 

+14% 

12ft 

13% 

—14% 


»■■■■■■■■ 

fflBBBHBBB BMS 

■ffliiiinm 

piHltaH 

ImmHmmumll 
■RimiiniinniiHiin 


Indexes are plotted on a ratio scale ttiat reflects comparable changes in them. 


New York 
Stock 
Exchange 
1984 Prices 



23* IMS AAR 24 

30* 9* AGS 
23 13* AMCA 63 

17* 13% AMF 14 
51* 49* AMF Pf 103 
41* 24* AMR 
20* 181* AMU pf II J 
41* 27* AMR Pi 53 
2514 22ft ANR Pf 1TA 
23 19 ANRpf 103 

W* 8*APL 
694* 4444 ASA *3 
30* 1* AVX 13 
48ft 34ftAWLab 23 
23* l6*AccoWdsl.9 
2716 TZ»AoneC 3.1 
12* a 'A Acme E 14 
m 15 AdoEar >Z7 
18* 11% AdmMI 23 
21* BftAdvSvs 83 
, 41* 25* AMD 

I. 14* a* Admit 13 
t 15* MAefflex 

39 27UAaKlU 73 
82* 63* AotnL Pt 23 
3M 5ZtaAotL.pl 103 
34* 1516 Ahmn> 45 

5* 2% Alteon 
48* 36*AlrPrd 23 
30* 13 AlrbFrt 33 
416 1*AtaMoo IIS, 
27* 21 AlaP pt 12.1 
31 26ft AlaP PtA 1X1 
7* 6 AlaP dpi 123 
n 61* AlaP Pf 134 
101 SSVkAlaPpi 113 
74* 63* AldP Pi 117 
64* 57 AtaPpf 13.1 
64* 56 AlaP of 135 
13* lOftAtaaics 73 
1714 9U AbfcAir -* 
22* I»A8»no 16 
29* 22*A(Usns 23 
41* 23* Atom 43 
36* Z7*AIC05td 43 
25% 17 Alex A lx 44 
28* l6*Atoxdr 

87* 62*AllsCP 14 
26*23 AtaCppf 115 
3* ISUAkllnr U 
22* 15* Alain Pi 124 
93* 81 Alai PTC 124 
30 24*AllaPW 94 
36 15ft AllenG 35 
37* 28*AiMCpS ff 
64* 53*AtdCPPt 113 
113 99 AkfCnpt 115 
107*100* AldCal 122 
23* Bft Af Id Pd 
Si* 38 AIW»T 43 
17* 5* AlllsCh 

40 24 AIISCpI 

25* 20 ALL.TL 74 
33 27 ALLTpf 64 

27 JBftAiptlPr 15 
48% 38* Alcoa if 
27* i5%Amax if 
43* 32*AnKM Pt 93 
34* 22*AmH» 45 

144 101 AHOSpf M 
3 l*AmA0f 
19 14 ABakr 

65* 52* A Brand 
S3* 52 ABrdpf 3J 
28* 24%ABrdPt WJ 
65* 53 AB rflPf *1 
7714 30% ABdCd ff 
26* I9*ABWM 34 
23* lTftABusPr 2.7 
S3 40%AmCm 
24% 21% ACanpf l»f 

41 36 AG** 7.1 
1» 103 ACanof 13J 

19* 14ft ACopfld 114 
33* 25* AC onCv 244 
Uft 4* ACenlC 
S3* 42*ACW w M 
29* 18* ADJ 65 
21* 15* A E IP* 

39 25 Am ExP 14 

25 13* AFomll M 

26 'A 19*AGnCP ^ 
9* 5*AGn«Tt 
57 51* AOnl pJ* * 
73* 57* AGnl tHB S3 
SS* 43*AGnlpf 5.9 
53 39*AGnifID 5.1 
tm 25V.AHW11 33 

14* 7»AM0W 
55* 46* AHomo 5f 
347V6210V. AHtneP* 

42* 34* AM0» 3-J 
78 62%Amrtrf' '5 
73 50*A(nGn 4 
125 I12WAIOPPI A* 
ZB* 28* AMI 
8* 3*AmMo» 

SJSSSra £ 

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26 30ft — 18* — 378 

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10% 17ft— 5ft— 242 
25% 36 —9*— 20J 
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9% 13ft+ %+ £8 
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16ft 17ft— 2*— 1X7 
34ft 35 -7*- 68 
65% 71ft— 5*— 78 
70*110% +3Sft + 538 
45% SP*+ 7ft + 1X8 
30 35%+ S%+ 1X1 

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20% 2B*+ <ft+ 3X5 
16 17*— 6 — 2£5 

14ft 29* +13*+ 867 
32 49 +10*+Z7J 

23% 23ft— 10ft— 3X3 
28* 34%+ 4%+ 142 
25% 27»— Sft— 17J 
35* 41ft— m— 14.T 
10* lift— 2ft— 198 
15% 18ft— 2*— 120 
14% 11 + *+ X9 
23% 37ft +14%+ 608 
43% 49*— 2*— 40 
30% J2ft+ %+ 8 

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64 70*+ ]*+ 27 

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a 24 

43* 51ft- ft- 18 
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105* 96 CSOpfo 148 
IDA- 95 CSOpfnliA 


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3065 95% 60 09* — Ufa — X3 

1187 79 65 70ft— Bft— 11.1 

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1669 65* 54* 63 + 2 *+ XI 

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39* 26 Com pot 18 II 13879 39*% 30*— I*— 71 

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50% 45 DPLPf 1X9 
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96 75% DPLpf 138 

91% 75 DPLpf 1X1 
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16% 11% DetEd 108 
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56 45%D0tEpf 138 
24 19* DE pfF 118 

24% 20 OEorR 113 
24* IflftDEpfQ >38 
24% 19 DEpfP 1X7 
23* 19* DE ptB 1X2 
25% 19ft DE pfO 1X7 
25ft 19* DE P4M 138 
30 24* DE prL 1X9 
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US 96 DE Pf J 1X1 
MO* U DEM 1X2 


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19456551 40* 
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10* lift- 3ft- 248 
21* 26ft- lft— 48 
4ft 7 + 2*+ 558 
fl* W%+ %+ X2 
64% 85U+18ft+2S8 
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13* 30*- 7*- 2X4 
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12* IS*- 1%— 168 
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45* 53 + 1*+ 28 
45 55*+ 1%+ X3 

45 52*+ 2%+ 5L5 

75* 96 + BW+ 91 
75 82 —15 — 158 
19* 27 + 516+ 341 
24ft 29*- 0ft- 227 
17% 32 + 2%+ IO 
27 43ft+ 3ft + 91 

4* 4* — 4ft— 458 
35* 57 +17%+ 4X9 
22% 22ft— ft— V 
30* 42*+ 5%+ 158 
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46 52 +2 + 48 
45* 54 + 3 + 58 
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20 K%+1*+ 68 

19* am+ 1*+ m 

19 D%+ r*+ 98 

19* a%+ 1 %+ sj 

19* 24%+ 1*+ 48 
19% 2Sh+ 1%+ 78 
24* 28%+ 1 + 38 
24* 29ft + lft+ X9 
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36* 26ft EGG 1 j 18 9337B 36* 26ft 31ft- ft- 27 

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14911 4* lft 1»— 1%— 518 
24180 lft * ft- 1%- 654 
5167 13* 6* 11*+ %+ X4 
16376 15% 6% 11*— 1 — U 
VftOAirpK 1315719% 9% U%— 3 — 1BJ 

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IB 12% EastUtl 108 6 46873 IB 12% 10 + 3%+ 218 

70 60* E&Kfld 48 14012211 71 60* 71ft- 4*- 58 

r 37% Eaton XJ 9 16385B 56% 37% 53%— 2ft— 38 

lM%Eatanpf 48 5B10 164*210 +2 + 18 

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29% 20% Eckert X5 12 213695 29% 70* 38% + 1 + 26 
43 32%EdtaBr XI ■ 217704) 32* 33*- 8*— 198 
19% 13 EDO U 12 43025 19% 13 16ft- 1%— 6J 

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14 29435 Bft «ft 4ft- 3*— 408 
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ft % EnEnc .. . 

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MQ 97 EnachpMOJ 8006003 97 101 — 1 — 1 J 

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15% 12%EstHsn 8 10 17096 15% 12% 14% 
22ftl5ftEmxC XO 10 9619 22% 15% 20ft + lft + Lt 
34% Edrlne 2J 12 33024 34ft 20% S%— 4 — 13J 


(Continued on Page 14) 


















































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21* 12% ParttPn 23 2ft 360621* 12% 15*— 3*— 17ft *2 

32* 20* Parson 8ft 15129013 32* Mb 31%+ 6* + 27.9 37%SecrleG .•* 

7* 1* PatPtrl 119420 7* 1% 1*— S — 55ft 2T , S eor *_. *4 

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254964 21% 14* 18* 

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21% 17% Seagirt W 2662121% 12% 17%+ !%+ 100 
73^ 18% Seal Air 1J |4 40835 78* 18* 24 + 1 + 43 

32% 19* seal Pvt 19 B 32573 3m 19*25*— *— 2ft 

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40* 29%Seor* 5ft B*14S6«40* 29% 31*— S*— 14ft 

102* 97 SeorkPl 6.7 3645402* 97 99* 


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27* 20 JWTs <2 
35* 23% JHNw 1ft 
19 12% jamswv ft 

15 TO* JopoF 9ft 
41% 23* JetfPI* 13 
29% 24% JerCot 13ft 
64 54* JerCpf 14ft 

55% 4ft%J«rCpf 14ft 
55 0 JerCpf Uft 

54% *5% JerC »f 145 
98% ■% JerCpf 142 
92* 7ft* JerC p| 115 
16* 12* JerCpf 13ft 
B 5* Jewtcr 
42* 28 JatmJn 13 
49* 37%JatwiCn 45 
30* 2l*Janwn 42 
22% lS*JDstani 3ft 
32% 21* Jay Mlo 5ft 


11 3618* 27* 
8129678 35* 
9 <512719 
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19810 64 
44910 55% 
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1103 54% 
54830 98% 
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14108316 32* 


25* 26%+ *+ lft 
23% 38*— 6*— 187 
12% 18*+ 1*+ lift 
10* 12%- lVb— 45 
23* 48% +15*+ 402 
24% 29%+ 2%+ 9J 
54* 64 + 2 + 37 
46% 55 + 1%+ 2ft 
0 53*+ %+ 17 

45% 54%+ 3%+ 6ft 
83% 95 + 3%+ 3ft 
76* 88% + *%+ lift 
12* 15%+ 1%+ 9ft 
5% 6*- *_ 7ft 
ZB 36*— 4*- lift 
37% 41%- 7 —14 ft 
71* 23* — 5*- Uft 
20V. 22*+ 3*+ mo 
71* 25*- 5 — 16ft 


20 11*POVNP 5.1 11 SJZB4 20 11* II*- 5*- 33.1 

55 13% Pay C5h lft 13238358 2S 13% 15*— 7*- 32ft 

14* ft* Peatay 3ft 50414 14% 6'« 6*— 7W— 52J 

1% Pengo 35904 1% *— ft— 547 

50'— 3ft* PenCcit 41240137 50* 36* 0 +M+JSJ 

IS 94 PenC or 4ft X33S22 94 114*+17*+ 177 

57% 46 Pen nay 5.1 743770S 57% 46 46*— 10%— 18.1 

25* 19% Pa PL 9S 018410 25* 19% 25% + 4*+ 21ft 

36% 30% POPL 9t 111 18630 36% 30% J3%+ %+ 1ft 

37% 3D PnPL Ul 114 4S550 37% 30 33%— *— Ij 

67 57* PaPL pf I3ft 24120 67 57* 43*+ *+ 17 

27* 2T4 PoPL (tpflll 3337 27* 23* 26* 

23% 30 PaPL dpfllS 2463 23* » 23 -+ 1*+ 57 

65% 5e% PaPL or 137 3S200 6S% 54% 63 — %— ft 

3ft* 22* PoPL 0BI12J 7*24 26* 22* 25*+ %+ 2ft 

29* 2SV.PoPLdprfl3 3597 29* 2S* 23* + *+ 27 

84% 65* PaPL Bt 117 2277 84% 05% 79*4- 3*+ 3ft 

97% SI* PaPL P T 125 S13X 97% 81* fflV-— 1 W— 1ft 

02 94% PaPL W 13.1 6519002 94% 99%— %— ft 

42 54% PaPL pr 137 41788 62 54% 58% 

68 58% PaPL pr 114 UBS 68 58% 65 + 3 + 4ft 


36% 30% POPL Pf IXT 
37% 3D PaPL el 13ft 

67 57* PaPL Pf !3ft 
27* 23U PaPL 0PI13.1 
23* 30 PaPL dprtlS 
65% 56% PaPL er 137 
3ft* 23* PoPL Bert 2ft 
29* 2SV.PoPLdprtl3 
84% 65* PaPL Pi 117 
97% 81* PaPL PT lift 

m 94% PoPL pr 1X1 
42 54% PaPL pr 137 

68 58% POPL PT 1X4 


53* 38 SecPae 47 7186948 53* 38 51%+ %-*- 1ft 

SL. 12%SetsLI 10 14083 22* 12% 13*— 7*— J&7 
3P* 20*SvcCP9 1ft IS 59263 37U. 20* 29 * 5* + 247 

22 ll*5taklee 57 43 80427 S II* 13*— 7*— 35.1 

22* I0«k5howln 27 7 0311 22* 10* IB*— 2*— 13ft 

61% 39 ShellO J4. 10332385 61% 39 S5*+I5*+ 39.1 

3*% 28%ShellT 7ft 4 33171 39% 28% 30%— 2'A— 6.9 

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30* IBVSShelGpf <7 733 30* 18% 30 

99* 6«*ShelGBf AS 13 99* 46* 6ft*— 28*— 29.9 


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»% 17V. shelGlo 25 

39* 18% SheIG Pf £7 
99* ftt* SheIG of 6ft 


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124 
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Mef 84 
STM 84 
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— Bft 
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Pi 14ft 
L lift 
L pi 1X4 
L pi 134 
L Pi 13ft 
Lpf 12ft 
Lpf 137 
2ft 
7ft 
1X7 
82 
17ft 
lift 


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62 48 L. Penw pf 4ft 10 62 4*57 —ft — «ft | 

2i*20 Ponw pf 7ft 3»3 24* 2D 22 A— 1'-— 57 

45* 30*penrue1 4.T 10372155 45* 30* 44% +10%+ 307 
S3 72 PemeffllXI 1034 33 77 79U— 4*— 57 

15% 9% PeonEn 6.9 714115115% 9% 15*+ 5* + 57.7 
33% 23b Pea Bo+ 17 13 ?K»33% 23b 29%— %— 17 
45* 34% PepsiCo 19 20 644132 45* 34% «71k+ 4*+ 121 
31% 17* Perk El XI 16 368183 31% 17* 26%— 3b— 11.1 
10% 7*prmlen 157 6 ®7B61 10% 7* 7*— I*— 184 
1«% \2*PCT9DT 1ft U 1965618% 12% 17*+ IVs-V 93 
37% 26% pefrte 45 14 59119 37% 26% Jib + 3*+ 121 

32* 26b PefRs 13ft 14987 S* 26b 26b— 2%— 74 

17*14 PrtRa Pl 10.7 7289 17* 14 14*— l — 64 

8* 4*Pmnv 227 10373 8% 4* 4V»— 2*- 36ft 

42* 29* Fiber XI I4»1054942* 29* 42b+ 6%+ 18ft 
7T7, 12% PTwIeD 1909527* 12* 13*— 11*— 455 

48*34 Phelo or 13ft 1434 4*34 36 

34* 2ffbPflBKS 17 10n10980 34b 2tfti 22 + %+ ft 

16 9 PhlloEl 14ft *A33S3 16 9 14*+ %+ X5 

29% 22 PhllEpf 14ft 55350 29% S 26 — %— 1.9 

32% 24 PhllE Pf 14J 16480 32% 24 30 

33 25 Ptlliepfl44 4499 33 25 30%+ %+ 17 

34 25% PhllEpf 14ft 35=30 34 25% 33 + %+ 1ft 

50% 40 PhllEpf 14J) 1111 50% 40 SO + 2*+ 5ft 

«VS 50* PhllEpf 1X1 1284 47% 5Db 58 — Vi— 4 

100 100 PhllEpf 14ft 51100 100 100 

10b 6% PhllEpf 14ft 2l0«TDb 6% 9% 

55*43 PhllEpf 15ft 177255*43 S2b+ %+ ft 
10% 6* PhllEpf 137 2178610% ft* 9*+ *+ 4ft 

llft% 77 Phllpf 155 15£ai6% 97 110%— *— ft 

106% 87 PTillE Pf 14ft 12m0ft% tf 103*— *— 7 

72 56 PtUIEpI U.1 45573 72 55 <7*—!*— 15 

0 51 PhllEpf 153 1293 0 51 67*+ b+ A 

Si 44 PTillEef I5ft 1680 56 M 52 %— 1%— 2ft 

56% 40% PTll IE Pf 15ft 30330 56% 0% 51%+ %+ 1ft 

20 15V. PhJtStlb 7ft 11 12110 2] 15b 17%+ *+ 2ft- 

S3b 62% PTHIMr 4ft 10699291 83b 0% 80*+ B* + 1X4 

17* lD%PnilPln 27 10 66503 17* 10* 17*+ 1*+ 1X9 

0 26 Pnlllnpf 2L4 2410 26 0 + 3%+ 9.1 

56b 33% Phi I Pet 5ft 8el4730 56b 33* 44*+10b+ S7 
28% IbUPNIVH 1ft 9 6539 3% 16b 2S + 2*+ 10ft 

19 27% PledAvt ft B11141B 39 27% 36 — %— J 

J2 23* PleNG 7ft 8 8864 32 23* 31*+ S%+ 19ft 

21 14 Pier 1 4 30336 21 14 14*— 2*— 14ft 

65* 33 Plllhry 3ft 1D23B204 45* n 44%+ 6% + 22ft 
33 21* Pioneer 4ft 734891233 21* 3lb+ «%+ left 

29* 17 PkmrEl ft 41 11406 29* 17 2DT»— 7*— 27ft 

36b 26% PltnvB 29 1120629736b 26% 35%+ 2%+ eft 

72 53bPrtnBpf 3ft 50B7 72 53b 70 + 5%+ 7.9 

16% 9* Pitts m 128670 16% me 9*— 4*— 3IJ 

17b 5* Plan Rs 1ft 11 62153 17b 8* 13*— 3*— 197 
24% 12* Plan mi lft 12 31996 24% 12* I31k— 11*- 46ft 
12b 7% PMyboy 3 21268 13b 7%llb+S*+26J 
35b 23b pfesev LX 11 2089 35b 23b 23%— B — 25ft 

23* 16% PoooPtf X7 16 40118 23* 16% I6%— «k- 21 J 

34* 25* Polar Id X6 21236004 34* 25* 27b- 5*- 17ft 

24* HttPondrs ft 8126909 24% 11% 1J%— 7%- 36.1 

24* 15 PacTof XI IS 16405 26* 15 1S*-10%- 40ft 

1«k UbPortec 2ft 21938 19% 13b 16b + j*+ isft 

M 72b Partr p( 7J I10MB6 72b 73 - 8 - 97 

17% U PnrtGE U.l 5129504 17% « Wk+ 3%+ 2X6 

*% 90 PoG pf 12ft 31650 96% 90 93%+ 2% + X7 

21* I7*PorGpf 1X9 1588 21* 17% 20%+ 1 + 5ft 

33b 2abPotOpf 1X8 850 33b 2flb 31%+ 1 + 3ft 

32% 28% PorG pf 13ft 6838 32% 20b 31b + 1%+ 5J) 

38 SSbPotltCfl 54 11 3093338 25* 2Mk- 9%- 3X0 


32* 22b Shrwin X7 10118064 32* 22b 28 + 1*+ X7 
9* 4%snoetwn 9 27171 9* 4% 6 — 3 — 3X3 
18* 12 Showrbl 47 12 12076 18* 12 12*— 2*— 177 

16* 17bS1erPoc 9ft 7 18869 16* 12* 16b + lb + 8J 

25* 24%5lenal 10 14436611 35* 34% 33%+ %+ 4 

58 4S*5lgnlpf 7J 856051 -0*56%— *— 7 

TO 50 Slonlel 10 35T70 SO 66 + %+ ft 

25* 20* Slnser J 14183562 35% 2D* 29*+ 1*+ eft 

20* 26b Slnarpf 1X1 2004 Mb 26b 2ST8+ 1*+ 6ft 

19*k fTU SKvIlne 10 23 60100 19% 12b 16 — 1*— 97 

21* 9*5nlthln 10 18155917 21* 9* 10%— 1D*~ 50J 
60b 50 SmhB 5 A 9445782 60b 50 52 'm— 4b— 7ft 

Sab HhSmucUr 1.7 15 7759 56+ 3*]n 55 +14%+ 35ft 


29% S PhllEpf 144 
32% 24 PhllE Pf 1X3 

33 25 PhllE pf 144 

34 25% PhllEpf 14ft 
50% 40 PhllE Ol Mil 
62% 50b PhllE Pl 1X1 
100 100 PhllEpf 1X6 

10b 6% PhllEpf 1X4 
S* <3 PhllEpf 110 
10% 6* PhllEpf 137 
116% 77 Phllpf 15ft 
106% 87 PhllE Pf 1X8 
72 56 PhllEpf U.1 

0 SI PhllE pf 153 
56 44 PhllE el 1 5ft 

56% 40% PTlJlE Pf 15ft 


28% IftbPNIVH 
19 27% PledAvt 

J2 23* PleNG 
21 14 Pier 1 


36 b 26%PJfnvB 27 
72 53V6 PltnB pf 3ft 

16% 9* Pitta h» 

17b BbPlonRs 1ft 
34% 17* Plan fm lft 
13b TViPtavboY 
35b 73'A Plesn 4ft 


ZOk 11% Rondrs 
26* 15 PopTaf 
1«k 13% Portec 


umn iivs ui-j— /no— 46. i 

11040 16 72% 73 — 8 — 97 I 


106%10l POflth pl 117 634006*101 TBJ*+ %+ ft 

25% 19% PofmEt 77 B226Q16 25% 19* 25b + 3*+ 154 
74% 56% Put El Pl 3ft 9974% 56% 74% +12*+ 19ft 

0% 36 PofEfpf lift 5509041% 36 39 + 1 + 24 

36 31 P0fElpf1!7 247936 31 34%+ !%+ 4J 

0b 38* Pet a pf 10ft 0242b 38* 0%+ I%+ 3ft 
37b 2Sb Premrl 17 16 18287 J7b 25b 311h— 2*- 8ft 
36* 16*Pre> wl 24* 16* —1000 

35* 23 Prlmk5 XI 6 41849 15* 23 33 + 7 + 2X9 

3T% 11* PrlmeC 16573411 21% 11* 18 + *4- XT 

25% 14 PrlmM J 20 55306 25% 16 2Sb+ 4%+ 217 
99% 45%ProctG 44 11549012 59*45*0 + %+ ft 
7*PrdRsh 27 20 32503 14* 7* T0%- «h- 184 
47b 3T Pro Mr X9 • 6418 47b 31 3db+ T%+ XJ 
19* T6b PSvCol 9.9 83367MI9* 14b l«k+ %+ 47 
68 0* PSCd pf 12ft 82440 60 51* 56*+!*+ 3ft 

18* 16bPSCoipni4 482718* 16% W%+ *+ XI 
TJ% 6*P5lnd 1X3 239718313% 6% 7 — 4*- 39ft 
25 19%PSlnpf 15.! 38280 25 19b 23%— 1*— 7J 

8U 6 PSInpf 136 3SC8 8% 6 7*— *— 47 

8 6% PSInpf 154 223 8 6% 7 — 1J 

50 36% Plln pf 1X1 98720 50 36* 42%— 1%— 34 

66* 49* PSInpf T6ft 2241 66* 49* 58 — Z%— 17 

91 44% PSlhBl 1X7 3K7 5a 44% 51 -3*- XB 

0 43 PSInpf 16ft 30370 43 50 — 1 — 2J 

66% a* PSInpf lift 2215 Mb 50* 62 + 2%+ 3ft 

60 46%P5lnpf 164 1539 60 46% 54%- %— ft 

12* 3% PSvNH 1 02541 12* 3% 3*— 7*— 04 

19 4 PSNHpf 214619 6 9'*— *56— 0ft 


37b 2Sb Premrl 17 16 18287 37b 25b 31 Vs— ! 
24* 16*Pre>wl 24* 16* 

35* 23 Prim* S XI 6 41849 15* 23 33 + ] 

21% ll*PrtmrC 16573411 21% 11* 18 + 
25% 14 PrlmM ft 20 55306 25% 16 25b + , 

59* 45*ProcfG X6 11569012 59* 45* 0 + 


19% 

20 * 

29* 

22 19% 20%— 

« 27 3t* + 

5% 2% Zb— 

37* 23% 28 — r — 
77 56 *1 -1 lb- 

25* 17% 23*+ * + 




17* 14* 
20% 17% 
16* 14* 
14* 8% 


37% 27 SnoeOn 2.9 13 7aLW 37% 27 34*+ 4 + 1X0 

58 n Sonal Sft 5 143014 38 J} 33*+ 1 + lft' 

17* 12* ScayCo 1.1 1191231? 17* 17b 14 — I*— 104 

29% 22b SoaUn XI 9 590729% 22* 23*— 2b— 104 

3521 27b SourcC HA 9078 35* 27* 3Sb+ 4%+ 1X6 

20% 18 SrcCpPf 11.9 1976 20* 18 20b+ *+ 1.9 

22* 19* SCrE Pf lift 256 27* 19* 22*+ 2%+ lift 

27b 22 SaJerln XV 8 10358 27* 22 57*+ S%+ 3X0 

48* 38b Soudwn lft IQ l«a84S* 36b 43*+ 2*+ 5A 

26% 22 SoetBK XS 8 8099* 26% 52 25%+ l%+ 63 

7*— 4*— 38ft 
22*+ 2%+ 1X5 
18*+ 2%+ 1SJ 
33%+ 5*+ 21ft 
36 + 1%+ 4ft 
33*+ *+ lft 
0 — 5 — lee 
23*+ *+ X3 
25* + 2%+ 10ft 
27% — 5 — lift 
12 —4*— 2X4 
6*— 3Vk— 314 
49 —4 — 7ft 
22 — 5% — 19J 
15%+ *+ 24 

14 + lb+ *A 
TO* +11*+ 20ft 
20 — %— 24 
20%+ I%+ 5ft 
14*— 5U — 2X3 
22'£»- 3b— 1X2 
41*— S%— lift 
3Jb— 6 — 1X1 
39*— %— lft 
53%+ Bb+ 1X1 
20b— 3b— 13ft 
18*— Me— 8ft 
13b— SVk- 27 ft 
52*+ ZVa+ X2 
0 -2*- XI 
74*+ lb+ lft 
IB + %+ 29 

15 + lb+ 9.1 
25%— 1*- XO 
29%+ 1 + 3ft 

9%+ b+ 2ft 
17% — 7%— 300 
3 — lb— 294 
16*— %— 2ft 

10b 

28*+ l*+ 65 
I7M— To— 12J 
29 + %+ 2ft 
10* 

40b + 1 + 25 
Sib- B%- 21ft 
41*— 4b— 13.0 
17*+ 1 + 5ft 

2b— II*— 8X5 
46W+ 9H+ 244 
23* 

15 — 12*— 44ft 
4%- 3*- 44ft 
30*+ S%+ 14ft 
29 - lb— XI 
a*- 9*- 5X1 
46Vk+7*+ 54 
96b+ 5*+ XI 
44% — 4b— X7 
0 - 3*- 319 
4*- l*~ 2X7 
31*+ 2*+ XI 
33* +10* + 4X9 
15b— 2*- 1X3 
19%— 2te— 114 
32 — 3 b — 9ft 
11*— 4b— 36ft 
48*— 4*— 07 
33*- 2b- 7ft 


68 0* PSCd pf 12ft 

18* 16b PSCd pf 114 
HVi 6*P5>nd 1X3 

25 19b PSInpf IX? 

8b 6 PSInpf 13ft 

8 6* PSInpf 154 

50 36* PSInpf 1X8 

Mb 49* PSInpf 16J 
a 44% PSInpf 1X7 
0 43 PSInpf 1X8 

Mb SO* PSInpf 15ft 
60 46b PSInpf 164 

12* 3% PSvNH 
19 4 PSNMpt 

19b 6* PNH Pffl 
TO 8% PNH PfC 
W 7 PNH pfO 
25 7 PNH PtE 

21* 5* PNH PfF 
22% 7* PNH PfG 


a 35* TDK J 

30% 24 TECO 74 

15* 7%TGIF 
Mb i1*TNP X7 
36 17 TRE XO 

82 53* TRW 4.1 

T79%134 TRW pi ZB 
10 110 TRWpt X4 
14% 3% TocBool 


J 17 25635 0 35% 39%— 7%— 15ft 

74 8 1 87867 30% 21 29*+ 2* + 107 

14 58739 1 5* 7% 8*- S%— 39ft 
Bft 7 6257 14b 11* 13*+ 1 + 7B 
Sft 14 438936 17 20 —10b— 31* 

4.1 10123847 82 58* 72%— 7%— ftf 

ZB 16979*134 156 —17*— 10ft 
14 247152 110 133U— 12 — &J 

42960 14% 3% 4b— 7*— 634 


a 


XI 

1 

XI 

109- 

7.1 


7.1 


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14 

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16 

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26* 22* 26*+ 3*+ 1X4 
15* 7* 12%+ 2 + 19A 
10 6b 8% 

17* 12 15 + 2*+ 2X7 

5* a 2b— 2H— 514 
11* 8 10*— lb— 105 

19* S* 9*— 8%— 46J 
30% 14 14*— 12* — 4X0 

60% 45% 46 — 13%— 22ft 
31% 18b 2Tb— 8*— 29J 
6* 50% 55 

17* U 14b 
IB* 10% 10b— 7b— 403 
3fb 15* 26 + «*+ Sift 
12* 8* 8*- 3V»— 272 
31* 23* 25 — 4*— 15ft 
18* 12* 14*— 3 — 1X9 
3* 1* 2%— %— 211 
14% 10% 11% — 1*— 1X2 
26b 13% 31b— 4b— 1X7 
H 20% 23b— 3 — lift 
% 37% 44b— l%— 2ft 
95 109b— 2b— 2/0 

* U 15b— 2*— 153 

* 24% 29%— 9%— 3X4 

— 20% 25*+ 2+84 

13* * **— 1W— 13ft 

21* 15% 1Mb- 1*- 5ft 

5 TV, Mb- Vo— 43 
38% 25 at*— 3*— lift 
19% 13* IS — 3*— 19ft 
19* 9* 12*- 4*— 26B 
33* 16 . 28* +11*+ 69.1 
33 TO S1%+ 9%+ 412 
53* SO S3 

43% 32 35b— !«*— 29J 

43% 25* 36* — 6Vk — 1X3 
50 30* 44*+ 6b+ 1X2 

79 C 71%+9%+15J 
26* 21 22*- b— LI 

67* S3 66 + 8%+ 1X0 
a 15% V + 2%+ 102 
41% 26b 39 + 6%+ 195 
b 114% 157 b +27* + 214 

8 11*20*+ *+ ft 

56b 64*- 5* — XT 
25% 16% 20%+ 3*+ 224 
48* M% 44 +4 + MB 

42* JO* 34 — 7%— 1L1 
106% 70*105 +30*+ 407 
XI* 19 31*+ *%+ 25.1 

33* 34* 33%+ 3* + 1Z9 
29 b 17* 26 — ZVk- 7ft 
112 112 112 +4 +37 
S3 44 49b 

Tl» 3* 6%— J%— 3X7 
33 16 2S%— 7%- 22ft 

X 14% 22b- 4* — 213 
65 a 57*— 3 — 49 
S% 21% « — 8%— 17ft 
55% 23* 41 -8b- 16ft 
23* 0% 17% — 4%— 222 
23* 9 17*— 4*- 109 

23% 9% 17*- 4b — 194 
28 11* 20*— 5*— 71J 

a 8% 16* — 4b— 515 
65 27* a -lib— I&4 

17* 4 12*- 3*— 2L1 

IS 7 14%- 2 — lift 

49* 34 44b— 4*- 9JJ 

29* 18% 26% + !*+ 5ft 
15 11 II*- %— LI 

34% Mb 31 +3%+lXJ 
29* 17 21% — 3% — 1X8 

31% 28* 31 

» 16*22*+ b+ 1.1 

28* 22* 25%+ 2U+ 9ft 
49* 36 46*+ 3H+ 7ft 

25% 16b 24*+ Z*+ 106 
24% 18b 21*- %- ZJ 
a 26* v — i*- U 
19* 15* 174b- 1 — SJ 
16* U% 11*— 2*- 19J 


w 




$f 


a 


19 6 PSNHpf 3346 19 6 9b— 8*— 0ft 

19b 6* PNH Ptfl 740 19b 6* 9 — 8%— 497 

M 8% PNH PfC 3228 28 8% 13V=— 12%— 401 

21 7 PNH PfO 7601 24 7 11%— 11*— 50ft 

25 7 PNH PtE 15346 25 7 1I%— !1%- 4B4 

21* 5* PNH PfF 8934 21* 5*10 — 9*— 494 

22% 7* PNH PfG 16913 22% 7* 10*— 9*- 402 

at*t9%PSvNM lift 9160B62 26* 19% 34*— 1 — 3.9 
27* 2fl% PSvEG 102 7464328 37% 2D% 26*+ 4 + T7ft 
Ub lOVkPSEGpf lift 1313 13b 10% 12%+ 1 + 07 

33* » PSEGpf TZ2 >062 33* 28 33%+ 2% + Ol 

35 2B% PSEGpf 1X1 78640 35 28% 37 — b— ft 

35 29% PSEGC'UO 150B35 29* 33 — b— B 

41 33% PSEG pf 1X1 6016041 33% 3B%+ b+ J 

43* 355% PSEGpf 13J2 M660 4J* 35* 40%- *- ft 

103 91 PSEGpf 11.9 3C4QC3 92 97%— 2%— 25 

109 97Vi PSEGef 12ft 186309 VTtAiaTlk— 5%— X3 

lllblOl P5EGpl 110 S240niV.10> 103%— 4b— 44 

10b IS PSEGpf 1X0 4719 18b U 18* 

56% 46% PSEG pf 12ft 77940 56% 46% 53 — W— ft 

30* 16* PSEGpf 12ft 4789 20* 16* 19 — b— 1J 

104% 96 PSEG Pf 127 4397004% 96 M%— 4 — 4 J3 

64* 53 PSEG Pl 1X9 4556 66* 53 59b + 1*+ X0 

66* 55 PSEGpf 13.0 5386 66b 55 60 + %+ ft 

64 55 PSEG Pl 1X5 14411! 64 56 60 + U+ lft 

67b 51% PSEG pf 134 2746 62b S>% 56 — 2%— 3ft 

63b 51 PSEGpf 126 3466 62b 51 5B%+ 1%+ 24 

79 65* PSEG Pl 1313 SJ1T0 79 65* 72%— %— ft 

4% 2% Public* 20056 4% 2% 2b— *- 105 


70 49b ToftBrrl IB 14 50191 70 4?b 43* + Ab+ 114 

15* 9* Talley 11 35167 15* 9* 14 + 7%+ 21ft 

17* 13% Talley pf 4J 63179 171k 13% 14 + l*+ 94 
Alik 46* Tombed 54 12 8117361* 46* 59*+ 1*+ 24 

43* 3b Tandy 9 757234 43* 23b 24b— 19%— 4X1 

1»% ll%Tndvttr 12 853216* IV* 13 — 1%— 12ft 

73b 51%Tek1rnx lft f 1154CS 78b 51% 57b— lib— 225 


3* 2% THcom i 10338 3* 2* 2b- Vi- Bft 
3G2*10b Teldvn 1328836£02*147b346 +78* + 0.1 
Ob 13% Teirote Z0 25 57293 23b 13% 16b— 6*— 290 

3e% 18* Telex 12237599 36% 18* 35* +10 + 306 

37* Z5*Templn 1J 1014670637* 25* 37*+ 4%+ 1X9 
Alb HbTetrnco 7J B6SB480 44b 33* 37%— 3%— 7ft 
97* 87%Tencpr Uft 2177997* 87% 94%+ J%+ OB 
76 65 Tencpr 10.1 6372 76 65 73%+ 7% + 107 

39* 21b Terdyn U 239830 39* 21b 26 —10 — 27ft 

20* 9*Tesoro X0 17113665 28* 9* 10 — 4 — 23ft 
16* TObTesorpf 102 81W36* 20% 21*— 5b— 214 

48* 31% Texaco OB 8x12677 48% 31% 34 %— 1*— X» 

42% 33* TxABc 44 9 25650 42% 33* 34b— 4%— Uft 

48b 36*TexCm XO 71010 48* 36* 39 — 2*- 57 

35% 26%-xEsts 7J 9232392 35% 26% 29%+ %+ 1J 


23b 20*’xETpf 114 4S9S23b 20* 21 — %- XO 

25* 24'i TxETpf lift ■ 6420 ZS* 34% 24%- *_ lft 

58 0 TxETpf lift 26279 58 52 53%— 21b— &l 

«* 25 Texllld 29 16 20736 40% 25 27b- T !» — 20ft 

149%lll*Texlne» lft 90438949%! U*llV%—19Vk— 1X8 
5* 1 Tex In} 177516 5* I 1%— 4—700 

27*17 TbxOGs 1.0 11825989 27% 17 17%— 4b— 25ft 

39 S TxPoc lft 17 5378 39 32 33b— 4*— T2J 

28% 20* TexlflU 09 6631715 28% 20* 26*+ 3%+ 1X4 

8% 7 Texfl In 25524 B% 2 2*— 4*— 644 

43% 25% Textron 5ft 132333M «% 25% 33*+ 1*+ XB 

47b WbTexfrpf 5.7 78S4 47b 23* 36*+ %+ 2ft 

38 23*Toxtref XJ 340 38 23* 29*+ *+ 2ft 

9* 5% T hack 9415 9* 5% 6*— 29b— 31.1 

28b Z3V. Thock Pf IAS 1344 28b D'« 2SVB— Uk— X3 

2m 13* Therm E 24 2930 27% 13b 28—2—9.1 
a 28b ThmBI 8 3ft 14 29132 38 2Sb 354*— T%— SB 

18% 12% Thom In 3ft II 11266 18fk 12% I8b+ 5%+ 39.0 

26% ISbThmMed 2ft 7 058526% 13b 15%— 21k— 1X6 

21* 1!%TI*Wv ZA U 114077 21% 11% 19%+ 2%+ Uft 

2915 17* Thfyrtr 4ft 15238S 7915 17* 19*— 2W— 9A 

W3% 99% Tkfwt pf 9.1 65S2U»% 9V%1004* 

* 9£b Tlperln 177360 9 4% 64*+ *+ ISft 

50% 33* Time 1.9 13376154 50% 33* 42*— 9b— 17J 

88% 60% Tlmf pfB 2JJ 10888% 60% 7TVt— lf%— 1X9 

21% 12 Tlntpfx 19 47977211k 12 1B%— 1 — 5.1 

45% 2BbTlmeM 34 12 1 842045% 28b 48%+ 2% + 7 ft 

67% 0b Timken 3ft 12 2496967b 0b 52 —12*— 19ft 

35% TBbTodShp X3 6 20865 35% 28* JOtk— b— ft 

31 23b Tofchm Z2 M 24138 31 23b 27%+ 2% + 84 

Ifik UbTolEOta 1X4 5134269 18% 13% 1B%+ %+ X» 




r 




7 nr 


13% 7* Pueblo lft 7 2997313% 7* 9%+ T%+ 105 
12b 6% PR Cent 5 039 12% 6% 69k- Uh— 214 
15 9%PugetF 1X0 B166B22 15 9b I3%— *— 53 
77 TOVkPulteHm ft 21 18370 27 10% 18%— 6b— 2SJ 

65% 23% Purptof XS 16 42553 45% 23% 2**— 33b— 53ft 
9* 5%Pvn> 710240 9* 5% 8% 


75% 54%QuokO X4 11 1297W 75% 549k 72% +13% + 2Z2 
38% 27V. QuofcO 1 136834 38% 27b 38%+ B%+ 29ft 

97b 90% OuoOof 9ft 1K5 97b 90% 96b+ lb+ lft 

19% 15 QuafcSO 4ft 13 H505B 19% 15 18%+ %+ 3ft 

1ZV5 6%Quonex 41 45418 12% 6% 7*— 2%— 235 
37% 73 Qunfor 54 9 81386 32% a 29%+ 3% + 1X3 

201k 14 QkRell lft 13 3123228% 14 15%— b— lft 






20 % 

i 17* 

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) 32% 
i 65% 
ilOOWl 
i 36 
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i 24b 
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69b 48% . 
46% J7b . 
17b 10% 
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149k 0% 
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45* 22*. 
21% 13 
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35* 17* 1 
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17 Month 5K Pci. TJ/.lonlh 51s Pet. 

High Low Stock Yid PE Vol. hiah Low Close Ch ae ChVe rngn Lew stack via PE vai High low Page Cifpe Cn ge 


IT Month 

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5% 10b— 7Ys— 4X3 


0% 33* SCM 4ft 9 57200% 33* 42%+ 6% + ™ 

0% 23 7 S SFN XO ffl 777200% 43*+ 7%+ 2IJ 

12b 7*5L inds ZO 10 5581 12b 7* 10b+ 1%+ 17.1 

JO 19% SPSTcc 18 II 17876 JO 19% 21b- 3*- 

a 15 Seblne J 20 67129 » 15 15'-k— 5 — 2+4 

a Is 5cOnRv l/j 29203 3 14 16»2— 5 — ZU 

WT M*StaflB3 lft 14 4*527 18% II* Mb- J*— 

10 SbSfOdSc 81 36592 10 5* 7b+ 1%+ 1J.6 

5% SSfadSkrf 137»» 2% til l%+ 1 +3BM 

41* 29b5offtl» :.l l» 3SI60* »b JS*T 1*+ X0 

27* 19% Saf ICM s 20 3J519ZT* 19% 26*+ 3%+ 16ft 

WbjlbSofewv 5ft 9327716 »b nvi 27%+ 1*+ 53 
35% 24* Sana IJ 13 S3900 35* 34* 33W+ 2+64 
211 15bS1JOLP 04 7 13MB « 15b W + IV. + 20ft 

»* ? 5 Paul lift 1167810* 9 10’.t+ b+ Z5 

12% 6% Satan* 1026112% 6% 7*— 4b— 400 

34% 71 SOIIIsM ft 15184786 34% U 26% ■‘■1%+ 60 

53b 49USol(Mpf 7B 4J521 53b 49 b H 


35% 24* Saga IJ 13 S3900 J5W 24* 53b+ 2+64 

211 15=aS1JOLP 04 7 13MB® 15b W + IV. + 20ft 

»* ? 5 Paul lift 1167810* 9 10’.t+ b+ Z5 

12% 6%Salonf 1026112% 6% 7*— 4*— 4HB 

34% 71 SallisM ft 15184786 34% a V*-. *- 1 % + 6B 
53b «uSollMpf 7B 6*521 53b 49 b g 

23* 17*SDtoGs 9J 7241427 23* 17* 23*+ 3b + lift 
W* WiSJuanB 10B 9 96788 10* 6* 74k— 2b— US 

«* BViSJuonR 16 STM ISTk 3% ?*+ %+ W 

51 35USandrs lft 14 184974 SI 35b 35*— 14*— 2X6 

34* IBbSAnlrfit 93 12 906 24* 18* 31*— *— X0 

26* 20b SFeSoP XV 107373*3 26* 20'- 75*— %— lft 

Mb 24b SstV/el X2 16 3174 34b 24b 33 + 6%+ 2X5 

57* 12* Soul RE lft 43 8426 17* 17% 16*+ 3*+ 250 

19* 13*Sav£IP Bft 7 1883* IP* IJ* 18%+ 4*+ »ft 


2» 3«*TafEdPf 14ft J7725* 24b 25* 

26% 22 TolEd of 14ft 5983 26% 22 25% 

25% 20 TafEdpf 14ft 00 25* 20 23%+ I + 44 

32 25% To< Cdpl 1« 841132 2SVS 2Wo+ 1*+ 4& 

18b 13b TolEd pl 1X3 36018b 13% 16%+ %+ A 

17* 13% TalEdpf 144 10117*13*15*+ %+ X4 

4SV, 73 Tanka IB 1052748* 73 41 +18%+ 812 

34% 16 TootROI IJ 11 8834 34% U 31 +I3W+ 7X6 

34b TWkTrchm* X2 11 9730*34% IB* 0%+ 9%+ 4X2 
109b V2* Trch pf HA 2306009% 92*103 — I*— lft 
13* 9% ToroCo 1A 9 26960 13* 9* I2*+ 1%+ 108 


5% 1 Tosco 
73 ti*Towle 
15* 5* Towle pf SB 
52* J1* Toy RU 
33% 25* Toy R w? 


187196 SVfc 1 1 —4 — 8041 

20B34Z3 II* 11*— 9*— 4541 
1171 15* 8* 8*— 6b— 41ft 
0 399920 57* 31* 38* + 3*+ 73 
575 35b a Hi 26%+ 2%+ X9 


27% 18% Trocar IJ 13 70513 27% 18% 26b + b+ IJ) 
14 7* TWA 8617979 14 7* 10%— 1 — 0J 

15% ll*TWApf lift 3195315% 11* 13* 

34% 16%TWAPfB11J 58070 24% 16% 20 — %— XS 
30* »*Trmsm 63 13247420 30* 20* 26*— 5 — 1X1 
IMk 16* Tran Inc lift 650 18* 16* 1B%+ *+ 2.1 

12% 10* TARJfy Eft 3ZJ712% 10* 11*- Vfc— 21 

55% 33%Tnmsco 19 Ml 2870*0 55% 33% 52 +14%+ 37ft 
S9*4Z%Tmscpf 6ft 2489359*0% 56 +11*+ 2X2 


253* 19 TranEk ^ 
17% 4% Tfinuen 
71*43 TrGPpf « 
93b B0 TrGpf 
87* 77 TrGPpJ JJ5 
24 20 TrGP Pf 17-2 , 

13 4taflM» „ 1 

28* 2B Tranwv SJ 
32% 23*TmwId IJ 1 
16% 97hTwfd«4A 

28% 22%TwMBf 7.1 
17* 14* TnrWpf 
3flb 35%Travler SJ 
26% a* main rJ 
2J% 20b TrfCn pf 17.0 
A* 5 TrtSoln 1 
22% i2*Trtaind 2J 4 
29% 28% TrIaPc 17 I 
34% 24 Tribune Z4 1. 
6% 4b Trlortr Bft 
10* 5* Trice 3A 1 
iSbTrliitv 19 
19% llbTrlfEno .7 1i 
11% fl*Tr1IE pf IM 
0*33*TuCSEP AJ 1 
16* lOUTullJM XS 
23* 16 TwInOs X7 11 
37* 25% TyeaLb 24 1 
31 S% Tvler 14 L 


cm rcu 

VM PE vsi Hlah LOW Cl tt^CB’OkC*” 

71% 63 71*+ 2%+ M 

riiSSJ i* 

32* 23* 31 

SS^^3%+.g 

38% »5 §»+ *%+ IM 
26* 21* 24* — *7 Of 
»b a%+ 1^ Jf 

Bft if* W** 

25 3^+3*+!^ 


K%,3b |7*=«k=itfJ 
Wk 11% 1*- M 

11% 8* 10% 

41* 33* 41%+ M 

16* 10* 11V+- 2^- »0 
23*16 16%— 4*- 70 S 

37% 25% 34 + 4 + 2M 
31 23% 29*+ *+ ,J 


46* 28 UAL 1-1 
31* 24 UALpf 7 J 
12* 79b UCCEL 
S% 16% UGI "A 
a%l+%UGlpf 7M 
11% 3 UNCRM 
U% 10 UR5 IS 
30* ITHUSFGs 7+ 
1«* 12* UnlDvn XB 
20b 13% UnlFrsf U 
55% 45 Unllvr 41 
93% 7S UnlNV X8 
0b 30% U Cantos 4A 
65b 32* UnCarb 9 J 
7% 4% UnlonC 
16% 12 UnEhfC 104 
27 33 UnElpf 113 

25% UnEI pf I3A 
M% UnElpf I3J 
27% UnElpf m3 
39% UnElpf 13J 
24%UnEIPfNB14 
48% UEI pfL 1X9 
13% UnElpf 1X0 
13% UnElpf 114 
19* UnElpf 111 
45 UnElpf 114 
4+ UEiPfH 1X6 
34b UnPoc *A 
S3 UnPc pf 7 A 
Vb unlrevi J 
53% unrvl pf IZ1 
3* Unitor 
TObUnBmd 
9*UBra ol 
M%OCblTV J1 
22% UnEnrv 9.1 
9 U Ilium 1X5 
IV Ulllupf I6J 

11 Ullhipl 1X7 
20% Ulllupf 1X5 
10 Ulllupf 1X5 
15* unltlnd 26 
32% Utdrinn A 
25% UJerBJi XB 

9*UMMM 
2% UPkMn 
27 UialrG A 
45 USGyps XI 
40%USGypf X4 
SVfUSHam 
2ffb US Leas £2 
23 USShoe X2 
S3 ussieel 3A 
49*USSIIPf 1Z7 
715* USStl or 1 0A 
229h USStl pf X4 
31WU5Tob 3ft 
55* USWesf 7ft 
29% UnTch s X9 
27*UTcf»Pf 7B 
I7*UnlTe1 8A 
26% UnJTI pf XB 
21% UnfT 2pf 5A 

12 UWRs XI 
22 Unffra# ft 
U* Unlvar X0 
18* UflivFd X4 
15b u Leafs X6 
30 Unocal Z7 
45 Uplohn 37 
23% USLIFE XI 
30M< USLF pi lftft 
25 USLF Pf XB 

8% UalteFd lift 
20% UtaPL 1X5 
M*UtPLpf 12-0 
21* UtPL Pf 1Z1 
ITHUIPLpf 1Z1 
15* UtPL Pl 11 3 


32% n*VFCorp 
23* 5% Valent 
26 14 Volerpf 3 

5* 7b Valeri n 
14% liObVanDrs 
ru 2b voreo 
20% 5% Voreo pl 
58% adbvarlan 
15% 9% vara 
26* 17* veace 
6% 3% vonda 
W* BbVestSe 1 
34* 23* Viacom 
0 36% VaEPpf 1 

63% 54 VoEPpf; 
71 60%VaEPpll 
78% 67* VoEPpf 1 
79% 67% VaEI Pf 1 
77* 68% VoEPpf 1 
60* 52% VoE PtJ ' 
58% 49* VaEPpf ' 
61 51* VaEP pf ' 

20* MTkVhhav ' 
38* 2$*Vornad 
73* 58 VutcnM 


27* aObWICOR BA 
0 34%WObRpf 1X2 
29* amwocftvs X2 
2S% 16*WodiM XS 
9* ibWolnoc 
0 SObWolMrt A 
99 68 WIMrtpf 

45b 2B*Wolgm 2B 
22* I5*WKHRSS 
32* 23* WOlCSv 1-4 
37* 22 Wtalt J 3 X8 
9% 7% Walt J Pi 1 0B 
0«»%WalUof XB 
28* 18 Wamco 4ft 
29* 17 WraCm 
36* 28% WamrL 0 
18% l«*WashGe X5 
28* ISHWshNar XB 
SO 3Q%WasNpf Aft 
20* 16 WshWI 13A 
0* 27b Was* IB 
27% 18 WatkJ 9 1 J 
13* SttWbvGas 11 
9 ZOtoWovGpt 7.9 
10* 4 WeonlT 
12 9*Wecmpr 
24* 12WW0bbD ft 
37b 29*WebMk lft 
49* 3D¥>Wet1sF 46 
50 40 WMFpf 1L5 

28* 2Z*WelFM 109 
20% 13* Wendy s 1.7 
28% 16bW«fCo 2J 
40 34 WPenP pllft 

53% 34* WsfPtP XI 
12* 9 *Ws1c>Tb 
5% 2* WnAIrL 
2b bWTXlrwt 
18 flbWAirpf 1X0 
13% 8b WAlr pi 17A 
11% 4 WCNA 
53% 47 WCNAp 0X8 
W9 81 WPocl 
39* MkWUnton 
87 26*WhUnpf 

78 29%V9nUnpf 

9* 3V»WUndOf 
15% StoWUnpf 
48* 23 WUTlpf 
20* 8 WUTVpl 
2E% 19* WsfpE 3 3A 
40% aittWestvc XS 
35% 25 Weverfi X5 
45 34*Weyr Pf 7J 
a* 43* Weyr pr 9 A 
93 74b Whet LE 7 A 

35* UVkWhefPH 

0 3l%WhPMpf 17A 
a 25 WhPUpflBA 
50 36%Whlripl 43 
47% 24* WWtC S3 
49 47% WhHC pfA X3 

45% 36% WhrtC PfC 7ft 
0* I7*Whltehl 
22b 14% Whlttok 2ft 

7 wiwuukh sft 

10* 8 WIHrdn 
0* 22* william X7 
10* 2 WHitiEI 
10* 6b WllshrO IJ 

34 25* WlnDIx SJ 

15% 7b Wan bo J, 
l»b 5Vk Winner 
10b 3* Whiter j 
33% 25b WIscEP 7J 

79 6B*WbEpf 11.9 

68 59% WISE pf lift 

25* 23V» WlJ&ul 10ft 
30* 25* WlscPL 8A 
32* 24b WlscPS Bft 
37% 77* Wftca 44 
MS IBS Wit ca pf 14 
17* Wf watvrw zj 
27% 18* Wood Pi 3J 
38* 29* Wolwfh 4ft 
54 Vi 0% Wofwpf 4ft 
Sb 2*WrtCAr 
«j , 45 WMcfv 10 
B* SVkWurltzr 
25% lObWyteLb 2ft 
a% 16VkWvnns 3ft 


672570248* 2S 64 + 7b+ 19ft 
H6^3lto £ 30*+3b+ 11B 

30 3WU 12* 7* IW+ 1*+ 17 9 

12 vxx 23% 16% 22^*+ 5 + 2X2 
2 4516023% 19% 22%+ [*+ SJ 

13817811% 3 9%+5*} + $K 

13 11945 14* 10 M*— 2*— 17 -J 

831IB61 30* 17* 3 7% — %— B 
8 39380 IV* 12* 15*— %— JJ 
12 56020* 13% 15b— Mk- 1X1 

B 215 55% 45 50*— 1% — 2 A 

B 5B618 93% 7S SS + t + 

9 1BS776 42’U 30* 35*— 5*— '+2 
13695369 65 b 32* 36 *— 76 — 41A 
27770 7% 0k 4V»— 1* — 3BB 
6351054 16% 12 16% + 3%+ 28ft 

*21 S3 27 a 36b + 1 + 40 
S%29*— *— | 

28% ab+ b + a 
OT? 34*+1»+ 4ft 
39% 48 + 2%+ 47 
24% 29*+ 7*+ 48 
48% 57*+ 1*+ 2ft 
18% 0*+ 1*+ 03 
13% 16*+ 1*+ 1X7 
19% 22%+ 2*+ Uft 
45 S*+ 5*+ 10B 

0 5844+ lb+ 2ft 

MV.«lk-Wk-l« 
82 9 2* 19b— 17ft 

9* 13*— 3 b — 193 
53% 66 +7 + 11 3 
3* 3%- 2 — 3AA 
10b 10*— 4*— 3X6 
7* 10*— lb — 17J 
20* 30*+ 5b+ 2SA 
27%+ 2%+ 9B 
9 13* — 6*— 3X3 

19 24 — 2 — 7-7 

20% 24b— 2*- 1X2 

f5* 19*— 4%— 1X5 
32* 36%+ 3%+ 1X6 
25% 3 2* *— 1.1 

9* 15*+ 3%+ 2X8 
2% 2*+ %+ 5A 
72 33b + 1%+ *7 

45 59*+ *+ ft 

40% 53 + b+ J 

5Vk lb— Sb— 45J 
28* 34* — 1%- J-I 
a 264k— 11 — 29ft 
22 26% — 4b— 1X0 

0* 51 — b— J 
115*125%— W%— 1X4 
22* 26*— 2%— SJ 
31b 38% — 1*— X4 
S3* 70% +74*+ 2X7 
28% 36b 

2744 32 %— %— TJ 
17* 22b + 1%+ 5J 
26% 31%+ %+ 1A 
21% 27 + 1*+ X9 
13 15*+ 1*+ 1X4 

22 27%— 5%— 1X9 

1446 17%— 34k— 17J 
18* 23* — 2%— XI 
15b 19*+ 244+ 1X1 
30 37 + 5*+ 17B 

45 79%+18*+ 1X4 

739, 33*+ 5 + 17J 
Wb 30*— *%— 7ft. 
2S 33 + 4%+ 1X8 
8* 9b— b— 26 
20* 72 — Ilk- 7ft 
21* 33* 

a* 24 — 1 — X0 
17* 19% — 4k— XI 
IS* I7%— b— 1A 


Mb 264k— 3%— 
5* 6b— u*- ; 

M .6% — Bb— ; 
2b 2%— 246— i 
14* 19*+ VA + 
2U 2% — 4%— 1 

5% 7*— lib— 

30 V. 17*— 17*— 
9% 10% — 3b— 
17b ZDVi — 5 — 
3* 4*— 2 — 
Bb 10 + b + 
2344 32%— b— 
36% 0 + 244 + 

54 59 + 2 + 

60% M + 1% + 
67* 75% + 4b + 
<7* 76%+ % + 
68% 75 + 3 + 
52% 59 +2 + 
0% SSb+2%+ 
51* 58%+ 1* + 
14% 18 — 2 — 
25* 35%+ B*+3 
S 69*+ 1% + 


28b 24* + 5b + 

34% 44b— lb- 
20* 28*+4% + 

16*17 — 4b— 

6b 7 — 2b— 

30b 37*- IVk- 

« 88 +2 + 

28* 4S + 6* + 

rBn 

7% 9b+ * + 

29% 42 +3 % + 

18 18 — 9b— 

17 29* — 6%— 
a* 34*+ 5% + 

14* 18%+ 2% + 

15* a*— 2b— 

30% 40b— 3% — 

16 18% — Uk— 

27b 43*— 3% — 

18 21 — <*— 

8* 9*— 3b— 

SOb 20b— 646— 

4 5% — 3 — 

9% II +2 + 

24% 12% a%+ 2% + 

37b 29* 37 + *+ 

49* 38* 47%+ 7% + 

SO 0 43*- 2b- 

M* 2Z* 25*— 146— 

20% 11% 16*+ 1 + 

20* 16* 17*- B*k- 
40 34 Mb+3b + 

34* 36 — 15%— 

9* 114k— *— 

2% 3 b— 1 — 

* %— 46— 

fb 1!%— lb— 

8* 12% 

4 4*— 4*— 51 J 

0 48*— 3*— 6ft 

BH m +19 +23ft 
B% a*— 27*— 7X0 
26* 28 % 56 * 6X5 

27% 30% — 67 — 6X7 
3% 3*— 5%— 59ft 

m 6 

23 23 —Kb— 49 ft 

8 8 —11 — 57ft 

19* 26% — lb— 4A 
31* 37'6 — 1*— X5 
25 29%- 4*- 1X7 

34* 40 — 3% — 8jB 
43* 4746— lb— ZB 
74V. 02 — 1 — U 
13% «%— 14%— 5X9 
31% 34 —446— 12J 
25 26b— 6% — 186 

36% 46% — 2 — XI 
24* 29 -1(46- 39J 
0b 4746— %— IB t 
36* 39 + %+ A ? 
T7% n%— 16*— 4X8 
14% 21*+ 3*+ 18ft 
6* 74k— *— 4A 
8 9* 

22b 29*+ 2%+ 77 
2 7% — 646 — 71 B 
6b 644— %— X9 
25*a*+3 + 10A 
7* 15%+ 2b + 17B 
5% 6*— 846— 5X5 
3b 4b— 4b— 52A 
25b 31K»+ 3*+ Uft 
60* 73 — I — IJ 
59V* 66 +1 + 1 J 
23% 23*- *- 3A 
25% 29b + lb+ X4 
Mb 3Tb+3%+ I2A 
27* 34 — lb— X5 
85 IBS + 6 + X4 
9% IO%— 4ft— 31ft 
18* 20*— 3%— 1X3 
29* 37 + 1*+ SJ 
0% 52*+ 2*+ SB 
2* 246— 146- 38ft 
45 59*+ 7%+ 115 
3% 3b— 5 — 40A 
10* 14* — 10 - 40ft 
14% 10*- ft- X5 


51% 33b Xerox 7ft 
50% 4Sb Xerox of lift 
36b 19 XTRA 2J 


31* 24 ZoieCp XI 

24 iVbZdepfA 3J 

34* 15b Zapata SI 

210 210 Zapaipl lft 

0 ZBbZoyre ft 

38* 19%ZcfdthE 
27* 10 Zero lft 
30% 2l%Zurnin XI 


71 697270 51* 33b 37ft— II*— Ml 
57494 50% 45b 40%+ ft+ ft 
9 47797 Mb 19 23b— 1846- 30.9 


8 14576 31* 24 25ft— 4*- 145 

... 70 34 WA »%— 2 — 8J 

1320355 24* 15b 16*— %— 3J 
R10 MO 310 +15 + 7 ft 
121833880 31*44%+|b+ 79 
7314166 38* 19% 19*— 15*— UA 
18 16613 27* 18 23ft! 2%^ 8ft 

11 304930% a% 26 — ]bZ 2ft 


4Vk— 113 
7b— ISA 
2b— 1X1 
1*+ 13 
2*+ 8J 
2*- IB 
S — XO 
12*- 107 
3%+ XI 
6%+ 17A 


146- 36ft 
B —3X4 
5-1X5 
2*— ZZ6 
4*+ 9.7 
5*+ 117 

146- 1X0 
9 — 2£7 
9ft- 1X5 


The Daily Source for 
International Investors. 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 1985 


OTC Stocks 
1984 Prices 


Start YM PE Vat HtoWLowCtoMOitwOi'aft 


lZMonlti 

HfehLow Stock 


PE VoL him. , „ 


TO. MAMpd 

6 2k. AA imp 

6b «%AB5h A3 

Mb 10%AECs to 

4% 23* AFP 
5*9 199AMCUI 
1h 7 AST 
II 2MAT&E 
t i AVfACp 
H 9to Abrnrrts 3j 
6 % 3% acooRs 
34 17*4Aceto 
U MACMAT 
1M VbAcmoO ID 
9 216 ACTOEn 

10b 5 k. Aero un 
4b IkActvsn 
24b w%Actm« 

33 21bAcn«iW 23 
154k l2%Adio 2 
6*4 4% AdvRos 

tvs a Adept 

11 % 2WAdvG*n 
3t MAiAdvSwn 
8b TMAduTd 
316 l%Adw|Lds 
Mk 1*9 AorSvc 
« 1*4 AorSvs 
2614 IBVbAriBco SJ 
16 7*6 ApnlcOB 

4% 2 AldAut 
714 4 AlOupb 
2414 7 AlomoS 5J 
1 b Alone® 

2fc %A1skAp 
**k 4 AlskBc 
1514 9%AlikNt 
4314 27 Aloten 5.4 
MU 614 Alcan wt 
414 2% AlmEn 
58% SO All co in A 
16*4 4Va AllSeo s 
48% 43% AtenOrg ID 
23U 17V. AlldCoo SJ 
414 IbAiMRsli 
13b 6W Ally Gar 
1614 10 AloSetir 
7b 7 Altalr 
64k 4 AltrncT 
13 TOiAHron 
TO. 4V4 Amrird lj 
2514 IBbAmrftK 5L7 
614 6 AmBuwli 
25 22%AmApgr 4.1 
15% 9WAB4 CIb 3D 
614 3 ACellTl 
55% 71 A Cedi p( 164 
8k. 2*4 AmEcol 
514 314 AExpl ■ 

25 17*4 AFIIfm SJ 

Ml 8*9ARlpfD 1IJ 
9% BUAFnpfElID 
13*1 mkAFnpfF I4J 
1114 714 AFum 11 
25% 15b AlndmF 7.1 
1344 6*4 Ain rear 
914 AV4 AlnvLI 3D 
8b 4%ALand 
H* -ntALndun 

3n 7™ A Lets un 
514 WAmLIil 
13% 714 AMdSv ID 10 
2 % AMldl 

M n. AMIdl wt 
9 2*9AMonll 
20% 15*4 ANtHId 6D 
1% toANutPt 
5% 2% Am Poe 
9*4 7%ARecr 1.7 
6% 2*9 AmRni 
714 5 AmStird 
6 «% ATrust 

5% 4 AWStCp 
19% 13% Amhrst 
B 5% AmfsJar 
39% 33 A mask 11 
9 S Amaalpf 5.7 
6 5W AmsirplIU 
T9% 9 AnflrGr 
714 1*9 Andrwi 
Sb 2b Andrsln 
12*4 5% Andovr 

20% lo% AnaSA sj 

13% 8 AnuAGs 2D 

11 2*6AptdDt 

12 414ArabSH 

17 7% Anion 

4fc lUArlvoca 
14% 11 Arm*! 

29% 23 Anw Id 2.1 
42 38 ArowB 4.9 

M 5*. Ashton 
7% 4 AspRim 
27 1M Asd&cp 2D 

5 4 AssdCo 

UFA SUAstTMd 

5% IfliAstrcm 
9% £V4Astron ID 
19 12 AstrSy un 

6 4% AflenFn 
9% 5% Alt an Tl 

29 19% AtIGsLt IB 

10% 7% AllPrm A 
14% 11 AudVFd 
13% 2% Ault 
M &% Autoctv ID 
4*4 1*4 Ant Med 
10% 8*6 AutoSy 
3% 1% Aulomtq 
9% 4%Aut0Cp 
5% 4% Avalon 
5% 4% Avalnpf 


’«6 I* Sf IV- 3%- 4U 

m%m 

15202 9% 7 475 

’5«011 2% 

,‘%« £ + “ 

2158 1314 $£ f 7 

1217W *1 

13102 6% 4Vi £ - - 

s r 5*7 a*# 
Bt 

USM V £ fr- 64J 

,^iS5 ?%,a + * + ® 

1B *4I «JW 77 41 +13 + 46A 

71 10% 64. 6% 

4% 2% 3 
1237 58 Vs gn n 
2»54 16*4 4% fl% 

691 «% 43% 48%+ 2%+ 57 

39 88 23% 17% 1» — 4%__ (?j 

0222 4% 1% 7% 

'E?S ! 3W «* 9 - 1%- 163 

31*1 '? 10 — 6%— 

1446 7% 7 ?«.+ V.+ 3L6 

20924 6*4 4 4% 

11475 13 9% 9% 

™ 4% 4%— 1%— J5D 

33 “ Vtr ~ 103 

.S 3 bVl 6 4W| 

» 22% 24% +2+0.9 

mK’ss r , is + ^ ^ 

203ll^% ’iv *7 
6442 5*. 3% 3*4— 1%— 256 
17% » 25 +4%+22D 
136 M. 81k 8%— U— 2D 
B ' A %— 1.4 

s§!SS % Tt OtiH 

5383 9% 6% 6*4— %— 54 
1749 8% 414 6% 

6840 916 414 A% 

7BM g. 2H. 2ft+ »W+ 14J 
930 5% 3% 5 

, TTMIJVj 714 13 +2*4+268 
152*67 2 % %— %— 47J 


S 1* CWTrrt 3D 
» 20 CtyFdpt 10D 

g 22 %cnROMBit.i 
» 22 City Ben 3D 
££ 5^ Ck»tcC 
9% 5% CV»MF 
ili 260B9S4V 

THClowCp 3.1 
Sn. 2 Cod»lM 
. 7 % i% coast rv 

7%Crtlim 26 

’<% 7 CstSav 
fi. TViCofiftec 
“ MColFdl 
WW 11% DHABstl 3D 
J2% W CBCWA 5D 
31% 25 CohiBcs 2D 
!?* 10*4 C0U1G0, 9J 
11% CalGE pf I2 jO 
■ 5% CohimPd 

10% 6% CalSav 
S 24%C0tuMJI II 

'1 L Co «« r a 

3*6 CmndAr 
•I'M B Coen BCD L9 
«S.39*4ComaS *4 
70% SO CxxnCIH 2D 
1»6 13%CmBC«l ID 
40% 79 CmClBlh 5D 
5% 5% CmlDcl 
•% 8*kCmciFd 
27 IB CbriINI 14 
J7% 28 CwNIFn D 
>0 Bt4CimMRt 68 
1* 9*6 0 thvSv 

IB 6*6 Cam Stir 7.1 

7 4 CmpU 5 

6% 3V4CmPVkl 
lWfc 3% QnpraL 
1>% 7%CmptMc 
95 4*4CmpSve 
9% 4*6CmPOPI 
IB 516 Cm Hi un 

9% 5 CmpNat 
B !4V4Cmp5vs 
8% 4 CmSyn 
9 214 empire 

9% 7%Conutk 
17*4 SKiConcDs 

8 6% ConcCp) 

5 2*4 Condetr 

9% 9% Con SIP 
12% 4*6 coma 1.1 
14% !l%C0MIWt 1DJ 
36 32% ConToni ID 

24% 16 CmMl 74 
19% 12%CNFSL 

14 ■% CtlHIt un 

M % ContSrl 
34% 12 Canttn ■ a 
B% 4%CcmvFd 74 
21% 11% Corned 2D 
6% TlfaCooUDi 
24% 22 Caras Pf 127 
3% 2HCosCre 
4 2%CosCun 
16% 8*6CotnSLf 2D 
2B% IB Courer ZJ 
7*6 316 CourD 1 3 
IB 2%CousnH 
18% 10 Cdu»Ps U 
7% ikCavnai 
M% 9%CrorfTr 4.7 
S% 2*4 CrftHou 
9% 6% Craftier 
19% 13V. CrwfdC 3D 
11*4 8%CrazEd 
S>f> 3% CflAUl 1 
9% SMCnvnA 9.1 
3% l*6Cucind 
15*4 S Culp ID 
3*4 %Cunu> 

10*6 2% Cut CO 4.1 
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212H 28 20 22 — 4Vi — 17D 

17444 23 17*6 19 — 216— 104 

421430 S X +6 +35D 
7718 12*1 S% *%— 6 — 49D 
1371 9% 5% S%— 3%— 38.9 
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12036 11*6 744 9 — 1*6— 163 
3250 6 3 6 + 2*6+ B4D 

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9919 14% 7 14% 

9)45 5% 3*4 3% — IW— 26J 
24780 16 9*6 16*4 

2976 16% 11% 16 + 4%+ ».t 
4182 12% ID 12 
14661 31*4 25 28*4+ 1 + 3D 

13880 1516 10*4 15*6+ 4%+ 355 
534 15 11% U + 1%+ 11.1 

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31111 10% 6% 7% 

1208 33 34% 32 — 1 — 3D 

537614 B 916-2%-au 

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3685 46*6 39*6 45 - %— A 

18782 70% 50 M%+ 6%+ 1IU 

1550 18*4 13% 14*6 
4240 40% 29 39*6 + 6*6 + 20D 

679 5% 5% 5% 

6474 8% 814 8% 

1014 27 18 2316 

559937% B 37%+ 9%+ 3X9 
W1S 10 8% 10 + 1*6+ 21D 

1121516 9*6 14% + 2%+ 204 

3895 ID 6*k 8% 

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35220 6% 3% *4— 14— 194 
38892 10% 3% 5 

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11142 9% 4*6 5% 

1890 18 516 7*6— 816— 53D 

12336 9% 5 9%+ 2%+ 37D 

829 33 14% M%— 14W— 494 

1004 8% 4 4% 

5067 9 2*6 8 +4 +1B0D 

13547 9% 7% 8% 

43096 17*6 516 7%— 4%— 394 

2714 8 6% 6% 

1895 5 216 3% — l%— 30D 

15 9% 9% 9% 

5438 12V. 4*6 7 — 3%— 333 

416814*6 11*6 14 + 164+ 13.1 
412 36 32% 35 + 2W+ 7J 

2458 34% 16 19W— 2%— 114 

8950 19% 11% 12% — 3 - 194 
1885 14 8% 12*6+ M6+ 41D 

89662 2ti % 4- 1K+— 71.9 

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4487 8*4 4W 5 — 2*4- 3Sl 5 
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6607 24 % 22 24%+ *e+ 14 

1608 3% 214 2*4 

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5332 28% 18 25*4+ 7%+ 41.1 

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S4928 18 Z% 6%— 8*6— 574 
22906 18% >0 16%+ 8% +025 

34005 2% «4 1%— IV- 454 

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2671 5W 2*4 2*4- 3 — 554 

3548 9% 6% 814+2%+MD 

6491 19% 13% 19%+ 6 + 44.4 
42772 11*4 8% 11% 

7794 5% 3% 3 ’ll — 1*4— 294 
2076 9% 5*4 5% — 3*6— 40D 

1783 3% 1*6 2% 

18304 15*6 S *%— 9%— 58D 

115646 3*6 % ’(4— 2% — 764 

8690 10*6 2% 3*4- 6*4— 663 
11189 B*4 5% 5U 

4662 13*6 8% 11%— 2% — 164 
2780 6 2% 3 V. — 2*6— 4SB 


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19*4 11*6 FullPD D 
5 mFOmet 
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214 5% 
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7177 10% 
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17417 7% 
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3561 1716 
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3784 4% 


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216 3*4— 194— 37D 
6% d% 

2% 3 - 16-17J 
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1116 12*4— 4%— 267 
19k 4 — 44- 1X5 
4% 5 — 1W— 20D 


20% 1 S mEZ ’wH *ij 

51961 ltW *4 — — 3X2 

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7015 916 7*e 9%— *4- 62 
10723 6% 2*6 2% 

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3K! S1B+ w+ SJ0 

2326 5% 4 4 — %— 11.1 

79X 19% 13’A 16% — 2 — 1DD 
14481 8 5% 61k 

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IJ72 9 5 5*4— Hfc— 250 

1468 6 5V. 5% 

6706 19% 9 low— 9W— 47D 
12473 7*6 1% 2 Vo — 4%— <46 
1599 5*6 21k 2*4—2%— 45D 
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57030 20*4 10% 1114— 4*4— 2S5 
51352 13W B 8*4— 2*6— Z5J 
8390 1! 2*6 3 — 716- 72.1 

11» 12 4*6 6*6 — +W— 43D 

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10433 49k IV4 l%— 1*4— 47D 
2830 14% II 11*6— 2W- 194 
2549 29% 32 V — %— 17 
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60161 14 5*6 6%— 5*6— 46.9 

11981 7% 4 4 

3387 27 15*6 26*4 + 9 + 522 

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2610 9*4 6V4 8*6+ 1*4+ 15J 

54 19 12 12 — 3*6— 230 

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4625 9% 5% 4*4+ *4+ 6J 

33507 29 19*6 28%+ 8*6+ 44D 

2013 10*6 7% 8 

27864 16% 11 1216 

8446 1316 2% 2*6—11 — B3D 
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14625 4*6 1*4 3*6 — *6— 18D 
6740 10W 8*6 916 
7120 3% 116 216+ 1 + 800 
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7 4 *k Nobels 44 

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2%+ 14J 
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November 19, 1984 


This advertisement appears as a matter of record only 



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21*6 17 


CREDIT D’EQUIPEMENT 

DES PETITES ET MOYENNES ENTREPRISES 

US Dollar 100,000,000 
12 1/4 % NOTES DUE NOVEMBER 21, 1991 


guaranteed by the Republic of France 


Issue Price: 100 % 


Issue Date: November 21, 1984 


Payable as to 10 per cent, on and for value November 21, 1984 and a§ to the balance 
on and for value November 21, 1985. 


Soci 6 t 6 G 6 n 6 rale 


Algemeue Bank Nederland N.V. 

Banque Indosuez 

Caisse des Dtpdts et Consignations 
Samuel Montagu & Co. Limited 
Nomura International Limited 


Lehman Brothers International 

SheanoB Lehnaa/ American Express lac. 


BankAmerica Capital Markets Group 
Bayerische Vereinsbank Aktiengesellschaft 
Manufacturers Hanover Limited 
Morgan Grenfell & Co. Limited 


Orion Royal Bank Limited 


Salomon Brothers International Limited 











































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NASDAQ 

National 

Market 

1984 




















































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 1985 


Page 17 







.- u:yt» 

■- -Sib* 
■ ‘eu* 


* 


NASDAQ 
National 
Market 
1984 

■ 0W0*» #n*t * MM All other aoi« B 


B Month . 
Utah um Stack 


SIS. 


PE VC. 

(Continued from Page 

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OTC Stocks 
1984 Prices 


«/ 


17 Month 
High Lai* Stock 


Sis. Pd. 

yid PE Voi. Hitfi Law dose CtiXie Oi'ge 


(Continued from Page 15 ) 




“ r *f 2 






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5K. Pd 

Y* PE VoL Htjh Lav, Close Ch-ge Ctvue 


2 H 1% TrltonG 
32 nWTrolMJ 
2517 17* TraN Y * 
8* 4%TurlPpr 
27 IS TurnrB 


266113 29V lb t* 

4124 32 23* 32 + 8* + 360 

1293 25* 19% 25 + J + T16 
21897 8* 4* S*+ 1 + 5X9 

13376 27 IS 17*— 6 b— 260 


4*6 

3WUCI 



7b uci un 



1% UMC El 



8% USP Rl 



17b UST 

35 

F-’yj 

19V, UltrBcP 



10 Uniticp . 


trm 

12b Untoc pi 

1X6 

il** 

2WUnlll wt 



7 Unllrcs 



3 Unimed 



3 Unlmet 



25W UnBcps 



2SWUnNatl 


16b 

9% UnSpiC 



6 Unworn 






6 UBkSF 



7%UBkSa 



Sb UnBkri 


34b 

IVbUCorBC 



90 

50 

30 


5* 2b UCnBsh 
IS* 12b UCtvG* 

23 U Count 
14% 7%UFdBk 

33 14 UFIreCs 40 
4* n. u Hirer 

lb iKUnHmt _ 
53* 30 UnMICtl 3.1 
33W 27% t/MoBn 3.1 
42 37* UnBkNj X9 

12b 7%unMMex 16 
10 7 UnOkla 30 

12* 12 UnSvMa 20 
7% 2* US Em- 
13* 9 US Htttll 
10 4%USMed 
7b 2% US Mull 100 
(6% 12% US Play 
5* 5 USPIwt 
57 44 USSugr 

8* 3b US Voc 
«% 4% UTelct 
12* 9% UnTcte .. 
IS* 13 UnVtBn 4.9 

34 39 UVaBk Di 80 

13* 7* unvDev 0 

7 * u Money 

9* 6* UHVT1A . 

7 3b UnRighl 10 
18 14*UpPanP 110 
23% IB UtnhBc 40 


2257 4* 3* 3* 

7935 10 7b 8* 

1119 6 1* 1*— 3H— 690 

5099 12 8% 12 + 3b + 37.1 

3445 26* 17% 26*+ 3* + 1S0 
2565 26% 19* 26%+ S%+ 270 
2304 16% TO 12—3—200 
5477 19 12b 14* 

594515% 2* 2*— 11 %— 8X5 
18409 15% 4*15% 

21780 19* 3 4*— 8b— 6X5 

7T20 1I 3 5 — 4 —440 

26X37 25* 37 +11*+ 440 

4099 X 25* » +10 +350 
7154 lftb •% 9b— 6 — XI 
20640 11b 6 9* 

Tit** 2B% 19* 28% + 7%+ 36.9 
4034 II 6 6*— 2b— 25.7 

4943 13% 7% 10*+ %+ 90 

7047 13 8% 12% 

5420 24b 20 24b+l*+ *0 

68546 5* 2% 2*— 1 — 270 
4174 15* 12% 15b + 2*+ 190 
856 X* X 28b+3b+UD 
22740 14% 7% 14 +4b+Ht6 
460 32 14 16*— 15*— 4#4 

jtKJB lb ft %— 170 

3780 53* 30 53*+18*+540 

213733b 27% 32%+ 4*+ 160 
336 42 37* 42 +4 + 105 

817212b 7% 9*+ !%+ Z20 

2£95 10 7 Trt— 2 — 21.1 

IS 13* 12 13 

18315 7% 2* 5*+ 1*+ 380 

2391 12* 9 9*— 2 — 170 

13329 10 4% 4% 

10347 7b 2% 3 — J*— 530 

5010 16% 12% 14 — *— 3 A 
661 5* 5 5b 

226 57 44 49 — 8 — 1*0 

4310 B* 3b 3b— 4*— 57 A 
12216 9% 4% 5% — 2—250 

10197 12* 9% 10* 

328 IS* 13 IS* 

160 34 29 33*+ lb+ 3.9 

1200 13* 7* 12*+ %+ A* 
3947* 7 * 1*— S%— 7B2 

714 9* 6* 9 + *+ IS 

8396 7 3b J%— 2*— 400 

3649 IB 14* 17% 

6123 23% 18 23%+3%+IU 


io% 4* v Bona 
M* 7BiVaolRs 900 
79k »VocOTY 
X 19% VnllAsc 
16% T3%Vallen 
» 17 VolvBep 40 

6% 4%ValFfO 
X* 53* VINBCP 
23* lA'AValmnt 
7* 5* vattefc 
Il 5b VonShk 
0 SbVarfCr 
X* I2*Vorten 
7b » vowtp iki 
3* % VectAul 


10 

5.0 

XI 

0 

10 

0 

40 


2329110b 4* 9* 

119 M 9 14 * rt* aft- 250 
62SO 7* 3% 6 + %+ IO 
2061 28 19% 26V, + 3%+ 16.7 

1626 18% 13% 18%+3*+2U 

1750 27 17 2b 

2536 6% 4% 5*— %— 40 
1921 59* S3* 59* + 6 + IU 
5693 21* 16b 19*— 4 — I7J1 
11446 7* 5* 6*— *- 1.9 
3894 11 S% B%— 2b- 215 
2640 a 5h 6%+ *+ 1X9 
482820* lM 13 — 6 — 310 
10336 7b * 1% 
rb43 3* % 1 


12 Month 
High Low Stock 


Sis. _ Pd. 

Yld PE VOl. High Law Close QYge Ch'ae 


44* 76 Vclcra 
15* ** veioBa 
T3 7v?vrFedl 
27* 23 VtFnd 
16 13*VersaT 
3* 1% Vlcnm 
X* 20 VldBn 
17* IT* VkrtMkt 
14% 10 View Ms 
Bb 4%VaBech 
5b 3 VaFsl 
30 X vistaRs 
13* 4bVttram 
8b 5 Vortec 
17% 14b VuJtlan 
7 4% Wqust s 


■00 44* 26 3»b+7*+2X6 

58*15* 0* 14*+ 6 + 700 
5954 13 7W 10* 

109127* 23 26 + %+ 30 

3571614 13* TSb+ %+ 50 

5242 3* 1% 3 
3490 X* X 22% — 3 — 110 
49« 17* 11* 1 4b— 1*— 90 
10097 »4b 10 12% + I + BJ 

13243 8% 4% 6 — 1*— 2X0 
1593 5b 3 5 + 1*+ 290 

986 X TO 38 — l%— 59 
62S9 13* 4% 6*— 4b— 4X2 
5063 8b 5 7* + 2*+ 500 

24903 17% 14b 16* 

5970 7 4% 5*— 1*— 110 


W 


30 

0 

160 

X3 

40 

100 

11.1 

90 


16* 14%WOCOOl 14. 
18% 14* Wakfc 
13% 5* wlfcrT un 
29* IB* WamEI 20 
15* 7* WihSes 0 
Bb 4*warrsr*t 10 
14% (ViWbusPd 
15% 10% Waver 
10* 4* Waxmn 

9* e* wedstn 
17* lObWeigTr 
13% 10% Welsfd s 
23% ii* Welblts 
14* A'bWelkG 
12% 9* Wespac 
10% 8 WP3PC7 
*b 5* WctCiim 
17 MbWAmBC 40 
4* 3* WnCmct 
67 33%WDeep 7.1 
56* 2e*WHo« 100 
16b AbWrtWste 
7% 3% WMorE 2 2 
17 10* WStLf s 20 

12 9 WsKtear 20 

17 15% WsfBcp 

14 3*WstsBc 

10 9*WstwdGp 

51 43 Wevnbn U 

4* 2* Wharf 
5b 1* WheolC 
9% 7 Wiener 40 
6% 5* Wlland 
36 77 WllvJ A X6 

36 20 WllvJ B 30 

11 6% WllrWW 50 
7* 4* Wlllml 

44 31 WlmgTr 40 

10 3% Wilton 

5* 4% WtacRE 
31% 19 WsSGs 50 
6% 4 Wolotui XI 
11% BbWofvTs 20 
10b SWWrlghtW 19 
7* 5% Wvse 


10 T6* 14* 14* 

13661 18b 14* lBb ♦ 3%+ 210 
214613b 5*12*+ *+ 40 
10447 29* 18* 29%+ 5%+ 214 
8241 15* 7* 14b + 5%+ 670 
3836 8b 4* 6* 

6243 14% Bb *%— 6 — 40.7 
2219 15% 10% Ub— 2 — 1X1 
68*2 10* 4* 10*+ 6% + I5DJI 
5652 »* 6* 7% — !%— 20J 
2400 17* 10% 13b— 4*— 250 
1141 13% 10% 11 — 7b — 200 
3511 23% 11* 20 + 7%+ 610 
32366 U* 4* 7*— 4*— 39 0 
12207 12% 9* 9b— %— 7.1 
5537 10b 8 8*— 1*- ISO 

3749 9% 5* 7 
4649 17 14b 16 +1 +60 

1873 4* 3* 3* 

43317 67 33% 34W— 17%— 340 

25679 56* 26* 28b— 14 — 33.1 
10980 14% 6% 7*— 7b— 690 
3665 7% 3% <%— 2% — 319 
1307 17 10* 13 — *— 17 

5505 12 9 9 — 2%— 2X4 

775 17 15* 17 

95S6 U 3* 3b— 6%— 64J 
62 1 0 9* 10 

5209 43 C +3 + 60 

72287 4* 21k 7% + *+ 40 
W30 5% 1% 2 — 2*— 550 
71U 9% 7 9* — %— 2J 

7897 6% 5* 5% 

5B23 36 27 30*— 3* — 1BJ 

875 36 28 31 - 4 — 110 

•UI1 6% 10 + lb + 48.1 
5433 7% 4* 7*+lb+20JJ 
7819 44 31 44 +12* + 390 

13716 10 3% 4 

2126 5% 4% S*+ *+ 100 
817 31% 19 29 +9 + 450 

18181 6% 4 5Vk— %~ 100 
5631 11% 8% 9 — 2%— 230 

7907 10% 8* 9%— 1 — 90 

23801 7* 5% 7 


1 * l 

15W 11%XldMog 

1S80S 15W 11% 14% 

1 

lb 6% YBaarg 

4S2S |% 6% 8W — b — X* 

lib 9 YorhFd 10 

317311b 9 10W 

1 » - 


15V, 

17% 

14 


9%ZenHh 
7% Zycod 
7 Z-w 


U 


1448315% 
59357 17% 
577? 14 


9% 14b— b— 1.7 
7% 10% 

7 7 — 7 — 5Q9 


y $ 


licralbSShbunc 

r *ibd«4iLbi+r— iiLi.h, p— 




Mutual 

Fund 

Prices 

1984 


17 Month 
High Low Stock 


Pd. 

High low Close Ch'ae ovpe 


AflT Family; 

1103 905 Emery 
1206 1US grwtmnc 
11.75 1001 seclnc 
1502 1208 UttUnem 

3204 2600 AcernFdn 
2107 1706 ADV Fund n 
1604 1003 AtutureFd n 
AIM Fanes: 

1303 10.94 CortvYld 
*05 7.17 Greonway 
1X46 907 HI Yield 
503 404 Sum! I 

1100 902 Inti 

906 803 Mortg 
_2I02 1<78 Tech 

2609 1809 AlnhaFnd 
Amer Capitol: 

4.97 6.17 CpfpBd 
15.00 1X05 Cnmsttc 

1201 903 Enterp 

4709 4X30 EkdlFdn 
1X19 1X76 FundAm 
11.95 1108 GavtSeC 
30 18 2X79 Growth n 
1601 1 1X9 Haraor 
1X14 8.96 HlYWInv 
1760 1602 MunlBend 
1005 X24 OTC 

21.14 17J9 ran Fed 
5.93 <43 Prevldni 
1504 1201 Venture 

1106 806 AmBolpn 
806 7 32 AmcnpFd 
15JH 1X97 AmMutt 
1X72 1104 BondFfl 
1422 1X57 Eupcc 
1152 906 Fundmirrvs 
1197 1I.M Growth Fd 
10 JO 903 incomeFd 
1109 900 InvCOA 

14 JJ 1XQB MewEcen 

803 7.15 NewPerspFd 

907 803 TdAExpt 
■0JI X1S WehMut 

9.19 7.18 AmGwttl 
373 Z65 Am Her Keen 

904 604 Am invest n 
10.90 EAOAmlnvincn 
to ts #609 Am medAsc n 
<85 302 Am NatGiih 

1904 1602 Am Nattnco 
604 507 ArmravMutl 

144JT2 12904 Analytic n 
■05 602 Armsing n 

Axe Haag Mon: 

909 (L50 Fund B 

4j 56 300 incomFd 
709 5.77 StockFd 

104 100 Bondn 
900 9.1 1 Enterp 
1306 1X43 Gwfhn 

1108 9.79 UMB Stock n 
1X39 9JJ7 UMB Bd n 

1905 1340 BLC GthFd 
16.44 1X79 BLC Inca 
1«7 1X71 BeoamGffin 
1701 l<90 BeocanHUI n 

Rintinm AtJliel ■ 

■ ■UkllHIUI b l 6K »ip« ■ 

905 X97 CalTFIn 

903 9.13 CalTFIn h 
1X41 906 Cat, TNT n 

1801 1X06 100 Fund n 
1187 1X70 101 Fund n 

2801 2113 CaoAprn 
1X72 908 Mgdlnn 
1X74 1X78 SnGth n 

1X48 1X02 Basi Found 

205 203 Bawsern 
10707 6200 BruceFdn 
Bull BearGe: 

1602 1103 CopGthn 
11 J1 907 Eouifl n 
14.12 901 GoJcondan 
1407 1X23 HI Vie Id n 

1804 1521 Faulty n 
15.18 1100 I neon 
1709 1504 Social n 
1004 1X16 TxFtt n 
1501 1155 TxFLiwn 

1X81 609 AoaresGm 
1X79 1X10 BullOCltFd 
X92 127 Canadian 

302 203 DtvktSh 

1103 1006 HllncoShr 

1109 900 Monlhlylncm 
1X96 9.90 NatnWde 
9.79 806 TakFree 

1107 1X71 Capplello 
lint 1X59 Cardinal 
1401 1000 CenlryShr n 
2000 5.44 ChartnrFd n 
1101 9J>? ChosdeDoJlrn 
4X18 41.79 CtiednutStn 
CIGNA Fends: 

1504 1101 Growth 
9.95 8.90 HIYId 
X9I 606 income 
7.17 651 MunIBd 

1600 11.93 CppApt 
4709 44JM CorpCsh 
1407 1202 Fund 

1104 IXttGvISec 

1DJ0 807 GrwthShry 
701 6 .73 High Yield 

6.97 6.16 Income 
903 702 Oof Inc 
1106 1101 Opllnll 
13.71 11.49 TaiEkpl 

1X39 1103 Fixed n 
2600 1X76 Grthn 
Muni 


1103 905 1X86— .13— 

1X86 1102 1X48+ 01 + 

1105 IQJJ1 1102— 03— 

1X82 1208 1500+ 203+ 170 


3334 2600 3X89— .93— 
2107 1706 1902— 102— ._ 
1604 1&43 1108 — 401—300 


1306 1X94 1178— XI 2 — 150 
9^5 1.17 7 JO— 401- 370 
1X46 947 941— 03— 70 

543 <54 MB— 09- 70 

1100 902 1003— 104— 1X5 
906 XS3 944+ 04+ 4 

2242 1408 1642— <92- 22.9 

2699 1X69 1909— 6JB— 234 

697 XU 603 — 04— 30 
1500 12JH 1X96— 1.72— 110 
1184 943 11.17- 404- 2X0 
4749 4X30 44.1 B— 141— 19 
1X19 1X76 1X99— 379— 260 
11.95 1148 11.90+ 04+ XI 
30.18 2X79 23.11— 607— 910 
1691 11-29 12.10— 402— 360 
1X14 X96 900— 1 

1740 1603 1709+ .16 + 


1X35 

X34 


1 


21.14 

17.99 

I8J8— 

138- 

ft 3 

5,93 

*43 

*59 — 

124— 210 

154* 

1X91 

1309— 

132- IT* 

1106 

X96 




086 

7 32 

<27— 

*7— 







1237 

11*4 




1*22 

1X57 

1X83 + 

.10+ 

3 

1X53 

9.96 

11.94 — 

03— 

1.9 

1X97 

11.14 

12*1 — 

1.17— 


1X70 

903 

1X70 + 

01 + 

70 

11*9 

900 

1100— 

06— 


1*33 

1300 


00 + 


843 

7.15 

736— 

.91— 


*47 

<93 

940 + 

04 + 

* 






*.19 

7.18 

7*3 — 


150 

173 

245 

223 — 

01— 

250 

904 

<54 

<83— 

1.97— 22* 

1X90 

IA 

<54— 

209— 

19.7 

3X28 


2942 + 

33 + 

5 


<85 142 308— 1.11— 230 
1904 >692 >707— 103— 9a 
604 5JT7 545— 49— XI 
1440212*44 14313 + 4JB+ 30 
X7S 642 663— 146— 217 


949 

<66 

709 


X50 

390 

507 


940— .15— 10 
<63+ .13+ 27 
645— 7.17— 51.1 

01 + 


104 140 100 + 01+ 0 

900 9.11 900— 02— 70 
1X96 1X43 1149— 141— 130 
1148 9.79 1100— .14— 10 
1009 947 1007 + 08+ XI 

1905 1360 1545— Z94— 157 
1644 1209 1406— 109— 110 
I <67 1201 1<19 — 08— 1.9 
1701 14.90 1742+ 44+ 34 


975 

903 

1X41 


X97 940— 
9.13 950 — 
9.76 1X40 + 


1X21 1X06 1341—349— 2X0 
1107 1X70 1347— 41— <5 

2801 3X13 2191— 201— 

1X72 948 KL6Q 
1X74 M08 1547— IIS— 12.1 

1168 1X02 1340 + 00+ 61 

27S X53 245 — 45— 154 
10747 6X4010X79—0577— 5X5 


1X22 1143 1X80— 307 — 190 
1103 977 1X93— 00— 14 
14.12 903 943— 301 — 260 
1407 1303 1106— .91— 60 


1046 1501 1600— 14*— 
l&ll 1X00 1X12+ 41 + 
1709 1504 1701 + 01 + 
1044 1X16 1003 + 45+ 
1501 1345 1400— 04— 


1041 669 7JB— 340— 3X6 

1X79 l&ID 1546— 147— 95 
072 707 740— 1-D6— 120 

332 241 X97- 03- 70 
1143 1X36 10.78— 72— 7.9 
1109 948 1100 + 04+ 20 
1X96 9.90 1071 + 48+ 44 
909 846 940— 04— 4 

1367 909 11413+1.03+1X3 
>306 >059 »JM— 47— SJ 
1401 1X80 1482 + 40+ 39 

603 144 <10— 00- 54 
1101 901 976— 45- 7.9 
4X18 41.79 4640— 1.13 — 24 

1544 1141 1242— 251— 164 
9.95 698 943— 41— 40 
691 606 604— 04— 4 

7.17 641 649— .11- 14 

1640 11.93 1X58— 254- 154 
<740 44JU 4702 + 00+4 
1407 1X82 KIT + .16+ 1.1 
1134 >045 1>09 — 31— 67 
1X80 X57 941— -BO- 70 

751 603 707— 06— 35 
697 616 648— .11— 14 
903 742 804— 106— 114 
1146 1101 1147+ 03+ J 
1X71 11.49 1142— 41 — <1 

1209 1101 1X14— JIT — 4 

2680 1006 7143— 393— 154 


140 

1.94 


101 ComwtttiAXB 
1.71 Comwtth C8.D 


105 

101 


140— 01— 
1.92— 05- 


Composlte Group; 


1X45 

801 BXSn 

10*5 

<01 

*08— .94— 

90 ! 

946 


11.14 

902 Fund n 

11.14 

932 

936 — 104- 1X3 

10.92 


<63 

556 To* IT 

642 

506 

607— JOT— 

1.1 

945 

604 Otvrt GDI 

— 






308 


K59 

3*76 CnncordFd n 

5*59 

3*7* 2500 + .1*+ 

0 

9*1 

9.12 TaxFr 

2X60 

1*70 CongteiIGto n 

2X40 

X7B 

1605— 4£5— 210 

903 


709 

547 CorrlMutlnv n 

709 

647 

503— 107— 170 

9J1 

705 VptuAnpr 

701 

£99 Copley Tl 

701 

£W 

701 + 1*5+ 230 

— 

49.94 

4504 CorpCsh 

4904 

4504 4501 — £87— 

£9 

9*2 


17.10 

1X91 CounlryCapGr 

17.10 

1X91 

15.15— 1.47— 

LB 


Criterion Fundi: 





1403 


9*9 

&27 Comrceinc 

9*9 

837 


.1 


700 Income 

904 

8*7 invOual 

904 

8*7 

903+ .10 + 

10 

700 

<08 Municipal 

X93 

7.17 PltotFund 

X55 

7.17 

£20— <78— 360 

— 


901 

X73 OuaTT* 

901 

£73 

907— JD — 

0 

1007 

9.18 MFI 

1408 

1X74 Sunbli 

1408 

1X74 

1*35— .14- 

10 

1X06 

947 MFG 

— 






11.92 

1008 MIT 


17106 14402 14**6—1707— 

106 

1209 

904 MIG 



10X33 

9*44101.10+ 06 + 

* 

809 

709 MID 

Dean 

1X31 

Witter: 

903 ColTaxFr 

1001 

903 

1001 + 01 + 

XI 

1X85 

1445 

1X69 

1301 

939 

701 

1X09 

XT5 

*06 MCD 
1102 MEG 
1X04 MFD 
1107 MFB 
843 MMB 
<46 MFH 
906 MMH 
<17 M$F 



9*6 

735 

70S— 10*- 17* 

1102 

1102 DlwGthn 

1X02 

1102 

1203+ *3+ 

3* 

14X1 

1X47 H1YW 

U03 

12*7 

1235— 109- 

73 

1145 

X93 IndVal r n 

11£S 

8-93 

1X06— 20»- 190 

X19 

606 NtIRscn 

XI9 

606 

<70— 1.16— 

140 

1X20 

9.46 SeorsTE n 

1000 

9*8 

1X14+ 03+ 

0 

1001 

1X49 

9.1S ToeEe 
1000 USGvt n 
904 WrldWn 

1001 

104* 

1040 

1000 

*04 

900— J»— 
10*7+ *T+ 
909— *1— 

<7 

40 

3449 

3X17 

KV7 Mathers n 
2101 Mesdtrtn 


948 XM DMCTk 
1509 1X99 Decpturlnc 
2X06 1644 Detowre 

7.95 6JW Delchsir 
695 647 Tax Free Pa 
14.12 1041 Delta Trend 

1147 902 DepstCapn 
1649 K14 DepsITrn 
946 874 DepctCurlnc 
1.11 01 Dirracapn 

2503 2100 DG Olvn 
23JA 2349 DadgCokh 
2S46 2107 DodgCaxSIkn 
1703 1540 OrexiBurnhn 
Dreyfus Grp: 

1302 1141 A Bonds n 

1183 1243 ColTxn 
15.94 1903 Drevtus 
1X61 1144 Inltnnn 
1741 K74 Leverage 
1203 944 GwttlOn 

1345 1X05 NY Tar n 
7.91 590 Sod Inc n 

1109 1007 TaxEjunpt n 
705 548 ThlrdCntrvn 

7.96 607 EagleGthSh* 
Eaten Vance: 

707 649 EH Batoned 
TXZJ 1043 EH Stock 
1240 1X19 GvtOSIg 
6.99 542 Growth 

445 40J HI Yield 
X97 770 IncBM 

840 703 Invest 
1941 1561 SaecEatv 
1509 1242 Tnx M pd 
1X27 1020 VS Spec! 

11.72 80* Chemical 
1X99 949 EnovRet 
1508 1141 Surveyor 

1X47 K81 EmoBId 

2X47 1X64 EngvUtll n 
<548 2606 Everamnr 
1X14 1127 EvrsTlin 
FPA Funds: 

11.98 X10 COPlt 
843 747 New Inc n 

1347 1X08 Pormni 
1626 1171 Perenn 

1«4 1X09 FarmBuroGtn 
F e d e ra t e d Fund*: 

1145 947 Am Leaders 
I0J7 1026 CorpCcsh 
3509 3X68 EschFd n 
9JB 907 Fdlntr n 
1X71 9S5 GNMA n 

1X11 1X« Hi Inanse 
1X41 905 lt«en 
10.17 929 snort n 
1001 1022 ShlntGtrt 
1607 1X72 SteckTrn 
909 821 To* Free 
848 7.70 USGvfSec 

607 604 CorpBdn 
3.-11 47.19 Congressn 
1X16 842 Carrtratnd n 
1X70 *48 Destiny n 
21.05 1603 Discover n 
27.11 2048 Eautlncm 
4406 3829 E+cfiFdn 
3046 1115 Fidelity n 

1303 1061 Fredrnn 

907 X57 GovtSecn 
*.l? 846 HIIncoFd il 
1144 1X14 High Yield n 
808 745 Ltd Muni n 

3X93 2826 MooeHon 

691 <16 MunlBond n 
ML! 5 XS6 MttnT* 

114? 1009 Mercury 
I22e 1X79 Puritan n 
Has 10.76 SelDetAar 
1044 908 SelErov 
19.96 1541 SPIFncl 
1803 1694 5erHllti 
1612 943 SelMell 
7629 1740 SelTedi 
17.33 1X75 SeiUHi 
1159 *55 SoeeSH 

946 B74 Thrill n 

3951 » j? Trend n 


948 X89 948 + 03+ 0 

1X89 1199 1404 — 43— 34 
2006 1644 1847— 1+0— 70 
702 690 707— AO— 11 
695 647 683+ 47+ 10 
1141 1041 1007 — 209— 214 

1147 922 1X7?— jW— 4 
1609 1<T4 15L77— 43— 20 
906 X94 906 + 05+ 5 

1.11 01 05— 02— 290 

2503 2UM 3503 + 145+ 7.1 
22M 23.49 36*1— 1^2— S3 
3656 21J7 2445+ 06+ 0 

1703 1500 1747+ .19+ 1.1 

1302 1101 1X16— 41— .1 

1303 1242 1300— .16— 10 
1X94 1X73 1X45 — 205- 190 
1X61 1X84 1208— .V— 1.1 
174! X74 1604— 01— 10 
12JO 9SU 908— 207 — 2X3 
1U5 1205 13.14— .16— 1.1 

741 690 7.0— JO— <» 

1109 1X37 TX95 — .12- U 
705 55B 609— .71— 100 

7.9* AST 607— 03 — 104 

7.77 *0* 703— .90— 110 
1X33 1X43 1X14— 106 — 1X1 
1X50 1X19 1X22+ 46+ 40 
699 502 610— 0?- 104 
405 423 <84+ J»+ 10 
EL97 7.90 B07 + 00 + 20 
X50 703 7.99— 09- 40 
1901 1541 1809— <61— 1*4 
1509 1242 1509 + 209+ 150 

1527 TX20 1100- X8Z— 2S0 

1102 X39 9.18— 200- 2X0 
1X9* 909 1X39— 1.10— 9* 
1548 1141 120?— 202- 190 

1X47 KB1 1506 + 107+ 75 
2X47 1X64 2242+ 1.93 + 94 
4548 3506 3904— 508- 110 
1614 1127 15-52 — 08— 24 

1108 XI0 9.17— 257- 2U 
XSJ 747 X50+ 34+ <2 
1107 1X08 1307 + 03 + 3 

1636 1X71 1409 + 206+ 173 

1444 1209 1196— 1.14— 80 

1145 947 1X88- 47- X7 
11107 1036 1037 
3509 3048 3X94 + 37+ I 
900 907 MS- 0S— M 
1CL7T 90S 1X66 + .17+ 14 
1X11 1X92 11-56— 07— 3.1 
1041 905 1038 + .13+ 13 
1X17 909 1X15+ J«+ 4 

1001 1X2? 1X28 

1637 1X79 1604 + 105+ 93 

909 031 803+ 104+ 260 

BJB 7.70 844+ 01+ .1 

677 604 *2— X— 1-1 
5X41 47.19 5337- 34- 14 
1X16 867 9J7 — 2-96 — 2X3 
1330 908 1145— 1.73— 1X1 
2105 1633 1X17— 226- 11.1 
27.18 2048 23.95— 258- 9.7 
406 3X59 4821 + 09+ 3 
2046 1115 102- 507— 2X5 
1303 1041 T2S2 — JS- A 
931 157 906— 04— A 
9.1? 806 809— 01— 15 
1 1-54 1X14 11.18— 03- 0 

108 745 X19 + .12+ 1-5 
3X93 2836 JM9- 30*- U 
691 616 670— 02 — 0 

IX 15 806 938— .17- 13 
1342 1X39 1210— 101— 70 
1X26 10J9 1157— 47— 65 
1105 1036 1141 + 141+ 14.1 
1X*4 908 903+ .10+ 10 
19.96 1501 19.96 + X91+ 17.1 
1803 1494 1706— 04- 20 
1612 943 90S— 336— 77 S 
2 609 1740 2007— 403- 170 
1702 13.75 1703+ 176+ 1X9 

IIJ9 946 1009 + 08+ 88 
*46 174 901 + .10+ 10 
J90I 32.42 3606- 149- 44 


H Month 
Htan Low Stock 


Mloti low Ckse 


1X34 1X1? FlduCapn 
FbMBctal Prog: 

604 503 Bondn 
933 604 Dynamics n 
U.79 123b FnciTxn 
<53 1M Industrln 
900 7.17 income n 
833 607 WrtdTc 
1<13 1107 BendAapK 
1X95 1X1? Discovery 
1148 11.12 Govt 
11.16 613 Growth 
655 169 Income 
1684 1231 IntlSec 
749 <19 NatRnse 
1444 1X77 90-10 
£92 408 Option 
U? 033 Tax Eumpt 
1234 1X12 FtokFan 
683 148 44 Wall gq 

1304 405 44 Wall St n 
£28 407 FndatnGrwth 
Founders Group: 

744 £93 Grwthn 
KS3 UP ineamn 
1X93 900 Mutual n 
2XC5 2X09 Sued n 
30S 306 AGE Fund 
9J5 DNTC 
933 FMTO+Fr 
103 Gold 


2?- 

gagas 


1804 15.17 1668— i: 


£9 


604 503 
933 6M 

1*39 1X76 
<53 346 
*00 7.17 

ifflitz 

1X95 1X12 
1148 11.13 
11.16 6.13 

605 549 
1684 1231 

709 <19 
1444 1X77 
£92 <■ 
809 U3 
1X24 1X1? 
603 X4B 
1X24 405 
508 407 


10.97 

1009 

1X51 

1106 

1X14 

603 

<34 

2-04 

703 

<78 

648 


90S Growth 


NY Tga 
500 OpttonFd 
S.U Utilities 
108 income 5tk 
641 USGovfSoc 
404 RshEnuft 
60? ColTFr 
KB6 1407 FreeOGoMG 
1300 949 FflMSW 
1009 9.55 GIT HYldn 

1945 14.15 GTPodllCIt 
1X19 1X04 GatwvOPtnn 
Gen Elec tnv: 

1X7B 947 Eltunlncn 
2X31 2001 EltunTrn 

1101 902 EltunTxExn 
3446 2906 S&Sn 

1X94 9A4 S&S Long n 
1205 900 GenSecuritn 
3X73 31.93 GMitelErisn 
9109 67.70 GlnteiFdn 
803 734 GrdsnEm 
HL92 941 GrdsnEs 

1102 949 Growth Ind n 
1902 1501 GrdnPkAw 

5-8? 405 Horn HDA 
15.10 9.14 HorfweilGthn 

1603 906 HortwIICevr n 
1005 9JT7 Hemelnvsta 
2<7B 2006 Heroc Man n 
Hutton Group: 

1X92 903 Bona n r 

909 OJOCtrilf 
1100 9.17 Emryn r 
1X57 1101 Gwtnnr 
10,1a X57 Ootnlitc n 

ions «02 GevSecn 
1X11 9.01 Not) 

901 X97 NY Mun 

1605 1X32 IRiStk 
IDS Mutual; 

£95 £17 IDS Ag r 
X» 502 IDS Eat r 
£■>? S.10 IDS Inc r 

<85 4J5 IDS Band 
003 509 IDS Disc 
509 4-60 IDS E* 

1X33 1368 IDSGth 
<01 3.71 IDS HIYIekf 

907 703 IDS NewDhn 
7.16 £94 IDS Prggr 

11.18 1007 Mutual 
3-SI 301 IDS Tax Ex 
14.71 1401 Stock 
£01 7.19 Select 
692 VorUdjI 


764 

14-53 

1053 

2805 

305 

1X97 

1X09 

1X51 

1106 

1X14 

603 

604 

104 

703 

<78 

648 

1406 

1X00 

11109 

1955 

15.19 

1X78 

2X31 

1101 

3446 

1X94 

IZ05 

3802 

9109 

BS3 

1X92 

11.92 

1902 

£87 

15.10 

1603 

1005 

2408 


£93 

1341 

9JD 

2X09 

306 

90S 

9.73 

£03 

9,95 

939 

£80 

£14 

1.70 

641 

405 

602 

1407 

*09 

905 

14.15 

1304 

907 
2001 
*53 
2906 
9 64 
9J8 
31.92 
67 JO 
734 
*41 
9.49 
1601 
<85 
*.14 
956 
907 
2006 


622— 
671— 
1X95- 
<16— 
XI 6— 
7.13— 
1X16— 
HL46— 
1158 + 
626— 
£76— 
1X50— 
<31- 
1X93 — 
<96 — 
£ 00 — 
1048— 
< 02 - 
<42— 
<50— 

645— 
K14— 
*08— 
2340— 
306— 
f 02— 
1IU)9 + 
803— 
1105— 
900— 
617— 
604 + 

143 + 
7.10— 
<69— 
631 — 
1407 + 
904— 
1X09— 
1698— 
1402— 


43— 65 
241— 294 
.16- 14 
Jb- 50 
42— 9.1 
141— 175 
147— 1X3 
7.13— 405 
.45+ 44 
US- *4 
05 — 115 
246— 164 
134- 350 
IJ3— 90 
-8»— 15.1 
56— 0 

147—1X7 
X51 — 3X4 

101 — 290 
58- 1X1 


.15 


104— TZ5 
349— 140 

01— 55 
109- 155 

46+ 5 

137— 280 
04— 20 
. 12 — 10 

02- 1X4 
50+ 1X6 
53+ 15 
07- 15 

152 — 230 
41— 3 
51+ 35 
205—2X1 
.12— 10 
.91 — 5.1 


1X71 + 01 + 7.1 
2131— MO— 25 
949— 109— 115 
3405— 1.4*— 40 
1X94 + 56+ 5A 
1X46— 150— 1X5 
2<46— 291— 70 
7694-1206- 140 
850— 09- 30 
1051 + 00+ M 
1X29- 150- 7X0 
1X17— 103— 55 
350— 56— 95 
901 — 453— 115 
1056— <93 — 315 
1004+ 00+ 20 
2X06— 106— £5 


1X92 903 1048+ JC+ 3 
9J9 8S0 - 

1100 9.17 

1157 11.71 
1X16 857 
1005 9.32 
1X11 9.01 

9.91 177 


957+ JH+ .1 
*44— 148— 1£« 
1X05 — 202 — 1X4 
906— 43— 80 
1X01 + 51 + .1 

10.10+ 00+ XI 
941 + .19+ 24 


1605 1202 K41 — 1.14— 7J 


855 

653 

180 

IDAS 


£95 

559 

£92 

<85 

803 

549 

1X33 

<01 

908 

7.16 

11.18 

351 

1678 

£01 

855 


£17 £43 + 
£23 £59 + 
£10 503 + 

405 458 — 
5J* 601 — 
<60 <75— 
1X68 1400 — 
301 193 + 
703 754— 
£94 608— 
1X07 tlj» + 
301 353 
1401 1501 — 
7.19 756— 
692 756— 


53+ X6 
59+ 114 
03+ 66 
.18- 34 
147— 2X7 
05— £0 
304— 1X9 

jn+ 0 

151— 164 
J61 — 114 
42+ 3 

57- 35 
04— 10 
59- 85 


646 Growth 


948 TratShr 


744 

1602 


615 indust Fd n 
9.99 Int Invedors 
Imrst PorttoUe: 

958 £27 Equtt n 
853 852 Govt PI 
807 B0O HIYId n 
857 857 Option 

1158 806 invTrBas 
1306 1X9S HllncPIus 
1649 1305 Mas&TxFr 
504 <41 InvRtfi 
1£90 1X4? lytelFd n 
154* 1147 IvvGth n 
11104 9349 Ivylndlnvn 
1508 1Z27 JP Growth 
802 702 JP Income 
1X63 11537 JanusFundn 


653 606 621— .13- XI 
180 14 171+ D9+ 25 
1055 *48 1X50+ 03+ 20 

744 61$ 633— 150— 190 
1602 949 1005— X7D — 215 

958 107 &4S+ 05+ <1 

853 £52 X52+ JE+ 0 

X77 800 £66+ .16+ 15 

X57 857 857 + 47+ 4 


1158 

1X76 

1459 

504 

15.90 

1549 

11104 

1508 

X33 

1163 


806 955— 100- 1£1 
1X95 1X60— 01— 20 
1305 1404 + 45+ 0 

<41 <57— 56— 125 
1X42 1358— Xll— 1X4 
1147 1348— I AT— 105 
9X0*11X73 +1X73+ 1X7 
1X27 1X79— 1.16- 74 
702 804+ .17+ XI 

1147 1151— 103— 1X0 


1453 1X75 Bond 
1X47 1X71 Growth 
X66 745 US Govt 
951 855 TcnEwmp 

.14 .10 Kaufmann n 

Kemper Funds: 

1X37 1106 Calif 
X36 702 Income 
1346 1X90 Growth 
10.51 90s High Yield 

1611 1207 IntIFund 
X13 758 MunlcpBnd 
1X50 10,79 Option 
2502 2052 Summit 
1246 1045 Technology 
KQ5 1140 Tot Return 
X92 £26 USGvt 

!£*• 1340 invBdl n r 
1X67 1439 MdBtIB? n r 
£41 750 DlsBB4nr 

900 7AS incoKl n r 
750 559 Gwtnmnr 
2142 1702 HGCmSInr 
904 70S GthSSnr 
754 <53 LOPCS4 n r 
551 <31 inllnr 

2X36 1X32 KPMr 
740 7.13 TasFrnr 

1554 1403 KMrPear 
2100 1752 LegoMnson n 
2158 1444 LehmnCaon 
21.97 1£S* Lenmmnv n 
£63 £84 Leverage n 
Undnataa Ora: 

1X68 1053 CnrpLrodfr 
441 300 GOMtondn 

7 *4 A46 GNMA Inc n 
1051 6*1 Growth n 
2005 1X7# Reyear ch n 

2X59 7104 UndDv 
1*51 1750 Lfndnern 


1453 IX7S 1406+ 07+ X6 
1X87 1001 1X13— 106— 1X1 
856 755 861 + 01 + X5 
*51 855 *02+ 06+ 5 


.14 .10 .14— VI 


9X6 


1207 IIJ6 
006 702 
1X46 law 
1051 955 

1611 1207 
XI3 758 
1X50 1X79 
2542 2052 
1246 1X0$ 
144$ 1140 
X92 X2A 


1190 — 
X14— 
1102 — 
*47— 

ffli= 

1054— 

1X71— 

•03— 


.1? — 15 
.13— 15 
251— 17.7 
04— 30 
7-50 — 167 
JB+ 5 
101— 105 
237— 94 
216- 17.1 
.94- 69 
J*- 5 


1£*4 1340 1559- 
1147 1609 1742- 

K l 750 758- 
0 745 808- 
740 £49 61B- 
2142 1702 1850- 
904 705 756- 
754 <53 £00- 
551 *31 <54- 

2X36 120J 1247- 
748 7.13 757- 


.15- 

95— 


a 

47- 90 
1.19— 161 
204- 104 
148- 195 
212— 294 
01— 135 
'630—312 
49— 10 


iSoylcs: 


1858 144? Coo I to I n 
1953 K42 Mutual n 


1554 1403 1*94— 04 — 0 

3100 1742 2100+ 102+ 84 
2158 M44 1652— <77— 205 
2197 15-59 1741— 3JU— 17.9 
8-63 £44 670— 159— 190 

1248 1053 1152— 105- 104 
<61 300 £05 — 149— 260 
7.94 644 704+ JB+ 0 
1X41 691 7.98— 206— 2X1 

2005 13JB 1507— <45- 2X0 

0X99 2144 2X52+ .90+ <2 

1951 1750 1804 — 06— 15 

1X71 1442 1707— 744— 315 

1953 144? 1741— 141— 94 

946 XI9 898 — 53— 44 

T092 9.13 944— 44— 74 

945 6.74 7.15— 202— 245 

£08 Z77 X99+ 41+ 0 

*51 9.12 *51— .12— 10 

953 9.1B *57— 46— A 

9.71 705 944— 04- 34 

*52 Xll 851— 50— 75 

1*93 1X83 1421+ 51 * 23 

£62 7.80 £59+ 47+ 4 

700 638 643— .16— 20 


1007 9.18 
1X06 947 

11.92 1X08 
1X29 9.94 
£99 749 
1X85 906 
1445 1142 
1X48 1044 
1341 1157 
909 £43 
701 646 
1X09 946 
X15 617 


9J6- 
1X02 + 
TUB— 
1X32— 
853— 
1X11 — 
1X99— 
1057— 
1X74 + 
900 + 
670— 
944— 
670— 


58- 53 
- 02 + 0 

59— £1 

101— 140 
-29 — £3 

204— 184 
105— £8 
1-23 — 145 
JJ7+ 4 
.11+ 13 
58— 128 
J$— 34 

102— ISA 


3 <6* 1697 19.97— <10— 174 
2X17 2141 2X17 + 1.14+ £4 


MarrUt Lynch: 


14L77 

1X53 Basic Value 

1407 

1203 

1X3B — 

03— 

60 

2241 

16*1 Capital 

2241 

1641 

1903— 

100— 

SJ 

1103 

904 Equl Bond 

1103 

904 

1100 + 

.12+ 

10 


90 8 FedSeeTr 

949 

9JB 

944 + 

06+ 

20 


90S FdTomrn 

1008 

903 

1X90 + 

0B+ 

90 


7*2 Hlincom 


7*2 

702— 

08— 

40 

10*9 

900 HlOuaity 

1X49 

900 

1X44 + 

00+ 

£0 

9JB 

9.15 Inttild 

9.78 

9.15 

902— 


0 

1003 

908 inlTerm 

1003 

90S 

1052 + 

.15+ 

I * 

900 

940 LtdMat 

900 

948 

904— 

02— 

0 


8*7 Mur+HYId 

902 

8*7 

X96— 

05— 

4 

7.16 

6*4 Muni Insr 

7.16 

<44 

<88— 

09— 

10 

1643 

1X7S Pacmc 

1643 

1X7S 

15*8— 

5b— 

3* 

Vi 




1045— 



£27 ScITedt 

900 

£27 

80S— 

.73— 

74 

120* 

1X50 SoVal 

1209 

IXW 

11.10— 

105- 100 

639 

546 Mid Amer 

<79 

£66 

602— 

08 — 

80 

530 

*16 MWAmHlGr 

£20 

*16 

4*0 — 

41— 

120 

1X68 

907 MMwBBViH n 

1048 

907 

1X53 + 

05 + 

2* 

2147 

17.13 MSS Fund n 

2147 

17.12 

1900— 

£12— 100 

W.13 




1009 + 



1407 

946 Mutual Benefit 

1407 

906 

1107— 

206— 2X5 

Mutual of Omaha: 






Ip. 15 

9JJ0 Airyertcnn 

1X15 

900 

937 + 

JC + 

0 

W8 

<95 Growth 

£88 

<95 

M8 + 

02— 

£4 

803 


£51 

741 

05+ 

4 








1801 

1£91 MvftOualn 

1801 

1£91 

1605 + 
5X32 + 

04 + 


5501 

4901 Mvtl 5hrsn 

5541 

4901 

03 + 

1002 

701 Not AvIaTec n 

1002 

701 

901 — 

02— 

9.1 

1X49 

1081 Nttlndn 

1X49 

1001 

1104— 

109— 132 


Nat Securities: 

1445 lX4i Balanced 

£44 341 Bond 

1156 TCL49 CntTxE 
1100 I1J9 FedSeeTr 
9-64 757 Growth 

668 Preferred 
£15 Income 
702 stock 
746 Tor Eumpt 
£37 Tot Ret 
691 Foirfld 


700 

7.19 

953 

85* 

650 

950 


KBS 

354 

1156 

1100 

944 

708 

7.19 

951 

859 

640 

950 


1251 1342 + 

341 3-20 — 

>059 1141 — 
115* 1159— 
757 759— 

668 7.13 + 
61S 688— 
702 £84— 
746 £29 + 
507 £95— 
691 753— 


41+ 44 
.16— <4 
01— £9 
JIT— 4 
10*— 144 
41+ .1 

00- 18 
59- 50 
41+ .1 

05- £6 
156- 170 


1457 1142 NotTete 
Nattomrldp Fds: 

1008 £98 NatnFd 
£84 746 NIGWttl 
903 80S NtBpnd 

2X73 1643 Equity 
2458 1743 Growth 
1054 947 income 
2300 1S04 Renta Eat 
67b 621 TaxExmt 

1907 1693 Energy n 
3959 3353 Guardian n 
612 345 Liberty n 
662 £56 Mamaln 
1X1B 1X96 Partners it 

1JI9 142 NY Muni n 
&1Z 683 NY Venhir 
2X73 2X96 NewtonGthn 
851 741 Newton I nan n 

Nictates Grow: 

2653 2143 Nichoton 
11.79 1063 NIOi II n 
170 306 Nkhlncn 
11.77 1X33 NrestinTr n 
1156 740 NrestlnGfn 
1754 1109 NnvoFundn 
751 692 NuvetlMunn 

1306 9.10 OmegaFdn 
oppenbelmer Fd: 

2X11 1424 Aim 
2X83 1617 Direct 
744 617 EqlnC 

948 754 Owentuntd 
1X3* 650 Gold 
1X93 1657 High Yield 
2457 ZDL52 Premum 
1302 1X94 RSACV 
234* 1690 Special 
1946 1643 Target 
7.95 704 To* Free 
1407 11.17 Time 
1701 1348 OverCount Sc 
11,99 1144 PocHrzCal 
Paiee Webber: 

703 70S Atlas 
1309 ixoj Amor 
948 955 GNMA 


1447 1142 1147— 201— 117 

1028 £98 959+ 46+ S 
844 746 745— 01- 30 
903 80S 907 + .15+ 15 

2293 1603 1X68— £76— 164 
2638 1743 1903— 341— 165 
1054 957 1X45+ JB+ 4 
3X20 1X7* 1X21— 09— 190 
604 601 667 + 46+ 4 

1947 1643 1706— 45- 35 
3949 3343 3854+ .16+ 5 

<12 165 349- .17— 62 
642 £56 <66+ 04+ 14 
1£1» 1X94 1*85 + X»+ A 

149 142 147 
X12 <43 703— 43— 60 
2X73 2246 2*02- 174- 1X1 
X41 741 R 33+ .11+ 15 

2653 214 2584 
1109 1053 1109+156+ 1<I 
£78 136 365— 42— 4 

1147 100] 1109— .IX- 4 
1146 950 1105 — 42— 0 

1754 1109 1208— 657- 274 
751 648 701+ 43+ A 
1326 9.10 10JI— 1.91— 15.1 


2X11 

2243 

744 
948 
1009 
1893 
2657 

S3 

1746 

745 
1409 
1701 
11.9* 


104 1403— 
1617 1743— 
617 647- 
744 *00— 
650 663— 
1657 1681 — 
2042 3140— 
1X94 1109— 
1690 1944— 
K43 1£16— 
706 747 + 
11.17 1149— 
1348 1448 — 
1144 11.99— 


£17—264 
447-1X6 
45— 114 
145— 150 
266— 2X6 
143— 94 
IBS— 124 
452-2X0 
198— 170 
190— 704 
.10+ U 
HU— H6 
148— 110 
41- <1 


13 Month 
HU Low Stock 


HU low Ogee, 


Pet. 

QraeOVg 


949 


962 HfYld 
9,77 ImrGrd 
9.90 PexWMTdn 
740 PetnSqren 
$58 PennMutuoln 
1149 1002 PermPrtn 
903 756 Prrito Fund 


940 

1142 

946 

667 


1107 943 Baton Fd 
2050 KM CvFdSer 
1301 1141 Growth 
959 134 HI Yield 
1144 955 SteekFund 
1105 949 PCCaell 

656 545 MoanoCao 

£21 735 Manna Inc 

2X70 Z1.U PAR 
1330 1147 Pilgrim Fd 

_ 909 X27 Plow Bd 
2263 1743 PIpnrFund 
1643 130$ Ptanr II Inc 
1X19 11.91 Pionr III Inc 

1440 104* PWtiendn 


1X11 Grawthn 

1143 Gwthlncn 
S45 income n 

1144 intln 
I£14 NewEran 
1141 NawHpriznn 

<B9 5«T Bondn 
X17 Tax Free n 
449 <90 TxFrSI n 

936 940 PrinPresrv 
Pro Services: 

1X3* 7.70 MedTacn 
753 U3 Fund n 
803 748 tncpmen 


2544 2240 
1449 12L38 
1003 1X06 
1X00 903 

1006 907 
1340 1356 
1XM 9.94 
1342 1060 
1SJQ 1X64 
L5JH 1£83 
904 7.90 
110* 90S 


AdIPtdn 
Eaulty 
GUI nr 
GvtSc 

H (Yield 

HYMunl 

MuniNY 

MwDec 

Option 

Dually 

Rschnr 

Utility 


1504 

1X79 

1300 

4948 

4847 

1348 

2X10 

1500 

I3J2 

1647 

1604 

645 

1159 

1444 

1X51 

2X59 

1406 

2104 

1708 


114$ Convert 
1X74 Como 
557 Capital 

4£0i CCsArp 
45.73 CCs D ap 
948 lltfoSc 
1300 inti Eau 

944 George 
903 GraXinc 

13J2 Health 
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Page 18 



YOU WON, V WON 

.SIR* 71 WHAT?, 


INTERNATIONAL 


I JUST HEARD THAT YOUR 
E 5 W ON WHAT YOU 
PIP WRING CHRISTMAS 
VACATION WON THG'ALL- 
OTY SCHOOL ESSAY 



TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 1985 


YOU WROTE ABOUT 





PONT WIPE YOUR 
TEARS A WAY’ WITH 
YOUR PRENCH FRIES, SIR 



BLONDIE 


ACROSS 

1 Mexican food 
6 Exotic bird 

10 Injure 

14 Harden 

15 Manganese 
and malachite 

16 Curved 
molding 

17 Meditated, 
with ‘‘over" 

18 "Pop— —the 
weasel" 

19 Facts 

20 Mixture 

22 Deg. holder 

23 Weigh tin India 

24 Hammer 

20 Kitchen gadget 

30 Organize 

32 Dog that went 
toOz 

33 Notices 

35 Nocturnal 

lemur 

39 Displayed 

41 Matriculator 

43 Islamic 
spiritual 
center 

44 Impression 

46 Golden of 

the West Coast 

47 Sequence 

49 Trample 

51 Force 

54 Princely 
Italian house 


56 Sanction 

57 Mixture 

63 Roast: Fr. 

64 Gaelic 

65 Nigerian 
seaport 

66 Def. alliance 

67 So be It 

68 Quibble 

69 School an the 
Thames 

70 Ointment- 
yielding plant 

71 Not so 
common 


1 Apexes 

2 Puzzler’s 
favorite ox 

S Ringlet 

4 Utah city 

5 Collected 

6 V.I.P. 

7 Historical 
period 

8 Penury 

9 Help 

10 Mixture 

11 Henry 

Wallace 

12 Place a new 
label on 

13 Victor at 
Gettysburg 

21 Prickly 
evergreen 
shrub 


25 A knockout 

26 Goblet part 

27 World spinner 

28 Suffix with 
Ham or Shem 

29 Mixture 

31 Sum 

fui. . . 

34 One of the 
Adams es 
36 Harvest 
37"-—— each life 

38 British gun 
40 Reiner or 
Sagan 
42 Morsel 

45 Backstage 
employee 
48 Lower In 
dignity 

50 Bank 
employee 

51 Seine tributary 

52 Untersee craft 

53 Argument 

55 Lurch forward 
on heavy seas 
58"My 

Friend " 

59 Mount St. 
Helens 
production 

60 Thickening 
agent 

61 Protuberance 

62 Belgian canal 
connector 



wow, what . 

A BATTLE/ 


? AND SUCH A ^ 
GREAT ENDING 


I'LL HAVE TO STOP ■ 
READING IN THE TUB 



„ I KEEP FORGETTING 
' TO WASH 

l 


BEETLE BAILEY 


© ^ /eu> Tori Tones, edited by Eugene Maletka. 

DENNIS THE MENACE 


i?v? 


•lTfcTOO C0U3TDPUY OUTSIDE , SO MEAN' JOET 
ARE GONNA TALK ON THE PHONE TODAY. * 


THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME 
3 by Henri Amok) and Bob Lee- 


Unscramble these four Jumblos, 
one letter lo each square, to toon 
lour ortfinary words. 


SUMEA 


ALA FT 



hi A! 

hi A! 9 ^ 


5 V&L 

I OhM, 


y'KNOty FEET 
ARE REALLY 
FUNNY LOOKING 


ANDY CAPP 
R 

J > R3RA1 

\~ ( lAflTH/Usir 


CTCOVFFI FOPCXJT] 
• FORA DRINK < 
WITH ANDY, DEAR? 


f \tJU MIGHT 
AS WELL 
RDRAU-7HE 
> USEM3U -< 
\ ARE ABOUT 

l THE house: 


TAKE NO 
NOTICE, 

hOBfc* 

NOU IN A 
/MINUTE 


MARRIED UFE.EH? I 
y atone TIME 

A LOD COULDN'T ) 
UNDERSTAN [Wp «• 

7 HIS WIFE....r -S 




NOWADAYS ms HS WIFE, 
HOVtECCWPLITERS, VIDEO 
BAUDS , MtCR3WW/E OVEN 
, INSTRUCTIONS — 


VIZARD of ID 

VtiArMQOVAtt THE PE 4 S 4 Nts in P 


mom 

. AtiP 
Wewz 


WU4t£ 

tU4t 

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-vmz<zm*£>i(xx. 
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TQHAT0&& \QOf- 



REX MORGAN 


ASB&TWU I 
PALE DRIVES t 
tANZTUA ACtMF.r 

UESUDDEUiy L 
s&SACOmo-* 
T/QN NEAR JS 

HER HOUSE? Mk 


MAX7UA.CAN WU M AtiC 
OUTWWte HAPPENING 
DOWN THEJPE? IT IDO&. 
U&AfieMrOR^ 
.SOMETHING/ A/^ 


OKAY. WANDA- ASS 
IVES Of HIM/ \ 
LETS SEX art ) 
s,OFH0?E»' CT 


CLOSE ' 
THAT 
l I TOOR/j 


GARFIELD 

> WELL, THE HOLIDAYS ARE < 
[FINALLY OVER AND THE OL' 
[VWSTUNE HAS EXPLORED < 
S NEW VISTAS p 


PAV?& 




IT 6 TIME TO DECLARE ANOTHER 
NATIONAL FAT WEEK. WE 
SHALL TELL SKINNY JOKES 
i AND REVEL IN OUR FAT /" 


TM TALKING TO 
VOttCHUBBY 


BOOKS 


THE DARK BRAIN OF PIRANESI 
AND OTHER ESSAYS 

By Marguerite Yourcenar. Translated from 
the French bv Richard Howard. 232 pp. 
SI6.95. 

Farrar Straus & Giroux. 19 Union Square 
West. iVw York, .V. Y. 10003. 

WITH OPEN EYES: 

Conversations with Malthieu Galey 

By Marguerite Yourcenar. Translated from 
the French bv Arthur Goldhammer. 271 pp. 
S/9.95. 

Beacon Press. 25 Beacon Street* Boston. 
Mass. 02 JOS. 

Reviewed by John Gross 

M ARGUERITE Yourcenar is best known 
in the English-speaking world as a nov- 
elist. above all as the author of “Memoirs of 
Hadrian.** The seven essays gathered in “The 
Dark Brain of Piranesi" make it clear that she 
is also an outstanding critic. They are forceful, 
deeply pondered, the record of a full imagina- 
tive response. But to stress their creative quali- 
ty does not imply that they are capricious or 
loosely impressionistic. On the contrary, they 
proceed point by point, with notable lucidity; 
most of them could serve as introductions to 
the works they discuss. 

At leasL one of them, the essay on the Greek 
poet Constantine Cavafy, was designed as such 
an introduction. Originally written as a preface 
to Yourcenar s volume of translations From 
Cavafy, it sorts out his themes and divides his 
work into a number of readily grasped catego- 
ries. But it does so with a compelling elo- 
quence. and with wit. too. 

“Erotic concerns aside." Yourcenar writes, 
“Cavafy's poems resemble those Near Eastern 
cafes frequented only by men." On the other 
hand, “the undeniable monotony of erotic ex- 
pression" in his work no longer seems to her 
the defect it once did; she now sees it as “a 
warrant of authenticity in a domain where 
secret routines almost always prevaiL" This is 
criticism for grown-ups. but then so is every- 
thing else in the essay. 

In order lo bring a writer's qualities into 
sharper focus, she quite often resorts to an 
analogy with the visual arts. One Cavafy poem 
suggests an Ingres drawing, another a Mante- 
gna, just as elsewhere the “cold perspicacity” 
or the Roman historian Suetonius calls to mind 
the realism of Holbein, in lesser hands, this 


Solution to Friday's Puzzle 


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□cnnannnnnannQH 
EEE □□ana anoa 
QBHDaaaa anaana 
Baaa □□□□ 
□Banns aaQaanaa 
ciEHnaniiasHiiaaaa 
□one cnataaa aaaa 
EBHB BG1BB □□□□ 


kind of comparison could easily degenerate 
into a trick. But here, the parallels come nalu- 
rallv. with the same sureness of touch that she 
reveals in her discussion of Piranesi, where she 
moves into reverse and uses works of literature 
to illumine art — invoking Volutin: and SrnfL 
borrowing her title from Victor Hugo, showing 
what Coleridge and de Quincey made 0 r the 
Italian artist's work and what they distorted 
for their own Romantic purposes. 

‘The Dark Brain of Piranesi" is an essay 
that matches the somber poeuy of jis subjecL 
It is equally persuasive whether it is defining 
the dreamlike qualities of Piranesi's prison 
drawings or relating them to his engravings of 
the antiquities of Rome (one series dominated 
by the concept of space, the other by that of 
time), and it includes some memorable obser- 
vations on his visual effects — how he succeeds , - 
in convincing us. for instance, that the cavern- > 
ous prison hall in which we find ourselves “is 
hermetically sealed, even on the Face of the 
cube we never see because it is behind us." 

But Yourcenar also appraises the signifi- 
cance of Lhe prison universe in human terms. If 
God’s writ no longer runs, who has consigned 
the tiny phantoms Piranesi portrays to the 
“limited yet infinite world" of his drawings, his 
secular Inferno? “We cannot help thinking of 
our theories, our systems, our magnificent and 
futile mental constructions in whose comers 
some victim can always be found crouching." 

The subjects of the other essays in the book 
range from the lives of the later Roman emper- 
ors. as chronicled by the shadowy authors of 
the “Historia Augusta,” to the novels of Thom- 
as Mann. Mann is placed in a double tradition, 
part hermetic and part humanistic, to which 
many modem German writers have belonged, 
but he is admired for being closer to Goethe 
than his mystically inclined contemporaries, 
nearer the humanistic end of the spectrum. \ - 
Yourcenar finds less to esteem in the “His- 
toria Augusta.” The men who compiled the 
greater part of it (somewhere between the mid- 
dle of the second century and the end of the 
fourth) are dismissed as hacks — not sunns- 
ingly. the biography of Hadrian is singled out 
for particular complaint. And yet the book 
fascinates her. A “dreadful odor of humanity* 
rises from its pages, and she extracts an omi- 
nous lesson for our own time from its account 
of Rome's decline. 

A similar vein of pessimism runs through her 
conversations with the French literary critic 
Matthieu Galey. which took place over a num- 
ber of years at her home on Mount Desert 
Island, off the coast of Maine, -and which have 
now been translated under the title "With 
Open Eyes." Sometimes you feel that the 
gloom is overdone, or too facile, but no doubt 
she would retort that such a reaction is compla- 
cent. At any rate, her views are all of a piece — 
those of a liberal and a humanitarian who 
believes that "the social problem is more im- 
portant than the political problem.'* and whose 
deepest public concerns lend to be cultural and r 
ecological. 

It is not for such matters that most readers 
are likely to turn to these interviews, however, 
but for the light they throw on the author's 
personality and on her writing. And here they 
will not be disappointed. 

But the gossipy detail is less important than 
the feel mg of being brought into contact with a 
quite exceptional woman — someone who can 
be flinty and intimidating when serious issues 
are at stake, but who also goes a long way 
toward embodying her own ideal of “intelli- 
gent sympathy.” 

John Cross is on the staff of The Ne*> York 
Times. 


by Alan Truscort 

O N the diagrammed deal. 

South landed in four 
hearts when his opponents, in- 
hibited by the vulnerability, 
missed their chance for a cheap 
save in four spades. 

The opening spade lead was 
won with the ace, and South 
cashed the king and ace of dia- 
monds. 

He then played Lhe spade 
jack, discarding his remaining 
diamond. 

This neat loser-on- loser play 
guaranteed that he would be 


BRIDGE 

able to establish diamonds 
without allowing East to gain 
the lead for a club play. 

When West won with the 
spade queen, he led a trump, 
his only safe play. 

South won in dummy with 
the nine and ruffed a diamond 
with the trump ace. He then 
cashed the trump king and led 
to the ten. 

The two established dia- 
mond winners took care of two 
club losers, and South had 
made an overtrick where many 
would wind up with an under- 
trick. 


NORTH 

♦ jo 
aiOM 
0 A 10 9 S 3 
4732 


WEST 

• K Q 10 9 7 

?ssa 

0 74 
4 A q 5 


EAST 

• 83432 
O 7 

OQJ2 

* J 10 B 4 


SOUTH (D) 

* A 

O A K Q J 5 3 
O K83 
4X86 

East and West were vabaralde 
The WdtUag; 

Sooth Wort North East 

17 l* 2 o 2* 

Pass Pass pan 

Wert ted the spade king. 


HOARIM 


VURSCY 


WH/rr LIFE AT THAT 
SINGLES BAR WAS. 

Vi ----- 

Now ai range the aided Idlers to 
loim the surprise answer, as sop- 
gesied bv the above cartoon. 


Race to 


tar a 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Pfj*. I Jumble* POUCH FORTY EXHALE CELERY 
™ Kiy5 Answer What that skillful witch was— 

A "HEX-PERT’ 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


Athene 

Be res tana 

Brtsradc 

Berlin 

tweets 

Bucharest 

Budapest 

CenenhasM 

Costa Del Sot 

D«Mn 

Edtabarib 

Florence 

Frankfurt 

Geneva 

HeMnfel 

Istanbul 

LasPafeeas 


Mu 

Orta 

Paris 

Proase 

Reykjavik 

Rome 

Stockholm 

Strasbourg 

Venice 

Vienna 

Warsaw 

Zorich 


HIGH LOW 
C F C F 

It 43 T4 ST d 

-5 23 -13 9 sw 

17 03 11 52 O 

0 32 -2 28 a 

-ID 14 -11 12 SW 

•11 12 -U 9 h- 

-7 19 -11 12 d 

-0 21 -15 5 D 

-II 12 -13 9 cl 

•11 12 -12 10 sw 

IS 59 9 48 Cl 

4 39 -1 38 lr 

5 41 -1 30 a 

-2 28 -0 21 fr 

-ID 14 -10 3 sw 

-9 16 -10 U d 

-22 -8 -29 -90 d 
IS 59 11 52 a 

20 68 14 57 d 

7 45 5 41 a 

2 36 -S 23 SW 

5 41 4 39 D 

-3 26 -B IB fr 

-11 12 -20 <4 sw 

-11 12 -13 9 fr 

3 38 -2 28 fr 

-12 10 -13 9 fr 

4 23 -11 12 lr 

-11 12 41 4 SW 

1 34 -1 30 fe 

-1 30 -2 SB sw 

-14 7 -23 -10 Sw 

■9 16 -13 9 fr 

4 21 .10 14 fr 

4 16 -12 10 fr 

•16 3 -20 -4 fr 


Bel) lea 
Haas Kane 
Mamie 
Hew DeOri 


Singapore 

Taipei 

Tokyo 

AFRICA 

Alrters 
Cairo 
Cape Town 


HIGH LOW 
C F C F 

33 40 19 66 fr 

0 32 -9 48 fr 

17 63 15 59 o 

25 77 23 73 e 

13 55 9 48 to 

-1 30 4 18 lr 

7 45 2 36 fr 

27 It 25 77 Sh 

18 64 15 59 0 

6 43 -1 30 fr 


Cairo 19 66 8 46 to 

cap* Town 26 79 16 64 lr 

Caooblaaeo 16 61 12 54 o 

Harare 25 77 17 63 cf 

Urn 28 82 23 » o 

lialreW 23 73 12 54 fr 

Tunis 14 57 7 45 d 

LATIN AMERICA 

Buenos Aires 25 77 19 « a 

Lima 26 79 17 63 6 

Mexico City — — — — no 

Hade Janeiro 24 75 19 66 d 

SaePaalo — — — — na 

NORTH AMERICA 

aKMroM -10 14-15 5 to 

Atkanta 10 50 -1 30 fr 

Barton -2 28 -7 19 fr 

dueaaa 2 36 -7 19 ee 


Zorich -12 10 -19 -2 sw 

MIDDLE EAST 

Ankara 8 46 1 34 o 

Beirut 17 63 6 43 o 

Damascus U 57 -2 28 el 

jm-utatom 13 55 7 45 o 

TetAvhr 21 70 7 45 a 

OCEANIA 

Auckland 24 75 14 57 ir 

Sydney 22 72 14 57 d 


Detroit 

HoaoJala 

Houston 

Los Angeles 

Miami 

MktneapoMs 

Montre al 

Nassau 

new York 

San Frasdsce 

Seattle 

Toronto 

WasMiwtoe 


14 57 -3 26 
1 34 -7 19 
26 7V 18 64 
16 61 2 36 

21 70 8 46 

19 66 11 52 


28 82 21 70 fr 

3 38 J 26 d 

tf 55 7 45 pc 


d-cloudy; fotooov: lr-tofr; h-tall; oavercoat; pc - portly cloudy; r-raln; 
sh-shewersi swsnow; el-rtoT iwy. 

MONDAY'S FORECAST — CHANNEL: NA. 

-10 - -15 1 14 - 51. LONDON; Snow. Tory. - - -4 (90 -2S). MADRID: Ooudv. 
Temo 5 — 4 141—391. NEW YORK: Partlv ClOUdV- Temp. 2— 1 1 36 — 301. 
PARIS: Snow. Temp. -3 — 0126 — 2fl. ROME: Showers: Temp. -3 — 6 (26— 71 J. 
TEL AVIV: Cloudy. Temo. 30 - 8 (68 - 461. ZURICH: Sn wA.D mw.40— ■» 
(14 — u. BANGKOK; Foaov. Time. 33-21 <91 — 2PJ. HOHJS KONO: Fair. 
Temo. II- 13(64 — 54). MANILA: Folr.TenmZ7- W (81 — S^SNiii J3H.1' 
Temo.-I — BOO — 18). SINGAPORE: Fouev.Temo.29 — 24 (M— 751. TOKYO: 
Fair. Temp. « — -t 143 — 30). 


By Andrew Beyer 

Washington Post Service 

WASHINGTON —Who should 
be the horse of the year — John 
Henry or Slew o' Gold? The choice 
for the Eclipse Award, which will 
be announced Tuesday night, has 
never been tougher. 

Slew o’ Gold scored five easy 
victories in a row before losing a 
photo-finish decision in the Breed- 
ers* Cup Classic. AD his races were 
on the din. John Henry was six for 
nine, finishing his season by win- 


ning four straight major stakes. All 
his victories came on the grass. 

Slew o' Gold earned more money 
than any thoroughbred has won in 
a single season — S2.6 million. 
John Henry won S2J million, the 
second-highest total in history. 

Not only were they productive, 
but each horse was, in his own way, 
admirable. John Henry defied (he 
laws of geriatrics to accomplish so 
much at the age of 9; he still is a 
fierce competitor. Slew o’ Gold 
managed to excel although beset by 


SPORTS BRIEFS 

English Defeat Romanians in Rugby 

LONDON (Combined Dispatches) — Cambridge University fiyhalf 
Rob Andrew scored 18 points in his international debut Saturday as 
England’s national rugby union team held off Ro mania, 22-15. Andrew 
kicked four penally goals and two drops, and right wing Simon Smith 
scored a late tty from a scrum. 

In its first match ever with England, Romania reached lhe final 
minutes only three points back — thanks to five penalty goals hv flyhair 
Dumitni Alexandra — but never threatened to score a try. {UP!, IHT) 

3 Records Bettered at U.S. Swim Meet 

FAYETTEVILLE, Arkansas (AP) — Three relay t eams established 
world bests at the U.S. International sw imming meet here during the 
weekend 

On Saturday, East Germans Dirk Richter, Steffen Uess, Uwe Dassler 
and Sven Lodziewski swam the men’s 800-meter freestyle relay in 7- 13 99 
to lower the short-course (25-meier) 7: 14J4 set by the U.S. team in 1 978. 

. 3J l 53W v ? n " ^ Ar ^ nsas mm s 200-meter medley team turned in a 
1 ? nda y bettering the 1:4438 recorded by Southern Meth- 
odrst University m 1981 And the U.S. women’s 200-meter medley team, 
with a 1:55.96, cash improved on the 2:03 set by the Sl Peterebun- 
(Flonda) Aquatic Cub in 1973. 6 

McEnroe Victor in U.S. Round-Robin 

LAS VEGAS (AP) — John McEnroe defeated Guillermo Vilas of 
Argentina, 7-5. 6-0, here Saturday to win the Challenge of Champions 
tennis tournament. McEnroe had moved Into the final by defeating 
Jimmy Connors, 6-3, 4-6, 6-2, Friday night, while Vilas qualified by 
beating Ivan Lendl of Czechoslovakia, 6-4. 7-5. France’s Yannick Noah. 

n ‘PPol Was i Gendaiib. 6-3, 2-6. 6-4. On Saturday, Noah 
defeated Connors. 7-6(18-16). 7-6 (7-4). for third place 


foot problems all year. If he hadn't 
cracked his hoof for the third (imp 
just before the Breeders’ Cup. he 
probably would have been unde- 
feated in 1984. 

My own racing prejudices make 
me want to vote against John Hen- 
ry because he is a grass horse, the 
ultimate test of U.S. racehorses is 
running classic distances on the 
dirt. 

But Slew o’ Gold's record this 
season isn’t nearly as impressive as 
it looks. He was able to sweep New 
York’s fall championship series be- 
cause the opposition was so medio- 
cre, notably Shifty Sheik, Bounding 
Basque and Canadian Factor. 

John Henry wasn't winning bis 
races by default. In the Arlington 
Million, be beat Royal Heroine, 
who subsequently set a world re- 
cord in the Breeders' Cup MDe. In 
tbe Turf Classic at Belmont, he 
whipped All Along and the rest of 
an excellent field. Because he beat 
formidable opposition, while Slew 
o' Gold didn't, John Henry de- 
serves lo be the horse of the year. 

Predicting the other Eclipse 
Awards is relatively easy, largely 
because the Breeders’ Cup provid- 
ed definitive championship tests in 


most categories. StflL some voters 
may go asuay for reasons of senti- 
ment, because principal horses in 
three divisons died or almost died 
during the season. 

• Z- Year-Old Colt: Chief's 
Crown may be the weakest juv enile 
champion in more than a decade, 
but he is the champion, neverthe- 
less. His victory in the Breeders’ 
Cup should have clinched the title 
for him, although some sentimen- 
talists still may vote for the unde- 
feated but overrated Saratoga Six, 
whose career was cut short by an 
injury. 

• 2-Year-Old Filly: Although 
Outstandingly won the SI million 
Breeders' Cup race and the 
$500,000 Starlet Stake at Holly- 
wood Park, she did so in such abys- 
mally slow lime that I’d have lo 


bum ray speed figures before I 
could vote for her. Folk .Art, a filly 
who won three races in Califoniia 
before a minor illness sidelined her, 
gets my vote. The 1985 racing sea- 
son wiU prove me right. 

• 3- Year-Old Colt What do you 
say about a 3-year-old colt who 
died? That he was grossly overrat- 
ed? That he won the Kenlucfy 
Derby and the Belmont Stakes be- 
cause he had perfect racing Luck? 
That's what i say about Swale. 
Gate Dancer was the best 3 year 
old of the year, as he proved with a 
smashing victory in the Super Der- 
by at Louisiana Downs and his 
near-miss against older horses in 
the Breeders' Cup Classic. 

• 3- Year-Old Filly: Life's Magic 
was the best of this uninspiring 
group. 

■ Older Horse or Gehfing: Slew 
o' Gold is the obvious winner in 
this category, which implicitly is 
limited to horses who race on dirt. 

•.Older Fffly or Mare: Princess 
Rooney was the most dominant 
member of any of the Eclipse 
Award categories. Her runaway 
victory was the most impressive of 
all the performances on Breeders’ 
Cup day. 

• Mak Turf Horae: John Henry. ; 

• Female Turf Horse: Royal j 
Heroine could beat any member of 
her sex, and almost any male but 
John Henry. 

• Sprinter: Eillo clinched the ti- 
tle with his victory in the Breeders' 
Cup Sprint. His award will be post- 
humous because be died earlier this 
month after an attack of colic. 

• Jockey: Because he rides prin- 
cipally in Lhe Midwest, Pat Day 
doesn’t win the big money that An- 
gel Cordero Jr. and Lai fit Pincay 
Jr. do, and so he usually gets over- 
looked in the Eclipse balloting. But 
when riding bead to bead against 
the big names of his profession, be 
often outperforms them, as he did 
when he rode Wild Again to his 
upset victory in the Breeders* Cup 
Classic. 



he resigned last season, after the Celtics 


■ • : 


-Vl do 







ENTERJSATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 1985 


SPORTS 


Dolphin® Beat Steelers, Gain Super Bowl 

The Associated Press r u 


The Associated Press 

MIAMI — Dan Marino threw 
for 421 yards and four touchdowns 
both American Conference chann 
pionship game records, and the Mi- 
ami Dolphins bombed the Pitts- 
burgh Steders, 45-28, here Sunday 
to gain a berth in Super Bowl XDC 

Marino, who shattered several 
National Football League passing 
records in 1984. his second pro sea- 
son, burned the Steelers with scor- 
ing passes of 40 yards to Mark 

^ NFL PLAYOFFS 

Clayton in the first period. 41 yards 
to Mark Duper in the second. 36 
yards to Duper in the third and 6 
yards to Nat Moore in the fourth. 

Thai surpassed the AFC title- 
game record of three TD passes 
shared by George Blanda of Hous- 
ton and Joe Namath of the New 
York Jets; Marino’s passing yard- 
age was the second-highest ever in 
NFL postseason play, behind Dan 
Foots s 433 in San Diego’s 41-38 
overtime victory here in a 1982 di- 
visional playoff. 

Marino completed 21 of 32 
passes — 8 of 9 in the second half 
— as the Dolphins tied the Dallas 


appearances Super Bow] TD pass of the game, a 29-yarder When Malone tried to rally die 

Miami u,„ _ w ’ th 25 seconds to play. Steelers, free safety Lyle Black- 

Bo U n i n ,, ^ WQB ltvo The Dolphins, intercepting Pitts- wood intercepted him at Pitts- 

National of b . ur B h quarterback Mark Malone buigh's 35-yaid line, putting Mi- 

^ and recovering a Frank ami back in buaness. ^ 

ford Stadium at pif' ?! 10 fumble, ran up a 24-14 Marino passed II yards to Na- 

KHifS 11 ?. “ Alto, Calif, halftime lead. than and. \dteT an apparent TD 


Wenzel, McKinney Take 
World Cup Slalom Races 


ford stadium at Palo Alto. Calif. 
Pills burgh also had been bidding 
fora fifth Super Bowl appearance. 

The 45 points were the most ever 
lor Miami m post-season play and 
the most scored against Pittsburgh 


Lh«? mnu cr-nnLT — nearly 1 ] of the first 15 minutes but Joe Rose at the 1. Three plays later. 
Sw ? a&arnst Pittsburgh came out of the first quarter with Nathan slanted over behind a Ben- 
ce,,.,. t£ 1" ^ Pf I trou , Iast only a 7-7 tie on Erenberg’s 7-yard nett block and Miami owned a 10- 


season. The 73 AFC title ^ 


bl rolled up by San Diego and the 
Boston Patriots in 1963 and by 
Oakland and San Diego in 1980. 

Touchdown bursts of 2 yards by 
Tony Nathan in the second quarter 
and 1 yard by Woody Bennett in 
the third offset a 7-yard scoring run 
by Pittsburgh's Rich Ermberg in 
the first period. 

John Stallworth of the Steelers. 
who had shared post-season scor- 


• potnts run. point lead. 

;ded the Uwe Von Schamann put Miami Pittsburgh never got doser. 

and the on top 10-7 with a 26-yard field On the second play of the third 

and by goal, out then Malone shocked the quarter, Marino aQd Nathan 
1 980. Dolphins by hooking up with Stall- booked up on a 24-yard pass. 

-aids by worth on the 65-yard TD pass on a On the fourth. Miami was in the 







booked up on a 24-yard pass. 

On the fourth, Miami was in the 



third- and- four situation. It gave end zone again as Duper, 
the Steelers a 14-10 lead. It was off a desperation dive by badly 
their only lead of the game, and it beaten - Sam Washington, made the 
held up for just 82 seconds. catch at the 10 and trotted in for a 

Marino, driving the Dolphins 77 31-14 lead 1:48 into the period, 
yards in five plays, completed Stallworth’s second scoring 


Sleders ’ “ ] ive pky* completed Stallworth's second scoring 

bo had shared post-season scor- passes of 16 yards apiece to Duper cairb capped a nine-play, 72-yard 

^ayiofl. then lofted his 41- drive, then Miami wt£t to iisbwn 
with Oakland s Fred Bdetmkoff, yard scoring strike over Chris version of bafl-controL 

fetches Brown to Duper. who made the The Dolphins consumed 6:15 in 
n,t 5 £ 9 r rr l ‘J 1 “2 caJch al the Wt edge of the goal line a 10-play, M^yard march — with 
1-th en route to his Mth playoff and tumbled backward into the end Marino passing for 89 yards, mak- 
game over 100 yards. Wayne Ca- zone, restoring Miami’s lead al 17- ing up lost rushing mid penalty 
pers caught Mark Malone s third 14 with 1 :30 remaining in the half , yardage. 


■■ - ' •^1 


Andreas Wenzel eo route to victory 




toWen/UMrd Aw* I 

in La Mongie, 


France. 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

LA MONGIE, France — An- 
dreas Wenzel of Liechtenstein Sun- 
day won the first World Cup sla- 
lom ever held in the Pyrenees on an 
icy course on which more than two- 
thirds of the skiers fell 

Wenzel had the top time of 49.62 
seconds on his first run and was 
second at 43.96 in the afternoon 
beat to win with an aggregate time 
of one minute. 33.58 seconds. It 
was Ids second victory of the season 
and his 13th World Cup triumph. 
Sweden’s Jonas Nilsson was second 
in 1:33.81; Liechtenstein’s Paul 
Frommdl was third in 1:34.04, and 
Italy* Paolo de Chiesa finished 
fourth, with 1:34.11. 

In Maribor, Yugoslavia, on Sat- 
urday. Tamara McKinney of the 
United States posted the fastest 
second run to win a women's sla- 
lom. Sbe was the first American to 
win an event in this World Cup 
season. 

McKinney, the women’s overall 
champion in 1983 and third last 
season, completed her second trip 
down the course in 4202 seconds 


for a cumulative tune of one min- 
ute, 24.06 seconds. She moved into 
fourth place overall with 66 points, 
22 behind the leader, Marina Kiehl 
of West Germany. 

Olga Charvalova of Czechoslo- 
vakia, was second in Saturdays 
combined with 1:24.24. Brigitte 

Gadient of Switzerland, with 
1:24.75, was third, and compatriot 
Erika Hess, the defending overall 
champion, was fourth with 1 :24.6Q. 

In Sunda/s race, only 19 men 
finished both runs. The icy course 
proved too slippery on the first run 


t? Reich , Finds Lead East to 34*14 Hula Bowl Victory 


ICOI 


IARD 


The Associated Press 

HONOLULU — Maryland’s 
Frank Reich and Doug Flmie of 
Boston College combined for 341 
passing yards and Wisconsin’s Al 
Toon was on the receiving end of 
two touchdown passes as the East 
defeated the West, 34-14. in the 
39th annual Hula Bow! here Satur- 
day. 

Reich, who missed four games 
during the regular season with a 
slightly separated right shoulder 
before coming back late in the year, 
was the hotter of the two East quar- 
terbacks. 

Flulie, the 1984 Heistnan Tro- 
phy winner who Jed BC to a 10-2 
record including a Cotton Bowl tri- 
umph over Houston, had an aver- 
age day, completing \0 of 19 at- 
tempts for 1 1 1 yards. 

He engineered die first East scor- 
ing drive and capped it with a one- 
yard toss to Tool 


yardage in the 53-yard drive came Cunningham, of Nevada-Las lead at halftime. Hiiger fired passes | 

on the ground. Vegas, was named the most valu- of 29 yards to Colorado State’s Keli T7T~Z 

Running back Ricky Moore of able offensive player of the benefit McGregor, 38 yards to Washing- Selected 1J.S. College Scores 
Alabama gained !„ yards on a game for Shriners' hospitals, which ton's Danny Greene and five vards ® 


Basketball 


Alabama gained yards on a game for Shriners’ hospitals, which ton's Danny Greene and five yards 
draw and North Carolina’s Ethan drew an estimated 72,000 fans at for the touchdown to Fresno 
Horton bulled for six before chang- Stanford Stadium. State’s Larry Willis, 

ing directions on a stuffed play to Lineman Garin Veris of Sian- Ricky Anderson of Vanderbilt, 
gain 13 to the West two-vard line, ford was named defensive player of the nation's leading kicker this sea- 
4 After a running play, Flutie loft- the game. son, missed his first chance to nar- 

ed a one-yard pass to Toon in the C unningham marched the West row the lead late in the second 
corner of the end zone, and Raif 76 yards in 1 1 plays in the fourth period when his 36-yard field-goal 
Mojsigenko, Michigan State kick- quarter, capping the drive with a attempt struck the right goal post 
er, converted for a 7-0 East lead. 1 5-yard touchdown pass to Terry and bounced back. 

Reich guided the East in the sec- Orr of Texas. In the third period, however, 


Mojsigenko, Michigan State kick- quarter, capping the drive with a attempt struck the right goal post 
er, converted for a 7-0 East lead. 1 5-yard touchdown pass to Terry and bounced back. 

Reich guided the East in the sec- Orr of Texas. In the third period, however, 

ond quarter and began his perfor- In the first period, after the Wisconsin's Richard Johnson in- 
man ce with nine pass completions East’s only touchdown. Cu nnin g- tercepted a Hiiger pass on the West 
in nine attempts. His sixth cotnple- ham began a 43-yard drive that 25. and Anderson booted a 35- 
tion was to Toon, who made a so- ended with a flea-flicker TD play yarder to make the score 14-10. 
perb move on a West defender at early in the second quarter. A long, fourth-quarter drive by 

the five-yard line to record his sec- After completing an eight-yard the East ended on the West’s two- 
ond touchdown, this time for 29 pass to Arizona's Vance Johnson yard line with 2:31 left when Ken- 
yards. and an 18-yarder to Larry Willis, lucky’s George Adams fumbled on 

Reich was successful on five at- Cunningham ran twice and threw a a dive for a first down from the 
tempts in the East’s third scoring short pass to move to the East three, 
drive. Three completions went to three-yard line. Cunningham then The East opened the scoring in 


Reich had one of the most pro- Toon lor a total of 35 yards and the threw a lateral pass to Johnson, the first period after Scou Bergold, 
dnetive quarters in Hula Bowl bis- score came on a 26-yard strike to who faked a run and lofted a pass Wisconsin defensive lin eman , rc- 


tory as he threw for two touch- 
downs in the second quarter that 


flanker Chock Scott of Vanderbilt. 
Toot had a great first half as he 


boosted the East to a 21-0 halftime caught a total of seven passes for 93 
advantage: In that one quarter yards. Scou was right behind with 
Reich passed for 202 yards with 14 70 yards on five receptions. 


completions in 17 attempts. 


The West managed just 28 yards 


Toon, who was named the rushing and 45 yards passing in the 
game’s outstanding offensive play- first half, 
er, tied a Hula Bowl record with 10 Jack BkkneB, the East Coach, at 
catches equaling the record set by the end of his first all-star game, 
Donnie Anderson of Texas Tech in was savoring his fust victory in a 
1966. pressureless situation. 

Defensively, the East stymied “The most difficult thing in a 
the West much of the day, and game like this is giving everyone a 
Mississippi’s Freddie Joe Nunn chance. We had great runners in 
was one of the main reasons. The Ricky Moore and Ethan Horton 
defensive end, who was in the West and we had great receivers plus 
backfield most of the day, was cho- Frank Reich and Flutie at quarter- 
sen the outstanding defensive play- back. How do you give them all the 
er erf the game. He had nine unas- ball?" he asked. 


to Cunningham, who was wide covered a fumble by C unningham 
open in the end zone, tying the on the West 23. Quarterback Steve 
game 7-7. Calabria of Colgate threw a pass to 

Rusty Hiiger of Oklahoma State Tennessee's Johnnie Jones, who 
also performed well at quarterback stepped out of bounds a foot from 
for the West, coming in during the the goal line. On the next play, 
second period and marching the Jones ran up the middle for the 
team 83 yards in six plays for a 14-7 touchdown and a 7-0 lead. 

Routing Islanders, 7-3, 
Sabres Win 7th Straight 

Complied hr Our Staff From Dispatches Greg Gilbert added a second- 

UNIONDALE, New York — period Islander goal but McKen- 
Sean McKenna scored two goals na's second tally of the game was 


FRIDAY'S RESULTS 
EAST 

Buffets St. IN, Modoar Evers 63 
SI. Lawrence 59. Habari 32 
UPsala 78. Keen 63 
Wldener 71, Kino's 54 

SOUTH 

Radiant S3, Compboii it 
Roanoke 70. Muhlenberg to 
IMDbtr 107. Dyke 89 

MIDWEST 

Broaiey 99. N. Iowa 67 
N. Dakota 6a St. Cloud SL 44 
S Dakota SL 63, NebXJmctoO 46 
SOUTHWEST 

AWtane Christian 75. Texas Lutheran 74 
Oklahoma Baottst 9X Dane CoL NoO. n 
Sam Houston St. 81. Henderson St. 7D 
way lend Boons* 61 Control SL, Okie. 59 
FAR WEST 
Colorado St. <7. Air Fore* 58 
Denver 75. We e t em SL 55 
Hawaiuraelfic 60, Hastings 56 
Humboldt St 76. CaL-Oovtm 68 
HI Inott-W — levon 78. Hawaii- Lao 66 
Momma Si. 70. Loyola Colli. 60 
Son Frondsca St. 69. Sacramento SL 68 
So. Colorado 7X Mesa 70, 2 OT 

SATURDAY'S RESULTS 
EAST 

Bucknell 68. Towoon SL 3D 
ConlsJuo 8ft Siena 71 
Cleveland SL 67. Utica 59 
Cornell 77. Robert Morris 66 
Dartmouth 62 Harvard 60 
Delaware 76. Rktar 70 
George Washington flX Ouquesne 66 
Georgetown 82 Boston CoL 82 OT 
Gettysburg 82 Kings Point 74 
HotStra 75. Lotov* 64 
Holy Cross 72 St. Peter's U 
Navy 62 Lovoia. Md. 54 
New Hampshire a Cotoafr 40 
Hoftoik si. 62 Delaware SL 63 
•northe as tern 71 Ntoaorn 7D 
NYU 67, Rochester 51 
Pittsburgh 71 Providence 63 
Princeton 7S> Lehigh 67 
SL Bonovenfure 74, Rhode Island 70 
St. John's 71 Satan Hall 57 
St. Joseph's 50. W. Virginia 49 
Slaton I stand 86. Buffalo St. 75 
Temple 65. Pm SI. 49 
VT1 Ionova 7ft Connecticut 59. OT 
Yoie 71 Vermont 59 

SOUTH 

Alabama 87, Georgia 74 
toa-BIrmJnohom 62 DePoul 59 


sisted tackles and one assisted and “I 
' 4 . made three quarterback sacks for all i 
• losses of ! 7 yards. hint 

“We tried everything we could this, 
think of to keep him out of there, T1 
but noihingworked," Terry Dona- fans, 
hue of UCLA, the West coach, Stad 
said. “1 thought the East bad two _ 
dominating players, Nunn and " Y 
Toon. It was impossible to stop In 
either.” back 


scan McKenna scored two goals na s second iauy or tne game was »• vr™ 

m, ... T-. and the red-hot Buffalo Sabres the only score of the third period as mt *4 o* j- 

one powered pastthe New York Island- the teams combined for just nine NBA Standings 

?°“ Sh .SS t «• 7-3, hm Saturday tught for siou on goal. ^,e.. c™f, 

u 0 ^ 1 ,3 T k S fS lc “ e their seventh straight National Buffalo goal tender Tom Bar- 
mis. especially m uustxaL Hockey League victory. rasso stopped Biyan Trouicr on a 

The Sabres, 9-1-5 in their last 15 penalty shot at 18:59 of the first 
^ a ^° Ul ^ A ^°^ a outings, roared to a 5-1 lead early’ period after Mike Ramsey was 

ataaium. in the second period as Phil Hous- called for dosing his hand on the 

■ West Wms Shrine Game, 21-10 hy and Mike Foligno scored on the puck in the crease. 

In Stanford, California, quarter- " Al Arbour could ^understand the 

back RancSn Cimnin^amSn£t NHL FOCIS sustained boos and catcalls from 

a touchdown pass on a flea-flicker first two Buffalo shots of that se&- ^002.^ po^I 

and passed for a tonchdown to lad sio a, sending New York goaiiender said the Islander coach. 


Auburn 80. Florida 74 
cnadrt 82 Forman 76 
Delta SL & Valdosta SL 70 
Duke 62 Virginia 58 
Jacksonville St. 71, M. Alabama 65 
James Moalsen 66, Davis and Elkins 44 
Kentucky 72 M. Carolina SL 62 
Louistano Tech 92 NW Louisiana 63 
Mercer 71. Go. Sauthern (0 
Mkkfle Tenn. 79. Cumoertand SS 
Mist. Valiev Si. >7, SE Louisiana 74 
Missttsippi SL 82 Louisiana Si. 69 
Moramod SL 62 Saginaw Valiev 60 
N. Carolina 72 Florida St. 69 
Notre Dame 79. Davidson 62 
Oklahoma SI. 72 New Orleans 51 
Randolph M uLB n 79, Coastal Carolina 60 
So. Carolina 62 Memphis St. 58 
So. Carotin SL 62 Alabama SL 61 
Tampa 72 Liberty Bmtlst 55 
Termesm 72 Mississippi 63 
Tennuoee St. 82 Florida A2M 82 OT 
Vo. Conunonweami 43. J oc k se aviHe 62 OT 
Virginia Tech 92 N. Carolina A&T 67 
VMI 52 Morsholl 54 
Mtake Forest 62 Georgia Tech 54 
MIDWEST 

Augustana. 2D. 62 Neo.-Omtdw 41 
Ball Sr. 81. Bonding Green 67 
Brodlw 82 Drake 74 
ClnObinati 52 Tutane SO 
Dayton 67, Maryland 63 
DePauw 8& Manchester 77 
Iowa 62 UHnots 60 
Kamos 92 Wichita St. 83 
Kansas St. til. Morgan St. 70 
Kent St. 91. E. Mklrigan 90 
Loyota. IIL 82 Butler 76 
Miami. Ohio 91, Cant. Michigan 99 
Mkrtean 87. Ohio St. 82 
Michigan SL 62 Indiana 61 
Missouri 72 Austin Peav 63 
N. Dakota 64. Mankato St. 47 
N. Illinois 69, Toledo 82 
Purdue 72 Minnesota 65 
S. Dakota SL 65. N. Colorado 64 
Sf. Thomas 62 St. Mary's, Minn. SS 
SW Oklahoma is. Dana CoL. Nets 52 
Tulsa 92 2 Illinois 96 
W. Michigan 82 Ohio U. 79. OT 
Wisconsin 52 Northwestern 51 
Xavier 62 Detroit 63 

SOUTHWEST 

Arfcj-Lltfle Rock 97. Samtard 71 
Houston Baptist 75. HordlnSImmora 64 
Indkma St. 91, W mat Texas St. 88 
Oklahoma 101. ME Louistano 95 
Oral Roberts 62 St. Louis 55 


Rice 12 Texas Christian 62 
5a. Methodist 62 Arkansas 62 OT 
Texes 61. Houston 58 
Texas A&M 102 Baylor 78 
Texes Tech 81, N. Texas SL 55 
Texas- ArJInoton 82 Texas- San Antonio 81 
FAR WEST 

Arizona 61. Arizona si. 60 

Boise St. 62 E. Washington 57 

Brig. Young-Hawoll 99. AMSto-FaJrtaanks 59 

Cat-1 rvine 82 Utah St 73 

Caf-5anto Barbara 89. New Mexico St. 83 

Chaminode 82 Concordia 7B 

Chico St. 57, Cal -Davis 47 

Denver W. Metre St. 57 

Fresno st. 62 Pacific 57 

FL Hays 82 Atas*»Ancborooe 67 

Fullerton St. 82 Lane Beach SI. 71 

Gonzoga 65, Idaho St. 60 

Great Falls 62 E. Oregon 56 

Hawaii pacific 82 Houghton 64 

Idaho CaL 82 Oregon Tech SB 

Marquette 67, Cotorodo 53 

Montano 72 Lovoia Coin. 58 

Montana Tech 74, Rocky Mountain 73 

Nev.-Las Vaoas 82 San Jose SL 65 

New Mexico 72 Brigham Young b 

Oragbn SL 52 Washington 45 

Pacific 67. Lewis 2 Clark 51 

Pepperdlne 72 Fcr dh c m 71 

Portland 62 Nev^Reno 64 

Son Diego SL 82 Air Force 73 

San FraixdBc o SL 92 Stanislaus 51. 76 

Santa Clara 74. Idaho 58 

Texas-EI Paso 72 Utah 67 

UCLA 67. Oregon 59. TOT 

Washington St. 71. Stanford 59 

Weber SI. 89. SW Louslm 80 

TOURNAMENTS 
Frank Shannon invitational 
Hone 72 Rose-Hulman 67 
Ohio Wesleyan 92 Comegke-Mellon 63 
CbommoQfMp: a. Wesleyan 92 Hoae 92 30T 
Coosointlon: Rwe-Huimon 72 Ccmeole-MeF 
ion 59 , 

Great Daw Ctaselc 
Jersey CHy St. 81 Albany SI. SI 
Sprtngtleid 79. Buffalo U. 64 
Owmplenshlg: SprtagtiMd 79. Jar. CUv SL 7k 
^oosofatloo: Albany St. 82 Buttata 64 
union College lavftaffoaal 
Susauehanno 62 W esleyan 55 
Jnfon 72 Bondeln 50 
nwrnpioasJilP: Union 55. Susquehanna S3 
SensolaHon: Wesleyan 62 Bawdoin 56 
United First Federal Classic 
-lor too Southern 92 American U. 86 
-ano island U. 72 E. Illinois 71 
ChmtpiansMp: Long 1st 92 Fla Southern 80 
Cwta ftan; American 82 E. Illinois 79 


for 40 of the 74 skiers, including 
Luxembourg's Marc Girard elli, ihe 
overall World Cup leader, and Pir- 
min Zurbriggen, who is second 
overall. 

A second slalom, originally 
scheduled for Baquieia on the 
Spanish side of the Pyrenees, is 10 
be held Monday at La Mongie. 

Wenzel, who remained third in 
the overall standings, slipped on a 
sharp descent near the end of the 
60-gate second run but righted 
himself to finish. 

Nilsson won the second run in 
43.40 seconds. (VPJ. A?) 


Hockey 
NHL Standings 

WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick Division 



w 

L 

T 

Pt* 

IL 

O 

GA 

Philadelphia 

23 

11 

5 

51 

166 

117 

Washington 

27 

11 

7 

51 

163 

123 

NY Islanders 

21 

16 

1 

43 

164 

155 

Pittsburgh 

IS 

19 

4 

34 

134 

169 

NY Rangers 

13 

19 

t 

32 

138 

154 

New Jersey 

13 

21 

4 

30 

133 

Ito 


Adams Division 



Montreal 

21 

11 

B 

SO 

164 

132 

Buffalo 

18 

12 

9 

4S 

148 

111 

Quebec 

19 

16 

6 

44 

168 

154 

Boston 

16 

16 

7 

39 

142 

136 

Hartford 

15 

18 

4 

34 

123 

157 


CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 
Nonit Division 


Chicago 

18 

IB 

3 

39 

156 

145 

to. Louis 

15 

16 

6 

36 

135 

143 

Minnesota 

13 

19 

7 

33 

140 

155 

Detroit 

13 

22 

5 

31 

146 

184 

Toronto 

6 

2B 

S 

17 

115 

181 


SatvWe Division 




Edmonton 

to 

8 

4 

56 

195 

ito 

Calgary 

21 

15 

4 

46 

196 

158 

Winnipeg 

19 

16 

4 

43 

160 

160 

Las Angeles 

16 

15 

8 

40 

171 

160 

Vancouver 

10 

26 

5 

25 

130 

219 

FRIDAY'S RESULTS 



Ptttdberah 



1 


a 

V- 8 


The first half belonged to the a touchdown pass on a flea-flicker 
East as it rolled to a 21-0 lead. and passed for a tonchdown to lead 


rERN CONFERENCE 
Altaoflc Division 


him out of there. The game was watched by 30,767 

ed," Terry Dona- fans, which about half filled Aloha 
the West coach, .Stadium. 


■ West Wms Shrine Game; 21-10 
In Stanford, California, quarter- 
back Randall C unningham caught 



w 

L 

PCI. 

GS 

Boston 

28 

6 

.834 

— 

PhltodeJpbla 

27 

6 

JIB 

Mi 

iVoahtagtan 

19 

15 

.559 

9 

New Jersey 

16 

19 

ASJ 

I2V> 

New York 

13 23 

Centra) Dtvfstoa 

J61 

t» 

Milwaukee 

23 

13 

J39 

— 

Detroit 

19 

15 

-59 

3 

Chicago 

17 

17 

JOB 

5 

ftrtonto 

IS 

3D 

J09 

7VD 

Indiana 

10 

73 

JU 

UV» 

Cleveland 

■ 

23 

258 

12VS 


Fluuedrovc the East toils first ^ Billy Smith to an earlv erii. It was ^ W ere bad in all areas. Now we 

score midway through fast ^ Stonc the Islanders fourth loss in thar ^ f orgel j L ’- 

quarter, although much of the All-Star Game. Iasi six games. The Islander defense was sliced 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 


The Islander defease was sliced 


Versatile Thomas Sparks 
d21-113 Piston Triumph 


Compiled Ik Ov Staff Frm Du/KBcha 

LAN DOVER, Maryland — 
Most of the National Basketball 
Association players who perform 


who became an instant pro star 
after just two years of college at 
Indiana, also had four steals to lead 
the Pistons to their fourth victory 


Ekewlwre it was the New York ^ Buffalo’s speed. Smith was SST 

**f ngcrs driven from the net after surrender- *"*»; 

Montreal 4; Los Angeles 5 Detroii ^ Qve I5 sbols , bul the ROBS “ a 

f was no 1 Ids alone. Four of the i_a. u*e 

ford ^ Chicago 3 ; Qitebar B Pitis- riI5t five Sabre goals were scored by 
bu^3: VM^uver 4 Toronto L p i aV era who w^elrft alone in front ££« 
Md Phdadelp^a 6. Sl Lotis 3. On ^thcneL 

Friday it was Buffalo 7, Pittsburgh . . Gotten st 

2; Quebec 5, Washington 3. and . ^ to 

Edmonton 7, Winnipeg 4. said Srmlh. Itslmsiral- AtlQat0 

Buffalo’s Ric Selling opened the mg. You have to just try and keep ogran 
scoring with a 15-foot backhander y°^ “d- , Bul J ?°° 1 
at 6:48 of the first period, but Pat happening to this team. I don t like 

LaFontaine tied it on a breakaway losul 8- 

at 10:37. Brent Peterson and Me- Smith has lost his past three 



Midwest Dhrtttoo 



Houston 

20 

13 

JU6 

— 

Denver 

19 

15 

JS9 

Ito 

Dallas 

16 

16 

-SCO 

3to 

Utah 

16 

11 

jn\ 

4to 

Son Antonio 

15' 

18 

ASS 

5 

Kansas City 

12 

20 

J75 

7Mr 


Pacific d tv woo 



LA. Lakers 

23 

10 

JUT 

— 

Phoenix 

18 

17 

SU 

6 

Portland 

15 

19 

AO 

*to 

Seattle 

15 

20 

AB 

9 

LA. Clippers 

15 

21 

A 17 

9»s 

Gotten State 

10 

23 

JT3 

12to 


FRIDAYS RESULTS 
14 M 31 


Magic Johnson and Larry Bird, 


We are beginning to pm tne al 10:3 7 Brent Peterson and Me- bmiih has lost his past three 
way I thought we could,” Coach jcenna put the Sabres ahead, 3-1, starts while allowing 16 goals; he is 
Chuck Daly said. “The last few f^-period goals, and Hous- 2 ~ s m his last seven starts while 

hi. mum, In Vw> dnino nvru. ■ , r-.i- . . j in allminni. It n.,1. i>P«. 


for instance, both 6-foot-9 (105- games we seem to be doing every- )ey Foligno then scored 49 sec- allowing 35 goals. *Tm getting 

metersX perform the feat most of- thing right.” onds span in the second to bring ticked off,” he said. 

ten, and Moot-5 Michael Ray Thomas downplayed his perfor- onjslander goalie Kelly Hrudey. The Sabres have allowed only 

mance. “I thou 


meters), perform the feat most of- 
ten, and Moot-5 Michael Ray 
Richardson does it occasionally, 
tea 

Bui when laah Thomas does it, 
he raises a few eyebrows. 

The 6-1 guard didn’t shoot espe- 


macce. “I thought the key lately Tomas Joossoq convened a rwo- 118 goals this year, second in the 
has been a sharp defense that has man power-play advantange with a league, and the Islanders had trou- 
enabled us to jump in from early,” 40-footer from the slot to make it 5- ble cracking that solid defense, 
he said. Z but the Sabres’ Dave Audrey- They had just one shot on goal in 

Jeff Ruland led the Bullets with chuk then slammed a rebound past the first 10 minutes of play and a 


dally weQ Saturday night at Lan- 27 points and 13 rebounds, but 
dover, Maryland, but he had 27 fouled out in the fourth quarter and 

— *» tniowd a triple double because he 

NBA FOCUS only barf six assists. 

— r— — r: — , , ,, .^Z The Bullets were cold from the 

* P“ lt Sf } 1 rebmipds and 13 1 assets missingsix of ibdr 

H3 Victory over the asfamgtoo ^ BaHard made a basket to 

SSSwfcMq---. 


he said. 

Jeff Ruland led the Bullets with 


Hrudev. 



them was a 26-foot, three-pomi 
bomb that broke the spirit of the 
Bullets. . 

The shot came with 68 seconds 
left, with tnne running out on the 
shot- dock and with the Pistons 
ahead by only three. 

Elsewhere in the NBA, it was 


The Bullets didn’t get their sec- 
ond field goal until 8:24 remained 
in the period, a jump shot by Gus 
W illiams. By that time they were 
behind, 12-5, and their defiat 
reached 16-5 before the Bullets 

made a move. 

Although the Pistons were run- 


toial of 20 in the game. (AP, UPJ) 


.2 # 

/vj#- 


AttaOta 14 M a 40-111 

Detroit a a 30 25— ut 

Thomas 11-17 3-5 22 Trlaucko 7-12 64 »; 
WlWns M9 6-7 12 E. Johnson 4-105-6 17, Carr 
7-10 34 17. Raboente: Atlanta 47 [Wilkins 71; 
Detroit 73 CLatmboor 10). Assists: Atlanta 20 
(Rivers 81: Detroit a (Thomas U>. 
Fhoeotx a 19 27 T9— a 

New Jersey 36 a M 28-185 

Rldwrtiaon ll-a44 22 Williams 9-135-723; 
Nance W-14M7L EOuartb 54 10-11 22 Re- 
bounds: Phoenix 47 (Nance 13); New Jersev 
50 (Williams 13). Assists: Phoenix 33. (Lucas. 
Nance. Humphries «); New .terser 25 CRKh- 
ar dxo n 13). 

LA. Otaoen 31 38 27 16-112 

Kansas atr K 39 31 17—132 

E-tahnson 13-198-1032 Woodson 11-26W25; 
MJttnson 13-253-4 27, BrWoemon9-16 14 19. 
Rebounds: Los Angeles 54 (Walton 141; Kar»- 

sasaty52COJbert&ng9}.AssUx:UXAflortes 

25 (Worrtck 6); Kansas Otv 30 (Draw 13). 
NOW York 27 16 S 26—94 

Boston a O 34 297-185 

Bird 13-21 4432 Parish 9-143-421; King 10-21 



KB Walton went iq> through 
Saturday, helping the Los An 
game NBA losing streak wWi a 


9-20 5422 Evaw9-ieMT2enel«i2»5421. 
RebooKft: Las AnneiM 54 (Woiton 12). Den- 
ver 49 I Lew 8). Assists: Los Angeles a 
(Johnson and Warrfdt 71; Denver 26 (Lever 
71. 

PUtadeMdo U 21 M 29-118 

MUeRMkM 25 n 9 21—186 

Ervlng 9-18 M 24. BatWev 44 12-1320. Mo- 


Ae rim to block this shot 
geles Clippers end a seven- 
L27“115victoiy wer Denver. 


BuffMo 1 2 4-7 

Ramsey (4). Holt (5), selling (91. FWtgno 
(14). Cvr (11), Tucker (10). Perreault (17); 
JHanttia (9) Babvch (10). Stmts on goal: Pitts- 
burgh (an Barrosso) 6-44—18; Buffalo (on 
Herron] 19-104-34. 

QwsMC 1 5 1—5 

Wnralngton 8 2 1—3 

Sowe 2 (5), Ashton (8). Polement 2 (10); 
Gartner (M), Christian (15). Gould (6). Shots 
an goal: Quebec (on RJggln) 10-7-10-27; 
WosMngton (on Sevlgnv) 1-1 M0— 22 
wiaatoeo 2 1 1-4 

EOmoatan 2 t 4—7 

Kurri 2 (39t, Power 2 1 21. Gregg 13). McClel- 
land (6). KrvsheinvsfcJ (18); Hatverchuk 3 
(Ml. Turnbull (7J. Shots on goal: wmnioeg 
(an MoooJ 6-10-9—25; Edmonton (an Hay- 
wand. Behrend) 13-14.15—42 

SATURDAY'S RESULT5 
Mantraal 1 2 1—4 

New Jersey 0 3 2-5 

Muller HOI, Driver (4). Sul 1 1 man 2 (IB). 
Gogne (12); Corbonnaou (121, FlocUwrt (6). 
Gainey (lOi.McPtwe (51. Shots on goal; Mon- 
treal (on Resch) 9-I4-M— J9; New Jorsev (on 
Pennev) 6-10-12—28. 

N.Y. Rangers 1 1 1 O-l 

Boston 0 2 1 0-3 

Sondstrom (14). Brapfce (41, Ruatsalolnen 
(12); Simmer (23), Unseman (10). Donnelly 
(3). Snots on ooei: H.Y. ion Keans) 4-54-2— 
17; Boston (an Vrnibtosbrauck) 13-14-12-3— <0. 
PMtodetpUe 3 1 3-4 

SL Loafs I 8 3—3 

Tocchef (B), Ertlc5BOfi (61. Howe (10), Car- 
son (M), Kerr 3 (31); GJlmour MOl.Lovallee 
(14), B. Sutter (16). Shots m goal: pniioaei- 
phfe ion Uut> 10-13-16-09; 51. Louta lonLlrto- 
bergh) 104-1—35. 

Vanco u ver D 3 2—4 

Toronto • 1 8—1 

Smvl (l2I.Tontl (13). MocAitam (Bl, Kirtan 
(8); Frvcer (18). Shots on goal: Vancouver 
(on Bernhardt) 8-11-14—33; Toronto (an pro 
deurl 9-9-4—27. 

Minnesota 2 110-4 

fnlmii 1 2 11 Q 1 

Bellows 2 (17), Lawton (4). Acton H2I; Wil- 
son (11), Eaves (B). Bazek (6), Du Inn (10). 
Shots on goal: Minnesota (on Lnmellni 11-89- 
*— »; CoJoarv (on Meiodto) 15-12-76- 1— *4. 
QoetMK 13 3-8 

Pttfshoroii 3 8 1-8 

Cota (7). Ashton (91, M. Stastnv (7). P. 
Stastny (14), KiHIWOl (4) Hunler (11), Ashton 
V»>. MDfler 14); Shsoden i»), Betanaer (3), 
Lamouroux (3). Shots on goal: Quebec (on 
Rommo) 9-13-15 — 36; Pittsburgh Ion Gosse- 
Hn) 12-5-9—26. 

Chicago 2 i 0-8 

H ar t ta r it 2 3 0— f 

■Johnson M3|, Boutette (7), Neufold (1(1), 
QuennevlUe (21: 5- Larmor (23). LudetLl (61. 
Shots on oeal: Chicago (on Milton I 13-7-12— 
32; HarHonl (on 5koraderiGkll 15-18-8—41. 

Lot Angeles 2 1 2-5 

Detroit 1 2 0-3 

Nicho(ls2 (2M.MocLMtan2 ()7).Stortt (II) ; 
Silk IB). Slitter (5). Yzermon (20). Shots on 
goal: Los Angelas (on Staton) 11-109— 30: 
Pel rail (on Eliot) 12-11-9-32. 

Bottom 3 3 1-7 

ply. UtaMers 1 2 e-8 

SeUing (101. Petereon (8). McKenna 2 (9). 
Housiev (9) Foligno (15). Andreychuk (17): 

La Foul otoe (11). Jonsson (8). Gilbert (to), 
foots engeef: Buffalo (on Smith, Hrudev) 13- 
13-5-30; Now York ton Borrasso) 0*9—20. 


World Cup Skiing 


S10a.Cmnmlngs1M91-22S.ReOoradS.New lonB 4.| 5 ia.i42B;C M n«mbiosl1-82S427.Mon- 
Yore a ( Cavern u. Snarraw 6); Boston 52 ^ 1IJ2 w n preseev Ml >3-16 23. Ro- 
(Partsh12).Aieists;NewYork1i(Wolker6); aogoas; Philadelphia 4* (Barfciov 


Boston 23 ID Johnson 7). 

Denver 36 21 35 16— 108 

Utah 29 87 a 12-118 

GrHflth8-M8-UM.Dantlev9-143-S21 ; Matt IV 
17 KM 1 32. English 9-24 3-5 21. Rebounds: Den- 
ver 51 (Caoaer 12); Utah 41 (Ballev 8). as- 
sists; Denver 22 (Laver 8); Utah 29 (Green 
tot. 

Portland 28 23 29 23- K 

Los Angola 26 22 36 26-120 

Abdul- Jahbar lMB *-628. MeGee9-16M 18 ; 
Drooler 8-15 3-4 19, Colter 8-16 M 14. M- 


u 171 ;Mitwaufcoe 56 (Cummings 16). Atotsts: 

Phlladetphlo 18 (Cheeks 6); Milwaukee 24 
(Pnssey 8). 

JJSit Koesas atr 2 9 8 17-1*7 

8) AS- oalla S 31 38 31 35— YB 

(Green AOuirra 1VI7 3483 Harper 8-14*4 81 ;John- 

van 11-19 M 35. Tlwus 7-15 5-S 19. ReWeads; 

53 K Kansas city 37 (Thompson ii); Dallas a 


(Perkins T2J. Assists: Knsos CMy 28 (Drew ;3Us 

15); Dottas 34 (Davl? 71. Tlwmni 

Pbecafx 2? 21 25 28 — Mi 45J3— 1:17.18 


ME ITS SLALOM 
(Al La Morsle. France) 

1. Andrea WenzeL Liechtenstein, 49.42- 
43M — 1:3358 

2. Jonas Nlbson, Swedaa 5041-4140— 
1:33J1 

3 Paul FrommeiL Uechtenstein 49*7- 
44JT7— l:3L&4 

A Paolo de Ctilasa. Italy, 89. 9 6 Ul? 
1:34.11 

& mgemgr5tenmark, a i N de ag . 38 4448 ■ 

1:3506 

6. Max Juien Swltzwtana. 5U4-44J5— 

1:3529 

7. Alex GtaraU Italy, 51XQ-44J5— V.35H7 
8 Lnrs-Gfa'on Halvarssm Sweden, 5*31- 


:■ . ‘Tgcs-. 

:••• . . 


... poaods; Porriandto (Bowie 10); La* Andelto devetomt 


9. Thomo Burglar, Switzerland. 51.55- 
45J3— 1:17.18 

10. Naomlno Iwowl Japan, S241-45J3— 


54 (AMukiratnr 11). Assists: Perllrad 24 
(Valentine 6); Los Angeles 42 (Goner 7). Foster 7>14 5-7 22, Adams 8-T0 2-2 18. Re- ll.Michei V 
MllwaukM 27 14 29 33-101 beeods: Phoenix 41 (Nance and Edwards 6 J; 12. Stefan 

Chicago 23 38 28 33-185 Cleveland 52 (Ponuotte 11). Assists: Phoenix 4&4B-i:3&6« 

Dailey 11-19 4-5 26. Jordan 0-164-522; Man- 26 (Humphries 10); Cleveland 29 IB09»y»J. 

Brief M9 13-16 29, Cummings MB 6-8 24. R8- 82 38 33 35—113 I 

tmads: Mihraukoe 36 (Cummbrge7); Chico- York 3s 38 85 39—119 I 


Davis 10-15 10-11 30, Hubbard 5-M 10.I2 22; 1:37J4 


. , — rr . . ,VT iTT- At. AlutOUgn tnc niiuu* ws.it 

New York 119, Chicago II • ^ot, the Bullets were tbdr own 

fima 124, New Jew 114, Oeve- with less than two 

bud 1 1 ] ’ Plrao ; !?n’ nrinuies to go in the half , Washing- 

9 of 46 from the Grid 
^ " of 18 free 

^^ o 9 7 . Houston 103, offset a rally by 

Golden State 94. _ the Bullets that gave the home team 

On Friday it was Chicago Wo, ^ Iea( £ 9 -j _90 early m 

Milwaukee 101 ; Boston HK, New foUrlt quarter after it had fali- 

Yotk 94; Nw Jersey _ 0S j en Sind? 65-50, shortly before 


1 1. Mlchd Vlan, France, 524UM6-I J3SJ 

12. Stefan Pfstor. west Gammy. 52J8- 


98; Detroit 134, Atlanta 1H; i«vrTtox«4 iceiioga e. 17 s-s 24 . 

-as Gty 130, Los AngriesOpp^ I1 ^B ll i l e ts > cliff RobinsOT sat Pittsburgh defenseman Todd Chariesworth gave goaiie Ro- ^SSlSSi 
1 U; Utah 118, Denver J08, ana second consecutive game berto Romano a band on a shot by Mario Stastny Saturday Seattle as isikma 1 

Los Angeles Lakes 120, Portiami ^ strained ugamems in the joint night, but Stastny and bis brother Peter scored second- \ 


go 47 (Johnson ill. AssUtv. Mltraufcee 24 Kfcng 
(Preasev »); Chicago 21 (Jordon A). jordai 

SATURDAYS RESULTS RMw 

Heotten 22 24 B 80— III verKSB 

GaMto state » 14 V 31- H ^ 6 

SamoMn 9-17*7 22, Otaliraon 10-17 1-321: 

Ftavd 10-19 7-7 31. MJatunan M7 10-13 21 "Z?_. 

Reaands: ttaustofl 57 (Olalinmn 15): Gotten 

Stale <9 [Whitehead 12). AHMs: Hrastan 26 

(McCray, Hsillne 7); Cotoen State 13 (Cemw 

MtaN 38 87 38 10- 97 J"®** 

Seattle 23 to 17 30-M6 «' WM 

Chambers Mt 12-U 26. Slkma 9-19 34 21; N ew Jc 
Kellogg 9-17 5-J 24. Williams 9-19 M 30. Rf AlWta 
bouedi; Indiana S3 (Garnett 15); Seattle S Wllklr 
(SUuna 101. ahIsH: indlane 29 (Slenrtno 7); Glenn7- 
Seattie 28 (Stkma Henderson 7). 8-314.R 

|_A. Clipper* 37 38 81 89-127 9); Alta 


King 13*22 8*14 34. CummliSS 7-11 6-6 20: 
Jordan 16*25 10-11 A Woe I ridge 13-15 34 27. 
ReMuadt: Chicago 48 (Corxtoe 12); New 
York [BoDoYt). Aabh: CMcbboS {Mat- 
thews 6); Nrn York 26 (Walker 7). 

De troll » 36 25 M-I31 

wnbiogtan 57 86 3( 86— 1U 

Thomas B-ZI 10-13 27. Tripudia 9-16 M 19; 
Ruiand 10-83 7-10 87. Williams 9-82 4-5 24, Ro- 


Tennis 


WORLD DOUBLES TOURNAMENT 
(At London) 

Ftoal 

Ken Flaai and Robert Seguso, UA, deL 
Heinz Gtoithardt Switsertand, and Baton 
Taraczv. Hungary, W, 3-6, 6sL 64L 
Seaifflaali 

Fiach and Segusa deL Sandy Mover, UJS. 


; DafenitM (Roundflotd 12); WMhtaO- 0K i WrtW spi M LPolon***,74lM).M.M. 


M „ ton 52 (Ruland 13). Acstee: Detroit 9 1 Thomas 
4); wathtoatan 6 (Gus WDUams 4). 


Guntnarat and Taraety del. Kevin Curren, 
South Africa and Sieve Denton. UA. 54, M. 5- 


35-114 X 6-2. 


Thomas, a fourth-year 


WUH siraiiiw - — j-— - — o— • j — — — *■ *■“** penvw 30 31 37 17—115 

Piston, of an index finger. (LAT, Wr) period goals 31 seconds apart to spur Quebec's 8-3 victory. smith 11-15 64 86, Johnson 11-222434; Halt 


2B. Re* Aifrata «9 31 M 80-lto Fifth Place; Anders Jamd and Hans 54- 

attle to Wilkins 11-81 7 -b 29, Levfnastofi 7-ID 8-4 16. mortsson. Sw e d en, d ut. Fritz Buehnfno and 
Uno 7); Glenn 7-9 2-3 16; Rwwev10-T7M20; Eng lor 6-7 Peter f taming, ui, 6-3. 3-4, 7* 

8-3 14. g eb ee n di : New Jersey 35 (B. Williams Seve n t e Ptoee: Pavel Slozfl end Tamos 

89—127 9); Atlanta 47 (Levlnsstan 12). Assists: New 5m M, Czechoslovak la, dd. Mari Edmondson, 

IT— Iff Jersev 24 ( ft ta h ontauu 7); Atlanta 33 ( Rivers Australia, ond Sherwood Stewart, U.5, Ml. 7-6 


13. Peter Nantoeraer. Welt Germany. R8D- 

46.14—1:3894 

MGwmiarHeuiieeser.Swedea51JE-474a-. 

1:38.97 

15. Tefeura Okabe. Japan. 58.B6-4t.i5— 
i:3Mi 

ME ITS OVERALL STANDINGS 

1. AAane GirardeilL Luxembourg, T20 points 

2. Plrmln Zurhrlggen, Switzerland. 104 
3 WenzeL Mil 

4. J titan. 70 

5. Robert Ertartwr. Italy. 64 

4. De Chiesn and Buraler, 59 

8. Martin HangL Switzerland. 58 

9. Bulan Krtal, Yugnetovta, 53 

10. Nilsson. 52 

WOMEN’S SLALOM 
(Al Maribor. Yugoslavia) 
l. Tamara McKinney. U-5. VMM. 

8. Olga Charvalova, CzedwslovcAla. 
1:2434. 

1 Brigitte Gadient. Swttwlind, 1:2437. 
a Erika Hera switzertand. 1:2*40. 

5. Perrfm Petan, France. 1:2440. 

a Ursula KetueH, Ltaditmeleln. 1:2101. 
7. Peolefta Magonl, Itoiv, 1:25.11. 

0 Uanca Fernandez*Odiea Spain, 1 12S40. 

9. Darota Tlalke, Poland, 1:2548. 

ML Monks Aellas. Sweden, 1:2536. 

11. Roswttha Stainer. Austria. 1:25.92. 

1 Z An|g Zftvadlav. Yugoslavia 1 : 26.13. 

IS- MalgeRota Ttolka Potond, 1:364* 

M Dantata ZlnL Italy. 1:2648. 

15. vrenl Schneider. Switzerland. ) :26J8. 

WQMEWS OVERALL STANDINGS 
1. Marina KlehLWest Germany, 88 Points. 

Z Hess. OZ 

a Elisabeth Klrchier, Austria 70. 

4- McKirvwv. **. 

& Zee Haas Switzerland. 65. 

A Marta Walllser. Switzarketa. »1. 

7. Charvalova 59. 

A Chrlstelto Gulgnard, Franco, 57 . 

9. Schneider. 56. 

10, Miawia FiginL Switzerland. 55. 




Page 20 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, MONDAY, JANUARY 7, 1985 


LANGUAGE 


No Pig-Outs for Porky 


By William Safire 

W ASHINGTON _ In Paris, 
they're au regime ; in Berlin, 
they’re into Diaileberr, in London, 
they're slimming, here at borne, af- 
ter stuffing ourselves for the holi- 
days, we’re dieting. 

Perhaps I used that term loo 
quickly. According to Weight 
Watchers, the current euphemism 
for dieting is being careful. Not long 
ago. that was a euphemism for con- 
traception, which shows how our 
worries change. 

If you've been fressing or noshing 
(Yiddishisms based on the German 
fressen. “to devour.” and naschen. 
“to eat surreptitiously”) or snack- 
ing between meals or grazing all 
day, then you, like most of us. have 
been overeating. 

As they say at Weight Watchers 
(National Lampoon calls it 
Weighty Waddlers). you were being 
bad. 

Now we’re into fiber. That’s the 
hot new word in the language of 
diet. It means “the part of food that 
is indigestible cellular matter.” In 
the days when waitresses giggled to 
hear you order bran flakes with a 
side order of prunes, fiber used to 
be called bulk or roughage. 

Empty calories is another phrase 
you come across while nibbling 
your way through diet books. The 
calories themselves are not “emp- 
ty.” but they come from food with 
little or no nutritional content 
(What jargon am I accepting with 
nutritional content ? The simple En- 
glish word is nourishment . J This 
pseudoscientific term has replaced 
the familiar junk food. 

Reliance on high-energy foods 
spawned the current phrase carbo- 
hvJrate-loading, popular among 
runners of marathons who stuff 
themselves with whole-grain pasta 
before trotting off to the day’s race. 
Most dieters, who do not exercise 
enough as it is. frown on loading 
themselves with carbohydrates. 

In that regard, every health-food 
nut knows what gorp is: a mix of 
cereal grains, peanuts, raisins, 
dates, little bits of chocolate or sug- 
ar candy. 

Some hikers and campers go for 
gorp . or trail mix, on the theory that 
its high energy content gives them a 
lightweight kick. Some folk etymol- 
ogists contend that gorp is an acro- 
nym for granola, oats, raisins, pea- 
nuts. but that smacks of the port 
out, starboard home malarkey about 
the origin of posh. 


To me. the word seems formed 
like Lewis Carroll’s creation of 
chortle by combining chuckle with 
snort: gorp is a wadded snort and 


Because those of us who shovel 
food in our faces ravenously are 
addicts, the vocabulary of addic- 
tion has been adapted to dieting. 
You can O. D. on the mocha butter- 
cream Ilona tones in George 
Lang’s new “Cafe des Artistes 
Cookbook”; O.D. comes from over- 
dose in drug usage. The suffix 
- aholic or -holic is now being ap- 
plied to lovers of darkly delicious 
sweets, as in the word chocoholic. 


Hie words used by dieters to 
revile nondieters include pig out 
and binge, taken from the noun 
that described the lost weekends of 
alcoholism. Wolfing is what fast 
eaters do. and this term has been 
bastardized to voofing, adding a 
canine dimension. 


The biggest verb in this fast- 

food-for-thought category is scarf. 
“to wolf down;” this verb originat- 
ed in the black English term for 
food in the 1930s. scoff, which 
Wentworth and Flexner's Dictio- 
nary of American Slang suggests 
has an African origin. Farmer and 


Henley’s “Slang and Its Ana- 
logues” traces the word scoff to 


1893 hobo use. Clarence Major's 
Dictionary of Afro-American 
Slang defines scoff! scarf as mean- 
ing “to eat.” synonymous with 
“grease (one’s) chops.” 

In the lexicon of lip-smacking, 
an epicure is fastidious in his choice 
and enjoyment of food, just a 
soup^on more expert than a gastro- 
nome; a gourmet is a connoisseur of 
the exotic, taste buds attuned to the 
calibrations of deUdousness, who 
savors the masterly techniques of 
great chefs; a gourmand is a hearty 
bon vivant who enjoys food with- 
out truffles and flourishes: a glut- 
ton overindulges greedily, the word 
rooted in the Latin for “one who 
devours." 


What do you call a person who 
has become corpulent portly, or — 
let’s face it — fat? You call him, or 


call yourself. Uubber-guts. fat stuff, 
i\ tubbv. 


five-by-five, porin', tubby, bucket o’ 
lard, solid suet, beef trust or hippo. 

What would I like you to call me 
if 1 can get these 15 pounds off and 
then go into a maintenance mode? 
One name fits all: Slim. 


New Yarii Times Serw r 


■a i o | • Unlike His Elusive * Catcher in the Rye ’ Father , 

lYlatmeW u3 linger Writer's Son Is Seeking His Role on Broadway 


By David Remnick 

Washington Past Service 

N EW YORK — Just a few years before he 
stopped publishing and went into seclu- 
sion. J. D. Salinger urged his friend and edi- 
tor at The New Yorker, William Shawn, to 
accept the dedication to “Franny and Zooey" 
“as nearly as possible in the spirit of Matthew 
Salinger, age one. urging a luncheon compan- 
ion to accept a cool lima bean." 

■ Matthew Salinger is 24 now, tall and rangy 
like his father, handsome like his mother 
Claire, an actor like his father’s creation, 
Zooey. He has appeared as a hyper-libidinous 
lacrosse coach in the soar opera “One Life to 
Live,” as a crasher of slide-rule-bearing rap- 
squeaks in the movie “Revenge of the 
Nerds." And he is now the star of Bill C. 
Davis's “Dancing in the End Zone" at the 
Ritz Theater on Broadway. He plays a college 
football star tormented by the demands of his 
mother, his coach and ms tutor. 

“This is it for me,” Matt Salinger says as he 
urges a luncheon companion to take a seat a 
few days before the play’s opening Jan. 3. 
“You don't get a chance an Broadway every 
day of the week.” 

Salinger is string in an Upper East Side 
bistro that serves 300 varieties of omelet. “I 
don’t know aboot fame.” he continues. “I 
want to be successful as an actor, and if fame 
is a byproduct of that, well, then it’s a neces- 
sary evfl. It’s not something I aspire to.” 
Dudley Moore is sting over in the corner. 
An excruciatingly casual couple enters the 
restaurant. They notice Moore and start fum- 
bling with their coats longer than necessary 
so they can stare ai the movie star. 

Salinger is the first to norice this little 
d rama- “Fame is — well, you look over in the 
comer there at Dudley Moore. Everyone’s 
staring at him. It’s a loss of privacy.” 
Fame has hem a na gging companion tn thg 
Salinger family. “Catcher in the Rye,” pub- 
lished 34 years ago, was the sort of in timat e 
book that (in the wards of Holden Caulfield) 
“when you're all done reading it, you wish (he 
author that wrote it was a terrific friend of 
youis and you could call him up on the phone 
whenever you felt like it” 

J. D. Salinger is about the last author in the 
world you could call op on the phone. It’s 
unfair to speculate on what be felt or why, but 
something made him stop publishing and 
keep his distance from the public world. His 
last published works were “Franny and 
Zooey" (1961), “Raise High the Roof Beam, 
Carpenters and Seymour: An Introduction” 



conspicuous parallels and symbols. But the 
acting is strong and Salinger is a boyish, 
affecting presence on stage. 

Says producer Morton Gottlieb: “We au- 
ditioned about 100 guys for the part and we 
loved Matt He’s a wonderful actor and he 
looks like a football player. When we audi- 
tioned him, we didn’t even know if he was 
related to the writer. It really doesn't matter. 


It may get us an extra mention or two in prim 
but I don’t think anyone goes and buys a 


Money Kaye,- for The Warrington Post 

Actor Matthew Salinger: “It's me 
who's chosen a more pubfic life." 


(1963) and one final stoiy> “Hapworth 16, 
1924,” which appeared in the New Yorker in 


1965. His physical seduaon has been nearly 
as complete as his literary silence. The gam- 
brel-roofed Salinger bouse in Cornish. New 
Hampshire, overlooks the Connecticut River 
and is protected by high walls. 

Matt 5 father and mother, a Jungian psy- 
chologist, divorced when he was 6 years old. 


But his parents lived dose to one another and 
Matt divided his time be t ween th«n before 
leaving for a series of boarding schools and 
Princeton and Columbia uni verities. 

“I remember that stuff happ ening way be- 
fore I even knew what it meant," Matt Salin- 
ger says. “Obnoxious people would show up 
at the house and start demanding things 
There were reporters, photographers, aspir- 
ing writers. He was as polite as they were. I 
just sort of accepted it all like you would a 
surrealist drama. 

“I see red now when I hear about people 
bothering him. My father does not want a 
public life. Thai’s been clear for many years. 
He wants to write for the page and he wants 
his characters to be on the page and in read- 
ers’ minds. He doesn’t want people to malm 
him into something be's noL He thinks it’s 
bad for biin and his work to have a public 
life.” 

Salinger began acting as Mouse Soldier 
No. 17 in “The Nutcracker" at Norwich Ele- 
mentary School in Norwich, Vermont, just 
across the river from Cornish. At Andover, 
Salinger bad the lead role in “Charley’s 
Aunt" which, be says, “was about the biggest 
thing I’ve done in theater until now.” 

“Dancing in (he End Zone” is a drama 
marked by rather preachy wri ring and a set of 


ticket because one of the actors is related to 
J.D. Salinger.” 

In “Revenge of the Nerds,” Salinger paid a 
multitude of Hollywood does. As an apish 
football player, he somehow managed to ride 
a tricycle, dress as a woman and join in a 
group mooning session all within a couple of 
hours. “Great scenes in cinema tic history,” 
he calls them. Salinger turned down two mov- 
ie roles to appear in “Dancing in the End 
Zone.” For sizable sums he could have beaten 
up Rob Lowe in “St Brno's Fire” and pol- 
ished a Ferrari in “Summer Jobs.” 

Salinger is more than willing to work in the 
movies as well as ou stage. He is marrying 
Betsy Becker, a jewelry designer soon, and 
“and I do have to think about earning a 
living,” he says. But Salinger’s stint in Holly- 
wood was not always pleasanL 

“You’re always having meetings with peo- 
ple you have little or no respect for. I’ve had 
people tiy to offer me things in exchange for 
doing something having to do with my fa- 
ther’s work. You know, boy the rights to his 
work. You want to spit at people like that 

“When l first started acting I tried to make 
sure (hat as few people as possible knew who 
my father was. I was very self-conscious. My 
first agent didn’t know and the agent that I’ve 
got now. her partner didn’t even know until 
be saw a little squib in Time magazine. But 
I’ve finally realized that there's too much 
money at slake for someone to hire me if I 
didn’t have any talent. 

“1 love my father. Tm not rebellious 
against him at alL He’s made a decision about 
how he wants to live. Why would I ever want 
to violate that in any way? It’s me who’s 
chosen a more public life. That’s acting. 
That’s the wav it is.” 


■ ’Modified Campus Drama’ 

“Dancing in the End Zone.” is “a muddled 
campus drama.” Frank Rich of the New 
York Times wrote in his review of the play. 
“At the center of this disorganized panel 
discussion is a Midwestern coDege football 
hero. . . . Timmy is an ‘open wound’ search- 
ing for love, the meaning of existence and just 
possibly a surrogate father. We never find out 
for sure (let alone care) whether Jimmy suc- 
ceeds in his quest, but the role is charmingly 
played by Mau Salinger, a young actor whose 
appealing presence should resurface in hap- 
pier surroundings soon.” 


BAIKAL POSTCARD 


Russia’s Water Treasure 


By Nancy Travel- 

A i«« mti-J Pta.\ 

L istvyanka, u.s.s. r. — 

i This liny village in remote Si- 
beria sits on the edge of one of the 
the world's deepest, purest and old- 
est lakes, once worshiped by Siberi- 
an tribes and now a protected na- 
tional treasure in the Soviet Union. 

The Soviet government's efforts 
to maintain the ecology of Lake 
Baikal have kept it the world's larg- 
est body of fresh, clean water. But 
they also have affected the lives of 
the’ hardy people who made their 
homes on its rocky shores. 

A ban on killing rare species of 
fish, for example, has caused fisher- 
men to more away from the sur- 
rounding villages, according to a 
Soviet newspaper. 

The population around BaikaL 
which lies 4.000 miles (6.460 kilo- 
meters) southeast of Moscow, has 
dropped by two-thirds since the 
ban was introduced, said Komso- 
molskaya Pravda. the Communist 
youth newspaper. 

Regulations protecting the lake 
were approved in 1971 by the gov- 
ernment after naturalists protested 
that toxic wastes from a cellulose 
factory were threatening the 1,200 
species of plant and fish life unique 
to the lake. 

The regulations also put a halt to 
timber harvests lhat were stripping 
the surrounding slopes and causing 
soil erosion. 

Now. in an age when ecologists 
worry about lakes being polluted 
hv industrial waste arid acid rain, 
the water in Baikal is still so dean 
that residents carry it home in 
buckets rather than drink from 
their own taps. 

Baikal's surroundings appear as 
unspoiled as the lake's water. Visi- 
tors who reach the area on the 
Trans-Siberian express get. their 
first glimpse of Baikal as the train 
winds around its south side. 
Ringed by snow-covered peaks. 
Baikal's shimmering beauty comes 
into view through a morning mist. 


North America’s five Great Lakes 
combined. 

BaikaL believed to have formed 
25 million years ago. also is the 
world's oldest lake. 

It has many ocean-like features, 
including currents and the sarma 
wind, which blows up to 80 mph. 

After a winter in which, tempera- 
tures plunge to minus 40 degrees 
Fahrenheit (minus 40 Celsius), the 
lake warms slowly. Ice floats on the 
surface in some areas even in July. 

The golomyanka. a spedes of 
fish unique to BaikaL lives 488 me- 
lers (1.600 feet) under water. They 
are almost completely blind and v 
little more than a backbone en- ’ 
cased in faL They mdl or burst 
when washed ashore, leaving a pool 
oT oil rich in vitamin A that the 
native Buryat people use medici- 
naily. 

Golomyanka also are eaten by 
the no-pas, fresh-water seals who 
number about 70.000 and are be- 
lieved to have migrated from the 
Arctic Ocean, although scientists 
can't explain how they reached 
Lake BaikaL 

Baikal also is famous for its stur- 
geon. which grow as large as 500 
pounds and yield up to & pounds 
of black caviar. 

The native Buryat tribes, rela- 
tives of the nearby Mongols, be- 
lieved evil spirits lived in (he lake. 
They also believed their great hero'’ 
Genghis Khan had a camp on one ~ ’ 
of the lake's 22 islands. 

Legends and myths still sur- 
round Baikal and residents speak 
of the lake with awe. They have 
reported mirages over the lake, in- 
cluding a whole train of the Trans- 
Siberian express. Earth tremors are 
common, producing rumblings and 
disturbing the lake’s surface. 

“Baikal is a great bowl that can 
be calm and gentle or. with waves 
as high as a house, it can make our 
lives horrible." said an elderly 
woman. 


ft" 



^'■ ir 


Standing on the shores of the 46- 
mile-wide. 385-mile-long crescent 
or water, it is impossible to see the 
opposite side even on a clear day. 

Local guides proudly recite Bai- 
kal’s impressive statistics. Covering 
an area as large as Belgium and 
Holland, the lake is more than a 
mile deep in one spot and contains 
one-sixth of the world's fresh-water 
supplies. U holds as much water as 


Soviet Vessel Rescues 23 


The Associated Press 

SAN SEBASTIAN. Spain — A 
crewman of the 4,500-ton Spanish 
cargo ship Don Fernando 
drowned, while a Soviet ship 
picked up 23 others Saturday afte.^J 
the Spanish vessel was caught in 
rough seas off Morocco and began 
to list dangerously, a radio report 
said. 


:f*V. - 




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MADRID: 

MANCHESTER: 

MUNKH: 

NAPLES: 

PA 8 J& 

ROME: 

VHNNA: 

ZURICH: 


■41)64062 

■21)170591 
(02)720,95.63 



CONITNEX: Coriuten to 300 sties 
wcrMvnde - Air/Soa. Gofl Chdie 
281 18 81 fans - Oars loo 


BAGGAGE moved via Air/Seo USA/ 
Wbrldvv i de.Bsen lluuu nowGx.Loiv 
don 603 1 266/7. Weekends 474 4743 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


MOVING 


VAN LINES INTL 

ora i,ooQ AGons 

in U-SJL. - CANADA 
350 WOOD-WIDE 
AES SIMMIES 

PARIS O e ib otde s I 


Mortal 


1-M.S. 


{01} 343 23 44 

hwnkrjrt sJZfiR 

(069) 250066 

MUNICH 

(089) 142244 

LONDON , 

(01) 953 3636 
CAIRO Allied Van laws IrrPl 
(20-2) 712901 

USA ABed Van Uneelnft Caqs 
( 0101 ) 312-681-3100 


DEMEXPORT 


PARIS • LYON • MARSEILLE 
imp e NICE 

Inti iromg by spoacriet from 


tmi itowg ay ipoapio tram wcey 
cries in Frcmce to cfl dees m toe wold 
To* free from Frand 16 105) 24 10 8 ? 
SIMMS 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


ITALY 


POCTCTNO 

baton Riviera Magnificent 6.000 
residence u*h tpfendd view an harfa 
+ ton, with 3 safe's. 6 bedrooms, 
some m separrie itufa, tent'd feat. 
aS modem comfort. Brochure ovotab te 
DE HAAS Red Estate 
ieho u wwe a 32. Wear aor. H c O ar d 
TeL 3t $ 1751 • 19229 or 14400. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


COTE D'AZUR 
NICE CENTER 

UNIQUE OPPORTUNITY 
to uMu p 

villa, hot, fcvmg, 4 be dr ooms. 3 bativ 
rooms, lerge terrace, 55 tQJti, fwng 
south, panoranec nvtatato sea view 
Price: F3J95.00Q 
_0°w 


6 A»m Georges Cfemenceou 
06CO0 N«e. Tel: |93) 88 44 98 


MONACO 


MONTE CARLO 
Principality of Monaco 

5H1ING VERY EXCEPTIONAL 
APARTMENT, PATK2, 


700 eg.m. private a 
ReodeiVrd area Center of town, arim. 


300 tQjn. bring s po re , kego erriremon. 
large reception, ttrory, (Snmg, TV 
room. 4 bedrooms. 3 baths. I room for 
staff with bark. Largs modern fiBy 
equoped kitchen. 1 Irenr spare room, 
and* office, targe creoing roam, 
grange. High dess service: 

Mi mntfhoned. electric Winds, etc 

SrOUSTVc AGeNCE INTERMEDIA 
B.P. 54 

MC 98001 MONACO CHJEX 


84 


: 469477 


USA GENERAL 


KCSGiAFASM. 1043 acres, open + 
weeded land. 3.C00 ft. grass cent np, 
targe rent-, re-aere poridvriheabuv 


Mcny other form buiine. Ekfc con- 
-jdr-ed un*d Feb 15, 1&. Ctadtee 


Fa rms. P.CSar 51 S*. Cordefe, Ga 
31015 USA (91? 273-1164. 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 

REAL ESTATE 
TOREMT/SHARE 

SWITZERLAND 

GREAT BRITAIN 

SUNNY 5WT7ZEBLAND 

LAKE LUGANO 

lokesde apretaierto in a beautiful pmfc 
with lvwmming poof, own landtag 
doges. Pnt guoSty equipmaY 9a fire- 
places, Irege terraces, built in briin, 
«c Prices From 5P453^00 up to 
SF1, 123/00. Mortgages up to 60S ct 
taw interest dries. Series perms to 
foreigners ore ovorichie. For fwther 
detail dtae cantori. 
EM&UUD HOME I3D. 

Vta G- Cotton 3 
CH6900 LusoooPnrafao 
Tefc Swifierfcmd 91-542911 
Tries: 73612 HOME CH 



AF 6 COMBE A RfNGLAM) writ of- 
fices m SI Johns Wood & Kenstagtan 
offer toe best sennee m reridfari 
felting. Tefc 722 7101 (01). UK. 

PARIS AREA FURNISHED 

Embcassy Service 

8 Awe. de Mown 
75008 Press 

Trie- 231696 F 

YOUR REAL ESTATE 
AGENT IN PARIS 

FLATS FOR RENT 

SB£CT3> ABEAS 
PHOFE 562-7899 

FLATS FOR SALE 

PHONE 562-1640 

OFFICES FOR RENT/ SALE 

PHCIC 562-62 14 

SWITZERLAND 

FORBGNERS CAN BUY: STUDtO/ 
APARTMBIIS, CHALETS, VILLAS. 
Prices from about SFIOO/MO Regm 
Lt*» Geneva. Montreur & feraous 
Mountan resorts. We have far you o 
big choice of very reawnobly pneed 
Swm homes, but riso Ihe very best & 
the meat esdiaive. BEFORE YOU MAKE 
A DECISION contact: 

H. SBBOLD SA. 

Tour Grke 6 . CHI0P7 lausarvw. 
Tel: 21/25 26 11 Teles. 24298 SEBOCH 

SWITZERLAND 

r— fan m buy □ STUDO 
APARTM&JT or CHALET on LAKE 
GENEVA - MGNTREUX or in torse 

TANA, l£S 01 ASSETS, VSSIS, 
VIUARSp JURA, etc. IrcmSFRI 10.000. 
Mortgages 60% at 6W*4 »i>oiat 
MVAC S-A. 

52 rue de Montbrifarrt. CH-12S2 
G84EVA. Tel. 41 -22 '34 15 d> 
Tefer. 23133 

AVE MONTAIGNE 

Uivurtaus fumnhed. 70 ta-ns, 2 rooms, 
targe entree*, marbfe bortwoom. aid- 
ed »Anq. very hmh class. F25TOjOOO. 
Tefc 57? 32 25. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


NEUILLY ST JAMES 


teri uu . luminous double Swig, 
*oorre. pcetno FI Z 000. 
Embccsy 563 68 38. 


74 CHAMPS-ELYSES 8«i 


Shxio, 2 or 3*oora ijice l u Tt. 
One mar di or more. 

IE OAJBDGE 359 47 97. 


FOR 6 MONTHS. Rued Mdkndson, 
ipfencfid baton nqhr an Bos de St 
Cuaifa 160 sqjn. * bed ro o ms , krge 
Swig romn. drnng. 2 bathe, 1st Boo*, 
ovmdbte Feb 1st let 751 23 96 


REAL FOR SHORT TERM STAY. Paris 
stodkn 8 2 room, decorated Conroe 
Sorelm: 80 rue Unrversite. Boris 7th. 
Tat (1) 544 39 40 


1ST. PLACE VBtDOtWL 

double iving, bemoan, beouti- 


1 fie inJied, mod el i i biJen, bflK 
FI 0,000. Tefc 720 37 99 


Mi: GEORGE V. Began! targe firing 
+ one bedroo m, fireplace, wel fur- 
nished. btchen. bath. F600Q Tefc 
720 37W 


I6TH THOCAOEtO. Lovely umoue 
apartment, tvein + 2 bedrooms, 
beautihJy fwnaned, worry, moavh- 
cent view. F950a 720 3799 


MONTPARNASSE AREA. Z^oom 
■ 41 m ime r it. Feb. to Sept- F3JOO per 
month TeL- 335 48 25. 


SHORT TERM n lath Ouorer. 
Nomjerih.Td ! 37»3B«a. 


REAL ESTATE 
RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


l&th: VICTOR HUGO- Very lovdy 
targe double bvmg. 3 bedroo m , 
equpped kitchen, perfect c o ndition. 
on garden FI 5,00ft 720 37 99 


7TH RACE PALAB BOURBON, 

charm ng 2 -room fltf, 
erju^pod latches bath, 
ptace. F6.00Q. 720 3799- 


7 th AREA. RUE BABYLOW. 

Kps. apartment, Swig with 
+ one bedroom, kitchen, 
room. F3100L Col 771 63 S5 


45 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 


FRANCE. YOUNG ANGLOAMSU. 
CAN fcruly seek comfortable srcoda 
house for march <k ) Jy 1985. Hong 
Kang home possMy offered m e»- 
droxje-^Pteme reply to Bax_l556, 

Ranee. 


NeuSy Cedex. 


NEUU1Y (92) OR 17TH. 2/3 roams 
65 sam. Manmurn F&000 charges 
taduaed for English executive in 
France 12-18 months. Serious refer- 
ences. Starting Jan. - Feb. 85. Pouibifc- 
ty parting. T&P3) 3) 76 17. 


RIEM5HH) SUBLET FOR 4 MONTHS 
JmtApril tequeed. Refer Paris 16. 
Write with proposab Bo* 30, 33 roe 
GdUee. 75116 W. 


EMPLOYMENT 


EXECUTIVE 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


16. 


Towrhotne. 350 sam.. 3 imt y c, 7 
rooms. 4 bofhs, garden. F23fl00. GA 
Geneva 41-22/468220. 


Internatiocai Business Message Center 



ATJBfTXJN EXECUTIVES 


m the InSa m ta ional Heretd Ttt- 
bu r m, whore m ere then a third 
of 0 mBBon lead e rs urartd- 
3 wide, m ost of wham am fit 
* butiaaa and indashy, wiS 
- rood if. Just Mete us (Paris 
1 613S95J before Warn., en- 
miring mot w* 
back , and yea 
appear wfeiwt 
rrie 


48 boar*, the 
US.S9.80 or fatal 
equ f vo ' en f per Una. You neat 

t mdede coiulntr end venlh 
^ able bSUng addrms. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


TroveOere from iap cat i 
Home without ii_ 


Ncr cfa the Sngtah. French, Germoi or 
Auc-c£iore_ 


Tbs! r._ vri- out cdecytfc travel mc£- 
d rsrai ca. Yet, len than 4% of 
Ameers eote the USA wrtfi it. 
There »!bre rg<rl of 25 nAan U5 
cvrrec s troveC en in 1985 and rm 
neve *ne onr, cudcy travel medical ev 
mrana? pr aduff cjnerdy Qridobl a to 
Ametg s re. We *» mcrlgfted it Mccess- 
k»* for 5 veers but w think Res is the 
-ijn* time fc o targe tcoie. ysr* vemure 
wt>o^e» per vffo »iimj i hg tmg partner. 


yew ar jm b u n has a flood track 

record m c rVetwq mumgfafes, and 
mode jie to dnarss m ur k etn i g this av 
»tns — Lei’s tef. 


Wr«»,o:oprfii fe vg<feolorniei 
earstaer ai equ*y postal Send aa» 
itan e n and time bit to- 

Tom SI. Deni* Sr. 

Strife ±600 


8027 leeebarg 
Vienna. VA. USDA 22180 


The 292802 AMUR 


€BGL 

gFncu*.w«cH 


18 ct Gold. Steel and I Set Gold, Steel, water resistant 30 m. 'IX/art*. 
For imlotmalion write EBEl S A,23(X)ta Cfwtrr-de Fords / Swil^dond. 


IM-WKSAfrON TO USA 
, MACS EASY 

fit-amrv & 9nata> obtamS mas & per- 
"<os*rt rntaenec. Heips to tei up USA 

8 ccm eoanwraol, mdav 
c ieo> esiate. fo» tree 

!>Xtar «-.!r Zaud Hooil 1201 
2F* 51- 1 fee ax. Mevtoari Beads. CA 
USA. (71q 752 0966. 


I HONG KONG CORPORATIONS fa. 

US52T Arrud dontictle SZ30. Si 
! UO. Fm '31. 3 Oueenv M. Hong 

; !Cc«i >: 5-:33iT. Tfa 8387BS«f 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


iNVBT 525,000 

EARN $404,112 

{AND MORE) 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


^ a&r G: Acerone 


Ho ri e o i m 2CO O h One ef t he Be*t 
hwedneeh in A^rkrilert to Hie 
United SMet today, h own pnne 
laid Nut trees crowig. 3CS avenjrjo 
tend return ra. oe c-sdet mvcvri 
due to tec h n o tayori beetaohrewgn pd- 
neered b y p o mmeri urwereN proto*- 
5®, *CP 

Uniqofl Opportunity for tavador* 
Broi mn' o n qupir* vmcomncL Mcomict 
m Encfah. ■ .'-J.. Gctt-icti, Arobfe 
Contact: GLOBc PLAN S Jk. 

A*. Mon Repce 2c 
0+1055 Lcuiome. Swesmi^id. 

Tel pi) 22 35 12 Tl. 25IB5V£USOH 


COMFUTS PORTRAITS 


T-SHIRT FOTOS 
NOW IN rau. COLOR 

on oiLcmfi busmra that con earn you 
SBOOO - Sl0.000<’morih. New and used 
from SI 0.000 - S30.C0C Kara 
Co. Dpt P 8 e e th o . uwii i 9 


Fcordfmt/W. G ermany. 

12713 KtMA 


TeL 069-747803 TV 41Z713 


UX OffiSHORE OOMPAMESI We 
provide n anv ne* Orida & Seae- 
tarjrt Comptote damcfetonl London 
bank oaztarm opened wnu to jnwj vdy 


with compcny bemg pechened) 
er Sheet avatabal IP Can 


Ctnrponr 


CASH BUTBt it wiEng to pay the best 
pnee* for a3 well-known t* arris ot 
Flench perfumes, Cafegnes and tofot 
wnt e r . Pfo cee send often to- Fe Trad- 
ag, P OB IS C. AnEtardam/Hoforta. 
Trier: 57733 mm fr Trnrirvy 


SMAIi RESTAURANT M BANGKOK 
nv stoe, now eperatmg Ideal for foil 
food conw roo n E xe c fu U be rf reri, 
avafcbto now. Enquiry 95'4 Bnjn. 
dmmi Food. Brairaon. Ban ' 
105QO Tri 251 4^36 or 252 Q7T 


FRESH WA1B ICAR1 STRAW 
and tooee peart an roto hi Hang Kang. 
Good quehry and tool pnee. he mere 
dadkc Tl», 57719 PCXA8 WL Tel O 
6832767. Address. 9/F. WtoLok Nton- 
wi Na K Pekto Bood. TS.7, 
MONG KGNG 


Special eSekvery. Pfoasr* c otoad-. 
Ownveat Trairig Lid TTv 4JJ500 tee CH 


FIDUCIARY BANKING on targe coL 
loMdaed bans. Dm only canvner. 
od he™ wSi o representative office 
n London cpeochang m ttoi service. 
Arab Overse a s 6 cnk & Tnrt (WJ1 
ltd. 23 Stack Pnm Ed. London SE1. 
Tel 735 8171 


HOW TO MAKE USS2SOOOO 
ttvoogH mntokevel mail order uto 
The report will give you modi needed 
Bdbrmancn to help yov in this aims It 
wfi show jtau how you realy con 


moke o quarter ne&an doBai m just 3 
Itrom 


of 4 man Sis. Order ito report 
Coterie &rmo*j Sertoce*, PO Bov 
0982. Scorodato. AZ 9S252 USA and 
endow USS10 (a the equivalent m 
giy LQiweittble gngjcji 


DIAMONDS 


DIAMOM3S 

Your bea buy. 

fine diamond: ei any price range 
m bwql ^who l oi c ile pric es 
dneri from Aitverp 
center of the ckomond world. 
FuB geaardee. 

Far free once tot wnfa 
Joachim GoWeeefefe 


btabfished T928 

Pe Hc oonstroot 63. B-201B Antw er p 
Brigum ■ Tnt P3 3] 234 51 

Tie.- 71/79 ryt b. AI (he Demand Club. 
Heorr ef Antwerp Dromond induHry 


OFFICE SERVICES 


ZURKH-ZURK»-ZU)aCH 


BAHNHOFSTRASSE 52 
THE HNANOAL CENTS! 

* Your ete gtd td Business Seraces 
(jjTipeny to (he f monool Center 

• Office tnfrariruriwe: Eaeatoe 
Ohcrs. dedom e d te lep hone, tele*, 
men a ge arttt. mohmtgud 
w cyetnrme +■ re u e sto rv i ft. 

6 Doncfie your oddms at Zuridis 
renowned bianem rfreet. 

Buiin— Sflrvke* Ga mut! Coro. 
BcMtotarode S3. CH-8Q22 Zurich. 
TeL 01-211 92 07. Tl*. 813 062 


OFHCE SERVICES 


PARIS 

nocr CHAMPS RYSSS 


RENT 

YOUR OFFICE 


wftb «dt foeSafioe 


75116 Pans. Ti 
Toler: to tote! 


8 rue Cocenec 
b (33 1) 72/ 15 59 
ltd 620 IP3F. 


YOUR OFRCE fff PARIS RIGHT ON 

THE CHAMPS ELYSEE5 

LUXURY SBTVtCTO OFFICES 
Tetoctone ontwere y , loin. Fern 
leootarnt, meeting room 

Ti 


ACTE. 66 Chornas Byy»« (tore Brh 
562 66 00 7k 649157F 


rax 5WTS5 BUSR4E5S 
BASE IN LUGANO 
F« 6 y m tegroted buunesi services 

phones trierimol WKe, 

Ronsktore/odmnalKton/ 
fcooWoejwta. Tel 091/231.161 
Hr: 795*4 PMSA CM 


YOUR LONDON OFFICE 
at the 

Q4ESHAM EXECUTIVE CENTRE 
Comprehensive range of lenneat 


150 Repem Sneer. London W1. 
Teh (01) 439 6288 Tbc 261426 


BUSINESS SERVICES 


OFFSHORE 
UMTTHI COMPAMES 
BANKS 

INSURANCE COWANES 


Worldwide 

Nomme roAtaeetolronan 
Boot Begolrobons 
ReodynoOe or Specol 


LOMX3N RreK584TATIVE 


ASTON COMPANY FORMATIONS 

Dept HI. 

8 Vtctana Si 


Dovgtas. Ud ol Mm 
TSOft 


0624 265*1 
Telex 627691 SPIVA Q 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


15% ON FUME NY MORTGAGES 
written m your none. PO SOX 62$ 
Depr. MT-1, Middletown. NY 10940 


SALES ENGINEER 


A fU ajo, U 5 . TnduU rM 
eorporatosn a aeefang on Ddituring 
Hong Kong resident to fill a new pro- 
cess engineering and tdn position. 


Food. PharmaorutKOl or bev u t ug e in- 
dustry eupcnenca worfd be espmiaPy 
valuable Experience m drafting and 
00619 pnntv ard m Otra bunnea 


devetapmonf o plus. Burnt m Mondmm 
& Engfan o 11 


equifement 
F oftoly m Pnd con f idence with 
1(4 resume & salary expected, together 
with one lecer* photo to 


TST, P.O. Box 99074, Haag Kong 


GENERAL POSmONS 
AVAILABLE 


The CtussfinJ De p ort m e n t of the 
INTERNATIONAL HERALD FRAME 
seeks 

YOUNG JUNIOR SALES PERSON 
to assut sales team in France to develop 
fitting and new amtocn. EKngud 
French/ English. Self inflahve and 
aynmnam appreoatsd. EEC ncOanal or 
worfong prm i. Free February. Plea* 
tend CV. aid photo tor 
Mot Ferrero 

INTERNATIONAL HOALD TOBUNE. 
92521 Neuily Cedax. France. 


B4GUSH SPEAKING SALES GIRL 


wanted. Wnte with reference & ptero 
Bd du Monf- 


■f posuHo to Deutith, 1 

aarnaue. 75006 Poo 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


Far PARS la DBB4SE 


SECRETARIES 

Wngud. nmmum BTS level, 
knowledge IBM wprd proaeaor, 
perfect nmmtodge at EngfoK 

TREX OPSATORS 


working w6 compute ^ rela yed 


oqu^xnenf. Written 

Switchboard Operators 

BAngud EngtaMrench, 
Expenenas in into rntfiond doraan. 
Apoiy PBODCST *tt 


43, r. feomnl 26S 16 62 
295 b * 


bd Rnspail 335 14 30 


MIMES VF SfSCS fo« AMERICAN 
miraEKVC F0WS HI PAHS 


Vdar Hugo, 7SI 1 

61 697 


727. 


[fetch or German 

at French <*. 
■L Knpipl 

phone - 138 Avenue 
6 Pori*. 


Purbw fiimae. Tel: 


Den t tube 
R4TERNATIONAL 
SECRBMBAL MSiriONS 


TUESDAY5 

m 6 iHI ClreeHled Sadtan. 


YOWG OFFICE JUNIOR, FWi/ 
Engfch toeokmg regueed Goad Pyp. 

a and Shorthand. F 6 J00 pm month 
723 7224 eel. 309. 


Place Your Classified Ad Quiddy and Easily 

in lho 

INTERNATIONAL HBUOD TRIBUNE 


By Phone: Cot your local MT representative with your text You 
wA be informed of ihe cost tamdnieiy, and once prepaymert is 
mode your ad will appear withta 48 hours. 

Cert The basic rate is $9 JO per fine per day + local knee. There are 
25 letters. o^» and spaces m Ihe fimt fate aid 36 * 1 6 * Mowing fines. 
Mmnjm space h 2 ires. No ofabnevtaiiore uct nptod. 

Cnedd Cards: American Express, Diner s Oub, Eurocard, Master 
Cord, Access and Vha. 


HEAD OFFICE 


LATIN AMERICA 


Puri*-- (For dmrifiad only): 
747-464XL 


_ : 212-9608 

Btrenoe Alnoc 41 40 31 




EUROPE 


ib 26-36-15. 
Attrone; 361-8397/360-2421. 
1343-1899. 

n: pi) 329440. 
Franfcfiwt (069) 72-67-55. 
IromontM: 2958-94. 

Lisbon: 67-27-93/66-25-44. 
London: pi) 836-4802. 
Madrid: 455-2871/455-3306, 
MMaru (02) 7531445. 
Norway: (03) 845545. 
Rome: 679-3437. 

Tel Avhr 03J55 559 
Vienna: Contact Fr a nkfurt. 


= 331454 
s 431 943/431 
Unro 417 852 
P retoat a- 64-4372 
San Jaw: 22-1055 
Santiago: 6761 555 
Sae Paula: 852 1893 


MIDDLE EAST 


Bahrain: 693592. 
Jordan: 25214. 
Kmnrih 5614485. 
Qatro: 416535. 

Saucfi Arabia: 
Jeddcdv 667-1500. 
Dcettman: 8343466, 
UAJL-. Dubai 224161. 


FAB EAST 


Bangkok: 390-96-57. 


j Kang: 5-420906. 
Manila: 8170749. 


Snout: 725 87 73. 
Singapore: 222-2725 
Tafenet: 75244 25/9. 
Tokyo: 504-1925. 


UNITED STATES 


AUSTRALIA 


New York: pi 2J- 752-3890. 


Sydney: 929 56 39. 
Melbourne: 690 8233. 




EMPLOYMENT 


SECRETARIES AVAILABLE 
GB-IHEOGEMEDEUCRBttte^ 

porory help people w«h you a Happy 
retx Tear. B you cr»? o 
wry gne ut a coil. Porn 


1 ya n are o Mod sneer 
» 758 82 30. 


«INTWM - Ihe Uteri Bdfabfo Tem- 
Fenonnel m P**. French & 
offal personnel Cal Don- 
83 30 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


UNWERSnY IECTURERS 
A re*«rm ore nvited for academe 
year 198586 m 1 Busmen & Menage- 
n»«. Con^rier Stories. Bc a no ma Tbt- 
G*ih. Government. Hotory. Mathemar- 
*s, Ph yeq. ffiyrfiotagy Speech & 
Saoofagy. Dario, ct* preferred. Recent 
fcoehmg enp e n eri L e in Amencmi Ure- 
i^ iy^fo ^tydwtadtfeMustbe 
NATO n ahcnoL Program B offered at 
xores at tocaflans rtirouflhout Weriern 
atrope. 

1W WnraBITY OF MARYtAND 
tat Bosseldorn 30 

6900 HBDa»!G 


West Germcny 
W 6221-37658 


^B^ORAMWCANreocS 

ers. tree mommgs &/or late oftor- 
fares. West 

utreyir 609 2p 87 fan. 


Evry. Tef 078 3302 


„ DOMESTIC 
positions wanted 

^n e m cockin g. 1 6 yeorr weh orevi- 

efale e^lem 




TSWUKbee^t 


WWAYS AVAILABLE - AU PAIRS. 
”?77- 2 »'* tefeen & 

London nn*rmSJ!Vn 




Mather 1 Hdps 


EMPLOYMENT 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 


FRS4CH CW. 33. seeks responsible 
Mmbon with trovefing oenon or fast- 
By. Htahest references. Free from Jan- 
ucey. Box 40144. IH.T, 63 Long Acre. 

toreton. WC2E9K 


EATON BUREAU ST. 1969. owriobk 
now iwn«, me4h«ri' hdps 8 , dl 


g'^awfa Svewi domestic staff, UK 


Oversea*. Ccfl London 730 9564 
Lc. UK, Employment Agency. 


B4GUSH NANNY 34 , troned & tope- 
fenced References avcdaUe, seek* 
>n now. Tefc Eaton Bureau 730 
be UK Employment Agency. 


portion 1 

9566.be 


B4GUSH RUnSt/CKAUFFaiR 40. 
US otaew. me aUm ! re feren c es. Free 
now. Cal; Baton Bureau 730-9566, 
farion.Enfl4oynwreAqcncy.be. UK. 


ALWAYS AVAILABLE LONDON only 
babyrmnden & Id etasi da9y mads. 
Crfl 5taane Bureau, London 730 
B122/5I42. liCEMP. AGY. 


AUTO SHIPPING 


HOW TO IMPORT A EUROPEAN $ 
_ CAR INTO THE U^A. 
ihs document mp hre fuBy what are 
•nust do to bnnq a cor into the LLS. 
satriy cmd fogafiy. ft ine fo des new & 

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UOT * ffA commrsion addresses, cus- 
tom dmraica 8 sfepptag procadnes 
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tgiSDOO when Uiying □ Mercedes, or 


BMW 
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Stotas. To itton tfa mrod . tend 


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TWO Stuttgart 1, Wed Germany 


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PAGE 4 . 

FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


& 


S 


■ gaqv. • . 




VAN CLEEF& ARPELS 


WORLD FAMOL'S JEWFLLFRS 
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LONDON 

tel- oi 5 »??Xi? c W street. ' 

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