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The Global Newspaper 
Edited in Paris - 
Primed Simultaneously 
in Pane, London, Zurich, 
Hong Kong, Singapore, 

The Hague mid Marseille 


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INTERNATIONAL 



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WEATHER DATA APPEAR ON PACE 14 


No. 31,690 


Published With TTie New^ork^ffl^s and The Washington Post 

AfUANUA^Y 9, 1985 ~ 

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Baker, Regan 
To Exchange 
Sg Their Positions 


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By David Hoffman 

IVmfaflgiwi Past Service 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ranald Reagan, climaxing a major 
shake-up of his senior advisers, an- 
nounced Tuesday that the White 
House chief of staff. James A. Bak- 
er 3d, would switch jobs with Trea- 
sury Secretary Donald T. Regan. 
The announcement means that Mr. 
Reagan wil) begin Ins second term 
without any of the senior White 
House advisers from his first term. 

Flanked by Mr. Regan and Mr. 
Baker, the president made a hastily 
arranged appearance before White 
House reporters to announce the 
switch, which aides said he had 
approved only the day before. . 

Mr. Reagan said the switch 
would take effect upon Mr. Baker's 
confirmation by the Senate. 

The chief White House spokes- 
man, Larry Speak es, quoted Mr. 
Regan as saying that “I am the 
author” of the idea. Mr. Speakes 
said that Mr. Regan went to Mr. 
Baker before the New Year’s holi- 
day and suggested that they switch 
positions. 

Mr. Baker had made it known 
that he wished to serve only four 
years as the president's chief of 
staff and that he wished to move to 
a cabinet-level position. 

Mr.. Speakes said Mr. Regan 
would not have made the proposal 
if the deputy White House chief of 
staff, Michael K. Deaver, wanted 
to be chief of staff. But Mr. Deaver, 
trim was told of the idea, said he 
wanted, to leave the White House 
for the. private sector, where he is 
to take a lucrative job in 
: relations. 

Mr. Speakes said Mr. Deaver ac- 
celerated the announcement of his 
reagnaiion last week to clear the 
way for the Baker-Regan swap, ai- 


Mr. Regan said both he and Mr. 
Baker would be “accepting new 
challenges. Since each of us has had 
a great deal of exposure to the oth- 
er's work, the transition should go 
smoothly.” 

With the resignations of Mr. 
Deaver and Interior Secretary Wil- 
liam P. Clark, who have worked for 
Mr. Reagan for almost two de- 
cades, and the renommation as at- 
torney general of Edwin Mecse 3d, 
counselor to the president and an- 
other longtime Ragan adviser, 
conservatives had expressed con- 
cern that moderates in the White 
House led by Mr. Baker would lake 
the lead in policy-making 

Mr. Baker has been credited with 
working out many of the legislative 
compromises thai gave Mr. Reagan 
his string of policy victories during 
his first term. The compromises, 
which sometimes came at the ex- 
pense of conservative doctrine, an- 
gered some of the president's long- 
time supporters. 

But although Tuesday's an- 



U.S. and Soviet Agree 
To 3 Groups of Talks; 
Space Arms Included 


KMtrvUMad Plw I 


otional 


President Reagan announced Tuesday that James A. Baker 3d, left, die White House chief 
of staff, will exchange positions with Donald T. Regan, right secretary of the Treasury. 


nouncement means that Mr. Balter 
is leaving his post, prominent con- 
servatives expressed little satisfac- 
tion with the move. 

“It may be on balance a nega- 
tive.” said Richard Viguerie, pub- 
lisher of Conservative Digest. 

John T. Dolan, head of the Na- 
tional Conservative Political Ac- 
tion Committee, pointed out that in 
1980, Mr. Regan headed a political 
action committee that gave money 


to the presidential campaigns of 
Senator Edward M. Kennedy, a 
Democrat of Massachusetts, and 
Jimmy Carter. 

“We are a bit concerned,” said 
Mr. Dolan. He said that "the next 
move as far as assuaging conserva- 
tive concerns is Regan’s.” 

Questions also arose about the 
effect of the swap on enactment of 
the tax simplification plan pro- 
posed by a Treasury task force. 


U.S. Public Skeptical on Arms Talks , 
Poll Shows , but Reagan Rates High 


By Hedrick Smith 

New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — The American 
public is deeply skeptical thai Pres- 
ident Ronald Reagan will achieve 
an arms agreement with the Soviet 
Union during his errand term, al- 
though it backs his handling of re- 
lations with Moscow and voices 
confidence that he wants an agree- 
ment, according to a New York 
TUnes-CBS News survey. 

More broadly, the poll reveals 
though the president was not in- that the public's fear of nuclear war 
formed of the possible switch when has diminished somewhat over the 



be accepted Mr. Dea vet’s resigna- 
tion. 

Mr. Baker and Mr. Regan then 
agreed on die plan, Mr. Speakes 
Edklj inn the idea was taken to the 
presiden t only Monday by Mr. 
Dearer. Mr. Speakes said the presi- 
dent approved it late that day. 

Ina statement released by aides. 


last four years and that more peo- 
ple now believe the two superpow- 
ers are roughly equal than held that 
view in 1981. 

The survey, take r. frvm Jan. 2 to 
4, indicates that, in spite of the 
wide publicity being Even to the 
current arms talks in Geneva, pub- 
lic expectations are modest. It 


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sv'I ' ' -s ■ ■■ - . ■ . 

SiT-.i'.'-M. ■ >■’ .. pC., 

■M 

Japan’s Space Pioneer 

Japan launche d its first deep space probe Tuesday. Called 
^irigairc or Pioneer, it is part of the mte m ational Halley’s 
Comet Survey Project organized by the United States, the 
Soviet Union, the European Space Agency and Japan. The 
comer’s orfcril hrings it closest to the sun in Match 1986. 
friVigpIrp. will pass within 3.7 mfllkm miles of the comet add is 
to return data about the interaction between it and the sun. 


found that only a fraction expects 
(he Geneva sessions to produce 
more than arrangements for fur- 
ther negotiations. Over the longer 
run, moreover, only one-fourth of 
(he public believes an : ms agree- 
ment will be achieved within four 
years. 

The president’s plan for an anti- 
missile defense system, a central 
issue in the talks, received ambiva- 
lent reactions. Despite challenges 
from some scientists and politi- 
cians that a full space-based de- 
fense shield is not feasible, the sur- 
vey found that most people believe 
the plan would work. Yet major- 
ities also fear that the program will 
make the arms race more danger- 
ous and will not be -v?-* 1 ’•”* 
projected at $26 billion over the 
next five years. 

Evidently accepting the notion 
that this program could become a 
bargaining chip with the Russians, 
a modest plurality believes it will 
make negotiating easier. But con- 
siderably more people feel the 
chances of agreement would be 
substantially increased by annual 
meetings of Soviet and American 
leaders. 

Yet apart from specifics of arms 
control issues, the survey indicates 
the strength of Mr. Reagan’s politi- 
cal position as he tries to revive 
U-S.-Soviet aims talks. 

Mr. Reagan won his strongest 
approval ratings for his handling of 
the presidency and his handling of 
foreign policy since the early weeks 
of his first term. 

Overall. 65 percent of the re- 
spondents approve his handling of 
the presidency, 54 percent on for- 
eign policy, and 60 percent on rela- 
tions with Moscow, aQ notable im- 
provements from before bis 
re-election in November. His polit- 
ical support was so broad that Mr. 
Reagan even received approval 
from 51 percent of the people who 
say they are liberals, from 30 per- 
cent of blacks, and from 20 percent 
of those who voted for Walter F. 
Mondale. 

By contrast, the survey reveals 
substantial wariness toward Soviet 
leaders. Although 55 percent blame 
both the United States and the So- 
viet Union for the failure to reach 
any new arms agreement since June 
1979. Americans are wary of the 
Kremlin’s intentions. 

Fifty-one percent voice doubts 
that Soviet leaders really want an 
agreement (36 percent said they 
did), 59 percent say they do not 
think that the Soviet Union would 
five up to an arms accord and 67 
percent say they believe that Mos- 
cow has violated past arms ireaiia. 

Nearly three-fourths of the pub- 
lic credited Mr. Reagan with sin- 
cerely seeking an arms agreement 
and seven in 10 people said the 


Death Toll Approaches 80 in European Cold Wave 


. . United Prat fnumatmai 

LONDON —The death toll in Europe’s cold 
wave diinbed to around 80 <m Tuesday with 
temperatures hi a half-dozen countries at their 
lowest readings in decades. 

France, Italy and Spain were the hardest hit 
in southern Europe with, at least 39 weather- 
related deaths. The cold swept across the Medi- 
terranean to Algeria where at least 26 persons 
were rraorted kuled in a week of snow, flooding 
and subzero temperatures. 

Northern Europe also suffered unusually se- 
vere conditions. At least seven persons were 
reported kille d in West Germany, three in Aus- 
tria mid three in sou than England. 

Swiss police said that they feared that three 
skiers missing in the central Alps since Sunday 
were dead ’ 

Snow-ttjyered Italy reported at least eight 
deaths caj^ed by the weather. The Arno River 
in Florenre^as. frozen for the first time since 
W29^eaa’s piazza del Campo lay under 3S4 
““^^lO renomelers) of snow. 


More heavy snow, accompanied by thunder, 
returned to Rome Tuesday. Newspapers there 
reported TOO people hospitalized m two days 
with broken bones and sprains from falling on 
the ice. 

Twenty-one ships were trapped in the port of 
Trieste where the temperature fell to minus 18 
degrees Fahrenheit (minus 27 degrees catti- 
grade) overnight. It dropped to zero degrees 
Fahrenheit (minus 17 centigrade) on the Iipinia 


living in makeshift houses since the 1980 earth- 
quake. 

The French Transport Ministry ordered all 
Paris subway stations to remain open Tuesday 
night to shelter vagrants and homeless from the 
cold. Most or the 24 deaths reported in France 
were of homeless, elderly persons or those living 
in unheated quarters. 

in Spain, at least seven persons froze to death 
in Barcelona and Madrid. Fanners said they 
feared frost damage to the Valencia orange 


crop, and officials said they wanted the region 
declared a disaster area. They es timate d that the 
cold temperatures — the worst in 29 years in 
some places —caused $ 1 1 million in damages to 
fruit and vegetables. 

The weather warmed up slightly in West Ger- 
many on Tuesday, but no break was forecast in 
the cold wave. Two thousand people were with- 
out water in Breckerfeld in Saueriand when two 
water mains burst. A tug pulled free a grounded 
U-S- tanker before its 60,000 ioas of North Sea 
crude could spill in the mouth of the Elbe River. 

It snowed again in much of England for the 
fourth day in a row. The temperature dropped 
to 3 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 16 centigrade) in 
eastern England, and tracks broke down when 
diesel oil froze in their fuel tanks. Motorists 
gave up trying to sun Lheir cars when the door 
Jocks froze. 

A half-dozen major soccer games were can- 
celed throughout the country. 


While House officials said they ex- 
pected the move to enhance the 
prosper ls for tax simplification be- 
cause Mr. Baker will be pushing it 
from Treasury and Mr. Regan from 
the White House. 

Also the subject of speculation 
Tuesday was the tenure of David 
A. Stockman, director of the Office 
of Management and Budget. 

Mr. Stockman and Mr. Regan 
(Continued on Rage 2. GoL 7) 


The Associated Press 

GENEVA — U.S. Secretary of 
State George P. Shultz and the So- 
viet foreign minister, Andrei A. 
Gromyko, agreed after two days of 
milts that ended Tuesday that the 
United States and the Soviet Union 
will resume negotiations aimed at 
“preventing an arms race in space 
and terminating it on Earth.” 

Mr. Shultz said at a press confer- 
ence that discussions on space 
weaponry would be one of three 
negotiating areas. The other two 
areas would focus on strategic and 
intermediate-range aims. Strategic 
arms include missiles that can be 
fired across continents, while inter- 
mediate missiles are of shorter 
range, generally targeted between 
European bases. 

The ultimate purpose of the 
talks. Mr. Shultz said, is the “com- 
plete elimination of nuclear arms 
everywhere.” 

“Our exchanges were frank. 


businesslike and useful,’’ the secre- 
tary said. “It is a task worthy of our 

best efforts” 

He said that the date and the 
place of the new round of talks will 
be set within a month. 

In Moscow, the Soviet press 
agency Tass said that the United 

The U.S. is pjannmg to invite 
die Russians to take part in a 
new space mission. Page 2. 

States and the Soviet Union would 
appoint three sets of negotiators to 
deal with the three areas to be dis- 
cussed. There was no immediate 
commentary on the agreement by 
Tass whichi published the joint 
statement early Wednesday morn- 
ing Moscow time. 

Mr. Shultz said that a summit 
meeting between the Soviet and 
U-S. presidents had not been dis- 
cussed. 

In Jane, the Soviet Union 


pressed (he United Stales to begin 
talks on banning weapons from 
space, but despite a US. agreement 
to meet with the Russians, talks 
never took place because of a Sovi- 
et refusal at the time lo also consid- 
er strategic and medium-range nu- 
clear mi M iles. 

“These meetings represented an 
important beg inning ,” Mr. Shultz 
said at the start of the late-night 
press conference. 

He cautioned that severe differ- 
ences re main between the super- 
powers. 

“There are many tough and com- 
plicated issues to be resolved.” he 
said. 

Mr. Shultz said that in his discus- 
sions with Mr. Gromyko he had 
defended the Reagan administra- 
tion’s plan for a space-based mis- 
sile defense system and that Mr. 
Gromyko had expressed concern 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 5) 


United Stales would keep its word 
in an arms accord. 

Despite overwhelming endorse- 
ment of the president personally, 
altitudes on h is policies and die 
promise of his current diplomacy 
are mixed. 

Only 27 percent say they think 
an arms agreement can be reached 
within four years and 36 percent 
say it will take at least five years, 14 
percent say h will never happen. 1 
percent say agreement will come 
when the world changes, and the 
rest voiced no opinion. 

In his first term. Mr. Reagan said 
his acceleration of military spend- 
ing would improve chances for an 
arms agreement and dose to four in 
;u r >sopU ajjeoi 3ut u larger 
body, roughly half the public, said 
the Reagan buildup had either 
made an agreement less likety or 
had made no difference. 

Nonetheless, public jitters about 
nuclear war have eased, the nation 
seems slightly more at ease about 
the nuclear balance and there is less 
public pressure for more nudear 
aims. 

The survey found, for example, 
that 29 percent of the people con- 
sider nudear war either very or 
fairly likely in the next decade — 
down from 47 percent in a Gallup 
poll in June 1981. Similarly, 52 per- 
cent now think that the mfliuny 
threat from Moscow is growing, 
down from 64 percent after Soviet 
jet fighters shot down a South Ko- 
rean airliner in September 1983. 

One possible reason is that more 
people now think there is rough 
nuclear parity than in 1981. Right 
now, 46 percent regard the super- 
powers as rough equals, compared 
with 39 percent in a New York 
Times-CBS News survey in June 
1981 . Now, 29 percent see the Sovi- 
et Union as stronger, down from 42 
percent in 1981, and 17 percent see 
the United States as stronger, up 
from 1 1 percent in 1981. 

Moreover, in early 1981, 52 per- 
cent of the public favored seeking 
superiority over Moscow, but to- 
day 50 percent say parity should be 
the nation’s goal, and 37 percent 
still favor seating superiority. In 
addition, roughly 60 percent now 
say both sides have so many nucle- 
ar weapons that it does not really 
matter which country has more. 

Generally speaking, men were 
considerably less likely than wom- 
en to fear nuclear war, more in- 
clined to believe that the space de- 
fense system would work and 
provide useful leverage in current 
arms talks, more prone to think the 
Reagan arms buildup had in- 
creased chances for agreement, but 
also considerably more willing than 
women to believe that Soviet lead- 
ers really want an arms agreement 
now. 



Soviet Foreign Minister Andnri A. Gromyko, on the left 
side of the table, pcir.ree across to Secretary of State 
George P. Shultz duriog negotiations on arms control in 
Geneva. To Mr. Gromyko’s right was Anatoli F. Dobrynin, 
the Soviet ambassador to Washington, and to his left were 


Rfum 


Viktor Sukhodrev, an interpreter; Viktor P. Karpov, an 
aims negotiator, and Alexander Bratchikov, the Soviet 
note-taker. At Mr. Shultz’s right were his interpreter, 
Carolyn Smith; Robert G McFariane, the national securi- 
ty adviser, and Jack Matlock Jr., the U.S. note-taker. 


Cambodian Fighters Flee to Thailand 
As Vietnamese Troops Overrun Base 


By William Branigin 

li ashiogron Post Sen ice 

5AN SANGAE. Thailand — 
Vietnamese troops overran 2 key 
base of Cambodia's main anti- 
CommunJsi resistance eroup Tues- 
day after more than 24 hours of 
shelling and ground fighting that 
forced the camp’s guerrilla defend- 
ers to flee across the Thai border. 

A number of Vietnamese artil- 
lery rounds landed on Thai territo- 
ry, and Thai gunners fired back 
across the border. About 60 miles 
(96 kilometers) north in Thailand's 
Buriram province, a Thai Air Force 
A-37 light strike aircraft was shot 
down while supporting ground 
troops in an area where a Thai 
patrol clashed (hiring the weekend 
with Vietnamese intruders, Thai 
authorities said. 

After having been driven from 
lheir main camp at Ampil. hun- 
dreds of guerrillas of the Khmer 
People's National Liberation Front 
were regrouping along the border 
□ear here. Their leaders said they 
were preparing a series of counter- 


attacks aimed at recapturing their 
most important base, site of the 
front’s military headquarters. 

But it was apparent that the Viet- 
namese onslaught, which went 
more quickly and met less resis- 
tance than expected, had already 
dealt the Khmer Front a severe 
military and political blow. 

Sporadic fighting continued in 
the camp just across the border 
from here amid what appeared to 
be a systematic Vietnamese effort 
to destroy its main installations. 

As Vietnamese artillery and 
mortar rounds crashed near the 
main western entrance to the Am- 
pi] camp a few hundred yards from 
a Thai antitank ditch, tank and 
automatic weapons fire could be 
heard inside the sprawling settle- 
ment It formerly boused about 
23,000 Cambodian civilians and 
more than 5,000 Khmer Front 
guerrillas. 

About 400 yards from the anti- 
tank ditch, one of AmpiTs bamboo 
and thatch structures went up in 
flames, apparently torched by the 
invaders. 


* r - 


Lieutenant General Pichjtr Kul- 
lavanijaya, commander of Thai- 
land’s 1st Army Region, said at the 
border that, although the Vietnam- 
ese had largely overrun Ampil, the 

guerrillas still held about a quarter 
of the camp. But Khmer Front 
leaders told Western diplomats 
that only about a tenth of the camp 
was still under guerrilla control. 

Later, a Khmer Front spokes- 
man said the remaining guerrilla 
defenders had been ordered to 
withdraw to avoid further casual- 
ties and to regroup the front’s 
forces. 

As artihejy fire echoed across the 
border behind them, hundreds of 
Khmer Front guerrillas dressed in 
camouflage uniforms and carrying 
Chinese-supplied weapons could 
be seen waiting in ditches betide a 
Thai border road for trucks bearing 
old Cambodian license plates to 
take them to regrouping points 
along the frontier. 

Thai military sources said fewer 
than 20 Khmer Front gnerriOas 
were killed and about 50 were 
wounded in the Vietnamese assault 
that began Monday, the sixth anni- 
versary of Vietnam's capture of the 
Cambodian capital, Phnom Penh. 

The Vietnamese invasion of 
Cambodia, launched in December 
1978, quickly overthrew the Com- 
munist Khmer Rouge regime, 
which ruled the country brutally 
for nearly four years. 

Since the invasion, the Khmer 
Rouge, the Khmer People's Na- 
tional Liberation From and a 
smaller non-Communist faction 
led by Prince Norodom Sihanouk, 
the former ruler, have formed a 
coalition recognized by the United 
Nations as Cambodia s legal gov- 
ernment. 

Although the Khmer Rouge, 
with 3 0,000 to 40J000 hardened 
guerrillas, remain the strongest mil- 
itary threat to the 160,000 to 
180,000 Vietnamese occupation 
troops in Cambodia, the brunt of 
Hanoi’s current dry season offen- 
sive along the Tnai-Cambodian 
border has been borne by the 
Khmer FronL 

Although this non-Conununist 
organization fields roughly 16.000 
relatively inexperienced fighters. 
Western diplomats said, i! repre- 
sents a far more serious political 
threat lo the Vietnamese than the 
widely hated Khmer Rouge. 

According to General Pichjtr. 
the Khmer Front guerrillas per- 
formed reasonably well “against 
heavy odds” in defending Ampil. 
“They were outgunned and out- 

. ^ ~ . . f. . ,, . numbered, and they didn't have 

Anti-Communist Cambodian guerrillas, carrying bags of any tanks,” be said. “They put up a 
foodstuffs, fled from their fallen base at A mp3 Tuesday, good fight” 




* *■ f 


Business Units 
JnS. Africa 
Assail Racism 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

JOHANNESBURG — In a ma- 
jor challenge to the government, 
five leading South African business 
groups, representing more than gQ 
percent of the country’s employers, 
have called for new legislation that 
would assure “meaningful political 
participation*’ for blacks. 

The business groups asked for an 
end to restrictions on black busi- 
nessmen, strengthening of the 
black trade union movement, the 
fair administration of justice by the 
country's courts and an end to 
forced resettlements. 

Adopted Monday by the Feder- 
ated Chamber of Industries, the 
South African Chamber of Mines, 
the Association of Chambers of 
Commerce, the Afrikaanse Han- 
ddsinstitute and the Mack Nation- 
al African Chamber of Commerce, 
the statement said that the groups 
also would work for better labor 
relations, improved blade housing, 
a greater role for black business- 
men and increased educational op- 
portunities for black children. 

The business leaders made six 
demands for dismantling the racial 
segregation system known as apart- 
heid: 

• Me 
tion for 

• Blades should be allowed to 
own shops and conduct trade any- 
where in the country, and no jobs 
should be reserved for whites. 

§ Universal citizenship. 

• Free and independent trade 
unions. 

• Restricting the power of the 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 4) 


Ttw f,ri I n in I him 


INSIDE 

accused of 
a Polish priest gives 
conflicting testimony about su- 
periors’ involvement. Page 2. 

■ Preadent Reagan is now pre- 
pared to consider a freeze on 
Social Security adjustments for 
inflation. Page 3. 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 

R General Motors announces it 
is setting up a new small-car 
division. Page 9. 

tomorrow 

The Congressional Black Cau- 
cus. long considered as little 
more than a social dob, has 
assumed a new prominence in 
the U-S. House of Representa- 
tives. 













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Page 2 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 9, 1985 


**R 


Polish Captain Implicates Minister 
In Plot, Then Changes Testimony 


Unttal Press International 

TOR UN, Poland — A Polish se- 
cret police captain accused of mur- 
dering a Roman Catholic priest 
gave contradictor? testimony Tues- 
day, first saying that a government 
minister had ordered the tiltin g, 
then that his immediate superior 
was the sole Instigator. 

But Captain Grzegorz Pio- 
trowskj admitted kidnapping the 
Reverend Jerzy Popieluszko be- 
cause Poland’s minister of the inte- 
rior had thwarted other plans to 
discipline the priest, an outspoken 
supporter of the banned trade 
union Solidarity. 

“I now realize that there was no 
top level from where the orders 
came,” said Captain Piotrowski 
who with two police lieuten ants 
and a colonel is charged with the 
Ocl 19 kidnapping and murder of 
Father Popieluszko. 

Referring, to his co-defendant 
and immediate superior. Colonel 
Adam Pietruszka, the department 
bead in the Interior Ministry who is 
charged with instigating the crime. 
Captain Piotrowski said, “The only 
top level was Pietruszka.*' 

Captain Piotrowsid testified ear- 
lier that before and during the mur- 
der he was convinced that the or- 
ders to abduct the priest were 
issued from at least the level of 



made a sign above his head indicat- 


ing superior authorities. r r ** m -n 7 

The captain said that Colonel Iff H I/f/l/miWl 
etruszka and General Platek *■* 


U,S. Priest, 
Head of Relief 
Unit in Beirut, 


Pietruszka 
wanted to silence Father Popie- 
luszko and another pro-SoUdarity 
priest, the Reverend Stanislav 
Malkowski. 

He said the colonel told him. 
“We need to shock them in such a 
way so that the shock wOl verge on 
a heart attack.” 

He said he received Interior Min- 
istry approval in May to counteract 


% John Kifner 

New rat 


New York Times Service 

BEIRUT — A Roman Catholic 
priest working for a relief agency 
was kidnapped by gunmen Tues- 
day morning, the fifth American to 
disappear on the streets of West 
Beirut in 10 months. 

Witnesses said about eight men 


Father Papieluszkn s involvement carrying automatic rifles grabbed 
in distributing Solidarity literature, the priest horn his car as be was 


Grzegorz Piotrowski 


deputy minister. 
The I 


: body of Father Popieluszko, 
who was beaten and strangled, was 
found in a reservoir Oct. 30. 

Captain Piotrowski said he 
pleaded not guilty and that he was 


guilty only of taking part in “cer- 
tain operations.” 

But he admitted beating the 
priest and dumping his body in a 
reservoir. A judge dismissed his not 
guilty plea as illogical. 

Captain Piotrowski recalled a 
conversation, before the murder, 
with Colonel Pietruszka and Gen- 
eral Zenon Platek of the police, 
who has not been charged. The 
captain quoted Colonel Pietruszka 
as saying of the abduction plan, “I 
don't have to tell you, comrade, 
that this decision comes from the 
highest level" He said the colonel 


hut that the interior minis ter. Czes- 
law Kiszczak. ordered that no ac- 
tion be taken. 

A co-defendant. Lieutenant 
Waldemar Chmielewski, said Mon- 
day that he gathered from conver- 
sations with Captain Piotrowski 
that senior Interior Ministry offi- 
cials approved of the abduction, 
and expected the priest to be beat- 
en and possibly die from a heart 
attack, as his health was frail 

“If that happmed, he had per- 
mission to get rid of dte body by 
dumping it in the water,” the lieu- 
tenant added. 

Lieutenant Chnridewski retract- 
ed a statement, made during pretri- 
al investigations, that Cap tain Pio- 
trowski had told him Colonel 
Pietruszka and Wladydaw Gaston, 
a vice minister of the interior, tiaH 
plotted to abduct Father Popie- 
luszko. *Tbe name is straight out of 
my imagination,” the lieutenant 
said, referring to Mr. Gaston. 


Turkey Is Prime Threat 
To Security , Greece Says 


United Press International 

ATHENS — The government of 
Prime Minister Andreas Papan- 


dreous approved on Tuesday a de- 
fense policy that officially empha- 


sizes Turkey rather than the Soviet 
bloc as tito main threat to Greece, 
offi dais said. 

“Hie foreign affairs and defense 
council of the cabinet met today 
with the participation of the leader- 
ship of the armed forces and ap- 
proved the policy of national de- 
fense.” a government statement 
said. 

“The basic objective of our na- 
tional defense policy is the safe- 
guarding of national independence 


English Lessons 
ToBeGwenon 
French Trains 


The Associated Press 
ROUEN, France — Regular 
riders on trains between the 
port city of Le Havre and Paris 
will be able to take lessons in 


English be ginnin g J an. 29. 
'file | 


project is a joint effort by 
the state-run railroad and the 
Le Havre Chamber of Com- 
merce and Industry. 

Teachers will give advanced 
courses in English to groups of 
five students in specially re- 
served first dass compartments. 


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and territorial integrity of the 
country,” it said. 

The statement did not mention 
Turkey by name. But last month 
the government announced that it 
was forming a new defense policy 
that would be the basis for deploy- 
ing Greek armed forces toward 
Turkey rather than Bulgaria, which 
is Greece's northern neighbor and a 
Warsaw Pact member. 

Officials reiterated Greece’s be- 
lief that its position in NATO is 
unique because it is threatened 
from within the Western allianc e 
by Turkey, which is also a NATO 
member, rather than by Bulgaria. 
They stressed that the new policy 
did not contradict Greece’s obliga- 
tions as a member of NATO. 

“The new policy is 3 rationaliza- 
tion of the existing deployment It 
does not effect the commitment of 
Greek forces to NATO,” one offi- 
cial said. 

A major pan of Greece’s armed 
forces were already deployed to 
turn hack a Turkish rather than a 
Soviet-bloc attack. Western mili- 
tary officials said. Greek officials 
said Greece bad assigned more of 
its troops to NATO in 1985 than 
ever before. 

A senior Greek official said that 
Greece has had all the land troops 
it needed faring Turkey since 1964. 
But be said the country may rede- 
ploy its air force and naval units to 
protect hundreds of islands in the 
Aegean Sea. 

He said, “My government feds 
that, since the NATO alliance 
shows no interest in involving itself 
deeply in the subject, it has to 
adept a strategy which accom- 
plishes NATO obligations and also 
provides for the security of our own 
country. It would be a paradox to 
deploy forces against a possible 
threat instead of an imminent 
threat." 

Officials said they hoped that 
their policy would convince NATO 
to try to resolve disputes between 
Greece and Turkey over the Aege- 
an Sea. including air space in the 
area. 

“The only way for NATO to 
minimize Warsaw Pact political 


U.S. to Invite 
Soviet on 2d 
Space Mission 


By Robert G Toth 

Lea Angeles Times Service 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan intends to invite 
the Soviet Union to plan another 
joint space m«rinn owiflar to the 
Apollo-Soyuz flight of 1975 but in- 
volving the rendezvous of the U.S. 
shuttle and a Soviet space station, 
according to White House and 
space agency officials. 

Mr. Reagan's offer may be made 
this week, the officials said Mon- 
day, adding that it follows a similar 
proposal that the Russians rejected 
early last year. 

“The president is committed to 
the idea,” a White House official 
said. 

“It’s just a matter of timing now” 
on when to issue the invitation, he 
added, confirming a report in the 
ament issue of Aviation Week 
magazine. 

In last year's proposal Mr. Rea- 
gan had suggested that the two na- 
tions take part in a “joint simulated 
space rescue mission” in which 
U S. astronauts and Soviet cosmo- 
nauts would practice a “combined 
operation in space to develop tech- 
niques to rescue people” in case of 
spacecraft malfunctions. In declin- 
ing that proposal Moscow “indi- 
cated they had higher-priority con- 
cerns regarding U.S.-Soviet 
relations," the White House official 
said. 


driven to his relief offices in the 
mostly Moslem western sector of 
the Lebanese capital 

The kidnapped priest was identi- 
fied as the Reverend Lawrence 
Martin Jenco, 50, of Joliet, Illin ois 
He worked for Catholic Relief Ser- 
vices, which has been providing aid 
to war refugees and other victims of 
the strife in Lebanon. 

Father Jenco’s kidnapping came 
less than 12 hours after a Swiss 
diplomat was released after being 
kidnapped and held for four days. 
Eric Wehdl Switzerland's acting 
chaigfe d’affaires, had fhiactw 
down by a carinari of pinmen in 
West Beirut. He was freed Monday 
night in the offices of Nabih Bern, 
leader of the Shiite Moslem Amal 

militia 

Amal officials said their men had 
spotted the hideout where Mr. 
Wehrii was being held and freed 
him when be was being pul in a car 
to be taken somewhere else. The 
Amal officials said his abductors 
fled. 

Meanwhile, the Lebanese gov- 
ernment managed after mrtnihs of 
argument, to send 200 paramilitary 
policemen about 10 miles (16 kilo- 
meters) south of Beirut in the first 
stage of a long-heralded peace ef- 
fort. The policemen of the Internal 
Security Force are to clear the way 
for the deployment of troops to 
open the coastal highway to kraeli- 
occupied southern Lebanon, which 



WORLD BRIEFS 


Green* Plan to Disband Berlin Branch 



BONN (API — The Bonn headquarters of West Germany’s Greens 


E has issued a statement calling for the disban ding of the party’s 
‘ ' * ' “* 


branch because at least four members had ties to neo-Nazi groups 
promoting fascist ideas and use of force in Berlin. The members were not 
identified. 

The statement, issued Monday, said a vote to expd the Berlin branch, 
which has 1 50 members, would be taken at a national meeting Jan. 26 and 
27 in Freiburg. In the meantime, it said, the party leaders were withdraw- 
ing support from the Berlin brand) effective this week, and would not 
sanction G reens candidates r unning in city parliamentary elections 
March 10. Greens members were urged to negotiate with the leftist 
Alternative List party on forming a combined organization in Bedim 
Hubert Bjarsch, the Greens’ leader in Berlin, rgected the accusations 
and said the party already disassociated itself from neo-Nazi ideologies. 
He said that despite the action from Bonn headquarters, Greens candi- 
dates campai gning in two Berlin districts would gp ahead with plans to 
run in the city parliamentary elections. 


Eric Wehrii, the Swiss charge d’affairs who was held 
captive four days, leaving his Beirut apartment Tuesday. 


Surrogate Baby Is Ward of ILK. Court 

LONDON (AP) —Britain's first commercial surrogate baby, only four 
days old, became a temporary ward of the High Court on Tuesday. 

The order was announced just before the council ctf the north London 
borough of Barnet was to meet to discuss its next move in the case. On 
Friday night, the council obtained a lower court order preventing Kim 
Cbtton, 28, the woman who bore the baby girl from handing her over to a 
childless couple reported to be wealthy UJS. ci t izens. 

The counol prevented the proposed transfer of the baby be cam e of 
uncertainty over the legality of surrogacy arrangements in Britain. A 
council spokesman said he did not know who had obtained the High 
Court order, “but it was not ourselves.'’ 

To have the temporary order extended, whoever applied for h would 
have to present the case before a High Court judge in chambers, the Press 
Association news agency said. 


bas been blocked by feuding Druze 
and Christian militias. 


French Officer Killed 
An officer with the French ob- 
■ Israel Delays Return server force in Lebanon, tentatively 

The New York rimes reported identified only as lieutenant Colo- 
f torn Jerusalem: '* ^ mt ~ ,-J 

Israel said Tuesday it would not 
return to the withdrawal talks with 


Mine Accident Reported in Siberia 


MOSCOW (AFP) — Several hundred people were killed in mid-De- 

nnn rtrfaw 


Lebanon on Thursday because of 
“stalling’ by the Lebanese. 

Senior defense officials said 
members of the Israeli cabinet win 
meet Wednesday to begin discuss- 
ing what Israel should do next re- 
garding a withdrawal from Leba- 
non. They emphasized that they 
were not permanently walking out 
of the United Nations-sponsorcd 
talks, but reviewing their options in 
view of what they see as a total lack 
of progress. 


nel Guino. the group’s deputy com- 
mander, was shot to death Monday 
night in West Beirut, security 
sources said Tuesday, according to 
Reuters. 


defense industry plant at the 
i reported here Tuesday, 
been mentioned in the 


■ UN Aide to Join Talks 
Brian E. Urquhart, the United 
Nations undersecretary-general for 
political affairs, will go to the Mid- 
dle East in an attempt to breath 
new life into the Israeli- Lebanese 
negotiations, a UN spokesman said 
Tuesday. Agence F ran ce-Pr esse 
said Mr. Urquhart is expected to 
leave for the area this weekend. 


cember in an accident at an uni 
Knzbass basin in western Siberia, reliable sources 
The reasons for the accident, which has never been 
official Soviet media, were not knows. 

The sources said that immediately after the accident, many Commu- 
nist Party and government officials went to the area, which had been 
blocked off by units of the Soviet Army and the KGB, the seoet police 
and intelligence agency. The plant the source said, was in an abandoned 
mine near the town of Leninsk-Kuznetski in the Kuzbass basin, a 
coal-mining region near Tomsk, 2JQ0 miles (3,500 kiloineters) from 
Moscow. 

Newspapers appearing in the area are not available to Western report- 
ers here, and the Moscow press reported no trips by government officials 
that could have been linked to the accident. Fragmentary information 
received here could have come from local residents coining to Moscow f re 
year-cod holidays, the source added 


Business Units inS. Africa Assail Apartheid 


(Continued from Page I) 
police to detain people without 
charges. 

• An end to the forced removal 
of people. 

“These are thin gs that must be 
done by the country,” said Arthur 
Hammond-Tooke, director of eco- 
nomic affairs for the Federated 
Chambers of Commerce, one of the 
country’s largest business group- 
ings. “We need action and we arc 
prepared to broker it” 

While expressing their opposi- 
tion to foreign economic sanctions, 
such as those proposed in the Unit- 
ed Stales and Western Europe, the 
business groups made dear their 
strong belief that the South African 
government is doing too tittle and 
moving too slowly to resolve the 
country’s problems. 

On Tuesday, Senator Edward M. 
Kennedy, Democrat of Massachu- 
setts. in a speech to business lead- 
ers, called for concrete steps to end 
apartheid. Mr. Kennedy said that if 
efforts were not made to achieve 
equality Tor blacks, then South Af- 
rica risked increasing world isola- 
tion. 


investments from South Africa un- 
til after his trip. 

He said that the right to organize 
trade unions freely would be a ma- 
jor test of businessmen's commit- 
ment to change. 

“South Africa can resist the 
mounting pressures from outside, 
and the criticism in my own coun- 
try ” Mr. Kennedy said, “that now 
comes not only from Democrats, 
but from Republicans and from 
President Reagan. 

“And South Africa can continue 
to resist most of its own people and 
function for a whole as an isolated 


minority within a nation largely 
isolated in the world. But this 
makes no more sense in politics 
than a trade policy erf absolute pro- 
tection.” 

After the speech, police escorted 
Mr. Kennedy through a large 
crowd of jeering black demonstra- 
tors. 

The demonstration was staged 
by about 100 members of the Azan- 
ian Peoples Organization, a radical 
black consciousness movement op- 
posed to visits by foreign political 
leaders. (LAT,AP) 


Pentagon Investigating Contractor 

WASHINGTON (WP) — The undersecretary of the army, Janies R. 
Ambrose, says that he has begun an investigation of Ford Aerospace & 
Communications Corp., the prime contractor for the U.S. Army’s $4.5- 
billion Divad anti-aircraft gun. 

The investigation centers on reports that the company hired at least 
four retired military officers who had had roles in the gun’s development, 
and that four other officers have been hired by Ford Aerospace’s Divad 
subcontractors. Divad, for Division Air Defense, an elaborate weapons 
system that relies on radar to delect enemy aircraft and helicopters, has 
had a succession of serious problems since the army decided to bu3d it in 
the mid-1970s. 

Last year. Defense Secretary Caspar W. Weinberger set aside the 
scheduled purchase of 1 17 of the units — 146 already have been bought 
— pending further tests. 

Ford Aerospace won the contract after a disputed shoot-off in 1980 
with a General Dynamics Carp, design. An investigation by The Wash- 


■:hiiU>r .■!>*« 


iijJU'S U i 





U.S., Soviet Agree to Talks 
That Include Space Arms 


Japan to Act to Open Markets to U.S. 


TOKYO (Reuters) — Prime Minister Yasnhiro Nakasone told his 
cabinet Tuesday to draw up measures to open up Japanese markets in 
response to calls by the United States, a spokesman for the prime minis ter 


(Continued from Page 1) 
over the so-called “star wars” plan. 


„ In his address to 600 business- 

Now. the White House appar- men, Mr. Kennedy said the limi ted 
only sees hopes for a more positive reform in recent years, “which only 


Soviet response. The initial U.S.- 
Soviet agreement on space cooper- 
ation, signed in 1972 at the height 
of d&teate, led to the successful 
rendezvous in orbit of three Apoflo 
astronauts and two Soynz cosmo- 
nauts. 

The five-year agreement was ex- 
tended in 1977 and includ ed plans 
to prepare a joint mission with the 
next generation of spacecraft, the 
UJS. shuttle and the Soviet Salyut 
space station. But the Reagan ad- 
ministration declined to renew the 
agreement in 1982. 


slightly corrects a staggering ineq- 
uity. has been accompanied by con- 
tinuing repression and retrogres- 
sion.’* 

“fir too many areas,” be said, 
“too many blacks have fallen too 
far behind.” 

Mr. Kennedy, on the fourth day 
of a nine-day tour of South Africa, 
said he would withhold comment 
on the debate on withdrawing U.S. 


“l 

said, “that the strategic defease ini 
dative is a research program in- 
tended to determine whether it is 
possible to reach a greater relation- 
ship” by implementing a defensive 
system. 

He said he assured Mr. Gromyko 
that no decision had been made to 
go beyond research itself. 

Mr. Shultz cautioned several 
times that the agreement be 
reached with Mr. Gromyko repre- 
sented only a starting point. 

“We can’t be sure where these 
negotiations will lead and we have 
a long road ahead of us," he said. 

The talks between the two lead- 
ers lasted more than 14 hours. Mi. 


ShuJtz was to return to Washington 
on Wednesday and report to Presi- 


The spokesman said that Mr. Nakasone instructed the cabinet to create 
high-level committees in their ministries to draw op measures by the end 
of March. Last week in Los Angeles, President Ronald Reagan urged Mr. 
Nakasone to intensify efforts to remove trade barriers and reduce Japan’s 


explained to Gromyko.” he dent Ronald Reagan shortly after 53 T tTi? 11 surplus wxth (he United States, 
“that the strategic defense ini- his arrival. . A . • that the United Stales wt 


U.S.-Soviet Communique 


Mr. Reagan's original proposal 


gains from this situation is for it to followed an accident in September 


try and arrange all the internal dif- 
ferences within its own structure, 
especially in the southern region,” 
one said. 


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1983 in which a Soviet rocket 
launcher exploded on the pad, with 
its cosmonauts narrowly escap ing 
injury, and subsequent reports ■— 
erroneous, as it turned out — that 
cosmonauts orbiting at the time in 
the Solyut-7 space station might be 
stranded because of the aborted 
launch. 


The Associated Press 

GENEVA — Here is the text of a communique issued Tuesday by 
U.S. Secretary of Slate Georg; P, Shultz and Soviet Foreign Minister 
Andrei A. Gromyko: 

As previously agreed, a meeting was held on Jan. 7 and 8. 1985, in 
Geneva, between George P. Shultz, the U.S. secretary of state, and 
Andrei A. Gromyko, member of the Politburo of the Central Commit- 
tee of the C.P.S.U., first deputy deputy chairman of the Council of 
Ministers erf the U.SJJ.R. and minister of foreign affairs of the 
U.S.SJL 


After the White House requested 
a quick feasibility study, the Na- 
tional Aeronautics and Space Ad- 
ministration determined that the 
shuttle could rescue the Soviet cos- 
monauts, if called upon. 

Mr. Reagan reportedly had 
hoped to announce his initial offer 
for a new joint space flight last 
January in his State of the Union 
message, but the Soviet rejection 
precluded that plan. 


ip : subject and objectives of the 

forthcoming U^. -Soviet negotiations on nuclear and space arms. The 
sides agree that the subject of the negotiations will be a complex of 


questions concerning snace and unclear arms , both strategic and 
, with all the : questions considered and resolved in 


his arrival. 

The president has scheduled a 
press conference for Wednesday 
nighL 

The Reagan administration en- 
tered the negotiations hoping that 
the Kremlin would agree to resume 
substantive negotiations without 
American concessions or curbs on 
the U.S. space defense research 
program. 

Mr. Shultz and Mr. Gromyko 
arranged their conference to dis- 
cuss negotiations on the whole 
range of nuclear weapons and 
those that one day could be consid- 
ered for outer space. Officials indi- 
cated a hope for a rew round of 
post-Geneva arms negotiations, 
following a lapse in such talks 13 
months ago. 

The Soviet Union abandoned 
strategic missile talks in Geneva on 
Dec. 8. 1983. Several weeks earlier, 
the Russians had walked out of 
intermediate-range missile talks 
when the North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization began deploying 572 
cruise and Pershing-2 missiles in 
Western Europe. 

The Russians went into the cur- 
rent Geneva talks stressing the im- 
portance of averting an arms race 
in space. Mikhail S. Gorbachov, a 
powerful member of the Politburo, 


about barriers to 
lions equipment, so 


of American forest 
and phaimaceutii 


was especially concerned 
st products, telecommunica- 
icals. 


Japan, Russia Agree on Whale Limit 


TOKY O (AP) — Japan and the Soviet Union wOl voluntarily limit the 
catch of minke whales in the Antarctic in the 1984-85 season to 3,027 for 
Japan and 3.028 for the Russians, the same as last year, officials said 
Tuesday. 

Japan, however, plans to consult with the United States on the 
numbers since U.S. officials have said that Japan's catch in the rich 200- 
mfle (320-kilometer.) fishing zone off the United States would be cut if it 
did not abide by an International Whaling Commission resolution. 

Last June, the IWC voted to limit the overall number of minke whales 
to be caught in the Antarctic Ocean in the 1984-85 season to 4,224. 


For the Record 


intermediate-range, 
their mterreUtionship. The objective of the negotiations will be to 
work out effective agreements aimed at preventing an arms race in 
space and terminating it on Earth, at limiting, and reducing wupWt 
arms, and at strengthening strategic stability. 

The negotiations win be conducted by a delegation from each side, 
divided into three groups. The sides believe that ultimately the 
forthcoming negotiations, just as efforts in general to limit and reduce 
arms, should lead to the complete elimination of nuclear arms 
everywhere. 


The Ui*. Supreme Court has upheld an appeals court ruling against 
Iran, deciding that the Iranian government has no legal right to pursue a 
lawsuit to recover S55 billion it said Shah Mohammed Reza Pahlavi took 
with him when he fled the country in 1979. (UPI) 

The worid champion, Anatoli Karpov, and his challenger, Gary Ka- 
sparov. agreed to a draw Tuesday in the 39th game of their che» title 
match m Moscow. Mr. Karpov leads 5-1 and needs only one more victory 
to retain the crown. LAP) 

The drift back to work continued in Britain’s coal strike Tuesday with 
A35 miners abandoning the nine-month dispute, the National Coal Board 
said m London. The union contests the board's figures, saying 140 000 
miners are still on strike. * ( Reuters) 

Planning chiefs of the 10 nations of Cbmecon, the East Bloc tratk 
alliance, met for an economic conference in Prague on Monday, official 
sources said. Western diplomats said they thought the experts were 
meeting to discuss the coordination of 1986-1990 fiw-von ohms and 
^ Plaice broad agreemems 

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crol if the space issue were not re- 
solved. 

When Mr. Gromyko arrived in 
Geneva on Sunday, be made no 
reference to such linkage and 
pledged a “responsible and con- 
structive approach” toward the 
talks. He said that he favored “rad- 
ical reductions of nuclear arms.” 


Baker, Regan to Trade Jobs 
At White House, Treasury 



1 ^TiVr! 

Sr, i 


m f 


NV« 


''ll,,. 


Vi* 


Moscow Commentary 


(Continued from Page 1) 

often have clashed over whether 
budget deficits were threat ening 
the economic recovery. Mr. Regan 


Tbe Soviet Union said before the has played down the impact of the 
communique was issued Tuesday deficits, while Mr. Stockman has 


that the Geneva talks opened tbe urged strong measures to reduce 
way for continuing negotiations than, including tax increases, 
but warned that the United States But Mr. Stockman’s associates 
was presenting positions that said Tuesday they looked forward 
“complicate" hopes for an agree- to the move because Mr. Regan will 
mrot. United Press International bring more energy to the deficit- 
reported from Moscow. reduction efforts. They said Mr. 

A commentary on the official Baker had grown tired of the inter- 
eveoing news said that the clarifies- nal battles over the deficit, 
tion or positions by Mr. Shultz and In his announcement on Tues- 
Mr. Gromyko was an “important day, Mr. Reagan said that Mr. Bak- 
factor contributing to the coulinua- er, once confirmed by the Senate. 

linn ,U_ n a |j L. .1 - r - 


In a departure from custom, Mr. 
Reagan said his new treasury secre- 
tary would have a seal on the Na- 
tional Security Council and that 
Mr. Regan, as chief of staff, would 
remain as a member of tbe catenet 
and also sit on the National Securi- 
ty Council. 


* 


tion of the dialogue.' 



UNIVERSITY 
DEGREE M 


EorUfa. Anada m l c AWoA FTTi q ri a wM 

mumavuutfiiiM 
MASrEBSOHpOCICXUTE 
Sena aeiwlecr resume 
far ab]M evaluation 

RACING WESTERN UNIVERSITY 

(WTl (aoeg OLMOIUS* 


“would become chief economic 
spokesman for my administration” 
and would also serve on the nation- 
al security council as had Mr. Re- 
gan. Once he eaters the White 
House; Mr. Regan will have cabi- 
net rank. 

“After four grueling years in 
their current positions, their desire 
for change is completely under- 
standable,” tbe prradent said of 
Mr. Baker and Mr. Regan. 


Those close to Mr. Regan exc 
him to be a consensus-builder, 
more direct and blunt-spoken than 
Mr. Baker but not an ideological 
conservative. One of Mr. Regan's 
assets, they say, is his understand- 
mg of economic issues; one of his 
weaknesses, they add, is a lack of 
experience in practical politics. 

Mr. Regan beaded the giant bro- 
kerage firm of Merrill Lynch, 
fterce Fenner & Smith before join- 
rag the Reagan administration four 
years ago. 

Despite his limited experience in 
financial matters. Mr. Baker’s con- 
firmation in the Senate was consid- 
“ed certain. His political experi- 
ence made him a favorite of 
me ™bets erf Congress and RqntWi- 


-j' 1 * ■ 

- - 




can operatives who often need fa- 
> from the ’ 


vois from the White Home. 






** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 1985 


Page 3 


U.S. Social Security May Feel Budget Ax 




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By David S. Brodcr 

, ' Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan is prepared to coo- 
sifler a freeze on Social Security 
cost-of-living adjustments, but 
only if congressional Democrats 
endorse such a move and take it out 
pf the area of partisan politics, a 
senior White House official has 
said. . 

The official made th*. comments 
at a briefing Monday as two key 
Republican senators and the House 
Republican leader raised new 
warnings that cats in military 
Spending would be necessary to re- 
duce the federal budget deficit. 

The senior official said the deci- 
sion by Senate Republicans on Fri- 
day to draft their own package of 
defirit-rcdijction measures before 
Mr. Reagan formally submits his 
budget on Feb. 4 was not a repudi- 
ation of or a setback for the presi- 
dent. 

‘'What they, are doing has our 
Cooperation and approval,’’ mid 
the official, who met with reporters 
on the condition that bis name not 
tje used. “We all recognize it wSl 
take a coordinated effort to pass 
any budget this year. We want to 
involve them early, and they all 
understand that the president’s ap- 



Robert H. Michel 


er Republican senators have said 
that a one-year freeze oa Social 
Security cost-of-living adjust- 
ments, which would save about $6 


proval win be n ecessary for tbeir billion, mi ght be necessary to reach 


success. 

The official also said that Mr. 
Reagan intended to make a “major 
effort” for tax simplification this 
year. But the president wants to 
Conduct extensive discussions and 
negotiations with Congress before 
submitting a proposal, he said. 

. On the politically sensitive ques- 
tion of Social Security cost-of-liv- 
ing adjustments for inflation, the 
official appeared to suggest a 
slightly greater degree of flexibility 


the spending-reduction targets and 
to be equitable with freezes in aid 
programs for low-income people 
that the president is expected to 
propose. 

The official said Mr. Reagan 
would not recommend any such 
Social Security freeze and “would 
work actively against it, unless the 
leadership of both parties came for- 
ward with it.” 


Barry Goldwater 


ood, to the memory of the way in 
which congressional Democrats 
used a 1981 Reagan proposal to 
trim selected Social Security bene- 
fits as a major issue in the 1982 

midterm election campaig n. 

Top House Democrats have said 
they would oppose a Social Securi- 
ty ast-rrf-hvmg-adjustment freeze 
unless Mr. Reagan recommended 
it. Monday, the House minority 
leader, Rooert H. Michel, Republi- 
can of Illinois, threw cold water on 
the idea as well, saying that “we 
have to honor” the president’s 
statements that such a freeze would 
be “off-limits.” 

The official signaled the White 


could receive from the govemmenL 

Mr. Michel, Mr. Dole and other 
top congressional Republicans 
haw suggested that there will have 
to be farther cuts in projected mili- 
tary spending, but the White House 
official said that Mr. Reagan was 
not reviewing defense outlays. He 
conceded that many of the Repub- 
lican legislators “have different 
ideas” from the president on that 
issue. 

■ Senators Join Michel 

Mr. Michel renewed bis warn- 
ings on Monday and was joined by 
two influential senators, United 
Press International reported from 
Washington. 

Senator Alan K. Simpson, Re- 
publican of Wyoming, the Senate’s w, :>* . • 
new assistant majority leader, said ’• ; . '• ' 

the goal now was to balance the •" " * -* ' ' ' 

budget by 1990, with cuts in mili- 
tary spending a necessary part of 
the picture. 

“we’re going to have to cut the 
defense budget,” he said. “There 
isn’t any question about that.” 

Senator fiany Gold water, an Ar- 
izona Republican, the new chair- 
man of the Senate Armed Services 
Committee, said Monday there 
were about 10 bases “we don’t 
need.” Additional savings, he said, 
could result if all baric pilot train- 
ing were put under a angle com- 
mand. 

Mr. Goldwaier, during a brief 
session of the Senate, rJrwmg 
about 10 bases would result in 
some added costs in the first year, 
but save about 51 billion a year 
after that. He did not name any 
specific bases as candidates for clo- 



Gerakfine A. Ferraro and ber husband, John A. Zaccaro. 

Ferraro’s Political Future Clouded 

Differ on Fallout From Husband’s Guilty flea 


ButEa 


IlIVMh 


quest, according to an attorney, Ar- 
thur L. 1 -iman 


“This is a pledge Ronald Reagan 

is not gc^ to hre^” he said. “But 

On the president’s part, without if there is an overwhelming consen- House’s readiness to bargain with 
contradicting Mr. Reagan’s rater- sus” in Congress, be added, then Congress on another politically 

“he would obviously have to con- 
rider it." 

Mr. Reagan’s position reflects 
two political sensitivities: first, to 
his 1984 campaign promise; sec- 


By Frank Lynn 

New York Tima Service 

NEW YORK — Geraldine A. 

Ferraro's political career has been 
damaged by the indictment and 

guilty plea of her husband, John A 

sure, but his comments indicated Zaccaro, Democratic politicians The charge is punishable by up to a 
that he was referring to bases in the political consultants said. But year in prison and a $1,000 fine but 

they disagreed on bow much. jie judge indicated be would not 
The assessments, which ranged sentence Mr. Zaccaro to prison, 
from “too early to tell" to “dead- 
ly,” were si 


Mr. Zaccaro pleaded guQty to a 
misdemeanor charge of fraud in 
connection with the proposed pur- 
chase of five apartment buildings. 


a led promise during the 1984 cam- 
paign to oppose any reductions in 
Social Security benefits. 

The Senate majority leader. 
Robert J. Dole of Kansas, and oth- 


sensi live issue, farm price supports. 
He said Mr. Reagan has given his 
approval to a budget proposal that 
would cap the amount of “deficien- 
cy 1 '’ payments or loans a fanner 


United States rather than abroad. 

In calling for the merging of ba- 
ric flight training, Mr. Goldwater, a 
retired air force reserve general, 
noted that (he air force, army and 
navy all have their own separate 
pilot training programs. 

“We don’t need that,” he said. 
“We only need one training com- 
mand.” 


leant because Ms. 
Ferraro hasliinted that she might 
challenge Senator Alfonse M. D’A- 
mato, a Republican, next year. 

Ms. Ferraro did not appear with 
ber husband at his booking and 
arraignment Monday at his re- 


Later. Ms. Ferraro issued a‘ two- 
paragraph statement 

“Today’s events bring to an end 
the difficult period my husband has 
endured stemming from my histor- 
ic candidacy.” rite said. “From 
what F have lamed about the mat- 


Film, Editor Asserts He Warned CBS 
Of Flaws in Westmoreland Program 


TaxrLaw Changes Affect 


Time to Protest 
Limits on Access 
To Israeli Reports LA Citizens Abroad 


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: By Eleanor Randolph 

. Washington Post Service 

v NEW YORK — The film editor 
far the CBS documentary at issue 
in W illiam C. Westmoreland’s 
SI20-nrinion libel suit has testified 
that he warned George Crile, the 
producer, before the broadcast that 
Mr. Crile was jeopardizing the pro- 
ject and “destroying the credibility 
of the film " .... 

- Ira Klein, General Westmore- 
land's final witness as the trial en- 
tered its 13th week, also said that 
Mr. Crile and others at the network 
refused to listen to his warnings 
about flaws he believed were devd- 
in the program, which was 
[Jan. 23, 1982. 

Mr. Klein testified that one CBS 
official said “don’t get involved" 
when Mr. Klein complained that 
Me Crile's thesis for the show, ti- 
ded “The Uncounted Enemy: A 
Vietnam Deception," was not sup- 
ported by die transcripts of inter- 
views for the documentary. 

The program alleged that Gener- 
al Westmoreland participated in a 
conspiracy of nrihtary intelligence 
officials in 1967 to suppress higher 
enemy troop figures to' maintain 
support for the Vietnam War. 

" Mr. Klein also said he was re- 
buffed when he told Mr. Crile that 
die film’s credibility would be 

al Wtstmorelaucr^hav^ 8 time to 
present his point- of view." 

.-“Did Mr. Crile say anything in 
response to that?" asked Dan M 
Burt, General Westmorland’s law- 

^“Yes," Mr. Klein said. “Mr. 
Grfle toM me be was deciding what 
was accurate and what was true 
and what wasn't.” 

, - Mr. Klein made it dear that he 
thought many o£ Mr. Crile’s meth- 
ods woe unethical and not up to 
CBS journalistic standards. 

■ David Boies, the CBS attorney, 
tried to attack Mr. Klein's credibil- 
ity by demonstrating the two men 
had a personality conflict, citing an 
interview that Mr. Klein gave after 
the broadcast 

; Mr. Klein acknowledged he had 
said that Mr. Crile was “a social 
pervert," and that by die end of 


their work on the program, “I 
couldn't stand to look at him.” 

“Did you tdl this reporter that 
Mt. CnJe was ‘devious and 
slimy?’ ” Mr. Boies asked. 

“Yes,” Mr. Klein said, “and I 
believe that to be so." 

Mr. Boies also attempted to 
prove to the jury that Mr. Klein 
was merely a technician and was 
not familiar with many of the docu- 
ments used in preparing the pro- 
gram. 

The attorney established that 
Mr. Klein had not' read the books, 
military cables and congressional 
reports used by Mr. Crile for the 
documentary and had not attended 
any of the interviews. 

Mr. Klein, a free-lance employee 
for CBS from 1978 to 1982, also 
described his rale as a sound tech- 
nician during a screening of the 
program for Van Gordon San ter, 
the president of CBS News. 

At the screening, Mr. Klein testi- 
fied, Mr. Crile wanted to cut short 
a statement that General West- 
moreland made on an NBC pro- 
gram in 1967 because it seemed to 
contradict what the general said in 
his interview with Mute Wallace of 
CBS. 

Mr. Klein testified that Mr. Crile 
told him he would signal the mo- 
ment to cut off the statement by 
pairing a downward motion of hu 
hand. 

“And did be do that?" Mr. Burt 
asked. 


“Yes. he did,” Mr. Klein said. 

Mr. Klein also said that Samu el 
Adams, a former analyst with the 
Central Intelligence Agency who is 
a codefendant, had told him after 
the broadcast “that we have to 
come eWi we have to make a 
statement, the premise of the show 
is inaccurate.” 

“I looked at Sam and said, ‘It’s a 
little bit late.’ " 

CBS will begin presenting its 
case on Tuesday. 

■ Westmoreland Rests Case 

Attorneys for General West- 
moreland rested their case Tues- 
day, saying they proved he did not 
hide information about enemy 
troop strength. The Associated 
Press reported from New York. 

Mr. But dosed his presentation 
by reading part of a 1982 memo 
from Mr. Grde to Mr. Wallace in 
which Mr. Crile wrote, “1 produced 
the documentary I promised.” 

General Westmoreland contends 
that Mr. Crile ignored witnesses 
who contradicted the CBS account 
while “coddhng” those who sup- 
ported it. 

Mr. Boies, as he prepared to 
open the defense case, said the gen- 
eral had not shown that the report 
was false nor that CBS broadcast a 
false report knowingly or reckless- 
ly. 

“CBS had more than ample rea- 
son to be convinced” the report was 
true, Mr. Boies said. 


WaMngion Port Service 

NEW YORK — Time Inc. say s 
it wifi “strenuously object” to Unn- 
tations placed on its review of doc- 
uments that the company said 
would support its defense in a 550- 
million libel suit filed by the former 
Israeli defense minister. Arid Shar- 
on. 

An e xamination in Jerusalem of- 
some of the documents related to 
Mr. Sharon’s role in the 1982 mas- 
sacre of Palestinians in Beirut ap- 
parently failed to uncover any evi- 
dence to support Time’s case. The 
company, however, said it wanted 
to review other materials. 

“We at Time Inc. believe we have 
been denied potentially crucial in- 
formation.” said a statement read 
Monday by a Time spokesman. 

Mr. Sharon, before leaving Israel 
for New York on Monday, said the 
documents prove “beyond any 
doubt Tune magazine hed.” And 
his lawyer. ME ton Gould, said the 
material “confirms everything that 
we bate said in this case.” 

Tune’s statement noted that it 
had objected that the papers re- 
viewed did not include material 
gathered by staff investigators for 
the commission that looked into 
the massacre. The statement said 
that Time believes “this informa- 
tion could include the testimony of 
the most objective parties present 
at the meetings” that Mr. Sharon 
bad with the Christian PhalangisT 
tnibtiamen who carried out the kfll- 
ings. 


By Robert G Siner 

International Herald Tribune 

WASHINGTON — While the 
Reagan administration cont inue s 
its struggle to revise the tax code, 
Americans abroad wifi find that 
changes made last year in the tax 
law will directly affect both their 
1984 income tax returns and future 
tax planning. 

Gtee provision in the 1984 Tax 
Reform Act freezes the foreign 
earned income exclusion at $80,000 
through 1987. Without the freeze, 
tbe exclusion would have been 
$85,000 for income earned in 1984, 
$90,000 for 1985 and $95,000 for 
1986. These increases now will take 
place in 1988, 1989, and 1990. 

The exclusion for housing costs 
remains in effect and Americans, 
abroad who are able to benefit 
from this may exclude costs over 
56,604 for 1984. 

Under the 1984 act, some Social 
Security benefits will now be taxed 
if other income is “substantial" 
Income will be considered “sub- 
stantial" if the total of one-half the 
Social Security benefit plus all oth- 
er income, earned or unearned, ex- 
ceeds $25,000 for anln dividual and 
532,000 for a couple filing a joint 
return. This includes tbe excluded 
foreign earned income, tax exempt 
interest and (he married couple de- 
duction. 

Another provision adds new tax 
liability for no-interest or below- 
market-rate-interest loans made af- 
ter June 6, 1984, with imputed in- 


Reagan to Ask 41% More in Honduras Arms Aid 



By Doyle McManus 

Las Angeles Times Service 

WASHINGTON —Tbe Reagan 
administration plans to ask Con- 
gress for a 41 -percent increase in 
militaiy aid to Honduras but only a 
qnflll increase in arms aid to El 
Salvador in the budget being pre- 
pared for the 1986 fiscal year, UB. 
officials said. 

The large increase for Honduras, 
from $615 mfifion this year to 
$88.2 million in the new budget, is 
partly a response to comp l aints by 
Honduran leaders that they are 
bearing the brunt of the U.S. con- 
frontation with Nicaragua but get- 
ting insufficien t, benefits, the offi- 

To Abortion Issue acton. 

hue, f acing a major buildup of Nk> 
aragua’snriliiafy strength, and they 
need more help," a State Depart- 
ment official said. 

Honduras had requested mili- 


v ado ran Army to hold its own 
against leftist guerrillas, they said. 

The budget, to be submitted to 
Congress Fbb. 4, calls for $1316 
million in military aid to El Salva- 
dor in die 1986 fiscal year, which 
begins Oct. 1. The figure represents 
a 4-percent increase ova- the $ 1272 
milli on appropriated by Congress 
this year. 

E) Salvador received a record 
sum of $197 million in U.S. mili- 
tary aid in 1984. Tbe undersecre- 
tary of defense. Fred C. Ikle, said 
recently that be expects aid levels 


to begin dedining soon because of 
tbe Salvadorans improved military 
performance. 

No request is planned for a sup- 
plemental appropriation of mili- 
tary aid for El Salvador this year, 
the officials said. It would be the 
first time in four years that no mid- 
year appropriation would be 

sought. 

Honduras, on the other hand, 
has complained that its needs are as 
great as El Salvador’s but that it 
receives far less U.S. aid. Hondu- 


ras, the poorest country in Central 
America, has allowed Ni 
rebels supported by tbe U .5 
era! Intelligence Agency to operate 
from its sod and has invited the 
United States to buOd a complex of 
airstrips and other military facili- 
ties in case of war in the area. 

Total military aid to Central 
America in tbe proposed budget is 
S26 1.4 million, up from $231.4 mo- 
tion provided by Congress this 
year. Total economic aid is a pro- 
posed $133 bflhon, up from $1.19 
billion this year. 


Church Fire Tied 


Honduras Tells Nicaraguan to Leave 


-- Someone tned to burn down a 
nwlll' church here attended by three peo- 
***"' * . pie who are accused in anti-abw- 


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.-rv* 

, pv-' -i 

: -* , -■■■v-'. 

.• “■ ui-’- 

■-■■fyrt 

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The Associated Press 

PENSACOLA, Florida — 

Someone tried to bum down 
ch: 

pie who are accused in anti- 
toon bombings, -and the arsonist taiy aid averaging $100 million a 
daubed its door with the biblical year for the four years be gin ni ng 


maxim “an eye for an eye,” police with fiscal 1986, as well as a fleet of 
said. The small fire caused an csti- 12 F-5 fighter planes. The State 
(hated $500 worth of damagp- Department said earlier that the 
- Meanwhile, a U.S. magistrateon request for the fighters would be 
MhndayrefusMtofiflniss charges rejected. 


Z. .A, 

... s’; -: - -i ; 


■ * • > » 
w.:r - 'v 

■' . V- 


against the three and a fourth per- 
son charged in the bombings of 
medical facilities that perform 
abortions. 

- Two of the defendants have 
claimed they were doing God’s bid- 
ding when they planted bombs, 
and one of the defendants said 
Monday the bombings had been 
called. “the Gideon Project," a ref- 
erence to the Old Testament char- 
acter commanded by God to do< 
sfroy altars and trees used in pagan 
worship. 


•WHAT WOULD LIFE BE UKE 
- O ' WITHOUT IT? 

- WEEKEND 

. eachway.in the iht 


Honduran officials also suggest- 
ed last year that the United States 
roughly double their economic aid. 

But the Reagan administration's 
budget proposal includes only a 
email increase in economic aid to 
Honduras, from $134.8 million to 

5137 million, U.S. officials said. c . , J1? 

* “Thafsnot going to make the New Switzerland Envoy 


The Associated Press 

TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras — 
Honduras on Monday gave tbe 
Nicaraguan rebel leader, Steadman 
Fagoth Muller, who is accused of 
violating immigration laws, 24 
hours to leave tbe country for a 
destination of his choice. 

Tbe government has not re- 
sponded to a request from the Nic- 
araguan government to extradite 
Mr. Fagoih, 34, on criminal 
charges. 

Colonel Miguel Flores Euceda, 
director of the immigration office, 
said that Mr. Fagoth, (he head of 

U.S. Expected to Name 


Indian rebels opposed to Nicara- 
gua’s Sandinist government, would 
leave “in tbe next 24 hours,” but he 
did not know what his destination 
would be. 

“He will choose the country 


day after be threatened, in a news 
conference here, to kill 1? captured 
Sandinist soldiers if the Nicara- 
guan government did not release 10 
Mistira rebels. Honduran immigra- 

_ tion laws forbid political ernes 

where he will reside. The govern- making political statements. 


Hondurans ha] 


a Democratic 
aide predicted. Hon- 
duran officials could not be 
reached for co mm ent. 

Hie congressional aide said that 
it appeared unlikely that Demo- 
crats would mount any significant 
resistance to the aid proposals. 

The leveling off of requests for 
aid to El Salvador after several 
years of large increases reflects new 
confidence in the ability of the Sal- 


Washingr an Past Service 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan intends to nomi- 
nate Faith Ryan Whittlesey, the 
While House director of public liai- 
son, as ambassador 10 Switzerland, 
officials said Monday. 

Mrs, Whittlesey, 45, the most se- 
nior w oman on the White House 
staff, has been assistant to the pres- 
ident for public liaison since March 
1983. 


mem gave him that option," Colo- 
nel Flores Euceda said. 

A spokesman for President Ro- 
berto Suazo Cordova said Sunday 
that the government planned to de- 
port Mr. Fagoth to Miami this 
week. A UR Embassy spokesman 
said he did not know if Mr. Fagoth 
planned to travel to the United 
States. 

The colonel denied that Hondu- 
ran authorities had detained Mr. 
Fagoth, the leader of Misura, an 
organization of Miskito, Sumo and 
Rama Indians fighting tbe Sanriin - 
ists. 

Bui Foreign Minister Edgardo 
Paz Bamica said Saturday that po- 
lice had arrested Mr. Fagoth rat 
Friday because be had violated im- 
migration laws by making political 
statements. A government source 
confirmed that he had been held 
until Monday. 

Mr. Fago th’s arrest occurred a 


Honduras has provided a haven 
for tbe UR-supported Nicaraguan 
guerrillas and has allowed the 
United States to build military in- 
stallations, hold maneuvers and 
train Salvadorans on its territory. 

■ Panel Criticizes CIA 

The Senate Intelligence Commit- 
tee said Monday that tbe Central 
Intelligence Agency exercised “in- 
adequate supervision and manage- 
ment” of its coyen war against Nic- 
aragua’s leftist government, a 
factor that contributed to a cutoff 
of such funds by Congress last fab. 
The Associated Press reported 
from Washington. 

A 61-page committee report also 
predicted that controversies over 
the CIA’s mining of Nicaragua’s 
harbors and its production of a 
rebel manual an political violence 
will cause difficulties for Pres dent 
Ronald Reagan’s expected effort 
next month to revive the financing . 


terest at market rates considered as 
income to the lender. 

The new laws also make it sub- 
stantially more difficult to take ad- 
vantage of income averaging and 
they tighten the rules for claiming 
both the investment tax credit and 
deg radation for automobiles used 

All contributions to Individual 
Retirement Accounts must now be 
made no later ihan tbe filing dead- 
line for the tax return far that year 
— April 15 for most taxpayers — 
even if tbe in dividual takes the 
automatic two-month extension 
available to Americans abroad. 

On the plus side, tbe holding 
period to qualify for favorable tax 
treatment as long-term capital 
gains has been reduced from one 
year to six months for assets pur- 
chased after June 22, 1984. 

For 1985, tax indexing takes ef- 
fect to offset inflation-caused 
“bracket creep." The income levels 
for each tax bracket are increased 
by slightly more than 4 percent as 
are the standard deduction and the 
personal exemption. 

The law simplifies the estimated 
tax rules for individuals. For 1985 
and thereafter, estimated tax pay- 
ments can be the lesser of 80 per- 
cent of tbe current year’s tax; 100 
percent of the prior year's tax; or 
80 percent of the tax based on an- 
nualizing quaneriy income. 

The exclusion erf 15 percent of 
net interest income up to $3,000 for 
an individual and $6,000 for a joint 
return, due to take effect in 1985, is 
repealed. 

On the mailer of 1984 tax re- 
turns, tbe Internal Revenue Service 
is reminding UR citizens abroad, 
including mditaiy personnel, that 
they must attach a statement to 
tbar returns indicating absence 
from the United States on April 15 
in order to get the automatic two- 
mouth filing extension until June 
15. 

In addition, taxpayers should be 
sure to attach all W-2 and other 
forms, schedules and statements to 
tbe return; check for accuracy and 
use the address label from the tax 
package and make any corrections 
necessary to the labeL 

Returns must be signed and dat- 
ed and on a joint return both hus- 
band and wife must sign. 

Tax information and assistance 
is offered at many UR embassies 
and consulates and from the legal 
assistance office for nnhtaiy per- 
sonnel Tax assistance and infor- 
mation is also available by writing 
Foreign Operations Districts; In- 
ternal Revenue Service; 1325 K 
Street, N.W.: Washington, D.G 
20225; Attn: FOD:81. 


Arena France-. 

BELGRADE — A minor earth- 
quake shook Sarajevo in central 
Yugoslavia on Monday night but 
did not cause any casualties or 
damage, tbe Tanjug news agency 
reported Tuesday. 


death notice 


SAMOAN 

We announce with deep sorrow that 
Mr. AS Mohammad SAMOAN of 
Tehran, Iran passed away m Jack- 
sonville, Florida Jan. 3, 1985 at the 
age of 85. The survivors are his wife, 
Effal Samo an, his childr en, Shari 
Goharian, Dr. Behi Oskoui, Baraz 
Samoan, Dr_ M. Rob Samiian, I Hi 


Poarmand, Zohreh DowlatshahL 


ter that was tbe subject of the dis- 
trict attorney’s investigation, John 
tried to help a clien ( and in doing so 
committed judgmental error. He 
has freely admitted his mistake and 
for this 1 am proud of him. ” 

Ms. Ferraro was not available. 
for comment on ber plans. But oth- 
er Democrats were not reticent 
about discussing the effect of ber 
husband’s guilty plea on her career. 

“1 think it has a tremendous im- 
pact,” said Stanley M. Friedman, 
tbe Bronx Democratic leader. “It’s 
unfortunate and sad, but it’s the 
facts of hfe.” 

Terry Michaels, spokesman for' 
the Democratic National Commit- 
tee; added, “There was nothing to 
suggest that Geraldine has not ad- 
hered to the highest ethical stan- 
dards in her own persona] and pub- 
lic life, and that’s bow she should 
be judged if she seeks public office 
again.” 

But Mr. Michaels cautioned that 
Ms. Ferraro could lose support 
from those voters who will “use any 
excuse” not to elect a woman. 

Ethan Gelo, a political consul- 
tant, said Mr. Zaccaro's legal prob- 
lems would have a “deadly” impact 
on Ms. Ferraro’s political career. 



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Page 4 ■ 


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 1985 


Hcralb 


internationu. 


Eribunc 


Pnbfalieil Wrtfa The New Yotk Tinea an) The WaJd^kn Pott 


Progress or Sanctions 


The courageous and irrepressible Bishop 
Desmond Tutu, back now in South Africa, has 
made use on home ground of the stature and 
protection accorded by his Nobel Peace Prize. 
Addressing the foreign companies that do 
business in his country, he demanded that they 
actively work Tor far-reaching social change. If 
there is not fair progress in two years, be stated 
— and here he was bumping against a law that 
criminalizes advocacy of sanctions — “the 
pressure must become punitive and economic 
sanctions should be applied." The particulars 
remain to be elaborated, but the heart of the 
Tutu appeal makes good sense. 

Foreign firms are a smalt but influential 
sector. Under the Sullivan principles, written 
by the Reverend Leon Sullivan of Philadel- 
phia, an effort has been made by some of the 
U.S. firms to become what Americans would 
call equal opportunity employers. Building on 
this base, Bishop Tutu seeks to enlist all for- 
eign companies and to induce them to tackle 
larger issues: abolition of the migrant labor 
system, housing blade workers with their fam- 
ilies, ending the pass laws, broadening onion 
rights, advancing black education. 

Will it work? The Sullivan principles have 
helped, although they have had too little steam 
behind them. A more sustained approach is 
needed. American firms, which operate in an- 
other political environment at home, may turn 


Mischief in Yugoslavia 


Writing a master's thesis at Brandeis Uni- 
versity in Waltham. Massachusetts, can be a 
risky business if you are a Yugoslav. Milan 
Nikolic. a 37-year-old sociologist, is threat- 
ened with jail in Belgrade because he “falsely 
asserted" in his thesis two years ago that Yugo- 
slavia’s ruling party was “firmly Stalinist" in 
1945. Worse, he is accused of LeUing others 
read an article about the Kosovo region that 
gives a “false account" of boundary changes 
during the Balkan wars of 1912-1913. 

Nonsense like this is solemnly paraded in 
indictments of Mr. Nikolic and five other 
Serbians now on trial for allegedly organizing 
to subvert and overthrow Yugoslavia's Com- 
munist state. No evidence has been produced 
in open bearings that any of the Belgrade Six 
planned or advocated the use of violence: 
What the state finds intolerable is their private 
discussions of politics in an informal “Free 
University” founded by teachers expelled 
from official universities. 


The case against Mr. Nikolic betrays the 
regime's desperation. Thai Brandeis master's 
thesis was written in English and kept in his 
desk until the secret police seized and translat- 
ed it. And that article on the “Kosovo prob- 
lem" was mailed to him, unsolicited, by the 
British “New Left Review" — and was avail- 
able on open shelves in libraries. 

Those who truly subvert Yugoslavia are the 
instigators of this show triaL 
President Tito's most valuable legacy was 
the good name that Yugoslavia won for itself 
as the least repressive of Communist states. 
Five years after his /tenth, his heirs have been 
unable to make a hybrid economic system 
create jobs and prosperity. Unwilling to de- 
bate real change the regime treats dissent as a 
crime and reviles foreign critics who expect 
better. The reputation that will be on trial 
when hearings resume next Monday is not that 
of the Belgrade Six but of Belgrade. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


More Falashas to Save 


The passage of Ethiopia’s small, ancient, 
beleaguered Jewish community to Israel has a 
Biblical quality to it. The so-called black Jews, 
or Falashas — the word means “stranger” in 
Amharic — are said to be descended from a 
Jewish tribe that has been cut off from the rest 
of world Jewry for more than 2,000 years; they 
trace their beginnings to a union between King 
Solomon and the Queen of Sheba. Sharing the 
dismal poverty and backwardness of most oth- 
er Ethiopians, a small number of the 10,000 or 
1 5.000 Jews of the country had begun emigrat- 
ing to Israel in the 1970s. The current great 
drought in Ethiopia provided the stimulus and 
opportunity for the Israelis to try to bring all 
willing Ethiopian Jews — just about the whole 
community — to the Jewish state. 

It is not entirety dear that the Marxist 
government of Ethiopia has been paying any 
serious attention to Israel’s rescue of the tiny 
Jewish fraction of the millions of Ethiopians 
who have been dying and suffering because of 
the drought. The regime may have allowed 
them to slip out as part of a still obscure 
transaction with brad, which apparently sup- 
plies spare parts for planes that the previous 
government acquired from the United States. 

The departing Jews, fleeing death and fam- 
ine along with hundreds of thousands of other 


Ethiopians, ended up mostly in Sudan. Su- 
dan’s involvement may not have been entirely 
disinterested, but as an Arab country officially 
at war with Israel it stood to face harsh politi- 
cal attack from other Arabs for “collaborating 
with the enemy." Stifl, Sudan allowed thou- 
sands of refugees to move to Israel, by an 
indirect route, from November on. 

It was Israelis who, for some baffling rea- 
son. broke the official silence that had shielded 
the flight of the Ethiopian Jews. 

The Ethiopian government at once de- 
nounced the rescue, calling it “sinister” and a 
“gross interference" in Ethiopia’s internal af- 
fairs —words that emphasize the character of 
the Marxists but that change very little, since 
the regime was neither cooperating with the 
exodus nor in a position to do much to hall it. 
More harmfully, the Sudanese government, 
embarrassed in the eyes of fellow Moslems, 
halted the airlift out of Khartoum. 

The common effort now should be to allow 
matters to cool so that Sudan can reconsider 
quietly this unfortunate judgment. Some 4,000 
or 5,000 Ethiopian Jews are estimated to re- 
main in jeopardy. Israel in keeping with its 
prime purpose as a nation, is ready to receive 
them. These who can be saved must be saved. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


Other Opinion 


India: A Battle Against Inertia 

The outlines of Rajiv Gandhi's thinking can 
be inferred from public statements. He is 
ready to let chief ministers run the states with 
less interference from New Delhi than had 
been the custom under his mother. But be 
insists they must obey the federal constitution. 
In practice that means no autonomy and no 
special status, let alone independence, for Pun- 
jab. The mixture sounds reasonable, but will 
require reasonableness from all parties if it is 
to work. It will also have to be shored up with 
agreed solutions to specific local issues. 

On the larger issue of the management of 
the Indian economy and erf public affairs in 
general the greatest need of all is for Mr. 
Gandhi's enthusiasm to overcome die inertia 


of Indian society. His drive against corruption 
and for greater efficiency may capture imagi- 
nation at the top of the bureaucracy. It wiH 
faO unless it involves the lower echelons — 
the civil servants who actually work on files 
and see that they get to their destinations. It 
wQ] fail if industrialists do not accept the 
challenge of greater freedom. 

— The Financial Tunes ( London ). 

if [the] government can live up to its prom- 
ise, a new era in Indian politics could be 
starting, with Congress possibly assured the 
same majority in future elections. If it does 
not, the electorate will swing away. What 
choice it might then make in its frustration and 
bitterness could be very unpleasant indeed. 

— The Times [London). 


FROM OUR JAN. 9 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Now Wireless Electric Light? 
NEW YORK —Nikola Tesla, who has been at 
work on a “wireless electric light" for twenty 
years, says that he has practically brought it to 
a state of perfection. “It would be possible by 
my wireless transmitter of great power" said 
Mr. Tesla, “to light the entire United. Stales. 
The current would pass into the air and, 
spreading in all directions, produce the effect 
of a strong aurora borealis. It would be a soft 
light, but sufficient to distinguish objects. I 
would lib**- nothing better than to undertake to 
illuminate first the harbor of New York for a 
distance of say. 100 miles around.” 


1935: Congress Warned on Budget 
WASHINGTON — Administration leaders 
warned members of Congress that the dob of 
extra taxation was hanging over their head 
if they insisted on any reckless expenditures 
or appropriations beyond the $8,000,000,000 
budget brought in by the President [on Jan. 7], 
Leaders in both Houses let it be known that u 
any legislation was passed which called for 
appropriations in excess of those recommend- 
ed by the President, then extra taxes, the 
bugbear of every Congressman, woold have to 
be forthcoming to meet them. The revenue bill 
is being held back, pending developments. 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 
JOHN HA Y WHTTNEY. Chairma n 1958-1*82 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM S. PALEY. ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Chairmen 


Reagan and the People May Be Parting 

WfflSBLttM* * s "“““ »33 ™SSk= 


out to be more responsive than European and 
Japanese firms, but all should be held account- 
able. For the premises of the Tutn proposal are 
unassailable. One is that companies profiting 
from the black labor that apartheid 

makes available have a moral obligation to 
combat the iniquity of the system. The second 
is that the companies are in fact operating in a 
society open to change by their exertions — 
not wide open, not easily open, but open to 
purposeful persistent reform all the same. 

Therein lies the fragility of Bishop Tutu's 
position. Many whites regard him, falsely, as a 
carrier of revolution. Many blacks see him as 
one who does not understand that the time for 
reform is past. He hopes against hope that they 
are wrong. But, evidently to accommodate 
their impatience, he declares that if his reform- 
ist approach does not bear early fruit, “the 
pressure must become punitive.” 

Just what the effect of sanctions would be 
on white privilege is much debated. There can 
be no question, however, that the immediate 
punishment would fail greatly on blades, who 
depend on the white-run South African econo- 
my for their livelihood and for what opportu- 
nity is open to them. It is precisely to forestall 
the possibility of such a deepening tragedy 
that Bishop Tutu calls on the foreign compa- 
nies to play a larger role. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 


PHILIP M. FOiSTE 
WALTER WELLS 
ROBERT K. McCABE 
SAMUEL ABT 
CARL GEWR.TZ 


LEE W. HUEBNER. Fiddahtr 

Extaan* Editor RENE BOND Y Depay thdOsher 

Editor ALAIN LECOUR Ajxxtatt Pt&aher 

Deputy Ed it o r RICHA RD H. MORGAN Associate PoNuker 

Deputy Edstr STEPHAN W. CONAWAY Director cf Opesadm 

Assoaae Editor FRANCOIS DESMA 1 SONS Direaor Cmdaaai 

ROLF D. KRANEFUHL Director of AAertahtr Sola 


International Herald Tribune. IS 1 Avenue Chartes-de-GanEe, 92200 NaaHy-sur-Seine, 
Fiance. Telephone: 747 - 1265 . Tetac 612718 (Herald]. Cables Herald Faiu. 


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Asia Headoumm, 24-34 Hamasy Rd. Ha 
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*. All ligjia nsermt 




raises interesting questions about the nature of 
President Reagan’s leadership and about his 
ability to attain his second-term goals. 

Political observers have judged Mr. Reagan as 
a powerful leader who has changed the role of 
government more than any president since 
Franklin Roosevelt. IBs charisma has been de- 
scribed as so strong as to win him congressional 
and public support for unpopular programs. 

But the public opinion trends suggest a con- 
trary view: that Mr. Reagan's success until now 
may have crane about because his rhetoric and 
goals were almost a perfect fit for the national 
mood at the time of his first election. There may 
have been an inevitability to his military buildup 
and his cuts in domestic programs. 

And today, as President Reagan prepares for 
his second term, the pendulum may have begun 
swinging in the opposite direction. 

This is one way of interpreting a 483-page 
compilation of poll data offered by the Universi- 
ty of Chicago's National Opinion Research Cen- 
ter under the heading. “General Social Surveys, 
1972-1984: Cumulative Handbook." 

The report never mentions Mr. Reagan by 
nam e and has no narrative to speak of, aside 
from some pages exp laining the survey method- 
ology. Each year from 1972 on the research 
center, in a project supported by the National 
Science Foundation, would ask a battery of ques- 
tions on social and political issues. Not every 
question was asked every year, but by repeating 
most questions frequently the survey captures 
the drift of public thought on sudt key matters as 
military spending and welfare programs. 

Polling for 1984 was completed in the spring, 
before Mr. Reagan's record-making re-election 
victory. The results were released in October. 

The trends suggest that Mr. Reagan, whose 
main ideas were in line with public opinion in 
1980, has now moved out of step. He begins to 
look less hke a political master who shaped 
opinion and morenke a fellow who happened to 
be in the right place at the right moment, whose 
ideas converged with the nation’s for a time. 

Consider military spending. The NORC data 
yield two important fin dings . One is that the 
defense bufldnp was the public’s idea, not just 
Mr. Reagan’s, in the first place; The public was 
crying out for increased readiness when be took 
office. The second is that this support may have 
ended. More Americans are concerned about the 
extent of military spending today than at any 
time since the closing years of the Vietnam War. 


By Barry Sussman 

In 1973, the year US. troops were withdrawn 
from Vietnam, 40 percent of persons polled said 
that too much was bring spent on the military. 48 
percent that outlays were about right and 12 
percent that too little was being spent. There was 
a sharp imbalan ce betw e en those saying “too 
much" and those saying “too little-'* 

In I97S. three years after the fall of Saigon, the 
figures were 24, 47 and 29. The “too much" and 
“loo little" percentages were about equal- 
ity 1 980, Americans had been taken hostage in 
Lran and the Soviets had moved savagely into 
Af ghanis tan . In the 1980 NORC poll the figures 
were 12, 28 and 60. It was the perfect moment for 
Mr. Reagan, who had been calling for a military 
buildup for many years, and he seized the oppor- 
tunity. Cutting taxes and domestic programs, he 
won militar y spending increases that averaged 9 
percent a year during his first term. 

By 1982 there was a return to equilibrium: 32. 
37 and 31. In 1983 this shifted slightly to 34. 40 
and 26. In 1 984 the survey results were 38. 43 and 
19: the percentage of respondents saying “too 
much" was twice the number saying “too little." 


spendin g seems at least as dramatic as the spun 
the other way in 1 980. Mr. Reagan now seems to 
be going in one direction, the public in another. 

What is uue for military spending also holds, 
though to a lesser exienL for aid to the poor. In 
other areas the divergence is more pr on oun c ed. 
Sixty -one percent feel the government is not 
spending enough on protecting the environment, 
while owy 5 percent feel it is spending too much. 
The same proportions exist on spending for 
health programs, and there is more support than 
there has been in years for aid for cities, educa- 
tion and improving the condition of blacks. 

None of these are pet Reagan projects. How 
well he does in disregarding those national man- 
dates and implementing his own could tell us a 
lot about the relationship between public opin- 
ion and strong leadership in the United States. 

It was an outstanding achievement for Mr. 
Reagan to bold government to his wishes the 
first time around, but it was made somewhat 
easier because the national mood tended to be in 
harmony with him. Much of the harmony is 
gone, and the second Reagan administration wiD 
tell which is stronger: one bold leader or the 
amorphous creature we call public opinion. 


The decline in support for more military The writer directs polling for The Washington Post. 




7 • • f I 





Power Is Shifting to a New Generation of Leaders 


W ASHINGTON — Two re- 
markable actions on Capitol 
Ed last week signal a power shift 
that very likely will prove to be of 
historic dimensions. 

In one, the Senate Republican 
leadership, under the new majority 
leader. Bob Dole of Kansas, an- 
nounced that it would prepare its 
own budget proposal and have it 
ready for consideration on Feb. ], 
three days before President Reagan 
is scheduled to present his budget 
So far as I could check, it is un- 
precedented for a leader of either vigor ana mm 
house of Congress — linked by Mr. Reagan 
bonds erf party loyalty to any presi- peatedly by 
dent, let alone one who has just won senators and 
an election landslide — to draft his 
own budget for the executive agen- 
cies without even giving the presi- 
dent the courtesy of waiting for his 
spending blueprint for the year. 

The second event, which oc- 
curred the same day, was the deci- 
sion of (he House Democratic cau- 
cus to unseat 80-year-old Melvin 
Price of Illinois as chairman of the 
Armed Services Committee and re- 
place him with the committee’s sev- 
enth-ranking member. 46-year-old 
Les Asp in of Wisconsin. 


By David S. Broder 


Only four times before had the 
House breached the seniority sys- 
tem to remove a committee chair- 
man, the last time a decade ago. 
Never before had it dipped so deep- 
ly into the ranks to find a successor. 

The two actions send a sharp 
message to the lame-duck leaders of 
both parties and two branches of 
government, 73-year-old President 
Reagan and the 72-year-old speaker 
of the House, Tip O’Neill that then- 
vigor and influence are w aning 

Mr. Reagan had been warned re- 
peatedly by leading Republican 
senators and rcprcsenrauves, in- 
cluding some of tne most conserva- 
tive men in both chambers, that bis 
budget would be dead on arrival if 


well as tne domestic agencies. Mr. 
Reagan ignored the advice, went 
along once again with Defense Sec- 
retary Caspar Weinberger and has 
now been publicly bypassed by his 
cwn party’s Senate leaders. 

Mr. O’Neil] was warned that Mr. 
Price's physical infirmities had 
readied the point at which they im- 


paired his leadership of an impor- 
tant committee. He was urged to 
arrange a graceful exit for Mr. Price 
as chairman emeritus, or with some 
such title. Mr. O’Neill who is retir- 
ing in two years, tried to procure 
another term for Mr. Price — and 
was repudiated by his membership 
on the first test vote of the year. 

Both actions indicate that power 
is moving from the While House to 
Capitol Hill and, within Congress, 
to a new set of leaders relatively 
unencumbered by the thinking and 
the loyalties of the pasL 

The loss of energy and leadership 
that is a chronic threat to any sec- 
ond-term president has struck Mr. 
Reagan forcibly even before his sec- 
ond inaugural. Meanwhile, the exo- 
dus of key aides is coming even 
faster than anticipated. 

Mr. Reagan stiD has important 
cards to play. With speeches and 
veto threats later in the year he can 
influence Congress as it digs into 
the difficult budget decisions. But 
be has lost the initiative in (his vital 
area. And he has shown again that 
he becomes almost a cipher in his 


own government when he is not out 
in front of the television cameras. 

The people filling the power vac- 
uum expect to live the most impor- 
tant part of their political lives in 
the post-Reagan, post-O'Neill era 
of the late 1980s and the ’90s. Mr. 
Dole has just taken over as Senate 
leader and has already es tablished 
more independence from the White 
House than his predecessor, How- 
ard Baker. He can do so in part 
because so many key committee 
chairmen — like Pete Domeniri 
(Budget). Mark Hatfield (Appropri- 
ations). Bob Packwood (Finance) 
— are also independent men. 

In the House the shift is even 
sharper because it is clearly genera- 
tional Les Asp in came to Congress 
in 1970 after Pentagon service dur- 
ing the Vietnam War. The new 
chairman of the House Budget 
Committee, 42-year-old William 
Gray of Pennsylvania, was first 
elected in 1978. The new chairman 
of the Democratic caucus, which 
put Mr. Aspin and Mr. Gray into 
their positions, is 43-year-dd Ri ch- 
ard Gephardt of Missouri, who has 
been in Congress only since 1976. 

The Washington Post. 


Young Nation-States Shake Up the Old Arab Nation 


P ARIS —The threnody of Arabs 
still mourns the Arab nation and 
chants the need fra unity and solidar- 
ity. Only rarely does a leader move 
without looking over his shoulder, 
calculating carefully and often fear- 
fully whose support can be induced, 
whose opposition might be averted. 

This search for consensus is what 
makes it so difficult for Arab rulers to 
reach a decision, except on negatives. 
There is always an effort to wangle 
and press others to budge first, a 
temptation to wait and nope that 
open disagreement can be veiled. 

There are profound and bitter dis- 
putes among states. The concept of 
an Arab nation is elusive, constantly 
coming into conflict with state inter- 
ests. Une of the most important un- 
derlying developments in the Arab 
world is that states, a new and some- 
what awkward idea in the region’s 
history, are putting down roots and 
developing specific identities. This 
movement is gradual not yet measur- 
able in sharp Western terms, but it is 
making a difference. If it continues, it 
will change the way the rest of the 
world can deal with Arabs, and even- 
tually Arab attitudes to Israel. 

The ruling Ba'atb Party of Syria, 
about to hold a critical congress, still 
calls its top leadership the “regional 
command," meaning that Syria is but 
one region of the larger nation that 
the Baath aspires to consolidate. 

Most Arab regimes are run as fiefs; 
a man or at most a family defines 
them. That is why instability is such 
a constant threat There is a lack 
of institutions, but also a lack of 
the cohesion from winch the Wes tern 
nation-stale draws allegiance. 

This is where the subtle change is 
coming. Not onty are there rivalries 
among regimes, but people are start- 
ing to identity with their countries 
and to notice conflicts of interest that 
are not just tribal sectarian or politi- 
cal Syrians are pleased when their 
government even if they don't like it, 
appears influential in the neighbor- 
hood. Iraqis are defending not just 
their land and their chief against 
Iran, but their sense of independence. 

Among many dark speculations 
about various regimes’ intentions is 
that Iraq’s enemies want to break it 
up into its Kurdish. Shiite and Sunni 
segments. But the time when that was 
possible has probably passed. 

When decolonization came in Afri- 
ca, new governments saw that trying 
to redraw illogical crazy-quill bor- 
ders left by European empires would 


By Flora Lewis 


bring endless wars. They agreed it 
was belter to maintain existing fron- 
tiers than to open them to question. 

Arabs instead found inspiration in 
the idea of a great community based 
on culture, languages religion and se- 
lected portions of history. They as- 
cribed their weakness to division, and 
dreamed of restoring a golden age. 
Failure to go in tins direction has 
caused deep frustration, but mean- 
while state aspirations take bold. 

The borders are not altogether fan- 
ciful'. they are based on old Ottoman 
administrations as modified by Euro- 
pean dominion. In some parts of the 
Arabian peninsula they are not even 
complete. But economic organization 


has grown within them, and develop- 
ment is country-based. Very different 
kinds of regimes have emerged — 
radical more or less moderate, feudal 
— and there is not much on which 
they can agree with ease. 

No Arab state is a full-fledged de- 
mocracy, but there are differences in 
the degree to which legality is ob- 
served and in how much voice, if any 
at all. citizens have in government. 
Ail this, plus exposure to a modern 
world in which national sovereignty 
offers decisive, even lavish advan- 
tages if there is oil beneath the desert, 
is strengthening the states. 

They do not like to admit that this 
is at the expense of the concept of the 


Arab nation, but it is. For this reason 
it is probably no longer possible for a 
man to become the Arab leader, as 
Egypt's Gamal Abdel Nasser was. or 
for one countty to win acknowledg- 
ment as the primary power, as Syria’s 
Hafez al-Assad would wish. 

The opposing force to solid state- 
hood now is no longer Arab national- 
ism but Islamic fundamentalism. It 
has every Arab leader worried. 

For all the damage that nation- 
states have done in other areas, their 
emergence in the Arab world is a 
modernizing trend that undermines 
myths and increases the capacity to 
deal with practical issues. They are 
not yet firmly established but they 
are creating possibilities. 

The New York Tunes. 


Moderates Pay With Extreme Prejudice 


W ASHINGTON — Fahd 
Kawasmeh, useful to Palestin- 
ian extremists as long as he remained 
a symbol of resistance to Israeli occu- 
pation of the West Bank, was gunned 
down in Amman on Dec. 29 tor hav- 
ing applied his political influence to 
the cause of moderation. Mr. Kawas- 
meh was one of those unfortunates 
who, placing good sense above fanat- 
icism, was reviled by both sides. 

He became mayor of his native 
Hebron in 1976, when Israel gambled 
that free elections would produce of- 
ficeholders wdl disposed to the mili- 
tary administration. Instead the ejec- 
tions carried Palestinian nationalists 
to power throughout the West Bank. 

Mr. Kawasmeh was a nationalist 
long before the Israelis arrived in 
1967. He fought for establishment of 
a Palestinian state even under the 
Jordanian rule that preceded Israel’s. 

He campaigned for office in 1976 
od a nationalist ticket At the time he 
had no formal connection with the 
PLO. But he supported it, he told me. 
because its objective was on indepen- 
dent Palestine — independent not 
only of Israel but of the Arab world. 

Once elected, be tended conscien- 
tiously to the city’s business, as even 
the Israelis admitted. Butin 1980 the 
military government, in reprisal for 
disorders, exiled Mr. Kawasmeh and 
two other West Bank leaders, without 
charge or uiaL Israel's courts ruled 
the expulsion illegal but Mr. Kawas- 
mch was never allowed to return. 

I met him soot after his expulsion, 
during a (our on which he appeared 


By Milton Vlorst 

in a public meeting at an American 
synagogue. He denounced terror but 
refused to disavow the PLO: insisted 
on the right of Palestinians to a state 
on the West Bank and in Gaza: in- 
sisted that it would live at peace with 
Israel. The Washington Post reported 
the meeting as "chaotic." Zionists in- 
terrupted him with “boots, catcalls 
and shouts of 'murderer,' ‘Nazi’ and 
‘down with the PLO.' " 

I saw him several times in Amman, 
his home in exile. He remained a 
symbol of tbe Palestinian cause, but 
there was no place for him in the 
PLO's delicately balanced leader- 
ship. He felt frustrated, useless. 

What made him different from the 
PLO leadership. I think, was that he 
had actually lived under Israeli rule. 
Most of the top PLO leaders have 
been emigres all their adult lives, 
nursing grievances, perpetuating dis- 
tortions of reality. Much of Mr. 
Kawasmeb's family was still in He- 
bron. His home was a tangible place. 
He knew Israelis as people, and spoke 
warmly of those who understood the 
Palestinian cause and wanted peace. 

He was a moderate in that be ap- 
plied a human measure to his nation- 
alism. His people were suffering un- 
der occupation. How best to end it 1 
Not by continuing a futile struggle 
that at best would take decades to 
win and might never be won at all. 

“Sure xvc believe that all of Pales- 
tine is ours,” he told me, adding that 


Jews also regard it as theirs. “At the 
same time that we ask for our rights 
of self-determination, we cannot 
deny them theirs. We each want our 
state. Maybe some day we will unite 
into a federation or a confederation, 
but we must decide that together.*’ 

His views overlapped with those of 
(he Israeli peace movement. He was 
not willing to relinquish tbe dream of 
all of Palestine — or deny die Jews 
tbe same dream. Based on the demar- 
cation of 1967, each side would re- 
nounce its claim on the other’s land 
in return for an end to conflict. 

After the PLO’s military defeat in 
Lebanon in 1982, he found hims elf 
less isolated. The PLO became more 
polarized. The majority, led by 
Yasser Arafat, gravitated toward his 
position: the extremists turned more 
intransigent The split burst into tbe 
open in November at a meeting of the 
Palestine National CounriL Influ- 
enced by Syria, the extremists stayed 
away. The meeting enacted steps 
meant os signals or a willingness to 
become pari of 3 peace process. 

Those signals included the election 
of Fahd Kawasmeh to a seat on the 
PLO executive committee. It was the 
first time someone of his views, com- 
ing from the West Bank had held 
such a high PLO post He traded the 
symbolism of resistance for a posi- 
tion of influence on behalf of moder- 
ation in the Palestinian movement. 

The writer, a free-lance specialist in 
Middle East affairs, comribuied this 
comment to The Washington Past 


Accidental 
War Can Be 
Prevented 


By Paul Bracken 

This is the second of two articles. 

N EW HAVEN, Connecticut — 
Some may interpret any think- 
ing given to crisis actions in high 
alerts or even in a nuclear exchange 
as an indication of a war-fighting 
rather than a deterrent doctrine. Yet 
it is this attitude that has left the 
problem of inadvertent war to nar- 
row military staffs without broader 
political review of alerting opera- 
tions, dangerous strategies and fool- 
ish military assumptions. 

An exclusive focus on deterrence 
may reinforce the danger of inadver- 
tent war in crisis because it encour- 
ages unrealis tic or sloppy planning. 

There are broader reasons still for 
tackling the accidental and inadver- 
tent war-in-crisis problem directly. 
We should attempt to build security 
institutions whose success in avoid- 
ing mu-lftir war does not depend on 
crisis avoidance and a cooperative 
political spirit What is needed is a 
system capable of withstanding ad- 
verse political relations, and varia- 
tions m the political stripe and the 
competence of leadership — and per- 
haps even gross stupidities. 

However difficult the problems, we 


should be thinking about long-term 
nudear policies, anticipating that we 
are not likely to achieve general nu- 


clear disarmamen t even tty the early 
years of tbe next century. 

A first step in this process is to 
recognize that the problem of acci- 
dental or inadvertent war will be dif- 
ficult to resolve if we attribute it all to 
incompetent people. Leaders have 
made micrakes in past crises and the 
military has not always carried out its 
orders suitably. But'il is unproduc- 
tive to speak of stupidity, the use of 
invalid mental models or the intro- 
duction of “biases" in crisis decision- 
making, as if we understood how to 
overcome these obstacles. Under- 
standing of human behavior and its 
modification is far too shallow to 
accomplish this worthy objective. 

Instead of hying to change people, 
it will be more effective to change the 
premises of their decisions through 
better organizational design, infor- 
mation flows and removal of the 
threats that compel them to make 
irrevocable choices without due con- 
sideration of alternatives. 

For example, trading deployments 
of Pershing-2 missiles in Europe for 
the Soviet nudear submarines near 
the U.S. East Coast would give both 
sides precious minutes to rake such 
steps as searching for corroborating 
evidence of attack or even translating 
messages sent over the hot line. 

Similarly, Robert McNamara has 
proposed that second use of nuclear - 
weapons not be authorized until it is 
absolutely certain that an attack has 
taken place. Deployment of reliable 
satellites and ground-based warning 
tystems could make this possible. 
Progress is being made on this front 
Other wavs to improve the ability 
to deal with crises can be imagined. 
Realistic simulations that introduce 
members of the political high com- 
mand to the problems of intense cri- 
sis and even the breakdown of deter- 
rence are needed. Political exercises 
should introduce the fog of war. the 
breakdowns of command that occur 
in the real world and the complexities 
of coalition defense. At the White 
House there is need for continuity of 
people who understand the alerting 
process and possible consequences. 

Soviet- American agreements could 
reinforce confidence in crisis stabil- 
ity. For example, each nation could 
pledge noninterference with the na- 
tional warning sensors of the other, 
paralleling pledges of noninterfer- 
ence with national means of verifying 
arms control agreements. Of course, 
there would be no guarantee that this 
pledge would be honored. Bui Ameri- 
ca could guarantee that the Soviets 
would know just how dangerous such 
interference would be in a crisis. 

The list of suggested improvements 
and questions could go on. and the 
answers may be unpleasant or infea- 
sible. But the goal of this exercise is 
not to construct bizarre scenarios or a 
list of arms control measures for its 
own sake. It is to reduce the probabil- 
ity of accidental and inadvertent war 
in a crisis. Unless a more sober atti- 
tude toward this problem emerges, 
the world may be edging toward an 
institutionalized nudear showdown 
that would demonstrate how irrele- 
vant many of our strategic and arms 
control ideas are to the security needs 
of the late 20lh century. 

The writer is an associate professor in 
the School of Organization and Manage- 
ment at Yak University. He contributed 
this comment to The Washington Past. 

^"Tetters 

Good Luck, All in All 

Regarding that overflight of Nor- 
way: Aren’t we lucky it was a Soviet 
missile violating NATO territory, not 
the other way around! Who knows 
how the regime that destroyed KAL 
flight 007 would have overreacted? 

BOB SPENCER. ; 

London. 

Hie Wrong Church \ 

A photograph in your Special Re- j 

port on London (Dec. 7) showed St. 
Paul's Cathedral and not Wesimin- 
sier Abbey, as stated. Tbe view is of 
the choir looking toward the altar. 

D.S. REEVES. ■ f 

Bristol England. * 

M’Bow Out of Order ' 

In response to “U_S. Envoy lo * 
UNESCO Is Assailed by M’Bow" 
(Dec. 31 ). 1 write to express my indig- 
nation that an international civil ser- 
vant should resort to a personal at- u 

rack against a U.S. ambassador. ' 

JOHN R. FISK }\ 

Paris. ‘.t 


Sal 




55* 
v 5 

v 






VAC> 



INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 1985 


PageS 


Tanker Hit; 
Iraq Appears 
To Extend 
War Zone 


The Associated Press 

MANAMA, Bahrain — War- 
planes, believed to be Iraqi at- 
tacked a South Korean ship Tues- 
day in Gulf waters near the Iranian 
coast, killing one crewman and in- 
juring another, marine salvage 
sources said. 

An Iraqi military spokesman in 
Baghdad said that “our eagles 
scored direct and effective hits on a 
large naval target" near Iran's 
Kharg Island oil terminal. 

The attack followed one Monday 
by Iraqi planes on a Panamanian- 
registered freighter, which was hit 
by a missile but sustained little 
damage. 

- In Iraqi military parlance, “large 
□aval target" means an oQ tanker. 
It was not immediately clear if the 
marine salvage sources and the 
Iraqi spokesman were speaking of 
the same raid. The attack on the 
1 1,367-ton Hanlim Mariner report- 
edly occuned at 9:08 GMT. The 
Iraqi spokesman said the raid on 
the “naval target" took place at 
8:30 GMT. 

- The military spokesman said the 
raid was in line with Iraq's air and 
sea blockade of Iranian ports, to 
“Mock Iran’s oil exports and de- 
prive it of the revenues it has been 
using to finance aggression against 
us." 

But judging by the location of 
the attack, and others recently, the 
Iraqis appeared to be extending the 
scope of their blockade of Ir anian 
pons weO south of the war zone. 

' At the onset of the “ tanker war" 
early last year, the Iraqis defined a 
50-mile (SO-kilometer) radius 
around Kharg Island as a “ military 
exclusion zone" and warned inter- 
national shipping companies to 
keep their vessels out of it or risk 
air and sea attacks. 

Shipping sources in Bahrain re- 
ported the captain of Lbe Hanlim 
Mariner as saying there was “no 
fire aboard" his ship, but that be 
required medical assistance for two 
emergency cases. 

! The dead crewman was identi- 
fied by salvage sources as the sec- 
ond engineer. 

Red Square Smoking Banned 

Agence France- Press e 

MOSCOW — The Moscow au- 
thorities have banned smoking in 
Red Square, site of Lenin’s Tcanb, 
and nearby Alexander Square, 
where the tomb of the unknown 
soldier is located, the city’s evening 
newspaper Vetshemyaya Mioskva 
said Monday. 


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Both Sides Criticize 
French Proposals for 
New Caledonian Vote 


i - ---■ 

-- r. — - ' 


Kim Young Sam 

Seoul Police 
Bar Dissident 
From Bailies 

Reuters 

SEOUL — Police surrounded 
the house of a leading dissident 
(Cim Young Sam. for nearly three 
hours on Tuesday to prevent him 
from attending opposition political 
rallies here, a senior police officer 
said. 

Superintendent Kim Ki Sop. 
who led the operation, said that 
police were dispatched to stop Mr. 
Kim from attending rallies bring 
held by two politicians campaign- 
ing for next month's elections. 

Mr. Kim is banned from taking 
part in any political activities. “We 
withdrew from around the bouse 
after his aides promised that he 
would not attend the political ral- 
lies,” the police officer said. 

Mr. Kim said that be is constant- 
ly watched by plainclothes police 
but is not under house arrest A 
former opposition leader and presi- 
dential contender, he staged a 23- 
day hunger strike calling for de- 
mocracy in June 1983. He was 
released from an earlier period of 
house arrest after receiving medical 
treatment 

Despite the political ban. Mr. 
Kim last year formed a dissident 
group called the Council for the 
Promotion of Democracy. In the 
last few weeks, he has played a 
prominent role in moves to form a 
new party. 

Mr. Kim is among 13 politicians 
still banned from political activity 
until 1988. One of the others is Kim 
Dae Jung, a former presidential 
candidate who has been in the 
United States for the past two 
years. Kim Dae Jung has said he 
will return to Seoul at the end of 
this month despite fears that he will 
be jailed again to complete a 20- 
year sentence. 


Rowers 

NOUMEA, New Caledonia — 
French plans to shape the political 
future of New Caledonia were 
sharply criticized Tuesday both by 
settlers favoring continued French 
dominion and indigenous Melane- 
sians seeking independence for the 
Pacific territory. 

Settler-dominated groups said 
the plan, pul forward Monday by 
Edgard Pisani. a French special en- 
voy, was unacceptable because 
(hey wanted to remain French. 

Leaders of the Melanesian Kan- 
aks said that although the plan was 
the first dear statement on inde- 
pendence. there were major flaws 
in iL 

Jean-Marie Tjibaou, the militant 
Kanak leader, said, “Ptsani’s plan 
is a gamble to change the mentality 
of the settlers." 

Mr. Pisani arrived on Dec. 4 to 
draw up an independence formula 
after confrontations between Kan- 
aks seeking independence and set- 
tlers left 16 people dead. 

After talking to all parties, Mr. 
Pisani proposal a referendum in 
July that would ask the 75.000 vot- 
ers. Kanaks and settlers, if they 
wanted independence. 

If the referendum passed, inde- 
pendence would be granted to New 
Caledonia on Jan. 1. 1986. and a 
treaty would be drawn up for spe- 


cial continued defense and internal 
security links with France. 

Mr. Tjibaou. a leader of the 
Kanak Socialist National Libera- 
tion Front said Tuesday that if the 
referendum were defeated, his or- 
ganization would continue to push 
for independence. 

“The result will not change any- 
thing” for the Kanaks, Mr. Tjibaou 
said. “We are the rightful owners of 
the country.” 

He said that Mr. Pisani’s plan 
was the first proposal recognizing 
sovereignty for Kanaks. who make 
up only about 40 percent of the 
territory's population of 150,000 as 
a result of heavy immlgratiou from 
France and French islands in the 
Pacific. 

Mr. Tjibaou said the front would 
pul forward counterproposals on 
Saturday. 

Mr. Pisani's plan was con- 
demned outright by the conserva- 
tive party. Rally for Caledonia and 
the Republic, which won the Nov. 
18 election under which it was to 
run the territory under greater au- 
tonomy from France. The Kanak 
party boycotted the election. 

Dick Ukeiwe. president of Lhe 
territorial government said: “We 
cannot accept the Pisani plan. We 
are French and want to stay 
French. We cannot discuss inde- 
pendence.” 

Mr. Pisani is to hear the views of 
all sides and report back to the 



/•V-ik-.. ^ ■ ’ T ^ v-ov-i;- 


Peres Says He Approved 






Assure Its Continuation 


Dick Ukeiwe 

government in Paris early next 

month. 


woman said in Paris that u resi- 
dents or New Caledonia vote 

against independence in the refer- 
endum. “the verdict of the ballot 
box will be respected, - Agence 
France- Presse reported Tuesday. 
The spokeswoman, Georgina Du- 
foix, also said that it would be a 
“delicate and difficult” problem to 
guarantee the rights of non- Kanaks 
under the propoals for indepen- 
dence.] 

Conservative newspapers in Lhe 
French capital also sharply at- 
tacked the plan, but the proposal 
won praise on the left. 


Jean-Marie Tjibaou 
■ Situation Is Cairn 

Kanak militants were maiming 
roadblocks in three regions Tues- 
day, apparently to guard against 
backlash by Europeans opposed to 
the independence proposals, 
Agence France-Presse reported 
Tuesday from Noumea. 

In Tahiti. Gaston Flosse, the po- 
litical head of the French Polyne- 
sian Government Council, said he 
would campaign actively agains t 
independence in Lhe referendum. 

He said he would explain to Pol- 
ynesians living in New Caledonia 
“that their interest lies in re mainin g 
with France and that independence 
would be a catastrophe’’ for both 
New Caledonia and French Poly- 
nesia. 


General Sir Brian Horrocks, 89, Dies 


The Associated Press 

FISHBOURNE. England — 
Genera] Sir Brian Horrocks. 89, 
who helped Montgomery defeat 
the Germans in North Africa, died 
Sunday. 

Sir Brian became a television 
personality and also held Lhe cere- 
monial title in the House of Lords 
of Black Rod. He died at a nursing 
borne in this village near England's 
south coast. 

A tall, imposing figure with a 
natural air of command. Sir Brian 
was wounded and received the Mil- 
itary Cross for bravery in World 
War L 

On the outbreak of World War 
II, his promotion was swift. He was 
put in command of a battalion, 
then a brigade before the British 
evacuated Dunkirk. 

In 1942, he was summoned by 
Montgomery, then commander of 
the 8th Army in Egypt, to take 
charge of 13th Corps, which was 
holding the southern end of the EJ 


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TV series, “Men in Battle,” in 
which he recreated some of the 
war’s great campaigns and talked 
to those who fought in them. 

He published bis autobiography, 
“A FuD Life.*' in 1960 and wrote 
often for The Times of London on 
military matters. “The pen has 
gained what the sword has lost,” 
the paper said of his reportage. 
Johnny Guamieri. 67, 

Jazz Pianist, Composer 

LOS ANGELES (API — Johnny 
Guamieri, 67. the jazz pianist who 
was a mainstay of the Benny Good- 
man and Artie Shaw bands and a 
composer of hundreds of songs and 
instrumentals, died Monday in Liv- 
ingston. New Jersey, apparently of 
a heart attack 

A descendant of the Guamierius 
family of violin makers, he first 
played with George Hall later join- 
ing Goodman from 1939-40 and 
Shaw from 1940-41. He also was a 
staff musician with NBC for many 
years. 



United Press International 

JERUSALEM — Prime Minis- 
ter Shimon Peres told the Knesset 
on Tuesday that he had approved 
the publicizing of the airlift of Ethi- 
opian Jews to assure its continua- 
tion. 

‘The immigration is continuing 
and it wjl! continue,” he reported to 
the Israeli parliament. “Neither 
economic difficulty nor internal 
distress, nor geographic distance, 
nor political obstacle shall halt or 
postpone the rescue and immigra- 
tion effort- ” 

As usual in official Israeli state- 
ments on the operation, Mr. Peres 
provided no details on how it is 
lairing place. Sudan, which has 
been the transit point for the airlift, 
has canceled its cooperation, effec- 
tively curtailing the operation, be- 
cause the publicity embarrassed it 
with its Arab allies. 

Since news of the airlift became 
widely publicized last Thursday, 
there have been bitter charges that 
the attention bad jeopardized the 
future of the rescue effort. 

President Chaim Herzog, refer- 
ring to criticism over news leaks of 
the airlift which led to its termina- 
tion. said: “We have a dubious tal- 
ent for converting any admirable 
achievement into a matter of con- 
troversy.” 

About 10.000 Ethiopian Jews 
have been brought to Israel in re- 
cent years, including about 7.000 
since November. It is believed that 
4.000 more Ethiopian Jews are 
stranded in Sudan and more than 
twice that many are still in Ethio- 
pia. 

Mr. Peres made a 12-minute 
statement in parliament in ex- 
change for two small parties drop- 
ping motions d emanding that the 
four-month national unity govern- 
ment be subjected to a vote of con- 
fidence on the issue. 


"The release of material" Mr. 
Peres said, “was coordinated to 
permit the continuation of the res- 
cue and absorption process. Al- 
though it isn't possible to go into aD 
the relevant considerations. I may 
note that the withholding, just like 
the publication, were aimed at serv- 
ing this vety same purpose.” 

“In order to focus attention 
where it should be and to divert ft 
from delicate aspects, and to put 
mailers in their proper propor- 
tions. 1 approved, after consulting 
with the relevant factors, the hold- 
ing of a press briefing," Mr. Peres 
said. 

“We are one nation. There are no 
black Jews or white Jews. There art 
Jews. History and belief bind us 
forever." he said, adding that the 
airlifts “are continuing and will 
continue." 

Israel radio reported that the re- 
action to the prime minister's 
speech was mixed. 

A Knesset member. Shulamit 
Aloni of the leftist Citizens Rights 
Movement, which sponsored one 
of the motions, said tie speech was 
the best that could be expected un- 
der the circumstances. 

Another Knesset member, Geula 
Cohen, of the conservative Tehiya 
Pany, which also sponsored a mo- 
tion, said the mauer was dosed 
even though she believed the gov- 
ernment was wrong to publicize the 
exodus. 

Some of the refugees in Israel, 
concerned about their countrymen 
left in Ethiopia, on Monday de- 
nounced the news leak of the airlift 
and accused the government of 
publicizing the operation in order 
to end iL 


PSSOT4AUTIE5 PLUS 
MARY PIUlMr 
IN THE WEBCEND SECTION 
OF TODAY'S IKT 





General Sir Brian Horrocks 


BROADCASTING ID CABLE COMPANIES 
IN EUROPE & THE UK VIA SATELLITE 

C H A N N E L 

PROGRAM, WEDNESDAY 9th JANUARY 

UK TIMES 15.00 SKY -FI MUSIC GUEST SHOW 
1500 SKY-FI MUSIC 
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1900 SMOKE IN THE WIND 

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Iberia * 

The Africam Middle 

Eastern Highway. 





Today, from anywhere in Africaor the Middle East to 
any destination in Europe or America, travel one 
highway.- Iberia’s. 

Iberia flies between Madrid and Tangiers, 
Casablanca, Dakar, Abidjan, lagos, Malabo, Mirobi. Jeddah, 
Algiers, Tripoli, Tunis, Cairo, Tbi Aviv, Kuwait and 
Johannesburg. 

Iberia also flies you directly between Barcelona and 
Algiers, Tunis, Cairo, Tfel Aviv, Jeddah, Kuwait and 


Dakar. Lagos, Malabo and Abidjan. 

Almost a II our flights are non-stop, with an average 
of 5b weekly. 

Thar’s why flying Iberia is the quickest and most 
effideni way to travel between Spain and Africa or the 


Middle East. And, when in Spain, our domestic network, 
Europe's most extensive, speeds you to and from our 
gateway cities. 

Iberia is also the best way to reach Africa and the 
Middle East from the Americas. Our network provides fast, 
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in other words, Iberia's Spanish , American and 
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Iberia: Spain's Highway to the world, 


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1 «* 


Page 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 1985 


ARTS /LEISURE 


New Staging of 'Great Expectations’ Fails to Live Up to Them 


OOONESBURY 

.jwtNtmm 

to being fully wsg 

EQUIPPED. ALL (XR 
*IAB5HME SHAG CAR- 
: ^ FETING* 


By Michael Billington asnobb 

International Herald Tribune the aid I 

L ONDON — Dickens loved the and bis 
• theater. The theater, in return, as he res 
has often lived off Dickens. In his fortune 
own day pirated versions of his more tri 
books were rushed onto the s tage. kw. 
Solo performers, from Bransby Coe 1 
Williams to Emiyn Williams, have success* 


a snobbish London gentleman with piece of prose Tilled with the sound feast of impersonation and a sense 
the aid of a mysterious benefactor, of the water slapping against the of what the book is about. 


idual moral awakening shore or the grinding noise made by 
es that he owes his good die oars in the rowlocks. What Coe 
Magwitch and once gives us is dry ice, a boat lugged 
to help him escape the onto the stage and a clash with the 
pursuers that looks about as men- 


They start with one great advan- 


more tries to help him escape the onto the stage and a clash with the 
Law. pursuers that looks about as men- 

Coe heaves the story at us in a acing as a Sunday-afternoon pile- 
succession. of short scenes hacked up on a park lake. Threadbare ac- 


froin the book. What he doesn't don is no substitute for the calm 
THF mivnnN CTAfE 1 show is any feeling for the mysteri- excitement of Dickens’s prose or 

OiAvrfc ous, dreamlike quality of the story the revelation of the characters' in- 

, „ . . . . r , (superbly realized in die David nermost thoughts. 

Lean film) or the richness of Dick- A couple of Old Vic perfor- 
rea ^ n fS fr om bis works ens’s narration. Strip Dickens to mances suggest what might have 

DionmiS Treror nI b Iaindi yo ■ 861 “ ? co^denre-ndden Vic- gers has the bearded, saturnine au- 
£e jKS sEdSocSs toru ?? melodrama: the genius Ires rhority and “manner expressive of 
P 631 * mood and tone. It was a knowing something secret about 

point realized by the RSC. which in evelySL TuFZt Mdce^dl 
idueoy. “Nicholas Nickleby” gave us large scribes. And Charles Lewsen cap- 

But the hazards of turning Dick- swathes of descriptive prose, such lures vividly the double-life of his 
ens into drama are well illustrated as Ralph Nickleby’s nightmare clerk Wemnrick who is an automa- 
by Peter Coe’s savorless adaptation chase through a darkened London ion in the office and a capering 


masterpiece At a time when British 
politicians frequently call for a re- 
turn to Victorian values, Dickens's 
1S54 book reminds us what those 


Lean film) or the richness of Dick- A couple of Old Vic perfor- 
ens’s narration. Strip Dickens to maneps suggest what migh t have 
the barebones storyline and what been. Tony Jay as the lawyer Jag- 
you get is a coincidence-ridden Vic- gers has the bearded, sa pimim- au- 


torian melodrama: the genius lies rhority and “manner exp ress ive of 
in the mood and tone. It was a knowing something secret about 
point realized by the RSC. which in every one of ns" that Dickens de- 
“Nicholas Nickleby” gave us large scribes. And Charles Lewsen cap- 
swathes of descriptive prose, such tures vividly the double-life of his 


values really were. It is a bitter, ratu ' 

pungent attack on utilitarian eco^ *** *3" 

□omics, on an imaginadon-crush- ^ reciate was 2 g^ 115 - 
iug education system, on the q 

scarred landscape created by the , - . 

industrial revoiidon and on pow- Uieraiy theater is everywhere in 
er-hungrv union leaders who <£re- * e ^ Januai y P^-pause; and 
cized workers refusing to strike, yei j^pfe is to be found 
Only in a troupe of fireus vaga- pt theBus hThcatre. WnWcUs s 
bonds does Dickens find evid2ee Common, 

of the warm-hearted humanity de- at E t!" 

nied to the governing classes. mburgh Festival, is a bnef, touch- 

O mo irarKellif fhp 


voices and characters with a light- ly in that world of Bohemian chic 
ning facility. Even this version isn’t spearheaded by Hemingway and 
quite the whole story; but when Picasso. 

you watch Spiro as Louisa Grad- Stein dearly had an ego as big as 
grind registering in a mailer of sec- the Gare du Nord: Toklas provided 
onds the transition from girlhood loyalty, security and a surprising 
to womanhood and the breakdown capacity to get things done, even 
brought on by her f ather ’s insen- selling her churn's pictures to get 
sate adherence to logic and fact, her works published. The play, 
you get dose to the humane radi- mainly a compilation of bon mots, 
calism of Dickens and begin to ap- evokes their mutual dependence 
predate why he was a genius. and shared wit (“If .Alice were a 

general." murmured Gertrude. 
□ "she’d never lose a battle — she’d 


you get dose to the humane radi- 




ihapnqio&thatmby , 
DOC M&SOfmBiJVYAP- 

p&m&xemawmM 

FROM? ROOFS AND CANVAS 
TBNIS! W 





Literary theater is everywhere in merely misplace it”). But it is given 
the usual January play-pause; and abundant life by Miriam Margo- 


and production of “Great Expects- which \ 
dons" now playing at the Old Vic. claimed 
In the course of nearly four hours. There 
Coe attempts to stage the bulk of sage in 


which was almost chorally de- eccentric at his home whic 


claimed by the whole company. 

There is a strikingly similar pas- 
sage in “Great Expectations’’ 


this long, complex 1860 book. Thus where Pip tries to aid Magwitch’s 

we see young Pip bringing food and escape down the Thames. Dickens that Coe’s bmp, externalized va- 
a file to the escaped convict, Mag- prepared for this by making a trip sion robs him of the gufli-ridden. 
witch, on the misty Kentish down the river before writing the first-person narration that in the 
marshes; Pip’s transformation into chapter. The result is a haunting end is the whole point of the book. 

□ 

;; A vastly superior Dickens adap- * 

t 21102 is to be found at the tiny 
, Orange Tree Theatre situated 
^ above a pub in Richmond. Here 
‘ | $ ri’ M four actors are playing “Hard 

% j $jki '7 ^ Tunes’’ in a new version by Stephen 

y,, . r j f I J Jeffreys and the result is three 

— \ l • . 1 hours of gripping narrative theater. 


erally treats as his castle, complete 
with flag and drawbridge. But Ian 
McCurrach's Pip is no more than a 
cherubic cipher, and the reason is 
that Coe’s limp, externalized ver- 


In Jeffreys’s version, fluently di- 
rected by Sam Walters, “Hard 
Times” becomes a play for today; 
and the four actors (David Timso’n, 
Kate Spiro, Caroline John and 


yet another example is to be found lyes as Stein, looking like a rotund, 
at the Bush Theatre. Win Wells’s cropped Joan of .Arc and sounding 
“Gertrude Stein and a Companion.'' like Mae West and by Natasha 
already ac claim ed at last year’s Ed- Morgan as a bonily beautiful at- 
in burgh Festival is a brief, touch- tentive Toklas. The evening cele- 
ing, verbally precise account of the b rates emotional bonding with ver- 
<□ tense, loving relationship be- bal felicity: but. after a trio of 
tween the avant-garde poetess literary works, I am Steinishlv re- 
Stein, who came from Pittsburgh, minded that a play is a play is a 
and the San Francisco-born Alice play. 

B. Toklas. The two lived in Paris in Sheridan Morlev is on a leave of 


TRS PLACE HAS ALLTWOU? • 
UiORLPQIARM OF A TROPICAL 
OXFORD. ONE CAN AIMOSTSEE 
THE DONS 3PPIN6 PORT ON 

|| 


ACTUALLY, I MEAN, HOW MANY 

THREEM0NM5 CLAS5RD0M55THL 
ABO, TT MAS HMER8PVEUJET 
A BROTHEL. MUMPER* . 

\ L I. 


Frank Moorey) switch hat s , roles, the inter-war years and moved easi- absence. 




It’s Official: 117-Year-Old World Almanac Is a Best Seller 


•ft 4 4 

A ■ 1 



By Edwin McDowell 

New York Times S&rice 

N EW YORK — It has taken 
more than a century, but The 
World Almanac and Book of Facts, 
the reference book that has been 
called on to settle innumerable dis- 
putes, is a No. 1 best seller. The 


7 kSBSSinS: 928-page potpourri of tots and fig- 


OX STAMPEDE — China's new 8-fen (3-cent) stamp 
marks the Year of the Ox, which according to the lunar 
calendar bepns Feb. 20. The first-day Issue qtnckly sold 
out; speculators resold the stamps for five times the price. 


dramatized scenes with narration. 
And. as they slip easily from one 
character to another, you get both a 


I Roman B uilding 
Found in London 


The Associated Press 

L ONDON — The remains of 
' wbat appears to be a Roman 
civic hall or a military headquarters 
have been uncovered during a six- 
month archaeological dig in Lon- 
don, the Museum of London said 
Tuesday. 

The building, which measured 
about 90 feet by 36 feel (27 by 11 
meters), bad stone foundations and 
at least 10 rooms linked by a long 
corridor, said Mike Hammerson, 
an archaeologist at the museum. 

It was excavated near a Roman 
road on a 7-acre (2.8-hectare) site 
within the old Roman town of 
Southwark in south London, in an 
area earmarked for construction of 
a housing development at the end 
of February. 


of paperback Advice, How-To and 
Miscellaneous books. 

“We’re aO very proud,” said Jane 
D. Flatt, the publisher of World 
Almanac Publications Inc. 
‘There’s some luck involved but 
there was also a lot of hard work 
and dedication.” 

The “luck” refers to the fact that 
The New York Times revamped its 
best-seller lists two years ago to 
include reference books. Neverthe- 
less. with more than 1.76 milli on 
copies of the 198S edition in print, 
the Almanac’s success would ap- 
pear to be less the result of recent 
goddiuck than of its 117-year-old 
legacy of providing brief, accurate 
information on an endless array of 
subjects. 

Want to slim down af ter the holi- 
days? Turn to the book's Recom- 
mended Daily Dietary Allowances 


258 and 271 respectively. Who in-house editors, a Canadian editor barked on a crash publishing pro- 
owns Haagen-Dazs ice cream? See and Kenneth L. Fr anklin of the ject immediately after the votes 
page 139. Need to know 1981 pro- American Museum- Hayden Plane- were counted, 
due lion figures of wheat, rice and tarium, who edits the astronomy “It meant staying up all one 
corn in Nepal? Look at page 205. section. Twenty percent of the night proofreading the results," 
. The Alm a n ac lists the popula- book is rarely updated {Le> the Lane said, “making film for the 
tion of Lima. Peru, and the mayor Constitution, facts about the presi- pages and my getting on a plane the 
of Lima, Ohio. It contains color dents), but 50 percent is updated at next day and hand-carrying them 
flags of 180 world governments and least briefly each year and 30 per- to our printing plant on the out- 
statistics about the television view- cent is completely new. skins of Buffalo." As a result of 

ing habits of men, women, teen- Collating that vast amount of that whirlwind schedule, however, 
agers and children. It offers in- information successfully has the Almanac went on sale in New 
structron in tnouih-io-moutb earned the Almanac a reputation York a week later, 
resuscitation and includes a sam- for accuracy. But inevitably errors Ironically, for a book that de a l s 
pling of notable earthquakes, tidal creep in. This year, for example, the in facts, the Almanac’s most nota- 
waves, train wrecks and other di- book lists Tom Ritter, a Republi- ble new feature is more likely to 
s 251 * 15 - . . can, as the election winner in Mich- start arguments than to settle them: 

There are omissions, of course, jgan’s Sixth Congressional District, the editors of Omni magazine have 
“We no longer fist raw steel pro- when in fact be was nosed out by taken a look into the future and see 
duction or the distribution of in- Bob Carr, a Democrat. a brave new world that includes an 

d us trial minerals,” admitted Hana “It was very close when we went inhaler to shield people from dam- 

Unrlauf Lane, the almanac's editor to press, but tire results we relied on age caused by smoking and air pol- 
since 1980. There are also some bad Ritter the winner.” said Lane, lution (1986), three-dimensional 
apparent ambiguities: a Chinese a Vassar graduate who holds a mas- television (1992). a vaccine against 
scientist wrote u> say he did not ter's degree in Russian and East a human cancer (1995), the whole- 
»o lte j imde I? t ^ nd de ^ mjdotl European Studies from Yale. The sale displacement of manufacnir- 
“Baud rate given in the Computer error will be corrected in the next ing jobs by robots in Japan and the 
Language glossary on page 116. edition. So will the reference to United States (1999) and the reviv- 
But if the Alm a nac were the last South Korea as a “police state.” a al of nuclear power (2000). 
word on every th i ng , there presum- description that Lane said did not But it is the facts rather than 
would be no need for The accurately reflect the political forecasts that reference librarians, 
World Almanac Consumer Infor- changes of the last few years. researchers and students have re- 


nation Kit, The World War II Al- Even when elections are not in lied on since soon after the appear- 
*9^ War dispute, they play havoc with the ance of the first edition of The 

5 Ahnany or any of the Almanac's production schedule. Us World Almanac, a 120-pagevoi- 
° ri M ™ m * C f^. d ^ ei ?^dtfO^ urae with 12 pages of arsing. 


the listing under “Important'* "" 
Events of 1867” included: “Indians -i 
troublesome, and 8,000 U. S.-" 
troops ordered to the Plains” (Jan: . 

21); “Winter Garden Theater, New a ; 
York, destroyed by fire (March 
23); “Queen's Proclamation declar- - 
ing the Dominion of Canada”- 11 .. 
(May 23). '•} - 

Publication of the Almanac was Z : ■ 
suspended in 1876 but revived a” •- 
decade later by Joseph Pulitzer, the. 
publisher of The New York World, 'J •- 
with the goal of making it “a com-’ 
pendium of universal knowledge.” ’ 

The cover of the 1886 edition de- : 
picted the Statue of Liberty, for. — 
which Pulitzer had led the fund '' - 
drive. The Almanac, published ev- ^ - 
cry year since, has sold more than • 

45 million copies. ' 

The Almanac was acquired by 
Scripps-Howard Newspapers in- 
1931 and for some years bore the - 
imprint of The New York World- ” . _ . 
Telegram and later The New York 
World-Telegram & Sun. Now it is 
published, in hard-cover (S 11.95) * _T 
and paperback ($4.95) editions, b/ - J." 
Newspaper Enterprise Association ' 
Inc., a Scripps-Howard company. - * 


Stt'K^orS ' l „ ber, in time to include ftelforid 

Abnanacis pul Aether by a Series results. buL in election years in 1868. Fourteen of those pages 
Si staff, indud^anin- the deadline is pushed back at least were devoted to the complete tS 

tiocer two editona^ assistants the a week. This year the editors kept of the Reconstruction Acts and a 
ten the lowest. They are on pages compiler of the chronology, four almost 80 pages open, then era- history of Reconstruction, while 


Vatican Library Exhibit 

The Associated Press 

VATICAN CITY — The Vati-v 
can’s Apostolic Library has opened 
an exhibition of books, drawings 1 
and other Roman art works of the - 
early 16th century. 


spert> l r*j*‘ 

an to Stem 

?mic‘ Rate of 







BA&V 

TlYAP^ 
Was 


FYTERNATIONAJL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 1985 


Page 7 


INSIGHTS 


French Socialists Find That Gaining Power Has Eroded Ideology 



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jO* iCD 



By John Vino cur 

Net r York Times Service 

P ARIS — Alain Touraine. a leading 
French sociologist, has defined the most 
important event of the period of Socialist 
government in France as the disintegration of 
socialist ideology. 

The Socialists themselves, for the most part, 
do not go that far in describing what has gone 
wrong since they came to power in 1981. But 
they agree that socialism, as it has been experi- 
enced in France, has created a crisis in their 
world of ideas. 

They acknowledge that the government of 
President Francos Mitterrand has abandoned 
. many of the verbal certainties that have been the 
essence of socialist ideology for more than a 
century, and that no one can say any longer that 
applying a specific aspect of socialist policy will 
produce a specific socialist result. 

The crisis has two facets, creating a vast field 
of debate that has dominated political life for 
months; This struggle for the ideological hig h 
ground here is of real importance because, m 
relation to much of Europe and the Third 
World, France retains intellectual and political 
influence disproportionate to the country's fi- 
nancial or military power. 

One aspect of the debate is within the left 
itself. The question is whether the government's 
economic policy and language should represent 
only a ‘‘parenthesis" until a return to doctrine is 
possible, or whether the Socialist Party must 
move toward advocating more individualism 
and less state control, putting the old doctrine 
aside. 

The other factor is the new respectability that 
the Socialists* difficulties have brought to con- 
servative thinking in France, which, with the 
exception of the late philosopher^ ournalist 
Raymond Aron, had not nad an admir ed intel- 
lectual champion since the end of World War IL 
Now French conservatives have seized an 
issue that for the first time in many years goes 
beyond their usual promises of protecting vot- 
ers' property and standard of living Although 
France nad a strong central government appara- 
tus long before the Socialist victory, the conser- 
vatives have succeeding in tarring the Socialists’ 
ec on omic, education and press policies as exam- 
ples of an anti-individualistic, statist character. 

T HE theme of less government interven- 
tion, called liberalism here, has been tak- 
en up piecemeal by most of France’s 
conservative and moderate political establish- 
ment 

Not only the conservatives but also Socialists 
of the pasty’s left wing and more moderate 
factions acknowledge the left’s ideological dis- 
array. The Communists, who left the govern- 
ment this summer, have chastised the Socialists 
Tor compromises with capi talism, bat their own 
internal disorder appears enormous, and they 
are confronted with a progressively dwindling 
share of the electorate. 

For Didier Motchane, one of the Socialist 
Party’s leading Marxist-oriented theorists, than 
is currently “a crisis of the left and the workers’ 
movement of historical dimensions. ” 


U.S. Experts Urge 
Program to Stem 
'Epidemic’ Rate of 
Teen-Age Suicides 

By Wayne K i ng 

Nor York Times Service 

ALLAS — A program to 
odes by adolescents s 


D 


t sid- 


es 

i S 


oped and introduced into high schools 
around the United States, psychiatrists and oth- 
ers agreed at a conference here. 

anodes by young persons have climbed to 
“epidemic proportions,^ said the panelists, who 
included T ^imant Governor Alfred D. Del- 
Bdlo of New York and some of the nation's 
leading experts on teen-age suicide. 

Mr- DexBdk). co-chairman of the National 
Committee on Youth Suicide Prevention, called 
for a congressional commission to study the 
causes of such suicides, develop practical meth- 
ods to identifying those considering it, and find 
ways to stop them. 

He noted an absence of information on teen- 
age suicides, although there is agreement that 





alcohol by young persons to the failure of par- 
ents «nd teachers to identify warning sig nals 
and offer help. They said that increasingly easy 
access to firearms in American homes was a 
significant factor. Most of the young who kill 
themselves do so with firearms. 

The panelists agreed that most nidi suicides 
were preventable and that almost all teen-agers 
who took their own lives declared in some way 
then intention to do so. 

- Adolescent suicide is aimed at “the cessation 
of intolerable emotion, unendurable pain,” said 
Dr. Edwin Schnddman. A professor at the Uni- 
versity of California, Los Angeles, School of 
Medicine, Dr. Schnddman is a co-founder of 
the Los Angeles Suicide Prevention Center. 

If other ways are suggested to relieve emo- 
tional pain or make it endurable, adolescents 
will usually choose than, Dr. Schneidman said. 

D R. Schnddman told of a pregnant gki 
who told him that she planned to kill 
herself. He persuaded her to write down 
alternatives he suggested, such as keeping the 
baby, giving it up far adoption, marrying or 
nr rni mi ning strickle. As he suggested each of a 
total of 14 alternatives, she rejected them one by 
one. Bill wheat she was asked to rank than in 
order of preference, he said suicide ranked no 
better thatfcnrtlL 

But panelists cited statistics indicating that 
increasingly thereis no one to offer such alter- 
natives. " 

Dr! Pamela Cantor, a developmental psycho- 
logist who has. written and lectured extensively 
about- youthful suicide, described a study show- 
ing that typical American fathers spend “an 
average of 37 sc onds a day with their infant 
children, and American parents spend less time 
with their rhil A rra than any other nation of the 

world." 

The National Center for Health Statistics 
estimates that more than 6,000 people IS to 24 
yean c^d-ldUed themselves in 1983. 

Thai is more than five times the number who 
conmuitai snkadem 1950. Since then, the num- 
ber oryouihs who have committed suicide has 
gone from^J to 1 15 per thousand. 

: at .of those attempting suicide 

’ a tor raid, although most of 



The trouble, he maintaine d in an interview, is 
that the left was not leftist enough. The left has 
become traumatized, be said, because the gov- 
ernment “did not demonstrate its difference 
from the old ruling class.” Mr. Motchane added, 
“What it tried to do, in fact, was to make itself 
acceptable by imitating the old ruling class.” 
Asked if France has actually known socialism 
since 1981, he replied, “You know very well that 
it hasn't.” To a president whose vocabulary has 
moved to words like “modernization.” “adapt- 
ability" and “mobility” from phrases like “the 
cruelty of the forces of capital,” Mr. Motchane 
said: “The task of the left is to modernize 
France, and not capitalism in France.” 


O 


THER Socialists, however, look out- 
ward and see their party threatened less 
_JF by the abandoning of doctrine than by 
an inability to change in relation to changing 
attitudes in France. Jacques Delors, the former 
minister of finance and now president of the 
European Commission, the executive body of 


Ahhh, the Good Life: Kiwi Fruit, 
Radial Tires and Credit Cards 


By Nancy Rivera 

Los Angeles Times Service 

M ENLO PARK, California — What 
has lots of credit cards, probably 
drives a foreign car and prefers 
chunky peanut butter to smooth? An average 
resident of one of the 13 Western states, 
according to Sunset magazine. 

Sunset’s recently published Western Mar- 
ket Almanac lists little-known and sometimes 
strange facts about people who five in Cali- 
fornia, Arizona, Alaska, Colorado, Hawaii, 
Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Ore- 
•gon, Utah, Washington and Wyoming. The 
Western Market Almanac, compiled from 
research done primarily by Medtamark Re- 
search Inc. of New York, compares Western 
preferences and buying patterns to those of 
other regions, and with a national average. 

The almanac, which the magazine has pub- 
lished every other year for more than 20 years 
as an advertising tool, consistently finds that 
Westerners live their stereotype said Ar- 
mand A Schwartz, editor of Sunset's re- 
search publications. But that is not bad, Mr. 
Schwartz added. 

“The West has more of the people who are 
living these new lifestyles," he said “There 
are people who are dong exactly the things 
that we are in California" and the other 12 
Western stales, “but there just aren’t as many 
of them.” 

Then " g ain. “we do have a lot of bizarre 
characters out here,” Mr. Schwartz allowed 

T HE almanac found that Westerners 
are more innovative and more entre- 
preneurial than residents of other re- 
gions, primarily because they are more edu- 
cated Forty-one percent of Western adults 
have attended college for one or more years 
compared to 32 percent nationwide, Mr. 
Schwartz said. 

Westerners aren't necessarily bora with a 
yen for learning and innovation, but educat- 
ed and innovative people are more likely to 
move, Mr. Schwartz explained 


“The root thing is education,'* Mr. 
Schwartz said “You see it in the willingness 
lo accept new things." 

The almanac contains an admittedly par- 
tial list of 97 products and activities that 
gained their first wide acceptance in the 
West, including dishwashers, kiwi fruit, tele- 
phone shopping, radial tires and of course, 
hot tubs. 

The West is credit-card country. “We cany 
more plastic around in our wallets," Mr. 
Schwartz said Westerners lead in every cate- 
gory listed except Sears credit cards, which 
are more widely held in the Northeast and 
Middle West. 

Automated-teller cards and second mort- 
gages have a greater acceptance in the West 
than in other regions, the almanac says. 

Westerners prefer foreign cars. During the 
1983 model year, the four top-selling cars in 
the 1 3 Western states were imports, led by the 
Honda Accord, while in the rest of the United 
States the top four sellers were domestic auto- 
mobiles, led by the full-size Oidsmobile. 

In food “the buzz words are nutritious, 
fresh, light, healthy and ethnic,” Mr. 
Schwartz said 

Compared to other regions, Westerners are 
big on guacamole, brown rice, hot sauce, 
apricots and small-curd cottage cheese, 
among other things. Contrary to national 
preferences. Western residents would rather 
eat chunky peanut butter than smooth and 
would rather spread jam than jelly. 

Westerners also prefer kitchen gadgets, 
such as electric juicers, and fancy consumer 
electronics items, especially video cameras — 
an item that sells far better in the West than 
in other parts or the country. 

Even color choices vary by area. Warm, 
earth colo/s predominate in the West, chang- 
ing io cooler colors such as gray and blue in 
the Northeast and Middle West, according to 
the Ameritone Paint Corp. of Compton, Cali- 
fornia, which tracks color preference by the 
movement of its color chips. Its results 'were 
included in the almanac. 


titora't^ sticceed are boys.; * 


T YPICALLY, the female adolescent who 
attempts suicide is a First-born child 
dose to her mother, but unable to accept 
help heredf. 

The father is often absent physically, and if 
present, is psychologically unavailable. If par- 
ents are divorced, the child tends to blame 
herself for the breakup and sees the split as 
abandonment by the father. 

Among boys, she said, the suicidal type is 
often a younger child, more likely to uy to solve 
problems on his own rather than ask for help 
from others. As an adolescent, be is likely to 
seek relief from problems in alcohol or drugs 
rather that turn to friends or therapy. A loner, 
he may be from an affluent home with high 
pressures to achieve, or from a poor environ- 
ment. In dther case he tries to please his parents 
but feels he is not recognized for what he is. 

“In a sense he mirrors a larger sense of not 
belonging to a community or a family that many 
adults feel with the increasing numbers of up- 
wardly mobile families who migrate around the 
United Stales into plastic communities with 
look-alike bouses, pursuing the goal of better 
life for our children," she said. 

One of the problems surrounding youthful 
suicides, the panel agreed, was a failure of 
parents and teachers to recognize the so-called 
“cry for help." 


There is almost always some warning, panel- 
ists agreed. It may be something relatively ob- 
scure, an odd remark like “This is the last time 
FJI be in Dallas." Or a suicidal youth could 
begin giving away prized possessions, withdraw- 
ing from friends or refusing to answer the tele- 
phone 

Quite often, suicidal youngsters mil say 
something like “I'm tired of living, wouldn’t it 
be better to be dead?" Or one may make an 
overt declaration to a close friend, sworn to 
secrecy: “I'm going lo kill myself." 

In a significant number of cases, the panelists 
said, close friends of adolescents considering 
suicide knew or strongly suspected their friends 
were considering ending their lives. The friend 
often said nothing, either out of confused loyal- 
ty. or because they did not believe the threat, 
and wanted to avoid getting friends into trouble. 


O THERS on the panel were Dr. Alan L 
Berman, president of the American As- 
sociation of Suiddology; Dr. Douglas 
A. Puryear, director of emergency psychiatric 
director of emergency psychiatric services at the 
Southwestern Medical School, and Win Jaixeu, 
editor of the The Dallas Tunes Herald, co- 
sponsor of the conference with the Dallas-based 
Trail ways Corp. 


Among the analysts of so- 
cialism in France since the 
1981 election are, dock- 
wise from below, Didier 
Motchane, Andr& Glucks- 
mann. Max Gallo, Jacques 
Delors and Alain Touraine. 



the European Community, is one of them, “The 
wind is not with us,” he said in an interview, 
“either in terms of ideas or if you’re just looking 
at the raw facts. Intellectually, we’re at the 
bottom of the curve. We've got to discover a new 
frontier." 

Mr. Delors suggests a major problem in fash- 
ioning a new ideological basis — and retaining a 
majority in the French parliament in elections in 
1986 — is the split between people like himself, 
who have moved away from doctrine and con- 
sider it discarded, and Socialists who contend 
that the government's departure from doctrine 
is just tactical, a temporary deviation. 

But Mr, Delors thinks more people in France 
now want a diminished state presence, more 
emphasis on the individual than the collective. 
“We can’t say it's awful, and what a shame,” 
Mr. Ddors said of the change in public senti- 
ment. "If we do, we’ll turn socialism into just 
another intellectual jot in the margin." 

The crisis in leftist ideology in France in- 
volves a 15-year decline in the number of indus- 


trial jobs, a decrease in union membership and 
an unproved standard of living that has unrav- 
eled old woriting-class ties and dulled old work- 
ing-class reflexes. At the same time, studies have 
found a slow change toward the idea that the 
government is too involved in business and 
people's lives. 

Sociologists and political analysts have sug- 
gested that the movement, largely ignored by 
politicians until a year or two ago, goes back to 
attitudes developing in the 1960s as France 
became a country with social legislation compa- 
rable to that of Scandinavia. 

T HE evidence of the French shift away 
from attitudes traditionally associated 
with socialism is convincing. In a poll 
taken in November by the newspaper Le 
Monde, 47 percent of a sample group said they 
favored a dear reduction of the state role “even 
if it is to the detriment of solidarity” with the 
disadvantaged. Only 27 percent favored main- 


taining the current level of government involve- 
ment. 

Another poll, published by the magazine 
L’Express, showed an increasing belief that 
there are too many government functionaries. 
There also were sharp changes in attitude over 
the last three years touching on traditional areas 
of Socialist doctrine. No longer did a majority 
favor a 35 -hour workweek; no longer did a 
majority consider trade unions indispensable. 

in a way, conservative politicians, whose indi- 
vidual popularity has fallen parallel to Mr. Mit- 
terrand's, have had to run to catch up with the 
swing in attitudes. French conservatives have 
traditionally been statists in the manner of the 
French kings, Napoleon and Charles de Gaulle, 
but men like Jacques Chirac, the neo-GauDist 
mayor of Paris, have started to distance them- 
selves from some of the social policies of the 
1960s and 1970s. 

A series of best-selling books, popular and 
conversational in tone, by such neoconservanve 
writers as Guy Sorman, Jean-Fran^ois Revel 
and Francois de Closets, have argued that 
France has become such a state-controlled soci- 
ety, rife with privilege and restriction, that it 
cannot grow, innovate or prosper. 

They propose to' break down what are de- 
scribed as the privileges of unions and certain 
5 tale enterprises such as the national railroad or 
the national utility company, deregulation of 
many sectors of business, and a return of some 
industries nationalized by the Socialists, partic- 
ularly the banks, to the private sector. 

The arguments have the advantage of corre- 
sponding to a national mood, of contradicting 
the Socialist policies that coincided with record 
unemployment and diminished buying power, 
and — as the Socialists point out — of not 
having to be put immediately into practice. 

I N the face of the ideological challenge, the 
Socialists have responded in sometimes 
contradictory fashion. 

On one hand, they condemn French neocon- 
servatism as a law-of-the-jungle philosophy. In 
a speed) in October, Mr. Mitterrand deplored it 
as “the enemy of real freedoms.” But he also has 
asserted that he wants “less state involvement, 
not more, just like you.” Taxes can be lowered, 
he insists. 

This land of statement is contradicted by left- 
wing party spokesmen such as Mr. Motchane, 
who talks of raising income taxes as “one of the 
imperatives” of solidarity with the poor. As for 
the idea of less stale control, less involvement in 
the economy, Mr. Motchane said, “It’s a siridd- 
al left that allows collective organization and the 
public service to be discredited” 

In the view of Andre Glucksmann, a political 
scientist who played a major role in the 1968 
student rebellion, the Socialists are incapable of 
reasserting a single ideological line. He said 
their crisis was one not only of ideology, but also 
of culture — an entire attitude, a way of ' 
that had characterized a significant segment 
French life for a century. 

“The idea was always that the man who 
worked with his hands held the future in them,” 
he said, “and now that idea is dying. When 


you're forced to dose steel plants and mines, 
you're taking away the mission of the working 
class. What's left then?" 

N OW, “the Socialists must ask themselves 
what they can become, can represent,” 
Mr. Glucksmann said. “They’ve an- 
swered with a word like ’modernization,' which 
doesn’t mean much. In truth, the situation is 
really much more serious than that. Theexperi- - 
ence of the last three years means that a certain . 
view of fairness,' an internal morality, a system : 
of values that lasted a century is breaking down. 
The Socialists will leave power showing the 
emptiness of both their old and new ideas, and - 
that, for want of something honorable to replace 
it. is catastrophic.” 

Max Gallo, the former spokesman for the ■ 
Socialist government, talking about the mood of 
the French left, called the current period “its 
hardest hour, the time of realistic awakening” 
“All the fusions were shared by the directors 
of ihe Socialist Party,” fie said. “We were car- 
ried along by them, and there was a departure - 
from the laws of reality.” 

These days, there is considerable casting 
about for a new Socialist line, some kind of 
intellectual project that could reinvigorate the 
French left and allow it to do battle with those 
who call French Socialism a failure, a concept 
drained of contents, out of step with the coun- 
try’s instincts. 

The party- leadership will meet this year to 
work on a new ideological basis, on finding a 
voice that would allow it to bold onto power in 
1986. But the only (heme that the Socialists have 
fastened onto so far is a recent warning by 
Prime Minister Laurent Fabius to the parlia- 
ment that the opposition’s proposals for the 
future of France “would constitute a grave step 
backward.” 

AT a Socialist convention last month all the 
ideology discussed was that of the con 
MM. servatives; what the Socialists once 
called the scientific logic of their ideas seemed 
to have been filed away. Continuing to offer 
“modernization” as the essential element of the 
Socialist plan for France in 1985, Mr. Fabius 
spent most of his energy castigating the “war 
ideologues” of the right, who he said were plan- 
ning a “systematic denationalization for ideo- 
logical reasons,” if they regained power. 

With the election in view, the Socialists avoid- 
ed frontal dashes at the convention and kept 
their ideological turmoil out of view. But they 
allowed their despair to show through in anoth- 
er way. 

Lionel Jospin, the party's general secretary, 
offered a stark wanting. “If the current relation- 
ship between right and left doesn't change be- 
fore 1986," he said, "we’re going to lose.” 
Ideologically, this approach is what the So- 
cialists at times in the past have denounced as 
dectoralism — looking at results ahead of pro- 
grams and doctrine. Under any circumstances, 
it is an eon from what the party was promising 
in the decade before it came to power. “Social- 
ism," Mr. Motchane wrote in 1973, “is above all 
the demand for totality." 



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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 1985 


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M - - c 11 


NYSE Closes With Small Gain 


Thr Associated pros Just before the stan of Tuesday's session, 

NEW YORK — The stock market turned in President Ronald Reagan announced that his 
a mixed performance Tuesday as traders were chief of staff. James A. Baker 3d. and his 
hh with a surprise switch in the Reagan admin - treasury secretary, Donald T. Regan, were trad- 
istration Iinenp. a swap of jobs by the treasury fag jobs. 

secretary and White House chief of staff. “The stock market was befuddled by the 

“Wall Street was a little confused by it aU," sidedoor shuffle,” said Mr. LeFevre. “A lot of 
said William LeFevre, an analyst at Purcell, the day was spent figuring out what does it all 
Graham & Co. mean.” 

The Dow Jones average of 30 industrials, up Robert Stovall, an anal yst at Dean, Witter 
5.63 points Monday, gained smother 1.11 points Reynolds Inn, said the narrow movement fa the 
to close at 1,191.70. Earlier fa the session, the market indicated that traders “absorbed the 
blue-chip average had been up as modi as 4.64 news of the shift of responsibilities without 
points. voting on it one way or another.” 

More than eight stocks rose in price for every ' ” 


seven that fell on the New York Stock Ex- 
change 


Hil degarde Zagorski, a market strategist at 
Prudential- Bacfae Securities Ino, said: “People 
will have to sit down and mull this over.” In the 


Big Board volume rose to 92.1 1 million shares meantime, she said, “the marin* is reacting to 
from 86.19 milli on Monday. Nationwide turn- this frith a big yawn.” 
over fa NYSE-listed issues, including trades in For the most part, analysts said, major stock 
those stocks on regional exchanges and in the swings resulted from developments affecting 
over-the-counter market, totaled 1 13.23 million individual companies rather than broad trends. 
sh ?T es ' . Teledyne, which plunged 11% on Monday 

Several broad indexes of stock-market actm- following a disappointing ea rnings report, fefl 


ty declined. 


another 87a to 232%. 

“The collapse of Telecine is casting a bit of a 

pall on the market.” said Robert Colby, an 
analyst at Smith Barney, Harris Upham & Co. 
“It put the fear of «»nmg«: fato the market." 
In the next few weeks, a flood of earnings 


The NYSE’s composite index of all its listed 
common stocks slipped .08 to 94.81. 

Standard & Poors index of 400 industrials 
fell -21 to 182.62, and S&Ps 500-stock compos- 
ite index was off 25 at 163.99. 

Monday’s advance, the first gain of the new reports for the fourth quarto- and all of 19^4 
year, came as hopes brightened for additional wfll hit investors. 

declines fa interest rates and for continued Holiday inns, which said it plans to buy back 
moderation in inflation. up to 28.6 percent of its outstanding stock. 

But even though bond-market interest rates Himhod 2ft to 46%. 
fell again Tuesday, there was uncertainty about Unidynamics, the object of a takeover bid by 
the cabinet shakoip and worries about the up- Nortek, jumped 5 Vi to 22%. Nortek rose % to 
coming round of corporate earnings reports. 15%. 


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34 

% 

1U 

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34 

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81* 81* 

1 % 11 * + % 
% % 

1% 1fc+V* 


36% 17 Contoxn 
22% 16% CmSoW 100 80 

25% 16% COnHud 204 110 

23% 10% CCnIILf ZU 92 

17% 14 Cnl IPS 100 90 

22% T7% CnLaEI 106 80 

33% 29% CLaElpf 4.18 1ZS 

14% 7% CoMPw 100 149 
17% 14 CnSovo 
17% 10% CVIP5 
17% 7% Control 
9% 7% CntryTI 
25 18% Cwivtll 

23% 15% Crt-teed 
27% 17 CossAIr 
28% 16% Cftmpln ... 

28% 19 aimlpl 100 

56% 4314 Ounl pf 400 

12 8 ChamSp 00 

129b 1 *iauic 
6% 1* vICW wl 

11% 1% vlOalOf 
52% 35% Ctaso 305 

63 57% Chase pf 60S 123 

44 36% Chau Pf 525 120 

5B 48 omul &57slZ2 

57% 51 Chase pf 63Dail0 

19 13% Chetoso 06 30 0 

36% W* ChcitMd 108 50 II 163 2*1* 25% 25% 

15% r% O1NV3 236 69 5 1126 14% 33% 34 +% 

35% 23% QiNYpf 107 50 4 3J% 33% 33%- % 

* OiNYpf 6570123 10 53% 53V, 53%— % 

38V. 31% OHBPk 104 30 16 30 33% 33% 33% - ta 

1.92 SJ 11 4081 33% 33% 33% — % 

100 U 7 4571 2F% TO I. _ 

9 207 23% 23 23% — % 

SI 61 195 190% Wl —3% 
25 69 6* 68 — % 

7 11 19% 19% 19% 

034 4.1133 40 8% 8 8 — % 

084 10 U 34% 34% 34% — % 

IS 9% 9 9% + % 

24 10’* 10% lOW 

100 33 4 4450 30% X 30 + % 

34% Oiubbs 200 43 II 1662 51% 51 511*—% 

21V6 aiureft 00 25 17 1494 31% 30% 31% + % 


47% 46% 46%— % 
55 55 55 + % 

41% 41% 41%— % 
54 53% 54 + % 

53% 53 S3% + % 

18% 17% M + 1* 


39% 32% ChasPn 
% 29% CTwvm 


41 18% CNWsf 

195% 84% CMMIW 
74% 4 7 CMMIPf 
25% 16 CMPnT 
15 7% ChkFull 

351* 24% OlrtsCr 
10% S CUrtrtn 
W% 9% Chroma 
33% 7Bf* Owvsl r 
S3 
32 


43 35% anBau 

15% 8% ChvGE 
31 24 OrKJpf 

32% 39 OnOrt 
69% SO CMObI 

77 

34 


3.12 70 
Zli U4 
400 130 
704 143 
9L51 140 


13 
6 1118 


43 % 41 431* + 1* 

IS 149b 15 + % 

50Br 30 30 30 

201 52 52 52 + % 

lOQz 65 65 65 

58% ClnGpf 1030 IZ1 223001 78 75 78 +3 

QMWI 32 U 35 W 22% 22% 22% 


100 30 
100 53 
A 75 


33% 20% a relit 04 23 M 
29% 16% ClrCJtv 08 J 14 
19% 13% Circus II 

40% 27% CJHcrp 206 50 6 
86 68% Orteppf 8J3ellJ 

99% 75% OttP PfA 90SO110 
101 771* Clta>pfB902o 9.1 

44% 32 Ofrlny 200 9.1 9 

40 49% Ctyinpf 200 30 

26% 21% Ctvlnpf 207 110 

11% 6% CtaMr 02 90 
3* 23% ClartcE 1.10 4.1 14 

13% 6% CtovMm 14 

26 17 Owdl 100 50 

201* 13% CJovEI 253 120 * 

60 47 ChrElpf 756 130 

171* 10% ClMpfc 00 90 

171* 15% Ovofcpf 203 135 

20% 14% OvpkDf 104 115 

31 22% Clorax 100 4.1 10 

17% M% CKJbMn 

309b 22% CluettP 

19% 1496 Cbetpf 

ZQ& 11% Csadwn 

391* 23% Coastal 

38 24% Cstlpf 

4V Coca a 

. MCeba 
371* 25V* Cotanai 
26% 20% Cota PM 
39% 27% CollAlk 
16% 99b ColFdss 
31% 20% Cal Pen 
57 39% Cattinri 

37% 27 CelGas 

* 49% OMCopf 5.12 11.1 

H77 86 CSOpf 01505 140 

421* 271* Contain 208 50 TO 
3S% 25% CmfcEn 104 55 13 
TWi ■ Carnots 
26 15% CatnMIl 

49% 161* Comdra 
28% 21% CmwE 
UVb 13 Cwe pi 
16% 131* CwE pf 
21% IM Cwe pf 
24% 20% CwEp* 

<5% 54% CwEpf 
57 46 CwEpf 

25% 16% CamES 
34% 2B% Corns of 
» 16% CPwei 

*9% 26 Gomanr 
*1% IT CompSc 
46% 29 Cptvsn 
»V* 19% ConAos 

22% 131* Coaolr 

Wfa 12% CoraiEs 152 


50 

137 

1 

513 


279 

17 

176 

5 


2G 
14 

9 1377 
B 

5 132J 

6 102 

41 3 

40 13 18M 

794 

40 9 
50 10 
11 7 


100 
I0B 
100 
.14 1.1 11 
100 50 9 
250 45 TO 
&I4 __ 


32% 31% 32% + % 
23% 23 23% + % 

17% 17% 17% 

37% 36% 37 — Mr 
73% 7216 7216 + % 
85% 85 89 + % 

99 99 99 +1% 

39% 391* 391*— % 
40% 40% 40% 

24% 24% 84% 

7% 7% 7% 

27% 27 27 — 1* 

12 % 12 % 12 % — % 
SB KVA 17% 17% + 1* 
847 189b 19% 19%+ 1* 
20* 55% 55% 55% 

42 13% 11% ll%— % 
23 14% IM 14% 

04 15% 15% 15%—% 
29% 29 » 

16% 16% 16%— 1* 
30% 28% 30% +1% 
19V. 18% 19 +% 

17 15% 1* —1 

38 27% 28 + % 

29% 29 29 —3 

43% 42% 02% + % 
13% 121* 12H— % 

30 86% 25% 25% — % 

799 84% 84 24%— I* 

.... — 


300 107 
1J0 115 
200 120 
207 110 
207 120 
840 1X3 
7 M 112 
132 181 5 
1.20 AS II 
04 0 23 

5Sa 15 11 


126 14% 14% 14%+ % 

272 27% 26% 2C%— % 

231 51% 51 Sl%— % 

221 23 32% 32%—% 

5 46 46 44 

aofeKH MS 106 +3% 
279 30% TO1* 38%+ % 

653 33% 331* 331m— % 

10 11 440 13% 11% 12 — U 

20 11 278 15% 151* 15%— % 

3 2454 16% 16% 16% — % 


25 19Vi CnnNG 
U% in* Conroe 
>11* 32% Com Ed 


„ 20% 27% 2>Vb + % 

7 15% 15 15V- + % 

86 15% 15% 19% 

2 2D% 20% 80% 

2 231* 23% 23% — % 

IBB* 63 63 43 —1% 

1002 55 55 55 +1 

60 22% 21 Zl — % 

30 37 26% 86%— K 

600 27 26% 26% + 1* 

1 29% 89% 29% 

TO 117 13% U% 13% 

39 1160 34% 33U B%— 1% 
07 13 13 86 36% 36% 26% 

282 31% 21% Zl%— % 
63 1 30 17% 17 17%+ % 


200 90 
00 29 
112 70 


9 19 24% 24V* 24% + Vk 

6 114 14 13% 13%—1* 

7 1148 30% 30 10% + % 


n Month 
toga Low stack 


Dlv. nil PE 


Sts. 

WteHJghLwr 


Quo*, cm* 


40% 30 


ConE pf 409 111 5400* 38% 38% 38% 

CanEpf 500 113 7 <2% 42 42 +% 

34% 25 ConsFd 104 40 10 315 32% 31% 32% + % 

29% 2 on CnsFrfS 1» 35 11 224 29 28% 2816— % 

O'* 31 CnsHG 132 5* 8 583 41% 41 61V— U> 


12 Month 
HWiLow snefc 


Dlv. rid. PE 


Sis. 

MDs High Low 


Ouot.Orte 


RManHl 
High Low Shrek 


Sis 

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OoW 
qwA.QiVe 


.12 


T1 7 
V 15 


090 0 » 
JOb 4.1 10 


14% 9% Eoultcn 
14% 8% Erbmnf 
15% 12% EssBsn 
22% 15% EsasxC 
34% 20% Estrtno 
33 u, a Ethyl 
10% 3 Evoip 

14% n evonpf 110 1X7 
39% 30 ExCeto 100 40 10 
16 13% Cxcotar IJiellJ 

45% 36% Exxon 


28 12 
17 11 


300 70 


155 
304 
8 
142 
111 
96 
2 
9! 
31 
6 6296 


10% TO 10 — % 
11% 11% 11% + % 
IS 1 * 14% 14% — % 
19% 19% 19% 

25% 25% 25%— % 
32% 31% 32 — % 
3% 3% 3%— % 
11 % 11 % 11 %— % 
36% 36 36% 

15% 15% 15% 

44% 44% 44% 


75 54% Ho I rtf pf 137 31 

72% 61 HOlntPt 615 9.1 


120 

215 


12% 6% PH IM 
62 41% FMC 

76% 51% FMC Pf 

45% 35% FPL Gp 176 
22% 22% FPL GP wl 
13% 9% FcbCtr 
16% 9% Facet 
19% 15 FaJrchd 00 
33% Fairs Pf 840 


14 

691 

TO 


-28 12 15 


16% 9% Falrto 


.U 


40 9 
910 _ 
11 


66 

667 


79« 7% 7%— % 
55% 54% 54% + % 
67% 67% 67%+ % 
44% 43% <3%— % 
22% 22% 22% 

12 % 12 % 12 % 

11% 11 11% 

16% 16% 16% + % 
34% 36% 36% — % 
U% 12% 13%— V> 


22% 17% Houlnd 
63% 39% HouNG 
20 9% HouOR 

23V. 11 Ho+ICp 
26 20% Hu&Crt 

15% 9% Huffy 

21% 12% HuofiTI 
23% 17% HugflSp 
33 71% Human 

24% 17% Hunt AM 
39% 23% HuftEF 
23% 18V* Hydro! 


11.1 4 1299 
200 40 10 766 
2150200 96 

.*0 23 28 24 

120 80 11 119 

00 11 0 
08 36 

10 8 19 

11 II 3604 

10 16 51 

18 20 678 
85 8 23 


12 

08 


00 

102 


73% n% 73% 

68% 68% 6B%+ V* 
22% 22% 22% 

41% 40% 411* + Hr 
11 % 11 % 111 * + % 
15 U% IS 
... 86% 84% 26% 

T19x 12% 12% OTb + % 
477 13% 13% 13% — % 
17% 17% T7H— % 
22% 21% 22*— % 
24 23% 23% — % 

28% 20 281* + 16 
22% 22% 22%+ % 


1J0 

250 


41 


51 


29 ft 


32 


19 

246 

23* 

28ft 

14* Forah 

JO 


8 

13 

19* 

13% 


JO 

20 

IS 

95 

10% 

7% 

4ft Fedors 



10 

345 

Sft 

15% 

29* FedlCo 

104 

40 


153 

34 

47 

27* Fed Exn 



21 

76! 

34% 

37% 

29* FdMoo 

102 

40 

10 

52 

31% 

25 

10* FedNM 

.16 

1.1 



IS 

27 

i<* FedPBs 

JO 

X3 


121 



9% 10 
5% 5H— % 
33% 34 + % 


28% 21 ICInds 
84% 62% ICInpf 
9% 4% ICN 

25% 22% ICN pf 170 T0 l 6 
17% 14 INAin 102 110 
19% 13% IRTPrs 100 80 TO 
47% 27% ITTCP 100 35 ~ 
76 « ITTpfK 4J» 75 

71 44% ITTptO 500 80 

SB* 28 ITTpffl 225 U 
80 42% ITT pfl 450 8.1 


5 

330 

13 

35 

13 


8 1664 
2 
36 
7 
25 


14% 15 + % 


63 45 FPappt 110 20 

21% 16 FedRJt 104 60 16 32 

19% FdSonl 00 51 17 26 

55% 42% FOdDSt 140 41 8 345 

38% 22v* Ferre 110 A7 9 187 

39 251* FWaJ IDO *5 10 66 

24% 4 FlnCpA 10 25 7297 

48 14% FlnCppf 6144010 50 

91* 2% FrtSBor 21 

22% 15% Ftresln JQ 47 9 431 

2% 19 FI Ah In 0 12 7 35 

29% 21% FBkSvs 100 57 7 1196 

33 24% FBAFla 110 41 11 X 

56 34% FBort 00a 1.1 9 19 

27 18% FsfOWc 132 62 T5 1716 

57 44% FOllOPf 5JQB120 80 

87% 70 FChl PfB &67 bHI 10 

201* 13V. FtBTax 100 17 13 1(1 

21 11% FtOty 14 847 

18% 15% FFedAz 569 

45V. 3tH* FlBtste 134 55 7 170 

30% 71 Flntstpf 137 80 40 

13% 7V* FtMlTO 04 25 10 551 
46% 31 V. FNSfB 208 60 6 72 

107% 90% FNSIB pi 100*110 
7% 4% FStPo 100 313 

28% 20V. FstPapf 162 100 160 

20% 80 FfUnRI 104 60 13 71 

20 14% FTVoBk 54 43 B E 

25% 14 FIWIsc 100 40 7 84 

52% 45% FIN be pf 60S 120 
54% 381* Ftscflb 100 30 17 


51% 51% 51% — 3% 
21% 21 W 211*— U 
15% 15% 15% 

52 51% 51% — % 


25% 15% luinf 1-20 70 22 196 

391* 30% IdoftoP 308 80 7 1017 

26 13% IdealB 24 

23% 17% lllPtnw 164 115 4105Q2 
34% 27U, Iipowpf AI2 125 2001 33 

31 25 HPowPt ire 130 17901 29 

45% 37% lipgwpf 464*115 101 


442 


16% 4% ConsPW 

50 231* CnPpfO 705 190 

51 2S% CnPpfE 7 32 195 

S3 25 CnPpfG 706 190 
28% 11% CnPprV 400 210 
23% 9% CnPprU 360 206 
25% 101* CnPprT 308 307 
51 25* CnPpfH 768 190 

25% 11% CAP PTR aso IU 
28 in* CnPprP 308 21.1 
25% UK* CnPprN 305 210 
16% 7% CnPprMISD 30L2 
15% 7 CnPprL 223 190 
86% 11 GnPprS 402 210 
17 71* CnPprtC 143 20 J 

38 23% CfdtCp 160 7.1 

7% 4% Can! Ill 
23* 3k Conflict 
511* 12 CntlOPf 
4% % CIIIHdn 

24% It CanfTol 102 
48% 24% CfOaflJ 64 
33% 22% Conwd 100 
4% 1 vlCoakU 
37% 26 Coopt 152 
38% 30 COOPIPI 200 
27 10% CoopLb JO* 

19 17% GaarTr 00 

84% 11% Coopvfs 
in* 11% CapwM 


70 


3 


29% 19V, CowMpf 200 111 


_ 30 M 

52 46 11 
156 30 15 
160 14 23 
04 . 0 14 


100b 40 22 
16 


W 


23% 16% Cardura 
14% 10% CwHrr 

74% 51% ComG 
31% 22% CortWk 
54% 38% CaxCm 
0% 4% Crota 
OF* 27 Cron# 

50% 38% CravRs 
29% 16% Crock N . .. 

2J% 15% CrckN Pi 118 111 
22% 19% CrmpK 100 56 
45% 34% CramOc 
30% 27% CrwZal 100 30 11 1133 

51% 43 Crz*p4 463 90 42 

63% 50 CrZa4 pfC4J0 XI 34 

47% 84% Cull not 32 117 

23H 12% CutTOJwt 1 

■8V, 41% CumEn 200 20 4 121 

10% 81* Currinc l.lOolQ0 48 

49% 301* CurfW 100 30 9 6 

42% 27% Cvcfcips 1.18 25 11 157 


2 755? 4% 4% 4% 

100z 38% 36% 3t%— % 
12402 39% 38% 39% ■» 
40i 39 39 39 

263 20% 20% 2J% 

21 17% 171* 17% + % 
6 181* 18% 18% 

3002 28% 38% 3Mb + % 
125 1CU 18% 18% + V. 
130 19 18% 18%+ % 

MU 11% 1«%+ % 
12% 12% 12% + M 
11% 11% Tl%— % 
18% 18% 18% 

12 % 12 12 — % 
37% 36% 36%—% 
6% 6% <%+% 
2% 1% 2%+% 
37% 37 37% + % 

1% % l%+% 

22 % 22 % 221 *— % 
34% 34% 34% 

31% 31% 31% 

1 % 1 % 1 %+% 

5 % 29% 29% 

% 33% 33% + % 
14% 13% 14% + % 
17% 16% 16% _ 

16% M% 16% + % 

13 n% 12% 

20% 20% 28% — % 
21% 21% 21% — % 
12% 11% 11% 

40 % 68 % 68 % + % 
29% 29% 29%—% 
47% 47% 47% — % 
6% 6% 6% 

34% 34% 34% — % 
51% 51 51 — Vi 

2416 23 ZJ —1% 
10% 18 18 
21 % 21 % 21 % + % 
13 45S 46% 44% 46% +1% 
33% 33 32%+ % 

46% 46% 46% 

551* 54% 55% +1% 
43% 43% 43% — % 
221* 22% 22% 

77% 77% 77% 

10% TO 10% + % 
32% 32% 37V.— % 
41 42 44 +3 


84 
8 

5 932 
6M 
3621 

3736 
10 11 1721 

UUP 

52 15 994 
16 668 
0 3 1227 
20 7 68 

20 13 TO99 
A5 11 107 


59 

17 

25 

149 

196 

461 

1 

23 


10 


MO 

347 

1 


20 31 
40 8 


19% 10% DomonC 
31% 21% DonoCto 
7% 5% Donohr 

13% ■% Damn 
07% 64% DartfO" 

59% 39 DafcGn 
30% 13% Dotard 
12% ff% DtaDso 
19% 12% Doyen 
37% 26% DoylHfl _ 

14% 11% DovfPL 2J0 120 
SSH 45% DPLpf 700 137 
58% 45 DPLpf - — 

29% 19% DactnFs 
40% 24% Deere 
22% 17% DeimP 
45% 27 DrttaAr 
8% 4% Del tuna 
58 35% DlxChk 

24% 17% DwiMfs 
42% 30% Demurs 
36% 26% DeSota 
16% 11% D«Ed .... 

69 59 DefEpf 901 130 

SB 47% DetEpf 700 130 

57% 46 Doiepl 

56 45% Detent 

24 19% DE pfF 

24% 20 OEPTR 
24% 19% DEpfQ 
24% 19 OE PIP 
24 19% DEpfO .... _ 

25% 19% DE dM 302 130 
TO 24% DEprL 400 130 
30% 24% Ot pf K 4.12 130 

17% 13% DefEpr 138 120 
2S% 17% Dexter 00 40 
IS 9% DIGtor 04 45 
& 17 CMGtopf 08 30 

27% 21% DKVloof 235 80 
22% 16% pfamS 106 90 SI 36810 
B% 34% OlaSti p# 400 110 32 

*8% 65% DtaWd 100 10 II 


10% 10% 10% — % 
26% 25% 26% + % 
56 7% 7 7 — % 

■18b 10 621 11% 10% 11% 

406 50 10 531 86% 84% 84% — % 
17 1228 55 53% 53%— 1% 

1? 2520 am 19% 28% +1% 
00 13 9 61 9 8% Bib 

06 10 6 136 14% 14% 14% — % 

04 13 12 1045 31% 31 31% + % 

' 7 733 15% 15% 154* 

10z 54% 54% 54% + % 
700 130 lOOr 56% 56% 56% +1% 
08 10 15 353 26% 26% 26% + % 

100 14 19 1951 30% 299b 299b— % 

102 90 I 355 2146 21% 21%— % 

00 10 8 1112 43% 43% 046 

_ 72 S* 5% 5% 

106 12 14 197 55% 54% 55% + lb 
TO 137 22% 22 22% + I* 

15 1269 42% 42 42%—% 

9 84 33% 32% 33% + % 

7 897 15% 15V. 15% — Vb 

ttttc 67 65% 67 —1% 

350i 56% 56 56% + % 

INz 55% 54 54 —1 

54Qz 56 55 56 +2 

4 84% 84% 84% + % 

>7 24 23% 23% — % 

B 23 23 23 + % 

11 23% 23% 23%+ % 

46 25% 24% 29%+ % 

149 25% 25% 25% + % 

5 28% 2696 38% + I* 

8 29% 29% 29% + % 

9 17% 17% 17% — % 

II 586 19% 18% 19% + % 

31 148 14% 14 14% + % 

310i 24% 24% 24% — % 
3 25% 25% 2S%— % 
18% 17% 18% —1% 
3S% 34% 35% + % 

72% 72 7296 


100 40 
108 11JI 


705 130 

706 13.1 
205 110 
304 130 
Z13 110 
112 1X5 
300 13J 


!]!«■ 77% Dtottal « 6328 TO3% 102 102%—!% 

68% 451* Disney 700 20 22 616 60% 59% 40% + % 

« 30 DEI 160 7.1 S 18 36% 36% 36% + % 

4% 3% pfvreln 3 46 4% 4% 474— % 

.12 443 6% 6% 6% — % 

291* 20% DomRs 232 90 8 2047 29% OT 2S%— % 

34% 16 Donald 06 17 8 168 17% 17% 17% 

30 14% POO L; 08 0 18 13 X 29% 25% 

££ 5.. P""** 14)0 20 14 505 461* 46 46—1* 

TOVi 23V, Dopey 1 00 40 II 40 25% 25% 25% + % 

« »% Payer 02 u 13 112 36% 35% 36 

?SV> OawCh 100 60 10 21*3 W% 27% 28% +% 

J1* OowJn 02b 10 21 641 42 417* 41%— I* 

W }”* J 40 184 11% 11% 11% 

HU 2 r * Ir 00 40 15 844 18% 17% IB + lb 

18% U% DrexB ZOO 110 84 17% 17% 17%+ I* 

23* Dreyfus SOa 10 10 194 34% 36% 3i%— I* 
52% 42% dUPM 300 60 8 1951 48% 47% 47%— % 


341* 30% OuPntpf 300 IU 
44 39 duPatpf 400 107 

30% TOV. DUkeP 148 80 8 
171 95 Dukopf 60S 50 

69% 59% Dukopf 800 120 
£ 57 oakapf 700 120 

» 219b Dukopf 209 11.1 

.32% 28 Duka pf 303 120 
TOW* «2* Duka pf H0O 110 
69% 40% Dukopf X28 120 
67% 51% DunBrd 108 30 19 546 
g* 11V6 DWqLf 206 130 6 4579 
15% 12% OWPf 100 143 
]7 12% DOQPl 107 13* 

14% 12% DUOPTK 110 115 
p% 13% Duqpr 131 1XB 
18% 8% DrcaPt 08 23 
22% 17% DvnAm 0D 3 


32% 31% 31% — % 
U 42 42 42 

4*4 299* 29 29%+ 1* 

1 121 121 121 
15b <8 67 67 + % 

W30z 64% 62 63 — % 

11 *4% 23% 3416 + 96 
31 3216 31% 32 + % 

300QZ 971* 97% 97%+ I* 


12 


66% «%— 96 
62% 63% + V* 


15% 14% 15 
750l 14 14 M 

TOCx 15V. 15% 15%+ % 
1 15% 15% 15%+ I* 
681 Bz 17 16% 16% + 1* 

33 TO V. TO 19% + % 
186 22% 21% 22 + % 


08 10 18 
00 20 13 
104 40 9 
04 20 


36% 26% EGG 
»% 21% ESrst 
as% 20% eaobP 
22% 12 Eons 

7% 3% EOStAIr 

*% 1*6 EALwfO 
1% % EALWtA 

p% 6% ESAh-pf 
^ 6% EAlrpfB 
9% EAlrpfC 

TO <91* EOMGF IJB 40 
18 12% Eastun Ml 110 


TO 401* ESKari 
SM* m. Eaten 
2% 20V. Erttfln 
2% 20 V* Eckert 
4B 32% EdlsBr 
1£* U EDO 
TO »% Edward „ _ 
22 22 EPGdDf 2JS W0 
TO 25% EPGM 135 1X1 
23% EPGpr 
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in* 8 % eicot 


320a 40 14 3998 

10 U I 81 

06 19 12 113 

UO 30 12 263 

100 40 a io 

04 10 12 845 

00 30 16 380 

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1 
5 

in* j% eawipt 100 111 ” 

TO 13 Elchps 0B A 35 

WTO 11% EWta 00 XI n 

TO 5% EMCfcri 30 

G* Z40 30 13 

■JTO 5% EmRds 041 90 16 
TO 11% EmryA 00 X0 IO 
TO 14% enfint 100b sj) ■ 

TO w Enmos u» 90 7 
4% 3% Efllppf 07 U.1 
7 Emapf .91 11.1 


393 32% 31% 31%+ % 
623 25 24% 84% 

64 2J% 25% 23% — 1* 

1K4 ISU 18 J*% + H 

573 4% 4 4 

S TC VP 

48 »%»%»%+% 
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27 13 12% 13 — % 

9 3273 3% 27% 20 ♦ % 

4 IX 17% 16% 17 — Hi 


8% 2% EHCAS 

8% 446 EMM 


8% 


108 

68 


„ % EflExc 

» EiwKp 02 20 15 

TO TOj* EnlsBu 06 10 12 

22% 17% E AWrcB 100 70 IS 3993 

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30 14% EntxEn 13So 7.1 

2TO » Elrttatln 100 60 7 

35% 231* Eqolfax IJB 80 13 

Rf 3 Eavtrefc 

18% 11% EaflUcpf 201 Ul 

3H* 38% EaiRm 17] to J 


31% 33% m,— % 
16% 16% K96+ % 
23% 23% OJb— % 
22% S' a% 

946 2846 2M+ % 
27% 27% 2746 
u% im n% + % 
>%(%(% 

3 3 3 — % 

0% 4% 4% 

89* 1% 8V.— % 
2196 21% mb + % 
13% 13% 13%— % 
7% 7% 71* + % 

48% 67% S7%- 96 
B4D W% 8% 10 — I* 
515 144* 16% MA* + % 
347 8H 2816 38% + % 
46 18% 1846 U86 
12BZ 41* 4% 41* + % 

SXh SV* 8 . 8V. + 14 


51 

10 

IM 

* 

104 


31 

44 

130 

MB 

1 


2796 27% 2746+1* 
so 29% »+ % 
221* 28% 22 +1% 
2 2 2 
996 91* 9*6+ % 
IB 1796 1796— 1% 
2096 20 20%+ % 

3i >1% a + S 

4% 4% 4% 

1496 1496 1416— % 


202 35% 34 34% — % 


12% 8V. FIshFd jOSo _ 

29% 201* FltFnGs 8 

47% 43% FRF pf 403*100 
30% 14% Fleet En 06 10 10 

35% 221* FlOfimg M 18 12 

30* 23% FKDtlV 00 17 12 

17% Mr* Flerd pf 101 119 2 

35 19% FligfSf 08 0 If 12 

36* 12% FlaatPt II 291 

36% 2996 FtoEC .14a 0 12 76 

2496 1894 FiaPra 114 U 9 3047 

24% 1196 FlaSh 00 30 12 61 

10% 31* FlwGan 46 

17% 11% Floors 00 13 17 41 

23% 14% Fluor 00 23 sn 419 

54% 4396 FocfeC 120 40 9 36 


30% 30% 30%— % 
8% 71k > — % 
32% 31*b 32% + 96 
4% 4 4 — % 

17% 17 17 

2366 23V, 73% — V. 
26% 25% 25% — % 
2966 29V. 2996 + % 
53% 5*96 53% + % 
211* 20% 21% + U 
45% 45 45 — % 

71% 71% 71% +J 
15% 14% 1496— % 
I? 10* 10% + 96 
149* 14% 1496 + H 
«n* 42 421* + I* 

27 2696 2696 — 96 

99* fl* 996+ % 
46 45% 46 

W 101 101 +2 

6% 6 6 
26 25% 2594— % 

269* 30% 34% + 96 
19% 19% 199* 

2596 25 25% 

Mb 50 49% 499*— 1* 

43 111* 309* 31 — U 


5196 33 FordM 100a X7 
12 KH* FfOaar 106 110 _ 

*3% 45% FIHowd 104 20 15 385 

1696 10 FoStWh 04 16 12 119 

129* 696 FOkSfP 08 73 14 3* 

40% 77 Fakhra IM 30 60 113 

1196 5% FMOG 101H210 3Z7 

75>* 13% Frtrt Me 00 SJ 11 1414 

3496 28% FrWfrn 00 20 15 207 

33% 19 FrwOMs 00 27 5 331 

399* 25 Front Pf 200 70 34 

31% 20 Fuaua .40 10 9 IX 

49% 35 Puaapt 105 16 4 


10% HP* 10% 

29 30% 29 

44% 43% 43% 

25% 25 2596+1* 

33W 32 32 —1% 

296* 29% 2996 
12% 12% 12% — % 
33% 33% 33%+ % 
20V. 194* 194*— % 
35 _ 

34% 34% 24% + I* 
13% 13% 13% + % 
4% 4 4% 

171* 17 17% 

14% 14% 14% 

48% 48% 4M*— % ; 


29% 311* ITW* 04 13 15 

37% 279* ImpChm 200 59 13 

9% 596 impICP 

15% 896 1NCO 00 10 

102% 91% IndIM pf 1200 12 2 

17% 14 IndIM Pf 115 119 
!79a 14% InCOMPt 125 129 

25% 16% InaGflS 108 LI 6 

15 5% Inexcs .14 14 15 

24% 131* iRftntC 13 

559* 35% ingarR 160 58 

35 279* InoRPt 135 70 

15% 10% ingrTee 04 *0 19 

32% 19% I roast l 00 13 

48% 38% IntdSTPf 4-75 11.1 

21% 14 irallcn 100 50 10 
raw 4% Imp PS 
29% 11% IrttgRkC 4 

33% 19 IntgRpi 103 119 

54>* 42 IntoRpf 603*140 

42% 251* IntoRpf 405 140 
10% 71* IrtfRFfl 
18% 15% ItcpSc 

67% 55 Intrrca 

145% ix inter pf 
10% 9% intrfsf 
51% 41 Intrtk 
19% 89* Intmed 
21% 14% intAhi 

128% 99 IBM 

29'* 22% IrdFtor 

17% 596 InfHarv 

9% 2% intHrWt 
44% 23% IntHofC 
9096 20% IntHptA 


125 

702 

76 


27% 27 27 — % 

81% 81 81 — % 
9% V% 91* 

25% 259* 25% + I* 
16% 16% 16% 

18% 18% 189* + % 
29% 289* 289*— % 
539* 539* 539* 

57% 541* 57 +1 

389* 389* 38% 

56th 55 55% 

16% 16 16% 

39% 39 3996+ % 

13% 13% 13% — % 
33% 23% 225*— % 
33 33 + % 

29 29 

37 37 


21OD110 
308 5.1 
735 60 
00 50 
200 5.9 


299* 279* 28% + % 
33% 33% 33% + % 
B% 8% 8% 

10% 12% 12% + % 
wax 98 98 98 +16 

7 169* 16% 1696 + % 
17% 17% 17% + % 
23% 23 23V. + % 

5% 5% 5%+ % 

159* 15% 15% — % 
45% 45% 45% — % 
32 31% 31% 

13% 13% 13% 

22 219* 21% 

42*6 41% 4296+1% 
10% 18% 1896 + % 
355 itt 4% 4%— % 
711 149b 14% 14% 

33 21% 21% 219*+ % 
6 45 449* 44%— 196 

12 2996 29% 29% — % 
25 8% 8 8—1* 

55 18 17% 18 + % 

606 60% 60 6096 

2 12916129 129%— % 

XI I09U 10% 1896— % 

76 44% 44% 44V. — % 


18 

X 

178 

609 

H3 

10 

11 

145 

25 

45 


46 99* 9% 996+ % 

72 40 9 28 18% 18% 18%—% 

400 37 1211221 120% 1 191* ll9%— % 

1.12 40 14 TO1 269* 26% 26% + % 

4920 89* 8% 89* 

625 59* 5% 59*+ % 

7 40% 40 40 

2 32% 32% 32%— 96 

106 27 26% 27 + % 

1925 37% 36% 37% +1% 

44 21% 259* 26% + % 

>327 54 53 SB* + 96 

169 1296 12% 12% — % 

327 3996 39 39 — % 

6 140 140 140 —216 

969* 86% IntNI pfHi-50 TU 6 94 M 94 

36 8496 IrripGpS 100 19 11 99 34 34 84+% 


TO 

17* IntHpfD 




49 

32% 1 Id Min 

260 

70 

IT 

33 

23 

Ini Mu It 

1J6 

63 

8 

5?% 

46 

IntPopr 

200 

45 

II 

17* 

9 




14 

42% 

32* IntNroi 

208 

60 

7 

148% TTO 

Inttft pUO0O 

70 



3 4627 43ft 43% 431* + % 
11% ll« 1194— % 
62 60% *2 +2 
129* 12 12% 

8% 89* 8% 

2996 29% 2996+ % 
8% 8% 8%—% 
169* 1*1* 1696 + % 
31P6 X 30% + % 
22% 22 22% + ft 

27 86% 27 — % 

219* 31 31% + 1* 

499* 4896 4896 + 96 


17% 10 iniBakr 
19% 15% Intsfpw 100 MLI 

1896 14% loan El 100 100 

27% 21% lowllG 200 90 

TO 17 lowlllpl 131 120 

30% 25 InraRs 308 I CL6 

33% 26 I oaks 192 9.1 

1496 99* iPcnCn 04 XI 

34% 23% IrvBkS 104 53 

54 429* ItvBkaf 5.1TO110 


36 169* 16% U%— % 

131 18% 189* 189* — % 

96 18 179* 17% — % 

185 27% 27% 2796+ % 

7Wb 19 19 19 + % 

167 29% 28% 29 
425 32% 32 32 

13* 11 II 11 + % 

771 32% 32% 32% 

21 45 44% 45 — % 


25% 15 GAF Me 0 
32 20 OAF pf 100 30 

34% 25* GAT X 100 30 
44 331* G ATX Of 130 60 


495 

1 

193 


41% 19% GCA 
6596 48% GEICO 
10% 4 GEO 

13% 5% GFCp 
43% 34% GTE 
25 21% GTE P< 

229* 1996 GTE pf 
10 4% GalHau 

SD9* 3396 Ganoft 
23 17% GapStr 

3096 10*6 Gaartri 
23% 18% Gel cd 
65% 5396 GemCa 
« 30% GnCBrp 

229k 15% GAInv 


14 
10 10 


300 70 
201 U 
208 110 



249* 24% 84%+ % 
SP* 30% 309*— % 
3Mb 319* 32 — % 
42 42 <2 

84% 84 24 — % 

57% STVt 57% + % 
5 49* 49*— % 

6 % 6 6 

489* 40% 40H+1* 
25 2*9* r 

22 % 22 22 — % 


27% 20 JOTs 
35% 23% J River 
19 12% Jamswv 

15 10% JapnF 

41V, 239* JeHPIs 
29% 24% JacCPf 
55 47 JerCpf 

16% 129* JerCpf 
7% 5% Jewtcr 

42 25 JrtrUn 

49% 37% JshnCn 
30% 21% Jargon 
27% 1596 J octens 
33% 21% JayMfo 


1.12 40 11 
06 U 9 
.10 0 0 
1.15! 90 
102 30 10 
400 140 


21 25% 25% 25% — % 

3S0 X 29 X + 94 

14 17% 179* 17% 

454 12% 11% 12 — % 

119 38% 37% 38% 

Mb 28 28 28 — V* 

800 1 40 116Kb 54 53% 53% 

111 184 7 16% 16% 1696 + 96 

19 79 7% 7% 7% + V* 

100 80 14 3415 369* 35% 36% + 96 

106a A3 9 12 4396 43% 43%— % 

100 43 14 29 239* 23% 239*— % 

JO U U 122 TO 21 21 — % 

100 18 13 809 84% 24% 84%—% 


45% 29% GoScsfa 1-00 20 8 
28 169* GCWni 00 


27 169* GQtPf s 06 

s ^SSS.' 

59% 4»* Gen El 
59% 45% GnFdS 
31% 23% GGttl 
31% 8«% GGttl Pf 
22 12% GnHosf 

19% f% GflHous 
84% 15% Gnlftat 
60 


10 

10 


31 
164 
77 
16 
<76 
120 
174 
203 
40 

18 7TJ7 
100 10 f 2097 

220 19 1J 4004 

150 40 9 947 

00 2011] 447 

UO 60 21 

00 20 2 153 

34 20 11 145 

-50 11 IS 1349 

4196 GnMIfls 204 40 12 561 

<1 GMot 475r 60 5 4911 

(M 33 GM E n 1459 

39 33% GMdtpf 305 103 2 

52% 44% GMOfPt 5-00 10.1 14 

129* 3% GNC .16 80 13 B3 
1196 7% GPU 4 224 

67% 44% Gen Re 104 14 22 1285 

9 5 GnRefr 5 71 

53% 3996 GflSM 100 If 12 10* 

12 10 GTFlPl 130 100 !0to 

m 5V, Gemco » 324 

89 13% GnRtid .10 0 17 IM 

25% 15 Gensia 100 274 

23 16% Grt Pf 108 80 1 

339* 84 GenPT* 102 30 15 550 

259* 18 GaPOC 00 30 11 3366 

27% 22% GOPWPf 304 119 4 

30% 25% GaPWPt 306 130 ST 

22 17% GoPtaPf 156 1Z0 2 

21 17 GaPwpf 202 120 H 

24% 71% GaPwpf 175 111 77 


5% 5% 594— % 
OR* 479* 4896+ % 
21% 31 21% + % 


11% 10% 10%— % 
15% 15% 15% + % 
64% 64 64% — % 

849* 34% 349* 

16% 16% 14% 

42% 42% 42% 

25% 25 25% 

84% 84% 84% + % , 
15% 14% 149*— % 
*9 48% 68% + % 

57 56% 5696+ % 

55% 5496 549b— 1* | 
30% X% 30% + % 
»9* 30% 30% + % 
18 179* 17% +16 , 

9% 9 *%+ % 

16% 159* 15% — l* 
48% 48 489* + % 

769* 76 7896 + 96 | 

43% 42 43% + 9* 

Im BAIL HUi 
81*3 BWS 

49% 4996 49% — % 
5% 5% 5% 

1196 11% 11% 

4196 40% 6l%— % 
7% 796 7%+ % 
4496 45% 46 -96 
H 12 12 + % 

61* 6% 4% 

15% 15% 15% 

20 30 20 + % 

19% 19% 19% — % I 
31% 3196 319* ♦ % 
84% 34% M9* + % , 
26% 76% 26% — % 
29 38% 289*— % 

20V. 20% 20% + % 
20V. 79 20% + % 

22% 22 229*+ 9* 


873 


30 22 18 

400 120 ’ 2 3 

134 30 8 2139 
13 37 

00 <1 41 299 


30 

137 


10% 49* KOI 
14% 9% KLMS 
39% 33 KMIPf 
37% 2*9* Kmart 
36% 84 KNEna 
22% 129* KatarAl 
25% 14% KatsGo 
a% 15% Kate pf 
16% 8% Kaneb 0B 40 
20% 14% KCfyPL 206 1IJ 4 
33% 29 KCPLRf 405 130 
36 29% ICC PL Pf 450 130 

10 14% KCPLPf 130 120 

19% 15% KCPLpf 133 120 
59% 36% KCSou 100 11 12 
15 10% KCSopf 100 73 

18% 12% KanGE 

35% 2796 KonPLf 


35 
3 

1073 
IBS __ 
430E 33 


9 89b 9 

139* 13% 13ft— % 

26 36 36 — % 

34% 34% 3416— % 
29% 289k 2916+ 16 
149* 1496 1496+ % 
17% 17% 1716 — % 
14 16 16 

99* 9% 946 
20% 1996 28 + % 


12 Month _ 
High low Stack 


Oiv. Yht PE 


5C* 

WBlHWHJw 


aan 

OaflLQTOe 


5996 359* MrstlM 
4696 30% MartM 
14% BH MaryK 
33% 22% MOSCO 
12% 7% MassMr 
18% 15% MasM 
6% 2% MasovF 

25% 2096 Mascp 
11% 996 Mas Inc 
80% 51% MatsuE 
13% 4% Mattel 
low 4 MaM wt 
309* 14% Marti pf 
15% 9% Maxam 
43% 30% MOvDS 
53 3*1* Marta 

32% H% MtOrPf UO 
31*6 239* MCDOfl 100 
12 6% McDrl wt __ 

III* 6% McDld -28 
55ft 40ft McOrdS 92 
739* 4796 McDnD 103 
414* 319* McGEd 200 
489* 34 McGrH 104 
33* IM. MdRtg 
44% 32ft McKoss 140 
69 54 McKpt 100 

15% 10 McLean 
6% 346 McLoawf 
25% 19% McNeil 90 
41% 27% Mead 
22 1296 Mesrux 

43% 84% Medtrn 
51 33% Malian 


)' ' 

Its 


57% 569* 53 
42 41% 4196 + 96 

Mb 91* 946 
27% 269* 26ft + % 
119* II — - 

789* 18% 

29* 296 _ 

25ft 25% 25ft + % 
11% II 11 —16 
3 18 422 62% 6146 41ft + ft 
HEM iftTOWt + b 

122 7% 7% 796+ 1* 

179 2446 259* 26% +1 
9 129* 129* to* 

464 409* 40% 40ft + <4 
36 44% 439* 439*—% 
6 25ft 25% 2516+ ft 
349* 24% 24% — ft 
~ — — ft 



6 

1.72 43 9 
2000 50 18 
8.7 

70 24 2201 


60 10 
19 

9 


100 

04 

36 

140 


1645 

6 


264* 23ft Mellon pf 200 11.1 36 

45% 309* Metvtlt 102 30 10 1717 

59 40% Merest IX U t 118 

77% 71% Merck 128 IS 14 978 

56% 39 Merdttl 00 10 13 15 

3696 23 MerLvn JS 19713 2884 

346 2 MasoOf 
22 12% MesoPt 4 

35ft 24ft MesaR 1060 60 
9 5% Merab 01*120 a 

6% 2% Mssfek 
53 44% MtE PfG 708 15.1 

55 45% MTE pfl 8.12 150 

56 48% MfEpfH IL32 150 

4 2ft MexFd .13! 47 

1816 1696 MACnpf 005 17.1 
25ft 22% MhCnpl XIV 113 
16% 12 McfiER 108 00 8 
*% 4% Midribs 06 10 10 
42% 3296 MMcan 136 50 0 


20 15 47 71* 7% 716— % 

1 J 12 1228 53% 529* 33 + ft 
14 9 465 67ft (7 67%— 4* 

5_5 12 534 36ft 36% 3646 + % 

10 15 582 4116 41% 41ft 

27 27% 27% 27V" 

384* 389* 3(4*— 1* 

619* 61 619* + 1* 

10ft 10ft 7046— 1* 
41* 4 4% 

23 23 23 

349* 34% 34% + 9* 
u 17% n — % 
85% 2596 2516 + 96 
4516 449* 44ft— % 
25% 24ft 25%+ U 
37% Ml* 36% — ft 
55% 54% 55% 

90ft 90V* 909* 

54% 54 54% — l* 

27% 26ft 27% — I* 
1 29* 29b 

76ft 16% 169*— ft 
29% 29% 29% — % 


52 
12 
88 
112 
IT 1 4 

15 8 1418 
10 13 27 

19 7 45* 
50 7 195 


149* 


9% MkJSUt 

17 MklRas 

27% 22 MWE 
18% 11% MtttnR 
85% 681* MMM 
30ft 239* MfaiPL 
264* 7% Mtantns 

1996 IS MoPSv 100b 6.1 
22ft 189* MOPS pr 201 120 
16% 4 Mitel 
32% 23% Mobil 200 80 
5% % vlMototH 

9ft 5ft ModCpf 
24 16% Mohax 

169* 8% MahkDt 
24% 14% Monrcfl . 

53% 4096 Morans 130 
30% 26 MntDU 156 


108 110 5 
100 50 18 
206 99 10 138 

.40 32 13 2 

300 40 13 1330 
256 LS 7 80 


7* 6* 

6* 

6* + % 


2 3ft 

3ft 

3ft 

i*T ■ 

1002 51 

90% 

SI 

- 

30Z 54 

54 

54 +lft 


5IK 54 

54 

54 -1 



2* 

2* 


1 18% 

18% 

18% 


13 2Sft 

25% 

25*+ % 

~ 

6 >5* 

15* 

15* 

— ■ 

15 4* 

4% 

<* 


360 4Mb 40* 

40* 


3858 13% 

13 

13* + ft 


88 18 

17% 

17% 



00 10 


6 44 
4 

125 

7 6628 
81 
24 

9 12 

416 
50 24 30 

50 8 1164 
07 8 


27% 26ft 27% + 14 
19% 12% 12*6 
78ft 77ft 78 —9* 
3o% 30 30% 

9% 8ft 8ft— 46 
199* 199* 19% 

20% 2D9A am 
6 5% 6 + % 

36% 24 26% + ft 

ft % 96 

6% 6% 6% — ft 
229* 22% 22% + % 
10% 18% 10% 

16% 15% 16% + ft 
476 41% 42% 


30ft 16ft MonPw 200 180 
17% 14ft MonSf U0nI0-7 

69* MON Y 00 90 a 
45% 34ft MOoraC 2J» 45 12 
25% 1846 Mo TOM 104 40 11 
20ft 23% WlarMpf 150 100 
BOft 56% Maroon 400 SJ 7 
39V. 28% Moron w) 

B«ft 75ft Moran Pf 7J7»iai 
34V* 26% MarKnd 100 40 8 
32% 18% MorseS 00 40 8 
18 12 MtoRty 104! 90 10 

31% 2D Mortens 04 20 12 
46ft 29% Moirlas 04 10 10 
34% 159* Munfrd 04b 14 11 
14 Munsng 15 

26 Morohc 100 30 9 
30% 23% MurpO 1-00 41 9 
24% 1896 MurrvO 100 60 10 
II MufOm 104ell.l 
3ft MverLn 


13 

11% 


37 

29% 

29% 

29% — ft 

3641 

19* 

19* 

19*+ U 

109 

17 

16« 

16% 

120 

8% 

8* 

8% 

21 

45 

44% 

44% — % 

234 

22% 

271* 

22%+ ft 

1726 

25ft 

34* 

TO — ft 

B84 

77% 

77ft 

77*+ ft 

4 

39 

39 

39 +1* 

216 

76% 

76% 

76%+% 

59 

33* 33ft 

33*— ft 

20 

18* 

18% 

IS* 

225 

17* 

17ft 

17% + % 

653 

271* 

TOM 

27 + * 

5172 

341* 

37* 

33ft— * 

35 

20% 

70% 

20* + % 

2 

17ft 

17* 

17ft 

TO 

37% 

37 

37ft 

116 

24% 

74 

24%+ ft 

11 

19 

19 

19 

134 

13% 

17* 

13 + ft 

TO 

4ft 

4% 

4ft + 16 


25% 16 NAFCO 
ft 39ft NBD 
tv* 141* NBI 
16% NCH 


26V, 

Mft 

17 

33 

2% 

49 

54 

»ft 




NCR* 


JOb 40 17 
200 40 7 
11 

39 12 
30 9 


?3% M -* 


00 


12 


15 

397 

363 

2 

20 


A 




NL lad 
25% NUI 
% NVF 

33% NWA 08 11 10 

38% NabKB 108 40 11 

21 Naka 130 40 13 

_ 28. Nashua 7 

37% 2?% NafCan 100 32 8 

13% 11% NICnvs M 24 15 

30 229* NafDlst 120 30 13 

191* 16% NDIsipr 105 100 


8 4*49 
7 4(2 

574 

I 

65 

585 


rn ire— e 
0% 101* 


401 


33ft 179* Katvln 
17% 109* KariBr 
169* 1216 Koufpf 
•39* 68 Koufpf 
<2ft 27 Kallogo 
31% 21% Kaiiwd 
49* 1 Kraal 

35% 19ft Keren! 
25 20ft KeUHl 
18% II KerrGI 
35ft 2m KerrMc 
23% 16% KevBk 
696 2% KeyCnn 
2216 14 Kevslnt 
35% 26% KJdde 


269* 1796 Kogar 
34 161* Koimor 

23ft 17% Kepers 


TOOx 5ft* 99% 99% + 9* I 
_2te 50% 51% 30% 

25% 24ft 8Sft— ft 
IS 14 14% + % 

8ft 5% B9* 

99k 9% 9ft 
24 23% 23% 

549b 53ft 54 +1* 

12 ft 12 % 12 ft— % | 
5 4ft 4%+ % 


396 

12 

281 


42% 52 GaPW Pt 700 1X1 
*19* 51% GePWPf 7J2 112 
32 20% GerbPs 1.1* 43 10 

21 12 GerttSf .12 0 12 

10% 7% GtantP 

11% 596 GlfcrFn j 

36% 1646 GfffHIII 02 22 14 3 

58% 42% Gtlterte 200 40 10 227 

T79* 11% GftaeC 29 

9ft 4% GtOMM 04 40 246 

26 1796 GlebMPf X50 1*0 58 

159b 1% GWHUO 11 16476 

6% 1ft GUN wt 1823 

25% 11 GkWF 00 3 6 1636 

36% 24% Gdrtch 1-5* 50 4 114 

11 3% GdrCTPf 07 1(18 7901 

3196 23 Gaodvr 100 6.1 7 1214 

20V, 13ft GordnJ 32 U 7 IO 

34% 19 GauM 08 12 12 S7 

46ft 3*% Grace 200 7.1 TO (7B6 

65 47 GrtUrarr IU 12 12 454 

13% 3% GtAFd 00 19 8 634 

II 11% GIAtfC 9 162 

39% 77% GHJOn ,90a 20 10 X 

21% 15% GNlnt 105O110 6 8 

43V. 31 GtNNk 102 4J 7 1375 

47% 51% GtNNk Pf475 00 6 

26% 1*% GIWFIn Ji X7 10 1V44 

TO ,*W GWH4P 34 381 

U% 11% GMP 1J2 110 9 SI _ 

TOH U% Greyti 1J0 40 12 2185 25% 34% 2S1* + I* 

<7% 37% Greyhpf 4J5 IU 3«z 43 42 42 _ % 

5 2ft Graller 5 332 JV. 3% 3%— % 

20 12% GrowG 00 12 15 M 10% 13 1816— % 

Aft Gratoei 00 10 10 231 8 7ft 7%— % 

»% 21ft Gromn 100 17 7 ISS 27 8*% 8*94— ft 

Mft 24ft Drum Pf 180 IM 10 25% 25% 25% 

•% 4ft GranM .1* X0 84 W5 5% Sft 5ft 
23% 14% Guartl 32 1A 13 98 23% 23V. 23V. 

31 22 GulMld 08 XI 7 2 22 22 22 — % 

35 2?* G !2Ki -90 12 I 797 28% 28% 30ft- ft 

.... S* GlfWpf 175 1X1 1 57 57 57 — ft 

24ft lift GuffRs XI 5 189 12% 11% 12% — % 

11% 10 GlfSIUt U4 120 6 1127 13 129* 13 

30 *0% GffSU Pt 400 1X0 XOz 32ft 32 32 — % 

25 — 2!5H F* 1 “S (5 28% 25 38% + ft 

22 S.- SJSHEJi-S 24 32 3196 31%—% 

W GHSUPf MO 120 Ite 70 X 7t +1% 

>2% GAora So« I 398 13% 139* 13% + % 

14 GuHM 00 41 12 25 15 149* 149*— % 


14 17% Korean 

39ft 29% Kroger 
18% 1«% KuMms 
<7% 44% Kvoarrs 
l«% 13 Krsor 


236 1X4 

4 

709 

236 

82 

7 

277 

1 223 110 


11 




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10 17ft 169* 17ft + % 

13 10 179* I( + ft 

8C 499* 48% 4896 + 9* 
TOOK 13 13 13 

179* 17ft 1796+ I* 
33% 33% 33%+ % 
19% 19% 19% + % 
Zlft 229* 22ft— % 
14% 14% 14% 

14% 14% 14%+ % 
73 73 73 — 9* 

40 39ft 3996+ % 
27% 86% 27%+ % 
196 Ift 1ft— % 

21ft 20ft 71%+% 
24ft 24% 84% 

129* 12% 129* + % 
27 261* 26% — % 

23% 23 23% 

3% 3% 3% — % 

I* 16 14 

39 3m 20% — % 
44% 44% 44% + % 
48 47% 47%+ ft 

25 28% + % 

25% 25% 2596+ ft 
17 169* 1696—96 

18ft 179* 13 — % 
100% 100ft inoft— 9* 
W% MV. 14% 

38ft 39 +1* 

17% 17% 17% + % 
539* 5396 539* + % 
17 16% 16% — % 


2046100 9 


10 9% 9ft + ft 

2ft 2 216+ % 

23ft 22% Z316 + 96 
26% 26% 26ft — ft 
9ft * 9 — % 

26% 86% 8696+ % 
17% 16% 14% —1% 
21ft 21 21 — % 

39% 38% 39%+ % 
55% K% 55ft— ft 
13% 13% 139* + ft 
IS* 1596 15% + % , 
38 37ft '• 

16% 161* 16ft— ft I 
34% 33ft 33ft— % 
57 56% 56% — •" 

23% 23% 23%+ ft 
14% 14 14%— % 

15 1496 1«%— % 


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169 

4 

474 

1472 

2 

231 

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27 22% LN Ho 

1596 7% LFE 
10 4V. LFE pf 00 59 

17% 12ft LLERy U2el&9 

19% 0% LTV 
30% 14 LTVA 03T 17 

11% lift '.TV pf 306 130 
69 50% LTV Pf 535 93 

179* 13 LTV pf US 80 

18% 10% LQufcrt 13 MI9 

36% 15% LocOss IJB 67 7 234 

12% 8% Lafarge 08 20 36 

31% 23ft Latrgpf 204 9.7 U 

18% 12% Lamour 3* 13 4 4 

» 19* LamSes 37 

14% 10% Lowtlns 56 40 13 127 

36ft 13% LearPI JO 9 13 11*7 

29% 2D% LeorPpf 207 110 479 

49% 77% Laredo 1 00 4.1 9 534 

19% 14 LaoRnls 06 20 12 34 

3P% 24% LswyTr I JO 50 ig IM 

30% 20% LenEnt 00 17 15 61 

13% 9 Leo Mia 20 

219* 15% LeoPtot 04 

5 2% LohVol 

M% 25 LVlnpf 
19% 13% Lahmn _ 

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25 20 Leucdpf 100 

37% 23 LrvISf 105 
42% 25ft Lertta J2 
50 389* LOF U2 

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?% 5ft Hahyd pf -56 70 
55% 38ft HomrP 204 60 
17% 11% HanJS l07alO9 
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29% 14% HreRw 00 16 II 48 
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lift 0 Haves* .10* 0 8 47 


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475 1ft 1% IM— % 
53 8% 8 3 

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295 13% 13ft »% 

31 1996 19% 1996 + % 


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U% 16% 
18ft 18 


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43ft 41% 42%— i._ 
47% 47% 47%+ % 


9 9%+ % I 

30% 30% 38%+lft 
3% 27 27ft + % 
12 11% lift— ft 


41% 36ft UncNtt 
21 18% UncPI 

5616 Litton 
40ft 30% LOCTM 
43% 3046 tactile 
106% 70% Looms 
3Zft 19 Lem Fin 
33ft 24ft LcmMf 
29ft 17% LnSfar _ 

S3 44 Lanes pf 537 110 
1196 ,39* LILCo 
33 16 LILpfB 

30 14% LILpfE 

53% 21% LILpfJ 
23 8% ULBfX 

9 LILpfW 
Zlft 9% LIL PTO 
lift LILpfU 
(ft LILpTT 
17% 6 LILpfP 
U 7 UL pfO 
«% 34 Langor 
19* W% Loro! 

15 11 La Gen! 

34% 22ft LaLreid 
2996 17 LaPoe 


60 

13 11 
10 9 

30 B 

30 13 
<0 10 
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49 9 - - 


26% 8696 26ft— % 
lift 129* 13% + ft 
0 % 8 % 8 % 

14% 13% 14 — ft 
10% 10% 10% + ft 
15ft 15ft 15ft— ft 
2296 2196 22 + ft 

57 57 57 +1 

15ft 15V. 15ft + ft 

1096 1096 109*— ft 
20ft 25V. 25ft — ft 
8% 816 8% + ft 
25ft 25 25%+ % 

14% 1496 14ft— % 
.2% 29* 29* 
lift lift llft+ % 
2196 20% 21ft +!ft 
24% 24ft 24%+ ft 
44 43* 43%+ ft 

15ft 15ft 15ft + ft 
30 299* 25% 

30ft 2996 29%—% 
2 im TO IW 
41 19% 19 19 

91 3% 3 3 — % 

2 31 31 31+1 

260 15% 15ft 15ft 
40 1216 12% 12ft— % 
14 »% 81% 31%— % 
4 »K 33ft 33ft 
334 Kft 25% 2Sft+ ft 
TO 37% 37% 37%+% 
78 4Kb 43% 4X6— % 
DA 24ft 23* 24ft + ft 
35? 65ft 65 65% + ft 

2796 8 Sft 27%+ % 
37* 37ft— ft 


1340180 43 209* 20% 2096— % 

100 XI 9 301 *5% 65% 65ft— % 

0So 1.1 8 1121 42 41ft 41M— % 

JO 14 12 4 33ft 33ft HI* 

100 10 I 117 W0% 99 HO 

l.t* 30 12 133 29% 29ft 29% + ft 

136*1X0 10 51 33% 33% 3J% + 1* 

IB M 9 61 249* 21* 23*— 96 
17 49% 49 49 

3 2671 8 7% 8 + % 

29fc 26 25* 36 +1% 

WOz 22% 22% 22% —4 

17BZ 41% 41% 41% +1% 

64 1896 18 18 + Vb 

17 18% 18ft 10ft + % 

in* iB% ia% 


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03 10 15 

04 40 9 207 
100 30 H 135 

JOb 30 25 1300 


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159* 99k H acks 
23% 13ft HectoM 
30% 14ft Hal imp 
21* IM* Hal lie 
45 32 Hafiu 

12ft HalnaC 

18 He ImP 

Jft .3% HamCo 
T2ft 11% Hemlnc 
38 27ft Heraiis 

19 . W* HarUC 

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30 17% Kexcsl 

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51ft 85ft Holiday 
65 55% HHtfyA 

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27% 12 HBRWO 
25ft 119* HmFSD 
9ft 8 HmeGpf 1.18 1X4 
W* 30% HfMrtW ~ •’ 


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29% 29% 29% 

15% 15% 15% 

21ft 30% 21. + ft 
11% Wft 11% 

361* 26 811* + ft 

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11% 109b VPh— ft 
1996 13% T3%— % , 
Uft is* 1* + % I r 
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23ft 22 21%+ % 

3096 3096 30%+ % 

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•90 36% »% 2696 

136 46ft 46 46 — ft 

778 24* 2*ft 24* 

656 21 20* 309*— % 

13 27ft 27 27 — ft 

... 9 1121 1796 17% 1796— ft 
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12 12 12+16 
33 31* 31% 

1896 15ft 18% — % 
22ft 22ft 22ft + ft 
30ft 379k 30%+ % 
Aft 6% Aft 
34ft 33* 34% ♦ ft 
25% 25ft 25%+ % 

17 15% 1646 + 96 

10ft 10 1096 + ft 

17% 19% 19% + % 

57% 56% 56% 

»** 33% 33%+ % 
47ft 46 4696 43* 

70% 70% 78% +5* 
71* 7196 71*— % 
1746 17 17%+% 

19% 18* 19 +1* 
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21* 20% 20%— % 
13% 12ft 12ft 
TO 4* 4096+196 

5*9* SS* 55*— ft 
23* 23% 23% 

----- if* 25% am am— ft 

396 Horizon 59 496 4% 496 + % 

« 35* Horae P JO 1J 13 1798 39% 39U 3996+ % 

“ 21% Hotel In 200 9.1 13 78 28* 38% 2M— % 

39V* W* HOMHW 06 20 13 192 33 32* 3 - ft 

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39% 3816 39 — % 
211% 10ft 20% 

37 37 27 

1196 11% lift— ft 
3616 37ft 1796—96 
12% 12 12 


71* 13% MACOM 33 1 J 20 771 
46ft 3*96 MCA JS Z3 19 1470 
»ft 1696 MCorp 100 *0 5 « 

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12* 7ft MDC 33 20 9 29 

40 31% ME! 41 U II U 

13ft «U MGMOr 04 30 X 25 

12 * MGMGr p(04 30 12 

W% 1« MGMUB 00! 10 M 21* 11% lift lift 

5ft 2% MOMliMf 1 2% 2% 2% 

S 4 K H 11 00a 30 13 207 20ft 20% 20% 

48% 17% MB lie J3T 3 19* 19ft 19ft 

47 » Atacmil 100 23 M 112 43* 43ft 4116— ft 

51% 38% Mocv 1JM 20 10 2343 41% 41% 4196 + ft 

TO 3*96 MCKVPt 425 71M 20b M 36 36 -I 


Hotatha JO 10 27 1311 
MmrtFrt 00 3J 4 36 

Hondo .00* 0.10 590 


19* 11% Mod Are 

«9k 24 MoefCf 
27% 17% MolAsf 
2b 12% Monhln 
19% 13ft Monhftt 
Uft W% MreoCa .. 

41% 22% MfrHOn 3J0 90 
59 41 MfTHpf 607*1X1 


162 

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108 

JOb 20 4 177 
J2 20 15 17 

.15 J 16 325 
' 4 1176 
2 


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66% 46ft HOBwell 100 U 
20% 10% HoovrU 10f 40 
28ft 13 HrmBn 1.12 ' 
18 


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e 60 
8 


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TO 5% vIMOfIVt 4 

21ft left vlMiMel 
30* 21 MAPCO 100 S3 re 
« 3 MOmtz 
2 % 1 Morcde 
28* Wl MarMkl 108 17 5 
■Oft 271* Morion 53 TJ JI 
14% 9* MarkC 02 12 35 
19ft Uft Market IjO 7.9 
80ft 58% MOTrtot 04 J I* 


3* 25% 01 + % 

15 14% 15 +9* 

Uft 16 + ft 

lift M MIA— ft 
36 35% 35* 

47% 47% 47% — I* 
44* 44% 44* + % 

4% It* It** + n 

27% 26% 27 
3 % 3 % 

1% 1%— % 
a 27* 27ft— l* 
43ft 42* 42% + % 
Wfc 10 VH6+ ft 
15ft TO 15% — ft 
74 23% 74 +ft 


SS 


108 70 
1J* 46 


JS 

500 

02 


108 


s a 

XI 18 
2J 12 4150 

40 12 49 

11 4371 
43 
9 

4 18 


20ft 12% NtErius 
29% 16* NatFGs 
40 27 NatGyp 

51* 2% NtHom 
37ft 22% Nil 
77 56 Nil pf 

25% 17ft NMedE 
12% 6ft NMIneS 

29ft 20* NfPrert 

19* 9% NtSeml 

TO 2T% NISvIno 100 23 10 

17ft 11% N stand 00 29 B 

lift W Moran J 2 * 30 
29ft 219* NevPw Z76 1X1 0 
U 11% NevPpf 100 12J 
17% 14ft NevPpf 171 99 
20% 17% NevPpf 230 110 
16ft 14% NevPpf 1.95 120- 
U* 8% NavSvL 00 40 5 
«* 2W6 NEOOEI 300 90 6 
26ft 19 NJRsc 204 70 7 
23 14* NYSEG 204 108 A 

2* 19ft NYSpfA 301*120 
»% 24 MYS PfD 2J5 1X0 
17ft 131* Newell .50 13 10 
40ft 28*6 Newhol 03 1 J 2* 
16ft 11 NtwMI 4780370 
12 7ft NwhlRs 2550290 
54ft 31 Newmt 100 27 29 
Mb V* Mwpork 
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V* 22 NlaMpf 300 128 
31% 2(1* NlaMpf 190 117 
*9% 2SV, NlaMpf 6.10 140 
TO 19% NlaMpf 276 123 
92% 73 NlMcf 1000 123 
21% 1596 NktaSh 223*114 
17* 1096 N (color 06* 0 22 
29ft 24% HICOR 304 100 15 


23 


19 12% NoblAf ,12 

641* 48% NorfkSo 3J0 
38ft 17% Marl In 
38% 29ft Naratr 220b «J 
17* 12 Nortek 08 J 
54 42 NACaai 100 21 

«% 28% NAPnis 100 27 
nib 1346 NEurO 1060112 
W 1«6 Neesiui 108 102 
15 % 10* NlndPS 104 111 
48% O NIPS pf 403e1OJ 
44ft 339b No3tPw 3J4 70 
33% 28 NSPvrpf 300 T1J 
36% 31ft NSPwpf AlO 124 
41 349* NSPwpf 456 120 

75% 60* NSPwpf 800 121 
60 51 NSPwpf 700 123 

42V. 39% NreTel 0( 12 
5% 21b Nltwate 
39% 23ft Nortrps 1J0 10 


17ft 17ft 17ft + K 
5096 509* 50%+ 16 
16ft 16ft K% + ft 
10% 18% 18% + ft 
35 34* 34ft— ft 

25ft 25 25ft + ft 
17ft 17ft 17ft— ft 
10ft 70% 1| 
Jlj*31ft 

43 42% 42%— % 

747 51% 50* 51 

404 25% TO 25ft + ft 

6 26% 2Sft 26% + M 

34 31ft 31ft 31ft + % 

- 15ft 1496 1516 + % 

25ft 25% 2596— 96 
17% 17% 17% — ft 
12* 13% 12% 

M% 24ft 25%+ ft 
38% 37% 30% + * 
Ift 3H 2ft 
28* 2* 2*% + ft 

61% 61% 41% + ft 
23 22* 22ft+ ft 

2516 35* 25%+ ft 
12 lift 1196—96 
27 26* 26ft 

14% M M +16 
10* 18% 10% 

172k 27* 27ft 27ft— % 
lOOz 13 13 13 — * 

lamoy 18 17% 17% + ft 

200* 19* T9* 1996— ft 
lx Uft Ml* 16ft + ft 
133 lift 1196 11*+ 16 
36* 3*1* 34% — ft 
» 25* 25% 

22* 22% 22% — % 
231* 23ft 23ft + * 
20ft 28% 28ft +1 
15% 15ft 15ft— ft 
39ft 39ft 39ft + ft 
12ft 12ft 1296- % 
Sft Bft Oft— 16 
36ft 36% 36* + ft 
lft 1ft 1* 

171* 17 17ft + ft 
200z 26% 26% 26% +1 
302 28% 28% 2B% 

70z 43% 43% 43% —1 
184 21*6 21% 21% — ft 
20* 86 86 86 
25 16* 16% 1696 + ft 
99 IS 14* 14ft + ft 


-d: 


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304 

IS 

105 

36 

9 

5 

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215 

303 

860 



604 29ft 2H* 29ft- 


,0 35 1372k 1396 13% 13% — ft 


50 8 


1478 Uft 58% 5996+ ft 
93 17% 1716 1716— ft 

96 35 34% 34% + ft 

134 15% 15% 159*+ ft 

10 48V. 48ft 481* + ft 

257 37 36% 36ft 

32 14.. Oft 1396— ft 


62ft 40% Nwtlnd 268 22 18 7945 


2% 19% NwfPpf 250 120 
21 * 19 * NwfPpf 236 110 
TO* Bft NwStW 
* 30* Norton 200 S3 II 

Oft «% NorwsT 100 7.7 12 
AMk 20% Nava 09« 12 10 
43* 26 Nucor 26 13 II 
11 % 4ft Nutris J3 50 


S 1722 14ft 14% 14% 

7 4534 12ft 11% 119b + 1 * 
, 1 43 a 43 +96 

7 168 4196 411* 411* — ft 
3Kte 3216 321* 321* +11* 
,30002 36 32ft 33 — ft 
T 12002 40 36* 36*— * 

100Z 73 73 73 +1 

4200z 57% 56* 57% +lft 
33% 31V. 319*— ft 
3ft 3 3 

33* 33 33V*— 7ft 

52* 51 51*— ft 

1996 1996 19ft— ft 
28% 20% 20% + ft 
lift 1196 1196 




56 

10 1949 


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23ft ZT% 23*— ft 


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31* 311* 311* 

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7396 72ft 73 —* 


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23 SJJ 25*/ W ’ *7 10 22 

TO* 23% pad Pet 200 100 624464 


17 9 ft OcdPwf 


St S' S^£ Bl 5J 

TO* 20 pcdPpr 250 1 IJ 


17% OcdPpf 212 120 
Zlft 18* OcdP pf 2 JO 1X0 
51ft 48% OcdP pf £25 120 
’12 'Mft OcdPptlS0D 140 
i®* 1 * 101 M, OccJref 1402 140 
107 loo OcdP pf 1400 132 

? 25? 03 M 

38* 3416 Ogden 100 05 13 

Mft 9ft 104 130 5 

TO 23% Otl Ed pf X90 1X4 
33% 25* OlEdpf 400 150 

34 24% OtlEdPf 406 140 

S3% 41 OnEOpf TM 140 

AOft 45 OhEdpf 820 140 

S)CdPf XM UJ 
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if* 100 120 

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K7 98 OIIP pfA 1400 112 
TO* 90% OllPpfFU.DC 11 s 

T9% OW«E UB M | 
JS* 7 OUaGpf 00 1 QJ 
33% 25ft Of In 100 S3 g 
SS 108 29 19 

319k 56 Omncrr f 

2% 14 OneMa 00 SJ 9 

» W? ONEOK 256 B0 0 

TO 19ft OraaRK 204 8J 9 

2* ,SS J3I sj 13 

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sa sesu": ^ , 

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38% 25% OwenC 100 40 8 

10% Oxford s 00 3J a 


29* 2% 396 
26ft 26* TO*— 16 
26ft 25 25 +1 

ion. 10 n%+ * 

41% 41% 4116-41* 
21* 21 2H6 + * 

17* T7* 17* + ft 
19% 19% 19ft— ft 

49 48* 48*+ 1* 

571 108ft 107% U7*+lft 
18? MS 1041* 104* + lb 
MOzMS HU 106 


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32 26% 25% 26% +11* 
21 28ft 27* 27ft + ft 
17 14% 14ft 14% 

Mfe 61ft 61ft 41ft— * 
100 b 85 05 85 

274 14 13* 13*— ft 

5Qz 58ft 58ft a ft +1* 
174 18 17* 17*— ft 

150x104 106 106 —4 
30x104 104 184 —1 

517 23 21* 2Kb— % 

MB* 8ft 7ft 7*— ft 
287 29% 28* 29% + * 
162 37ft 37% 37ft 
277 S* Sft 5%— % 
.81 15% 141b 15% + * 
218 28* 28% 28% + % 
121 25 24* 25 + * 

208 9* 9* 9*— ft 

9 21% 21ft 71ft— ft 
164 89k 8* Bft + % 

M 7 6ft 7 + % 


442 28% 28 26 — % 

49 19* 19* 19%+ ft 
876 26% 25* 25* . 

13 13ft 13* Uft + ft 
408 31% 31% 31% + * 
835 40 39* 40 +* 

88 12 lift a * ft 


35ft 18 PHH 08 30 II 

24* PPG \A4 O a 

34* 15 PSA M 29 

109 11J 
100 110 
I0HU 7 
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20% PcLwn 


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6* n 2 

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«1 33* 33ft 33%+% 
102 21 20% 21 + % 
0 16* 16% 16* + » 
114 12* 12% 12* + ft 
3546 16* 16% 1t»— % 
2U 41* 40% 41 — % 
U4 351* TO 25% — % 
45 6 6 6 

17 12* 13* 13* 

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1039 < 8 % 67* 67ft— % 
5*4 25% 24ft 23%+% 
19 32% 31* 32% +1 
841 28% 27* 27ft— % 
52 37% 37ft 37%—% 
M 20* 20% 30* + ft 
1373 4V> 4* 4M>— '% 

239 3% 2 3 

104 15 1496 14*—* 

35* 35% 55* 

4% 4% 4ft— % 
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14% Uft U — ft 


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(Continued on Page 10] 

















































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Amex hWH/toiMP.12 FRno rots notes P.10 
HY5E orkai " P. 0 GcUnwWs P. 9 
NYSE Mataflowi P.M imrast rate P. 9 
Canadian stocks P.M MvtatswnnaryP.fi 
Currency rate P. 9 . Daltons P.10 

OMinMd. KM! OTC sate P.M 

■ Diy fcku * P.M OHwc mnrtats P.M 

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 1985 


MANAGER 


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By SHERRY BUCHANAN 

International Herald Tribute 

B RUSSELS — These days, owning a palm-oil plantation 
doesn’t mean wearing a white Linen suit with a wide- 
brini straw hat, and ruling over a vast domain. Although 
the job may retain some of its B-movie romantic appeal 
’for some, mid its visions erf an unsavory colonial past for others, 
- neither stereotype really applies in the post-colonial era. 

In fact, the few remaining European managers of large agricul- 
rural businesses in former colonies are international managers in 
a high-margin, high-risk business — and they are figh tin g a tide 
- of government control. 

» After the end erf the colonial era, many large U.S. and Europe- 
an agribusiness multinationals got out of the plantation business 
rather than face the threat erf government measures that have 
- ranged from expropriations to heavy export taxes to rules requir- 
ing that majority ownership 


be held by citizens of the host T 

country. Larger groups seem 

to he getting out, 

in downstream operations of but smaller ones 

processed tropical goods, 

partly because they were en- are holding fast. 

couraged by most govern- ° 

meats, who needed such capi- 
tal investments. This trend seems to be continuing, following 
Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co.’s divestiture erf its Malaysian 
plantatio ns earlier this year. 

“ But if the larger agribusiness groups seem to be getting out 
some of the more tenacious smaller ones are holding fast 
“To say we are an anachronism is wrong,” says Hubert Fabri 
. of the SOCFIN group, a French-Belman group that owns planta- 

- tions in Indonesia and Kenya as well as two private banks. 

SOCFIN is one of the four European companies that have a 
majority share in Inrinnesian p alm -nil plan tations The others are 
CIPEF’an Antwerp-based tropical products group, Harrisons & 
Crosfield PLC of London, and Unilever PLC, the only large 

- m ultinational group in the p alm -oil plan tatio n business in Indo- 
, ncsia. 

“My reward is that I'm not sriling wind,” says Mr. Fabri. “We 
-■ manufacture foodstuff of very high quality. We're contributing to 
technological progress and we're making money.” 

' T"R ALM oil is currenJy produced mainly in Malaysia and 

- \r* Indonesia, where labor costs have remained stable, and 
“ JL where demand for the staple food is increasing. 

. h is a lucrative business, in spite of wide price fluctuations. 

- “The mice erf palm oil is on the high ride now,” says an expert 
with me London brokerage of Laurence, Pnist & Co “But the 
price will never oome down to levds at which profits axe seriously 
threatened.” 

At present, labor represents about one-third of total produc- 
tion costs. 

If the large profits are still there, so are the political risks and 

- the substantial initial investments in new plantings and new 
; technology. 

A company investing in palm oil can expect to see cash i ncom e 
only after a minimum of four years. According to the SOCFIN 
" group, costs can vary from $7,000 to $10,000 dollars per hectare 
(2.47 acres). 3,000 hectares being the smallest efficient plantation 

- me 

A main challenge for the smaller- plantation owners is to be 
^ softest!? diversified ehberin product or in geography, in order 
" to weather temporary political storms. In the 1930s. die Indonc- 
v saan government, for instance, sequestered most of the foreign- 
hdd pahn oil plantations. 

“You have to be tough but you also have to be able to adapt 
yourself to what the government asks of you,” says Fridferic 
' Vdge of the SOCFIN groop, who is chairman of two plantations . 
More recently, the Indonesian government declared that palm 
(Continued oh Page H, Cot 8) 


Currency Bates 



■ c 

t 

DiM. 

F.F. 

ILL. 

•Mr. 

OF. 

5J=- Yon 

Amsterdam 

05*5 

4,102 

112JB • 

3988S* 

01*4 

— 

1541* 

13932*139X5* 

■r— aUCI 

tax 

7147 

bums 

9545 

uia* 

77-7305 

— 

2999 24425* 

■Fnarktei 

1085 

3L427 

— 

39545* 

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88525* 

4.994* 

119.49 • 1.2385 * 

IqaOoa (M 

1.1485 


i on 

11.112 

322448 

45983 

7259 

9828 29143 

Mean 

1A04D 

242020 

614.15 

29052 

— - 

54X59 

30554 

73522 7408 

•HawYarktej 


1.1389 

917 

9.7115 

1A45A0 

3575 

ass 

2451 25447 

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11.123 


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97101 1&2V25* 

3548 3394* 

■rtafera 

20725 

299.18 

8987 

9944 

1917* 

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27-295* 

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4.177S* 

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24299 

48282 

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15182 

445412 

1461 179498 

T SDR 

0779568 OB47817 

907437 

9X2344 

1X9008 

9477 

614638 

25691 fcttJOa 

- • 



Dollar Values 





Utt AatnSonS 

JMa Antrtoi kH 


HIM Hwldw! 


Per 

Cancan 

Per 

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Satav. 

U54 

Eaatv. 

13386 

09031 trite* 

14172 

0X55 5tt— eras 

2233 

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121*7 Kowomataa- 

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14208 

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94M 

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19X73 

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T3949 

00*99 Porteaaxlo 

17098 

09067 TMbtet 

7406 

*2793 Saote rtwl 

9581 

OZ723 UJLE-tertMl 


Interest Rates 


Eurocurrency Deposits 


ivuw p warn SSe State mk ecu *0* 

1M. 8Vh -Vk S* -5W 4W.-4<»i. *«.- MB. 10*-10*9Ui - 9H T* - S 

2ML file - Bib SM-5W 1 Hi ■ 4 0V 1M - WVb TOM Sfc-JH 7M-0M 

3M. |h ■ Bh SVb-SM 4H.-4H, 10»t- WM 10M - IT H. 9*W ■ *IW 8 • 8W 

fiM. BH-fK St! • 5% 4Hi-4W TOM- 10M I! II** 9K.-90. Ml > m 

TY. 9H. -»W JS-STb 4H.-4H. Wft-lMfc TIM - 11M 9* - * 8% ■ 9 
RotKm>lkx*lB to Interbank dopotlts of Slrt 

Saurats: Morgan Guaranty (dottor. DM. SF. Pound. FF): Uovds Bank (€0/1. Citibank 


Asian Dollar Rates 

Tan. 2ms. 

8*»8* IM-8M 

Source: Reuter* 


JCey Money Rates 


Wscoud Rot* 

Fadend Fun* 

. Frtme RaM 
-’Bfntef lean ate 
Comm. PSOOT, 30-TO <San 
,-Sflionm Treasury Bills 
’-tflXMitti Treasury WIT* 
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CD’s »-5? (Javs 


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-’ France ; 

■tearteiHea Jtotg 
Caa Money . - 

■ teUrbwtfc 

'S^nanth Tntertanfc 


8 > 
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VM TOM 
WA-10 W.-HJ 

AAS MB 
7J4 7J6 

7.9 1 - 888 
. 788 ' 7.95 
SOB L10 


US US 
580 58B 

580 580 

580 580 


I0M TOM 
10* 10ft 
W 9/56 TO 9/16 
10 9/16 10 9/16 
10ft Uft 


- sank Base Pale 
Caft Money 
91-dov Treasury Bill 
MnanMi inlcrtaiH 

.ton 

Obcoonl «te 
Cali M»WY 
AO-aay intrrtiank 


vn m 

7 7 

9 7/16 9 7/14 
10 » 7/16 


5 5 

6ft 6 304 

4 VS. 64 


Cold Prices 


Beaters. Comwenbanh Crktot Li 
oanali^ioutH Book. Scnk of Tokyo.. 


am. P-M. ate 
Maw few® »JJ5 30115 +780 

iMwnfinjra 30175 — ' “flO 

MdZSllM 305.75 8&S +78? 

zaftcti mss sows + zw 

Lsrtan 30148 30280 +375 

K.W York - a*-* 

Offfckti flxtrtfl* tor Union. Parts end Lmm- 
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md Zurldi. Now York Cemex amni contract. 
mi pMcbs In u« om ow«». 
source: Reetor s. 


Hcralb^fe.erib«nc 

BUSINESS /FINANCE 


** 


Late interbank rate* on Jan. 8 , exdutfing fees. 

- Official fixings far Amsterdam. Boesak, Frankfurt, Milan, Paris. New York rates at 
'4 PM 


German 
Jobless 
Up in '84 

But Bate Holds 
At 9.1 Percent 


Compiled by Ovr Staff From Dispatches 

NUREMBERG — West Ger- 
man unemployment rose to an av- 
erage 121 million in 1984 from 
226 million the year before, the 
federal Labor Office reported 
Tuesday. Both figures, however, 
represented 9.1 percent of the 
workforce. 

The average duration erf unem- 
ployment rose to eight months last 
year from seven in 1983, it said. 

The office earlier announced 
that the unadjusted jobless total in 
December rose to 133 million, or 
9.4 percent of the workforce, from 
2.19 million, or 8.8 percent a month 
earlier. 

But seasonally adjusted unem- 
ployment, which measures the un- 
derlying trend, fcD to 223 million 
last month from a downward re- 
vised 225 milli on in November. 

At the end of last month, the 
Labor Office said, 43.3 percent of 
the unemployed were women and 
56,7 percent men. 

The number of workers on cur- 
tailed shifts during the month rose 
4.3 percent, or 11,036. from No- 
vember to 268,419. 

Compared with December 1983, 
the number erf short-shift workers 
was down 47.7 percent, the office 
said. 

Heinrich Fr anks, president of 
the Labor Office, said the improve- 
ment last month underscored the 
continuing improvement in West 
Germany’s employment outlook. 

The adjusted figure has fallen 
each month since August, when it 
stood at 2J32 milli on. 

“Hie monthly rise in unemploy- 
ment is due solely to seasonal fac- 
tors” Mr. Franke told a news con- 
ference in Nuremberg. 

He noted that December's figure 
was aided by mild weather. 

(Reuters. UP1 ) 

■ Stocks Index at Record High 

Growing confidence in the West 
German economy unleashed a 
flood of foreign orders for stocks 
on the Frankfurt Stock Exchange 
on Tuesday, pushing prices to their 
second consecutive record high this 
week, Reuters reported from 
Frankfurt. 

Dealers said foreign activity was 
heavy in selected bank shares, in- 
surance issues and blue chip auto 
stocks. 

“Today is the first time this year 
that foreign buyers have emerged 
in force,” one dealer said. 

The Commerzbank index of 60 
leading shares set a record high for 
the second consecutive day, ad- 
vancing to 1,137.8 from Monday’s 
1,123.5. 


C5tetea:U<33irMC 

- 4a) CommrcM trout lbiAj»mantetiMtedtetevoii#pteicl (cl Amaurtitieadad to toy ana ttBarl") 
Unitj of weCxUMfl* of LOOO (y) Unltt o» TOO* 

Benelux (Brussels}: Banco Oommerdato Itotkma IMJtan); tew 

- Nadanoie departs (Parts): IMF (SDRI: Banoue Arube at Internationale d’lmestlBmneat 
■ -irBnar. rivet, dbvatn). Other data from Reuters andAP. 


Comptroller 
OflLS.Plansto 
Resign in Spring 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The 
UB. comptroller of the curren- 
cy, G Todd Conover, whose ap- 
proval of limited-service “non- 
bank banks” has drawn sharp 
congressional criticism, said 
Tuesday that he plans to resign 
in the spring. 

Mr. Conover said he will re- 
turn to the private sector but is 
not sure what he nil] do. His 
term as supervisor erf the feder- 
ally chartered commercial 
banks in the United States was 
to run through 1986. 

His approval of the nonbank 
banks was challenged last 
month in federal court in Flori- 
da, and Mr. Conover, 44, has 
agreed not to give final approv- 
al to any more of them until the 
case is resolved. A nonbank 
tank avoids certain federal re- 
strictions by either not making 
co mmer cial loans or by not ac- 
cepting d emand deposits. Fed- 
eral law defines a bank as an 
institution that does both. 

These was no indication that 
Mr. Conover's statement had 
any connection with President 
Ronald Reagan’s announce- 
ment Tuesday that his chief of 
staff, James A Baker 3d, and 
his treasury secretary. Donald 
T. Regan, are switching jobs. 

The House Banking Commit- 
tee chairman, Fernand St Ger- 
main. a Rhode Island Demo- 
crat, introduced legislation, last 
week to undo Mr. Conover’s 
approval of dozens of nonbank 
tanks. 


Options (prices In S/m.). 



KflWSflJ 
313322a? 
I 1 JQQ IS 7 S 172 S 
800 12001350 
575 9801050 


Gdtt 2B25-30Z75 

VriensWUeWeM SA. 

I. Qumi da Maaf-Bfaec 
1211 Gama I. Swfezeriaad 
Tct 310251 - Tain 2*305 



Korea’s Conglomerates 

South Korea's largest conglomerates 
ranked by 1983 sates in bffiwns o! 
dofl&rs, translated from won at current 
exchange rate 

Hyundai $8.0 

Lucky-Goldstar 8,7 

Samsung 6.0 

Sunkyong • 5.9 

Daewoo 5.8 

Source; The Korea HerafeJ 

Yla N— Yor* Tm 


A Daewoo Corp. showroom where the conglomerate displays its diverse products. 

South Korea’s Conglomerates Face 
Increasing Pressure to Curb Growth 


By Susan Chira 

New York Tunes Service 

SEOUL — In the showroom where Daewoo 
Corp. displays its wares, giant panda dolls stand 
next to shelves of jogging shoes. Grand pianos 
bump up against scale-model tractors, cranes and 
ships. Personal computers vie for space with video 
recorders and stuffed toy rabbits. 

But the same corporate diversity that Daewoo 
executives find so pleasing worries government 
economists and angers the general public, who 
resent what they see as monopolies that keep 
domestic prices high and small businesses badly 
overmatched. 

South Korea owes much of its economic “mir- 
acle” to giant conglomerates such as Daewoo that 
produce everything from toys to tankers. But now 
these same companies find themselves the targets 
of antimonopoly measures from the government 
that helped create them. 

“to Korea, this is a flaming issue.” said John T. 
Bennett, president of the Korea Economic Insti- 


tute of America, established by South Korea’s 
chief economic research institute. He compared 
the public’s emotion to the suspicion of big busi- 
ness that grew into the populist movement in (9th- 
ceotury America. 

But leaders of the South Korean conglomerates 
argue that the complaints are unfounded and that, 
in fad. their concerns need to remain large to 
compete internationally. 

Most of the conglomerates, known as chaebol 
were founded less than a generation ago as small 
businesses by the entrepreneurs who still control 

them. 


Hyundai Corp.’s founder, for example, was a 
garage owner who began by repairing U.S. Army 
trucks and expanded into runway-budding during 


the Korean War. 

From such beginnings the chaebol continued to 
expand like centipedes growing new legs, encour- 
aged by government-backed loans and tax credits. 
By last year, the top 10 chaebol accounted for 64 
(Continued on Page 11, Col 5) 


New Foreign Role Seen in DM Bonds 

O 


By Warren Geder 

International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT — Foreign 
hank* ma y be allowed to lead man- 
age Eurobonds denominated in 
Deutsche marks as eariy as April, 
sources close to the Frankfurt 
banking community said Tuesday. 

Since the late 1960s, West Ger- 
man commercial tanks have had 
the exclusive right to lead manage 
DM-denominaied Eurobonds un- 
der terms of a ladt agreement be- 
tween the banks and the Bundes- 
bank. The accord was revised in 
1980. 

But sources involved in talks be- 
tween the West German banks and 
the Bundesbank on foreign-tank 
lead management say the chances 
are good ihat non-German banks 
will be competing to lead manage 
DM-denommated Eurobond issues 
by April 

For the foreign banks, three ad- 
vantages are at stake: 

• They stand to collect more 
money in fees, as the lead manager 
usually takes a potion of the over- 
all management fee for having put 
the transaction together. 

• They should record additional 


profits, since the lead manager can 
take a bigger share of the under- 
writing than is available to co-man- 
agers. 

• They would gain increased 
prestige, as banks use the number 
and nominal value of issues for 
which they were lead manager as a 
measure of their standing in the 
international capital mark«. 

A Bundesbank board member, 
Claus K&hler, said in an interview 
that the central tank feels strongly 
that there is a need to help along a 
trend of capital liberalization seen 
in recent reforms in the United 
States, Britain. Japan and in West 
Germany itself. 

He said that foreign-bank partic- 
ipation in DM Eurobond lead 
management might be a vehicle to- 
ward promoting “reciprocity” in 
global efforts to liberalize capital. 

Mr. Kbhler cautioned, however, 
that the Bundesbank is reluctant to 
act abrubtly in changing the cur- 
rent system for fear that iD-defined 
guidelines concerning foreign bank 
lead management could create vol- 
atility in the DM Eurobond mar- 
ket. 

A bond analyst at Wesideutsche 


Shamrock Weakened by Pact Failure 


New York Times Serrice 

NEW YORK — The sudden ter- 
zninauoa of an agreement in which 
Diamond Shamrock Corp. would 
have merged with the far larger 
Occidental Petroleum Corp. may 
have left Diamond Shamrock vul- 
nerable to a hostile takeover at- 
tempt, according to many analysts. 

“This means Ihat Oxy Pete has 
got to struggle to regain credibility 
but Diamond Shamrock has a big- 
ger problem — it could be on the 
auction block," said Alan Edgar of 
Schneider Bemet & Hickman, a 
Dallas securities firm. “Once ex- 
posed. vulnerable, and Diamond 
Shamrock better watch out." 

The news of the cancellation 
Monday came after the trading day 
had ended on the New York Slock 
Exc h a ng e, but on Tuesday Dia- 
mond Shamrock closed at $18,123, 
down S1.873. Occidental, mean- 
while. rose SI, to $25. 

An earlier indication of Dia- 
mond Shamrock's weakness came 
Monday in third-market trading on 
the West Coast, when Diamond 
Shamrock prices fdl much more 
precipitously. 

At Jeffries & Co., the leading 
third-market firm. Diamond 
Shamrock was off about S3 a share, 
to $17,125. Thus, the total market 
value of Diamond Shamr ock’s 133 
million shares outstanding de- 
clined nearly $400 million, making 
it a much easier takeover target 

In the third market, trading in 
shares listed on the Big Board takes 
place off the floor of the exchange 
aL brokerage firms such as Jefferies. 

Spokesmen for both companies 
declined to say why the agreement 
was scrapped, or at which compa- 
ny’s initiiative. 


Ofl and gas industry experts said 
they were not entirely surprised by 
the sudden turnabout, because of 
the mercurial personalties of the 
two chair men, William H. Bricker 
of Diamond Shamrock and Ar- 
mand Hammer of Occidental 

“Hurrah.” said Anantha Raman, 
a chemical industry analyst wbo 
follows Diamond Shamrock, when 
he was informed that the merger 
had fallen through. “It didn’t make 
a bit of sense to begin with. Bricker 
and Hammer would never have 
gotten along." 

For Diamond Shamrock, the 
merger talks came in the aftermath 
of an aggressive program to in- 
crease its holdings in the energy 
business while scaling back a line erf 
chemical-manufacturing business- 
es that, as recently as a decade ago, 
were its largest source of revenue. 

The company’s acquisitions un- 
der Mr. Bricker have included Fal- 
con Coal Co. in 1979. Amherst 
Coal Co. in 1981 and Sigmor Corp., 
a gasoline concern with a refinery 
and a chain of service stations, in 
1983. 

Its biggest single purchase, also 
in 1983, was Natomas Corp., an oil 
and gas company with large re- 
serves in Indonesia, for which it 
paid $1.4 billion. 

Mr. Bricker’s aggressive style has 
been questioned by several indus- 
try experts. They criticized the tim- 
ing of the Sigmor purchase, made 
when gasoline prices and profit 
margins were declining, and the lo- 
gistics of the Natomas acquisition, 
which committed the company to 
major foreign operations. 

Had it been completed, one ben- 
efit of the merger with Occidental 
would have been that it would have 



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given the holders of Diamond 
Shamrock common stock a hefty 
premium for their shares. 

■ Shamrock Opposition Seal 
Patrick Boyle of the Los Angeles 
Times reported from Los Angeles: 

The merger was apparently can- 
celled after opposition developed 
among Diamond Shamrock’s di- 
rectors, apparently because Mr. 
Bricker tad not been promised a 
specific role, according to Waff 
Street sources. 

The sources suggested that Mr. 
Bricker may have turned against 
the deal because be had not been 
guaranteed a key executive post in 
the combined company. 

A Diamond Shamrock spokes- 
man denied that assertion, but de- 
clined to elaborate, and attempts to 
reach Mr. Bricker were unsuccess- 
ful 

Occidental would have been the 
surviving company in the merger, 
with shareholders of both compa- 
nies receiving stock in a new hold- 
ing company to be formed by Occi- 
dental. 


SIptapman 


MANAGED 

COMMODITY ACCOUNTS. 

PERFORMANCE 
RESULTS FOR 
COMPTRENDII 

BEGINNING EQUITIES 
OF $100,000 
ON JANUARY! 

OF EACH YEAR 

yielded the blowing 
star al charges: 

IN 1980: +165% 

IN 1981: +137% 

IN 1962: +32% 

M 1983: -24% 
ssd 

JAN. 3, 1985 
EQUITY 
STOOD AT 
U.S. $64,60576 

More then 550,000,0001)0 
currently under management. 

Cal or wfftte Royafl Fraziar at 
TAPMAN, Trend Analysts and 
ftxtfcto Management Inc.. 
Walt Street Plaza, New 'fak. 
New Mxk 10005 212-269-1041 
■fetex BM 667173 UW 


U.S. Stocks 
Report, Page 8 

" Page9 


GM to Set Up 

New Company to 

Build Small Cars 


i andedant Girazentrale in Dfls- 
sddorf said that foreign banks are 
exerting strong pressure on the 
Bundesbank to allow them to take 
part in the lucrative DM Eurobond 
lead management business. 

But arrayed against those efforts 
are dams by West Germany's 
leading co mm ercial banks that for- 
eign pariticipation could disrupt 
the smooth fonctioning of the DM 
Eurobond issue calendar. 

“You can be sure the German 
banks are going to put up stiff 
resistance to allowing foreign bank 
lead management," the bond ana- 
lyst said. 

Hans-JQrgen M Oiler, general 
manager at Morgan Guaranty 
GmbH in Frankfurt, said that par- 
ticipation as lead manager in the 
DM Eurobond market could be 
very attractive to a large foreign 
bank, especially “if the Deutsche 
mark becomes more attractive 
among investors and if interest 
rates in Germany faH” 

He said that the DM Eurobond 
market in 1984, induding 131 DM 
issues, totaled 19 billion DM ($5.9 
billion). 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

WARREN, Michigan — Gener- 
al Motors Corp. announced Tues- 
day that it would form a new cor- 
poration to develop, manufacture 
and market a new line of subcom- 
pact cars in the United States. 

The new unit, to be called Saturn 
Corp-, will produce and market up 
to 450.000 front-wbed-drive sub- 
compact cars annually, GM offi- 
cials said. It will oppaie as GM*s 
sixth automotive division. The oth- 
ers are Chevrolet, Pontiac. Olds- 
mobile, Buck and Cadillac. 

“We don't reel we have been 
competitive" in the small car mar- 
ket. CM'S chairman. Roger B. 
Smith, said in a news conference. 

He said that the automaker even- 
tually would invest $5 billion in the 
new company, which will have its 
own network of dealers and distrib- 
utors. But unlike the other divi- 
sions, Saturn, as a separate corpo- 
ration, wQ] have its own labor 
contract, allowing GM to pursue 
labor-cost savings GM says it must 
have to compete against the Japa- 
nese in the small-car market 

“This is. truly an historic occa- 
sion.” Mr. Smith said. “Not since 
1918, when Chevrolet joined the 
General Motors family, have we 
added a new nameplate." 

GM announced more than a year 
ago what it called Project Saturn, a 
way to squeeze profits out of small 
cars by abandoning the traditional 
assembly line and bunding cars in 
sections that would be fitted to- 
gether at a final work station. 

The Sauira car will use produc- 
tion and labor-management sys- 
tems now being developed at New 
United Motor Manufacturing Inc., 
a GM-Toyota Motor Corp. joint- 
venture company that recently be- 
gan production of subcompact cars 
in Fremont, California. 

But the production technology 
as well as the vehicle technology 
will be more advanced than those 
being tried at Fremont, sources be- 
lieve. 

The United Auto Workers 
union, which j crated GM in a Sat- 
urn task fence, win accept radically 
different work rules in an effort to 
lower production costs by reducing 
the number of man-hours needed 
to produce one car. GM is shooting 
for 70 to 75 man-hours per unit, 
versus the current 130 man-hours. 

“We believe Saturn will use less 
material, energy, manpower, inven- 
tory, floor space, and even less cap- 
ital investment than any project of 
comparable capacity," said GM*s 
vice chairman, Howard H. KehrL 

The Saturn will be “reversed de- 
signed” —that is, designed to best 
take advantage- of the efficiencies 
built into the new factory. The cur- 
rent method of auto development 
emphasizes b uilding and retooling 


the factory to meet the engineering 
specifications of the car. 

Many questions remained unan- 
swered after Mr. Smith's presenta- 
tion, including where the car wall be 
built, when it mil be on the market 
and what kind of contract changes 
will be «dfed of the UAW. 

Joseph Sanchfg, 54. vice presi- 
dent and general manager of GM*s 
Oldsmobile division, was named 
president of the new unit He has 
extensive experience in GM^ over- 
seas operations. 

The Saturn plant will employ 
6.000 people working two shifts 
and turning out 400,000 to 500,000 
cars a year, the GM chariman said. 

That would be double the capacity 
of most new an to assembly plants. 

GM also used the news confer- 
ence to underscore its desire to 
learn management techniques from 
Toyota Motor Corp. in its 12-year 
joint ca rmaking venture in Califor- 
nia. The first jointly made Chevro- 
let Nova was produced last month. 

(AP. WP) 


Gold Plunges; 
Dollar Closes 
Up in New York 

The A. nodal at Press 

NEW YORK —The price of 
gold fdl to its lowest level in 5Vi 
years on Tuesday as the dollar 
resumed its surge and set a re- 
cord against the British pound. 

Gold for current delivery 
dosed at $296.70 a troy ounce 
on the Commodity Exchange in 
New York, down $5.50 from 
the previous session. That was 
the lowest level since gold 
dosed at $293.90 on Aug. 8, 
1979. the exchange said. 

Bullion was Bid lower, al 
$296, at the Republic National 
Bank in New York, down $5.75 
from Monday. 

The dollar fdl in early trad- 
ing, but rebounded and finished 
up. 

In London, the pound rose to 
$1.1485 from the record dosing 
low of $1.1403 set Monday. 
Other dollar rates in Europe, 
compared with Monday, in- 
cluded: 3. 1385 Deutsche marks, 
down from 3.1780, and 9.620 
French francs, down from a re- 
cord 9.7215. 

In New York, the pound 
closed at $1.1389, down from 
$1,153 Monday. Other New 
York dollar rates, compared 
with Monday, ind uded: 3.17 
DM, up from 3.1405; 9.7115 
French francs, up from 9.6025. 



Brown Brothers Harriman & Co. 

PRIVATE BANKERS 

NEW YORK BOSTON PHILADEtPHIA CHICAGO 
ST. LOUS LOS ANGELES DALLAS NAPLES 
LONDON PARS ZURICH TOKYO GRAND CAYMAN GUERNSEY 

STATEMENT OF CONDITION, DECEMBER 31, IBM 


ASSETS 

Cash and EX* from Banks. . 

LLS. Government Securities. 

Bren and G ip raraeed. 

State and Mxicoxi Secures . ... 

Federal Funds SoU 

Loans and Oscajnts. 

Customers - Uetity on Accwtances. ... 

Interest and Other Recovades. 

(Yemeas end Equprnnt. no. 

Omar Assets 


S280.378.t73 

121,470,31a 

62.010.972 

75.000.000 

250988.168 

20305621 

29.633.765 

15.141.650 

5670.B44 

5874.599.508 


UABUTIES 


9746654,590 

Federal Fi«te Purchased EJ&QOO.OQ0 

A c ceptances: Less Amount oi Porflcio 27.405621 

Accrued Expenses ... 9.573668 

Otter tiaMWS 4.477.3QB 

Capes! 923.000000 

Surphia 35.58BJ00 56668000 

S874.599.50S 


PARTNERS 

J. Eugene Banks 
Peter a Bardot 
Water H Brawn 
Granger Casbkyan 
Alan Crawl ant Jr 
WafemRDrwer.Jr 
Anthony T. E raters 
Alexander T.ErcUena 
T M. Farley 
Ebndgs T. Gerry 
EtoriOgB T Gerry. Jr. 

LIMITED PARTNERS 


John C. Hanson 
NoahT. Herndon 
Landon Hflterd III 
Frank W.Hoch 
ft. L Ireland III 
F H. Kingsbuy. Jr. 
Michael Kraynot. Jr 
T Michael Long 
John B. Madden 
MctualW. McConnel 


VWfcom H MOdne II) 
Donald 8 Murphy 
Eugene C. Rams 
Wiftam F. Hay 
Robert V. Roosa 

L Parts Sfaptay 
Snkley P. Towles 
Lawrence C. Tucker 
Maarten van Hengel 
JahnC. Vlfest 
Lawenw F. WhKUmon 


W.AvereHHamnian- 
Kate Ireland 
Gany Brother® SCo. 


Robert E. Hutter.Jr. 
Robert A Lovett 
Merchant Scarfing Gorporanxi 


COMPLETE BANKING FACUTES AM) INVESTMENT SSW1CES 

Depose Accrues • Gommeim Loans and Qscounts 

Cdtnmerwl Lenars of Craft an] AccefXaraas » Foregn Exchange 

Corporate Knanoof Counting • Mow ent Acqutotion Senates 

Custody of Seorties 

hmstmox Adraory Serves 

InscOnnl Investor Sovcas 

Reran! Franoal Services 

Brokers for firehose end Sale dt Sacurioes 

Members of Prnapsl Soxfi Exchanges 


Rduwry saniees to irafiwiuate and emptayae bantfc plans are provided through 
Brown Brothers Hanvnrai Trust Company, a wtxAy owned sutafery. 






















Tuesdays 

NYSE 

Dosing 


Tables include the nationwide prices 
up ta the dosing on Wall Street 


TV im pseg pf w 1U 

6* 2 Vi Public* 

13* 7* Puttfe .16 U 7 

12* Ufi PR Cam S 

l« 9* PuertP 1-74 135 8 

Wk IM PinteHm .12 7 30 

64* 23* Puretat 1JS 46 16 

V* SV2 Pwa 7 


1101 72* 72* 72* + * 

a 2* 2* »— * 

289 IB* 9* V* + * 
VMM 6 *— * 
764 13* 12* 13 + * 

122 W* 18 IBM— M 
67 27* 27* 27*— * 
192 7* 7* 7*— W 


38* 27* QuafcOl 829 28* 37* 37*— * 

1VM IS OuofcSO P U II 399 1IM 18 18* + M 

12* 6* Quonex 46 371 8* 8* 8* + * 

32* 21 Qtastar 160 5A 9 297 28* 27% 28*— M 

2DM 14 QfcRaU Jfe U 14 28 16* 16* M*— * 


llktordti 
Haft Low stock 


oh. YU PE MBiHWtLow OgoLOToe 


(Continued from Pages) 


.16 

26 


1.12 

3X 

11 

J7 

23 

26 

74 

TX 



SB 

3 

11 

14 

70 

21 




41 

577 

4J 


236 

57 

7 

248 

97 


4X0 

IU 


0X0 

123 


r342 

128 



129 


6X0 

125 


rOTS 

129 


rl75 

123 


974 

11X 





1200 

121 


650 

126 


270 

U 

JO 

1X0 

77 


220 

57 

18 

176 

77 

7 

76 

17 

13 




JSA 

12 

15 


1.7 

12 

1X8 

47 

14 



Jfc 


1 









PSI 
PSI 
PSI 
50 36* PSI 

66* <M PSI 
SB 44* PSI 
57 43 PSI 

66 * JO* psr 

60 46* PSI 

s 

24* 

SB 


IBM 18* n* 
10* ISM MM 
7* 7* 7M 
22* 21* 21* 
7* 7* 7* 


44 42 

57 96 

51 48 

50 49V, 

57 56 

52 


H 


7 ■i 


12* SoasuJ 
18* SaalAIr 
lo* BeatPw 

37V, 

29* 

97 

» 

12V, 


m 


29V. 
41* 40* 
31* SOM 
40* 48 
ISM 17* 
2* 2M 
46* 45* 
2BM 28* 
14* 14* 
4* 

2BM 28 
29* 29 
9* PK 
44* 44 
90* 90* 


4f+ 


* 
M 
* 
M 
* 

61* +1* 
53M 
27M 
ISM 








w 






ft 


JUAH 


22B 

77 

8X0 11A 

7.75 117 

296 

85 

256 

87 

1X8 

47 

74 

27 

72 

24 

UO 

47 


13 13 — M 

28* 28* 

46* 45 +* 
27* 2Bth— * 
2D* 20*- * 
21 21 — * 
7M 7M— M 
W* ID* + * 
27* 27*-* 
2* 3M + M 
6* 6*— M 
33* 32*—* 
14* IS + M 
6* 6* + M 
4* 4*— M 
21M 31*+ M 
7S 77 42* 

M 66 
19* SOM + M 
31* 31*— M 
UK 34* + M 

IB* 10* 

20* 21 + M 

17 37*+* 

2* 2*— M 
99 58M— M 

3* 3* 

13* 13*— M 
IS* 19 — M 


- \\ iM 


NYSE Higfis-Lows 



NEW HIGHS 19 


Adam Rusal 

CtzFstBco 

Ghrasef 

PGE240pfK 

SecCapCp 

AmFnict B 
CltFst 250a 
LsulsvCcnt 
PocGTron 
SMShanu 

BtosstfiM 

vICmtAIr 

PGE173MF 

PannaRE 

TumarCps 

Buall Ind 
vICantAh-pf 
PGEU24af 
RBWCp 


NEW LOWS M 


AtomltD n 
CrwnOiPef 
GrtdftoktCa 
Tuftex 

AmRayaltyn 

CrwnCnPB 

Heftanatka 

Ultimata 

BowVPttoy 
Crystal Oil 
MCORes 

COfNhMSt&M* 

Ducammun 

Tabaelcn 


Dividends Jan. 8 


i 


C«nmv 

Per 

Amt 

Fay 

RFC 

CASH SPECIAL 



Plonear Fad. SSL 


70 

1*25 

1-M 

INCREASED 



BKCorp 

a 

.18 

24 

1-21 

Carolina Freight 

O 

-ID 

M 

LIB 

Core Industries 

Q 

.14 

3-25 

34 

Orfard industrtos 

Q 

.11 

3-1 

MS 

TecJmalytJs Coo* 

A 

72 

2-4 

1-34 

OMITTED 




1 ShncoSfarea Inc. 





USUAL 




BC Sugar Raflnerv 

S 

70 

2-25 

2-1 

Bark of Now York 

51 

25 

1-18 

Bratov Co 

Q 

.17 

2-15 

1-71 

Orrfrn] Vt Pub Sv 

Q J7h 

MS 

1-31 

Diamond Shorn rock 

a 

X4 

37 

2-20 

Dfvwrsfftad Enrgias 

a 

AS 

2-10 

1-23 

Ftamfng Cos 

Q 

72 

M 

2-20 

GATXCorP 
Goodvear Tire 

Q 

Q 

JO 

AO 

3-29 

3-15 

34 

2-19 

Itonredun Fum. Ind 

§ 

71 

2-1 

1-21 

La Id low Indusfrtos 

74 

ss 

+15 

Ltoerty Homes 

a 

as 

1-21 

Mark Tncln Bncshrs 

Q 

70 

27 

1-18 

Plan inn 

Q 

03 

1-28 

1-17 

Soutrnvstni E nervy 

Q 

.13 


1-11 

MS 

SW Motor Products 

Q 

J> 

York Federal S&L 


J2 

25 

1-25 

A-Aangat; M MeuftSv; Q Quartorfy; SGeail- 
AnaaaL 

J Source: UPI. 








London Commodities 

Jan. 8 

Figures In sterling per metric ton. 
Gasoil In US. dollars per metric ton. 
Gold In 115. dollars per ounce. 


High Low dose Previous 
SUGAR 

MOT 12280 12800 12150 12150 11950 12050 
MOV 13050 12750 12950 12958 12720 12750 
AUB 14050 13950 13950 14050 138.40 13850 
Oct 14750 14650 VHJBB 14730 14550 14530 
Dec 15350 IS350 15350 15450 15250 15350 
Mar 16950 16050 16050 16950 16750 16830 
May 17450 17450 17550 17550 17350 17550 
1533 tors of so tens. 

COCOA 

Mar 1.935 1.900 1.932 1.933 1595 1597 

May 1,945 1.915 1.945 1.946 1.908 1.909 

Jly 1.9S2 T.924 1.951 1.952 1,916 1517. 

Sen 1.951 1,926 1.949 1,950 1.91B 1520; 

Dec 1590 1575 1506 1588 1566 1569 

MOT 1585 1575 1580 1585 1565 1566 

MOV N.T. N.T. 1565 1585 1530 1.910 

4562 tots of 10 tans. 

COFFEE 

Jan 2253 2325 2344 2348 2543 2347 

MOT 1285 2275 2.780 2781 2587 2284 

Mpy 2295 2284 2286 2J88 2283 2290 

JIV 2597 2292 2292 2374 2J93 2295 

SeP 2700 25*3 2592 2293 2295 2300 

Now 2300 2300 2293 2236 2295 2300 

Jon 2590 2290 2285 2300 2290 2305 

2740 tots of S tons. 

GASOIL 

Jan 23075 22850 22850 22025 226J0 2Z775 
Feb 23050 22650 22675 2750 m K 225l 50 
Mar 23450 27175 22175 21 JO 2275 22750 
Ad 22150 217.75 21850 21075 21775 21 7 JO 
May 27150 21750 71750 21 7 JO 715J0 21650 
Jim 21050 210JO 21550 21750 21450 216» 
JIV 22O50 22050 31250 21650 21150 21650 
Aup N.T. N.T. 21250 22150 21150 22250 

Sep N.T. N.T. 21050 22550 21150 22250 

3540 lots of 100 tons. 

GOLD 

Feb 305.90 30240 301.90 30250 298J0 29850 
Art 30970 30840 304 JO 30650 30250 30270 
48 lots of 100 tray ez. 

Sources: Reuters and London Petroleum Ex- 
chan ae (gasoil). 


London Metals Jan. 8 

Figures In sterling per metric ton. 
Silver In pence per trov ounce. 


Asian Commodities 

Jan. 8 


HONG-KOffG GOLD FUTURES 
U 57 per ounce 

Close Previous 
Htph Lew BM Adi BM Adi 
Jon _ N.T. N.T. 30250 30450 29450 29650 
Feb _ N.T. N.T. 30450 30650 29650 2M50 
Mar _ N.T. N.T 30650 30850 29S50 30050 
Art _ 30950 30950 30850 31050 30050 30250 
Jun _ N.T. N.T. 31250 31450 304X0 30650 
Alia „ N.T. N.T. 31650 31850 30R00 31050 
Oct _ 32150 32150 32150 32350 31350 31100 
Dec _ N.T. N_T. 32650 32850 31650 32050 
Volume: 34 lets of 100 ok. 

SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
UJ5 per ounce 


Cash Prices Jan. 8 


Commodity tmd Unit 
Coffee 4 Santos. n» — 
Printdotti 64/30 38 M, vd . 
Sleet blftols (Pin.), ton _ 
Iron 2 Fdry. PhUa.fon _ 
Steel scrap No I hvy Pitt. 

Lead Spot, lb 

Copper elect. R> 

Tin I Si rails), lb 

Zinc. E. St. L. Basis, lb — 
Palladium, ox _____ 

Silver N.Y.ae 

Source: A P. 


High Low 

FetJ 30470 30270 

Mar N.T. N.T. 

Art N.T. N.T. 

Volume: e72 lots of too ol 
KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Malaysian coats per Ulo 
Close 

SM Ask 

Jan 18350 18450 

Feb 1 90X0 19150 

Mar 19575 19650 

Apr 1 99 JO 200J0 

May 20550 20650 

Jun 20650 20950 

Volume: 36 lols. 
SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Singapore coats per kilo 
Close 

Bid Ask 

RSS 1 Jan_ 16350 • 16350 

RSS 1 Feb_ 17050 17050 

RSS 2 Jan— 15675 1597S 

RSS 3 Jan— 15625 15775 

RSS 4 Jan— 14975 15175 

RSS 5 Jan _ I462S 15075 

KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
Malaysian rlnpgits per 25 tans 
CION 

Bid Ask 

Jan 1710 1780 

Feb 1.190 1760 

Mar 1700 1740 

API 1700 1740 

May 1.190 1730 

Jim 1.110 1720 

Jly 1.170 uio 

Sep 1,160 1700 

Nov 1,110 1700 

Volume: 12 lots of 25 fans. 
Sana: homers. 


Settle Settle 

30470 296X0 

38670 29860 
30850 30070 


Piev tous 
Bid Ask 
18050 18159 

18750 18850 

192J0 19350 

19850 19750 

20350 20450 
2DSJ0 207 JO 


Previews 
Bid Ask 

16150 16250 

16850 1687S 

15675 15775 
15475 1S75 

14775 14975 

13975 14175 


Previous 
Bid Ask 
1.190 1775 

1.190 1745 

1.190 1740 

1,1 90 1750 

1.180 124) 

1.170 1730 

1,160 1720 

1.170 1710 

1.1SD 1710 


r 


Today Previous 

HI oh grade capper cathodes: 

■pat 1.15250 1.15258 1. 14100 1,14450 
3 months 1,15950 1,16050 1,14550 1,14450 


S&P 100 Index Options 

Jan. 8 



spot 1,14550 
3 months 1,16050 
Tin: snot 9*7550 
3 months 950550 
Lead: soot 38350 
Smooths 329 JB 
Zinc:spot 71658 
3 months 70750 
Silver: spot SZ3J0 
3 mwittis 536.5c 
Aluminium: 
mat 90650 
3 months 93150 
Nickel: spot 4,17550 
3 months 470550 
Source; Reuters. 


90950 90450 90S50 
931X0 *27X0 92650 

4,18550 471050 472050 
471050 473000 473050 


SM* Calb-Last Pets- Last 

Price Jen Feb Mar Joe Feb Mar 

145 — — — — — Vi 

150 — 14* — 1/16 M * 

155 7M » 10* 1/16 9/16 1 

140 3* 5* 7* * I * 2M 

IM * 2* 4* 3W 4* 5 

179 M Hs 2M 5* 8* 8M 

J2 * 1 M — — 13* 

180 1/16 M 7/16 — — — 

Total call volume 1 22X52 
Total call open bii. 514.171 
Total put volume 78X72 
Total put open InL 284704 
index: 

Hlgb 16277 Law I61J5 Close 16155 — 0.14 
Source: CBOE. 


Paris Commodities 

Jan. 8 

Sugar In French Francs per metric tan. 
Other figures In Fnma per MO kg 


High Low Clan ChMe 

SUGAR 

Mar 1760 1739 1756 USB +16 

May 1X10 1792 1X09 M10 +19 

Aug 1X15 1X79 1X91 1X95 +18 

Od 1X50 1X30 15«5 IJSS +20 

Dec 1525 1X05 1X20 1X35 + 30 

Mar 1740 1,715 1730 1740 +13 

EslvoL: 1550 krts of 50 tons. Prev. actual 
sales: 1.1 10 lots. Ooen Interest: 16631 


COCOA 

Mar 1129 2590 2,118 2.121 +34 

May 2130 2120 2125 2133 +34 

JIV N.T. N.T. 2130 — +4D 

Sea N.T. N.T. 2135 — +35 

Dec N.T. N.T. 2089 2100 +23 

Mar N.T. N.T. 2085 — +30 

May N.T. N.T. 2080 — +30 

Est. voL: 76 lots of 10 tans. Prev. actual 
sales: 7 tots. Open Interest: 733 

COFFEE 

JP" NTT- N.T. 2X56 2500 —20 

Mar 2510 2500 2SM 2512 — S 

May 2499 2X9* 2X00 — — 10 

Jly N.T. N.T. 2495 — +5 

Sep N.T. N.T. 2495 — +5 

Nov N.T. N.T. 2490 — Uncft 

Ja l . . N -L. N - T - 2X90 — +5 

E*t. vpL: a lots of 5 ton* Prov. actual 
sales: 13 lots. Open Interest: 309 
Source: Bourse dv Commerce. 


DM Fn tares Options 

Jan. 8 

£McoBo«ere«fll6 Exdmge. 

w. Genni Atart^san nrb cafe per imk 


»** Can+Settte Pms-5e«e 

Price Mar Jsa sept Mar Jan sept 
X — — — au — — 

31 15* 1X5 — 074 0X5 — 

33 0X3 LID — 080 1.10 177 

B 0.25 074 1.18 1X9 1X3 IX 

34 0-12 046 tBS 234 — — 

35 055 0JS 042 177 — — 

Estimated total saL 1608 
ails: Moa voL 3795 open bit. 24.990 
Pab: Mon. vsL 1261 apeaUL 1X06 
Seurat: cme. 


HOW COMEX MOVED THE WORLD TRADIHG CEHTER FOR GOLD 
TO NEW YORK CITY- IN JUST TEN YE ARS. 


Floating Rate Notes 


Jan. 8 


The first gold futures contract was traded at COMEX 
on December 31, 1974-ending 40 years of U.S. 
restrictions on private gold ownership and trade. 

Since then COMEX gold futures have become 
the world's most actively traded metals contract. In 
1384 COMEX traded almost 10 million gold futures 
contracts with a market value of more than $300 
billion. Often, on a single day contracts equivalent to 



r- v :• 


ws^ 





* i 




,4 i * ** , . 


mmi 


5 million ounces of goJd are traded on COMEX, 
dwarfing activity on conventional gold markets. 

In 1982 COMEX introduced options on gold futures. 
These options are setting new volume and open 
interest records even with gold prices tame and flat. 

As the gold world turns to i/^V/ 

COMEX, New York has turned *i_AjTVro^L 
to gold. The World's Metals Market 


A 1 

. ' - V 

w 


Dollar 






'Jl 


m 






p* " 1 “ 






^ ' 8 : V 





5 ■» 

. 

-4C-+ 



Mi. 

mi 







Non Dollar 





































































Page 11 


** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 1985 


I; 

g* «$ • 
& 


BUSINESS ROUNDUP 


BUSINESSPEOPLE 


3 U.S. Makers Register 
Chips Under New Law 


; fa* 

» m? 

a icn ¥ ££?i 

? S&' 

^ peg, 

Jn 6ua B( 


5 Senirrlg*' 


-30.8 


*“?" 1* 
p'stes 


sf^awsEi. 

SyCMonua 

‘"worn 


By Elizabeth Tucker 

tt'ashir.gtai Past Service 

WASHINGTON — Three chip 
makers hove registered the first 
semiconductor chip designs at the 

Library of Congress, under new 
federal legislation that protects tbe 
devices from piracy. 

Intel Corp., Motorola Inc. and 
Harris Corp. registered their de- 
signs Monday at the library's copy- 
right office under the Semiconduc- 
tor Chip Protection Act of 1984. 

“The Semiconductor Chip Pro- 
tection Act is the first new intellec- 
tual-property law passed by Con- 
gress in more than 100 years,* 1 said 
Representative Robert W. JCasfen- 
rneier, the Wisconsin Democrat 
who chairs the House Judiciary 
Committee's subcommittee on pat- 
ents copyrights and trademarks. 
Mr. Kastemneier was a drafter of 
the legislation. 

“Now, semiconductor compa- 
nies will have protection from pi- 
rates copying their complicated de- 
signs," said Tom Dunlap, Intel's 
general counsel and secretary. “As 
a remit, the Chip Protection Act 
will encourage the development of 
chips that were previously consid- 
ered economically marginal." 


Other products, such as comput- 
er and video software not clearly 
protected under the existing system 
of patents and copyrights, may be 
examined in Congress this year to 
determine whether new legislation 
is necessary for them as well Mr. 
Kaslenmeier said. 

Other products, such as biologi- 
cal designs used in biotechnology, 
may eventually be covered by legis- 
lation designed to protect technol- 
ogies that may not be explicitly 
covered under existing laws. 

The Semiconductor Chip Protec- 
tion Act came about as a result of 
pressure from the chip industry, 
which said that existing laws did 
not sufficiently protect its products 
from increasing piracy at home and 
abroad. 

The new law, which draws from 
both copyright and patent laws, 
protects the designs of chips by 
making it illegal to reproduce any 
semiconductor pattern for 10 years 
after registration. It carries penal- 
ties of up to 3250,000. 

Foreign companies will be able 
to register their works if their coun- 
tries extend equivalent protection 
to U.S. designs. Tbe Japanese are 
considering a chip protection law. 


Northeastern 
Seeks Shelter 
In Chapter 11 

Untied Press International 

MIAMI — Northeastern In- 
ternational Airlines filed Tues- 
day for protection bom its 
creditors under Chapter 11 of 
the U.S. Bankruptcy Code, but 
continued service with dune 
aircraft, officials said. 

A Federal Aviation Adminis- 
tration spokesman said the air- 
line was using the planes for 
flights to Philadelphia, Chica- 
go, and Isiip, New York, as well 
as to the Florida towns of Or- 
lando, West Palm Beach, St. Pe- 
tersburg and Fort Lauderdale. 

Northeastern officials filed 
the petition early Tuesday in 
U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Mi- 
ami. 

In the petition, the Fort Lau- 
derdale-based airline listed as- 
sets of about 328 million and 
liabilities of about $48 million. 

The petition listed North- 
eastern's three largest creditors 
as Airbus Industrie, the Euro- 
pean consortium, owed $10.5 
million for Airbus A- 300 air- 
craft; Aeroformation of Blag- 
nac, France, owed Si. I million, 
and AeroThrust Corp. of Mi- 
ami. owed $1.5 million. 


COMPANY NOTES 



To* 


m 

r-t: 

v-2 „ 

< vr‘" 

- c>~ 


r» 

A* 

IS 

lb 

5^ 

n:a 

as 




u 

Wfi 



Burroughs Corp. said it has 
signed a contract valued at $20 mil- 
lion under which a group of Chi- 
nese companies will assemble, dis- 
tribute and maintain its 
small-business computers in China. 

Eastern Air Lines's largest union, 
the Machinist's Union, filed a fed- 
eral lawsuit to block the carrier 
from extending an employee wage- 
concession program. U.S. District 
Judge Joe Eaton set a Thursday 
bearing dale for both sides to argue 
whether Eastern's action was legal. 

Grand Marine Holdings, the 
shipping arm of collapsed Carrion 
Investments, has filed for liquida- 
tion. The company said in a state- 
ment that its fleet was valued at 
$9.8 million at the end of 1984. 

Hongkong Land Co. said it has 


issued tender forms to potential 
buyers of tbe Excelsior Hotel. A 
company spokesman said bidders 
are required to include a cash de- 
posit with their tenders, but de- 
clined to disclose the amount or the 
deadline for tender returns. 

LTV Corp. said it has agreed to 
form a joint venture with Japan's 
Sumitomo Metal Industries Ltd. to 
make galvanized steel for the auto 
industry at a new plant in Cleve- 
land, Ohio. LTV said the $125- 
million project is scheduled to be- 
gin operating in the spring of 1986. 

NV Phffips GJoedampeofahrie- 
keu said it frill introduce a VHS- 
formal video camera/ recorder in 
late spring. The camera was devel- 
oped jointly with Japan's Matsu- 
shita Electric Industrial Co., it said. 


Saab Scania AB said its U.S. 
sales in 1984 rose 27 percent from 
1983, to a record 32,768 cars, mak- 
ing the Uni led Stales its biggest 
market. 

Singapore Airlines said it frill be- 
gin service to Beijing. Shanghai, 
Malta. Vienna, Karachi and Mau- 
ritius by April I. 

Sony Corp. said it will introduce 
an 8-millimeter compact video 
camera in Japan on Jan. 21. The 
company thus would be first to 
market the new 8- millimeter tech- 
nology. 

Union Carbide Corp-’s potential 
liability following the poison-gas 
tragedy in Bhopal India, has led 
Standard & Poor’s Corp. to lower 
its ratings on several categories of 
Union Carbide debt 


French Daily 
On Finance 
Set for Debut 

By Axel Krause 

lotemuional Herald Tribune 

PARIS — La Tribune de l’Econ- 
omie.- a French financial daily 
aimed al an international reader- 
ship, frill debut next Tuesday, its 
sponsors said Tuesday. 

“Until now, the ground for high- 
level international readership is 
Europe has been occupied by the 
International Herald Tribune, the 
Financial Times and the Wall 
Street Journal" said Jean-Mi chcl 
Qualrepoint. general manager, dur- 
ing a news conference. “Our goal is 
to coexist with a high-quality 
French product.” 

Much of tbe financing and statis- 
tical data for the new paper wQJ 
come from the La Vie Fran^aise 
group, which, in addition to La 
Tribune, controls La Vie Franqaise. 
a business weekly, and Le Nouveau 
Journal a financial dally estab- 
lished in 1 967, that will cease publi- 
cation next Tuesday. Its circulation 
has been about 25,000. 

Mr. Qualrepoint, a former re- 
porter /or Le Monde, a Paris daily, 
said La Tribune's goal was to reach 
50.000 paid circulation within two 
years, mainl y in the Paris area, split 
equally between subscriptions and 
newsstand sales. 

The paper will appear in two 
afternoon editions. Monday 
through Friday, and will be sold in 
France at a news land price of 5 
francs (51 cents), he said 

Several thousand copies will be 
sold outside France, primarily in 
Belgium. Switzerland, Italy and 
French-speaking Africa, Mr. Qua- 
trcpoint added. 

Somewhat resembling its main 
competitor. Les Echos, a financial 
daily with a paid circulation of 
about 100,000, La Tribune is 
counting heavily on developing a 
high-quality editorial staff in 
France and abroad. 

A fund of 70 million francs, to be 
spent over two years, has been ear- 
marked for hiring editors, reporters 
in France and correspondents in 
about 30 cities, including New 
York. London. Bonn. Zurich, Jo- 
hannesburg and Tokyo, he said. 


Cis*e 


cm 


| U.S. Futures Jan. 8 


-is 

UiS 

• J - : -■«; -s 

’ i-5 <y. -Z 

■ tr. :..j* 

-■nr. vs 
«. 'Of v 9 ’:. caa 
e-ta is a;. 


- -i 

i j: 

:.*u; - *: 

lifri — -£ 

:• -:ri =-*. :rr 


i r» - 

- -{ 
- COB 

:-n. — -> 

:s.-i ? m t. 

>:* 


Season Season 
High Law 


OHM Hloti Low Oom Chg. 


Grains 


WHEAT (CUT) 

5X00 bu minimum- doiiant 


4*4 


Mar 

3X1 

1421* 

148U 

4.05 

3J2V* 

Mov 

13* 

1364* 

134 

190 

3X7V* 

Jul 

130V* 

1331* 

129 

.#*17692 

129 

Sep 

131 

132ft 

1291* 

16316 

3J7V> 

Dec 

HOte 

141ft 

138ft 

3J49J 

144VX 

Mar 








5X1 

5X6 

S77ft 

Sxnk 


5.93 

5X7ft 

528ft 


Jut 

Afllte 

606 

5X7 

5.95 


6X4 

6X8 

5.98 

5X5 


ttlte 

6X5 

5JSV* 

5J7ft 

Mtov 

608ft 

5X7 

6.13 


6.15ft 

6X1 

610 

*30 

Mar *30 «J0 

Prev. sales 47.123 



V.cf S’** 

civ ‘ •' 




:p-jr. 3 * a* 

- . iivrM 

;■* * : >ir.j i 

£ 

‘ •: i -Sftff 

si $ §*i 


Est Sclav.. .--ArBV.Safes.Mn. 

Prev. Dav Open Int 41921 oHflt 
COBH (CUT) 

5X00 bo minimum- dollarsper bushel 
U94 2 AS Mar 2X9ft 27016 2 SB 

370 . May 27* 2J6te 2741* 

231 274ft Jut UTC 2.79ft 27Ai 

331ft 272ft Sop 232ft 27314 271W 

2*S 2J7ft Ooc 268ft 2X8ft 2X614 

210 - 17m Mar UM 27914 2MK 

22114 284 May 284 285 223ft 

EsL Saits Prev. Solos 2B970 

Pnw. Day Open Inf.UIJMO off 34* 

SOYBEANS tCBT) 

5060 bu minimum- do! tars oerbirtfvH 
7.79 SJ7*. Jan 31V 5 . 7414 i£7ft 

7.90ft 
797 
7.19 
7M 
471- 
40 . 

479 
782 


Prev. Day Open Ini. 48,120 off 54* 

SOYBEAN MEALICBT1 
HQ tons- dol bn per tan 

13480 Jan 138.10 13970 13778 

Mar 14280 145-10 14230 

MOV 1£J0 15070 V«-00 

Jol 15330 155JO 

Aus 155JM 15480 1B80 

SOP U8SB 1»J0 1W8B 

Ocl 13980 15930 15780 

DOC 143-20 1*480 16240 

Prev- Sales 1WS4 
Prev. Day Open Int. 37331 off 4*5 

SOYBEAN OIL CCBTI _ 

40000 Hu- doikn pot 100 
3030 2285 Jan 2592 2S8B 25*0 

30^0 2295 Mar 25X5 25X5 24W 

20.10 22X0 May 2585 2585 2JX0 

3030 2270 Jol 24*0 2430 2290 

2770 3250 Auo 3430 2430 

2585 2230 50P 2480 2480 2335 

2480 2290 Ort 2335 2335 3 

2475 '2280 Dec 2330 2330 2280 

Eat. Sales Prey .Safes 77.910 

Prw. Day Open lot. 39,145 off 912 
OATSCCST) 

&0®ix»mWniiifii-iWlaTSPerouahrt 
174V5 173 Mar 18014 IJMVi I7B 

MOV U*VS 177 J74M 

Jlrf 172 172 171 

SOP 18m I86U ixm 


um — jn 

334 —jo 
33914 — 8H4 
12914 —mu 
3J8W — 83V5 
1X2 —M 


28014 

274% 

277*4 —811* 
271V* -8214 
284V4 —8214 
Z76M 
28314 


— 87W 

588 — .»» 

5.95V4 — -T0V4 
5.9714 -vIlVS 
AID — 82 

424 —.12 


20980 140.10 
2H80 145X0 
19*30 , 15030 
1B080 1Q7.9I1 
17930 15480 
18030 15530 
1B4W 1*240 
EiL Salts 


153X0 —70 

155-10 —80 

15780 
15780 

16280 —30 


2572 —38 

2498 — X7 

2431 —J* 

2403 — A0 

2375 —35 

23X5 —35 

2330 —30 

2285 —80 



J. « 171 

l.HVb . 1*9 
179 . 18* 

18215 17M , 

EsL Sales Prev. Sales 

Prw. Day Open lit*. STS off 7 


17BK — 821* 
175** -81W 
171V* —811* 
18* —81 
189 — XOVi 


Livestock 


rf: :55ft.,- 


c; - .- 1 
j'' 

' t: 

Y r ":*■ iSP'Jl 

■ ! l >• 

£ A# 


$ ; si 

c-J 2& 

tnmi 

■ ■■ 


CAmUECCMEl 

40000 lbs.- cenfapor lb. , „ 

<57JU *280 Feb *585 **.« 

6872 63X0 Apr 6730 *732 

6837 6580 Jim 673D 6772 

66X5 6115 Aim *577 6530 

*5-10 61X0 Od 6375 43^ 

65X0 6880 Dec *S80_ M87 

Est. Sales 18848 Prev. Sates 1S317 
Prev. Day Open rut *1358 up 18*7 
FEEDER CATTLE (CME1 
44800 lbs.- cents per Rl 
7100 4575 JMI 2-1® 

7185 6575 MOT 72X7 7110 

72X0 *7X0 ACT njO 7110 

7020 *493 MOV 69X5 69® 

7080 - *6X0 AUO 49-H *»30 

IOJSS 67.00 SOP tun 6837 

6US 67.18 Del 

Eit. Sales 1850 Prev.Sotes 1722 
Prev. Day Open inL 8713 up 66 




v-. -r-i- 

'J ?££ 
ji-tiJ if 

-v- ifrj-' 

^ •: 

- 

:&ss 
■ .*& 
"r. .522 


5870 °SS P8r Feb 5385 »» 

54X5 45.10 Apr .4987 5035 

5140 «X0 JIM 54JU 54B 

5577 48.95 JUl S450 5SJB 

507 47JD AUB S3J8 3400 

5175 fiJU Oct 4975 «J5 

5085 4430 Dec 49X0 . 4938 

4970 . 463 Feb 4935 4935 

«J5 4575 Apr 

Eat. Sales prev. Sale* 4,157 

Prev. Day Open lot. 24748 offKW 
PORK BELLIES (CME) 

38300 Ifeb- cents par lb. 

8135 _■ 40.95 Ml TL10 

■130 *6.16 Mar 7575 76.15 

B2JJ0 61.15 MOV T73S 77% 

82X7 61H Jol 7780 7830 

83X5 tliJD A VS 7580 7530 

XW «L15 Feb »J5 S9S2 

7140. *410 Mar *080 *880 

Est. Solos 8823 Prev. Sates 3356 
Prev. Day Open Int. 14331 up64 


*430 *435 —182 
6585 *687 —133 

6635 6652 -73 

6480 6582 — X8 

6110 6330 — XD 

*475 647S —35 


7030 70X0 — 70 

7280 7282 -85 

7130 7132 — Xfl 

69-26 *935 —37 

6880 *930 —82 

*780 Ml O +X0 
4780 +.10 


5180 5280 —87 

48.95 49.10 — -47 

53J0 5387 -.18 

5*35 54X2 -88 

53X2 5382 +.17 

«75 4985 
49.10 4935 —.15 

4935 48.10 —110 
4630 


75XS 7145 —JOB 
7162 7162 —280 
75.12 75.12 —200 
7585 7535 —130 
7X10 7X10 —137 
6675 6782 —88 

6840 6880 


Food 







>: I,, 


COPFES CrNYOCE) 

37^80 Bh.- cert* per lb. . 

15380 mss Uar U2X9 14280 

15200 12201 MOV 13975 140.10 

14930 12180 Jut 13888 13&5B 

14780 12700 Sea 13700 13700 

14180 12935 - Dec 13535 13535 

13480 12850 Mar 

13325 13188 May 

Est. Sates 850 Prev. Sales 1X17 
Prev. Dev Open Jnt 11M8 affSOO 
SUCARWORLD 11 (NYCSCEJ 


584 
527 
5X3 
6X3 

mv dju mui 630 , 

|SI.3ote» 5X54 Prev.S^e* LM 
Prev. Day Open Int. 86332 up 1X62 

cpauuHvcscai 

I 0 meh-le tgciB-iper ten 
S3 1988 Mar 
3570 
2100 
2«S 

—I _ 

§^-8ete» ABM Prev.Sotes W 
"•v-OayOp^j InL 21837 up 19* 


14180 

13935 

13800 

isxa 

13X35 


18L38 

13939 

13825 

13635 

138X5 

13483 

13303 



13X0 . 

401 

Mar 

1DJD 

434 

Mav 

9.95 

4X3 

Jul 

9.75 

458 

hP 

9X5 

5X7 

Od 

9J3 

6X2 

Mar 

_ 

620 

May 


3049 JuJ 
2053 SOP 
1999 Dee 


430 

432 

429 

4X5 

4X0 

4X2 

8X5 

497 

sxo 

127 

124 

524 

5X5 

539 

543 

6X4 

638 

6X2 

670 

8 

i 

630 

6X0 

3899 

2878 

20M 

2117- 

2100 

2180 

2115 

2W 

7109 

Z115 

2100 

2110 

2038 

2045 

2050 

2055 

3050 

an 

2048 


+.17 

+.19 

+85 

—07 

+.10 

+25 

+02 


+05 

+03 

+82 

+83 

+85 

+87 

+02 


+15 

+22 

+26 

+25 

+17 

+20 

+» 


Season Season 
Hian Law 


Open Hteh Law Close Che. 


ORANGE JUICE INYCE) 

15X00 itn.- rents per lb. 

18560 109X0 Jan 157X0 157X0 15650 156X5 —180 

185-50 118-50 (War 140.10 160.10 15825 15020 —1X0 

185 JW 15180 May 161X0 161X0 16000 16020 — 1-20 

184X5 155 Ml Jul 16120 16120 16080 16020 —120 

181-50 15850 5«P 15&XQ 15880 15600 15680 —150 

18180 15725 Nov 15725 15725 15725 1572S —225 

180-00 15980 Jan 15625 —275 

165X0 15925 Mar 15625 —225 

Mov 15625 —325 

Est. Sales SOB Prev. Sales 895 

Prev. Day Open int. 0.191 off 106 


L Metals 1 1 

COPPER tCOMEX) 
25X00 KHJ- cents per lb. 






92X0 



5675 

5695 

3695 

5675 







57X5 

—m 


5520 

Mar 

57.95 

5630 

57.10 

57X5 

— AO 


5620 

Mav 

5855 

5690 

S7.75 

5605 

—A0 


5720 

JW 

59.15 

59X5 

58X5 

58X5 

-A0 


5720 


59X0 

40X0 

59.25 

5930 

—A0 


5820 

Dec 

6055 

6095 

*610 

*615 

—AO 


59X0 





60X5 

—.45 


59X0 

Mar 

*1X5 

61X5 

*120 

*1.15 








<1X0 

-XS 


6120 

Jul 

*115 

63.15 

*215 

*2X0 

—JO 

7890 

6230 





6105 

—55 

Est Sales 

9X00 Prev.Sotes 11268 




Prev. Dav Open Int 84X58 off 12 




SILVER 4COMEX7 






1 SXOO troy az.-oent» per troy 02 . 




—182 

1575X 

5B2X 

Jon 

6042 

4042 

S85X 

5868 

7232 

*165 

f-«fa 




5892 


16202 

5855 

Mar 

6142 

6152 

592X 

5925 

—165 


5952 


6245 

6345 

6002 

6021 

— iax 


*032 

Jul 

6322 

6332 

<1tX 

6112 

—tax 

11810 

6140 

Sop 

6422 

6422 

4222 

621.1 

—192 


amh 

Dee 


6592 

6372 

*37.1 

—192 

12152 

fttn 

Jan 

6562 

6542 

6560 

*42* 

—192 


6492 

Mar 

6762 

6762 


6526 










9452 

*710 

JUI 

6912 

6912 

6892 

*772 

— aox 

9480 

6812 

Sep 




*161 

— 202 

Est Sales 34008 Prev.Sotes 37X05 
Prev. Day Open Inf. 80,987 off 129 




PLATINUM fNYME) 














27*30 

27670 

37120 

267X0 

—7X0 






27120 

27170 



27650 

Jul 

20520 

2BSX0 

27520 

Z77J0 

—770 


28420 

Oct 

292J0 

29250 

28600 

28420 

—770 

37150 

305X0 


29400 

296X0 

29400 

291.10 

—770 

EsL Sates 

1296 Prev.Sotes 1X23 




Prev. Day Open Int 11304 off 101 




PALLADIUM (NY ME) 












107 JD 


11220 


10975 




10620 


11050 

111X0 

109X5 

109X5 



1065B 

Sep 

11035 

11035 

11625 

109X5 

—20 


10675 

Dec 

11020 

11075 

11080 

10695 



350 Prev. Sates 

611 




Prev. Day Open 1 nt. 6377 off 26 




COLD (COMBO 







IQOtrov at- dollars per travat. 
- 3020 29820 Jen 300X0 

300X0 

ttim 

pn 

— SJ0 


29670 

Fr+i 

30450 

305X0 

297 20 

rT T t ■ 

—570 


30020 

Mar 

30450 

30450 

wat 

i-L 

—SXO 


30030 

Apr 

309X0 

309X0 

381X0 

1 jkl 

-5X0 




312«0 

31230 

to 

pVx , ' i | 



309X8 

Aua 

318O0 

31820 

31600 

!■ j ' 1 

—680 

moo 

31420 

Oct 


jiaxo 

318X0 



327X0 

327X0 





32SJU 

Pea 



-630 

496X0 

43530 

33530 

33630 

Apr 

Jun 

33520 

333X0 

33520 


—6X0 

428X0 

342X0 

348X0 

Aua 

Oct 





=£8 


55200 Prev.Sotes 552B8 




Prev. Dav Open 1nt-17%2f7 off 1.B7B 




LZZ 


Financial 



□ 


Season Season 
Hteh Law 


□pen Hteh Low Oaee On 


1X450 1.1330 SOP 1.1330 1.1330 1.1330 1.1330 

12710 1.1330 Dec 1.1330 

EsL Sales 8894 Prev. Sales 9219 
Prev. Day Open InL 17X99 off 786 
CANADIAN DOLLAR (I MM} 

S per <llr- 1 point equals S00001 
8050 2446 Mar 2558 2560 2542 2549 

-7835 2440 Jun 2540 2542 2530 2533 

25BS 2507 SflP 2533 2533 2531 2526 

2566 2495 Dec 2533 2532 2525 2524 

Est- Sales l.lai Prev.Sotes 544 
Prev.OayOoenlnt. 7,133 up 73 
FRENCH FRANC (IMM1 
S per franc- 1 Point equals SflJIOOOT 
.11905 .10235 Mar .10X50 

.11020 .10210 Jun .10310 

.10430 .10200 Sep .Mam 

Est. Sates Prev. Seles 

Prev. Dav Open Ini. 291 

GERMAN MARK (I MM] 

Spot marie - 1 point equals 308001 


—105 

—100 


—7 

-9 

—10 


-41 ID 

7160 

Mar 

7197 

7203 

7170 

7173 

—26 

7733 

TIBS 

Jun 

7228 

7230 

7201 

7201 

—27 

2545' 

7227 

Sep 



7233 

— 2B 

■3*10 

7257 

Dec 

7287 

7287 

7280 

7363 

—71 

Est Sales 


Prev. Sales 24224 





Prev. Day Open int. 38X47 up 3215 
JAPANESE YEN [I MM] 

S per yen- 1 paint equate 50800001 
004495 803921 Mar 803954 ,003961 802042 803947 
004450 803955 Jun 803985 803993 8039BI 803979 
004150 80014 Sep 80014 804034 804013804012 
004350 80078 Dec 804863 80063 804061 804055 
Eit.sales 7411 Prev. Soles 8X63 
Prev. Day Open Int 14139 upSA 

SWISS FRANC (IMMI 
S per franc- 1 Point equalsSLOOOl 


—1 

—1 

—1 

—1 


2035 

7002 

Mar 

7836 

7841 

7796 

7798 

—45 

XVOC 

7844 

Jun 

7881 

7882 

7836 

7838 

—47 

XS30 

7915 


7920 

7920 

TWO 

7883 


A360 

7945 

Dec 

7950 

7950 

7950 

7931 

—44 


Est. Sales 15X55 Prev.Sotes 14.724 
Prev. Day Open InL 19.979 up 1X59 


Industrials 


LUMBER (CME) 

130X00 b*«.-SDer IXOObeLft. 

22120 13020 Jan 16050 16220 


22X40 

22580 


13920 MOT 16780 16920 
147X0 MOV 173-50 17580 


177*0 15720 
186.10 16780 
1B780 17580 


15380 Jul 17880 17780 
Sep 178X0 18080 


Nov 17820 lBtLOO 
Jan 10320 185.10 


19580 17BJ0 MOT 187 JO 187 80 

EsL 5a les 3.145 Prev. Sales 1123 
Prev. Day Open int. 920* off 277 
COTTON KtrrCEl 


159 JO 1*180 
166-50 166X0 
172J0 17520 
177X0 177X0 
17660 17635 
17820 178J0 
183X0 113X0 
10780 18780 


+120 

+2.10 

+110 

+XC 

+X0 

+80 

+450 


US T. BILLS (I MM} 
si mi llion- phol Ml net. 

91X0 fixe 9129 91X* 

9092 9098 9092 9098 

9055 9055 9055 9059 

90-25 9024 9024 9824 

9080 9000 89.95 B9JB 

8935 0935 8935 0933 

09X9 


9125 

8779 

Mar 

91X9 

91 X* 

87.14 

Jut 

91X0 

91X1 

8694 

Sep 

9692 

90X2 

8577 

Dec 

9655 

9627 

86*0 

■Mar 

9035 

90JJ4 

87X1 

Jun 

90X0 

8973 

88X0 


8975 


Dec 


Est. Sales 

1072* Prev. Sales 11 


teiflS* 

up 53* 


... 71-33 

70-1* 71 70-12 7M9 

69-29 70-9 69-34 70-7 

Dec 69-9 69-20 6+5 69-20 

Mar 68-28 69-3 60-20 694 

68-6 68-31 485 68*21 

68 68-8 67*25 6M 

67-20 6+29 67-14 67-29 

Mar 67-11 67-19 6+11 67-19 

Jun 66-91 67-10 66-28 67-10 

6+2 


Prev. Day Open Int. 44046 
18 YR. TREASURY (CBTJ __ 

SHXUMBprln-Pts832ndiof laOpct 
wn 70-25 Mar 80-19 80-25 80+ 8002 

B+7 70-9 Jun 79-24 80 79-21 » 

90-23 7S-10 Son 7+W 

78-20 75-13 Dec 73-29 

78-23 75- IB Mar 70-15 

7+9 7+22 Jun 78-2 

Est. Sales Prev. Sales 6276 

Prev. Day (teen Int- 34971 off 117 

US TREASURY BONDS ICBT} . 

(Boct-sioaooo-pta&aaxJsotioopdi 

77-15 57-27 Mar 7+13 7+26 71-7 

77-15 57-20 Jun 

76-1 57-10 Sep 

7+5 5+8 

7+30 57-2 

70-6 562* Jun 

69-25 S 6 » SOP 

69-26 56-25 Dec 

*9-7 56-27 

68 - 11 663 

*7-19 6621 Sep 

Er£ Sales Pnev.SotBS 124194 

Prev. Dov Open lnL197X71 UP1J43 

GNMA (CRT) 

S100800Prtn-Pts832nGsotl00PCt 

69- 13 5+5 Mar 49-15 6+12 69-6 69-17 

Sm 57-17 Jun 68-24 68-25 68-14 6BJ5 

66- 20 59-13 Sep 6 W 

Sill Ho 6631 67-5 4627 *+5 

67- 4 50-25 Jun £23 

65-23 65-21 Sep 4611 

Egt Sates Prev.Sotes 1,100 

Prev. Dav Open Int. 7,352 off 569 
CERT. DEPOSIT (IMM) 

«3'!T-W c SS r ™ ™ jj.jj 

anjtf BSJ 0 Jun 90J4 90X0 90J4 9059 

gnn* KSJJ 0 Sep 90JJ7 

S25 85J4 Dec 8986 B9J6 89J6 8 ?x 2 

#9.10 8656 Mar 

0808 86X3 Jun 

87JB 57X6 Sep 

Est. Sates Prev.Sotes 1JB3 

Prev. Dov Ooen int. MX83 up» 

EURODOLLARS (IMMI 

a 9R7S 90X1 9873 9078 

ana 82X9 Jun 90.14 9071 9813 9819 

SS sS 89X4 09X0 09X1 09X7 

84X0 Dec 89.21 89.24 89.19 09X3 

88 J 2 84.10 Mar B 8 BS BU 

MX] 8633 Jun 0854 BSJ5 8 BJ 0 8855 

nxi STM Sep 8837 *837 BUI 88 X 6 

8937 8801 Dec SSJH 

EU sales 21X46 Prev. Sales 28X73 
PrevToavOoen Int. 89X40 uo2.112 
BRITISH PDUND{IMMI 

Saeraouwl - 1 point equals *00001 ( ]JH 

14 ] 70 1.1365 Mar 1.1515 1.1S30 1.1355 L1360 

1J350 liloS JW 1.1485 1.15D0 11340 1.1340 


49-25 

88.92 

88*3 


+J07 

+4* 

+X7 

+X* 

+-W 

+X1 


+5 

+5 

■« 

+5 

+5 

+5 


+9 

+10 

+10 

+11 

+11 

+12 

+12 

+12 

+12 

+13 

+12 


45 

+5 

+5 

a 

45 


+J» 

+X6 

4-J17 

+JJS 

+-C2 

-dn 

-as 


+AS 

4-X4 

+05 

+X4 

+JB 

—XI 

—XI 


—125 

—115 


32200 lbs.- cents per 1 b. 






7975 

4512 

Mar 

<7.15 

<770 

66X2 

67 JM 

— X2 

7930 

6670 


67.90 

6600 

6770 

6774 

—72 

79X5 

*7X0 


*648 

£2 

663S 

68X9 

—2* 

77 JO 

67X5 

Oct 

6636 

663* 

6632 

—28 

73X0 

6600 

Dee 

68X0 

6660 

6635 

66X8 

—JO 

7*75 

6975 

M or 
May 

69X0 

69X0 

69X0 

6925 

7075 

—.15 


Est. Soles 3X00 Prev.Sotes 1597 
Prev. Dov Open InL 17X46 UP 717 
HEATING OIL CHYME} 


*2200 eal- cents per eol 
8675 69X5 Feb 

73X0 

7120 

7275 

7275 

+-.10 

83X0 

68X0 

Mar 

7135 

71X5 

69X5 

6991 

— 28 

8275 

6690 

Apr 

*690 

*9.10 

<7X0 

£7X5 

—AO 

82X0 

6620 

May 

<790 

<795 

<690 

<690 

—AD 

76*0 

46» 

Jun 

£720 

*7 JO 

<640 

*640 

—78 

6650 

75X0 

Est. Sales 

*650 

7520 

Jul 

Dec 

Prev.Sotes 13.125 


6695 

7220 

—JO 
— JD 


Prev. Dov Open Int. 23X08 off 903 
CRUDE OiLOtYMS) 

1X00 bt>].- dollars per btoL 

71-50 25.15 Feb 7S75 250* 25X1 25X8 ^XB 

31-30 25.1* Mar 2SJ0 2558 25X6 25J1 — X9 

31X5 25.10 APT 2531 2535 2i44 25X9 — JJS 

30.28 25.10 MOV 2535 2SX8 25X0 25X6 —M 

29X5 25X5 Jun 7530 2SX4 2SX5 25X6 — X3 

29J4 2400 Jul 25X7 2SX2 25X5 25X6 — X2 

29S7 2SX7 Auo 2SX6 2132 25X6 25X6 —X? 

29 JO 25.16 Sep 25X6 25X6 25X6 25X6 -XI 

29 JO 2630 Oct 2SX* —XI 

29-50 2SJn Nov 25X9 25X9 2SX9 25X6 —XI 

29X0 25.15 Dec 25X6 —XI 

29X6 29X6 Fob 25X6 —XI 

29X5 29X5 Mar 25X6 -XI 

29X5 25.10 Apr 2SX6 —XI 

27 JO 27 JO May 25X6 —XI 

2&7D 2*30 Jun 25X6 —XI 

Jan 2SX6 —XI 

Est. Sates Prev. Sates 21423 

Prev. Day Open Int. 53X07 us 738 


Stock Indexes 


SP COMP. INDEX (CME} 
points and cents 

100-25 153-30 Mar 1*6.95 1*7*0 

18070 156.10 Jun 16905 170*0 

183.90 14000 Sea 

17720 17720 Dec 17300 173.90 

EsL Sales 49 JOS Prev.Sotes 59X42 
Prev. Dav Open Int. 38J41 off 1.177 
VALUE LINE (KCBT1 
points and cents 

19420 1*8.10 Mar 181X0 18230 

197X0 77X00 Jun 105X0 105X0 

199X5 18535 Sen 

Est. Sales Prev.Sotes 3XS9 

pm. Day Open InL 4.160 off 34 

NYSE COMP. INDEX (NYFE) 
points and cents 

10X80 8820 MOT 96X0 96X0 

105X0 90X0 Jun 9820 9820 

105J0 9725 Sep 100X5 WL25 

1(0X0 101-20 Dec 101X5 101X5 

Est. Sales nasi Prev. sates 11X03 
Prev. Dav Open 1 nt. 6X02 up 271 


T667S 

1*685 

-38 

169 JO 

169 JD 

—70 


172XS 

—.15 

17370 

17390 

—.10 

18135 

18270 

+7S 

18520 

78&8S 

+20 


187.95 

+80 

9605 

96X0 

—as 

9720 

961D 

—.10 

9975 

9980 

—.15 

101X5 

101 JD 

—JO 


Commodify indexes 


Moody's. 

Rasters. 

DJ. Futures. 


Close Previous 

96050 1 955.10 f 

1,92260 1,9 ISM 

123.12 12409 

Com. Research Bureau. 242J0 24170 

Moody's : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1931. 
a - orelimlnarv; t - final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. 18. 1931. 

Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec. 31. 1974. 


Market Guide 


CAT: Chlcase Board o< Trod* 

CME: Chlcaao Mercantile Eatoiw 

IMM; Infemattanal Monetary Merkel 

Ot ChJefto* Mercantile Exchpnm 
NYCSCE: New York Cacao. Sugar. Caftaa Exctange 

NYCE: New York Cation Exchange 

COM EX: cammodHy Evcnonge. New Ym* 

MYME: New York Marcnnillo EtKAanaa 

KCBT: Kansas City Boom at Trade 

NYFE; New York Futures Exchange 


LeutoJcUer, Ex-BIS President, 
Named an Adviser to Robeco 


By Brenda Hagerty 

Inierrwurmal Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Fric Leutwikr 
has become an adviser to Robeco 
Group, the Rotterdam-based inter- 
national investment trust. 

Mr. Leutwder. 60, moved at the 
beginning of this year from the 
presidency of both the Bank for 
International Settlements and the 
Swiss National Bank to head the 
Swiss engineering concern BBC 
Brown, Boveri & Co. 

in tbe past few years. Robeco has 
recruited advisers from several 
countries. Others are Yusuke 
Kashiwagi, chairman of Bank of 
Tokyo: Robert S. McNamara, for- 
mer president of the World Bank 
and U.S. secretary of defense, and 
Guido Carli, former governor of 
the Bank of Italy. 

Citibank has appointed Henri 
Jacquand as corporate officer for 
France, succeeding Francesco 
RedL Mr. Jacouand moves to Paris 
from the bank's New York head 
office, where be served as chief of 


staff and financial controller for 
the Europe/ Middle East and Afri- 
ca banking group. Mr. Redi will go 
to New York as head of the trea- 
sury division. North America 
banking group. 

Mitsui Finance International 
Lid, the London-based merchant 
banking subsidiary of Mitsui Bank 
Ltd. of Tokyo, said David K. Dodd 
has joined the bank as a deputy 
managing director. He wfll be pri- 
marily responsible for Mitsui Fi- 
nance's corporate finance, syndica- 
tions, sales and trading activities 
and to help in expanding the bank's 
business. Mr. Dodd had been with 
Merrill Lynch, New York, and 
most recently with County Bank, 
the merchant-banking aim of Na- 
tional Westminster Bank PLC of 
London. 

Baring Far East Seasides Ltd. 
has named R. Diarmaid A. Kelly a 
director. Mr. Kelly, who had been 
an assistant director, is based in. 
London. Baring Far East is a Lon- 
don-based securities concern in 
which the merchant bank. Baring 


Brothers & Co. of London, bolds a 
majority. 

Morgan Grenfell &. Co, the Lon- 
don-based merchant bank, has 
named Robert Binyon. Michael 
Bullock, Michael Dobson, Keith 
Harris, Christopher Knight, Rob- 
ert Shrager and J. Stephen Syreit to 
its board. 

Rio Unto Zinc Corn* the British 


mining and industrial group, said 
Peter H. Dean will be retiring from 
its boad on March 31 to concen- 
trate on other interests. Mr. Dean is 
a pan-lime member of Britain's 
Monopolies and Mergers Commis- 
sion and a non-executive director 
of Associated British Ports Hold- 
ings PLC. 

Electro-Nucleonics Inc. said 
Lord John Jacob As tor of Hever, a 
businessman and member of the 
House of Lords, was elected a di- 
rector. Sectro-Nucleonics, which 
is based in Fairfield. New Jersey, 
develops and makes medical diag- 
nostic instrument systems. 

Monument Oil & Gas PLC has 
appointed W.N. Scott a non-ex ecu- 
uve director. He recently retired 
from Royal Dutch/SheD Group, 
where he bad been regional coordi- 
nator for the Western hemisphere, 
and a director of Shell Internation- 
al Petroleum. 



Frans van den Haven, former 
chairman of Umtever NY, has 
been elected {Resident of the In- 
ternational Chamber of Com- 
merce, winefa has headquarters in 
Paris. He replaces Francois 
Ceyrac, a former bead of the 
French employers' association. 


Curbing Korea’s Big Conglomerates Risks, Profits 

On Plantation 


(Continued from Page 9) 
percent of South Korea’s gross na- 
tional product and 70 percent of 
the country's total exports. The 
leading conglomerates — Hyundai 
Daewoo. Samsung Sunkyong, and 
Lucky-Goldslar — all have more 
than 20 subsidiaries each. 

Korea's conglomerates are usu- 
ally organized around one flagship 
company that controls and owns 
stock in the other companies. 

This contrasts with the typical 
Japanese conglomerate, which con- 
sists of a group of businesses shar- 
ing dose ties and affiliation with 
one bank, but not ownership. 
Among these are Mitsubishi, Sumi- 
tomo and Mitsui. 

The U.S. conglomerate, mean- 
while, typically comprises one par- 
ent company that owns unrelated 
and autonomous businesses. 
Among the largest are Textron, 
Gulf & Western Industries and 
ITT. 

Opposition politicians have at- 
tacked South Korea's conglomer- 
ates and the government for help- 
ing them grow. But the 
government's own economists also 
have criticized the conglomerates 
for borrowing excessively to fi- 
nance expansion, for buying or 
squeezing out small and medium- 
sized companies and for high 
prices. 

Anh Seung-cheol president of 
the government-financed Korea 


lopi 

the early stage of development, the 
government actually subsidized big 
companies. This produced unfair 
trade practices, price maneuvering 
and collusion in the domestic mar- 
ket." 

Koo Bohn-Young, senior coun- 
selor to the deputy prime minister, 
offered several examples: 

• Hyundai, which constructs 
apartment buildings, has begun to 
offer built-in furniture with the 
apartments, threatening small fur- 
niture makers. 

• One conglomerate that owns an 
interest in the Silla Hotel in Seoul 
promoted spinoff bakeries, which 
undercut small bakeries. 

• Finally, be said, tbe control of 
conglomerates over their own com- 
ponents suppliers prevented the 
growth of an internationally com- 
petitive components industry. 

In their defense, corporate lead- 
ers such as Kim Leon, president of 
Daewoo Electronics Co„ point out 
that tbe government itself encour- 
aged them to acquire new business- 
es and that they need to be big to 
compete overseas. 

They add that all conglomerates 
are not alike. Daewoo executives, 
for example, stress that their com- 
pany is not dominated by one fam- 
ily, as are some others. And they 
deny unfair marketing practices. 

Kang Jin Ku, president of Sam- 
sung Semiconductor & Telecom- 


munications Co., said: “If they re- 
strict us, Korea's overall worldwide 
competitiveness will be lowered. As 
for small companies, many supply 
big companies with components. 
Without a locomotive pulling 
them, bow will they survive?' 

Thus, the conglomerates present 
government economists with a tick- 
lish problem: how to check such 
market domination without hurt- 
ing the economic growth that these 
companies made possible. 

According to Mr. Koo. Seoul has 
taken several steps in recent 
months to curb the conglomerates’ 
growth. 

These include a directive to com- 
mercial banks to restrict loans to 
them; a prohibition on members of 
the same group from lending mon- 
ey to each other for expansion, and 
directing loans and tax breaks to 
small and medium-sized compa- 
nies. 

Another program to open up 
South Korea's domestic market to 
imports is aimed, in part, at forcing 
tbe conglomerates to increase effi- 
ciency and slash prices at home 
through increased foreign competi- 
tion. 

By most accounts, the govern- 
ment measures have not been very 
effective. ' 

Kim Manh Je. the minister of 
finance, concedes that the “degree 
of concentration is increasing rath- 
er rapidly.'’ 


(Continued from Page 9) 
oil was a staple food, and therefore 
that it could apply a 1967 regula- 
tion that requires foreign-oeld 
companies that have operated in 
Indonesia for 10 years to be con- 
trolled by Indonesian interests. 

“We will not apply it strictly/ 1 
says an economic officer with the 
Indonesian Embassy in Washing- 
ton. “They could stw have a major- 
ity share until the government 
thought it timely to give the major- 
ity to Indonesians." 

Diversification, however, also 
has its dangers. For instance, ac- 
cording to Laurence. Prust & Co„ 
after Harrisons & Crosfield sold its 
majority ownership to Malaysian 
interests, its stock performed poor- 
ly compared with the London mar- 
ket average in 19S3. But London 
stock brokers expect the company 
shares to recover in the future. 

The SOCFfN group, whose 
plantation shares on most markets 
doubled last year, still derives most 
bf its profits from its plantation 
business. “We are palm oil produc ; 
ers and we want to stay as produc- 
ers by reinvesting locally and up- 
grading our plantings,” says 
Philippe Fabri, Hubert Fabri's fa- 
ther and an officer in the SOCFIN 
group. 






TIMES WERE 


MEANT FOR KENT 


^ The Good Taste from America. 

\ 







I 


liiesda>£ 

Ml 


Cbsmg 


VoLaMPJH. 
Prev. 4 PJA. v 


Tables Include the nationwide Pric 
up to Hie closing an Wall Street 


17% lift CD I s 


10 IS* 15% 15*+-% 


13ft 

9ft CUB 

job 2.1 

9 




9ft 4- % 

9* 







7* 

7ft 4% 

22ft 

i3ft ciis 

J4 

22 

15 

10 

15ft 

15* 

75*— ft 

19* 

9ft CdBSNJ 



in 

40 

10ft 

9* 

9*— % 


3% Coe lie a 



8 

2 

8% 

8% 

8ft 4 H 

13% 

10 C0IRE 

IJ4 104 

13 

11 

lift 

11* 

11*4 ft 

25 

18% Cfllmln 


3 a 

22 

46 

19* 

19ft 

19*— * 

10 

7% Cal prop 

jotiao 

3 

1 

8 

8 

8 — H 


9ft Cameo 

32 

2 A 

10 

12 

12* 

12* 

12*4% 


lr.Mpnm 

■an Lam 'rod 


2% 2% 7*— ft 


23% 

13* CMarcn JS 


178 

Wft 

14 

14ft 


25* CWbM 



32* 



6* 

4% Cardin 


16 

5 

5 

9 






2* 


11% 

7* CareB 

13 

6 

8* 

Uft 

Bft— .M 

11* 


16 

6 


Sft 

Bft 

43* 

36 CaraP pf SSfJ UJ 


2001 42% 41 

42% 42% 


1ft KopOkC 2 B 2% 2% 2* + ft 

10 KovCP JO 1J 18 5 12% 13 12 

9* KearNn ^0 U 7 7 lift 11% lift + % 

3 Kmtm 18 9 3ft 3ft 3ft 

10ft KeMitn SU 14 31 IIS T7 lift lift 

5ft K*YCo 3 11 » fll 6'i ift + ft 

8 KevPti JO 20 16 W7 10 9% Oft— ft 

2ft KlOdewt 26 2ft 2% 2ft 

3% KJrwrfc 9 9 4ft 4% 4% + % 

18ft KlngR JO S 23 <2 37ft 37% 37ft 

3 KJrtrv 146 3ft 3ft 3ft 

7ft KMerV • JBr X 44 3ft 3ft 3ft— ft 

Bft Kiiobd 14 20 lift lift lift— ft 

Bib KilMl 13 71 lift lift lift— ft 

71 KOO0TC 2J0 88147 126 25ft 24ft 25 + ft 


8ft 3U> CoSMon X6t 166 
17ft 14ft Cost I A 5 m 38 
1ft ft Center* 

2 1ft Centl of 
27ft 20ft CenMpf 3X0 148 
left 11 CentSe uoelM 
lift 6ft Cetec JO 28 
5ft 2va ChmoH 
17ft 12ft CftnpP 32 5J 
34 lift ChrtMA JO -7 
33 lift Chrtma JO J 
19ft 14ft ChlRv 1 JO 6X 
15 9* CMDvg 


k5 4 16 4 4 4 + ft 

US 1 15ft 15ft 15ft 
2 111 
2 1ft 1ft 1ft + ft 
18 50* 23ft 23ft 23ft— ft 

LO 60 13ft 12ft 13ft + ft 

U 9 24 7ft 7 7ft 

14 364 3U 3ft 3ft + ft 

U II 2 13ft 13ft 13ft + ft 

J 17 279 3Kb 29ft 30ft + ft 

3 17 IS 30ft 29 33ft +1* 

L6 10 6 18ft IBft 18ft 

22 10ft 10ft 10ft 


20* 




19 

82 

IB* 

18 

18ft— ft 

16* 




6 

373 

16 

15% 

16 4 « 

27* 



9 

55 

Z7* 

26* 

27*41 

38ft 

27* CIIFstpf 250 

63 


2 

40 

39% 

40 +2 

38% 

28% Oarml 

1.45b 3.9 


33 

36* 

36% 

36* 4 * 

9ft 

6* ClarxC 

J8c 14 

7 

2 

8% 

8ft 

Bft— ft 

34ft 

21 ft C la rod 

JVC 23 

10 

20 

30* 

30 

30* 4 ft 









18* + ft 

12% 





127 

6 

5* 

5ft 4 ft 

UP« 


JO 

24 

8 

1 

744 

7* 

7*4 ft 

4 





21 

3* 

3% 

1ft 

15* 

8 Comfd n 



3 

S3 

12* 

12 

12*41% 

16* 





5 


8g <JJ4% 

5* 

% ComdrC 




177 

* 

11* 


JO 

22 

8 

74 

9 

8* 

9 — ft 

12* 

6ft ComnD 



78 

34 

7* 

7% 

7*4 ft 


i9ft 7ft cmpCn li 772 ii mb left— ft 

9ft 5ft CmpFci 26 98 7ft 7 7ft + ft 

22 lift Cndun JO* 33 9 9 15ft 15 15 — ft 

121a 6ft ConcdF 5 30 9ft 9ft 9ft 

18 12 Conrtfm 7 34 1 7ft 17 171b 

lift 5ft Concjj} 35 79 6 5ft 5ft— ft 

7ft 2 Commit 29 2 1ft 2 

lift 8ft ConsOG 4 51 8ft 8ft 8ft— ft 

9ft 4ft vICantA 381 9ft 9ft 9ft + ft 

lift 5ft VlCntApf 75 lift lift lift + ft 

34ft 12ft ConIMfl 7 16 18ft 18ft 1Mb + ft 

14ft 8 Cook Ini JDe 35283 3 14ft 14ft 74ft— ft 

4ft U Corodtan 248 1ft % 1 

10ft 5ft CntCrd J4r 17 18 13 6ft 6ft 6ft— ft 

2ft lftCourtld Me 33 5902 Vn 1ft Ift 4- ft 

lift 7ft CrstFO .15* 1-7 8 10 8ft Oft 8ft 

32ft 23ft Crass 1J2 4.9 13 23 26ft 26ft 36ft 

22% 10% CinCP 72 18 10 W — ft 


12ft 

6* ConcdF 

5 

30 

9ft 

9ft 

18 

12 ConrHm 

7 

34 

17ft 

17 

11* 

5% Cana* 

35 

79 

6 

5* 

7% 

2 Caeviwt 


29 

2 

1* 

11* 

Sft ConsOG 

4 

51 

8* 

8ft 

9* 

4ft vICantA 


381 

9% 

9* 


3 

1ft L8B 




5 

Ift 

1* 

1ft— % 

4* 

2% LaBaro 

J6 

22 


9 

2* 

2* 

2* 

7ft 

2* LaPnt 



7 

16 

5% 

Sft 

Sft— ft 

41ft 

23ft Lakes D 

.15* 



45 

24* 

24ft 

24% — % 

14* 

11* uidBnn 

J4 

38 

10 

2 

14* 

14* 

14*4- % 

17ft 

11 Ldmks 

-16a 1J 


125 

17% 

16 

14 —1ft 

17* 

9% Laser 



36 

It 

10* 

10* 

10%+ % 

18* 

8* Loumn 




31 

10* 

10% 

10% 

3* 

2ft LaePti 



11 

16 

2* 

2ft 

2ft— % 

44% 

35* Led lull 



14 

4 

42% 

42 

42%+ % 

Sft 

3* LetaurT 



21 

92 

5 

4* 

5 + ft 

4* 

1* Lodue 




13 

2ft 

2% 

2ft 

31 

11 Loalcon 

JO 

8 

16 

73 

24* 

34% 

24* 

35 

20 Lorlmr' 



16 

614 

30* 

30% 

30*+ ft 

70% 

31* Lou SC* 

1JM 

IX 

20 

3 

70* 

70* 

Til* + ft 

31* 

8* Lwnw 

JOB 

8 

17 

47 

13* 

Uft 

13%— ft 

12* 

6% LundvE 



17 

135 

10 

9* 

9*— ft 

16* 

10ft Lucia 

XI t 21 

10 

104 

Uft 

12* 

13% 

Uft 

9* Lvdals 



4 

2 

12* 

12V. 

12* + ft 

26* 

12* LvnCSv 

.10 

X 

IB 

79 

26* 

26ft 

26ft— * 

10ft 

B* LvnctiC 

JO 

21 

15 

6 

9* 

9* 

9* 


* 




18V. 8 CrCPD 

28ft li CwCPpf 152 H J 
14ft Oft Crownl JB Z3 
4ft 1 CrutcR 
17 2ft CryslO 
27ft 13ft Cubic J? 24 

SB 21ft CurtJce JO 10 
9ft ft CustEn 


18 13 6ft 6ft ift— ft 

5902 1ft Ift Ift + ft 

8 10 8H 8ft 8ft 

13 23 26ft 26ft 26* 

72 18 10 W — ft 

7 8 7ft 7ft— ft 

7 17ft 17ft T7ft 

7 9 12ft 12 12ft + ft 

3 42 1ft 1ft 1ft 

28X1 2ft 2ft 2ft 

9 693 lift 15ft 161b +1 

10 45 26ft 26ft 26ft— ft 

17 ft ft ft +h 


♦. 


801128 

8 

?4 

7% 

2ft 

2* 


82 

1J 

8 

3 

34* 

24* 

24* 

- ft 



3 

00 

4% 

4ft 

4* 

+ % 

280 

128 


4k 20ft 

TO 

20 

175 

18.4 


1 

20* 

20ft 

70* 


.16 

1.1 


AS? 

14* 

14 






7 

4* 

4* 





B 

4 

Sft 

5% 

5* 


1X8 

12.1 

B 

6 

13* 

13% 

U%— M 




282 

2* 

2% 


J3I 

5.1 

10 

6 

4% 

4% 

4%- 

- ft 

521 1U 

14 

23 

7% 

7% 

7% 



8 

6 

Uft 

Uft 





IS 

81 

7ft 

6* 

6*- 




15 

24 

6* 

6* 


- ft 

JO 

20 


1 

9* 

9% 






3 

2% 

2% 

2M 


JO 

S 

13 

388 

38 

36% 

37* +1% 



7 

11 

4% 

3* 

4 


.17* 

24 

10 

5 

7 

6* 

7 





475 

m 

lS 

In— Ki 




310 

25% 

75ft 

25% 





29 

7* 

9* 

9*- 

■ Mi 




37 

Ift 

1ft 

1ft- 




26 

10 

73ft 

23% 

23ft— M 

JO 

11 

25 

73 

MK7 

26% 

* 

25* 

ft 


XOn 

10 

13 

25 

13* 

Uft 

18* 


J5r 

32 

12 

74 

11* 

11 

lift- 


80 

A3 

• 

16 

1BV, 

18% 

18ft— % 


7ft 7ft 
1Z% 12ft 
72ft 121b 
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Thismcban^^ notleaveyoumdiaiiged 


Ronda is haumed. A snail city, an hour's drive Iran sneers sain Sovilk. 

SLS® 8 ]?? ^ a soaring rod above a gentle, k u-as here, at the difT where the park ends, that an 

lemfc vaDcy. Its principal bugn&s is the making of inddem look pbee thai ins p ire d Hemingway iq write 
“8®*“- "For Wfioni the Befl Tcdbr 

.j J. w 11 * ^ ^ took And it was here flat the classic an of buflfwlnim 

pact, long before Bizet heard of it, and made it into cm foot with cape and sword was invented by Francisco 


Romero more than two centuries ago. 

The mystery of that art is e nshrined in the bull 
of Ronda, one of the oldest in Spain. Ronda is ham 


Inside the bridge, in an arched stone tavern that once 
was a prison, you can at In cod peace and enjoy the 
famous ham of the town, washed down with a light red 


and you will I fed die brush of the spirits' wings at the wine, but you wfll still sense the ghosts of ihetetesid 
Moorish Baths and on the ancient bridge that spans a makers. 


And they will not leave you unchanged. 


C 5 fg /1 


Spain. Everything under the 








































Over-the-Counter 


NASDAQ Nottonot Market Prices 


BBOO 

200 

47 

138 42V. 

41ft 

42fa 





276 lft 

1% 

1*— V 


BlWCb 

.180 IX 

69 Aft 

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BPISV 



113 2* 

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BRCom 



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BdnIC 

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BottScp 



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Boncoki 

.90 

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18 

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127 26% 26* 26% 

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49 17ft Ufa 17ft— * 
55 7ft 7ft 7ft— fa 
239 3ft 2ft 3ft 
■322 23ft 22 +1 
164 22V. 22 22ft + ft 
27 6% 6ft 6ft- ft 
4435% 3Sft 35ft 
22 43ft 43ft 43ft 
11 4ft 4ft 4ft + ft 
■9920ft 19% 20ft + ft 

4 wft reft 10% + % 
941 6ft 5ft 616 + ft 
32216ft 15ft 15* + ft 
952 9 Oft Oft— ft 
4 7ft 7ft 7ft— fa 
W 10 17Ml 17ft— ft 
3 20 X a 
16420* M 30%— fa 
57 4ft 4* 4ft + fa 
105 18% 18ft 1M + ft 
1 4ft 4ft 4ft- ft 
2020ft 20U 20fa+ fa 
95 9ft 0% 9ft + fa 
1534% 34fa 34%+ fa 
JB 4ft 4fa 4ft + ft 
mm 17 17 — » 

48 5 4* 4* 

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3 7 6ft 7 + fa 


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190 2* 

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119 3ft 

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3 8 

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309 9ft 
745 3* 
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200 1% 
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47 Oft 

3072 48ft 
227 Aft 
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I 64016% 
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169 Mb 
165 1% 
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Ole J 640 4 
1692 9ft 
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33 13ft 
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34 A 
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29% 29% — ft 
18 IB — % 
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A* 7 — ft 

st sr* 

7% 7* 

20Vi 20% 

14ft Uft + ft 


15% 14 + ft 

4ft 4ft 
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M |4ft 
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A* Aft— fa 
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44% 44% 

X% 35ft— lft 
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9ft 9ft 
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27% 27% 

5ft 5ft— % 
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26 

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1521 20% 

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110 14 13% 

100 25% 25 
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60 0 7% 

333535% 3£ft 
454 8ft 7ft 
125 1 DM 10 
377 Jft 9fa 
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153 29b 2ft 
160 19 10% 

477 23% 23ft 
A 7ft 7ft 
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21 +« 
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45ft 
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1006 4 3* 4 

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la 39 10331ft 31% 31ft + ft 

a 5 4% 4% 

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122 1* 1* lft— ft 

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Fujitsu Upgrades 
Supercomputer 

Rouen 

TOKYO — Fujitsu Lid. said 
Tuesday that hardware improve- 
ments have enabled it to develop 


QMS 4 

15312* 

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12* 

Quodrx 

168 4ft 

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QuakrC 

M 33 IX 

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VL1 


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A company 


LDBmk 

1_JN 

LSI Log 

LTX 

LaPilti 

LaZBy 

LadFm 

LakOw 

LomaT 

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Lily Tul 

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34 •% lft 
172 4% 59b 
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700 Wb 18ft 

93 Ufa 14ft 
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150 15% 15 
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40 200 20% 
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HBO> -14 10 016% Uft 16% 

HCC 06« 0 5 7% 7« Tfa 

HCW .10 20 7 Sft 5ft Sft 

HMOAm 109 9% ■> 9ft— * 

HOtMTS 135 12% 12ft 12% 

Hodson 11 2% 2 2 — ft 

HolaSy l 5ft Sft 5ft— % 

Hnbnl 88 1% lft Ifa +* 

Human .10 3 5*14 13* *4 


IF YOU GET A (OCX 
OUT OF SOCCS?, READ 




WTONESDAY5 IN THE tHT 


New Issue 


on reported 


This advertisement appears as a matter of record only. 


okesman said the 
of the computer 


ence and Technology Agency. 

He said the supercomputer's op- 
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capacity of Fujitsu's current best 
computers, which can perform 250 
million to 500 milli on operations a 
second. He said the company ex- 
pects an order for its supercom- 
puter later this year but gave no 
further 


Taiwan Records Price Drops 

Reuters 

TAIPEI — Taiwan’s consumer 
prices dropped 0.48 percent and its 
wholesale prices fell 0.24 percent in 
December from the previous 
month, the government reported 
Tuesday. Year-to-year, consumer 
prices rose 1.66 percent in Decem- 
ber while wholesale prices fell 0.60 
percent. 


January 8, 1985 


c 


Nippon Shinpan Co., Ltd. 

Tokyo, Japan 

DM 200000000 
yu % Bearer Bonds 1985/1990 
with Warrants attached 

to subscribe for shares of Common Stock of 
Nippon Sftfnpan Co~, Ltd, Tokyo 

unconditionally and irrevocably guaranteed by 

The Sanwa Bank, Limited 

Osaka, Japan 
Offering Price: 100 % 


Dresdner Bank 

Aktiengeseilsctiaft 


Banque Paribas Capital Markets 


DaHchl Europe 

Limited 

LTCB International 

Unified 

New Japan Securities Europe 

Limited 

Sanwa International 

Limited 


ABO Securities Corporation 
Aigemene Bank Nederland N.V. 

Amro Inte rn atio n al Umitad 
Banea del Gottardo 
BankAnwrfca Capital Markets Group 
Bank tor Gcmehiwtotschatt 
AkttengeaeSaetiaft 
Bank of Tokyo International Umftad 
Bankers Trust International Limited 
Banque BnueBes Lambert SJL 
Basque B u pa l ae du Commerce Eaddriote 
Banque Internationale h Luxemboug SA. 
Banque Nationals da Pads 
Banque Popdobc Sidsee SJL Luxembourg 
Barclays Bank Group 
Bating Brothers A Co, Umitad 
Bayedache Hypothekem- und 
We c haeJ B ank AfcMangeaellschaft 
Bayerioehe Landubenk Girosentrale 
Joh. Berenberg, Goesier & Co. 

Betfiner Bank AkBeng eaad s ch aft 
Catsae dee Depdts at Coadgaadona 
Caiase NaUonale da CrMt Agricola 
Centnde Rabobank 
Chemlcri Bank inte rn atio na l Group 
Commeizbank AkUengeeaBcchaft 
County Bank Limited 


Beriiner Handels- 
und Frankfurter Bank 


Bayeriscbe Vereinsbank 

AktiengeseUschan 

Deutsche Bank 

McttanBesetlsctiatt 

Merrill Lynch Capital Markets 


Nomura International 

UmHed 

Tokai International 

Limited 


Cridt Lyonnais 

DaHchl Kangyo International Limited 
Dan norske Credhhank 
Deutsche Gkozentrale 
- Deutsche Komnumafbank - 
DG Bank Deutsche Ganosaensehaftabank 
Effcctenbenk-Wartnitg Aktlenfle8eflschafi 
Hambros Bank Limited 
Georg Heuek A Sohn Banklars 
KomanwKfitgesellschaft auf Aktten 
Hessische Landasbank - Gbozentrale - 
Imhnbiebank von Japan (Deutschland) 
AkfiengeneUschaK 
Kfebiwort, Benson Limited 
Krediatbarik SJL Luxembourgeoise 
Landesbank Rhataland-Pfaiz 
' -Ghnzentrate- 
Manufacturers Hanover Limited 
Merck, Hnck&Ca 
B. Metzler seeL Sohn & Co. 

Mitsubishi Finance international Umitad 
Morgan GrenfaB & Co. Lhntted 
The NftkD Securities Ccl, (Europe) Ltd. 
Nippon Credit International (HK) Ltd. 
Mppon Kangyo Kakumaiu (Europe) 
Limited 


Daiwa Europe Limited 


Crerfit Suisse Rrst Boston 

Limited 

Fuji International finance 

Limited 

Morgan Stanley International 


N. M. Rothschild & Sons 

Limited 

Union Bank of Switzerland 
(Securities) 

Limited 

Nordrfeutsche landesbank Gcrozentrale 
Nuovo Banco Ambrosiano 
6steneichische LSndetbank 
AktiangeseBschaft 
Sal. Oppanheim jr. A Cte. 

Orion Royal Bo* Limited 

Postipankki 

ReuschelACo. 

J. Henry Schroder Wagg & Co. Limited 
Smith Barney, Harris Upham & Co. 

Incorporated 
SocMte Generate 
SocNtt Gdndrata de Banque SJL 
Sumitomo Finance IntemsHonal 
Sumitomo Trust IntL Ltd. 

Toyo Dust intemaHonal Limited 
Trinkaus & Burkhardt 
Vaband Schweizerischer Kantonaibanken 
Verefcis- und Westbank Akdengeseltschaft 
M. M. Warinirg-Brinckmaim, Wktz A Co. 
Weatdeutache Genossenadiafts- 
Zentraibank e.G. 

Weatdeutache Landesbank Girozentrale 
Wood Gundy Inc. 

Yamafchi International (Europe) Limited 
Yaauda Trust Europe Limited 

























































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Page 14 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9. 1985 


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PEANUTS 


EXPLAIN BUS, IF VDU CAN, 
CHOCK ..EVERYONE IN OUK 
[CLASS HAP TO WRITE AN 
ESSAY ON WHAT WE PIP 
PURIN6 CHRISTMAS VACATION 

K 



WHEN I GOT MINE BACK, 
THE TEACHER HAP GIVEN 
ME A "P MINUS.".. WELL. 
I'M USED TO THAT, RIGHT, 
CHUCK? RIGHT! 



NOW. GUESS WHAT..ALL 
I7H0SE ESSAY5 WENT INTO 
A CITY E55AY CONTEST, ANP I 
X WON! EXPLAIN THAT OWCKl 



Ii- i - 


NEVER LISTEN TC 
THE REVIEWEK5 



BOOKS 


JITTERBUG PERFUME 


By Tom Robbins. 320pp. SI 5.95. 
Baniam, 666 Fifth Avenue, 

Sew York, S. Y. 10103. 

Reviewed bv Don Scrachen 


BLOND IE 


T OM ROBBINS’S first novel “Another 
Roadside Attraction,” was refreshingly 


ACROSS 


1 Boys 

5 A power source 

10 Secure' 

14 French 
violinist: 18th 
century 

15 Ling-Ling, e.g. 

16 Partof Q.E.D. 

17 Notion 

18 Norse sagas 

19 About: Abbr. 

20 Part of a 
drummer’s 
gear 

22 Egyptian 
monarch 

24 West role 

25 Metric unit 

26A.S.A.P. 

30 Hampers 

34 For each 

35 Luftwaffe, to 
R.A.F. 

37 Glacial block 
of ice 

38 State or lake 

40 Opera hat 

42 Prima donna 

43 Stone worker 

45 Replacement 

parts for a 
cobbler 

47 Wax: Comb, 
form 

48 Resins used in 
varnish 


50 Summer 
beverage 

52 Milky gems 

54 Anger 

55 Part of a 
signature 

58 Everlasting 

62 Playing card 

63 Vinegary: 
Comb, form 

65 Weathercock 

66 First rib-loser 

67 Type of type 

68 Sicilian 
volcano 

69 Potential 
blooms 

70 Anoint, old 
style 

71 Rise sharply 

DOWN 


13 Engrave with 
add 

21 White House 
figure 

23 Hellenic hawk 

25 Emblems 

26 Froth 

27 Corolla part 

28 Expunge 



BEETLE BAILEY 


29 Garlands 

31 Heath 

32 Was delirious 

33 Frighten 

38 Hobday season 

39 This puzzle 
has three 
sets of — - 


1 Secular 

2 Griffith or 
Williams 

3 Judge 

4 Nativity site 

5 Kind of bee 

6 Bits 

7 Finish 

8 Make suitable 

9 Like some hot 
potatoes 

19 Hidden 

11 Cherubini 
creation 

12 Gambling 
game 


41 Musical half 
step 

44 Palm or liquor 
46 Painful 
49 Maple fruit 
51 Hysteria 
53 Ecole 
assignment 

55 Stiletto thrust 

56 Indie language 

57 Peruse 

58 Relative of etc. 
58 Defense 

acronym 

69 Ballerina 
Pavlova 

61 He was “every 
inch a king” 

64 Scottish unde 


SEN. HALFTRACK 
JUST PUT HIS AILING 
PUTTER OUT OF 
ITS MISERY ^ 



ANDY CAPP 


AKIM'S nwrrH> US 

FOR TE A, PET, IF YOU'RE 
INTERESTED — 


C'M5C 


'NOTHING PERSONAL. HBZGO&\ IS 
ICO UNCOMFORTABLE TO STRETCH 
OUTCJN, AND OURS IS TOO -< 
— COWORTASLE 
TO GET 



blithesome, a rollicking collage of Joycean ver- 
bal cornucopia, Brautiganian diamond- like 
sentences and Fiddingesque joie de vivre — 
until it lapsed into a preachy, comatose coda 

His second. “Even Cowgirls Get the Blues.” 
if rough, unleashed a soaring comic spirit and 
hit the best-seller chans. "Still Lifewidi Wood- 
pecker” was only slightly less buoyant and 
finally pulled a story tightly together. With 
“Jitterbug Perfume.” Robbins has truly ar- 
rived. 

"Perfume” is still less exuberant than “Cow- 
girls” — that’s one of those magicaL one-time 
books like “Catch- 22.” whose sheer brilliance 
si earn rolls over its excesses. Bur “Perfume” is 
less diminished than boned. The author may 
still occasionally stick his foot in the door of 
his mouth, as he would say in one of those 
metaphors he loves to mix with wordplay sal- 
ads. but then he’ll unfurl a phrase that wEB 
bring your critical mind to its knees: "... his 
latest beard flying in the wind like a nauseated 
Chinaman losing his birds-nest soup.” 

The plot: Beets mysteriously appear at the 
respective doors of perfumers in New Orleans 
and Paris and a genius waitress in Seattle. 
Meanwhile, in the 10th century, a monarch 
challenges death and launches but on a pro- 
found and pungent odyssey. King Alobar is 
Robbins's finest character to date, less hilari- 
ous but more fully- rounded than "Cowgirls’” 
Sissy Hankshaw. After his differently but 
equally well-rounded wife Kudra crosses over 
to the Other Side. Alobar takes up with Lhe god 
Pan. reduced to a shadow of hrs former self 
since the Christians turned him into Satan. 
Like the multiple tails of Borelly’s Comet, the 
multiple tales of .Alobar and the three beet 
recipients come to a head. 

And then there’s the founder of the Last 
Laugh Foundation. Wiggs Dannyboy — a 
. Dannvboy. like Alo- 


si miles often entertain more than they evokff: 
“His knuckles began rapping at his eye patch 
like a mongcloid woodpecker drilling for 
worms in a poker chip.” 

“Perfume” is also about immortality, about 
life and death, about the evolution of con- 
sciousness. and first and last, about beets. 
Paradoxically, its most penetrating vegetable 
observation regards the onion, which “has as, 
many pages as “War and Peace,' every one of 
which is poignant enough to make a strong 
man weak.” 




tfilhri 


But peel an onion and what do you have?, 
ery one of "Perfume’s” pages has enough' 


Every 


befly laughs to reduce .Arnold Sc&waizenegger. 
to jelly. fVs a rich artichoke of a book: Ped h 


away and it’s all heart. 


Don Sirachen , a freelance reviewer, * rote this 
review for the Los Angeles Times. 1 


BEST SELLERS 


Hie New Yovk ' 

Tins Hu is based on rawns from more than 2JOOD bookstores 
throughout the United States. Woks on fist ire not necessarily, 


T 14 
We* 


FICTION 


lan Wetta 
Week oo Ui 


THE TALISMAN, by Stephen Ring and 
Peter Straub . 


THE SICILIAN, by Mario Puzo 


LOVE AND WAR. by John Jakes 
THE LIFE AND HARD 


TIMES OF HEI- 
DI ABROMOWTTZ. by Joan Riven 

SO LONG. AND THANKS FOR THE 

FISH, by Douglas Adams 

NUTCRACKER, by E.TA. Hoffman — 
THE FOURTH PROTOCOL, by Freder- 
ick Forsyth 

“ . ..AND LADIES OF THE CLUB, by 


6 2) 


Helen Hoovea Saouoyer 

LINCOLN, by Gore Vidal 

WS. 


.... 9 


GOD KNOW; 


bv Joseph HelW 

STRONG MEDICINE, by Arthur Hailey 


14 


LIFE ITS OWN SELF, bv Dan Jenkins _ 
JITTERBUG PERFUME, by Tom Rob- 
bins 


ILLUSIONS OF LOVE, by Cynthia Free- 
man i 


13 


THE BUTTER BATTLE BOOK, by Dr. 
Setus 


14 -« 


— 38 


NONFICTION 


name you want to meeL 


bar. would be immortal. Are those ^an’s 
calling, or the sound of Wiggs’s roses falling’ 


IACOCCA: An Autobiography, by Lee la- 

cocca with William Novak 

PIECES OF MY MIND, by Andrew A 




the .Vw 


I 10 


sss 

His name is dropped now and then to keep us 
piqued and finally he enters, smiling: It's 
Timothy Leary. Wiggs, alas, is less entertaining 
than the real Leary. His brogue is a question- 
able artistic decision, and he's given to a speech 
form which could be death to a lesser novel: 
the lecture. 

On the other hand. Wiggs's final manifesto 
could have been limned by Leary himself, and 
mad perfumer Marcel's treatise on smell and 
evolution, central to the .book, casts a spell. 
Such paeans to hitherto unappreciated items 
— New Orleans, February and the body mo- 
tions of a bartender — more aptly suit the 
comic muse. Behold the elegant nonsense (ink- 
ing bivalve and urbopolis: "Each ritzy glob 
glistening upon the lustrous floor (or ceiling) of 
its desire. The oyster was an animal worthy of 
New Orleans, as mysterious and private and 
beautiful as the city itself.” 

But "Perfume” really is about perfume. 
About jitterbug perfume. Fragrance holds this ‘ 
book together as surely as it binds men to 
women, although you can't really smell it as 
you can a William Burroughs boot As much 
of 3 sensualist as Robbins -is. his wigged-oul 


LO 

tia 


G EACH OTHER, by Lm Buscag- 


2 17 


“THE GOOD WAR,” by Stud* Tertel — 
HEY. WAIT A MINUTE. I WROTE A 


BOOK ! by Jobs Madden with Dove An- 
DR. BURNS’^ VrESCRIPTION" "FOR 


6 jfr 


! Bums ... 
MOSES THE KlTTEtf bv James Hezriot 
THE BRIDGE ACROSS’ FOREVER, by 
Richard Bach . 


ELVIS IS D) 


Abba Eban 


AND I DON'T FEEL 


SO GOOD MYSELF, by Lewis Grizzaxd 
II A LIGHT IN THE ATTIC, by Shd SD ver- 


9 T 


stem 

12 THE BRAIN, b 

13 SON OF THE 
Evan S. fwwvii 

14 THE WEAKER 

v Richard M. Restafc 

MORNING STAR, by 

VESSEL, by Aatoni* Fra- 

13 ONE WRITER'S BEGINNINGS, by Eo- 
dnm Wrfty • 


12 HP 

11 4 


15 .4* 


13 12 ~rr- 


14 41* 


ADVICE, HOW-TO AND MISCELLANEOUS 

WHAT THEY DON’T TEACH YOU AT 
HARVARD BUSINESS SCHOOL, by 


Mark R McCormack 


WOMEN COMING OF AGE, by Jane 

Fonda with Mumon McCarthy . .... 

WEBSTER’S NEW WORLD DICTIO- 


I 16. .: 


2 3- 


NARY. SECOND COLLEGE EDITION 
WEBSTER’S II: NEW RIVERSIDE UNI- 
VERSITY DICTIONARY 


3 W f 


CHEF PRUDHOMME’S LOUISIANA 
KITCHEN, by Paul Pradhomme .... 4 


5 


fe ;T~ 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscoct 


*1 mm ran auw toujne rjrthe mst 

TIME ID EAT AflY CARROT’S 


GARFIELD 


I THAT SCRAMBLED WORD QAME 
■ » by Henri Arnold and Bob Lea 


Unscramble these lour Jumbles, 
one letter to each square, to form 
tour orefinary words 


FYLOT 


i 

I 



Things sure have changed 
since I was his sge 
/ > 


EVIRT 


1 

m 

REFTER 


■■MB 

■Ml 

GEPLED 


■•:■■ 

■Ml 



O N the diagramed deal. 
South chose a good mo- 
ment to make a “selfish” bid: 
when his partner. North, 
jumped to three spades over 
the two-diamond overcall, he 
insisted on no-trump rather 
than make the routine raise to 
four spades with three-card 
support for a known five-card 
SUIL 

It seemed important to play 
form the South side of the ta- 
ble, with the diamond lead 
coming round to the closed 
hand, and this judgment 
proved accurate. 

Three no-trump was unbeat- 


THE ONLY THIN© 
COMMON TO 
[THE FAST, PRESENT 
ANP FUTURE. 


Now arrange lhe circled letters lo 
Form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


Print answer here: THE 


cm: xx an 


Yesterday's 


(Answers tomorrow) 

Jumbles-. CRAFT MOUNT SCRIBE HAPPEN 

Answer How he looked when she seemed apathetic 
— PATHETIC 


WEATHER 


EUROPE 


Atoenrs 

Amsterdam 

Athens 


to 


Costa Del Sot 
DabKn 
Edtaburofa 
Florence 


Helsinki 
Istanbul 
Les Palmes 
Lisbon 


HIGH LOW 
C F C e 
n 52 4 39 

-I 30 -13 9 

IV M 1] 55 

4 39 -6 21 

-10 14 -15 5 

-5 23 -15 5 

-8 14 -15 3 
-4 25 -V T5 
•» 14-14 3 

-7 19 -B 18 sw 

u 57 8 44 Cl 

5 41 0 32 o 

3 34 -I 30 fr 

0 32 -10 W Sw 

-8 W -13 9 tr 

-9 14 -13 9 Cl 

-14 3 - 34 -II o 

15 59 6 43 cl 

21 70 15 59 fr 

4 43 2 34 fr 

•2 28 -7 19 sw 

5 41 -4 21 (r 

-3 24 -10 14 Sw 

-6 2T -4 21 sw 

-18 0 - 25 -13 tr 

-3 24 - 2 28 sw 

-13 * -IS 5 fr 

-7 19 -12 10 tr 

-14 35 -25 -13 fr 

1 34 -I 30 tr 

3 38 .7 19 r 

-15 54 - 21 -4 Ct 

-11 12 -17 1 fr 

-3 24 -II 12 O 

-12 10 -19-2 fr 

-17 T -25 -13 tr 

■IS 5 -17 1 o 

MIDDLE EAST 

Ankara 10 SO 4 39 o 

Be trot 22 72 8 44 d 

Damascus 17 43 - 3 24 e 

Jerusalem 20 48 5 41 o 

Te< Art* 2$ 77 6 43 0 

OCEANIA 


Madrid 

MDcn 


Munich 

Wee 

Oslo 


Reytclavik 

Rome 

Stockholm 

Strasbourg 

Venice 

Vienna 

Warsaw 

zsrkft 


Auckland 24 75 IS S» fr 

Sydney 26 79 20 48 el 

ct-deudv; to-fomy; tr-fqlr; h-hoil; 
cloudy.' r-roui; sh-snowers; sw-snaw; 









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St-Stormy. 


WEDNESDAY'S FORECAST — CHANNEL: SltaMly dray. FRANKFURT* 
Foouv Tern#. -I — U US — 71. LONDON: Snow. Tama. -1 --5 I JO — 231. mL 
DRIB: Ftor. Tenw.4 — 5143 — 31. NEW YORK: Fair. Tempt. 2 — 8 iS—W. 
PARIS; Snow. Temp. .4 — -B (25—181. SOME: Showers. Temp. 4 — -s 
139 — 231. TEL AVIV; Partly dOlltfV. Tome. 21 — 7 (70— 4SI. ZURICH: FtMTBV 

sss&; 


able, and in practice South 
made two valuable overtricks. 
West guessed correctly that 
South held ace-queen of dia- 
monds, but his heart lead was 
even more helpful to the de- 
clarer. South was able to win 
with the eight and lead a low 
spade. The nine would have 
been an error, costing a trick 
with the actual lie of the cards. 

West’s spade king was taken 
by the ace, and East won the 
third round of the suit with the 
queen. His diamond shift was 
wot by the ace and South took 
her black-suit winners. It was 
now dear that West held noth- 
ing but red cards, and he was 
eventually given the lead in di- 


amonds to play another heart. 

That gave North-South a 
top score. 2 


NORTH 

♦ AJ1083 

oma 

P 78 

♦ A J8 

WEST EAST 

Ill ■ 

O 2 J 9 1 3 2 HIIIIII 
*« AQU8742 

SOUTH TO 1 

♦ 894 
OAKJ8 

4 A Q B 

♦ K91 

Neither aUe «n vu&mUb. Tbs 

bNkSsg: 

9wA Want North East 

IN.T. 2 0 34 Pin 

3N.T. Pan Pan Pus 

Wort tad dw hout six. 



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54015 Alt Enenjv 
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25V2 Moons SI 
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4000 AtCD 1 1 
9800 BPConodo 
279951 Bank N S 
7S950 Barrfck a 
1000 Baton At 
35748 Bonanza R 
100 arolome 

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400 Brenda M 
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2500 FCA Inti 

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820(8 28(8 28(8 + 
435 435 4JS +10 

*1518 15(8 15(8 + (8 
84(8 618 4(8— to 

81748 17(8 1748 + 
sun 14(8 1418 + (8 
*» 80 80 — (8 
» 250 2® —5 

*1918 79to 19to + 

821 2014 21 

812 llto llto— to 
*17(8 17 17(8 + (8 

SWto .19 19 —to 

S24to 24 24% + 

siito iito iito+to 

204 200 201 +1 

*7(4 748 711 + 

_S5to Sto Sto— 
s*7to 37to 37(4 

44 44 44 

SB! 84 44 

gSto 25to 2Sto + 
S24U 24(4 241 m— 

1W 130 140 +5 

*17Vt IW 17>i + to 

•19 19 19 

*1718 1718 1718 
4518 45to 


Sllfe llto llto+ 4 

..... ... + 




23028 Inter pipe 
ITOIvqcoB 
200 Jannock 
4000 Kom KqHq 

200 Kerr Add 

11981 Laban 


*13(8 I2to 

Sir* 14to 1A4— to 
834(8 34 34(8 + 

*15to 15(4 15V. + (fa 

*1014 !H4 1014 

W « % +8 

ST41k 14(8 1418— Ufa 

*22% 2118 21* 


14437 Lac Minis 
4400 Lacuna 
44LLLOC 
4792 LdMowCo 
4MMDSHA 
91700 MICC 
34831 McSonHX 
41444 Mortaode 
8954 Moteon A f 
3700MotanB 
4iooMun*ir 
175DNafateC0L 
bDOMraida 
934 Noram 
KP586NVOAHAI 
22« Nowkd W 
54aSNuW«wA 
750 Oak wood 
1380 O3hawoAf 
1992D PanCan P 
5700 Pembina 
500 Pfaonlx Oil 
100 Prte Polnl 

3000 Place GO o 
19410 Placer 
SOOPrmripo 
300 Quo Stun) o 
10Q0 Ram Pet 
UOORavrockf 
1754 Redpath 
34544Rd&tWhsA 
17100 Rnservf 

,2S5* wnPrBA 

1900 Roman 
3lx Rottwnon 

<600$oeotre 

3450 Scoffs t 
4463 Sears Can 
10720 Shell Can 
3442ShOTTm 
mo Stater Bf 
JU9 5oultwn 
2720 51 Bradcal 
1B7B Stolen A 
1100 Sul Ptra 
MOStoepR 
SDSuncorpr 
7050 Sydney o 
3000 Toteorp 
3100 Toro 
1480 Teck Car A 
7073 Tecfc B I 
7151 Tex Con 
10QSD TAOm N A 
051743 Tor Dm Bk 
597 Torxtor 8 f 
4937 Traders A I 
210 Tms Ml 
*480 Trinity Res 
235799TrnAf1a UA 
4411X3 TrCon PL 
9790 Trlmac 
(7750 Turbot 
SOOumearpAf 
352 linCorfaid 
443*0 u Enfprte 

TOU Kent. 

1000 van Dr 
<350 va ran At 
_ 358 vastpran 
24000 WWmfai 
400 Weston 
133 Woodwd A 
_ nra re Bear 
Total Satos: NtRUH shorn 


Htak Law Ctote aroe 
SB 24% 24 to — to 
* 10 % 10 10 
S26to 26to 24% — 
*19 18(4 lIFto— 

*10(8 18V. 18to— to 
300 282 300 +15 

S22W 22 22to — to 
«S 448 *4& — s 

SIBto >4to 1448+ 
SI6to 16 16 - 

521(8 21to 21 to — 
524(1. 24(h 34V.+ to 
517V* I7to 1718+ to 
S15(» is* 15" 

57(8 4% 7 

SIB*, 13(8 ISto— to 
53 49 50 

SS 5 S 
S23to 23 23 —to 

S2to 2714 27(6— 
517to 1718 T71h+ to 
57to 7(8 7(8— (l 

*23(8 27(8 22V| + 
105 105 (OS —U» 

522 2114 2114 + 

S16V. 16U. 16% 

385 3B5 3SS +5 

W4 » Sto- to 

532 31(8 3!to— 14 

*17to 17(4 (7to + to 
18S 175 180 +10 

101 101 101 -18 

512(4 13(4 13W 
SC 42 42 +1 

5518 Sto 51fa 
*17(8 17(8 1718 
*7to 7to 7(fa— „ 
S22to 22to 2248— 
54(8 4(4 4(4 

59(4 9 to 9(4 + 

153V. 53V, 53 + 


*12 

12 

12 

S2»fa 20to ZJto 

290 

290 

290 4 

215 

215 

215 

*239* Sto 23* 

22 

21 

21 

73 

73 

73 


SIS* 1518 15(4 + 
510 914 10 + 

51018 1018 10(4+ (6 
S34to 34 34 — M 

*49 48 48to 

SJ7W 17% 1718— 

4*^ 445^ 445* —15 
SZlto 23(4 23(4—18 
*21(9 31(8 211e + 
450 435 435 
29 28(8 29 + 

57(4 74fa 7lfa— 
sum urn ion. 

"» w 1218 + 
*10 10 10 + 
*25 310 210 + 5 

SSto 5(8 5(4 + 

S10V. 10to 10Vi 
*1118 1118 llto— 
574(4 74 74 — V. 

10(418(8 into— Vfa 

SMm Wto 10*8 


Montreal 


484*3 Bank Monl 
2550 Can Both 

<379 Dorn TxtA 

nooMntTrsi 
<57*1 Nat BkCda 
4400 P ower Carp 
MO Rutland A 
1200 Rdl land B 
3m3 Raval Bank 
_ 309« Rmr Trs Co 
Total Sales: 17717S1 


High Lott Ctaso CBob 
5258a 25V. 2S1fa 
S1M4 16to 14b + Ml 

*1218 1218 m 
sizto i2to izvi— to 

*141% Uto 14 


SOPH, 28%* 2Hto— (fa 
*1*14 1414 llto 


*15 15 15+14 

t» Wtom. 

*17 UH. 1414— to 
meres 


AKZO 

Ahold 

AMEV 

AtTamRub 

Amrobank 

BVG 

Buehrmonn T 
CaiandHida 
Elsevier 
Fakfaer 
Gist Brocades 
Hetaeken 


KLM 


Hat Hedder 

NedUovd 

OceVonderG 


Philip* 


Rodamat 
Rpuneo 
Rsrenlo 
Raval Dutch 
Un H evwr 
(/(ViOmmeren 
VMF Stork 
VNU 

ANP-CBS Gtnerc 
Pievtoa s : 18720 
Source: AFP. 



Hoizmanr 
Horten Aa 
Kail + sal* 


tax 


fsa 


173J0 774JO 
31750 


314J0 

77JV 2L68 
144 14+80 
21450 21+80 
lades: 


Brussels 


Aibad 


1430 1+30 

4520 4JW 

Cockerflt 240 260 

EBES 2380 2J55 

GD-limo-BM 1080 3.T7Q 

2A75 HJ3. 
3+00 3AOO 
+058 +050 

7A20 73M 

+920 +920 

1435 Tasa 

7J50 7040 

4105 4100 

3.970 3045 

.IWfi K 

— r. 977.13 

Prertoiis: 97X58 

Soercr: Brvssrtt stock Ex- 


Close Prev. 

grat-An 18+90 18+30 

Baver-AP 195 195 

Bayer .Hypo. M 234 

Bayer.WrAmk J39 333 

P W . . ,,279 37403 

Commerzbank Aa 17+JO 17020 
Cantfgumml 117.1011530 

Dairrtier-Bera 611J0 603 

Deaussa Aa 344 34+50 

Deutsche Babcock 144 159 

Deutso* Bank Aa 403^8 389 JO 
Dradner Bank A* 197 JO 193J0 
pUB-Scfiuthe 220 21+50 

GHH 144 18+50 

Hochtief 488 490 

JJoechet Aa 1TL50 19190 
HoescilAO 98J0 97 JO 

387 375 

178JD 179 

-Mi m m w 

Karstodt Dl T 

Kautoot 219 318 

KHD 2S8J0 257 

Ktoeclmer Werke 73J0 71 ju 
K runo stohl Aa ns 8050 
UndeAg 796JC J99 

Lufthorao 193 18+50 

MAN (5»J0 icsiw 

AVkinesmonn 15+40 15240 

Preusaao 255 253 

gtetoera-VVerke 332 jn 
148 16700 

StSwrlng 459 455 

^•ihansAB 4KL50 48+80 
Thvssen AB if an 

174 173 

VEW 12X5Q 124 

VoRcswoocflmrfc 2T170 7\2M 

SSSS??Si“” ; ’ ra 

Source: AFP. 


GDL 
Oevoert 

Petra Ibw 
SecGMrnle 
Seflna 
Sahmy 

TnxJlan Elec 
VMonkoM 


Frankfurt 


AEG-Tetahmken 10110 19140 
Ah loro vers laso 102 s 


Hong Kona 


BkEcstAsia 
2*una Kona 
China Lion! 

Cross Hcrbor 

HKWharl , la 

1490 18.90 

Jonflne Moth 9.10 US 

445 8 

wewwtertp +fo 5.1s 

1*» 1438 

CToa t iM 

IgneDorby njs. _ 

SMux 150 1 to 


lljo 
14 1430 
UL2B 11J0 
4f75 4+75 
+95 7 

2750 2750 
4075 3525 

4g 470 

350 +15 




t Canadian Indexes 

Jan. 8 I 


Prev ious 

'Montreal 109J3 10924 

Toronto ZMSSO 2 n T5 52Q 

Montreal: Stock Exdmge Industrial* Index 
Toronto: TSE 300 Index 


Singapore Market Sells Seals 

Reuters 

SINGAPORE — The Singapore 


International Monetary Exchange 
that it has sold its 


said Tuesday 

initial 300 membership seats and is 
offering 150 mare to indivjdaals 
and corporations, lhe issuing price 
wBl remain 50,000 Singapore dol- 
lars ($22,727; each, it said. 


Other Markets Jan. 8 

Closing Prices in local currencies 



3230 2240 
I t 
+125 +20 

+45 +50 

1.74 173 


Prertoor :1JB(57 

Source: Bouton. 


Johannesburg 


AECI 


Btyvoor 

Buffels 

Eland* 

GFSA 


Kloof 
Nedbank 
PstStayn 
Rmtplat 
SA Brews 
St Hat 
Sosol 


740 740 

1050 1025 
1550 1500 
*350 4450 
1390 ISO 
2SB 2425 
PM 3*58 
7558 7350 
1120 1148 
5^0 5425 
1S25 1508 
440 470 

3275 3108 

540 540 


Nwflxei*. 


London 


JftCorp Sllto *11 xd 

AHfed-Lvais 148 xd 145 

A nglo Am Gold *80 *78 

g <*q»c fc 144 144 

Sarclayj 572 544 

KV- ^ 

SiS"" 253^ 

BL 38 a 

BOC Group 241 249 

Boots 200 xd 193xd 

Bowoter indue 234 S 

BP 493 <n 

Brir Hama SI 247 244 

BHtTaiecom in iobv, 

B TR 424 617 

Burmc*l Z27 TO 

OK**jry Sctmr 144 143 

OwrtwCofto tod 283 xd 

Coats i Patons 159 153 

Cons Go ld 479 474 

Court aulds 142 xd 130 

Dftoety 484 470 

deBoers 5397 *393 


Distil ten 


291 tea 


Solution to Previous Puzzle 

IaIliei 


Eiuaa ljQulDuj 
hbhih □□□□ cicDtaaa 
□naDanaas aaaaa 
EEDEEI a0CIB 0QI3Q 
□Eaaaiaaaaaaa 
□□□□ aiazinans 


LBJ o A 


o C IS I 


□QcaisaaaaGiaaQaQQ 
□Eann nnn finn 


uuuQana aHaa 
Qnaaananaaaa 
□Ban anna aniaaE] 
□ehqci aasoaonHa 
BBDcia □□□□ sans 


ITIEIEINlSMAlQDlIMEiTRl 

TB/83 


Drlafontaln 

Dunlop 

F (sorts 

Free st Gad 

GEC 

GKN 

Glaxo 

Grand Mel 

Go fatness 

GUS 

Hanson 

Hawker 

ICI 

imps 

Lloyds Bank 


Lucas 
Mark* and Sp 
Meto/Box 
Midland Bank 
Not West Bank 

PflklrKrton 

KSTehc. 

Rondfonteln 
Rank 
Reed faltl 
Reuter* 

Raval Dutch 
RTZ 
Shan 
STC 

itd Otartared 
Tota and Lyle 

Teeco 
Thorn EMI 
T.I.BTOW 


*24to *34 Vfa 

Suva susp 
29B 295 

*31 (fa *21 (i 
214 214 

207 204 

llto 11 3/32 
Mfl 
232 TO 
7D9 xd 701 xd 
141 xd 341 xd 
441 433 

738 731 

If* 194 
544 529 

145 143 

343 xd 257 xd 
130 Xd 119 xd 
494 xd 402 xd 
352 252 

599 sn 

300 xr 300 xr 
204 204 

276 248 

*92 S9DK> 

304 304 

552 Xd 540 xd 
295 295 

429*42 31/64 
587 581 

A5S AS5 

218 2ta 

477 474 

455 444 

237 xd 234 xd 

457 459 

340 242 


Trafalgar Hse 345 xd 348 Xd 

THF 158 155 

Ultramar 211 205 

Unilever 11 Ned 11 toed 

United BHcutts 203 xd 199x0 

Vlcker* 223 222 

toUet* SS3VJ *33VC> 

WitoMlnss SD tZTVz 

War ,+oan 3 to 35to jsvfaxd 

Wootwarth St 0 578 

ZCI S13to lUk 

F.T.38 Index : 97L2 


Source: AFP. 


Milan 


Banco Comm I7J10 

Cxnrrote. 229 2 2.(97 

Oaeontet* +347 +271 

Cred Hal 2075 

Form Italia 8,000 

24B5 
49 J3 


Flat 
Finsidar 
Generali 
IFI 

iW ani e i M 


Olivetti 
Pirelli 
RAS 

Rfatoace n ia 

SIP 

Snlo 

Stando 



MIB Index ilAifjo 
Prey. :L087jat 
(Bose V1/8S - 1800) 

source stock Excftonpt 


Paris 


Air Uaukle 

Alstham AH. 
AvDaseault 
Bsnwire 
BIC 

Bouvaue* 

BSN^D 

Corretaur 

Club Med 

Cafimea 

Ownez 


5*8 £44 

2GLS 2QBJB 
80B 793 

590 574 

S % 
J0L- m 

722 


Eft -Aouita ine 

Eurooel 

GenEaux 

Hochette 

Imefal 

Lafaroe Cop 


roreal 
Metro 
Mlctwlln 
MMPennar 
MaetHennessy 
Moulinex 
ttard-est 
Occidental* 
Pernod Rlc. 
Petrales Use) 
PMKMN8 
Podain 
Pr i nt e mu s 
Rodiafechn 
Redoute 
Roussel Ucfof 
Skis Rossi a nal 
Sour^errlar 
TWamoeon 
Thomson CSF 
Voleo 


227 XU 
go 850 
S5B 545 
1499 1480 

7+50 
37B90 370 

lyZS 1851 
2348 2368 

1740 1745 

778 745 

4+90 6+70 
1908 1897 
91 AO 90+5 
7+30 7+95 
650 455 

718 718 

252 247 JO 
319 JO 24+80 
41J0 41JQ 
189 1 X7 £0 
220.10 219 

1215 1192 

1445 1479 

’52 

492 488 

3245 2235 
428JD 420 

240 24250 


Poke 
Poseidon 
RGC 
Santo* 
Sleiafa 
Southland 
Woodstd* 
Worntald 


405 395 

255 2S 
330 330 

530 5» 

171 170 

24 24 

93 99 

317 315 


All Ord bterles index :718J0 
Previous : 71+38 

Source: Routers. 


Tokyo 


Aaefl index : 18845 
Previo us : 18+73 
CAC Index : T8+1 
Previo u s : U2» 
Source: AFP. 


Singapore 


Bawatead 

Inehcape 
KeppelSMp 
Mai Banking 
OCBC 
OUB 

Semb Shipyard 
StmeDartry 
5 Steamship 

st Trauma 
UOB 


141 144 

3J4 256 

+15 +30 

+88 +88 

HZ W 

235 234 

1+4 M4 

8J0 8JS 

174 276 

J-45 1A7 

1A6 JjS9 
1 1 
+40 +52 

424 426 


DOB Index : 29+03 
Previous 2KB 
Source: Overseas Union Bank. 


Stockholm 1 


AGA 

Alfa Laval 


Astra 

SS3£~» 

Electrolux 

Ericsson 

Eswlte 


Ptwr m u U u 
Saab Scania 
Sandvlk 
Sksnska 
SKF 

SweawiNwwi 

Vetva 


3M 367 
12 WB 
350 sea 
335 ra 
HO 102 
178 178 

299 254 

2*7 2M 
305 300 

197 19S 

194 190 

420 420 

340 345 

IS 9158 
UD ISO 
» 255 

224 222 


Akaf 

AsaMChem 
Asahl Glass 

%£££?” 

Canon 

D Nippon Print 

Dahm. House 

Full Bank 

FutI Photo 

Fulttsu 

Hitachi 

Honda 

1HI 

ttah 

JAL 

Kallma 

Kansat ElccPwr 
KoaSoap 

sa*- 1 

JJatau Elec met* 

ytotxuEtoefaeorVs 

Mltmib Bank 

Mitsubcnem 

Mitsub Elec 

Ml tsab Heavy 

Mitsubishi 

Mitsui 

MHsukmM 

Mitsumi 

NEC 

NikkaSec 
Nlman Steel 
Nto»on Yusen 
Nissan 
Nomura Sec 
Olympus 
Ricoh 
5bort> 

Sony 

sunn Bank 
Suml Cham 
suml Metal 
Taisel 
Toisho 
Tokeda 
Tallin 
Tk Marino 
Tk Pow e i 1 




-'fariih 

hi 


429 440 

738 728 

880 871 

475 485 

520 530 

1J30 IJ30 
980 WO 
552 585 

U90 1+00 
U20 1580 
1J30 1J90 
851 847 

1J40 1 JX 

isi ur 

155 341 

+300 5L37D 
286 280 
1,490 U00 
806 115 

149 152 

545 545 

445 445 

.324 323 

1480 1.540 
OS OS 
1370 1400 
367 371 

405 403 

260 265 

S3 548 
350 341 

374 345 

14190 14» 
1.250 1J00 
648 449 

152 153 

299 360 

610 617 

940 947 

1,100 LOGO 
940 949 

14MO IAS? 

3 An ISAO 

’■S 

151 149 

205 207 

412 41+ 

798 805 





TaahttM 
Toyota 
Yamalchl : 


7*2 779 

1 +90 1+9B 
445 445 

414 411 

1.250 1407 
610 423 


New index : 92254 
Pre v t u u * dlM 
SSfHU index :1U7959 
Pravlu u * :T1J7+g 
Source: Reuters. 


eKSTSS, !*■*“ 

Source: UotonFobonkoo. 


Zurich 


Sydney [ 


AC I 
AMI 
AN? 

BMP 

Barol 

BWflahtvnie 

Bra™** 

Cgjotap 

CSR 

Dunlap 

Eidareixl 

Hooker 

Maoetlaa 

MIM 

Myer 

OokarWpe 


193 194 

240 240 

3B4 498 

£4 490 

314 Jl* 

& J 41 

348 347 

SSS 393 

300 200 

478 477 

Z7j 265 
157 188 

35 307 

JS 

B0 227 
228 222 
147 148 

67 68 


Bank Leu 
Brawn Bavert 
CJtxj Getov 
Credit Butsan 
Electrowaft 

Georg F (sorer 

JalmoJI 

Nestle 

Oerflkan-B 

RoOW Babv 

Sutler 

SBC 

Swlsaalr 
Union Bank 
Whdemur 
Zurkh ln+ 




1808 XT&5" 

Z39S 2J75 

2+40 

425 
UCTk 
+950 +788 
L335 1 J40 

ha 

312 300 

365 34+ 

1.100 1X85 

1+900 18X00. 


SBC Index: 426.it 
mifantnui 
I Source: afp . 

Nfl~ net wwa+Ml: na: ’ 
avallobte: xd: ox-dlwloend. 




•Ll':' 
































INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 1985 


Page 15 


SPORTS 


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iuiir.fi ",,r * 

• abn U , L W t 

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chCr " nrJU fc 
“ 


Brock, WUhelm in Hall of Fame 







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klren 

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ROT- , 

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VSA fc-. 


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emptied bf Oar Scuff From Dispatches 

NEW YORK — All- time base- 
stealing king Lou Bred and Hoyt 
Wflhdm, the knodd eb ail specialist 
who tamed relief pitching into an 
art, were elected to the Baseball 
Hall of Fame Monday night, while 
sJy&^teUfingNdlie Fox missed out 
by the closest margin ever. 

Both Brock, an outfielder, and 
Wflhehn were named cm more than 
the required 75 percent of ballots 
c ast by members of the Baseball 
Writers Association of America, 
but Fox, who died in 1975, missed 
by two voles. 

• Brock, only the 15th player ever 
voted into the hall in his first year 
of eCmbQity. was named on 315 of 
the 395 ballots — 795 percent, 
WOheini, who pitched in the major 
leagues for 21 years and is the first 
reliever to be elected, was named 
on 331 — 83.7 percent- 


voted into the hall in the regular 
phase of the voting, received 295 of 
the needed 297 votes, a percentage 
of 74.6. The writers association 
ducked with Edward Stack, direc- 
tor of the hafl,to see if that percent- 
age coaid be rounded off to 75 
percent, but Stack said a “pure" 75 
percent is required. 

Infielder Fox, who had a 19-sea- 
son lidding average of .984, was 
the American League's most valu- 
able player in 1959 for the Chicago 
White Sox and had a lifetime bat- 
ting average of .288. In five years. 


be will be eligible for voting by the 
hall's veterans committee. 

Outfielder Billy Williams was 
next on the 41-man ballot with 252 
votes, followed by pitchers Jim 
Bunning 214 and Jim (Catfish) 
Hunter 212. No one else drew more 
than 2Q0 votes. 

“This recognition is the ulti- 
mate,'' said Brock, who played in 
the majors from 196] through 
1979, started with the Chicago 
Cubs and spent most of his career 
with the St Louis CanUnxh He 
srill leads all base stealers with 938 
and holds the National Le ague re- 
cord of 1 1 8 steals bases in one sea- 
son (1974). He had a career barring 
average of 295. 

In leading SL Louis to two world 
championslups. Brock appeared in 
three World Series, stealing 14 
bases in 21 games and baiting a 
composite .391, the highest Series 
average ever. 

Others who have been elected to 
the hall in their first time on the 
ballot: Ted W illiams, Stan Musxal 
Bob Feller, Jackie Robinson, 
Sandy Koufax, Ernie Banks, Willie 
Mays, Warren Spahn, Mickey 
Mantle, Al Kaline, Bob Gibson, 
Hank Aaron, Frank Robinson and 
Brooks Robinson. 

Wilhelm, who missed making the 
hall by only 13 votes last year, 
started his career in 1952 with the 
New York Giants and went on to 
play with the Cardinals , Cleveland 
Indians, Baltimore Orioles, White 
Sox, California AngeU. Atlanta 


Braves, Chicago Cubs and Los An- 
geles Dodgers. 

He bad a lifetime record of 143- 
122 with an earned-mn average of 
2SL The right-hander spent much 
of his career specializing in relief, 
but that was before saves were re- 
corded in the statistics. In an era erf 
home runs and high scoring, be 
posted ERAS of under 2.00 in six 
seasons — five of them from 1964 
through 1968. 

Bill Rigney, who played with 
Wilhelm on the Giants and later 
managed him in New York and 
with California, was elated. “That’s 
wonderful,” Rigney said. “The 
Hall of Fame is gating kind of 
classy now that they've added Hoyt 
Wilhelm," 

Rigney said “there's absolutely 
no doubt” that Wilhelm was ahead 
of his time as a relief specialist 

“The first year be came to us, 
which was '52, be almost didn’t 
make the balldub. I don’t think 
Leo [Manager Leo Durocher] really 
thought a knuddeballer could get 
the job done. He pitched that day 
against the Cubs in an exhibition 
game,” Rigney continued. “The 
butterfly was going all over the 
place, every which way — they 
couldn’t hit it and we couldn’t 

Mirfi it. 

“He was someone who did things 
no one else could do and he could 

do them every day He was a 

manager’s pitcher because of the 
way be went about his business,” 
said Rigney. (AP, UPl ) 



Biirgler Wins Cup Event 


Complied bp Our Staff From Dhpotcha 

SCHLADM1NG, Austria — 
Thomas Biirgler of Switzerland 
won Ms first World Cup race here 
Tuesday, holding off a second-leg 

WORLD CUP SKIING 


(2:39.35) and Austrian Franz 
Gruber (2:3956). 

The skiers raced only hoars after 
arriving from La Mongie in the 
French Pyrenees, whoa a slalom 
race was cancelled Monday morn- 
ing because of a heavy snowfalL 
The competitors and team offi- 


charge by Marc Girarddli to take a - dais flew to Munich and then 
men’s giant *lalnm drove to Schladmms, most of them 

arriving Monday night. (UPf, AP) 


Hail of Famers Hoyt Wflhehn in 1979, left, and Lou Brock in 1970. 


Starting the New Year in Style: A Load of Bull on a Big Day for Litde People 


international Herald Tribune 

LONDON — Before the snow blanket feU. English 
soccer wore for a day its coat of many colors. Never 
threadbare, ever ready to warm the most mundane of 
seasons, this coat seldom forgets our need for New 
Year's injections of fantasy. 

The first Saturday in the calendar is set aside for the 
little people — for assorted unknowns to play Davids 
to the household-name Goliaths they normally pay to 
watch. 

Under the innocuous label of FA Cup, round three 
isalottoy.lt sends the gods of the sport into dens they 
had fogotten existed since their schooldays. 

A little frost or a lot of mud on an exposed, bumpy 
pilch can undenmne the supposedly superior talents 
of the glamor boys — and if their nerve is frail or their 
determination suspect, they face ridicule in front of 
packed stands and crowds baying to see the mighty 
fallen. 

It is blood-stirring staff a nriffion miles from the 
Wembley spectacle m the spring, when the finished 
product is bounced via satellite to 70 or more nations. 

So metimes, too, it is a load of buIL That, anyway, 
was what it came down to in the West Country town of 
Hereford on Saturday. 

That Arsenal, a midturnDjon-pound collection of 
International “stare” trembled before eager Foorth- 
Drvman stirrers wfao wcre outrageously ill-rewarded 
by the final M scorefine. 

-Ihe upstaging of Arsenal began even before kickoff. 


when the region's prize Herefordshire bull — worth 
more than the combined market value of the home 
team — was paraded before the assembled 15,777. The 
boITs name happens to be LivopooL 

He didn't play. Indeed he became quite forgotten as 
the Hereford team, which cost just £5,000 (about 
55,700) to put together, outfought and outplayed Lon- 

Rob Hughes 

don's pride. In the end, a miraculous save and the base 
of agaalpost saved Arsenal to fight a replay whenever 
the big freeze relents. 

Tboe were as many angles to Arsenal’s near-humili- 
ation as there wOl one day be joints of beef from old 
Liverpool himself,. Meanwhile, settle for the disgrace 
of Charlie Nicholas, far whom Arsenal paid three- 

Sesaooiid halfbecai^Wspt^omiaQce and cramrit^ 
meat was no match for Jimmy Harvey, Hereford's 
captain — who years ago was cast out by Arsenal as a 
failed professional 

If ever Arsenal was going to break Harvey’s heart, it 
was thou. Last Saturday, all it broke was ins left wrist, 
a tiifHng injury he insis ts will not prevent him leading 
Hereford in the replay. 

Hereford was until recently too inconsequential 
even to figure among England’s 92 professional league _ 
dubs. So, today, is Burton Albion, the team of a small 
Midlands brewery town. 


Albion had scuffled and battled through half a 
dozen games dating back to the summer before meet- 
ing n ear-ne ighb or Leicester City, a First-Division 
straggler with big cup traditions. Leicester spanked 
Burton's part-timers, 6-1, and so ended an unlikely 
fairytale. 

Or did it? Burton has appealed to have the match 
replayed because its goalie had been concussed, with 
the score at i-Z, by a chunk of wood hurled from the 
crowd. England's FA will 1 fancy, find ways to reject 
little Burton's request, although the craven logic- by 
which UEFA recently ordered Celtic to replay a match 
because a bottle narrowly missed an opposing player 
suggests anything can happen. 

It reflects sadly on modem times that when min- 
nows earn the right to romance, the unacceptable face 
of trendy hooliganism cranes barging in. 

Burton, even at its level has sponsors (in this case 
the same brewery whose name Leicester carries), di- 
rectors and bank managers to appease. And so, put- 
ting profit ahead of the glory of playing on its own 
little ground. Burton transferred the game to Derby 
County’s larger stadium. 

More than 22.000 came, including the lout who tore 
up a seat and hurled it at Paul Evans. The nonleaguers 
then aped the foolhardy nonsense seen from profes- 
sionals — risking a man's livelihood and posibly his 
life in the name of bravery. 

Evans was badly concussed. He was revived, refused 
the stretcher and dragged onto wobbly legs. “I fdt 


dizzy. 1 wanted to vomit, but nothing would come out 
Things were happening yet they were noL I can’t 
remember their second and third goals. I was praying 
for halftime." 

When that came a doctor advised Evans not to go 
out again. The doctor allowed his advice to be over- 
ruled. Groggy as be was, Evans did not want to let the 
team down by leaving them a man short. Not now, not 
on the afternoon of the greatest game of their lives. 

How stupid can we get? I don’t mean Evans — 
whose mind was so jangled he hardly remembers 
where he was — but the medical profession, the 
legislators, the blinkered management who permitted 
a man of 34, a qualified lawyer, to risk Ms entire future 
by groping through another hour, flin g in g his head at 
the feet of forwards in pursuit of a lost cause. 

Hereford against Arsenal Burton Albion against 
Leicester . . . and half a dozen others. Those games 
invoke an intoxicating euphoria. They are by- the- 
grace-of-god opportunities to overturn the established 
order of thin g s, the impossible dream that sometimes 
comes true. 

Most of us can sense why Evans, an intelligent ma n 
in workaday life, should forget he was doing all this for 
£15. But to allow him to ignore medical opinion that 
he was unfit to continue was so senseless it wipes out 
for tne the most enjoyable day of the season. 

The spirit of “the FA Cup was not meant to be a 
funeral hymn. 


Fastest on the first run, Bmgler 
skied an excellent second leg to 
thwart Girarddli and win with an 
aggregate thne of 2 minutes and 
36.65 seconds. 

He was just 0.11 seconds better 
than Girarddli, who was fastest in 
the second heat and finished with a 
total docking of 2:36.76. Switzer- 
land’s Martin Hang] took third 
place in 2:38-33. 

Austrian-born Girarddli, who 
races for Luxembourg, nonetheless 
increased his lead in the overall cup 
standings. 

Girarddli now has 140 points, 36 
more Lhan second-placed Swiss Pir- 
nrin Zurbriggen — who was dis- 
qualified for missing a gate in Tues- 
day’s race. 

“I never thought I'd really win a 
World Cup race," BQigler said. 

He said maintaining the lead go- 
ing into the second run was the 
most nerve-racking pan of the day. 
“I would have prefe r red to start 
third or fourth. I had a lot of time 
to think after my run, and that 
seems to haw been my problem in 
the past” said Borgler. whose older 
brother Toni retired last year from 
the cup circuit. 

“When I heard about GirardeJ- 
li’s time, I knew I had to risk every- 
thing," said the winner, referring to 
GirarddlPs second-run 1:15.79 — 
0.92 seconds faster than his own. 

Liechtenstein's Andreas Wenzel 
third in the overall standings with 
101 points, suffered the same fate 
as ZQrbriggen, failing to add to Ms 
total after going out with a missed 
gate on the second run. 

GirardeDTs father and ' coach, 
Helmut, said Ms son could have 
done far better on a better-pre- 
pared course. 

“I know Marc could have gained 
at least a second in the afternoon if 
he bad a later starting position,” 
the rider Girarddli said. “There 
was entirely too much powder 
snow on the course, especially in 
the tracks around the gates. Later 
starters bad a much better time of 
h.” 

Girarddli fifth fastest in the 
morning ran, started first in the 
second heat but could not quite 
make op the deficit on Biirgler. 

Fourth place went to Austrian 
GDnther Mader, whose 2:38.57 
brought him his first cup prints of 
the season. 

He was followed by Switzer- 
land’s Joel Gaspaz (2:38.87), Rich- 
ard Promotion of Italy (2:38.99), 
Jure Franko of Yugoslavia 


76ers Counter 
Slowdown by 
Suns , 100-99 

The Associated Pres 

PHILADELPHIA — The Phoe- 
nix Suns knew they couldn't outrun 
the Philadelphia 76ers. So they 
slowed thing s down and tried to 
outshoot than hoe Monday night, 
and the strategy wotted almost 
well enough to keep the 76ers from 
winning their eighth straight game. 

“It was the only answer, said 
Coach John MacLeod after the 
Sans* 100-99 loss. “We came in 

NBA FOCUS 

here last year and tried to run with 
them and fell behind by 30 points. 
We didn't want them to start flying 
up and down the court.” 

The Sons Mt 58.6 percent of their 
shots and held the 76ers to 66 firid- 
goal attempts, 20 below their aver- 
age. But Philadelphia won by going 
57.6 percent from the floor and 
outscoring Phoenix by 24-15 from 
the free-throw line. 

Elsewhere it was Boston 108, 
New York 97; Dallas 102, Seattle 
84; Kansas Gty 110, Golden State 
101 and Los Angeles Clippers 116, 
Utah 106. 

Phoenix often waited until only 
10 seconds showed on the 24-sec- 
ond clock to start its offense. Time 
and a gain the Suns scored just be- 
fore the cl ode expired. 

So few shots were taken that Mo- 
ses Malone had a season-low five 
rebounds to go with Ms 19 jwints. 
But 76er rookie Charles Barkley 
had 13 rebounds and 15 points, ax 
of them down the stretch. 

After the game was tied, 90-90, 
with 2:2! remaining, Barkley Ml 
two free throws and moments later 
stole a pass and dunked to give 
Philadelphia a 96-90 lead with 57 
seconds left. Phoenix cut the deficit 
to 96-94 with 20 seconds remain- 
ing, but Badde/s two free throws 
boosted the lead baric to four. 

Larry Nance made it 98-96 with 
eight seconds left, and Andrew 
Toney's basket five seconds later 
offset Rod Foster’s desperation 
three-point goal at the buna. 


Bruins Down 
Kings, 5-4, 

In Overtime 

Compikd by Our Staff From Dijpairha 

BOSTON —They don’t get ex- 
tra pay for it, but you wonthcar 
the Boston Bruins complaining 
about a little overtime. Flaying in 
their fifth consecutive extra session 


NHL FOCUS 


at home Monday night, the Bruins 
used Charlie Simmer’s goal to de- 
feat the Los Angeles Kings, W. 

“Pm g)ad we bad the overtime,” 
said Coach Gerry Cheevers, whose 
Brums are 3-0-2 in their last five 
overtimes. “It was a tough game for 
the Kings to lose. Charlie made a 
great play." 

Center Tom Feigns, who had 
three assists on the night, got 
around defenseman Craig Red- 
mond deep in the .Los Angrfes zone 
and passed the puck from the tight 
side to Simmer, racing in from the 
ltfL Sumner, who had been traded 
by the Kings Oct. 23, tipped the 
puck past goalie Bob Janecyk fra 
Ms 24th goal of the season with 39 
seconds left in overtime. 

1 “You don't have much time, so 
all you try to do is gri a stick on the 
pock,” yamm er said. 

! In Monday’s rally other g am e, 
Hartford downed Toronto 7-4. 

The Kings squandered a chance 
to move into a third-place &nythe 
Division tie with Winnipeg. The 
Brains were trailing 4-3 before a 
Ken I.rnseman deflection feared 
the ovratum. Iin.««nan was posi- 
tioned in front of the Los Angdes 
goal as a Mike O'Connell slapshop 
hit Ms right skate and went into the 
net with 59 seconds left in regpla- 


The Kjngs broke a 3-3 tie at 
11:12 of the third period when Em 
Fox, who stele thejwck from de- 
fenseman Mike MHbisy, wristed a 
shot -past Boston goalie Pete 
Peelers. Earfror in the period, Bffl 
QDwyer's fist NHL goal had giv-' 
ea the Kings a 3-2 lead, but Geoff 
Courtnall answered Ira- the Bruins 
2^26 later, 

Mated Dionne took advantage 
Of a mfctflhs to make it 2-2 at 3:33 
of the find period. Peeters attempt- 
ed to dear- the pack and Ml the 
skate of ieammaie Mats Thclin. 
Dionne pitied up tbe loose puck 
and pm Ms 25th goal of the season 
into an empty net. 

“I didn't .thi nk we played very 
wtO,” said Cheevers. *We ware 
very fortunate to get a tie.” 

- ‘T'forslwaysdo yon get what yrai 
deserve,” said coach Pat Quinn af- 
ter Ms team dropped to 1-5-3 fra its 
Uat mnegames. “We played 1 sound- 
ly»andwebadn’t been playing wdl 
before /so perhaps it is a trend. A- 
°0Kh?cati take something away 

‘ ... ..(VPIAP) 



fwtmdW 

Dan Marino 

Marino Named 

Best in ’84 NFL 

Compiled by Our Staff From DUpatches 
NEW YORK —Dan Marino 
of the Miami Dolphins was 
named the National Football 
League’s most valuable player 
Monday night by the Profes- 
sional Football Writers of 
America Monday. 

The second-year quarter- 
back, noted for his ability to 
handle blitzing defenses, be- 
came the first player to throw 
fra more than 5,000 yards in a 
season (5,084). 

He also threw a record 48 
touchdown passes, bettering 
the old mark by 12, and set 
mar ks with 362 completions 
and nine 300-yard passing 


In two playoff games so far. 
Marino has thrown for seven 
TDs, The Dolphins will play 
the San Francisco 49ers in the 
Super Bowi Jan. 20. 

Marino has made K look easy 
all through his record-breaking 
season. “Bnt who’s to say 
what’s easy and what isn’t?" be 
said Monday. Tm not the rate 
who’s malting it easy. A lot of 
guys have helped me reach this 
level Our offensive Hne is vay 
intelligent and they don't make 
many etrore. They know who to 
pick up. That’s why I’ve only 
been 13 or 14 times all 
season-” 

And wide receivers Mark 
Qayton and Mark Doper * 
“having them makes it easier 
too.” . 

Manno won in a year when 
Chicago’s Walter Payton be- 
came the all-time NFL rushing 
leader, Eric Dickerson of the 
Los Angdes Rams set a single- 
season rushing record. Art 
Monk set the smgle-seasan re- 
ceiving mark and Charlie Joiner 
eclipsed the all-time receiving 
reconi (AP, UPl ) 


SCOREBOARD 


Hockey 


Basketball 


National Hockey League Leaders 


National Basketball Association Leaders 


Naihnal Hsduv Lwhm Icatfari ttrawb 
i of job. «-. 

OVERALL OFFENSE 

GAP Pim 


SNOOTING PERCENTAGE 


GratzkVi EAtl 
K uril. Edm. 
BOSSV. NLY.I. 
i mwrehuk, win. 
B. Swttur. N.Y.I. 
Dtonm. LA. 
Nilsson, Cal. 
Karr. PAL 
Oaradnlck. DaL 
Fadarko. SI. L 
Goulat. Qua. 
Yzernwi, Dei 
Nlcholls. LA. 
MocLeon. Win. 
TanollL N.YJ. 
Carpenter. Wash. 
Coffey. Edm. 


41 71 112 It 
39 42 B1 12 
34 34 At 8 
24 J7 41 St 

23 38 tl 25 

24 33 97 2A 
21 35 St 10 
31 24 £5 23 

27 28 S5 10 
15 40 B IB 
11 23 54 31 

28 34 54 19 
24 27 53 31 
17 36 53 *9 
23 29 52 44 
38 21 51 4« 
17 34 51 47 


Youna. PI*. 

Kuril. Edm. 
Davis. Buf. 
Simmer. LA.-BO*. 
PcrttufOun. CoL 


G» 

G 

s 

Pd 

38 

34 

61 

35-1 

39 

39 

132 

IU 

28 

11 

38 

28.9 

38 

23 

81 

2S4 

40 

21 

76 

77* 


National Basketball Association 
Uirouvfi bo mm of Jan. 4: 

TEAM OFFENSE 


leaders 


ASSISTS 


GOALTENDING 

(Emptv-Nel Goals in P m a i theses) * 


POWER-PLAY GOALS 



Go 

Ppg 

Kerr, Phi. 

37 

13 

ButianL PR. 

35 

11 

GauleL Que. 

39 

* 

Hawerchuk. Win. 

40 

9 

BJuttar, N.Y.I. 

38 

e 

SHORT-HANDED GOALS 



Go 

5hg 

Gretzky. Edm. 

39 

7 

Der logo. Tor. 

37 

3 

KurrL Edm. 

39 

3 

McKernimr. Qua. 

40 

3 

TJWurrav. Chi. 

40 

3 

GAME-WINNING 

GOALS 



Gp Gwg 

Karr. PhL 

37 

6 

KurrL Edm 

39 

6 

Bossy, n.y.1. 

37 

5 

GorntMf, Wash. 

40 

5 

SHOTS 

Gp 

S 

Bourque- Bos. 

39 

l« 

Gretzky. Edm. 

39 

174 

Mad rails CoL 

40 

168 

Gartner, wash. 

40 

165 

Dionne. LA 

39 

159 

Ooradtilck. Del. 

40 

159 

NicMIS, LA. 

39 

>58 

Bossy, N.Y.I. 

37 

147 


NHL Standings 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick DWIslM 

W L T Pts GF GA 


23 11 5 SI 164 117 

22 11 7 51 163 123 


PMIoMpMa 

WsoWPiTton 

NY islanders 21 14 1 43 184 US 

Pfffste/ren IS 19 A 3* IV W 

NY Rengare 14 19 6 V 143 158 

Haw Jersey 13 22 4 X 137 164 

Adams Division 

Montreal 21 11 8 X 144 132 

Buffalo II 12 9 45 148 118 

QuaOOC I* 14 i 44 1 48 154 


Sauve 
CMMitler 
Buffalo (31 
From* 

Urxfl»ndi 
Pftlludelptila n> 
Meson 
Mao in 
Jensen 

WttsMnafoa (3) 
Permev 
Soetaert 
Montreal U) 
Moon 
Futir 

Edmonton (2) 

Prefers 

Keans 

Svlvesfrf 

Daskalakhi 
Boston U) 

SkoradaraU 
Bonnermon 
auouob (2) 
Bouenard 

Gasset in 
Sevlanv 
Quebec HI 
Heinz 
Wamslev 
Uul 

SL Louis n> 
Melodic 
Beauere 
AManson 
Sands 

Minnesota (31 
Lem aim 
Edwards 

Catoonr (T) 
Hanlon 

Vanttiasbrauck 
N.Y. Ranoart (3) 
Janecvi 
Ella! 

los Anaaiatf]) 
HrwJev 
Smith 
Mammon 
N.Y. Islanders 

Hayward 

Bchrand 
Wlaniiftta HI 


MP 

Ga 

SO 

Avg 

1548 

70 


271 

775 

40 

0 

110 

65 

4 

0 

369 

2588 

118 

2 

IN 

484 

17 

0 

211 

1386 

99 

1 

3.15 

2570 

117 

1 

256 

441 

19 

1 

259 

1554 

87 

2 

197 

245 

14 

0 

363 

2*42 

123 

3 

3Jtt 

1565 

86 

1 

110 

780 

44 

0 

238 

Ml 

132 

1 

359 

1,139 

54 

1 

264 

1522 

72 

1 

354 

2561 

US 

2 

355 

1564 

78 

0 

3120 

651 

36 

0 

352 

102 

6 

0 

253 

164 

14 

a 

5.12 

1JS1 

116 

0 

363 

587 

27 

l 

276 

1534 

IIP 

o' 

359 

1*21 

KS 

i 

157 

1571 

68 

0 

321 

1A32 

68 

0 

3.9S 

199 

17 

a 

5.13 

2502 

154 

e 

169 

70 

3 

0 

257 

1547 

63 

0 

361 

1.194 

78 

8 

352 

2511 

141 

0 

176 

1527 

57 

0 

233 

905 

60 

1 

298 

364 

27 

0 

466 

87 

8 

0 

552 

2JS3 

155 

1 

290 

1565 

81 

0 

165 

1562 

74 

0 

All 

2577 

158 

0 

191 


Denver 

Boston 

San Antonia 

LA Lakers 

Derail 

Portland 

Kansas a tv 

Philadelphia 

Utah 

Atlanta 

Phoenix 

CWCOBO 

Indiana 

Dallas 

Houston 

New Jersey 

Milwaukee 

New York 

LA. Clippers 

Golden state 

Washington 

Cleveland 

Seattle 


G 

34 

34 

34 

34 

34 

35 

32 

33 
35 
35 
35 

34 
34 
32 

34 

35 
34 
34 
34 
32 

34 
31 

35 


PTV 

4038 

3951 

3941 

3922 

2404 

3989 

3426 

3735 

3880 

3832 

3828 

3704 

3487 

3452 

3458 

3744 

3842 

3810 

3794 

3369 

3540 

3223 

3519 


Milwaukee 

Seattle 

Washington 

Houston 

Dalits 

Boston 

Philadelphia 
New Jersey 
A Manta 
Now York 
Phoenix 
CMcaua 
LA. Lakers 
LA Clippers 
uitdi 
Portland 
Cleveland 
Golden state 
Derail 
Indiana 
Kansas City 
Sai Antonio 
Denver 


TEAM DEFENSE 

G PIS. 

34 

35 
34 
34 

32 

34 

33 

35 
35 

34 

35 
34 
34 

34 

35 
35 

31 

32 
34 
34 
32 
34 
34 


3434 

3414 

3542 

3599 

3434 

3440 

3555 

3783 

3795 

3924 

3827 

3729 

3734 

3955 

3880 

3894 

3444 

3597 

3531 

3722 

3945 

3994 


Avg 

1185 

J16J 

1155 

1154 

1148 

1148 

11X3 

1112 

110.9 
1098 
1094 
1098 
1084 
1078 
1074 
1078 
104J 
1058 
1054 
1058 

1047 

1048 
1004 

Avg 

1018 

1038 

1042 

1058 

1078 

1074 

107.7 
108.1 
1084 
109.1 
1098 

109.7 
1098 

109.9 
1HL9 
1118 

111.7 
1124 
11X7 
1134 

1153 

1154 
1174 


G Nol Avg. 
32 395 128 

34 407 128 

34 334 9.9 

21 192 9.1 

35 3B3 8.1 

32 251 78 

35 374 78 

35 371 13 

M 249 72 

31 237 74 


Johnson. LAL 
Thomas. Dot. 

Moore. SA 
LuaJL Hou. 

Nixon, LAC 
Thew, ICC 
Richardson. n_i. 

Sparrow. N.Y. 

Valentine, PIL 
Green, Utah 

FREE THROWS 

Ftm Fta Pet 

Adame. Ptix. 83 87 843 

Davis. DaL 45 71 815 

Trlpvcka. Def. 134 148 806 

Bird. Bos. 134 151 801 

Vandoweahe. Pfl. 179 202 884 

Davis, Cte. 114 129 884 

Taney, PhL 120 137 874 

Brotz. GJ. 54 44 875 

Cheeks. PhL 70 80 875 

Thews. ICC. 137 157 873 

THREE-POINT FIELD GOALS 

Fgm Fga Pd 
459 


Bird. Bos. 
Agufren, DaL 
Davis, DaL 
Faster, Phx. 
Free. Cie. 
Bradley. Wash. 
Griffith. Utah 
MOO re, SA 
EIIIl Dal. 


17 37 
12 27 

12 27 
25 45 

10 24 

13 34 
50 135 

14 44 

11 31 


Top-20 College Ratings 

The top-20 teams in The A ssocki t c d Press 
college basketball pan (Rrsl-ptace votes la 
parentheses, total points baaed on 2»-T9-«L 
etc, records through Jan. 7 and last wears 
ranking): 

Record Pts Pvs 

1. Georgetown <631 138 1279 1 

2. Duke (1) 10-0 1214 2 

3. SI. John's 11-1 1101 4 

A So. Methodist 11-1 1049 7 

5. North Carolina 10-1 987 9 

4. Memphis St. 9-1 937 3 

7. Syracuse B-l 740 5 

8. Oklahoma 10-3 432 13 

9. Georgia Tech 10-2 425 8 

10L Kansas 11-2 413 11 

11. Indiana 9-3 *52 12 

Vt Boston College 10-1 442 — 

U DePem W 344 ID 

14. Louisiana Tech 12-1 341 18 

15. UllnoJi 11-4 334 6 

1L VHtonava 9-2 302 — 

17. Michigan Si. tl-1 301 — 

1& Va. Commonwealth 9-1 Z75 20 

19. Iowa 13-2 3*9 — 

2Bl Oregon St. 11-1 238 - 

The United Press International board of 
coaches top-28 oofleee basketball ratings 

(With 


1. G eorgetown (40) (134) 
t Duke (104) 

X Southern Methodist (11-1) 

4L St. John's (1) Ol-l) 

5. Memphis SL (9-1) 

L North Carolina (10-1) 

7. Oklahoma (KM I 
8 l Syracuse (0-1) 

9. Kansas (IGZI 
XL Georgia Tech 110-2) 

11. Indiana (9-3) 

IL Oregon SL (11-1) 

13. Louisiana Tech (12-1) 

ML Michigan SL (11-1) 

Ji DsPoul fW> 

14. Illinois (11-4) 

17. Boston College no-1) 

18. Louisiana St. (9-2) 

19. Washington 194) 

20. Vlllanowa (9-2) 

U.S. College Results 


612 

573 

488 

438 

381 

380 

230 

217 

209 

158 

140 

138 

120 

101 

92 

83 

74 

58 

SS 

49 


J85 

J82 

870 


Jan. 7; total points bated on IS tar first atace, 
14 for second, BtcJ: 


NBA Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Annette Diwlstan 


Adetphi 97, Now England 41 
BuHalO St. 47. NYU SB 
Delaware 45. Columbia 43 
Duquesne 70, AsNond. 58 
Hurder 66. Mu-door Evers 59 
Indiana Pa. 6& Kutztown 47 
Lafayette SB. Drexel 55 
Lovola. Md. 47. Robert Morris 64 
Navy 83. N.C- Wilmington 48 
Scranton 4& Dickinson 59 
SI. Bonavontura 54. Wldener 55 
St. Fronds, n.y. 49. Southampton 45 
SL John's 74, vntanovo 71 
Su s q u eh anna 72, Gettysburg 49 


Buse. K.C 

17 

48 

554 



W 

L Pd. 

GB 

Wdl Paterson 47, CCNY 60 

STEALS 




Boston 

29 

6 

629 

— 

Yale 79, Case Western 64 


G 

5tl 

Avg 

Philadelphia 

28 

6 

624 

to 

SOUTH 

Richardson, NJ. 

35 

97 

277 

Washington 

19 

15 

J59 

9to 

Bentley 47. Florida Tech 65 

Gs Williams, wash. 

31 

83 

268 

New Jersey 

16 

19 

657 

13 

Delta St. 90, Trey St. 76 

Lever. Den. 

34 

BA 

253 

New York 

13 

24 

5S1 

17 

E. Kantueky 49. Morehead St. 58 

Thomas, Del 

34 

82 

261 


Central DWWoe 



Florida si. 88. St. Joseph's. Maine 72 

Jordan. ChL 

34 

80 

255 

Milwaukee 

23 

13 

639 

— 

George Mason 81, E. Carolina 69 

Moore, SA 

34 

80 

255 

Detroit 

19 

15 

659 

3 

Jacksonville SL tel Taim-Marffn 70 

Cheeks. Phi. 

31 

71 

259 

Chicago 

17 

17 

500 

5 

Kentucky 75. Vondertallt 58 

Dunn, OefL 

34 

72 

2.12 

Atlanta 

15 

28 

629 

7to 

Louisiana Tech 83. Centenary 65 

Harper, DaL 

32 

6a 

266 

Indiana 

10 

24 

594 

12 

Mara Hill 84. Knoxville 75 

Conner, gjl 

30 

61 

2JB 

Cleveland 

8 

21 

558 

12W 

Marshall 42. E_ Tennessee SI. 57 





WESTERN CONFERENCE 


McNesse SI. BA, SE Louisiana 68 


Boston 

17 

16 

7 

41 

147 

140 

Low 

Hartford 

16 

IB 

4 

36 

130 

161 

Reich 

CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 


Kammpurl 


Nanis DNIiloa 




New Jertei 

Chicago 

18 

19 

3 

39 

157 

148 

Mlllen 

St. Louts 

16 

16 

6 

38 

138 

145 

weeks 

Minnesota 

13 

19 

7 

33 

140 

IS 

Hartford (1 

Detnril 

13 

22 

5 

31 

146 

184 

Romano 

Taranto 

6 

29 

5 

17 

119 

188 

Herron 


Smvthe Division 




Dion 

Edmonton 

27 

8 

4 

a 

202 

128 

Pittsburgh 

CaMw rv 

n 

IS 

4 

46 

196 

ia 

Stefan 

Winnipeg 

19 

17 

4 

42 

162 

167 

Mkalef 

Las Angeles 

16 

14 

8 

40 

175 

165 

Mlo 

Vancouver 

18 

26 

5 

25 

130 

219 

Detroit in 


MONDAY'S RESULTS 

3 1 3-7 
18 2-4 

Metric w (11). Fraiels 3 115). Dlneen (61, 
Turgeon CIA), Johnson (14); valve (15), Ter- 
rion 2 (41, Frvcer 19. Shots M OOOl: Hartford 
(on SL Croix) ll-M—31: Toronto (on Mlllen) 
J5-7-9 — Jl. 

LOS Angeles 8 118-4 

Boston 112 1-5 

Thelln (3), NUddtatan (IS), Courtnall (4). 
Unseman (ll).SImtn«r (24); Rvskowski (8) 
Dionne (221 0T>wyer (1) Pox (19>. SMtif on 
peal: Los AngetoS (on Peelers) 11-9-15-1—34; 
Boston (on janecyk) *-12-11-3—31. 

Goulet. Qu*. 19 144 

Carpenter, wash. 40 145 


Besier 
SI. Croix 
Bernhardt 
Wreogati 
Toronto (1) 


12*2 a 

1,076 73 
2870 Iff 
U 74 B8 
910 49 

2J84 168 
940 56 

932 64 
425 3S 
1297 155 
1.420 91 

1«9 77 
2429 147 
789 47 

U24 91 

230 23 
1365 164 
1JG9 16 
420 40 

2AM 157 
662 42 
1491 82 
553 43 

2J04 169 
1.500 108 
870 67 

60 7 

2428 184 
633 43 
480 34 
365 26 

893 75 
2471 111 


0 44) 

0 447 
• 4JT 

1 X5S 

0 ASS 

1 03 
1 157 
0 4.12 

0 4.94 

1 445 

0 IBS 

1 448 
I All 
1 347 
0 443 

0 427 

1 4.14 
1 U1 

0 SJ1 

1 4.19 
1 341 
0 451 

0 467 

1 IBS 
0 432 
Q 442 

0 740 
8 454 

1 448 
0 425 
0 447 

0 544 

1 458 


Kina, N.v. 

Short, G£. 

Danllev, Utah 
English. Den. 

Bird. Bes. 

Malone. PM. 

Wilkins, AIL 
Jordan. CtiL 
Natl. Don. 

Johnson. KLC 
Cummings. MIL 
Thomas Del. 
WooirJdge, CM. 
Aguirre, Doll. 
Griffith, Utah 
Moncrltf. ML 
vondemeahe. PtL 
Chambers. Sea. 
AMvf-Joour. LAL 
Garvin, SA 

FIELD GOAL 


SCORING 
G FG 

28 355 

30 333 
34 238 
34 388 

34 382 

33 277 

35 358 

34 337 

33 383 
32 310 

35 337 

34 299 

34 5)7 

31 280 

35 329 
31 252 
35 296 
35 277 
34 310 
34 279 


FT Pts AV0 
220 930 335 
198 882 294 

197 673 2B4 
152 929 Z7J 
136 917 274 
317 871 264 
192 913 26.1 
206 882 2S4 
209 815 247 
151 775 342 
166 840 240 

198 809 234 
)75 mm 
141 715 211 
92 800 22.9 

184 691 332 
179 774 22.1 
211 7M21.9 
IIS 738 21.7 
161 719 21.1 


BLOCKED 5HOT5 

G Blk Avg 

Eaton, Utah 35 195 549 

lUllns. AIL 30 89 247 

Otahman. Hou. 34 83 244 

5amMoa Hou. 34 BD 245 

Abdul- Jobber, LAL 34 75 221 

Wallftl. LAC 34 75 221 

Cooper. Den. 34 73 2.15 

Lister. Mil. 36 76 2.11 

Bowie, PtL 31 63 243 

Malone. PhL 33 65 1.97 


Midwest Division 

Houston 20 14 588 - 

Denver 19 15 459 i 

Dallas 17 16 515 2to 

Utah 17 19 472 4 

San Antonio 15 19 441 5 

Kansas City 13 20 JM Mb 

Pacific Divdfea 

24 10 206 — 
18 « SB 7 



16 19 457 8U 

14 21 432 9V> 

15 31 417 16 

16 23 203 13W 


Donakhon, LAC 
Gilmore, SA. 
Nance, Phx. 
Ruians. wash. 
Banks. SA. 
AMuLJatobor. LAL 
McHale, Bos. 
Worthy. LAL 
Johnson, LAL 
woolrldoe. ChL 


PERCENTAGE 
Fa Pan Pd 
143 207 491 
225 343 420 
295 485 408 
231 381 595 
125 213 587 
310 531 586 
215 373 576 
254 441 576 
211 372 567 
317 559 567 


MBITS GIANT SLALOM 
(Al Sdiladmlna. Austria) 

1. Thomas Bunder, Switzerland. 1:1924- 
1:1621—2:3655 

2. More GlnonMIl, Luxembourg, 1:20.97- 
1:1529— 2:3426 

1 Martin Honor, Switzerland, 1:2028- 
1:1755—2:3823 

4. Gunther Madgr, Austria, 1:2155- 

1:1722—2:3857 

i Joel Gaspez, Switzerland. 1:2147- 
1:1740-2:3857 

6. Richard Promotion. Italy. 1:20.96- 
1:1803-2:3829 

7. Jure Franks, Yugoslavia, 1:2041- 
1 : 1854—2:3955 

& Franz Gruber. Austria, 1 :21 48-1 ‘.1858— 

2:3954 

9, Ineemar SttnmarK Sweden, 1:2151- 
1:1759—2:3940 

Id Hubert Strata, Austria. 1:2157-1:17.95— 


LA. Lakers 
Phoenix 
Portland 
LA. aippors 
Seattle 
Got Den state 

MONDAY'S RESULTS 
Baden 87 13 27 31—188 

New Yurie IS 21 23 26- *7 

Bird 9-168-8 26. Parish 1020 1-221; King 8-21 
4-3 22. Cummings 8-1 A 5-4 27. Rebounds: Bos- 
ton 48 ( Pgrl#n 11), New York a (Cummlnos 
MI. Assists: Boston 32 (DJohnwi 12), Now 
York 19 (Sparrow 51. 

Phoenix M M 18 28- ft 

PhHudeMia 24 Is 27 23-181 

Taney 9-14 3-321. Mataw 4-9 7-719; Nance* 
14 3-3 21, Humphries 8-16 3-3 19. MiMdltfs: 
Phoenix 36 (None* 61. Ptiltadelphia34(Borii- 
toy 13). Assets: Ptioanix26 (HoltortAdamsS), 
Philadelphia 22 I Bark lev 4). 

Golden State B 2S 38 23-H1 

Kansas atv zs 22 25 3S— IIS 

Woodson 6-11 12-15 24. Johnson 6*18 6-6 18: 
Short 17-4244 38, Floyd 5-18 66 17. Rebounds: 
Golden State 51 (Smith 11), Kansas City 57 
(Thompson 1S1. Assists: Golden State 73 
(Bratz ■). Kansas Cltv 31 (Drew 13). 
Dallas 97 86 26 23-102 

Seattle 9D162I2S— 88 

Blackmon 811 3-3 19, DOvfe 810 83 19, 


Murray St. 4* New Orisons 4| 

N. Georgia 85. Webber 75 
tLC-Charkme 75, Hartford 65 
Tampa 78, Pwrdue-Cakimot £2 
Temwsaea Tech 70, MkhBe Twin. 64 
Virol no Union 85. Corson-Newnmn 72 
W. Gaorsio 69, N. Atofcomo 64 
MIDWEST 
Butter 70. Detroit 67 
IIL-CMano 8k Jackson St. 63 
Kansas 79. W. Carolina 62 
Missouri 88, 5W Texas SI. 54 
SL Mm it, Mien. 77, Cartefon S3 
SW Missouri 5t. 7L Texas-Ariington 49 
Xavier, Ohio 95. Lovola (1L 9Q 
SOUTHWEST 

Arkansas Tech 70. S. Arkansas 68 
Creighton 87. Southern U. 82 
Houston Baptist 71. Prairie View 52 
Oral Roberto W, Evansville 75 
Wee 71 Notre Dame 78 
SL Louis 7X Oklahoma City 60 
Stephen F. Austin 88. Howard Payne 63 
Texas Lutheran 79, Texas A&l 67 
Texoa-Ef Paso 66. Oatatsf QrfL 47 
FAB WEST 

CM-Santa Barbara 84, Long Beach SI. 73 
Fresno SL 5& Son Jose St, 49 
Hawaii Loa 79, Hastings (Neb.) 75 
Hawaii Paciflc 94, Alaska- Falrtxsiks 61 
Loyola. Colli. 84, U5. International 65 
Whitworth 70, Seattle Pacific 61 


Transition 


Bradeur 

Coprice 

1641 83 

988 BS 

0 678 
0 550 

REBOUNDING 

G OH Def Tot Avg 

r.trxa 

OVERALL STANDINGS 

Aoulrre 0-18 1-3 17, Harper B-12 0-1 17: Cham- 
bora 12-21 (Ml 24, Slkma W6 M18. Wood 8-172-2 

Garrett 

4Q7 44 

8 669 

Malone. Phi. 

33 

164 

270 

434 112 

1. Glrordelll, 140 points 

18. Rebound*: Dallas 49 (Awing I2).5aaftln 

Vancouver {11 

2688 219 

8 558 

Lolmbeer, Dei. 

34 

114 

787 

401 116 

1 Firm In ZOrbriggen, Switzerland. 104 

48 (Slkma 13). Asitets: Dallas 27 (Aguirre 71, 

— 


Ololuwart. Hou. 

34 

178 

215 

393 116 

3. Andreas wonseL Liechtenstein, 101 

Seattle 30 (Henderson 14). 

SAVE PERCENTAGE 


Ruland. Wash. 

33 

no 

257 

357 115 

4. Burn tor, Switzerland. 84 

Utah 19 16 » 36— 106 


5 

Pd 

Williams, NJ. 

35 

136 

259 

395 116 

5 Hanoi, 73 

la. enppers a 25 a 28 — im 

Mooa, Earn 

603 

510 

Slkma, Sea. 

35 

97 

2W 

391 !tf 

6- Max Jutan, Switzerland, 70 

Johnson 9-202-420. Smlth8-U Mi9j Dontiev 

Fuhr, Edm 

710 

698 

Thompson. K.C. 

32 

107 

246 

353 116 

7. Robert Ertochor. Italy, 64 

8-21 6-7 a Wltk»ft*6-13 6-4 18. Rebounds: Utah 

Lindbergh, PM. 

970 

698 

Eaton, uioh 

35 

91 

295 

386 116 

8. Paolo de Chleso, Italy, SI 

49 (Poultz 8), Ln Angolas 40 (Walton 151. 

Meioche. Min. 

547 

696 

Giimani, SA 

34 

KB 

268 

370 10.9 

9. Baton Krtzol, Yugoslavia, 58 

Assists: Utah 20 (Groan A). Los Angetoa 33 

Romano, pit. 

400 

695 

Vincent, DM. 

32 

83 

Ml 

344 106 

10. Sienmorfc, 54 

(Nixon tin. 


BASEBALL 
Americas 1 toque 

Kansas city— T raded uj„ wosWnai 
shortstop, la Hie Montreal Expos far Ka 
Baker, outileMer, and Mike Khmunen. i 
chenAcnuired George Fousstones, tti 
basemaik irom the Detroll Tiger*. 

FOOTBALL 

Naftonat Football League 

HOUSTON — Fired Kay Oaitna ottens 

coordinator. 

MINNESOTA— Named Marc Tratmm 
tlsiant coach. 




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Page 16 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9, 1985 


OBSERVER 


Get Hold of Wyatt Earp 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — I never knew 
Abilene on Saturday (right. or 
Dodge City, or Tombstone in the 
old days, but the old-timers still 
talked about those places when I 
first came to New York. 

“I’ll tell yew this, young feller—" 
That was the way they talked, only 
with a Bronx accent. “I'll tell you 
this, young EeUer, anybody who 
could survive Dodge and Tomb-’ 
stone and Abilene on a Sadddy 
night, he jest naturally ain't gonna 
have one bit of trouble surviving 
the New York subway.” 

I thought of those words the first 
time I walked down those mean 
steps and pul token to turnstile. As 
I did so, four men jumped over the 
other turnstiles, thus breaking the 
social contract under which all rid- 


Thai's why the man with the 
hatchet who used to come out of 
the subway doors splitting skulls of 
people on the platform never man- 
aged to brain me. Behind the trash 
can, I was out of the line of hatchet. 
□ 


The years passed. Loved ones 
ied with me: “Stay out of 


ers had agreed to pay equally for 


underground travel 
My instinct was to seize the re- 
bellious louts and compel them to 
pay for their rides, but 1 remem- 
bered the old-timers, who had said: 
“Hie way sensible folks survived 
Dodge and Tombstone and Abi- 
lene on a Satiddy nigh t was jest 
pretend nothing die least bit un- 
usual was goin’ on. Then eventual- 
ly. of course, Wyatt Earn, he’d 
came a-ridin' into town ana pretty 
soon the place would be so safe that 
everbody d feel like they was in Sl 
P atrick’s Cathedral." 

O 

Remembering the wisdom of the 
old-timers, I let the turnstile- 
jumpers go free, thus — so I have 
since been assured — saving my 
life. 

With the passing years 1 saw it 
was easy to save my life in the 
subway. The old-timers had been 
right when they told me: 

“You see, son, if a feller wanted 
to survive Tombstone and Dodge 
and Abilene on a Sadddy night, he 
had to know things like where the 
line of fire would be, so's he could 
stay out of it until Wyatt Earp 
could eventually come along and 
make evmhing as safe as Mac/s 
on Monday morning. Same rule 
applies for subways." 

And it did. That's why, when 
everybody used to push everybody 
else off the platform in front of 
oncoming trains. I was never killed 


by a train. I was back in the middle 
epl 

hind the trash can where the push- 


f a train, i w as dock lu me mumir ^ 

the platform hunkered down be- 


pieadi 

those barbaric subways.' 

I would not be moved. “A man's 
got to do what a man's got to do,” I 
told them. 

A few God-fearing people — 
fare-payers, schoo Unarms, parsons 
— had to keep a toehold under- 
ground until Wyatt Earp arrived to 
restore civilization. 

More years passed, working their 
evil rhangg upon my youth. Light 
bulbs were going oat aD over the 
subways. Subway doors (hat had 
once opened partly now opened 
scarcely at all; when they did, the 
menacing figure that slithered in 
and gave each passenger a glance so 
villainous as to chill the most felo- 
nious blood was — yes, that figure 
was mine. 

How had this foul distortion of 
human nature been wrought from 
the charming, romantic youth who 
had once listened with delight to 
the old-timers talking about Tomb- 
stone and Dodge and Abilene on 
Satiddy night? Years of subway 
riding bad done iL 

I had realized that Wyatt Earp 
was never going to come, ai least in 
my lifetime. That Mayor Edward 
Koch and Governor Mario Cuomo 
were never going to come either. 
Why should they? Up in the sunlit 
world of limousines and helicop- 
ters, why should they venture into 
the r uin, of civilization? 

□ 

And so 1 had turned myself into 
a creature of such menacing ap- 
pearance that other subway riders 
scurried for other cars when they 
saw me. 

Then — a horror! Two weeks 
ago, another subway rider shot four 
teen-agers because they looked 
menacing. And the subway riders 
of New York still applaud They 
want more shooting. I must get rid 
quickly of my menacing look, but I 
cannot Cultivated so Tong, it will 
not come off. 

Ed Koch, Mario Cuomo, send 
me your limousines. Better yet, get 
‘ ” of Wyatt Earp fast. 


ers couldn’t find me. 


New York Tuner Service 


Kenneth Clark: Reflections on Racis : 


By Walter Goodman 

New York Times Service 

N EW YORK — “If you look at my re- 
cord," said Kenneth B. Clark, with a 
melancholy smile, “you can see I’m no proph- 
et." 

Clark, who turned 70 last July, was reflect- 
ing mi a lifetime of effort in behalf of racial 
integration and rhe education of black chil- 
dren. With his hair untouched by gray and his 
trim mustache, he looked younger than his 
years, but his tone was weary. 

He recalled that he had been “very opti- 
mistic" 30 years ago, when the Supreme 
Court outlawed school segregation in the case 
of Brown vs. the Board of Education of 
Topeka, Kansas. But the optimism has long 
faded. 

After all the civil-rights successes of the 
past several decades, he observes gloomily 
that many black children are sti ll 
segregated and inferior schools, and he con- 
fesses that he has no new answers to a bleak 
and seemingly intractable situation. 

“I believed in the 1950s that a significant 
percentage of Americans were looking for a 
way out of the morass of segregation," be 
said. “It was wishful thinking. It took me 10 
to 15 years to realize that I seriously underes- 
timated the depth and complexity of North- 
ern racism." 

Clark, distinguished professor of psycholo- 
gy emeritus at City College of New York and 
a member of the New York State Board of 
Regents, attracted national attention in 1954 
when the Supreme Court, in its Brown deci- 
sion, cited hts work on the pernicious effects 
of segregation on black children. 



He shook his head unbelievingly as be 
asked: “Do they see blacks as threats? ft’s 
complimentary. 'but unrealistic." 


Clark expressed particular distress at the 
criticisms of onetime allies such as Nathan 
Glazer, the Harvard sociologist who is a for- 
mer student of his and whom he described as 
“very intelligent and likable." Clark conced- 
ed that the critics have a point when they 
argue that some programs, such as Aid to 
Families With Dependent Children, the ma- 


jor federal welfare program, may have wors- 
ened the lot of blacks bv enc 


Tla New Turk Tm 

Kenneth B. Clark 


her, recalling. “She was always interested in 
individuals." 

Clark’s own interests have drawn him to 
social issues, as a scholar, teacher and consul- 
tant to universities, corporations and govern- 
ment bodies. He was the first black to receive 
a doctoral degree in psychology from Colum- 
bia University, and be joined the City College 
faculty in 1942. His books include “Dark 



Drawing on the studies of Clark and other 
social scientists, U. S. Chief Justice Earl War- 
ren wrote that to separate black children 
from white “solely because of their race gen- 
erates a feeling of inferiority as to their status 
tn the community that may affect their hearts 
and minds in a way unlikely ever to be un- 
done.” 

In a recent interview at the consulting firm 
he founded in 1975 when he retired from 
teaching, Gaik mused on. (he disappointing 
sequel to that decision: ‘In the South, you 
could use the courts to do away with separate 
toilets and all that nonsense. We haven't 
found a way of dealing with discrimination in 
the North.” 

Framed photographs stood out on his of- 
fice’s bookshelves: Har t with President Jim- 


my Carter, group portraits of officials and 


colleagues, family snapshots. 

He referred often to his wife and closest 
colleague, Mamie Phipps Gark, who died in 
August of 1983. In 1946, the couple founded 
the Norths de Center for Child Development 
to provide psychological services to Harlem 
residents, and Mrs. Gark remained its execu- 
tive director for the next 34 years. His rough 
chain-smoker' s voice softened as he spoke of 


Clark, a veteran of dvfl rights causes, has 
not been identified with demonstrations. “I 
haven't been arrested since I was at Howard 
University in 1935 ” he reminisced. “I was 
picketing the exclusion of blacks from the 
congressional dining room. I enjoyed that, 
but 1 don't plan to be arrested for picketing 
the South African mission.” 

He seemed perplexed as wefl as angry at 
the growth of opposition to programs to help 
blacks in the past decade. “The civil rights 
division of the Reagan Justice Department is 
taking a position against the civil rights 
laws," he said. “That didn’t happen in the 
Nixon administration. I don’t believe the 
Justice Department can pul the genie of civil 
rights back into the bottle, but they can slow 
down the movement of the 1970s." 

Gark said he was “bewildered’' by the 
stand against desegregation of Northern 
schools and neighborhoods by former liber- 
als, some of whom are now identified as 
“neoconservatives." 

“The neoconservatives are formidable ad- 
versaries,” he granted. “They say that victims 
are the cause of their own victimization. “We 
pulled ourselves up by our bootstraps,’ they 
say. and they want us to do the same even 
though they want to take away our boots.” 


jy encouraging a trend 
toward one-parent families and helping to 
maintain what he continues to call the “pa- 
thology" of ghetto life. 

“Bui that's not God-ordained.” he added. 
“I'm convinced that social engineering is no 
more difficult than space engineering. If a 
program to get us to the moon didn’t work, 
the engineers would try another program. But 
in social engineering you have to have the 
political and racial attitudes to keep trying" 
Clark also lamented the “contemporary 
passivity of black leadership.” which he at- 
tributed lo “battle fatigue." He suggested 
that a new type of black leader was wanted, 
“with new perspectives.” but allowed that he 
could not provide those perspectives. 

He acknowledged that the Reverend Jesse 
Jackson had brought excitement to the presi-. 
den dal camp ai g n, then shrugged, “1 do not 
see any effects of his candidacy on the larger 
problem. Charisma can't help that.” 

The overriding problem, in his view, re- 
mains “the perpetuation of segregated and 
inferior education and gbettoization.” The 
only glimmer of hope he discerns is that 
whites will come to recognize that racism is 
“a social cancer" that threatens the whole 
society. 

“I don’t want to be cynical" he said, “but 
when drug use spreads from the ghetto to 
white youths, then society takes action." 

Referring to recent calls from Washington 
for “excellence” in education, he remarked, 
“I doubt that we can have excellence in some 
schools and intolerable inferiority in others.” 
He summed up with quiet passion: “It may 
be possible to maintain a high standard of life 
for whites at the same time that minorities are 
kept at oppressed levels, but I don’t believe iL 
Am I naive about that? If so, well never get 
rid of American racism.” 

He recalled the words of Thurgood Mar- 
shall, who represented the civil rights forces 
in the Brown case before he was named a 
justice of the Supreme Court: “Kenneth, 
there is only but so much lawyers can do. 
After we get the (aw clear, the hard job 
begins." 

Marshall's words of 30 years ago remained 
in the air like an unresolved chord, as Gark 
puffed at a cigarette and sighed, “I am bewil- 
dered.” 


PEOPLE 


Golden Globe Nominees 


“.Amadeus." based on the life erf 
Wolfgang Amados Mozart, and 
“The Killing Fields." a New York 
Times correspondent's experiences 
in war-tom Cambodia, led con- 
tenders for Golden Globe Awards 
Monday with six nominations each 
— incl udin g best film drama. The 
Golden Globes, presented by the 
Hollywood Foreign Pres Associa- 
tion. are considered a major indica- 
tion of leanings for the upcoming 
Academy Awards. Following 
“Amadeus" and “The Killing 
Fields” for top Golden Globe 
nominations was David Lean's “A 
Passage to India,” with five nomi- 
nations, including best director and 
screenplay. Also in the running for 
best motion picture drama were 
“The Cotton Club," “Places in the 
Heart” and “A Soldier’s Story." 
Movie musical or comedy nomi- 
nees were “Beverly Hills Cop." 
“Ghoslbusters.” “Micki & 
Maude." “Romancing the Stone” 
and “Splash." “Amadeus" won two 
nominations for best acton Tom 
Hidce for his portrayal of Mozart 
and F. Murray Abrahams, who 
played Antodo Salieri, the envious 
composer who set out to destroy 
Mozart. “Amadeus" also won 
nomination* for best supporting 
actor, best director and best screen- 
play. Sam Waterloo received a 
best actor nomination for “The 
Killing Fields.” which also picked 
up no mina tions for best supporting 
screenplay and 


the Skflful discovered America 17 
years before Christopher Columbus 
and may have explored from Hud- 
son Bay as far south as Maryland, a 
retired British geography professor 
claimed Monday. Professor Arthur 
Davies said in a paper published in 
the journal of tbe Royal Geograph- 
ical Society that Skilful, whose real 
name was John Lloyd, reached 
North America in 1475. Colum- 
bus's voyage of discovery was made 
in 1492.’ The reason Uoyd did not 
trumpet his discovery, which ac- 
cording to many experts bad al- 
ready been made by the Vikings, 
was very simple. Davies concluded: 
Columbus had sweet- talked Queoi 
IwMn of Spain into letting him 
claim possession under the Spanish 
crown, of all the lands he found 
when he sailed west But Lloyd, like 
most navigators of his day, had no 
such charter and kept quiet to stop 
rivals moving in. Davies was pro- 
fessor of geography at Exeter Uni- 
versity in southwest England from 
1948 to 1971 and is an honorary 
fellow of the Royal Geographical 
Society. 

□ 

Princess Caroline of Monaco 
said Tuesday she was disappointed 
at being forced to abandon the Par- 
is- Dakar rally and blamed the team 
co-driver for the accidenL The 
princess, who acted as navigator, 
her husband Stefano Casiragfai and 
co-driver Gian carlo ArcangioS 




i 


l*- - 






s J f. 


sl 




Former President Richard Nixon 
is in “excruciating pain” at his New 
Jersey home with a case of the shin- 
gles which has plagued him for the 
last month, the New York Daily 
News reported. A friend of the for- 
mer president told the News that 
Nixon’s physician. Dr. Harvey 
Klein, called it “the worst case of 
shingles he has ever seen.” The dis- 
ease is caused by the chicken pox 
virus and affects the nerve endings, 
often resulting in blisters and sores. 
Nixon, who turns 72 today, fin- 
ished work on Ins latest book — 
“No More Vietnams” — despite 
coming down with the ailment in 
December, the report said. Nixon 
has not been hospitalized with the 
condition but has remained in his 
Saddle River. New Jersey, home. 

□ 

A Welsh seafarer named John 


ten) into tbe first special timed leg 
of the event when their truck ran 


off the desert track after leaving • j 
and overturned 


Ouargla, 

Caroline said that contrary to pub- 
lished reports, ArcangidL not her 
husband, was driving at the time. 


A majority of Britons think 
Queen ERzabeth should abdicate in 
favor of her 36-year-okl son and 
heir. Prince Charles, according to 
an opinion poD published Tuesday. 
A similar poll in 1980 had two 
thirds against abdication. The lat- 
est survey, for the weekly ma garirw 
Woman, showed that 52 per cent of , 
(hose questioned thought the ; 
queen, aged 58 and in good health. ; 
should abdicate voluntarily. The ' 
magazine said most people sur- 1 
veyed were still in favor of the mou- ' 
aicby and the queen was the favor- 
ite member of the royal family. 


ANNOUNCEMENTS 


Henri de To 


vc I am pre- 

pmg ta axrenpondoncit for pifet- 
Wah to hear from 


canon wan no near tram anyone 
vrth arigtort;, ttonjcriphorii of When, 


ottwjmlin^Cart reimbursed. HD. 


i ftii NYC 1 0021 


ANONYi 

ftjm: 634 59 AS. 
Rome 39 48 91 


MOUS 


IX3NDON, ENGLAND. Dine privately 


aboard Work rasing dip to Green- 
wich. Reservations. Trts 01 


■4807295. 


MOVING 


INTERDEAN 


WHO BSE FOR YOUR 
NEXT INTERNATIONAL MOVE 


KHARS ESTIMATE CALL 


AMSTERDAM: 

ATHENS: 

BARCELONA: 


(07 II 89.9114 
(01)961.12.12 


CADIZ: 
FRANKFURT: 
GENEVA: 
LONDON: 


MANCHESTER. 

MUNCH: 

NAPLES: 

PARIS: 

ROME: 

VWJNA: 

ZURICH: 



0615269342 ■ 


DEMEXPORT 

PAMS • LYON • MARSEUE 
UUECNKE 

inti moving by speooist from nxvw 
c6« in Franca to dries in the wodd. 
Ted free from Praia 16JQ51 24 10 82 
BSE ESTIMATES 


CONTRSX: Cnstbusnw to 300 cities 
worldwide - Air/ Sea Co* ChwSe 
281 1881 Pore - Can uo 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 


FRENCH PROVINCES 


NEAR SAMCSBE (WINE AREA) in 
France, a Jyp*aV country haw ui a 
protecte d wane area Man wab 
-J land out- 


hourly rebuilt, vdh 
buMnfp. Price: 



ronaetnontj. Writ# to: 
943)2 Vincv 


Vincanrei Cede*. France 


'. A 


MONACO 


MONTE CARLO 


Prinapdity of Monaco 

SBUNG VBtY EXCEPTIONAL 
APARTMENT, PA' 

700 eq.m. private I 
Ramfenth* area Cantor of kwm, cabn, 
300 iqjn. Ivina space, larya entrance, 

largo rececMon. Or — 

0017 witti oam. lot go 
equipped kitchen, I ' 
small offiar 
Rfoqv. High 
Air camfaorad. electric 
EXCLUSIVE AGENCE 
BJ>. 54 
MC 98001 MONACO CB3EX 
Tab (93) SO 66 84 
it 469477 


.. W 

I roam for 
My 
tpare room, 
room. 


SWITZERLAND 


SUNNY SWITZERLAND 

LAKE LUGANO 

Lafaaida upui t men tt in a beautiful part 
■with (Miming pool, awn taring 
Pago. Rut quofcy equpmwtf Me 'fire- 
fW jarge terraas tahn fafcheni, 
etc. Prices from SF4S3,900 W to 
SF1 .123,600. Mortgage! up to 60% a 
lent interest rote. Saes pewits to 
foreigner s are available, nor further 
defats flaae contact. 
EMERAiD HOME LTD. 

Wo G Cation 3 
044000 Luboto-Tl* odi» 

Tel: Switzerland 91-542911 
Telex: 73612 HOME Oi 


SWITZERLAND 


FOBEKSNBRS CAN BUY: STUDIO/ 
APARTMENTS, CHALETS, VILLAS, 
Price* from about SFIQQwO. Regioifc 
Lot* Geneva, Monfccux & frsnow 
Mountam ranrtf. Wa have far you a 
big dKxce of i very_ lecBonafaly priced 


Swos homes, but aba the very i 
•he mart wdume BEFORE VOU MAKE 


A DEQSQN contact 
H. SBOtD SA. 


Tour Gr» 6 CH-IQQ7 lauume. 
Tel: 21/25 26 1 f Telex: 24298 SEBO CH 


PARIS A SUBURBS 


RE ST lOUS 

On the Seine, being Notre Dane 
Ground floor apartment 


bb Swng + bedixm, caosptiond 
Serge Rayier 329 60 60. 


WEST INDIES 


DOMNCAN REPUBUC 

Property far sale ii mast axdutiva hafi- 
beadi resort. Several plats af lord 
~ e yw. each) . Ganorud ian pew it. 

& electricity on size. Pwclitee by 
,ne»s dready ^proved by 
Goremmere decree. 

OWNBRStiP OF PROPERTY 
BiRTUS OWNER TO DOMMICAN 
PASSPORT WITHIN 3 YEARS. 
Write to: Bax 1606. Herdd Tribune. 
92521 Neufly Cede*. Franco. 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


GREAT BRITAIN 


F WBRSH P 17Hi CENTURY period 
cottage, 4 bedroom, 2 bathrooms, 
noor Sevenaaks, Kent, 30 mins train 
from Central Lond on, £550 per 
month. CtA G732-452S82 before 
930 am or dter 6 pm 


LONDON, far the bert fvnefied flat* 
and houses. Cora* the Soecafefe: 
Phifc*, Kay and Lew s. Teh London 
839 2245. Telex 27B46 RESIDE G. 


ANSCOMBE A ENGLAND with of- 
floe* in St Johns Wood & Kenenglon 
offer the best service in ruedeirud 
letting. Tet 722 7101 <01). UK. 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


HOLLAND 


Rerrthouse International 
020-448751 (4 lines] 

Amsterdam, Soiestein 43. 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


Embassy Service 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 


PARIS AREA FURNISHED 


74 CHAMPS-RYSHS 8th 


Studio. 2 or Jraom apartment. 
Orv: jim ill or more 
IE OABDGE 359 67 97. 


I Aira de Meerine 
75008 An 
Telex 231696 F 

YOUR REAL STATE 
AGENT IN PARIS 


FLATS FOR RENT 

SaECTBAKEAS 
IWNE 562-7899 

FIATS FOR SALE 

PHOT* 562-1640 

OFFICES FOR KBIT/ SALE 

PHONE 562-6214 


AVENUE FOCH 

Suratutxa reception. 


PAMS PORT ROYAL quiet, frmahed. 
2-rocjn m u dern ug d flat, elevator 
wrehnq machine, cfchwntw, heated 
aralabto now, 1 i month* F4&0Q. Tefc 
874 29 34 fcfayl 


IDEAL FOB SHORT TERM STAY. Pans 
studes & 2 rooms, decorated. Cotoad 
Sorefmr 80 rue Urwerete, ftx» 7th. 
TeL P) 544 39 4p. 


IESHAUES, owner 'i loft. hotoUke but 
wth 60 sam, TV. video, quolty 
F300 per dw. Teh 8$4tt7l2 


SHORT TERM in Latin 
No Oflenb. Tri: 329 38 63 


Quarter. 


BBT T6TR New large Gving bedroom 
fitted Idtohen both no egerf 527 6710 


15TH PEAR 5ENE, 2-roam, large tv 
ma. bedraom. Comfort. TeL 70443)7. 


PARIS AREA UNFURNISHED 


PARC MONISOUMS. Uvma 2 bed- 
. . bath, new bwVfcttdl 
comfartv F4A5C. TW 563 64 14. 


rooms, kitchen. I 


EPLANADE 2 beth, 2 baths. Reasorv 
abie, key money oppfoncei- 555 6841 


FAST EXECUTIVE KOMEHNUNG- 
ftsris & suburbs. Rents/sales 551 09 45 


REAL ESTATE 
WANTED/EXCHANGE 


NBA1Y (92) OR 17TR 2/3 rooms 
b5 tom. Maximum F5.000 d xx ge i 
inducted for Engfch executive in 
Fraiee 12-1 B months. Serious refer- 
ences. Starting Jai - Feb. 85. PaetbiS- 
ty poriong. Tek (23) 39 76 17. 


EMPLOYMENT 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


The G asified Depci m m* of the 
MTERNATIONAL HHUUD 7RBUNE 


seeks 

YOUNG JUMOR SALES PERSON 

ta isisi ioks man i n Frrmce to develop 
ending imd new contacts. Eanguoi 
french/ fogish. Self irxxAve and 
dynamism ■q^xeoaled. EEC nationd or 


warfara ptrrnrt. free February. Please 
send Cv. and photo to 


_ Max Ferrero 

inthnational herato iwupe. 

92521 NeuRJy Cede*. Fraw. 


FETROtBJM 
BROKERAGE RRM 


EMPLOYMENT 


GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


MTT. MOVING COMPANY SSCS 
ex p ei ien c ed srrfes representative, bi- 


faigucl Ensfeh/Frerefi for its ft** 
offa. Wree m fogfish with CV and 
photo with iday requireme n t s to 
newmener who wffl trsmaTiL Box 
1605. Herald Tribune. 92521 NeuOy 


Cedex. Fra*e- 


GENERAL 

POSITIONS WANTED 


2 CANADIAN (NTONATIONAL 

donor - fashion coor dinuta t . eques- 
trian rider. Sin • plot, ptvbsopher, art 
gradxsto. gemclorest. We abo hove 4 
0O« males. TetoS? 21341. 46 Cox- 

?S»J , wiSl T B don - °* B,V Tete » 

*49703 TBSH G. 


Strang Inti DecAigs 
veelo tor young team 


r^oung ' 


- around 25. 

. very aien 

- fluent French/ EngGsh 

- AvcAiJo rapefly 
Send CV + photo to 

sew CAST, 10 rue de CastigKom 
75001 Paris 


WTBNATIONAULY EXPERBICH) 
23 year old graduate in fitoi & tolew- 
eon seele pasmon with estobfchad 
proctocer or dredcr a asshrax. Far 
jwtme contact Daniel BcrtoJni 9 
Kendcl Ave, Epping, Essex 0M?6 
78346. 


HBKH LADY, 35, 

race, ipeals French 

Jtobxi parUhne job 


PA, duty free shop etc. Free now. 
Para 25073 85 5-9 pPL Serious only. 


EMPLOYMENT 


SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


INTERNATIONAL 
SHV1CE ORGAMZATION 

with a smdf Europecn coord noting 
office in Centraf Pn a looks*) far an 
Executive Secretoy/Assstant, bingud 
Engfah/ French, to wari for »ts Director 
respaneble for a large and growmg 
European Monagemerr Coreufroncy 
Drvisiorv. 


EMPLOYMENT 


_ SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


company « Pen 
spedatoed in importing aarmerts 
retires to work ifreclfy wSth mana^i 
(firedor, an 

EXPBUB4CB) 
SECRETARY 

Very fast shorthand, tenner in French 


with 


rerairemarts are good profes- 
I Wi [ u se of mod em equ ymenl 
moo experience a definitB 


•xpen^ias 

advarcoge, shorthand S i 


under prawe, initiative and sente of 
humor, "ttre cfebrtx^fard serrf un 
yard oMintugej" 


Knowledge of amounting and Europe- 
an languages wmM be advantageous. 


Sutoble condrfcries should send then 
CV (with photo] to Box 1601. Herald 
Trfljune, 5'2521 Neielly Cede*. frt»ce 


Don't Bilti 
INTHMATlOdAL 
SECRETARML POSITIONS 


TUESDAYS 

to An VfT OoMffied Section. 


International Business Message Center 


ATmmON EXECUTIVES 


nthmaiNrd 


of a itiSm render* wwid- 
moot of wham an m 


nod ». Ja vt Wtor Of (Par* 


613595^bofon TOojru, un- 


yoo 


outing 

tods mdrnur mmm go 
dPpon wfthm \ 48 hours. Tbm 
nxto h US. $9.80 or toad 
eraft o to nf pot fine. You must 
I carqptoto aid V«riB- 
rftfeUfingreUva. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


UNrrm sTATB 
WTHNATIONAL 
COMMBtCT GROUP 

W PASSPORT TO PROFITS to USA. 
EdAtt your products 365 days / yecr 


a irternaliemd erfiiition carter 


Pmne opp u rtmwy to obtain wposure 
sate far your products a IS 522 p 
dw " your own 11 iq. meter space. 
Take aAoeage, of tt» opportunity 


NOW. For detail contact : 


Ui Inter nohor ul Go mnwr ce Group 
Ni 07095 


P.Q. Baa 247, Wi 
Tet (201) 


135056 


WWBISALCONTAR4ERS LTD. 
Htfi Intern* toeome Flan 


17%% P/A 


in US$ 

U<1 provid e* jnvBsajrs with a high 
fa™ wnh sea/rity by operat in g 


_ toqueies erfl9% offer wil 

oontnM to be dodt vrth as received. 


guaranteed and 


Per detoSi of thb My guarait 
wired imr es neei* plan, conK 
UtvtVBSAI CONTVuhBtS LTD. 
P.O.BCK 562 LQhCON SW5 OOZ 
Tel 350 0667, Tlx, 896757 


CARISBERG 

One of Cofifanva'e man wcomsh* Reed 
Estate companes has a l eto cnon of 
lend parcels owrtdJe far mtgnation d 
tovenan. The properties, located 


throurtmut the stole" 
frorellOIMO to 


with terms. For tofarai ot igii about the 
c ompany, t heir tra ck record end (he 
pfOparta. canfotb 


CARI5BBG LAND CORP. 

PO Bax 412 
London NW3 4P9 
Tefc 936 9119. Tries 268048 art3013 


CASH BUYBt a vrifag to pay rhe best 
pnea far aB vrefl- kno wn brands of 
French 
wo<W. 


ora™ "revuwn aim U, 
di perfumes, calopie s and toiet 
f- rkox send offers to FE Trad- 


e^POBJSa Anstedaro/HJand. 


: 57233 attn Fe Tracing. 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


BUST HAM) EXPBBB4CE 


OF TW US MARKET 


For retable i n form a t ioii gathering for 


identifying new rrendl &”prod!X». 
Let ui hande w 


„ . .. _ _ yrar marfcm rewardt. 
Food /beverages a speciality. 


A Hoehr Associate 
175 West 93 Street 
New Yorfc, NY 10025 
Tbu 42890* 


COMPUTS PORTRAITS 

T-SHUtT FOTQ5 
„ NOW IN HAL COLOR 
onottcadi braness that cai earn you 

nstams from $1(1000 1 ■ SXOT. Kemo 
Computer Co, Dpt J9 fleethoensr 9 
6000 FnrfcfwtTW. Gvmony. 

Tefc 069747808 Tbu 412713 KEMA 


Collaborator Wanted 


tearing mdustnd Ster imrafaduring 
oompoiy of Inria & Criaitto wtCng to 
dverefy in car pdulion fitsr/aqUp- 
menf mawfochjrmg. Interested partes 


may cort otf Fitra r»Ci678B Centre* Ed, 
Crtcutto, 7M032 . ma Tbt 021/249) 


with proposals. Con aha meer m 
London far dheusdan. 


OffiMORE TAX ADVANTAGES 


Lew Cote OUes Comerafiara 
to Waridvride 


toenedlately. eirsieHe 

Comprefceraw Admnirtration ixri 


Directorid Services 
‘Strict caafidwrtefry* 

Wand ftmeces lid Bodacwri# Have, 
Sm tey eihB. Me af Man. 

Telex via UK 628 352 Wand & 
Tefc (0624) 28020720240/28933 


I mmi g rati on- Residency 
Nahm£zation 

Avofebfn through G overnment 
grogrc rojri C ortobaan. Oentroi & 


Contact 


IQ Golden W Mx WI 3AF 
Tefc (D1J 734 2077 IK.- 298240 Worid G 


IMMKJBATION TO USA 
MADE EAST 
Attomey & RmAcx obhans visa & per, 
mtment readeree. Helps to set up USA 
tomrewre A legates con v lie ud , toris- 
traia reodmol real estate. Far Free 
brochure ante David Hrsav 1201 


PRWQPAl erf M service ntt fce t e i u / 
«0«y y mou fa uiu ' 
nriprg European imfceiers ia « 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


USS 20,000000 8EQUBEJ 


For further information, contact: 

S«J MSG at Otow INC 


140 Ord St. Brootoyrv NY 11232 
92-7HXL TK 127570 


Tefc (718) 492-74 ... 

Asi for Joy. 


HBH WATH PEARL STRAND 
»id loose peert w sole to Hang Kan 
Good mighty end best price. Far mo 
defab iTK 57719 POttB HX. Tefc I 


sion. No. 


PttHDfiNrOF SBKON VAURY t 


Group, LM. taedalrzing to emen 
Jerinriocy bu^iesies, is to 
rope m raigti Jan. soeJdnq invasmets 
eapmi tertnology tronwr. and re- 
gwncl devriopmenl apportietoiti For 




UK ONSHORE COMPANE5I We 
provide nominee Director S Secre- 
torri Ccmptote ixmcftctoonl London 
bm oxaents opened nmfroneousfy 

Regatrobers bd. New Conecrtoi 


7HP. 


IMMIGRATION - MVE5TMENI5 

JN THI U5JL 
GONRDENTIAL 

Trare Oobrt fate m aB — I Ltd. 
28362 ' 


(714) 


2S362 Mernuerte Porkway | 
Vi*o. Crtriorrva 92692 ■ 
495-8475Triex 288601 TAGf-W 


5U«S PARTNS REOUKS with 
«mee ei Geneva, by Briiish entrefre- 
neur. Experienced in ftsatoon & eon- 
«" adwxtfooe. Prato aver 
SF300^000 emnsaged wati no < — * 
outlay. Bo* 401ft. UiT» 63 
Acre. London WCZ 9JH. 


SMALL US COMPANY has ton been 
agyd W potent an tool reed m 


ofttoare iaefcel as toltaeaMn oompa- 
ny looltira far tovastor IO heto buSd & 
prom o te itre xxi- toteraded tovestar 


am ami rej : Porn fll 345 81 83 <* 
USA 318457 6449. 


AN EXHIBIT OPPORTUNnY to to- 
vat at the movie industry. Seeking 
mvestori lor a near fereure Rtoi 


ttoetrty re pragnscLdian. Phase 
pry to-. 8 Tr PraducPora. 9903 


Santa 


Monica Bhrt. Sate 349. Beverly hub. 

-fclllV-M. 


CdL 90212 or Tol: 


^ mrefcat on riart^s bosk be in 
Atonch Ids Jon. to meet with 




FIDUCIARY BANKING on kvgq 
Werefaed (ocre. The orfy ra m m e r 
del bonk with a repte&an fohv« office 
in London loedoSnnq in iha serwea 
Arab Overseas Bmk & True (WX) 
Ltd, 28 Bbdc ftmee ft}. London 5E7. 
Tri 735 8171 


PRODUCING gold & damn! raw, 
need unesaneffl from £170.000. brio 
0367 21341. 1U 449703 TH5EE G 


BUSINESS 

OPPORTUNITIES 


^^3 

CHNA. BUSM5SMB4 traveStog to 
Chtoa often. W®ng to lads irto po» 
faSties far your praducJt buyua ft 
faftng. WAS conBOtr aftrojeds. Se- 
rty Bax 40178. 1.H.T.. 6futoflAere. 
London WC2E 9JH. 


SPAMSH TRADWG Cft con topply 

•tsgijsn 

Household arfdcs. Enquiries vu*t 
oome. POoa* 2733,O8O0Wareefana 
Tbu 97606 RNFT-E. 



US DOUAR 1NVBTMB4T. Earn 1SX 
rawed. Foreign eertrange avafarte. 
Cash Amenca finradal Gsrter, PjO. 
Ban 1987, fetonmee. R. 32741 USA. 
Tele* 8(0848 ST^D KSS. {305} 
84668901 







BUSINESS SERVICES 


ONSHORE 
UMITHJ COMPAMQ 
BAMCS 

INSURANCE COMPANIES 


Worldwide 

Nonvnees A Lh r vuc tration 
Boar 


LONDON RSWES94TA1TVE 
ASTON COMPANY KMMATK3NS 


Dept HI, 

I Victoria St 
We of Mra. 

Tote* 627691 SHVA G 


YOUR OFFICE M MW YORK, fifth 
.1 


KOUMAR - MeCARE SBtVICES. Do- 

wf^J^AN^^OteS^.Tri. 
021/34 82 18. Tba 25074 MQCOU. 


FINANCIAL 

INVESTMENTS 


Property Development 
IN USA ft UK 


Mriooro 

Develop 

London, W1R 


ID Golden 


Thu 29824b W<i« I G 34 


jEni® ^ of 


FROM TOP BAMCS AV> 


Joann 


Or Tetox 236464 


SS.N.T. 

164 SOU^J 


-UR 


’0016 


AM LOOKING FOB A mortgage af 
U2DJXB to be repaid over TO- 15 


won to purthcae o freehold in (he 
UK. Al p ra postoore c ora riee d , 


Write to tlrirt confidence: 66e 40177 
IHT. 63 Long Acre, London WC2 


j your name. PO BOX 625 
Dept. MI-1. Mdrietovn. NY 10940. 


S WISS U ff INSURANCE, first doss 

3252 


axjpeny, taoe bens. W. 5BLK. 
26. Ot-1009 FULLY. 


DIAMONDS 


acceptable. Good sdary far 


tent end hordworUng appcarrl 

CV& recent photo to reference SB 2-85, 
CABS. CO. 

26. '28 rue d Aboufc'r 
75002 Paris 


SECRET ABIES AVAILABLE 


GR - TIC CREME DE LA CRB4E tera- 
pprary help people wish you a Happy 
New Year. If you (xe o apod secrer- 
fary gw re a ari, Paris 758 82 30- 


EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


TBi/ESL TRAINERS required, 

mother longue. VdM French i 

papas a must. ErperiancEd. Pans 
wih easy access. Photo Araume to: 
Box 1597. Henrid Tribute. 92521 
Newty C erie*. Frtxxj. 


EXPERIENCED Tm. leadien sought 
with papers. Send CV + photo fa 
EXPRESS SECRETARIAT, l5r uo rfu 
Faubourg Montmartre, 75009 Paris. 
Reference IT), or/8, cdi 523-3440 
Extension 316. Thursday, 9 / 11 pm. 


LANGUAGE SCHOOL seris Ml tune 


mother-tonguo Enafah teachers. Mb t 
be in posuuian of EC passport i 
vofrd Core deTraraT.CaJlPorvs 747 


l ora 


DfAMOr«)S 


Your best buy. 

fine riamonds to any pnee range 
at lowest wholesale prices 
rirnct from Artwerp 
ter of the riamand vujrid. 

F»A guarantee. 

For free price fat write 
” Grid* 


928 


Embishsd 
PeHtaantfroat 
Beta fan - TM 

Tbu 71/79 iyl b. Ai the Diamond Orix 
Hevt af Anhrerp Diamand indwtry 


' 6ZB-2QIB Antwerp 
* P2 31 234 07 51 
>. Ai the Diamond □ 


OFFICE SERVICES 


LOS ANQB8 

Fimbhed offices in Beverly Ml Gem- 
vanert, presrigare address. Tb, mail, 
secretond & 


9777 W fefrre Bhd, Se. 609, fleveriy 
HA, CA 902]2.T^^Bife.167B. 


YOUR UMDON OFFICE 

OBHAM EXEOiTTVE CENTRE 
Con^reheneve range of eerviore 
750 Brewrt SfreeOindon WI, 
Tefc (01/439 6388 Tbe 261426 


PARS ADDRESS, ■■ 

■Since 1957LSJ>.provto«Hl 

Mex. meeftig rooms. 5 ruedArtefc, 
|^5k Teh 399 47 04. Tbo 6425a*. ■ 


YOUS Garrncr Office. Fuly 
■ mgbSraiai secrefevy. Phdi 


23 89/1 


IOFTAD. 


BRUSSB5 ADDRESS. Mai offices. 


phoney triee, seerotorid sendees. 
Contact 




OFFICES FOR RENT 


SHA®. PRESTKJWUS office 

ideal image and location far 

town .corporations which need on lm- 
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«. Shore pnuote tovra Boor mducfc 
"0. elegant reception area 
anarence room wte h video Kreenng 
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on cri tides, extojlert bcotian on fifth 
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9353800fer mo re detafc. Prefer mn. 

— i tenerts 


GBJEVA KA * s ^g , « s 

Fuiy equa ted offices to rent. Donidfc- 
aton trwJ,tetox& phane). Trade, rates 
owwwrtan & teerdond services. 

'SSMlfWStB' 


12 B0. So For ton gues. 


DOMESTIC 
POSITIONS WANTED 


ALWAYS AVAILABLE.- AU PAH 
dridren's nanny, mum's helpers 6 _ 
branches t»f 1st dass Eveto domestic 
help wtoridwide. Co* Sloan# Bureau, 


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INTONATTONAl HERALD TRIBUNE 


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Cook The bade rate is $9J0 per Ene per day -f- luari sa xe s. Hwreae 
25 tetters, ops and spaces to the first line and 36 in the fallowing fas. 
Mtoenum space is 2 Knes. No abbreviations accepted. 

Credit Cards: American Express, Diner's Club, Eurocard, Master 
Card, Access and Vbo. 


HEAD OFFICE 


LATIN AMHUCA 


Frefa: (For dasafiod only): 
747-4660. 


Bogota 2129608 

i AJree: 47 40 31 


P-H. 3^ 


EUROPE 


A ms terdam: 263615. 
Athens: 361-8397/360-2421. 
: 343-1899. 

it (01) 329440. 

: (069) 72-67-55, 

1 29-58-94. 

Itebani 67-27-93/66-2S-44. 
London: (01)8364802. 
Madid . 455-2891/455-3306. 
si (02) 7531445. 
ys (03) 845545. 
Rortwc 679-3437. 

Tel Aw. €0455 5». 
Vienna: Conrad Frankfurt. 


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San Jaea: 22-1055 
Santragoc 69 61 555 
Soo Paolo: 852 1893 


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tetfrfrdi. 667-1500. 
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Tahran 7524425/9. 
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ll;*- 


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t:B9S067()SLOAf»gG. 


CCMPAGY.Tbfcf 


EATON BUKAU EST. 1969. ovsriabfe 
now navies, mothers' haps & cri 
professional fcve-m domestic staff, UK 
6 Oversees. Gri) London 730 9566. 
Lie. UK. Empteymert Agency. 


seeks responsible 


rTM iTOJl 


OT fOTTfe 


weyfBoe^Ol 44, LHT, 63 Long Acre. 
London, WC2E9JH. 


Jos- 


ALWAYS AVAAABLELONDCNonty 
bobymtodert ft 1st dass ckriy maids. 
Cefl Sloono Surea:, London: 730 
81 22/51 4Z UCEMP. AGY. 


mOUSHNMMB ft Masher s Hefas 


free now. Nash Age ncy, 5 3 Omh 
Rood, Hare. UK. TeTlOOT 29044/5 


AUTOMOBILES 


1936 AUBURN PHAETON roodster 




mecharkrts, 71, 

Connelly farther, wire wheels, much 


more, tea n u merous to mention. Tek 
Holland i/77.22643. Th 18101 NL 


AUTO SHIPPING 


HOW TO IMPORT A EtRtOFEAN 
CAR INTO THE UriA. 

Ties document replans fuBy whex one 
mres da to bring a cor into ihe US. 
safely and lugolv. b todudes new & 
wed Eunuiaai auto iriOBi. buying Bps, 
DOT ft EPA oomarean addrems, as- 
tom efaeronce ft ripjg procedures 
as well ae legal points. Because af toe 


strong doear, you eon save up to 
USS 16^00 when buytog a Muroedhs. or 


BMW ui Europe & enportwg tt to Ihe 
Sirere. To rwaive tha maiuafc sand 

7000 9uitgart 1, Wert Germany 


SHV9MG CARS WORLDWIDE 


We 5Hppad 79,750 TtmrW Cm 
raON Vessels in 1983 


cau MATINA at 


ANn«P20 fines (3) 234 36 68 


SHP TOUR CAR TO A FROM USA 

VIA ANTWStP AM3 SAVE, free ho- 
tel Regular seffngj. Airport deSvery, 




Bdatum. Tefc 231 42 39, 


RANKRJRT/MAB4-W. 

tsermann GmbH. Tefc __ . 

PlA-up tri aver Europe *ro/rtnfips. 


WORUWSE Car dvppea & 
ah ATX. MV. Arterra2? 20 
- ' • “'231 l&T 




ramow 
2000 Ant- 
T* 31535 


Impnme par Offprint, 73 nude VEvangUe, 73018 Paris. 


TRANSCAR 20 ISO U Suour. 75116 
Para. Tri, 500 0304. Nee; 83W33. 

Antwerp: 233 99 85. Onnes 39 43 44 


AUTO CONVERSION 


DOT/ffA CONVHBKINS to Ui 
sped. Aoontonce guaranteed. WA 


WOO Freeporf Centre, Balti- 


mareMD TSZUJok 30143^8611 
ft* 4973689 


1 via US 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


EXCAUBUR 

AUTOM08HES 
tre cornjrietely handbuilt to America 
reid destated after the 1939 Merceda 
540^oSy44 of Ihe 250 unit praduc- 
Mn far 19S5 are betoa alaauad to the 
Eat market 
New far 1985 (far Europe ortyl is a 
speart General Wtotor* 57 «v 


one produdrjg 300 H.P. in its norurat 
farm or 425 HP. vriien supa re hcsgeA 


.tt 


This resutb in L 

«gT» ? bto k> to Bendey Turbo but 
wnh o ngner mcasmum speed there- 
fm flv oostagfc exsfloo 

with sports-car Oe perfa nuun ce. The 
bade price starts around US56O000 
rad the spead eautenMrt is endea. A 
a priced 


cfades choice of Mtenor/ mterior 
rad options, f 
dertmafian at 

matelySwMb 

ration (cats. Orders ora be aacacMd 
with a deposit rf 25% and Ihe balance 
paycfcfa a! tame of dement. For more 
mrorm e teon conwfc issue Na. 12 * 


5ynta l rnaymne . .ntalabU a Rob 
orQ rorrori 


Rmb and Reran deafen. orihsDo- 
cember ftobScohon of Avanr Garde. To 
pace an ortfar c ortoct Ihe sole rad 


esdueve ddrributarv 

AUBU8 MOTOR 


EXCAUBUR MOTOR CAR 
DKTRfflUTORS 
rk Prtece, Awe de fa Costa 
MrateCrefa. Monaco 
Tefc 33 - 93 - 25 63 91 
Tefata 469R7Q MCS 



fuly loaded, I»A1C 

380 SOndnight I 

toother blue brand new, 

AMtiJSSSLr 

DMBOjOOtL 


280 g. 0/84 rirtsgte blue/ 

91 T PQUCa^RRBU'^ertato 


whse/terthar fated, DM68,000. 

AB pices tee u4Mi 


For more infarevahtei of 
new Menades "85 modd. 
cm us dov and niaht: 

OflNAfOING CORpSatION 


Tel: B141/8i$u 2^“&1N D. 


ICW PEUGEOT. Land Row. 


K\ T g^rsiss 


faw*. Hotfand 0J3O445492. b 47D8Z 


AUTOS TAX FREE 


TRASCO 

THE MBtCBJS SPECIALISTS 


^ lr. 


Tm free IXO. At rwxtefe todudng 1000 j: 


SB. ft stretch fanousines far tounedfrA 
shfntant from stock. 


EPA/DOT ce r l ificra on ft shippuiQ by 
(he experts. 


WRECT ROM SOURCE 


Trorao London Ltd. 
warden fcfifl, London NW2 7BR 
TeL 01-206 0007. 

Telex B956022 TRA5 G. 


NEW MERCEDES 

PORSCHE, BMW, EXOTIC CARS 

FROM STOCK 

far IMMBXATE drifeary 
, BBT SERVICE 

RUTE INC. 

. Tounrestr. 52, 6000 Frantrfurf. __ 
W GentL, tel (C569-2323S1. itx 41 1559 




m. 


'A- 


." v, . ' 


TRANSCO 

TAX FREE CARS 


Wa keep o constant stock of more thra 
one hundred farad new con, 
oam p artivel y priced. 


i. ; : . 


Sand far free oaertowe & stock fa 
SA. 95 feordslaan. 




2023 


Teh 0-/542 62 4) tiff fries). 
Tlfc 35207 WAWB. 


sV:*:-- 


TAX RE CARS 
P.CT. 


largest Show r oo m ft Imreeriory 
AB makes, oS models, brarrt new 




Rrerioan 1, JOM^An^erg, Belgiim 


Tel: 3/231 _ „ 

Tin 35546 PHCABT B 
Apply far out celetf catalogue 
USS5 cash 


Jlf* 


\i«. 


^ > . 


PAGE 5 
FOR MORE 
CLASSIFIEDS 


^:V 

Mv 

■.* IT’ l*u. "