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Edited in Paris 
Printed Simultaneously 
in Paris, London, Zurich, 
Hone Kong, Singapore, 
The Hague and Marseille 


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Published With Tie New York Times and The Washington Post 


No. 31,692 


PARIS, FRIDAY, JANUARY 11, 1983 


Soviet Switch on Arms Talks 
May Show Economy Concerns 


By Sah My dans 

Nr w York Times Service 

MOSCOW — Six months ago. 
Western diplomats were writing off 
the possibility that the Kremlin 
might return to arms negotiations. 
They said the Soviet Union’s aging 
leaders were too i nsecu re, too set in 
iheir ways, to take initiatives. 

This week in Geneva, however, 
the Russians, who often complain 
about what they call zigzags in U.S. 
policy, completed a turnaround 
that these same diplomats concede 
was beyond their expectations. 

A leadership that seemed to have 
bunkered down behind the Krem- 
lin's red-brick walls, refusing to ne- 
gotiate with Washington and ready 
to ride out a new Cold War, has 
quickly agreed to new arms negoti- 
ations ano now is latvinr about a 
whole new perspective for better 
relations between the two nations. 

The Soviet press on Wednesday 
portrayed the talks in Geneva be- 
tween Secretary of Slate George P. 
Shultz and Foreign Minister .An- 
drei A. Gromyko as a success, de- 
scribing the agreement to open new 
negotiations as a victory for Mos- 
cow. 

The government newspaper, Iz- 
vestia, even allowed itself a mo- 
ment of jubilation, exc laiming , 
twice. “The talks are on!" 

Press commentaries stress the 
broader context of the agreement 
In this, they followed the lead of 
Mr. Gromyko, who said as he left 
Geneva that “the situation in the 
world as a whole largely depends 
on the state of U.S.-Soviet rela- 
tions" and that now “a certain step 
has been made in establishing a 
dialogue between our two coun- 
tries." 

Mr. Gromyko was shown on the 
main television news program, 
reading his statement at the Gene- 
va airport. The program also 


showed the press conference in Ge- 
neva at which Mr. Shultz said that 
“an important be ginnin g" had 
been made. 

“There is, and can be, no sensible 
alternative to the policy of peaceful 
coexistence," said Yuri Kornilov, a 
commentator for Tass, the official 
press agency. 

He said: “There is and can be no 
means to solving pressing interna- 
tional problems other than con- 
structive dialogue, tails , a search 
for areas of agreement that could 
lead to stronger trust between 
countries, to the creation of such an 
atmosphere in international rela- 
tions as would be free of the nucle- 
ar threat, enmity, suspiciousness, 
fear and hostility." 

As recently as October, Soviet 
officials were stonily insisting that 
there would be no return to negoti- 
ations until the United States re- 
moved the new missiles it had be- 
gun to install in Western Europe. 
The start of deployment of the Per- 
shing-2 and cruise missiles at the 
end of 1983 led the Soviet Union to 
break off talks in Geneva on strate- 
gic arms and medium-range mis- 
sies. 

Last summer, the Russians an- 
grily rejected an American sugges- 
tion that talks on the militarization 
of outer space be combined with 
the suspended talks on nuclear mis- 
siles. Some thing along these lines 
emerged from the talks Monday 
and Tuesday in Geneva. 

Western diplomats see a strong 
motivation on both a substantive 
and a public-relations level for the 
Soviet turnaround. 

“There is both the economic re- 
ality that they have to face and the 
reality of strategic weapons: They 
see the arms race as destabilizing,’' 
a diplomat said. In addition, he 
said, “There is a very real fear of 
U.S. superiority in space weapons 


and the possibility that the way 
would be opened to a nuclear first- 
sirike capability.’ 

The Soviet Union's economic 
difficulties have been mentioned 
by Konstantin U. Chernenko, the 
Soviet leader, who has spoken of 
the drain of military spending on 
the national economy. 

The tremendous costs of a new 
arms race in space, in which the 
initial U.S. program is estimated at 
$26 billion, would throw off plans 
for the Soviet economy, one Soviet 
official said. “They would have to 
set aside the whole economic plan 
For the next 20 years,” he said. 

This official who has access to 
high-level policy thinking, said that 
Soviet military-industrial experts 
may have advised the leadership 
that they could match U.S. space 
technology, but that its cost would 
be virtually prohibitive. 

A scientific report on space 
weapons obtained from Soviet 
sources this week stressed the 
“huge funds" that would be called 
for — funds drained from other 
projects. 

On the public-relations level a 
Western diplomat said: “They've 
been in a terrible position, refusing 
to negotiate. They'd walked out of 
Geneva and they couldn't get off 
the hook." The Kremlin’s intransi- 
gence was making iu position in- 
creasingly awkward mth both its 
East European allies and with the 
West European nations it has been 
courting, he said. 

In addition. Western analysts 
say. there seems to be a genuine 
desire to improve relations with the 
United States. 

Mr. Chernenko is seen as a back- 
er of detente, a basic policy of his 
mentor, Leonid 1. Brezhnev. Other 
analysts suggest that Mikhail S. 
Gorbachov', who at S3 represents 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 4) 


Polish Colonel Denies 
Ordering Priest's Death 


. By Michael T. Kaufman 

■Vev York Tuna Service 

TORUN, Poland — The highest- 
ranking of four Polish security po- 
licemen on trial lor killing a pro- 
Solidarity priest denied Thursday 
that he had approved any physical 
violence against the Reverend Jerzy 
Popieluszko, an action he said was 
inconsistent with “socialist human- 
ism." 

Instead, Adam Pietruszka, 47, 
who was stripped of bis colonel’s 
rank after his arrest on charges of 
aiding and abetting the crime, indi- 
cated that it was his chief accuser 
and co-defendant, former Ca ptain 
Gtzegorz Piotrowslri, 33, who led 
the abduction of the dissident 
priest on his own initiative. 

Captain Piotrowslri and Lieuten- 
ants Waldemar Chmielewsfci, 29, 
and Leszek Pekala, 32, are charged 
with kidnapping, beating and loll- 
ing Father Popieluszko on Oct. 19. 
The priest’s body was recovered 
from a reservoir on the Vistula Riv- 
er on Ocl 30.' 

Mr. Pietruszka spoke after the 
court had heard evidence from the 
other three officers. All four face a 
possible death sentence. 

Mr. Pietruszka conceded that 
last September he had discussed 
with Mr. Piotrowslri and another, 
unindicted officer the need to curb 
the political activities of certain 
priests, whom he described as 
“wearing crosses on (heir chests 
and hatred in their hearts." 

He said there were a few dozen 
such clergymen in Poland and be 
numbered Father Popieluszko 
among them. He said these clerics 
had “encouraged aggressive behav- 
ior" from their pulpits and that 
some “fomented hatred not just to- 
ward Marxists but to people who 
had secular outlooks." 


However, be insisted, "at no dis- 
cussion in regard to Father Popie- 
luszko was there ever anjr approval 
for using physical force. 

He said such approval could not 
have been given for two reasons. 
The first, he said, was that “in ac- 
cordance with socialist humanism 
we follow the rule that a political 
enemy should be foughl but only 
with political and soda! arguments, 
not with the strength of fists.” 

The second reason he cited rest- 
ed in the code of conduct of his 
department whose principles were: 
“Respect for law, objectivity, effec- 
tiveness and in some instances se- 
crecy." 

He concluded: “From the two 
spheres, morality and regulation, 
such orders could not be given." 

Mr. Pietruszka insisted chat the 
operation he bad envisioned 
against outspoken priests simply 
involved gathering information on 
their “illegal political activities," 
which could then be passed to the 
Roman Catholic hierarchy. 

The expectation, be said, was 
that church leaders would silence 
the priests involved. He said that in 
detention be had read that Cardi- 
nal Josef Glemp had ordered one 
of the priests he had targeted. Fa- 
ther Stanislaw Malkowski, not to 
preach in Warsaw. 

Mr. Pietruszka said that Mr. Pio- 
trowski had been assigned to help 
analyze information gathered by 
another officer about Father Po- 
pieluszko. 

He said the plan was to turn such 
information over to the Curia in 
Warsaw and to the National Con- 
ference of Bishops with a recom- 
mendation that they stop the 
priest’s, political activities. 

He said be did not assign Mr. 
Piotrowslri to follow Father Popie- 



Adam Pietruszka 

luszko to Gdansk on Ocl 13. the 
day that the three other defendants 
testified to having failed in an at- 
tempted abduction of the priesL 

Furthermore, be said, be did not 
know that his three subordinates 
went on another trip a week later 
when, as they testified, they seized 
Father Popieluszko. beat him, 
gagged him, tied him with a rope 
round his neck and threw his body 
into the water. 

As for having said that activist 
priests should be given “a shock up 
to the point of inducing a heart 
attack,” as Mr. Piotrowslri had 
claimed he did, Mr. Pietruszka ac- 
knowledged that he might have 
used such an expression but meant 
it metaphorically. 

Mr. Piotrowslri had also cited his 
superior as suggesting that Father 
Popieluszko could be thrown from 
a train. When asked about this, Mr. 
Pietruszka replied: “If Piolrowski 
had really heard me say this, he 
would have had no other alterna- 
tive but to go to our commanding 
general and tell him I was going 
crazy." 


Reagan 
Hopes for 
'Dialogue’ 

Arms Agreement 

Called a Step in 

Improving Ties 

By Bernard Gwertzman 

Nr» York Times Service 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan has said that he 
hoped the agreement with the Sovi- 
et Union on bolding arms talks 
would produce “a new dialogue" 


The chief U.S. delegate says 
trade talks in Moscow have been 
’useful.' Page 2. 

and better relations between Wash- 
ington and Moscow. 

In a statement opening his first 
televised news conference since his 
re-election. Mr. Reagan said 
Wednesday be wanted 1985 to 
“emerge as one of dialogue and 
negotiations, a year that leads to 
belter relations between the United 
Stales and the Soviet Union." 

Mr. Reagan said he hoped the 
improved climate brought on by 
arms talks would also lead to 
wanner relations on other issues, 
such as trade and the handling of 
regional conflicts. He declined to 
describe the new outlook as “de- 
tente," a word be has often derided. 

He asserted that the United 
States would be “flexible, patient 
and determined" in future talks, 
and he called on the Soviet Union 
to reciprocate “to help give new life 
and positive results to that process 
of dialogue." 

The president cautioned that dif- 



The Aucortcd Pies 

Secretary of State George P. Shultz, flanked by President Reagan and Vice President 
George Bush, on his arrival at the White House’ after the arms negotiations in Geneva. 


feTeoces with Moscow remained 
“many and profound" and that the 
negotiations “will be difficult as we 
grapple with the issues so central to 
peace and security for ourselves, 
our allies and the world." 

“But we will persevere." he said, 
evidently pleased that his efforts to 
renew arms i jks had produced re- 
sults. 

“It is my hope," he said, “that 
this week's meeting in Geneva, 
while only 3 single step, is the be- 
ginning of a new dialogue between 
the United States and the Soviet 
Union." 

When asked whether he favored 
an early meeting with Konstantin 


V. Chernenko the Soviet leader, 
Mr. Reagan repeated his view that 
it served no purpose to meet just 
for the sake of meeting. He said he 
would welcome a summit confer- 
ence that was well prepared. 

When asked whether he agreed 
with Mr. Chernenko in reviving de- 
tente, Mr. Reagan said, after paus- 
ing. “Yes. we would welcome such 
a thing if it is a two-way street." He 
said that too often in the past, “it 
was a one-way street," with the 
Soviet Union taking advantage of 
the United States. 

Referring a gain to his goals in 
the arms control negotiations, he 
said “our objective in these talks 


French Government So Lift Price Curbs 
And Cut Taxes Before 1986 Elections 


By Axel Krause 

Iniermmonnl Herald Tribune 

PARIS — ■ r rime Mnialcr Lau- 
rent Fabius announced Thursday 
that the government planned to lift 
controls on wholesale and consum- 
er prices before parliamentary elec- 
tions in the spring of 1986 and 
would cut personal income (axes 
the same year. 

Mr. Fabius. addressing a group 
of business leaders, said the un- 
specified moves on prices and taxes 
illustrated a more flexible ap- 
proach by the government to the 
sluggish French economy during 
the next 15 months. 

He described the policy as “rig- 
orous management of growth" and 
added that this included efforts to 
reduce inflation and government 
deficits. 

Mr. Fabius, who also pledged to 
cut bureaucracy, urged the business 
community to invest more and 
where possible, hire workers to re- 
duce unemployment. 

The jobless level in France is 
forecast to rise to a record 1 1 per- 
cent of the labor force this year 
from 10.5 percent at the end of 
1984. According to National Statis- 
tics Institute figures, industrial in- 
vestments this year will fall to an 
annual growth rate in volume terms 
of about 3 percent, from 9 percent 
in 1984. 

On Wednesday, four national- 
ized banks said’ they would cut 
their base lending rate to 1 l'.i per- 
cent from 12 percent, which the 
Finance Ministry estimated would 
save industry between 3 billion and 
4 billion francs (S309 million and 
S412 million) in financial charges. 

That move followed the lifting of 
controls on some prices and a sight 
easing of foreign exchange controls 
in November. 







Laurent Fabius 

About 30 percent of all French 

wholesale prices and virtually all 
consumer prices are subject to gov- 
ernment controls, which were im- 
posed by the Socialist government 
as an anti-inflationary measure 
shortly after it took power in 1981. 

However, Mr. Fabius and gov- 
ernment officials noted that infla- 
tion last year fell to around 6.7 
percent from 9.3 percent in 1983 
and about 14 percent in 1981. The 
government’s goal is to reduce in- 
flation to 4.5 percent by the end of 
this year. 

Businessmen, bankers and diplo- 
mats attending the meeting, which 
was sponsored by L' Expansion, a 
French business magazine, said af- 
terward that Mr. Fabius clearly 
sought their support for his policies 
and that they were awaiting details 
of bow the price and tax proposals 
would be implemented. 


“The speech and his answers to 
questions reflected a very nonpole- 
mical approach to economic policy, 
which we welcomed." said an offi- 
cial of the Paironat. France's em- 
ployers’ association. But he added 
thai “they do not go far enough nor 
quickly enough." 

Mr. Fabius said in his speech 
that the government would take 
steps to implement a cut in person- 
al income taxes, effective in 1986. 
but be did not specify what groups 
would be affected or by how much. 

Asked whether the government 
also intended reducing corporate 
and payroll taxes, as the Patronat 
has repeatedly urged, the prime 
minister said that question was 
"still open." 

Mr. Fabius was asked whether 
the government intended to decon- 
trol all prices before the parliamen- 
tary elections in 1986. He said 
"yes” and then later added that the 
government would first act on 
wholesale prices. 

“The rest will follow as inflation 
continues to fall.” he said. 

Mr. Fabius also said that before 
the end of January, he planned to 
announce measures related to 
worker training, involving the ap- 
plication of computer technology, 
along with projects aimed at im- 
proving French science and tech- 
nology. 

Mr. Fabius ruled out any imme- 
diate readjustments of currencies 
in the European Monetary System, 
but cautioned that “disorder” in 
international markets could be cre- 
ated this year by such factors as the 
high U.S. budget deficit, a sharp 
fall in the dollar and high interest 
rates. 

France will remain “vigilant" in 
implementing its restrictive mone- 
tary and fiscal policy, he said. 


will be the reduction of nuclear 
arms and the strengthening of stra- 
tegic stability.” 

“Our ultimate goal of course, is 
the complete elimination of nuclear 
weapons," he said. 

When asked whether be thought 
the Soviet Union could be trusted 
to abide by an arms control agree- 
ment, Mr. Rea gan said that “abso- 
lute verification is impossible,” but 
that “verification to the extent pos- 
sible” would be sought. 

Earlier Wednesday afternoon, 
Mr. Reagan had given a warm wel- 
come to Secretary of State George 
P. Shultz, who returned from Gene- 

(Continued on Page 2. CoL 2) 


Nerve Gas 
Plans Denied 
By Thatcher 

_ 'Vnn.it r.-.-v. inhrnittwkii . 

LONDON — Prime Minister 
Margaret Thatcher on Thursday 
denied reports that Britain pro- 
posed to resume making chemical 
weapons. But she did not rule out 
the possibility that those weapons 
might be made in the future. 

“Britain abandoned its chemical 
warfare capability in the late 
1950s.” Mrs. Thatcher told the 
House of Commons. “There has 
been no change in government po- 
licy since then, nor is any change 
now proposed. 

“Bui as a responsible govern- 
ment we have a duty to keep de- 
fense policy under review in the 
light of the massive Soviet capabili- 
ty in chemical weapons." 

The prime minister spoke be- 
cause of a magazine report that she 
had formed an “ultra-secret” cabi- 
net committee to study proposals 
to resuming the manufacture of 
chemical weapons. 

A leftist weekly. The New 1 States- 
men. reported that “Mrs. Thatcher 
is on the point of forcing through a 
decision that Britain should restart 
production of nerve gases. 

“Proposals for Britain lo start 
production of nerve gas have al- 
ready been put to an ultra-secret 
special ministerial committee, set 
up by Mrs. Thatcher last summer," 
the magazine said. The weekly said 
it based its article on secret govern- 
ment documents it had obtained. 

Government sources confirmed 
only that senior ministers held a 
series of meetings last year to re- 
view the government position on 
chemical weapons. 

A government spokesman insist- 
ed that a statement made in March 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 6) 


New Shifts 
By Reagan 
In Cabinet 

Appointments Set 
For Education, 
Energy, Interior 

By David Hoffman 

H'ushtnglon Post Service 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan, in the second shuf- 
fle of his cabinet in a week, said 
Thursday he would nominate Ener- 
gy Secretary Donald P. Hodel as 
interior secretary and the White 
House personnel director. John S. 
Herrington, as Mr. Hodel *5 re- 
placement. 

The White House spokesman. 
Larry Speakes. said in announcing 
the changes that Mr. Reagan also 
would nominate William J. Ben- 
nett. chairman of the National En- 
dowment for the Humanities, as 
secretary of education. 

Mr. Speakes said that Mr. Rea- 
gan would name his assistant chief 
of staff, Richard G. Da mian, as 
deputy secretary of the Treasury. 
Mr. Darman wifi follow his current 
boss, James A. Baker 3d. who was 
named Tuesday as incoming secre- 
tary of the Treasury, in a job switch 
with Donald T. Regan, who will 
become Mr. Reagan's chief of staff. 

The shifts were the latest in a 
series of high-level adjustments Mr. 
Reagan has made in the cabinet 
and White House for his second 
term. 

Mr. Speakes said Mr. Reagan 
asked that Mr. Hodel, Mr. Herring- 
ton and Mr. Bennett Lo propose 
“reorganization options" for their 
departments, possibly including a 
merger of Energy ana Interior. 

He said the Energy Department 
Study was intended to “recognize 
the interrelationship of energy, nat- 
ural resources ana defense poli- 
cies.” 

The Education Department 
study was to “determine the proper 
organizational structure and role of 
the federal government in educa- 
tion," be said. 

“Although the president has of- 
ten stated his belief that the Educa- 
tion and Energy departments could 
be eliminatea, he feels any. such 
reorganization should be fully 
studied and considered before any 
final decisions are made to reorga- 
nize.” Mr. Speakes said. “Asking 
for the studies does not necessarily 
constitute a decision to eliminate or 
reorganize these departments.” 

Mr. Reagan also met with his 
cabinet Thursday to study possible 
re-organization plans that would 
create a new Department of Inter- 
national Trade and Industry out of 
the current Commerce Department 
and Office of the Trade Represen- 
tative. 

Before becoming energy secre- 
tary. Mr. Hodel held the second- 
rank post at Interior, under Secre- 
tary William P. Clark, who is 
resigning to return to his California 
ranch. 

Mr. Bennett will replace Educa- 
tion Secretary T. H. Bell whose 
resignation was effective Dec. 31. 

Mr. Darman will succeed R. T. 
McNamar as deputy secretary at 
the Treasury Department. 

ln previously announced person- 
nel changes, Lbe deputy White 
House chief of staff, Michael K. 
Deaver plans to resign early this 
year. Attorney General William 
French Smith is also resigning, and 
the White House counselor, Edwin 
Meese 3d, has been nominated to 
succeed Mr. Smith. 

[The reported decisions left the 
president with at least two major 
personnel moves still to come — 
appointment of an arms negotiator 
for the talks due to resume in the 
□ext several weeks with the Soviet 
Union and a successor to Jeane J. 
Kirkpatrick as U.S. representative 

(Continued on Page 2, CoL 2) 


Tiny U.S. College Gets Top Marks for Thinking Big 


By Garry Abrams 

La Angeles Times Servin' 

LOS ANGELES —Global ambitions lurk 
in unlikely places. An hour's drive from 
Chicago, for instance. 

There — in resolutely Middle Western, 
industrial Rockford. Illinois — Norman L. 
Stewart, the president of tiny Rockford Col- 
lege. has reached across the Atlantic and 
under the noses of bidders from Hong Kong, 
Japan and Saudi Arabia to acquire a London 
campus from the queen o? E ng land. 

This fall the fust group of about 100 
students from Rockford are to begin their 
semester abroad in Britain —a semester that 
does not cost extra because of the elaborate 
financial arrangements that Mr. Stewart has 
worked out with other educational institu- 
tions. Moreover, Rockford is the only college 
in central London with a real campus — 
trees and grass and all that. 

Reciting these facts, as he did on a recent 
risk to Los Angeles, makes Kir. Stewart. 43, 
very cheerfuL He has scored an academic 
coup, it seems, beating out competitors much 
more accustomed to international enterprise, 
to lease the 10-acre (4-home) campus in 
Regent's Park from the Crown. The Chroni- 
cle of Higher Education, a U.S. education 
journal, called the location “one of the 
world's choice academic sites, set amid the 


trees and ornamental gardens of London’s 
Regent’s Park." 

“It was my idea to promote a large pro- 
gram for Rockford College students over- 
seas." Mr. Stewart said, adding that his ini- 
tial plan was modest in scope. "Then I 
discovered this piece of property — a whole 
college for sale in central London." 

Actually, the campus was for lease. It has 
been a part of the Crown's personal estate 
for nearly 900 years and has been leased out 
since the reign of Henry VIII. Mr. Stewart 
snapped up the remaining 27 years on a 99- 
vear lease, with an option to- renew. 

He still sounds slighriy amazed that his 
school, which has 1,500 students, was chosen 
last fall over much wealthier bidders, includ-- 
ing a Saudi group that wanted to establish an 
Islamic education center in London. 

“The Crown had little interest in who 
could pay the most." Mr. Stewart said. "I 
think the primary reason we were given the 
lease was they Liked our proposal for an 
Anglo-American institution.” 

Rockford will sublease seme of the dozen 
campus buildings to British educational as- 
sociations and universities, using the money 
to subsidize the semester abroad for Rock- 
ford students. 

Money also will be raised by leasing food, 
housing.’ health and other services lo Ameri- 


can schools with European programs, Mr. 
Stewart said. Michigan Slate university, 
Dartmouth College, the University of Mis- 
souri and the University of Oregon are 
among the institutions that will buy services 
from the school, which has been renamed 
Regent's College, he said. In all. Mr. Stewart 
estimated that there are about 70 American 
colleges and universities with programs in 
London that are potential customers. 

In this way Rockford hopes to raise the $1 
million annual roil and funds for its own 
program, Mr. Stewart said. 

Rockford students will be expected to 
spend at least a semester abroad, studying 
the English aspects of their majors, he said. 
Nursing students, for example, will learn 
about midwifery. 

“The problem we saw with many junior- 
year-abroad programs is that they were de- 
signed for students in certain fields,” Mr. 
Stewart said. “Frequently students in history 
and foreign languages would go abroad and 
students in accounting would qol We want- 
ed a program for all our students. And stu- 
dents would be expected to go, because we've 
found that people often cite their foreign 
study as one of the most important parts of 
their formal education.” 

Mr. Stewart said that when he first 
broached the possibility of acquiring the 


campus, some members of Rockford's board 
of trustees, asked, “Should we be biting off 
something this large?” He said it was a “very 
conservative board — they’re really grass- 
roots America." 

But a few board members, especially busi- 
nessmen with dealings in foreign countries, 
were enthusiastic from the start, he said. 
“Most of the larger companies in Rockford, 
metal and aviation products, for instance, do 
overseas business,” he said, “and they said, 
‘We’ll need people who understand other 
cultures.' " 

Once the board was persuaded, the deal- 
ings with the organization that oversees the 
Down’s property were largely a matter of 
huny-up-and-waiL 

“Pve been there every other month for 
about the last two years/* Mr. Stewart said. 
“There were times when nothing would seem 
to happen for six or eight weeks. Then we’d 
get a tall and have to respond in a couple of 
days. I think that was an advantage for us. As 
a small college we can turn on a dime, but 
larger institutions had to take more time." 

Die payoff was a campu5~ia one of Lon- 
don’s most exclusive neighborhoods. “The 
only people who live in the park are our 
students, the American ambas sador and the 
animals in the zoo,” Mr. Stewart said 









■W'.V? 

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Page 2 

Trade T alks 
In Moscow 
'Useful,’ 

U.S. Says 

By William J. Baton 

Las Angela Tima S err ice 

MOSCOW —The first U.S.-So- 
viet trade talks in six years ended 
Thursday and the chief of the U3. 
delegation reported they were “use- 
ful." 

“There is reason for optimism,’' 
said Lionel H. Olmer, undersecre- 
tary of commerce for international 
trade. 

He also hinted that the U.S. 
commerce secretary, Malcolm Bal- 
drige. would visit Moscow later this 
year for cabinet-level talks with Ni- 
kolai Patolichev, the Soviet trade 
minister. 

Mr. Olmer said the three-day 
meeting pointed to wider opportu- 
nities for American companies to 
export goods to the Soviet Union 
and raised possibilities of addition- 
al U.S. imports of Soviet raw mate- 
rials. 

But, he said, be bluntly told his Lionel H. Olmer. lef 

counterpart Vladimir Sushkov, the 

Soviet deputy foreign trade minis- — ^ rr 

ter, that there was no chance that fiTdffl rid 11 

the United States would drop exist- -IlCWfilMI' -Uvl 
ing restrictions on trade. ^ 

A 15-nation coordinating com- (Continued from Page 1) 
mil tee known as COCOM bars the va to report to him on Ins two days 
export of items of possible military of talks with Forrien Minister An- 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 11, 1985 


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Greek, Turkish Cypriots 
Draft a Secret Accord 
For 'Federal Republic’ 


WORLD BRIEFS 


_ V 


New West Bank Settlements Planned 

TTYm T? TEL AVIV (AP) — The Israeli government has decided to buOd six 

A U1 X CllCI OX XlUpUDDL new Jewis ij settlements in the occupied West Bank by autumn, Israel - 

Radio reported Thursday. ' 

The Associated Pros turned be capable of resettling A decision to build six settlements within one year of the formation o. a 

UNITED NATIONS. New large numbers of displaced Greeks, bipartisan government was made in September as a compromise between 
York — Greek and Turkish Cypri- .Another committee is to be set the Labor Party’s demand for a settlement freeze and the Likud s demand 
ot leaders have agreed secretly on up to write a constitution based on for unlimited settlement building. The decisi on required a review and 
the basis for a unified “Federal the agreement. determination where they would oe established. _ . 

Republic of Cyprus.” according to Other committees would deal The settlement agreement reached between the twoparties cans for jm 
a text of an accord obtained here, with questions of compensation for settlements to be established during its four yeartoi office. Five of the sk 
B ut important points still must be property lost in the population e.x- settlements are to be built in areas lhe Labor Party has said it would lafe 
resolved. change after the Turkish invasion, to keep in any peace agreement with neighboring Jordan. 

The .Associated Press has cb- and freedom of travel and settle- 

m ^reeb Cypriots losisi that a fool- 14 Separatists Killed in Sri I^nka : 

to the negotiations. proof constitutional system be set COLOMBO. Sri Lanka (AP) — Fourteen Tamil separatist guerrillas 

Hie points will be dealt with at a U P to avoid deadlocks that could were tjUgJj and 44 others captured in a military sweep of the Jaffna area 
critical summit in New York on paralyze the government because northern Sri I anb on Wednesday, National Security Minister Lalith 


I. ii- 
\‘i'> - 


The Associated Pros 

UNITED NATIONS. New 
York — Greek and Turkish Cypri- 
ot leaders have agreed secretly on 
the basis for a unified “Federal 
Republic of Cyprus." according to 
a text of an accord obtained here. 


resolved. 

The Associated Press has ob- 
tained a copy of the agreement, 
which was verified by sources close 
to the negotiations. ' 

The points will be dealt with at a 


change after the Turkish invasion, 
and freedom of travel and settle- 
ment. 

Greek Cypriots insist that a fool- 
proof constitutional system be set 
up to avoid deadlocks that could 



The ATOooMd Prw 


Lionel H. Olmer. left, and Vladimir Sushkov during a break in trade talks. 


Jan. 17 which, if successful would of the Turkish veto. 

result in working committees to ne- 

gotiate the details of a territorial 
and constitutional settlement. 9 

According to the agreement, the 
Turkish side is to make substantial 

territorial concessions. fyi 1/ mfn/YTtl 

Turkish troops will withdraw Y 

from Cyprus under a schedule to be o 

drawn up that permits establish- XclDCT SGtYS 
meat of “sufficient international 1 J 

guarantees.” a reference to Turkish A settee France 

Cypriots’ insistence that Turkey HANOI — Thret 


Aih uladun odali said Thursday. 

Describing the operation as “the biggest single successful at lack *~ 
ageing the nonhem terrorists,” the minister told Parliament that the 
armed forces acted on the basis of a tip an informant had personally given 
him. 

He said that in the destruction of the hideout, many guerrilla leaders, 
including the local leader of a group called the Liberation Tigers of Tanhi 
Eelam, had been killed. He added that destruction of the hideout would 
be a “serious setback” to the separatists’ intention of unilaterally declar- 
ing independence on Jan. 14. 


HANof — «>o- Israel-Lebanon Talks May Resume 

„„ .,r J . 


value to the Soviet Union. U.S. law 

also denies the Soviet Union calls for holding three sets' of nego- mredrfen^ve^wrapras, butsaid 
‘ most-favored-nai/on status, tiations in one forum. that the prdcct would be “on the 

winch means that there an; higher Two of the negotiations, on lim- table” there were no precon- 
taxiffs on many Soviet goods than iting medium-range missiles and on di liras “to the tati™ that we’re go- 
on si m i l ar goods from other coun- reducing strategic arms, were sus- ing to have.” 
me t ...... . . pended by Moscow 13 months ago, u. rh*. cu-h rr^rrh 


Reagan Hopes for a 'New Dialogue’ SsSSSs 

, ,, international guarantees, which been executed in Ho Chi Minh a.tatn tnio sani Thmsday^ut a govmunenl soorce said later a resomp- 

(Continued from Page 1) presaon of what it is we are talking United States to take steps to back include a Securin' Council Cirv iccnniine to a new^naner re, 1)00 of * e was not certain. . - 

va u report to him on histwo days Soot.” up us conciliauny wor^ Sa^t for C^Sre^g SS.' toad had canedrf Th.tuada/s anssion of the negodanons, wtodtare 

of talks with Forrien Mmister An- h. that m.hi “For our part,” he said, “we will th^Hirnmii i«u« tmuminp r._ _ J: . : u : deadlocked over an Israeli proposal to send UN peacekeeping troops uitu 

be flexible, patient and determined. 


drd A. Gromyko. 


mister An- He that only research 

agreement would determine the nature of fu- 


guarantee for Cyprus, are among port, 
the difficult issues remaining. l Q ^ e 

Turkish Cypriots won demands Thursday 


We now look to the Soviet Union SS w p^on 

to help give new life and positive federa] aj3d dut powers of 
results to that process of dialogue. ^ f ec j era j government be limited. 


on similar goods from other coun- 
tries. 

“I marie it plain that’s not about 
to change,” Mr. Olmer said. 

But he said that there were sever- 
al areas — including agricultural 
products, petrochemicals and 
chemicals — where there was a pos- 
sibility for increased trade. 

U.S. exports to the Soviet Union 
last year were valued at S2.9 billion, 
the lowest in five years. Eighty per- 


and the agreement to resume than Hc rep ^ atc ? ^ uc f 0 5? caf ? day accused Mr. Reagan of evading . “ Ul u,c 

aasft’&Sffflt fernSdS 

«n program found it wi feasible to toiy of the island except Tor two 

■ 

L. £ negotiations would be held with l,n c- ^ -n,- The agreetnent says the Turks. 


the federal government be limited, 
■ Tass Accuses Reagan with substantial authority left to 

The Tass press agency on Thurs- tiie two stales, 
day accused Mr. Reagan of evading But the nonaligned stare would 

have one citizenship, one currency 


Russians. A third negotiation is to 
take up ways of “preventing an 
arms race in space,” something 
sought by Moscow. 

Before the Geneva talks, White 
House nfRriafa had sairi die United 
Stales would not agree to negotiate 


. ... .. „ . deadlocked over an Israeli proposal to send UN peacekeeping troops uito 

In its ediuon^chmg Hanoi on ^ vacated by j 0,000 Israel troops. 

Thursday, the Ho Chi Minn City The radio, which reported that Israel would return to the talks in 
daily newspaper, Saigon Giai Naqoura, Lebanon, on Monday, said Jcan-Claude Aime, the UN's 
Phong, reported that Tran VanBa. specialist, visted Jerusalem on Wednesday and then went to 

n 9 ' i e 2. uoc ^ UaxL 43 ' Tt 7™ Beirut to discuss the deployment of peacekeeping forces. 

Bach. 58. were executed Tuesday. L aler> however, a source in the Israeli Foreign Ministry said: “We will 
The rqjort did not say how the men ^^, 1 ^ returning to the talks after we get the Lebanese answer. The 
died, but executions here are nor- p ahir P 0 f Qj e answer will determine whether we return to the talks." 
maily earned out by firing squad. 

Last week Vietnam commuted to 

Arrest of Argentine Asked in France 

on the same charges, including one PARIS (AP) — Two French lawyers asked a Paris judge to issue an 


negotiations would be held with u.S -Soviet treaty The Associated agreement says the Turks, on the same charges, including one PARIS (AP) — Two French lawyers asked a Pans judge to issue an 

albes and others before it would be reported from Moscow 3X1 18-percent minority, would re- recognized as a French national, international arrest warrant against an Argentine Navy captain, Alfredo 


deployed. 

According to a White House 


Press reported from Moscow 311 10- P en -cui- Luujumy. *uum ic- rcwgiuzea as a rrcncn uauumu. international arrest warrant against an nrgeuunc navy capuuu, numjo 
“Reaean clearly tried to evade 10 30 percent of the territo- Prime Minister Laurent Fabius of Astiz, on charges concerning the illegal arrest and detention of two 

Li J ^ e-t, PrivinA U .y A tr% Uonni f ac ¥7-- .L T - J- — - — » flinn raimn i.'dorr nrrr. 


tbe lowest in five years, ugnty per- away its right to co 
amt of the total represented the into defenses, 
sale of grain and other farm com- When a reporter i 
modifies. In return, Soviet exports lar term “Star War 
to die United States last year were that research, Mr. I 
valued at only $500 million. wished the term hi 
Tass, the Soviet news agency, coined, because it gt 
said, “The talks confirmed that 
there exist brood possibilities for a _ ^ 
considerable expansion of trade be- K PQ0Qf| 
tween the two countries if artificial 1 1 

obstacles, which are not the fault of ^ 

the Soviet Union, are removed.” I /v W|ip/> 

The Tass report criticized “van- x v 
ous sanctions and embargoes and (Continued from Page 1) 
the unreliability of tbe United to the United Nations. Tbe Assod- 


away its righ t to conduct research mde, Mr. Shultz, in a meeting last- 
in to space defenses. ing more than an hour, told Mr. 


answers to these questions, but at 
the same time reaffirmed that the 
U-S-A. would go ahead with the 


France had appealed to Hanoi for French nuns who d 


Cyprus became independent clemency for the condemned. 


The nuns. Sisters 


leaned in Argentina more than seven years ago 
ice Demon, 43, and Leome Duquet, 62, were 


When a reporter used the popu- R«gan that “we got what we want- program of development of space 
lar term “Star Wars” to desenbe in Geneva. weapons,” Tass said. 

thai research, Mr. Reagan said he Mr. Reagan, in his comments. It said the program would under- 

wished the term had never been mirrored statements marie by Sovi- mine tbe treaty, which limits anti- 
coined, because it gave “a false im- et leaders, who had called on the ballistic missile systems. 


^ wiui ^ from Britain in 1960 after a com- In France, relatives of Mr. Ba. arrested in Buenos Aires on Dec. 10. 1977, and never seen again. _ . 

program of development ofroS agreement between the the former bead of an anti-Com- The lawyers. Jacques MIquel and Francis Szpiner, requested Uk 

weapons," Tass said. F Greek and Turkish communities, munist Vietnamese students assod- warrant Wednesday from die investigating magistrate. Gaudine Lc 

ttsaid the program would under- The Turte ^drew from the gov- ation in Paris, said that he also was Chanu-Forkel who did not rule immediately. Captain Astiz, the corn- 
mine the treaty which bouts anti- emment in 1963 and a United Na- 3 French national, but French offi- mander of Aigentina’s garrison occupying the island of South Georgia 
ballistic missile systems lions peacekeeping force was estab- dais were unable to determine his during the Falkland Islands war. is also wanted by Sweden on suspicion 

fished in 1964 to separate the two status. of involvement in the disappearance of a young Swedish woman in 1977. 

groups. In 1974, Turkish troops in- Tbe French Ministry of External 


Reagan to Nominate Hodel Soviet Arms Shift 

rp n 1 rn 1 _ t _ • iffoy Show ( jOTIOBTil 

lo Succeed Clark at Interior ^ . r 

. ..... L For Economic Lost 


States as a supplier." As a result, ated reported. 


day night, Mr. Reagan said he 
would ‘‘look at” a deferment in 
Soda! Security cost-of-living ad- 
justments to help reduce the U.S. 


the agency said, Soviet-American [Max Kamp elman, a Washing- 
trade has been “s t a gn a ting " for six ton lawyer, has been mentioniyj as 
yens. a possible candidate for a post, but 

The U.S. Embassy in Moscow Secretary of State George P. Shultz 
issued a statement saying tbe talks said the president has made no de- 
were “frank and direct, which is rision. Mrs. Kirkpatrick has said 
diplomatic code for fairly sharp she plans to leave her cabinet-level 
disagreement. But the statement post. She and Mr. Reagan have 
also said that Mr. Olmer expressed agreed to discuss her future in tbe 
“satisfaction" with the “tone and administration.] 
substance" of the sessions. In a press conference Wednes- 


Open February 1985 

INTER-CONTINENTAL. 

WE OFFER YOU THE 
BEST OF LUXEMBOURG. 


(Continued from Page I) 
tbe Kremlin's younger generation, 
may be a force for flexibility and 


groups. In 1974, Tmkish troops in- Tbe French Ministry of External 
vaded and seized 37 percent of the Affairs in Paris and the president 

island to counter a coup aimed at 0 f the National Assembly ex- Turkey Sentences 3 KUTOS tO Death \ 
uni im g the island with Greece. pressed grief and indignation J 

If the summit succeeds, a work- Thursday at tbe executions. A min- ISTANBUL (AP) — A Turkish military court sentenced three convict- 
ing committee would be formed to is try spokesman said the govern- ^d Kurdish radicals to death on Thursday for attempting to establish a 
draw the exact borders. This com- mem's appeal for clemency had Marxist- Leninist dictatorship through acts of political violence, the 
mil tee will deal with Greek Cypriot “continued until the last minute, independent Humyet news agency reported. 

insistence that the areas to be re- up until yesterday." The three, all members of an outlawed Kurdish separatist group, were 


rijrfU f if 


Niimn 


deficit if he is “faced with an over- better relations with the West. 


whelming bipartisan majority in 
both houses in support of that” 


On Wednesday, the highest-level 
U.S. trade delegation to meet with 


Mr. R e a g a n appeared to be the Russians since 1978 ended two 
opening tbe door for the first time days of talks aimed at paving the 
to a one-year delay in inflation ad- way fra a meeting between Com- 
justments in the Social Security merce Secretary Malcolm Baldrige 
program of retirement benefits and and the Soviet foreign trade minis- 


disability payments. 

But he continued to stand fast 


ter. Nikolai S. Patolichev. 


out « 10 autmj The delegation, headed by Lio- 

nel «■ 08 * undersecretary of 
commerce for international trade, 
bas kept a low profile. But Tass has 


ur m 333 kc P I a Iow Piffle. But Tass has 

Lpe? wilh 4 aspec. of Soaal fj*? tettvnamm covay, 

STq-. mcludilg imun) , tfc « ” YI ? lMd ' r , sh ‘P 

Ik sui,ds UK.dr.-dopmem of mu- 


! living adjustments. 

Senate Republicans have sug- 
gested a one-year delay that could 
reduce tbe estimated deficit by 
about $6 ItiHion in the 1986 fiscal 


tually beneficial trade, economic 
and other contacts” with the Unit- 
ed States. 

Izvestia carried two reports on 


year and save 522 billion over three ^ ^ 

years. Deficits are expected to be Ha 7 C 

more than $200 billion a year ^ * hn f 

through the rest of the decade if no Amencan reason headline^ Tbe 


action is taken to cut them. 

While Mr. Reagan said Wednes- 
day that he would resist any 
changes in Soaal Security, he add- 


Approval of tbe Americans." 

As the talks dragged on, tbe 
newspaper said, reporters in Gene- 
va asked each other whether the 





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ed that, if Congress incicr^H -j results would be positive. “Tbe 
would have to look at that situation wom® vanished with the publica- 
aod what I was faced with, with **"* °f joim Soviet-American 
regard to_a possible congressional communique," h said, 
mandate.” 

He said the budget request he is c „ . lt . 

scheduled to submit to Congress on **ntons 366 Racial rrejnaice 
Feb. 4 would meet his goal of hold- Reuters 

ing spending in the next fiscal year LONDON — Nine out of 10 
to this year’s levds. not counting Britons believe their counliymen 
interest payments on the (rational are racially prejudiced, according 
debt. But he acknowledged that to a government survey of social 
some programs “are ©ring to spend trends released Thursday, 
more, some are going to spend less, 

and some we’re just going to wipe 

out entirety." 

White House officials have said 
[hat Mr. Reagan will not meet an- 
other goal that they had originally 
set in connection with reducing the 
deficit to $100 billion, or about 2 
percent of the nation’s expected 
gross national product, by 1988. 

The officials said domestic 
spending cuts approved by Mr. 

Reagan fall short of tbe goaL But 
be has resisted retrenchments in 
dlber Social Security or the mili- 
tary. which together with interest 
comprise two- thirds of the budget. 

The president stood fast against 
! cuts in his military buildup, saying 
that “defense is not a program in 
which we can determine what we 
want to spend.” 

“That is dictated by outride in- 
fluences, things outride our coun- 
try,” be added 

The president again said that So- 
cial Security Is not a pan of the 
deficit problem.” 

“It is totally financed by a pay- 
roll tax.” be said, “and that tax 'is 
totally dedicated to that one pro- 
gram. If Social Security's spending 
were reduced, you could not take 
that money saved and use it to fund LONDON EXPLOSION - 

some other program in the deficit. K . 

It would simply go back into the apartaent-bkx* seoion was 
Social Security trust fund." gss leak is suspected as the t 


European Cold 
flattens Bubbles 
biChampagne 

International Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Europe's worst 
cold snap in more than 20 years 
I can now count yet another vic- 
tim — champagne. 

Freezing temperatures have 
made it risky to remove the 
champagne from temperature- 
| controlled cellars throughout 
I France, and, if the weeklong 
cold spell continues, the situa- 
tion could become “dramatic" 
next week, according to lames 
Gudliepain of Moei et Cban- 
don, a large champagne pro- 
ducer. 

Many distributors are refus- 
ing to deliver orders, in France 
and abroad, because at tem- 
peratures below minus 7 de- 
grees centigrade (19 Fahren- 
heit). tartar forms iaside 
c hamp a gn e bottles, ruining the 
wine. Temperatures have been 
hovering well below zero centi- 
grade during tiie last week. 

Some distributors are using 
heated trucks as a temporary 
solution, but it is more costly. 

“Transporting champagne in 
this weather is just not a wise or 
prudent thing to do." said a 
spokesman for Champagne 
Palmer, a small producer. 


Nerve Gas 
Plans Denied 

(Continued from Page 1) 

by the foreign secretary. Sir Geof- 


The three, all members of an outlawed Kurdish separatist group, were 
convicted by the court, in the southeastern provincial capital of Diyarba- 
kir, of several killings and armed robberies and of kidnapping several 
people, the report said. 

. Another person was sentenced to life imprisonment and 1 18 other 
defendants received jail terms ranging from three months to 24 year^ 
while 176 persons were acquitted, the agency said. 

U.S. Court Rejects Deportation Move 


by the roreign secretary. Mr Oeof- SAN DIEGO (LAT) — A U.S. appeals court on Wednesday rqected 
frey Howe; still applied. Mr. Howe attempts by the United Stales to deport Edgars Laipenieks, an accused 
said then that Britain bad not made c riminal from Latvia and former CIA employee who has admitted 
chemical weapons for 25 years and beating communists while working for Nazi occupation forces during 
had destroyed its stocks of such World War 1L 

weapons. The U.S. 9ib Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that Justice Department 

■ Leak Raises an Outcry officials failed to prove allegations that Mr. Laipenieks. 71. of La Jolla, 
If The New Statesmen did obtain pe^ecuted Jews and political prisoners hdd at the Riga 

secret documents, it would be the Cen^ Pnson in Latvia. 

third major leak of confidential pa- *j ie ]usuce Department s Office of Special Invesugauons in June 19S1 
per* in 15 months. Conservative sued to have Mr. Laipenieks expelled from the country, claiming that he 
Party members of Parliament have bad concealed ^ roIe as jailer at tbe Riga prison during World War 
raised an outoy about the “treach- ,L ^messes who testified in 1 982 at a deportation bearing in San Diego 
eiy” of civil servants, Reuters re- Laipenieks was responsible for oraering tbe execution there of ai 


The Justice Department's Office of Special Investigations in June 1981 
led to have Mr. Laipenieks expelled from the country, claiming that he 

>.-1 hlc ml. «<- h.ori iallo .k. DU. .J... J...'.. TII .,1 J 


ported from London. least 200 Prisoners from 1941 to 1 943. 

Anthony Beaumont-Dark, a 

Mrs. Thatcher to begin a rigorous Ex-Intelligence Officers Back CBS 

inquiry and prosecute the guilty NEW YORK (NYT) — Four former U A military intelligence officers, 

person to the full extent of the law. who said they witnessed or participated in the arbitrary reduction of 
I be government has already tak- enemy troop estimates in Vietnam in 1967, have testified by means of 
ct legal action over two earlier depositions and filmed interviews at the trial of General William C. 
leaks. A junior foreign office clerk Westmoreland's libel suit against CBS. 

was imprisoned for six months for Lieutenant Richard McArthur said estimates he compiled in Saigon on 

leaking 10 the press the arrival dale Vietcong guerrilla forces had been “massacred" by his superiors — 
ra U.b.-made ennse missiles in “falsified, faked, whatever terminology you would like me to use." 
Britain late in 1 983. Lieutenant Colonel George Hamscber said that at a Pentagon meeting he 

in another case, a Defense Min- took part in the “bloodless wiping out” of units in the official military 
isuy official goes on tnal this listing of enemy strength. 

month on charge of leaking docu- The depositions and videotapes, also taken from Lieutenant Colonel 

men is on the sinking of the Argen- David Morgan and Lieutenant Marshal] Lynn, were introduced Wedncs- 
tine cruiser General Beigrano dur- day by David Boies, a lawyer for CBS. to show that, for political and 
*j* 8 j ; , 5 **" war ovcr l “ e public relations reasons. General Westmoreland's command had im- 

Falklands. posed an artificial “ceiling" of 300,000 on reports of enemy troop 

strength in the year before the January 1968 Tet offensive. 

Soviet Union Cuts Prices on 2 Cars 

MOSCOW (AP) — The Soviet authorities cut prices Thursday on cars, 
one of the most coveted consumer possessions here. 

Prices of two brands of automobile were slashed by np to 28 percent, 
effective immediately. But tbe cuts still left the lowest prices 14 times 
above tbe average monthly wage of 180 rabies (S207). 

The cuts were made in prices of the Niva, a four-wheel-drive vehicle. 


Ex-Intelligence Officers Back CBS 



Falklands. 


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L OND ON EXPLOSION — Rescue workers searched for survivors Thursday after an 
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For the Record 

Gary Kasparov ahradooed efforts to score his second victory in the 
world chess championship and agreed to a draw Thursday in Moscow 
after the 70th move of game 40. Anatoli Karpov, the champion, leads the 
contest by five games to one. and needs one more victory to retain the 
titljL (AP) 

The trial of three Bulgarians and four Turks charged with complicity in 
the plot to kill Pope John Paul II is expected to start in early April, a 
lawyer for one of the defendants said Thursday in Rome. (AP) 

Spanish. British and Gibraltarian officials met in La Linea, Spain, on 
Thursday lo discuss the planned reopening of the border Feb. 5 between 
Spain and tbe British colony of Gibraltar, officials said. (Ratters) 
Iraq »id its warplanes Thursday attacked an unidentified ship near 
Iran s Kharg Island oil lei ruinal in the Gulf. Shipping sources said there 
was no independent confirmation of the attack. (AP) 

K Briton ms jailed for fire years in Libya an Wednesday for drag 
smuggling, a British member of Parliament, Ron Brown of tbe Labor 
Party, said in London. He said Michael King, an oil engineer from 
Aucn tennuchty in southeastern Scotland, was also fined 3.000 dinars 
(J 10, J 35) in Tripoli (AP) 

Qw» is to test an international exposition on defense technology New. 
1-11, 1986. including displays of armaments and hardware for all miliurv 
services, the Xinhua press agency reported Thursday. (AP) 

The United Stales expressed regret Thursday over a North Korean 
decision to postpone Red Cross-sponsored talks with South Korea 
because of military exercises Seoul is planning to conduct wilh US. 
forces next month. (AP) 

Swedish police reported Thmsday that a poison gas leak from a 
chemical plant was threatening part of the town of Karlskoga. 150 miles 
1240 kilometers) west of Stockholm. No further details were immediately 
available and there were no initial reports of injuries. (Reuters) 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY XI, 1985 


Page 3 


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First Assembly 
Since Revolt 
Is Installed 
JnNicaragua 

By Stephen Kinzer 

Nett York Tima Smrce 

MANAGUA — Nicaragua’s 
new National Constituent Assem- 
bly has been installed, the first 
elected body to lake office since the 
Sandmist-led revolution in 1979. 

The assembly’s 96 representa- 
tives filed to the podium of a newly 
redecorated ball on Wednesday to 
receive their official credentials. 

Even among the legislators, how- 
ever, there was no consensus on 
whether the new government struc- 
ture, or the constitution that the 
.assembly must soon write, would 
be able to improve life Tor the coun- 
try’s' 3 million people. 

The assembly elected Carlos 
NAhez, a top Sandinist command- 
er, as its chairman. 

Mr. Nunez told the assembly 
thaCtbe constitution it is charged 
with creating win be a “product of 
tbs revolution that destroyed the 
whole political and legal order of 
the system of exploitation that had 
ruled in our country since colonial 
times.” 

Opposition leaders have de- 
clared that they will fight any at- 
tempt to impose a Marxisl-style 
constitution. 

They said in interviews Wednes- 
day that they would press for mea- 
sures to stimulate production by 
providing financial incentives to 
the private sector. They said they 
also would seek changes in the mili- 
tary draft law and an easing of 
press censorship. 

President-elect Daniel Ortega 
Saavedra, who was to be inaugurat- 
ed Thursday, has warned Nicara- 
guans that they face continuing 
warfare and intensifying economic 





Key Part of Sharon Story Was False 
Time Concedes During Libel Trial 


IhAsocnfedPra 


Officers of Nicaragua's new National Assembly are sworn 
in. From left: Carlos Nunez, president: Leticia Herrera, 


vice president: Clemente Guido, vice president; Maurido 
Diaz, vice president; and Rafael Solis, secretary. 


(On Thursday, President Fidel 
Castro of Cuba arrived in Managua 
to attend the inauguration of Mr. 
Ortega, The Associated Press re- 


ported, quoting the government ra- 
dio. The Voice of Nicaragua said 
Lhat Mr. Onega was at the airport 
to greet Mr. Castro.] 

Mr. Ortega and the governing 
Sandinist Front will dominate the 
elected government, but the oppo- 
sition bolds one-third of the assem- 
bly seats. 

Opposition representatives have 
said they would immediately chal- 
lenge a number of key government 
programs. 

“The future may bring many 
changes.” said Clemente Guido, 
who is one of 14 Conservative Par- 
ty deputies in the assembly. “Nica- 
raguans want a Western democracy 
that will also do justice to the poor. 
We are going to see if the San dinis t 
Front mil change its mentality and 
if the opposition will change its 
mentality enough to produce a na- 
tional consensus.” 

The three-year Nicaraguan guer- 
rilla war, which is believed to have 
taken 5,000 lives during 1984, re- 


mains the dominant force in Nica- 
raguan life 

Mr. Ortega said in his year-end 
message: “During 1985, military 
aggression will continue being the 
major factor affecting the life of Lhe 
country. The crisis has grown to the 
point where urgent measures must 
be taken to help us confront it/' 

He said that 40 percent of the 
national budget in 1985 would be 
devoted to the military. He charac- 
terized the war in which Nicaragua 
is engaged as one of national de- 
fense against a mercenary army fi- 
nanced and organized by the Unit- 
ed States. 

Sandinist leaders have alleged 
that the United States is deeply 
involved in guiding the rebels, of 
which the Nicaraguan Democratic 
Force is the largest armed faction. 

With the government desperate- 
ly short of cash and with many 
items unavailable or extremely 
costly, the effect of the war is now 
felt more widely than ever. 


Cigarettes are the latest item in 
short supply, water is being ra- 
tioned in Managua and, according 
id the Sandinist newspaper Barri- 
cade. the price of shoes has risen to 
die point where many working peo- 
ple cannot afford them. 

■ Rebels Said to Kill 13 

The Nicaraguan Defense Minis- 
try reported two attacks Wednes- 
day in which rebels killed 13 civil- 
ians and abducted 10 people, 
including an American nun who 
later was released unharmed. The 
Associated Press said. 

The rebels freed Sister Nancy 
Donovan, 52. of Walerbury, Con- 
necticut, “apparently because she 
was an American," said Myriam 
Hooker, a Nicaraguan Embassy 
spokeswoman in Washington. 

The nun was traveling with mote 
than a dozen Nicaraguan civilians 
in a government truck Tuesday af- 
ternoon when the rebels ambushed 
several government vehicles near 
the town of San Juan de Limay, 84 


miles (134 kilometers) north or Ma- 
nagua. the Defense Ministry said. 
■ U-S. Missions to Resrnne 

The U.S. Navy's biggest ships 
soon will resume the “show-the- 
fiag” missions off the coast of Nic- 
aragua that were suspended Iasi 
summer before the U.S. election. 
The Washington Post reported 
Thursday. 

The aircraft carrier Nimitz. with 
its full air wing of 90 warplanes, left 
Norfolk. Virginia, on Tuesday and 
was headed toward the Caribbean 
coast of Central America, Penta- 
gon officials said Wednesday. The 
battleship Iowa and its battle group 
are to follow in a few weeks. 

Neither ship was expected to 
spend more than a few days in the 
regjon, but both visits will be “high 
visibility.” Officials of allied Cen- 
tral American countries may be 
flown out for shipboard visits. 

From the summers of 19S3 to 
1984, the Reagan administration 
maintain ed a strong naval presence 
off both coasts of Central America. 


By Herbert H. Denron 

Washington Post Scrvnr 
NEW YORK — Time magazine 
has conceded in court that a key 
detail in the February 1983 article 
at issue in Ariel Sharon's S5Q-mil- 
lion libel lawsuit was false, but it 
said it continued to believe the arti- 
cle was substantially true. 

The admission Wednesday by 
Time's lead attorney, Thomas Bari, 
followed a review Sunday in Jeru- 
salem of secret Israeli documents 
detailing the actions of Mr. Sharon, 
who then was Israel's defense min- 
ister, shortly before the 1982 mas- 
sacre of Palestinians in Beirut. 

Mr. Barr conceded there now 
was “dear and convincing evi- 
dence” that the secret documents 
contained no evidence that Mr. 
Sharon, on Sept. 15. 1981 a day 
before the massacre, had discussed 
with Christian Phalangist leaden 
the need for avenging the assassi- 
nation of Bashir Gemayel. The mi- 
litia commander and president- 
elect of Lebanon had been killed by 
a bomb on Sept. 14. 1982. 

“We're standing by our commit- 
ment to make a retraction” in the 
magazine, said a Time spokesman, 
Mike Luftman. “but we re not go- 
ing to discuss what we might do 
while the case is before the jury.” 
In order to prove libel, Mr. Shar- 
on must convince the jury that the 
article not only was false but that it 
defamed him 'and was written in a 
spirit of “actual malice." meaning 
Time either knew it was false or 
had serious doubts about its accu- 
racy. 

The review of the documents was 
conducted by Yitzhak Kahan, the 
former chief justice of the Israeli 


The Israeli government did 
broadcast, over state radio Monday 
morning. Mr. Kahan's responses to 
Judge Sofaer's questions on the 
content of the secret documents. 

in uii u..i»iuu muhi » Judge Sofaer said he fell that was 
morning. Judge Abraham D. So- unfair and gave the appearance^ 
faer expelled reporters and specta- impropriety because Time s re- 
tore from the courtroom for about spouses were not made puwic, toa 
10 minutes while the jury heard He said he had argued this in three 
Time's “reservations" about the or four telephone conversations 
conclusions Mr. Kahan drew in re with an Israeli government lawyer 


Supreme Court who headed the ini- 
tial inquiry into the massacre. He 
said that no evidence had been un- 
covered to support the disputed 
portion of Times article. 

In an unusual action Wednesday 


viewing the secret papers. 

Judge Sofaer said he felt cum- 
peUed to dear the court because of 
an agreement he made with the 
Israeli government. 

Several news organizations for- 
mally challenged the decision dur- 
ing a brief afternoon hearing in 
coon. But Judge Sofaer did not 
relent and said he would take simi- 
lar action during a portion of the 
dosing arguments if Isradi officials 
continue to rebuff his efforts to 
allow Time's reservations to be 
made public. 

Two Isradi lawyers, one repre- 
senting Time and the other Mr. 
Sharon, were also permitted to ex- 
amine the documents reviewed by 
Mr. Kahan. But under the terms of 
an arrangement suggested by Judge 
Sofaer. the attorneys had to sign an 
agreement pledging not to reveal 
what they had seen. 

Time's lawyer, through the 
judge's interventions, was allowed 
to express his reservations with Mr. 
Kahan's conclusions to magazine 
officials and to the court. But the 
Israeli government, according to 
Judge Sofaer. felt its decision al- 
lowing Time access to the docu- 
ments specifically ruled out public 
disclosure of the reservations. 


over the last 48 hours. 


Researchers Identify Infectious Agents 
That Transmit Lethal Form of Senility 


President 
Is Critical of 
VigUantism 

By Howard Kurtz 

Washington Patt Service 

WASHINGTON — President 
Ronald Reagan, commenting indi- 
rectly on the case in which a New 
Yorker shot four teen-agers who 
accosted him on the subway, has 
cautioned against people “taking 
the law in their own hands.” 

Mr. Reagan, asked about the 
ease during his news conference 
Wednesday night, said he could not 
comment specifically while the 
matter was before the courts. 

Then he said: “I think we aO 
realize that there is a breakdown of 
civilization if people start taking 
the law in their own hands. 

He said lhat “while we may fed 
understanding or sympathy for 
someone who was tested beyond 
his control,” at the sane time **we 
have to abide by the law and stand 
for law and order.” 

- He said that “wc all can under- 
stand the frustration of people who 
are constantly threatened by crime 
anti fed that law and order is not 
paitkalariy protecting them." 

Mr. Reagan noted that the rate 
of serious crimes in the United 
States had dropped in the last two 
years. 

He said he did not blame police 
for the crime problem so much as 
“kind of an altitude” in the struc- 
ture of the judicial system “in 
which it seems we got oveczealous 
in puotectixg rami rials' rights and 
forgot about the victims." 

- Eariier Wednesday, hospital of- 
firials in New York disclosed that 
one of the four youths shot Dec. 22 
had lapsed into a coraa. 

/ EtaxylCabey, 19, was in critical 
condition and using a respirator to 
Breath, according to a spokesman 
ai/Su Vincent’s Hospital. Mi. Ca - 
bey, who was paralyzed from tire 
waist down ami was. the most seri- 
ously wounded of tire four, con- 
tracted pneumonia last week. 

- Tire subway shooting, in which 
police have charged Bernhard H. 
Goetz, 37, has prompted an out- 
pouring of public support for tire 
gmrman as a symbol of a crime 

U.S. Official Urges 
Aspirin Warnings 

New York Timer Service 

WASHINGTON — Margaret 
M: Heckler, secretary of Health 
ted Human Services, asked aspirin 
manufacturers Wednesday to want 
caosunrers that using a^isa under 
certain conditions may be associat- 
ed with tire development of Reyc’s 
Syndrome, a potentially fatal ail- 
inoiL She asked maHufactnrHS to 



ContadorcL Group Agrees on New Text 


Los Angela Times Service 

LOS ANGELES — A recently 
identified class of infectious agents 
lhat are smaller than viruses has 
been found to be the cause of a rare 


President Ronald Reagan 


victim who fought back. Mr. Goetz 
shot the four youths after they al- 
legedly surrounded him on a sub- 
way train and asked for S5. 

Each of the four youths had been 
arrested or convicted at least once 
and each was facing a trial or a 
hearing on c riminal charges at the 
time of the incident. 

Mr. Cabey was arrested in Octo- 
ber on charges that, using a shot- 
gun, he held up three men in the 
vestibule of a New York Gty 
Housing Authority building in the 
Bronx, stealing their cash and jew- 
elry. 


By Juan M. Vasqucz 

Los Angeles Tima Service 

PANAMA GTY — The foreign 
minis ters of the four countries of 
the Contadora group have an- 
nourced agreement on revisions to 
a proposed Central American 
peace treaty aimed at ending re- 
gional hostilities. 

A declaration issued by the dip- 
lomats Wednesday, at the end of 
two days of discussions, came as a 
surprise because For the first time it 
referred, tentatively, to a signing 
ceremony. 

The foreign ministers called for 
another round of talks with region- 
al leaders on Feb. 14-15, “to pre- 
pare the dements for a conference 
destined to subscribe to the Act of 
Peace and Cooperation in Central 
America." 

That is the name of the draft 
peace plan produced in a series of 
negotiations that began on Jan. 10, 
1982, on the Panamanian resort is- 
land of Contadora. The island gave 
its name in the group of mediating 
nations — Colombia, Mexico, Pan- 
ama and Venezuela — that worked 
out the plan in consultation with 
the five affected Central American 
countries: Costa Rica, El Salvador, 
Honduras, Guatemala and Nicara- 
gua. 

The 


Contadora diplomats ac- 
knowledged that “divergent posi- 
tions which are unresolved” still 
existed between Nicaragua and the 


U.S. allies in Central America, but 
they insisted that none were insur- 
mountable. 

“We will make proposals which 
we hope wOl be received sympa- 
thetically and accepted by the gov- 
ernments of Central America,” said 
Foreign Minis ter Bernardo Sepul- 
veda Amor of Mexico. 

Isidro Morales Paul, Venezuela's 
foreign minister, added, “We have 
managed in this meeting to crystal- 
lize a series of proposals with the 
aim of bringing all the parties clos- 
er together." 

He cautioned that “our opti- 
mism must not be exaggerated.” 
but he said the group was hopeful 
its suggestions would work because 
they resulted from a series of pri- 
vate talks that the foreign ministers 
have held with their Central Ameri- 
can counterparts over the past 
three months. 

The principal U.S. allies in the 
region — El Salvador, Honduras 
and Costa Rica — produced an 
alternative draft of the peace plan 
on Oct 19 and submitted it as a 
new basis for negotiation. Nicara- 
gua. which bad endorsed the origi- 
nal Contadora plan drafted in Sep- 
tember, balked at renegotiating on 
the basis of the new version, how- 
ever. Thus, the talks appeared 
stalemated. 

The main disagreements focus 
on some of the mam security provi- 
sions: the presence of foreign mili- 


tary advisers and the holding of 
military maneuvers by foreign ar- 
mies: the composition and author- 
ity of a panel that would monitor 
compliance; the level of armaments 
that each nation would be allowed 
to possess, and the timetable for 
putting the provisions into effecL 
The Contadora foreign ministers 
left together Wednesday afternoon 
aboard a Panamanian Air Force 
plane bound for Nicaragua, where 
they were scheduled to attend the 
presidential inauguration of Daniel 
Ortega Saavedra on Thursday. 


but fatal type of human senility, mans. 
University of California research- 
ers reported in Thursday's edition 
of the New England Journal of 
Medicine. 


The researchers from the univer- 
sity's Berkeley and San Francisco 
campuses say' they have conclusive 
evidence that tiny agents, known as 
prions, cause Crcutzfeldt-Jakob 
disease, a condition that was be- 
lieved responsible for the death in 
1983 of George Balanchine, the 
choreographer. 

Prions were first identified in 
1982 by Dr. David Pnisiner, a Uni- 
versity of California, San Francis- 
co. neurologist, and his colleagues. 


They found that prions caused 
scrapie, a degenerative neurologi- 
cal disease of sheep. The current 
report is the first to show that 
prions can cause a disease in hu- 


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Anton Karas, Vienna Zitherist, Dies 


The Associated Press 

VIENNA — Anton Karas. 78, 
the zither player who performed 
the haunting theme for the movie 
“The Third Man,” starring Orson 
Welles, died Wednesday following 
a long illness. 

After “The Third Man" became 
one of the biggest hits of the post- 
war period, Mr. Karas opened a 
tavern in Severing, a suburb of 
Vienna, and it became a major 
tourist attraction. But he dosed it 
in 1966 because, be said, “the taxes 
nearly kQl me.” 

SSr Carol Reed, the movie direc- 
tor, discovered Mr. Karas in 1949 
during location work in Vienna for 
“The Third Man.” The script was 
by Graham Greene. 

Mr. Karas was trained to be a 
locksmith, and his musical career 


Bom in Russia. Mr. Lyons came 
with his family to the United States 
as a child. As a young man. he was 
a dedicated Socialist and supporter 
of the Russian Revolution, serving 
as the U.S. correspondent for Tass 
from 1923 to 1927. In 1928, he went 
to Moscow as a correspondent for 
United Press and in 1930 became 
the first foreign correspondent to 
obtain an interview with Stalin. 

But the six years Mr. Lyons 
spent in the Soviet Union led to his 
disillusionment with Communism, 
and on his return to the United 
States in 1934 he wrote a denuncia- 
tion of the Soviet system in ibe 
book “Assignment in Utopia." 

■ Other Deaths: 

Dr. Cornelius Osgood, 79, a for- 
mer professor of anthropology at 
Yale University and a leading 


of a heart attack in New Haven. 
Connecticut. 


developed by accident. He found scholar of the Cultures of the Arctic 
an old zither in an attic and became and East Asia, Friday, apparently 
a virtuoso after receiving instruc- 
tion from local players. 

Eugene Lyons, 86, 

Veteran U.S. Newsman 
NEW YORK (NYT) — Eugene 
Lyons, 86, one of lhe first Ameri- 
can correspondents to report from 
the Soviet Union, died Monday at 
his home in Manhattan. 


Barbara Myerboff. 48, whose 
documentary “Number Our 
Days." on the aging Jew's of Venice. 
California, won an Academy 
Award in 1976, Monday of cancer 
in Los Angeles. 

John E. Horne, 76, head of the 
Small Business Administration un- 
der President Kennedy. Tuesday in 
Alexandria, Virginia. 

Alberto Juometti, 82, a resis- 
tance leader in World War II and 
former Socialist Party secretary, of 
a hean attack Thursday in Novara, 
Italy. 

3 Killed in Ecuador Strike 

The Associated Pros 

QUITO. Ecuador — Thousands 
of people demonstrated Wednes- 
day throughout Ecuador on the 
first day of a two-day general strike 
against increased gasoline prices 
Three people were killed and at 
least 12 were arrested. 


• put wanting labels on 
ih& products. 

"lhe move was in reaction to a 
sjtndy by the Centers far Disease 


atiochfldren suffering from dude* 
axpax oarfln inoisases the rid: they 
wflKoBB down with die syndrome. 
Symptoms of the afiment include 
v omiting , fewr, convulsions and 
comas, with death resulting in 
nmsjhly * quarter of the cases. 
j lifeH«kier^^ortsw^criti- 
®ed as too late and too weak by 
I fc; Sidney M. Wolfe, the head of 
tito-cousGmer advocate Ralph Na- 
dcs’s Heahh Researeh Group. Dr. 
Wdfe, who. lad made the study 
resihxpubBc, called for steps to 
icqpfc;tte labeling, rather titan 
natmgft'i mii m ta iy. 


Japanese Police Arrest 
Suspected Terrorist 

Reuters 

TOKYO —Japanese police have 
captured a suspected terrorist and 
seized an arms cache belonging to a 
leftist group thaL claimed responsi- 
bility for bombing a U.S. consul- 
ate. a police spokesman said Thurs- 
day, 

The arms were discovered in a 
raid on a house in southern Japan, 
where police captured Kogo Hashi- 
saux 35, who disappeared 1 5 years 
ago while free on ban. Mr- Hashisa- 
to’s radical movement, known as 
rh.ikaimha- claimed responsibility 

for an attack oq the U.S. Consulate 
in Kobe on New Year’s Day. 



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Page 4 


FRIDAY, JANUARY 11, 1985 


INTERNATIONAL 


(tribune 


PubB»J»rf With The Npv YoHe Ttmn and The WaAn^mPbn 


A Modest Step Forward 


U is indisputably better for Americans and 
Russians to be talking about their midear 
arms race than to be running it in feverish 
isolation. Having to explain weapons pro- 
grams reduces the chance of calamitous mis- 
calculation. Talking may also usefully calm — 
or confirm — mutual suspicions. It preserves 
hope for restraining the nuclear competition 
and also for negotiating more reasonably 
about other issues. So this week's Geneva deal 
to resume talking, which was a full year in the 
making, is a modest step forward. 

The deal reflects a judgment in both Wash- 
ington and Moscow that the snarling hostility 
of recent years incurred even greater costs than 
ballooning military budgets. It made allies 
anxious and uncooperative. It distorted do- 
mestic politics and budgets. Most dangerous- 
ly. it sapped the patience of nations that have 
put off acquiring nuclear arms on the promise 
that the superpowers will reduce theirs. 

Do not, however, be misled by the televised 
hoopla in Geneva. This Shultz-Gromyko 
agreement to toss arms control into a new 
forum implies nothing promising yet about the 
compatibility of the two governments’ objec- 
tives, their dedication to the task or their sense 
of urgency. If they really want to restrain the 
arms race by agreement, they will have to 
quickly ban at least certain types of testing. If 
they do not, and deploy some weapons now 
available, thiar diplomats will be merely wav- 
ing at horses bursting oat of the bant. 


At the crudest level, the coining discussion 
may be nothing more than an effort by each 
side to blame the other for failure. But it could 
alcn become a genuine attempt to move be- 
yond the hostilities produced by Afghanistan, 
Poland, KAL flight 007. Nicaragua, Cambo- 
dia Bad new missile deployments in Europe. 

Without significant discussion of arms con- 
trol. it was becoming ever harder to preserve 
co mmuni cation, avoid confrontation and nor- 
malize some exchanges of goods, ideas and 
people. At least a token recognition of the 
change in climate c an be read into the Krem- 
lin’s simultaneous decision to let the mother of 
Ana toU Shdtaransky visit him at a labor camp. 

That is hardly a major concession to decency, 
but it does suggest that the channels now 
reopened can be used for intensely human 
con c erns as well as grand strategic debate. 

The new agreement offers one other shred of 
hope: It provides f or conducting the separate 
discussions of space weapons, intercontinental 
missiles and EuronrissQes under a single tent. 
That concessions in one area amid be 
traded against those in another. To wait for 
coordinated progress in all three realms would 
be yet another way to frustrate final agree- 
ment. But interim bargains would be easier if 
negotiated with three different kinds of chips. 

The difficult weapons choices are all in the 
future. That they will be faced, no less made, is 
far from clear. But it is at least possible. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 



*/ jiTl* 3 

NoTw 5> V1 

For Bygone 
Caudillos ; '* 


(ill® 





*[tc *c „ 

4* Mat***' Atr df**? 


After Geneva: To Start With, a Test Ban 


Heart of the Experiment 


“We need a dynamic, forceful fighter, a gny 
like Schroeder who wants to live.” Those are 
the words of Dr. William DeVries, the heart 
surgeon, seeking a third candidate to receive 
an artificial heart It is good news that his 
second patient, William Schroeder, is now en- 
joying the new year he never expected to see. 
But in the search for patients it is important 
not to lose sight of the experiment 

No one would think of letting an experimen- 
tal drug on the market until it had been ade- 
quately tested for safety and efficacy. Unfor- 
mnately, no agency exists in America to 
regulate novel surgical procedures, doubtless 
because of an assumption that surgeons can be 
trusted to regulate themselves. But the recent 
record of heart surgery contains proof to the 
contrary. After Christiaan Barnard performed 
the first human heart transplant in 1967. a rash 
of I-can-do-it-too operations swept through 
cardiology departments around the world. 
Only a handful of transplants was needed to 
conclude that the technique was premature. 

Coronary bypass operations have been a 
gold mine for surgeons for more than a decade. 
They alone accounted for SIS billion, or near- 
ly I percent, of America's 1982 medical bill, 
and the number is s till rising. Only recently has 
the success rate of the operation been otgec- 
tively compared with alternative, nonsurgjcal 
treatments —which, for certain coronary dis- 
eases, seem to be just as effective. 

The implant of mw;hnnic«l hearts is about 
as experimental an operation as you can geL 
Each case needs the most careful assessment 
How much can life be prolonged and with 


what quality? How well do patients adjust to 
being tethered to a machine? How seriously 
does the energetic pluming shock other parts 
of the body? Barney Clark suffered seizures 
and William Schroeder is recovering from 
strokes of so far unknown origin. But are 
answers being urgently sought to these ques- 
tions. or are Dr. DeVries and his hospital 
taking the operation’s success for granted? 

Dr. DeVries implanted Barney Gaik’s heart 
at the University of Utah Medical Center, an 
academic environment well suited to the as- 
sessment of experimental procedures. Some 
physicians have criticized the “Roman circus’* 
publicity fostered by the Humana Hospital- 
Audubon in Louisville, Kentucky, to which 
Dr. DeVries has moved. Mare to the point is 
whether the hospital, which does not specialize 
in teaching or research, win properly evaluate 
what it is trying to pioneer. 

“No one questions the clinical competence 
of the cardiac surgical team there,” notes Ar- 
nold Reiman, editor of the New England Jour- 
nal of Medicine. But he adds that assessment 
of innovations “is usually best carried out in 
hospitals that are specially equipped and 
staffed for clinical investigation.” 

Several more operations must be done, and 
each scrupulously evaluated, to decide wheth- 
er or not the mechanical heart has a niche in 
medicine: Understandably, Dr. DeVries exult- 
ed after the successful replacement of Mr. 
Schroeder’s heart: “I fdt I'd been vindicated." 
But it is the experiment that awaits vindica- 
tion, not the surgeon. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES 


W ASHINGTON — The aims 
control talks in Geneva pro- 
vide the first major news stoiy of 
1985. At best, however, the Shultz- 
Gromyko meeting was only the first 
in a long series of talks about hold- 
ing future talks. In the meantime 
both sides will go on amassing omi- 
nous new nuclear arsenals. 

America is building about five or 
six nuclear weapons each day to 
satisfy plans for 17.000 new nuclear 
weapons by 1992. It is clear that the 
Soviet Union will keep pace. Both 
sides are building new strategic mis- 
siles, intermediate-range missiles, 
cruise missiles, bombas, subma- 
rines and battlefield weapons. 

We are in danger of seeing a re- 
play erf the 1970s, when the United 
States and the SovieL Union con- 
cluded 10 arms control agreements. 
In the same decade. America added 
6.056 weapons to its strategic arse- 
nal aimed at the Soviet Union, 
which itself added 3,903 weapons 
aimed at America. Both sides built 
far faster than they talked. 

Tune is r unning ouL Two events 
will occur next September that 
make it imperative that there be 
progress on arms control soon. 


By Eugene J. Carroll Jr. 


First, the Alaska, the seventh Tri- 
deni submarine, wiD go cm sea tri- 
als. Thai will put the United States 
over the SALT-2 limit of 1,200 mul- 
tiple-warhead missiles. 

Second, signatories of the Nucle- 
ar Nonproliferation Treaty will 
meet in Geneva to review progress 
by the nuclear powers toward meet- 
ing their obligations ander Article 
VI of the treaty. In that article all 
parties agree “to pursue negotia- 
tions in good faith on effective mea- 
sures relating to cessation of the 
nuclear arms race.” Nonnuclear sig- 
natories warned in 1980 that they 
were dissatisfied with the fact that 
nuclear arsenals were still growing 
on both sides. If these signatories 
return in 1985 to find a further 
acceleration of the nudear arms 
buildup, wholesale withdrawals 
from the treaty are possible, adding 
new danger to the already perilous 
problem of nuclear proliferation. 

There are other serious time pres- 
sures on arms control. Sea-launched 
nuclear cruise missiles, still in test- 
ing by both sides, will pose verifica- 
tion problems when operational. 


Also, in the spring the United States 
will bqgin a critical phase of testing 
for its F-15-launched ami-satellite 
rocket, another system that will be 
nearly impossible to limit under 
verifiable terms. 

In short, time and technology are 
rapidly reducing the opportunity 
for effective arms control agree- 
ments to keep weapons out of space 
as weQ as to stop the extremely 
dangerous buildup of superpower 
weapons and proliferation of nucle- 
ar weapons in the Third World. 

Talks to talk about future talks 
will be a facade to cover the inexo- 
rable growth of nuclear arsenals. 
The Reagan administration con- 
cedes that the talks are only the 
beguiling of a long and complicat- 
ed process and that a continued 
arms buildup is a virtual certainty. 

Is there not a more constructive 
approach to arms control today? 
One practical, achievable and safe 
measure stands out The United 
States should propose a moratori- 
um on nuclear testing and early re- 
sumption of negotiations on a com- 
prehensive nuclear test ban treaty. 


Most of the provisions under which 
the United States, the Soviet Union 
and Britain would end nuclear test- 
ing have already been agreed upon. 
A test ban could be verified with 
confidence. An end to testing would 
put an end to the qualitative aspect 
of the nuclear arms buildup and 
would set the stage for an end to 
new weapons and reductions in old 
ones. It is the first, essential step 
toward slowing, stopping and re- 
versing the nudear arms race. 

Above all, a bald American ini- 
tiative to end nuclear testing would 
bypass the delays inherent in the 
present approach. President Rea- 
gan’s commitment to peace would 
be dear and the burden would be on 
Moscow to follow his lead. It is 
impossible to think of any valid 
reason why America should not 
stop nudear testing today, when it 
has conducted more tests than the 
test of the world combined. 

The writer, a r&ired rear admiral, is 
deputy director of the Center far De- 
fense Information, a private organiza- 
tion that mafyzes defense policies and 
pending. He conmbuted this common 
to The New York Tones. 


A Crucial Second Step in Fighting African Hunger 


Other Opinion 


Geneva: Hope Enough for Now 

A single drop of water falling from an icicle 
does not signal a thaw. But it is a better sign 
than a sword of solid ice that winter may not 
last forever. So was the message that came 
Tuesday at the end of the first arms control 
talks between the United Stales and the Soviet 
Union in more than a year. 

The Geneva talks were "aimed at preventing 
an arms race in space and terminating it cm 
Earth.” The results, if any. will come only after 
months and years of saber-dancing among 
nudear strategists and technicians who will be 
advising the negotiators, each grimly deter- 
mined not to let the other get an edge. 

The world wffl settle for that, for now. 

— The Los Angeles Times 

The bare fact that negotiations are now 
beginning does not mean that there is neces- 
sarily enough common ground to bring them 

to a successful conclusion. There is little 
chance that [Soviet leaders] wDl agree to reduc- 
tions in their offensive forces with an Ameri- 
can administration that is publicly committed 
to a new and speculative concept of strategic 
stability, and none that they will agree rapidly. 

It is, therefore, extremely encouraging that 
the United States has this week made great 
efforts to inform, and perhaps consult, its 
European allies on the Geneva meeting. A long 


drawn-out negotiation which may frequently 
appear stalled wiS offer Moscow many oppor- 
tunities for divisive propaganda. It will be 
essential that intensive alliance consultations 
are maintained permanently, partly to counter 
these divisive dangers and partly to bring the 
maximum European influence to bear on an 
[American] administration whose negotiating 
posture appears, at this stage, to be idealistic 
but unpromising. 

— Financial Times [London). 

Finally, both sides have shown some will- 
ingness to co mp ro mi se. It is a positive pram 
that both superpowers want an arms accord. 
But as a final treaty oa nudear arms and space 
weapons may be years away, no rate can pre- 
cisely foretell bow far both superpowers would 
have advanced in space armament technology 
ra whether an arms race, both on Earth and in 
space, would really have taken place. 

— Indonesian Observer (Jakarta). 

What the talks in Geneva accomplished is 
an encouragement for the forces of peace in 
the whole world. The citizens of our republic 
wish the upcoming negotiations all success. It 
was and remains a basic principle of oar policy 
that it is belter to negotiate 10 times than 
to shoot once. That too is confirmed by the 
joint Geneva declaration. 

— Neues Deutschland (East Berlin). 


W ASHINGTON — While the 
outpouring of emergency food 
to Africa is a worthwhile and dramat- 
ic fast step toward saving lives, it is 
merely a first step. Alone it will not 
save the continent’s stricken people, 
nor break the cyde of their depen- 
dence on imported food for survival. 
The crucial next step, which must be 
taken now, is to determine what long- 
term development aid will best lay 
the groundwork fra- the recovery of 
Africa’s environment and agricul- 
ture. Its goal should be to help Afri- 
cans begin feeding themselves. 

But reaching that goal will be a 
long, difficult journey. For rate thing, 
donors cannot agree on the answer to 
a simple but highly charged question: 
What kind of long-term development 
aid best saves Africa? While relief 
workers, and even East-West rivals, 
cooperate in Africa’s dusty feeding 
stations, bureaucrats in pin stripes 
squabble across mahogany tables 
about budgetary mid ideological an- 
swers to that question. 

The most open, if not contentious, 
debate involves the World Bank and 
the Reagan administration, both ma- 


By Jack Shepherd 


jor foreign aid donors. They agree 
that past aid programs in Africa have 
failed and that changes must be made 
— but then disagreement sets in. 

The World Bank, a multinational 
institution with 147 members, bases 
its view of the next step on need. It 
has made Africa its regional priority 
for the 1980s and has increased its 
disbursements to the continent by 50 
percent — to more than Sl.l billion 
this year. It also has called for 52 
billion more in economic assistance 
for the continent. 

The Reagan administration, on the 
other hand puts forth an African 
policy based not on need but on ide- 
ology and East-West considerations. 
Thus, while U.S. aid to Africa in- 
creased 40 percent during the last 
three years. American arms sales and 
assistance jumped 150 percent This 
year, five nations will get more than 
half of all U.S. economic aid to Afri- 
ca: Sudan, Kenya, Somalia. Liberia 
and Zaire — old friends or strategi- 
cally placed nations. 

The administration has opposed 50 


loans to Africa considered by the 
World Bank or smaller multinational 
development agencies — among 
them six loans for Ethiopia that were 
proposed last year. The administra- 
tion has refused to increase fiscal 
1985 contributions to the World 
Bank’s International Development 
Association — the “soft loan win- 
dow to which Africans, and others, 
turn for development assistance. The 
administration is cutting back dona- 
tions to the International Fund for 
Agricultural Development, which 
during the last six years has spent 
$400 million to help poor African 
farmera. Further, the administration 
is not renewing funding for the Inter- 
national Planned Parenthood Feder- 
ation, a shockingly myopic move 
considering Africa’s population 
growth rate of 3 2 percenL 
Instead of multinational aid pro- 
jects, administration officials speak 
of a strictly American initiative to- 
ward Africa based on frae- market 
and growth-oriented policies. But 
how does free-market development 


take place on a continent where one 
in three people struggle to find shel- 
ter for die night and food to eat? 

Africa's development needs are 
getting buried beneath budget cuts 
and Republican Party ideology. This 
is not a useful way to deal with 
change that most come to Africa — 
in internal economic policies, incen- 
tives to agricultural producers, popu- 
lation growth, the environment and 
the infrastructure. 

During 1985, emergency food aid 
must stabilize Africa. At the same 
time, America must help create mini- 
mum conditions for the recovery of 
Africa's land, agriculture and people. 

Since Africa is too poor to go it 
alone, the large donors must immedi- 
ately resolve their differences and 
Speedily take the next critical step. If 
they do not, Africa may well become 
a political, soda! and economic 
nightmare by the end of the decade. 


The writer, a senior associate at the Jimmy Carter’s 
Camegfa Endowment for Inlemation- rights and democr 
a! Peace, is author of “The Politics of port one moment. 
Starvation.” He contributed this com- activism fed late 
mem to The New York Times. were at a critical e 


By Jonathan Power. 

L ONDON — It has been a long, 2 
/ painful road. But on Tuesday, 

Brazil will complete its return to de- 
mocracy when a civilian president is . 
chosen by the electoral college. Over- 
whelmingly. South America has be- 
come democratic. Yet when Presi- 
dent Jimmy Carta came to office in 
1977. only Venezuela. Colombia and 
Suriname bad democratic regimes. ;. 

What has happened to the long 
tradition of the caudilla the strong- 
armed dictator? Is this not just one 
more pause in Latin America's V 
lengthy pattern of seesaw politics 
in which democracy is only an itaer-_ - " 
lude between coups? Among those 
who will argue that case is Glen De$- 
ly. In an article in Foreign Policy. be 
decries those who try to foist Western 
democratic concepts on an unwilling 
Latin American tradition'. 

“In Latin American minds,” be 
writes, “the vision of freely compet- 
ing factions all too often seems a 
choice between chaos and privilege. . .. 
Latin Americans maintain that union . - 
comes from unity, not from diveirity. 

Their political beliefs are based, on 
the corpora list medieval and Renais- 2 
sance political theory that predated ^ 
the contractarian thought of Locke ” 

For observers such as Mr. Deaiy, i , 
governments — whether of the right, ;!• I 
center or left— will be marked by dn - 
urge not to balance competing cen- 
ters of power, but either “to integrate Jj 
or to eliminate them in the nam&of 
collective harmony.*' 

There is, it most be conceded, his- fyi 
torical evidence for this view. -The ■ 
Argentine dictator Juan Per on talked 
of “the society of the future, which 
will be a perfect harmony wherein uo 
discordant note is heard.” This ech- 
oed Sim6n Bolivar’s famous Sjpeedi l 
in Colombia in 1819: “Unity, unity, < - 
unity must be the motto of all things- 
The blood of our citizens is varied' ' 

Let it be mixed for the sake of empty. ~ 
Our constitution has divided the . 
powers of government; Let them be r 
bound togetha to secure unity.” The 
left has talked the same way, whether 
it be Fidel Castro, tire Sandinists or 
the Salvadoran insurgents. “We have 
set out fully aware of what we aje j 
doing, with firm steps, on the road to 
the monolithic unity of all people^" 
said Salvador Cayetano Carpio. the 
late Salvadoran guerrilla leader. ’ 

Histo rians of this school point, to 
the Mexican constitution of 1917. 

This was the first explicit adoption of I. 
a nationalistic, centralized govern- 2 
meat in Central or South America. It T 
ended the 19th-century effort to into- 2 
grate the egalitarian-based theories 
of the French and North American 
revolutions. This constitution, anil 
Mexican practice; have been regard- 77:: 
ed as Latin America’s ideal -? a j'". 
strong but relatively benign govertiH'^ 
mem with major interest groups sub- "" 
sinned in a corporate whole. 

All this is true, but only half tijc - ; ' : 
picture. Chile and Urnguay both $is- - ' 
rained 50 years of uninterrupted dfc- 7 
mocracy in (his century. Costa Rica '• 
has been democratic since World r: ~ 
War IL And the traveler in today's 
Latin America encounters a desire - r 
for a new political maturity, for a 
pluralistic approach that wifi enable 
even profoundly divided societies; to 
live without violence. 

Mexico's last nationwide electioh, 
in 1982, was the first that gave oppo- v. : j 
sition parties a reasonably fair run. 

Since 1978, Peru, Bolivia, Ecuador - 
and Argentina have retired their gen- 
erals and held honest elections. , 

The Latin America of Bolivar and 10]i \i 
Perrin, with a small middle dass and I 

enormous undereducated proletariat, 
no longer exists. In its place fra ’ 
growing middle class and increasing- 
ly sophisticated working class. ; 

Jimmy Carta’s crusade for human - 




D -hi r?? 

f- 


null ■' 



uavt 


^ peaceful The Ebodaghe Formula: Ingenuity, Good Sense, Sweat 


FROM OUR JAN. 11 PAGES, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1910: Tale of a Most Polite Intrnder 
POUGHKEEPSIE, New York — The sound 
of breaking glass at three o’clock aroused An- 
nie Hansom, cook in the home of O. Bemsom, 
54 Montgomery Street. Jumping out of bed sbe 
saw a man raise the window and crawl into the 
room. He struck a match and lighted the gas. 
Mrs. Han$om confronted him. “Tdl me what 
you want and I’D give it to you, Mr. Robber,” 
she said. “It’s funny, but I don't know you,” 
replied the intruder. Blood was streaming from 
the man's hand where the glass had cut it. “If 
you don’t go HI call a man who is asleep in the 
next room.” said Mrs. Hansom. “Sorry to have 
disturbed you.” said the man with a bow. “Of 
course m go. I wouldn’t offend a lady for the 
world.” He backed away with another bow, 
opened a door on the back porch and went out 


1935: Persiaro to Become Iranians 
TEHERAN — The Persians — the only peo- 
ple who can truly claim to be Aryans — wQ] 
adopt the appellation of Iranians after March 
21 this year to emphasze their descent from an 
ancestry which peopled a large part of Asia 
and Europe. The change of name from Persia 
to Iran and from Parians to Iranians was 
decreed [on Jan. 10]. The government’s deci- 
sion is approved by public (pinion, which in 
recent years has advocated the change on the 
ground that Persia is <»Iy a province erf the 
Shah’s territory. This includes the whole of the 
Iranian plateau, which several centuries before 
the Christian era was inhabited by the Aryans. 
Iran is a modem version of the Middle Persian 
Eran. which in turn is a corruption of the Zend 
word Airyana, or “land of the Aryans.” 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 

JOHN HAY WHITNEY. Chairman 1958-1982 

KATHARINE GRAHAM. WILLIAM &. PALEY, ARTHUR OCHS SULZBERGER 

Co-Cha irm en 

LEE W. HUEBNER. hMCAtr 

PHI LIP M_ FOISIE Extern* e E d i tor RENE BONDY Deputy PidAther 

WALTER WELLS Editor ALAIN LECOUR Associate PMsher 

ROBERT K. McCABE Deputy Editor RICHA RD FL MORGAN Aaodau Pehtaher 

SAMUEL ABT Orpan Editor STEPHAN W. OtJNAWAY Dmctor td Operations 

CARL GEWIRTZ Aaoaate Edter FRANCOIS DESMAISON5 Direct* of Orodadai 

ROLF D. KKANEPUHL Darter 4 Adeeming Seta 
tatanational Herald Tritaoe. 181 Avenue Cbaries-de-Gaufte. 92200 NeoBy-sir-Seiae, - 

France. Telephone 747-1265. Tdex: 612718 (Hoakfi. Cables Herald Pais. JtQN&L 

Director de b pMaaam: Water N. Thom. 

Asia Nea^amen. 24-34 Hermasy RtL. Haag Kang Tel 5-285618. Tdex 61170. 

Managing Dir. UJL ReimMad&kai. 63 Long Am. Lonkn WO. TeL 816-4802. Tdex 262009 
SjL a u capital de UOO.OOO F. RCS Naatrre B 732021126. Cammixthm Paritaire No. 61337. 

“ * r - gm 


This is the first of two articles. 

f^NNE, Nigeria — A man dressed 
V/ in brown pin stripes has stopped 
his htMDodd Kenault on tire ride of 
the road, near a field covered with 
head-high plants. Now we all stand in 
a sudden downpour, listening to Joe 
Ebodaghe expound on his plans for 
the future. “1 want to get into by- 
products.” he says. “Chips. Health 
foods for diabetics. Bread maybe.” 

My notebook is getting wet and my 
ballpoint pen is seizing up. but i have 
to admire the enthusiasm of a man 
who believes he can become a food- 
growing tycoon in a part of the world 
often thought to be condemned to 
permanent hunger and dependence 
on food aid from abroad. 

The entrepreneurism of Joe Ebo- 
daghe, however, is reaL It is the other, 
more hopeful side of an otherwise 
bleak .African agricultural picture. 
For Mr. Ebodaghe is the beneficiary 
of a little-noticed international effort 
to harness biology, plant genetics, 
technology and common sense to in- 
crease the crop output among the 
world’s poorest people. 

If farming can be made to pay, the 
thinking goes, funds (and jobs) will 
begin flowing to rural areas, invest- 
ments in the Jong-neglected agricul- 
tural sector wfl] increase ana food 
win find its way more efficiently into 
Africa’s urban areas. 

Africa was largely bypassed by the 
Green Revolution of the 1960s and 
1970s, in which new strains of wheat 
and rice cultivated with fertiliza, wa- 
ter. chemicals and relatively sophisti- 
cated farming methods helped fann- 
ers in India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, the 
Phflmpines and Indonesia. 

Africa lacked water, and its ciiinate 
was severe. Fanning technology and 
agricultural institutions were unde- 
veloped. And. across large pans of 
the continent, the staple foods were 
largely unknown to Westerners: cas- 
sava, millet, sorghum, fa*a beans. 


By Christopher Matthews 


In the (hick of efforts to redress 
(his situation is the International In- 
stitute of Tropical Agriculture, or 
ITTA, in Ibadan, Nigeria, one of 13 
international centers around the 
world funded collectively by the Con- 
sultative Group on International Ag- 
ricultural Research. The research ef- 
fort is supported by 40 donors, 
including 24 governments. 

Whether money and expertise can 
create an agricultural miracle is an 
open question. 

Nigeria, where much of IITA’s 
work »s conc ent rated, is not typical of 
Africa. It has oil money, a prosperous 
middle class and a fairly developed 
agricultural structure. Successes in 
Nigeria may not be easy to replicate 
in places where drought and political 
tunzxnl are causing terrible hunger 

Even in Nigeria, perhaps only one 
farmer in 100 uses the improved vari- 
eties and techniques, ana the acreage 
fanned with new technology ami 
seeds is minuscule. Spreading infor- 
mation is an uphill tattle that must 
overcome traditional ways, bureau- 
cratic hassles and politics. But to 
demonstrate the possibilities is to 
provide a start. 

Plantain, the leafy banana-like 
plant grown by Mr. Ebodaghe, is not 
a miracle crop. But until the IITA’s 
George Wilson come along, few Ni- 
gerian farmers had thought of it as a 
field crop that could bring in 
Villagers believed that plantain 
would grow only near the f amil y’s 
cooking Ore — whose smoke was 
thought to be beneficial to iL 

Mr. Wilson, a Jamaican, found 
that what made plantain thrive was 
not smoke from the home fire but 
large quantities of household refuse 
dumped around the plants, which 
served as a mulch. 

Mr. Wilson devised the idea of 
planting fiemeugia, a last-growing. 


bushy-leaved legume, between rows 
of plantain. By pruning and spread- 
ing fiemeugia leaves, a farmer could 
protect the plantain’s fragile roots. 

Mr. Wilson found that I hectare 
(about 15 acres) would support up to 
2^00 plantain plants, each able to 
produce $5 worth of plantain a ye ar. 

The news spread around ITTA’s 
research station at Onne; one who 
beard it was Mr. Ebodaghe. 

A retired petroleum engineer, he 
realized that there was a growing seg- 
ment of the population that wanted, 
and could afford, food delicacies 
such as plantain. 

He acquired 100 acres and hired a 
crew to plow it and plant it with 
plantain. Now he is talking about 
getting into processing, where profits 
are bigger. Already, plantain .drips, 
something like potato drips, are be- 
ing sold throughout Nigeria. Mr. 
Ebodaghe said be may mill the plan- 
tain into a flour to produce a sort of 
bread to be sold in health-food stores. 

It b increasingly recognized that 
the key to solving Africa's food prob- 
lem lies not with commercial farms or 
billion -dollar projects but in helping 
the small -bolder to produce more 
food for himself and his community. 
That is why ITTA specialists are glad 
to see more small farmers be ginning 
to grow plantain as a cash crop. 

Cassava, a tall, spindly plant, is the 
most important carbohydrate for 
about 400 million people in the 
world. It can grow in very dry condi- 
tions, Like the potato, the food part 
of the plant is a starchy protuberance 
that grows on the tool Africans com- 


were triple those formerly obtained. 

Today. HTA officials say. several 
million acres are planted with the 
new cassava varieties. One of those 
who heard about TMS 572 was Jo- 
seph Okunola. Eight years ago he was 
fanning less than three acres and 
tardy surviving. But when he began 
using HTA varieties his output in- 
creased. He was able to demonstrate 
to village leaders that he would be 
able to farm productively more of the 
village’s communally owned land. 

Mr. Okunola now farms more than 
750 acres, two-thirds of it in cassava, 
and employs 17 people. He is buying 
a tractor and is in the market for 
some new wives, a symbol of prosper- 
ity among Nigeria’s Moslems. 

The writer recently traveled to Afri- 
ca on a grant from the International 
Fund for Agricultural Development. 
He contributed this comment to The 
Washington Post. 


rights and democracy came at an op- 
port one moment. His rhetoric and 
activism fed latent emotions that 
were at a critical evolutionary stage. 

But the growing acceptance of -de- 
mocracy does not mean an end. to 
Latin America’s problems. Class di- 
visions are still profound. Inequal- 
ities are severe ana nearly every coun- 
try is saddled with debt atfd 
deep-seated structural problems. , 

The omens for Brazil look more 
promising. Brazil has taken 20 years 
to leave the shadow of the 1964 coup 
led by General Humberto Castdo 
Branco. It has been a careful and 
slow process, but oae which com- 
mands nearly universal support The 
Roman Catholic Church has played 
the most important single role in 
bringing Brazil to this juncture. It is a 
very different church from the oije 
that welcomed the 1964 coup. -The 
student and guerrilla uprisings of the 
1960s that netped justify the mili- 
tary’s crackdown show no rign of a 
resurgence. Brazil looks poised far a 
new maturity. If this giant, which has 
nearly half the continent’s popula- 
tion and Wealth, Can maintain " Tt< 
democratic institutions, the impact 
on the rest of Latin America wi0 be 
profound. The days of the caudillo 
may well be numbered. 

International Herald Tribune. 


LETTER TO THE EDITOR 

Stem and die Diaries <»uvin«d that we h 


■fltLi.J— 

r 

te ■ 

: 

2 - 

v&A:* ■' * 

?&<;.•- 


monly pound it into a meal to make a 
kind of porridge known as gari. 

Several years ago. HTA began 
working on a new variety of cassava 
that would mature faster and be more 
resistanL The result was a strain 
called TMS 572. On test plots, yidds 


Regarding “ Hitler Diaries Trial 
Puts Spotlight on Stem Publisher’' 
(Jan. 8) by James M. Markham: 

As chairman of the Gruner & Jahr 
publishing group, I must correct the 
following statement: “Mr. Schulte- 
Hillen said that neither Rupert Mur- 
doch, the owner of the Tima erf Lon- 
don. nor representatives of 
Newsweek magazine had worried 
about the problematic copyright situ- 
ation when they entered into negotia- 
tions to serialize the diaries. ‘The 
problems were ova money,’ he said.” 

What 1 did say was that we talked 
about the copyright situation with 
Rupert Murdoch of The Times and 
Mark Edmiswn of Newsweek. We 
explained to them that the legal posi- 
tion was complicated but that we 


were convinced that we had the corn- 
right We told them, in effect thnl we 
knew we were on thin ice, but we 
thought we could skate on it [ 
The nmesentatives of Newsweek 
and The Times decided to bring in' a 
German lawyer whom they trusted. 
This lawyer could not be there before 
the following day. So both parties 


2^- . 

- ' r 

iSLh*-? ■■■■ 


We continued the negotiations un- 
der the assumption that the copyright 
situation would not be a problem. 
Then the negotiations came to a halt 
because of the money question. 
Therefore a detailed discussion on 
the copyright situation did not dkc 
place the next morning. 

GERD SCHULTE-HILLEN. 

Hamburg. 










v 








INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 11, 1985 


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Thailand and Vietnam 
Setting Up DMZ on Part 
Of Cambodian Border 

77 xtstetuued Press captured the Ampii base from 

BAN SANGAE, Thailand — guerrillas Tuesday claimed 
Thailand and Vietnam have agreed Wednesday that Cambodian terri- 
io set-up a demilitarized zone along tory extended to the eastern side of 
part of the Thai-Cambodian bor- a That anti-tank ditch. The Thais 
der occupied by their troops, a Thai insisted that the ditch was dug well 
general said Thursday. inside their border. 

1 Major General Safya Sriphen, Officers from the two sides con- 

commander of Thailand’s Eastern f erred at a bridge spanning the 
Task. Faroe, said that a. strip 20 ditch on the main route imoAmpiL 
jneters (22 yards) wide down each - General Salya said the Vietnam' 
side of the frontier near Ampii, ese had cleared out of an area two 
. Cambodia, “will be our DMZ.” kilometers long, running north- 

• . Vietnamese officers agreed to the south along the ditch, and 500 me- 
■ DMZ when they decided T hursday tere to the east toward Cambodia. 

• to pull back from a confrontation Once the Vietnamese moved 

' with Thai forces, he said. back Thursday, Thai soldiers stan- 

• ‘ ^We just want to avoid any pos- phdog Hags and other 

sanity of oar territory berngin ™ tos ®“ lhe boundary. General 


^ ‘ ~ ' 

WP&k*. ; s - 





Egypt Asks U.S. for $1 Billion More 
In Economic, Arms Aid for Fiscal ’86 




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sanity of oar territory being in 
dispute,” General Salya said. 

“Everything was put calmly and 
peacefully" to the Vietnamese, he 
said. General Salya insisted that 
four rounds of talks Wednesday 


Salya said. 

The tense atmosphere at Ban 
Sangae on Wednesday, when Thai 
troops were on full alert, had 
changed completely by midday 
Thursday. Thai soldiers lounged on 



TV AttOCx**d Pren 

Lieutenant General Pichitr Ktdlavanijaya, the supreme commander in Thailand, talks to 
Cambodian refugee children in a camp inside Thai territory near Ampii, Cambodia. 


By David B. Ottaway 

U'ash/ngffMj F>m Strike 

CAIRO — Egypt has asked the 
United States Tor an increase in 
economic and military assistance 
oT almost SI billion for the 19S6 
fiscal year, according to Prime 
Minister Kamal Hassan Ali. 

In an interview. Mr. Ali said that 
Egypt was counting upon increased 
U.S. aid to offset an expected de- 
cline this year in income from oil 
sales, remittances from Egyptians 
working abroad and from tourism. 

Egypt earned about SIS billion 
in oil soles and 53.4 billion in remit- 
tances in its 1983-84 fiscal year, 
which ended in June. Bui the oil 
glut and the end to the economic 
boom in the Gulf states is expected 
to cut into these sources of earnings 
substantially in the coming year. 

Mr. Ali indicated that the more 
than 40- percent increase in Egypt's 
aid request would be one of the 
main issues raised bv President 


_ . TT, lrrc/ l a v hrn urrn THai unS * ‘luiJMM-. iu»i suiuias luuugcuuu 

^■L,!Sr.r!!;iTL L 7 lop erf the ditch away from their preme commander. Lieutenant ed Thursday that a Cambodian 
Vietnamese officers at the frontier h— -i nu,:.. v'..u ,k., i vi j. 


did not constitute negodanoos. W ^£Sury sources said spora, 
. General Salya said the Vietnam- fighting continued Thursday 
ese admitted that they were mi sin- several points along the border, 1 
formed about where the border was no major dashes were reported, 
in that area. General Sahra did not refer 


weapons. General Pichitr Kulbvanijaya that sistance leader. Prince Norodom 

Military sources said sporadic other intrusions as deep as iwo kj- Sihanouk, arrived Thursday in 
fighting continued Thursday at lomeiers had been made into Thai Pyongyang. North Korea, by train 
several points along the border, but territory after the fall of AmpiJ. from Beijing. 



&y. * 




t that area. General Salya did not refer to 

The Vietnamese soldiers who allegations Wednesday by the su- 


Exile Plans 
ToRetum 
To Philippines 

.. United Press International 

• MANILA —The acting chief of 
the Philippine armed forces agreed 
Thursday to provide security for an 
opposition leader returning home 
from more than three years of self- 
imposed exile in the United States. 

Former Senator Jovito Sakmga, 
62, faring possible arrest on sub- 
version charges in connection with 
a series of bombings in Manila in 
1980, is scheduled to return to Ma- 
nila on Jan. 21. 

■ -Aides to Mr. Salonga said they 
wanted to avoid any possible at- 
tempt on the senator's me. Former 
Senator Benigno S. Aquino Jr. was 
'shot to death at Manila Interna- 
tional Airport upon his return on 
Aog. 21, 1983, from a similar peri- 
od of exile in the United States. 

A civilian commission sobse- 
quezrtly concluded thatMr. Aqtaao 
was kdled by one of his mintary 
escorts. 

Thegovennnent had warned Mr. 
Aquino against leturning, citing al- 
leged assassination plots, but state- 
nm tdevirion has said that “there is 
. no known threat to SaloMa's life” 

Lieu tenant General Fidel Ra- 
mos, the acting: ntilftajy chief, who 
replaced General Fabian. Verpend- 


l Sihanouk in Pyongyang 

The Chinese press agency report- 


Trom Beijing 

The Associated Press quoted a 
Chinese dispatch from the North 
Korean capital saying that Prince 


Hosni Mubarak when he goes to 
Washington Tor talks with Presi- 
Sihanouk's entourage was greeted dent Rods Id Reagan in early 
bv the North Korean vice” presi- March, 
dent. Li Jong Ok. and the depuiv . E SyP‘ us.&eiung about SI billion 
prime minister, Chong Jun Gi. The in.^wmonuc aid and SI— billion in 
report gave no indication of bow military assistance during the cur- 
long the prince planned to slay in U.S. fiscal year, all of it for the 1 
Pyongyang, where he maintains first time in the form of grants. 1 





orean capital saying that Prince one of his residences in exile. M r - Egypt was asking 

for $1^ billion in economjc assis- 
tance. S250 million for grain im- 

r w -a /nr| • P A t Tf 1 ports and S1.7 billion in military . 

lulu Omf Asks Kennedy 

— - n _ million more, for the 1986 U.S. 

To Support Investment 

X X for $4.05 billion in economic and 

The Associated Pro* tered blacks demonstrating about military aid for fiscal 1986 plus an 

DURBAN, South Africa— The his visit. The other protests, by a additional S800 million in emer- 
ader of the Zulus. South Africa’s black-consciousness organization S® nc y assistance this year. It is al- 


Zulu Chief Asks Kennedy 
To Support Investment 



leader of the Zulus. South Africa’s black-consciousness organization 
largest tribe, told Senator Edward which is anti-American, urged Mr. 
M. Kennedy on Thursday that Kennedy to go home. 


pulling U.S. investment out of 
South Africa to protest the coun- 
try’s racial policies would hurt 


Kennedy Rebuts R.F. Botha 


ready earmarked to get $2.6 billion. 

The two Middle East nations 
have become increasingly depen- 
dent economically on the United 


Mr. Kennedy struck back Thurs- States since they signed a peace 


blacks more than the ruling while day at Foreign Minister R.F. Bo- heaiy in 1979 and are by far the | 
minority. tha. who had said the senator was ^ wo recipients of U.S.aid 

“It is no use doing things just in portraying a distorted view of Lhe anywhere in the world. In addition, 
order to salve consciences,” Chief country and that he should solve both now recetve their economic 
Gatsha Buthelezi said in a state- problems of poverty and racial dis- ^ nulnaiy assistance in pure 
ment at the start of his talks with crimination in the United States S 1 * 015 instead of loans. 

Mr. Kennedy, a Massachusetts before criticizing South Africa, sai . Egypt was deter- 

Deraocrat. “To exert pressures Reuters reported from Cape Town. rmne ^ J° continue vwth the pro- 


wtakh do more harm to the op- 

10 lil ' ° PPreS ”' S “ rocuon -mm* 

“No one has oroved to us that subject was all too subsidies for basic food items that 

aS^SS^J^JS last year.cosi it nearly $3 billioa 


The senator said that Mr. 


gram of economic reforms it has . 
begun and to slick to its policy of 


the suffering which will ensue with- 
in the black community as a result 
of disinvestment will actually force 


hide toward all criticism.'’ 

“That 1 do oppose injustice in 


He said that as or Jan. 15 the 
price of bread would be doubled on 


kUnM Fna fcw ni flhcad 


Former Senator Jovito Salonga, left, talks to Heberson 
Alvarez, a Pbffippine dissident, at a New York farewell. 


the regime to effect the fundamen- ?y own land, wherever it occurs. 80 percent of Egypt’s daily con- 
ud chinees ali of us are clamoring ‘Wes nol roean that I can or will be sumption, saving rbe government 
fnr’’h»* THdf-H blind to injustice in South Africa, an estimated $723 million in subsi- 


for ” he added. ouna 10 injustice in aouui ninu, 

SSLSS ssjsns SLZt compJ^Mon of blocks io 


Mr. Kennedy said, adding that it dies for that item alone and 600,000 
was a transparent distortion to tons of wheat and 300,000 tons of 


ButhdezTs Inkatha Party demon- ^IMted State ^ with those in 
draw up plans to “provide the nec- killed because he was not a “formi- strated outside, welcoming Mr. ^/^ca. 

«sary security measures" from the dable political personality" like Kennedy but opposing any moves 

time Mr. Salonga arrives at the air- Mr. Aquino. to reduce American business inter- 

port anti! he reaches his residence. ^ had lafcen Mv Dre . ests in South Africa. T A 

The black leader's supporteis 


on unui aereacncs ms reaoence. Askedifhefaadtafcenanvpre- 

replaced General FabimiVer paid- ^ Sakmga, a member of the cautionary measures. Mr. Salonga black leader s supporteis 

ing resolutioil of the Aqnmo case, Liberal Party, is regarded as a pos- said that several opposition leaders waved banners saying. We wet- 

met with Mr. Salonga’s at aMe presidenlial candidate should and some foreign journalists can, £ American companies tn 

■miitarv KAorim.'irtprctr, Venice w. President Ferdinand E Marcos call planned to accompany him on his Sou 1 * 1 Africa provided they ad- 


flour annually. 

He was apparently referring to a 
government plan to replace the; 


military headquartersto discuss se- Preheat Ferdinand E Marcos call planned to accompany him on his Sou* . Africa provided they ad- 

• curitv arrangements for the sens- 80 Section before the end of his night to Manila from Hong Kong, yancejusuce for blacks, and Dw- 

tor’s return. ‘ » term in 1987. ■ the last leg of his homecoming uip. mvesiment is^not supported by 

The aides proposed six steps to The former senator was held un- “I think an additional factor of b “ ‘ u ncan ^ 
ensure Mr. Sawnga’s safety, in- der house arrest in 1980 pending safety in the case of my return." he Mr. Kennedy amved m bourn 

! eluding the presence of senior mDi- the resolution of subversion said, “is that it would really be the Africa on Saturday for a fact-nnd- 


Jackson Asked to Help 
Rescue Ethiopian Jews 


By James R. Dickenson 

Washington Past Service 

WASHINGTON —Mayor Ted- 


lease lieutenant Robert O. Good- j 
man Jr., a US. Navy flier shot , 
down on a combat mission in sup- 


O ■ 1 — — ~ — — — ✓ . | . ■ • m Tf n. 1 1 ^1 I 1 | J A VU 

tiny escorts and opposition repre- charges against him, but was al- height of stupidity for the Marcos mg \our oetore tne issue ot eooK dy XojjA of Jerusalem has port of Lebanese troops. 


sentatives. ttiey also asked far fuB 
media coverage. 

General Ramos said be had as- 
sembled senior staff officers to 


■ O * {/ ** m '* * ** *T — w — — tr — “ — j m m a n L i r U J n I I it tm JVl UouiWUJ » in.< i w 

lowed to leave for medical treat- regime to commit another act of oomic sanctions against ooutn At- ^ £_ Jackson to Mr. Jackson has just returned 


ment in the United States. 

Mr. Salonga said in New York 


barbarism and exacerbate the very rica comes up in Congress this year. 


severe crisis that now besets the 


that he was not afraid of being regime.* 


The incident marked the fourth 
time that Mr. Kennedy has encoun- 


Saar Mayor Campaigns Against U.S. and NATO 

Tnjfmtnmp’x Price Seen as Amdngat Leadership of German Social Democrats 


By James M. Markham 

. . New York Times Service 

\ SAARBRUCKEN, West Ger-. 
■ many— -The man who would lead 
West Germany out of NATO has 
borrowed one of his best lines from 
Ronald Reagan’s 1980 election 


in West Germany helped under- such a move would require the ap- embassies Wednesday to schedule ( 
mine Chancellor Helmut Schmidt’s proval of Chancellor Helmut meetings with officials, a spokes- 
Sodal Democratic government. Kohl's conservative coalition in man for Mr. Jackson said. 
Challenging Mr. Schmidt's insis- Bonn. Since 1978, Bonn and the “Reverend Jackson is trying to 
tence on Bonn’s “reliability" and Saar government have pumped determine what Mayor Kollek 
“duty" to the North Atlantic Trea- more than $1 billion into Arbed u> wants him to do and to determine 
ty Organization. Mr. Lafontaine stave off a bankruptcy that might the feasibility of getting involved, 
said these were qualities needed to put 50,000 people in the steel nails to learn whether he can be helpful,” 
run a concentration camp. and dependent industries out of said the spokesman, Lamond God- 


,.i r' j... ■ WttC UI 

r.l'j cn * - member 
ten tA Party ai 
;cpj • lhe- 41- 


’ “My question is simple,” Oskar 
Lafontaine told his audience as he 

Stood b ehind a mistletoe-draped 

• lectern of the BBesransbadi Sports 
AssodatkHL “Are people better off 
or not? The goveramenl boasts of 

• is success. If this successful gov- 
ernment continues its policies far 
another four years, we will have 
100,000 unemployed instead of 
50,000." 

- r His - 100-odd listeners in the 

■ drafty halt, gnarled men in leather fl 

’ jackets and tou^i-looking women, 

- were mostly bhie-coQar workers, 

~ members of the Social Democratic 

Party and fans erf Mr. Lafomame, 



try to persuade the governments of from Rome, where he met with 
Ethiopia and Sudan to allow Ethio- Pope John Paul a and London, 
pian Jews tn those countries to re- w ^ iere the Reverend ■ 

sume their immigration to Israel. Robert Runcie, the archbishop erf 
The mayor first made the request Canterbury. Mr. Jackson urged the 
Tuesday in a telegram, then called P 0 !* ta nsl Sou™ Md 
Mr. Jackson, a nvil rights leader ^cd for “a more just society” 

and a 1984 presidential candidate, there. 

in Washington on Wednesday. _ _ 

Mr. Jackson made preliminary WORLDWIDE 
calls to the Ethiopian and Sudanese ENTERTAINMENT 1 


■-as w^wm 


CABARET 

* 


run a concentration camp. and depen 

On the stump in the Saarland, a wor ^- 
conservative. heavily Roman Cath- One of ti 
olic state, the Jesuit-educated Mr. post powe 
Lafontaine steers dear of appeals is that if 
he has made elsewhere for one- Bonn’s gen 
sided disarmament, draft-dodging will wither, 
as “a moral duty in the nuclear “Withot 
age" and a general strike against lights wouli 
American bases. in the Saar. 


work. win. “We haven’t sat down with 

One of the Christian Democrats' ^yone; w are ^ang^ meetup 
most powerful election arguments ?° me ° f ^ «? bass > officials .that j 
is that if Mr. Lafontaine wins, ^ n^ to tajt to are oat of town ' 
w s generosity toward the sS bu > J* S, 


Jurgen Domes, a political srien- 
Oskar Lafontaine ^ M r - Lafontaine is trying 
to assemble a coalition of young 
middle-class voters, Green-orient- 
Gennany," said Mr. ed students and dropouts and blue- 


wither Reportedly, 7,000 to 10,000 Ethi- 

. ... , , , opian Jews have been airlifted from 

Without Helmut Kohl, the Sudan to lsael, with an estimated 
lights would have already gone oui 1 0,000 to 12,000 still in Ethiopia 
m the Saar," said Mr. Zeyer. M( j ot her countries. 

"Lafontaine does not believe it The airlift from Sudan was sus- 
himself,” Mr. Zeyer said as he took pended last weekend, reportedly 
a break from a budget debate. “He because news of it was leaked and 
has been systematically preparing Sudan feared that its cooperation 
the alliance with the Greens for In lhe covert operation would open 


ndfans of Mr r a rftm«n« Lafontaine, leaning forward on the collar workers. To unsure the third years." it to criticism" from Ethiopia and 

year-aid major Of Saar- gctem and looking airery. “pe dement of this coalition, the mayor ‘ ~ LafoiUaine * dangerous for Arab nations hostile to Israel. Al- 
3 ‘ fot things that have to leave Ger- needs a solution — • or needs to „ - d . though Sudan does not formally 

!lu lanafiMt 9 t Mr I flfnn- many are the atomic weapons. It is sound as if be had a solution — for r” H _ i , nf . recognize Israel it allowed Ethicwi- 

sLaM pwr » the Arbed ae d plant, a ^ y ^ mEUa to tak?. 

3maun pc- *“"* ■«* ““P 011 who* cr™nto m Ijaemtouij ^ manned t “ rllfu ? 1 to Europeahcmes and 

sar--*-*-** HisMiit 


reportedly i 
leaked and i 


• i'-p- '■'"■j* 

s&iS? 


■•brfldaaL 

Bo they lasted at Mr. Lafon- 
- tame’s gahies at the Saarland's col- 
orless fhrisrian Democratic pro- 


have control over atomic weapons 


^ thTSaar who on our temtoiy." 

* Werner Zeyer is, w he said, “They Mr< 10 W - 4JU - votes from Greens. “But he will 

' think he may be a fullback cm a ^ , , - Many industry experts regard a lot different in power than he i 

j. no,asradta 

jSSferf ; 

lifcblo<xl ° f suaST becoming British Charge an Irish Psychiatrist 

ISpiUSSE' With Conspiring to Cause Explosion 

^ „ men detained over the Chrisui 

-SSSKwtauS . LIVERPOOL. &«l a0 d_ Mag- holiday, « of 


leaaer oi tae ureens, wno acxnowi- - 

edged that Mr. Lafontaine’ s posi* f“ r ^ cfaed lts holders to 

be arflifted to European ones and 
tions on military matters and envi- . , « ■ 

mnm(»nfal rra.IH win ^ Israel, rcpOnedW at the 


March 10 in the Saarland, an in- 
dustrialized border state with only 
1.1 million inhabitants. 

Although lhe Saarland is small. 


Many industry experts regard a lot different in power than he is L 
Mr. Laf on lame’s pledge to nation- the opposition — not as radical. 


aTi7-c Arbed as unrealistic because Mr. SchudeD said. 


. i 

*:5i£t** 
?r* s - v 


ronmenial protection could win ^V^iiriSc^. ‘ 
voles from Gteens. “But he will be 


i j-tr . ,1 Tv- A spokesman for the Israeli Em- 

alotdtfferattm powct thanhe tsrn ^ in Washington d^Uned to 

the opposition — not as radical. TiVj B j . , > 

Mr lOLuuai. Wednesday except to 


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Schmidt, the former chancellor, 
wiih^ 

1 lead the ffliea aasbadi Sports .As- 
sociation into deeper waters, into 
; making a coDuectton between the 
'crisis of West Germany's smoke- 
stack bdt and ini&aiy spending. 
•■"When NATO needs a bflHon, it 

ge»it" rmsm^iC he said sarcasti- 
cally. For the mice of one and a 


. could be provided to unemployed 
ywmg peoj^ Tlie U.E economic 
ibqqin ( iie'Q^,'is being fiided by 
geney fleeing Western Europe and 
%'explffliatmof the Third world. 


To govern the Saarland, howev- LIVERPOOL, England — Mag- 
ee, he would probably have to refused bail Thursday to an 

strike a ctmtion with Ute towns, a jnsh-bom psychiatrist. Dr. Maine 
leftist, aDti-nudear pa^ which has Q’Shea, who is charged xvilh con- 
become a third force m West Ger- spi^ng to cause an explosion in 
man politics. So far, however, the J rilaijl 

Greens have rgecled lhe possibility Dr O’Shea. 65. was arrested Sai- 
erf such a state coalition. _ ur day when she returned from a 

“A victory here by the Social Christmas vacation with her family 
D emo crats and the Greens would jp Dublin, 
be the fust signal for the Federal She was held for four days under 
Republic’s departure from ,j, e prevention of Terrorism Act 
NATO,” said Hoist Rebberger, 46, before being charged. Magistrates 
the state’s minister for economic j n Liverpool ordered her held for 
affairs and a local leader of the another eight days. 

Free Democrats. 

TVo years ago, Mr, Lafontaine's 
battle against the deployment of 


’ ^ ' say: "Where humanitarian ques- 1 

lions are involved, we welcome any 
• it* t a • help. It is worthwhile to tn any 

rish F sychiatrist avenue.” 

^ -L 1 In his telegram to Mr. Jackson, 

Cause Explosion Ma y° r K-olfek said: “Knowing 

1 your deep h umani tarian convic- 

men detained over lhe Christmas tions, permit tne to suggest you 


I • ■ ■ 1 


"There fe no coontty that is so battle against tne aepioymem w 
stuffed with atomic and chemical American medium-range missiles 


holidays on suspicion of terrorist approach the Sudanese govern- 1 
offenses were released or fined for menr to permit the black Ethiopian 
giving false names to the police. Jews w h° hare reached there, and 

I blessings of these people wtU be 


lease of convicted Irish Republican 
Army bombers jailed in England. 


your greatest possible reward.” 

A year ago, Mr. Jackson suc- 


The police action came amid ceeded in persuading Syria to re- 
tears that the IRA might mount a — 


bomb blitz of English cities over 
the holidays. 

Pi ess reports said that the police 
also seized materials, believed to be 



Four other men. including Peter explosives, that were to be used in a 
Lynch, said to be a longtime Mend bombi ng campaign during the sales 
of Dr. O’Shea, have been indicted after Christmas that bring thou- 
on similar charges. .Another four sands of shoppers into big cities. 


Turks to Stud) Bribe Charge i 

Revjers I 

ANKARA — The Turkish Par- , 
liament decided Thursday to iores- j 
ligate charges that Ismail Ozdaglar, I 
a former minister of state, accepted i 
a bribe from a shipping company. | 


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far and away 
the best nude revue 
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one-penny flat bread — the staple 
of the lower classes — with a two- 
penny better quality version, a 
measure that already has been par- 
tially implemented. Bread is so 
cheap in the country that Egyptians 
use it even to feed their animals. 

Mr. Ali said he hoped the grow- 
ing government deficit, which 
reached S6 billion during Egypt’s 
1983-84 fiscal year and was sched- 
uled to hit S6.5 billion this year, 
could be mostly eliminated by the 
end of 1985 through curs in food, 
electricity and oil subsidies and the 
new taxes and fees announced Last 
fall. 

He also expressed cautious opti- 
mism about the success of the mea- 
sures announced last week estab- 
lishing for the first time a partial 
floating exchange rate for the 
Egyptian pound and greater state 
control over the thriving "free mar- 
ket" in dollars. The market handies 
S3 billion annually outside the reg- 


ular banking system — about a 
third of the total in circulation. 

The new rate, fixed daily by a 
boaid of state and private bank 
representatives^ has initially set the 
value of the pound at about SO to 
SI US. cents. This applies, howev- 
er. only to three activities —work- 
ers' remittances, tourism and the 
imports of both the private and the 
5iaie sectors. The government is 
still maintaining the official rate of 
84 cents to the pound in calculating 
other transactions and refusing to 
cal] the new floating rate a devalua- 
tion of the pound. 

The old “free market’* rate in 
pounds, which had reached 73li 
cents to the pound, has temporarily 
risen to about 79 cents to the 
pound, and many private dealers 
have gone oui of business, 

“There is a now a hesitation in 
the black market at least." said Mr. 
Alt. and the new system “will stop 
the black market” 


BROADCASTING TO CABLE COMPANIES 
IN EUROPE A THE UK VIA SATELLITE 

C H A N N E L 

PROGRAM. FRIDAY 11th JANUARY 

UK TIMES 15.00 SXY-FI MUSIC GUEST SHOW 

16.00 SKY-F1 MUSIC 

17.00 SKY-F1 MUSIC 

18.00 GREEN ACRES 
18.30 THE BRADY BUNCH 

19.00 MORK & MINDY 

19.55 STAR SKY & HUTCH 

21.00 THE DEADLY ERNEST HORROR SHOW 
22.35 SKY-FI MUSIC 

contact sky CHAiwEL. Satellite television pic roa furtheh information 
TELEPHONE LONDON (01) 636 4077 TELEX 266943 


flfrHWimOMAL BEAL KSTWE 

826 , 000 Acre 
Australian 
Cattle Ranch 

Current working ranch with strong real estate 
development and recreational potential — hunting, 
fishing, outdoor sports. Approved for subdivision. 
Included are 3 mufti-bedroom modem houses, 
6,000 head Brahman cattle, 1,000 head 
domesticated buffalo, 40 horses. Access is by 
two all-weather, sealed highways. Location 
is approximately 126 KM south of Darwin 
International Airport. Auction date March 1. 

Private offers prior to February 1. Inspection 
can be arranged with the sole selling agent . . . 
LMPA Real Estate, Winnellie Darwin, Northern 
Territory, Australia, Telex LMPA 85427, 

Telephone 6189-844011. 


raumsooD 

TORONTO. CANADA 

C$10,5 00 — A SMALL DOWNPAYMENT 
FOR A BIG INVESTMENT IN 
PRIME LOCATION CONDOMINIUMS 

■ only 15% cash downpayment 

• 3 years rental and management guarantee 

• prices; CS62, 0000598,000 

• 2. 3. 4 bedrooms, multi-level 

• Apartment sizes; 1 190 sq. It. (11 1m 2 )— 2(M0 sq. it. (187m 2 ) 

• Modem conveniences and recreation facilities 

• Constant appreciation, fully rented, professionally managed 

WIN ZEN CORPORATION LIMITED 

Alt Marketing Manapar. 67 Yonga Straw. Sulla 700 
Toronto. Ontario, Canada. M5E 1 J8 
Tel; <416)8630171 — Telex: 06S24301 

• IN ADDITION WtNZEN OFFERS: 

— quality commercial properties & rental apartment buildings 

— comprehensive services to potential Immigrating entrepreneurs 


+ SWITZERLAND 

FOREIGNERS CAN BUY 
a STUDIO, APARTMENT 
or CH ALET on 

LAKE GENEVA- MONTREUX or 
in thsse ••voHo famous resorts: 
CRANS-MONTANA. 

LES DIABLE3ETS, VERBIER. 
VILLARS. JURA, etc 
rrorn SEr. ilO'CCO.— 

" REVAC SA 
~~Cr,-Z:i GENEVA 


Investment 

Opportunities 

Co mm er ci al real estate imas&neab and 
k wesli mini management. Undeveloped 
land la be held far appre ciat ion. Turn- 
key prefects with substantial apprecia- 
tive pote n tial -design, c o n tf nxj l ou , 
Imm up and management Completed 
profed* fully teased, financing (mail- 
able to achieve leverage. For nfumo- 
lion on investment opportunities in 
southwest United States contoc h 

TARBC Inc. 

4742 North Orad. Read 
Sate 213 

Tirtun, Arizona 85705 
Telex: 165541 EXTUC 


For Sale - ROME 

Errfire new building of 1.600 cq.ni. 
centrally located in residential 
area near FAQ. SuHable for corpo- 
ration or dpfomotic represents- 


For information write to; 

Stutio Notarile W Maggfeie 
(Rn. Ref. Ill), 

Via del Viminde 43 Rome 
or tofephona Rome 
06-57973820 (office hour*}. 


CANNES 

Wonderful vffla bu3t in 1977 
B double bedrooms -7 bathrooms 
big swimming pool 
FOR RENT: 

FT. 60,000. — per month 
(15-5/15-9) 

FT 30,000 other months 
FOB SALT 
FT.3,800,000. — 

Further informations Aon>; 

WMOKUto DE WARS S Jl 
Box 62 - CH - 1884 V3kas 
Tel: 41-25-35.35.31 
Telex: 456 213 GESE 


= BARBARA MclAIN = 

PROPHtTIES 

2715 Cmhbad BhxL, 
Carfrixxl CxdH. 92006. 
61*434-6161. 

CARLSBAD OCEANSIDE 

DBAJXE DUPLEX ON BEACH. 3 bed- 
room & 2 bedroom, Amud income 
$37.0004. Beautifully furnished. 
Eqg.pQp 

GORGEOUS 5ING1E FAMILY HOME 
on beach. Profeuionalty decor cSed. 
trr-level. 3 bedrooms, Th bath. 

smjooo. 

LARGE PENTHOUSE CONDO ON 
BEACH 2X»sq.ft„ 3 bedrooms, 

4 bada. $550^00. 

44ffPWttttt HOUSE ON BEACH. 

With targe studio rental. J475JXK). 
3UW5 ON BEACH. 

3 bedroom, 2 bedroom & 1 bedroom 
50 faei of beadi. SS99jOOO. 

5 DEUJXE INTS ON BEACH 
Annuel income $70,000+. Wed far 
WSA, °’ 

OCEANFSONT TMPIEX. 

$43JXX) mud income. $543,500. 


EVTEBMTlOm 

REAL ESTATE 

appears every 

FRIDAY' 

• 

To place an advertisement 
contact our office h your country 
(listed in Classified Section) or : 

Max Ferrero, 

181 Ave. Charies-de-GaaBe, 
92321 ISeriDj Cedes, Fratto. 
Trf.; 747.IZ65. Tetec 613593. 






i 



Dow Jones Averages 


OPM HUM LOW LOtt COM 

Indus 1201.1V T22S53 11 9556 122250 + 2076 
This m»7 57203 55SS0 5*9.97 + 553 

UtW 14MD WBJ4 146M J47JM + US 

comp a&TO as to aua 49453 + 


NYSE Index 


Hlgli urn Close Cb'W 
97.13 95+3 97.13 + 109 
111,40 10VJS 111+0 +2.10 
9104 8934 9134 + 105 
5109 5130 gjBV +0.48 
9835 9634 9SJS5 + tl6 


Composite 

industrials 

Transo. 

UWJfttos 

Finance 


NYSE Diaries 



Ihutsdais 

N1SE 

Closaig 


AMEX Diaries 


NASDAQ Index 


Advanced 

Declined 

Unclianaed 

Toiai issues 
New MJsfts 
New Lows 
Volume up 
volume SDim 


dose Pm. 

383 Ml 

177 210 

224 228 

783 7*9 

23 a 

t 13 

+1 13*00 

!jws«n 


Com collie 

industrials 

Finance 

insurance 

u Mines 

Banks 

Transo. 


Close Ch'M "mo 
25035 +141 246 41 
264.78 + 4.19 259+0 
30131 +1+7 298.90 
3B-S6 + 2.92 28176 
2*470 +724 33552 
23263 +159 230.77 
242+7 + 1*1 23734 


AMEX Most Actives 


VOt HUM LOw LOW CHag 





Bo* sales 

■Shirt 

Jen. 7 

166.107 3050*1 

3022 

Jon. a 

158S75 407227 

476 

Jon. 7 

163723 427023 

706 

Jon. 4 

178071 366024 

384 

Jar,. 3 

143006 3BL972 

865 

"included In the soles figures 



vol ot 4 p ja_ lxmm 

Prev.6PM.yoL 9U308M 

Prev consolidated dote 1 28094830 


ToUes iadude Hie oat tanrkfe prices 
dp to HN dasina on wall Street 


Standard & Poor’s Index 


Hlati Lew Close Cnee 
Industrials 18703 183.75 15753 -3JI 

Tronic 146.17 142.94 144.1. ->-lA! 

Utilities 7556 75.12 7S5J + 058 

Finance 1*00 45+« W-W +150 

Composite I68JI I*i.« 16851 +313 


Wants 

ToxAIr 

TIE 

CntCrd 

Marm pi 

Helwr 

Amdahl 

DemeP 

KevPh 

CttrtMA 

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AM Inti 


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3965 10V» 
2*99 6b 
2339 698 

172* 2M 
16S2 20* 

1400 Mb 
UTS It* 
1167 10*6 
1121 319* 

im in* 

1039 3% 


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W* - V* 
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23 +** 

24* + V* 
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47 


Prices Rise Sharply on NYSE 


77ic Associated Proa 

NEW YORK — Prices on ihe New York 
Stock Exchange recorded their best gains since 
mid-December on Thursday as Wall Street's 
belated New Year's rally continued through its 
fourth straight session. 

Analysts said the gain drew much of its mo- 
mentum from comments by Chairman Paul A. 
Voicfcer of the Federal Reserve that seemed to 
indicate his willingness to ease credit conditions 
further. 

The Dow Jones average of 30 industrials 
climbed 20.76 to 1,233.50, bringing its gain for 
tbe post four sessions to 38.54 points. 

In addition to being the market’s best day 
since the Dow Jones industrials rose 34.78 
points on Dec. 18, it was the busiest of 1985 to 
date. Volume reached 124.68 million shares, up 
Tram 99.23 million Wednesday. 

This week's gains have more than offset a 
drop of 26.71 points in tbe Dow over the first 
three sessions of 1985. In effect, tbe market 
waited until hopes had faded for a rally to start 
off the new year before staging one. 

In the daily tally on the Big Board, advancing 
issues outnumbered declines by more than 3 to 
1. The exchange's composite index jumped 1 .69 
to 97.13. 

The upswing in stock prices has been attrib- 
uted largely to failing interest rates and hopes 
for some further easing of the Federal Reserve's 
credit policy. 

Rales backed up a bit in the credit markets 
Thursday as investors awaited the Fed's weekly 
figures on the money supply, issued after the 
close. 

But stock traders apparently focused on news 


M-l Falls $50<) Million 

The Associated Pros 

NEW YORK — The U.S. basic money sup- 
ply, known as M-l. fell $500 million in the final 
week of 1984, declining to a seasonally adjusted 
5557.2 billion from a revise d 5557.7 billion the 
previous week, the Federal Reserve Board said 
Thursday. 

Tbe previous week's figure originally was 
reported as $557.6 billion. 

reports about Mr. Voicfcer. who said in a lun- 
cheon speech that he believed that continued 
progress was being made against inflation. 

Wall Streeters evidently took that as a signal 
of Mr. Volcker's willingness to consider relax- 
ing credit conditions in the future. 

Blue chips leading the market higher included 
International Business Machines, up 3ft at 
123%; American Telephone & Telegraph, up ft 
at 20%; General Motors, up 2V« at 79ft, and 
Ford Motor, up 1% at 46. 

Ford raised its quarterly dividend from 40 to 
50 cents a share. AT&T reached Us highest 
levels since late 1983, shortly after it began 
trading separately from tbe seven regional com- 
panies that were divested in the breakup of the 
Bell System. 

Batik stocks were strong as Chemical New 
York and Bank of New York reported higher 
fourth-quarter profits. Chemical rose 1ft to 
3514; Bank of New York % to 36ft; Citicorp 2ft 
to 39ft; J.P. Morgan 1ft to 80ft. and Chase 
Manhattan 1ft to 48ft. 


i* 

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BO DEREK’S DECOLLETAGE 


LortiTennyson'sctassic lines: “Ring out the old. ring oi the new, ring out thefaise. rmgm the true, 
have relevancy even in mi&eus as non-poetic as Wtefl Street, tn late July, 1982. white trie DOW was 
drooping under BOO, our analysts defied prevailing opinion, stating “tbe DJI W8LL TOUCH 1,000. 
BEFORE HITTING 750". On August 9th, 198a BARRON'S, in mirroring Hie malaise on the “Street", 
mused The market seems to be saying if s seen the future and it doesn't work". The rest is history; 
the Bull rampaged toa January 4,1934. high of 1286. Joseph Granville, who had. in November, 1982, 
envisioned the Dow 'collapsing under 850” was among the prophets of doom who hid behind a 
Mag inot Line ot semantics to justify their myopia 

Interest rates were high and, to the consensus, headed higher. CGR baited, stating that the 
Prime Rate would plunge tower than Bo Derek's decdetage. Now that the Dow has eased, the 
‘Crowd’ is cringing, mesmerized by prophets of doom; the same species who, at $800 an ounce, 
urged investors to hoard precious metals, antique Chinese commodes and other cq fiect ibtes, 
awaiting a fiscal Apocalypse. 

The world has not wited: Visigoths have not stormedthe Crazy Horse Saloon in Rsris; Site Birds 
are still flying over the white cliffs of Dover. 

Our forthcoming report discusses why the DOW wiB vault over 1500; why the “Power EBte* 
relishes temporary, downside, spasms; corrections that enable them to buy into weakness, 
ultimately selling into strength, defying the manic-depressive behavior of most investors. 

In addition, CGR focuses upon emergng equities with the dynamics to mature tnto prominence, 
as did a recently recommended "juntor* oil that gushed from $2 to £16, before a 4-1 split, as the 
company discovered a major field in Texas. 

For your complimentary copy, please telephone, or write to: 


CADITAI FPJS. financial Planning Services bv 

VMri ■ Kahrerstraatt12, 

GAINS 1012 PK Amsterdam, The Netherlands 

Phone: (020) -27 51 81 
Telex 18536 


Past performance does not guarantee future results 


JO 

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26 13b IdeolD 334 14 13b 139k + 46 

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! Jan. 4, 1985 


WEEKEND 


Page 7 


S |r i)heirUp- 

S^tonf 
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^ishis K 

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ain S that the 

00 an ounce 
GOBsctiblS 

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t°o£*^ 

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EW YORK — Waul to know 
how they play Dvorak in Prague? 
Or in Rotterdam, or Denver? Cu- 
£JL ^ nous to hear how Beethoven fares 
hfcese days in Cincinnati or Cleveland, how 
Stabler is making out in Israd and Los 
{Angdes, what sort of Bruckner Parisians are 
wetting, (and whether it affects their Rave!)? 
pondering how the string players stack up 
l jn Toronto and Montreal? 

J^Yoti can leam all this and much, much 
■jpore this season at Carnegie and Avery 
Jfjs her Halls, where more than 25 hill sym- 
phonic ensembles and at least half as many 
■-Chamber orchestras will converge on New 
■York from Salzburg, Stockholm, Poland, 
*Rusbuigh, Rome, Rochester, the north of 
"Bwlanri and of France, and points around 
figie globe. 

C'But to a depressing and puzzling extent 
life answers to all those questions might be 
.“Pretty much the same as in New York.” Or 
‘Susi fee whatever you heard over the radio 
\tas morning.” The world's most celebrated 
■^rchcstras — Philadelphia, Vienna, Amster- 
dam, Berlin and the comparable elite —have 
jong made extended lours, often imeniation- 
'ifones, year after year, the last two decades 
/have seen a surge in travel by the orchestras 
•§T smaller cities, ensembles without inunedi- 
iate name recognition outside die profession. 
Without star-conductor identification. Bat at 
^e very moment the exchange of orchestras 
’-between nations is reaching its busiest phase 
ftbdate, that exchange may be well on its way 

C; • ' 


to becoming artistically irrelevant as the dif- 
ferences between one orchestra and another 
blur and threaten to vanish. 

National and regional differences in or- 
chestral sound are as old as the orchestra 
itself; -they arose and reinforced themselves 
naturally, like regional accents or figures of 
speech. Idiosyncratic differences within one 
nation — special identifying sound traits 
belonging to a particular orchestra — are as 
old as the age of the Romantic virtuoso 
conductor, the maestro who would meld a 
disparate body of 100 or so players into a 
pliable instrument for his personal vision of 
music. (This has been especially true in the 
United Stales, whose symphonic traditions 
have historically been imported in the per- 
sons of European music directors.) Both 
kinds of distinctiveness are fading today, 
and many in the musical world seem to want 
them to. 

The distinctiveness as it once existed can 
be sampled on an enormous number of re- 
cordings. RCA issued some years ago a fasci- 
nating album dedicated to the man probably 
most associated with sound for sound's sake 
in our century. “The Stokowski Sound,” it is 
called, and it comprises recordings of Dvo- 
rak’s “New World" Symphony led by Leo- 
pold Stokowski in 1927 with the Philadel- 
phia Orchestra that he had beat conducting 
for 15 years, and in 1973 with the New 
Phflhar monia Orchestra of London. 

In the slow movement of the earlier re- 
cording, there is an utterly extraordinary 
halo of lush, quietly resonant string sound, 
bound together by the gentle connection 
between notes called portamento. It sounds 


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at tunes absolutely vocal, as though a word- 
less chorus were oob-ing along in an aristo- 
cratic version of Hollywood style backups. 
There is nothing quite like it on the 1973 
version, romantic and old-fashioned as Sto- 
kowski may have seemed to his younger 
contemporaries by then. What those old Vic- 
tor microphones caught was in an essential 
sense not the Stokowski Sound but the Phila- 
delphia Sound; Stokowski may have shaped 
it over years of meticulous rehearsal but be 
did not carry it in his briefcase. It became a 
feature and a property not of the conductor 
but of the ensemble. The Philadelphia play- 
ing later under Eugene Ormandy has more 
of it than the New Philhannonia under Sto- 
kowski. 

O F course pan of this contrast is a 
matter of then versus now, of genera- 
tional shifts in music-making. Bui 
that is far from being all of it. Today’s 
Philadelphia, London, Paris. Rome and New 
York orchestras are similar in sound to a 
degree that simply did not exist in 1927. A 
random example:* Igor Stravinsky recorded 
his Capriccio for Piano and Orchestra in 
1934 with (he Orchestre des Concerts 
Straram conducted by Ernest Ansermeti and 
in the same year performed it with the Dan- 
ish Radio Symphony under Nicolai Mnlko. 
The archival tape from Copenhagen differs 
from the recording not jusL in the relatively 
ragged execution, but in the striking absence 
of a sound that had seemed almost a part of 
the music itself, namely the sassy, nasal 
brilliant sound of French woodwind playing. 

That sound, today all but extinct, is one of 
(be most straightforward examples of what 
has been happening over the past few de- 
cades. As late as 19S9 the wind playing of the 
Orchestre National de la Radi ©diffusion 
Fran^aise. under Sir Thomas Beecham in 
Franck’s D minor Symphony, was distinctly 
French: compact, pungent tone, with a 
whining plaint that immediately identifies 
itself as Gallic in the slow movement. (That 
it is once again the orchestra's sound rather 
than the conductor's may be confirmed by 
sampling Beecham’s British recording of the 
work-jConversely, a French conductor like 
Pierre Monteux could lead a beautifully 
shaped interpretation with the Chicago Sym- 
phony in 1961, but no. the sound is not 
French. Any more than it was German when 
a French orchestra played Wagner (though 
its French colors might cast an in try 
alternative light), or Italian when the T 
Philharmonic played Verdi (though its cool 
sensuousness might lend a special beauty in 
an unsuspected place). 

But to make such comparisons in modem 
recordings is a sobering experience. In the 
Franck, for instance, you can try the Or- 
chestic National de France playing under 
Leonard Bernstein, the Orchestre de Paris 
under Herbert von Karajan or Daniel Baren- 
boim, or the young French players of the 
Orchestre de Bordeaux-Aquilaine. compar- 
ing them with any number of foreign record- 
ings. and bear more or less the same neutral, 
rounded, un-nasal un-French tone. One 
might also try Carlo Maria Giulini’s new 
“Trovatore” recording, comparing today’s 
Santa Cecilia Orchestra first with the ringing 
warmth of an Italian band from the days of 
Giulini’s childhood and then with any mod- 
ern London orchestra. Differences in con- 
ductors’ tempos, in certain aspects of phras- 
ing and dynamics, yes, certainly — but in the 


sound itself and the style of playing, not 
much. 

What happened? In fact, many conduc- 
tors have in effect worked toward this stan- 
dardization. Leonard Bemstdn, is an inter- 
view last season: “I'm not interested in 
having an orchestra sound like itself. I want 
it to sound like the composer. That was my 
greatest pride with the New York Philhar- 
monic — that they could switch on a dime 
from Haydn, to Ravel to Stravinsky, to 
Brahms, and it would always be stylistically 
right. I don't believe in my sound/’ he con- 
tinued. “or Ormandy’s sound or the Chicago 
sound or the Philadelphia sound.” Nor does 
Ormandy’s successor: “There is no ‘Phila- 
delphia sound,’ ” says Riccardo Mud, “there 
is a Mozart sound, a Brahms sound, a Mah- 
ler sound.” Seiji Ozawa has said that there is 
no Ozawa sound, only the composer's, with a 
facetious allowance that this might change 
since “1 might become more limited." Baren- 


boim spoke recently of the successful Bruck- 
ner and Mahler cydes his Paris orchestra has 
undertaken, and said. “I do not want a 
French sound. We should be able to play 
idiomatic Bruckner, no? We are going on 
tour to make music. Being a French orches- 
tra has nothing to do with iL” 

These ideas are the fruit of what was once 
a struggle to introduce audiences and orches- 
tras to foreign music. Toscanini made much 
of his early career on the introduction of 
Wagner to a resistant Italy. Brahms had to 
be campaigned for in France; so solid a 
repertory work as h is Second Piano Concer- 
to apparently remained unheard there until 
the 1930s. When Erich Leinsdorf was a stu- 
dent in Vienna between the wars his profes- 
sors knew nothing of Debussy and didn't 
care whether he did either. In their zeal to 
break down barriers like these, the crusaders 
probably never stopped to reflect that the 
apparently invincible, (iresomdy durable 
national traditions might actually suffer 
once the internationalization of the reper- 
tory was accomplished. 

A NOTHER factor is that in the jet age, 
an orchestra's sound is no longer 
XX shaped by the constant presence and 
endless hours of rehearsal that a Stokowski 
would bring to a Philadelphia. “One of our 
biggest problems today/' said Seymour Ro- 
sen. the managing director of Carnegie Hall, 
in a recent interview, “is the era of the guest 
conductor, and the music director who 
isn't.” In Chicago the subscription season 
runs 30 weeks; Sir Georg Solti currently 
conducts right of them, though orchestra 
officials hope he may consent to a ninth next 
season. Ozawa at the Boston Symphony and 
Zubin Mehta at the New York Philharmonic 
conduct only slightly over hall their respec- 
tive orchestra's borne seasons — and they 
score higher than mosL Muti is down for 13 
weeks out of 30. This is a far ay from the 
pattern a generation or more ago, when 
Ormandy. or Chicago’s Fritz Reiner, would 
' stay in town for very nearly the full season, 
leading most of the concerts and often even 
hearing the orchestra rehearse and perform 
under such guests as did come. Shortly be- 
fore his retirement Ormandy described him- 
self as “fighting a losing battle” for the 
concept of one conductor and one orchestra. 

“They are not orchestra builders, they are 
career builders." says Rosen of the younger 
generation. It is not at all unusual for a star 
conductor to combine “directorship" of a 
U.S. orchestra, one in Europe, and a summer 



Stokowski's Philadelphia sound . . . 


festival or an opera house, with substantial 
guest conducting commitments thrown in. 
“They hear something in Vienna and like it,” 
Rosen continues, “and they try to get it in 
Philadelphia or Chicago. It doesn’t work; 
you get a homogenization. It isn't really 
Philadelphia and it certainly isn't Vienna.” 

That homogenization is widely felt to have 
made strong and perhaps irrevocable en- 
croachments. fostering a consensual interna- 
tional style that won’t rock the boat when 
strange orchestras and conductors face each 
other in dizzying succession, or when con- 
ductors and players whose musical back- 
grounds are widely disparate are thrown 
together on a regular basis. (A glance over 
the schedule for visitors to Carnegie and 
Avery Fisher shows how useful such a style 
would be. There will be Stockholm under a 
Russian. Paris under a British-oriented Is- 
raeli Rotterdam under an American, the 
Berlin Radio Orchestra under an Italian. 
The Israel P hilhar monic will play Mahler’s 
Sixth under Mebla. So. three weeks later, 
will the New York.) 

A powerful support in moving toward 
uniformity has bent the very phenomenon 
that enables us to chart its course: recorded 
sound, whose profoundest impact is perhaps 
only now beginning to be felt fully. Before 
recordings, a young musician’s role models 
could only be those geographically near him. 
An oboist growing up in Paris heard only 
Parisian oboe playing, whether in the 
“Eroica” Symphony, “Tristan,” or the 
“Symphonic Fantastique." A conductor 
coming up through the ranks of the German 
opera houses learned the German style of 
singing, conducting and playing. Glimpses 
of other cultures through tours or travel 
could be powerful inspirations, but they had 
their effect against a background firmly 
rooted in time and place. 

Edison’s invention changed all that, 
though it took many years before recording 
technology could reproduce an orchestra 
convincingly, and many more before a gen- 
eration whose habits were formed before 
radio and recording ceased to hold the domi- 
nant influence. At a certain point between 
the world wars, though, and increasingly 
after World War IL music students every- 
where began to hear music as it was played 
everywhere rise. A young conductor growing 



is not Muti’s. 


Hany Gic 


up in a Cincinnati without records or broad- 
casts during this century would inevitably 
have been shaped by the steadily German- 
oriented musical leadership there — but any 
dose look at the work of the Cincinnati-born 
James Levine shows that the predominant 
influence among the many he felt was Tosca- 
nini's. 

What’s wrong with this? Does it not am- 
ply make excellence in music more widely 
available, all musical styles accessible to ev- 
eryone? Why shouldn't great orchestras turn 
on a dime, bringing their audiences the best 
of all worlds? 

Before trying to answer those questions, it 
is worthwhile to pose what might be an 
embarrassingly simple one. Why should an 
orchestra tour? Suppose the slate apparently 
desired by Bernstein and Barenboim is at- 
tained; why then should a Paris orchestra 
take the vast trouble and expense of coming 
to London. San Francisco, Vienna or New 
York? Surely not to provide audiences with 
the same Mahler’s Mahler. Franck’s Franck, 
Mozart’s Mozart that they are presumably 
getting whenever their own orchestra turns 
on its own dime. 

The overwhelming evidence, though, is 
Continued on page 8 


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California’s Wine Statesman 

style as reflected in his several wines; there is 
a fascinating chapter on the Mondavi winery 
at Woodbridge, California, where the Mon- 



ift**" 1 


by Frank J. Priai 

EW YORK — Robert Mondavi 
is one of those people who tran- 
scend the relatively limited fields 
... in which they -make their mark. 
f Thous ands who may never drink his or any 
other wines thrnk of him when they think of 
■ California wine. There are people in CaKfar- 
‘itia win mak e more wine and there are 
"people in California who from time to time 
make better wine. But none of them have 
' achieved Mondavi’s stature as an innovator, 
As a leads:, as a generous teacher and dedi- 
cated prosdytizer, not just of his own wines 
'but of all the wines of California. 

Once, several years ago, Mondavi invited 
‘ ihfo writer, who happened to be in the area, 
fofjnin him andMlcajko (Mike) Grgjch, 
■partner and wine maker at Grgidi Hills 
; Cellars, for lunch and a tasting at the Mon- 
’ daw Winezy. The tasting consisted of a range 
‘jof chardozmays, from both Mondavi and 
Grgjch Hilts. Grgjch’s wines did bettor and 
!the .first one to say so was Mondavi. It was a 
tna gnawimnus gesture, particularly appreci- 
.atfdby Qrgich, who trained under Mondavi 
-for five years. 

- -Bob Mondavi's influence on his o wn ge n- 
.eration of wine makers and the generation 
flat has fallowed him is probably incaknla- 
■fjfe. But someone had to try, which is what 
■prompts these lines today. A book was re- 
cently p ublished in Britain: “Robert Mon- 
davi of the Napa Valley” by Cyril Ray 
XHememann — Peter Davies). Reams have 
been written about Mondavi including an 
embarrassingly bad novel in which he and 
3ns family wane the thinly disguised protago- 
"jrists; Bur this is a full-length, factual book 
’by a man who has already done books on 
BoBinger, the Champagn e house, and on 
'Chateau Moolah- Rothschild and Chateau 
iifito-Rothsdrild. Ray. brings experience 
an Fngltehmfmj fl fresh perspective lO 
his Mondavi p or tr ait More, be brushes in, 
,Ywih fascinating and very precise detail the 
•fife and work, of the Napa Valley itself, 
'Atiiexica’s premier wine-growing area and 
•Mondavi’s home for most of his Kfe. 

C There is mote. As a young reporter, Ray 
^$achnted into the Battle of the Bulge with 
A British unit he was covering. Nowadays, 
-more bdletrist than journalist, Ik meanders 
! through his subject rather than landing on 
,ftp ofiL There are the expected chapters on 
^ths Mondavi family's odyssey from iheAdn- 
$tic coast of Italy to the sere ranting country 
^.Minnesota to the. San Joaquin Valley of 
‘Qhf orma and finally, 90 miles (145 Irilome- 
,(ers) farther west, to the Napa Valley. 

. There are histories of the valley in general 
^rnd of the little comer of. Oakville, where the 
Robert Mondavi. Winery, now stands. There 
are detailed descriptions of the Mondavi 


davi generic wines, red. white and rosfc, are 
made. The wines, Ray informs us, are known 
informally as Bob Red, Bob White and Bob 
RosA 

There is even a long digression on contem- 
porary California architecture, featuring the 
handsome Mondavi winery budding, which 
is visited by some 300,000 tourists each year. 
Brendan Gill who has written about the 
California ranch style of architecture, turns 
up in this section, twice, as GiU Brendan. But 
no mat ter. Half the world prefers the patro- 
nymic first. 

Ray creates a memorable portrait of the 
wine mak er. Some of his better lines are 
cross-cultural as when he describes Monda- 
vi’s hurried stride as “a British light infantry- 
man’s step.” His mind. Ray goes on, “moves 
not merely at the short sharp pace of a light 
infantryman, bat at the double. like the 
march-past of the dashing riflemen — the 
Bersagueri — of the country of his fathers/’ 

Ray captures the Mondavi verve and ener- 
gy. “At 70 ” he writes, “Bob’s ideas tumble 
over each other faster than he can egress 
them, so that the sentences pour out. in his 
gravelly voice, many of them never finished, 
most of them marked for emphasis by the 
constant repetition of synonyms and near- 
synonyms usually linked together in pairs.” 

P ERHAPS the Mondavi story is inter- 
esting because it is. to an unusual 
extent, the story of wine in the United 
States. The family moved from the mining 
country of northern Minnesota to California 
in 1922. They settled in the Central Valley 


and went into the fruit business, shipping 
grapes to Italian wine makers in the East 

After Prohibition. Cesare Mondavi moved 
out of the fruit business and into the bulk 
wine business. He bought the majority inter- 
est in a small Napa Valley winery now 
known as the Sunny Sl Helena Winery, 
where his son Robert joined him in the mid- 
1930s. 

In 1943. the Mondavis purchased the 
Charles Krug winery in the Napa Valley, 
resolved to make fine wines ana leave the 
bulk business to Central Valley wineries who 
could do it more cheaply. 

The venture was a success. Even so. 
spurred by the compulsion to experiment 
and innovate, to do even belter, Robert 
Mondavi in the early 1960s broke with more 
conservative members of his family and went 
out on his own. His first wines, the 1966 
vintage, were released just as the United 
States began to come of age as a wine- 
drinking nation. 

There is as much fad and fashion in the 
wine business as anywhere else. This year’s 
wine maker and this year’s winery are quick- 
ly replaced by next year’s. Wineries develop 
styles, signatures so to speak, that define 
them and make their reputations. 

Robert Mondavi or more accurately the 
Mondavis, because his sons Michael and 
Tiro are deeply involved, go on their restless 
way. refining techniques, experimenting, an- 
alyzing. This can be exasperating for people 
who fee to categorize, but it creates a sense 
of excitement and adventure that arc rare in 
any line of work. 

Cyril Ray has captured that sense rather 
nicely. ■ 


Linguistic Lolly gagging 


by Joy Schaleben Lewis 



O /ttf 5 The Stew York Times 





Robert Mondavi 


The Nm Jorfc Tiny* 


AD ISON, Wisconsin — Americans like to do much of 
“nothing in particular "judging by expressions across 
the country for fooling around or ki l l in g time. Depend- 
ing on which state they’re doodling in. they also could 
ggjng, frittering, shilly-shallying, running in neutral mufl- 
■, piddling, or even sitting with their teem in their beads or 


mg it over, p, 

whipping the devil around the stump. 

And, when they pretend to be sick, the diseases they conjure sound 
mighty serious: from mulligrubs in Georgia, gonny-wobbles in 
Pennsylvania and bongo-bongo in Oregon to epizooty in New York, 
lergy in California and loopus-tupus in Utah. 

They sound drastic enough to call a gut plumber in New York, a 
pill chaser in Massachusetts, a rub doctor in Kansas and a bloodlet- 
ter in California. 

If you’ve got a cough along with the mulligrubs, Georgia folk 
recommend a peach-leaf poultice. Arkansas folk, however, swear by 
onion plasters. In Wyoming, folk claim “Denver mud” relieves a 
cough: folks in North Carolina disagree: rock candy and whiskey is 
more effective. And. in Iowa, Michigan and New Jersey, goose grease 
does the uick. 

Such remedies, however, may not be appealing So you admit you 
were feigning sickness and explain, “I was only playing possum. I 
had the yellow dog fishing fever and the washing dishes trots. Is 
there any harm in hippoing or in four-flushing?” 

Nonetheless, folks in New Jersey might still say you look peaked, 
“like a bar of soap after a hard day’s washing" In Washington you 
appear “drawn through a knothole.” 

Remembering that laughter is the best medicine, they try and 
cheer you up with a joke. But it’s an old joke, older than Job’s turkey. 
It must have come over on the Mayflower, or worse, it’s as old as 
when the Lord was a baby . You might shrug off such a joke as moth- 
eaten or a dead duck. But if-you're Texan, you mav complain, “If you 
warned to pull something old, why didn’t you take your socks off?” 

These folk idioms, ana thousands more, have been collected for 
the first Dictionary of American Regional English, known as DARE 
The Belknap Press of Harvard University expects to have the first of 
five volumes printed in 1985. No work of this magnitude has been 
attempted before; it will be a significant milestone in the writing of 
the United States' linguistic history. 

The idea for a dictionary began with the founding of (he 
American Dialect Society in 1889, but it wasn't until 1965, when the 
society chose Professor Frederic G, Cassidy to bead the project, that 
it took form. 

The task of explaining and editing U.S. regional English currently 
occupies 10 editors at the University of Wisconsin in Madison, where 
Cassrdv. the chief editor, has been part of the English faculty since 
1939. ’ 

Cassidy, 76, once commented that the English language is like 
flypaper — “everything sticks to it.” He points out that by 1989. the 
idea for the project will be 100 years old. “We’d better Finish DARE 
before it finishes me,” he jokes. 


C ASSIDY describes the work as “a modern, scholarly, scientif- 
ic dictionary which gives an accurate recording of the facts ” 
He notes that some people are under the impression that a 
dictionary exists only to record “proper words” or “standard words” 
and that the others are not “real” words. BuL he emphasizes, “if a 
meaning is communicated, the word is real." 

Cassidy was bom in Jamaica. “I spoke two kinds of English,” he 
recalled, “standard at home and Creole in the community.” His 
family moved to Akron, Ohio, when he was 1 1, but be has often 
remmed His first book, published in 1967, and updated in 1980, was 



Smhaion b, Fer rondo Krotw 


the Dictionary of Jamaican English, which took 16 years of prepara- 
tion. 

The American Dialect Society entrusted Cassidy with 76 years of 
accumulated word lists — over 40.000 folk words. This provided an 
excellent base for the dictionary, but five years of research in 50 
states lay ahead 

Field workers were armed with a questionnaire Cassidy designed 
with Audrey Ducken, a University of Massachusetts English profes- 
sor. The researchers interviewed 2,752 native Americans in 1,002 
communities and asked each participant to answer a book of 
questions — 1,847 in alL 

For example, they asked: “Words or expressions used around here 
about a very slow person. What’s keeping him? He certainly is. . 

Americans came up with 301 ways to describe a slowpoke, includ- 
ing he is “like coal tar running up a hid” “slow as fleas falling off a 
dead dog," and “slow as cream a-riang.” 

Six questions were asked about clouds, including: “What do you 
call the big clouds that come up high before a rainstorm?” 

“Th underheads," was the response of 428 people. But the data also 
lists 107 other ways Americans describe thunderheads, including 
“Peter’s mudhoie,” “teacups and saucers ” and “ice cream sodas." 

It took a field worker about a week to complete each question- 
naire. Respondents chosen by the field workers had to meet certain 
requirements. They had to be natives of the community, speakers of 


Continued on page 8 




it‘» 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY II, 1985 


TRAVEL 


-1 








A dervish theater performance . 


Turkey’s Secular Dervishes 


by Thomas C Goltz 


K ONYA, Turkey — “There are no 
dervishes in Turkey,” maintained 
a tourism official, Fevri Halier. 
• Which was odd — since he had 
just been watching the famed “whirling der- 
vishes” of Turkey spin and spin to embrace 
the divine, exactly as Jalaladm Rnmi taught 
some 700 years ago. 

“One has to distinguish between the lovers 
of ‘Meviana’ — ana there are 45 million in 
Turkey alone — and those who have actually 
fulfilled the prerequisites of dervishhood, 
Halid said. “And of those, none remain 
today.” 

“Meviana,” meaning “Our Master ” is a 
nanw* given tO Riuni, an Islami c mystic who 
came out of what is now Afghanistan — he 
was bom there in Balkh in 1206 — to gather 
students about Him in the Sdjak capital of 
Konya. 

Debates on the nature of the divine led 
Meviana and his students to seek new ways 
of finding onion with God. The result was 
the highly stylized sema, or whirling ceremo- 
ny, performed unchanged ever since. 

It begins, as Meviana decreed, with a 
raspy, flute-Uke instr umen t called the ney, 
whose ethereal tones he likened to the sound 
a f God's voice. 

As it plays, the dervishes enter in sQence. 


Their black cloaks represent their graves, 
their tall conical hats their tombstones, their 
white tunics their burial shrouds. 

The dervishes pass before their sheikh to 
receive a final blessing, shed their cloaks in a 
symbolic abandoning of the world, and be- 
gin to whirl. 

Slowly at first their white skirts billow out, 
their arms spread to embrace God, one palm 
up to receive blessings, the other turned 
down to pass the blessings to earth. 

Round and round, faster and faster, their 
faces devoid of emotion, the entire stage now 

filled by whirling, turning for ms 

The Last known true dervish, said Halid, 
founder of the Konya tourism association 
that sponsors the whirling ceremony each 
December, died years ago. He was the last to 
spend the 1,001 days of manual labor in a 
Meviana monastery — once required before 
a dervish could even see the whirling ceremo- 
ny. 

Today’s dervishes need only permission 
from the sheikh of the Konya group. They 
practice the dance for as long as it takes to 
master it — usually six weeks. 

T raditional dervishes also 
trained as poets, calligraphers and the 
like. Today’s are businessmen, stu- 
dents, workers, farmers and, in one case, a 
senator in Turkey's parliament. 


Turkey's secular republic, founded after 
World War L swept away the Meviana mon- 
asteries in 1925 along with other “backward” 
institutions of religion. But semi-secret 
Hianting groups remain throughout Turkey. 

In the 1950s, Mevlana’s dervish music was 
allowed a performance at a Konya seminar 
on his works. A dancer in street clothes 
demonstrated how the dervishes once 
whirled. 

A year later two dancers were allowed to 
perform. Finally the traditional costume was 
revived with a full Meviana orchestra, al- 
though not in a dervish monastery but the 
thoroughly secular floor of a local gymnasi- 
um. 

The performances are classified as folk- 
lore, not as a religious rite. Even so, the 
traditional meaning of the sema is ever pre- 
sent in the four whirling selams: The first to 
comprehend God as the creator of all, the 
second to orbit his creation, the third to 
annihilate all traces of self and ego, and the 
fourth to obtain union with God. 

Modem audiences hold palms upward as 
the sheikh redtes the Moslem creed and 
joins the dervish can tha t brings the ceremo- 
ny to an end It is said to express all the 
names of God and his myriad attributes in a 
single syllable, hu, which means: “He 
is...” ■ 

0 1985 United Press huemaiional 


Linguistic Lollygagging 


Continued from page 7 


the local variety of American English at 
home, and regular residents who had not 
traveled or lived elsewhere long enough for 
their language to be affected They also had 
to be of all ages, with preferences for old- 
rimers, of both sexes, of all levels of educa- 
tion and of all races. 

S UPPLEMENTING the written inter- 
views are 1,843 half-hour tape record- 
ings of regional speech patterns. On 
the tapes, the respondents conversed freely 
for 20 to 30 minutes on any topic they knew 
wed such as oyster fishing or providing for a 
family during the Great Depression, and 
read a verson of “The Story of Arthur the 
Rat” to provide a phonological pattern of 
each reader’s speech. 

When the field work was completed in 
1970, over 100,000 folk expressions had been 
collected from newspapers, books, diaries, 
folklore journals and individual contribu- 
tors. 

The next step was the computer, which 
sorted the folk expressions into 41 general 
categories, including time, weather, domes- 
tic animals, vehicles and transportation, 
birds, honesty and dishonesty; body, physi- 
cal characteristics, snoring and tticoqnng; 

and meaL^religion and beliefs. 

Each entry explains what the folk word or 


phrase means and who uses it, broken down 
by type of community and geographic re- 
gion. It may also explain the education of the 
respondent, sex and race, and include a map 
of the United States illustrating the distribu- 
tion of certain folk terms. 

For instance, the expression “fall away” is 
chiefly used in the Northeast and South. 
“Fall away means to lose weight, usually as a 
result of illness. “’E just plumb fell ’way to 
nothin’,” said a respondent in Tennessee. 
“Don’ gain no weight ’tail” 

Funding for the project has come mainly 
from the U.S. Office of Education the Na- 
tional Endowment for the Humanities, the 
National Science Foundation, the Universi- 
ty of Wsconsin. the Rockefeller and Mellon 
Foundations. But cutbacks have struck, and 
Cassidy himself now works full-time without 
salary, pursuing contributions from founda- 
tions and private sources against which the 
National Endowment will provide matching 
funds to pay the rest of the staff. 

T HE editors have traced the origins of 
thousands of folk expressions, but 
would welcome insights — facts, not 
just good hunches — into some still puzzling 
them. They include: 

“Chuck wagon” — a type of sandwich. 
How long has this been in existence? What 
are the ingredients? Where is it well estab- 
lished? 


“Borga. booga” — a paper sack or bag. 
Two reports came in from the Georgia-Flon- 
da borderland, near the coast, but both form 
and usage are uncertain. 

“Clacky,” “clackies" — The first is hard, 
no good gravy: central Virginia. The second 
is given as an answer to the question, “What 
do you call a doctor who is not very capable 
or doesn't have a good reputation?" 

“Come-all-you" — a fist fight with several 
people participating: a free-for-all Reported 
once from northeastern New York, this 
looks like something that should be more 
widely used. Is this so? 

“Chicken-fool ice” — the first thin ice tc 
form on a pond or other surface of water: 
one report from Oklahoma. Is it used else- 
where? What is the meaning of this term? 


O NE of Cassidy’s favorite expressions 
is “hoofties.” “We came across it in 
an article from a Pittsburgh suburban 
newspaper," he said. 

“The police were complaining they were 
having trouble with the hoofties. Hoofties? 
What could that be, we wondered. Then we 
got to thinking perhaps hoofties was related 
to Pennsylvanian German. Sure enough. 
‘HOfie' in German means ‘hip’. So, hoofties 
were hippies. The police, in other words, 
were having trouble with hippies." ■ 


Restaurants: Plain, With Truffles 


by Patricia WeDs 


M ONDRAGON. France — Ev- 
ery once in a while one stum- 
bles upon an unspoiled gem of 
a restaurant in the country, 
where the chefs work is a passion and not 
simply a profession, where the wine list 
could easily make a good night's reading, 
and where, on the first visit, you decide this 
is a place you could return to time and again. 

La Beaugravitre, on the northern edge of 
Provence by Route Nationale 7, is that kind 
of place. This is a most unassuming restau- 
rant — plain, no real decor, no great creature 
comforts. But it's real and it's honest. The 
large dining room is more a dining hall, the 
sort one would expect to find attached to a 
1930s hold. 

But there are three simple reasons to go to 
La Beaugravi&e if you happen to be in the 
area: the exceptional and extensive list of 
Rhone wines, including a healthy batch of 
old Chftieauneuf-du-Pape; the giant, fra- 
grant black truffles of the Vaucluse; and the 
rabbit prepared by the chef, Guy Jullien, 
roasted and served with whole cloves of 
garlic. Anyone who demands more than that 
of a simple restaurant ought to stay at home. 

Obligatory is his truffle omelet Not the 
kind of omelet filled with specks of truffles, 
or a wimpy purfe of truffles, but big. whole 
chunks of truffles, so big they crunch when 
you bite into them, releasing that heady and 
intoxicating black-earth aroma, that singu- 
lar, enduring flavor. He is not a stingy man, 
using about 15 mams of truffles — the equiv- 
alent of a healthy-sized truffle — per omelet. 
(Fresh truffles are now selling for 3,600 
francs, or roughly S370, a kilo in Paris. His 
omelet is priced at 68 francs. It doesn't take a 
computer wizard to figure out that this om- 
elet is a bargain.) 


wimpy purfe of truffles, but big. whole 
oks of truffles, so big they crunch when 


M. J.CMJU.9 ▼ T M. 

The chef offers no less man three other 
truffle preparations, all of which are fine, but 
ultimately" less satisfying. There’s a cnausson 
of truffles and foie gras and a perfectly 
respectable feuilleie d'oeufs brouules aux 
iruffes. both combinations that complicate 
what might otherwise be pure and simple 
bliss. Somehow, puff pastry shells are always 
forced to compete with their contents, and 
they rarely come out on the winning end. 

Finally, if you happen to be in the mood 
for a great big steak, it would be hard to beat 
his excellent Jito de boeuf aux iruffes. priced 
incredibly at 1 10 francs. 

Once sated, or at least satisfied, with truf- 
fles. move on to the rabbi l Jullien, a native 
of the area, likes to talk about integrating the 
bounty of the local soil: the Rhone wines, 
truffles and rabbit, an animal that exists in 
abundance in the wilds of northern Pro- 
vence. and is equally at home in a domesti- 
cated state. 

Even those who are oot fond of rabbit 
should try Jullien's. He insists that all the 
rabbit he serves is killed that day, and that 
this makes all the difference in the world. It's 
□o exaggeration to say you can taste the 
freshness in these tender and delicate rab- 
bits. roasted simply and surrounded by giant 
whole cloves of garlic roasted in their jack- 


N OW, to choose the wine. You could, 
with confidence, leave the ordering 
up to the chef, a man with a passion, 
and an impeccable palate, for sampling the 
local wines. Although be has been buying 
wines for only nine years, the list is remark- 
ably complete, and other restaurateurs 
would shudder with shame at the pricing: 
Almost no thing costs more than 300 francs, 
and most bottles are in the 100- to 1 50-franc 
range. 


He has all of the Rhdne greats, front 
Trollat's Sainl-Joseplv including the light 
and fruity red and the very rare white, tc 
Chave’s superlative red and white Hermit- 
age. He offers wines from a full range of 
C6te ROtie growers, including bottles from 
Jasmin, Dervieux, Veraay and Guigal; there 
are the Gigondas of G. Faraud, and an entire 
page of Chateauneuf-du-Pape, ranging from 
the 1966 to the 1981 vintage. 

Wine lovers unfamiliar with the Rhone 
whites owe it to themselves to ay something 
as rare and wonderful as Ventay’s Condrieu, 
a wine at once deep and mellow, delicate and 
flowery, even a bit earthy. 

And in his wide range of reds, it would be 
hard to pass up any of the pre-1976 Chateau 
Rayas, now an almo st legendary wine,, a 
Chateauneuf-du-Pape that underwent as 
much five years of aging in the cask, to result 
in a perfectly balanced wine. 

But it’s not simply a connoisseur’s list. La 
Bcaugraviire allows one a chance to sample 
a variety of less grand, but no less delicious 
domain-bottled wines, including the Cair- 
anne of Rabasse Charavin (48 francs) and 
the Cfltes-du-Rhdne-Villages of Guy Stein- 
maier (59 francs). 

The cheese tray is limited, but does in- 
clude a fine local Saint- Marcellin to help 
finis h off what wine remains in the bottle, 
and there's a very decent, though slightly 
dry, lane Tatin, which is considerably im- 
proved when ordered with a dollop of crime 
fraldie. 

La Beaugraviire, Route Nationale 7, 84430 
Mondragon (6 kilometers southwest of Bot- 
lene ); tel: f90) 30.13.40. No credit cards. 
Closed Sunday evening. Menus at 42. 68 and 
107 francs, intruding service but not wine. A la 
carte, from 100 to 300 francs a person, depend- 
ing upon wine selection. ■ 


Homogenizing the Orchestras 


Continued from page 7 


that orchestras don't really do that, unless 
perhaps now and then through a particularly 
concentrated rehearsal process. Erich Leins- 
dorf tells in his book “The Composer’s Ad- 
vocate" of trying, as it were, to teach a Dutch 
orchestra to turn on a Hungarian dime for 
Kodal/s “Haiy Janos” suite: ‘T went so far 
as to learn the Hungarian words of the song, 
imagining that if I pronounced them with the 
proper accent the player would perceive that 
his literal reading was inadequate. All was in 
v ain." 

Mightn't it be better not to lament that 
failure too keenly, not to push too hard for 
such cross-cultural versatility, and instead to 
nurture and preserve the characteristics an 
orchestra already has? Such traditions help 
to lend an easy conviction to performances 
and (no minor consideration) see the orches- 
tra through routine evenings or visits by less 
than first-class guest conductors — occa- 
sions for crashing boredom today. 


T HE fact is that in general, orchestral 
styles can'L be exchanged as though 
by inserting a new floppy disk into the 
computer. They don’t coexist; they merge, 
all too often into a featureless average. Bern- 
stein's personal achievements with his “vir- 
tuoso chameleon,” as he called the Philhar- 
monic on another occasion, are not in 
question, but his legacy to the orchestra is 
highly debatable: If there is consensus cm 
any musical question in New York, it is that 
the Philharmonic is not what it should be. 
Barenboim’s Parisians may have achieved 
acceptably idiomatic Bruckner, but their val- 
ue lies, far more in the ability to purvey 
idiomatic Ravel, Debussy, Berlioz ana 
Franck: music that has something to do with 
their heritage, history and understanding. 
Yet Franck may be slipping away from the 
French; nothing suggests it more than their 
recordings of him under Barenboim and 
Bernstein — as beautiful as those recordings 


are by more general standards. Mud's Phila- 
delphia, meanwhile, turns not a whit France- 
ward on its dime for Franck — but it has 
dearly turned away from Philadelphia, the 
sound newly lean, less personal, more like 
that of other orchestras. 

So why tour? Or why welcome visiting 
orchestras? There are of course still many 
reasons. One has to do with exposure to 
orchestras that have not yet, or not com- 
pletely, bought into the international con- 
sensus. Recent friction notwi thstanding , 
Herbert von Karajan has made a musical 
island of the Berlin Philharmonic (and has 
done it largely by staying put, like Ormandy 
or Reiner). 

The Vienna P hilha rmonic has preserved in 
large measure its idiosyncratic sound, espe- 
cially in certain wind and brass departments 
for which instruments of old-fashioned con- 
struction continue to be used. Rosen cites 
the example of the Leipzig Gewandhaus, 
which recently here played Beethoven rather 
roughly but with a conviction and string 
sound all its own. and of the Leningrad 
Philharmonic: “Those horns are thrilling, 
and it's a completely different kind of thrill” 
And every now and then an unlikely group 
can spring a surprise, as the Curtis Institute 
stud ait orchestra did when it came to Carne- 
gie with Sergiu Celibidache and played Ros- 
sini the way Joan Sutherland sin g s Rossini 
(that is, accurately, instead of almost accu- 
rately). 

There are also justifications for touring 
that have nothing to do with an orchestra’s 
sound. One is to share a major work that 
requires special preparation and is unlikely 
to turn up with frequency on even a sophisti- 
cated local scene. A good recent example is 
the Cleveland Orchestra's “Jakobsldter” 
(Schoenberg) under Christoph von Doh- 
nanyi, in whom Rosen sees “a musical intel- 
ligence at work” that, be hopes, will spell a 
return to the era of the music director com- 
mitted to his orchestra and community in 


time and concentration. Other reasons for 
traveling have to do with the prestige of 
sponsoring a tour (corporate sponsorship is 
a relatively new and fast-growmg phenome- 
non in Europe), and its usefulness in market- 
ing efforts bade home. 

O NE more reason is simply to hear a 
great conductor with his own band, 
regardless of whether it has a nation- 
al style or any other style of its own. When 
asked the “Why tour?” question point blank, 
Barenboim rephrased it in an interesting 
way. ‘You're asking my why I come with the 
Paris instead of just guest conducting the 
Philhar monic or something?” He went on to 
emphasize the advantages of bearing a con- 
ductor with his own orchestra rather than 
one with which he's had a handful of harried 
nmthroughs. (This is only true to the extent 
that the conductor does truly shape the or- 
chestra to his ideas, of course, and that 
brings back the whole argument about music 
directorships in the jet age.) 

Still, it is sad to reflect that France, whose 
musical traditions were once so proud, 
should be sending over an orchestra of 
whose music-making it can be said that be- 
ing French has nothing to do with it, an 
orchestra whose appeal is simply that it 
offers the most effective way to near Baren- 
boim's interpretations. He is widely thought 
of as an extraordinary conductor of the Ger- 
man Romantics who avoids the blandness of 
so much in modern musical life, and be may 
very well give memorable concerts here in 
March with the Orchestra de Paris, just as 
Bernstein has consistently done with the 
various ensembles he has led. But the advent 
of chameleon orchestras, whatever advan- 
tages they may afford, brings with it the loss 
of something individual, something that has 
long lent variety, charm and at the same time 
stability to musical hfe. S 

e 1985 The New York runes 


jddlfr 


WEEKEND 


INTERNATIONAL DATEBOOK 


★★★★★ 

f iSBStfy 


HOTELS 


The Grand Hotel in the mountains 

The hotel surrounded by snow-covered 
forests. Skischool. Chairlift and skilifls lo 
the sunny slopes. Downhill runs to the 
doorstep. Cross country skiing. 
Curling- and skating rinks. 

Elegant indoor swimming-pool. 
Sauna and massage. Solarium. Bars. 
Dancing. Restaurant franfa is «Le Miroir*. 


SUVRETTA HOUSE ST. MORITZ 

. Phone 082-21121 Telex 74491 R. F. Muller. Mgr. . 


HOLIDAYS 

ROME 

RESIDENTIAL AREA 

Lovety upj t m cnti by day. by week or 
by monm. Direct phone, autonomous 
hooting, bat. restaurant, garage, 
24 hour service. 

RESIDENCE 

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_ (39-6) 3387D12- 338701 S. - 


HOTEL UITET1A PARIS 

ft 31S KKKBON 

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A TRADITIONAL 192S 1 sms, 
HNOVATH) HOTEL 
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«.U.heri.7MU-TA|l]M4JL10 

«-■— 170 *34 — — 


WEEKEND 


appears every 
Friday 

For information 
call Dominique Bouvet 
in Paris on 747.12.65 
or your local LETT representative 

(List in Classified Section) 


AUSTRIA 

VIENNA, Kottzerthausi tel 72. 1 2. 1 1). 
CONCERTS — Jan. 15: Hagen Quar- 
tet (Mozart, Brahms'). 

Jan. 1 7: ORF Symphony Orchestra, 
Matthias Bamen conductor (Sibelius, 
KodilvV 

REClTALS — Jan. 13: Jorma Hyn- 
rrinen baritone, Ralph Gotham piano 
(Schumann). 

Jan. 14: Johann Sonnlehner. Borbala 
Dobozy harpsichord ( Bach). 

Jan. 16: Andras Schiff piano (Bach). 
■Museum of Mankind (tel: 93.45.41). 
EXHIBITION — To Jan. 20: “Medi- 
eval An from Serbian Monasteries.’' 
•Siaatsoper(id: 5 3240V 
BALLET— Jan. 13: “The Fairy DoH” 

( Hassid ter). “5 Tangos" (Van Manen. 
Piazzolla). 

OPERA — Jan. 12: “Elektra” (R. 
Strauss). 

Jan. 14: “The Queen of Spades” 
(Tchaikovsky). 

Jan. 15: “La Traviaia" (Verdi). 


BELGIUM 

ANTWERP, Royal Flemish Opera 
(tel: 233.66.SS). 

BALLET — Jan. 12: “Coppslia" 
tSainl-Ltoo, Delibes). 

OPERA — Jan. 13: “Samson ei Da- 
ifla” (Saim- Safins). 

BRUSSELS, Bellevue Museum 
(tel;3i 1.44.25). 

£XHTBm ON —To Jan. 20: “Colom- 
bian Gold Artifacts.” 

■Pal ais de s Beaux Arts (id: 51 1 39.95). 
CONCERTS — Jan. 12; National Op- 
era Symphony Orchestra, Sr John 
Pritchard conductor (Mozart, Ravel). 
Jan. 17: Belgian National Orchestra, 
Emmanuel Krivine conductor (Ravel, 
Schumann). 

LIEGE. Theatre Royal de Luxe (id: 
23.59.10). 

OPERA — Jan. 18: “The Devils of 
Loudon” (Penderecki). 

ENGLAND 

LONDON, Barbican Centre (tel: 
628.87.95). 

Barbican Art Gallery —To Jan. 20: 
“James Tissot 1836- 19021.” 

Jan. 16-March 2: “Prin (makers at the 
Royal College of Art.” 

Barbican Hall —Jan. 1 1. 12, 16: BBC 
Symphony Orchestra, Peter Ettvds 
conductor (Stockhausen). 

Jan. 13: Royal Philharmonic Orches- 
tra, Enrique Bat» conductor, Ldand 
Chen violin (Dukas. Elgar). 


Jan. 1 7: London Symphony Orchestra. 
Yondani Butt conductor, Maurice 
Murphy trumpet (Rossini. Beetho- 
ven). 

Jan. 18: Gty of London SinTonia, Yan 
Pascal Tortelier conductor, Gordon 
Hu nt ob oe (Bach, Vivaldi). 

RECITAL — Jan. 18: Antony Peebles 
piano (Chopin, Beethoven). 

Barbican Theatre — Royal Shake- 
speare Company — Jan. 12, 14-19: 
“Peter Pan" (Barrie). 

•Tate GaDeiy (td: 821.13.13). 
EXHIBITIONS — To Jin. 20: "Susan 
Rothenbetg." 

To Mar. 31: “William James Muller," 
“John Walker Prints 1976-1984." 
•Victoria and Albert Museum (td: 
5S9.63.71>. 

EXHIBITION —To Feb. 28: “British 
Biscuit Tins.” 

•Wigmore Hall (lei: 93521.41). 
CONCERT — Jan. 18: Amsterdam 
Goi Lar Trio ( Vi vakli X 

RECITALS — Jan. 12: William Ben- 
net fl ute. Clifford Benson piano(Sdm- 
ben, Remecke). 

Jan. 13: Yoshi Iwanaga guitar (Bach). 
Jan. 14: Brian Scbembn piano (Bach, 
Liszt). 

Jan. 15: John Chilton accordion, Dina 
Bennett piano (Saxton. Carpenter). 
Jan. 16: Sergiu Luca violin (Bach). 
Jan. 17: Stephen Varcoe baritone. Joy 
Farral clarinet (Schubert). 

FRANCE 

ANGERS, Masteries Beaux- Arts (teL 
88.64.65). 

EXHIBITION — To Jan. 15: “La 
Cliche Animfie de Roland Rome." 
•Thiatre Municipal (leL 88.90.08). 
JAZZ — Jan. 17: Tito Puente Orches- 
tra. 

PARIS, Centre Georges Pompidou 


(td: 277.1233). 

CONCERT — Jan. 14: Orchestra de 
L'De de France. Jacques Merrier con- 
ductor (Schbnberg, Julich). 
EXHBmONS —To Jan. 28: “Kan- 
dinsky," “Homage to Kahnwrifer,” 
•Gal eric 55 (teh326.63.Sl ). 
THEATER — Through January: 
“The Pink Thunderbird'TMcLuie). 
•Galerie Horizon (id: 5553837). 
EXHIBITION — To Jan. 26: “Fred 
Pe terd t,” 

•Grand Palais (leL 26134.10). 
EXHIBITIONS — To Jan. 28; “Wat- 
lean (1 684- 1721).” 

To Feb. 4: "Zhongshan: Tombs of 
Forgotten Kings.” 

•Mueeedo Loom (tel: 2603936). 
EXHIBITIONS — To Jan. 28: 
“French Drawings of the 17th Ceniu- 

to April 15; “Holbein.” 

•Music du Luxembourg (tel: 
23435.95). 


EXHIBITION— ToFeb. 10: “Hmpo- 
lyte. Auguste and Paul Flandrin.* 1 
•Optra (id: 742.57.50). 

OPERA — Jan. 28: “Tristan iwd Isol- 
de" (Wagner). 

•Palais des Sports (id: 828.40.90). 
CIRCUS — To Jan. 13: Moscow Cir- 
cus. 

•Salle Gaveau (id: 56330.30). 
RECITAL — Jan. 18: Scott Ross harp- 
sichord (Scarlatti. Bach). 

•Salk Pleydfld: 563.88.73). 
CONCERTS — Jan. 16 and 17: Or- 
chestra de Paris, Riccardo Chailly con- 
ductor (Schumann. Stravinsky).' 

Jan. 18: Nouvd Orchestra PMIhar- 
monique, Christian Badea conductor. 
Victor Tretiakov violin (Brahms. 
Liszt). 

RECITAL — Jan. 15: Daniel Baren- 
boim piano (Beethoven ). 

•Th&llre des Champs fiys£es ltd: 
72336.27). 

CONCERT — Jan. 16: Orchestra Na- 
tional de France, Georges Prfttre con- 
ductor (Berlioz). 

•Theatre du Rond-Point (tel: 
256.7030). 

CONCERT — Jan. 13; Brandis Quar- 
IrtfWolf. Beethoven). 

•Thiitre Musical dc Paris (tel: 
233.44.44). 

CONCERT— Jan. 14: Orchestra Co- 
tame, Dennis Russel Davies conduc- 
tor (BaduRavd). 

OPERETTA — Jan. 12. 16. 18: “Die 
Fledermaus” (J. Strauss). 

Jan. 13. 15, 17:“La FiOedc Madame 
Angot”(Leoocq). 

•Theatre 3 sur 4(id: 327.09. 16). 
RECITAL— Jan. 14: Elena lakoubo- 
vitefa guitar, Russian ballads, gypsy 
songs and poetry (Okudzhava. Push- 
kin, Pasternak). 


GERMANY 

BERLIN, Deutsche Oper (tel: 
341.44.49). 

BALLET — Jan. 17: “Echoing of 
Trumpets” (Martin it, Tudor). 
OPERA— Jan. 12: “The Marria ge nt 
Figaro” (Mozart). 

Jan. 13 and 16: “Ophelia” (Kelter- 
bom). 

Jan. 15: “Madame Butterfly” (Pucci- 
ni). 

Jan. 18: “La Bohfcme” (Puccini). 
•Philharmonic (.id: 25.48.80). 
CONCERTS — Berlin Philharmonic 
Orchestra — Jan. 12 and 13; RiccanJc 
Muli conductor (Haydn, Beethoven). 
Jan. 16 and 17: Claudio Abbado con- 
ductor (Schonberg, Tchaikovsky). 
COLOGNE, Museum fttr Qstasia- 
tisctoc Kunst (td: 403038). 

EXH3 BJT10N —To Jan. 1 3: “Korean 
An.” 

•ROmiscb-Gcnnantscbes Museum 
(id; 22133.04). 


EXHIBITION — To Jan. 27: “The 
Treasures of San Marco.” 
FRANKFURT. Alte Oper (tel: 
134.04.00) 

CONCERTS — Radio Symphony Or- 
chestra of Frankfurt — Jan. 12: Acade- 
my and Chorus of Sl Martin-in- the- 
Fields. Laszlo Heltay conductor 
(Handel). 

Jan. 13 and 14: Frankfurt Opera 
House and Museum Orchestra. Jin Be* 
lohlivek conductor (Janacek. Stravin- 
sky). 

Jan. 1 7 : Radio Sympb ony Orches tra ol 
Frankfurt, Meodi Rohan conductor. 
SO via Marcovici violin (Schubert). 
RECITAL — Jan. 14: Edith Mathis 
soprano, Gerard Wyss (nano (Schu- 
bert, Brahms). 


ATHENS, 
(tel: 72433.77). 
EXHIBITION - 


Gallery 


EXHIBITION — To Jan. 25: “Elena 
Zantrdko.” 

•Goethe Institute (id: 360.8 1 . 1 1 ). 
RECITAL — Jan. IS: Conrad Jungb- 
Snel lute (Bach). 

•Medusa Galbsy (td: 724.45.52). 
EXHIBITION — Jan. 15-Feb. 9: 
“Bullfight." drawings by Yiannis Di- 
mi Irakis. 

•Nees Morphes Gallery (tel: 
361.61. 65). 

EXHIBITION —To Jan. 26: “Vassiiii 
Spcrantzas." 

•Skoufa Gallery (td: 36035.41). 
EXHIBITION —To Jan. 3 1 : "Mina." 

HONGKONG 


HONG KONG. Gty Hall Concert 


Kenneth Sch e nne rh or n conductor, 
Monique Duphil piano (Bernstein. 
Bruckner). 

ISRAEL 

JERUSALEM. Israel Museum (id: 
69.82.11). 

EXHIBITIONS — To Feb. 28: 
“Eliohu Gat-Women and Nature," 

“A Vanished World - Roman Vish- 
niac, “photographs. 

ITALY 


BOLOGNA, Teatro Comunale (id: 
2239-99). 

CONCERTS — Jan. 15 and 16: Or- 
chestra e Coro del Teatro Comunale, 


CKinier Neuhold conductor (Mahler, 
Stravinsky). 

MILAN, Teatro alia Seals (tel: 
80.9136). 

CONCERT — Jan. 14; S yarn bony Or- 
chestra of La Seals, Lorin Maazef con- 
ductor ( Faurt, Rachmaninov). 
OPERA — Jan. 13: “Carmen” (Bizet). 
ROME. Accademia Nazioaaledi San- 
ta Cbrilia (td: 679.03.89). 
CONCERTS — Jan. 13-15: Orchestra 
dell’ Accademia Nazionale de Santa 
Cecilia, Walter Weller conductor 
(Mendelssohn. Bruch). 
TURIN.TealroRegioftd: 54.80.00). 
BALLET— Jan. 12. 13. 15, 16: Ballet 
Theatre Fran^ais. Rudolf Nureyev. 

JAPAN 


TOKYO. Idemitsu An Gallery (tel: 
213.3138). 

EXHIBITION —To Feb. 3; “The In- 
teriniluence of Ceramic Art in East 
and West." 

•Korakuen Stadium (tel: 811.2 1 . II). 
CIRCUS — To Feb. 17: Korakuen 
Great American Circus. 

MONACO 


MONTE-CARLO. Salle Gamier (tel: 
50.76.54). 

OPERA — Jan. 12 and 15: “LaTosca" 
(Puccini). 

Jan. 18: “Simon Boccanegra” (Verdi). 


AMSTERDAM. Museum Fodor (td. 
2439.19). 

EXHIBITION —To Jan: 20: “Dutch 
Drawings Since 1945." 
•Rijksmuseum Vincent Van Gogh 
(tel: 76.48.8U 

EXHIBITION— To April 15: "Dutch 
Identity.” 

•Stadsscbouwburgtld: 2433.1 1). 
BALLET — Jan. IS and 17: "The 
Anatomy Lesson” (Tetley, Lan- 
dowski). 

•Steddijk. Museum (tel: 7331.66). 
EXHIBITION — To April 15: “La 
Grande Parade" 

■Willet-Hotihuysen (td: 2642.90). 
EXHIBITION — To Jan. 13: “Mas- 
ter-works in Silver.” 


SCOTLAND 

EDINBURGH. Natiooal Gallery (id; 
556.8931). 

EXHIBITION —To Jan 31: “Turner 
Wain-colors,” 

•Queen's Hall (id: 66831.17). 


CONCERTS — Jan. 17: Edinburg 
Quartet (Tippett, Smetana). 

•Usher Hafi (td: 228.1 135). 
CONCERT — Jan. 18: Scottish Na- 
tional Orchestra, Sir Alexander Gib- 
son conductor (Bruckner). 
GLASGOW, Theatre Royal (tel: 
331.12.34). 

OPERA — Jan. 12: “Capriccio” (R- 
Strauss). 

SPAIN 

MADWD.Grculo de Bellas Artes ( id: 
2313J37). 

EXHIBITION — To Jan. 31: “Para- 
dise Lost, Paradise Recovered" 

• Fundaci6n Juan March (tel: 
435.42.40). 

EXHIBITION — To Jan. 27: “Julius 


EXHIBITION — To Jan. 27: “Julius 
Bissier." 

RECITAL — Jan. 16: Judit Cuixart, 
Eulalia Sol6 piano (Schubert). 
•Teatro Monumental (td: 227.12.14). 
MUSICAL — Through January: 
“Barn urn” (Coleman, Stewart, Bram- 
ble). 

•Teatro Pav6n (tel: 22733.15). 
MUSICAL — Through January; 
"Buenos" (Taylor). 

•Teatro Real (td: 24838.75). . 

CONCERTS — I an 12 and 13: Span- 
ish National Orchestra and Chorus, 
Maximiano Valdes conductor (Schu- 
mann. Saint-Saftns). 

Jan. 17 and 18: Spanish Radio-Televi- 
sion Orchestra and Chorus, Salvador 
MAs conductor (Brahms). 

Jan. 18: Spanish National Orchestra 
and Chorus, Maximiano Valdfes con- 
ductor. Eulalia Sold piano (RaveL 
Stravinsky). 

UNITED STATES 

NEW YORK, Lincoln Colter (tel: 
870.59.60). 

New York City Ballet — Jan. 12 and 
13: “The Four T emperaments" (Bal- 
anchine, Hindemith). 

Jan. 12, 13, IS: “Jewels" (Balanchine. 
Fauri, Stravinsky). 

■Guggenheim Museum (tel: 
36035.00). 

EXHIBITION— To Feb. 3: “Robert 
Motherwefl." 

•Metropolitan Museum of Art (Id: 
535.77. ft)). 

EXHIBITIONS —To Ft*. 24: “Chi- 
ocse Fainting and Calligraphy.” 

To Sept. ] : “Man and the Horse." - 
•Metropolitan Opera (td: 7993138). 
OPERA — Jan. 12, 15. 18: “Ariadne 
auf Naxos" (R. Strauss). 

Jan. 1 2 and 16: “LaChanen^adiTiio'' 
(Mozart). 

Jan. 14: "Wotteck” (Berg). 

Jan. 17: ‘Tales erf Hoffman” (Offen- 
bach). 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 11, 1985 


TRAVEL 


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Paddling Down the Zambezi 


by Alan Cowell 


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f 


K ARXBa, Zimbabwe — There was 
quiche and salad for lunch on the 
first day and an elephant shared 
■ the spot, deep in the Kariba 
' -Gorge of the Zambezi River, defoliating a 
. tree as the travelers look their sustenance 15 
- yards away. 

"'• The great stream. 1,600 miles (2,600 kilo- 
- meters) long, carls like a question mark 
through half a continent, pushed by — 
smooth and dark, adorned with capricious, 
small whirlpools — at a brisk 10 or 11 knots. 

The safari had begun. When it ended three 
days later, those undertaking the voyage 
from Kariba to Chirundu, down a mere 60 
. miles of tbe river's length, would leave the 
.waters with reluctance and fond memories. 

The Zambezi, for this correspondent at 
’ least ranks with Africa's greatest rivers, as 
mighty in spirit as the Congo or tbe Nile, 
superior in every way to the Kafue or tbe 
Ubangi or the Shari. In the past it was an 
access mate to an unwitting continent for 
Arab slavers wielding guns, a corridor for 
jnissionaries carrying Bibles and conflicting 
. ofeeds. Portuguese traders pressed inland 
tram i the Indian Ocean, some of them freed 
criminals like Antonio Fernandes, who in 
‘ ^1514 made the earliest recorded alien intrn- 
.sion. 

The river was whispered to be part of the 
route that led inland to the fabled and non- 
existent gold Gelds of Ophir, drawing Cecil 
4ohn Rhodes’s pioneer column to establish 
the colony named for him, Rhodesia- 
. In Africa’s pre-colonial turmoil, waning 
tribes crossed the river’s span or were 
Mocked and contained by it The fanciful 
might sot it was at times a bloodstained 
stream. Tnesettlers brought the Maxim gun 
and the Martini-Henry rifle to subdue the 
--riverine-people. Less than -a -century later, 

. .they were dislodged by bazooka and assault 
rifle and political intrigue. - 
.It is a river, too, of adventurers and 
.rogues, hunters like Frederick Courtney So* 
-tpus, who roamed the great plains for un- 
. .touched herds, and of grandiose planners, 
like those from Britain who designed the 
great wall of Kariba Dam, forcing the river 
to back up on 175 miles of its length to form 
one of the world's biggest man-made lakes. 

. i The royal house ofthe Bazotse flourished 
upstream from here before the foreigners' 
.arrival, its life dictated by tbe rhythms of the 
.river. To this day- theLitunga, or paramount 
chief , will move his palace and court by royal 
barge once a year, transferring to higher 
• .ground when the stream floods and return- 
ing to the plain in the dry days. 

David Iivingstoae, the Scots-bom mis- 
*• sionary for whom a town on tbe Zambian 
bank is named, passed this way too, "discov- 
ering” far Britain the mighty cascades that 
he' called Victoria Falls. No creation of man 
. cm this river’s curling route, from Zambia 
and Angola to Zimbabwe and Mozambique, 
can match the splendor.of the sight of a mile 
of water plunging over a sheer, 350-foot 
(100-meter) precipice. There are those in 
. Africa who bridle at Livingstone's use of tbe 
'word "discovery” to describe his stumbling 
on tbe fahs, “Mori-oa-Tunya,” tbe Smoke 
That Thunders, but perhaps he can be for- 
- given: Every visit I have made over the last 
right years to this great river has been a 
voyage of discovery, and the latest was no 
exception. 


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A FEW years back, only the foolhardy 
or the brave would have undertaken 
the canoe trip from Kariba to Cfair- 
nndu. It’s not that there is white water — - 
there is, menafnlly, very little cf it on this 
'■stretch — it’s just (hat there was a war that 
matte the river unsafe. Since tbe end of the 
- conflict in 1980, and the independence of 
L -Zimbabwe, the former Rhodesia, the river 
has reverted to its. true self — acon tmnum . a 
thread of faistoty, raging s o m e t im es, as it 
does through the gorges below the Victoria 
Falls, well upstream from Kariba, then eas- 
ing — tranquil, contemplative, diffuse — as 
'..it caresses me ocean, 
j With peace, there came those who sought 
to expand Zimbabwe’s established safari pp- 
UHtions from the usual game paries, and 
canoe safaris came into bring. The trips can 
be' booked to take anything from three to 
~lqght . days, and 1. had time only for the 
.'shortest of the options — three days and two 
nights on the river, enough to induce a han- 
.. leering for permanent residence on my favor- 
ite stretch of water. 

_ We started, seven travelers and a guide, 
Sony Somore-Cox, eariyish one morning 
from Kariba, w alking with our packs (bear- 
ers are available for those who want them) 
down the scrubby, rough sides of Kariba 
Gorge, just below the massive wall of the 
Ham. A rhinoceros had been sighted there 
earlier, it is serious country. 

Only one of the travelers had canoed be- 
' -fore, so embarkation in the broad-hulled 18- 
foot canoes, IjtHgn amidships with gear, was 

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. 'Sense of achiewmait at not eapsiang^The 

d^for instance, if confronted by 
■musesi crocodiles, whiripools, each other s 
- sanoesL After a brief practice, the small flo- 
tilla headed out into the stream past outer 
vessels, dngoats on die Zambian bank that 
prompted a thought What did their naviga- 
jsmb, mat who bad no choice but to use 
canoes, think.' of those who had access to 


motors but still chose to spend leisure lime 
arched over uncooperative paddies? What, 
moreover, did they make of the party: a 
young couple from' Cape Town, a teacher, a 
reporter, a man and his son, and a man 
called John, who. when it was ah over, 
vouchsafed that he was S4 years old, quash- 
ing any inclination on the' part of younger 
diems to think in macho terms of their 
sojourn on the river? 

T HE first and virtually only white wa- 
ter came just after the start, a gentle 
rapid that rocked the bows and 
proved that nervousness makes navigators of 
novices. 

The river is smooth and sleek, encased in 
the steep walls of the gorge, settled on the 
Zambian side by small villages of thatch and 
mud, the homes of fishermen who. according 
to Somers-Cox, are overfishing the river. The 
Zimbabwean bank is free cf human habita- 
tion because it is mostly game reserve and 
hunting area. 

In one of his many letters sent back to 
England, Livingstone recorded that there 
were so many hippopotamuses on the Zam- 
bezi that members of his expedition, which 
ran from 1858 to 1863. were obliged to open 
fire on them. That is not the way things are 
done anymore, but there are still a lot of 
hippos m the river. Between Kariba and 
Chirundu, the population is estimated at 
between 800 and 1,500. These days, you 
don’t shoot them, you sort of talk to them. 

Somers-Cox has been paddling the Zam- 
.bezi for over three years and believes be 
knows the whereabouts of most herds. Tbe 
only ones you need worry about, he said, are 
“subdommant males,” that is, males forced 
out of a herd and roaming the river bed as 
loners. When there is a known herd in the 
area, Somers-Cox raps sharply on the gun- 
wales of the lead canoe .with a paddle. It's 


A few years back, only 
the foolhardy or the 
brave would have made 
the canoe trip from Ka- 
riba to Chirundu. 

kind of code language, apparently, for when 


i TANZANIA 


KanbeOam 


Livingstone 


fy Chtnintfu 1 
KBriba 

ZIMBABWE 


BOTSWANA 


MozambfQts 
i Charnel 


SOUTH AFRICA 


Th» Nm Vo>* TW 


baleful of visage, huge heads on huger bod- 
ies. 

When they see tbe canoes, the three- ton 
animate seem to accept their presence, pro- 
vided territorial courtesies are observed, and 
sink back under the water, while the safari 
skirts round them at as respectable a dis- 
tance as possible. Normally, the novices do 
not keep tight formation because there are 
times when canoes seem uncontrollable, 
willful thing s with their own directional in- 
clinations- When Somers-Cox raps on his 
canoe to talk to the hippos, the message is 
well understood too by the paddlers, who 
suddenly acquire a knack for tight formation 
— courage is imparted by proximity. 

The days on the river meander by in plea- 
surable, s mall things; tbe negotiation of hip- 
po herds becomes an accepted part of this 
new life; you swim in strong, clear rapids 
and try not to think too much about tbe huge 
crocodile that slipped into the stream just 
behind the canoe at Crocodile Point, a for- 
mation of rocks at a bend in the river: 
breakfasts are solid affairs of bacon, eggs, 
toast, jam and coffee; lunches lighter cele- 
brations of salads, drawn from the cooler 
boxes that are packed with ice and carried in 
the belly of the canoes between the paddlers. 
The travelers learn, too. how to line m> all 
four canoes side-by-side without paddling, 
in long, slow glides, linked together by an 
arm or leg from one canoe to Lhe next, . 


turning slowly in the current. Then, there are 
cool drinks or beers and conversation be- 
tween people who were strangers a few hours 
before but who are sharing a new experience 
that seems to impart tolerance and common 
purpose. 

The first day’s paddling and drifting leads 
to the beginnings of the flat bushlands at the 
mouth of the Kariba Gorge and. on a gravel- 
ly bank by the stream, the canoes tethered, 
we pitch camp. There is no need for tents, 
and there are no fixed camps — everything 
for the safari is carried in the canoes', right 
down to tbe trenching tool that provides the 
basis for sanitation. 

At the first site he chooses. Somers-Cox 
notices fresh hyena cracks, so he relocates 
the camp a hundred yards farther down- 
stream. During tbe night, sleeping under 
Africa's great bowl of stars, the sinister ani- 
mal whoops nearby. Somers-Cox acknowl- 
edges, under questioning, that he travels 
with a heavy pistol in his pack, but there are 
no hunting rifles or other big guns, and this, 
is real bush country; the hyena’s presence 
provides a ruminative moment. In the two 
years be and his colleagues have been run- 
ning the safaris, Somers-Cox assures us, not 
a single cheat has been Josl 

The evenings, as elsewhere in Africa, are 
brief and magnificent. On these safaris ev- 
eryone is expected to do a share of the 
chores. (Anglers, like this correspondent, 
seek exemption, citing the call of the fighting 
tiger fish as their only justification.) Sleeping j 
bags are laid out on narrow cois. tables are 
erected, cooler boxes with good precooked 
dinners (chicken and asparagus stew on the 
first night, boeuf Provencal on the second) 
are unloaded from canoes. Firewood is gath- 
ered and private supplies of liquor contribut- 
ed to the communal bar. 


A CROSS the river, the sun dips, silbou- 
etting a ridge of trees against the 
_L A. orange gasp of sunset, turning the 
stream gold. As night settles, the sound of 
dram beats from the opposite bank, half a 
mile away, mingles with the trumpeting of 
Irippopo [amuses preparing to come ashore 
for their nocturnal grazing, and fireflies pin- 
prick the gloaming. 

The final stretch, with the canoes linked 
together in a last glide downstream, is a sad 
one. Speedboats appear near Chirundu and 
(heir noise offends after the silence of the . 
river, a silence that has become part of the 
voyage, along with soaring fish-eegle, ' 
glimpses of game and the wrestling against a 
headwind after the calm intnquUljty of a 
pink dawn over the brittle ocher of lands 
scorched by drought. 

At Chirundu. the canoes are beached for 
the last time and loaded onto the trailer of a 
Land-Rover that will cany the party back to 
Kariba. On tbe longer canoe safaris, Chir- 
undu is simply a re-victualing halt, where the 
ice in the cooler boxes is changed and fresh 
supplies are taken aboard for a long haul to 
Kanyemba. on the Mozambique border. But 
for this party, it was time for farewells, and 
the storing of private memories. B 

* 1985 The ,V«w York Times 










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Thinking Small on Nob Hill 


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■*'**>.■«* .. 

Staying close to a bank of the Zambezi. 






by Marian Burros 

S AN FRANCISCO — Vera Kulik is 
holding the bathroom glasses up to 
the light to check for water spots. 
She has already tugged on the bot- 
tom of the bedspread because it was not even 
and noted that a spot on the ebair would 
have to be shampooed. She has also straight- 
ened the bath mat, run her fingers under and 
over the bathroom counter where she discov- 
ered a speck or two of dust, and found 
streaks on the bathroom's marble walls. 

Mis. Kulik, a housekeeping inspector at 
the Stanford Court Hotel on Nob Hill in San 
Francisco, is conducting one of her daily 
white-glove inspections, not much different 
from those dreaded by generations of army 
recruits. ‘Tt is not 100 percent," she says of 
the room. “It’s nor 95 percent.” She will have 
a talk with the maid. 

It is such fine attention to detail that keeps 
this luxury hotel, built on the site of the old 
Ldand Stanford mansion, looking as good 
as it did when it opened 12 years ago. As a 
guest on almost a dozen occasions, I have 
always wondered bow the hold keeps up its 
standards. Why, for example, is the wood 
paneling in the elevators almost as blemish- 
free today as when it was brand new? 

James A N assikas, managing partner and 
president of the Stanford Court, explains 
that be keeps eight spare panels behind tbe 
scenes and “as soon as someone scribbles on 
it. I have an engineer bring a fresh one up 
immediately.'’ 

But it isn’t just the number of people who 
staff the hotel; with a total of 402 rooms and 
suites and 390 people on the payroll, the 
ratio of staff to guests is about 1-to-l — high 
by American standards, average by Europe- 
an. It's the attitude, one that emanates from 
the from office. Not only is Nassikas usually 
on the scene, he spends his waking hours 
worrying "I wake up scared every sinde 
morning” he said recently, “and I would 
think that at the more independent hotels 
where the owner is on the premises, he would 
have tbe same frame of mind, the same 
neuroses I suffer.” 

Perhaps, but the results are not necessarily 
the same. Friendliness and eagerness to ac- 


commodate do not come automatically. 
“You don’t know when arrogance will set 
in,” Nassikas admitted, “and once it sets in 


it's better to close the place down for a year” 
Bui at the Stanford Coun a guest is a guest 
whether the name is Prince Albert of Mona- 
co or Jane Smith. The hotel is large enough 
so ihat guests have complete privacy and 
small enough so that the treatment seems 
personal. 

Conversations with employees during a 
behind-the-scenes tour provided similar im- 
pressions. Their offices and corridors are as 
clean as those out front and are decorated 
with attractive art works. The room where 
the two telephone operators work might al- 
most be described as cozy: it contains a 
couch for the night operators and a televi- 
sion set for slow periods. Charlotte Ander- 
son. a daytime operator, regards the people 
staying in the hotel as a family. “We are 
allowed to take the time to be considerate to 
the guests," she said. “We hardly ever feel 
pressed.” 

To Nassikas the ideal employee is one 
“who smiles over the phone.” But he ac- 
knowledged that “people can turn sour,” 
adding, “I get a little depressed sometimes." 

The employees take pride in working at 
the hotel. “Size has a lot to do with it,” said 
Patricia Kelley, the executive housekeeper. 
“We have the same rules and regulations as 
big hotels, but the way they are put across is 
different. There are only 27 maids here when 
the house is full instead of 82 in a large hotel 
where I used to work, and there you had to 
post the rules instead of talking to people 
about them. 

“It’s the same difference,” she added, “be- 
tween a large city and a small town.” 

Nassikas believes small is better. When he 
was a student at the Ecole Hotelifere de la 
Soci£t£ Suisse des Hoteliers, the famous ho- 
tel school in Lausanne, Switzerland, he 
dreamed of having “a little inn in Lhe moun- 
tains of New Ham pshire.” his home state. 
But after working for the Hotel Corporation 
of America for 12 years, he met Edgar Stern, 
a financier and philanthropist from Louisi- 
ana who turned Nassikas' dream into a San 
Francisco luxury hotel. “I would like to have 
bad an even smaller hotel,” Nassikas said, 
“but I think I know how to behave small: the 


scale of the building, the scale of the rooms, 
the scale of the furniture, a minimum of 
signs and very little convention business. I 
haven't spent 10 cents to advertise in the 
papers to outsiders about the restaurant. Tbe 
hotel is for the guests, not outsiders.” 
“Unending critical self-analysis” is Nassi- 
kas' stock in trade. Because so many people 
have mentioned terry cloth robes, he is about 
to order them for each guest. “Those robes 
are about $90 each,” he said. “Thai’s a 
$200,000 investment." Because twin beds arc 
less popular than they were, the hotel is 
gradually chang in g to king- and queen-size 
beds. Also being changed are the windows, 
which cannot be opened. According to the 
chief engineer, John TeUinghuisen, the man 
who contracted for the windows came from 
New Orleans, “and the last thing you want to 
do in New Orleans is open the windows 
because of the heal. But our guests want to 
open the windows and bear the cable cars.” 

A MONC hotels, the Stanford Court is 
/\ noted for its dining room, Fournou’s 
f~\ Ovens. Its wine cellar contains 30,000 
bottles; several fine wines and champ a gn e, 
such as Iron Horse Vineyards chardoiinay 
and Domaine Chandon, are served by tbe 
glaw The restaurant, built around working 
ovens of Portuguese tile and made bright by 
conservatory-style windows that overlook 
the street, is Mediterranean in feeling and 
style. 

There are minor lapses. The table for our 
room-service dinner was still in our room 
four hours after we had finished tbe meaL 
Since no one had called to see if it could be 
removed, we had to put it outside our door. 

According toNassikas, tbe restaurant part 
of the business is the most difficult “Every 
day you have to start all over again,” he 
explained. “With two restaurants, banquets 
and the staff, the kitchen prepares 1,500 to 
1,600 meals a day.” 

To make a profit a hotel's occupancy rate 
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pursuit of excellence, profits just roll in.” 
"Frankly,” he said of the Stanford Court, 
“the hotel makes a large profit” ■ 

C 1985 The New York Times 


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Now in the 1984 up-dated edition, 200 pages 
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Indispensable for corporate, government and 
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ACCOR - AEROSPATIALE - AIR FRANCE - 
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AMEX Him P.12 Eamlngs resorts P.14 
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NYSE ortces P. t Goto markets P.11 
NYSE MgM/lom P.19 Interest rates P.ll 
Canadian stocks P.16 Martel summon P, 5 
Ontmce rates P.ll Options P.u 

CB HBtwEw m P.14 OTC stock P.14 
DMiMi P.14 . Other markets P.U 

FRIDAY, JANUARY XI, 1985 


licralbca^&ribunc 

BUSINESS/FINANCE 


TECHNOLOGY 


New Device Permits Callers 

To Talk’ With Deal Persons 


•-• \ :•**■* 


Instead of hearing his 
caller, the hearing- 
impaired person sees 
the caller’s words. 


By ERIC BERG 

New York Times Service 

N EW YORK — In what could be an important develop- 
ment for the nation's 2 minion deal people and 14 
million others who are hard of hearing, a scientist at 
General Electric Co. has invented a device that enables 
someone with hearing problems to use the telephone. 

The device cannot teach the people to speak and, unlike an 
■ artiffcaal ear recently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug 
Administreition, it does not try to give a handicapped person a 
sense of hearing. 

What the me c h a nis m does, rather, is to convert tones generated 

by a Touch-Tone telephone to 

tetters that a hearing-unpaired , 
person can see. Instead of hearing his 

If someone wants to “talk”’ .. . , . D 

1 by telephone with a hearing- CHIler, Hie bearing" 

impaired person who owns the hrmahwl npna/in «*** 
new device, the caller sends Hupairea person sees 

bis message by pressing his the cafler’s words. 

. push-button phone s keys. 

Thus the keypad is used like a ” 

typewriter keyboard. Cta the receiving end, the varying tones are 
translated electronically into characters that flow across the 
device’s liquid-crystal display screen. Instead of hearing his 
caller, the hearing-unpaired person sees the caller's words as if on 
ticker tape. 

The significant idea is that the world is getting full of Touch- 
Tone phones,” said Edwin C. Underkoffler, the scientist who 
invented the device to help a coQeague communicate with his deaf 
son. “This enables people who might otherwise be unable to 
telephone the deaf or hearing-impmred to do so." 

For more than two decades, deaf people and others with severe 
bearing ailmen ts have been able to pfwmmimirate over telephone 
lines. In general, however, there have been drawbacks to the 
available methods. 

They have relied mainly on a Teletype system called Telephone 
Devices for the Deaf. To make a call, someone with such a device 
would type out a message, which would go via phone line to 
another person’s Teletype. 

B UT this requires both the caller and die individual being 
called to own a Teletype, which is a bulky and often costly 
machine. And in the few large dries with so-called relay 
stations — centers where a volunteer sitting at a Teletype relays a 
caller's message to a handicapped person's machine — users have 
complained that intimate conversations through a go-between 
are difficult 

The new, pocket-size device is aimed at overcoming such 
problems. General Electric has licensed the device for manufac- 
ture to Palmetto Technologies Inc, a small engineering concern 
in Duncan, South Carolina, near Greenville. Stephen L Fowler, 
the founder of Palmetto Technologies, says that aD a caller needs 
to use the system is a Touch-Tone phone. The system, called the 
Echo 2,000, costs $250. 

“The Teletype method demands that a person with no handi- 
cap spend a consderable sum of money to talk with a person who 
is deaf,” said Mr. Fowler, an electrical engineer whose mother is 
deaf. “Thafs unreasonable. This device puts the responsibility on 
the deaf person to overcome Ms handicap.” 

The technology is much like (hat used by banks and brokerage 
linns to let customers get account information with push-button 
phones. In dial case also, tones are changed into signals a 
computer can understand. 

Many banking applications pose a problem for hearing-im- 
paired- -people, however, because replies to their Touch-Tone 
queries are usually audible (in the form of a computer-generated 
synthesized voice) rather than visual. A U.S. Veterans Adminis- 
tration office in California is exploring ways to use the new device 
to help the hard of hearing. Banks’ computers, for example, might 
(Continued on Page 13. CoL I) 


Currency Rates 


Late interban k rales on Jan. 10 , exdudmg fees. 

OFfirid fixing* for Am s f wdu m, Brussels. Fran kfo rt, Mon, Peris. New York rate a! 
4 P.M. 


London A) 
Milan 

MWYorfcCO 

Parti 

Tokyo 

zona 

1 ECU 

I SDR \ 


* P * r 
Eaahr. C ° rTW ' USS 

UtH AmtraBmS 17291 
00151 Auirtaa itftntos ZU6 
amss BtiManfla. franc *M 0 
U572 CanOnt U®7 
amt Dartfc krone 11» 
0.1519 Ftnabfcmark 05825 
asm OnakotractaH OMO 
01282 NomKomS 71985 


Dollar Values 

* rmTTwmr* P "’ 

Eqofr. US S 

asm irao t \sm 

04015 rtroail fftekfl 658.95 

12745 KoweJMflOW 03BSJ 

IL4M1 Motor, riogen mms 

MOM Nono.kraM 918 

CLA524 PMLimso W.M2 

0409 Portascwto TO40 

02792 Scarf rtvaf 1SHS 


5 JF. Yen 

13474*14072* 
OB 24468 ’ 
119.16* 1442* 
24873 2B747 
73X08 7435 

24405 25X35 
3451 1405 • 

9636 

TJM2 * 

14673 179.144 
05846 248J67 


* 

B»t*. ass 

04548 StoBOWre* 2.199 
04755 S. African mod 3103 
00912 5. Karan uni 83050 
04057 SnaB.paxcfti 17475 
0.1105 SaaLknH 945 
04254 TatooaS 37J8 
64067 UKriDrtt 73375 
02773 UAE-cUrkon 34737 


0Starttoa:U4S5HMi£ 

(ol ComnareMI franc IM Amounts needed to bov one Bound Id Amounts naedeo to twv one doiiar (■} 
Unite Of HO U)U«J 5 (41480 tV) UnBs of 14000 
NQjaatqDtdediKA.: nut avotabfe- 

Sources: BandayoBank (Anu i erdom); Banana du Benelux (Brussels}; Banco Cammarctam 
UaUano (MUaa); Banaue National* de Parti (Ports); IMF (SDR); Barque Arab* el tntema- 
Hanate trtmeeBsmment (Ulnar, rtycrL tBrtmah Other data from Reuters andAP. 


Interest Rates 


Eurocurrency Deposits 


Jan. 10 


■ DoMT - D-Mark Franc sterRra Franc ECU SDR 
1 M. B -m 5W-5H 410-4* FK-9M W "to- 10 M. Iln - 910 7M-710 

2M. Bto • OU 5 ¥j ■ y* 4S» - 4V. 9W-10 10*r 1090 7M. - «* 710 ■ 790 

3M. SVi -810 SH. -5 VO 480-4M. 9 9W ■ 1090 1M0 ■ 1190 9V. -910 TV. - 0 

MIL BW.-BK 5H - « 484 - 490 IffMr ■ HB* 1140- lilt Mfc - 91V SMi - SM 

*Y. Mb - 940 SM.-5H 490-4 ^ 10W- 10M 1140- 1190 **. -«6 8Vi - 8V. 
Hates applicable to Interba nk deposits oft I million minimum Car equivalent L 
^Sources: Maroon Guaranty [dodar, DM. SF. Pound, FF); Uovd* Bank (ECU); embank 

'tsom. 


Asian Dollar Rates 

: lm 2««w- 

SiO -910 810 -810 

Source: Re u ters. 


Key Money Rates 


Jan. 10 


tMsdoni Rata 
. Fodarni Funds 
Prtew Roto 
Srakiriflan Rato. 

Comm. Pnptr. 30-179 days 
3-mooHi' Treasury BUM 
44nom> Treasury BUIs 
CDY 3BSt days 
CM 0M9 dove 


Lombert Rato . 
OwmioW Rato . 
One Moofit IntottMdk 
tanonm inttrtmk 
frown lotorMnk . 

France 

Intorve ate * Rate 
Coll Money 
QnMnantti mrauank 
J«mi latortwnk 
frmowi intorbcnk 


m 890 

imt t«» 

94 tf 6 fl 4 - 1 M 
8 80 S 

• 772 7£3 

772 743 

772 777 

744 7 JO 


MO MO 
MO MS 
540 180 

540 180 

jJO £40 


10» Mft 
10ft mt 
10ft Wft 
ID 7/16 10 7/16 
10 1/16 IQ 1/M 


Bank Bom Roto 
Call Money 
91-dav Treasury BUI 
J-monfft interbank 


□tecaunt Roto 
Coil Money 
60 -dov (Rtortxmk 


9ft Wi 

7 7 

9 7/16 9 7/16 
ID 3/16 ID 1/16 


5 5 

6ft 610 
4*4 6U 


Gold Prices 


Smtes; Reuters. Camnerxtxmx, CeMtt Lv- 
***** i (jaytts Bank, Bank at Tokyo 


AM. PM. OrtK 
Hana Kona 3D445 30175 + MO 

Lnnium 3D4J0 — + £65 

30S7B 30U7 +433 

304J0 30125 + 175 

Lonoof, 30440 30340 +U0 

Now York - 

Official H*kws tor London, Pori* and Uwam- 
Baura. «»«»«» and^ clnitaa or Ices tor Hana tjwo 
and 2vriDv »*»• York Comes current contract. 
All or tad In UM nor ounce. 

Source: Routers- 


Pretax Up 

At British 

Telecom 

Its New Taxes 
Keep Net Lower 

By Bob Hageny 

international Hernia Tnbune 

LONDON — British Telecom- 
munications PLC, helped by 
tighter cost controls ana strong 
growth in telephone usage, report- 
ed Thursday a 48-percent increase 
in pretax profit for the half year 
ended Sept 30. 

Separately, Thorn EMI PLC re- 
corded a steep deeftne in earnings 
for (he same period. 

British Telecom’s results were 
the first since the government sold 
502 percent of the company for 
£3.92 billion ($4.4 billion) last No- 
vember in the biggest public share 
offering ever. 

Since then, BTs share price has 
surged 54 percent, prompting 
charges that the government sold 
the shares too cheaply. One union 
leader described the sale as “the 
sting of the century." 

The telephone company, still 
49-S-percent owned by the govern- 
ment, said pretax profit in the half 
totaled £684 milli on on revenue of 
£3.68 billion, up II percent. 

After provisions for deferred 
taxation, net profit was £428 mil- 
lion. down from £462 million in the 
year-earlier period, when the cor- 
poration bad no tax liability. 

For the second quarter, pretax 
profit rose 49 percent from a year 
earlier to £365 million on revenue 
of £1.87 bQlion. a rise of 10 percent. 
Net profit came to £224 milli on, 
down from £245 million. 

A large part of the gain in pretax 
profits reflects reduced deprecia- 
tion, pension and interest costs. 

Stripped of these distortions, re- 
lating to the transfer of the compa- 
ny to private ownership. BTs pre- 
tax profits showed underlying 
growth of 27 percent in the half and 
23 percent in (he quarter, the com- 
pany said. 

The results were at the high end 
of the expected range, and BT 
shares rose another 5.5 pence to 
close at 120.5 pence each on a 
“partly paid” basis. Buyers from 
the government had to initially put 
(Continued on Page 15, CoL 5) 


StkMngtoBask»Cu8hioinA.G.Edwanto 

Leading fuH-Ctw nttkxiil brakortgsa ranked by RoraBntafla Of ravtlUM ttortraS 
from equity oornnfeakina bifiratnkia months oil BB4. 


A.Q, Eflwarda 

PrudonWaKtoche 
Paine Webber 
E.F, Hutton 
Merrill Lynch 


CttnreMoM' Tatuum 
Short al *84 Capital 

Hofuta (inattnra) 

S2w*% S 174.3 

35.7% 403.4 


21.0% 2,023.7 


Natkeom ChtOQtltl 
ttnrtbi'M Not tent 
gwgtora) FMH8M 

S1B.1 -33.1% 

(104.8) — 

3.8 -08.7% 

28.4 -72-1% 

65.8 -75JJ% 


Soma (Gonrataatan cftti£ Upper AmiyOool Sanrfeat 


Benjamin F. Edwards 3d 


Midwestern Brokerage Firm Thrives 
Far From the Wall Street Crowd 


By Steven Greenhouse 

New York Tunes Service 

ST. LOUIS, Missouri — A.G. Edwards & Sons, 
the biggest U.S. brokerage bouse based outside 
New York Gty, has managed to do quite well far 
from the Wall Street crowd — and it believes its 
distance from that canyon is one of the main 
reasons. 

Benjamin F. Edwards 3d. the company’s often 
irreverent 53-year-old chairman and chief estecu- 
. bve, said that by bring so removed. A.G. Edwards 
bad not fell the pressure to follow the herd. In that 
way his brokerage, the nation's seventh largest 
based on number of brokers, has avoided many of 
the costly fads that others have followed in recent 
years. 

"Bring here in St. Louis, we have fewer tempta- 
tions to keep up with the Joneses,” said Mr. Ed- 
wards, whose great-grandfather. General Albert 
'G. Edwards, founded the firm in 1 887. **We don't 
have people across the street telling os, ‘Gee, 
you're dumb for not cleaning up on this thing when 
everyone else is.' ** 

The brokerage's success is often attributed to 
good internal controls and keeping change to a 
minimum But some analysts say that Edwards has 
prospered also because of the foresight of its man- 
agement in steering an independent course. 

Thus, when other securities firms derided to 
become financial supermarkets, selling everything 
from real estate to pork belly futures. Edwards, 
with more than 2,000 brokers and 250 offices in 43 
states, chugged along as a low-profile brokerage 
specializing w the retail stock trade. 

In addition, when the other big firms began 
adding hundreds of employees to produce all sorts 
of esoteric financial products, such as unit trusts 
and annuities. Edwards took the low-cost road. It 


decided not to add staff for such financial wares, 
and indeed has produced few of them. 

“They don’t like (o build up big staffs and have 
high overbeads." said Perrin H. Long Jr., an ana- 
lyst with the Upper Analytical Securities Corp. As 
a result, Mr. Long said, “of the pnbHdy traded 
firms, Edwards bas consistently been die most 
profitable" on a profit margin basis. 

Certainly the stock market's year-long doldrums 
have hurt Edwards’s performance. But low over- 
head has enabled the firm to stay in the black while 
many of its competitors have lost money. 

For example, Priidendal-Bacbe Securities lost 
S 104.8 million in the most remit nine months, 
ending SepL 30, and Dean Witter Reynolds lost 
$28.8 milli on in that period. But A.G. Edwards 
Inc_ the firm's holding company, reported net 
earnings of S18.1 million on revenues of $221.2 
milli on in the nine months ending Nov. 30. 

Mr. Edwards, however, -said the results woe 
nothing to be proud of because they were down 
from net earnings of $27 million on revenues of 
5249 million in the comparable period in 1983. 

"Our general equity business is off 30 percent 
from last year, arid that is a very profitable busi- 
ness for us," he said. 

Analysts see little reason, however, for Mr. Ed- 
wards to be modest. 

“In an environment that is as bad as you can 
imagine for a retail firm, they’re continuing to 
show profitability," said Rodney S. Schwartz, an 
analyst with Paine Webber Inc. 

“They’re doing much belter than most,” Mr. 
Schwartz added. “Indeed, they may be one of the 
best-managed companies in the country.'’ 

Even so. Mr. Schwartz sees a daunting challenge 
for a retail-oriented brokerage like Edwards. That 
(Continued on Page 13, CoL 1) 


Texaco Reduces Price 
For Most U.S. Crude Oil 


United Press Imemaaonal 

NEW YORK — Texaco Inc_ a 
partner in the Arabian-American 
Oil Co. that refines the bulk of 
Saudi Arabia’s oiL on Thursday cut 
the price it will pay for the most 
important U.S. crude. 

Texaco’s action was seen as a 
blow to the Organization of Petro- 
leum Exporting Countries's cam- 
paign to prevent its oil prices from 
collapsing. 

Texaco, which low ered its posted 
price for West Texas intermediate 
by $1 to S28 a barrel, blamed the 
recent erosion in U.S. oil prices on 
high petroleum-product imports. 

Analysts said the move by Tex- 
aco, the first Aramco partner to 
drop to the $28 level, would inten- 
sify pressure on OPEC to reduce its 
$29-a-band base price for Saudi 
Arabian light crude. 

Wesi Texas intermediate should 
sell for SI more than OPECs 
benchmark oil, which is overpriced 
in face of weak world demand and 
surplus supplies. 

The other Aramco partners — 
Exxon Corp -1 Mobil Corp., and 
Chevron Corp. — still are paying 
the prevailing S28.50 to S29 a bar- 
rel for West Texas intermediate. 
But five other large oil companies 
have reduced their posted prices in 
the past three weeks. 

Some analysis had expected the 
Aramco partners to bold the line on 


West Texas intermediate until after 
OPEC held another meeting on 
pricing later this month. 

In Houston, Texaco said it also 
lowered its buying price for West 
Texas sour — the nation's major 
heavy crude — by SI to S28 a 
barrel. Texaco cut its posted prices 
for six other domestic crudes by 
between 15 cents and SI a barrel, 
effective Jan. II. 

■ Iran Raises Price of Crude 

A senior Ir anian Oil Ministry 
official said Thursday that Iran had 
raised official prices for its light 
and heavy crudes and would give 
no more discounts. Reuters report- 
ed from Tehran. 

He confirmed reports from Eu- , 
rope that Iran had increased offi- 
cial prices for its light crude by 
$1.11 a barrel to S29.il and heavy i 
crude by 45 cents to S27J5. j 

■ Rumors on Nigeria 

Rumors that Nigeria had formal- 
ly severed its links” with OPEC de- 
nied by the National Nigerian Pe- 
troleum Corp. in Lagos, 
interrupted strong price increases 
on the spot oQ market Thursday, 
Reuters reported from Rotterdam. 
European spot prices had risen in 
the morning u> S26.65 a barrel for 
North Sea Brent loading next 
month, 40 cents up from Wednes- 
day. 




i/afcjl-au 




m 


la r* >i 


N.Y. Stocks Soar; 
M-l Falls, Page 6 

Page 11 


W. German GNP 
Rose 2.6% in 
1984, Bonn Says 


Reuters 

WIESBADEN. West Germany 
— West Germany’s adjusted gross 
national product rose 2.6 percent in 
1984 after a gain of 13 percent in 


lion in 1983. In current prices, 198)1 
GNP was up 4.6 percent, from 

1.671.6 billion marks in 1983 tp 

1.747.7 billion last year. 1 

The West German statistics of- 


I lPty* cUlGl it X/Uii l*. tMM. — — — — 1 . 

1983, the Federal Statistics Office- fice also confirmed that the cost <H 


said Thursday. living in 1984 rose an average of 2>t 

The office said growth speeded penult; it had gone up 3 J percent 
up over the year. GNP rose a sea- m , • 

sonalfy adjusted I percent in the 111 < ^tSi to 

fust half of 1984 overthe previous consumption rose 0-8 percent to 
six months, but in the second half 1984 «?npanxl to a g® <rf U 
of 1984 h grew by 2 percent over 3 

the First half of the yearT percent m 1 982. Investment m cap- 

' ■ ital goods rose 1.0 percent last yea - , 

Wralrer growth m the nret sn comp ^ loan i ncr easeof6.1p«a-- 
months of 1984 was partly due to hi 1983 and a decrease of 5,7 
Joss of output through strikes m the linm2 . . 

printing and metal industries. r ■ 

GNP measures the total value of _ — ■ 


a nation’s goods and services, in- 
cluding income from foreign in- 
vestments. 

Economic growth was belped by 
foreign demand, with experts rising 
a real 7.4 percent, the statistics of- 
fice said. In comparison, domestic 
demand rose only 1.9 percent. 

Growth was mainly due to high- 
er productivity, since there were 03 
percent fewer workers. Average un- 
employment was 04 percent high- 
er, with 221 million unemployed. 

An economist with the federal 
statistics office, Frank Dorow, said 
that the West German economy 
bad picked up markedly in the sec- 
ond half of 1984, forming a good 
starting point for economic growth 
in 1985. 

But Mr. Dorow said there was 
some difficulty assessing the under- 
lying strength of growth in the sec- 
ondhalf of 1984 because the econo- 
my is still catching up after tbe 
May and June strikes. 

West German GNP, adjusted for 
price inflation, had declined by 1.1 
percent in 1982. The increase in 
1984 was the strongest since 1979, 
when a gain of 4.0 percent was 
registered, the statistics office said. 

The 2.6-percenl rise in economic 
growth in 1984 is broadly in line 
with autumn forecasts made by 
Germany’s nugor economic insti- 
tutes and the government's Council 
of Economic Advisors. 

In 1984, real GNP, in constant 
1976 prices, rose to 13983 billion 
Deutsche marks from 1.265.1 bil- 


Pound Plunges j 
To New Lotos j 

On Oil Rumor j 

Untied Press International \ 

NEW YORK — The Britishj 
pound hit new lows Thursday, 1 
apparently because of imcon-i 
firmed rumors that Nigeria' 
would pull out of OPEC. The, 
dollar was little changed. J 

The British pound plunged' 
against the dollar and outer ma-| 
jor currencies on rumors — Ian 
er denied — that Nigeria would! 
pull out of the Organization for) 
Petroleum Exporting Coun-j 
tries, traders said. j 

In London the pound closed; 
at a new low of S1.1335, down 
from SI. 142 on Wednesday. Inj 
New York it was S1.1320, down 
from SI. 144, and also a low. 1 
In New York, the dollaij 
dosed at 3.145 Deutsche marks,' 
up from 3.144 Wednesday; alj 
9.625 French francs, down from 
9.6375, and at 2.6405 Swiss 
francs, up from 2.6355. | 

Dollar rates in Europe, conn 
pared with Wednesday doses] 
included: 3.152 DM, down 
from 3.1672; 9.6565 French 
francs, down from 9.6975; anq 
16473 Swiss francs, up froiq 
16455. ' 




mma 














U.S. to Investigate Charges 
Of Steel Dumping , Subsidies 


For the man with exceptional goals, 
a new dimension in banking services. 


United Prat huemauonal 

WASHINGTON — The U 3. 
Commerce Department has agreed 
to investigate whether steel imports 
from eight nations are being sold in 
the United States at less than fair 
value or are subsidized by their 
governments. 

Tbe department said Wednesday 
that it wul look into charges that 
steel products from Austria, 
Chechoslovakia, East Germany, 
Hungary, Poland, Romania and 
Venezuela have been dumped — 
sold at less than fair value — and 
that steel from Austria, Venezuela 
and Sweden has been subsidized by 
those governments. 

The allegations were made by 
U.S. Steel Corp. in petitions Tiled 
with the government Dec. 19. That 
was two days after the Reagan ad- 
ministration announced it had 
reached agreements with seven oth- 
er countries— Japan. South Korea, 
Brazil, Mexico. Spain, Australia 
and South Africa — to voluntarily 
limit their steel exports to the Unit- 
ed States. 

That, along with a similar previ- 
ous agreement with the European 
Community, brought 75 percent of 


U.S. sied imports under restraint 
agreements. Similar industry peti- 
tions against those countries were 
withdrawn when the agreements 
were reached. 

If the Commerce Department 
and the U.S. International Trade 
Commission rule against the eight 
countries listed, punitive duties 
would be imposed againsL their 
steel products. Or. as has happened 
before, the government could uy to 
negotiate agreements. 

■ EC Approves Pact 

The 10 members of the European 
Community on Wednesday For- 
mally approved an agreement cov- 
ering exports of sted pipes and 
tubes to the United Stales, a 
spokesman quoted by The Associ- 
ated Press said in Brussels. 

Under the agreement, agreed to 
in principle last week, the Europe- 
an trade bloc will limit iis exports 
of pipes and tubes to 7.6 percent of 
the VS. market this year and nexL 
The EC had agreed in 1982 to I 
limit its exports to 5.9 percent of 
the U.S. market, but its share had 
swelled to 14 percent, mainly be- 
cause of the rising dollar. 


W ’bat makes Trade Develop- 
ment Bank exceptional ? 
To start with, there is our 
policy’ of concentrating on 
things we do unusually well. 
For example, trade ana export 
financing, foreign exchange 
and banknotes, money market 
transactions and precious 
metals. 

Equally important, we are 
now even better placed to 
serve your needs, wherever 
you do business. Reason; 

We have recently joined 
American Express International 


Banking Corporation, with its 
89 offices in 39 countries, to 
bring you a whole new dimen- 
sion in banking services. 

While we move fast in 
serving our clients, we’re dis- 
tinctly traditionalist in our 
basic policies. At the heart of 
our business is the maintenance 
of a strong and diversified 
deposit base. Our portfolio of 
assets is also well -diversified, 
and it is a point of principle 
with us to Keep a conservative 
ratio of capital to deposits and 
a high degree of liquidity - 


sensible strategies in these un- 
certain times. 

If TDB sounds like the 
sort of bank you would 
entrust with your business, 
get in touch with us. 

TDB banks in Geneva. London, 
Paris, Luxembourg, Chiasso, Monte 
Carlo , Nassau, Zurich. 

TDB is a member of American 
Express Company which has 
assets of US$ 62.8 billion and 
shareholders' equity of 
US$ 44 billion. 



Trade Development Ban k 


Shown at left, the head office 
of Trade Development Bank. Geneva. 


An American Express Company 





INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 11, 1985 


Thursday^ 

AMEX 


12 Month 
Utah Low Stack 


5ft 

S FrlesEn 



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14 14 lift 

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16ft + ft 
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2546+94 
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22ft + ft 
144,— ft 
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14ft + 94 
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9 + ft 

944,+ ft 
1544+ ft 
644+ ft 
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1444 
2144 

7ft— ft 
104k— ft 
20ft + ft 
3944— ft 
72 +1 

8ft— ft 
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10ft 

lift + ft 
1144+ 44 
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4 — ft 
544 
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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 11, 1985 


Page 13- 




BUSINESS ROUNDUP 


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U.S. Divides 
Contract for 
Jet Engines 

By Wayne Biddle 

- . New York Times Service 

WASHINGTON - The U.S. 
Air Force has announced (hat the 
General Electric Ca would coniin- 
Djfi to produce (be majority of its 
jet-aircraft engines in 1986. 

But in a move that marked a 
significant recovery for GE’s main 
competitor, the airforce decided to 
award 46 percent of next year's 
engine-production work to tbe 
Pratt & Whitney division of the 
United Technologies Corp. 

A year ago. the Pentagon ended 
what had become known as the 
_ “Great Engine War" by awarding 
OE 75 percent of the engine pro- 
duction for F-15 and F-16 war- 
planes in 1985.' Pratt & Whitney, 
which had dominated tbe industry 
for decades, received only 25 per- 

penHif-the work. 

' The split award in favor of GE, 
announced Wednesday, was widely 
seen as an attempt to invigorate 
competition and hold down costs. 
The air force saw potential savings 
of S3 billion over the engine's life 
cycle of about 20 years. 

According to air force and indus- 
try officials, Pratt was able to re- 
gain some of the ground it lost to 
GE by catting costs and improving 
the reliability of its engines. 

• “We are looking at it as a recov- 
ery.” said Jim Linse, a Pratt 
spokesman. “After last year’s deci- 
sion, we revised our proposal" for 
the 1986 engine contract The revi- 
sion was beueved to be based pri- 
marily on a. less costly warranty. 

A study conducted by the Gener- 
al Accounting Office of last year's 
G E-Pratt competition concluded 
that GE bad offered a significantly 
more favorable warranty on its en- 
gines. The technical capabilities of 
{he two were judged to be equaL 
At GE, Brian Brimeiow, manag- 
er of the F-110 program, said tbe 
company was “delighted” to lave 
won the larger share of the 1986 
production. 

’ An air force spokesman said 
Wednesday that of 343 engines io 
be built in 1986, GE would produce 
184 and Pratt would make 159. 

* AH of the GE engines, known as 
The F-110, would be placed in F-16 
Falcon aircraft. Of the Pratt F100- 
220 engines, 45 would go to F-16’s 
and 114 to F-15 Eagles. 

; The air fence also announced 
that future models of the F-T5 
would be designed to accept the 
GE engine as well as the Pratt pow- 
er plant, “providing additional 
fteiubiGty in future decisions.” 
Between 1985 and 1990, the air 
force spokesman said, tbe service 
expects to acquire U995 engines for 
the finhtere at an estimated cdsrdf 
$8 button. Production in 1986 is 
valued at about S13 billion /or en- 
gines and related spare parts. 


Sanyo to Report 
Gains in Sales, 
Profits for 1984 

Reuters 

OSAKA. Japan — Sanyo 
Electric Co. wfil report Jan. 28 
record profit of 55.60 billion 
yen ($218 mfllion) for the year 
ended Nov. 30, a 30-percem in- 
crease from 42.79 billion yen in 
1982-83, a company spokesman 
said Thursday. 

He said sales in 1983-84 were 
991.70 billion yen, a 21 -percent 
increase from 819.77 billion a 
year ago. 

He said the increase was due 
to greatex-ihan -expected sales 
of video tape recorders and of- 
fice automation equipment, 
mainly in the United States, 
and reduced inventory, the 
spokesman said. Exports to the 
United States rose 54 percent 
from a year earlier, tout! ex- 
ports rose 29 percent, he said. 

A spokesman also said 
Thursday that Sanyo had re- 
ceived a 7.8 billion-yen order 
from China National Technical 
Import Corp. for color televi- 
sion manufacturing plants and 
parts, for delivery io China in 
the fourth quarter of 1985. 


FCC Says Graphics Scanning 
Hid Control of Companies 


By Reginald Smart 

New York Tima Service 

Washington — a federal 

administrative law judge has de- 
nied petitions by four companies 
for nearly 700 new one-way 
systems because he said they 
been acting as fronts for the na- 
tion's largest radio-paging compa- 
ny. the Graphic Scanning Corp., 
which had fifed competing applica- 
tions. 

Michael Deuel Sullivan, chief of 
the mobile-services division of the 
Federal Communications Commis- 
sion, said Wednesday that Graphic 
Scanning had engaged in “misrep- 
resentation and lack of candor” in 
its initial applications and in re- 
sponses io subsequent questions 
raised about it and the four other 
companies. 

“Probably every license Graphic 
Scanning and its subsidiaries hold 
is at risk because of this action," 
Mr. Sullivan said. He noted that 
the company has license applica- 
tions pending in cellular-telephone 
services, date-transmission services 
and pay- television systems. 

At Graphic Scanning’s head- 
quarters in Teaneck. New Jersey. 
Edward R. Bush, a vice president. 


said the company planned to ap- 
peal the derision to the full com- 
mission. 

“We believe that when this deci- 
sion is reviewed by the full commis- 
sion the company will be vindicat- 
ed,” he said. 

Graphic Scanning controls 
about 200,000 paging systems 
through its subsidiaries. It also pro- 
cesses and transmits record and 
data communications for many 
banks through its subsidiary, 
Graphnel, operates pay-television 
systems and is involved in petitions 
pending before the FCC /or entry 
into the cellular telephone market. 

The four companies whose peti- 
tions were denied are A.S.D. An- 
swer Service, B.W. Communica- 
tions, P.A.L. Communications 
' Systems and Vineyard Communi- 
cations. 

In reaching his conclusion that 
Graphic Spinning was the “real 
party in interest" in tbe nearly 700 

applications, Thomas B. Fitzpat- 
rick, tbe chief administrative judj^e 
for tbe commission, found that nei- 
ther Graphic Scanning nor tbe four 
companies disclosed that Graphics 
had performed nearly all of the 
work for the four companies. 


Group Buys Stake Chemical Says Net Climbed 
In Petro-Lewis, 

May Take It Over 


New York Times Service 

NEW YORK — An investment 
group said it has acquired a stake in 
the Petro- Lewis Corp., die debt- 
troubled, ofl- and gas-production 
company, and that it was “explor- 
ing several options,” including 
seeking to take the company over. 

In a disclosure statement with 
the U.S. Securities and Exchange 
Commission, the investor group, 
Jakobson, Kass Partners of New 
York, said Wednesday that it 
owned 1.367,100 shares of Petro- 
Lewis common stock. This repre- 
sents 63 percent of the common 
shares outstanding in the Denver- 
based company, which is carrying 
heavy debts due to the long decline 
in oil prices. 

Douglas Kass, a principal of the 
group, said, “They’ve had a big 
finang jjd dond lifted from them 
recently," referring to the recent 
settlement of a class-action suit 
agonist Petro-Lewis. 

Lincoln Werdra. as analyst with 
Thompson McKinnon & Co, char- 
acterized the Jakobson Kass ma- 
neuver as “a very special high-risk 
investment” because the future of 
Petro-Lewis was still cloudy. 

David R. Longtime of Dam, 
Bosworth & Co. m Denver noted 
that Petro's stock was undervalued, 
so the investor group would be in a 
good^toatkat irthe stdckTOse: Pd 1 
tro, which trades on tbe American 
Stock Exchange, closed Thursday, 
at $435. up 37J5 cents. 


Reuters 

NEW YORK — Chemical New 
York Corp- said Thursday that net 
income rose about 20 percent in the 
fourth quarter from a year earlier 
and 1 13 percent for aD 1984 from 

mi 

It attributed the increases to im- 
provements in net interest income 
and service fees, substantia] gains 
on sales of investment securities 
and profits from foreign-exchange 
trading 

Chemical New York is the hold- 
ing company for Chemical Bank 
the sixth- largest U.S. commercial 
bank. 

The rise in net income for the 


quarter was to $105.5 million, or 
SI. 96 a share, from $88.1 million, 
or S1.68 a share, a year earlier. For 
the year, the increase was to 5340.8 
million, or S636 a share, from 
S305.6 million, or $6.02 a share, a 
year earlier. The per-share figures 
are fully diluted. 

It said net interest income rose 

9.8 percent to S1.715 billion from 
51.562 billion for the year and 8.4 
percent to S459.4 million from 

5423.8 million for the quarter. 
Foreign-exchange profits rose 

about 50 percent to S60.6 million 
from 540.4 milli on for the year and 
108 percent to S1B.6 milli on from 
S8.9 million for the quarter. 


COMP ANY NOTES 


Broken Hffl Associated Smelters 
Ply. of Australia said it had ac- 
quired a 30-percem interest in a 
Taiwanese secondary lead smelter. 
Tai Ping Metal Industries Co. for 
an undisclosed sum, effective Jan. 
1. 

Chiiia Cement Co, (Hong Kong) 
will be taken over by a company 
linked to China's siate-strpported 
Kiu Kwong Investment Corp.. ac- 
cording to China Cement's manag- 
ing director. Michael Horner. He 
drained to give further details. 

GTE Corp. has realigned its busi- 
nesses into three operating groups 
in response to increased competi- 
tion resulting from deregulation 
and the breakup of the former Bell 
Telephone System. It said the re- 
alignment will put more emphasis 


on intercity -communications busi- 
nesses and the development of new 
products. 

Sharp Corp. plans to assemble 
microwave ovens at a Welsh sub- 
sidiary. Sharp Manufacturing Co. 
of U.K., where it will also begin to 
make video tape recorders next 
month, a company spokesman 
said. The initial work force will be 
251, rising to 630. 

Sumitomo Chemical Co. will re- 
port at the end of February that 
profit for 1984 was 43 billion yen 
{SI 69 million), more than double 
the 18. 1 7 billion in 1983. Sales were 
700 billion yen. a 6-percent in- 
■erease from 65S.S3 billion, a 
spokesman said. The company 
plans to pay a 5-yen dividend after 
paying none in 1982 and 1983. 


Midwest Brokerage Thrives Far From Wall Street 


(Continued from Page 11) 
is the mstitutionalizarion of Wall 
Street' and the continuing with- 
drawal of tbe small investor from 
the market 

Those developments could derail 
the progress cl a firm Eke Edwards, 
which specializes in working with 
middle-class investors in small and 
medium-sized towns. In the fiscal 
year 1984, Edwards added 
branches in Daphne, Alabama; 
Russellville, Arkansas; Natchi- 
toches^ Louisiana, and 30 other 
towns. . 

“1 don't think their basic busi- 
ness has terrific long-term growth 
potential," Mr. Schwartz said. - But 
if they can gain market share; they 
can do quite wdL" 

Edwards’s strategy is to defend 


its market share and even grow by 
keeping its costs down and by me- 
ticulously tending the garden that 
has fed it over the years — the retail 
trade. 

Mr. Edwards sets the example 
for keeping costs down. He usually 
flies in tourist class, and his 9-by- 
. 15-foot (about 3-by-4.5-meier) of- 
fice is more the size of a children's 
bedroom than the workplace of a 
chairman. 

At Edwards, there is one support 
employee per broker, compared 
with the industry average of 1.72 
per broker. Mr.’ Long of Upper 
Analytical says Edwards can make 
money when its brokers bring in 
commiS5kni5 of just $95,000 a year 
while many firms cannot see a prof- 
it with commissions twice as large. 


.c - . 




New Device Permits Callers 
To ' Talk 9 With Deaf Persons 




(Continual drain Page 11) 
generate tones that would be con- 
verted to account balance numbers 
that could be read. 

Tbe GE invention reEes on a 
coding system to change tones into 
letters. To “talk," a caller depresses 
two telephone keys fra each letter. 
The first key is the one on which 
the letter itself is found; die second 
isibel, 2or3keyto indicate the 
position of the letter on tbe first 
key. 

• To transmit “P.” for example, 
the caller would press the 7 key (on 
winch the letters PRS also appear) 
and then the 1 key. The informa- 
tion then flows over the phone line 
to the Echo ROOD'S tiny screen, 
which can display 16 characters. A 
microprocessor inside the device 
with two kilobytes oS memory can 
store aa additional 800 characters. 
A little more than half of its memo- 
ry is devoted to internal programs, 
such as the operating' system, that 
regulate the Echo ZuOQ. \ 

. The device, which 2 hearing-im- 
paired person attaches directly to 
his phone, is not without its prob- 
lems. Learning the codeitoold be 
difficult fra some persons. And Mr. 
Fowler concedes that his device, 
which can t ransmit uily about 30 
words a.mhmte, is .slower (ban 
Teletypes. 

Fra these reasons, organizations 
representing the deaf are hot con- 
vinced that the Echo 2,000 is a 
panacea. .• 

“The typing Is very, very slow," 
said Joel O. Ziev. an executive at 
the New York Society for the Deaf, 
who has studied the new machine. 

“ We’re interested, but we'd like to 
know more -More we pass judg- 
man.” V 


“It might be an advance for short 
conversations or in areas where 
there aren't relay centos.” said 
Gifford R. Rowley, president of 
New York/New. Jersey Pbone- 
TTY Inc., a service group provid- 
ing communications devices for the 
deaf. “My impression is that it 
might be O.K. for a percentage of 
the deaf population but not for the 
majority.” 

Still, Mr. Fowler hopes his de- 
vice will succeed. To compensate 
for its drawbacks, he has installed 
fast-forward and reverse features 
so that users can review what has 
been said. And he has programmed 
the device so that callers need 
punch only two keys to transmit 
common words such as “yes,” 
“no ” “hello" and "‘goodbye” But 
callers would have to memorize 
these shortcuts. 

With $51,000 in vested in bis ven- 
ture, Mr, Fowler has sold about 100 
Echo 2,000’s and has not yet made 
a profit But that may come soon, 
he said. 

“So far it has been an expensive 
hobby," he said, “but it’s rapidly 
becoming a full-lime job.” 


“Last year, Edwards was ex- 
tremely profitable with SI 40,000 in 
commissions per broker.” Mr. 
Long said. 

In the decade before 1983. he 
added, Edwards's stock price rose 
about thirtyfold — more than that 
of any other brokerage. Its earnings 
jumped from 511 J million in the 
fiscal year 1979 to S34 million in 
1983, before sliding to S29.2 mil- 
lion in 1984. 

As Mr. Edwards sees it. the com- 
pany owes much of its spectacular 
performance to blind luck. 

“Back in Lhe 1960s we decided 
what type of firm we’d be. and we 
decided primarily to be in the retail 
business through branches,” he 
said, “ft looked dumb at the time 
because the firms doing best were 
doing institutional business. But in 
1975. the institutional boutiques 
faced disaster with the end of fixed- 
rate commissions. By blind luck we 
ended up in the best part of the 
business." 

Even though banks and discount 
houses are taking more or this busi- 
ness. Mr. Edwards said his firm 
planned to continue to devote most 
of its energies to serving its retail 
customers rather than diversifying 
or developing financial products. 

“Sometimes I wonder whether 
I'm smart enough to manage one 
type of business, let alone three or 
■four." Mr. Edwards said. 

In recent years, concerns like 
Merrill Lynch and Paine Webber 
have been expanding their empires 
by diversifying into real estate or 
developing'new financial products, 
such as unit trusts. But when its 
customers ask for new products, 
Edwards generally shops ar other 
brokerage houses for the best avail- 
able and then pays a commission to 
those firms. 

2n this way, Mr. Edwards ex- 
plained: “We didn’t have to take on 
all those people and costs to manu- 
facture products. Besides, we didn't 
warn our brokers and customers 
thinking we were trying to sell an 


inferior product just bec au se i I was 
on our shelf." 

Mr. Edwards said many firms 
had become bloated by taking on 
excess staff to make those products 
ratber than “make another firm 
rich" by buying them. “It’s impor- 
tant to avoid the Big G. Greed, and 
the Big P. Pride.” he said. 

But when Edwards has trouble 
finding a financial product else- 
where, it will “manufacture” the 
product. It often does this with real 
estate tax shelters, for example. 

In Mr. Edwards's view, the prob- 
lem with many large brokerage 
houses is that they have lost their 
way. 

“I’ve never seen a period in 
which the great firms are so con- 
fused about getting their an to- 
gether, ” he said. “They're confused 
about what they should be doing." 

Mr. Edwards said his firm's deci- 
sion not to diversify - had “kept us 
out of trouble by keeping us out of 
businesses we didn’t know ” but 
the firm has taken several small 
steps toward diversification. 

Since many regional corpora- 
tions come to Edwards for under- 
writing help, investment banking 
now represents about 25 percent of 
its revenues. up from 9.7 percent in 
1979. In addition. Edwards is in- 
creasing its ability to sell to institu- 
tions to better serve its investment 
banking clients. 

“We'd be an investment banker 
for someone and in the next trans- 
action they might need something 
appropriate to sell to the institu- 
tional market.” Mr. Edwards said. 
“Not being a factor in that market, 
we would sometimes have to tell 
them to go to someone else." 

Mr. Edwards is optimistic that 
small investors will come back to 
the market He reasons that when 
investors recognize that inflation 
has been beaten down, interest 
rates will fall and stocks will rally. ! 
making stocks more attractive io 
small investors. 


Gold Options 


Rw 

Mi 


** 

2» 

300 

310 

320 

333 

30 

laTKBTS 
1175-132 
675 as 
325- 47S 
J25 23> 
QS3- LSD 

27D0-2MD 
20(021 S3 
1475U>2 
10SMUB 
72- VS 
42- MS 

28£O30CD 

71332333 

i6SMam 

lTiD-um 

92T0S 


Valero White WeM SA. 

t, Qm 4 da MoM-Btaw 
I2!l Cam 1. S**“*£“‘ 

TtL 3IAZ51 - Tele* 283*5 


CORRECTION AOTICE 
£50,000,000 Guara n te ed Sterling/ U5 Dollar Payable 
Roc ting Rale Nans due 1990 

Lloyds Eurofinance N.V. 

(Incorporated in the Netherlands with limited HabiBty) 
Guaranteed on a swbordnoMd bads OS to 
payment of principal and interest by 



Lloyds Bank Pic 

(Incorporated in England with Embed Eabdrty) 

Tbe value erf Coupon No. 9 from the subject issue, payable on January 7, 
198 5 is US S63.08. 

January 8. 1935. London 
By: Citibank. NA (CSSJ Dept), Agent Bank 


CIT)BAN <0 


■J, 


i’jr- 

i 

£vi 

■-T ’• 
>■.; ■ 

u 

£.7, 


INTERNATIONAL 
HERALD TRIBUNE 
SPECI AL REPORTS 

1985 


The following Reports are scheduled for 
1 985, with topics and dates, of course, subject *f. 

to modification. 


tif. 

!#* 

M 

I 

1 
T . 
l.rr 

$ 

h 

$ 

% 
.5- . 
•vt-i 


£ 

s 

■* 

*r'. 

if. 


v*: 




FEBRUARY 

Qatar Economy 
International 
Education 
Nigeria 
Cyprus 

MARCH 

Bermuda Economy 
Countertrade 
Japan Economy 
Japan Fashion 

APRIL 

Korea 

Bahrain Economy 
Office Automation 
Germany 
Kuwait Economy 
Banking & Finance 
in Italy 

Travel in France 
Commercial Real 
Estate in Britain 

MAY 

Arts & Antiques 
Banking & Finance 
in Britain 

United Arab Emirates 
Economy 
France Economy 
Jordan 
Scotland 
Aviation 

Telecommunications 

Turkey 

Portugal 

JUNE 

Banking & Finance 
in Luxembourg 
Electronic Banking 
Egypt 
Spain 

Cayman Islands 
Economy 
ECOWAS 


SEPTEMBER 
German Fashion 
Commodities 
Auto Industiy 
Japan 
Singapore 
Banking & Finance 
in Nordic Countries 
Banking & Finance 
in the Arab Worid 
North Yemen 
Hong Kong 
Italy 

Small Computers 


OCTOBER 

Greece 

French Fashion 
Banking & Finance 
in Aria 

Italian Fashion 
Banking & Finance 
in France 
American Fashion 
Energy 

Banking & Finance 
in Austria 

NOVEMBER 

Saudi Economy 
North American 
Real Estate 
Netherlands Economy 
Construction in the 
Arab Worid 
Travel in West Africa 
Euromarkets 
Gulf States 

Latin American Trade 

DECEMBER 

London 

Caribbean/Central 

American 

Development 






For information on placing advertising in 
these Special Reports, or to receive pndinri- 
naiy editorial synopses of the topics to be 
covered, contact: Mrs. Mandy Lawther, Ad- 
vertising Manager. Special Reports, Interna- 
tional Herald Tribune, 181 Avenue Charles-’ 
deCJaulle, 92521 Neuilly Cedex, France. 

TeL: 747 1265. Tlx.: 613595, or your 
local IHT representative. 



2? I 


IONAL 



Sribiute 


**>°er*‘ ** 



advertisement 


NEC CORPORATION 

(CDRb) 

Rrfwr rW tn mlvwtiaaneid in ihn paper 

of 31irtAugtBt, 1934 the underagntd an- 
nomas that the original ohara from 1©% 
free dtatribadoa new bon recorwi 
Aafr4*k 17tk JJBHUU 7 . 1985 «»•»*• 

0)KNECCori»a«atioflannq?J0.36 

■ «i, ml t »Vm roar. UDO A*, at 
Yen 50,- will be milabk M Kas-Amodatic 
N.V„ Spatanat 172. Amsterdam agm* 
defiwry of SO d&rxp*M. X* of CDRa 

NEC Gorponktion rnr. 200 As. or 10 

dir,CTHkJ»o. 24 ol CXfU* NEC Corpora- 
tion, repr. 1.000 aim. ComhmatKW of 
denoaniainB is possible. Alter 29dt 
Hnxfa, 1985 lhe etmhmknt ai lhe CDRt. 
which have not been riaimr d by tbe holdos 
of div.quio. 24 mil bo sold, 
the proceeds, slier deduction of exposes, 
will be held in cub at the disposal of said 
1 bolder*. 

Further tbe onderaigued announces tbit M 

from 17th January, 1985 at Kas-Asn- 
ri^ N.V_ Spntttzast 172, Amsterdam. 
dwxaMM. 25 (Mooinwuad by an “Affi- 
dariO of tbe CDRt NEC Corpontkm 
I will be payable with Mfc 9,58 net per 
CDS, repr. 200 ofas- and with Bars. 
47,90 not per CDS, rrar. LOOO As. 
(dnr.per record-dale 30.9.1904 jjn» 

A. P «h ) alur deduction of 15* Japanese 
tn = Yen 120 ,- - DO*. 1,70 per CDR, 
rent 200 ah&. Yen 600,- « Dfls- 8^0 per 
CDR, repr. LOGO shs. . . 

Without on Affidavit 20% Jip.ux ■ Yo 
26a- - DQt 2^7 per CDR, rep r. 200 sbs. 
Yen 800b- - DOa. 1-U5 per CDR, repr. 
L000 , will be deducted. 

After 30.4.1985 the dir. will only be paid 
under deduction ol 20% lap. tax with reap. 
Oh. 9,01. Ok 4SJ05 net per CDR. repr. 
200 and LOOO she. each, in accordance with 
the Japanese tax regulations. 

AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY N.V. 

Amatodam. 3rd January, 1985. 


advertisement 


IHE NOMURA SECURITIES GO., LTD* 

(CDRa) 


» its advertisement in this paper 
of ] 4 ch 'September, 2984 the undenagnsB 
wunuwatbi the original shares frtsn 25k 
free dBstrfbotiott have been referred. » 
As from 17th January, 1985 tun new 
CDR The Nomura Securities Co^ Lnhr 
repr. LOOO shs. an cp-«»- S3 ssi,. 
ud tolou wifl be araibUe at Kas-Afisocia? 

tk N.V^ Amsterdam agaiwt ddiway of 
500 dJv.qtsjBO. 31 of QJR* lie No- 
mura Securities Cm Ltd- A 100 ahs, 
or 50 di'r-cfMJBO. SI of CDRa ti* 
Nuuwn Securities Co-, Ltd. reprr^ 
LOOO ■!», or romhiiurtnn hereof^ 
After S2ud February, 1985 the equiva- 
lent at the CDRa. which hare not boot 
by the holders id dir.ep.no. 31 wi0 

bs sold. 

The proceeds, after deduction of expenses, 
will be held in cash at tbe disposal of sadd 
holders. 

Further the undersigned amuxmea that ja 
boas 17th January), 1985 at Kis-Aso 
done N.V.. Sj Hiimryai 172. Amawdaui. 
<fiv.cp.no. 32 (accompanied by an “Affi- 
davit! of the CDRs The Nomura See* 
rities Civ, Ltd. will be payable with Dfb. 
9,07 ui per CDR, repr. 100 ahs. and 
with DBs. 90,70 net per CDR, renr. 
1.000 ths. (div.per rrcord-dalu 30.9. 19&& 
Yen 75 pan.) after deduction of 15% 
tax - Yen 112^0 = DOs. lfiO 
CDR, repr. 100 ahs. Yen 1.125,- - 
. 16.- per CDR. repr. LOOP ahs. 

Without an Affidavit 20% JopJax °* Yen 
150.- - DOs. 203 per CDR. repr. IOObIhl. 
Yen L50a- = DOs. 2100 per CDR, repr. 
1.000 shs., will be deducted. Alter 
30.4.1985 tbe diT. will only be paid under 
deduction ol 20% Jap. tax with reap. DQ&. 
854s DOs- 85,40 net per CDR repr. reap. 
100 and 1.000 ahg. each, in acantunce with 
the Japanese tax regulations. 

AMSTERDAM DEPOSITARY 
COMPANY N.V. 

Amsterdam, 3rd January, 1985. 


EL. L 


WORLDINVEST INCOME FUND 

DIVIDED ANNOUNCEMENT 
DECLARATION OF DIVIDEND No. 16 


The Trustees of tbe Woridinvest Income Fund are pleased to announce a 
U.S. S5.50 per share distribution to Shareholders in respect ol the half-year 
period (rom June 29th, 1984 io December 27th, 1984. 

Coupon No. 16 and also any previously unpresented 
presented tor payment on or after February 1st, 1985 to any 
Paying Agents: 


may be 
foDowring 


aying Agents: 

of America NT & SA, 

Hong Kong Branch, 

Sl George’s Building, 

No. 1 Ice Home Street, 

Hox 
B.C.I 

BankAmerica Trust and Bawlrtwg Corporation 
(Bahamas) Umioii, 

50 Shirley Street, 

Muma, 

Bahamas. 

Bank of America International S.A., 

35 Boulevard Royal, 

Lmemhonrg. 

BankAmerica Trust Company (Jersey) limited. 
Union House, 

Union Street, 

Sl. Helkur, 

Jersey, 

Channel Islands. 

Payments will be made subject to any applicable fiscal or other regulations 
within fourteen days of stum presentation. 

BankAmerica Tract Company (Jersey) limited. 


am 


Kingdom of Sweden 

U.S. $700,000,000 

Floating Rates Notes due 2005 
and %6% Income Rights due 1990 

In accordance with the provisoes of the Notes, notice is 
hereby given that for the six months interest period from 
10th January, 1985 to 10th July, 1985 the Notes will carry an 
Interest Rate of per annum. 

Interest payable on 10th July, 1985 will amount to 
VS. S443-0T7 per US. S10 JXX) Note. 

Interest payable on Income Rights on 10th January, 1985 

will amount to U.S. S9.43 per U.S. SlOjOOO principal amount. 

Morgan Guaranty Trust Company of New York 

London 
Agent Bank 


NEW ISSUE 


This amK’ttnrtmtnl appr.m ns n mnUrrcf-, 'retard nnh 


November 1984 


US$30,000,000 

igRateXondcm Certi 
DueNavember 18. 1988 

Arab Banking Corporation (ABC) 
ALUBAF Arab International Bank E.C. 

Commerzbank Aktiengesellschaft 


DG Bank 

Deutsche Gcnosscnschatisbjnt 

Kuwait Asia Bank E.C* 


Bank of China, 

London Branch 

Credit duNord, 

London Branch 

Die Erste osterreichische Spar-Casse-Bank 

- First Austrian Bank - 

The National Bank of Kuwait S.AJC. 
Svenska Handelsbanken Group 


Agent 

Arab Banking Corporation (ABC) 




.-no*' 


Page 14 


. Over-the-Counter 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 11- 1985 


Jao. 10 


NASDAQ Notional Market Prices 


Saiala Net 

ISM HWi Law 2P0+Ct|-ge 


l .IS A 

.i< i a 


MK In Net 

lOta HISA Lew 3P-M.Ch'BC 


107 

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325 
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t « 

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4946+ % 
22*+ 46 
646+ to 
I3to+ to 
4746 + * 
57*— to 
23* 

1346+ * 
itf«— to 
6% 

846 + to 
22* 
25*— 1 
26 to— * 
51 

1314— * 
23 — % 
1746 + 46 
1146+ 46 
10 

14% + to 

19 

18 *— % 
174*— to 
22* — to 
31% 

31% 

514* + to 
1446 + * 
26% 

21 + * 
8% 

20 — U 
294k + % 
35*6+ * 

6* + 46 
13*— 46 
16 + * 
31* 

1446+ to 
12* + to 

5% + * 

1346 

1746— % 
27* 

IS* 

15V6 

246 

7* 

6to+ to 
21 *— * 
1746+ 16 
10* +1V6 
1446 


8* 9 — 46 
13 1346 + to 

B 8% 

1146 1146 , 
2% 246 +h 
36 Uto + to 
5* 546— to 
7 7* + to 

3* 3* 

3to 3% 

5% 54k + 1* 
546 546 


Salta Hi Net 

Wta Hhfe LOW 3P.M.C tl’BB 


5 5* + ft 

tk 9ft 
5* 5%+ % 
264k »%— % 
16* lift 
9* 1046 + ’k 
104* 11% + * 
\ * 

15to 15% 

11% II* + to 
15* 14 f 
104* 10% + > a 
746 7*— % 

9* 94, 

4 <% — 4. 

14% 15% + * 
114* 12 + % 

16 16 
13 IS* + * 
14% 144, 

15 15 — to 

9 9 to + to 


I A B 14 
21 J 


56154b 
84 11* 
76 42 92 16% 

M 4.1 15311 

93 Bto 
54 9% 
B9A7 4* 
08e XI 294 15% 


766 16* 16* 16% * to 
4 7* 7* 7* 

7 5% 5% 5% + to 

54 9* 94ft 
138 13* 12* Uto + 46 
4 6 6 6 

SB 5% 2 2 — % 

2D Sto 5% Sto— to 
298 1?W 1* l*+h. 

14 14 13* 12*— W 

1 30 30 30 - to 

633 26% 26* 26* 

50 9% 9 9 — to 

166 8* Sto B* + % 
1274 1446 14 144* + * 
49819 IB 194* 

TO 7* 7 7 — * 

457 Sto 2 3 


Salta id Net 

100s High LOW 3PJM.CH BO 

LocalP 214ft 14ft l*ft 

LeSbF 1 J8 H 71 21* 22% +1. 

Lotus 1579244* 24 74% + 

Lvnden 5 19* 19* 19* + 4k 

UCftOS 475 15'. 14* 15*+* 


35308 8* 7* aft+i 
1 6* 5* S*— * 

I BO 17* 16% 17% + * 
358 IE* 18* 18% 

10 11=- 11* 11*— to 
125 6 to 6 6% + to 

733 14* 1* 14* + * 

I 132 23* 22% 2346+ * 
U II* 11* 11* 

96 3* 8 £ 

44 111. 114, 114k— * 
68'. 11* 11% 1146 + 46 
1 59 1346 1876 184, 

l 134 46% 45* 44% + 46 
) 32 T4to 14 14% + % 

150 7 7 7 + % 

r 11 Tto 7 7 

r 165 44 43* 43% + % 

57 29 28 28% + % 

9000 S* 4* 51b + * 
4210* 10* 10* 

I 114 26* 26% 26*—* 
84623 2146 23 +14, 

60 10 94k 10 +46 

215 4to 4* 4* 

1 346 346 3% 

| 61 32 31% 31* + * 

U 10 10 10 

72 lift 11* 1146— * 

■ 128 7to 7 7to + to 

508 6 546 6 + % 

40 144, 14* 1446 
51 16 16 16 — % 

79 6to 6 6% + 4k 

223 13 12% 12to— to 



.16 

3 

146 22 

21% 

22 



MenlrG 


313 Mto 

19 

20% 

+1% 

.ID 

A 

73 22% 

22 

22 to 

+ 


MorcBs IA2 

58 

17 33* 

33 

33 




45 6* 


6* 

— 

* 

AtarcBk 100 

19 

26 43% 

43 

43 




39 25% 

74% 

25 

+ 

1 4 

AlrchCo 


212* 

Oft 

12ft 

+ % 

X4c 

2J 


.15% 

35% 

+ 

to 

MorSv 03 

33 

35 213* 

23* 

23* 

— % 

100 

U 

40 43% 

43% 

43% 

+ 

ft 

MrdBe 2A0 

+1 

39 36* 

39 

39* 

+ * 




+to 

4ft 


% 

MrdSpf 2X0 

BJ 

30 29* 

29% 

»to 

+ to 

IJW 

+9 


2D 

Mto 

■4- 

to 

Mere IB U» 

40 

621 

20* 

21 





10* 

10* 

+ 

% 

MervGk 


157 !J% 

13% 

14% 




2571 7 

Aft 

I 

+ 

to 

MetrAlr 


54 12 

It* 

11* 

— % 



84 15* 15* 15* 

2321 9% 846 9% + * 

33 7% 71b 746 + to 

58 1746 17* T7* — to 
13 20 1946 19% 

308 29% 29to 29*— * 
Ik 5* 5 5 — to 

719 1946 1B46 19* + * 
66 4* 44m 4* + * 

26 21 20% 20% — * 
41 9* 9 9 — % 

71 34* 34 34* + % 

22 4* 4% 4* + to 
90 17% 17 17 — % 

BO Sto m SVk + to 
20 5% 5* 5% + % l 

7 7% 7% 7% + to 


U.S. Futures Jan. 


Season Season 
HlDtl LOW ( 

ORANGE JUICE (NYCE) 
15.000 lbs.- cents per lb. 


Open Htoti Law 


Season Season 
High Low 


Ooan High Law Closa 


Season Season 
,Hlah Low 


Open High Law dose Che. 


18500 

10900 

Jen 

156X0 

157X0 

15625 

157 JO 

+J» 

185X0 

11BJ5U 

Mar 

158X0 

16075 

159X0 

16005 

+1.90 

185X0 

151X0 

Mav 

160X0 

16175 

160X0 

16170 

+170 

184X5 

15&X0 

Jul 

161X0 

161 70 

161X0 

16170 

+100 

1B1X0 

157X0 

Sep 

158X5 

159 JO 

158X5 

159 JO 

+IJ0 

180X0 

157X0 

Nov 

199X0 

159X0 

199X0 

19900 

+175 

15+00 

Jan 

15835 

15835 

15835 

150J5 

+205 

16500 

15630 

Mar 




158X0 

+220 



May 




15800 

+220 


WHEAT (CUT) 

5X00 bu minimum- do! tore per bushel 
4 04 13746 Mar X4516 151 

+05 132* May X37 143 

3-90 127* Jut 129* 133 

176* 129 Sep 130 133 

163* 137* Dec 139 141* 

174* 143 Mar 143 143 

Esi. SaHH Prev.Sales 11 JM 

Prev. Day Open Ini. 44535 up 150 
GOEUt(CBT) 

50ao hu mini muwHdelien oar buohel 
125* 245 Mar 248% Z71* 

130 2L77% May 27446 276* 


145 150% +JI4% 

137 14246 +25% 

128* 132% +02* 
378*. X32 +J2* 

130 340% +JM46 

343 343* +00* 


375* 245 Mar 248% Z71* 248% 249* 

3J0 277% May 27446 276* 274* 274% —.00* 

131 276* Jill 277*1 27846 177 277% —.01 

121* 27046 Sep 271* 272% 271% 271* — OOto 

295 245 Dec 246% 248 24546 246% +40* 

X10 275* MOT 276* 27B 276* 277 +00* 

121% 222 May 223* 224 * 223* 224* +21 

EM. Sales Prew, Sales 2S437 

Rrev. Day Open I nt.l 31833 up 1242 
SOYBEANS lean 
5003 bv minimum- dollnri per bushel 


139 

5X7% 


578 

5X7% 

576 

SX2 

+03% 

7.90* 

509* 

Mor 

5X8 

5.96% 

5X6 

5.91% 

+03 

7.97 

5X1% 

May 59» 

6X0* 

5X8 

602* 

+X2 

1.99 

551* 

Jul 

6X0 

617 

6X5* 

611% 

+04 

7X6 

5X5 


610 

617 

6X9 

612 

+03 

671 

5X5 

Sep 

+02 

609 

601* 

605 

+03 

668 

5X7 

Nov 

+(□* 

+10 

6X1 

60S* 

+02% 

L79 

610 


618 

+22 

618 

+18* 

+03 

7-62 

634 

Mar 

+35 

6J7 

633 

+32 

+04 


Est. sales Prev.Sales 32400 

Ff-B*. Dav Open Hit. 68297 off 310 
SOYBEAN MEAL(CBT) 

100 tons- dollars per tan 
208-00 13420 Jan 14020 14100 

20920 140.10 Mar 14540 14870 

K&00 14540 MOV 15120 15420 

19650 15X50 Jul 15620 15870 

iBOjn 15220 AUO 15770 16020 

179 JO 15420 5ep 16020 16120 

18050 15550 Oci 1 5920 16150 

18420 16240 DOC 16320 16620 

Est. Sales Prev. Salta 11.984 

Prow. Day Open Inf. 36,964 oft 162 

Soybean oilccbtj 
40200 nw doikirs per 100 lbs. 

■ 3050 2225 Jan 2525 2610 

■ 30.40 2295 Mar 25.15 2S45 

30.10 2220 May 3642 24.95 

,9X30 9270 Jul 26.15 9648 

12770 2250 Aug 2425 3470 

12525 2250 Sep 2420 2605 

,2620 2270 Oct 23A0 2340 

'3475 22.90 Dec 2X20 23JO 

EsI. Sales Prev.Sales 13701 

Prev. Day Open Hit. 37J97 off 737 
OATS (cun 

SOOQbumlnlimm- dollars par buttel 
3.96* 173 Mar 178 179 

5.91 171 May 174 176* 

1.78* 1x9 Jul 172 172 

479 145% Sen T47 147 

.122* 1.72* Dec 

EsI. Sales Prev.Sales 382 

Prev. Day Oaon Ini 3735 off 32 


[ Livestock 

CATTLE (CME) 

40000 lbs.- cents pot lb. 

,4749 6228 Feb 6440 6470 

. 6872 6340 Apr 66.30 6677 

68J7 6520 Jun 6645 67.17 

■ 6645 6X15 Aug 6570 6543 

. 65.10 6140 Oct 6377 6420 

.6540 6U0 Dec. 6*30 6X22 

£si. Sotos 1X668 Prev. Sotos 27451 
Prev. Day open inf. 57, Til oftZAOJ 
Feeder cattle (cme> 

44200 lbs- cents per lb. 

■ 7220 6573 Jan 7020 7175 

7325 6575 Mar 7120 7240 

7240 67.40 Apr 71 25 7L95 

’ 7020 6+95 Mov 69-50 70.10 

• 7020 6640 Alia 69 JO 70.10 

, 6870 OT20 Sen S&75 69SS 

.6075 67.10 OCt. 6848 6920 

£sL Sales L338 Prev . Soles 1778 
Prev. Day Open I nt. X350 oH249 
AOOt(CME) 


14020 14240 
14520 1*7 JO 
15128 15270 
15520 157 JO 
15770 15920 
16020 16020 
15920 MOJO 
16320 16520 


2575 2578 —.11 

2S.12 25.16 —24 

2443 3473 +24 

24.1S 3*43 +20 

2425 2+L3 +.13 

2X95 2423 +.18 

2X40 ZX75 +45 
2X70 2X50 +28 


178 1-78% +20* 
1.76 176 +20* 

171* 171* 

146% 146% 

149 


6452 4457 +27 

6620 6647 +45 

6645 6620 +23 

65.15 6570 +70 

6X37 6X47 +75 

6+90 6+20 +21 


7020 70.92 +20 

7120 7222 +J2 

7175 7170 +45 

49.50 7020 +40 

69 JO 6925 +40 

6875 6925 +.70 

6840 6825 +20 


Est. Sales 700 Prev.Sales 680 
Prev. Dav Ooen lot. 8,159 off 48 


I Metals 

COPPER 1COMEX) 

2X000 R»s.- corns per lb. 

9220 5545 Jan 

Feb 

9120 5520 Mar 5620 5845 

9X50 5620 Men- 5970 5920 

B825 57-DO Jul 5920 5920 

82-lfi 57 JC Sep 6075 4075 

8*25 5850 Dec 61.10 61.10 

s-ijs 5740 Jan 

S9J0 5940 Mar 6220 62.20 

7+00 61 J5 May 6240 6240 

7440 61 *0 Jul 

70J0 4270 SeP 

Est. Sales 10200 Prev.Sales 11492 
Prev. Dav Open Ini. 85457 off 83 
SILVER (COMEX1 
5200 travaz.- cents per Ireyaz. 

15750 58X0 Jan 8100 6100 

7232 6165 Feb 

16202 5855 Mar 6140 6240 

151X0 5952 Mov 6232 635.0 

14612 «W Jul 6312 6412 

11832 6140 Sep 6410 6512 

1230.0 4302 DOC 4622 6642 

12152 6332 Jan 6702 6702 

11910 *490 Mor 4792 6830 

10482 6602 MCV 6892 6902 

945.0 6732 Jul 7070 7070 

940-0 6812 Sep 

EsI. Sales 30200 Prev.Sales 35.157 
Prev. Dav Open Mr. 81238 off 60 


5745 
57 SO 
5825 5BJ0 
58.70 5625 

5920 »45 
6020 6025 
6090 6023 
6175 
61J5 6170 
6X45 62JD 
6X1S 
6X70 


6100 6082 
8110 
611 J 6150 
4210 6237 
6302 +17B 

6402 64X7 

6S72 6587 

6702 66+2 

67X0 6757 

6892 6877 
7872 6992 
7117 


17719 1.1325 Dec LI300 1.1300 1.1270 1.1125 

Est. sales 10561 Prev.Sales 8023 
Prev. Day Ooen InL 1X145 off 608 
CANADIAN DOLLAR (IMM) 

Sperdir- 1 point eaucrisS0200l 
205D 7444 Mar 2549 7552 7541 7547 

7835 7440 Jun 7515 7535 75Z5 7S3D 

7585 7507 Sep 7504 .7526 7526 7524 

7566 7495 Dec 7530 7520 7320 7320 

Est. Sales 1268 Prev. Sates 654 

Prev. Day Open Mt 7217 off 5 
FRENCH FRANC (IMM) 

S per franc- 1 point eaualsUOQMn 
.11905 .10235 Mar .10305 

.11020 .10210 Jun -10310 

.10430 .10200 Sep .10380 

EsI. Sates Prev.Sales 35 

Prev. Day Open ML 266 off 25 

GERMAN MARK (IMM) 
Spermork-lpalnteatiobSUMOI _ 

4110 J160 Mar 7183 7207 2191 2199 

2733 2188 Jun 2210 2233 2298 2227 

2545 2227 Sep 224* 2299 2344 2257 

2610 2257 Dec 2290 

Est. Sotos 34715 Prev. Sotos 23264 
Prev. Day Ooen ML 33239 uelJOl 
JAPANESE YEN (IMM) 

Saer yen- 1 POM equals 80200001 
004695 203921 Mor JBW46 203968 203945 2 03963 
004450 203955 Jun 203976 203978 203976 203992 

004150 203998 SOP 204007 204007 204007 204021 

00050 208145 Dec 2043U 

Est- Sales 0227 Prev.Sales 5241 
Prev. Dav Open Inf. 14280 offll 

SWISS FRANC (IMM) 

Saer franc- 1 aolnl equals 802001 
J035 2792 Mor 2809 28Z7 2798 2809 

Am 2830 Jun 2040 2866 2837 2848 

2836 2880 Sep 2888 

-4360 2925 Dec 2915 

Est. Soles 1+935 prev. Sola 17.493 
Prev . Day Open tot 2X866 up 1,437 


Industrials 


61 

20 2 375 

77 
671 
64 

14 
6 

46 

34 

18 

120 42 30 

13 
9 
1 

1449 

263 

15 
2 

6207 

410 

28 

98 

3 

.16 1J 187 
128 
3300 

na 

564 

120 

33 

380 

150 

t 57 

16 
210 
897 

33 

82 

21e 2 Iff 
' 716 
6 
533 


24 12 2214* 

I 1W 4ta 
572 38Ks 
30719% 
JOn X3 370 18* 


JO 62 328 8* 
30022 

201 22 131 15% 


7% 8 — % 


36% + * Medina 

100 

3J 

185 73 

36 


1* Moloch 





8 —to 

Bft— % Mo lex 

03 





3ft MonCa 

100 

33 

55 44* 



6ft + % Moncar 



M 3* 

3* 


2ft— % ManfCI 

35e IX 

24810* 



2 + * MonAn 



3 m 

8% 

Sto 

4% Monalll 



2376 13% 

13 

13%+ * 


23 23 

32% 33 

24 * 24* + * 

19 19*+ * 

18 18 + to 

9* 9*+ to 
10% 11* + % 
3* 3* 

17 17 

28% 30 +1U 

Ota Bto 
1* 1W— % 

13* 13*— * 
Bto Bto— to 
10% 10th — to 
6* 6»+ % 
48* ffto +1* 
6 6* + to 

17* 17%+ to 
5* 5* 

2% 1% 

12% 12* + % 

14 14*+ % 
16% 16% 

12* T2to— % 
Sto 6* 

1% Tto+to 

15 15to + to 
4* 4*+ to 
4 4to + *i 
t-'i 9 - to 

H* M*— to 
5* 5* 


14 14 I 

3% 4to+ to 
29% 30*+ % 
18* 19% +1% 
17% 18% 

6% 6%— to 
16* 16* + to 
% * + to 

3* 3*+ to 
3* 3% + to 
7* 7to+ % 
20% 22 +1% 
14% 15% + * 


293 29% 29% 29* 
4215* Uto 15* 

7i ii* ii n*+ * 
5416* 16% 16*— to 
757 5% 4* 5% + % 

12 13* 13 13 

164 38% 37* 38% + % 
17724* 24* 24* 


102 3Vta 
313% 
39 20% 
E® 38% 
621* 
573 B% 
521% 
22 5% 
239 4% 

51 3* 
88 4* 

429 5* 
12S 8* 
264 7* 
2973 Zl* 
215 4 
22 34 
39 77k 
8 23* 

52 24 
54 5* 
1211* 

231 23% 

232 6% 





Feb 

52X0 

53J0 

5200 

52X5 

+.18 









.55-40 

48-® 


5175 

54X0 

5375 

S+C 

+07 


48X5 

Jul 

5430 

5475 

5+30 

5+65 

+00 


47X0 


53X5 

53X5 

5300 

SL72 

+J2 


45X0 

oct 

4900 

4900 

4902 

49.12 

—28 


4630 


49 JO 

49X0 

49.10 

4900 

+.15 


4+25 

Feb 


4935 



—.10 

■ 47.35 

4575 

APT 







EsL sales +326 Prev. Stan 9,174 
Prev. Day Open InL 25.228 WI85 
PORK BELLIES (CME) 

«■ 7+* 

1 BUB 60.10 MIT 7X90 7+JO 

• 8200 61.15 May 75L50 76J7 

t 8X47 6X15 Jul 76.15 77-25 

, nata 6020 Aim 7+75 75X0 

' 75-15 6X15 Fkb *875 6XK 

7140 6+30 Mar 

Esf.Saita i860 Prev.Stata 8773 
Prev. Day Onen inf. 1X469 eN873 


7X80 7X9J +.72 

7X85 7472 +75 

7580 75.98 +85 

76.15 7+90 +.B3 

7+S7 7+65 +90 

8025 6027 +UKJ 

6020 +70 


PALLADIUM (NYME) 

100 troy oz- dot Mn per ei 
12970 12+50 Jon 11675 11675 

16XS0 10753 MOT U+JO 11675 

159 JO 106J0 Jun 11475 11400 

14VJC0 10453 5eo I1SA0 11570 

141 JO 10675 Dec 11400 11575 

EM. Sales 484 Prev.Sales 503 
Prev. Day Open Ini. 4497 off 72 
GOLD (COMES] 

100 trey ot- Collars per haves. 

333JP 29800 Jan 3B3JM 30X50 

52X00 294711 Feb 304 JO 30700 

J05J0 3CO50 MOT 

S14J0 300.711 Anr 308J0 31QJ0 

510-00 30400 Jun J1X70 J14J0 

4B5JK) 309 JO Aug 317.80 318J0 

493JW 314JH) Oct 32X00 32X00 

489 JO 318JC Dec 32400 32X50 

405-50 rsen Feb 334 JO 33470 

494E0 330.50 Apr 

43SJO 33470 Jun 

424m 342X0 Aim 35020 35070 

39470 J42JO Od 35400 355J» 

EM. solos 33X00 Prev.Sales 60.900 
Prev. Dav Open mt.i73.na oH4Q5 


I Financial 

US T. BILLS (IMM1 
SI million- Btsal 108 pcL 
92M 8779 Mar 91.97 91.9B 

91JJ 87.14 Jun 91 JO 91 JO 

9171 867* S« 91X3 SUU 

«J3 85.77 DOC 9065 9065 

9X41 B660 Mar 9020 9030 

9X12 P7XI Jun 

89X4 88X0 Sep 

Doc 

Est. Sales _ Prev.Sales 14X34 

Prev. Dav Open InL 47411 UPX764 
18 YR. TREASURY (CBT) 

SlDOXff pr In- pis & 32nds M im ad 
81-27 70- Z5 ftlar 83-18 80-23 

§1-7 70-9 Jun 79-25 79- 2S 

80-23 7S-1B Sec 79-11 746 

7B-2B 75-13 D»c 

78-23 75-18 Mar 

78-9 77-21 Jun 

EsL Soles Prev.Sales 

Prev. Day Ooen Inf. 35477 ua47 
US TREASURY BONDS (CBT) 

(8 Pd-sinuno-atss 32nasef luoact) 
n-15 S7-27 Mar 71-13 rl-16 

77-15 57-20 Jun 70-21 70-3 

7+2 57-30 SCO 7D-1 70-1 

7»V5 57-S Dec 69-11 6% 15 

72-30 57-2 Mar 68-30 8800 

7W_ 56-29 Jim 68-11 68-15 

*9-25 56-29 See 6701 68-3 

69-26 56-25 Doc 67-23 67-34 

690 56-27 Mar 674 47-14 

68-11 64.J Jim 

_ 67-19 6401 Sob 

Est. Sedas Prev.SaltaH+475 

Prev. Dav Open lnt.194243 up 879 
GNMA (CBT) 

SIOanOprln-ptSiSilSnifsDf 100pd 


272X0 27X90 —490 
27400 277X0 -5X0 
283BB 283X0 —5X0 
288X0 29030 —5X0 
278X0 297X0 — 5X0 


116X5 115X0 
114X5 115X0 
113X0 11470 
11+75 11420 
11450 11X70 



1X00 ML ft. 

Jan 159X0 1«L» 
Mar M7X0 16870 
May 174X0 175X0 
Jul 177 JO T7U0 
Sep 17BJ0 179 JO 
Nov 180X0 188X0 
Jtal TB450 18450 
Mar 

■rev. 5am 4080 
I. HUM1 UP 372 


15X50 150X0 
16490 167X0 
17X80 17480 
177 J0 177X0 
17X50 179.18 
188X8 17960 
18450 18+30 
187X0 


KyOrtJ AS 22 
KeyTm 

Klmbal -54 IX 

Kimbrk 

Kincaid 

Kinder a M A 
vIKoss 

Kray J16 J 
Kruers J2 24 
Kutcke .16 6 


LDBrnk 
LJN 
LSI LOB 
LTX 

LoPetes 

LaZBy 

LadFm 

Lafdlw 

LomaT 

Lancasf 

LndBF 

LdmkS 

LoneCs 

Langly 

Lawsn a 

LeeDia 

Latter 

LewtsP 

Lexicon 

Lexldlu 

XJebrf 

Lflnvs 

LfeCom 

UlvTui 

UnBnf 

LincTel ' 

Undbro 

LlzCtas 


15* 16% + * 
4* 4*— to 
21 2216 + % 
13* 13* + M 
!3to 13* 

6* 7to + to 
2to 2*+* 
■Mk 44* + % 
35* 35* 

5* 5*+ to 
9to 9* 

2B% 28% 

5% 5% 

8% Bid— to 
M* 1Sto + * 
* *— to 

12% 12% + to 
12% 13* + * 
24 25% +1to 


i 8* 8* + to 
i 5* Sto + * 
i 13 14* +tto 

17% 18 
14% 15 + to 

34* 34*+ to 
13% 14% + * 
13* U 
12* 12* + to 
15% 15* + % 
13* 13* 

6* A* 

39 39 

6to 6% + to 
24* 24* 

6to 6to+ * 
12* 12* 

as a + - 

3 3* + * 

21% 21% 

41% 41% 

6 6% + % 
13* 14* + to 
23% 23% — % 
29* 29%+ to 
5* 5*+ % 

24% 25% +1 


OCGTc 

Dale Hill 
OblRec 
Oceaner 
Odlkre 
Of* Los 

OoUMs X2 26 
OMoCa 268 SX 
a 83 lent S 

Old Rep X8 29 

OldSpfC 260 1X0 

OneBce .13e X 

Online 

Onyx 

OptteC 

OpftcR 

Ortwnc 

Orbll 

OrfaCp 

OttrTP 268 0J 
OvrExp 

OwenM -36 7J 
OxOCO 


Jto+ to 
13 — to 
20% 

38 

21* 

8% 

21 to + to 

5 + to 
4* 

3% 

4* + to 
5*— to 
Bto 
7* 

21* + * 

4 

34 + lb 
7%— to 
23*+ to 
24 + to 
5%+ to 
llto 

23 + * 
6to + * 

B* 

17* — to 

30% + to 

6 — to 
7% — to 
Sto + to 

17 

39K + to 
30% +1 
23to+ * 
43*-* 
5* 

5 + * 


2% 2to— to 
3* 3*+ to 
2to 2*— to 
Sto 3to+ to 
15 15*+ to 

1% T*— to 

35% 35* 

45% 45% 

22% 23% 

30* 30*— * 
20 W — % 
16* 16* + to . 
4% 4% + ft 

I* 1* 

14V. 14% + to 
32% 33 + % 
14* 14* 

5* 5%+ to 
5to S%+ to 
27* 28* 

Uto llto 
12% 13to 
3% 3*— to 


3 5* Sto 

222 47% 46% 
10310* 10 
184 47 45* 

377 Bto 8* 

BT 14 13% 

12014* 13% 
97 7* 7* 
685 14* U* 

4 10* W 
1514* 13% 

888 6* 5% 
459 8% 71k 

94 12* 12% 
86 7* 7* 
2 22 * 22 * 
40 9* Vto 
6511* llto 
360 22* 22% 
218 5* 5* 
136% 26% 
136 26* 26* 


55b + * 
47 
10 

47 +lto 
Bto + to 
14 +16 

14* +1% 
7*— to 
Uto— to 

io — to 

14*— to 
6to+ * 
8* + to 
13* + * 
716— to 
22* 

9* + to 
11* + to 
22% 

5% — to 
26to+ % 
26*— * 


Dividends Jan. 10 


91.91 91.94 

9162 91X5 

WX7 90X0 
9060 9062 

9010 9tU0 


80-10 08-19 
79-20 79-28 
79-1 79-10 

78-36 
78-12 
77-31 


71-3 71-14 

70-W 78-21 
69-22 69-31 
69-3 69-13 

68-19 6 829 
6*6 68-15 

67-28 68-3 
67-17 67-24 
67-7 67-14 

67-5 
66-29 


COTTON 2 (NYCE) 

50X00 Itar cants per lb. 

79.35 65.12 Mar 67X2 67.18 66X6 67.12 

7920 6620 May 67X5 68X8 67X0 6X07 

79X5 67X0 Jul 6X50 6X85 68J0 68X5 

77 JO 67X5 Oct 68J2 6X50 6824 6X50 

73X0 68.00 Dec 6U0 6X52 6837 6X51 

7675 6925 Mar 6975 69X0 6975 69X0 

May IM5 

EsL Sales 2X00 Prev.Sales 2.9M 
Prev. Dav Ooen Inf. 17X09 off 229 

HEATING OIL (NY ME) 

42X00 eol- cents per gal 

8675 69X5 Feb 74X0 7SX5 74X5 75J5 

8060 68X0 Mar 71.90 71.90 7090 71+0 

8275 66X0 APT 69AD 69+0 6X70 68X0 

EQ60 66X0 MOV 67.90 6X25 6775 677S 

7X40 65150 JUTl 67X0 6775 66-55 67X0 

66-50 6+50 Jul 6X50 6X75 6X53 6X60 

EsL 5a les Prev.Sales 11,291 

Prev. Dav Ooen 1 nl zl+tb off 410 


CRUDE OIL (NYME) 

1X00 bbL- dollars per but. 

31-50 25.15 Feb 2SXS 26X0 2&4S 

31-30 25.1* Mor 25X5 2SX9 25X4 

31X5 25. VO Aar 2S7S 25X0 7SM 

3028 25.10 MOV 2X65 25-75 2SJ7 

29J3 25X5 Jun 2X65 2570 2X50 

29 J4 2+90 Jul 25-58 25158 2158 

29J7 25X1 AUB 25X5 25X5 2S65 

29 JO 2X16 Sew 2X45 25X5 2X45 

29 J® 2+20 Od 

29J0 25X1 Nov 

29 JO 2X15 Doc 

29X6 29+6 Feb 

29.45 29X5 Mar 

29X5 25.50 APT 

SJ® 27 JO May 

2670 2670 Jim 

Jon 

Est. Sales Prey. Sates 1X532 

Prev. Day Open InL 5X143 off 1X07 


Ford Motor 
Pali Corp 


Per Ami Pay R« 
INCREASED 

Q JO H 1-30 
a .12 2-8 1-25 


REVERSE 5TOCK SPLIT 
Cal ton Inc — 1 -tor -2 

STOCK 5PLIT5 

Gencrol Hoal — 3-lor-? 

Sheldahl Inc — Wor-2 

U5UAL 


Conoara Inc 
Genl-Amer-Invta! 

Gonl Dynamics 
GTE Corn 
Hanover Insurance 
Pnciricora 
Pltlwav Corp 
Royal Bonk Canada 
Rubbermaid Inc 
Si Paul Sec 
Transae EkPlorotlon 
A-Am»a1; MJHooiMr; 
Annual. 

JOorcr: UPI. 


Q 25 2-15 1-21 

Q .77 +1 2-20 

Q .14 2-15 1-18 

Q JB MS 1-21 

Q +5 4-1 1-15 

O JO 2-22 1-24 

O 21 VI 2-15 

M .10 2-15 1-25 

Q J5 VI 1-21 

O-O ee rtorfy; S-Saml- 


Asian Commodities 

Jan. 10 


HO NO KONG GOLD FUTURES 
UJX per mnee 

CIom Pravhwi 
High Low Bid Aik Bid AM 
Jon _ N.T. N.T. 304X0 306X0 390X0 3X0X0 
Feb _ N.T. N.T. 306X0 300X0 299X0 301.00 
Mar _ N.T. N.T. J0B.00 310X0 3Q1X0 330JM 
API _ 310X0 310X0 309X0 JJ 1X0 303X0 305X0 
Jun _ N.T. N.T. 313X0 31SX0 307.00 3OT.0Q 
Aim _ N.T. N.T. 31X00 37000 311X0 313X0 
Od _ N.T. N.T. 37100 325X0 316X0 318X0 
Dec - 329X0 329X0 328X0 330X0 321X0 323X0 
volume: 26 lots af 100 oz. 

SINGAPORE GOLD FUTURES 
LLSAper oaece 

Prev. 

High Low Settle Settle 

Feb 30670 30+50 305X0 29960 

Mar N.T. N.T. 307X0 30TX3 

Apl 309 JO 2a«_g) 309 JO 30170 

volume: 895 lots af 100 oz. 

KUALA LUMPUR RUBBER 
Mofayston cents per kilo 

Clow Previous 


i phllGI 

; PimxAm 
PlcSav 

: PlcCafe M U 
PionHI 
PoFolK 
PICvMB 
Pore* 

PosJSi 
Powell 
Powrte 
PwConv 

PrecCs* -16 X 
PrpdLS 
Prewav 
Priam 
PricCtn 
PrlcCaS 
Prtron* 

PradOP -16 15 
PrqptTr L20 8X 
Prut a d 
Provin 
PullTrn 

PurtBn -40 16 


Sales In Net 

108s High LOW SPJM.Ch'ge 

3705 II 9* lOJk + % SluWlM 
41 % ft to 

1 6% 6% 6%-- to SubrB 

99 9 8% 9 Sumn” 

1.12 +J 160 26% 25% 26% + to SumtHl 
25 6 Sto 6 SunCSl 

11140 8% EBk 8% SunSL 

A * XX 224816* IS* 16to+ to SupRto 


75 3* 3* 3%— % SuPSfcy 

1043 19% 18* 19% + % Suprfe* 
60 13 24 18 17% 18 + to SuprEa 

.92 2X 51533% 33* 33*+ % Sykes 
94 IP* 10 10* + to SvmbT 

681 25% 25* 25% + * Syncsr 
197 Zl* 21* 21*+ to Syntech 
84 7* 7% 7* + * Svntrex 
62 1* 1% I* Svscon 

5115% 15* 15% SyAeec 

34 7 69k 7 Svstln 

.16 X 1033 32* 33 +* SVBlntg 

41 6% 6* 6*— ft SyatGn 

37 4 3* 4 + to Syshnt 

552 5* 5* Sto SCTCe 

130 16* 15% 16* + * 

558 44* 42% 44* +1% I 

76 16* 15% 16 — Vk 1 

.16 15 39 44k 4% 4* TBC 

XI U 26 14 13* 14 + * TCA Cb 

80 2% 2 2to + to I«V* 
1914% M% 14% — to Tondem 
41 4* 4 4* Tandan 

AO 26 29M6% 15 15* + to If 1“ 


OMSs 

Ouadrx 

OuakrC 68 
Oisaisy 

Ouailm 

QuestM 

Ouixaie 

Quofrn 


40 5 S IS) 10% 10* 10% + % 
2638 28% 25 28 +1* 

242 4 3% 3* 

313* 10* 10* 

X6 17 126 5 4% 4*— * 

1133 22* 21* 21% + * 
280 5 Ah 

85 5* 5* 5U— * 
82 5% 5* 5 'A— to 
A0 22 717 1B% 17* 18% 

1.12 3J 28 27* 29% 29* 

199 4* 3* 4 
120 1* 1% 1% 

A4 1J 1502 33* 32% 33% 

107 4 3% 4 

A4 U 535 34% 34 34% + % 

1509 3* 3* 3W + * 
99 19* 19% 19* + * 
Xle 3214* 14* 14* 

40 79k 71k 7% + to 
830 8 7* 8 + to 


147 17* 12% 12% + to I e if2H 
4+0 4* 4% 4* + % TeWpJd 

8 25 24% 23 + % Tehrjd 

41 3 3 2 + % I"}** 5 

35120% 20 20% Triwm 

146 3% 3* 3*— to 
13 10* W 10* + % Term PI 
920 9% 9 9to + to Teidata 


9% Tnrmdc 

14U + * Thetfd 

uu + % ThdN s 

nt + to Thor In 

S-* n»f!« 

6 + to n»«T e 

47*+* 3 Com 

5% TlmeEs 

13% + to TmeFUi 
19% TTprory 

6% TofU S 

28* + * lotlSy a 
a%+ to I n*A u 
6* TrtaOgy 

12% 


Safes in Net 

i Ota men Lew 3PJU.argt : 

XS L4 19 3* Jto 3*— to 
Ui M 11317 116*117 +* 

1X4 4.1 44 44* «% 44* + % 

75 M 3* 3*+ to 
X 99 13 60 7* 7* 7% 

u i* Ito lto— to 
t 825 9 8* Bto— to 

.16 IX 52 16% l$% U%— * 
6 8* 8% 8* 

Z3S 4* 4* 4*+ to 
186 12 lOto 11* +1 
424 1* T% I*— * 
2D910 9* 10 +* 

3» 3% 3% 3% + U 

726 9% 9 9* 

2S4 4to 4* 4to— to 

24 IX 33 13% 13% 1314— % 
3316* 15% 16 + % 

306 6* 5% 6 — % 

132 8* 8% 8* + * 

15 7to Sto 7H 

X4I 2 28 Uto 16 Uto + to 

2SS 11* 10* 11* + % 


154510% H% 10%— to 
.12 X 534 14% 14 14tk + % 
S3 a 7% 8 
139019* Uto 19% +1 
T703B 8* 7* 7% — * 
11718 17* It 

t 1381 23* 23 13* + * 

738 9% 8% 9% + * 
9 Sto 5* 5*— % 
28 IX 252 18* 17% 18* + M 
IBM 18 16% 17* +1 

123 3* 3 3* 

162 IS 14* 14% + % 
76 16% 76 16* + ft 

21 4 3* 39k 

51 9% 9% 9% — to 

21 2* 2* 2ft— ft 
34 1* Tto 1*+ to 
35m U 34 12* 12% 12* 

79 14* U 14h + ft 
19912% 12 12%+ * 

44 7% 7* 7% + to 
1X8 3J 157 33% 33 31% 

12511* ID* llto + * 
1325 10* 9to 10* + to 
1719 Uto 15* 16% +1 
157 7% 7 7* + % 

48611% 10% llft+ to 
39U% W* KM— to' 
f 282 Ito 1ft 1% 

69 13% 13* 13*— U 
1313% 13* 13% 
3711% 11% 11% 

331 9* 9% 9*+ to 
JO IX 1 26 28 36 


fi**'- ;; 

iij-f''- 1 ■ 


22* + % TBk’ .J S 1X0 3-1 14933 32% 32%- to 

« I Turfcnr 1 Sto 5to Sto + to 

... _ I3Z 2 1% 2 + to 

Bto + to Tyson F X8 2 95 33% 32% 32% + to 


8% + to TyaonF 

lift + to | 

72*— * I 

SBS-* 43 

3% UltTsy X6e X 

34 Ungmn 


12* + * 

Sto + to yjunb 
20%— to UnPiji 
3 UnTrf 

13% + to UACffl 
Zl + % UBAh 
6* UBCol 

75% — % UFnG 
11+1 UFrtF 
14% — to UGrdr 
U UPraa 

20% + * US An 
34*+ * US Be 
i*— * us Ca 
18 US D* 


28 42 11 28* 28 28 + to 

X6e X 1Z7D 7% 7% 7* 

450 16% 14% 16% -HM 
187 9to S* 9 
277 I* Ito Ito— Ik 
149 11% 18% 18% + to 


6* — % US Hts 
8 US Slilf 

12* + to HI32T 

U|T ? 


6410* 
792 12% 
147 13% 

-lor 1.1 118 8% 

t 133 Uto 
68 3X 425 18 
196 14* 

1X0 4J 610 33 
9 74% 
376 8U 
3X0 6.1 210049* 
92 3% 


32 26 201 27% 
115 7* 
100 73% 
22 32 47 9* 

Jt 23 016 

11 7% 
22 7to 
93 4% 
1 11* 
80 3* 
3416 
90 6% 
13814 6* 
25 2* 
6 66 5% 
JB 4.1 10319% 

JB 3 1560 7* 
XB 3 3358 II* 
1.12 3X 2496 30 


1X0 SX 3S0 30 
.16 .9 2DB 16* 

48117* 
.U X 24232* 

2 a* 
-I0e 20 26 5* 

614 I 
441 11* 
2715% 
9315% 
9 8% 

AO SX 16914* 


W* 

12 *+ * 
13*— M 
0% + % 
14 

17* + to 
14* + to 
33 +1* 
14%+ » 
8% + % 
49%+lto 
3 — to 
7* 

Sto 

6 %— * 
27% +1* 
7* + to 
13 + * 

9*+ to 
16 
7% 

7*— * 
4%+ to 
II* + * 
3* 

16 + to 

6%+ % 
6* + % 

19*+ % 


UnTrBc 2X0 4X 100 49% 49* 49* 
UACcm .12 X 148 26% 26* 2b% 
UBAiefc .10k 1.1 44 10 9 9 —1 

UBCol 1X6 43 193 23% 22* 23* 

UFnGrn 115 B* HU 8* 

UFktFd 5713* 13% 13*+* 

UGrdn 1 280 17 16 16% + * 

UPreed 3210 W 10 — * 

US Ant 20 2* 2* 2* 

US BGP 1X0 39 808 25% 25* 25*— to. 
US COP 93 2* 2to 2% 

USDsxm S3 5 S 5 

US Hts 110930% 19* 30 +* 

USSilf X66 IX 27 3* 3* 3*+ to 

US SW 41915* 14* 14*—* 

USTr* 1X0 10X 21 11U llto 11* 

115 Tr 1X0 35 37 45% 45% 45% 

U Slain S JO VO 92 30* 19% 19%—* 

UnTetov 12 Uto Uto 16* 

UVaBk 1-44+1 10 35 35 35 

UnvFrn 418 16 15* 15% + % 

UnvHH 466 J0to IB 10 — to 

UnvHId 3 4% 4* 4to+U- 

UFSBk 20 9 B% 9 

UreeCr 

Uscnfo XT* IX 


20 9 B% 9 
28B 5* 5* 5*— to 

16 3* 3* 32k— Vk 


Tte. i i g. v on I ITI 

11* + * VWkO 

29*— * I 

IS*— % I 

WD 40 

** re liir.lhjr 

30 + * 

i4* JH52« 

11 _ Sa. Wane 

32* + * 

3 _ UW_M. ■ 


VaILn 

ValDus A8 19 
VanzkH 
VearG 
Ventre* 

Vow 
vicanF 
Vlcorp 
VldraS 
uidnTa 

VledeFr 220 IX 
Viking 
Vlratek 
VhTeGh 
Vodavi 
voffinf 


350 6* 5% 6Vb+* 
629 Sto 7* I + M 
in 9% 9 9to 
.15* IX 17 Mk 8% 8* + % 

193112* 10% 12* +1* 
IS e* 8* 8* + to 
1 JO +1 132 29* 29% 29* + to 
XDe IX 24S 25 24% 25 + to 
XS 19 124X4 13% 13%— to 


22412% II 12% +1* 
148 to ft S— to 

??? % ^ » 

2 3 2 3 - to 

■13e X 2357 14* 74% 14% + Vk 
14 3 2% 3 

2119* 19* 19* 

J2e IX 51 11* 11* 11* 

4911* llto 11* + * 
61 18M 17% 18 + to 
42 2* 2* 2* 

102 7* 6% 7to + * 

3017* 17 17% 

1325% 25* 25% + to 


15% 

IS + % 
8% 


Webbs J6 29 
WestFn 

WnCasS 2X4 6J 

WstFSL 

WMicTc 


XB 4.1 1052116 20% 21U 

X8 J 320% 20% 20% 

386 10 9* 9*— % 

1X8 12 584 20* 19* 20* + % 
701 2J 1X128 27% 27% + * 

6911* llto 11* 

36 7* 7to 7%— ft 

M 29 9 12* 12* 12* + to 

164 9* Tto 9* + to 

2X4 62 2 45% 45% 45%— to 

40 6% 6* 6% + % 

73 8% 7% 0 — * 

44 5* Sto 5* 

149 13% Uto 13% + * 

A0 2.1 3618% 18* 18% 

20I9to 19ft 19*—* 
141 U 13% 14 
A8 35 6825ft 25 25 

' 134 m, 3% 3* * ft 
. _ 297 ■% Bto 8* ♦ ft 

1 JO +1 245 36% 34% 36% +1% 
301 8% 8 8* + ft 

1 10* lBto 10* + to 
205 9% 9* 9% + to 
JB IX 43 llto ie% 11 — * 
JJ7 IJ 173 5% 5* 5* 

132 3* 316 3* + * 
XB 47 3318% HP6 18% 

60 34 61 17* 17% 17* + to 

J6 2X 262 23% 23 23 

X0 32 560 25% 24% 25% + * 


uvs + % WMkr 44 Sto 5% 5* 

+* WtTIAs 14913% Oft 13% + to 

4% WmorC 40 2.1 36 18% 18* 18% 

t* +7 wafwdo i9* 19* 19*—* 

1? lu Wstwdc 141 U 13% 14 

- 120 4% T* 4ft + ft Wottra JR is 6825* 2S 25 

m 3* 3* 3ft- to £"“* 134 3% 3% 3ft* to 

1J0 4X W2U 36* 37 + * S2fl a,m 297 ■% Bto 8%+to 

7612*12*H*+* WWJJJ « 245 36% 34% 36% +1ft 

60117* 15% 17^ +1 
120a 20 7739* 39 39*+* 

A0 lx ^ZI* 23% OTk + ^ X7 IJ 173 5% 5% 5* 

111 49* 4 ™ 132 3* 3to 3* + * 

X2 IX 56 30% 30 30% + to 

XB IX 34 23 2Z* 22*—* SSSgE 

.10 IX 190 8 7* 8 + to SJS?™ 

1X8 42 168 39 38% 39 + to ” Vmcn 

12 2V6 7% 2to + to , 

X5e 14 75 3* 3% 3* + to I jt I 

309 12 11 12 +1 1 ■ ■ ■' * ... n I 

nr □ £ ’IS ‘US ’US W**® 1568 3* 3* 3% 

■“ ' S 2? S 6 515" 35011* 10* 11*+ * 

8615* 14* ll XW ” 000 llto 12 12to— to 

6011* 11* 11* + Vk I 3 1 

JO 3X 220 5* S* S* I 1 1 

JM fflSf Tt* 19%to V,W ' F, , -®° U 103034,4 34 + » 

1.16 2J 5246% 45% 46 — to , — 

3S S* 5U 5ft— ft | Z | 

120 5X 20 21ft 21* 21* +1 — 1 

1X6 2J 4647 48% 46% ZanUlB 66 19*19 1916—16 

.15b 19 1U2 5* 5 S* + to Zeidec 348 4 3% 3% — % 

B6 4% 6* 6ft— to S«Sr 42 1011* llto lift 

5 12* 12* 12* + * BanUI 124 4X 137 31% 31 31 
35 5ft 5% 5% 2 5 5 5 

12 9% 8% 8% Zlyad 33 7 6% 6% + to 

„ 1388 10 9* 10 + ft Zondvn 3+ 13 in 9% 8% 9% + to 


r ; t.V'i* 

'’■n If in 

■Sli fnt 


1568 3ft 3* 3% 
35011* 10to llto+ to 
80012* 12 Uto— to 


■90b IX 630 50* 46% 47% —3% Zvmos 
4025% Mto 2S% +1 lZytrex 


64 19* 19 Uto— to 
„ _ 148 4 3% 3% — % 

,48a 42 wil* n* ui, 

124 42 137 31% 31 31 

2 5 5 5 

33 7 6% 6%+ to 

J4X7 ICS 9% 8% 916 + to 
jw m m— H 

63 1* 1% l* 


London CommodiUea L Cash Prices Ja “* 10 


• ri . £ i 


Jan. 10 

Figures In sterling per metric ton. 
Gasoil In UA dollars per metric Ton. 
Gold in U.S. dollars per ounce. 



■M 

Aik 

Bid 

Ask 

FCO 

18975 

19025 

189 JS 

19825 

MOr 

19125 

19375 

19400 

18425 

Anf . . . . 

19800 

198X0 

198X0 

199X0 

MOV 

202X0 

20100 

203X0 

205X0 

Jun 

20600 

20800 

207X0 

208X0 


High Lew CMse 
SUGAR 

Mar 124X0 12240 12+00 12440 
Mov 133.40 130X0 132X0 13340 
Aua 14+40 141X0 1+3X0 M+3) 
Od 15140 I+&80 T5I.OO 151X0 
Dec 15840 156JB 157X0 15U0 
Mar T72X0 170X0 172X0 173.40 
May N.T. N.T. 179« 179X0 
3X7+ lots el 50 Ions. 


COCOA 

Mar 1.973 1,950 

Mav 1,976 IAU 

JIV 1.975 1.961 

Sea 1,984 IA6S 

Dec 1X15 1X0? 

Mar 1.905 ixas 

MOV 1.909 1X00 

4J83 lafa of 10 Ian 


120X0 120X0 
128X0 129X0 
14008 14020 
146X0 14720 
15Ua 15390 
168X0 16&XO 
174x0 175X0 


Commodity and Unit 

Coffee 4 Santas, lb 

Prhifcioffi 64730 38 to. vd — 

Stael twitaia (Pitt.i. Ian 

Iren 2 Fdrv. Phlia. Ian 

Steel scrao No 1 hvy Pin. _ 

Leaa Seal, lb 

Crow ded_ Ut 

Tin (Straits], lb 

Zinc. E. St. L. Basis, lb 

Palladium, oz , . — 

Silver N.Y_ oz 

Source: AP. 


Thu 

Year 

Ago 


128 

1X5 

- • . 

078 

47100 

085 

451X0 


213X0 

211X0 


78X0 

88-89 

’ - 

18-23 

26-28 

, 

64*67 

66*68 


+5792 

+2232 

•i 1 . 

0.45 

0X1 


115-117 

156* 


6.135 

8045 



1.964 1.965 1X47 1.948 

I. 970 1X71 1,950 1.953 
1X72 1X73 T ASS 1.953 

J. 972 1X75 1,955 1AS6 
L913 I.9J5 1X92 1X94 
« 1X30 1X87 1X9+ 
1X90 1X30 1X55 1,915 


London Metals Jan. 10 

Figures m sterling per metric ton. 
Silver hi pence per troy ounce. 


DM Futures Options 

Jan. 10 

W. Gennon «tark-12S£00 marts, emb per mo* 


Stock Indexes 


143X0 142X0 142X1 — XO 

l 141.10 140JS 14035 —24 

139X0 138X0 139.15 +.11 

13800 137X0 137X2 +01 

136X0 13640 136.13 —.77 

134.15 —1.11 

1443 m ' 11 -*- 13 


69-20 

57-5 

MOT 69-12 

<9-15 










59-13 





68-13 

59-4 





67-15 

58-20 

Mar 





58-25 





66-13 

65-71 

Sea 




Est. Salas 


Prev. Sam 

547 




SP COMP. INDEX (CMC! 
aptnts end cents 

ISU0 M«r 16820 172.15 
im.70 156.10 Jun 17148 17520 

IB3X0 16000 Sen 17620 17420 

777.60 175X0 DOC 17745 177X5 

E»L5al« 60X23 Prev.Sales 66281 
Prev. Dav Open InL 40X64 up78S 
VALUE LINE IKCBT) 
na bits and cnnlk 

19+2 U8.10 Mor 18+15 1*745 

MniS d“" 186X5 190X0 

79005 18525 Sen 

EW .Sdes Prev. Sates 4X44 

Prev. Dav Onen I nl. +170 o«45 

NYSE CO MP. I NDEX (HYPE) 
potnisood cants 

!ta0O M2D Mor 9725 99X0 

10+00 9000 Jun W140 TO 140 

325-55 .Sl-S Sep 100X5 MOLTS 

1MXO 10120 _ Dec 104X0 104X0 

Ed. Sales 17227 Prev. Sola UXM 
Prev. Day Open 1 nr. 7270 up 190 


Mar 

Jao 

Seal 

Mar 

Jan 

seat 



— 

0X8 

0J0 

-m. 

121 

ITS 

— 

IU2 

056 

■i 

042 

120 

1X3 

063 

0.96 

1.12 

030 

614 

25! 

124 

005 

JJB 

2.12 

IJO 

1X1 

OJN 

033 

0X1 

3X1 

— 

— 


VaHjme: 44 tats. 

SINGAPORE RUBBER 
Singapore cents per kilo 

dm Previous 

Bid Ask Bid Ask 

RSS I Feb— 17000 169.75 17DJ5 

RSSIMar. 17125 171 JS 17125 17225 

RSS 2 Fab- 15800 15600 15800 15900 

RSS 3 Feb. 15600 15700 15600 15700 

RSS4Feb_ 149.00 15100 14900 15100 

RSS 5 Feb- 14100 14300 14100 14300 

KUALA LUMPUR PALM OIL 
Malaysian rtaeoM* per 25 lens 

Close P re v toe* 


U8J0 171X5 
171 J0 17+70 
17420 177X0 
177X5 19000 


18320 18605 
186X5 18905 
19220 


9720 9940 
98X8 IOL10 
I0O0O 10200 
102X0 104X0 


Pels ; Wed. veL 961 epee kd. 13X39 
Source: CME. 


Company 

E arnin gs 

Revenue and profits, in motions, 
are in kml currencies unless 
otherwise indicated 



Bid 

Ask 

Bid 

Aik 

Jan 

1.190 

1250 

1.190 

124© 

Feb 


1210 

1.195 

1210 



1230 


12U 



1220 



Mov 

1.160 

1210 

1.160 

1200 


1.150 

1200 

1,150 

1.190 

JIv 

1.140 

1.190 

1.140 

1.190 

Sen 

1.130 

1.100 

1.130 

MB# 


1.130 

I.1BD 

1.130 

1,180 


VehJine: 8 lots of 25 Ions. 
Source: Reuters. 


Paris Commodities 

Jan. 10 

Suoor In French Francs ner metric Ion. 
Other Houres In Francs ner Iff kg. 


Prev. Dav Ooen Inf. 7271 ofl87 

CERT. DEPOSIT (IMM) 

SI million- p!s at 100 ad 


Britain 


XOB 

3X8 


428 

426 

+03 

408 

477 

+05 

5X6 

5.1 B 

+07 

525 

503 

+.10 

509 

5X4 

+.11 

607 

+64 

+.13 

+72 

+91 

+22 


9124 


ttor 

9123 

9124 

91,19 











9022 


Sop 

90.11 

90.11 

9Q.I1 



8937 

8524 

Dec 

8920 

8920 

BP Ml 

IWJ0 



86X6 







8808 

0603 

Jun 




89X4 

—02 

8706 

8)06 

Sea 




8875 

-03 

EsL Sates 


Prev. Salta 1X55 





Prev. Day open lot. 14X19 OH3M 
EURODOLLARS f IMM) 

Si mltik>«»-ofso(H»pa. 










9038 

8209 

Jun 

VQ2S 

90J7 

9022 

9026 

—414 

890S 

B+5S 


8975 

B9J6 

8972 

8975 

—04 

8902 

MRfl 

Dec 

S9JI 

B933 

B9.29 

8972 

-J3 

8907 

96.10 

Mar 

83.98 

2198 

8895 

B8.9S 

— X2 

8877 

8673 

Jun 


E8X7 

08X7 

88X8 

—XI 

8800 

67X5 

Sea 

8370 

8378 

8875 

8879 

—X 

8927 83X1 Dec 83.11 *3.13 

Eft-Salec Prev. Soles 29.994 

Prev. Day Ooen Ini. 92X72 up 2168 

Ban 

58.13 

— S3 


j Commodify indexes 

Close 

Moody's 96+20 1 

Reuters 1,956X0 

DJ. Futures 12L57 

Com. Research Bureau _ 284X0 

Moody's : base 100 : Dec. 31. 1931. 
p- preliminary; I - final 
Reuters : base 100 : Sep. IB. 1931. 
Dow Jones : base 100 : Dec. 31, 1974. 


Market Guide 


British Telecom. 


Previous 
96+00 f 
1.932X0 
124X0 
244X0 


Prefax Net 
Per Share - 


1st Half 
Revenue — . 
Pretax Net , 
Per Shore - 


SUGAR 

High 

LOW 

Clew 

Clfoo 

Mar 

1275 

1260 

1770 

1J7 

+ 24 

May 

1023 

1007 

1030 

021 

+ 26 

Aua 

1X13 

1X00 

1X10 

1X12 

+ 35 

Od 

un 

1X65 

1X60 

1X67 

+ 19 

Dec 

N.T 

NT. 

1X15 

1X50 

+ 15 

Mor 

1759 

1250 

1.750 

1250 

+ 20 


Thom EMI 


Esi. voi.: 1200 tats of 50 Ions. Prev. actual 
sates: 2483 lots. Open Interest: (8811 
COCOA 

2.150 2.125 2.132 2,134 4 

2.168 2.155 2.140 2.145 

“ T N.T. 2.140 — 

N.T. — 2,140 

N.T. 2XM — 

N.T. 

N.T. 


BRITISH POUND (IMM) 

S Per pound- 1 potat eauatsnXQOI 

-'an 1.1300 

1X178 1.1350 Mar I.I3S0 1.1350 1.1270 1.130 

1J350 1.1331 Jun 1.I38G 1.I31D 1.1250 1.12S5 

14450 1.1330 Sco 1.1235 


United States 

Chemical New York 


Ath Qear. 

Net Income. 

Per Shore — 


Net income 
Per Share. 


GASOIL 

Jan 23125 228X0 23100 211X0 22600 22+30 
Feb 229 JO 22600 227.75 22800 77+25 27450 
MOT 22+50 22IJ5 222J0 232J5 2I9JS 7 IV. 50 
API 219X0 21525 31800 21+25 21475 21500 
May 71+25 21705 21700 21800 213JO 31900 
Jun 31600 21600 21 500 21700 31000 21+00 
Jly 217X0 21700 21200 21700 21200 21400 
Alia N.T. N.T. 21200 223-DO Sliffij mi® 

Sop N.T. N.T. 212X0 228X0 21300 mm 

1198 MM aflOB tans. 

GOLD 

Fob 30600 303JD 18100 30440 302X0 30250 
Ad 30900 30900 30740 30830 30+50 30700 
289 hits Ot MO Irev oz. 

Sowers: Ftruten and London Petroleum Ex- 
change fgosoll). 


French GDP Grew 
0.8% in 3d Period 

Reuters 

PARIS — French gross domes lie 
product rase a revised 0.8 percent 
in ibe third quarter of last year 
after a revised 0.4 percent fall in (he 
second quarter, the National Sta- 
tistics Institute said Thursday. 

The figures compared with the 
institute’s provisional announce- 
ment in November of a I -percent 
third-quarter rise after a 0.5-per- 
ceni second-quarter fall. GDP 
growth in the first quarter was 1 
percent, the institute added. Gross 
domestic product is a measure of 
nation’s total goods and sendees, 
deluding income from foreign in- 
vestments. 

Hie rise in (he third quarter was 
due mainly to the industrial sector, 
and particularly manufacturing in- 
dustry, while in other sectors of (be 
economy the sharp rise in agricul- 
tural production was offset by stag- 
nation in services and construction. 


Today 

Htoti grade coeoer cathodes: 
3PPI 1.173X0 1.17300 

3 mor ms 1.182X0 1.182J0 
Coooer ca tirades: 
spot 1.16600 1.168X0 
3 months 1,18300 1.18400 
Tin: soot 9X10X0 9X2000 
3 months 9 .78500 9.7B90O ' 
Load: soot 370X0 37500 


1.163X0 1.16400 
1.172X0 I.I72X0 


Load: soot 
3 months 
Zinc: soot 
3 months 
Silver: soot 
3 months 
Aluminium: 


328X0 329.00 
715X0 716X0 
70+50 707X0 
53800 53900 
S51X0 55150 

92250 92300 

944X0 94500 


Nickel : sbo! 4J60X0 +370X0 
3 months +3D0XD +3QSX0 
5owce: Reuters. 


91800 919X0 

941 JO 942X0 
+‘914191 4JKBfl 

6X60X0 +261X0 


S&p 100 Index Options 

Jan. 10 

Chicago Board 


Sire* 




Price 

Jtm 

Fab 

Mar 

Job 

Fen 

Mar 


145 





_ 

_ 



ISO 


16 

— 

1/16 

1/16 

3rti 








* 



7% 

9 




1 + 

rv 

165 

2ft 








* 

2* 

4 


4to 

5 



1/16 







180 

— 

ft 

% 

— 


— 

Vi .. 


Total can vakMM 300X56 
Total con opob ioL 558.928 
Total uta return* ngAOt 
Total POI mn ML 318X6+ 
locum; 

HMO 16+79 Low U24S CfaCO I66J9 + 3^9 

Xwrar: coae. 


Hrralb^^&rtfmne 


Reaching More 
Than a Third of a 
Million Readers 
in 164 Countries 
Around the World. 












INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY II, 1985 


Page 15 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


Trr 


REAL ESTATE 
FOR SALE 
USA 

COMMERCIAL 
& INDUSTRIAL 


(Contizraed From Back Page) 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 

GREAT BRITAIN 


t , V 'i ' 

.? -1 <"H 



EMPLOYMENT 

SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 


Don’t nte 
MIHMAHONAL 
SECRETARIAL PQSftONS 

TUESDAYS 

fated HI Oawtfwd Steffen. 

EDUCATIONAL 
POSITIONS AVAILABLE 

LANGUAGE SCHOOL setes fuU time 

mother -tongue English leadm. Mist 
he in poamon of EEC passport or a 


12 90, So far trag/W. 

NATIVE BMUSH toother ora rv 
, bto. pgpera ABceagy. Td HonAon. 


AUTOS TAX FREE 

BUY YOUR NEXT CAR 
TAX HH Al© US OUR 
BUY-BACK PROGRAM 

AND SAVE 

NffiE FOB HE CATALOG OB 
HSEBUY-BAOC FOLDER TOt 
SHFSDE B.V., ?JQ. fat 75tf, 1 1 1 8 ZH 
Airetenfara Al port, tiw N e tMate. 
Phono (Q2jl£E33- Telex, 12568 


SUPStD e Ux., 576 fifth Anno. 

747 7* Root, New YoftNX 1HD6,U5A. 


AUTOS TAX FREE 

TRANSCO 

TAX HIE CARS 

We keep a constat* nod of More than 
one hn&zd brand now an, 

. c o mnetitivtey priced _ 

Sand far Free catcfogue & stadt fat. 
Transco SS 95 ferdsfaan, I 


Farhc 77D 31 11, Fri. A weteend 
EXECUTIVES AVAILABLE" 


7th Roar. New Torts. N.Y. 10036, USA. 

Phono tfl2J 6044k TdoT&965 

SHP9DE SA, Choussoe de Wave 
465, 1040 fcus*k, Bsfcure. 
Phone; (02)6499062. lnSet 63290 


Morgan Bank Names Culver Lawrence Urquhart group maoag- JT Is Promoted 

” mg director, responsible for cspl°- V. * . .. , n 

To Head Euro-Qear Unit and fuels, sp^^^omcab^ *> fa Angela r,ma 5^^ 

shipping, effective in early Apni- YORK Internal' 

By Brenda Hagerry Gtfcorp has named Robert E Mr. Urquhart, currently a lP^ cr the la rges t US 

International HeraU Tribune Fallon to head its Capital Markets uu ?* JS~LiiriS!SS f 0 «esH ,roducls company, said 

LONDON — Morgan Guaranty Group Activities in Japan. Mr. Fal- rail, wU succeed JJSpraidait anddiefex- 

Trust Co. of New York announced Ion, a director of Qticorp Interna- ^ Andasrai is John A. Georges will 

Thursday [be appointment of Peter tional Lid. and Vickers Da Costa fc^ diai ™ 1 April 9on the 

F. Culver as Mneral manager of die Ltd, will be based in Tokyo. Previ- the Brnnah group^oaxaUng of Edwin A. Gee. 64 

Euro-aear Oporad^uCniter in ously, he was based in H^g Kong 

the bank’s Brussels office. as managing director of dticop rf* d** executive! 3fes£ 

Mr. Culver, who takes up his new International Ltd and as head of as president will be 

post Feb. L was previous^ deputy corporate finance for the Asia-Pa- ford will succeed Mr. Fanctougn. . O'Neill, cunatly £■ 

general manager of the onus. Hfc dlic region for the Gticorp Capital appointed m^yice presidetit in charge of 

succeeds Thomas H. Fox. Mr. Fox. Markets Group. SJrwn ramticboari “f 1 packaging oo- I 


Eui^*^ 5pomd^&nter in 
50QSLjnbindt/ga o5ta + 500 slw the bank s Brussels office. 

inm c brMn/b4? soo^sc’ln Mr. Culver, who takes ip his new 

paKFfKhwpmMfdm 
T90n5-I6wdw5inbkrkmotafc general m a n ager of the center. He 


WEST INDIES 


PARTS AREA FURNISHED 

74 CHAMfS&YSEB 8fh 

Sh*fia2 or 3rocm op qrt m e ro. 
Ora Djordti or toont 




GENERAL POSITIONS 
AVAILABLE 


500 St black/ 

leather palamoino, brand new, 
folly loaded DMIO&OOQ. 
380 sa widnghl bW 

lo u ihar blue, brand now. 
f ulfo- looded, DM84 JD0. 
500 Sa 5/84 an&wtndt/ 
tatter btcai, OM30/I0Q. 


succeeds Thomas H. Fot. Mr. Few 
S SSS^SrSz rmmr r appanted a senior vice presi- 
fSi dent of the bank and head of its 
amice insert / nyort T s dot a management-inf orm&tion and 
4 ^ profit-analysis depanmem in the 
dorf. w. Gwwnwy. Tat, M 211 - New York office. 

434646. Tatec 


an office in Frankfurt and 


Thorn EMI PLC has appointed 
Ivor Owen to its board. Mr. Owen 
currently is diaitma" of Thorn 
EMI Commercial and Hone Ap- 


4r. 8L 4 Dunt 

p. t 2 n 2ii 

374. 


John Busch representative- For- pliances and in addition will be- 
^rcm-anairas depanmem m tne he ^ ^ NOcko Seaui ^ ^ dhajwtaa ^ EMI Gtot&J™™™* president 

Mew York office. ties in Frankfurt. An executive of Lighting next month following the and Jjjp “JS officer in 

The Euro-dear Operations Ceo- Robert Fleming, a London-based retirement of Leslie H3L Named °ctob« JjgJ* was naroed 

er, the dearance system for inter- merchant bank, said the opening of associate directors were Tom du g catfiQ inv 351 September. 

lationaHy traded securities, has the Frankfurt representative office Mayer and Gary DarWalL Mr. ” 

jeen opoated by Morgan Guaran- was “part of our policy for increas- Mayer is chief executive of Thom T ___ « „ . 

y on behalf of Euro-Qear Clear- ing market coverage in securities EMI Electronics; Mr. Dartnall, ceeding Janw o. Henderson, who 

race System PLC since 1982. broking and dealing.” rhairman and chief executive cf retired. 

Thom EMI Screen Entertainment British Cfoeooon Airways has 
n . TF7»n r . IT. . ~w~t* appointed Lany Langley to the 

ltomgnon Wuljom Kissinger firm SbeB International Petroleum in new post feting con- 

^ ^ London has named Philip J. Car- sultant to.asist with the develop- 

The Asnoated Press ed by the fonner U S. secretary of roll natural-nas coordinator, effec- tnenioftbefflrimes North Atlantic 


TRAVEL A GB4CY IN PARIS twb 

tourist tnjdo. Write wait CV la Trano- 


PARtS seeks 280 SL 9/84 ndni^t bW 

911 POKGH^UtflBtA^LrlUe 

* • i ‘‘- ** *‘ rMirfifm 


whiWI oartw block. DM6aa». 

Ftetete Roa^eA gTftSggfl.CT gT^ 

gjjM . M . „ r«w Merades 55 modd, TRANSMM8 BBOUM, 21 Ge 

GENERAL cal ns dm end rfate sabaan, &-2241 Zotnal, Wwp. 

PORTIONS WANTED anNANZWG COWOtATlON 03384J054 Tk 323trf Tnxasi 1 

t* SUIT'S sSm%MB. 

TOSCO 

sstss^swrisi T 

4 Wm^S djn - ^ 76099 B ^31@tf?T&. 

■WISS, FBAALE, kring in Pans, veih *'*"** UEGAL SERVICES 

amtaanMot pnatian in phamaceub- EPA/DGT a rtfiaaion & (hipping by 
cod incijsJTy seals intoresbrg, ndmen- the coepertv 

dent and respcxsT^e pasaber vmvi an 

irtem*o!id corporation, (public relo- OIR&CT FROM SOURCE 


TRANSJttJNDI BBCftJM, 21 Gstal- 
soboan 8-2241 Zotnal. Ai*«nrp. Tet 


REAL ESTATE 
TO RENT/SHARE 

AUSTMA 

VBMA Anerioan roots 4-raam fia- 
nstod not foxing Opura. J7S) month- 
ly + condamnuiiL Please a/I Rome 
06863065 or lawyer Stager Vienna 
526874. 


FRENCH PROVINCES 



KFSMaTa.TMQn.Afaayiin The Eurodear Operations Cen- 
stoda bra nd iw Mercedes, bmw, isr, the clearance system for inter- 
nationally traded securities, bag 
20 iB Aj**«ra. Ttx; 72950 a Tel: 32/ been operated by Morgan Guaran- 
3 / 233 99 SL Ttc 72931 BOSS. (y on b ehalf of Fimwlfar Qear- 

ance System PLC since 1981 

orange axneraoa + sfasnant. FA 

Sf9fc*B?i (%SEr* T * n tw:tj r-A 


cBemteS*? president will be 
ppiiLTL OT^oll, currently se- 
nioryice president in charge of 
pajxiho*ru and packaging op- 
eratioos- Georges came to 
lntei»tfOT« Paper in 1979 af- 
terayen 5 91 011 p °nt Co. Mr. 
Georges was named president 
and efref operating offierr in 
October l»*» wd was named 
chief executive last September. 


03-384 'ICL54 Ik 3Z3td Trena &. fa 
dodo Mereedw, WM. ASQ 
EW BB) MEKBB SOO SEQ so- 
pert, 1965 ns Style Autaovtive 
Lfd. EngmlpCO] CT099. T«kx 


BRUSSELS — Etienne Davig- state, Henry A. Kissinger. 


NEW MEBCSS BH 
not models raceine 


non, the former Eurtqjean Commu- Mr. Davignon was Belgiui 

nity industry commissioner, will commissioner at the EC for d 
join Kissinger Associates Inc. as a years> He was responsible for 
consultant and board member, an industry and energy, and condi 
EC spokesman said. m trade nesoiiations with 


1UU I1ALA11 HI gild VWIUUKMWly w ' : , 1 . , 

tive Feb. 1. He was with Shell Oil route netwak ana the introduction 


Mr. Davignon was Belgium's Co. in Houston as vice president May 1 of its s^J 10 ^ between Lon- 
mmissioner at the EC for dght for public affairs. In addition. Jade don and N® x ore. Mr. Langley 
ars. He was responsible for EC E Little, area coordinator for was previously in charge of the 


KLTefcTi “? sult f nt 20(1 b ? ard uonbtt. an industry and energy, and conduct- Southeast’ Asia for Siefl Interna- British opera tms of Trans World 

rue FC spokesman said. trade negotiations with the tioaal, has been transferred to Airlines and m ost recently estab- 

ICES The company, which gives pditi- United States and Japan, the EC’s Houston as senior vice president of lished a trawl mans try consul Lan- 

cal advice to governments, is head- main trading partners. administration for Shdl Ofl, sue- cy. 



GERMANY 


GREECE 


NYC - 47* & Bari 

RIVBi PLAZA CORP 

DAG HAMMARSUOID TOWEB 

QufAty kmstarOMwd 

Condonmai Apartmem In 
Now FuB Service BtAteg Wdb 
S wroana Pool, Ftacflh Club, and 

lin, ■ - - C-nM-M.i » Lli. 

nousenaapmg jonnin akiblmo 

knmectiate Rented 
SFKTAOItAJt 
1, 2, S, a 4 Ho c 
Ajiwhnarti fa— » $2420 

Fumishad Apotaranb Also Avotabio 


DOMESTIC 
POSmONS WANTED 


Trace tendon lid. 

II Hawarden Ht. ten doi NW3 7BR. 
Tel: 01-208 0007. 

Teles 8956022 TEAS G. 



SERVICES 

YOUNG LADY 

PA/InterpnOer & Touram Guide 

NEW MERCEDES PARIS 562 0587 

FOBSOtf, BMW, EXOTIC CABS 

com i C7/V"^ wrt YOUNG LA0Y GUDB 
rnfo/rn 3 / UCn o dumled , for day, dinnea & travel 
fa UtMtfTTftl JT iWi.r» . PARIS A AKPOBT5 Tab S27 90 95. 

BBTSHtVICE 

Far ehianina. incarmce, band, 

—SSiS**- YOUNG BArANT LADY 

RUTE INC. PARIS: 52S 81 01 

Tounusstr. 52, 6000 Frankfurt. ■ — ■ 

WGerm-tal P) 69-232351,11x411559 MTGMAIIONAL BEAUT1RB. People 
hfomioton only by ptene or tele*. UN.TD. USA & WOfiLDWEJE- TS 
212-7657793 / 765-7794 

PARIS 527 01 93 PA YOUNG LADY 

ROliS-ROYCE 


British Telecom’s Pretax Profit Increases 48% 


(Contmoed from Page 11) United States under the offering In its report. Thorn EMI said 
SO Deuce a share: a further 80 have been sold back into the British pretax profit in the first half ended 


corder market ‘Head me to lake a 
cautious view of the results for the 


GREECE iwar Kobncta. Soudi frb- 
B Wta i panmufa. Comfort style 
name, 6 Maple, 2 fas from ML 
fant m tic wow, ft 0.000/ rnonrtv Tel: 
Peris 251 S3 81 ewerings. 

HOLLAND 


DUTCH H0U9NG CBKRE B.V. 
Dduaa rantalL Valeriogtr. 174, 
Amriardani. Q2U621234 ar 623222. 


PHB BRUM MAKHAARDU 


For Info CaB 212319-1990 
Sat & Son. 212759-8844 
Sot - Swi 11 - 4j Mon to Fri 9 - 5 



fall llnaiiiu Swvio fcwlrii 

AmsforfaeTTefc 020768022. 


REAL ESTATE 
WA2VTCD/EXOUNGE 


■.TTT.THi Ac 


AUTOMOBILES 

MOODES FOB USA 
Bradnow, al fypes inmac£c*afy or 
fort dated avadable. accarduig la 
DCTT/ffA, Runda Autamobl Exports, 
snai 1972. 8998 lindnnbara, W. Ger- 
many. Phonra (0)6381 72513 Tk 541145 

19U AUBUM PHAETON roadter 
tepfoca). 4 pannger, Cafiorwa bub 
ISO ado, Uncom medanictfa 71. 
Comely leather, wra wteeb, modi 
aora. loo iwnenais to mertfon 7«i 
HoBand 2977-22643. Tlx 18101 N. 


PARIS: 52S 81 01 


ROUS-ROYCE 

BBtflEY 

BRITISH MOTORS 
WRIGHT BROTHHS 


up 50 pence a share; a further 80 have been sold back into the British pretax profit in the first half ended cautious view a me results lor the 

pence is due in two installments in market Sept 30 sank 28 percent to £40.2 year." . 

the next 17 months. If the extra 80 hi contrast he said, Japanese in- milli on, reflecting higher borrow- Thorn’s l™ 05 umi \ a microchip 
pence is added, the shares are trad- vestors have been net buyers of 8T ing costs along with weakness in maker, showed oper ating profit of 
ing at 200 5 pence, up 54 percent since the offering. music and a drop in sales of large- £ 2.6 million, loom, which bought 

from the governments offer price Despite the sleep rise in BTs screen color television sets and vid- 16 percent of mines from ioe Brit- 
‘ of 130 pence. shares, analysts at some London eo recorders. Operating profits ish government for £95 million last 

Al the current diare mice. RT i< stockbrokoages still recommend were higher for military dectronics. summer, said it still plans to make 

YOUNG ELEGANT LADY Eurooe’s second-lames? conroanv buy* 0 ® them with a long-term view, domestic appliances and lighting, an offering of Imnos shares to the 
^*525 81 01 mVSSKteSSH “T^ prospects fort^ rest of the Overall, Ses grew 8.4 percent to P u^ “at the ^propnaie time." 
wtmNATioNAi BEAUTi HiLfa^e /DuS SbelL year and next year look good, so £1-44 billion. j ^^hongh Thom S results were 

JMTD. USA a woaowffit^t U.Su investors have beta takin g the underlying support should re- Peter Lais ter, chairman and about in hne with expemuoru, the 

?i 2-765-7793 / 7&7T94 their profits on BT shares. 8 main,” said RiciafdRyder of Phil- chief executive, said problems m company’s shwa declined 10 

flinclnnliAr Bull BTc t nmciirAr line A Drew, who said British insli- the British television and video-re- pence to dose al 4/ / pence. 


their profits on BT shares. 
Christopher Bull, BTs treasurer, 


Ups & Drew, who said British insli- 


cstimated ti»t at least two-thirds of tutions are Ukely to buy whenever 


soqeie diane park 260 87 43 the 180 million shares sold in the the price slips. 



MOAN fUBMSIB APABTMBir to 

1st $900 nouNy. London 870 0512. 

GREAT BRITAIN 

RELOCATION WITHOUT Aegmm- 
hon. If you unh to rant or acquis a 
hows ar ifaUuiO it 2m test nj> 
dated dsna of London and iti onvi- 
ram, your ford port-of-ed should be 
Georoo Knight & Partners - Tte U»- 
hng Apente. 9 Hocdh Street, tendon 
Nm Tteghaafc 01-794-1125, Tte 

2S480HXfeGL 

CMVAL LONDON - bracutee MT- 


EXCHANGE APA1IM&4T «i Honda 

for o PortnaH hate Bha iiU or Bwi- TO BTTMCX8SS, Dec 62, modd TO. 
era. Stootad Burt keynokf* tone- Gwntea Mfoe mtanw. 5 
town Jupiter. 20 tehi North Mm JWJM) k™. Pna F34JOO. O-nm: 
Beach, an wte, around floor. 6 Pnra7639B8P 
yeara" |, w.?bedi, 2 tote&dMcte 1983 DATStM 280 ZX twtxx Euro- 


MONTE CARLO 
tarafotehr of Monaco 
Tel: (93J 50 64 84 
Teltoc 469475 MC 
OfSad Dared Factory Deal 
Cm Saopte Woridwide 
Ertrto&ted ifoce 1925 


MM&ManmudH,israrity&rerii- BT said it is on course to meet its 

P ^foL earto ' forecast »hat pretax profit 

catod^Eu^orfoS’S Australian Jobless Rate Falls Jf' at leas J 

cemypnan J £1.35 billion. The brokerage of 

YOUNG german lade - Muten- ReuIm James Cape! & Co. forecasts £1.44 


gud^Jgsmndiata ' n 

Pft ' ifi htuc a ttp CANBERRA — Australia’s sea- Michael Armiiage, an analyst at 

yawn lady coqram for sonally adjusted unemployment Capri, said BT still has ample 
ran&eeetei8i.Gnn vote. 2770i«. rale declined lo 8^ percent of the scope for cutting costs by reducing 
MUUIU NGIIAL N YC lADY ognm- estimated work force in December its staff from the current level of 
RftCvid. pi 2 i 4nSn!* from 8.7 percent in November and about 239,000. In the 12 months 
young a somsticath) toiy 9.4 percent a year earlier, theStatis- ended Sept 30, BT shed 5,400 em- 


James Capri & Co. forecasts £1.44 
billion. 

Michael Armitage, an analyst at 


MHS4CAR HWC MQNCZAU. 34 
bedroom ftmfated eyait ui * Apri 1 
-June !5,1985iiWarhouM*Mpflr& 
cock butnerf raqwsd. Oucfoy imaor- 

*m± Ban 161V&dd Tribune,^! 
NeuiBy Codex, (tanas 


MBKDE5 SOO SB, BRAND «W, 
blue mefofc; al etora^ rmecSaldy 
auteoble, K. Bktenna Gemumy (tj) 
23734055 

AUTO SHIPPING 


'SSZ.TriS HOW TO IMPORT A BStOFEAN 

CAR INTO TM ILSJL 

? IvJT^Iu* Wntnr >« Hw dooenem enjluin ftey whst one 
nrf! m«te do to bring o ot eito «te Ui 

’^Siftrsaftc A&sr 


TAX FRE CARS 
, P.C.T. 

Ingnl Showroom X In ventory 

Al mnbt. cfl m odek. trend new 
S ra riom 1, 2008 Antwerp, Bdaucn 
Tet 3.'231 59 00 
Th 35546 PHCA8T S 
Apply for cur colo ur ctfaiopm 
US$5 C9L1 

TAX ns CARS: MERCEDES, fafe 
Boyce. Aotfi. Volvo. Parscne. BMW. 
We keep a brge node of vend new 


companion for rate. draan&buB- tics Bureau said Thursday. 

nen. Trf, 578 2087. 

LOM3GN. YoongGenmn/Frandioft- _ 

oa to meet you on var visit lo I 

london. Tet UK 01-381 8852. J Ttl • HT 

, SRBR Barawa I floating Rate Notes 

cQQHXxruorL 

5MGAPORE INTL GUDES. Cot Sev | 

popore 734 96 28 . Dollar 


ployees. 


ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 

Quotations Supplied by Funds Listed 
10 January 1985 

The net osset volueoootathxn shown betoware supplied by tee Fflodl dltca with thr 
exception of some funds whose quotes are based on Issue prices. Toe following 
morainal symbols indicate frequency of quotations soaaHM far the I HT: 

Id) -dally.- (to) -weekly; (M-bt-mwiHilv; (D-reaalarfy; Ol-lrrnsulorry. 

AL MALMANAGEMENT — id I Bevy DllLBBfomnl I S3«60 

(w)AKMal Treat. SJ» S 137.2* LLDTDS BANK INTUPOB 43k Geneve II 

.... ,.,c n.r-r, . .-r. , ^ — Hwl Llovds lOflDollor ___ 5 102J0- 

BfMK JUUUSB AE R t Ca Ltd —Hwl Lloyds Infl Europe SF 1W.TO 

ilTSi 1 ™ — «tol Ltovdslnr»Grovrtl»_ SF HMOM 

— 7T: J™* — «*») Lloyds I nr I laapito— SF 30950- 

—Id > EoutooM- Pacific SF >153.00 PARI5BA5— GROUP 


Jan. 10 


1—rfMlq B»e/Uot. ceueoeWtod Bid Askd 


dwrepn)3 

UEsUml 

London 


SlWliSS; bww. 92521 Nto* Cgdo^ Frong^ ^00u*ente^s 

EMPLOYMENT s£L T?S5i J5 


odekenes. cus- 
ng procEtiures 
Becrartr of tfto 


rtrora dobs-, you con sm up to 
USSIAL® 0 when buying a Mereedw, or 


LUXURY SBVKXD BATS m Mayfair 
and Keangtan ere tfw dternotnns to 
e^emnn. hotel accommodteoa 
Confext Awdeh & Gonpcpiy, 155-157 
Oxford 3 , London Wf or phone 01- 
434 ITOiTfrc 26^46. 

UNDON BARB ST. SeBddems 
holiday Art*. FuRy equipped, edor 
TV, Inao. deeps 1-6 peoara. Sdf- 
co n ta rnrd (ioai £90/vmnL Crawford 

FfoSday Ffaj, 33 Gawfard St, tea- 
don Wt. Tet 01-40? 616& 

BM t BUTCHOFF. A large selection 
of propertaH n St John's Wood, 
Regeab Pest Sun Canaan. H» 

stood & ■tmrom. 6 mm +. T« 

01-586 7561. The 8831 68 AGO G 
JOFM BStCH has 20 years wperience 
in Rentals, law ar short tenraaes, 
CentrcJ & suburban Lond on & Abefr 
deen. Breh 8 Go. 01-49M802. 

LONDON. For fce bed funmhed Aids 
and he me s. Consul! the SpeodisH 
Pfdfan, Kay and Lewis- Tet tendon 
Bg2MTelMg846gg)E& 
R» UDOJBT BBSS) RATS inten- 
ded’* lop rasidwtod areas, phone 

tendon 328 3333 

FOR RjnetB) 1ETTMGS M S.W. 
Londorv Soney & BettiwB. Ccrtod 
MAYS, 0»W» (3^ 284)3811 UK. 


secretarial 

POSITIONS AVAILABLE 
far PARS Loomei 

SECMTAUB 

fafinmal, nemum BTS fawl, 
tea n4 edge BM-word onxenor, 
pmforttecsMedgo « En^nh. 

TELEX OKKATORS 

woddng wtfi compter relayed 
equipment. Written Bl^BA 

Swildiboord Operators 

BSngud EnflWvftnoch. 
Experience in Bdernalianal dornan. 

App^r: PROOEST ett 
«. r/MromesrS 265 16 62 
795 bd. Raspai 33S 14 30 

EXECUTIVE SEOiAir RGQUSH1 
by and tendon repnamdalwa office, 
octiw in intarordiond trode md dip- 
ping. Ideal mnddato should be on 
ffdeperafert csd snB-rooteoled per. 
son wdh arawoui espericnca at senior 
tost, and cUe to hade d faces af 
office wart. Foreign languageM and 
ise ofwordnrocesswwouidbeea- 
sals. Pfocna lofcphono tendon |DTJ 402 ' 
7256/7 far oa eody qtooinfatort 


BMW n Errepe & nym ting it to ihn 
State- To recom the momd, and ... ■ , ■ 

7000 Stanyirt 1 . West Germany 

■ - ^ Tan Free Cat/ Tea Roe fah 

FRANKHJttT/ MAIN-W. Genry yry. il Shop around, find foe bee prices 

liertnon n GmhH. Tet 069-448071. you can get and then coma to 
Fid: -op al ewer Europe “ra/ra-dsps. BRM PY 

TRANSCAR 20 rue La Soar, 75116 . -i n - . -w ^ 

Preis. Tet 500 03 04. Nice: 8^ 95 33. 


and good used ars. We do die » . I 

DX3li. and ERA on our care pro- SOUTH OF FSANQfc Young kxly ajrrv 

macs. We oho tale care or fee s ri p- pontons Tat {93) 85 19 90. lauer/Mln out/. 

^^ bo, &^ J ' S ^i CO taS2« NYC COMPAMON VIP. SoarAy 

SSISlKS 

Its Betoaan 82209 EUROAU 8. to BBJNGUAL ASSISTANT to business AJHeo irWiSU-C? 
U-SA 4995689 wo US. W Euro Au- eseemivra. Prra SOO 58 17 AWra* leHN-mtoras 


eseemivet. Pant 500 58 17 
FRENCH RIVERA. IrtarpnOe 
Compce so iL Tat 193) 6f 78 4 

FBAN»URT - Young, tody c 
pon end guide. Tet 1069] 44 


r* »s wjowjd 

I1H 17-4 100J2100JB 
Nw 6-7 IKLSllKil 
MUX4MIM 
m, iso n.N wur 

ISIS ao lDQjniHLZI 


BceCeeim. llellonioSU.-N f** M 19S3 10003 


FRANKWRT - Young tody uoieuii- 1 BonceDi Rmno-tl 
pon and guide. TetlWl 44 77^, Ban® tote Wr, to 

PASS 747 59 SB TOUBST GUIDE Bk^Gmxe.n/w 
Agporto. 7 M/adjdl tntlmrweL Bi Ql Ireland jy<-g 


BcoNazLO«aro5Vr41 Iff*. 3M 10U5MIL4S 

Bence Di Roma -*1 7-* *9£7 f?.W 

Bunco Santo Seirila SHte W. W W.lfl WJB 
Bence Pin to liva 30-5 99.25 108J: 


Teton 89551 1Z 

eum £ *2f2 ILTS^E 

IstfaH. Tet^ rfoTpil UK. 2-673 33 92 

I DMSlMfeRRSn TLX- 25459 

ttMsa-aar 5 


Irtwerp; 233 99 85. Cannes 39 4344 ! 

AUTOS TAX FREE 


UAL SA 
ONK3AL 
ROUS ROYCE 
DEAUSt FOB BB0UM 


TAX FRB CARS 

ROLLS ROYCE 
BENTLEY 

Worldwide delivery 

r. de Middelbourg 74-B2 

1170 BRUSSELS 


BMW or Roils Zoyts front: 
ESmEX GmbH. Ganfingrtr. IX. 
D-4330 MuriheuT: ad. 2uhr. W Gem. 
Tet (0J208-434O99 TU. 8561188 


PARIS 747 59 SB TOURIST SADE. Bk Or Greece fin* 11 % 141 9U0 9M 

Airports. 7 anx/mid«ghL IntlrraveL Bk 01 Ireland 5V>« Vh 2M 100.1110023 

^ - j=SS3C= “* ^ Bk Of irokmd 5W47 U 25-1 WJ5 UB2S 

NEW YORK 6847500. ton. 1102. Bl Mentroel swta e*. 2W HiaimaQ50 

VIP. WIPersond Assistant Si Ctf Montreal 5 -« 18% 28-1 lDtUEmn 

Bk Of Monartol 5U.-V1 up% jo-« loi^iioun 

HONG KONG K-620000 Young tody Bk Of New vert M n, vw mcomw 

(AsoiAVertanil convxnon. BkOl Now Seetto S’i4W] TBs 3W loaifua95 

Bk Of Mono Scoria 5%-H ffa |[.7 HNLg7UHf7 

WBT INDIAN LADY COMPAMON. Bk Of Tokyo iHnW 11 >4 injOmK 

Tet tendon 01 381 9847 Bk Of Tokyo W.-W W* 29-1 !0MCnOO5O 

■— -■■■ ■ Bk Of Tokyo -47 12% »1 UXUiHXMi 


11 in IDWOmK 
H% 29-1 IOB40M050 
12% »1 I00J5MO45 



PARIS VtP LADY GUB3E 5338026, Bk Of Tokyo 5ii-+w88^i 17b 5-2 iousui5B 


— -n_o.su ^ _ r—— Bb nnwiiffl Vi Tj 

YOUNG LADY 01-630 0757 London- Bakers Trusts 
Aa-ports/TrayeUng. Bonkers Tnref 5W-W_ 


EUROPE AUTO BSOKBS 

FOB 214, 3430 AR Nieuwearin Holland 
Tet <01 340341346. TV- 7^68 EAB M 


TAX FREE AUTO SA1ES 


PARIS YOUNG LADY 341 21 71. BU5-95 
VIP PA S biEngud irterpreler. BO*. 5 -99 „ „ 

Til . _ * 1 . 'L 1 Bo li'foj fl^gr 

AJH»5.Lx^aDnnanmcraperiori- Ba I nMUB 5tt-fP 

d Mite, tet 8066194, BoLynfon Eur5%4» 

■ * Ufa SVb47 

PARIS HH PEESONAI/ BUSINESS Btcsv-ocffl 

Astetont Tot 32S7V32. BtetSiMtoMI 


Bk Of Tokyo 5V. -decSB/91 9% 12 * 1007810058 

3* AnwriasS'i-% •% 3M IDOOSIBOTS 

Bonkers Trust 5^-94 8 % 25 -1 I0O4D1BO5Q 

Bonkers Trust 5WM 94* 13-2 1001718077 

BqAnrae Invest PWO/fl 12 29-19050 9930 

BMS-95 M I)-* 1805310093 

Bhl 5-99 11% 11-4 1 0638 16040 

Bolnaosuez5to«9 9V. is-7 imjfliouo 

BalnkxsuetHinv 72k. 27-3 W1M1KL15 

Be LVnion Eur5WM B% 20-1 1003530045 

fMc( SW-63 134. 20-1 1003710043 


° r * r 7W Eu ^?L US • ond ^ PARIS YOUNG LADY, tote* gwfc. 

aunivcx&ei. T J- Bfl7 BneS%4i* 


Or rental, unfimced mfleage. 
Leasng new car 1 to 6 merths. 
Tetez 20Q572. Tab 6S1 4342. 
Pancart, 2 Awe Ports de Sofot Oeud 
Pen 7501 A 


NEW MBCEDB CARS 


Tet 807 8495 Paris 

FOR SALE & WANTED 


) DeEven From Stock 

500 S. 50CTSEC 50QSL 
380 SB. 380 5EC 380 S 
Porsche Carrera, Porsche Turbo 
Aatobaue-Sead GmbH 
BochumerStr 103. 4350 Sedtteghawen 
Tel 02361/ 7004 Tx 82995/ AHSD 



TLX: 25459 


COLLECTORS 


ESCORTS & GUIDES I ESCOTTS & GUIDES j ESCORTS & GUIDES | ESCORTS & GUIDES | ESCORTS & GUIDES 


INTERNATIONAL 

ESCORT 

USA & WOMDWIDE 

Head affioe to New York 
330 W. 56tb », MYjC 10019 USA 

212-765-7896 

212-765-7754 

MAJOR CHIT CARDS AND 
OCaSACCBTH) . 
Private Mnefaots hJ ps AyaRetole 

Ifoto — J wtoatog rarvire has 
been iaakredasSa lop A meet 
mduiluB hwl Sarvloe by 
USA A Inlsruiillueul naurtBOtfa 
IntfaiBga ratio gad IV. 


* USA 5 TRANSWOOD 

A-AMERiCAN 

BCORT SBMCE. 

EVSTWHSE YOU AK OK GOL. 

1-813-921-7946 

Cc( free front USj 1-800^37-0692 
CoS froe firm Rorida 1-830^820892 
lowfl Eularu w tl coous yon fcncM 


CAPRICE 

ESCORT SaWKE 

M NEW ¥OW 
TH.* 212-737 3291. 


LONDON 

Portroon Emit. Agency 

AY-Odtora SImC 
,, B - teodoe W1 
Jbb 486 r 3734 or 486 1158 

A* w*r ou* W* accepted 


LONDON 

BGLGRAIffA 

Erairt Sorvica. 

Tel: 736 5877. 


LONDON 

BEST BCORT SERVICE 
TEL- 200 8585 

LONDON 

KENSINGTON 

10 «N5WGtS mSSi stws 

ABSTOCATS 

ij-uton Esate Service 

12BWiflw^.S^bxi dowWL 

laiZon-i^M* 


ZURICH 

At£XB ESCORT SBMCE 
TH.- 01/47 55 8i 


* Z U R I C H * 

GMGBTS BCORT SERVICE. 
TEL 01/363 08 64 


★ MADRID * 

TASTE ESCORT SERVICE 
Tab 4117157 -4117602 


! loo touaefa let 322/734 38 Bo. 


FUANWURT + SUBROUM»4CS - 

Caroteess Escort & trove! lervn. LONDON 
I En^h. French, German spoken. TeL Tet 935 
1069] 43 57 61 ....... 


COLLECTORS dem WurStzer jukebox 

type 1015 mini oancStion Dft9jOOO. siig 6ec-99/s4 

^ Bnra^tovelrter^lS, I^SiSSligSjiS? 
1024 PG AMSTBSJAM ar ad 3120- King Beto 5 KnvKTW 
367800. Kino Beio Srta -eerp 

a«s4Mi 

‘ CcraS'WE 

_ _ _ _ — — _ __ Cncn SV. -90/97 

ESCORTS & GUIDES 

FRAMOURT, BRUSSBS. GENEVA, ObrflviftJvl SU-*t 

Mam. Gtenan Escort Service. Con- C*>c!M-W 

50 . 8 ^^ 322^ 38 Bb. , 

l T?^ , «W BCOaT AGWCY - 

Tet 935 5339, OwstoH iWklvl P--N 


I G»tEVA-HHe« BCORT SOVKI 
Tab 36 29 32 


AMSTERDAM JEANET Escort Serviae SSStaU 
Tet (020) 3264J or 3401 la _ g^^SwiStt Am r 

HAMBURG -KATWYN BCORT Ser- S ’*' W 

rice. MulHEnauaL 040/2^8168 


| BRUSSHS, BaGtUM VXP. BCORT ^ ^ 3^ ^ ^ SSll 
6 TRAVH. 5BNKZ 02/537 33 97 ^ 2b T. FRANKFURT TO RT ! Ser- gSSS 5, 

LONDON BCtXTSatVICE Tet 937 ZS: 069/68 O ” Sr--awn 

6574 AMSTERDAM: CLASS Escort Service. 

AMSTERDAM, Sasseh, Artfwtrp, The ^<0)20-198753 I C a SW eWe 

Hague. Rotterdam. College Escort DUSSHDORFMJRBAEicart Service. 

Service. Amsterdam (00B1 201- 906266 0211-395066. Crete rardi accepted. rSErDuHort STW9/' 


LONDON BCORT SERVICE. Tab 937 
6574. 


AMSTERDAM CITY Escort Service. LONDON 1AUS94 BCORT Service. 
10)20-340507 HeodWGolwicfc. Tet 602 1243 


AMSTBtDAM, Sassefc, Anfwera. The 
Hague. Rotterdam. College Escort 
S«Stoik Amsterdam ^(0031^906266 


Z ll D I C H neotorow/Gctwick. Tet 6PZ crLron 

W K I V n DOM1NA, AAKiagAM ESCORT LONDON ZARA ESCORT Service. gS!t\Este £*7 
•- %-wir- Gmfe Servaa. TeL- (020) 7g2342 1 TJ tyi ‘ ■"« ^ 


SanMi Escort 6 Guide ten 
Tak 01/56 96 92 


GENEVA ESCORT 

5BEVKX. Tet 46 09 28 


GENEVA .BEAUTY* 
BCORT SKVKE. 
TO: 29 51 30 


Heathraw/Gcdwidt Tet 834 79<i 


DUSS300SF-C0L0GFE-ESSB4 Ex- MJNKH ‘STARWOOD' Bcort + 
dteve BKpn service. 0211-6799863 Guide Serwce. Tet 089/4486038 

FRANKFURT + SURROUNDINGS FRANKFURT JETMY BCORT -f irov- §2f!i7g2su^ m. !n»£tf 

Orenno's Escort Servae, 069/364656 el lerviee. Tet 069/SSJ2-10 S2H2if!Ss%-«7w w» IV) JOOJSMO* 

FRAMOURT- PETRA Ejobi & Travel FRANKFURT 50NJA BCORT Ser- 


I Dollar I “ wwo 

* J Gnat Western Fin SUi-N «. 

Hill Samuel Pb-% 13% 

bner/Mta oui/Mot. ceueea next Bid Asm nm Sonwet Pgp S'k-eero ijk 

KTsoano Amertcuno llh 

uui-MOLK n, M.C ao-ni os HI Hvctro Oaebec 5VW4 D?V 

Alnad I nsn 9". u>o wjo wa ir iiihRiriB - 41 131^ 

AHto4lrWlSV.-K lift 17-4 1HL77100J2 S^SaSrtB 13 

. AMedlrWiSv.47 *% *.7 loajiiOOii 0 

ABMirish-pen> MU Hm tote kv 

Arab Bks Coro 5V-96 Ui ID B.MHI1U nrtad^SkW 7 * 

Travel | Aiienric Ra int-W Iffrt 3B-3 1DQJU1B6Z1 taT 

BcaCaem. llallanto5Ui4t tot 64 99 33 I DOJI) iwsms to, 

Bco NazLovoroSW-91 10% 3M lQa»«L«S !taW(£p^||cl 5>k-f9 lS 

CltohSV.47 UIV 

Italy -V/W f% 

J J*. Morsai 5Vt-97 9% 

Bk Of Ireland 5V.-W Vh 3V3 100.131H1ZI toSvSwWl iftw 

BkOflrefcnj5te«3 U 25-1 99.75 100-25 SJ 

Bl Montreal SW4B 9% 3W HHUSIODJO 

Bk Of Montreal 5-H 18-4 28-1 1DQ4BUR4I tS£^Bk 7 U 4 P ^ 

Sk Of Mona real 94 -91 UTV 3CM 1019)10103 2 

Bk Of New York ■** BVs IM 10 UX» 1 »M SSf iqS! m. 

BkOf Nova SCSI 10 5-4-68/9318^ 30-4 IOOAJm9S rS^ 5 U-« Si. 

Bk Of Nova Scofia SV-M 9fV tf-7 10a87WLr7 

Bk Of Tokyo 5te93 II »4 lOUDmtS Jl% 

BkOf Takva5Ui-89 H% 39-1 10MOWLSD 12% 

Bk Of Tokyo -47 IJ% 28-1 U3U5KXW5 1» 

BkOt Tokyo Slk-ffOSSTVl l» 4-2 IDUSMliB # 

Elk Of Tokyo 5U decSB/91 9% 134 KBJBlOOSa H2|(T™ , 9 T 

Bk America 5<4-9i •% 26-3 IOOJHIDO.15 £2 

Bcmkers Trusts^ 8% zs-3 lOAffliBOJO ^ 

Bankers Trust SW-94 9«. 13-2 108.171S0J7 S3^toSWr«/93 12 

BO tege invest S4M7/91 T2 79-1 9U0 9WO 18 

MetovsiaSwwn 12% 

IT - li Mon Han 0/ Seas S>4-9f Wl 

25 SSfJSrS J, 5 -’ H]SEH? Man Hon flMM SW9* 8% 

Ba fndasber S1 m-*9 72V, 77-7 WlMISLU Mark* Midland H4-94 «% 

Bo LVnion Eur 5%-M B% 3IW lOOMiaU! MkeandSV.-Vi ?*. 

ah»swe7 12 % 26-1 lomnKLo S; 

Bto»5V.-oOffl W?» 30-4 lOftfiOlOOM JSSflSn 9% 

Bfc* SW-lonflB n% » I WU21«LC J ZsSndSMi l5k. 

Bk*5Vto99 17*. TW 1BL571KU7 9% 

Bn>SVa-9S 17H 6-2 lOQJSmas Ja 

Bro5VH«Ml 12H 22-7 UJ 6 ai«Lta {SSSd9te 1? 

8is5U7 11% 2S-3 7>JS bid 

Bra>SV245^a Wo 11-1 1QCL2710017 (S’ 

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Bita5%49 KL60 9-5 IffO^lIBM Atari BOO, Dm -92 9% 

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Ba Porfbas -pern 9ta IT-2 10035106.45 uv, westrokiSli-TI 12% 

BO Worms S4-89/W 73% 4-2 Ut351BU5 SSviSSSfltw 9% 

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Bar Ckm Overseas S -90 9<v 17-* iouHioa.M SSI vvSninr^n n 

Borovs Overpass -04 « SSSSS^S Mast*OyS%«4 I» 

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King Beta SII 9 dec -99/04 9 li-J 99J2 99J2 BkJ WK IK* 

Kira Beta sue oct-f9<w n% iw uxujidsj) SSSoncrS^ Bky4« 9 % 

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g«»S te9» 1114 2M UCJ31^n g^SS2?5* 17% 

Cnt5te91 10% 0-5 IUL651KL/5 Mrvfll S4-91A4 12Vl 

^fwuyiib* » 17-] SSnT-Syi «T 

CRXS^-M 13% IB-1 lOOJOIDO^L me 1 iiikirt Till Tfi 1B% 

C*1«t5+f.»4-94 9% 28-5 100.nUnE HW 

^Mrahonra 51^93 1 » 3M wiUUi ^SkSeoHandPtato/wm* 

Qv« y^-g° 9% M 9925 99^5 5annro0 5W-9l/93 9% 

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C7jrWfan*DBk51i-91 9% 11-2 MOJOIOUS CW 

Scondtoovtan Fin 5V.-rar9311% 
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Scotland imFhi5l4-92 11% 

Snd5%-88 im. 

Seci 5*4-90/93 9% 

SJ.E.5M9 fta 

S.F£- -91 P% 

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55Jf 0, £S ISWn w** JK InMnnK SodetaGenMar5W94 13% 

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f!i hL SMS SS'15 SfmSChorlSWvnortO 12 % 

CrLron $14-93/9* 11% IM 10L74100A4 stBTrtawel-oere W)k 

CrodJILvoeS^g m. 71-3 RMS smBkOiiSSMJ 9ta 

Czodft Lvon 5%-98/W 13 9-4 1 01.19101 JB sundtomo Finance Sto-88 17% 

^LronSV,*/*. W4 9-7 100J7100J7 |S3tagS Tf5Ss£.I?3S 1% 



BraStetaMl 

BnoSVrC 

BraS%-t5/ea 

BwTVHWH 

Bnp 5^-99 

BraS14-«9 

Bnp-ia/91 

BraSVi-ta 

Bo Paribas -pero 

Ba Worms 5%-89/W 

Barciavs Overseas S-9S 

Bor days Overseas S -90 


W9. 30-4 10M01IXL90 
13% 23-1 1003219043 
12% TW 1005710047 
17% 4-J 10O751OLH 

12% 22-7 106319058 
11% 2S-3 <*J5 Wd 
VOVj 31-1 1002710037 
9% 13-4 IfiOKlOOiS 
9% $4 99A0 99J9 
1060 9-5 1003310049 

m* 4.3 iBi.moiJ 2 

13% 22-1 100381003! 
9% 11-3 1 CO-351 06.45 
73% 42 1003516045 
I TVS 31-1 1013410134 
9% 04 10134190.14 


Borders DveneasS-pere 10% 1-5 1006510015 

Barclays Overseas $-04 12% 4-3 10O29100J0 


fto 31-3 lQOM1IH.il 
11% 15-1 10013100.13 
9 n-J 99J7 9912 
11% 17-4 1004310033 
9% 97 100X10840 

77V: 17-3 lOMIOUB 
IJH lf-2 lOCL/SlOBAS 
«ta 14-3 1014110052 
12 % 24-3 MU 0101 .K 1 
fta 74 106.9210112 

11% 2*4 UKL731DU3 
UR* 45 10045100-75 

34 IM 99.90 99 JS 
12% IB-1 106X10045 
9% 28-5 1 06 T2 10022 
17% IM I0B24100J4 
7% 5-3 99J5 9945 

8 % 27-3 1063470044 
1% 77-1 9U9 98.98 
«ta 11-2 700X10645 
12% 6-3 1004876650 


ailcorp IWkfv) Aue S76-9S 8% 71-1 99J* «Jt 


Cllioorp Sat* 5%-** 

cmocita- 

Dnare*-*4 
CHlcnrn Undafea- 
Commenbar* P6-89 
Commerttoak nov-89 


9% IM 99M99X 
IDta 38-1 99J3 99JS 
9% 13-3 HH74160J6 
11% IS-I WX wax 
9% 21-7 99.96 10600 
10% 20-5 1063510045 


S 84.12 

DM 1249.11 
_ SF 91JU 
. S13W7J3 
Y 1(te292J)0 
FL 1051-73 

19Z55 

_ 8I0IJ1 


__ id j Grobar SF 97AD0 —Id I Cortexa Intematkiool S 84.12 

r/fflf =B«*toac=£S)«B 

— jd I C SF Fund - SF 3489 _| W) OBLI-DOLLAR S 1/W7JE3 

—id J Crrc&ow Fund 5F 0.91 —/-I nm I.vru Y10A2KJXI 

— W I ITF Fund R.V., — *1127 — (w) DBLI-GULDEN FL705IJ2 

BANQUE INOOSUEZ ~ {? | pah?nTER FUNT5 9*101« 

-Id ) Aslan Growth Fund 1 1634 — JP | gARIHTEI^UHP^^ . J »01 J 1 

— <w) Dh/erbood SF 81.55 —«H PAR US Treasury Bond— *70001 

— <wl F IF— America 5 1744 Roval Bank Of Canoda^OBatAGuernsev 

— fwl FIF— Eurara S»A1 -4-fwl RBCComtefon ifaidUl. *1065 

— 4wl FIF— Pod fk *1601 -Hwl RBC Far EastAPodf 

— <d I Indasuez Multibanrts A *8942 -Hwl RBC Inn Carttal Fd. 

— Id I IndosuaMulttbondsB *1*741 -Hwl RBC inri income Fd S 10^7- 

— (w) BrttS MonoaCurr «BJ9* SKAMPIFQM D IH^ FUIM 1^1382701 

— Iw) Brlt.Unfverta! Growth S OlMO SWISS BANK CORF. 

— (wl Brlt.CoM Fund . — *0497- —{a ) America Voter SF SC'S 

— Iw) BritAtanaaXurrency— C 15J5 — (p j D-Mark Bond Sttocfkn dm 12273 

— i 1 *} fnVti — W ) Dolior Band 5aiecffcjn_-_ S 133315 

— (w) Brit .Jersey Gilt Fund C0J25 — (d 1 Florin Band Irtarhiii FL 12849 

-,W > grit, world tel*. Fund- *g-«? Zj„ } Wervotor_!l!^Z_ SFmS 

— (d) BrH. World Techn. Fund_— *0733 — (d 7 Japan PxwltoUo— SF 83250 

CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL ^ld i ^ »wlS 

— tw> Cartlol inri Fund *43* Z/2 I 5 t F J^-* 

-4wl COPHDI Italia SA S 1674 ^ » IJJ^SlRfczZr S^1?U2 

CREDIT SUISSE (ISSUE PRICES) UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAkin 

— (d I Actions Sunns SF 35200- iiTd IIZERLAND 

— 4d) Bond Volar Swf SF 10140 i 

^<d) Band Valor (Mnark DM 1 06J2 Zjg \ F^K^nrZT #uuo 


CAPITAL INTERNATIONAL 

— Iw) CaMial Inn Fund 

— (wl Capital Italia SA 


— (dl Bend Valor D-mark 
—40) Bond Valor US-DOLLA 
— fd) Bond Valor Yen 


ZJS( T eciiU* —«* I Sofli South Afr. SJv^ SF dS5o 

— (d) Convert Votar Swf SF 10605 _|d 1 Sima IBack ortol rn 

—fd) Convert Valor US-DOLLAR. *10611 moot btk^j SF2QL50 



SF 80 UX> UNION INVESTMENT Frankfurt 

SF 74_oO — (d 1 Unlrento — DM 4031 

SF 10*25 —fd ) UnHonds DM 2631 

S1D31D0 — (d I Unlrok-^. DM 77^9 

other Funds 


— (d)Canasec 
—Id 1 CS Fond 
— Id ) CS FencH— Inti 

—Id ) CS Moray Market Fund— * 1031 JB — W » uniraij-- dm 71 T9 

—Id 1 CS Money Market Fund DM 107700 Other Fkmrlc 

—Id 1 Enerak— VMQT SF 154410 vriucr rUDOS 

— (d ) Ussec — SF 89iiXl fw) Actlbonds Immstnwnts Fund. *2657 

— Id I Europe — Valor SF U5J5 Iw) ActWest Inti — ■■■ 

— <d ) Pacific— Valor — SF 14625 [wl Aaullo infernartonaj Fuod_ * i mu 

DIT INVESTMENT FFM L \ oS5 n ^ IC>0nCg l-F ,* 

— 4IJ 1 Canocntro . DM 2449 w i Tni Svv Inti Fri IflFin'" 

-4-td 1 inn Renlenfond DM93J26 SS a Smu S tA E' F > A Ifig 

Dunn & Haraitt 6 Llovd Gaaroe. Brussels ft BNPiafierponii Frag _ SUMa* 

— (ml DAH Commodity PooJ_ *27314— wl BonflsN ra. Issue Pr. SF 14130 

— (ml Currency & Gold Pool SI 7533 — ml CUnadaGtd-Mortoue F(L__ SBSS 

-[ml Winch. Ufo FuL PooJ_ *57640— d Ffl- Inti S71JB 

— (ml Trans World Fut PoaL. S7942S— w) WaMFurt___ * U9 

FiC MGMT. LTD. INV. ADVI5ER5 d > CJ.rT i 2^ 

1. Lourwce PownW HI6 EC4.01-423-4U0 ml QovBlaiSolFthnrrFd" 

— J"} F4C Atl antic — *'l]J wj Columbia Socurltlas___ FL tSei 

— Iw) FiC European S 9-59 B j r ram ft p ~ 

— (wl FiC Oriental JOLS9 d ) Cons. Bt^iteFted S iSttM 

FIDELITY POB 470. Hamilton Bermuda te S 1212 S -* ?J7 

— (m)AmericteiVniues Common. *7057 w) Convert. FO inri B Cwts S2SJ7 

— Iml Amer VokxaCurrLPref—— *10025 egg *ZI- ro 

— (a ) Fidelity Amer. Assets *6147 \ g- winer Wld W hte ivt Tn »jn 

—Id I FldHItv Australia Fund S 740- J £££? JrjSftES" - MlV — * *7499 



S 119J4 id ) Drevtus Fund in n.. 
S18J9 <»> Dreyfus imercowtlneal. 


-fd ) Fidelity Orient Fund — 
—id I Fidelity Frontier Fund. 
— Id 1 Fidelity Pacific Fund— 



— (d I Fidelity Dfr.SvaATr *119.94 ° f IMHO 

-fd ) Fidelity Far East Fund *1849 ” *30J] 

-fd 1 Fidelity Inn. Fund S 50.53 T ha EFt pbliS hmenf Truel S1J14 

-fd ) Rdel tty Orient Fund *2477 W i!2»“S| , SS5 n * .LF».fl 

—id) Fidelity Frontier Fund SI1A3 " *114081 

— id ) PkfeJfiv Ppdflc Fund_ s 13TJU* , „ LM S8Z145 

^fd 1 Fidelity SiW^&awth Fd. SI 186 " rSS P p t r M *”0-16 

id > FldelHv World Fund S2U6- {* Foracte^ ^t Fr- sf ^qj, 

FORBES POB8S7 GRAND CAYMAN Iw Formula Selection en « yjg 

tendon Agent 01-839-301 3 fd FondHada 97119 

-(wl Gold income *8J0* Id Goveram. See. Funoe I liki t 

— I w> Gold Appreciation S4L71 Cd FrnnkF^'-st Inter* [ns _ DM41J2- 

— fw> Dollar income S600 tw) Hnuuiminn Hhto*. ir v *9948 

— (ml Strateufc Trading S13V fw) ftaaflc Fimv K 


(w) Hor to n Fund — S l.T mn 

saaiss th I ILA fntl Grjfd Bond ieeS 

|5rS Id j intorhjnd&A JjlSa 

£ !JSv! (wl iwtorinorlcet Fund _ $306311 

w) inn Currency Fund lw t -nu 
r ) l nil Securttlos Fund tin 

CORP. W I investa DWS mu jffi 

81-28715 (r) Invest Aftanffoues UA* 

* 11338 (r 1 Itoltartune Infl Fund s a *1841 

*17623 (w) Japan Selection Fund Siaaju 

*11844- (w> Japan Pacific Fund $9926 

S80J0 Id ) KleHnrari Benson Inri Fd. rmt/. 

*1100 fw) Kieinwort Bene. Jan. Fd *6940 

1003X1 (d ) Letcom r.«f S 1A4487 

* I w> Leverage Con Hold —. s iSav 

S 100310 (d I 1 Im.Pvier S 1765-00 

13X1 p (Wl Llovd* I ML Small Cos. *7248 

*11245 <w) Luxfund., S 6695 

may P (ml Maonatuna m-v — . s 754.77 


— (ml strategic Trading — *73)0 (w) HU Id F unds ~ 

-lw» tS5 fS-nl Fund *35055 g5Sb bSSCZ 

iS' ?lSa di InJecMnriSA 

_ - S1M74 w) Intonriarket Fund 

— * 13174 w) l art Currency Fund Ltd. 

CaptLGuld.Lld-LOAABenU<l-497423D r ) inti Securttlos Fund 

GLOBAL ASSET MANAGEMENT CORP- a I Investa DWS. 

PB 119, Sf Peter Port, Guernsey. 0481-28715 r I Invert AflrniHouec 

ImlFutwrtSAMSA ' 1 — ■-*■■= — ■-- 

(m)GAM Arttttraue Inc 
(wl GAMertca Inc 


De Montreal 5W-91 12% IM 106T0HII2S 

CdFe-aSrtt 13 3M 10685106*5 

.CdSVWrtS 72-06 9-4 701J518IX 

Ccf - -89/96 9ta 31-5 1 06151 KUO 

IcdSW-tetr* Dta 3-2 1CB48IKI58 

Oonw5’i47/9i 18% 134 IM5410UH 

Ceane SW-M 9ta M 106321060 

Credit Du Nerd SW87/93 9V> 174 1063570645 

CredH Fender M- 88 /n 12 94 15U4HXL94 

Credit For Exsort 5V9? 9ta 1-7 I00401».16 

Cr LTW $% -93/96 11% IW 10L741D6U 

Crtdll Lvon $«.« 12% 71-3 106210675 

Credit Lvon 57*46/97 13 94 107.70101 X 

Credit Lvon 5%-S9te 9% 77 1007710687 

Credit LVBO SW41/9S 9% 29-5 10105101.15 

Credit Lyon cre-99 9% 274 1061518625 

Credll Lyon 5Wfonf2/96 12% 18-1 106151062 


Iw) GAM Bfxden Inc 
Iw) GAM Ermltnne. 

Iw) GAM Franc-Voa 
(d ) GAM International 
Iw) GAM North America Inc. 

(w) GAM N. America Unit Tru6t 

(w) GAM POCHIC Inc *1124 

fw) GAM Stert. A Inti Unit Trust may 
(ml gam Systems Inc - 
fw) GAM te ar ta w toe me 
(m) GAM Tvctw 5A Otota A 


S ) Medtatonum SeL Fd 
) Metpare 


S))&99‘ (b) Mettmro. 
*10657 IwlNAAT— 


G.T. MANAGEMENT (UK) Ltd. 

— <w> Berry Pot. Fd. Ltd. 

-fd ) G.T. Applied science 


(d ) Nlkko Growth Package Fd 59588.17 


eo — tw) Nippon Fund 

■« Iw) Novuiec investment I 
*}<■?** (w) NAM.F 


— fd ) G.T. Asean H.K. GwttLFd *12.14* i m ) NSP F.ItT 


Service. Tet 067 ' 68 24 05 


foe. Tet KW 8 34 <2. 


Crod Hatl Slle $y 90/M 

Cr*dltieisloft--*4 

C re d MerateR 57^91/97 
Credftanstatt SUMS 


HOLLANDS ESCORT SSVKE 020- LONDON ZOE WEST Bcort Agency SSi^almSSR* 

•rnne nree )S« ni m m Danskewra*^-’" 


2227B5. C30-944530, 039?7-368i 


Tet 01.579 7556 


Den Norsks -aevfO 
Den Narske -deefl 




.Tet 62 88 05 


ran & Guide Sense*. 0311004369 


LA VENTURA 

**''!!?J8£r' K£ 


LONDON 

Tte 938 1647. 


MADRID INTL 

^ aSsPcARK 


tOM£tMJSBJ80f*EXXXT 
& Guide SafvictTte 0h/589 2604- 589 
1146 (from 4 pm 10 10 pm) 

AMSTERDAM JASMINE 

ESCORT SBMO. 030-366655 


BCUS5B& CHAMTAl ESCORT Ser- | MUNCH -f EVBYWHBE 


: Tet 02/520 23 65. 


escort serve*. Id I 


IHBEWfado 
89 / 91-4S93. 


Denmark 5%-edOM) 114k IW 1DOJOI8LO 

Dwwnarkita-W » *2 100JflBl7 

Denmark flien Ifa M 106377804 

Die Erste - 

Oesten<cMsdieSV^92A4 73% 28-1 WfoWJ# 


I3ta 11-3 lOOJOHaJB 
9. 11-7 1062D100X 

F% 184 1004110673 
13% 2-2 106.151002 
K% 13-5 106451 065$ 
9. 7-2 10UBH618 

9ft 11*2 99.95 MUD 
9% 194 99.95 70650 
9% 9-7 1067010630 

114k IW 1009018100 
We 18-2 1005816678 
1ft 0-2 1063778647 


GBEVA CHARLBC Gusto wrvra. RANBURT/ MUNICH htato Escort 
Tet 783 397. Senna, 0fP'38&44l & 089/3518226 

LONDON USA BCORT SHtVICETet lOMJON MALE ESCORT SBVKX. 

4CQSS7 Tet 385 94 76. MS?* 


Tel 385 98 76. 


ASIRP’SESOXrSHVKIfaxkfijn MUMCH. PRIVATE Eicort Servct SSXJ* 


• 069 ' SI 70 ^3. 


Tte 912314^18132 


Eab--9I 

EabSU-9* 


GEWVA FOBTESCOn i 7SAVH + 8B5SB5, /WWW NATA5CH* MADtSO IMPACT ESCORT & Cade . 


WfflLSa + S» STATIONS 
TO: 3T 49 87 


CWSEA BCORT SBEVKZ 
51 Boaudiomp 

Tte 01 584 mam [*-12 pm) 


GBGVA - SST 
BCORT SBMCE 
TO.- 022/ 29.13 J4 


Esrart Service. Tte Q2/731J6.4I, 

OUSSBDORF/ COLOGNE/ BONN. 

inti Escort Srtvtee. 0211 ' 383141. 


Ertertar Inti -44 

FefrnvleSta-99 


m IM I0U2W12 
«% 25-3 99.90 MUD 
tO** 27-2 106301064) 
72% 21 106X10645 
17ta 25-2 706310640 
I2K 11-2 >004510655 
9% 174 1066770617 
IX 3%3 KAsnaui 
9% 17 1 063010641 

9% 31-4 99.95 10US 
Ifn 28-3 1065370603 


SwtevonxmkenMS 119k 

Svenska Handels -87 12% 

Sweden 9 -97 1D% 

Sweden 5*4-37/09 129. 

5raden5V91TO 10% 

Sweden 12% 

Sweden -89/94/99 9V, 

Swcdenperp- 9% 9/7 

ftraden -99/85 8% 70-7 

Tain Kobe 571-92/04 lOh 28-5 

T[fo*ta 574-92/94 1214 183 

Takaf Asia LW 5%-M/w 9 % IM 

Taranto Dominion 5V92 12% M-2 

T0YDTnJ3ty* -92/99 9% 744 

TveSVWW 9 7-8 

IMonBk Norum 5Vrt9 13% 31-2 

united D/SeasBk 0-89 9% 2H 

7Mfltoms+Glyin5!44l fflk 184 

Wertd B b* --94 BM 28-2 

Yokotsmo 5V. -91/94 1144 M 

Zaitrt»tesPorka»eS'441 9% 15-17 


Non Dollar | 

twier/Mln cet/Met. Coupon Next BM AsU 
Pray N Brunswick 39/94 11% 19-2 9S425994B 


“ th ! r r «*JKE <m) Oppornmtty Investors Ud S 3U7 

— d ) G.T. Attend to Fund saLT^ lw , panCURRI inc_ 1 14 . 12 

Zih 1 r’?’ nSSSfiFS* *S12 lr J Porfon Sw. R Est Geneva SF U97A1 

r/2ir'T'2S5cfj2 d eooS (r)Paniwl Value Fund N.V — *1.148x2 

— Id 1 G.T. Bono Fund S 9.77* Ik 1 Dlalmlai ear, na 

—Id 1 G.T. Global Tectinlgv Fd S 1142 l°! jj \j iKjS 

Zrn I &]•' Mjwtnom inn Fund. S55L54 

— (d t G.T. InvnslinefU Fund , 1 641 [k i p,i Tarn tntii 

~W ? J ° p P n Smal lCO-Funfl— MU6* (w) Quantum Fund N.V. *2^9075 

“fd 7 BT ISrthoSJ. S*1^2? W * Ren *? Fuftd LF 2J99JB 

—Id 1 G.T. Soutti Qitna Fund S 74.14* (d } Herd Invest LF 7,05673 

EBC TRUST CO.UERSEY) LTD. W j * 1152X9 

1-3 Seale Sj^L He! ier ,17554-34331 id ) Sote Trusl Fwid S0.I3 

TRADED CURRENCY FUND. f?} S7S2L P ?A? ,,fa ^zrr- SF 1PI2 

outline.: BW S9A4* Offer S9J70 d 

® Id I Can. l Bid *1027 Otter S1059B (w) Slow SI. Bank Eterty HdwNV S7J7 

INTERNATIONAL INCOME FUND j? 1 , g? ,”? ? [ivrL?fAi Fun<1 — VS5 

— (d ) Snarl Term 'A* (Attumi * 1X384 (d I Syntax LM (Ctos Al - Si« 

— Id 1 snort Tunn 'A' iDIStr) 5 69942- j w j f -r— - SF JSH 

— (d 1 Snarl Term -B’ (AGaiml S 1.1)4] (*> Tokyo Pnt HoftL CSenl_. . 1 9XS0 

-Id » Short Term V (oSfT±T SOiST? *J TrtyoP«.H^N.V * 12814- 

— (w) Long Term. * 21 . 15 - ? ffawPBdflc fa ncL SBJ9 

JARDINE FLEMING. POB 7BGP0HD Kg (w) TweedV^rawne AvCiasA S 1.9SL35 

—4b I J.F Jooon Trust .. ....... Y 4791 (wj Tweedv£rawne nifikaiB * 1X2442 


~W ? §■!• S mallOkFund— S41J8* (w) Quantum Fund N.V. . 

— fd ) G.T. Tedmoiaav Fund . *2479 m 1 dm*, ehmi 

-Id 1G.T. Soutti China Fund *1414* (3 1 hS3Siv«£ZZZZ 


—1b ) J.F South East Asia S2U0 Id 1 UN 1 CO Fund 

“15 -Mi dS? w S3 Tnettan to gv — y 27815 (d ) UNI Band Fund 


10NTCN TB«E ESCORT Sen«. 


Tet 01-373884. 


SIUITGART-TOVATE Escort service. LQMtQN CBS ESCORT Servo. I £m. l i^? a, ' 5W5 

TJ.mi 'TiH'.CI TJ_ T7n 7in I Mill/ 


Tet G 711 - ' 2621 1 SI Tte 370 7151 . GaHimeSW-IT 

V®«A FOIE SCORT SSLVK 2 . VBMA VIP ESCORT SHWCE. Tte 
Tet 56 76 & nS 41 58 SsT 


Tte 56 76 5S 


BONY ESCORT SBVKX. New Tart U3M30N JACGUBB« BCORT Ser 


Z13 23?-4HS 


«e.Tet01J02 7M9 


jPSfS 650087 ^ I T ^>iS9®^ na FTB "‘ ,fin I 


area Tet SI 01 8 


FVsf Boston lrtcS'i-01'94 9ta 28$ 9943 99M 

Flrsaila>P0?-*44 10 21-2 99.98 H6M 

FlreiCilv Terns FA-9S *41 22-1 w% Wta 

First interstate ftk-95 9% kO 99fi 9992 

Full --94/94 *71 15-1 10606)0616 

Uenllihtoce 5^-87 II SM IOO45I0675 

GenFmcmCn 5V8R9N! 9% 284 100^10675 

Genflranu 5 -92/94 IJ5i 22-1 106281 O0 lX 

Glt)5Vr-99 9% 11-3 1064*10679 

Czi 5U-75 91/12 11-3 HBXWLtt 

Gte-pers 10% 14-5 94ft 97ft 

Gzb5%-94 99. 2«-5 100231064} 

Gne PA-91 9. 27-3 7067*1068$ 

Grind law 5%-9j 13 2M IOJOIOUC 

GruuiawSW-«4 lift 1-2 ID64010676 


Gib 5L.-9T 
Grtj-perc 
GaSta-94 


Are 97 

Bk Montreal Sta-W 
Bk Tokyo -M/90 
BalndesuerSta-91 
ClilcoroilMetMS 
Ceome 574-94 
Cnd Natf stiff $ft4l/9$ 
Dennurk 93/9818 
1.1.1. 5-94 

KinedDm Betaum 5 -N 
Lloyds 5 -94 
Sncf5W4Q/9J 
YortaNre 514-91/94 
Croat Faaetw$lta99 


10% 18? 99JI9MI 
lift 77-1 99A5 9988 
9% 27-2 99J0 
9% 2F? 99J0 99AS 
ad 15-7 99.10 992$ 
H)ta 21-3 99 IS KI60I 
fta IB-3 99 JS 99.9B 
Od 22-7 9943 1HLBD 
Wta 15-1 W-77 99.92 
Wt 10-4 99 J0 99.905 
99k 15-2 992*994 
lMk 281 I06BWU7 
life 270 994* 99.71 
10% 84 9943 93 


— (b I J.F Pacific Sec£.(Acc) . 
—lb I J.F Australia 

NIMARBEN 

—Id > Clou A 

-fwiCtaBB-ue 

— (w> anssC- Japan 

ORANGE NASSAU GROUP 
PB 85571 The Howe (070) 449470 


*634 lb 1 UNI Capital Fund - *1645X1 

*647 (wl United Cog. Invt. Fund Ltd. *151 

|w) Wedge Europe N.V. S &*4 

AKije fwUMedne Joann N.V. StUi 

Iwimwhid&lti/. 

Iwl Wedffe U&N.V $ ffifc 

*“ im) winemaer Financial Lid. * 6 M 

imt wincneMer DtvenMIedoe _ S2QJ7> 

(d 1 wortd Fund S A__ *» 3 | 

Iw) WortowMa Securities S/S 3ft. smjl 
(wl Wondwfde Special 5/S 2Vi. SIaMjq 


Grindlort5W-44 


Source : CredH 5uftse-Ftnt Boston Ltd, 
London 


DM — Deutsche Mark; BF — Belgium Francs; FL — Dutch Florin; LF — 
SF T7 5wi “ F rones; a - asked: + — Offer Prlces;b — bid 
chw»wP/V *iatp*l p erunlt; na-IW Available; teLL~NoHfommunieolw; D _ 
Nnw, S — su spended; S/S — Sleek Sellr; • — Ex-Dividend; — — Ex-Rtv — _ 
Grass Performance index nbvj • — Rei&mBt-Prlo- Zx-CaLpon- mm— Famimrt* 
Worldwide FureJLtd; b>- Otter Prli'foT^ nrtem.SSJS?^ - dK 
price ns an Amsterdam Stock Exchaise 


1 




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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 11 , 1985 


n«to 

HMlI 



** 


BOOKS 


THE HOUSE OF NIKE 


By Morio Kilo. Translated from the Japa- 
nese by Dennis Keene 519 pp. SI 6.95. 
Kodansha International, 10 East 53d 
Street, New York, N. Y. 10022. 


Reviewed by Carolyn Kizer 


T HE chief reason for reading “The House 
of Nire” is to become acquainted with 
Kiichiro Nire, founder and inventor of the 
house and its name. Kiichiio is an unforgetla- 


ties one finds in the laughter of such patients: 
vacant, moronic, with no rise or fall, no heights 
or depths, a laughter that made nonsense of 
any h uman attempt to understand it” As he 
mined away from her, towards home, “shoul- 
ders h ir"<™d, there was som ething a wkward 
and un gainl y about him, the impression of a 
man trying perhaps to escape from some- 
thing.” 

There are other bcaudfuU^ handled epi- 


ble character all right. Horrible, at 

. he slides in the mind in 


the way that Satn Point, the father in Christina 
Stead's masterptice, “The Man Who Loved 
Children.” won't go away, even as the more 


admirable characters fade into anonymity. 
Kiichiro. offspring of peasants, has aban- 


sodes. particularly the death of Kiichiro. He is 
out in a meadow with an assistant, measuring 
the site of a new hospital (the earlier one 
having been destroyed in the great earthquake 
of 1923), and here, near the end of trim, we 
begin to feel some sympathy for this vain, 
pushing, brash narcissistic fellow: ‘The sun 
beat down now, inducing sleep. The expanse of 
com seemed to be caught in a great silence. 
Some way off the figures erf two or three 


doned their name for one of his own invention. 
Having started as an ordinary general practi- 
tioner. he studied mental illnesses in Germany, 
and returned to establish a hospital dealing 
with mental disorders. Once these facts are 
established, early in the novel, the reader be- 
gins to lick bis or her chops: we are happily in 
the genre of “The Magic Mountain,” iSflip of 
Fools,” or even “Grand Hotel,” and settle back 
for a good read. But, curiously enough, the 
mental hospital barely figures in the novel One 
wonders why the author sets the book in such a 
milieu without taking advantage of it 

But perhaps the author is correct in feding 
that egomania is more interesting than mani^ 
and certainly it is more rife with comic possi- 
bility. However, he makes the strategic mistake' 
of lolling off Kiichiro on page 246, and the 
heart goes out of the novel, as well as most of 
the comedy. We are left with a bunch of char- 
acters just as unpleasant in their various ways 
as Kiichiro without being as interesting. Tetsu- 
kichi, Kiichiro’s sctn-in-law, begins to stir our 
sympathies, put upon as he is by his harridan 
wife, bat his total indifference to his children, 
his emerging anti-S emitism and admir ation for 

Hitler's Germany put an end to that A hope- 
lessly morose character, Tetsukichi is working, 
throughout most of the novel on a history of 

opKita’s ncwcHstbe careful attention le gives 
to Japanese prejudices and opinions from the 
end of the first World War to the end of the 
second. So we are painlessly fed a good deal of 
hitherto imfamillar information. For example, 
in t ellin g us about Tetsukichi’s history of psy- 
chiatry, Kita says, “Despite the fact that Sig- 
mund Freud was deariy the most famous med- 
ical man of his age, in Germany his had 
been subjected to vilification and ostracism for 
years. Since the medical world in Japan was 
little more than an offshoot of the o sc in 
Germany . . . Tetsukichi too had never had 
the least inclination to take his psychoanalytic 
theories seriously” in 1939. 

However, Tetsukichi is not a fooL He real- 
izes that his work. like himself, is simply ordi- 
nary, “an aspect of the trivial everyday.” It 
aroused no sense “of something taking shape, 
of something cold and pure and hard within 
him,” but was merely the product of his obsti- 
nate determination. 

There is a wonderful passage when Tetsuki- 
chi finally finishes his book and sits vacantly at 
his desk for awhile. Then he goes out for some 
air and runs into a woman patient As he is 
about to speak to her, “she suddenly burst out 
laughing. The laughter was not only totally 
unexpected, but possessed all those peculian- 



scape, _ 

worked endlessly, stretching their bug piece of 
string, walking, stopping, returning, writing 
their measurements on a piece of paper. . . . 
Some distances away he [the assistant] could 
see the small figure of the director squatting 
down on the pathway between the cornfields, 
□o doubt making some eager calculations on 
the drawing paper. But after he bad taken a few 
more paces, he noticed that Kiichiio was lean- 
ing forward in a peculiar way, with his fore- 
head apparently touching the ground, like a 
toad with its head beaten flat by something.” 
Kiichiro. monstrously inflated until this scene 
by his powerful drives, his inordinate ego, has 
<hnmk and shrunk, to a little old man, to a 
email figure, to the image of a toad. And now 
he is dead, in the golden field. 

There is another lovely scene, where Ttis uki- 
chi’s children go to a summer cottage built by 
their grandfather long ago, dragging their 
heavy luggage up a steep path to thehot spring, 
where “the dear-toned cicadas were tinging in 
chorus from the dark cedar woods that lined 
the roadside. . . . From the tide of the veran- 
da, with its glass sliding doors where the putty 
had come off in a number of places, a partially 
enclosed walkway led across to the bathhouse 
where a constant airing of sulfur ous hot water 
bubbled noisily. The children bathed a number 
of times each day, prancing about in the murky 
water and splashing it over each other.” That 
description seems to me to exemplify the Japa- 
nese sensibility, with its attention to the subtle 
attritions of daily life, and the small vivid signs 
that indicate the seasons and their passing. 

Such eminences as Yukio Mlshima and Ed- 
ward Stidensticker have lulled The House of 
Nire” as a humorous work. Perhaps humor, 
rather than poetry, is what is lost in translation. 
But, with the exception of the first 250 pages, I 
don’t think so. It is a family chronicle of an 
unlovable tribe, set in a fascinating period, 
with some fine set pieces. The publisher prom- 
ises a sequel in a year. One will read it for the 
author’s insights into his society rather ihan for 
any curiosity about his dismal characters. As 
one sees from the quoted passages, it is ably 
translated by Dennis Keene, except for some 
sentences dial seem to indicate haste on his 
part. As usual Kodansha has gjven us a beauti- 
fully produced volume and a handsome cover, 
which puts most of the products of our domes- 
tic publishing houses to shame. 


Carolyn Kizer' s most recent book is “ Bar- 
maids in die Basement: Poems for Women. ” She 
shine 


wrote this review for The Washington Post. 


BRIDGE 


By Alan Truscott 


O N the diagrammed deal 
West led the club four, 
giving the declarer a cheap, 
trick. The ten won and South 


was led and covered with the 
queen and king. South was al- 
lowed to win, leaving this posi- 
tion: 


led a diamond trying to reach 
teart lea 


dummy for a heart lead. West 
put up the king and, after not- 
ing that his partner had sig- 
naled with a high diamond, be 
returned that suiL 


NORTE 

*1873 

o — 

• 8 


the lead of the diamond ten 
speezed South in the major 
suits. The veteran partnership 
had collected 500 points and 
all the match points. 


WEST 

* A8 

OA75 
O — 

*K 


EAST 

8X101 

093 

018 

* — 


South should have won in 
dummy with the queen to lead 
hearts, but he chose to win in 
his hand with the ace and work 
on dubs. He played the ace 
and another, giving West the 
queen. Instead of cashing the 
rematng club winner. West 
played another diamond to 
dummy's queen. The heart ten 


SOUTH 
*Q 18 
918* 

0 — 

♦ — 


South had five tricks, but 
could not make any more. He 
tried the spade queen, which 
West captured with the ace. He 
then cashed the dub king. A 
spade was led to the king, and 


tfOKZH 
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The bidding: 


WEST 

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9 A 7 8 4 

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♦ KQ74 


1 N.T. SbL • 


Was led tbs ch* tar. 


DAYDEL 

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Now arrange me dreted letters to 
form the surprise answer, as sug- 
gested by the above cartoon. 


Print answer hero: f I X jtXjQ 


(Answers lomonow) 

Yesterday's I Jur fble* GLADE JOUST ADJOIN FAMILY 

I Answer What the X-rated movie definitely was— 
a "Sflq-EMA” 


WEATHER 


Europe 



middle 


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Damascus 
Jerusalem 
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78 

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21 

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fr 




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-3 

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34 

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Mexico City 

21 

70 


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27 

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34 

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-3 

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fr 

Denver 

-6 

23 

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Detroit 

-4 

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Honolulu 

26 

79 

18 

64 





IIUlMIIAI 

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Los Anodes 

17 

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Miami 

23 

73 

12 

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M*eit*aae(ls 

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New York 

-2 

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FRIDAY'S FORECAST - CHANNEL: SUBMIT CfwOOV. FRANKFURT: Vari- 
able. Tenia. -a— -10 121 — 141. LONDON: Cloudy. Temp. 3 1 <34— -SSI. MA- 

TcniP. J - -10 <36 — Ml. NEW YORK: Snow. Temp. 2- 5 (»- 731. 
PARIS: Variable. Temp. o — -7 (33 — 1*>. ROME: Cloudy. Temp. 1 — -3 
rfi-24) TEL AVIV; Cloudy. Ten*. 25- 13 <77 -SSL WHICH: variable 
To"** -M — -14 (12—1). BANGKOK: Fooav. Tema. 33 — 23 1*1—731. HONG 
VON*; Odimv. T emp. IS — » (S»— 451 . MANILA: — 11 184 — 66). 

SEOUL: SIMM. Temp. -4 — -* (2S— Ml. .SINGAPORE: Fair. Time. 30—24 
(6 — 751. TOKYO: Foggy. Temp. 12—3 [54—381. 


It/ Aotr Free 
400 Aek tends 
ilMAsnicoE 


1250 Aura Ind A 
■ SAHEr 


4632S Alt Energy 
150 Alta Nat 
IW Also Cent 
I3H Atoama SI 
200 Anars WAf 
3B60 Aracen 


in n b 

$17 17 17 

Sink 1Mb 12 
sssb » m+b 

S18V5 185ft 18ft + 
IIA 143ft 14ft + 
KMft 20V. 3RA 
SI8H 18ft l89b + Vb 
S32ft 22V, ZFA 
81736 I7ft 1 74ft— 
S11 11 It + 


5300 A! Co 1 f 

S7ft 7ft 7ft— 

3740 BP Canada 

*26 

25ft 

26 

+ ft 


slow 12 ft i: 

+ 


155 

153 

155 

+ 1 


400 

3BJ 

400 

+10 

■L ' 1 f ' 



*90 



SI 6ft 

16ft 

toft 


78313 BCFP 

Sllft 


lift 



70335 BC Res 
18410 BC Phone 
llOOBrvnswk 
1000 Buda Con 
30650 CAE 
100CCLA 
2S92S Cod Frw 
43169 C NOT Wait 
50 C Part r* 
39884 Con Trust 
365 C Tung 
5*4340 Bk Com 
WOOD Cdn Not Res 
7753Z CTIrft A I 
230 OC uni B 
300 Cara 
610 Celcmese 
1000 C Dtsttj A 
2125 CTL Bank 
300 Commit A 
13400 CosefcaR 
330 Conran A 
tfflOCrownx 
13000 Cxar Ree 
151115 Doan Dev 
3075 Dasn A 
£0533 Denison A 
19310 Denison B I 
71100 Devftfcon 
112BDk*nsnAf 
343 DIcKnsn B 
6665 Daman A 
11550 Dafaoca A 
133 Du Pont A 
1800 Dvl»x A 
925 EldtnmX 
90000 Emeo 
12600 Eaultv Svr 
1800 FCA intf 
17200 C Falcon C 
5800 Fto nm due 
isoa Foray Res 
830 Fed indA 
1*09 F City Fin 
100 Fraser 
600 Gena l*A 
1650 Geoe Comp 
16254 Geocrude 
30B0 GRirattor 

zwn Gaidars r 
100 Goodyear 
3000 Grandma 
100 GL Forest 
200 Gt Pacific 
200 Grey hnd 
1 £00 H Grom A 
5600HnflnB A! 
4800 Hawker 
soeoHeyftsD 
970 H Boy CO 
26666 IfflOXO 
23100 indai 

4110 Inland Gas 
5122 Infpr Pipe 
529 Jcnnoek 
2004 Kara Kolia 
2000 Kelsey H 
386 Kerr Add 

307*4 LobaH 
21934 LOC MfUll 
JWLOnlCem 


240 256 258 + 2 

S22 3116 22 + 

*131* 13*b 13W»— 
S14ft 14 1ft 14ft 
S14ft HVz 14% + Vb 
*34ft 24ft 344ft + 16 
S14ft 14ft 14’*— 4ft 
S24Vz 241ft 24 'A 
S2B 28 28 — Vft 

530 V* 2914 3011+ VS 
514% 1416 Iflft + ift 
S39* 29VM 2916+ Vft 
17 17 17—1 

S9Vi 916 9VS + 
*171* 17 17 

*11 4ft lift 114b— W 
S6VS 61ft Aft + !* 
56 54ft 6 + 

*10 9”ft 95ft- ft 
*7 7 7 + ft 

263 260 242 + 1 

•lift lift lift 
*15 1416 14ft— ft 

141 14D 140—5 

340 222 236 *15 

290 270 270 

516ft 15ft 14ft + *6 
51416 14ft 14ft + 
57ft 746 7Tb + 
*60 650 450 —15 

460 43fl 455 
385 2S0 365 +35 

EMft 3416 34ft 
516ft 16ft 16ft + 
528 ft 20ft 20W + 
425 420 430 —15 

ST6 16 16 + ft 

*646 4ft Mu+ft 
*11 17ft 18+16 
Cl 4ft 14ft 14ft— 
48116 80ft 81 <6+1 ft 
260 260 360 +5 

519ft 1946 19ft + 
511ft lift lift 
517ft 17ft 17ft + ft 
53416 24ft 24ft— ft 
512 12 12+ft 

206 202 202 — 3 

S8ft B 8 — ft 

SSft s 51 b— ft 

537V* 37ft JTft 
40 48 41 +3 

483 S3 83 —1 
SJSft 35ft 25ft+ ft 
S24VS 24ft 24ft 
ST 7 T 
160 155 155 +4 

5171b 1716 1716+16 
430 194b 20 + I 

51736 171b 17ft 
547ft 46ft 47 + ft 

51110 lift lift + ft 
5146. 1416 1416 
134ft 34ft 34(6- ft 
*11 11 II 

n 9e m 
53246 37ft 32ft— 36 
515 IS 11+16 

43245 B — 

5356. 25 

59ft 9ft 


3210 LOC 
200 LLLOC 
IOOLoMowCo 
700MDSHA 
14000 M1CC 
S9891MctonHX 
SOO&MertondE 
339112 Mofoon A f 
300 Motion B 
10000 Murphy 
S00 Nabisco L 
24694 Noranda 
1DQSS Narcen 
130880 Nvo AKA f 
lmNswKOW 
71396 NaWd sp A 
166S0 OdkwooC 
300 Ostuwi] A I 
6800 Pamour 
200 Pan Can P 
64 Per w Mwo 
1400 Phonlx Oil 


1 300 P toe Point 
seGOa 


3000 Place I 

41552 Placer 
33) Proviso 
15DOOueShirBO 
116 Ram Pel 
11200 Rayrack r 
TMORedpoth 
40S93 Rd SlWthS A 
54Re4dUX»d 
8550 RasServf 
391 Revn Pro A 
1800 RooersA 
7000 Romon 
200 Roto men 


1300 Scoffer 
1473 Sears Co 
16238 Shell Can 
14S65 Sherritt 
2480 Stoma 
3000 Staler Bf 


20 5outHri) 452ft 52ft 
100S1 Brodcsi 


4S837 SteleoA 
2100 Su terra 
ooosunearpr 


46208 Sydney o 
[eck Cota 


2SK+ ft 
9ft— ft 


aaOTeckt.. 
TZ2S0 Teck B I 

xoraiedtwe 

17300 To* Con 
SfOOTTmmNA 
3676S Tor DmBk 

ISO Torrfor B I 

300 Traders a I 
13*0 TrieMi 


3300 Trinity Rss 
9556 TmAita UA 


27656 TrCon PL 
9976 Trlmoc 
40318 TrlzecAf 
2S000 Turbo I 
IDOUntcoraAf 
300 UnCartM 
84551 u EntPrfee 
1310 U Keno 
710 VanOer 
20500 Versll A I 
i40oveslaran 
4S0 Wetawud 
3200 Westmln 
9oaweNon 
12949 WooawdA 
2000 Yb Bear 


Total Sola: HAW^IB.dtam 


5101* 10 10 

52*ft 26W 2ift + ft 
19 18ft 19+16 
11816 1116 18ft 
280 375 275 —7 

527* 22ft 2216 + 
440 *40 440 —5 

516ft 15ft 16ft 
*16 16 16 
521 21 21 + ft 

524*6 24ft 2416+ ft 
51 7ft 17ft 17ft + ft 
415U 15V. 15ft+ft 
57ft 6ft 7 
*1 3ft 1816 18ft + ft 
51 49 50 —3 

55ft 5 5 —ft 

523ft 23ft 23ft 
475 475 475 — 5 

52716 Z716 2716 
517ft 17ft 17ft- 
57ft 716 7ft + 
S2M6 22ft 22ft — ft 
106 105 US 

*2116 21ft 2116— 
514ft 1616 16ft— 
395 390 390 

SSVs SVb Sft 
SSYb 8 I 
532 Tift 32 
510 17ft 18 + 

5916 816 BH- ft 

175 170 170 —5 

103 103 103 — 4 

57ft 7 7ft + 
*1216 1216 12ft— 
542 42 42 

*516 Sft 516 
*1746 T7ft 1716 + 
17ft 7b. 716 

522ft 21H 2116- ft 
S6ft 6ft 6ft + 16 
59 9 9 + 

*016 9ft 016— 16 

52ft 

512 12 12 

520ft 20ft 20ft + 
Z7TJ 262 263 —13 

04 24 24 — Vb 

26 20 26 +3 

S9ft 9ft 9ft 
51 Oft 1016 10ft+ Vb 
5)016 ISU 1016— U 
53516 35*6 3S>4— 
549 49 *9 + ft 

517ft 17ft 17ft + 
fliVt 14ft 16ft— ft 
SSft 20ft 30ft 4- 16 
S7Vb 7ft 7ft 
440 43S 435 — 5 

524 23ft 24 + 16 
5211b 2116 2)ft + 
440 430 430 —10 

*33 22ft 23 
29 26 36 —3 

58 8 8 + ft 

515ft 10ft 10ft— 16 
512ft 12ft 17ft— 
510 ID 10 + 

220 205 205 —15 
*616 6 61b + 

510ft 1016 10ft + lb 
*15 15 15 + Vh 

511ft lift llft+ft 
574ft 74ft 74ft + ft 
510ft 10ft 10ft— lb 
SI Oft 10ft 10ft 


Montreal 


36694 Bank Mont 
1608 CIL 
7tt0 Can Bath 
13108 Dorn TWA 
400 Mnt Tr*t 
91913 Mat BkCdO 

43635 Power Cara 
100 Holland a 
21387 Raral Bank 
2400 Ray Tw Co 


HW 

5261b 


S16Vb 

*13 

SI216 

S14ft 

538ft 

514ft 

53016 

517ft 


Total Sew: ftsjuimrts 


La* dess ckae 

25ft 26ft + ft 

75 a + ft 

16 Mft 

12ft 13 + ft 
1216 1216+ ft 
14ft 1416+ ft 
28ft 28ft+ ft 
14ft Uft 
X 30*4 + ft 

17 17 


ABN 

Close 

Pnr. 

ACF HoldlnD 

I9J 

19150 



15450 

AKZO 

102.70 

10160 

Ahold 

704.70 

199 50 

AMEV 

228 

321 

ADam Rub 

720 

725 

Ammtar* 


7150 

BVG 

225 

324 

Buehrmenn T 

78 

7650 

CatondHIde 

3350 

3X30 

Etsrvter-NDU 

12130 

119 

Fokker 

92 

91 

Gbl Brocades 

ire 

17450 

Hdneken 

15050 

149 JO 

Hooaavens 

M 

6250 

KUW 

OM 





Hal Nedder 

27150 

269 JO 

Nedltovd 

T52 

15250 


290 

388 

Pokhoed 

73J0 

72 

Philips 

5650 

5650 


70.10 

69 JO 

Rodamco 

13660 

I36J0 





4350 

4350 

Raval Dutch 

173 

17290 

323 

317.10 


28.10 

7760 

VMF Stork 

14450 

14450 

VNU 

218 

212 


ANP.CB5 General 
Preview! :136M 
Soorer: AFP. 


Brussels 


Arbed 

1610 

m 






E7 

EBES 


j r 

GBL 


L - 




Gevaert 


.TT^ 



rrz 

Kradiettxmk 


z- 



* _ 



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Traction Elec 



VMonlaene 


■nka 

Boom :NU2 






Source; Brunets 


fntam. 



1 Frankfurt 1 


107 J0 104.10 

Aiitaiz iters 

1070 

1063 

Basf 

18350 1B450 



Ctas* 

Pryy. 

Bayer 

194 19460 

Borer .Hypo, 

33650 

338 


337 33850 

BMW 


317 


17550 

176 


11750 117 JO 1 

Doimler-Bertz 

61 3 JO 

4131 


343 344.90 

Deutsche Babcock 160 

165 


399 

401 


195 19650 

DUB-Schulhe 

23459 

233 


164JD 16450 

Hochtief 

4*5 

4*5 i 

Hoechst 

188.10 191.101 

Hoesch 

99 JO 

9950, 

HoUmonn 

383 

390 

Horten 

17817850 

KoflUSoIz 

245 36450 

Korstodt 

l [ l 

242 

kaufhof 

Hi -q 

224 



257 

Kloeefcner Werfcc 

75JD 

74J0 


00.70 

77 

LindeAo 

39950 

3V8 

Lullhansa 

192 

195 


15V JO 15960 

Mojwesmann 

15760 

157 




1145 

1140 

Preussou 

25460 

255 

Ruetoerj-werke 

330 

332 

RWE 

16850 

149 

Sdlerlitg 

457 45950 


496 

497 

Thysson 

*460 

84 

vorta 

177 

177 



vew 


Vdlawsgtnsart 

2)0 

211 

CoatmeribaBk Index : 1,146.10 

Pttvteos : 1,16160 



Sottrco: AFP. 



1 Hons Kong | f 


25 

2S 

CMung Kona 

1130 

11 JO 

CNna Light 


M 


NO. 



4650 

4550 


7.15 



2850 





HK Shanatnl 







550 

5.15 


19.W 


JorzfineMam 







5J0 










— 





2X40 

2120 





A10 

4JB75 


Other Markets Jan. 10 


Closing Prices in local currencies 


540 

IAS 


540 

1.78 


Hose Sesa lode* :l*3lk55 
Prertaa* :IMVSS 
Source: Reuter* 


I Johannesburg 


760 

760 


1825 



1660 

1A0C 


mo 

6825 


145<1 

woe 

GF5A 

2650 

360C 

Harmony 


2700 

7625 


1110 

me 

Pststevn 


5450 

1540 


655 

655 


i*n 


Sasol 

NA. 

560 

Composite Stock Indn : 98X49 

Pmrteei :mja 
Source: MBtO/anK 



London | 


AA Coro 

Allled-Lyons 
Anoto AmGoM 


LT. 


nift 

167 

WT 

148 

584 

504 

363 


BFCC 
BL 
BOC Group 
Boat* 

Bowafer Indus 
BP 

Brit Home 51 
BrU Telecom 
BTR 
Burma*! 


268 

40 

278 

199 

236 


273 

120 ft 

621 


169 

205 

164 

482 

147 

491 

390 

303 


278 

203 

236 

490 

272 

115 

634 

Z3I 

169 

203 

166 

479 

149 

490 


525ft 5249b 

5U1A. — 

296 294 


I Conodtan indexes Jan.nT 


Close Previous 
Montreal 110.25 109 JO 

Toronto 1381.10 2JS9.10 

Montreal: Stack Exchange Industrials index. 
Toronto: TSE 308 Index. 


Japan Shipbuilding Permits , 

Heaters 

TOKYO — Japanese shipbuild- 
ing permits in 19S4 totaled 361 for 
-ships totaling 7.91 million gross 
tons, down from S7S ships totaUng 
10.7 million ions in 1983, the 
Transport Ministry said Thursday. 


Solution to Previous Puzzler 
lAlOlElLlAI 


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GEC 

GKN 

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Hanson 


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Lloyds Bank 

Lonrno 

Lucas 

Marks ond So 
Metal Box 
Midland Bank 
Not West Bank 
Pllklnotan 
preasev 
Focal Elect 
Randfontem 

Rank 

Reed toll 

Reuters 

Royal Dutch 

RTZ 

Snell 

STC 

.std Chart b 
T ote and Lyle 
Tosco 
Thorn EMI 
TJ. aroilP 
Trafalgar H 
THF 

Unramor 
unltaver 
united eusemts 
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S2ft 521 ft 
216 230 

llftll 11/32 
310 316 

233 233 

722 717 

338 337 

435 441 

7S2 750 

200 197 

547 549 

167 165 

249 253 

128 127 

406 410 

349 157 

tar 6i4 

JOB 303 

212 710 

284 288 

» 1 V*| 590ft 

316 312 

562 55* 

300 300 

142+. £429. 

597 584 

653 648 


404 47* 

473 465 

244 240 

467 477 

250 240 

358 xd 355 

160 160 

203 205 

lift lift 

217 314 

334 223 


WJTeeo 334ft 533ft 

W.HOldlna* SZ7ft 127 

War loan 3 1/2 OSVbxd asft 

Wootwortti 615 9(9 

ZCI 13 13 


F.T.38 index : *8240 
P u rto u s : (83-1 
Scarce; AFP. 


Close Prey 


Hachetta 

I metal 
Lafarge Cop 
L aarand 
IXJrvai 
Moira 
Mlcfteiln 
MM Pennar 
Moet Hennessv 
Moulinex 
Nora-Bet 
Ocddenlole 
Pernod Ric. 
Petrates Use) 
Peu&rol 
Potto in 
Prin temps 
Rodtoirdm 
Ridoute 
Roussel Udaf 
Skis RosslanOI- 
Sour terrier 
Teta m e con 
Thomson CSP 
Valeo 

Aaefl index : (LA. 
Prey tout : 1*9 47 
CAC Index : M9A0 
Prevtous : W7-79 
Source: AFP. 


1701 1680 

79 79.80 
377 379.70 
1*62 1*42 

2365 2180 

1755 1741 
605 108 

67.10 6L50 
1929 1920 

92J0 9' 

74 7540 
657 658 

704 702 

254 251.10 
257 259 JO 
41M 42 

189 19030 
220 272.70 
1225 1225 

7680 1680 

1900 1B75 

4B4J0 486.90 
twa 7750 
446 439 

22S 


Singapore 1 


Bausteod 
Crtd storaoe 

DOS 

FraserNeawe 
Haw Par 

Inchtop* 

Kepoeisup 

OVJB 

Semb ShJpvord 
S StetStSte 

SS*" 



OUS index :i 
Previous :381 Ja 
Sourae.- Overseas Union Bank. 


1 1 Milan i 


17,900 17AOO 1 









2.125 

Formltolla 






F Insider 



Generali 

IFI 

36.125 

5650 

IS 








| Olivetti 











SIP 

1,954 

1612 



2.178 



8^00 

s_. . j*' . « . smm 


|.L 





1 Paris 

Air Liquids 



Alathom AtL 



Av DassouH 



Bemad re 

594 



550 


Bouvoues 



BSN-GD 

7429 

24QJ 


1*55 


* ■ ^ 

1114 


Callmeg 

24350 

242 

Dumez 



Ell-Awl la toe 

23150 

230 

Eurooe 1 



Gen Em 

535 

535 


Stockholm j 


366 

203 

265 

365 

110 


AGA 

Alfa Loyal 
Asea 
Astro 

Allas Copco 
Batten 
Electro! 

Ericsson 

Esserte 
Handel stiken 
Pharmacia 
Saab- Scon la 
SandyRc 
SKF 

Swedish Matcn 
Volvo 

Af ta r i e ai tdtn Index: 404J0 
Previous: 40L78 
Scarce; IWHODMIH. 


270 

305 

199 

208 

500 

390 

1*4 

26* 

230 


Sydney 


ACI 

ANI 

ANZ 

BHP 

Borol 

BougatmflUc 

B rambl es 

Com 

Ctania 

CRA 

CSR 

Duntoo 

Elders Ixl 

Hooker 

Moaeilan 

MIM 

Myer 

OrtOrldae 

Peho 


498 

317 

160 

355 

397 

205 

490 

773 

187 

305 

177 

220 

235 

170 

45 

415 




Pass! den 

RGC 

StXltOS 

Sleiah 

Southland 

Woods! do 

Wormold 


Close Pray. 
270 255 

340 no 
530 524 

170 167 

24 74 

94 92 

316 318 


All Ordinaries Index : 773.18 
Previous : 71 540 
Source: Reuters. 


Tokyo 



J'« , 

; 'L’f'7 


But > 


r / 


■ .-M If !?! 


~*i shi 




Altai 

469 

459 

: ' : K- '■ 

Asahl Chotn 

704 

714 

'■‘a ' * . • ' ' 

Asahl Gloss 

910 

900 


Bank Of Tokyo 

650 

667 


Bridgestone 

548 

528 

. T 

Canon 




D Nippon Print 


900 


Oohea House 

576 

576 


Full Bonk 

UI0 

1360 

\ 

Full Photo 

TJ3D 

1670 


Fulltw 

1600 

1660 


Hitachi 


870 


Honda 

1500 

1670 

it.. *■ 



MB 

•t “x' - 



380 

: 

JAL 

&420 

5J90 

... ' ’ r - 

Kailma 


705 


Kansoi Eloe Pwr 

1660 

1650 


Kao Soap 

830 

807 


Kow Steel 


151 

q* s '. 

Kirin 


547 


Komatsu 


4*6 


Kubota 


322 

.j 

Matsu Elec Inds 




Matsu Elec works 


626 

; , '• r •• 

Mirant Bank 


1600 


Mitsub Chem 


373 


Mhsuh Elec 

409 

406 

Ml hub Heavy 

753 

257 


Mitsubishi 


574 


Mitsui 


363 





■ •• 


1.130 


NEC 


1330 

_ 

NlkkoSec 


633 


Nippon Steel 


1S2 



255 

Nissan 


610 

•fclk. 

Nomura Sec 


932 


Olympus 







Shorn 



■■ ■■ 

Sorrv 


1780 

Sum! Bank 


L760 

;*5d i • •.- .- . 

Suml Cham 


223 


Suml Metal 


151 


Tolsel 


209 


Talsho 



J'Cv::.’- 





Km 






Tk Power 


L6M 

Torov 


444 

^ -> • . . - 

Toshiba 

435 

420 


Toyota 


IJ80 

Yamolchi See 
New Index :H4N 

6» 

617 

■ 

Nlkkewkr index .-IU 2 U* 
Frawtaus :IIJ4U7 
Source: Reuters. 


'*/' '*» - l ■ ■ ■ 


Zurich 


Bunk Leu 
Brawn Bovari 


SS^tSL 


CrMH ..... 
Etectrowatt 
Gears Fbcner 
Je knoll 
Nestle 
OerTlkon-B 
Pocfte Baby 

Suiirr 
SBC 
Swissair 
Union Bank 
Wtoterfhvr 
Zurlch ms. 

SBC ladek : 47020 
Previous : 428J6 
Source.* AFP. 

NjD. 


2J1S 

633 


1850 3430 
1495 1470 

2490 2590 

~ 

633 

U8S »«; 
5490 5.955 
1,300 UI5 
9475 9.100 
1490 1400 
364 366 

1485 1491 
3475 3460 
MM * 

>0,700 19425 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 11, 1985 


Page 17 


•sS'E'o 


£ 

* * * 
B.. 

; 'i> 

: S ’h 
* - ,->»? 

: £/ 

: !**■*■}• 


SPORTS 


Nystrom Surprises 
Gerulaitis, 6-3, 6-4, 
In Masters Tennis 




' 5«. 


'Z£ i? 




By Mike Penner 

Lot Angela Junta Service 

NEW YORK — Joakira Nys- 
trom came to the big city, to the 
Masters tennis tournament, to edge 
his way into territory long domi- 
nated by John McEnroe, Ivan 
Lendl and Jimmy Connors. 

On Wednesday night he scored a 
b- 3 , 6-4 victory over Vitos Gerulai- 
tis, a Masters veteran, in front of 
► -9.235 fans at Madison Square Gar- 
den and gained a berth in the quar- 
terfinals Friday against Lendl. 

In Wednesday's other prelimi- 
nary match, EHot Tdtscber defeat- 
ed Tomas Stnid, 6-3, 6-4, to setup a 
Friday confrontation against Jim- 
my Connors. 

Nystfom is part of the Swedish 
new wave that pounded the shores 
of men’s tennis in 1984, but he is 
perhaps the least recognized of the 
lop exponents. Mats Wilander has 

won three Grand Slam titles, Hen- 
rik Sundstrom and Anders Janyd 
own victories over McEnroe and 
Stkan Edberg won the Olympics 
last summer. 

Nystrom? He is best known as 
ibe Swede who did not make the 
1984 Davis Cup championship 
team. 

“I expected not to be on the 
team," Nystrom said “Mats and 
Hennk are better on day, and Jar- 
ryd and Edberg were the best dou- 
bles team. I just stayed in ray 
hometown and watched the match- 
es on television.” 

This week, Nystrom is getting a 
chance to leave the ranks of Top- 10 
Anonymous. He beat one of New 
York’s Favorites, if no longer finest, 
in Gerulaitis. by sticking to the 
baseline and staying away from 
infaiakes. 

Nystrom let Gerulaitis take the 
gambles, wailing for him to finally 
bust Sure enough, it happened. 

“He was steady; I made all the 
mis lakes," Gerulaitis said. “I won 
all the -points and made all the 
mistakes. He played a couple of 
good, offensive forehands, but that 
was about it. He really didn't do 
anything flashy." 

That's the way most of these new 
Swedes play .it, which kd to the 
inevitable question: How does this 
one. Nystrom, compare with the 


Erving Excels 
As 76ers Win 
9th Straight 

The Associated Pros 

PHILADELPHIA — Jnlins Er- 
ring scored a personal season-high 
35 pom is Wednesday night as the 
Philadelphia 76ers outlasted the 
Detroit Pistons, 126-122, for their 
ninth straight National Basketball 
Association victory. 

“We came up with a couple of 

NBA FOCUS 

good defensive plays at the end, 
particularly Moses Malone making 
a big block and Charles Barkley 
getting a couple at defensive re- 
bounds," said Billy Cunningham, 
ihe 76a coach. 

Elsewhere in the NBA Denver 
beat New York, 100-95; Phoenix 
defeated Seattle, 94-88; Milwaukee 
edged Indiana, 106-105, and Bos- 
ton beat Chicago. 111-108. 

In Philadelphia, the score was 
tied, 116-116, when Maurice 
Cheeks hit a 17-foot jumper with 
2:39 left. The 76crs never again 
trailed. 

Malone followed with a pair of 
free throws for a four-point mar- 
gin. But BQJ Laimbeer’s layup with 
54 seconds left made it 123-122. 

Andrew Toney then hit a 17-foot 
romper for the 76ers. and Erving 
converted a free throw for the final 
margin 

These two teams are used to 
close games. The 76ers have won 
three of the four meetings this sea- 
son by four points or less. 

In the last period, - the lead 
changed hands, nine times before 
Cheeks's basket gave Philadelphia 
thetead. 

“For a while there it looked like 
the last ««<nn to get the ball was 
going to win," Cunningham said. 

The Pistons led after one period, 
37-32. Wkh the help ofl 5 points by 
Sedate Threat t, the Sixers closed to 
a 66-66 tie at halftime and led after 
three quarters, 93-91. 

“In order to beat Detroit,'* Cun- 
ningham naid , “we have to do what 
we do best and that is get strong on 
the defenave end. I don't like to see 
us get is these shoot-out games 
because over the long haul we're 
not going to be successful.’’ 

The Kston coach. Chuck Daly, 
said of the 76ers; "They made the 
big plays down' the swatch. They 
made every dutch basket at the 
end. For us. we have to come up 
with a few. stops at the end We 
simply did not do that.” 

Erving got help in the scoring 
from Malone, who had 22 points 
and 15 rebounds. Toney contribut- 
ed 17 ami Checks 16. Cheeks and 
Toney each handed out six assists. 

For the Pistons, Dan Roundfidd 
had 20 poinis and Laimbeer and 
Vamfe Johnson scored 17 each . 
Ronndfield led' in rebounds with 
10 . 


patron saint of Scandina vian ten- 
nis, Bjdrn Borg? 

“None of the Swedes are in 
Borg's class," Gerulaitis said. “No- 
body is as quick, nobody has the 
same physique, nobody has the 
same mental approach, nobody 
played the big points better. Borg 
hit through the ball better, he 
served better." 

But Gerulaitis thinks Nystrom 
has a chance against Lendl. 

“This kid’s a fighter," Gerulaitis 
said. “He's not going lo give up. I 
would not put any money on this 
guy, but he will definitely give 
Lendl a run for it-" 

Tdtscher has to wonder if he can 
do the same with Connors. 
Tdtscher has never beaten Con- 
nors in 12 encounters. 

He is hard to pry from the base- 
line. but against Sraid be rushed the 
net repeatedly and hit volleys with 
precision. Maybe that will not work 
against Connors. But then again, it 
might be worth a try. 

“1 like to stay back and hit 
grounds trokes and so does he," 
Teltscher said, “but he hits the ball 
a little harder. Everything 1 can do, 
he can do a little bit better." 



Sizing Up the NHL at the Halfway Point 


Semen/Unaed ft«g hw imwB 


Joaldm Nystrom serving to Vitas Gerulaitis in the Masters. 


Tigers Call Roster Juggling Routine 
Rut Show Some Concern Over Pitching 


The Associated Press 

DETROIT — So, the free spirit 
Dave Rozema has departed for 
Texas, the pitching coach Roger 
Craig has retired and the Detroit 
Tigers continue to haggle with Wil- 
lie Hernandez. What does it all 
mean? 

Just business as usual according 
to Bill Lajoie, the Tigers' general 
manager. 

*Td call this routine," Lajoie 
said Wednesday, between picks in 
the amateur baseball draft. “This is 
a normal procedure every year. We 
have 12 or 13 players on multiyear 
contracts and the rest have to be 
signed.” 

The situation that has grabbed 
the most attention is the effort to 
reach a long-term agreement with 
Hernandez, the left-handed reliev- 
er who won the American League 
Cy Young and Most Valuable 
Flayer awards after Detroit beat 
the San Diego Padres in the World 
Series. 

The Iig£Ts.bave offered Hernan- 
dez S4.6 million dollars. Tbe nego- 
tiations once were stalled over a 
plan to spread payment over sever- 
al years. That hurdle was cleared, 
bnt Hernandez now reportedly 
wants a clause guaranteeing that no 
player on the Detroit rosier would 
earn more than he earns. 

“I think Willie will sign his con- 
tract,” Lajoie said. “I talked to him 
just before Christmas and he 
sounded very encouraging. I've 
talked with his agent a few times 
since then." 

One of the players most affected 
by the Tigers' on-season activities 
is the right-handed pitcher Dan 
Petry. As a starter, Petty came to 



Roger Craig 

rely heavily both on the fate-inning 
help from Hernandez and the guid : 
ance of Craig, a modern-day guru 
who made the young Tiger pitchers 
believe in themselves. 

Craig has been replaced by Billy 
MuffelL the Tigers' minor league 
pitching coach for tbe past several 
years. 

“The whole staff win miss Rog- 
er,” Peiry said from Anaheim, Cali- 
fornia. where he studying video 
tapes of last season’s games, look- 
ing for ways to improve. “But. we 
have lo go on. At least we know 
Billy Munett from spring training. 
so it won’t be a complete shock. I i’ll 
just be a little adjustment. 

“They're complete opposites. 
Roger and Billy. Roger gives you 


confidence. Billy is more mechani- 
cal He can spot flaws in your deliv- 
ery that really help." 

It was understood at the conclu- 
sion of the 1984 season that the 
Tigers had lost interest in Rozema. 
There was talk that his arm was 
gone, and the strong showing in 
September of the rookies Randy 
O'Neal and Roger Mason pretty 
much sealed Rozema's fate. He de- 
clared free agency and signed with 
the Rangers during the holidays. 

Two others — Ruppert Jones 
and John Grubb, both outfielders 
— also tested the kee-ageni waters. 
Grubb eventually re-signed with 
Detroit but Lajoie has indicated 
that the Tigers will let Jones move 
on. 

“We’ve encouraged Ruppert to 
go through the secondary phase of 
the draft.” Lajoie said. “In the 
meantime, we've decided not to 
talk. We want to give some young 
players, like Nelson Simmons, a 
chance." 

... Milt Wilcox, another, starting, 
pitcher, has not responded well lo 
surgery on his aging right arm. La- 
ioie covered himself for that possi- 
bility by trading the promising 
third baseman Howard Johnson to 
the New York Mets for the rigbt- 
handed starter Wall Terrell 

Kirk Gibson, the slugging right- 
fielder who was sensational during 
postseason play, is one of 15 play- 
ers unsigned. “I think we're in pret- 
ty good shape with Gibby.” Lajoie 
said. 

Other unsigned players include 
Lbe utility man Marty Castillo, the 
infi elder Doug Baker, the outfield- 
er Rusty Kuntz and pitchers Juan 
Berenguer and Bill Snerrer. 


By Robert Fachet 

Washington Post Service 

DETROIT — As tbe National 
Hockey League moves into the sec- 
ond half of its long season, congrat- 
ulations are in order for coaches 
Mike Keenan of Philadelphia. 
Doug Carpenter of New Jersey, 
Jacques Lemaire of Montreal Jac- 
ques Demers of St. Louis, Barry 
Long of Winnipeg and Pat Quinn 
of Los Angeles. 

Condolences are the lot of Van- 
couver’s BiQ Laforge and Minneso- 
ta's Bill Mahoney, neither of whom 
lasted until the halfway mark. Herb 
Brooks of tbe New Y ork Rangers 

Flames, Kings 
Skate to a Tie 
Before Sellout 

Las Angela Times Service 

CALGARY, Alberta —The sell- 
out crowd of 16.683 at the Olympic 
Saddled ome had at leasL one rea- 
son to be pleased Wednesday nighL 
Tbe hometown Flames did not lose 
to the Los Angeles Kings. 

They did not win. But tbe 4-4 tie 
in overtime was better than the 
Flames have managed in three pre- 
vious meetings between the two 
National Hockey League teams 
this season. 

Elsewhere in the NHL Pitts- 
burgh beat Vancouver. 7-4; Boston 
defeated Toronto. 5-3; Washington 
downed Sl Leads. 4-2; Chi cap) 
edged Minnesota, 4-3, and Winni- 
peg beat the New York Rangers. 6- 
5. 

“I thought we had lost it in the 

NHL FOCUS 

second period," said Bob Johnson, 
the Flames* coach. 

“We were lucky to get a tie," 
added Rich Kromm, the Flames' 
left wing. 

The Kings are 3-0-1 against Cal- 
gary. Coach Pat Quinn of the Kings 
explained; “I ihmk they underesti- 
mated us in the first couple of 
games, and maybe they were look- 
ing ahead to Christmas when we 
beat them the last time." Quinn 
was referring to a 6-3 triumph on 
Dec. 18. 

Trailing, 4-3, after the Kings 
scored three straight goals in the 
second period, the Flames tied it 
with 9:06 left in the third period 
when center Jim Peplinski lipped in 
a shot by right wing Hakan Loob. 

Goalie Darren Eliot blocked 
Loob's shot, but the puck rolled 
loose to Peplinski in the crease. 

“Eliot made the stop and the. 
puck was just sitting there," Pe- 
plinski said. “I picked it up and 
jammed it into the net." 

The Flames had a chance to win 
when they were awarded a power 
play with 3:08 left in regulation. 
The Kings’ left wing Hill Sykes got 
a two-minute penalty for hooking 
defenseman Paul Reinhart. 

Reinhart had the Flames' best 
chance on the power play when he 
hit the right post with 1 :41 left, and 
Eliot later made a save on a shot by 
left wing Kent Nilsson. 

The Kings killed the penalty, 
however, lo force a five-minute 
overtime period, during which the 
Flames outshoi them, 3-1 


and Gerry Cheevers of Boston still 
are cm the job, but they deserve 
some sympathy. Meanwhile, To- 
ronto's Dan Maloney seems to be 
paying a just penalty for all the 
elbows be threw as a player. 

Philadelphia ranks as the major 
positive surprise of the season. 
With Bob Claike retiring as a play- 
er to become general manager. Bill 
Barber disabled and Darryl Sixtier 
traded, the Flyers began the season 
with many eager youngsters and 
little in the way of experience. 

Few rated Philadelphia higher 
than fourth in the Patrick Division. 
Some questioned whether the Fly- 
ers could hold off Pittsburgh and 
its battery of high draft choices for 
the fourth playoff spot. But 
Keenan got the club off to a fast 
start and, following a brief Decem- 
ber slump, the Flyers moved back 
into a first-place battle with Wash- 
ington by winning four of their last 
five on a tough western road trip. 

Tim Kerr, with 31 goals, has 
shown that last season's total of 54 
was no fluke, and Pdle Lindbergh 
has emerged as one of the NHL's 
leading goal lenders. 

Although New Jersey still ranks 
last in the Patrick Division, it has 
been competitive from the start 
when it opened with a 7-2 rout of 
the New York Islanders. 

The Devils have nobody with 
more than 32 points. The usually 
reliable goalie Chico Resch has 


been less than impressive, so it is 
apparent that Carpenter deserves 
credit for the team's disciplined 
play. 

Montreal jumped to the front of 
tbe Adams Division in the second 
week and has stayed there, t h a nk s 
to Sieve Pennev's consistent goal- 
tending and a physical style keyed 
by Craig Ludwig and Chris Niton. 

Leading thfi C anadia ns* resur- 
gence are three young defensemen 
from the United States — Chris 
Chdicts, Tom Kurvers and Ludwig. 
Top honors go, however, to Le- 
maire. who withstood considerable 
criticism of the team's new style. 

Demers has used similar tactics 
to guide the Blues to a challenging 
position in the Norris Division. He 
also has got the club to an emotion- 
al high for key Norris games; the 
Blues are unbeaten in their last 
eight meetings with divisional ri- 
vals. 

Winnipeg is without a triumph in 
its last seven games. Nevertheless, 
if Long can regain his winning 
touch of November, the Jets re- 
main in good position to challenge 
Calgary for second place in the 
Smylbe Division. 

Despite the overall slowdown, 
captain Dale Hawerchuk continues 
to enjoy his finest NHL season, 
with 24 goals and 37 assists. 

Los Angeles is right on Winni- 
peg's heels, after Quinn patiently 
drilled a group of largely undisci- 


plined players who did not win this 
season until the 10th game. Tbe 
surge of the Jets and Kings from 
the mediocrity of a year ago has the 
once-sorry Smythe challenging the 
Adams for die title erf strongest 
overall division. 

The obstacle to such status is the 
presence of Vancouver, seemingly 
out of playoff contention foUowing 
a 4-21*2 start that cost Laforge his 
job less than six weeks into the 
season and produced embarrassing 
13-2 and 12-1 defeats. j 

Another major disappointment 
is Minnesota, the Norris champion 
of last season, which is assurra.'ja 
playoff spot only because ir plays 
in the same division as Toronto. 

The North Stars have been 
changing coaches, captains apd 
personnel regularly over the last 
few seasons and seem destined to 
struggle until they achieve stability. 

One can only wonder where Bos- 
ton would be iX it had not obtained 
Charlie Simmer from Los Angete? 
for a future draft choice. Simmer 
has scored 23 goals in 34 games 
with the Bruins, who have by no 
means assured themselves of. a 
playoff spot over Hartford. 

Toronto cannot be categorized 
as a disappointment because it was 
expected to finish last. But 6-29-5? 
The last time the Maple Leafs won 
fewer than 19 games was in 1929; 
30, with a 44-game schedule. 


O’Meara, Oft to Quick Start in PGA, 
Has High Hopes for 1985 Golf Tour 


By Gordon S. White Jr. 

New York Times Service 

PALM SPRINGS. California — 
Mark O'Meara won only one event 
on the 1 984 PGA Tour, the Greater 
Milwaukee Open, and it was his 
first victory in four years on the 
circuit. But the 27-year-old finished 
a close second to Tom Watson on 
the money-winning list, the mea- 
sure of achievement in professional 
golf. 

O'Meara said that after the sea- 
son ended and all checks were 
banked, Watson told him. “Thanks 
for respecting your elders.” 
O'Meara said, “1 told him, T 
tried to beat you-"* 

On Wednesday, on the first day 
of the 1985 Tour. O'Meara was in a 
familiar position. The North Caro- 
lina native who now lives in this 
desert community, shot a 5-under- 
par 67 in the opening round of the 
Bob Hope Classic, a shot off the 
first-round lead held by Craig 
Stadler, Doug TewelL Gil Morgan 
.and John Mahaffey, the defending, 
champion who birdied four of tbe 
last five holes. 


“I may not make as much money 
this year as I did fast year." 
O’Meara said. “But that won’t nec- 
essarily mean I'm not improving. I 
think my game is improving and 
my goals this year may be a little 
different.” 

O'Meara, who finished second 
three times and tied for second in 
two other tournaments in 1984, 
earned $465,873 in his fourth year 
on the tour. Even though he won 
only once, all of those second-place 
finishes and eight other top-10 fin- 
ishes helped him end the year just 
SKX387 behind Watson, who won 
three tournaments and $476,260. 

“This year I'm set to be in all 
four major tournaments," O'Meara 
said. “If I mention my goals for 
1985 it might be to win another 
tournament and to win a major. 

“But Watson, Nicklaus and 
those guys are in a different league 
than I'm in. I've got a long way to 
go to be there." 

All O'Meara has to do to start 
the 1985 season with a jump on 
Watson is to make the cut in this 


five-day pro-amateur competition 
when the field is trimmed Saturday. 
Watson, by choice, is not playing-in 
this event 

O'Meara, who admits to some 
advantage because he often plays 
these courses near his home, got off 
to a fine start with a birdie 4 on the 
first hole at Bermuda Dunes and 
four birdies on the front nine. * 

Three other courses are used for 
this event — La Quinta, Tamarisk 
and Indian Wells — with the golf- 
ers playing a different course each 
of the first four days. Indian Wells 
is the home club this year, site of 
Sunday’s final round. 

Lanny WadJdns, Fred Couples, 
Calvin Peete, Chip Beck, Ted 
Simpson and Robot Wrenn also 
had 67s. 

Wadltins said: “If you have to 
get started on another year I guess 
a 67 is a good one. But I could have 
done belter because I didn't get' a 
birdie on any of the par-5 holes." 

O’Meara, on the other hand, 
scored a birdie 4 on three of the 
par-5 holes at Bermuda Dunes. ■ 


SCOREBOARD 


Hockey 


Basketball 


NHL Standings 


NBA Standings 


WALES CONFERENCE 
Patrick Divtetan 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Afloat Ic Division 


Baseball Draft Takes a Family Twist 


United Press International 

NEW YORK — Five sons of 
former major leaguers were select- 
ed Wednesday in the two phases of 
basebalfs winter free-agent ama- 
teur draft. 

It was a particularly big day for 
tbe Stottlemyre family. 

Todd Stottlemyre and MeJ Slot t- 
1cm vre Jr_ sons of the former New 
York Yankee star Mel Stottlemyre, 
were chosen by the St Levis Cardi- 
nals and Houston Astros as the 
first and third picks of the draft’s 
secondary phase. 

“We are real excited about this," 
the senior Stottlemyre said. “It’s 
something we have all been anx- 
iously awaiting since the fall when 
both boys made moves out of the 
school they were in, Nevada Las 
Vegas." 

The shortstop Craig Repoz, son 
of the former major-league out- 
fielder Roger Repoz; the outfielder 
Scott J aster, son of the former 
pitcher Larry Jaster. and the out- 
fielder Grayron Jackson, son of the 


former pitcher Grant Jackson, also 
were selected. 

The Nevv York Mets took Repoz 
in the secondary phase and claimed 
Jaster in the regular phase. Jackson 
was chosen by the Montreal Expos 
in the second round of the regular 
phase. 

Todd Stotdeymre. a 19-year-old 
right-handed pitcher from Yakima 
Valley Junior College, w as the first 
pick of the secondary - phase, which 
is for players who previously were 
drafted but did not sign. 

“I scouted this boy last spring,” 
said Fred McAlister, scouting di- 
rector for the Cardinals. “He threw 
an above-average fastball and re- 
minded me of his father when his 
father was young. 

Tm sure this kid has a good 
background because of his father. I 
hope we can bring him along real 
fast, because we need pitchers." 

Todd Stottlemyre had been se- 
lected by the New York Yankees in 
tbe fourth round of tbe June 1983 
draft after being graduated from 


Davis High School in Y akima . He 
elected to go to Nevada-Las Vegas, 
where last spring he was 1(M with a 
4.20 ERA and 91 strikeouts in 105 
innings. 

Both pitchers tried out for the 
U.S. Olympic team but did not 
make the club. 

“Mel is very anxious to sign a 
contract; hopefully he will be 
signed in time for the spring train- 
ing,” said the elder Sioitiemyre. 
now pitching coach for the New 
York Mets. “Todd can’t sign until 
after school in June.” 

The first pick in the regular 
phase of the draft, in which players 
from four-year colleges are not eli- 
gible: was outfielder Rick Nelson 
of Orange Coast College, who was 
selected by the San Francisco Gi- 
ants. 

In the secondary phase, which 
contains the more talented players, 
the Brewers, choosing second se- 
lected Randolph Veres, a right- 
handed pitcher from Sacramento 
City Junior College. 


60-Second Spot 
On Super Bowl 
Now $1 Million 

United Press International 

NEW YORK — Tbe ABC 
television network is charging 
SI million for a one-minute 
commercial during Super Bowl 
XIX. the National FooLbaJI 
League championship game on 
Jan. 20. 

It fa the highest price in tele- 
vision history for a minute of 
commercial time, an ABC 
spokesman said. A 30-second 
spot will cost $525,000. 

Among the sponsors who 
have already signed up for mil- 
lion-doUar 'minutes are IBM, 
Anheuser-Busch, ITT. Coca- 
Cola and Sony. Among the buy- 
ers of a 30-second spot was the 
U.S. Marine Corps. 

The game's advertising time 
is more than 90 percent sold, 
and ABC expects a complete 
sellout bv airtime. 


Figini Wins 2d Straight Downhill; Leads Standings 



W 

L 

T Pts 

GF 

GA 


W 

1 L 

Pci. 

GB 

Washington 

24 

11 

7 

55 

171 

127 

Boston 

30 

6 

A33 

— 

Philadelphia 

24 

11 

5 

53 

171 

130 

Philadelphia 

39 

6 

JB9 

V2 

NY Islanders 

22 

16 

1 

45 

187 

156 

Washington 

20 

15 

J71 

9W 

Pittsburgh 

16 

19 

4 

36 

141 

173 

New Jersey 

16 

20 

•444 

14 

NY Rangers 

14 

30 

4 

34 

148 

144 

New York 

13 

25 

342 

18 

New Jersey 

13 

22 

4 

39 

137 

164 


central Division 




Adams Division 




Milwaukee 

34 

14 

-632 

— 

Montreal 

21 

13 

8 

59 

145 

135 

Detroit 

19 

16 

343 

3 VS 

Buffalo 

18 

13 

10 

46 

153 

122 

Chicago 

17 

18 

•486 

5W 

Quebec 

19 

17 

6 

44 

168 

158 

Atlanta 

15 

30 

•429 

7Vs 

Boston 

IB 

16 

7 

43 

152 

143 

Indiana 

10 

25 

386 

nvi 

Hart lord 

16 

18 

5 

37 

134 

145 

Cleveland 

9 

23 

391 

12 


CAMPBELL CONFERENCE 
Norris Division 


WESTERN CONFERENCE 
Midwest Division 


aucooo 

19 

19 

3 

41 

161 

151 

Houston 

21 

14 

M0 

— 

SI. Louis 

16 

17 

6 

18 

140 

149 

Denver 

21 

15 

MS 

ri 

Minnesota 

13 

20 

7 

33 

143 

159 

Delias 

19 

16 

529 

21* 

Detroit 

13 

23 

5 

31 

148 

188 

Utah 

17 

19 

•472 

4Vl 

Toronto 

6 

*0 

5 

17 

122 

193 

San Antonia 

76 

19 

•457 

5 


Smythe DivlUoa 




Kansas Cltv 

13 

21 

382 

7Vi 

Edmonlon 

28 

B 

4 

60 

206 

128 






Calaarv 

21 

15 

5 

47 

200 

162 


Pacific Division 

586 


Winnipeg 

20 

17 

4 

44 

148 

172 

LA. Lakers 

24 

11 

— 

Las Angeles 

16 

16 

9 

41 

179 

169 

pnoenlx 

19 

19 

514 

6 

Vancouver 

10 

28 

5 

25 

137 

231 

Portland 

16 

» 

•444 

8W 







LA. Clippers 

16 

21 

432 

9 

WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS 


Seattle 

15 

22 

405 

10 

Vancouver 



2 


2 

0—4 

Golden Stale 

10 

24 

394 

13VS 


- -F YOU GET 
A KKX CUT Of SOCCS. READ 

, K» HUGHES 

WffibBDAYS IN THE HT 



butofi 


Michda Figini 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

BAD KLEIN KIRCH HEIM. 
Austria — Michela Figini of Swit- 
zerland won her secon2 ski race in 
two days on Thursday, and the 
Swiss women’s team posted its sec- 
ond consecutive 1-2-3 finish in 
World Cup downhill action. 

Figini. the reigning Olympic 
downhill champion, flashed down 
the 2.670-meier rack with a drop of 
700 meters in one minute 41.72 
seconds. 

Brigitte Oenli was second in 
1:42.35. and Maria Wallfaer came 
third in 1:4X58. 

The duo of Figini and Oerlii also 
took the top two positions in the 
downhill here Wednesday, when 
Ariane EhraL took third place. Eh- 
ra: took 10th place Thursday in 
1:43.27. 

“1 think I could have raced even 
faster, but 1 lost some time shortly 
after take off in one of the sharp 
bends." Figini said. 

In addition to the two downhill 
triumphs. Figini afao won Wednes- 


day's combined event. The 75 
points earned in all the victories 
shot her into the lead in the overall 
standings with 130 points, replac- 
ing Marina Kiehl of West Germa- 
ny. She also leads the downhill 
standings with 67 points. 

"It didn't go as well as yester- 
day.” said Figini despite improv- 
ing Wednesday's winning time by 
lil seconds. “1 made a mistake 
high up on the track and then in 
one jump when 1 opened up too 
much. 

"No. it wasn't an optimal race. 1 
had a mistake high up and then 

D ynam o Wins Canada Series 

L n;ted Prcsi Internal:" ui 

MONTREAL — Mnfchst Fakh- 
rutdinov scored two goals to lead 
Moscow Dynamo to a 5-4 victory 
over Team Canada in Wednesday's 
final contest of the Soviet team's 
10-game cross-Canada hockey 
tour. Dynamo dominated the tour, 
winning the series 8-1 


a ffiin opened up too much in a 
jump further down.” 

Other top Swiss skiers, such as 
specialist Erika Hess, were likely io 
do well in Friday's slalom here, 
which, together with Thursday’s 
downhill, gives all-rounders a 
chance to pick up combined points. 

-There is no doubt that the Swiss 
women s team is currently the most 
powerful on the World Cup ci r - 
cuiL” said Andreas Rauch, coach 
of the Austrian women’s team. 

Austria had five finishers in the 
top 15. but for the second day in a 
row bad to settle for a fourth place 
by Elisabeth Kircbler, who was 
l.!7 seconds back of Figini. 

Laurie G raham led a strong Ca- 
nadian showing by taking fifth in 
1:42.95. Liisa Sarijorvi was 12 hun- 
dredths of a second back in sixth 
place, and Karen Stemmle was 
ninth with a clocking or 1:43.26. 

Figini's rivals marveled at her 
supremacy. “She has so much self- 
confidence.” Kirchler said. "She’ll 
be hard to overcome." (AP. UP l) 


pittebura* 3 9 4 — 1 

Chobol 2 (71. Manilla ( 101, McCarthy 2 (41. 
Snedden 120). Voting (2SI ; MocAdam (9>. Lo- 
mov (13). Smyl (U). Lkfcder (4). Shot* an 
Bool: Vancouver (an Romano) 12-12-11-35; 
Pittsnursh (an Bradeurl 114-1445. 
Mianourta 1 1 1 — J 

Chicago 3 1 9-4 

Savard (22). Peterson (2). Larrrar (24), 
MacMillan (4); Napier (101, Clcearelll (4), 
Me K coney (17). Station goal: Minnesota (an 
Bannemiani 8-8-19—35; CMcooa (an 

Beaupre) I3-IO-12-4I. 

WastiiMton 9 1 3—4 

51. Louis 9 I 1 — 2 

Duchesne (10). Gould (7>.McEwm 14), Car- 
penter (31); Ramaee (2). Pettersum (12). 
snots oa pool: wasfttnaton (on wamsiev) 5-7- 
0— IB; SL Louis (an Jensen) 10-1 14— 27. 
Boston 2 2 1— 5 

2 19-3 

■ 2 (12). Unseman (12). Gorina (3). 
G.Courtnoii (5); R.Courtnail (7). lerfrate (3), 
Valve (16). Sbots oa goal: Boston (on SL 
Croix) 11-15-16— *2; Toronto (on Peeters) 10- 
12-6—39. 

K.Y. Rangers 1 1 3 9-fi 

Winnipeg 2 2 1 1—4 

MocLean (18). McBaln 2 (5), Boschman 
(151. HowcrdHik (25); Sandstram (16). Lor- 
gudw2 (14), Ruotso hi Inen (13), Paveilcti (21. 
Shots enooM : (on Keyword) New York 7-10 V- 
J— 29; Winnipeg (on Vanblesbrouck) 14-13-13- 
4—44. 

Los Angeles 13 0 B-4 

Calgary 3 9.1 9-4 

Nlctaflis (27), Smiffi {15}. Sykes Ofl). Fox 
(201; Wilson (12). Mocoun (3), Kromm (151, 
Pspilnski (10). Shots en goal: las Anodes (on 
Lemeilnl 10-9-10-2— 31; Calgary (on El to!) 14- 
11-10-3-39 


WEDNESDAY’S RESULTS 
Milwaukee 34 23 11 31— IM 

Indiana 19 27 30 29—195 

Cummings 14-25 2-2 39. Moncr let 7-1S 9-9 23; 
Stpanovicti 10-14 10-12 39 Williams B-12 3-4 >9. 
Red ou n ds ; Milwaukee 44 (Cummings 14); In- 
diono 7 (Sriponovlch. Kellogg 7). Assists: Mil- 
waukee 25 Moncriof, Hodges 6); Indiana la 
(Stlaanavlcti. Thomas 4). 

Chicago 32 23 22 11—199 

Boston 29 21 29 29—111 

Bird 9-21 10-10 29 McHale 10-15 4-6 24; Jor- 

don 12-24 12-12 34. Woolrldae 12-21 7-8 31. Re- 
bounds; CM com G (Corzine 9); Boston 42 
(Bird 11 ). Assists: Chicago TB (Matthews. Jor- 
don A); Boston 3) (D Johnson A). 

Detroit 37 29 25 31—122 

PMlOdelPMo 32 14 27 33-126 

Erving 14-24 6-9 35, Malone 7-18 9-12 22: 
Thomas 9-13 4-5 2X Round he kJ 1(314 DO 29 
Re boa ads: Detroit 40 [Roundfleld M)); Phila- 
delphia 57 (Malone 15). Assists: Detroit 32 
(Thomas 17) ; Philadelphia 24 (Cheeks. Taney 
A). 

Seattle 22 26 M 26— IS 

Phoenix 3D 22 25 17- 94 

Nonce 9-13 5-7 ZL Edwards 5-104-6 14; SlXma 
S-12 4-5 14. Wood 5-11 3-2 IX Sobers 5-9 2-3 IX 
Sundvoid S-8 2-2 IX Rebounds: Seattle 49 
(Slkma 12): pnoenlx 45 (Lucas 10). Assists: 
Seattle 20 (Henderson. Wood. McCormick. 
Brtckowskl 3),- Phoenix X (Foster 51. 

New Vert* 19 24 16 34— 95 

Denver 26 27 16 31— 180 

English 11-22 7-9 29. Cooper 13-21 0-0 2A; 
Cummings B-U 4-5 29 Carter 5-7 6-9 17. Re- 
bounds: New York S3 (Cummings. Orr 91: 
Denvcr 55 (Cooper 10). Assists: New York 15 
(King. Walker. Tucker 3); Denver 26 (Haiulllc 
61. 


Selected College Results 

Wednesday's Games 

EAST — - 

Allegheny 91. Thiel Aa 
N ortheastern 94. Maine 70 
N.Y. Tech BV, New Haven 71 
Providence 75. COrmecffcirf a 4 
Thomas CoiL. ML MIT A7 
Westminster. Pa. 59 SL Vincent 52 
Wilkes 79 Drew 79 OT 

SOUTH “ 

Alo borne 79, Louisiana St. 67 
Duke B7, E. Carolina &j 
Kentucky 57. Mississippi 45 
Lamer 73. Marshall 67 
Louisville 52, Tuiane 51 
Memphis St. 99 Tennessee St. 57 
Mississippi St. 6S, Georgia 64 

M. Carolina 73L Maryland 74 
S. Carolina 79. Hartford 67 
5. Florida 5 a. Florida St. 54 
Stetson 71, Brown 60 
Tennessee U. Auburn 7* 

MIDWEST - 

Akron 89, Edbiboro SL 60 
Albion 67. Alma 62 
Ball Sl. 91. E. Michigan 79 
Chicago SI. 94. Southern U. S3 
DePouw 9), Wabash 66 
Illinois SI. 79 S. Illinois 63 
Iona 87. Detroit 82. OT 
Kansas St. 81. E. Washington 43 
Marietta 61. Caollal Sl 
Miami. Onto 5a. Bowling Groan 50 
Missouri 79 N. Iowa 56 
Muskingum 55, Ohio Northern 49 

N. Illinois 66. W. Michigan 63, OT 
Nebraska 69. Wb.-S!evens Pt. 42 
Ohio St. 99. Wisconsin 88 

Ohio U. 75. Cent. Michigan 46 
Ohio Wesleyan 19 Denison 68 
Olivet. Midi. 65. Katomazoa Mich. 60 
SOUTHWEST 

Arkansas 67. Texas Christian 59 
Houston S3, Texas Tech 74 
NE Oklahoma 81. Phillips 74 
Southern Methodist 95. Bov lor 63 
Texas 45, Rice 53 
Texas ASrfA 77, Manwene 69 
Texas- Son Anlonlo 69 New Orleans 54 - 
Tulsa 104. Oklahoma 89 

FAR WEST 
Fresno St. 72. UC Irvine 46 
Oregon Sr. 59. Oregon 54 


World Cup Skiing 


Transition 


BASEBALL 
American Leaase 

CLEVELAND— Released Rodnev Crate, 
out Fielder. Said Juan Esplna catcher, to me 
N.v. Yankees. Stoned Bolen Benton, catcher. 
Orlando sonchez. dm baseman-outfielder, 
and Dove Von Oftlen ana Craig PiBBln.Pltc»-. 
era, to contracts with Maine of the Interna- 
tional League. 

National League 

MONTREAL — Traded MUe Stgnhouse. 
outfielder, to the Minnesota Twins for Jack 
0 1 Coongr, pitcher. 

BASKETBALL 

National Basketball Association 

HOUSTON— Agreed io terms with Larry 
Mlcheoux. forward, on a two-veer contract. 

FOOTBALL 

Nefionai Football League 

BUFFALO— Retained Kav Stephenson, 
head coach. 

NEW ENGLAND— Reiolned Dante Seer- 


nocchin, assistant coach. Named Dan Shin- 
nick, Bobby Grier, Jimmy Carr, and Dean 
Britten tiom assistant coaches. 

HOCKEY 

NattoMl Hockey League 

Edmonton— Colled UP Daryl Reough. 
goalie. from Kamloops of the western Hockev 

League. 

MONTREAL— Called up JeH Teal, left 
wkiB, and John Newberry, cenier, from Sher- 
brooke of the American Hockey League. 

COLLEGE 

NEVADa-RENO — R einstated Curtis High 
to the basketball team from suspension. 

OREGON 5TATE— Named Jhn Paramo 
running bocks coach. Named Garth Hall of. 
tensive ceodlnalor. Named Gary Knechttine- 
boefcers eaacn, 

PtTTSBU ROH — Named Trent Walters and 
John Montgam ery.asslstant football cooctws. 

SIMPSON— Named Lloyd Crum taut head 
football coach. 


WOMEN'S DOWNHILL 
(At Bad Kleinkirchheim, Austria) 

1. Mlcheto FieinL Switzerland. 1:41.72 - 

X Brigitte Oertli. Switzerland. l:«2J5 -. 

3. Marla Walliser. Switzerland, l:«L5B - 

A Elisabeth Kirchler. Austria, 1:4289 • 

5. Laurie Graham. Canada 1:4X 95 

A U tea SavilaTvi, Canada 1 :*107 

7. SJegiinde Winkler. Austria. 1:4X15 . 

9 Kafrki Guteraahn. Austria. T:41Z3 
9. Karen stemmle. Canoda 1 :4386 
19 Ariane EhreL Switzerland. 1:4127 
11. Svh/ta Eder, Austria. i -avk 
IX Rcgine Mceaenlechner. west Germany. 
1:4150 

IX Slgrtd Well. Austria 1:4152 
U Olgg Chorvotova ClechMtovakla 1:4153 
is. wvichaetc Gera, west Germany. 1:4382 
Overall Standings 

1. Mlcheto Figini. Switzerland. 130 aabns 
X Marino Kiehl West Germany. H7 

1 Brigitte OerttL Switzerland, 1U 

4. Elisabeth Kirchler, Austria. IDS 

5. Maria walliser, Switzerland 1IO 
A Erika Hess. Switzerland. 84 

7. Zoe Haas. Switzerland, 74 


Te nnis 


Volvo Masters ChamptonsMm 
(At Maalson Swore Garden. New V 
Men's Singles 
First Round 

Anders jarryd. Sweden, del. Henrik ! 
shorn, Sweden 4-i, 6-1. Johan Kriek. U4 
Aaron Krickstein. U8. 

Joaklm Nystrom. Sweden, del. Vitas ( 
loliis. U.S. 4-1 4-4. Eliot Teuscher, U.S, 
Tomas SmkL Czechoslovakia AX 6-4. 







p age 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, FRIDAY, JANUARY 11, 198 j 


OBSERVER 


PEOPLE 


Copying the Cony Cats The Kenyan Phone: A Very Busy S ignal Rockin’ in Rio Isn’t Easy 

J- Qi> CU*..').-. DmIa I -'2 9B5S aiuai A7 HmI iKp Irnnl m a rprAmiwn 


By Russell Baker 

— 0°x office 
h?s dozens of pfaoto- 
SE®* machines. AD day, all 
r 1 ®" °tirs is a roond-tbe-cktck 
5®“** — workers are busy at 
“fc* machines m a ki ng copies of 
dippings, book 
omcpnnU, Dow charts and 
ujd only knows what else. 


- j lAuuna w im ase. 

I never make a copy of anything 
There is talk behind my hark- 


- — U-Uiuu UIY uovx: U 5 

a decidedly odd. duck that sits 
m^ rcnd the office never making a 

Three years ago, browsing in the 
at home, I found my fourth- 
grade report card. 

Nen morning I got in line at one 
of the company copying machines. 
The word spread. My colleagues, 
who were waiting to copy encyclo- 
pedia pages, manuscripts of their 
®wds, expense accounts, purloin- 


ed letters, compm nriging photo- 
graphs for use in blackmail 
schemes, all greeted me cordially. 

“dad to see you on the team!" 
they cried, “Do it in triplicate!” 


Someone told the vice president 
for photocopying. He emerged to 
sh a k e my hand. “It is a great day,” 
hesaid. 

“Yes.” 

“What are you making a copy 
of?” 

Well, 1 couldn't show him my 
fourth-grade report card. Not with 

its humiliating D in leadership 
and the note from teac her on the 
back saying, “Pupil’s lack of get- 
up-and-go makes him an extremely 
weak candidate for industrial cap- 
taincy when he grows up.” 

So I said I wasn't making a copy 
of anything, I th ought this was the 
Kne for (he water cooler. “Better 
pull up your socks, fella,” he said, 
and I promised 1 would. 

The truth was. though, that I had 
no desire to copy things. My desk 
was always covered with papa 1 so 
uninteresting that merely looking 
at it could put me to stem. The idea 
erf duplicating it through the mir- 
acle of photocopying was more 
than the soul could brar. 


people’s feelings," he said. “What 
do you think they invented the 
hold* button for? You use it to 
show telephone callers how impor- 
tant you arc.” 

“Telephone callers?" 

1 never had telephone callers, ex- 
cept for a cousin calling now and 
then to announce a death in the 
family. The doctor asked the natu- 
ral question. “If you’ve got no 
phone callers to put on hold’ and 
you never copy anything, what’s 
the point of going to the office?” 
In the first place, if I didn’t go to 
the office, what would I do with 
myself all day? And in the second 
place, people who quit going to the 
office sometimes sot fired. 

The doctor tola me to take two 
aspirin tablets and do some copy- 
ing on the office machines, but he 
had raised a troubling philosophi- 
cal question. Had the office, the 
great American office, become 
no thing more than a state-of-the- 
art electronic Toyland where one 
passed the time playing with mar- 
velous telephones, amusing copy- 
ing machin es, computers full of 
more ingenious tricks than the wiz- 
ards of the old Lionel train compa- 
ny ever dreamed of? 

If so, why should one be fired for 
refusing to play? More vitally — 
why should anyone of sound mind 
prefer not to play? 

□ 


By Sheila Rule 

New York Tima Service 

AIROBI — When residents 


N AIROBI — When residents 
of Kenya use a public tele- 
phone. they do so in ways that say 
more about the ingenuity of a 
developing nation than about 
manners established by conven- 
tion. 

The clothes that are drying in 
the temperate climate may be 
hanging from “liberated" tele- 
phone wires. The panes of glass in 
phone booths may end up as pic- 
ture frames. Ana, according to 
The Sunday Nation, a local news- 
paper in this France-sized coun- 
try, the “ingenuity and the entre- 
preneurship of the vandals is 
particularly remarkable on the 
parts inside” the receiver. 

The paper reported that one 
factory had been found using the 
equipment inside the mouth- 
pieces to make microphones to 




m 

/ ml 








amplify guitars. Other parts of 
the telephone were being used to 


There could be only one answer, 
and it was alarming. I preferred to 
work. Thus does the process of self- 
examination lead to grim discov- 
ery. Earnest drudge that I am, 1 
have studied the joy of copying and 
have a plan to join the sport with a 
sense of purpose. 

Just outside my office door is 
one of the newest photocopiers. It 
does not simply copy things; it si- 


multaneously shrinks the copies 
down to such size that the print is 


I was tempted to quit going to 
the office. My doctor had mged me 
to quit it after I told him I didn't 
have the nerve to put any tdephone 
callers on bold. 

“You’re too timid about hurting 


almost illegible. 

Tomorrow 1 shall start copying 
all this vastly uninteresting desk 
paper on this wonderful maehiiw 
that feed the originals to the shred- 
der. When the job is over, the paper 
on my desk mil be useless until 
copied on another machine that en- 
larges the print He office doesn't 
have such a machine yet Until erne 
comes along I shall keep busy culti- 
vating people wiling to phone me 
at the office so I can pot them on 
“hold.” 


New York Tima Service 


make headphones for cassette 
players. Such inventiveness is the 
norm in many African and other 
developing countries. 

Nevertheless, all this ingenuity 
is just so much malicious destruc- 
tion of property to the Kenyan 
government, which has been in- 
stalling pay telephones from the 
country’s Indian Ocean coastline 
to its upcountry towns in an ef- 
fort to provide affordable tele- 
phone service to ordinary people. 

In the first phase of the project, 
3,500 pay phones are to be in- 
stalled with an eye toward mak- 
ing the service easily accessible. 

Judging from the long lines 
that form at the pay booths, talk- 
ing — lots of it — is very much in 
vogue. The scene played out on 
any day at the row of public 
phones outside Nairobi's main 
post office is repeated in the vari- 
ous nooks and crannies of this 
East African stale. 

A caller, coins in hand, occu- 
pies the booth. Three people wait 
thdr turn. The conversation 
grows longer; so does the line. 
Soon there are 6, 7 then 10 people 
in line, all casting irritated 
glances at the talkative offender. 
Some Kenyans have taken to call- 
ing this affliction “ telephonies." 

Simon Gachoka was No. 8 in 
line recently outside the post of- 
fice on the wide thoroughfare of 
Kenyatta Avenue. P e erin g over 
the beads of the long-suffering 


K 






m. 


j 

2 * * 

* ~ 

-.Wl ?' 


Concert promoters go to great 
lengths to satisfy the needs and 
whims or rock stars. Organizers of 
the 10-day Rock in Rio concert in 
Rio de Janeiro, which begins today, 
had to proride Rod Stewart with a 
dozen soccer balls while AC-DC 
will have six real cannons. Iron 
Maiden needed special customs 
clearance for its 12-foot monster 
named Eddie. Also playing the fes- 
tival will be Queen, (he Go-Gos. the 
B-52s. Yes. the Scorpions. Nina 
Hagen, James Taylor and George 
Benson. The festival's planners 
hope for 250.000 people per night 
and admit they are out to make a 
buck on their show, which is being 
called the “the Woodstock of capi- 
talism." “Rock in Rio is primarily a 
business enterprise.” said organizer 
Roberto Medina. “It will prove 
once again that business success 
and dreams mav walk together." 

□ 


42. tied the knot in a ceremony 
performed Dec. 30 by a Buddhist 


priest in a Nepalese jungle, her 
publicist said Wednesday. The 
bride, groom and best man arrived 
on elephants painted in the Nepa- 
lese tradition. The publicist said it 
was the second marriage for both. 

O 


.rr— 




The Reagans have received the 
Christmas present they bought for 
each other — a four-wheel-drive 
pickup truck with a long bed. stereo 
radio and five-speed manual trans- 
mission. Apparently President 
Ronald Reagan likes to run through 
the gears. The pickup mil be used 
at the Reagan ranch near Santa 
Barbara, according to a Ford : 
spokesman, and is “bright canyon 
red,” which should go well wit*-- 
Naacy Reagan's wardrobe. 

□ 





, 1 -..r 




“Telephonitis” at a Nairobi phone booth. 


others, he stared at the booth's 
occupant and then rolled his eyes 
in exasperation. 

“What is there to talk so long 
about?” be asked no one in par- 
ticular. “What is the romance 
with the telephone? 1 came to 
make a quick call and now the 
whole lunch hour is spent waiting 
for the end of a conversation that 
probably has no known signifi- 
cance." 

□ 

It was Sunday night and time 
for “The Flip Wilson Show” on 
the Voice of Kenya, the nation’s 
sole television -station. The guest 
was a young Richard Pryor, com- 


Complainis about local pro- 
gramming abound in this country 
of about 120,000 television sets 
for 1 8 million people. There have 
been debates on the subject in 
parliament, calls for a television 
adviser and promises by the Min- 
istry of Information and Broad- 
casting that the medium will be 
freed from its time warp. 

Those Kenyans who can afford 
a ticket look for relief in local 
movie bouses. But this, too. poses 
its problems. Many of the films 
arc American and dated, with in- 
side jokes and phrases that tend 
to leave Kenyan audiences un- 
moved. 


(zoological) a long sea worm or 
centipede.” 

Video cassettes, featuring tele- 
vision shows and motion pictures 
from abroad, are cherished items 
in the homes of the more affluent 
Kenyans. But there have been 
outcries that cassettes of an ob- 
scene nature are flooding the 
country, spo iling the youth and 
shaking the country’s moral foun- 
dation. 


The Spanish painter Antonio 
Fernandez Soler says he is leaving 
the modest accommodation that 
has been his borne and studio for 3 1 
vears — a cave. Local officials in 
Corolla. Spain, said the 79-year-old 
artist had told them he would leave 
his tiny cave outside the small 
northern Spanish town for a studio 
in the popular Mediterranean re- 
son of Mar be 11 a. Soler came to 
Corella in 1954 to decorate a house 
and stayed on painting and lending 
animals in the cave. But, he now 
savs. a change of atmosphere is in 
order. 

□ 


Former President Gerald Ford, 
actress Ginger Rogers, drummer 
Foster Brows and former New 


York Governor Hugh Carey gath- 
ered to congratulate Bob Hope at 


plete with huge Afro hairdo and 
Dapping bell-bottom trousers. On 


another day, the same wrestling 
program was repeated for the 
third time. One of the featured 
wrestlers had died some lime ear- 
lier. 

According to one viewer, when 
a government official makes a 
pronouncement on television, ev- 
erybody listens. “This is because 
that is all time is to hear,” he 
said “You would think that local 
affairs of Kenya were all that 
happened in the world” 


“How to Beat the High Cost of 
Living," a recent movie billed as a 
“hilarious new comedy,” revealed 
its age with references to Presi- 
dent Jimmy Carter and his chal- 
lenger, Ronald Reagan, t -aught «• 
in the cavernous theater was in 
short supply. 


The beat goes on in Kenya, but 
it is more than likely Zairian or 
American. Zairian bands domi- 
nate the local music scene. When 
they take a break, clubs are filled 
with the driving sounds of Ameri- 
can disco music. 


The title of a more recent mov- 
ie, “Revenge of the Nerds," sent a 
local film critic hurrying to his 
dictionary for a definition. The 
closest thing he could find was “a 
Nereid which is a sea-nymph or 


One man, browsing in a record 
store that lines its windows with 
albums featuring American per- 
formers, said “Why should we 
buy a copy when we can buy the 
real performer’s work? 1/ 1 closed 
my eyes and listened to a Kenyan 
group and a Zairian group, I 
might not tell the difference. 
They are very good at copying, 
but why is it that they cannot 
create their own?” 


Given the fact that he is the 
great-great-grandson of Curies 
Dickens, the family of the R&tf 
Reverend Michael Whinney proba- 
bly had great expectations for Him. 
Whinney f unfilled those expecta- 
tions on Wednesday when the 
Church of England named him the 
Anglican bishop of Southwell The 
54-year-old Whinney says he found 
some of his famous ancestor’s nov- 
els to be “somewhat long-winded," 
but added that he hoped he had 
inherited Dickens’ passion for so- 
cial justice. 

□ 

Pamela Befiwood has been riding 
high on the hit ABC prime-time 
soap opera “Dynasty” in the Unit- 
ed States and when it came time to 
exchange wedding vows the 35- 
year-old actress showed up perched 
high atop an elephant Bell wood 
and photqjournalist Nik Wbeefer, 


ered to congratulate Bob Hope at 
groundbreaking ceremonies for a 
cultural center m Palm Desert, Cal- 
ifornia, bearing the comedian’s 

name “ imagine naming a cultural 
center after me,” said Hope at the 
ceremony Tuesday. “That’s like 
naming a (Bet center after Jackie 
Gleason.” The Bob Hope Cultural 
Center will be the first performing 
arts complex in the Coachella Val- 
ley. an area about 1 10 miles east of 
Lo 6 Angeles that includes Palm 
Springs, a rest spot for the rich and 
famous. A group called Friends of 
the Cultural Center has raised S 6 


milli on of its 59- million goal Tor 
buildine the first phase of the Hope 


building the first phase of the Hope 
complex, a 1.220-seat theater ex- 
pected to open for the 1986-87 sea- 
son. 

□ 


Join Naisbitt, author of the 1982 
best-seller “Megatrends.” has - 
moved to loTdluride. Colorado, to .. 
launch an institute to monitor the ; 
effects of evolving technology. 
Naisbitt and his wife, Patricia 
Abmdene, said they joined with 
longtime Telluride residents Pame- 
la and John Lifton-Zofine, energy 
researchers Amory and Harter Le- 
vins, and British author John Onto 
to form the TeDuride institute. Its ' 
first function will be an “ideas fes- 
tival" slated to begin Aug. 16, Nais- _ 
bett said. z 




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